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INTERNATIONAL 



• PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


■J,i. 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 




Paris, Friday, July 11, 1997 



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• Bnu LlUir/Agmu: Truce ftnve 

A boy batting a ball Thursday against a wall painted with a “wanted” poster of the 
Northern Ireland secretary. Mo Mowlam, and signs forbidding Protestant marchers. 


Peace Hopes Recede in Ulster 

Disenchantment With Blair Drives Away Catholics 


By Fred Barbas h 

ttiehuH'ivii Post Senior 


BELFAST — There is still such a thing as the 


“Northern Ireland peace process.” But some- 
times it is hard to catch a glimpse, for it's a very 


loose light bulb, flickering on and off in response 
to vibrations from the ground. 

It was beginning to brighten up. just a bit. 
when rioting swept the British province this 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


week following another controversy over an- 
other sectarian parade that could have been 
avoided by compromise. 

Now. positions that seemed to be softening 
have hardened. Trust in the British govern- 
ment's chief Northern Ireland policymaker, 
who was building unprecedented popularity 


among Catholics, has evaporared. 

Moderate Catholic political leaders, who were 
supponive of the two-month-old government of 
Tony Blair, are now denouncing it. Ordinary 
Catholics who say they have always supported 
moderate leaders are seeking out reporters on the 
streets to say they are shifting allegiance to hard- 
liners. such as Sinn Fein, the legal political arm 
of the outlawed Irish Republican Army. 

Even as George Mitchell, the U.S. envoy, was 
tirelessly and patiently presiding over the year- 
old multiparty talks for a broad political set- 
tlement, Catholic protesters and gunmen have 
been at work. Ana Monday night, members of 
Protestant paramilitary forces paraded in Prot- 
estant East Belfast in their balaclavas, the dark 
ski masks worn by gunmen here, waving their 
automatic rifles for television cameras. 


See ULSTER, Page 7 


Peacekeepers Kill Serb Suspect 

Another Is Seized and Taken to War Crimes Tribunal 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Times Service 


ZAGREB, Croatia — Peacekeeping troops 
in Bosnia, in their first attempt to arrest sus- 
pected war criminals, captured one Bosnian 
Serb and killed another on Thursday in a shoot- 
out in northwestern Bosnia. 

A British soldier was slightly wounded in the 
action. 

Alliance officials said troops of the NATO- 
led peacekeeping force, known as SFOR, for 
Stabilization Force, returned fire “in self-de- 
fense” after Simo Orljaca, a suspect in war 
crimes, fired at them when challenged in a 
restaurant. 

Last fall, Mr. Drljaca was removed from his 
post as the Prijedor police chief at NATO’s 
insistence. 

The troops in the raid detained another war 
crimes suspect. Milan Kovacevic. director of a 
Prijedor hospital, without incident in a separate 
operation, officials said. 

“Indicted war criminal Simo Drljaca, 
former police chief in Prijedor. opened fire on 
SFOR soldiers as they approached for the pur- 
pose of detaining him. ’ a NATO statement 
said. 

‘ 'One of the SFOR soldiers was wounded in 
the process,” it said. “Dijlaca was killed when 
fire was returned in self-defense.” 

[The United Nations war crimes tribunal for 
the former Yugoslavia in The Hague an- 
nounced Thursday night that the captured Serb 
had already been transferred to there, Reuters 
reported.] 

The commando action was carried out under 
a long-established but little-used mandate giv- 
en to the 31 ,000 peacekeeping troops in Bosnia 
to detain indicted war c riminal s when they are 
encountered, these officials said. 

NATO commanders have, until now, proved 
reluctant to cany out such arrests, fearing re- 
prisals against allied troops. 

American commanders have been especially 
vocal about avoiding such incidents, citing a 
disastrous attempt to conduct a manhunt in 
Somalia that left 18 American soldiers dead. 

Secretary of Defense William Cohen said 
during a visit to Budapest that suspected war 


criminals in Bosnia were put “on notice” by 
the raid that they would not remain free in- 
definitely, Reuters reported. But Mr. Cohen 
cautioned that there was no decision to use the 
arrest authority not used in the past. 

NATO’s secretary-general. Javier Solana 
Madariaga, praised the troops involved in the 
raid for “professionalism and dedication." 

“We will not tolerate any behavior by any of 
the parties contrary to the Dayton peace agree- 
ment,' * he added in a statement made public in 
Brussels. 

Mr. Drljaca. a military leader with a reputation 
in the region for brutality, has long been cited as 
one of the instigators and leaders of massacres 
and expulsion of thousands of Muslims and 
ethnic Croats from this part of Bosnia. 

A spokesman for the United Nations tribunal 


on war crimes, Christian Chanier, said Mr. 
Drljaca’s name was not on a published list of 
indicted war criminals. He would not confirm 
or deny, however, that the name of the former 
police chief was on a list not yet made public. 

In the Serbian enclave of Eastern Slavonia in 
Croatia, administered by the United Nations, 
tribunal investigators last month made a sur- 
prise arrest of the former Serbian mayor of 
Vukovar, Slavko Dokmanovic. ■ 

.Mr. Dokmanovic ’s indictment was not made 
public before his detention. 

Mr. Drljaca and Mr. Kovacevic were both 
the subject of sealed indictments issued by the 
war crimes tribunal. 

The tribunal’s chief prosecutor, Louise Ar- 


See BOSNIA, Page 7 


Growing Pains at a New NATO 


Will Alliance’s Popularity 
D iminis h Its Efficiency? 


By William Drozd iak 

Washington Post Sen-ice 


MADRID — As the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization embarks on its biggest expansion 
in history and a new set of security partnerships 
with more than two dozen countries, there is 
creeping anxiety within the alliance that its own 
popularity may be its undoing. 

As a military allian ce that prizes clarity and 
efficiency, NATO rarely encountered diffi- 
culty in rallying members to form a united front 
against the threat of a Soviet-led invasion. But 
as its activities evolve into a transcontinental 
security order stretching from Vancouver to 
Vladivostok, some allian ce officials fear that 
its global reach may mean diluted strength. 

“You will see a lot more people becoming 
worried that NATO may be like a juggler that 
risks putting too many balls in the air,” a top 


NATO diplomat said. “At some point you have 
to ask yourself whether all of them will come 
tumbling down.” 

The potential trouble of accommodating a 
bulging roster of nations became evident as die 
leaders of 16 NATO members and 28 other 
states crowded into a cavernous hall to in- 
augurate the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Coun- 
cil. The gridlock caused by protocol rituals and 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


welcoming speeches by so many dignitaries 
left no time for serious discussion. 


Besides its rich overlay of political and mil- 
itary committees, NATO will soon begin reg- 


ular consultative councils on a monthly basis 
with Russia and Ukraine. 

The number of high-level meetings within 
the alliance has already doubled in the last three 
years, and the NATO secretary general, Javier 
Solana Madariaga, has warned that urgent re- 
forms must be adopted to streamline delib- 


See NATO, Page 7 


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dollar l. CLA medical 
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e National Cullen w 
l selected .o the chief 
two new Ijpoiaiune*. 
to include a park-hle 
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■^placement and 
ii her ho? pi ta I room. 


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dumped him aal 
vine him for to, 

n album released 

* hand 




"orabi loeetifi? 
iim « 


was .» victim < 


You Are There: A Panorama of Mars, 119 Million Miles Away 




-•**£:. -r; v 


i&ttr ~ 






> -• 









The AmmM 


A “monster panorama” of the undulating. Martian plain Ares Vallis 
as seen from Pathfinder in photographs released by NASA. To the left 


of center was the robot rover Sojourner sitting next to the quartz-rich 


rock nicknamed Barnacle Bill, the first to be analyzed by the rover. In 
the next few days, scientists plan to have Sojourner analyze the big 
rock in the center background, which has been dubbed Yogi, and two 


other whitish rocks. Far in the distance in the left background was a 
365 meter (1,200 foot) peak, about 32 kilometers (20 miles) away, that 
scientists hope to use to track the haziness of the Martian atmosphere. 


T .Access Number which 
ier countries n 1 ^!' ^ 


As Washington Stews, 
Americans Tune Out 




er for the coun i ■ : . 

* clearest copiucuotis 


: Economic Boom Drowns Out Scandals 


By Dan Balz and Ceci Connolly 

Washington Post Sen-lcr 


new nationwide Washington Post/ABC 
News poll. Approval of Congress stands 


V01IT 


»e your calls on . 
vou avoid <>uir.iiS fl, ‘ ls 


10 


Nil and sa« up 

,r iM 


EDMONDS, Washington — Dennis 
Wight can see Puget Sound from the 
front porch of his house here in the 
Seattle suburbs, and the view seems a lot 
more compelling than any of the images 
coming from the other Washington 
these days. 

• Mr. wight, an electrical engineer, 
fries to pay attention to the news from 
the nation r s capital, but finds other de- 
mands take priority. “Politics in Wash- 
ington doesn’t seem to affect me di- 
rectly,” he said. “It’s all too remote. 
My job and the traffic and the kids 
swamp out national politics.” 

* lit, TKA.<. JL: 


at 40 percent, where it was last spring. 

Whatever tins mood of contentment 
has done for Mr. Clinton’s standing, it 
has only made Washington appear less 
relevant titan when voters wanted action 
on the economy. Voters dislike the never- 
ending flow of news about scandal and 
are pessimistic that the campaign financ- 
ingsystem will ever be cleaned up. 

These are among the conclusions that 
emerged from interviews in three con- 
— sional districts around the country 

, which was 

interviews 


Mr. Wight's situation is hardly sin- 
Tl. Tne na- 


gressionai districts around tn< 
last week along with the poll, v 
completed this week. The it 
took place in ticket-splitting areas of 
Wisconsin, Missouri and Washington, 


anvwhere else n-r 


Altf- 

travelers do. 


asr Access > u,!,ben ’ 


gular in this^ summer of 1997 
tion’s humming economy has helped an- 
esthetize the anger that drove American 
politics in the eariy 1990s, bringing about 
level of personal satisfaction and eco- 
^nomic confidence not seen in decades. 

* The bountiful economy appears to be 
paying dividends for President Bill 
Clinton, who despite controversies over . 


in precincts where voters generally 
chose candidates from different parties 
in last year’s presidential and congres- 
sional races. 

More than anything, the national 


See CLINTON, Page 7 


AGENDA 


m- 


Kenyan Leader 
Accuses Opponents 


m.. 


NAIROBI (AP) President Daniel 
arap Moi, facing international crit- 
icism over his use of force to break up 
rallies for democracy, accused oppo- 
sition leaders Thursday of misleading 
people into destabilizing Kenya. 

In his first comments since nine dem- 
onstrators were killed Monday, Mr. 
Moi also told foreigners who had crit- 
icized his actions to stop interfering. 

Earlier article, Page 6. 


I The Dollar 1 

NwvYotk 

Thursday O 4 PJd. 

previous dow 

DM 

1.7511 

1.7603 

Pound 

1.6885 

1.6868 

Yan 

113.105 

112.75 

FF 

5.92 

5-9445 





Thurtday doaa 

prevtwdoM 

+44.33 

7886.76 

’ 7842.43 

| S&P 500 | 

change 

Thureday 9 4 PJ4. 

prevtoua don 

+&3 

913.77 

907.47 



Da* kl ChoAkVAjcnra France-Prone 

TALLYHO — John Pugh and his Welsh foxhound joined thousands 
at London’s Hyde Park on Thursday to defend the hunt Page 6. 


Germany Makes Cuts 

Bonn announced new belt-tightening 
Thursday as the Bundesbank criticized 
calk for exact adherence to Maastricht 
treaty deficit targets. Page 18. 


Books 

„ ... Page 9. 

Crossword . 

PaM 9. 


Page 8-9. 

Sports 

. Pages 20-21. 

| The IHT on-line http://'. 

vwvv.iht.com | 


ASEAN Delays 
Admission 
Of Cambodia 

U.S. Suspends Aid 


By Michael Richardson 

IntemiritHUil Hcrjkl Tribune 


Qatar’s Ruler Slowly Blazes a New Trail in the Gulf 


highest of his presidency, according to a 


Newsstand .Prices 


By Douglas Jehl 

Nw York 7 hues Sendee 


AT&T 


* 


■Andorra... — 1000 FF LetBnon^—iLLaooc 

! An$es 1250 FFMorocco .__16 Dh 

f-Carrenm..i.600CFA Qatar a^.,10^0 Rials 

Egypt EE 550 R&rion 12.50 FF 

France 10.00 FF Saudi Aiabfa-.IOOO R. 

■Gaboru^.„1100 CFASenegaL„J.1.tOOCfiA 

■tab—. 2^00 Lira Spain. „_,.„_225 ptas 

jvny Coast.1250 CFA Tunisia ^.,.1250 On 

doidan 1250 JDUAE.„ — laOOOirh 

Kuwait .700 Rte OS- MS. (Eur.}.„.^120 


f r-9* r 



DOHA, Qatar — It began as a quiet coup. Now, die 
question is whether it was also the beginning of a quiet 
revolution. . , . , 

For Sheikh Hamad ibn Khalifa al Tharn, who 
toppled his father two years ago to become emir of 
Qatar, the transformation has not been easy. His 
government had to foil at least three attempted coun- po 
tercoups while battling furiously to recover billions of Sb 
dollars squirreled away in the foreign bank accounts of 
the former emir. 

But at 47, the Qatari leader has adopted a course so 
distinctive that it has caused discomfort and even 
alarm in neighboring Gulf oil monarchies, where the 
average age of the five other heads of state is 69. 

“This is the beginning 'of the 21st century in the 


Gulf,” said a Western diplomat who predicts that a 
turnover in the years ahead in countries like Saudi 
Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait could 
lead to similar changes. 

Already, the new emir has announced an end to 
press censorship and he has established a satellite 
television station that allows open criticism of his 
government and others in the region. 

But Qatar remains far from a democracy, with its 
wer and most of its wealth firmly in the hands of 


And while he speaks of moving toward democracy, 
he has already chosen as Ins successor a 19-year-old 
son. Sheikh Jassim ibn Hamad Thani, tire crown 
prince, who has followed in his father's footsteps by 
attending Sandhurst, the British military academy. 
But in a sign of his intentions to move to greater 


openness, Emir Hamad has called for municipal elec- 

rlf — to be 


beikh Hamad and his family. 

Under thecountry’s 1971 Constitution, members of 


a 35 -member advisory council were ro have been 
elected, but no elections have been held. 

Despite its declaration of an end to press censorship, 
(he new government has twice shut oowa newspapers 
after they published articles it deemed contmy to 
Qatar's interests. 


lions — which would be the first in the Gul 
held by the end of the year. 

He said he expects to allow women to take pan in 
them — a step that not even Kuwait, with an elected 
Parliament, has been willing to take. 

He has also said he is determined to end the practice 
that has allowed members of the ruling family to treat 
oil and gas revenues as their own — among the reasons 
he has given for overthrowing his father — thus 


SINGAPORE — In a move to in- 
crease international pressure for a ne- 
gotiated end to the political conflict in 
Cambodia, the Association of South 
East Asian Nations announced Thurs- 
day that it would indefinitely delay 
Cambodia’s admission to ASEAN, 
which had been scheduled for this 
month. 

ASEAN has a policy of noninter- 
ference in other countries’ internal af- 
fairs, and the decision was its strongest 
signal of disapproval toward a neighbor 
in its history. 

At a special meeting in Kuala Lum- 
pur, foreign ministers of the group made 
it clear that they were opposed to the 
way in which Cambodia’s de facto ruler. 
Hun Sen, bad used force to oust his co- 
prime minister and chief political rival. 
Prince Norodom Ranariddh. 

“ASEAN will continue to regard 
Ranariddh as co-premier of Cambodia, ” 
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi, Malaysian 
foreign minister, said after the meeting. 

[In Washington, the United States 
announced it was suspending its aid 
program for Cambodia for 30 days, 
Reuters reported. 

(The State Department spokesman, 
Nicholas Bums, said this was “a clear 
signal to Hun Sen and his associates that 
the U.S. will not be conducting business 
as usual with those individuals.'' 

[After 30 days, and depending on the 
circumstances in the country, he said, 
“we would anticipate resumption of 
those programmes which do provide 
humanitarian people-to- people support 
in the area of basic human needs.” 

[Mr. Bums could not give derails of 
exactly how much aid would be cut.] 

The ASEAN ministers, evidently con- 


See QATAR, Page 7 


See CAMBODIA, Page 7 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1997 



PAGE TWO 


U.S. Work Force / Entrants Preclude Shortage 

‘A Huge Reserve’ Gets to Work 



By Louis UchiteUe 

New York Tunes Sen-iee 


L ouisville, Kentucky — 

The hailstorm that did so 
much damage to roofs a little 
more than a year ago pulled 
Antonio Rodriguez into the labor 
force. Kneeling on the lawn in front of 
a white clapboard home recently, he 
cut strips of asphalt into shingles 
while four other young men lugged 
the shingles up a ladder and nailed 
them in place. 

Soon after, the team moved on to 
the next damaged roof. 

Mr. Rodriguez immigrated from 
Mexico and settled here five years 
ago, but making a living came bard. 
Stints as a day laborer alternated with 
longer periods of idleness in which he 
rarely even looked for a job. 

“My friends offered me work 
some times,” he said. Then a year ago, 
the hailstorm and the prospering Ken- 
tucky economy brought Mr. Rodrig- 
uez hill blast into the labor force. 

For 18 months, the U.S. labor force, 
which is everyone working or actively 
seeking wort has been growing at 
nearly mice its normal rate and more 
than double the growth rate of the 
working-age population. 

That has fed about 4 million more 
people into a growing economy. 

Hispanic people are the biggest 
contingent, but younger women and , 
men over 55 also figure prominently 
among the entrants. 1 

Many are being pulled into the 1 
work force by employers who are 
offering better pay than the minimum 
wage and — with the U.S. unem- 
ployment rate hovering at 5 percent or 
below — are less choosy than they 
once were about whom they hire. 
Mostly the new people are entering at 
relatively low pay. like Mr. Rodrig- 
uez, who is earning S50 a day. 

But companies clearly are recruit- 
ing among those ignored in the past: 
mothers at home with their children, 
older men who had retired or been laid 
off. students, immigrants, people with 
criminal records. 

State officials in Kentucky who 
help former prisoners get jobs say 
companies now reject fewer con- 
victed felons. 

Tens of thousands of welfare re- 
cipients are being pushed off the rolls 
and into work by changes in the fed- 
eral welfare system. 

“There is a huge and chronic re- 
serve of working-age people in this 
country," said Mark Zandi. chief 
economist at Regional Financial As- 
sociates, "and when conditions are 
right, or they are pushed, they come 







into the labor force. That is happening 
now." 

One of the big national economic 
issues is how long the U.S. labor force, 
now numbering 1 29.4 million work- 
ers and 6.8 million people actively 
seeking work, can continue growing 
at this faster rate of 2 percent a year. 

During the 1980s, similarly strong 
labor- force growth started shortly 
after the recovery began and lasted for 
five years, helping to keep the econ- 
omy expanding without the inflation 
that can result from labor shortages. 
This rime the above-normal labor- 
force growth kicked in only during the 
fifth year of recovery, and it could 
continue to die end of die century. 

“Millions of people are out there 
willing to enter the labor force without 
bidding up wages very much." said 
Alan Krueger, a Princeton University 
labor economist. “This implies dial 
the unemployment rate can remain 
low without the inflation that usually 
accompanies low unemployment.” 

Much of the labor-force growth is 
in the Eastern states, with their big 
concentrations of immigrants ana 
people on welfare, and in prospering 


Southern states such as Kentucky that 
are producing many new jobs. 

As workers shift from one sector to 
another in pursuit of. better jobs, new 
workers move in to fill the empty 
slots. Often they are Hispanic people 
such as Mr. Rodriguez, who have ac- 
counted for 28 percent of the labor- 
force growth in the past 18 months and 
are America’s most mobile workers. 

In Kentucky and Tennessee, for ex- 
ample, new auto plants — particularly 
Toyota Motor Corp.’s sprawling fac- 
tory in Georgetown, 75 miles (120 
kilometers') east of Louisville — have 
attracted networks of parts suppliers 
in recent years, offering thousands of 
new jobs at $ 10 an hour or more. 

They have hired many people who 
have shifted from lower-paying jobs 
in construction or in tobacco fields. 
Hispanic people, drawn to the state in 
the past decade, have led the way in 
replacing them. 

“It happened gradually ,” said 
James Thompson, a regional admin- 
istrator for the Kentucky Department 
of Employment Services, ,! but one 
day you wake up and you notice." 

Mr. Rodriguez had come to Ken- 
tucky to visit a friend from his Mex- 
ican hometown of Guanajuato. The 
friend stayed, and so did Mr. Rodrig- 
uez, in time marrying an American 
and applying for legal status. As jobs 
have opened up in construction, steady 
work has made Louisville his home. 


F OR THE NATION as a whole, 
the Labor Department counts 
67 million working-age 
people age 16 or older who are 
neither holding jobs nor seeking them. 
Most are out of the work force will- 
ingly — as students, retired people, 
mothers with young children and 
older women who rarely worked out- 
side the borne. Many are now being 
drawn in. while others find them- 
selves forced to enter. 

From this pool, Nadirah Amin 
made the transition in June. Ms. 
Amin, 43, along with 16 other black 
women on welfare, graduated in iare 
June from a 13-week course in New 
York where they had been taught the 
latest office computer software. The 
goal is to land office jobs that pay 
enough (at least $23,000 a year) for 
them to get by in the city without too 
much privation. 

By graduation, only five had been 
offered such work. The rest, including 
Ms. Amin, began anxiously trying to 
land jobs before they are forced off 
welfare in August and into whatever 
minimum-wage work they can grab. 

“I am putting on my happy face to 
look for a job,” said Ms. Amin, who 


New Workers: Who and Where 


Recent growth in the U.S, labor force has not come evenly across 
the spectrum of workers and regions. Young women, people near 
retirement age and Hispanic people have increased their rates of 
participation faster than most other groups. Participation rates have 
been rising on the coasts and falling in most other areas. (The 
participation rate is the number of people working or looking for work 
as a percentage of the total population.) 


DEMOGRAPHICS 

Change in the labor 
force participation rate 
in each group from 
December 1995 to 
May 1997, in percentage 
points. 


Ail women |M||j 
16 and older 

Age 20-24 
25-54 
55-64 

65 and older 3+0.1 




All 

workers 

White 

workers 

Black 

workers 


^3 40.6 


■•'■I +0.6 


Hispanic . .;■« 
workers 


REGIONS 


All men 

1 6 and older ® 

Age 20-24 . 

25-54 vj+0.1 
. 55-64 

65 and older +0.5 

- 7 All teenagers 1 6 to 1 9 

"°* 7 i a £ ag (both sexes) 


Change in the overall labor force participation rate in each region from 
May 1996 to May 1997, in percentage points. Darker shading signifies 
faster growth. 

New England JA 

+0.9 


West 

North 

Central 

-0.4 


Mountain 

/ -1-3 


Pacific \ Li — 

includes Alaska 

and Hawaii. ™ 

Source: Bureau at Labor Statistics 


has a year of college and last worked as 
a salaried school aide in the early 1990s 
— taking a S4.000 buyout in 1994 as an 
alternative to being laid off. 

Men over 55 are also entering, or 
more precisely re-entering, the labor 
force in unusual numbers. Jobs are 
now easier for older people to find, 
particularly as security guards, clerks, 
stadium ushers and cashiers. 

Sometimes theygo head to head 
with the young, as Thomas Bail, a 70- 
year-old former appliance repairman, 
has done in Louisville. Hoping to earn 
extra money to pay expenses on his 
car, which he uses for Red Cross vol- 
unteer work, Mr. Ball applied to 
United Parcel Service of America Inc. 


East 
North I 
Central 
-0.3 " 


Middle 

Atlantic 

+ 1.2 


South 

Atlantic 

+ 0.6 


L East 
South Central 
+ 1.0 


last autumn for a Christmas season job 
at its huge distribution center. 

He did not get the seasonal job, but 
in early January. UPS. short-staffed, 
hired him as a permanent part-timer, 
earning $8 an hour on a 2:45 A -M. to 7 
A.M. shift. 

Mr. Bali says he is delighted by 
what be viewed as recognition of his 
youthful vigor. 

* ‘The younger people might outlift 
me on a dead lift, ” he said, referring to 
the company’s loosely enforced re- 
quirement that each employee have 
me strength and agility to lift 70- 


Big vs. Smallsl 
US. Proposal^ 
On Ticket Tax! 



pound (32-kilogram) boxes. “But at 
the end of four or five hours. I’m still 
working steadily, and they aren’t.” 


sweltering mid afternoon heat, oh ■tie'.' 
front steps of the Capitol tohissaodbopj' . 
and corse the Senate’s proposed verSiohVx- 
of the airline-ticket tax. . /. \~. m %> /.• y/;-\ 

“Support the Archer pianl'”:'ih££ ;> : 
shouted, making it clear- that ;t&# ; 
favored the version being offeredbythe ‘ 
House Ways and Means committee: - ' 
chairman. Bill Archer, Republican-, ^ . :• 
Texas.' '' '■ /'i'-; 

But it was not quite a united front.- Ih J - 
their offices, in airports and on ^ahpfenesll . 
around the United States,. thO owhm/4, 
and employees of small disebunt ’afr^ -": 
lines were sending out the opposite mes- J 
sage, using slogans,- advertisements ' • 
ana, in one case^ begging fo-kill the-; - 
House proposaL * .. f - ir.i-.c . 

“Skyway Robbery,” a Southwest t ' ; ' •• 
Airlines newspaper advertisement 
stated in bold type. * “The U.S. Congress. • 
is under siege by a political army of the’; - -' 
seven largest airlines in America/’ . ;.V,: : 

What began as the airline indiistryls' 
war against any kind of tax increase has'. / 
degenerated into an internecine battle > ‘ 
pitting corporate powerhouses iinclud- 
mg American Airlines and Delta Air, ' ' : 
Lines against smaller companies; fed byjl 
Dallas-based Southwest Airlines.. - 

At issue is who will be hit moist.by the ; r. 
proposed tax increase, which-is expec- 
ted to generate $33 billion to $34bmion . - 
in revenue over the next five years. . 

The Senate Finance Committee pro-' : 
poses extending the current IQ percent ' . 
tax, which expires on Ocl 1 , and raising:; 
the flat tax on international round trips. : - 
to $16 from $6. . . : J4 - 

Larger airlines, which charge higher" 
prices, have long argued that this pdt& - 
them at a disadvantage. The Senate plan : •' 
would also levy on additional lDperceni 
tax on the domestic legs of international . 
flights, a move the large airlines say. 
would benefit foreign camera. That last . ; 
provision, senators say, would probably 
be dropped from the final legislation as 
the House and Senate come up with a ' . 
compromise tax bill. 

The House plan would reduce the 
current 10 percent tax to 7.5 percenLbtrt 
would add a $2 fee for every flight 
segment, raising it to $3 in 2002. The tax 
on international flights would rise to - 
$31. Smaller airlines with more short 
flights, and mare connecting fligbts, - 
would pay more in taxes under this 
version. : 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


BA Turns to Chartered Jets 

LONDON (AP) — British .Airways said it was flying more 
airplanes through the second day of a flighi attendants’ strike 
on Thursday — but it accomplished this partly by using 
charter jets and cabin crew from other carriers. 

Many of its own jets sat silently on the runway at Heathrow 
International Airport. But British Airways said it was unfair to 
call the 10 leased jets a small strike-busting fleet. 

* ‘You can call them strike- busters — we call them a way to 
get customers from A to B, and customers are our priority," a 
British Airways spokesman, Jamie Bowden, said. 

Mr. Bowden identified some of the other carriers as the 
British Airways German subsidiary, Deutsche BA: European 


In this Saturday’s 







MW- WK# V 

V.3v:» MM* 



Fixed 

Income 


G 


lobal funds 
& outlook ahead 
of EMU. 


international f&i ♦ 


THE WORLDS DAILY NEWSPAPER 


Air Charter, and British World Airways. 

Counting those leased aircraft, British Airways said it was 
flying about 25 percent more services than it had Wednesday, 
when some of its flight attendants walked off the job or 
phoned in sick in a pay dispute. 

Even though British Airways managers said they were 
pleased to be operating more flights, tens of thousands of 
passengers faced more hours of delays. 

National Airport Is Reopening 

WASHINGTON (AP) — For years, the airport of politi- 
cians was one of the nation’s dingiest. No longer. Washington 
National Airport is ready to offer travelers a glitzy welcome 
after a $1 billion facelift. 

National's new terminal opens July 27. The airport will 
continue to handle about 45,000 passengers a day at 44 gates. 
There still will be no more than 60 takeoffs and landings each 
hour. And, in a concession to Washingtooians who live just 
across the Potomac, only planes that meet noise restrictions 
arepermined to fly between 10 P.M and 7 A.M. 

Travelers who step off Metro subway trains will be 100 
paces from the terminal. They also can hop on moving 
sidewalks for the short trip to the terminal. 

The German airline Lufthansa will open a new telephone 
switchboard in Dublin on Ocl 1, which will handle re- 
servation calls from across Europe, the company said 

Wednesday. (AFP) 

Iran and Qatar have begun a direct flight from the holy 
Iranian city of Mashhad to the Qatari capital, Doha, Iran’s 
official press agency ERNA said Thursday. (AFP) 

Germany’s oldest half-timbered house in the northern 
town of Quedlinburg was seriously damaged by fire 
overnight, but no ope was bun. The police said Thursday that 
said they suspected arson. The Staender house, which has 
been a museum since the 1950s, was built in the second half of 
the 14th century. (AFP) 


This way to 


si THE INTERMARKET 


Don’t miss it. A lot happens there. 



Mudslide Kills 19 in Southern Japan 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — A mudslide 
touched off by torrential 
rains swept down a mountain 
in southern Japan on Thurs- 
day, killing 19 people and 
wiping out more than a dozen 
homes. Two people were 
missing and feared dead. 

An additional dozen people 
were injured, two of them se- 
riously. as the mudslide 
crashed through a concrete 
barrier 14 meters (45 feet) tall 
that was being built to protect 
the city, Izumi. on the south- 


Europe 


Algarve 

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Barcelona 

EMgrade 

Bertti 

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Budapest 

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Florence 

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La Palmas 
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Madrid 

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Milan 

UOSCO* 

Muich 

Nice 

(Ms 

Parts 

Prague 

Reyktuk 

Sa 

Si PemOurg 

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36/97 21/70 pc 
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em island of Kyushu. 

After three days of rain, a 
section of mountain gave 
way at abour 1 A_M„ releas- 
ing an avalanche of mud, 
boulders and trees on the 
small community 625 miles 
( 1 ,000 kilometers) southwest 
of Tokyo, ft carried away all 
or part of 16 houses in the ' 
basin below. 

Izumi was the worst-hit 
area in Kyushu, where flood- 
ing damaged some 600 
houses and set off about 100 
small landslides. 




t' 7 - 

■£ : v\ . - .. • 

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The -Wocat-d Pma 


Japanese troops seeking survivors Thursday in Izumi. 


WEATHER 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by AccuWeather. 


Tomorrow 

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OF OF 
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29*4 21,70 pc 
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21/710 1253 pc 
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19448 1 1/52 c 
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25m 14/57 pc 
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13*5 *46 f 
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1*88 13*6 9h 
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20*8 11*2 sh 
28779 16*1 PC 
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23/73 14*7 e 


innt & 



tNOJ Unsaasonat* [Vs\J UruoasOfutfv K 

Jowpwn f£S|c* Kss3«« S: 
North America Europe 
Sunny and turning hoi Sal- Damp and cool across 
urday through Monday Eastern Europe Saturday 
horn the Ohio Valley to the through Monday, Including 
Northeast. Hof and dry Moscow. Sunshine and 
across the Southwest, but warmth will continue over 
heavy thunderstorms will Scandinavia through Mon- 
rum Die across the Plains day. but cooler weather will 
and Midwest. Cool, damp return to London and the 
weather will Mi north ol the tinned Kingdom th* week- 
Maritime Provinces ol end. Hot and dry weather 
Canada. trom southern Spain to 

Greece 


mzM 

m mtmb 


Asia 

Soaking rainfall will affeot 
southeastern China Irom 
north ot Hong Kong to 
Shanghai. Hot and dry wan 
plenty ot sunshine across 
muon ol northern China to 
Bei/ing Monsoon rains win 
dampen western India. Out 
only a <ew scattered thun- 
derstorms will affect Delhi 
ana Caicuna. 


North America 


Anchorage 

AOBnu 

Staton 

Cheep? 

Daiu 

Pefitor 

DttM 

HtMuUu 
houKon 
Lot Angstn 
Mtam 


Hto*i LnwW 
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28/64 17*2 » 
3W88 15*9 S 
34/93 22/71 pc 
32*9 14*7 s 
2WS4 18*1 9 
31/88 2V73 pc 
34793 22/71 I 
28782 17*2 pc 
32*9 24/751 


Won Lower 
OF OF 
'6*4 11*2 5h 

31/88 2177D PC 
27780 16*4 pc 
2*82 IB/64 pc 
34*3 23/73 pc 
3*85 13/55 pc 
29*4 18*4 pc 
12/89 23*3 Ui 
34*3 £3/73 | 
31*8 16*1 PC 
33791 25/77 I 


Mnmapofa 

Montreal 

Nos mu 

Nnx Yort 

Ortanda 

Phnom 

Son Fran 

Sanaw 

Tororao 

Vancouver 

Wachotyan 


High Low W 
OF OF 
30/86 IMG pc 
27**80 16*1 pc 
32*9 24.75 pc 
30*8 20*85 
33*1 23/73 1 
40/104 26/79 ! 
23Tj i 3/55 pe 
2! 73 i2r53 pe 
27*0 1355 pe 
!»« 12*3 e 
31*8 ia«6i 


Tomorrow 
Hfgti LdwW 
OF OF 
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32 89 23-73 pc 
30/86 20*81 
3191 23-73 1 
40104 2579 i 
25/77 1i51 1 
23/73 1*57 pe 
26*2 15*61 pc 
24/75 1W1 pc 
32 89 JfVGS > 


ATnwy 

Bangtoli 
B^ng 
Bomswy 
Calcuiu 
ChBng Mai 

Coimkk) 

Hanoi 

HoCMMuh 
HOng Kang 
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Karachi 
k- Umpur 
K KrwCAhi 
Manta 
t**wD«*n 
Phnom P 0/1 
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Hmgoon 

SKI/ 

Shanghw 

Sngapora 

Tokyo 


Afsrars 
Cops Town 
Casattarca 
Hmng 
Logos 

Norn*. 

Tunic 


Today 

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OF OF 
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30786 2079 r 
38797 ZT*0pc 
26*2 26791 
32789 26779 > 
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42/107 29779s > 
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INTKRNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. JULY 11. 3997 


PAGE 3 


r s. Stnaj| : 

Proposal 

ieket T ax 

Airlines 


THE AMERIC4S 


S 




Democratic Party Official Testifies 
He Believes Huang Played by Rules 


— — Workers 

attendant cradl mg h pll,J| '- 
nghter — o a ihJ , r J'J. 
P idafte nioon^J d . ln «k* fs ’ .) 
:Je Capitol 

i Senate’s Drorv^ < ' b *>' 
■-ticket tax. r0p ° se ^ Ver Mtn 
fte Archer p/^r- 
« clear tha , N 
version being 
's and Means* awn ^ 

^111 Archer. RepuhS'f; 

not quite a united f m , 
maiymando,, ™ i" 
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nd 1 ngoutUieopK, sil " , ' IJ 
slogans, adS e C 

beggins u«E 

Robbery." a South*,,, 
ifwspaper advents^ 
dtype. The US Cu r ,, 

:e by a political amtvor i, • 

t atrlines in America.- 
an as the airline indusm 

any kind of ia.x increase h 3 

into an internecine K an t 
orate povcerhou** includ . 

an Airlines and Dd, a A 
;t smaller companies, ledh 
a Southwest Airlines. 
i who will be hit most hi ^ 
k increase, which is eu*. 
ite S33 billion to S34 hilh w 
iver the next fi\ e \ cals 
te Finance Comn’uuee pr.w 
ding the current 10 percent 
spires on Oct. 1 . and nnsins 
on international round trip- 
S6. . 

rlines, which charge hiahu ^ 

• Iona argued ihai thi- put. 

;ad vantage. The Senate plan 
evy an additional lOpereew 
amestk legs of ituenutional 
love the large crimes sa-. 
fit foreign carriers. Thai lag 
enators say. w uuld proNbh 
from the final legislation » 
ind Senate come up with a 
i tax bill. 

ise plan wouIJ reduce lhe 
ereent tax to “5 percem.bui 
a $3 fee for every flighr 
ising it to S3 in 2002. The ia\ 
ional flights would rise it- 
er airlines with more short 
1 more connecting ilishj. 
more in ux?> unde; itos 


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WASHLNGTON — A former Demo- 
cratic Party official testified Thursday 
that if he had known when John Huang 
was hired as a fund-raiser that he would 
solicit money from foreigners. “I would 
have personalis walked him 10 the el- 
evator and out of the building." 

Richard Sullivan, former finance di- 
rector for the Democratic National 
Committee, also told senators of lhe 
Governmental Affairs Committee that 
he still did not believe that Mr. Huang 
had raised money from foreigners, 
which is illegal. More than half the S2.fi 
million the Democrats returned from the 
1996 campaign because of suspicions 
about ns origins was raised by Mr. 
Huang, whose employment as a fund- 
raiser” had been urged hy party officials 
starling with President Bill Clinton. 


The Governmental Affair* Committee 
is investigating whether foreign nations 
or individuals tried to illegally influence 
lhe 199b elections or government policy 
and whether the While House traded 
access for political donations. 

China on Thursday denied trying 10 
influence American elections* — a 
charge laid out in detail at Tuesday’s 
opening hearing by the committee chair- 
man. Fred Thompson. 

"Some people in rhe United States, 
out of domestic political needs, are out 
of thin air once again slandering China 
w illi accusations that it is involved in the 
so-called political donations.” a For- 
eign Ministry' spokesman. Tang Guo- 
qiang. said in Beijing. "This is com- 
pletely groundless.” 

Mr. Sullivan faced tougher question- 
ing during his second day as a witness ai 


U.S. Won’t Be Ready 
For ‘Year 2000’ Glitches 


By Rajiv Chandrasekaran 

H 2 O. eft: ... 

WASHINGTON — The federal 
government could face a partial com- 
puter crash in the year 2000 because it 
is moving too slowly to adapt its ma- 
chines so they can understand dates 
that don’t begin with ” 19.” a growing 
number of technology specialists say. . 

Of the nearly 4.500 "mission crit- 
ical” computer systems the govern- 
ment needs to repair — which include 
those for the military, air traffic con- 
trol and income taxes — only 6 per- 
cent have been adapted, according to 
an Office of Management and Budget 
report that was to be made public at a 
House subcommittee hearing Thurs- 
day. 

About 35 percent of those com- 
puters needing repairs have not even 
undergone a systems analysis, the first 
and simplest step in rhe renovation, 
the report said. 

"They’re not on a time schedule 
that looks like it’s going to be 
doable.” said Ann Coffou. a research 
director at Giga Information Group, a 
Cambridge. Massachusetts, industry 
research firm that specializes in so- 
called year 3000 issues. "They’re suf- 
fering from 'analysis paralysis.' 
There's too much work to be done.” 

Most large computer systems use a 
two-digit dating system that assumes 
I and 9 are the first two digits of the 
year. Without reprogramming, the 


systems will think the year 2000 — or 
00 — is 1900. a glitch that would 
make most of them go haywire. 

For the government, the problem 
could result" in computers that come to 
a sudden halt and others that generate 
erroneous data, such as wrong tax 
bills, computer experts say. "in a 
worst-case scenario, compuiers that 
control military systems or sensitive 
communications between federal 
agencies could be rendered inoper- 
able, some specialists warn. 

Thomas Oleson. a year 3000 com- 
puter analyst at International Data 
Corp.. a consulting firm in Framing- 
ham. Massachusetts, characterized 
the government's situation as “way 
behind.” Adapting the government’s 
compuiers on time, he said, "is near- 
ing the point of impossibility.” 

Mr. Oleson and other industry ana- 
lysts expect the federal computer sys- 
tems that handle the government’s 
most critical functions to be adapted 
in time. But many other systems could 
still be in rhe electronic repair shop in 
3000. they warn. 

Overall, of the 7.649 computer sys- 
tems in the executive branch other 
than the Social Security' Administra- 
tion, 21 percent — or 1.598 — are 
ready to handle the year 2000. An 
additional 9 percent will be replaced 
and S percent will be scrapped, the 
report said. It estimated rhe cost of 
renovating computers throughout the 
government at S3.fi billion. 


(he hearing* looking into illegal money 
(hat puured into the 1996 election. 

He stuck 10 his guns. 

"1 never had an inkling that John 
Huang was purposely raising foreign 
money, and I still don'i believe he ever 
did."\Mr. Sullivan said. 

Instead. Mr. Sullivan said, he was con- 
cerned chiefly about appearances. He 
worried dial it did not look g<xxi that *0 
many foreigners had been invited to have 
coffee at lhe White House. He said he was 
also bothered that so much of the money 
Mr. Huang raised was “soft" money, 
which by law can be used only for ‘ ‘parry’ 
building" activities, such as gei-oui-the- 
vote drives, and so little was "hard" 
money to pay campaign expenses. 

Mr. Thompson adopted a prosec- 
utorial tone to highlight what he saw as 
discrepancies between what Mr. Sul- 
livan said in testimony Wednesday and 
what he had told Senate investigators in 
a month-old deposition. 

*Tm having a hard time understand- 
ing what you are saying m light of what 
you said” in lhe deposition, the Ten- 
nessee Republican said. 

Only a short line formed Thursday 
outside the hearing room for spectators’ 
seat*, and only half of the 16 senators 
showed up. 

Mr. Sullivan testified that he had hired 
Mr. Huang with misgivings because of 
his lack of fund-raising experience. 

"Let me tell you If I had had any 
inclination that John Huang would have 
raised foreign money, I would have per- 
sonally walked him to the elevator and 
our of the building,” Mr. Sullivan said. 

Mr. Thompson accepted his answer. 
"That’s pretty definitive.” he said. 

In questioning Mr. Sullivan about 
Democratic fund-raising, (he senators 
focused on a cast of donors w hose con- 
tributions have been returned because of 
questions about their origin: Pauline 
Kanchanalak, a Thai businesswoman: 
Johnny Chung, a California business- 
man. and Yogesh Gandhi, who has said 
he is a distant relative of the Indian 
liberation leader Mohandas K. Gandhi. 

Mr. Thompson asked Mr. Sullivan 
repeatedly about whether he was worried 
that Mr. Chung might be contributing 
money that actually came from China. 

"Yes. that was one of my concerns.” 
he said. 


No Evidence 
Of Sabotage 
In TWA Crash 


Programmers Agree to Use 
New Warning Symbols on TV 


UtiJliMiB/iw PoM Scn i, r 

A ■ WASHINGTON — Television pro- 
■*f grammers have agreed to modify the 
industry's program-rating system and 
use hew symbols to alert viewers about 
shows that contain sex. violence and 
■crude language. 

, Starting October 1. cable and broad- 
cast networks will flash new symbols at 
;the start of programs when applicable: S 
when a show features sexual depictions, 
V for acts for violence, L for coarse 
language and D for suggestive dia- 
logue. 

Ratings for children's programs will 
include die additional designation FV to 
flag "fanrasy violence” of the kind 
featured on programs such as “Mighty 
Morphin Power Rangers.” 

The new syrnbols are in addition to 
the much-criticized age-based ratings. 


such as TV-PG and TV- 14, that have 
been appearing at the start of shows for 
six months. 

Viewers eventually will be able to 
program their sets to block our shows 
' rated at a certain level by using the V- 
chip. a piece of microcircuitry that Con- 
gress mandated be placed in new sets by 
February next year. 

But the agreement reached in prin- 
ciple Wedn«day has one significant 
defector. NBC said it would not support 
the modifications. It would offer its own 
advisories, the network said, similar to 
"viewer discretion" warnings now ac- 
companying some programs. 

Network representatives are divided 
over whether the new ratings will scare 
off advertisers. Some fear that the wide- 
spread blocking of programs could re- 
duce audiences. 




At Least 46 Are Dead in Quake 
That Rocks Coast of Venezuela 


I'.iyrv/.,, K Lhriun Fnmi hn 

CUM AN A, Venezuela — Rescue 
teams in eastern Venezuela tried 
Thursday to reach an unknown num- 
ber of survivors trapped beneath 
buildings destroyed by an earthquake 
that hit the Caribbean 'coast and lolled 
at least 46 pecfflle. 

Schools and office buildings were 
flattened by the quake, which meas- 
ured 6.9 op the open-ended Richter 
scale, and offrcials'said the death toll 
could rise from Venezuela’s worst 
natural disaster in three decades. 

Many of the dead were children, 
crushed as schools crumbled. At least 
162 people were injured and more 
than 500 families were made home- 
less. 


Sixteen hours after the quake, res- 
cue workers were still pulling sur- 
vivors from the rubble. 

Overall, damage was limited to a 
handful of buildings, witnesses said. 

Most of the deaths occurred in the 
small coastal town of Cariaco, about 
295 miles (470 kilometers) east of 
Caracas. Two schools collapsed there, 
killing 22 people, most of them chil- 
dren. said Francisco Espin, civil de- 
fense director of Sucre Stare. 

The epicenter of the quake was 
about 30 miles north of Cumana. 
across the Gulf of Paria from the 
Caribbean island-nation of Trinidad 
and Tobago. There were no reports of 
damage or injuries on the Caribbean 
islands. 


A «■ Friiiicc-Picx.se 

WASHINGTON — The FBI inves- 
tigation into the crash of a Paris-bound 
TWA 747 last year will soon be closed 
without turning up evidence of criminal 
conduct, an official said Thursday. 

"All our efforts to dare have failed ro 
uncover any credible evidence that the 
loss of Flight 800 was the result of a 
criminal act,” said James Kallscrom. the 
assistant FBI director who is heading the 
agency's investigation ofthe disaster on 
July 17. 1996. that killed all 230 people 
aboard. 

Mr. KaUstrom spoke before a con- 
gressional panel bearing evidence on the 
disaster as the anniversary of the crash 
approaches. 

■ A Debate About Damages 

Matthew L. Wald of The New York 
Times reported earlier: 

The House Aviation subcommittee 
called the hearing to determine why the 
cause has not been found and whai can 
be done to improve safety. 

The committee also planned to ex- 
plore whether Congress should coun- 
termand a Supreme Court decision that 
puts damage awards in crashes like this 
one under the control of a 77-year-old 
law written to help the widows of ship- 
wrecked sailors. 

The law. the Death on the High Seas 
Act, allows for "economic damages.” 
like the loss of the wages of a bread- 
winner. but not for loss of compan- 
ionship, for pain and suffering, or for 
punitive damages. Relatives of several 
passengers were scheduled to testify that 
the statute needs to be changed. 

As the anniversary of the explosion 
nears, officials at two federal agencies 
have been busy describing their efforts 
to solve the mystery and their disagree- 
ments with each other over how to pro- 
ceed. 

One agency, the National Transpor- 
tation Safety Board, which investigates 
air crashes.’ has called for changes in 
fueling procedures to reduce the risk of 
explosions. Investigators say they be- 
lieve an explosion in the main fuel tank 
made Flight 800 crash, although they 
still cannot say why. The Federal Avi- 
ation Administration, which regulates 
airline safety, was to explain why it has 
been cool to the recommendations. 


— - a 


Away From 
Politics 

•Mayor Rudolph Giuliani 
of New York is calling for 
tougher laws -regulating dan- 
gerous dogs after three sep- 
arate attacks by pit bulls and 
Rottweilers, * ■ , {AP) 

• The FBI is reopening its 
investigation into the bomb- 
H ing of the Sixteenth Street 
Baptist Church in Birming- 
ham, Alabama, in 1963 that 
killed four black girls. After a 
secret yearlong review of ev- 
idence, investigators an- 
nounced that the>' had found 


new information on the 
. case. - (APi 

• A jury of three non- 

smokers, two smokers and 
one former smoker has been 
picked in Miami to hear the 
case brought by flight attend- 
ants who blame the tobacco 
industry for illnesses caused 
by. secondhand smoke in air- 
liners. (AP) 

• A woman married to a 

ideath-row inmate opened 
nfire through a prison fence in 
Florence, Arizona, as her hus- 
band worked in a vegetable 
garden. Guards then shot and 
killed her. and the inmate also 
the gunfire. {APi 


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A— . .iwj Pin* 


John Glenn, left, conferring with the chairman of the Senate committee, Fred Thompson, during testimony on 
foreign donations to the Democrats in 1996. A former Democratic Party official faced a second day of questions. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Senate Rejects Plea 
For Base Closings 

WASHINGTON — The Senate has 
rejected President Bill Clinton's pro- 
posal for two more rounds of military 
base closings, brushing aside argu- 
ments by the nation's top military lead- 
ers that more dosings would save bil- 
lions of dollars that could be bener 
used for modernization. 

The Senate instead voted. 66 to 33. to 
require the Defense Department to as- 
sess the cost and savings from previous 
base closings and “the need, if any. for 
additional base closure rounds.” 

The decision, which came as the 
Senate began voting on its version of 
the 1 998 defense finance bill, virtually 
assures that no more base dosings will 
be ordered this year. tW'Pl 

President Assails 
Tobacco Provision 

WASHINGTON — Presides Bill 
Cl inton has confirmed senior officials' 
comments that he finds a central pro- 
vision of a landmark tobacco settle- 


ment "unreasonable,” and a threat to 
federal authorin' to regulate nicotine. 

Speaking at a news conference 
Wednesday in Madrid, where he was 
attending a meeting of the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization. Mr. Clin- 
ton criticized a provision of the pro- 
posed pact that would require the Food 
and Drug Administration to prove that 
reducing nicotine levels would not cre- 
ate a black market in high-nicotine 
cigarettes. 

"What is a black market, after all?” 
he asked. "A 1 percent penetration of 
the market, a 3 percent penetration of 
the market? Would we deny the FDA 
the right to protect 100 percent of our 
children because there might be a few 
black market cigarettes around? I think 
that is unreasonable.” {NYTI 

No Liquor Ad Inquiry 

WASHINGTON — The Federal 
Communications Commission has de- 
cided against opening a broad inquiry' 
into liquor commercials on TV and 
radio, handing a vicioiy to alcoholic 
beverage marketers and broadcasters. 

President Bill Clinton, members of 
Congress and more than a dozen state 
governments had urged the commis- 


sion to open the inquiry' to study what 
effect the ads have had on children. 

The liquor industry’s reprieve from 
commission scrutiny is likely to be 
temporary, however. Three * of the 
agency’s* four commissioners will 
leave the by year’s end. including the 
two who voted Wednesday against an 
investigation. 

A reconstituted commission — this 
time with a majority of Clinton ap- 
pointees — is widely expected to re- 
open the liquor issue next year. (I VP) 

Quote/Unquote 

Senator Robert Torricelli. Democrat 
of New Jersey, chiding Republicans 
for not having a heavier hitter than 
Richard Sullivan, the Democratic cam- 
paign financial director, for their first 
witness in the hearings on campaign 
spending: "If Mr. Sullivan is the lead 
wimess before this committee, having 
absolutely no knowledge orexperience 
with the raising of foreign contribu- 
tions. the compromising of security or 
the sharing of classified information, 
one can only conclude that the final 
witness, after we have exhausted this 
process, is unlikely to find China on a 
map.” {N)Ti 



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PAGE 4 


ENTEBNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1997 


' 4 


ASM/PACIFIC 


I 


. 4 
. I 


India, Independent 50 Years, Is Thinking Ab 



M ' S 


By John F. Bums 

Nor York Tones Service 


NEW DELHI — Like many of the 
officials overseeing India’s celebrations 
of the 50th anniversary of its indepen- 
dence next month, Yogesh Baweja has 
been struggling to get into die spirit of 
the occasion. 

In the weeks leading up to midnight 
Aug. 14, when India will mark the mo- 
ment of its freedom from Britain in 
1947, Mr. Baweja conducts business to 
the cacophony of workers hammering 
and sawing in his New Delhi office. 
With little furniture, files are on die 
floor, along with a water pitcher to.help 
cope with the 1 10-degree heat 

But the spokesman for the govera- 


Along with Pakistan, created simul- 
taneously by Britain's partition of the 
subcontinent, India was one of the firs: 
of dozens of new countries that emerged 
from colonialism after World War H. 
With a 1947 population of about 350 
million — nearly tripled since — India 
was the most populous of the new coun- 
tries, with problems and hopes that were 


symptomatic of many others. 
Halfacen 


meat body organizing the celebrations, 
allows himself a fleeting moment of 


pleasure as he lifts his telephone. 

