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4 W INTERNATIONAL « 4 

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/{PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 



The World's Daily Newspaper 


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London, Tuesday, July 15, 1997 



No. 35.573 


Spain Stops to Mourn 
A Victim of Terrorism 

Demonstrations Across Nation Condemn 
Basque Group’s Slaying of Young Politician 


■ter, pusbins his bik^S 
• and Jeroen B!iji tVe 


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Compiled bt Oar Staff Final Daptuchn 

ERMUA,-Spain — Spain came to a 
standstill Monday as the nation paid its 
last respects to a young politician kid- 
napped and killed by Basque separatist 
guerrillas. 

Miguel Angel Blanco Garrido. 29. 
whose death has unified Spaniards in 
outrage against the guerrilla group 
ETA, was buried in his hometown in the 
heart of the northern Basque country in 
a somber ceremony broadcast live on 
national television. 

; Millions stopped work at noon to 
"T observe 10 minutes’ silence in memory 
of Mr. Blanco and marched in demon- 
strations in the capital and other major 
cities. 

The public outay found resonance 
among elements of the separatist move- 
ment itself. A town councilman who 


was a member of ETA's political arm, 
Hem Batasuna, quit, and six ETA pris- 
oners joined the 10-minute tribute. 

Huge crowds stood motionless on 
sidewalks in central Madrid. Traffic 
came to a bah. Flights* out of the in- 
ternational airport stopped. The stock 
exchange suspended trading. 

ETA's history of violence. Page 10. 

In Ermua, where Mr. Blanco was a 
town councilman and member of the 
governing Popular Party, tens of thou- 
sands lined the streets outside the 
packed chapel. 

"We’ve all been pounded by this 
ETA strike,” Bishop Ricardo Blazquez 

See SPAIN, Page 10 



UN Court Sentences 
A Serb to 20 Years 

Innkeeper Convicted of Torture 
And Murder in Bosnian Camps 


The Amenta! Pie* 

Dusan Tadic putting on his earphones Monday to listen to the UN war 
crimes tribunal at The Hague sentence him to 20 years in prison. 


Civqoltd Our SuffF nvi Dnjxm An 

THE HAGUE — A United Nations 
tribunal sentenced a Bosnian Serb to 20 
years in prison on Monday for killing 
and torturing his Muslim and Croatian 
neighbors during the Bosnian civil 
war. 

The tribunal sentenced Dusan Tadic, 
an innkeeper, to a total of 97 years for 1 1 
separate war crimes and crimes against 
humanity. 

The longest term was 20 years and the 
others were to run concurrently. 

Hie sentence was the first banded 
down by an international court after a 
full-length trial since the years after 
World Warn. 

Unlike the military tribunals at 
Nuremberg and Tokyo, the Hague court 
has no power to order death sentences. 


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Resisting Global Currents, France Sticks to Being French 


World View Is Rooted 
In Faith in the State 

By Charles Trueheart 

WagJn'*»jeto*i PfSi Service 

PARIS — When President Bill Clinton offered 
President Jacques Chirac a pair of cowboy boots 
at the economic summit in Denver, Mr. Chirac’s 
refusal to put them on was taken by many ob- 
servers as another example of stubborn French 
pride. 

Pride it was. Faced with a torrent of what many 
Europeans considered triumphant American rhet- 
oric and condescension, Mr. Chirac's message 
was as clear as his theater. 

“France,” he said, "intends to remain 
France.” 

To many Americans and others, this is just the 
problem. * ‘France" means too much government 
regulation, too much state bureaucracy, too much 
spending and taxation. France’s resistance to the 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

grand currents of late-century global economic 
capitalism, its critics say, has doomed it to bank- 
ruptcy and irrelevance. Returning a Socialist gov- 
ernment to power last month, as the French did, 
only reinforces the impression of a society out of 
step with the world. 

But from their perspective, the French are 
behaving in a perfectly rational fashion: They are 
righting to preserve what is to them one of toe 
most successful societies and most agreeable 
ways of life in the world — one that other 
Europeans esteem and Americans still flock to, 
admire and even envy. 

What the French mean by “France” is evident 
to any tourist here: an enviable subway and rail 
network, open-air markets brimming with col- 
orful produce of every kind, often-swept city 
streets lined with trees, stunning, historical ar- 
chitecture, high learning and good manners, smart 



Privatisation Is Essential , 
Chirac Warns Socialists 


By Barry James 

huemulionul Herald Tribune 


J«cX Muphian/Reulm 

President Jacques Chirac of France, left, greeting Prime Minister Lionel Jospin on Monday 
as the Bastille Day military parade got under way down the Champs-Elysee in Paris. 


clothes and fine food — a people confident of who 
they are. 

French citizens speak with pride of a society 
that provides them with their schooling, their 
health care, their retirement, their employee ben- 
efits and their long vacations. They contrast ex- 
tensive support for France’s poor with huge in- 
come gaps in the United States. 

Far from feeling isolated and defensive, the 
French have a global sense of themselves — 


particularly now. As a people who have stood up to 
Americans more stoutly than any other Europeans 
since World War H, the French today see a geo- 
political opportunity in the breakup of toe Soviet 
Union. The American-inspired “cowboyism” of 
Denver plays into modem French aspirations to 
provide an alternative point of view to the Amer- 
ican one — political, cultural, social, economic. 

See FRANCE, Page 10 


PARIS — President Jacques Chirac warned 
Monday that France’s new Socialist-led gov- 
ernment risked isolation in the international mar- 
ketplace by its failure to sell off state-controlled 
companies. 

In his first open criticism of the government's 
record, Mr. Chirac also attacked its ‘ ‘obsolete and 
absunf ' plans to revive controls on labor layoffs 
that were abolished in 1986, adding, “The state 
today no longer has any place in toe management 
of competitive industry." It was, he said, “a 
debate mom another age.” 

Mr. Chirac, making his first major pronounce- 
ment on domestic affairs since the crushing defeat 
of his Gaullist party in the elections that brought 
toe Socialists to power six weeks ago, roamed 
over a wide range of topics in a television in- 
terview coinciding with Bastille Day, the French 
national holiday. 

He said that large companies were no longer able 
to survive without European alliances — yet he 
questioned whether international partners would 
be willing to link up with state-owned corporations 
that are not guided purely by market interests. 

Last week. Prime Minister Lionel Jospin said his 
government was halting toe previous conservative 
government's plan to sell off Thomson-CFS, 
Europe's leading company making electronic 
equipment for defense. He said that the govern- 
ment would keep a decisive share in the company, 
arguing that its sale would benefit toe interests 
neither of the state nor of Thomson employees. 

Until the announcement, analysts had seen 
Thomson as the key piece in a Europe-wide 
electronics company capable of competing on an 
equal level with U.S. conglomerates. 

See CHIRAC, Page 10 


The judges said Mr. Tadic should 
serve at least 10 years. 

In the hours between the defendant's 
court appearance and rhe funeral on 
Sunday of another war crimes suspect 
killed by NATO troops, an explosion 
rocked a Bosnian Serb hotel used by 
United Nations officials and interna- 
tional police monitors. 

Mr. Tadic stood calmly in the dock 
with a slight smile as the presiding 
judge, Gabrielle Kirk McDonald, read 
out the sentences. 

The judge said that the defendant had 
beaten his victims “intentionally and 

The blast at a Bosnia hotel stirs 
fears of anti-UN acts. Page 7. 

with sadistic brutality, using knives, 
weapons, iron bars, toe butt of a pistol, 
sticks and by kicking.” 

The judge went on. saying that in one 
instance, he tightened “a noose around 
the neck” until the prisoner lost con- 
sciousness. 

"Why?” the judge asked. 

The judge then read out the 11 sen- 
tences, ranging from 6 to 20 years. The 
court's maximum sentence is life im- 
prisonment. 

The judge also described the ethnic 
hatred whipped up by political leaders 
before the civil war erupted in Bosnia. 

‘ ‘To condone your actions even when 
committed in this context is to give 
effect to a base view of morality and 
invite anarchy,” the judge said. 

Mr. Tadic's attorney, Nikola Kostich. 
criticized the decision, saying: “We are 
disappointed. 1 think that it is a very 
severe sentence and I think that what the 
court does is to place Mr. Tadic really at 
the top of the ladder. The fact is, he was 
a very small player.” 

Mr. Kostich added that toe court had 
“boxed itself in” in terms of sentencing 
suspects like the fornier Bosnian S< rbs’ 
leader, Radovan Karadzic,' who has 
been indicted twice for genocide but is 
still at large in Bosnia. 

Mr. Kostich said Mr. Tadic would 
appeal the sentence. No date has been 
set for an appeal hearing. 

The sentence angered Bosnian Ser- 
bian leaders, who fear tougher action by 
the international community to hold 
more of them accountable for deeds 
during the 1 992-95 Bosnian war. 

The Bosnian Serbs' president, Mrs. 
Biljana Plavsic, and Momcilo Krajis- 
nik, the Serbian member of toe col- 
lective Bosnian presidency, both crit- 
icized the verdict as unjusL 

Goran Neskovic, deputy justice min- 
ister in toe Bosnian Serbs' government 
and responsible for relations with the 
Hague tribunal, said Mr. Tadic’s sen- 
tence proved an anti-Serbian bias on the 
part of the court 

“Tadic was convicted only because 
See SENTENCE, Page 10 


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AGENDA 


Boeing Merger Negotiations Intensify 


. • Boeing Co. executives were still 
talking with European Commission 
antitrust officials as Monday's mid- 
night deadline approached in Brus- 
sels. 

Last-minute lobbying by Washing- 
ton brought toe Justice Department's 
top antitrust official to toe Belgian 
capital Sunday to tell European of- 

PAGETWO 

Is the Net Tightening on CNN? 

THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

Cashing In on the Fear Market 

ASIA/PACIFIC Page 4. 

Indian Party Leaves Government 


fi rials why U.S. authorities at toe start 
of this month gave the go-ahead to the 
merger. 

The European Commission has toe 
power to levy fines of up to 10 percent 
of the company's sales and make it 
illegal for Boeing tp do business in toe 
European Union, steps that Boeing 
agrees would stop the deal. Page 13. 


Books 

Crossword. 
Opinion — 
Sports - 


........ Page 5. 

Page U. 

Pages 8-9. 

Pages 22-23. 


Sponsored Section Pages 18-20. 

Indonesia: Built for Business 


The IHT on-line http://www.iht.com 


NASA Loses Contact With Pathfinder 


Communication with toe Pathfind- 
er spacecraft on Mars was cut Mon- 
day when a computer, onboard in- 
explicably reset itself as it was 
sending back pictures, NASA scient- 
ists said. 

They tried to re-establish contact 
later, but Eatto-based antennas used 


to communicate with toe lander were 
being used by other space missions. 
Scientists planned to try to contact 
Pathfinder again when Mars lined up 
with Earth. 

The cutoff was toe third since July 
4, when the spacecraft landed on Mars 
* and began its experiments. Page 6. 


Cambodia 
Plays Tough 
With ASEAN 


By Michael Richardson 

I nic manorial Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — Amid signs of in- 
creasing political acceptance of toe de 
facto coup in Phnom Penh, Second 
Prime Minister Hnn Sen of Cambodia 
threatened Monday to withdraw his 
country's application to join ASEAN if 
the group “continues to interfere in our 
internal affairs.” 

“Should we go into ASEAN or 
should we stop?” Mr. Hun Sen said in 
Kompong Thom Province, north of toe 
capital. “I want to stop if ASEAN con- 
tinues to interfere in the internal affairs 
of toe nation." 

ASEAN officials said toe threat was a 
bluff and that continued international 
pressure was needed to restore toe co- 
alition government in Phnom Penh and 
to ensure that free and fair elections 
were held. 

“Hun Sen must realize that political 
problems in Cambodia should be solved 

See CAMBODIA, Page 10 


Yeltsin Tames the Forces of Nature 

A Fish Story of Truly Russian Dimensions 



By Michael Specter 

Neti- York Times Sen-ice 


President Boris Yeltsin bringing 
in a fish on vacation in Karelia. 


MOSCOW — Vacation season has 
descended on Russia, and like millions 
of other people, Boris Yeltsin lit out 
for toe territory last week. A fisherman 
of great eagerness, if modest talent, toe 
Russian president decided to head 
straight to toe northern lakes of the 
Karelia region and try his luck with rod 
and reel. 

Luck was not necessary, though. By 
the time be arrived in the resort town of 
Sbuya on Lake Ukshe, toe forces of 
nature, which can sometimes interfere 
maddeningly with fishing, had been 
brought to heel. 

A lake that was already a prime 
Russian fishing stop was stocked with 
10,000 perch and trout, and navy frog- 
men scoped out toe scene beneath toe 
water to make sure that nothing could 
frighten Mr. Yeltsin’s imported catch 
away. 

Just for good measure, Kremlin of- 
ficials saicC Mr. Yeltsin’s bodyguards 
have been starting every day with a 
new assignment: digging for worms. 


“We were told by the city admin- 
istration to make sure President 
Yeltsin had a good time,” a member of 
the Karelian Fisheries Commission 
told a reporter for a Russian daily 
newspaper, The St. Petersburg Times. 
“That is exactly what we are doing. 1 
would say there are more than 10,000 
fish that were specially stocked for toe 
president. He won't be able to miss.” 
He also will not have any com- 
petition, said Anatoli Tsigankov, toe 
editor of toe local weekly newspaper, 
because the lake has been closed to 
everyone but Mr. Yeltsin. 

That is toe kind of certainty that 
Russian leaders have always relied on. 
When the czars went hunting, scores 
of people would drive animals into the 
open to help them. And toe Soviet 
leaders did even better. 

When Leonid Brezhnev, long an 
avid hunter, was too sick to do much 
more then stroll a few unsteady steps, 
he still managed to bag many wild boar 
on every vacation trip. 

Instinct? Not exactly. The animals 

See FISH, Page 10 




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Epic Court Battle in Texas Over Land and History 


By Sam Howe Verhovek 

New York Times Service 


SARITA, Texas — Asa courtroom drama, toe legal 
battle shaping up between more than 800 descendants of 
Jose Manuel Balli Villarreal and toe John G. and Marie 
Stella Kenedy Memorial Foundation has toe makings of 
an epic, set against toe backdrop of the vast and thorny 
brnsWnd of South Texas. There are ancient family 
feuds, mysterious reports of yellowed documents found 
in an attic that could prove to be legal bombshells, 
claims and counterclaims of fraud and treachery. 


In toe early 1 800s, Jose Balli was given a land grant 
by the King of Spain to a large tract in South Texas 
when it was pan of toe Spanish empire. The clan 
descended from him and his wife, Maria Antonia 
Cavazos de Hinojosa, asserts that the land was ul- 
timately stolen by Mifflin Kenedy, one of Texas’s 
most powerful ranchers, who buut a cattle empire 
across toe area and whose own descendants later 
became fabulously wealthy from both toe cattle and 
the oil and gas on the property. The Ballis are asking 
for teas of millions of dollars, maybe much more, in 
compensation. 


At its core, the issue turns on an interpretation of 
history: Were toe great Texas ranchers like Mr. Kenedy 
and Richard King, of the fabled King Ranch, visionary 
figures who tamed a wasteland with honor and grit, or 
were they Anglo land grabbers who used trickery and 
violence to rob Mexicans of their property? 

And, while scholars watch with fascination as toe 
case unfolds, many say that the fact that the lawsuit has 
even advanced in toe courts speaks volumes about the 
changing demographics of toe region and the ways in 

See TEXAS, Page 10 







%- - r- r-.VT.- ^.v^ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 



PAGE TWO 


Tapping Into NASA / A World of Mars Nows 

One Giant Leap for the Web 


Coming Into Their Own 

Sometimes a major news event wffl prove that a nw meditfntea^®! 
not only because of their historical significance, but because they sign 


£o.T 


, mass medum. Hare SSZttEtX*' 
jd a change in the way people received v^news. . _ 


By Amy Harmon 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — As television 
viewers watched the Mars 
Pathfinder scientists hug 
one another last week in a 
brief, oft-repeated video, and news- 
paper readers scanned snippets of 
their comments on the space mission, 
Joy Connolly sat transfixed for hours 
at her computer screen, spying on the 
NASA team in their Mission Oper- 
ations Room. 

A camera at the Jet Propulsion Lab- 
oratory in Pasadena, California, trans- 
mitted the images to the laboratory’s 
World Wide Web site, where Ms. 
Connolly kept an eye on them while 
working on her classics dissertation at 
home in Philadelphia. 


Where 
to Go 


• UNKS TO THE MARS PATHFINDER 
PAGES 

http^/wvvw.jpl.nasa.gov/rr^}frnfr 

• ABC NEWS'S MARS COVERAGE 
WlpyAvww.abcnews.com^ectrans/ 
scitech/marsorbust/mars_lndex.htmJ 

• CNN INTERACTIVFS MARS COV- 
ERAGE 

http://www.cnn.com/TECH/9707/ 
tOAnars. pa tfifindar/indfix.html 

• PAST MISSIONS TO MARS 
httpJfwvM.jsc.nasa.gov/pao/flash/ 
mars Irfe/pastexpJ.htrn 

• NATIONAL SPACE SCIENCE DATA 
CENTER MARS PHOTO GALLERY 

mp-J/nssdc.gsfc.nasa-Qov/photo 

_ga/fery/photogaIIery-mars.htmI 

• SPACE-VIEWS MARS PATHFINDER 
MISSION 

http^/www.seds.org/spaceviews/ 

pathfinder 

• JET PROPULSION LAB'S FUTURE 
MARS MISSION 
httpy/mgs-www,jp/.nasa.gov 

• UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA'S 
LUNAR AND PLANETARY LAB 
IMAGER 

http://wwwJpLarizona.edu/iTnp/5mp.html 

• PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE 
MARS MISSION HOME PAGE 

http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/mars 

Thu New Y.ek Tunes 


“They weren't really doing much, 
mostly standing around, talking to 
each other, looking kind of nervous.” 
said Ms. Connolly. "‘But instead of 
these big dramatic moments, you 
could actually see science happen- 
ing.” 

With the Mais landing — about 45 
million people visited the lab site in a 
week — the World Wide Web passed 
a milestone and came somewhat ab- 
ruptly into its own as a popular news 
medium. 

Just as the broadcasts following the 
assassination of John F. Kennedy in 
1963 became the defining moment for 
television as the nation's information 
conduit of choice and the Gulf War 
served as CNN’s vehicle into the cul- 
tural psyche, the Mars landing may 
signal die start of anew interactive era 
in the mass consumption of news, 
media scholars said. 

Already prepared for a flood of 
interest, the laboratory nonetheless 
scrambled all week to accommodate 
the wave of Web browsers cresting at 
its electronic door. Commercial Web 
sites devoted to news also reported 
unprecedented interest 

“America was sitting around look- 
ing at their watch saying, ‘OK, it’s 
landed, let’s check the Web,” said 
Duane Wessels of the San Diego Su- 


percorapating Center, who monitored 
traffic on several of die laboratory’s 
21 identical sites. 

Hie number of visitors increased 
tenfold between 9 PJVl and 10 P.M. 
on July 4, the night of the Pathfinder 
landing, and stayed strong through the 
-week, Mr. Wessels said, adding, 
1 ‘This is the single most popular event 
on the Web so far.” 

Other recent news events have also 
drawn large crowds to the Web. But in 
part because the act of landing on 
Mars struck a visceral chord in mil- 
lions of Americans, and in part be- 
cause the images were so spectacular 
— and so elusive on TV — millions of 
nonscieatists consulted the Web for 
information. 

Despite frustrating delays, the lab- 
oratory logged 80 million “hits” a 
day early in the week. (Hits are a unit 
of measurement referring roughly to 
the number of images and features 
visitors were exposed to on the site.) 

The critical mass of interest in a 
proactive approach to gathering news 
was seen as a turning point that could 
effect the way news is reported, con- 
sumed and interpreted for many years 
to come. 

“More and more people are going to 
be diving into these great tidal currents 
of information, and will assume that’s 






Fort Sumter, 

Civil War 

April 13 

Newspaper draiafon 
shot up during the war. 
The New Yoric Herakfa 
readership grew from 
77.000 in 1880 ID 107.520 
the day after Fori Sumter 
was attacked. 


Japanese Attack 
on Pearl Harbor 

Dec. a 

Sixty mWon people 
tuned In to President 
Franldln D. Roosevelt's 
address to Congress 
the day after the 
bombing of Peart 
Harbor. 


1963 

Kennedy 

Assassination 

Nov. 22 

The networks dropped regu- 
lar programming to broad- 


tion. From 4 PM until 11 PM. 
more then SO percent ofthe 
51.6 mffllon homes with TV 
sets tuned In. 


1991 

Attack on Baghdad, 
Gulf War 

Jan.l7 

When the afltesbOfTJbed 
Baghdad. CNN capitalized 
on its strength: continuous 
coverage. CNN's ratings Wt 
a record Hgfi (brstajidffld 
cable, 22.7 rating points, or 
about 12.9 million 
households. 


Sounsas: “American JoumaBsnf bv Frank Luther Mott; NASA; CNN: AC. Nielsen 


1997 

Exploration. ' 
of Mare : J 

July 4 r > ■■ 

NASA reports ^ 1 » 

about 45 mffion 

people vfsfiadfls Waft * 
site and mkTwdjes, % 
offering the eantirv- % 

Information, bsteari- ; •' 
July 4 and It. 


The New YaA. Tgq.fr 


the behavior they should resort to dur- 
ing an emergency or a ritual of col- 
lective amazement,” said Todd Giflin, 
professor of culture, journalism and 
sociology at New York University. 

The political and cultural effects of 
such a shift are just beginning to un- 
fold. Television network news in its 
heyday fostered a sense of security 
and shaped national attitudes toward 
major events by providing a collective 
— and, some critics have argued, a 
monolithic — viewpoint By contrast, 
the Web caters to a creed of indi- 
vidualism that allows people to get tbe 
information they want when they want 
it 


Sifting through Mars material at 
their own time and pace is precisely 
what so many enjoyed about the Web. 
Because electronic publishing is re- 
latively cheap, more details are avail- 
able on-line than anywhere else. 

For traditional news organizations 
trying to figure out how to translate, 
say, their television business on-line, 
the spike in traffic from the Mars 
landing was encouraging evidence 
that the surfing public tends to grav- 
itate toward established journalistic 
sources in the Web’s morass of often 
inaccurate electronic information. 
Visitors to CNN’s site jumped 40 per- 
cent, and ABC’s two-month-old site 


recorded a 12 percent incite** fa • j - 
traffic. 

Historians note that just as tfiead-^ 
vent of television did not put an end to ... 
radio, the Web does not threaten «£; 
eclipse its predecessors , anytime 1 .-, 
soon. 

Bat they might do well to trim note -jj 
of the evolving media habits of peepfe% 
like Bob Stonner, 33, who speat;^- % 
eral hours each night last week wading 
through G-force charts and Mss mis- 
sion background on the laboratory's - 
Website. r'. 

“I’m not an Internet weirdy but 
there’sjust not enough information on : 
the tube,” Mr. Stormex said. ; 


Amid Growing Competition, CNN’s Ratings 


By Mark Landler 

I New K>/& Times Service 

-sn -pEW YORK — For CNN, the U.S. 

|\ I Senate hearings last week on caro- 

I ^1 paign-finance abuses should have been 
jL 1 a welcome jolt of news in a season 
notably short of earth-shaking events. 

But the situation instead illustrates how far the 
Cable News Network has fallen in the round-the- 
clock news business it pioneered nearly two 
decades ago. 

Despite the vivid tableau of indignant law- 
makers. mysterious fund-raisers and tbe scent of 
corruption in high places, CNN’s coverage drew 
a 0.4 rating, meaning fewer than 300,000 house- 
holds were watching. 

Ten years ago this month, CNN won triple that 
rating for its coverage of Oliver North’s testi- 
mony about the Iran-contra scandal before the 
Senate. Meanwhile. CNN is getting still lower 
ratings for even more dramatic stories, such as its 
coverage of the Pathfinder mission to Mars. 


I The network's average rating in the second 
I quarter of 1997, according to Nielsen Media 
J Research, which monitors the size of television 
I audiences, was 0.39. the equivalent of only about 
/ 284,000 homes nationwide. It was the lowest 
| average 24-bour rating in CNN’s 17-year his- 
' tory. 

“They've got a ma- 

jor problem on their . 

hands,” said Jon Man- They’ve been covering news the 

del, director for na- • ? 

tiona] broadcast at same way since they started. 

Grey Advertising. " 

“They’ve been cover- 
ing news the same way since they started. They 
haven't kept their relevance in the way they 
cover iL” 

So far, CNN’s dwindling ratings have not cat 
into its advertising revenue. But some analysts 
said the gradual erosion of audience share could 
pose a long-term threat to Time Warner Inc., 

■which acquired CNN’s parent company. Turner 
Broadcasting System, for $7.5 billion in 1996, in 


J part few the cachet of owning the world’s pre- 
j eminent television news service. 

I It is tempting to attribute CNN’s lackluster 
I ratings to a dearth of major U.S. or international 
f news developments. The United States is at ■ 
I peace, and the ‘economy is flourishing. 

During fee second quarter of 1995, when fee 
O.J. Simpson (rial was 
■ riveting viewers, CNN 

fi rmo news the recorded an average 24- 
19 j , hour rating of 0.92 — a 

ley started. huge jump from the pre- 

vious year’s quarter. Last 

year, without a Simpson 
trial, fee rating swooned to 0.4. (In cable tele- 
vision, a rating point represents 1 percent of fee 
households in which the network is available; 
CNN is distributed to 71.2 million homes, so a 
rating of 1.0 would be 712,000 households.) 

But the 4 ‘no news ’ ’ explanation is too simplist- 
ic. Over the July 4 weekend, the Pathfinder 
landing offered CNN an event tailor-made for 
television. Yet CNN got only a 0.7 rating — 


( about what it used to get for routine coverage’ 
back in 1986. Hits on fee network’s Worldwide 
Web site , however, jumped 40 percent 
Part of CNN’s problem is that as more cabfe- 
and broadcast channels fill up fee Edevisiph cfiai - 
tbe audience is being shaved into thinner slices. 
Other established networks have also experienced 
.clipp ing ratings, and rival news channels such as 
MSNBC and Fox News have such minuscule ; 
ratings feat they barely register on Nielsen ’s andi- 
ence meter. 

Somesay fee network will notsolveitsratings 
conundrum until it makes hard news more al- 
luring. 4 ‘CNN was a revolution, but now its news 
is a world wide and a half-inch deqp, ” said Reese 
Schonfeld, a cable-television executive who 
oversaw fee start of CNN in 1 980. “They run tbe 
risk of being nibbled to death.” 

But Larry Goodman, president of CNN sales 
and marketing, dismisses fee ratings problem. 

* ‘Frankly, I don’t think CNN is sold on ratings,” 
he said. “It’s sold on the brand name, the news 
product and its credibility.” 


Reformer Wins Key Russian Election 


Reuters 

NIZHNI NOVGOROD, 
Russia — In an election seen 
as a litmus test for liberal re- 
forms in Russia, a Kremlin- 
backed reformist Ivan Sklya- 
rov, defeated a Communist 
rival to become the governor 
of the Nizhni Novgorod re- 
gion. 

The election commission 
said Monday that Mr. 


Sklyarov, mayor of Nizhni 
Novgorod, bad won 52 per- 
cent of the votes in an election 
held Sunday. The Communist 
candidate, Gennadi Kho- 
dyrev, who ran the region then 
known as Gorky under Soviet 
rule, received 42 percent 
Turnout was 49 percenL 
The outcome was a relief 
for the Kremlin after tough 
campaigning since a first- 


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round election two weeks 
ago, in which the two can- 
didates emerged as front-run- 
ners but neither won enough 
votes for outright victory. 

The result overshadowed a 
disappointment for the Krem- 
lin on Sunday in the central 
city of Samara, formerly 
Kuybyshev, where a support- 
er of General Alexander 
Lebed was elected mayor — a 
post that holds less power 
than regional governor. 

Georgi Limansky. head of 
the regional branch of a party 
led by General Lebed, won 
more than 54 percent of fee 
votes in Samara, compared 
wife 38 percent for fee can- 
didate backed by the Kremlin, 
Anatoli Afanasyev. The result 
will encourage General Lebed, 
a fierce critic of President Bor- 
is Yeltsin who is expected to 
ran for president in 2000. 

The election in Nizhni 
Novgorod, 420 kilometers 
<260 miles) east of Moscow, 
filled fee post vacated by Bor- 
is Nemtsov, a leading re- 
former, when Mr. Yeltsin 
summoned him to Moscow in 
March. 

Mr. Nemtsov, who was ap- 
pointed a first deputy prime 


minister, is now overseeing 
radical economic and welfare 
reforms, some of which he 
tried out in Nizhni Novgorod 
during six years in power. 

Mr. Nemtsov congratu- 
lated Mr. Sklyarov after pro- 
visional results were an- 
nounced, fee Interfax news 
agency said. 

“Sklyarov's success is a 
victory of common sense, a 
victory of constructive, 
healthy forces in fee society 
over political extremists.” 
the agency quoted Mr. Nemt- 
sov's spokesman as saying. 

But Valentin Kuptsov, a 
senior Communist leader in 
Moscow, said that fee elec-; 
tion had been close and had 
shown feat society was di- 
vided over the government’s 
painful reforms. 

“Tbe outcome again 
shows to what extent society 
is split,’ ’ he said. 4 'The 52-to- 
42 result shows half of society 
is in opposition to the author- 
ities and not happy with their 
course.” 

Mr. Khodyrev did not com- 
ment on fee outcome but told 
local television he was not 
planning to challenge fee re- 
sults. 





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TRAVEL UPDATE 

BA Sees Full Return by Midweek IgKSjftS 


LONDON (Reuters) — British Airways said Monday feat 
normal service would not resume until later in fee week in fee 
wake of a 72-hour strike. 

BA expected to talk with leaders of the 9,000 cabin crew 
later this week to try to resolve their dispute over pay. A threat 
of a possible walkout by caterers receded Monday when their 
union decided to seek talks. 

“We’re hoping to restore a full program by midweek,” a 
BA spokeswoman said. “There are still significant numbers 
of aircraft and crew out of position,” she said, adding feat of 
the 2,000 cabin crew who called in sick last week, only 200 
had reported in for work. 

Thousands of passengers were stranded last week during 
fee 72-hour cabin crew strike over pay Mid conditions. 

Warning on Beech and Piper Planes 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal safety investigators are 
calling for inspection of some wing parts on Beech 1900 


commuter planes and changes in training procedures for Piper 
Tomahawks until further tests can he done on those planes. 

The National Transportation Safety Board issued the pair of 
recommendations after incidents and accidents involving the 
two types of aircraft. The Federal Aviation Administration 
said Friday it was preparing a response to fee recommen- 
dations. 

The safety board said it had received four reports' of flap 
malfunctions in Beech 1900 turboprop planes that caused tbej| 
aircraft to roll to one side. r 

The board also recommended fee agency set limits on fee 
slow flight and stall training on Piper PA-38-1 12 Tomahawk 
planes. Investigators discovered tint tbe Tomahawk had been 
involved in 12 fatal accidents in which stall or spin was a 
factor. 

Peru’s air carriers now meet safety standards similar to 
those used in the United States, fee U.S. Federal Aviation 
Administration says. In 1995, fee agency gave Peru a “com 
ditional rating,” which put restrictions on Peruvian carriers* 
service to and from the United States. (Bloomberg) 


WEATHER 


Europe 


CIF 

Ngern Vim 

Aratartam tint) 
Mjrn Stm 


Copanhagon 
Costa Del Sol 

Di«*< 

Ednburgh 


Oslo Mira 

Pone 21/70 

Plague 98/79 

nevtps* (3*5 

Ffcga 20/68 

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SI PoMburg IBP64 
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Team IMS 

mu* aw 

Vo net 2802 

Verna 48/79 

Waiaaa 23/73 

Zuitoi IBM 

Middle East 


High Loot W 

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SUn 14/57 i 
24/76 8148 c 
31/81 21/7D pe 
25/77 17/82 pc 
2187 14/87 pe 
23/73 13/55 c 
22/71 14/57 c 
27/80 15/59 pc 
21/70 11/S2 pc 
24/75 17/82 pe 
IMS 14/57 eh 
IMA lSS3c 
28/84 18184 s 
43/73 12/93 pc 
28/79 14/57 pc 
21/70 8/48 pe 
2S m 1«61 » 
21/70 1 1/52 all 
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2271 16/81 c 
2M4 15/88 c 
23173 1084 pe 

21AI 18/84 pc 
20V8 8/48 pc 
IMS !»53 r 
28 W 21/70 pe 
23/76 12/53 pc 
22/71 14/57 c 
21/70 12(53 r 
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22/71 11/52 po 


Forecast lor Wednesday through Friday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 


7 ' T . '•-, t C* - ^ 


Ctta/egMu 

Colombo 

Hero* 

HoCMIMi 

Jakarta 

Karachi 

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Manta 

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North America 
Hoi and humid in (he 
Northeasr Wednssday and 
Thursday, but it may thun- 
derstorm. Gusty thunder- 
storms wilt move across 
eastern Canaan witn heavy 
downpours in the Mar- 
/times. Hot and dry witn 
noting sunshine from the 
Southwest to the southern 
P/ains. Nice m the Norm- 


Europe 

Sunny, dry and cool across 
Eastern Europe from 
Poland into Russia and 
Ukraine An area ot rain 
will be Irom Romania to 
western Potand and south- 
ern Germany Sunny and 
warm in Madrid and Rome, 
but soaking rains ore in 
Store for northwestern 
Spam and Portugal Show- 
ery m London. 


Asia 

Partly sunny, warm and 
hurruo m Tokyo, bul k may 
shower. Southern Japan 
will nave soaking rains, 
whle Beijing wB be sunny, 
hot and dry. Warm and 
humid at Hong Kong with 
me chance ol a shower. 
Drenching rams wM contin- 
ue over south -central 
Chna and eastern T2 m(. 


twee n/52 e 
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24/75 14/57 c 
21/70 11/52 pc 
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27/60 1 8/64 PC 
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24/75 1 1/52 4 
23/73 14/37 c 


« North America 


3WI<e 2V70 a 37/M 28/78 a 

24/75 18/84 3 24/75 17/821 

34/03 law • 33/81 18184 a 

W8T 13/65 a 25/B2 12K3S 

26/70 13/55 a 35/77 12/63 a 

43/100 1M4 0 41/106 1MBO 

42*107 22/71 a 42/107 2303 a 


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LcaAngatao 


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31/88 17702 a 

32/89 24/751 


San Finn 

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Toronto 

Vmounn 

Washngton 


Today 

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OF OF 
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38/89 24/7Spe 
3*/83 25/77 pc 
33/01 22/71 I 
43/100 28/04 a 
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23/73 1955 pc 
30— >71021 
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38/100 28/79 PC 


Today 

High UwW 
OF CIF 
37/08 17762 ■ 
28/82 22/71 c 
3BIB4 26/701 . 
37/08 25/77 8 
ZMS4 26/70/ 
3MI 25/77 c 
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sens 27/80 1 

31/86 24/75 r 
20/84 3£fnt 
447131 30Ha 
31/88 23/rape 
30/B7 2B/821 
32/86 23/73 pe 
31/68 22/71 pe 
32/89 2373 pc 
38/100 29/64 pc 
30/80 24/75 1 
28/84 20791 
2084 28/79 1 
2879 24/751 
34/TO 28/70 pc 
31/88 22/7* pc 
32/89 24/75 pc 
2W84 24/76 pc 
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Capa Team 24/75 IV50 a 

r«aati)nnca 1B66 14/S7pc 

H— to IB/66 BMflpc 

Lagoa 28/B2 23/73 1 

MaaetN 23173 8/46 pc 

Tuna 00 24(75 a 

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Buena* fc/ta 14/57 1/34 pc 


Mgh L—W 

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80/102 10/88 a 

3088 18/68 pc 
3108 25/77 r 
36*7 26/70 pc 
20184 27/80 r 
32/89 24/75: 

3108 23/73 r 
2004 23/77 dl 
310B 287701 
3200 24/75 r 
2904 24/73 r 

48111 3109 a 
3008 24/75 pc 
3M7 30/98 pc 
32/89 23/73 pc 

3089 22/71 pe 
3209 23/73 pc 

38/100 2904c 
3106 24/75 r 
8108 25/77 r 
31/88 25/77 r 
2004 21/70 r 
3209 27*801 
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3209 23/73 pc 
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3109 28/79 r 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


Here am some event* 

S.waypeopie receive!? 

a.--- n **r 


o 


Americans’ Longing to Conquer Violence Fuels a New Industry 


By Patricia Leigh Brown 

itfiw Yuri Tunes Service 


tritionists and pel therapists abound, Mr. 
de Becker has become one of America ’s 


best-seller, aided by an endorsement from 
Oprah Winfrey, who called it the most 


jshbnted ' 
*?tapaataec 
r continuous 
INIs rasngs In: 
-tor standard 
ports, or 

Son 


xonted 

affic. 


^sw^ians note that mu 
era of television did not nL* ** 
** Web doe, n . 

dmse ltc ... 1 WtMh. 


i LOS ANGELES — Somewhere in 

Los Angeles, in a sinister-looking win- 

•J Go dowless warehouse that has no visible 

p v "' ' address, there is a business that arguably 

rf Pj 0r ation could exist only in America. Here, past a 

™ ars concealed entry and a trick door disguised 

4 to look like a paint closet, lies wbal mi ght 

re^rr- be called Fear Central, the office of Gavin 

atoui J5 de Becker, security guru to the stars. 

''sue -! ,u „ Inside the office is an archive of daric- 

^ ness: alson i 300,000 chilling commu- 

mt'- r7nfc- Uva " -.-'nications •— he calls them “excursions 
jaili. taL into obsessed minds” — written to Mr. 

11 >i de Becker's clients, who have included 
presidents, movie stars and chief ex- 

ecu lives, as well as companies coping 

with disgruntled and potentially dan- 

ue^cem " gerous emptoy® 68 - 

^rieau In this metropolis where personal nu- 


leading entrepreneurs of anxiety, one of important book she had ever read, 
the captains of a flourishing industry of Though violent crime in the United 
fear. He was recently hired by Bill and Stares has been falling for several years 
Camille Cosby, in part to assess threat- and last year’s drop was the biggest in 35 
ening mail after their son’s murder. years, anxiety has not followed suit, 
in. two decades, he has built a sub- experts say, largely because of the pe- 
standal career on America's propensity cuiiar terrors of modem violence, 
for and fear of violence, evaluating A million American women and 


rise, Mr. Levin said. 

“The quality and nature of crimes 
have changed, becoming scarier,” he 
said “Rare and publicized events, such 
as 168 innocent people killed in Okla- 
homa City, color our thinking. There's a 
sense: ‘I could be next. So could you.’ ” 

A predictable outcome of all this un- 
predictability is the growth of security- 


threats to his clients and testifying in or 400,000 men are stalked each year, ac- 


percent 


consulting on court cases in which stalk- 
ing and predictions of violence have 
been central themes. 

Though well-known among the cor- 
porate and Hollywood elite, Mr. de Beck- 
er. 42, kept his profile low until writing 
“The Gift of Fear,” a book in which he 
lays out his strategies, some of them con- 
troversial, for demystifying, defusing and 
predicting violence. The book is not for 
the nightmare-prone, but it has become a 


cording to a new federal study. And the 
mysterious crash of TWA Flight 800 last 
year and the bombing of the federal 
building in Oklahoma City in 1995 have 
underscored a sense of vulnerability in 
the lives of many Americans, said Jack 
Levin, a sociologist who runs the Pro- 
gram for the Study of Violence at North- 
eastern University in Boston. 

Crimes committed by strangers and 
crimes with unknown motives are on the 


related businesses. The installation of homicides, 
security systems in si ngle-family homes The comj 
has more than doubled in five years, the if danger© 
industry says. In the past few decades, an worsen, bas 
estimated 25,000 communities with questions d 
gates — America's version of the me- domestic at 
dieval moat — have been built across the The abilil 

country. self from v 


consulting firm based in Washington. 

Much of Gavin de Becker Inc.'s busi- 
ness involves selling computer systems 
to help the Supreme Court, Federal Re- 
serve Board and others assess risk and 
avert violence. He is also trying to get 
police departments to use his computer 
programs to defuse potentially volatile 
domestic situations before they result in 


The computer program warns victims Mr. Levin added: “We haven’t stud- 
if dangerous behavior is likely to ied the phenomenon of stalking, serial 
worsen, based on their responses to 48 killing or sexual sadism long enough. 

S uestions developed from thousands of Most of this is an art, not a science. We 
omestic abuse cases. should stop pretending.” 

The ability to predict and protect one- But to Mr. de Becker, a lot of violence 


among scholars, criminal-justice officials 
and people in the security business. 

“Yes, we can make predictions better 
than random,” said Or. Park Dietz, a 
forensic psychiatrist in Newport Beach, 
California, who was a witness for the 
prosecution of Jeffrey Dahmer, the Mil- 
waukee serial killer. “No, we cannot 
predict and control human behavior to 
the degree some might wish. ” 

Mr. Levin added: “We haven’t stud- 
ied the phenomenon of stalking, serial 
killing or sexual sadism long enough. 


ieval moat — have been built across the The ability to predict and protect one- 

)untry. self from violent behavior and harass- 

A new industry survey found that 67 ment, largely through one's own wit and 


percent of all new buyers of cellular 
telephones purchase them for safety rea- 
sons, said Tom Ross, a consultant at 
Strategis Group, a telecommunications 


intuition, is the central premise of Mr. de 
Becker's work and book — hence the 
idea in the title that fear is a gift. But it is 
also a matter of considerable debate 


is predictable precisely because it is not 
mysterious or impersonal, as the Okla- 
homa City bombing was. “Eighty per- 
cent of crimes are committed by people 
we know.” be said. “Spousal violence is 
the most predictive.” 


xJ* r'^ Clinton Works Overtime 

But they might do * e || [t)u . 

sgpSSS? To Pass His Job to Gore 

trough G-force chan, und\l^ 
on background on the lah 3 

*Tm e not an intemc Seldom Has the No. 2 Had Such Support 

terc’s just not enough iniW 4 ' ' "" “ 

petobe,” Mr. Storiner Bv Richarci I Berke 311 adviser to President John F. 


- — < former *id By Richard L. Berke 

Afar York Times Service 

fTT I !• WASHINGTON— Nor Ronald Rea- 

I || YY”i 1 1 w% n gan, nor Dwight Eisenhower, not even 

m ■ I IJllJIB Thomas Jefferson worked as early and 
as aggressively as President Bill Clinton 
1 has worked to help his vice president 
it used to get for routin- Even be took the oath for a 

k'Hstsonthe network'* W •£? s®*"* 1 ^ Mr. Clinton shattered 
Minever. jumped 4f> p-re-m *' Hoase m®”* 1 by publicly sig- 

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shed tm-nrki v v - i m* 1 * such «dy P ublic declarations. 

-T' c ' P®* The last two-term president, Ronald 

¥p v ‘ n -^ ne): Reagan, waited until shortly before the 

. r * R “ v e r ‘ **•■&:■ '.general election to announce his support 

hey barely region • £ -? or Vic e President George Bush -Sid 


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his remarks were hardly enthusiastic. 

More important than words, Mr. 
Clinton has taken steps to make sure that 
the staff and resources of the White 
House are at Mr. Gore's disposal — not 
only the traditional perquisites like Air 
Force Two. As a result; while Mr. Gore 
quickly established himself os an un- 
usually influential vice president after 
the 1992 election, his public and polit- 
ical profile has only intensified. 

And behind the scenes, President 
Clinton has staffed the White House 
with many of Mr. Gore’s allies, who are 
committed to seeing the vice president 
elected president in 2000. 

-The president^s-efforts mayhave^ig— = 
nificant consequences not only for Mr. 
Gore but also for Democratic politics in 
general. Some of the presidents allies 
may feel that they have little choice but 
to rally behind the vice president 

For example, George Stephan o- 
poolos, Mb'. Clinton's former senior ad- 
viser, has long been close to Repre- 
sentative Richard Gephardt of Missouri, 
the House minority leader. 

But if Mr. Stephanopotflos does not 
support. Mr. Gore, the president could 


an adviser to President John F. 
Kennedy. “It carries certain risks of 
alienating possible contenders, partic- 
ularly Dick Gephardt” 

The president is willing to take those 
risks, his aides said, because his support 
is a logical outgrowth of their unusually 
close relationship. While the two were 
not close when Mr. Clinton picked Mr. 
Gore as his running mate in 1992, they 
have bad one of the closest relationships 
of any president and vice president. 

The president cut short his European 
trip by a day last weekend to attend the 
wedding reception of Mr. Gore’s 
daughter Karenna. 

“This president has always felt that 
A1 Gore would be an excellent pres- 
ident,” said Douglas Sosnik, a senior 
Clinton adviser, “and that furthermore, 
the vice president has been ah integral 
part of the successes of this admin- 
istration.” 

“AJ Gore is locked in the trunk of Bill 
Clinton's car,” one expen said. “If the 
car goes over the diff, that’s the end of 
Al. If it roeeds first over the finish line, 
it helps AL” 


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Imuqi.y) 1 Vi-v- 

SHELL GAME — A Chicago cyclist locking his bicycle in a plastic shelter intended to promote commuting. 


Away From 
Politics 

• AIDS deaths continue to drop in 
the United States, the Centers for Dis- 
ease Control and Prevention reported, 
f allin g 19 percent during the first nine 
months of 1996, to 30,700. (AP) 

• A teenager in New York City fell to 
his death as he tried to escape a pit bull 
on a roof. The dog owner was charged 
with second-degree murder. (NYT) 

• A tornado blew a house trailer into 
a lake near Junction City, Kansas, but 
the three occupants escaped. (AP) 

• New York City's claims that it met 

curbside recycling goals set by the 
City Council eight years ago are the 
result of counting tons of old roadway 
that are used each day to make tem- 
porary roads on top of a dump. A 
Supreme Court judge has dismissed 
this system. (NYT) 

• The Colorado supreme court re- 
jected a prosecutor’s effort to keep Jon- 
Be net Ramsey’s autopsy report sealed, 
meaning much of the report on the 6- 
y ear-old beauty queen's December 
murder could be made public. (AP) 

• A nasal spray vaccine has proved 
very effective in preventing iniluenza 
among young children, the National 
Institutes of Health said. (Reuters) 


POLITICAL NOTES 


4900 turboprop p.-inr' ...j-v-. ^jaerpret that as a personal slap. (He 
ide . expects to back Mr. Gore.) 

metended the agen:> ^ The downside is that by taking sides 
lining m Piper To- this early, Mr. Clinton could fttriher 

activfKil that t he T - p damage his relationships with important 
ccidems in which Democrats in Congress who are pre- 


now meet safety standard? •- 
ted Stales, she V ’•> " 

n *995. ibe agency J 

t put restriction* on 
? United State 4 * 


expects to hack Mr. Gore.) 

The downside is that by taking sides 
this early, Mr. Clinton could farther 
damage his relationships with important 
Democrats in Congress who are pre- 

S to run for president themselves, 
y Mr. Gephardt. 

And Mr. Gore could still be damaged 
if the president’s popularity slides, or if 
voters rebel against being told whom to 
vote for — or against the notion of a 
Clinton dynasty. (Only four vice pres- 
idents have been elected directly to the 
1 Oval Office from the vice presidency: 
Martin Van Buren, John Adams, 
Thomas Jefferson and George Bush.) 

“I don’t think any president three 
years before the election has tried to 
) designate his successor,” said Arthur 
Schlesinger Jr., the historian who was 


Clinton Opposes Genetic Bias 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton endorsed 
legislation Monday that would make it illegal for health- 
insurance companies to discriminate against healthy people 
on the basis of their genetic inheritance and would help 
assure the privacy of genetic information. 

Mr. Clinton’s call for increased protection against genetic 
discrimination comes at a time of rapid advances in bio- 
logical sciences that are giving doctors and researchers an 
increasing ability to predict who will succumb to various 
inherited diseases. 

Widely available blood tests can show whether a person 
harbors genes that increase the risk of breast cancer, colon 
cancer, melanoma or brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s or 
Huntington’s disease. Dozens of other predictive genetic 
tests are available through research studies and may come 
to market in the next few years. 

A report by the health and human services secretary, 
Donna Shalala. based on findings of a federal task force 
warns that the potential benefits of genetic testing may 
never be realized if people reject the tests out of fear that the 
information may be used against them. (WP I 

Party Vote to Reflect on Gingrich 

WASHINGTON — The House speaker. Newt Gingrich, 
is not running for anything this week, but be will be much on 
the minds of some of his 227 Republican colleagues as they 
cast their votes for a relatively obscure leadership posL 

Many House Republicans are seizing on the vote 
Wednesday for deputy chairman of the House Republican 
Conference as an opportunity to signal unhappiness with a 


leadership that they say is not listening to them and not 
adequately communicating the party's message. Some are 
calling the race a referendum on Mr. Gingrich’s stew- 
ardship. The dissident candidate is Jim Nussle of Iowa, who 
is squared off against Jennifer Dunn of Washington. The 
contest is to replace Susan Molinari of New York, who is 
resigning to become a weekend anchor for CBS News. 

"A Nussle victory would be seen as a statement that 
we're not pleased with the direction we’re going," said 
Representative Joe Scarborough, Republican of Florida. 
‘ ‘He is trying to ride the tide of the current sentiment toward 
the leadership.” 

