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NATO: OPENING TO THE EAST 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World's Daily Newspaper 


R 


Paris, Wednesday, July 9, 1997 


No. 55JS68 


Alliance Votes to Accept Poland, Hungary and Czech Republic 


For the Chosen, a Day 
Of Dreams Come True 

By Michael Dobbs 

tilnitw gf.wi Po\t Sen it r 

MADRID — "This is the end of the road we began 
traveling in 1980,” said Bronislaw Geremek, a pipe- 
smoking history professor who was one of the brains 
behind Poland's anti-Communist revolution. "We finally 
fee! that we have regained our rightful place in Europe.” 

Janus/: Onyszkiewicz. who served as spokesman for the 
Solidarity trade union movement during the political up- 
heavals of 1 980-81. reaches for another metaphor to ex- 
plain his feelings now that Poland has been invited to join 
NATO. 

"If s like getting engaged to your one true love," he 
says. "For 45 years, we were stuck in a shotgun marriage 
that didn't work. In the end, we got a divorce. We only hope 
that this marriage will be consummated.” 

. As it plays host to NATO leaders gathered for their 
historic summit meeting, the Spanish capital is crammed 
with heads of state and armies of assorted hangers-on. 
Official motorcades careen around Madrid's broad 
boulevards, sir ms blaring, snarling the already impossible 
traffic. Bureaucrats haggle over the wording of commu- 
niques. 

Against this ritualistic, almost world-weary backdrop, 
the East Europeans stand out because of their enthusiasm 
and their innocence. 

For many Americans and West Europeans, NATO is just 
one more international acronym. The organization has been 
around for so long that they almost take it for granted. 
Familiarity’ breeds boredom, if not contempt. 

But for many Poles, Hungarians and Czechs, NATO 
remains a source of wonder and excitement. More than just 
a military alliance, it is the club from which they were 
excluded for so long by the arbitrary facts of geography. To 
join NATO is to become part of the West 

Nowhere is the sense of reconnecting with Europe 
stronger than in Poland, where resistance to Communist 

See CLUB, Page 10 



Historic Expansion Is Approved 
With Some Discord at Summit 


By John Vinocur 

iniem/rionul Herald Tribune 


Gctail Fuflci/Agnuc Ft3ixv4V"< 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany, top. President Bill Clinton and President Suleyman 
Demirel of Turkey taking position for a photo Tuesday at NATO's summit meeting in Madrid. 


MADRID — NATO voted with his- 
toric intent Tuesday to expand east- 
ward toward Russia, accepting can- 
didacies for membership from Poland, 
Hungary- and the Czech Republic in a 
discussion of as much dissonance as 
epochal achievement 

The alliance’s heads of state and 
government agreed to the United 
States' insistence that candidates be 
limited to the three former Warsaw 
Pact members, described as having the 
necessary political stability and mil- 
itary infrastructure to meet NATO’s 
standards. 

But a provision was written into the 
summit communique, over U.S. and 
British reservations, indicating tharthe 
two unsuccessful petitioners, Romania 
and Slovenia, would receive what was 
described as preferential consideration 
in 1999. 

Trying to concentrate attention on 
the vast ambition and peaceful purpose 
of the expansion, NATO’s secretary- 
general , Javier Solana Madariaga, said 
in opening the summit meeting that 
"Madrid will be remembered as the 
time when North America and Europe 
came together to shape the course of a 
new century.” 

But this was not history both gra- 
cious and seamless. A rough canvass of 
die 16 participant countries early in the 
meeting showed that a clear majority 
favored admitting five countries im- 
mediately instead of the three sought 


by the Americans, delegates reported. 

The ensuing compromise was aca- 
demic in the sense inat any candidate 
country must have the unanimous sup- 
port of NATO’s full membership. 

But ii provided the occasion for 
France and other European members to 
insist that the Clinton administration 
was an overbearing leader of the al- 
liance, one unable, even with the Cold 
War ended, to agree to a more equitable 
sharing of control and responsibility. 

As it turned out. neither France nor 
Spain was able to find the prerequisites 
they considered necessary to join rhe 
integrated military command at the 
summit meeting, removing another 
element of the event's planned his- 
torical gloss. France fell into a dispute 
with the United Srates months ago 
about who would hold rhe southern 
regional command, while Spain said it 
still had a number of technical prob- 
lems to resolve before being ready to 
become a full participant on the mil- 
itary level. 

For a day meant to be emblematic of 
the closing of the divide between East 
and West following the Cold War, 
there were strong clashes that did not 
accord with the language of leaders 
wanting to be seen as making history. 

President Bill Clinton, who must 
convince two-thirds of the Senate to 
approve the expansion plan, insisted 
that "this was a great day for the cause 
of freedom in the aftermath of the Cold 
War.” 

See NATO, Page 10 


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9 


Cambodia on the Brink: 
Fear of Civil War Rises 

Execution Reported in Power Struggle 


By Seth Mydans 

New Tori Times Service 


PHNOM PENH — Cambodia 
entered a period of dangerous uncer- 
tainty Tuesday, poised between the grip 
of a harsh new strongman government 
and a possible deterioration into unrest 
or civil war. 

Second Prime Minister Hun Sen, who 
seized full personal control over the 
nation in two days of fighting this week- 

UJ>. wait-and-see attitude. Page 4. 

rad, asked foreign nations on Tuesday to 
keep their hands off Cambodian affairs. 

His statement came as First Prime 
Minister Norodom Ranariddh, the bitter 
rival; whom be ousted from their co- 
alition leadership, sought support in 
Paris from the international community, 
meeting with French and Japanese of- 
ficials. 

Mr. Hun Sen stepped up his efforts to 
minimize his actions by persuading 
Prince Ranariddh's supporters to con- 
tinue working with him in a recon- 


stituted coalition and by accelerating 
plans for what is most likely to be a 
tightly controlled election next year. 

But at the same time, one of his 
advisers admitted that one of Mr. Hun 
Sen’s most prominent opponents. In- 
terior Minister Ho Sok, had been seized 
and was executed Tuesday. 

“He was arrested by the government 
and troops, and he has died.” said the 
adviser, Khieu Sopheak. "He was shot 
down by the people, who were angry 
with him.” 

And several of the more outspoken 
members of the opposition said they 
were hiding from security men who 
were hunting them down. 

"1 am tired, exhausted and scared, 
and 1 am having nightmares,” said one 
opposition member of Parliament, who 
is hiding with his wife and children in a 
downtown hotel. “They went to one of 
the rooms and knocked on the door and 
1 ran out, quick, from the hotel.” 

Though they have broken Prince. 
Ranariddh's military forces in the cap- 
ital, Mr. Hun Sen’s troops; were facing 

See CAMBODIA^ Page 10 


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The Dow 


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Tuawdaydow pWouadose 

+103.82. 7962.31 7858.49 


S&P 500 


dungs ' Tuesday O 4 p.M. partus dess 


AGENDA 

A Wall Street Record 

Buoyed by news that International 
Paper would cut 9,000 jobs in a re- 
structuring program, a late rally on 
Wall Street sent the Dow Jones in- 
dustrial average to a record close on 
Tuesday. The Dow Jones industrial 
average rose 103.82 points, or 1.3 per- 
' “,962.31. Page 14. 


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The talent of the British designer 
John Galliano reached full bloom in 
his second season with the bouse of 
Dior, with a fashion showing in the 
_ Pages 22-23. Bagatelle garden that fused romantic 

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past and exquisite French workman- 
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To Our Readers in France 

The Tuesday editions of the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune were 
not available in France because of a 
strike that blocked the delivery of 
newspapers throughout the coun- 

^We regret toe inconvenience and 
invite readers to see toe missing 
issue on the Herald Tribune’s web 
site: 

http://www.iht.com 



Dan*. C.«*/rhe Avst.-ralcJ Pltv. 


Senator Fred Thompson, right, opening a hearing in Washington on Tuesday into 
accusations of fund-raising abuses in the 1996 campaign. Senator John Glenn was at left. 

Fund-Raising Inquiry Begins 

Senator Says China Sought to Influence U.S. Policy 


CmyaM by Oar Stiff Firm Dnjwn * n 

. WASHINGTON — The chairman of the Sen- 
ate. mvestigarioninto campaign fund-raising ab- 
uses said . Tuesday that China had sought to 
influence U.S. elections with illegal money and 
that "our investigation suggests the plan con- 
tinues today.” 

Senator Fred Thompson made his comments, 
as he opened hearings that are expected to 
provide the most extensive look ever at pres- 
idential election fund-raising. While the bulk of 
the hearings will look at accusations against the 
Democratic Party, the committee will also ex- 
amine the role that conservative groups played in 
helping Republican candidates. 


Mr. Thompson, Republican of Tennessee, im- 
mediately turned to one of the most serious 
allegations — that China soughrto influence the 
outcome of U.S; elections in 1996. 

“The committee believes high-level Chinese 
government officials crafted a plan to increase 
China’s influence over the U.S. political pro- 
cess,” he said. ‘‘The committee has identified 
specific steps taken in furtherance of the plan. 
Activities in furtherance of the plan have oc- 
curred both inside and outside the United 
States.” 

China denies such accusations. Mr. 

See PROBE, Page 10 


Hong Kong Scraps 
Its Voting System 

Pro-Democracy Leaders Assail 
Change as a Rig Step Backwa rd 9 


By Edward A. Gargan 

New York Tunes Sen-ice 


HONG KONG — Hong Kong’s new government, barely a 
week in office, moved swiftly Tuesday to establish a new 
electoral system that will probably limit sharply the presence of 
pro-democracy candidates in future legislatures while ensuring 
the dominance of pro-business and pro-Beijing lawmakers. 

Pro-democracy politicians were swift to denounce the 
government's move as a retreat from the political liberties and 
rights that were enjoyed by Hong Kongers under British 
colonial rule. 

At the same time, the government, led by the Beijing- 
appointed shipping tycoon Tung Chee-hwa, announced sub- 
stantial reductions in the number of voters wbo could participate 
in the elections to be held for a new legislature next year. 

"Our key considerations,” said Nicholas Ng, a senior civil 
servant charged with enacting Mr. Tung's electoral plans, 
“are to have an open and fair election, to achieve a balanced 
participation of all groups and individuals, and to constitute a 
credible legislature.” 

China ordered the abolition of Hong Kong's legislature, 
elected in 1995 under political reforms instituted by the 
British governor, Chris Patten, claiming that a frilly elected 
body violated agreements between London and Beijing, a 
contention it has never substantiated. 

Hours after China resumed sovereignty over Hong Kong 
last week, the Beijing-appointed Provisional Legislature was 
sworn in. Shortly thereafter, all elected councils in the ter- 
ritory were reconstituted with appointed, pro-Beijing mem- 
bers, many of whom lost in the 1995 elections. 

Mr. Tung and his senior advisers have repeatedly expressed 
their disdain for rejjresentative government, insisting that an 
oligarchy of toe business elite is the best system for preserving 
Hong Kong’s prosperity and stability. Criticism of Mr. 

See HONG KONG, Page 10 


Signs of a Deluge on Mars Leave Scientists in Awe 


By John Noble Wilford 

New York Times Service 


PASADENA, California — With each new color 
photograph from Mars Pathfinder, scientists are rec- 
ognizing toe awesome magnitude of a deluge ' ^ 
swept over much of the red planet billions of ’ 


that 

years 


swept 
ago. 

From the shapes and colors of the rocks, surface 
textures and undulating low ridges and valleys, sci- 


8port send Suction Pbfftc 

Eumytrig IMM in C*twN Europe 


entists have inferred that the plain of Axes Vallis, 
where the spacecraft landed, had been scoured by 
liquid waters. The tilt of rocks and tails of debris 
behind pebbles suggested that the flood came from the 
southwest. Crustal splotches indicate that puddles left 
by the flood slowly evaporated, leaving what appear to 
be salty residues. 

Dr. Michael Malm, a geologist and head of Matin ‘ 
Space Science Systems in La Jolla, California, es- 
timated that toe deluge was hundreds of kilometers 
wide and flowed for thousands of kilometers . 

"This was huge,” he said, “but we don’t know 
where toe water went.” 

One of toe big mysteries of Mars, which scientists 
hope Pathfinder and subsequent missions will solve, 
concerns toe planet's ancient environment Its surface 
is bone dry now, although vast amounts of frozen 

See MARS, Page 10 



, Hi- Urn, Mini IV* 

The view From Pathfinder: In the distance, two hills the scientists have dubbed “Twin Peaks.” 


$ 












PAGE TWO 


The ‘Second’ Black / Out of the Shadow 


Larry Doby, Baseball’s Quiet Hero of ’47 


By David Maraniss 

Wishing tan Post Service 

T HERE IS only one person alive who knows 
what it was like to be a black ballplayer 
integrating the white world of the major 
leagues during the historic summer of 
1947. If yon are young or only a casual follower of 
baseball, perhaps you have not heard of him. 

Larry Doby is 72 years old now, and his calm 
manner seems out of style in this unsporting age of 
self-obsession. He is neither a celebrity nor die stuff 
of myth, simply a quiet hero with an incomparable 
story to tell. 

This season, as the national pastime commem- 
orates the 50th anniversary of me breaking of the 
color line, the attention has focused inevitably on 
the first black player of the modem era. Jackie 
Robinson, who shines alone in baseball history as 
the symbol of pride against prejudice. 

But Doby was there, too, blazing his own trail 
later that same year. He was brought up by the 
Cleveland Indians on July 5, 1947, three months 
after Robinson broke in with the Brooklyn Dodgers. 
Some of the strange and awful things that happened 
to No. 42 in the National League happened to No. 14 
in the American League as well. 

“I think I'm ahead of a lot of people because I 
don't hate and I'm not bitter,” Doby says softly 
now. He has spent a lifetime “turning negatives into 
positives,” but he is also sharp and direct in point- 
ing out what he considers to be myths surrounding 
the events of a half-century ago. 

Robinson in death has gone the way of most 
American martyrs, transformed from an outsider 
struggling against the prevailing culture into a legend 
embraced by it In the retelling of his legend it sounds 
as though most people always loved him. Doby 
knows better. He was there and he remembers. 

After that first season, he and Robinson barn- 
stormed the country with Negro league all-stars. 
They rarely discussed their common experience in 
white baseball ( “No need to, we.both knew what the 
situation was”), but a few times late at night they 
stayed up naming the players in each league who 
were giving than problems because they were 
black. It was a long list. 

“Know what amazes me today?' ' Doby asks, his 
deep voice rising with the first rush of emotion. 
“How many friends Jackie Robinson had 50 years 
ago! All of a sudden everyone is his best friend. 
Wait a minute. Give me a break, will you. I knew 
those people who were his friends. I knew those 
people who were not his friends. Some of them are 
still alive. I know. And Jack, he’s in heaven, and I ■ 
bet he turns over a lot of times when he hears certain i 
things or sees certain things or reads certain things i 
where these people say they were his friends.” 
Playing and traveling in the big leagues that year 
was a grindingly lonely job for the two young black 
men. Which leads to Doby 's second shattered myth: 
the notion that Robinson, by coming first, could 
somehow smooth the way for him. 

“Did Jackie Robinson make it easier for me?” 
Doby laughs at his own question, which he says is 
the one he hears most often. ‘ Tm not saying people 
are stupid, bat it's one of the stupidest questions 
that's ever been asked Think about it We're talking 
about 1 1 weeks. 1947. Now it's 50 years later and 
you still have hidden racism, educated racist people. 
How could you change that in 1 1 weeks?” 

There was no transition for Doby, no year of 
grooming in the minors up in Montreal tike Robin- 
son had. One day he was playing second base for the 
Newark Eagles of the Negro league, two days later 
he was in Chicago, pinch-hitting for the Cleveland 
Indians in the seventh inning of a game against the 
White Sox. “We’re in this together, kid,” Bill 
Veeck, the Indians' owner, bad told him at the 
signing, and that was enough for the 22 -year-old 
Doby. He trusted Veeck, then and always. 

When Doby was introduced to the Cleveland 
players that afternoon of July 5 a half -century ago, 
most of them stood mute and expressionless, es- 
sentially ignoring his existence. There were a few 
exceptions. The second baseman, Joe Gordon, told 
him to grab his glove and warmed up with him 
before the game, a practice they continued 
throughout the year. The catcher, Jim Hegan. 
showed he cared by asking him how he was doing. 
And one of the coaches. Bill McKechnie, looked 




ebration afterward, a wire service photographer 
took a picture that was sent out across the nation 
showing something that had never been seen before: 
a white baseball player, the pitcher Steve Gromek, 
hugging the black player, Doby, who had won the 
game for him. 

Doby says he will never forget that embrace. 

“That made me feel good because it was not a 
thing of, should I or should I not. not a thing of black 
or white. It was a thing where human beings woe 
showing emotion. When you have that kind of thing 
it makes you feel better, makes you feel like, with all 
those obstacles and negatives you went through, 
there is someone who had feelings inside for you as 
a person and not based on color.” 

It was a rare situation that went easier for the 
black person than his white friend. Gromek received 
hate mail an d q uestions from his neighbors when be 
went home. What are you doing hugging a black 
man like that? Hey, was his response. Doby won the 
game for me! 

But the world did not embrace Doby as warmly as 
Gromek had. In St. Louis one day, McKechnie 
restrained him from climbing into me stands to go 
after a heckler who had been shouting racist epithets 
at him the whole game. 


H IS ANGER erupted one other time in 
1948, when be slid into second base and 
an opposing infielder spit in his face. “I 
didn’t expect to be spit on if Tm sliding 
into second base, but it happened I just thank God 
mere was an umpire mere named Bill Summers, a 
nice man, who kind of walked in between us when I 
was ready to move on this fella. Maybe I wouldn't 
be sitting here talking if that hadn't happened They 
wanted to find anyway they could to get you out of 
the league.” 

AJ Smith, a left fielder who joined the Indians in 
1953 and became Doby’s roommate and close 
friend, said mere was one other way opposing teams 
would go after black players. Whenever A1 Rosen or 
some other Indian hit a home run, me pitcher would 
wait until Doby came up, men throw at him. “They 
wouldn’t knock me player who hit me home run 
down, they’d knock Doby down,” Smith said. 

Common practice in those days, says Doby. He 
and Minnie Minoso, a Cuban- bom outfielder who 
was an All- Star for seven years despite not becoming 
a regular in the major leagues until age 28, and Roy 
Ounpanella, a three-time NL Most Valuable Player, 
were hit by pitches 10 times more often than Ted 
Williams, Stan Musial and Joe DiMaggio. 

“You don’t think people would ao it simply 
because of race, ' ’ Doby says. “But what was it? Did 
they knock os down because we were good hitters? 
How you gonna explain DiMaggio, W illiams and 
Musial? Were they good hitters? So you see, you 
can't be naive about this kind of situation.'’ 

’ But there was one setting where Doby and the 
other blacks on me In dians * team felt completely 
protected — when a loyal teammate, Early Wynn, 
was on me mound. “Whenever Early pitched we 
didn't have any problems getting knocked down,” 
Doby said. “£arly, he would start at me top of the 
opposing lineup and go right down to the bottom. 
Ibey threw at me, he'd throw at mem.” 

At the All-Star Game at Jacobs Field in Clev- 
eland on Tuesday, all of baseball was finally to tip 
its hat to Lawrence Eugene Doby, who has emerged 
from the enormous shadow of me man he followed 
and revered, Jackie Robinson. The American 
League, for which Doby works as an executive in 
New York, named him honorary captain of its team, 
and he was selected to throw out me first pitch. 

That honor led Doby to think about wbat has 
changed since he broke in with me Indians 50 years 
ago. 

“A lot of people are complaining that baseball 
hasn’t come along fast enough, and mere is much 
more work to be done,” Doby says. “But if yoa 
look at baseball, we came in 1947, before Brown 
versus the Board of Education, me 1954 Supreme 
Court decision integrating public schools, before 
anyone wrote a civil rights bill saying give them me 
same opportunities everyone else has. So whatever 
you want to criticize baseball about — it certainly 
needs more opportunities for black managers, black 
general managers, black umpires — remember that 
if this country was as far advanced as baseball it 
would be in much better shape.” 


[VfimsnaAnilni Prrra hMrrMWral 


Steve Gromek, left, received a 
storm of hate mail for hugging 
Larry Doby after winning Game 4 
of the 1948 World Series. 

after him. “He was like Veeck, but mere every day 
on me road — nice man,” Doby recalls. 

B ut mere was no roommate for him on me road, no 
one in whom he could confide. In every city except 
New York and Boston, be stayed in a black hotel 
apart from the rest of me team. Equally troubling for 
hnn, he rarely got the chance to play. After starting 
one game at first base, he looked at the lineup card 
the next day and was not there. Same thing merest of 
the year. The manager, Lou Boudreau, never said a 
word to him about why be was on me bench. He was 
used as a pinch hitter, and could not adjust to the role. 
He finished the year with only five hits and no home 
runs in 32 at-bats over 29 games. 


A FTER me last game of me season, he was 
sitting at his locker, wondering if that was 
the end of the experiment, when McK- 
echnie came over to him and asked wheth- 
er he had ever played me outfield. No. Doby said, 
always infield, in high school, college at Long 
Island University for a year, Negro league, me 
streets, wherever. 

“Well," Doby recalls McKechnie telling him, 
“Joe Gordon is the second baseman and he's going 
to be hoe a while. When you go home this winter 
get a book and leam how to play the outfield.” 

He bought a book by Tommy Henrich, the New 
Yotk Yankees’ outfielder, and studied the finer points 
of playing outfield: what to do on liners hit straight at 
you (take your first step back, never forward), throw- 
ing to the right bases, hitting the cutoff man. 

He started the next season in right, and within a 
few weeks was over in center, where he developed 
into an offensive and defensive star, a key figure on 
me fearsome Indians teams from the late 1940s to 
mid-1950s. With Doby driving in more than 100 
runs four times and tracking down everything in 
center, me Indians won me World Series against me 
Boston Braves in 1948, and lost to me Giants in 
1954 after winning a league-record 111 games 
during me regular season. 

It was during me '48 season that Doby set several 
firsts. After batting better man .300 in me regular 
season, be became me first black to play on a 
championship club and me first to hit a home run in 
me World Series. His blast won me fourth game that 
fall against the Braves. In the locker room cel- 


Most Expensive City: It’s Paris 

Age nee Fmnce-Presse 

TOKYO — Paris has replaced Tokyo as the city with me 
world's highest cost of living, the Japanese Trade Ministry 
said Tuesday in its annual report. 

ConsumerpricesinTokyo weighed in at about 98 percent of 
those in Paris during me quarter ended March 31. compared 
with 108 percent a year ago, me report said The report also 
showed mat Tokyo’s prices were 127 percent of those in New 
York, down from 146 percent me previous year. 

Falling prices in Tokyo reflected a decline in the yen’s value 
against other major currencies, ministry officials said. 


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TRAVEL UPDATE 
72-Hour Strike at BA Set to Begin 

LONDON (AFP) — British Airways canceled 14 flights 
Tuesday as 350 workers reported sick before a planned 72- 
hour strike by cabin crew on Wednesday, which the airline 
said showed they did not want to join the stoppage. 

Flight attendants are to start a three-day walkout ar 0500 
GMT on Wednesday to protest a pay restructuring deal 
imposed by management 

Tens of thousands of British Airways passengers will be 
affected by me strike, with London’s Heathrow international 
airport — Europe's busiest hub — me most disrupted. 

Bur the airline said it seemed now that from 30 to 35 percent 
of domestic and European services will run from Heathrow, 
rather than the 25 percent it originally thought because more 
crew were planning to come to work. 

Half of British Airways’ intercontinental flights will be 
grounded ar Heathrow. At Gatwick international airport two- 
thirds of me carrier’s long-haul flights will not be operating. 

Heavy rain for the last four days has wreaked havoc 
throughout Austria, triggering floods and mudslides and crip- 
pling road and rail traffic, Austrian television said, f Reuters ) 

Israel will grant visa-free entry to holders of Hong Kong 
Special Administrative Region passports, officials in Hong 
Kong said. (AFP) 

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority of Los ' 
Angeles and the 4,200 drivers belonging to me United Trans- 
portation Union transit agency reached a tentative agreement 
on a contract Tuesday, averting a strike mat would have 
crippled public transportation in me nation’s most populous 
county. Terms of me agreement were not announced. (AP) 


Moscow Wants to laJ 
A Gamble on Lottery 


By Michael Specter 

New York Times Service ■ 

MOSCOW — In his own sorry way, 
Andrei Maganov is in serious pursuit of 
the new Russian’s most cherished 
dream: instant, effortless wealth. 

Every day — sometimes more than 
once — Mr. Maganov finds a way to 
come up with me rubles he needs to buy 
lottery tickets. 

Slipping his hand into a jacket pocket, 
the 37 -year-old laborer eagerly pro- 
duced a fistful of wortiiless chances. 
“That was last week,” he said, shrug- 
ging and f lashing a nearly toothless 
smile. 

* ‘This week will be better. They can’t 
take my money all me time. ” 

Actually, they can. It's a bold as- 
sertion to make, but most law enforce- 
ment officials say that the lotteries here, 
all of mem privately run, have become 
the biggest fraud in Russia. The people 
love them and so does me mob. In this 
country, where love of gambling is 
claimed proudly as a fundamental na- 
tional trait, as many as 65 milli on people 
— more man half of all adults — will 
buy a lottery ticket this week. 

Even for many of me winners, that 
money might as well be burned 

For, until now, what 
the people of Russia *“ ““““ 
have got for their trouble Reporters 
(and for a little less than .*. „ 
a dollar) has been me . 
rhanry to tain* part in piTVCttV lOl 

scores of crooked, on- found thei 

regulated numbers J ^ 

games often run openly winning u 

by organized gangs. 

As any police officer on me street will 
tell you, the tickets lying on hundreds of 
card tables in most cities are usually 
fake. 

Often, more than one with the same 
number can be bought from the same 
vendor. 

“Since we gamble to no purpose,'] 
Dostoyevsky wrote in “The Gambler,’ ' 
the b rillian t novella that doubled as a 
psychological portrait of the Russian 
people, “we tend to be losers.” 

Tne cash-depleted tax-revenue-poor 
government has finally come to un- 
derstand that as well as everyone else, 
and it has decided the time has come to 
stake a claim on me $1 billion in annual 
revenues mat a legal lottery might 
bring. 

“This government is scrounging 
everywhere far money,” said Alexan- 
der Pochinok, me recently appointed 
chief of the federal tax service. “We 
have no money, and me tax revenues are 
not good enough. A national lottery is 
not going to solve all our problems. But 
it can help." 

Soon Russia may find out A bill now 
before Parliament would create a na- 
tional lottery that one operator, Yuri 
Rakhlevsky, who runs the enormous 
and apparently legitimate Rossiyskiye 
Lotterei, calls “me world's biggest pot 
of gold” 

There are at least 300 lotteries op- 
erating in Russia today, but fewer than 
50 are registered. Some, like Mr. 
Rakhlevsky’s, are large — me 
Rossiyskiye Lotterei sells more than 
$ 10 million worth of tickets each month. 
But a national lottery, run by the gov- 
ernment and coordinated through satel- 
lites and radios from one end of Russia 
to me other, would dwarf mem all. 

Perhaps that is why so many current 
lottery leaders are fighting it. “This is 
me fust time me mafia and the gov- 
ernment have battled it out for me same 
turf, ' ' said Mr. Rakhlevsky. 

He added that although itwas nec- 
essary to drive criminals from the lot- 


WEATHER 


Reporters bought all 
the tickets for a 
private lottery and 
found there teas no 
winning ticket 


tery business, die government was nof 
necessarily the group to do in ' ~ . A 'J 

“Tile government thinks it can just 'j- 
step in and set up a lottery^’ be said; ‘‘It 
is not mat easy. You need expertise add ■ - . 
employees. The money , doesn’t Just . % 
walk to the bankby ltscll” . 7 

The history of lotteries is" older even , 
than Russia. Archeologists bave found’ 
evidence of lottery-like games idatin® 
back to the pharaohs. . . • ;; ‘ I’fJj 

They helped pay over the centuries . -i>. : 
for the Great Wall of China, Harvard , A 
University and me Revolutionary War. 

In the 19th century, the era’svbiggest 
such contest — the Louisiana Lottery — 
was distributed by pony express. ... • 

The Soviet-era leaders, starting with ;; " 
Stalin^ permitted occasional lotteries. % 
But these days me biggest lottery in y V. 
me world is me one run by Britain. -It % 
grosses more than $150 million a weefc ; - - . 
in sales. ;yyy-_'-- ; y 

* ‘We could easily do more than that;! *;y ' 

' said a spokesman for the Russian tax ; . 

department. “Easily.” A;’ 

If only me Parliament will let them. ' 
The government's proposed national Ay- 
lottery has been meeting resistance from y %.. 
some legislators. Most of die lobbying ] ] % 
against it has been done by current. o^y -jL-y 
era tors, and they have a lot to lose froin fjf;- 
a new contest aseoyi-% 

“ sioned by the Kremlin.' ■ -} 
bought all At least 90 percent of 

fmTa Russia’s lotteries today. ' 

jor a are instant — - the type 

tery, and that involves scratching } _• 
e was no 10 revea ^ a nuntber on a. . % 

. piece of paper or tick- -~f' 

cket eL 

— : “They are the .%% 

biggest rip-offs that exist on eartii,” said 
Sergeant Pavel Dyanbenko, a Moscow^-* 
police officer, adding that dozens of .% 
people complained every day of having ,.-l% 
been cheated. Since mere are few iaws'%;. 
regulating lotteries, it is difficult for the -^% 
police to act. “You can buy the whole H . 
table’s worth of tickets and yoa wori’t 
win a penny,” he said. - Jpf 

Recently a couple of reporters far a . 
Moscow newspaper did just that < • 

They said they bought every ticket for. As 
a local Moscow lottery — there are yy 
dozens of such contests — and didnYy-y, 
buy a single winning number.' . . . J yy ., 
A national lottery could change that -I;'sv 
“You have to take the historical 
view," said Robot Rendine, vice pres- 
ident for corporate communication at. 
Gtech, Inc., the American company that ; A 
is by far the world’s biggest lottery i 
vendor. “It was only back in the 1960s '■'*£ 
mar all me numbers rackets in me . 
United States were run by organized 
crime. The lotteries starred in many . 
parts of America as a way to rid the field 
of the mob. And it worked. ^ 

“Illegal numbers operations in many , * 
of the states with big lotteries are almost 
gone now.” ’ ".Sg 

This notion warmed Russian poGti^ ; ' 

cians to Gtech, which is hoping to bid ; 'j; 
for any national lottery that emerges this 
fall, and to other such companies. Gtech 5 
or one of its rivals would wire the conn- 
tiy, bring in computers and' run thfrfrA 
lottery through retailers. A A 

The company would have to pay 1 

set it up, and the cost could be $100 jftV. 
million. But the payoff for Russia would 
be worth it As Mr. Rendine put it Z f 
“Obviously, it could turn out to be the . jj'. 
world’s greatest lottery. " A 

Not surprisingly, Galina Serotkrna, 

58, has a more positive view of the « : 
current lotteries, since she works for A ;, 
one, Russian Lotto, the winningnumber - ,* % , 
of which is picked on television by an 
audience each week. ' V.-. 

‘ ‘This is the only game that is played . 
fairly,” she said. . f 


Europe 


AJgan/a 

Amatenbm 

Ankara 

Mm 


Casa Dal Sol SB/79 1UM 

DMn 22/77 ia®6a 

EdMugh 23/73 I3/S5pt 

Ftoronco 28/82 lB60p< 

Fran Wilt 24/75 12/53 p» 

Gon«o 26/78 13/55 pi 

HabmM 21/70 11/52 pt 

ttuW 30/86 19/60 pi 

Kiev 2-1/75 16/61 r 

Las Palmas 27/80 ims 

LMun 25/77 15/58 a 

London 24/75 14/57 pi 

!*■**• 2984 14/57 c 

MafeMOa 22/71 16/61 a 

Milan 28/82 1881 pe 

Moscow 27/80 17/82 ps 

Munich 22/71 12/53 pt 

NkJO 34 US 17/82 s 

Oslo 23/73 13/56 pc 

Part* 23/73 13/56 pc 

Pngun 23/73 12/53 C 

Rayktartk 13/65 11/52 c 

21/70 12/53 pc 
Remo 28/79 14/57* 

5L Peterafaum 23/73 12/93 pe 

Stockholm 18/64 11/52 pc 

SPaataup 2V78 13/56 pc 

Taflm SM8 13/55 pc 

TMM 32^9 IB/64 pc 

Vert c* 28 m 1HI pc 

Vienna 24/75 14/57 e 

Wanaw 94775 W48 pc 

Zurich 23/73 13/55 pc 

Middle East 

MtuOKaU 40/704 23/84 b 

Beaia 26/70 1B/B4 a 

Calm 33W 17/62 a 

Da/naacua 34/B3 12/53* 

Janaakni 28 /TO 1»53 • 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AccuWaalher. 


Tamo n ow 
High Low W 
OF OF 
28/79 17® 8 
23/73 13156a 
24/84 1050 pe 
30/86 21/7D a 
3303 16/61 pc 
95 777 13156 pc 
24/75 13/55 a 
24/75 14/ST a 
27/80 13/55 a 
22/71 13/55 pc 
26/70 17182 s 
22/71 72/33 C 
22/71 11/62 pc 
28/89 14/57 pc 
Wit 12<S3 S 
28/79 12/53 pc 
16/81 10/50 ah 
2»84 1B/B4 pc 
25/77 15/59 r 
24/75 18/64 • 
24/76 14/57 a 
24/75 13/S5 • 
97/80 13/55 pc 
22/71 17/62 pc 
27/80 18/61 ch 
27/BO 1W841 
93/73 12/53 c 
24/75 17/82 pc 
23/73 14/57 pa 
25/77 13/55 pc 
24/75 1 1/52 a 
13/55 SMBr 
2 2/71 12/83 c 
28/79 14/67 B 
18/64 11/E? c 
19/66 11/59 pc 
27/80 14/67 PC 
22/71 12/63 po 
33/01 18/64 pc 
26/78 18/81 C 
24/75 13/55 pc 
22/71 11/59 pc 
94/75 13/55 pc 


40/W 2082 3 
24/75 18/66 3 
33431 IB/66 f 
33W 14/57 a 
26/79 14/57 s 



i Unmaoratfir 
COd 


North America 

A stocm tn eastern Canada 
will causa soaking rain 
from Newfoundland to 
northeastern Guebec. Hot 
and dry from lho South- 
west to the central Plains, 
but gusty thunderstorms 
will roam the northern 
Rockies and PUna. Sunny 
and nice in the Northeast 
Thursday through the 
weekend. 


North America 


Today 

Mgh Loww 
OF OF 
92/ 71 19/60 pc 
32/88 21/70 pc 
28/82 17RS> l 
24 17*. 13/55 pc 
34/93 23/73 pc 
32/68 15/591 
24/75 iSSSpc 
29/84 26/77 r 
33191 93/73 pc 
26/79 17/63 pe 
3Z/B8 2ftf7ftpe 


Europe 

Vary warm in soutnern 
Spam, but drenching ram 
will reach tram northern 
Spain and southern France 
to northern Italy. Warm 
with some sun in England 
Thursday, then cooler with 
showers, maybe a thunder- 
storm. Sunny and nice m 
Scandnavta this weekend, 
but cool with showers in 
eastern Europe. 


Asia 

Soakmg ram will continue 
across southeastern China 
)ust north ot Hong Kong. 
Beijing and alt of northern 
and wesiem Chinn wQ be 
sunny, hot and dry Thurs- 
day Into Saturday. Warm m 
Tokyo with the chance for 
showers, but thunder- 
storms win be scattered 
across Korea each day. 


Ah«y 

Bai 

Bmipiak 

Bondar 
Ctoeulm 
Chung MS 
Cotonba 
Huiol 

HgChlMfcih 

Hong King 

Marabou 

Jakarta 

Karachi 

K. Lunipw 

K-Kkubalu 

MM 

NwDaH 

Phnom Panh 

RWM 

Rangoon 

Seoul 

Shonrtwl 

Stogapora 

Tarpai 

Tokyo 

VtaMana 


Capo Town 


Today 

High LoarW 
OF OF 
33^1 16/61 pc 
29/84 18/Bt s 
32/88 25/77 r 
37/86 2977s 
20/84 26/70 r 
31/86 277901 
32rt» 23/71 r 
30/86 25777 pc 
33/89 ZJWDr 
32/89 23/73 c 
30/86 25/77 pa 
*47111 2*82 0 
29(84 22/71 pc 
34/98 27780 pe 
31/88 22771 pc 
29/84 21770 r 
31/88 23/73 pc 
397102 29fB4pc 
32/89 93/73 r 
32«8 95/77 r 
32/89 24/75 r 
32/89 21770 1 
28/82 22/71 r 
31/88 22/71 pc 
33/91 24/75c 
31/88 94/75 pc 
3108 27/Ur 


Mgh Low W 
OF OF 
SOW 17182c 
2904 18/64 a 
3036 95777 r 
36797 28/89 pc 
28/82 20/79 r 
me 27/eot 
33«1 24/75 c 
. tan* 2ST77pc 
31/88 27/80 pc 
3108 23/73 'ah 
2904 94/75 pc 
42/107 9802 s 
2904 92/71 pc 
34/93 28/99 pc 
31/88 22/71 pc 
30/86 21/me 
31/TO 23/73 c 
38/102 28/82 pc 
31/88 23/73 r 
30(86 25777 r 
S3»1 26777c 
24/75 17/62 r ■ 
2904 23/73 pc 
31/88 22/71 pc .; 
32/89 24/750 . 
30/88 24/73 pc 
32/89 97/80 pc : 


Boacn 

Chicago 

Dabs 

Domor 

Damn 

HanoUu 

Houston 

Laa Angetoe 

Mbrrt 


Nassau 

NawVark 

Ortnndo 

Phaanto 

Swi Fran. 

Soatua 

Toronto 

VOKOimr 

Waafrington 


Today 

Mgh LonrW 
of 

27/80 16/61 pc 
21 /TO 11(52 Stl 
33/71 23/73 S 
30/88 90881 
33/61 23/73 pc 
43/109 27/801 
22/71 1-655 a 
19/86 11/59 sh 
21/70 8/48 pc 

14/57 948 ah 
32/89 20*81 


26/79 12/53 a 
22/71 10/50 8 
22/71 13/55 a 
22/71 11/52S 
28/82 23/73 c 
24/75 10/50 pc 
31/88 20/08 pc 


26/79 14/67 * 
23/73 SMBs 
21/70 1081 a 
33/73 1 1752 pc 
28/82 23/73 r 
24/75 1030 pc 
24/75 16/61 r 


Latin America . - - 

Buonoa All nr. 2068 14/67 ah 1M4 1363 r . 

Ctoacaa 31/88 24/75 pc 30«8 2477S pc 

Ln« 21/70 15/61 PC 19/86 16*1 pc 

MwocoCay 26/77 11762 c 23/73 1366c 

FtodaiariMO 24/78 17K24 WOT 21/70 » 
Saiwago 13/55 -101 pe 12*3 -1/31 pe 


42/107 1B*4S 41/106 19*0 a 
447111 23/73 a 447111 24776a 


Lagand; a-aunny. pc-pnrty ctoudy, c-duudy. ah-nnowra. HhundefSwrra- r-ram. •J'yxrm Bucrtes. 
sn-snea*, Uca, W-Woetwr. AM mapa. l o rnc a a ta and Can protfklad by A ccu T Vs lhar. inc-~C 1987 


Oceania 


14*7 11/59 pc 14/57 8/43 pc 
18*4 8/43 ■ 1509 7744 a " 


i COUNTRY/ CURRENCY 

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7 SO 

360 

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i FINLAND 

FIM 

624 

310 • 

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FF 

S20 : 

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1 82 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBl^X. WEDNESDAY. JULY 9. 1997 


PAGE 3 


Taki 

®ry 


THE AMERICAS 




jovernment Was _ 

JP to do it. 1,01 

EL 1 ■> can j UM 
lottery," h e said *m! 
uaeedexpeniseanS 
“?ney doesn't j U M 
/ itself.” JUS1 

'«erie s is older even 

° ** fou "2 
games dating 

\ Cent “ries 

l Of China, Harvard 

Revolutionary War 
y» the era's bigger 
Louisiana Lottery 
pony express. 

starting wirh 
pcasional lotteries 
he biggest lonery m 

S™ *?y Brita ^- S 

5150 million a week 

/ do more than thai. ‘ 
for the Russian tax 

«pient will let them, 
s proposed national 
ehng resistance from 
«>st Of the lobbying 
done by current urv- 
»ve a lot to lose from 
iew contest as envi- 
oed by the Kremlin. 

least 90 percent of 
ssia s lotteries today 
instant — the lyp^ 
t involves scratchine 
reveal a number on a 
ce of paper or tick* 

“They are the 
t exist on earth,” said 
’anbenko, a Moscow 
ding that dozens of 
1 every day of having 
^ there are few laws 
s, it is difficult for the 
•u can buy the whole 
ckeis and you won't 
said. 

ale of reporters for a 
jt did just that, 
ought every ticket for 
lottery — there are 
) rites ts — and didn't 
ng number, 
ry could change that. 

take the historical 
t Rendine. vice pnes- 
’£ communication at 
nerican company that 
dd’s biggest lottery 
aly back in the 1960s 
ibers rackets in the 
re run by organized 
ies started in many 
s a way to rid the field 
t worked. 

rs operations in many 
>ig lotteries are almost 

uned Russian politi- 
hich is hoping to bid 
ttery that emerges this 
jeh companies. Gtech 
would wire the coun- 
njputers and run ibe 
ailers. 

Mould have to pay to 
: cost could be S 100 | 
.yoff for Russia would 
Mr. Rendine put it: 
uld turn out io be the 
artery." 

|y, Galina Seroikina, 
positive view of die 
since she works for 
). the winning number 
d on television by an 

efc. , . 

ly game that is played 


It’s Ballots, Not Bullets, 
Governing Mexico Now 

Longt ime Party in Power Faces a Battle 
For Survival in a Pluralistic Democracy 


By Sam Dillon 

\< Vij’A times Seri ue 




MEXICO CITY — A few weeks ago. 
former President Jose Lopez Portillo, 
who was installed in office by the gov- 
erning Institutional Revolutionary 
Pany. or PRI. after a 1976 election in 
which no opposition names appeared on 
the ballot, was asked about Mexico’s 
recenr democratic evolution. 

He was nor impressed. 

"The conduct of the PRI is and has 
always been democratic, and be who 
doesn't understand char doesn't know 
what he is talking about,” snapped Mr. 
Lopez Portillo. ’ 'Pure, direct democracy 
doesn’i need elections.” 

For most of this century. Mexico has 
been governed by men who have shared 
Mr. Lopez Portillo’s views. The gov- 
erning pany was founded in 1929 by 
revolutionary generals who believed 
that their legitimacy was derived, in 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

a phrase from a popular new history of 
Mexico ihat was published this spring, 
‘‘not from the ballots of democracy, but 
from the bullets of the Revolution.” 
when centuries of autocracy gave way to 


the popular will. 
In the i 


* 


decades that followed, the party 
has helped successive authoritarian 
presidents to modernize the country and 
mobilize support for nationalistic goals, 
but it has also been used to repress 
inconvenient minority views and steal 
elections. 

In 1986. for example, party leaders 
padded electoral rolls to rob opponents 
of a gubernatorial victory in the northern 
state of Chihuahua, and two years later 
the presidential vote count was inter- 
rupted fora time in an election that many 
Mexicans consider fraudulent 

The campaign that culminated in Sun- 
day's sweeping defeats for the PRI made 
it clear for the first time that the party’s 
opponents outnumbered its followers. 
That is provoking a debate about how 
effectively its leaders will perform in a 
government in which negotiation must 
replace presidential dictate and Con- 
gress, previously a rubber stamp, may 
rival the power of the executive. 

. Some have even questioned whether 
the party will survive in the pluralistic 
Mexico of die next century. 

Juan Mil lan. the party's secretary- 
general. said last week that the party had 
. developed plenty of experience as a loy- 
al opposition in the four states that have 
been governed since 1995 by the pro- 
business National Action Party. 

And Jose Angel Gurria, the foreign 
rairpsier, said in an interview that the 
party had long made it a legislative 
practice to build consensus with op- 
ponents, even though the pany could 
nave approved government initiatives 


by bringing its own absolute majorities 
to bear in both houses of Congress. 

"There isn’t a single important piece 
of legislation today that is not nego- 
tiated.” Mr. Gurria said. "In all cases 
we try to get everybody on board.” 

But others say that the party’s belated 
efforts to adapt to modern democracy 
will be as traumatic an experience as that 
of the Communist parties of Eastern 
Europe after the fall of the Berlin Wall. 

“Pan of the glue that held the PRI 
together was winning,” said John 
Bailey, a Mexico specialist at Geor- 
getown University in Washington. "But 
if there are really transparent elections, 
and victory isn’t guaranteed, then the 
30-something PRI politicians who have 
40 years ahead of them may begin to 
look to other parties. If votes begin to 
count in Mexico, then this is a rev- 
olution.” 

Although the PRI has been compared 
to Communist parties, it has been guided 
by pragmatism and has never had a 
utopian ideology. And in contrast with 
communist systems, in which the party 
is more powerful than the state, the PR] 
and its leaders have always been sub- 
ordinate to Mexico’s imperial presi- 
dents. 

The party’s current crisis can be 
traced to the early 1980s, when Mr. 
Lopez Portillo plunged the economy in- 
to crisis and nationalized the banks. 

Taking advantage of the outrage that 
followed, the conservative National Ac- 
tion Party grew from a fringe sect into a 
robust opposition movement that won 
control of dozens of city halls. 

PRI hard-liners responded by orches- 
trating a series of blatant electoral 
frauds, and in 19S7 those and a series of 
authoritarian measures produced the 
first major democratic rupture in the 
governing party itself, when 
Cuauhtemoc Cardenas Solorzano broke 
with the leadership and later formed the 
Democratic Revolution Party. 

In the last decade, the two opposition 
parties have posed a growing challenge, 
obliging President Ernesto Zedillo and 
his predecessor to cany out reforms that 
have thoroughly modernized the coun- 
try's electoral system. 

Now some senior PRI leaders ques- 
tion whether the party that dominated 
Mexico country in the 20th century can 
adapt to the next. 

“The PRI was bom to give the coun- 
try stability, to sustain the revolutionary 
state and to connect the state to . the 
masses.” Genaro Borrego Estrada, who 
was head of the party in the last ad- 
ministration. writes in a forthcoming 
article in the magazine Conciencia Mex- 
icana. 

“It was not bom to compete polit- 
ically, nor to operate in a regime with 
other parties, nor to exist in a pluralistic 
society.” 


Facing Loss of Majority, 
Zedillo Urges Consensus 


<srS" 

C/F 

3086 IT'S 4 
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SV86 & 771 

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Reuters 

. MEXICO CITY — Mexico em- 
barked on a new era of multiparty poi- 
' incs Tuesday as President Ernesto Ze- 
dillo sought to reach out to the 
'. opposition following his party’s biggest 
election setback in 68 years of rule. 

• Latest preliminary results from Sun- 
day’s election for the lower house of 
-Congress gave Mr. Zedillo’s governing 
- Institutional Revolutionary Party 38.86 
A‘-> percenr — short of the 42 percent it 
needed to keep its majority. - 

Authorities suspended the count late 
Monday with almost 87 percent of the 
votes tabulated, saying that final results 
: would not begin to be known until 
Wednesday. . 

-Thafleft open the possibility titai the 
party, which is known as the PRI, could 
muster enough votes in remaining rural 
districts to retain its control of the Cham- 
ber of Deputies. Since 1929, it has been 
a rubber stamp for presidential rule. 

But even party leaders doubted that 
the PRI would hold its majority, and Mr. 
Zedillo began courting the opposition to 
prevent legislative gridlock when the 
new Congress opens in September. 

*V "Following yesterday’s elections all 
parties are entering a new era in which 
we must promote dialogue, agreement 
and consensus,’ ' the president said. 

In an unusual ^esaae, he held our the 
hand of friendship to main opposition 



nano oi menastup to mam opposition Mexico s loom 
that he aH&cted.during me elec- hotly contested e 
'* ~ tic® campaignrpaymg^ecial tribute to toiy.” ■ 


elections, its strength largely buoyed by 
die landslide victory of its populist can- 
didate. Cuauhtemoc Cardenas Solarz- 
ano, as mayor of Mexico City. 

“I have always thought that a party of 
the left, a strong one, as the PRD showed 
it was yesterday, is good for Mexico.” 
Mr. Zedillo said, repeating his offer to 
work alongside Mr. Cardenas and con- 
gratulating him on his victory. 

The new mayor has been similarly 
conciliatory to Mr. Zedillo, acknowledg- 
ing that the president’s political reforms 
helped level the playing field in a country 
long considered a one-party state. 

■ Clinton Hails the Vote 

In Madrid, where he was attending the 
NATO summit meeting, President Bill 
Clinton hailed the Mexican elections as 
a historic step toward democracy, 
Agence Jrance-Presse reparted. 

“We believe that anything that adds 
to Mexico’s strength as a democracy is 
good for our common future,” he said. 
“It doesn’t matter how it came out.” 

He added that die. elections as a ‘ ’free 
expression of their will’ ’ were good for 
U.S.-Mexican relations. “We have 
many of die same problems with the 
narcotics and many of die same op- 
portunities with economic growth.” 

A White House spokesman, Eric Ru- 
bin, said in Washington that the vote was 
Mexico’s “most competitive and most 
“"■* election in modern his- 


nenca 

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the leftist Democratic ‘Revolution 
Party*. 

The; party made s huge leap in the 


We believe it represents a big step 
forward in the process of democratiz- 
ation,*' he said. 



Ri<grh» SnliVTbr Av>.M*td Pirc 

A FIRST IN MISSISSIPPI — Harvey Johnson being sworn in as mayor of the state capital, Jackson. Mr. 
Johnson, a 50-year-old government planner who promised to reduce crime, is Jackson's first black mayor. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Ferraro Gets Ready 
To Run for Senate 

NEW YORK — Geraldine Ferraro 
says that she will probably seek the 
Democratic nomination to challenge 
Senator Alfonse D' Amato. Republican 
of New York, next year. Dying a polit- 
ical comeback that could recast what is 
already shaping up as one of the most 
competitive contests of 1998. 

“If it were today. I’d probably say. 
’Yeah, I’m going to go.* ’ Ms. Ferraro 
said Monday, in her strongest public 
indication that she will try for a second 
time to win the Democratic nomina- 
tion to oppose Mr. D ’Amato. 

Ms. Ferraro. 61, said she would 
make a final decision by December. 
Political associates in New York and in 


Washington said the main reason she 
was putting off a formal announce- 
ment was because she did not want to 
jeopardize her politically lucrative po- 
sition as a commentator on the CNN 
program, ■■Crossfire.” 

Her contract with the network ex- 
pires next May. and she would have to 
give up her commentator’s job. once 
she announced her candidacy. iNYT) 

Dollars and Sex 

WASHINGTON — State govern- 
ments are embroiled in a controversy 
over how to spend — or even whether 
to spend — $250 million authorized by 
Congress to persuade teenagers not to 
have sex. 

Birth-control groups like Planned 
Parenthood have denounced the fed- 
eral grant program as a dangerous 


waste of time and have asked states not 
to take the money. 

Conservative activists, meanwhile, 
have accused some states of planning 
to spend the binds in ways that do not 
conform to the program’s goals. 

States have until July 15 to apply for 
the funds. (WP) 

Quote / Unquote 

Representative Albert Wynn, 
Democrat of Maryland, expressing 
alarm at the huge number of racial 
discrimination complaints filed by fed- 
eral workers and calling on President 
Bill Clinton to root out racism in the 
federal workplace: “It seems to me if 
we are serious about dealing with the 
problems of race in America, we ought 
to stan in our own backyard: with the 
federal work force." (WP) 


Saudi’s Denial 
Could Unravel 
U.S. Inquiry 
Into Bombing 


By David Johnston 

Sev Yu ri Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A Saudi suspect 
recently deported here from Canada 
said documents showed he was in Iran 
when a bombing in Saudi Arabia killed 
19 American servicemen in 19%. 

Law enforcement officials say the 
suspect. Haiti Abdel Rahim Sayegh. ac- 
ted as a driver and lookout in uie attack 
at Khobar Towers, an American mil- 
itary housing complex in Dhahrsn. Bur 
Mr. Sayegh said Monday that an airline 
manifest and his passport indicated that 
he had gone to Iran before the bombing 
and had flown from there to Kuwait 
shortly afterward. 

Mr. Sayegh was brought to the United 
Stales under an arrangement in which he 
was expected to plead guilty to con- 
spiracy for his role in a separate, un- 
successful plot to scout American in- 
stallations inside Saudi Arabia as 
possible targets for attack. 

His comments Monday appear to add 
to the confusion that hangs over the 
case. Federal officials said that Mr. 
Sayegh had told them thar he could shed 
light on the bombing. His denials and 
shifting statements suggest that the legal 
arrangement which brought him to the 
United States could unravel as faces a 
court hearing as early as this week. 

“I don't even know the location of 
Khobar,” be said Monday, speaking by 
telephone from an undisclosed location 
in the Washington area, where he is 
being held by U.S. marshals. 

Mr. Sayegh said the Saudis had made 
him a scapegoat because he was a thorn 
in their side as a political dissident. 

If Mr. Sayegh repudiates his con- 
fession, it is unclear whether prose- 
cutors will have sufficient evidence to 
try him on the conspiracy indictment. 
And he could plead not guilty and apply 
for political asylum on the ground that 
he would face political persecution if he 
was returned to Saudi Arabia. 


Away From 
Politics 

• A U.S. Air Force search team 

found human remains and bits of 
ammunition but no sign of the four 
powerful bombs an A- 10 warplane 
was carrying when it crashed on a 
rugged Rocky Mountain' peak; 
Nine rescue and explosives experts 
recovered the remains and found 
pieces of 30 mm ammunition. Cap- 
tain Craig Button, whose remains 
were turned over to the Eagle 
County, Colorado, coroner, broke- 
formation during training over Ari- 
zona on April 2 and flew more than 
800 miles (1.300 kilometers) off 
course before crashing. (AP) 

• The fatal shootings of three 

Starbucks Coffee bar workers in 
Washington are prompting the com- 
pany to increase security at some 
stores. The Mid-Atlantic regional 
director for the Seattle-based chain 
said Starbucks would begin posting 
security guards at some of its Dis- 
trict of Columbia stores. f AP) 

• Autumn Jackson’s belief that 

BUI Cosby is her father proves she 
was only trying to get what right- 
fully belonged to her when she de- 
manded $40 million from the en- 
tertainer. defense lawyers said 
Although a federal judge has ruled 
paternity not an issue in the ex-, 
tortion case. Ms. Jackson’s lawyers 
demanded that jurors be told she 
passed a lie-detector test in which 
she was asked about her fa- 
ther. (AP) 

• The New York police are con- 

sidering bringing charges against a 
man who, they said, beat nearly to* 
death a suspect in the sexual assault 
of a 5-year-old Brooklyn boy. Ac- 
cording to the authorities, the boy 
told his mother that he had been 
sexually assaulted by a local handy- 
man. The mother’s boyfriend then 
found the handyman and held him 
until the police arrived. But the 
police found that the handyman had 
been badly beaten. {NYT) 

• Three women who said they 

were subjected to X-rated wise- 
cracks and lewd drawings after 
they joined the Temple University 
rowing team have lost a sexual har- 
assment lawsuit against the uni- 
versity. The jury of five women and 
three men deliberated about four 
hours before deciding that the 
women’s civil rights had not been 
violated. f API 


Air Force Tells Lawyers to Shape Up 

Military Legal System Assailed in Wake of Fraternization Investigation 


By Elaine Sciolino 

AW York Times Sen-ice 



McVeigh Appeals Verdict, Calling for New Trial 


WASHINGTON — To ensure fair- 
ness in its military justice system, the 
U.S. Air Force has ordered one of its 
bases to cease calling its legal newsletter 
"NooseJerrer” and has ordered lawyers 
in a major command to eliminate any 
bias that may exist in their legal pro- 
cedures. 