"You see, it works," he said, holding 
the handset aloft to the buzzing of a dial 
tone. "We are making progress.' ’ 


: a century later, die anniversary of 

what its first prime minister, Jawaharlal 
Nehru, called India’s "tryst with des- 
tiny’' is being celebrated with festivals 
and exhibitions around the world. 

Western countries have organized 
lavish tributes in India: the United States 
leads off with a tour of several cities in 
January by the Paul Taylor Dance Com- 
pany. Britain sent as exhibition of price- 
less Mogul ait, and Germany is sending 
the Munich Philharmonic later. 

Bur plans for India 's own celebrations 
have only begun to take shape, so late 
that officials announced Last month that 


instead of organizing a buildup of events 
before Aug. 14, the celebration would 
take the August anniversary as its start- 
ing date and continue for 12 months. 

Officials have said dial this is not 
because die government has messed ap. 
as critics have asser- 
ted. but because India, 
with a sense of timing 
"different from the 
West’s,” likes to 
stage its celebrations 
after its anniversaries 
rather than before. 

Some officials have 
attributed the delay to a succession of 
governments — four in the last year — 
that have spent most of their energies 
fighting for survival. But others say an 
underlying reason has been that India is 
approaching the anniversary in a mood 
of introspection and self-reproach that 
allows little zoom for celebration, even 
of half a century of independence. 

From Prime Minister Inder Kumar 


A natio n ‘behaving 

as if it had been 
ambushed 9 by an 
unexpected event. 


Gujral on down, leading politicians have passed, what’s 
been saying that while India can pride 
itself on having maintained the demo- 
cratic system adopted in 1947, it has 
failed dismally in tackling die vision set 
forth by the generation of independence 
leaders led by Mohan- 
1 das 


ed, 

let's just start now from, a clean slate and 
see if we can’t rekindle die spirit of the 


Gandhi and 
Nehru, of eliminating 
poverty, illiteracy and 
endemic disease. 

According to many 
surveys, this country 
has been one of die 
Least successful devel- 
oping nations in tackling basic social 
problems, and has also suffered more 
than most from corruption. 

Mr. Baweja caught the mood when he 
said that planning for the anniversary 
had met with widespread indifference. 

"It’s difficult to persuade people to 
forget their everyday problems and cel- 
ebrate,” he said. "So what we’ve been 
telling them is: O.K., 50 years have 


freedom struggle. " . . 

Although a former prime minister, 
P.V. Narasimha Rao, ordered prepara- 
tions for the celebrations to be started 
more than three years ago, little was 
done until this year. 

By then, with a$14 million budget but 
only two working telephones, no com- 
puters. ho secretaries and ideas batting 
back and forth in handwritten notes, 
officials decided that time had run out, 
and that the celebration would have to be 
extended through 1998. 

In an article last month, the country’s 
leading news magazine, India Today, 
described the government’s - handlin g of 
die issue as typical of its "historical 
slumber.’’ 

It pointed to what it called "die ab- 
surdity of it all: a government behaving as 
if it had been ambushed by an unexpected 
happening, and launching a shambolic. 


Defector in Seoul Repeats Warning 


11 di-hour scramble to commeancatttft ai' 
date which has been lying quietly inside;.; r 
the calendar for 50 years.” - 

Officials said recently that Aug: J4;/ 
would be marked by. a "March 
Nation” in New Delhi, feahufog-groups; 
from across the country that will con-;..;. 
ver°e on the Parliament 
There, at midnight, India's leaderS ^itti :': 
observe a two- minute silence far thtish' 
who died in the independence struggles J ” 
and then listen to recorded speeches* Tsijp .r- 
Gandhi and Nehru. j 

An outline for the celebrations, pb^ - - - 
slsts mainly of a catalogue of dozens _o£(j| 
official committees and what one. of- W 
fidal described as a "wish ^”.;ofi 3 
events to be organized by the 25 India*? 
states, including festivities in each of the^ . . 
country’s 650,000 villages. Bat Mr„, v 
Baweja said the states had made few,.; *. 
commitments. . r ’ 

“We’ve told them. *We don’t hftvtfv • 
much tim e left, so please, for God's*.’ 
sake, do it fast,' ” he said. V;T • 

rm.; 

* 


By Kevin Sullivan 

Washington Post Sen-ice 


TOKYO — Inhisfirstpub- 
lic comments in more than 
two months, a top-ranking 
North Korean defector said 
Thursday that the North was 
preparing for war against 
South Korea, and its agree- 
ment to attend formal peace 
talks next month was merely a 
tactic to obtain emergency 
food aid. 

The remarks by Hwang 
Jang Yop reiterated state- 
ments he has made to South 
Korean and American offi- 
cials since his arrival in Seoul 
on April 20. Despite the talk 
of Pyongyang’s desire for 
war, the news conference by 
Mr. Hwang, who was the 
North's top political theorist 
before his Feb. 12 defection, 
was notably cautious in tone 
and provided little new in- 
formation. 

“The North’s war prepa- 
ration is beyond imagina- 
tion,” Mr. Hwang said at the 
briefing. "North Korean so- 
ciety is swept by a war at- 
mosphere.” 

Mr. Hwang said the North 
was confident it could 
achieve victory with a huge 
missile attack on Seoul, and 


that the North Korean leader, 
Kim Jong H, believes be 
could keep the United States 
out of the conflict by threat- 
ening missile strikes on 
Tokyo and other Japanese cit- 
ies. 

But in his comments, and 
in an 80-page report issued by 
South Korea’s Agency for 
National Security Planning, 
the agency that has been ques- 
tioning him, Mr. Hwang 
offered few hints about 
whether he had provided sub- 
stantial new intelligence to 
help Western analysts under- 
stand how North Korea’s se- 
cretive ruling cabal makes its 
decisions. 

At the news conference, 
Mr.. Hwang said North 
Korea's leader presides over a 
"medieval” dictatorship that 
tolerates no dissent or minor- 
ity opinions. Yet in almost 
two hours of questioning by 
reporters, he never once men- 
tioned Kim Jong £1 by name. 
Analysts said that suggested 
how careful Mr. Hwang and 
his South Korean handlers 
were being not to antagonize 
the Stalinist ruler, who 
presides over a million-mem- 
ber army. 

The information presented 
Thursday by Mr. Hwang and 


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Tin-; \V( uu.os »mi.\ xr.w sr vpi.r 


the security agency was in- 
teresting, but not tantalizing. 
Privately, American and 
South Korean officials were 
circumspect about whether 
Mr. Hwang had delivered 
considerably more than was 
made public, or if he turned 
out to be the pot of gold at the 
end of the rainbow that many 
had hoped for when he fled 
his homeland. 

"It would not be useful for 
me to comment on that,’ * said 
one U.S. official, who would 
not discuss the U.S. role in 
questioning Mr. Hwang — or 
even why that issue would be 
too sensitive to discuss. 

Another U.S. official was 
more forthcoming, but also 
played down tile significance 
of Mr. Hwang’s information. 

"It’s been very useful,” 
the official said. “But it’s not 
the Rosetta Stone, which now 
reveals all — we don’t have 
that. He has offered us re- 
finements in our understand- 
ing, rather than break- 
throughs.’’ 

As for Mr. Hwang's as- 
sertion that die North is not 
truly interested in peace, a 
U.S. official in Seoul said 
Thursday that die peace talks 
are a good idea, even if North 
Korea was not sincere. "Our 
policy is to persuade them 
that it is in their best interest 
to negotiate,” the official 
said. 

After several months of ne- 
gotiations. North Korea 
agreed to send officials to 
New York in August to attend 
■‘preparatory’' meetings for 
peace talks involving the two 
Koreas, the United States and 
China that could bring a for- 
mal end to the Korean War 
nearly a half-century after the 
lasr bullet was fired. 

Those talks were proposed 
last year by President Bill 


Clinton and the South Korean 
pres iden t, Kim Young Sam, 
and the United States sees 
them as an important step to- 
ward reducing tensions on the 
Korean Peninsula. With 
North Korea facing food 
shortages that are reported to 
be reaching famine levels, 
some analysts have worried 
that it may see a military 
strike as its only option. 

In Seoul, where Mr. 
Hwang’s news conference 
was carried live on national 
television, members of Pres- 
ident Kim’s governing New 
Korea Party said Mr. 
Hwang's statements con- 
firmed what the president has 
been saying: that North Korea 
is a military threat and that all 
political parties should sup- 
port his efforts to strengthen 
South Korea’s readiness. 

Opposition politicians 
were more skeptical, com- 
plaining that Mr. Hwang’s in- 
formation had been made 
public "selectively" and 
calling for Mr. Hwang to ap- 
pear before the National As- 
sembly for more extensive 
public questioning. Others 
said that Mr. Hwang's rea- 
sons for defecting were still 
unclear and that his informa- 
tion was still suspect. 

That follows the line of 
some critics who have said 
Mr. Hwang seems almost too 
good to be true, perhaps even 
some kind of plant by the 
North Korean government. 

Others have suggested that 
rather than being an agent of 
the North Korean govern- 
ment, Mr. Hwang may be a 
tool of the South's security 
3gency. They have com- 

S lained that all of Mr. 
[wang's public statements 
almost precisely mirror South 
Korean government thinking 
on North Korea. 



John MxcOnngafl/Agcacc Enax-ftcac 

MARCH FOR MEGAWATI — Supporters of the Indonesian opposition leader Megawati Sukarnoputri 
bearing her photo through the streets of Jakarta on Thursday, under the close watch of riot policemen. 


BRIEFLY 


Children Will Sue Hong Kong 


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HONG KONG — Several Chinese children prepared 
Thursday to sue the government of Hong Kong over a law 
that will have illegal child immigrants deported back to 
China. 

The authorities said that 1 4 children born on the mainland 
had applied for legal aid to challenge the legality of their 
deportation and would hear by the weekend if their ap- 
plications were successful, government radio reported. The 
Legal Aid Department expected more applications to follow 
and was setting up a special staff to handle the cases. 

On Wednesday the new legislature, installed after Britain 
handed Hong Kong back to China last week, rubber- 
stamped a government bill to allow illegal child immigrants 
to be repatriated even if they have the right of abode here. 
Hundreds, possibly thousands, of children have been 
smuggled into Hong Kong over the last year or so to join 
parents who already have residency rights. (Reuters I 


thorities were reciprocating for Beijing’s unprecedented 
return of a Taiwanese hijacker in May. 

Taipei's semi-official Straits Exchange Foundation and 
Red Cross officials in the nearby mam land province of 


Fujian will handle the repatriation of Han Fengying and 
Huang Shugang next Wednesday. Taiwan’s state-financed 


Central News Agency said. 

Mr. Han and Mr. Huang have served four-year prison 
terms in Taiwan for air piracy. (Reuters) 


41 Die in Floods in South China 


Philippines Extends Cease-Fire 


COTABATO. Philippines — The armed forces extended 
a cease-fire on the island of Mindanao on Thursday after a 
former Muslim guerrilla chief. Nur Misuari, visited a rebel 
base to ask his erstwhile comrades to resume peace talks. 

A unilateral military cease-fire that was to end Friday has 
been extended by four days to pave the way for the 
resumption of talks with the insurgent Moro Islamic Lib- 
eration Front, the military said. The government and the 
front were to discuss a truce in Mindanao and set the agenda 
for formal talks on ending the conflict. (Reuters) 


BEUING — Some of the worst floods in 20 years in. . 
China’s southern Guangdong province have killed 41 
people and affected 3.26 million residents, officials said 
Thursday. 

Tens of thousands of people were left homeless by the 
floods, along the Pearl River in the province, which borders 
Hong Kong, a local official said. At least 41 people were 
reported dead as of Thursday. 

Officials estimated that about 54,420 buildings had beezi 
destroyed by the floods, which followed several days of 
torrential rain across southern China. Direct damage was 
estimated at 1.836 billion yuan ($221 .2 million), an official- 
said. 

The worst-hit town was Qingyuan. where almost atfrohds • 
were damaged and the old section of the city was under 
water, he said. / Reuters J 


Fiji Amends Its Constitution 


SUVA. Fiji — The upper house of Parliament passed -a- . 
rrt - . q. » rj .. * Tr law Thursday to change the country's constitution to end the- ■ 

laiwan to Send Hijackers Home guaranteed parliamentary dominance by native Fijians. 

J The reform passed by the Senate reduces the number of 

House of Representative seats reserved for ethnic Fijians. If'i 
also allows for a multiracial government and permits a-M 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1997 


RAGE 5 


EUROPE 


ramble to com™ 
asbeenlyin^^^e 
for 50 years <?,qu eii V in,^ 

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fewDelHfea^of,^ 

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Swiss Facing Suit on Holocaust Gold 


By Barry James 

InhrmatioKjl flenilj Tnhwtc 


organized by the £ 

,* e — si * 

st,’ ” he said. G °d * 


r r«M 


X: ^ring B % GENEVA - In a federal court in 

£r CQUntry that wifi rc ’ u P' New York later this month. Switzerland 

SnJahf 1 ? a 5? enl build, C ‘ % ^ *“« demands to “disgorge” bil- 

■ jr? 1, Juba’s leadi«ft ^ lions of dollars to repay what is claimed 

o-minute silence for a 1 * 1 to be both a moral and an actual debt to 
me ^dependence sio hiy * Holocaust victims, 
m to recorded Speeek 8 ®^ The c k ss ^bon is based on alle- 
? ° CS ^ gations that the Swiss handled German 

i^or the celebration gold they knew had been stolen, ac- 

Dt a catalogue of <i Q , c °d- cepted deposits from Nazi war criminals 

mrttees and what „ s "* and served as bankers for the giant Ger- 

3 ™ as a “wish jvaasi companies tint profited from an 

organized by the '•5/ 111 ’’ endless supply of slave labor, 

ing festivities in ea'k dlaji Worse, however, is the accusation 
>0,000 vUlai es °* Lhe thax for more than 50 years S wiss banks 

the stares lJad ^ have held onto the wealth of Jews who 

5. ITia, J e Fevk never survived fo claim it. Heirs of the 

old them. ‘We dn ■ victims say they have never been able to 

left, so please f * ^ lc penetrate Swiss bank secrecy laws to 

st.’ *’ he said ’ IOr G °d‘i claim what rightfully belongs to them. 

In addition, the prosecution states. 

Swiss dealers often acted as imerme- 
diaries in selling a huge storehouse of 
Art and valuable heirlooms looted from 
Jewish families. 

; Swiss banks, meanwhile, have said 
that from July 23. they will start pub- 
lishing on the Internet the names on 
Holocaust-era accounts. An independ- 
ent, international panel using “liberal 
rules of evidence” will judge any 
eiaims. 

. ^ , * But neither this, not the Swiss hanks' 
? offer to set up a fund to help Holocaust 
victims, nor a government proposal 10 
establish a $4.7 billion solidarity fund 
against racism and injustice has been 
enough to placate Jewish groups sup- 
porting the class action suit. 

; Whatever the Swiss contribute, it is 
merely “a return of stolen property.” 
said Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of ‘the 
iSiraon Wiesenthal Center. “Let's not 
kid ourselves: Switzerland will not get 
the Nobel Prize for philanthropy.” 

• He described as “a terrible public 
Relations disaster” the flight for safety 
to die United States earlier this year of 
fhe bank guard who revealed that Holo- 
caust era records were marked for 
shredding by a leading Swiss bank. 

, ' Michael Hausfeld, the Washington 

* lawyer leading the class action, said that 
this one incident alone could cause 
Switzerland to lose the court battle. He 
said he was confident that the court in 
Brooklyn would agree to take the case 
, . Jmder its jurisdiction. 

« » The Swiss banks have filed more than 

5®? f 1 ■ , d |- nt P utn 1,000 pages of motions to have the case 

left 01 not policemen. dismissed, and the government wrote to 

■ the court saying in effect that everyone 

has the facts wrong. Mr. Hausfeld re- 
torted that this was premature since 
“they don’t even know what the facts 

are yet” 

; He said he was confident that if the 
Beijing's unprecedented ( case comes to a jury trial, the victims 

May. : ■ 

xchange Foundation jj>i 

y mainland province 01 ’ ' • 

m of Han Fens> mg and ! 

. Taiwan's »tare-i maned . 


served four->ejr prison 
•Rent irv 

South China 

St floods in 20 >eur^ in : 
ro vince have killed 41 
residents, officials saw 

I 

ere left homeless by ihe 
1 province, which herders 
At least 41 people were 

^420 buildings had been 
ollowed several days m 
lina. Direct damage was 
1 1 1 .2 million >. an 01 hciai 


and their heirs would win the largest 
cash settlement in hisiory, although he 
added that the main object of the trial 
would be to establish truth and justice. 

The total amount of the sums de- 
manded could “tear the political fabric 
of Europe’s most enduring democra- 
cy.” said Faith Whittlesey, who has 
twice served as U.S. ambassador in 
Bern. The demand for restitution comes 
al a time when the Swiss economy, as in 
much of the rest of Europe, ha-* soured. 

When new research brought the sub- 
ject of Nazi gold and other assets to light 
two years ago, it opened a Pandora’s 
box. The affair has set Switzerland 


One goal of the class 
action is to get the facts 
about the last 60 years. 


against its ally, the Uniied Suites, and 
smeared its reputation as a plucky little 
nation that alone in Europe was able to 
stand up to Hitler. 

The quest for truth hits spread around 
much of the world — to Argentina, for 
example, where Eva Peron reportedly 
opened Swiss bank accounts during vis- 
its to Zurich in 1947 with protection 
money paid by fleeing Nazis. 

That many other countries have also 
come under moral and diplomatic pres- 
sure to search their consciences and 
their bank records for trace': of Nazi- 
originated profits is of some comfort to 
the" Swiss, who question why they have 
been singled out for opprobrium. 

Switzerland's artfully nurtured repu- 
tation as a haven of democracy and 
humanitarianism took a battering earlier 
this year when a report supervised by 
Stuart Eizenstat, the U.S. undersecret- 
ary of commerce for international trade, 
said that the wartime neutrality of 
Switzerland and other ; countries 


"provided a pretext for avoiding moral 
considerations.” 

Mr. Eizenstat said Switzerland con- 
ducted business as usual with the Nazi 
regime and prolonged the war despite 
“repeated Allied entreaties to end their 
dealings with Nazi Germany.” 

To many Swiss, these allegations are 
port of an American plan to destroy the 
bonking system on which the nation's 
prosperity rests. The attacks on Switzer- 
land’s reputation and the integrity of its 
banks “is pushing us to the precipice,' 1 
said the Journal de Geneve. Amember 
of Parliament, Marc Suter, said attacks 
from London and New York were de- 
signed “ro weaken Switzerland as a 
financial center and undermine banking 
secrecy.” 

Thomas Borer, head of the 19-man 
task force set up by the government to 
deal with the crisis, said foreign media, 
“as often as not the Anglo-Saxon me- 
dia.” had launched on unwarranted at- 
tack on Switzerland against ail the rules 
of fair play. 

According to a Swiss historian, Ant- 
oine Fleury, in looking at the Eizenstar 
report and documents in the archives 
here “one can ask if we are talking 
about the same country.” The U.S. ac- 
cusations, he added, were “grotesque," 
and had “deeply shocked” the Swiss 
people. 

’Die goal of the Jewish organizations, 
Mr. Hausfeld says, is to make Swiss 
banks “disgorge” not only allegedly 
stolen wealth but also the facts about the 
last 60 years. Although an independent 
commission under the former president 
of the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank, Paul 
Volckcr, has begun to investigate bank 
records, “they see only what the banks 
want them to see,” Rabbi Hier said. 

1 ‘They do not see the underlying doc- 
umentation.” Rabbi Hier’s associate. 
Rabbi Abraham Cooper, said the banks 
have been “explicit in their refusal” to 
break secrecy rules. 



J. Van Ypfrfr* bta/n* -luoculrd fVm 

President Clinton greeting a Polish soldier in un military fashion on his arrival at Warsaw on Thursday. 

Clinton Is Welcomed by a Jubilant Poland 


The Associated Press 

WARSAW — Poland welcomed 
President Bill Clinton on Thursday with 
a red -carpet celebration of the country’s 
invitation to join NATO and its new 
military and economic ties with the 
West. 

“This is a great day for the Polish 
people,” a beaming President 
Aieksander Kwasniewski told Mr. 
Clinton as they met at the 17 th century 
palace where the Soviet-led Warsaw 
Pact was founded in 1955. 

Mr. Clinton replied that praise was 


BRIEFLY 


due to the people of Poland, who have 
labored on the track to democracy 
since 1980, said Sandy Berger, the 
national security adviser, who briefed 
reporters on the private meeting. 

Poland, the Czech Republic and 
Hungary, all former Warsaw Pact 
members, are due to join the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization in 1999. 

Mr. Clinton heads to Romania on 
Friday, where his reception is likely to 
be subdued. He opposed extending 
immediate NATO invitations to Ro- 
mania and Slovenia, though a majority 


of members favored taking them in. 

“We would have been very happy if 
we had been invited in the first wave.” 
Prime Minister Victor Ciorbea of Ro- 
mania said. “But at the same time we 
are looking at tilings realistically. Ro- 
mania has real and great chances to 
integrate by 1999 if we continue with 
reforms.” To Poland, NATO’s invi- 
tation is a final step away from Russian 
control a pledge that the West will 
defend their country against attack and a 
boost to an economy that has rebounded 
from a post-Communist low in 1992. 


MnMj.Ui-jg Jl v ». t-... i- .. 

egawati Sukarnoputri 
;tch of riot policemen. 


Paris Bans Fishing Near Atom Plant 

PARIS — France imposed an open-ended ban Thursday on fishing 
and yachting in a zone near a nuclear-waste treatment plant amid 
concern over radioactive contamination. 

Environment Minister Dominique Voynet described the step as 
precautionary, pending completion of a state study of possible health 
risks from nuclear waste discharged into the English Channel. 

Asked whether the plant, on Cap de la Hague, west of Cherbourg, 
might eventually be shut down, she responded, “We haven't got to 
that point yet." (Reuters) 

Death Toll Mounts in Flooding 

WARSAW — The death toll approached 30 Thursday as au- 
thorities in Poland and the Czech Republic struggled to cope with the 
floodwaters that swept parts of Central Europe and caused hundreds 


of million of dollars in damage. In Poland, where at least 13 people 
were killed, some flood victims criticized rescue operations. 

Die Polish deputy minis ter of the interior, Zbigniew Sobotka, said 
7,500 fire fighters and 2,000 soldiers had been mobilized, but be 
acknowledged the government did not have sufficient funds to cover 
the damage. (AFP) 


elections, strategists for his party in Bonn acknowledge that they are 
concerned about his fading popularity in the East. 

Hans-Reinhard Guenther, director of the Institute for Market 
Research, said its surveys showed that support for the Christian 
Democratic Unionfell in the East from 33.3 percent in January to 27 
percent in June. Support for the Social Democratic Party rose to 37 
percent in June from 30.3 percent in January. (Reuters) 


Support for Kohl Fades in the East Cyprus Talks Get Under Way 


BERLIN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s Christian Democrats are 
losing support in Eastern Germany and could trail the opposition 
Social Democrats there in next year's elections, poll-takers say. 

The Christian Democratic Union, which sealed victories in the last 
two national elections with strong showings in the East, fell behind 
the Social Democratic Party in the region in opinion surveys early this 
year, and there are few signs of a change on the horizon, they said. 

With Mr. Kohl seeking a fifth term in the September 1998 


NEW YORK — The leaders of the Greek and Turkish com- 
munities in Cyprus began discussions Thursday that United Nations 
mediators hope will lead to negotiations on ending the 23-year 
partition of the Mediterranean island nation. 

“1 believe that a lasting peace in Cyprus is now within our grasp,” 
the UN secretary-general Kofi Annan, said as he convened talks 
between Glafco CJerides. the president of Cyprus, and Rauf Denktash, 
the Turkish leader, at Troutbeck, a resort north of New York. (WP) 


nstitution 



; d subscript' 0 " 
ublicatio"- 
113 9361 





PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JULY II, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


The Hunt Invades Hyde Park 


100,000 Rally in London to Defend Right to Cry ‘Tallyho’ 


By Fred Barbash 

Wdiiitiiqtiin P,ist Serrhv 


LONDON — One hundred thou- 
sand * ‘countryside people,* * as the hunt 
crowd calls itself, rose up Thursday in 
exceedingly well-mannered wrath, de- 
scended on Hyde Park and sounded the 
hom for a chase they hope will kill off 
legislation that would outlaw hunting 
with hounds in Britain and, they say, 
destroy their way of life. 

Hyde Park, in central London, is die 
venue for hundreds of rallies each year, 
but these were not your usual suspects. 
They were clad not in denim but mostly 
in tweed, or in sweaters knotted loosely 
around their shoulders, with a few in 
their red hunting outfits. They came 
armed not with placards but with those 
really nice sticks, shooting sticks, that 


hunting, or any hunting with hounds, 
have been proposed for years by an- 
imal welfare groups, who contend that 
sending snarling dogs to chew up an- 
imals is cruel. Bnt such bills have al- 
ways been chewed up themselves, fra* 
they never had government support 
under the Conservatives, who were 
ousted by die Labour Party on May 1. 

The government is not sponsoring 
this year's legislation, but Mr. Blair 
favors it along with most of his party 
members, and has installed as minister 
for sport a man who calls hunting a 
“perversion.” 

The protesters from the shires, and 
from rural Scotland and Wales, de- 


C 


t your teeth back in when you smile 
die cameras,” said the emcee.) 

“We fed that we are a minority 
being attacked, being discriminated 
against,” Mr. Page went on. "They 
support the culture of the gays, but they 
don’t support our culture and it’s about 
time they did.” 

A vote on the hunt is expected in 
November in the House of Commons. 
It may get tied up in the House of 
Lords, where Conservatives onto am- 
ber Labourites by a margin of 20 to 1 — 
which is what happens when one party 
is in power for IS years and gets to 


dared war against what one speaker 
“uninformed” people in the 


appoint 

dxsparit 


open up to become seats, and with song 
snei 


sheets opening with “John Peel" — 
“D'ye Ken John Peel when he's far. far 
away, with his hounds and his horn in 
the morning.” 

In the crowd and among the speak- 
ers, there was an uncommon sprinkling 
of lords, one of whom got cornered by 
a television crew that said it was from 
Moldova and was trying talk him into 
saying “Tallyho* ’ for the cameras. 

"I’m afraid I don’t personally say 
‘Tallyho.*" replied Lord Mowbray 
Segrave and Stounon. “But I want 
people who do to be able to do so if they 
want to.” 

The target of the protest is the new 
Labour government led by Prime Min- 
ister Tony Blair. Bills banning fox 


called 

towns and cities who just don’t un- 
derstand. * ‘They see the countryside as 
an extended theme park.” the actor 
Jeremy Irons told the protesters, “with 
little furry animals who speak like they 
do in Walt Disney.” 

“If they manage to ban hunting, 
wbat next,” Lord Wakeham, chairman 
of the British Horse Racing Board, told 
the throng. * ‘Each of oar country sports 
is in danger. This is a totally unjustified 
attack on the way of life of country 
people.” 

"This is not just about hunting,” said 
Robin Page, described as a conserva- 
tionist and author. “It's about what 
they're doingto our villages. The pubs 
are closing. They’re building airports, 
highways. Young people are leaving.” 
It was, in fact, an older than average 
crowd for a demonstration. “Be sure to 


>int all those people for lire. The 
rity r 

cinrp- Mr. Blair plans to name 25 La- 


th ere may change shortly. 


hour supporters as “working peers’ 
soon. In any case, the Lords cannot 


block legislation but they can tie it up 
for a long time. 

Banning hunting with hounds would 
affect a lot of people who are not lords, 
and some who are. The hunts are a 
considerable business in Britain, with 
an estimated 215,000 people partic- 
ipating annually. Thousands are em- 
ployed taking care of the horses, the 
hunters and the dogs — in whose name 


many spoke Thursday, claiming that 
hundreds would have to be “put 


down” if the hunts are harmed. 

Few of the speakers or demonstra- 
tors were willing to say they oppose the 
bill because they enjoy the hunt. They 
talked instead of jobs lost; vermin 
(foxes) multiplying; “a way of life” 
destroyed, ana the destruction of point- 
to-point racing, a kindred recreation. 


Ex-Spymaster in Spain Is Convicted for Leak 


The Associated Press 
MADRID — A military 
tribunal on Thursday con- 
victed a former head of 
Spain's spy agency on 
charges that he leaked doc- 
uments about a “dirty war” 
against Basque separatists. It 
then sentenced him to seven 


years in prison. 

Investigators suspect the 
leaked documents dealt with 
plans to create death squads, 
which killed 27 people from 
1983 to 1987. 

The death squads, which 
operated under the name 
Anti-Terrorist Liberation 


Groups, targeted members of 
the separatist groop ETA. or 
Basque Homeland and 
Liberty, in their haven in 
southern France. 

Colonel Juan Alberto 
Perote, who ran the clandes- 
tine-operations section of die 
government’s CESID intelli- 
gence service in the mid- 
1980s, was arrested in June 
1995 and served 2 1 months in 
prison before being freed on 
bail in April. Because of the 
time served before the trial, 
he is unlikely to return to pris- 
on. his lawyer's office said. 

The Socialist government 


of Prime Minister Felipe 
Gonzalez was removed from 
office in elections last year 
partly because of the death- 
squad scandal. Colonel Perote 
asserted throughout his trial 
that Mr. Gonzalez had known 
about the death squads but did 
nothing to stop their activities. 
Mr. Gonzalez has repeatedly 
denied his government was 
behind the death squads. 

The Supreme Court last 
year indicted Mr. Gonzalez’s 
former interior minister, Jose 
Barrionuevo, accusing him of 
directing the death squads. 
His trial is pending. Mr. Bar- 



Panjgia Odigitro. 1260-JS7O, Monastery of Chcbuxlari 


Mount Athos, 

the worldwide centre of Orthodoxy. 



Mount AcbosI A unique, 
blessed piece of Greek land, 
rightly surnamed “Our 
Lady’s Garden". A historical 
centre of Orthodox mona- 
stics m in which Greek- 
Christian tradition and 
(earning, and the genuine Byzantine worship, have 
been preserved for over 1,000 years. 

Discover its majesty now. in an exhibition of 
international renown in the Museum of Byzantine 
Culture in Thessaloniki opening on 21st June 1997 
under the title: TREASURES OF MOUNT ATHOS. 
Admire 1,500 objects of an and articles used in the 


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present, selected by experts. 

Acquaint yourself with every aspect of life in the 
Athos Monastic Community by concentrating on 
the particular entities devoted to the Natural 
Environment, the Architecture, Everyday life and 
Worship, and Art. 

Let the spirit of Mount Athos permeate your soul - to 
illuminate its most secret and innermost depths! 



TKBteSOFMDOSrKnffiS 


JUNE 21 - DECEMBER 31 1997 

• MINISTRY OF CULTURE • THE MUSEUM OF BYZANTINE CULTURE • THESSALONIKI - GREECE 


i _ The Holy 
1 Community of 

Mount AthOS 


Thessaloniki 

wmw7 


O' 


A Private MIA Hunt in Slovenia 


By Chris Hedges 

Ne k* York. Tunes Service 


LOGARSKA DOLIN A, Slovenia — 
In the winter of 1944, with the Ger mans 
retreating up the Balkan Peninsula and 
Tito’s Communist partisans poised to 
take power in Yugoslavia, some British 
and American soldiers found tbeov: 
selves cornered by German units in the 
ravines of the Slovenian Alps. 

As they struggled to stay one step 
ahead of the Gomans, a handf ul Hie , 
appeared. Some were captured and ex- 
ecuted. Others died in combat But a 
few, including two Americans, were 
probably killed by the partisans whom 
they had come to Yugoslavia to assist, 
historians say. 

One of the surviving Americans, 
Robert Plan, 77, who parachuted into 
Yugoslavia in 1944 as a member of the 
Office of Strategic Services' mission 
assigned to the partisans, is now retired 
and living in Trieste, Italy. From time to 
tone he comes back looking for clues to 
the fate of his wartime colleagues. 

- Mr. Plan, a Croatian-bom American 
who grew up in New York and went on to 
work for the Central Intelligence Agency 
in. Europe, Africa and Latin America, 


spent almost a year in the Karawanken 
Alps on '-a mission in which 87 British 
and 33 American soldiers were assigned 
to the Slovene branch of the partisans. 
Slovenia was then part of Y ugoslavia. 

Mr- Plan’s first, and in his eyes, 
greatest triumph came two years ago 
when he found the mass grave that held 
the body of Ms commander; Captain 
Charles fisher, on a remote slope. 

Until, the discovery. Captain Fisher 
was - listed as missing.' He was killed 
along with 16 partisans .after they were 
captured by German soldiers, who had 
m^mrpd i a big offensive in the Slo- 
venian /Ups in December 1944. Now, 
on a remote hilltop a few miles from 
where they were slain, they are buried at 
a monument in a collective grave that 
holds the. American officer and 1 92 par- 



Austria and Trieste — did not waffi . 
Allies to get a foothold in the arras; 
Austria that they wanted to annex.- -?-. .. 

By the fall of 1 944, fee Alfred officend; 
found themselves carefully watehednofr 
denied even routine intelligence 
from partisan commanders. •; 

On a recent visit, Mr. Plan "sat 
mountain inn with a former 
commander, Bozidar. Gorjan, _ 
courtly man who also- fought in. 
steep, snow-crested mountains. ' 

Mr. Gorjan was visibly di 
when speaking of the struggle 
partisan fighters and savage reprisals, j 
carried out by the Germans against vjf-| 
lagers who aided them. He had. op 
formation on the disappearance;^ 
two American operatives, Julius Rosot||* 
feld and Ernst Knoth. ' -** 


74. 


Qfi 


tisane 

The British and American soldiers 
were trying to build a resistance move- 
ment in southern Austria and blow up 
rail lines Connecting Germany - to Italy 
and die Balkans. But with the impend- 
ing Geimah the partisans, whom 
tire Allies, supplied with tons of air- 
dropped aims, began to obstruct their 
wore. The partisans — Communists 
who hoped to seize pans of southern 


Mr. Plan said he had heard peraistezn . 
reports that the two men had madefeefri j 
way to a hidden partisan hospital deepsisl 1 
the mountains, their feet badly 
bitten. 

“If they had tried to leave the he 
on their own, which,, knowing 1 
was quite possible; the partisans . 
have shot them,” Mr. Plan sauL “ 
partisans didn’t want the location 
these hospitals exposed.” 


Kenyans Urge 
Changes in 
Constitution 


rionuevo’s second-in-com- 
mand also has been charged 
in the case. 

The documents leaked by 
Colonel Perote were pub- 
lished in Spanish newspapers. 
Although they discussed cov- 
ert operations against 
Basques aiding out in France, 
they did not mention Mr. 
Gonzalez by name or discuss 
assassinating people. The 
death squads targeted mem- 
bers of ETA, w hich since 
1968 has killed almost 800 
people in its fight for the in- 
dependence of the Basque re- 
gion in northern Spain. 


Agence France-Pnsse 

NAIROBI — Leaders of Kenya’s 
powerful Kikuyu tribe have vowed to 
disrupt upcoming elections artless the 
country's constitution is amended first, 
the press reported Thursday as tension 
dnpped a notch in Nairobi after three 
days of violence that left 16 people dead 
and hundreds wounded. 

The authorities closed Nairobi Uni- 
versity and the Jotno Kenyatta Uni- 
versity of Agriculture and Technology 
on the outskirts of the capital Wednes- 
day as. students continued to clash with 
riot police. Most of the out-of-town 
students went home, bringing a col- 
lective sigh of relief from motorists who 
had been caught between stone-throw- 
ing students and police firing tear gas. 
More shops were open in Nairobi on 
Thursday morning, and no riot police 
were in evidence. 

Opposition activists held unlicensed 
rallies in 56 Kenyan towns on Monday 
to demand changes to the constitution 
before presidential and parliamentary 
elections due by the end of this year. 

Riot police broke up the rallies in 
Nairobi and several other towns, firing 
live ballets. The police also stormed 
Nairobi’s Anglican cathedral, clubbing 
clerics and demonstrators inside. 

On Wednesday, two opposition mem- 
bers were charged in the Indian Ocean 
city of Mombasa with being in pos- 
session of a publication subtitled 
‘ ‘Mourning for Monday,’ ’ the independ- 
ent Daily Nation newspaper reported. 

It said that leaders of the Kikuyu and 
associated Embu and Mere tribes met 
all day Wednesday in a hotel outside 
Nairobi to plot strategy. 

The Kikuyu are the biggest tribe in 
Kenya, powerful in business and ag- 




POOR FISHING - — Nigerian children fishing in the waters of the 
Niger Delta. Residents of their village, Ekeremor-Zion, are threat-, 
enirig to attack the Royal Dutch/Shell installations, which they say 
owes compensation for an oil spill that poisoned fishing grounds. 


BRIEFLY 


riculture, but political power is held by 
the small Kalenjin tribe of President 


Daniel arap Moi and its allies. 

Those who met Wednesday included 
18 opposition members of Parliament, 
the Nation reported. • 

They passed a resolution calling for 
dialogue between Mr. Moi and oppo- 
sition leaders to avert further bloodshed, 
but resolved that if the constitution was 
not amended they would join with op- 
position parties, religious groups, pro- 
fessional bodies and nongovernmental 
organizations to disrupt the polls. 

They argue that the constitution gives 
too much power to the Mr. Moi, 72, who 
has been in power for 19 years. 

Opposition members also want the 
repeal of laws like the Public Order Act. 
which requires organizers to apply for 
permits — often refused — for ail polit- 
ical rallies. 

Mr. Moi ruled Kenya as head of a one- 
party state until be bowed to pressure 
from aid donors and introduced mul- 
tiparty politics in 1991, while warning 
that this would lead to tribal clashes. 


Dissident Is Barred 


From Leaving Iran 


TEHRAN — The authorities have 
confiscated the passport of Iran’s 
leading dissident thinker, barring him 
from leaving the country, a source 
close to him said Thursday. 

Abdolkarim Soroush was to give a 
lecture at Oxford University in Eng- 
land, but the Intelligence Ministry 
denied him permission to leave Iran, 
said the source, who spoke on con- 
dition he not be identified. 

Mr, Soroush submitted his passport 
to the authorities for a routine en- 
dorsement, the source said, but was 
later told he could not get it back 
because he was banned from leaving 
the country. (AP) 


Both major opposition parties — 
the conservative National Action 
Party and the left-of-center Demo- 
cratic Revolution Party — were in 
contact with the Green Party, which 
took about 3.8 percent of the vote 
nationwide in die elections Sunday. 

One newspaper quoted a newly 
elected Green senator, Adolfo Aguilar 
Zinser, as suggesting an alliance of - 
opposition forces to pass structural 
reforms and investigate graft (AP). 


Brazilian Airliner 


Explodes in Midair 


Malawi Is Ravaged 
By AIDS, UN Says 


BLANTYRE, Malawi — Nearly a 
quarter of Malawi’s population — 
about 2.5 million people — will have 
died of AIDS within 25 years, ac- 
cording to the United Nations. 


SAO PAULO —7 A passenger was 
sucked out of a Brazilian TAM air-, 
plane and fell to his death after, an 
explosion probably caused by uniden- 
tified chemicals tore a hole in the, 
fuselage, the police said. ' y 

Hie police said they found- bum; 
marks on the floor underneath the row' 
of three seats that were thrown from 
the Fokker-100 aircraft after the ex- 
plosion Wednesday ripped a gash in 
the side of the plane. Hie authorities 
stopped short of saying fee explosion 
was caused by a bomb. (Reuters) 


The UN Development Program re- ... 

2 Algerian Boys Shin 

infected. (AFP) 


Politicians Jockey 
For Edge in Mexico 


MEXICO CITY — Election of- 
ficials were still counting votes from 
the national elections Thursday, but 
Mexico’s major parties already were 
wooing smaller factions in a newly 
contentious Congress. 


PARIS — Two child shepherds * 
have been found with their throats slit 
in the Bougara area, south of Algiers*: 
the Algerian newspaper El Watah re- 
ported Thursday. .? 

It said “terrorists,” Algeria’s term / 
for Muslim fundamentalist rebels, had ; ' 
killed fee children, both boys aged / 
nine and 10. The two had been tending^ 
their sheep on Bougara heights, about J 
20 kilometers U2 miles) south of fee j|| 
capital. (Reuters)., 


iV 




; 


Style, Sounds, 
Dining, Arts. 


Hemlines, jazz, restaurants and art — the 
past year’s articles from the IHT can be 
found on our site on the Worldwide 
Web. 


http://www.iht.com 


Expensive? fit?; 


Paris Asserts M 
It’s Not No. I 


1..L- 


Agenrv Framc-Presse - 

PARIS —The Paris 
authority hit back witfr£ 
geance Thursday at .Tapa_,. „ 
claims that the City ofLigl? 
had become . the \wc#ld*8 
“most expensive cily.’V w •;> 
The French capimV fec 
Paris Tourist Office/ said,' is 
the 1 3th mast-expensive cap- 
ital in Europe and the-32d in 
world terms as far a£ hotels 
and other tourist posts are! 
concerned, - • ;*.'■* | 
The Japanese Trade' MLo-j 
is try asserted this week feaf 
Tokyo had been replaced by. 
Paris as the. city, wife -fee. 
world's highest cost offrytng: 
French officials said 
port was based on Japapeseffc 
style consumer, . spendiflftj 
They sa id the Tokyo surveypf| 
93 items of consumer goods| 
and services listed such nemSf 
as video cameras and record^ 
ers but did not list hotels, res- 
taurants or transport — in ofej 
er words, tourist items. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1997 


RAGE 7 


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INTERNATIONAL 





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On Tape, Chretien Slights Clinton 


By John F. Harris 

P»*l Sen w i 


MADRID — President Bill Clinton 
was late in arriving, so Prime Minister 
Jean Chretien of Canada was passing 
rime by giving a on the 

American political system — and on 
how to deal with the U.S. president. 

Mr. Chretien, chatting with two 
European leaders while waiting Tues- 
day morning for Mr. Clinton to arrive 
at a NATO meeting, apparently did not 
realize that his remarks were being 
picked up by an open television mi- 
crophone. 

In his caustic discourse. Prime Min- 
ister Chretien derided President Clin- 
ton's motives for promoting the ex- 
pansion of NATO — the very reason 
the alliance leaders had gathered here 
this week. 

"I know the rules,” Mr. Chretien 
confided to the Belgian prime minister. 
Jean-Lac Dehaene" ‘'It’s not for rea- 
sons of state. It's ad done for short- 
term political reasons.” 

Domestic politics. Mr. Chretien 


said, was the reason Mr. Clinton was 

S ashing here for consideration of the 
altic nations of Latvia. Lithuania and 
Estonia when NATO considers in 1999 
the admission of more former East 
European states. 

The reason that Mr. Clinton cares. 
Mr. Chretien asserted, is because eth- 
nic voting blocs in the United Slates ore 
pushing their causes. 

“Take the quarrel over whether io 
admit the Baltic states.” Mr. Chretien 
said, in remarks that were carried by 
the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. 
“That has nothing to do with world 
security. It’s because in Chicago. May- 
or Richard Daley controls lots of votes 
for the Democratic nomination.” 

Mr. Chretien's remarks, which were 
made in French, came as he and the 14 
other NATO leaders were wailing for 
Mr. Clinton to arrive for a meeting this 
morning. President Clinton was about 
20 minutes late and television footage 
showed several of the leaders looking 
grumpy. 

Prime Minister Tony Blairof Britain 
and President Jacques Chirac of France 


were chatting and looking impatiently 
at their watches. A While House aide 
said Mr. Clinion. who often runs be- 
hind schedule, was tardy this time for 
reasons beyond his control. Because of 
traffic problems. Spanish protocol of- 
ficers had delayed his motorcade. 

Mr. Chretien filled the time by talk- 
ing with Mr. Dehaenc and the Lux- 
embourg prime minister, Jean-Claude 
Juncker, delivering an impromptu lec- 
ture on intricacies of politics in the 
United Slates, as well as about his 
tricks for dealing with Mr. Clinion. 

”1 make it my policy.” Mr. Chretien 
said, to “stand up” to Mr. Clinton. 
This makes him more popular with his 
Canadian constituents. “It's delicate,” 
Mr. Chretien said. “He’s- so huge.” 

Mr. Chretien’s candor could be a 
problem for the American president. 
For montlis. White House officials 
have been trying to rebut criticism that 
Mr. Clinton’s NATO expansion policy 
was motivated by domestic consider- 
ations. Now that view has an endorse- 
ment — however unintentional — 
from one of the closest of U.S. allies. 


NATO: Anxiety That Popularity Could Undermine Efficiency 


Continued from Page 1 

erations so that future sessions arc not 
paralyzed. 

Henry Kissinger, a former U.S. sec- 
retary of state and a supporter of ex- 
pansion who laments the way the Clinton 
administration has carried it out, fears that 
the NATO- Russia forum will supersede 
the alliance’s own policy-making ses- 
sions. He and other skeptics said they 
believe Moscow will hold the alliance 
hostage on all major issues or threaten to 
walk out if its views are ignored. 

NATO diplomats acknowledge that 
some powers will have to be delegated to 
the new councils with Russia, Ukraine 
and other European and Central Asian 
partners or their functional roles will 
wither and die. Though die United States 
insists that the North Atlantic Council 
will remain the alliance's premier policy- 
making forum, senior NATO officials 
acknowledge that Russia’s concerns will 
be taken into account by many allies. 
They say the psychological need to keep 
Russia involved in sustaining NATO's 
new role as a pan-European organization 
will mean that the West must be much 
more responsive to Moscow. 

The “super-restricted" sessions that 
have been a hallmark of NATO policy- 
making in the past will now be jeop- 
ardized by the need to bring so many 


other countries into the process. “There 
is some risk we will lose confidenti- 
ality." a senior official said, “but it is a 
price worth paying to show Russia and 
the others that we consider them to be 
worthy partners.” 

On the military side. NATO also faces 
a dramatic transformation that some 
analysts believe could gut its combat 
potential. Sam Nunn, who as a senator 
chaired the Armed Services Committee, 
says he remains adamantly opposed to 
expanding NATO's commitments be- 
cause that would undermine the alli- 
ance's uniquely successful military 
command structure. 

NATO military commanders say that, 
in the absence of any visible threat, al- 
liance forces will have to demonstrate 
political and peacekeeping skills in ways 
many of them were never trained to do. 
But they insist that this innovation should 
not impair the alliance's effectiveness. 

General George Joulwan, who is re- 
tiring as supreme allied commander this 
month, said he was convinced that (he 
peacekeeping experience in Bosnia- 
Herzegovina — where soldiers from 25 
nations are working under NATO's 
leadership — has proved that the al- 
liance is flexible enough to survive as a 
military organization. 

“NATO is now more than ever a polit- 
ical alliance, but as a military man that 


BOSNIA: NATO Troops Kill a Serb and Seize One for War Crimes 


Continued from Page 1 

boor, announced recently that she 
planned, in a change of strategy, to keep 
indictments secret in the future to avoid 
tipping off suspects about possible ar- 
rests. 

And it. was unclear Thursday night if 
this operation, planned over the week- 
end, meant there would be an attempt by 
troops to seize Radovan Karadzic, the 
indicted war criminal and Bosnian Serb 
leader, or General Ratko Mladic, the 
Bosnian Serbs’ commander,. 

These two Bosnian Serbs are heavily 
protected and an attempt to arrest diem 
would, many peacekeeping command- 
ers fear, provoke a strong reaction from 
their supporters. 

. A senior NATO commander said 
Thursday that alliance had ruled out 
“manhunts” and stressed that peace- 
keeping troops in Bosnia would only 
arrest suspects encountered during their 
routine duties. 

Mr. Karadzic, who retains control of 
the police and ruling party in the Bosnian 
Sob enclave, has steadfastly blocked the 
carrying out erf the Dayton accord. He is 
under attack from the figurehead Bos- 
nian Serb president. Biljana Plavsic. 

The region around Pnjedor saw some 
of the most brutal “ethnic cleansing” 



Unfa. OiLuvfc/RnMri 

Simo Drjlaca, former police chief, 
had a reputation for brutality. 

attacks in 1992 by the Bosnian Serbs 
against ethnic Croats and Muslims. 

'Whole villages were razed, thousands 
of people were shipped off the detention 
camps, like Omarska and Kereteram, 
and many of these detainees were ex- 
ecuted. Muslim and ethnic Croatian men 
were often rounded up by Mr. Drijaca’s 
paramilitary force and beaten, tortured 


and killed. Tens of thousands of fam- 
ilies. stripped of all their possessions, 
were driven from their homes into the 
beleaguered Muslim enclave. 

Mr. Kovacevic. a former head of the 
local government, was arrested at the 
hospital without resistance. NATO of- 
ficials said. 

There is growing alarm among many 
Western governments and within NATO 
itself that fighting might resume when 
the peacekeeping forces depart next 
year. The troops have managed to es- 
tablish a cease-fire, patrolling the rigid 
partition lines in Bosnia that separate the 
three ethnic enclaves. Bat the cease-fire, 
even after a year and a half, has done 
little to prod the former warring factions 
toward peace. 

The European Union announced 
Thursday that it was freezing $33 mil- 
lion in aid this year to the Serbian- 
controlled pan of Bosnia because of the 
government’s failure to arrest Mr. 
Karadzic. 

■ Clinton Calls Raid ‘Appropriate’ 

American troops contributed trans- 
portation and other logistical support to 
the NATO raids in Bosnia, President Bill 
Clinton said in Warsaw on Thursday, 
The Associated Press reported. “It was 
the appropriate thing to do,” he said. 


‘I Am Captain,’ Hun Sen Asserts 


By Seth Mydans 

■Vin t.irk ImuSrni i 


suits me fine.” General Joulwan said. 
"We represent shared ideals, not just 
tanks and soldiers. We want our values to 
take mol in other countries, because that 
is the best way we know to prevent 
conflicts from exploding into war.” 

Besides juggling the many new part- 
ners and many new military roles. 
NATO must also confront the challenge 
of maintaining a coherent strategic axis. 
With a growing list of members bringing 
their special geopolitical concerns to 
light, some NATO experts believe the 
alliance could be split along north-south 
lines. 

The unsuccessful campaign by France 
and eight other allies to include Romania 
and Slovenia in the first wave of ex- 
pansion along with Poland, Hungary and 
the Czech Republic has nor diminished 
its sponsors' conviction that the alliance 
must look south. 

France, Spain and Italy insist on the 
need for an enduring security presence in 
the Balkans and the Black Sea region. 
They also want NATO to expand a 
Mediterranean dialogue with North Af- 
rican states to embrace such Middle 
Eastern nations as Israel, Egypt and 
Jordan. But the United States. Germany 
and northern states want to keep its 
energies focused on building a strong 
partnership with Russia and enhancing 
security in Eastern Europe. 


PHNOM PENH — He spoke of 
Richard Nixon and Mike Tyson, of cro- 
codiles and kings. He lit a cigarette and 
leaned back slightly as an aide fanned 
him with a pink file’ folder. 

Second Prime Minister Hun Sen is the 
supreme leader of Cambodia now. a 
position hard-earned by force of arms, 
and he savored his power Thursday in 
his first public appearance since staging 
a coup last weekend. 

"Don't forget to take plenty of pic- 
tures," he told photographers as he sat 
alone at the head of a long table in his 
first cabinet meeting since ousting bis 
coalition partner. First Prime Minister 
Norodom Ranariddh. 

"Those pictures must cost $20 each, 
enough to buy lunch.” he said, drawing 
a little laughter from his aides. 

Still only 45 years of age. Mr. Hun 
Sen has been his nation's leader in one 
capacity or another for more than a de- 
cade, but until now. he has never held 
complete power on his own. 

From 1985 to 1993. he was Cambod- 
ia's leader in an administration installed 
and controlled by Vietnam. From 1993 
until last Sunday, be shared the office of 
prime minister with a man he clearly 
despises as effete and incompetent. 
People who know him say he has yearned 
for the stature he believe* he deserves. 

At a news conference that followed 
the cabinet meeting Thursday, he was 
able to say. “1 am the captain alone.” 

With his youthful looks and incon- 
sistent personality. Mr. Hun Sen has 
been underestimated by outsiders ever 
since he became the world's youngest 
and most inexperienced foreign minister 
at the age of 27. 

Suddenly. Cambodians are facing the 
realization that this is the man who could 
lead their nation for decades to come, and 
the notion is unsealing (o many of them. 

He made no attempt Thursday to soften 
his image as a tough and ruthless leader. 

“Hun Sen is not a military man.” he 
said, speaking of himself in the third 


person. "But if you use military force 
you have to use it wisely. When handled 
by Hun Sen, it is not a joke.” 