It is a position that has helped Mr. Nussle compensate for 
Ms. Dunn’s earlier start and better organization. Repub- 
lican lawmakers said that even if Mr. Nussle lost, his vote 
total could send a powerful message. (WP) 


Milken 9 s 2 -Track Gifts 

Felon Works on Image With Checks to Teachers 


Quote/ Unquote 


Ty Cobb, a lawyer seeking limited immunity from pros- 
ecution for the embattled former Democratic fund-raiser 
John Huang; “The laws of campaign financing are very 
complicated. For the most part, they are treated as mis- 
demeanors. They are rarely prosecuted criminally. There's 
obviously a foreign-connection issue here which needs to 
be explained, and he looks forward to that opportunity.” 

Senator Fred Thompson, the Tennessee Republican who 
is chairman of the Senate hearings on campaign-finance 
abuses, on whether Mr. Huang would be offered limited 
immunity. “We’ll all be willing to listen to any attorney 
who wants to come in and convince us why his client should 
be absolved of all prosecution. It’s our obligation to listen to 
that, but am I holding my breath? No.” (NYT) 


By Jay Mathews 

Washington Post Service 

When Alma Walker-Brown won a 
$25,000 Milken National Educator 
Award, she assumed the money was for 
her inner-city Baltimore school. She 
was stunned when Maryland's stale 
school superintendent told her other- 
wise: It was her money , to spend on a car 
or a vacation or anything she wished. 

Ms. Walker-Brown, principal of Dr. 
Bernard Harris Sr. EJementaiy School, 
was one more U.S. educator rendered 
speechless, then grateful, then uneasy 
by the unexpected award. 

Her award is part of a growing effort 
by the financier Michael Milken, the 
multimillionaire and convicted insider 
trader, to improve education and per- 
haps remake his image. Since 1987, the 
Milken Family Foundation has given 
out 1,020 of the $25,000 checks, the 
largest individual award program ever 
for educators in the United States. 

The foundation says that in the 
United States, financial success catches 
the eye. So students are more likely to 
consider becoming teachers and school 
boards are more likely to support teach- 
er initiatives if the best ones receive 
attention-getting sums of money. 


“Our ultimate goal would be if the 
states would increase salaries," said the 
foundation president, Lowell Milken, 
49, brother of Michael, 51. “But since 
that doesn't seem to be something that's 
happening in the very near term, we 
want to call attention to the outstanding 
work they do through these awards.” 
Michael Milken's name was 
blackened by his 1990 guilty plea that 
led to a two-year prison term and 51 
billion paid in restitution, claims and 
fines for security law violations. 

The recipients are picked secretly by 
committees appointed by school super- 
intendents in the 32 states that have 
agreed to take part The committees 
look for teachers and principals who 
have started innovative programs and 
inspired high achievement. 

“I applaud his generosity but ques- 
tion his methods," said Joe Nathan, 
director of the Center for School Change 
at the University of Minnesota's 
Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs. 
“If I had X million dollars. I would try 
to change the public school system.” 
But so far, no educator has refused the 
$25,000. For veteran public school 
teachers and principals whose salaries 
range from $40,000 to $80,000, the 
award is an impressive sum. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY JULY 15, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Wave of Kidnappings and Murders Mobilizes an Anxious Taiwan 


1 



By Sheryl WuDunn 

A few Kni Times Service 


Ilk Nrt. Y.vfcTaacx 

A crime wave in Taiwan has popularized crime prevention programs 
including this anti-kidnapping course in a Taipei elementary school. 


TAIPEI — Wu Chihau often watches 
good guys bash bad guys on TV, but 
when he found himself tied and blind- 
folded the other day, he realized that 
heroic escapes are not as easy as they 
seem. 

Chihau, 13. was bound and gagged in 
a simulated kidnapping, one of a grow- 
ing number of training programs that are 
flourishing after a surge of sensational 
crimes in Taiwan this year. 

“If we faced the real thing, I’d be so 
scared I wouldn't be able to think what 
to do," Chihau said with, a wide-eyed 
look. “But now, at least I’U have some 
idea.” 

Taiwan and the rest of East Asia have 
been proud of their mix of exploding 
wealth and low crime rates. Modern- 
ization has brought fancy cars, com- 
puters and marble floors to many mil- 
lion -dollar homes here. At the same 
time crime rates have been at die low 
levels of an agrarian society. 

But lately, in Taiwan at least, rising 
rates of robbery, assault and murder have 
trickled into society along with the Itali- 
an fashions and Japanese department 
stores. Taiwan has become a cosmo- 
politan and mobile society, but also — by 


its own standards — a dangerous one. island. Miss Pai appealed to the public 
Indeed, crime rates arc creeping upand to cooperate with the police, but after a 
In some cases surpassing those in West- failed attempt to deliver the money, her 


era countries. The murder rate in Taiwan 
is 8 .5 per 100.0QQ people, compared with 
8 2 in the United Stales in 1995. 

"The perception of the people is 
tight,” said Huang Fu-yuan, a crim- 
inologist at Central Police University. 
“Crime is terrible.” 

“We need to pay the price of mod- 
ernization," he added. “If we are going 
to get more materialistic, then there will 
be more crime." 

Overall, crime rates soared 80 per- 
cent over the last decade in Taiwan, but 
public discontent exploded in May after 
several brutal cases. Including the kid- 
napping and slaying of Pai Siao-yan, the 
17-year-old daughter of a much loved 
movie actress. 

The girl was on her way to high 
school when she was abducted. Later 
that evening, the kidnappers called the 
mother, Pai Pin- pin, and told her to go to 
a cemetery, where she found a demand 
for $5 million, scraps of her daughter’s 
clothes and a section of the girfs pinky 
finger. 

Miss Pai went immediately to the 
police, and when word of the kidnap- 
ping was leaked to the press, the drama 
unfolded on television and riveted the 


daughter's body was found in a swamp. 
No one has been arrested. 

“Now, society Is very different from 
when we were small, when we’d play 
outside until our mother called us in for 
dinner. There was no fear at all," said 
Mao Kai-ting, 42, die mother of two 
teenagers. 

“But now because society s chan- 
ging so fast, we need to learn about these 
cri minal affairs. We need to take re- 
sponsibility for ouf own safety and get 
the tools to deal with it” 

The killing of Miss Pai led to demon- 
strations in which thousands of pro- 
testers demanded that Prime Minister 
Lien Chan resign to take responsibility 
for what they viewed as a crime wave. 
And they called for President Lee Teng- 
hui to apologize for neglecting to safe- 
guard the security of the island's 21 
million citizens. 

In the end, Lin Fung-cheng, Taiwan's 
interior minister, stepped down, along 
with the government's spokesman. But 
public concern has hardly abated. 

Two other prominent cases remain 
unsolved, one of them the killing in 
Novemberof a top county executive and 
his entourage of seven people at his 


official residence near Taipei, h 
November, a female politician in the 
main opposition party, the Democratic 
Progressive Party, was killed. 

“Along with the development of our 
economy, people have been calling for 
democracy and freedom, but their moral 
thinking has not yet found solid 
ground,” said Chou Wen-keh, a senior 
police official. “Violent crime is ac- 
tually dropping, bur these three cases 
give everyone the impression that 
there's a lot of crime.” 

In 1996, the number of criminal cases 
rose 12.5 percent But in the first five $ 
months of this year, violent crime cases 
have dropped. 

In the years since 1991. only 30 chil- 
dren have been abducted. But prom- 
inent cases have drawn public attention 
to the crime problem. 

That was why Shaw Mei-chen sent 
her daughters to a kidnapping-combat 
class run by a security organization. 

“If the kids don’t have any inkling of 
how to handle such a situation and if 
something really happened, they’ d be at 
a loss," Mrs. Shaw said “They’d 
scream and shout.” 

“We protect her from everything. 

We think of everything for her. She'd 
definitely get herself killed. So I wanted 
her to learn about what to do.’ 1 


Indian Party Pulls Out of Government 


G^mpdnJ hv Om SuffFnw L'tSfW' hts 

NEW DELHI —A region- 
al Indian party said Monday 
that it would pull out of 
Prime Minister Inder Kumar 
Gujral’s United Front coali- 
tion. sparking concerns over 
the government's stability. 

The Dravida Munnetra 
Kazhagam party, to which 
Industry Minister Murasoli 
Maran belongs, said it 
planned to continue to sup- 
port Mr. Gujral’s govern- 
ment from outside, but cited 
differences over the conduct 
of some unnamed coalition 
partners. 

“The DMK is not willing 


to go along with parties that 
are functioning with minimal 
plans and with persons hying 
to fulfill their personal am- 
bitions,” said the party lead- 
er, Muthuvel Karunanidhi, 
from Madras, the capital of 
Tamil Nadu. 

There was no immediate 
threat to the government, 
which has been in power for 
less than three months. The 
Dravida Munnetra Kazha- 
gam party accounts for 17 of 
die United Front's 178 seats 
in the 545-member lower 
house of Parliament. 

The party gave no details 
on why it was leaving the 


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coal ition, but party politicians 
said its criticisms were dir- 
ected at the Communist Party- 
Marxist, which has taken a 
hard line against admitting a 
breakaway faction of Mr. 
GujraJ's Janata Dal party. 

“We are angry with the 
Communists, who are unne- 
cessarily creating complica- 
tions,” a state government 
minister said. He said his 
party believed the Commu- 
nists were “interfering too 
much in the affairs of the 
Janata Dal.” 

Janata Dal split a week ago 
in the wake of a corruption 
scandal, leading three coali- 
tion ministers and 14 mem- 
bers of Parliament to join the 
breakaway faction. 

Stock markets reacted 
nervously to the newest signs 
of weakness in the minority 
government, brokers said, 
with the benchmark index of 
die Bombay Stock Exchange 
falling more than 2 percent. 

“Tlie DMK's decision 
certainly worries us and is 
bound to create upheavals in 
the government.” the pres- 
ident of the Federation of In- 
dian Chambers of Commerce 
and Industry, A.S. Kasliwal, 
told the Press Trust of India. 

The main opposition 
Bharatiya Janata Party as- 
sailed the newest signs of dis- 
array within the coalition. 


die Dravida Mun- 
netra Kazhagam party's de- 
cision “political suicide.” 

The United Front’s key 
ally, the Congress Party, said 
that the decision would not 
affect the government’s sta- 
bility and that its 140 depu- 
ties would continue to sup- 
port the coalition. 

( Reuters , AFP) 

■ A Presidential Vote 

Nearly 5.000 state and na- 
tional politicians took part 
Monday in an electoral col- 
lege vote that is expected to 
result in the election of 
Kocberil Raman Narayanan 
as India's new president, 
Agetice France-Presse re- 
ported from New Delhi. 

Mr. Narayanan, a former 
journalist, diplomat and 
member of Parliament who 
has clawed his way up from 
humble beginnings, was en- 
dorsed by all the major polit- 
ical parties and is expected 
easily to beat his challenger, 
the former election commis- 
sioner T.N. Sesban. 

The result of the ballot, 
comprising votes of 4.8 48 na- 
tional and state politicians, is 
to be announced Thursday. 

Officials reported turnout 
in Parliament and at most of 
the state assemblies at more 
than 80 percent of eligible 
legislators. 


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INSIDE, LOOKING OUT — Illegal immigrant children peering at Hong Kong's skyline from inside the 
Legal Aid Department on Monday while their parents sought help in challenging the repatriation law 
adopted by the new Beijing-appointed legislature after the former British colony reverted to China on July 1. 


BRIEFLY 


Taiwan to Seek U.S. Visa for Lee 


UN pact banning the use of mercenaries and would lobby 
other governments to do so. 

TAIPEI — Taiwan said Monday that it would ask Wash- _ Foreign, Minis ter Alexander Downer and Attorney General 
ington to grant its president a transit visa and expected the Dary Williams said coordinated international action was the 
request to be approved despite an expected protest from 
Beijing. 

A Foreign Ministry spokesman. Roy Wu, said Taiwan 
would seek the visa for President Lee Teng-hui at “an 
appropriate lime.” Mr. Lee last was on U.S. soil during a 1 995 
visit to New York state that brought a furious response from 
Beijing. 

The United States, which does not maintain official ties 
with Taiwan, said in April that Mr. Lee was eligible for a visa 
to pass through Hawaii or the U.S. West Coast on his way to a 
September conference in Panama. f Reuters) 


Drought Record for Yellow River 

BEUING — China's Yellow River has run dry in its lower 
reaches since June 23, bringing serious drought to north- 
eastern Shandong Province, the official Xinhua press agency 
reported Monday. 

The dry section of river bed is now the longest the river has 
ever seen, ex lending westward into Henan Province, it said. 

But devastating floods in eastern and southern China have 
killed at least 101 people this month and forced the closing of 
10.000 mines and factories in Zhcijiang and Jiangxi provinces J^OJ" the ReCOrd 
alone, officials and stale media said Monday. 

(AFP. Reuters I 


best strategy to stop governments from hiring mercenaries. 

A Foreign Ministry official said the decision followed the 
souring of relations between Australia and Papua New Guinea 
over Port Moresby’s hiring of African mercenaries to put 
down a nine-year secessionist rebellion on the island of 
Bougainville. ’ ( Reuters ) 

Seoul Expands Aid to Defectors 

SEOUL — South Korea adopted legislation Monday to 
expand and coordinate assistance for the growing number of 
defectors from the North. 

The centerpiece of the new program, which will be ad- 
ministered solely by the Ministry of National Unification, is a 
halfway house where defectors from the Communist state will 
spend their first year studying politics, the economy, culture 
and social studies. 

The following two years will be spent easing the new 
arrivals into society, with the government offering subsidized 
education and housing, as well as job training. During this 
time, they will be under police supervision. (Reuters) 


Australia Opposes Mercenaries 

CANBERRA — Australia said Monday that it would sign a 


Malaysia s High Court delayed for seven weeks, until 
Sept. 4. the sentencing of Murray Hie ben. a journalist with the 
Far Eastern Economic Review, who was found guilty of 
contempt of court, the national Bemama press agency re- 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 


Albright Wins Honors in Return to Czech Roots 


By R.W. Apple Jr. 

New York Times Service 


PRAGUE — After an emotion- 
ally taxing evening, when she saw 
for the first time the names of her 
grandparents among the Czechs 
who died in Nazi furnaces and gas 
chambers. Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright spent an al- 
together cheerier day Monday in 
the land of her birth. 

President Vaclav Havel draped 
the red-and-white sash of the Older 
of the White Liao, die Czech Re- 
public’s highest honor, over her 
shoulders. 

Old Mends,' they exchanged 
words of praise. She exulted in “a 
moment of special emotion and joy 
for both of us” — she having 
returned to her roots as the senior 
member of ber country’s cabinet, 
he having achieved NATO mem- 
bership for his country. 

With the American ambassador 
here, Jenonne Walker, Mrs. Al- 
bright walked down the steps from 
the hilltop Prague Castle, stopping 
in the warm midday sun to gaze at 
the city’s spires and to admire two 
old Baroque squares. 

The secretary fingered her sash 
and the jeweled red star hanging 
from it, and asked Miss Walker, 
“Who would ever have thought I’d 
get something like this?’* 


This afternoon, in the magni- 
ficently restored Municipal House, 
one of the continent’s an nouveau 
masterpieces, the secretary spoke 
admiringly of this country's forti- 
tude during the long national night- 
mare following World War EL 
“The Communist authorities 
kept from you the truth, and still 
you spoke die truth,” she told 7S0 
leading Czechs. “They fed you a 
vacuous culture and still you gave 
os works of art that fill our lives 
with intelligence, humor and 
warmth. 

“They tried to smother your al- 
legiances. your faith and your ini- 
tiative, and still you taught the 
world the meaning of solidarity and 
civil society. 

‘They banished your finest 
leaders, and still you gave us 
Vaclav Havel.” 

Mrs. Albright predicted -that the 
U.S. Senate would ratify the new 
agreement admitting Hungary, the 
Czech Republic and Poland to 
NATO, bur she said: 

“The burden of proof will still 
rest with those of us who believe 
that NATO enlargement serves 
American interests.” 

Senators, she continued, “will 
ask us many appropriate questions 
about risks and costs. * ’ 

And she challenged critics in the 
United States who, she said, echo 



Siaitti* PofcVThc Amused Pm 

Secretary of State Madeleine AJbrigbt receiving the Order of the 
White Lion from President Vaclav Havel in Prague on Monday. 


the mood at the Munich talks be- 
fore World War n by saying: “We 
will protect the freedom of Bar- 
celona but not Brno; Stuttgart but 
not Szczecin.” 

They should come to the East 
European countries, she said, and 
“speak with their people, look 
them in the eye and tell them why 
we should be allied with Europe's 


oJd democracies forever, but its 
new democracies never.” 

Czech and American flags were 
draped behind Mrs. Albright as she 
spoke. A red-coated brass band 
played when she entered the 
Smetana Hall in the Municipal 
House, whose every light fixture, 
sign and door handle, every mural, 
sculpture and stained-glass win- 


dow has been restored to tum-of- 
the century elegance. Designed in 
part by Alfons Mucha, the building 
was reopened only this spring. 

For Mrs. Albright, the events 
closed more circles. Sitting in the 
front row at the little ceremony 
where she was given her sash was 
her first cousin. Dagmar Simova, 
who lives in Prague. The two have 
seldom met in years past, but they 
met Monday for breakfast at the 
Intercontinental Hotel, chatting in 
Czech. 

In her speech at the Municipal 
House, the secretary quoted from 
T. S. Eliot’s ‘‘Four Quartets” to 
characterize her own journey from 
Prague to America and back, and 
this nation's journey from inde- 
pendence in 1928 to "the day in 
1948 when its liberty was extin- 
guished” by Communists, and to 
entry into the Atlantic alliance. 

"We shall not cease from ex- 
ploration and the end of all our 
exploring will be to arrive where 
we started,” she said. “And know 
the place for the first time.” 

She did a little business at the 
news conference, which took place 
in a cream-and-gold rococo ball- 
room in the Presidential Suite at the 
castle, publicly reminding the 
Czechs that “first-class member- 
ship in NATO requires a first-class 
contribution.” 


BRIEFLY 


Lethal Floods in Poland Recede 

WARSAW — Hood waters from the Odra River began 
receding Monday in the historic city of Wroclaw, but smaller 
communities downstream were bracing for a similar deluge. 

With water still covering thousands of square kilometers of 
southern Poland, the police said about 36 people had died after 
a week of flooding. Tbe government has declared Friday a 
national day of mourning. The flooding also has caused 31 
deaths in the Czech Republic. (Reuters) 

English Priests Protest Gay Clergy 

YORK, England — More than 300 priests stoimed out of 
tbe Church of England's General Synod on Monday to protest 
plans by church leaders to debate accepting homosexuals in 
the clergy. 

Outside the meeting hall, a crowd of gay Christians held a 
vigil, singing hymns under a banner reading “We’re praying 
for an inclusive church.” The debate threatens to spark more 
anger than the 1992 decision to ordain women. (Reuters) 

Turk Official Says Torture to End 

ANKARA — Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit called 
Monday for the release of writers and journalists held in 
Turkish prisons and an end to torture, the state-run Anatolian 
News Agency said. 

4 ‘We will take firm steps to end the practice of beatings and 
torture, especially against journalists,” Mr. Ecevit told a 
visiting delegation of Western reporters. ( Reuters) 

U.S . Says Sofia Could Join NATO 

SOFIA — The U.S. defense secretary, William Cohen, said 
Monday that Bulgaria bad a strong chance of joining NATO in 
the future if it overhauled its crisis-torn economy and Soviet- 
style aimed forces. 

Mr. Cohen said that if Sofia enacted more reforms, it would 
be “a very strong contender” for membership in the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization. ( Reuters ) 


Washington Helps Ukraine Come Under the Protective Wings of NATO 



By Dana Priest 

Washington Post Service 


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KIEV — In the shadow of NATO's 
historic eastward expansion last week, 
an equally historic accomplishment 
look place. 

% Ukraine, once tbe home of the Soviet 
' Union's largest nuclear arsenal and 
800,000 of its front-line troops, offi- 
cially became a Western-leaning non- 
aligned state. 

That Ukraine could sign and cele- 
brate a cooperative military agreement 
with the Western alliance without in- 
furiating its daunting Russian neighbor 
is a testament to one of the most intense 
and unusual diplomatic efforts under- 
taken by the U.S. Defense Department 
since the end of the Cold War. 

“This commitment stems not just 
from friendship,” Defease Secretary 
William Cohen said in a speech to mem- 


bers of Ukraine's military academy here 
Saturday, “but from strategic self-in- 
terest. Ukraine is a bridge between East 
and West” 

While the United States has 
sweetened its relations with some 
former Soviet Bloc countries with 
promises of military protection and so- 
phisticated Western military equip- 
ment, it has lured Ukraine with technical 
expertise and economic aid. 

Much of the assistance goes toward 
destroying weapons, slashing troop 
strength, professionalizing its armed 
forces and reorganizing its stagnating 
and corruption-flawed state-led econ- 
omy. 

Last year, Ukraine became the third- 
laigest recipient of U.S. aid, after Egypt 
and Israel. 

Of the nearly $1.4 billion in such 
assistance since 1992, nearly one-third 
has gone toward dismantling and des- 


troying thousands of leftover Soviet nu- 
clear warheads. 

Ukraine is now free of nuclear arms 
and has cut its troop strength at the same 
time to about 350,000. 

Two months ago, President Bill Clin- 
ton committed an 
additional $47 mil- 
lion to help destroy 
the long-range 
missiles on which 
the warheads were 
mounted. 

Washington, 
meanwhile is gent- 
ly pressing Kiev to cut its ties with such 
states as bran and Syria. 

“We understand there are existing 
relationships,” said a high-ranking De- 
fense Department official. “What’s im- 
portant is that they not cany on into the 
future.” 

In May. at Washington's insistence, 


Ukraine is now the third- 
largest recipient of U.S. 
aid, after Egypt and Israel. 


BOOKS 


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ERNIE PYLE’S WAR: America’s 
Eyewitness to World War II 

By James Tobin. 312 pages . $25. Free 
Press. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley 

C UT away everything else about 
journalism, and what you’re left 
with is its inescapable evanescence. 
)Herc today, gone tomorrow. Not merely 
is today's hot story tomorrow's fish 
wrapper, but the person who wrote it 
isn’t going to hang around in our 
memories much longer than tbe fish 
odor Ungers in our nostrils. We like to 
think that we’re forever, but the hum- 
bling truth is that we’re forgotten faster 
than you can say “Richard Harding 
Davis” or “Anne O'Hare Mc- 
Cormick” or “Arthur Krock.” 


Or “Ernie Pyle!’ '’If you’re under 60 
years old and you think “Ernie Pyle” 
played second banana to Andy Griffith 
m Mayberry, that’s understandable, but 
if you think he’s ancient history, think 
again. Barely half a century ago Ernie 
Pyle was one of the most famous people 
in America, a man who ranked along- 
side the likes of Franklin Delano Roose- 
velt and Dwight David Eisenhower in 
the esteem of his fellow citizens. The 
columns he wrote for scores of news- 
papers were read by millions, anticip- 
ated and revered as though they were 
regular bulletins from a sacred source. 

He was an ordinaiy man from an 
ordinary place, an Indiana small town 
called Dana, where he was bom at the 
turn of die century. Like innumerable 
other sons and daughters of innumerable 
other such places, he wanted nothing so 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


G ARRY Kasparov won the presti- 
gious Novgorod International 
Tournament. In a very complicated fifth- 
round battle, however, he was outplayed 
and defeated by Vladimir Kramnik. 

In the Classical Variation of tbe 
King’s Indian Defense, after 7._Nc6 8 
d5 Ne7, White’s -advanced d5 pawn 
gives him tbe advantage on die queen- 
side. To reinforce this, he prepares c 5. 
Usually 1 m first braces himself for 
Black’s impending counterattack on the 
opposite wing with 9 Nel , 10 Be3 and 1 1 
f3, but lately tbe immediate attack with 
10 b4 is achieving a revived popularity. 

After II.. ^5 12 ba Ra5, the splitting 
of the white queen’s flank pawns does 
not prevent a breakthrough m that area. 
In the long ran,- the sequence Nd2, a4, 
Nb3 and t5 cannot be stopped excqtf by 
1 3~.c5, as Kasparovplayei Then the b7 
pawn is backward and the white pieces 
will press in down the b file. 

After 14..Ra6, Kramnik unveiled his 
.^innovation, 15 Ra3!?, in place of 15 
fRbl. He was not hurrying to press his 
queenside attack but putliis faith in a 
move that would prove useful for die 
defense of his king. 

KA5PAR0WBLACK 


Kasparov sacrificed a pawn with 
15~g5 16 g3 Nh3!? 17 Bh3 Bh3 18 Qh5 
Qd7 19 Qg5 and after 19...h6 20 Qe3 £5, 
his attack appeared to be dangerous. 

On 21 Qe2, it is unclear whether 
Kasparov should have preferred 21...fe 
22 Nde4 Nf5 to his 21..J4. But with 22 
Nb5! Kramnik revealed the justification 
for ttis 15 th move: his queen rook swept 
across the third rank. 

Kramnik crystallized the kingside 
pawn formation with 23 gf ef , which 
also opened the g file both for attack and 
defense. One point quickly emerged: 
after 24 Khl Bg4, he did nor need to 







Rgl!, Kramnik prepared 

answer 26.~Nb4 by 27 Ng5! hg 28 Qg4 
Qg4 29 Rg4 Kh6 30 Bd2 with a pawn- 
ahead endgame. 

After 28...Qf7, Kramnik, figuring 
that he had tbe upper band on tbe long- 
side in a middle game, spurned the 
exchange of queens with 29 Qh3! He 
thus allowed Kasparov to make up his 
material deficit with 29..Nc4. 

But after 30 Rf3 BeS, Kramnik pro- 
duced a stunning blow with 3 1 Nc7! The 
penalty for seizing the knight with 
3I...Qc7? would have been' 32 Qb6! 
Kh6 33 Rh3 mate. So die champion 
picked up a pawn with 3 1 —Ra4. 

■ Kramnik landed the decisive Wow 
with 3? Bf4! and Kasparov gave up. He 
saw that it was fruitless to go on with 
;8QgS35Qf5.» 
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KING’S INDIAN DEFENSE 
White Black Wbbe Black 




a b ~ e d • ' t b R" 
KflAMMKMHTE 

Fmal Position 


1 NO 

2 04 

3 Nc3 

4 e4 

5 d 4 

6 Be 2 

7 0-0 

8 d5 
9b4 

10 Rel 

11 Bfl 
1? ba 

13 Nd2 

14 84 

15 Ra3 

16 £3 



much as to get away from it, which he 
did well before reaching his maturity, 
but ever after he remained Living proof 
that you can take the boy out of the 
country bat you can’t take the country 
out of die boy. Throughout his career, as 
James Tobin writes, “Ernie wrote ‘on 
the level,’ among and about ordinary 
people.” Whether his subject was a 
fanner in the West or a GI in the Euro- 
pean war. he always wrote about tbe 
“ common man.” 

Now, five decades after his death 
from Japanese fire on a small island in 
tbe Pacific, Pyle has had the good for- 
tune to fall under die scrutiny of a sym- 
pathetic, unsentimental and scrupulous 
biographer, a reporter for the Detroit 
News. The result is a thorough, reveal- 
ing book. 

As is so often the case with people whp 
write afiectingly about tbe lives and mis- 
fortunes of others, Pyle himself was not a 
happy man. He was prone to depression, 
a heavy and melancholy drinker, subject 
to Qiness and exhaustion. He married an 
unconventional woman whom he loved 
greatly but who gradually slipped into 
mental illness; he had at least one brief 
extramarital fling and a long love affair 
with a married woman, but he found no 
heart’s ease in his amorous entangle- 
ments. Though he had far more success in 
his working life, he was uncomfortable 
with fame, did not take money especially 
seriously and was short on self-confi- 
dence. 

But a measure of insecority is a useful 
shortcoming in a journalist. It guards 
a gains t self-importance and laziness. 
FMe connected with common people 
largely because he never thought he was 
anything except one of them. Early in the 
war he told me readers of his Scripps- 
Howard column that he knew he was 
expected to look for “great tragedies, 
unbelievable heroics, even a constant 
undertone of comedy.” but what he 
found was: “Men at me front suffering 
and wishing they were somewhere else, 
men in routine jobs just behind the lines 
bellyaching because they can’t get to the 
front, all of them desperately hungry for 
somebody to talk to besides themselves, 
no women to be heroes in front of, da mn 
little wine to drink, precious little song, 
cold and fairly dirty, just toiling from 
day to day in a world full of insecurity, 
discomfort, homesickness and a dulled 
sense of danger." 

Small wonder the GIs trusted him: be 
lived the life they lived, and he reported 
it honestly. Occasionally bis prose 
seems saccharine and his narratives con- 
trived but in the end it is this honesty that 
shines through. It is a rare quality, one 
that does not deserve to be forgotten. 


Jonathan Yardley is on the staff ofThe 
Washington Post. 



English 
books 

to yo or door 
to T— IS «toyt> 

1 3KtiWltfttaS' not a c(ub» tree atdog 
Ttt +33 (0)1 39 07 01 01 
Fax: +33|0)1 39 07 00 77 


the Kiev government agreed not to sell 
turbines to Iran for a nuclear power 
facility, but it has sold the Islamic re- 
public small arms and spare parts. 

Moreover, U.S. officials say, 
Ukraine's state-controlled defense sec- 
tor is helping Syria 
maintain and up- 
grade its tank force 
and is bidding to 
provide it with mil- 
itary infrastructure 
and naval mainten- 
ance. 

Of more con- 
cern now are negotiations over the 
transfer of technology that Syria could 
possibly someday use to make ballistic 
missiles. 

Tbe American-Ukrainian military re- 
lationship began wanning during the 
tenure of Defense Secretary William 
Peiry, who made more visits to Ukraine 


than to any other country. He went to the 
strategic-missile launching site at Per- 
vomaysk four times — first to witness 
the uncapping of the silos and finally to 
watch the destruction of rais-iies that 
once carried nuclear warheads targeted 
at the United States. 

On his fourth trip, he planted sun- 
flowers at the site. 

Mr. Perry’s highly personalized re- 
lationship with Ukrainian leaders ap- 
parently has been taken up by Mr. Co- 
hen, who during his two-day visit here 
was enveloped time and again in bear 
hugs by Defense Minister Oleksandr 
Kuzrauk. 

“I tell you, he is a beautiful man.” 
Mr. Kuzmuk said. “Once you have 
good relations with the military in the 
Ukraine, you will have good relations 
with its other institutions.” 

The NATO-Ukraine charter, signed 
at last week’s alliance summit meeting 


in Madrid, cements Ukraine’s place as a 
nonaligned nation that — for the mo- 
ment at least — has balanced its ties 
with the West and with Russia. 

Moscow has signed its own cooper- 
ative charter with die North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization. 

Ukraine has not asked for NATO 
membership, but Kiev wants thai option 
left open. 

Meanwhile, the accord calls for the 
opening of a NATO mission in Kiev and 
allows Ukraine to establish a .nilimy 
liaison office in Brussels, NATO's 
headquarters. 

The agreement also creates a dip- 
lomatic mechanism to deal with any 
crisis in which Ukraine feels threatened 
militarily. 

It also calls for a commission to dis- 
cuss arms exports, arms control and 
disarmament, defense reform and drug 
trafficking. 


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THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 




v 


\ 





PAGE 6 


nSTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY JULY 15, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


A Daunting Task in Mexico City 

The Mayor-Elect Intends to Fight Corruption and Pollution 


By Mark Fireman 

Last Anxcles Times 


MEXICO CITY — As 
soon as Cuauhtemoc Carde- 
nas lakes over as mayor of 
one of the world's largest 
and most unwieldy cities — 
a nightmare of snarled 
traffic, polluted air. corrupt 
cops and patronage politics 
— he plans to fire about 500 
seni.tf municipal officials. 

But he will keep the re- 
maining 170,000 city work- 
ers, said Marcos Gonzalez, 
the transition point man for 
Mr Cardenas. Those are the 
electricians, subway work- 
ers, garbage collectors, bus 
drivers, bureaucrats, cops, 
technicians and street sweep- 
ers who were used as a polit- 
ical army to help keep the 
governing Institutional Rev- 
olutionary Party, or PRI. in 
power here for seven de- 
cades 

This city of 8.5 million 
people chose Mr. Cardenas 
over seven rivals on July 6 in 
the first mayoral election in 
the capital, giving the civil 
engineer and political leftist 
50 percent of the vote. His 
Democratic Revolution 
Party won a commanding 
majority on the city council. 

Mr. Gonzalez cited some 
key moves that Mr. Cardenas 
plans to make after he takes 
office Dec. 5: 

• He plans to rid the city's 


notoriously corrupt police 
force not only of crooked 
commanders but also of the 
Mexican Army, a plan that 
could put him chi a collision 
course with President Ern- 
esto Zedillo. Two years ago, 
the president appointed a se- 
nior military officer as police 
chief of Mexico City, and it 
is Mr. Zedillo — not Mr. 
Cardenas — who retains 
power over that civilian 
post. 

• He intends to attack cor- 
ruption not only at the 
highest levels of government 
bat also at the street level. 
Garbage collection, for ex- 
ample, is officially a free mu- 
nicipal service, but it is never 
provided unless residents 
and businesses pay collect- 
ors, who solicit payoffs door- 
to-door. 

“We have to start at the 
top and go to the veiy bot- 
tom, and clean it all up,” Mr. 
Gonzalez said. Ironically, 
many of the workers at the 
bottom, in the days since the 


poll, have said publicly that 
voted for Mr. Caide- 


they 
nas. 

• He wants to tackle the 
vexing air pollution problem 
by doing something no other 
Mexico City government 
ever has: try to determine 
exactly how many cars — 
the source of 70 percent of 
the pollution — are on the 
streets each day and then ne- 


gotiate agreements with 
neighboring states to reduce 
the number of commuters to 
the capital. 

“We have created a so- 
ciety that benefits the drivers 
instead of having an effi- 
cient, positive and econom- 
ical public transportation 
system,” Mr. Gonzalez 
said. 

On each count. Mr. Carde- 
na* and his inner circle con- 
ceded that the decades of un- 
challenged rule by FRI- 
appointed mayors have 
placed towering obstacles in 
their path. And many ana- 
lysts wonder whether Mr. 
Cardenas — or anyone — 
can overcome them to 
achieve his stated goals dur- 
ing the two-year and eight- 
month term that lies ahead. 

The city’s massive work 
force is a prime illustration 
of the problems. The workers 
and their jobs are protected 
by labor unions ran by the 
PRI, which is expected to 
complicate Mr. Cardenas's 
plan to purge corruption 
from municipal ranks. 

Mr. Gonzalez and other 
advisers said they are ready 
with an alternative: In ad- 
dition to changing the 500 or 
so officials at die top, they 
will try to change people's 
mentality — especially that 
of mid-level bureaucrats. 

Mr. Cardenas and his 
aides say they will create cit- 


izen advisory groups 
throughout the entire city 
that will have easy access to 
the 500 senior local govern- 
ment officials the new mayor 
will bring with him. 

“In 70 years, the citizens 
here have not made decisions 
about their city,” Mr. 
Gonzalez said. “Decisions 
have been imposed from the 
top- Now, we want to create a 
city of the citizens.” 

Last year there were 
nearly 2,500 street demon- 
strations here, most of than 
hours-long marches dial 
paralyzed traffic. 

Other statistics spell out 
the extent of the challenges 
facing Mr. Cardenas. On an 
average of 325 days a year, 
air qnality is officially 
deemed unsatisfactory, with 
above-danger levels of 
ozone and other pollutants. 
An average 550 crimes are 
reported each day in a city 
with an estimated 8,000 
prostitutes and more than 
2.500 intersections that are 
officially classified as dan- 
gerous. 

Both Mr. Zedillo and Mr. 
Cardenas stressed last week 
that they would seek a “re- 
lationship of cooperation” 
between the municipal and 
federal governments that 
most coexist in the capital. 

“I don’t see any animos- 
ity,” Mr. Cardenas said, “or 
that Dr. Zedillo lacks any 



Eufrac Uv&AnfTh* luwaalnl Aw*. 

Cuauhtemoc Cardenas is Mexico City's next mayor. 


willingness to work toward 
collaborating.” 

Many average citizens 
here are most concerned 
about what happens in the 
next few months. 4 ‘What's to 
keep the PRI-istas in office 
now from stealing all the 
city’s money and leaving 
Cuauhtemoc with nothing 


but an empty shell?” asked a 
newsstand owner. 

“I actually think the op- 
posite will happen,” Mr. 
Gonzalez said. “Part of 
Cardenas’s credibility lies in 
keeping his promise ro fight 
corruption. That means cor- 
ruption among those who are 
about to handover power.'* 


Bomb in Algeria 

Kills 21, 

Slayings Reported in Villages 


* 



The Associated Press 

ALGIERS — A bomb exploded Monday in a niaiket jum 
outside Algiers, and the government said 21 people had died 

and 40 had been injured. ■ , 

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the 
bombing In the market at Baraki, on the eastern outekirte of the 
capital Previous similar attacks have been blamed on Islamic^ 
fundamentalist insurgents. . ..' , 

The government issued a brief statement giving the casualty 
toll from the blast. 




9 

& 




W, • •' , 
tJ/L- ' - 


The bomb exploded as reports emerged of 
/hie 


massacres in which 44 villagers had died. The attacks early 
Sunday occurred around Ksarel Roukhari, 100 kilometers (60 
miles) southwest of Algiers. 

According to local officials and two newspapers, an armed 
band invaded the village of Fetfaa, killing 33 people; seven 
people were killed in the village of Aziz, and four were slam in 

the hamlet of Dehag. „ r . 

There was no claim of responsibility for the massacres, 
which bore the hallmarks of the Armed Islamic Group, the 
most radical of the organizations that has been waging an 
insurgency against the government for more than five years. 

More than 300 people have been killed since early June, 
when a new government took office after Algeria s first 
multiparty legislative elections. 

The June 5 elections, won by a government-backed patty, 
were intended as a signal that the authorities bad overcome 
violence that has killed more than 60,000 people since 1992. ^ 




i*-' 


I'r-' 






. V, 


Palestinian Police 
Return to Hebron 




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Russian 
On Mir 
Is Ailing 


Tile Associated Press 

HEBRON. West Bank — 
For the first time in weeks, 
Palestinian police officers 
patrolled central Hebron on 
Monday to prevent clashes 
between Israeli troops and 
Palestinian stone-throwers. 

About 2 00 uniformed of- 


ficers were deployed in alleys 
i Israeli- and P 


And Tired 


Reuters 

KOROLYOV, Russia — 
Vasili Tfcibiiyev, the Russian 
commander of the damaged 
Mir space station, is overtired 
and health tests have revealed 
a problem with his cardiovas- 
cular system, a Mission Con- 
trol spokesman said Mon- 
day. 

The spokesman 


between Israeli- and Palestin- 
ian-controlled areas from 
which Palestinians had been 
hurling rocks and firebombs 
at Israeli troops nearly every 
day for the past two weeks. 

Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu said Monday that 
Israel would take “very 
forceful measures” if the ri- 
ots continued, but that he was 
ready to return to peace talks 
if die Palestinian police 
calmed the situation. 

Mr. Netanyahu did not 
sped out how Israel might re- 
taliate for continued violence, 
but hinted it might tighten the 


Palestinians wounded by rub- 
ber and live bullets this 
month, 93 were hit in the up- 
per body, the groups said. 

The army did not imme- 
diately comment on the ac- 
cusation. 

Although Israeli troops • 
have mostly used rubber-* 0 * 
coated steel pellets, not live 
rounds, in quelling the riots, 
rubber bullets can be deadly if 
fired at close range or if they 
hit the head. 

Several Palestinians have 
been seriously hurt, but none 
has been killed since the latest 
riots began two weeks ago 
after a Jewish extremist dis- 
tributed a leaflet depicting die 
Muslim prophet Mohammed 
as a pig. 

Among those wounded by 
the rubber bullets Sunday 
were three television camera- 
men and a soundman. An 
army spokesman. Brigadier 
General Oded Ben-Ami. 





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NAME 


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For faster service, 
fax order to: (44-181) 944 8243. 

Or E-mail: paulbaker@btintemet.com 


llYrEHNAWUL 


THE WORLD'S DATIY NEWSPAPER 


planned sortie by Mr. Tsib- 
liyev to one of the space sta- 
tion’s research modules, 
Spektr, which was damaged 
in a collision with a cargo 
craft on June 25. 

He said that more tests 
would be made Tuesday and 
that doctors would draw final 
conclusions then. 

“Today we have canied 
oat medical experiments us- 
ing an exercise bike to test the 
cosmonauts’ cardiovascular 
systems,” the spokesman, 
Valeri Lyndin, said after a 
television linkup with the 
three-man Mir crew. “Tsib- 
liyev’s reaction appeared to 
be negative." 

“The doctors’ initial reac- 
tion is that Tsibliyev is over- 
tired,” the spokesman ad- 
ded. 

"He has problems with his 
sleep, but his general condi- 
tion is within the norm.” 

Reporters at Mission Con- 
trol could hear Mr. Tsibliyev 
saying Monday that he had 
developed a health problem 
after the collision last month, 
in which Spektr was pierced 
by a Progress cargo craft. The 
airless module is now sealed 
off from Mir. 

Mr. Tsibliyev and the Mir 
flight engineer, Alexander 
Lazutkin, are preparing to 
enter Spektr for repair work. 
The risky and complex sortie 
is planned for this week. 


mg, only Palestinians with 
special permits can enter Is- 
rael from those areas. 

Mr. Netanyahu also said Is- 
rael would not meet Palestin- 
ian demands to stop building a 
Jewish neighborhood in east- 
ern Jerusalem and halt the ex- 
pansion of Jewish settlements 
in the West Bank and Gaza 
Strip. The Palestinians, who 
would like to have eastern Je- 
rusalem as a capital of a Pal- 
estinian nation,- have said they 
would not resume negoti- 
ations until die building ends. 

Senior Palestinian and Is- 
raeli security officials met 
Sunday night to discuss the 
situation in Hebron. The Pal- 
estinians asked Israel to ease 
restrictions imposed in the city 
after the riots began, said Col- 
onel Gadi Shamnv, the city’s 
Israeli Army commander. 

Palestinian police com- 
manders said they were act- 
ing to prevent riors because of 
concern that Israel would 
seize some Palestinian-run 
areas from which stones and 
firebombs had been thrown. 

"We must not give the Is- 
raeli side any excuse to retake 
Shalalah Street and other 
areas,’ ' said Tarek Zaid. the 
Palestinian police command- 
er of Hebron. 

Palestinian human rights 
groups, meanwhile, accused 
Israeli troops of trying to 
wound protesters in Hebron, 
not just disperse them. Of the 


In a protest letter to the 
army, the Foreign Press As- 
sociation said Sunday that the 
four journalists, who were 
covering a flag-bunring 
protest, stood well to the side 
of the rioters. 

But General Ben-Ami said 
that the four were hit becaustjd* 
they were among the protest- 
ers. 


ClhinaAidelliges 
Talks With Taipei 


Agencr Fram e-Press* 

BEIJING — A top Chinese 
negotiator on Taiwan has 
called for political talks be- 
tween Beijing and Taipei as 
soon as possible, the official 
China Daily reported Mon- 
day. 

But the talks can succeed 
only if they are based on the 
principle of “one China,” 
Tang Shubei, deputy chair- 
man of the semi-official As- 
sociation for Relations 
Across the Taiwan Straits, 
was quoted as saying. 

Such negotiations could 
have a “positive influence," 
Mr. .Tang said, on the resump- 
tion of regular talks between 
the association and its Taiwan 
counterpart, the Straits Ex- 
change Foundation. In the ab- 
sence of official ties,- a liaison 
has existed through the pair of 
semi-official organs. 


NASA Loses Mars Contact 

Software Problem Causes Break in Pathfinder Data 


The 4 xsm-Mteii Prcxx 

— Communication 
with the Pathfinder lander on Mars was cut 
off Monday when a computer aboard the 
spacecraft inexplicably reset itself as it was 
sending back pictures, NASA scientists dis- 
covered. 

When the scientists tried to re-establish 
contact later. Earth-based antennas used to 
communicate with the lander were being 
used by other space missions, said Frank 
O Donnell, a spokesman for NASA’s Jet 
Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Cali- 
fornia. Scientists planned to attempt contact 
again later in the day. 

Before the break in communications, rhe 
National Aeronautics and Space Admin 
isiration received data indicating ihat the 


Sojourner rover had planted its chemical 


tester, an instrument called an alpha proton 
A-ray spectrometer, on the rock dubbed 


V_„: c • : — - «« iva. 

Yogi for a 10-hour examination, 

, I ,, c he pr J ?° ]em w ‘th Pathfinder's computer 
was a software glitch rather than an equip- 
ment failure. Mr. O’Donnell said 

lhe ?V rd rt™ 5 NASA scientists had 
oecome unable to communicate with the 
spacecraft. Glitches caused communica- 
tions to be cut Friday and July 4, the day the 

Kl boUnced t0 a landin g Mars: On 
Saturday, scientists reprogrammed the 

problem. 1 " 10 ^ 10 avoid another resetting 


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EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 


PAGE 7 


INTERNATIONAL 


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Rioting Shakes Nairobi 

Students Seise an Avenue in New Violence 


Reuters 

NAIROBI — Thousands of students 
fought riot police in the heart of Nairobi on 
Monday, defying President Daniel arap 
Moi a week after the worst political unrest 


in Kenya in seven years. 

Students from Kenya Polytechnic seized 


control for hours of Hail e Selassie Avenue, 
a major route through the city center, throw- 
ing stones and demanding constitutional 
reforms before elections later this year. 

Chants, of “Moi must go" mingled with 
others, such as "The time for change is 
now” and “We want reforms now." 

Witnesses said two people, apparently 
passersby, were seriously injured Later, a 
riot policeman knocked a Renters pboio- 
grapner unconscious with a baton. He was 
released from a Nairobi hospital after treat- 
ment 

The police fired tear gas and rubber bul- 
lets to drive the students back into the 
Polytechnic campus after they hit police 
and cats with rocks and used slingshots to 
send stones flying across the wide avenue. 
Hundreds of police later stormed the cam- 
pus firing live ammunition in the air. 

The violence in the city center broke out 
a week after nine 
unrest in Nairobi and other cities. 

Students blocked almost the entire length 
of the avenue with tires and makeshift bar- 
ricades. The police protected the Central 
Bank and the nearby U.S. Embassy. 

Some students also shouted slogans 
against Asians, accusing Kenyans of Asian 
origin of growing rich at their expense. Bat 


the unrest was confined to the avenue and 
failed to halt business in Nairobi. Else- 
where, traffic was snarled but most people 
went on with their work. 

Opposition-backed groups have cam- 
paigned since June for Mr. Moi to agree to 
constitutional reforms before presidential 
and parliamentary elections this year. No 
date has been set for the polls. 

Mr. Moi, 73 and in power for 19 years, 
said last Friday that be would take action 
against any attempt to bring chaos to the 
country. He challenged the opposition to 
take the debate on reforms to Parliament, 
where his ruling party has a majority. 

The authorities last week closed Nairobi 
University and Jomo Kenyatta University 
indefinitely and sent students home fol- 
lowing days of clashes in die capital. 

In addition to the reform issue, students 
are angered by a -draft parliamentary bill 


requiring the expulsion of those who fail to 
rill is a World Bank condition 


s.Thebi 

jf aid. 

Archbishop David Gitari on Sunday as- 


sailed Mr. Moi from the pulpit at Nairobi ’s 
ithearal at 


Anglican All Saints Cathedral at a cere- 
monial rededication after last week’s riots. 
Hie police threw tear gas into the cathedral 
and beat opposition and reform leaders 
when people fleeing the violence sought 
refuge there last Monday. 

Sheikh Khalid Balala, a Muslim preacher 
and one of Mr. Moi ’$ main opponents, was 
at the service after being allowed back into 
Kenya on Saturday from two years’ exile in 
Germany. 


Three Decades After Riots, 
New Jersey City Still Hurts 


By Ronaid Smothers 

New York Times Service 


NEWARK, New Jersey — 
Amiri Baraka, the poet and 
writer whose advocacy of 
“black power” is inextric- 
ably linked to the riots that 
tare through this city 30 years 
ago, was sitting on the porch 
of his Victorian style house in 
west-central Newark the oth- 
er day, pointing to his neigh- 
bors’ well-kept homes. 

The neighbors — a mail- 
man, a schoolteacher, a col- 
lege professor — were de- 
termined, he said, “to stay 
here and scratch it out.” But 
be went on, "If you go two 
blocks in either direction 
from here, yon are in some of 
the worst slums imagin- 
able.” 

Mr. Baraka's porch, is as 
good a vantage point as any 
from which to view Newark’s 
situation. Much as his neigh- 
borhood of neat blocks of 
single-family homes repre- 
sents a gleam of hope amid 
wider devastation and 
poverty, there are other pock- 
ets of progress in the city, 
from a huge new $200 million 
perfbnning-arts center to 
hundreds of middle-class 
townhouses to construction at 
the University of Medicine 
and Dentistry of New Jersey 
and the New Jersey Institute 
of Technology. 

Yet all the millions of dol- 
lars in national and state aid 
that have flowed into the city 


since the riots in 1967, all the 
corporate assistance all the 
jobs and education and hous- 
ing programs, have failed to 
change this fundamental fact 
about Newark: It is a city in 
the clutches of poverty, a city 
sliding ever downward, one 
that many say is in worse 
shape now than it was on July 
12, 1967, the night the riots 
began. 

The riots were less a tam- 
ing point than a “historical 
inevitability,” said Mir. 
Baraka, who was then known 
as LcRoi Jones and who was 
charged but later acquitted of 
weapons possession and in- 
citing to riot 

Even before 1967, Newark 
— like many other troubled 
U.S. cities, particularly in the 
industrial Northeast — was 
gripped by economic forces 
that were' squeezing its tax 
base, shuttering its factories 
and drawing its middle class 
to tire suburbs. 