In an unusually sharp message to the 
two dozen supervisory lawyers in the Air 
Combat Command. Brigadier General 
William Moorman, the head of the com- 
mand’s legal office, said that he ordered 
lawyers at Whiteman Air Force Base in 
Missouri to change (he name of its 
monthly newsletter because it could give 
the impression that the Air Force stands 
“for conviction at all costs.” 

The name of the newsletter came to 
light as pan of a pending fraternization 
and lying case at the Whiteman air base. 

General Moorman also ordered the 
chief lawyers within the Air Combat 
Command “to immediately and crit- 
ically review” their legal operations to 
ensure that justice is served. 


“Do you proudly proclaim yourself 
as a ‘hang-'em-high-judge’ or do you 
take pride in the fact that you are in- 
terested in truth, fairness, justice, equit- 
able treatment and good order and dis- 
cipline?” General Moorman wrote in 
his message to the Air Combat Com- 
mand lawyers, sent by e-mail Friday. 
”Our business is deadly serious. Our 
advice and decisions potentially take 
away people's liberty and alter their 
lives.” 

Criticizing the use of the masthead 
“NooseJetter.” he added. “There is no 
place in our business for 'cuteness' when 
it is entirely likely, as we have seen 
today, that an attempt to be cute po- 
tentially indicts our entire criminal 
justice system-” 

In a telephone interview from 
Langley Air Force Base in Virginia, the 
headquarters of the Air Combat Com- 
mand, General Moorman declined to 
discuss the contents of his memo. 

But be explained thar he took action 
because. “We need to be careful about 
perceptions.” 

Whiteman Air Force Base, the 
headquarters for the S2 billion B-2 Stealth 


bomber, is where Second Lieutenant Wil- 
liam Kire Jr., a supervisor for security 
police, is awaiting court-martial. 

Lieutenant Kite has been charged 
with fraternizing with an enlisted air- 
man. Rhonda Kutzer, whom he married 
earlier this year. He also stands accused 
of initially denying the relationship 
when he was confronted by his super- 
iors. 

Captain Joseph Cazenavette, the law- 
yer for Lieutenant Kite, formally pe- 
titioned Air Force Secretary Sbeila Wid- 
nali on Monday to dismiss the charges, 
give his client a reprimand and allow 
him to stay in the Air Force. 

Secretary Widnall is still studying the 
case, a senior air force official said. 

On Capitol Hill, Senator Slade Gor- 
ton, Republican of Washington, who is a 
former air force judge advocate, added 
his voice to those lawmakers who have 
criticized the handling of the case. 

“The air force is making a laugh- 
ingstock of itself on this one,” Mr. Gor- 
ton said. ’ ‘The sooner the secretary of the 
air force gives Lieutenant Kite a written 
reprimand and he is restored to duty, the 
better off everyone is going to be.” 


jTrib** 

or+y- 




- By Richard A.' Serrano 

- . ; LusAngrks Tunes -• • 

DENVER — Timothy Mc- 
- Veigh’s lawyers have filed an 
. appeal for a new trial, claim- 
ing he was unfairly convicted 
and sentenced to death in the 
. Oklahoma City bombing be- 
cause his defense .ream had. 
been prevented from present- 
ing a variety of evidence on 
his behalf. > 

Their key constant .was 
that the fed^ judge. Richard 
Matsch, had barredtestimony 
■ from a farmer paid govern- 
ment witness, Carol Howe. 


t 


Mr. McVeigh’s lawyers 
said she would have shown 
that she had told federal 
agents that residents of an ex- 
tremist religious compound in 

Etohim City in eastern Okla- 
homa were planning to attack 
several federal buildings — 
including the Alfred P. Mur- 
rah Federal Building in Okla- 
homa City — m retaliation for 
the 1993 government raid on 
another religious cult in 
Waco, Texas, in which more 
than 80 people perished. 

- . The lawyers said in the res- 
idents “had the same motiv- 
ations, knowledge, expertise 

\ 


and politics that the govern- 
ment attributed to Mr. Mc- 
Veigh and were suspects in 
the initial investigation. 

“The testimony would 
have established either that 
Mr. McVeigh did not commit 
the crime or that he did not 
/wninir the crime alone.” 

Judge Matsch had ruled 
that testimony about die 
group was not directly rel- 
evant to the case. He has not 
indicated when he might rule 
on the appeal. Also, he has not 
set a date for formally im- 
posing the death sentence on 
Mr- McVeigh. 


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DEATH NOTICE I 


When Death's dark stream I ferry o'er 
( a time that surely shall come ), 

In Heaven itself IH ask no more 
Than just a Highland welcome, 

(Robert Burns) 


We mourn the loss of 
our Director 

Ambassador David Anderson 

•January 3, 1937 t July 4, 1997 

The Aspen Institute Berlin staff: 

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Rebecca Heruth, Petra Ihloff, 

Elka von Klopmann, Liliana Kohls, 
Susanne Kraus, Monika Rippert, 

Elke Rustenbach-Wampfler, Steffen Sachs, 
Jutta and Gunther Voigtlander. 


Aspen Institute Berlin, InsdsuaSe 10. D-I4129 Beriia ret ++4930B04 8900 



ASIA/PACIFIC 


In Japan, Equality Has Its Price 

Women Take On Burdens as Opportunities Open in Job Market 



By Andrew Pollack 

Nev York Times Service 

OPPAMA, Japan — Fumiko 
Haneda. one of only 1 8 women among 
the 2,200 workers in Nissan Motor 
Co.'s sprawling automobile factory 
here on the southwestern outskirts of 
Tokyo, says she is “determined not to 
fall behind the men.” 

Still, the 19-year-old assembly line 
worker is not sure she really wants to 
keep up in one respect — working the 8 
P.M. to 5 A.M. shift every other week. 

Women have been shut out of jobs in 
Japan's world-beating auto factories. 
Companies say this is because Japanese 
law prohibits women from working be- 
tween 10 P.M. and 5 A.M., preventing 
diem from fining into the typical job 
rotation — a week on a day shift fol- 
lowed by a week on a night shift. 

Now. as pan of a push for equal 
opportunity, restrictions on late-night 
and overtime work for women are being 
lifted. But after years of complaining 
about their second-class status, some 
women now fear the price of equality 
will be schedules as arduous as those of 
Japan's notoriously overworked men. 

“When you see the men after their 
week on the night shift, their cheeks are 
sunken in and they look thinner,” Ms. 
Haneda said. “They just look dead.* ' 
The relaxation of rules on working 
hours is but one step in a broad, slow 
transition in die role of women in Japan. 
And as often happens when women 
advance in the workplace, there is a 
conflict berween their commitment to 


health and family life, and on society. 

Although about half of all Japanese 
women are employed, making up 40 
percent of the work force, they have 
traditionally been restricted to rather 
menial jobs, often part-time, and have 
been expected to quit when they many 
or become pregnant. 

Wives care for the family, while hus- 
bands work until midnight and some- 
times transfer to distant cities without 
their families. 

But that traditional model has gradu- 


ally been breaking down. The lifting of 
restrictions on women’s working hours, 
which was approved by Parliament in 
June will take effect in two years, 
could ‘ open more opportunities for 
women, not only in factories but in 
some white-collar jobs, where working 
until midnig ht is often requi re d. 

“As long as women have the courage 
and die energy, they can advance,” said 
Yoshie Ota, director general of the wom- 
en’s bureau at the Minis try of Labor. 

But critics, among them many wom- 
en's advocates, say the new law will 
result only in new types of exploitation, 
allowing automakers and other compa- 
nies to replace full-time male employ- 
ees with part-time women workers, 
who will receive lower wages and ben- 
efits and no lifetime employment 

Others say it will .be difficult for 
women to spend more time on the job 
unless men spend more time on house- 
hold chores. 

“It is impossible to work at the same 
level as men who have a dish of rice 
waiting when they come home late.” 
said Tomoko Kawasaki, 33, who works 
for the Japanese branch of an American 
bank. “They have wives doing 
everything for them.” 

A report by the prime minister's of- 
fice notes chat Japanese men spend less 
than half an hour a day on child-rearing 
and household chores, even when their 
wives work. While Japanese women 
account for only 35 percent of paid 
working hours, the report says, they 
shoulder more than half of the total 
work of society when unpaid house- 
work is included. 

There is also concern that longer 
working hours might further discourage 
women from having children. Already, 
mostly because of economic prosperity 
but also because of the difficulty women 
face balancing jobs and family, Japan’s 
birthrate has fallen to what the gov- 
ernment sees as an alarmingly low level 
with an average woman expected to have 
fewer than 1.5 babies in her lifetime. 

In response, laws were enacted a few 
years ago to give women a year's ma- 
ternity leave and to allow women with 


young children to leave work up to two 
horns early each day. 

Still some women find working long 
hours to be a reasonable co mprom ise. 

Yasuko Matsu ma. 49. a divorced 
mother of two high school age students, 
drives a taxi from 8 AJM. until 2 A.M. 
or even 5 A.M. the next day. 

After quitting a clerical job to care 
for her mother-in-law six years ago. 
Ms. Matsuura could not get a similar 
job when she tried to re-enter the work 
force a year ago. “At my age no other 
job would offer as much salary’ ' as taxi 
driving, she said. 

The new equal employment oppor- 
tunity law is intended to strengthen 
Japan's first such law. enacted in 1985. 
That law merely uiged companies to 
“endeavor” to provide equal oppor- 
tunities in hiring and promotion. And 
there were no penalties for violators. 

"After 10 years of enforcement, we 
realize this law has no teeth,” said 
Hiroko Hayashi, professor of law at 
Fukuoka University. 

For while there has been some im- 
provement, women still earn far less 
than men. Salaries for full-time women 
workers rose to an average of 60.2 
percent of men’s in 1995, up from 56.1 
percent in 1985. 




Mnoni (fcjflgeds/riK New tntkTiam 

Japanese women are finding that greater access to jobs comes with a 
cost Yasuko Matsuura, top, drives long hours in her taxi, while Fumiko 
Haneda is one of 18 women working the night shift at Nissan. 


While the share of women in 
Japan who work is not 
su bstantia lly smaller than in 
the United States... 


...women in Jepan hold fewer 
positions of responsibility in 
the workpiece... 


...are more Fkefy to have a 
part-time job... 


...and experience a larger 
wage gap with men. 


UfUTED STATES' 


UNITED STATES 


U WTBP STATES 


Percentage of 
30 managers who ~ 


are women 


UNITED STATES 


women who 
work who are 
employed part-tone 


Worm’s pay as a 
~ — percentage of men's. 
20 including overtime 


Sources: Japan Ministry oT Labor. Japan Management and Coordination Agency; Untied States Bureau ot Labor Statistics 


Suicides by Managers Soar as Japanese Firms Downsize 


By Sandra Sugawara 

Washington Post Sen-ice 

TOKYO — Early last year, the 56- 
year-old personnel manager of a Jap- 
anese manufacturing company drove in- 
to the mountains near his home, put a 
rope around his neck and hanged him- 
self from a tree. 

He left behind a note saying, “I’m 
sony.” Family members say the pres- 
sure of having to supervise layoffs at the 
company where he had worked for 20 
years led him to kill himself. 

The man was one of 478 managers in 
Japan who committed suicide last year, 
a 16 percent increase over the previous 
year, according to figures released re- 
cently by the National Police Agency. 

Psychiatrists and job counselors here 
predict that the number of suicides will 
rise, a reflection of growing stress as 
economic restructuring forces managers 
to assume new and unpleasant roles. 

In the personnel manager's case, he 
had been asked by tire president of his 
400-person company to do something 
that would have been unthinkable in 
many Japanese operations only a few 
years ago: He was asked to draw up plans 
for laying off 20 lo 30 employees. 

The manager felt anguished over the 
order. So instead of carrying it out, he 
told the labor union in the company 
about the impending action. The pres- 
ident found out and angrily confronted 
him. As the situation intensified, the 
personnel manager took his own life. 


For years, many workplaces in Japan 
have been almost risk-free for employ- 
ees and managers alike. At medium- 
sized to large companies, everyone 
could count on seniority and lifetime 
employment Employees joined a com- 
pany when they graduated from high 
school or college. They were promoted 

-Many workers feel driven 
into a corner/ 

with others their age and received the 
same salary as their peers, and they were 
guaranteed a job until retirement 
Being told to fire someone, said an 
executive at a medium-sized company, 
would be “like being told to kick out 
your own sons.” 

But as Japan deregulates its economy 
and tears down market -entry barriers to 
foreign companies, companies are learn- 
ing that they no longer can afford to give 
their employees such protection. Compa- 
nies find that to be competitive, they need 
to lay off workers or find jobs for them at 
other companies — a practice called 
“fanning oul" Others want to offer 
some employees higher salaries and bo- 
nuses to spark creativity and lure talenL 
Other rules of the game are changing 
as well Last month, the former chair- 
man of one. of Japan's largest banks. 
Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank Ltd., committed 
suicide after he was questioned by pros- 
ecutors in connection with his bank’s 


CROSSWORD 


alleged payoffs to sokaiya , racketeers 
who demand money from companies. 

One Japanese businessman said the 
former chairman. Kuniji Miyazaki and 
others caught up in the sokaiya scandal 
were being prosecuted for behavior that, 
although illegal for a long time, was 
treated as routine a few years ago. 

Now the government of Prime Min- 
ister Ryu taro Hashimoto seems intent 
on aggressively prosecuting -cases 
against (he bank and Nomura Securities 
Co. to clean out the corruption that has 
underlain much of the business world 
here. Such changes are necessary to the 
success of Mr. Hashimoto *s efforts to 
deregulate and stimulate the financial 
maikets, analysts say. but they are a 
shock to many. 

Takashi Sumioka, a psychiatrist, said 
the number of middle-aged patients he 
sees has increased dramatically in re- 
cent years. The traditional system “has 
broken down,” he said. “But a new 
framework has not been determined 
yeL" 

American executives went through 
similar stresses while the U.S. economy 
was being restructured during the late 
1980s and early 1990s. and some com- 
mitted suicide. But today those most 
likely to kill themselves in the United 
States are not executives, but the un- 
employed and people in a handful of 
professional groups, particularly in the 
health field, according to a 1995 study 
by the National Institute for Occupa- 
tional Safety and Health. 


Masao Miyamoto, a psychiatrist who 
has practiced in both the United States 
and Japan, said U.S. executives gen- 
erally deal with stresses differently than 
their Japanese counterparts. “In Amer- 
ica. emphasis is put on independence 
and individuality,” he said, adding that 
these are concepts that can help people 
deal with job changes. While Japan has 
focused on deregulating business, he 
said, there has been no corresponding 
pressure to promote individual rights. 

“Many Japanese don't have the sense 
of ‘I have built my own career.’ ” said 
Keiichi Iwao, president of Way Station 
Co., a Tokyo-based career-counseling 
firm. '‘Those who are thrown into the 
competitive world without that sense 
have problems adjusting. Japanese so- 
ciety is entering an era of competition, 
and many workers feel driven into a 
comer.” 

Tokyo Managers Union, a union of 
middle managers, opened a hot line in 


June and October last year to take calk 
from people considering suicide. 

“We received reports of 21 cases of 
suicide and attempted suicide.” said 
Kiyotsugu Shitara. general secretary of 
the group, “so we "were aware of the 
seriousness of the problem.” 

Kiyotsuga Shitara said hot-line calls 
also indicated that more companies had 
resorted to bullying to try to get rid of 
employees. For instance, a 55-year-old 
section chief who called the hot line said 
he had been made to sweep factory 
floors and weed grass. 

Mr. Iwao is not hopeful that middle- 
aged managers and workers will be able 
to adjust to this new situation soon. 

“The changes in the employment 
system will continue for another 10 
years,” he said. “Those under 40 years 
of age are gening used to tougher com- 
petition. But those in their early 40s and 
older have not yet come to grips with the 
changes around them.” 





U.s. Adopts 

Wait-and-See 
Attitude on 
Cambodia 




• • • ; • jSg= 

. By Tyler Marshall. - 

Lvs Angeles Tunes Service . , .y -y-sg: 

WASHINGTON — ; With Cambod-^|g 
ia’s poitrieal coalition in shambles after.-^i^'- 
heavy fighting in Phnom Penh, U.S; 
ficials are delaying cboosingsides-in the>.^; 
crisis in hope of salvaging portio ns of 
international agreement that had brought ^ ^ • 
a brief peace to the Asian nation. . . . 

Thar peace ended Saturday wbepV' pi: -- 
forces loyal to one of the country’s 
prime ministers, Hun Sen. seized ki tyfy.gg 
military strongholds that had been loyu'? v 

■to Prince Norodom Ranariddh. Mr. Him 
Sen’s political rival and reluctant - 

alition partner. Under CambodiaV'v" 
political framework. Prince Ranariddh^^* 
beld the tide of first prime minister. . 

Despite evidence mat Mr. Hun Sen;s 
forces launched the attempt to oust Ins 
rival who is now in France, the Srate.^ t- 
Department spokesman, Nicholas 
Burns, repeatedly stressed Monday that . 
the United States was apt yet prepared - . 
to take sides in the crisis. jL 

Mr. Hun Sen has said he acted only #?' 
after seeing evidence that Prince Ranar- . «••>> 
iddb had secretly joined forces with the 
Khmer Rouge, the Co mmun ist gner- . 
rillas responsible for the slaughter of 
more than 1 million Cambodians when 
they ruled the country in the l?70s. , \ j 

“We prefer to continue our consulta- 
tions with both political parties today in V 

Phnom Penh and with OUT allies before 

we are able to make that kind of a final •••/;>. 
judgment — that the Paris peace accords -. -j- ip : 
have been ruptured,” Mr. Bums said. : _ 
The other nations that have poured . 
b illio ns of dollars into Cambodia since. ■?'. 
the 1991 United Nations-sponsored ac- •■' se- 
conds are taking a similar wait-and-see 
attitude. That includes Japan, which has 
been the largest single aid donor to.-. 
Cambodia, and the Association of South ' tV 
East Asian Nations. ... 

The seven-nation ASEAN had been >• 
scheduled to admit Cambodia on July V 
23. However, member nations’ foreign 
ministers are scheduled to meet Tbura- ,-T 
day in Kuala Lumpur to reassess that • 7 . 
decision. Prince Ranariddh and the . * v 
Khmer Nation Party leader, Sam Rainsy, ., I . : 
both in France, have called on the in- --V? 
temationai community nor to recognize ?■. 
a Hun Sen-controlled government. v- 

In a radio broadcast Sunday evening. v v 
Mr. Hon Sen rejected a mediation offer 
from Prince Ranariddh's father. King 
Norodom Sihanouk, as unnecessary, de- 
claring, “Everything is over.” ’ ’ • ' 

International organizations involved 
in Cambodia also hesitated to assign 
political responsibility for the recent ;. 
events, which one human rights advo- 
cate called “still so fluid and unclear that . 
it’s hard to know who’s behind what." ' 

In an attempt to clarify the situation . .-ly 
and study possible options, the U.S.- 
undersecretary of state for political af- 
fairs, Thomas Pickering, met Monday in.. : 
Washington with ambassadors of l • v 
ASEAN. r..: 

The convulsion is a serious setbackto L 
Cambodia's struggle for recovery. In- -jjjjt 
temationai donors who last week ^ f< '■ 
pledged $450 million in new devef- 


that commitment with the warning that 
continued cooperation between the two 
rival leaders was essential. 


30 People Die in Bombing on a Train in Punjab 


The Associated Press 

AMRITSAR. India — A bomb ex- 

¥ loded on an express train in Punjab on 
uesday, killing at least 30 passengers 
and wounding 67 others, the police and 
doctors said. 

The blast occurred soon after the five- 
car commuter train with 500 people on 
board left the railroad station of Bhat- 
inda, 200 kilometers ( 1 25 miles) west of 


Amritsar in northern India, said Parshna 
Singh, a local police constable. 

There was no immediate claim of 
responsibility. Punjab was the scene of a 
10-year secessionist revolt by Sikh mil- 
itants who wanted to carve out an in- 
dependent homeland. The rebellion was 
crushed in the early 1990s. but sporadic 
violence continues. 

In Tuesday's bombing. 27 people 


died at the scene and three children died 
later at the Bhatinda District Hospital a 
doctor said. He said 67 people were 
admitted, with 17 in serious condition. 
Sixteen of the wounded were children. 

The blast was the fourth in Punjab 
this year. Eight people died in the last, 
bombing, on June 6. and a total of 13 
people were killed in bus bombings in 
April and March. 


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formerly 
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BRIEFLY 


Pm*m «jr ana dmh 


Manila Halts Drive on Rebels 

MANILA — President Fidel Ramos ordered the Phil- 
ippine Army Army to stop all offensives against Muslim 
rebels on Tuesday in order to allow the resumption of cease- 
fire talks. 

"If there is Fighting, it’s very hard to talk,” a presidential 
adviser, Alexander Aguirre, told reporters. “That’s why 
the order is, ‘Don’t make anv offensive action, stay 
put.’ ” 

But if government forces are attacked they can retaliate, 
he said. 

The insurgent More Islamic Liberation From postponed 
cease-fire talks scheduled for last month after clashes with 
government forces in which the military said scores of 
rebels and 15 soldiers died. Philippine government soldiers 
also overran a major rebel base. 

The Muslims are fighting for an Islamic state on southern 
Mindanao island. f Reuters > 


©iVeie York Trmes/Edited by wm skortz. Ramos Election Plea Rejected 


01- Blue?- 

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•a Nero, e.g.: 
Abbr. 

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you?* 


Solution to Puzzle of July 8 


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□aaoBBiaaaaQiaaaa 
qqdqei aaaa aaaa 
hqqqq asaa aana 
□□bsb QaaEi aaaa 


MANILA — Attempts by a citizens group to change the 
Philippine Constitution and give President Fidel Ramos the 
chance to run for a second term in office received nearly a 
death blow on Tuesday. 

The seven-member Commission on Elections voted 
unanimously to throw out a petition by the group, called 
Pima, that called for a referendum to amend the 10-year- 
old Constitution. 

The decision was the second defeat suffered by the 
organization in its campaign to scrap the limit and allow 
Mr. Ramos to nut for re-election in the Jane 1998 polls. The 
Supreme Conn has also rejected the petition. f Reuters i 

Mourning for Kim II Sung Ends 

SEOUL — North Korea declared an end Tuesday to the 
official three-year period of mourning for the country’s 
Great Leader. Kim II Sung. But. as expected, there was no 


word on when his son. Kim Jong 11, would take over the key 
state and party posts. 

“The mourning is over," Foreign Minister Kim Yong 
Nam announced at a ceremony on a huge Pyongyang plaza 
to honor the founding father of the S talinis t state. 

Top figures vowed loyalty to Kim Jong II as he presided 
over the ceremonies marking the third anniversary of his 
father’s death, indicating that be was still firmly in con- 
trol. (Reuters) 

Australia Holds Black Panther 

CANBERRA — Australia ordered the deportation of a 
former Black Panther activist in the United States, who was 
once convicted of hijacking an aircraft. 

_ Acting Immigration Minister Amanda Vanstone said the 
visa of the black human-rights campaigner, Lorenzo Ervin, 
had been canceled and that he was being detained pending 
his deportation. 

Mr. Ervin was invited to Australia for a four-week 
speaking tour by an anarchist group. Angry People. He was 
convicted in the United States in 1969 of hijacking a plane 
to Cuba - (Reuters) 

For the Record: 

Ten people were injured in Kathmandu when dem- 
onstrators protesting against an increase in oil prices 
clashed Tuesday with the police in the Nepali capital daring 
a daylong strike. (Reuters) 

Vietnam announced that Do MuoL, the Communist 

Party chief, would visit Beijing sOon at the invitation of 

President Jiang Zemin. (Reuters) 

An Afghan pilot defected with his Russian-made Suk- 
hoi-22 jet and landed in the eastern city of Jalalabad on 
Tuesday. The Afghan Islamic Press said the pilot, identified 
as General Naqibullah Logarl had declared loyalty to the 
Islamic Taleban militia. (Reuters) 


ii 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JULY 9. 1997 


PAGE 5 : 


EUROPE 


opts 

id-See 

ion 

lia 


vlarshall 

mis Serv ice 

T With Cambod- 

1 in shambles after 
10 m Penh, U.S. of- 
nosing sides in rhe 

gmg portions of the 
that had brought 

>sian nation, 
d Saturday when 
f the country’s two 
n Sen, seized kev 
that had been loyal 
■anariddh, Mr. Run 
and reluctant co- 
nder Cambodia'* 

Prince Rananddh 

prime minister, 
inat Mr. Hun Sen's 
attempt to oust his 
1 France, the Slate 
isman. Nicholas 
messed Monday that 
is not yet prepared 
nsis. 

said he acted onlv 
'• that Prince Ranax- 
ned forces with the 
Communist guer- 
»r the slaughter of 
Cambodians when 
ry in the 1970s. 
itinue our consuha- 
ical parties today m 
th our allies before 
that kind of a final 
Paris peace accords 
" Mr. Bums said. 

» that have poured 
ito Cambodia since 
aons -sponsored ac- 
imilar wait-and-see 
es Japan, which has 
ngle aid donor to 
association of South 

ASEAN had been 
Cambodia on July 
ier nations' foreign 
lied to meet Thurs- 
rar to reassess that 
Lananddh and the 
leader. Sam Rainsy. 
e called on the in- 
ity not to recognize 
d government. 

1 st Sunday evening. 
:d a mediation offer 
iddh's father. King 
, as unnecessary.de- 
g is over.” 
anizations involved 
hesitated 10 assign 
lity for the recent 
human rights advo- 
luid and unclear that 
id's behind whai " 
clarify the situation 
r options, the U.S 
tate for political a/- 
ring. met Monday in 
ambassadors of 

; a serious setback 10 
le for recovery. In- 
who last week 
ion . in new devel- 
tus year had coupled 
ith the warning that 
ion between the two 


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Hoxha’s Widow in Albania Has Little Left but Marxist Memories 


By Jane Perlez 

■tV'i ]..!«, r.niri.Stf ;:i 1 


TIRANA. Albania — For more 
than 40 years, in Easicm Europe's 
smallest, poorest and most sealed-off 
country, ner power was unassailable. 

Like the wives of Mao in China and 
Nicolae Ceausescu in Romania. 
Nexhmije Hoxha was the wife and 
conspiratorial companion of a Sta- 
linist leader. 

She was not well known abroad. 
Bui at home, everyone knew of her 
and feared her to the bottom of their 
hearts. 

Now she spends her clays as iso- 
lated as her country used to be — 
cooped up in a few rooms in a shabby 
building, surrounded by a smattering 
of possessions, chiefly volumes oY 
communist ideology and a statue of 
her late husband. Enver Hoxha. Her 
habitat is probably the last commu- 
nist -style redoubt in her country. 

At *77, Nexhmije Hoxha " (pro- 
nounced NEDJ-mia HAW-djai is 
gray-haired, a wispy version of the 
stout woman dressed in utilitarian 
suits whom Albanians associated 
with prison camps, internal exile, per- 
secution and executions. 

For the terrible conditions in which 
the 3 million Albanians lived. Mrs. 
Hoxha expresses few regrets. 

“It was a communist state — for 


self-respect, a state has to maintain a 
standard." she said in Albanian, 
checking with the interpreter every 
now and Then, uncertain whether her 
meaning was being conveyed accur- 
ately. 

“Four thousand in 50 years isn't 
many." .she said of political prisoners 
during ihe Hoxha years. 

Kurt Kola, president of the As- 
sociation of Former Political Prison- 
ers. said documents showed that 
5/HXi political prisoners had been ex- 
ecuted and 25.000 more imprisoned 
for long periods during the 40 years of 
Hoxha rule. An additional 70.000 
were sent into exile in remote moun- 
tain regions, the association says. 

When the Communist Pany re- 
gime. the last in Europe to crumble, 
fell in 1991. Mrs. Hoxha was hustled 
off to prison, sentenced to 1 1 years for 
embezzling stale funds. 

"For 50 years 1 was what l was." 
she said, “ft never occurred to me I 
would have five years in jail.” 

She was granted an amnesty in 
December after a harsh prison’ ex- 
perience. including two years in iso- 
lation. that appears to have left its 
mark. 

In a rare note of remorse about whai 
went on under communism, she said: 
“Maybe there was an exaggeration in 
some of the sentences. Now that I have 
been in prison I can understand this." 


The effects of those years of un- 
yielding rule are strikingly evident 
here. Over the past several months. 
Albania has rumbled through (he 
worst violence and political chaos of 
any of the former communist coun- 
tries in Europe. The extreme behavior 
— the lack of trust among people, rhe 
craving for decent food after decades 
of brutal rations — lias its roots in the 
paranoia of the Hoxha period. 

Mrs. Hoxha. the daughter of a 
Muslim peasant family in the nonh. 
mei her husband when he was the 
leader of the Communist partisan 
group that fought ruthlessly against 
the Italian and German occupiers in 
World War It. 

A photograph of her wedding day 
in 1945 shows a beauty in her 20s 
dressed in a tailored shin and jacket, 
with an adoring look for her uni- 
formed husband, who had just tri- 
umphed as the new Albanian leader. 

From the 1970s on. as director of 
the Marxist-Leninist Institute in Tir- 
ana. the capital. Mrs. Hoxha spotted 
and nurtured the careers of rising 
party workers. One of her favorites. 
Fatos Nano, is now die leader of the 
Socialist Pany. which has just won 
parliamentary" elections here. 

But it was in her behind-the-scenes 
position that Mrs. Hoxha was so 
powerful, former associates say. She 
was the second-most-presiigious in- 


habitant of the Blockhouse — where 
Communist Party leaders lived in a 
style many cuts above the populace. 

She had a hand in dispatching 
prominent party members to prison, 
when one of "them. Fadil Pacrami. 
wrote asking why he had gone from 
friend to foe. Mrs. Hoxha replied, 
' ' Shut your mouth and eat the piece of 
bread we are giving you." recalled 
Elsa Ballauri, now the director of the 
Albanian Human Rights Group, who 
had knowledge of rhe goings on at the 
Blockhouse. 

Mrs. Hoxha ‘s moment of reality 
came in late 19S9. when the Com- 
munist edifice shattered in Eastern 
Europe. "We actually thought it 
could never happen here," she said. 
"But after we saw what was hap- 
pening in Romania, we thought it was 
possible.” 

She watched the television scenes 
of the executions of the Ceausescus 
with horror, she said. Her husband 
had died in 1985. and with her back- 
ing, a pany; insider. Ramiz Alia, had 
become president. 

She now seems to regret the choice. 
"He was not an Enver Hoxha," she 
said. "He didn’t have the guts to make 
the decisions he should have." 

Mr. Alia was still president when 
Mrs. Hoxha was arrested. He. too, 
ended up in prison. They had cells on 
the same corridor. 


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Nexhmije Hoxha, in her simple apartment in Tirana, has few friends, or regrets. 


Ulster Rioting Widens 
Amid a Call for Talks 


The Ami M-idlfJ Frets 

LONDONDERRY. Nonh- 
em Ireland — New violence 
erupted across Northern Ire- 
land on Tuesday with arson 
and riots in retaliation for Bri- 
tain’s decision to allow Prot- 
estant marchers to pass 
through a Roman Catholic 
neighborhood. 

A policeman was shot and 
wounded on Garvaghy Road, 
the Catholic enclave in the 
predominantly Protestant 
town of Portadown where the 
latest round of violence began 
on Sunday. 

In north Belfast, a Protest- 
ant man was shot and 
wounded in a burst of gunfire 
from the Catholic Ardoyne 
neighborhood as he stood on 
tbe street with a group of oth- 
er Protestants. The police said 
the man’s wounds were not 
life-threatening. 


In Londondeny. Mayor 
Martin Bradley said he had 
invited politicians, church 
leaders and residents' groups 
to try' to reach an agreement 
for a peaceful Orange march 
in the city this weekend. 

"I think this is a positive 
step to let people channel 
their feelings,” he said. 
"Hopefully we may get some 
sort of general consensus." 

Since disturbances broke 
out early Sunday, the police 
said there had been 776 at- 
tacks on policemen and sol- 
diers. 1,444 gasoline bomb- 
ings and 363 hijackings. 

The police also said arson- 
ists set fire to Protestant meet- 
ing halls in Portadown, BaJ- 
lycasrle and Moy. The halls, 
belonging to Orange Order, 
the long-dominant Protestant 
fraternal group, were empty 
at the rime. 


BRIEFLY 




Swiss Find Holocaust Assets 

ZURICH — Swiss banks have dug deeper and found 
10 million Swiss francs in unclaimed assets of nine 
Holocaust victims, the banking ombudsman said Tues- 
day. 

Most of the money, equivalent to $7.1 million, be- 
• .longed to a single Jewish victim, said Hanspeter Haeni. 
the ombudsman appointed by the Swiss Bankers As- 
sociation to help heirs search for assets. 

.1 He gave no names or other details of the victims or the 
heirs. . 

The assets were included among 17 million francs 
found in unclaimed accounts. Mr. Haeni said. The re- 

■ maining accounts were unrelated to the Holocaust. (AP) 

Yeltsin Retreats From Pay Vow 

' MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin backtracked 
Tuesday on his promise to pay millions of Russian 
workers their overdue wages in three months, saying 
. instead that those wages would be paid by the end of the 
year. 

.. The Itar-Tass news agency said President Yeltsin had 
promised that salary debts to rhe military would be paid in 
two months, with the debts to other workers to follow by 
Jan. 1. 

- Taking a break from his vacation. Mr. Y eltsin met with 
' First Deputy Prime Minister Boris Nemtsov, who has 
been a driving force behind recent attempts to revitalize 
the ailing Russian economy. 

..! The Russian government is locked in a cycle of un- 
collected revalues and unpaid bills. (AP) 

9 Russians Die Near Chechnya 

-.MOSCOW — ■ Nine Russian policemen died when 
their vehicle was blown up near Chechnya on Tuesday 
and a-Frenchaid organisation said one of its workers had 
been kidnapped, the third foreigner abducted in the area in 
a week! 

Five Chechens were also seized Tuesday from a bus on 
its way to Chechnya from the Caucasus region of North 
Ossetia in whai Chechnya's president called “a pro- 
vocation.” 

The incidents raised tension between Cbechny a's sep- 
aratist leaders and Moscow, which fought a military 
campaign against them from 1994 to 1996. 

A spokeswoman for Doctors Without Borders said 
unidentified kidnappers had taken Christophe Andre hos- 
tage from the group's headquarters in Nazran during die 
-night -of July 1-2. (Reuters l 

■ German's Dismissal Is Upheld 

' KARLSRUHE, Germany — Germany's highest court 
niled constitutional Tuesday the dismissal of a Berlin 
university theologian who had collaborated. with the 
former East German spy agency. 

The tiieologian, Heinrich Fink, a rector at Humboldt 
University; said the 1991 dismissal, after the Berlin Wall 
fell, violated his basic right to employment. 

The federal Constitutional Court said cooperation with 
the Ministry of State Security, known as the Srasi, unlike 
direct employment by the agency, was not reason enough 
for dismissal. But H upheld a lower court’s ruling that the 
firing was conect because Mr. pink, through his Stasi 
collaboration, hod violated the trust he enjoyed as both a 
rector and a universityteacher, (AP) 

For the Record 

A third British teenager died from injuries suffered 
Monday when, a bus canying children on a school trip in 
eastern France, veered off a road, British and French 
officials said Tuesday. ( Reuters ) 



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PAGE 6 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


llcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



pi m.isHLu wmi niK ism mirk times and hie «.binwnm fust 


On the Red Planet 


jfky Should NATO Grow? Just Look at History 

E' .. .r j.. r»n Fnrf.iOTl Rftlflflm 


While the space shuttle Columbia 
circles the Earth on a routine mission 
and Russian cosmonauts try desper- 
ately to repair their stricken Mir space 
station, the real drama in space has 
been occurring on the surface of Mars. 
There, a small robotic vehicle has been 
inching its way across the harsh, rocky 
landscape, and the Pathfinder space- 
craft has been sending back the most 
spectacular images yet of the orange- 
and-gray surface of the planet. 

The Mars mission, the first in a series 
of unmanned probes to the planet 
planned for the next decade, is em- 
blematic of a new emphasis by NASA 
on mounting smaller, cheaper missions 
whose failure would not disrupt the 
entire space program. This mission will 
cost about $266 million, roughly the 
projected cost of the forthcoming 
movie “Titanic." Yet the drama it con- 
veys seems just as palpable, at least to 
those witnessing the cheering, fist-rais- 
ing elation of space engineers at their 
near-perfect technical achievement. 
More than 100 million '•hits” were 
recorded on the mission’s Web sites in 
just two days, propelling the Mars visit 
toward becoming the largest Internet 
event in history. 

It was hard to tell from all the hype 
about searching for life on the red 
planet that this was actually a geology 
mission, designed to sample rocks and 
soils and analyze -their chemical com- 
position. The landing site was picked 
because it is believed to have expe- 
rienced a mammoth flood eons ago that 
deposited a variety of rocks from other - 
locations. It is proving even more fruit- 
ful than geologists had hoped, offering 
up a diverse array of rocks of different 
colors, textures, sizes and shapes. 


some apparently moved by flood wa- 
ters, some apparently ejected by im- 
pact from a nearby crater. 

The mission has only an indirect 
bearing on the question that has always 
riveted attention on Mars, the pos- 
sibility that life may have formed there 
— if not the proverbial little green 
men, then possibly microscopic life, 
and if not now, then possibly in the 
distant past. 

An essential precondition for life as 
we know it is water, and the fust photos 
back from the scene show such in- 
dications of water as rounded rocks, 
water marks on distant hills, possible 
dried-up puddle residues and boulders 
in orientations that suggest they were 
shoved by a flood. Where all the water 
went is a puzzle to be explored. 

Despite a few glitches in radio links 
and in unloading the rover, the mission 
thus far looks like a resounding tech- 
nical achievement, a welcome success 
after several costly Mars failures by 
both the American and Russian space 
programs. Space engineers hit their 
target with considerable accuracy and 
demonstrated the workability of a new, 
cheaper landing technique, in which 
the spacecraft hit the surface at 23 
miles per hour and bounced 50 feet 
high, its fall cushioned by air bags. 

The lasting scientific importance of 
this mission may well be the light it 
sheds on geologic processes that 
shaped not only Mars but also the rest 
of the solar system. Few scientists ex- 
pect to find any direct evidence that life 
has existed in the harsh Martian en- 
vironment until a later mission returns 
rock samples in 2005, and maybe not 
even then. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Mexican Passage 


Mexico is doing the very hardest 
thing: turning itself from a’ residual 
rampart of authoritarianism into a 
working democracy, and doing it gen- 
erally peacefully and inside a frame- 
work of consent and law. The achieve- 
ment is the larger for the fact that the 
principal political price for it is being 
paid by the party directing the change. 
That is the PRI, the longest-ruling 
party in the world (68 years ). Its leader. 
Ernesto Zedillo, has bravely freshened 
its revolutionary tradition at the ex- 
pense of ensuring its customary victory 
at the polls. 

All this climaxed at the raid-pres- 
idential-term elections on Sunday. 
President Zedillo bad opened for elec- 
tion for the fust time the country’s 
No. 2 post of mayor of Mexico City. 
The post was captured by the leading 
opposition politician, the twice and 
perhaps future presidential candidate 
Cuauhtemoc CSrdenas Soldrzano. 
President Zedillo had also launched 
rigorous electoral reforms aimed at 
leveling the playing field for parties 
running against his own. The result 
here was the PRI’s apparent first loss of 
the lower house and a number of gov- 
ernorships. 

Whar is taking place goes far beyond 
the familiar American exercise of good 
government. The PRI was not super- 
ficially comipt, it was corrupt to the 


core. That meant not only that party 
leaders and members profited as persons 
and as members of interest groups. It 
meant also the flat lack of any instru- 
ment to enforce official accountability. 
This explains much of why Mexico has 
been so badly governed: The bad leaders 
never had to answer at the polls. 

But now. of course, comes the hard 
pan: making the new system being 
built work. Mayor-elect Cardenas, es- 
pecially as be tackles entrenched cor- 
ruption. will come up against powerful 
PRI interests on the municipal as well 
as on the national scene. President Ze- 
dillo must defend his party's reformist 
elements against its reactionaries, or 
* 'dinosaurs.” Other parties, to become 


responsible, must learn their way from 
politics for show to politics for keeps. 
Passage to the deals and compromises 


of multiparty politics is bound to be 
rough. 

For Americans, the Mexican pas- 
sage offers the United States its first 
chance ever to have a second (after 
Canada.) democratic neighbor. For the 
convenience and out of habit, Wash- 
ington has long worried more about 
instability in Mexico than about demo- 
cratic progress. Now. with the Mex- 
icans setting their own democratic 
course, Americans have reason un- 
equivocally to suppon their choice. 

- THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Fund-Raising Facts 


The hearings that opened Tuesday in 
the Senate could give Americans an 
unfdtered and heretofore unseen look 
into a campaign finance system that 
cries out for exposure and a thorough 
r leansing. Members of the Senate 
Governmental Affairs Committee can 
provide that forum. Or. if they slip, 
they can follow the trail blazed by 
other recent legislative panels and in- 
dulge in headline-hunting performan- 
ces that only further demean Congress. 
We hope Chairman Fred Thompson 
and the ranking Democratic member. 
John Glenn, can keep their colleagues 
headed in the right direction. 

The role of foreign money in last 
year’s presidential race is only one of 
several serious questions to cover. Be- 
sides unearthing all the facts concerning 
possible funneUng of foreign funds into 
the campaigns of both parties, the com- 
mittee needs to determine if any national 
security breaches resulted from ques- 
tionable foreign involvement Millions 
of dollars in campaign funds have been 
returned to contributors since last year’s 
Democratic and Republican conven- 
tions. As Senator Thompson said last 
weekend, those returned checks rep- 
resented "presumably illegal campaign 
money.” At issue, as he said, is who 


knew it who should have known about 
it and whether anyone attempted to cov- 
er up line-crossing by fund-raisers. 

Some members of the Senate are 
clearly reluctant to support a full-blown 
inquiry into actions of their own party. 
And the White House, which has been 
the locus of some of the worst offenses, 
has hardly been cooperative. The rea- 
sons are understandable but hardly de- 
fensible. Even with some witnesses 
hiding overseas, taking the Fifth 
Amendment or showing a reluctance to 
appear without a subpoena, chances are 
the hearings will still produce new in- 
formation about the fund-raising scan- 
dal. In fact the more hiding out and lack 
of cooperation take place, the worse it is 
going to look for the noncooperators. 

.After witnessing so many oversight 
hearings in the post-Watergate era in 
which congressional committees strain 
to create sensational story lines and 
stage surprises, citizens have come to 
spot political gamesmanship when they 
see it. In this instance, there's no need 
for bombshells. The comminee should 
just present the facts as they have been 
gathered. Those revelations alone may 
be enough to stimulate strong public 
pressure for corrective action. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


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W ASHINGTON — The list of rea- 
sons not to expand NATO is long 
and, in some cases, troubling. An ex- 
pansion would be expensive, might an- 
tagonize Russia, might jeopardize arms 
control treaties and obligates us in the 
United States to come to the aid of 
people we hardly know in places both 
distant and unpronounceable. The List of 
reasons to expand NATO is much short- 
er but, in the end, persuasive: history. 

Twice in this century, the United 
States has fought wars in Europe, each 
time arguably because we weren’t pay- 
ing much attention and had left the 
Europeans to their own devices. World 
War! started in the Balkans, an area that 
persists as a problem, and World War II 
was triggered by the German invasion 
of Poland, a country that, if things go as 
planned, will be one of the first to join 
the new NATO. The other two are the 
Czech Republic and Hungary. 

Ultimately, other countries will fol- 
low. The French are already plumping 
for Romania, with which it has historic 
ties, and Slovakia also is expected to be 
invited to join next time around. ' 
Significantly, though, few are sug- 
gesting the Baltic states — Estonia. 
Latvia and Lithuania — which could 


By Richard Cohen 


probably use NATO protection more 
than, say, Hungary. After all, the Balt- 
ics were the very countries forcibly 
incorporated into the Soviet Union.' 

NATO enlargement — which has 
split the U.S. foreign policy commu- 
nity — reminds me of Ronald Reagan’s 
old "Star Wans” proposal. It was a 
preposterous notion that, at the time 
and probably even today, was not 
feasible. American scientists, by and 
large, did not believe in it. but that was 
not the point: The Soviets did. They 
were so enamored of U.S. technolo- 
gical know-how that they were con- 
vinced we could do what, it seemed 
clear, we could noL 

Something the same applies to 
NATO. Whatever we may think of it, in 
Central and Eastern Europe it is fer- 
vently desired. As a result, all sorts of 
lions and lambs are lying down with 
one another. To qualify for NATO 
membership, Hungary has patched up 
disputes about ethnic minority rights 
with Slovakia and Romania. The Ro- 
manians, in turn, have kissed and made 
up with Moldova and Ukraine. Who 


knows where this creeping rationality 

will lead? f 

It just could lead to the avoidance oi 
another war. .After all, it was a recent 
Hungarian prime minister. Jozset An- 
tall. who ominously referred to 15 mil- 
lion Hungarians — about 4 million 
more than live in Hungary. The rest live 
in other European countries. It was 
precisely this maddening obsession 
with ethnic minorities that helped ignite 
World War II and. much more recently, 
the fighting in the former Yugoslavia. 

Over die years, America has found it 
impossible to stay out of these conflicts. 
So, if we are going to get involved, it 
might as well be on our terms. Just 
recently, for instance, we left the Balkan 
war for the Europeans to handle — and 
they simply could not do so. The result 
was a horrible stab at genocide by the 
Bosnian Serbs. It took NATO involve- 
ment — which is to say U.S. air power 
and leadership — to end the fighting- 
For some time now, the adminis- 
tration has proceeded as if NATO en- 
largement were a foregone conclusion. 
It is not. A significant number — if not 
an outright majority — of what used to 
be called the foreign policy establish- 
ment (think tanks, important members 


of the Council on Foreign Relations,., 
etc.) is opposed, as is a growing numbecu 
of senators. That number will surely,.; 
increase when the public asks just why: i- 
American boys might have to die for*; 
Budapest. And besides, where —-and;-;: 
who — is the enemy? 

In my case, the answers to flies# 1 ' ; 
questions have never been obvious?! 
enough to convince me to instantly aitdJ* 
eagerly embrace NATO enlargement!^ 
had my reservations and have them st^? 

not the least of them being a 

itation to become obligated by treaty: to*; 
a pan of the world where then?-is 
much of a democratic tradition. Evets^jJ 
Poland was having a hard time before;* 
World War H deciding if it was a deij? 
mocracy or a military dictatorship.-The^ 
German occupation and the subs^uepf ; 
Communist era ended that debate. 

Still, though, the risks attached 
NATO expansion are ourweighed'bjt^ 
the benefits to Central Europe and; ’tag 
the end. to the United States itself. 
best we stay involved now father .than*4 
as twice before, having to get involved,^ 
later. This debate about NATO enlarge^ 
ment is really about history — about* 
making sure it stays in the past. "\;3 

The WasliiiifUon Post. . /i'Tr's 


At Long Last, Cyprus Should Seize the Chance to Heal Itself 


L ONDON — Abba Eban, the 
former Israeli foreign min- 
ister, used to say that the Pal- 
estinians never missed an op- 
portunity to miss ' an 
opportunity'. The same senti- 
ment could well be hovering 
over the Troutbeck Conference 
Center in upstate New York * 
when UN Secretary-General 
Kofi Annan sits down Wednes- 
day morning with the leaders of 
Cyprus's two main communi- 
ties to resume what is just about 
the longest-running peace pro- 
cess in modem history. 

Ir has been almost five years 
since the parties met for full- 
scale negotiations, and those 
were not years that encouraged 
the belief in any useful altern- 
ative to the UN-led process 
aimed at setting up a bizonal, 
bicommunal federation which 
is again under way. 

What is different now that 
could make it possible to suc- 
ceed after the unbroken record 
of past failures? For one thing, 
the objective now is a compre- 
hensive settlement of all aspects 
of the Cyprus problem. In the 


By David Hannay 

The writer is Britain’s special representative for Cyprus. 


past there have been attempts to 
establish an outline framework, 
to negotiate substantial confi- 
dence-building measures or to 
proceed sectorally (a “security 
and demilitarization first” ap- 
proach). None succeeded. 

Of course, aiming for a com- 
prehensive agreement — in- 
volving the drafting of a new 
federal constitution and agree- 
ing to provisions on the geo- 
graphical limits of the two 
zones, on the issues of displaced 
people and compensation, and 
on security arrangements — is 
to up the ante considerably and 
also has implications for the 
probable duration of the. nego- 
tiations. But in a situation where 
it is clear that no one will agree 
on anything until everyone 
agrees on everything, it is surely 
the only realistic approach. 

Then there is the EU dimen- 
sion. Tliis offers the longer- 
rerm prospect of prosperity and 
stability for a federal Cyprus 


but in the short term, has be- 
come another apple of discord, 
as the Turkish Cypriots have 
objected strongly to an appli- 
cation for membership made 
without their involvement. 

It is common sense that ac- 
cession to the EU preceded by a 
political settlement is the best, 
but certainly not the only, op- 
tion for both communities in 
Cyprus. As such, the EU 
timetable for opening accession 
negotiations with Cyprus 
(among others) early next year 
offers a stimulus and an incen- 
tive to conclude a settlement. 

Moreover. international 
support for the LHV-ied nego- 
tiations has never been higher, 
nor has there ar any srage been 
less evidence of any funda- 
mental conflict of interest be- 
tween the external advocates of 
a settlement. The recent ap- 
pointment of Richard Hol- 
brooke as the U.S. president’s 
special envoy is another im- 


portant signal of that support. 

This of course leaves out of 
consideration the abiding sus- 
picion and distrust between 
Greece and Turkey, but they, 
too. could benefit from an equit- 
able solution ot‘ the Cyprus prob- 
lem, making this issue more than 
a simple zero-sum calculation. 

So does this mean the success 
of these negotiations is assured? 
Far from it, alas. The legacy of 
the past the bitterness en- 
gendered by the long confron- 
tation along the Green Line, the 
distorted view of the other com- 
munity nurtured in schools and 
in the media, the pressure of 
extremists on both sides, the 
low credibility of the peace pro- 
cess — all weigh. heavily on the 
shoulders of Glavkos Klerides 
and Rauf Denkiash at the table 
in Troutbeck. 

Somehow the twin night- 
mares — that the Turkish 
Cypriots are seeking effec- 
tive separation and eventual 
secession, and (hat the Greek 
Cypriots are aiming for dom- 
ination. whatever soft words 
they use about political equal- 


ity — have to be 

In any negotiation of . this sen v§ 
it is important that all ooncem^|4 
make a hardheaded aliajysis'<tf~.4 
the potential benefits, of success;^ 
and of the costs of failure. | 
An unresolved Cyprus 


lent will be a factor of ia^bility r^j 
in a region where that cotnrnod^yij 
ity is not in shon supply 
impoverish the lives of afl tfae^J 
island’s inhabitants, even' if 
does not actually threaten thtan^| 
It will also continue to poi&pn- J 
the relationship between Tud^ J 
and the EU, and will confr&t J 
the Union with difficult . tfe- jJJ 
cisions on Cyprus’s accessionYvj 

A settlement, in contrast. wiH .>• j 
have strongly beneficial effects^ 
in all these areas. So while sue---:-: 
cess is a zero-plus game, failure - 1 
is surely a zero-minus one. , u; 

Nothing is less convincing'; 
than diplomats conveying pro- ' 
fessionai optimism, but after' 
many contacts with those prin- -■ 
cipaily concerned I believe a 
settlement is obtainable ifoaly j 
the demons of history can be. J 
overcome. . j 

International Herald Tribune. 


Europe Has a Major Role to Play in Asia-Pacific Security 


T OKYO — The sight of Brit- 
ish forces departing Hong 
Kong has doubtless reinforced 
the general impression that 
Europe has irrevocably disen- 
gaged from the security affairs 
of the Asia-Pacific region. But 
the reality is one of growing not 
diminishing involvement. Im- 
portant reasons exist, moreover, 
for Europe to play a much great- 
er role in the future. 

Though undeniably modest 
when compared to America’s 
influence, Europe’s contribu- 
tions to regional security are 
significant: 

The European Union is now a 
regular participant in the 
ASEAN Regional Forum, es- 
tablished to promote dialogue 
and mutual confidence in East 
Asia. The EU is also making an 
active effort to stabilize the 
Korean Peninsula, first with a 
pledge of $90 million to the 
Korean Energy Development 
Organization to help forestall 
nuclear proliferation and. more 
recently, with $69 million in 
food aid to the North. 


By Paid Stares and Nicolas Re gaud 


European countries have also 
been heavily involved in the 
self-defense efforts of regional 
powers, primarily with arms 
transfers but also through in- 
dustrial cooperation, military 
training programs and joint ex- 
ercises. These activities have all 
increased steadily since the end 
of the Cold War. 

During the 1990s, Britain and 
France have vigorously pursued 
defense cooperation agreements 
with countries throughout East 
Asia. Both, along with Ger- 
many, have also begun holding 
regular security dialogues with 
Japan. France, moreover has re- 
cently launched an independent 
initiative to engage China on a 
variety of security issues. 

In general, however. Europe's 
involvement in Asia-Pacific se- 
curity is a patchwork effort pur- 
sued without overarching design 
or higher coordination. This de- 
ficiency should be redressed for 
two fundamental reasons. 

First. Europe’s growing eco- 


nomic stake in the Asia-Pacific 
region demands it O'er a 
quarter of the EU’s external 
trade — nearly SI 80 billion in 
1995 — is with East Asia. EU 
members have also made sub- 
stantial investments in the re- 
gion that are now valued at 
around S75 billion. While lower 
than U.S. levels, the difference 
is not so significant and cer- 
tainly does not justify the much 
lower European security role. 