But he played down the weekend's 
military action and the arrests of his 
opponents that have followed, insisting 
thai he had not staged a coup because the 
nation's constitution and its political 
parties and institutions remained in 
place. 



fanunrl DannJMgcihx 

Hun Sen warning ASEAN on Thurs- 
day not to interfere in Cambodia. 

All that happened, he said, was that 
Prince Ranariddh deserted the nation 
when he took a trip to Paris last week — 
like Richard Nixon resigning after Wa- 
tergate — leaving Mr. Hun Sen alone to 
crush lawbreakers and take control. 

“Now everyone is on board except for 
Ranariddh, who jumped into the water,” 
be said, witha sweep of his hand. ' 'If the 
crocodiles bite Ranariddh, he is bitten 
alone and I will take over the boat." 

A Khmer Rouge commander before 
he allied with the Vietnamese, Mr. Hun 
Sen is a student of strongman govern- 
ment. He is a pragmatist rather than an 
ideologue. 

But his pragmatism can also veer into 
something approaching instability. He is 


not averse to threatening — and using — 
violence. 

“Whai Hun Sen threatens, Hun Sen 
dares to do," he said last year. 

As co-prime minister, he sometimes 
organized violent demonstrations and is 
widely believed to have been behind the 
killings of opposition journalists. Inves- 
tigators here say there is strong evidence 
that bis men were involved in the deadly 
explosions of four hand grenades March 
30 that kill ed and wounded nearly 150 
people at an opposition rally. 

western diplomats who have dealt 
with Mr. Hun Sen are sometimes 
charmed, sometimes appalled by his be- 
havior. 

Mr. Hun Sen likes to date his sen 1 ice 
with the Communists to 1970, when 
Prince Ranariddh’s father, the then- 
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, called for 
resistance to the American-backed gov- 
ernment of Lon Nol. 

According to his official biography, 
Mr. Hun Sen rose to command a Khmer 
Rouge division and was wounded five 
times, losing his left eye to shrapnel on 
April 1 6, 1 975. the day before the Khmer 
Rouge took over Phnom Penh. 

He was the bead of a military region in 
the eastern part of the country when he 
broke with die Khmer Rouge leader, Pol 
Pot, in 1977 and fled with other regional 
leaders to Vietnam. 

When the Vietnamese invaded Cam- 
bodia and ousted Pol Pot in 1979, they 
installed Mr. Hun Sen as foreign min- 
ister. and in 1985 he became the head of 
government as prime minister. 

His former Communist Party lost to 
the royalists in United Nations-spon- 
sored elections in 1993, but when Mr. 
Hun Sen refused to accept the result, the 
international community backed down, 
and his compromise partnership with 
Prince Ranariddh was formed. 

Mr. Hun Sen showed his contempt for 
the prince at the news conference Thurs- 
day, comparing him to Mike Tyson as a 
man who will bite when he cannot win. 

"He failed.” Mr. Hun Sen said, “and 
his only choice -was to flee and cry 
‘coup.’ ” 


CAMBODIA: ASEAN Delays Admission 


Continued from Page 1 

cemed to keep the door open for ne- 
gotiations, did not specifically condemn 
Mr. Hun Sen’s government as illegal in 
their joint statement, nor did they endorse 
Prince Ranariddh's call to freeze aid to 
Cambodia unless the coalition of the two 
co-prime ministers, installed after elec- 
tions in 1 993 that were supervised by the 
United Nations, was revived. 

Although reaffirming ASEAN's com- 
mitment to the principle of noninter- 
ference in the internal affairs of other 
states, the ministers “decided that in the 
light of the unfortunate circumstances 
which have resulted from the use of 
force, the wisest course of action is to 
delay the admission of Cambodia into 
ASEAN until a later date." 

To emphasize Cambodia’s isolation 
in Southeast Asia, they said that Burma, 
whose military regime has been widely 
condemned by Western governments for 
human-rights abuses, and Laos would be 
admitted as members of the group as 
scheduled this month. 

ASEAN’s current members are Brunei, 
Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines. 
Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. 

The group decided to defer the in- 
duction of Cambodia because it did nol 
want to give “de facto recognition to 
Hun Sen's coup d'etat,” said Abdul 
Razak Baginda, executive director of the 
Malaysian Strategic Research Center. 

Analysts said that ASEAN, which 
played a key role in arranging tbe U ri- 
al ted Nations-supervised elections in 
Cambodia, was working closely with the 
United States and other countries to re- 
store the Cambodian coalition govern- 
ment ahead of fresh elections in 1998. 

Members at the ASEAN meeting also 
decided that All Alatas, Indonesia’s for- 
eign minister, and Domingo Siazon, his 
Philippine counterpart, should fly to 
Beijing soon to meet Cambodia’s head 


of state. King Norodom Sihanouk, for 
consultations on ways to resolve the 
situation. 

Mr. Siazon said (hat after consulta- 
tions with tbe king, who has been re- 
ceiving medical treatment in C hina for 
several ailments, they would contact the 
two co-prime ministers. 

But analysts said Mr. Hun Sen ap- 
peared unwilling to make political con- 
cessions that would significantly reduce 
hishold on power. He said Thursday that 
the international community, including 
ASEAN, should stay out of Cambodia's 
affairs. 

■ ‘Not a Militarist,’ Hon Sen Says 

Keith B. Richburg of The Washington 
Post reported from Phnom Penh: 

Mr. Hun Sen denied Thursday that the 
weekend military operation that ousted 
his main rival from power was a coup, 
and he said his main target was the 
Khmer Rouge that had infiltrated guer- 
illa fighters into the capital. 

“I am not a militarist,” Hun Sen told 
reporters, at times raising his voice to a 
snout. 4 ‘If I had a coup d’etat, I *d have to 
topple the Kin'g and change the country 
from a monarchy to a republic.” 

At another point. Mr. Hun Sen, said the 
rival he ousted. Prince Norodom Ranar- 
iddh. was free to return to Cambodia to 
face trial on charges of stockpiling 
weapons and holding secret, illegal ne- 
gotiations with the Khmer Rouge. 

But as Mr. Hun Sen defended his 
actions, troops of his now-dominant 
Cambodian People’s Party were busy 
eliminating the last vestiges of resis- 
tance to his rule. About a dozen 
frightened opposition politicians 
scrambled to the airport, with United 
Nations' assistance, for flights out of the 
countiy to Bangkok, while others who 
opposed the new political order were 
being rounded up and arrested. 


In a Switch, 
Haughey Says 
He Took Cash 


By James F. Clarity 

New York Tunes Service 

DUBLIN — Former Prime Minister 
Charles Haughey has admitted that he 
accepted about $2 million in 1991 from 
the man who was then the chief ex- 
ecutive officer of Dunnes, Ireland's 
largest department store chain. 

A lawyer for Mr. Haughey read a 
statement saying Mr. Haughey had taken 
the money from the executive, Ben 
Dunne, in the last years of his tenure as 
prime minister, a post he held three times 
for a total of eight and a half years. Mr. 
Haughey had previously denied taking 
the money. 

The statement by Mr. Haughey, 71, 
was read Wednesday to a special 
tribunal that is investigating reports that 
Dunnes gave members of Parliament $5 
million from 1986 to 1996. 

TTiere has been no allegation that Mr. 
Haughey had broken any law by taking 
the money from Mr. Dunne, who was 
ousted from the family business four 
years ago. But lawyers and tax experts 
said he may be liable for as much as $1 
million in taxes if the money is con- 
sidered a gift, and more if it is considered 
earned income. 

Mr. Dunne said when he testified two 
months ago that he had received no favors 
from Mr. Haughey for the money. 

“I felt sorry for the man,” he said, 
after learning be was deeply in debt. 

In his statement Wednesday, Mr. 
Haughey said he had “mistakenly 
misled” his lawyers. The company says 
it wants the $2 million returned. 


QATAR: Ruler Slowly Builds a Quiet Revolutionfor the Gulf ULSTER: Hopes for Peace Fade Amid Disenchantment With Blair 


Continued from Page 1 

treading on delicate ground in a region 
whose vast energy reserves have created 
not only some. of the world's wealthiest 
countries but also some of its wealthiest 
families. . - 

The steps taken by the emir come at a 
time when dissidents in countries like 
Saudi Arabia and B ahrain have increas- 
ingly resorted to violence in their calls 
for change. - 

In a speech at Georgetown University 
in June during his first visit to tbe United 
States. Sheikh Hamad quoted President 
John F.- Kennedy' m ; saying that those 
who fail to make ipeaceful revolutions 
possible make violent revolutions in- 
evitable. 

In an interview at the royal palace, the 
Qatari leader, whose English is fluent, 
said flatly that he was moving toward 
greater openness “to secure ourselves in 
the future.” 

“In some countries now you see un- 
rest because of a lack of democracy, 
because of lack of sharing with their 
people.” be said. 

“If the leaders concentrate on con- 
trolling their people, through tbe police 
and through the intelligence services, the 
result will not be good for, the countiy as 
a whole. So 1 don Ywam'to see myself in 
that position m the future." 

Under the sheikh's father. Sheikh 
Khalifa ibn Hamad ai Thani, Qatar 
earned a reputation as one of the Gulf s 
most rigid states, deferring to Saudi Ara- 
bia on virtually all matters related to 
foreign policy and maintaining strict 
prohibitions against criticism of the 
country and its neighbors. 

But under Sheikh Hamad, Qatar has ■ 
adopted the face-of a new generation. 



N.Y. Times News Service 


People close to him say that whatever 
caution he has shown has been mo- 
tivated mostly by a concern that to move 
forward too quickly would cany with it 

the risk of having to step back. 

Among (he Gulf states, Bahrain and 
Kuwait long ago established parlia- 
ments, but Bahrain's Parliament has 
been closed since 1975 and Kuwait’s has 
been suspended at least twice. 

"We need to learn about democracy, 
as a people and a ruling family," Sheikh- 
Hamad said. “But we are nol yet 
ready.” . 

In the capital, Doha, and around the 


to overthrow the young leader, including 
a February 1996 effort that Qatari of- 
ficials and Western diplomats say could 
have been planned only with the know- 
ledge and acquiescence of Saudi Arabia 
and the United Arab Emirates. 

Those countries have denied any in- 
volvement in any attempted coups. 

Under Sheikh Khalifa, a large share of 
the revenue from Qatar’s sales of oil and 
gas was typically transferred from the 
treasury to his personal bank accounts. 

Exactly how much money Sheikh 
Khalifa accumulated over the yeah and 
stored in accounts abroad remains a 
question that no Qatari official is willing 
to answer. Estimates have ranged from 
$3 billion to $7 billion. After failing in 
early efforts to recover the money, his 
son’s government asked courts in eight 
countries to freeze his accounts: 

An out-of-court settlement reached 
last .year between representatives of 
Sheikh Hamad and his father hro ight an 
end to that squabble. 


Continued from Page I 

Under such circumstances, and with, 
tbe IRA assassinating police officers as 
it did last month near Portadown. an 
increasing number of people in Northern 
Ireland regard the discussions led by Mr. 
Mitchell as a well-intentioned but ir- 
relevant sideshow. 

Parading, generally to commemorate 
events 200 or 300 years ago when Prot- 
estants and Catholics also were fighting 
here, is a time-honored practice of Prot- 
estant fraternal organizations such as the 
Orange Order and the Apprentice Boys. 
They say. with passion, that it keeps 
alive their heritage and their culture, 
which they contend are threatened by the 
desire of Catholic nationalists here to 
reunify the British-ruled province with 
the overwhelmingly Catholic Republic 
of Ireland. 

Catholic nationalists, with equal pas- 
sion, say the parades, when routed 
through Catholic neighborhoods, are de- 


signed to humiliate them and remind 
them who is in charge in Northern Ire- 
land: the majority Protestants. 

For many years, die annual march of 
the Orangemen in Portadown — a town 
of about 30.000 people south of Belfast 
— caused less problem because the 
town's small Catholic population (now 
about 8,000} was relatively integrated 
into Protestant neighborhoods. 

When the sectarian troubles got more 
violent in tbe 1970s, the community 
segregated, with Protestants leaving the 
mixed Garvaghy Road area, which be- 
came a Catholic ghetto. 

By 1995 the Garvaghy Road was a 
potent symbol of sectarian honor for 
both Protestant and Catholic politicians 
and their followers. 

On May 1 , Prime Minister John Major 
was defeated by Mr. Blair’s Labour 
Party. Catholics hoped for a better deal 
because Mr. Major’s minority govern- 
ment bad been dependent for survival on 
a handful of Protestant members of Par- 


liament from Northern Ireland. Mr. 
Blair, with his huge majority, had no 
such constraints. 

Moreover, he replaced the patrician 
and distant Northern Ireland secretary 
with a down-to-earth, plain-spoken 
woman named Marjorie (Mo) Mowlam, 
who immediately tackled the impending 
Portadown parade with an unceasing 
round of ifllks with both sides. 

But on Garvaghy Road, the Catholics 
got a surprise: in tbe darkness before 
dawn Sunday morning, the chief con- 
stable sent in hundreds of troops and 
police, forcibly removing residents 
awakened by lookouts, and penning 
them in to let the Orangemen pass, citing 
the same reasons as the year before. 

The Orangemen are still planning 
marches this coining weekend through 
other Catholic neighborhoods. 

And. as that weekend approaches, on 
ominous adage here is being heard once 
again: “Bad things,” they say, “never 
happen just once in Northern Ireland.” 


CLINTON: With Economy Booming, Americans Are Ignoring Scandals in Washington 


country, there appears to be broad sup- 
port for the course being charted by the 
emir, who consulted with his family and 
others before’ seizing power on June 27, 
1995, and has therefore not had to con- 
tend with substantial internal opposi- 
tion. 

But at least three times. Sheikh Khal- 
ifa and people loyal to him have plotted 


Continued from Page 1 

economy has widened the gap between 
voters and Washington. In LaCrosse, 
Wisconsin, unemployment stands at just 
2.7 percent, while in Columbia, Mis- 
souri, it is around 3 percent. In the 
Seattle area, which has suffered from 
boom-and-bust periods, the two mar- 
quee employers. Boeing and Microsoft, 
are flush with business. 

Volets still see balancing ihe budget 
as a lop priority. But with Congress 
poised to do just that, voters remain 


skeptical they will ever see the deficit 
eliminated — particularly when the 
biggest cuts come after Mr. Clinton 
leaves office, 

-“Nobody wants to have it on their 
watch," said Paul Kress, who lives in the 
Seattle suburbs. “It’s more important to 
be liked than to do what's right.” 

Mr. Clinton's popularity has spilled 
over onto his party. Voters said they 
trusted Democrats more than Repub- 
licans to help the middle class and handle 
the economy. Even on traditional Re- 
publican issues like holding down taxes 


and dealing with crime. Democrats hold 
a narrow advantage, the poll found. 

For his part. Mr. Clinton is considered 
a champion of the middle class, a man of 
obvious foibles who struggles on in the 
face of adversity battling a Republican 
Congress best known for shutting down 
the government in 1995. 

Even many conservatives who object 
to what one described as Mr. Clinton’s 
"alley cat” morals nevertheless ac- 
knowledge that the country is thriving on 
his watch. “1 don’t trust him,” said Don 
Crosby, a former priest who runs the 


Kirksville, Missouri, ambulance service. 
”My economic life is doing well, so I 
guess l have to give him some credit.” 
The electorate also exhibits a weary 
resignation with the scandals consuming 
Washington. Only 25 percent said they 
were very or fairly interested in Paula 
Corbin Jones’s sexual harassment law- 
suit against the president, and 78 percent 
said the charges have not changed their 
opinion of Mr. Clinton. On Whitewater, 
40 percent said they were very or fairly 
interested in the probe of the' Arkansas 
land deal known as Whitewater. 




PAGE 8 


FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


lieralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Pl'Bl.IMIED V,[TH THE KtW MIRK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


An Open Door 


Two Years After Srebrenica i, Killers Remain free 


NATO rook an important step this 
week toward promoting stability and 
democracy when the Western alliance 
invited three additional nations to join. 
Just as important was NATO’s pledge 
that those three will not be. the last — 
that enlargement is more than a one- 
step process. President Bill Clinton 
will dramatize that prorruse Friday 
when he travels to Romania, an eager 
NATO aspirant not invited in the first 
round. There he will make clear to all 
of Europe's emerging democracies 
“that the door to this alliance and to 
partnership with the West is open," as 
he said Wednesday, and "that we are 
determined to help them walk through 
it if they can stay on the path of free- 
dom and reform.” 

Critics charge that NATO expansion 
will create new divisions in Europe. 
The reverse is true. NATO has begun 
the process of removing walls that Stal- 
in built and welcoming nations that 
were forcibly separated from their nat- 
ural allies on the Continent. It is telling 
that virtually every country now 
emerging from communism’s shadow 
wants to join NATO, despite the fi- 
nancial costs associated with member- 
ship. While Poland, Hungary and the 
Czech Republic — those invited this 
week — are most ready, it is crucial that 
no developing democracy be denied 
This is especially the case for die 


small Baltic republics of Estonia, Latvia 
and Lithuania. All three are democ- 
racies, and all want to join the Western 
alliance. Some in Europe and the 
United States would deny them because 
many Russians object to NATO's ac- 
ceptance of any former Soviet repub- 
lics. But this attitude only caters to the 
worst kind of old thinking in Moscow. 
Hie three Baltic republics were illegally 
occupied by Stalin; the United States 
rightly never recognized their inclusion 
in the Soviet Union Now it should 
honor the same principle by ensuring 
that no country, by virtue of size or 
history, can determine another's fate. 

Such a principled position would by 
no means compromise Russia’s in- 
terests. On the contrary, the United 
States has been right to engage Russia 
in the process of shaping a new NATO. 
Honoring Russia’s Ultimate aspira- 
tions for respect and inclusion now, 
when it is weak, will foster goodwill 
and increase the likelihood that Russia 
will be a responsible player as it grows 
stronger again. But those legitimate 
aspirations have nothing in common 
with ambition ro maintain old-style 
spheres of influence. Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright was right to say in 
Madrid, "No European democracy 
will be excluded because of its place on 
the map.’’ 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Hun Sen’s Coup 


The last thing Cambodia needed was 
the armed overthrow of its democra- 
tically elected government. It had just 
begun to recover from a catastrophic 
quarter-century that included Amer- 
ican bombing raids, the annihilation of 
one-seventh of its population during 
four years of Khmer- Rouge rule, a 
Vietnamese invasion and a civil war. 
Now it faces new convulsions and ex- 
ecutions and a likely withdrawal of 
most intern atioaal aid. 

Washington is still searching for a 
diplomatic euphemism to describe this 
week's military ouster of Cambodia's 
first prime minister. Prince Norodom 
Ranariddh, by his coalition partner and 
longtime rival. Second Prime Minister 
Hun Sen. Simply calling it a coup 
would bring an automatic suspension 
of American aid to the country. The 
Clinton administration fears such in- 
stant disengagement would reduce 
rather than increase U.S. leverage. 

Whatever label Washington applies. 
Mr. Hun Sen's bloody seizure of power 
is an affront to democracy and a vi- 
olation of the 1991 Paris peace agree- 
ment that ended the Cambodian civil 
war. Most of all if is a disaster for 
Cambodia. If Washington cannot get 
the coup leaders to back down, it 


should suspend American aid and 
work to persuade other countries to do 
the same. Japan, a major aid donor, has 
already cut off its assistance. 

Mr. Hun Sen’s actions came after 
Prince Ranariddh had begun making 
overtures to dissident leaders of the 
Khmer Rouge. Given the Khmer 
Rouge's responsibility for the death of 
more than a milli on Cambodians two 
decades ago, chose overtures were 
cause for concern. But sending tanks 
against Prince Ranariddh’s supporters 
and murdering leaders of his political 
party are not a legitimate response. 

Despite its tragic histoiy, current 
political infighting and serious cor- 
ruption problems, Cambodia has re- 
cently been showing a surprisingly vi- 
tal economy. Its citizens, long 
traumatized by war and dictatorship, 
had begun openly expressing political 
views, educating themselves on human 
rights issues and turning to newspapers 
increasingly willing to challenge gov- 
ernment behavior. 

Washington should be resolute in 
opposing Mr. Hun Sen's outrageous 
coup by making clear that unless he 
restores the elected government he 
faces costly international isolation. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Drop the Ethnic Card 


While the Senate committee inves- 
tigating campaign finances is consid- 
ering whether to grant some kind of 
selective legal immunity to John 
Huang, former Commerce and Demo- 
cratic National Committee official and 
key figure in the Democratic fund- 
raising scandals, there is another kind 
of immunity that is being sought on his 
behalf by various friends and backers. 
It is a kind of immunity by reason of his 
ethnic background. 

From the earliest days of Mr. 
Huang’s notoriety, back when the 
White House was saying it was not 
even entirely clear who he was, the idea 
of “Asian bashing * ’ has been floated in 
his defense. This was then and still is a 
variant on what is otherwise often 
known as "playing the race card. ” The 
immunity it is meant to afford comes 
from presumably shaming those who 
are pursuing Mr. Huang's alleged vi- 
olations of the law by suggesting that 
they are acting out of racial bias, not a 
desire ro get to the bottom of scandal. 

Americans have laced the situation 
many times before in which members of 
a particular ethnic group have been as- 
sociated with a particular breach of law, 
whether organized crime, drug crime, 
stock manipulation or any of a variety of 
other misconduct It is true that there is 
always the danger of generalizing from 
these few cases so as to smear an entire 
group that had nothing to do with their 
behavior. And it is equally true that there 
is always the danger of sliding sloppily 
into the false and offensive conclusion 
that the person charged was acting out of 
some characteristic ethnic defect. 

Undoubtedly some of that has 
seeped into the dialogue about Mr. 
Huang and other Asians and Asian- 


Araericans who are involved in the 
current fund-raising scandals. But to 
say that and condemn such thinking 
where it occurs is not to settle the case. 
It does not say anything about Mr. 
Huang's innocence or guilt 
John Huang is accused of very se- 
rious misconduct The administration 
in which he gained so much access and 
influence beyond that normally accor- 
ded someone in his different jobs has 
much to answer about his activities. It 
is not “racism," “Asian bashing” or 
any other sucbToathsome practice to 
seek vigorously to find out the truth 
about what he did and how he was able 
to do it. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Cardenas’s Job 

The new political leaders in Mexico 
face a young electorate demanding an- 
swers io problems with no easy solu- 
tions. The voter believes the economy 
is now in worse shape than in the 
disastrous 1994 peso debacle. The 
ranks of the unemployed and self-em- 
ployed are ballooning. Crime has risen 
.to unmanageable levels. The education 
system is abysmal. 

When the election results were an- 
nounced in the capital Sunday night, a 
large crowd gathered in the Zocalo, the 
city's main square. When Cuauhtemoc 
Gird en as — now Mexico’s second 
most powerful political figure — ap- 
peared, the populace shouted time and 
again, ' 'Don’t fail us. ” He dare noL 
— Los Angeles Times 


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N EW YORK — Exactly two years 
have passed since the fall of the so- 
called safe area of Srebrenica, followed 
by the slaughter of thousands of its 
inhabitants. Srebrenica has become a 
symbol of the atrocities committed dur- 
ing the war in the former Yugoslavia. It 
is also a symbol of the inaction of the 
international community — not only in 
failing to prevent the massacre but also 
in failing to bring its authors to justice. 

Of the 78 people on ail sides publicly 
indicted for war crimes in the former 
Yugoslavia, 66 remain at large. They 
include General Ratko Mladic, who 
personally presided over the slaughter 
in Srebrenica, and Radovan Karadzic, 
the political mastermind of the Bosnian 
genocide. NATO knows where to find 
these and other accused killers and has 
the legal duty and the means to capture 
them. 

But with the exception of NATO’s 
first arrests of suspected war c rimin als 
Thursday (one of whom was killed). 
Western political leaders have refused 
to order their arrest If peace is to endure 
beyond the planned withdrawal of 
NATO troops in June 1998, the indicted 
war criminals must be apprehended. 

Many suspects — including Mr. 
Karadzic and General Mladic — enjoy 
not only freedom but power They ob- 
struct the return of refugees, suppress 
dissent and use violence and mtimi- 


By Kenneth Roth 

datum io enforce their vision of eth- 
nically "pure" states. As long as the 
suspected war criminals keep their in- 
fluence, real peace is impossible and any 
NATO exit strategy is doomed tofaiL 

Many Western leaders, including 
NATO Secretary-General Javier Solana 
Madariaga, argue that arresting indicted 
war criminals is the responsibility of the 
region’s governments, not international 
troops. However, all the unarrested de- 
fendants have taken refuge in areas con- 
trolled by forces of their own ethnicity, 
which, in turn, refuse to arrest them. 

Despite considerable financial pres- 
sure, neither the Republika Srpska, 
where most of the suspects live, nor 
Serbia has handed over a single indictee, 
and Croatia has surrendered only two. 
While tough ai K f sustained financial 
pressure on Zagreb may yield further 
cooperation. Pale and Belgrade have 
indicated that they will never cooperate 
regardless of the financial pressure im- 
posed. To say that it is up to the local 
parties to make arrests is effectively to 
say that there will be no arrests. 

In a s imilar buck-passing maneuver, 
some Weston militar y commanders 
have asserted that arresting indicted war 
criminals is a "police function” that 
should be divorced from the military 


duties of NATO troops, this oemtya * 
disappointing lack of vision and an in- 
adequate understanding of the contem- 
porary requirements for international! se- 
curity and world order. Since the end of 
ihe Cold War, the most common reason 
for deploying NATO troops has been 
not to counter classic international ag- 
gression but to mitigate hu m a nit a ri a n 
hardship caused by highly abusive 

forces. , . 

A functioning internaDonal system or 
justice is an essential tool for deterring 
such atrocities in the future — before it 
becomes necessary to risk the lives of 
international troops. Officials who con- 
template mass murder are likely to think 
twice if they believe they may be 
brought to justice for their crimes. 

Despite NATO’s legal obligation to 
help arrest war criminals, political lead- 
ers have so far given NATO troops 
instructions to arrest only suspects 
whom they "encounter.” But even this 
mandate has proven farcical, as NATO 
troops go out of their way to avoid any ■ 
such encounters. 

The "War Criminal Watch” Web 
site {http:www.wcw.org/wcw/news/ 
html) regularly updates the where- 
abouts of most of the suspects, a num- 
ber of whom are living openly in the 
jama towns where they co mmi tted eth- 
nically motivated murder, rape, mu- 
tilations and expulsions. 


s. This betrays a 


Perhaps the most significant factor^ 
weighing on the minds of "Western nuti' 1 
itary leaders, particularly in Washing- 
ton, is the risk involved in m alti n g ar^. . 
rests, especially ihe risk from Bosnian- r 
Serb troops. Most agree that NATO’s- i 
superior firepower would overwhelm^ 
what portion of the disoriented and dis-j* 
illusianed Bosnian Serb army might be/i 
guarding the indicted war criminal 
stead, they fear retaliation later: smpfljg^ 
or hostage-taking . directed : agaiaaj& 
NATO troops or die many lntemanodaLi 
workers in Bosnia. But this risk isboflF? 
containable and necessary to - take; yrKf 
order to avoid greater risks to tbs peace;* 
process and the prospects for a systefe 
of international justice. - - -- / w 

To overcome the "Somalia -syn-^ 
drome’ ’ that is paralyzing the Pentagon*^ 
leadership is needed from Europe. ^ 
Many European militaries taking part 
the earlier UN peacekeeping 
suffered casualties in Bosnia. Eurot|| 
peans have shown that they nndostand^ 
the need to take some risksin order tom 
avoid far greater ones down the roadv^Si 
European leadership is thus needed- to : J| 
overcome American shortsightedness-^ 
and to ensure that the indicted war crim- - a 
inaic are arrested before it is too late. . 

The writer is executive director effr- 
Human Rights Watch. He contributed - 
this comment to the Herald Tribune. • ' 


The CIA Proved No 


P ARIS — Only driblets have 
emerged of the massive 
fiasco inflicted on die United 
States by Iraq's Saddam Hus- 
sein and his now-and-th'en 
Kurdish collaborators last year. 
It ranks with spectacular CIA 
failures like the Bay of Pigs and 
is an example of how far Amer- 
ica is from the capacity for dom- 
ination that friends and enemies 
alike charge it with exercising. 

Thousands of people were in- 
volved. The United States did 
manage to extricate most of 
them and then sent them as far 
away as possible — to Guam, 
presumably because on the iso- 
lated, militarized Pacific island 
their chances of spilling the sto- 
ry woold be reduced. S till, a few 
Iraqis and at least one framer 
CIA official are beginning to 

talk. 

This is certainly a case that 
needs congressional and more 
vigorous repertorial investiga- 
tion. It shows that for all the 
pledges of reform, the CIA still 
hasn't learned much and indeed 
seems incapable of learning 
much about the Middle East. 
From the end of the Gulf War 


By Flora Lewis 


in 1991, Washington has been 
trying to overthrow or arrange 
the assassination of Mr. Sad- 
dam by proxy. When Iraqi 
forces moved north to take ad- 
vantage of fighting that had 
broken out between rival Kurd- 
ish factions, it became clear that 
despite U.S. support for oppo- 
sition to Baghdad and the A no- 
fly” zone established from a 
base in Turkey, Mr. Saddam 
could still work his will. He 
withdrew the army under threat 
of aerial attack but left his shad- 
owy network of agents. 

Turkey, which keeps renew- 
ing the six-month agreement for 
use of its Incirlik air base but 
with increasing reluctance and 
cost in concessions, undoubtedly 
knew about what was brewing. 
But Ihe United States was taken 
by surprise and lost all it had 
tried to establish on the ground. 

There has been no explan- 
ation of why Turkish intelli- 
gence did not supply more se- 
rious warning ana why those 
who did warn were not heeded. - 
But Turkey has its own com- 


plicated web of relations with 
Iraqi Kurds in its attempt. to 
suppress the insurrection of 
Kurds in eastern Turkey and 
destroy their bases in Iraq. 

A remarkable new book by 
the Washington Post correspon- 
dent Jonathan C. Randal illu- 
minates the jungle of conflict- 
ing interests and ambitions, 
repeated betrayals and collu- 
sions in Kurdistan that continue 
to defeat simplistic American 
attempts to line up friends and 
overwhelm foes. 

Mr. Randal developed an ob- 
session with die hapless Kurds. 
At grear personal risk and even 
greater discomfort, he managed 
to keep visiting their belea- 
guered strongholds over a num- 
ber of years. He is deeply sym- 
pathetic to their cause of 
community and identity if not to 
actual statehood, given the 
fierce resistance of the various 
countries that hold sovereignty 
over their tribal lands. 

The Kurds are the largest na- 
tion in the ethnic sense that have 
never achieved a state. Hiey 


were promised one in the post- 
World War I distribution of the 
Ottoman empire, but the prom- 
ise was not kept. 

The book is titled "After 
Such Knowledge, What For- 
giveness?” and subtitled "My 
Encounters with Kurdistan.” It 
documents the feuds, the 
treacheries, the atrocities, the 
ardent patriotism of the Kurds 
and the endless tragedies they 
have suffered from almost blind 
dedication to the old strategic 
illusion that "the enemy of my 
enemy is my friend.” 

But it doesn't do much to ex- 
plain tiie essential mystery of 
their survival and their impo- 
tence. They are an old tribal 
mountain people, and while they 
are Muslim they always insist 
that they are not Turkish, nor 
Arab, nor Persian but distinct 
from all around them. The cul- 
ture has vigorous roots and a 
warrior tradition. Some assim- 
. ilate in the countries where they 
live — Turkey, Iraq, Iran primar- 
ily — but they do not lose their 
adamant sense of Kurdishness. 

And yet, fairly geographic- 
ally concentrated unlike the 


Jews in the millennia of diS-^ 
pension, they have nev^ Than^-’ " • 
aged to form a political union. ," 
For all the American .airpawer': 
protecting them from Mr._Sad- \: i 
dam’s planes and poison ’ C- J 
they are no closer to it fcdday. •• j \ 
Massoud Barzani, theKurd- v 
ish leader who made thedeal.; 
with Mr. Saddam, froldscraurol - 
along the Turkish border and , • 
therefore monopolizes- ,v-.the 
smuggling trade that became ^? -T ? ; 
lucrative with the etitisairo .. 
against Iraq. His one^thne - ally. . . ~ 
and rival, Jalal Talabani, wanted V 
a cut of the loot andaihareof _ H si 
power. So they fought -and Mr. 
Saddam tipped the scales. The y : > 
United States held its nose.ini- " 
frustration and embarrassment y ' ■ • 
The United States is still in; i - 
the neighborhood, achieving;';, 
nothing at considerable cost, 1 / •! 
and the players have lost none\ ^ i 
of their appetite for intrigue and 
brutality. There are things su- ‘ - * 
perpowers can't settle in "this - 
world, but neither can the 
clumsy attempts be hidden in- ; 
definitely. This chapter of How 
it’s tried is a nasty one. j 

© Flora Lewis 


Indonesia: Far Too Complex to Demonize as a Pariah State 


J pound, Indonesia has to be the 
least understood country in the 
world. With 200 million people, 
it is the globe's fourth-largest 
nation .and by far the largest 
Muslim country — triple the 
population of Iran. It takes the 
same time to fly across the 
17,000 islands and 300 different 
ethnic gronps that make up In- 
donesia as it does to fly across 
the United States. But ask most 
Americans about Indonesia and 
only three things are likely to 
come id mind: Bali, East Timor 
and "The Year of Living Dan- 
gerously,” starring Mel Gibson. 

The United States looms 
somewhat larger in Indonesia. 
The U.S. Congress has been one 
of the main forces pressing for 
improved rights for Indonesian 
workers, as well as for the mueb- 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


brutalized people of East Timor. 
Human rights activists here say 
the U.S. spotlight has been cru- 
cial in keeping Indonesia's lead- 
ers focused on addressing ab- 
uses, even if progress is sporadic 
and at a snail’s pace. 

But in the wake of recent 
moves by Congress to block the 
sale of nine F-16 fighter jets to 
Indonesia and to freeze the train- 
ing of Indonesian military of- 
ficers in America — because of 
Indonesia's occupation of East 
Timor — Indonesians are be- 
ginning to fear that something 
new is going on: that America is 
going from criticizing them for 
certain abuses to Cuming Indone- 
sia into a pariah state — another 
Burma, China, Iraq or Iran. 
(Angered by congressional crit- 


icism of its human rights record, 
Indonesia pulled out of the mil- 
itary program and the F-16 deal 
last month.) 

Indonesia is too complex to be 

a pariah. It has probably the best 

macroeconomic management of 
any developing nation, along 
with mind-boggling corruption; 
it has political repression along 
with a tolerance for hundreds of 
independent nongovernmental 
human rights groups and a press 
that is unafraid to write about 
abuses; it has occasional church 
burnings, but the most popular 
Muslim leader in die country 
sent his daughter to study in Is- 
raeli As a banned newspaper ed- 
itor here told me: "Ihe Indone- 
sian government is a police state 
about six hours a day. The other 


Suharto and a New Political Map 


J AKARTA — President 
Suharto delights in surprise. 
But facing a decision soon on a 
vice president for his next five- 
year term (assuming he runs), 
his room for maneuver is lim- 
ited. His control of civilian pol- 
itics has weakened and the mil- 
itary is becoming more 
conscious of its own impor- 
tance in a smooth transition. 

The Nfay parliamentary elec- 
tion was a Pyrrhic victory that 
has complicated his own future 
and his choice of vice president 
Even if Mr. Suharto. 76, 
wanted to step aside in March, 
arranging a transition would not 
be easy. But expectation of 
change is remorselessly build- 
ing. The longer it is delayed the 
more difficult it will be — and 
the more likely to occur when 
the economy is less benign than 
it is now. 

The nominal success of the 
government’s Golkar party was 
bought at a high price. 

The collapse last year of die 
Indonesian Democratic Party 
following the ouster of its lead- 
er, Megawati Sukarnoputri, un- 
dermined the three-party sys- 
tem on which Mr. Suharto has 
built his version of democracy. 

The PDI collapse increased 
the influence of the formerly 
moribund Muslim-associated 
United Development Party, 
whose leaders were pushed into 
unaccustomedly radical pos- 
tures. 

The election also opened up a 
gap between the government 


By Philip Bowring 


and ICMI, the Association of 
Indonesian Muslim Intellectu- 
als, set up to divert Muslim 
political aspirations and to be a 
counterweight to the military. 
ICMI is headed by B. J. 
Habibie, research minister, eco- 
nomic nationalist, Suharto con- 
fidant and vice-presidential as- 
pirant 

In short, the election left 
three years of Suharto politick- 
ing in tatters. 

The government has found 
itself in need of help from Ab- 
durrahman Wahid, leader of the 
largest and most liberal Muslim 
organization. 

Another winner from the 
election was the armed forces 
— called ABRJ — which have 
mostly been seen as the guard- 
ian of order rather than as 
Golkar's strong arm. Disturb- 
ances before and after the elec- 
tion have underlined for ABRI 
tbs proximity of instability. 
While localized rioting has al- 
ways been a feature of Java, the 
tempo has picked up. The mil- 
itary also noted that much dis- 
content focused on "unfair- 
ness" as exemplified by first 
family privileges. Riots were a 
reminder of ABRI’s own as- 
sumed dual political-military 
function as protector of a unified 
nation, and of its belief in pwt- 
casila. the vague bht all-embra- 
cing stale ideology, as antidote 
to religious and ethnic politics. 


None of this means that Mr. 
Suharto is under direct pressure 
from a military that respects au- 
thority and has always been ma- 
nipulated by him. But any re- 
peat of the errors that led to the 
July 1996 riots could be cause 
for younger generals to suggest 
to Mr. Suharto that his time was 
up — as his generation told 
resident Sukarno. 

Recent events have made it 
more likely that the next vice 
president will be a military man, 
whether the incumbent. Try 
Sutrisno, or one of three or four 

S >ssibles. Among civilians, Mr. 

abibie has an outside chance, 
but there seem none weighty 
enough io offer stability should 
Mr. Suharto die in office. 

On the surface there is no 
meaningful political evolution 
in sight Organized pressure for 
change is still weak. Radical 
elements have been suppressed 
or forced underground. Middle- 
class ones are active but cau- 
tious, wanting participation but 
wary of a possibly chaotic 
multiparty system. 

Change has to stan while the 
majority recognizes how much 
the system has delivered, and 
while an aspirant urban lower 
middle class fears disorder 
more than it feels resentment. It 
ought to come from within the 
system, but the different ele- 
ments are still more divided by 
post-Suharto ambitions than 
united by anti-government sen- 
timent. 

International Herald Tribune. 


18 hours you can negotiate with humbly, we don’t deserve to be -j 
it, bribe it, ignore it or go around put into a comer and to [betnldj,^ ; | 
it” And strategically, Indonesia ' You are a pariah nation and we f 
is the keystone of the Assod- must clobber you all tbe time^® ] 
ation of South East Asian Na- because of East Timcr.t- - *- ‘ « 

. tions, the main counterweight to "You can criticize" us about ‘ j 

China and Japan in this region, human rights; no coontiy is be- K'j 
Turning Indonesia into a pariah yond criticism on human. / ] 
will produce a nationalist back- rights," he continued^ We; 
lash here among the good guys, would prefer that you don’t ciit-~ 
let alone the bad. idze us by shouting .from The* s 

Listen to Foreign Minister foots, but that you sit dqwn and ; 
Ali Alatas. as a friend say: ‘Look, we don't ;.- : 

"What we had hoped,” Mr. like the way you do things. You - 
Alatas told me, “was that pub- better change because. ybu ? ie , : j 
lie opinion would not forget In- getting in trouble. ’ Butwhy linke r j 
donesia's constructive role in it to such things as 
world affairs. We are not a pari- IMET — International Mil- i 

ah country that is looking in- itary Educational Training — is .1 j 
ward or that deserves to be hit a pr o gra m under wHiph :the : , ? 
an one issue only. Yes, we have Pentagon trains forei gn' mili tary *. / 
an issue, we have East Timor, officers, in military nhitfers and . ] i 
but that’s a complex issue with a h uman rights. After JheUi99 L * 
long histoiy that we are trying to Dili massacre, IMET for In- ] 
resolve. We are a huge society donesian officers was suspeh- - j 
in continual growth. It is not an ded; the ban was lifted in 1996. • ■ 1 
easy country to govern and we "Indonesia is a friend of-the L" 
have come very far. U.S., not an enemy;’ - Mr. AI- V 

"We are not causing the atas said. " It is important nOttO^. 
world problems because we make it an opponent. BecEtosc-j- 
have dreams of becoming a nu- an Indonesia that is feeling nn-;'. «' 
clear power,” added Mr. Alatas. justifiably pushed around, anl.J 
“We don't believe in that Indonesia that feels that 

“Economically, we have sia-bashingi 5 goingon,re^te^i/..' 
been at the forefronr of the a point where It says: j 

North-South dialogue, but with OJC., we’ve done what fe rain; 
a very rational voice. We are the If that is not understood thed i * j 
biggest Islamic population, but we’ll just shrug our shoulders^ r J 
we are not an Islamic state. Take and continue on.’ ” 
all of these factors and I think , 


The New York Tunes. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO"' 

1897: Addicted to Love Charles Burgess, as it was beib^ j 
p a dic r „ ti t x- to the Glasnevh?' 

cemetery. The cort&ge- passed^ 


the Mind , Dr. de Fleury states 
that when passion is developed 
in a nervous subject it can be- 
come pathological. Comparing 
passionate love to the habit of 
taking morphine, alcohol, ether 
or opium, he shows that there is a 
real intoxication caused by the 
features of the person cherished 
The amorous state is character- 
ized by suffering caused by sep- 
aration from the beloved subject, 
the increase of the complaint 
after each meeting, and the same 
turning into a vicious circle; no 
relief for suffering save by an 
indulgence which forthwith re- 
vives and strengthens it. 

1922: A Rebel’s Rites 

DUBLIN — A procession a 
half-mile long, made up of men 
and women opposed to the 
treaty with England, followed 
the body of the rebel leader. 


along O’Connell street between. ? 
heaps of charred dfbris, where 
Burgess and his followers made 
their last stand. Anti-Govern- 
ment troops recited prayers near 
the GranaviUe Hotel, die last 
building which the irregulars 
were able to hold V. 

■ 

1947: Czechs 

PARIS — Czechoslovakia. iie-S 
versed her previous acceptam»E 
of the invitation to the J*arisp.; 
conference on the Marshall prOrE* 
posai. The reversal of her de-fe 
cision came after die -Czech# 
Premier and Foreign MinTs terg, 
had been received by Presided t|$ 
Josef V. Statin. Poland. Ro-[| 
mania, Yugoslavia and BhLtf 
gana already gave (heir refus-P 
als. There were no officials 
replies from Finland, Albania® 
and Hungary, although tholatterj 
two were expected to refuse^ 




t> \Sp 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY*. JULY II, 1997 


PAGE 9 



OPINION/LETTERS 


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wrsion. they have never ^ 
iged to form a political qj» 
? or all the American umt* 
>rotecting them from Mr & 
lam’s planes and poi^r. 
hey are no closer to » 1 ,^ 
Massoud Barzani. the Ksr 
sh leader who made the 4 
with Mr. Saddam, holds toe 
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herefore monopolizes t 
imuggling trade thai becank’ ' 
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clumsy attempt* be biota* 
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T!»-" 


Mars Mission Demonstrates 
Who Has Power on Earth 

By Barry Buzan and Gerald Segal 


L ONDON — Why does it matter that a 
vehicle made on Earth can be made to 
trundle around on Mars? Most answers 
either wax lyrical about uplifting the hu- 
man spirit or try to persuade us that there 
are many spin-offs from the technology 
devised for such missions. These ex- 
planations are partially correct, but they 
are far from the whole story. Going to 
.. „ Marsalso tells us a great deal about where 
we. stand at the end of the millennium. 

This momenr is not just about the 
ticking of the clock. It is about filling the 
planet, for the first time in human ex- 
istence, and about beginning to look 
further afield. We should all be awed 
that it is in our lifetime that humans 
began exploring other planets. 

This exploration, like that of other 
continents m earlier ages, reveals a great 
deal about where power lies and who 
has the confidence 10 use it. 

Historians still marvel that the great 
Chinese civilizations never "dis- 
covered” America, while die less grand 
but more inventive and ambitious Euro- 
peans "discovered” distant places and 
planted great empires. The triumph of 
Western science and notions of progress 
will continue to shape the 21 st century 
long after European empires have died. 

Hence the importance, in terms of the 
contemporary balance of power, of the 
fact that an American-made buggy is 
roving around Mars. Its landing on the 
Fourth of July — U.S. Independence Day 
— tells us who is the world's greatest 
power. Only the United States has the 
scientific and engineering power to un- 
dertake such an operation. It is a beacon 
of American dominance. The Mars mis- 
sion also demonstrates which power is 
sufficiently confident in progress that it 
can raise its sights beyond our planet. 

Consider the contrast with other pu- 
tative great powers. The Mir spare sla- 
tion is an equally potent symbol of a 
faded Russian power. Mir stays manned 
only because the United Stales sees a 
■_J purpose in propping up Russia's former 


prowess and is keen to integrate Russian 
scientists into Western projects. 

Europeans contribute to the scientific 
and engineering success of the Mars 
Pathfinder project, but they are bit play- 
ers. Europe's Ariane rocket program is a 
commercial success, but its complexity 
and innovation are far less than that 
required for the Mars mission. Euro- 
pean astronauts go up in U.S. space 
shuttles, but there is little prospect of the 
reverse taking place. 

Even China has trouble getting its 
commercial space program to work. The 
best and the brightest of Chinese sci- 
entists study in the United Stares — and 
over 90 percent do not return. China’s 
political system and society* are still too 
inimical to the free thought and icon- 
oclasm that make for good science. 

Although aspects of scientific success 
suggest there is an increasingly glob- 
alized international community, cutting- 
edge science is still primarily an ad- 
vantage of the Atlantic world. Genetic 
engineering, biotechnology and space 
research may all need state support, but 
success also requires support for a lib- 
eral. enquiring and skeptical mind. 

The triumph of the Mars mission, the 
inherent triumph of Western ideas and 
the explicit triumph of the United States 
also say something about where future 
power will lie. In an increasingly post- 
industrial world, progress will' come 
from an innovative mind. Aspiring rival 
powers know that unless the next Mars 
buggy has a Chinese. Russian or Euro- 
pean flag, they will not be a match for 
America's winning combination of sci- 
ence. technology and self-belief. 


Don’t Know Who He Is, but He Sure Can Dance 

By Helen Frankenthaler 


Mr. Buzan is a professor of inter - 
national studies at the University of 
Westminster and Mr. Segal is a senior 
fellow at the International Institute for 
Strategic Studies. Their book, '‘Antici- 
pating the Future," will he published 
later this year. They contributed this 
comment to the Herald Tribune. 


S TAMFORD, Connecticut — Fall 1985. A heav- 
ily embossed handwritten invitation arrived in 
the mail. 

Could the president and first lady have the pleas- 
ure of my company at a White House dinner to honor 
the Prince and Princess of Wales? 

Black tie, cocktails, the works. 

Would I? I was tempted, but warned to think about 
it. My longtime assistant. Maureen, and my friend 
Phyllis begged me to anend. 

"What,” said Phyllis, “you're not going?" 
Maureen chimed in: "People are dying 10 go to 
that. Go!” 

So, I accepted, but then the anxiety began. What to 
wear? *T11 pick up the right thing someplace,” 1 

MEANWHILE 

thought, but suddenly the day arrived. It was time to 
pack up and get on the shuttle. 

But what dress to pack? Nothing seemed right. 
Then I went to the anic and plucked out a former 
“uniform” of mine from the ’70s, a black silk 
Chand purchased at BloomingdaJe's: Rhinestones 
etched a deep lapel running down the front of the 
dress, faux diamonds outlined the cuffs of the slim 
sleeves. Perfect. 

The Big Night arrived. The concierge at the Hay- 
Adams Hotel announced that my escort from the 
White House was waiting. He appeared to me to be 
our equivalent of a dashing Coldstream Guardsman 
— as memory recalls, my "date" was all in white 
with epaulets and sundry shoulder ropes. 

At the White House, he led me to the long stairway- 
leading to the receiving line. 

Everyone in line was photographed. There l am 
with the princess, flanked by our hosts, the Reagans, 
and the prince. 

Di was elegant, tall, wreathed in jewels (no 
rhinestones), and wearing a plunging midnight-blue 
velvet dress. 

The night progressed Drinks, chats, gowns, jew- 
els. Names, more names, fabulous hors d'oeuvres. 
Dinner — four-star menu, flowers, speeches, 
laughter. The wine flowed. Flowed and flowed. After 
dinner we eventually repaired to the dance floor. 

By the time I got near it, Di was gracing the floor 
with a handsome, sleek partner. They took off. 
Stunning. 

I love to dance, but I had no dinner partner to grab 



NEXT IIEfl: THE- EH. 

50-CALLED 
NAUGHTY SHORTS- 


NUDGE, NUDGE. 
MNK.HNK, 
SAY NO 
MORE* 


Los Angeles Times Syndicate 

Prince Charles decides to auction off some of his more famous garments . 



and whirl around. I looked around, searching for my 
long-gone escort. Who to dance with? By this rime Di 
was switching partners left and right, and the band 
was really swinging. 

Suddenly, I spotted that terrific partner of Di’s. He 
was standing alone! I inquired, would he like to 
dance ? 1 confided that I admired his steps with Di. He 
agreed with pleasure and somehow, making me feel 
luce a marionette, led me to the center of the floor. 

He was great! We took up a lot of space. I'd waited 
a lifetime for a dance like (his. 

"You're awfully good, you know.” I said breath- 
lessly when the band stopped 

"Thanks.” he smiled. I asked for his name. 

When I returned to my studio in New York, 
Maureen and Phyllis wanted a full report of the event 
— who. what — down to the canapes, outfits, 
conversations. Knowing me as a hoofer manque, did 
I dance at the party? 


' ‘Did I dance? Did I ever dance, ' ’ I said fishing in 
my purse and pulling out the card with his name. 
"His name was John Travolta. He was out of this 
world!" 

My buddies stared at me. "John Travolta? Do you 
know* who he is?” 

T confessed I did not, but 1 thought he'd go far. 
They sighed in shock and exasperation. 

Now look what's happened to Di's garb. Her John 
Travolta dress went for $222,500 last month at a 
Christie's auction. 

I hope I have the occasion to wear my John 
Travolta dress again, but in the meantime, if anyone 
wants to borrow it ... 


The writer, an abstract expressionist painter, will 
have a show opening at the Guggenheim Museum in 
New York next year. She contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


On NATO 

Regarding " Why Romania 
Should Be Admitted Now ” 
(Opinion. July 8) by Jacques 
Watch: 

Mr. Walch said that Ro- 
mania "offers significant 
capabilities in influencing 
political and military devel- 
opments" in rhe Balkan 
region. 

In my experience as a free- 
lance photojournalist during 
the war in the Balkans, Ro- 
manians provided a steady 
supply of arms, fuel and even 
mercenaries to their old allies 


the Serbs. Like the Greeks 
(disobedient to NATO during 
the Balkan crisis), the Ro- 
manians took the low road 
and mocked the internation- 
ally sanctioned blockade. 

The Greeks showed them- 
selves to be as bad in the south 
and showered money and 
supplies on the Serbs. There, 
even the churches were col- 
lecting for rhe Serbs. 

NATO expansion will 
neither erase' old enmities nor 
temper passionate alliances, 
based on events that occurred 
centuries ago. Romania will 
never in practice enact sanc- 


tions against the Serbs, a 
people with whom the Ro- 
manians have enjoyed peace- 
ful border relations for nearly 
a thousand years. 

Like Greeks and Serbs, Ro- 
manians will always bristle 
with nationalism whenever a 
Muslim population is active 
in their area — as if the Ot- 
toman empire were still a 
threat to them. 

I would like to see if NATO 
expansion can fix all that 
MICHAEL MATURO. 

Alzenau, Germany. 

The writer worked for the 



Organization for Security and 
Cooperation in Europe as an 
election officer in Bosnia. 

At the Madrid summit 
talks. NATO members dis- 
cussed many issues except the 
important one — the role of 
nuclear weapons in the post- 
Cold War world. 

Why do the peoples of 
NATO countries accept the 
organization’s . military 
policy, which raises the threat 
of the use of weapons of mass 
destruction? 

MIGUEL MARIN-BOSCH. 

Barcelona. 

“Guilt and Emotion, Not 
Strategy, Prompt Enlarge- 
ment" (Opinion, July 7) hy 
Jim Hoagland): 

To understand the political 
meaning of NATO enlarge- 
ment in Europe, it is neces- 
sary to stress that the main 
and central problem of 
Europe remains Russia. 