The city remains a trans- 
portation nub. Train and bus 
lines still run through Ne- 
wark. Its airport has become a 
major force in (he region, as 
has its port Newark also has 
the advantage of being near 
New York City. 

But many of the ware- 
houses and trucking compa- 
nies that once thrived in the 
city's 24 square miles (62 
square kilometers) have shif- 
ted out of its narrow, crowded 
streets to spacious suburban 
tracts made more accessible 


by new highways. 

The riots did lead to some 
significant changes. In 1970, 
the city elected its first black 
mayor, Kenneth Gibson. And 
national and state assistance 
began to pour in. But these 
changes failed to reverse Ne- 
wark's decline. The city re- 
mains New Jersey's latest, 
but it has shrunk substantially 
in the last 45 years. From 19S0 
to 1967, its population fell to 
about 406,000 from 438,776, 
and in 1994, the latest year for 
which figures are available, it 
was about 259,000. 

Mageline Little, a retired 
school librarian who at the 
time of the riots was among 
the few middle-class black 
residents in the mostly white 
Weequahic Park area, recalled 
noticing within two years of 
the riots that many of her white 
neighbors had moved away. 
She and other blade 
homeowners hung on, cling- 
ing to the hope thatthe election 
of black mayors would bring 
more services, lower taxes and 
more police protection. 

“I think it was the third 
burglary in a month and no 
one from the police depart- 
ment showing up that did it 
for me,’ ’ she said, explaining 
why she decided in 1990 to 
move to the nearby suburb of 
Maplewood. 

‘ T was tired, and it was like 
the black elected officials had 
forgotten us. Somehow they 
got selfish and failed to en- 
courage us." 


BRIEFLY 


Brazzaville Cease-Fire 


KINSHASA — Shooting subsided Mon- 
day in the capital of the Congo Republic, 
Brazzaville, and sources close to mediators 
said they expected the warring parties to 
start observing a cease-fire. 

President Pascal Lxssouba and his pre- 
decessor, tile former military leader Denis 
Sasson Nguesso, initialed a cease-fire 
agreement Saturday to halt more than a 
month of bloody political and ethnic 
clashes, but there was confusion oyer the 
timing. 

- “For an hoar the guns have gone silent 
under instructions,” a source close to the 
mediators said in Brazzaville. ( Reuters ) 


recently toppled the president Nigeria, as 
head of the 16-member Economic Com- 
munity of West African States, has de- 
manded that Major Johnny Paul Koromah, 
who led the May 25 coup, restore President 
Ahmed Tejan Kabbah's government to 
power. 

Attempts last month by the Nigerian 
peacekeepers to dislodge Major Koromah 
left more than 50 people dead. The two 
sides battled again Wednesday at Lungi 
international airport, with unconfirmed re- 
ports putting the death toll at nearly 300, 
and again Saturday and Sunday. fAP) 


Peru Citizenship Feud 


Cruise Stuck in Arctic 


OSLO— Gennan: cruise ship with 260 
people aboard. was stuck in the Arctic on 
Monday after tunning aground near Nor- 
way's Svalbard archi p ela g o. No injuries or 


The Hanseatic ran aground Sunday af- 
ternoon 660 kilometers (400) north of the 
mainland Passengers used (he unscheduled 
stop for excursions aboard rubber rafts to 
the islands, said Klans Helms, a spokesman 
for the ship owner Hapag-Lloyd of Ham- 
burg. 

Two coast guard ships were en route 
Monday, but officials said no effort would 
be made to five the ship until a third coast 
guard vessel arrived Wednesday. (AP) 


LIMA — A television station owner has 
been stripped of his Peruvian citize n ship in 
what his attorney says was a reprisal for 
reports criticizing the military. 

Baruch Ivcher, owner of Channel 2, did 
not property complete steps needed to re- 
ceive Peruvian citizenship in 1984, when he 
renounced his Israeli citizenship, the gov- 
ernment said His citizenship was revoked 
Sunday. 

Mr. Ivcher said Monday in Miami that all 
paperwork was in order, while his lawyer 
contended that the government’s move was 
politically motivated Recent Channel 2 
reports had linked members of the armed 
forces to torture and corruption. (AP) 


Protests in Bombay 


Sierra Leone Calmer 


FREETOWN, Sierra Leone — Relative 
calm retained to the capital of this west 
African country Monday following a week- 
end of heavy fighting that took at least four 
lives and wounded.50 people. 

Heavy weapons and mortar fire bom- 
barded tiie town of Jin, about 20 kilometers 
(12 miles) east; of the seaside capital. 
Sporadic fighting over seven weeks has 
pitted a Nigerian-led peacekeeping mission 
against soldiers of the military regime that 


BOMBAY — Demonstrators protesting 
tiie billing s of low-caste Indians during 
weekend riots blocked rail tracks in Bom- 
bay on Monday, keeping thousands from 
their jobs in the country’s financial hub. 

The atmosphere was tense in the city’s 
eastern slams, where police shot and killed 
at least 12 people Friday and Saturday in an 
attempt to quell class-based rioting. 

Opposition parties called a strike Mon- 
day for the rest of the western stale of 
Maharashtra to protest the killings, but 
Bombay was to have been exempted. (AP) 


Bosnia Blast Stirs Fears of Serb Revenge 


OvnptlattvOarSuffFnmiDbpaiclia 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Her- 
zegovina — An explosion has 
damaged a hotel used by 
United Nations officials and 
international police monitors, 
prompting fears Monday of a 
Serbian nationali st backlash 
against foreign personnel 
after the shooting of an in- 
dicted war criminal and the 
seizure of another last week. 

Serbian anger increased 
with the sentencing Monday 
of the first convicted Bosnian 
Serbian war criminal, Dusan 
Tadic, to 2D years in prison 
for crimes against humanity. 

Mr. Tadic came from 
Pri jedor, the northwestern 
Bosnian town that in 1992 
was the site of some of the 
worst detention camps for 
Muslims and Croats during 
the 1992-95 conflict. 

Prijedor’s former police 
chief, Simo Drljaca, also was 
indicted by the war crimes 
tribunal at The Hague for al- 
legedly helping to run the 
camps. 

He was shot and killed 
while resisting arrest last 
Thursday by British elite 
troops under NATO com- 
mand, and was given a hero’s 
funeral Sunday. 

Hours later, an explosion 
blew out windows of a hotel 
housing three international 
or ganizati ons and a nearby 
school in Zvomik, a Serbian- 
controlled town' on the border 
of Serbia. 

A jeep belonging to the Or- 
ganization for Security and 
Cooperation in Europe was 
destroyed and at least one ci- 
vilian vehicle was damaged, 
said Liam McDowall, a 
spokesman for the UnitedNa- 



EmQ VWKnilm 


UN officers examining a vehicle Monday after a bomb during the night exploded in front of a hotel in Zvornik. 


s pol 

“We have to consider the 
reasonable possibility that 
this is in some way linked to 
the events in Prijedor," he 
said. 

The Hotel Drina houses lo- 


cal offices of the Organiza- 
idCooper- 


tion for Security and Cooper- 
ation, which is organizing 
Bosnia's local elections in 
September, as well as the UN 
police and a UN refugee 
agency. 

A spokesman for the or- 
ganization, Johan Verheyden, 
said at least two kilograms 
(4.4 pounds) of explosives 
were planted under the engine 
of a Nissan jeep. 


The Organization for Se- 
curity and Cooperation 
tightened security, ordering 
its personnel not to move 
around Serbian territory with- 
out an escort from the NATO- 
led peacekeeping forces, Mr. 
Verheyden said. 

On Sunday, pamphlets 
typed in broken English ap- 
peared in Serbian-held Doboj 
in north-central Bosnia, 
threatening “a head for a 
head” and warning that 
4 * Somalia was too gentle’ ' for 
United States troops. 

Eighteen American sol- 
diers were killed in Somalia 
in 1993 during an unsuccess- 
ful attempt 'to capture a fac- 


tion leader, a debacle that the 
U.S. military is determined 
not to repeat. 

The pamphlets were signed 
by a previously unknown Ser- 
bian group. Mr. McDowall 
said. 

Since Thursday, he said, 
UN police officers have had 
the windshields on their 
vehicles smashed, have had 
bottles hurled at them and 
have been threatened with 
eviction from rental housing. 

The rhetoric at the funeral 
for Mr. Drljaca was sharply 
anti-NATO. 

Milenko Karisik, the 
deputy Bosnian-Serb interior 
minis ter, said the effort to ap- 


prehend war crimes suspects 
was a move to crush the Ser- 
bian Republic, which shares 
Bosnia with a Moslim-Croat 
federation. 

“They killed a patriot, 
without an investigation and 
without a trial,” Mr. Karisik 
said. 

“They killed him perfidi- 
ously. from the back, because 
they didn’t dare to look him in 
the eyes.” 

Major Chris Riley, a 
spokesman for the NATO 
force, said amopsy reports 
showed Mr. Drljaca was shot 
“from a distance,” three 
times in the side and once in 
the chest. (Reuters. AP) 






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PACE 8 


TUESDAY JULY 15, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Ueralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


FfiU.ISHED WIT)! THE NEW YORK TUI KS WD THE WASHINGTON POST 


Together Against Drugs 

ingress put America into the busi- 
of grading other nations on their 


Congress 
ness 

performance in the war against drugs, 
and punishing those found to fall short, 
back in 1986. “Certification" seemed 
an idea worth testing. It now has been 
tested. It is a flop. By provoking local 
nationalism, this sort of unilateral U.S. 
intervention has, in Mexico, Colombia 
and elsewhere, strained the anti-drug 
cooperation it was meant to strengthen. 
!l has centered the U.S. fight against 
drugs more on foreign supply than on 
consumption at home — an emphasis 
that, for all the successful drug seizures, 
has seen the international drug flow 
pick up over the years and force prices 
on the American street steadily dawn. 

Now comes a move in Congress to 
look at certification with a beady eye. 
Senators Christopher Dodd and John 
McCain are leading a bipartisan, ideo- 
logically neutral effort that draws rea- 
sonable and necessary conclusions 
from the experience ot'ibe past decade. 
They would suspend for two years the 
process of unilateral certification and 
enlist (he drug-producing and transit 
countries to join the United States in an 
international program to contend with 
both trafficking and consumption. In a 
word that Americans will have to get 
used to in dealing with these “global 7 ’ 
issues, the United States would “mul- 


tilateralize’' the war against drugs. Co- 
operation would become the key. 

International problems exist for 
which one-sided applications of Amer- 
ican power — in fins instance, control 
of international credit — are a remedy. 
Drugs are not one of them. While other 
countries are the principal source of the 
supply, the United States is the dom- 
inant source of the demand. It is laugh- 
able to pretend that just one side of mis 
equation can and need be dealt with. 

Then, a concentration on foreign 
supply ignores that Americans have 
done no better cleaning up trafficking 
networks at home than others, includ- 
ing Latins, have done with the net- 
works abroad. The certification policy, 
imperiously penalizing foreigners not 
just for their lapses but for the United 
States' own, ignores this evident face 
Mexico provides a particular reason 
to review American drag policy. Its 
corruption is unquestionably respon- 
sible for some part of the flow of illegal 
drugs. But Mexico is also a country 
now making an immense effort to undo 
the political distortions that lie behind 
sh of the corruption. By looking for 


mucr 


cooperative wayson drugs, the United 
States tackles a hemispheric menace 
and encourages Mexican democracy 
at the same time. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Recalling TWA 800 


A year ago this coming Thursday. 
TWA Flight 800 crashed off the coast 
of Long Island shortly after takeoff, 
killing all 230 passengers and crew 
members. Testimony by relatives of 
(he victims last week before Congress 
offered vivid accounts of their searing 
pain. Government cannot heal their 
wounds, but it can work hard to prevent 
further tragedies. The first anniversary 
is a good time to take stock. 

The Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion. which regulates airline safety, the 
National Transportation Safety Board, 
which investigates (he causes of 
crashes, and the FBI have exhaustively 
investigated cause and remedy. They 
have uncovered neither. Their inability 
to do so lies not in lack of effort, which 
included trawling 40 square miles of 
ocean bottom to recover an astonishing 
95 percent or more of the exploded 
plane, but in the complexity of the 
investigation. Officials of the FAA and 
the safety board can be faulted, 
however, for juvenile bickering. 

A year of intensive examination has 
uncovered no evidence of bombs, mis- 
siles or other forms of sabotage. The 
board has determined chat the center 
fuel lank of the Boeing 747 exploded, 
and that that explosion was what 
brought the plane down. At the time of 
the accident. Boeing was unsure 
whether explosive vapors could build 
up in the fuel tank. Now it knows 
better. But investigation has not turned 
up the source of the spark that set the 
fuel vapors afire. Without a cause, reg- 
ulators are left to speculate, and dis- 
agree, about remedies. 

The safety board recommended last 
February that the FAA consider or- 
dering planes with center fuel tanks to 
fill them with cold fuel before takeoff. 
A full tank of cold fuel would produce 
fewer ignitable vapors at and shortly 


after the takeoff. The board also sug- 
gested that the FAA consider ordering 
better insulation for the center fuel 
tank, which sits near heat-creating air- 
conditioning units, and new sensors so 
that pilots would have better readings 
from the fuel tank during flight. 

These recommendations are reason- 
able. Yet the FAA took two months to 
respond, and then only solicited com- 
ments by outside expats. The board is 
clearly peeved that the FAA took so 
long to do so little. 

Yet the FAA technical experts have 
plausible reasons for questioning the 
board’s proposals. They worry, for ex- 
ample, whether a full foci tank in the 
belly of the plane adds risk in the case 
of an aborted takeoff. Would new 
sensors add a potential source of spark 
to the fuel tank? At the core of the 
FAA’s hesitation ties the fret that there 
have been only two explosions of Boe- 
ing central fuel tanks in more than 120 
million hours of flights. This is an 
astoundingly good safety record, 
which warrants no hasty correction — 
especially if “corrections’’ could cre- 
ate a new. graver risk. 

The squabbling reflects the agen- 
cies' history. The board cites numerous 
instances — requiring airlines to use 
better flight data recorders and to 
provide background checks on pilots 
who change employers — where the 
FAA took years to institute straight- 
forward recommendations that should 
have been accomplished in months. For 
its part, the FAA resents ridicule from a 
board that issues proposals whose com- 
plexity is often misunderstood. 

The important fact is that repeti- 
tion of Flight 800’ s center tank ex- 
plosion is a small enough risk that 
regulators can lake the time to make 
the right decisions. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Ever Closer to 20 


U.S. agencies have been scrambling 
to avert a disaster at the close of the 
final day in 1999. That is when thou- 
sands of computers around the world, 
as currently configured, could go hay- 
wire as the first digits of the year turn 
from 19 to an absurd and menacing 20. 
It is not clear, however, whether the 
agencies are scrambling enough. 

Official reports and a congressional 
hearing last Tliureday brought disquiet- 
ing assertions of agencies failing be- 
hind both their own schedules and the 
timetables recommended by private- 
sector computer experts. Republican 
Representatives Connie Morelia and 
Stephen Horn, who chair the relevant 
government and technology subcom- 
mittees. are pressing President Bill 
Clinton, or at least his information 
highway -boosting vice president, to use 
the bully pulpit to goad civil servants on 
this maddeningly complex issue. 

At stake is much more than the risk 
of a few silly typographical errors. 
System-wide crashes and corrupted of- 
ficial data are merely the software- 
related dangers. There is also the bur- 
geoning cost of new purchases and 


reprogramming strategies — estimat- 
ed by the Office of Management and 
Budget at $2.8 billion, but set by some 
private analysts at $9 billion to $15 
billion and counting. 

In jeopardy are the government’s 
check-cutting capabilities and its 
“mission -critical” military and intel- 
ligence functions, among other things. 

After prodding by congressional 
overseers, OMB has" stepped up its 
monitoring efforts. This allowed the 
OMB information and regulatory af- 
fairs administrator, Sally Katzen. to de- 
clare last week that die government has 
made **a good sum” but that “the bulk 
of the hard work lies ahead." White 
House officials say the issue is being 
appropriately handled by staff and that 
there is no sense in sowing panic. 

Some of the calls for presidential 
intervention come from commercial 
interests with a stake in maximizing a 
problem to which they offer part of the 
solution. But there is a demonstrable 
need to avoid caking chances in this 
uncharted territory. The millennia m is 
an unforgiving deadline. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


MTEKNATUWIL * 4 

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Yes 9 Keep Going After the Warlords in Bosnia 


N EW YORK — The last time I saw 
Simo Drijaca, be gave me a 
friendly pat on the back as I said good- 
bye. We had spent the better pan of a 
day together, and we ended it with a 
beer and a toast to peace. 

Simo Drijaca was a warlord in Pri- 
jedor, and he gave me a four of his 
prison camps — Triiopolje, Keraterm, 
Omarska. Tne tour of his gulag occurred 
five years ago, just a few months into 
the Bosnian war, when the ugliness of 
the conflict was shielded from view. 

I traveled to Prijedor with a few other 
journalists, and we were met by Milan 
Kovacevic, the town’s other warlord. 
Anyone who visited the town and 
wanted anything done had to deal with 
them. They had accomplished much 
during their reign of terror, “cleans- 
ing" Prijedor and the surrounding re- 
gion of almost every non-Serb. 

Milan Kovacevic was a bear of a man 
who wore a T-shirt that said “U.S. 
Marines," and a pistol at his waist. He 
cursed us for coming to Prijedor on a 
Sunday, and be said we couldn’t visit 
the camps. But he soon got tired of 
shouting at us (and at the military officer 


By Peter Maass 

who escorted us into town) and agreed 
to let Simo Drijaca show us around. 

The camps were the most fright- 
ening of places. The day was a long 
horror show in which prisoners, some 
on the edge starvation, showed the 
signs of utte* fear and mortal peril: 

Clinton has realised 
that the only way-out of 
the Bosnian morass is 
to march through it 

averted eyes, untreated wounds, stick- 
like limbs. Simo Drijaca began the tour 
by showing a tidy building where he 
saidprisonezs had been held. (That was 
false.) “See," he said, “no blood." 

We won’t be hearing any more tales 
from him, because he was shot and 
killed on Thursday when he resisted 
arrest by NATO troops. Milan Ko- 


vacevic was arrested without incident 
and flown to The Hague, where he 
awaits trial for war crimes. f 

The operation to arrest Prijedor s 
wartime leaders is the best news to 
come from Bosnia in some time- Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton has finally realized 
that the only way out of the Bosnian 
morass is to march through it, and that 
m^ans arresting alleged war criminals. 

The short-term consequences could 
be harmful, for retaliation is possible. 
But the wrath of Bosnia’s Serbs has 
always been greatest when the targets 
were powerless, and the NATO troops 
are not powerless. 

Simo Drijaca and Milan Ko- 
vacevic ’s lack of international notori- 
ety might give the impression that they 
are small fish, and mat me only im- 
portant thing is to capture Radovan 
Karadzic, leader of me Bosnian Serbs, 
and Rarko Mladic, his top military 
commander. But that is wrong. 

Of course, those two must be re- 
moved from me scene, one way or 
another. But the atrocities in Bosnia 
were not carried out by just two men; 
scores of men and women organized 


**£££* serve 
The foundation for long-term stability 

depends on thenaum of 

tomeTlt is hard to imagine refugees 
wanting to return to towns ran by war- 
lords. |id harder to imagine that the 
warlords would let them return at all ■ 

The Western response to Bosnia has 
been one of half-measures. When the 
war started, mere were economy sanc- 
tions bot no military action. When mil- 
itary action was taken, its scope was 
limited. When the Dayton peace ac- 
cords were negotiated, more man half 
of Bosnia was handed to Serbian ana 
Croatian nationalists. 

One can only hope that the moves 
against Simo Drijaca and Milan Ko- 
vJcevic are not half-measures. The 
question is whether politicians, espe- 
cially Mr. Clinton, have the nerve to 
follow through on a risky path. 

The writer is author of “ Love Thy 
Neighbor : A Story of War . " which 
chronicled the war in Bosnia. He con- 
tributed this comment to The New 
York Times. 


An Emerging Market Can Be an Emerging Disaster, as Usual 


J AKARTA — So I was - vis- 
iting a businessman in down- 
town Jakarta me other day and 
1 asked him for directions to my 
next appointment His exact in- 
structions were: “Go to the 
building with the Armani Em- 
porium upstairs — you know, 
just above me Hard Rock Cafe 
— and then turn right at Mc- 
Donald’s." I just looked at him 
and laughed. “Where am 1?" 

Where I was was in one of the 
hottest emerging markets. 

You have heard about emerg- 
ing markets. Your pension fund 
probably owns some shar es in 
the $125 billion Jakarta Stock 
Exchange. And thank s to your 
pension fund — and global 
companies like Nike, Freeport 
and thousands of Japanese and 
Korean Anns mat have moved 
their smokestack manufactur- 
ing here to tap me cheap labor 
and lax regulatory standards — 
Indonesia is a boom country. 

There is just one little down- 
side: The environment all over 
this remarkably beautiful ar- 
chipelago is being devastated. 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


According to me World Wide 
Fund for Nature, 44 percent of 
the original natural habitats of 
Indonesia have been converted 
to other uses, and even larger 
portions of its lowland tropical 
rain forests have been lost. Sev- 
eral key coral reefs have been 
decimated by dynamite and cy- 
anide fishing (stun die fish here 
today; sell mem fresh in Hong 
Kong tomorrow). 

Precisely because it is home 
to so many species. Indonesia 
today has more types of animal 
threatened with extinction (600) 
man any country in die world. 

All the rivers in Jakarta are 
dead, choked by acids, alcohol 
and oils, and a thick smog cloud 
envelops the city. Environmen- 
tal degradation, due to mining 
in outer Java islands and quar- 
rying for building materials in 
Java, is constantly increasing, 
exposing Indonesians to ero- 
sions, a recent forest fire the size 
of Belgium and landslides. 

Yes, the developed, northern 


nations, who have been pollut- 
ing for years, have do right to 
lecture Indonesians, now that 
they are trying to develop, too. 
Still, it is hand not to feel a sense 
of a tragedy in die making, and 
those Indonesians who have 
reached an income and educa- 
tion level where they can afford 
to think about the environment 
share this sense of being over- 
whelmed by global capitalism. 

For a developing country like 
Indonesia, plugging into the 
global market often means a 
brutal ultimatum: Jobs or trees? 
You can’t have both. This is 
globalization’s dark side. 

Some artists on Indonesia’s 
tropical island of Bali just held 
an exhibition protesting the 
paving of their paradise. The 
Jakarta Post said their drawings 
included a cartoon of a golf ball 
dribbling into a Hindu proces- 
sion, another of Bali as a golf 
ball being batted around by me 
world, and one of a village 
fanner swinging his hoe like a 


golfer teeing off, only he is 
swinging away at developers . 
The show was wryly entitled 
“glo-BALI-zation.’ ’ 

I asked Agus Pumomo, who 
head’s the World Wide Fund 
for Nature in Indonesia, what it 
is like to be an environmentalist 
in an emerging market: “We 
are in a constant race with de- 
velopment." he sighed. 

“Before we even have a 
chance to convince me wider 
audience hoe that environment- 
ally sound development is a vi- 
able way to do things, the plans 
to build roads, factories or {tower 
plants are moving ahead. 

“We have a problem here 
with unemployment, so any de- 
veloper who can sell promises 
of employment will get support. 
When that happens, we get 
labeled as against employment 
and get treated as outsiders." 

There are environmental 
laws here, but they are rarely 
enforced, and polluters can eas- 
ily bribe inspectors. 

Nabiel Makarim heads In- 
donesia's infant environmental 


protection agency. He knows 
that real enforcement is im- 
possible, so he has opted instead 
for embarrassment — creating 
public awards for cities and 
companies that achieve stan- 
dards of environmental protec- 
tion and spotlighting those (fiat 
don't. He is a realist: “The 
power base for environmental- 
ism is still very weak,’’ he says. 

Indonesia is now in a race. 
The same growth that is pol- 
luting its environment is also 
producing a middle class with 
an environmental awareness, as 
happened in me WesL Will that 
middle class reach critical mass 
before the environmental de- 
gradation here does? 

“You lose a mountain, you 
lose it — you can’t regrow it," 
said Agus Pumomo. “If you cut 
me forests, you can grow than 
back, but you lose the biodi- 
versity — the plants, the animals. 
I’m worried that in a decade 
we’ll all be environmentally 
aware, but mere will be nothing 
left to defend." 

The New York Tunes. 


Now Let’s Get Closer to the Bottom of the Asian Connection 


W ASHINGTON — We 
learned from Fred 
Thompson, at me outset of Sen- 
ate hearings into campaign cor- 
ruption, that me committee had 
reason to believe that “high- 
level Chinese government of- 
ficials crafted a plan to increase 
China’s influence over me U.S. 
political process,’’ and that me 
FBI “has developed and 
garnered a large volume of de- 
tailed information on the plan's 
implementation.’ ’ 

No senator would make that 
statement without FBI approv- 
aL It is surely connected to Di- 
rector Louis Freeh’s unprece- 
dented refusal in February to 
share sensitive counterintelli- 


By William. S afire 


gence with me White House 
counsel, which could stem from 
evidence of an espionage pen- 
etration of me administration. 

To follow op Senator Thomp- 
son’s stunning disclosure, the 
Senate should discover what top 
secret information was provided 
to John Hoang, the Lippo op- 
erative whom President Bill 
Clinton placed first at Com- 
merce and then at -the Demo- 
cratic National Committee. 

One CIA official briefed Mr. 
Huang 37 times, showing up to 
15 classified documents on 
each visit He wrote down Mr. 
Huang's comments on the doc- 


uments, some of which re- 
vealed human sources. It does 
not matter if the CIA briefer has 
to wear a bag over his head at 
mis week’s hearings to protect 
his identity. Senator Aden 
Specter, a former prosecutor 
with intelligence credentials, 
should be tasked with me full 
interrogation. 

Mr. Huang men made many 
calls to his former Lippo em- 
ployer, and went across the 
street to make surreptitious 
calls from me office of Steph- 
ens Inc., banking buddies of Mr. 
Clinton who sold an Arkansas 
bank to Lippo. Let's see me list 


Which Clinton in the Tax Battle 


W ASHINGTON— If you 
want to see where 
American politics is moving, 
watch me tax fight in Wash- 
ington. President Bill Clinton 
has redefined me baulc. 

Once it was over whether 
mere should be tax cuts. Now 
it is a fight over who will 
benefit most, me middle class 
or the wealthy. 

Republicans are furious. In 
theory, Mr. Clinton stuck to 
the deal with mem by pro- 
posing a limited capital gains 
tax cut and very modest relief 
for those who inherit farms 
or small businesses. In prac- 
tice, his proposals gat the parts 
of the Republican tax plans 
that give me most to the 
wealthiest taxpayers. 

Republicans are reduced to 
saying that the Clinton tax cut 
shortchanges the wealthy and 
gives too much to the lower 
middle class. I( is not an easy 
argument to make. 

Republican leaders have ar- 
gued that 10 raise questions 
about the distribution of the 
benefits offered by their 
party’s lax plans is to wage 
“class warfare." But who ex- 
actly is waging class warfare? 

When folly effective, the 
House Republican plan offers 
18.8 percent of Its benefits to 
the wealthiest 1 percent of 
Americans, according to me 
Center on Budget and Policy 
Priorities. 

Once upon a time, “class 
warfare" meant soaking the 
rich. Now you are in the 
trenches with bearded Marx- 
ists if your tax cut for me 
wealthy isn’t big enough. This 
is Washington in 1997. 

The Republicans arc miss- 
ing a chanw to make their best 
case for a tax cut. For years 
they argued that government 


By E. J. Dionne Jr. 


should not tax people into 
poverty or make life tougher 
for me pressed middle class. 
They were right, especially 
since regressive payroll taxes 
take a much bigger chunk 
from me incomes of me 
middle class and me working 
poor man from me wealthy. 

So it is incomprehensible 
that Republicans are fiercely 
resisting Mr. Clinton’s pro- 
posal to give me $500-per- 
child tax credit to families 
who owe no income taxes but 
pay substantial payroll (axes. 
Most of these families earn 
roughly $17,000 to $24,000. 

House Speaker Newt Gin- 
grich said provisions helping 
such families turned the tax bill 
into “a welfare bilL" Demo- 
crats loved this. They scoured 
the country for policemen, 
nurses and other hardworking 
taxpayers who resent being 
labeled “welfare recipients.” 
When cops and nurses are on 
your side in the class war, me 
other side needs to regroup. 

Peopleat me middle and me 
bottom need relief for another 
reason. For nearly two de- 
cades — until me last two or 
three years — they have lost 
ground or barely kept up. 

According to Congressional 
Budget Office figures, Amer- 
icans in me bottom fifth of (be 
income distribution saw their 
after-tax incomes drop by 16 
rent from 1977 to 1994. 
next-to-the bottom fifth 
lost 8 percent, while the middle 
of the middle class stayed 
about even. Members of the 
wealthiest fifth saw their in- 
comes rise by 25 percent, and 
the too 1 percent had a whop- 
ping 72 percent increase. 


Government cannot radic- 
ally redistribute income with- 
out seriously negative con- 
sequences. But it can do two 
things to preserve a middle- 
class society. One is to provide 
general benefits to everyone 
— for starters, good schools 
and universal access to med- 
ical insurance. The other is to 
take less money from those 
who can least afford to pay. 

That means mat when the 
government can afford tax 
cuts, i t shou Id direct me 
money to people whose take- 
home pay most needs bolster- 
ing. This isn’t class warfare. It 
is a modest step toward class 
harmony. 

And, to make me Repub- 
licans even madder. Mr. Clin- 
ton’s bill is more fiscally con- 
servative than theirs. The 
costs of me two Republican 
proposals balloon after a de- 
cade. In me 10 years after 
2008. the Republican bills 
could cost between $650 bil- 
lion and $700 billion. In the 
same period, the Clinton plan 
could cost a more sustainable 
$450 billion. 

The Republicans would be 
smart to declare victory and 
buy me Clinton plan whole. 
That way they could claim 
credit for a tax cut and avoid 
being cast as class warriors for 
the wealthy. Their biggest 
mistake in 1995 was shutting 
down the government instead 
of buying the budget conces- 
sions Mr. Clinton offered. 

The key player mis time is 
Mr. Clinton. Will he stick with 
his overly generous but rea- 
sonable plan, or will he give 
yet more ground? Everything 
in Washington these days is 
called a “character issue.” 
but this one is me real thing. 

WashinyUiii Putt Writers Group 


of all those calls to Canada and 
overseas. 

Hard evidence that contribu- 
tions to Mr. Clinton’s DNC ori- 
ginated illegally in Beijing: One 
wire transfer of $150,000 from 
the Bank of China covered die 
check for $50,000 handed di- 
rectly to Hillary Clinton's chief 
of staff in the White House. That 
purchased six Chinese “busi- 
nessmen’s" entrance to the pres- 
ident’s weekly radio address. 

We can deduce from Mr. 
Huang's immunity ploy that he 
worries about a potential charge 
that he unlawfully solicited 
political funds while he was a 
Commerce official. The DNC 
thrice listed his wife as me fund- 
raiser; after Mr. Huang moved 
to me DNC, the same donors’ 
subsequent contributions were 
credited to him. If convicted on 
such a charge, he might be in- 
clined to tell much more to re- 
duce a sentence than he would if 
now granted immunity from 
prosecution. 

Last week’s fund-raising wit- 
ness testified that me DNC con- 
sidered Mr. Huang a specialist 
in “soft money" — big chunks 
directed to me party, not smaller 
sums that could go to a can- 
didate. Here is me significance. 

In August 1995, Joseph 
Giroir (a Riady acolyte re- 
membered at me Rose Law 
Firm as me partner who hired 
Hillary) started urging me DNC 
to take on Commerce official 
Huang. When me DNC resisted 
for unexplained reasons, in- 
credible neat was applied. No 
fewer than 16 buttons were 
pushed, including one by Har- 
old Ickes; finally. President 


Clinton himself Jiad^ to direct 
finance chairman Marvin Ros- 
en co hire Mr. Huang. 

Why the urgency? Because in 
mat summer (as books by Bob 
Woodward and Dick Morris 
show) Mr. Clinton was. desper- 
ate for soft money to pay foranri- 
Republican television ads to 
boost his ratings. Direct contri- 
bution of small sums to die Clin- 
ton-Gore campaign would not 
do me trick. To circumvent the 
campaign finance law, Mr. Clin- 
ton needed a source of major soft 
money paid to the DNC, fast 

Mr. Huang’s Asian connec- 
tion was a key source. Hearings 
should show that at the .notori- 
ous Oval Office meeting on 
SepL 13, 1995, lyingly labeled a 
“social visit," Mr. Giroir asked 
Mr. Clinton to move Mr. Huang 
from Commerce to the DNC. 
Then and mere. Mr. Clinton i 


proved Mr. Huang's transfer 
from favor-doer to fund-raiser. 

Did he suspect mat Mr. 
Huang might be using his top- 
secret clearance to provide 
Lippo, and ultimately China, 
with trade secrets? 

I like to mink that the pres- 
ident was merely duped by his 
Asian contributors, and per- 
suaded himself mat be made no 
policy decision “solely" — his 
chosen qualifier — on me basis 
of their largesse. 

These hearings may find that 
our president — blinded by am- 
bition and greed into breaking 
the campaign Jaws — was un- 
aware of me danger that his 
confederates may have been 
manipulating him in the interest 
of foreign powers. 

The New York Times 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Behring Affair 

NEW YORK — A despatch 
from me correspondence on the 
Behring Sea question between 
me British and the United States 
Governments was published. 
Secretary of State Sherman 
wrote that the President was 
greatly disappointed at me re- 
fusal of me British Government 
to suspend pelagic sealing and 
to agree to a joint conference of 
the representatives of the 
Powers concerned with a view 
to me preservation of seal life. 

1922: Bastille Lesson 

PARIS — The storming of the 
Bastille was a spontaneous 
manifestation. But it was not 
revolution itself. That came 
through organised efforts fol- 
lowing it and culminating in me 
decapitating of the French King. 
In the two great Anglo-Saxon 
countries, revolution was ef- 
fvCUd through the rccoguiuiu' 


representatives of the common- 
alty, as in 1688 in England and in 
1776 in me united colonies of 
Norm America. These facts il- 
lustrate me wide difference of 
temperament of the Latin and the 
Anglo-Saxon peoples. There has 
been no time when it was more 
worth while to recognise and to 
study this difference than at mis 
stage of the world’s affairs. 

1947: Hoxha Accuses 

BELGRADE Albanian 

Premier Enver Hoxha, speaking 
at the National Assembly, said 
that the government holds doc- 
uments testifying that certain 
Anglo-American representatives 
in Albania were preparing to 
overthrow the government. Re- 
cent Greek- Albanian border in- 
cidents, he asserted, were “part 
of a general anti-democratic plan 
by Anglo-American reactionar- 
ies whose aim is to bring about a 
new war. recommended by the 
: nur.an dnctrinc " 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 




nia New Land Shows Us Earth in a Different Light 


tier. 

would serve QO i Dnk . . 
for long-ten!!’' 

niher^offef^^liiv 

is hard io r 

? to run h Uge ^ 
I harder ro imaoi n ? ^ w *r 

■would let taSS* 3 ' »r 

2 Siem response toh ai a| t 

of half-measures B vffi ,la ^ 

d.Ui^wereeco nu ^ n 

to military action wE sa ^- 
» was taken. i ts 
M*® tire Davt on "as 

■e negotiated. We^‘. ac 

1 was handed to Serb," haJf 
nationalists. D,an ^ 

Ji only hope that the m 
«no Drljaca and 

?re not half-nteasur'f ^ 

ts whether politic lans 
• ^ Union, have the nei?*' 
■oug hon a risk y p Jlh e * 

iter is author of , „ , Tl 
-■ A Story of U;, r : 1 J h ' 
d the war in B.jsnJ n hi ‘ h 
t/us comment to Ti,' \" n 
»S. 1 Aft, 


N EW YORK — f spent most of the 
last decade writing a novel set on 
Mars, and at some point early in the 
process I stared at a pair of stereo- 
scopic photographs from the 1976 
Viking 2 mission until the images 
merged into a shimmering false 3-D, 
and a shiver went down ray spine: I 
saw what it would be like to stand on 
another planet. 

I think the widespread public en- 
thusiasm for Pathfinder’s great suc- 
cess is based on a similar shivery 
sensation — the apprehension of out 
neighboring world’s reality. 

This response is much more emo- 
tional than scientific, and that is 
perfectly appropriate. Pathfinder will 
generate a great deal of excellent 
science, but what will get it in the 
history books, I believe; will be its 
first panoramic photographs of the 
Martian landscape. 

These reveal a much more exciting 
region than the Viking sites, which 
were deliberately chosen for their 
flatness, in the interest of the craft's 
safety. 

Bur the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration took all kinds 


By Kim Stanley Robinson 


of risks with Pathfinder, and the 
payoff was a landing in extremely 
rough and wild terrain, featuring 
distant hills, crater rims, bluffs, 
channels, sand dunes, big rocks, small 
rocks, bedrock. 

Taken together, these various fea- 
tures compose a dramatic landscape 
(hat is distinctive, compelling and, 
that rarest of rarities, land that no 
one had ever seen before. 

The way we first set eyes on this 
new land is an important pan of 
the story. It is also a good illustration 
of how NASA has begun to think 
about the human element as well 
as (he engineering, even in a robotic 
mission Idee this one. 

The landing came on the Fourth of 
July, so that it became part of a na- 
tional U.S. holiday. 

The risks were made clear, so that 
we all felt the suspense. 

Clearly NASA was out- on a limb 
that could have snapped off; that 
has certainly happened before 
with Mars missions. So when the 


lander got down safely, there was 
a shared sense of pleasure. 

Then the information it sent back 
was made available instantly, and 
also directly on the Internet; the hun- 
dred million “hits” recorded 
by NASA’s Web site show how 
popular this access was. 

And the whole thing was very 
clearly a public project — financed by 

Mars is a lens through 
which to see Earth 
tnore clearly. Wherever 
you are on Earth , you 
are in a landscape 
even more beautiful 


taxes, not for profit, and indeed amaz- 
ingly removal from the whole eco- 
nomic realm. 

Eventually, of course, the panor- 
ama of the rocky landscape will be- 
come familiar, with posters of if 
everywhere, and every rock will be 


given a silly name — Ares Vail is will 
have become a human place well be- 
fore our arrival there in person. 

Other landers will then arrive and 
show us different parts of Mars, and 
we ’ll be off again to some new topic. 

Bur in the meantime. Pathfinder 
will have shown what Mars can do. 

Mars is, in the end, such agood way 
to think about Earth; it’s a sort of lens 
through which to see Earth more 
clearly. After all. notwithstanding the 
spare grandeur of Ares Vallis, 
wherever you are on Earth when you 
read this newspaper, you are in a 
landscape even more beautiful. 

And walking around on this most 
beautiful lively planet, remembering 
the photographs from the empty 
planet next door, it is sometimes pos- 
sible briefly to merge the two images, 
generating moments of vision during 
which one can see more clearly, as 
if in three dimensions, our place 
in the universe. 

The writer is the author of the tri- 
logy "Red Mars," “Green Mars" and 
"Blue Mars." He contributed this 
comment tv The New fork Times. 


There Isn’t Much Romance 
In Danger -for a Living 

By Sebastian Junger 


N EW YORK — For five years — before 
I managed to make a living as a free- 


er, as Usual For Human Pioneers , Mars Will Be the New Frontier 


protection asenci He u 
*■ "■> citfnrccnicnf Z 
possible, so he ha, „ ploJl * 

for embarrassment — 
public award, f,, r iu ^ 
companies that £ 

dards of environmental PWtf 
uon and spotlighting thu*X 
-dent. He is a rcj]p.,i ■•■n. 
power base for cnv,n flTCra J 
ism is stiil very wejk.-fa^. 

Indonesia i> no* m a a, 
The same grow ih :h.u | S 
luring its environment \> ^ 
producing a mukli-.- d.i^ uni, 
an environmental u-u*. k 
happened in the W W ill fa 
middle class reach aiiial m* 
hetore the er.\ irornirnj k 
gradation here d. c - 1 
"\ou Io>c ^ n.i>ur. : .jin. '.<jy 
lose it — > ou ..-.r.i reer- •» il 
said Agus Pun-. m... ■ I: 
the forests, you .. : .'i grow tlw. 
back, but »ou !•.•*..■ ’he m 
vcfeily — the pi-in: - the jnimta 
I'm wumed tha; u. j Jecai 
w«Ti ail be er.-.ir.tnnwiA 
aware, but there v.iil K- n.-itfuni 
lets to defend. 


connection 

Omtoa himself -.i-l :o tins 
finance chains:. Man in Rns 
esi to hire Mr Hu.i:-.c 
Wh> the uree.u 1 Brsjues 
that summer book- h> Brc 
Woodward or..; L’;a ^1*^- 
show r Mr. Cants '.7 *o> 
ate for sof: money pa> 
Republican teleM'ion jJ? 1 
taxM his raring.- Piicii i own- 
button of sums !»■ thcCtor 
ton-Goie camr^er. woulojj 
do the trick. To unwai 
campaign itnanee i.i* > b ^ . 
toil needed a source oi nuHf 
ihoik-v saw to l - rJ l. 
Mr Huang > 

lion was j ke> Hta : 

shemid shew ;hjt j tne 
Oval Office Wjj!, 
Sept. 13. 1995. ;> mgl> 

'Ir G ^J ,|r u2 
Nfr Clinton to move Nit nw 
Inm Commerce ^ 

Then and there. Mr. ^ - ,n *^ 
proved Mr 

from favor-doer to tun 1 

Did he 

Huang might r. u- •>- j, 

secret clearance 'ciua-' 

Lip no. and uliim-'- • 
vnth trade secre>> . «<• 
i -o dunk 
tderu was iwkM ps 

Asian conn . b-«y ■ • j; » 

suuded bim»ch y- 1 ;. 
policy decision^ 


«i quasi- t-’r ^ 

i and gree- 

unpaign -a' >? * 

. J, dw w 

d S"'.r, C‘:-'T 1 -' 1 n:h'’" ,ie,r ’ 

sulatmg 

**ier* power*- 


D enver — After 
Pathfinder, what next? 
More unmanned probes to 
Mars will follow, certainly. 

But the search for life or its 
fossilized remains on the red 
planet will require mobile 
systems capable of traveling 
long distances through unim- 
proved terrain, climbing steep 
slopes, performing heavy 
work and delicate work, and 
adapting in a versatile way to 
unexpected conditions. 

In short. Mars needs hu- 
mans. 

Approached correctly, the 
task of establishing human 
explorers on Mars could be 
accomplished within 10 years 
at a cost of about IS percent of 
the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration's cur- 


By Robert Zubrin 

rent budget. The trick is to 
design the mission using the 
pioneer’s credo: Travel light 
and live off the land. 

Mars is rich, possessing 
all the resources necessary 
to have supported life in the 
past — and possibly in the 
future. It is the richness of 
Mars that makes the red 
planet not only interesting, 
but also attainable. 

Here's the plan: In 2003 we 
use a single heavy-lift booster 
to shoot an unmanned and un- 
fueled Earth Return Vehicle 
off to Mars. 

Upon landing, the vehicle 
uses a pump to suck in some 
of the carbon-dioxide atmo- 


sphere, and combines it with a 
bit of hydrogen brought from 
Earth to produce a copious 
supply or methane-oxygen 
rocket propellant. 

Then, in October 2007, an- 
other booster is used to fire 
the crew to the red planet. 
Because their return ride is 
waiting for them on the plan- 
et’s surface, no giant space- 
ship loaded with round-trip 
supplies is needed to trans- 
port the crew members. In- 
stead, a simple habitation 
module will suffice. 

The health effects of zero 
gravity can be avoided by 
spinning the spacecraft or. as 
Shannon Lucid showed in her 
recent six-month space flight, 
by following a rigorous ex- 
ercise program. Solar-flare 


radiation hazards can be neg- 
ated though the use of an on- 
board storm shelter. 

Landing on Mars in April 
2008. the crew will begin 
wide-ranging field explora- 
tion, using ground veliicles 
powered by Mars-produced 
propellant tapped from the 



t Did we ever try to turn this place over to the Chinese ? f 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


About Taiwan 

Regarding ” The West 

Should Face It: Taiwan Is 
Pan of China" ( Opinion . July 
JO) by Gregory Clark: 

Mr. Clari; said that the 
West “implicitly accepted 
Beijing’s right to use force 
against Taiwan.” 

The United States has re- 
peatedly rejected the use of 
force by Beijing. France's 
sale of defensive weapons to 
Taiwan in 1992 is a standard 
way of ‘ ‘implicitly’ ’ rejecting 
the use of force by Beijing. 

And the people of Taiwan, 
with the natural assistance of 
the Taiwan Strait, are per- 
fectly capable of preventing 
an invasion by the People’s 
Liberation Army of China 
without any outside help. 

The Charter of the United 
Nations recognizes the right 
of every people to self-de- 
termination. The people of 
Taiwan have that right, as 
do tite people of Quebec, 
Tibet or any other region. The 
implication that . the 
Taiwanese belong to Beijing 
because they are ethnic 
Chinese is racist • 

JIM WAJtSH. 

Taipei. 

Mr. Clark’s statement that 
the United States “has ac- 
cepted Beijing’s claim, that 
Taiwan is part of China” 
is inaccurate. _ According to I 
the Shanghai Communique ! 
of Feb. 28, 1972. “die U.S. ! 
acknowledges that all 
Chinese on edther.side of die 
Taiwan Strait maintain there 
is but (me C hina and that 

■Letters intended for pub- 
lication should be addressed 
“ Letters to the Editor" and 
contain the writer’s signature , 
name andfitll address. Letters ■ 
should be brief and are sub- 
ject to editing. We cannot be 
responsible for the return, of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


Taiwan is a part of China.” 
Acknowledgment does not 
mean acceptance! 

Western nations should not 
accept Beijing’s right to use 
force against Taiwan. Based 
on the universal right of self- 
determination as laid down in 
the UN Charter, it should be 
clear that it is only up to the 
people of Taiwan, and not up 
to C hina, to decide their fu- 
ture. If it is the will of the 
people of Taiwan to choose 
independence, the world 
should respect that wish. 

YU CH1NG YEN and 
KIMBERLEY KUO. 

Washington. 

Is the United States pre- 
pared to send soldiers who 
may die for Taiwan’s inde- 
pendence? That indepen- 
dence, if declared, may be 
left unchallenged by China 
for decades, but ultimately 
it will be negated. Sover- 
eignty is never negotiable, 
and Taipei cannot sail an is- 
land to California. 

JAY CHEN. 

Hong Kong. 

A Singapore Facility 

The article titled “For 
Singapore, a Clouded Out- 
look” (June 28) stated that 
Seagate Technology Inc. 
“would relocate its disk- 


EUROPE 

Exquisite style, witty provoca- 
tion, right on the inside track 
of European government. 

ff you missed his reporting in the 
I John Vinocur IHT, look for it on our site on the 
I Senior Correspondent World Wide Web: 


http : //www. iht.com 



Earth Return Vehicle. Extra 
oxygen from the propellant 
plant can be used to back up 
the mission's life-support 
system and to make water. 

But Mars has water, lots of 
it, frozen into the soil as hy- 
drates. peimafrost and ice. Tfie 
crew of the first expedition 
will test techniques for ex- 
tracting it Once this is demon- 
strated, future expeditions will 
not have to bring hydrogen to 
Mars, and agriculture can be- 
gin in inflatable greenhouses. 

At the end of a year and a 
half on the surface, the crew 
will board the Earth Return 
Vehicle and return to Earth, 
leaving behind the habitation 
module, greenhouse, power 
systems and ground rovers. 

As one mission follows an- 
other, more habitats and other 
equipment will be added to 
the base, incrementally build- 
ing up the first human set- 
tlement on a'new world: ■ • 


Mars was once a warm 
and wet planet, a place 
friendly to life, and someday 
human settlers will make it 
so again. But long before that 
happens, we can transform 
Mars into a habitable planet 
intellectually. 

We can do this by learning 
the craft of the place — how to 
make fuel and oxygen, grow 
plants, extract water from the 
soil and geothermal power 
from the subsurface. We can 
leant to make bricks, ceram- 
ics, glasses, plastics, metals, 
wires, tubes and habitats. 

We must go to Mars for 
the knowledge it will bring 
of life’s place in the universe, 
for tiie challenge it offers 
of a new frontier that will 
invigorate our society and 
mobilize our technology, and 
for the sake of a branch of 
human civilization that is 
waiting to be bom. 

We can open the way. All it 
takes is current technology, 
some pioneer adaptability 
and a little bit of moxie. 

The writer, an astronom- 
ical engineer, is the author of 
"The Case for Mars." He 
contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


lance journalist — I made my money work- 
ing as a high climber for tree-removal 
companies. 

The trees were leaning over people's 
houses and couldn’t simply be felled; they 
had to be dismantled piece by piece. 

Two or three days a week I would climb 
60- or 70-foot (18- or 21-meter) trees, cut- 

MEANWHILE 

ting sections off with a chain saw and 
lowering them on ropes held by workers 
on the ground. It was dangerous work, but 
for manual labor, it was extremely well 
paid and one of the few things that managed 
to prop up my self-esteem. 

Watching the top 20 feet of a pine tree 
peel off over my head while the chain saw 
screamed in my hands was a thrill that 
almost made up for my failure as a writer. 

For a few moments, at least, 1 would feel 
like the most powerful man on earth. 