Second. European countries 
may be drawn into a major re- 
gional crisis whether they like it 
or not. This is particularly true 
for Britain and France in their 
capacity as permanent members 
of the UN Security’ Council. 
The United States is’ also likely 
to request the support of its prin- 
cipal allies should it become 
militarily engaged, something 
that would be difficult to duck 
without alienating their primary 
security guarantor. 

And lest they be overlooked, 
both Britain and France have 


More Trouble for Shangri-La 


N EW YORK — Grieve 
afresh for luckless Tibet. 
Out of the blue comes the dis- 
closure that Heinrich Harrer, 
the author of “Seven Years in 
Tibet,” was not only a Nazi 
but a sergeant in Himmler’s 
SS. Since Mr. Haner was 
friend and tutor of the young 
Dalai Lama 50 years ago, this 
long-kept secret may now be 
undeservedly used in China's 
campaign to discredit the ex- 
iled Tibetan . 

Along with the Dalai Lama, 
millions of readers of “Seven 
Years” believed its author 
was merely an Austrian moun- 
taineer who escaped to Lhasa 
in the 1940s from a British 
prison camp in India. After 
leaving Tibet, transformed by 
the Buddhist kingdom. Mr. 
Hauer devoted his life to non- 
violence and human rights, a 
spiritual journey now being 
recast into a Tri-Star film for 
release this fall with Brad Pitt 
as the Austrian climber. 

One wonders how- Tri-Star, 
a division of Sony, will cope 
with the unexpected new twist 
in the story as divulged in the 
German magazine Stem. Mr. 
Harrer, now 84. called the rev- 
elation “extremely unpleas- 
ant” but said his conscience 
was clean. There is no ev- 
idence that he took part in 
atrocities. 

This SS connection to Tibet 


By Karl E. Meyer 


is not an entire surprise. The 
Nazis were obsessed by Cen- 
tral Asia, as evident in the 
swastika, a symbol they pur- 
loined from ancient India. 
Persia and Tibet. 

According to their ethnic 
pseudo-science. Asia was the 
ancestral cradle of the Ary an 
race. By virtue of their iso- 
lation. Tibetans were deemed 
racially "pure.” and hidden 
somewhere in their mountains 
was Shambhala. an earthly 
paradise and inspiration for 
James Hilton’s Shangri-La. 

All this was of peculiar in- 
terest to Heinrich Himmler, 
the SS Reichsfiihrer. a devotee 
of the occult. Himmler re- 
cruited Dr. Ernst Schaefer, an 
SS major who had in 1934 
led a Tibetan expedition 
sponsored by a .science 
academy in Philadelphia. Dr. 
Schaefe'r returned to Tibet in 
1938 as head of an SS team. 

Dr. Schaefer’s team filmed 
and measured Tibetans but 
also prepared maps and sur- 
veyed passes for possible use 
of’Tibet as a staging ground 
for guerrilla assaults on Brit- 
ish India. This melding of 
motives is an old story for 
Tibet and contributed power- 
fully to its present agony. 

Legally closed to the out- 


side world at Chinese insis- 
tence. Tibet in the 19th cen- 
tury had the irresistible allure 
of the forbidden. 

In India, the British trained 
Hindu volunteers to pose as 
pilgrims, and some did reach 
and map Lhasa. Russia re- 
sponded by using its own 
Buddhists as “pilgrims.” and 
so alarmed the British that in 
1904 Lord Curzon. as Viceroy 
of India, sent an expeditionary 
force to subdue Lhasa and end 
Tibet’s isolation. 

For explorers, entering or 
“penetrating” Tibet was a 
passport to fame. For imperial 
powers. Tibet w;i> of strategic 
importance, given iLs location 
ana spiritual significance. The 
world refused to leave this an- 
cient and fascinating theo- 
cracy alone even as it 
struggled for greater indepen- 
dence. China finally respond- 
ed by occupying Tibet in 
1950. later forcing the Dalai 
Lama into exile. 

That something precious 
was lost is implicit in the Hein- 
rich Harrer story. Those seven 
years he spent in Lhasa as a 
close companion in a living 
god. ihe 14rh Dalai Lama, 
chosen by divination as an in- 
fant. touched even an erstwhile 
Nazi. The pity is that Mr. Har- 
rer did not tell the truih about 
himself long, long ago. 

I lie Sen Times 


made important — albeit non- 
binding — commitments to the 
security of key countries in the 
region.” notably South Korea. 
Singapore. Malaysia and 
Brunei. Some of these agree- 
ments are remnants of the Cold 
War. others vestiges of the co- 
lonial era. Regardless, they re- 
main in effect and could be in- 
voked in the future. 

In short. Europe's direct in- 
terest in promoting peace and 
stability in the Asia-Pacific re- 
gion necessitates a more active 
and coherent policy of engage- 
ment. 

Clearly this iseasiersaid than 
done. Europe's progress toward 
a common foreign and security 
policy lags well behind its as- 
pirations. The twin goals of 
deeper European integration 
and enlargement have also be- 
come all-consuming priorities 
and thus leave little enthusiasm, 
to say nothing of additional re- 
sources. for bold new initiatives 
beyond Europe. 

The trick, therefore, is to do 
more with similar levels of ef- 
fort. Pulling it off emails better 
coordination and collaboration 
among the mosi interested 
states. Practical steps to this end 
include the following: 

• Establish a high-level con- 
tact group for Asia- Pacific. This 
would exchange assessments, 
discuss initiatives and generally 
build consensus on such matters 
as responding to a Korean crisis, 
engaging China, defusing con- 
flict over Taiwan and defining a 
common arms .sales policy. 


• Make European paiticipa- ■ 
tion in the ASLAN Regional- 
Forum more effective. The ; 
EU’s current weak represen- : ' 
ration needs to be reformulated ■■ 
and room found for British and: 
French membership, if only on Y 
a rotating basis. 

• Bolster Europe’s military^* 
options and contingency plan-^ 
ing. Britain and France now de-.^ 
ploy modest forces at irregnlaj.^; 
intervals to the region. By cocth Y 
bining their assets for joint ex-1 i 
ercises, a more meaningful ? 
presence would be possible-;^ 
without additional cost. Forces-' 
from other European countries Ci 
could join them if desired 

• Develop a coordinated dia-' J 
logue with Japan, China andtheM; 
United States on Asia-Pacific^,* 
security. By building onexistingfj 
ties. Europe can play a useful^ 
moderating role in fostering aV: 
stable trilateral relationship^ 
among these three powers, a proY^ 
cess that is absolutely critical to,- ! 
the equilibrium of the. region. 

Europe’s colonial presence Vi 
in East Asia is indeed nearly^ 
over — Macau's reversion nrlSu 
1999 will end ii finally — but'-jj 
the stakes are too high and the : ’ y 
world too small for it to stay 
of the security affairs of thejs 
region. ’ 

Mr. Stares is a senior 
search fellow and Mr. Regaudw^i\ 
a visit! hr research fellow 
Japan Institute of hiiernatioifof^\ 
Affairs in Tokyo. They conai&%^ 
tiled this comment to the 
remain mol Herald Tribune.-*/: 


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JNOUR PAGES: 100, 75 .AND 50 YEARS AGOSl 

1897: Ghoulish Frisson pension costs the world in tte'^ 


PARIS — Rarely has there been 
a greater sensation in the 
crowded Poisson iere quarter of 
Paris than yesterday morning 
{July 8] when four young worn' 
en were found dead in a small 
room having suffocated them- 
selves with the fumes of a char- 
coal stove. The incident formed 
the sole topic of conversation 
among it population largely 
composed of the class for whom 
a hcan suicide is ten times more 
interesting than the most excit- 
ing jeui licit m in ihe halfpenny 
paper which they daily devour. 

1922: Labor's 'Hors' 

PARIS — - [The Herald says in 
an Editorial:) That would be an 
interesting calculation which 
Would afford a companion of 
the intrinsic wealth lost by labor 
strikes and that wasted in wars. It 
can scarcely be doubted that un- 
W'lse labor hy its unjustified sus- 


pension costs the world In the';* 
course of a given normal period j 
as much as the average costs or r 
wars, if nor more. The strike^isi^ 
war of a kind, because, if naW 
satisfied, it would disrupt socirfV* 
and scatter to the winds all tb&L 
merited gains of civilization! 

'•".i.'.i® 

1947: Roswell Craft 

WASHINGTON — Brigadie^ 
General Roger Ramey said to-y 
night [July 8] that a baaerekjv 
object which had preyioni^' 
been described as a flying dislfii 
found near Roswell, New Mexrr 
ico. is being shipped by air to 
Army Air Forces research cehterf* 
ar Wrighr Field, Ohio. Generate! 
Ramey described the object as of ^ 
“flimsy construction almost li&£ 
a box kite." It was so badBg: 
battered that he was unable - ® 
say whether ir had disk fonty* 
Nothing in this construction “ii 
dicated any capacity for speed 
and there was no evidence of 
power plant Air Forces said.: • 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 199 



OPINION/LETTERS 


rtory 


'oreign Relations 

avowing number' 

irpber will sureh 
ibhc asks ju Sl why 
m have to die fn r 
tes. where — wd 


Real U.S. -Mexico Affairs 


Are in the People’s Hands 


By Step lien S. Rotsenfeld 


Take the President-Bashing 
Off America ’s Front Page 


PSYCHICS TELL INDEPENDENT COUNSEL 





WEEKLY WORLD GLOBE NEWS 


WEE mjBBtll 


answers to these 
been obvious 

ne to instantly and 
TO enlargement, | 
and have them still 

■hem being a hes- 
ligated by treaty r,> 
where there U'noi 
tic- tradition. Ev en 
i hard time before 
wg a it was a de- 
y dictatorship. The 
and the subsequent 

d that debate, 
risks attached to 
re outweighed by 
ral Europe and. i n 
d States itself. It i s 
d now father than 
Ing to get involved 
>ut NATO enlarge- 
t history — abo ui 
in the past. 

V<vi Post. 


W ASHINGTON - A quick 
dip into Mexico leaves a 


tl Itself * 


ive to be banished 
legotiation of this MlM 

cant that all concerned 

irdheaded analysis ,,| 

ial benefits of sucee^ 
costs of failure. 
;solved Cyprus prob- 
; a factor of insubi lu\ 

1 where that comnW- 
l short supply and u ill 
h the lives of a!) the 
-lhabitants. even if n 
ctually threaten them. 

<0 continue to poison 
□ship between Turkev 
iU. and will confront 
n with difficult de- \ 
Cyprus's accession 
ment. in contract, u ill 
lgly beneficial effect , 
e areas. So while sm- 
ero-plus game, failure 
1 zero-minus one. 
g is less convincing 
imats conveying pro- 
optimism. "but after 
itaers with iho>e prin- 
ancemed I believe a 
t is obtainable if only 
ins of history can he 


■returning American uncertain 
.whether the two countries can 
■soon get a grip on the peculiar 
."tensions lying between them. The 
-problem is not simply that some of 
Mheir interests rub. which they do. 
It is that while the governments 
;set ihe framework of relations, the 
.content is greatly affected by de- 
termined individual aetors. many 
ol' them regarded as criminals, 
■who are not easily brought under 
official control: Mexican job 
•seekers and their American cm- 
.plot ers, Mexican drug traffickers 
■and their American customers. 

' The two governments do deal 
with each Other, but Mexico may 
be the only country where foreign 
policy, usually the realm of go\- 
■emments. is so thoroughly 
;• ’privatized" on both sides. High 
■policy, including the critical core 
.of the terms of trade, investment 
■and debt, is in a few official hands, 
but low policy is in millions of 
individuals' hands. This is what 
makes it hard to grasp. 

The declaratory foreign 
policies of the United States and 
Mexico originate in shared in- 
terest. cooperation and respect. 
Bui the gritty daily stuff of foreign 
policy takes life from the fact of 
their common border. It is the lone 
land border between one of the 
big. rich democracies and a Third 
World place. Two thousand miles 
(3;2tiO kilometers) long, it is dif- 
ficult politically as well as prac- 
tically to police. 

Mexicans may have their na- 
tionalistic nightmares of a reborn 


or continuing American imperi- 
alism. Americans live with a kind 


tuiruil Ht i Tnr.,- 1 , 


curity 


of reverse, subterranean anxiety 
. over a Mexican collapse. The bor- 
j der renders Americans perman- 
ently vulnerable to the demo- 
graphic, economic and social 
consequences of this specter. 

- In terms of culraraJ attitudes, 
moreover. Americans see the bor- 
der as a line on the map to be 
protected by the law, and tell 
themselves that they have a 
‘ —right” to get control of it. 

But Mexicans see the border. as 
an arbitrary and confiscatory line 
that Americans unfairly drew in 
the 19th century. That line now 
"criminalizes a social problem.” 
the problem of what Americans 
call ‘ * illegal * ’ Mexican migration, 
die opposition leader Cuauhtemoc 


Cardenas Soldrzano told me. 
Mr. Cardenas won the important 
Mexico City mayoral election Iasi 
Sunday. 

If migration issues are relent- 
less and unending, then drug is- 
sues are sharp-edged and unfor- 
giving. They rub raw a connection 
that is already permanently agit- 
ated by migration questions. 

Some part of the drug traffick- 
ing in Mexico arises from rhe play 
of big money in a poor society and 
can perhaps be diminished over 
time by economic development. 
The more objectionable but also 
the more treatable part of the traf- 
ficking arises from corruption in 
the Mexican police and judiciary. 
The government of President Ern- 
esto Zedillo represents an honest 
reformist streak, but his efforts are 
mired in historical and structural 
corruption in the ruling parry. 

The answer is to put the gov- 
ernment in the charge of a party 
that is not corrupted by power be- 
cause it has never known power. 

Meanwhile, we Americans 
have got to get our heads straight 
on the drug problem. Let us de- 
mand ever-higher law-enforce- 
ment performance by the Mexican 
authorities. But lei us realize there 
are other engines to the trafficking 
train. There would be no problem 
to speak of if American demand 
did nor rempr and corrupt aJl the 
supplier and transit countries. 

Even as we scold the Mexicans 
for failing 10 close the Mexican 
networks that deliver drugs to the 
United States, we have failed to 
come anywhere near closing the 
American networks that actually 
distribute the stuff to U.S. con- 
sumers. We have the substantial 
advantages of affluence and in- 
stitutional capacity. Yet we can- 
not do the task we berate the Mex- 
icans for failing to do. 

Mexican providers of illegal 
drugs and labor, American con- 
sumers of both commodities: 
These are the most politically vol- 
atile agents in the broad stream of 
relations between the United States 
and Mexico. The citizen, rather 
than the official base of these trans- 
actions, makes them" hard to get at. 
Still, the U.S. interest in checking 
the flow of drugs and regulating 
and making more humane the flow 
of workers is overwhelming, and is 
unquestionably consistent with the 
Mexican interest, too. 

The Washington Post. 


By George McGovern 


L OS ANGELES — Bashing the pres- 
ident is one of the oldest' American 


J— /idem is one of the oldest American 
spoils. From the beginning, the press corps 
and the public have considered a silting 
president a legitimate punching bag for 
unloading current frustrations and resent- 
ments. Even presidents later memorialized 
by histoiy have been pilloried while in 
office. 

.After eight years of absorbing the barbs 
of his critics! President George Wash- 
ington said. "I had rather be in my grave 


hesitate 10 criticize presidential policies 
with which I disagreed — especially those 
centering on our' ill-advised involvement 
in Vietnam. 1 believe that conscientious 
criticism is essential to our democracy. 

But when criticism takes the form of 


Starr 







destructive personal attacks on the pres- 
ident’s private life or of mean-spirited, ill- 
founded condemnations of his character 
and purposes, it nor only undermines our 
democratic system but also adds to the 
cynicism about government 

I believe that President Bill Clinton and 
his wife, Hillary, have been subject to 


MEANWHILE 


than endure another four years in the 
White House." 

Thomas Jefferson was widely assailed as 
an atheist and a stooge of the hated French 
Jacobins — the Bolsheviks of that era. His 
critics repeatedly charged that he was plan- 
ning to confiscate and' destroy all Bibles. 

Abraham Lincoln was verbally assas- 
sinated long before his death from an 
assassin’s bullet. 

As a youth. / grew up with rhe most 
popular, perhaps greatest, president of the 
20th century, Franklin Roosevelt. But he 
was constantly assailed during his long 
and difficult years in the White House as 
he led the nation through the Great De- 
pression and World War 11. Eleanor 
Roosevelt — perhaps the most notable 
first lady in our history — w as pilloried at 
(east as savagely as her husband. 

In recent years. President Harry Truman 
has become a favorite of both Democratic 
and Republican politicians, who love to 
quote his eanhy observations. But as a 
sitting president, he was so continuously 
branded a failure that almost no pundit gave 
him a chance of being elected in 1948. 

As a longtime U.S. senator. I did not 


more of this mean-spirited personal attack 
than anv presidential couple in memory. 


than any presidential couple in memory’. 

I enjoy the humbling distinction of a 
reputation for public integrity and faith- 
fulness 10 my convictions.'My admiration 
for Mr. Clinton is the highest when he is 
fighting for what he believes is righrforrhe 
nation, rather than listening to the ad- 
monitions of others. 

Having been elected and re-elected to 
the presidency and now holding an im- 
pressive public approval raring. Mr. Clin- 
ton. in my judgment, has not been treated 
fairly by his critics. 

Year after year, we have been offered 
massive coverage of the so-called White- 
water scandal. But how- much of a scandal 
is it? 1 can only conclude that the whole 
thing seems a minor business failure w ith a 
few 'local Arkansas political overtones. If 
there was any corruption involved, it cer- 
tainly didn’r enrich the CJinrons. We have 
had presidents who became rich in public 
office; Mr. Clinton is not one of them. 

As for the president’s alleged sexual 
ventures, similar charges were directed at 
Presidents Jefferson, Harding. Eisenhower, 
Kennedy and Franklin Roosevelt. In each 
case, most of the public — including me — 



simply concluded that such personal mat- 
ters were none of our business. 

Let’s continue to debate and criticize 
public policy. But how about a truce on 


of our children and America’s role in the 
world to Page 1. 


personal attacks on the president and the 
first lady? Let’s move Whitewater and 


first lady? Let’s move Whitewater and 
sexual speculation to the back page or the 
gossip columns and move the well-being 


The writer, a U.S. senator from South 
Dakota from 1963 to 1981 . wur the Demo- 
cratic presidential nominee in 1972. He 
contributed this comment to the Los 
Angeles Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Seamy Politics 


Regarding "New Whitewater 
Twist: Prosecutor Looks Into 
Clinton's Sex Life" ( June 26): 

Is it any wonder that Kenneth 
Starr’s office is dredging up any 


story it can to give credence to its 

own The Rpnnhlirans 


own existence? The Republicans 
have used the Whitewater special 
prosecutor as a political weapon 
against President Bill Clinton 
from the beginning. 

We Americans are increasingly 
prone to "bread and circuses" 
politics with a touch of scandal 


to titillate our fantasies. Serious 
debate bores us — we pre- 
fer seamy gossip to truthful an- 
swers to tough questions. Politics 
play to our dysfunctional puritan 
values. 

In short, we have the govern- 
ment that we have chosen. 

JOSEPH M GUERRA. 

Tnofa. Portugal. 


Marijuana Report 


huge doses of THC, marijuana’s 
active ingredient, somewhat con- 
trived? 

Let’s face it. marijuana does 
affect the brain's pleasure centers 
— why on earth else would so 
many use it? This exercise of 
pointing out the obvious, and then 
blowing it out of proportion, 
smacks of politics, not science. 

R. VLAHOS. 

Arlington. Virginia. 


Regarding ” Addled ? Could Be 
the Marijuana" (June 28): 

Isn’t giving laboratory rats 


When it was discovered that 
strenuous exercise stimulates the 
release of endorphins similar to 


opiates (hence the "runner's 
high”), was running denounced 
as a "gateway'’ activity that 
primes the brain for other drugs? 
Of course not. 

While the discovery of the 
mechanism by which marijuana 
acts on the brain is interesting, 
it does not change what is al- 
ready known about the drug. It is 
nonaddictive. presents no danger 
of overdose and can be discon- 
tinued easily and without ill ef- 
fect 

LYNN CAROL. 

San Diego. 


Offensive Cartoon 


The cartoon depicting a Swiss 
banker (Opinion. July 4 J is prim- 
itive and vindictive. * 

All those self-appointed critics 
of wartime Switzerland should 
bear in mind that the Swiss 
sheltered thousands of refugees 
who made it across the border 
without a visa. 

Also, cuckoo clocks are nor 
typical of Switzerland but of the 
Black Forest region of Germany. 

HANS E. DULDNER. 

Vienna. 


BOOKS 


ropean pariicipj- 
,SEAN Regional 
effective. The 
weak represen- 
* be reformulated 
id for British and 
srship. if onJ> c«n 


urope’s military 4b 
tnringency plau- 
1 France now de- 
>rces at irregular 

region. By com- 
sets for joint ex- 
ore meaningful 
ild be possible 
trial cost- Forces 
ropean countries 
n if desired, 
coordinated du- 
m. China and the 
on Asia-P*’U |1 ' 

tiding on exists 
in pla' a useful 
[e in fostering a 
ral relationship 
ree powers, a P**’’ 
oluteiv critical if & J 
1 of the region, 
ilonial 

is indeed « iear - 
u’s reversion IU 

it finally -* 
too high am 
Iforittosrayo" 

V affairs of «" e 


GLENN COULD: 

■The Ecstasy and 
Tragedy of Genius 

■Bv Peter F. Ostwald. 
Illustrated. 368 pages. S29.95. 
W.W. Norton & Co. 


Reviewed by Christopher 
Lehmann-Haupt 

P ETERF. OSTWALD met 
Glenn Gould after a con- 
ceit Gould gave in San Fran- 
cisco on Feb. 28, 1957. The 
.encounter was typical of how 
'the Canadian pianist made 
friends, as Ostwald explains 
in his intriguing new book, 
"Glenn Gould: The Ecstasy 
and Tragedy of Genius.” 
Dazzled by Gould’s perfor- 
mance, Ostwald. himself a 
skilled violinist, made his way 
jo the young star’s dressing 
room. There he found Gould 
wearing too much clothing in a 
room that "was stiflingly hot 
"and "muggy, like. a sauna." 
Gould seemed avid for corn- 
party; and eager, to talk. The 
two spent a long and stim- 
ulating evening together, and 
despite Oswald's- feeling that 
Gould .wanted both contact 
and isolation, they developed a 
lively friendship that lasted for 
two decades, until five years 
before Gould 1 died in 1982. 


When Otto Friedrich's oth- 
erwise worthwhile "Glenn 
Gould: A Life and Vari- 
ations” appeared in 1989. 
Ostwald was not "entirely 
satisfied,” he writes, “with 
the way Friedrich had 
bandied the medical aspects 
of Glenn’s problems.” 

As a professor of psychiatry 
and the author of two psy- 
chobiographies, "Schumann: 
The Inner Voices of Musical 
Genius” and "Vaslav Nijin- 
sky: A Leap Into Madness," 
Ostwald derided to. "ap- 
proach Gould by combining 
personal knowledge with bio- 
graphical data gathered since 
his death.” 

Going back to Gould's in- 
fancy, Ostwald cites an an- 
ecdote about a family doctor 
who remarked on the baby's 
unusually active arm and fin- 
ger movement: "That boy is 
going to be either a physician 
or a pianist — one or the 
other." To which Ostwald 
adds with a sardonic edge that 
Gould fulfilled both predic- 
tions. Besides becoming one 
of the century’s great key- ' 
board performers, he tried 
"to be a sort of medical ex- 


edies, thus managing to get 
through many immediate 
crises but probably damaging 
his health in the long nra.” 

Ostwald deals with both 
these careers. His view of the 
musical one is more or less 
routine, a rehearsal of Gould’s 
wide-ranging, sometimes per- 
verse tastes in composers, and 
a review of Gould's agonizing 
withdrawal from the fearful 
concert hall to the cozier con- 
fines of the recording studio. 

What is fresh here is his 
theory that Gould’s fre- 
quently willful nusimeiprer- 
ation of familiar works had 
two possible causes. One 
might have been a simple 
competitive desire to distin- 
guish himself from and out- 
perform hjs rivals. 

The other might have been 
Gould's unusual ability to 
sense the interior structure of a 
composition rather than its ex- 
ternal form, which explains 
why he often practiced a piece 
while masking its sound with 
the noise of a vacuum cleaner 
or a radio. 


suffered genuine physical af- 
flictions, a stiff neck, a sore 
back, dizziness, numbness in 
his fingertips, hypertension. 


DO YOU LIVE IN 


premature aging. The stroke 
that killed him at the age of 50 


T" 1 HE portrait of Gould as a 
1 physician trying to dia- 


pert," repeatedly diagnosing 
- himself, consulting numerous 


physicians and experiment- 
ing “with all kinds of rem- 


BESTSELLERS 


N** York Times 


This Ini sSised an repons from more 
linn 2.0W taoJaiacft throughout the 
UnwiT Sum .West*- on lisrare not 
neemaiiK aoKcapve. , 


FICTKJV 


- I PLUM ISLAND, by 

. ..Nriswi DcMilhr 1 . 5 

2 FAT TUESDAY, by . . 

-• Sandra Bnnui 9-- 2 

i THE PARTNER, by John 

Giuharoi.j 2' 17 

. 4-tip -15LANT>. by Are* - .. 

-RnwiSkJJom .. 5. 4 

S LONDON, bv ' Edward 

•Riiihrriuid 8 '5 

<THE .. PRESIDENTS 
• DAUGHTER by Jad, 

. Hiomns - 5 

7 PRETEND YOU DON'T 
SEE HER. by- "May 


2 ANGELA'S ASHES, by 

Frank McCoun — A 42 

3 THE BIBLE CODE, by 

Michael Drosmn..- 5 3 

4 BRAIN DROPPINGS, by 

George Carlin 6 ? 

5 JUST \S I AM. by Bitty 

Graham. — — 1 & 

6 THE GIFT OF FEAR, by 

Gavin <ie Becker 1 

7 INTO THE STORM, by 

Torn Clancy *nh Fred 
Franks Jr. 3 5 

S MIDNIGHT IN THE 
GARDEN OF GOOD 
AND EVIL, tar John 

Bne&dt ■■■■- 10 *55 

9 CONVERSATIONS 
WITH GOD: Book 1. bv 
. Neat PtmaW Watscfi.. - 12 29 
10 THE PERFECT STORM. 


X physician trying to dia- 
gnose himself is fascinating. 
As Gsrwald portrays him, the 
pianist was stupendously 
neurotic: phobic about germs, 
human contact, cold air and 
all manner of diseases he ima- 
gined were assailing him. 

To the extent that the au- 
thor offers an explanation, it 
is an Oedipal one. Gould 
shunned his gruff father, re- 
pulsed by the dead animals 
required for the family’s fur 
business. He never escaped 
his enveloping mother, whose 
bed he shared at night as late 
as his adolescence. He ab- 
sorbed her critical views of 
his piano playing and projec- 
ted them onto the concert 
audiences he came to loathe. 

Yet at the same time Gould 


that killed him at the age of 50 
was hardly imaginary. 

Ostwald hints that Gould's 
well-being was threatened 
from an early age. speculating 
that the motion of his arms , 
and fingers in infancy may 
have been a symptom of As- 
perger disease, "a variant of 
autism." But ultimately the i 
author leaves us with a sense 
that Gould reflected some 
sort of perverse efficiency in 
nature. His genius led to bis 
grotesque Dess, which in turn 
accounted for his genius. 

The only drawback to this 
portrait is that it reveals too 
linle of the Gould who was so 
brilliant in all his facets, from 
his witty conversation to his 
compulsively comic play- act- 
ing, which the author inter- 
prets as Gould’s way of dis- 
sipating his sometimes near 
murderous hostility toward 
people. Having shaped his 
text around the excesses of 
Gould’s character, Ostwald is 
forced to repeat several of his 
theories, especially the ones 
concerning Gould’s suspi- 
cious attitude to live auai- 




i ^.gnbunc. 





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ences. 

Such narrative problems 
might have been solved bad 
the author not been struggling 
with terminal cancer while 
working on this biography. 
He died shortly after com- 
pleting this book last year. 

This provocative psycho- 
biography shows how contra- 
dictorily Glenn Gould went 
about fashioning his remark- 
able legend. At the same time, 
it deepens the mystery of his 
peculiar genius. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1997 


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Gnat Uanbrft-e Uotkxi - fj* 3T> 

Kxrrflrnt L ran- J lulu l>*rni |hwud>ilily 
3(H> l'^.r|iunil-' Xinmnl- Hit. I prnwln^ 
On. (rtjrl+n Of-|>r>rtiinily 

IeL (SIX) 73Z-7UO- Bn. ISIS) TtStSZS 


OFFSHORE BANK 


with correspondent relationship. 

Class A commercial license. 
Immediate delivery. PS $60,000. 

Nassau, Bahamas 

Tel: (242) 394-7080 far. (242) 394-7082 
Agents Wanted Worldwide 


INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISES 


RETAIL INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 



The Museum Company is now acceptm 
European licenses including Germany, 
Scandinavia and the Low Countries. Foi 


is now accepting applications for (he 
France, Italy, Spain, 
or each country we are 
prepared to negotiate an exclusive license for a single franchisee 
to operate stores under our trademark offering our exclusive 
museum-related merchandise. As the world's leading retailer of 
museum reproductions, we look forward to offering our unique 
assortment to a European public sophisticated about art and 
demanding of high quality merchandise. 

The Museum Company operates 94 shops worldwide including 
locations in the USA, Canaria, Great Britain, Japan and Korea. 
The stores range from 100-400 square meters and feature fine 
museum reproductions from more man 200 museums around die 
world including jewelry, sculpture, stained glass, giftware, textiles 
and paper goods. The high quality of our exclusive art reproduc- 
tions, presented within our classic prototype shop design, 
continues to drive our sales and profits. 

We look for licensees with a strong background in retail man- 
agement and commercial real estate, as well as the financial 
capital necessary to expand the chain throughout the nation or 
territory to he franchised. 

Please address serious and qualified inquiries to the attention of 
William Edwards [Vice Chairman) at 

Museum 

COMPANY 

695 Route 46 West, Fairfield, NJ 07004, USA 
Fax: (201) 244-4280 



Setting New Standards For The Industry 


'I chose a BMS Technologies franchise because it is 
a business Ireland simply needed. With ihe 
technology and training we received, along with the 
tremendous ongoing support, we are now m a 
position to offer a service dial is unrivaled. In the 
fields of Insurance Restoration and Indoor, Air Quality, 
we are setting new standards for the industry.” 

"BMS Technologies offers a fantastic opportunity to 
grow a substantial business in several diuerenl 
markets. Already a household name across many 
pans of the world. Europe 
is set to take off!" 

For mar afimaiito astt MUimsat HmtK T^ cJinotogieM 

1-817-332-1575 

FAX: 817-332-5349 us* 


Dominic Fitrpalciclc 

Ireland 


Visit Our 
Web Site At; 
vww.steoiTiaric.com 


JUST PUBLISHED 

International Herald Tribune's 
International Franchise Guide 
INTERNATIONAL MASTER FRANC HISE 
& .AREA DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

Thi- dpfiniiive guide dc\otcd solely to international franchising. 
Detailed, up+o-dale profiles on the worlds leading international 
frunrnison*. 17a page*. L SS34.95 (includes shipping) 

Srndm 1HT Guide. P.O. Bos 12488. Oakland. CA 04604. Cadi. Money Order. Visa 
or M/C (*end Ain. *. Exuir. Dae & AirprmnJ Signature)." 

Tel: (5 JO) 83U-5477 or Fax: (HOI £473*45 
E-Mail: sourcebookiS 1 earth link.net Website www.frandruseind.com 

Hcndb Z^flftl Eribunc 

IM «Mgg«THg, VT+Mtu+i 


AFC Enterprises. 


2,300 locations in 
27 countries. 
Make yours next! 

<^lp> 


800-848-8248 ext 81 

Ot 770-353-3363 ext 81 


) Mum-uni; tenana agreement preferred. ] 


CONTROL 

AN ENTIRE COUNTflV WITH 


Master Rights Opportunity 
Tra^teh^meNalte^awEyctBin 
rih over 400 batons in ISranfries. 
mvJravnflcartitandsse 
See schedule b meal Madras 
Stephanie Abrams. Exec V. P. 


fmport/Export 


BUYING OUTLET FOR THE LARGEST 
Tiatfing Companies Branded & Usury 
goods Fragrances/cosmetics. watches, 
pens, eftnaware, crystal, haute®, 
apnea frames, smgteses. fine ogara 
Grm Tag Heuer Cartier, wwtgewood 
Soaravsb Herend PerrBaamo. Pm da. 
Hemes, ere Please a Max- TRACING 
DESK Tef USA ^-1-212-807-0973 Fax. 
USA -1-212-007-5058 At calls treated 
wan urns ctiridtHxe. 


DOMINiCAH CIGARS 9 styles, tend 
rolled volume purchases only 
Teietor. USA-954-474-2066 ' 


EXPORT AMERICAN SUPERMARKET 

* consumer mods SWkons m ready 
sock. Far 972 3 68178W 


N0AMEX INC. 

LARGE GRADER OF USE D CLOT HING 
For women ■ tn®i - entoren 
PREMIUM & DOMESTIC 0UAUTY 
DENU JEANS & OBflM JACKETS 
Export tsg hales, smal bales, bores. 
AFRICA ASIA. EUROPE. MID-EAST, 
CENTRAL S SOUTH AMERICA. 
TeL7IB-34M27B Fa*r7>E»-342-2258 US 


FRENCH WINES: Quality Fran* wires 
or otter a outstanding prices t Brand 
red/white from St 15/boflle. Sparkfings 
(ram SI 50| tn 20 ft container For 
quotes' FTU France .33(0)1 4640 0693 


GENERIC CIGARETTES. American 
blend tobacco, lowest prices private 
labeling avalabte FAX USA i (964) 
474-3086 


RELIABLE SUPPLY - Constructor m- 
leto&cemwfHeeL Seafcorf-frnzeivdted 
CorsumaWe/sundiy products Please 
contact INTRACO Group of Companies 
[Ctwa-Tattran+tong Kong-Maayaa-Sai- 
gapore. ontti Head Office in ihe Phffip- 
pmes) Tels (63-2) 7213222 7217501: 
7225362 Fan 163-31 722715B 


KCHAMCAL SPARE PARTS - 
COUPON 3TTS. at models lor rrotw ve- 
nds ; yards, aeronarais: wrttwde ex- 
press defivery cwjj tx*r lo nerntze ihe 
requessta va Cajr * 3S-43 


■ 434 32692 


LEVI 50V5. Used and Nw Quafiy 
leans direct tram the USA. Honest and 
fiefiabfa Fax 5U3S5-0T43 USA 


SHALL ARMS AlHUNmONMUTARY 

equipnen) and supplies, bust prices, 
■awn* only FAX USA +95W74-3KS 


EMPIRE STATE BUILDING 
ADDRESS 

Gain instant cradlbiUty. 
Establish a NY presence in 
the world's best-known 
building. Maflracehw d. phone 
onrawnnQ, OOntOfenoe 
room. fumWied mini-offices. 
EMMIE STATE OfflCC WMCES 
TH: 20,736402* FAX- ZIHH-T135 


WORLD TRENDS: 

if >au want the \«.-rv lies lre.lvK.-r 
cunventiuml Intel lip*? rwc 
Gnntjcr 

THE SPECIAL OFFICE 
UK Fax: 01608 650 5+0 

Nr. pn-p.iy.tndi. n*'i .iuigtr 
hut **>i w iuld Iram (he 1 jCI> 


BG SEEKS ACTIVE PARTNERS 

for creation of highly 
profitable projects, 
opening iBC centers in 
USA, AKA, AFRICA & EUROPE 
AS new concepts & 
exceptional products. 

Teh PARTS +33 (0)1 41 05 07 06 
Pax: PARIS +33 (0)1 47 58 55 1 7 


We sell the following brands 
of watches: 

Cartier, Rofex, Omeea, Cued. 
Piaget, Tag Heuer. Breitling 
and many others. 
International supplies: 

Fax: + 31 (0) 20 63M394 m 
The Netherlands 


INVESTORS 


Wanted! Investors for 

TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDECINE 

proreci n &»(nrtanl IAn mwnsi USS 100.003- 
Tbrafsharaiawai i Wo lixamanw 
YN 3snm d braam. ar?*9« Chnacarods! 
For free brochure or advice: 
Panoonsult Trust Corporation LTD. 
Norastr. 7 . 8004 Zunch. Switzerland 
Fax: +41 1 491 65 75 


READERS ARE ADVISED 

that the International 
Harold Tribune cannot be 
held responsible for lass or 
damages incurred as a 
result of transactions stem- 
ming from advertisements 
which appear in our 
paper, H is therefore rec- 
ommended that readers 
make appropriate inquir- 
ies before sending any 
money or entering into 
any balding commitments. 


USED LEVI 501 JEANS - All cotare & 
grades. For price bst FAX BOi-561-3849 
USA. RECYCLEWEAR 


Business Opportunities 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
IMWGRAT10N/P ASS PORTS 

BartarioAcawarg^eoMarBi 
vat PsflsiiatiofHnvdKirq 
Maif-Ptene-rw Servm Wavtiwe 

Aston Coroofate Trustees 

19 Ped Road, Douglas. Isle of Man 
Tef: +4J (fll 1624 62691 
Fax: +44 (0) 1624 G25126 

London 

Tet +44 (D) 171 233 1302 
Fax: +44 [0} 171 233 1519 

E Mai: aston@enterprise.net 


CIGAR DfSTRBUnON 
Exdusws country reoresemabon and tfc- 
tteuUor loubCe USA) is wanted wrtF 
wide for one of tie very best pranum ci- 
gar brands. Conlacv Oiiveros Cnara 
FAXfUSA) 941 594 9260. 


SWISS KNOW HOW COMPANY we« 
agerts wtndwOe Mora than 30 market- 
hjg opportunities i Health & Beauty ' 
Household 5 Car Applencesi wadabie 
Fix app&cation coraact tmer Proma AG. 
Fl-9490 Vaduz Tef. 0041-75-232 7172 
Fax 0041-78-233 i667, s-mad rter-pro- 


INTRODUCERS wdh contacts in South 
America. Africa India Pakistan and 
Eastern Europe We *» provide kwgn 
exchange, hiures and options products 
High ronraauxi an ongoing bass p»- 
sfcJe TeVFac 44 171 2B6 3329 


PROJECT RNANCE CONSULTANTS - 
We have sources where we can arranqe 
protect finance. For appbcaiion forms 
ptesse comad OF Proiea Finance Con- 
MJiants on Gi-7-55711638 


2nd PASSPORTS : Dnwng Licences r 
Degrees/Camoiifiage Passpons/S«rel 
Sank Accounts. GM. PO Bo* 70302 
Athens WO. Grwca Fat M62152 
nop;.ww» glct&-nrrer cm 


OFFSHORE COWANES. For tree bro- 
chure or afree Tet Lonton 44 lSi 741 
1224 ran- 44 101 “40 6550/6338 
srmapcieanco.uk 


ACORNS TO OAK TREES - (FORMA- 
TION TECHNOLOGY RELATED - Tel 
44 07MO 74 « 66 


HAWAfl ice mamtadimg Co S75K i 
3 bedroom home i acre S400K Tet- 
906-33W256 or 008-235-8345 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


LOWEST 1NT L PHONE RATES! 

Savings Up To 79% • No Signup or Monthly Fees 
Any Phone, Fax or Cellular • Call lor Ail Our New Rates 
24 Hr. Persona! Service • No Confusing Bills 

Check Out Our Rates To U.S.A. From: 


France JS2t 

Germany .33* 

Switzerland Me 

UK .25* 

Hong Kong .44$ 

Italy 459 

Netherlands ,39* 

Japan .37? 

Canada .25? 

Spain 60? 

Belgium i5? 

Austria 50? 

Wsrf our VVeb S/fe 

HTTP-llYPN.com/KaIIMart 

476 Hwy. A1A, 

SafefHe Beach FL329SZ USA 
E-tnaB: 76726, 1 743ecompusefvtco ib 


Singapore A 4? 

Philippines .76? 

Indonesia $1.03 

Thailand .$1.02 

Taiwan..... 66? 


KALL 



PPIOE - QUALITY - oenvicc 


Tel: 1-407-777-4222 

Fmc Mgy-777"44I1 uxsomMHa. 


Enter ExL112(Wvi^onl 


Save up to 80 % 

ON ALL 

International Calls 


COFF 1 Remote Programmable Service, Speed Dialing, 
rUCCx and Personalized Voice Prompts 

No Startup Fobs • MiittUiBni Operators Ana&bta • EroaiorFaxus 
24houra/<fry;7(fcvV«ieek • Perfect for Hone, Offlca, Hotol, Fat, or CtSobr Pbooei 


SSE OUR WCKEPKm RATES TP THE ILSJ 


ILK. SO. 19 SWITZERLAND 80^9 

FRANCE SO JO ITALY S0.38 

GERMANY m $0^4 EGYPT $L08 


ATTN: 

CALLBACK 

AGENTS! 

CONTACT JEAT41E 
KX 201-928 -4385 


Call Nancy at 44.171360^037 Fax: 44.171.360.5036 

e-mail-. tribime39nmnmir1dtale-com htlpV/ w»rr jwwworfdtel e. co m 

Fn-qdcXarre^)' pinH mmOM M ernrtwr tEfcl 
cuxope pj. gwc6 aa48wnz at rax'nu-w Mizo 




OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

READY MADE CO'S., FULL ADMIN 
TRADE DOCUVOITS AND bC 
BANKING & ACCOUNTING 
CHNA BUSINESS SERVICES 

Contact SMa Ha lor iromedete 
services & company Indue 
NAGS LTD. Room 1108. Atun Ptea 
2-6 Granvae Road. 1ST. Kodoan 
Hong Kona e-mai nacsdhlLSioer/ia 
Tef: 65*27241223 Fax 27224373 


YOUR OWN COIIFANYM 
SWITZERLAND 
ZURtCHTUG - LUZERN 

C0NRDESA 

Baareiatasse 36. C+630D ZUG 
Tl 441 41 711 32B8 Rt 441 41 71C1W9 


UNIQUE opportunity next to Casino of 
Monte Carlo Presftgloifi estabfishmem. 
Bar. restaurant, jazz dub disco. Buy 
goodwill 377-607333177 i 377-93S4012 

Franchising 

NATIONAL FRANCHISE Consultants 
seels tfl. afHiates for expanson of 
oclllnq & praftebe frandisB consulting 
busroess. edusta? ^Hritamg rights and 
temton prowled. USA 704.743-1000. 
Canada 90M92-8W. 

Business Services 

2ND PASSPORTS. Visa ttee Iravei S 
banking back door lo Spam t EU. 
Agents are wetome. Tel- 972 50883135. 
Fax 972 4 8667029 or E-mai- 
«passptxte pasepoh-cfl & 

A BRIDGE TO CHINA: Cottufiing. Bu^ 
ness Development and Slralegrc Intro- 
ductions Please lax attention FDG 
(8521 25J5 05W 

YOUR OFFICE M DUBLIN. Sevced Of- 
fices. Mai. Phone 6 Fax, Offshore Co 
Fonnations Prestigious Address. Tel 
*353 0} 475 1891 For (1) 475 1889 

YOUR PERSONAL ASSISTANT, hrsi 
class lady, eastern aiffure. 6 languag- 
es. also tor travel Fax Geneve 41- 
22/736 3074. 

PASSPORTS, IW REPORTS ! 
Worldwide acceptance 
Ouch dafivsy 

Phone. Fax. 66 2 852 21 37 

MAILING LISTS by Berger l Company 
European business and consumer data 
Td 44 1312262996 Fax 44 1312287901 

YOUR OFFICE M LONDON 

Bond Street - Mai. Phone, Fax. Tetax 

Tet 44 171 290 9000 Fax 171 499 7517 

SECOND PASSPORT. Free Mb emal: 
PASSPORTS GWFOFflEE.COM 
FAX. +322225.0525 

Banking 1 

MERCHANT BANK appoints qirt&sd m- 
divduals as banks representatives K> 
market irmmeitve. nee financial concept | 
Apply wth (totaled CV. to Box 337. i 
Fnettttear. 15. 0-60323 Frankfurt. Ger- 
many 

Capital Available 

CAPITAL CORP. 

II & A 

Corporate Financing 
Venture Captel 
(WoMMtoi 

Tel: 001407-24M360 
Fax: 001-407-248-0037 USA 

GLOBAL PROJECT FUNDING 
VENTURE CAPITAL-JOINT VENTURES 
-PROJECT FINANCING 

ogr?) 

i-<![iMllns,l VlMi-Xt 

Tel: +44 113 2727 550 
Fau +44 113 2727 580 
Ffres are nM requeued mot lo 
an o#« ot funring being made 


avaiaWe for any triable protects world- 
wide. Fax brief synopsis In English to 
Corporate AdvaittS. l4|«>12J3Hffil300 

i. 


01 1 RISTON <5t CO 


International Funding Experts 

• CoBffitd/Guaranee Programs 
- Real Estate Projects 
• Lsteure Protects 
- AmattStvcpng 

BROKERS COMPENSATED 
No fees until contract siting 
Tel: 602-468-9715 
Fax: 602-468-9663 


ANGLO AMERICAN CROUP 
PLC 


PROJECT FINANCE 
YBtTURE CAPITAL 
GLOBAL COVERAGE 
NO MAXIMUM 
BROKERS WB.C0ME 
For i^caporase Brochure and 
mfomalion pack 
T-31 t44 1324 201 365 
Fax.' t44 1924 201 377 
you aro wettome n vki us. 


UNLIMITED CAPITAL 

FOR PROJECTS 
N APPROVED COUNTRIES 
Funding ot Bank Guarantees and 
Otter Fnanaal instruments 
Lines of Credit va Marketable Securitas 
Mil 510 Baton USD, No Max. 

ALSO, ASK ABOUT THE 
SiGNFICANT CONTRACTED 
RETURNS AVAILABLE 
FOR PARTICIPATION M SIC POOL 
Mil S6 Ml Bon USD, No Max. 

tntemathmal Funding SanvkeB, tnc. 
1-SW-28W646 Fax 1-«4-2ftM647 
Web: wrrt*is.i?rg 
E-Mai funding? isxxg 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 
For Mveamenl Programs 
Proof of Funis Avaiatte 
Through Acctum Hotaers ai 
Sever U 5 S European Banks 
(212) 756-4242 Fax: (212) 758-1221 
KWR.jahrKiaiTMYAim 
Aftomay's S Brokers Invled 
3^ Park Ave.. NY. NY 10lK USA 


IRREVOCABLE BANK 
RESPONSIBLE FUNDWG 
AGAKST SUfTABLE GUARANTEE 
MINIMUM USSIOBOOjOOO 
TYPICAL COST 5% 

LESS ON LARGER AMOUNTS 
NO RISK DELIVERY 
FOR MEETING FAX 
,44 (01171 470 7205 


COMMERCIAL FUNDING AVAILABLE 
Business Finance ' Venture Captai 
Worldwide * Brokets wefcorae 


ETHIC MVESnCNTS LTD 
FAX +44 (0)115 342 7B46 


"IMMEDIATE & UNUMTTED ” 
Capiat avaiabte ftx 
Aa business prateasi 
HK U S $1 mtfjna max 
im Busne&s Consutxw 
1717) 397-7490 (U.S FAXi 
hdp-jmm nbusotn can ilreemefl 


Nawiy Available hi 3rd. Quarter 
PROJECT CAPITAL & LOAN FUNDS 

Min USD 2M Fax lull summary lo ihe 
Fund Martaoers & investment Banker; 
COC FAX 


INVESTORS WITH FUNDS AVAILABLE 
to toragn protects S Mmom S?M USD 
Must have business plan No upfrom 
lees IrtlerWl S up Contact Mr 
Gieene Tet 604-r>W23J Caraia 


Save 85% On 

International Calls 
With The Original! 

kallback 


• AT&T Fiber Optic Networks 

• 24-Hour Customer 
Service 

• IUI/FCC Approved - 

• Itemized 6 Second Billing 
» Ideal for Home, Office, 

Hotels and Cell Phones 


i tnnmatianii HeraU THbunej 





Tel: 1.206.599.1991 • Fax: 1^106.599.1981 

417 Second Avamra WM !• I SMBte .WAJMMUSA 
umioRbiudcxoin ■ EntidflnfbCMtfctcoin 


VENTURE CAPITAL 
Hki USS 3m bran Prfttdpd 
Stan usa, dmJofHnent, eft: 
h Poof r 


New ! 

Fax: -*44 (0J171 470 ' 

Attn: Coroorafe Rnanw Diacor 




Financial Services 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 

lor 

SOLUTIONS 

Contact 

BANCOR 

OF ASIA 


Barlabie 


bi viable i 

VENTURE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 

Long term ratoera) 

Sugponed Guarantees 

Fax: (632) 81M2S4 
Tel: (632) 59+5358 

(Cotnmisstor earned only upon Funrtegi 
Brokers Commisston Assurad 


' WORLD WIDE HNANCiNG 

•Oonunerdaf Mortgages 
■Vwnwa Capital 
•Stock Loans 
•Project Funding 
lanara of Credit 
'Anoints Receivable Financing 
•Pitots Placement 
•Public Shafts 

Tel: (212) 75W242 
Far. (212) 758-1221 

Broker's Watate 

375 Parti Ave.. NY, NY 10152 USA 
mmjofntemeyttm 
fl durable Ream 
Sometimes Reqtmd 


FINANCIAL GUARANTEES 

Insurance > Retnsuance backed 
guarantees (or quated 
buEiness projects 
Tflh 561-996-3222 
Fac 561-998-3226 USA 
rttVKxpewortjnffl-atLnei 


FINANCING DONESnC SALES 
» EXPORT UC 

Do you have an vrowcabte confirmed 
L/C in your favor and need financing to 
pnetese these ordered Pmraie group a 
wUHnq to finance your sales up to 
USDS 10 Ml 

T. 212-302-5405 *206 Far 212-575-1894 


UJS. DOLLARS AVAILABLE 

• Trading ProgramvVerture Capxal 
■ Equly Loans Bridge Loans 

• Ittmort^xport Finrarg. 

• Sa+f5Mf finis Guaranteed 
i Franca) InsSutore 

[-325-3555 


Financial Investments 


WHO IS INTERESTED? TREASURE 
hunting project requres Initial funds 
[i l aaojono i Great returns! Bar 10 12 
45. D-50452 CGdnw 


Diamonds 


ROUGH DIAMONDS YVe a« pay insranL 
cash for gem quafiy. African main 
volume only. Fare 954 474-3806 USA 


Serviced Offices 


YOUR OFFICE W PARIS 

b randy when you wed it, 
even for a couple ot hours. 

* Ft^ ’ functional modern offices 
ara conference roans to rert by 
hour, day, month etc — 

• Yotr tactksri or permanert-base 

■ Prestige maing address. AS services 

BI, Fg St-Honora 76006 Paris 
TeU33 (0)144713635. Fax (0)1 42661560 


* 


TAX FREE HAVEN 
it the heat of Nassau 
Prestigious Office Space Avatetie 
Seoaanal Services. Prfvae Ptene 
& Fax. Conference Room 
FuiyPan-Tne Office Rom 
Tet '.-242-3564444 Far. 1-242-326-3555 


MAYFAIR, LONDON UK. FJy Firehed 
& Sewced Offices Irrroafiae Ocapatinn 
Campettve Ram. T& uitibss 519? 
Faj 44 t*1 491 7679 


COMMERCIAL 
REAL ESTATE 


Sales 


SWISS ALPS. HISTORICAL BUILD MG 
FACING MATTERHORN. Exceptionally 
sunny healttw climate, ski resort, suiable 
lor hotel, heaTti center, apartman house-' ' 
5tt stones 2 TOO sgm. 55 rooms, 3 _ 
apanrnents i3 restaurants. 2 oars, bou- ‘ 
uguej in onvaie part, nuh Anglican . ; 
church. VERY INTERESTING PRICE, ' 
TeLTax -41 22 7333311 - "i 


GREECE - SPATA • VRAVRONA, 
11 000 sq ro tanatarm near the nmr rtl 
curpori 1.000 m. from the sea panoram- . 
re \teti. Includes house, nevriy but lags - 
storeteuw vineyard, qhva trees & edta' 
facihhes For more Infonration Teh 
-30 94 466764 

PARIS MAOELEINE / OPERA. 60 stun 
high oass office 3 rooms + parking. W. 
♦'& iQtt 432f 4069 answwtno machina 




HcralbSSribunc 

TTtKinjRIJrSMAJU >E1TSP\PFR 

PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 


foce your Ad quickly and easily, contact your near, 
-trice or representative with your text. You will be inf 
of [he cost immediately, and once payment is made your i 
will a £Fj ear Wf rain 48 hours. All major Credit Car 


Acce 


EUROPE 

FRANCE H3J: Fcm 
Tel (01)41 <J'?335. 

Fa*. fOI) 41 43 9370 

E-mai Oaui1ied@ml cam 
ANXXRA: Andorra foV«5a 
W 8*7 813. 

F». W 822 

GaUMNY. AU5U8A A CENTRAL EUROPE: . 

rrankrjtT, 

H |OS9]C7I2JOO 
ra«. 106 a | 97125020 
BaGUMA LUXEMBOURG Bfuuok. 

W KCI 344.3505 (02] 344-01 17 
fa 1021 34*0353 

Greece a Cyprus: mws 

Td »T/e8 51525 
f®. 301/46 53 357 
DMMAiDL- C^per+oipen 
Td . j I 42 9J 25" 

FNLAND: Hdwlu 
Td 358 9 406 626 
Fa. 558 9 44* £08 
ITALY: Mtana. 

Td 58315738 
Fax 583 

NETHERLANDS: Amsterdam 
Td 31 20 4841060 ' 

For 31 20«8t374 
NORWAY £ SWBDBt 

terpen Norwa,. 

Td 14715:513070 
fv 147) 55 PI 3072 
PORTUGAL- Inter. 

Td 351-1-457-7243 
_ Fa, 3S1-I -457-7352 
SPAJN: MaJnd. 

Td 4572855 
Fw 458*374 
SWTfZBZMND: FVJfy 
Td 10211 ?22 » 21 

nAea*" 9 ’ 

it 

UteTOKWajbMiliwfcn 

Td »17t)82iiM- 
Fa. K’lTl 1 2400338 
ft- 212009 

MIDDLE EAST 

fSRABd Td “ 

Td ';'72-W-584-24*. 

« , 2-:»-58i24<. 

Fa- «72-«-5S5l85 
JORDAN ; Amman 
'd 124430 
F* 52+1*6 

SAUM ARABIA; Cameo le^,. 

Id 7! 03p 4802 
Fa. 71 240 22*4 

Fa. to 3748886 
n. <,0484 r#;*?!,' 


AFRICA 

EGYPT: Cano 
Id 3J 99 838 
fr 21274 VIPCO UN. 

Fen 3444 4?) 