It should be obvious that 
the United States is interested 
not only in good relations 
with Russia, but also in nor- 
mal relations between Europe 
and Russia. As North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization mem- 
bers, Poland, Hungary and 
the Czech Republic need not 
fear Russia. 

No European country, 
whether a NATO partner or 
not, can feel safe if Russia is 
again permitted to treat Cen- 
tral Europe as a glacis for its 
expanding influence. After 
all. the Russia of today will 


not necessarily be the Russia 
of tomorrow. 

ALEXANDER UEXKULL 
Vienna. 

Defending Taiwan 

Regarding "Beijing and 
Taipei Appear Committed to 
a Collision Course" (Opin- 
ion , July Wi by Richard 
Halloran and "The West 


Should Face It: Taiwan Is 
Part of China" t Opinion. July 
10) by Gregory Clark: 

Mr. Halloran touches on 
the essence of the matter We 
Taiwanese want to be accep- 
ted as a free and democratic 
nation, while China refuses to 
accept reality. 

The historic boundaries of 
China do not include Taiwan. 
Before the 1600s. only abori- 


gines lived on the island. Only 
after Dutch settlers built plan- 
tations there did Chinese 
laborers start to migrate to the 
island. They intermingled with 
the aborigines, and the 
Taiwanese identity was bora. 

As Mr. Halloran noted, the 
majority of people in Taiwan 
consider themselves 

Taiwanese, not Chinese. 

But Mr. Clark's approach 


condones Chinese aggression 
toward Taiwan, fanning the 
flames of nationalism that en- 
danger stability in East Asia. 

MEI-CHIN CHEN. 

Chevy Chase. Maryland. 

The writer is editor of the 
Taiwan Communique, pub- 
lished by the International 
Committee for Human Rights 
in Taiwan. 


BOOKS 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 Turpentine 
source 
<0 Splotches 
is Kepi the lid on 
ts Fashionably 
nostalgic 


17 Popular 
comedienne 

is 'Sweet* stream, 
to Bums 

19 A White House 
scandal 

21 Shepherd ■ 

22 Steno's need 



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23 It's a draw tor 
astronauts 
29 Pioneer 
balhyspherist 
29 Natural 

32 Psychiatrist 
who coined the 
term "inferiority 
complex* 

33 Water tester 

34 ‘Mail Order 
Bride' co-star. 
1964 

38 Hezbollah 

stronghold 

Valley 

39 Uncertainties 

40 Mrs. Yeltsin 

41 Quite a nose 
<2 Grass variety 
«3 A hundred 

smarter* 

44 Tees and efts 
46"S«ddhanha‘ 
writer 

47 Art and history. 

e.g. 

fioKeabter 

character 

52 Teen-: — 

53 Upbraided In no " 
uncertain terms 

so Rudimentary 
thermos 
inventor 

62 Renowned exile 

63 Jane Curia) rote 

64 Small carriage 
gs Final word 

sc Hoax 


DOWN 

1 Go 

•shooby-doa,' 
or just “shoo" 

2 Unparalleled 

3 “Finnegans 
Wake" wife 

« Put one’s foot 
down 


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a band? 

s Michelangelo 
masterwork 

7 Then 

• Octavla's 
husband 

9 Cheesy town 

10 Hidden means 
of support? 

11 Unable to go 
home 

12 Relative of a 
ferret 

13 It may bs 
broken on a 
ranch 

14 High-altitude 
probe 

20 Maniacal reader 

24 Chips, to Mr. 
Chips 

as Another name ' 
for Barb 

26 Fan setting 

27 Pony express 
stop 

28 Dry wine 

30 Like some 
yogurt 

31 It's 41 

35 Tests the water? 

36 Man's name 
meaning 
■mortal 

37 the Great 

fluvemle 

detective) 

45 Language suffix 

47 Touchy fellow? 

48 ‘A Passage to 
India" woman 

49 Uke a 
bloodhound 

«« Letter paper? 

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Moon 

' 55 She played 
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56 Oomph 

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Po 


BECOMING MAE WEST 
By Emily Wortis Leider. 431 pages. S30. 
Farrar Straus Giroux. 

Reviewed by Jonathan .Yardley 

F IRST in a play called "Diamond 
Lil,” presented on Broadway in 
1928, then in its film adaptation. "She 
Done Him Wrong,” which opened five 
years later, Mae West created the char- 
acter of whom she said, "I’m her and 
she’s me and we’re each other.” In 
Emily Wortis Leider’s words, "Dia- 
mond Lil was the insouciant, insinu- 
ating, sashaying, tough-talking, sultry- 
voiced, golden-wigged, diamond-en- 
crusted. bone-corseted, wasp-waisted, 
flaring-hipped and balloon-bosomed 
1890s Bowery saloon hostess and singer 
(who) transformed Mae West from a 
mere actress into an enduring icon of 
American popular culture.” 

Yes, this is 1997 and "Becoming Mae 
West" is an exercise in the study of 
popular culture, so of course the ob- 
ligatory "icon" is trotted out at every 
conceivable opportunity. But take away 
that tiresome vogue word, and Leider 
has gotten a good way toward what 
appears to be the truth about West, that 
Diamond Lil, her “signature role,” has 
become a figure of American mythology 
with whom her creator is inextricably 
intertwined. Leider’s aim in this biog- 
raphy is to describe how that came to 
pass, bow West invented Diamond Lil 
and her numerous alter egos in a process 
of careful, deliberate manufacture dur- 


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ing which West herself was absorbed 
into this fictional character. 

Who in fact was Mae West? Such a 
question, when asked of almosr any actor 
or performer, is almost impossible to an- 
swer. especially in the age or film, when the 
projection of self is valued mote highly 
than the performance of roles. In the case of 
Mae West, it is all the more difficult to 
answer because she was self-created from 
. the outset and because the line between 
actuality and mockery was usually invis- 
ible. Indeed, about the wily thing we can 
say with confidence about West is that she 
almosr certainly was not whatever we think 
she was. 

Bom in 1893 in Brooklyn, she was (he 
child of a mother whose first daughter had 
died soon after her birth, with the result that 
she was given ’ ‘doting, undivided maternal 
attention [that] established her as an eternal 
soloist and a Jaw unto herself.” Matilda 
West was the proverbial stage mother, and 
Mae was a willing object of her manip- 
ulations. She was far less close to her 
father, but she developed a taste for the 
rough life he lived and the rough company 
he kept This, combined with the single- 
mindedness imbued in her by her mother, 
made her at once a hard-drwing profes- 
sional and an earthy, bawdy woman who 
came to maturity just as American society 
was loosening its rigid sexual and moral 
standards. 

Heaven knows she was funny. Few 
men or women whose lives were spent 
on stage and film have contributed so 
many enduring one-liners to the Amer- 
ican compendium of familiar quota- 
tions. Most were her own rather than her 
writers because she wrote her own 
stuff and because she was fast on her 
feet "If you don’t like my peaches, 
don’t shake my tree.” “Why don’t you 
come up sometime, see me?” "When 
women go wrong, men go right after 
them. ” "Is that a gun in your pocket, or 
are you just happy to see me?" "Ima- 
gine censors that wouldn’t let you sit in 


a man's lap. I've been in more laps than 
a napkin!” "Goodness had nothing to 
do with it, dearie.” "Beulah, peel me a 
grape.” "When caught between two 
evils I generally like to take the one I 
never tried before.” 

West made a joke out of sex, which 
did not prevent the Watch and Ward 
crowd from coming after her — she 
spent more than a week in jail on an 
indecency conviction arising from her 
1927 Broadway play, provocatively en- 
titled "Sex' ' — but which did defuse the 
quite incendiary bombs she tossed at 
American propriety. She was a rebel not 
merely because of the sexual activity she 
engaged in and portrayed, but because 
she was far ahead of her time in die open 
practice of racial tolerance and her le- 
nient attitudes toward homosexuality, 
the practice of which she abhorred but 
the practitioners of which she found "so 
talented, so very deveT.” She had sev- 
eral black lovers and became one of the 
homosexual community ’s favorite camp 
figures, a honor bestowed in affection 
and admiration as well as amusement. 

L EIDER has not written a full bi- 
ography but has cut off her story in 
1938, the end of West's tenure at Para- 
mount She considers “the first four 
decades in Mae West’s life . . . when she 
was still honing her performance style 
and still taking risks, to be, hands down, 
the most dynamic decades in an" — 
yes! — "iconic life." 

She probably is right; the rest of the 
story, even "My Lirtle Chickadee,” her 
film with W.C. Fields, is anticlimax, 
though some readers may pine for its 
biographical details. But when one con- 
siders the exhausting length at which 
Leider recapitulates the plots of West's 
plays, movies and writings, what she has 
given us seems more than enough. 

Jonathan Yardley is on the staff ofThe 
Washington Post. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


iWabyBobKMn 

©JVete York Times! Edited by Will 1 /torts. 


r J~'HE first 


Solution to Puzzle of July 10 


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□□□003013000 OH0 

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99 Causing a 
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contemporary 



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appearance of 
bridge in an Olympic-type 
setting occurred at the Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island. It was 
the world Scholar-Athlete 
Games, in which about 2,000 
high-scbool students from 144 
countries took part in a wide 
variety of sports and cultural 
activities. Ail were required to 
have good academic records. 

Nearly ail die 34 partic- 
ipants came from North 
America. The first event was 
won by 18-year-old David 
Halasi of Toronto. For two 
days, he and other experts 
were paired randomly with 
less-expert performers, and 
then he played for two days 
with his chosen partner. 

He also won the ■ sub- 


sequent team event, with 17- 
year-old David Grainger of 
Toronto, 18-year-old John 
Hurd of Charleston, South 
Carolina, and 16-year-old 
Erin Berry of Regina. Saskat- 
chewan, one of the six female 
competitors. 

Halasi won the individual 
in spite of a disaster as East on 
the diagramed deal. Ai most 
of the other tables. South was 
defeated in six spades after 
West led the dub ace and 
South took a normal trump 
finesse. But against Halasi, 
the North player was Joel 
Wooldridge of Buffalo. 

When his partner opened 


and Hurd, sitting West, as- 
sumed that there was no hurry 
to cash the club ace. He chose 
a trump lead, and thus gave an 
opportunity to the Soum play- 
er, Josh Heller of Toronto, 
who happens to be Halasi's 
step-brother. 

It was now unnecessary to 
stand or fall on the tmmp fin- 
esse. 

Heller pui up the spade ace 
and when the king fell made 
all the tricks for a top score: 
He drew the missing trump 
and threw dummy's clubs on 
his heart winners. 

If the spade king had nor 
fallen, he would have had an 


one spade, Wooldridge made ' excellent chance to survive 
a tricky response of two by playing diamonds: if the 

queen fell, he would have 
been able to throw his club 
loser on the diamond jack, 
and if not he could attempt to 


clubs, judging that only a club 
lead would put a spade slam 
in jeopardy. 

He eventually bid the slam. 


reach his hand with a dia- 
mond ruff, and throw 
dummy's clubs on heart win- 
ners. 

NORTH 

♦ AQ7S2 
0 — 

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4Q102 

west east 

943 ** 

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* 10633 0 Q® 

*AJ4 *K98?63 

SOUTH (D) 

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*72 

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North and South were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

South 

1 * 

29 
39 

4 * 

Pass 

west led the spade three. 


West 

North 

East 

Pass 

24 

Pass 

Pass 

24 

Pass 

Pass 

3 4 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 

64 

Pass 





•_ • • i- . • - '• •* "■ ^ >■ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, JULY II, 1997 



Rave On: You Have the Cash? Hong Kong Has the 




Hong Kongs nightspots, jazz bars, hotel discos and rave clubs are surely the wildest and woolliest in China, and whatever your taste in music, the Fragrant Harbor city has it. 



-Si 


By Richard Covington 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

ONG KONG — Plunging 
into the lower depths of the 
obscenely expensive Lost 
City nightclub, in the Tsim 
Sha Tsui district of Hong Kong, was like 
entering the seventh circle of a par- 
ticularly freaky video game. 

This Ali Baba's cavern of decadence 
unfolded like a Chinese box: first a 
video arcade, then a jam-packed disco, 
onward to another room pounding out 
techno music, and finally through a 
sound-proof door into a karaoke bar. 
Inside, a woman in a red silk sheath 
dress was lustily trying to outdo die 
Cantonese pop singer Sammi Cheung, 
oblivious or being painfully off-key. 

Off the assorted bars, chambers were 
dolled up with leopard-skin rugs, video 
karaoke equipment and gilt beds. Enter 
these dens and a hostess immediately 
materializes. If you refuse to order the 
200 Hong Kong dollar ($25) glasses of 


scotch, she politely bids you to raise 
your red lanterns somewhere else. 

If the whole of the Fragrant Harbor 
city is now die most exclusive club in 
China, its nightspots, jazz bars, hotel 
discos and rave clubs are surely the 
wildest and woolliest in the country. If 
you’ve got the money, Hong Kong has 
the nightclub. 

Outside the Hong Kong Convention 
Center, hundreds of teenagers jostled 
one another, bidding up to $200 per 
ticket for a chance to see TRF, Namie 
Amuro and other Japanese heartthrobs. 
In a flashy floor show worthy of Las 
Vegas, highly packaged dance sensa- 
tions created by Tom Yoda of die Avex 
Group pumped out “Try Me,” "Can 
You Celebrate?” and other hits broad- 
cast over STAR-TV’s Channel V and 
MTV Asia, the video channels that 
make or break groups across the re- 
gion. 

“The biggest recent change in the 
music sceneis that karaoke is losing its 
grip and live music is staging a come- 


back," said Anders Nelsson, a record 
producer and concert promoter and 
long-time Hong Kong resident 

To continue to lure increasingly jaded 
audiences, owners of karaoke clubs like 
the Apple Lounge in Mong Kok have 
resorted to “manual karaoke,” a new 
twist harking back to karaoke's roots. 
Customers hop on stage to belt out 
songs with professional live bands, in- 
stead of crooning along to wide-screen 
televisions playing laser disks of the 
Taiwanese pop singer Andy Lau and 
syrupy Western ballade ers luce Richard 
Marx. 

THI ravi explosion Rave dance has 
exploded in the past six months, ac- 
cording to Nelsson. with venues like Bar 
City in the basement of Kowloon’s New 
World Harbour Hotel attracting a mix of 
local and Western rave fans. 

Along with European-style raves 
have come Ecstasy and other designer 
drugs. So far this year, Hong Kong 
police have confiscated 40,000 tablets. 


Chief Inspector Bruce Hawkins told 
Reuters. “Ecstasy used to be mainly 
confined to expatriates, but with the rise 
in rave culture, it’s exploded into the 
local community.” be said. 

At Club 1997, in the Lan Kwai Fong 
district, a smattering of Western ex- 
patriates were interspersed among the 
largely Chinese crowd, listening to an 
everything-birt-the kitchen-sink menu 
of musical styles that skipped from acid 
jazz to 1940s swing tunes and house rap 
hits. Jeremy Irons. Gong Li and others 
in the cast of Wayne Wang’s coming 
film ‘ ‘Chinese Box’ ’ were club regulars 
during the shooting this spring. 

Club 1997’s clientele has changed 
dramatically in the past two years, be- 
coming “far less European and much 
more decadent/ ’ explained Nicole Gar- 
naut, the Australian-born manager of 
the 15 -year-old club. Ninety percent of 
the club’s customers are Hong Kong 
Chinese, what one observer dubbed 
‘ ‘chuppies,” Chinese urban profession- 
als whose ranks include prosperous 


stockbrokers and entrepreneurs in their 
20s and 30s unbothered about paying 
2,000 Hong Kong dollars for a bottle of 
champagne. 

“People come here fo blow their 
money away,” said Gamaut. 

Up the street, the Jazz Club, a 
cramped upstairs den, makes up for its 
poor sight lines by attracting main- 
stream performers like Chicago blues- 
man Eddy Clearwater and Cesaria Evor- 
ia of the Canary Islands and fielding 
discoveries like die Trio Toykeat from 
Finland. 

A T the Fringe, a no-frills bar, 
upmarket restaurant and pocket 
theater complex next door re die 
Foreign Correspondents’ Club, a mixed 
bag of homegrown folk singers, har- 
monica virtuosos like William Tang, 
urban country singers and scat-singing 
poets regularly entertain a largely West- 
ern crowd. 

Live rock and dance acts occasionally 
shake up die sedate Hard Rock Caf£ and 


Explorer 


Planet Hollywood clones in Kowloon. 

Some bands even invade the turner pre- 
cincts of CafS Deco, a spacious Peak 
aerie whose chief asset is a pano ramic . 
view of the city and harbor 400 meters "■ ; 

below. . . „ ; _ • 

In Wanchai, exclusive, overstuned 

hotel clubs, like JJ.’s in die Grand Hyatt a • 

and Manhattan Westworld in the New 
World Harbour View next door, remain ; • -Ir- 
resolutely loyal to the disco-karaoke * 
formula. - , 

Elsewhere in Wanchai, stand-up . 
comedians, mostly from Britain, are 
drawing audiences to the Viceroy, a . 
combination nightclub and Indian res- 
taurant that regularly programs salsa. 
nights and Indian pop singers to bring - : 
the city’s many-splendored ethnic 
groups out in force. A.. 

4 ‘frs part of Hong Kong’s strength to 
be able to support so many scenes within ' r • 
scenes.” scud Mirko Whitfield, sales 
manager with Reed Midem organize- • •, 
don, an international company that 
stages music and media trade fairs. 


Detroit and the Freedom Trail 


By Robyn Meredith 

York Times Sen-ice 



ETROIT — Earl Calloway, a 
visitor from Chicago, stood 
up in the sanctuary of the 
Second Baptist Church in 
downtown Detroit and began re sing an 
impromptu a cappella rendition of 
“Live a-Humble,” an African-Amer- 
ican spiritual. “I want to sing in this 
' church.” he explained to the roomful of 
•strangers with him on a tour of the 
; church that served as the last stop on the 
- Underground Railroad for 5,000 slaves 
on their way to freedom in Canada. 

Detroit is a powerful draw for anyone 
interested in African-American history. 
In die 19th century, it was home to some 
•of the largest “stations,” or hiding 
places, on the Underground Railroad, 
■ the network of abolitionists who helped 
slaves fleeing north to freedom. In this 
century, waves of African-Americans 
came from the South to work in the city’s 
auto factories. In the 1960s. Detroit 
spawned the Motown sound, and today, 
with a population that is 76 percent Af- 
rican-American. it is the largest U.S. city 
with a black majority. 

Last spring, ihe nation’s largest mu- 
seum devoted to black history and cu (cure 
opened in the city's downtown cultural 
district. The new Museum of African- 
American History is part of a significant 
group of African-American historical 
sites in the city or within a short drive. 

Any visit should surely start with the 
new museum, a 1 20,000- square-foot 
(1 1. 150-square-meter) building with a 
glass rotunda and bronze doors that 
houses a powerful core exhibit "Of the 
People: The African-American Expe- 
rience.” It is centered around a repro- 
duction of a slave ship that carries in its 
hold 40 life-size sculptures of people 
and a number of empty shackles to rep- 
resent the Africans who died during the 
Middle Passage, the long voyage from 
West Africa to the New World. 

Around the ship are eight smaller 
exhibits that survey the black experi- 
ence in the United States. They include 
artifacts from Africa, maps of Under- 
ground Railroad routes, photos of 
Iynchings and a representation of a vot- 
ing booth that includes examples of 
difficult questions that were used to 
prevent blacks from voting in the South 
just four decades ago. 

Blues to Motown 

There are also more uplifting exhib- 
its, including a case full of inventions by 
African-Americans and the flight suit 
worn by the first female African-Amer- 
ican astronaut. Mae Jemison. In nearby 
rooms, visitors can listen to the work of 
African-American composers — 
everything from the blues to Motown to 
symphonies. Or they can hear readings 
of African-American authors. 

Through Sept. 7. the museum is 
showing “Africa: One Continent, Many 
Worlds.” This is an overview of the 
many cultures of the continent, from 
those of desert nomads to cosmopolitan 
city dwellers. Tel: (313) 494-5800. 

A short walk northwest is the Detroit 
Institute of Am, the city’s main art 
museum. It is perhaps best known for 
Diego Rivera’s Detroit industry fres- 
coes. Tel: (313) 833-7900. Its collection 
of works by African-American artists 
includes “Quilting Time.” a 9!A-by- 14- 
foor mosaic created by Roman Bearden 
in 1986, and works by Robert Scon 


Duncanson. Edraonia Lewis, Glen Li- 
gon and Jacob Lawrence. 

From July 16 to Jan. 4 at the institute, 
“Splendors of Ancient Egypt” will 
trace the history of Egyptian ait from 
3500 B.C. to 6 A.D. It includes statues, 
jewelry, mummy cases and ceramics and 
a life-size statue of Hemiunu, thought re 
be the architect of the great Pyramid of 
Cheops, from about 2530 B.C. 

After automobiles, Detroit is prob- 
ably most closely associated with the 
Motown sound of performers like the 
Supremes, the Temptations and Smokey 
Robinson. Motown Record Corp. was 
started by Berry Gordy Jr. in a two-story 
house he called Hitsville U.S.A. The 
house, at 2648 West Grand Boulevard, 
near the longtime General Motors Corp. 
headquarters, has been turned into the 
Motown Historical Museum. Tel: (313) 
875-2266. 

Visitors begin by viewing a film 
about Motown’s beginnings and accom- 
plishrnents v then work their way past 
displays of platinum and gold records, 
band costumes and Studio A, where 
many of Motown’s hits were recorded. 

T HERE is also an excellent Mo- 
town exhibit, including a video 
that teaches the Temptations’ cho- 
reography for 4 ‘My Girl,” at the Henry 
Ford Museum in the suburb of Dear- 
born. Tel: (313) 982-6150. Adjacent to 
the Ford Museum is Greenfield Village 
(same telephone), a complex of his- 
torical re-creations, including the home 
of a freed slave and buildings from a 
Georgia plantation that were moved to 
Dearborn. On Aug. 2 and 3, Greenfield 
Village holds its “Celebration of Eman- 
cipation," with actors portraying So- 
journer Truth, Buffalo soldiers and oth- 
er historical figures. 

Because Detroit is separated from 
Canada only by the Detroit River, es- 
caping slaves nicknamed it “midnight” 


and it became a popular last stop on the 
Underground Railroad before they 
reached freedom in Canada, where 
slavery was already illegal. 

Detroit's best-documented stations 
were Finney’s Bam and the Second 
Baptist Church. A historical marker on 
the comer of State and Griswold streets 
shows where Finney's Bam stood, but 
the stone church still stands at 441-461 
Monroe Avenue. The church opens its 
double doors of wood and stained glass 
to visitors three days a week. Tel: (313) 
961-0920. . 

According to colorful maps in its 
basement. Second Baptist was one of 
the largest stations on the Underground 
Railroad and the last stop on Route 4, 
which stretched from southwestern 
Michigan to Detroit At the top of a 
narrow set of stairs leading to the small 
basement room where the slaves hid. 
several pre-Civil War “wanted" 
asters are displayed. One offers a 
),000 reward — more than enough to 
build a mansion in Detroit then — by the 
Slave Owners Association for the cap- 
ture of Harriet Tubman “ for slave steal- 
ing.” Another offers a $3,000 reward 
from the State of Missouri and a $250 
reward from President James Buchanan 
for the capture of John Brown. 

In the tiny room at the bottom of the 
stairs, slaves stayed overnight and were 
given food and clothing before crossing 
the river to Canada the next night. The 



Re-creation of the house of a freed slave at Greenfield Village in Dearborn, a suburb of Detroit. 


room had space to sleep nine on bunk 
beds and up to five on the floor. 

To get a feel for why Detroit was such 
a popular Underground Railroad stop, 
drive to the comer of West Jefferson 
Avenue and Sixth Street and look across 
the river to Canada. That narrow stretch 
of the Detroit River was one of the most 
popular crossing points. There is no 
marker there today, but Rosa Parks, who 
became a living symbol of the civil rights 
movement when she refused to sit in the 


back of a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, 
lives in an adjacent apartment building. 

Given Detroit's importance as a last 
stop on the Underground Railroad, 
crossing the Ambassador Bridge to 
Canada makes a fitting ending to a tour 
of the area’s African-American histor- 
ical sites. Two sites are worth the drive. 
Near the village of Puce, Ontario, less 
than 20 miles from Detroit, the John 
Freeman Wails Historic Site and Un- 
derground Railroad Museum — tel: 
(5 19) 258-6253 — tries to re-create the 
journey of the Underground Railroad. It 
is where Walls, a former North Carolina 
slave, settled in 1846 with his wife, 
becoming a successful farmer. 

Walking tours of several buildings 
containing the mementos of the family's 


dash to freedom are given by Walls’s 
descendants. Visitors then tread a path 
through a wooded area to the sounds of 
baying dogs meant to represent the dan- 
gerous flight between stations on the 
Underground Railroad. The Walls His- 
toric Site is sponsoring a daylong gospel 
concert of area artists on Aug. 2. 

uncle TOM About an hour farther is 
Uncle Tom’s Cabin Historic Site in 
Dresden. Ontario — tel: (519) 683- 
2978. The Reverend Josiah Henson, the 
former Maryland slave memorialized 
by Harriet Beecher Stowe as Uncle Tom 
in her famous novel, established a pre- 
Civil War haven there. The site is now a 
small complex of a few restored build- 
ings and a museum, but it once consisted 


of 200 acres where Henson and a j_ 
of abolitionists established a vocations 
school for escaped slaves. 

Henson's great-great-granddaughter: 
Barbara G. Carter manages the mu- 
seum, and if you ask, she will remind 
you that in Stowe’s book. Uncle Tom 
was an honorable and trustworthy man. 
Traveling troupes of actors in the South 
twisted the original meaning by por- 
traying him as a willing collaborator 
with whites, giving the term “Uncle 
Tom" its pejorative meaning. 

Henson died in 1SS3 and is buried 
behind the church. But many enslaved ; 
people followed in his footsteps and 
found freedom at the end of their long 
journey on the Underground Railroad to ' 
Canada. 


ill * 


Tale of 3 Cities Where the Tourist Is a Target 



By Jane Perlez 

Ne*- York Times Sen tee 






P RAGUE — When President 
Vaclav Havel returned from a 
vacation in Belgium recently, 
he lamented that his country 
had gained the reputation as the Wild 
East. A surge of pickpocketing, price 
gouging and general thievery against 
the swarms of tourists in Prague en- 
couraged the impression, he suggested. 

But his beloved capital is not the only 
place in Central and Eastern Europe 
where tourists are targets. Two other 
popular cities, Budapest and Warsaw, 
also suffer from rising crime against 
foreigners, part of the overall growth of 
crime in these countries. Tourists are the 
most conspicuous and obviously the 
easiest ana richest prey. And in many 
cases, calls for help from tourists in 
trouble — say a pickpocketing incident, 
a bag being grabbed on a crowded tram 
— are ignored by indifferent residents. 

With some basic guidelines, there are 
ways to minimize the dangers. 

It should be taken for granted that 
hailing a taxi in the street in these cities 
is an invitation to being overcharged. In 
ail three cities there are honest taxi 
companies that can be called on the 


telephone. At the Budapest and Prague 
airports, take only taxis where a dis- 
patcher is present Warsaw is much 
more difficult: There are plenty of 
crooked drivers and no dispatcher. The 
best rule is to take only a taxi that is part 
of a fleet with a telephone number 
prominently displayed on the roof or 
side door, ff a driver from one of these 
fleets refuses to take you because he is 
waiting for another passenger, the 
driver — if asked — will usually call for 
another cab over his radio phone. 

The Big Bill 

Budapest’s image took a nosedive in 
May when a Danish visitor was charged 
the equivalent of $6,000 for a dinner for 
four at the Dreher Haiaszesarda restaur- 
ant and night club in the fifth district, 
where many of the big hotels are. A 
photocopy of the bill published in a na- 
tional newspapers showed that four shots 
of cognac cost S330 and a round of drinks 
for a band of Gypsy musicians was 
charged at $3,200. This finally proved 
too much: In May the restaurant was 
closed down for three months. 

The U.S. Embassy said that was the 
most egregious case it had come across, 
but by now more than half a dozen 

V 


Budapest restaurants and cafts are on an 
embassy “no go" list — places where 
tourists have been overcharged and 
threatened if they refused to pay the 
inflated bills. Advice: Make sure menus 
have prices on the English version as 
well as the Hungarian. 

The Budapest authorities have been 
much more aggressive since the first 
incident in closing down overchaigers. 
In Warsaw and Prague, the city fathers 
have also been sympathetic to tourists’ 
complaints this season, but often the 
petty thieves outfox the police. 

In Warsaw watch out for the fol- 
lowing trouble spots: The No. 175 bus 
that goes from the airport to the city 
center has become the province of an 
organized gang that steals passports and 
money. It watches the flight schedules 
for arrivals from the United States and 
boards the bus during those hours. The 
central train station in Warsaw is no- 
torious for pickpockets. 

The major hotels in Warsaw advise 
guests not to visit the Russian market 
held daily at a sports stadium. The nar- 
row alleys between stalls and the crush 
of trading make it pickpocket heaven. 

In Budapest, the subway, especially 
the No. 2 line, is a favorite hangout for 
petty thieves. The police also advise vis- 


itors to be careful on the most crowded’ 3 y • 
trams — Nos. 4 and 6 lines — nnd on they ’ 4 
escalators leading into the subway sta-; j 
tions. Margaret Island, an idyllic green J&i. 
spot for bicycling and running in the be’' 
middle of the Danube River, is a crime, y: 
hot spot, police say. Also, at Mathias/-:^ 
Church in the city center, tourist groups 
have been harassed by pickpockets. . -V 
Budapest police warn visitors not toZ 
be fooled by plain-clothed men posing- '/ 
as “tourist police.” These men often -Vli 
ask for identification, ask to check how 
much money is in a wallet and then 
return little of what they inspect . ; V-£r 

I N Prague, pickpockets concentrate^! \ 
on the crowded Charles Bridge,;'^ 
Mala Strana, Wenceslas Squared < t\- 
and crams. Beware of the exchange out-’ •• £ • 
lets in the center where commissions ; 
9 to 10 percent are quite common. 
not change money on the street. The/V'si 
rates are bad, and it is illegal, anyway. idfK 
Taxis in Prague are a particularly sorey 
Point. v . m\ 

More than 2,500 taxi drivers receritiy 
demanded that Mayor Jan Koukal-; i|^ 
resign because, they said, he had ] 

honest taxi drivers by openly declaring;/?!^' 
that cabbies were thieves, a statement^?? J 
many Czechs agree with. 





VSfi 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JULY 11, 1997 


PAGE 11 



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THE CAR COLUMN 


MOVIE GUIDE 


Mercedes-Benz Thinks Radical 


By Gavin Green 


W hile most high-tech in- 
dustries have been think- 
ing laterally, carmakers 
have been building lat- 
erally. Computers, airplanes, electrical 
goods, communications: They have 
been revolutionized over the past few 
decades. Cars on the other hand — like 
lazy and rich old men — just get fatter. 

Of course, they've improved. They 
are now more reliable, more refined, 
less polluting and more comfort- 
able than ever. The downside is 
that they’re also longer, 
wider, heavier and more en- 
ergy consumptive. 

At least die carmakers 
know that they have to 
change their ways. People 
— especially in Europe 
and Japan — are demand- 
ing more socially respon- 
sible machines. And now, 
after decades of mere incre- 
mental improvements, the car 
industry seems on the verge of 
step-ahead creativity. 

Amazingly, Mercedes-Benz is lead- 
ing the charge. The German maker may 
have invented the motor car just over a 
century ago, and it continues to be one of 
the best resourced of all companies, but, 
until recently, it was also one of the least 
imaginative and most conservative of 
all car firms. More than any other Euro- 
pean maker. Mercedes subscribed to the 
build-bigger, charge-more philosophy. 
It undoubtedly makes some of the finest 
big sedans and sports cars in the world. 
But Mercedes’ environmental creden- 
tials have hitherto been about as good as 
a logger in a rain forest. 

Big Car, Little Car~~ 

Until now. It has just unveiled the 
most space-efficient small car ever It 
promises big-car safety and comfort and 
refinement, but small-car length, small- 
car driving and parking ease and small- 
car fuel frugality. The new A-class — 
priced against mid- to upper-range VW 
Golfs in Europe — is the most rev- 
olutionary little car since the Mini. 

Next year, an even more extraordi- 
nary machine hits die street: The Smart 


Car, co-developed by Mercedes and 
Swatch (the watch people), is a tiny and 
relatively inexpensive two-seater aimed 
at trendy urbanites. It may revolutionize 
city cars. The A-class, on the other hand, 
could fundamentally change all cars, for 
it introduces a new way of packaging 
people and mechanicals. Like a modem 
minivan, it is "one-box" — so it can 
devote most of its fore-aft length to 
carrying people. Yet, in the A-class, the 



percentage of space devoted to carrying 
people is even better, owing to an in- 
genious "sandwich" floor pan that en- 
ables the front-mounted engine to be 
situated partly underneath the passen- 
gers and partly on its side. In a big front- 
end crash, the floor pan swallows the 
motor, keeping it away from the pas- 
senger area. This represents a huge 
safety boon, and enables the Mercedes 
engineers to do without the massive 
hood and attendant crumple zones. Mer- 
cedes claims that the A is as safe in a 
front crash as the much bigger E-class. 

The tiny hood means the A-class is as 
small as Europe's shonest super-mini 
hatchback, the Rover 100 (which used 
to be called the Metro). Yet it has as 
much front and rear legroom as a Ford 
Mondeo, two classes up. Its high roof 
means it has even more headroom. Sure, 
shoulder room is not as good as in the 
wider Mondeo’s, but you can still carry 
three children comfortably in the rear 
seat, or two large adults. 

The cabin is not just roomy, it's ver- 
satile. The passenger seats can all be 
removed, turning the A into a one-seater 


van. All seats are fore-aft adjustable. The 
tall trunk is also surprisingly spacious. 

Inside, you sit high, gening a good 
view of the scenery. The dash is ima- 
ginatively sculpted — there is the bare 
necessity of instruments in front of you 
— but the dash looks rather plasiic and 
cheap, which is disappointing for a Mer- 
cedes, although it's the way that even 
the bigger Mercedes models are going. 

solid and stablb Once under way, 
the car feels solid and stable and is 
rooted to rhe ground at speed, a 
characteristic of all good Mer- 
cedes-Benzes. The power-as- 
sisted steering is excellent 
and the car handles and 
grips well, with little of the 
roly-polyness you might 
expect of a small, high 
car. It is quiet and stable at 
speed. The quietness is 
helped by the twin floor 
pan, which muffles road 
noise and also houses many 
ancillaries (exhaust, axles) 
that typically travel exposed 
underneath the floor of conven- 
tional cars, causing wind noise and 
blunting aerodynamic penetration. 

The new 1 .4 liter four-cylinder engine 
is rather sluggish but, once the A-class is 
on its way, it proves long-legged. This 
little car can comfortably travel at 160 
kph ( 100 mph). and there are not many 
small cars that can be said of. It is radical, 
cleverly designed, full of new ideas, the 
most refreshing car of the '90s, and a car 
that is bound to be widely copied. 

I T also proves, despite evidence to 
the contrary, that the car industry is 
awash with creative thinkers and 
talent. Now, finally, spurred on by Mer- 
cedes, they'll get ihe chance to show it. 

• Mercedes-Benz A- 140. About 
522,000. Engine: 1397cc four-cylinder, 
82 BHP. (1.6 gasoline and 1.7 turbo- 
diesel engines also available.) Five- 
speed manual or automatic transmission. 
Top speed: 170 kph (105 mph). Ac- 
celeration: 0-100 lq>h in 12.9 seconds. 
Average fuel consumption: 6.7 liters per 
100 km. 

Next: The Toyota Corolla 



MHinla Sac Cx^n 


Agent K (Tommy Lee Jones, left ) and Agent J (Will Smith) in Barry Sonnenf eld's " Men in Black." 


Gavin Green is the editor in chief of 
Car magazine. 


Men in Black 

Directed by Barry Sonnenf eld. US. 
“Men in Black" is an alien abductee's 
worst nightmare come true. In this winy 
and stylishly offbeat sci-fi comedy, the 
Earth has become a "kind of like Cas- 
ablanca. but without Nazis" for extra- 
terrestrial war refugees. At any one time, 
the United States allows 1,500 legal ali- 
ens to live among us, mostly in New 
York. These creatures look just like us, 
and their activities are constantly mon- 
itored by a team of crack coven op- 
eratives from an unofficial branch of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 
known as the Men in Black, or MiB. 
Equipped with shades, short-term- 
memory bleepers and an array of guns 
that look like outsize saxophones, the 
mysterious G-men track down undesir- 
able illegals and send them packing. 
Based on an obscure comic book series 
by Lowell Cunningham, this cheerfully 
perverse movie could just as easily have 
come directly from the text of a su- 
permarket tabloid. Agent K (deadpan 
Tommy Lee Jones) regularly consults the 
lurid rags — source of “the best in- 
vestigative reporting on the planet" — 
for news of rogues and extraterrestrial 
orbit-jumpers. Agent K and his cocky 
new partner, Agent J (engaging Will 
Smith), are up against a "bug," one of 
the dumbest, meanest, ugliest, cussedest 
varmints in die known universe. After 
crashing his dilapidated saucer in Upstate 
New York, the cockroachlike fiend sucks 
the innards out of a burly redneck (hil- 
arious Vincent D'Onofrio) and. wearing 
his victim's rotting body as a disguise. 


heads for Manhattan. There the mammal- 
hating insectoid causes war to be de- 
clared between Earth and another galaxy. 
O.K.. so "Men In Black" isn’t going to 
overtax any synapses. But director Barry 
Sonnenfeld, who demonstrated a knack 
for Gothic comedy in "The Ad dams 
Family." brings the same mischievous 
gleefulness to this deliriously macabre 
enterprise. iRira Kempley. HP) 

Bliss 

Directed fry Lance Young. US. 

If Terence Stamp isn't careful, he is liable 
to find himself replacing Dennis Hopper 
as the name actor most willing take any 
far-out role, from matronly transsexual 
<“The Adventures of Priscilla: Queen of 
the Desert”) to radical sex therapist 
("Bliss"), just because it has an offbeat 
erotic frisson. Baltazar Vincenza. 
Stamp's character in "Bliss," is a 
haughty, silver-haired know-it-all who 
plays the violin and whose therapeutic 
vocabulary’ is a ludicrous amalgam of 
tan trie teaching and leering locker-room 
innuendo. When dispensing smarmy 
platitudes about how making love to a 
woman is like playing a violin, Baltazar 
is likely to pick up the fiddle next to his 
chair and start sawing out some icky 
musical equivalent of foreplay. In its 
confused way. “Bliss" really does mean 
well. Behind the therapeutic attitudin- 
izing and soft-core prurience, you can 
discern a peep of good advice. Sexual 
fulfillment, the movie preaches, is not a 
matter of scoring but about communi- 
cation and die cultivation of intimacy and 
trust. (Stephen Holden. NYT I 


Four Little Girls 

Directed by Spike Lee. US. 

"Four Little Girls" is Spike Lee's im- 
mensely dignified and moving reassess- 
ment of a terrorist crime. This watershed 
moment in the history of the civil rights 
movement, the bombing on Sept. 15. 
1963, of the 16th Street Baptist Church in 
Birmingham, Alabama, left four young 
Sunday school srudents dead (the oldest 
were 14) and a nation galvanized by 
outrage and shame. Thirty-four years 
later. Lee and the many wimesses he 
interviews are able ro see both the 
tragedy and the ruming point in this 
event.’"This was rhe awakening." says 
Walter Cronkiie. speaking of how the 
bombing shocked white America as he is 
interviewed in Lee's first feanire-length 
documentary', a thoughtful, graceful, 
quietly devastating account. Old photos, 
fond memories, childhood anecdotes are 
among the personal touches that help 
summon Carol Denise McNair, II, ana 
Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley and 
Carole Rosamond Robertson, all 14. 
Lee, whose lean, straightforward docu- 
mentary style loses none of his usual 
clarity and' fire (the film has been ex- 
ceptionally well shot by Ellen Kuras), 
summons a powerful sense of Birm- 
ingham's past. “Four Little Girls" is 
most remarkable, though, in making the 
girls unforgettable and eliciting the long- 
buried emotions of those who loved 
them. Addie Mae Collins's soft-spoken 
sister tells of panic attacks she expe- 
rienced after the bombing, shaken by the 
profound fear that not even church was 
safe anymore. ( Janet Maslin. NYT) 


ARTS guide 


RECORDINGS 


AUSTRIA 


Vienna 

Kunstforum,te1; (1)71191-5737. 
open daily. To Aug. 24: The Froe- 
lich Collection." The private col- 
lection of German and American 
art brings together 150 works by 
Warhol, Beuys,: Sasetta end An- 
selm Kiefer. 


BELGIUM 


Brussels 

Palais des Beaux -Arts, tel: (2) 
507-8486, closed Mondays. To 
Aug. 17: -Alberto Burri." Based on 
his experience as a prisoner of war 
in Texas, the Italian artist <1915- 
1995) uses and assembles tom 
sacking, tar, burnt wood and 
plastic. The exhibition brings to- 
gether 100 works. 


BRITAIN 


i Target 




; EDfNBUROH 

i Scottish National Gallery of Mod- 

■ on Art, (eh (131) 556-8921, open 
' daily. To Nov. 9: “Surrealism and 
f, After. The Gabriefle Keiller Collec- 
> Bon" Donated by the former golfing 

* champion, Gabriele KeiJIer, this «*■ 

■ lection of approximately 170 paint- 
ings, sculptures, prints and draw- 
ings combines paintings by Dali. 
Bacon, Ernst and other Surrealists 

; with the works of contemporary 
artists such as Eduardo Paolozzi 
and Barry Flanagan. The collection 
' also contains over 200 Dada and 
Surrealist manuscripts, and unpub- 
, .fished or privately printed books. 

. Rarities indude a fflnvscript by Dali 
and fashion Sustfafiorts by Magritte. 

* London • - 

British Museum, tel: (171) 636 
■* 1555. open daily. Semi- permanent 

- exhibition. “Arts of Korea" This ex- 
hibition is a. preview of. the mu- 

f seum’s new Korean Gallery, sched- 
uled to open in 2000. It spans the 
' development of Korean art and ar- 
1 chaeofogy from Neolithic times to 
; the 19th century, reflecting the ln- 

* finances of dynastic successions 
and' tee cultural move from Budd- 
hism to Confucianism in the 15th 

- century. The collection Includes a 
magnificent gold crown from the 
Stfla royal tombs, dating from the 
5th-6th century A.D.* ceramics from 
the Yi dynasty considered so tech- 
ricafty advanced by the Japanese 
that they were imported there for 
use In the Tea Ceremony and ex- 

, amples of eatyprinted books. 

- Oxford 

Ashmotean Museum, iqfc (1865) 

, 278-010, dosed Mondays. To Sept. 

* 28: “Early Netherlandish Engrav- 
ing. c. 1440-1540." Traces-tee de- 
velopment o! engraving from the 

' workof theearfest Dutch masters In 
the 1440s to the works of Lucas van . 
Leyden in the early fSth century. 

jj CANADA . 

Montreal - 

Muse* des Beaux-Arts, tel: (514) 

’ 285-2000, dosed Mondays. To 
Sept 7: -“Exties and Emigres: The 
Flight of ‘ European Artists from . 
HBet" Ah exhtoition of 140 works 
. by 23 painters, sculptots, architects 
. and pbotographere who fled Hitter’a 
Germany, Indudteg' Albers, Kand- 
' insky, Grosz, Beckmann and 
1 Schwitters. The exhibition, .wNch - 
; examines tee Impact of '(Ms migra- 

■ tiorr on European and American 
artistic and intefleckial life between 

. 1933.and 1945, win travel to Berffn. 

to P I MM A R K 

' COPEMHAOEM . 

, Arbojdermuseet, teh 33-03-25- 

- 75, dosed Mondays. Continuing/ 

■ To SepL H “Red and White: 

■ Praters From the Russian Civil 
War 1917." Propaganda during the 



Cesar’s “ Centaur ' 


Jw db Pane Nanmsi □ dlety 

sculpture in Paris retrospective. 


tivU war that followed the 1 01 7 Rev- 
olution. 

i FINLAND 
Helsinki 

Museum of Foreign Art, 
Sinebrychoff, tel: (0) 17-33-61, 
dosed Tuesdays. To Aug. 17: "The 
Rose Madonna and Other Mas- 
terpieces From Utrecht" In the 
16th and 17th centuries, Utrecht 
provided a fertile ground for the 
development of religious art as ex- 
emplified here by Jan van Scorel's 
"Madonna.” Also includes works 
by Dirck van Baburen, Gerard van 
Honthorst and Jan Weenix. 

■ nMnizzzi 

PARK 

Institut du Monde Am be, tel: (1) 
40-51-38-38. dosed Mondays. 
Continulng/To Aug. 31 : “Soudan: 
Royaumes stir ie Nil." An exhib- 
ition of archaeological finds from 
Sudan. 

Jeu de Paume, tel: (1) 47-03-12- 
50. dosed Mondays. To Oct' 19: 
“Cesar Retrospective." An over- 
view of the French sculptor's work: 
from the welded animals and 
.nudes, to the compressions and 
expansions of the 1960s and VOs 

that make him one of tee precurs- 
ors of Minimal Art 
Mission du Patrimolne Photo- 
graph Ique, Hotel de Sully, “La 
Cote d'Azur de Jacques-Henri Lar : 
hgue." To Sept. 14. The exhibition 
contains more than 150 modem 
black and white prints, teree-dbnen- 
slonal photographs and odor slides 
taken by Lartigue (1804-1986) on 
the Cots d'Azur between tee 1 9208 
and tee early '80s. Indudes por- 
traits of celebrities and friends such 
as Sacha Guitry, Abel Gance. Jean 

Cocteau, Picasso and Jack Warner 

as weH as photographs of beach 

games between tee two wodd wars, 
early waterskling competitions and 
automobile races in Monte-Carlo. 


created during tee last 20 years 
chart tee artists' engagement with 
social Issues, such as feminism, 
Vietnam, and AIDS. 

■ ■»»» 

Jerusalem 

Israel Museum, let: (2) 6708-811 . 
open dally. Permanent exhibition. 
“A Day at Qumran: The Dead See 
Sect and Its Scrolls." To commem- 
orate the 50th anniversary of the 
discovery of the scrolls, an exhib- 
ition documenting a day In tee life 
of the Qumran sect Features a 
sundial, agricultural tools and 
phylacteries, as well as newly ex- 
hibited fragments of scrolls. 

■ ITALY 

Bologna 

Galleria d'Arte Modems, teh (51) 
50-28-59, cksed Mondays. To 
Sept. 7: “Baselitz." Works by the 


German artist (bom 1 938), a lead- 
ing artist In the Neo- Expressionist 
movement, and best known for 
painting bodies upside down. 

to iwitxihamF" 

i 

Geneva 

Petit Palais Muaee, tel: (22) 348- 
14-33, open dally. To Oct. 30; 
“Chagall et I'Eoole de Paris." A col- 
lection of paintings by MarcChagall 
from various stages of his career 
accompanied by tee works of other 
Immigramartlsts working In Partsat 
tee beginning of tee century. In- 
cluding Soutine and Pasdn. 
Known together as The School of 
Paris, it was largely the activities of 
these indlvlduais which led to the 
establishment of Montparnasse as 
an artistic center during that period. 

Martmny 

Fonda tl on Pierre GJanadda, tel: 
(26) 22-39-78, open daily. To Nov. 
11 : “Joan Mlro." A retrospective of 
paintings, gouaches and watered- 
ore. sculptures and ceramics by 
the Spanish painter (1893-1 983). 

■ UNITED STATES 

New York 

Paine Webber Ait Gallery; tel: (21 2) 
713-2885, dosed Saturdays and 
Sundays. To Sept 19: “Lteette Mod- 
el: Photographs from the interna- 
tional Center of Photography Col- 
lection." A rare opportunity to view a 
representative sample of Model's 
entire career, alongside works of 
some of her contemporaries, and of 
later photographers influenced by 
her approach. Bom in Austria, her 
work sustains a strongly European 
sensibility despite her 50 -year res- 
idence to New York Crty. Her passion 
tor probing tee human pysche links 
her with German Expressionists of 
her youth such as Egon Schiele, and 
leads to powerful and dynamic rep- 
resentations of the frenetic dty which 
became her adopted home. 

Philadelphia 

Philadelphia Museum of Art, tel: 
(215) 684-7860, dosed Mondays. 


To Aug. 31 : “India: A Celebration of 
Independence, 1947-1997.” More 
than 250 photographs made In In- 
dia since tee prodamation of its 
Independence in August 1947, in- 
dudlng images by Sunil Janah. 
Cartier-Bresson and Sebastlao 
Salgado. The exhibition will travel 
to New Delhi and to London. 

Washmoton 

National Gallery of Art, tel; (202) 
737-4215, open daily. To Sept. 28: 
"Millennium of Glory: Sculpture of 
Angkor and Ancient Cambodia." 
Approximately 00 objects dating 
back to the Bth century and con- 
tinuing for more than 1 ,000 years. 
The sculpture ranges from monu- 
mental sandstone representations 
of gods, guardians and female 
dancers to bronzes for rituals and 
ceremonies. The exhibition will 
travel to Tokyo and Osaka. 

CLOSING SOON 

July 13: "Onental Green W&res; 
Pottery and Porcelain from the 
Near and Far East" British Mu- 
seum, London. 

July 13: "Johannes Vermeer Der 
Geograph und der Astronom." 
Stadelsches KunstinstituL 
Frankfurt 

July 13: “Van Dyck a Genova: 
Grande PHtura e Collezionismo.” 
Palazzo Ducate, Genoa. 

July 13: “Arte del ‘900: La Prttura 
Fiamminga e OJandese." Palazzo 
Grass!, Venice. 

July 13: “Louvre: 16th Century 
Paintings." Tokyo Metropolitan 
Art Museum, Tokyo. 

July 13: "Matisse. Picasso and 
Friends: Mesterworks on Paper 
from tee Cone Collection." Mu- 
seum of Fine Arts, Houston. 

July 13: “Prints In the Age of Al- 
brecht Durer and Lucas van Ley- 
den.” Metropolitan Museum of 
Art, New York. 

July 14: “Paris/Bruxelles - 

BruxeUes/Paris." Grand Palais, 
Paris. 

July 14: "Emile Verhaeren: Lin 
Musee Imagtnaire." Musee d'Or- 
say, Paris. 


• taj mahal “Senor Blues' ’ (Private Mu- 
sic): Taj is like a gumbo with seasoning from 
Africa, the Caribbean, the Delta and Chicago. 
He has played with Bonnie Rain, Chuck 
Berry, Enc Clapton, Howlin' Wolf, Sheryl 
Crow, Wynton Marsalis, the Rolling Stones 
and so on, and, with Ry Cooder, he co- 
founded The Rising Sons. He likes ro fish, 
cook and garden. This is his 36th album. 

• RODNIT KENDRICK "We Don't Die We 
Multiply" (Gitanes Jazz): Branches to land 
on or spin off of between Thelonious Monk’s 
minimal themes and variations being hard to 
come by, young pianists with Monk-derived 
styles are unusual. Eccentricity is unusual to 
begin with. Harry Connick did it on his first 
album or two. Kendrick takes it further. 

• DUKE ELLINGTON “Berlin '65, Paris 
’67" (Pablo/JATP): Previously unreleased 
concert performances with Duke’s big band 
at the height of its power featuring Cootie 
Williams, Ray Nance, Lawrence Brown, 
Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Hairy Car- 
ney and Sam Woodyard — the big guys. 
Considering the ensemble of what else most 
of us were listening to at that time, dis- 
covering this puts a new slam on the ’60s. 

• rachelz * 'Room of One’s Own” (NYC 
Records ): Rachel Z. who has played the piano 
with Wayne Shorter, is helped here by Tracy 
Worm worth. Cindy Blackman. Regina 
Carter, Terri Lyne Carrington and Maria 
Schneider. The varied, substantial and some- 



Jxac* Minchcn III 

Taj MahaT s 36th album is “Senor Blues . " 

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Django Reinhardt of the accordion. 

Mike Zwerm/IHT 


G E RMA M Y 


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V 






PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1997 


R 


NYSE 


Thursday's 4 P.M. Close 

Nationwide pitas not reflecting late Irate elsewhere. 

Associated Press. 



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Continued on Page 16 









HcralbiS^riburus 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY, JULY 11,1997 


PAGE 13 


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Shares Fall 
As Apple’s 
Chairman 
Leaves Post 


L'iMpWh OtrSzfffffimiPi3jha.tri 

CUPERTINO, California — Apple 
Computer Inc.'s shares fell Thursday in 
heavy trading after the announcement 
Wednesday that Gilbert Amelio, the 
company’s chairman, had been asked to 
resign. 