Society has a great use for young men 
who feel invincible. It throws them at proj- 
ects that are so brutal or dangerous that 
no one in his right mind would go near 
them, much less relish them. In exchange 
for that feeling of strength, young men 
go to war. go to sea, build skyscrapers, 
parachute into forest fires. 

One day I was up in an utterly forgettable 
elm tree when a hurried move with the 
chain saw opened up the back of my leg. I 
could see the Achilles tendon, white and 
rubbery, imbedded in a substance that was 
the inside of ray leg. 

It didn’t particularly hurt and it didn't 
bleed very much. But it took a month to 
heal. Facing my 30th birthday and the 
revelation that I could actually get hurt or 
killed doing certain things. I started to 
reassess my life. 

I decided to make it as a writer or to get 
out of the freelance trap entirely. No more 
of this in-between stuff, facilitated by the 
easy money I was making in the treetops. 

So instead of doing the dangerous 
jobs myself, 1 researched smoke jumpers, 
loggers, war correspondents and commer- 
cial fishermen. The people who did 
these jobs seemed to divide neatly into 
two categories. 

The first, in which I included myself, 
were mainly college-educated men and 
women who wanted to experience the 
world as broadly as possible. For them, 
fishing in Alaska or fighting forest fires in 
Montana was an interesting adventure. 

Eventually, they moved on to the kinds 
of careers that — if I may say this. — their 
parents probably envisioned for them. 

As the poet Michael Klein observed, “risk 


is extra life.” and that wonderfully simple 
formula describes these people perfectly. 

Their decision to do dangerous work was 
evidence, in a way, of die vast array of 
choices they had after college. 

The other category of people — almost 
exclusively men — were in dangerous 
work for the opposite reason: They had 
almost no choices at alL The Oregon log- 
gers I spoke with, and the fishermen in 
Gloucester, Massachusetts, often hadn’t 
even finished high school, much less col- 
lege, and were hanging on for dear life to 
the only industry they knew. 

Few relished the beauty of the sea 
or forest Most saw precious tittle romance 
in their work and wanted to get out of 
the business before they were killed 
or maimed. 

America has become fascinated with 
dangerous sports — mountain climbing, 
big-wave surfing, extreme skiing — and the 
people who do these things receive an in- 
credible amount of attention, even glory. 

And some of them should. 

What is missing, however, is an ap- 
preciation for workers doing things that are 
just as dangerous — and that actually con- 
tribute to society. 

Let’s face it, we don’t, in any kind of 
basic way, need another solo ocean cross- 
ing or another free-diving record. But we 
do need people who are willing to work on 
oil rigs, build skyscrapers and run farm 
machinery — jobs that kill people with 
relentless regularity. 

In Gloucesteralone, for example, 10,000 
men have been lost ar sea since the town 
was founded. Has any other American town 
taken those kinds of Josses? 

Not only are these jobs dangerous, but 
also many of them are dying out. Two of the 
country’s most hazardous occupations — 
logging and fishing — are so fraught with 
problems that many families can’t even 
support themselves anymore. 

One fisherman 1 know — whose an- 
cestors settled in Gloucester in the 1600s — 
refused to let his children set foot on any 
fishing boat because he was afraid they 
would fall in love with it. He wasn’t wor- 
ried that they might die at sea; he was 
worried that they might never get the 
chance to die at sea. 

Formany people, risk doesn't mean extra 
life — it means hardship, unemployment 
and even the possibility of early death. 

And the rest of us. parachuting from 
airplanes, climbing up rock faces, skiing 
down mountain walls, would do well to 
keep our accomplishments in perspective. 

The writer is the author of " The Perfect 
Storm." He contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


S .... v 55i 

. .j :■ ■ *•**! 


drive manufacturing facility 
from Singapore to China.” 

But Seagate has told the 
Economic Development 
Board that it has no such 
intention. In fact, Seagate 
recently opened a disk-drive 
plant in Singapore which is 
the company’s largest and 
most productive, and has the 
capacity to manufacture 
50,000 drives per day. 

PHILIP YEO. 

Singapore. 

The writer b chairman of 
the Singapore Economic De- 
partment Board. 

"White House’s First 

Regarding "Take the Pres- 
ident-Bashing Off America's 
Front Page " (Opinion, July 
9) by George McGovern: 

Mr. McGovern quotes 
President George Washing- 
ton as saying, “I had rather be 
in my grave than endure an- 
other four years in the White 
House.” Impossible! 

Washington never spent 
a day in the White House, 
which was first occupied 
briefly by John Adams in 
1800. Dining Washington’s 
presidency, the capital was 
briefly in New York and 
mostly in Philadelphia. 

BERNARD SINSHEIMER. 

Boulogne, France. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 


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INTERNATIONAL 


Latest ETA Killing Fits a Pattern 


* 


‘<ty US 


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But the Group’s Terror Tactics Alienate Majority of Basques 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 


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Pedestrians and drivers in Madrid stopping in their tracks at noon Monday to participate in a 10-minute 
silent protest of the killing of Miguel Angel Blanco by ETA terrorists. Similar protests were held across Spain. 


FRANCE: Going Its Own Way, Despite Global Economic Trends 


Continued from Page 1 


In their view of the world, Americans 
and French share a trait that may make 
them unable to see each other clearly. 
Richard Kuisel, an American scholar of 
France, called them “two huge narciss- 
isms — the only two cultures in the 
world that believe they have a civilizing 
mission, believe their model is applic- 
able universally." 

The pervasive reality of French so- 
ciety is a central government that takes 
care of all the details of life," in the 
words of Michel Rocard, a fanner So- 
cialist prime minister. It was evident, for 
example, on Monday. Bastille Day, 
when every patriotic parade and village 
dance was underwritten by the state. 

“The state sector is at the heart of 


even the far-right leader Jean-Marie Le 
Fen, are social democrats to one degree 
or another. 


The popular attachment to that model 
is richly reflected in the state's role as 


France’s No. 1 employer. 

One working person in every five is a 
government functionary — a share lar- 
ger even than in Washington. Bureau- 
crats are not objects of derision, either. 


Americans and French, 
one scholar says, are 4 the 
only two cultures in the 
world that believe they 
have a drilizmg mission.’ 


French point to the American dark side 
— the ‘ ‘social cosL" Jean Daniel, editor 
of Le Nouvel Observateur magazine, 
described it as “the poverty of 20 mil- 
lion whites and 10 million blacks, the 
largest prison population in the world, 
the weakest social protection, the im- 
plosion of the educational system, crime 
and drugs in the urban ghettos." 

French pride in the society they have 
built is a matter of culture and history. 

France was created from warring, 
shifting kingdoms by a willful power at 
the center. “The little king of Paris.” as 
Mr. Rocard. the former prime minister, 
said in an interview, conquered and 
dominated much more powerful duchies 
across what is now France. Paris even 
imposed its language on hundreds of 


Since it began a bloody battle for 
“setf-detennination" on behalf of 2.5 
million Basque people in 1968, die ETA 
terrorist or ganizatio n has taken almost 
800 lives in shootings and bomb attacks 
throughout Spain. 

In 1993, captured documents show, 
the organization, Euskadi ta Azkatasuna, 
or Basque Homeland and Liberty, turned 
its terror tactics against moderate region- 
al politicians and officials and members 
of the autonomous Basque police force. 

The latest victim, Miguel Angel 
Blanco, a town councilor for the gov- 
erning Popular Party, was fust such a 
target. Manacled and shot in the head 
after the government refused ETA de- 
mands to send Basque terrorist prisoners 
to their home region. Mr. Blanco was the 
third person to have been kidnapped and 
murdered in this way. 

In 1981, ETA kidnapped foe chief 
engineer of the Lemoniz nuclear power 
station, Jose Maria Ryan, and demanded 
that the unfinished p lant be demolished. 
The government Teriised to give in to the 
demand, and shortly afterward Mr. Ryan 
was found killed with a bullet in 
the neck. The nuclear plant has never 
been put into operation. 

In 1983, ETA terrorists seized an army 
captain, Alberto Martin Barrios, and de- 
manded the release of two of their im- 
prisoned colleagues, a demand they later 
reduced to die broadcast of a commu- 
nique by state television. After two 
weeks of tension in which die govern- 
ment refused io give way. Captain Martin 
was fonnd tied up and mortally wounded, 
with a bullet through die head. 


As with the cold-blooded killing of 
Mr. Blanco, those earlier assassinations 
touched off waves of revulsion not only 
across Spain but in the Basque country 
itself. The Ryan killing marked a turning 
point in the region’s history because, for 
the first time, people broke with fear and 
silence and poured onto the streets to 
protest ETA violence. 

As the huge Basque demonstration 
S unday agains t the terrorist organization 
again showed. ETA evokes disgust from 
die majority of the people for whom it 
claims to be waging war. 

ETA is represented politically by die 
Herri Batasuna party. But security of- 
ficials believe drat the hard core of the 
or ganizatio n consists of a few isolated 
cells with bases and logistics support 
across the frontier in France. 

The newspaper El Pais quoted Madrid 
police sources as saying dial die group 

that kidnapped and assassinated Mr. 
Blanco probably was made up of two or 
three killers operating independently of 
known ETA sympathizers in the region. 

ETA was formed in 1959 by zealots 
discontented with the veteran Basque 
Nationalist Patty's, rejection of armed 
struggle to topple die dictatorship of 
Francisco Franco arid set the Basque 
homeland free. The organization for- 
mally divided in 1966 into two wings — 
the nationalists pursuing the goal of 
Basque autonomy and a group favoring a 
Marxist- Leninist brand of revolt. 

In 1968, ETA began its campaign of 
assassination and sabotage, and 
Franco’s police responded with brutal 
efficiency, rounding up the principal 
leaders and subsequently executing five 
condemned terrorists. 

With the death of Franco in 1975 and 


the return of democracy. ETA splitinro 
internal factions that variously ; sought to 
continue the campaign through political 
and military means. 

The previous Socialist government 
wanted broad autonomy to the Basque 
region and ofibed to pardon ETA wh* 

bra who renounced violence. YetETA s 

military command only stepped up its 
campaign of tenor and violence^- tar- 
geting primarily judges, military officers 
aj yl government officials. The 'govern- 
ment responded with an illegal, under- 
ground “dirty war” against ETA rear 
bases in France, touching off a* inves- 
tigation that ultimately helped bring 
down the government of Spain’s veteran 
prime minister, Felipe Go nzale z. 

Prime Minister Jose Maria A zaar took 
office more than a year ago, determined 
to crack down hard on the terrorist or- 
ganization. At the same time, cooper- 
ation has been stepped up in recent years 
with French anti-terrorist forces. Bur the 
murder of Mr. Blanco was yet another 
confirmation that the application of 
force has not succeeded in eli minatin g 
ETA's military command- 

Spanish security officials say that 
ETA has increasingly become a criminal 
mafia that collects large sums of money 
through extortion, robbery, kidnappings 
and die levying of “revolutionary 
taxes" ou regional businessmen.. 

Meanwhile, the Basques have ob- 
tained a degree of autonomy they could 
only have dreamed about in die Franco 
years. As a result, and probably also 
because of the widespread revulsion 
against violence, support fra - Hem Bata- 
suna, ETA’s political face, has declined 
steadily over the last 10 years. ETA is 
ruthless and deadly, but isolated. 


SPAIN? Nation Condemns ETA. as It Mourns a Young Politician 


Continued from Page 1 


1,000 things that are going well," said 
Emmanuel Todd, a Paris intellectual and 


Emmanuel Todd, a Paris intellectual and 
author, ticking off the rail system, the 
aerospace program, the energy self-suf- 
ficiency — "public enterprises that are 
working very well." 

The French term for welfare state is 
the “providence state," suggesting its 
divinity. “God exists,” remarked the 
scholar Bernard Cerquiglini with a 
smile, “and the proof is the state." 

Keeping that faith in the state into the 
last detrade of the 20th century has cost 
the French dearly and plagues many of 
them with doubts: an unshakable un- 
employment rate that nudges 13 percent; 
an economy in which public spending 


outstrips private spending; a govern- 
ment deficit that is not expected to meet 


original standards for admission to the 
new European currency nexr year; labor 
regulations, banking traditions and an 
educational system that seriously cramp 
entrepreneurialism and innovation: 
strikes, work stoppages, road blockings 
and street demonstrations that have be- 
come a grim way of daily life. 

The result, everyone seems to agree, is 
a country in a blue funk — "morose," 
the French say. 

From the outside, the cure for what 
ails France seems simple, and it has been 
tested successfully on big social democ- 
racies in countries all around France: 
loosen the reins of government, cutting 
its cost and scope considerably , and re- 
move the state from much of what it 
runs, owns or meddles with. 

But that is not the response, not yet. 
When the French erupt in frustration at 
the way they are governed, as they do 
frequently, their ire normally is directed 
not against the vast central apparatus, 
but against its personalities and parties. 

Theirs is not a passive civic life — as 
burned prefectures, reflexive tax evasion 
and huge turnouts at strikes attest. As 
they demonstrated June I , the French are 
willing to fire a Gauilist majority gov- 
ernment only four years after they elect- 
ed it and two years after they installed a 


In a recent poll, nine out of 10 people 
surveyed said they would be proud to see 
their children become public servants: 
eight of 10 thought a public servant has 
better pay and porks man someone in the 
private sector. 

That’s why “touching the public ser- 
vice is considered a sacrilege, threat- 
ening to undermine the foundations of 
the stale." says Jacques Chevaltier. au- 
thor of the book “L’Etat de la France." 

It also explains why “the public ser- 
vice has become more than ever the 
refuge of choice for the French, because 
they’re afraid of losing their jobs, afraid 
of Europe, afraid of the multinationals, 
afraid of entrepreneurs — these savages 
who want to hire and fire strictly on the 
basis of what their businesses need," in 
the ironic description of Stepbane 
Marchand, who for 10 years was the 
Washington correspondent of the news- 
paper Le Figaro. 

To claims that U.S.-style capitalism 
and a laissez-faire state are superior, the 


thousands of people. 
There followed th< 


There followed the slow expansion of 
the state into the fabric of society, a 
political belief system that was built by 
the monarchy and became the soul of the 
democracy that eclipsed it. 

The cradle-io-grave social benefits 
that are die French birthright are fiercely 
protected, and the fairness of their dis- 
bursement is closely monitored. Mr. 
Marchand, in his book “French Blues,” 
says “France is a country of privileges" 
— and a self-regulating one at that. 

The French are so wedded to the the- 


of Bilbao said during the funeral Mass. 
“The responsibility lies purely with the 
authors, its instigators and those who 
support them.” 

Throughout the ceremony, Mr. 
Blanco's girlfriend, Maria del Mar Diaz. 
23, clutched two drumsticks that be- 
longed to the dead man as she tried to 
hold back tears. She placed them atop 
die dark wooden casket. 

Mr. Blanco’s mother, father, sister 
and other relatives led the funeral pro- 
cession. The heir to the Spanish throne, 
Prince Felipe, walked behind, alongside 
Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar and 
three former prime ministers. 

Crowds, held back by red-jacketed 


Basque police, chanted “Miguel, 
Miguel, Miguel" and “Murderers! 
Murderers!” as his casket was carried 
through narrow streets en route to its 
entombment at the town cemetery. 

ETA has assassinated almost S00 
people in its 29-year struggle for an 
independent Basque homeland. 

Rebels abducted Mr. Blanco on 
Thursday and threatened to execute him 
unless 500 ETA inmates were moved to 


prisons in the Basque region by 4 P.M. 
Saturday. 


Saturday. 

The government said it would not give 
in to blackmail, and guerrillas shot him 
just after the deadline passed. 

Mr. Blanco was found Saturday on a 
roadside outside the Basque city of San 
Sebastian, his hands tied behind his back 


and two bullets in his brain. He died 12 
hours later. 

Reflecting the depth of public emo- 
tion, King Juan Carlos made a rare tele- 
vised address to the nation. The king 
makes a regular speech at Christmas but 
otherwise generally refrains from ad- 
dressing the populace directly. The king 
also made a speech in 198 1 after military 
officers stormed Parliament and held le- 
gislators hostage in an attempted coup. 

Mr. Aznar vowed to intensify the fight 
against ETA. “We will put a stop to 
terrorism." he said.' 

But he warned his countrymen to 
brace for “painful days” ahead. “Those 
who only know how to kill, those who 
only know how to kidnap, will continue 
doing it," he said. (Reuters, AP) 


ory of their state system, and the way it 
has worked so well for the people, that it 


has worked so well for the people, that it 
is hard for them to question its current 
practice. 

They are deeply conservative at heart, 
Mr. Chirac said in a television interview 
last December Change is a menace to 
them. That’s why, when he vowed to 
reform this country, he promised in the 
same breath that he would never touch 
social entitlements — “the only sig- 
nificant reform,” Mr. Marchand ob- 
served, “that can change France.” 


CAMBODIA: Coup Leader Warns ASEAN Against ‘Interference’ 


Continued from Page 1 


by negotiations and the ballot, not the 
bullet,” an official said. 

But Vietnam, an ASEAN member, 
indicated publicly Monday that it was 


unhappy with the group’s decision to 
isolate ’Cambodia. ASEAN decided 



CHIRAC: Presidential Warning to Jospin 


Continued from Page 1 


Gauilist president to preside over it. 
French Socialists are buck in powe 


French Socialists are buck in power in 
(he Parliament But compared with the 
vanquished majority usually described 
as “center-right,” the new one’s ap- 
proach to governance is only a more 
candid attachment to the omnipresent 
state and the way France has worked for 
centuries. All major French politicians. 


The government has yet to pronounce 
its position on the proposed pn vatization 
of the plane, maker Aerospatiale and its 
merger with the privately owned 
Dassault, a manufacturer of high per- 
formance fighters and business jets. Any 
failure to go ahead with this plan could 
obstruct the project to turn the Airbus 
Industrie consortium, in which Aerospa- 
tiale is one of the lead partners, into a 
privately owned corporation by the end 
of the century. 

Mr. Jospin also has aot said whether 
he intends to sell off France Telecom, 
the proceeds of which could be critical in 
ensuring that France meets the 3 percent 
deficit target to join the European single 
currency next year. 

Mr. Chirac said there would be * ‘very 
serious consequences” if the European 
currency target was not met and France 
was not ready to join. ‘ ‘We would isolate 
ourselves," he said. 


He insisted that the monetary union 
target could be met provided the gov- 
ernment controls public spending for the 
rest of the year. It would be easier to meet 
the criteria, he pointedly said, “if we cany 


out privatizations that are necessary for 
the economy and useful for the budget.” 
The president said that for Europe and 
France to develop their economic ca- 
pacity, "it is necessary to have a mon- 
etary power as, strong as the dollar.” 
T7ie government insists that it can 
cany out its aim of creating jobs, while 
staying on course for monetary union, by 
redirecting money already allocated by 
the previous government. 

Air. Chirac was asked whether he 
thought that the Socialist-led majority in 
the legislature would last its full term of 
five years. “I think so,” he replied, say- 
ing that he wanted to establish a “con- 
structive cohabitation” with Mr. Jospin. 

He said there would be no problems if 
the government worked with him in 
modernizing France, upholding its place 
in the world and protecting its insti- 
tutions. But he suggested that such gov- 
ernment actions as the plan to reintro- 
duce restrictions on layoffs ran against 
such modernization. 

If France wants to have a prosperous 
economy and create jobs, ne said , it 
should not “imprison the activities of 
those who create, invest and work in 
totally obsolete and absurd regulations. " 


isolate ’Cambodia. ASEAN decided 
Thursday by consensus to delay Phnom 
Penh's membership. 

Meanwhile, King Norodom Sihanouk 
of Cambodia said he doubted that 
ASEAN envoys would succeed in ne- 
gotiating an end to the crisis caused by 
Mr. Hun Sen’s ouster of Fust Prime 
Minister Norodom Ranariddh. He said 
Mr. Hun Sen had rejected mediation. 

In Japan, a leading specialist on Cam- 
bodia was quoted Monday as saying that 
Prince Ranariddh bad provoked the 
fighting. But in a report in Nikkei 
Weekly, a Japanese magazine, the spe- 
cialist, Yukio Imagawa. also said that the 
use of force should be condemned be- 
cause it effectively had changed the out- 
come of the 1993 Cambodian elections. 

“Ranariddh provoked Hun Sen in a 
serious way by sneaking about 140 
Khmer Rouge fighters into Phnom 
Penh,” said Mr. Imagawa, a former Jap- 
anese ambassador to Cambodia who was 
one of two envoys sent to Phnom Penh 
last month by the seven leading indus- 
trial nations and Russia to convey their 
concerns about increasing tensions 
there. 

“Hun Sen reacted in an understand- 


; ■*- < "* ***>$ & 




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Rttlud VogeJ/Thc AnocmnJ Prc*» 

The army of Cambodia’s coup leader marching Monday in Siem Reap. 


able way, even if not in a legitimate way, 
to Ranariddh's insensitive attempts to 
recruit hard-line elements of the Khmer 
Rouge,” Mr. Imagawa said, according 
to the article. 

The Khmer Rouge, under the lead- 
ership of Pol Pot, was blamed for the 
deaths of more than one million Cam- 
bodians during its tyrannical rule from 
1975 to 1979. 

Japan, which provides about 45 per- 
cent of the foreign aid to Cambodia, has 
appeared unwilling so far to join the 
United States and Germany in even a 
temporary suspension of assistance. Its 


position may influence other major 
donors, including Australia and France, 
which are reviewing their programs fol- 
lowing Mr. Hun Sen ’s takeover, analysts 
said. 

Mr. Hun Sen warned foreign' donors 
noi to pressure him with aid cuts. “ You 
should not want to threaten Hun Sen, 
you can threaten anyone else, that’s all 
right, but not Hun Sen," he was quoted 
by Reuters. 

In Vietnam, the Foreign Ministry said 
Cambodia should have been allowed to 
join ASEAN, as scheduled, next week 
along with Burma and Laos. 


TEXAS: Court Battle Over last Tract Turns on Historical Issues 


Continued from Page 1 


FISH: Big Ones That Couldn’t Get Away 


Continued from Page 1 


were usually as aged and infirm as the 
man who was stalking them — and if 
that was not enough, they were often 
drugged or simply tied to stakes in the 
ground. 

Early this year, Russians were 
shocked to learn how their current prime 
minister. Viktor Chernomyrdin, spent 
his winter vacation. 

Eager for bear. Mr. Chernomyrdin 
traveled to the woods near Yaroslavl by 
helicopter. 

He was able to land because bull- 
dozers had just cleared a mile of virgin 
forest to make a road. Teams of body- 
guards, police officers, federal security 
agents and professional hunters pre- 
pared the way. 

Attack dogs then flushed a mother 
bear and her two cubs from the silence of 
their winter den. After that,. Mr. 
Chernomyrdin managed to kill one of 
the cubs. 

The sense that Russia's leaders play 
by different rules does seem to rankle. 
Last year, for instance, when Mr. Yeltsin 
was so sick that he was unable even to 
vote in public, he was said to have killed 
many wild boars and ducks on a bunting 
expedition. 

The 66-year-old president, who has 


shown new vigor since recovering from 
open heart surgery last year, said he 
wanted a long, quiet family vacation this 
summer. 

The first news that many local res 
idents had of his arrival, said Mr. 
Tsigankov, was when they were banned 
by the local leaders from fishing in their 
own lake. 

Local reporters have complained that 
they are not allowed access to the pres- 
ident and that the only subject they are 
permitted to address in their stories is 
fish. . 

So far, Mr. Yeltsin has caught many. 
Mr. Tsigankov’s paper. Severny Kurier, 
published a photograph that apparently 
shows the president's fishing boat on the 
lake. 

But the photograph was taken from so 
far away that it looks like nothing but a 
gray blur. 

It is accompanied by a first-person 
account of how the paper's photograph- 
er got the photo. 

1 ‘Since no other boats are allowed out, 
our photographer could pick out foe one 
boat on the lake that must have been the 
president’s," the paper wrote. 


SENTENCE: 

Serb Gets 20 Years 


Continued from Page 1 


“We had time to snap off one photo 
before a lieutenant put his hand on our 


shoulders and smiled. He offered us 
mineral water and sent us on our way.” 


he livedin Prijedor." Mr. Neskovic said, 
apparently alluding to crimes and prison 
camps in the area. 

“That man is not guilty and not a 
single witness could confirm that he was 
responsible." 

The tribunal deputy prosecutor, Gra- 
ham Blewitt. bailed a “substantial sen- 
tence" and said it marked “a significant 
step in the work of the tribunal." 

Mr. Blewitt added that survivors of 
Mr. Tadic’s reign of tenor would also 
welcome the sentence. 

Judges cleared Mr. Tadic of 20 
charges, including nine murders, for 
lack of evidence. 

He received the 20-year sentence for a 
blanket charge of persecution of the non- 
Serbian population of Prijedor in north- 
west Bosnia in 1992. 

The charge derailed bis involvement 
in a notorious ethnic purge, including 
killing two Muslim policemen by slit- 
ting their throats, herding thousands of 
civilians into three prison camps and 
beating and torturing prisoners. 

He will likely serve his sentence in 
Italy or Finland, the rally countries will- 
ing to accepi them lAP. Reuters. NYT) 


which American . Jstory is revised from 
generation lo generation. 

‘ ‘The kind of argument that the Ballis 
are making is going to get a much better 
hearing than it would nave had 20 or 25 
years ago," said Don Carleton. director 
of the Center for American History at the 
University of Texas in Austin, and a 
specialist in Texas history. “Hispanic- 
Americans in this country have a lot 
more political power, and this is what 
happens when you get political power in 
a democratic society.' 

In setting foe stage for a lawsuit, the 
more than 800 Balli descendants asked 
to be legally acknowledged as his heirs. 
Last month, the case took an important 
step forward when Judge Manuel Flores 
of the 49th State District Court in Zapata 
County, along the Mexican border, de- 
clared 586 of them in that role. They 
joined about 250 other petitioners who 
had already been declared Balli heirs. 

In an unusual response, the Kenedy 
Foundation, a charitable trust whose as- 
sets derived from Mifflin Kenedy’s for- 
tune, filed a court petition in Santa, the 
county seat of Kenedy County, that seeks 
lo have the approximately 370,000 acres 
(148,000 hectares) at issue legally de- 
clared to be owned by (he foundation. 

The petition, which listed many of the 
Ballis by name in an effort to have their 
claim ruled invalid, said that the Kenedys 
had been “in possession of all or said 
lands for over 100 years." and noted that 
the land had •..-n* ‘fenced and unclosed" 


for all that time. It also contends that even 
if the land had at one time been taken from 
the Ballis. it had long since come into the 
Kenedys’ possession under a legal prin- 
ciple known as “adverse possession," a 


rough equivalent of squatter's rights.’ 
The Ballis contend that thev ne 


The Ballis contend that they never 
abandoned the land and note that various 
efforts have been made by clan descen- 
dants over the years to get land back, 
including an effort in the 1950s to reclaim 
much of Padre Island, on the Gulf Coast. 
The bid was thrown out by a state court. 

‘ ’Those lands belong to us," said Jose 
Perez, a retired air traffic controller in the 
Fort Worth area who is president of Los 
Ballis Restoration LLC, a partnership of 
Balli descendants formed to advance foe 
clan’s claims on the land. “They were 
taken, stolen, whatever, from our fore- 
fathers. and it’s time we go into court 
once and for all and get this resolved." 

Tire land owned by Jose Balli, a Span- 
ish military officer and rancher, and oth- 
er Hispanic families was swallowed up 
over the years, primarily by Anglo ranch- 
ers, after Texas defeated Mexico and 
became an independent nation in J 836 . 

In 1842, Texas military commanders 
“advised all Mexican nationals to evac- 
uate south of the Rio Grande," writes 
T.R. Fehrenbach in his book, “Lone 
Star: A History of Texas and the Tex- 
ans" (American Legacy Press. 1983). 
“Many did. abjuring Texas citizenship 
and abandoning their land, from Juan 
Segutn of San Antonio to the Balli heirs 
on Padre Islam " But many did not. and 
even many of foo. who had Fled in fear 


came back, contending that they had 
never renounced their claims. 

By 1 848. with the United States having 
annexed Texas and defeated Mexico in 
yet another war, foe Treaty of Guadalupe 
Hidalgo “confirmed all Mexican land 
tides in principle but could not guarantee 
them in practice," Mr. Fehrenbach notes. 

A horde of American businessmen, 
squatters and ex-soldiers arrived," he ad- 
ded, many with various types of claims to 
the land. In subsequent years, many of the 
large ranching families, including the 
Kenedy and King families, consolidated 
their holdings. 

Several legal experts said that if the 
claimants could demonstrate continuing 
efforts to get back the land, they might 
have a case — or a shot at a settlement 
with foe Kenedy Foundation. Eileen Mc- 
Kenzie Fowler, a Houston lawyer who is 
representing the 586 Balli family mem- 
bers recently certified as heirs, said foal 
one family member had unearthed a stun- 
ning set of papers while cleaning out the 
attic: a lease that had been signed in 1949 
by Santa Kenedy East, Mifflin Kenedy’s 
granddaughter and then the leading mem- 
ber of the Kenedy family, and by Gustavo 
Munoz, Jose Balli ’s great-great grand- 
son. In it, Mrs. East purportedly agreed to 
a cash payment and cattle in return for the 
grazing rights to Balli land. 

Specifically at issue is a tract known 
as La Baireta when it was granted to Mr. 
Balli by the Spanish king. The overall 
grant to Mr. Balli and some of his rela- 
tives involved about 2 million acres in 
me presen. day counties. 







Pattern 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
TUESDAY, JULY IS, 1997 
PAGE 11 



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Feast of Couture 


The Craft Is in the Details 



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more than a year aeo 7?®"* 

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r of Mr. Blanco w*, ? ' Bui >* 
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as mcreasmglv become j'rS * 

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on regional businessmen ® -> 
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McQueen; Balmains fur-trimmed wedding gown by Oscar de la Renta: Scherrer's silver-embroidered dress by 
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Thierry Mugler's snake-patterned Latex dress, left, and Galliano's saucy hose for Dior. 


MumeAThirmi' 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — Think of it as an ex- 
quisite dish, created from or- 
dinary ingredients by a master 
chef. Like a humble egg whisk- 
ed into a souffld or magical decorations 
spun from icing sugar, the real art of 
couture is in the craft. 

Designers increasingly bring their 
studio technicians out on the runway to 
share the bravos. Maybe someday they 
should think of linin g up all the back- 
room suppliers who make couture 
unique to Paris: the feather workers who 
can turn a simple rooster feather into a 
bleached and stenciled plume: the em- 
broiderers with their dense floral pat- 
terns or icicles of silver beads; the 
weavers, dyers, hatters, hosiers and 
shoemakers whose techniques have not 
changed since their forebears were sup- 
pliers to the court of the Sun King. 

The fall-winter season was about 
grand spectacle, from Dior's fantasy 
rose garden through the sculpted de- 
signs in a modernist concert had from 
Thierry Mugler, who closed the shows. 
But it was also about the art of cutting 
and the craftsmanship in the details. 

The most dramatic statement came 
in the revival of interest in fur and 
feathers by a new generation that had 
previously shunned them. Jean Paul 
Gaultier’s his-and-hers mateiot sweat- 


over a jersey jumpsuit, followed by lush 
fur trimmings and hats. With that same 
throw-away luxury, Oscar de la Renta at 
Balmain used fur trim even on the floral 
wedding gown. At Valentino, there was 
a rash of fur, as leopard prints appeared 
on vast fox colors. John Galliano’s furs 
included a chinchilla kimono coat worn 
over an hourglass Bede Epoque silhou- 
ette. 

Galliano also brought his romantic 
refinement to hose and gloves, making 
them in delicate lace, which was a 
favored fabric for other couturiers with 
a womanly touch, like Ungaro and 
Valentino, both of whom made dresses 
in spider's webs of pattern. Christian 
Lacroix used patchworks of different 
laces in one cocktail dress — an ex- 
ample of the way the designer uses 


artisanal suppliers to create exceptional 



example of a fresh and witty take on 
fur. 

Gaultier, in only his second haute 
couture collection, seemed intent on 
giving a modem spin to traditional 
skills, by using the coiffeur Alexandre 
to create the complex braided hair and 
putting Van Cleef & Aipels diamonds 
around the leg like a royal order of the 
garter. 

The petite mains, or "little hands,” 
were given an aerobic workout at 
Givenchy, where Alexander McQueen 
seemed to be stretching their skills to the 
limit with complicated cuts, appliqugs 
and decoration. His use of feathers in the 
bird-inspired collection was extraordi- 
nary, from the upstanding crown of 
plumes through the dying-swan feather 
bodice. McQueen also focused on fur, 
giving a new look to the famous fox-fur 
square coat sent out 25 years ago by 
Yves Saint Laurent. 

Saint Laurent opened his collection 
with a floor-length sable coat shrugged 


couture effects. They included the fab- 
ric roses, with petals the texture of peach 
skin, that decorated the diaphanous hats 
or the upswept chignon wigs. 

How to give embroidery an update? 
The sheen of silver or the cranslucence 
of glass beads give a new visual light- 
ness to an old-established craft. 
Chanel’s frosty, abstract patterns 
echoed Karl Lagerfeld's icy nordic 
theme. 

At Jean-Loui s Schemer, the geomet- 
ric silver embroideries had a hint of Art 
Deco in a collection executed entirely 
in shades of gray. The monochrome 
color and the link with an early mod- 
ernist era was a way for designer Bern- 
ard Perris to give cohesion to a col- 
lection that went from "demi -couture” 
selling from 15,000 francs ($2,500) an 
outfit to the high- fashion embroidered 
gowns. Scherrer’s new owner, Fran- 
cois Barthes, said that be had "lots of 
ambitions” for the development of the 
house. 


achievements: the spiral zipper that al- 
lowed a trench coat to peel off the body; 
the latex dress, molded to the torso and 
printed with a boa-constrictor pattern. 

Hie show opened with Mugler's 
scalpel-sharp tailoring, which the de- 
signer creates effortlessly in soft fabrics 
like crepe or the firmer glazed leather. 
Into his aesthetic. Mugler absorbed the 
current vogue for chinoiserie, using pa- 
goda shapes, and all die current trends, 
including feathers, (fake) fur sprinkled 
with silver glitter, and extravagant cou- 
ture details like gloves in zebra stripes 
with horse-hair fringes. 

The laser beams raking the room un- 
derlined Mugler’s commitment to mod- 
ernity and his skill at spectacle. The 
show was made in heaven for MTV. 

Client couture is booming, with sales 
up 100 percent at Saint Laurent, and 
Lacroix sales tripling in three years. But 
more significant is the fact that the cou- 
ture shows now go out live on French 
cable television and YSL was put out 
directly on the Net. Craftsmanship may 
be the glory of haute couture, but today, 
the medium is the message. 


D ominique sirop is anoth- 
er designer offering access- 
ible couture. This disciple of 
Hubert de Givencby showed 
light-banded embroideries, in thin fil- 
aments of silver or square crystal beads, 
that looked modem. By playing with 
asymmetry for both cutting and dec- 
oration. Sirop broke up his slender sil- 


houette in an intriguing way. 


Mugler’s show was such a dramatic 
and stylized presentation that it some- 
iked like a 


times looked like a caricature of the 
designer's signature vampish style. 
There were some amazing technical 



Natasha Fraser and Cavassoni. 


For Hanae Mori, 
A 20th Birthday 


International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — With a dignified bow 
of her head, Hanae Mori ac- 
cepted die applause that ac- 
knowledged her 20 years in 
French haute couture. Since the Jap- 
anese designer first started to show her 
collections in Paris in 1977, she has built 
up an international clientele that spreads 
from the Japanese royal court through 
New York to Paris, where her wedding 
dresses are especially in demand. 

The fall collection, with its feath- 
eriight dresses in floating fabrics, some 
printed with Oriental patterns of pe- 
onies, peacocks and butterflies, was an 
homage to the current year of Japan and 
to Mori’s desire to bridge the cultures of 
East and West. 

That meant slim-line tailored suits 
with an asymmetric drape to the jacket 
or skirt, and a rigorous, body-conscious 
cut to cocktail dresses that were en- 
riched by Chinese lacquer and cloisonne 
colors. Her mastery of French couture 
skills included suits with interlaced-rib- 
bon embroidery, feathers and lace. 

“Twenty years is a long time — but I 
have so enjoyed showing in Paris,” said 
Mori after the show, which she will take 
to Beijing in September. 



A New Beginning 
At Season’s End 


International Herald Tnbunc 

P ARIS — With enough flower- 
decked hats for a remake of 
“Four Weddings and a Funer- 
al,” a fashionable marriage 
closed the Paris social season. Natasha 
Fraser, surrounded by her English fam- 
ily, from her grandparents, the Earl and 


Countess of Longfrud, through her moth- 
er, the historical biographer Lady Ant- 
onia Fraser, and her stepfather, Hamlri 


Suzy Menkes 


Mms/Thm 

Hanae Mori's peacock dress. 


Pinter, who gave her away, married her 
French beau, Jean-Pierre Cavassoni 

The wedding dress, with its sinuous 
lace sheath and soft tulle (rain, was 
made by Gilles Dufoor, director of the 
Chanel smdio. Guests who cheered the 
couple as they left the church in a 
bubbl e-gum-pink Cadillac and then at- 
tended the garden-party reception, in- 
cluded Joan Collins and Nan Kempner, 
both in cartwheel hats; a top-hatted Ines 
de la Fressange, with daughter Nine; the 
fashion jeweler Kenneth Jay Lane; an 
arange-turbaned Sao Schlumberger and 
a host of children. 

The same crowd, without their hats 
(and in the case of the bride, minus long- 
sleeved bolero jacket and train), then 
discoed die night away at Ledoyen, the 
Champs-Elysees venue favored by the 
young French upper crust. 


Suzy Menkes 


* • T =.' ■ 


L. ’ 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 


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All of the past month’s technology arti- 
cles from the IHT, now available on our 
site on the World Wide Web. 



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Magazines 
Extol Joys 
Of the Life 
'Of Gamblers 


Apparently Not the Luck of the Draw 


Magazines about gambling — and more to the point, winning — are 
carving out a niche for themselves. 


Chance; The Best of Gaming 

Summer 


Glossy magazine for high 
rollers with features, gossip 
about famous people who 
gamble and advice on how to 
win. 




By Constance L. Hays 

New York Tunes Service 


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v.'Sr- 


N EW YORK — With more and more 
Americans flocking to the crap tables 
and the slot machines, whether on In- 
dian land, Mississippi river boats or the 
Atlantic City, New Jersey, boardwalk, it 
was just a matter of time before a 
magazine like Chance came along. 

Lush, slick, it both reflects and ex- 
aggerates the widening influence of 
gambling. People in the photographs 
look well off and content, like winners. 
It is not just about gambling, but 
something trumpeted as the gambling 
lifestyle, which, as far as the ads are 
t concerned, translates into finely tailored 
clothing. Grand Marnier and of course, 
lots of cigars. 

"When something becomes more ac- 
cessible. there's more interest," said 
Matthew Tolan, the publisher. “It kind 
of whets the consumer appetite for it.” 

Along with Chance has come the 
magazine Milton, described by its edi tor 
in chief and publisher, Susan MoU, as 
“going back to the good old-fashioned 
vices,” in the manner of the comedian 
Milton Berle, the magazine’s namesake 
and president, who is Ms. Moll’s step- 
father. Milton, published by Berle-Moll 
Enterprises, is subtitled “The Luxury 
Gaming Magazine.” 

“We celebrate the good life and ail 
the things you can do in public, which 
are drinking, smoking and gambling,” 
'Ms. Moll said. An article in the first 
issue, titled “How to Play Blackjack 
Without Looking Like a Dork," goes 
into strategy and terminology in detaiL 
Elsewhere there are glossy fashion 
spreads and a discussion of under- 
ground gambling. 

Both Milton, which has a circulation 
of 67,000, and the 100,000-circulation 
Chance, from ARC Publishing, were 


miM 


Dr. G, the Gambler, explains 
the terms of art and offers 
advice: What is a 9/6 video 
poker machine? It pays nine 
coins for a full house and six 
for a flush. 


Lottery New 
June 25 


Statistically 
dense, a 
listing of 
winners and 
losers with 
tips from 
devoted 
lottery 
players. 


From a column 
called “The Rose 
Knows Numbers:" 
“Simple ain't it? Just 
turn to the 
Rose Knows and 
your money just 
grows" 


& P/V 




The magazine is 
chock-full of charts 
tracking the numbers 
to help players spot 
patterns that they 
think will help them 
win. 


Lotto World 
June 

Features, news, 
letters and 
charts on 
lotteries. 


'SBSSZSgzS. 






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In “Lot-o-Letters," a 
reader complains 
that a Boston Globe 
article resulting in a 
discontinuation of 
lottery coupons in 
Massachusetts 
ruined his fun. The 
coupons were later 
restored. 


***#» •*•«*- 


introduced this spring, catering to a 
hieh-end gambling clientele. At die orh- 


iws»“ 


high-end gambling clientele. At die oth- 
er end of the scale is Lotto World, a 
small-format monthly with a circulation 
of 120,000 containing cheery stories 


i«wmu.oiHas> 


“Astral Predictions" 
offers horoscopes 
just for lottery 
players. 


ffii* 


See GAMBLE, Page 17 


The New Timo 


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j+Sf.. : ‘ 

•S^Tr • 

~.Vai ‘-zy < 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 

Europe’s Map Lines Are Hardly New 


%>■*. «*.. • 
Mica .• m 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


5.- .• > - 


«. : -ai_« - * . . 

■fi -.4111 1 » - • 

' t . 


W ASHINGTON — Nearly 
eight years after the fall of 
the Berlin Wall, the two 
main Western power 
groupings in Europe are beginning a 
cautious advance into what used to be 
enemy territory. 

The North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation has decided to open its doors to 
three former Warsaw Pact members, 
the Czech Republic, Hungary and Po- 
land; the European Union is consid- 
ering starting entry negotiations with 
the same three countries plus Estonia 
and Slovenia. 

Not everyone in the West thinks this 
is such a good idea. Particularly in 
America, it is quite common to hear 
people warning against 4 ‘drawing new 
lines” on the map of Europe. 

Those warnings are ill-conceived. 
What matters is not whether lines in 
Europe are new — few of them are — 
but whether they are in the right place. 
The old East- West line, the Iron Cur- 
tain, was clearly in the wrong place — 
too far west 

Russia will not be invited to join 
either the EU or NATO in the fore- 
seeable future, if ever. Nor should it be. 
It is simply too big, too different and 
too potentially destabilizing, if not hos- 
tile. 

That means that there will be some 
kind of political dividing line some- 
where between Berlin and Moscow. 


YaTVIA* 


Latin peoples, and the original six- 
nation European Community launched 


W: 


UTHUAHto 


CfeOATTA 

. x 

ITALY 


QUBANtA- 


nat ion European Community launched 
in the 1950s was an almost exact rep- 
lica of Charlemagne's ninth -century 
empire. 

Europe's eastern frontier has always 
been fluid. But there is a fairly well- 
defined historical, cultural and polit- 
ical line separating the countries seek- 
ing EU entry from those that are mem- 
bers of the Russian-led 
Commonwealth of Independent 
States. 

The line has sometimes been defined 
as the border between Western and 
Orthodox Christianity established in 
the 16th century or as the point where 
the Cyrillic script begins. Its northern 
path is clear it puts the three Baltic 
countries, Poland and Slovakia 


Wherever that line is drawn, there can 
be iinle argument that the countries to 
which NATO and the EU are now 
offering membership ought to be on the 
Western side of iL ^ 

In fact, though, with the EU en- 
tertaining membership applications 
from a total of 10 countries in Central 


squarely in the West, with Belarus and 
Ukraine mostly in the East. 

Farther south, as it approaches the 
Balkans, the line gets fuzzier. Romania 
is a borderline case; Bulgaria looks 
more Eastern than Western. Greece, on 
the other hand, while on the Eastern 
side, is already a member of both the 
EU and NATO. 

The line’s importance should not be 


and Eastern Europe — the five favored 
for early entry plus Bulgaria, Latvia, 


for early entry plus Bulgaria, Latvia, 
Lithuania, Romania and Slovakia — 
the line that is emerging is nor new, but 
very old. 

Europe's old lines have a babir of 
refusing to fade away. The frontier of 
the Roman Empire still broadly marks 
the division between the Germanic and 


exaggerated. It cannot be .used to pre- 
dict the precise ultimate shape of the 


diet the precise ultimate shape of the 
EU or of NATO, and it does not help to 
resolve the problem of Turkey, a 
NATO member, which ultimately 
should be in the EU. 

But the fact remains that those most 


See THINK, Page 17 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Jitfy 14 

OR ELF. LF. Yn CS PenJn 

iffl* 1JS77 1J717' 1JJ3S 13D* 

1.WM — B09 Utt J7JD75 Mass" 

BlOB 42MT L2152 1-5713' 1J1B IJW 
1IQ8 04394 1402 19112*6 131 2546011 

was mi mm uun'iiua — 

8043 47JB6 lltU 15267 L271J6 HSS 

mi 37.12 L477S 1U9tf l-3®4 ISITi 


Cross Rates 

5 I OIL FJ. U» OH &F. IF. Y« C* P**" 
Amsterdam 2At UBS 1J2S9 UB MW — 542" 13B7 17717' MBS 1U7 

Knosets 36JB5 OMOS 2*605 6W lla* W3JH — 2SJ0 03246 J7JD75 20*25 

.Frankfurt usjj ma — UM 0.183* 4MO* 052 15723' OB 1JM* 

- Lawton (a) 145BB3 — 10231 102025 2,93732 14DB 424D4 1401 1911286 131 2544041 

Madrid 15BJ53 250716 14266 3U0 U7I* MBS 402 3B4T7 1X433* 1 — 

Man ij»a mss msn wm — ssic csn. tmu 152*7 utkm jjaj 

N«w YwktH — 16877* LOT UB V45J0 2J04 37.12 14775 111*5 1J»4 

Pah* Qm 

To**® ma 19225 6400 IUI . Ott 5685 1UB5 77J0 — 8119 0J»4 

Tanwtfa T3(9 13W 0M5 022H 00284* 0064 B36S* 0M*5 L2B6* — 

ZbM tCB 24Mb 88229 U04 UWT 07305 1BJ* — 1-2931* 1« 

i ecu lioisi us un* 6fl*r inua ini 4uoa ion mu os i*6*a 

3 SDR 053 08292 LOB 8207} 137381 17403 50.1928 25337. 15U19 ISIS S5J15 

Closings inAmstwnkm. London, AMan Pori* and Zwtd* Atfnffs mathertxrOmsiNanYottimla 

at 4 PM. and Toronto none at 3 PM. 

b ft bay one poont b: To boy one doBae 'UW*s of 7<tt N.Q.- nut vnOett AtA.- nof otoUbWe. 


Ubid-Ubor Rates 


Swiss Fnwch 

Dais' D-Mark Franc Storing Franc You ECU 

1 -month S9»-5W m-3Mi lW-tVt Mto - M* 3Vk - 3Va V4-W 4Va-4VW 
3-m0Rth 5*i4- S’y* 3 ■ 3Vi Ua-lVi fiW.-7V» 314-3H Vb - iyb 4V> - 4Vk 
frnwrth sv». 5V* 3V»-3Vi* Ut-lVt 7Va- 7Vk 3Va-M* St- 44 4M4-4U 
1-year S’Va-SVb 3Vn-3V» 114-15* ZVa-71* 39H-39S >Vh- V* 416- 4Vb 


Sources: Reuters. Uoftis Bonk. __ , . , _ 

Rotes aopBcnbie to Interbank deposits of SI mOSan minimum (or equivalent). 


Key Money Rates 


Other Dollar Values 


Ca n— i iT 

AqaaLpen 

AutnSonS 

AnMonsdL 

Bnalraal 


;■ 


DflobkknM 

Egnri. pound 
FfaL martin 


Omanot 
6nakrtac 
Hang Kangs 
Hung, forint 
Indtanrapaa 
lndt.npM 
Irish £ 

Imtf rink. 
XmrtBW . 
Malay, ring. 


Mcx.p*so 
H. Zealand S 
Nerw. krone 

PH. PM 

Pcdblizhriy 

Partascmta 

RpnruHa 
Saudi rfpd 

Snf-* 


Qnrnncr 
&Mr.nmd 
S. Kar. won 
SmdL krona 
T ainan s 
Thai mat 
TMdsfcBra 
UAEdktna 
VenoLbafti. 


ISIMay CP dMders 
3 moatti Tknasnry bffl 
T-yMrTranswTtBI 
z-fna-TrinsarrM 
5-year Trans ory note 
7-yaor Treesmy note 
lO-yom-Traosury onto 
SO-ytar Treasury band 
MarriD LjBdi 3Mny RA 


aose Pray 

SJ» 5J» 

m at* 
SMs 53* 
SJ51 5.61 
551 550 

5J» 5jD 0 
524 i23 

SS0 557 
6.14 4.12 

6l19 6.16 

624 &21 

454 452 

507 i07 


Britain 

Bank base rate 
am money 
1 -month Mertank 
a^nenth Interbank 

6-month brierbank 

ltHfenrCfli 


654 644 

69* 6*1 

6M 6M 
6Wm 6V» 
m 7v» 
7 M 7M 


Forward 


Jnpnn 

Dtscwolnrt* 
CaBmanay 
1-ramlttl lotarbonk 
Smooth ktartnnk 
frmoflffi fntanMndr 
10-year Govt bond 


050 050 

050 (US 
060 054 

069 063 
073 OdS 
256 255 


ftnw 

IntamnHne rate 3.10 3.10 

Call money CtsiL 34to 

l4watb letertank - 314 

3 H BPHth Interbank - Wb 

6 month interbank - 

10-yanrOAT - 540 

QmwawtA C/etm tjwwwt 


AM. P4»- arge 


Qmncy 304ay 60 4ay 9Mey Cemoey 

PeundSkritag 16886 16849 14831 Japanese yen 

Conodon dofcr 15653 1-3627 15604 Suttfniac 

Daotsttomark 1J871 1J835 1.7798 


30-dsT 60-day 9MaT 

113J7 112J0 11242 

14680 14630 14578 


Saras mi Bank (fimsMatOt Mosuet Bank /aussetslfflm» tiaoww^^ 
iMitonk Batqm tfo Fiokb (Paris); Bate at Taltytt^imuitls/UtTblyidi 


Germany 
Lombard rate 

Call money 
1 -mM intefbaitk 
Snomafli iattrtiank 
6-amtti intafMnk 
lOnearBuad 


450 450 

3.10 356 

3.13 110 

113 113 
119 117 
558 181 




Tax Battle Threatens Bonn Budget 

Opposition to Kohl’s Reform Package Endangers Aid to East 


By John Schmid 

Jmemuiiunal Herald Tribune 


FRANKFURT — Germany’s tax-re- 


form package appeared Monday to be 
headed for failure in Parliament, raising 


the prospect of a renewed budget crisis 
for Chancellor Helmut Kohl's fragile 
coalition. 