SOUTH AFRICA 

JOHANNESBURG: 

Td [271 f < 603-5692 . 

Far 1271 1 1 303 9509 

NORTH AMERICA 

NEW YORK: 

Td 1212} 752-3390 
Tcfl fae (BOOl 572-7212 
Fae (212) 755-8705 

CANADA 

TORONTO: 

Td |905] 633-4200 
Fa» (905) 833-21 14. 

LATIN AMBMCA 

BOUV1A: Santa Our. 

Td (591-3)53 99 00 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. JULY 1997 


1.1VK ^ 


INTERNATIONAL 


Opposition 
Vows to Press 
Kenya Protest 


Hcxurs 

NAIROBI — Opposition-groups 
calling Tor constitutional reforms in 
Kenya before a general election this 
year vowed Tuesday to step up their 


campaign of public protest a day after 
lashes 

in seven vears. 


The most violent clashes with the police 


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But officials and the police said they 
expected the calls for more protests to 
go largely unheeded and the capital and 
other lovvos were reported calm and 
back to business after closing Monday. 

Security remained right in Nairobi for 
a meeting of regional presidents on the 
war in Sudan. Riot police waited in the 
rain near the hotels where foreign lead- 
ers were staying and patrolled shopping 
centers around the capital wielding ax 
handles. 

Opposition ponies, human rights 
groups and other hodies in the Nanonal 
Convention Executive Committee or- 
dered a new demonstration for Wednes- 
day to put pressure on the government 
and bring the nation's conflict to the 
attention of visiting leaders. 

But Kenyan officials ridiculed the 
executive committee 's ability to disrupt 
the six-nation summit meeting at State 
House, which opened Tuesday and ends 
Wednesday morning. 

"What can they achieve?” asked a 
senior official at the heavily guarded 
State House. ”f don't see anyone 
demonstrating here.” 

Nine people were killed Monday dur- 
ing the most violent clashes between the 
police and protesters since unrest in 
1991 that helped push President Daniel 
arap Moi to allow multiparty elections. 

The executive committee called for 
three days of national mourning from 
_ Wednesday to Friday “for the gallant 
' sons and daughters who were killed by 
the government.” * 

But on the bustling streets of Nairobi 
if was unclear who was observing the 
call for mourning, and Nairobi Uni- 
versity' students, the bedrock of the op- 
position-backed rallies, were busy with 
examinations. 

* ‘There is a determination of and a 
capacity by Kenyans to ensure that no 
election is held before reform is ef- 
fected," the committee said. "The cry 
that there be no elections before refoim 
is the ciy of every Kenyan.” 

Hie committee said it was planning a 
national strike and holding protests out- 
side provincial administration centers 
as pari of its nonviolent campaign to 
force constitutional changes, which Mr. 
Moi says cannot be introduced before 
the general election. 

No date has been set for the par- 
liamentary and presidential polls; in 
which Mr. Moi. 73, is still widely ex- 
pected to win another five-year term 
because of squabbling among opposi- 
tion leaders. 



arni 

. jJsA&vfti 


f WmiT"U - 

BULLS WILL BE BULLS — A bullock, left, accompanied by a fellow stampeder. jumping over fallen 
runners in the street during the second day of the San Ferinin festival in the Spanish city of Pamplona. 


UN, Yielding to Kabila, 
Shifts Massacre Experts 


By Barbara Crosseue 

•\cu l«<ri Tara it-n tee 


4 South Africans Apologize for Killing 


Renters 

CAPE TOWN — Four black, youths 
who were pan of a mob that killed a 
white American student in a South Af- 
rican township in 1993 apologized 
Tuesday to her parents but said they had 
acted out of political conviction. 

The four, who are serving 18-year 
prison terms for the murder of Amy 
Biehl in the Gugulem township outside 
Cape Town, issued the apologies during 
a public application for amnesty to 
Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s Truth and 
Reconciliation Commission. 

Miss Biehl's parents. Peter and 


Linda, had flown to South Africa from 
California to attend the hearings. They 
have said they do not oppose the am- 
nesty applications, which are parr of 
South Africa's attempts to heal the 
wounds of the apartheid race war. 

One of the four. Vusumzi Ntamo. 
acknowledged in a statement to the 
commission thar he was mentally back- 
ward and described himself as someone 
who followed others. 

"1 think I do suffer from some mental 
incapacity',” he said. "lam not able to 
properly arriculare any political ideol- 
ogy or motivation for my conduct.” 


In their statements the four men. all 
now in their early 20s. described chas- 
ing Miss Biehl down a street after her 
car was stopped by a croud of youths 
who had attended a meeting of the rad- 
ical Pah Africanist Congress. 

Mongezi Manqina told the commis- 
sion he had tripped Miss Biehl and 
delivered what he believed was the fatal 
knife vyound while she lay on the 
ground. Other youths rained rocks on 
her body. 

"We were in high spirits.' * another of 
the four men. Ntobeko Peni. said. "We 
had no mercy on white people.” 


. UNITED NATIONS. New York — 
Saying that he has to be realistic in 
deal mu with President Laurent Kabila 
of Congo, the United Nations secretary- 
generaf, Kofi Annan, has given in to Mr. 
Kabila's demand that the UN replace an 
international team of experts charged 
uitft investigating allegations of mas- 
sacres of Hutu refugees from Rwanda. 

"We expect the secretary-general to 
go to the Security’ Council tomorrow to 
brief ihem on his plans for puning to- 
gether a new team." Fred Eckhard, Mr. 
Annan's spokesman, said Monday. 

Hie investigation of sites where Hutu 
from Rwanda may have been killed by 
rebel forces loyal to Mr. Kabila be- 
ginning late last year was to have begun 
Monday. It is now likely to be post- 
poned for some time, raising concerns 
that evidence can be removed or des- 
troyed in the interim. 

The Kabila government, which as a 
rebel movement ousted President 
Mobutu Seso Seko in May, has said that 
an\ killings were carried out by rene- 
gade troops, not as a matter of policy. 

Hie government has also asked the 
United Nations to give it the names of 
the new investigators 10 days in ad- 
vance. and Mr. Kabila continues to in- 
sist on other changes in the investi- 
gation's mandate. 

The decision to send a ream more to 
his liking has distressed UN officials. 
They said they believe that at least 
200.000 Rwandan Hutu who had taken 


refuge in eastern Congo, then Zaire, are 
still unaccounted for. The decision has 
also led to sharp criticism from human 
rights groups. 

""This is a disastrous precedent.” 
said Kenneth Rorh, executive director 
of Human Rights Watch. "We will be 
suffering the consequences of this for 
decade s"to come." 

Mr. Roth said that in the past the 
United Natrons has not accommodated 
government leaders in this way. -Look 
at Cuba. Sudan. Iran. Iraq — there are 
plenty of countries who have refused 
access. In each case the United Nations 
has said: ‘Look, this is who we ap- 
pointed. You either let him in or suffer 
the consequences of becoming an in- 
ternational pariah.' " 

Mr. Kabila has objected to the pres- 
ence on the team of Roberto Gatreion. a 
human rights lawyer from Chile who is 
the United Nations' designated "rap- 
porteur.” or expen investigator, on 
Congo. In April. .Mr. Garret on said he 
had enough evidence of massacres to 
warrant a full investigation. 

The UN Human Rights Commission, 
of which the United States is a prom- 
inent member, then asked him to lead a 
team to eastern C ongo. w here reports of 
massacres are still accumulating. 

An advance party of negotiators spent 
more than a week in Kinshasa trying to 
reach an agreement with Mr. Kabila's 
government. When that mission failed, 
the UN Human Rights Center m Geneva 
turned the matter over to Mr. .Annan. 

"The most important thing." he said, 
"is for us to i>et the facts." 


Algeria Frees Islamic Leader 
In Move Seen as Peace Feeler 


Le Pen Faces Trial for Election Scuffle 


Reuters 

PARIS — Jean-Marie JLe Pen. leader 
of France's extreme-rightist National 
Front, faces trial in November on 
chaises that he assaulted a Socialist 
parliamentary candidate during the 
campaign in May, justice sources said 
Tuesday. 

They said Mr. Le Pen would be tried 
in criminal court on charges of violence 
at a public gathering and public insult. 

Two days before the June I election 
for the National Assembly, in which his 


daughter was a candidate, the burly 68- 
year-old politician was involved in a 
"scuffle in a Paris suburb. He could 
clearly be seen in videotapes of the 
incident tussling with the Socialist can- 
didate. Annette"Peulvast, who opposed 
Marie Caroline Le Pen in the election. 
Mrs. Peuivast won the election. 

Mr. Le Pen has denied any wrong- 
doing and said he had no reason to 
apologize for his conduct. 

According to a local government 
spokesman, Mr. Le Pen had been con- 


fronted by protesters while campaign- 
ing for his daughter. He “caught the 
first person" being pushed by the crowd 
— Mrs. Peuivast — "and threw her to 
the ground." the spokesman said. 

In another incident, Mr. Le Pen was 
fined Friday by a Paris court for calling 
the Senegalese-bom French director of 
an anti-racism organization a "mad fat 
zebu." A zebu is a hump-backed do- 
mestic ox found in Africa. India and 
China. The court fined Mr. Le Pen 5,000 
francs (S850l for uttering a racial slur. 


Atinre Front e-Prcssc 

.ALGIERS — The military-backed 
government of President Liamine Zer- 
oual released a top official of the banned 
Islamic Salvation Front from prison 
Tuesday even as .Algeria's bloodletting 
continued. 

Hie release of Abdelkader Hachani 
was seen as a move to placate some 
Islamic extremists, even as 61 people 
were being killed over the weekend. 

Mr. Hachani was released from 
Serkadji prison in Algiers early T uesday 
only a day after being sentenced to five 
years' imprisonment for trying to incite 
an army revolt 

He was released because he had 
already served five years in detention 
while awaiting trial. The court, 
however, denied him his civic rights for 
three years. 

Nonetheless, the move signaled an 
effort to encourage peace with the ex- 


tremists — the stale prosecutors had 
sought a 1 0- year sentence for Mr. Hach- 
ani. a fundamentalist figurehead since 
he led the Islamic Salvation Front to a 
stunning election victory in the first 
round of legislative elections in Decem- 
ber 1991. 

His release came after a weekend of 
independence celebrations that were 
marked by the killing of at least 61 
people by suspected Islamic extremists, 
according to reports Tuesday in the Al- 
gerian press. 

At least 260 people have been killed 
since the June 5 legislative elections, in 
which Mr. Zeroual's allies won most 
seats in the National Assembly. 

The deaths of the 61 people over the 
weekend were neither confirmed nor 
denied by the Algerian security forces, 
which consistently contends that fun- 
damentalist violence has been eradic- 
ated. 


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GENERAL 


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ibunr 


•VPER 



AFRICA 

,274 \VCCCN 
AiA3,T9 

crniTH AFRICA 

■5BU8C* 
71l!8Ci£S*- 
:71!| 604*50* 


55.3js«* 


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United Stans District tout 
. EASTERN DISTRICT OF MEW YORK 
SUMMONS IN A CML ACTON 
CV 96-2502 STATEN ISLAND SAVINGS 
BANK v. KEYSTONE TRADING C0BP. 
. B/kfe KEYSTONE TRADING. NC.. 
SEWER'S KOSHBttAND, M2 aVa 
KQSHERLAND. INC.. M0SHE 
ROSENFELD. M05HE PRAGEfi. 
CHAYA PRAGER and SAMUEL 
PRAGER. TO Most® RoserfeU 1145 
fifth Sheet BnuMyn. New Yort TT219 
YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and 
rcqairad to fBe trite the Clerk of His 
Court and sene upon PLANTIFFS 
ATTORNEY THE LAW FBI OF HALL & 
-.HALL, 57 BEACH STREET STATEN 
&AM>. NEW YORK 10304 an answer 
to 8* compton wttch is hemnfo served 
upen you. wdlv 60 days after serves ot 
«s summons upon you. extiustt d the 
day of saws 9 wxi to do sapdg- 
. mM by debit m be taken ageing you 
torB» reW demanded m W complain 
ROBERT C. HEHEUANN CLERK 
/Signed BY DEPUTY CLERK 

1996. This anon is based m 
and State In afcglng. inter aha. 
uHnJenfy inducing the issuance ol 
cashier's checks of 5400,00000. 


•Announcements 


, .4 ii 

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; ' BARBIE AS 24 ■ 

. . - ;:AB 9 JULIET 1997 
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OUR NEXT SPECIAL HEADJW3 

REAL ESTATE 
W7HE SOUTH OF FRANCE, 
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FRIDAY, JULY IBth 1997 


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PACE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Karadzic a Dilemma for Alliance I ^ 


The Associated Press meeting. The statement said there can be 

MADRID — The leaders of the na- no -‘lasting peace without justice” in the 
lions that make up NATO expressed former Yugoslavia and urged Croatia, 
concern Tuesday about a political crisis Bosnia-Herzegovina and Serbia to arrest 
in the Bosnian Serb Republic, but about 75 suspected war criminals, 
showed no readiness to bring to trial the The statement echoed earlier com- 
indicted war criminal who is challenging mitments to help bring P eaM 
President BUiana Plavsic. region, but without using the 30,000* 

Without mentioning the name of strong NATO-led peacekeeping force to 
Radovan Karadzic, the Bosnian Serb arrest Mr. Karadzic or other war crimes 
leader who is maneuvering against Mrs. suspects. 

Plavsic, the leaders warned that they NATO governments say the Dayton 
would not accept a power grab. “We will accord did not give them that mand ate, a 
not tolerate any recourse to force or position increasingly under fire from 
violence,” President Bill Clinton and the human rights groups. 


other NATO leaders said in a statement 
on the opening day of a two-day summit 


Before the summit meeting opened. 
Human Rights Watch said in a statement 


fi To Maintain an Open Door’ 


The Associated Press 

MADRID — Following are excerpts 
of remarks by NATO’s secretary-gen- 
eral, Javier Solana Madariaga, about 
the invitations Tuesday to three coun- 
tries to join the alliance: 


an interest in becoming NATO members 
but that were not invited to begin ac- 
cession talks today will remain under 
consideration for future membership. 

No European democratic country 
whose admission would fulfill the ob- 


thai unless NATO troops brought all 76 
people indicted for war crimes to justice, 
there could be no peace and reconciliation 
in the former republics of Yugoslavia. 

“Only 10 have been taken into cus- 
tody,” the group's statement said. “If 
peace is to endure beyond the planned 
withdrawal of NATO troops in June 
1998, persons indicted for war crimes 
must be apprehended.” 

Mr. Karadzic is the most notorious of 
the war crime suspects. He has been 
indicted to stand trial before the United 
Nations Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in 
The Hague. 

Last week. Mrs. Plavsic sought to 
dismiss Interior Minister Drag an Kijac, 
whom she accused of corruption and of 
being in league with Mr. Karadzic. 

She accused Mr. Karadzic, who has 
the support of the army and the police, of 
amassing wealth by smuggling fuel, cig- 
arettes, timber and drugs m cooperation 
with the authorities in Serbia. 

Secretary of State Madeleine Albright 
said that the NATO leaders would dis- 
cuss “possible coordinated action” 
against Mr. Karadzic. 

American officials have hinted at 


? it ■ NATO . • 

j .TbbeadmfesT . 

j.QjlMJttife;:.'-. 


weiani&v”< 


Atlantic Ocean 




% m 


v. ■ 






J 


Today, heads of state and government jectives of the treaty will be excluded plans for combined U.S. and allied com- 




Spain Defiant 
Over Gibraltar 
Despite Threat 
Of NATO Veto 


:^S Reuters ■ - . \kx, : 

MADRID — Spain has objected to a : 
=: : British threat to block its full uuegranm. 

into NATO in a dispute over Gibraltar, . ^ : 

saying Tuesday that it would not lift air 
and sea restrictions on the colony asUjk 

H London demands. . _ P/f 

The resurgent dispute with Britain 
overshadowed Spain’s message ax : fht^-- 
opening of the NATO summit meettog;^ 
'* r inMadrid that it was prepared to take on 

a fu]j ro ie in the alliance's new conunan^,;^ 

structure. . • 

• * Spain will maintain air and manhn»jvp 
ll|i|M restrictions on G ibraltar , ’ ’ Foreign Mu*- . 
Msmm istCT Abe! Matures said at a news coit-.ri£ 
ference. “Spain is not going to lift any -i:.p 
restriction that could affect its legitimate^ *«; 
demands of sovereignty over Giblal-: :- ; i ' 


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have agreed to invite the Czech Re- 
public, Hungary and Poland to begin 
accession talks with NATO. Our goal is 
to sign the protocol of accession at the 
time of the ministerial meetings in 
December 1997 and to see the ratifi- 
cation process completed in time for 
membership to become effective by the 
50th anniversary of the Washington 
Treaty in April 1999. 

We reaffirm that NATO remains open 
to new members under Article 10 of the 
North Atlantic Treaty. The alliance will 
continue to welcome new members in a 


position to further the principles of the and Slovenia. 


from consideration. 

In keeping with our pledge to main- 
tain an open door to tne admission of 
additional alliance members in tile fu- 
ture. we also direct that NATO foreign 
ministers keep that process under con- 
tinual review and report to us. We will 
review the process at our next meeting in 
1999. With regard to the aspiring mem- 
bers, we recognize with great interest 
and take account of the positive de- 
velopments toward democracy and the 
rule of Jaw in a number of southeastern 
European countries, especially Romania 


raandos raids. 


NATO: 3 - Country Expansion to the East Is Approved at Summit 


Continued from Page 1 

NATO was stronger, he said, with 
more responsibility going to the Euro- 
peans and greater motivation to reach 
out to new partners snch as Russia. 

Although the alliance 'and Russia 
signed a charter in May that establishes 
closer organizational ties between them. 


seized the meeting was made clear when 
a closed-circuit television camera broad- 


Tony Blair, supported the position that it 
made no sense to prematurely earmark 


treaty and contribute to security in the 
Euro-Atlantic area. The alliance expects 


The alliance recognizes the need to 
build greater stability, security and re- 


Foreign Minister Yevgeni Primakov of enouj 
Russia asserted Tuesday in Moscow that and 
“NATO enlargement is a big mistake, NAT 


cast to reporters a scene in which Pres- either country for special consideration, 
ident Jacques Chirac of France pointed In the end the allies pledged in their 
his finger at Mr. Solana and spoke to him communique to maintain an open door to 
with apparent heat the admission of new members and re- 

It later became clear that Mr. Chirac view tile process in 1999 at die next 
bad blocked a version of the final com- NATO summit meeting, 
munique that be felt did not stress “We recognize with great interest and 


gh the particular status of Romania 
Slovenia in a second round of 


the admission of new members and re- 
view die process in 1999 at die next 
NATO summit meeting. 

“We recognize with great interest and 
take account of the positive’ develop- 


The rocky peninsula at the southern 
tip of Spain dominates the western 
trance to the Mediterranean. Gibraltar, 
was ceded by Spain in perpetuity andecr / -;- 
the 1713 Treaty of Utrecht and becamea. > 
British colony. ' ' ' 

Spain has sought its return tor cat- 
turiesTin particular the isthmus linking.^ ■ 
Gibraltar to the mainland where the air- y/ . 
strip is located " - f 

In principle there is an agreement , . ' 
between the two countries for joint use ' 
of the snip, but Spain has never allowed . 
it to be implemented - : j - . 

Senior Spanish officials say privately : : 
that access to sea lanes might be ne- 


to extend further invitations in coming gional cooperation in the countries of possibly the biggest mistake since the 


years. 

NATO will maintain an active re- 
lationship with those nations that have 
expressed an interest in NATO mem- 
bership as well as those who may wish to 
seek membership in the future. Those 
nations that have previously expressed 


southeast Europe, and in promoting their 
increasing integration into the Euro-At- 
lantic community. At the same time, we 
recognize the progress achieved toward 
greater stability and cooperation by the 
states in the Baltic region who are also 
aspiring members. 


end of the Second World War.” 
President Boris Yeltsin refused an in- 
vitation to attend the meeting and was 
represented by a relatively .low-level 
delegation. 

Inside the conference hall here, the 
extent of the teosion and irritation that 


CLUB: From the Chosen , Alliance Elicits a Burst of Enthusiasm 


Continued from Page 1 

rule ran deepest As NATO expands 
eastward, to the borders of the former 
Soviet Union, it is the country that best 
epitomizes the enlargement debate. 

For the 38 million Poles, the argument 
in favor of joining NATO is very simple. 
Their ties with Western Europe go back 
a millennium, when Poland was con- 
verted to Roman Catholicism. Sand- 
wiched between Germany and Russia. 
Poland has been dismembered four 
times since 1772 and found itself con- 
signed to the Soviet “sphere of influ- 
ence" at the 1944 Yalta conference. 
Joining NATO will right an historical 
wrong. 

“We suffered, we fought, and now we 
are gening our reward,” said Mr. Gere- 
mek. now chairman of the foreign re- 
lations committee of the Polish Parlia- 
ment “We want to be embedded in the 
Western camp." 

For the Clinton administration, the 
Madrid gathering represents the start of a 
great effort to convince Americans and 
the U.S. Senate of the need for NATO 


expansion. Administration officials 
bridle at suggestions that they are losing 
the public relations war over the east- 
ward enlargement of the 1 6-member al- members of the alliance, he insisted that 
liance. At the same time, they acknowl- he had come to Madrid as a “private 
edge that they will face a tough battle individual" rather than as the repre- 
winning the required two-thirds' ma- sentative of a major American arms 
jority next year in die Senate to ratify manufacturer eyeing a lucrative new 
changes in the North Atlantic treaty. The market 

parliaments of the other 1 5 members of ‘ ‘The fact that the debate becomes ad 
the alliance also have to approve of the hominem is a testimony to its low in- 
expansion. rellectual content," said Mr. Jackson. 

American supporters of expansion still smarting from an article by The New 
have come out in force in Europe this York Times (IHT. June 30) suggesting 
week. Congress has sent an eight-person that U.S . weapons suppliers have a com- 
^bserver group" headed by Senators mercial interest in NATO expansion. 
William Roth and Joseph Biden Jr. An- The pro-expansion committee to- 
other six-member Senate delegation, led eludes people like Robert Zoellick, a 
by the Republican majority, Trent Lott, close aide to former Secretary of State 
has been traveling around Eastern James A Baker 3d, and a former U.S. 
Europe, visiting the countries that will trade commissioner. Paula Stem. 


works for Lockheed Martin Corp. as 
director of strategic planning. At a cock- 


NATO expansion. 

In pressing for Romanian entry, 
France seemed to be seeking to portray 
itself as the alliance member most willing 
to confront the United States. Mr. Chirac, 
with an eye to domestic politics, looked 
pleased at a news conference to be able to 
report, “There were a few difficulties.” 

He warned earlier, according to his 
spokesman. Catherine Colonna, that die 
alliance “will not continue durably with 
an unbalanced European- American re- 
lationship" in either the areas of polit- 
ical or military decision-making. 


•of merits toward democracy and the rule of gotiable but airspace is not. 


law in a number of southeastern Euro- 
pean countries, especially Romania and 
Slovenia,” it said. “At the same time, 
we recognize the progress achieved to- 
ward greater stability and cooperation 
by the states in the Baltic region who are 
also aspiring members.” 

No one in the allian ce organization — 
although expressing admiration for the 
Baltic states' democratization — has 
said they should join the alliance at any 
foreseeable date. 

Mr. Clinton, talking Monday to a group 
of U.S. senators who accompanied him 


rail party to welcome the prospective meeting with Mr. Clinton had ended 
members of the alliance, he insisted that with a complete rejection of France’s 
he had come to Madrid as a "private interest in securing for a European 
individual" rather than as the repre- NATO's southern regional command, 
sentative of a major American arms which includes the U.S. Sixth Fleet, the 
manufacturer eyeing a lucrative new French president replied: “Yes. You’ve 
market. got it right.” 

‘ ‘The fact that the debate becomes ad France will reconsider its position on 
hominem is a testimony to its low in- military integration only if reforms 
rellectual contenr.” said Mr. Jackson, aimed at giving European members 
still smarting from an article by The New more control succeed. Mr. Chirac said. 
York Times (IHT. June 30) suggesting With support from Italy, which re- 
thatU.S. weapons suppliers have a com- quires the backing of Paris in^ nego- 


When Mr. Chirac was asked if a brief here, said that although he was enthu- 


siastic about recent developments in Ro- 
mania and Slovenia, “I just don’t think at 
this time that they should be admitted.” 
The accession negotiations for the 
three countries are expected to take 
about six months, followed by ratifi- 


Tbe British foreign secretary, Robin 
Cook, said at the summit meeting that his- 
government would veto Spain's integra- 
tion into the NATO military command : 
nnh^c there was a deal on Gibraltar. 

“Our case is that if Spain wishes to 
come frilly into the alliance and into the - 
integrated command structure, then, it . 
must behave as an ally when we want our ^ 
militar y aircraft to go in and out of^- 
Gibraltar," Mr. Cook said in an in- - ' 
terview with BBC radio. 

In negotiations with NATO on in- 
tegration into the military command, 
Spain has sought command over all . 
Spanish territory and control of access to • • 
the Mediterranean through the Strait of 
Gibraltar. 

Prime Minister Jose Maria A mar of 
Spain opened the meeting Tuesday by 
pledging to join NATO’s military com- 


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France will reconsider its position on parliaments. The official entry of new 
military integration only if reforms members is expected to be in 1999, on 
aimed at giving European members the organization's 50th anniversary, 
more control succeed. Mr. Chirac said. The cost of the expansion is uncertain. 

With support from Italy, which re- The U.S. Congressional Budget Office 
quires the backing of Paris in. nego- has estimated ihaiover 15-years the total 
nations on entry into the first wave of may reach $125 billion, with the United 
European Monetary Union countries. States paying $19 billion. Defense Sec- 
France said it was able to push through a rotary William Cohen has pot the cost to 
special position for Romania and Slov- the United States at $150 million to $200 
enia. Britain, through Prime Minister million a year for 10 to 12 years. 


cation by each of the 16 member-state mand soon. “As you know, Spain de- 


cided to take the necessary steps for 
participating fully in the alliance’s new 
command structure, in accordance with; 
the decision by the Spanish Parlia- 
ment," he said. 

Spain joined NATO -hr L982;3jttt 
stayed out of the command structure. 
Parliament has now voted to participate 
in the command but stipulated that the 
country must remain free of nuclear 
weapons. 


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soon be admitted into NATO. 

Also in Madrid are members of the 
U.S. Committee to Expand NATO, a 
private nonprofit group of former 
Democratic and Republican party of- 
ficials. Its president is Bruce Jackson, a 
former Pentagon official who now 


In the coming debate over NATO 
expansion, supporters will go head to 
head with people like Jack Matlock, a 
former U.S. ambassador to Moscow, and 
a former presidential adviser, Paul 
Nitze. who say that the alliance should 
stay as it is. 


PROBE: Fund-Raising Inquiry Opens With China Accusations 


CAMBODIA: Nation on the Brink as Fear of a Civil War Grows 


Continued from Page 1 

potentially stiffer resistance in the 
provinces. 

Bur even those provincial forces have 
limited strength, and it seemed that Mr. 
Hun Sen was on his way to consolidating 
full control over a nation in which gov- 
ernment has become paralyzed by in- 
fighting. 

The increased efficiency that a one- 
man leadership might bring, however, 
may come at the cost of the democratic 
liberties that were implanted here by an 
idealistic 52 billion project organized by 
the United Nations after the Paris peace 
accord in 1991. 

That effort sought to revive a nation 
that was almost destroyed by the rule of 
the Khmer Rouge, in which more than a 
million people died from 1975 to 1979, 
and by a decade-long civil war that fol- 
lowed their ouster into the jungles by a 
Vietnamese invasion. 

Foreign aid workers voiced concern 
Tuesday over the survival of the lively 
democratic debate, the free press and the 
growing community of human rights 
and legal aid workers that had begun to 
flourish since United Nations-super- 
vised elections in 1993. 

Mr. Hun Sen’s tasks now are to coopt 
as much of Prince Ranariddh's party as 
possible and to legitimize his rule by 
proceeding with long-schedaied elec- 
tions; to put down armed resistance, and 


to persuade foreign governments to rec- 
ognize his control and continue foreign 
aid. 

“I appeal to the international com- 
munity to give their understanding to 
Cambodia and please not to interfere in 
Cambodia’s internal affairs,” he said. 
“Let Cambodians solve their own prob- 


lems." without immunity made a last-minute 

Two days after the weekend's fight- offer. The official, John Huang, said he 
ing ended, the international community was willing to testily about assertions 
seemed not yet to have decided on its that be disclosed classified information 
response. when be worked for the Commerce De- 

Foreign nations are in a delicate po- partment but still insisted on immunity 
sition, said Raoul Jennar, a historian of for any testimony about fund-raising. 


Continued from Page 1 

Thompson said some of the evidence is 
sensitive and could be discussed in only 
closed session. 

Meanwhile, a Democratic fund-rais- 
ing official who had refused for months 
to testify or provide some documents 
without immunity made a last-minute 
offer. The official, John Huang, said he 
was willing to testify about assertions 
that be disclosed classified information 
when be worked for the Commerce De- 
partment but still insisted on immunity 


“Is there any real evidence that the 
Chinese government, or any other for- 
eign government, actually infiltrated the 
American government via campaign 
contributions?” he said. 

Mr. Thompson asserted that China 
undertook the covert effort to influence 


closed session — but agreed after long ^ 
negotiations to provide information to*!/ 
Mr. Tbompson. 

It was Senator Glenn who disclosed. ... 
the offer by Mr. Huang to testify before 
the committee without a grant of im- 
munity on w he flier he committed eco- 


the U.S. election to counter fears that nomic espionage or disclosed classified 


Taiwan — which China considers a 
rogue province — was growing closer to 


information when he worked for the 
Commerce Department A congressman 


the United States. “Implementation of has accused Mr. Huang of 



Cambodian affairs. 

"They cannot accept this coup, but 
they must not respond in such a way as to 
plunge the country into a new war,” he 
said. "A new civiJ war could be the 
beginning of the end for Cambodia. This 
country is so weak already, so poor." 

Foreign ambassadors avoided state- 
ments of either condemnation or support 
for Mr. Hun Sen. mostly confining their 
comments to concerns about the welfare 
of their own citizens in the country. 

Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia 
signaled their displeasure by preparing 
plans to evacuate their citizens. 


senators said. 

“I think it is very important, and I 
think it is encouraging,” Mr. Thompson 
said of Mr. Huang's offer, but “serious 
questions" must First be resolved. 

Still, the focus on the first day was on 
the allegations about China. Mr. 
Thompson’s Democratic counterpart. 
Senator John Glenn of Ohio, warned 
against a “jump to conclusions" based 
upon news reports of China’s efforts to 
use contributions to lobby the U.S. Con- 
gress. He countered that the investiga- 
tion should look at foreign money con- 
tributed to both parties. 


the plan has been handled by Chinese 
government officials and individuals en- 
listed to assist," he said. 

Mr. Thompson said Mr. Clinton's de- 
cision to grant a visa to Taiwan's pres- 
ident, Lee Teng-bui. to attend an alumni 
gathering at Cornell University in 1996 
after pressure from Congress caught 
Beijing “off guard" and led to its de- 
cision to become involved in U.S. pol- 
itics. 

An individual familiar with the in- 
vestigation, speaking on condition of 
anonymity, said Mr. Thompson’s state- 
ment was based on information gathered 
by U.S. intelligence agencies during a 
14-month-long investigation. 

This person said U.S. intelligence of- 
ficials declined to testify — even in 


and Mr. Huang has denied wrongdo- . 
ing. 

About half the $3.4 millio n Mr. 
Huang raised in 1996 for Democrats has . . 
been returned because of suspicions . 
about its origins. . .!'■ 

“Having become a defenseless target ; ; 
for Asian bashers,” wrote Mr. Huang’s ^/ 
lawyer, Ty Cobb, “Mr. Huang feels' . J 
compelled to forgo the security of bis 
constitutional protections and to attempt . v 
honorably to acknowledge whatever ' ;."' 
mistakes he may have madL” .. 

The first day was devoted to opening J 
statements by senators. The finance di- 
rector of the Democratic National Coin-, j:, * : 
mittee, Richard Sullivan, was expected^*';', 
to be called Wednesday as the first wit-; 
ness. fAP, Reuters, NYT) A 


MARS: Signs of a Deluge Billions of Years Ago on Red Planet Leave Scientists in Awe 


Continued from Page 1 


Ridoxl Vifd/TUr A.«o«d 1 ho, 

A Japanese woman weeping Tues- 
day over the coffin of a country- 
man who was killed by a rocket in 
Phnom Penh over the weekend. 


water are thought io exist in the northern The Ares Vallis site was chosen be- 

polar cap and beneath the surface os cause pictures from previous missions 


supported the origin of some forms of called Barnacle Bill. The rock is only 20 
Martian life? to 25 centimeters long, a little shorter 

The Ares Vallis site was chosen be- than the rover and about three meters 


permafrost. 

But surface erosion indicates that in 
tiie past there was an abundance of wa- 
ter. The questions are: When and where? 
And could those wetter conditions have 


HONG KONG: Chinese Government Scraps Electoral System 


Continued from Page I 

Tung’s decision was quick in coming. 

' ‘Chinese leaders have said that Hong 
Kong would be more democratic under 
Chinese rule,” said Martin Lee, leader 
of the Democratic Party, which held the 
largest number of seats in the disbanded 
elected legislature. “Now we see what 
democracy with Chinese characteristics 
looks like.” 

Under the new electoral arrange- 
ments. the voting system that brought 
the democrats a near majority in the 
election of 1995 will be scrapped. In its 
place, a voting system known as pro- 
portional representation will be intro- 
duced to elecr 20 of the legislature's 60 
seats. Unlike the 1995 election, in which 
candidates who garnered the most votes 
in a district were elected, the top three to 
five candidates who win the highest 


number of votes in vastly larger districts 
will win seats under this arrangement. 
The remaining 40 seats will be se- 


palitical parties from winning. 


showed that it was probably a flood plain 
scattered with rocks washed down from 
nearby ancient highlands. 

Scientists think the highlands are 3.6 
billion to 4.5 billion years old. which is 
the same period in which life emerged on 
Earth. The early evidence indicates that 
the most recent flood at the landing sire 
occurred 1 billion to 3 billion years 
ago. 

In any case. Dr. Matthew Golom- 


south of the landing craft. 

Pictures showed, as Dr. Golombek 
said, thai Sojourner “nestled up and 
kissed affectionately Barnacle Bill.” 

Sojourner’s principal scientific in- 
strument is an alpha proton X-ray spec- 
trometer, designed to bombard a rock 
with protons and record changes in them 
as they return to the instrument In this 
way, the spectrometer should be able to 


determine any elements in a rock’s miihX , ‘ :: !*'; 
orals, except for hydrogen and hehuni:' ^^. 
The results will be the first detern^;vV 
nation of the composition of Martiaa^^t 
rocks. -?W- r 

Later in the day, the solar-powered^^^ 
electric motors moved Sojourner to thejpr 
right for a study of the texture of a sandy v^ 
flat area. Its wheels dug into the- soti to-dg 
check its depth and firmness. Early me- 
dications are that the Landing . site 
coated with a veneer of powdery soiT,^^ 
about like flour. 

- mM, 


Mr. Ng, the secretary for constiru- bek, the chief project scientist at the Jet 


defended the govem- 


lected almost entirely by the leaders of ment’s move. “We will never be able to 


Hong Kong ’s business community and 
the professions. The election is to be 
held sometime before July of next year. 
This system, which has been vigor- 


find a perfect system," he said. “In the 
final analysis, the system we adopt must 
be perceived as fair and open." 

But Hong Kong’s democrats dis- 


ously supported by pro-Beijing parties agreed. “There has been virtually no 


who lost in virtually every race in 1995, 
was designed, according to its pro- 
ponents, to dilute the influence of the 
Democratic Party and its allies. 

Lau Siu-kai, a professor of law ai 
Chinese University who led a Beijing- 
appointed committee that demanded the 
electoral changes, said in an interview 
with the South China Morning Post earli- 
er this year: "People always misunder- 
stand that we purposely designed this 
voting system to exclude the Democratic 
Pany. In fact, its objective is to prevent 


public consultation, and a large number 
of Hong Kong people will be disen- 
franchised and will lose their votes," 
said Mr. Lee. 

Allies of Mr. Lee also criticized the 
government’s plans. “Only the elites 
and the privileged classes hand picked 
by Mr. Tung Chee-hwa and his Beijing 
masters will win seats,” said Emily Lau, 
an independent pro-democracy politi- 
cian who lost her seat on July 1. It’s not 
a great day for democracy, it s a big step 
backward.” 


Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, 
said: “We’re fairly confident that 
there was 'water on Mars. The only 
question is. could early Mars have 
been wanner and wetter and could 
liquid water have remained on the sur- 
face for any time. ’ ’ 

While scientists studied the pictures, 
the roving vehicle Sojourner continued 
its reconnaissance of rocks and soil away 
from the lander. 

Geologists said they had not com- 
pleted analysis of the rover’s first meas- 
urements of the soil chemistry, conduc- 
ted Sunday. 

After making those measurements at 
the base of the Mars lander, the six- 
wheel Sojourner, about 30 centimeters 
tall and twice as wide, turned left and 
crawled over to a small knobby rock 


David Anderson, Envoy, Dies 


New York Times Sen-ice 

WASHINGTON — David Anderson, 
a U.S. ambassador to Yugoslavia in the 
1980s. died Friday in Berlin of a liver 
disease. He was 60. 

As a specialist in German affairs, Mr. 
Anderson became a key member of the 
U.S. delegation that negotiated the four- 
power Berlin agreement of 1 97 1 with the 
Soviet Union. Britain and France The 
pact reduced Cold War tensions' and 
eased the way to German unification. 

„ Ser 7‘"8 38 ambassador in Belgrade 
From 1981 to 1985, his main task was to 
help Yugoslavia cope with a deepening 
economic crisis by refinancing inter- 
national loans. 


He was born Jan. 3, 1937, in 
caldy, Scotland, and came to the Umte#3 
Stales in 1952. After ear nin g a bache]b£^i 
degree from Union CoUege.i^3 
1958. and a masters degree a year lateral 
from the Fletcher School of Law aixL?1 
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menL His initial overseas posts included!! 
embassies in Belgrade. Bamako, Bra&vl 
sets and Bonn. 

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of international relations at Siimnti&gj 
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Berlin, bringing together scholars 
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bsternational herald tribune. 
WEDNESDAY. JtXY 9. 1997 
PAGE 11 


STAGE/ENTER TAINMENT 


In Belarus, an Underground Film Is Big Hit 


By Judith Miller 

New iurk Ttutrs Srn icr 


M INSK, Belarus — The 
most-talked-abour film in 
Belarus, a forlorn little 
country sandwiched be- 
tween Poland and Russia, has never 
been shown in a Belarussian movie 
theater or on state television. 

The Soviet Union may officially be 
.history, but not in Belarus, where the 
k . government has again begun banning 
dissident voices of poets, journalists, 
independent filmmakers — anyone, in 
fact, who dares criticize President Al- 
exander Lukashenko, who proudly 
refers to himself as a “Soviet person.” 

! So along with Communist textbooks, the 
old Soviet flag and other authoritarian 
trappings of the former Soviet Onion, 
samizdat films — anti-government 
tracts that circulated underground in the 
Soviet era — are making a comeback. 

And no banned film is more popular 
than “An Ordinary President." a saun cal 
documentary about Lukashenko, made 
by Yuri Khashchevatsky, the country's 
leading filmmaker. “My film is driving 
. Lukashenko crazy, * ’ he said. The director 
of five cridcallv acclaimed films. 


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'Star Turn: 
All About 
Tallulah 


THEATER 


g| 


By Sheridan Morley 

Jfiremi/umjl HcrM Tribune 

L ondon — of ail forms of 
modem theater, one of the hard- 
est to get right is the show about 
a great dead star. You will per- 
haps forgive a few thoughts about the 
genre, prompted as they are by "Tal- 
lulah, a generally very successful at- 
tempt to get us back to back to Bankhead 
'at die Minerva in Chichester. 

First off, we need to decide what we 
are supposed to be seeing: a vague im- 
pression of the original, or a look-alike 
impersonation? Second, are we witness- 
ing a dramatized biography, or a critical 
hatchet job, or some kind of mindless 
concert celebration? These, madden- 
ingly, often seem to work best at the 
box-office, or how else to explain the 

everlasting success of 

■MUMI shows like “Buddy" 
THEATER or “Elvis?” 

Who. ar these stage 
biographies, are we 
meant to be? Neutral 
observers of a life 
taken at the hilt but un- 
der floodlights now long extinguished? 
Judge and jury as to whether or not the 
subject really deserves this kind of 
posthumous attention? Adoring fans fi- 
nally allowed to explore the star's home 
and its contents, albeit only in recon- 
struction, as if we were on a kind of 
4N package tour of whoever was the owner 
* of our selected Graceland? 

Sandra Ryan Heyward's ■'Tallulah’’ 
confronts most of these queries head-on: 
Tallulah Bankhead was one of those 
curions theatrical anomalies vastly more 
inreresting off. stage than on; since she 
died a drugged and alcoholic eccentric 
in 1968 at the age of 66, there have been 
no fewer than seven biographies of her, 
which must suggest that Heyward is not 
alone in her fascination. Moreover, she 
and her director, Michael Rudxnan, have 
found in Kathleen Turner a brilliant 
interpreter, an actress who is not afraid 
to stand alone on stage with a slightly 
hazy recall of the actual text and yet 
mesmerize the audience into joining 
what at times could as well be a seance 
) designed to prove that Tallulah lives. 
The daughter of a southern senator, 
she was an often terrible actress who yet 
was breathtaking in Lillian Heilman's 
original “The Little Foxes”; she fired 
Brando for being roo good opposite her 
but was one of the first to recognize the 
genius of Tennessee Williams. 

So many chances in her chaotic life 
and career either never came or were 
overlooked when they did. The Queen of 
the Nil, as they described her infamous 
Cleopatra, could also sometimes amaze 
berself and her audiences by acting very 
well, and the best thing thar Turner, 
Rudrrian and Heyward have done in this 
compelling critical celebration is to fo- 
cus on the shefer complexity of whoever 
was the real Tallulah Bankhead. 


Khashchevatsky noted that his documen- 
tary, which cost about 540,000, had won 
several prizes this year, including a Ber- 
lin film festival award. “Making this 
movie was easy,” he said." Very few 
filmmakers get raw material this good.'* 

Thai raw material is Lukashenko, a 
relatively youthful 42 and a mere child by 
the standards of old Soviet bloc leaders. 
His origins as a collective farm boss shine 
through. To Western audiences, Luka- 
shenko may not seem an obvious matinee 
idol. But his muscular build and rugged 
looks appeal to Belarus's pensioners — 
one-quaner of the country's 10 million 
people — and especially to rural women. 
"Thej' literally swoon when he visits 
their villages," Khashchevatsky says. 

But it is Lukashenko's words that 
inspire Khasbchevatsky’s satiric genius. 
Much of “An Ordinary President” re- 
lics on an interview that Lukashenko 
gave to Siberian journalists who were 
the director's friends. The film opens 
with scenes of the Belarussian heartland 
and a gravelly voice-over that informs 
viewers of the country’s ancient divine 
curse. “God gave us the world’s most 
beautiful land,” intones Khashchevat- 
sky, the narrator. “To compensate, he 
also gave us the world's worst bosses." 


The camera cuts to Auschwitz, the 
Nazi death camp in Poland, where 
Lukashenko is axtending a memorial ce- 
remony. Looking appropriately solemn, 
he gazes at the sinister slogan over the 
entry gate: ’’Arbeit machifrei" ( " Work 
makes you free”). "Human rights” in 
Belarus, the president then lectures the 
journalists, implies more than it does in 
the West. In Belarus, he says, it includes 
the freedom to work. Work makes 
people free, he declares. “Not every- 
thing that happened was black and 
white.” he continues. Hitler must have 
had his “good side. ’ ' After all. Germany 


reached "the peak of its power” under 
Hitler, strength that developed slowly 
over centuries. "And that corresponcfs 


to what’s happening in our country.” 

S TALIN remains Lukashenko's 
hero. Last month Lukashenko 
became the first post-Commu- 
nist former Soviet leader to sign 
a union agreement with Moscow and 
now boasts of having czarlike powers. 
After disbanding the parliament and gut- 
ting the constitutional court. Lukashen- 
ko restored the symbols of Soviet rule: 
the film captures the president’s en- 
tourage gleefully lowering the red-and- 


white flag that flew over Belarus after it 
gained its independence from Moscow 
in 1991. “But it wasn't enough just to 
lower the old flag," the director says in 
the film: the advisers are pictured cut- 
ting the cloth into tiny squares, which 
were then sold off for a 100 each, a 
fortune for Belarussians, who earn about 
SSO a month. “I know the price.” he 
says. “I bought a piece." 

A graduate of the film academy in St. 
Petersburg, Khashchevatsky was influ- 
enced by the films of Federico Fellini 
and Ingmar Bergman, and most strongly 
by the Soviet filmmaker Mikhail Romm, 
whose 1966 movie. "Ordinary Fas- 
cism," compared fascism in Germany io 
communism in Russia. Undaunted by 
the baruiing of his film at home, he is 
already planning his next: “An Ordinary 
President: The Sequel.” He is unwilling 
to say whether he is joking. But 
Lukashenko, he adds, is no laughing 
matter. “His ambitions are far grander 
than tiny Belarus," Khashchevatsky 
said. "He sees himself as a future leader 
of a unified Russian Federation. So he 
embraces the right-wing Russian oppo- 
sition and wails for Boris Yeltsin to die 
and for fortune to mm his way. We laugh 
at him now, but we should be afraid." 




fes 

i;^i 


Jikhih MilierThe Sen Y.ik Time* 


Yuri Khashclieiarsky's banned film satirizes the Belarussian president. 


Academy for Young Musicians Hopes to Settle in Venice 


V the fall of the Berlin Wall, the 
European Mozart Founda- 
tion's aims were to revitalize 
the Continent's chamber music tradi- 
tions and to give a chance to young 
musicians to broaden their horizons and 
launch their careers without subjecting 
themselves to the blood sport of in- 
ternational competitions. 

The Velvet Revolution in Czech- 
oslovakia appeared to be an opportunity 
for the foundation to establish itself 
permanently in Prague, but the original 
prospect of a home in the restored theat- 
er where Mozart premiered “Don Gio- 
vanni” in J787 eventually came to 
nothing, and a subsequent proposal for 
the foundation to settle in Hungary at 
Eszterhaza, where Haydn lived and 
worked, also turned out to be a fairy 
castle in the air. 

The foundation, however, stuck it out 
in Eastern Europe by adopting a peri- 
patetic lifestyle, spending two years in 
Czechoslovakia and three in Poland, 
and holding successful festivals every 
Christmas in Budapest, Easter in 
Krakow and June in Prague. Over the 


By Roderick Conway Morris P ast 18 m ° n ?* Ihe - vou "S . music , ia ? s 

/.«. rn.nu.ml HcrM Tribune 5 1Ve ^ devastated Cities of the 

former Yugoslavia. The foundation has 

ENICE — Bom at the time of now announced that it is to seek a 


permanent base in Venice, and to herald 
this change in direction, it has just 
staged its first Mosira Mozart (Mozart 
Show), a four-day festival billed to be- 
come an annual event here. 

The brainchild of Alain Coblence, a 
49-year-old American-bom interna- 
tional lawyer of French parentage with 
a passion for chamber music, the foun- 
dation was inspired by his realization 
that the lively state of chamber music in 
the New World and its relative weak- 
ness in Continental Europe was primar- 
ily the result of the Holocaust and 
World War n. which had forced so 
many leading musicians to flee. 

“So it became my dream to replant 
these roots of the great central Euro- 
pean chamber music tradition by bring- 
ing back the great masters who had 
emigrated and reuniting them with the 
younger generations of European mu- 
sicians," Coblence said. 

A first attempt to hold a summer 
school at Nimes, France, in 1986 co- 
incided with a record-breaking heat 
wave, and was "a total disaster,” 
Coblence said, as the grear masters. 


V .ViivS . 



several of whom were in their 70s and 
80s, fled once again to America in 
search of air-conditioning. 

Meanwhile. Coblence came to think 
thar a summer school was nor in any 
case adequate to his purposes, “because 


lions from corporate sponsors and 
private donors. 

A guiding principal of rhe founda- 
tion's’ ethos remains its creator’s op- 
position to competitions. “I felt very 1 
strongly that they are destructive, cruel 


what I reallv wanted to do was to brine and absurd, and that it was time to find 


back not just the music, but the culture 
surrounding it. And by then I'd become 
aware that young musicians were being 
trained like circus horses, with so much 
emphasis on virtuosity and technique 
that they no longer had time to read, to 
visit museums, to go to the theater and 
achieve a wide enough culture to un- 
derstand the context and the meaning of 
what they were playing.” 

The upshot was the Mozart Foun- 
dation's Academy, where musicians 
over 22, who have finished their formal 
studies, can spend up to a year playing 
with invited masters, learning about oth- 
er art forms, and talking to invited “hu- 
manities professors,” who have so far 
included writers, film directors, archi- 
tects, historians and diplomats, and non- 
musicians from many-other fields. 

All of the roughly 60 students are 
fully supported by scholarships, the 


another way of discovering new talent.” 
Coblence said. “And I rather naively 
thought that I could in fact mobilize the 
Western critics, agents and concert pro- 
ducers to come to Prague. Krakow and 
Budapest to listen to these rising new 
talents. But it didn't quite work out that 
way. And. though we’ve had a huge 
success and thousands of people have 
come to our festivals, I can’t say I've 
managed to get- the presence of the mu- 
sical professionals I’d hoped for.” 


A S well as seeing Venice as a 
place that should lure the lead- 
ing lights of the international 
music world for an annual tal- 
ent-spotting visit. Coblence said that he 
had also been influenced in his choice 
by looking toward the next century. 

“Although the foundation has 
played its modest role in reviving 


foundation's S 1 .5 million yearly budget chamber music and promoting dialogue 
being raised from grants, from bodies within Eastern Europe," he said, "I’ve 
such as the European Union and dona- come to believe that the challenge now 


lies in building bridges with the South, 
with the Near and Middle East, for 
which Venice, with its unique position 
and history, would be the ideal 
place.” 

The projected move to Venice, which 
could take place as early as the fall of 
1998, has been the occasion of the fur- 
ther opening up of the Mozart Foun- 
dation s activities, with an invitation to 
other institutions around the world to 
propose their most promising young 
musicians to take pan in the Mosira 
Mozart. Thus, of the 25 or so musicians 
appearing this year, only a third had 
previously been to the academy. 

Four main evening concerts were 
held in the ballroom of Ca’ Rezzonico. 
the city’s Museum of the 18th Century, 
on the Grand Canal, with additional late- 
aftemoon "beach” recitals in the Sala 
Visconti at the Grand Hotel des Bains on 
the Lido. The evening performances re- 
volved around geographical areas, the 
first featuring Armenian songs and 
works by Shostakovich, Prokofiev and 
Lutoslawski: the second, on July 4, New 
World pieces by Copland, Corigiiano 
and Tower (rounded out with Mozart's 
Clarinet Quintet); the third, French 
works by Debussy, Chausson and Rous- 
sel: and the last, music from India. 


PARIS FASHION 

Taking Dior Into Wonderland 


Pi 

derland. 


By Suzy Menkes 

hucnuriiinal Herald Tribune 

ARTS — A midsummer moment 
of magic and poetry unfurled in 
a rose garden Tuesday, as John 
Galliano took Dior into Won- 


Dior’s mermaid dress with irises and peacock appliques. 


The exceptional talent of the way- 
ward British designer reached full 
bloom in his second season, as he fused 
his romantic imagination with exquisite 
French workmanship, creating a high 
noon .for haute couture. 

The audience in the Bagatelle gar- 
dens sat transfixed at the vision of fin de 
sibcle dresses embroided with sinuous 
irises or a skin tike overlapping peacock 
feathers. They were a theme taken up in 
the bird-topiary lopping a four-poster 
bed that served as a sensuous resting 
place for the models. 

With the mise-en-sefene alone — the 
urns created from silver-gray goose 
feathers, the rambling bouquets of tea 
roses and the beribboned chandeliers 
swaying in the transparent greenhouse 
tenr — Galliano created spine-tingling 
anticipation. 

But he also created superb clothes, 
with many references to the past, because 
that is his thing. But they were so subtly 
done that the Edwardian silhouette of the 
daywear could be broken down into the 
wasp-waist jacket of Dior's glory years, 
worn with the slinky bias-cut skirt that is 
theglory of Galliano. 

To be sure it would have been good to 


see the curved riding coats over slim 
pants (as clients will order them) instead 
of the ankle-sweeping skirts — if only to 
see more of the adorable shoes, fluffy 
with feathers. As swan-like necks, ringed 
with silver African necklets, rose from 
sculplted collars, die effect was wildly 
dramatic. But it was also a pure and 
beautiful abstraction of signature Gal- 
liano ideas. 

Instead of just pecking at different 
cultures, the designer absorbed them, 
making his familiar short, sexy dress 
into an utterly-French froth of lace, worn 
with feather-patterned black hose and 
garter belt — a saucy take on Toulouse- 
Lautrec’s carrot -haired La Goulue. 

Other light-hearted references were 
to Mata Hari in seductive tiger-marked 
furs, the British Raj in feathered ai- 
grettes and Alphonse Mucha in the pea- 
cocks feathers and irises, which were 
even worked into a fur stole. 

But forget the camp vampiness of 
previous collections. The defining spirit 
was lighthanded sumptuousness: the 
succulent. 18th-century colors; the 
jeweled Belle Epoque corsages; the tar- 
nished lam£ fabrics; the lyrical ball 
gowns in mille-feuille layers of pleats. 

In a world of functional fashion, these 
clothes were the stuff that dreams are 
made of and the enchantment of the 
audience was palpable. 

“ft is so beautiful you can 't believe it 
— some of the dresses are like flower 
arrangements,” said the British ambas- 
sador's wife, Sylvia Jay, wearing one of 


the Dior panamas handed out to shade 
the crowd. 

“I have never been to a fashion show 
which is so well put together,” said 
Princess Marie-Chantal of Greece, sit- 
ting in a spring-green Chanel outfit near 
Dior's president Bemaud Arnault, who 
must feel proud to have had his con- 
troversial choice of Galliano so swiftly 
vindicated. 

Big-spending couture client Mouna 
ai Ayoub, front row in a fringed Prince 
of Wales Dior suit from the summer 
season, summed up a general feeling. 

"There is now no doubt that Galliano 
is one of the great couturiers,” she said. 
' ‘And don’t tell me that these clothes are 
not made to be worn. High fashion is 
like any other art. And this show was 
brilliant.” 


ESCADA 

in Paris 

SALE 

on summer 
collection 

Marie-Maitine 

8, rue de Sevres. 

