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INTERNATIONAL 



Srlbtttti^ 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


l^rsace: Victim No. 5? 

Police Suspect Homosexual Prostitute 
Sought by FBI as a Grisly Serial Killer 



Cimftkdt^ UtrStM/rFitiM Pur^Jhlrs 

MIAMI BEACH — The first vic- 
tim, a 28-year-old former U.S. Navy 
lieuienanl, was found wrapped in a 
rug in a loft apartment in Minneapol- 
is, his head b^hed with a claw ham- 
mer. The second victim, a 33- year-old 
architect, was found on hour’s drive 
north, shot once in the bead. 

llie third victiin was a 72-yeor-old 
Diicago real estate tycoon, found in 
the garage of his town house, his throat 
slashed with a saw blade, his chest 
slabbed with pruning shears and his 
head wraf^>ed in masking tape with a 
- breathing hole left at the nostrils. 

Hie fourth victim was William 
Reese, the caretaker of a New Jersey 
cemetery, found shot to death in the 
burial ground. 

Now. federal investigators believe 
that all four deaths — and a Hfth. the 
fatal shooting Tuesday of the SO-year- 
old Italian fashion designer Gianni 
Versace — were the work of a single 
killer already on the FBI’s 10-most- 
wanted list, a man who Wednesday 
was ihe object of a search in Florida 
and across the United States. 

The suspect is Andrew Phillip Cun- 
anan, a 27-year-old fugitive who has 
been described by police, acquaint- 
ances and his mother as a homosexual 
prostitute who caters to wealthy men. 
Therar said he did not know all of his 
apparent victims. 

Jim Chambliss of the Florida De- 
panment of Law Enforcement said 
dttfc was ’"a certain possibility” that 
the killer was still in the Miami area, 
evading a “massive manhunt.” More 


than 200 calls had been legged on a 
police hotline created to seek the pub- 
lic’s help. * ’We want to lake him off the 
streets as quickly as we can,” he said. 

After the Versace shooting, wit- 
nesses led police to a parking garage 
near the designer's home where a man 
fitting Che descripdon of the suspect 
was seen. There, police found a red 
Chevrolet pickup truck that inves- 
tigators said Mr. Cunanan stole from 
Mr. Reese. Clothing under the truck 
fit the description by witnesses of the 
killer’s clothes, police said. One wit- 
ness said the man changed clothes in 
the truck, then hailed a taxi. 

Without Gianni, what's in store 
for the Versace label? Pdge 2. 

Asked Tuesday night to describe 
the fugitive’s mt^us operandi, Paul 
Philip, the special agent in charge of 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 
Miami, seemed taken aback. “He 
kills people,” Mr. Philip said. 

“We’ve been actively looking for 
him since April,” be said. “Every- 
body’s at risk. Evecybody’s got to 
help us put this guy in jail.” 

The i^lice cluef of Miami Beach, 
Richard Barreto, said the shooting of 
Mr. Versace outside the gates of his 
Mediterranean-style mansion — 
twice in the back of the head at close 
range — was not a random act 
Mr. Versace was gay, but inves- 
tigators said they did not know of any 

See M URDER, Page 6 


\ By Barbara Cassette 

yitrt runes Sf/vice 

UNTT^ NATIONS, New York — 
Secretaiy-Geoeral Kori Annan an- 
nounced Wednesday that he intends to 
sweep away a Unit^ Nations manage- 
mem system accrued over more than 
half a century and significantly restnic- 
tnre the organization’s administration 
from the top down. 

would be the cumbersome ar- 
Tf JDARIT^ — RiLurd" •* langement under which more than two 
idiDEth<.*niu:>icijn«jndMn^‘ dozen fiefdoms within the secretariat 
ilanN La SljU. ihi: ^ the organization’s autonomous 

‘ • mdO^ agencies all had direct access to the 

Hlhartnon..- ( >r. In its place would be 

huruib in a toncert ^ cabinet of fewer Aan a dozen top 

officials wiA enhanced powers in major 

areas of activity. 

A deputy secretary-general's posi- 
tion would be created. A Department of 
Disannameot would be reinstated and a 
strengthened human rights office would 
get a role in top manageraent, Mr. An- 
-i - . „ nan said. 

:!^ CsV.T' '■ Mr. Annan, who presented his plan to 

a special General Assembly session 
We^esday morning, is gambling that 
. . his plan has enough stF^mlining and 

Tivn/: ■ ‘ ■ j cost-cuttingtopac^theU.S. Congress . 

^ and yet pays adequate attention to the 
demands of poor nations that could use 
their majority to block changes that 
i; tht Aix; many believe have been forced on the 

^ organization by industrial countries. 

' Saying that “tiie United Natimis is 
7= not woridflg as it should,” Mr. Annan 
' ~ ' pledged to begin “a quiet revolution” 

that would make the organiution more 
efficient without reducing its ability to 




have an impact in a wide range of 
areas. 

“In return 1 ask of you, and of the 
wOTld, that you judge us not cmly by the 
cuts we propose or by die structures we 
change.'’ the secretary-general said. 
“Judge us instead — and judge us 
rightly by the relief and r^ge that 
we provide to the poor, to the hungry, 
the sick and diieaiened: the peoples of 
the world whenn the United Nations 
exists to serve.” 

Most diplcanatic missions here and 
interested groups around the United 
States were seeing the completed plan 
for the first time Wednesday, since it has 
been written and rewritten many times 
over in the last week or two, amid 
gathering gloom in many quarters that 
the UN bureaucracy was watering down 
the proposal 

Initi^ U.S. reactions to Mr. Annan's 
proposals were mixed. In Washington, 
Senator Rod Grams, the Minnesota Re- 
jxiblican who is chaiiman of die Senate 
Foreign Relations subcommittee on is- 
temational organizations, said that 
“this meager package represents noth- 
ing more than the status, and that is 
unacceptable.” 

Bill Richardson, the United States 
representative to the United Natums, 
said in an interview after hfr. Annan’s 
speech that die report “heads in the 
right direction.” 

* ‘The general thrust, which improves 
efficiency, lowers cost and focuses on 
the core miarinns of the UN, are steps in 
the right direction,” Mr. ^chardson 

See UN, Page 6 


London, Thursday, July 17, 1997 


No. .35.575 



Dow Index Vaults 
Over 8,000 Barrier 

Technological Gains Fuel Rise 
Of 24% in Average So Far in ’97 



X ^ , -K 


4. " 


Peter MoipiVReaici' 

A New York trader watching the Dow Jones industrial average leap 
above a key milestone in the first half hour of the Wednesday session^ 


By Mitchell Martin 

tmen utriiwa! Herald Tiihune 

NEW YORK — The Dow Jones in- 
dustrial average crossed the 8,000 level 
for the first time Wednesday, a mile- 
stone that brings the gain in blue-chip 
American stocks to a .<:tunnmg 24 per- 
cent ibis year and reflects a growing 
U.S. economy in which lechnoiogicaJ 
advances apparently have helped wring 
inflation out of the system. 

liie Dow has doubled in less than 
three years, and the value of shares in 
the U.S. stock market is now about 
$10.65 trillion, accounting for about 
half the traded equity in the world, ac- 
coiding to Birinyi Associates Inc. in 
Greenw'ich, Connecticut. At the start of 
the decade. U.S. stocks were only worth 
about $3 trillion, although some of the 
rise in recent years refiects non-U.S. 
companies listing their shares on Amer- 
ican maikeis. 

The rise of the Dow through 8,000 
was almost anticlimactic, as the average 
has flirted with that milestone for two 
weeks. More notable have been the 
strcMtg gains in the Nasdaq composite 
average, which corrqnises many of the 
major technology companies that are 
traded on the over-the-counter system. 
Technology shares were slumping earli- 
er in the year, so even though it has risen 
30 percent since early April, the Nasdaq 
average's gain for this y^ is only about 


The Dollar 


New 'foik Wednesday 6 4PM pievtaus dose 


chariQe Wednesday e 4 p M. pieinous dc>se 
+T0TO 936.56 925.77 


22 percent, trailing the Dow and the 
broadest of the major stock gauges, the 
Standard & Poor's 500. which has in- 
creased 26 percent. 

An illustration of the increasing role 
of technology companies in the finan- 
cial markets was the fact that Microsoft 
Cotp.. whose software is found on most 

g ersonal computers, was worth $175.4 
illion in late trading, behind only Gen- 
eral Electric Co., which has a market 
capitalization of $241.5 billion. Mi- 
crosoft's stock rose more than $9 a share 
to $148.4375, allowing it to eclipse 
Coca-Cola Co. for the No. 2 position, 
even Aough Coke’s stock also rose. 

See MARKET. Page 6 


UN Qlief Unveils Proposal 
To Revamp Organization 

Plan Seeks Deputy, Cabinet and Streamlining 



EUs Struggle to Redefine Itself 

Radical Reform, It Says, Must Pave Way to Eastward Expansion 


By Tom Buerkle 

Imenkaiond Hehdd Tribune 


STTtASBOURG — Orcoing what 
will probably be years or struggle to 
define the European Union’s contours 
for the next century, the bloc’s exec- 
utive commission c^ed Wednesday for 
a radical overhaul of EU policies, fi- 
nances and governing procedures to 
prepare for expansion into Central and 
Ea^ni Europe. 

“We have a historic o{^)Ortunity, car- 
tying wiA it profound changes,” the 
commission president, Jacques Santer. 
said in formally unveiting the {voposals 
before the European Parliament here. 

Tbe European Commission also ex- 
plained its decision, made .the day be- 
fore, to recommend that the Union begin 
membership negotiations next year with 
only five of £e foimer Soviet bloc 
countries seeking entry — the Czech 
Republic, Estonia, Hungaiy, Poland and 


A^em Akcc- neue 

Jacques Santer unveiling propos- 
als on Wednesday for EU reform. 


Slovenia. Cyprus has also been en- 
dorsed for membership talks. 

In its most exhaustive analysts yet of 
the region, the commission said the five 
East European countries had made the 
most progress in implementing demo- 
cratic and free-maiket reforms. But it 
cautioned that even they have a long 
way to go to bring their competition 
laws, environmental standard and 
transportation and energy networks up 
to EU levels. 

The need for further substantial re- 
forms in tbe candidate countries, as well 
as tile prospect of stiff opposition from 
existii^ members to a reduction of (heir 
EU fann and development subsidies, 
indicated that tbe Union’s mlaigement 
will be a Iraig and politicaUy tortuous 
affair. 

As Prime Minister Gyula Horn, 
speaking in Budapest, expressed hope 
t^t Hungary would join me Union by 
2000, Mr. Santer saw the first expansion 


in 2002 or 2003, while many EU of- 
ficials privately suggested 2005. 

The commission’s proposals were 
W’elcomed by the five favored candi- 
dates. particularly Slovenia and Estonia. 

After NATO's decision last week to 
limit its initial enlargement to only three 
countries, the positive recommendation 
from the commission “helps a little bit 
to repair the wounded Slovenian soul,” 
said Boris Cizelj. the country's am- 
bassador to the EU. 

In Estonia, Prime Minister Mart Sii- 
mann said the recommendation “gives 
us a new impulse' ' to anchor the former 
Soviet republic firmly in the WesL 

In Bucharest, however. Prime Min- 
ister Victor Ciorbea called Romania's 
exclusion “unjustified." 

Turkish leaders also voiced their 
pique at being left behind Eastern 
Europe and Cyprus. Deputy Prime Min- 

See UNION, Page 6 


Europe and U.S. Edge Toward Trade War Over Boeing 


By Bany James 

IniematuMtal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The Eurc^iean Union took a further step 
lowanl a possible trade war with the Uoitad States on 
Wednesday when antitrust experts representing member 
governments endenxed rejecting tbe $153 billioa ac- 
quisition of McDonnell Douglas Corp. Yty Bodng Co. 

Boeing’s vice president in cha^e of die nego- 
tiations, Richard Albrecht, fiew back to the United 
States, leaving what was left of the talks in the hands of 
lower-level negotiators. 

With both sides keeping silent about the substance 


of tbe talks, there was no indication that th^ would 
achieve a breakthrough before the European Com- 
mission, which negotiates on behalf of EU member 
states, decides on the issue next Wednesday. 

The antitrust experts from tbe 15 member coDOtries 
urged the conunission to keep the negotiations t^n. 
But they agreed with the commission's assessment 
that Boeing’s proposals did nothing to “prevent a 
strengthening of Boeing’s dominant position,” anEU 
official said. 

President Jacques Chirac of France said during a 
visit to Brussels: “We strongly support the commission 
on its position on Boeing^cDonneU,” adding, “U 


could be extremely dangerous for Europeans.” 

If it rules against the acquisition, the commission 
will be faced with the decision to pul into action its 
threat to levy heavy fines against Boeing. 

The United Suites already has warned rhe com- 
mission it will back Boeing to the hilt and will react to 
any European sanctions. Such a reaction could include 
an embargo on Europe’s four-nation Airbus con- 
sortium or on hundreds of European companies that 
supply Boeing. 

“If they're going to take sanctions against Boeing, 


i A!’- 


What Price Free Markets? Japan Anxiously Builds Capitalism 




By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New York Tams Service 

TOKYO — Westm-style capitalism is coming 
to Japan, raising tensions and eyebrows, upsetting 
plans and a way .(^.Ufe. 

Obviously, the home of Toyota and Sony is not 
communist country - — though Japanese and 
foreign analysts have often pointed out parcels. 
But h is not really a capitalist country either, in tbe 
ratrepreneurial, freewheeling- way of Western 
maiket economies. 

; As Japan, searches for a.patii.imo tbe next 
century, the challenges of boila^ a tnodern mar- 
ie^ economy — and tbe resulting anxiety — are 
disconcertindy sin^ar tolhose in the fotmer com- 
niunist WMld. in Japan almost as much as in Russia 


there is a consensus that the old economic and 
political system was ill-suited for the future, and 
tha t society must move several steps in the di- 
rection of American-style capitalism, but that this 
will be as painful as it is inevitable. 

The J^anese economy is marked by a high 
degree ^central planning , presided overt^ power- 
ful bnieaucrats confident that they can allocate 
resources better than the free markeL Business is 
highly regula^ and often collusive. The economy 
is bias^ toward producers rather than consumers, 
resulting in first-class steel mills and third-class 
apartment buUdings. And in many cities, tbe econ- 
omy seems closer to that of a 16th-cennny village 
than that of a modem capitalist country. 

The anti-caphalist side of the econmny is sq>- 
parent in the back alleys of cities like Utsunomiya. 


a sprawling warren of veget^rle shops and noodle 
restaurants at die foot of the great moun tains of 
central Japan. Resistance to the rough and tumble 
of the maiket in places like this is simply a matter of 
goexi neighborliness. Keiko Abe, a longtime res- 
ident of Utsunomiya, says she feels a strong sense 
of moral obligation — what the Japanese call gin 
— to buy from local shops, whatever the price. 

“The elderly folks tty to buy from local 
shops, and the shop owners buy ^m each other,’* 
she said. “But young people don’t feel that girl. 
They go wherever it’s cheap.” 

These webs of giri in some ways reflect the very 
best of Japan, its civility and respect for others. A 
fundaments question for Jsqian is whether it can 
move to a more market-oriented system without 
disrupting the sense of co mmuni ty that for cen- 


turies have been at die root of Japanese society. 
Some Jt^aoese wonder whether capitalism will 
lead to layoffs, inequality, crime and a society that 
vSues wealth more than cooperation and social 
resTOnsibility. 

Bor all the ai^vehensions about the future, 
J^»nese society is virtually unanimous on the need 
for change — Sthough there is debate about the 
pace. Thm is a remarkably gloomy consensus that 
the country has lost its edge, diat it been oM- 
maneuver^ by mme creative and entrqrreneuriS 
countries like the United States, that it will be 
challenged in the coming decades by the booming 
econmnies of Asia and that o^ess it can restructure, 
its best days are behind it But for the Japanese, tbe 

See JAPAN, Page 6 


AT&^ 


Wewsstand Prices 

Bahrain 1.0(X)Din Mata. .55 c. 

Cypois C.E1.00 hSgeiia...12S.OO Naira 

Demiark....14J]0 D.KC Oi«n..~...1.2S0 Rais 
Finland.....1U0 F.M. Qalar~l~.10.00 Rials 

Gtaatar £0.65 Rap. lrelBnd...»£ 1.00 

Great Brtain~.£ 0.90 Saudi Ai^ .10.00 R 

Egypt £E&S0 S.'Ahlca~~Ri2 + VAT 

Jordan 1250 JO UAE. iiaoODirh 

....K. SH. 160 US. MB. (Eur.) ...$ 120 
Kuwait .700 Fits ZknbatNn.-. Zim230J)0 


Cambodia Coup Leader Appoints Co-Prime Minister 


See BOEING, Page 6 

AGENDA 

U.S. Faults North 
La Korean Clash 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
State Department on Wednesday 
accused North Korea of unusually 
ag gressive provocation in sending 
skiers across the demilitarized 
zone with South Korea, but said the 
action would not afiect promised 
new food aid. 

The department spokesman. 
Nicholas Burns, spoke after North 
and South Korean troops engaged 
in an hourlong gunfight along their 
common border in one of their most 
serious clashes in recent years. 

Earlier article. Page 4. 



9J'770294*‘'8Cl‘5b"49 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Wadiui gim Post Service 

■ PHNOM PENH — Cambodia’s for- 
eign minister, Ung Hoot, agr^ 
Wednesday to become first prime min- 
. ister, replacing Prince Nimsoom Ranar- 
iddh. who was deposed in a bloody coup 
this monti) and remains in uncertain 
exile abroad. 

Tbe stuprise announcement by Mr. 
Ung Huot — who is backed by a dis- 


sident group of Prince Ranariddh’s frac- 
tured party — lends an air of legitimacy 
and interoational re^tectahility to die rule 
of die second prime minister, Hun Sen, 
and undercuts tbe prince’s effims to rally 
foreign backing for a return to power. 

“I think it solves everythuig,” said 
Dav Roueng, a top police official and a 
Ixeakaway member of Prince Ranar- 
iddh's royalist party. 

But most Cambodian analysts said 
they expected Mr. Ung Huot to be little 


more thnn a figurehead, with Mr. Hun 
Sen maintaining near-absolute power 
behind the scenes. 

' 'These days, and for the foreseeable 
future, I don’t think he can refuse flatly 
what Hun Sen wants,” said Lao Mong 
Hay, executive director of die Khmer 
Institute of Democracy. “Hecangeton 
with Hon Sra, and perhaps restrain Hun 
Sen a little biL” 

”It’s a good choice to get tbe in- 
ternational commnnity to recognize tbe 


new regime.” he added. 

After his troops touted Prince Ranar- 
iddh’s outDnmbeied and outgunned 
fences during fierce fighting in the capital 
July 6, Mr. Hun Sen said his power play 
was not a coup since he inten(ted to aUow 
Prince Ranariddh's party to retain tbe top 
job and name a successor to the van- 
quished prince. With top officials of 
Prince Ranariddh's party either ex- 

See CAMBODIA, Page 6 


THE AMERICAS 

Page 3. 

Bill Cosby’s $100,000 Secret 

1 EUROPE 

Pages. 

1 Naa Gold fVobe l^eris 







Sports 

.. Pages lS-10. 

TJtetntormarket 

Pages. 

Blhe IHT on-line http: 

:/A'AVw.iht,comB 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY JULY 17, 1997 


PAGE TWO 




The King of Frock W Roll / Designer Who Caught fho Moment 


Without Gianni^ Can J^rsace Survive? 


By Suzy Meokes 

Imenutiond Herald TrUmne 


L ondon — Pick up any 
glossy magaziiie — say tte 
cmieat Vanity Fair widi 
Plincesa Diana rec Kning on 
the cover — and yon will find, in pole 
position, an ad for Veisace. 

The liters printed in sunshine yel- 
low aCTOSS ^ bared chest of a 
some yoi^ boy, or on a sUhooetted 
hand wei^ied down with Medusa 
rings, are not **Gianni Veisaoe" — 
the name of the desim^ who was 
gunned down at his Miami Beach 
home Tuesday. 

Instead, tl» word is just **Ver- 
sace." It is symbolic of the faa that 
the Italian company has aheady made 
the transition from designer label to 
brand and is therefore in a vi^le 
position to survive the deatii of its 
rounder — [aoviding Ae financial 
situatitxi is sound and the rest of the 
close-knit hunily unit remains intact 
Although Voaace wiAout its 
bravura designer — and his exuberant 
personality, sound-bite quotes and 
rock-star eotourage — oii^ seem 
incoaceiwAle, the conq)any is facing 
in a brutal and public way the same 
dilemma that other fastuKi houses 
have surmounted and tiiat many others 
will have to solve as time ticte away 
for an aging designer gcfleratioo. 

How can you have “Hamlet** 
wiAout Ae prince? Can you per- 


suade people to buy into a fashion 
sewnen 


universe when the idng is dead, leav- 
ing only a logo behind? 

The Ftencn houses of Chanel and 
Dior are exanmles of companies that 
were foundc^y high-pro^ design- 
ers and diat have reinvented them- 
selves as luxury brands following the 
deaths of their chiefs. 

‘*Veisace is confronting Ae same 
nioblem we had 40 years a^o." said 
Francois Baufume, presKieat of 
Christian Dior couture, referring to 
the eponymous founder's deaA in 
1957 after just 10 years as a fashion 
leader. Eveiy successful designer has 
to develop from creative force to 
label ana Aen A the “ultimate 
stage*’ of turning products into a 
brand, Mr. Bauftirae said. 

“It isn't easy." he said. “They will 
have to find someone to desi^ for 
Versace and be very careful mpositioo 
themselves — but it can be done.*' 


D onatella vereace, 40. 
the desiguer's flamboyant, 
bonle-blonde sister and 
muse, is the most likely 
candidate to take over, alAough no 
one can know how she will function 
wiAout Ae broAer to whom she was 


specially close. 
Ms. Vei 


tersace already designs Ae 
Versus collection, a subsiduiiy line, 
and in recent years, especially while 
Mr. Versace was battling a cancerous 
tuiZHV A tbe ear, she shared Ae lime- 
Ught and even produced a signature 
frurance. Blonde. 

u) Ae U.S. market, retiul analysts 
have seen Ae power sharing as part 
of utelligeot management by Santo 
Versace. Gianni's elder brwher and 
business partner, aimed at establish- 
ing a global brand. 

Rose Marie Bravo, president of 
Saks Fifth Avenue, said Wednesday 
from Orlando. Florida, Aat Ae com- 
pany had a ‘'shrewd strategy" and 
had already t^en “all Ae right 
steps'* to create a Versace look aad 
baud up a base of customers from 
Asia through SouA America who 


“love what he stands for.** 

“1^ siguature is so strong and 
consistent and tbbre are so many pro- 
duct categories wiA the color and Ae 
! — and people are desiious 


sex 


of b^miitg part of Aat imageiy,” 
she said. 

At Bogdoxf Goodman in New 
Yodc, which cairies only the men's 
and WDinen*s Vesssec couture lines, 
not its secondary lines or andllaiy 
products like bMnewares and jeans, 
jos^ Boitauo, Ae store*s executive 
vice preddent, said tiiat tiie empire 
could wittastaud Ae current crisis. 

“The name Versace has a very 
cJear-cut image, and although Gianni 
was an mt^ral they have already 

maH t» Ae transition into a txand," he 
said. “Between tiie publicity, the re- 
tail positioning and the proAict, tiie 
situation is very strong;'^ 


H O W did an Italian boy from 
a snople southern Italian 
funily, who founded his 
label in 1978, manage to 

bl« Md such an nfia««anah1e emp ire in 

such a relatively short time? 


The answer is money — and hype. 
Mr. Versace was empti^caliy not me 


most creative desigicr of bis gen- 
eration. Fcrmost of the 1980s, when 
Giragio Armani reinvented tailoring 
as an androgynoos comfort blanket, 
Mr. Veisace was vilified for his ila- 
gi^t, hard-edged sexiness. To tiie 

n/rfe nf an Tfatinn afnhflufiq do'' *^^ **ri*, 

it was “La ModaPutana’* or “booker 
fashion.'* 

Nor did Mr. Versace mveni the 
fashion spectacular. A decade befor e 
him, in Paris m Ae 1970s, Kenzo had 
nroented shows in a ciieus tent, and 
ibieny Mugler did so m a gjant 
stadium. 

But what Mr. Versace did was big- 
ger aad bttur than anyone else: His 
aldn-tight leatiiers were softer, his 
sex-chaiged dresses silkier and his 
verdginoos high-heeled shoes glitzi- 
er. Heusedmon^ — mysterious tons 
of it — to hire the best models and 
photographers and to boy the good- 
will (or at least sUeace the munnuring 
doubts) of magagineg A whidl he SO 
conraicuously advertised. 

Although tiie French designer 
Azzedme Alaia was Ae first to put 
photographic snpermodels on the 
runway. Mr. Versace owned the ter- 
ritory Ae time he had bolstered 
theirflrostoS10,000ashow. In 1991 


he lined up models including 


Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista 
and Christie TtirlAgton m one mem- 
arable show. 

Even if histoiy told otherwise, Mr. 
Versace bliAely rewrote it, Harming 
to be a best friend of Andy Waihol and 
part of the famous Factory scene, al- 
tfaou^ m tbe 1960s he was a shy, 
fledgling Italy-based designer who 
spoke not a w^ of English. (Later be 
learned to oixiverse fluently.) He ag- 
graiNlized his motiier's small dre^ 
making bosiness m Reggio A Ca- 
labria, calling it a famous couture 
business servicing aristocrats of Italy. 

In a recently published pocket his- 
uxy of Versace, Richard Martin, cu- 
rator of Ae Costume Institute of tiie 
Metropolitan Museum (whose 
“Haute Couture** exhibition the 
company oo-sponsored) quoted hfr. 
Versace as saying that his sister had 
shared black leather puts — as well 
as initials. — wiA Diana Vreekuid, 
tbe k^endaiy Vogue fashion editor. 

According to Katell le Bourhis. 
Ms. Vreeland's assistant at Aat time, 
Mr. Versace had sent her a pair of 



Gianni J^nace and his tisier, DonaieUa^ sharing the ^ry 
on the ntmoay after a recenl shou^ above^ and naomi 
Campbell modeling a hbrsace cocktail dress last weelL 


leather pants m homage but neither 
he DOT sister ever Imew her. 


T he myA-mnking was on 
such a gargantuan scale that 
it was impossible for an in- 
dustry ba^ on hype not to 
be swept along. 

Gianni Versace*s engaging per- 
sonality made it seem p^ectly nor- 
mal for him to present himself at the 
same time as a king of frock *n* roll, 
a connoissein^ of modem art (he 
claimed that he bought his Picassos 
not from a gallery but from “Ae 
family*’) and Ae reincarnation of a 

Renaissance'prince. 

“I feel like a Medici,' ' be said last 
monA. standing on a podium in Ae 
Boboli Gardens in Florence, stretch- 
ing out his arms to Ae envifix po- 
sition, as he was wont to do ax Ae end 
of each show. 

In his paJazzo in Milan, he lived 
like a Medici, surrounded by clas- 
sical busts and Renaissance ^^intings 
— yet lunched at himie chi simple 
pasta every day at Ae family Able. 

Everytiwg that Mr. Versace Ad 
was grist to the publicity milL Or, as 
a British editor, put it: “If be has a 
cup of tea, 1 get a press release." 

If Ae Verstxes decide to look out- 
side their immediate family for a 
replacement for a designs' who had 
an instinct for gaiching — rather Aan 
creating — Ae fashion moment, Aey 
will find it hard to fUI Mr. Vssace's 
shiny. gUt-trimewd shoes. But there 
is one prerequisite in following in Ae 



f.iMh »i |. 


maestro’s footsteps — or for wearing 
his clothes. 

“1 like to dress egos," Mr. Versace 
said. “If you haven't got a big ego, you 
can forget iL" 


Rwandan Army Accused » i 
Of ‘Widespread Atrocities! 

us. Training Didn’t Deter KiUings in Congo 


By Thooias W. Lippniazi 

VbsUmtMH Past Service 


WASHINGTON — A tfaree-year ef- 
fort by Ae Pentagon to raise tiie Stan- 
dai^ and discqwne of the Rwandan 
Army has failed to deter Ae Rwandans 
“widespread atrocities agrinst d- 
viiian populations in eastern Con^o,* 
aoeordms ^ ^ rq) 0 !rt by hu m a n rights 
uvestigators. 

Tlie i^iort. by the group. Physicians 
for Human Rights, waspiqwredforAe 
House Intemadonal Relations Commit- 
tee on the sitnation in Congo, wbsie last 
wintertiieRwandanmilitaxy engineered 
and belied cany out a successful re- 
bellion against ite govemmeut of what 
was then^dre. 

Defease Minister Paul K^ame of 
R'wanda has conf ir med Aat his coun- 
try's amed forces oigtmized imd sup- 
ported Ae seven-monA rebellioa that 
ended the three-decade rule in Zaire of 
Mobutu Sese Seko and propelled the 
nrnwinfll rebel leader, LanrentKabila, to 
tiie inesidenOT. Mr. Kabila has renamed 
the country Congo. 

Congo’s Dew leader has sou^lit to 
block mvestigations by jonmalists and 
hnman rights workers uto atrodties Ad 
have been reported in the east 

The i«)Oft by tiie Physicians for Hu- 
man Ri^ts its tiiree-person team 
two wedks in Rwanda and 
Congo “received reliable re^ioits chat 
Rwandan militaiy have committed, and 
gnnbnnft to commit widespread atroc- 
ities against dvilianpopulatioiis u east- 
ern Congo. Repo^ <n robberies, rape and 
attflftlfg by Rnglish- and Kinyarwanda- 
sneaifing soldios are numerous wiihm 
NocA and SouA Kivu provinces.** 

Wimesses said Ae troc^ commioing 
the allied atrocities wore Rwandan 
military uniforms, the i^iort said. The 
Irilling g “appear to be systematic at- 
tacks’* aimeo at eliminaiing tiie threat to 


«-a«npaig n ^ bvt that S m a l l groups of U.^' 
Army Spec^ Ftirces and oAer unib 
have provid^ several forms of trainiiig 
to tiie Rwandans fOT some time. - 
A seven-member Special -Forces 
r<tam ftom Foit Btagg, NorA Carolii^ 
is to leave soon for Rwanda to tram 


officers to le^t human ^is and the 
miutar! 


role of a miuw ^ d^ooary,-;. 
Pentagon official said, adding that fSe^ 
i^iorts of atrodties was “an arra q| 
serious concern.’' « 




Kenya Leader l 
A grees to MeeJ 
Political Foes " 




liiip ^ 


S"! 


Thlsi-domiDated Rwanda from rival 
Hum who fled into after the 1994 
genodde in Rvranda, Ae rqiort said. 

The U.S. training of Ae Rwandans 
began ato Mr. Kagame’s zdiel army 
seized control of the country and halted 
Ae Hutn slayings of Tutsi in 1994. 

Defense and State Department of- 
ficials said no U.S. militmy personnel 
paitidpated in any way in the Zaue 


Sewers 

NAIROBI — President Daniel arap* 

Moi of Kenya, faced wiA persis^' 
demandsfbrchailgesinAecQUStitutioQ,! , 

agreed Wednesday to meet opposition- . fh|p 
leaders next week. 

But leaders of an opposition-bad^' ^ 
campaig n for reforms said M^. Moi's- 
talks wiA Ae leader of Ae opposition in' ,.a;' 
P;^^ ^iamenr nn Wednesday andteligious' ' 

leaders on Tuesday were not enough lo; 
prompt them to abandon thdr pressure! 
onAepresident j \ 

Michael Wamalwa, leader of the par- t 
liamentary opposition, said Mr, Moihad' 

10 minutes of “cQidial** talks wiA him 
oo Wednesday and had agreed to a; 
mggring between Ae government and; 
opposition lead^ next week, although; 
an esxact date was not seL ' - . ! ' 

' 'We are not asking for a whole lot,’ ’ | 
be said. “We are asking for minimum 
r e fo r m s Aat will level Ae playing field' ^ 
so we can on fnto free and rairelertions.- ^ 

The presii^t seemed to be in tiie mood'V 
fordialogue.” 

Mr. Wamalwa leads the FOPD-; 

Kraya party but is not on Ae National- 
Convention Executive Committee, an! 
aiiiflnce opposition parties, human; 
rights groups and other bodies demand- :> 
ing constitutional changes before a gen-' 
eral ejection. 


LOV Condemns Israeli Building 
And Hints at Other Sanctions _ 


By Barbara Crossette 

Hete TImev Service 


UNTIED NATIONS, New York — 
For Ae third tune m four months, Ae 
Genoal Assembly has adopted a nss- 
olntion coodemnijag Israel for contiou- 
to boild housing in disputed ter- 
ritories. 

Tbe lesolutioD asked Israel to ideot^ 
promts produced in Aose areas, with 
the mtentioD of calling for a boycoA It 
also nude a vagi^y worded threat to 
Israeli rights witlao tbe United Nations. 

The resolution was approve^ 131 to 
3, wiA 14 abstentions. CTuy Micronesia 
voted wiA Israel and Ae United States 
against Ae resolution. 

Tbe action brought immediate crit- 
icism from Israeli and American en- 
voys, who accused Ae General As- 
sembly of reverting to the anti-Israeli 
cniswles of Ae Cold War era. 


Bill Richardson, the American rep- 
resentative, repeat^ Clinton adminis- 
tration criticisms of Israeli building of a 
housing conqilex called Har Horoa on a 
site in East Jerusalem Aat Arabs call 
Jabal Aba Chneim. But Mr. Richardson 
-also called Ae threat to Israeli mem- 
bership in Ae United Nations “a throw- 
back to the ugly credentials challenges 
of past decades.*' 

■ Netai^aha Complains 

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 
dismissed tbe settlements issue 
Wednesday as a “red herring” and 
called on Ae Palestinians to negotuue it 
wiA Israel in place of stirring up worid 
condemnation in the United Nations, 
Reuters reported from Jerusalem. 

“There so much happening in tbe 
world,” he said. ''Tliere's fi ghting . 
There are wars. There is genocide. And 
this is what the UN has to do?" 



TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


Are Frequent Fliers Short-Seated? 


WASHINGTON (AP) — The government is investigating 
wheAer U.S. airlines give customers enough infomuuion 
about limits on the number of seats that may be available under 
frequent-flier programs. 

The Transporranon Department asked nine major U.S. 
airlines for detailed information on their programs as part of an 
overall review of airliners* consumer eftorts started in 1995. 


for reduced use of air conditioners and htwn sprinklers and are 
warning the elderiy and young to avoid outdoor activities. 

In tte New York area's firat extended heat wave of Ae 
summer, the temperature hit 97 degrees Fahrenheit (36 degrees 
centigrade) in Central Park. At National Airport in Wash- 
ington, the high was one degree shy of Ae record 100 degrees 
FahreofaeiL The air has been so polluted Aat the plane Ae 
University of Maryland uses to measure ozone levels could not 
take off Tuesday because of poor visibili^. r WP. NYT) 


Heat Wave Stifles U.S. Northeast \]JL Promotes Tourism Via the Web 


NEW YORK (Combined Dispatches) — As temperatures 
in Ae Northeast brush records, local governments axe callixig 


Living in the U.S.? 

Now printed in New York 
for same 

delivery in key cities. 

To subscribe^ call 

1 - 800^82 2884 


Hmlb^SSnbune 


.TOE WORUrS nUQ' NEVSnvPLR . 


LONDON (Reuters) — Britain inaugurated a 40,000-page 
Web site oo Wednesday in an atzempt to pnmTote its tourist 
industry around Ae globe. Set up Ae British Tourist 
Authority, the site gives Internet users access to a vast 
database of attractions, events and acconunodation in Eng- 
land, Scotland and Wales. 

The sic Asplays picture-postcard style images trf* Britain's 
coasts, cities and countryside, as well' as detailed maps and 
infonzaation on its fickle c^mate. The address of the site is 
www.visiAritain.com. 


Tourists hoping to see Paris from the Eiffel Tower were 
locked out Wedoe^y after striking worters forced Ae monu- 
ment to close, a tower spdeeswoman said. Tbe workers were 
angry about tbe firing of a colleague, she said, adding Aai she 
did not know how long Ae strike would iasL (AP} 


American Airlines said that losses due to competition From 
the three-way alliance of Sabena, Delta and Swissair had forced 
it to eliminate its daily flight from Brussels to Kennedy In- 
ternational AtrpoR in New York, effective Oct. I. (Reuters) 


Europe 



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Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by AccuWsalher. 


Asia 





North America 

oppressively hot and 
humd Friday from Bosun 
u PhlledelpMa wpfth tfturh 
dersttrms Iktfy; not as hoi 
or riumw over ttw week- 
end. Diy and hoi wWi Has- 
Ug stsi from tfw SDutfiwest 
to the central and soiiV«m 
Plaint. Thundereterms wW 
ivntole aciBts the nert h etn 
Plains and Great : 


Europe 

Cool in London FtMay with 
8 showar possibla. than 
some sun and milder 
through Sunday. A daveU 
epmg storm wfli move tarn 
southern Germany to 
Romania, ivfn^ doudy. 
wet cool weather to an ot 
eantral and southaastem 
eurepe; haiwy rain tsHh^ 
In Graoee and across the 
Banana. 


Asia 

Very hat and humid %*eath- 
er e m toore tor Korea and 
most ol Japan Friday 
through Sunday, Including 
Seoul and Tok^. Warm 


and humid m Beijing and 
all el northeastern Chin 


Jhina 

wah showers and thurtoai- 
storms. Orenchlng rain win 
continue across eatiern 
Tibet and south-central 
Clana. 



Today 

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INTIlRNATIONAL herald TRDBLTNE, THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1997 


PACES 


7 a 

■ AtrocitL 

ter Killings f 

Special Fore? ^'^Psr. 

a^Tjovided % 

t>^Ru.-andansfoJ 

«m from Fon Brag. vP^iaJ 
yo leave soon for 
»fficcR lo respet;! hJnv fc. 
ole of a militar\ m 
»eniagon official\a". 

?^s of atrociti4 
enous concern.- 


THE AMERICAS 


Huang Saw CIA’s Raw China Data 

Officer Didn’t Know Others Wanted His Access Restricted 


Kenya Lead,, 

Agrees to Ma 

Political Pte 


11 


sraeli Buildi 

her Saiietior 


The AsitiruirJ Prets 

'•WASHINGTON — The intelligence 
officer who provided John Huang with 
hundreds of classified reports on Asia 
told Senate investigators that be had 
never beui told that the Democratic 
Party fund-raiser’s boss in the Com- 
ffaerce Depai^nenLwanted-hifn. “waited' 
ofT-’ from matters involving China. 
''John Dickerson, the Central Intel- 
ligence Agency officer who was de- 
'tailed to the Commerce Department 
when Mr. Huang worked there in 1994 
and 1^, said Mr. Huang probably had 
been shown benvera 370 and 530 raw 
intelligence reports, mostly on trade and 
economic matters. 

“He had an interest in China because 
that is where he came from,’’ Mr. Dick- 
erson said in a Senate deposition. “He is 
ao ethnic Chinese and was bom there, 
had worked in Hong Kong.” Mr. Dick- 
erson said that the level of Mr. Huang’s 
interest in intelligence on China “might 
have been a bit higher' ’ than his interest 


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.Army General 
Is in Line for 
Joint Chiefs 

Mew York Hsies Service 

• WASHINGTON— DefenseSec- 
reiary William Cohen will recom- 
mend that General Henry Shelton of 
the army, who commanded the op- 
; eration in Haiti in 1994, be the next 
‘chairman of the Joior Chiefs of Staff, 
■a top official says. 