The collapse of Mr. Kohl’s compre- 
hensive tax overhaul would deal a blow 
to business confidence, the government 
warned. 

“The willingness to invest is clearly 
being hampered by the continuing lack 
of clarity over the final drafting of im- 
portant government reforms,” the Eco- 
nomics Ministry said in its monthly re- 
port. It said blocking tax reform would 
add “a major burden” to the economy. 

Industrial leaders repeatedly have 
urged Bonn's parties to set aside their 
ideological bickering and implement a 
“grand tax reform” as Germany’s best 
hope to rebalance rhe nation’s corporate 
tax load in a way dial stimulates in- 
vestment and hiring at a time of near- 
record unemployment. 

If Bonn's left-leaning opposition 
manages to bury Mr. Kohl’s tax plans, 
as several German newspapers sugges- 
ted Monday was increasingly likely, it 


would undercut a stream of revenue that 
Finance Minister Theo Waigel needs for 
his 1998 budget, a plan that Mr. Kohl’s 
cabinet approved last week after months 
of setbacks and political embarrass- 
ments. 

The 7 billion Deutsche marks ($3.94 
billion) that Mr. Waigel stands to lose in 
1998 was earmarked to finance a long- 
promised reduction in Germany's 
deeply unpopular “solidarity sur- 
charge” on income tax, a charge meant 


to pay for East German reconstruction. 
Backing away from tax-cut pledges 


Backing away from tax-cut pledges 
could endanger Mr. Kohl’s coalition, 
where the Free Democratic Party, the 
junior partner in the center-right alli- 
ance, has staked its political survival on 
the credibility of an anti-tax position 
centering on a cut in the solidarity tax;. 

Viewing the likelihood that a tax- 
reform package will be passed as slim, 
Eastern Germany’s leaders within Mr. 
Kohl’s party formed a united front in 
resisting any cuts in the surcharge with- 
out an equivalent source of funds to 
offset the lost revenue. 

The issue also draws attention to the 
stalled East German economy. The 
strong resistance to a cut in the East 
German tax demonstrates that the re- 
gion remains dependent on state aid and 


that a self-sustaining economy is 
nowhere in sight. 

Politics in the region threaten to be- 
come more volatile in coming months 
because Mr. Waigel' s latest budget plans 
foresee the first round of deep cuts in the 
Eastern subsidies since unification. 

Federal subsidies would fall to 1.25 
billion DM by 2001 from 2.84 billion 
DM this year, according to a financial 
plan that was included with the budget 

Political fights over taxes deprive Mr. 
Waigel of any respite from his budget 


quandaries. His acknowledgment that 
the federal budget deficit would surge to 


the federal budget deficit would surge to 
70 billion DM this year from previous 
forecasts of 53 billion DM was seen as 
the closest the government has come to 
admitting that it will overshoot bench- 
marks for a single European currency. 

Even so, the Economics Ministry at- 
tempted to put a sunny spin on the 
economic news, saying in its monthly 
report that Germany's economy con- 
tinued to recover during the second 
quarter. It cited strong exports. 

Manufacturing grew m April and 
May, the ministry said, lifted by over- 
seas demand. Industrial output also 
grew faster in Eastern Germany, climb- 
ing by 17 percent in the two months 
from a year earlier. 


Boeing Talks Are Down to the Wire 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 


BRUSSELS — Boeing Co. execu- 
tives held intensive negotiations with 
European antitrust regulators Monday 
in a last-minute attempt to win Euro- 
pean approval for the company’s pro- 
posed $14 billion takeover of McDon- 
nell Douglas Corp. 

While Boeing and the European 
Commission reported some progress in 
the talks, commission officials pressed 
the company to make further conces- 
sions to ensure that the acquisition did 
not strengthen Boeing’s dominance of 
the world aircraft market at the expense 
of Airbus Industrie, the European con- 
sortium. 


“Some progress has been made on 
one of the issues.” said one official at 


the commission, the European Union's 
executive agency, who spoke on con- 


dition of anonymity. “But altogether, 
more progress needs to be made, to put it 
mildly.” 

A team of Boeing executives led by 
Richard Albrecht, executive vice pres- 
ident in charge of the Boeing Com- 
mercial Airplane Group, met with se- 
nior officials of the commission's 
merger task force into the evening 
here. 

Commission officials said an agree- 
ment was expected to be reached by 
midnight to respect die agency’s legal 
timetable, but uiey left open the pos- 
sibility that talks might continue for 
another few days if the two sides were 
close to agreement 

“We still are optimistic that we will 
find a mutually acceptable solution,'’ 
said Jim Frank, executive vice president 
for European public affairs at Boeing. 

The negotiations followed some last- 
ditch lobbying by Washington, which 


sent the Justice Department’s top an- 
titrust official to Brussels on Sunday to 
tell commission officials why U.S. au- 
thorities gave a green light to the deal at 
the start of this month. 

The proposed acquisition has the po- 
tential to affect global aircraft and de- 
fense markets, as well as broader trans- 
Atlantic relations, for years to come. 

The combined company would con- 
trol roughly two-thuds of the world 
market for commercial aircraft and rank 
second behind Lockheed Corp. as the 
largest military contractor. 

Technically, the EU commission can- 
not block the takeover, because Boeing 
and McDonnell have no European man- 
ufacturing presence. But the agency can 
impose fines of as much as 1 0 percent of 
Che company’s sales and make it illegal 
For Boeing to conduct business in the 
European Union, measures that Boeing 
acknowledges would stop the deal. 


PRIVATE BANKING 


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We at Credit Lyonnais Private 
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And, equally important we 
have the knowledge, special- 
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to help you get where you 
want to go. 








Our Geneva subsidiary, specialized 
in Private Banking since 1876. 


We’ve gained unrivaled, in- 
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Even in the most out- of- the - 
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But there is yet another 
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Lyonnais Private I 

Banking strength. 

From the time 

we opened our 

first office in ** 

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120 years 
ago, our 

history has revolved around 
durable, personal relation- 
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We listen first... and then 
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Whether you are a private, 
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Together, these two dimen- 
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Let’s talk. 


CREDIT LYONNAIS 


Zurich MA. 32130 +240 

Loudon BUS 3Z1JD +250 

NewYort 322.10 32060 -142 

US. OoOms per oi^ London o/nckd , 
ftonas; Zurich cmi New York opening 
rw&SoUngpticesiNewYmOXieii 

(AvgJ 

SumHeums. 


Switzerland: Geneva tel 41 22/705 66 66 - Headquarters for Credit Lyonnais International Private Banking 
Basle tel 41 61/284 22 22 -Zurich tel 41 1/2I7 86 86-Luganq7el.4I 91/923 51 65 
Paris tel, 33 1/42 95 03 05 -Luxembourg tel. 352/476 831 442 - London tel. 4+ 171/499 91 46 
Monaco TEL 377/93 15 73 34 - Vienna tel 431/531 50 120 . Montevideo tel 598 2/95 08 67 - Miami tel. 1 305/375 78 14 
Hong Kong tel 852/28 02 28 88 • Singapore tel. 65/535 94 77 




Continu* 


< 






Investor’s America 



Euro Pessimism Propels Dollar to Highs 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — Hie dollar was 
higher against most ■ other major 
currencies late Monday, climbing 
to a six-year high against the 
Deutsche mark and breaking 
through the level of 6 French francs 
on expectations that Europe’s 
single currency will be weak. 

In 4 PJM trading, the dollar was 
at 6.0680 francs, up from 5.9925 
francs at Friday’s close. It was also 
at 1.7970 Deutsche marks, up from , 
1.7770 DM on Friday, and at 1.4775 
Swiss francs, np from 1.4645 
francs. But the dollar slipped to 
113.965 yen from 113.980 yen. 

The pound fell to $1.6877 from 
SI. 6930. 

The dollar’s rise against major 
European currencies, according to 
some analysts, reflects the belief of 


currency traders dial Germany and 
France are not likely to reduce their 
budget deficits to the required 3 
percent of gross domestic product 
for entry into Europe’s planned eco- 
nomic and monetary union. Sup- 
porting that expectation. President 
Jacques Chirac of France said Mon- 
day his country’s 1997 deficit 
would be about 3-5 percent. 

Traders sold manes on bets that 


euro and that me entry rules would 
be loosened rather than exclude 
Europe’s two largest economies. 

“What's going on in Europe con- 
tinues to propel Ae dollar higher,' ’ 
said Bob Savage, chief currency 
trader at Lehman Brothers. “There 
are significant questions whether 
Germany will meet the entry cri- 


teria, let alone France.” The dollar 
rose as high as 1.7996 DM, its 
highest since it reached 1 .8065 DM 
in August 1991. Because the euro 
will replace die marie as Europe’s 
benchmark currency, talk of a weak 
euro tends to hurt the mark. 

The pound soared past 3.03 DM 
for die first time in seven and a half 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE"” 

years on speculation that Britain 
would lift its benchmark interest 
rate to rein in the rapidly growing 
economy. 

High British interest rates would 
increase the allure of some pound- 
denominated deposits and bonds. 
The pound is also benefiting from 
its status as a “safe” currency out- 
side the monetary- anion fray. 


“Sterling’s on a tear of its own,” 
said Varick Martin, manager of for- 
eign exchange at Manufacturers & 
Traders Trust Co. “You’ve got to 
Ulce sterling because of the UJC’s 
interest-rale differential and the fact 
that it’s outside EMU.’ ' 

The pound climbed to 3.0353 
DM. its best showing since October 
1989. Britain’s base lending rate, 
which the Bank of England charges 
for overnight loans, is at 6.75 per- 
cent, and Germany’s benchmark se- 
curities repurchase rate is at 3.00 
percent 

The dollar weakened against the 
yen after Shoichiro Toyoda, chair- 
man of the Japan Federation of Eco- 
nomic Organizations, or Keidanren, 
and the chairman of Toyota Motor 
Corp., suggested that Japan's in- 
terest rates should be higher. 


lech Stocks Rally as Financial Issues Lag 


Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


Very briefly; 

• Federal Express Corp„ United Parcel Service and other 
airlines flying converted Boeing Co. 727 freighters may have 
to reduce their payloads by more than half until changes are 
made to strengthen the planes' floor decks, the Federal 
Aviation Administration said. The new rule would not go into 
effect until October at the earliest 

• Sprint Corp. said Ronald LeMay had resigned to become 
chairman, president and chief executive of Waste Man- 
agement Inc. 

• Iberdrola SA and Gas Natural de Espana, both Spanish 
companies, head an international consortium that has agreed 
to buy two Rio de Janeiro gas companies for 622.1 milli on 
reais (5581.4 million). 

• Campbell Soup Co. may sell some noncore businesses, 
including Swanson frozen foods, Vlasic pickles and a fresh 
mushroom business, which together account for about $1.4 
billion in annual sales. 

• Walt Disney Co. is expected to agree to sell Institutional 
investor publications to its British rival monthly. Euromoney 
Publications PLC, for $120 million to $130 million. 

Bloomberg, NYT 


Weekend Box Office 

The Associated Pros 

LOS ANGELES — * ’Men in Black' ' do minated the U.S. box 
office over the weekend, with a gross of $305 million. Fol- 
lowing are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday’s ticket 
sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


Catted hr OwSeff From DTjpaKka 

NEW YORK — Computer-re- 
lated stocks extended their recent 
rally Monday, bar the broad market 
turned mostly lower on declines in 
financial stocks. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
finished at 7,922.98 points, up 1.16, 
having retreated from a nearly 30- 
point gain. Declining issues out- 
numbered advancers by a narrow 
margin on the New York Stock Ex- 
change. 

Broader-market measures also 
were flat, with the Standard & 
Poor’s 500-stock index up 1.69 
points at 9 18.37, but the technology- 
rich Nasdaq Composite Index 
reached its eighth consecutive re- 


cord high, rising 21.25 to 1,523.87. 
Dell Computer, which jumped more 
than 9 points Friday, lea the ad- 
vance. 

Among other leading computer 
makers advancing late Monday 
were Hewlett-Packard, up 2 1/16 at 
63 1/16 as the Dow’s strongest is- 
sue, and Compaq Computer, up 216 
at 126. 

Investors who expect personal- 
computer price cuts to fuel sales in 
the second half of the year were 
poshing up shares in the largest com- 
puter-related companies, portfolio 
managers said. Intel, Microsoft and 
IBM all were higher. 

NationsBank, the fourth- largest 
U.S. bank, rose 1 3/16 to 67 3/16 


after reporting earnings of $1.05 a 
share, above expectations. Among 
other banks reporting Monday, 
Bank of New York rose l A to 46!6 
after reporting earnings a penny a 
share above the average estimate; 
Norwest, which matched expecta- 
tions, fell 14 to 59 15/16; National 

U.S.STTOCKS 

City fell M-to 5414 after coming in a 
penny above the average estimate, 
and First Chicago NBD gained 1 to 
64 after coming in 1 cent above 
expectations. 

Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette 
rose 2 11/16 to 59K after the se- 
curities broker said it earned $154 a 


share, well above expectations. DU 
rose 63 percentinthe second quarter 
on speculation it will be acquired. 
TRW rose after reporting a 


percent. Gannett shares rose after it 
said second-quarter profit rose 42 
percent on lower newsprint prices 
■and higher advertising revenue. 

Bond yields rose amid concern 
that reports on retail sales and in- 
flation, due Tuesday and Wednes- 
day, may offer the Federal Reserve 
Board reason to raise interest rates. 
The yield on the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury* bond was at 6.55 percent, 
up from 653 percent Friday. The 
price was at 101, down 9/32. 

(AP. Bloomberg) 


Exiting CEOs: Too Big a Bite of the Apple? 


1 . Men In Block 

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summon 


By Denise Caruso ■ 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — “Kleptocracy” 
is a harsh word, bat it is the term that 
some disgusted employees have 
been using to describe the gov- 
ernance of Appte Computer Inc. over 
die past few years — and (Specially 
now, when the company is in a mor- 
tal struggle for its existence. 

What they lament is a style of 
leadership, practiced by the com- 
pany’s board and its three chief ex- 
ecutives in less than four years, that 
has allowed its revoJving-door man- 
agement to leave with ever larger 


amounts of cash even as the com- 
pany's losses mount and its share 
price drops. 

When John Sculley was deposed 
by Michael Spindler in 1994, he re- 
ceived a $3 milli on severance pack- 
age. Mr. Spindler, who presided over 
one of the company’s steepest de- 
clines, was paid between $3 millio n 
and $4 million to leave Apple, plus 
the cost of moving to France. 

It appears that the severance 
package for Gilbert Amelio, who 
was forced to resign Wednesday, is 
even more generous. 

Apple's board of directors, the 
legal guardians of shareholders' in- 


terest, agreed nearly 18 months ago 
to a contract that allowed Mr. 
Amelio to resign and still receive his 
full annual salary until his contract 
ran out at the end of 2000. If he was 
asked to leave, which he was, the 
sum was to double — which it did. 

In the end, Mr. Amelio is ex- 
pected to leave with about $7 mil- 
lion after having been paid almost 
$7 million in salary and bonuses in 
1996 and receiving stock options 
worth about $26 million. 

He will fare much better than most 
others involved with Apple. During 
Mr. AmeJjo’s 18-month reign, the 
company laid off thousands of em- 


ployees, its stock dropped to a 10- 
year low, its share of die personal- 
computer market dropped from 9 
percent to 3.3 percent, and the com- 
pany lost nearly $15 billion. Some 
analysts are predicting an additional 
loss of $70 million or more when 
Apple announces its latest quarterly 
results this week. 

It is unclear whether Apple’s new 
direction will be much the same as 
the old: a continuing downward 
spiral. But If survival is possible, it 
may hinge on whether Apple’s 
board of directors can hire a chief 
executive without promising to give 
him a king's ransom if he fails. 



Sells Most 
Appliance 
Operations 

Qmp&xlfoQvStBgFreMtXtpaxha 

LEXINGTON, Massachu- 
setts — Raytheon Co. said 
Monday that it had sold off * : 
three of its five appliance units 
for $750 million, generating. 
rash to help finance the com- 
pany's recent expansion in de- 
fense electronics. 

The deal with Goodman - 
Holding Co. of Houston in- 
clucks me Amana brand of kit- 
chen appliances and manufac- 
turing plants in Arkansas, Iowa, 

South Carolina and Tennessee, 
Raytheon said. 


million for the home appliance, 
air-conditioning and commer- 
cial-cooking segments of Ray- 
theon Appliance Group. 

Other parties, which Ray- 
theon declined to name, bought 
the rights to collect $200 mil- 
lion in bills owed to the three 
units. 

Raytheon will keep two parts 
of the appliance group — its 
market-leading commercial - 

laundry business and a unit that 
makes electronic controls for 
appliances. Those two busi- 
nesses account for 21 percent of 
the appliance operation's sales 
and 51 percent of its profit 

It was not immediately clear 
whether any jobs would be af- 
fected by the transaction. 

Raytheon said it would use 
the proceeds from the deals to- 
ward two major purchases 
aimed at making it a $21 billion 
company and a major player in 
the defense-electronics busi- 
ness. 

Federal regulators this 
month approved Raytheon's 
purchase of Texas Instruments 
Inc.’s defense and electronics 
unit The company is still await- 
ing clearance of its purchase of 
Hughes Electronics Corp.’s de- 
fense business. 

The sale announced Monday 
also is subject to federal ap- 
proval. A Raytheon executive 
said the company expected to 
close the deal in September. 

Raytheon shares were at 
$55,125 late Monday, up 93.75 
cents. (AP, Bloomberg) 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


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48604 45 0ft 01 

48150 77ft 75W 76 

47W9 83ft Hft 82 


IM lift .lift vwim JMJ-UU trrju «ud +0. 
am son .Sn B4. sates NA, Ffl-s.st*a 20.938 
II 2219 +5ft Wsooonlnt I1L924 UP 2064 

Mft'^ssvj *fjft SOYBEAN OIL (ram 


0U0ftk +5Vk 


S3 SE* 


-ltk 

-ft 

-ft 

+h 

-ft 

-ft 

636X3 

Dow Jones Bond 

01X3 

Pnftan 

Ckso 

632X3 -2X4 

Tp*» 

Hum 

* 1 
■w 

20 Bonds 

10199 

103X8 

Xk 

10 utilities 

101.11 

101.11 

-ft 

-ft 

♦ft 

10 Industrials 

106X8 

106X6 


VOL MW LM UO Og. 

30900 (lift 911* 

17574 M 699* 6ft 
1M67 Mt IM m 

SSI Sgk & ft 

7(0 18k 1(1 14k 

7382 2m 26ft 266k 
5921 l«k 9U 10*k 

a w 


^ W -1ft 
1(1 14k +'k 

76ft 26V, -Hk 
9U lWk +ft 
iHk 2Sk -ft 


Trading Activity 


Ctacansu 

Undnnped 

ToUiflUH 

NOWHlBtB 

NMLOHS 


JU97 2270 

2227 

2239 

+049 

1X54 

Auof7 22.(3 

2210 

22X3 

♦ 0X0 

23X03 

Sen 97 22.(0 

2235 

22X6 

taxi 

14.938 

Oct 97 22X0 

22X5 

2251 

+8X3 

I3XU 

Dec(7 22W 

2211 

2263 

+0X1 

42X79 

Jtei98 2295 

2250 

2275 

+0X9 

5X35 

Est. soles NA FfPs-SdOS 15,107 

Fri’s open ini 

106X99 

up 1530 



SOYBEANS (caon 




MW Du ITiMnwn. osf*l POT teruJlld 


Jul 97 825 

111 

819 

♦ 33ft 

3X71 

auov no 

m 

779 

♦29 

35X62 

Sep 97 676W 

662ft 

674 


12.935 

Not 97 623ft 

UO 

621ft 

♦ » 

71X03 

Jonffl 07 

<13 

625 

+Z7ft 

14X23 

Est. solos NA Fri’s. soles 47X50 

Fri's open w 

146X40 

up 3151 



WHEAT (CBOT) 






JW97 335 

327 

329 

+ 7 

1.(37 

Sep 97 30 

332 

336 

♦ Oft 

42X99 

Obc97 355 

345 

349ft 

♦ 7ft 

36X87 

Mar(8 36JM 

355 

351 

♦Aft 

6X81 


M GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 

2WD0 » 1 V- cent, Mr to. 


Now 97 10480 +1.70 US3 

Dec 77 10420 18X00 HJ3JS .10 70S 

J*19B 10X10 +1J0 ns 

Feb (8 10250 +125 429 

Morn 10230 KUO 101.(5 +120 1,976 

Est.srtes NA FiTs. sates 7,738 
Frfsepenbv *9.174 up 779 


+27ft >2,(35 SAOQitwoL-oonnparirovoi. 

+2B 71AD MW 43000 42430 4200 -8.0 223 

+27K I4J22 S«P 97 43750 426 JO 477J0 -8J0 62,(62 

«0 DOC 77 44100 43100 433X0 —060 MJ10 

Jon 98 43550 -4M 19 

6*r9B 44900 439 0990 -MM 9 AH 

^ , MavTfl 44X7D —460 2^57 

+ 7 1 937 $*'%. <S2X W7 - SD U,S ‘ 7-WB 

.4ft aim ... «»■*• -840 713 


Nasdaq 


i am i/*J Acwcncea 

W* 1113 pkCHnetl 

573 571 unavnt 

3431 3JTi Tdotntua 


Undrand 

TOMItwi, 


Market Sales 


247 NYSE 

143 Ante* 

’g Nasdaq 
io InmBliom. 


Eg. sates NA Fritides 19A53 
FifsoPonM 90,501 iff 4059 


in Livestock 

” CATTLE (CMERJ 
4R080 too.- esnt, oar to 
Ago 97 65.90 6620 <40 -0J3 34826 

p-, 0097 «40 6450 69.15 +028 29,27] 

ZZ 0«c97 7140 700 7043 -042 IS4M0 

P*® 243 TIM Tin +002 7J» 

AW 98 75JO 7452 7470 -030 3JJ9 

JunW 71J0 7065 3095 + 050 3J76 

K,l ‘“ Est. sales 30774 FTfS-Mke, 21J04 
Fit's oponlnt (4271 aH 274 


DMdends 

Company Par Amt Roc Pay Company 

IRREGULAR 

Banco BOb _ .1674 7-1 B 7-30 

NYSlDtELG 


■ FEEDER CATTLE (OMER) 

UHMCHiavIk 

AW 97 8155 8045 6050 -065 1U13 Spal 679550 680500 6025.00 683X00 

Par Amt Roc Pay Sepw bu» rlb 805d -077 3.9s* Fomam 69iooo oozojn 694000 w«ao sSpw im» ijS!* 

* a, ss% as ss bs =% ss a »« szs 5 i 1 

U u si an S3 es ss ds ’« 

Q - 1S 2S 8-3 Esr. soles 4 SB Frrs.sales 4998 Spto 150450 150500 10100 148200 3MJ * "" 545 

V 2“3 J'sJ 7-31 FlYsopenH 24149 up 554 Fmanl 150500 150600 1487.00 140800 


PLATMUM (NMER) 

» Im M-- doOak Par trov to. 

■MV mao 4(050 —9 jo 743 

SoP 97 38770 

0097 3(558 38120 38450 -750 10AM 
Est. soles NA Frfk-wtes IJT3 
FlTSOPenM 12444 up 7 

Ooso Pmtnus 

LONDON METALS (LME] 

Dodon periMbtc ten 

AteUDuw (HMi Cradal 

Spot 1559ft 1560ft 1541.00 154700 

Foranrd 1587 TO 1SB8TO 15*»ft 157000 

Comw CottadM (DM end*] 

Spot 254X00 tS50M HUM 2430.00 

Email 731X00 231400 22B3M 23844)0 

LMt 

Spot 655 TO 966.00 656ft 657ft 

Forman] 649.00 670.00 640TO 66948) 


Est. sales; 15X015 Wev. Mies; 161875 
Prev.opon W- 294959 up 2,320 

{TAUAN GOVERNMENT BOND nJFFE) 
m.2aj mUlon - ptsoMOO k> 

TOP W 137.10 13412 13429 107.586 

OK w N.r. N.r. I‘B834 —0.49 109^76 
Softs. 44604 Piw. sates: 34184 
Pnv- open Inlj 109^76 oft 1,135 
EURODOLLARS (CMBU 

SI mOHan-m of 100 pc*. 

AW 97 PCS MJK4 

AuO (7 (426 «JM (425 19,123 

&.V. *15 (421 (422 —am 539.008 

Dec (7 9407 (402 MM HUB 452476 

Atarw 0402 (1(7 9UI — (LM 310,802 

M W WI — (LOS 257.059 

5^ S 78 9179 -0JM2O7.143 

5-D. 9148 -(UM 15X651 

Mar 99 9170 9U6 9X0 —CM 114877 

M —0.04 msn 
Sopw 9U2 9359 9359 -OP 7i018 

Dr9( 9355 7153 9353 -003 68473 

Ev- sates 256,150 Frt*s.sotes 314365 
Fn soaenrt UTW 10 4573 


BRITISH POUfO) (CIAER) 

Gum pwnas. s pernouna 
Seo97 1.6900 1-6820 15644 
Dec(7 1.6830 15770 15786 
g«(8 . _ 16728 

soles 6.986 PrTs. sates BJ88 
Ffl’sopwilrw 67,2)3 up 1960 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMERJ 
iflamaoNarkf oorCdn-tor 
S»97 7345 J329 7332 

Dec(7 7380 7369 73 m 

Mar 99 7415 7400 7400 

gsr.SQtes 4560 Fri's. sates 6.578 
FTfsoaenaa <3513 up its 

GERMAN MARX (CMERJ 
175TOB marks. Spar mark 
S»W 5654 558) 55M 

Ore 97 SMS 5613 5622 

MorW 5676 5674 5656 

|V. softs 72,062 Fri's. sales 34440 
RYs open ire UJJ 52 up SOI 

JAPANESE YEN (CMBi) 
IZJrMWn+cn. tnrr Wnn 

Sep 97 5897 5840 880 
Oec(7 8990 5960 m\ 

5?or(8 .9078 

E 51 . sates 10AM Fri’s saws is. (08 
FrTsooenM 5ITO2 up 435 

SWISS FRANC (CMERI 

I ISAM trench 1 par tronc 

Sep*7 5876 5805 6817 

DecW 5(21 5881 6089 

Mcr *9 j7jj 

» Kites 70506 ft’s, sates (4241 
FrTsooenM 0 J» off ws 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 
teOTOp pesos S par ppw 



High 

Low 

Latwl Chfl» 

HEATMGOH. (NMER) 



0TOQM. cervsper ate 



Aug (7 

5100 

51X0 

51X7 

— 0X8 

SepW 

53X5 

52X0 

S20 

-0X4 

Oct 97 

5U0 

5105 

5126 

-0X9 

Nov 97 

55X5 

54.05 

54M 

—449 

Dec 97 

56.20 

54.90 

55X1 

-8X9 

Jan 98 

56.0 

SSM 

55X1 

—41X4 

Feb 98 

5645 

55JS 

&9I 

-0X9 

Mm-n 

55.(0 

BJ1 

55X1 

—024 

Apr 98 

S4J0 

S4JB 

54X1 

— 1X9 

Est sates NA 

Fri'v. 5des 

27X50 

Fri’s Open W 149X14 

UP 1460 


- JS4 9-10 70-1 


STOCK SPLIT 

Banco BtoVb ADS 3 for 1 spW. 


Fai l- 

Hyp«lon 1997 Tnn 
Hypertoo 1999 Tra 1 
HypwtoBjWOTim 
Hyperion 2005 li^_ 
IndSfloairinco 


INITIAL 

BmwoBBb - JB56 7-18 7-29 JtaS&Bm 

-educed 

HrperiorrTaffRef M JO 7-21 7-31 New Jersey 


Baffle Mtn Gold 
Capa Cod Bk&Tr 


ICED NaHCamm 

M M 7 7-21 7-31 NosrJeney Rmwr 

Putnam IncoFd A. 
LAR Putnam US Out A, 

S SOS 8-1 8-15 SteneaJetatBiKp 


S AS 27 HJ Mcr« 8120 8250 8250 — 04S 742 

S HJ £»■«** 4502 Fn’s. sates 49(8 

7-2] ft] 24M* up SS4 

M .(D95 7-21 7-3) H0G5-Ma» (OHERJ 

M7U58 7-21 7-31 0500 ul- cants 00 b, 

M .115 7-23 7-31 Jul97 0352 8X30 8X70 +042 3,171 

Q D75 8-14 8-28 Auo97 B155 11.15 -030 TfcflO 

Q ,125 7-15 7-31 Oa97 7500 7425 7465 -0.17 11J» 

Q .11 9-S 10-1 DecW TITO 71 JB 7150 -057 S.I90 

0 JO 9-1$ Uhl F tt>9B 70.25 69.45 70 CD -0.15 1AH 

M j 037 7-1 S 7 25 Est. sates 1529 Fri's sates 8.178 
M .m 7-11 7-21 FmoponM 36506 oH 228 


MW98 .11607 11590 .11594 

EV. saes 35*5 Fit's, sates >o,sw 
FrTsooeninr 3X0* on stS 


HJpti Low CWso Otgr OpM 

Financial 


LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

1500 bH- denars par PM. 

S"S SS SP -AM 68J75 

Sep 97 19J9 19.10 19.13 — 439 63579 

Oct (7 1952 19 JO 1(53 —033 41526 

NW(7 1955 1941 1942 - 041 71476 

Dec(7 1945 1945 1948 -029 0.111 

Jan 98 1942 1942 1942 —029 23436 

Febf8 1977 1945 {(45 -OJR 10409 

M0T9B I9J9 1947 190 -027 M53 

Apr 98 1951 493) 

MOV 98 19.58 1956 19J6 — 8.25 7499 

Fri's. soles 63591 
Firs open mi *1X748 ott 2136 
NATURAL 6AS (NMER) 

10TO0 mm biurs. soar mm tnu 
AU897 XI 55 Xl)0 1145 3443* 

Sep97 IIS) 1110 XI 50 77500 

OOW 2.160 X12S X160 2453B 

NW9T 2JE0 1290 7 Mft J1JIO 

Dec*7 2415 2395 2415 15,106 

Jon (8 2460 2435 2460 15483 

Feb *8 2475 2JM 2475 W40 

War 98 2460 1255 U60 7«n 

2IJ5 2)38 21K iS 

morn ZI93 im 2100 1866 

21.595 

"•sewn mJ 201,218 up 434 
UNLEADED GASOL^tE (NMER) 

O TOO Mk, cents par 001 

S3“ S' 0 S8JS —0.91 31,165 

tow 5*2 g-H - a?I H446 

toW 5680 55-30 5546 —0.77 8.11) 

n2?W «« “■« 5469 _W4 108 

Dec” 55J0 5436 5436 —0.72 4375 

S™ S^S HS 5441 - 173 Sw5 

FttW 55JO S5JJ1 S5JI1 -472 MU 

gpes.NA HnaStmF 

GAMlf?| PE, 77 ** , ° « « 

irTFS’ET' 

S®P 9T 164.75 1623)0 1 62.53 1 00 7,997 

Od(7 16450 16425 leSTO ^75 (TOO 
rwa, 17R00 1663)0 1647S —13)0 ***4 

14775 1WJ5 —13)0 14206 
£[5J 171.75 1693)0 16925 —075 41S7 

{»•» If? 25 1e0-S0 —1.00 110 

0or(O 16400 16400 16425 —1.00 1,755 

EM. sales: 17JXS. Prmr. man : s. 122 
Pmv.epeninl^7lj6Hip*0 

BRENT OIL (1 PE) 

. 1 2S ta ^P 8r . btnftl ■ 10,5 01 1 .WO barrets 

*H2£ !. ,7 -* > UX2 —027 35130 

IH 6 !745 1746 -076 7378* 

Od97 |4H 17,95 17.99 —0.73 17785 

Nw« 1842 1417 1413 -425 10447 

Deg7 1470 1428 1BJ4 —0X5 14663 

MM 15^ j® 77 11,171 

143* 74X1 I8J7 -on 407 

NtotOB 1434 18X1 18X6 —0X1 2A04 

i 3 ^- Miles; 71JBS . Pm. sales : 27,978 
P""- open tot.; 174 123 ott 499 

Stock Indexes ' 


ITS T. BILLS (CM ER) 

n maHan- Disol loopa 


S3J- H ^W JP,!EJ ^ Indaxes 

SwW 92.85 91H2 9284 -flJU Uljo* 

SSS Sfi V& SSrSSSS EffflS »» «« —4.90 1793)0} 

52S 5-S 6MW 2£S WIW ™ 8*. 


.18 7-29 B-12 


CtMCefB.WTr o XI 7-21 7-37 fraamab ftappRortnal* moouM par 

DutffbdDUffiHxni M -065 7-31 8-11 sln«(ADRif«qtotelftCimP«in(undN 

DuflPMb UfBncs M MS B -20 9-10 nt-wontfaft; ^-ouur tt rt y; s-mmHnitninl 


Stock Tables Explained 
Sates flgura are onoffidoL Yes 
amani meek, but HRttw latesHr 


PORK BELLES (CMER) 

404)00 »».- cants per to 

JU97 B3J0 WO BJJ7 +022 622 

Au097 8205 7(XS 80X5 -450 M5I 

Fab (8 7X30 740 70X5 -182 04 

Est. stem UM Fri’s. sates IA65 
Frrsaaonlrir 4.127 off IS 


r rr !2 ky V. t ^ o, ' 00pa Sw(8 02X7 9250 92X1 -a'S ^Sf , 2^* hug 

«■» 9Uf MM -0X2 7X5* 92M tlSi «X4 loot stwo Ws.sS^«.no 

OIC97 (672 94.71 (4.72 -0X4 401 M*9* na OJ^ 9257 — AJM MTO2 ^'OPWint 186XJI w 100 

2H rn-r 10 Ert. sown. S0X4X Prn solos. 9X10 1«1(UPFE1 

S**?,. 407 Pteo Op™ M. 58S.770 off 4L369 g5pw Indox po*« 

HiS ooen irk 4470 off 131 Sep97 oafflX rtian 

! MEEaEL— ”tl 


10 ,S8J41 Pnw sates. »Xl *2 

Pteo Open M . 58S.770 on 4X69 


?3J^ SW ' r<CBaT7 QMImf 

SS K2 St2 H5i! -E 


N Uncfi 1^31 


fW D7 4HOUJU 4-4aD 71 rW 

£to» ^rf SSn 

F,l ... N T 40810 

14139 


and tows refled 


S ilk 1** lift -H 

7ft M* 7 +(k 

UU 3® MP 20ft 

ft u In lift (< 

TO SOi 5» S -lit 

MB 11k Wk 19k * 

2»9 51k 4Uk 3 +lk 

12*4 <K Wk A -Ik 

m 2*9 L» L *■* 

.TO nk Wk 


.» Slk «k S +(k 

12*4 6ft 6Vk 67k -9k 

2£ 219 111 l +Vk 

,E JS i ™ r 

1«* TO*k 2Hk 2m 0 

ijp m ts m 

jrn 270k 2<k 2W -Wk 

wi m* vn 2 su -m 

fflWIl 4ft -4 

J« » IN 3 

« t n -{* 

23 S *» a -Ik 

IS H5 IP *» ■»» 

i" 17k 176 n*k 4k 

14S I <M 

fl ig iff A * 

2}g iuf IBft tm i5 

» 11ft lift in 41 

TO 1 59, I?/, |jh 

IS !S? !?* >CT* +ft 

9 © p la +x 

is m iis st s 

XH ITkk I7fk 17ft **k 

3721 h ft <| -ft 

SZ4 1ft Ik 1ft 4« 


stock* ofUy. Unless oflieTwtac noteSfrote of ^cBvhkm^monnualdbtMiiieirwnis based un Food 

tt»ta 1 edtfd«lflrotsaa 

0 - dividend also exlro (j). p - wrta! OtvidaTOt onnuol rote unknown. COCOMNOW 

b - annuol rate of dhndtenct plus saw* *■ OT-priOMimi^nrtrt WS 1551-6 SO 

e-BgoWrttngdhiWend r-dMtl*tKldedored«'I«iW in preceding 12 S’i ™ 1A 07 T 62 B +1 22X46 

cc -PEexcoeds W. mouths, plira _ mS -98 1667 16C 1665 * 5 JIJ59 

cu-caBetL s- stock spB.0Md*fld begun wtm dote of USv « IMS 16(0 was +s mjw 

d-Mwnorfylow. spSt 3u(M tw r«o iw *S hw 

Od- less tattle toll 2 montte. sb-Mtes. Ejt. softs 4jsi Fit’s, soles 5.990 

e-dhMenddackiredwpddlfl preceding 12 r- dWkteflfl pold in stock In precctfinq lj ri’scptow WX57 ofl *9 
months. months, estimated aah wlue on m-dh - armnw 

1 - omwal rote, increased on lost dodo- (WendofowSstitbuhori ttata oo^EECwraw 

_ . . u-nwrewirW* S#*|bSb wa a> 


wr 5 v - £ - Ss B. k 

SSSSS Ba» . SI 3 II SS 4 !! iii tse ^ 


Commodity indexes 


HVR, TREASURY OOT1 olw SfS 1 55X80 

2tDOJX)0prln-ptm&3Mfta#10Qpca B£S S’!? qT?5 SJ? -"0 .U 1 1 2.640 

Sep 97 109-70 109-13 109-14 —04 3 &M7 ?S * 7S 9i - 7t —0.10 B&53& 

DtcWJOMT urr« j own 7^1 J 1 

Mir M9-27 —04 J ww. oprnfcit . lJt4771 up J SjjiQ 

JUfl 14MONTH F II PHI IDA fltCEci 


Moody's 

Reylers 

^■Futures 


M’s ooen tut 357.3 II up 6 M 2 
US TREASURY BOfRtSKBDT) -^OS 111»» 

iSPO-llMTOO-pts i. ZBndiirf lOOpOJ 2^2 2 173 “ 40s (1^ 

SmW 114-07 113-28 11J-X -86 01X58 *** «*■» Mf2 - 0 JU 53 ^* 

Ore (7 ll>76 113-17 tl>ig —% 31.931 J«(B 94A8 *40 9440 -005 naif 

113-08 11341 -5 IXS13 g"" *}« «« -on ® 

Jun >* 1*3-29 —06 7» J 47 * 9*X2 -dm ji ,« 

gVLMH 1NM0 M’t50»S 417X10 JJ 77 U 7 * *■*» I1.0TO 

Pd SopenW 0X760 up I63M ,unw *463 (462 -Oiu U41 


24MNTH EUROURA (L1FFE) 

ITLi rnwon • pis ot too pd 

Sep* 7 W4l MJJ 9233 . 


unuiidi mpnn> oniRireu 9-M08I un 

f - onnual raft, increased on test dodo- ytdwdwM-rSsffl button *riB. oomeecwow 

mHorfc u-mivpaorfrhlSh. yw^lMW 1F«‘ IHW tlA 43* 

g - (flvidend in Canadian (units, subject la *-lratSngtaatua . uj™ , 1]JB moa -110 11X07 

l5%iMn-reskteflcetBx. y| * In OanitiuptcY or reeonwrahip or being mu urjn 1495 Q —'-50 5.7*9 

i - dhMend declared otter spUf-yo or stock reamanbed imdec Hw Bankruptcy ACL Of m<v« t*Ta uoxo 141X0 -085 2X17 

dividend. securWes assumed by such companies. mqv(S 13IX0 11500 U6XS —2X5 M5 

I-dMdmdpold1t)te5*TOOiri48eiLdefefTHlor wd-whendteMbutea. Eftsdes xmb M'xsoin 3X39 

nooeflon tafeat tatetidMdend ™ j*xl »( - whwissuetV FtTsoptoH 3BXH oH S4 


iSSSSaanir-- 


dividend. secu rtfestasumed by such an 

l-dMttendpoJdltksjwttoombted, deferral or wd-wheddteMbutea. 

noocBon tafei al btesifvidaxt moefino. wt - when iwuetV 

k ■ tSvktend dedored or paid «s yeqo m *to-wfthwominls. 
ocajmXattve asuc srita dmdends « oitcots. x-ex-dvktefldtfaz-rigtns. 

b • anmial into reduced on tost dedons- *rt»-iawJta*ribution. 

(ton. ZHr«wnMulHanan& 

n- new in It* post 52 weeks. n»hlgl»- y-es-rflektendOiWt sates in fulL 

few mnoe begins wdtitta start at tnnftng. yU-yteM. 

nd-nenday ddivery. 2-S0teStatuIL 


Fri’s OPTO irt 2BXH Off 254 
SUGAR- WORLD 11 (KSEJ 

!srwnHri« »» 

255 \1% IB iB H 8 

Jul« ii.» 11X6 H.MJ +0M 4.776 
Est. solos 4X07 Fri's. sates 9X00 
Fri’s open in 157X64 up 1D6 


U60R I -MONTH (CMER) 

p’* 01 ' WOncL 

JU97 9U2 

Ain 97 MJ4 kin WJ3 
5(P(7 MX tUI NX 
“■w tes 7X16 FrfssdH 3X39 
M's open Iri 48,953 oH 712 

long GILT (UFFE) 


Jon 98 (448 *40 060 -005 3079 ? 

(448 (4X9 9461 

ttee« 94J9 94.73 9422 -oaa 21M? 

(A 77 94 70 9471 ^.02 l 'JS 
bn 99 (4X9 94X3 94X7 -Oci 

Ed. sates.- 39X49. Pnw sates 5SJ45 
Pmv oponlnt 364434 up 5.760 


Industrials 

COTTON I (NCTN) 

384)00 Htl- cents P>r to 
0O9J 73.70 7125 73X8 
0«97 73J0 7320 73X7 


'009 12X37 
>0.12 47 [Si 


OMWoO-ptoX JBkHoMOOpa NtarM 74X5 7441 7£« Inm < i’2 7 

* 7 1 14-05 TI4df -O-JI 177.10 yfS j*" S.tB6 

D**7 MT NX. IIJ-36 -0-21 I78X7J }[S ?>1<6 


sates 61,272. Prev. sate* 93X81 
Piw open ml. 178X75 up 10X38 


£98 76.10 7M0 75.(5 Zj® f S 

Esr. sates na Fr.-v tales uins 

Rrsowntor W^r JSlTai 


For uwesitoevt 
INFORmoN 
__ Read 
TOE MONEY report 

every Saturday 
in the IHT. 

Heralb^Snlnnic 






u* \£p 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 


PAGE 15 


EUROPE 


Raytheon ^ Shares Get Boost 
Sells Most From Du Pont Bid 




lQ nce For Chemicals Unit 
nation, 


lbongton 


By Charles V. Bagli 

New York Tunes Service 


— Raith'e, M ** 




Monday that it had ""' ^ P crceniJv ionaay t aaayaneruui'oni me titamunj-aioxjwJe market. 

™ ra ® of its, five apni,, -So ^ of Co. announced it would buy ICI’s Du Pom. which in recent years 


eon Co^ 


LONDON — Shares of Imperial 
Chemical Industries PLC rose S.6 
percent Monday, a day after Du Pont 


plastics and paint, Du Pont would 
see its share of the $7 billion world- 
wide market for that chemical jump 
to 35 percent from 25 percent. 

ICI was its closest competitor in 
the titanium-dioxide market 


its rive apDlia Q % announced it would buy ici s ltu Font, which in recent years 
For S750 million ance Hit* -^industrial chemical businesses for has tried to refocus itself in several 

roswH m. i , een*^..“ n k:n; n . i u . ■ 


» help 

s recent exp^, ^ C|W ' 
fense electronics^ S 


The 


Jmcs. 

deal with 


CiW 

' l0n m i 


Holding Co. ©f 


Raytheon said. nne int 

au--condibonine lanc f 
cial-cookingse g mem , Cr ’^ le >- 
*^Appliance Group' 1 Ri> 

iheon decSSiTo n^‘A **! 


$3 billion. 

The deal, announced late Sunday, 
would help ICI fund its S8 billion 
purchase of Unilever NV’s spe- 
cialty-chemicals businesses, com- 
pleted last week, and would give Du 
Pont a global reach into the volatile 
commodity chemical markets that 
ICI is sedung to leave. 

Already the global leader in the 
production of titanium dioxide, a 
white pigment that provides color, 
brightness and opacity in paper. 


on declined to name k, ■ 
the rights to collect in?"* 


ok “guts to collect 

makes electronic comruft 
appliances. Those t* 0 Jl 
nesses account for : i nc+Jz 
the appliance operation'i yj* 
and51 percent of n> profi, ' 

It was not lmmediaielv cb 
whether any job. v,.juld'be* 
fected ov the transaction 


Rastheon said u w . » u ld $• 


•he proceeds irurr. the deals *. 
w;ard two major purchase 
. armed ai mafcinc n j s:i bi|l n 
company and a major ph\ aa 
me defense-electronics bug. 
ness. 

Federal regulators lh- 
month approx ed Rj'.iheoc. 
purchase of Te\*, !n>injnwc 
Inc. s defense an j e^ecuciuc.- 
unit. The compare is >ii|j r*u- 
ing clearance o: purchase o; 

Hughes Electronic ■ C.vp \ic 
fense business 

■Hie sale amour.,, td Mondr. 
abo.is subject i.-d^l z- 
prpval. A Ra>the*»n ciecuu': 
said the compare, expected* 
close she deal*:?. September 
..Raytheon >h -Acre i 
S55.125 Late Moriju* . up**?" 
cents. At ft.'.vi-rfvr- 


BT to Send 
Aides for Talks 
On MCI Deal 


Cuotpilai try Onr Sfcjf Fmm Dapxcba 

LONDON — British Tele- 
communications PLC said 
Monday that it would send top 
executives across the Atlantic 
for face-to-face talks with its 
prospective partner, MCI Com- 
munications Corp., after the 
U.S. telephone operator's sur- 
prise profit warning last week. 

Tbe $24 billion takeover of 
MCI by BT, which would cre- 
ate one of die world's biggest 
telecommunications concerns, 
was thrown into question when 
MCI said Thursday that losses . 
from its local-phone business 
would be $8(X) milli on this 
year, double previous fore- 
casts. 

BT said Friday that it could 
not rule out renegotiating the 
deal. 

“There will be face-to-face 
meetings” between BT and 
MCI executives, a BT spokes- 
woman said Monday. “We 
need information and we need 
the line straight.” 

BT shares rose 13 pence, to 
457 pence, in London. 

(Reuters, AFP, Bloomberg) 


key areas, would also extend its 
reach with the acquisition of ICl's 
manufacturing plants for polyester 
films, resins and fibers, moving 
from a strong regional player into 
the global arena. 

“This is a very exciting acqui- 
sition for Du Pont and our employ- 
ees.” said John Krol, president and 
chief executive of Du Pont. “It di- 
rectly strengthens our strategy for 
global growth.” 

While Du Pont will be gaining 
market share in bulk chemicals, tbe 
deal reflects ICl's desire to lessen its 
dependence on these businesses, 
which are highly cyclical, in favor of 
a greater focus on specialty chem- 
icals, which provide more consist- 
ent earnings. 

Under the deal with Unilever, ICI 
is adding businesses that produce 
chemicals used in adhesives, starch, 
food ingredients and flavorings, with 
annual sales of nearly $5 billion. 

As part of the same strategy, ICI 
has also agreed to sell its majority 
stake in a subsidiary, ICI Australia 
Ltd., for about $1.64 billion to a 
group of investors. 

Du Pont's deal with ICI isione of 
the company's largest acquisitions 
since 1981, when it purchased the 
energy company Conoco Inc. for 
$7.3 billion. 

Last year, Du Pont had about $44 
billion in revenue, with its chemical 
business generating about $25 bil- 
lion in sides and the energy com- 
ponent providing the remaining $19 
billion. Mr. Krol said he expected 
the latest acquisition to add about 
$3.5 billion in revenue over the next 
several years. 

Du Pont said it expected to close 
the latest transaction early in 1998. 
The company will acquire ICl’s fac- 
tories in France, Italy, Spain, the 
Netherlands, Britain and Japan, in 
addition to operations in North Car- 
olina, Virginia and Delaware. 

ICl’s shares rose 69.5 pence in 
London to dose at 880 $14.90). Du 
Pont shares were quoted in late New 
York trading at $62,375, down 8 7.5 
cents. 


U.S. Moves on Finance Trade 


By Tom Bueride 

InicmiiiiHhil Herald Tribune 


BRUSSELS — The United 
States revived efforts Monday to 
liberalize global trade in financial 
services by presenting a fresh offer 
to open its banking and insurance 
markets to foreign operators and 
coun- 


>pei 

pressing rapidly developing o 
tries in Asia and Latin America to 


follow suit 

Washington's offer to put banks 
and insurers from other countries 
on the same footing in the U.S. 
market as their big American com- 
petitors is conditional on winning 
market-opening commitments 
from a substantial number of other 
countries, Jeffrey Lang, the deputy 
U.S. trade representative, said. 