The surprise move cast doubt on 
whether the company, which pioneered 
the personal-computer industry but has 
been plagued by product delays and 
high costs, can be revived 

Mr. Amelio's departure after only 18 
months on the job came less than a week 
before Apple is to report its second- 
quarter results. One industry analyst 
speculated that the company's directors 
might have learned that the results, due 
to be released Wednesday, were worse 
than expected. 

‘ ‘7 o me, it indicates Apple is going to 
have a whopper” of a loss, “substan- 
tially more than had been anticipated.” 
said Eric Lewis, an analyst with In- 
ternational Data Corp. in Mountain 
View, California. Mr. Lewis also pre- 
dicted more declines in sales. 

Amid persistent doubts about its fu- 
ture, Apple’s stock has recently slipped 
to new lows. The shares were quoted at 
$13.3125 late Thursday, down 37.5 
cents, in Nasdaq stock market trading of 
nearly 4JS milli on shares. 

Apple’s troubles result from tech- 
nological stagnation, product missteps 
and management turmoil that several 
rounds of layoffs and revised corporate 
strategies have been unable to correct. 

Mr. Amelio’s departure marks the 
second time in less than two yens that 
Apple's board has replaced its chief ex- 
ecutive. After firing Michael Spindler. 
directors in February 1996 hired Mr. 
Amelio, who had a reputation for turning 
around troubled companies. He was the 
coauthor a book about the transform- 
ation of National Semiconductor Corp. 
titled “Profit From the Experience.” 

While Mr. Amelio has helped Apple 
by slimming it down and urging it to 
concentrate on key businesses and pro- 
duce impressive new Macintosh com- 
puters, he could not reverse the com- 
pany's eroding fortunes — at least not 
as quickly as he 
analysts said. 


and the board hoped. 


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“I don’t think he realized how deep the 
water was until it was around his knees,” 
Janies Staten, an analyst with Dataquest 
Inc, in San Jose, California, said. 

In December, Apple bought Next 
Software Inc. for more than $400 mil- 
lion.. The company was headed by 
Apple's co-founder, Steven Jobs, who 
had been ousted himself in a 1985 
boardroom coup and who was brought 
back as an adviser. On Wednesday, 
Apple said that Mr. Jobs would play a 
larger role in its affairs in the coming 
months but was not expected to take 
over as chief executive. 

In recent months, Apple's depressed 
stock price has attracted the interest of a 
bargain-hunting Saudi prince, Walid 
ibn Talal, and die threat of a takeover 
from a Silicon Valley billionaire, 
Lawrence Ellison of Oracle Corp., who 
later said he was backing off. 

Apple’s woes have tested the loyalty 
of the millions of people who still use its 
computers and the software makers who 
write programs that run on the com- 
pany's Macintosh machines. In the first 
quarter of this year, Apple’s share of 
personal-computer sties in the United 
States fell sharply, to just 33 percent, 
according to International Data Corp., 
as computer users continued to shift 
toward machines that used Microsoft 
Carp, ’s popular Windows software. 

while Apple searches outside the 
company for a chief executive, its chief 
financial officer, Fred Anderson will 
take charge of day-to-day operations. 

Meanwhile, Ellen Hancock, Apple's 
bead of technology and one of the 
highest-ranking women in the high- 
technology industry, is leaving the com- 
pany. She came to Apple from National 
Semiconductor after a long career at 
International Business Machines Coi 


(AP. 


L-orp. 

\NYT) 



Losing Its Luster 

With inflation at bay in 
much of the world and central banks 
selling some reserves, (he price of 
gold has tumbled. South Africa, 
the leading producer of gold, 
has been hit hardest. 

The New Yiri rimes 


jj 

April \ j f 

Htkm 


A, 


$340 1 

— 


Hi 


Australia discloses 
selling 167 metric 
tons, 60 percent of 
its reserves. 


$320 


Africa’s Gold Industry Loses Glitter 


By Donald G. McNeil Jr. 

Nne Yuri Tunes Service 

ROODEPOORT, South Africa — 
Michael Prinsloo, managing director 
of the company -that owns the Durban 
Roodepoort Deep Mine in Roodepoort, 
went Tuesday morning giving a tour to 
four television writers who were cre- 
ating a soap opera set in a gold mine. 

“We want to start shooting in 
March,” one said. “O.K.?” 

Mr. Prinsloo replied. “If the gold 
price doesn’t improve soon, you can 
buy it for a set” 

The decline in gold prices over the 
past few months and their plunge last 
week to a 12 -year low have alarmed 
many in this country, which is still die 
world’s hugest gold producer. With 
the commodity price of gold in the 
$320-an-ounce range, the index of 
gold-mining shares on the Johannes- 
burg Stock Exchange is down roughly 
38 percent so far tins year. 

A decade ago, in a South African 
economy severely pinched by inter- 
national sanctions aimed at ending 
apartheid, gold accounted for a quarter 
of die gross domestic product and half 
of export earnings. 

Today, with the nation’s growing 
economic vigor. It still creates 5 per- 
cent of the gross domestic product and 
accounts for 20 percent of exports. 


Though decades of ore extraction 
and the convulsions leading to the new 
South Africa have sharply reduced the 
productivity of the nation's mines, the 
gold industry employs 400,000 
people, in the mines and in related 
industries such as explosives, steel, 
drilling machinery and engineering. 

With a gold price that lingered below 
$320 an ounce, 50,000 or more jobs 
could be lost, economists estimate, and 
this year's projected 3 percent growth 
in output could drop to 2 J percent. 

That kind of damage could shake 
confidence in South Africa's cur- 
rency, the rand Only a week ago, the 
Centre! bank allowed South African 
citizens to invest money overseas for 
the first rime. To its relief, there has 
been no large-scale outflow of capital 
so far, and the dollar has held steady at 
about 4.55 rand. 

Layoffs in the mining industry 
could undermine confidence in Pres- 
ident Nelson Mandela's government, 
which has promised its constituents 
jobs, housing and a larger share of the 
national wealth. 

Since the governing African Na- 
tional Congress embraced capitalism 
over socialism three years ago, it has 
preached prosperity through growth, 
not by nationalizing the mines or hand- 
ing out public jobs as so many other 
African countries have done. If black 


South Africans are thrown out of work, 
the government will come under heavy 
pressure to do something about it. 

Last week's slide in gold prices was 
setoff by the Australian central bank's 
decision to sell 167 tons of bullion, or 
60 percent of its reserves. 

Tire transaction has aroused fears in 
South Africa that other central banks 
will gradually unload their gold and 
ultimately discontinue their use of the 
metal as a repository of national 
wealth, much as they abandoned silver 
decades ago. 

That would flood the market until 
hundreds of tons of the world's gold 
now stored in central bank vaults and 
presumably depress prices for years. 

With low inflation in the industrial 
nations stripping away much of gold's 
financial mystique, central bankers 
already have become aggressive 
lenders of the metal, a practice that 
spurs trading in options and puts more 
downward pressure on gold prices. 

Some traders in this country pre- 
dicted that gold, which sold fra- $800 
an ounce in 1980, would drop below 
$300; a report that a Merrill Lynch 
analyst said it might go below $250 
was widely quota!, spreading new 
pessimism. 

Even at $320, said Leon Ester- 
See GOLD, Page 14 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


Advice to U.S.s Stop Demonizing Japan 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


W ASHINGTON — Here we 
go again. After two years 
of relative calm in U.S. 
economic relations with 
Japan, the main warning light of trouble 
ahead is again flashing red as the Jap- 
anese trade surplus resumes what looks 
like another remorseless climb. 

The predictable response from Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton and other senior U.S. 
officials has been depressingly mercant- 
ilistic: They are telling the Japanese 
government not to allow the surplus to 
grow much further — if at all — and to 
stair domestic growth instead by faster 
deregulation. 

Toe message is stiffened by warnings 
that Mr. Clinton may not be able to 
contain protectionist forces if the sur- 
plus readies unacceptable levels. 

Washington, it seems,' has learned 
nothing during a two-year mice in trade 
hostilities. It is still allowing its bilateral 
deficit with Japan — a virtually mean- 
ingless statistic in a global economy — 
to dictate the tone of its economic re- 
lations with Tokyo. No account is taken 
of the booming U.S. economy, which is 
drawing in imports from all around the 
world, as much from Europe as Japan. 
Nor does die state of the Japanese econ- 
omy seem to matter. 


Part of the reason for Washington’s 
concern is as much political as eco- 
nomic. Fra historical, cultural and other 
reasons, Americans seem much less 
able to tolerate a trade deficit with Japan 
than with, say, Europe. 

Many Japanese, including Ryu taro 
Hashimoto, the prime minister, have 
said, probably rightly, that Americans 
still too oftea allow their views of Japan 
to be colored by World War Q — far 
more than they do in the case of Ger- 
many. Washington certainly feels it is 
entitled to lecture Japan, and impugn its 
honesty, in a way it would never do with 
its other allies. 

But demonizing Japanese exports 
and trade practices is not the solution. 
By b laming Japan fra the surplus, 
Washington encourages American 
business to condude that the main prob- 
lem is Japanese trade barriers rather 
than its own possible failings. Business 
in turn puts more pressure on Wash- 
ington to act against Tokyo, 

A survey of U.S. business opinion 
published by die Economic Strategy In- 
stitute in Washington reveals astonish- 
ingly negative attitudes toward Japan's 
efforts to open its markets and little 
confidence that the World Trade Or- 
ganization can make any difference. 

Such perceptions encourage the U.S. 
government to continue its aggressive 
bilateral policies and underestimate the 


amount of real change that is taking 
place in Japan. 

In the past six months it has become 
increasingly recognized in Japan that 
business is adopting much more flexible 
and competitive labor and sourcing 
practices and that the government is 
seriously promoting deregulation in 
such areas as telecommunications, en- 
ergy, transport, retailing and the 
planned “Big Bang” deregulation of 
financial markets. 

That does not mean the United States 
should stop pressing Tokyo ro dereg- 
ulate. U.S. business is right in thinking 
that many barriers to open markets re- 
main. But deregulation is a slow pro- 
cess, and restarting economic growth is 
urgent There is no sound reason export - 
led growth should be taboo. 

Japan can help by not making false 
promises or obfuscating the likely 
trends in trade. Bui it is up to the United 
States to make the greater effort. Amer- 
ican businesses should not expect gov- 
ernment to do their work for them. 

Washington should give Japan credit 
where it is due, refrain from encour- 
aging the idea that trade problems are all 
Japan's fault and stop basing its policy 
on bluster and mistrust. 


Eurotunnel Holders 
Vote for Rescue Plan 

Firm’s President Expresses Reluctance 


By Barry James 

/n.'cTTuni >nal Herald Tribune 


PARIS — The president of Euro- 
tunnel SA, Patrick Ponsolle, facing 
down a noisy and mutinous minority, 
won overwhelming support of share- 
holders Thursday night for a last-ditch 
restructuring plan that be admitted even 
he did not like. 

As a special stockholders’ meeting 
gave the reorganization with creditor 
banks a 98 percent vote of approval, Mr. 
Ponsolle called the plan a “realistic in- 
strument of recovery and development. ’ * 
But it shifts much of the assets to creditor 
banks, and Mr. Ponsolle acknowledged, 
as shareholders catcalled and whistled. 
“I don't like this plan either.” 

To shouts of, “We're already 
ruined.” Mr. Ponsolle said that if share- 
holders rejected the plan, ‘ 'The creditors 
will take over, and it will be our ruin.” 
The chances that the plan would be 
accepted improved after Mr. Ponsolle 
announced that a quorum representing 
25 percent of Eurotunnel shares had 
been attained. Without a quorum, there 
could have been no vote. With more 
than 900 million shares in the hands of 
some 700,000 shareholders — most of 
them French and many of them very 
angry over the shrinking of their assets 
the result of the vote remained in 
doubt until well into the evening. 

Straining to make himself heard over 
boos and cries of “swindler” and “ac- 
complice,” Mr. Ponsolle outlined the 
rescue package that the binarional com- 
pany reached with representatives of the 
170 creditor banks, giving them a 45.5 
percent stake in Eurotunnel in return for 
the rescheduling of about 70 billion 
French francs (SI 1 . 8 billion) of debt. 

Plagued by cost overruns, delays, a 
mountain of debt and a fire that closed die 
freight shuttle for months, Eurotunnel 
would have been likely to declare bank- 
ruptcy if shareholders had rejected the 
plan, analysts said. Trading in Eurotun- 
nel shares was suspended in Paris, Lon- 


don and Brussels on Thursday because of 
the meeting, which was attended by 
about 2,000 shareholders and proxies in 
Paris's cavernous Palais des Congres. 

Eurotunnel units were at S.05 francs in 
Paris and 81.5 pence ($1.37) in London 
when trading was suspended. The stock 
has risen 29 percent on both exchanges 
since late June, helped by an agreement 
by the French and British governments 
to extend the company's operating con- 
cession by 34 years, until 20S6. 

But that was scant comfort to thou- 
sands of French shareholders who 
bought what they believed was a safe, 
solid stock at up to 110 francs in 1989 
only to see it shrivel as Eurotunnel's 
debts mounted. 

The company reduced its 1995 op- 
erating loss of almost 1.7 billion francs 
to 292 million francs last year, despite a 
savage pice war with the cross-Channel 
Dover-Calais ferry services. Eurotunnel 
operates car and truck ferry services 
through the tunnel between Calais and 
Folkestone and receives income from 
cross-Channel passenger and freight- 
train operators, including the Paris- 
Brusse Is- London Eurostar service. 

There was a further outbreak of boo- 
ing and shouts of “mafiosi” when Mr. 
Ponsolle said the governments would 
take 25 percent of Eurotunnel profits 
after 2052 in return for lengthening the 
concessions, despite not having paid a 
centime for die construction. 

Mr. Ponsolle said that although they 
would have to hand over much of the 
company's assets to the banks, share- 
holders would have the consolation of 
retaining the majority of the capitaL 

He added that the restructuring plan 
was flexible enough to allow the com- 
pany to redeem debt early if its per- 
formance exceeded target levels. 
Through a variety of complex financial 
maneuvers, the plan aims ro reduce debt 
interest to 3.5 billion francs in 2003 
from 5.5 billion francs last year. Mr. 
Ponsolle said total debt would be re- 
duced by 23.36 percent. 


Tumbling Baht Throws 
Siam Cement for a Loss 


By Thomas Crampton 

Special in the Herald Tribune 

BANGKOK — Siam Cement, Thai- 
land's largest industrial conglomerate, 
said Thursday that it would register its 
first Joss in 84 years, because of un- 
hedged foreign debt, in the first major 
example of corporate damage done by 
last week's flotation of the baht. 

The report by Siam Cement Group, 
one of the largest, oldest and most di- 
versified con glomerate s in the country 
and a major motor of the Thai economy, 
was an indication that the pain from the 
nation 's currency crisis would be felt by 
many. This includes the royal family, 
which owns more than a third of Siam 
Cement’s shares and which established 
the company to promote the economic 
independence of the nation. 

The conglomerate makes and sells 
products ranging from car parts, ce- 
ment, paper, iron and steel to petro- 
chemicals. 

The company president, Chumpol 
NaLamlieng, said there would be no 
layoffs, but die company will make no 
further investment for up to two years. 

As a result of the July 2 flotation of 
the Thai baht, Siam Cement Group’s $4 
billion in unhedged overseas loans 
could cause losses as high as 9.9 billion 
baht ($330 million) if the currency sta- 
bilized at 30 baht to the dollar, Mr. 
Chumpol said. This would hurt profit, 
which Mr. Chumpol said would be less 
than the 6.8 billion baht of ] 996, though 
he said he did not yet know how much 
less. 

Siam Cement is not the only company 


caught out by the currency crisis that has 
sent the baht plunging after authorities 
loosened it from its peg to the dollar; 
However, despite the cheaper currency 
and a multitude of bruised balance 
sheets, analysts said it was unlikely that 
foreign investment would soon flood 
into Thailand to take advantage of low 
prices and an inexpensive currency. 

“This is exactly why the Bank of 
Thailand was reluctant to devalue,’ ’ said 
Mark Sundberg, Hong Kong-based head 
regional economist fra Salomon Broth- 
ers. “It is not a smprise, but it confirms 
that there is going to be a long period of 
restructuring and paying fra the bad debt 
cycle Thailand got itself into.” 

Mr. Chumpol agreed. “I do not 
blame the government,” he said. “I 
think we have to blame the whole of 
Thai society for thinking thar we could 
live on borrowed money forever.” 

Thailand's ballooning foreign debt 
was built over the last five years by 
companies and financial institutions un- 
willing to pay hefty onshore interest 
rates and confident in the baht's peg to 
the dollar and a basket of other cur- 
rencies. Private-sector foreign debt rose 
from less than $20 billion in 1 990 to $62 
billion by the end of 1996, according to 
the Bank of Thailand. Mr. Sundberg 
reckons this figure may have grown as 
high as $67 biUron today, with less than 
half of it hedged against currency fluc- 
tuation. 

Given the baht's stability and the 
length of his loans, Mr. Chumpol said 
hedging would have been too costly. 

See LOSS, Page 15 


:x~ 

■Lt £ . 7r m W 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 

LIbicHJbor Rates W 10 

Suns Fran* 

Dolor D-Mark Franc Sterthn Franc Yon ECU 

JVi-SMr W-3* fc-Vu 4*. 4 *. 

3-monUi StfW-SNti 2W. : 3*k Itf-Uft d«tt»-7Vta W-jfl* Vi»- AVi- 4W 

frflWjnh 5V»-S»y*J»Vta-3M* m-t*i 7yo-7Vi» 3M-3K w-w 4Vn-4Wi 

1-year SVi-SVm 3W-314 7Y»-7*4 3H-3K *-■** 4VW-4H 

Sources Rsutas. UortH Bank. 

Cafes applicable to Interbank depasta of St mfflfcn mtobmim (oroquiwfeftt). 



. j "-TV 

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Cross Rates 


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AutfrnfiMS 10444. 
Austrian sdi. 12JW 
Brag red- 1.0777 
Chins# yuan a tm . 
QKfikonma 32£5 
Danish Itbm 6MS> 
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Man rapes 35735 
iMfc^npinfc 2432-00 
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branS slink. 55585 
Kndhrer 03998 
Malay, ring. 14907 


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AJA. PJ5 Cb'ge 


Zurich HA. 31840 —120 

Lnndofl 31945 31940 —240 

Ha*Y«k 31930 33040 -1.90 

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iMnmTutkbandNew^epHUtg 

ami Ooskia Pdcesi New Wu» Cower • 
(Aug) 

Sounr. Antes. 


South Korea 
Goes to WTO 
Over U.S. Tariffs 

OwpdntfrtOvSuffFramDafkBrbn 

SEOUL — South Korea 
and the United States ex- 
changed trade salvos Thurs- 
day, with Washington impos- 
ing punitive tariffs of as much 
as 14.1 percent on Korean 
steel pipes exported to the 
United States and Seoul filing 
a complaint with the World 
Trade Organization against 
the continuation of U.S. tar- 
iffs on television imports. 

In the television complaint. 
South Korea’s first to the 
trade organization, the Fi- 
nance Ministxy said the tele- 
vision tariffs had been main- 
tained even after Seoul 
stopped exporting domestic- 
ally made TV sets to the 
United States in 1991. 

Separately, Japan said it 
might join the European Un- 
ion’s complaint to the trade 
organization over a Massachu- 
setts law that bars companies 
that trade with Burma from 
doing business with the state. 

(Bloomberg. Renters) 




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CANADA 

TEL (416} 928-2745 

THE NETHERLANDS 

TEL 31-20-589-0910 

KOREA 

TEL 82-2-566-9768 

JAPAN 

TEL 8 1 — 3-5570-5432 

UNITED STATES 

TEL 1-80D-2-XJNKOS 
(front U.S. & Canada) 

Opening soon: 

CHINA, 7HAIAND, ENGtAND, 
ARGENTINA, BRAZH, and 
UMIED ARAB EMIRATES (Dubai) 


nw l*c At tfcfeb mmad. (MbS « | Ov 

m My to elfin m yqpricaiy ntfe of IMtaft 
UmtMs, Ik pud nr md h p# f. ni n. 


t h 








"a-Ii 


PACE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1997 


R 


< r - 

;iv 


THE AMERICAS 




1 The Dow: ... ■ 

30-Year: T-Bdnd Yield I 

0000 


7J0 J 




680./ 


6400 ^ 


650^ 





130 

120'^^ 

n. 

,JS F M 
1997 

A M J J 

1,0 F M 
1997 

Yv^vs. 

A M J J 

£xO*t nge. 

index 

Thursday 

©4PM 

Prev. . % 
Ctose Change 

NYSE 

The Dow 

7886.76 

7842.43 +057 

NYSE 

SAP 600 

913.77 

907.47 +0.^ 

MYSE 

S&P 100 

89022 

885^3 +055 

NYSE 

Con^poafte 

476^7 . 

47303 +0.68 

US. 

Nasdaq Composite I49a,93 

1436^0 +0.29 

AMEX 

Market Value 

631.70 

63t. - ^ . 40 . 11 

Toronto 

TSE index 

6595.70 

6593.10 ■ +0.04 

Sao Paulo 

Boveapa 

13568-51 

13617.31 -0.36 

Mexico Chy 

6dsa 

4860-36 

4816.50 . +0,86 

Buenos AiresMervaJ 

84651 . 

64833 +0.02. 

Santiago. 

fPSA General 

584651 

5840.92- +0.00 

Caracas 

CapSaf General 

3343J6 

8^4,1?. +&B6 


Deal Will Erase Valujet Name 


The Assoauieil Press 

ATLANTA — ValuJet Air- 
lines. whose public image has 
suffered since a May 1996 crash in 
the Florida Everglades, said 
Thursday that it was buying Air- 
Tran Airways and that it planned to 
drop the Valujet name. 

The deal will be accomplished 
though a stock swap valued at 
$61.8 million. The combination of 
ValuJet and AirWays Corp., Air- 
Tran's parent company, would 
have 2,742 employees and serve 
46 cities with 40 aircraft and 238 
peak daily departures. 

The new company will be called 
AirTran Holdings Inc. The deal is 
expected to be completed within 
four months. 

ValuJet has been losing money 
since the May 1 1, 1996. crash of 
Flight 592, which killed all 1 10 


people on board. The airline be- 
came the subject of an intense 
safety review after the crash, and 
was grounded by the Federal Avi- 
ation Administration for more than 
three months. 

VaJuJet's president and chief 
executive, D. Joseph Corr, will fill 
the same posts in the new com- 
pany. Robert Swenson, AirWays’ 
chairman and president, will serve 
as nonexecutive chairman of the 
combined company. 

The companies did not imme- 
diately say what role VaJuJet's 
chairman, Lewis Jordan, will play. 
Mr. Jordan took the lead in trying 
to restore public confidence in 
ValuJer after the crash. 

Steven Lewins, an analyst who 
follows ValuJet for Gruntal & Co. 
in New Yoik, said the merger is 
risky because both companies are 


expected to continue to lose 

money. 

"I think that it's always risky 
when two troubled companies try 
to increase their critical mass,'* he 
said. "I would be more comfort- 
able if ValuJei got its own house in 
order first." 

AirTran serves 23 midsize cities 
from Orlando. Florida. ValuJet 
serves 24 cities from Atlanta with a 
fleet of 30 aircraft. 

Terms of the deal call for 
ValuJet to pay one share of its 
stock for each AirWays share. 
Based on Wednesday's closing 
stock price, that comes to $61.8 
million. 

ValuJet shares rose 75 cents in 
afternoon trading on the Nasdaq 
exchange in New York to $7.5625. 
while AirWays shares rose $1,625 
to $7. 


Optimism on Profits 
Gives Stocks a Boost 


GOLD: South Africa's Industry Loses Shine Amid Price Fall 


Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 


Inunuui'iul KcrjkJ Tribune 


Very briefly: 


Joe Camel to Become Extinct 

WINSTON-SALEM. North Carolina t AP) — Joe Camel, 
the cartoon character that became a target of anti- tobacco 
forces, is being dropped for a new advertising campaign 
beginning on billboards this week and in magazines in Au- 
gust. 

The character, which R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. has used 
since 1988, will be replaced by the more lifelike camel on .the 
label of the cigarette packs, the company said Thursday. 

Last month's proposed $368.5 billion settlement between 
the tobacco industry and states suing to recover the cost of 
treating smoking-related illnesses included a ban on the use of 
cartoons or human figures in cigarette ads. 

2 Named to Federal Reserve 

WARSAW (API — President Bill Clinton named Edward 
M. Gramlich, an economics professoral Michigan University, 
and Roger W. Ferguson Jr., a securities and banking lawyer, to 
the Federal Reserve Board on Thursday. 

Mr. Gramlich, a former acting director of the Congressional 
Budget Office, and Mr. Ferguson, a partner at McKinsey & 
Co. in New York, were identified by administration officials 
in April as Mr. Clinton's choices for the openings, pending a 
final screening process. Their confirmations would bring the 
seven-member Fed board back up to full strength. 

• LLS. Can Corp. said it would close five plants and cut about 

300 jobs because of the loss to Crown Cork & Seal Co. of a $35 
million contract with S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. AP) 

• Marvel Entertainment Group Inc. has agreed to re- 
organize the company by combining with the profitable 
toy maker Toy Biz Inc. 

• Quaker Oats Co. will close two plants and an admin- 

istrative office as part of its effort to cur costs, resulting in 
pretax charges of $49 million. (AP. Bloomberg ) 


Continued from Page 13 

huizen, a gold stock analyst with 
Societe Generale Frankei Poliak in 
Johannesburg, more than half of 
South Africa's 30 gold mines are 
unprofitable. At $305, only five 
could stay open for long, he said. 

South Africa bolds an estimated 40 
percent of the world's gold reserves, 
but its operating costs, once the 
world's lowest, now vie with Aus- 
tralia’s to be the highest 
Production, meanwhile, has 
dropped to 495 tons last year from 
1.000 tons in 1970. 

Since unions for black workers 
were legalized in the late 1980s, 
wages and working conditions have 
sharply improved, bur productivity 


has dropped, and the union has op- 
posed efficiency measures such as 
seven -day -a- week operations. 

At the same time, the ground it- 
self is getting harder to work. In 30 
years, average ore grades have de- 
clined from 15 grams of gold a ton to 
about 5 grams, and the richest lodes 
are being found at greater depths — 
as much as two-and-a-half miles 
(4,000 meters) underground in thin, 
mechanization- resistant veins — 
which means shorter work shifts, 
high air-conditioning costs and 
greater danger to workers. 

Marginal mines such as Durban 
Roodepoort Deep, just west of Jo- 
hannesburg, are in serious trouble. 
The 102-year-old mine had as many 
as 18.000 workers in its heyday but 


now employs 2.600. 

Its pipes and winches and hoists 
are rusting. It breaks even at a gold 
price around $360 an ounce, and the 
company's reserves would last 35 
years at that price, managers said. 
The ambitious expansion plans were 
written when gold was at $400. 

"Now, since the gold price 
smacked us in the face, the whole 
revival we had going for two years is 
falling over the cliff," Mr. Prinsloo 
said. "You ny to keep a mine going 
because closure is fatal Things are 
vandalized, equipment deteriorates, 
and start-up costs are huge." 

It is much cheaper, he said, to 
employ a skeleton crew that will 
maintain the equipment than to shut 
down a mine and then reopen it 


c.wnbd to *»w niit»i J. un 

NEW YORK — Stocks turned 
higher Thursday after encouraging 
profit reports and more indications 
that inflationary pressures were 
easing. Optimism over profit at In- 
ternational Paper also helped blue- 
chip averages resume their climb. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age rose 4433 points to close at 
7,886.76. recovering from an early 
loss. International Paper, a Dow 
component, accounted for almost a 
fifth of the gain. 

The bond market was tittle 
changed, holding yields near four- 
month lows, as investors were re- 
luctant to push yields lower before a 
report on producer prices Friday 
that will be examined For new clues 
about inflation. The benchmark 30- 
year bond was unchanged at 100 26/ 
32, with a yield of 6.56 percent, up 
from 6.55 percent Wednesday. 

Computer shares were mixed, 
hurt by disappointing earnings from 
Seagate Technology and others, an 
analyst's statement that Intel's 
earnings could be disappointing 
and concern that price cuts by Com- 
paq Computer and Hewlett-Pack- 
ard could hurt profit margins in the 
personal-computer industry. 

The Nasdaq Composite Index 
rose 430 to 1,490.30. 

The S&P 500-stock index rose 
6.23 to 913.77, led by telephone 
stocks such as BellSouth, which 
won a mobile telephone concession 
in Sao Paulo on Wednesday. 

International Paper gained as in- 
vestors seeking stocks with. pros- 
pects for higher earnings turned to 
paper companies because paper 
prices seem to have bottomed out 
and the industry has cut capacity, 
analysts said. 


“There’s certainly more interest 
than there has been,” said Todd 
Peters, an analyst for Banc One In- 
vestment Advisers Corp., which 
oversees $40 billion. “Some con- 
solidation has occurred, and product 
prices are near trough levels.” . 

International Paper announced a 

cost-cutting effort Tuesday. Geor- 
gia Pacific gained after reporting 
earnings that beat the 23-cenl-a- 
share forecast from analysts. 

Compaq fell even after reporting 
earnings that beat the average ana-.~ 
lyst forecast. The company said it- 

U.S. STOCKS 


. ‘ ’* h? V 
;• - * 




Tietmeyer’s Comments Pull the Dollar Down 


C&inftlnJtn Our Sutf From Pufkarin 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against the yen Thursday but fell 
against the Deutsche mark and other 
European currencies on Bundes- 
bank comments that the dollar's rise 
had gone on long enough. 

In London, the pound dropped 
against the mark despite an increase 
in the British base interest rate. The 
Bank of England said Thursday it 
was raising the rate to 6.75 percent 
from 630 percent. 

The increase, which had been 
widely expected, was the third in as 
many months and the second since 


the British central bank was given the 
power to set rates independently. It 
followed data this week showing that 
inflationary pressures in the econ- 
omy had been rising. 

"The quarter-point hike came as 
no surprise to the market," said 
David Coleman of CIBC. * 'but there 
had been a significant minority hop- 
ing for a half-point point hike, and 
the decision has led to some profit- 
taking." 

Bur expectations that the central 
bank might raise rates again in the 
near term are likely to keep the 
pound strong through the end of the 


year, Mr. Coleman said, wkh a fur- 
ther quarter-point rise likely before 
the end of the summer. He predicted 
that die basic rate would peak 
around 7.5 percent early next year. 

In Germany, the Bundesbank 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

sought to brake the dollar's recent 
surge, slating firmly that its recov- 
ery from 1995 lows had gone far 
enough. 

President Hans Tietmeyer said 
the central bank was “closely 
watching" developments on for- 


eign-exchange markets and was de- 
termined .that the mark would re- 
main strong in the run-up to the 
launch of the euro in 1999. 

"We ate now in a phase in which 
the correction has clearly come to an 
end." he said. 

In 4 P.M. trading, the dollar was 
at 1.7511 DM. down from 1.7603 
DM on Wednesday, and at 1 13.105 
yen, up from 1 12.750 yen. 

The dollar fell to 1 .4485 Swiss 
francs from 1.4580 francs and to 
5.9200 French francs from 5.9445 
francs. The pound rose to $1.6885 
from $ 1 .6869. (A FX. Reuters) 


was cutting prices on business coov 
puters as much as 22 percent. Hew- 
lett-Packard said it would cut prices. ■ 
on its desktop computers 24 percent 
in response, but its stock price 
rose. 

Intel fell after a Salomon Broth-, 
ers analyst told the company - s sales 
force that Intel would probably fail 
to meet analyst expectations be- 
cause of a decline in gross, margins 
and that Salomon would probably 
cut its third-quarter earnings esti- 
mate for the chipmaker. 

Seagate Technology dropped 
after the world's largest maker of 
computer disk drives reported 
lower- than-expecied earnings be- 
fore charges for its fourth quarter of 
61 cents a share. 

Pairgain Technologies fell after 
the telecommunications equipment 
maker reported second-quarter net 
income of 16 cents a share, below 
the expected 1 8 cents. 

GE gained after it said second- 
quarter net income rose to 66 cents a 
share from 58 cents a year earlier, 
above analyst forecasts of 65 cents. 
J.P. Morgan rose on relief that the 
bank’s second-quarter profit 
matched expectations. The profit 
was below last year's level because 
of reduced bond trading revenue. 

Abbott Laboratories fell. The 
health-care company announced 
that its acquisition of Sanoff Phar- 
maceuticals helped lift second-, 
quarter earnings 10.9 percent. 

Wal-Mart Stores, which- said 
same-store sales rose 6.4 percent in 
June, gained. Other retailers report- 
ed mixed sales results in June, with 
lower-than-expected demand for 
clothing hurting department stores 
and apparel retilers. 

Yahoo! shares fell a day after 
reporting a bener-th an -expected 
second-quarter profit, helped by 
growth in traffic on its Internet nav- 
igation site on the World Wide 
Web. ( Bloomberg . AP ) ., 


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U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday's 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 most active shares, 
up to the dosing on Wall Street. 

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IIMW 7*510 791121 7809 A3 TtKJt, *UJ3 

Tram 7aiu> 71173.84 J797J1 281221 *0J3 

UTII 230J3 73140 779J9 23110 *119 

Como 2421.75 2439.41 2411.12 2430.14 + 1 1.22 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


Sfondard & Poors 


indusMob 

Transp. 

Unities 

Finance 

SP500 

SP100 

NYSE 

CampKile 

Itaisinab 

Trancp. 

uiiory 

Rnance 


Prcvaui 

Hlgt Ua dost 
1 08o.46 1062.84 1 069.08 
4*5.05 653.52 655^3 
3C2J64 IV9J7 200.11 
104.B3 102.57 10X05 
922.03 902A8 
899.77 B79A5 885J7 


Today 
4 PM. 

1075.65 

654L58 

20138 

103.83 

913.5* 

890.06 


Nasdaq 


12 '. 


Com pas fee 

Inthistnab 

Bonfcs 

linuraru) 

Hnonu 

Transa 


477 48 471.97 47637 
*05.48 598.07 5618* 
4l15« 427.2b 430.07 
291^5 747.48 JM J1 

435.95 43185 43JJS 


HM* la Last 
1491.95 147638 149193 
1205.14 119181 1205.06 
1651 J3 1644.94 1648.77 
167974 1*6124 1679.02 
1951.50 1942-20 1951.10 
9*5 AO ««L97 9*7 


.124 

♦MO 

♦lit 

+297 

*115 


cap. 

♦ 430 
*7.79 
+ 140 

+-I1-25 

♦ 149 
*04! 


29; AMEX 


4h 

9>1 

17>. 


-»I 

4a 


Wife LBV Uni Op. 

£31.71 62946 631 70 +0AB 


Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 

lOUtmties 

10Indusfrfal5 


Todoy 

Oovt ItoM 

10303 10198 

10134 101 J* 

106.43 106*0 


K mai 

Compaq 

SuodIpj 

PM Mot s 

ATSTi 

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WPnp 

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McOniai 


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PofeyiTdl 

PrecResn 

3Com 

Oy» 

Ascend 

WsIMars 

OcflCpI s 

Amqen 

NedeKm 

BMCnfe 

Ouaniums 

Miaoslls 

Qrade 

DSC 


AMEX 

SPDR 

XCLUfl 

nscw 

Nn&an 

TWA 

MonvDtf 

Hm6ro s 

feKUCp 

Harten 

CnlLB 


Vet Hjgfe 

9J7I* ll'l 
70514 122'. 
40945 38 J . 
5(*Oti 4JV. 
53*35 3b 
53764 69'fe 
53507 35V5 
50439 OfrF'K 
49322 23 
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47B8I 3S«'« 
45J27 5BV. 
42976 35'n 
40674 O'* 
3*527 4W| 


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22 23 

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331 ”35 

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144573 V7Vi 
127*75 1531 
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107311 54V* 
93583 76V » 
90791 49I* 
70425 20V* 
67608 I30VJ 
67505 56+1 
MOW 22'Vn 
99888 l|4t 
55074 74U 
54520 13 M4 
54799 52Aii 
50161 27V* 


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19779 91 Vb 
19030 Vt 
15360 1 
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5817 2»H 

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49J7 

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■ I 
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♦ V. 


duly 10, 1997 

High Law Lfllesl Chge Opml 

Grains 

CORN (CSOT) 

SAW tor minimum, cum oer Bushel 
J0I97 J47 247 247Li -7 16.082 

5es97 Zjr.i 233 234Vj -}-< 62.928 

Pec 97 235V1 233’a 234V: _7i« 15DJ43 

Mar 98 743'- J4I»* 242'r. -J'i 26J92 

Mar'S 247 Va 248 -I'.* 4,561 

JLH98 252 2501; 251’i -2W 8.208 

Sec 95 248 ?44fe; 746'5 -JV; 762 

Ejj. sale njv. wetfs-sate 69.499 
Wed'S aoeninl 274 J96 of! 1671 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 
mions- ooBara per ron 

M 97 2*3 U 2545) MBS -0.90 7.IH9 

Aug 97 24300 239 JO 24380 253)79 

Sen 77 223 JO 219J0 27130 -2J0 17.100 

00 97 204.00 202J0 210*0 -3 50 13.821 

Dec 97 176J0 I9J30 194J0 —6.10 36.135 

Jan 98 176.00 I92J0 19170 -4.00 4.304 

Es.sdes na wed's, sale 30.253 
Weds open ini H4jj7j oN 2296 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 

60.MQ e»- oerm par Ri 


High Low Laled Oige Opini 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTN1 
IS D00 bs.- O otki par Hi. 

JUI97 7600 7100 74J0 *055 175 

Sen 97 76.00 73J0 74.80 *040 19463 

Nov 92 7W» 76JD 7735 -041 6.574 

Jan 98 81 JO . 79 JO 80JD -040 2.459 

Ek. sa«es NA Wed's, sde 2.144 
v/ed*scFaifeii 31J71 o« 2fl 


Metals 

GOLD (NCA4X) 

lOOtroviE.- dollars per troy oj. 

JU97 32020 -ZOO S 

Aug 97 322J0 31 9 JO 32080 -U0 111717 

Sep 97 31140 *1.80 4 

OC 77 32180 331 JO 3Z2J0 *140 10.901 

Dec 97 325.90 32Z70 324 JO *140 37.529 

Fel>98 37640 -1.80 9.993 

Aw 98 378.50 *180 4.864 

JunJfl 330.90 329 JO 33190 -1.80 7,544 

Aug 98 333.40 -1J0 IJ43 

Es* soles NA Wetfs. sates 42.060 
Wed’s open int 218751 up 7 88 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 

75.090 lbs.- owns per in. 


JUI97 

2213 

21.75 

7144 

-0.22 

1480 

Jui 97 

107.10 

10545 

106.90 

*145 

5408 

Am 97 

27 J5 

3IJ1 

2149 

-OJO 

24466 

Aug 97 

1BSJ0 

1W.0C 

10445 

* IAS 

J.VJ* 

Sen 97 

22.33 

71.93 

21.97 

-044 

144IQ 

Sep 97 

104.90 

10X65 

1005 

+ 1.70 

24,755 

Cld97 

2245 

21.97 

21.99 

—0.34 

14453 

Od97 

10X50 

10121 

mm 

+ 1.50 

147/ 

Dec 97 

2143 

77 06 

2248 

—046 

41491 

Nov 97 

1(000 

10240 

10165 

-IJb 

1,229 


22JD 

2241 

2241 

-041 


Dec 97 

102/5 

10740 

101.90 

+ 1/0 

4.782 

Est.sdes NA 

Werfs. rate 

78.390 


Jon 90 

10140 

100*0 

101.10 

+ 1.20 

664 


wed's open inf 106.878 oh 4282 
SOYBEANS (CBOT) 


Fed 98 10040 100.75 100140 -IA) 


Mar 98 10U0 98.90 99.80 


►1.40 


ESI. sate NA Wed’s, sate 14.038 


m 

14M 



5/00 Du mnimum- cent eor Budw< 


Wetfs opetiW 

51440 




JUJ97 

797 

740 

779 

—10 

4.488 




+ S 

6U997 

7® 

729 

746 

-2 

33465 

SILVER (NCMX) 




+ »» 

Sep 97 

452 ’4 

437 

44514 

-SV, 

17.687 

SMB bov 01- c«ir» oer mor oz. 




Now 97 

406 

593 

59b V, 



Jui 97 434.90 

630.00 

434 JO 

-4/0 

237 

♦■n 

Jm98 

605V, 

597 

400 

— 17Ai 

11751 

Sep 97 439.50 

430J0 

43840 

-440 

6S.7BI 



71.777 


Dec 97 6453)0 

42100 

484J0 

+ 19 JO 

14/70 

■ife 

Wetfs WW ini 

141.931 

Oft 9J9 


Jon 98 


44640 

+640 

18 


7** 

14* 

8'4 


10 1 

1*7 

a* 1 

nl 

24*. 

a - 1 

9 


Trading Activity 
NY5E 

Advanced 
Detuned 
Unchanged 
law issues 
Nbn Hiqt- 
New L9W 


.fi AMEX 


Adviinded 
DednM 
unmonqed 
ToW issues 
New Hlqm 
New Lows 


I7B4 

1099 

557 

3400 

JOS 

14 


302 

m 

m 

TT> 

2b 


1145 

1725 

542 

3432 

366 

24 


12 


Nasdaq 

Advanced 

Decfincd 

Unchanged 

Towwsubs 

NewHMAs 

New Laws 

Market Sales 


NY5E 
Arne* 
Nasdaq 
In millions. 


Ho am Pi*,. 

1632 1891 

I6AJ 2767 

2134 1574 

5451 5772 

1 16 374 

E 77 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

5.000 bu mlr*mom- cores per Bushel 
Jul97 325 321 321Vj -41/* 7.5*1 

5ep97 JM'b 329 32915 -41* 31425 

Dec 97 349V. 347 XOHl -5h 34.600 

Mar 98 356 351 351 '-a -5 5.793 

Esi. sate NA Wetft soles 30450 
Wed'S open W 46.953 off S9I 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CMER) 


6J0 9426 
6J0 7.860 


► 640 693 


Mor 98 450.70 44450 450.70 
Mav98 45450 

Ail 98 4S8JQ -630 1.997 

Sep 98 46230 45850 46230 
Est. sales NA Wed’s sate 17.244 
Wed’s open int 100.224 up 1171 


PLATINUM (HMER) 

SO my Di- am tars per frov 01 
JUI97 398-70 3HL00 39170 
Oa97 38X00 30030 181.70 
Jan 98 38000 376.00 37630 
EsI. sate NA Wed's, sate 3.7* 
Weds Open felt 12.784 of) 570 


1.70 B13 

040 9.961 

010 1461 


3651 2 
17532 
544.757 
447^71 
309.426 
254411 
210417 
151361 
111792 
92409 
73.908 
.67395 


64.179 

«2 

3 


39430 

2.676 

555 


108.579 
1.094 
349 


Tatar 

MO 

549.8* 

Z23I 

549.8* 



40.000 lbs.- cents per b 
Aug 97 45.10 6152 

64.97 

+ 142 

40488 


Da 97 

68.47 

OS! 

4847 

-040 

27/48 


Dec 97 

70.97 

70JJ7 

70.85 

+0 A/ 

14.975 


Feb 98 

7X00 

7100 

72.77 

*0/7 

7,115 

707/7 

Apr 98 

74.85 

7195 

7470 

*0.45 

3.454 

Junta 

TUB 

70JS 

7tt 67 

-0J2 

2.204 


dose 

LONDON METALS (LME) 
Dollars per metric Ian 


Dividends 

Company Per Ant Rec Pay Company 

IRREGULAR . 


91 >".f 

S-*c in*" 

18" IIW 


12W 

life 

3>t 


•’l 

Corporate Hi Yld 

.. .1195 

7-21 

7-31 

_ 

Corporate Hi Yld II 

- .1074 

7-21 

7-31 

- 

MunlYMFLFd 

- -0734 

7-21 

7-30 

■ ’• 

MuniYId PA Fd 

- .0729 

7-21 

7 30 

■lB 

MuniYId Outalty 

- .0741 

7-21 

7-30 


Senior HI Inca 

- .0716 

7-21 

7-31 

-•t 

Tour Mir id 

- .0544 

7-21 

7-30 


10 '. 
16 1 
23»* 
IM 
9%« 
Hi 
12V. 
TPl 
4V» 
IV* 


STOCK SPUT 
Walgreen Co 2 lor 1 spH. 

REVERSE STOCK SPUT 
Ptey Co Toys 1 forSreverse spiTL 

INCREASED 

Circle Inn S .13 8-15 P-15 

FCNBCorp Q 16 7-18 7-31 

INITIAL 

Eaton Vance Corp - .10 7-31 8-11 

Walgreen Con _ M b-21 

REGULAR 

Ape* Mum Fd M AS39 7-21 


Bu it Ingin Res 
Cortoo Ceramics 
Ford Molar Del 
Heritage USGvl 
Into OppFd 2000 
Indiana Fedi 
Miller, Herman 
Peerless Mfn 
Richardson El 
Roodway Express 
Souitiran Incg 
Sttmesin Enemy 
Tour Muni NY Hid 
Voyogeur AZ, 
VayogeurCO. 
VayageurFL, 
Voyage urMmn 
Vpyngeur Minn a 
Vuyagcur Minn 111. 
Weeks Corp 
Wolverine WM 
World wd Dllrvcsl 


Par Amt 

□ .1375 
Q -075 
O M 
M .087 
M .0529 
Q 18 
Q 0725 
Q .175 
Q .04 
0 .05 

O .06 
O .06 
M .0549 
M .064 
M .0612 
M 4XJ 
M .0775 
M .0*8 
M JkJ 
O .43 

a xqi ? 

M 0785 


Rec Pay 

9- 12 10-1 

7-31 8-15 

0-1 9-2 

7-18 7-24 

7- 21 731 

715 7-JO 

8- 39 10 15 

8-15 8-74 
8-70 93 

8-15 9-2 

9-1 '>-15 

7-21 B-5 

7-21 7-30 

7-17 7-38 

7-17 7-28 
7- 1 7 7-28 

7 17 7-28 

7-17 7-28 

7-17 7-2B 

7-21 7-3? 

10- 1 11-3 

7-21 7-31 


Ed sate 17.390 Wed’s, soles 17.117 
Wed's open im «54*4 ua 785 


FEEDER CATTLE (GMER) 
SOMO lbs.- cents per IB 


1 (HM Grade) 

Spat iBlta IS52W 1540D0 1541.00 

Forward 1579.00 1680.00 15*9.00 1570.00 

Capper CaMades (HW Grata) 

Spa r 239700 2400.00 2386V> 2389 ^ 

Fonwrd 723X00 228300 2271 Vj 2372fei 

Lead 

Spat 645V, 446V, 633 Vl 634V, 

Forward 664LOO M140 648 00 *4900 


Aug 97 

81 12 

10 02 

01.12 

♦ 0.97 

1IA77 

Sen 97 

81.15 

79.90 

BIO 

-0.57 

1043 

Oct 97 

81 JO 

00.15 

8140 

♦ 0.95 

4.182 

Nov 97 

KL2D 

8165 

82.73 

+ 090 

X922 

Junta 

8170 

SX55 

CUD 

+ 0.90 

1.384 

Marta 

8170 

82.37 

tm 

+1140 

nr> 

Esr.sate J.947 

’ wetfs. sate 

3.992 


Wetfs open int 

2X538 

UP 175 




9-12 


7 » 


i»-«"nartt b-cpproxunale aauaat per 
share/ ADR; g-payable in Canadian funds,- 
■wwfefiRilp R-Rinrtwly; s-semt-onnoai 


HOGS-Leaa (CMER) 

«4»o ■» - eras eer a 

Jui 97 82.90 82 45 8245 -4.20 4.783 

Aug 97 81 17 805 «L72 *007 12,952 

009? 74 77 718? 7435 *025 9.TO 

Dec 9 7 7160 J1L60 71.15 * 042 4.644 

Feb 98 rare 89.10 49.90 *040 1.791 

ESI sate 9.695 Wed's, sate "MS 

WedTsaoennl 34060 up 804 

PORK BELLIES (CMER) 

w.raaitn - eras per ib. 

Jui 97 81 J7 WO 81.47 *100 772 

Aug 97 00 37 7105 7907 *2J7 4JS9 

Fe09S 7265 71.15 7225 * US 787 

Ed. soles 2J4S wed’s. sales 2417 
Weds aoenint 6.1*3 1* 179 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sales figures are unaffiooL Yewlir highs raid lows reflect Itw prawous 52 weeics plus Itie curienl 
weefe. toil nefl the fate! tnrfng day. WhereaspU or 5®* dividend amounOng to 25 perc cm ar mm 
has been paid Ihe years hi^-iow range and dMdcnd are slum lor me new sfcrics only. Unless 
<<hentose noted rales olrftrrdends ore an nualdisburseincnts based on Itie Wes) d wJa ration, 
a - dividend also extra (s). b - annual rale at dividend plus stock dividend, c - liquidating 
dividend cc - PE exceeds W.dd - called, d - new yearty low dd - loss in the Iasi 1 2 rnonihs. 
e - diviaend declared or paid hi preceding 12 months. I - annual rale, increased on kisi 
dedoraiion.g- dividend in Canatfian funds, subjcci lo 1 5*v non-residence fat 1 - dividend 
declared atier spfil-up or slock dividend, j - dividend paid this year, omitted, deferred. □» no 
action taken at lotos) dividend meeting, k - dividend declared ar paid ibis year, an 
accumulative Issue with dividends in arrears, m - annual rate, reduced on lost declaration, 
n - new issue in the past 52 weeks. The high-low range begins with the slo»i of trading, 
nd - next day doDwerv. p - initial dividend, annual rate unknown. P/E - pnco-camings ralio 
q - closcd-end mutual fund.r- dividend declared or paid in preceding 1 2 months, diu^ iimk 
dividend, s - stock split. Dividend begins wiih dale of split, sis - sales. I - dividend paid m 
sloes in prccctfing 12 months, estimated cosh value on cx-dividend or ex distribution dale, 
u - new yearly high, v - trading halted, w - in bankruptcy or iccchrmnip or being rearganued 
under the Bankruptcy Ad. or securities assumed by such companies «rd -when distributed, 
wi - when issued* ww - with warrants, k - ox-dnndond or c« rights nlis . ci-rtninbuiion. 
*W - without warrants- y- ex-dividend and sales In tulL ytd - yield * • saves in w# 


Food 


COCOA (NC3E) 
igmrVK an- 11 
Juisr 
See 97 


1580 

1543 

1580 

‘ B 

S3 

1609 

1575 

1599 

► 5 

17.919 

1656 

1427 

1488 

♦ 4 

22.055 

1684 

1657 

1479 

t s 

71-689 

1699 

1680 

16*9 

4 5 

MJM0 

1717 

1700 

1717 

♦ S 

1.147 


JUI 98 

ESI sows SJW wea-s-saes xw* 
WetTsooenmt 101.849 off KBS 

COFFEE CtHCSE) 

V.SOO lbs -eras Berta 

JUI97 195 00 182 50 IB2.S0 -14.50 

Sep 97 178 00 160.00 161 70 -1535 

Dec 97 16000 I47J9 14840 -10.95 

ftftr M 15000 14050 14050 -9JW 

MOV 98 1 39-50 136.75 IJ67S -876 

Est. tales 9.54a w«r s sate 5-336 

Wed's ooen ml 7041? Oh 54 
SUGAR-WORLD II INCSE) 

lu.oooibs -trasi**ih 

Od 97 11.20 II « HOi 

Mu' M H30 11.23 H24 -001 

MOV 98 II 18 II 12 II II -002 

JUW 1112 HO/ 110? -0.02 

Eil. wte 9.613 WotTs sate 10-409 

WeO'sapennU la.at up MS 


519 

I1J66 

1203 

J.«8 

083 


97.730 

47.468 

10.105 

*.559 


Fonlfeinl *8*54)0 6876.00 689SJM 690000 

tin 

Spot 5465.00 547500 546500 547SJH 

Forward 5520470 5525J0 5520-00 553000 

Hoc (Special High Grata) 

Spat 147200 147100 1451 fe, 1452'? 