General Shelton, 53, had been 
- considered a dark horse to succeed 
■General Jolui Shalikashvili, whose 
second two-year term expires in 
September, but he emerged as the 
•favorite after die initial choice. 
General Joseph Ralston of the air 
force, removed himself from con- 
sideradoo after h was disclosed that 
he had carried on an adulterous 
■affair in t^ mid-1980s. 

General Cohen will probably 
meet with President Bill Clinton 
this week k> mge the nomination, 
'the official said General Shelton 
beads the CJ.S. Speci:«i Operations 
Command at M^DUI Air F^rce 
.Base in Florida, which oversees the. . 
army's Grecm Bo'ets, the navy Soils 
and other elite special forces. 

^ He was a platoon leader in Vi> 
-emamin 1966 and 1967 and earned 
'numerons medals. 


in some of the other countries in his area 
of responsibility for Asian trade. 

In lestinKniy Wednesday before the 
Senate Governmental Affairs Commit- 
tee, Paul Buskiiic. acting security di- 
recior at the Commerce Department, 
said that in hindsight he re gretted mat 
~Mr. Huang 'had reeeivi3~a top-secret 
security clearance wit^t the usual 
background investigation having been 
ctxiducted overseas. 

“In hLidsigiu. there was a rock that 
was not turned over,’’ Mr. Buskiik said 

Investigators have been tantalized by 
the access that Mr. Huang had to clas- 
sified information, by his links with the 
Indonesian-based Lippo Group and its 
Chinese ties, and by the circumstances in 
which he received a top-secret securit)' 
clearance at the Ctxnmerce Department. 

The issue is being investigated be- 
cause contributions to federal campaigns 
by non-U.S. companies are illegal, al- 
though U.S.-based subsidiaries of over- 
seas companies may contribute to U.S. 


campaigns from their net U.S. profits. 

Senator Thad Cochran. Republican 
from Mississippi, disclosed that Mr. 
Huang had been recommended to Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton's administration as a 
“must hire" by the Democratic Party. 

Gary Christopherson, a former White 
House associate personnel director, test- 
ified that Mr. Huang bad been treaicNJ as 
a. “high-priority’’ hire because he was 
an Asian-American who could bring 
diversity to the administration and not 
because of his Democratic Party woik. 

“Even if he bad never touched the 
campaign, be still would have been re- 
commended for the position," Mr. 
Christopherson said. 

In ms Senate deposition, Robert 
Gallagher. Mr. Dickerson’s White 
House boss, disclosed that at one point, 
Mr. Huang’s superiors suggested he get 
a security clearance higher than top 
secret, something that would require an 
extensive background investigation, but 
that Mr. Huang did not want it. 


Cosby Reveals a Secret: 

Fling Cost Him $100^000 


By Benjamin Weiser 

JVnt' Kirt 7im(*5 5rn‘ii:r . 

NEW YORK — For more than 20 
years. Bill Cosby said, he kept a secret: 
that he had had a brief afTair with a fan 
named Shawn Thompson, who told him 
she had given birth to their child, Au- 
tumn. and that she had made threats to 
reveal their relationship unless he gave 
her money. 

The entertainer, who built his career 
around his image as a loving and un- 
erring fadier, denied that Autumn was 
his daughter. 

But be told a federal court jury in New 
York City on Tuesday that be paid Ms. 
Thompson more than $ 1 00,000 over the 
years to keep her quiet, and that he sent 
money for Autumn as well. 

Then, late last year, Mr. Cosby said 
he began to get calls from Autumn Jack- 
son, then 22. Ms. Jackson is charged 
with threuiening that she would sell u 
story to The Globe, a supermarket 
taJbloid, that she was the actor’s out-of- 
wedlock daughter unless he paid her 
$40mUUoa. 

Mr. Cost^ testified that be had told 
his wife, CamiUe.. about his affair 17 
years ago. but that his real fear was that 
Ms. Thompson “would go public" and 


damage his reputation. Prosecutors led 
Mr. Cosby through his career and what 
he called his emphasis on “the moral 
values" and “the family values" in his 
films, television work, books and even 
commercials. 

The juiy seemed rapt as he described 
being tom between his .inger at Ms. 
Thompson and her coostunt demands for 
money — linked to implied threats that 
she would break her silence about dieir 
affair — and some sort of obligation to 
her daughter. He said he told Ms. Jack- 
son several years ago: “Autumn, I am 
not your father. 1 will be for you a father 
figure, but 1 am not your father." 

Judge Barbara Jones has excluded 
testimony on the paternity issue, ruling 
that it was irrelevant to the extorrion case. 
But she has permitted the defense to try to 
show that Ms. Jackson believed she was 
the actor's daughter, as a way of ex- 
plaining her actions in wliat she contends 
was a lawful negoiiarion of her rights. 

In a new disclosure, Mr. Cosby ac- 
knowledged that he arranged to have a 

R atemity test with Ms. Thompson and 
Is. Jacbon some years ago to clear up 
the issue. But he said he canceled the 
test because he feared that some 
"bounty hunter" would find out and 
“go to the tabloids" with the story. • 


Away From Politics 

• A former Miller Brewing Co. ex- 
ecutive in Milwaukee was awarded 
S26.6 million — about three times what 
he had sought jurors who d^ided 
he did not deserve to have been fired for 
telling a female co-worker about a 
"Seuwld" episode with a racy plot 
twist. Jerold Mackenzie was fired from 


POLITICAL NO rES 


Last Wbrd on Foster: 
Suicide, Starr Finds 

WASHINGTON — “Mr. Foster 
committed suicide by gunshot in Fort 
Maicy Park, Vitsiiiia, on July 
1993." 

Thai is die long-awaited conclusion 
issued by the office of Kenneth Starr, 
the. independent counsel investigating 
die Whitewater aftair, after an exhaust- 
ive investigation into the unexpected 
death nearly four years ago of Vincent 
Foster Jr.. Mr. Foster, die deputy White 
House counsel, was a close mend of 
Ptesidem Bill CUnton and his wife, 
HUlaiy Rodham Clinton. 

Mr. Starr’s office issued a brief state- 
ment, offerii^ no details beyond the 
stark concIusKMi that Mr. Foster died by 
his own hand, after delivering late Tues- 
day what it described as a compre- 
hensive report on his deadi to a qiecial 
panel of the U.S. Court of Appe^ for 
the District of Col^bia CircuiL 

Officials expect the court panel to 
make the report public Mr. 
Foster’s family and other interested 
rardes have a chai»% to comment in its 
nndings. (WP) 

Clinton Will Battle 
Helms on Nominee 

WASHINGTON — Setting the 
stage for a confrontation wi± the 
powerful chairman of the Senate For- 
eign Relations Committee, President 
Clinton has decid^ to go ahead with 
the nomination of the governor of Mas- 
sachusetts, William Weld, as amb^- 
sador to Mexico, the White House said 
We^esday. 

Mr. Weld, a Republican, challenged 
Mr. CUnton publicly Tuesday to pro- 
ceed with bis nomination despite the 
opposition of the panel’s chairman, 
Jesse Helms, Republican of North Car- 
olina. Mr. Weld, who said he would 
accept no other position, was respond- 
ing to reports the president might bow 
to pressure and nominate someone else 
for the sensitive post 

Mr. Helms has branded Govemor 
Weld as soft on drugs, and has vowed 
to the nmninatioo by refusing to 



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Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and Jesse Helms, head of ffie 
Senate Fore^n Relations Committee, at a softball game of their staffs. 

hold a committee hearing on it. from both parties said they would try to 

“The president is going to stand up finish woik this month on legislation to 
and right for Governor Weld," the balance the budget and cut taxes. 
White House press secretary, Michael "In principle." Mr. Clinton said, “1 
McCuiry, said Wednesday. support means-testing" of MetUcare. 

Mr. Weld, a moderate, also took on he said more clearly than ever that 

Mr.HelmsonTuesday.Speakingatthe he hoped to devise some airangement 
Massachusetts statehouse, he said the to charge higher premiums to higher- 
senator’s opposition had nothing to do income beneficiaries, 
with drug glides. “It has everything After the meeting, the Senate ma- 
te do wi£ the future of the Republican jority leader, Trent Lott. Rejniblican of 
Party." he said. “In plain language, 1 A^sissippi, said, “We can probably 
am not Senator Helms’s kind of Re- rind some agreement on means-testing 
publican.” {Reuters. NYT) fra- Medicare." (NYT) 


Accord on Medicare Quote / Unquote 


WASHINGTON — President Clin- 
ton and Senate Republicans have 
agreed to work together on legislation 
to charge higher Medicare premiums to 
affluent elderly people, even though 
House Democrats and some libe^ 
Democratic senators dislike the idea. 

At a White House meeting. Mr. 
Clinton and congressional leaders 


his $95.0(X>-a-year job in 1993 after be 
told Patricia Best atout the episode and 
she complained. (AP) 

• Video stores in Oklahoma Ciri that 
lost copies of “The Tin Drum’^ in a 
police seizure wont a federal judge to 
dirow out a lower court decision that 
nUed the Oscar-winning film to be ob- 
scene. The Video Software Dealers As- 
sociation. which represents the stores, 


.Mel Reynolds, a former Democratic 
representative from niinois who is 
alr^y servi^ a five-year sentence for 
having sex with an underage campaign 
worker, pleading for leniency tefore 
being sentenced to the minimum six 
and a half years in prison for bank fraud 
and campaign violations; “Who will 
take care of my babies?" (AP) 


filed a class-action lawsuit that accused 
the Oklahoma City police department of 
conducting an ille^ search and seizure 
on June 25. (AP) 

• The number of death row inmates 
released from prison on the strength of 
new evidence risen shaiply in recent 
years, in pan because of DNA analysis, 
a study released by an anti-death pe^w 
group has found. (EAT) 




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INTERNATIONAL TfK1tAl.D TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1997 


m 


ASM/PACmC 


Legislature 
Votes Down 
Hong Kong 
Labor Rules 


Lawmakers Named 
By Beijing Suspend 
4 Bndsh-Era Acts 


HONG KONG — The new legis- 
lature backed (he territory’s chief ex- 
ecutive, Thqg Chee-hwa, oo Wedaes- 
day by strUung down several laws 
protecting labor rights that were passed 
m the final days of British rule. 

Members of the Provisimial L^is- 
lalive CoonciL appointed by Bdjuig, 
voted 38 to 9 to suspend four of seven 
laws that were enacted shotly before 
China took cratrol of Hong Kc^ on July 
1 and replaced the elected legislature. 

Thnse of the four suspended laws 
concern labor rights and involve the 
riglu of unions to l»igaiD collectively 
witii employers oo wages and benefits 
on behalf of en^loyees and to use union 
funds for political activity. The fourth 
one deals with individual rights. 

But the legislature refused to suspend 
two other labor-rights laws and another 
pre-handover law halting land reclam- 
ation in the Hong Kong harbor. The two 
labor laws that survived vote in- 
crease conmeosation for victims of oc- 
cupational deafness and declare May 2 a 
I^al holiday. 

Mr. Ttmg's administration bad recom- 
mended that the seven laws be sounded 
through October to give him time to draw 



la Hourlong Exchange 


Korean Clash k the Most Serious in Ifeorl 


SEOUL — South aiid North Korean 
hoops engaged m an hourlong exchai^e 
of gunfire Wednesday in one of the most 
serious bolder clashes in recent years, 
the Soutii Korean Defense Ministry said 
here. 

North Korea said several of its sol- 
diers been wounded in the exchange 

along tile central part of the border 
tween the two Koreas, tiie world's most 
hea^y armed frontier. No South 
Korean casualties were reported in the 
shooting, for which e^h side blamed 
tbeodier. 

Soutiiero border guards ^tted at 
least seven Nonh Korean soldiers on tiie 
southern side of tiie Demilitarized Zone 
a^ OTdiered them by loudspeaker to 
withdraw, the ministry said. When the 
North Korean soldiers continued mov- 
ing southward, it said. South Korean 
s^dieis fired about 200 rifle shots into 
tiie air as a warning. 

The Nortii Korins fired rifles ^ tiie 
South Korean soldiers, the ministry 
said, and the Soudieni guards then dir- 
ected machine-gun fire at the North- 
erners. 


Members of the Democratic Party protestii^ Wednesday in Hong Kong against the repeal of 


BoMgr VIpffBitm 

labor laws. 


Northern soldiers at a guard jx>st 
across tiie border returned with a 


BRIEFLY 


Hong Kong Easier on Qdldren 


in a city park in 1994 in whidi nearly 20 people, 
including 10 foreigners, were wounded. (Reuters) 


RaniosFlrmonDeeUhPenalfy 


up new legislation. His rovemraent ar- 
sued that the laws woold harm Hems 


gited that the laws wodld harm Hcmg 
Kong’s economic competitiveness. 

Pro-democracy activists protested the 
vote, witii some shooting at legislators 
at the start of the session and others later 
presenting a petition with 12,000 sig- 
natures to Mr. Tung's office urging him 
not to suspend the Tabor laws. 

Lee Cheuk-yan, secretary-general of 
the Confederation of lYade Unions, said 
freezing Iflbor rights meant “the death 
of rule of law in Hong Kong.” 

Ehning the legislative session, Leung 
Kwok-hung of the Ap^ Sth Action 
Group stood up in the visitor’s gallery 
and ^uted: “The Provisional Legis- 
lature is a rubber stamp! IRetum the 


HONG KONG — Beijing and Hong Kcmg agreed 
Wednesday to allow more children who were bom on 
the mainland to enter the foniier colony, a senior 
immigration ofiiciai said. 

But the Hong Kong immigration director, Regina 
Ip, said in Beijing that the two sides had not agreed on 
the size of the increase. In comments earned by Hcmg 
Kong media, she said the Public Security Mxmstiy of 
China “will undertake an overall review” and “will 
come to a decision at the end of the year.” 

Hong Kong’s Basic Law, the new constitution in 
effect since China resumed control tk the former 
British colony on July 1, allows mainland-bocD ciiil- 
dren the right of abode if they have a parent wifb legal 
residency rights in Hong Kong. (Reuters) 


Taiwan Extradites HijcuJiers 


BEUING — Qtina said Wednesday that it would 
try two mainlanders who were repatriated from 
I^wan ai^ hijacking airliners to ti>e island in tiie 
early 1990s. 

Ibe hijackers, who had been in detention in north- 
ern Tsuwan, arrived by boat in the first such ex- 
tracUtion across the Taiwan Strait (AFP, Reuters) 


MANILA — President Rdel Ramos on Wednes- 
day rejected calls by Roman Catholic bishops to 
block the execution of convicts on death row, saying 
the death penalty must be cairi'xl out. 

Coogiess in 1994 passed a law restoring capital 
punishment for such crimes as murder, rape and drug 
dealing. Executiois are to be earned out by lethal 
injectioa llie first will probably take place in the 
first half of next year, officials s^. (AFP) 


Beijing Open to Rights Talks 


For the Record 


Hanoi Convicts 5 as Terrorists 


power to the people! Shame oo die 
Provisional Lemslaiure!” He was ex- 


Ptovisional Le^slaiure!” He was ex- 
pelled by guards. (Reuters, AFP) 


HANOI — Two people have been sentenced to 
death and three have bem jailed for life on te i ro rism 
charges in southern Vietnam, an official said Wed- 
nesday. 

The official at the Ho Chi Minh City People’s 
Court said the five were involved in a grenade attack 


BEIJING — China is ready to hold talks on human 
rights witii any group as long as those disenssions are 
based on mutu^ reflect and equality, a top Chinese 
human rights official said Wednesday. 

Zhu M iiThi who returned from a European trip that 
included the first meeting between Chinese officials 
and representatives of Amnesty IntemationaL said he 
expected an end to differences over human rights evoi 
though disputes could not be ironed out ovemi^L He 
is the president of the nongovernmental China So- 
ciety the Study of Human Rights. (Reuters) 


Ao Imliao judge investi^ting the world's 
deadliest in-flight Elision said be had turned over 
bis findings to tiie govemmenL In November 1996, 
349 pec^e died when a Kazak jediner approaching 
the New Delhi airport collided with a departing Saudi 
Arabian Boeing 747. (AP) 


Korean Airlines was ordered to pay 136 nullion 
yen ($1.19 million) in dam^es by a Tokyo court to 
the families of four Japanese passengers tilled when 
a KAL jet was shot down over the Soviet Union in 
Septomber 1983. (Reuters) 


round from a lecoUless rifle, abont 16 
□UHtiff rounds and two fooTe tounds 'dl 
unidentified artilleiy, the said 

Sooth Korean troops also fir^. 
round frxim a recoilless rifle, it addedT 
and tiie exchange finally ended after the- 
Southern side broadcast a cease-&e . 
proposal , 

Pyongyang denied that Its troops had 
crossed me border. A ra^o rqaott 
the soldiers were carrying out nomud, 
reconnaissance when Soutii Koreans' 
opened fire. . Ct 

“From tiiis attack, several soldiery 
were, injured, and several guard post;^ 
were dwtroyed,” it said. p 

“This is an intentions 

grave violation of the military aimisti^- 
and we make clear tiiat all blame Ue^ 
witii Nwth Korea.” a South Kcxeaq; 
D^eoto Ministry spetitesman. Kang Jim 
Kwoo,said. , . . 

Seoul accused tfae Nosrth of iieigbtT, 
ening border tensions with serious prp^ 
vocations. “We strongly warn ti^ we^ 
will never tolerate any p^ocation io; 
the fri&iie,” Lieutenant General Joung, 
Young Moo said. , 

ifoutical analysts In Seoul said the. <9 
incident had been engineered ^Pyongs ^ 
y ang mainly to tally doinestic SUppOlt 
behind the leader Kim Jong II at a tun^ 
of /amine and economic collapse. r, 

“Threatened by famine and a coir; 
lapsing economy, Pyongyang ne^ 
whip up a war atmosphere to tighten^ 
contiDl,” said Kim Qiang Su, [a fello% 
at the Korea Institute for Defense Anal^ 
ysis in Seoul. 

By raising tensions, the analysts said^ 
North Korea also hoped to persuade* 
Washington to open further channels o|; 
communication to deal with security* 
issues. 

Around 37,000 American tnxips are 
stationed in South Korea, but no U.S^ 
forces were involved in the clash. j 

The shooting occurred just tinee^^ . 
weeks before the two Koreas, tiie United 
States and China were to hold talks' 
intended to pave the way for peac^ 
negcMiations. ,;{ 

Officials from tiie four nations are; 
scheduled to meet in New York on Aug,J 
5 to work on an agenda and other pro^ 
cedural details for.tiieir talks aimed at' 
thrashing out a peace arrangement tq. 
bi^ a formal era to the Korean War*, 
Soutii Korea has promised huge ec<>^ 
nomic benefits for Nortti if it insc - 
proves ties. 

Analysis said it was unlikely the^ 

. shooting would der^ the peace pn>;^ 
cess. , (Reuters, AP^).\ 


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Top Seoul Court Overturns 


Same-Name Marriage Ban 


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The Associated Press 

SEOUL — South Korea's highest comt struck down a 
14thHcentuiy law that prevent^ people with the same 
surname from manying one another, ruling Wednesday 
that it was unconstitutioDal and outdated. 

The decision affected an estimarad 60,000 couples who 
live together but whose clan names had kept tb^ frem 
marrying even though there was no evid^e of blood 
ties. 

The iaw was written in 1308, when inbreeding was a 
concern because pet^le lived in isolated villages for 
generations. It has had a major impact in a country where 
most of tiie 44 millira people share a few dozen sumames. 
One outofevery five people is a Kim — the most common 
name — while Lee and Paik respectively are shared by 
about 15 percent and 8 percrat of the pc^wlatioa. 

Calling the law unconstitutional and outdated, the 
Constitutional Court ordered it revised 1^ the end of 
1998. “The nation most allow people die freedom to 
many those tiiey love,” said the lead judge, Kim Yong 
JuD. ' 'The ban on same-name mamages violates the right 
to pursue happiness.' ' 

About 40 Mckers of the law picketed the courthouse, 
arguing that allowing same-name marriages would wf^ 
havoc on South Korea’s Confrjcian society. 


Jews Break Silence on Shfihghm Eri^ 

Survivors Who Fled Naas Recount Misery of Their Improbable Haven "j 


By Henry Chu 

Los Angeles Times 


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Speak live 
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Secretary- 
General 
tonight. 


IMeed Nations SeaetaryG«Mral 
Kofi Annan wV be Ray Suarez's 
.tbtinguished guest toi^ght on 
NaHenaiPuUeRadlei's'aaUmed 
talk show^ TUt of the Nation.* 
libu can jafti fisteners Awn the 
United States «vho «vrO be 
cenverseig wrtft the SeereCaiy^ 
General dialhg the first hour of 
thapfognm, hem2000-20S9 
CET. Can 1 - 1 202.406.7544 with 
your questiens or comments. 


SHANGHAI ~ Ingrid Wilmot 
stopped eating apple cores Just a few 
yei^ a^o. She had picked up the habit as 
a giri in tiiis free-wheeling treaty port 
duriog Worid War n, when food and 
digni^ were scarce among tiie Jews who 
hra fied to China from the Nazi jog- 
gemaut in Europe. 

Th^ came by the tiaousands to the 
only city on Earth that would accept 
them without passports or visas — no 
questions asked. Shanghai, den of vice 
and iniquity, c^nm a^cts aod in^ier- 
iaiists, was tiiev improbable haven. 

But in 1 943, to appease the Nazis, the 
city's Japanese occupiers rounded up the 
newly arrived Jews into a ghetto. For 
two years, 18,000 Jews, most of them 
from Austria, Germany and Poland, 
battled squalor, fear and want in 
Hongkew, on Shanghai’s northeastern 
fringe, half a world away from tfae Holo- 
caust in Nazi-controlled Eur^. 
j They fought diseases so vinilent that 
even bananas and oranges had to be 
soaked in chemicals for an hour before 
being eaten. They sweated out rumors 
that they might all be deported without 
warning. They suffered at the hands of a 
capricious Japanese overseer. 

Yet ib^ nearly all survived to see the 
end of the war, a testament to human 
resilience — and to the fact that their 


Nazis' first pogroms. Terrified Jews 
began looking for a way out 

Word quickly spread that cosmopol- 
itan Shanghai, even under its uew Jap- 
anese rulers, placed no restrictioiis or 
quotas on Jewish immigrants. 

Indeed, thousands of Jews were 
already living in Shanghai by the 
1930s. 


Sephardic Jews like tiie Sassoons and 
: i^oories landed here in the mid- 


the Kadoories landed here in the mid- 
19th oeuttuy, founding vase financiai 
empires trac^ in silk, tea and opium. 
Decades later, Russian Jews poured in, 
on the run from political upheavals at 
home. 

to early 1939, Heinz Joachim Cohn, 
then 12, watched as his father, Carl, sold 
the rest of his once-successful hat fac- 
tory in Berlin and used the cash to buy 


‘The conditions in 
Shanghai were awfii], hut 


it was not Auschwitz. So 
you have to be grateful.’ 


fopanese captors, who brutalized the 
Chinese, were less monstrous toward tfae 
Jews, despite Nari proposals to 
slaughter them. 

“The conditions in Shang^ were 
terrible, but it was not Auschwitz.” said 
Ms. Wilmot, who eventually settled in 
tiie Los Angeles area after tiie war. "So 
you have to be grateful.” 

Scholars are scrambling to preserve 
stories like Ms. Wilmot's and those of 
other Sha n ghai ghetto survivors. 

After hafr a century of reluctance by 
many to speak out about the past, ai^ 
limited access to records and material in 
C hipa, a new urgency has taken hold to 
save a slice of factory unknown even to 
many Jews. 

Academics have b^un collecting oral 
histories. Survives are writing mem- 
oirs. Diplomatic ties between Chiru and 
Israel, established only five years ago. 
have finall y made scholastic exchanges 
possrNe b^een the two countries. 

“It was always felt that anybody who 
was not in a concentratira camp wasn’t a 
true survivor,” said Evelyn PiKe Rubin, 
author of “Ghetto Shanghai,” an ac- 
count of her childhood in Hongkew. 
“And we in Shanghai felt that a little, 
too. I wrote my book because I felt it was 
a story of the Holocaust that's a little 
different — and that needed to be 
told.” 

For her and thousands of Jews who 
escap^ to Qiina, the story started Nov. 
9, 1938, with the Nazi rampage in Ger- 
many Imown as Krisiallnachi. when 
Jewish businesses were destroyed and 
synagogues burned down in one of the 


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train tickets for his family to Italy. Then, 
with hundreds of other Jeuish refugees, 
the Cohns boarded the Conte Bianca- 
mano in Genoa and set sail for Shang- 
hai. 

“It took four weeks to get to China,” 
Mr. Cohn said. 

Relief groups funded by American 
and local Jews met the new'arrivals and 
proce^ed them at Embankment House. 
Those without sponstKS or relatives in 
Shanghai were snipped to one of several 
shelters across the city. 

The dormitCNies teemed with more 
people than could fit. At the Ward Road 
facility in Hongkew, scores of men 
shared a single washroom, said Mr. 
Cohn, who spent five years there. Scarlet 
fever killed 100 people in the various 
shelters in 1939. 

The luckier refugees had brought jew- 
elry and furs to pawn or skills to put to 
immediate use, which enabled them to 
buy bouses and apartments outside 
Hongkew, a rundown district badly 
damaged in bomb attacks by Japan. 

Some, like Ms. Wilmot. who^ father 
bad been an executive with Bally shoes 
in Vienna, settled in Shanghai's fash- 
ionable French Concessira, with ser- 
vants and spacious accommodations. 

But most stayed in Hongkew, site of 
the fiituru ghetto, relying on menial work 
or charity to eke out reduced existences. 
Mr. Ctdin. barely in his teens, pulled in a 
meager wage mixing ash and water to 
mold into coal teiquettes for stoves. 

For a while, the refugee community 
thrived alon^ide the established Jewisfi 
enclave. Children attended British-run 
Jewish schools. Synagogues held ser- 
vices on Friday evening. There were 
Zionist youth groups, Jewish recrcatitm- 
nl clubs, musical and theater pcifor- 
mances, dances, boutiques, kosher 
butcher shops and several Jewish pub* 
(icaiions. 


“We had a wonderful life in Shangr; 
hai,” said Michael Medavoy, 78, wh 9 ., 
had arrived as a Russian immigr^ in.i 
the 1920s, and whose son. the 
mogul Mike Medavoy, was bom 1 % 
Shanghai. 

But in 1941, after more than IS.OOQti^ 
Jewish immigrants had arrived in the 
previous two years — an influx tfaabi 
some Jewbh relief groups had tried tO'i 
stem for fear of oveicrowdiag — the 
in the Pacific broke out Food was hun 
tioned and foreign aid to Jews was cu£i 

off. '-4 

In 15^42, Colonel Josef Meisinger, the! 
Nazi wbo had been in charge of die.*: 
Polish ghetto in Warsaw when up to 
300,000 pe^le died or were deported ton 
extermination camps, visited ShanghaiJt 
He proposed that Japanese officials’: 
round up all Shanghai's Jews as they', 
worship^ on Rosh Hashanah, the Jew- 
ish New Year, and set them adrift on> 
barges to starve or ship them to a coa^y 
centration camp to be set up on nearby* 
Tsungming Islrad. -1 ■ 

Exactly why the Japanese resisted; 
Colonel Meisingcr's recommeadatira^^ 
remains a source of debate. 

Some say Japan still harbored a sense'' 
of gratitude to the Jews because Jacobs 
Schiff, a prominent Jewish American, 
had lent Tokyo money in the 1904 
Russo-Japanese War. 

Others attribute it to a desire 16 use tbe\ 
refugees as a hedge with America, where*! 
the Japanese government believed JewS“ 
exercised great influence on Washina*’’ 
ton. ^ 

But tiie Japanese commanders did*’ 
bow to continued Nazi pressure by or--, 
dering, on Feb. 1 8, 1 943. that all recently ' 
arrived, undocumented refugees — 
which did not cover the Sephardic and*' 
Russian Jews who had come a gen-., 
OTiion earlier or more — move to ihd 
liny gheao in Hongkew within tiiree' 
months. •'<. 


, contagion there killed: • « 

i. 000 people, mostly elderiy and infants, ^ 


by the end of 1944« according to 
Gu«g, dean of the Center of Jewish; 
Studies to Shanghai. ^ 

The Japanese had to do something 
b«ause Hitier was an ally,” 
said. 

WTien the war ended in Asia, many of j 
the Jews m Hongkew expressed anger 
mat they had not waited out the war iir 
f'ort of ihe Holocaust 
the enorraiiy of 
what they had escaped filled tiw« 
Hongkw Jews with a terrible sense of I 
awe, relief — and guilL 1 

^Sered for decades, re-! 
sdtmg m years of silence after virtually I 
survivora left China in the } 

Md Sis® i 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1997 


PAGES 



pteat 
Exchang, 

ost Serious it, y 

nidenlifieH 


EUROPE 


Nazi Gold: 
Probe Shifts 
Continents 

«*™uiied aniUer\- roii^ - 

jKfes /wq^ficofe Boil/w 
Canada 

c oroadca.^1 . 

*Y<»gyang deoied rs, • ^ ' 
raised the border A •* 

w soldiers were 7 


By Anthony DePalma 

Nnf York limtSerria 


xonnussance ®«i 




^’wal 


pelted Ore. 

From this attack v«, 

'ere injured, and seve?!’*^ 

iTiis tocidcni is •* ^ 

rave\iolaiion of 
^ we make clear £l ‘SrjS 
MJ North Korea.- a 

■efense Minisir\- spokL,; ^ 
w<Mi, said. ' ^ 

Secwl accused the \, ,„h 

nng border tensions 
?5^**ons. -We sironoK- J'"^f 
lU never tolerate anv nm?^''®- 
« Uemcnan, 

.ouag Moo said. In- 

Political analvsis ;« c 
cident had be^n enamiS .. 


^ ofife 


^ TORONTO — Newly declassified 
American documents for the first time 
implicate the Federal Reserve Bank of 
New York and die Bank of Canada in 
Ottawa in lUtempts to launder tons of 
gbld that the Nazis looted during World 
War n, according to the World Jewish 
Congress. 

* While the Federal Reserve Bank 
would not comment on die disclosures, 
the Ba^ of Canady Canada’s central 
bank, has be^m an investigation. 

' Bank ofBdals are searching for ev- 
idence diat the Naris used die bank to 
disguise the origin of gold confiscated 
from countries they occupied during the 
war. The Ixillion may also have con- 
tained gold taken from individual vic- 
tims of the Holocaust 


enom^ r^‘ Documents . from the Nadonal 
’ Archives in Washington examined by 
. ..H,.... theWorldJewishCongresshadexposed 
ai,^ Swiss collaboration with the Nazis. But 
the new disclosures, made Monday by 
psinc economy Congress, marie the 

hio uo -1 first dme the trail has been followed to 

mtrol ■’ «iH North America, and raise both legal and 

!>w» I C. hang Su. i £ mt^ questions about the involvement 

•utn of Ca*^ and the United Stales in the 

Nazi plundering of Europe. 

-It is inconceivable to me that their 
gold e xp erts weren’t aware of what was 
behind diese oansactions,” Elan Stein- 
berg, executive director of the World 
Jewish Gmgress, said in reference to 
American and Canadian bank officials. 
’^We have moved beyond legalisms, 
and wh^er by the strict sense of the 
taw it was appropriate, to a moral and 

it was 


iog i^nly lo raJlv dutn«i?^ 
;iynd the leader Kim Jon. 
t^int and economic 
Threatened b\ famn 


By raising tension., 

onh Korea also hope«3 lo ’po» 
ashmgton lo open lunherchS 
immunicatfon :o deoj uiihl!; 

SilCsi. ^ 

.Around 37 000 AmerKon tro®. 
aiioncd m Souih Korea. huiZ‘ 
■r^ were lavolv-d i.n chst ' 
The shooting o.vurrfd 


bsh. 
m It 


ccLs before ihj Korea> dimension of whedier 

aies and China were 

!o pave !he ■ 


a 

Id It 


tc.'ided 
igPrialion.'. 

OlTiciiUii SroT. the four njuat 
hcduled to .nee; ir. Nea ^ ,,,rtdiV 
W work on or. agenda jnd citac 
du.'ai detu.'Js :'or aad 

t^:iig ou! a peace ananaema; 
iQ^* d t'orenj;! er.d :>:■ the Korcul. 
luUi Korea has pr-m^ed h-jsce 
snic bencfii? for ir-s Sontiur 
DVtfs lies 

Aiui>s!9 sajJ it unliteli 1 
potang u'ouid aer.ol the pacip: 

" 'RanrUi 

inghai En 

r Improbable Ha>^ 

"We had a .K'.TJ.-riu! iii? loSh^ 
said .Mic.hai;! 

i arrived ar> a Rj>>iar^ inya^* 
iy20.s, j£id w 

•ga? Mike .\k-daK’>. ■a.u hos^ 
angh-ai. ^ ' jf 

Sal tr. i94i. jf:.T m.-re liian >■; 

visa amrrJjrants haJ ai-n'edfi' 
•vioiss two' years — 
tts JwU jsh r"i25f* jrours haWiR®* 
m foi :«ar o: o\ s:: row 
the Pacific broir 
led. iid foru;an .ii'T t*-"* 



iXm peocJe o: 
cmiir.ai]t>n c:lTr.p^. - 
‘te vtopcsic trial 
sriW'^; 


mgniir.u l9;ar.d. 

IxJC ' 
fmcl 

fccns a !»ource o* oe 
loaicsjy 
.•rairttKiv* to ^ 

. j<*n* TokSi. • 


The World Jewish Congress in New 
Yoit has examined more 14.mil- 
limi documents and has worked with 
Smart the undersecretary of 

commerce who directed a recent studCy 
of the Swiss hanHling of Nazi assets. 

* William Slany, the chief historian 
working wi^ hfr. ck(i the 

study, said he was not aware ^ the 
newly declassified documents concern- 
ing Nmtii American banks. Bot he said 
th^ after the Allies warned neutral 
countries like Portugal not to deal with 
the Nazis, fteie were aneinpts to dis- 
guise such transactioas. 

Accofdmg to a Se^ 10, 1944, doc- 
ument from tibe Amorcan Overseas Spe- 
cial Senraxs office (maikcd -from a v^\ 
cnrifideotiaT source”) that was declas- 
sified in ,tanu^. the Portuguese central 
bank zegnlariy boogU gold that the Ger- 
mans in file Swiss Nafional Bank. 

In the transaction involving Canada, 
the Pormgnese bought four tens of Naa 
gold in Switzeriand. The Swiss instruc- 
ted the Bank of Canada to transfer to a 
Portuguese account the equivaleot 
afnonnt of gold fiiat (he Swiss held in 
Qttawa since before the war. Later two 
more t<»s were moved fids way. 

‘Mr. Stdnberg said that the swaps 
involving the Foieral Reserve Bank of 
New Yo^ were much fiie same. Ac- 
ebrding to declassified documents, after 
Portugal booght 15.5 tons of Nazi gedd, 
the Swiss National Bank wired the Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank to move that amount 
from its account to ite Bank of Portugal 
account 

'‘At no thwe did gold bars, some 
marked wifii the hamtwj and sickle of 
the Soviet Union or the symbols of 
occupied coontries, actni^ cross the 
Atlantic, Mr. Sternberg said. 

Despite warnings from the Allies, 
Pormgal is believed to have traded 
fredy with Gennany. In 1939, Portugal 
had DO gold on deporit with the Fedval 
Reserve Bank of New Yrak. By war’s 
end in 1945, the Portuguese account in 
New Yoik held 2^ tons of gedd, ac- 



VUimr Franv Picc 

The U-S. astronaut Michael Foale, left, and the Russian cosmonauts Alexander Lazutkin, center, and 
Vassili Tsibliyev ciMiferring from the Mir station on Wednesday with die mission control center in Russia. 

Mixed Signals on Mir Repair Mission 

NASA Denies Russian Statement It Agreed to Train American 


The Associdted Press 

MOSCOW — Russians officials 
said Wednesday that NASA had ten- 
tatively agreed to have a U .S. astronaut 
train for a delicate repair mission on the 
Mir space station. 

But officials of the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration said 
dtat no such agreement had been 
reached. 

The Russians said the U.S. astronaut 
Michael Foale might be needed for the 
repair mission because the Russian 
cosmonaut who complained of heart 
trouble, Vasili Tsibliyev, was not fit to 
carry it out. 

“We have tentatively agreed that 
die American astronaut and the Rus- 
sian flight engineer will have a practice 
run on Mtxtday. July 21 * said toe head 


of mission control in Russia, Vladimir 
Solovyov. -Then, we’ll make a final 
decision with our NASA colleagues on 
whether to cany out the space walk.- 

Repairs designed to restixe full 
power to Mir, a mission twice delayed, 
are scheduled to begin July 24. 

But NASA officials in Moscow and 
at the Johnson Space Center in Hous- 
ton said they had not yet assented to 
Mr. Foale’s taking part in toe mission, 
and were still evaluating wh^ would 
be expected of him. 

For now, said Catbtfine Watsim, a 
NASA spokeswoman in Moscow, *‘he 
can do some basic things, but no of- 
ficial simubtions or the actual space 
walk — none of that's been approved 
by NASA yet*" 

Even if NAS A does decide to let Mr. 


Foale participate in toe mission. Mr. 
Solovyov said Russian space officials 
would not decide until next week 
whether he would actually take part. 

1^. Foale began making routine 
preparations Wi^esday, which in- 
cluded checking his space suit and 
studying documents, Mr. Solovyov 
saiil 

The two Russians on Mir — Al- 
exander Lazutkin, toe flight engineer, 
and Mr. Tsibliyev, the mission com- 
mander — were to carry out repairs to 
r^ura the craft to full power after a 
cdlision June 25 with a cargo ship. But 
Mr. Tsibliyev, 43. has an irregular 
heartbeat, and Russian space control- 
lers pronounced him unfit for the repair 
job, which ts expected to take four to 
five hours. Mr. Solovyov said. 


No Problem From French 
In Bosnia, Americans Say 

Paris Is Said to Back Raids on Tfhr Criminals 


By Joseph I^tchett 

Iniemationji Herald Tribune 


Russian Joins Roll of Defiant Astronauts 


By William /. Broad 

Nete York Tunes Service 


NEW YORK — American spa« 
experts say they believe that Vasili 
Tsibliyev, the commander of toe Mir 
space station, has been badly shaken by 
a series of space failures in recent 
months and is intent on avoiding a 
risky repair mission. 

If so, they say. he joins a little- 
known roster of astronauts who have 
rebelled against Mission Control when 
faced with heightened risks or tensions 
in exploring space. 

The earliest known instance of de- 
fiance was on Apollo 7, in October 
1968. The goal of the 1 l-day flight, 

S uite lengthy by toe standards of toe 
ay, was to test toe AtoUo command 
and service module in earth orbit as a 
preparation for landing men on toe 

The fiuee-mao crew was extraor- 
diiumly tense before and during toe 
mission be^se it was the first 
manned American space flight after an 
Apollo c^ule burned on the ground 
during a Horida test, killing three as- 
tronauts. 

To confound matters, all three got 


bad colds in orbiL No astronaut had 
ever had one in space before, and it 
made toe commando' of Apollo 7. 
Walter Sclurra Jr., extremely testy. He 
refused to do s^eduled tests and 
caiped mightily. He basically would 
not obey ground control, Jsunes Oberg, 
a Houston-based engineer and space 
historian, said in an interview. 

The next rebellion occurred during 
toe third manned mission to Skylab, a 
giant space station pioreered by the 
United States in 1972 after the suc- 
cessfnl lunar landings. The 84-day 
mission, from November 1973 to 
ruary 1974, set an endurance record 
and became extremely tense as as- 
tronauts fell increasingly behiiKl 
schedule in doing ambitious tests. 

Near the breaking point, the com- 
mander, Gerald Carr, told ground cem- 
troUers tbat he and his crew were tak- 
ing a day off, which they did with the 
radio svritched off. 