“Major emerging markets in 
Asia and Latin America are ab- 
solutely critical" to reaching an 
agreement by a December dead- 
line, said Mr. Lang, who made his 
comments before American offi- 
cials formally presented the U.S. 
offer at the World Trade Orga- 
nization in Geneva. 

Mr. Lang declined to specify 


individual targets, but U.S. and 
European officials have men- 
tioned South Korea, Thailand, 
Malaysia, India and Brazil as be- 
ing at the top of their lists. Malay- 
sia, for example, has offered to 
allow foreigners to buy as much as 
40 percent of local financial -ser- 
vice companies, a move that could 
actually require the insurer Amer- 
ican International Group Inc. to get 
rid of half of its 80 percent holding 
in a Malaysian insurer. 

The American offer, which fol- 
lowed similar moves by the Euro- 
pean Union and Japan in the past 
two weeks, was welcomed by 
WTO officials because the huge 
U.S. market makes Washington's 
participation vital to an accord. A 
U.S. decision to withdraw from a 
previous round of negotiations in 
1995 torpedoed an accord then, 
although many countries have 
made interim commitments that 
run until the end of this year. 

“Without them, there is no 
deal," one official said, referring 
to the United States. 

WTO members had set a dead- 
line of Monday for presenting of- 


fers. Negotiators will meet Thurs- 
day in Geneva to discuss them. 

Mr. Lang said he was encour- 
aged by signs that developing coun- 
tries increasingly regarded opening 
their own markets as essential to 
rapping global capital markets to 
finance their growth. WTO officials 
agreed, saying that neither Thailand 
nor tbe Philippines had shown signs 
of backtracking in the talks despite 
recent financial turmoil that forced 
them to devalue their currencies. 

Under the new offer, die United 
Stales would open up its financial- 
services markets to new invest- 
ment from non-U. S. companies, 

instead of only to companies that 
have established U.S. subsidiaries 
as at present. Unlike the U.S. offer 
of 1995, the new proposal also 
makes non-U. S. companies eli- 
gible to benefit from any future 
financial -services deregulation in 
the United States. 

Non-U. S. companies would 
have the same opportunities to con- 
duct interstate banking as their 
American counterparts, and they 
no longer would have to pay special 
fees for supervisory examinations. 


Investor’s Europe 


I pax - •• ■ 

4000 / 4800 

[■ 3800 jJ l 4600 

3600 Jh~~ '< 4400 

I. 3400 AaJ ■* 4200 4 
3200/** 14000 



Source; TaJekurs 


luicnuiiwuJ Hcrmkl Tribcme 


Very briefly: 


Alcatel 6 Rumors 9 Irk Lagardere 


Reuters 

PARIS — Lagardere S A hit back 
Monday at reports that its rival, Alc- 
atel Alsthom, would be given ah 
important role in Thomson-CSF 
now that plans lo sell a stake in the 
French defense electronics com- 
pany have been called off. 

Lagardere ana Alcatel both bid 
for Thomson-CSF before the new 
Socialist-led government canceled 


the sale Friday. The two also bid last 
year for the parent company, Thom- 
son SA, in another sale that was 
canceled. 

“Governments change but the 
same rumors are being repeated and 
still favor the same group. Alcatel,” 
a Lagardere spokesman said. “As 
happened last year, it is being said 
that they have won in advance before 
the new process has even begun.” 


. . In canceling the sale of a 58 per- 
cent stake in Thomson-CSF, tbe 
government said it would soon draw 
up a new plan with Thomson-CSF at 
the center of a French defense in- 
dustry. Alcatel has teamed with the 
Preach warplane manufacturer 
Dassault in the Thomson discus- 
sions, while Lagardere’ s partner is 
Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG of 
Germany. 


• Westdeutsche Landesbank Girozentrale refused to with- 
draw a loan it had granted to Offshore Engineering & 
Construction Co. of Iran despite a warning by a U.S. senator 
that the deal would violate the America’s 1996 Iran-Libya 
Sanctions Act WestLB said it was not breaching any laws. 

• Russia’s central-bank chief accused the commercial bank 
Unikombank of misappropriating $500 million in govern- 
ment money and said Finance Ministry officials had broken 
rules in their dealings with iL 

• British Midland Airways signed a deal with Airbus In- 
dustrie, the European plane-making consortium, to buy 1 1 
A320 and nine A321 aircraft for about $1 billion. 

•Lufthansa Service Holding AG, the catering division of the 


German airline, is planning to seek a bourse listing in tbe second 
half of 1998, but Lufthansa will retain a majority stake. 


• W.H. Smith Group PLC’s share price rose nearly 3 per- 
cent, to close at 350.5 pence ($5.94), after reports that the book 


and paper retailer faced a takeover bid. afp. Bloomberg . Reuters 


SBC- Warburg Ventures Into Russia Merrill Lynch Buys Slice of Bezeq 

^ Bloomberg News 


Bloomberg News 

MOSCOW — SBC-Warburg, the 
investment-banking arm of Swiss 
Bank Corp., said Monday char iz 
would form a joint venture with the 
Russian brokerage Brunswick In- 
vestment Ltd. to enter the booming 
Russian stock business. 

SBC-Warburg will combine its 
Russian corporate-finance opera 
tion with Brunswick into a new 
company called Brunswick War 
burg, with SBC-Warburg owning 
50 percent. Brunswick managers 


and Brunswick Investment Ltd. will 
hold the remaining 50 percent. 

The venture comes amid consol- 
idation in the Russian securities in- 
dustry and a rally in Russian stocks 
that has seen some stock indexes 
rise by 150 percent this year. Last 
week. Renaissance Capital Group, 
one of Russia's largest securities 
firms, merged with International 
Company for Finance and Invest- 
ment, Russia's fifth-largest bank. 
The joint venture “will create a 
werful 


po 


new presence in invest- 


ment banking in Russia,” said Ger- 
ard De Geer, a founding partner of 
Brunswick. 

Brunswick will gain a deep-pock- 
eted partner with an established in- 
ternational distribution operation for 
Brunswick's Russian equities. SBC- 
Warburg will gain research expert- 
ise in Russian equity and access to 
Brunswick's clients, which repre- 
sent about a third of tbe Russian 
market, said Martin Andersson, who 
comes to the new venture as chief 
executive from Brunswick. 


TEL AVIV — The government said Monday it had sold a 
1 2.4 percent stake of Bezeq Corp. to Merrill Lynch & Co. for 
$250 million, sending die phone company’s shares higher and 
taking the state closer to its target for asset sales. 

Merrill Lynch paid $50 milli on for a 25 percent share of 
Bezeq, according to Tsipi Livni, head of Israel’s Government 
Companies Authority. It then bought the rest of the 90.6 million 
shares for $200 million and has an option to sell them back if it 
cannot resell them by the end of February 1998, he said. 

Bezeq ’s shares closed 1.5 percent higher, at 10.26 shekels, 
($2.88) after the sale was announced. The purchase price 
indicated that Merrill had paid an average of $2.76 a share. 

The sale brought the Israeli government closer to its goal of 
selling 4 billion shekels of state assets this year. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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UW News 

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State BkMdia 3e2 334 336. ?> 350 

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Tata Eng Loco 43X75 419.25 426 439-50 


Brussels 


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7650 7500. 7610 7490 

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3590 3S70 . 3570 3580 

8000 7930 7980 7910 

3300 3260 3770 .33017 

6010 5950 3960 -6010 

15050 14850 14925 14975 
15250 15050 15150 15125 
13575 13325 13325 13550 
«70 4940 4950 4950 
11850 10950 10950 TTOOD 
3695 3*40 3650 3650 

21850 21600 2M00 21775 
14900 34850 14850 14Sn 
136410. 129000 13S20D 129000 . 


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ASJD 44J0 

9.15 

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115 111 JO 
845 8J0 

70.50 m - 
1535 1485 
SUB 30 . 20 
1885 1828 
535 4.9S 

250 246 

6735 66 

2340 23 

2240 21 JD 
19 JO 19.10 

49 JO «.10 

113 2.95 

1J0 1.15- 

9450 92 

4J3 4J0 

7.95 7 70 

745 740 

70 6825 
33-50 3240 
1X25 17.90 


835 

3X10 

1420 

7725 

2340 

4320 

4740 

45 

920 

14.10 
112 
865 

6925 

1525 

274S 

1840 

5.10 
249 

6626 

2X15 

M..M 

1920 

4870 

225 

1.16 

9225 

423 

775 

725 

£825 

yna 

1810 


830 
31.90 
1445 
7775 
2325 
42J0 
47-80 
4X80 
WO 
14 
‘ill 
845 
6925 
1470 
30. ID 
1815 
423 
245 
6675 
2X30 
2125 
19.10 
4810 
3 

1.18 

9220 

478 

7.90 

725 

69 

3240 

1790 


Bril 
Brit Tehran 
BTR 

BurmahCasW 
Burton Go 
CdUeWwtess 
CodburySdnir 
CaritonCoRM 
Comad Union 


863 

424 

7.67 

6.10 

143 

541 

5*89 

1228 

834. 

522 

427 
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1047 
7.91 
327 
1X37 

*92 

230 

640 

720 

428 
122 
440 

2 
ID 
127 
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STS- 
522 
727 
6.33 
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□nans 
ElechoaMapoMfds 422 
EMI Group 1121 

ISKSS ^ 


EntofpriseOil *99 

FaroQltoaU 149 

GerrlAcddent 929 

GEC 188 

GKN 10.15 

GtaroWWta me 1X99 
Granada Gp 7.90 

Grand Mel 
CUE 

Greutoftljfi 
Gutooest 
GUS 


45BC Wdgs 
■pi Tobacco 


Jakarta 


ev w* 1 ir~ ,Jg -iJZ* 

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c — < 


Copenhagen 


Stock te dita 63X3 1 
Prertoos; 42477 


■“^■saaaa 


Land Sac 
Loum 

Legal Genl Grp 
UWtaTSBGp 
LucasVortry 
Maria Spencer 
MEPC 

Moray Aseal 
NatWwl Grid 
NaB Power 




Den 


Bk 


3 ^: 

965 

415 


398 400 397 
263 365 . 967 
949 965- -945 
409 412. 412 
725 742 750 






D/SSvendbrgB 394000 386000 394000 395000 


d U- 


- r -• i t-v- -.v " ’ 





m 


275000 270000 Z75BOO 270000 
Z3S 200 230 232 

70*57 780' :7B0 780 

7S 735 750 734 

1W 90 MOO 979 

381 . 375 27922 373 

425 399 425 4D0. 

455 . 438 IBS 443 


Astro Infl 

Bfclatllndan 

BhNegwa 

GudangGann 

JndoceoaO 

indofood 

Semen Grerik 


8700 8525 ^ Mg 
_1900 1775 1W 1«0 

1525 1475 1500 125 

9530 M50 9450 9425 

2650 4450 4550 4375 

5550 5450 SSi 5450 

7530 7425 7525 7425 

M5B 9325 MOO MB 
5100 4975 4975 SOW 
3975 3900 3975 3925 


5-- 


Johannesburg xnwrasB 


Frankfurt 


"5SSS 




DAX‘ *134.79 
PMkWh 484897 


a^nlonrotri flto. 3185 ' 3X40 32*0 3X40 
ASkStaW 268J0 . 266 3£*a 268J0 






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1850 

22890. 

AflnuHdo 439 
Altana 18J 

BkBerBi , .3840 
BASF - £830 

Bayer Hwo Bk 57 JO 
Bw.Vtatototank J840 
Bawr 7*0B 

MM. 

Beuag - 4176 


1750 1810 1740 
227 22850 226 

431 JO 433 . 41* 
171 184 . M 

38S .3858 3838 
67 JO WJ5 6A97 
57 57.15 5*SI 
7*20 78B 75J0 
7X65 7185 7X45 
8810 8920 89 JO 
41 .41. « 


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AnSoAmtod 195 

AVMJN 


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FONaBBk. 

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... 192 192 193 

1480 14J0 1475 M5D 
4980 49JS 4980 49 JD 
25 JD 35 25 2815 

1MJ0 1*5 USJD 16*75 
MM 33 3X25 31-50 
37 JO 3*40 3750 3*50 
1985' 1975.1980 1970 
9*25 « 9*25 9*75 

63 62 62. £3 

2*50 2150 25-50 25J0 
253 288 SM 287 


Mr 

jgB^i 

RwrtrosHdfls 

RTZreg 

RmI&SudAH 

Safeway ^ 


ScotNewoofle 
Sarf Power 
Sec uri cnr 
Severn Trad 
SheS Trump E 
Stebe 


*16 
X7B 
4.72 
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582 
19.90 
890 
X£8 
130 
XS3 
937 
■ X71 
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1387 
148 
5J1 
872 

780 
832 
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769 
4*5 
613 
777 
387 
980 
2J4 

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274 

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9.05 

X24 

*13 

10.16 

487 

191 

430 

17.65 

781 

450 
273 
870 
4J? 
I DOS 


886 861 
486 452 

7-50 7J3 

*05 *09 

180 1.42 

5X5 *36 

587 585 

1X03 1X32 
JJi .87: 
*37 *48 

*18 *32 

199 408 

1025 18.35 

7.71 7-82 

102 106 
1X15 1125 
684 *86 

X24 X28 

*22 680 
779 7.90 

483 452 

188 1JZ 
44) 457 

182 1.96 

983 9.95 

124 126 

5J5 *83 

5-56 *71 

*15 51? 

*80 704 

5-95 *99 

105 1D9 

*47 5Ji 
427 430 

11-uJ llild 

6»3 686 

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187 189 

9 984 
387 X79 

9.93 1815 
1X20 1389 
730 786 

6D5 6:' 

IT. V7e 
470 
*05 *i2 

oJ3 *19 
*76 *79 

1885 1987 
839 m2 
383 384 

7.10 7.14 

281 2 JB 
9.13 934 

286 170 

4X3 435 

68C ■ *dS 
1.91 XW 
*53 *59 

*06 *09 

1X36 1X99 

283 145 

532 *43 

851 860 

7.18 7J1 

3.17 120 

24K 807 

*31 *33 


8-53 

450 

7J0 

6 

183 
588 
*86 

1X16 

824 

539 

418 

407 

1CL29 

7-85 

3 

1X25 

*89 

228 

*29 

7-82 

439 

184 
443 
1.96 
9.99 
125 
572 
588 
&.MJ 
689 
lyffi 
387 
586 
425 

1127 

*50 

*87 

187 

898 

376 

988 

1X18 

737 

*15 

274 

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530 

u 

7 x^ 

436 

68d 

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580 


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FECSA 
Gcei Natural 
Ibenkoia 
Pryca 
■toped 

SeviDanaEtoc 

Ta fa oc nl on 

TetetonkB 

UnianFenasa 

UrteacGanert 


28990 

1920 

6090 

9650 

13980 

1510 

27600 

6090 

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4755 

5030 

3375 

SfflO 

13810 

1310 

32350 

182)1 

3225 

6550 

1510 

B450 

4535 

1255 

2600 


28500 

1880 

6000 

9510 

12860 

1405 

27230 

6000 

37800 

4*35 

4965 

2300 

8630 

12610 

1290 

31800 

1770 

3190 

6350 

147P 

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45 (to 
1245 
2S60 


28520 28450 
1890 1910 

tti 6050 
9600 9470 

12980 12810 
1495 1495 
27330 27398 
£070 6030 
38000 38180 
4750 47W 

4995 49B0 

3345 3375 

9000 8530 

12760 12500 
1300 1305 

31800 31700 
1785 1815 

3200 3180 

6550 6350 

1475 1485 

0450 8310 

4525 4515 

1250 1255 

2560 2560 


The Paris stock market was 
closed Monday for a holi- 
day. 


SaO PaUlO Bira^atadBlsna 


Amcor 
ANZ Bktafl 
BHP 
Baal 

Brartbto* bid. 
CBA 

CCAraaH 
Coles Myer 
Coinafa) 

CSR 

Fosters Stow 
G aoihmsiFM 
la Australia 
Lend Leas# 
MIMHdu 
Nat Aid Ban* 
Nat Mutual Hdg 
News Corp 
Podflc Dank*) 
PtoneerlnM 
Pub Broadcast 
RjoTmto 
St George Bank 
WMC 


BradescoPfd 
Brahma PM 
CrmigPfd 
CESPPM 
CopeJ 

Etehobm 
taubancaPfd 
iSwvfcte 


11-60 

8653)0 

6450 

8X50 

2450 

689.00 

«W 


Manila 


PSEtodkc 271073 
PnftaH: 2781.14 


jPftl 

Poulhhi Luz 

SIdNadonal 

Souza Cjvz 

TcfcbrasPfd 

Tetemlg 

Trial 

TehspPtd 

Unbanm 

UetarinaePM 

CVRD PM 


49X00 
32*00 
199-00 
3&50 
10.10 
169 JO 

tv-::.oo 

169JJ0 

3B0JH 

4*00 

1139 

29.17 


1315X30 

11J0 11.10 
830-00 B30J8 
61 OO 

80-00 80-00 
2X30 24M 
440.00 £40100 
©ffl-00 *7*00 
587J» 59000 
48*00 499.00 
309-00 309 JO 
199-00 189.00 
37.00 37 JO 
975 9J5 

15*00 158.8® 

18*00 T8iG8 
1*1 JO 161JSB 
3S3JJS 36400 
4497 4*®a 
13X12 1X05 

27J0 27 JO 


842 

10.17 

1878 

4X7 

2*50 

1*45 

1499 

*85 

*65 

*27 

245 

ijn 

1245 
27 J4 
IJ4 
19.92 
X15 
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374 
496 
8 

2191 

8J5 

727 

899 


847 

9J4 

1E45 

423 

2*10 

1*27 

T465 

*50 

*51 

*07 

2J8 

1.76 

1X49 

77.10 

1J2 

19J5 

X10 

*20 

X£4 

483 

7.94 

2141 

849 

771 

7.93 


849 861 

9.92 10.15 

18.50 1875 
427 438 

2*20 2*42 
1627 16X6 
1476 15 

*59 *80 

*55 643 

5J07 527 

2.5V 244 

180 178 

1X61 1270 
2741 27J5 

M3 M3 
1941 1995 
X1D X15 
6X0 *43 

170 X74 

486 496 

7.97 7.96 

21-69 2181 
851 860 

774 780 

7.93 *10 


The Trib Index 

Prices bb of 3.P0P.M. Atew York tone. 

Jan. t, I0S2- tOO. 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to date 
% change 
+20.06 

World Index 

179.06 

-0.29 

-0.16 

Ragionaj mdaxaa 
Asm/PaaHc 

131.14 

+1.85 

+1.43 

+6.25 

Europe 

187.22 

+0-28 

+0.15 

+16.14 

N. America 

207.26 

-0-94 

-0.45 

+28.01 

S. America 

Industrial Indexes 

177-27 

-8.27 

-4.46 

+54.92 

Capital goods 

227.24 

+0.66 

+0.29 

+32.95 

Consumer goods 

200.37 

+0-28 

+0.14 

+24.12 

Energy 

194.91 

-3.19 

-1.61 

+14.18 

Finance 

135.89 

+1.39 

+1.03 

+16.68 

MtscBBanaous 

179.94 

-0.75 

-0.42 

+11.23 

Row Materials 

190.73 

-3.09 

-1.59 

+6.75 

Service 

168.88 

-0-89 

-0.52 

+22.97 

Utilities 

176.30 

-5.55 

-a 05 

+22.89 

Tbe Unemotional HoraU Tribune World Stack Index G tracks the U.S doltar values Of 
2B0 Intsmatlonally imesteUe stocks trom £5 countries. For mm information, a tree 
booklet Is avadeUe by wrong m The Trib Max. Wi Avenue Charles ote Gauito, 

B2521 NBiOty Cadex. France. Compaed by Bloomberg Nam. 


IUO 

90580 

ram 

82.8B 

2X00 

67780 

«80 

59080 

«5J}B 

31780 

19*00 

38.40 

8080 

1*5.10 

18880 

16180 

370.00 

4*00 

1X80 

yim 


Ayala B 
AyrioLand 
BkPMIpbl 
CAP Homes 
Manila Elec A 
Mel id Sank 
Priron 

PCJBm* _ , 
Ptri Lang Dht 
SaaMtauriB 
SM Prime Hdg 


1*25 

17 JO 

1775 

1*50 

2375 

2X75 

23 

23 

158 

151 

153 

1S2 

9J0 

9 

9 

9J0 

87 JO 

8*50 

B5JD 

86 

555 

540 

55S 

530 

*60 

*30 

*60 

*30 

242 

2.® 

242 

240 

966 

950 

965 

735 

66 

63 

63-50 

6350 

740 

*90 

7 

7M 


Seoul 


OMpUltotada; 76445 
P teri — m 74838 


Mexico 


aba todflc 488X82 
Prefioas: 4821 82 


Aha A 
BanacriB . 
Came* CPC 
ObnC 

EmpModeraa 
GpdCeHoAl 
Gpo F Banner 


Gw Fin Inborn 
SSb 


1 Oort Men 

TdwboCPO 


5*60 
M30 
398(1 
1422 
4780 
57 JO 
2J6 
3*85 
3*65 
12X00 
2185 


S5J0 5*60 5680 
1988 1976 3025 
3920 3940 3980 
1414 1414 1424 
4775 47.75 4780 
57X0 57X0 57-73 
?_53 Z53 2-56 

3595 3*95 3*«® 
3*95 3*95 3*65 
120.50 U0l5D 12480 
7180 2185 2180 


Doom 

Daewoo Heavy 
Hyundai Eng. 
tab Motors 
Korea El Put 
K orea Each Bk 
Kona Mem Tel 
LGSemkxn 
Pahang Iran 51 
Samsung Dblay 
Samsung Else 
SUnhanBank 


107000 102000 103000 102000 
7950 7m 788® 7750 

22400 2 1509 21500 221 09 
msb mm usoo woo 
28000 27-ew 27700 mm 

5990 5750 5810 5820 

490000 475000 475000 485000 
36000 36000 37700 36000 
£3900 61200 61200 63200 
46200 45200 45500 46000 
68100 66600 67600 68000 
10600 10100 10100 1QSD0 


Singapore smi hhs 195440 

Prorioos: 1947-14 


Asto Roc Brew 
CenfaosPtx: 
OtrDarite 


Milan 


MIB TotaaoBcK 1404880 
! 140TBJ8 


□airy Farm I 
DBSIwetai 
DBS Lara 


Aerie 


Ini 


15105 

4455 

6050 

1455 

26900 

3790 




*76 *77 

1.17 1.19 


7M 

455 461 

682 *07 


7.15 771 

385 Xte 


9X0 980 

187 270 


*85 *09 

X16 272 


584 589 

X25 2X8 


895 985 
X15 XlA 


*07 *07 
1086 10.10 
459 485 
382 385 
420 423 
1787 17J6 
7X5 7X1 
438 450 
285 285 
056 883 
471 4X6 
998 10 


M9 

1.18 
7 JO 
462 
592 
773 
381 
. 9X2 
287 
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X15 
583 
2X7 
986 
132 
411 

HUB 

459 

395 

430 

17J6 

7X8 

428 

X74 

883 

421 

9.97 


RAS. 


10360 

6450 

wnn 

16245 

2625 

5400 

7675 

11685 

1156 

*5 

2510 

4410 

14435 


5 Paoto Torino 
Stef 

Tetecamlhfla 

TIM 


14800 

10645 

015 

5835 


14350 1«40 
4220 4375 

5835 5835 

1361 1440 

26250 26700 
3630 3690 

8705 8790 
10190 1024S 
6360 6375 
32750 32850 
158*5 15935 
2580 2605 

5290 5375 

7575 7650 

11280 11*80 
1138 1143 
470 47X50 
2470 2505 
4215 4355 

14225 14325 
22650 23650 
14150 14450 
10235 10420 
5650 5875 
5625 5645 


14650 


5965 

1349 

26150 

3630 


Fraser&Neatre 

HKUmd* 

Jned Motown* 

Jmd Strategic* 
KeppriBank 
Kernel Fete 
I Land 


10270 

A9t* 

32950 

16145 

2590 

5325 

7645 

11290 

1142 

481 

2455 

4230 

14210 

22900 

14540 

10155 

6000 

5765 


OS Union A F 
RutaKqrHdgi 


Sing I 

Sing Press F 
Stag Tech Ind 
StagTetaomn 
TatToeBoak 
Utd IndiBtM 
UMOSeaBkF 
Wing To! Hdg* 

^ArUJLabftn 


51*5 

540 

5*5 

. 5*0 

*25 

655 

*10 

*20 

13J0 

13 

1110 

13X0 

1350 

1370 

1180 

1370 

OJI 

050 

OJffl 

079 

1940 

1850 

1850 

19.10 

474 

4.58 

4*2 

470 

loxe 

10.10 

10.18 

HJ.10 

2*2 

X59 

160 

2*2 

7X5 

7.10 

7.15 

7.10 

3JB 

3JB 

158 

3J8 

372 

3*0 

3-fifl 

3*6 

5 

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491 

5 

*06 

402 

452 

48S 

1*10 

1*70 

1480 

1490 

950 

9J0 

9JS 

9J5 

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*35 

6X5 

AJD 

*90 

65S 

*90 

*»S 

13*0 

13X0 

13X0 

13J0 

7 

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755 

2*40 

Z770 

1770 

2*40 

374 

3*8 

168 

372 

2*1 

X5S 

158 

2*1 

254 

276 

276 

276 

157 

156 

156 

156 

1*50 

1*10 

15X0 

15X0 

4X0 

414 

414 

4X4 


Montreal 


■■dirtMotairiitaxi 358*10 
Pneton: 3S63JJ 


Bee Mob com 

GtaTbeA 

Ota USA 

CTFrolSvc 

GozMerin 

G*Wt*ILBWB 

bnasco 

hiMSkrsGq) 

LoWowCos 

Natt BkCmoda 


RowwCaa 
rFm 


Power l... 
OuebecorB 
Rooms ChibiB 
RoptBkCda 


4*95 44X0 4*95 4380 
2&1Q 27.90 28.10 27J9S 
37.90 37U 37.90 37H 

3W 3814 38* 3SL60 
19X0 1880 1880 1W 
33,9® 3385 SJS 33Jf 
4X90 4X40 42-^ 4190 
31?i 3i¥ 31*4 31M 

31H 2111 2114 71.15 

IBX0 1785 18.05 1785 
37X0 3*55 37 3*40 

34 3414 34X0 

2714 27W 

9J5 n 

66 66 


3*30 
77Mr 27X0 
9JS 9X5 
6*90 


Stockholm 

SX 16 iwlae 351X46 
PmriNSi 8479X1 

AGAB 

111 

109 109 JO 

109 

ABBA 

m jo 

110 

III 

iioio 


242 231 JO 

240 

235 

Astra A 

156 

153 

156 

157,50 

/ties Copoa A 

234 

226 

231 

229 

a mm 

301 

29/ 

398 

2V9 

BerirotuxB 

64 

640 

647 

m 


331 

327 

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326 


322 

305 

no 

30450 

|| r 

695 

690 

m 

fi91 


430 

475 

476 

423 

r**'1 MS 

268 

Ml 

765.50 

26/ 

Nsr^anken 

m 

K0 

281 

265 

ar 

285 

255 

282 

250 

285 

255 

280-50 

249 

Scania B 

23*50 232JD 

235 

SCAB 

179 

174 

176 

17SJ0 

S-EBanknA 

92 

VI) 

91 JO 

91 JO 

SbmdiaFdK 

331 

XU JO 

328 

32BJ0 


Hbo&deM 

Woohmrlhs 

HJl 

423 

11X0 

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11X5 

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11*8 

4X0 

Taipei 

CoBwy Ufelra 
ChmMHwdBk 
ChtooTurifl Bk 
Odna Bevripml 
China Steel 
Hist Bank 
Fannoea Ptastfc 
Hud Mon Bk 
- Wl Comm Bk 
Non Yta Pfasflo 
Sirin Kong LBe 
Tolwtai Srirri 
Tatung 

UU Man Sec 
UW World Chin 

Stack Mahnftadec9593J4 
Preriow: 9394*3 

150 145 146 145 

122-50 T17 117 119 

88-50 Cl 87 83 

178 163 178 162 

29-50 28X0 28X0 29J» 
122 11*5$ 117 118J0 

48.50 66 66 67J0 

124 1)8 1)8 1)9 

£6-50 64 £4 6*50 

77 74 7*50 S3 

11X50 107 toe sc® 

138 129 JO 137 JO 130JB 
5*50 54 54 54 

154 141 154 141 

71J0 69 69 JO 7DJD 

Tokyo 


NiM 225:28228X2 
Prevtoun 19875J9 

AJTEtopwiAJr 

Eh 

1150 

741 

1160 

748 

1160 

746 

CfUk 

Hj 



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647 

645 

A50 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC — - 


PAGE 17 


Many See Protectionism in SeouVs Frugality 


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By Donald Kirk 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

SEOUL — Buy a foreign car, 
and you face a tax audit 
That is the fear of potential buy- 
ers in South Korea, according to 
foreign automakers and industry 
representatives, who put part of the 
blame on the country's so-called 
frugality campaign. 

While South Korean authorities 
have distanced themselves from a 
campaign by local consumer or- 
ganizations aimed at cutting down 
on luxury goods, many foreign ex- 
ecutives here still suspect that there 
is official support behind the anti- 
imports drive. 

‘ ‘The frugality anti-import cam- 
paign has really hurt imports,” 
Wayne Chumley, president of 
Chrysler Korea, said. “Customers 
have a perception, if they buy our 
import, they'll get audited,” 

The Ministry of Trade, sensitive 
to widespread claims of pressure 
against imports, has assured foreign 
chambers of commerce that the 
frugality campaign is strictly “a vol- 
untary movement by civic groups” 
and mat the government has railed 
on officials not to target “certain 
groups of people or goods.” 

The tax administration, for its 
part, said it had ordered bureaucrats 
to call off the audits of tax returns of 
buyers of foreign cars. 

Official statements, however, 
may not change old habits. South 
Koreans bought just 4,707 foreign 
cars in the first six months of this 


year, down from 5.003 in the first 
half of 1996. Foreign car sales for 
the year are expected to hover 
around 10,000, down from 15,787 
in all 1996. 

Despite “Herculean efforts,” 
antn manufacturers in the United 
States and the European Union last 
year were able to capture only 0.6 
percent of the South Korean market 
for all vehicles and 0.8 percent for 
passenger cars, Andrew Card, pres- 
ident of the American Automobile 
Manufacturers Association told 
Reuters on Monday. 

Other countries in the Organi- 
zation for Economic Cooperation 
and Development have import pen- 
etration rates of between 25 percent 
and 75 percent. Mr. Card said. 

“This is a very, very closed mar- 
ket and one that should be opened 
op," Mr. Card said, “not just be- 
cause it presents opportunities for 
manufacturers of automobiles but 
more significantly because it rep- 
resents opportunities for con- 
sumers.” 

South Koreans often explain the 
difficulties facing foreign manu- 
facturers by citing what is viewed 
here as an economic slump. Not 
even the latest estimate from the 
Bank of Korea, predicting a 6.3 
percent increase in gross domestic 
product for the second half of this 
year and an increase of 5.9 percent 
for the year, has had much impact. 

“The downturn of the economy 
influences our potential custom- 
ers,” said Yoon Dae Sung, exec- 
utive director of the Korean Auto- 




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Pan! Baiio/Raum 

Andrew Card urges opening 
South Korea's auto market 

mobile Importers and Distributors 
Association, which represents for- 
eign dealers and manufacturers. 

In fact, overall domestic motor 
vehicle sales have fallen sharply, 
from 682.169 in the first five 
months of last year to 595.891 for 


the same period this year. Exports, 
however, rose to 590,000 units from 
585,921 for the same period, and 
total sales of South Korean vehicles 
are likely to match, if not exceed, 
last year's total of 3,054,071 units. 

“Psychologically, people are 
very negative about buying a for- 
eign car,” Mr. Yoon said. “TTiey 
are convinced they could get some 
disadvantage. They are thinking 
there could be a tax audit The 
government says no audit, but our 
customers don't believe it” 

Motor-vehicle importers are not 
the only ones to suspect official 
support for what they see as an anti- 
import campaign. 

The American charge d’affaires, 
Richard Christenson, has warned 
against “the erection of new bar- 
riers against the common prin- 
ciples” of the OECD and the 
World Trade Organization. 

Mr. Christenson’s remarks 
echoed the tone of a letter from 
Michael Brown, president of the 
American Chambered' Commerce in 
Korea, to members in which he re- 
marked chat “the frugality campaign 
is problematic” for importers. 

“Importing any kind of con- 
sumer goods is not easy,” said 
Kenneth Merron, president of Es- 
tee Lauder's South Korean affil- 
iate, ECLA. “Periodic outbreaks 
of anti-import activities are sort of a 
knee-jerk reaction.” 

Government calls fora slowdown 
in consumer spending persist even 
though exports are likely to go up by 
more than 15 percent in the second 


half of this year, to about $75 billion, 
according to the Bank of Korea. 
Imports will probably edge up to 
about $80 billion for the second 
half. 

Still. South Koreans warn 
against letting down their guard. 

“This is just a developing coun- 
try,” said Park Chan Sung, chair- 
man of the Citizen’s Movement 
Center for Anti-Overconsumption, 
a grouping financed, he said, by 
donations from religious organi- 
zations. “It’s too early for us. Av- 
erage spending is almost as high as 
advanced countries.” 

On a table in Mr. Park's office are 
advertisements in South Korean 
magazines for foreign cigarettes, 
cosmetics, liquor and motor 
vehicles. “Korea imports a lot of 
high-priced consumer products from 
Europe and the States. ’ be said. 

John Alsbury, president of BAT 
PLC’s Korean unit, sees govern- 
ment influence in the efforts of the 
government-owned Korea To- 
bacco & Ginseng Coip. to hold 
down the sale of foreign tobacco — 
not legal at all here until 1988 — to 
just 10 percent of the market. 

“They have a strong campaign 
against retailers." Mr. Alsbury 
said. BAT’s products cling to a 
scam 1 percent of the South Korean 
market. “They tell retailers, if they 
sell foreign cigarettes, they won't 
give them Korean cigarettes." 

“Not true,” counters Park Kang 
Jae, managing director of Korea 
Tobacco & Ginseng. “There is no 
limitation on foreign tobacco.” 


Southeast Asian Currencies Falter 


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SINGAPORE — Southeast Asian 
J yurrenries tumbled Monday as Malay- 
sia abandoned efforts to prop up its 
money, the ringgit, prompting concern 
it will follow Thailand and the Phil- 
ippines in devaluing its currency. 

The Thai baht and Indonesian rupiah 
fell to record lows against the dollar. 
The Malaysian ringgit fell to a 1 7-month 
low, and the Philippine peso 
weakened. 

Regional markets have been shaky 
since Thailand floated the baht July 2 
after sustained attacks by speculators, 
who next turned their sights to the peso. 
The baht has since fallen 19 percent. On 
Friday. Indonesia widened the trading 
band for the rupiah, effectively weak- 
ening the currency’s link to the U.S. 
dollar. 

“This is regionwide contagion,” said 
Desmond Supple, bead of regional cur- 
rency research at Barclays (BZW) Glob- 
al Foreign Exchange. 

“Exchange-rate risk has heightened, 
and that has reduced the attractiveness 
of the region to geauine investors, while 
at the same time speculators have been 
emboldened by a perception of weak- 
ness in die currencies.” 


Malaysia, while not announcing a 
policy change, let the ringgit weaken 
Monday by keeping the central bank out 
of the foreign-exchange market as the 
currency reached 2.5250 to the dollar. It 
finished at 2.5425 to the dollar in Kuala 
Lumpur. It was not immediately clear, 
however, if the central bank will return 
to the market 

“The central bank's absence from the 
market amid all the problems with 
Southeast Asian currencies just made 
people buy the dollar for the ringgit” 
said Owen Wong, manager for regional 
currencies at Tokai Bank in Singapore. 

Most regional stock markets fell, with 
the benchmark index in Kuala Lumpur 
dropping 0.21 percent as Indonesia’s 
fell 0.13 percent. The Stock Exchange 
of Thailand Index fell 16.64 points, or 
2.65 percent, while the benchmark in- 
dex in the Philippines gained 9.59 
points, or 036 percent 
Analysts said investors were wary of 
investing in die region’s stocks because 
a sudden currency movement could 
wipe out much of their investment 
“You’re getting a contagion effect 
from the nervousness about all the 
Southeast Asian currencies,’ ’ said 
Seema Desai, regional economist at 


GAMBLE: Magazines Try Their Luck 


Continiied from Page 13 

•' about lottery winners. What is missing. 

for the most part in all three magazines 
j is the acknowledgment that for many 
people, gambling becomes an addiction 
that can ruin lives. 

“We understand that that’s out 
there,” Mr. Tolan said. “We are going 
to take a very aggressive stance on re- 
> sponsible gaining. We're talking to 
^ some of the organizations to get them to 

i take our a page.” . 

“We’re going after an emerging 
breed of players in the 29-45 age brack- 
et,” he said. “We’re not trying to reach 
jl people who are going to put down their 
last paycheck on the table.* ’ 

But the gambling magazines' rosy 
- view is not the only one available. 
Mother Jones magazine has devoted its 
entire August issue to an investigation 
of gambling. The magazine underscores 
how gamhHng has moved from a mob- 
dominated, seedy business to a slickly 
i- packaged, family-oriented industry run 
by cor pora tions like Hilton Hotels 
Corp., ITT Corp. and MGM Grand 
Corp. 

According to Mother Jones, more 
than $100 milli on in political contri- 
butions has been made in the last five 
years to stale governments responsible 
for regulating gambling. 

. “We’re in a period paralleling that of 
; a century ago, m which basic Calvinist 
; tenets are transformed into casinoism,” 
said Jeffrey KWh,; editor in chief of 


Mother Jones. “Everybody thinks they 
can get rich.” 

In the meantime. Lotto World has run 
into an unfortunate patch on its own. 
Publicly traded since March 1995. the 
parent company, Lotto World Inc. was 
delisted as a Nasdaq small-cap stock last 
month. At the time, the shares had sunk 
to a low of 373 cents. 

James Cullen, the company's director 
of investor relations, shrugs it off. 

“The stock is still traded over the 
counter,” he said. At the same time, die 
company laid off more than a quarter of 
its 40-person work force, although Mr. 
Cullen said it bad signed contracts with 
five states to pot out local lottery 
magazines. He counts his company's 
total circulation at about 2 million. It 
also publishes a weekly magazine for 
the New York State Lottery and has just 
finished one for Virginia. 

In the first issue of Chance, a 
. quarterly, the articles include an inter- 
view with Donald Trump on the future of 
casino gambling. Sample question: 
“Rom a consumer perspective, what 
makes, people feel more comfortable 
about going to casinos today?” Half of 
the fiiif issue was distributed on die 
newsstand, the editor in chief, Anthony 
Reilly, said, while about 15.000 copies 
were mail ed to people identified as gam- 
blers by a fist brokerage service. 

“We accidentally sent a copy to a 
• Southern Baptist' church in Missis- 
sippi.” Mr. Reilly said. “They thought 
it was a joke. ” 


Schroders Securities in Singapore. 

Other analysts said the wave of de- 
valuations and floats signaled an end to 
the tight linkage between the region’s 
currencies and the U.S. dollar. 

Pegging a currency to the dollar 
“makes it safer for foreigners to invest 
without risk of depreciation.” wrote 
David Roche, a principal with the Lon- 
don consulting firm Independent 
Strategy. But with higher inflation and 
the need to bring down interest rates to 
stimulate exports. Southeast Asian 
countries have no choice but to float 
their currencies to stimulate their econ- 
omies, he said. 

Malaysia, like the others, faces a 
choice between raising interest rates to 
keep its currency strong, which chokes 
off growth, or giving in to pressure and 
letting its currency weaken. ■ 

Malaysia's central bank, like its 
counterpart in the Philippines, had 
vowed to defend its currency vigor- 
ously. It raised a key interest rate, the 
three-month interbank rate, to 14.4 per- 
cent from 11.1 percent Friday. Now 
traders are wondering if the bank will 
announce capital controls or other mea- 
sures to prop up die currency. 

f Bloomberg , AFP) 


Small Businesses 
In Japan Step Up 
Capital Spending 

Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — Japan's small man- 
ufacturers are increasing invest- 
ment in new factories “faster than 
expected” to catch up with major 
companies, the Bank of Japan’s 
Osaka branch manager said Mon- 
day. 

Small companies have room to 
spend more because the dollar’s 
almost 3 percent gain against the 
yen during the past year helped ex- 
porters expand output and profits, 
said Eiichiro Kinoshita, the Osaka 
branch manager. A stronger dollar 
makes Japan’s exports cheaper. 

Traders and investors are keep- 
ing a close watch on small compa- 
nies’ economic health because Y as- 
uo Matsushita, governor of the 
Bank of Japan has said the central 
bank must maintain its low-in- 
terest-rate policy partly to aid smal- 
ler companies, whose performance 
lags that of larger ones. 

Mr. Matsushita reiterated Mon- 
day in a speech to central bank 
branch managers that the central 
bank would maintain its policy of 
stabilizing interest rates near his- 
toric lows to support the economy. 


3"H1NK: Europe 9 s Map Lines 


Continued from Page 13 

clearly on the Western side of 
the line are also those most 
ready for membership in the 
Western institutions. A sur- 
vey of formes Comm unist 
countries Just published by 
Freedom House in Washing- 
ton finds a “dramatic’ ’ cor- 
relation between progress to- 
ward democracy, moves to a 


market economy and eco- 
nomic growth. 

The top seven countries in 
achieving those aims are the 
five that the EU wants to ad- 
mit first, followed by Latvia 
nrui Lithuania. All are to the 
west of the cultural divide. 
There is little point in wor- 
rying about new lines on the 
map when the old ones are 
still there. 



Arts & Antiques 

. Appears every Saturday. 

To advertise contact Kimberly Guerrand-Betrancourt 
TeL: + 33 (0) 1 41 43 94 76 / Fax: + 33 (0) 1 41 43 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office or representative- 


CALDR. ROWENTA. SEB. TEFAL 


1 st HALF CONSOLIDATED SALES 



1997 

(FRFmifficms) 

1997/1996 

1%) 

1997/1996 
At constant 
exchange rates (%) 

European Union . „. 

... 2362 

- 3 

- 5 

including France . . 

... 1331 

- 4 

- 4 

Americas continent 

... 1036 

+ 85 

+ 73. 

Other countries .... 

... 1430 

+ 38 

+ 32 

Total 

... 5428 

+ 17 

+ 13 


The sales of the Brazilian company ARNO, which 
the Group acquired on April 10, 1997, are included 
within the “American continent" sales for an amount 
of FRF 370 million. 

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DIVIDEND NOTICE 

At the Annual General Meeting held on July 14. 1997. it was decided 
to pay a dividend of USD 0.07 (7 cents) per share on or after July 23. 
1997 to shareholders of re c ord on July 1, 1997 and to holders of bearer 
shares upon prescozshon of coupon n° 18. 

Paying Agent: KREDIETBANK S.A. LUXEMBOURGOISE 
43. Boulevard Royal 
L-2449 Luxembourg 




Request for Proposals 


The Puerto Rico Pons Authority is accepting proposals for the 
desi g n , development, construction, administration and financing 
of Cruise Terminals 8 and 9 in the harbor area of San Juan. A 
pre-submittal meeting will be held on August 6, 1997. The 
proposal must conform with the Port Master Plan and should 
include in response to the RFP, as a minimum, the following 
paragraphs.- 

L Company profile h Commercial areas (duty free 

2 Project bittiness plan shops, restaurants, cafeteria, 

3. Financing and development plan souvenir shops and parking) 

4 Facilities administration plan c Tourism and waterfront areas 

a. Maritime area (facilities 5. Tenn of contract (not to exceed 

for mega cruise ships and 25 years) 

luggage warehouse) 

A detailed RFP may be obtained by writing to the FRPAat 
P.O. Bax 362829, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-2829. Hesse indude 
a non-refundable certified check in the amount of $100 made 
out to the PRPA. 

All the costs and expenses incurred for feasibility studies 
and/or any other study in the preparation of the proposal are 
the responsibility of die bidder even if the Ports Authority, for 
any reason, rejects die proposal 

The proposals must be submitted in English and must be 
in the office of the Executive Director by 4:00 PM on September 
26, 1997. Bor any additional information, please contact Mr. Jesus 
Jimenez, telephone number (787) 7296678. The Ports Authority 
has the tight of accepting or rejecting any of the proposals, to 
obviate any information and to adjudicate the contract under 
the most favorable conditions regarding the public interest of 
the Ports Authority. / • 

Herman Sulsona, PhD. 

Executive Director 


HongKcmg 

Hang Seng . 

17000 - 

'.16000 

15000 Trfl/-- 

14000— S-T- 
' 130 00\7 

.■12000 p— M A jyfj-j 

1997 


Times 


Tokyo 
. Nikkei 225 



1950 F'M A'ii j j 


17000 f" m a m’j j' 


Exchange ■ ' .index 

HongtCong . Hang g ang 
Singapore Straits Times 


.Tokyo. ;W'22S : . 

Kuala L umpur Conyoate 
Bangkok , SET - . 

Seoal ■ " index 

.Taipei"'' ' Stodt^laiketlrBiB 

Manila . PSE 

Jakarta Cori^D^efodox 
Wemngton; r ~ 
Bombay /'".'ipensBve' ’index" 

Source: Tetekurs 


1997 

Monday Prev. % 
.Ctosa . Cfose Change 
' 15^7p.M 15,225.29 +0.96 
"ijBSASB 1,96^14 -0.64 
2£73#0 2,099.10 -0.97 

29#2&?2 19,875.49 +1.78 
1.017.61 -Oil 


2,770.73 2.701 .14 +0.36 

~72 £®6T 723.42 ' -0.13 

2J»Q&32 “2,516.84 -0.46 
4,225.02 4,321.98 

Inicnuii-tful Hi-rakl TntwiK 


Daewoo Globalizes 

Fourth-Largest Chaebol Expands Fast 


SEOUL — Aggressive global expansion efforts by 
Daewoo Corp. are showing tangible results and are 
earning praise from corporate rivals, analysts said Mon- 
day. 

•‘Daewoo has moved very, very swiftly," an executive 
of Hyundai Corp. said. “At the same time, the group's 
strategy seems to be well focused.” 

Daewoo, South Korea’s fourth-largest conglomerate, 
has said it will have $15 billion in overseas projects by 
2000, employing 250.000 workers in more than 1,000 
sites worldwide. 

By 2000, it has said, it plans to be producing 20 million 
television sets worldwide and 2.5 million vehicles an- 
nually in more than 10 countries, as well as building 30 
hotels in 20 countries. 

“Daewoo's sales will grow to $177 billion in 2000 
from $68 billion in 1996, with more than 50 percent 
earned from overseas business,” Lee Jung Seung. a 
Daewoo spokesman, said. 

Daewoo also has announced plans to set up 20 entities 
around the world that will operate independently of its 
Seoul headquarters to strengthen its operations abroad. 

Daewoo has emerged as the largest carmaker in Po- 
land, Uzbekistan and Romania. The conglomerate ex- 
pects to sell 500,000 vehicles in Eastern Europe and the 
Commonwealth of Independent States this year, up from 
almost none in 1996. 


Very briefly; 

• Toyota Motor Corp. plans to list its stock on London's 
stock exchange in 2000 to try to increase its presence in the 
European market. 

• Hyundai Corp_ South Korea's largest conglomerate, is 
ready to take over the steel business of the failed Hanbo 
Group if the government gives the green light for a new steel 
mill, government and industry officials said. 

• Berjaya Industrial Bhd. shares were suspended from trad- 
ing pending an announcement, the Kuala Lumpur Stock 
Exchange said. Shares of the investment company controlled 
by Ling Hee Liong, the eldest son of Malaysia's transport 
minister, were last traded Friday at 2.91 ringgit ($1.16). 

• Vietnam cannot afford to build its own $1.5 billion oil 
refinery, and some industry specialists question whether it 
needs to have one. The state-run Vietnam News said Prime 
Minister Vo Van Kiet last week approved building the refinery 
in Dung Quat in remote Quang Ngai Province. 

• Indian stock prices tumbled 2.25 percent on the Bombay 
exchange after the Dravidian Progressive Party, a partner in 
India’s ruling United Front govemmenl, walked out of the 
coalition, taking four cabinet ministers with it 

• Alliance Capital Management L.P., a major player in U.S. 
mutual funds, is gearing up to sell fund-management services 
to retail investors in Singapore. 

• The Bank of Japan's governor, Yasuo Matsushita, said the 
counuy's economy was “continuing its gradual recovery on 
the back of firmness of output and wages. ' ' He said a rise in the 
consumption lax was unlikely to undermine a recovery in 
consumer spending. 

• Japanese bankruptcies rose in June from a year earlier for 
the sixth month in a row. climbing an unadjusted 1 8.7 percent 
from a year earlier, as many construction and real-estate 
companies closed and public spending declined. 

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PAGE 18 


SPONSORED SECTION 



SPONSORED SECTION 


Built for Business: Indonesia 


leader President Srdtarto 
was re-elected m May. 
Atttn W& the etectioB 
season was turbulent, 
social and economic 
stab&ty is returning, aad 
both dm government and 
the private sector are 
moving ahead with their 
projects. Jakarta (right), on 
Java Island, is a busting 
metropoBsof more than 10 
mSEon people. The 


encouraging bxtastiy and 
tourism &owth on islands 
other than Java and BaR. 