Paris 6th 

Tel: 01 42 22 18 44 


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Hcralb lSSl Sribunf 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


R 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Stocks Hit 
A Record 
On Job Cuts 

' International Paper 
Plans to Lay Off 9,000 

By Mitchell Martin 

huemarional Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — A late rally on Wall 
Street sent the Dow Jones industrial 
average to a record close on Tuesday, 
lifted by news that International Paper 
was planning a restructuring program to 
improve its financial performance. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
rose 103.82 points, or 1.3 percent, to a 
record 7,962.31, preliminary closing 
data showed, while the broader Stan- 
dard & Poor's 500-stock index gained 
6.55 points, to 918.75, also a record. 
*-i Technology issues were strong, and 
~ they helped the Nasdaq composite index 
rise 14.36, to an all-tiine high of 
1,485.10. 

News that International Paper would 
cut 9,000 jobs, curtail pulp ana uncoated 
paper capacity and sell about SI billion 
worth of assets kindled a sharp rise in 
prices when it reached the markei just 
before 3 PM. New York time. Inter- 
national Paper, a component of the Dow 
industrials, rose 5 1 1/16 to 56%. 

International Paper said it would re- 
duce pulp and uncoated p^per capacity 
by at least 400,000 tons, closing several 
U.S. facilities and converting several 
others to new uses. It said it would sell 
its imaging and multiwall kraft pack- 
aging businesses and 175,000 acres of 
■- i timber! and in the western portions of 
J Pennsylvania and New York State. 

The market “has been waiting about 
20 years’' for this kind of focus on 
profitability, said Mark Connelly, a pa- 
per and forest products analyst at JP. 
Morgan Securities. 

He said it was good news for in- 
vestors that the company was getting 
out of some of its less-profitable lines, 
although he said it was hard to tell which 
businesses were the most lucrative be- 
cause International Paper does not “dis- 
close that much. " He said it was “fair to 
assume that their specialty, businesses 
are doing better than their commodity 
businesses” although the latter were a 

See STOCKS, Page 14 



KMjj Uu/AfOK Fwhnc 

TOASTING THE BULLS — A stock trader in Frankfurt celebrating with champagne Tuesday after the 
DAX benchmark index crossed 4,000 points for the first time. The index dosed up 0.84 percent, at 4,006.4. 


GEC ‘Radical’ Plan Shifts 
Focus to Defense Unit 

Chief Seeks Move From ‘Joint- Venture Culture ’ 


CtmqnM be Our Su/FFnim Dapuxkrt 

LONDON — General Electric Co. 
PLC unveiled on Tuesday a four-year 
plan of “radical change” to focus on its 
Marconi defense electronics unit and 
perhaps pull out of its two biggest joint 
ventures. 

Britain's largest manufacturing com- 
pany, which produces goods from Hot- 
point appliances to Brimstone anti-tank 
missiles, said it was in talks over the 
future of its GEC-Als thorn rail-car unit 
and its GPT telecommunications unit, 
two its largest businesses. 

The plan, engineered by the man- 
aging director, George Simpson, is the 
first shakeup of GEC in the 34 years 
since former Chief Executive Lord 
Weinstock started patching it together 
through acquisitions. 

. “The ambitious repositioning 
strategy announced today is designed to 
build Marconi into a global player,” 
Mr. Simpson said. "GEC has reached a 
stage in its development when it needs 
to transform itself through a process of 
radical change." 

Mr. Simpson said he wanted to focus 
the company “away from joint-venture 
culture* ' ana on defense, industrial elec- 
tronics and telecommunications . 

The announcement marks the end of 


Japan Banks Sell Eurotunnel Loans on the Cheap 


CMpMbyOtrShtfFnmtDupjitka 

TOKYO — Several Japanese com- 
mercial banks said Tuesday that they 
had reduced their exposure to Euro- 
tunnel debr by selling loans to other 
financial institutions. 

“We haveentirely quit our holding of 
debt for Eurotunnel PLC,” a spokes- 
man at Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank Ltd. said, 
referring to the financially strapped op- 
erator of the Channel Tunnel. 

“We cannot disclose the timing of 
the sale or the amount, as transactions 
involve other financial institutions,” he 
added. 

Executives of Fuji Bank Ltd. and 
Asahi Bank Ltd. also confirmed that 
they had shed Eurotunnel debt. 

The Nihon Keizai Shimbun reported 


Tuesday that 10 city, or commercial; 
banks had cut their combined exposure 
to Eurotunnel debt by 60 percent by 
selling their loans to European and U.S. 
investors. 

Eurotunnel's total debt is estimated at 
£9 billion ($15.16 billion). Of that sum, 
more than 30 Japanese banks held a total 
of £1.8 billion, or 20 percent, as of 
March 1996, making them Eurotunnel's 
largest lender. 

Loans from the 10 city banks were 
about £1 billion, the Nihon Keizai Shim- 
bun said, but the amount has plunged to 
£400 million because of the loan sales. 

Hie newspaper said Sanwa Bank 
Ltd., Dai-Ichi Kangyo, Sakura Bank, 
Fuji Bank Ltd.. Asahi Bank, Sumitomo 
Bank Ltd. and Hokkaido Takushoku 


Bank had sold their entire holdings of 
Eurotunnel debt, while Bank of Tokyo- 
Mitsubishi Ltd., Tokai Bank and Daiwa 
Bank still held some Eurotunnel debt. 

European and U.S. institutions 
bought the loans from the Japanese city 
banks, planning to resell them when 
Eurotunnel finances improve, the paper 
quoted sources as saying. 

A manager at the London branch of a 
U.S. bank was quoted as saying it had 
bought loans at 40 percent to 45 percent 
of face value. 

The news comes days before Euro- 
tunnel shareholders are to vote Thurs- 
day on the company's latest debt-re- 
structuring plan. But analysts said 
sharehokfers of Eurotunnel SA of 
France and Eurotunnel PLC of Britain 


were likely to approve the company’s 
financial reorganization plan. 

Resistance to the plan has crumbled 
since the British and French govern- 
ments agreed last week to extend the 
company's concession to operate the 
tunnel. The remaining opposition to the 
debt restructuring will not be enough to 
block it, the analysts said. 

The plan submitted to shareholders 
would give creditor banks a 45 J percent 
stake in Eurotunnel in return for the 
rescheduling of some 70 billion French 
francs ($11.9 btllion)of debt 

“A good number of shareholders 
have come out in favor of the plan, 
especially since the operating conces- 
sion has been lengthened,” die bank 
manager said. (AFX. AFP. Bloomberg) 


Mr. Simpson's 10-month review of 
GEC’s strategy, which started when he 
took the reins from Lord Weinstock in 
September. His fin ding s were delivered 
as GEC said it expected to report a 32 
percent decrease in its 1997 net income, 
to £460 million ($774.9 million), re- 
flecting a higher tax rate and charges to 
streamline the group. 

The figures suggest profit fell 30 per- 
cent in the second half of 1997, to £286 
millio n, though GEC did not release 
those numbers. It said pretax profit for 
the year before the charges rose 1 per- 
cent, to £1.01 billion, in line with ana- 
lysts’ expectations. Sales rose to £11. 15 
billion from £10.99 billion. 

Speculation has swirled for months 
that GEC would announce the sale of its 
venture with Alcatel Als thorn of France 
or the GPT venture with Siemens AG of 
Germany. 

In his statement, Mr. Simpson 
stopped short of announcing that the two 
would be divested, saying only that talks 
with the partners were in progress. 

In Paris, an Alcatel spokesman con- 
firmed Tuesday that talks with GEC had 
been in progress for some time but that 
no conclusions had yet been reached. 
Siemens executives were unavailable 
for comment 

Mr. Simpson expressed frustration 
that Alsthom and GPT. two of GEC's 
biggest units behind the Marconi de- 
fense electronics business, could not 
respond quickly to changes within their 
industries because of their joint venture 
status. Marconi, be said, needed invest- 
ment to maintain its place as Europe’s 
second-biggest maker of military radars 
and missiles. 

“GEC, as an increasingly global 
company in a rapidly changing envir- 
onment, must respond to external 
change more quickly," Mr. 


said. 


Simpson 


“Second, oor corporate performance 
needs ro create greater value for share- 
holders,” he added 
Mr. Simpson also decried the pres- 
sure for change created by “rapid con- 
solidation of the U.S. defense in- 
dustry.” In telecommunications, he 
said, GPT must respond quicker to de- 
regulation efforts. 

The new GEC, he said, would be 
“tightly focused” on units that the com- 
pany controls. (Bloomberg. AFX) 


MEDIA MARKETS 


Book Trade Finds It Must Modernize 


By Doreen Carvajal 

New York Times Service 


NEW YORK — In a watershed year 
for the business of books, the pub- 
lishing industry is struggling with rec- 
ord-breaking returns of unsold copies, 
a steady decline in adult trade sales and 
a shelf life for new tides that has com- 
pressed to “somewhere between radic- 
chio and active culture yogurt,” 

That is the gloomy family snapshot 
of the literary trade in 1996, a portrait 
compiled in an annual study by the 
publisher-backed Book Industry Study 
Group, which found that the system is 
suffering from some fundamental 
problems that date back to business 
practices developed 70 years ago. 

Sales of hardcover and paperback 
adult trade books — the chief money- 
makers for publishers — fell by 5.3 
percent, to 459 million copies, in 1996, 
the second consecutive year that the 
drop topped $ percent At the same 
time, the average rate of returns in that 
category ho vered at about 35 percent of 
copies shipped to booksellers. 


data, 1991 though 1996, showed that 
sales grew steadily in the early 1990s 
and peaked in 1994, when 513 million 
copies were sold, an increase of 6.3 
percent from a year earlier. 

Publishers have been acutely con- 
scious of the subsequent fulloff, which 
has-been accompanied by large num- 
bers cf returns from bookstores. Unlike 

in many other industries, booksellers 


— tiie retailers — share little of the risk 
that a product will be unsuccessful, 
since publishers allow them to return 
unsold items, a custom that started in 
the Depression as an enticement to 
booksellers. 

“The returns problem in 1996 has 
proved so widespread and persistent 
that the industry has had to admit there 
is an underlying, fundamental prob- 
lem,” said Jean Srnecz, a contributor 
to the report and a merchandising vice 
president for Baker & Taylor Books, a 
distributor. 

In the report, Ms. Srnecz blames the 
‘ ‘returns crisis” on a variety of forces, 
from reliance on computerized sales 
information that compresses the life 
cycle of books to the rise of conglom- 
erate-owned publishing houses that an- 
swer to Wall Street 

She said these publishing houses try 
to satisfy corporate demand for profits 
by betting their money on what they 
think are sure winners — a limited 
number of star authors who command 
premium advances. 

But too often recently, these gam- 
bles have resulted in heavy returns — 
as demonstrated by the dismal showing 
of books by such celebrities as Dick 
Morris, the former aide to President 
Bill Clinton, or Jay Leno, the host of 
the Tonight Show, or Johnnie Cochran 
Jr., the attorney for O J. Simpson. 

For the foreseeable future, adult 
trade sales are expected to only sta- 
bilize, according to the research group. 
It projects a drop of 0.6 percent for 


1997 and a modest 0.9 percent increase 
in 1998. Such lowered expectations 
have inspired a new mantra in the pub- 
lishing business: efficiency. 

"We’ve gone through a few go-go 
years when superstores were opening 
up on every block,” said Larry Kirsh- 
baum, chief executive and president of 
Warner Books. "We had this enor- 
mous growth in retail distribution. It 
was natural that sales would be ar- 
tificially inflated. We paid a price in 
terms of efficiency, ana I think what 
you’re seeing now is a correction 
where the publishers are putting out 
less copies and the retailers are more 
efficient themselves.” 

By publishing fewer titles and lim- 
iting print runs, publishers may be able 
to improve their profits, bat not ne- 
cessarily increase their overall sales, 
according to the report. 

Sales also lagged last year for pro- 
fessional and technical books and mass 
market paperbacks. Most other cat- 
egories of books fared better. Sales of 
books aimed at juveniles increased by 
S.S percent, to 388.5 million, while 
religious books sales grew 5.1 percent, 
to 164 million. 

The Book Industry Study Group has 
created a returns task force to study the 
issue with a rather ambitious goaL 

The mission, said Richard Kirsh, the 
head of the task force and a vice pres- 
ident at Bames & Noble, is to “reduce 
the negative financial effects while 
modernizing the industry’s basic busi- 
ness model to enter the 21st century." 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 




Cross Rates 

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Swiss FMMU 

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1-year 3VJ-314 1VS-TW 7*-7fc 4VI-414 

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(MOu^BmifimaeFmneelPintsirBmkafTakribMlaAbien'^veii 

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Key Money Rates 


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530 

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US 4ttten per ounce. UMon otfkM 
m^ZMcnaM^nift opening 
MritioUng prices; New YbrkComex 
MobJ 

Source: Reuters. 


Global Private Banting 


Wx 


DELY RECOGNIZED AS ONE 


OF THE WORLD’S SAFEST BANKS. 



Republic clients are uncommonly 
perceptive people. Tkey bnow we offer 
all the services of a modem, growth- 
oriented hank. Yet ask any of tkem to 
describe Republic in one word - and that 
word is invariably: Safe. 

The main reason is that we have built 
Republic’s global operations with client 
security. uppermost. It’s why we 
maintain one of the strongest capital ratios 
in the hanking industry, a high degree of 
operating efficiency and a relatively small 
loan portfolio. Our credit ratings are AA. 

Republic is now one of America's 25 
largest hanks and one of Switzerland’s 
largest foreign-owned banks, ranked by 
assets. Putting safety first evidently makes a 
great deal of sense to a great many people. 



TorlJ IhiaJqBOrttrt of 
Republie National Beak of 
Noe York hi New York. 



Republic National Bank of New York" 

Strength. Security. Service, 


A SJn> RmIi • New York » Geneva «. London • B«jln£ • Beirut ■ Beverly Hill. ■ Bueno* Aire. • Cayman L Linda * Copenhagen * Gibraltar 
Gncnuey - Hong Kontf - Jakarta - Lo* Angola. ■ Lugano - L ni n mk ourtf - Manila - Mexico City • Miami - Milan - Monte Carlo - Montevideo 
Montreal . Mo#c«w - Nuuu - Pari* ■ Perth ■ Punts del Erte * Rio de Janeiro • Santiago ■ Singapore • Sydney • Taipei • Tokyo • Toronto - Zurich 

* Rcpiddic Natuvul Buili i/i'mt YitL 1996 



PAGE 14 


30-Year T-Bond Yield 




F M A M J J 

1997 

tettvito ' ■ rvtegtoifj-.'r : J - * 


F M A M J J 
1997 






Qu o rt oSN 


Sourre: Bloomberg, Reuters 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 

ING to Acquire Equitable of Iowa 

Dutch Finance Firm Aims to Double U.S. Insurance Business 


j : 

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: 890-40-::.: 

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: ^ V'-' .v ; '8^2S s#M3: +0.SS; 


CoupOn) tnOwSuS! From Dppakhn 

ING Group, the largest Dutch 
financial-services company, said 
Tuesday chat it would buy Equit- 
able of Iowa Cos. for $2.6 billion 
in cash, stock and assumed debt, 
doubling its U.S. life insurance 
and retirement-savings business. 

Insurance companies have been 
consolidating rapidly in an effort 
to cut costs or expand as banks and 
securities firms make inroads into 
the insurance business. 

The acquisition of Equitable of 
Iowa gives ING access to middle- 
income, Midwestern life insurance 
markets, complementing its focus 
on upper- and lower-income East 
Coast customers, the company said. 
The purchase would raise the Dutch 


company to the No. 21 spot among 
U.S. life insurers from 43rd at a 
time when its Dutch rival, Aegon 
NV, and other European firms are 
vying for the U.S. market 

The deal is ING’s largest since 
its formation. In March 1995, ING 
took over Barings PLC, a British 
bank that collapsed amid massive 
losses. 

Equitable, based in Des Moines, 
Iowa, has operations in almost 
every state. In 1996, it reported a 
premium income of $2.1 billion 
and a net profit of $123 million, 
ING said. Equitable of Iowa is un- 
related to Equitable Cos., which is 
controlled by Axa-UAP of France. 

Under terms of the deal. Equit- 
able of Iowa shareholders would 


receive $68 for each of their 
shares. ING would also assume 
$400 worth of Equitable's debt. 

Hie deal needs the approval of 
U.S. authorities and Equitable’s 
shareholders. Also, if ING’s U.S.- 
traded shares average less than 
$40.29 or more than $54.51 in the 
10 days before the expected clos- 
ing in the fourth quarter, the deal 
may be called off, ING said. 

Equitable of Iowa shares singed 
15 percent on (he news, gaining 
$8,375 to $65.75 in late trading on 
che New York Stock Exchange. 
DIG shares rose 6.6percent to 
101.7 guilders ($51.77) in Am- 
sterdam. Its American depositary 
receipts were up $3 at $51.25. 

(Bloomberg, AP) 


MCI-BT Deal Clears a U.S. Hurdle 


lounulpuul Herald Tribune 


Very briefly! 

U.S. Says EU Cannot Stop Boeing 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — U.S. officials said Tues- 
day that the European Union would not be able to stop Boeing 
Co.’s acquisition of McDonnell Douglas Corp. and that its 
threat to disapprove the transaction on antitrust grounds would 
win few concessions from either Boeing or Washington. 

Administration officials said the EU was using the Boeing 
case to try lo force Washington to renegotiate a 1992 treaty 
that limits the amount of financial aid governments can give 
commercial aircraft makers. But Washington will reject any 
effort to link the takeover to the subsidy pact. Trade Rep- 
resentative Charlene Barshefsky said. “There is no need for 
fundamental modifications" in the treaty, she said. 

Texaco Names 2d Black to Board 

WHITE PLAINS, New York (AP) — Texaco Inc. has 
nominated Mary Bush, president of an international con- 
sulting firm, to be the first black woman on its board. 

Peter Bijur, Texaco’s chairman, said Monday that the 
nomination was part of Texaco's "continuing effort to bring a 
diverse array of ideas and talent to the board. ' * Texaco already 
has one black and one woman on ixs 12-member board. 

Texaco's racial policies became the subject of widespread 
debate last year with the release of tape recordings on which 
company officers allegedly belittled black employees and 
plotted to destroy evidence in a race discrimination case. The 
case was quickly sealed for a record $176 million. Criminal 
prosecutions are pending. 

• Chrysler Corp. is preparing to recall more than 1 .6 million 
trucks and vans this summer to fix several safety-related 
problems, including faulty air bag controls and minivan lift- 
gate supports. 

• America Online Inc. signed marketing agreements valued 
at $44 million with Amazon.com Inc. and 1 -800-Flowers, 
using its 8 million members to attract partners. BU-omhtrg. ap 


By Mike Mills 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
Justice Department has approved 
the proposal $2 1 billion sale of MCI 
Communications Corp. to British 
Telecommunications PLC, after the 
companies agreed to adopt safe- 
guards to ensure competitors are not 
hurt unfairly by the deaL 

The settlement, which bars BT 
from sharing confidential informa- 
tion about its other U.S. customers 
with MCI, removes another barrier 
to what would be the largest foreign 
buyout of a U.S company. Final 
approval of the deal, which was 
announced in November, now rests 


with the Federal Communications 
Commission and several stale reg- 
ulatory bodies, including Califor- 
nia’s. 

By acquiring MCI, the second- 
largest long-distance company in 
the United States, BT hopes to be 
able to expand more quickly world- 
wide while getting a major foothold 
in the U.S. telecommunications 
market. 

"MCI and BT remain confident 
that the merger can be completed as 
expected by fait" said a joint state- 
ment issued Monday by die compa- 
nies, which plan to call the com- 
bined entity Concert 

In approving the deal, the Justice 
Department’s antitrust division 


Euro Jitters Lift Dollar Against Mark 


Bloomberg Nett’S 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
to a three-year . high against the 
Deutsche mark Tuesday as the Ger- 
man currency fell against the pound 
amid expectations that Europe's 
single currency would be weak. 

The pound surged against the 
mark after a report showing a pickup 
in inflation reinforced expectations 
that the Bank of England would 
raise lending rates this week. 

That rise, combined with spec- 
ulation that Europe's planned eco- 
nomic and monetary union would 
include a weak euro, bolstered the 


dollar to its highest level against the 
mark since February 1994. 

“The dollar is trading off ster- 
ling-mark predominantly, and it's 
still seen as a safe haven against the 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE ~ 

euro," said Seth Garrett, chief for- 
eign-exchange trader at Credit 
Suisse First Boston. 

The dollar was at 1.761 1 DM at 4 
P.M. in New York trading, up from 
1.7530 DM. 

It was at 1 12.925 yen, up from 
112.750. as traders took positions 


Retailer Ward Files 
Surprise Bankruptcy 


asked the U.S. District Court in the 
District of Columbia to modify and 
extend an existing settlement that 
the department reached with MCI 
and BT in 1994 when the British 
company bought an initial 20 per- 
cent stake in MCI. 

“A lot has happened in this dy- 
namic industry since 1994, but Brit- 
ish Telecom still has market power 
in the U.K.," said Joel Klein, acting 
antitrust chief. He cited a need to 
"ensure that U.S. consumers con- 
tinue to enjoy the lower prices and 
better service associated with com- 
petition on international routes." 

The European. Commission ap- 
proved the MCI purchase, with only 
minor conditions, on May 15. 


By Jennifer Steinhauer 

Snr York Time* Servin' 

NEW YORK — Montgomery 
Want one of the oldest names in 
U.S. retailing, has filed for bank- 
ruptcy protection, surprising even 
those who had closely monitored 
the company’s waning fortunes. 

Montgomery Ward Holding 
Corp. is half owned by GE Capital, 
which many had expected to again 
bail out the retailer — it has invested 
$180 million in Montgomery Ward 
and lent it an estimated $300 million 
to $900 million. Instead, GE Capital 
sa id Monday, it would provide $1 
billion as part of the Chapter 1 1 
bankruptcy reorganization. 

For GE Capital, which has en- 
joyed a long run of successful in- 
vestments, the filing Monday was 
an embarrassing culmination of a 
troubled nine-year link with Mont- 
gomery Ward. 

’Tbe retailer, known for its aisles 
of appliances and electronics, has 
been reporting losses for ai least a 


year. The privately held company 
lost $249 million on revenue ofS5.8 
billion last year. In recent weeks, it 
failed to make payments to many 
important suppliers, many of whom 
stopped shipments. 

The bankruptcy filing in U.S.- 
Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, 
Delaware, came after tire company 
had been deadlocked, in., ajgotk 
ations with its banking syndicate ,, 
and insurance companies; for A 
months over $1.4 billion in defer. - 

Montgomery Ward had been , ^ 
hoping to secure a refmancingpack-.. 
age, but the banks would refinance 
the company only if new loans were 
secured, an idea that GE Capital 
opposed, knowing that it also would 
have to supply more cash and want- . 
ihg its own position secured over ' 
those of the other lenders. 

The company is hoping to make a ‘ 
comeback by turning its outlets into # 
lower-priced department stores, 
with a strong emphasis on apparel, ' 
jewelry and other goods with higher 
margins than consumer electronics. 


STOCKS: Paper Firm Sparks Record ^ 


ahead of the release Wednesday of a 
Japanese government report on 
trade. 

The dollar was also at 1.4645 
Swiss francs, up from 1 .46 1 2 francs 
and at 5.9397 French francs, up 
from 5.9105 francs. 

The pound was at S 1 .6880. down 
from $1.6903. 

The British inflation report “was 
strong enough to get people con- 
vinced that interest rates are going 
up on Thursday," said Jeremy 
Hawkins, chief economist at Bank 
of America in London. “Sterling is 
going to 3 marks." 


Continued from Page 13 

far bigger part of its sales. 

The news from International Pa- 
per came as it announced its earn- 
ings, one of the first major compa- 
nies to do so for die second quarter. 
Profit reports are expected to give 
the market direction -in coming 
weeks as investors gauge corporate 
results in light of the expected slow- 
ing of the U.S. economy from its 
rapid first-quarter expansion, which 
was 5.9 percent at an annual rare. 
With the Dow industrials up 23 per- 
cent so far this year, following 
double-digit gains in 1995 and 1996, 
profit growth is expected to be an 
important factor for stock prices. 

Paper companies had been ex- 
pected to post weak earnings be- 
cause of heavy inventories of their 
goods on user's shelves. It was hard 
to tell how International Paper’s op- 
erations did because the company 
said it was taking $535 million of 
pretax charges for the divestitures, 
but its report of $59 million, or 20 
cents a share, in second-quarter in- 
come before the unexpected ex- 
penses seemed to be a little bit better 
than analysts’ estimates. 

Overall, the company had a loss 
of $419 million, compared with net 
profit of $99 million, or 33 cents a 
share, a year earlier. Sales fell to 


$5.0 billion from $5.1 billion in the 
quarter. 

The company said its restructur- 
ing plan would begin to add to earn- 
ings this year and would have a 
greater impact next year. It plans to 
maintain capital spending at $1.2 
billion next year but would pot make 
significant additions to capacity. 

Elsewhere, technology stocks 
were strong, with Compaq tip 5 at 

IIS. STOCKS " 

1 19 Vi. Motorola, which was sched- 
uled to report its earnings after the 
market closed, added 254 to 8254. 

Amgen shares rose after the drug 
company was added to the “ap- 
proved list" by analyst A. Marshall 
Acuff at Smith Barney. 

Atlas Air fell as the air carrier was 
cut to “neutral" from “outper- 
form" by analyst Jordan Sherman at 
Morgan Stanley, Dean Witter, Dis- 
cover & Co. 

Barrick Gold stock after the gold 
mining company was boosted to 
"buy" from "hold” by Salomon 
Brothers Inc. analyst Leairne 
Baker. 

Boston Scientific rose after the 
medical device company said 
second-quarter revenue increased 
25 percent to $474 million from 
$379 million a year earlier. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

Die lop 300 most active stares 
up to the dosing on Hat Street. 

The Associated Press. 

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s« hiu m Lam ctrgf Indexes 
in ii* is* nl*. Dow Jones 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


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II* 11* 

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Tram 7 010. Tfl 28722? 28OT 02 2S21X5 +M4 
Ull 231.71 23200 2X1 .23 22130 +1.06 

Con* 242433 7446.1 B 2423 4? 2444 16 + 2224 

Standard & Poors 


Industrials 1065.721069.28107261 
Transp. 657-44 649.79 652(H) 

Utilities 20234 20067 201.00 

Finance JUS-97 10432 10437 

SP 500 92226 90969 91220 

SP TOO 90136 88733 890-41 


47S-« 475.16 4780? +194 

40638 40166 *0681 +481 

43038 47*61 43632 .334 

390.94 339.15 790.7? +QJ) 
43844 43631 43771 *836 


Compaq 

(VUmT 

CateTOWs 

GajEfeci 

4 man 

PWlMOfS 


Vot Mlg* 
;23272 2649 
6)1*4 S3 
5S7B9 119* 
54416 43* 
477Q 34*k 
44587 7U* 
46400 11* 
45480 45 
44797 14* 
40074 S7V, 
38824 S3* 
38024 16* 
37674 39*1 
36295 346* 
34124 Hi 


Lew Law 

Z5k 2471 
79* 87b 
115* 1191b 
41* 43* 
35Vk 36b 
48b 499k 
lib II* 
441k 44* 
MVb 1 46* 
51* 54 

51* 57* 
14* 16W 
31* 29* 
33b 34* 
I M 


Nasdaq 


** Nasdaq 


148507 1470.15 14*5.07 +1433 

170030 1190.71 1700.19 +900 

169735 1642J3 1650.18 + 5.17 

167134 1659-40 14A5.IT -S32 

195448 194838 195461 *SjH 

97234 9*461 969J0 -533 


Hlgk Ih a*. 

432.77 43121 632.11 *0.14 


107746 ISO* 146* I 
8931? nx * 
86378 24 21* 

83070 48*. 45", 

81446 75* 73T*, 1 
789*3 50* 4** 

7 5341 17* IS* 
68E39 37* J/to 
601*0 39* 37tok 
53494 127* 124* 1 
49*55 43V, 42* 

44991 II* 90b 
* 46 3 1HV»I28*. 
43207 76* 74 

38204 58* ST* 


Dow Jones Bond 

20 Bonds 
10 UBBTres 
10 Industrials 


Cm 04 

103.77 +0.02 

101 J1 +003 

10623 +0.02 


914b 91 
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1* 1* 
5* 5*b 
r* in, 
26 * 264. 
44k 6»i 
S* 5* 
25* J6«re 
7V. 7* 


Trading Activity 


Advanced 

OerSrwa 

Uncnanned 
tboi raucs 
NewHtgtn 
New LOWS 


Advanced 
Decs usd 
Uncnonged 
TaoMKUW 
KewHIgte 
He* Lam 


J699 1473 

1153 1*15 

564 539 

3415 3417 

377 499 

20 78 


Nasdaq 


Amo need 
Decsnrt 
Unchanged 
Total aa» 
NcwH«K 


Market Sales 


1777 1991 

1623 7091 

3179 1652 

5578 5734 

.1*1 2*» 

79 83 


228 

257 

265 

309 

NYSE 

MC 

529.15 

157 

187 

Ames 

24 JO 

642 

~T. 

743 

74 

20 

NasOaq 

574J1 

7 

Inm&ons. 



Dividends 

Company Per Amt Rk Pay Company 

IRREGULAR AmerFsT 

AtnerFstArtlnv . A62S 741 8-25 SSS&S 


Par Amt Roc Pay 


Anw Partpf Eq 
Latin Amuibcoi 


_ .0625 741 8>25 
^ . .0883 741 9-2 

Latin Am Discover - .7007 7-14 7-18 

Mataysra Fund _ J065 7-14 7-1B 

MaryanS ton Aincfl - .4014 7-14 7-18 

Moran Emerg MM . .0203 7-T4 7-18 

Moran RusNwEu - .076 7-T4 7-18 

Thai Fund . .1794 7-14 7-18 

STOCK SPLIT 
Financial Fedl 3 tor 2 spilt. 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Gree ns t one Roberts I lor lOrevenespRt 
INITIAL 

Autoliv Inc _ .11 8-7 9-4 

Bay View Cap n - .08 7-11 7-25 

INCREASED 

Meditnist - .7175 741 B-1S 

. REGULAR 

Ale mo Group O .10 7-17 8-4 


AmerFstTxEx 

Associates Fst Q .10 B-4 9 

Bun Bear Gtalnco M .07 7-IB 7-: 

B rental Banks Q .14 7-17 7-3 

CoroGna F*t 
Cleveland Cliffs 

GreenPolnt On _ _ . _ . 

H otteras Inca Sec M .095 7-11 7< 

Kerr McGee a AS 9-5 10 

Line Nat CvSecvr 0 24 7-18 7-i 

UncNHInco 0 28 7-18 7< 

Method® Eke 0 ,05 7-15 7-j 

Nttnnt Natur Gas Q 30 741 8-1 

Pall Carp O .14 7-18 8 

Sefloman Quel 
Settjman Sel 
TennocaCorp 
Todd- AO A 
Twin aty Bncp 

Weyerhaeuser 

Hmudi b-apprwtawte c mount per 
slun/ADR; 9 -pombk la Cmmaon foods; 
m - m onthly , q-quortwfy i s-wit-onwtf 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sates fipures m umffiaaL Yeofy Kghs aid lows reflect the previous 52 weeks plus itio cunert 
week, but nc^Ttie lutest l iud inB day. Where uspit or staeUcftMen d an m urtlngB 25 percem or mere 
has been paid, Die yean hftfv-tow range and Addend ora shown lor the new stods tally Unless 
otherwise noted rales of cMkms so annual dsburaements based on the toted dedaratton. 
a - avidend also extra (si. b- annual rale of cflvWend plus stack dividend, e - liquidating 
dividend, ec - PE weeds 99.dd - coded, d - new yearly Paw. dd - toss In the tostl 2 months, 
e - dividend doctored or paid In preceding 12 months, f - annual rale. Increased on last 
dccio ration, g - dividend in CanotSan funds, subjea fa 15% nonresidence fax. I - dividend 
declared Offer split-up or stock dividend. | - dividend paid this year, omitted, deferred, or na 
action taken at latest dividend meeting, k - dividend dedared or paid this year, an 
accumulative issue with dividends In arrears, m • annual rate, reduced an last declaration, 
n • new Issue in the past 52 weeks. The high-low range begins with the start of trading, 
nd - next day delivery, p - Inffial dividend, annual rate unknown. P/E - prtce-eamlngs ratio, 
q - dosed-and mutual fund, r -dividend declared a r pa Id In preceding 1 2 months, plus stock 
dividend, s - stock spa. Dividend begins wfrti date of spilt, sis- sales, t- dividend paid In 
5fodi in preceding 12 months, estimated cash value on tt-dJvidend or ex-rtstitbutton date, 
u-new yeoiiy high-v-frodlng halted, N-/nl»ffluupfcy or racelmsWp or being reaiganized 
under the Bankruptcy AcL or seeurtttes assumed by such companies. wd> when distributed, 
wt - When issued' ww - with warrants, x - ex-tivideitd Of ex-rignts. alls - cx-dlstributm 
Wf - Without warrants, y- ox -dividend and sales In fuL ytd - yield, l - sales In full. 


July 8, 1997 




Hgh 

Low 

Latest 

Chge 

Optnl 

+l*k 

Grains 

CORN (CBOT) 

5000 bu n»nuik»r»- cotes per busbei 


*l‘l 

Xrl9T 

MA“i 

740 

W3’4 

-7'4 

17.794 


S®P V 

2J4 

228'4 

279*4 

-•to 

62.199 

IS 

Dec *7 

235 

22B*. 

227V. 

*V: 

I49J23 


Mar 78 

243 

237*1 

238 

*V: 

25J88 


MCV7B 

748V» 

243 V: 

243*5 


3024 

♦T 

JU98 

25114 

24641 

747*5 

-V. 

6.034 

♦ivj 

Sen 98 

249 

245 

745 

-Li 

7® 

Es.smes NA 

Mot s. sales 

10.777 



Moo's open in! J74J5D up 6927 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBQT) 

IM nvu- dolors oer ion 
AH 97 25200 74140 251 JO -?A0 
Aup97 23590 224.50 ZHJQ +7.49 
Sep 97 21600 211.00 21390 -SJ0 
00 97 20230 19830 19*30 -180 
Dec 97 19450 19030 19160 +i« 
Jan 98 19330 18*30 19080 +230 
Esl. sates NA Man's, mfes 25.160 
Man's aoeninr 116.754 up 291 

SOYBEAN OR. tCBOT) 

uaMO bv cen* par "b 


■W 77 

73.15 

22. DO 

2115 

*031 

30)1 

Aug 97 

22.25 

21.75 

3122 

♦0J4 

26386 

Sep?/ 

■nut 

22J0 

2134 

*034 

14.165 

0077 

2200 

2120 

2236 

*026 

15.716 

Dec 97 

2144 

220* 

2201 

*036 

42319 

Jan 78 

ZL57 

22.48 

2151 

*031 

cm 


Est. soles NA Mon's, staes M.IO? 

Man's open in) 111473 ait SO 

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

S^oe bu mnirnwn- cvntt per bushel 
Jd97 769 7324* 748 * 35S 7232 

AuoTT 724 *98 722 - 25 XL7I3 

5en97 635 614% 678% -14 17.801 

Nov 77 602(5 5KH 59 344 -9* 40317 

Jan 98 405 997 597^. *9*2. 12.912 

Est. sales NA Men's sales 51.908 
Man's open nd 144,345 up X26 

WHEAT (CBOT) 

5JX» bu rrenbnum- ccnK per IxnhH 


Jul 77 

J17W 

3Wte 

314 to 

-3 

3JI4 

Sep 72 

378'to 

331 

171V. 

-3 

41.265 

Dec 77 


3344. 

339 

*3>i 

32335 

Mar 78 

350 

345 

348 

♦ 3 v. 

5315 


Est. stfes NA Man's, soles 17,487 
Mon's open W 85.943 up 94 


Livestock 
CATTLE fCMER) 

JOJWOlbv- cunts per ib 

Aug 97 6X40 4230 62.92 -0.60 41424 

Od 97 47.07 6430 46.87 —025 15.(91 

Dec 97 69.97 4932 60.77 -0.27 14.937 

Feb 98 7185 71.42 71.75 6.104 

Aar 98 7175 7345 7172 -0.02 3.297 

Jun9B 7015 60.90 49.90 -0.12 2.134 

Est.sdes 15.677 Mon's sales 9.702 
Man's open m 94.341 aft 514 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

50-000 **. - rwvs per ta. 

Auo 97 0030 79.60 BOAS -085 11.066 

Sep 97 80.15 79J5 79.05 -030 2.918 

Oct 97 30J0 79.60 8015 -047 X96i 

Nov 97 8180 BIJ5 8135 -037 2J18 

Jan 98 US 8235 B2J» -0.60 1321 

Mor98 8140 8110 8129 -060 689 

Est. sales 4.150 Mon'S sales 1353 
Mon's open W 22.074 up ei 

HOG5-LeOB (CMER) 

«u»e tas - cwiis pw «x 

MV 83.25 8170 8305 -0.15 5.173 

AuB 97 8042 79.57 79.85 -025 UrdOl 

0097 7365 7L6S 7142 -032 8.152 

Dec 97 7TUS 60.70 TOffll -025 *,532 

Feb 98 48.85 48JD 4832 - 0 05 1.719 

ESI. sales 10.958 Man's, sates t0J*P 
Man's Open rt 344156 up 34057 

PORK BELUES (CMER) 

41 JOB tas.- cents pw ta 

Jul97 80-25 7780 78.72 -045 1.129 

Aug 97 79 JO 77.50 7B.50 -007 4386 

Feb 98 TUB 69-S 7035 *057 732 

Esl. sows 2.471 Mott’s, hops 7JH 
Mon's open frn 4.174 att 109 


COCOA (NC5EI 
M mnrlc tans- totrmi 


1556 

1495 

1556 

— 14W 

62 

1SB8 

1545 

157B 

—79 

33377 

1637 

1577 

1627 

-17 

32016 

1665 

1638 

1658 

*20 

21,771 

I67B 

1657 

16TB 

-12372 10043 

1476 

1675 

1676 

—12129 

1.148 


Est. sales 5.093 Man's, sates 5452 
Man's oaeninr 102,170 cH 1733 

COFFEE C (NCSE) 

I7JD0 bi* conn per fa. 

Jui97 191.50 187* 19130 -&2S 

Sep 97 17100 16UD 17135 -59$ 

Oec97 1572)0 15775 10.35 *150 

Mir 98 14X00 14430 146.75 -100 

Marti 143.00 1423d 14275 *225 

Ep. sates 5.329 Mon's, saws 4.909 
Man’s ooenlnt 20419 up IS 

SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSE1 
1 12400 to, - cores oar id. 


0097 

11,12 

■US 

1)01 


93012 

Mar 98 

1136 

11.20 

1131 


42047 

Me* 91 

11.14 

11.11 

11.11 

• 001 

9080 

AI 70 

11.05 

1102 

1103 

-801 

4.H 


High Low Latest Cltge OptnJ 

ORANGE JUKE (NCTN) 

1 5 400 fas. - cpvj per ip. 

Jul97 75.50 74.00 7435 -030 S99 

Sep 97 76JS 7440 7125 -l.W 19438 

Ptov 97 79.15 7730 78.10 -1.05 6.514 

Jon 98 8210 8060 90.90 — 1.15 2.500 

Est. sales NA Man's, sates 2359 
Man's open ire J1J47 i*> 43 


GOLD (NCMX) 

100 n<7f OL- twins par TW cu. 

M97 J3C 30 * 2.10 5 

Aug 97 32340 318.10 321 AO -LOO 11X910 
Sep 97 321.70 *IJ0 4 

On 97 32530 32030 372-80 *1.70 HUBO 
Dec 97 32730 32240 32400 +1.60 33081 
Feb 98 32930 32440 32700 *140 9J7S 

Apr 98 330.10 129.10 329.10 *1.60 4062 

Jun98 33330 33000 J3I30 *130 8,059 

Aug 98 33400 *100 747 

Ed. soles NA Mon’s, sates 6A4BI 
Mwi'sooenW 21X421 UP 2508 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 

IS400 tas.- cents per fa. 

Jul 97 III JO 107 JO 10740 —415 6432 

Aug 97 11040 10540 10530 -430 X716 

Sep 97 liaio 10400 10505 -435 24051 

Da 07 108.00 10335 10305 —430 1.284 

Now 97 10700 102J0 KOI 5 —440 1.215 

Dec 97 10710 102.70 10200 —4.10 4324 

Jan 98 104.90 I02J5 70235 -110 651 

Feb 98 10230 10135 101.35 —130 545 

Mar 98 1(030 IOOJO 100-30 -330 1.003 

Est sales ha Man's, sates 5060 
Man's open err 47387 i*> 276 

SILVER (NCMX) 

SUBUnwn-omiiPn irovot 
Jul 97 43500 47430 43000 *510 397 

Sep 97 43800 41730 4X150 -430 S3.773 

Dec ?7 44430 43200 41900 *4J0 14496 

Jan 98 44100 * 4.90 18 

Mor«8 44830 43800 446.00 *500 9.428 

Mav <8 45700 -149.00 4N.90 *440 7.863 

Jul 98 45730 45300 4S380 *400 2.000 

Sec 9* 44000 457.80 45700 * 400 489 

Es*. sales NA Man’s, srtes 39.3S0 
Man's open ntr V.TJ9 up MX 

PLATINUM INMER) 
tabov ox.- donors per UDV 04. 

M 97 40800 40150 4(030 -12S 1.103 

0097 39400 38630 3B6J0 -4J0 11002 

Jan 78 38«0O 38130 38130 -620 1.856 

Es). sales NA Tnon's-sates 2013 
Mon's open mt 13.758 oh 737 

Oase Previous 

LONDON METALS (LME1 
Doi tors per irelrtc Ian 
Alerelpuai iHtgk Crede) 

Spa I IS3900 154000 IS6SVT 1 5441S 

Fawara 1548.00 156000 159300 159400 

Capper CeMades (Hlgn Grade) 

Spot 2504.00 150700 254000 254300 

Hxwcrt 237800 237100 240100 2402.00 

Lead 

Spot 6359; 6369) 645 1 .* 644.1 

Favrard 648‘i 649V? 65600 65700 

Spot 6745 00 67SS0Q 676000 676500 

Forward 4860.00 687800 687500 688000 

Tin 

Spot 5470.00 548000 551000 5520.00 

Rvwred 5525.00 55X00 5540 00 557000 

2Idc CSpecka Hlgb Grade) 

Spol 143611 1437V* 1450.00 145100 

Forward 144900 145000 146300 146400 


Eg.f-Jes 9005 Mpfiiam 8401 
Man's ppwitm iSi.Btt oh m 


»gh Law Ouse Oigc OpW 

Financial 

U5T. BLLS (CMER) 

11 rmlion- pis or 100 pet. 

5eP 97 9490 MJS W .99 -0.0) 8.0)1 

Dec 97 94.75 94.73 94.74 SSJ 

MtrVB 94.66 9466 9466 -001 6 

Est. sales na Mon’s, sates 250 
Men's open i tv B.S69 a" 45 

5 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

SidO.aooarM-ate&eemsot i do per 

Sep 77 106-63 106-52 106-58 217.855 

Dec97 106-46 106-30 106-41 iui 

Mar 08 -ai 

Esl. soles 21000 Mon- 1. sales 73.617 

Man's open, nt 771076 aH 1317 

10 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

IlOO.DOe pnrv- pts & Pnas at 100 pa 
Sep 97 100-15 UN-07 107-12 138.679 

Oec97 109-04 ID8-X 109-01 5,137 

Mar 9* 1 0S-71 I 

Est sales 55.555 Man's, sates 58 Jie 
Man's open w 343016 up 3070 

US TREASURY BONDS IC0OT) 
ib oci-s iwaoa-pts a. jmo ■ of 100 act) 

Sep 77 113-78 11J-12 113-20 *56.793 

Dec77 113-14 113-00 1 1 3— 06 M.-JT* 

Mar 98 112-30 - 01 3028 

Junta 112-19 —01 001 

Est sales 300000 Man’s, sixes 114.080 
Mon’S men Ini 490020 UP 67 B4 

USOR 1-MONTH (CMER) 

S3 mraen- ate at 100 act 
0477 9434 9432 940] -O01 180Q6 

Aug 77 9433 74J2 7433 mS? 

5ep97 9401 7430 743l , jA 

Est. sates NA Man's sates 4.782 
Man's open W 47,579 up it? 

GERMAN GOV. BUND (UFPE) 

DM25MOO - pts of Ifldpct 
Sep 07 102.92 105-19 1K7« -Oo* 79a 1 7 * 
Doc 77 1BI.V1 101.75 101.83 -00s 8155 
Est.ialM: 158014. Pro*. wUn- 126.853 
Pro*, open (nt : 796.329 up 11.864 


Ktgti Law Latest Ctige Oplrd 

LONG GILT (UFFE) 

E5O000 - pts & 32nds of 100 pd 
Sep 97 114-29 114-15 U4-21 -005 162016 
Dec 97 NT. N.T. 11408 -005 628 

Est. sates: SA681. Prev. sales: 58.191 
Pre*. open bit- 1630*4 ufl 3011 

1 0-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT IF) 

FFsoaooo-ptsaMaopct 

Sep 97 13006 13030 13838 ~8 lI4 215.957 

Dee 97 9930 9898 *9.04 -0.12 1386 

EsL sates- 127.975. 

Opening 219443 up 16091. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 

ITL 200 minor -pts of 100 jxi 
Sep 97 13600 135.98 13646 *0.02 109029 
Dec 97 10830 10820 10832 -OOI U50 
Est sales: 51898 Piev solas: 4*814 
Pre*. open W 110H7 up 1359 
EURODOLLARS (OD£R> 

SI mRlon-atsal 100 pa. 

Jul 97 9426 9425 W25 42.553 

Aug 97 9434 9424 9434 18.151 

Sep 97 *423 9421 9422 552.974 

Dec 97 9407 9404 9406 449.270 

Afcrff MJS nn *401 J 87018 

JunTB 91«3 93.90 93.92 2S3J41 

Sep 98 9302 9300 9181 209045 

Dec 98 9171 9108 9170 14,938 

Mcr99 9309 9307 9168 112.325 

Jun9J 9305 9362 9304 89007 

SeP 99 9301 93J9 9300 76,529 

Dec 99 7354 *352 7353 67019 

BRITISH POUND (CMS!) 

63,9)0 pounds, S per pound 
SeP 97 1.0]O 167*4 10854 62012 

Dec 77 10840 I0?SO 1 6796 831 

Mar 98 10731 2 

Est. sates 11016 Man’s sales 10046 
Man’s open int 63045 UP 2752 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100000 aaUars. 1 nrr Cdn. <flr 
Sep97 J315 7284 7304 39033 

Oec97 7354 .»33D 73*7 20D9 

Mar 98 7374 555 

Esl. sales 5.542 Man's, sates 7.508 
Alton's open ini 42058 ad 325 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

1 23000 mars s. S Per made 
SeP 97 SV Sm 0708 103064 

Dec 97 0765 0741 5746 1062 

Mar 98 0784 227 

EU. sales NA Man’s, setes 17.441 
Mon’s open ini 104053 up 3658 

JAPANESE TEN (CMER) 

I ’.SraiTSon ren. s per 100 yen 
Sep 97 0990 0903 0953 60214 

Dec 97 .9102 9048 906* 1049 

Mar 98 9187 107 

Est. sales NA Mai's, sides 39.716 
Man's open rt 61070 up 1441 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

175000 trancs. S per front 

5«P *7 0906 0866 an 51056 

Dec 97 6963 6940 0952 *47 

Worn 7027 161 

Efljates NA Man's, sates 15009 
Men's uoenint 52064 up 1010 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

SMJtttnos loerjxBO 
SeP 97 .12330 .12285 .12327 19002 

Dec 97 .11910 11B6S .11907 I02S6 

Marie .11540 .11500 .11540 4057 

Esl. sales NA Man's, sates 18087 
Man’s open int 35.190 oN 55 


3-MONTH STERUNG (UFFE) 
C50a000-piioll00pd 
Sep97 *206 92.78 9200 — OJ35 I 

DBC97 9206 9206 92.SB -0.07 

Mar ®8 7706 9146 92-ffl -0.08 

JunTB 9205 9244 9247 — aQ7 

5epW 9206 9246 9248 -0.07 

Dec 98 9207 9247 7200 -0.07 

Esl solos: 122.751 Pre* sales fln.285 
Pro*, open Int 566063 up HL156 

MAONTH EUROMARK (UFFE) 

DM] tnliRon . pts at 100 pet 

Jin 97 9608 9687 9*07 UnOi. 

AugW 96 87 9487 9*06 Unci, 

9*04 -a.oi J 

Dec*7 *6 79 96 77 96.78 -001) 
MarTJ 96 70 9668 9609-0.01) 

ton w 96M 9604 9605 -0.01 1 

S'?! 2*^ ^ Una, i 

2*2! ?9-’ 1 9608 96 10 linen. I 

Mor*9 9608 9585 958* UnrtT 

c Un n ?5 67 95 65 95 ,6 UlKtL 

Sop 99 95 47 95 45 95 46 Until. 

I? soles: 88261 . Prev. stfoi: 45,129 
Pie*, open Int.. 1,4820)96 ofl 

w sl ££ 25 “8S ! 

OkM S*- 28 *A30 — OOI : 

96.10 76.10 — 002 - 

25-S ,ia ® -an ■ 

S 71 W7 ° ,in u nas 

Eli. roles. 37010. 

OponlnL-24a687 off 1 . 186 . 

3-MONTN EUROLIRA (UPFE) 


ITL 1 nitBlan - ptsoMOO pet 

W07 9302 9304 —0.04 110040 
2JEJ2 S 3 ® 3 91M —005 86005 

MarTS *4.74 9*15 7420 —AM «L4U 

ton W 9447 9441 7444 —am 35,957 

St 58 94441 77011 

DocTfi 9473 9407 9471 UnOi UM3 

Est mi os- 51065. Prev. sofas: 3405* 
open W.: 3*0.870 up 332 


Hltfi Law Latest Chge Oplrd 

Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTN) 

50.000 fas., certs per Bx 

Jul 97 71 JO 71.08 71.15 *0.15 98 

0097 7420 7308 7170 *046 11064 

Dec 77 7400 7180 7416 +IM1 43016 

M0T9B 7508 75.18 7503 +(L4J 7.797 

May 98 7601 75.90 76.15 *000 1.788 

Est.atts NA Man's. soles 37033 
MreYsopenire 70008 up 4S0 

HEATING OR. (NMER) 

43000 sal. owns per are 
Aug 97 5145 5765 5340 *032 48.148 

Sep 77 54 HI 5US 5L74 *827 22025 

Od97 S48S S430 5459 * 809 1B0S2 

Nov 97 &751 5520 55.47 +0J7 14018 

Dec 97 56.40 S6.10 56JM +009 M.7S2 

Ax’ 98 57.1S 5605 5L84 *0J9 uxa 

Feb98 5725 56.97 56*7 *837 6JU8 

Mar 91 5660 5680 5617 »«U7 6,17* 

AW9B 5120 54.75 5*09 . *829 1211 

Est. sales na Man's, soles 17050 
Man's open int 146442 aft 977 

LIGHT 5WEET CRUDE (NMBU 
1000 MX- aooarsper hoc 
Aug 77 17.78 1705 I9J4 *822 85,999 

Sep 77 1709 1906 1904 +021 S096 

00*7 17.91 1905 1708 +0.17 34082 

Nov 77 17.91 I9J1 1907 +811 99+211 

D0C97 19.94 17.75 1906 +005 42095 

Jot?| 19.76 1704 17.94 +810 71073 

Feb 78 1705 1705 1705 -401 9,4)1 

Warn 1772 1772 19.92 • +004 5.158 

Are 98 17.87 4.905 

MOV 58 17.75 19.70 19.95 +105 6,738 

Est. sates NA Man's, sates 72071 
Mai sopot inf 400,593 up 4105 

NATURAL GA5 (NMER) 

10000 mm btu*s. S per rren ntu 


2051 

2.116 

42336 

2020 

1126 

71004 

2385 

2137 

28366 

23X1 

2360 

11,136 

2J65 

1400 

18752 

2000 

2045 

14,982 

2335 

2365 

10328 

2325 

2255 

t.m 

2)00 

1)30 

J.4D) 

2370 

1070 

2875 


Man's open ini 200013 up 849 

UNLEADS) GASOLME (NMER) 

* 20 aoaai. can per are 
AugW 5925 5700 58.92 +007 36534 

Sen 77 6830 57.15 580B +807 12,178 

Od97 5600 5610 5666 * 0J0 7.967 

Nov 77 5680 5140 5546 *846 207V 

DecW BAB 55.15 S5JB +866 S.TM 

tonW 5173 55J0 5593 +M ISM 

FebTB 5633 5610 5633 +004 U13 

MarlS 57 JO 5700 5703 +00* 1 , 804 

sales na Man's sates 13030 
Marsopenire 72J76 oft 227 

GA50IL(IPE) 

UJ. dolms per metric tun - Ms at 100 Ions 
tol 97 16175 162 JO 162.75 *1-50 10347 

Aug 97 14430 16325 16330 +125 2L352 

Sep 97 16*25 14525 16530 *1-00 6928 

Od 97 14825 167J0 ua00 +0.7S 7043 

Nov 97 17025 16975 17800 +073 4776 

Dec 97 171 ..’5 17130 77? J8 +075 9,999 

Jon 98 17225 172JM 172.25. +850 6790 
Feb 78 N.T. N.T. 17220 +850 2062 

Ell. sates: 16453. Prev. sates : 2402* 

Pm. open mt - 74000 off 2375 

BRENTQILIIPE) 

UJ. dollars per barrel - tats of 1400 bared 
AugW 1639 1808 1838 +819 58791 

Step97 1847 1818 1804 +816 57,133 

9PH 1827 1836 1860 +815 1S989 

N°*77 1803 1848 1873 +815 9,914 

Dec97 1874 1857 1882 +815 15713 

Jon?8 1874 1 8*8 1885 *015 10545 

JMtto N.T. N.T. 1883 +ai5 4013 

Wans N.T. N.T. 1881 +0.16 2004 

Esl. sales: 32J00. Ptev. sates : 28352 • 

Pre*. open M: 178841 Off 4081 

Stock Indexes 

S&P COMP. INDEX (CMBQ 
SDOxlndea 

SeaW 93630 91839 923J0 +515 177013 
Dec 77 73100 978.90 93400 +608 5071 

Mor* 938.15 1,7*8 

BfjCtes NA Mon's, sotes 62,743 
Alton's OPenM 1M271 up 966 

CAC40 (A4AT1F) 
p™? P^Jtodee palm 

i Ul9 L J919 -° 27370 — 180 31052 

S 1 ?- 0 39450 —180 2012 

r£« »«2 29360 29530-184) 20505 
39760 — 180 *3 

AA«98 2991.0 29910300800-180 7.767 
Ed. sates: n.748 
Opan frit.- 68995 up SOS. 