"We looked out toe window, took 
showers and did that sort of filing.” 
Mr. Carr said in an interview. He later 
be negotiated a new schedule with, 
ground controllers in which no work 
would be done after 8 P.M. 

"We said, *We want time off to 


i7>ess around.' " be added. "They ac- 
quiesced." 

The last known rebellion was in 
June.1995 aboard toe Mir station when 
two Russian cosmonauts, Vladimir 
Dezhurov and Gennadi StrekaJov, 
were to conduct their sixth space walk 
in two months to inspect toe outpost's 
solar-energy arrays. Tired and edgy, 
they balked, and ground controllers 
reluctantly canceled the work. 

Mr. Oberg. the historian who is an 
expert on toe Russian space program, 
said of the pair "They were fined, in 
dfect, for mutiny. They bad to go to 
court to get their flight bonuses." 

Mr. Oberg said he believes that Mr. 
Tsibliyev, commander of toe Mir sta- 
tion. has heart irregularities but. more 
isrponant. has been shaken by failures 
lo the point that be is losing confidence 
in his ability to work safely and pro- 
ductively after a number of misb^. 
including toe crash on June 25 when a 
supply ship crashed into Mir. 

Mr. Ob^ said toe Mir commander 
thinks toe mission lo repair toe damage 
caused by toe recent accident should be 
done by a fresh crew trained on Earth. 
"He may not see the urgency of it, and 
□either do L” Mr. Oberg said. 


PARIS — Washington and Paris are 
both still comnutted to seeing NATO 
forces capture war crime suspects in 
Bosnia-Herzegovina, U.S. and French 
officials said Wednesday, playing down 
a published report that France objected 
10 an allied plan for a second raid to 
capture Bosman Serbs who have been 
indicted by the intemational tribunal in 
the Hague. 

"Cooperation has been especially 
good on the issue of war criminals, 
particularly considering all toe tensions 
we have with Fiance on other alliance 
issues, and I haven't seen or heard any- 
thing to suggest any change," a White 
House aide said by telephone from 
Washington. 

A French Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man said that there w'as "no basis" for 
toe allegation, contained in a New York 
Times report ^zn Washington on Tues- 
day, that France had declined to support 
— as "too risky" — a second com- 
mando-s^Ie operation to seize high- 
ranking Bosnian Serbs. 

Tlie report suggested that the alliance 
was readying a follow-up raid near Pale, 
toe stronghold of toe Bosnian Serbs, on 
toe heels of the capture of an accused 
war criminal and toe killing of another 
on July 10 in northwestern Bosnia, 
where British troops lead toe North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization's peace- 
keeping effort 

Pale would be a much larger chal- 
lenge; It is the redoubt of toe most 
prominent alleged war criminals among 
the Bosnian Serbs, including their 
former p^ident Radovan Karadzic. 
Any NATO attempt u> seize him would 
probably encounter significant military 
resistance. 

While the actual arrest would be car- 
ried out by special forces from NATO 
nations, toe operation — with its risks of 
reprisals — could not be launched with- 
out the cooperation of toe local peace- 
keeping forces, which are led by 
France. 

The article in The New York Times 
quoted a senior U.S. official as saying 
that the French bad "pulled back from 
their readiness to be an active partic- 
ipant" in the planned second strike and 
speculated that President Jacques Chir- 
ac of France might have become more 
cautious about a military setback in 
Bosnia after his party's disastrous de- 
feat in parUaineniary elections last 
month. 

But American and French officials, 
expressing skepticism about the report, 
sa^ Wednesday that France had not 
backed out of any scheduled operation 
or torpedoed prospects for furfiier action 
in apprehending suspected war crim- 
inals, even heavily guarded figures like 
Mr. Karadzic. 

In weighing such actions, officials 
said, NATO’s key considerations in- 
cluded the probability of success in c^ 
tuiing suspects with minimal civilian 
casu^ties; toe likelihood of being able 
to deter Bosnian Serb retaliation, and 
the value of any specific operation in 
destroying toe power base of the hard- 
line leadership epitomized by 
Karadzic. 

The increased U.S. pressure on the 
issue of war criminals has coincided 
with a power strug^ inside toe Bosnian 
Serb Republic pitting Mr. Karadzic and 
his supporters, notably Momcilo Krajin- 
sik, toe Serbian member of Bosnia's 
three-member presidency, against BU- 
jana Plavsic, toe woman who succeeded 
Mr. Karadzic as the Bosnian Serb pres- 
ident aixl the only leader in her ethnic 
community who ^vocales closer com- 
pliance with toe Dayton peace accords. 


U.S. officials have made no secret of 
their desire to help Mrs. Plavsic if it can 
be done without exposing her to ac-. 
cusations that she is a U.S. puppet ready 
to undennine the Serbian cause. A pos- 
sible way to bolster position, of- 
ficials said, is intemational action to 
anest her key opponents — like Mr. 
Karadzic, who is ^itrayed by U.S. of- 
ficials as a man who has parlayed his 
civil war leadership into a [^twar rack- 
eteering and smuggling empire. 

Any move to capture Mr. Karadzic 
would reqi^ an active French role, and 
U.S. officials in Washington and in 
Europe, without providing specifics, 
said that bilateral consultations itoout toe 
possibility seemed to be proceeding. 

"It's a very sensitive channel, with 
only two NATO commanders in toe 
loop," the White House aide said, "but 
certainly everything 1 've heard su gg ests 
that both we and Paris see a need to go 
further." 

Mr. Chirac has consistently prodded 
NATO to be bolder in Bosnia. 

The Clinton administration has tried to 
avoid any risk of U.S. casualties, with 
Congressional leaders repeatedly tim- 
ing against any expansion of toe NATO 
mission in Bosnia ^t could make Amer- 
ican troops a fxime target for reprisals. 

Recently, however, political pres- 
sures have mounted on President Bill 
Clinton for stronger action ahead of 
NATO's planned withdrawal from Bos- 
nia next year. A bipartisan group of 

g romineni U.S. politicians, including 
ob Dole, the defeated presidential can- 
didate. said this week that toe United 
States should take the lead — and cas- 
ualties if necess^ — in hunting down 
Bosnian war criminals while NATO 
still has 31.000 troops in the country. 


U.S. Soldier 
In Serb Area 
Is Stabbed 
With a Siekle 


Seu/er.i 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina 
— A U.S. «oldier was stabbed in the 
shoulder in Serbian-controlled territoiy 
in Bosnia-Herzegovina on Wednesday 
by a mao wielding a sickle, the NATO- 
led peace force said. 

The stabbing, near TuzJa, was the 
first direct attack on soldiers in toe 
peacekeeping force since troops con- 
ducted a raid last week seeking two 
Serbs indicted for war crimes. One of 
the suspects was killed in a firefight, and 
the other was captured. 

The U.S. soldier suffered minor in- 
juries and was treated at an American 
military hospital, a spokeswoman for 
toe NATO-1^ Stabilization Force said. ; 

He was attacked from behind after he 
went outside his living quarters to in- . 
vestigate a noise, toe spokeswoman. 
Sergeant Mitzi Piumlee, said. 

"Hehasbeenreleasedandreturoedto ' 
his um't for duty,"she said by telephone : 
frrom toe U.S. base in the nortbeastem : 
town of Tuzla. The stabbing followed ; 
three bombings in three days apparently i 
aimed at international monitors in Bos- ! 
nian Serb territory. No one was injured ; 
in the blasts, but the violence raised i 
cMcems about a possible nationalist | 
backlash over toe raid last week. ■ 

The Bosnian Seib authorities have | 
expressed outrage over that action. ! 


Despite Glitches, 
Pathfinder Enjoys 

j.s.iii - i.ninsse***” rtew you: new ZD7 tons or goio, ac- j 

'-y , ,‘Upiiruraii^ ccading to declassified doenmentsfirom JulOthjBT MJCrV 

:I • ' the U.S. Embassy in Lisbon. 

iv* lo inc J-)'' *1 AinflK 


BRIEFLY 



ri'iaeti jrcji tr...— 



ion earsjc. 

tn ^“•=‘ 



The Jar-ine^*^ ■ 





■ U.S. Refuge Ibr Bank Guard! 

.The U.S. House of Rq w e sc otaiives' 
1^ approved and sent to ixesident a 

measure that would give pennaneat res- 
idency to a focmer Svi^ bank guard 
in bis own country after res- 
cuing Holocaust-era documents. The 
AssocUted.Pless rqxnted frtun Wash- 
ii^n. 

' Ibe l^islatioa, which President BiD 
Qmtein is expected to sign, grants sanc- 
tuary to Christephe Meili, 29, lus wife 
apd two children. 

Mr. .discovered in Janua^ that 
toe Union Bank of Switzerland was 
shredding dbcmnteits dating finma toe 
years befm Worid War n. He secretly 
retrieved some of toe material and gave 
‘ itfo a Jewish oigiuuzation. 

Mr. Meili was, dismissed from his job 
after tunung over die rinrai^nants, and 
Swiss prosecutors are investigating him 
for possibly violating Swiss bank 
secr^ laws. He has b^ denied other 
employment in Switzerland and, after 
recexving nnnMsdus death tiireais, fled ‘ 
with his fanuly to the United Stat^. 


Los Anseles Times Service 

PASADENA, Califrmua — The 
Mars Pathfinder lander' continues to be 
, led by conqiutBT problems that 
e slowM communications with dis- 
tant Earth to a crawl, even as its tiny 
robot rover sniffs toe chemical com- 
position of the rocks around the landing 
she. 

Glenn Reeves, toe flight software en- 
gineer who leads the team analyzing the 
problem at the Jet Propulsion Labo- 
ratory, said was confideru toe re- 
curring glitch tiiat forces the lander's 
computer to reset itself during data 
transmissions could be solved. 

So far no data have been losL And 
what’s mr»e. Tuesday "was an excel- 
lent day on Mars," according to toe 
Patofinder project scientist, Matthew 
Golombeck. 

. ^joumer, the six-wheeled rover, 
spent toe day analyzing a rock that mis- 
sion scientists nicloiamed YogL Pre- 
liminary data, surest the rock is much 
totac primitive and, peiiiaps, more 
Earih-^ke than other portions of the 
Martian landscape. 


Jospin and Chirac Spar 

PARIS — In one of the first open spats of their 
forced political marriage, PiWidect Jacques 
Chirac and Mme Miruster Lionel Joispin sparred 
Wednesday over their political roles. 

Mr. Jospin, whose leftist coalition took power 
in France last month, used a vreekiy c^inet 
meeting to lecture Ourac on their respective 
prerogatives as spelled out in toe constitution, a 
spokeswoman for the govemmern said. 

Mr. Chirac started & verbal scra;^xng Mrm- 
day by criticizing some of Mr. Jospin's economic 
and i^ustrial policies in a television interview 
on BastiJee Day. On Wednesday, Mr. Oiirac 
reasserted his right as (resident to criticize toe 
government lAP) 


suicide with toe killing of Miguel Angel Blanco, 
29, adding that while many Basques shared the 
dream of an independent homeland, they were 
r^udiating ETA after toe attack. (Reutersi 

Flood Damage Control 

WARSAW — Poland’s prime minister ad- 
dressed Parliament on Wednesday to defend bis 
goveniroent’s response to disastrous floods. 

"This flood, which caimot be compared with 
anything in toe past has not thrown us on oux 
kii^." Wlodzimierz Cimoszewicz said. 

Deputies began the gathering with a moment’s 
silence for at least 39 people who have died and 
hundreds of ihousanck whose homes and live- 
lihoods have been wrecked. Mr. Cimoszewicz 
said the damage was incalculable. (Reuters) 


SpanishKing Assails ET4 A New Leader in Ukraine 


MADRID — King Joan Carlos added his 
voice Wednesday to toe outoiy in Spain against 
the Basque organizatioo ETA. denouncing its 
guerrillas as contemptible terrorists for their 
killing of a yootig Spanish politiciaiL 

"His murder was as contemptible as the ter- 
rorists who killed him,” the king said in Berlin in 
a speech broadcast on Spanish radio. 

A leading Basque nationalist politician said 
We^esday that CTA had committed political 


KIEV — Valeri Pustovoitenko, a political 
pragmatist and close ally of President Leonid 
Kuchma, was confirmed as pnime minis ter of 
Ukraine by Parliament on Wednesday. 

He won the support of 226 deputies, just 
artaining toe absolute majority he needed in the 
450-seat chamber. Addressing toe chamber, Mr. 
Pustovoitenko said that Ukr^e would stay on 
the track of economic reform. (Reuters) 


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TUKVORUrSIMU NCWSixrtiK 





M U 


. PAGE 6 


international herald tribune, THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1997 



IJSTERIUTIONAL 


U.S. Arms Sales in Gulf Bis 



ma 





By John Lancaster 

Washbigtaa^taSa^w 


th^ say th^ may cod up buying tl 
Chinese wewons lor reasons that ha\ 


KUWATT — After U.S.-led fbices 
drove Iraqi tro^ from Kuwait in 199L 
this country and otfaerGulf allies showed 
their gradtude by spending billions of 
dollars on Amerii^ weapons. But U.S. 
aims merchants no longer can take their 
wealdiy customers for granted: Kuwait 
is considering rfae purchase of long- 
range howitzers firam China. 

Kuw^'s potential purchase of 72 
Clunese-made self-propelled howitzers 
instead of what are widely considered to 
be superior American, Bntish and South 
African versions has raised ^ebrows 
among U.S. defense contractors and 
pronged a personal appeal to Kuwaid 
leaders from Vice President A1 Core. 
Kuwaiti officials assert publicly diat 


tliOT have not made a final decision and 
wiJIc 


I do so only after each model has been 
thoroughly equated <m the basis of cost 
and pMormance. In private, however. 


the 

weapons for reasons that have 

oottung to do with range, price or ac- 
curacy and everything to do with pol- 
itics. 

Eager to gain a foothold in one of the 
world's ricii^ aims markets, Qiioa has 
hinted that it will witibhold its support at 
die United Nations for eatending trade 
sanctions s gaina t Iraq if Knwait does not 
agree m dre estimated $300 million pur- 
chase, according to Western diplcmats 
and a senior Kuwaiti official who ^>ote 
on condition of anonymity. China is one 
of five permanent reemb^ of the UN 
Security Council — along with die 
United States, Brit^ France and Rus- 
sia — which votes on the renewal of the 
sanctions in O^ber. 

“Sofaedmes you get to a state when 
you feel you*xe bdng blackmailed,” die 
senkx' Kuwaiti official said. **We lean 
toward die U.S. equipment, but we have 
to find a way tooled the Chinese and not 
upset them in the Security CoondL” 


The United States is not the only 
weapons supplier in die Gulf. France and 
Britain have lon^ been major compet- 
itors here. Knwmt has boo^t armored 
militaiy vehicles from Russia, tanks 
from fee former Yugoslavia and patrol 
boate from France. 

The Gulf War, however, gave the 
United States a competitive e4g& Arab 
nations in the U.S.-ied coalition that 
dn>\^ Iraqi invasum forces from Kuwait 
were’" ^ ,-:-v —u . — — 


W' 


ere impressed by high-tech Amocican 
eapoos and gmtefril ^ U.S. leadetsh^ 


darihg fee crisis. 

American officials also have been 
sncces^ in persuading Gulf allies to 
buy weapons con^atible with tiiose that 
would be us^ by American troops in fee 


event of another conflict in the te^n. 
The partnership has been a profitable 


one for the United States, 
weapons exporter in the wrx'ld. Since 
1990, fee six nations of the Gulf Co- 
operation Council — Saudi Arabia, 
Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, fee United Arab 


Enxinttes and Chnan — have signed con- 
tracts for $36 biiUoQ worfe of American 
arms — 32 percent of fee $1 10.S billion 
in U.S. aniis m^rts over fee samepeil- 
od, according to an analysis of Defense 
Department ^uies by the Washin^n- 
based Arms Control Association. 

Bat as memories of fee Gulf Warfade, 
U.S. ddimse contractofs have bMon to 
face growing coirq>etition from, abroad, 
especially in fee realm of such;!^ so- 
phisticate vieapoDs as howfe^ and 
armored vdiiclK, as Arab allies divo^- 
sify their snpplim for political and eco- 
nomic reasons. ' 

The U.S.-based Locifeeed Martin 
C(xp., for example, is competing 
fiercely to sell as m^ as 80 long-range 
strike planes to the United Arab Emirates 
in a worfe abmit $6 billion. Despite 

a personal appeal in 199S by I^ident. 
Bui Clinton to President Zayed ilm Sul- 
tan an Nahayan, offidals of the emirates 
said in Matvfe titat they were seriously 
consufeiing two Europe ofiera. 


Kuwaitis oh excellenc terms wife fee 
UnitedEfetes; theu forces conduct reg- 
ular maneuvers t^^ber. So Amoican 
officials were surprised to leam recent^ 
feat Kuwait's JS^er Zkfonse Ccmncil 
was leaning- toww China's Norfe In- 
dostrire C^rp. to sappiy it wife 
jat^}elled howitzers — tradongyd^les 
feat frucdoD as long-range artillery 
pieces. 

The United States has beenpushing Us 
' M109A6 Paladin modd, soiDe of which 
are deployed in fee des^ ncrih of 
Kuvrait .City to defoid it against any 
invasion from Iraq. 

U.S. Army warrant officers who te- 
cendy examined fee Chiri^ howitzer in 
KuwaU said they fouiid fealty welds and 
anrifpiatftH mdio e q uip" V*-"* that would 
not permit commiuucation wife Amer- 
ican-tnade Ml A2 tanks used by Kuwaiti 
and U.S. forces, according to feplomatic 
source. 

**Fpr sure, feose vriio win use the new 
artillery pieces^ would like to see Amer- 


icaii tedmoJoey, butvre^ 

please other mends,' 




Diease omci miww, . ^ ~ 

Minister Sideiman Shaheen « Kuwait._ 
said in an interview here this we^ 
.“China is a power w be reckoned witiB 
so it is in our inteij^ to. have a 

defense attachd office m Wastaigfoiu^g 
who would not give his na^. prosed to j. 

cormnent on tire proposed howitzer sa^l, 

But he said: “fo Ounese policy, wc wilT 
not inmose any political., conditions 
any country. We want to have nonnaLijJ 
trade relations vrife evwone.*; 

News of the propr^ purchase set 0!^ 
alarm bells in Washington. ■ ' , 

la April, according to Defense News. • 

. .^^1 i&MartA tlip. iMHeretiin' 


... 


r-. ' 


i ' . ;r 


.. •*!"* 


la Apnl, accoroing l/cabubc; 

Mr. Gore wrote a letter to the leadershi^^* 

in Kuwait, saying: “I would Ifee to' 
leiterase my strongest sujqiort on boial^ • 
of United Defease UP., a U.S. cemap^t| 
which has proposed to movide Ag;; 
155mm M109A6 Paladm self-propeilecf ^ 
howitzer." 


N. 


MARKET: Dow Jones Average Hits 8,000 


Continued from Page 1 


giving it a value of $174.8 billiou. It is 
axiomatic on Wall Street that a bull 
market is near an end when investors say 
"this tune is different," but many econ- 
omists have been explaining the rise in 
stocks as a result of the end of fee Cold 
War and significant advances in tech- 
nology tiiat have increased the jxt>- 
ductivity of American compaiues and 
exerted downward pressure on long- 
term interest rates. 

"This is part of fee peace dividend," 
said Alan Ackennan, executive vice 
president of Fahnestock & Co. "This is 
part of a high-tech leadmhip that has set 
the U.S. apart from most economies in 
the world, and clearly fee low-interest- 
rate. low-inflation environment been 
able to fuel this positive backdrop." 

Id addition to that positive badafiop. 
Wall Street's strengfe and recent shaip 
gains in tiie dollar helped European 
stock indexes to also set record highs 
Wednesday. (Page 1 1) 

The Dow clo^ up 63.17 points, at 
8,038.88, a record, while fee Nasdaq in- 
ti^ was 38.^ points higher, at 1 480.63. 
The S&P 500 was up 10.80, at 93646. 

Fueling the latest rise in fee Nasdaq 
were b^ter-fean-expected secoad- 
quartereamings Tuesoay from two lead- 
ing dupmakers, Intel (forp. andfTexas 
Instruments lnc„ although the latter is 
traded on fee New York Stock Ex- 
change. 

Increasing investment in such pro- 
ductivity-enh^ing devices as com- 
pufen is Cuming into handsome profits 
for the American companies such as 
Intel and Texas Instrum^ts feat dom- 
inate fee techhol<^^ihdustiy~. 

In genonal, second-qnarter earnings 
have been robust, and that is another 
factor lifting stock prices. 

One of the key measures of a stock’s 
value is its anni^ earnings divided by 
fee number of shares fee company has 
ontstaoding. Tltis price-to-earoings ratio 
shows how much investors are willing to 
pay to buy into a conq>any's income 
stream. 

Currently, the P/E ratio for the stocks 
in the Dow is abcxit 22, historic^y a 
high level but one that might be sup- 
prated if investors continue to pour 
money into the market and if alternative 
investments are not attractive. Although 
letums have been good in emerging mar- 
kets and in some of the West European 


exchanges, current crises in Asia and 
Craitii 


weakness in fee Continental foreign- 
exchange sector have reduced those re- 


snlts when translated into dollars. 

Not only is ite American stock maritet 
attractive when con^)ai«d wife overseas 
equities, but it also looks good when 
measured against fee yields available on 
bonds in the dranestic maikra. Interest 
rates are falling, making it hard for bond 
yields to lure investors away from Wall 
Street, where doublendig^t percentage 
gains in each of the last dure years nufee 
die 6A7 percent yield o«i 30-year Treas- 
ury boods seem pahry. Yet Treasury 
bonds, even ar cbeir reduced rates, offer 
higher interest payments than govern- 
ment boods from most of the efeer in- 
dustrialized countries. 

The yield on the 30-year Treasury 
bond feu below 64 percent Wednesday 
for fee first time since Decranber. 

The government said the consumer 
price index, its nuun measure of inflation 
at the retail levA, rose just 0.1 peroeot in 
June, ra 2.3 percent for tiie past year. 

Although techaologically bas^ p^ 
dttctivity gains are widely credited with 
keeping inflation at bay while unem- 
pktyn^t is a modest S percent, die 
statistical evidence does not absolutely 
confirm tiiis view. 

It is generally accepted that data col- 
lection has not kept pace wife toch- 
nologicai advances, but fee scope of the 
eiTDf is dieted. 

While disinflation over a long period 
is not likely, the CPI data reducra the 
probability that fee Federal Reserve 
Board’s C^ien Maritet Committee would 
vote to raise interest rates at its August 
meeting. 'The Fed did raise rates once 
this year, in March. 

Intel, which reported its second- 

S r profit after the market dosed 
ay, was sharpTy lugBra.'Tts remits 
were slightly ahead of the latest ex- 
pectations, dthough the company had 
caodoned of a slowdown as it shified its 
emphasis to producing its new Pratinm 
chips wife MMX technology. These 
products are in demand, maldi^ Intel's 
older chips relatively unattractive. 

Microsoft’s stock was strong on ex- 
pectations the company would report 
good earnings Thursday. 

One company that reported poor 
profit results was Eastman Kodak, and 
the stock maiket punished its shares, 
which lost more thM 10 percent of their 
value by late afienoon. Reflecting the 
view that global coinpetition is keeping a 
lid on U.S. prices, Kodak's 16 percent 
drop in profit was attributed to com- 
petition from Fuji Photo Film Co. as weU 
as a strong' doll^. Fuji's American de- 
positary receipts were higher. 



FmDi SataafReuttts 

HONORED — A Turkish newspaper editor, Ocak Isik Yurtcu, left, 
walking tfirongb Hie main gate at the jail in Saray to meet the press 
Wedn^day. Yurfm, serving a 15-year sentence for his pro- 
Kurdish paper's reporting, bad just received a press freedom award. 


MURDER: Gay Prostitute Is Sought 


Continued from Page 1 


previous link between Mr. Cunanan and 
Mr. Versace. 


UNION: A Tortuous Road to Next Century 


Continued from Ps^e 1 


ister Buleoi Ecevit even threatened late 
Tuesday to annex norfeeni Qjqxus and 
its etiihjcTOriush commum if the EU 
proceeds wife plans to include the Creek 
Cypriot goveroment in the first wave of 
enlragemem talks. 

The Europe Coromissioa has de- 
clared Turii^ ineligible for negotiations 
on economic and human ^hts grounds, 
although it propo^ interim measures to 
intensity economic and political cooper- 
ation wife Ankara. The EU committed 
itself to including Cyprus in the firsr 
round of enlargement talks three years 


ance within die Union, as Scandinavian 
countries have championed the Baltic 
states and Italy and ofeer souifaemeis 
have lobbied on behalf of Slovenia. 

Money and policies wili-almost cer- 
tainly prove nwre divisive. 


As part of his proposed Agenda 2000 
to ready fee Union for enlargement, Mr. 


ago to win Greek support for an EU 
customs union wife Tu^y. 


Most pariiameotaiians reacted favor- 
ably to the commission’s selection of the 
five countries, indicating that EU leaders 
were likely to endorse fee strawy when 
they make the filial decision in December. 
Officials said the choices reflect the state 
of economic and political developments 
in die East and maintain geograpmc bal- 


BRIEFLY 


Turk Pcaiy Accused 
df Illegal Donations 


ANKARA — Hie Turkish military 
Wednesday accused the religious Wel- 
fare Party of accosting $16 million in 
illegal contriiwtions from Libya and 
Syria. The auction was contained in 
documents submitted to the supreme 
court in a case feat could lead to the 
party’s closing, the Istanbul oewsp^ier 
Satehsaid. 

Turitisfa laws ban the accqrtante of 
foreign financial assistance by political 
parties. Welfare officials had no com- 
ment Wednesday, but the paity has 
denied tiiat it has foreign financing. 

The main allegation in fee court case 
is that Welfare tried to establish an 


Islamic regime, a violation of fee Turk- 
ish Constitution. 

Welfare led the coalition govern- 
ment tiiac resigned last month undra 
pressure from the military. 'Hie mil- 
itary, the self-appointed guardian Of 
Tmkey's secular system, oppos^ 
Welfare's religious policies. (AP) 


went on trial on charges related to the 
assassination Tuesday, they added. 
Prosecutors say Mr. Hussein was a 
founding membra of the fundamentalist 
Jihad group, members of which killed 
Mr. Sadat in 1981. They coukl not say 
bow he was captured or where be had 
spent fee last 16 years. fReuters) 


Sadat Case Fugitive 
Captured and Tried 


V.S.'Panama Talks 


CAIRO — *rhe Egypthm police have 
caught a militant Islamic fundamen- 
talist who spent 16 years on the run 
helping to found the group rhar as- 
sassin^ed President Anwar Sadat, se- 
curity offidals said Wednesday. 

The police caught the militant. Hus- 
sein Ahmed Hussein, in June and he 


WASHINGTON — TIk United 
States will begin fonnal talks with 
Pwama this monfe on tumii^ Howard 
Air Force Base in {^utama into an in- 
ternational anti-drug center wife U.S. 
participation. 

The United States will turn over 
control of fee Panama Canal to Panama 
and withdraw all troops, including 
from the base, by end 1999. (Reuters) 


Santer called for significant cuts in farm 
subsides, which now account fra about 
hafi' fee Union's budget of 86 billion 
Ecus ($78 billion), to be partly offset by 
direct income payments to farmers. He 
also proposed to restrict fee aumber of 
EU regiofis qualifying for industrial and 
development aid. Those measures would 
free Dp 75 hillioi) Ecus for a "new Mar- 
shall Plan" to help fee 10 Eastern coun- 
tries prepare for membership, he said. 

But in a taste of fee budget battles to 
come, the French Farm Mitiistry im- 
mediately rejected the proposed cuts in 
farm support as unacceptable, while fee 
British foreign secretary. Robin Cook, 
praised fee plan as one that would steer 
the Union away from costly subsidies 
and toward freer trade. 

But fee real obstacle to enlaigemenl 
remains fee Union’s lack of political 
momentum, which has been underscored 
by fee growing tensions surrounding the 
planned single currency and the fsSlure 
of EU leaders to streamline decision- 
making and to curtail national vetoes at 
summit talks in Amstenlam last month. 

"Wtot's missing is the political am- 
bition," said Wilfried Martens, fee 
former Belgian prime minister who 
leads the Ctuistian Democratic bloc in 
tte European Parliament. 


However, a journalist Maureen Ortii, 
who bad been researdung an article rat 
Mr. Cunanan for Vanity Fair magaane, 
said on tiie NBC "Today" show 
Wednesday ttiat, according to friends, 
Mr. rsinannn and Mr. Versace had en- 
coimtesrc^ one another a few years ago 
backstay at ^ San Bancisco Opera. 

"Z dim ’t believe they were lover^ but 
I believe tii^ were in the same pla^ at 
fee same time and that- they kn^ each 
ofeer," she said. 

Soufe Beach, with its thriving gay 
community and wild party scene, is the 
kind of place Mr. Cunanan could fit in 
easily. Investigators said Mr. Veisace 
was shot by a white man in lus mid-20s, 
dressed in a vriiite or gray shirt and dark 
shorts and canying a ba^ack. 

For three montiis, law-eiifbrcement 
officials say, Mr. Cunanan has been on a 
murdetous coast-to-coast odyssey, sus- 
pected of IdUing the five men and, -in 
diree cases, stealing their cars and mov- 
ing to the next mui^ scene. 

He has been charged wife fee murder 
of an aidixte^ David Nbdson, once his 
lover, and he is wanted for questioning in 
theoferaJdllings — that afJeffrQ' Trail, 
anofeer former bttyfrieiid, fee Chicago 
millionaire Lee NGgiin, axto Mr. Reese. ' 

After fee murder qnree b^an in late 
^ril, the FBI b^an a natioavride hunt 
FEers have circulated widely in East 
C!:oast hars. dubs and healfe fifties 
wife gay clientele. The FBI said that the 
brown-haired, brown-eyed fugitive had 
been sighted several weeks^ago id Palm 
Beach County, north of Miami, so police 
officials knew he was in tiie area. 

Mr. Chmanan has been described as 
flamboyant and extravagant, taking an 


epicurean delight in life. Boyishly hand- 
some, charming to excess, te-was a 
professioiial party boy, say friends and 
acqoaifltanoes in oan Diego, wfeere until 
.fpugr mraitbs ago he was a hi^-flying 
'fixture on the gay circuit. One r^ort said 
he had used an alias, Andrew E^ilva. 

He dressed in garments feat seemed 
certain evidence of good breeding and 
wealth. He drank, dtuiced and ate out 
often, wife large groups of friends, fror 
OTently p igicfng up the tab, said Nicole 
Romirez-Muiray, social efetor ctf 'Tbe 
Cay and LesWan Tunes in Saa Diego. 
Ste said it was well known iit the gay 
community that Mr. Cunanan was a 
prostitute with w^thy clients 

"He mastered his craft," she said 
"He was tiie American gigolo." , 
In an interview wife fee Chirac Sun- 
Times in h^y, his mother. Malty Ann 
. Cunanan, desmbed Andrew as "a high- 
class homosexual prostittite." And 
diougbhehad no job. investigatras have 
said that be often handled large sums of 
money, moving ^5,000 in and out of 
bsink accounts tills year alone. 

He did not leave California until 
A{»il. He had been livii^ wife a rooror 
mate in arented apartment in San Di^ 
and be told friends be would be movii^ 
to San Francisco. But first he said be was 
goinglo Minneapolis to see old friends, 
friend was Mr. TTaii, who had 
b^ stationed in San Diego while in the 
navy but who had moved to Miiinesoia 
after lea>nng the service. The other was 
Nfr.Madsrat 

Investigators believe feat Mr. Cun^ 
anan stole Mr. Madson's red Jeep, ft was 
found in Chicago, across from towu: 

•hoasoof Mr. Miglin, whose iSWiexas 
:Was. found at tte. cemetery wbeie.Mirr 
Reese was fee caretaker. Mr.r Re^’f 
pickup truck was missing. 

(NYT,WP.AP,APP„Reuters) 






UN: Annan Offers a Plan to Clean House 




Coatinued from Page 1 


said. "But the secretary-general can't 
acconulish aU his pre^mised reframs tty 
himself.'’ 

The secretary-general, die first insider 
elected to fee position, is widely believed 
to have a reservoir of good will to draw 
on in tiie oiganization. But he will be 
judged by how firm he can be in making 
appointments, cutting into bureaucratic 
empires and fending off pressures from 
goveiTUDeots demanding jobs. 

iynong several piopo^s that require 
action tty fee 185-member General As- 
sembly and are eiqiected to generate 
dilute feere is the appramment of the 
de^ty secretaiy-genram. Anofeer is the 


Trus{ise^p Council, fee insertiem of • 
"sunset'’ clauses into new programs \ 
and tiie creation of a high-level muT ; 
isterial commission to study fee work; 
ings of UN agencies not under fee sec- 




ii^iy-seneral's direct control 1 — among ; 
them me World Health .Orgaiuzation, j 


Unesco and bodies deiding wife inter- ; 
national trade and commuiwations. ' 


Mr. Annan will not need assembly' ! 
^provai to create his govenunen^ ' 
stvle 


plan to create a revolving frmd to cany 
the oi^ization through mianczal prob- 
lems uke the one caused by Washing- 


ton’s refusal to pay its dues. Such a fund 
would rob Congr^s of sraneof its power 
to hold fee organization for ransom. 

The General Assembly would also 
have to approve the dist^ding or re- 
directing of irrelevam bodies like the 


s^e cabinet, however, or to group the . 
organization’s activities under four ma- ) 
jor headings led by managers of cabinet ; 
rank; peace and security, humanitarian ! 
affairs, economic and social affairs, and J 
deveic^nnenL . i 

Unioef and the UN Populatirar Fund ! 
would come under the oversight of tte | 
UN Devdopment Program. ■ 

A similar group of relief raganiza- \ 
tions — the Hi^ Corranissipner for ' 
Refugees, the World Food Program and I 
the Rdid and Works Agency in tbe'~' * 
hfiddle East — would come under fee-** 




... 


’V---. 1. 


'I'.; 


chairmanship of a new emergency reliefs 
coordinator, yet to be named. •P 


BOEING: Stalemate in Talks on McDonnell Douglas Acquisition 


Continued from 1 


JAR4N: The Country Anxiously Builds Wlsstem-'Style Capitalism 


Continued from 1 


issues of restructtiring go much furtiier 
than economics. They a&> involve social 
values of ^alitariani^ the creation of a 
consumer society with better housing and 
h^her Uving standards, the ef^ to cul- 


tivate a two-party political tystem, fee 
devolution of now 


po^ to localities and a 
looser education system to encourage 
nxne critical thinking. 

"Jtqjan is caught now in a serious 

stalemate, and lots m people see it as 
virtually the end of fee worid," said 
Tadao Ando, a leading architect **The 
rules diathi^ are osualty said to be 

dxMit business, but fee more imponant 
thing we should discuss is how these 
rules stifle the Japanese sense of freedom, 
the sense of our own posabilities.’.* 

Some of the broad impan of tte 
changes unfold^ in Iwim is ai^nrent in 
the Utile gas station that Rild Tamura runs 
in Utsunomiya. Car owners used to be 
depen^fe customers, forging a rela- 
tionfeip with a sendee station &it would 
repair their vehicles as well as fill their 
tanks — a bond nourished by extra at- 
tention and occuricmal free service by the 
mechanics. Now, instead of relatii 


customers want cheap gas. The petro- 
leum industry was partly deregulate last 
year and sw-service stations may be 
allowed soon as weU. Price ware have 
broken out among stations, and many 
economists prefect that about one-third of 
feem will close in fee next decade. 

"Almost all gas stations are in fee red 
right now, so I’m woiried." Mr. Tamura 
as he stood in his office, watching 
cars sail by on the road outside. 

"Now (he difierenees between the 
good stations and the bad stations have 
become clear," he said. "When prices 
were deregulated, we lost fee cradle that 
we'd been rocking in." 

For all ^ anxieties, Mr. Tamuia notes 
that rite filling station can benefit from 
the changes in fee marketplace. He 
points proudly to a Uttle shop the station 
□as opened so custonteis can buy a few 
products — like rice. In the past, the law 
generally allowed only rice shops to sell 
rice. But that rule was relaxed tot year, 
and now anybody can seU it. 

Mr. Tamura is h^ful feat his rice 
sales will save his job. But, down the 
road, they are helping to destrtty the 
business of Yozo Kaiga. Mr. Kaljga. a 
pudgy man with a few wisps of gray hair. 


sat forlornly in his rice shop, sipping hot 
water and waiting for customers who 
never came. "My business has dropped 
70 percent" since the law change^ he 
said. "1 don't kriowhowro survive." 

Mr. Kaiga is worried, but like many 
Japanese be has concluded that amarket- 
oriented economy is inevitable and es- 
sential. "1 can't say I’m hs^y about it, 
but this is the trend of the tmies." he 
said. “Regulation isn’t the normal way. 
There should be competitive markets." 


that’s a very serious matter," said R^- 
resentative Norm Dicks, whose congres- 
sional district includes Boeing 
headquarters in Seattle. "The American 
people aren’t going to stand for the EU 
blocking a merger between two U.S. 
compaiues." 

The commission argues that the 
takeover is a global issue giving Boeing 
three quarters of a market w<^ trillions 
of dollars over tiie next quarter of a 
century and having a direct impact on 
Airbus Industrie, & pride of Europe's 
aerospace tecluiology. Since Boeing is a 
gk>b(U power that does much of its busi- 
ness in Europe, fee ctxrunission argu^ 
feat it has Jurisdiction, Just as U.S. an- 
titrust aufeorities can issue rulings gov- 
erning European companies that do 
business in the United States. 

The commission cannot halt the mer- 
ger, uriiidi was approved by the Federal 


Trade Commission and tiie Defease De- 
partment in fee United Stales two weeks 
ago. after Boeing submitted 5 million 
pages of testimony. 

But it can make life difficult for Boe- 
ing tty imposing fines amounting to bil- 
lions of dollars and penaUzing European 
companies, includutg airlines, that do 
business with Boeing. 

Boeir^ is sajring nothing about the 
negotiations, while issuing bland and 
reassuring statements, such as the one by 
a Boeing ^xriceswoman. Sherry Nebel, 
after the talks broke down Tuesday: 
"We’re confident we will reach a mu- 
tually acceptable soluticm." 

B(Ming can aifonf to take a relaxed 
attitude while waiting for the acquisition 
to be made final Au^. 1 . It gambles that 
the Europeans are likely to be divided. 
For example, will British Airways, 
which buys all its planes from Boeing, or 
Rolls Royce PLC, which supplies Boe- 
ing with engines, go along with a trade 


war engineered by the oommission? 

TTie four countries feat would be most’' 
afteoed by retaliation and counter-ro-*' 
taliatton would be the four whoM in- 
dustries participate in the Airbus part-" 
nership — Gennany, France, Britain and 
Spain. 

Yet, even tiiese countries are having 
difficulties coordutoiiig their polifees 
and turning Airbus into an independ^c 
company that could compete more ef- 
fectively with the Boeing behemoth. 

Airbus claims its planes are better, 
more i^dem. more comfortable and 
more enicient than the planes built bv 
Boeing. ^ 

But tiie word that most sings to air- 
u^ « ‘cheap," and Airbus could 
probably get its costs down if it operated 

as a regular corporation. That 



up in fee air because <rf fee 


cialist 


govenoment's insistence w 

banging on to its ownership of Aerospa- 
tiale. one of fee lead Airbus partners. 


CAMBODIA: Neu> Co-Prime Minister Seen as Lending Legitimacy to Hun Sen’s Regime 


Continued from Page 1 


ecuted. in hidii^ or in exile, it was un- 
clear who, if anytxie, would be available 
and willing to become co-leader with the 
erratic and violence-pione Mr. Hun Sen. 