Mining Gold and Diamonds 


Bullish Mood After Election-Time Slowdown 


The government and private sector have ambition to match their optimism. 


E veryone is bullish 
here,” says Jopie Wid- 
jaja, president-director 
of PT Steady Save, one of 
Indonesia’s leading transpor- 
tation companies. “The 
economy is doing veiy well, 
inflation is low and, after a 
brief period during the elec- 
tion when many projects 
were on hold, it's now boom 
time again for the construc- 
tion industry.” 

*”1 don’t think the recent 
unrest will have any long- 
term impact," says Tom ing- 
lis, chief researcher for ING 
Baring Securities in Jakarta. 
“The investment climate 
here is still pretty favorable. 
Certainly within Asia, In- 
donesia is still one of the top 
destinations. The country is 
still very foreign-investment 
attractive.” 

Despite die reassurances, 
die May vote — and the tur- 


bulent four-month election 
campaign — had at least a 
temporary effect on the coun- 
try's business climate. In- 
vestment has dropped signif- 
icantly this year, falling 36 
percent in volume and 2S.S 
percent in value compared 
with the same period last 
year. 

Par for the coarse 
But this seems to be par for 
the course during election 
time. Sanyoto Sastrowar- 
doyo, the investment minis- 
ter, predicts the decline is 
temporary — and will be less 
than die 40 percent slump in 
investment the last time the 
population went to the polls 
in 1992. 

“During previous elec- 
tions, the effects were more 
severe,” says Mr. Widjaja, 
“but this year, we didn't feel 
it so much. This election 


proves that Indonesia can up- 
hold democracy without all 
the negative effects.” 

There's no denying that in- 
vestment is boomipg in die 
long term. As Mr. Sanyoto 
points out; from 1989 to 
1994, foreign investment ap- 
provals totaled $44 billion. 
As part of the 1994-1999 
Five-Year Development 
Plan, licenses have already 
been granted for more than 
double that amount — $108 
billion. 

“Nineteen ninety seven 
looks like another good year 
for the Indonesian econo- 
my,” declares a recent fore- 
cast by the Economic Section 
of the U.S. Embassy in 
Jakarta. “Barring unexpec- 
tedly bad news on die polit- 
ical front, foreign investment 
approvals should continue to 
roll in at a rate of $30 billion 
to $40 billion a year.” 


The World Bank is also 
taking the long-term view of 
Indonesia's investment 
scene. In its 1997 country 
report, die bank says “In- 
donesia is experiencing an 
increase in investment that is 
projected to keep annual 
growth between 7.5 and 8 
percent ... for the next few 
years. 

“On die basis of broad 
macroeconomic indicators,” 
die report continues, “the In- 
donesian economy is per- 
forming very well. Gross do- 
mestic product increased, 
inflation dropped and local 
and foreign investment have 
been increasingly buoyant” 

The bank farther estimates 

that by 2005, exports wUl 
reach about 28 percent of 
gross domestic product, ex- 
ternal debt will improve and 
half die county's 200 million 
inhabitants will become city 


dwellers as Indonesia 
evolves into one of the 
world's 20 biggest econo- 
mies. 

But as usual, there’s a 
catch. The World Bank re- 
port also points out factors of 
“some concern,” including a 
fell-off in die pace of new 
government deregulatory 
moves, a weak banking sec- 
tor (which is overexposed to 
the property sector) and high 
core inflation. On die bright- 
er side, Indonesian govern- 
ment statistics put inflation 
for the first five months of 
this year at 2.71 percent, 
compared with 4.1 percent in 
the same period last year. 

Since the publication of 
this World Bank report, the 
Indonesian government has 
unveiled a new economic de- 
regulation package. Accord- 

Continued on page 19 


M ineral companies continue to foige 
ahead with various extraction proj- 
ects for precious metals and stones:. 
The Bre-X scandal has not deterred those in 
the minin g sector, despite the feet that it 
temporarily dented investor enihusiasrrL 
One of the most ambitious 
(and unique) schemes is the 
Sunda Shelf offshore alluvial 
diamond project It aims to 
scoop millions of dollars 
worth of precious stones off 
the floor of the Java Sea 
southeast of Kalimantan 
(Borneo). 

Trans Hex International, a 
leading Canadian diamond 
mining firm, wrapped up its 
initial exploration phase in 
March with an announce- 
ment that an estimated 70 million tons of 
diamondiferous basal gravel rests on the 
underwater Sunda Shelf. Bulk sampling is 
under way, and Trans Hex expects to spend 
about $5 million in total exploration costs 
before extraction resins. 


C o rporate au thor it i e s 
aro sobuUish on the 
Stand* ShoW that 

they have earmarked 
the project as one of 
the three most 
Important for 1997 


Corporate authorities are so bullish on the 
Sunda Shelf feat they, haw earmarked the 
project as one of the three most important for . 
1997 (along with Northbank in Namibia a nit 
Acordo in Brazil). 

East Indies Mitring Company, another Ca- 
nadian firm, announced last 
month that it had started 
drilling at a new gold field 
site at East Salopa in West 
Java. In the wake of Bre-X 
the company has been ex- 
tremely cautious m releasing 
information about the proj- 
ect 

East Indies executives 
have gone out of their way to 
reassure investors that rig- 
orous controls will be im- 
plemented during the collec- 
tion of drill core samples and shipment a£ 
samples for assaying. e 

Results of the initial exploration efforts 
and assays are expected before the end of 
July. 

J.R.Y. 


“Built for Business: Indonesia” 

produced in its entirety by the Advertising Deportment 
of the International Herald Tribune. 

Writers: Joseph R. Yogerst, based in die United States 
and reporting firm Indonesia, 
and Julia Clerk based in the United States. 
Program Director: BUI Mahder. 



-V 


Where public trust 
is everything 


The initial 8 pages of 
The Jakarta Post on Monday, 
April 35, 1983 were not very 
impressive. Yet, that first issue 
laid a milestone in the history of 
media publishing in Indonesia. 

It was the first newspaper 
to be born of the shared ideals of 
a number of this country's 
leading media publishers. And it 
is based on the belief that public 
trust is everything for a 
newspaper. 

People don’t read a 
newspaper because of its news or 
views. They read a newspaper 
because they trust the 
newspaper. Because 
they trust the people 
working at the 
newspaper. And people 
don’t trust others 
easily. 

You have to 
prove that you are 



Sta* JttrWvwt 


contfidsffts 

(MflOWKCd 


trustworthy. By being ’ 
professionally capable at your 
job. By firmly adhering to your 
professional code of ethics. By 
not compromising your integrity. 

Which is why we have not 
been selling newspapers for the 
last 14 years. We firmly believe 
that we have been delivering 
credibility. 

The fact that our audited 
circulation figure has been 
consistently increasing - today 
more than 49,000 copies — seems 
to prove that. 

So, on our birthday, we’d 
like to sincerely thank every 

single one of the public, 
our readers, our 
advertisers, and 
everybody else for 
trusting us. 

We don’t take your 
trust for granted. 

Thanks a million. 



The journal of Indonesia today. And tomorrow. 

Advertising & Subscription : 

Gedung KOMPAS. JaJan Gajahmada 1 10, Jakarta i 1 140, Indonesia 
Phone; (62-21) 260-1777- Fax.: (62-21) 260-1112. 260-1717. 549-2685, 530-9066 


i 




(_>* 


SPONSOR! I) StX f lON 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 


PAviE 19 


Built for Business: Indonesia 


sponsored section 


m 



irT\ 

{ :<v 


- — ' Is'^aheh* 

f* ^E^.MOUJcr*^ 


Auto Giants 
Scramble for 
Market Share 

" Local content for local people " is the byword. 

D eveloping nations in Toyota's sole Indonesian 
Asia will account for distributor. PT Astra, report- 
some 54 percent of ed an overall sales increase of 
capacity expansion in the 49 percent in May. The story 




8anda$oa 

/™«5r Timor See 


> Diamonds 

porate authorities are ■*-> 

: Shelf that thev 

t as one of the three m „s,^ 
along wrthNorUibanlunS? 

0 m Brazil). 

f Indies Mining Companv.w, 

• - nadia J fir ™- anniJJ: 

Ufa, ™" lh that „ ^ 

<friUing at j neu 
te site at East Salop?; 

Java, lnihcuakeo,^ 

the compan\ has £ 
kmd ^melycauiiouMnrc 

i of wfonnaii.»n about fc. 

East Indies CXft 

have gone out of their-. 

reassure •m,-*.* & 
orous control, t 

P i vr. :c J dunn a & • 

1 dnil core sample anj^n®- 

2s for assaying. ‘ \ 

lifts o: the initial „• ^pi.'*raii,tn ■ 
MW are expected N-ibre ife. • 


automobile industry over the 
next few years — 5.8 million 
units — according to a June 
forecast by DRIVMcGraw- 
Hill. 

One of the countries with 
the greatest potential in auto 
manufacturing and sales is 
Indonesia. The question is 
how to tap into the country's 
rapidly expanding appetite 
for cars and trucks. 

Almost everyone involved 
in Asian business has heard 
about the controversy swirl- 
ing around Indonesia's auto- 
mobile industry and the 


was not so rosy for the new 
national car, however. Timor 
sales fell to 1.298 units in 
May, from the 1,625 vehicles 
sold in April this year. 

The Indonesian auto- 
mobile market is currently 
dominated by Japanese man- 
ufacturers, which have a 65 
percent share. European 
brands are a distant second 
with a 20 percent share, 
while U.S. and South Korean 
brands have less than 8 per- 
cent each. 

In the face of ihe Timor 
competition, Japanese auto 



Best Web Sites for Business and More 


country's new national car makers have done everything 
project. The Timor sedan in their power to keep prices 


project is a joint venture be- 
tween PT Timor Putra Na- 
sional of Indonesia and Kia 
Motors of South Korea. 
Since last October, more than 
1 2,000 Timers have been im- 
ported from Korea, where the 
cars are being temporarily 
manufactured until the In- 
donesian assembly line be- 
comes fully functional. 

The debate centers on the 
fact that the national car is 


constant — despite an ap- 
preciating yen. Some have 
even cut prices. Earlier this 
year, Suzuki slashed prices 
on its 1600cc Esteem (from 
53 million rupiah, or 
$21,800, to 45 million rupi- 
ah) and I300cc model (49 
million rupiah to 40.5 million 
rupiah). By comparison, the 
1 500cc Timor sedan has a list 
price of 37 million rupiah. 

Meanwhile, Toyota has 


being produced in another announced plans to introduce 
country. And many auto a new sedan with injection 


makers in Tokyo, Detroit and 
Europe say the deal smacks 
of trade protectionism. 

A net result of the con- 
troversy, however, could 
mean big advantages for In- 
donesian consumers. To 


technology in 1999. ft is 
called the Asian Family Car, 
and Toyota and Astra have 
invested $75 million in its 
development and manufac- 
ture. They are targeting sales 
of at least 30,000 units ayear. 


iWfil.V CK'^ir ’V-. r; 

' TrlruKi- 

ri nV f.r.iJjL.';: 

■uiwti Suzc<- 
Wahiix? 


compete with government Indonesia is only the second 
tax incentives (which can add location to manufacture this 
up to 50 percent of foe total car after Thailand. Toyota 
car cost) granted to makers of has reportedly told the In- 


the national car. other man- 
ufacturers operating in In- 
donesia are being forced to 


donesian government that 
the amount of local content 
will have a direct correlation 


take a long, hard look at their to local demand. 


trust 


models and prices. PT Bimantara Hyundai In- 

donesia has announced that it 
A developed market will soon start producing cars 

The Indonesian, automobile in Indonesia at a cost that is 
market is already developed. 25 percent lower than those 
Unit sales have risen steadily made in Japan. A joint ven- 
in recent years — from ture between local conglom- 
170,000 in 1992 to 380,000 erate PT Bimantara Citra and 
in 1995 — as new affluence South Korea’s Hyundai Mo- 
hrt foe roads. The first nine tor Co. for the construction of 
months oflast year, however, foe $400 million body and 
saw a decreased demand for . main engine component car 


vehicles. 

Industry experts believe 
this phenomenon was largely 
} due to a “wait and see” at- 
titude on foe part of con- 
sumers who were hesitating 


plant in Purwakaita, West 
Java is scheduled for the end 
of 1998, with commercial 
production of a medium- 
sized sedan targeted for Janu- 
ary 1999. The factory will 


to buy new cars until they have an jrdtia] annual pro- 


could assess foe Timor. 

Their hesitation may be 
over. The Indonesian Auto- 
mobile Association reports 
that total vehicle sales in May 
reached 37,000 units, up 42 
percent from the same period 
last year (26,000 units). 


duction capacity of 50,000 
vehicles, with plans for a 
gradual increase to 200,000 
units by 2001. 

Popular model 

Local manufacturers are also 
starting to look abroad. 


searching for possible export 
markets. For example. Gen- 
era! Motors Buana Indonesia 
(GMBI) began manufactur- 
ing Opel cars in Indonesia in 
1 994. starting with the Vectra 
sedan. Since (hen, the com- 
pany has also introduced the 
Optima sedan and Blazer 
sports-utility vehicle. Last 
year, GMBI started to export 
Blazers to South Africa and 
other right-hand-drive coun- 
tries. 

Toyola-Astra has decided 
to make Indonesia a produc- 
tion base for Kijang exports. 
A light industry commercial 
and passenger vehicle, the 
Kijang is the most popular 
car on Indonesian roads. 
Offered in a wide variety of 
designs, the vehicles range in 
price from 27 million rupiah 
to 43 million rupiah and cur- 
rently account for about 80 
percent of Toyota’s sales in 
foe archipelago. 

Exports in the last force 
years have amounted to 
6,300 units — mainly to 
Malaysia, the Philippines 
and Taiwan. Toyota-Astra 
hopes to export 25,000 Ki- 
jangs a year starting in 1998 
to complement the 75.000 
annual domestic sales. The 
company will export knock- 
down units to ASEAN coun- 
tries, with Brunei as foe first 
key market. 

The new Kijang has 55 
percent local content, and in 
order to reach its target of 60 
percent local content by 
1999, Toyota-Astra is plan- 
ning to invest $130 million in 
some new component 
plants. 

This move comes in the 
wake of a government an- 
nouncement that domestic- 
ally owned auto makers will 
get tariff and luxury sales-tax 
exemptions provided they 
raise foe content of locally 
produced components in 
their cars to 60 percent within 
three years. So far, only the 
Timor has qualified for these 
privileges. 

J.C. 


He at, your 
rir^g to your 
■ ethics. By 
our integrity- 
.ve have no* 
pers for 
prrly relieve 
;euverhi£ 

ur audhec 

£ been 

ing - today 

OTies - s*® 5 


Post-Election Bullish Mooi 


Continued from page 18 

mg to Coordinating Minister of Finance 
Saleh Afif, this latest round of deregulation 
brought 62.55 percent of the country’s tariff 
codes between foe zero to 10 percent range. 
“I think this ranks us number two [in 
ASEAN] after Singapore," he says! 

In its 1997-98 outlook on Indonesia, foe 
highly regarded Pacific Economic Cooper- 
ation Council predicts that the archipelago’s 
GDP will grow by 73 percent this year, rising 
to 7.8 percent in 1998. 

PECC backs its prediction with a list of 
positive factors that underpin foe economy 
and that will help boost private sector in- 
vestment this year despite foe violence-prone 
May election. The factors include foe coun- 
try’s macroeconomic stability, strong “pull” 
factors that are increasing foreign direct in- 
vestment (FDI), rising domestic investment 
and the government’s fiscal discipline in 
. -a drawing up and keeping to a tight budget 
■v Meanwhile, foe World Bank cautions that 
increasingly tough competition is just around 
foe comer as other developing countries seek 
greater access to foreign markets. Indonesia 
can keep pace with this competitive threat by 
relying on tried and proven measures that 
have already served foe country well. 

“In terms of foreign direct investment, the 
biggest competitors at present are China and 
foe Philippines," says .Mr. Inglis of ING 
Barings. “Maybe in foe longterm, Indonesia 
will also sec competition from Myanmar 
[Burma] and .Vietnam, but both of those 
markets are relatively small for foe time 
being. ” 

Increased foreign .competition isn’t In- 
donesia’s only concern! With unemployment 
w rising to 7.24 percent in 1995, and with as 
* many as two4faii& of focal graduates unable 
to. find jobs, there has been significant pres- 
sure to reduce foe number of expatriates 
working in foe country. . 

According to the manpower minister, Ab- 
dul Latief, mere are now about 70,000 ex- 
patriates among the country's 35 million- 


strong workforce, earning $2.5 billion to $3 
billion a year. Analysts believe that local 
graduates and managers could easily fill po- 
sitions currently held by expatriates from 
Thailand, foe Philippines and India because 
they are willing to work for lower wages than 
locals. 

A new law being drafted requires compa- 
nies to explain foe need to hire expatriates, 
foe position they will hold and foe length of 
their tenure, and to identify Indonesians who 
might be able to replace them. 

This comes on top of a new levy ($100) 
introduced in January on every expatriate 
employed in foe financial and manufacturing 
sectors, money that will go toward the es- 
tablishment of a skills-devclopment fund. 

In a recent address to parliament, Mr. Latief 
announced that up to 74 percent of foe work- 
force has only an elementary education. “One 
of Indonesia's real problems is a skill shortage 
in terms of upper and tertiary education," says 
Mr. Inglis. “The government's education 
budget increases every year, but there is a 
general perception that there is still a lot more 
that can be done to improve skills.” 

The next big eventon Indonesia’s political 
calendar is a March 1 998 vote to re-elect 76- 
year-old President Suharto. Some investors 
think foe most important issue next spring 
will be Mr. Suharto’s choice of a vice pres- 
idential running mate, which could finally 
signal his personal choice of a successor. 

“President Suharto is not a young man, 
and questions about the succession will con- 
tinue to arise,” says Mr. Inglis. “We don’t yet 
know what’s going to happen after him." 

“The bull story on Indonesia is that 
Suharto is no older than Deng Xiaoping 
when he launched China's reforms,” de- 
clares a recent report by Hong Kong-based 
Peregrine Securities. “The bear story is that 
foe seemingly complete absence of a suc- 
cession mechanism threatens the country 
with foe risk of a vacuum ... but an ap- 
parently unified army should ensure nec- 
essary stability during the post-Suharto tran- 
sition." Joseph R. Yogerst 



The national car faces some stiff co mp etition as offier autos tempt 
consumers. 


Given the number and variety of Web sites 
emerging in I ndonesia these days , the coun- 
try may soon be known as the "silicon 
archipelago" of Southeast Asia. 

Indonesia's academic and research in- 
stitutions have been Internet-lit erate for 
quite a while. In recent years, the govern- 
ment and private industry — as well as 
various groups involved in tourism, culture 
and entertainment — have started to leap 
on the on-line bandwagon. 

Some of the best places to start are 
general country sites or national Web dir- 
ectories that provide links to Web sites in a 
number of categories. 

Arch i pel a Go (www.goarchi.com), which 
calls itself an "all-Indonesia Web site," has 
information on business, tourism, culture, 
the environment and more. The site also 
posts facts and figures, academic papers 
on Indonesia, important business phone 
numbers and addresses, rupiah exchange 
rates and the current interest rates of five 
leading local banks. Delving even further 
into ArchipelaGo, you'll find links to Web 
sites on every Indonesian province. Even 
more obscure regions are included — 
places like Irian Jaya, Maluku and Nusa 
Tenggara. 

A similar resource is Access Indonesia 
Online (www.accessindo.com) which bills 
itself as ‘foe premier gateway to Indone- 
sia." The site includes business, travel and 
cultural information. The business section 
features an export directory broken down by 
sector and a company information section. 

Indonesia Business Online (www.cool. 
mb.ca/indonesia/business) lists hundreds 
of Web sites related to commerce and in- 
dustry. Sites are sorted according to sector 
(agribusiness, banking, etc.) or region (East 
Java, Bali, Batam, etc.). The country's most 
comprehensive on-line business directory is 
the Indonesia Yellow Psees Web site 


(www.yeUowpages.co.ld), with thousands of 
fisting in seven major cities. The site is 
maintained by PT infomedra Nusantara. a 
division of PT Telkom, the national tele- 
communications giant. 

Stock exchange goes live 

The Jakarta Stock Exchange now has its 
own Web srte called Indo exchange 
(www.jsx.co.id) to improve communications 
between Investors and listed companies, 
both local and overseas, Indoexchange 
provides company profiles, financial infor- 
mation, shareholder profiles, stock prices, 
press releases and news bites from the 
[ndonesia wire service Antara. There is also 
an e-mail facilityto enable dialogue between 
potential investors and the corporations. 
The 55,000 pages are updated daily, and 
the site is recording about 2.5 million hits a 
month. The undertaking is supported by the 
Capital Market Society, Capital Market Su- 
pervising Agency (BAPEPAM). the Jakarta 
Stock Exchange and the Indonesian Issuers 
Association (AO). They view the site as a 
way to provide a comprehensive source of 
information on financial markets and ser- 
vices. 

A number of government ministries have 
also launched theirown Web sites, including 
Industry and Trade (indag.dprin.go.id). For- 
eign Affairs (www.dfa.deplu.go.id). Public 
works (www.pu.go.id). Forestry (www2. 
bonet.co.id) and Agriculture (www.deptan. 
go.id). 

Indonesia’s best foreign diplomatic Web 
site is that of the U.S. Embassy (www.usem- 
bassyjakarta.org). which posts economic 
news and reports, a comprehensive local 
commercial guide and an Indonesian hu- 
man rights report, among other features 

For current foreign exchange information, 
try the Bank Intemasional Indonesia Web 
site (www.bi.co.id).. J.R.Y. 


In 1996, LG invested over USS9 billion to grau its business. 



We put people first. 


Chan-Su Yu lias created something unbelievable. 

Imagine a device that combines the functions of a computer, a fax machine, a modem, a web browser, an electronic organizer and 
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PAGE 20 


INTERNAXIOIUL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY JULY 15, 1997 


SPONSORED SECTION 


S PON SOR ED S ECT ION 


Built for Business: Indonesia 







mMm 


Volcano Life: 
Hiking, Boating 
And Golfing 

Some of the world’s most spectacular eruptions 
have occurred in Indonesia. 


H ollywood movies 
like “Dante's Peak” 
have stimulated the 
public's interest in the an- 
cient phenomenon of volca- 
noes. Unlike the stegosaurus 
and triceratops in the movie 
“Jurassic Park,” volcanoes 
continue to rumble across our 
planet And one of the best 
places to see them is Indone- 
sia. 

They don’t call the ar- 
chipelago the “Ring of Fire” 
for nothing — Indonesia is 
home to more than 400 vol- 
canoes, about 20 percent of 
which are still active. Major 
eruptions occur each year, 
and several mountains con- 
tinue to produce an almost 
continuous flow of ash, rock, 
steam aod deadly pyroclastic 
gases. 


greatest explosion in human 
history took place in the sum- 
mer of 1883, when a tiny 
volcanic island called 
K jakatoa erupted with a 
force equal to several hydro- 
gen bombs. The resulting tid- 
al wave destroyed more than 
a hundred villages along the 
Javan and Sumatran coasts, 
taking tens of thousands of 
lives. The blast was heard 
more than 2,500 miles away, 
on Australia’s eastern sea- 
board. And the cloud of ash 
and dust — blown 17 miles 
into the atmosphere — 
circled the earth seven times 
before dissipating. 

Tambora was another epic 
performance. Looming high 
above Sumbawa island in 
eastern Indonesia, the vol- 
cano burst apart in 1815 with 


While the vast majority of a magnitude almost as great 
Indonesians don’t actually as Kjakatoa 's. This eruption 


worship volcanoes, nearly 
everyone has a healthy re- 
spect for one of nature's most 
powerful forces. Volcanoes 
feature in festivals on the is- 
lands of Java and Bali, and 
several major Hindu temples 
have been builtatthebaseof 
these lifelike mountains. 

Volcanoes have influ- 
enced Indonesian culture in 
many respects. The red-hot 
lava and white-hot ash that 
spew forth with every erup- 
tion have made the Javanese, 
Balinese and Sumatran soil 
some of foe world's richest 
For thousands of years, lava 
and basalt stone have fea- 
tured heavily in local art and 
architecture. 

Eruptions have also made 
headlines. Possibly the 


caused earthquakes 400 
miles away and sent a huge | 
plume of ash into the atmo- ’ 
sphere that caused a two-de- 
gree drop in average global 
temperature for more than a 
year. More than a hundred 
thousand people perished 

Krakatoa and Tambora 
can both be visited today, 
along with scores of other 
Indonesian volcanoes. 
Krakatoa makes a conveni- 
ent day trip Horn Carita 
Beach and Labuhan in West 
Java, although seismic and 
pyroclastic activity might 
preclude actually landing on 
die island remnants of its 
once-great cone. 

Tambora presents a differ- 
ent challenge- It hasn't erup- 
ted in years (1913), but die 


VKVsands erf peoptecBmb ML Bromo in Java every year and are rewarded with an exqiasite sunrise. The less hanfy can ride a horse to the top. ML Bromo is atso home to an annual torchlight c&vmony. 


only way to view the moun- 
tain at close range is to trek 
through the surrounding 
jungle and then scale the 
2,800 meter (9,186 foot) 
crater. A round-trip excur- 
sion requires at least four 
days. 

Javanese encounters 
Java offers several close en- 
counters ofthe volcanic kind 
The most convenient is an 
easy hike (90 minutes) to the 
scientific observation post on 


the south flank of Gunung 
Merapi (“Fire Mountain”) 
near Yogyakarta. The peak 
has erupted more than 30 
times since World War I — 
several times in the 1990s 
alone. 

The picturesque Dieng 
(“Abode of the Gods”) Plat- 
eau, a day's drive north of 
Yogya, is the caldera of an 
ancient volcano. A thousand 
years ago, the lush highland 
area became a major center 
of Hinduism. Today, the an- 


cient temples and various 
geothermal wonders make 
Dieng one of Java's best-kept 
holiday secrets. 

Farther east in Java is the 
legendary Mt Bromo. 
climbed by thousands of 
people each yean Those who 
don’t want to walk can ride a 
horse to the top to view the 
most exquisite sunrise in the 
East Indies. The Kasada Fes- 
tival in February is a 
poignant torchlight cere- 
mony. 


Bali also has its fair share 
of volcanic intrigue. ML 
Agung — the “navel of the 
universe” — towers above 
just about every Balinese 
landscape. The last eruption 
was in 1963, which means 
that Agung is now cool 
enough to climb. The 2 ki- 
lometer (1.2 mile) round trip 
is one that only the fittest 
trekkers should attempt Oth- 
erwise, foe best views of foe 
summit are from Besakih, a 
beautiful Hindu temple. 


The remnants ofthe Batur 
volcano in north-central BaJi 
can be explored by road foot 
or boat This giant caldera — 
10 kilometers across — was 
formed many moons ago by 
a prehistoric eruption that 
may well have been as great 
as Kjakatoa or Tambora. A 
deep blue crater lake now 
graces foe valley bottom, ad- 
jacent to a small (and active) 
cinder cone that can be scaled 
in about two hours. 

The Bali Handara Country 


Club in Tabanan District of- 
fers what is perhaps foe 
world’s only opportunity to 
play 1 8 holes within foe con- 
fines of an extinct volcano. 
Beauty aside, this is one of 
Indonesia's most challenging 
courses. 

Nearby is a charming 
crater lake called Bratan, 
with waterfront pagoda 
temples that look like 
something from an ancient 
Chinese painting. 

J.R.Y. 


We Only Believe 
In 

CONSERVATIVE, COMPREHENSIVE 
CONVENIENT and COURTEOUS 

Banking 


CO 


TAMARA BANK 

A Public Foreign Exchange Bank 
(Since 1957) 


Head Office (8th floor Tamara Centre jl. jend. Sudirman Kav. 24. Jakarta - Indonesia. 
Phone : ( 62 - 21 ) 2525888 Telex : 60252 TAMARA IA Fax ; ( 62 - 2 1 ) 2526658 - 9 



Scuba Divers Extol Manado Reefs 

This peaceful resort on the north coast of Sulawesi Island is a model of marine biodiversity. 

I ndonesian authorities have spent 
much of the 1990s trying to figure 
out how to spread foe tourism in- 
dustry beyond its traditional bastion in 
Bali to less-developed regions. The 
campaign has not bon a great success, 
and there is a shortage of hotels, res- 
taurants and other vital services in these 
regions. 

One noteworthy exception is Man- 
ado, a bustling city on the north coast of 
orchid-shaped Sulawesi Island, which 
is slowly but surely starting to gain a 
reputation as a world-class holiday dcs- x 
tmation. Man ado’s reputation is primar- 1 
ily based on one thing: extraordinary! 
scuba diving — some of the world’s ^ 
best, according to foe experts. Dive £ 

Travel Magazine, for example, calls | 

Manado an “equatorial paradise" and S 
says the offshore reefs have “exquisite 
ocean wilderness [and are a] central 
focus of biodiversity in foe Indo-Pacific 
region.” 



The deep blue sea: 7Ws equatorial pamBse otters breathtaking views of underwater Me. 


The three Cs 

With a population of just 325,000, Man- 
ado is relatively small by Asian urban 
standards. Founded in the 1 6th century 
as a trading port between the Pliil- 
ippines and foe Spice Islands, the city 
grew into a stronghold of foe Minuhasa 
people, who still predominate in north- 
ern Sulawesi. During Dutch colonial 
times, most of the Minahasa converted 
to Christianity; today, there are more 
than 250 churches in Manado alone. In 
fact, foe Minahasa got along so well 
with their colonial overlords that the 
region was sometimes called the "12th 
province of Holland.” 

With a local economy based on foe 
“three Cs" — coconuts, cloves and 
coffee — Manado was never as down- 
trodden as other ports of the eastern 
archipelago, but it wasn't thriving 
cither. Tourism was encouraged as an 
alternative means of stimulating eco- 
nomic growth. Fortunately, the city was 
just a stone's throw from one of In- 


donesia's most impressive natural won- 
ders — the Bunaken Sea Gardens — a 
remarkable reef area that plays host to 
thousands of different marine species. 
Now protected within a 75,000 hectare 
(185,330 acre) national park, Bunaken 
has become a magnet for divers and 
snorkeiers from around the globe. 

The sea gardens circle five small 
islands in foe Celebes Sea: Bunaken, 
Manado Tua, Si laden, Mantchage and 
Nain. Underwater visibility is stu- 
pendous, often reaching 30 meters (100 
feet), and the water temperature re- 
mains constant, at between 27 and 30 
degrees Celsius (81-86 degrees Fahren- 
heit) year-round — so wearing a wet 
suit is unnecessary. 

Among foe "big game” that divers 
and snorkeiers encounter at Bunaken 
are pilot whales, dolphins, hawksbill 
turtles, barracuda, Napoleon wrasse, 
blue ribbon cels and giant grouper. 
There are hundreds of tropical fish spe- 
cies, as well as giant clams, nudi- 
branches (Spanish Dancers), various 
rays and some ofthe most colorful coral 
in foe Asia-Pacific region. 



Bunaken also has a resident wreck, a 
World War 11 caigo ship called foe 
Molas. which lies intact and upright in 
65 feet to 130 feet of water. And just 
outside the national park boundary is an 
active underwater volcano called 
Singihe. 

Manado is well-stocked with under- 
water outfitters, including the Bar- 
racuda Diving Resort (which special- 
izes in small group and customized dive 
trips), the Nusantara Diving Center at 
Molas Beach, and the Thalassa Diving 
and Watersport Center at Hotel Sanrika 
Manado. Courses are available and are 
certifi ed by PADI. the U.S.-based scuba 
organization. 

Tempting sideshows 

But Manado is not just a “one hit" 

wonder. There are plenty of sideshows 

in north Sulawesi, a region where five 

different ethnic groups peacefully 

mingle. 

Tondano, a pleasant highland town, 
hovcp at 700 meters (2.297 feet) above 
the Celebes Sea. Nearby Lake Tondano 
has the remains of a huge volcano called 
Lokan, which blew its top in prehistoric . 
times. " 

Speaking of ancient history, stone 
sarcophagi with engravings and statues 
are preserved at an archaeology park 
between Tondano and Sawangan. - 
Mount Klabat is a still-active volcano * 
that can be sealed in five to six hours of . 

hard trekking. 

Like most of Indonesia, foe region 
offere excellent local cuisine. Manado 
specialties include sayor puit, a dish 
made from tuna, coconut and papaya 
flowers; and ikon mas. fresh fishgrilied 
over a charcoal fire. For dessert, try 
? cake ^ioned from rice 

fcl^ msUB3r and wra pp ed in 

kpfj 5 * 5 211 ever-increasing 
Z"°L g ^ d .. holels - . in ? lu ding several 




77iese efevsferf torts are near the Bunaken Sea Gardens, where vbbitty teaches lOOfcet 


8 that were inaugurated during thTSt ft 
| Among the top spots are the No- f 

| a TmT™r^ t TS Manado - the Santika 


J.R.Y. 


X&P 


K 

























































































































PAGE 22 




Sports 


TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 


World Roundup 


Athlete Dies in Israel 

A wooden bridge leading to a 
stadium collapsed into a river near 
Tel Aviv on Monday under the 
weight of athletes going to the Mac- 
cibiah Games. One died and 34 
were injured, the police said. Israel 
television said all the injured were 
Australians. The bridge fell as ath- 
letes gathered for opening ceremon- 
ies for the quadrennial event (AP) 

Johnson Gets Wild Card 

athletics Michael Johnson, the 
double Olympic champion, will be 
able to compete in the world cham- 
pionships in Athens even though he 
was not selected for the U.S. team. 

The International Amateur Ath- 
letic Federation voted Monday to 
give wild cards to defending cham- 
pions for the first time. 

Gail Devers. Gwen Torrence and 
Dan O'Brien, who all failed to 
make the U.S. team, will also be 
able to race. 

Ame LjungqvisL the IAAF vice- 
president, criticized the decision and 
said he had abstained. “The de- 
cision-making process is completely 
mad," he said. “The U.S. should fit 
its rules with those of the IAAF.'] 

• Haile Gbrselassie of Ethiopia, 
the 10,000 meters world record 
holder, said he would miss the 
world championships because the 
Athens track was too hard. 


Sargis Sargsian jumping for 
joy after his first tour victory. 

Armenian First 

tennis Sargis Sargsian became 
the first Armenian to win an ATP 
Tour title Sunday when he beat Brett 
Steven of New Zealand, 7-6 (7-0) 4- 
6 7-5. in the final of the $255,000 
Hall of Fame Championships in 
Newport, Rhode Island. ( Reuters ) 


Brochard, in Polka Dots, Proves 
He Is King of the Mountains 


By Samuel Abt 

Inirmatitaul Herald Tribune 


L OUDENVIELLE, France — Al- 
though Laurent Brochard was 
wearing the white jersey with red 
polka dots that denotes the king of the 
mountains Monday rooming, few 
thought much of his chances as the Tour 
de France began climbing in the Pyren- 
ees. 

Brochard, a Frenchman who rides for 
the Festina team, is not famous as a 
climber but as a puncher, the sort of 
bicycle racer who can roll all day on the 

Tour di France 

flat and then finish with a kick. He woo 
the king of the mountains jersey, after 
all, on small hills during the first week 
of the Tour. 

Go figure. Brochard realized every 
French rider’s dream by winning the 
Tour’s daily stage on Bastille Day, his 
country’s national holiday. “Magnifi- 
cent,” he said, heading for the victory 
podium. “My best day ever. A won- 
derful present.” 

It wasn't easy, though, since be had to 
survive what could be read as either a 
treacherous attack by his team leader 
and fellow Frenchman, Richard 
Virenque, or as a brilliant piece of 
strategy. 

Virenque chose to read it the second 
way, of course. “The team did very well 
today,” he said. He finished second and 
his Festina team placed four riders 
among the first 1 1 to cross the line. It 
also has three men among the top 10 
overall. 

Perhaps that success was the reason 
Virenque broke a rule of the sport and 
led the chase after his teammate, 
Brochard, on the last of four climbs 
during the 182-kilometer (113-mile) 
trip from Pau to the secluded valley 
town of Loudonvielle. 

By attacking, Virenque towed two 
opponents with him and the three made 
up more than a minute on the climb to 
overhaul Brochard, who was riding 
alone, just before the final peak. 

On the 1 1-kilometer descent to the 
finish line, Brochard was left behind 
briefly. But he caught up and displayed 
his noted punch by riding clear to win by 
14 seconds over Virenque, Marco Pan- 
rani, an Italian with Mercatone Uno, and 
Jan Ullrich, a German with Telekom, in 
that order. 

Imagine the national mood on 
Bastille Day if Pantani or Ulrich had 
won the stage because one Frenchman 
hunted down another. 

Ullrich, who finished second in the 
last Tour to his teammate, Bjame Riis, 
moved up to second place overall. 13 
seconds behind Cedric Vasseur, a 
Frenchman with Gan who rode valiantly 
to finish 19th, 2 minutes 57 seconds 


down, and save his yellow jersey for one 
more day. Abraham Olano, a Spaniard 
with Banesto. is third overall, 1:14 be- 
hind. 

Riis, a Dane, is now fourth, 1:43 
behind. He finished eighth in the stage, 
41 seconds down on Brochard, who was 
timed in 5 hours 24 minutes 57 seconds. 
Until Virenque’s attack left him behind, 
Riis was part of the main chasing group, 
so Virenque was able to justify his tac- 
tics by citing the fate of the Dane, 
among others. 

“I continued to gain time on some of 
my main rivals and that’s promising for 
the days to come,” Virenque said. 
“Maybe Riis just had a bad day. We'U 
find out” 

Virenque, the victor in the king of the 
mountains competition in the last three 
Tours, has his eye on bigger things this 
year. After finishing third in 1996, he 
ranked fifth overall after this ninth of 21 
stages and believes he can win the 84th 
Tour de France. 

So does Ullrich. He has not yet shown 
any sign of personal ambition, however, 
and rode loyally for his team captain, 
Riis, leading the long chase against 
Brochard until Virenque decided to lend 
a hand. 

A number of other riders who thought 
they had a chance to win the Tour now 
know otherwise. 

After the first of two days in the Pyren- 
ees, with the Alps to come on the week- 
end, Luc Leblanc, a French favorite. 
Da vide Rebellin, an Italian, and Franck 
Vandenbroucke. a Belgian, are sleeping 
with the fishes in the overall standings. 

So is Chris Boardman, the British 
leader of the Gan team, who had another 
disastrous day in the mountains, includ- 
ing a fall on the first descent in which he 
displaced two vertebrae in his neck. 

The stage was conducted before im- 
mense crowds, which saw almost noth- 
ing. A cold and heavy fog settled over 
the first three of four mountains, re- 
ducing visibility to about 3 meters ( 10 
feet), what is usually a sunny holiday 
outing became chill, damp and forlorn 
as the roads down each mountain, and 
the riders ascending them, were lost 
behind white curtains. 

The fog covered the descents too, 
which are dangerous enough in good 
weather, when the riders hit speeds of up 
to 80 kilometers an hour (50 miles an 
hour) on sinuous and narrow roads that 
rarely have guard rails. The view into 
valleys thousands of feet below was 
happily obscured Monday. 

Only after the race crossed the regal 
Soulor, Tourmalet and Aspin passes did 
the fog lift for the new Val Lourou 
climb, 10 kilometers long with an av- 
erage grade of 8.2 percent. Brochard 
forged ahead alone there, seemed 
beaded for victory, was caught and then 
showed, at least until Tuesday, that he 
really is king of the mountains. 


Maradona Makes a Winning Return 


• jMpi/rJ In Uv Oufunrha 

BUENOS AIRES — He rarely ran 
hard but there were still flashes of vin- 
tage Diego Maradona as the former Ar- 
gentine captain made his fifth — and 
apparently final — comeback at 36. 

Maradona delighted the crowd Sun- 
day with an overhead scissors kick, non- 
chalant flick passes with his heel and 
pinpoint distribution as his team, Boca 
Juniors, beat Racing Club. 3-2. in a 
league match — Maradona's First of- 
ficial game in 11 months. 

Although he struggled to keep up. 
Maradona played a pan in all three goals 
before hobbling off after 60 minutes, 
after getting hit on the leg. 

Boca’s third goal - was scored by a 
defender, Nestor Fabbri, who headed in 
a free kick by Maradona. 

Maradona's latest return to profes- 
sional soccer was celebrated in carnival 
style, with Fireworks lighting up a wet 


winter evening. The match was delayed 
for more than 20 minutes as cameramen 
surrounded Maradona on the field. 

After two minutes, the stocky mid- 
fielder threaded a pass to the striker 
Sebastian Rambert, who shot just wide. 

It was Maradona's first official league 
game for almost a year. His short frame, 
which usually shows plain evidence of a 

SOCCER 

well-known liking for pizza, is 24 
pounds (l 1 kilograms) lighterthanks to a 
fitness program in Canada under the 
supervision of the sprinter Ben John- 
son. 

Thee hero of Argentina’s 1986 World 
Cup triumph has since struggled with a 
admitted cocaine problem, and his last 
comeback with Boca petered out as he 
gradually stopped bothering to show up 
for matches last year. 


This time. Maradona says he is se- 
rious. He will not play the remaining 
three fixtures this season to concentrate 
on getting ready for the new season, 
starting Aug. 24. All past sins were 
forgiven Sunday night. The other Boca 
players, generally little more organized 
on the field than Maradona's social life, 
charged around with the conviction that 
the force was with them. 

But Maradona's distinctive bow- 
legged gait became more exaggerated as 
the match wore on and he slowed down, 
particularly after being fouled hard in the 
leg late in the first half. 

Eventually it was too much, and 
Maradona charged ofT the field lo an 
ovation 10 minutes into the second half, 
crossed himself, got a kiss from a grate- 
ful trainer. Hector Veira, and that was 
all, folks. 

Johnson watched the match from 
Maradona's private box. (AP. Reuters ) 


Rodman Gets Kicks 
In Wrestling Debut 


Dennis Rodman rising to the chalienge of Giant’s hold. 


The .Associated Press 

DAYTONA BEACH, 
Florida — Dennis Rodman 
knocked down the referee and 
kicked him out of the ring. 
But he didn’t have to worry 
about a Tine from the NBA 
commissioner, David Stem. 

The Chicago Bulls bad boy 
made his official pro wres- 
tling debut Sunday in a venue 
where the only rules were no 
biting, no eye-gouging and no 
throwing wrestlers past the 
first row of spectators. 

Rodman and his tag-team 
partner. Hulk Hogan, lost to 
Lex Luger and Giant, who 
stands 7-foot-4 (2.18 meters) 
and weighs 450 pounds (202 
kilograms), in die World 
Championship Wrestling 
match. The 25-minute bout 
ended after Luger got Hogan 
in a “torture rack” submis- 
sion hold above his head. 

“I’m very tired, but I made 
it,” Rodman said after the 
bout. When asked if he would 
do it again, he said, “Of 
course, of course.” 

Rodman, wearing black 


pants, a black T-shirt and 
black bandana, impressed his 
opponents with leaps over 
Luger’s head and a forearm to 
Luger’s chest after he 
bounced off the ropes. He 
also aim-dragged Luger 
twice to the ground. 

He gracefully rolled off op- 
ponents and took his hits with 
elan. 

“Too bad he lost the 
fight,” Giant said. “Rodman 
is a quality opponent” 

Rodman joins the Green 
Bay Packers' Reggie While 
as a professional athlete try- 
ing a second career of body 
slams and headiocks in the 
ring. 

Hqgan said he didn’t ex- 
pect Rodman to become a 
regular on the wrestling cir- 
cuit, but be wouldn’t be 
averse to teaming up with him 
again. 

“The bottom line is if he 
takes it to another level. I'll 
hold onto his pantyhose,” 
Hogan said. “It s entertain- 
ment. That’s what this is 
about.” 


Unreal Reuuuiviw nw 

Jan Ullrich of Germany, left, and his Danish teammate, Bjame Riis, climbing Monday up a foggy Soulor pass. 

Olazabal’s Painful Steps to the Tee 


international Herald Tribune 

T ROON, Scotland — Seve Balles- 
teros hasn't been able to play on 
the weekends this year, and Jose- 
Maria OlazabaJ has just learned bow to 
walk again 

Tiger Woods be warned — win as 
fast and as often as you can, because it 
can all vanish underfoot 
In Olazabol's case, he has not been 
able to come up with any great lesson to 
rationalize the 18 months he lost to 
debilitating foot problems. “Before all 
of this, I knew that Moved the game 
vety, very strongly he said. He didn't 
need to be crawling on all fours to 
realize what he was missing. 

But crawling he was, within two 
years of winning the 1994 Masters, his 
only major title. In 1994 Olazabal at last 
seemed to be picking up where Balles- 
teros, his elder by nine years, was leav- 
ing off. Already the two Spaniards had 
formed the strongest team the Ryder 
Cup had ever known. Now Olazabal 
was getting ready to run as fast and far 
from Ballesteros as he could, as if the 
baton had just been handed over in a 
relay. 

As it happened, Olazabal didn’t even 
make it out of the first turn. Ernie ELs, 
Tom Lehman, Woods — they've all 
gone surging past while he has watched 
them on his TV screen in terrific pain. 

“The muscle and the tissues around 
the joints got weak, and the joints were 
unprotected,” Olazabal said. “The 
muscles were not doing the job properly 
and that caused the pain.” 

Before he put his faith in this ex- 
planation, the 31 -year-old had been told 
by three specialists that he was suffering 
from rheumatoid arthritis, an almost 
hopeless diagnosis. In the morning he 


British Open Golf /Ian Thomsen 


would wake up and crawl to the bath- 
room. He thought he might eventually 
be confined to a wheelchair. 

“There was obviously a chance I 
might never play golf again,” Olazabal 
said Monday while waiting to begin the 
1 26th British Open. ‘ ‘But I never said to 
myself I would give up that chance. I 
always kept some hope within myself 
that the situation would change and I 
would be able, to play golf again. ” 

His return from a considerable depth 
began when an old friend ran into him in 
Munich, where Olazabal’s sponsor was 
going to try fitting him with special 
shoes. The friend asked if Olazabal had 
been examined by Dr. Hans-Wiihelm 
Muller- Wohlfahrt, the physician to Lin- 
ford Christie, Boris Becker and other 
stars of sports more strenuous than golf. 
The doctor found a hernia between the 
fifth lumbar and first sacral spinal 
bones. 

“The nerves that run all through the 
body go through spine,” Olazabal ex- 
plained. “If the gap between some of 
the vertebrae is not wide enough, it 
might hurt the nerves in the feet.’’ 

He went through up to six hours of 
painful exercises daily. He would stand 
on a wooden table, which forced him to 
move his toes in order to maintain bal- 
ance, and too often he would fall off. 

The work can be seen in his upper 
body's new muscles. When he returned 
to the European Tour in February he 
finished 22ih in Dubai, was fourth in 
Portugal and won the third tournament 
of his comeback, the Tores pana Masters 
in the Canary Islands. 

“I don't have a clue,” he said, when 


asked to explain how he reacquired such 
a high level of play. He added, “It was a 
surprise to me to do as well as I did.” 

With a month and a half to go. Olaza- 
bal seems to be on the verge of earning 
an automatic place in the Ryder Cup — 
which, as was pointed out, would make 
a happy man of Ballesteros, the Euro- 
pean team captain. 

“Those are two different matters,” 
Olazabal said. “Seve has had trouble 
with his game, we all know that. He 
knows what I'm capable of. The thing 
that will make him happy is if he starts to 
play well again.” 

Ballesteros has missed the cut in lOof 
his 12 starts this year. Olazabal has lost 
an estimated $3 million in potential win- 
nings and other fees, in part because of 
his misdiagnoses. On their best days 
together at the Ryder Cup, it seemed as 
if Ballesteros was teaching Olazabal to 
be angry, to care so deeply that the anger 
could be channeled out through theclub. 
To lose was unacceptable. 

On Thursday come the daily exer- 
cises for Olazabal’ s feet and his first, 
still painful steps onto the British Open 
tee in two years. 

“Sometimes I was too hard on my- 
self,” Olazabal said. “This last year 
makes you think a lot about what you 
have, about what you have achieved, the 
things you can do. It makes you take a 
step back and take things in a different 
way. 

“I will be happy to tee off on the first 
tee, I don’t care what happens after. If a 
win comes my way I will be a happy man. 
and if it doesn't I will have to wait until 
next year. But £ won't stop trying.” 


Nicholas Leaves Lopez Frustrated Again 


By Amy Shipley 

Washin/ttun Post Sen-ice 


NORTH PLAINS. Oregon — Nancy 
Lopez's last-chance putt on the 18th 
green slid past the cup, and Alison Nich- 
olas finally could breathe again. As the 
crowd groaned and Lopez's eyes filled 
with tears, Nicholas spun around dizzily 
and released a long sigh. She looked 
sick, not celebratory. 

In securing her first U.S. Women's 
Open championship Sunday at Pumpkin 
Ridge Golf Club with a tap-in putt 

U.S. Women's Open 

seconds later, Nicholas survived tension 
as thick as the knee-high rough, a near- 
collapse on the back nine and Lopez's 
unflappable demeanor. 

Nicholas ended up one shot ahead of 
Lopez with a total or 274, 10 under par, 
after Lopez's lale-day run shrank Nich- 
olas’s lead by three shots over the last six 
holes of a gripping finale. 

Lopez blew kis 

five-foot final putt, but she left with the 


; blew kisses after knocking in a 


disappointment of failing to win her first 
U.S. Open in 21 tries after coming closer 
than she ever had before. She could have 
forced a playoff if she hadn’t missed that 
15-foot birdie putt — one of many nar- 
row misses for Lopez on Sunday. 