Forward 148200 14814)0 14*3 00 1464JH 

High Law Close chgc Opkrl 

Financial 

US T. BILLS (CMER) 

tl mHEon- pli <0 100 OC1 

54P97 94.90 94J9 9490 a.135 

Dec 97 94 76 W.74 *4.7* «0I 

MorSO 9AM 10 

ESI. soles 307 Wed’s, sate 153 
Werfsonenint 8.746 up 23 

5 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

liooJWOaiin-te SMPnoi 1 00 per 

Sep 97 107-03 106-54 107-00 217^59 

Dec 97 104-47 106-39 106-47 1.926 

Mw98 41 

Esr. ute na wed's, sate *0-355 

Wetfs ooen ml 2I9J85 oH 13604 

I0YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

1 1004XM arm- pn & xrrte al ISO Pd 

Seta 9? 109-17 109-08 109-15 342^54 

Dec 97 109-04 HW-OO 109-04 6.541 

Mor 98 108-74 1 

ESI sate NA wed’s, sate 78-396 

Wed’s open «n J48.995 up 4561 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 
is prt-Siopaoo-prs A rends or 100 pd) 

Sep 97 113-11 113-lb 113-38 -01 463.199 

0x91113-11 113-04 113-16 -01 JSJI4 

Mot-981 13-06 113-05 11106 —01 9493 

JunfS 112-77 —01 78* 

Esi sores N^S wed’s soes 313.845 

Wed’s ooen ini S0IJ6S up 162*9 

LIBOR I -MONTH (CMER) 

U ml fcan- pis o» MO Kl 
WW 4412 9431 94J3 I8.M6 

Aug 97 9434 WJ7 94 JJ 19.910 

Sec 97 94 31 94.74 44JI 7 053 

Esi sate 3 387 Wed's sate /.tv 
Wed'snpen-nl 49.97* up III 

LONG GILT lUFFEl 

L54000 ■ pis A 32nds oflOOpd 

Sep 97 114-14 114-03 11447 0 07 1*2370 

Dec. 97 NI Nl 113 2b 1) 07 

Esi sate 75.1*0 Pr« ah's, 52.4W5 

P*”v ixtaninr 1*2.498 up u/mi 


High Law Latest dige Op felt 

GERMAN GOV. BUND (UFFE) 

DM25a000-ptsori0Dpd 

Sep 97 102.93 102J3 10171 -0.15 291873 

Dec 97 101 JM 10173 101.78 -0.15 8764 

EsL tales: 1*1128. Prev.sate: 201814 

Prev. open fell.: 3cn.*37 up 4063 

10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS fMATIF) 

FFsaaooo-pbot loopd 

Sep 97 130.70 130-24 13044—028 219.203 

Dec 97 - 99J6 98.98 99.12 —0 Jo 1402 

Mar *8 98.7b 98.7b 90J2 — 0J6 0 

Ext. sate; 141954 

Open tnL: 721605 up 7X25. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 

ITT. 200 million ■ pts of 100 pci 
Sep 97 13&51 13595 136J4 -032 111,648 
Dec 97 108.40 10806 10829 -02* 1.773 

EsL win: 90*05 Pre*. sate: 61724 
Prev. open fed.: 351461 up 74173 
EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI rn41ain-pts o4 100 pa. 

JU197 94J4 9425 9425 

AU097 M2S 9134 9424 

S8P 97 9423 9421 9423 

Dec 97 94.87 9405 9407 

Mar 98 9402 9199 9402 

Jun98 9193 91*9 9193 

S6P98 9183 7179 9182 

DBC98 9372 7168 9171 

Mar?? 9171 9166 91 70 

Jun99 9166 9163 9165 

Sec 99 9162 915? 9142 

Dec 99 9166 9153 9155 a 

Esfsdes 368422 Wed’s softs 252.128 
Wed’s aoeninl 2J75414 oil 3864 
B7HT15H POUND (CMER) 

63. sn pounds. 9 per pound 
Sep 97 16816 1.6804 tjJ4S 

Dec 97 urn U7W 1J7W 

M«v98 1.6732 

E5t. sates 9.907 wetrs sales 7.185 
Wed's open int 653)04 up 986 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

1 06.000 daan. 1 per Cdn du- 

Sep 97 7 JM 2305 73)2 

Dec 97 7365 7350 7350 

Mar« .7388 .7375 .7382 

Esr.sate 4.145 Wetfs. safes 401 s 
WM'iOPenml 43.092 off 7* 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

125.000 mar* 5 , 1 pot morfi 

Sec 97 J7S4 5686 J734 

Dec 97 J7B7 5764 J772 

Mar 98 5820 5008 jfilO 

Est.sdM 34.24) wed's. sote ir.433 
Wed’s men ml 110.124 up 264 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

1 15 milan van. 1 per POD ven 
Sep 97 8968 8917 8922 58.219 

Dec 77 .9057 2035 HDS 955 

Mor» .9156 IB 

Es soles 11401 wed's, sales 9.159 
Wed’s openin' 59.282 oh 908 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

1254)00 hand- I per Nan: 

Sep 97 4968 HOI J7S1 
Dec 97 7035 .7005 7025 

Mar 98 7101 

SSL? 0 ** '’-W. Wed’S. sote 11.149 
Werfsatonmi 51 JOT eft 1521 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

500.000 mn. X per ana 
Sec 9/ .12410 .12335 .12405 
Dec97 .I19M .1(915 .11980 
Mor 98 .11600 .11555 .11600 
ESI sate 7,536 Wed’s, sate 5.554 
Wed'S open itf ISAM up 1401 
3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

65004)00 - pis of 100 pci 

Sep«7 92 86 92.77 93 *3 * 0,05 Ul.ni 

2 59 *<UM 139.500 
91A4 9243 92.47 * 0j)2 101^40 

97J0 ■»? 40 92 45 ,0 02 65.5W 

97 JO 93 Jf 9J46 < 0 03 44.* 10 

2H! S^S !£■* tOOJ 31J12 

92J4 92.48 93.51 .Ob2 37.470 

9158 92 JO ojij , 0i(n ^780 

Esi sides. 90U43S. Prer ante: 61734 
Pm. Open fell . JSI^bl up 7.073 
1-MONTH EUROMARK (LIFFE) 

DM1 mfeUan ■ pis of 100 pci 

9* 8 7 94 B7 96*7 Uneh. *116 

S? 84 *9 *• Until. 1.141 

9*BS 9b JI3 9*A4 — DjOI 254.393 

9*78 9* 73 96.75 ^0 03 toLW 

9* 69 9bAS 9664 ^003 Ml JM 

94-55 «6j0 96 52 raiMS 
9* 36 9630 9*14 Jom \stra 

*610 9* Ob 9609 ^002 lOim 

* »" «« 4.S? 'M 

95b* vs *3 9SA5 —002 4SJI1 
Esi sate *0405 Pm cote: 4X774 
Ptpv opnn mi 351.4*1 up 7.073 

™°"I H PIBOR (MAT IF) 

FF5 mHEon ■ pis d 100 pn 

**-57-005 7*774 

2, B 94J0-PAS 14.299 

9649 9642 96.45—0 05 2&503 

**J4 96 JJ — 004 Siw 

9b 3* 96 24 *6.26 —.0 03 3L509 

96 10 Vb Ob *607 —004 18424 
9591) 9SB6 9&89 -00? 144*8 
Esi ■ate. 1 1 1.352. 
ripen ml 297A«upXI8 

?rl*? E U BD u M “J Fp E > 

irt 1 1 mdlhSn • pf.. or too pci 
5ep97 93 30 *3 78 93JI -009 113271 

*3» 93 M n.KI 014 HOW 
*■»<* V4 07 94 10 0 10 5dL469 

94 ^ 

‘ ««• -JOB 78.710 

’l.T *164 94 67 -007 ItlA. 

«4 w 2122 -<10, 10 

, . , *■**» *9J* -00b 5.177 

f^SOfe- 90.M3S Prrv snte U.JU 

Pm “Pi’iiftl 3M 44,1 up 7.0 n 


High Low Latest Orgc Qptnt 


Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTN) 

504XW IDs.- cants par b. 

Od97 7X95 7X30 7X80 -036 12.20 ‘ 

Dec 97 7420 7140 7403 -832 4X1T 

Mar 98 7130 7465 75J0 -OJO 7.7T 

Mov?8 76M 71*0 7185 -835 1.9* 

Jui 98 7640 76.00 76J5 —820 UK 

Esl.sttas N.4. WWs. safes 9.634 
wed’s open Inf 70.831 up 383 

HEATING OR. (NMER) 

AUnOeo 1 , cents per oto 

Aug 97 5185 51.90 S2.I1 37J47 

Sep 97 5134 52J0 5279 -0J1 23414 

Oct 97 5418 5335 5159 -056 20053 

Nov 97 S10S 5445 5449 -056 14.911 

Dec 97 5590 5115 55 l34 -0J6 15.181 

Jan 98 54 A) 5584 55184 -058. 1X114 

Feb 98 5455 5405 56.09 -ft* 6-577 

Mor 98 5195 5534 SS34 -ft* 4303 

Apr 98 5460 5414 5414 -076 33)9 

Esr.sate NA w«fs.sote 27JM 
Wed’s open felt 144476 off 1328 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

1.000 MX.- tartars pm- Ml 
Aug 97 19J2 19.07 1931 -025 74716 

5w97 19.66 19.19 1937 -032 5840? 

0077 19.72 19 35 1936 -6J0 37^78 

Nov 97 19.73 19 40 19.51 -Ot? 21,007 

Dec 97 19.42 19.45 19.55 -030 4X427 

Jpn98 1961 19 J4 19.61 -0-17 21,747 

Feb HI 19.64 1?J9 1944 -OT7 KMM2 

Mar 98 19.67 1935 196? -414 5415 

Apr 98 1968 1968 1968 -017 4927 

Mcv9B 19.70 1930 19.70 -017 7,094 

Es. soles NA Wed's, soles IMJ51 
WM s open int 4Q9.S75 up 4456 


' ST’. 


NATURAL GA5 (NMER) 


X085 

LIP 

39m 

LOTS 

L12S 

23.178 

2.115 

2-130 

24,189 

X24i 

1260 

H424 

2485 

2490 

15495 

2.421 

2/3S 

15J23 

2JW 

2460 

10/34 

2445 

1250 

7JDS 

LIIS 

1120 

3L4D7 

1075 

LOBS 

LS75 


50.307 

1.171 

161 


19J67 

10.539 

41* 


Dec 97 

Mar 98 

Junta 
Septa 
o«ta 
Mar W 
Jun99 


Aug 97 
Sop 97 
Doc 97 
Mar 98 

Jim's 
Sop'S 
Doe ta 
Mar 9* 
Junta 


Doc 97 
Marta 
Jun ta 
Srp9B 
Doe98 
Morta 


Doc 0 
Marta 

Junta 
Sop'S 
Oc 98 
Morta 
Junta 


.TT „ raoi-ioiES a.™ 

Wetfs open inr 201328 up 1213 • 

UNLEADED GASOLINE (NMER) 

<1600 so. cams nor aal 

Aug97 SJ5 5730 5080 ‘0J7 3S4R4 

Sep97 57*5 5665 57J0 *(U» 153118 

0097 55.95 55.* 55.95 -0.14 &4» 

Nov 97 553) 5480 5530 -832 X8M 

DecW 5470 5465 54JO -40 6303 

£nW 5530 5475 55.15 -837 4364 

M - 10 “ ftI7 , '* !1 

Morta 55,70 5530 070 —482 3386 

Efljdes NA Wetfs. soles 28398 
wetfs open mr 77.196 up 3399 

gasoil iiPE) 

U.S. doUora per metrte ion ■ lots of MB tans 
Aug 9? 1*425 16)35 161.75 -1J0 24199 

Sep 97 1*5.75 16X00 1*400 — 1610 7.553 

Od 97 168 is 1*SJ0 1*635 — 1JJ0 7.«« 

Nov 97 166.00 1*7.75 1*8.25 —1.00 4693 

Dec 97 17475 169J0 17000 -0.75 9J85 

JBI9S 171.00 170 JO 130.75 -035 iWB 

Feb 98 171 JO 171.00 17135 -0J0 2J»2 

Marta 170.75 1*9.75 170.00 -OJO 1605 

Esi. sate: 71.21* . Prev. sate 31.917 
Piw. open Hit- 74355 up 115 
HHENT OIL (!PE) 

Jr “■ £P Uar ^; of IJ»0 hamils 

ISH 17 ’ BS IT-96 *S315 

5jy « IS- 30 17 W -e-M 65.042 . 

0ct97 18 4* 1814 18.16 —038 14351 

Nm9» IBJ* 1432 1832 -035 9388 

Pe«7 14** 1863 1463 -034 14780 

jTr 1 * 18 70 1845 1447 -033 10990 

18JO 18J2 1445 — OZ! 451? 

Maras NT. N.T 1SJJ -433 7,404 

S ,7S ’ Pl»* *ote’45.3M . 

Fnw. ooen feiLl 77,208 up 1459 

Stock Indexes ' 

SAP COMP. INDEX (CMER) 

900 « Indu 

IS.- 2MS 9”-® 91935 +135 179374 

S’’ 00 mso - 0 - 21 W 1 * 

22 r . , L! J6 5 a . 93 f- 00 ’ 34 “ -I’M ».t98 

Est.saes NA Wetfs. sate 73,129 . 
wetfs ooen M 186385 up19ffl 

CAC40(MATIF> 

FFJO0 per Inara point 

*9® -J 7* 1 7.0 2931 J —21.0 

$321 7Wao TWO — 21J) 

SfFV 2975 0 2*270 2W7J-20J 

^ q 7 29840 2944X1 2971.0 — 20J 

Mar 98 3007003001 JM 2995J — 20J 
Esi. sate 14843. 

Open mi . 1Q.458 up 1650. 

RSE 1M1LIFFEI 

r2£ POT Indox point 

-*778.0 

MOfta NT NT 4881.0 -Ml 
p?f ^ ****** 10.281. Prfv sate: 12,7*9 
Pm- 00m m 7X1*2 m\.in 


♦ SJ) 
»5t0 
*ift 


30074- 
1653 
7ft 88* 
990 
.45*7 


*4923 
4138 
- 101 


: 4 


Cofiunodiiy indexes 

Ooso PrevtaKt 

Moody s NA 1JO6J0 

1.900. SO 1.90030 

MJ.W 16830 
237.74 223.91 

saanSSS®®*** - " 


Reuters 
O-l. Fuhrres 
CRB 


L> vSP 











INTERN ATIO!N A L HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 11, 199' 


PACE 15 


rofits 

Boost 


AS1A/E4CIF1C 


'cast*. 

WO by lion. w Vh 

bas occurred ami? t,Sl 

tionai Paper anm 
’S effoaVs^a 
c gained after L 
^ beat the ^ 
c^t from analvs, ^ l ‘ ni - 
l fe [[ even after rm n 
bat beat the 3v«.?^ n,[| t 


'tn/. 

"niit« 


.decline m S r,,s, m;lrWi 


Salomon *™i d 
xd-quarter eom.ne-. ■' 
he cmpmaker. 

: Technology d r ,. md 
world s largest nuk« ,, 
- disk drives rvi«.n 0 ! 
vexpected cumin*. ™ 
esfor its fourth quanr-r ..i 
share. 

a Technologic i L -|] „ |f . r 
mmuiucation-. cq u ,p ninil 
•orted second- qu.1 ncr nt , 
-.16 cents a s|, are . W„ A 
:ed 18 cents, 
ned after it s.ud 
I income rose t# > t* tL - ravj 
n 5S cents a y.-jr earlier 
lyst forecasts ni 1,5 ^ nu ‘ 
an rose on relief ih.it ihi 
second-qu.inv.' 
expectations rhe pr..|ii 
■ hist year s level le*.jue 
i bond trading revenue 
Laboratories u*JI The 
e company .-.nii.<utkr\i 
quisition of Sanou Phar- 
ils helped Sift .eowd 
mings 10.9 percem. 
an Stores, whu.ii aid 
e sales rose b 4 pet cent in 
iCni. Other ret a 1 1 :r> r-.p >ti- 
sales results m Juru.. v.nh 
n-expected .lenunrl . 
tuning dcpariniem More 
el retailers, 
shares fell . »ti» alter 
a bener-th.:ii-expc«.io1 
tarter profit, hdpo.l to 
traffic on u> Internet n.n ■ 
lie on the Vv..rld Wulf 

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AjmsT kwkr Iks* 

FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY — Katsumi Terada, president 
of Rhyme Co^ testing a prototy pe of a Boys Dream Helicopter 
in Matsumoto, Japan. It will go on (he market in 1998. 


Downdraft on Asia Markets 


l ~ . mqllni K Om 'i# t r, 

SINGAPORE — Southeast 
Asian stocks tumbled Thursday 
amid concern that Thailand's finan- 
cial woes would be mirrored in other 
countries in the region. 

‘ 'Everything is getting a bit 
wobbly,” said Hugh Young, man- 
aging director at Aberdeen Asset 
Management Asia Ltd., which has 
$1 billion under management. 

“Many investors don’t differen- 
tiate” among countries in Asia, he 
said. 

Some of Thailand's problems — 
slowing growth and a bloated real- 
estate market — are evident in other 
countries in the region, leading in- 
vestors to lump them together, ana- 
lysts said. Thailand last week gave 
up its multibillion-dollar defense of 
the baht and devalued the currency, 
cutting it loose ftom its peg to a 
basket of currencies dominated by 
the dollar. 

Key interest rates in the Philip- 
pines and in Malaysia were shoved 
higher TTiursday as the central banks 
in those two countries sought to 
defend their currencies. 

Markets across the region — with 
the exception of Thailand — 
plunged. The benchmark slock in- 
dex in the Philippines fell 3.01 per- 
cent, Malaysia’s lost more than 2 
percent, and markets in Indonesia 


and Singapore tumbled about l per- 
cent. 

The Philippines’ central bank 
raised a key interest rate for the 
fuunh lime in about a week to de- 
fend the peso, lifting it to 32 percent 
from 30 percent. The rate, Manila’s 
overnight borrowing rate, has more 
than doubled in the week since the 
devaluation of the baht. High in- 
terest rales tend to depress stock 
prices because investors fear a slow- 
down in corporate borrowing, 
which could affect the economy in 
general. 

"The central bank has decided to 
defend the peso at all costs.” said 
Joel Mendoza, research head at 
Banco Santander's Manila office. 
“Companies wouldn't want to bor- 
row at such high rates.” 

The Philippine Slock Exchange 
Composite Index, a basket of 30 
companies, fell 78.05 points to close 
at 23 U. 15, its lowest since May 20. 

In Malaysia, the benchmark 
Composite Index fell 2.4 percent, to 
J. 008.52, its lowest since January 
1996. after the government’s top 
economic adviser warned currency 
speculators that the central bank 
would defend the ringgit. Malay- 
sia's overnight rate — the rate at 
which banks lend to one another — 
jumped to 50 percent, from 9 per- 
cent Wednesday. 


In Indonesia, the Jakarta Stock 
Market Composite Index fell 8.99 
points, or 1.2 percent, to 729.15. its 
largest one-day drop since May 15. 

Indonesia this week became the 
latest of the countries in the region to 
place curbs on property lending, 
largely in reaction to Thailand's fi- 
nancial crisis, which was caused in 
part by a glut in the property mar- 
ket. 

Property concerns also weighed 
on Singapore stocks, with the 
benchmark Straits Tunes Industrials 
index of 30 stocks falling 14.63 
points, or 0.7 percent, to 1 ,968.34. 
The DBS50 Index, which includes 
banks and property stocks, fell 
10.13 points, or 2 percent, to 496.46. 
its biggest decline in two weeks. 

In Hong Kong, meanwhile, share 
prices rose 0.9 percent, largely cut 
gains in property stocks as investors 
seemed to play down concern over 
the government 's land policy, 
traders said. The benchmark Hang 
Seng index rose 135.50 points, to 
14,839.23. 

Victor Kwok, head of research at 
Deutsche Morgan Grenfell Asia Se- 
curities Ltd., said restraint among 
developers in pricing apartments 
had eased concern that the govern- 
ment would impose harsh measures 
to stem soaring capital values. 

f Bloomberg. AFP) 


Investor’s Asia 


Singapore 
Straits Times 



Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 


F M A M J J 
1987 


F M A M J J 
1997 


23000 

21000 

20000 

'19000 

16000 

17000 




F M A M J J 
1997 


Exdwtge 
Hong Kong 

Index 
Hang Seng 

Thursday Prev. . % 

Close . . Close Change 

' 14J3933 14,703.73 +0-92 

Singapore 

Straits Times . 

1.96&34 

1.982.07 

*0.74 

Sydney 

AHOrdararies 

£694.40 

2,688.10 

-0.06 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

19,754.78 

19.897.17 +029] 

Ku^UanfwCon^osrte 

1.0&&52- 

1,033.24 

-2L39 

Bangkok 

SET 

649.33 

639.71 

*2.1 4 

Seoul . 

Composite Index 

787,77 

771.99.,. 

-6,55: 

Taipei 

Stock Marictt Index 9,429.74 

9,362.68 


U&nSe 

P$E ■ 

2,511.15 

2,589:26 

-3*1 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

729.15 

738.14 

. -T.22 

WeSington 

NZS&40 . 

ZSQ7JS1 

2.52SL3G 

,-OJSO 

Bombay 

Sensitive tn&x 

43T&37 

4,404.69 

-OJRJ 

Source: Talekurs 


lniciTCiu.4ial Hirold TriNnc 

Very briefly; 


Bangkok to Look to Tokyo First for Aid 


A U.S. Investor Backs 
Hong Kong’s Dollar 


? j 


Fannie Mae Issues Bonds in the Currency 


l»r 


Bloomberg Men s 

HONG KONG — America's big- 
gest investor in home mortgages 
made a show of confidence Thurs- 
day in the currency of Hong Kong 
under Chinese rule. 

The Federal National Mortgage 
Association sold 1.5 billion Hong 
Kong dollars ($193.8 million) of 
five-year global bonds, the first such 
bonds denominated in the currency. 

The sale, little more than a week 
after Chinese troops rolled across 
the Hong Kong border to underline 
the end of 156 years of British rule, 
seemed to indicate that the asso- 
ciation, widely known as Fannie 
Mae, expects Beijing to live up to its 
promise to leave Hong Kong's cap- 
italist ways, and its currency, the 
way they are for some time. The 
agreement on returning the former 
British colony to China called for 
Hong Kong’s systems to remain in 
place for at least 50 years. 

Bankers at Merrill Lynch & Co. 
and HSBC Markets Ltd. who helped 
sell the bonds said they would serve 


as a model for similar issues by 
Hong Kong's own nascent mort- 
gage company and by General Mo- 
tors Acceptance Corp.. which has 
expressed interest in selling a Hong 
Kong dollar bond this year. 

Fannie Mae officials said they had 
chosen the Hong Kong dollar for the 
bonds because of investor demand. 

“A lot of investors who have 


Bloomberg Mens 

TOKY O — When Thailand starts 
knocking on doors in search of $10 
billion in international aid to bail out 
its finance industry, its first des- 
tination will be Tokyo. 

Japan is Bangkok's biggest for- 
eign investor, trading partner and 
creditor, so it has more to lose than 
other countries when Thailand's 
economy falters. 

“Japan has clear reasons to lead 
the effort to protect the stability of 
Thailand’s financial markets.” said 
Minoru Yamaguchi, an economist 
at Nikko Research Center. “Besides 
protecting its direct investment. Ja- 
pan wants to cement its leadership 


over Asia's emerging financial mar- 
kets ahead of the U.S. and European 
nations." 

According to data from the Bank 
for International Settlements, which 
sets guidelines for international 
banking, at the end of 1 996 Japanese 
banks had extended $37.53 billion 
in loans to Thailand. This accounted 
for half the total foreign debt held by 
Thai companies. 

Thanong Biday a. Thailand's fi- 
nance minister, plans to visit Japan 
next week to discuss financing for 
Thai banks and property lenders 
saddled with bad loans stemming 
from the real-estate market's col- 
lapse. 


“We expect cooperation from Ja- 
pan, Asia's financial center,” Mr. 
Thanong said in an interview last 
week with Japanese correspondents 
in Bangkok. 

The Thai government, faced with 
the nation's slowest economic 
growth in a decade, said it was ar- 
ranging to sell as much as $5 billion 
of bonds and borrow as much as $5 
billion more from foreign banks. 

The government’s drive to raise 
cash to bail out finance companies 
and spark the economy comes a 
week after the central bank effec- 
tively devalued the baht by letting 
the currency float freely for the first 
time in 13 years. 


• China called directors of Hong Kong-listed companies to 
Beijing to receive “direction” amid concern that the compa- 
nies’ share prices had surged too much, the Oriental Daily 
News reported 

• Japan's private machinery orders, a key barometer of capital 
spending, rose 12.8 percent, to 1 .23 trillion yen ($ 1 0.9 billion), 
in May from April, their second monthly increase in a row, as 
manufacturers raised investments to meet demand overseas. 

• Australia's unemployment rate fell to 8.5 percent in June, 
its lowest level since November, from 8.8 percent in May, as 
total employment rose by 1 1.900. 

• South Korea plans to increase the power of the central bank 
under a draft bill that aims to reform the country's financial 


industry. Some said the government appeared to be retreating 

Lofsomei 


from its plan to strip the Bank of Korea of some of its regulatory 
powers, a move strongly resisted by the central bank. 

• Yaohan Japan Corp. denied reports that the company had 
asked banks to lower its interest payments on loans but said 
hanks bad extended its repayment period to March 1 999, when 
the company plans to complete its restructuring. 

• Isuzu Motors Ltd. said it had reached an agreement to 
develop and sell engines to General Motors Corp. 

• Sing Tao Holdings Ltd. had a profit of 26.9 million Hong 
Kong dollars ($3.5 million) in the year that ended in March, 
rebounding from a loss of 146.42 million dollars the previous 
year, as advertising revenue picked up. Bloomberg, Reuten 


LOSS: Devaluation of the Thai Baht Causes Siam Cement to Post Its First Loss in 84 Years 


bought our dollar debt are interested 
in Hot 


Continued from Page 13 


long Kong dollar debt,” said 
David Levine, a director in the treas- 
urer's office. But some investors 
said they would not buy the bonds 


because the yield was not high 
enough. At 61 basis points over 


comparable U.S. Treasury bonds, 
the issue pays investors 6.75 percent 
a year in interest 

No U.S. government agency has 
sold Hong Kong-dollar bonds be- 
fore, and the issue is the largest 
fixed-rate local-currency bond ever. 

The Hong Kong dollar is pegged 
to the U.S. dollar in a policy thatbas 
been one of the bulwarks of investor 
confidence in Hong Kong. 


“With hindsight, yes. it would 
have been good to hedge over this 
past week.” Mr. Chumpol said. 
“But if you continually hedge on 
the short term, it will end up cost- 
ing you more than the weakening 
of the baht.” 

Since it was released from its 
peg to the dollar last week, the 
baht has fallen about 10 percent in 
the onshore market, to 29 to the 
dollar. The central bank has said 
that the baht should not fall below 
30 to the dollar, but some research 
houses expect it to drop to 32 or 
even 35 to die dollar next year. 

Mr. Chumpol said that while 


Siam Cement had incurred more 
exchange losses than any com- 
pany in Thailand, the loss was not 
grievous given the company's re- 
latively large cash flow. The 
company’s revenue in 1996 was 
1 1 1 billion baht. 

”We have got solid dollar 
based assets: equipment, ma- 
chinery and factories." he said. 
“Today if you put up a new pet- 
rochemical plant in Thailand it 
will cost you 15 percent more. It 
is like we have gold. We are not 
worried.” 

The loss would be written off 
in the second quarter of this year, 
allowing the company to pay no 
taxes on profit this year. Mr. 


Chumpol added. The falling baht 


will eventually increase 
and's attractiveness to foreign in- 
vestors, but there is little like- 
lihood the inflow will be as 
abundant as the tidal wave of in- 
vestment that fueled last decade's 
economic boom. 

The sharp rise of the yen 
against the dollar in the mid- 
1980s. combined with a devalu- 
ation of the doUar-pegged baht in 
1984, made Thailand a prime des- 
tination for Japanese investors. 
Japanese investment in Thailand 
rose from an average of 1.7 bil- 
lion baht a year in 1 980 to 1 985 lo 
1 8.8 billion baht in 1989 and 27.9 
billion baht in 1990. 


“When the investment poured 
in, we ran faster than we really 
should have. The economy needs 
to catch up," Mr. Chumpol said. 

As for foreign direct invest- 
ment, the overseas relocation of 
Japanese production facilities has 
slowed down, and Thailand’s in- 
ternal market is facing a slow- 
down in consumer purchasing. 
According to the Board of In- 
vestment, the number of appli- 
cations for investment dropped 
sharply in the first half of this year 
from a year earlier. 

While many investors will wait 
until the baht stabilizes, those 
venture capital companies will- 
ing to take the risk have found it 


difficult to close deals. 

“This country has been a ven- 
ture-capital opportunity for nine 
months now. but people still 
aren’t budging.” the president of 
one venture-capital company 
said. Analysts said tightly held 
family companies often were re- 
luctant to open up to outsiders at a 
time of crisis, used excessively 
optimistic growth models and of- 
ten did not understand the func- 
tion of venture capital. 

"A lot of private companies 
are in a dream land. We have to 
figure out which ones will survive 
until the upturn," Virapan 
Pulges, managing director of 
H&Q Asia Pacific, said. 



GENERAL 


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BRITTANY, mr QUWER, 2 km Iran 
sea & baches. FtJy furnished character 
turn. Swashed, buB i960, wry large 
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KYTHNOS Louha. a acne buifi 4-bed- 
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EXQUISITE TWIN VILAS, recently re- 
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B bi too hZs d the teatiui 
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TOSCANA. A sevetMoom house tar sale 
in toe Appemne5 benwen Arezzo and 
Cortona Renovation is in progress. 
5160.000 Wrte u International Herald 
more, Box 340. na Cassota. 2012? 
Lfiano kaly 


THE INTERMARKET 
Continues 
on Page 17 












































































































































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RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE 


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Real Estate 
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French Riviera 


CAP D'AIL 

QTr.- Sr.- TrfV* Jni', V'- ,f ? :W 
3 Wis+Cji*.; Ki."i 
PK=r. iW; «a si.T^.- ; ?:: - 
sp^-cfe^r .-»i •.*+, :: s*a 

0rl.2~r~O fry*? ^ tre £?s*f 
‘.V. ***» f!!SK£?. r -: Z^'.r 

tea cum w-f 

E 2 EECBKBEI 

La Park Pause 
25 WM tie la Ccsa 
MC 98000 Uor» Carta 
W: (3771 53 25 J: R1 
Fas (3771 33 25 3 33 
vsi-rjorteani.r; zzerse 


HEAHT OF CAP FERBAT 

ififaw Oflge tnsttr. 

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CAP MARTIN NEAR MONACO 

Large Medraw apermer: 
ph* -M sqm tpraen renae sth ar 
exceprcnai new tr.-ertcokng me sea S 
Vie kgrzs of f-tona Cade- 7ns m 
t> sitiei« m a man radusj.e bSe* 
teaurrfl envar, security S a m* 

. up porn Fhoros aid plan a.^Jatt 
Price. FF2.3M win carat? fl store room 
Phone Owner +33(6)4 93 28 96 36 


DRAM0NT near ST RAPHAEL 

Yen/ nro? ccnsvucnon 
For photos &'lreaoi coma* on Hemet 
hnpj'.'memsrs aotrarrtcnampaSe/ 


FR9KH fflVEHA. 40 mins NICE. 200 

sqm. BasMe on 3 500 sj tn grounds. 
magnfic em vcw. 4 daHe za-txns 3 
Uaftrecro. fiimnwg pool access to pri- 
vate tennis and lake tseecti AsA-nn pnee 
FF22U Oner +33 104 94 ?S S3 34 

FORMER SHEEPFOLD, 133 sqm Ir.mg 
space. 25 fa 125 .TOO sqm j enclosed 6 
treed land nate». eiecinoty, telephone 
Very calm area. !7 kms Cartes, i how 
Nice a«port. FF 195 COOO Tet. +33 
(0)4 93 GO 23 34 fe 104 M 70 54 17 


CAP D ANTIBES For sale or rent By 
owner ora floor l-W sqm pu terrace 
m two storey villa Sea vf w. etekfinre 
soot, garden, palm trees Price 
FFiiffl.QaO Can oo 39 345 26» 794 . 


Paris and Suburbs 


FACING BOIS DE VINCENNES 

:,v.= taf. ijiti dwfei. 4tfi5tn 
: «r«!e tains 2 bettooms. 
t+*jsS r/Jen 40 sqm Used terrace 
Secwar - parkflos a must to be seen. 

HAKE AH OFFER., 

7ri ■& psuSst +33 |D|1 43 £8 2T 63 

cr Spme I'jt 43 £3 57 22 


:S7 ■ ST. KCWORE, NEAR VENDOKE 

.saicn to etegan: rra lum 
aparmer f: sqm F*i Afc-OO Cmvr 
Te> :<i ' 41U 3331 1 lansvprng ma- 
cs.”. " -I 5 jC« 6043 6iau -.nceJet 

ST CLOUD, tvgh ctess jpanmem. 104 
sqm. 53 m Srge hm 2 Bectons 2 
W.+L. EKTCed Usnen Parting Dose 
T ;;f30l. temn. LBimirbrg pool 
7-: K Cvj Otnw +33 -GiT 2726 

UNIQUE IN ST CLOUD OWNER SELLS 
rrC'wH »: ^ t. on praen 1 500 sqm 
n:^ .i ijizjora pr.se access to 
H-- =*2 = L* ragaatf? Tel +33 INI 
4’ r-d -jj ,cn 46 02 32 03 

ll!h near REPUBUQUE rtgfi class. 34 
s~ m r.ut-o wan urge bay-window on 
t: sqjT. anen.'iitch£'n hath. 3m- 
r,q+. -FJBjXC' JOil 434BS4ES 

HARAS, rue de Tcurwfles. ctu/mng. 
catn ctewr mpte etposum. ir^:ramne 
Weeny Eeoeraie kitchen l Daih 
”■■5: a: “si +23 ion « 77 s 32 

SURESNES VILLAGE, tugn class. *re» 
cn 5 + re are =cs aMte Irnng t bed- 
’kts asevy :rjcie panutiq ffitm 
“e :-i 4 >: ci ij •:? wo zt 

U:h - iflJFTTE - FRAHQUEVU1E. lop 
is*-? .+t ;00 sqm + 57 tqm 
trace 2 Se-crons Bartine BELL 
GAOL? :trL Tel .11 47 27 34 65 

16th SeflJlW ‘50 so nr. ajartmem m 
resnemai jeener,-. quiet race tecepliin 
3 Prtrooms. 2 Laths large balcony 
F=5 y5D 003 Te +33 (Oil 42 24 92 72 

SAHT NOM LA BfOEOC 20 mnues 
1mm Paris, on gcH. very bmuUU villa 
sir. garden TAJAN IMUOBILER Tel 
+33 (Oil 53 3C 93 2D 

FACING BOG DE K)ULOGNE,23 sqm. 
Kucfe tsn nwderrei wml charming 
=F37X Tel +:*3i0»1 43 45 85 07 

5th LATIN QUARTER^ Hemmgiray's 
acanment. 4C sqm full of charm. 
=?1 150050 TH +33 (W 43 9S 38 57 

5ft, QUAI ST UCHB, 5 fiiates bom 
tlctie Dame ideal 'ped a tene'. TAJAN 
If.lMOBtUER Tel *33 (OH 53 30 83 20 

78 - FHJCHEH0LLE5 - 15 mins PartT" 
La Defense I7lh cent hejsa. Listed By 
04T£T S70QD00 Tet +33 10)1 30545398 

HE SANT LOWS, exceptional bartering 
'jcater. sunm side, trptex. 4 bedreoms. 4 
Bans. +33(011 55429234 renof possWe 

RACE des VOSGES 100 sqm. 3rd floor 
' kit. 16 ft cent buiUng fully renovated 
hen class Stags. 0»w 10)1 4470 5872 

ST GERMAIN DES PRES top floor Hat. 
ifth cent house ideal coupl e. 3/4 
items calm idea Tel +33 10)143293757 


Switzerland 


VERBER - A detached chalet is being 
Bui or a i JD0D sqm. U bcaed In the 
heart of the resort This very spacious 
property offers a sped) master bectoom 
ffi thp Mr. iwih warn hah - , 

mom. tour futfier bedrooms wkh Braute 
taft rooms, too large reception rooms. 
My ffled fcadm. peuzs. sauna, games 
room, hso large south-facing terraces 
wth panotamc mis. large private pr- 
den and low-car ndoar parking. Exacting 
standards of corctuction. Intator tegn 
and piamnig to buyers' preferences. 
Price ^jpiw. CU39M PrwBto sale Con- 
tad Jean on 44 (0|l71 655 7558 


NEAR STTRtPEZ saner were anoettf 
stone house tasWu% decorated. 5 bed- 
rooms. poof. T.70G sqm land, peaceful, 
arad itieyarts. FF2M -3310/4 ?47B208$ 


ST PAUL DE VBKE prcpsrt)' on 1 lev- 
el. 4 bedrooms. 4-car basement. 3.700 
sqm park, pod. quiet FF2 950000 
UV£ TeFFax +33 (W 93 20 22 44 


NEAR ANTIBES. Seediul 4-bed via. 
private pool. 10 mns Nice airport 
E250.0PD Tel 44 (0 il‘I 431 644J 


388 sqm, 3 bedrooms. 31 & bafts, 
(reubb entrance itaty. 3 indoor parting 
spaces. 3 cellars large terraces 
fetoSous vira nstStsrarBan and 
Monaco Has not bwnfved in sow 
uSSi 2M lenowaton sate by owner. 
Tell +33 (OK 08 37 03 01 


MONTE-CARLO STAR, facing Bn i 

Perfeci tNeds dans fea \i 
ngtu on B» Casnr Square 


ExdusMty AFW (377) S3 30 98 59 


ILAKEG9HA&ALPS 


a authorized 
alnce 1975 


Aftadm properties, overtookun views 
1 » 5 bedrooms, from SFr 20DD00. 
REVACSJL 

52 . HontbiBBrt CH -1211 GENEVA 2 
Tel 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 


USA Residential 


DETECT FROM OWNER 
LUXURY BRfCK HOME, rth many sne- 
otrfs such s mdoor Banning pxl B- 
car garage, ac. Ttw-bedroom apartment 
atachea 45 stall bam with 2-bedroom 
apartment and office. Fix sate or trade 
lot anytimg ot value Must sM Drty 
Si 2 mfton Located in SW Mich. 15 
ran from South Bend. IND and 15 hr 
bom Chicago loop. W9 finance Please 
cal Stuai in US. a +1-219-352-0001 or 
FK +L21 9-262-3212. 


UORAGA CALIFORNIA BY OWNER 
Set In San Francfsco Easl Bey Hilts. 
Pnshne 5 bedroom. 3400+ sqJl, 11 yrs. 
Private vieeM-poot-spa-top schools. 
Spacious master siae-2 bonus rooms 
5750KL Phaoteetais Tet 5tl>376^157. 
E-Mat DANjPOWQABaolcaii 


-7W « V IMTB>lTbrtU ft* • 4 

iicralo^fig^enbunc. 

me wnnurs uuu MiNMnnUi 



EUROPE 


FUNCEHQfefcra. 

W {Oil At 43 ?3 85. 

far. fen 4143 ^70 

. E-mcri LkB>fckWH(Q«n 
GStMAMT, AU51HA ACENWALEOBOPfe. 
Frowuw. 

. T«L. fW91 P7I25O0 
Far [OWf 071 25020 
B8JGUM & LUXEMBOURG. Bnaub' ~ 

W fl32J 344-3509, (02} 34*0! 17 

,F«i02] 3460353 

GHEQ&CYnUS: Mm, 

Tsl 301/58 51 £25 
Fat 307/68 S3 3S7 
FHANft-HMsnU. 

, Td 3589608828 
. Foe 258 9 646 50G 
ITALY: Mdsno, 

Td: 58315738. 
f» 56320938,, . 
wmawcsiAnjtadU 
' Td . 3I2D.664IOBO - 
Rk 31 206331374. 

NORWAY. SWH3B4 A D04VWK: 


UNTTEP STATES 

fair Sl2)755-8785 
Idfc tteOI 572-7212 

LATIN AMERICA 


Td 147)55913070 
Fw 14^55913071 - 

PORTUGAL Lsbcn. 

Tel- 351-1 -457-7293 
' For 35M-4577352 
SPAKwtdrd. 

Td 4572858 . 

Fm. 4586074 

SWfnHUND-.PuSy 

W. (021)7235021 

• F»(» 1 ] 72 S 30 ?I 

UMTH) KINGDOM: London, 
td t017' 1 336 4802.. 
FckJQI 7 11240 0338. 

• R» 262009 


B8AZE: Sod Route. 

W-B53 4133 

fas 8528485 
CHBfc Sminoo de CUt 

CH26^ffl2 79 37. 

- fa* 63201 26 

fec^682Bl 22/6874842/ 
536 3577.. 

MPWIEASf 

UMD^EMRHESs.ShB^ 

Td B6 351133. _• 

3748888. 

Ibc »4B4 TltNGt r • 

ASIA/PAOHC ' 

&»52)25S?fl90 

SlNGAPOffi: _ . . 

. Td. 223 6478 
Fat 325 W412 
Hr.2B749HtSW 

•wiiifaw 

7k J33673.fe« 3201 0209 


BOCA RATON, FLORIDA PENTHOUSE 

ritui.'us oc<?an vies. 730*1 igii 
2 t« rooms, 2 i : Mth.-.. Mrt-trjiBte 
f-artHiion shutt+rs ihrpiujhDut tie* 
ax-toinces. pnvoir heaeft. r fioMed 
i-rwu-, coup; pooJ. |3cuc.'i ?3un.ic 
Viiip's jnd nniiain rooms, deev 
acre 1 , underground parking. +4 hour 
; canty 5399.™ Td 1 :!S»-75 u-464l' 
Fra l661.7y>S653 USA. 


NAPLES FLORIDA 
ON THE GULF OF MEXICO 

Bearn, poll, it+nms yat M Lumphu- 
ne v. specious 3 Mm I t-stii li.ti 
PMJatten .ira rrximnc luumi 
US S1.45U 

Terry Wwren (Downing-Frye Realty) 
Tet 941-434-8049 Fra: 941-434-7324 


NEW YORK - CENTRAL PARK SOUTH 

HAMPSHIRE HOUSE Br-I luoiinn in 
HY Six< Your Own Lin up, HrJ .4 Apjit 
ment Eiecjamiy Apfirunied with Fin* 
r tine jre 5mqte S175K D:ubte An C 
entranres S295K Ari.r Mirliarls 
212-769-332 «3l7 F.n 2U 307 5ijJ 

Pafpitstlons of The Heart. U Manon 
Emeuitaue. r-W rossue to diyiur^o 
Hear D C & int i 4,rpurt. cnA > rail 
HUP ■■ atm rniddtrtrurQonln? uum iciKi 

e-mail through web site 

La. Fleur EreharwivsuinfureneCHn 
TH 54'3r»t3555 

BREATHTAKING 108 acres 011. 3t»-T- 
ioom store house ri ft-Y Ei'lf Spr-cTft- 
ubr 260 degree wvn 1-acie sunmrw 
pyta rUJtng brth, S »MS 11)45 NTC 
LlSSECO 000 TdFra -33 (OH ■rtdriC’ir 

Real Estate 
for Rent 

Belgium 

KNOKKE HET ZOUTE SEASIDE. 

Prime shopping area, too sqm split 
te'jd. renmaieb 19%. shop, bm rorm 
rem and lako.er negotiable Available 
October 1997 Please corte.; Mr Vetan- 
neman Fax -32 5C 602745 dtl-H 19.03 

BRUSSELS, EU area, nee scanfnawir. 
penthouse. 1-3 bedrooms 2 bafts, nea 
110 sqm. ♦ terrace 3223305140 

KELLES, LOUSE, fura&hed lift if vn 
lerm poslbflty BF 23.900 al mduaeq 
Tflt 322.6497250 ■ 3275911.9K- 

French Provinces 


Be a Chatelain in Loire Valley 

Independenl aide ot smb3the<: Caslk- 
4 room. 4 baths, large Mceptot period 
turtUhre BO rare hom Pare, fcy TGV 
FFB-I2.000monih or FF5.000 tree* 

OR 

Aunt Agatha's Dafidoua Cottaga 
Mvkfla ot gardens 3 rooms. 3 bafts, 
large taring. toireV fumaure. 
FF6,000hrortli Fra.OXHeek. 

Tai +33(0)549211502. Fra (0)549853965 





Holland 


RENTHOUSE WTERNATIONAL 
No 1 ki HoUanri 

for (soni) fintahed houses', flats 
Tel: 31-20-6445751 Fax 31+2M4G5S08 
Nhovpn 19-21. 1083 Am Amsierdarri 


HOMERNDERS INTL Herenqracht 14 1 
1015 BH Amstertam Tel -31 206392352 
Fax: 6382262 E-riBfliWOrselflClSlpnl 


We; ! acanraiuinE r p-jccms 

C-xaHv ann se’.»^ aoypf-i 

READY TO WOVE M 

Te: -, ; 3(0|l 43t2«e00 Fv ult 43129505 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
Tel: +33 (0)1 47.20J0.05 


EXCEPTIONAL RUE DU BAC. MG 

sqm in fre?-fr.« private courtyard Out- 
er 2 bedroarre drang rc-vr larae b.jrg. 
an ftvnNflo Frev> *,>■; :=:r. • end D+c 
FF4W(y.-.++4 CaB I’-.l 45 44 ~i 74 

BASTILLE, h) sqm 2 zntoon age 
Lv»j. baSOT.- qmer an «-.-iitfort£ earn- 
mg iujijst lG-sOtr-. FRuiv Ti' -33 
•Oil 4355 i'-'W a tv 0,t 461- 4J.T 

HOUSE t bkd> Cu loJe ryjn «t Parc. 
J b^rujnis. qa>q*n jteiier anu: 
UH1 5r»no tflliCe • J3 i0)‘ 45694930 

LATIN QUARTER-. Char- hgm clean 
:uitv equipcad 4 roomt Tji Fecruar'v 
pFsKu net T+t +33 (C-i 46 ?3 55 36 

II LOCAFUT.COM - CENTRAL PARIS 
t sn+i t i mitihs D^sj+t jftmeris 
TV tnpr MPlfms Tel-:-} -C-|i43067C32 

MARAIS, tjvsqm i;jrmenr. rrpqem 
Inter**, i Mii tftms : tains 30 sq m 
kitch-n Fj 1 it +3? ,Iit 4029 CxTi 

MARAIS gieai 2-rocm tji. iC sqm. 
rum, pro Me hen 2 nd ikw; oath 
FtO.C>:Ii ♦‘bther hats i47lT-te3t 


Paris Area Unfurnished 

PARIS CENTER Sept. 1 n. mafcm Ngh 
class BaL 2 -ram 63 sq m vie* 
quiet. FTCv-0 - charge-; <9): 2S£ 3237 

VANEAU. 200 sqm (uiuirous Hal. 
4 bertiooms FF27.5W mo nef. Claude 
Pastivi Td. +33 (On JT 65 89 51 


Switzerland 


ZURICH • SWITZERLAND 

F« rent from 1st C+tober 1997 in 
ASoKem sA a v*n? behveen 
Zurich 1 22 km] and ZuQ i10 kmi 
LUXURIOUS 5 1/2 ROOM ROOF FUT, 
170 sqm, 2nd floor 
4 separate bedrooms. 2 bathrooms 
(1 m suflei. tug liuing/dniig area aim 
open (replace, roily equated kitchen, 
addnronal quest tolel 2 baicpnes. 1 
store cetet.'i -me ceter. partang places 
n underground oarage. Monthly rent urv 
hmheo CHF 321000 exclusive 
For further rioroffllon 
please cafi +4i / 1 , 354 3111 


GENEVA, LUXURY FURNISHED apart- 
mem> From studfos to 4 bedrtwms Tel. 
+41 2 735 6320 Fax +4! 22 738 2671 


NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 1 
neek lo I year Great L Manors Cali 
Pa'ChquI 212-448-9223. Far 212 - 
448-9226 E-Uai aftomehcroSaoLccm. 


HOTELS 


PARIS 

j LES SUITES SAINT-HONORE i 

★★★★ 

j 

| 1 J. rue D’Aguesseau. 75008 Paris 

1 Ju\i fri the Fitnhwv Snint-Hnth «#v and The Eh. see Pahiee 

; A LL^L'RV APARTMENT HOTEL RESIDENCE j 


Ver\ ewlusi\e. located in one ol'ihe most presiisrit.-U’* neigh- ! 
[ h^iurliood-: Faub*.'urc Saint-Honors and Champs Elksses. 

1 Thtneen petsonalized large apartments up to 12 *'X» su. leer 
| complete!) resimedin 1 W 2 with tiilh equipped kitchens. In- • 
j ing-dmmg nxmi-. .»•+ vseli as one or two bedr^nims. one or i\so : 
marble bathroom- and some uilh studies. 

; ldejl tV«r both t'aniih holidays and business inp-. a pert’eci , 
i "pieJ-a-rerre". 

| All hotel services. Dail> maid sen ice. .\ir conditioning. : 
Undergn >und parking. Complete security. 

! Far wnti /»?,*,' . 7; nr rt .\en\iiiatn. piease *«.m -Jin ah.' h>: 
+ 3 J 1 Ot 1 42 66 35 70 < >r . nil -+33 lOtl 44 51 16 35 


YACHTS 



DISCOUNT TRAVEL 



AUBERGE 
DU VIEUX VILLAGE 
D’AUBRES INYONS) 

L+jn - Biofi m-s-i# rr-wSs - Da 

! : 2 r--arJ ws /: .'-r r.- jlt ». rs n 

vc*i Tv 
Tef. -33 lOh 75 2c :2 


DISCOUNT TRAVEL 


Why pay retail? 

Dirc-'h-ui: tnj>; wi^mpt-ws jiiiI -elW if* ■ >-*n nip- 
dltL-.-tlv wirh.ni anv inkTrvtlijnv- 

TOP PROMOTION: CRETE Juh/AugusC 4 130 FT 

I vuvi, ili-:hr +■ hoict NflNOS PALVCF 5 Lu\w- A-jhin- NiL-iL>t» 

Full K:imd 

\\ ine included. Free lennis. One chbd is free. 

RjJu-'rtJ pnev Departure HOtOn and ?.4)7 - -3m.i FT 

Supplcii srnun pnee. Dcpunure 4 and 1 1/0$ = +200 FT 

SHS8B& F>t\ .Iik iimrutiiru'ii .i/*ui n^u* u > it Tel +.'3iO*t 45 *+2 A2 *2 mimmi 
Minne! 5615 Dnvcrours I.2M FF/mn WTi v- duei-Mur- ir 
OPEN on The SUNDAYS 22 and 2“ „t June 
96, ». Chanms-Ehste, 75008 Paris 

Ntei| Me iii<n . il S\l\ T lil t noils. uL ?uai,irt 


flic 


Cruise v 


The concept, design 3nd the decoration in 1930 Art Deco sr/le 
of this cruising casino-yacht: is our cf ihs ordinary and is 
designed by David Ruimy.The 700 sq.m, of antique leaded glass 
windows and the ancient lead setting bordering and inlaying 
the mirrors, will make chi s luxurious and refined yacht the 
'•THE ORIENT EXPRESS OF THE 7 SEAS". 

The quality fittings on board, remind one of the golden years 
of which only France holds die secret Eqmped with 72 pas- 
senger cabins, including 7 Suites and I Royal Suite. A large 
gastronomic restaurant, exclusively French, followed by a large 
Bar-Brasserie decorated in 1930 style. A vast 600 sq.m. Casino 
with jack pot machines will give the pleasure *0 the passen- 
gers. I large cabaret-spectacle wjth a discotheque, 1 swimming- 
pool, I solarium, I sports room, ! sauna and I jacuzzi. The 
Duty-free luxury boutiques v/ijj represent the most well- 
known French brands. 

200 passengers and 36 crew members wiil find an agreeable 
environment under exceptional cruising conditions in this truly 
floating palace **★*■*. The launching . ceremony of The 
Casino Royal cruising rs set for the end of the 
century-December 99. 