Mr. Ung Huot, fee foreign minister 
since 1995, was in Paris meeting with 
Western aid donors at the time of the 
coup. He returned Monday. 

"I put fee interests of my country, my 
people, above anything else," he said 
We^esday. "Al^e political parties. 



above m; 

"I sti 

said of the pinice, "but the interests ot member or Pnnee KananOdh s party wug as oeing nrsi oriine roini«^ 

the country dictate feat Cambodia must led a breakaway movement last April. Mr. Une Huftr’« 

^on.” Nto.ToanCtayd«)pp«loutofteo«,o difemnu ■ 

Mr. Ung Huol, an Australian-trained replace Prince Rananddh because, he whether wcoi&nue to J 

telecommunications engineer with a said, he was not a member of Parliament Ranaiddh as fe^ m 

■ • ■ • and by law could not bold the job. inmisteranddftS^JS?™?*® ^ ^ 

Mr: Ung Huoi's selection' must be toSilS 
endot^ ^ the NadteKiJ Assembly, .. bsyiolaitcoi 

which is expected to convene this monfe 
— if enough members can be found who 
have not fled 


"Mr. Clean" reputation, criticized 
Prince Ranariddh for carrying on ne- 
gotiations "behind closed doors" with 
hari-line Khmer Rouge holdouts in 
oorfeem Cambodia. 

Mr. Ung Huot won backing from an- 


as fee only leader left inside C^bodia 


the country to make up a 


whoean-.A< « f v.tunooa» 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 17, 199' 


PAGE 7 


HEALTH/SCIENCE 



^ A One-Brain, Two- System Approach to Languages 


By Sandra Blakeslee 

New Kirfc Tunes Service 

EW YORK — As thQii-ywirts 
of teenagers who have 
struggled to engrave high 
school French on recaldlTaat 


languages harder xo leam later in life? 

'niere have been strong hints that the 
brain can use sqxuaie brain legims for 
first and second lan g ua ge *aiH Dr. Mi- 


TW0“j 

Suleunan 

^ ' By Sandra Blateslee re^ni^ m the brain? Wlq^ do some 

U is in W Ne^ YorkTunes Service 1^. re^oiu appear immutable aftCT 

ionshi^wSh u! childhood, while others aoDcar flexible 

fense attache 
»wotiidnoigiv?h® 'n 

rament on the propQ. re^ neurons might have guessed, a new first and second 'languages, saicTDr. Mi- 
« nc said; **In Chines? . O- **9*^7 ^ found that second languages chad Posner, a psychotogik at the Uni- 

'-.unpose anv politic 1 ^^'^ ^ ^rad <h^erently in the human brain veni^ of O^on in Eugene. Bilingual 

y country'. \Ve depending on when they are learned. q>ile^ patients may. during seizures. 

£e^laxjons with ev? ^Babies who leam two languages si- lose me abfliQr to speak one language and 

Ne'fc’softheproposfH'^'^'^- ' ^ multaneously, and appa^tty effort- not another. A stroke victim can per- 
Ipn bells in \Va.4hinot ■ ^ single nain r^ion for manently lose the abili^ to speak Bench 

in April, accordino genenttingconmlexspeedi, researchers but retain English or ariotfaerlaiiguage. 
r-GorawToteaien?''^^^'^''sev, say. Bat pec^le who leam a second “Bat it's not been known how &ese 
Kuwait, savins- language in wfescence or adulthood separate lai^age areas form in the 

1^1^ mv stronle&r possess two such brain legions, one for bnun,” Dr. Posner said. “Are the lan- 

t'nited l^fense i d “^Pong,,^: each language. guages fused? Do tb^ prime one an- 

iich has Dro 7 v^^ !4 ''^^ -^ C(w -.The findings, described in the current other? Is one translated by another?’' 
SnunMl09a^i Pt<^ issue of the journal Nature, shed new The study shows for the first time that 

‘ light on srnne notoriously difficult ques- two languages can be mwped in com- 

tions about brain development: How mon neural tissue, rasner said, 
— does the luain mganize la^uage in in- adding, “It is ve^ helpful for under- 

fancy and now are multiple languages siand&g bilin^alism.*'* 


represented in the brain? Why do some The research was carried out by Dr. 


brain r^ions appear iirunutable after Joy Hirsch, head of Memorial Sloan- 
childtaood, while others appear flexible Kettering Hospital's functional MRI 
and maU^le in adult life? Why are Laboratory and her graduate student. 


“But language is a htgb-rent district.' ’ 
Dr. Gutin said. Some high-level aspects 
of language tend to be found only on one 


Karl Kim. Functional magnetic reson- 
ance ima^ng, or ^DU, is a relatively 
new, noninvasive brain imaging tech- 
nique that can pinpoint exactly which 
pam of the brain are active during cog- 
nitive tasks such as talking, seeing, wav- 
ing an aim or daydreaming. Brain sur- 


side of the brain. By removing a qiot of spoken. 


second language around 1 1 and had ac- 
quired fhi^y by 19 after living in a 
country where the language was 


tissue smaller than an eraser, a surgeon 
could excise a region of language pro- 
duction and destroy a penon's ability to 
speak or understand ^glish. 

Moreover, language areas are never 
found in exactly the same spot. Dr. Gutin 
said. These regions are formed in child- 


geons at the hospital are now using the hood as language is acquired and are in 


itu-te Is ^oiighf 

^feandeligfatinmv.BovL^^ 

je. charming to 
»fessional parn- hf,v »> 
ItiaintaiicesinSanDleSS^i:' 

J^thsago he 


technique to identify critical brain re- 
gions so that they will not do more harm 
than good when removing a tumor or 
other abnormality. 

Of diese criti^ r^ons, language is 
pe^ps at the top of the list, said Dr. 
Philip H. Gutin, the hospital's chief of 
nenrosuigery. Some functions such as 
seeing and hearing are located in both 
brain hemisphere, he said. When a tu- 
mor forms, surgeons can cut out tissue 
and not do great harm because the other 
side of the brain will take over. 


slightly diiTerent spots in different 
people. Given that a quarter of all brain 
tiimois occur in regions of the brain 
where language skills might reside, ac- 
curate imaging is a musL he said. 


T O explore where languages lie 
in the brain, Dr. Hirs^ re- 
cruited 12 healthy bUin^al 
people from New York City. 
Ten languiues were represented in the 
^up. Half had learned two langi^es 
in infancy. The others began learning a 


With their heads inside the MRI ma- 
chine. subjects thought silently about 
what th^ had done the day before using 
conqilex sentences, first in one language, 
tiien in the other. Ihe machine detened 
increases in blood flow, indicating where 
in the brain this thmlcmg tocdt pl^. 

Aspects of laitguage abili w are dis- 
iributkl all over the brain. Dr. Hirsch 
said. But there are some hi^-level, ex- 
ecutive regions that are usu wy localked 
in a certain neighboihood on me left side 
of the brain, but are sometimes found in 
the same nei^boihood on the right side, 
or on both sides. Oneis Wernicke's area, 
a region devoted to understanding the 
meaning of woids and the subject matter 
of spokm language, or semantics. An- 
other is Broca's area, dedicated to the 
execution of speech as well as some deep 
grammatical aspects of language. 


None of the 12 bilinguals '>■ 
had two separate Wernicke’s ^ 
areas. Dr. Hii^h said. In an En glish 
and Spanish speaker, for instance, 
Spanish semantics blended with English 
semantics in the same area. But there 
were dramatic differences in Broca’s 
areas, she said. 

In people who had learned both lan- 
guages in infancy, there was only one 
uniform Broca’s region for both lan- 
guages, a dot of tissue con taining about 
30,000 neurons. Among those who had 
leajned a second language in adoles- 
cence, however, Broca's area seemed to 
be divided into two distinct areas. Only 
one area was activated for each lan- 
guage. These two areas lay close to each 
othCT but were ^ways separate. Dr. 
Hirsch said, and the second language 
area was always about the same size as 
the first language area. 

This implies that the brain uses dif- 
ferent strategies for learning languages, 
depending on age. Dr. Hirsch said. 


tore on the gav circu-f f 1 

He dressed in ^■•rmcni 

evidence 5t' c-.i hr^'^ 
allh. He drank, danced m"*' 
en unthlaroe sronp. 
picking 

■ouw-Mcrey, soc.al cd“, 
yandLeib;nn Tmev sj,?!' 

■ d Ad! known iniL/ 
imunm- i.hj! Mr Cunnnitf 
isHtuie A!tn «ec|.n;, cl,e„,r ** 

He msHiered craii." 
fe »as me c.coin ' 

ws lu Mj>. r.is mother. ■. 
ftanan. described .AnGre\* a 
ss ho:no-exu.;i nr-Miiuic. - i 
■ugt he hue nr. jot. :nve>tiaa,or,b 
i lha: he oiten handled \as\ ^ ■ 
ncy, movsng ?“ 5 .nN, 
yt SkCosmis Lh,s ve,:^ 

•1c did no! >is.: Calii'oraiaic 
ni. He had beets !!\!nu -Aiiliaite 
fe in a rented apurimeiii m SanDt 
1 told f.rienii he w,«uld be mi 
»an Franct'^co. But I'lrM he .jiJlkv 
ng to Mtn.*scaroii> '.o -e? old m® 
Jac frw.iJ wa> Trjil. *bofe 
flsUlioncd in Sun Die:..-Aluleiiit 
y but w,*io had m ■>■. ■: : i. > Mwaa 
,T U«vi ,»:'2 '.he Thck^httr. 

■ Miidsori. 

nvcMigotors rei!tf\e s.ajt \lr Ct 
iiiitoftf' Mr. Madj- - rec Jeep In: 

in Chicago. aC' 
i9e<if Mr. .Vliiiiir.. ■'..■’•.'■•c 
v.focnd at the rjr.w'tcr. uthit.4 
*stf was the k'a.\‘ia>.L-T NL’. Rest- 
U2ptn!ckwad::.:*-in: 

r.vn: \p ^FPRinff 


n to Clean House 

Coiinci':. i.hv itbenwti 
tOii;*'' *c:ju>iS.* .frO r.c'A pros® 
CTca'.ior. c-:' .s h.ich-le'cl# 
rial ciznmts>'-.'.r tte*® 

i of I'N ajer.j:'.;- no: under die-> 
r^-^generui d;.*'?.': 

Ti the World .Hu-aJ:h 
and bkvdi.’a cs-aling 
ojul trade ar. j c.-. r!’r;unirtihW 
Hi \"na.n will n^ed 
rwvei. L, criu:.- his 
ecabiiuf!. howjur. or 

i: peoce ,r;i. 

ers. t-ct'no.mtc ar.- .-o,.-' 

eiopmeni.^ 


Smoky Plumes 
Deep in Ocean 


Picky Eater: New Image for the Great White Shark 


— me nil-.; 
jgees. :.b-j T;- K- ^ 

Bche! iind 
die &Lsr -■ 
rnun>hiP*'' 

.tisnaior. sv: ic ^ 


I . By Jane Ellen Stevens 

I Wfw ygrt Times Service 

A board R/V ATLAbrnS, off the Azores — A 
site tiiai is believed to be one of the largest 
volcanic vent fields in the Atlantic Ocean h^ 
been .discovered by a team of scientists on a 
French submersible 7,700 fb^ below the surface. 

An American submeraible, Alvin, was nearby when tire 
vent field was found JulylO. It joined the French sub- 
mersible, the Nantile, on Friday afternoon to explwe the 
'strange ecosystem. Both returned to the she (» Satorday 
for several more hours. 

Dr. Richard Lutz, a marine biologist from Rutgers 
University, described the newly found vent field, named 
Rainbow, as a 100-meter-square (330-fooC-sqnare) area 
.'withafraestofmtmtban 100 smoking vents. The images 
from the Alvin show the yellow Nautile hovering over 
uneven ground among clumps of brown rocky spires 
rising npward for one to five feet Many i^w^ what 
appeared to be black smoke into the clear water. 

“We’ve been doing things on each otiier’s sobmers- 
ibles separately to a v^Jo^ time and it’s nice to finally 
be doing something witii oor submersibles togeth- 
er," said Dr. Lntz, one of the (ftiief scientists leading an 
international team aboard die Atlantis, the American 
research vessel on which Alvin is based. “I hope this will 
be die first of many joint expeditions into inner space." 

' In die Alvin were Dr. Lut^ Dr. Yves Fouquet, a 
geologist at the Institat Francais pour la Rechendie et 
L’ExploitatiOD de la Mer in Brest and the chief scientist of 
a European Commission research team aboard die French 
research vessel L’Atalanle. and Alvin’s pilot. Matt 
Hdhte! In the Nautile were Dr. Fenumdo J JLS. Baniga, 
a Portuguese geologist from die University of Lisbon, ^ 
two'Biradi pilots. 

The Nautile’s robot arm probed'one of the vents with a 
thmnometer and found the water to be nearly 600 degrees 
Fahrenheit (about 31S degrees Centrigrade). The water 
eoieiged deu from the vent, but h turned black within a 
couple of inches as minerals prectotated after hitting the 
4()-^girBe ocean water. Because or the extreme presmres 
at the botton of die ocean, water boils at a higher 
termeratore there than on the surfEure. 

' Scientistsbe^lookiiigtoventsmdiel960sbecanse 
geolc^jsts suffiected that deep-sea volcanoes existed 
along a range ca tmdeisea mountains that curve around the 
world at the edge of drifting ccmtmemal plates. Using 
remote sensing, thQr tfiscovoed dial rift vuleys cleaved 
die mountains, wfai& are spreading at about rate that 
per^le’a fingernails grow. 

In the v^^s, 2ava oozes and sometuztes erupts to 
create new crust, which cracks as it cools. Into Jhese 
craciu plun^ cold sea water, which is heated by the 
magma uutonealh the sea IQoor. The superheated water 
shoots out ftom the ocean Boot through vents. %£nerals 
precipitating frezn the water tom futestically shaped 
spires, sornetimes bimdieds of feet taU. 

' On and around the vents have evolved communities of 
baetteia, gtirnrip snails, clams, tubewonus and 

that live in constant darkness in a sea of heat and 
chemicals that would be toxic to most organisms on 
Earth’s surtece. In 1977, hnnuns first laid eyes on a vent, 
in the Galapagos Since dien; people have visited 50 
others in the Adantic and Fadfic Oceans. 


By William J. Broad 

New York Tunes Service 

EW YORK — 
Few animals have 
the power to 
frighten people in- 
to the cold terror of being 
eaten alive. But the great 
white shark does so effort- 


scientist at the California 
Academy of Sciences who 
studies great whites, said the 
new insights, while substan- 
tial, still lefr a greater number 
of riddles. “For instance,” 
Or. Long said, “we know vir- 
tually nothiog about how and 
where they mate.” 

Even as scientists seek to 


[essly. Its rejtetation for blood unravel the great white's bio- 
lust is rooted in images of jaws logy, behavto and ecology, a 
gleaming with rows of razor- politiral push is accelerating to 
sharp tera, titeir edges nicely protect the beast Ibe top 
serrated to ease die job of tear- ator of the sea, it ^ipears to be 
ing toough bone and flesh. declining in numb^ because 
Nature’s great killing ma- of assaults by sport fishermen 
chine grows to lengths of 20 as well as commercial interests 
feet (6 meters) or more and is serving a growing intemation- 
ofren viewed as crude and al market to white-shark jaws 
mindless ly malevolent, feed- and teeth. Calitonia, South 
ingjastasbeartilyoahumans Africa and Australia have 
as on fish, seals, whales and taken steps to try to save the 


Ritual Combat 
Over Dinner 

After a kiH by two mate sharks, 
scientists observed them in a 
sfHa^ing display to determine who 
ffof the carcass, first swimming past 
each other without touching, then 
rolling oversHghfiy to splash water 
in file other’s direefion. The shark 
that managed to stir up the most 
water in several passes got fits 
meal. 


Souree: "Grear White Shaiks,“A. P KNrxiteyantf 
D. G. Amley (Academic Pteee) nyr 









sea lions. But new research is 
challeng in g th at notion and 
shedding light on the hidden 
life of the great white, re- 
vealing a finicky eater that 
may tod people unpalatable. 

Though it is pitiless with 
prey, lunging and slashing in 
red-stained water, the species 
can be quite civil among its 
own. SciendsQ; have found 
what to be a ritualized 

comp^itirxi over kills in 
whi^ two great whiles wiU 
forgo attacking one another 
for a goiteel bwt of slap^g 
tails rai the sea’s surface.^e 
biggest ^bash decides the 
winner. Such finesse stands in 
static contrast to the raw vi- 
olence among predators- like 
wolves, whi^ can engage 
one another in bloody fights 
te the death. 


great whit^ and other states 
and countries are considering 
such (xxiservatioD efforts. 

Its numbers “will inevit- 


constanily being formed in 
this replacement process. 

Judgiog from stomach con- 
tents, the beast can indeed de- 
vour prey whole, including 
other sharks and sea lions. 


ably dwindle unless prudent Though one of its nicknames 
controls are enacted,’’ Dr. is “man-eater” (another is 


Richard C. Murphy, a marine 
ecologist at the Cousteau So- 
ciety in Chesapeake, Virg^ 
ia,- wrote in “Great White 
Sharks,” a coUection of sci- 
entific reports published late 
last year by Academic Press. 

“Id addition to being in- 
creasingly rare,” Dr. Murphy 
said, “they are majestic pree- 
minent partidpants in a com- 
plicated food web which we, 
as yet, only partially under- 
sta^.” 

Sharks are ancient animals, 
long predating the dinosaurs. 
Caicharodon carcharias. or 


O say, great whites 
have been badly 
misunderstood, 
wrongly malfing fiiem the 
dtenons of movies and night- 
mares. Some research has 
even found evidence that die 
killers, when thwarted in 
feeding, get visibly frustrated 
and amtat^ periuqis even 
sad aim dejeoi^ 

“We're dispelling mydis 
and iMtuing a lot about bow 
they realty live,” said Dr. A. 
Peter Klimley, a biologist at 


h. “la^ed tooth” in scholarly 

Latin, is found in temperate 
VER all, scientists waters throughout the world’s 
say, great whites seas. To find prey, it has 
have been badly sensors known as lateral-line 
misunderstood, organs that apparently can de- 


ls “man-eater” (another is 
“white death”), no one 
knows for certain if people 
are in fact a preferred food. 

To explore such questions, 
scientists in the last decade 
have increasingly studied the 
beast’s predatory habits. Dr. 


BOOKS 

STEVEN SPIELBER& 
Tlie Unauthorized 
Biography 

By John Baxter. 457 pages. 
j25. HarperCollins. 

STEVEN SPIELBJSRG: 
A Biography 
By Joseph McBride. 528 


Klimley of the Bodega Mar- 
ine Latoratory, working with 
Peter i^Je and Scot D. An- 
derson, did a pioneering study 
near Farallon Islands, 
which Lie some 30 miles west 
of San Francisco in one of the 
most productive fisheries on 
die west Coast Video re- 
cordings were made of 129 
great-white attacks on seals 
and sea lions, the assaults rich 
in ejqilosive splashes in 
bloodstained water. 

An analysis suggested that 


an-bom critic-novelist-bnoad- 
caster John Baxter (whose 
woiks include studies of 
Bunuel, Fellini, science fic- 


a shark near the surface would 
bite its victim, drag it down 
bleeding, carry it imderwatea* 
and perhaps take another bite, 
then let toe carcass float up- 
ward. If the victir.-'. was still 
alive, the act m'glit be re- 


ilar pattern — but the sharks, 
after dragging humans down, 
bleedii^, often let them go. 

Dr. Klimley said white 
sharks might spit out humans, 
birds and sea otters because 
their bodies lacked the energy- 


peazed The shark's aim, the rich layers of fat possessed by 
scientists deduced, was to seals whales. “If they in- 


have the prey bleed to death 
as soon as possible, minim- 
izing a violent stm^^e. 

In an interview,^. ICUin- 
ley noted that attacks on 
people often followed a sun< 


sprinkled witii careless errors 
(Albert Brooks did not direct 
“Broadcast News**) Baxter’s 
book is largely a cut-and-paste 


tioQ movies and gangster pic- job based on secondary 
hires). Ctoisequently, these sources. But the author’s geo- 


tect disturbances in sea water pages. $30. Simon & Schuster. 

at ranges of a mile or more. hv ^ oiciess researener. 

Closer to a victim (exactly _ , _ «• McBride spent three years 

how close is uncertain), its ^regei tracking down more than 300 

keen ears can hear tfarashiiig, VHE mastering object of ofSpielbeig’steariiers,neigh- 
its sensitive nose can sniff I Steven Spiefoerg’s life, bois. colleagues and friends, 
blood, and its eerie black eyes like that of his movies, issue- his reflected by 

can spy flesh. Powell cess at the expense of sub- SO pages of source document- 
muscles s»d it lunging. stance. One would expwt the ation and dozens of footnotes. 

Tbetiiarigularte^^tiwto saga of the world’s richest. The result is probably more 
iez^thsaftwoormore inches most celebrated filmmaker to information than anyone cares 
aria are extnu)tdiziarily strong, be packed with challenges toknowabouttbefilrmnaker's 
Three layers of enamel and conflicts, the biographic eariy years; it takes McBride 


the Universiiy of Califcznia Three layers of enamel cris- 
Bodega Marine Labmatoiy in scross in Afferent directions 


keen ears can hear thrashing, 
its sensitive nose can sniff 
blood, and its eerie black eyes 
can spy flesh. Powell 
muscles smd it lunging. 

The triangular te^ grow to 


unauthorized biography 
were forced to draw h^vily 
on the same pool of previously 
published interviews, which 
results in consideiable anec- 
dotal overlrm in their books. 

A tireiC researcher, 
McBride spent three years 
tracking down more than 300 
of Spielberg’s teariiers, neigh- 
bois. colleagues and friezids, 
his zealousness reflected by 
50 pages of source document- 
ation and dozens of footnotes. 
The result is probably more 


graphical and skqjtical dis- Spidberg regards himself, 
tance from his subject affbeds as he does his protagonists, as 
him a perspective McBride “Mr. Eveiyday Regular 
lacte. A smoother stylist, Bax- Fella,” and his consensus 
ter keq» his account moving artistic tastes — he collects 
(his Spielberg finishes high Norman Rockwell pain ting R 
sdiool by page 40), pointedly and Disney animation cels — 


gest something that’s not en- 
ergetically profitable, then 
they’re stuck with that for a 
few days” of slow digestion, 
be said. “Pat has twice the 
energy value of muscle.” 


aihleticaUy inept and, he al- 
leges. tormented continually 
by youthful anti-Semites. 
(Many of McBride’s inform- 
ants question the existence of 
these persecutors.) 

Spidberg regards himself, 
as he does his protagonists, as 
“Mr. Everyday Regular 
Fella,” and his consensus 
artistic tastes — he collects 


Bodega B^, Califrxnia, who 
is a prominent erm^ on the 
infomous shark. “They’re not 
stupid feediiig machines. 
Th^’ie exquisitely adrqxed.” 
Douglas J. Long, a fish 


so the teeth can better with- 
stand impact as well as twist- 
ing and bending, ff a tooth is 
lost, a T^lacement directly 
bdiiiid it will rotate forward in 
a day or so. New teeth are 


CROSSWORD 


equivalent of his roller-coast- 
er {xoductions. What’s sur- 
pri^g, even shocking, about 
these two hefty tomes is the 
banali^ of Spielberg’s story, 
as rou^ane as the suburbia 
that spawned him and that he 
celebrates in his work. 

Anticipating a future auto- 
biography. S{»elberg and his 
key associates refused to meet 


eariy years; it takes McBride 
132 ^pentoise pages to reach 
his subject’s hi^ school 


probes srane disquieting mis- 
odes in his subj^’s pn^- 
sioual and personal history, 
and provides a useful artistic 
and commercial context in 
which to view tte filmmaker’s 
ascent. Each biograi^y has 
admirable qualities, notably 
McBride's doggedness and 
Baxter’s detachment, but 
either will suffice. Ptewing 
through two accounts of this 
less-ihan-gripping life can be 


graduatioa hi terms of sheer recommended only to Spiel- 
data, McBride far ouichu®es beig obsessives and jouraa- 


his conqietitor, though his 
prachant for repetition grows 
numbing. Operating on the ap- 
parent agsiimpTinn fhaf read^ 
experience amnesia attacks 
every dozen pages or so, he 
compulsively recycles inci- 


lists on assi^iment. 

In interviews, Spielberg 
whiningly depicts his child- 
hood as a movable trauma. 
Draggedby his peripatetic, in- 


tend to reinforce this image. 
Yet, de^ite his paranoid con- 
trol d media mterrogation, 
hints itf a darker side emerge in 
both biographies. His sadistic 
treatment or his three sisters, 
greedy reluctance to share crit- 
ical kudos and financial re- 
wards with coUer^gues, and 
eagerness to distance himself 
ftom troubled associates sug- 
gest that he’s considerably 
more conqilicated than an 
emotionally stunted Pan 
who compensates for a dismal 
cluldhood concocting lost- 
boy screen fantasies. 

W HAT both books fail to 
confrrxit is how 


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with his present chroniclers — dents and insights ttiat an ex- 
the Am^'can film historian acting editor, tfany still exists, 
Joseph McBride (autiior of would have excised, 
boob about Ctqira, Welles Drawing on only a dozen or 

and Hawks) and the Austral!- so fresh interviews and 


dents and insights ttiat an ex- trical engineer, and Leah, a 
acting editor, tfany still exists, frustrated suburban bohem^ 
would have excis^ — from Ohio to New Jersey to 

Drawing on only a dozen or Arizona to Nc^em Calito- 
so fresh interviews and nia, he was academically and 


dulgent, ill-mated parents — drastically Spielberg’s suc- 
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BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

O NE candidate for the title 
of best all-time bridge ra- 
conteur is Jerry Machlin, who 
died recently. One of his 
many tales concerns Jerry 
Pop^, a Georgia expert 
who, many years ago, showed 
up at a Honda tournament 


and passed. The kibitzer again 
leanittl over to whi^ser. 

“ He bid your best suit 
Why didn’t you raise him?” 
lliis attracted anotho* 
“shush” and the auction 
ended. 

South turned purple. “You 
need nine clubs to do tha^’* 
he snarled. So when ttie dia- 
mond king was led, Popkin 


following a three-year ab- pur his eight clubs down. 


I I Mill I I I I Wiiij I I — i — i sence friom the game. 

An unidentified woman, 
^BgSTBJWwiiiii — — ^ e^er to kibitz, showed up 

© JWew Yof* Times/Edited by IRIf Shnrti. and asked ,^kin a que Jion. 

“I'm told that you and Jus 


ss One to grow 
on? 

CO ‘A Pure 
Woman’ of an 
Y891 novel 
aa Actor Ayres 


Solution to Pusle of July 16 


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Jacoby are the two best play- 
ers here. Which of you should 
I watch? 

“Me,” was the prompt anr 
swer. “Jacoby travels a lot 
and you can watch him any- 
where. You’ll seldom have a 
chance to watch me.” 

ttie fiftti deal, Popkin 


opened one no-tnunp bolding the director, “1 haven't seen 
the Nmth l^d shown in the you for ^wars.” He then 
diagram. listened to the story and gave 

Hie kibitzer leaned over aquickiuljng:“Havai'ty'alI 
and whispered to him: '*You ever heard of a psychic?*^’ 
don’t have enough points for “Tliat director was a friend 

oneno-trump.” ofhis” said t^ kibitzer. “I'd 

“Shush.”^ call another director.” So 

FOpldui was relieved to hear they did. The greeting and the 
Stayman two-club response, rulmg were idratical. 


very, very slowly, one by one. 
He made them stretch across 
the table, and the deuce fell 
off the far side. 

South made nine tricks to 
a score of 110. The dazed 
opponents were ready to con- 
tinue wjfo the next board, but 
the kibitzer was still active. 

“Yrw know, yrai’ve just 
been swindled,’ ' told East- 
West “If it was me, I’d call 
foe director.” Sotheyfod. 

“Jerry Popkin,” declared 
the director, “I haven't seen 
you for ^wars.” He then 
listened to foe story and gave 
aquick ruling: “Havm'ty'all 
ever heard of a psychic?” 
“Tliat directo was a friend 
of his” said t^ kibitzer. “I'd 
call another director.” So 


“Are you now satisfied 
that ev«ything was above- 
board?” Popkin asked &ist- 
West Hiey nodded. 

“And are you satisfied?” 
he asked the Ubitzer. 

“Not really, but we’ve 
already had two directers and 
I really don’t know what else 
to do.” 

“May 1 make a sugges- 
tion?” 

“Certainly.” 

“Please go and kibitz Jim 
Jacoby.” 


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North West SoMh East 

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Pass Pass 

West led the ittainoeii kliig. 


film culture. His strate^ of 
euticing huge intematiouai 
audiences by inflating 
siiTipUstic, formulaic pop ma- 
terial into blockbuster events 
movies, then selling off mer- 
chandising licenses for addi- 
tional [xtmt, has inflamed the 
rapaciousness of Tinseltown 
bean counters. In 1975 — the 
year ‘ 'Jaws” became foe most 
profitable movie ever made — 
Hollywood produced “One 
Flew Over the Cuckoo’s 
Nest,” “Nashville,” “Bany 
Lyndon,” “Dog Day After- 
noon,” “Shampoo,” «n<j 
“The Man Who Would Be 
King,” adult projects that 
would stand scant chance of 
being green-lighted in foe 
post-Spielberg era. The next 
time you scan foe movie list- 
ings only to find the multiplex 
stuffed with footll^ Spielber- 
gers — caitoonish acurai pic- 
tures, oveipioduced B-movie 
monster pictures and sacchar- 
ine fomily fare — you’re wit- 
nessing his legacy. 

Joel E. Siegel, who writes 
about movies, music and 
books for Washington City 
Paper, wrote this for The 
Washington Post. 


Elng^lisli 

books 

to yoor door 
ER^DJ-RI in 7-12 doTH 
354000 WM • not a did • ftee CBCstag 
TbI; +33 (0)1 39 07 01 01 
FEx 433 (0)1 39 07 00 77 


Ci I ‘ wil. 


jjrtsbsiir? ' 








THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1997 


EDTWRL 4 LS/ 0 PINI 0 N 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLMIMJ wrni TIW IVKW »»»( TMMHI AND TUF- WASUiNCTON POffT 


Open the China File 


Sribuit^; Edsins Toward a Peacekeeping Role for Japan 

Tin; wASUiNCTON POffT M fJ v * 

^ . V* ...:n /•lanfv TaTMn'fi min 


As a result of disclosures in Tues- 
day's campaign finance hearings, the 
Dnnocratic National Committee said 
it would return $50,000. The OKmey 
wound its way from the Uppo Group 
in Jakarta to President Bill Clinton's 
friend and fund-raiser John Hoang to 
the party coffers back in 1 992. Senator 
Joseph Lieberman of Connecdcnt said 
it "certainly looks like die movement 
of foreign mon^ into an American 
campaign in 1992." That makes two 
campaigns in a row, since we already 
know that the Democrats haw retunied 
$2.8 million in suspect foreign con- 
tributions in 1996. 

So much for the conunentators who 
assured the countiy that there was nodi- 
ing to be learned from these hearings. 
The fact is that every time the Senate 
Governmental Affairs Committee can 
get a straight answer or a firesh doc- 
ument, another $50,000 or $100,000 
wire transfer from Asia turns up. 

One fact is beyond dispute. There is a 
pattern of money pouring in from Asia, 
some from Ctiin^ banks, diat calls for 
a public airing of the mfocmatiort dial 
led Senator Fred Thompson to say the 
Chinese government h^ a plan to in- 
flueoce the election. 

The same information provoked Sen- 
ator Jc^ Glenn to say that Mr. 
Thompson had inteipreted the material 
too "loosely." On Tuesday, Mr. Lieb- 
erraan, a Democrat who deploced 
the abuses of the Clinton re-election 
drive, said he now felt that there was 
indeed a Chinese plan last year to in- 
fluence the congressional elections widi 
illegal money. But he differed with Mr. 
Thompsou’s view that the plan was 
aimed at the presidential contest, loo. 
Given the importance of the issue, the 
confusion is unacceptable. The matter 
needs to be ciariried. 

Mr. Thompson's staiemem was 
based on his own investigation and on 


a review of intelligence reports gar- 
nered die FBI, the CIA and the 
Nation^ Security ^ency. The Wash- 
ington Post repcvtod that FBI Director 
I -rails Freeh was involved in clearing 
Mr. Tompson's statement sunnnar- 
izing the intelligence finding before 
he released it A Clinton political ap- 
pointee, Assistant Attorney General 
Andrew ^is, countered with a letter 
saying that the Justice Department re- 
view was only for the protection of 
classifled infoimation and that Mr. 
Thompson’s conclusions were "not 
neces^i^y those of the law enforce-' 
ment or intelligeace community." 

It deGes cranmon sense that Mr. 
Freeh would review a statement that he 
thought erroneous in its basic inter- 
pretation and then let it go forward, but 
put diac aside for the moment The 
question of what U.S. intelligence 
agencies know is too crucial to be left 
up to a Ping-Ponging argument among 
these senators. Toe issue must be settled 
in full view of the American people, and 
it can bk Makiiig that happ^ ou^t to 
be Mr. Thomreon's hipest priority, 
regardless of DemocTaoc obsnvction 
ai^ myopic comnientaty. 

Coogr^ has plen^ t^expmencein 
placing intelligextce information in the 
public domain in a f<»m that do» not 
comjmmiise spying sources and tech- 
niques. It was done during Senate con- 
sideration of Cold War arms cmiizol 
treaties, as well as in the congressional 
investigation of the lian-ctficra-case. 
The iidomnsaion can be safely sum- 
marized by the new CIA director, 
Geofge Tenet, or by Mr. Fie^ in pub- 
lic testimouy. If they are unwilling to do 
so. the Senate Intelligence Commttee 
can prepare a public report on the Otina 
connection. China's role rests at the 
center of this affair, and it cannot be 
allowed to remain a mystery. 

— THE NEW YORK TIUES. 


Free Turkey’s Press 


It is an irony and an embarrassment 
that even as NATO imposes h4:h 
democratii. siandaids un new mem- 
bera. It hav en an errain old member, 
Turkey, a bye. On the litmus issue of 
imprisoning joumalisis for what they 
wnle. for instance, Turkey is thefrec- 
ognized world champion. The Com- 
mittee 10 Protect Journalists, an Amer- 
ican defense group, counted 78 Jailed 
Turkish journalists at the beginning of 
the year. AU the more satisfying, then, 
that the group has uow elicited from 
the new Turiush government of Mesut 
Yilmaz a commitment to do something 
about.a record that, if a current NATO 
applicant had iu would exclude it from 
die West's premier democratic club. 

The trouble lies, of course, in Tur- 
key's continuing conflict with a Kurdish 
minority that has its pacific assimil- 
aUonist element but its aimed separatist 
element as well. An official policy ^v- 
ina a long leash to an assertive Turteb 
mOitaiy has not only failed to curb 
Kurdish terrorism but has also cost past 
governments political support Journa- 
lists who write about Kurdish nation- 
alism from an independent perspective 
have been at risk of being locked up and 


censored, harassed and beaten. Article 
312 of die potal code p^mits reporting 
and commentary on other than die gov- 
enunent line to be punished as "in- 
citement to racial hai^." 

The Kurdish prdijem U as tough as 
any ethnic conflict anywhere. No one 
has a good solution in the inGamed 
circumstances in which it is unfolding 
now. What is certain, however, is that 
the problem must be addressed in a 
context in which the Tuikisb people are 
fiiUy and fairly Lnfbcmed about the op- 
tions before mem. This is the prospect 
now opened up by the Yilniaz gov- 
ernment. It sp^iks for a mioovity co- 
alition and faces parliamentary resis- 
tance to its new free-piess com- 
mitments. But it also has the ot^xirtunity 
to bring Turkey the appreciation rather 
dian die opfvobrium of die democratic 
West Up to tiiis point, the army has 
plainly b^ calling most of the shots on 
polity toward the Kurds. The army is 
manifesdy unGt for this role and plays it 
poorly. Opening up the press is no glib 
civics lextbocA pr««ription. It is a prac- 
tical way forTukey to build suppcm fot 
a consensus approach. 

— THE WASHiNCTON POST. 


Kenya Needs Reform 


Across Africa, people are demand- 
ing greater democracy and con- 
demning corrupt govemments that 
cheat them out of economic growth. 
The latest protests have erupted in 
Kenya, where the autocratic regime 
established by iomo Kenyatta in the 
1960s has continued, with deepening 
conruption. under Ptesideor Daniel ar- 
ap Moi since 1978. Oblivious to 
Africa's new climate. Mr. Moi has 
responded, as ever, with brute force. 

In this he ignores a new sensitivity to 
democracy among the Western coun- 
tries he counts on to provide aid and 
encourage invesimeni and trade. The 
Clinton adroinisiTiitian and its Euro- 
pean partners need to remind him that 
Kenya risks losing this crucial support 
if it continues lo meet reasonable de- 
mands with violent repression. 

For years Kenya's opposition lead- 
ers and human rights activists have 
braved police beatings, long prison 
sentences and even death threats to 
press for broader political rights. Five 
years ago, after their efforts were 
backed by a brief suspension of West- 
ern aid, Mr. Moi agreed to multiparty 
elections. He survived chat challenge, 
even though he failed to win a majority 
of the votes. Opposition divisions and 


electoral regulations favoring the rul- 
ing party preserved his grip on power. 

With new elections due this year, 
opposition groups are campaigning for 
constituuo!^ changes that would give 
them a realistic chance of wiiming. 
Their efforts have attracted broad pub- 
lic support, and a harsh police re- 
sponse. Police have attacked unarmed 
demonstrators with guns, clubs, whips 
and ax handles and invaded the sanc- 
tuaries of churches and universities. At 
least nine protesters have been killed. 

Kenya's crisis is an early test for the 
Clinton administiatioa's newly de- 
clared approach to Africa. And Britain, 
closely linked to Kenya since colonial 
times, has a new government that is 
emph^izing demcxracy ^ .buroan. 
rights issues in its cfiploniacy. Germany, 
another large donor, said this week Aat 
continued assistance to Kenya would 
depend on Mr. Moi’s resp^ for 
"democratic, pluralist and constitution- 
al rules in political debate." 

One clear lesson from past policy 
failures in Africa is that far more ar- 
tention must be given to the internal 
practices of govemments receiving 
signiGcant Western support. Kenya is 
a good place to start. 

— ms NEW YORK TIMES 


SK. iNTtmvniiMi. M •« 

ESTABUSHED tHK? 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SU'LZBERGER 

KATHARINE P. DARROW, tir# Chairmun 
RICHARD McCLEAN. PvhUiher A^Cliuf Exenaiie 
MICHAEL GETLER. Exefuine tJmw 

• WALTER W'ELLS. Artinti.cwij> EJiiiir • PAUL HOR^TTZ. Oepuy Mcmaguig Etiaur 
t KATKBUNE KNORR jad CHARLES MITClSUWXiB. A 7 W 1 Eeiurs • SAMUEL AST mJ 
CARL GEWIRTZ. Awrurr EJirurs * ROBERT J- DONAHUE, EdatvtftheEiUofnul Paxes 
■ Jl^ATHAN CAQ&.BusinestimdFimiKvEi£tor 
• REN^ BONDY.Atwo Pid^istkT 

• LAMES Jtk'LEOD./Wimtftfic Dtretfnr • DfDfER BRUN', Cmdaiim Diremr. 
Duet'WurJe h PMtcittun- RkimrdMKCltim 


biKmalioiul Herald Tribune, 181 A\cnucCharics-ik-Gaulle. 925^1 Neoillv-»ur>Seine. France. 