Lopez still became the first woman to 
shoot In the 60s on four straight days in 
[he Open, with a 69-68-69-69-275. Nich- 
olas had an overall 70-66-67-71-274. 

“It was a tremendous day,” said 
Nicholas, a native of Birmingham. Eng- 
land, who had won only two other LPGA 
events. “I can’t believe it right now.” 

No other player stepped into the dud 
between Nicholas and Lopez, who was 
three shots back when the pair iced off 
together to start their rounds. Kelly Rob- 
bins shot a 5-under-pnr 66 to finish third 


at 277. Karrie Webb was 9 under par 
during the last two days to finish fourth 
with a 278. Lisa Hackney and Stefania 
Croce each finished at 279. 

The lone for the afternoon was set 
early. Nicholas was superb. Lopez 
merely played great golf. The afternoon 
could be summarized with this se- 
quence: On the fourth hole. Lopez hit a 
brilliant 60-foot chip to within five feet, 
in position for her third birdie of the day. 
The cheering had barely subsided when 
Nicholas hit her chip — off the flag and 
into the hole — for an eagle. 

”My shot looked terrible after she hit 
into the hole,” Lopez said. “It was kind 
of a kick in the face. I really thought I 
could pick up a shot there and 1 ended up 
losing a shot. I was pretty much numb. 
My birdie seemed like a bogey.” 

Nicholas nearly threw away the tour- 
nament on the par-4, 367-yard I4th hole. 
She hit her second shot over the green, 
into high rough. She took a penalty 
stroke, then chipped over the green onto 
the fringe. From there, she two-putted for 
a double-bogey cutting her lead to one. 

Lopez did not lake advantage on No. 

1 5. She missed a 1 0-foot putt just wide of 
the cup for a bogey when she could least 
afford it. “Stupid bogey," she said with 
disgust Nicholas parred the hole to 
widen her lead to two strokes. 

Lopez regained one stroke on the 1 6th 
by sinking a five-foot putt for birdie. 
Then on the 17th. Nicholas hit her 
second shol over the green again. She 
took relief because she was too close to a 
grandstand, but left her chip short and 
had to get up and down for bogey. 

But Lopez could not capitalize. She 
hit her drive wide left and missed a 10- 
fool putt for par. She remained one shot 
back going to the 18th hole. 

On the par-5. 494-yard 1 8th the play- 
ers hit their drives within three feet of 
each other in the middle of the fairway. 


Draig CnUicT/AprtKC Frjnu-Pnmc 

Alison (Nicholas hugging her caddie 
as Nancy Lopez left the final green. 

Lopez hit her second shot just short and 
to the right of the green, then chipped to 
15 feet behind the cup. Nicholas set 
herself up for a par by hitting an 18-foot 
pun to just inches from the hole. 

• Toms Takes Quad City Classic 

David Toms won for the first time in 
his eight-year PGA career with a final- 
round five-under-par 65 for a three-shot 
victory in the SI.35 million PGA Quad 

m r C ? al IslM d. Illinois, on 
Sunday. Toms finished at 15-under 265. 
He had rounds of 67, 66 and 67 before 
Sunday s 65 at Oakwood Country Club 

share ,'. S243 ' 000 * more 
man he had earned in any full season. 


Frenchman Punches Out a Victory on Bastille Day 


•i 





L>” l&o 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUIA 15, 1997 


SPORTS 


TUES » «;jix Yijl 


illeD 


a y 


It Was a Great Day to Strike Out 

A League Record 31 Players Fan as Rangers Beat Mariners 



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is to re or. irtc ■ jc «.'t camns 
italic place ;r. : u ..- K^lcr Cup- 
is u»aa pt»ui'.c»: ‘'•.•uliimat 


The Asiocuaed Frets 

What do Will Clark, Joey Cora, Alex 
Rodriguez and Paul Sorrento have in 
common? They were the only players in 
the Manners-Rangers game who didn’t 
strike out Sunday. 

Randy Johnson, leading the way with 
14, and four other pitchers — three from 
Texas and one from Seattle — set a 

major-league record with a total of 31 
strikeouts in the Rangers* 4-2 victory 
over the Mariners. 

“We got a loss," Johnson said. “It’s 
really irrelevant how many I struck 
out.” 

“It's nice when you win,” said the 
Texas manag er, Johnny Oates, “But I 
wouldn’t want to lose a game when you 
have 31 punchouts.” 

The other 17 players who batted be- 
fore a Kingdoms crowd of 47,467 all 
struck out at least once, with five players 
fanning three times each: Rusty Greer 
and Domingo Cedeno for the Rangers, 
Jay Buhner, Dan Wilson and Ross Davis 
for the Mariners. 

Ken Griffey Jr. missed the game to 
attend his mother-in-law’s memorial 
service. 

Bobby Ayala, the losing pitcher, ad- 
ded four strikeouts to give the Mariners 
18 forthe game, Bobby Win had nine, 
and Dan Patterson, who got the victory, 
and John Wetteland had two each for the 
Rangers. 

Daraon Buford, the No. 9 bitter who 
struck out once, snapped a 2-2 tie lead- 
ing off the ninth with a home run off 
Ayala. Mark McLemore then tripled 
and scored on Ivan Rodriguez's sac- 
rifice fly. 


Scoreboard 


Wettelan d , who picked up h is 19th 
save, strode out Rob Ducey to end the 
game and give the teams the nine-inning 
strikeout mark. 


game was 30. set by ‘Seattle (18) ana 
Oakland (12) on April 19, 1986. The 
record for an extra- innin g game is 43, 
set by California (26) and Oakland (17) 
in 20 innings on July 9, 1971. 

Whit* sox 7, Royals fi Frank Thomas 

and Albert Belle hit homers as Chicago 
swept the Royals in Kansas City. The 
Royals set a club record with their 12th 
consecutive loss. 

Thomas homered for the third 
straight game, and Belle hit a three-run 
shot The Royals, who had 10 walks, 
stranded 14 runners. 

Roberto Hernandez picked up his 23d 
save even though he loaded the bases in 
the ninth on a single and a pair of two- 
out walks. But Tom Goodwin flied to 
shallow left 

inifiani 12 , Twins 5 Jim Thome hit a 
homer and double and Brian Giles ad- 
ded a two-run homer as Cleveland took 
three of four in Minnesota. 

Bartolo Colon, recalled from Triple- 
A Buffalo earlier in the day, allowed 
three runs on three hits over five innings 
for the victoiy. 

Blue j«yi 3, Red s«x 2 Shawn Green, 
who homered Saturday to make Roger 
Clemens a winner against his former 
team, hit another one to give Woody 
Williams a victoiy in Boston. 

Williams allowed three hits in 6' A 
innings a day after Clemens returned to 
Fenway Park and fanned 16 Red Sox. 
After Williams departed five Blue Jays 
relievers were needed, with rookie 
Kelvim Escobar getting the final two 
outs for his first career save. 


Btewovx 6, Oriofoa 4 Dave Nilsson 
and Jack Voigt homered off Mike Muss- 
ina (10-3) as Milwaukee completed its 
first three-game sweep in Baltimore 
since 1987. 

Baltimore has lost six in a row. its 
longest slide since dropping six straight 
in April 1996. 

rigors s, Yanhota i Detroit snapped a 
10-game losing streak against New 
York as Bobby Higginson went 4-for-5 
and Willie Biair pitched seven strong 
innings. 

Higginson homered and, drove in all 
three runs for the Tigers, who had lost 
the first three games of the series at 
Yankee Stadium. 

Tino Martinez went 2-for-4 with a 
triple for the Yankees. Dwight Gooden 
(3-2) was the loser. 

Brian Hunter stole three bases — he 
has a major league-leading 48 — and 
scored twice. 

Angela 5, Athletics 3 Anaheim won its 
sixth straight, and Shigetoshi Hasegawa 
(2-4), with two and a third innings of 
scoreless relief, gained his first victory 
since April IS — a span of 26 ap- 
pearances. 

Anaheim has on 11-game winning 
sneak over Oakland, 10-0 this season. 
Oakland, which gave major-league 
home-run leader Mark McGwire the 
day off, has lost four straight. 

In the National League : 

Herts 7, Braves 6 Against New York, 
Atlanta hasn’t exactly resembled Na- 
tional League champions. 

For the fifth time in seven games this 
season, the Mets rallied to beat the 
Braves. This time, on Alex Ochoa’s 
10th- inning homer, which capped a 
comeback from a six-run deficit. 

“It probably was the biggest game of 



* -in CaaLr) / Rralcn 

Ken Cam ini ti, San Diego's third baseman, throwing to first base. But Colorado’s Walt Weiss reached first safely. 


my career," said Butch Huskey, who bit 
a two-run homer in the second and a 
three-run drive in the fourth, driving in a 
career-high five runs. 

“When you're down by six, we were 
all going up there with the intention of 
getting on base and getting something 
started.” he said. 

Dodgers 6, Giants 3 Dennis Reyes be- 
came the first left-hander to start for Los 
Angeles since Bob Ojeda against Cin- 
cinnati on Sept. 24. 1992, ending a 
major-league record 68 1 -game streak of 
consecutive starts by right-handers. 

With the score tied at 3-3 at Dodger 
Stadium, Raul Mondesi hit his 18th 
homer leading off the sixth as Los 
Angeles sent Shawn Estes (12-3) to his 
first loss since May 6. 


Marlins 9, phafias 3 Gary Sheffield 
became the first Florida player to homer 
twice in an innin g, then left with a 
strained hamstring. Philadelphia lost for 
die 14th time in 16 games and the 32d 
time in its last 37, dropping to a major- 
league worst 25-63. 

Expos 2 , Rods o Pedro Martinez (1 1- 
4) pitched a one-hitter, and Mike Lans- 
ing tripled twice, going 3-for-3 before 
leaving with heat exhaustion. 

Martinez got his league-leading eighth 
complete game and his third shutout in 
17 starts, allowing only Bret Boone's 
single in the fifth inning, striking out 
nine, walking one and hitting one. 

Padrss 13, Rockies 11 Quilvio Veras 
hit a go-ahead three -run double in Den- 
ver as San Diego rallied from an 11-8 


deficit in the ninth, sending Colorado to 
its ninth loss in 10 games. San Diego 
had trailed 6-0 and 10-5. 

Larry Walker went 3-for-4 with four 
RBIs, raising his average to .406. Tony 
Gwynn went l-for-6 and fell to .398. 

Pirates 5, Astros 3 In Pittsburgh, Kev- 
in Polcovich had key hits in consecutive 
two-run innings and Pittsburgh, which 
had scored only once previously in the 
four-game series, rallied from a 3-0 
deficit. Clint Sodowsky got his first NL 
victory despite walking two and throw- 
ing a ran -scoring wild pitch in two- 
thuds of an inning. 

Cardinals ii, Cubs 5 Gary Gaetti 
homered for the fourth time in four days 
— one of four St. Louis homers at 
WrigJey Field. 


Major League Standings 
juuhcjun uuhmie 

EAST DM6MN 



W 

L 

Pd. 

GB 

Baltimore 

55 

33 

625 

— 

New York 

51 

38 

573 

4V4 

Toronto 

43 

44 

694 

nw 

Detroit 

42 

47 

672 

1314 

Boston 

39 

51 

633 

17 


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42 44 -488 


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Cleveland 47 37 JiO - 

Otfoogo 47 42 528 TA 

MSxaukee 42 44 688 6 

Minnesota 38 51 627 UK 

Kansas City 36 SD 619 12 

WEST DIVISION 

Seattle 51 40 560 — 

Anaheim 48 42 533 I» 

Texas 45 44 506 5 

Oakland 37 56 398 15 

mnwuimitw 

EAST DIVISION 

w L Pet GB 

Atlanta 58 33 £37 — 

Florida 52 37 584 5 

New York 51 38 567 6» 

Montreal - 49. 40 551 8 

PNtodefohfe 3S S3 JS4 31H 

cCntral DriftStOM 

Pittsburgh 45 45 500 — 


51 38 567 m 

49. 40 551 8 


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Houston 
St Louis 
Cincinnati 
Chicago 


15 47 « I 

44 46 689 1 

39 50 -431' M 


Chicago 38 S3 JIB TA 

WESTonmooN 

SanFmncfaco 52 39 571 — 

Los Angelas 48 . 43 527 4 

Colorado 44 48 ATS 8M 

San Diego 41 50 651 IT 


AMERKAH LEAQUE 

Taranto OM 100 200-3 6 0 

Boston D00 010 100-2 7 0 

WMouns. QwnfrS (7), PMsoc (8U TTmUn 
' i TO, SpoQoric TO, Escobar TO and OBrters 
< WotefleW and Stanley. W-WDimns. 44. 
L— Wakefield, 3-10. Sv-Escnbar (1). 
HR*— Toronto, Green TO. Boston, Jeflereon 
TO. Stanley UO). 

MNwadne 2M *03 001—4 10 2 

BoBireore 002 NO 110-1 8 0 

D'Amico. ; Adamson (Q, Fetters (7), 
VBone (8). Wickman C8), Jones TO and 
Lovfa, Mathmy TOj Mussina Orosco (7), 
MBs (8). Beidtez (9) md Webster. 
W—D Arnica 7-4. L — Mussina 70-1 
Sv— Jones C3). HRv-MItanmkse, NBs9on 
(9), Voigt M. BaMrewa Atoanr TO. 


Detroit 101 010 006-3 11 0 

Now York 000 100 0*0-1 7 0 

Blair, Brocafl (8), Myere (8), Janes (9) and 
Casanova- Gooden, Mendoza (7). Lloyd (8), 
Nelson TO and GhredL W— State 7-4. 
L— Goodea 3-1 Sv— Jones 04). 

HR— Detroit Higginson 05). 

Chicago 014 200 000-7 9 1 

Kansusaty 005 000 106-6 10 8 

Baldwin. C CasHSo (3). T. CasSto (7), 
Kandiner 18), Hernandez TO and Fabtegas; 
Ptttstey, Walker (5), Perez {89 and Sweeney, 
w-c Castuia 1-1. 1^-PHtaley, 2-7. 
Sv— Hernandez (23). HRs— Chicago. 
Thorns (20), Beta 09). 

AMMm 030 101 001-5 9 0 

Oaktaod OOO 030 000-3 4 0 

D-Springet Hasegawa (3. DeLuda (8L 
Perebnl TO and Kreutec Oqulst Mohier (4), 
D. Johnson (7) and Moyne. W— Hasegawa 
2-4. L— Oqulst 2-3. Sv-Pertiwd(12). 

Texas ON 2M 002-1 7 0 

Seattle 0M 101 000-2 * 0 

Wilt Patterson TO, Wettekmd TO and I. 
Rodriguez; RaJohmon. Ayata (8) and 
Da. WHson. W— Patterson 6-3. Lr^yala 6-1 
5 v— Wettekmd 09). HRs— Tears, Buford 
(6). Sarftte. Buhner (23), Sorrento (18). 
Clewiand 102 216 000-12 15 * 

Minnesota *00 030 206-5 7 B 

Catarv weathers 16), Mormon flD, Plunk 
Wand Banters KawMnb SWtndeE (5K 
Trombley W), RBchto TO. AgwBero TO ond 
Myers. W— Colon 2-2. L-Hawkins, I-& 
HRs— Oeyekmd, Tlsme (26). Giles DO). 
HADOHAL LEAGUE 

Montreal ON 110 06O-2 4 1 

dndnatl ON BN 000-0 1 0 

Martinez and FMdtea Motgav 
RetnSnger TO and Taabensee. 
W— Martinez, 11-4. 1— Morgan, 36. 
Houston NO 003 000-3 6 1 

PMUburgh 0M 022 IU-5 10 0 

Garda. Springer (6), Marita (89, 
Magnartfe (TO and Ausmus Uebe* 
Sodowsky (6), Christiansen (7), WHUrw ®. 
Laisefe TO and (talk. W— Sodowsky, 1-1. 
L— Sprtager. 1-3. Sv-Lofce*e 01). 

SLLairls IN 0S1 130-H 20 0 

CUcaga IN N1 201-5 6 0 

Stattarnym FtaKOtore TO. BeOran (9) 
and DtaSce Lampkta TO; Trachset Adam 
HI. Tatis (ffl, Werotefl TO, Patterson TO and 
Houston Hubbard (69. W— Stotttemyre, 66. 
L— TradKoL 6-7. HRs-SL Lfluta. 

DoS Melds Hh Lankfaid 09), Gaettf (10), 
Pkmlfer 0). adcagn Hernandez {49, Orie 

to. 

Sen Dtage OOd 200 105-13 18 2 

Uorade 244 010 ON-11 14 0 

Bergman, P. Smith (3), Cunnane C59. 


Batchelor (BL Hoffman (9) ond Ftoherty; 
Jm. Wright Dlpolo H), 5. Reed (8), Leskanic 
TO. McQmy TO and Manworing. 
W— Batchelor 3-1. L-McCurry 1-2. 
Sv— Hoffman (18). HR— San Dlega. S. 
Finley D8>. 

SaDFnmdsoo 200 IN 000-3 6 I 

UsAngriM 101 013 03i— 9 1] 0 

Estes, Tavarez (6), Johnstone TO, D. 
Henry (8), R. Rodriguez (8) and Benytdife 
Reyn Hall (7), RmEtwky (B), Guthrie (9) 
and Piazza, Prince TO- W— Reyes l-O. 
L— Estes 12-3. HRs— San Frandsas Bonds 
01). Las Angeles, R. Cedeno (1), Mondesi 
08). 

PtaBadetaMa IN IN 101-3 6 1 

Florida ON 801 Nxr-9 0 1 

MJjefter. R. Harris (41, Ruflcom (59. 
Brewer TO, Gomes (B) and Lieberthal; 
AFemandez, Cook (8), Powell (9) and 
Zaun. W' A . Fernandez 10-7. L— M- Loiter 
4-ia HRs— Prifladeiphia. Jefferies (7). 
Florida, Sheffield 2 D1). 

Haw York #20 310 000 1-7 90 

Attain 480 ON OH 0-6 12 3 

BJ Jones, McMktiael (89, JoJriWKo (10) 
and Hundtay; N eagle. Fox (5), Cottier (79, 
Wohlers TO, Blefedd (10) and EdrLPenw. 
W^-McMtafpoel 46. .L-SkMA. 3-4.. 
Sv—JteFireKO BO). HRs— New York. 
Huskey 2 02), Ochoa (29- 


Asia Cup 

NB UMKA VB. MUdSUN 

HOMMT. W COLOMBO, SRI LAJUOt 
Sri Lanka: 239 all aMln 495 overs 
PaMshnc 224^ tarings dosed. 

Sri Lanka won by 15 runs. 


Tour pe France 

Restore Monday al IN Uameaers 013-1 

mita) INh rage Iran Peu to lMkre LovBon: 
1. Laurent Brodrord, Fnmcb Festtaa. 5 b.24 
m. 57 is Z RkfORj Vbengua France Fesfina. 
id 14 su 1 Marco PanffriL Italy, Monotone 
Una I4r4. Jan Uttch, Gennany, Telekam, lta 
J. Jose Mreta Jimenez, Spata, Bonesla 41/4. 
Laurent Dutaux, SwItzerianA Festtaa 4U 7. 
Fernando Esoarila Spain Kehna 41; 6 


Blame Rite, Denmark. Telekoin it; 9. 
Francesca Casagranda Italy, Saea 1.-07; 10. 
Abraham Ohm Spain Banestalriff. 

OVERALL: 1. Cedric Vosseur, Fr. GAR 
47:l*35i 2. Ullrich at 13 sj 3. Diana 1^3; A 
Rib. l^Q; 5. Vbenqua 1^3; 6. Fernando 
Escartin Spain Kehna 214; 7. Cameruind, 
Z27; 8 Du faux. 2:48; 9. Datdele Nanteta, 
Italy, AAapev 3-jft 10. Brodrord, *04. 


US Women's Ope n 

Final scores and roomy wtmrtngc Sunday 
of Si J nNm US. Women's Open, played 
on Pumpkin Ridge's 6^65-yard (5jna 
merer), par-71 Witch HoNow Course in North 
Plains, Oregon: 

Afison Nidwloa Blit 70-6667-71—274 

Nancy Lopez, U^. 66686669-275 

Kelly Robbins. U5. 68667466— 277 

tea rrie Webb, AostraCo 73-726568— 27B 

SteidniaCrocn Italy 7269-7167— 279 

Lisa Hackney. Britain 71-7667-71—279 

Tammle Green U5. 74-70-7165-280 

Mlcheie Redman, U5. 7467 7069-280 

Pally Sheehan U5.‘ 72-71 -7168-282 

Chris Johnson, U.5., . 22687369-282 

Dawn Coe-Jones. Can. 7267-73-70—282 

Docmo Andrews. U5. 74-7166-71—282 

A Fukushima Japan 71-716671—383 

Quad City Classic 

Final scares Sunday at S1J5 mb lion Quad 
City Classic on Ore B,762-rard (S.1 53-metar), 
par-70 Oakwood Country Club course In 
CoriVUtylEnoii: 

David Toma U5. 67686765-265 

Jimmy Johnston U 5. 70676662—268 

B. Chombtee. US. 71656567-268 

Robert Gamez, U5. 67656967— 268 

Brad FabeL U5. 68676566-269 

Frank UdUUer, UJS. 71676368-269 

Steve SMdier, US. 69686768-270 

Dave RummeSE, U5. 68706567-270 

Russ Cochran U 5. 68676869-270 

John Magtartea U5. 71686767-271 

Bob Woicoft U5. 70686867 — 271 

Ed Doogherty, U5. 6765-7168— 271 

Anthony Potater, 70666567— 271 

Kenny Pcny, U5. 67686868-271 

John Adama U5. 66686868-271 

Wayne Levi U5. 68676868-271 

Scott VCrptank, U5. 67686766-271 


Davkt Toma U5. 67686765-26 

Jimmy Johnston U5. 70676962— 36 

B. Chombtee. US. 71656567-26 

Robert Gamez, U 5. 67656967— 26 

Brad FabeL U5. 68676569-26 

Frank LfcMter, UJS. 71676368-26 

Steve SMdier, US. 69686766— 271 

Dave RummeSa U5. 68786567—271 

Russ Cochran U 5. 68676866-271 

John Magtartea U-S. 71686767-27 

Bob Wok»ftU5. 78686867-27 

Ed Doogherty, U5. 67687168— 27 

Anthony Potater, 70666567— 27 

Kenny Perry, 115. 67686868-27 

John Adama U5. 66686868-27 

Wayne Levi U5. 68676868-27 

Scott VCrptank, U5 67686766-27 

WORUNUUNIONH 
1. Tiger Wooda U5, 10.95 pofrts average; 
Z Ernie Eta, Sooth Africa, 1056; 


3 Greg Norman Australia. 10.46 
i.ColtaMontgomeria Britain 947 
5 Nick Price, Zimbabwe, 957 

6. Tom Lehman U5. 952 

7. Steve EHdngtan Australia, 850 

8. Masashi OzokL Japan. 7.91 

9. Mark O'Meara, U5. 741 

10. Phil Mldtelson U4„ 7.18 

11. Nick Fakta, Britain 755 

12. Bred Faxon U.S. 650 
11 Fred Couples. U5„ 6J4 

14. Scott HodbU5. 658 

15. Jesper Pamevik, Sweden 5.73 


INTEXTOTOCUP 

GROUPS 

Ebbw Vote. Wales. I, Bastta, France, 2 
GROUP 4 

Standard Liege, Belgium, 8 Macoabl Petah 
THrea, Israel 0 

GROUP sa 

Kaunaa Uthuanfa 1, Hamburg SV, Ger. 2 
MAJOR LEACUl soeax 
Darias Z Columbus 1 
Tampa Buy Z San Jase 2 
New York-New Jersey 6 Colorado l 
Eastern Conference: D.C35 points; Tampa 
Boy 24; New EngtamJ 23; Columbus 17,-NY- 
NJ 16; Wtatant Conference: Kansas City 2ft 
Colorado Sts Dolas 24: San Jose 17; Los 
Angeles 16. 

African Hatioms Cur 

GROUP 1 

Ghana Z Zimbabwe I 

CROUPE 

Benin 8 Ivory Coast 0 

GROUPS 

Egypt z Senegal 0 

CROUP « 

Tunisia I, Guinea 0 

group e 

Togo 4 Liberia 0 


HALL OP HIM! 

H HEWPORT. RHODE BLAND 
FINAL 

Sargis Saigskai (5). Armenia, def. Brett 
Steven (89, New Zealand. 76 (7-01. 46, 7-5. 
DOUBLES FHAL 

Brett Steven, New Zeokmd. and Justin 
GtaieMote U-S. (4). def. Kent Kiimeac U5. 
and Aleksandar Kitinov, Russia BZ 84. 


Davis Cup 

KUO/AFRICAII ZONE 

GROUP Z SECOND ROUND 
Norway 4, Slovenia 1 
Portugal 1 Yugoslavia 2 
Finland 1 Belarus 2 

GROUP 1 PLAY-OFFS 
Georgia 5 , Nigeria 0 
Egypt 1 Lithuania 2 

Fed Cup 

1 991 WORLD OltOUP PLAYOFFS 

UNTTEO STATES 5. JAPAN a 
Lindsay Davenport. U-S.. def. Ai Suglyo- 
ma Japan, 0-4. 76 (7-1). 

Kimberly Pa U5«def. Naako Sawomatsu. 
Japan. 8Z 6 - 4 . 

Davenport and Lisa Raymond. U5w def. 
Naoko lapmuta and Nana Miyagi, Japaa 6- 
4,84. 

AUSTRALIA 3, SPAIN 2 
Arantxa Sanchez Vicaria Spabv def. 
Annabel Elhvocxt Australia 8Z 6-8. 

Marta Lutaa Serna Spabv def. Rochel Mc- 
QulUaa Australia 81, 83. 

Kerry- Anne Guse and Kristtne Kvnca 
Austrafia def. Marta Antonia Smchez 
Lorenzo and CrisitaaTanens-Vdlera Spain. 
8Z66. 

SWITZERLAND S, ARGENTMA 0 
Martina Hlngta, Switzerland, def. Floren- 
aa La bat Argentina 8Z81. 

Potty Schnyder, Swttzertand. det Maria 
Jase Gaidana Argentina 81, 88 Doubles 
Hlngta and Emmonuefe Gogaaidl 
Switzerland def Mercedes Paz and Laura 
Montahia Argentina 83 84 

WOUDOROUPE 

REOtONAL QUAUFYHG ROUND 
Russia 4 South Korea 1 


AMERICAN LEAQUE 

BALTIMORE - Released 3B Kelly Gruber. 
ckkabo — Sent 3B Rubin Ventura la 
NashuDte AA on rehabilitation assignment. 

CLEVELAND— Bought contract of RHP 
Davkt Weathers (ram BirtfofcvAA. Designat- 
ed OF Trenldad Hubbard for assignment. Put 
RHP Alble Lopez and LHP Brian Anderson 
on 15-day dtaahfed list Lopez retroactive to 
July 2 and Anderson retroactive to July 8 
det bo it— P ut LHP Justin Thompson on 


15-day dbMiletf list retroactive to July 8 
KANSAS CITY— Put RHP HipolitD Pichardo 
on 15-day disabled ksL Recalled RHP Mike 
Perez tram Omaha AA. Designated LHP 
Allen McOn for assignment 
Seattle -Claimed RHP Tim Scott on 
walvere from Colorado. Transferred LHP Tan 
Dovta to 60-day disabled SsL Optioned LHP 
Greg McCarthy to Tacoma PCL Put RHP 
Tim Scott on 15-day disabled list. Activated 
RHP Mike Maddux from 15-day disabled list 
Released INF Alvaro Espinoza. Recalled 
RHP Bob Wolcott from Tacoma 
NATIONAL LEAQUE 
a m zona— S igned OF Jack Cist. 

ATLANTA -Put OF Kenny Lofton and C 
Jovy Lopez an 15-day disabled Itai retroac- 
tive to July 8 Sent RHP Joe BorawskL RHP 
Paul Byrd and RH P Brad Clontz to Richmond, 
IL Recalled C Tim Spetr and RHP Kevin 
Mktwaod from Richmond- Bought contracts 
of RHP Mike Cottier, OF Danny Bautista and 
RHP Chad Fox from Richmond. 

CHIC A GO A ctivated C Tyler Houston from 
1 S-day disabled fist Optioned RHPMarcPta- 
dadu la Iowa, AA. 

Cincinnati— Put SBTeny Pendleton on 18 
day rfisabled Rst raboaettveto J uly 7. RecaBed 
INF Eric Owens from rndtanapofo AA. 

FLORIDA — Reataed LHP Tony Sounders 
ham Charlotte, IL Optioned RHP Rob Stan- 
ds- and OF S«y McMifon to Chariot®. Re- 
assigned RHP Uvaq Hemondez to Charlotte. 
Transferred RHP Kurt MlUerfrorn 15-day dls- 
abledfkt to 60-day disabled list. Bought con- 
tract of OF Mark Kotsay from Portland, EL 
LOS ajigeles -Put RHP Ismael Valdes on 
15-day dtaabled Rst retroactive to July 8 
Bought contract of OF Eric Anthony and RHP 
Denote Reyes hum Albuquerque, PCL Op- 
tioned RHP Mike Harkey to Albuquerque. 
Designated RHP Fred Wanecterand RHP 
David Spykstro far assignment 
Montreal— P ut OF Vtodhnb- Guerrero on 
15-day dtaabled Rst Recoiled OF Sherman 
Oban da from Ottawa, IL 
new YORK mets— Activated SS Rey Or- 
donez and INF Manny Alexander from 13 
day ifisabted HsL Optioned INF Shawn 
Gflbert and C Afeerto CastlHo to Norfolk, IL 
Pittsburgh — Extended the contract of 
OF Al Martin through 2000 season. Optioned 
LHP Chris Petes to Calgary, PCL 
ST. lour— Put OF WHAe McGee on 15-day 
disabled Rst. Recalled OF Phil Plontier from 
Loutavfllte AA. 


NAHOHAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 

golden state —Named Garry 5t. Jean 
general manager. Moved Ed Gregory from 
director of player personnel to director of 
scouting. 


Houston -Signed F Rod rick Rhodes and C 
5eige Zwdiker. 

ids angeles— Signed F Maurice Taylor. 

Miami— R e-signed G Voshon Lenard. 

NEW vork —Signed F John Thomas to 3 
year contract. 

Philadelphia— S igned G Anthony Parker 
and F Tim Thomas. 

UTAH -Resigned F Antoine Carr la 7-year 
contract and G-F Shondon Anderson to 2- 
year contract. 

Washington— R e-signed G Chris WhM- 
ney. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

Chicago -Signed WR Haywood Jefflres. 
DB Kevin Scott. G Bob Sapp, S Van Hfles. DE 
Shown Swayda, L Rich Hogans & Rickey 
Parker, DT Mike Mbnoa DE Morvin 
Thomas and WR Marcus Robinson. Signed 
LB Ron Cox to a one-year contract. 

C been bay —Signed DT Jermaine Smith. 
Waived G Andrew Peterson, TE Jay Pet- 
tigrew and FB Jerald Sowed Signed S Darren 
Sharperto 4- year contract Claimed RBAaan 
Hayden off waivere from San Diego Chargers 
and K Ryan LongweE off yrabere ham San 
Francisco 4 Sere. Waived WR Ryan Yarbor- 
ough. signed WR OmarEltaon. 

san diego— R e-signed S David Hendrix to 

1- year contract. Waived Rfi Aaron Hoyden. 
Signed OB Torry Corbin fo 2-year confrad and 
WR Ray Crittenden to 1-year contract. 

sanfranciscd— W aived K Ryan Longwefl, 
T Andrew Moore and DT Corey Swanson. 
Signed LB Aubrey Beavers, LB HHarvButter, 
WR Truvts Hannah and DE Herman Smith. 

Tennessee -A greed fo terms wflfiT Scott 
Sanderson LB-DB Armon WR Der- 

rick Mason and LB Dennis StaSings on muttt- 
yea r contracts, Ag reed 1e rare wtttiCB DenaTO 
Walker and DE Pratt Lyons. Signed WR Joey 
Kent to multi-year conhad. 

Washington —Signed QB Gus FreraHe to 
a one-year contract. Signed C Dan Turk, 
Agreed to terms with LB Greg Janes and LB 
Derek Smith. 

HOCKWT 

national hockey leaoue 

BoiTOH-fie-signed D Dean Ciiynowefh to 

2- year contra d. 

coidha do— S igned F Jori Kurd to 1-year 
contrad. 

NASHVILLE— Named David Poile general 
manager. 

PHILADELPHIA— Signed G Jean- Marc Pd- 
letter. 

st. louis —Hied Jim Papphv director of 
proTesskmal player personnel Signed D 
Jamie H sword to 1-yearcontrecL 

PHOENIX— Named Benoit Allaire goaiteid- 
tagooodL 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


WHAT'S L0N6ER THAN 
A LINE THAT STRETCHES 
AROUND THE WORLD? 


A LINE FROM HERE 
.TO THE SON? J 


NO, A SUMMER 
. READINS LIST.. 


TVE QVMELED^ SITS 
M0TOWJES5. -- 


AHKZ.IHSLM. TVE LiZARD 
CHANGES GHOR TO BLEND 

in wrm v\s SJR 8 WNDWGS. 


MOMENTS LATER. WE IS 
VIRTUAL!^ )NVIS\BLE. . 


I SEE TCW HIDWG WQi. 
TWERE: NOW CDME.QEAN 
UPTHftMESs'RW VWCE 
^ IH THE WTCHEM.' — ^ 



„ N*chuU» s hu 
BO I*'!*' 

o'jinti 

fthet' 

ft it her --f 



Appears every. Saturday 
io Th? lotenoarkeL 
To advertise contact 
Kimberly CuerrantFBetrancourt 
' TeL: + 33 (0) 1 41 43 94 76 
Fax: + 33 (0)1 41 43 93 70 

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or representative. 























I 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD 


TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Smoking in Venice 



V ENICE— While the bad 
news for the tobacco 
companies comes from the 
United Stales, there is still 
good news for them in 
Europe. Nobody over here 
seems to hove 
quit smoking, 
and nobody 
seems to be su- 
ing the industry 
because its prod- 
ucts are haz- 
ardous to smok- 
ers’ health. _ 

Yob only re- gJcftwaM 
alize how seri- 
ously die Europeans take 
their smoking when you dine 
at an indoor restaurant with- 
out a gas mask. 

Thus it was at Alfredo 
Faoice, where we chose to eat 
me day. As we entered the 
q uaint restaurant the head 
waiter asked, “Would you 
{Kefer a smoking or a second- 
ary smoking table?’* Being 
Americans, we opted for the 
secondary smoking section, 
which comprised two tables. 

Tbe man at a smoking table 
was puffing on a cigarette and 
eating an artichoke at the 
same time. When he dis- 
covered that we were Amer- 
icans he said, 4 ‘Thank you for 
sending us the cigarettes you 
don't smoke any more." 

“Don’t mention it,” I said. 
“We helped you after World 
War II and only want to help 


Historic Seal Recovered 

Reuters 

BOSTON — Massachusetts 
officials have found the of- 
ficial seal to the document that 
created tbe Massachusetts Bay 
Colony 368 years ago. Police 
recovered die seal, a blackened 
clomp of beeswax bearing the 
crest of Britain’s King Charles 
I, while making a firearms ar- 
rest It was stolen from the 
state archives in 1984. 


you again. Besides, Euro- 
peans seem to be so much 
more sanguine about ciga- 
rettes than we are back home. 
You don't overdo a good 
thing — a pack or two a day, 
and that’s it” 

“It’s our culture," he ex- 
plained. "We don’t worry 
about getting sick from cig- 
arettes. Most of us have much 
more chance of getting sick 
from our governments." 


“If an Italian smoker has 
one tiring to worry about, 
what would it be?” 

"A shortage of ashtrays. 
Europe doesn't have nearly 
enough ashtrays. You can’t 
enjoy cigarettes if you keep 
dropping ash on the carpet.' ' 

{ f-ah Farb Chanin, who 
was sitting at our table, said, 
“I hope nobody tells them 
about the health hazards. They 
are such happy people.” 

Ai Goldstein said, “Do you 
think he’s serious about us 
sending ashtrays to Europe?” 

* ‘An Italian smoker doesn't 
make things up,” I said. 


The smoke in the restaur- 
ant was now so thick that all 
the planes at the Venice air- 
port were grounded. At the 
Fenice the specialty was ar- 
tichokes in vinaigrette, and 
many diners alternated be- 
tween eating their food and 
inhaling on their Marlboros. 

I was amazed at how the 
people in the smoking section 
were able to see each other 
through the fog. Tbe man who 
brought up the ashtray crisis 
turned to me and said, “Are 
you going to send us the ash- 
trays or not?” 

“It won’t be easy. Those 
Americans who have given 
up smoking are holding on to 
their ashtrays as mementos of 
the time when nicotine was 
king.” 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 

L ONDON — “I don’t like mak- 
ing films.” Judi Dench an- 
nounced disarmingly, explaining 
in one simple phrase why so ad- 
mired a British stage and television 
actress should be largely unknown 
outside her country. “I never have 
liked making films. I like doing a 
play because you go on and on and 
it gets better. I don’t like doing one 
take, or four takes, because I’m not 
sure of myself.” 

Well, if that is her conclusion 
after 40 years on stage and a hand- 
ful of small movie parts, “Mrs. 
Brown,” John Madden's new film 
about tiie strangely passionate re- 
lationship betweea Queen Victoria 
and her Scottish servant John 
Brown, is evidently the exception. 

In the movie, which opens in the 
United States on Friday, Dench 
plays tiie widowed British monarch, 
and she enjoyed every minute of it, 
she said, even the dreadful weather 
that accompanied the 30 days of 
filming in England and Scotland 
last fall. Tbe reason, it turns out, is 
quite simple. “He made me laugh,” 
she said of Billy Connolly, tbe pop- 
ular Scottish comedian who plays 
Brown, “and we continued laugh- 
ing until the very end of the shoot It 
was wonderful. One day he and I 
were in a boat and the water was 
seeping in. We sat there in tbe loch 
for four hours until the water was up 
to our waists. But it was OJC. Billy 
kept ns all laughing." 

“Mrs. Brown” suggests that 
Brown had something of the same 
effect on Victoria, who in 1861 had 
slumped into depression and reclu- 
sion after the death of hex husband. 
Prince Albert. Three years later, 
with the public restive over the dis- 


al household summoned Brown, 
Albert's loyal hunting attendant, in 
the hope that the earthy Scot could 
persuade the queen to go riding and 
resume contact with the world. 

Brown did that and more. Ig- 
noring court protocol, be spoke to 
Victoria bluntly, even addressing 


her as “woman.” This at first pro- 
voked ber indignation, bat it slowly 
won her over, to the point that she 
considered him her best friend and 
he was running the court. 

Soon scandal sheets were de- 
scribing them as lovers (they were 
roughly the same age, in their late 
40s) and mocking Victoria as Mrs. 
Brown. Finally, at tbe behest of 
Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli 
(played by Antony Sher), Brown 
persuaded the queen to return to 
public life. After that, his influence 
waned, but he remained at court 
until his death in 1883. “It's all 
true,’ ’ Dench said of the screenplay. 
“For example, the valentine she 
sent him; ‘My dear John, affec- 
tionately yours, VR.’ And there’s a 
lot more that isn’t in tbe film. 

“When be died, a lock of her hair 
was placed in his hand. She had 
flowers put on his pillow every 
single day from his death to her 
death in 1901. And when she died, 
she asked that his photograph be 
put in her palm. The horrified doc- 
tors said, ‘For heaven's sake, put 
some flowers over that. ’ ’ ’ 

So, to rephrase foequestion that 
intrigued Victorian England, ex- 
actly how close were they? “She 
believed that Albert’s spirit had 
entered Brown," Dench explained 
in an interview here at the Royal 
National Theatre, where she was 
rehearsing David Hare’s new play, 
“Amy ’8 View,” in which she 
plays an aging actress struggling to 
keep her name in lights. “When he 
came down south, he was tins old 
friend of her husband's whom she 
knew very well and who suddenly 
treated her as a woman." 

“You have to remember, he was 
a Highlander,” she added. 
“They’re powerful, attractive 
people. So it was a passionate re- 
lationship. But I think you can have 
a really passionate relationship that 
does not have to be sexuaL And I 
don’t believe this was.” 

On this point, the movie is am- 
biguous. There is ample flirtation 
between queen and commoner, and 
it’s evident that at least in tiie early 
years of their relationship Brown 



John Ihjm 

Judi Dench as actress Esme Allen in the play “Amy’s View.” 


held sway over Victoria. But 
Dench could be right. Amid the 
bowing and scraping of the court, 
Victoria may have felt it sufficed to 
be fond of someone whose only 
interest was to protect and entertain 
her. To the world, she remained 
haughty, intimidating and “not 
amused”; with Brown, she let 
down her guard. 

In several ways, the choice of 
Dench, 62, toplay foe monarch was 
a natural one. First, she looks the 
part. Like Victoria, the actress 
measures just 5 feet I inch, while 
her husky voice and vowel-perfect 
Queen’s English add to her regal 
aura. 


She also had her own experience 
to tap. She has .played many of 
Shakespeare’s queens onstage, and 
having been named a Dame by 
Queen Elizabeth n, she has even 
been entertained at Buckingham 
Palace, getting a peep inside 
today’s royal court 
At the same time, such is 
Dench’s stature here that her name 
alone will draw British moviegoers 
to “Mrs. Brown.” “When you talk 
about Judi, you unpack a suitcase 
full of superlatives, said Richard 
Eyre, the departing head of the Na- 
tional Theatre, who is directing 
Dench in “Amy’s View.” “She’s 
sort of diffident. There’s not a trace 


of. self-advertisement about, her. 

- She’s genuinely modest But in my 
view..^ is our greatest actress.” ; 

Almost from the Stan of her 

- stage career, playing Ophelia at the 
Old V5c. in J957, she has been-cpn- _ 
sidered a pillar of the English theat- 
er, appearing in d ozens of classical 
and contemporary productions and 
collecting innumerable awards.in- 
cluding an Olivier for best; actress 
in Anthony Page’s .“Absolute 
Heli” in 1995:and one for 
actress ih.aimusical in Stephen. 
Sondheim’s “little Night Music**. 

:■ foe same year. ~ ~ \ 

She is best known in Britain, 
however, for her frequentlead roles 
in television sitcoms, most recently 
in “A Fine Romance,’’ where she. 
played opposite her husband^ Mi-: 
chael W illiam s, and in “.As Time 
Goes By,” which is about to enter 
its seventh season. ;■ 

Connolly,, who has been in a 
haif-dozen films, said he leamied 
much from working With her. f ‘She.: 
is by for and away the best actor! 
have ever wadeed with in my life,” 
he said. “I didn’t care if she was a 1 
stage actress.or a film actress. I just 
knew I was being dragged along in 
the slipstream ofi this extraordinary , 
performer. She has that ability to 
switch it on immediately. She can' 
be telling yon a little joke and. 
foey!H say. ’Action,* and foe in- 
stantly becomes tbe other person. * 
It’s terrifying to watch.” 

In person, with her good humor, 
easy, laugh,, pageboy haircut and 
casual clothes, Dench exudes sim- 
plicity, which probably explains: 
why no one seems to nave a bad. 
word to say about her. . 

As it bappens/Ctonnolly said he - 
was “a bit scared" of meeting her, 
but he soon came to understand her 
popularity. “She’s held in deep af- 
fection,'’ he said. “The characters 
she has played, even in .comedy, , 
people sympathize with diem. They 
also sympathize with Judi’s shape, 
her height, her fece. There’s an or- 
dinariness ' about her appearance 
and an extraordihariness about her 
performance, that I think people 
identify with.” _ . .. 


PEOPLE 




TRACK AND SPIEL — The Formula One driver Damon Hill, left, and 
pop star Chris de Burgh at a rock concert after the British Grand Prix. 


TNjust nine months Karen na Gore and 
X Andrew Schiff went from how-do- 
you-do to 1-do; from an informal date in 
October to Aretha Fr anklin serenading 
tiie newlyweds under an enormous white 
tent. After tbe wedding ceremony at foe 
Washington National Cathedral, The 
Washington Post reported, came a party 
at Mom and Dad's — foe vice pres- 
idential mansion. The Grammy- winning 
fiddler Mark O’Connor played “The 
Tennessee Waltz’ ’ for Karenna’s second 
dance, with her father, and when the 
bandleader called for the family to join 
them, sister Sarah Gore turned to Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton and asked, “Wanna 
dance?” Yes, he did. And so did nearly 
all of foe 300 guests, who arrived shortly 
after 7 P.M. and left around 12:30 AH. 
when the bridal couple vanished into 
their limo. The wedding merged the 
Gores of Tennessee and the Schiffs of 
New York. The political clan claims 
three former senators, including the fa- 
ther of the bride. Vice President Al 
Gore, and her grandfather. Albert Gore 
Sr. The Schiffs’ 19th-cenmry patriarch 
was Jacob Schiff, foe powerful banker 


and philanthropist Some of his descen- 
dants, including father of the groom, 
David Schiff, are still in hi gh finance. 
Among foe guests: Housing Secretary 
Andrew Cuomo and Kerry Kennedy 
Cuomo, Agriculture Secretary Dan 
Gtickman and wife, Rboda, Senators 
Barbara Mikulski and Joe Liebennan, 
foe cosmetics mogul Leonard Lauder 
and wife, Evelyn, former HEW Sec- 
retary Joe CaUfano, and, of course, 
former New York Representative Tom 
Downey and his wife, Chris Downy, 
who introduced foe couple. Drew Schiff 
is a New York Hospital primary-care 
physician; Karenna starts law school at 
Columbia University in September. It is 
unclear how much entertaining they will 
do once classes begin. But judging by 
their Tiffany wish list, they eventually 
anticipate a gracious social life. 


Bill Gates, foe founder of Microsoft, 
remains foe world's richest businessman 
with a net worth of $36.4 billion, ac- 
cording to Forbes Magazine’s annual 
listing. Forbes said that in foe last year. 


foe computer tycoon’s net worth soared 
by $18 billion and is the highest ever 
recorded in the magazine's ranking. He 
tops foe billionaire’s listfor the third year 
in a row. Paul Allen, foe co-founder of 
Microsoft who no longer works there but 
retains an interest in foe company, ranks 
sixth on the list with a net worth of $14, 1 
billion. Only the Sultan of Brunei ($38 
billion) is richer than Gates, Forbes said. 
The magazine placed him at tile head of 
a separate category dubbed “Kings, 
Queens and Dictators.” Second to Gates 
is tbe Walton family , owners of foe U.S. 
Wal-Mart discount store chain, with a 
net worth of $27.6 billion. The Wall 
Street investor Warren Buffett is. third 
($23.2 billion), followed by tbe Hong 
Kong real estate investor Lee Sbau Kee 
($14.7 billion) and the Oeri, Hoffrnan 
and Sacher families of Switzerland rank 
fifth (pharmaceuticals, $14.3 billion). 


“Ma Vie en Rose,” a Belgian- 
French co-production about a little boy 
who likes to dress as a gni, won the prize 
for best picture at foe 32d Karlovy Vary 


lijil 


film festival. The Belgian director 
Alain Berliner accepted the Crystal 
Globe award at foe Czech spa and resort 
town, formerly known as Carlsbad. The 
director Milos Forman received a life- 
time achievement award 


Michael Jackson failed to fill Lon- 
don's Wembley stadium for his first 
London concert in five years. Ticket 
touts woe having a hard time, and just 
before Jackson came on stage, some 
were selling at half price. 


A South African cast will perform 
Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” at Lon- 
don’s Globe Theatre next month, in 
Zulu. The playwright Welcome Msomi 
said “Umabatha” will run for a week at 
the Globe from Aug. 4 after a season at . 
the State Theatre in New YorL-jP 
“Umabatha” — a mixture of drama, 
traditional Zulu music, dance and po- _ 
etry — was performed for foe first time • 
in 1972 in Durban, while Msomi, now 
53, was a drama student. 



Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 





makes calling home and to other countries really easy. 


Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country you’re 




calling from and you’ll get the dearest connections 


home. And be sure to chaise your calls on your 
AT&T Calling Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous 


phone charges on your hotel bill and save you up to 


* So when in Rome (or anywhere else for that 


When in 172 


do as the 172-lOlTs do. 


matter) do as many business travelers do. Use AT&T 


Check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


Steps to follow for easy raffing vorUwite 

1. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the count; you 
are calling from. 

1 Dial the phone number you’re calling. 

3. Dial the calling card number listed abo«? -.cur narar. 


»36 coo uaa mi 

TtWnK ' . 


- - Swdm .028-735-611 

. 8Z2-SB-011 Switzerland* 08004941011 

W 11 ?* mn B dDmA 0500-89-0011 

rtSiytlS 0800-80-0011 

Oflnwnj 0130481B - — HIPPIE EAST 

S»BW* 00489-1311 pWPt*(Calro)t 

Iratado ’ 1400-5504M “ f181 17i 

Italy* 172-1011 Saudi Arab ia c> 

Hetireitaris* 0800422-Bin AFRI CA 

Russia • a {Moscow)* 755-5042 Gbatta ~ — “ 

W 989-994 l-1f Scatfi Africa 'Jfa 

Can’t find the AT&T Access Number for die country your* oiling from? Jusi ask any operator for 
AT&T Direct" Service, orvfeji ourWeh site at fa tip-y/wwwjKUomrtravdcr 


5104210 

.177-100-2727 
■■ ■ .1400-18 

~ .. 0191 

.0490494123 




-n^ioicKUiirudeapiaciiduadaanlT *Lmisd oPufcBc (baauptte idne pqcca dun* a* qij nWW