FTSE lMtUPTB 
asperlndaipotnf 

SSE.+1 '5F- 0 67970 47710 —560 67312 
^0 48460 48370 —570 VSi 
Mar98 48860 4885.0 48780 -685 ) 

Esl. sate*. 12018 Pm. sola: 9332 
Pro*, open In1, ; 78,977 pft 1)3 

Commodity Indexes 

H(uuh , c * ew Pntrlws 

Bps- ’f| ifi 

4 



u* 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1997 


PAGE 15 


EUROPE 


sics, it - 

many 

whom 


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been 
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■OJB 8.738 

an . 


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Gern lan Jobless Rolls 
Swell to 4.37 Million 

Increase Hampers Deficit-Cutting Goals 


CtmqmirJhtf.lv Sstf Fim0nf»a *r> 

NUREMBERG — Unemploy- 
ment, _ which is hampering Ger- 
many's drive 10 join the single Euro- 
pean currency, rose again in June, 
the Federal Labor Office reported 
Tuesday as it predicted that the 
number of jobless people would 
stagnate above the 4 million level. 

The number of jobless rose to a 
seasonally adjusted 437 million 
people in June, an increase of 1 2 ,000 
from the month before. 

But the seasonally adjusted un- 
employment rate remained steady at 
1 1 .4 percent, 

“We are seeing signs of stability 


t 


‘Ready for Euro, 9 
Paris Official Says 


Gmq&Jhi Our SuJFimh Pupa On 

PARIS — Finance minister 
Dominque Strauss- Kahn reaf- 
firmed the government's com- 
mitment to economic and mon- 
etary union Tuesday, saying 
France was “ready for the 
euro.” 

Just because France, he said, 
“has some precise ideas that 
are not exactly the same as our 
partners on how to apply the 
Maastricht treaty doesn't mean 
it has doubts about economic 
and monetary union.” 

Mr. Strauss- Kahn also said 
he favored reforms to allow 
workers to invest in pension 
funds. Laws have been ap- 
proved to allow such invest- 
ment, but some members of the 
governing leftist coalition have 
said they do not want them to go' 
ahead. (AFP. IHT) 


particularly in Western Germany,'* 
said the office's president, Bernhard 
Jagoda, but he’added that the econ- 
omy was still too weak to bolster the 
job market. 

“Economic improvements are 
progressing,” he said, “but there is 
still no turnaround on the jobs mar- 
ket.” 

High unemployment has cut tax 
revenue and pushed up social spend- 
ing just as Bonn is struggling to cut 
the budget deficit to 3 percent of 
gross domestic product as required 
by the Maastricht treaty for Euro- 
pean economic and monetary un- 
ion. 

Although the government has in- 
dicated that it is more upbeat about 
economic prospects this year. Mr. 
Jagoda said growth in the first half 
of the year was too weak and too 
focused on exports to fuel invest- 
ment at home and thereby create 
jobs. 

The labor market would probably 
stagnate this summer, he said, but 
there were signs that unemployment 
could begin to fall in September. 

This year, unemployment is ex- 
pected to average a postwar record 
of 4.2 million to 4.3 million, up from 
3.9 million in 1996. 

In Western Germany, the number 
of people out of work on a sea- 
sonally adjusted basis fell to 
3,041 .000 in June, down 1 ,000 from 
the previous month. 

Separately, the Finance Ministry 
has drafted a bill calling for a more 
open stock market and more trans- 
parent accounting systems for 
companies, said Juergen Static, un- 
dersecretary in die ministry. The 
changes are aimed at encouraging 
companies to raise capital on stock 
exchanges and making Germany a 
more attractive site for investment, 
he said. (Reuters. AFX) 


Ministers Rule Out Internet Tax 


Governments Should Not Interfere, Bonn Conference Decides 


Cmyi/n/ h IW Sufi / mn Ihrpiu bn 

BONN — Special taxes should 
not be levied on Internet products. 
European government officials 
said Tuesday after agreeing on 
principles for regulating the in- 
ternational computer network. 

But the officials, joined by rep- 
resentatives of the United States. 
Japan and Canada, appeared to 
make little progress on how to 
regulate encryption technology 
needed for transaction security on 
the Intemer. 

In a declaration at the conclusion 
of a two-day conference in Bonn, 
the 49 ministers from 29 countries 
agreed that the private sector 
should take the lead in the ex- 
pansion of electronic commerce 
and embraced some ideas proposed 
last week by President Bill Clinton. 


But they stopped short of advoc- 
ating the U.S. proposal in full. 


Mi. Clinton had proposed that 
the World Trade Organization 
agree within a year to create a 
“free- trade zone” on the Internet. 

Guenter Rexrodr. the German 
economics minister, said he did 
not think the Internet should be- 
come a “global duty-free shop.” 
but he said he was ready 10 discuss 
abolishing tariffs for cyberspace 
products and services. 

Regulation should be done on 
an international level, the minis- 
ters said, and governments should 
take care not to interfere where 
they could do harm. 

Secretary of Commerce Willi- 
am Daley, who was an observer at 
the conference, said lowering tar- 
iffs was the key to expansion of 
electronic commerce on the In- 
ternet. 

“We can only encourage further 
growth by doing away with tar- 


iffs.” the American said. Small 
businesses have the most to gain 
from the internet. Mr. Daley said, 
since it gives them access to many 
potential customers at low cost. 

The ministers also agreed that 
users' worldwide, including in de- 
veloping countries, should contin- 
ue to have access to a free flow of 
information over the Internet. But 
consumer protection and right to 
privacy should remain top priority, 
they said. 

The ministers vowed to make a 
joint effort to clamp down on tax 
evasion on business deals conduc- 
ted over the Internet. 

The ministers agreed that net- 


work operators and access pro- 
sno 


viders should not be responsible 
for illegal content unless they had 
* 'reasonable grounds to know and 
reasonable possibility to control 
content.” 


|| Investor’s Europe j 

Frankfurt 

London 

Paris 


DAX 

FTSE 100 index CAC 40 


4000 

t *t 800 

.Af m 


3300 

J 4600 


10 j 

J 

m A 

r m sA/ 


Hjy/W 

Y 

fJ 

420(1 ^ 


K r tv 


3200 

■ 4000 

24{ 

10 


MA -JJ- »F MA 

M J J ™F M A 

MJJ 

1937 

1997 


1997 


Exdrange 

Index 

Tuosday 

Prav. 

% 


Close 

Close 

Change 

Amsterdam. 

A0C 

91&B4 

918.85 

■ -OX 0 

Brussels 

BEL-20 

2*493.21 

2,504.47 

*0.45 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

4,006^0 

3.972.84 

+0.84 

'Copenhagen 

Slock Market 

BO &37 

605.10 

+0.71 

Helsinki 

HEX General 

3^47.51 

3,344.66 

+0.09 

Qsto ■ 

OBX ■ 

676.17 

676.76 

-0.09 

London 

FTSE 200 

4,758^0 

4,811.30 

-1.10 

Madrid 

Slock Exchange 

623.79 

624.77 

•0.16 

D6tan 

fcBBTEL 

13774 

13804 

-0.22 

Paris 

CAC 40- 

2^29.81 

2,947.66 

-0.61 

Stockholm • 

SX16 

3,458.49 

3,444.09 

+0.42 

Vienna 

ATX. 

1^91^0 

1.390^8 

+0.06 

Zurich 

spI 

3,768.79 

3,729.03 

+1.07 


Source; Teteku/s 


Ink'nuu-Hul Ikrild TnlHuv 


Beef Crisis Is Costing Dalgety More 


Very briefly: 


Bloomberg Sens 

LONDON — Dalgety PLC 
shares fell IS percent Tuesday after 
the British food company more than 
tripled its estimate of the one-time 
charge it would take for the year 
ended June and said pretax profit 
would not meet expectations. 

In May, Dalgety said it would 
close plants and slash its dividend as 
Britain's “mad cow” crisis took its 
toll, taking a one-time charge of £36 
million ($60.6 million). The esti- 
mated charge is now £138 million 
due to further costs at its pet-food 
business and other write-offs, the 
company said. 

Blaming a “disappointing” 
fourth quarter, Europe's second- 
largest pet-food maker after Mars 


Inc. said pretax profit for the year 
would be £65 million before ex- 
ceptional charges. One-time costs at 
its pel-food division would be £67 
million, more than double Lhe initial 
estimate of £30 million. 

Shares in Daigely fell 39 pence to 
close at 222.5 after dropping as 
much as 44 pence to a nine-year low 
of 217.5. 

The Tuesday decline follows a 14 
percent drop in May, when the com- 
pany announced, the original charge. 
The stock reached a high of 363.5 
pence in the past year. 

“These results are unacceptable, 
and shareholder value must be re- 
stored," Chairman Denys Hender- 
son said. “The benefits of the rig- 
orous and extensive management 


actions recently completed or cur- 
rently under way are expected to 
lead to a substantial recovery in 
profits.” 

Dalgety ’s pet-food operations 
have struggled because cattle feed 
demand has slumped and the com- 
pany is having problems replacing 
banned beef ingredients in its foods. 
The setbacks came as Dalgety was 
already trying to streamline produc- 
tion after its 1995 purchase of 
Quaker Oats Co.'s pet-food busi- 
ness. 

Beef sales across Europe have not 
recovered since British scientists 
said more than a year ago that there 
was strong evidence linking “mad 
cow" disease with a similar brain- 
wasting malady in h umans . 


• Burton Group PLC plans to spin off its Debenhams 
department store chain as pan of a reorganization to reflect a 
trend toward specialization among British retailers. 

• Mannesmann Arcor, the German telecommunications 


company, said it had filed a jromplaint with the German 

‘ BKC 


government against Deutsche Telekom AG over the prices 
Telekom charges to allow rivals to use its monopoly network 
to reach customers in local networks. 

• Cap Gemini SA, France's biggest computer-services and 
consulting company, said its earnings more than doubled in 
the first half of this year, ro 220 million francs ( S37.4 million ), 
thanks to rising demand for new computer systems. 

• The European Commission plans to buy its former 
headquarters, the Bedaymont building, from the Belgian gov- 
ernment for 375 million Ecus ($424.2 million) over 27 years. 

• Amstrad PLC is considering new legal action against 
Seagate Technology Inc., its disk-drive supplier, “for al- 


leged fraud in order to obtain punitive damages,” after the 

C 01 


British company won a High Court claim for damages for 
faulty products Seagate supplied to it. Amstrad declined to 
gjve details Of the fraud Claim. BltwmhcrR. Reuters. AFX 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low Close Prov. 


High Low Ohm P rev. 


High Low dm Pro*. 


High Low Close Pro*. 


Brill 


Tuesday, July 8 

Prices in toco! currencies. 

Telekurs 

High Low Ossa Prov. 


Amsterdam 


AEXMbcMLM 
Provisos.- 91085 


ABN -AMRO 

Aegon 
AMU 
AboNobd 
Boon Go. 

Beta Wesson 

CSMewo 

DanfisdiePet 

DSM 

Elsevier 

FarUsAmev 

Gdrooics 

G- Brecon 

Hageoteyer 
I lnn,.li wi 

nwmn 


Hoogwenr an 
Hunt Doug K 


(Douglas 
I KG Group 
KUA 
KNPBT 
KPN 

NedfordGp 
Qce Grfcrien 

PMIm Bee 


IHdg 

Mmd 
Rodamca 
Rufinas 
Ro re nto 
Roraf Dutch 
Untowwo 
VendatW . 
. VNU 

nV VMtosKJcva 

*v 


41 JO ALSO 

147.10 14450 

17450 171.10 
278X0 274 

14850 14*70 

38.10 3750 
7730 95X0 
11450 111 

309 206.10 
34 3350 
*4X0 9240 
6850 6740 
6860 67.10 
10670 10X10 
348 342 

TU7D 112.10 
17040 16750 
10350 9150 
6970 6850 
4350 4250 
8330 8230 
5820 57-80 
33250 32650 
2*540 36240 
146 14240 

10120 loan 

207 20650 
1 9450 193 

6450 6440 
17430 17370 
11250 109.90 
416J0 412 

444.10 43080 

ii6u7D mn 

4750 46 

252 24*80 


4140 4080 
14450 14*10 
17250 17240 
27550 27750 
14830 146 

3790 3010 
97 97 

111 11540 
20650 20750 
3170 3350 
9X80 9350 
68 68.10 
6730 6850 
10320 10570 
34520 34850 
11350 moo 

16970 168 

101.90 9540 
6940 6*50 
4270 4350 
8250 8320 

58.10 58.10 
y jp ' jp 33030 

264 264.40 
14330 145JO 
102 10170 
208 206 
19350 19340 
*470 6430 
19170 19470 

109.90 11430 

4)6 416 

mm 442.90 

11350 11640 

46.10 48 

248.90 24950 


RWE 
SAP pfd 
Sdurtra 
SGL Carbon 
Stamm 
Springer (Are!) 
Suedmcter 
Tfepsun 

VEW 

Visa 

Vbfcwu fl CT 


High 

7650 

m 

195JC 

255 

11O10 

1665 

936 

43750 

10455 

SB® 

809 

1487 


Low 

7*45 

397 

191.70 

24950 

10075 

1*50 

935 

435 

10430 

580 

801 

1467 


CtaM Prev. 
7*70 7630 
398 38250 
194 190® 
255 248 

10875 10855 
1*55 1640 
936 934 

436 437 

10445 10525 
580 580 

901 m 

1467 1411 


Helsinki 

HEX GnaflAMdac 33(741 


Pitman; 324466 


*8X0 

4740 

48 

4840 

HuMutnOkJ 1 

231 

239 

730 

231 


5X50 

52 

52 

57, let 

Koto 

77 

7*40 

7*50 

77 JO 

Merita A 

20 

1940 

19.60 

20 

Metro B 

1*9 

1*8 

169 

1*9 

Metjo-5erta B 

*5 

4*50 

45 

45 

Neste 

Ut 

140 

140 

145 

NakklA 

417 

406 41250 007-50 

Orton- Ytoymae 

20050 

199 

199 20050 

OntokumpuA 

10*60 

1W 

10*50 

10*50 

UPMKynswane 

17X50 127X0 127 JO 127 JO 

Vahnet 

9020 

8940 

9020 

09 JO 


756 
441 

Brit Steel 140 

Bril Telecom 497 

BTR 1.99 

Burmah Castroi 10LQ5 

Burton Gp 135 

CnWe WMess 555 

CadbuySchw 554 

Canon Comm i30 

Co iiimi U nion *72 

Compass Gp *^9 

Ctawtoukta 114 

Mans 5.8! 

Bedrocoinionert»426 
EMI Group 1111 


775 752 

427 432 


137 139 

454 454 


159 

955 

1.16 


1.93 

9.95 

138 


547 554 

550 553 


523 *27 
652 *54 


637 *33 

108 112 


491 495 

413 417 


Enagy Group *50 

Enterprise Ol 755 

RmCnfcmU 158 


11 1158 
640 643 


Hong Kong 


Anw Props 
BfcEflSf Asia 
Ctrihoy PadHc 
ateongKong 
CXt nl rosh u d 


OdnaUgM 
PudBc 


CflicF 


Rnt 


HenaBs 

Perak 


nmnjrTMMl D 


Bangkok 


SET tadoe 61419 
PieVlMK 63343. 


I hw 

Henderson Lri 
HK China Gos 


AthrMo5w: 
Bangkok BkF 
Krm TO Bk 
PTTfitptor 
Stan Cement F 
Stan Com Bk F 
Ittoamuola 
Thai Ahwnys 
Ttlcri Farm Bk F 
DM Comm 


244 

244 

244 

270 

232 

224 

290 

236 

3125 

31 JO 

3125 

3325 

410 

404 

m 

410 

560 

514 

536 

54* 

130 

ns 

117 

129 

3725 

3*25 

3*25 

38 

59M 

5*50 

57 

55 

131 

120 

125 

133 

114 

108 

108 

119 


HK Electric 
l Tel 


HK' 


Hopewell Hdgs 
HSoCHdgs 
Hutchkon WTl 


HkoiDb* 

Jufansooi 


Keny Props 
NawWoridDm 
Oriental Press 
pHori Oriental 


SHK Props 
uToSHt 


Bombay 


SMSWlJliKfeKOKJ? 

Pra*twB429l4S 


593 


<2336 

21404 

*4066 

11,06 

14757" 

H582 

wua 

4WJ 

3401 

2575 


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tfSSia?? 

Huang, 5 

oatieflP 

what** 


ro'Auto 
3us« Lover 
HfndujJ Peflm 
tndDwBk 
(TC . _ 
MdunogorToi 
RfrijoncMfid 
State Ui Mia 
SleeiAuflMrily 
Tata Eng Lkd 


939 

1375 

46050 

10350 

55735 

292 

363 

3SS5S 

2175 

4V 


91535 93750 922.75 
1355136650136375 
452 45975 45635 
10150 10275 10350 
54835 55S35 55125 
27550 28050 2B7 

35635 362 36175 

34830 35473 354 

2075 2175 2175 
42850 43075 43*75 


Shni Tax Hdgs 
SfaoLondCoL 
ah China Poet 
Swire PneA 
Wharf Hdgs 
Wheetock 


*9 

Hang Sang: 1479X17 

Piwiant. 14C8J8 

825 

8 

*15 

8 

31 JO 

30210 

3120 

31 JO 

1X80 

1155 

1165 

11/5 

7X75 

71.50 

rus 

/I24 

2X95 

2X65 

2220 

2185 

42J0 

4120 

41.90 

42X0 

47X0 

4*40 

4*70 

47.10 

4*30 

45 

45X0 

4540 

9JD 

92S 

9X5 

9X4 

1*10 

1175 

>190 

1180 

107 JO 

104 

1IUJ0 

107 

*50 

*15 

820 

*30 

6*25 

6450 


66 

15X5 

1494 

15 

15X5 

3DJ0 

2925 

30X0 

29.95 

17.95 

I/JO 

1720 

17.95 

*58 

*35 

*40 

*43 

245 

243 

243 

245 

A5J0 

64 

65 

45 

HU 

2X05 

23X5 

22.15 

2X10 

22 

22 

22 

1*85 

1MI 

1820 

18X5 

4*40 

4*70 

45 

4*40 

110 

7.98 

3 

1UM 

1.28 

122 

1X3 

12/ 

8*25 

8*75 

8* 

85.75 

*85 

4*0 

4A3 

4*5 

725 

IMi 

/JS 

795 

725 

7.10 

720 

/-20 

69 JO 

6725 

69 

6725 

31 JO 

3U.20 

3030 

31X0 

17X5 

1725 

1734 

17X5 


Jakarta 


Compoxttatodn: 74133 
Pi mum. 73831 


Astra Ink 
gkjrflMoo 


Brussels 


BE4-20 index: 249U1 
Pterions: 250447 


nan^®' 

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first *1 


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B8L- - 
CBR . 
CotruyT 
Oelhabe Lion 


16450 15900 
7550 .7 m 
9830 9730 
3360 3210 
19625 IfBSfl 
1990 1945 


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Ekdrafiiu 
Forth AG 
Gevaert 
G8L 

Gat Banqut 
KredtaRxmk 
Pntaflna . 
Pnwnrtn 
RoyMeT 
SocGra 
Sohny 
Tractate) 
UCB 


7900 

3720 

mm 

3368 


17720 

3570 

rm 

3280 

16080 


14800 14625 
14725 14525 
13800 13700 
5K5S> 4980 
11100 10925 
3730 3610 

Wffp 1 77375 
15150 15000 
125500 123150 


16000 16473 
7460 7500 

9800 9800 

3230 3350 

1990 19850 
1945 1975 

7770 7880 

3595 3780 
8000 8010 
3305 339 
6100 6110 
14725 14775 
14525 14725 
13730 13775 
5030 509 

10975 10975 
3730 3645 

22375 2249 
15125 1509 
123500 124300 


iHM 
Semen Giw* 


8500 8400 8475 8400 

2025 2000 2025 2025 

1575 159 1575 1525 

10025 999 10000 WOQO 
3875 3850 389- 3900 

5675 5625 569 5600 

7925 7875 7875 789 

10200 9950 999 10175 

5375 5275 5325 529 

4275 419 4200 419 


989 Johannesburg 


AmntaomMBta 
AngtaMn Gxri 
AngtoAm-Goro 
AngtaAntGold 
AjioIoAdi hid 
AVMIN 




FstNnflBk 




d he)'® 11 

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Copenhagen “gjJgEjJgS 


BGBank 


383 377 382 375 


CartdngB 371 364 364 368 

QxkmFon - . . 975 940 99 99 

Dcrttcn ® ® ® 


IP 




o(^- 


Den DanstaBk 77171 715 721 717 

QSSwnrfhwB 36889 355008 39500 3546 45 
tt5 1912 B 25^300 247000 35190 2470“ 
R5M8 237 233 236 233 

KobLurihovne .230 720 725 714 






TK r 




— .-Ti 


NwNtMfiskB 73L80 727 730 ;7» 

SopttuBarB m «5 965 1000 

TaeDronakB 363 -353 ■ 360 7m 


BoHcol 


91 361 

40 394 


figCTOaii 


3140 

2699 

26105 

194 

1446 

4950 

25J5 

167 

m® 

37 

20*5 

9*9 

65 
2*9 

■ 2J8 

66 
343 

13125 

18 

100 

19 

waso 

47-25 

9.25 

76J0 

13025 

5b5 


3110 
773 
2609 
259 75 
393 
1*9 
49 
B 
16*75 
2975 
3*40 
1950 
96 
6*9 
2*9 
275 
63 
340 
1309 
1745 
989 
189 
W 
4*65 
689 
75 
137.25 
399 
5775 
214 
779 


3140 3115 
273 273 

2699 26075 
26115 260 

19150 194 

149 15 

49.40 4945 
94 IK 2&Q5 
167 167 

3015 299 
37 359 
199 209 
96 969 
649 669 
2*50 249 
29 29 

65 63 

343 340 

133 1309 
17.75 1715 
999 989 
TOTO 19 
s«ms 999 
469 .47 

6915 69. 

7*25 7£9 
138 T37J5 
40 399 
915 9 

214 215 

779 78 


G«rl Accident 9.19 
GEC MS 

GKN 9.® 

GimoWeflcome 139 

GronodoGp 79 

Grand Met 622 

GRE 276 

Gro«noB»6p 49 

GutaasE *30 

GUS *01 

Hon S84 

HSBCHW8* 108B 

IQ 022 

hnpITgtKKXD 323 

IQlwtWia- *70 

ipsdbroke 1M 

LmtSec 928 

Leairo 277 

Legal GcnlGip 49 

LtafibTSBGp *85 

LncosVcxtly 1J9 

Marks Spencer 5,11 

MEPC 5-18 

Mercury Asset 12J8 

Notknal Grid 252 

toll Power 5.S9 

MoJWeta &M 

Nad *88 

Norwich Union 318 

Orange 206 

PM) *18 

Pennon 7.10 

Pfltanqton 112 

ftxwuen 79 

Premier FoRiefl *54 

Prudential *26 

trtttrackGp *87 

RmkGnxro 1*4 

ReddHOdm 952 

RmSond 3 

Heed InS 5J4 

bHW 214 

Reuters Hdgs *04 

Rexan 233 

RMC Group 9.14 

Rolls Royce 29 

fWBLScot *25 

RTZreg TO25 

RoviriKSun Al *62 

Sonar 377 

Sotebuiy 190 

Sdiroden 179 

Scot Newcmfe *95 

Sent Power *18 

Secwtotr 29 

Sevtm Trent 8L57 

She! Tramp R 445 

State iaas 

SaOh Nephew 170 

StidAfOM 1179 

Smiths bid 740 

StaeniEtoC 445 

Stagecoach *45 

Stand Charter 988 

Tote* Lyle *56 

Tescn *10 

Thames Water 745 

31 Group 5.08 

T1 Group 4.72 

Tamkkis 290 

UnOever 17J7 

Utd Assurance *44 

UtriNmn 7JH 

Utd UflHIes 79 

Vendome Lxata *9 

Vodafone 297 

WMtfaread 7.93 

wntnm Hdgs 326 

Wotaetov 49 

WPP Group 244 

Zeneca 2045 


674 

IAS 

99 

252 


7 

1A6 

9.12 

259 


9.13 927 
1226 1126 
771 775 

*09 *15 

266 270 

*26 426 

*08 *13 

592 5.97 

578 59 

1062 1B72 
013 018 


370 

*60 

242 


272 

*66 

244 


8.99 94M 
2A5 272 


*30 423 

*40 *69 


1.93 1.96 

59 59 


5.0) 506 

1270 1228 
245 251 


545 525 

036 BL64 


*80 *88 
221 322 


203 105 

*10 *13 


7.79 

478 

178 

*90 

1.94 

978 

1.1 5 
*65 
563 
570 
*72 
*69 
212 
*98 
423 
11.12 
642 
7.04 
1A8 
9.12 
17B 
970 

1118 

779 

*13 

176 

476 
*08 

i 

574 

1085 

B2B 

373 

646 

241 

949 

246 

477 
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175 
510 
505 

1246 

249 

556 

875 

*7B 

326 

106 

*13 

706 

120 

777 

448 

60S 

*80 

254 

943 

303 

582 

223 

603 

233 

9.15 
226 
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1023 

442 

348 

379 

1750 

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145 

854 

442 

*53 

49 

779 

504 

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Ben Comm dal 
Bco Ftdeuram 
BcniflRom 

Benetton 
CredRo haiano 
Edbai 


4290 4145 4175 4240 
5985 5855 58M) 5930 
1360 1334 1350 1346 
27150 26500 27150 26300 
3585 3440 3585 3455 

8870 8660 8785 8895 


ENI 

10055 

9960 

10055 

10030 

Rd 

6500 

*190 

6430 

*475 


31500 

31100 

mno 

31811) 

IMI 

17170 

1*3*5 

1*390 

16490 

IMA 

2590 

2565 

2585 

261X1 

Italgas 

5540 

5445 

5475 

5500 

MeSasd 

7475 

7375 

7355 

7400 

Medtobancn 

11435 

111*5 

11715 

11375 

ManbnSson 

1199 

11*6 

1168 

1195 

OBveM 

500 

491 

491 

494 


2520 

2470 

2470 

2500 

Pi re* 

4295 

4195 

4230 

4270 

has 

14685 

14730 

14290 

14640 

Rato Boiko 

221X 

21500 

22050 

21900 

Sftaato Torino 

14700 

13255 

74000 

13355 

Stef 

10290 

10050 

10050 

10145 

Telecom Italia 

5700 

5580 

5580 

5*35 

TIM 

5795 

4715 

J795 

sm 

Montreal 

Intastrieis India.- 3435.93 



Pterions.- 342*42 

BaMebCon 

44 

44 

44 

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Cdn Tire A 

28*5 

2BVi 

2895 

7M 

Cdn Util A 

36 

35,/U 

3* 

35. /U 

aFWSvc 

37ta 

3/X5 

UV, 

37V, 

Gaz Metro 

N.T. 

N.l. 

Ml 

18 

Gt-West LKeco 

33. BO 

3395 

3X55 

nun 


4X65 

4X45 

4295 

42U 

investonGrp 

31X0 

31X0 

31X0 

31X0 


2195 

21X5 

21X5 

21.10 

Nad Bk Canada 

1790 

1720 

1795 

12 JO 


35ft 

3*911 

34.20 

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3*85 

3*70 

3*80 

34M 


2*M 

7*10 

26 Vi 

2*V» 


9X5 

9 

9 

920 

BnaLauMo — 

B5 65.18 

65.90 



Peugeot Ot 

Pmautt-Print 

Promodes 

Renault 

Rexel 

Rh-PeuiencA 

Sanofl 

Schneider 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
Sodexho 
StGote'm 
Suez 


584 

2906 

2519 

14*80 

1810 

25*40 

577 

330 

1080 

501 


Total B 
Usinor 
Valeo 


CSF 


861 

1485 

772 

176 

601 

11340 

40290 


570 579 

2821 2851 
2454 2466 
148 14170 
1770 1794 

25050 256 

570 573 

32*70 32940 
1043 1079 
48850 501 

689 694 

2946 2960 
843 843 

1*55 1*65 
754 760 

17280 17290 
593 600 

107.10 11210 
391 39*70 


570 

2915 

24*5 

14040 

1770 

25350 

577 

330 

1044 

48920 

692 

2980 

859 

1485 

769 

16740 

595 

11058 

400 


Sao Paulo BwKMMeKiMsoao 

Previous: 13S02JO 


BmdescnPM 
Brahma Pfd 
CrmtaPM 
CESPPtd 
Copet 
Eletrabms 
ttauhanco Pfd 
UgMSenridos 

petraaras i 


>Ptd 

PauGstaLuz 
Sid Nadanal 
Sou zn Cruz 
TetebrasPU 
Tdemig 


T^pPfd 
Untoanco 
Usiminas PM 
CVRD PM 


1180 

79000 

5580 

8201 

2200 

687.00 
62780 
60001 
49200 
32299 

193.00 
3050 
1081 
17*20 
19*00 

165.00 
37000 

4290 

1389 

3020 


10.70 
779.99 
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7640 
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65380 
62480 
55282 
46080 
30000 
19050 
3780 
1080 
17180 
19200 
16000 
36000 
41-50 
1275 
2780 


1180 1080 

790.00 79580 
5580 55 JO 
8180 8080 
2200 2180 

68780 66*00 
62680 67880 

583.00 55*00 
49000 46780 
32080 31280 
19180 19180 

3880 3880 
1080 1088 
17210 17*60 
19580 19980 
16080 16780 
36980 37380 
4240 4187 
1385 1210 
3010 2880 


ABBA 
As si Daman 
Astra A 
Atlas Copco A 
Autoftv 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson B 
Hemes B 
IncentneA 
Investor B 
MoDoB 
Nanflxrtcen 
PhamiUptahn 
SandwkB 
Sconta B 
SCAB 

S-E Bnnken A 
5knndta Foes 
Stansta B 
5KFB 

SparbankenA 
SteaA 
SvHandtas A 
Volvo B 


11150 

226 

15880 

224 

30a 

620 

32180 

294 

701 

431 

256 

26780 

28580 

239 

236 

16780 

B9J0 

332 

342 

206 

ISO 

126 

255 

21450 


112 

225 

15250 

21980 

303 

601 

3H 

285 

695 

422 

25180 

264 

260 

232 

23280 

166 


31050 

336 

204 

173 

12480 

252 

212 


11280 113 

225 22580 
15680 156 

220 22380 
30480 30580 
613 680 

31980 316 

294 285 

700 697 

426 42180 
25150 25*50 
267 266 

284 28S 

23880 233 

233 23480 
1*7 167 

8980 8980 
32280 3Z7 

33780 340 

205 20580 
17880 177 

12580 12580 
25180 25250 
212 213 


Sydney AJOnSnaries: 2679.20 

y 7 Previous; 271380 


Oslo 


OBXtadnc(7&17 
Previous; <7*7* 


Seoul 


AkcrA 


151 ISO 150 150 


oe 7S7J4 
Previou s. 77251 


Docom 


109000 105000 106000 110000 


Amcor 

*75 

845 

949 

*71 

ANZBHng 

990 

9.70 

990 

993 

BHP 

19.16 

1895 

1*86 

19X5 

Band 

*19 

*0B 

*12 

*15 

Brambles hid. 

2*24 

2*90 

26 

26X0 

C8A 

1X92 

1545 

1X74 

1X97 

CC Amalfi 

17 

1*75 

1*80 

17 

Coles Myer 

7X5 

*90 

*93 

793 

Cmaatco 

7.14 

*95 

7 

7.14 

CSR 

5X5 

5.10 

X24 

X16 

Fosters Brew 

249 

244 

249 

246 

Goodman Rd 

199 

191 

193 

198 

H3 AustraSa 

1228 

1281’ 

1290 

1295 

tendtenw 

2891 

27 JO 

MIW 

2860 

MiMHdn 

NatAustBoak 

198 

190 

191 

1.90 

1940 

19X6 

1940 

1940 

Nat Mutual Hdg 

214 

210 

212 

215 


The Trib Index 

Prices as of 3 00 P M New York une. 

Jan. >. 1992=100. 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to date 
% change 
+20.52 

World Index 

179.75 

-0.22 

-0.12 

Regional Indexes 

Asia/PacHk: 

129.02 

-0.45 

-0.35 

+4.53 

Europe 

187.48 

-1.27 

-0.67 

+16.30 

N. America 

208.91 

+0.36 

+0.17 

+29.03 

S. America 
Industrial Indexes 

186.36 

+3.75 

+2.05 

+62.66 

Capital goods 

224.80 

-0.90 

-0.40 

+31.52 

Consumer goods 

201.49 

+0.32 

+0.16 

+24.82 

Energy 

200.00 

-2.35 

-1.16 

+17.16 

Finance 

134.39 

-033 

- 0.24 

+ 15.40 

MscaHaneous 

180.01 

+2.01 

+1.13 

+11.27 

Raw Materials 

194.97 

+1.08 

+0.56 

♦11.17 

Service 

170.01 

-0.38 

-0.22 

+23.81 

UtMes 

182.16 

.+1.55 

+0.66 

+26.68 

77m Intnmalioruil Horutd Tribixto World Stock Irxtux C tracks thy U S Cottar values J/ 

280 ntemasionaBy Imostablo stocks from 25 countries. For mm information, a bee 
booklet is availabte by writing to Tlw Trib todex. 181 Avenue Charles da Gautte. 

92521 NevBy Codex, France. 


Comprise by Bloomberg Afews 

High 

Low Close 

Pro*. 

High Low 

Close Prev. 


DahnSec 

DD1 

Denso 

East Japan Ry 

iBank 
i Photo 


VG 

3FP 


TAGHeuer 


Madrid 


Acerinou 

ACESA 

Agues Boscekm 

6*7“ 


ilr 


3M 


Kuala Lumpur 


Previous: 104888 


Frankfurt 


D AX: 4(0*44 
PlOVfBK: 3972J4 



AMBB - MOO 
Adktas .. 218 

AHomHdg 40(80 
Mono ■ : 189 

SkBerBn 27 

BASF ' 6780 

BoywrHmoBk 5120 
Bar.Varetotnnk 7210 
Bow 7295 

Betawtarf 90J0 
Btnag .... 4080 

BMW- 1500 

CKAGCalonia . 188 
OamaaRzbank 51.15 
DatotarBen 
Dsguna 9380 
Oeutiche Bade 10445 
Dad Tetakmn 4245 
towtaerBmk 6*20 

SSnHM 18*30 
Fried. Kropp 3 a 
Geh*. . 121 

HefdebgZrot »« 
HflWpH 10480 
HEW 475 

Hodftf 8530 

HOKftst .. TWO 

1 taM 

f^ywrer . . T9M 
Unde .. IMS 
•tJ®aaan • 3*20 

MAN . 550 

Ite nn ea raaun 819 

McndiRtedtR -S15 

53980 


1650 1650 
20780 21270 
.. 401 40*20 
185 18*50 
3*55 3 m 
67.06 67.27 
52.95 ' 5115 
7140 7283 
7125 7127 
SMB 90 
3980 40 

MM 1491 
182 183 

5040 ■ sm 
14*40 14*40 
92 9280 
10250 10150 
. 43 43 

6*70 . 6585 
357 363 

15280 15280 
344 . 348 
■ 119 119 

16150 1419 
10160 10*40 
465. 473 
84' 84 

77.78 7885 
62180 623 


7W0. 79 J0 


1361 
.33 .. 

.546 -546 
BP 0129 
3*20 3*20 

71X90 21*40 

5480 5495 
530 537 


1665 

20080 

403 

war. 

3*10 
6*90 
528S‘ 
7180 
71 JB 
9080 
3980 
1467 
19080 

49.70 
145J0 
9X30 
10225 
42.90 
6XBS. 

360 

153 

345 

118.70 

ua 

10*90 , 
465 
8550 

7 &n 

’■ 639 

78.70 
1365 
3230 

549 

014 

37J». 

20580 

.S540l 

539. 


AMMB Hdgi U 
Gwting 1180 
McdBotelng 26 JS 
MallDflSMpF 7 
PdronasGa • 0* 
PWxr 1U0 

PahBcBk 

Raxing 026 

RatrbVtarid 7J5 
RoriwwnsPM 2675 
StaaDrohy 885 
Tetefcoroind- 1130 
Tenoaa 12 J 0 
tSdBijnew 1820 
YTt - 780 


1570 1570 1590 
1080 11.10 1180 
M 2*25 7625 
*85 685 7 

*70 (85 *65 

1160 11.70 1180 
*02 406 *10 

m 222 

*90 *95 

B ”9 itio 

I860 I860 1840 
760 765 785 


29190 

1990 

(050 

9080 

13830 

1480 

27990 

5950 

39350 

479S 

5100 

33115 

8370 

.12710 

13(0 

33990 

USB 

3185 

(630 

1505 

8700 

2500 



renMH 

Kyushu I 
LTCB 


Mibutushj HV£ 


MflUbfaMi 
Mitsubishi Tr 
(Usui 

Mitsui Fodosn 
Mosul Trust 
MuutaMfg 
NEC 

EStaSec 

Mnlendo 

Siisr“ 

Ngjpon Steel 
Nissan Malar 
NKK 

■ Sec 




18*50 

184 

184 

IBS 

2X10 

24JD 

24J0 

75 

2*50 

27.90 

7&50 

28- 

152 

149 

14950 

14V 

46 

44 

4* 

43J0 

460 

452 

454 

458 

397 JO 39X50 

39* 

397 

161 

758 

Ml 

259 

145 

141 

143 14*50 

S95 

587 

587 

590 

372 

:kv 

Ml 

370 

149 

145 

145 

14» 

148 

145 

MU 

145 

S52 

4590 

552 

4*50 

552 
45 m 

*38 


& 


Korea 1 


7970 6300 8300 

22200 vm 22400 

14700 14300 14400 14(00 
27* 27300 27500 27400 
i Bk S900 5740 5800 SM 

Tel 490500 470000 484000 488500 

J 35500 34300 3S500 25700 

Inxi5! 65100 63500 64600 65300 

□talar 47000 4(900 47000 47800 

Etee 70500 an oo 59000 7ms 

vm 10500 10500 10700 


News Carp 
Pacific Duntop 
PtamerMI 
Put: Broadens! 
Bo Unto 
St George Bar* 
WMC 

WWaacBUng 

VtooSctaPel 

WootHdrihs 


*49 *54 *51 

15D 386 365 

*92 *99 

765 768 782 

22 2246 2X45 

835 841 886 

745 764 *14 


Sefiisull 

Setdsui House 
Seven-Eleven 
Shorp 

SfftakuBPwr 

Sfissku 

lOl 


7.78 764 ^7« 


10S® 10.99 

*S *36 443 


Singapore 


Shuts Thees; 2607-33 
Prertress 199789 


Manila 


226 

7 a 

880 

11 


PSEtad«e2(9U6 

PmttonszmiS 


Paris 


CAC- ft; 292981 
PlMifi 1:294766 


.‘Brew 

sPk 

OyDerts 


London 


FT-5E lOi: 475880 

Prurient: 481*70 


AypJflfi 

K* 

SSSSa 

Mato Bonk 
PBlron 

PCI Baik 
Phil Lang Dist 
SonMlgueiB 
SM Prime Hdg 


1*25 17 JS 18 1*75 
2250 2X75 22.7S 2150 
158 155 156 

1025 960 . 960 
ac cn g*5D 8480 
535 520 525 

*40 *10 630 

» 249 249 

925 «5 915 

66 < * 1<:n 6250 *4 
780 780 780 780 


158 

10 

86 

530 

680 

8 


Natl 

. [Daneai 

AngSan Water 
■Am 
Artec 
Assoc Brl 
BAA 
Banteyt 
Btm 
BAT tad 
BenkScoflond 
Blue aide 
BOC Group 
Baris 
BPBInd 
BrBAerap 
MAInwya 
BG 

Bid Laid 


*81 *42 *56 8J9 

*48 *38 *47 445 
732 J68 732 769 
5J5 547 171 5J3 

188 184 137 134 

583 548' 580 549 

581 543 5J5 *77 

1235 1X15 1234 1235 
7J3 743 749 7J2 
585 545 549 549 

*21 *07 *16 *13 

*28 *16 *23 *27 

IOjSO 1047 1047 1055 
745 748 789. 748 
363 297 3 3M 

11 8. 1113 1333 1246 
. m *68. *71 *82 

234 238 2JB 232 
587 8J4 560 569 


Mexico 


MMtadn:4ts*9i 
PrerieoK 0413* 


Ada A 
BanacdB 
CanaCPO 
CBraC 

Enp Madam 
GpaCawAl 
Gi»FBooner 
GpoFinWiursa 
Kkb dark Max 

TotevtMCPO 

TelMnL 


5*60 

2360 

3*20 

1X« 

4*40 

6*00 

275 

3565 

3*90 

12540 

2*90 


5*70 S6jB 5470 
2240 2185 2330 
3*50 3*20 3*50 
1X96 1228 T2M 
4580 45.75 4580 
5770 mm 5730 
287 2J2 240 
3*50 ViK 'KBO 
3360 3*75 3275 
12460 12460 12S40 
2080 2*90 2*60 


MIBTrirataliCtt 1377*08 
pteriMK 130*80 


Milan 

AJeonaAssie 14050 13905 13970 M150 


Accra 

AGF 

Axo-UAP 

Banoabu 

bk: 

BNP 

Carerinff 

CBmfcw 

Casino 

CCF 

Qriakin 

Christa Otar 

CLF-OetooFron 

QroBA^tarifl 

Donne 

EBLAquUne 

EridnrinBS 

Euredmev 

Euroham 

Gen Earn 

Havas 

IneW 

hS2S* 

LEU (MI 

Ltftol 
LVMH 
Lvov Eos. 
mdteSnB 

Paribas A 

^^■,,.,1 nil -I 

rDLHii ruuiru 


958 942 5 U 949 

201 JO 19*20 195.0 1W 
970 953 9.0 930 

793 771 775 791 

37240 3(7.10 36830 37180 
737 745 746 779 

975 940 952 970 

2S3L90 24940 25230 25X10 
1205 1172 1180 1202 
4399 4336 4356 4392 


295 290 JO 291X0 

294 

155 2« JO 25390 

255 

724 

711 

724 

712 

999 

986 

999 

1000 

574 

560 

570 

5*4 

1256 

1255 

12561207 JS 


964 

967 

975 


659 

60 

674 


90S 

930 

907 


*85 

*95 

9 


*30 

*50 

*20 

759 

738 

7« 

751 

44090 

431 43X40 

439 

799 

770 

789 

783 


DBS foreign 
DBS Land 
FiweriNeo* 
KKUmd* 
JortMathesn* 
JftntaralBfllc* 
KuppdA 
I Bank 
I Feta 
I tend 



OS Union & F 
Partwar Hdg* 
Seabarong 
StagAIrtanign 
Sing land 

Is as 


1105 1077 
2500 2466 
1624 1595 
607 595 

37880 36*» 
419 40730 
31880 307 


1090 1110 
2497 2483 
1600 1625 
599 606 

37*80 366 

40730 420 

30730 31880 


, !Bdr* 

Utd Industrial 
aw (Ken BkF 
Wing Ttd Hdgs 
•an us. tunas, 


590 

*70 

170 

*10 

6 

*05 

1*60 

1*30 

1*50 

1*90 

1*40 

1*50 

0X9 

W7 

*78 

1990 

1U0 

1940 

*74 

*62 

*68 

1070 

10J0 

1*70 

2J1 

256 

241 

7X5 

7X0 

7X5 

390 

172 

176 

NX 

N.T. 

N.T. 

3,70 

346 

*68 

*10 

*98 

*10 

*14 

19* 

442 

1X80 

1X40 

1X60 

990 

940 

990 

*65 

*55 

*55 

*90 

*80 

*85 

1X90 

1X50 

1150 

745 

*90 

7 

rit>«n 

30X0 

3040 

394 

*78 

*80 

2X6 

2X2 

2X6 

2J6 

298 

299 

1.11 

147 

1.11 

1*50 

1*20 

1640 

*40 

*34 

440 


530 

565 


038 


*64 


286 

735 

278 

640 

348 

*98 


985 

*50 

*80 


Taipei 

Stock MraM tadcc 9305X7 


Preriaas: 932294 

Cathay Life tn& 

156 

149 

150 

154 

Chang KwaBk 
CMaoTung Bk 

119 

115 11X50 

117 

81 JO 

79 JO 

8*50 

H2 

Una Dweferot 

147 JO 144J0 14X50 14*50 

QwnSfed 

2940 

79.10 

29X0 

29X0 

FMBank 

II7J0 

114 

114 

Hi 

ForeusaPtartc 

71 

m 

69 

TO 

Haa Nan Bk 

12050 11*50 11*50 

118 

M Comas Bk 

67 JO 

66 

66 


Nan Yd Plasties 

86 

84 

Bi.cn 

auo 

Shin Kong Life 
lateral San! 

125 

121 12250 

124 

124 12058 

122 12X50 

Tatum 

Utd Mkro Elec 

55 

128 

54 

122 

54 5*50 
128 12*50 

Utd World a* 

.72 

70 

70 

71 JO 



TahnkuEIPwr 

TctaiBank 

TauoNlakie 

TakyoEIPwr 

TfityoBtarso 

TtjkypGas 

TakfuCnp. 

Toner 

ToppanPiU 
’■ find 


TagoTniri 
Toyota Motor 
Ybmanaucfal 


885 874 

B3£0a 8300a 
2740 2710 

5830a 5660a 
2420 2380 

4140 4070 
1570 1540 

4550 -MB) 
1541 1520 

1140 1130 

1280 1260 
3370 3300 
1610 1570 
413 407 

581 570 

(620 6510 

532 527 

8970a 8880a 
3850 3790 
644 634 

2200 2170 
1390 1510 

514 SIB 
3(0 349 

697 693 

1190 1180 
212 208 
888 877 

534 538 

8780 B7D0 
195® I960 

430 411 

513 505 

2850 2030 
4250 4150 

3360 2240 

1300 1290 

1330 1290 

371 3(2 

649 642 

1630 1*10 

876 Ui 
BOO 790 
1700 1*50 

1060 1070 

1520 1500 

779 7(0 

4200 4200 

1570 1540 
1W 1750 
695 *83 

9310 9OT 
883 874 

*15 (08 

354 349 

867 B50 

232 229 

1490 14(0 

loroa 1040b 
4330b 4250b 
700 693 

322 316 

1530 1510 

11900 11700 
805 781 

3900 3810 
1610 IS® 
500 491 

8250 B210 

5670 5550 
1158 1130 

1180 117D 

8750 8600 

15® 1520 
1970 1950 

(66 658 

2950 2928 

1910 18® 

1260 1250 
7310 7250 

9790 9700 

1070 1050 

1770 1750 

50* 495 

1900 1880 
320 316 

1150 1120 

3210 3140 
3270 3240 
84(0 8380 
2010 1990 
11® 1070 
1480 1440 

2310 2280 
5450 5310 
320 316 

*67 *55 

1280 1260 
1740 1720 
821 817 

712 706 

3100 3010 
928 911 

3260 3209 
3040 3010 


878 874 

B300C 8380a 
2720 2*30 
5810a 5540a 
2^0 2400 

4000 4130 

TSecj 1H8 
4480 «9 

1540 1520 

1140 11® 

W 1270 
3300 3220 

1570 1610 

411 487 

570 575 

6510 <600 

530 52* 

8930a 8900a 
3850 37*0 


CdnNatRes 
CdnOccid Pet 
Ctta Pacific 
Comioco 
Cetera 
Dental 
Donahue A 
Du Pant Cta A 
Ed per Group 
EumNwMng 
Fairfax Finl 
Fdoonbridge 
Fletcher Chafl A 
Franco Nevada 
Goff Cta Rer 
Imperial Oil 
Inco 


640 647 

220Q 2170 




1580 1580 

510 510 


Ltrirflawl 
Laewen Group 
Maanft Bldl 
Inti A 


350 

693 


351 

695 


Manna Inti 
Methane* 


1190 1170 
209 207 


887 

529 


880 

526 


8780 8750 

1S88 1960 


413 

505 


430 

507 


2040 2010 
4240 4100 


2250 2220 
1290 ITflD 


1320 1300 

3*5 365 


*42 640 

16X 1610 


873 

790 


1*50 1700 

1080 1060 


1520 1490 
769 m 


4200 4190 
1570 1530 


1790 17*0 

686 693 


9240 9228 

877 872 


609 

352 

B54 

229 


610 

34 

847 

230 


Moore 
Newbridge Net 
Narandalnc 
Norcen Energy 
NMieffl Teteamt 
Nana 
Onex 

Pimaki Petfan 
PetroCta 
Placer Dame 
PacnPetlm 
Potash Sask 
Renaissance 
Rto AJgom 
Ragen C antei B 
Swjroni Co 
SMCdPA 

Suncar 

TaEsreonEny 

TeckB 

Tetegtobe 

Teha 

Thomsoo 

TorDornBa* 

TromoBa 

TransCdanpe 

Trimark FM 

Tibet Hahn 

TVXGald 

tMestcoad Eay 

Weston 


3*90 3*20 
3*80 34* 

■ami 39ta 

38 3780 
2705 27.35 

121* 11.95 
29.85 29Vi 
31 31 

23.15 2X95 

39 3785 

391 390 

2*70 2*30 
2X90 221* 

63 61.99 
11*0 111* 
72*5 72JJ5 
40*5 40 

4785 4785 
I9ta 1890 
48*5 48X0 
181* 1830 
B*80 841* 

12J0 121* 

27 JO 2745 
67ta 6*90 

30.15 2960 
35J0 3*90 

131 179.40 

12.15 12 
27.B5 27*5 

28W 28 

231* 2X45 
1985 1985 
1*05 138S 
104Vi 10X45 
4X5 3885 
33.90 33V: 

26 26 
5490 54*4 

2085 20!6 

37.15 3*60 
45U 4*45 

27.10 2*65 
53 52 

2*15 25.95 
3330 321* 

4X1B 4115 
1*60 161V 

28’* 27.95 
59Vj 58 
29rt 281* 
*40 *95 

2514 J5.UJ 
94 93 


3*1* 3* 

3485 3*60 
4020 3935 

37.90 38 
2780 27.65 

17V* 11.95 
29.M 291* 

31 301* 

2X95 2X15 

38.10 38.45 

391 391 

26 Vi 2*65 
2X90 22 

61.90 <S2 

HjMJ 11j50 
7X30 72U 

4035 39.99 
4785 4785 

19.10 1895 

4840 4820 
1835 181* 

8*10 85 

1X70 TX78 
XT', 27V, 

*685 6*60 

30.10 2985 

35 3530 
12985 129 V, 

IX 10 12 

2745 27*» 

2845 28 

231* 2X40 
19J0 19V» 

1X90 1190 
HD 10330 
40 3845 

26 2*05 

5*40 55 

2085 2070 

37 37.38 

45.15 4*?0 

27 37X0 
521* 5110 

36 2*15 
33i'.‘. 31® 

41.90 4145 
1*55 1635 
2805 2820 

59 59.90 
2935 2935 

6.15 *30 
2545 25 JO 

94 9X40 


1470 1460 

WOb 1030b 
4330b 4230b 
693 695 

319 321 

1530 1520 

11708 ltsao 
782 B05 

3823 3880 

1540 1600 

495 499 

8210 8240 

5550 553® 

no na 
1170 USD 
B700 8600 
1530 1530 

I960 I960 

660 665 

2930 2930 

1980 1900 

1250 12(0 
7280 7310 

9760 9(60 

1070 1040 

1750 1770 

495 m 
1BB0 1B80 
316 319 

1120 1140 

3200 3148 
3250 3210 
B44Q 8400 
2000 1990 

ion ion 

1460 1430 

2310 2290 
54S0 5370 

320 316 

663 659 

1200 12SS 
1730 1740 
819 B2D 
707 712 

3040 3100 
911 PIH 
3200 3190 
3020 3010 


Vienna 


ATX Mac 139140 
Pierian: 139*58 


Boehter-Uddeh 1025 
CiedllansfPM 51780 
EA^enerafl 3460 
EVN 164*75 

FtataataiWIen 535 
OMV 1677 

OestEWdrte 87645 
V A Stahl 59890 

VATech 257150 
Wlenetfaeig Bau 2*55 


1000 1006101*30 
510 51X50 513 

3380 3430 3430 

1620162740 1626 

52/ 50 531 JO 529.10 
1628 1673 1620 

870 872 870.50 

582 587 58*80 

2444 

2(20 2635 2643 


Wellington NzsE-rotatasc 250734 

9 Premos: 251178 


AlrNZeaM 6 
Brierty Inri 
Qatar Hod aid 
Fktch Ch BWg 
nekhChEny 
FteMiChFonl 


LlanNafltaq 

Tdcaxn NZ 

WBson Horton 


4J2 

440 

*52 

440 

140 

1X8 

140 

140 

346 

164 

345 

348 

*46 

4X8 

4X8 

*44 

*71 

447 

448 

*71 

XU 

X10 

X14 

113 

146 

*40 

*46 

*49 

177 

175 

177 

3X5 

799 

7JS 

792 

793 

11X0 

1140 

11X0 

11.70 


Zurich 


SPItadei: 376879 
Pierian: 372943 


ABBB 
AdnsB 
AlusutsseR 
Aieb*enpoB 
AWR 
Baer Hdg B 
BakriseRdgR 
BXVhtan 
On Spec Chen 
OoriCBitR 


Out 100i A-X 1J00 


CrdSutaeG^R 


Tokyo 


NUd 225: 1985189 
PrevtoOE 197K.17 


&B5 


NlppooAir 


178 

170 

196 

1.07 


1150 1140 
748 738 


*38 


Stockholm ix^-ESSKj 


AGAB 


107 105 107 105 


AsoML_... 

AfaMCbero 
AjoWCiOta 
Bk Tokyo AHbu 
Bk Yokohama 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
OtubuElec 
Oiugaiu Elec 
Dal Niw Print 
DoW 

Da-lchiKong 
Doha Bank 
□trim House 


3690 3(70 
888 877 

662 677 

1 M0 109® 
7160 2120 
(38 632 

2580 2540 
3090 3020 
2000 20SJ 
200 2010 
2530 2500 
740 735 

1450 1420 
560 530 

1410 1370 


1140 1130 
740 741 


Toronto 


T5E iMtestrtofc: 656*68 
PWVtaus: 609.12 


3690 3700 
877 880 


677 
1100 1100 


2130 2140 
635 *31 


25(0 2590 
3000 3110 


AMU Cere. 

Alberta Energy 
Aten Atom 

AndenanExpl 
Bit Mental 
Bk No* Safe 
Barrie* Goto 


2070 2050 
2040 2010 


2520 2510 
738 740 


1420 1450 
531 570 


1400 1370 


BCTdeamm 

BtacfaemPham 

Bore ter ri te rB 

BrasamA 

ssr 

Cdn Not Rail 


26 2540 
35 3*60 
4X35 47 JO 

1040 1*15 
57X0 5*10 
45 6*15 
2940 2BU 
4145 4*70 
3X95 33JD 
3*10 2940 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


PAGE 17 


ij. - i i. 

l " 
fc f ‘ 

4*. ™ 

s; 4-. ■• 
£ 4. •’ 


Bangkok Earmarks 
Fund for Companies 
Hurt by Falling Baht 


Chinese Debts Come Cheap £W » 9 

iTOl*!: 

16000 — 

To Win Business, Banks Forgo ‘Risk Premium’ on Issues w — 


*» V. . . 