Td:ii)4UL«)3mi^SQbui|<kns.<l)4IA3.91IR.4tbeniar^U)4|j0.9iii>^^ 

iMenie(aiUicw:hDp://wurw.iluxun E-Mail: iNg'illUoin 

iCaMihanRtL.^iiXifianCSU lel\tS\S~Z-T!:a F±i.(tdi2~4-2334 
MngDirAsu.Ri/lfO KrawFOi!.?OGLmvrTRJ.Hti::iKM^ 

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SAS.iiHi-'iipiiid de 1 2 OI 1 WF. RCS Ntinierre B 7M02H2tt. CtffwiFi>n PjriuirfNo filJ37 
iil9i~,lmeniiithvialHeriiliiTnbm .Ml^jIasmeneJ ISSS fi2H-aOF2 


W ashington — Japan's ap- 
proach to war and global ^lo- 
macy since World War n can fairly if 
impftrfe etiy be summed up thus: Dra't 
mind us, we'll just sit over here and 
listen and concentrate on trade. No fuss 
please. We are Japanese. 

This obeisant, pedfisC-criented image 
subs the Japanese and reassures 
alixoad wlro recall the horrible con- 
sequences of Japanese militarism. But 
events in tile PaciGc are overtaki^ Ja- 
pan’s ambitioa to avoid fraejgn mihiaiy 
PT|ta" gieroepts. Tdtyo is about to em- 
bark 00 a revisioo of its security alliance 
witii America that will give it a clearer 
and l^er militaiy role in the PadGc. 

The pacifist image was never wholly 
accurate. Japan played a vital support- 
ing role for America's militaty pres- 
ence in Asia thrwghout the Cold War. 
At times it even suited Japanese prime 
ministers to call attentioa to their na- 
tion’s role as an uosinkable aircraff 
carrier, «nd to emphasize the abundant 
fuimcial support that Japan provides 
for U.S. bas^ in JapaiL 
It is true that the changes to come 
will be incremental and tal^ only after 
a laborious consensus-boikGng pro- 
cess, which began paradoxicfuly in 


a Hoadand American forces on ihe high There 

^ were alj to questions about the use or 

U.S. facilities in Japan in acoofltct wtdi 
tier this mon*. There China. These were questions th^ no 
ation of big cha ngM in reasonable ptannw would want to tave 

ill be many tin y dec- thrashed out iatfae noddle of a crisis, 
ly any change at alL 'IbercsultwasaquietU.S.-Japanese 
ae will be. It was negotiation on June 7. It produced a srt 

fo military coofrosita- of "defense guidelines’’ tfaat_ commit 
n the United States in Japan to help the United States in srtu> 
past tiiTKyms, These ations in areas sunounding Japan.’* 


By Jun Hoagiand 

Washington earlier this mondi. There 
wiU be no declaration of big changes in 
Tokyo. Thm will be many tiny dec- 
larations of hardly any change at ^ 

But'clu^e thoe will be. It was made 
inevitabje by two military coofrosita- 
tions forced upon the United States in 
the PadGc in the past tivee yrais. These 
t^ to the brii^ t^sed troubling ques- 
tions in Washington about what ex^y, 
it could count on Japan to do militarily if 
the 511^ did hit the fan in Asia. 

The first came three years ago as 
North Korea and the United States 
growled menacingly at each other over 
Pyongyang's development of a nuclear 
weapon. An accord avoiding war was 
reached. Then, 15 months ago, China 
fired missiles into commercial ship- 


ations in areas surrounding Japan.’ 

The document is deliberately vague 
00 how large that area is and on otiier 
key points. But it does make clear that 
in tire event of conflict in Korea, for 
example, Japan wonld send fiiel (but 
not weapons and ammunition) to help 
U.S. forces, and would enga^ in 
mineweeping in international w^era. 

Political leaders of the tim parties 
that make up Jt^wn's coalition gov- 


fired missiles into commerciai ship- ernnrent visited Washington at *eb^ 
p ing lanes around Taiwan, and U.o. giiiningof July and were briefed by 
carriers moved in to keep the peace. U.S. cmcials. The Diet will have to 


Ihese were carriers cu die sinkable 
irind U.S. planners ruiuung war games 
of WOTSt cases found problems in toe 
existing Japanese interpretation of the 
U.S.-devisM constitution. That inter- 
pretation would prevent Japanese mine- 
sweepeis or rescue vessels from helping 


authorize s pandlng and some spe> 
cLfic gnahiing legis^on if toe 
guidelines are to be put in effect A hot 
debate is expecu:d in the autumn. 

Just the kind of debate that JaptmeM 
politicians have preferred to avoid in 
^ past But events force this debate 


now. It will be^ clan& Japan’s think- 
ing about tire post-Cold War world and 
global peacel^ing. 

For tire past many, politicians, . 
sdiolan and business people of the ' 
United StatM aod of Ouna nave acted * 

andspokeaiasifdrefutureofAsiawere ^ 
amatrerfortireirtwocoimtrintuidtheir ’ 
countries alone to decide, through "en- ' 

Mgemebt” or coafiootatioo. Bat quiet I 
K£nv^ have much'to say about the ' 
outcome oftire contest of wills between ‘ 
these twqpowers. To focns toe Japanese 
(and tire oiinese and the Americans) on - 
Jiman's swing position is prepress. 

Was hingt on's key Asian partn^ to- 
maina Tokyo, not Beijing. President ■ 
Bill Ointon at times has given Japan ■ 
reason to doubt that he accepted this ' 
view. The guidelines and toe sustained ' 
effort that & United Stares has put into 
eiafting them help c o r re ct that lam- ; 
Enable inqsression. 

The new guidelines have nor been 
welctKned in Beijing. The Chinese ap- * 
patently fear that Japan is enlisting in a - 
U^.-led strategy toat would limit 
Olio’s ability to snatch back Taiwan. 
This time toe world should hope that - 
Beijmg has it right 

The Washington Post. 


Why Expand a NATO That Fails to Enforce Peace in Bosnia? 


P ARIS — The argument over 
removii^ U.S. fenxres from 
Bosnia in mid-1998 is currently 
only a mumble, a murmur, in 
■ WasfaingtOD 'a^ ait NATO 
headquarters in Brussels. But 
tire argument is growing louder, 
and will grow loud indeed as 
NATO marches toward that 
June 1998 deadline. 

A lesson about toe ingredi- 
ents of peace in Bosnia was 
provided last Thursday by 
NATO raids against two allied 
war crimiaals, whose indict- 
meot by the International War 
Grtmes THbunal in The I^ue 
had not previously been made 
public. One was seized and re- 
moved to The Hague, and the 
other was killed by a British 
SAS unit while resisting arrest, 
with a British soldier wounded. 

The violem coU^ise last 
week of the divided govern- 
ment structure drat toe United 
Nations up in tormented 
Cambodia offered another les- 
son about pe^. It demon- 
strated how flimsy fordgn-in- 
vented political structures are 
Likely to prove. 

The Bosnian-Croat federa- 
tion established by the Dayton 
agreement is hi^y artificial. 
Peace between the intransigent 
Bosnian Serbs’ Republika 
Srp^ (itself in a leadership 
crisis) 01 ^ its Bosnia Muslim 
and Croatian neighbors remains 
exceedingly frai^e. 

The I^yum arrangements, 
brokered by the Unit^ States, 
will not survive a NATO with- 
drawal next year. Withdrawal, 
however, is what the United 
States currently promises. 

An argument continues inside 
the U.S. government between a 
group led by Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright, favoring an 
activist U.S. European policy 
and coatinuing U.S. notary 
presence in Bosnia beyond June 
1998, and the American milit^ 
leadership, whose views are giv- 
en voice by Secretary of De- 
fense Willi^ C^ien. 

Tte military have uever 
wanted involvemeot in ex- 
Yugoslavia, and toey want out 


By William PfaCT 


of Bosma next year. America's 
military- leadershm and the 
U.S.-dominated NATO com- 
mand have stubbornly resisted 
pressure to arrest war criminals. 
It is suggested that last week’s 
SAS (meration was possible 
only because NATO was 
bri^y between commanders. 

Thus far, toe witodrawal 
camp is winning the argument 
in Washbgtoo. since it has 
Congress on its side. The House 
of (representatives has already 
voted to witiihold funds from 
any American presence in Bos- 
nia past the June 1998 deadline, 
and the Senate has less dra- 
matically expressed its reluc- 
tance to see Americans stay. At 
this rroini all tois is largely ges- 
ticuiatiocL but it is nonetheless 
sig^iificanL 

Congressional opinion rein- 
forces toe military leadership’s 
reluctance during recent years 
to assign missions to American 
professional soldiers that in- 
volve serious risk to their lives. 
Tltis has provided the principal 
obstacle blocking NATO fr^ 
attempting to seize mdicied war 
criminals. 

In the former Yugoslavia, 
dangerous missions have been 
left to the professionals of other 
countries. The British carried 
out last week’s airests, and Brit- 
ish, French and otoers did the 
United Nations' dirty work in 
the former Yugoslavia before 
NATO arrived in 1995. They 
took toe casualties. 

It should parenthetically be 
said toat some Americans feel a 
sense of shame at tois, and even 
that toe American uniform is 
dishonored by tois American 
claim to privilege. A White 
House dispatch on Friday said 
American troops "contributed 
transportation and other logis- 
tical support" to the British op- 
eration. which sounds (ike try- 
ing to appropriate some of the 
credit jis well. 

There are direct links between 
war crime trials, America's de- 
cision on Bosnia withdrawal and 


the NATO expansioa that tire 
United States has been deter- 
mined to bring abouL 

The U.S. govenunent and 
nulitary cannot promote a 
policy of expanding NATO as 
the way to guarantee peace and 
stability in Europe in the years 
to come, and at the same tune 
(.to employ an inelegant military 
phrase boro of toe Korean War) 
bug out of Bosnia next year. 

Qdier NATO kei^ toe 
former Yugoslavia at peace and 
promotes a political settlement 
toere, or it abandons the razzle- 
dazzle about peaoeke^nng, de- 
mocracy, pan-iEuropean umfica- 
tion and a New Atlaotic Onder 
that has been emplcw^ to justify 
expansion, and w^h orches- 
trated the Madrid NATO summit 
and Bill Clintou's visit to Eurepe 
earlier this month. America can- 
not have it both ways. 


NATO can continue to keep 
the peace in Bosnia beyond next 
June, with Americans ftilly en- 
gaged, and tbueby demonstrate 
the will and cap^iy of an ex- 
panding alliance to keep the 
peace throughout post-CoJd 
War Europe. 

Or NATO can leave the 
people of the former Yugo- 
sla^oa to resume their interrup- 
ted war, and thereby acknow- 
ledge toat toe claims Washiog- 
ton and Brussels have beta 
making for the new NATO are 
Qotiiing but international hypo- 
crisy motivated by dom^c 
vote-buying. 

TTiat last is what Canadian 
Prime Mmister. Jean ChrEtien 
has said ^ tire American po- 
sition. He told Belgium’s prime 
minister, in an overheard con- 
versation in Madri^ that "in 
your country or mine" politi- 
cians who (tid what Ammcan 
politicians were doing about 


NATO "would be in prison.’*^ 
The American decision on Bos=' 
nia will show whether Mr. •• 
ChrStien was right ornoL 

If NATO is to build a more* 
substantial political and secir^ 
rity order in Bosnia, it must end- 
the presenl poU<^ of pfsmutting' 
in^ted war criminals to coiti^. 
tinoe to dominate toeR^ublika’ 
Srpska, libcy faaire co be arres^i 
t^ and delivered to The Hague" 
The Dayton agreement ana the' 
international effort in Bosnia' 
are otiiewise meaningless. 

Tlie moral claims of inters 
national society are otirerwise-^ 
outraged, and toe oppratunity 
we now possess to deter some* 
future war crimes by demon-' 
strating that criminals are ao^ ' 
countable to an impartial au-‘' 
tbority will have been os-i 
tentatiously abandoned. Are 
there votes to buy with that? ' / 
Intermaional Herald Tribune. 

&LosAnjteIesTimesSyndicaie. ’’ 


Be Warned, There’s Trouble Ahead 


W ASHINGTON — Those 
of us in America whose 
job it is to view toe world 
through alaim-colored glasses 
are having a tough summer. The 
good news keeps piling up. 

The doUar is stren^eoing 
against the franc and maik be- 
cause the Europeans can't get 
their act togetiter and we did our 
downsizing years ^o. That 
means a Irettle of wine, or im- 
ported still water, is tantaliz- 
ingly cheaper for Americans. 

Epidemics are coming under 
control and welfare rolls are 
shrinking. The Food and Drug 
Administration bureaucracy 
snapped out of its lethargy long 
enough to ^prove an anti- 
plaque dentimee toat enables 
modem mothers to wash their 
ki^' mouths out with soap. A 
potency potion on toe horizon 
for both sexes is getting toe 
geezer generatitm all excited. 

Peace is breaking out ail over 
the world. War criminals are 


By William Safins 


belatedly being given a hard 
time, while political refonners 
from Mexico Cify ro Moscow 
are riding high. 

Inflation is a spent balloon 
and unemployment a relative 
joke. The Euphoria bidex (new- 
job creation plus productivity 
gains multiplied by the percent- 
age rise in consumer confi- 
dence) is making new fai^is 
everyday. 

Which brings us to the stock 
mariceL A few years ago ex- 
ecutives had to lent the Glomar 
Explorer to observe their com- 
pany’s stock options, but now 
they are up here drying in toe 
warm sunshine of runaway 
prosperity. Who would have 
thought that lowering the cap- 
ital g^s tax would become a 
pc^ulist issue — vritb the pop- 
ulists in favor? 

Such a h^py combination of 
peace, ptogr^ and pro^rerity 
is not without its downside. It 


ment does the nation need lOi 
give sharp definition to the pic-' 
ture of unrelieved optimism 
to remind good pUgrims that the. 
Man with toe Muckrake, hii^ 
gaze eternally cast downwa^i 
rails to see toe glorious celestiaL 
crown offered to him? 

Needed at this moment is ai 
conoarian. No garden party is 
complete without its skimk.'> 
Who will volunteer to click om 
toe icon of the iconoclasL toe 
provide the partying pqpulac^ 
with the low mutter of a jeremt'a^/ 
ad, to be the happy society';? 
sc^goal for the sin of negu 
ativism, to present a target to be; 
hooted at with universal glee? I: 
volunteer. Here I stand scruffil)*< 
in sandwich boards, proclaim-, 
ing my deviant doctrine. 

You see this articie in For' 
eign Affairs entitled "Tbe End. 
of toe Business Cycle?" and* 
assuring baby boomers toat no 
baby bust is ahead? 1 say hog- 
wash. You are going to see a 
correction one of these days that 
will curl your hair, followed by^ 


Better Keep Religion Out of It 


has driven professional p^im- a year in the doldrums befbr? 
•Sts — "prophets of gloom and "the next 'recovery. Those of usl 


By Abraham Rabinovich 


. .'fERVSALEM ~ Uke a lost 
•I Dostoyevskian soul, pale 
and aiml^, Tatiana Susskind 
drifted through toe bock 
streets of Israel, her new 
homeland, for six years, 
searching for direction. On 
June 28. the Russian-born 25- 
year-old revealed that her 
search was over. 

Striding into toe heart of 
toe West Bank city of Hebron, 
she pasted copies of a ^etch 
she had drawn depicting die 
Prophet Mohammed as a pig 
stamping on the Kman. 

That gross desecration of 
the holiest of Islam’s symbols 
touched off a firestorm in 
Hebron as enraged demonstra- 
tors hurled hundred of Mo- 
lotov cockt^s at Israeli 
troops. The deed had injected 
into the lerritorial dispute be- 
tween Jews and Arabs toe dan- 
gerously explosive element of 
religious confrontation. In 
Tehran, 15,000 demonstrators 
chanted "Death to Israel." 
Similar demonstrations were 
held across the Islamic world. 

Ms. Susskind's act demon- 
strated the potential for calam- 
ity when isolated individuals 
wander a no-man's-land of 
emotional disturbance be- 
tween toe conventional battle 
lines of this volatile region. 

She had left her faimly be- 
hind in Russia. She enrolled in 
a Jerusalem ait school but did 
not complete the course. She 
lived in smsill student rooms 
around the ci^, sometimes 
finding work as a graphic 


anisL Half a year ago her life 
changed because of a chance 
meeting with another Russian 
immigrant about her age, who 
had tttoen on the Hebrew name 
of Yehuda Shomron. He tield 
fanatical political opinions. 

He hared Arabs and hated 
Jews less zealous in their 
hatred of Arabs than he, which 
meant that he hated virtually 
ev^body. The anny refused 
to induct him. Even the ex- 
tremist Kach movemenL 
which he Joined, kept him on 
its raaigins. He earned his 
bread as a sometime die layer. 

The two were drawn to each 
other by loneliness, a shared 
background and their peripher- 
al existence. 'Tatiana trira to 
inferest him in art and take him 
to museums but he balked. He 
in turn attempted to inculcate 
her with his political views. 
The Arabs had to be driven out 
by force, he said. There would 
soon be a great war in the re- 
gion, and few would survive iL 
*1116 only person he admired 
was Yigal Amir, the assassin 
of Yitzhak Rabin. 

Tatiana at first argued with 
him. In time, however, she 
began to succumb. Two weeks 
ago the pair hitchhiked down 
to Heb^. Tatiana carried 
with her 30 copies of the sketch 
she luid done of the pig labeled 
Mohammed. She had bought 
an ^glish-Arabic dictionaiy 
the day before in order to copy 
the Prt^ihet's name in Arabic. 

They were put up in the 
home of an Israeli sctiier. After 


dark, according to police. Ta- 
tiana set out on foot- for the 
Arab markeiplace in Hebira 
with copies of her sketch. She 
proceeded to paste them up on 
a number of doors before a 
crowd of Arabs appeared. Is- 
raeli soldiers intervened and 
handed her over to police. 

Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu was so alami^ by 
Ms. Susskind’s act that he tele- 

E honed to the Arab mayor of 
lebron to apologize in the 
name of his countrymen for 
the insult "to one of the 
world's great religions." 

In an unprecedented move, 
one of israel's two chief rabbis 
traveled to Hebron to apolo- 
gize to the leading Islarmc re- 
Dgious figure in toe city. Sim- 
ilar apologies come from 
President Ezer Weizman and 
other leading Israelis. Their 
reaction reflected a basic un- 
derstanding toat religion must 
be kept out of the conflict. 

The Israeli gestures did not 
go unnoticed in the Muslim 
world. Egyptiao Foreign Min- 
ister Amr Moussa, a piersistcnt 
critic of Israel, went out of his 
way to note that Mr. Netan- 
yahu's telephoned apology to 
Hebron's mayor had been toe 
right move. With the wisdom 
bom of prolonged conflict, 
both sides are trying to avoid 
being led by lost souls into 
swamps from which there is 
no returning. 

The writer, a reporier with 
The Jerusalem Post, coturih- 
iiteJ this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


doom" and "troubadours of 
trouble" who see toe tank half- 
empty — into disarray. 

Wall Street bears are stuffed 
and hung on the wall. The Union 
of Concerned Scientists’ clock 
has been wound back to two 
minutes past noon. As cata- 
strophisis in every field suffer 
their worst disaster. Gloomy Gus 
has become a laughingsto^ 

In journalism, too, naysayers 
are in a rouL Upbeat reporters 
focus on the ho-hum reaction 
rather than the underlying ac- 
tion, and cover toe coverage 
rather than advance toe stoiy. 

What's missing? 'What ele- 


now conservatively 5 percent in 
cash will laugh. 

Count on toe Four Horsemen 
of the Apocalypse as an entry in 
the Belmont jStakes. computer 
cashing on Millennium Morn- 
ing, and the unexpected social 
consequences of the geezer-sex 
pill. Brace yourseu for toe 
dreary data in indictments 
hand^ up on Hubbell and Hil- 
lary followed by toe Great Pop- 
ularily Plunge. 

All this loatoed melancholy 
do I provide as a summertime 
public service. Repent! llie end 
is near. 

The New York TIukx. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897; Fighting Words Kathenau. and unless toe 
DADie D-: u ■ ji/v- "tiddle-class parties succeed in 

PARIS — PniiM Heim d’Or- foiming a counter fusion, it 
^eive^ or will seems to mean toat both in her 
r* challenge to home and foreign policies Ger- 

fight a duel from Lieutenant many will be controlled largely 
Pini, a brotoer of the f^ous by her 10,000,000 tratteuni- 

onists, which the Majority and 
Heon 5 iMers to toe Hero/d and In^pendent Socialists collec- 

have elicited promts lively represent with 180 

his criticisms of the conduct t • 

of toe Italian prisoners in Uner Mystery 

Abyssinia. A despatch from SYDMFV . , , . 

Rome announces that ihe Iial- 

ian officers back from 

have drawn lots to determine sons on 

which of them should demand w 

reparation by arms. 

^ ^ submarine instnimems and an 

ioos> G • 1 '^ mil echo-sounder, toe Australian 

V9£tit\ aociaiist Merger fngatc Lachlan has located a 

.an. pontica. even. Onn haf^- llS^^u’evS 





INTERNATFONAL HERALD TRIBL^NE, THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1997 


PACE 9 



or 


peaceke^ 

scholars and '^v^„ 


N: 

JCth. Coming Soon: 3-D Smut 
I ■ On a PC Near You 


OPINION/LETTERS 


Now Playing: The Revenge of the Couch Potatoes 


By Daniel S. Greenberg 


art-: aniaaerfortheir^^‘’‘'‘'^crft“l'^ wiU always get 

^ cpimtries alone boast of pro- 

^ ' ^gtsnent'' or crt jj^ ^wnenis in World War IL And they 
.v:> «psto will have m "Sh*- The same is already 

S^’rOiiicomeQfihe^ri^^ of pornography, smut and 

zipping aroond the 

Amt- Tana« »- thf techno-wizards that elec- 

l»» ' W^shinfiton^t"*'^'' *“‘*‘*y and fences wiU 

ete maine ^ Asiin'^I^P out. 

Jb • Bill Brace yourself, folks, and face 

lhai slopping the stuff, and even if 

w- ejfcrit55fJu“^-^*'''^^and!t?^^"'“^SOttenCommunicadoos 
w- • «WnihattheUnh^HcT^‘l»t!W.»n.-v Act hnd urithstood Su- 


slopping the stuff, and even if 


»*?' -winn.. »«._ rr‘ uiai oi«ppiuk uic aigu, a»u gvcii u 

w- ejfcrit55fJu“^-^*'''^^and!t?^*^"'“^SOttenCommunicadoos 
JT- 22?'*“^**^®^'niiedS^‘*?''?ecency Act had withstood Su- 
S scrutiny, there still 


The merger of sex and elec- 
tronics creates possibilities that 
defy forecasting, but a flourishing 
outcone seems assured for both 
eroticism and commerce, llie 
latest issue of the Futurist, a se- 
rious magazine that soberly at- 
tempts to look over the honzon, 
p^cts that “virtual sex,’* with 
viewer participation, could soon 
be showing on a computer screen 
near you. 

Tbc article adds that “hackers 
and clever adults will continue to 
find ways to gain access to and 
transmit unauthorized maieriaL 
And childreu will, as always, find 
ways to outwit their parents.” 

The brightest hope may be that 
easy access and abundance will 
iransfonn pornography into a 
bore. Thai’s possible. Widi the 
technical barriers weak and cbn- 
stiuitional impediments gone, we 
may soon find out. 

The writer is editor of Science 
& Government Report, a Wash- 
ington neM’slettcr. 


w, M.ir .1 1 ”• — com»r, sviuuiijr, uiwtw auli /\na cmiarco win, as always, lino 

.ea™cimpre&&ion IjAfOuId be no way of stopping the ways to outwit their parents.” 
i£ h, (tuff, short of the temporary fix of The brightest hope may be that 

£■■ “ Beijina Thf^ tracking and battering- easy access and abundance will 

S' assaults on the sources. And uansfoim pornography inm a 

■“ strategv (u '^Jiai would throttle the output only bore. That’s possible. With the 

y abiliij- fo ^^t^niil producers took up the slack, technical bairieis weak and cbn- 

Stt. . This time the wor j.j Ha i ’ ' Computers in schools, libraries stiuitional impediments gone, we 
IB Beijing has n riahi ^“wk »odofncescan.ofcourse,beeasily may soon find ouu 

tie. Ti-^. , ' lonfiguied and confined to ma- 

I:!:--'- ■• '' vcp,. trial deemed suitable for children The writer is editor of Science 

any other audience. But as om- ^ Government Report, a Wash- 

^ipreseni as computers now appear, ingion nen'sletter. 
o be. they remain expensive, com- 
■|‘»i |3_ plex and far short of the universal 
IJJ. £|0S]lpcces5ibility of radio and TV. 

*^Iready on the market, however, is 

kmeftitAon \TATr. ^ under-SJ,000 de^op com- 

bevond^S ■’•'ould hf auier with a broad range of ca- On Cambodia 

uSfeSPi? 1 fie American dec j»bUities, includina modem access 

jio the great world of the Internet Regarding "The Coup in Cam- 
Q^^^Htrate wj>ngf,j 5^ Coming soot, at even lower bodia" (Editorial, July 10): 

" i* N.-\Ti’j FoIhi'®*** ** *be Inieniet through your The editorial reaches the right 

S keen tte subsiamul pr.i,|Jiprne television screen. With elec- conclusion, that aid should be 
V .pOst-Coni order in BwniiilJonic technology becoirung withheld to Cambodia in light of 
•• _ ftspre^-nlpullr,J■'^eape^ and better year after year, the recent coup. It is incoirect, 

the indicted Aor cninl’-heccmiputerisOTlhernarke^lace however, to say that the inter- 
Vugo- linue todo.niinai-^P®th to becoming as inconsequeo- national community “penni^” 
etr'intemp- Srpakj. Ii.', ,‘nal a purchase as a cheap poilable Hun Sen to govern. The election’s 
^aclaicw- iedinia 5 ;i,Ver..!i.'-’adioorathrow-awaywristwalch. victor, I^ce Norodom Ran^- 
BWa^uns- The Da '. \ ,r. the equipnent in bountiful iddh, invited Mr. Hun Sen to join, 

•have bi^ internation -i !ifirl'^>upply<cutiousluds and dedicated More important, the editorial 
^-bfATOarc ai^ -Jn.. '^tno-addicts will encounter little mistakenly attributes the lecent 

tkM^bvpo- The mn'r d I accessing the elec- turn of events to a lack of in- 

trlT- . . * ■■n.^Mura-lil :« Aill ynlnr tATTiaHnnal snnrvwt fnr CiinihnH- 


W ASHINGTON — Where’d every- 
body go? That’s the question Amer- 
ican television and movie executives are 
askii^ this summer. Even though TV 
viewing always declines in waim-weather 
months, the four networks have been set- 
ting embarrassing all-time record lows 
recently. 

Ihe trend downward started long ago. 
of course. But it keeps getting more down- 

MEANWHILE 

ward. According to a study released by a 
cable TV trade group, ratings for ABC, 
CBS, NBC and Fox are declining sharply 
even in homes that don’t have cable as an 
alternative. The four nets together earned 
a 4S.9 in the May 1992 ratings sweeps bui 
only a 38.1 in May of this year. 

^viously, the disappearing viewers 
are not all going to cable. 

Cable ratings are flat Indeed, The New 
York Times reports that the ratings for 
CNN are barrel-bottom low, apparently 
because of a lack of traumatic news sto- 
ries. Even those fabulous photos from 
Mars don’t seem to be helping. 

For the first quarter of 1 997, the Times 
says, CNN eked out its lowest ratings for a 
single 24-hour period in die network's 17- 


By Tom Shales 


year history; a miserable 0.39, which 
translates into an average of only 284,000 
homes. 

it's loo early to tell if pay-TV is having 
a good summer or a bad. HBO and 
the other pay channels do have last 
year’s big bits to show, but * 'Twister*' and 
“independence Day” have alr^y been 
run about a thousand times each, and 
choice titles are becoming scarce. Mean- 
while, pay-TV has bad news for next 
summer because this summer's movie 
theater blockbusters are largely going 
bust 

Millions are being made, of course, on 
films like “The Lost World: Jurassic 
Park” and “Men in Black,” Iwt a recent 
headline in Daily Variety, the show biz 
newspaper, put it this way: '‘Summer Box 
Office Quickly Losing Its Will to Live.” 
Even films that have spectacular opening 
weekends fall off quicUy. 

Why the fall-off? lYobably for the 
simplest reason in the world: The movies 
stink. Or are mere replays of past hits. 
Audiences are correct when they think 
they’ve already seen enough versions of 
“Jurassic Park” and “Batman.” And as 


for ‘'Speed 2,*’ it never even achieved 3S 
miles per hour. Writes Leonard Klady in 
Variety, “Films aren’t d^vering on an 
entertainment level.” 

But waiL There’s even more bad news 
for the entertainment industry. Video 
stores are suffering, too. People aren’t 
renting last year’s movies any more en- 
thusiastically than they are going to see 
this year’s. 'Ihe huge Blockbuster chain is 

Why have Americans 
begun turning up their 
noses at television shows, 
videos and movies? 
Probably because the 
stuff stinks. 


expected to rqx>n a 76 percent drop in 
operating profits for the second quarter of 
the year. 

A^ far as TV goes, audiences are clearly 
sick of reruns that in many cases were 
already rerun once during the regular sea- 
son (Si^ember through MayJ. Fox isn’t 
doing much better by offering alternative 


first-nm fare, from the ridiculous “Ruby 
Wax Show” to the boring “Roar,” set in 
fifth-centuiy Ireland. 

So then: People are not w atching TV, 
not going to the movies, not renting films 
at video stores. Where the heck are they? 
They could be on the IntemeL Computers 
are now so popular that one brea^ast 
cereal is giving away a free CD-ROM as 
a prize this summer. If CD-ROMs are 
that common, then the medium really has 
anived. 

But there’s another explanation. It 
comes fimm USA Today. The newspaper 
r^xins that bookstores are booming, not 
necessarily in terms of sales but in terms of 
drawing people in. Americans are re- 
discovering OTokstores and turning them 
into meeting places where they can take 
the kids and be entertained, and possibly 
enlightened. 

For fall, ABC's ad campaign is built 
on the th^e “TV is Good.” One ad, 
though, was discarded because it rested 
poorly. It said, “TV is Good, Books are 
Overrated.” 

Could America be abandoning televi- 
sion in order to read? Maybe it is wishful 
thinking, but what a lovely, beautiful 
wish. 

The Washmaton Post. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


nnefokeep 
beyond next 
ms fiiliy ra- 
dOMmstrate 
^ of an ex- 
s the 

. pest-CbId 


On Cambodia 

Regarding "The Coup in Cam- 
bodia" (Editorial. July 10): 

The editorial reaches the right 
conclusion, that aid should be 
withheld to Cambodia in light of 
the recent coup. It is incorrect. 


problems lie 
themselves. 


squarely 


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‘‘ "’'with the equipnent in bountiful iddh, invited Mr. Hun Sen to join. 
^!!fr!?^>upplv, curious luds and dedicated More important, the editorial 
, ’ ' 3 omo-addicts will encounter little mistakenly attributes the lecent 
j '^'^’fjtfficulty in accessing the elec- turn of events to a lack of in- 
' '* Tonic underworld — in full color temational support for Cambod- 
probably even in 3-D. ia’svoters. 

' ^ ^ Irs a safe bet that 1^ the nira of Nttthiog could te fiinber from 

^'be century, the $100 hand-held, tbe truth. The international com- 
' ' Full-service computer will be in munity showered Cambodia with 

shops. And the porno industry, several billion dollars worth of 
•’’^which produces more films thw largesse ^d generously 
Hollywood and rakes in even big- democratic institution-building, 
i^venues, win not ignore the Cambodia’s politicians squand- 
o]^oitunities. ered this chance for a new be- 

- ~ P^o is already the leading* ginnmg and enriched themselves 
~ ' revenue producer on the IntOTnet, ^at the - expense of their jieople. 
sucressftiUy peddling its wares by Prince Ranariddh viewed his ^v- 
creditcard. ernirientsovice as little roore than 

4 L What's ahead, then, in society's a si^batical from his university 
\JQ^uouUed relaticmship with pomo- life in France. 

graphy? WiU it become so com- Only the opposition activist 
monplace as to pass unnoticed, Sam Rainsy has em^ed after 
r :.u.'like contemporary bare-skki.sneet the UN-^ elecmpiu in . 1993 as . 
'L'l.'.-radiicihatoacewouldbaye.seto^ a forward-loolcmg leader con-. 

: : ,Ta public coramotkHriTTTiesoftware cemed with demooratic principles 
j :: :rcand computor indusm'es, fearing land a brighter future for his. 
e \!'.vgovemment intrusions and public country. 

. .-rdvulsion, claim that technology ■ The Cambodians are a back- 
• .dm contain the problem through ward-looking people who long for 
ratin g systems and electnxiic the greatness of a kingdom that 
I- . i^^'blocking techniques. flourished some 700 years ago 

'But the wondrous technology and ruled much of present-day 
.f.i'lth^ have created has flowered Laos, .^Thailand and Vietnam. 
'i,,l.’iinoliteinllyinilljon5 of Web sites -Th^ cOTstamly blame otiiers for 
other connections around the their own troobles. One does the 
globe, making comprehensive historical record and the Cambod- 
blockage an impossible task, ian people a disservice to per- 
'r.' Teenagers have hacked their way petuate this myth. 

into tfael^tagoiubaoks and other Cambodians’ problems do 
.Ibastions of presoraed elecnonic not lie with the international 
•Ji^^security. The ponto shes can’t be community, aid gone awiy or 
'.'''..^ harder to crack. the United Nations. Cambodians’ 


.•A llfitfoubled relaticmslup with porho- 
graphy? WiU it become so com- 
monplace as to pass unnoticed, 
:rir r.^.'-like contemporary bare-skki.sneet 
irfL'i.'.-r attire Jhatonce would bave.sett^ 


.dm contain the problem through 
rating systems and electnxiic 
.'.'i-.'i^^'.bkxking techniques. 

• ^ wondrous technology 

' ..f.i ,:th^ have created has flowei^ 
. litdally millions of Websites 

'.p.^''rr and other connections around the 
globe, making comprehensive 
“ Lt-^..''-.I>lockage an impossible task. 
.*'.1 .'v; T^nageis have hacked their way 
[i.*:'- info banks and other 


ERICG. BERMAN. 

Geneva. 

The writer is executive director 
of United Nations Watch. 

The "wait and see” attitude of 
the United States and others to the 
current crisis in Cambodia is 
simply not adequate. 

We urge the Security Council 
to convene to discuss the imme- 
diate dispatch of a special rep- 
resentative or a small fact-finding 
mission to Cambodia, as well as 
the offer of a UN mediator. 

The Security Council should 
also consider offering assistance 
to ensure that Caml^an elec- 
tions are free and fair, and posting 
more UN human rights monitors 
throughout the country to ensure 
that the people are protected from 
abuse as folly as p^ible. 

The Unit^ Nations has put so 
much effott into Cambodia; it 
must not relax its efforts at this 
critical time. 

MALCOLM HARPER. 

London. 

The writer is dirvaor of the 
United Nations Association of 
Great Britain and Northern Ire- 
land. 

The United States now wants 
Canada — whose laws permit 
prosecution for acts of genocide 
— > to accept the extradition of Pol 
Pot for the crime against humanity 
committed by the Khmer Rouge 
from 1975 to 1979 ("Pul Pol Pot 
on Trial," Editorial, June 25). 

By the same token, Henry Kis- 
singer should be extradited to face 
trid for masteiminding the bomb- 
ing of neutral Cambodia from 
1969 to 1973. The secret bombing 
of Cambodia, which the Nixon 
administration denied at the be- 
ginning, devastated the Cambod- 


ian countryside, killing hundreds 
of thousands of civilians. 

Richard Nixon is beyond law, 
but Henry Kissinger is not. 

MAHMOODELAHl. 

Ottawa. 

ANaza Officer 

The obitua^ of General F. W. 
von Mellenthin {July 5) contained 
several historical errors. 

According to the obituary, von 
Mellenthin “was appointed chief 
of staff of a S0,000-man oxps led 
by Rommel during the battle for 
Alsace-Lorraine in 1945.” 

Field Marshal Erwin Rommel 
died in 1944. Von Mellenthfo 
was. in fact, Rommel’s intelli- 
gence staff o^icer in North Africa 
in 1942, but he never worked for 
Rommel after that 

Von Mellenthin served as 
chief of staff to General Her- 
mann Balck, commander of 
Anny Group G — two levels 
higher than a coips — during the 
Lorraine campaign. That cam- 
paign was fou^t primarily in late 
1944. Its main puipose was to 
serve as a diversion for the Ger- 
man buildup for the Ardennes of- 
fensive, launched in December 

1944. 

In November 1944 both Balck 
and von Mellenthin were relieved 
when Balck ran afoul of political 
intrigues by SS chief Heinrich 
Himmler. During the Ardennes 
offensive von Mellenthin served 
as a regimental commander, in 
early March 1945 he became chief 
of staff of the Fifth Ifonzer Army. 
Following the demise of that unit 
in the Ruhr pocket, von Mel- 
lenthin was captured on May 3, 

1945. 

DAVID T. ZABECKI. 

Freiburg. Gennany. 

The writer is editor of the En- 
eyviopeeUa of World War II in 
Europe. 


NATO and Bosnia 

Regarding "In the Balkans, 
NATO Must Go After the Mas- 
terminds" (Opinion, Julv 14) by 
CarlBUdt: 

After a year and a half of peace- 
keeping, Ae United States is pre- 
paring to disengage from the 
problem. But little has been done 
to address the root causes. 

The Bosnian federation is still 
an unviable state. Slobodan Mi- 
losevic and Franjo Tudjman are 
w inning the waiting game, and 
nationalists on all sides are 
sharpening their knives. 

Meanw^e, NATO's Euro- 
pean otornbers are igiiormg reality 
and U.S. troops are going home 
next June unless Congress has a 
radical chan^ of heart 


Maybe NATO’s newest mem- 
bers will have some interest in 
preventing a return to war. The rest 
of the alliance doesn't seem to. 

LUKAS HAYNES. 

Oxford, England. 


No Apologies 


Regarding "Make Them Say 
‘Sony’ " (Opinion, July 5) by 
Richard Cohen: 

Mr. Cohen is yet another 
whiner to weigh in in the tolxicco 
wars. Why does he deserve an 
apology for something he did of 
hu own volition? Did Joe Camel 
walk up and force-feed him cig- 
arettes? Did the Marlboro M^ 
lasso and then hog-tie him until he 
became addicted to nicotine? 
Nope. He walked up to the store 


and bought his packs and smoked 
them all himself. 

Why should tobacco compa- 
nies te contrite? America is a 
capitalist enclave that promotes 
the value of making money, 
something tobacco companies are 
very good at. Sure, make the 
comf^es admit that tobacco 
smoking is harmful and will kill 
you. It won’t hurt their business. 

Those who insist on suing to- 
bacco companies are nothing but 
whiners. F^ple who smoke in 
this day and age are killing them- 
selves knowingly. They make a 
conscious choice. Whining about 
it doesn’t change the facts: You 
decided to smoke, you die with 
that decision. 

PIERRE HONEYMAN. 

Vancouver, Canada. 








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THirRSDAY, JULY 17, 1997 


PAGE 11 


Did PepsiCo 
Swallow 
Too Much? 


Fast-Food Units Seek 

Rebirth Outside Firm 


By Glenn Collins 

.Vw Yvrk Tmfs Servtct 


•‘r ■ :•» 

sf5 5“H 




mm 

IS j; 

Urn- 


P URCHASE. New York — Was 
it ail a mistake? Eleven years 
ago. PepsiCo Inc. completed the 
lestaurant-buying s{^ that 
made Bell. Pizza Hut and ICFC the 
unruly siblings of its booming beverage 
and snack-food businesses. 