Sale by Time share to private individuals, cruising included 
starts at $19,000 per week for a cabin for 2-4 people for a 
period of 30 years, 

_ . , .. , , -'?.T-. 5 :.cnj' T'jce FirMnse Hi vice 

Spot City International 3 v 

33 . avc~u; ies ChoTpi-Elysecs t 5 


752-C3 Pari; • France 
1e: - 33 It- 1 42 2SC3C3 
Fat. - 23 <C> 1 43 52-31 56 


■*;= 52 Aroit-COT • Harsr.d 
Te - 31 , 0 ) 7 : 402 !3 07 
Far - 3’ :? CC 



FRENCH RIVIERA RENTALS 


Residence Hotels 


CLDtlDGE CHiMPS ELYSEES 

H<gn class rooms & suites 
Daly, weekly & mornulv raes Parts 
Tel+33 (0)144133333 ^<0)142256483 


Bed & Breakfasts 


MANHATTAN LODGINGS, NYC. Short 
stay luxury apartments, superior B & B 
.^registry. . .many locations. 
Tel 212-415-2050 Fra: 2:2-177-0420 
E-Mat rioSnaftattantoijglngscoiTi 


Lebanon 


HOTEL AL BUSTAN. East ol Bslnji 
5 star 'time Excepncnai team sea-- 
my. comftm, flne cuisine, converftens. 
busonsss services satellite TV IB mro 
[ranstef from airport free UTEa rax 
( 561 ) 4 - 972439 . 1 + 33 ) . 0 rM 39 Q 9 C 7 


Days ten HoM-N Bergen New Jersey 
Luxury aifentative to Nes York City a 
budget pnee Doubles 553 CO 5 rims n 
ftdtown Manhaflan £ 01 - 249 - 3600 . 


RE LAIS DE LA REIJVE SA & JOHN TAYLOR 

offering ai 

CANNES 

42 LA CROISETTE 

In a unique residence between the Carlton Hotel & Festivals 
Palace. 16 apartments. 3 rooms, bighh- luxurious, superbh 
equipped, renting furnished. All services available. 

Tel: Louis FORTIN 

TeL- +33 (0)4 93 06 60 OO or +33 (0)4 93 38 00 66 
Fax: +33 (0)4 93 06 60 20 or +33 (0)4 93 39 13 65 



VENICE ZATTERE ELEGANT apart- 
ment with 1 efface, ideal tor wu Monthly 
rem. TO. 139 - 2 ) 657177 B or 39 ^ 
5231331 . 


Monaco 


MONTE CARLO, nice 250 sq m apart- 
ment Panorama, seavev,'. FF 29.000 
rnytti - cnaroe*. INTERMEDIA Tet +37? 
93 50 66 84 Fax +377 93 50 45 52 


Paris Area Furnished 


20 KHS PARIS, superb vBa. 300 sqm 
Siring space. 6000 sqm part, bihart 
room, pteno. al confcrts FRO.OOC * 1 ma 
Tet +33 (OH 30 40 14 79 


FOCH, kaunous 230 sq.m triplex, pri- 
vate garden, parting FF 40 . 000 /mo- 
ciaudfi Pastor! TO + 33 ( 0)1 4265 B 951 


SPAIN 


Beautiful House 

GOLF CLUB COSTA BRAVA 

H ••■Ill’ll I' ill’ Min,-!., I h. n v +"•' 111 J 
w.ii. 1 J.I 1 .T 1 pi.' 1 K-Jrv-W t illr 
1 ■mi- li'-i li' if.-tf. "HP -.lilt Ib.i-Iki- 
. 11 I 1 TH-: i-jn-i Jinni-.-i -ti In .i-j.lepir. 
• In .- * * +JJ -.'".lli lll-.-Ji 1 lir 

t-nl> . i|iii|i|-,\l Fr:l.ii. in n iiri.r 
r.in-.T-'-l IlH l« i.-.-j •iilt-t- 
U .ii'ilnl ' 1 ii r n+niniiuv. jrJ J 1 ' 
Him Ni llu 1 +.u In-- 

yi-iiii-J +■ 1 it> ir.i-ni. m 1 '. 11 rhi'< t\ inI.i 
III 11 1 'Jlli'-r i- h-«->-i,|n-» m u h\ 

Price £410.000 

r-ij-iint-i + t. j>n Kritnirj n"<» 

->u i iwli.i -lAi.-ilj-.n-ir., >(*i'i- 
Fj\ 4* - . 1 -.Jllfi'i 
I", ,ni- hi\ '•‘Ti *'*.'•* 

•f 

hUn'JhL ,-n l{+l,iir.i rf i‘- 
M.i 1 rwnu I V" I «.i- r..i — |i Mi- 
ni 7 -i~J Vi' h > 

- •> <*+ 


BREATHTAKING VIEW OF NEW YORK. 
20 A. glass wall. Central Part 2 City. 
Luxuriously turns bed pano. fax. cable. 
Fix business, musician or honeymoon 
couple 1 btacfc to Carnegie Hall. 2 to 
Letterman. 5 lo Lincoln Center. Muse- 
ums. Theaters. Weekly, Monthly, 3 day 
weekends (minimum or rong term. 
Tel 212 - 262 - 1561 . Fax 71 M 8 W 142 


Holiday Rentals 


Caribbean 


ST. BARTH&EMY, F.WJ- OVER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION -TLLAS - beach- 
from to hiUsto? with pccts. Our a^ms 
hare rnspeded an villas personally For 
resanretons on 5 l Sans, 5 l kbitin. An- 
gufe, Barbados Uustque. 9 k Vrgn Is- 
lands. Ca* VVIUCOTiSIBARrH - US. 
(«W 9 -Mi 2 . 1 ax 347-6290 from 
FRANCE (H 30 16 20 • ENGLAND 0 
- 800 - 89-8318 


JACMEL. HAITI ■ SdrasroVary. hisonc 
House hy sea in loveiv tranquil tocn. 
Long-short lerm inexpensive!. Tel-lax 
-33 (01143458996 or Tel +1 2129791240 


French Provinces 


BEAUJOLAIS NEAR NYQN - Stay In 
deigiafm manw sat in own partend For 
further delate TeWax +33 (014 74015066 


Great Britain 


LONDON. High Gate, feght. quiel. beaufl- 
ful. 1 bedroom fist fcr August E 70 Min, 
OWwIi Tel + 33(011 43 56 27 37 


Paris & Suburbs 


PARIS NEAR BASTILLE, 90 sq.m. 4 
rooms, sleeps 5 . 20-07 to 30 rt) 8 . 
FFSOOCiweek, FFB 000/2 weeks. 
F 15000 fmWh. Maid pmstote. Tet +33 
( 0)1 43 38 90 56 , (016 60 90 03 12 . 


UNTIL AUG 1 - HEART MONTHAHTRE. 
U.S owner, charm, fully equipped 2 
rooms. Cable TV. Posstote in sleep 4 
F 3200 Tet ( 0 ) 1-41 43 93 B 4 office after 
10 am or home ( 0 ) 1-42 54 70 62 


Residence 

French Riviera 

Villas - Apartments 

France 

» 33 (0) 4.93 69 96 97 
_Fax 33 (0) 4.93 69 96 95j 


ah PAHS ca/m 32 sqm . batony reoiy 
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PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1997 


EUROPE 


Hambros 
Executives 
Step Down 
Under Fire 


Gw/ilnito OsrSk&Fntunywtn 

LONDON — Hambros PLC 
said Thursday its head of cor- 
porate finance and two other 
executives had resigned after a 
report criticized their conduct 
in handling a takeover bid for 
Co-Operative Wholesale Soci- 
ety this year. 

The banking company said 
Nigel Pantling, head of corpo- 
rate finance, Peter Large and 
Andrew Salmon all had been 
cleared by the report of any dis- 
honesty but that the report found 
they had failed at times to adhere 
to good business practices. 
Hambros also promised to tight- 
en controls and change some of 
its procedures, in response to 
recommendations in the report. 

The report, by the British law 
firm Norton Rose, came three 
months after Hambros and An- 
drew Regan, head of an invest- 
ment group called Galileo, 
dropped a £1.2 billion ($2.02 
billion! hostile takeover bid for 
Co-Operative Wholesale, a food 
retailer, amid allegations that in- 
ternal documents leaked from 
the retailer were being used by 
Mr. Regan and his advisers. 

The report concluded that 
those at Hambros who knew 
that confidential information 
"had or might become avail- 
able without proper authority" 
had "failed to appreciate that it 
was not appropriate for them 
either to receive or use that in- 
formation." Hambros said. 

( Bloomberg . Reuters ) 


Germany Plans to Sell Oil to Curb Deficit 



Onjfu&VSn Ora 5uff Fran DiqMtkn 

BONN — The government said 
Thursday it would sell part of its 
crude-oil reserves, tighten spending 
and contain social-security pay- 
ments to reduce its deficit enough by 
year’s end to qualify for Europe’s 
planned monetary union. 

Altogether, it said, Germany will 
reap 12.7 billion Deutsche marks 
($7.21 billion) from asset sales this 
year and a further 19.7 billion DM 
next year. The government said it 
planned to raise as much as 400 
million DM this year through the 
sale of oil reserves. At current mar- 
ket prices, about 12.6 million barrels 
would have to be sold. 

Germany also plans to generate a 
10 billion DM profit this year by 


"selling" part of its 74 percent 
stake in Deutsche Telekom AG, the 
national phone and cable-television 
company, to a government-run 
holding company. Kreditanstalt fuer 
Wiederaufbau, or KfW. In 1998, 
Germany plans lo generate another 
15 billion DM of "profit” by trans- 
ferring more of its Telekom stake to 
KfW. The government said it also 
planned to sell Deutsche Postbank 
AG, the banking system based in 
post offices, starting in 1998. 

The asset sales will help reduce 
total government debt to "just 
above" 60 percent of gross domestic 
product by year's end, another key 
requirement for joining the common 
currency, the government said. 

According to the government. 


Germany’s federal, state and local 
debt at year-end will total 1 10 bil- 
lion DM. That, according to a high- 
ranking government official, would 
reduce the budget deficit to less than 
3 percent of GDP, another critical 
requirement for joining the common 
currency. Economists in Germany 
were skeptical, saying the deficit 
forecast, which relies on rhe one- 
time sale of state assets and assumes 
economic growth of a robust 2.5 
percent, had been intended to keep 
the pressure on for fiscal discipline 
in other countries that want to join 
the common currency at its planned 
inception in 1999. 

Meanwhile, the Bundesbank 
moved to calm the debate within 
Germany over monetary union, say- 


ing the issue was being clouded by 
calls for exact numerical adherence 
to the Maastricht criteria. 

Hans Tietmeyer. president of the 
central bank, said insistence on 
meeting the deficit criteria was ob- 
scuring the more important task of 
bringing Europe's economies closer 
together and achieving a lasting fis- 
cal <fiscipIme.f8/r7om/xy?;. Reuters i 

■ France Seeks to Soothe 

Trying to allay concern over pub- 
lic finances. France said it would act 
to curb the public deficit and said a 
pickup in growth would work in its 
favor. Reuters reported from Paris. 
‘ ‘There is no reason for markets to be 
worried." Finance Minister Domi- 
nique Strauss -Kahn said. 


EU Says Deal Hinges on Boeing’s 6 Remedies’ 


CiiapiM by Pur Stiff Fnwn Daputcim 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Commission said Thursday it was 
confident that Boeing Co. would 
come up with changes in its proposed 
$14 billion acquisition of McDonnell 
Douglas Corp. dial would meet 
European Union antitrust concerns. 

But the EU's executive agency 
added that it was op to the U.S. 
aerospace company, not the com- 


mission, to decide what those 
changes should be. 

“It is not the European Com- 
mission's role to identify potential 
remedies," said a statement read by 
Willy Helin. spokesman for the EU 
competition commissioner. Karel 
Van Miert. 

When the commission raises con- 
cerns about a merger’s impact on 
competition, "it is up to the company 


or companies involved to come up 
with remedies,’ ’ the statement said. 

Mr. Helin also said the remedies 
would have to be of a "structural 
nature.'' He said the commission 
was reacting to reported comments 
by William Baer, a top official at the 
U.S. Federal Trade Commission, 
about a supposed demand by the 
commission that the merger partners 
sell McDonnell Douglas’s commer- 


cial-aircraft division. That issue "is 
but one of the main concerns ex- 
pressed by the European Commis- 
sion,” the statement said. Other 
concerns are Boeing's exclusive 20- 
year sales deals with several U.S. 
airlines and the size of Boeing and 
McDonnell’s combined in-service 
fleets, which would represent 84 
percent of all jets now in service. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

OAX 



Loreto* v S55&L - 
/fTSE t00 tndefc CAC 40 

3000 




2400 

2200 


F M A M J J ■ 
1987 


OT F MA M J J'' W FMA MJJ 

1997 1987 --- . .. 

i aw '■ \ : : ■■.«& ' ; ; 9S &38C- 


&xnss^.- : '..SEL*#?. »-.wgggl2BL 

Coognftaoan StoCK. 'v 6 - . .’.ffijjf 

artafr • • wfiT • 627 

- jpg 


m 




■ StptSiS^ ■ 

f j-r.i -a.: . 


Source: Tetakuis 


; t - '3.75337 

Inunuutioal Herald Trihore: 


Very briefly! 


Gazprom Results Show ’96 Profit but Little Else 


Comptttdtn Our Stcfl Fran Dis/knetn 

MOSCOW — RAO Gazprom, the world’s 
largest gas company, published its 1996 accounts 
according to international standards for the first 
time Thursday. 

But analysts said the new numbers did not 
clarify the company’s prospects. 

Gazprom reported 1996 net profit of 8.98 trillion 
rubles ($1.6 billion), under international account- 
ing standards, on sales of 126.24 trillion rubles. 


Earnings per share were 426 rubles, it said. But it 
said 57 percent of its receivables had been settled 
by Russian barter trade or by debt forgiveness. 

The Russian government owes Gazprom about 
10 billion rubles and intends to pay it in the next 10 
days. First Deputy Prime Minister Boris Nemtsov 
told the Prime Tass news agency. 

Mr. Nemtsov said the sum was being verified, 
and then the government would honor the debt, 
either by writing off a corresponding amount of 


Gazprom’s own debt or by issuing bonds. 

Analysts said it was difficult to evaluate 
Gazprom's results because there was no com- 
parable company. 

“It is a political stock: it remains under gov- 
ernment pressure,” one Western analyst said, 
noting that the government had tapped it for 
taxes, which consumed more than half of 
Gazprom's 20.69 trillion rubles in pretax profit. 

{Reuters, Bridge News) 


• RAI SpA, Italy’s state-owned television hroadc3ster. ap- 
proved a plan to create a digital satellite and cable system with 
the national telephone company Stet SpA and to acquire part 
of Stet's cable bosiness. 

• Finmec can ica of Italy and General Electric Co- of Britain 
will set up a joint venture in defense systems and take minority 
stakes in some of one another’s defense operations. Fin-; 
meccanica said. 

• Allianz AG, Germany’s largest insurer, wants to expand its 
international asset-management business to branch oat from 
the Hi ghly competitive insurance market. 

• Daimler-Benz AG expects to have a “considerable" one- 
time gain in the second half of this year from the sale of its 24 
percent stake in Cap Gemini to Compagnie d’ Industrie & de 
Participations of France for about 1 .4 billion Deutsche marks 
($795.5 million). 

• G1AT Industries, France's state-owned armaments group, 

signed a letter of intent on a possible sale of its 92 percent stake 
in Herstal SA of Belgium to Colt's Manufacturing Co. of 
die United States. BUnmber ^ . Rearm 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low Ossa Pmr. 


High Low Oom Prtv. 


Bril Peflm 


Thursday, July 10 

Prices in local currencies. 
Tetekurs 



High 

Low 

Close 

Prut. 

Amsterdam 

AEXiadeL 

92471 



Previous: 93532 

ABNAMRQ 

43.40 

47 50 

42.90 

4X30 


146 80 

145 

14660 

146J0 

A huki 

17110 

171 JO 

I72J0 

17X70 

Atari N aM 

278 

27£I0 77&JO 276.90 

Boon Co, 

151.30 

145J0 

146 50 

153 

BotsVtesscva 

38.10 

37 R0 

37.® 

3830 

CSM-nra 

10190 

94. B0 

107 

99 

Dardtsche Pet 

no £0 

107.10 

108 50 

111® 

DS7A 

209 ja 

20470 

707 50 

207 JO 

Elsevier 

34.80 

.1430 

3£70 

3430 

Fortis Amev 

95 JO 

9330 

9440 

95X 

Gelrortcs 

7180 

69 70 

7140 

7130 

G-Broccva 

6880 

67 JO 

67.90 

6740 

Hogemeyer 

105L50 

10? 

102 

105L80 

Hemelrfl 

34110 

.119 

339 JO 

us m 

Hoaqarens eva 
Hunt Douglas 

11420 

174 

112 

177 

11210 

17230 

11450 

174 

INC. Group 

104 60 

107 JO 

103 

105J0 

KLM 

71.90 

70.50 

70® 

71 A 

KNPBT 

44 

43.70 

£U0 

41® 

tPN 

8140 

81.80 

8X40 

8X40 

NedlbydGp 

58J0 

57.70 

57 JO 

S&X 

NuTricta 

332 

329 

329 

332 

OceGrrirten 

264 

2*1.40 

263 26120 

PhBips Elec 

147 

14380 144.10 

147J0 

rtllyflfOffi 
Randslad Hdg 

108 JO 

10350 

106 

10450 

710 

708 

210 

209 

Pobeco 

19530 

194.X 

194 JO 

195J0 

Podairco 

68J0 

6460 

67® 

67-40 


195.70 

I9£70 

195 

197 

Parcnlo 

11£60 

116 411 

11640 

114.® 

Foyai Dutch 

107.70 

IU£X 

107 JO 

109.90 


447 JO 

44230 

445 

449.® 

Vcndexlntl 

1)4 

112 

112 

Ill® 

VNU 

46 JO 

4580 

4640 

46.10 

Writers K1 OM 

261 

254J0 

254 JO 

260.90 

Bangkok 


SET tftaesc 649 J3 
Previous: 435J1 

AdvInfoSvc 

260 

744 

240 

238 

Bangkok Bi F 

254 

236 

747 

736 

Lrann Thai Bk 
PIT Explar 

36 

34 

35J5 

3475 

424 

410 

424 

406 

Siam Cement F 

544 

524 

544 

534 

Slam Com Bk F 

129 

170 

128 

124 

Tetecomasia 

39 25 

37 

J9 

37 JO 

Thai Airways 
Thai Farm Bk F 

64 

60 

60 

4150 

141 

133 

138 

132 

Uid Conur 

111 

105 

l® 

104 

Bombay 

Sosa 30 todec 4378J7 
Previous: 440469 

Bojai Auto 

949 JO 

930 933.25 941.75 

Htadust Lever 

1 417.75 

1386 

1393 

1379 

Hindus! Peflm 

484 

469 

477 

471 

Ind Dev Bk 

105 JO 

I03J0 

10135 

103 

ITC 

553 

542 J 5 

545 

S49J0 

MahonogorTel 

307 JO 

294 

2«7 JO 30450 

PeScnce Ind 

371 

362 

343 34X50 

Stale Bk India 

356 JO 

350 350 JO 35425 

Steel Authority 

25.75 

7£7 S 

75 JO 

2535 

Tala Eng Loa 

462J0 

445 

444 JO 

4S4 

Brussels 


BEL-28 indra: 248681 


Previous: 258032 

AJmonii 

16200 

16100 

16200 

16175 

Barca Ind 

7500 

7410 

7460 

74X 

BBL 

9000 

9620 

9680 

9780 

CBP 

3260 

3185 

3190 

3775 

Colruyl 

19750 

19J0O 

19450 

197® 

Delhoire Lion 

1990 

t9:a 

19*1 

1970 

Etedrobel 

7850 

7770 

78® 

7790 

Etedrafina 

3600 

3585 

3590 

3585 

Fortis AG 

8050 

7860 

7940 

7990 

Gewert 

3300 

3770 

3300 

33® 

GBL 

6130 

6000 

6020 

61® 

C<n Banaoe 

14925 

147® 

14925 

149® 

tjedieltmnk 

14900 

147® 

149® 

148® 

Perroflna 

13750 

13450 

13550 


Powerful 

4990 

4940 

4785 

4945 

Povaie Beige 

moo 

10875 

110® 

11050 

Soc Gen Bela 

3680 

3575 

36® 

3650 

Safrov 

22375 

217® 

71825 

22X50 

Tracfebel 

15000 

14925 

150130 

14975 

UCB 

130000 126700 128000 127550 

Copenhagen 

Stock Maudlin 

Previous: 41235 

BGBanli 

394 

377 

390 

382 

Cnrhberg B 

369 

364 

367 


Codon Fws 

950 

950 

9® 


OanrscD 

421 

413.97 

419 


Den DamteOh 

745 

719 

742 


0'S Sven dbrq B 

380(300 380000 380000 349075 

D/S 1912 B 

265000 255000 245000 255000 


236 

23t 

733 


fob Luflhavnc 

761 

750 



Nn NanbskB 

731 

778.77 


Saphus Ber B 

98* 

972J6 

979 


Tefe Danmk B 

370 

363 

366 


Trva Battica 

400 

393 



Unutamnorii A 

431 

198 

429 

402 


RWE 

SAPpW 

Sdierlnq 

SGL Carbon 

Siemens 

Springer (A*fl 

SuetJnxSer 

vsr 


High Low Oom Pm. 

75X0 7£40 7570 7675 
4Q5J0 39750 40550 40650 


194 

192 

19330 19450 

24830 

245 

245 

250 

110.60 10935 109.80 11030 

7677 

16® 

1677 

1465 

937 

928 

9® 

9® 


429-50 42050 42250 44250 
10220 101® 101.95 104.70 


VEW 

Vtag 

VbOuwugen 

565 
79150 
1479 30 

565 

785 

1448 

565 

786 

1453 

575 

803 

1485 

Helsinki 

HEX GeutrTO rebel: 3371X34 
Previous: 3407 JS 

EnsoA 

48.90 

4830 

48J0 

48® 

Huhtomcfcll 

232 

229 

232 

729 

Kendra 

5250 

5130 

5130 

57 70 

Kesko 

77 

7530 

7620 

76.10 

Merita A 

X 

19.70 

X 

19.® 

Metro B 

172 

170 

171 

171 

Mefaa-SeriaB 

45J0 

45 

4523 

46 

Neste 

140 JO 

137 

137 

14030 

Nokia A 

42830 

418 

418 

430 

Orion •YNymae 

2® 

198 

198 

198 

Outokumpu A 

10430 

10150 

10X50 

104 

c 

u 

5 

f 

I 

13X90 

IX 

13X10 

132 


7-0 

437 

BfffStad 1.46 

Brfl Teteaxn £86 

BTR 1.90 

Bjmah Costirt 9.97 

BirtmGp 179 

CabteWlreten 556 

Cadbury Sdrw £62 

Carlton Comm £05 

Goffinri Union 6.72 

Compass Go 673 

Coorteulds £15 

Dixons £66 

Etecteocamponents 477 
EMI Group UTS 

Ene^ £45 


Enterprise Of £93 

FamCafcrtd 147 

Gerl Accident 957 
GEC 
GKN 


7.72 

7.77 

733 

BcaConun Bd 

4190 

4070 

41® 

4105 

Peugeot Gl 

605 

591 

605 

£70 

£31 

4JQ 

Bca Hdeurom 

5600 

5570 

57® 

5675 

Pinoun-Pibri 

2 *29 

78® 

2929 

131 

1.44 

131 

Bar di Rama 

1X50 

1320 

1375 

1345 


2547 

2451 

7515 

£77 

£77 

434 

Benetton 

267® 

262® 

76XO 

764® 


146 

14220 

16X60 

195 

1.97 

136 


3790 

3®C 

37 50 

3635 


1838 

7811 

181 1 

977 

9.97 

9J3 


87® 

8610 

86 40 

8®5 

Rh- Poulenc A 

259 

257JD 

757 

T.75 

136 

178 

ENI 

102® 

100® 

101® 

10195 

Sanofl 

574 

561 

562 

535 

£® 

552 

Rat 

6395 

62® 

67S5 

6375 


331 JO 

32X20 330 JO 

546 

£59 

£52 

Genoa! Aisic 

322® 

31850 

327® 

323® 

SEB 

1083 

11352 

1056 

498 

£02 

5.12 

IMI 

16380 

16010 

16015 

16210 

SGS Thomson 

516 

497 

497 

651 

£68 

670 

INA 

26® 

2570 

75® 

2595 

Ste Generate 

6°5 

683 

689 

6X34 

£10 

633 

ttaJgtts 

5420 

S3® 

070 

5405 


3040 

3001 

3010 

3X19 

XI7 

3.13 

Mediaset 

7720 

7575 

7710 

7690 

StGobabi 

864 

845 

863 

538 

£55 

£34 


112® 

11135 

1119S 

114® 


1170 

14.90 

1565 

£01 

£27 

432 


1161 

1135 

11® 

1141 

Syntrietabo 

770 

753 

767 

1135 

1134 

11X39 

Oiveffi 

48550 

475 

476 

475 


171 

16510 

1 69 JO 

639 

£41 

£43 

Parmalat 

25® 

74® 

74® 

2490 

Total B 

610 

S«0 

972 

634 

£85 

£98 

Ptn* 

4255 

4175 

41 TO 

4210 


112.70 

110 JO 

11190 

135 

136 

136 

RAS 

14370 

14150 

142® 

14330 

Vateo 

418 

39X50 

40X50 


5.94 £97 

166 352 358 

9.72 9T4 9.63 


GtantffeScume 1117 13 1114 


Granada Go 
Grand Met 
CRE 


750 775 
670 £13 
2.76 271 


Greatcfls Gp 454 472 


>9.90 8970 89.50 89.90 


Hong Kong Hgiiywu » 

* 3 Prawns: I4703J3 


Amoy Props 
BK East Asia 
Lu a lay Podflc 
Dieting Kang 
CK Infrastiuct 
China Liam 
CatPadfic 
DaoHenq Bk 
IPadflc 


870 
31.10 
13.90 
76 
2115 
4140 
4670 
4470 

Fast 

Hang Lung Dev 111 
~ 10750 

£25 
6875 
1440 
2940 
1740 
475 
243 
<6 

Hyson Dev 2195 

Johnson 0Hdg 21 B0 
Kory Props 19 

New World Dev 4650 
Oriental Press 
Peart Oriental 
SHK Praps 
Shun Tak Hdgs 
5ino Land Co. 

Sffi China Past 
Strife PocA 
Wharf Hdgs 
Wheefock 


Hang Seng BK 
Henderson Irrv 
Henderson Ld 
HK China Gas 
HKEtecMc 
HK Tefecoran 
Hopevreil Hdgs 
HSBC Hdgs 
HuWWson Wh 
Hyson Dev 


198 

171 

90 

448 

770 

7.30 

6750 

3150 

1750 


875 8.15 

3070 30.90 
1120 1375 
74 76 

21.90 23 

4040 4170 
4570 4670 
42 42 

9X15 9.10 

1170 1185 
ICQ 107 
£05 8.15 

6575 6875 
14.10 1450 
2E95 2970 
17.15 1750 
455 £63 

240 241 

6175 65.75 
2270 2250 
2145 2145 
1850 19 

4470 4670 
258 2.95 

1X18 171 

8675 90 

£60 £60 
755 770 

770 775 

66.75 6775 
3040 3140 
17.15 1770 


8.10 

30.90 

1145 

74.75 

2140 

4170 

4£10 


Guinness 

GUS 

HsFcHWg 

ICI 

Imp! Taboo 

KMUicr 

Lmferoke 

Land Sec 
Lnano 
Legal Geri 


779 

£13 

176 

450 


£20 £12 £12 


9X35 

352 

979 

1116 

753 

670 

175 

425 

6.16 


Rota Banco 
5 Poata Torino 
Slet 

Telecom Italia 
TIM 


22400 22000 22050 21950 
14800 14450 145«5 14700' 
10170 9980 10070 10250 
5640 5510 SS60 5600 
5790 5730 5740 5815 


High Law Close Pm. 


596 

2900 

2471 

146.10 
1835 

25670 

574 

330.10 
1125 

505 

696 

3049 

857 

15 

759 

170 

60S 

11250 

41450 


Sao Paulo Bovbm tadex: 137*6.90 

Previous: 1361770 


Montreal 


HifcRtrMstadSfc 351415 
Previous: 3480.19 


37 


975 

urn 

105 

8.15 
6550 
1455 
2975 
1740 

453 

243 

£4 

22 

1870 

4470 

278 

1.15 
8475 

468 

7.60 

770 

67-50 

3070 

1775 


MEPC 

MeronyAs ... 

Noftonoi Grid 245 

£37 
858 

Nest 7.10 

NorwWl Untan 346 


£79 

£07 

£16 

6.12 

Bee Mob Can 

4X90 

43"» 

£1® 

583 

£78 

£78 

5.79 


78.10 

77 80 

7810 

1941 

1840 

18J4 

1BJ6 

Cdn Util A 

37 

36.® 

37 

810 

7.98 

8X39 

8XJ4 

CT FbtlSvc 

X 

37.90 

38 

371 

X£5 

X67 

X69 

Gaz Metro 

1855 

IRk. 

1835 

73B 

6J7 

7X34 

6.98 

Gl-West LReco 

33M 

33% 

33% 

?£3 

140 

7JQ 

X45 

Imasco 

42to 

42 

42 rt 

92V 

9.05 

920 

9.16 

tnvestarsGro 

31% 

31% 

31% 

7.71 

X62 

7£5 

173 

LobiawCas 

21.10 

X® 

«IRS 

£36 

£25 

£36 

£35 

Na8Bk Canada 

17% 

17® 

17® 

67b 

£® 

£66 

£75 


3SV- 

35.15 

35® 

7.7b 

1.97 

7.75 

101 

Power Fini 

34ly 

3A40 

34.40 

£® 

5J0 

£57 

5J4 

OiKbeaofB 

27’b 

27% 

27® 

£0/ 

4.98 

£98 

£04 

Rogers Garun B 

9.15 

9.10 

9. IS 

1X85 

12 £5 

178b 

1282 

Royal Bk Cda 

65.90 

6535 

4SMI 


319: 


351. 


27<+ 

9X15 


44 Nidi Power 


Oran 

PAD 


I*je 


2JJ3 

640 

£90 

173 

7.42 


Jakarta 

Cospaitte redrec 719.13 
Previous: 7381 4 

Astra Infl 

89® 

86® 

8650 

87® 

BkbiH Indcn 

1975 

19® 

19® 

70® 

Bk Negara 

1575 

lb® 

1550 

1575 

GudangGrem 

99® 

96® 

9625 

99® 

Indoasnerri 

4250 

40® 

4125 

4075 

Indatood 

56® 

56® 

56® 

5675 

Indosai 

78® 

74® 

7525 


Sampoema HM 

9725 

9S75 

96® 

9650 

Semen Gresi 

5175 

5025 

50® 

57® 

Telekom unika si 

4175 

4U25 

41® 

4175 


Pwdion 
nkinfltan 

Powertkai 

Premier Fame* 460 

Prudential £95 

RoflfracKGp 7.2S 

Rm* Group 361 

Ream Calm 9.43 

Retfcrd 290 

Reed Infl £94 

fentoMWtta 115 

Rentes Hdgs £74 

Remm 130 

RMC Group 9xn 

Rofls RtgBe ““ 

Rond 8k Sc 
RTZreg 
RayalS! 

Safeway 
Sovrsbury 
SttmxJers 


278 141 

577 531 

846 846 

£96 7.07 

370 122 

2 

677 
£71 
171 
779 


£08 

£62 

1.18 

775 


454 £55 

£82 575 

7X15 771 

355 341 


272 
Sail 670 


970 

180 

57! 

Ill 

£55 

275 

877 

2.16 

£13 


1076 
Sun AJ £60 
£06 


974 

277 

£92 

112 

£71 

277 

9.02 

119 

£14 


Sari Newcastle 7XJ7 


10.06 1070 
449 £55 

376 4 

476 198 £20 

1740 17.43 1740 


4.17 

180 


Johannesburg ai Mattel: 7337 js 

59 Premws: 7299.18 


5 a4 Power 

Secwfcor 

Severn Trent 865 

SheaTrarapR £22 

Siebe 9.97 

Smith Nephew 146 

Smith KBne 1104 

Smiths Ind 
Sthwn Elec £75 

Stagecoach £71 

Stand Charter 9.65 

Tate & Lyle £45 

Tesco £32 

Thames Water 755 


6.90 7.02 

408 £15 

175 175 

845 840 

410 £1? 

9.97 973 9.97 

144 145 

1145 1179 
7.18 7JT7 7XJ9 

455 4.75 


Frankfurt 


AMB B 1710 

Adidas 216 

Allmnz Hflg 412 
Altana 19255 

BKBerfen 38 

BASF 6770 

Barer Hypa BK 54.90 
Bov Veteinspank 7370 
Bayer 74 

Bemsdarl 9250 

Bewag 42 

BMW 1490 

CKAG Calann 180 
CammentianK 51 71 
□atmler Beni 145 40 
Dcgussa 93 

Deulsche Banl 10360 
Dcut TdcKam 4310 
□tesdner Bor* 67 
Frevennrs 3t3 

Ffcscnms Mod 15050 
Fried. Knipp 341 
Gche 121 

Hndelbq ?ml Its 
Herd el (rid 105.70 
HEW 470 

HcpcWkH 8450 

Hoedisi 7850 

rjrslodl 60450 

Lanmeyer 78 80 

Linde 1333 

Lafltwnsa 33 JS 

WAN 544 

Mannesmam 800 
Mekrilqewflschan 40 
Metro 211 

Munch Roeci P 5570 
Pleussaq ST3 


__ D AX: 399271 

Prevtaos: 405M6 

1700 1705 1707 

221 77450 226 

398 40650 417.50 
188 IBB. 10 19255 
3775 38 37.90 

6£3D 6770 67.75 
5405 5450 55 

7250 72.70 7140 

77.90 72.90 7340 
9070 9070 91.50 
41 41 41.70 

1460 1475 1504 

175 175 ISO 

5075 5078 5770 

144 70 14470 146.20 

92.10 92.10 94 

10225 10260 10440 
4240 4270 42.95 
66K 6650 6870 
358 158 M3 

l«9 150 15245 

329 341 346 

120 12070 12150 

145 50 168 165 

105 10 10510 107 

468 468 470 

83 8450 05 

77 20 7750 7890 

588 595 608 

78 7880 79 

1320 1324 1340 

32 tO 3260 34 

S40 542 545.70 

793 796 024 

39 41 37.J5 

207 50 20960 209 

5545 5560 5660 

526 50 527 M 54? 


Armrigrentd BLs 
AngtaAm Coal 

3140 

270 

31 JO 
269 

3160 

277 

31 JO 
272 

AngloAnvCnjp 

269 

267 

769 

769 

AngloAm Gold 

260 JO 

75/ 

7® 

2® 

AngtaAm Ind 

196 

191 

1® 

193 


14 JO 

14A5 

1645 

1445 

Bartow 

® 

49 JO 


49.70 

CG. SmJtt) 

2525 

75 

25 

25 

De Beers 

?6£75 

166 

166 75 

164.75 

Driefanleta 

3080 

79® 

29® 

29 JO 

Fd Natl Bk 

36 JO 

36 

36 

36 

Gencor 

19.® 

19® 

19X5 

19X5 

GFSA 

95 

93 



ImpeniriHdgs 

63J0 

63 

63 

63 

IngweCaal 

2£75 

2585 

26 

26 

hcor 

288 

284 

JRS 

285 

Jchrmtes Indl 

65 JO 

£525 

£575 

6£25 

LAertyHdgs 

362 

.150 

360 

360 

UbertyUte 

140 JO 

13835 

139 

139 

UbUte Shot 

17.65 

17.45 

17® 

17 JO 

Minorca 

10OJO 

9935 

9935 


Nampak 

19 JO 

1860 

I860 

I860 

Nedcor 

1WJ0 

V9./S 

100,75 

10875 

Rembrandt Cp 

4£7S 

4635 

47 

47 

Ridiemonl 

70 JO 

AV.75 

6975 

6975 

Rust Ptaflnura 

75J0 

/A® 

74® 

74® 

SA Breweries 

I40J5 

13735 

1® 

1® 

Sorrwncor 

41 

40® 

40 

« 

Sasoi 

S87S 

JS 

5835 


SBIC 

212 

211 

71? 

712 

Tiger Oats 

77 JO 

7635 

77 

77 

Kuala Lumpur 

Coaposie: 1M8J1 

Pravtaus: 103824 

AMMB Hdgs 

15® 

1470 



Goftfsig 

1080 

10 JO 

10 JO 

18® 

Meri Bairiunq 

2535 

24® 

24.90 

vs n 

MtolitHShipF 

690 

£65 

670 

630 

Petronra Gas 

875 

8J5 

8® 

875 

Proton 

10.® 

10® 

1850 

11 

PubfcBk 

196 

334 

174 

X96 

Renong 

118 

3XQ 

3X34 

118 

Resorts Worm 

735 

7.05 



Rothmans Pm 

17 

26 



State Darby 
Tetekren Mai 

830 

7® 

8 

830 

11.10 

10.70 

10.90 

11.10 

Tenqga 

Jfld&gmeen 

1110 
17 JO 

1140 

1740 

n jo 

17® 

12 

17.® 


730 

6® 

680 

730 


31 Group 
Tl Group 
Tomtom 
Unilever 


£02 

£85 

275 

1772 


£62 

954 

£33 

£17 

7.40 

£95 


£70 

959 

477 

£30 

7J0 

£95 


Uld Assurance £62 


UtdNevre 
Utd U1T 


£90 

7.07 


£62 £78 

2.75 177 

1752 1757 
£30 430 


Vendor* Uuts 480 


Vodotone 

WMtrepd 


397 

7.95 


w*«ra Hdgs 127 


£B2 
£95 
442 
2 59 
748 


£90 

7JJ1 

475 

195 

7.95 


Woiseiey 


£34 


WPP Group 143 


Zeneca 


2050 


123 375 

472 429 

135 139 

3370 2075 


145 
£35 
850 
£94 
375 
103 
£11 
657 
171 
740 
£60 
6X11 
£95 
162 
950 
186 
553 
113 
£60 
175 
890 
273 
£28 
10X34 
£63 
189 
198 
1757 
6.90 
£15 
181 
853 
476 
958 

146 
1173 

771 

460 

653 

952 

455 

£19 

7.45 

SXM 

473 

253 

17.74 

475 

£92 

7X32 

458 

194 

748 

125 

475 

242 

2075 


Bradesco PM 
BraTmuj Ptd 

CemigPM 
CESPPM 
Copef 
Ekrirabras 
ttaubonco Pfd 
Ijglri Servidos 
Ughtpar 
PetrabrasPfa 
PnuRdo Luz 
Sid Nooored 

Soubi Cmz 
Tele Bras PM 
Teiemrg 
Teleii 
TetaspPfd 
Unto moo 
Usiminas PM 
CVRD PM 


11. P0 
Boaoo 
5850 
8501 
2250 
725X30 
64700 
591990 
S3D.00 
3AO.OO 
19500 
39.10 
1040 
1B0.X 
20100 
177.99 

■nano 

4350 

I3»0 

3150 


11.10 U.4G 

79300 795010 

57.00 58eO 
8250 8150 
2100 2150 

692X30 69500 

630.00 6X650 
590X30 590 00 

500.00 510.00 
377.0C 1T° GO 

394.00 195.00 
38510 38510 

1070 1040 
176 BO 177.00 
197.W 200.00 

165.00 17370 
38800 375X30 

4250 050 
1150 13 eC 
29.80 29 90 


11.10 

790X10 

Se.30 

82.00 

2150 

69100 

626X30 

580X10 

-18800 

32800 

19300 

79.00 

10710 

174.00 

195.00 
16250 
3t8 00 

42 70 
1350 
3i00 



High 

LOW 

Oom 

Pnev. 

ABBA 

113 

I10J0 

110® 

Ill® 

AssiDanan 

131 

228 

231 

231 

Astra A 

154 

149 JO 

150® 

1® 

Alios Caeca A 

225 

221 

221® 

221® 

Autoliv 

301.50 

297 

29 8 

30) 

EtedrotuxB 

632 

615 

630 

625 

Ericsson B 

324 

31 5 JO 317JO 

rtAcn 

Heroes B 

29SJ0 

29150 

294 

291® 

Incentive A 

V>7 

6® 

693 

7® 

Investor B 

426 

4® 

421 

427 

MoDoB 

267 

2® 

265 

2*5 

Nardbonken 

272 

263 

2® 

2® 

Pharm r Upjohn 
Sondvi B 

284 

277 

283® 

287® 

744 

240 24150 

243 

Scania B 

Z34 

231 JO 23150 

236 

SCAB 

17150 

170 JO 

171 

172® 

5-E Broken A 

90 

88® 

90 

90 

Ska ndia Fare 

32SJ0 

322-50 32450 

327® 

Skartska B 

344 

338® 341® 

340 

SKFB 

2® 

205® 208® 

207 

SparbankenA 
Stwn A 

179 

175 

179 

177® 

1® 

128® 

129® 

129® 

Si- Handles A 

254.50 

251 

255 

254 

LtolvoB 

711 

208® 

209 

211® 


Sydney 


All Oidtaalas: 269440 
Previous: 2<9£18 


Oslo 

Aker A 

Berpesen Dy A 


OBXtadac 47836 
Previoos: 47122 


Seoul 


Composite tod en 76777 
Previouv: 771.99 


149 148 14850 

185 18250 18350 


149 

183 


Dacari 107000 103500 104000 105000 

Daewoo Heavy 6100 77 S3 7750 800.) 


Ammc 

870 

8J4 

8® 

873 

ANZ Suing 

1012 

9.70 

10.10 

981 

BHP 

19 

1870 

1877 

1896 

Sand 

4® 

4.17 

4® 

434 

Brambles Ind. 

2632 

25J0 

26.15 

2635 

CBA 

16® 

1584 

1£26 

16® 

CC Amato 

1£Q7 

15 

1£12 

16® 

Cotes Myer 

£95 

687 

£89 

6.98 

Lama tea 

6.99 

£70 

£70 

7® 

CSK 

5J7 

£14 

534 

535 

Festers Brew 

261 

152 

161 

2® 

Goodman Fid 

183 

139 

1.81 

184 

ICI Au strata 

1175 

12® 

1173 

12® 

Lend Lease 

7816 

7775 

2815 

27.95 

Ml *4 Hdgs 
Nat Arist Bank 

1® 

1® 

1.® 

186 

20X32 

1948 

19.96 

19.70 

Nat Mutual Hdg 

116 

2.12 

2.15 

117 


TheTrib Index 

Pricea as ot 3.00 P.M. New Yoiktm 

Jan. 1. 1993- tOO. 

Ind 

Ctungi 

% ctunga 

your to data 



% change 

World Index 

179.74 

+0.02 

+0.01 

+20.52 

Regional htdemu 

AsJs/Padfic 

128.38 

-023 

-0.18 

+4.01 

Europe 

187.65 

-0X38 

-0.47 

+16.41 

N. America 

208.13 

+0.7B 

+0.38 

+28.55 

S. America 

industrial IncfuiM 

190.57 

+2.58 

+1.37 

+06.54 

Capital goods 

225.84 

-0.40 

-0.18 

+32.13 

Consumer goods 

200.58 

-0.42 

-0.21 

+24.24 

Energy 

197.83 

-0^5 

-0.43 

+15.89 

Finance 

13420 

-0.44 

-0.33 

+1523 

Miscellaneous 

180.13 

+0.60 

+0.33 

..+11-34 

Raw Materials 

195.45 

-056 

-0.13 

+11.44 

Service 

171.93 

+2.49 

- >1-47 

. -+2S20. 

L/rif rites 

183.59 

+053 

+0.13 

+27.97 

The ftnerna ocviaf Hereto Tribune WOrfd Stock index © tra efts the U.S. dotarvatum at 
280 tntomaoonally kmstacie mocks from 25 courririeo. For mora mformatton, a tree 
OcoMerls arariaMe by wwng to The Trtb hxiax. (81 Avenue Cbaries do Gauto. 

92527 NeuOy Codex. France 


Campited by Bkxmbeig News. 

High Lew 

dose 

Pm- 

High 

Low Oom Pro. 


London 


Abbey Natl 
AJUed Domeca 
Angkor Water 
Argos 

Asda Group 
Assoc Br Foods 
BAA 
Baidays 
Bass 
BAT Ind 
Bank Scotland 
Bhie Ckcle 
BOC Group 
Boob 
BPB Ind 
Bnt Acraap 
Bnt Airway*. 

BG 

Bill Lond 



FT-SE 100:4767® 


Plllfaas: 474141 

8J4 

8 43 

8® 

867 

4 41 

428 

4 35 

434 

7J5 

7J5 

7® 

7.34 

S.95 

542 

£94 

£67 



141 


i 551 

5X3 

£45 

5® 

£83 

5JS 


670 

12® 

ilia 

1226 

12J4 

B.I2 

783 

80S 

7B4 

543 

£31 

5® 


4.17 

All 

4»1 

£16 

£10 

403 

409 



10.16 

1020 

1036 


7 80 



3 

196 

199 

299 

13® 

nn 

1179 

1171 

6.93 

685 

690 

69? 

2.27 

725 

776 

775 

6 10 

583 

6® 

584 


Madrid 


Balsa todrec 621® 


Pmtouv 61721 

Acerimm 

28S50 

281® 

28300 


ACESA 

1925 

IHV0 

1905 

1930 

AguasBorceton 

6000 

5940 

6000 

6060 

SK*" 0 

9270 

WTO 

9080 

91® 

12840 

17710 

177X 

i7tmi 

Bo rush] 

1485 

1470 

1485 

1400 

Bantanter 

27940 

271 IQ 



BcuGadraHbp 

5930 

5880 

9970 

5940 



3B6UQ 

38910 

39000 

Bca Srotander 

4885 

4790 

4810 

4870 

CEPSA 

5090 

4990 

5040 

5050 

Contaiente 

32® 

31® 

3200 


isssr- 

8300 

12480 

81® 

173® 

82® 

8320 

FEC5A 

1330 

1310 

1315 

1320 

Gas Natural 

32800 

31670 

31900 


Iberdrato 

1840 

1810 

1815 

1830 

Prycn 

31® 

3120 

3135 

317J 

Repso! 

6470 

6320 

6380 

640 

5evi8anaEtec 

1490 

1460 


1430 

Tabucotem 

8350 

8180 

8200 

8X50 

Tetetacuca 

*560 




Union Fawsa 

1255 

1740 



Vtrienc Cement 

2585 

7510 

2540 

2525 

Manila 


PSEtodae 2511.15 


Previous: 259? 20 

AyufcrB 

17® 

16® 



Ayala Lund 
BkPhSp 1st 

21 

19® 



1*8 

139 

139 

148 

CiP Homes 

9 

B.70 



Manta Etec A 

B3® 

82 



Metro Bank 

490 

455 

470 

505 

Pefron 

£90 

5® 



Pa Bank 

Z« 

240 



Ptd Lang Dis) 

860 

BIS 

89 

890 

Sot Mtgud B 

60® 

a 



5M Prime Hdg 

7® 

£40 

7 

7 

Mexico 


Baba redo: 400140 


Previses: 403449 

Aha A 

56-50 

55® 



Banccd B 

2220 

21® 



Cemex CPO 

38.65 

37.95 



atraC 

1X70 

I3J4 

1160 


EmpModemo 

48.00 

46® 

48.00 


GpaCarsoAl 

58.90 

57.80 

58® 


GpoFBcamer 

163 

2® 

758 

765 

Goo Rn inbuna 

15X50 

34® 

35® 


37® 

36X15 

37® 

77 IP 

TetetasaCPb 

176® 

m® 

175® 

12640 

TcIMol 

71.15 

70.90 

21.10 

20.W 



ChrisOonio Bk 
DennorskeBk 
Efcero 
Hohkmd A 
Kvee m er Asc 
Norsk HyAo 
NonteSkogA 
NyconedA 
Orida Asa A 
Pelfcn GeoSvc 
SogaPrrim A 
Scfibstad 
Transoceon ON 
Storebrand Asa 


25.40 

9*® 

25.40 

24® 

79® 

28® 

29® 

28® 

148 

146 

147 

149 

45 

44® 

44® 

44 

448 

441 

442 

*48 

392 

390 

391 

393 

270 

268 

270 

768 

142 

139 

139 

141 

578 

555 

565 

577 

364 

355 

3SS 365® 

144 

142® 

143 

143® 

148 

146 

147 

148 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

552 

4480 

4620 

46® 

46® 


HnindMEng. 22400 
Ka Woftxs U900 
Korea ElPwr 77900 
Korea Esrti BK 6200 
Korea Me&Tef «WB 
LG5*mkOT 36600 
Potong Iran SI 6«00 
Samsung Osloy 48DOO 
Samsung Elec 69600 
Shtnhan Bank 10500 


21600 22000 7200 
14500 14900 14900 
27400 27600 77900 
5750 5750 5750 

*1000 490000 487000 
36000 3(500 36000 
63700 63800 64900 
46000 46000 47000 
68300 69000 69400 
10400 10400 10500 


News Corp 

6® 

£43 

6® 

£53 

Podhc Dutitop 

171 

X54 

ATI 

X® 


5 

49* 

498 

5.01 

PubBraodcosI 

7® 

7W 

7® 

7.90 

Rn TWa 

27.06 

2IM 

7127 

2706 

SI George Bonk 

BJ8 

8J7 

8*7 

£57 

WMC 

7.9* 

7.b8 

7.71 

8 

West poc Bkinq 

805 

780 

803 

788 

Woodstoe Pot 

11.15 

10® 

11X17 

10.90 

Woohnrttis 

£34 

4.26 

£2/ 

4JS 


MIB TeJereottca 1382880 

Preview: 1389880 


Milan 

Aleorag AssK 14165 1390S 14155 1J06S 
l 


Paris 


CAC-40-. 2929X19 
Previous: 39S0J6 

Accor 

958 

9*5 

951 

940 

AGF 

198® 

190® 

196 30 

19* 

Akin ride 
Ataitd Afctfi 

975 

780 

958 

759 

964 

764 

976 

762 

AaMJAP 

37190 

368.50 

37170 

370 

Brocuire 

750 

73S 

747 

764 

B1C 

944 

919 

933 

935 

BNP 

258® 

255 

255.10 

757 

CoritoPUn 

1188 

1164 

1183 

1185 

Correia ur 

4370 

4275 

4790 

4369 

Casino 

293® 

289 

289 

288 

CCF 

259 

253.60 

254® 

259 

Cetatem 

723 

714 

717 

724 

ChristianDior 

996 

978 

984 

990 

CLF-Deda Fran 

572 

560 

563 

571 

CreiS Agricnte 

I25SI0 

1255 

1755 

1252 

Danone 

9B7 

972 

978 

985 

EH-Aqu table 

674 

655 

658 

675 

Eridrota BS 

925 

913 

917 

970 

Eurodlsney 

Eurotunnel 

8.95 

N.T. 

B.75 

N.T. 

880 

NT. 

S.9S 

8.05 

Gen. Eaire 

748 

731 

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1130 1130 
1250 1270 

3410 3440 

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2060 2130 
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346 348 
628 645 
1620 1630 
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1510 1550 
719 719 
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594 

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308 308 

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3130 3130 

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8500 8650 

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1030 1040 

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2770 2270 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBlnS'E, FRIDAY. JULY 11, 199 


PAGE 19 


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World Roundup 


Maradona Returns 


soccer Diego Maradona won 
rave reviews after scoring one of 
Boca Juniors* goals in a 2-fl 
friendly victory against Newell’s 
Old Boys in his fourth comeback to 
Argentine soccer. 

“Maradona: the Legend Lives 
On!” said the front page of Clarin 
newspaper, and Pagina 12 news- 
paper wrote: "‘Maradona’s Return 
with a Goal Like the Old Days." 

Maradona scored five minutes 
into the game on Wednesday, from 
a free-kick after he bad been fouled 
just outside the penalty area. 

Maradona, making his first pro- 
fessional appearance for a year, has 
shed 24 pounds (11 kilograms) 
after training in the Andes and in 
Canada with the banned sprinter 
Ben Johnson. (Reuters) 

• Johnson, meanwhile, told La 
Nacion, an Argentine newspaper, 
that all top runners are on drugs. 

' ■ ‘All the elite athletes that I know 
use drugs, even those who are con- 
sidered role models,” he said. “I 
don’t know anyone who is abso- 
lutely clean.” (AFP) 


Real Madrid Accused 


soccer Monaco, the French 
champion, said Thursday that its 
teenage winger Thierry Henry 
claims Real Madrid forged his sig- 
nature on a document in which he is 
said to have agreed to join the Span- 
ish club. 

* ‘What the player has always as- 
serted to us is that the Spanish 
counterfeited his signature, said 
Henri Biancheri, Monaco’s general 
manager. 

Real Madrid says Henry signed a 
pre-contract in January. (Reuters) 


Ivor Allchurch Dies 


soccer Ivor Allchurch, 67, the 
former Welsh striker, has died at his 
Swansea home. 

Allchurch made 68 appearances 
for Wales from 1951 to 1966, scor- 
ing 23 goals. He played for New- 
castle United, Cardiff City and 
Swansea Town. 