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c- -myth- o.. r«_r r„ i,, 

BANGKOK — Thailand threw a 
lifeline Tuesday to companies that 
suffered foreign exchange losses 
after the de facto devaluation of the 
baht, while it threatened to imprison 

• '* retailers who profit unfairly from 

the currency’s plunge. 

The cabinet approved plans to set 
up a 20 billion-baht (568 j.7 million) 
fund to provide cheap loans to 
companies that lost money in the 
July 2 flotation. Finance Minister 
Thanong Bidaya said. 

■ 'These measures will back up the 
government's decision to float the 
bahu" he said, "and we will come 
up with more measures to help Thai 
companies." 

Manila Panel 
Galls for Peso 

* Devaluation 

.-tci’fli i" Fiumv-Presse 

MANILA — A group of high- 
ranking government officials and 
business leaders has recommended to 
President Fidel Ramos a “possible 
gradual depreciation of the peso.” the 
presidential palace said Tuesday. 

The 140-member Caucus on 
Competitiveness recommended an 
exchange-rate review “to allow 
gradual adjustments to a more real- 
istic rate through a possible gradual 
depreciation of the peso.” 

The advisory group called for any 
depreciation to be conducted “in a 
... , . well -calibrated manner to attain com- 
T J petitiveness in the global marker.” 

Mr. Ramos had no immediate re- 
action. But Frederico Pascual. pres- 
ident of the Philippine Chamber of 
Commerce and Industry, rejected 
rhe call, saying that a weaker cur- 
rency “has not really prodded ex- 
port growth.” 

Raul Concepcion, head of the 
Federation of Philippine Industries, 
said talk of devaluation was "coun- 
terproductive” at a time when spec- 
ulators were circling the peso. 

In Manila, Che dollar finished at 
26.40 pesos, down from 26.41 on 
Monday, when the government 
raised overnight interest rates and 
intervened on currency markets. 


Analysis said that the float, in 
which the baht had plunged 15 per- 
cent as of Tuesday, would lead to 
foreign debt repayment problems 
for many weak companies. 

Thailand plans to borrow 510 bil- 
lion in the next six months to spur its 
economy and bail out its finance 
industry, a step that would increase 
sovereign debt by a third, an aide to 
the prime minister said. 

The government is negotiating to 
borrow S5 billion from foreign 
banks, said Poos an a Premanoch, 
deputy chief of staff to Prime Min- 
ister Chaovalit Yongchaiyui. An- 
other S5 billion will be raised by 
selling international bonds, he said. 

Meanwhile, the Commerce Min- 
istry said Tuesday that producers, 
importers and distributors of 30 
products had been told to supply 
details of their stocks and wholesale 
and retail prices. They face prison 
terms of up to seven' years and a 
maximum fine of 200,000 baht if 
they raise prices over the next three 
months to unfairly exploit the de- 
cline in the baht, the ministry said. 

Mr. Thanong said the forecast for 
growth in the 1997 consumer price 
index had been provisionally re- 
vised to 6.0 percent from the 4.5 
percent that had been forecast before 
* the baht .was effectively devalued. 

Some analysts have predicted that 
inflation could reach 1 0 percent this 
year because of the drop in the 
baht's value. 

The currency has further 
weakened this week, with the dollar 
at 29.00 baht Tuesday, up from 
28.65 on Monday. 

The Stock Exchange of Thail- 
and’s benchmark index fell 7 percent 
over the past three days. The index 
closed down 18.84 points, or 3 per- 
cent, at 6 14. 19 on Tuesday, as profit- 
taking that set in Monday persisted, 
particularly among banking, finance 
and communications stocks. 

Analysts and officials said 
Bangkok should develop its gov- 
ernment bond market while foreign 
money pours into the economy fol- 
lowing the baht's float. 

"We need a well-developed 
long-term debt market to absorb the 
funds . and keep them here longer,” 
Commerce Minister Narongchai 
Akarasanee said, “so that when for- 
eign investors don’t love us any 
more, the money won’t flow out too 
fast.” (Bloomberg, AFP) 


By Philip Segal 

Spt-chit f.< thi It.r.iU Tiihunr 

HONG KONG — In the world 
of Chinese finance, most of the 
attention has been paid to the 
frenzy for Chinese stocks listed in 
Hong Kong, known as “red 
chips. ’’ Bui away from the glare of 
publicity. China’ has quietly been 
raising far more money the old 
fashioned way: by borrow ing. 

Chinese state companies are 
funding their taste for stakes in 
expensive blue-chip Hong Kong 
companies by borrowing at din- 
cheap rates from foreign banks 
eager to cultivate strong lies. Most 
of the loans to such customers — 
like the Bank of China — are not 
even profitable. But given the per- 
ceived reality of doing business 
with China, banks figure they have 
little choice. 

•’The Bank of China deals are 
totally political.'’ said Donald 
Last, assistant vice fires idem at 
MCM Asia Pacific Co., which 
monitors Hong Kong's credit mar- 
kets. “Banks cannot afford not to 
have a relationship with BOC.” 

Tie hope on the part of foreign 
banks is that by building relation- 
ships with China's favorite state 
companies, they will be able to 


secure profitable business, like 
bond and stock underwriting, or 

less-restricted currency trading 
wiihin China. 

Foreign bunks are so keen to 
lend to i he Bank of China that they 
snapped up a BOC floating-rate 
certificate of deposit that paid just 
31 basis points over the Hong 
Kong Interbank Offered Rate, the 
benchmark for loans here. The re- 
sponse was so strong that BOC 
expanded the issue To 5 billion 
Hong Kong dollars (S645.8 mil- 
lion T from 2 billion dollars. 

By contrast, a similar issue in 
January by Hongkong & Shanghai 
Banking Corp. paid 30 basis points 
over the HIBOR rate. That means 
banks were willing to forego an 
extra “risk premium" for buying 
the issue from BOC. 

While Chinese companies have 
raised 2 billion dollars by issuing 
red-chip shares in Hong Kong, the 
former colony's credit market is- 
sues have dwarfed that amount. 
Syndicated loans and other lend- 
ing in Hong Kong (which include 
loans to red-chip companies) has 
totaled 17.2 billion dollars so far 
iliis year, about three-quarters of 
ihe value of credit for all of 1996. 
according to LFR Securities Data 
Co. Lending inside China itself has 


totaled another 3.8 billion dollars 
in the year to date. 

Bankers say the surge in lending 
was helped along by an upgrade of 
China's credit rating in May by 
Standard & Poor's Corp., which 
assigned the country's sovereign 
debt a BBB-plus rating in May. up 
from BBB. 

The scramble to lend is likely to 
continue, with loan rates continu- 
ing to fall as cash-rich foreign 
banks jostle for market share, said 
Michael Lawes, publisher of Basis 
Point, a Hong Kong newsletter that 
tracks Asian debt markets. 

For example, a subsidiary of the 
shipping container giant Cosco Pa- 
cific Ltd. paid 78 basis points over 
HIBOR in April for a five-year 
loan, compared with ISO basis 
points over HIBOR for a similar 
Joan in June 1 994. 

State-backed borrowers like 
Cosco, CIT1C Pacific Ltd. and 
China Everbright are thought to 
stand an excellent chance of being 
bailed out by the government if 
they default, which contribuies to 
the willingness of banks to lend at 
low rates. 

Because it is so dependent on 
foreign debt markets, China knows 
whaf damage a default could do to 
its fund raising efforts. 


15000 

15333 kfl 

14000 - V-F— 

12000 p mXm'Tj 


Singapore • 
Straits Times 

2250 -a — - 

2200 ft- 

2150-1 

2100— V A 

2050 — -Wf^ 

2000 T ■ 

1950 c u~i u 


F M A M J J 
1997 


Tokyo 

i ■ Nikkei 225 

22000 - 

21000 — 

29000 — 

\ . 19000 -R—jS- 

\L_ • iflooov vy 

A J J 17000 F~M * M jj 


Exchange 


Hong Kong Hang Seng 
Singapore Straits Times 
Sydney AH Ordinaries 
Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 


Bangkok 

Seoul 

Taipei 

Manila 

Jakarta 

Wellington 

Bombay 

Source: Telekurs 


Index Tuesday Prw, % 

Close ' Close Change 

Hang Seng 14,732.17 14,858.58 -0.45 

Straits Times 2,007423 1,997.99 +0.46 

An Ordinaries 2,679.20 2,713.00 -T25 

Nikkei 225 ■ 19,853.89 19,705.17 +0.75 

Composite 1,057.77 1,06053 -0.26 

SET . ” 614/19 633.03 -2.98 

Composite index 76774 773.51 -0.75 

Stock Market Index 9,305.27“ 9.32Z84 -0.19 

PSE 2396.66 £.753.15 -1.98 

Composite index 740.83“ 738 01 +0.38 

N2SE-40 2*507.34 2,513.78 -0.26 


SET , 

Composite Index 


Sensitive Index 


4406.39 4,291.45 +0.35) 

lriiL'nijii.T-_l H'ViU Tnn u n.' 


China Carmakers Fault Beijing 


Blotmhrrit News 

BELTING — China's automakers, 
stung by competition and sagging 
sales, are blaming die government 
for the industry’s dimming pros- 
pects. 

Xu Xingyao. vice president of 
China’s biggest automaker. First 
Automobile Group Corp.. said taxes 
and corruption had hurt its oper- 
ations. 

“I hope the government stops in- 
terfering in our business,” he said 
while attending the opening day of 
the International Automobile Show 
in Beijing. 

Mr. Xu and executives from other 
Chinese automakers also com- 
plained that regional governments 
had hobbled local auto industries. 

Chiysler Corp., the third biggest 
U.S. automaker, said Monday that it 
would close its representative office 
in Beijing because it saw no new 


project opportunities in a time of 
stalled sales. General Motors Corp., 
the world's biggest automaker, de- 
cided noi io a trend this year's 
Beijing auto show at all. 

Another automaker, PSA 
Peugeot Citroen SA of France, is to 
give up its unprofitable car plant in 
southern Guangdong Province, with 
a German subsidiary of General 
Motors Corp. expected as a replace- 
ment. 

But the exodus has nor stopped 
Toyota Moror Corp., Japan’s largest 
automaker, from opening its third 
representative office in Oiina be- 
fore setting up a joint venture with a 
local auto assembler. 

Toyota is awaiting final approval 
from the Chinese government to 
enter a joint venture with a state- 
owned company in Chengdu, in cen- 
tral China, to build small buses. 

Toyota first exported to China in 


1964 and began making auto parts 
together with China's Shenyang 
Jimbei Passenger Vehicle Manufac- 
turing Co. in J 988. 

■ Tsingtao Reshuffles 

Tsingtao Brewery Co., China’s 
largest beer exporter, will sell busi- 
nesses, including taxi services to 
restaurants, to buy breweries in east- 
ern China, a spokeswoman said. 
Bloomberg News reported from 
Qingdao. China. 

The move by the company, which 
owns one of China's most famous 
brand names, is part of a strategy of 
opening markets close to its Qing- 
dao base in the eastern province of 
Shandong. 

“It will be a repetition of what 
they did before.” said Pitzi Lau. an 
analyst at Salomon Brothers Inc. ‘ ‘It 
has yet to produce a positive re- 
turn.” 


Very briefly; 

• Japan’s cabinet has confirmed plans io trim the budget for 
next year by cuttins foreign aid by 10 percent, or 1 10 billion 
yen (S97I.3 million ), and by reducing public works and other 
spending. 

• Pilipino Telephone Corp. shares surged 1.25 pesos, or 10.4 
percent, to 13.25 pesos (50 cents), after the struggling cellular- 
phone company said it had named Roberto Ongpin. a former 
Philippine trade minister, as chairman. 

• Australia's prime minister. John How ard, said he wanted 
interest rates to continue to fall as the country’s budget deficit 
narrowed. 

• Kerin Wallace, a former private -client broker at Merrill 
Lynch & Co„ was arrested by Hong Kong's Commercial Crime 
Bureau after the firm alleged that he had defrauded customers. 

• Acer Inc., the world’s eighth-largest personal computer 
maker, said sales in June rose 35 percent, to 5. 9 billion Taiwan 
dollars (S21 1.4 million), the highest level this year. 

• Russia agreed to provide SI 16.5 million w'onh of com- 
modities and other goods, including enriched uranium, heli- 
copters, aluminum and electrolytic copper, to the South 
Korean government to repay part of its overdue debt. 

• The Australian Wheat Board, the country's monopoly 
wheat exporter, cut its forecast for the 1997-1998 crop to 
between 15 million and 16 million metric tons from a previous 
estimate of 18 million tons to account for the effect of low 
rainfall caused by the El Nino weather pattern. 

• Taiwan inaugurated a preparatory office for the construc- 
tion in southern Tainan of the island’s second high-technology 
industrial park. 

• Taiwan’s Securities and Futures Commission plans to 
strengthen laws against insider trading and more than triple the 
maximum prison term for the offense to seven years. 

• Hanbo Iron & Steel Co„ the bankrupt South Korean 

company, failed to draw even a single bidder in its first tender 
and was withdrawn from sale until July 29, according to 
newspaper reports. afp. Bioombern 


...; •. 


South Korea’s Financial Overhaul Stalls 


Bloomberg fins 

SEOUL — South Korea’s 
ambitious plan to overhaul its 
ailing financial industry has 
stalled because of opposition 
- 4 ly from politicians ana the cen- 
* tral bank. _ 

Finance and Economy 
Minister Kang Kyung Shik 
admitted dnring a meeting 
Monday thar the financial re- 
form bill could not be sub- 
mitted during this month's 
extraordinary session of the 
National Assembly. 

The impasse will com- 
pound inefficiency at local 
banks and securities firms, 
eroding profits. A string of 
business failures, stemming 
from inadequate credit anal- 
ysis, damaged bank finances 
this year by inflating their bad 
loans. 

j “There are so many 
’ obstacles for the bill to be 
passed during this adminis- 
tration,” said Kim Chang 
Hee, an economist at Kook- 
min Bank Research Institute. 
“Besides, dozens of related 
laws have to be amended for 
the bill to take effect, and we 
don’t have time for that.” 

. Inefficiency in the finan- 


cial system, particularly die 
banking system, was mainly 
responsible for the collapses 
of Hanbo Group and Samxni 
Group, w-hich failed under 
combined debt of 58.2 billion 
early this year. 

Hanbo’s fall highlighted 
problems at banks as the com- 
pany had bribed politicians 
and bankers to get unsecured 
loans. Chairman Chung Tai 
Soo is serving a 15-year pris- 
on term on bribery and fraud 
charges. 

To fix the problems, the 
Ministry of Finance and 
Economy proposed a draft 
bill on financial reform that 
would strip the central bank 
of its right to inspect com- 
mercial banks. 

The bill, already approved 
by President Kim Young 
Sam, would create a govern- 
ment watchdog to supervise 
banks, brokerages and insur- 
ance companies. The ministry 
says a single* regulatory sys- 
tem would enhance the ef- 
ficiency of financial supervi- 
sion. helping prevent 
bankruptcies caused by lax 
credit analysis. 

The central bank opposes 


ADVEBTIS&MEYr 


ASAHI OPTICAL LTD. 


the bill, saying it would lead 
to job cuts. More than 95 per- 
cent of its employees signed a 
petition demanding the resig- 
nation of the bank’s governor, 
Lee Kyung Shik, for accept- 
ing the bill. 

The bill could also 
strengthen the authority of i 
bureaucrats by putting the 
new Financial Supervisory 
Board under their control. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

HITACHI LTD. 

(CDRfl) 

The onderNgned unomees thal u from 
July IB, 1W7 si jto-AuocUiie S.V, 
Amsterdam, dir. cpo. bo. SO 
(seeampanied br u “AiM.vil") of lb# 


In a parliamentary meeting 
Monday, opposition law- 
makers demanded that enact- 
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until a new administration 
takes over. President Kim’s 
term ends in February. 



CDRa Hitachi Lid. riH be pnvebfe with 
Dlls. 39,84 per CDE raw. wffl siw. and 
with Ms. 79,68 per CDE. rrpr. LOW shs. 
(drv. per rrc-date SL03.97, go* W 
p. ihj «fler deduction of Japanese 
Gx = Ym 412£Q = Dfls. 7,07 per CDR 
rent. SOO shiTea 8ZS.- = Dfl* 14J4 p» 
CDR repr. LWO du. Without an Affidavit 
20% japfliiest tax = Yen 550,- = Dfls. , 
<M3 par CDR repr. 500 chfc. Yen LIDO,- | 


= Dfk 18.86 per CDR reor. 1.000 siu* 
wil] be dedncled. 

.After 3fi.09.lW7 the dividend rfl oalr be 
mid under deduction of 20% Jap. tax with 


Dtk 37.48; Dfls. 74.96 mp. 500 and 
1.000 iki, in accordance with the 
Japanese tax rendation*. 
AMSTERDAM. DEPOSITARY 



SOVEREIGN 
(FOREX) LTD. 

SWISS BROKERHOUSE 

ti 8. Rue du Rhdne. 

1204 Gendve 

24 HOURS FOREX DESK 

• Interbank Conditions 

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According to Swiss Law 

Inquiries: 


Phone: ++41 12 14 6322 
Fax: ++ 41 41 728 0809 




h 3I be deducted. 




li cal Co., Ltd. vul be 


bflt. 4,01; Dfls. 40,10 resp. 100 and 
1.000 ghi n in accordance with the 
Japanese ha regulations. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
■Amsterdam. July 4, 1997 


- SANYO KLEHiWORT SPAIN FUND 

- Fonds Commun de Placement 
11. n» Aldrlngen. L-1 118 Luxembourg 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

The Board of Directors of Ihe management company decided 
on 18 June 1997 to declare a dividend of USD 0.10 per unit 
to be paid on 25 July 1997 to unitholders on record on 
'11 July 1997 against surrender of coupon N" 9. Ex-dividend 
date is 11 July 1997. 

Paying agent KREDIETBANK SA. LUXEMBOURGEOISE 
43, boulevard Royal, L-2955 Luxembourg 


Babcock & Brown 
Leasing Services, Inc, 


is pleased to' offer its services in 
structuring and arranging domestic and 
cross-border leases of U.S.-manufactured 
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THE WORLDS DAILY JVE1V SPi PER 












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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY JUIA 9, 1997 


PAGE 19 


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demand rise. Shown at 
right is a modem shopping 
center in Prague. 






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Having Emerged, CEE Is on the Move 

This large, skilled workforce is also a rising consumer base with an appetite for Western products. 


Good Credit Risks 


O ver ihe last seven 
years, virtually all of 
the world's leading 
companies have set up shop 
in Central and Eastern 
Europe (CEE). In the pro- 
cess, they have spent more 
than $80 billion in the region: 
$51 billion through initial 
outlays and the balance 
through office and plant ex- 
pansions and other follow-up 
investments. 

An initial glance at the 
macroeconomic indicators 
does not completely reveal 
what has triggered this large- 
scale inflow of long-tenn 


capital. The 19 CEE coun- 
tries — counting Russia — 
constitute a market of some 
340 million people. That’s 
just a bit smaller than the 
North Atlantic Free Trade 
Agreement market (380 mil- 
lion) and the European Un- 
ion (363.4 million). NAFTA 
and the EU are the world's 
two largest markets. 

Furthermore, the “central 
core” of this large market is 
showing an attractive growth 
rate of more than 4 percent 
annually — roughly equal to 
that of NAFTA and almost 
twice as much as the EU's. 


The core is made up of the 
Visegrad countries (the 

Czech Republic. Hungary. 
Poland Slovakia and Slov- 
enia) and the Baltic countries 
( Estonia. Latvia and 

Lithuania). 

The power of provimjty 
But the CEE's growth rate is 
still below that of Southeast 
Asia, a region with which the 
CEE contends — fairly suc- 
cessfully — for international 
investment. And the gross 
domestic product per capita 
of the CEE region as a per- 
centage of absolute purchas- 


ing power is still only a 10th 
of the EU's. Why. then, is the 
CEE so popular with the in- 
ternational business commu- 
nity? 

“For one thing, you can't 
discount the effects of prox- 
imity-. Much of this corporate 
investment has come from 
Germany and Austria and 
has gone to the CEE region’s 
‘day zone,'” says Franz 
Zwickl. member of the board 
of directors of the Vienna- 
based Bank Austria. 

The “day zone” refers to 
areas within a day's travel by 
uuck or ship from the west 


Country 

Moody's 

Standard 
and Poor's 

irca 

Czech Republic 

Baal 

A 

A- 

Hungary 

Bal 

BB+ 

BBB- 

Poland 

Baa3 

BBB - 

BBB 

Romania 

Ba3 

BB- 

BB- 

Russia 

Ba2 

BB- 

BB + 

Slovaxla 

Baa3 

■ BBB- 

BBB- 

Slovenia 

A3 

A 

A- 


'A “ siznifttn j lop-qualitv credit ruuna Sources Crediuimudt 


“This proximity saves on 
transport costs — and allows 
investors to keep a close eye 
on the store,” adds Mr. 
Zwickl. 

“But even more impor- 
tant; The CEE region has 
some very impressive stat- 


istics if you look at the region 
with the eyes of an investor 
looking for a place from 
which to produce cost-effi- 
ciently,” continues Mr. 
Zwickl. “These highly pos- 

Condnued on page 21 


L. TURKEY 

4*. 


Small Businesses 

I n Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), there is a direct 
correlation between die size of a country's SME (small 
and medium-sized enterprises) sector and the pace of the 
country’s economic development. That is the highly in- 
teresting finding of “Perspectives on Eastern Europe.” a 
report issued early this year by Investmentbank Austria. 

< SMEs. i.e.. companies with 500 or fewer employees, 
| account for 65 percent of the Czech Republic's gross do- 
5 ? mestic produce the figures for Poland and Hungary are 56 
| percent and 51 percent respectively. The Baltics — Estonia. 
Latvia and Lithuania — are also reported to be above the 50 
percent mark. These countries have a level of entrepren- 
eurship (measured in tire number of companies per 1 .000 
inhabitants) that matches West European levels. 

The relatively low percentages in Slovakia and Slovenia 
(both in the lower 30 percentile) can be attributed to their 
economic histories. In both countries, a very few. very large 
integrated manufacturers (ended to — and to some extent, 
still do — dominate the economy. 

The report also found that most of the SMEs are very small 
indeed: 93 percent to 97 percent of them employ fewer than 
100 people. The majority of all SMEs are in the service 
sector. In several high-performing CEE countries, one- 
quarter to one-fifth are active in manufacturing. 

The SM Es may be productive, but their lot is anything but 
easy, says another study, this one from Eurostat. More than 
one-third of the 3.4 million businesses in the 1 1 countries 
receiving assistance from the European Union's PHARE 
program are no longer economically active, says the report. 

Lack of capital and managerial experience are said to be 
the main causes of foe SMEs’ decline. Although the news is 
not encouraging, the figure has to be put in perspective. In 
Western countries, between 40 percent and 80 percent of 
newly founded companies do not live to see their fifth 
birthday. In view- of that fact, the CEE's small companies are 
actually doing quite well. • 


(Often f/wri. (9/im &/im m/htfx S$(//yMr/y 


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Budapest is pretty', exciting and 
bubbling uith life with broad 
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and fascinating architecture of 
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There is something for everyone 
here: art galleries, museums, a 
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halls, cosv, elegant restaurants, 
cafes and confectionaries with 
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PAGE 20 


• - 'ArfvT 


EVTERJVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1997 


SPONSORED SEC 1 1 O N 


]>( ) N SO K Flf> St.< HON 


Emerging Markets in Central and Eastern Europe 


I 










■VXW 


The ‘Crown Jewels’ of Privatization 

Infrastructure projects involving airports , telecoms, utilities and transport are worth many billions. 


A 


n important statistic for Central 
and East European (CEE) gov- 
ernments is the share of the 
gross domestic product that theirprivate 
sector produces. This figure is a bench- 
mark of how thoroughgoing each coun- 
try’s privatization process has been. 

The figures include corporations still 
indirectly controlled by the state via 
“golden shares" — which confer spe- 
cial powers like veto or voting rights — 
or public-sector-controlled banks, so 
such statistics should be taken with a 
grain. of salt. Still, the numbers are 
impressive. 

Some 75 percent of the Czech econ- 
omy is now in private hands, says the 
European Bank for Recovery and De- 
velopment’s “Transition" report The 
country’s economic ministry puts the 
figure at SO percent. The governments 
of Slovakia and Hungary say they clock 
in at 70 percent The lowest total is from 
the slowest to privatize: Belarus, with 
15 percent. 

Large though these percentages are, 
they are still set to rise. A wave of mega- 
sized intrastructure' privatization — in- 
cluding airports, telecommunications, 
utilities and transport systems — is now 
sweeping through the CEE region. 


‘SsttH^upmostdasts 
Involves intricate, patient 


Delicate deals 

Infrastructure companies are widely re- 
garded as the “crown jewels” of the 
CEE countries’ business communities. 
By their very nature, these companies 
come with a strong and proven cash 
flow: Everyone needs telecommunica- 
tions and transport links, heat and elec- 
tricity. 


These companies also have a press- 
ing need to expand and upgrade their 
facilities and networks. Like the pri- 
vatizations themselves, upgrades usu- 
ally come with multibillion-dollar price 
tags. All told, it will take between $200 
billion and $300 billion in outside cap- 
ital to bring the CEE’s infrastructure up 
to Western levels, says Marko MuSulin. 
chairman of Creditanstalt Investment 
Bank AG (CAIB). the 
investment banking 
subsidiary of the Vi- 
enna-based financial 
services giant. 

“Setting up these 
privatization and post- 
privatization projects 
often represents a great 
challenge, but not necessarily because 
of the amount of capital involved or 
reluctance on the part of Western in- 
vestors to provide it. The money is 
there. The challenge stems from the 
complexity characterizing most indi- 
vidual deals." Mr. Musulin explains. 
“There are. of course, a number of 
projects that are relatively straightfor- 
ward to arrange, as. for instance, when a 
CEE government sells a tranche of its 
national telecoms stock to a single con- 
sortium or when an airport embarks on a 
facility improvement program. But set- 
ting up most deals generally involves 
some very intricate, very patient match- 
making among a variety of public and 
private sector parties." 


and 


variety of public and p r ivat e 
sector parties’ 


Based in London and Vienna 
headed by John Kramer, CAIB infra- 
structure Project Advisors has started 
life with a portfolio of $2.5 billion in 
existing project advisory work. A fur- 
ther $2 billion of CAJB-ad vised un- 
dertakings are now in the pl annin g or 
finalizing stages. 

In setting up its deals, the new com- 
pany has a key asset It has an in-depth 
knowledge of the 
CEE’s financial mar- 
kets and the fast-break- 
ing trends reshaping it 
This knowledge stems 
from the broad and deep 
network of nation- 
based and special-focus 
subsidiaries that Cred- 
itanstalt has set up in the CEE regions. 

Poland is one example: Creditan- 
stalt’s Polish subsidiaries have become 
one of the prime sources of banking 
services to the country's proliferating 
numbers of relatively high-net-worth 
households and commercially viable 
SMEs (small and medium-sized en- 
terprises). 

Via its own grouping of subsidiaries 
in Poland, CAIB itself has become one 
of the most sign i ficant lead managers of 
initial public offerings (IPOs) — now 
becoming more and more popular on 
the booming Warsaw Stock Exchange, 
which also recently listed .the country’s 
15 privatization funds. 


-V 

T*i 




New Roads for New Cars 

The race is on to build superhighways. 


- r A .7: 


(JRB 


opsincsE tr 

lople#* 


There’s a sense of urgency about Implementing ^ya st; 


The E&abetft Bridge crosses the Danube River in Budapest 


supe^ghway construction programs drawn up 
Poland foeCzech Republic and some other 
^an countries. In 15 to 20 years, 
expected to own as many automobiles as 
counterparts: roughly one for 

current figure for Central Europe is two^rfths , 

The number of new cars purchased in Central Eujope,ha$; 
been growing at annual rates of between 15 percent artd21 
percent (1996 figure). That’s two and a half to threettn&. 
the rate in Western Europe over the past few years, »*Handi 
is now “one of-the hottest automobile markets 
world,” in the words of a Daewoo spokesperson. - T-;---. 

Fdr drivers who have fought their way to and through : 
Prague, Budapest and other CEE cities, the thought of ^ 
and a half times as many motor vehicles on these Jamw 
packed, two-lane “highways" sounds like a rfightthare 
waiting to happen. / 

But it may not come to pass. Should foeambltlousA^l 
superhighway building plans become a reality, the Hungarian • ; 
government has authorized private-sector axvsBirtla to btiifef •' 
and operate 500 kilometers (310 miles) of toll roads. The^e .r 
concessions would run for 35 years. As of this witting, 
stretches of the new superhighway have been completed. I" 
The Czech and Polish governments are evernfjpre am- . 
bitious. Via similar PPP (public-private partnershlpfaffarigB*;' 
merits, the Czechs intend to build more tfiari' SCXXkf^ - 
lometers of superhighways —twice today’s tpta) T^-oy&rthe - 
next eight years. The Poles are planning to ouWoths. : 
Czechs’ 100 kilometers- ayear pace. Their goal: 160 ki- 
lometers a year over the next decade. 


T 


hanks 

transp< 

word-* 
^nendabo' 
javelers, Bu 
other c* 

* dE3St ££ 

rion are beet 

jrtgues. 

^ With thee: 

foe C 


bna. 


Enjo>^ 


sS soli 


foir'tounst' 
World Tourrs 


Uortf. 


the < 


Matchmaking 

CAIB recently founded a dedicated 
subsidiary to handle this matchmaking. 


Launching trends 


Hungary’s Close Tees With Neighbors! 


^ I ffoTM S d d aSitos a wTrfthl toning cemented strong ties with its Western neighbors. Hungary is new looking at the global ffj 


New Chips: Blue Chips 


Products ranging fiom software to pharmaceuticals are "hot. " 


This year, a net $14 
billion will be invested 
in Central and Eastern 
Europe's securities ex- 
changes. predicts the 
Suddeutsche Zeitung. 
Should this materia- 
lize. the inflow would 
be 66 percent higher 


than the 1 996 figure — 
itself a record — and 
would be partially re- 
sponsible for sending 
several exchanges to 
all-time highs. 

Setting off the inflow 
have been the strong 
prospects of the region's 


“new' chips.” companies 
that analysts see as the 
region's blue chips. 
These include Pliva. the 
Croatian antibiotics pro- 
ducer. and Computeriand 
and Scala. software pro- 
ducers based in Poland 
and Hungary. 


funds, and has become number one in 
Poland for discretionary portfolio man- 
agement It also ranks among the coun- 
try's top three securities brokers. 

“Actually. I'd like to think that 
rather than merely participating in these 
trends, we've actually helped launch 
several of them," says Mr. Musulin. 
“Nor should foe impression arise that 
we confine ourselves to the relatively 
well-developed 1 Visegrad’ markets [foe 
Czech Republic. Hungary. Poland, 
Slovakia and Slovenia]. By arranging 
sophisticated compensation-based 
deals and providing other financial ser- 
vices, we're also serving as the interface 
between foe highly promising business 
communities in Ukraine. Russia and the 
other Commonwealth of Independent 
States countries and foe rest of the busi- 
ness world” • 


.-prded an m< 
*nt in inten 

uni ovemigh 
\ num&e 

jLrtperformec 

Tourist reven 
iercent “J ™ 
Xnd 1997 k> 

n mo* com 

Ministry of i 

, 24 percent i 

jer of fbreigi 
country, 
postlinp has 
Sinope's fir 
spots smee 
mi- 

These got 
viihstandmg, 

ourism offici 
ng. The rea 

Jneasuring th 

against those 

epublic. wf 


A true reflection 

of real growth. 



Akh.mk enters. I'lT m ;i stronger pi^iru m than eier. 
Jui 1 to the rem.irkabli- level of growth tliui 
j*. liieveJ in I Wit*. 


FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS’ 


< L s > jiiiJii<:>ns 


TIk- loan portfolio ilmilviJ hy 45" •• »n lpWi. mirmrinv* 
•he strong an*J continuing commitment of Aklumk 
ti» it-, Mitsui inert. This. custnmer-onented approach 
resulted in an ]*"•• irureu-e in total asset,, reflecting 
i hf high rtfjJ pivn th Akh.mk experienced during 
ihe vear. 


AsSFPi 


1995 

3. VI 


1996 


LOANS 


«l4 


DEPOMTS 




tj-* 
3. JUS 


vkhzink hjs !■ 
institution in 


njt ranked as the 
Turkev. is 


most protiiahlc 
no exception. 


ST'NIKHOLDEkV EQl : m 
BEFORE TAN INCOME 




up lff[> 
up 45"'* 
up JlT.-i 

up ]4".| 

up 4j"u 


NET INCOME 


351 


Up H— 1‘ 


Akbank prepares its financial statements actor Jins 
to prudent and conserv ative accounting principles, 
sen ini; aside full provisions for deferred tax ILihiltnes 


l*Wn restills attest to Aki onk’s earning pow er, what's 
more, the numliers certify AklonkN commitment to 
candor in the presentation of its financials. 


Return on Awraue Equity 
Return on AieRipe Av<is 


49.h?!c 


'juUilc.l li» J'ih.e VT iintnu.-. 


AKBANK 


fur mure llltnrili.il n *n 
N .i I ■ .i n 1. 1 Center t 


md .< •.*-*p' • *i 
Lei cm Hu" 


>•■111 !“*«* \nnual I<rp< in 

i ' I'ljnbul-TiiiJ.i'i 


He. 

Tel 


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''i Hi. iii 
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Hi-pun ijieiier.il Man.i, 
• c on -j I 2 i 2*4 1 1* , 


Sza boles Fazakas has 
been Hungary's ministerof 
indastry and trade since 
November 1996. He brings 
a broad range of expertise 
to his position. Born in 
1947. he earned a doctorate 
in economics in 1973. Dur- 
ing his subsequent 16-year 
career at the country's 
minis try of trade. Mr. 
Fazakas held a number of 
senior positions. In 1989- 
90, he was deputy minister 
of the reform ministry of 
international economic re- 
lations. From 1990 to 1995. 
he was the CEO of Austria 
Industry’s subsidiary in 
Hungary. After a stint as 
state secretary at the min- 
istry of industry and trade. 
Mr. Fazakas served as 
Hungary’s ambassador to 
Germany. An interview 
with him follows. 

Hungary' has incontest- 
ably been one of the Central 
and East European [CEE] 
region 's strongest adherents 
of an “ open door " policy to- 
ward foreign investment, a 
policy that is gn-en more and 
more credence throughout 
the legion. Based on your 
counnys experience, what 
benefits • do you foresee 
emerging for the region from 
the espousal of FDl [foreign 
direct investment]? 

One thing has become 
clear from our experience: 
Given foe right conditions, 
foreign investment can spur a 
modernization involving all 


parts of a country's economy. 
One of these conditions in- 
volves foe country's body of 
laws. Foreign investment 
flows into countries that are 
perceived as "fair markets.” 
A precondition for rhese 
markets is a fair-minded, 
comprehensible body of laws 
regulating them. Cognizant 
of these tacts. Hungary ’s 
policy-makers began to sys- 
tematically modernize our 
country's laws at the very 
outset of the post-Soviet peri- 
od. All sectors of our busi- 
ness community have been 
profiting from the results of 
this process, which has also 
helped gamer S16 billion of 
FDI in Hunsarv. 



Szaboks Fazakas hasbeen 


ft 


Hungary’s mfrrister ofindusDy ^ j tflHAV' 


trade and tourism formostoF. 


ffie last year. He stresses foe 


importance of a fakktgtfframe-Z^ h^hd 


The statist! 
EE region 
timed into on 
. .... . great trading 

hfrastmeture and gtobalbation. i Czech Repub 

'••■ 'ri - now exports 
judged by foe strong rise in®ro : ; ^ore than il 


merit He also cries Hung&fs ;; y 

. • • . . *7|fr 

work in the areas of technology , t . f Ar 


Contfm 


few years, we've seen a 
large-scale increase in the 
number of young, highly in- 
novative companies in Hun- past few years. The rise-, in 
One very impoirantareaof _jEyy v ,For many of . .these _trade has been produced by\ 
our economy now being companies, foreign-owned and has produced — the^ 


inter-regional trade, has de- * V. Roland expor 
veloped strongly over the- / 'Anore.and Hu 


modernized with the assist- 
ance of foreign capital — and 
the technologies and man- 
agement styles — is our in- 
frastructure. And this is a 
very key development. Hun- 
gary's future lies in providing 
manufacturing, transport and 
technological development 
services for the entire CEE 
region and beyond. To 
provide those services, our 
financial. daca-processine 
and transport systems have to 
be at world-class levels. 
Thanks to the input from our 
“foreigners. ’* we will attain 
these levels. 

One final, very important 
benefit that we're also seeing 
from FDI in Hungary is in the 
high-tech area. Over the last 


corporations are a mam 
source of business. 

Over the last three years, 
the CEE region has outpaced 
Western Europe in gmss do- 
mestic product growth. Whal 
changes, if. any. has this 
"performance differential " 
caused in the relationship be- 
tween the two regions? 

Any changes occurring 
hav e not been foe product of 
varying rates of overall 
growth. This differential 
doesn't really exist because 
you can’t compare the in- 
creases in GDP registered by 
economies undergoing rad- 
ical transformations with 
those ^recorded by mature 
economies. 

This relationship, best 


=.f:ent more. 

A lull 60 
CEE region’s 
; ; io to foe higi 
West Europe 
■ Wth Aniei 
That’s twice 


B 


Creditanstalt Investment Bank 

Corporate Advisory • Securities • Asset Management 

Preeminent in Central and Eastern Europe 

Selected Transactions and Awards 1996 ft 1997 


MiiM 


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International Experience, Local Presence and Expertise 


HHOODee A- 10*1 Vnjnna. Juhus Tanfliw PiaK 3 T-l 531 94. F a . 11 3,7515 75 

| Warns Botetoua BuOwx) Quopoa Ciw™ Forttn UutAra urttr Mian Usm, r, 


’ JrtK 0r *M W •aw iKjtt) 


vast increase in knowledge^ 
foe two regions’ business' ; 
communities have of eachf- r? 
other. : ; v‘ ... 

For Western Europe, there- r ^cven years at 
are fewer and fewer, “blank U he industrial s 

spots” on foe map of Central^ . .. n restructuri 
and Eastern European bitsii“; •' -i jp^ding pr 
ness. The convereea,lsp holds *. f .S >nemin 2 mar 
true. That's a highly rmporn/. : The succes 

tant change: Western analf . - 1 regior 
CEE businesses now khow.; : - lustrial outpi 
each other, and' know each 1 ':.- 1 . « hreeyeais;3 
other very welL . .; ; and. 24 pern 

Hungary’s comfranies are / . . |g percent in 
no longer “unknown quan- 4 and 
titles” to their Western coun-T- 1 :. ? Slovakia, rept 
terparts, but rather partners ' 
with whom they’ve been' 
working for foe better part of* 
foe decade. But the most im- 
portant change in the reia-" 
tionship has been, produced,; 
by events not restricted to foe- 1 
continent itself. 

IVhat do you mean? ” 

Western Europe has been -- ... toeriino Wnp 
feeling the effected gleb-^f 
alization. wh ich has en-'J- In mother w; 
gendered the need to produce-^: < v, Actually 
cost-efficiently and to speed - - • * ■ 

up times to market of new^- 
products and services. - Thii^ 
has been one main cause . of - 
the rapprochement between J : - 
Western Europe and the CEE“ ; 
region. .u 

Within the space of a"- 
very few years, many of: U 
Hungary's companies have^ : j 
completely modernized'-, 
their operating structure^^ 
and brought out new ranges’ 
of products. Thar expertise^, 
in fast-lTacking technolo-:^ 
gical change, along with" 
our very low production’ : 
costs, has made our country 11 
an object of prime interest •• 
among international corpo-^j. 
rations looking to masterly 
foe challenge of globaliz- - 
ation. • 


{Russian raw 
ipre exceptk 
Justry-driven 
abroad is Ruk 
l»rt successe* 
autely from 
feold and othe 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1997 


RAGE 21 




SPONSORED SECTION 


SPONSORED SECTION 


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Emerging Markets in Central and Eastern Europe 


Urban Attraction 

business travel has set off a wave of tourism , as 
people return to admire the CEE cities. 

T hanks to improving 36 percent rise in interna* 
transport Imks and tional tourist overnight stays 
word-of-mouth rec- in 1996. 
ommendaticras by business 
tftvelers, Budapest. Zagreb Word of mouth 
and other cities in the Central The Czechs' performance 
at>d East European (CEE) re- has. of course, been powered 
“son are becoming the "next by Prague. Officials in some 
” of the other countries con- 

sider Prague’s pre-eminent 
status to be a bit ar b i trary; 
they say their cities have 
everything the Czech capital 
has, including enchanting 
skylines and rich historical 
and cultural traditions. 

Plenty of business travel- 
ers in the region agree. 

"I never cease to be 
amazed at the targe number 
of beautiful cities I’ve en- 
countered during the course 
of my travels throughout the 
CEE region,” says Atarich 
Fenyves. a member of Cred- 
itanstalt’s board of directors 
and bead of international op- 
erations. “Every time I’ve 
thought that I’ve found the 
consummately attractive city 
— say Budapest or Prague 
— I discover another one — 
Riga. Kiev. Ljubljana or 
Zagreb.” 

Travel has also increased 
with the improvement and 
extension of what tire travel 
industry simply calls "the in- 
frastructure." 


i - A r; •. -v . •> 


,V.« ; - •• ’>• -I _ . • * . . :• 

.! r-sv’- '- 

• - - . 


j With the exception of Bul- 
garia. the CEE nations are 
enjoying solid upswings on 
tiieir tourist markets. As die 
World Tourism O r g anizati on 
reports, the CEE region re- 
corded an increase of 8 per- 
cent in international arrivals 
and overnight stays in 1 996. 

; A number of countries 
outperformed these figures. 
Tourist revenues went up 20 
percent in Hungary in 1996. 
And 1997 looks even better 
in most countries. Croatia’s 
Ministry of Tourism predicts 
a -24 percent rise in the num- 
bprof foreign vacationers in 
Tfhe country, whose long 
coastline has been one of 
Europe’s favorite vacation 
spots since the Hapsbuxg 
eta. 

These good figures not- 
withstanding, many CEE 
tourism officials aren't smil- 
ing. The reason: They are 
measuring their own figures 
against those of the Czech 
Republic, which recorded a 



Riga, the captiat of Latvia, Is one of many CEE cMes attracting more and more international tourists. 


“One trend I've noticed 
throughout the region is that 
the standard of travel infra- 
structure — international- 
level hotels and restaurants, 
and the number and destin- 
ations of international flights 
— has been steadily rising 
during the past few years," 
says James E. Hogan, a Par- 
is-based partner with the in- 
ternational law firm Salans 
Hertzfeld & Heilbrorm. 


Zagreb is a case in point A 
number of international-stan- 
dard hotels have been built or 
revamped there over the past 
few years. Prominent among 
them is the five-star Sheraton, 
the city's new flagship hotel 
Via the fledgling Croatia 
Airlines. Zagreb is now 
linked to all of Europe’s ma- 
jor hub airports, plus most of 
the Continent's major busi- 
ness centers. These links are 


complemented by those 
offered in conjunction with 
Air Fiance, fCLM and Virgin 
Atlantic Airways. 

A growing number of pas- 
sengers are using those links. 
Their ranks are increasingly 
made up of “city hoppers," 
people in Zagreb for a few 
days of sightseeing and cul- 
tivated pleasures, says Ivan 
Misetic. Croatia Airlines’ 
general manager. • 


Having Emerged, the Region is on the Move 


Continued from page 19 

itive ’production fundament- 
als’ have helped the region 
achieve some very impress- 
ive trade statistics.” 

The statistics show dial the 
CEE region bos rapidly 
turned into one of die world's 
great trading regions. The 
Czech Republic, for instance, 
now exports 164.5 percent 
more than it did in 1990; 
Poland exports 79.2 percent 
more, and Hungary 56.2 per- 
cent more. 

A full 60 percent of the 
CEE region’s products now 
go to die highly competitive 
West European, Asian and 
North American markets. 
That’s twice the figure of 
seven years ago, and it shows 
the industrial sector’s success 
in restructuring operations, 
upgrading products and re- 
orienting market outreach. 

The success is manifested 

die region’s rises in in- 
dustrial output over the last 
three years: 33 percent in Po- 
land, 24 percent in Romania, 
19 percent in the Czech Re- 
public and 16 percent in 
Slovakia, repents the UN. 


gary’s standard of living, 
which dropped 6 percent dur- 
ing 1995 and 1996, has been 
rising in 1997. 

The ctmchmg attraction 
The demand for automobiles 
(sales in die CEE region are 
currently rising at a rate of 
more than 20 percent annu- 
ally). computers (15 per- 
cent). industrial equipment 
(10 percent) and other con- 
sumer and corporate ■ dur- 
ables has been increasing 
throughout the region, even 


in Russia, where the average 
household income has fallen. 
This raises another question: 
Where's die money coming 
from? 

The answers are die 
“shadow” and “spillover” 
economies. Estimates of the 
share of total economic out- 
put attributable to die off- 
the-books transactions (die 
definition of the shadow 
economies) ranges from 25 
percent to 30 percent (Hun- 
gary) to 50 percent to 60 
percent (Ukraine, Russia 


and other Commonwealth of 
Independent States coun- 
tries). 

According to a recent In- 
ternational Labor Organiza- 
tion estimate, more than 5 
million CEE housekeepers, 
construction workers and 
software engineers work on 
an occasional or regular 
basis in Western Europe. 
Their take-home earnings 
also constitute a major 
source of consumer purchas- 
ing power. 

According to Mr. Zwickl, 


the strengths of these indi- 
vidual sectors constitute the 
“clinching attraction” of die 
CEE region to Western in- 
vestors. 

“The primary criteria used 
by companies in deciding to 
invest in a region are the per- 
formance and prospects of 
their individual sectors, and 
not necessarily the figures for 
the economy as a whole. And 
a wide range of CEE sectors 
have both strong rates of per- 
formance and exciting pros- 
pects," says Mr. ZwickL • 


* \ (O 


Russian raw materials 
The exception to the in- 
dustry-driven rise in sales 
abroad is Russia, whose ex- 
port successes have stemmed 
largely from exports of oil, 
gold sod other raw materials. 
Russia’s sales abroad rose a 
sterling 30 percent in 1996. 

; Russia is also an exception 

f in another way. The country 
actually ran a balance of 
trade surplus with die rest of 
the world in 19%. The trade 
deficits of the other CEE 
comtries ranged from Slov- 
enia’s very nominal $100 
million to the Czech Repub- 
lic’s 51.4 billion — equal to 
8*6 percent of total GDP. 

.Nearly all of the new 
goods that the CEE’s cor- 
porations and consumers are 
buying cra ne fr om die EU. 
Thus, die CEE has become 
one ofWestern Europe’s hot- 
test export markets. Meeting 
die demand requires building 
up distribution and retailing 
networks, and that has ac- 
counted for a fair portion of 
investment in the 


gjod. 

It’s not hard to see where 
some of the demand is com- 
ing from. 

Total consumer expendit- 
ure is 33 percent higher in 
P&iand than it was seven 
yeans-- ago. The average 
Czech family has seen its in- 
comerise 14percentoverthe 
Istsr two years. And Hun- 


! “Emerging Markets 
in Central and 
• . Easier* Europe” 

• was produced in its entirety 

by die Advertising 
H ’ Deportment qf the 

International Herald 
[ Tribune. 

■Writer: Terry Swartzbeig, 
, ■ based in Munich. . 

• Program Director: 

BfflMahder. 



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Key Facts And Figures 


Country 

Asm , 

■» thousands of 
square blcmstas 

POTUUfflWI 

• inmiQioos ■ 


Albania 

28.8 

3.4 

360 

Belarus 

207.6 

10.2 

1760 

Bosnia-Herzegovina 

51.1 

3.5 

N.A. 

Bulgaria 

111 

8.4 

1330 

Croatia 

56.5 

4.8 

3800 

Czech Republic 

78.9 

10.3 

3870 

Estonia 

45.2 

1.5 

2860 

Hungary 

93 

10.2 

4120 

Latvia 

64.6 

2.5 

2270 

Lithuania 

653 

3.7 

1900. 

Fyr of Macedonia 

25.7 

2.1 

790 (1994] 

Moldova 

33.7 

4.4 

870(1994) 

Poland 

312.7 

38.6 

2790 

Romania 

238.4 

22.7 

14,901 

Russia 

17,075.4 

148.2 

2359 

Serbia (including .Montenegro) 

102.2 

148.2 

2359 

Slovakia 

49 

5.4 

2950 

Slovenia 

20.25 

2.0 

8200 

Ukraine 

603.7 

51.5 

1570 


Sources: OECD and Eurostat 


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PAGE 22 


Sports 


WEDNESDAY JULY ^1991 


World Roundup 


Iraqis Are Barred 

Lebanon has excluded Iraqi ath- 
letes from the Pan Arab Games 
which will open in Beirut on Sat- 
urday. sources said Tuesday. 

“The Iraqis don't have any visas 
to come to Lebanon," one source 
said. “They will not get visas." 

“Because diplomatic ties be- 
tween Lebanon and Iraq have been 
severed, we cannot welcome Iraq 
unless we receive an order from the 
political authorities, ” said Zeid 
Khyami, director-general of the 
sports ministry. “Until now we have 
not received such an order, so we 
cannot welcome the Iraqi athletes." 

He said Lebanon decided to ex- 
clude Iraq after pressure from Gulf 
nations. (Renters) 

Knicks Keep Van Gundy 

BASKETBALL The New York 

Knicks have given Coach Jeff Van 
Gundy a multiyear contract exten- 
sion. Van Gundy. 35, who took 
over as an interim coach from Don 
Nelson 17 months ago, led the 
Knicks to 57 victories last season. 

• Travis Knight, a five-agent cen- 
ter. signed a seven-year. $22 million 
contract with the Boston Celtics. 
Knight averaged 4.8 points and 4.5 
rebounds last season as a rookie 
with the Los Angeles Lakers. (AP) 

Young Rose Is Picked 

golf Britain and Ireland have 
picked the youngest player ever se- 
lected for the Walker Cup for this 
year's biennial amateur team match 
against the United States in August. 

Justin Rose will be just 10 days 
past his 1 7th birthday when the 36th 
match is played at Quaker Ridge, 
New York, on Aug. 9-10. The pre- 
vious youngest was Ronan Raf- 
ferty. in 1981 when he was 17 years 
7 months. i Reuters ) 

Kipketer Ties 800 Mark 

athletics Wilson Kipketer. a 
Dane originally from Kenya, 
equaled the longest standing track 
record. Sebastian Coe’s 16-year-old 
800- mete remark, at the Stockholm 
Grand Prix. 

Kipketer won the 800 meters 
Monday in 1 minute 41 .73 seconds, 
matching Coe's 1981 time. 

“It was a phenomenally good 
run." said Coe, who covered the 
event for British television. “I 
thought he went into the third 200 
meters a little sluggish, but he 
pulled it back dramatically from 
600 to 800 meters. * * (AFP, AP) 


Arsenal’s Bad Boy Meets Freud 


r,' , .... . 





Inremarionuf Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — John Glenn, 1960s 
astronaut, and Ian Wright. 1990s 
soccer star, are two of a kind. 

In the United States. Glenn is trying 
to talk NASA into launching him on one 
more space mission — offering his old 
bones to test the long-term effects of 
weightless flight 

In London, Wright is attempting to 
convince the Football Association, 
which runs English soccer, to allow him 
to reach heights he has never expe- 
rienced, as a striker if England qualifies 
for next year’s World Cup. 

Glenn, a U.S. Senator, is 76. Wright 
a goal scorer, is 33. which in athledc 
terms might be the equivalent The two 
men broadcast similar signals: age has 
not wearied them. 

Glenn is as sound of mind as a pilot- 
tumed-politician can claim to be, and 
his quest is physical. Wright is almost 
the opposite: Coming under the spot- 
light comparatively late at 21, he hasn't 
exhausted the speed and flair, the sharp- 
ness of eye and limb, that makes him a 
still predatory striker. 

Wright's mind, however, is in ques- 
tion. He always has displayed a pro- 
clivity to blacken his art Last season he 
stamped on a goalkeeper, insulted ref- 
erees and raised fingers to authority. By 
turns a witty and insolent fellow, he has 
left it mighty late to grasp that the game 
which transformed him from a strug- 
gling odd-job man to a millionaire also 
afforded him the privilege, the burden, 
of being a role model. 

Wright who is black, has sometimes 
blamed racial intolerance for his prob- 
lems. Now the Arsenal forward has be- 
latedly seen the light. He is taking coun- 
seling to curb hjs anger and try to 
channel his aggression for the good of 
himself, his team, his mission. 

There is the link I seek between the 
space flier and sport's high flier. Glenn 
and his fellow astronauts would have 
been dead men had impulsive behavior 
gotten the better of them. 

“We tattooed responsibility on a 
man's head.*’ said Lieutenant General 
Samuel Phillips, a U.S. military officer 


World Soccer / Rob Hughes 


connected with space exploration. 

He would have warmed to Wright’s 
courage, to his spirit in going where he 
must and ignoring danger in pursuit of 
goals. But Mission Control could not 
have abided such a wild passion, such a 
habit of pressing the self-destruct button 
and then seeking public absolution. 

This summer, Wright has two 
charges of soccer misconduct against 
him. He admits that his actions toward a 
referee and some fans on separate days 
were petulant. Yet in a paid newspaper 
column, he threatened to quit his game if 
the Football Association punished him. 

Wright is on the threshold of a first 
World Cup ( there would have been oth- 
ers had he controlled his mouth as well 
as he guides a ball into the net). He 
ended last season on the England team. 
He is just five goals short of eclipsing 
the revered Clin B as tin’s record of 178 
goals for Arsenal. 

He will do that. I am sure. But whether 
Wright can carry his remarkable reflex 
and reaction goals to the 1 998 World Cup 
is between him and his new therapist 

England’s national-team coach, Glen 
Hoddle. wants him, for Hoddle rec- 
ognizes a mature and at times nerveless 
scoring talent, together with a bubbly 
personality, as rare attributes. 

T HE PSYCHOLOGIST that 
Wright has been visiting for three 
months remains, rightly, confid- 
ential. She apparently helped wean 
Tony Adams, the Arsenal and some- 
times England captain, of his alcohol 
addiction, and worked on Paul Merson. 
whose dependencies came in threes — 
drugs, drink and gambling. 

Merson benefited from highly pub- 
licized confessionals and this week com- 
pleted a £5 million ($8.4 million) trans- 
fer from Arsenal, where he has played all 
his adult life, to Middlesbrough. 