PepsiCo had a great run with the 
restaurants, but in the 1990s it ran out of 
' good ideas at roughly the same time that 
price-cutting and competition intensi- 
fied and a public perception arose that 
the chains' formulas were tired. Now, 
PepsiCo is trying to get the underper- 
forming units off its b^ks. 

Still, while it was almost certainly not 
a mistake to buy the restaurants orig- 
. inally, the question is whether they can 




INTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


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. do any better out from under the Pep- 
siCo umbrella and the nearly bottomless 
. pit of cheap capital the corporation once 
brought to the business. 

Paradoxically, that problem will have 
to be solved by the architect of the initial 
strategy to buy the restaurant chains, 
"Andrall Pearson, PepsiCo's president 
■from 1971 to 19W. 

Mr. PearsOD, 72, has come out of 
‘redremem to b^ome the chairman of 
the planned new company. Tricon 
Glol^ Restaurants Inc., soon to be a 
publicly traded fast-food empire with 
'revenue sectmd only to that of Mc- 
' Donald's Corp. 

“The restaurants were the growth 
'engine of PepsiCo,” Mr. Pearson said. 
!'Tm not presiding over their departure 
I'm presiding over their rebirth.” 
Joining Mr. Pearson as a midwife of 
'the new venture is David Novak. 44. an 
11-year PepsiCo executive who is Mr. 

■ Pearson's undo^dy and heir apparent 
: 'Ibeir plans for die' new comf^y — 
-sprucing up KFC, expanding at home 
ami abroad — hardly seon revoluiion- 
aiy. But, Mr. Novak said, the essential 
- change is ID bedte freus be aodhis fellow 
: manageis can bring to operatons. 

“For the Grsi dme in the history of 
•these brands, they'll be run by a res- 
itauianr company, by people who know 
.^d love the restaurant business.” said 
Mr. Novak, who now heads both KFC 
!:and Pizza Hut North America. ”At 
Tricon, you won't have marketing 
j^eople dreaming up products that can't 
,be prepared for the customer.” 

The two men will have their work cut 



MkIufI ClcmcanV Mi* YiirL Tinr^ 

David Novak, top, head of U.S. operations for KFC and Pizza Hut, and 
Andrall Pearson, who will run the new Arm, plan a fast-food expansion. 


our for them. The fast-food industry in the 
United Sutes has been in the doldnims of 
late, with even McDonald's, the rnarket 
leader, ' finding that old formulas no 
longer exert the magic they once did. 

Moreover, fast-food chains are com- 


^up's profit, according to Andrew 
Conway, an analyst at Morgan Stanley 
& Co. Sales at U.S. Pizza Hut stores 


ing under siege on new fronts, from 
price-cutting casual-dining chains and 
upscale take-out restaurants to super- 
market delicatessen counters. 


The most formidable operational 
challenge facing Tricon will be to nun 
around Pizza Hut. which accounts for 
nearly SO percent of the fast-food 


were down 4.1 percent from 1995 to 
1996. while those at KFC were up 5.4 
percent and those for Taco Bell were up 
1 percent. 

Though strong for years. Pizza Hut 
began to have difficulty positioning it- 
self between the delive^ chains such as 
Domino's Pizza Inc. and locally owned 
outlets in virtually all its market areas. 


See PEPSI, Page 15 


9.1 :■•:,■ 

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Ford and GM Report Strong Profits 


Cmt<M <9^ Ov Slfc^rnm MfWrbn 

DEARBORN, Michigan — General 
Motors Corp. said Wednesday its 
profit rose 1 1 percent to $2. 1 billion in 
the sectmd quarter, while Ford Motor 
Co. said it earned a reo^ $2.5 biUion, 
an increase of 33 percent from a year 
earlier, thanks to strong sales of sports- 
utility vehicles. 

GM, the largest U.S. automaker, 
earned $2.68 a sluue, compared with 
$2.63 a share a year earlier, when profit 
totaled $1.89 bulion. Ford, the second- 


laigest, earned $2.1 1 a share, up from 

)f 1“ 


$1.60 in the second quarter of 1996, 
when fxofit came to $1.9 billion. 

Both ewnpanies' earnings were fair- 
er than analysts ha^ expected. ForFtx'd, 
the average estimate of analysts sur- 
veyed last week Hist Call was $1.82 

a share. For GM, the average estimate 
was $2.15 a share. 

GM's earnings rose despite strikes at 
two of its assembly plants. Hie com- 
pany said the strikes bad cost it an 
estimated S490 million after taxes from 
lost {NOductiem of 96,000 cars and 
truclu in the second quarter. 

”lt's signiricant mat even though 
strike-reiated losses hit die bottom Une 


pretty hard in the second quarter, we 
still earned a substantial sunoum of 
money durjng the period,” the GM 
chairman, Jo^ Smith Jr., said. 

“I wish we could have avoided the 
strikes,” Mr. Smith said. “But we 
have to make GM competitive, and we 
need local labor agreements that are 
consistent with that objective.” 

Ford credited its lugher profit to 
cost-cutting and stroi^ sales of pickup 
trucks and sport-utility vdiicles with 
high profrt margins. 

^Today's results come from several 
years of very tough work,” stiid Alex 
TVotman, Ford chairman. 

For the first half of this year, GM 
earned $3.9 billion, or$4.98 a share, up 
from $2.91 billion, or $3.57 a share for 
the first six months of 1996. 

GM’s revenue in die second quarter 
was $45.1 billion, up 1 percrat from 
$^.7 billicMt a year earlier. For the first 
half, revenue was S87.4 billion, up 
from billion. 


Second-quarter 1996 results forGM 
included a $208.8 million loss from the 


divestiture of its Electronic Data Sys- 
tems Corp. subsidiary. 

Ford reported revenue of $40.3 bil- 


lion in the second quarter, up from a 
restat^ $39 billion in the same period 
of 1996. 

For the first half of this year. Ford 
earned $4 billion, or $3.33 a share, 
compared with $2.56 billion. or$2. 1 5 a 
share, a year earlier. Revenue was 
$76.5 billion, comptu'ed with $74.2 bil- 
lion in the first six months of last 
year. 

While Ford's car sales have been 
down about 9 percent from last year, 
tmek sales have risen 4 percent. 

Ford benefited from ”a rich mix of 
business, with a lot of profitable trucks 
in North America,” said David Healy, 
a Burnham Securities analyst “Also, 
their cost-cutting is beginning to pay 
off.” 

In addition. Ford's global cost-cut- 
ting campaign lowered total costs by $ I 
billion in the second quarter, an amount 
equal to the company's announced 
cost-cut goal for the entire year. 

Ford's overseas automobile busi- 
ness earned $543 million, up 32 per- 
cent from the same quaner last year. 
±ough earnings fell 20 percent in 
Europe, where Ford faces intense com- 
petirioD. (AP, Bloomberg) 


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July 16 


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Now, LVMH Wants to Join the Party 

Grand Met and Guinness Reject Its Proposal for 3- Jfhy Merger 


C vifirirk/ to Car SeiFFow iltfwhn 

PARIS — After two months of trying 
to thwart the merger of Guinness PLC 
and Grand Metropolitan PLC, LVMH 
made a pitch Wednesday to be included 
in the proposed d^. 

Guinness and Grand Met immedi- 
ately dismissed the plan as too expens- 
ive and too complicated. 

LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuit- 
ton wants to exchange its 66 percent 
stake in Moet Hennessy, its 6.4 percent 
stake in Grand Met and its 14.2 percent 
share of Guinness for a 35 percent stake 
in a new beverage company that would 
include the brands of Grand Met's In- 
ternational Distillers & Vintners sub- 
sidia^ and Guinness's United Distillers 
division. 

The proposal continues the efforts by 
LVMH's chairman, Bernard Arnault, to 
affect the planned £24 billion ($40 bil- 
lion) merger of Grand Met arid Guin- 
ness into a new company, to be called 
GMG Brands, that threatens to over- 
shadow LVMH. 

“What Mr. Arnault is proposing is a 
complicated and costly break-up of both 
Grand Met and Guinness in order to 
leverage LVMH into a dominant po- 


sition in what would already be the 
world's leading spirits and wine com- 
pany,” Grand Met and Guinness said. 
But both companies agreed to study 
LVMH’s proposal. 

“The debate here is not about merger 
versus demeiger,” they said. “It is 
about creating the most value for our 
shareholders and ensuring that such 
value is fairly shared.'’ 

Nonetheless, tiiey said Mr. Arnault's 
propos^ submitted Wednesday, would 
give him “back-door control without 
paying a premium, and it is hard to see 
how this could be in the interests of our 
other sharebolders.” 

LVMH’s latest pitch would create the 
world's leading beverage company, one 
that would have had sales of £7.4 billion 
in 1 993-96. The new company would be 
listed In Paris. 

Under the proposal. LVMH's Moet 
& Chandon and Pommerpy cham- 
pagnes and Hennessy cognac would be 
joined with brands such as Guinness's 
Johnnie Walker and Dewar’s whisky as 
well as Grand Met's Smirnoff vodka 
and Baileys Irish Cream Uqueur. 

Mr. Arnault proposed that other op- 
erations of Guinness and Grand Met be 


spun off into separately traded compa- 
nies. Among those operations would be 
Guinness’s beer operations. Grand 
Met’s Burger King fast-food chain and 
Grand Met’s Pillsbuiy packaged-frxid 
businesses. 

Analysts agreed with the assessment 
by Guinness and Grand Met. 

“Thirty-five percent is a lot — he’s 
asking for a very significant part of this 
new company,” said Pascale Montag- 
ner, an analyst at Jean-Pierre Pinnatm 
in Paris. 

Charles Winston, an analyst at HSBC 
James Capel, echo^ that, saying. “He 
is asking too much, because if you look 
at the valuations involved, 35 percent is 
unacceptable.” 

Nigel Parson, an analyst with 
Charterhouse Tilney in London, said: 
“Arnault is being marginalized, and 
he’s looking for a way in. His proposals 
are what is best for him, rather than what 
is best for all shareholders.” 

LVMH shares rose 49 French francs 
to close at 1.628 ($271 .30> in Paris, 
while Guinness rose 6 pence to 612 and 
GrandMet rose 20 to 626 in London. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg, AP) 


Strong Dollar Lifts European Markets 


Rtuers 

LONDON — Stock markets in Bri- 
tain. France and Geimany closed at re- 
cord highs Wednesday, helpe4i 1^ the 
strong dollar, which continued to rise, 
unaffected by German officials' com- 
ments on foreign-exchange rates. 

Stock markets in Europe received an 
additional boost when Wall Street 
opened higher after benign U.S. June 
inflation figures. Dealers said a strong 
dollar was helping European export- 
oriented complies to post gains, and 
this was driving up the uidexes. 

“We are in slipsueara of the U.S. 

and the dollar, and we are reaching lof^ 
heights,” said Christoph Bruns, a fund 
manager at Union Investment “We are 
likely to cemtinue to see growth.” 

Britain's FT-SE lOO-share index 
faltered on the brink of 5,000 points and 
eased from the day’s best levels but still 
managed a rect^ close at 4,964.2 


points, up 64.9 points. 

Liquidity, stock shortages and the 


dollar’s strength were behind the in- 
dex’s rise, in which banks accounted for 
almost half the advance, with oils and 
pharmaceuticals also strongly ahead. 

French benchmark stoclu closed at a 
record high for a second day as the 
strength of the dollar fired exporters 
such as the car-pans maker Valeo SA 
and the cosmetics maker L'Oreal SA. 

The Paris market ended shod of its 
peak for the day but still set a record, 
with strong gains for LVMH, the luxury 
goods and drinks concern, and for SCS- 
Thomson, the semiconductor maker. 
Dealers said a test of the 3.000 level on 
the CAC-40 index appeared imminent 
as the average rose 37.3 1 points to close 
at 2,988.01. 

Brokers said the continued strength 
of the dollar and gains on Wall Street, as 
well as rises on other European markets 
such as London, were supporting the 
European markets. 

In Germany, the DAX index closed 2 
percent higher at a record 4,201 .24, and 


the afrer-hours IBIS DAX index rose 
well clear of that level, with trade un- 
derpinned by the strength of the dollar. 

Banks and chemied stocks were in 
favor, and Karstadt, the retailer, was up 
20.90 Deutsche marks at 662 ($369.42) 
in response to favorable perceptions 
about Its restructuring and in s{nte of 
reports it may be dropp^ from the DAX 
index in favor of Adidas. 

Austrian also shares finished at a re- 
cord high, powering through 1,400 
points on the main Vienna index, as the 
combination of a firm dollar and low 
interest rates lured buyers in droves. 

“This is a scenario for the bulls — • 
low interest rates and a strong dollar,” 
said a trader. ‘ 'The path ahead is clear,’ ' 
he added, wd the ATX index “should 
^ve little trouble vaulting 1.450 in the 
present environment.” 

Dutch stocks also rose to records ibr a 
fourth straight day amid confidence that 
the dollar and low interest rates will help 
corporate profits. 



REPUBUC NEW YORK CORPORATION 
SAFRA REPUBUC HOLDINGS S.A. 


Consolidated Statements of Condition 
and Summaries of Results 


These statements and summaries represent the consolidated accounts of Republic New York Corporation and its 
wholly owned subsidiaries and of Safra Republic Holdings S.A. and its wholly owned subsidiaries. Republic New 
York Corporation owns 49% of Safra Republic Holdings S.A.. which is accounted for by the equity method. 



REPUBLIC NEW YORK 
CORPORATION 

June 30, 

S.AFRA REPUBLIC 
HOLDINGS S.A. 
June 30, 

1997 

1996 

1997 


1996 

Assets 1 


(in ihousuicU of USt cuept per sthare daun 



Cash and due from banks 

$ 687.209 

$ 890,861 

S 64.130 

$ 

75351 

Interest-bearing deposits with banks ^ 

5.413..300 

5,573,134 

6.652,675 


6,532,792 

Predtxjs metals 

982,508 

1,043.985 

— 


— 

Investment securities 

23.607,529 

19.723,412 

8,919.721 


8.002391 

Trading account assets 

4.826,330 

3,508.884 

224.184 


143,01 1 

Federal funds sold and securities purchased 






under resale agreements 

2,094.029 

2.136,323 

— 


— 

Loans, net of unearned income 

12.801.172 

11,303,917 I 

1,994,617 


•1,638,857 

Allowance for possible loan losses 

t.325,525) 

(339.214) 1 

(120,9171 


(129.826) 

Other assets 

5,965.180 

4.738353 ' 

806,628 


497.005 

Ibtol assets 

S 56.051.732 

$ 48379.655 

$ 18341.038 

$ 16.759381 

Liabilities 






Total deposits 

$ 33,234,918 

S 30.079.744 

S 14396.996 

S 12329.456 

Trading account liabilities 

4,204,047 

3.190.666 

194.034 


101,389 

Short-term borrowings 

6,972,685 

4,958.942 

1,652,648 


2,162,857 

Other liabilities 

4.073.638 

3.161.159 

443.885 


301,947 

Long-term debt 

1,499,051 

1,696.108 

155,000 


175,000 

Subordinated long-term debt and perpetual capita] notes 

2,400,000 

2,406,441 

— 


— 

Manditorily redeemable preferred securities 

350,000 

— 

— 


— 

Sbarcbolders' Eqiii^ 






Cumulative prefened stock 

400.000 

575,000 

— 


— 

Common stock and suiplus, oet of treasury shares . . . 

73U78 

797,290 

891,656 


889,111 

Retained earnings 

2,066,707 

1,771,982 

657,084 


573,975 

Net unrealized appreciation (depreciation) on 






securities available for sale, net of taxes 

119.108 

(57,677) 

149,735 


25,646 

Total shareholders' equity 

3..U7393 

3.086395 

1,698.475 


1,488,732 

Total liabilities and shareholders' equity 

$ 56.051.732 

$ 48379.655 

1 $18341.038 

S 16.759381 

Book value per share 

' S 53.22 

$ 45.31 

' S 48.11 

S 

42.27 

Ctient portfolio assets held in custody 



$ 15.095,097 

$ 

7.722325 

Net income, for the six months ended 

$ 220,749 

$ 202342 

$ 119,603 

$ 

90352 

Net income per common share 

S 3.82 

S 3.35 

S 3.39 

S 

236 

Average common shares outstanding 

54,699 

55,870 

35,290 


35300 


Risk-Based Capital Ratios 

As of June 30, 1 997, Republic New York Corporation's risk-based core capital ratio was 1 3. 1 0% (eiBumated ) and total qua- 
lifying capita] ratio was 21.90% (estimated), llie ratios include the assets, risk-weighted in accordance with the require- 
ments of the F^ia! Reserve Bo^ specifically applied to Republic New York Corporation on a fully consolidated basis, 
and capital of Safra Republic Holdings SA. Total consolidated assets under these i^uirements exceeded US$ 70 billion 
and total consolidated cajrital, including minority interest and subordinated debt, was approximately USS 7 billion. 


Republic New York Corporation Safra Republic Htddings SJk. 

Fifth Avenue at 40th Street 32, boulevaid Royal 

New YofL New Yofk 10018 Banking Locations L-2449 Luxombowg 

New York ■ Geneva • London ■ Eleijing - Beirut ■ Beveriy Hills • Buenos Aires • Cayman Islands • Copenhagen • Eneino • Gibntltar • Guernsey 
Hong Kong ■ Jokaria ■ Los Angeles * Lugano • Luxerobo^ • Ma^a • Mexico City • Miami • Milan • Monte Carlo • Montevideo • Montreal 
Moscow • Nassau • Paris • Puma del Esie • Rio de Janeiro * Santiago * Sao Paulo ■ Singapore • Sydney ■ Taipei • Tokyo ■ Toronto ■ Zurich 







PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1997 


R 


THE AMERICAS 




nvestor’s America 






The Do'.v 


0-Year T-Bond Yield 



Dollar in Deutsche marks Dollar tn Yen 





Source: Bloomberg, Ffeuten 


lauilMMMl HenUTrtaie 


Very briefly: 


AT&T’s President Resigns 

NEW YORK (AP) — John Walter resigned Wednesday as 
president of AT&T Coup, after tfae compaiw decided not to 
make him the successor to the chairman and chief executive, 
R(A)eit Allen. 

Mr. Walter went to AT&T in November from the printing 
company RJL E>onneUey & Sons Inc. and was touted as tfae 
next leader of the Joog-distance gianr after it split into three 
conqtanies. Mr. Walter will get m.S imllioo in addition to the 
$22 million he was paid to leave his previous job. 

Signs of friction between Mr. Walter and Mr. Allen 
emerged in the past few mondis. As AT&T was negotiating to 
bay SBC Commimicatioas Inc., there were reports diat Mr. 
Walter would have been left out of the top managemeDt of the 
new company. Those talks fell apart last month. 

Mr. Walter said he was '^peifecdy ^alified*' to be AT&T’s 
C^. worked tirelessly on behalf of the shareholders of 
AT&T,” he said. 

Lucent Technologies Profit Triples 

MURRAY HUL. New Jersey (Bloomberg — Lucent Tech- 
nologies Inc.’s third-quarter profit almost tripled on increased 
sales of switches and wireless equipment to phcxie companies. 

Net income at Lucent, the former eqnqnnent bosiness 
AT&T Corp., rase to $213 tniUioa, or 33 cents a share, from 
$72 million, or 1 1 cents, in the year-earlier period. Revenue 

roselS 

from 

• General Oynamics Corp.’s second-qaarternet income rose 
19 percent, helped by the January acquisition of Lockheed 
Martin Corp.*s combat-vebicle and gun-systems businesses. 
The company, which also makes-submaiines, destroyer sfa^. 
tanks and combat radio systems, said its net income rose to mO 
mUlioti, from $67 million in the 1996 quarter. Revenue rose to 
$1.03 billion, from $930 milUon, Bioamhfrg./tfiiufs 


18 percent in the quarter ended June 30, to $634 billion 
U.36 billioiL • 


ITT Plans to Split Into 3 Firms 

Move Is Latest Effort to Repel a Hilton Takeover Bid 


NEW YORK — nr Corp., in 
its biggest effort yet tq repel a 
$103 billion hostile takeow bid 
from Hilton Hotels Coip., said 
Wednesday that it planned to spUt 
into three separate coti^panies. 

As part or the lescructuring, ITT 
said it would buy back 30 million 
shar8s,oraqoarterof the total, for 
$70 each, or $2.1 billion. It also 
will spend about $2 billion to buy 
back half its debL 
The new companies would con- 
sist of riT's hotel and casino op- 
erations, which inclnde the 
Sheraton chain: its teleirfume dir- 
ectory publishi^ business, and its 
techniCTi schools. 

ITT’s chairman and chief ex- 
ecutive, Rand Araskog, said tfae 
moves were ”in keeping with our 
goal of creatini! current value for 
Fit shareholders while enhancii^ 
long-tem prospects and strategic 
op portu nity for each business. * ’ 
riTs shares jumped 4H on the 
news, trading late at 67U. Hilton 

was up ^ at 29‘A. 

hi a terse response to llTs an- 
nouncemenc, HUton called the split 
up a “scheme'* that “reflects a 


value-destructive ‘anybody-but- 
Hilton’ attitude.” 

Analysts applauded The move. 
“Not only is tnU a good defense 
against Hilton.** said James 
Schmi^ an analyst at Westcountry 
Financial in Somis. California, but 
“it’s clearly spUoi&g apart some 
district businesses that will make 
investors happy/* 

Since Hilton opened its $SS-a> 
share bid in January. Mr. Ai^kog 
has fou^t back by selling prized 
assets like riT’s stake in Madison 
Square Garden to raise cash and 
bolster the stock. 

nr has “thrown the ball back 
into BoUenbach's court.” said 
Peter Schoeofeif, president of 
PSAM Asset Management, refer- 
ring to Hilton's chief executive. 
Stephen BoUenbach. '^Now he has 
to come to grips widt how much he 
is willi ng to (»y.” 
lTT*s remaining ho tels and 
casinos will be renamed ITT Des- 
tinations Inc., and Mr. Araskog 
will be chief executive. Tbe 
telephone directory business will 
keep the ITT Coip. name, and the 
tecn nica] sdiools wtU be called 
TTT Educational Services Inc. 


As part of its plan, ITT said U 
bought the 20 peicent of the tele- 
phone book company it did not own 
m>m BellSouth Corp. for $2S4 mil- 
lioh in cash. It plans to sell a third of 
the directmy company te the buy- 
out frnn Ga^n, DubiUer & Rice 
for $225 mimon, afDer (be 
Separately, ITT reported sec- 
ond-quarter earnings of $199 mil- 
lion, up from $96 million a year 
to. The 1997 results included an 


r-tax of $1 16 million for 
the sale of its 39.8 percent st^ in 
Madison Square Carden and a pro- 
vision of K million for costs as- 
sociated with the Hilton offer. 

Mr. Araskog said Aat bwause 
of its financiai flexibility the split 
would provide more value to 
shareholden than Hilton could. He 
estimated that Hilton would have 
to pay $500 milli on in taxes to 
cai^ out its promise to s^ the 
telephone book business and tech- 
nics school business.- 
It would be the second time that 
the company has split, in 1995. it 
divided into ITT Industries, a man- 
ufactuier: ITT Hart ford, an in- 
surer, and the current ITT Corp. 

(BioomJfcr;g,AP} 


Software Group Takes Aim at Pirates 


N«w York Timfs Servue 

Some people in tfae SiUcon Valley are ^nitinizing 
foe advertising indostty. contending that ^frware pir- 
acy is rampant 

The Business Software Alliance, a watchdog group, 
was expected to announce a $135,000 settlement 
Wedoe^y with Lamar Corp., an out^r advertising 
company, for unauthorized ct^ing of applications 
such as Mcrosofr Word and Adobe Pagemaker. 

The alliance also was expected to announce it was 


investigating nearfy a dozen other advertising fiims 
suspect^ of using copies of unpaid software. 

“Piracy is pervasive in the advertising industry,” 
said Greg Wren, corporate counsel for Adobe Systems 
Inc. “This sector should be a little more concerned.” 

Software piracy has appcmed in many business seg- 
ments. But some experts say it may be most widespread 
in the advertising indusiry, where many employees use 
deskn^publishing sofrw^ and rules about copying 
software may be lax. 


German Signals Slow 
DoUar Against Mark 


OmifMlrtlMSb4F"«Oaptntbr- 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against the Deutsche mark but 
g a i ned agains t Other major curren- 
cies Wednesday dter German of- 
ficials sent conflicting signals about 
Germany’s tolerance of a strong 
dollar. 

W hil e some officials said they 
were not troubled by the dollar's 
recent surge, others said they 
wanted a strot^ tnarlc, suggesting 
the Bundesbank might sell dollars 
to lift tte German currency. The 
contradiction left traders hesitant to 
push the dollar up too far too fast. 

“We’re still gening green lights 
from a variety of sources, but we 
also got a yellow,' ’ said Elliott Dix, 
chief currency trader at Signet Bank 
in Richmond, Virginia. “The 
Bundesbank gets antsy when the 
marie is sliding too fast The last 
thing they want to see is the mark 
plummti.” 

The dollar was at 1.7914 
Deutsche marks in 4 P.M. trading, 
down from 1.7920 DM the day be- 
fore. But the currency rose to 
115.62 yen from 115.45 yen, to 
1.4750 Swiss francs from i.4735 
francs and to 6.0504 French francs 
from 6.0475 fr^s. 

The pound eased to $1.6787 from 
$1.6795. 

Comments from the German 
government Wednesday soothed 
market fears that a central bank 
intervention was a certain near- 
term event 

A spokesman reiterated that Ger- 
many was in close contact with the 
Group of Seven industrialized 
countries in terms of foreign-ex- 
change policy, but he also said there 
was no need to dramatize the cur- 
rency situation and that the dollar’s 
and pound’s increases reflected 
conditions in those countries. 

That sentiment was reiterated 
later by Bundesbank conncil mem- 


Fear of Devaluation Buffets Brazilian Stocks 


By Diana Jean Scheme 

Nm York Times Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Nervous- 
ness about the Brazilian stock mar- 
ket's astronomical run-up dus year, 
mixed with fears that the nation's 
currency could come under devalu- 
ation pressures 1^ tiiose in Asia, 
have created a sell-ofT in Braziliaa 
shares. 

After pulling back sfaaipJy in the 


previous two sessions, stocks 
plunged 8.5 percent Tuesday, before 
fining back some of their losses in 
aitenooa trading Wednesday. The 
dn^ Tuesday also dragged down 
markets in Mexico. Argentina and 
odier Latin American countries. In 
late trading Wednesday, the 
Bovespa index was up 297.65 points, 
or 236 percent, to 1 1,914.^. 

The declines woe steepest in 
companies such os Telecomunica- 


coes firastleiras SA. the telecom- 
munications holding company that 
had been the motor of the Bovespa's 
stunning 93 percent run-up this year 
before Friday. “The m^et here 
had a propensity to faU, and it was 
looking for a reason.” said Maria 
Amalia Coutrim of Opportunity, an 
asset-management company. 

Other analysts said there had been 
talk of a correction in recent weeks. 
so a sell-off was enstiy ignited. 


Geoffrey Dennis, a strategist in 
emerging markets for HSBC James 
Cape], said that talk of a devaluation 
was a wild card that could make the 
correction more serious than orig- 
inally foreseen. 

“Whether this turns into a major 
crash very much depends on wh^- 
er it tarns into a currency crisis.” in 
which case, he sai^ the market 
would have “signifreant down- 
side,” dropping 30 to 50 percenL 




her Guntrani Pahn and Finance 

Minister TTieoWaigel. . . 

“Short-term currewy fluctu- 
ations give no reason for wwiy;” 
Mr. Waigel said. 

“It's pure noise, said Mwe 
Chandler, senior curienCT analysiat 
Deutsche Morgan Grenfell qjeak- 
ing of the German govemmeafs 
stared concern of a weak m»k. 
“The true si^al is that th^ is a 
very low lev^ of concern.“;_ 

The dollar’s run up to a six-year 
high against the mark is a devel- 
opment that is being greeted with 

foreign exchange"^ 

shrugs by many economists be- 
cause the doUar-yen relationship is 
by far the most politically sensitive 
in global foreign-c.xchange mar- 
kets, they said. 

The dollar's recent gains against 
the mark, some analysts say, stem 
largely from growing doubts about 
whether the euro, the single Euro- 
pean currency, will be strong when 
it makes its scheduled debut in 
January 1 9^. . \. 

Market confidence in the euro 
has been shaken by signals from 
French and German officials that, 
with unemplo>*ment stubbornly 
high, they are reluctant to embrace 
the economic austerity necessary to 
create a disciplined and well-co- 
ordinated monetary union. 

While the dollar also has risen 
sharply in recent weeks against the 
French franc and the currencies of 
other European nations that plan to 
join the single-currency scheme, it 
is trading al^ut 8 percent beiow its 
May peak against the yen. The dol- 
lar also has been weak against the 
pound — London has opted out of 
(he single-currency plan. 

“What is happ^ing is more for 
German policymakers to worry 
about than for the U.S. to worry 
abouL” said William Dudley, an 
economist at Goldman Sachs & Co. 

Treasury officials declined to 
comment for the record. 

When the dollar rises against the 
mark and other European curren- 
ctes. the implications for trade are 
not as dramatic — at least not po- 
litically — as they are when the 
dollar rises against the yen. the cur- 
rency of a country with persistent 
large trade surpluses. Still a rise in 
the dollar against European curren- 
cies could cause the U.S. trade def- 
icit to swell by billions of dollars if 
the rise were sustained, said C. Fred 
Bergsten. director of the Institute 
for Iniemationai Economics. 

• (B/uomberg. Reuters, WPt 


#• 






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1573.71 155740 ISTleO *3IM9 
ISCTO 123746 13434* ■*044 

147940 144741 147014 *1144 
)4H» 14I0.93 16000 40 

l*OS 1^74 1VQ41 *UI 
UnoS **14t *f71S *74f 


•l4 

,40 

AMEX 


•Sm 

NIW 

Uto SPJW. o«. 

•30 

•to 

«3I83 

6305 63687 •)J3 

4| 

-K 

Dow Jones Bond 


Jk 


Oh« Of. 

•0 

20 Bends 

103.75 .088 

-Ik 
• to 

iguMMies 

10180 •084 

•*0 

KMndtfshiuU 

I01?l ,081 


QjWjMH 

Oraoa 

tawHl 

Gus 

iniwwif 

Com 


AMEX 

Hv-m 

S«0R 

NffiWf 

CrrvMWl 

HenrOir 

VWB 

?s? 


SOrBElNMEALICBOTT 
100 Mn»- Mlor^P— van 

JU*7 271 n 26550 36&n -1*0 IZS* 

^ f** Sep 77 22740 22240 02M -69 14427 

5 in* ImS iSlin ”v2 3040 SUO -430 7.S47 

10434 I47>*)| M74»n *77n jonfl 1*7 J 1H00 1*110 -W 5476 BI40 —140 1.355 

35% 77M .*» ES.irt* NA Tue’6»W6 22205 - ** 

1 ^. sr>« Tw'tvenM 113.930 oft 1340 

54M SW 

£? *V^ sorBEANoniocn 

SS ^ ViE 404WW».eenl»BBrfc 

2LS 2125 R.I- -156 2.107 

4>» M A>W*7 7U? 22.25 TOh -IS S0.540 

J7M 47 *>Tc 5ep*7 2UP 22J0 2Z« -151 >1034 

im IT 0(3*7 23X5 2L44 22.44 -151 Uj*s 

33M 32M B*. -*• [WcV7 73S0 22J* 2240 -0.4* PJUl 

Jnn*e 23ti 2372 22.72 -«« 5.650 

Ev.sak* NA. Tiw'tsAs 7U05 
TvCSOPmlM I*Sa3I up 0ni7 


■sots 33 
lint n 
7&ne 9(M 
65711 
44W 39 
6SB51 60 
66426 10 
SSb 66M 
47107 4?V» 


ES.sMM NA Tiie'wsdw 3X737 
Tue'fOBnlnt TI'JTO W 74467 


««L IW u« CM 

25113 6M 6)« 6*» 

S 5IH * 451 * m^fVVa -l>e 


WOTS SD6 
V«t4) TV, 
1391 in 
•on Tin 
7969 II'-, 

73K r> 
4711 •> 

6365 '9 


SOW 30M 

2)5 1% 

IV, |>, 
TOM Jt“ 
IIV 1IS« 
6% «■. 

An 

hh 19 


TnnDng Activity 
NYSE 

AMoeod 


AMEX 


noo 

925 

»7 

36B 

SM 

)• 


fw Nasdaq 

1ST 

IU| AsfQKCO 

'sS PKId»,.0 


1707 

UfO 

SWT 

5S*7 

7» 


S0TBEAN6 <C80n 
1000 Dtt timnaim. apn pn DiDM 
JW07 on 777 TOO -7* 7.S28 

AugOT 774VV 7«$M 745V, -30 S4.4I7 

Sep*7 471 453 4g -74V, 1X017 

NtvOr 424 404 in -140, 70>C1 

* ' Jon*B 420 411 4l;'.-i -I4'« I4.7Q3 

Ui E9 5^ NA Tie’.-M4« SS.IOI 
•. Tic-fowim I4S.I46 Off 1*2* 

'' WHEAT (CBOT1 

— UtO bi> rM*nunv. ev*<io (V Mhel 

JM*7 320 J2S 125 —7 IJISf 

Swt7 97 91 UK: -4U 41.70 

Dec *7 jgv, 3M’’, J47 -56, 31073 

m«9B 359>-, 355 3S5M -6 4424 

E<90IT3 NA Tup^mOK KOTO 

Tue'fwniM 70.525 oO 130 


290 

<754 

JSS 

5771 

J79 

•9 


•ovgnaa 

~S ftaiHW) 

-I 


Market Sales 


7$ IWE 
4C Amea 
9 Nndoq 

UimSilBfts 


TaOtf 

4« 

ISIJO 

27.03 

7V7.9M 


Livestock 
CATTLE (OHER1 

- enV) Pmr M 

AuB*7 4A10 4102 44lJ6 


M. OofT 4*7P 
7I<7* Dvr *7 71 70 
3X94 FcOfS 7X55 
>40.46 Apr9l 7SV 
JI4IT8 7205 


4»n 

7090 

7X90 

74 n 

Tin 


0*S7 

714/ 

7X47 

7177 

71.75 


Dividends 

Gooipenv Per Amt Rec Poy CMipeoy 

WRECULAR 

. .03 7-15 7-34 


E« iom list* Tut'x um 70JI4 

TurvwniM 91.474 IFP I3n 


•on 31.777 
•115 3X5*7 

• 0S7 119/4 
<075 1727 
>B55 3JW 

• Oe 2.410 


LardAMrttGIEqA 
LDTdAUrttGlEqC 
MBNA Cp owe 
SiriDmCapM 
TwnBPCosSvr 


.01 7-lS 7-34 
.. A16I 9-30 10-15 
jQ 7-25 S-15 
S 7-31 — 


STOCK SPUT 

Coral Fst BrnSm 2 for 1 9 M. 

Clerai Co 2 lor 1 spilt. 

Erapren NodonEI 4 tor 1 spa. 

STOCK 

PennFintBnai . 10 M> 7-31 0-25 

F&MBoneoip . 7-35 8-6 

REVERSE STOCK SPUT 
CWysseyPMrall hrSiMcraespn. 

Zing Tecta one shore of Tnmsritonol 

Anotvsis Comp Tedi Inc tar mrrS- 

INCREASED 


CCBPitaf 

a 

87 

9-15 

KM 

CKFBtmcofP 

s 

85 

7-20 

0-11 

□emOo 

Q 

M 

7-3B 

B-1S 

QeeefBQyBncp 

0 

ZS 

8-t 

8-15 

RoanoktEteS 

0 

.13 

S-B 

8-25 

WOshMvtaH 

Q 

87 

7-31 

G1S 


FEEDER CATTLE lOWERI 
Pet Ant Rec Par sowiM-eeratewio _ 

* Awv7 aso njD n.iD *is7 < 1.133 

INITIAL S6»97 an 01X5 an -is5 jjho 

MmksIPnd o; 7.31 a.is M*? Bin 0155 IU7 -1.17 4.537 

^^^sPEciic"” K s;; ss 

SPeWAL Wimw RTS mo 0120 »I.n 770 

tltasfuraedFnel . 05 7-31 lo-i/ Estitan X4*7 Twlwib* X473 

RE6UUR Tuo-swailnt M554 in sn 

BoratanBOAOB 6 J03! 7-S4 w 

CheecPMCopA. QJ0625 9-IS 9-30 NOOSAeai ICMER) 

O j$7 9mS llkl ^0P9 W • Rp. 

Q S.B *1A O'? 

Q ITS X3I AI 4 ■'» taJO n«s -9J3 Mjm 

O S 725 Vi 0<aw 'MS 7X*0 -127 U.Ta 

a m ril 0^4 ’V-e 'iv -err isd 

O » 7-B ■ 4 WiO 41*0 49J7 -117 IS** 

M IW /■» 7JI EufUes l*n Tue’v rales H4B 
Q s-ii 9-in iuF'5«penrt SIOJJ ur * 1 * 

M 9 S 5 !o;| »*ORREajje$tCMBR> 

'« tal*7 an M.70 0540 -OJO 505 

» Di'i 045 I7J7 E7C -P3S 4.544 

H I- 

U » Es» »i« l.ns Toe’s um SA« 

^ Tvt-scwin 1*5* oH IH 


ChteePtaCopA. 
CoreStatas Fnci 
DlMi&BfodsIreei 
FPrFne 
FlMBoiMD. 
PSP Fna 

FolCOnMdae LW 
GIMHHhdW 
Howralion EM 
MBNA Com 
KJRcsoer 
Northw est Egwlh 
Ottatrt InOvf 
Penhonlte Ranthr 
Pn oedc BonBgp 
Pub Vft Eirtetpr 
Southwest Cos 
UMBFnd 

Wow Bancorp 


o 

Q 
O 

o 
o 

Q 
O 

O JOS l-IS 
O JO 9 -12 10-1 

B .10 7-35 0-1 


Food 


COGDACnCSE) 
lOnwHK wm - 1 w 


AMS 

iRi 

15(5 

1571 


Sta«7 

U9I 

1570 

IST6 

— tt 

Dec*T 

1615 

1519 

1625 


KtarfO 

1566 

15S4 

I5M 

— U 

MorK 

1555 

1577 

I5N 

— IA 

Jkiifl 

I4ta 

15*4 

1599 

^\6 


■M 


Stock TOMBS Exploined 

Sola figoie ore uivlli^Y^ilyNghs and tows relied Itiepravtaus 5 MoeKspkr5 The current Dk* 7 iof 

vnAMnEtt»lole5ttriiilfudor.vrhereoso»or5kxktfytoc9BBrai)nlUi9taS 'verw i«44 I0S4 

l)B been pBl the IMS higivtawrenw Old dnUota ora shown for ItwnnystaOaailr.UriMu '!*?!,** '* 

dhcrms*noleaalBoldiwdcnd4aRonrnnldbbun«nmbbssiidcrttvlDM(k<d(nilKn. ft, ,^r- 1 1 — . 