He died Wednesday night, a 
spokesman for the Welsh Football 
Association said. ( Reuters J 


Stars Continue Falling 


BASEBALL The All-Star game’s 
television rating sank to an all-time 
low for the third straight year. Tues- 
day night's game drew an 11.8 
share, down 11 percent from last 
year and 32 percent from six years 
ago. 

Fox, which was televising its 
first All-Star game, estimated that 
32.9 million people watched. (AP) 


Pioline Lays Down Arms 


tennis Cedric Pioline, the 
Wimbledon finalist, dropped out of 
the Swiss Open in Gstaad on Thurs- 
day. Pioline was trailing Alex-Cor- 
retja 6-2 3-2 in their second-round 
match when he quit 

“My arm just doesn’t feel like 
holding a racket right now.” he 
said. “It’s just tired from too many 
serves, too much this and too much 
that.” (Reuters I 


Lightning Stops Round 


golf Thunder, lightning and 
heavy rain Thursday forced a sus- 
pension of play midway during the 
second round of the Loch Lomond 
World fnviiauonaJ. 

The reigning British Open cham- 
pion Tom Lehman led the score- 
board with 10 under par when he 
was forced off the course after 1 1 
holes of his round. 

He was one shot ahead of the 
joint leader Joakim Haeggman of 
Sweden, who was nine under 
through 14 holes. ( Reuters ) 




. "rm * 

.Jy& V - '««■£■.■* 

T" •.■** r . 

•'ll. . 


Book Now: Tyson vs. Holyfield 3, Las Vegas, Oct. ’98 


W 


Washington Post Service 


ASHINGTON — Clip and 
save: Mike Tyson will fight 


Vantage Point /TonyKornheiser 


’▼ T next year, in October or 
November, against Evander Holyfield. 
In Las Vegas. Make your reservations 
now. 

Oh, that’s right Mike Tyson 
was . . . dum-da -dum-dum: BANNED 
FROM BOXING. 

His boxing license was REVOKED. 

The five-member Nevada State Ath- 
letic Commission THREW THE 
BOOK AT HIM. 

They gave him THE MAX. 

Oh, please. 

They gave him one year. 

He’Ll be back in Las Vegas before 
Liza Minelli will. 

The terms under which Tyson’s li- 
cense was revoked allow him to apply, 
for reinstatement in a year. So don’t be 
surprised when Tyson does so next July 
8 — and when, a few weeks later, a 
Tyson-Holyfield rematch is announced. 

And why will that happen, boys and 
girls? 

Because as a very smart man once 
told me: ‘"Hie answer to all of your 
questions is: money.” 

You may have noticed that Nevada is 
— hrnmm, how shall I put this delicately 
— a hellhole. It is mountains and desert. 
I have driven through it: it's as for- 


bidding as the moon. The lovely patches 
of green in Las Vegas and Reno are no 
more natural than the chests on so many 
of the chorus girls there. 

Nevada's single attraction is the 
“cha-ching” of easy money through 
gambling. Nobody would set foot in 
Nevada if not for gambling. One way to 
attract gamblers to Nevada is by offering 
first class entertainment. Siegfried and 
Roy pass for this. So does boxing. Mike 
Tyson is the biggest draw in boxing. 
And because of his recent notoriety be is 
bigger right now than ever. Tyson’s next 
fight — against anybody, against An- 
drew Golota in a steel cage, or against 
Wayne Newton in a laundromat — will 
bring many millions of dollars to 
Nevada, If Nevada had actually 
BANNED Tyson, he would have pur- 
sued his boxing career in a foreign coun- 
try, and all that cash money would have 
crossed ‘America's borders with him. 

The five-member Nevada State Ath- 
letic Commission voted to keep the 
money coming in. 

In political science this is called 
“voting your self-interest.” 

(By die way, did you gera good look 
at those “Nevada businessmen” on the 
commission? My friend Nancy said she 


thought each one looked like he could 
wake up with a horse’s head in bed next 
to him tomorrow morning.) 

You’ll forgive me for snickering at 
the fire-and-brimstone spin the Nevada 


revoking his license, and all the . while 
they were winking at the guy. “Get 
outta here, Mike, you beast., wink- 


People hate Tyson now. 
They may hate him for- 
ever But the next time he 
fights, die pay-per-view 
will go through the roof. 


State Athletic Commission is putting on 
its decision. 

These guys are standing around and 
puffing out their chests Uke they just 
sentenced Tyson to life imprisonment 
on Mats. They’re making a big deal that 
they fined him all the law allows. But 
while $3 million is a lot to you and me (if 
it's not a lot to you, feel free to donate 
yours to me) Tyson still has S27 million 
coming! “This deserves the maximum 
punishment,” Elias Ghanem, commis- 
sion c hairman , said gravely. 

But Tyson didn’t get the maximum. 
The commission made a big show of 


A two-year suspension would have had 
more, tun, bite than this. 

Tyson will be back in a year. 

He will go before these same guys, 
with notes from his therapist, testimony 
about his good work in the community, 
evidence of “rehabilitation,” and he’ll 
be reinstated. 

Tyson could have been banned 
forever. He did nothing less than throw 
the fi g ht; the second bite removed all 
doubt about premeditation. Tyson was 
afraid of sucb a ban. That’s why during 
his public apology last week be pledged 
that he wouldn’t contest the commis- 
sion's decision, adding, “I only ask that 
this not be a lifetime ban.” 

I admit I was moved by Tyson's apo- 
logy. (At least Tyson read the statement 
himself, unlike Roberto Alomar, who let 
the Orioles read one for him after he spit 
on John Hirschbeck. a scandalous act.) 
To me, a fair sentence for Tyson would 
have been a two-year suspension — 
with some creative codicil, such as re- 
ducing the suspension to one year if 
Tyson agreed to donate the purse from 
his next fight to help victims of anger. 

It doesn’t surprise me the business- 
men from Nevada applied the law more 


lightly. Holyfield himself gave them the 
opportunity. Holyfield has already said 
that he has forgiven Tyson, and. he 
wouldn’t be averse to fighting him 
again. Surely the,. members, of die. 
Nevada State Athietic Cofruzussion 
could persuade themselves thatifHoly- - 
field feels that way — and he’s thq 
aggrieved party — why should tbeyi 
treat Tyson more harshly? ; 


T HERE’S another context where: 

Alomar intersects: whhTyson — . j ; ; 
and it speaks- to fan tolerance* , 


JL and it speaks to fan tolerance* »• t -y- 
Tyson, looks like a terrible villain now, a ; ; -jfi 
mis creant, someone polite society j 
should shun. Roberto Alomar looked 
like that, too. During the playoffs fans in 1 
Cleveland and New York rushed into the 
aisles to boo Alomar and scream hateful y j r 
things at him. Yet less than nine months ; - ^ 
later baseball fans had voted him to start ; "K ; 
in the All-Star Game. Sports fans tend to - • 

forgive, even if they don’t forget • % ’ 

People hate Tyson now, and they may : 
hate him forever. But the next time' 
Tyson fights, the pay-per-view is going ■: = 

through the roof. . : 

Tyson is the attraction. NotHolyfield, 

Not anybody else in boxing. Tyson is the 
one who’ll draw the crowd and keep the J 

roulette wheels spinning. And that/: 
more than anything else, is why Nevada ; : - _ 
didn’t toss him out on his ear. 



Son Follows in Father’s Tire Tracks 

But Cedric Vasseur Owns a Yellow Jersey His Dad Never Wore 


C< W yv W hy Our Siflf Fnm Diqvu ftr*. 

LA CHATRE. France — Twenty 
seven years ago, Alain Vasseur won 
his only stage of the tour de France. 
On Tuesday, his son Cedric, a usually 
anonymous rider with the Gan team, 
repeated the feat and managed 
something his father did not achieve. 

After a solo breakaway that 
stretched over the last 147kilometers 
(92 miles) of the 261.5-kilometer 
stage from Chantonnay to La Chatre 
Vasseur finished more than three 
minutes ahead of the main pack to 
take the yellow jersey of overall lead- 
er off the more celebrated shoulders 
of Italian sprinter Mario Cipollini. 

4 *To leave the pack so for from the 
finish, that takes courage and a lot of 
class, ’ ' Alain Vasseur, die father, said. 
He won his stage one month before 
Cedric was born in August, 1970. 

“My father taught me to keep my 
head on my shoulders because cyc- 
ling is a difficult sport.’ ’ Cedric said. 
“I am a simple man. i don't want to 
have a big head about this.” 

Alain Vasseur has a bicycle shop in 
northern France. “ It's a great honor' ’ 
he said from his home. “I was really 
with him (he last 15 kilometers,” 


His son had more than a 1 7-minute 
lead over the pack at one time, but 
although that was shaved down in the 
final hour of the stage, he ended up 
more than two minutes ahead of a 
small group of riders, led by the 
Australian Stuart O’Grady, a Gan 
teammate. 

O’Grady ’s job had been to break 
up the rhythm of the small chasing 
group to keep them from catching his 


Tour de France 


teammate. He succeeded and com- 
fortably gained second place as the 
chasers sprinted for the finish line. 

“He controlled everything, and 
we did everything we wanted to do 
today," Vasseur said. 

Gan have collected 25 second 
places this season including one in 
Wednesday’s stage through Frederic 
Moncassin. 

The main pack came in 3:24 be- 
hind. That gap enabled Vasseur to 
gain the overall lead from Cippolini, 
who rides for the Saeco team. The 
Italian slipped to second place, more 
than two minutes behind. Erik Zabel 
is third, just behind Cipollini. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 




editor 


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book follows the races and the racers in 
whaf Greg LeMond once described as 
the toughest job in the wortd. 

Pedaling for Glory (US$14.95) can 
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CENTRAL LEAGUE 

HorKtiin vs. Yokohwm, ppd due to rain 
PACIFIC LEAGUE 
Ortt 1 Nippon Horn 2 
Kintetsu 5 . Settxi 3 


Postal service. sJ„ 6 . T Merry Bourqufcffoa 
Franco. Big Wot s.t. 7 . Fubrtce Gougot 
France. Casino, s-t. B. Step hone Cueft 
France. Mutuetfe Setae et Marne. &t, 9 . Mar- 
co Zen. Italy, Rasbtta s-t. 10 .Bo Hamburger, 
Denmark, TVM.s .1 

ovouui l. Cedric Vasseur, 2 SH 4 J& 3 . 
Mono OpaunL Italy. Soeco. 2 minutes. 17 
behind 3 . Erik Zabel Germany, Tetekom, 
2 : 19 : 4 . Dirts Bo an tma n . Britain. Gan, 234 ; 5 . 
Jai UUridh Germany, Telekom, 256 ; 6 . 
Franck Von aen Braucke. Beighmv Mope* 
MOt 7 . Abarfiam Otana Spcriis Banesto. 

8 . Stuart O'GrwJjr. 3 «& 9 . Laurent Jafoberi 
France ONCE. 3 : 06 ; « 0 . Frederic Monrassfew 
France, GAN, 3 : 06 . 


Lotte vs. Daid ppd due to rain 



■ NffttNIBlONAIINMat 


All-Star Game 


WEDNESDAY. WOLASQOW. SCOTLAND 
France 22 . Scotland 20 


Eosti West 4 

STAMOntas: Eastern Cmfsrence DC. 39 ; 
Tampa Bov 25 c New England 22 ; Columbus 
1 77 NY-NJ 13 s Western CenfeienceKansas 
City 2 ft Colorado 25 ; Deltas 21 ; San Jose 1 7 ; 
Los Angeles » 3 . 

Women’s Championship 


TRANSITIONS 


oaoup* 

SEN1FMAL 
Sweden 0. Germany 1 


_ Italy 2. Spain 1 . 


CYCLING 


Tour de France 


Hiroshima 36 34 — 


Leading pbdngs in die 261.5 tan ( 1 G 2 J> 
mfleej 5 tfi stage from Chantonnay to La Cha. 
K: 

1 . Cedric Vosseut France. GAN. 6 hours. 1 ft 
rmnutos. 44 seconds; 2 . Sluort O'Gratty, Aus- 
tralia GAMJ nwwfcs. 32 seconds behlncl 3 . 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

DETROIT ^Activated C Malt Wotoeck tram 
15-day disabled list Optioned C Brian John- 
son to Toledo. IL. 

KANSAS— Fined Bob Boont manogm Greg 

LiutnSkL hitting Instructor, and NUtohetl 

Page, nisi base coach. Named Tony Muser 
manager, Frank White Bret boto coach and 
Tom Paquette tulttag instructor. 

Minnesota -Signed RHP Tmwlby Stur- 
dy. 

SEATTLE -Signed RHP Brandon Parker. 
RHP Patrick Dunham. LHP Peter Duprey. C 
Opriano Gaiclo RHP Daniel Dcigocta. LHP 
Robert Chrysler and SS Hubert Parker. 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

HOUSTON-Puf RHP Tommy Greencon 1S- 
doy disabled I«sl Adkroted RHP Puss 
Springer from 15-day disabled Ssi 


Champion Comes Home, 
But Hardly in Triumph 




Hill Faces Mountain at British Grand Prix 


By Brad Spurgeon 

International Herald Tribune 


I HE WORDS embroidered on the left 
breast of the short-sleeved blue polo 


JL shin appeared to be there as a reminder 
“Damon Hill, World Drivers’ Champion. 


1996.” 

Hill is proud to be that champion. He is also 
proud that this Sunday at Silverstone, be will be 
the first reigning British champion to race in 
the home Grand Prix since James Hunt in 1977. 
But he knows history is unlikely to repeat itself. 


Hunt won the race. Hill will probably be happy 
to cross the finish line — something he has 


Ipim-I'w,' IV—- 

The peloton in the Tour de France rolling past a field of sunflowers Thursday on its way to La Chatre. 


Alex Zulle. a Swiss rider with the 
ONCE team who had finished 
second overall in the Tour in 1995, 
dropped out of the Tour before 
Thursday's stage. Zulle who broke a 
collarbone in the Tour of Switzer- 
land in June. He was operated on and 
started the Tour de France with a 
special brace and screws in his col- 
larbone. 

Zulle was more than four minutes 
behind after four stages. Although he 
did not fall in any of the crashes that 
plagued the Tour de France over the 
first four days, be was the only top 
rider hindered in all three of them, 
losing about a minute each time. 

He said he was growing more and 
more discouraged and that his injury 
was still hurting. 

“AJex Zulle" who has suffered a 
lot of incidents since the start of the 
Tour, does not want to take any more 
risks in order not to jeopardize the 
rest of his season,” the Tour or- 
ganizers announced. 

On Tuesday, Tony Rominger, an- 
other leading Swiss rider, dropped 
out with a broken collarbone 
suffered in a crash on that day’s 
stage. (AP, Reuters) 


done oily twice in eight races this season, 
finishing last once and next to last in an ab- 
breviated race in Montreal last month. 

In an interview under the awning of the 
motor home of his Arrows team at die French 
Grand Prix two weeks ago. Hill appeared full 
of pluck and confidence — but he seemed a 
little like the valiant knight from a Monty 
Python sketch who is sitting like a stump in the 
muck, his arms and legs having just been 
severed in battle. 

The knight says defensively, “I’ve had 
worse.” 

Unlike the knight. Hill is in excellent phys- 
ical condition. But he pointed out that at 36 he 
is 10 years older than most of the other 
Formula One drivers. 

Probably no other reigning world cham- 
pion has done so poorly. The bad luck can be 
traced to last year when, while Hill was 
leading the championship, his boss Frank 
Williams told him he was not renewing Hill’s 
contract. Hill was courted by many teams, 
including one of the up-and-coming ones, 
Jordan, now in the top five. 

But he joined one of the worst on the grid. 
Arrows. “I find it difficult to imagine Jordan 
being in a championship-winning position in 
the future.” Hill said, “and. that's really the 
key question for me: Where am I going to be 
to win a championship?” 

That is his goal now. Critics might tell him 
to forget it, at his age and without the prospect 
of a seat in one of the top teams. But many also 
wrote him off at the start of his Formula One 
career. Hill did not start racing cars until he 
was 24, they said, while Michael Schumacher 
was racing karts at 4. But Hill’s father, Gra- 
ham, a double world champion, had never 
driven a car of any kind until he was 24. 


“They were really in their death throes as a. m 
team,” he said of Brabham. “They’d gone 
from being a great team to being absolutely “ * | 
hopeless. I was using Brabham for the ojv - #!'• : 
portunity to actually cut my teeth and notch \ 
up on qualifying sessions and get some race , \ 

experience.” . ? 

He impressed Williams. After Nigel . . 
Mansell left the team when Alain Prost was., 
hired. Hill became the second driver. Hq 
learned from drivers who among them ac-.' V; 
cumulated 10 world drivers’ championships; 
Mansell had one, Prost four, Ayrton Senna j ,” 
three, and Hill’s father had two. Not that hi^ . 
father consciously taught the boy. >•_ . 

* ‘ My father expressed a desire for me not tq 
compete in Grand Prix racing,” he said. “But 
it’s a philosophical question because, what do 
you do with your lire? I really only.have ever 
been trying to do my own thing. A psy- 
chiatrist may disagree: If I was trying to come 
to terms with something at odd& withm myself^ 
by being a racing driver, then-Uhink Fd need) •: * 
help. I think I’m just doing what people do . 
naturally, which is to compete* • i Vx 


H DLL describes his childhood as “mol- 
lycoddled.” But when he was 15 
years old. his father died in an airplane 
crash. It became the beginning of a second 
phase in his life, one of struggle, including a 
period as a delivery boy on a scooter in 
London while trying to support his budding 
racing career. 

He started by racing motorcycles, but his 
mother thought that was too dangerous and 
encouraged him to try cars. After a mostly 
undistingu is bed career in the lower fonmu las of 
British racing. Hill landed a job as a test driver 
at the top Formula One team. Williams. 

He got his first chance to race in Formula 
One with Brabham in 1992. 


I N MAY 1994 his teammate. Senna, ified In *. \ \ 
a crash at lmoia. Even as he dealt with thej *’ •' 
death. Hill had to talre foe rote of leading the •: ;• 
team. But it was not until the year embroidered t Jy 
on the shirt that everything came together — jdji 
which made it seem all the more strange thar be -- i 
got kicked off the team after five seasons." \' v ‘ i 
“I put together all the experience,” he said . - f- 
“I had all die right ingredients to jjnt tqgefliar 2 % 
the championship, and to cope with the best * - £ 
team, and the situation changed. I lost the-. ; t 
opportunity of going just at a time when I felt ] 
that I was in my best position to do iL I'm :■ * 
watching with interest the situation at Wil- ' . 
Liams.” 

Last year Hill led the championship from ‘ >, 
start to finish, though his teammate, Jacques ’ ; * 
Viileneuve, was only a few points behind at the ; ) 
end. Viileneuve now is foe leading driver at '- 
Williams, but he is 14 points behind Schu- \ 
raacher in the drivers’ championship: Mil’s - ■ { 
replacement, Heinz-HaraJd Frentzen, is far ■ 
bdiind. v 

Hill, meanwhile, is enjoying -being the \M 

reigning drivers* champion. 4 

“It’s something that does mean something 
and is regarded as a relevant credential in .. > 
sport.” he said, “as it should be. And I get a ■ \ • 
fantastic reaction wherever I go from the" •'!* 
crowds. And 1 get a kick out of that.” - ’ ' i~ 

How can a driver who was almost always in - L. 
pole position be starting at the back of the . V 
grid? Hill says it’s simple: Forty years ago, in ' £ 
the days of Manuel Fangio, the driver ac- i 

counted for about 25 percent of the per- 
formance. Today, Hill says, the car is 98 - 
percem of the game, with the driver merely 
contributing foe final 2 percent. 

“But you only need 2 percent for the 
difference between winning and coming in ; 
sixth,” he said. ' J 

This weekend, he goes home to foe race he • . 
won in 1994, 

“I think I have quite an outside chance of '. 
getting in the top three.” he said. “If wecould . -• 
have one good day. that would do me.” - 


Yc'lohonta 33 3A — 


77* ~ tralia. GAN J nwwtts. 32 seconds behind 3. 

a, . , n Francisco CoboHo, Spain. Kelmc. same time. 

4. Marco Arttwnghi, Italy, MeratoiK Un* 
* S.L 5. Pxtof Melnert- Nk*on. Ocnrtwrt. U.S 


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
ahzdna -Re-sloned S Matt party lo I- 
year contact, suraed OL Oufe Dhhmon 
INDIANA POLK — ApTCed ID leitITS With LB 
Boil Beny RdcosoODB Enc Alton. 



Michael Schumacher, the leader in the 1997 drivers’ chamninn^hi^Z^ 
Thursday .0 Ihc rci,„i„ K champion . Dan, 




who rar 


tor coaw 


the ton* 


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00 




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y u£»c>l 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE. FRIDAY. JULY 11, 1997 


PAGE 21 


SPORTS 


fBID Ai-.Jli LV]1 





■Oj(] 

w 

•lift 

Ibr 


f lv aV "f Vh.irT 
■S' ® e members "% h 

ate Athletic Com J llJ ~ 

ide themselves ihuT|?u S11111 

that way - 

~ whv s hnu h |V lh - 
more harshly? Id 'he, 

- S . another coniexi , l 

fJST®”* wilh tL hl7,; 

t speaks To tan . ,i n - 
’ like a terrible vil| a «^ anic 
someone po|j,J m " nk •< 
o. Roberto Ak imjr 

Kj^Tingtbepj M, 11 

nd New York rushr-d ' 1,1 

) Alomar and 
n- Yet l ew than r ^' ctul 
JI fans had voted hi m ? ,,n,b 

tar Game. Spo n > f- ™ l 
a if they don i fori, 10,1 11 

«e Tyson now. ;m .fitu. Vll 

orever. But the n , xi ^ 
s, the pay- per- \ , IIT " ; 

the attraction. Not HoK fl , h 
y else in boxinc. Tw m , ! d 

draw the crowd and ui h‘ 

heek spinning. And 
ny thing else, i>uh% n- S 
him out on his ear. * 


Colombian 
Leads East 
In All-Star 
MLS Win 


Home, 


impl 

*rand Prix 


sally in their death (hruesj.o 
of Brabham. "Thex’d suix 
eat team to being uhsuluieh 
using Brabham inr ihe up. 
Jally cut my jeoih .<n,i n<>kii 
l session-. ami get -mu- rul- 
'd William- Alter Vd 
team when Alain h.i-.r » 
amc the second Jnva Hi 
rivers v% ho among them *. 
orld driver.-’ champion-hip* 
e. Prost fu i J r . A> n<»n Scnru 
* father had '•* •> N"t ih.-i hi 
;ly taught the lxi\ 
tpressed a de-ire lor me Mi- 
ld Prix rae.ng. ’ he -aid "Bur 
cal question bewtu-e. wh.ud- 
ir life? i r-.v.!l; only huieotr 
do mv ov.r ihmg A p? 
iagree. lt i w a? l r> mg m conic 
■neth’ingai OilJ > \ulhinmy«ell 
g driver. then 1 think I diH-eu 
n just doing uhai pc«*p!«: 
l is to com pc v 

4 his teammate. Sennit. dwh® 
tola. Even as lie Jr;ili vuih iw 
id to lake the role > «f feudinp* 

not until the > ear cmhmtJe^ 

every! hinc came o«geiher 
■cm all the more -ir.mge ihai ft 
ie team alter foe -e.uon-. 

;r all the experience. hei- 
ght ingredients io put 
Ip, and to cope « > ht . 

. .-hinoed U'*t 


ituation changed lb 
toine just at a nme ... 

w best position i" »' 1 , 

interest the Miuaiu*n a 

11 led the champu-nship^ 
hough his teaminaie- 
.onlyafewpomis^hm^, 

• now is the leaJm=; 
te U 14 po»n«>KW 
drivers' champion.-hj- » 
leinz-Harald Frent/en. 

•hik. is enjoying ** 

i* champion. wom ethn? 

^thatdoesmea.^, 

d as a r p lev J . n ‘ ^„dlsf ! 

, "as it should^ 

on where \er [ ~ - 

& et a kick out ot ,lul ' { ^i 

■iverwhowasaim^ p j ,hr 

>c stoning nMhc ba^^ # 

it's simpk: Fon> 1 * r * 

ianuel Fangio, he . * 

bout 2 a pereen ; is * 

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By Grahame L. Jones 

4*»i .-Uicr/f d 

EAST RUTHERFORD. 
New Jersey — Carlos Valder- 
• • ^ rama. the most valuable play- 
er in Major League Soccer's 
1996 All-Star game repeated 
the Feai in the 1997 march. 

The Colombian scored one 
goal and set up two others 
Wednesday as the Eastern 
Conference beat the Western 
Conference. 5-4. in a match as 
wild and as woolly as Valder- 
rama's famous hairstyle. 

It was a game ot' dramatic 
shifts. The West starters built 
a 2-0 first-half lead against 
the East sraners. u irh Dante 
Washington opening the 
scoring and the Galaxy goal- 
keeper Jorge Campos netting 
a spectacular second goal. 

Then, after the reserves 
came in. the East rattled off 
< four straight second- half goals 
T bv Valderrama. Giuseppe 
Gaiderisi. Robert Wurzycha 
and Richie Williams to take a 
4-2 lead after 70 minutes. 

. But the West fought back 
and tied it at 4 with Digital 
Takawira and die Galaxy’s 
Cobi Jones scoring. 

Finally, in the 88th minute, 
Brian McBride netted the 
winner before a rain-soaked 
Giants Stadium crowd of 
24.8 1 6. 

“Ir was a lot of fun." said 
Ron Newman, the Kansas 
City Wizards’ veteran coach 
who ran the West. ”It was 
perilous for defenders. And 
-jfor coaches, probably." 

•' ‘’There were a lot" of great 
goals, a lot of incredible 
misses, some bizarre things 
happening out there." he said. 
"But that’s entertainment." 

The emphasis was on attack 
all night, and it was Valder- 
rama, playing the entire 90 
minutes, who orchestrated the 
East's second-half surge. 

’ ’If you give him that much 
room." Newman said, “he’s 
brilliant, isn’t he? He was 
magnificent. That’s what All- 
Star games are all about, let- 
ting players play.” 

Campos’s goal, scored 
from a lough angle just before 
halftime, ignited the match. "I ' 
just close my eyes and shoot,” 
said Campos, who later left 
the forward position for his 
usual goaikeeping duties. 

■ Colombia Slioot-Outs 

The Colombian champion- 
ship has begun its no-draw 
era, in which penalty shoot- 
outs are used, Agence France- 
, jk Presse reported from Bogata. 
”v Victors by shoot-out get 
. only two points, and losers 
one, instead of the three given 
to winners of games finished 
wirhin 90 minutes. 

Magdalena, Envigado and 
Millonarios were the first 
teams to benefir, winning by 
shoot-outs Wednesday. 



The Big Unit and the Fear Factor 

How Randy Johnson Changed His Image and Started to Win 


* * % A % 

«ft II 

• ? | St 


r- • ' % ■ 


Carlos Valderrama stretching to keep the hall in play at the MLS All-Star Game. 


The U.S. Women’s Open: 
The Spirit of Woods Hovers 


By J.E. Vader 

lliu/itiii;r.'M h‘\i .Sit > 1. 1 


N ORTH PLAINS. Oregon — He’s 
now here near here. He has no in- 
tention of coming here. He has noth- 
ing ro do with anything here. But he is 
everywhere. 

The specter of the nor-so-ohscurc male 
golfer Tiger Woods permeates the 1997 
U.S. Women’s Open like a benevolent fog. 
As golfers prepared for the weekend's com- 
petition. it was hard ro walk nine yards 
without hearing his name, sometimes mur- 
mured in reverent hushed tones. (Of course, 
this is a sport w here spectators often whis- 
per. 1 

The top competitors are differentiated by 
how they can be described in relation to 
Woods: There is the current Tiger Woods of 
Women's Golf, rhe former Tiger Woods of 
Women’s Golf, the golfer Romantically 
Linked With Tiger Woods and the woman 
who is trying to do Just What Tiger Woods 
Did. Exactly Where He Did It. 

■ None of this, naiurally; is entirely ac- 
curate. 

Karrie Webb, last year’s leading money 
winner on the LPGA Tour, is often described 
as the women's game’s answer to Woods. 
The 22-year-old from Australia, who will 
not win anywhere near S2 million this year 
and can walk down the street unrecognized, 
was asked if she minded being compared 
with other golfers, such as Woods. 

She shrugged. ‘T don’t think you can 
ever stop people from making comparis- 
ons," Webb said. "I just hope I’ll be re- 
membered for the things I’ve done." 

Nancy Lopez won nine tournaments, in- 
cluding five in a row, to become rookie of 
the year in 1978. Attractive, articulate and a 
racial minority in a very white sport. Lopez 
was Woods before Woods was 3 years old. 
She recently improved her scores, a move 


she attributes to losing weight and gening in 
shape — thanks, naiurally. to Woods. Ai a 
news conference the second question she 
was asked — after “How do you like the 
course?" — was about Wood’s and if his 
story seemed familiar. 

"There were a lot of similarities in the 
way his career started and the way that mine 
was when I was a rookie, ’ she said. 

Referring to Woods's rookie year, she 
added. "I was getting some good feelings 
from what was happening to him because I 
remember the feelings 1 was having during 
that time." 

Kelli Kuehne. 20. is not yei a member of 
the women 'slour. but she has won two U.S. 
amateur championships and, similar to 
Woods, signed an endorsement contract 
with Nike (although it’s a stretch to equate 
them — hers is reportedly for $250,000 a 
year for five years: his is said to be worth 
S40 million. over seven years). She also is a 
friend of Woods’s and played with him last 
fall in the JC Penney Classic for her pro- 
fessional debut. 

Not long after that. Kuehne was in die 
grocery store checkout line and saw herself 
on the cover of tabloid newspapers — named 
as Woods’s girlfriend. She giggled when 
asked aboui that after a practice round. 

Kuehne said she — turd her 300-pound 
Texas football player boyfriend — found 
the reports hilarious. "Like it’s me against 
model. Tyra Banks." she scoffed. 

But the golfer who is most often men- 
tioned in the same sentence as Woods is 
Annika Sorenstam. She will attempt to win 
her third consecutive U.S. Open here, 
something no woman — or Woods — has 
done. But last year Woods did become the 
first man to win three straight U.S. amateur 
titles, so the comparisons are relentless. 
Especially because Woods won his third at 
the very' same club. Pumpkin Ridge, and on 
the very same course. W itch Hollow. 


H.u/ihiwVl'/j A*sf Strut r 

CLEVELAND — The first time 
Larry Walker had a chance to expe- 
rience the unique thrill of hilling against 
Randy Johnson this season, he didn’t. 
The National League batting leader took 
the day off last month, rested rhe aid 
.398 average and. generally speaking, 
opted to increase hLschances of living to 
see his grandchildren. 

Sandy Koufax was uohitiable. Bob 
Gibson was mean. Sam McDowell was 
as w'tld as he was fasL Ryne Duren wore 
glasses as thick as Coke bottles and, 
sometimes, threw his first warm-up 
pitch off the backstop as a message. Dick 
Radatz weighed 235 pounds and looked 
like his nickname — The Monster. Ro- 
ger Clemens’s rockets twice struck out 
20 men. Mitch (Wild Thing) Williams 
had the windup of a berserk whirligig. 
Every time Nolan Ryan took the mound, 
hitters fell like it was Friday the 1 3th and 
they’d just broken a mirror. 

But nobody in the last 40 years, and 
perhaps nobody ever, has terrified ma- 
jor league hitters like The Big Unit. In 
particular, Johnson scares left-handed 
batters more than Mike Tyson scares 
Ross Perot. Perhaps that other Johnson 
— Walter. The Big Train, with his 
stdearm blurs — caused more one-day 
flu epidemics among opposing hitters. 
Bui probably not. 

This week, on the eve of the 68th All- 
Star Game, won by the American 
League. 3- 1 . the 6-fooi- 10 Johnson with 
his IOO-mtle-an-hour left-handed fast- 
hall was asked his opinion of a sup- 
posedly great hitter such as Walker de- 
liberately ducking the challenge of 
facing a comparably great pitcher. 

"I didn't realize he wasn’t in the 
lineup.' ' said Johnson, making clear his 
view of his own place in the baseball 
universe relative to any mere batsman. 

Told that Walker had claimed that he 
and Johnson were “friends." The Unit 
responded, “I don’t remember getting a 
Christmas card from him last year." 

When Walker came to bat in the All- 
Star Game at Jacobs Field. Johnson had 
retired all five men he had faced — two 
on strikeouts and three on limp ground 
outs. So. Johnson could afford to in- 
dulge himself. 

His first pitch was a fastball four feet 
above Walker’s head. The man who hit 
19 home runs on 44 swings in Monday's 
home run contest did the logical thing. 


Vantage Point / Thomas Boswell 


He mined his batting helmet backward 
and moved from the left-handed barter’s 
box to the righty's side. 

As Walker 'mocked himself, the 
crowd laughed. The players in the 
dugout laughed. Walker laughed. John- 
son didn’t Faugh. He was thrown off his 
stride. After taking one pitch as a righty . 
Walker went back to the port side. But 
Johnson walked him. Not amused. 
Johnson quickly retired the side. 

"It was kind'of humid out there. The • 
ball just slipped." said Johnson of his 
comic interlude with Walker, who 
really is a longtime friend. 

"A spur of the moment thing," said 
Walker of his escape to a new batter's 
box. “I'm just glad it’s over." 

Five years ago. Johnson might have 
laughed' too —2 admitting that the gag 
was just a lark. Back then, he was a 
sensible fellow with a normal hair- 
cut. Hitters heard about the giant with 
die Alan Alda world view. They sensed 
that he feared his own power, if they 
crowded the plate, he’d take something 
off his fastball to avoid hitting them. 

B ack then. Johnson was also a 
mediocre pitcher. Then one day, 
he went to his idol — Ryan — to 
ask how his career record could be 49- 
48. Johnson talks about that meeting. 
But only hints about specifics. Hitters. 
however, got the message. Johnson Jet 
his hair grow and added a goatee and 
mustache, achieving a scraggly serial 
killer appearance. 

Hitters also began to notice that 
whenever Johnson went more than a 
couple of games withour drilling a hitter 
with a fastball, suddenly, in a suitable 
game situation. The Unit would become 
wild. Was it possible that Ryan had 
effected a soul transplant? 

Maybe it was all dugout scuttlebutt, 
occasioned by the New Look. But it 
stuck. And Johnson loved it You'll 
never get him to admit that his Kruk and 
Walker pitches were entirely innocent. 
His act is now pan of his an. Now. he’s 
one of the most dominant pitchers of the 
century. His record the past five years is 
67-18 with an almost unbelievable 
1,059 srrikeouts in just 834 innings. 
This is more than the confluence of a 
historic fastball with an 89-mile-an- 


hour slider and fine control. 

He has won 44 of his past 50 de- 
cisions, the second-best such record 
over a 50-decision span in history, ac- 
cording to Sports Iilustrared. 

Batters, naturally, cry to talk them- 
selves out of Big Unit Syndrome. "You 
have to tell yourself, ‘Hang in. Slay.’ 
You have to keep that from shoulder 
from flying. You can’t have any fear,” 
said seven-time batting champion Tony 
Gwynn before the All-Star Game. Then 
chuckling, Gwynn confessed: “O.K., if 
a 6-10 guy is dealing, maybe a little fear 
is good. It makes you concentrate better. 
But you can’t let the fear take over like 
Kiuky did." 

Easy to say. On the first pitch of bis 
first at-bai against Johnson. Gwynn 
learned that seeing is believing. Johnson 
threw a slider that Gwynn must have 
thought was going to go behind him. He 
leaped back. The pitch ended up barely 
missing the inside comer. 

Gwynn broke into a grin, shook his 
head and compared impressions with 
home plate umpire Larry Barnett. As 
soon as Johnson threw a pitch over the 
plate, Gwynn slapped ir into play — 
right back io Johnson. Despite his seven 
batting titles and his shot at a .400 
average this year, the lefty-hitting 
Gwynn might as well have held up a 
sign that said “Lemme outta here!" 

Baseball is a game of familiar sizes, 
dimensions and measurements. Big 
leaguers have grown accustomed to 95 
mile an hour "heat since their minor 
league days. Maybe they can’t always 
hit such stuff. But it’s familiar to them. 
Add just a few miles an hour, however, 
and their eyes open wide. 

All-Star’Games exist to showcase not 
merely stars but The Stars. Even the 
greats are not created equal. And 
nobody has ever been created just like 
Johnson. Many pitchers will end up with 
better career statistics. But few will be 
remembered more vividly. 

Randy Johnson is at his peak at this 
very moment. With chronic disk prob- 
lems that caused him to miss most of the 
'96 season, his prime may not be a long 
one. But no one since 1868 has ever stood 
taller on a big league mound. In fact, as 
rhe Big Unit showed again in Cleveland, 
even that is a slight understatement. 


The Triple- A Votes to Realign 


Tin- AssiiiuieJ Press 

DES MOINES, Iowa — Minor league 
team owners plan to overhaul Triple-A 
baseball to bring about more convenient 
travel, easier expansion, more opponents 
and maybe, just maybe, a world series. 

The owners voted Wednesday to 
eliminate one of the three leagues that 
operate just below the majors leagues. 
Starting in 1998. the American Asso- 
ciation will be no more. 

Three of the teams will join the In- 
ternational League, the other five will 
merge with the" Pacific Coast League. 
An expansion team will join each 
league. 

Branch Rickey, the American As- 
sociation President, said Triple-A needs 
to be prepared for growth higher up. * ‘If 
the major leagues expand again, in 
keeping the one-to-one ratio with the 
major leagues, we would have to add 
Triple- A teams," he said. 

"We see the reconfiguration of base- 
ball formats and schedules in the majpr 


leagues, and we think there are some 
similar benefits to be gained at the 
minor league level," Rickey said. 

The realignment must be approved by 
the National Association of Profession- 
al Baseball Leagues and then reviewed 
by Major League Baseball. 

■ Minor Hero for a Night 

For a night, Frank Catalanotto was 
glad to be in the minor leagues. The 
Associated Press reported. 

The Toledo second baseman went 2- 
for-4 with a two-run homer and two runs 
scored to lead the American League ro a 
5-3 victory over the National League in 
the Triple-A All-Star game Wednesday 
night. 

"Obviously I want to be in the major 
leagues," Catalanotto said. "Would I 
trade being an All-Star right now for 
that? Probably not. But here’s hoping I 
get that call from Detroit in the second 
half. That would be the best of both 
worlds." 



•Eric Owens forces out Eric Zinter, 
left, in the Triple-A All-Star Game 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 






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(MGRtoanram* 

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Arts ^ Antiques 

Appear Saturday. 

To atlvMtb*- HitUai 
| Kim berk Cuctraud-Botrancuun 
Td.:^ 33 (0)141439476 
Fax: + 33 (0)1 41 43 93 70 
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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JULY II, 1997 


POSTCARD 


Salon’s Trek to Texas 


Far-Away Kingdoms and a Storybook Ending 


B y Sam Howe Verbovek ™ nriifHo^orN^o’r' 
NewYi,rkrimaieniLe leans never got off the ground. 


By Suzy Menkes 

Inrernatii/rkll Herald Tribune 


OUSTON — How the fin But years later, Mecom's son 


P ARIS — The fantastic dreams of three 
powerful designers cast a strange spell 


the Countess Greffulhe of Par- 
is wound up installed here in a 
small luxury hotel is a bizarre 
but engaging tale, involving 
larger-than-life characters on 
both sides of the Adantic. 

One is the Franco-Belgian 
countess, a beguiling woman 
bom in 1 860 who played host 
to leading Literary, artistic and 
diplomatic figures of her day. 
Auguste Rodin, a romantic 
admirer, is said once to have 
worn pan of her nightgown 
around his neck as a scarf. 

Another is a wealthy Texas 
oilman, John W. Mecom, a 
generally astute but highly ec- 
lectic investor. He had such an 
outrageous penchant for ac- 
quiring French stuff — the 
contents of an old Paris Metro 
station, a 19th-century French 
bakery and Marie Antoi- 
nette’s bathroom (including 
hairbrushes and chinoiserie). 
as well as the countess's salon 
— that he finally had to buy a 
blimp hangar at an old U.S. 
military base in Hitchcock, 
Texas, in which to store it all. 


Stephen Zimmerman, a Hous 
ton hotelier who owns La 
Colombe d’Or and who is not 
exactly a shrinking violet 


himself. (At the peak of die oil 
bust in the 1980s. Zimmer- 
man got international atten- 
tion by offering four-course 
meals at his French restaurant 
here for the price of a barrel of 
West Texas crude. For many a 
traumatized o ilman , it was the 
only good thing about the 
plunging price of oil.) 

Zimmerman says he grew 
imm ediately fascinated by 
the story of the salon. Five 
years — and about $2 million 
— later, the result is Le Grand 
Salon de la Comtesse, newly 
opened at his hotel. La Co- 
lombe d'Or, in the Montrose 
neighborhood near down- 
town Houston. 

The salon — or at least the 
carved oak paneling from its 
four walls — has been in- 
stalled and is open for wed- 
ding receptions and business 
conferences. In the long run, 
it may well be revived as a fin 
de sidcle (that's the fin of the 
20th si&cle) hangout for the 
artistic and Literary, set of 
Houston. Rice University, the 
Houston Grand Opera and the 
Houston Museum of Fine 
Arts all have tentative plans to 
hold cultural or educational 
events in the salon. 

The original salon, erected 
outside Paris near Fon- 
tainebleau in the late 1880s at 
Bois-Boudran, the country es- 
tate of the Countess and Count 
Henri Greffulhe. quickly be- 
came a gathering spot for 
Parisian high society. It was 
“presided over by a hostess, 
who is the very personific- 
ation of charm, elegance and 
grace," said a November 
1891 article in Le Figaro. 


It was in this hangar that the 
Louis XV oak paneling from 
the salon, first carved by ar- 
tisans in the 1730s in the Ro- 
coco style of the period, re- 
mained in storage for nearly 
35 years. The paneling arrived 
in 1962 — in crates labeled 
“French bric-a-brac" — 
when a family squabble after 
the countess's death in 1952 
led to the dismantling of the 
salon in her French mansion. 
An intrigued Mecom bought 
the boxed-up contents from 
Jacques Lejeune, a legendary 
Parisian antiques dealer. 

The oilman is also now de- 
ceased, and his idea of restor- 
ing the salon and putting it in 


T powerful designers cast a strange spell 
over the ending of ibe couture season. 

Far. far away to the frozen north went 
Chanel's otherworldly show — all gray and 
glacial colors, frosty buttons and icicles of 
crystal beading — while clients were swel- 
tering in a plastic tent in the July heat 

To Eastern Europe went Jean Paul Gaultier, 
with Romany fiddlers, Russian doll makeup 
and braided hair, in a show that put the 
designer high in the ranks of haute couture. 

Christian Lacroix, in a serene and sublime 
10th anniversary collection, took a turn 
around his secret fashion garden, plucking the 
roses that clung to transparent hats, bloomed 
from pompadour chignons or were tucked 
saucily into swathes of fabric at the rear. 

Fashion is always about time and place. 

A creative designer has to stake out ter- 
ritory and then defend it — against the winds 
of change and cohorts of new designers. 

The red-curtained pavilion, like a battle 
tent at Agincoun, was an appropriate back- 


drop for Lacroix’s show. For after 10 years, 
the designer has his battle won. _ 

The rail collection he sent out Thursday 
was an affirmation of everything he stands 
for. rich colors and audacious mixes of fab- 
ric; a lust for luxury and for handwork; and 
trinkets taken to the peak of refinement 
Lacroix finally got all that together — the 
patchworks of laces, funky knitted ruUes and 
swaths of satin — into a structure that was 
cut to caress and enhance the body. 

“People say that I am more a" decorator 
than an architect, but this collection is more 


PARIS FASHION 


glancing reference to the 
1987 show r was an Artesian 
costume revisited as a scarlet 
satin apron over a black skirt' 
dress — new sophistication. 

but the same chaim. ■ 

Karl Lagerfe/d brought 
his formidable intelligence 
to the problem he faces: how 
to steer Chanel into the new 
century when its logo is 
stamped on this one. 

He set his compass to “the 

poetry of the norm, the light, 
the colors, the severe aimo- 


architectural than ever,” said Lacroix, who 
bought his atelier chiefs out for the bravos. 

The show was essential Lacroix, with its 
spanow-small tailoring in fancy tweeds that 
were handwo ven, appuqu 6d, embroidered — 
even shimmering with garbage-bag plastic or 
splattered with rubber raindrops. Yet the 
effect was like an artist's oil-paint texture. 

The lacy or draped dresses were little con- 
certos of harmony, while puff-skirted gowns 
were controlled with ribbon ties. The only 


sphere — the landscape of 
the mind." It is personal ter- 




Cbanel’s petal ed and feathered dress; Gaultier's quilted czarina dress. 


the mind.’’ It is personal ter- 
ritory inherited from a . 

Swedish father — but un- 
expected for ChaneL 

The idea worked for the 
linear severity of the elong- 
ated suits, with tufted braid 
and the white-gold buttons 
as the only decoration. Huge 
wigs, woven with tulle and 
feathers, melded with cob- 
web dresses, looked witch- 
like and weird. But occa- 
sionally an outfit was superb 
in its austerity, like the sil- 
ver-gray satin with flying- 
buttress panel at the back. 

Although a few flashes of 
northern lights streaked the 
gray palette, the show 
seemeo melancholic, refer- 
ring more to the world of 
Hedda Gabler than the con- - a . 
sumer hedonism of Chanel.-: . Lacroix’s shi 

In his sweet and sophis- 
ticated second couture show, Jean .Paul 
Gaultier spun castles in fee. air. 

It is winter 1997 and fee Princess of Rurit- 
ania arrives at fee gothic vaulted -hall ; wearing, 
a jumpsuit under jacket wife, collar, draped 
into a hood, and a dangling fox stole. For 
dinner, she changes into a spider’s-web sweat- 
er. slipped over mile skins. As fee candles 
flicker on fee spiral staircase and fee foMoric 
fiddlers play, fee starts to dream. 

Wife dresses in velvet and lace gliding 
past, fee effect was strange and compelling. 
For here was a designer talcing ancestral 
dressing — sweeping gowns, diadems and 
w inking diamonds — asa compass point 
from which he swung. 90 degrees to mod- 
ernity. 



Lacr oix’s sheath dress in a patchwork of pearly lace.. 


Taken out of their storybook context, fee.^. 
quilted coats, flower-velvet cardigans and : : 
chinoiserie embroideries made an eclectic, 
romantic, modem wardrobe. They were also 
the hautest of couture, in the way the intricate 
work created simple silhouettes — like. 
G aultier ’s matelot sweater worked in fur. 

“I found this image of Catherine the' 
Great, and it seemed so elegant, but a little fait ., 
wild," said Gaultier, to explain his Eastern •: 
European mood. The legendary coiffeur Al- 
exandre said that fee braids took his studio ' 
three months to make. 

Such a strong collection from Gaultier 
confirms his talent in haute couture and gives;.' 
the French — beleaguered by the arrival of 
the Britpack — a chance to cheer their own. ■ 


PEOPLE 


the new 


T WO men are accused of trying to 
extort money from Elle Macpher- 


J. extort money from Elle Macpher- 
son and threatening to harm the model if 
she fed not provide it. William Ryan 
Holt and Michael Robert Mischler are 
under arrest in Los Angeles. Mischler is 
also accused of breaking into Macpher- 
son’s house and trailer last month. He 
allegedly delivered a letter threatening 
"to expose a secret affecting" her and 
demanded money in exchange for not 
putting photographs on the World Wide 
Web. The police in Los Angeles would 
not discuss the nature of the photos or 
the amount of money demanded. 


self but urged Abdul-Jabbar to meet fee 
rabbi. Rabbi Lau, who was 7 when he 
was liberated, said he remembered 
black soldiers among the liberators, 
adding: “The first black face I saw in 
my lire was in the broken gates of Buch- 
enwaid." 


ter, Lourdes, from falling out. The city 
requires that windows in homes wife 
small children be protected with the 
steel bars, but last month City Coun- 
cilman Kenneth Fisher noticed in a 
newspaper photo that there weren't any 


to Count Dona DelleRose. fee founder 
and owner of a Sardinian resort. 


window guards in Madonna’s apart- 
ment. Fisher sent a letter to Madonna 


The former basketball star Kareera 
Abdul-Jabbar met Thursday in Jeru- 
salem wife Israel's chief rabbi, Yisrael 
Meir Lau. Abdul-Jabbar, who is in Je- 
rusalem to promote a streetball tour- 
nament. said a family friend had been 
among the U.S. soldiers who liberated 
fee Nazi concentration camp Buchen- 
wald, where Rabbi Lau was interned. 
The friend, Leonard Smith of New 
York, was unable to make fee crip him- 


Ivana T rump is suing her estranged 
husband, Riccardo Mazzucchelli, for 
violating a prenuptial agreement by 
talking to a tabloid about their marital 
problems and separation. The lawsuit 
seeks S10 million to compensate her for 
damages to her reputation and business 
ventures and S5 million in punitive 
damages. She had said earlier this week 
that she and Mazzucchelli were trying to 
work out their differences. She also 
claimed feat she dumped him, not the 
other way around, as he had told fee 
National Enquirer. 


raenL Fisher sent a letter to Madonna 
warning that it wasn’t too soon to start 


thinking about installing fee guards, and 
fee Health Department followed up with 


fee Health Department followed up wife 
another letter. “The window gates are 


up," said Madonna's spokeswoman, 
Liz Rosenberg. “I resent her being 


Mike Leigh, who wrote and directed 
“Secrets & Lies," a film about a white 
woman reunited with her black daugh- 
ter. is among the winners of the Hu- 
manitas Prize, given annually by the 
Human Family Educational and Cul- 
tural Institute to writers of films and TV 
shows communicating positive human 
values. 


portrayed as an irresponsible mother.” 


Madonna’s fifth-floor apartment in 
New York has been fitted with window 
guards to keep her 9-month-old daugh- 


Carlo De Benedetti. the former 
Olivetti chairman, wed fee ex-actress, 
ex-countess Silvia Cornacchia Thurs- 
day in a private ceremony at Turin city 
hall. The ceremony, attended only by 
close family, lasted about 10 minutes. 
The ANSA news service said Mayor 
Valentino Castellani presided. It was 
the second marriage for both the fin- 
ancier and his bride, whose stage name 
was Monti. She was previously married 


Oprah Winfrey is giving a show- 
and-teli about shedding all feat weight. 
The talk-show host had a film crew trail 
her from sunrise to bedtime, recording 
her meals and her workouts, and she’ll 
reveal her secrets on her “Oprah Win- 
frey-Make fee Connection" video, due 


out Sept. 30. Aided by a sports physiolo- 
gist, Winfrey also shares tips about 


gaining self-esteem. Proceeds will go to 
A Better Chance, a Boston-based pro- 
gram that provides school funding for 
needy children. 



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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar with Rabbi Yisrael Meir Lau in Jerusalem 


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Every country' has its own AT&T Access Number 


which makes calling home or to other countries 



really easy. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for. 


the country you're calling from and you'll get the . 


clearest connections home. And be sure to charge 



0m 


your calls on your AT&T Calling Card. It'll help you 


avoid outrageous phone charges on your hotel bill 


and save you up to 60%* t remember that old Chinese t ■ 


Not 


proverb -a yuan saved is a yuan earned). Check the ' 


all the tea in 10811 . 


list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


Steps to follow for easy calling worldwide: 

1. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country you 
ane calling, from. 

1. Dial the phone number you n? calling. 

5 Dial the calling card number listed above vour name. 




- ■ i®; 

S7BB till •*?:«* 


are ooo 67B0 till .ffs* 
r mm •' 


Austria *o 
Belgium* . 

Czacti Republic* . 
France . 

Germany 
GraecB*. . .. 
IrelandQ . 

Italy* 

fathBrtamis*. 

Russia **(Moscow)i 
Spain 


.. . B22-9B3-811 
. . .0-800-100-10 
.. . 08-42-000-101 

. .0-800-09-0011 

. 0130-0010 
00-800-1311 
1-800-580-008 

172-1011 

... .0800-022-9111 

755-5042 

900-99-00-11 


Sweden 
Switzerland* 
United Kingdom i 


820-795-611 

0880-89-0011 

0500-80-0011 

0800-89-0011 


MIDDLE EAST 


Egypt* I Cairo)’ 
taraal 

Saudi Arabia 


.. 510-0200 

177-100-2727 
1-800-10 


ATsT 


Ghana 
South Africa 


8191 

0-800-99-0123 


Can’t hud die AT&T Access Number for the country you're calling from* Just ask any operator for 
AT&T Direct * Service, or vt.it our Web site at: hrtp^/wmv ja^omAraveler 


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