Arsenal is regrouping, its French 
coach Arsene Wenger has bought eight 
overseas players to reshape and revital- 
ize a team which, although long in the 


tooth, might have won England's cham- 
pionship had it not amassed sq many 
suspensions, including those of Wright, 
for ill discipline last season. 

Wenger is tearing the old squad apart. 
He has speculated about $24 million of 
the almost $400 million that European 
clubs have lavished on 240 deals so far 
this summer. Yet, as far as Wright 
knows, his place is not threatened. 

“I’ve got three years to go on my 
contract," he says, “and the boss has 
said I can play as long as I can." 

The boss, presumably, is Wenger. 
But Wright's therapist might hold the 
key. “I expect to go on seeing herfor the 
rest of my time," Wright said at Eng- 
land's last gathering in June. “I’ve lived 
on the edge of a lot of emotions, and 
people either love me or hate me. 

“I don't mind that, but I accept I’ve 
got myself into trouble, and cost the 
team a man, by stupid acts of petulance. 
When I'm on the pitch. I'm a completely 
different animal, and now its an anim al 
I’m trying to keep tame." 

The counselor has discussed with 
Wright the controlled way in which his 
Arsenal partner, Dennis Bergkamp, 
steals his goals and keeps his cool. An- 
other psychologist, not employed by 
Wright but predatory in plugging his 
"Mental Game Plan” book, says the 
Arsenal team players should “rough 
him up” in training so he can practice 
holding back that infamous temper. 

A soccer player has to perform over 
90 minutes, twice or three times a week, 
500 to 1,000 times in a career. When, 
like Wright, his gift is to do the un- 
expected. to score where others may not 
see or sense the opportunity, can tam- 
pering with the psyche really separate 
the desired creative explosions from the 
undesired streak of nastiness? 

The inner mysteries can be more dif- 
ficult to fathom than ihe secrets of outer 
space. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London 


■■ 


•* • tv.- ‘i i 
■ -.Y, 



Piu.il Pavan/Agcncr Fittix-Picre 


Another Sprinter Wins in Tour de France 

Erik Zabel of Telekom crossing the finis h line in victoty Tuesday, the first ' 
stage not won by Mario Cipollini, the Italian sprinter. In a mass crash. Tony* 
Rominger, the Swiss veteran, was badly injured and had to withdraw. * 


Man With the Shoes Seeks Basketball’s Young Cinderellas 


Jjtk MiUni/Thc Aw4«.iaiai Prrw 

Kipketer crossing the finish 
line to tie the 800 meter record. 


By Robert Lipsyte 

Ne» Yort Times Sr nice 

“What I’m doing is morally wrong,” 
said Sonny Vaccaro. who does it better 
than anyone else. "Bui it's not in my 
power to stop it, and if I quit, they get 
everything. And that's very bad for bas- 
ketball. for the kids, for the country." 

What he does, originally for Nike 
("the>'" in his impassioned mono- 
logues) and now for Adidas, is subvert 
U.S. higher education, with the eager 
complicity of college presidents, in the 
interest of selling sneakers and athletic 
clothes. Specifically, he refined and in- 
stitutionalized the idea of paying col- 
lege coaches to make their players wear 
a particular brand of shoes. Now he also 
pays high school coaches. 

Monday was the start of a new sub- 
version season; more than 200 of the 
nation's best high school basketball 
players will converge on Vaccaro’s AB- 
CD camp at Fairleigh Dickinson Uni- 
versity in Hackensack, New Jersey, so 
recruiters can look them over like cattle 
herds. At the same time, in Indianapolis, 
“they” are running a similar camp; 
Vaccaro ran it for Nike through the 
1980s. 

Vaccaro did not create the summer 
basketball camp, but he made it a na- 
tional trade fair. He did the same for the 
high school all-srar game. In 1965. he 
created the Dapper Dan Round bail 
Classic in Pittsburgh, now Magic's 
Roundball Classic in Auburn Hills, 
Michigan. 

“mien I started this ingenuity." 
Vaccaro said, “it was to create more 
access to basketball There were spelling 
bees and national science contests, but 
nothing for athletes: no one knew who 
these kids were. Basketball didn’t mean 
much ro the countrv in 1965.” 


And John Paul Vaccaro meant even 
less. He was 25, just another good ath- 
lete from western Pennsylvania who had 
burr his back and was looking for a way 
to stay close to the game. He wanted to 
be a coach. He supported his wife and 
four children by teaching handicapped 
pupils in local public schools as he 
hustled along the fringes of the game. 

He was an agent, a salesman, a pro- 
moter. He even tried to peddle an after- 
game rubber sandal. Nike's Phil Knight 
passed, but eventually went for the idea 
of buying up coaches. 

It changed sports. It also made Vac- 
caro enough of a star for Nike to trust his 
“feeling" about Michael Jordan in 
1984. Vaccaro claims to have a similar 
intuition about each of his current Adi- 
das stars, Kobe Bryant, who just finished 
his rookie season with the Los Angeles 
Lakers, and Tracy McGrady, recently 
drafted out of high school by the Toronto 
Raptors. McGrady first flashed across 
the summer basketball sky exactly a year 
ago at Vaccaro "s camp. 

Twenty years ago Vaccaro talked 
Jerry Tarkanian of the University of 
Nevada-Las Vegas, and the late Timmy 
Valvano, then of Tona, into taking a few 
thousand dollars and free shoes. Now 
college coaches are taking million-doliar 
signing bonuses (Mike Krzyzewski at 
Duke) from shoe companies and are 
sitting on their boards (Georgetown's 
John Thompson at Nike). They are the 
conduits between shoe companies and 
such brand-name universities as Notre 
Dame ( Adidas ) and Southern Cal (Nike). 
They lend credibility to a multibUlion- 
dollar global industry in which athletes 
pledge a higher allegiance to their shoe 
logos than to their national flags. 

“Am I missing something?" Vac- 
caro shouted. He uses this line to signal 
that be is about to make a point. “Mil- 


lions are being made, and the kids get 
nothing. They are turned into gladiators 
and tossed aside when they get hurt. 
When something goes wrong they are 
stigmatized for life: they suffer every 
punishment there is under the auspices 
of corporate America. 

“They take a few dollars for some 
clothes they need, to go home to see a 
sick mother, take a girl out, thank you, 
and they are the bad guys. The National 
Collegiate Athletic Association, which 

TVike is the big, dark 
cloud that's going to 
envelop everything, 
poison the minds of kids 
and ruin the game.’ 

makes the rules to protect the schools 
and coaches from the kids, goes on. And 
the coaches go on and the schools go on 
and we put our shoes on someone else’s 
feeL" 

None of this is fresh. But Vaccaro may 
be the first to criticize while still profit- 
ing handsomely from it. While he likes 
to romanticize himself as an outsider on 
a mission there could be other motives. 
Such as revenge. 

Nike fired him in 1991 after years in 
which sales soared and the teams he 
recruited dominated the Final Four. 
“They,” he says, wanted a cleaner, 
“WASPier" image than his. The media 
has often characterized him, perhaps un- 
fairly, as a gambler with Las Vegas ties. 
Such as shrewd advertising. 

Adidas is a major international player 
with only a liny hoops presence in the 
United States. It can’t hurt to create a 
gutsy, battling image — pan outlaw 


Oakland Raider, part we-try-harder 
Avis — even as deals are struck with 
such established franchises as the Yan- 
kees and the University of Nebraska. 

“Why don’t you just step away if all 
of this is so wrong?" I asked one morn- 
ing at the dining room table of his duplex 
condo in Pacific Palisades. California. 
“You helped start all this; you help 
perpetuate this. You sound like an arms 
dealer who says there should be world 
peace but still sells nuclear warheads.” 

Vaccaro bounces and froths as he gets 
excited. "Go ask coaches why they 
don’t refuse to take our money. Ask 
college presidents why they don’t stop 
big-time sports. It didn’t hurt the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. What we do is legal, 
so I'll do it, because if I stop, they will 
own everything and I can’t let that hap- 
pen. 

“Nike is the big, dark cloud that’s 
going to envelop everything, poison the 
minds of kids and ruin the game. Now 
we’re paying high school coaches so we 
can tie up (heir kids, so we capture the 
minds and souls of the people. Look, I 
play by die rules. What I am saying is, 
for God’s sake, go change the rules." 

Changing the rules so that college 
players can share in the enormous 
wealth they help generatemay be an 
NCAA survival tactic as more and more 
talented players leave college early for 
the pros, or s’kipcollege altogether. Vac- 
caro’ s first major Adidas signing, Kobe 
Bryant, went straight from high school 
to the Lakers. Kobe’s father, Joe. is a 
former pro who 25 years ago played in 
the Dapper Dan all-star game. As is his 
style, Vaccaro stayed in touch. An Adi- 
das contract made the Bryant decision ro 
skip college easier. 

“Tell me I hurt this kid. I ruined his 
life," shouted Vaccaro. jumping up. At 
57, he seems to have boundless energy. 


He led me to a window- and pointed up a. . . 
mountain taa distant mansion overlook 1 - 
mg the Pacific Ocean. “Kobe bought 
that house, his, parents live with him anH 
he’s going to coHege.” ' ' ’ . 

"That is not Kobe's house,” said - . 
Vaccaro's wife, Pam Monakee, once ah 
actress in commercials and now Ms 
business partner." You can’t see'Kobe’s . 
house from here. But from his deck yon" 
can look down on our house. ’ ’ . ■ ' ; ; 

Vaccaro grinned and shrugged. *'I 
get carried away,” he said. "You get 
the idea.” 

Tracy McGrady also got the idea. Lak ' ‘ 
month the 18-year-old signed an incent- 
ive deal worth up to $12 million over six. . 
years. A few days later, he was pickofj 
ninth in the National Basketball As- 
sociation draft by Toronto. \- 

McGrady got more money than Bry- 
ant, according to Vaccaro. because Acfi-. , 
das now trusts him more. If McGrady 
also has a good rookie season. Vaccaro 
will be able to sign more “kids," buy 
more coaches, pass out more free 
clothes, although never, he says, out 6f 
pockets as deep as Nike’s. And his 
success will rouse “them" to greater 
competition. Former friends for whom 
he now has unkind words, like John 
Thompson, will turn up the heat. 

“I’m not going to let them take over 
the world," Vaccaro said. “When com- 
petition is eliminated they can do any- ' 
thing they want. What’s going to hap- 
pen when they own everything? No 
more incentive to make the bread better ' 
and the milk pure. 

"And did you sense anything creepy 
in that Junior G riffey-f or-President 
commercial? Nike is the best sports 
company in the world, and Phil Knight 
is brilliant, a Dr. Strangelove. Can you 
imagine if they put all their resources 
and smarts behind a candidate?'* , 


!Ya' 


Scoreboard 





•^^tNtoatidnal editor-' 

Sam Jgt.has bicycle 

racing -f&jtora decaS^^^w book, 

■ he covefe;ihe 1996 pro bk^e racing 
"= Reason - one of the most cJrartiafic In 
■history. Fro tfr the irie and show df the 
eariy races In «March to te sweltering 
Hieat at the Stimmer Ofyrjfcics* the book 
follows ihe ftace&and the^ctein what 
GredteMond'Once deserted as- the 
toughOsrjob in the world. *. ■ 

F^daling -for -Glory can tafe ordered 
through qualr^^ookstores everywhere. 
or from: 

Motorboofci International, ROB 1,t 
Osceola, Wrsconsin.USA 54020. ■: 


BASEBALL 


Majob League Standings 

AMIUCAN UAOUa 



EAsronnsJON 




w 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Battimore 

SS 

30 

Ml 



New York 

48 

37 

-565 

7 

Detroit 

41 

44 

JB2 

14 

Taranto 

40 

43 

482 

14 

Boston 

38 

48 

MS 

17’'! 


CENTRAL DIVISION 



Oevetano 

44 

36 

550 

_ 

Chicago 

43 

42 

506 

3’a 

Milwaukee 

39 

44 

-470 

6‘i 

Kansas City 

36 

46 

J39 

9 

Minnesota 

37 

48 

-435 

9*-; 


WEST DIVISION 



Seattle 

49 

38 

563 



Anaheim 

44 

42 

512 

4’y 

Texas 

43 

42 

506 

5 

Oakland 

37 

52 

■416 

13 


national HAom 

EAST DIVISION 

W L Pel. 
Atlanta 57 30 MS 

Ftolldo SO 36 381 

New York 48 M 5SB 

Montreal 47 39 £$/ 

PTiflottetpruo 24 o) j © 

CENTUM. DIVISION 


Pittsburgh 

43 

43 

500 

Houston 

43 

45 

489 

St. Louis 

41 

45 

j477 

Cincinnati 

38 

46 

M3 

Chicago 

37 

SO 

.425 

WEST DIVISION 


San Francisco 

SI 

36 

586 

Los Angeles 

45 

42 

517 

Colorado 

43 

45 

■480 

San Diego 

38 

49 

537 

HO OAHU MONDAY 

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 


G 

AB 

R H i 

S Alomar Cle 

64 

340 

40 90 

FThomosChW 

72 

261 

58 96 

Pomirei Cie 

73 

263 

45 90 

EMaitinez Sea 

87 

310 

45 106 

l Rodriguez Tw 

82 

341 

£6 116 

M Vaughn Bos 

65 

339 

49 80 

Justice Cle 

63 

218 

44 73 . 


WCtofkTet 72 264 39 88 .331 

Cora Sea 81 306 59 1Q1 330 

Greer 7ek 84 314 JP 10J 329 

RUNS — Knoblauch Minnesota 6ft Griffey 
Jr, Seattle. 67; E. Martinez. Seattle. 65; 
ToCloifc, DcIraiL 61: B. LHuntet. Detroit 61; 
GanJaparra. Boston. 6ft A. Rodriguez. 
Seattle, 60. 

RBI— Griffey Jr, Seattle, 8* T. Martinez. 
New York. 78; TaCtefk. Detroit 73; McGwire, 
Oakland. 7T; Belle. Chicago. 7ft E. Martinez. 
Seattle 6ft JuGoiualez, Texas. 6S. 

HITS— I. Rodriguez. Texas, lie.- E. 

Martinez. Seattle 10ft Garttaporra. Boston, 
TO* Greer, Texas. 104 G. Anderson, 
Anaheim, UEfc Bel te. Chicago, I0f; Cora, 
Seattle 101. 

DOUBLES— O. -Neill New York 27, ClrlNe 
Milwaukee. 2ft I. Rodriguez. Tens, 2ft- Cora, 
Seattle 2ft Sprague Toronto. 25.- A. 
Rodriguez. Seattle 2 4i R Davis, Seattle. 74. 

TRIPLES— Jeter, New York. ft 
Gordo parra Boston, ft Burreto Milwaukee 
5: Knoblauch, Minnesota. 5; Ottoman, 
Kansas Cily. & Vlzquel Cleveland, ft 7 are 
tied with 4. 

HOME RUNS — McGwire Oakland, 31; 
GrWey Jr. Seattle 3ft T. Martinez, New York, 
2ft Thome. Cferetand. 2ft ToClorit, Detroit, 
22, Buhner, Seattle 22; MVdogha Boston, 
2ft JuGonzalez, Texas. 2ft Ma. WRUams, 
Cleveland. 2D. 

STOLEN BASES— B. LHuntor. Detroit, Aft 
Nixon, Toronto. 37; Knoblauch, Minnesota 
3ft- T Goodwin. Kansas aty, 3 Z VizqireL 
Cleveland, 22; Durham, Chicago. 19; Easley. 
Detroit 18. 

PITCHING (10 Decisions) — Ra Johnson, 
Seattle 12-1 857, 2Jtt Mussina. Baltimore 
10-2, -633. 13ft Clemens, Toronto, 13-3, .81 2. 
1-69: Mayer. Seattle 8-3. .600, Oft Kcv. 
Baltimore. 12-4 .750. 2_55, Erickson 
Baltimore 11J, .733. 181; Witt; Texas. 10-4 
.714 382. 

STRIKEOUTS— RaJohnson, Seattle 16ft 
Cane New York. 16ft Ctemens, Toronto, 14ft 
Mussina Baltimore. 122; Appier, Kansas 
City. 109. B. McDonald. Milwaukee 102; C. 
Finley, Anaheim, tai. 

SAVES— M. Rivera Now York, 27; 
RaMyera Baltimore, 27; R. Hernandez, 
Chicago. 2ft DaJones, Milwaukee, 2ft 
Weitrtarxt Term, 1ft Taylor, Oakland, 1& 
Aguilera, Minnesota, 16 


NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADER5 

G AB R H Avg. 
LWalKerCol 84 309 79 123 JSB 

GwynnSD 82 330 55 130 304 

Piazza LA 83 300 51 107 857 

B looser All 85 283 SB 98 J46 

Lofton AH 68 288 51 99 3M 

Joyner 5D 70 246 36 83 337 

Lankford STL 66 260 49 80 .333 

AHonzaNYM 76 260 36 85 327 

MoGrace ChC 77 278 45 90 314 

Gafatraga Cal 84 328 66 106 523 

RUNS— L. Walker. Colorado. 7ft Blog to, 
Houston. 76c Gatotraga Colorado, 6ft Bonds, 
San Francisco 6ft EcYoung, Cotorada 5ft 
Bagwell Houston 5ft Ofenrd. New York. 5& 
Biauser. Atlanta, 5ft 

RBI — Galarraga, Cotoradft 84- Bagwell 
Houston 7ft Gwynn. San Dlege 71; ChJottes. 
Altana. 69; L Walker. Cotorada 6ft Atou. 
Florida 6ft- Kent Son Frandsoa 6ft Costtlto. 
Cotorada 6ft Bichette Cotorada 64. 

HITS— Gwynn San DJega 13ft L Waker, 
Cotorada 123; Plana. Lm Angeles. 107; 
B Igg la Houston, 106; Gatarroga Cotorada 
10ft Grudzielanek. Montreal 10ft Bagwell, 
Houston 1 Oft D So riders, Ondroiad. 10ft 
DOUBLES— Grudzielanek, Montreal 32, 
Lamina MortfreaL SSt MoiBiwJtot 
Philadelphia, 2ft Bagwell Houston 27; 
BonlBa Florida 2ft l. Walker. Cotorada 2ft 
Snou San Francisco, 24 Brngna 
PhBodelphto, 24 EUggto. Houston. 24. 

TRIPLES— W. Gwerma Los Angeles, ft 
De. Shields. St. Louis, ft Randa Pittsburgh. 
7i Womack. Pittsburgh. 7; DSandcm 
Ondmtatt. 7; EcYoung, Cotorada ft Tucker. 
Atlanta, ft McRaaditoagaS. 

HOME RUNS— L- Walked Cotorada 2ft 
Bogun* Houston %k CosttBa Cotorada 22. 
Galarraga. Cotorada 22; Karros. Las 
Angeles, 2ft Bonds. Son Frondsca 20r 
Hundley. New Yotk, 19. 

STOLEN BASES— D- Sanders, Cincinnati 
41; Womack. Pittsburgh 31 D. eShtoids. 51. 
Louli 31; EcYoung, CotoraUft 2ft Clayton. St. 
Loan. 19; Lofton Atlanta 19s l. Walker, 
Cotorada 19. 

PITCHING (18 DedstonsJ— Esins. San 
Frondsca 12-1 .857, 2-St; Neogte Altartta 
12-2 .857, 3Jtt Judea Montreal 11-2 .846. 
3,70s G, Maddux. Atlanta IM .78ft 2JJft 
KHn Houston 1IW. J69. 2.17; P. JMnrttnez. 
Montreal 10-4 71* 1.74 BJJanea New 


York, I7.ft.70a 108. 

STRIKEOUTS — Schilling. Philadelphia. 
15 ft P. Marttaa. Montreal 1 5ft- A f Senes. 
St. Louis. 13ft Noma Los Angeles. 131; K. 
J Brawn. Florida lift Kile. Houston. 109; 
Stolttemyrc. SI. Louis, 10B. 

SAVES— Beck. San Frondsca 29! Men, 
Florida 24- Wohlers. Atlanta. 2ft ToWorrail 
Los Angetea 30c JoFranca New York, 3ft 
Shaw, ClndnnaA. 1ft Edcersley. SI. Louts. 18. 

Japanese Leagues 

CINTWAL LAAOUI 



W 

L 

T 

PM. 

GB 

Yakulf 

47 

26 


544 

_ 

Hiroshima 

35 

34 

— 

507 

10.0 

Hanshln 

35 

37 

— 

586 

115 

Yokohama 

33 

34 

—.47812.0 


Chunlchl 

33 

39 

— 

.458 

135 

Yomluri 

31 

42 

— 

525 

160 

ML cine L1ABUX 




W 

L 

T 

Pci. 

GB 

Orix 

39 

34 

2 

519 



Seibu 

39 

30 

2 

56S 

3.0 

Dafei 

39 

33 

— 

542 

■15 

Nippon Ham 

34 

38 

1 

■472 

95 

Kintetsu 

3B 

40 

1 

,412 

135 

Lotte 

27 

41 

3 

J97 

145 


TO ISO AY'S RESULTS 
CENTRAL LEAOUE 

Yakut! 1* Hiroshima 0 
dninrcM 3 Yomhiri 2 
Yokohama ft Houston 2 

PACIFIC LEAOUE 
Nippon Ham l, Orix 1 
Seibu 11, Kintetsu 6 
□old ft Lotte 3 


CYCLING 


TOUH PE FHANCE 

Loading platings in the 224 km (1312 
ml toil 3d noge ham Vise to Plumetoc: 

1. Erik Zabel Germany. Telekom. 4 hours. 
54 minutes. 33 seconds: 1. Franck Vanden- 
oroudta Belgium. Mapel same time, 1 
Blame Riii. Danmark. Tetokcm. s 1. 4 Lau- 
rent Jatobcrt France. ONCE, s.t, 5. Dcwde 
RotnriOn. Italy. FDJ, al„ a. Abraham Otana 
Spain, flonesto, s.t„ 7. Jean-Cym Potnn. 


France. U5. Postal Service, s.r. ft Jan Ull- 
rich, Germany. Telekom. s.t„ 9. Laurent Du- 
faux, Switzerland: Fes Tina &t. 10. pascal 
Chameur. Franca Cnslna s.1. 

overall. 1. Maria CIpolllnL Italy. Soeca 
16:10:12; 2. Erik Zabel 14 seconds behind;!. 
Chris Boordmoa Britain GAN, 27 seconds 
behind; 4 Jon Ullrich, 29: 5. Franck Van- 
denbroucke, 31 ft Abraham Olano. 37; 7. 
Laurent Jatobcrt, 39: ft Pasd Lino, France, 
Big mat 51 9. Frederic Moncossin, France, 
GAN, S5- la Oscar Caawnzlnd, Switzerland 
Mapei 55. 


JOHNHH WAUCZR AVOIR CUP 

Standings for the ig97 Ryder Cup to be 
played SapL 26-28 M Vtiderreme in So- 
logrando. Spain. The top 10 flnisherfl will 
quafity tor the 12-man Mama. U.S. captain 
Tom Kite and European captain Save Baltea- 

toroa will select two pfayera at large ra eom- 

pletB each team: 

WWTtD STATES 

1, Tiger Woods 1165.000 polnis; 1 Tom 
Lehman 1016^84- 3. MarkOMeara 801 wt 
4 Brad Faxon 727 50a ft Scott Hocft 71 1.94ft 
P ur * W’-SOft 7. Tommy Tolies 
689 JftS; ft PhD Mk*etson 659.284. 9. Dovfc 
Lave III 655.166; ID, Jus On Leonard 58H_50Ct 
It. Stow Janes 57928ft U Jeff Moggert 
S66.62S; 11 Mark Brooks 540.75ft 14 Paul 
Stankowski 5013341 15. David Duval 
470.000. 

EUROPE 

1, Cofin Montgomerie. Scotland 700.67838 

2, lan Woesnam, Woles 489,852.19 

3, Darren Clarke. N. Ireland 41 9,09005 
4 Lee Westwood, England 397,478.17 

5. Bernhard Longer, Germany 364027.96 
ft Miguel Angel Martin. Spain 323. 600 JO 

7, Per- u ink Johansson, Sweden 31 1255 JO 

8 , Thomas Denmark 31 3.91 ft2* 

9, Costonttna Recta. Italy 29491 529 

lft Jow Maria Otazoboi Spain 2470340* 

I l.Pwi Brwdhuhrt. England 230.84468 

II Sam Torrance. Scotland 21 ft 321 .21 
ll Ignacio Gantao. Spam 212801 22 
14 Peter MHchelL England 19&21&07 

15. Podralg HarrimnarL Ireland 192,975 w. 


CRICKET 


MINOR COUNTIES VS. AUSTRALIA 
TOUR MATCH 

TUESDAY. N JE3UQND. ENGLAND 
Minor Counties: 281 -9 
Australia: 290-7 1, 

AustraSa del. Mmor Counties by 9 runs - 


transitions 


BASXETBJUI 

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCMTIOff 
BOSTON -Signed C Travis Knight to 7-y edTj 
contract. Renounced righto to F Rfck Fo 
Marty Coition. G Todd Day, F Frank Brick- ' 
avtokl C Alton Lister, G Nate Driggers, C 
Steve Hamer, F Brett Szabo and G Mkhofo) 
Hawkins. 

Cleveland -Signed G Derek Anderson 
ond G Brevtn Knight to 3-year contracts. 

new Yoinr -Signed Jeff Von Gundy, 
coach, la multiyear centred extension. 

toaiuu 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
i^h T ^ MBE U3 Tyros McCloud, C 

Jeff Mitchell, LB Comen Brawn, qb Watty 
Richardson and S Ralph Stolen. 
inoianafouj Sienetf ql AtSom fcleo|J . 

OL Janies Smb and OL Ron Cabins. 
_A9rCtd * terms vWtn CB *7™ 
HOCKEY 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAOUE 

Coshman 

D Pudy Poese * M * ta *■ . 
C™ LW Kris King to 4-yeor^ 

como i 

SSM-srsss . 

coach. 

mm TATB —Humea Brian Sfegnti sparte 




t 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JULY 9. 1997 


RAGE 23 




SPORTS 


X\\ 


r,% Ski 


v*. 




p 

ifvi 



Batter Up! Maris’s Record Looks Shaky 


Tittnihi A fls>:Amir FunrlW 

iTino Martinez of the New York Yankees winning the home run contest at the All- 
;Star Game festivities by hitting three in the final round. Larry Walker of the 
^Colorado Rockies was second. The American League won the overall event, 30-29. 


IKmAiijjmj Post Sen nr 

C LEVELAND — Far beyond 
die leftfield wall in Jacobs 
Field stands a “Hit It Here” 
sign. As Mark McGwire's blast 
soared toward that target Monday, a 
full house roared. The public address 
announcer reminded everybody to 
keep their ticket stubs; if a player 
conked the sign during the All-Star 
Game home run contest, somebody 
would win SI million. 

McGwire's bolt missed the jackpot 
by a foot. On line. Too long. 

All that was needed was a paltry 
455 feet (140 meters). 

Last month, McGwire drove a ball 
53S feet off Randy Johnson in the 
Kingdome. In Tiger Stadium, his 5 14- 
foot probe cleared the roof. This time, 
the job was just too small for Big 
Mac. 

“I’m sorry," said McGwire after- 
ward. dead serious. “Maybe next 
year." 

When Larry Walker took his turn, a 
second-deck sign in rightfield, 420 
feet away, flashed his name. Walker 
whistled' a drive under his name. 
Then, over it. Finally, his line drive 
not only hit his own name but smashed 
one of the lights in the “W.“ 

Sure, Walker’s hitting .398. But, 
traditionally, place-hitting has not 
been considered a craft that extended 
to picking a specific seat in the upper 
decks. 

As Monday's exploits at Jacobs 
Field document, the limits of hitting 
are being stretched as we speak. 

Sometimes, basball is lucky 
enough to have a mid-season debate 
about whether anybody can break Ro- 
ger Mans’s home run record of 61 or 
become the first .400 hitter since Ted 
Williams in 1941. 


lantage Point / Thomas Boswell 


This season, both marks are under 
fire simultaneous!)’. McGwire has 3 1 
homers. Ken Griffey Jr. 30. Walker 
leads in the National League baiting 
race by four points over Tony Gwynn 
who hit .394 in 419 at-bats in 1994. 

As a twist, Sandy Alomar, the In- 
dians catcher, is in the midst of a 30- 
game hitting streak. Joe DiMaggio’s 
56-game hitting streak is in little 
danger yet. But Alomar’s binge has 
helped focus conversation at this three- 
da)- baseball feast. What’s hardest? 
Hitting .400 or slugging 62 homers? 

“To me, they’re both impossible." 
Walker said. "But I’d like to see some- 
body do iL It’d be great for baseball.” 

“Hitting .400 is harder," says 
Gwynn. flatly. “You have to do it 
every day. You can’t have a slump. 
Sixty-two? McGwire and Griffey can 
get on a run and hit 10 home runs in a 
week. 

“The only way to hit .400 is prob- 
ably to stay at .390, then run right by it 
at the end. Make a mad dash. Maybe 
pass it the Iasi day of the season. 
Staying over .400 is too tough. I was 
hitting .402, went two-for-five and 
ray average went down ro .401.” 

“Sixty- two homers is harder than 
.400,’’ says Griffey with equal con- 
viction. “Home runs are the hardest. 
You can always get a pitch that you 
can hit for a single. With home runs, 
you might not get a pitch to drive for 
days. 

“How- many players have hit .400? 
And how many have hit 61 homers?” 
asks Griffey, knowing that long ago. 
.400 was rare but not unusual. 

McGwire, Griffey, Walker and 
Gwynn all have legitimate advant- 


ages. Walker plays in an unfair ball- 
park — Coots Field in Denver. The 
mil e-high air is so thin that the fences 
must be ridiculous!)' deep to prevent 
cheap home runs. Such a configur- 
ation produces a vast outfield that 
three men have no hope of patrolling. 
Balls drop for hits everywhere. If 
Gwynn played in Coors. .400 might 
constitute an off year. 

“For my money. Tony Gwynn al- 
ways has a chance to hit '.400,” 
says die Braves manager. Bobby 
Cox. “He can still beat a ball oul He 
never strikes out. It seems to me he 
always gets a pitch he can handle. I 
don’t think I’ve ever seen him take a 
bad swing.” 


W hile a .400 season by Walker 
might feel tainted, any other 
record would seem entirely 
legitimate. “Last season, the pitchers 
were getting killed,” Mike Mussina, 
the Orioles pitcher, said. “Now, 
we’ve made a comeback. 

“The fans enjoy the game more 
now because there’s good pitching 
and good hitting, too. You might see a 
monster homer or somebody deal a 
two-hiner. That makes the" records 
these guys are going for even more 
impressive." 

Already, the stars here are han- 
dicapping a September pursuit of 
Mans. “I don’t consider myself a 
home run hitter,’ ’ said Tino Martinez, 
who has 28 homers and won Mon- 
day’s home run contest. He'd rather 
analyze Mac and Junior. ‘ ‘Griffey has 
a great swing. McGwire has the 
power. Mac’s laid back, so pressure 
might not affect him. 


“If Junior gets close, he’ll close the 
' deal I don't lenow how he does iL But 
he always does. If he gets to 60, he’ll 
get 63." 

Both McGwire and Griffey have an 
attitude toward the game that's more 
reminiscent of Babe Ruth than of 
Maris. 

“Play hard. Have fun," Griffey 
said. 

“There’s no pressure.” McGwire 
said with a semi-sincere grin. ‘ ’Swing 
hard and hope you hit one a long 
way." 

Thus far. McGwire has made him- 
self the symbol of the '97 season. . 

Hardly a week goes past that he 
doesn’t hit a homer that reaches seats 
or streets that have never before been 
invaded by a baseball. 

“I’ve finally accepted that I’m a 
home run hitter," says McGwire, 
w’ho tried to flatten his uppercut spring 
for year. Now, he relishes the long 
bombs, just like a fan. 

"The one off Randy in Seattle was 
the first time I've ever admired one of 
my homers.” he admitted. 

“I don’t want to say I was in awe of 
myself. But that was’ the first time I 
ever saw ‘500’ on the scoreboard. 

“Randy tipped his cap to me from 
the mound. 1 thought that was pretty 
classy. I tipped mine back." 

Baseball has plenty to (ip its cap 
about at this middle-summer cele- 
bration. 

Even so. the big hoppers here 
couldn't stop talkin g about the 1998 
All-Star Game in — you guessed it — 
Coors Field. 

Ever see a 600-foorer? 

“Next year.” said McGwire, grin- 
ning wolfishly, "they're going to sell 
more tickets for batting practice than 
the game." 


r de France | 

i 

victory Tuesdav . me lira 
er. In a mass cr.i>h. Tun\ . 
bad to withdraw 


rellas 


o a window and pruned up. 
> a distant nun>wn c.erloul 
rific Ocean. "Kobe kwh 1 
bis oarenis In* .« -ih him and 


! Junior 9 Griffey and the Burden of High Expectations 




Kobe’- h« -u-e " -aid 
’am MoruKee. once an 
iercia!> .-nd no* Iff 
‘You car. ; ie? Kobe * 
But from 
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• i By Ross Newhan 

v Los An cries Tunes 

C LEVELAND — He 
came to the All-Star 
Game with 30 home 
Irons and widespread recog- 
nition as baseball's best all- 
around player — and prob- 
ably its most popular. 

He received more than 3.5 
milli on votes, the third con- 
secutive year he has led the 
All-Star elections. 

“My dad keeps punching 
‘all those holes" in the ballot 
cards, said Ken Griffey Jr., 
’the Seattle Mariners’ center 
fielder. He was smiling that 
.inimitable smile, bat he 
seemed to be laughing only 
fin the outside. 

“It’s a Carch-22," he said. 
’.‘No matter what I do. that’s 
"what I'm supposed to do. and 
■it’s never quite enough. I 
.could hit 55 homers, and 
people think I should hit 70. 1 
mean, a lot of players would 
take what I’ve done in a half 
< Season and consider it a great 
/year.” 

v. Maybe it’s that fluid nat- 
ural swing. Maybe it’s the ef- 
fortless glide with which he 
pursues fly balls in the out- 
field. Maybe he has hung up 
,so many spectacular n umbers 
-thready that, at 27, the ex- 
pectations have become an al- 
batross. 


Even an admirer named 
Barry Bonds, another 
claimant for the distinction of 
. baseball’s best player, sug- 
gests that Griffey, with his 
talent, needs ro lake his game 
to another level. “You can’t 
just go to the All-Star Game 
every year because you’re the 
fan favorite." said Bonds, the 
left fielder for the San Fran- 
cisco Giants’ and a three-time 
National League Most Valu- 
able Player. 

“He’s got all the endorse- 
ments in the world. He's got 
everything, but I don’t rhink 
he’s got what he should get. 

“He needs to take over the 
league, like he has the ability 
to do. Get those 60 home runs 
out of the way, so everyone 
can stop talking about iL Win 
some MVPs. Quit letting 
people sneak by him to have a 
little better year. I wish those 
things on Junior because be k s 
got the ability to accomplish 
things nobod)' will ever ac- 
complish." 

Bonds added: “I’ve never 
seen nobody like him — be- 
sides myself." 

Responded Griffey: "I 

take what Barry is saying as a 
compliment, as an expression 
of confidence in me. " But, he 
added, “I also don’t care 
about the awards or .the re- 
cord. If I don’t hit another 
home run and we win the 


World Series. I’ll be happy. 
My dad has three rings. I want 
my firsL" 

Ken Griffey Sr., the Cin- 
cinnati Reds’ batting coach 
who spent 19 years as a ma- 
jor-league player, and his 
wife. Birdie, were to make the 
comparatively short drive 
across Ohio to see their son 
play Tuesday night. It was 
Junior’s eighth consecutive 
All-Star appearance, but in- 
juries have kept him our of the 
last two games. 

And now, a recent ham- 
string strain has derailed that 
giddy home run pace of early 
season, the pace that seemed 
destined to cany Griffey past 
Babe Ruth and Roger Maris 
by AugusL 


H E MISSED only two 
games but misplaced 
his home run stroke, 
hitting only one in the last 12 
games before the break. 

With 30 home runs — 
Mark McGwire leads the ma- 
jors with 31 — he is on pace to 
hit a career-best 56. He is 
batting .307 and leads the 
American League in runs bat- 
ted in, total bases, extra-base 
hits and intentional walks. 

At his current pace, those 
56 projected home runs will 
be accompanied by a career- 
high 153 RBIs. the most in the 
league since Ted Williams 


and Vem Stephens had 159 
each in 1 949. He could be the 
first to reach both 50 home 
runs and 150 RBI since 
Jimmy Foxx in 1931 

Is that not enough? 

“As I’ve always said, all of 
that business about pace and 
projections is media hype," 
Griffey said. “I just want to 
go out and play. Whatever 
happens, happens.” 

In 1993. at 23. Griffey hit 
45 home runs, but each sea- 
son since has been interrupted 
by an injury or strike. Still, 
only Foxx. Eddie Mathews 
and Mel On were younger 
when they reached 250 home 
runs. 

Griffey did it on April 25 
— seven months short of his 
28th birthday — despite hav- 
ing missed 205 games. He 
holds die major-league rec- 
ords for home runs bit by the 
end of April, May and June. 
He hit 49 home runs and 
drove in 140 runs last year, 
even though he sat out 20 
games because of a broken 
right wrist, suffered while 
swinging at a pitch. He. also 
was still affected by a broken 
left wrist he had suffered 
crashing into a fence making 
a highlight- reel catch in 
1995. 

Lou Piniella. the Seattle 
manager, asked Griffey last 
spring to temper the reckless 


abandon with which he plays 
the outfield — and which has 
produced seven Gold Gloves 
— but Griffey said he told 
Piniella, “I’m not going to 
become a DH. I have to play 
the only way I know how to 
play, and whatever happens, 
happens.” 

Ine approach and ability 
were molded early. Griffey 
received the best of equip- 
ment, instruction and expo- 
sure toddling after his dad in 
major-league clubhouses. 
The younger Griffey lists 
three things that his dad con- 
tributed to above all: love for 
the game, approach to the 
game and confidence that he 
could - play in the major 
leagues. 

‘•‘No matter what happens, 
I always think I can do better, 
that I can improve,” Griffey 
said. “No matter what hap- 
pens, I always think there’s a 
next step.” 

F ather and son 

played together with the 
Mariners in 1990 and 
’91, and they still talk almost 
daily. Father doesn't tell his 
son, nor even his wife, how he 
still tends to tear up emotion- 
ally when he watches Junior 
play on television, but he re- 
mains a batting coach, con- 
stantly reminding Junior, 
“Stay back. Be selective.’’ 


Griffey hears the same 
from Piniella. “We’re always 
talking to him about being 
more selective." Piniella said. 
"Pan of the problem is that he 
sees the bah so dam well dial 
he thinks he can hit anything. 

“I’ve told him, ‘if- they 
want ro walk you, let them 
walk you. You’re capable of 
winning the triple crown.’ I 
mean, if stealing 20 or 25 
bases a year was his goal, be 
could do iL If leading the 
league in hitting was his goal, 
be could do it. But Junior is a 
slugger. I mean, you can say 
that he's a line-drive hitter, 
and be is. but first and fore- 
most he’s a slugger." 

Maybe it won’t happen this 
season, but Griffey seems 
certain at some point to ap- 
proach September with a 
chance to eclipse Ruth and 
Maris. “I don’t think there’s 
any question about iL if he 
stays healthy,” said Mike 
Piazza, the Los Angeles 
Dodgers' catcher. 

Piniella said that, in an era 
of diluted pitching, 61 home 
runs and a .400 average were 
possible. 

“The best thing Junior has 
going is his temperament, and 
that’s the most important 
thing for a home run hitter,” 
Piniella said. “He doesn't 
fight himself. He can have 
three bad at-bats, but he has 



Tinrthj A Claf).'Afcn.r Fiancr-PlMC 

Sandy Alomar of the Cleveland Indians wearing a 
catcher's helmet fitted with a small camera that 
was to be used at the All-Star Game, allowing 
television to show pitches coming toward batters. 


the inner confidence that the 
fourth will be a good one. 

“I also think that whatever 
additional attention might 
come to him late in the season 
wouldn’t affect him. He's 
never had to adjust to the at- 


mosphere because he was 
raised around major league 
clubhouses. Besides, he's 
been a star from the start. He’s 
used to the attention. He’s al- 
ways been able to rise to the 
occasion.” 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY', JULY 9, 199 


OBSERVER 


Murder in the Family 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — In the old 
days husbands and wives 
murdered each other. Now 
they hire bit men to do it for 
them. This is surely the final 
disgrace of a society corrup- 
ted by its own riches. Before 
the big money rolled in few 
couples could afford to hire 
somebody to clean house, 
much less a hit man. 

We are talking of an age 
before anybody ever heard of 
mutual hinds. Back then, hus- 
bands killed their own wives 
and wives killed their own 
husbands. They did it exten- 
sively. too. 

Two years of news report- 
ing on the police beat filled 
me with wonder at the con- 
nubial murder rate. The best 
trial I ever covered dealt with 
a husband who had planned to 
subject his wife to the perfect 
murder. He succeeded in 
killing her. but not in getting 


sequently hanged. 


Three recent hit-man 
events in the Baltimore- 
Washington area illustrate the 
new style. A Maryland wom- 
an. a minor political figure, 
has just been charged with 
trying to hire a hit man to 
dispose of her husband. 

Outside Baltimore the cops 
have booked one Mark Cor- 
dero. alleging that he offered 
$ 1 0.000 for his wife 's murder. 
Cordero is said to have made 
the offer to an undercover po- 
liceman after the usual an- 
onymous tipster disclosed 
that he was up to no good. 

Another undercover cop 
figures in the case of a man in 
Capitol Heights. Maryland, 
charged with trying to hire a 
hit man to dispose of his wife. 
Again, Anonymous Tipster 
talked to the cops, who had 


one of their own pose as a hit 
man for hire. The police say 
the price offered in this case 
was $1 .500. 

Several questions arise. 
How often does a spouse in 
search of a hit man make a deal 
with the real article instead of 
an undercover cop? If hit men 
are available- how do they set 
the price for their work? 

□ 

And finally, are there really 
that many hit men out there 
willing to work for dis- 
gruntled husbands and 
wives? Murderers have tra- 
ditionally preferred to work 
only for powerful institutions 
— 'kings and queens, crime 
families, national intelligence 
agencies — which could 
guarantee them protection 
from the law. 

Murder has never been a 
career to boast about. In 
■‘Macbeth” and “Richard 
m.” Shakespeare painted his 
professional murderers as 


murdered Thomas h Becket in 
Canterbury Cathedral to 
please King Henry II. and in- 
famy has been their reward 
for the past 800 years. 

Now, though, we have 
movies like "Grosse Pointe 
Blank,” in which charming 
John Cusack is a professional 
killer, “GoodfeHas,” in 
which funny Joe Pesci is a 
professional killer, and 
"Prizzi's Honor ” — admit- 
tedly a satire on romantic 
Mafia movies — in which hit- 
man Jack Nicholson marries 
hit- woman Kathleen Turner. 

When hit men are such rich 
and famous stars, how can we 
fail to think them glamorous? 
How romantic their work must 
be. Surely the woods must be 
full of these fascinating 
rogues. Surely they are itching 
to represent you for SI 0,000, 
or maybe only $ 1 .500. 

New Yvrk Timex Sen ice 


K NOXVILLE. Tennessee — It is hard to 
see the stars on Sunset Boulevard, all 
but impossible in Times Square. It is easy to 
regard them as cold and distant, as lifeless as 
neon. But in the suburbs around Knoxville, 
in the uncluttered night sky of East Ten- 
nessee. they seem so bright that a person just 
has to wonder, just has to believe, at least a 
little, in thepossibilities up there. 

Lowell Cunningham grew up under a 
Tennessee sky. The writer whose comic 
book, “Men in Black,” inspired the new 
sci-fi ‘movie. Cunningham does nor spend 
nights on the hood of his car, searching 
those bright stars for spaceships and the 
surrounding deep woods for little green men 
or purple women. But since he was a child, 
he has been enchanted by the possibility of 
life up there, of distant travelers who 
stumble onto earth. “The last rime I went 
out of my way to look at the sky, I was 
looking at a comet,” said Cunningham, 38, 
who lives in a neat, green, middle-class 
suburb outside Knoxville. “I didn't see a 
spaceship. But I do wonder if the stars have 
planets around them, civilizations on them. 

I can’t deny the possibility even though I am “Everybody hr 
by no means convinced of the reality." 

Or. as the film that was based on his comic-book premises, 
maybe there has already been contact, and an elite, supersecret 
organization shields us from the existence of alien visitors 
even as it blows ro bits those who might do us harm. “People i 
do like the possibility,” said Cunningham, a very normal 
looking man who lives in a normal town house — "though a 
little cluttered here and there with computer gear and the 
plastic models of monsters and action heroes he collects. i 
The notion of aliens living beside us. and occasionally 
threatening us, is so appealing that the movie was on the ; 
cover of Newsweek before it had sold a single ticket. To say 1 
it has changed Lowell Cunningham's life would be like i 
saying Tommy Lee Jones, who stars with Will Smith in the 
movie which opened in the United States last week, can act 
a little. “Everybody has one big idea in their lives,” ’ 
Cunningham said, humbly. "This was my big idea]” i 

It has given him at least a modest wealth — he will not say i 
exactly how much money he got for his idea but concedes it ' 
was six figures — and the idea has been spun off into an < 
animated television series (coming in October) and, last 
month, a new 20.000-copy reprinting of his first “Men in i 
Black” comic book, with drawings by Sandy Carruthers. i 
Two film producers, Walter Parkes and' Laurie Mac- s 
Donald, came across the original comic books in California < 
and contacted Cunningham in 1992. “I haven't done a lick I 
of honest work since then.” he said. “I haven't had to punch ' 
that time clock." 




fj'^'llrVii Vwi Thn-ft 


"Everybody has one big idea in their lives,” says comic-book author Cunningham. 


It is, cliche or not. a dream come true for a normal guy 
who turned an underground urban legend — the Men in 
Black — into an obscure comic series that faded ftom print 
only to be reborn, in a massive way,- in a $90 million 
Hollywood movie. 

"I stoned working on it 10 years ag’o.” said Cunningham. 
“Men in black have been talked about in UFO circles for 
decades. “It excited me. it caught my attention." 

The comic books, featuring the guardians in dark suits 
and sunglasses who tracked down the dangerous aliens and 
blasted them into vile goop, did not even make him a living, 
in the beginning. Now, things will never be the same. 

He was bom the son of Ralph and Ruby Cunningham. His 
father, the son of farmers, was an accountant. His mother 
was an office worker for the state of Tennessee. Cun- 
ningham grew up in and around the slow and sleepy little 
city of Franklin. Tennessee, and had a life that was not quite 
“country" and not quite “town." as in Nashville, Memphis 
or Knoxville. “I got the best of both worlds,” he said. 

Even as a boy. Cunningham was looking beyond Ten- 
nessee. and beyond his own planet His television took him 
there, though sometimes it took him in black and white and 
shades of gray. “When I was in the first grade, maybe the 
second or third, there was a sudden rush of science fiction," 
he said. He soaked up “Land of the Giants" and “Star 
Trek” and "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea." 

They happened to come along “in my formative years,” 


— and “Kolchak, the Night 
which a reporter in a 1965 Mustang con-** 
vertible chased vampires and aliens and oth^ 
er wretched creatures. Episode after eras 
however, no one believed Kolchak whenlje ^ 
warned them of impending doom. 

And Cunningham read comics, especiau v '- 
’ science fiction. He still does. - - _ V 

After high school he enrolled at the Un*-.. 
versity of Tennessee in Knoxville, where he * 
pursued and eventually caught a BA degjrefe ' 
In philosophy. It was there, m anenclayfc of;.; 
youno artists and writers with their eyes, 
turned to die stars, that he found a sou Of.; 
second home. “I’ve been here ever 
be said. “I took some writing: 
joined a writing club. Several members nave: 
made professional sales since — sborr.sto^.. 
ties, comics. ’ ' 

But in the world of fiction, in any fonn,the;r 
idea is everything. His came after bearing^ 
tales — tales dial many people deeply, deeply 
believed — of an organization of earthbotimfr 
secret agents who prowled the country in long, 
black cars and tracked down the dangerous : 
aliens. The agents erased the memories of anjf. 
unningham. innocents who might have encountered thenar- 
by using a, well, a mind-erasing flash-type- 
instrument The Men in Black were protected ftom having:, 
their own memories erased by special sunglasses — ‘‘They '' 
don’t call 'em Ray Ban for nothing." one hero explains in. • 
“Men in Black” No. 1, the limited-edition comic book that 
came out from Malibu in December 1989. ti 

The premise of the whatsit (called a ‘ ‘neuralizer ’ in botit 
the comic and the movie) explains why there has been no 
hard evidence — or credible eyewitness accounts — of alietr 
abduction or encounters. The Men in Black erased the;, 
evidence, -even as they destroyed, with space-age weapons 
confiscated from the aliens themselves, the visitors..-..- ; 

“A friend of mine, Dennis Matheson, was interested” in ; 
that folklore, he said. 1 ‘And I was taken with the whole idea 
of these powerful men who show up and keep the peace: I* ; 
shaped the Men in Black to be active agents, out there," 
respondingi to threats, cleaning them up if they've already, 
occurred. They describe themselves as the thin black line « •. 
between reality and chaos." _ . ; ' 

He is pleased that the movie seems to be a hit. Pleased : 
when he hears a line from his comic books in the movie - 
dialogue. He is even a little pleased with his brief appearance ? 
on screen as a worker at the Men in Black headquarters^ ; 

But mostly, he is pleased that his idea, bom in the -stars, ; 
nurtured by a black-and-white television and made bigger - 
than life by Hollywood, is still alive. "It’s escapUrm’\he 
said of his comic book and now the movie, in which a person i 
can ogle an alien and never even leave Tennessee. . 


PEOPLE 


W OU think you have alteration prob- 
X lems? Roxane Duke, a vice pres- 
ident of International Gem, Mineral and 
Jewelry Show Inc., plans to cannibalize 
the 534,500 Princess Diana formal she 
bought at the Christie's auction last 
month and turn it into earrings. For 
charity, of course. Duke wants the com- 
pany's craftspeople to remove an es- 
timated 20.000 take pearls and glass 
beads from the lacy bodice and sleeves 
of the white dress and set them in 14- 
karat gold to sell at $1,000 a set. "A lot 
of people just like the idea of sharing 
what Diana has," a company spokes- 
man said. Profits would go to unnamed 
good causes in the 50 American cities 
where the company holds its jewelry 
shows. But the proposal did not please 
the British press. The Sun called Duke a 
“Di Dress-troyer” and the Daily Mail 
ran a story headlined “Why I'll Cut Up 
Diana's Dress." 


Luciano Pavarotti gave a special 
concert in the cathedral sauare of Spo- 
leto, Italy, to mark Gian Carlo 


Menotti's 86th birthday and to raise 
funds for the composer's Festival of Two 
Worlds. The 3.000 seats went for up to 
5350 each. ‘ ‘I decided to come to Spoleto 
to celebrate a man who has given a lot to 
music.” Pavarotti said. 


A member of the Kennedy family 
says that it was easier for the young 
generation of the Kennedys to "get an 
Alcoholics Anonymous meeting to- 
gether than a touch-football team.” In 
an interview with Vanity Fair as part of 
an article on the troubles afflicting some 
of the children of the late Senator 
Robert Kennedy, bus 34-year-old son. 
Christopher, said his siblings were 
well aware of the moral ramifications of 
their actions and that alcohol definitely 
played a role. He was quoted as saying: 
“In cases where alcohol contributed to 
inappropriate behavior — in every case 
— these people don’t drink anymore.” 
He said that at least eight or nine mem- 
bers of his immediate family of 28 sib- 
lings and cousins or their spouses attend 
daily AA meetings. 



The Famous and Familiar Honor James Stewart 


..oi-nfc 

Nancy Reagan at Stewart service. 


By Todd Purdum 

Vta K >rk Times Struct 

B EVERLY HILLS. California — 
With an Air Force honor guard and a 
lone bugler sounding taps, the elders of 
Hollywood came to remember James 
Stewart, not as the movie star the world 
knew but as the quiet neighbor, modest 
war hero and loving husband and father 
who moved graciously among them for 
six decades. 

One by one. old friends and co-stars 
walked down the aisle of the Beverly 
Hills Presbyterian Church, where the 
Stewart family worshiped for years, in 
tribute to the star of "Mr. Smith Goes to 
Washington” and “It's a Wonderful 
Life,” who died last Wednesday of a 
blood clot in the lung at 89. 

On the arm of his wife. Dolores, there 
was Bob Hope, his hair snow white and 
his step slow at the age of 94, the last of 
Stewart's generation of male Hollywood 
royalty. There was June AJlyson. his co- 
star in movies like "The Glenn Miller 
Story," on the arm of her old MGM 
comrade-in-musical-comedv, Esther 


Williams. There was Carol Burnett, who 
grew up idolizing Stewart as an usherette 
in Hollywood movie palaces and went 
on to become a friend. 

There was Shirlee Fonda, the widow 
of Stewart's long-ago roommate Henry 
Fonda, who shared quarters with him in 
New York and Hollywood in the mid- 
’30s, when they were struggling actors 
surviving on boiled rice. There was John 
Strauss. Stewart's publicist of 40 years, 
who said simply, "I guess he was my 
closest friend.” 

And just before the memorial service 
began. Nancy Reagan, who spent many 
a New Year's Eve at the Palm Springs 
estate of the publisher Walter Annen- 
berg with President Ronald Reagan, 
Stewart and his wife, Gloria, took a seat 
with her friend Betsy Bloomingdale in 
the pew just behind the Stewart family. 

Stewart, who was buried next to his 
wife in a private funeral at Forest Lawn, 
the quintessential Hollywood cemetery, 
wanted no fuss at his passing, and the 
memorial Monday was about as un- 
glitzy as Hollywood can get, with the 
old mission-style church only about half 


full. There was no talk of Stewart's dayjT 
as a flashing young escort to die likes of 
Ginger Rogers, but instead of the quiet, 
conservative values he learned in his ■- 
hometown of Indiana. Pennsylvania, 
where his father owned a hardware *, 
store. ^ 

Kelly Harcourt, one of Stewart's twin 
daughters, spoke for her sister. Judy Mer- ' 
rill, and her stepbrother, Michael - 
McLean, Gloria Stewart's son from a 
previous marriage whom Stewart reared 
as his own. Harcourt, a professor of an- 
thropology at the University of California 
at Davis, noted that after his wife’s death 
in 1994, Stewart withdrew into his 'big 
Tudor house with its walled English ' 
garden in Beverly Hills, because "he just 
didn't know what to do without hex.’ 

But Harcourt said her parentsUoye 
and their friendships had sustained 
them, and she invoked the familiar citis* 
ing lines of “It's a Wonderful Life,”^. 
that no man is a failure who ha ^ 
friends. 

“Here's to our father,” she saidMtef 
voice catching. “The richest man m 
town." ' - 




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