0 - dhridond olso eetro (s). b - amuoi rata ol aiwdeno plus itacx dtviBenl e • llQiildrtino S'tMnJli loS Vei 32 l 
dividend, ec- PE eiieeeds W.cld - coiled, d - new Teodr tow. da • kns in me km 1 3 monrns. _ 

e- (fiddend dedonid er ptod ki precodm 13 menlhs. t- onnuQl rofe. mcreesed on kbI CO^eec(NO 0 
dedoretloi).|-dindcndinConodiontantesvbjedta)S9ftnQn-««4dcnutOAi-divld(nd ivis -i7S vi 

dedaredaflersptit-upor5tockdwideiHij-div«dMdMid1tiisyeo6orTirtTeddc4i?fT<?d.orno Sao*/ iSS istn iii50 *X45 I13D0 

odion token n kiliBl dvidend meeting, b - dividend dedored 0 * polO tan (•eo*, on Dee*7 isoJO US3I I4BJ0 -2.40 S.540 

ocunnilotii«l5sueiPillidlvidendsinDnnr5.ei-onnualreta.reducedonles>deetafmien. McrU Uin 1 U .10 1)175 ‘125 S.6i3 

n- new iKuomttw post S3 weeks. The hlgh-taff range begins «htMt>* Stall eUraaiira. ™ 

nd-neadevdqliirenr.p-lnitialdividcndonnualrale unknown. PTE- prfa-comKras njiio. grt..f oM6 0-?W_lgVyw .1B3 
q-etesed-endniuh«lfond.r-di¥idenadedoredorpaldJnprec8din4l2fnonms,olUivta^ Twsnenrt 70.*»? on 131 
dividend, s - stock spW. Oivtdentf begins with data of s{^tt. ih - soles. }• dividend po,d m SUCAR-wqrlo 11 fNCsei 

stackinpreeecGngrtmonlhLesiiniotadanhvolweonev^lvidendDriu-disIriburkinijob:. _ -- ««- 

»-iwwveorlvhigh.v-tiodNiBholtaa.*|.inbomijiiplc»orre«ivetshlporbi;IngrTOfDoni 7 cd I 1 J 9 ijm JI5 ISji 2ms 
undertheBonkrupteyAaersecuriiinai»in)edbysut 3 )CDniMnies.wd-)rt)cndi 5 irit>ulea iim nn .ajs wm 

vri - when IssuedT ww - wM) wonents. k - ei-dividend or cv-iigiits. Edb • e>>dninb(,iK 4 i. juiw iijs iipi nji i'iis 

nt-wUhei/lwoiTDnta-y-eK-dlvidendDndsatasiniua«M-yiel(Lx-Hicsinrvli. Str-sriR 3X*5i Tun’s mph 21.07 

Tue'seeenH 19.7*1 on 23i 


HI GRADE 00^02 (MOHXI 
7fjOU> IM.- cwm B«r <b. 

M*7 ID7JD IDkn 107 JO -I.N IBS* 

AugfT IBUO ia40 10105 -1.15 XtOS 

Sep*7 10470 tlBJO 1000 -1*0 S3JS5 

00*7 M03D 10X90 10*0 -IN l-IT) 

NOvVT 10170 1D2J0 10X70 -IN i.SSS 

Dec«7 10X30 lOIJO 101.90 -ISO 7.f»0 

JBI9I 101.10 WISO lOl.lD -1.10 7n 

F«e*l 10140 -ISO US 

MvN MOJO 100.10 lOlID -ON 2.010 

EP.WKS NA Tue'xHtes 1712 
Tue’sopmM NSO* uP C3 

NLVER (NCMXI 
SSOP Vvr «/.- coWi vm-er 
JW97 430S0 41550 4I5JD — IIX 194 

S(pt7 40X 4IU0 4IL50 —11.20 61.477 
Dk 97 0*.N 424S0 B4S0 -IIJD I144S 
tanM -HOJO iStJO -UUP -7740 7* 

Mvff 41500 43040 43030 -IIJO *.427 
Mev*l 4)440 -I1J0 7.054 

/Wta 45ISD 43030 4)020 -II 50 :iM 

sep*i 44U0 -tijo nj 

Esi.mMs NA. Tin’s M«K 11767 
Tue’iopeniiv **.155 up 1459 

PLATINUM rmUER7 

tafpro/ •M)9>ierr<tp^B, 

Mft 40120 40SS0 <0770 -ISO BS 

0(397 295 20 9570 3*LN -XH «.ia 

JexTI mSD 704 « 97.20 >SJ0 IJ74 

E 9 I mps NA Zufi HtaS I.I9S 
Tub's tpwiin I7J9 on 95 

C<crj> Pievtws 

LONDON METALS ILMEi 
DoOon P.* moinc ton 
AtoMewB /MM Grade; 

SpOl 1537' ISSk-^ IS39'.-; 1540.; 

Ponvwd 1566 00 156700 ISHOO 1569 00 
CMirCeibedn (Kleb Grade! 

Spp 7447.00 344600 753760 75S5CO 

PtnriPd 326400 276500 2307.00 S2B800 

Lied 

Spol 62700 63IA0 62800 62*00 

64DA0 64IAS 64X00 64400 


Spot 46)S(I0 M20.00 675500 676SOO 

Contord 672500 6735.00 6870S0 600000 

TIB 

M 5370.00 53W00 5475U SU500 

Strata 543000 SI35QD 553000 SS40Q0 

ZlK QfOciel K)*k Grade) 

6 doI IWS I49}|) 140500 1416 00 

Peiwrad inSOQ 14*7410 149400 I495D0 

Htotl Law Ctov- Quit Opini 

Financial 

UST.BUSIQUei) 

II DiHRon- He or in na. 

^*7 94WI 9410 9419 -.QOI ,'.401 

D««7 M.76 94 75 *475 •103 607 

Sjkrre 9461 M 60 <U40 -aat u 

Esi.soies 725 Tue's.soies r» 

Tufsoeenini l.ns oh 237 

S TR. TREASURY tOOT) 

5IH.no enn- Ms 1 6 «ii 6 M lOG eel 

$6P97 107.14 I06.SI 107-11 . 15 72017 

D(!c 97 106-41 106-51 106-99 -15 2Atf 

Aforft ^1 

Ed. scries NA Tim’s, tetes 31051 

TiWsonnlM 224.746 up 3433 

lemTREASwyfaoT} 

flDDADOlinn- Ms 1 StadsMIOOrM 
Stp97 IO*-2t IOt-13 lOf-a . 12 3<6Jl4 

Dk97 109-14 109-10 109-14 . 13 7147 

MorM W*-« • li 13 

EU.LMes NA TuB't.sdes iiiit 
Tue'sooenini 2 Ua*i oh 43N 

US mEASURriONOS (OOT) 
i9(u<.ii«jiea-i><’. A iTfliii of nopcii 
SbP« 7 II6.27 ll)-)0 IH-S • 24 4B2J09 

Do;t7IU.)5 1)>I0 1)6-10 -34 JXbl 

Mer9lll4-B lU-N IK-N • 24 IXSO* 

Junta 113-21 • 24 704 

EsISOlK NA. Tue‘5.ViW5 J4;j30 
Tw’soaniinf SlOAff ue 1107.' 

UWR 1>M0KTH fCMERI 
S3 mAlm. M) OMOO ert 
Aiiuf7 *133 *1.32 *433 23.ta5 

See*? 94J3 94JI *4r 7 727 

00 97 94 J0 *420 *12* -001 7.773 

Eyydcs 7.11* Tm-’i.soles 4A47 
rue'soceninl 51313 •» M 
GERMAN GOV. BUND (LIFFE) 
bU75aOQO -Pisof tOQpcI 
Vp*7 10267 I02J3 10X43 -0.11 S'lTOS 

Dcc*7 IDI .50 101 M I0IA3 « 0 i; 9.701 

EtLsoka. 151340. Pm.sMes *21213 
Pimr. open ftlT.' SB4406 off 4715 


High Low LMni Qige Opni 

LONG GILT (UFPE) 

CRMOO - M OiSBids of 100 pd 
Sop*7 11A1* 1I»1 1IA14 td-IO 174677 
Itac97 NT. NT. 11409 60-10 1.113 
EW Mries; 64E7& Prav.Mes; 79L342 
Prav.apenlnL: 175.7*0 up 1J07 
»YEAR FRENCH GOV- BONDS (MATIF) 
FFNIODO • pis of 100 pa 
S«p*7 13032 IJOiU 13114 * 0 16 SD1SB4 
DtC*7 9016 f«A* ta.14 4.0)1 43«7 

ElLMltf; 01066. 

Opanlnt.;71XV51eR&66X 

ITAUAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 
rn. an nMtn - pis eMOO ps 
5ep97 13SrB 13530 13511 -017 10X101 
Dec*7 10730 I07A7 >07.73 44106 X330 

Em sMbv 4X436 nev. Mries; 64,6a 
Pie«. optn kil.; I0S^I4 eP x?06 
EURODOLLARS (CMBU 
SI mlltan-pn M 100 so. 

Aue*7 ft.26 *115 *1U 8353 

Sep*7 *«.2< *1S *123 rioi 53UC 

Dr* 7 *4.n 94.09 9104 4QAS 44IA6S 

MratO 9413 *X*f *40) •003 3)X«M 

Jun *0 9173 93AI 9X9S -UN 265.205 

StaN 9X05 ru* *xn -uh 211313 

Decfl 9X74 9X60 *172 eXOO 15X655 

4tv79 an atf axn *-oh ii*.9st 

Jui** *Xt* ast a67 <065 N645 

sep«9 a(6 nn oils -xos hm 

Decta asi ass n.p -ih toaoi 

Eff.sMes J7X9N Tue’s.sfltos 37X473 
• wsopmint 7.407649 eP 0335 

BRmSH POUND (CMER) 

s/jBOpaei w .snweeuiw 

Sep*7 1.6704 1.6602 I.67Q 63A1I 

Dec*7 1.1663 1.6660 1 6634 * 1 *’ 

A'.irfO I.4M0 1.6*90 1 6674 3 

Ex soles 0.1*5 Tiie^.seiBS 11.927 

Tur'sKanei* 41S3 oH 2810 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER1 
1011 . 1100 drtim. spvr con M, 

•S«**? J326 72*0 7101 AIMO 

Dec*; .7W 7m .7337 2i*3 

Mv** 7375 7167 7W 5M 

Ea.saes 6.612 Tue'-, JWes 6 .IP 1 
TuB'seecniru 43.>u cie 35 

GERMAN MARK (ONER) 

l/SOnmceSs. Spc^miph 

S«P*7 5625 SSta 6606 II2.6I6 

Dk* 7 654 itl4 5642 1.126 

AtefO J653 66X3 64.-? 4S 

Ert.ioes U.OM Tim's. Sotos 25 . 39 * 
Tue’soBenini iM.sil oh £JJ 

JAPAISSE TEN IGWERI 

19 5*n4'.tnvsn. Siacr lODven 

s»e*7 B7P 6667 3731 56A52 

oeefT 5350 rs «U 

Mor95 9759 TS 

Esi satos 17.274 Tuv’s.scm Jl.sa 

TuesoeenM SSA 6 I oh 01 

SWBSPRAI9CICMER) 

■/XOCnnonc:,. SpcvfroTK 

3*p27 Sds: 4TH *on 

0cc97 6*IJJ 6056 63M i iq 

^*9 MU ^ 

Es.'jOIm 16.5*2 Tub's softs NOOS 
Tw’steenur 54.E39 up 1)16 

Mexican PESO I CMER) 

500Anpnas spnetisa 
te*7 I:dl7 I 22 GO . 1243 : I 34 M 

Dec*; .11*10 11310 .1197; 10^ 

Msrta .:M50 »^s» «|S*7 4310 

m soles 14 574 Tue u soles 10.414 
Tue's(wenini 3X436 up 25* 

• STERLING lUFFE) 

CSOGCW ■ pis .y !00 pd 

-/les *;3: «1« »4Cl 172.267 

Dec *7 *2 1 * *2i* *XW -PfLi lie sac* 

9267 97-9 9J» -005 1 ”;^ 

^ta 97SS 9X48 *7SJ .0 05 M.tl7 

^98 9263 92^1 

Drata «AI 9164 *?59 *4 05 37.463 

5Vl'99 9244 s;6P 97*3 - 0:5 

est.sMn. 74.432 Pn^y soli>s. 51.73 
Pnev. dom ni . 69X*S8 eff 443 
XMQNTH EUROMARK (UFFE1 
Dft)i'inMiM-c<se7 lOOpet 
Atig77 taA 2 96.22 $ 6 a * 0.01 1.261 

Sep97 96.TS 9i?6 9*78 -coi 784,972 

W9’ H7. M.T 9tn -OCI »K 

Dec*/ tat; «4.' V664 -v6J JJiiSi 

7/«rta *665 *66^ *663 .091 257.380 

" «t44 6*96 9*. M -001 IBBA96 

76J3 *6 18 «6 20 .Q.D UIJJ) 

*5*7 95*1 *595 •oai 121179 

V4irW *5 76 9j.’7 VS 75 ,0 03 OBJS? 

June* #5 5* *5 51 *5 55 -(L02 6IA97 

EsI. sides.' 14X120 Pnnr. spin. 30X01,'’ 
Pn«epMifii' l;5<A*5i 4H ;.7io 
X360NTH PIBOR (MATIF) 

FFSmillan .p)sQl )90i>;< 

^9- 

vSra fcK I ^ '''>*■ 

■<><» ?',367 

•‘‘OW *6jr -ftiif. 9f.>* (Inrn 7 ?»ca 

ot.a 961* es.Q . U'LS 

2?* ZJ” »s*7 .0C2 uS/ 

Junf* *&66 ej,; -DC? OMS 

s*0« «« HJS *|i -oSt tS 

PsI sol<r..3S.2K 
Qpminf }S9tj)uF}.r$* 


Junta 

Septa 

Qecta 


High LOR. UMM Qrae Opbii 


Industrials 

ODTTDHKNCnu 
*UB0 lb' cptn Per b 
Ort*7 ^ TXa 74.10 -«A6 12J30 

Dec*; 74J2 7X76 7120 -4UN 46.707 

MorN 7SJ5 75.15 7560 -4JB *611 

Mpv*0 7415 7X60 7MS -005 X367 

Mn 7175 76.N 7666 -005 1,315 

BAsoles NA Tue’s.soies I1S63 
TiM’smeiiid 77SH eif I095 

HEATMGOIL(NMER7 

48AP* pw. ewes Per bm 

Ai«W 5X10 5X35 5260 -027 37.144 

Sep*7 Slfi SIOS 5US — 0.a MAM 

oa*7 SIN an 5110 -023 22 JI 6 

Nnr*7 55.25 51N 5500 -0.10 I/liS 

0k*7 slid 5560 5580 -016 10137 

Sf!S ^ -0.13 13.9M 

Pe&ta 51*5 56J0 5170 -080 7,763 

73irta 5135 5580 5X95 —ON ISN 

34^ -MS IWB 

Ert.sdes 23.27* Tire's, soles 79,167 
Tue'saDeiidil 15586* up 1*6* 

UCHT SUrST Q9UDE (MMBR7 

) JMt bbl . daPm per HM 
•tore*; l*H 1937 

SdP?7 1935 19.50 

00*7 198* <985 

Nov *7 T9.90 IV.71 

DkT7 19.95 19.70 

Jen99 19.*2 I1.75 

KS -W1 

Ms 90 19.92 (t.TI 19.70 — 58BD 

“ '* 1983 


1983 -084 51075 
1*89 -087 7084? 

19.73 -0.10 3X0M 

10.73 -016 21874 
1*80 -aU 45.20* 
ItM -ai3 21.221 


Asrta 1*85 

MOV *8 


1*85 -117 S4B 
308* -1U6 787) 


XMONTN EUROURA (UFFE) 

ITL 1 firiOlen - p«s 4« l« M 
5cp97 7336 913C 93j; — OC2 111,307 

CM97 *371 f?M 9)&w — 1)01 XeuK 

.‘.lorta *4 04 *3*4 9401 -002 5l‘*l* 

Junta W1 91.n WJ6 _a04 

^40 «J'8I *4 42 *44i .4104 TH 

DtCta 94.« 9454 9457 -flOj ^ 

EtttOlBS' 45,615 Pnm 6467? 

PiOT opMUni JuC7} art iA04 


i/sa 


Esi aaes 112,167 Tue's.ailes 127,050 
Tiresopenint dio.lH Ml 6165 

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Aiiq9T U05 XI5B XI74 20832 

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BM RS,'60Manfl SflSuMns ter a smaS planel ait TaflfifiiitVi c4 In^etriitonal BuLsita MatJwwa CwpMahM 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 17, 19^ 




PAGE 13 


On May 11th, an RS/6000 kno^vTi as Deep Blue 
became the most famous computer on this planet. 





shrugs by man\ tfcuB««7^ 
cause the Joi;ar-\.-n 

in global lorcior-i'v -i,^ 
keis.iheysai^, 

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■ On July 4th, another RS/6000 became 
the most famous computer on this planet. 


















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The same IBM RS/6000”technology that as “Deep Blue 
world chess'champion Garry Kasparov is also conQuenng deep 

For the Mars Pathfinder mission. NASA and Lockheed •'^^^in had 
only one shot at success-Their solution: an onboard flight computer based 

on ever-reliabfe and powerful RS/6000 technology. 

From launch to landing, the computer was responsible for ove ™ 
mission-critical events. On Mats, it’s controlling vital communications 


between Earth, the Pathfinder lander and the 22 -pound Sojourner rover. 

Of course you don’t have to be a grand master or a rocket scientist to 
benefit from RS/6000 technology. More than 600.000 RS/6000 systems 
are in use around the world (Earth, that is), handling everything from 
massive data warehouses to mega-Web sites to large-scale simulations. 

For a closer look at the computer technology that’s taking this and 
other worlds by storm, visit www.rs 6000 .ibm.com 


Solutions for a small planer 


\- 















INTERNATIONA! HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAT, JTiLY 17, 1997 




\ 



PAGE 14 



EUROPE 


BT’s Plan to Review 
MCI Venture Fails 
To Assure Investors 


CV*qdrt( br Or fruR flftpA'Ae 

EDINBURGH — British Tele- 
communications PLC’s share price 
felJ Wednesday after the coni;^y 
said it could not make any promises 
about ±e future of its ambitious 


mti^ plan with MCE Commum- 
cadons Cot]^. before a review of the 


U.S. carrier s prospects. 

At its shar^olders’ meeting, 
British Telecomimiiu^ojis af- 
firmed its commitment to the U.S. 
market and to its relationship with 
MCI Communications, but it 
short of saying wh^er it 


wouid renegotiate tarns of its $25 

billion purchase of MCL 

“CW strategic relationship with 
MCI is of key uiqmrtance to us and 
will remain so," Sir Iain Vallance. 
the chaiiman, said at the company's 


Unemployment 
In Britain Falls 
To 7-Year Low 


Rtuiers 

LONDON — British unem- 
ployment tumbled to a seven- 
year low in June, official fig- 
ures showed Wednesday. 

The Office for Natioi^ Stat- 
istics said die number of un- 
employed dropped 36,500, to 

1 .6 million, lastmonth. the low- 
est level since April 1990. The 

5.7 percent jobless rate was the 
lowest since August 1990. 

Few analysts were sui^nised 
by the data, but they said that a 
drop in aniuial average earnings 
growth to 4.2S percent in May, 
from 4.S percent the numtii 
fore, was unexpected. 

But Che Bank of England's 
new monetary policy ctxnmit- 
lee expects British inflation to 
continue to rise because of ro- 
bust economic growth. 

Minutes of £e committee's 
fust meeting on June 6 showed 
all of its members voted in fa-^ 
vor of raising official interest 
rates to 6.5 percent, from 6.2S 
percent 


annual geoend meeting, which drew 
930 shamholders. 

"There are significant structural 
changes taking place in the U.S. 
martet’* he s^, adding that *‘the 
consequence of diese changes for 
any players is bard to pr^t" 

But the statement failed to re- 
assure inveshxs, and BTs shares 
feU 7 pence to close at 446 ($7.57). 

"Until we have completed our 
review, we cannot give you e^licit 
guidance as to the implications," 
Mr. Valence told shareholders. 

BT’s review will be headed by Sir 
Peter Bonrield, chief executive of 
BT, and Jerry Taylor, chief exec- 
utive of MCL 

ShareholdCTs began calling for a 
renegotiation alter MCH last week 
surprised investors by saying ite local 
phone business could lo% more than 
S800 million this year, or twice as 
much as it had expected. It said losses 
could be even hitler next year. 

Hfr. Vaiiance said both compa- 
nies' boards were reviewing their 
plans in the United States, where 
MCI is Ae No. 2 long-distance pro- 
vider behind AT&T Corp. BT 
already owns 20 percent of MCI. 

MCI's warning indicates how ex- 
pensive it is to compete with U.S. 
local operators, or Baby Bells, even 
18 months after sweeping telecom- 
munications deregulation that was 
designed to promote competition in 
Che local phone business. 

"We never said tiiis was going to 
be easy." s^ Sir Peter Bonfieid, 
chief executive of BT. "Hie U.S. 
market place is in a different place to 
where it was earlier in the year." 

MCI blamed the project^ loss on 
delays in entering the U.S. local 
phone market as a result of what it 
called obstruction ^ the Baby 
Bells. Analysts de^ribed BT's ap- 
parent surprise at MCI’s project^ 
losses "disturbing." 

James Golob, telecommunica- 
tions analyst at Deutsc^ Morgan 
Grenfell, said he had cut his earn- 
ings forecast for the combination — 
to be called Concert PLC — and said 
BT ought to renegotiate the terms of 
the accord. BT had expected two 
years of flat earnings at MQ fol- 
lowed by double-^git earnings 
growth, he said. 

(B/oombcrg, Reuters. APi 


Paris Ponders Thomson Sale 


Minister Says Majority of Defense Unit Could Be Sold 


/teulers 

PARIS — The government 
signaled Wednesday diat it was 
T^y to suireiuto its majority 
ownership of Thomson -C5F, a de- 
fense-electronics finn, opening tiie 
way to outside ailian ees while 
keying an iinpoilant stake in the 
cocmany for me state. 

FmaiKC Minis ter Domimque 
Strauss-Kahn said no decisions 1^ 
been made on the future of Eurc^'s 
t(» defenso^lecoonics supplier, 
whose planned privatizaticm was 
canceled Friday France's new 
Socialist-led government. 

Separately, Sir Geoffrey Pattie, 
marking director of General 
Electric Co. of Britain's defense 
cUvision, GBC-Marconi, said that 
company was ready to form an 
alliance with Thomson even if it 
remained under state control. 

Speaking after attending a hear- 
ing of the French Parliament’s de- 
fense committee. Sir GeofGcey said 
he hop^ the French government 
would make a quick decision on 
Thomson-CSF after halting hs pri- 
vatization last week. 

"We told the committee*we are 
working with both public and 
private-sector companies in 


France.” be said. 'It makes no 
difference. We will adapL*’ 

GEC was one of the oompaales 
q)unied the Ptench government 
in its initial privatization drive for 
Thomson. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn's statement 
was the fint indication by a mem- 
ber of the cabinet liiat the gov- 
enunent was considering letting its 
58 percent stake foil below a ma- 
joniy to give private partners a role 
in die company. 

“If you want to create an alliance 
with a partner, it is dilficalt to keep 
around 50 percent," Mr. Strauss- 
Kahn said after die closed-door 
hearing of the defense committee. 
"That is why the |mme minister 
has talked of a decisive stake and 
not a majority stake." 

Prime Maus ter Lionel Jospin on 
Frittey canceled plans made by tia 
previous center-right fflvemrnent 
to sell the state's stake. His office 
said a new project to muster a 
Ircnch defense-electtonics concern 
arounda "decirive" public share in 
Ihomsoo-CSF would be laundied 
soon but gave no details. 

FiTKJCh newaMpers have spec- 
ulated this would involve the gov- 
ernment cutting its stake in Thom- 


son-CSF to 40 percent, and perhaps 
as little as 33 percent by txio^g 
in new capital but without semng 
any stock diiecdy to the public. 

Many reports kive said the lead- 
ing candidate for a minority state 
in die new structure is Alcatel 
Alsdiom, but Lagardere Group 
called die reports premature. 

The two companies had been 
conqietiiig for control of 
TbomsoorCSF in the atendoned 
privatization plan.' 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn did not rule 
oat lowering the state's share to 33 
percent, die miniitium needed for a 
blocking minority, but said this 
was not the ortly proposaJ worth 
.considning. 

"It's a good solution, but dieie 
are other possibilities.'' he said. 
"Nothing has been decided." He 
said he hoped a decision would be 
made by vW-end. 

Lagardere, meanwhile, saud it 
would not go ahead with a planned 
issue of 5.5 billion francs ($907.8 
million) of special bonds to finance 
hs privatization bid. 

Shares in Thomson-CSF 
slipped a further 1.16 percent to 
close at 161.60 francs after falling 
3.6 percent Tuesday. 






Very briefiyc 


Bonn Inches Toward Deficit Goal 


CimftltSSrO»Sl^FvmDli/k»kn 


FRANKFURT — The federal 
government's cash deficit narrowed 
in June f^m a year earlier, but econ- 
omists said the improvement would 
not be enough to k^ the 1997 
deficit within the limit for Europe's 
planned single curren^. 

But Finance Minister Theo 
Waigel reiterated that Germany 
would be able to satisfy the require- 
ment that its deftcit be no more than 
3 percent of gross domestic product 
to qualify for the first wave of Euro- 
pean Monetary Union. 

Mr. Waigel said higher-than-ex- 
pected govenunent spending this 
)’ear would be offset by a surplus in 
the social security system and other 
factors. 

The Bundesbank said the deficit 
narrowed in June to 670 million 
Deutsche maiks ($373.9 million), 
from a 3. 1 3 billion DM deficit ayear 


earlier, according to figures the bank 
provided in its July monthly report 

The central bank said the im- 
provemcm seen in the previous two 
months had continued in June. 

Economists said, however, that 
the June defich was a positive sign 
that faster growth was playing a role 
in improving government finances. 

"Strong economic growth is fi- 
nally starting to help the budget” 
said Holger Schmieding, an econ- 
omist at Merrill Lynch Bank AG. 

Cash inflows rose to 53.20 biUion 
DM in June, from 46.35 billion a 
year earlier, while outflows climbed 
to 53.87 billion DM, from 49.48 
billion DM. 

But the Bundesbank noted that 
"unsatisfactoiy developments in the 
first quarter" meant federal income 
in the first six months of the year 
rose by just 6.5 percent while spend- 
surged 10.5 percrat compared 


mg 


with the same period a year ago. 

"We're forecasting an overshoot 
of the 3 percent mark," saidEckart 
Tuchtfeld, an economist at Com- 
merzbank. "One month’s figures 
aren't goi^ to change that." 

To qualify for entry into Europe 's 
cutren^ uoioo, scheduled to start 
on Jan. 1. 1999, countries must meet 
a number of economic targets. Ger- 
many is one of several aspiring 
members, along with France, strug- 
gling to meet the deficit goal iafd out 
m the Maastricht treaty. 

The French government plans to 
discuss measures on Thursday to 
curb its deficit. The Socialist-led 
govemmeat is due to announce die 
measures shratly after it releases 
results on Monday of a public fi- 
nances audiL which is expected to 
show the deficit running at 35 per- 
cent or more of GDP. 

(AFX. Bloomberg. Reuters} 


• Renault plans to cut costs by about 20 billion francs ($3.3 1 
billion) by 2000. Philippe Gamba, commerciai director, said 
die cuts were needed to make the coixq>any more effective. 

• Norway's central bank, after spending almost four weeks 
squeezing short-term interest rates hightf, lifted its deposit 

rate by a quarter of a point, to 3.5 percent. 

• The Vatican, which says its presence in international bodies 
helps strengthen global economic progress, was admitted to 
the world Trade Organization as an observer. 

• Russia took steps to create a gold market by freeing the 
prices at which domestic commercial banks may buy and sell 
buUion and preparing to allow banks to export precious 
metals, the cent^ bank said. 

• Switzerland posted its i2tfa monthly trade surplus in 14 

mon^, a filler sign that ex * 

of a six 
francs , 
francs in May. 

• The Netheriands' seasonally adjusted unemployment rate | 
rose to 5.9 percent in the second quarter of lv97 from 5.8 
percent in die previous three mondu; Finland's jobless rate 
rose to 16J percent in June from 15.5 percent in May. 

• The European Couimis^oo used on average annual eco-‘ 
noroic growth rate ^2.5 percent for current EU members in its 
buclget forecasts for 2000-2006, which covers the EU's 
planned enlaigement period, Jacques Santer, president of the 
commission, said. 

• Medeva PLC's first-half profit rose 35 percent, to £45.6 

million ($76.6 million), but the results were at the lower end of 
expectations, aiKl the pharmaceutical company's stock fell 16 
percent to 222 pence. - - - 

• Safr*a Republic Holdings SA’s second-quarter profit rose JT 
35 percent, to $62.4 million. Biocmbtm. Reuters, afk. afp. inf 


iOt 


III to 





iiil'lt'fii'iii 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low Ooso Pm, 


High Low CtOM Pm. 


High Low Oose Prev. 


Wecbiesday, July 16 

prices In loail cuncnties. 
Tefekurs 


High Utt Ouse Pm. 

Deutsciwaiinli T07S0 107.05 
P«ilT«tcM> 4<A5 41M 


High Low ChM Pm. 


Amsterdam 


AEXMwMUS 

Pra»iouKMr.U 


ABHAMRD 

tegon 

AhBM 

AksNoM 

BoopCa 

BiAWesicva 

CSMcw 

DwttfdwM 

OSM 

Eberiw 

FortisAiMV 

Gennia 

C4raccw 

HgogoitniCHi 

INGGraup 

KLM 

KKPBT 

KPN 

NcdlovdGp 

NuMoo 

OceCiintn 

PhBfsElK 


Roriditad Hdg 

Robeco 

RbOwbcp 

RefinsB 

Relents 

UiAmfon 

VeadBlnll 

VNU 

Woven KICK 


tuo 4U0 
1W.90 mg 
1«7.a) 1S1JD 
nsjo 2U0 

1UM 157J0 
42J0 4000 
1(040 101.40 
N.T. N.T. 
m» 2tL4D 
3010 300 

n H .10 

74 7U0 
74JP 73 
11180 MOJO 
33SJ0 327 

110 11030 
PIT. XT. 
103J0 10140 
71J0 70,4 
4040 4030 
aOBD 1050 
69,90 47 

33OS0 S3 SO 
244 21250 
15U0 1J3.I0 

loose 104 

230.90 225 

20040 19950 
*0 47.70 
2Q05Q 19950 
11750 ITOtt 
454.70 447 

II5i9D 11440 
47 4050 
24550 258 


41 

isoai 

185.90 

28450 

141.70 

41.90 
103 
N.T. 

23050 

31 

97 

7350 

73 

1I1J0 

330 

118.90 
N.T. 

103.10 
7040 

45.90 
05 
40 

337 

24350 

15750 

10060 

22090 

200 

47JB 

200.10 

117 

ns 

4090 

265 


44 

1S02D 

10050 

aiJD 

15250 

40 

10170 

«O90 

22S4D 

3050 

9SJD 

7240 

74 

10050 

335 

11350 

174 

103 

71 

44JD 


Dresdner Bank 
fim nhg 
FiesenhuMed 
Filed. Knm 

Ct^ 

HddelbgZmt 
Henkel pfd 
HEW 
HacMet 


Karriodt 

l iOi i mw 

UnSe 

LHClhmso 

NMN 

MonMinBiw 


74 72 

357 353 

151 146S0 
353 3S0.70 
I23JO 127 
143 15540 
106 104150 
4SB <55 

as 03 

84J0 8140 
666 <&5 

9JM 83 
>330 1318 

3SJ5 3105 
546 541 

age 797 


107JS 106.40 
43.90 43.10 
74 7050 
356 352 

1SO20 14650 
IS 347 
122 »9J0 
I«1 I5S 
1045D 104J0 
4SS 45S 
51 8440 
8408 8140 
463 62S5D 
8240 8155 


SA Bteweiies 

142 

140 1410 14050 

IMUIDfes 

777 

7S2 

in 


41 .73 

4)75 

41,75 

41.75 


173 

453 

44 

3osd 

S20 

58.75 

9725 

59 

VOdDfone 

.toi 

70 

70 

SBIC 

218 

2ISL7S 

218 

215 

WhjtbreQd 

865 

84 

8M 

Tiger Ods 

0.2s 

>850 

79 

050 

WBIhinisHiigs 

35/ 

.T.7.S 

336 






WUseiey 

44 

145 

447 






WPP Graup 

143 

■IM 

141 


7SS 

446 

MI 

850 


Paris 


UC<40: 298851 
Pn«taS:29SiJ0 


Z4T 


Kuala Lumpur “Sg£j5g» 


MeWgcneOieirtr 39 3Ki5 
Mi5o 230 219J0 

MiffldiRwdtR 4415 4280 


6&4D 

332.20 

26450 

151 

10150 

225 

199.10 

4750 

199.10 

11740 

44L5D 

11&7D 

4430 

25850 


Praumg 
RWE 
SAPpN 
MwnrM 

SgLcAwi 

SianWB 

SpitoocrOtafl 

Suedzudwr 

UlHHIt 

viiba 

VEW 


STS S4? 
75 7420 
433 423J0 
20950 200.70 
25250 252,7$ 

lisjo 115:20 

1470 1670 
920 900 

44250 44Q50 
I0S:I0 I044S 
570 547 

796 79050 
1485147150 


1318 

3510 

5« 

797 

305$ 

21930 

4370 


1323 

3415 

540 

790 

38 

218 

6400 


AMMBHdOs 
Genting 
Md Banking 

6Ulnfl«iipP 

Petrams Gas 

PralM 

Public Dk 

Henong 

RooihWeild 

RottunomPM 


Sim* Dolby 
~ komAW 


57450 55150 
75 7<L40 
<29 409.00 
203 197 

252 251 

11175 iUJD 
1470 1470 
900 940 

443 43250 
10805 103.95 
$47 567 

796 79550 
1475146750 


TeHaml 
Tango 
UidEnginetn 

m 


1550 

14.0 

IS 

1110 

11.0 

110 

114 

110 

2550 

35 

2133 

2523 

N.T. 

N.r. 

N.T. 

650 

80 

84 

80 

80 

11.10 

1) 

11 

II 

192 

30 

30 

3.94 

116 

30 

110 

3.14 

8 

7.75 

70 

70 

2175 

26.25 

2i2S 

2^ 

130 

105 

110 

810 

1)58 

KL0 

100 

II 

11 

10.0 

100 

11 

1810 

170 

17.0 

17.0 

7J0 

165 

7 

165 


London 


PT<SE 100: 496450 
Pnefoas: 419950 


Bangkok 


5BTMW.U1.66 
Pmtous: 62556 


lUyinfoSvc 

BmgkokBkF 

KningTholBk 

Pnlinler 

SkanCwncntP 

SMiConiBkF 

TtHcnmnsM 


256 340 253 234 

354 242 246 240 

3450 3351 3650 3125 

430 386 420 382 


ThoiAhwan 
IfmBk 


TMfmBkF 
utd Conn 


634 SU 
133 119 

40 3750 
99 $6 

154 144 

118 111 


500 532 
131 1IB 
40 3650 
59 54 
1S4 140 
118 108 


Bombay 


SOMW 80 M(K 41042 
PreMiis: 423152 


BoUAgto 
KMustLeMr 
HliidusinAn 
hid Dev Bk 
ITC 

rMianagqrTel 
RehmoeM 
Stole Bk India 
Stori AulhMlIv 
TflhiEnoliico 


841 

1365 

49350 

99 

519 

393 

35450 

34650 

2555 

433 


82550 83175 826.75 
1342134455134875 
48555 48755 4SB 
9575 9655 9575 
503 50555 SU7S 
28150 28650 288.75 
3A50 34950 35050 
32950 32050 344 

2450 2450 24J5 
4B355 405 41750 


Brussels 


BEL-AMw: 1521.11 
Pnvtoin: 2489171 


Almeni 

Bscsfnd 

BBL 


Colniyl 

OeBnBUim 

EledrabH 

Ele cbaOiifl 

FoilisAC 

GevBOl 

GBL 

GenBongue 
Kiedidhaia 
Pehn ft to 
P nwf f in 
Re»N*r 
SoeC 
Seim 
TrecMel 
UCB 


16400 16325 
7930 7700 

9730 9500 
3235 3150 
19100 18725 
2000 1935 
7760 7720 

3580 3530 
8170 8000 
3290 3250 

6000 sm 
14925 14700 
15100 14775 
13BSD 13350 
4975 4930 
11& 10950 
35» 3550 
21575 2147S 
15000 1487S 
148000 14IOOQ 


16375 16250 
7930 7700 

9710 9510 
3230 3185 
19100 18025 
1990 1935 
7730 7730 

3550 3550 
8150 8030 
3290 3280 
5980 5900 
14825 I475D 
ISDSD 14825 
13850 1300 
4940 4965 
10975 1)050 
359 3575 
2159 21500 
14B7S 14975 
146300 137600 


Copenhagen 

391 393 393 

39 374 362 

982J0 985 

413 409 

_ 79 743 

410000 4BOOQ 410000 401000 
2BSQ0D 279000 


BGBO* 
CoitabmS 
CedaiFon 
Omlseo 
OwiDomkoBi 
(VSSMndbraB 

D7S1912B 

RAMS 

RohLmihanw 

NmNordbkB 

SophnBaB 

t^Oanmka 

TiwBoOla 

UndonenkA 


401 


415 407 

7SL75 741 


Helsinki 

HEX Gaeeralinda: 34990 


PraiMWr03«4 

EnsoA 

490 

49.10 

49.10 

460 

HuMmioUI 

Kembp 

230 

520 

236 

1?7 

20 

530 

235 

$7 

Kesko 

00 

77 

089 

770 

Merita A 

22.10 

M0 

71 9C 

31 

MetraB 

1710 

173 

171 

174 

Mdse-SeitoB 

45 

440 

440 

440 

Nesle 

10 1370 

10 1370 

NditaA 

443 

426 

441 

4:4.0 

OlioiuYblvnKW 

)97 

196 

1«7 

197 

OuhikumiHiA 

105 

1040 

UU.0 10:0 

UPMKynimone 

'ildnwl 

1160 

U10 

136 90 

73SSe 

04 

0 

00 

90^ 

Hong Kong 

HengSea9!l$44lB2 
Prevtous: 1545754 


830 

80S 

8 If 

575 

BKEostAski 

0.0 

310 

iin 


CetlwvPoaiie 

150 

14 45 

14 7$ 

1.970 

Oironairana 

77 

7175 

7S0 

76 75 

Cklidinsiiud 

234 

270 

73 ns 

7105 

CMnaLluM 

CtIcPadK 


4170 

43 9C 

iA 

47 70 

414 

460 

4’.ra 

DooHenoBk 

470 

460 

471) 

4a 50 

Fimfteific 

9.3$ 

9.10 

?i9 

9J£ 

Hong Luno Dev 

14.15 

130 

14 

14 ;s 

HoneScnqBk 

1140 

111 

112 

152 

NenoeiWRAw 

U5 

840 

«« 


Henderson Ld 

69 

6175 

57 

6875 

HKOumto 

»2S 

ISIS 

1185 

1140 

HKEIeortc 

r 

3140 

310 

37 

HKTdeamn 

190 

1.9.97 

1909 

)9t9 

HuueaeB Hdgs 
HSBCHdqs 

5 

769 

44 

799 

4.93 

;53 

IIG 

?94 

HiridiiswiWh 

6725 

6175 

66 

6175 

NrsanDee 

JdnsenBHdg 

230 

23 

33 Gf 

2170 

230 

VM 

77 7S 

77.49 

KenyPieps 
New WM Dev 

190 

470 

19.15 

610 

1935 

46 

|90 

47,0 

0riMta)PiH4 

3 

70 

759 

3.98 


10 

US 

1.17 

1.16 

SHK Praps 

91 

K70 

bR7S 

079 

Shini Teh KdiB 

4.0 

40 

160 

470 


755 

70 

70 

/,70 

smOunaPnsI 

715 

750 

715 

765 


69 

67 

570 

079 


0 

210 

310 

33 

VHwelecfc 

18 

I74A 

I7JD 

1875 

Jakarta 

emnerihtad«s73a0 


Pre*iees:72ZjT 

Astra bin 

8500 

840 

0400 

8S2S 

MhPlInden 

18SD 

ino 

105 

1800 

BLNegom 

1458 

14CD 

USD 

140 

GodoioGorm 

9450 

977.9 

9375 

9in 

Mocemenl 

5000 

4R0 

4875 

4800 

indetood 

5450 

5400 


5450 

tndeeat 

700 

709 

7479 

705 

SasiDeeRM HM 

9450 

9250 

9350 

9390 


SOTS 

4875 

9000 

497.9 

Tdetoimudkasl 

4000 

3950 

3975 

3950 


Abbey N0H 

AfcoDemecq 

AntfiaiWotor 

uSoGrew 

AsHcBrtads 

BAA 

BanAqs 

BBS 

BATlnd 

BenkScoHond 

Blue Cud* 

BOCGnup 

Bools 

BPBind 

BfflAerasp 

BntAinmiTS 

3G 

Brit Land 
BntPefbn 
BSkrB 
BtalSted 
BMTdecom 
BTR 


BA 

442 

aos 

&35 

1U 

5J1 

607 

1199 

0.U 

534 

4.« 

430 

ia«7 

&2S 

106 

1X0 

7.05 

2.45 

644 

ao9 

457 

1.S1 

49 

102 


eurmohCosbol >0.15 


Burton Gp 
Coble MnHess 
CofturySdnu 
CorOon Cwiirn 
ConanlUnion 
CxtimsGp 
Courtguldl 

Oiigns . - 

Eioclracumponenls 445 
E.VIOmip 114)5 

Sntrgt aojp 
enterprise Os 
FcmColonMI 
GcrriMGadenl 
C£C 
GKN 

GtauVMccnw 1470 
GmnsdaCp 7.82 

GiBndMet 
CRE 

CraaMsGo 
Cuumess 
DUS 


655 
712 
I 75 
v.i: 
X77 
I0.2B 


IHIdgs 


241 

235 

240 

231 

7M 

789 

775 

775 

7810 767A6 

778 

770 

1083 

994 

1000 

995 

3» 

382 

395 

388 

430 

419 

419 

05 

44810 

435 439.44 

438 


Johannesburg AniMMMgpt 


Frankfurt 


DAXs 49184 
9WM6: 4121.13 


AMBB I860 

AdU« 236.0 

AMnnzHdg 439J0 

AMani 180.90 

Bk Berth 9.70 

BASF TOJO 

».70 


BevCT 

Behi^ 


BMV. 
CKACCotoi*i 
Cominenfaanh 

Dokn*rBeii2 


92.90 

40.90 
1538 
197 

5135 

15305 

» 


1790 

225.10 

42850 

179 

309 

70 

5753 

7090 

7&3D 

90 


195 

5110 

15130 

949 


180 1790 
22550 225.10 
438 420 

.180 179JD 

^ « tojs 

TOSS 680 
57.70 56.96 
90 77.70 
7S0 74 

9290 89 

00 48S0 
1522 1S3S 
196 1910 
S3J5 520 
tS10 10.9 
9490 020 


Aimdoonrid Bis 

Aiigi^Ced 

Aiigi^-C^ 

AngtoAnGOM 

AiigioAn bid 

AVMIN 

Sorionr 

c&smim 

DoBeeit 

Drirfbnleh 

fstlMIBk 

Geneor 

GFSA 

hnpiMKdgi 

higwrCoal 

tscor 

Jehnninindl 

Ubor/Hdgi 

Leery Uh 

UbUfeSbBl 

Whono 

Noii^ 

Nedcor 

RembtondtCp 

RleMmnnt 

RustPhnnum 


320 310 
266 265 

265 2630 
2560 2S4 

196 194 

15 1475 
&SD a 
25.15 35 

167J5 166 

320 3205 
39J0 3879 
2810 19.90 
96 95 

W 6335 
2&2S 747IS 
204 296 

*4 W 640 

39 XT 
Kf.TS 
18 170 

99.75 99 

18.75 1850 
1000 ICO 
46.10 453$ 

70.75 7025 
75 740 


2 i20 
2680 26U0 

264 2640 
2S47S 257 

195 194 

U IS 
a SOS 
35.10 2110 
1670 16625 
320S 320 
3910 330 
1990 19 95 
96 9SJ5 
64 62 

2490 282$ 

3 3il1 
6475 640 

3tt 268 
146 I4t.gi 
18 170 
99 ICO 
:8.70 1865 
'.K0 90 75 
.^.95 U 
;O0 760 
7S 7475 


HH 
ta 

ImelTobeeeo 

KtoBOsher 

La»i5« 

Load Sec 
Liwno 

Lead GenI Gig 

U^sTSBGp 

LiianVorilv 

.VtcrtsSecfieer 

MEPC 

Manny Assd 
NawndCria 
Non Power 
Nomest 
Hesi 

Nonndi Union 

Orange 

P&O 

Frason 

Piknqtan 

PowerGBi 

ftwmerPoiKfl 

^denttol 

RadndiGp 

RenkCram 

RediiRCahi 

Redtand 

Reed inn 

RaitoMbiitiri 

ReaeKMgs 

Ream 

RAICGfOiip 

SmbTsm 


Somgboiy 
sctwRleis 
SolNraasile 
Power 
Secuncor 
Severn Tieni 
ShdfTrarrinR 
S)^ 

SaahN o phwf 
SmOhKPne 
SnKhs ind 
SttientEfec 
aao e ni B Ch 
Stand Oiorier 
Tde&Lrie 
Tnoa 

Thames TiiOler 

3iGraa0 

TIGiow 

Tomkais 

Uidicver 

UM Assurance 

UtoSem 


6?7 

19S 

473 

626 

60 

10 

21.17 

9.12 

373 

7.S8 

870 

9J7 

177 

<0 

773 

1.93 

897 

mr 

13 

899 

50 

70 

U7 

812 

4SS 

873 

I.U 

810 

470 

433 
70 
Z50 
9J3 
812 

485 

839 

90 

20 

455 

1810 

476 

3.96 
436 
17.9S 

7.70 

475 

20 

890 

436 

1813 

1.75 

12J9 

70 

484 

7.10 

1846 

435 

436 

7.97 
495 
818 
297 
17.92 

434 
7 14 


7.96 

453 

70 

6J0 

141 

842 
590 

120 

848 

547 

429 

42) 

)044 

802 

3 

1U3 

671 

20 

60 

7.95 
40 
148 
43S 

1.96 

9.97 
178 
5.92 
S3? 
SAS 
671 
6.IB 
310 
579 
40 
1890 
64.* 

6.96 
1.70 
396 
301 

10.08 

130 

764 

604 

205 

4«3 

60 

64)5 

584 

034 

892 

342 

70 

856 

945 

169 

42S 

6.98 
10 

5.78 
S 

1870 

247 

&45 

860 

746 

321 

2.0 

443 

642 

1.17 

7.78 
462 
60 
70 

843 
9S5 

2.96 
5Z1 
813 
S.9S 
22S 
90 
821 
60 

9.97 
446 
187 
40 
170 

70 

445 

243 

878 

424 

9.05 

IJ1 

120 

70 

410 

892 

1003 

43S 

A.’!: 

768 

497 

5 

20 

170 

439 

70 


874 855 

40 456 

7.n 70 

431 423 

10 10 
50 50 

897 4^ 

120 120 

861 850 

50 SSD 
437 431 

426 4)9 

1875 1863 
814 809 

104 30 

130 1341 
487 678 
20 20 
4S5 60 

808 7.97 

457 449 

10 151 

446 453 

1.98 1.98 

18)3 999 
l.a 178 
5.96 597 

591 5S6 

500 6.13 

481 6.99 

470 6 14 

313 311 

585 50 

443 459 

1892 II 

60 40 

7.U 6 97 

1.75 i.n 
907 9 

365 169 

1026 1007 
1395 1380 
7.71 769 

626 e06 

2.9S 30 

468 448 

612 406 

478 675 

50 587 

2072 20 

9.03 80 

30 353 

70 734 

20 30 

951 9.0 

874 

45S 434 

7.12 60 

1.91 1.0 

50 577 

50 50 
1870 110 
20 20 


546 551 

8J4 &S3 


771 70 

134 373 


2.10 2.10 

60 60 


469 469 

10 1.19 


70 7.79 

469 462 


417 413 

70 771 


30 251 

90 9S6 


106 20 
585 $52 


114 816 

599 597 


2J9 278 

90 971 


374 272 

44 454 


1804 10 

472 466 


194 387 

47l 433 


17.9S 170 
70 70 

468 447 

365 365 

890 8M 
431 474 

1805 18)0 
1.75 160 

120 1251 
733 779 
47-f 474 

7.10 6 85 

1847 lOCI 
478 434 

43$ iSS 
7.91 7.73 

4H' 49? 

5.12 493 

390 397 

170 1764 

433 40 

7.12 7.11 


Madrid 


Bokoradox: 624,15 


Pnvtons: 61929 

Acnbm 

010 

7700 

2810 

2770 

ACESA 

1065 

IIUI 

ItWl 

180 

AmmsBoicdan 


010 

6020 

600 

Arenmna 

9410 

920 

940n 

920 

SBV 

1300 

179611 

imi 

1290 

Braiesto 

1490 

1475 

140 

1480 

Bonkhitcr 

27000 

36510 

2700 

scam 

BoiCaifeDHISS 

610 

6000 

6onu 

600 

Bee Pender 

36580 

.1570 

35770 

3990 

BcDSanhmder 

4705 

4675 

4645 

4695 

CEPSA 

4985 

4975 

00 

490 

Cmribienie 

3S9S 

010 

1470 

3315 

Ca^Mopbr 

9590 

13730 

000 

1760 

9470 

13660 

900 

12610 

FECSA 

1775 

120 

17M 

124$ 

GnsNutiMil 

3210 

3170 

3170 

31710 

Iberdroto 

1130 

170 

180$ 

1770 

PrycD 

3300 

2195 

3775 

310 

Repsd 

6610 

1500 

650 

640 

SevakmoBec 

1505 

140 

150 

1455 

Tobootlen 

8380 

KX 

030 

8)0 

IMeInmrn 

4450 

4405 

447.5 

4430 

Union Fenoso 

1240 

1735 

120 

120 

Vblenc Cement 

2500 

250 

2SM 

2SM 

Manila 


PSEIndR 258725 
Pmlew:3651N 

Awto 8 

17.75 

170 

170 

18 

Ayata Lend 
BkPhllelsI 

220 

22 

72 

22 

IS7 

147 

153 

10 

C&PHDIIKS 

9 

180 

80 

9 

MenSo Elec A 

85 

870 

H?0 

85 

NIetnBenK 

550 

50 

.545 

$50 


6.10 

.5.70 

170 

6» 

PCIBonk 

242 

70 

30 

242 

PhBLeneDist 

945 

975 

93.5 

90 

Son MmudB 

0 

510 

57 

610 

SM Prime Hdg 

7.10 

10 

4.0 

7.10 

Mexico 


BdsoiadR <74847 


P/ftiogs;4594J3 

AHoA 

510 

S50 

$60 

SS0 

BaitoKlB 

19 64 

19.0 

1562 

18.94 

CemnCPQ 

39.10 

370 

}8» 

0.r$ 

araC 

130 

1.1.56 

IT0 

1334 

Emo Modemn 

460 

410 

46 AI 

4l70 

GmCenaAl 

510 

00 

00 

$10 


2A7 

7.42 

747 

7A3 

Geo rm (nOuisa 

3S0 

ai2D 

350 

350 

Kimb Clerk Mes 

310 

00 

JlTO 

36$S 

TdneaCPO 

1190 

117.70 

11770 

MB0 

THMekL 

30JS 

200 

285$ 


Milan 

Mia Tetenaoee; 14010 


previeus: 141840 

AHeeniBAssic 

14050 

1490 

16005 

1498$ 


4555 

4385 

010 

400 


070 

560 

5775 

Se95 


1739 

1465 

105 

1575 

Benetton 

77700 

7610 

7H0 

7400 

Cieditaltaltono 

3680 

•iMtn 

350 

360 

Edfsen 

IMO 

R538 

850 

870 

EHI 

1020 

111075 

INTO 

10)0 

Fiat 

670 

6565 

6675 

650 

CmeinB AssK 

3590 

3380 

35M0 


IMI 

IS90 

1070 

15720 

1580 

INA 

2680 

75M 

76m 

260 

■Mu 

MeSoset 

CM) 

530 

530 

5305 

760 

7495 

757(1 

750 

Madobaiai 

1300 

11330 

11935 

1130 

Wtentenisfln 

110 

1134 

110 

1126 

OiKlti 

47J 

05 

415 

1690 

Pamotol 

3475 

2415 

240 

2410 

Paen 

470 

4SD5 

4725 


RAS 

15285 

1470 

15170 

1470 

Rob Bona 

73.00 

71650 

716.0 

73MD 

S Paolo Torinn 

1430 

1390 

1430 

1400 

Stot 

1110 

1070 

11070 

106S5 

TetoCMi ItaW 

610 

.590 

610 

5920 

TIM 

M» 

5535 

5645 

5575 

Montreal 

todosWWs Mr 271 1.M 


Prsvion: 364192 


46 

45.15 

4115 

46 


3816 

78 

7816 

97.95 

CdnUhlA 

380 

3R.10 

3855 



40 

390 

30Ui 

39 

GaMelm 

1&BS 

I8ta 

lO’J'i 

1BV5 

Gt-weslUfecD 

33>i 

32.95 

33 

33m 



410 

41.0 

0 

iiwodoRCrp 

N.T. 

N.T. 

3111 


nas 

085 

78A5 

2iu 


lOlk 

180 

181$ 


Power Com 


37m 

3820 

37(6 

34>h 

31» 

241m 

34J0 

QuebeurB 

27BS 

27A5 

270 

2785 

RoamCoanB 

9.95 

9.0 

9.95 

ra.05 

RoinlBkCita 

67.78 

68W 

67.U 

M 


Accor 

ACF 

AirUqinde 

Alc^AlsIh 

AXA-UAP 

Bonoolre 

BIC 

BNP 

Cn ndP tos 

Cnmtour 

Cnslno 

CCF 

CsMmii 

OuisthinDIto 

CLF-DMo Fmn 

CndOAgrtcnie 

Owione 

ElMwitotne 

EtidontoBS 

Eumdhnev 

Euiahoinil 

Gen. Eon 

Ham 

bitotd 

Lataige 

LMrand 

LtSed 


954 

20430 

984 

785 


750 

MS 


710 

1030 

50 


1005 

678 

893 


763 


no 


u 
LVMH 
Suu 


941 

948 

944 

01 

2050 10.10 

9S5 

975 

972 

70 

762 

772 

37130 3840 373.0 

722 

723 

732 

938 

947 

90 

257.30 25830 256.0 

110 

HAS 

1164 

4320 

4073 

4316 

28810 

797 

287 

2S120 2580 

2S6 

70 

703 

703 

994 

1030 

«1 

574 

577 

575 

1252 

1253120.10 

992 

999 

991 

664 

674 

464 

870 

870 

864 

80 

80 

80 

130 

160 

IBS 

747 

7S6 

70 

417.10 

01 

415 

70 

793 

785 

30.10 391.70 

38818 

1)0 

7)70 

1)0 



Hi«h .Low 

OM 

PlW. 

EledrahaB 

60 

60 

658 

660 

EricsionB 

343m 

330 

3400 

3280 

Henries B 

3540 

334 

337 

331 

IncentiwA 

699 

695 

698 

698 

InvstorB 

429 

421 

427 

.at 

MoDoB 

200 2650 

2680 

2640 

Hontiantien 

20 

264 

2660 

2S70 

Phomnnipiohn 

SmdVikB 

300 

251 

2850 

249 

2980 

2500 

2880 

3470 

ScnnkiB 

234 

232 

2330 

233 

SCAB 

173 

171 

171 

172 

S-EBonkenA 

9Z0 

900 

91 

91 

SkaraMFon 

342 

324 

337 

334 

SknnslieB 

356 3480 

3530 

30 

SKFB 

216 

214 

216 

212 

Spoibraiken A 

184 

179 

180 

10 

StanA 

1300 1280 

1300 

10 

SvHondraA 

255 

20 

2520 

2500 

VobmB 

213 2010 

212 

206 


Sydney 


ABOldMrhWT 26460 
PtestoM; 26370 


Suuljioni 

WdiSkB 


PortoosA 
Pernod Rlcord 
PeugeoiCIl 
Pbtodt-Mnr 
Pnmodes 
RernuH 
tori 

Rh-PMUencA 

Sonofl 

SduwMer 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 

SteGenenHe 

SooeOn 

SiGoboh 

Swr 

SvnrtiMbo 
Thomson CSF 
Total B 
Ustniv 

vAo 


2558 2507 2Sa 3495 

1627 1996 1690 1579 
EOUK 103 675 7W 669 

39IJD 385)0 3850 30 

413 40440 408 400 

315 30810 30830 3060 
619 60 401 406 

2940 2890 3900 390 

2749 2652 2699 2630 
152 lU 1510 100 
176) 170 17SD 170 

361.0 2570 25820 259 

564 556 560 553 

3430 3290 3420 3360 
1060 1054 1054 1069 

$93 956 01 S4D 

7)0 693 7H 70 

310 3031 3098 3025 
899 881 899 076 

170 160 17 MJS 

70 765 770 7N) 

167.0 161 16)0 1610 

604 587 05 03 

1)6 1)3 )I46D >13140 

4190 407 412 10 01 


Ansar 

ANZBtong 

BHP 

SremMoshid. 

CBA 

CCAnall 
Coles Myor 
Gonuleo 
CSR 

Foster Bran 
GootoMtoRd 
(Cl AadiaUa 
LmdUeose 
MIMHda 
NolAustMnk 
MitUirtudHito 
News Corp- 
PodOeDwrtOD 
tower Inti 
^iraodcDSt 
RtoTido 
StGeoraeBonk 
W«C 

MiBiKBkIiig 

WDoSidePet 

WooS^ 


85) 

84? 

846 

844 

90 

9.72 

9.7B 

9.75 

18d6 

1806 

1819 

1827 

113 

lO 

102 

106 


2170 

1116 

2125 

I6J3 

26 

1116 

1175 

1160 

lira 

110 

170 

153 

170 

146 

174 

leO 

173 

172 

190 

le 

1B3 

1B2 

20 

2J7 

157 

156 

1J3 

10 

10 

1.10 

I2J7 

180 

1155 

1151 

27 JQ 

270 

27 JO 

270 

10 

1.78 

1J8 

1.81 

190 

I9B3 

19.12 

19.17 

20 

2JS 

U7 

106 

121 

123 

124 

119 

30 

313 

316 

346 

183 

177 

177 

178 

7.95 

7.90 

7.90 

7.90 

210 

210 

31.61 

210 

8AV 

837 

80 

844 

7.75 

70 

7.72 

71$ 

78f 

7.69 

TM 

7.67 

IIJB 

11.16 

110 

11.15 

113 

107 

III 

104 


The TMb Index - 

PtiGmasrria-OOP.IilLNtmYorittima. 

Jan. 1. rce? » 10a 

LOVWl 

Clmnga 

Tkchnnga 

year to data 
%c)ian9e 
+21.87 

MTorkl Index 

iet.76 . 

■1^67 • 

■(•2.a6 

Tlnglonal hxksxm 

Asta/PadRc 

132.10 • 

+^39 


+7.02 

Europe 

190.50 - 

48.00 

+1.60 

+18.18 ' 

N. America 

212.41 

64.10 

+1.97 

+31.19 

$. America 
hidiistcW ImtaxM 

173.59 

+9J4. 

+5.69 

+51.70 

Capitalgoods 

236.55 

+7.89 

-13.45 

-i38>K) 

Consumer goods 

202.87 

+T.94 

+0.97 

-125.67 

Energy 

199.53 

■*027 

+3.24 

+16.88 

nname 

137.29 

+2.73 

+2.03 

■ +17.89 , 

Misc^neous 

181.39 

•13.05 

+1.77 

+12.12 

RawMawria^ 

193.33 

+3.81 

•12.01 

+10.23 

Sorebs 

169.98 

+3.59 

+2.16 

•F23.78 

maths 

173.11 

+3.23 

+1.90 

+20.67 

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High Low 

Close Pne. 


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MHMdPodesn 

M/toufTmt 

Murato wfB 

NEC 

NOon 

NSdtoSec 


Nlpp^m: 


sao Paulo 


Taipei 


stock MritM inddL- 95440 
PrevtowK 95550 



CoPioy Lite Ins 
OMUg Hwa Bk 
Qilno Tung Bk 
QwnOnvkmir 
QditoSieri 
FirsIBdik 
ForiMsaPtosiic 
HUB Non 8k 
Inn Comm BK 
Non Yb Plostics 
ShhilCwdlile 
Telwaii3<n)l 
Tolung 

UMN&nEhx 

UldWorMOtoi 


151 

MB 

87 

193 

280 

1)90 

650 


142 1470 141 

114 114 1140 

D 83 86 

IBS 185 190 

38 A0 38.0 
MS 115 1170 
61 63 650 


Tokyo 


Seoul 


AHnomolo 
A8 Nippon 


NIp^Ab 


C u m porihi todos; 739.71 
Prariuns:75S0 


rSiM »au 

OocweaHHiiy 

Npmdal Eng. 

KtoWotais 

KoRoQPwr 

KoicaExchBk 

KomMaTcl 

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PdwnglnmS 

Samsung Dbtoy 

SonBunElec 

ShinhonMnk 


10100 900 9990 10300 
n20 740 750 760 

2150 2090 2100 3)60 
1240 1240 1740 1340 
2740 2650 3670 2740 
540 510 510 550 

49300 4(100 48700 48500 
010 3720 2800 3800 
6330 6310 6380 63700 
4560 440 4540 4540 
6730 66000 OUa 667W 
980 920 930 1810 


Singapore »«S5|“JSS 


AstoPncBraw 

Ceicbosto 

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CvwCMrtHC 

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Oslo 


eWMcK 69137 
Pre9liK:60J1 


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154 7Jt 
10 1U 
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T5D 14690 
46 45 


154 I49J0 
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NoiAHvdlD 
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146 

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441 

402 

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155 

145 

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6 

4 

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13 

12JD 

1190 

13 

120 

120 

80 

080 

00 

19 

1840 

1800 

162 

10 

140 

10 

9JS 

90 

213 

70 

159 

70 

}fo 

156 

30 

%S6 

314 

IM 

XU 

190 

40 

190 

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3.96 

102 

1190 

1160 


915 

90 

90 

155 

60 

6J5 

7 

100 

18$ 

13 

I2.«0 

120 

195 

10$ 

10 

2840 

270 

2810 

318 

30 

30 

20 

7J6 

20 

20 

176 

Its 

106 

IM 

10 

150 

15 

1&20 

106 

3.98 

4 


AsoML-. . 
AsoMOwm 
AsoMClBS 
BkTdonMItsu 
BkYDkflhann 
Bridgestone 
Conan 
QnibuEtoe 
□wgdHiElcc 
DolNippPilnl 
DOM 

Dd-ldriKong 

CMmBa0 

DoKm House 

DdMSec 

DOI 

Denso 

East Japan Rf 
Ericrt 
Fonuc 
IBank 
iPhdo 


170 

IM 

>M 

IM 


62 

620 

630 

72W 

tf 

69 

72 

117 

DO 

1150 

109 50 

149 

MI0 

M« 

139 JD 

W 

010 

0 

5)50 

170 

163 

IM 

162 

64 

6 ) 

6)0 

670 


NBriM 225: 2035874 


Pnvtons: 1006941 

11 M 

11.10 

110 

110 

7S9 

763 

747 

741 

XWI 

350 

A$0 

3560 

877 

BSS 

864 

890 


653 

653 

651 

1061) 

HMD 

1060 

100 

2tao 

3170 

2240 

2160 


40 618 631 623 

2940 284 290 770 
340 00 340 3240 

300 200 3040 2040 
1900 I960 1970 I960 

350 250 2570 2570 
776 70 772 7S 

15)0 140 IS0 140 

50 50 50 525 

13S0 130 1340 1340 
ai 887 


10 

10 




30 


410 


Stockholm 


10 1370 


SX 16 Mk 35590 
Pnftaas:348SJl 


575 

561 

570 

563 

agab 

110 

1080 

109 

38150 

377 


374 

ABBA 

111 

110 

111 

100 

1-I4 

145 

144 


741 

235 

20 

16641 

1440 

1460 

144 


10 

IS 

w 

«7 

$87 

$87 SB30 


718 

7790 237.0 

480 

470 

00 

470 

AlrigOu 

295 

2910 

293 


236 

IBS 

70 


HocMuniBk 

HItacM 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

IHI 

ttodiu 

ItfrYbkodo 

JAL 

JpOonToboGeo 

Jusco 

Knfbna 

KonsdlElec 

Koe 

KrtwosokllBry 

koun Steel 

mnuNMRy 

KutoBmu^ 

KobeShxl 

Ketnolsu 

Kubota 

Kyocera 

KmhuEkc 

LTCB 

Marubeni 

Mold 

MduiCanm 
lAatwEIccind 
Matsu EIk INK 
rAdsubishi 
MltviBKhlCi) 
Mllsuhlslil |l 
MiIsuIhsIu EsI 
MOsubHhi Huy 
•VIRUJbUtllMol 
Milsutiuhl Tr 
Milwd 


8600 

280 

SBOOa 

760 

450 

160 

490 

170 

110 

130 

»n 

100 

439 

01 

7050 

S43 


Wpimn . . 
WppenSieri 
Nssmi Motor 
NKK 

NomuiDSec 

NR 

NR Data 

op Paper 

Osaka to 

Rkeh 

Pohm 

toufo Bk 

Sonk)n 

SmnvSard: 

SmifoElec 

Secom 

SetouRwr 

SoUswOen 

ScUsu House 

Seuen-Eleven 

Shoip 

ShAofcuEIP'.yr 

SMmiJu 

SMHibuOi 

ShboMo 

MinafcoBk 

Sdibenh 

Sony 

Sumitomo 
SwnHniioBk 
SumlChrro 
Sumitomo Elec 
SumitMeld 
Sufflri Trust 
TabM Rnnn 
Tskeda Chem 
TDK 

TotukuElPwr 

TokoiBank 

ToktoTAaiine 

TAmglPwr 

T0yoEleclron 

Tokyo Cos 

TekpiCore. 

Toecn 

Toppon Print 

TORnind 

TdShiba 

Tostom 

TdmTnist 

Toyota Motor 

YrtmanoocM 

a;Kl»iO;tlM0 


150 

70 

400 

)67g 

300 

698 

1000 

BS9 

574 

349 

864 

223 

151Q 

M90 

5010 

636 

314 

1678 

1310 

841 

420 

140 

517 

870 

570 

>940 

110 

920 

150 

1960 

60 

3340 

190 

12 » 

730 

1050 

110 

190 

$0 

300 

311 

1)0 

330 

3570 

940 

300 

1110 

140 

220 

720 

306 

665 

1290 

180 

804 

755 

2920 

9*5 

310 


150 

70 

010 

160 

1990 

690 

1850 

80 

564 

3Si 

80 

215 

140 

1990 

4790b 

425 

07 

160 

1300 

8T3 

410 

150 

50 

8540 

550 

1010 

110 

900 

1510 

1950 

631 

3260 

1890 

170 

710 

1030 

110 

law 

07 

1990 

307 

110 

320 

340 

970 

1990 

100 

1390 

00 

6800 

303 

6S 

130 

180 

797 

70 

290 

949 

340 

3060 


150 

786 

010 

160 

3010 

694 

1000 

859 

56$ 

364 

01 

317 

1490 

11708 

4980b 

625 

30 

160 

1300 

80 

4250 

160 

515 

5660 

570 

1010 

lira 

910 

)S» 

I960 

674 

330 

1920 

120 

710 

1050 

110 

180 

07 

200 

310 

110 

320 

350 

930 

2SS0 

110 

1410 

220 

77)0 

204 

657 

1260 

1860 

797 

70 

290 

964 

340 

310 


1510 

790 

4730 

16X 

190 

691 

1030 

838 

567 

347 

B64 

221 

150 

IA9Db 

4760b 

60 

325 

160 

1320 

813 

4140 

150 

494 

850 

5510 

«■» 

110 

0X 

150 

i960 

60 

00 

180 

730 

1010 

MX 

180 

497 

I97D 

07 

M« 

320 

340 

00 

300 

1070 

120 

2360 

660 

30 

652 

120 

180 

797 

70 

280 

926 

330 

300 


Meete 

Ne wbri dge Wef 

Nonindolnc 

NonxnEim 

Niiern Trieeem 

Now 

Dim 

toKcbiPdlm 

PctnCda 

PtaesrOme 

PbaMkn 

PotosnSosk 

Rennissoiice 

RioAigaffl 

Rogers Conlel B 


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Sonar 
TwsmonEnv 
TcckB 
Trieglobe 
Tetas 
Thomson 
TorOomBonk 
TransaKo 
TimsCdoPipe 
TnmikRnl 
Tnrec Hahn 
TvXGdd 
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7IJ15 69.0 
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147 1«0 
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220 220 
Z0.90 200 
13 121* 

MOU 100 
360 350 
35 3165 
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55.10 S4W 
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36.0 36 

__43 410 
270 260 
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26'4 260 
3110 330 
4316 420 
160 16Vb 
77.70 270 
63 62 

0 0.0 

60 50 

36'4; 260 
94'4 0 


2U5 

7B60 

290 

330 

1450 

120 

280 

270 

220 

300 

12.0 

109 

360 

0 

250 

546S 

210 

36 

420 

270 

510 

260 

34 

430 

160 

270 

63 

29.0 

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360 

9316 


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538 

3500 

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470 4920 4760 

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203 

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4920 

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685 

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2160 

1690 

527 

344 

677 

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316 

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1970 

507 

506 
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4800 
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1800 1660 
430 415 

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609 603 

21W 910 
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539 539 

344 347 

678 6BS 
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570 SI6 
960 0W 
1990 190 
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330 730 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY', JULY 17, 1997 


PAGE 15 


ASLUPACIFIC 


CACd 


J 


a®;Vyj/ 


Future Shock for Thai Business as Baht Floats 


By Thomas Crampcoo 

Special to the Herald Tribune 


has brought with it a revolution in 
corporate cultures as the country 


F M A 
1997 


M jj sZVj. 
Wedn 


BANGKOK — Behind the 
darkened shop front of one travel 
agency along Rajaprarop Road in 
c^tral Bangkok, bu^ess has 
boomed since the Thai baht floated, 
but nobody is booking tickets. 

Buzzed through the door ahcr a 
sideways glance from the boss, for- 


adapts to a fluctuating baht from a 
rock-solid currency. 


ei^ and Thai customers line im, 
ca$h in hand, for service at one of the 


^i 389.67 1 •snVr^- 


-asir CswTi'J.'' 


ca$h in hand, for service at one of the 
ci^’s most popular underground 
i^currency-exchange centers. 

“Many more people have been 
coming to buy foreign currency 
since the baht floated, ’ a woman 
counting U.S. dollars behind the 
counter said. 

Just around die comer, seated be- 
hind a stack of boxes, the woman 
running another exchange center 
said demand was so great last week 
that she tan out of dollar bills. 

From ille^ backstreet exchange 
centers to bank and corporate 
headquaners, Thailand's easing of 
the exchange rate early this month 


rock-solid currency. 

“In the past, the currency was 
risk-free, but now the cost of risk has 
risen,** said Aipom Chewa- 
krengkrai, chief economist at 
Deutsche Morgu Cranfen in Thai- 
land. “ft really is a big change.*' 

The result h^ been a son of future 
shock for Thai banks and corpo- 
rations as currency desks arc ex- 
panded and computer equipment is 
updated. Employees are being 
trained and consultants rushed in 
from overseas. 

Executives hurriedly consider 
whether and how to construct 
hedging operations for vast enier- 
jmses long sheltered from the vi- 
cissitudes of cunency turmoil. 

For more than a decade, the baht 
was pegged to a secret basket of 
major currencies and remained oue 
of Asia's most stable currencies. At 
8:30 A.M. each day. the central bank 
set a central rate around which com- 
mercial banks could buy and seU 


bahu Daily volatility was limited loa 
band of just two saihang — two one- 
hundrec^ofabaht — on either side 
of the centra] rare. 

On July 2. with a slowing econ- 
nny and lagging investor confi- 
dence. the floor fell out of the baht 
when the central bartk allowed it to 


Duangmanee said. On Wednesday 
the spread was down to 0.20 baht 
Ernployees at Bangkok Bank and 
Hiai Farmer's Bank said their cor- 


porate currency desks would soon 
be expanded and computer equip- 
ment updated. The currency-ex- 
change boards in most Thai Farm- 
er's Bank branches have been shut 
since July 2 because the computer 
system needs as much as 1 S minutes 
to update all btancbes. 

“If there U a half-baht change in 
the currency, we can lose a lot of 
money in IS minutes.’ ’ a staff mem- 
ber said. 

Thai businesses have also faced 
tough changes. 

“This has required a fundamental 
change in our business operaiioits.** 
a Siam Cement Group executive 
said. One of the country’s largest 
and most diversified conglomerates, 
Siam Ament’s 1997 profit will 
probably be wiped out by S4 billion 
in unhed^ foreign debt 

Two ^ys aft^ the baht was 
floated, Siam Cement centralized 
the currency <^>eratioas of its eight 


trade freely. Since flotation, the cur- 
rency has fallen os low as 30 baht to 


rency has fallen os low as 30 baht to 
the dollar, a IS percent deprecudion 
from its usual level. In late Wednes- 
day trading, the dollar stood at 29.40 


baht, but some analysts expect the 
baht to fall as low as 32 or 35 to the 


dollar within six months. 

“Companies will have to hedge 
more and be much more pnideot,' ' a 
Bank of Thailand sp^tesm^ 
Duangmanee Vongpraonip, said. 
“It has been a difficult adjustment 
for the banks, but the spr&ui has 


Quickly narrowed as they learned 
the new sYsterru'* 


the new systerru'* 

Because of a lack of experience 
with all-day live trading, the spread 


between buying and selling races 
has widened from 0.09 baht before 


the float to as much as 4 baht. Mr. 


divisioiis for the first time, the ex- 
ecutive said. More computers will 
be purchased and more staff hired, 
ftnri consultants from overseas will 
be brought in to give training in 
currency-risk management, he said. 

“They have to come from an- 
other country, because nobody here 
kriows how to do it.'* he said. 

■ 2 Currencies Under Attack 


Hor^Kbrjg' 

Hanging 

17DM- 


■'Skigapt^ ^ • 
StesStsllm(» ... MifctoiSSS 
• 2250 jr- 22000 — 

220oA -•■'21000 — -- 

'2150-\ — ■ 20000- — 

V\i- ■ 

2000 - 

M A M J' J 


16000 

15000 

14000- 

13000^'\- 

12000-..^ 


F M a' M J J 
1997 


laooofwW — 


''F M 'a M / 


'EnOiat^' tetfex. . 


Speculators launched attacks on 
the Malaysian ringgit and the robust 
Singapore dollar, pushing them 
lower against the U.s. dollar, news 
agencies reported. 

“The unoeriying thing is the herd 
instinct,” Alison Seng, an analyst at 
MMS Intero^ooal, said. “Ou or 
two r^icml cimencies gets attacked, 
and the otiteis also come down.** 

The Malaysian ringgit slid to 
2.S8S0 to the dollar, compared with 
2.SS6S to the dollar Tuesday, as the 
central bank abstained from inter- 
vention. dealers said. The U.S. dol- 
lar clos^ at 1.4466 Singapore dol- 
lars, compared with 1.4412 dollars 
Tuesday. 




•- HangSeng ' . 

Sfa^iqpdco . . StrtAs TMaa ■ ^ 
tol^ 

I Baoi^aaiii, " ' S5T~ • 

! Beetd ■ ■ ■ Cjon^io^^dea 

iTatpei.- > . ;St^Ma^U^X 
IHMa . .FSE'- 

• Cen yo sitelndwc . 
'Vtoffinston ' rizSMoT^ . 
Borntiay ' ■■ Sen^tttelnd^' 


.1^4^ •46^48734 4X27: 
.i,917ia ..-0.99 

^^4M9r2.B»iSD 
'2MSa.74. +1.44 

>J004:09 tjOISAa -.-OBS. 
'S63.96-. • 825:66 ' +6.07 
7^72 '7S5.05... -2^ 

.9,S4A55 9.555^ -at? 
i^987J36 2,65566 
■723;50 '722.21 ' ^.16 

.2,47769. 2670AI’ +0^7 
'4,183^ ' '4.2214)2 4X89. 


Source: Tefekurs 


iDicnidii. 4ijl HeniM Tnt<uiK 


«s hy.aboul 20 biihon 

eGamha.comn,er‘^" 

nake the ‘ 


uakeihecompanymor.S"' 

i. afier spendins aimn.., ( J"' 

er^t r«i»« . * '‘^'liTur., 


Seoul to Lean on Kia’s Bankers 


rates higher. 
nt. to 3.5 Perce.-’: 


nt. to 3.5 perce.i: ’ 
its presence m 
sconomic progress, v. 
laiion as an obsen er 


TCate a gold market h\ 

«,mmercialb:mk.rn:n-hT2! 


i 12ih momhh ;rj.k- >urnk»- 
te\pi?ns arc oui*''’ •• tni- - • 

.Juncfromar?M>ed:N!s.|„J 


ionaSiy ad;u«ed 
K ‘..econd qua.«er ..ij 


hrec rscnlhi; Fin!und'> iobls«c 
me from 15.5 ssr^'-. n; in \|j; 


tissionu>«d ar. .S’. ,r,ndi: 

jcrcenworvurenj fcl. n-.eir,hcp.ii- 
KX>-2CKJ6. which .■ .;r-, jhc q 
iod. Jajq'jc> S^nier rr^-Mdenioif 


aif profs: rose .'5 pcrtrjii. 
m ihc resu!i> w ere -i ilic 1- 
nhaveutieol • •inckt.-t 


CumpdrdbnOurSt^FinmDopiirkft 

SEOUL — The government said 
Wednesday it would put pressure on fi- 
nancial institutions to honor debts tb^ had 
guaranteed for the cash-strapped Kia Group 
in hope of saving thousa^ of subcon- 
tractors from going bankrupL 

**This isacrisis because of the likelihood 
5,000 subcofltractofs will go down like 
dominos,'’ said Song Chi Young, an econ- 
omist at the Korea Institute m Hnance. 
‘-'The impact is going to be felt throughout 
die economy.” 

The froancial crisis at Kia led to concern 
about a ibllow-up impact on banks and on 
other debt-ridden companies that rocked 
die South Korean stock iraikeL 
• InvestorsrushedioseUsharesuKia’ssix 
listed affiliates, sending all six plunging by 
their one-day limits, as fears moun^ over 
the future of die group that has been ^ven 
an initial two-mondi reprieve by creditors. 

The Korea Composite frid^ fell 2.03 
percent, or 15.33 pomts, to close at 739.72, 
and the exchange's baofdng subindex 
tumbled 5.U pcacenL. 

; Kia announced a drastic plan to slim 
down Wednesday, a day after a consortium 


of banks and rmancial institutions stepped 
in to rescue South Korea's eighih-Iargest 
business congJomeniie and bead off a chain 
of bankruptcies. But analysts said the 
moves were little more than a bandage and 
that Kia was likely to be broken up and sold 
off, with its carmaking flagship company 
possibly going to Samsung Corp. 

“Kia’s problems potentially could do a 
lot of damage,” said Graham Couitn^. 
director of Asian economics at SBC -War- 
burg in Tokyo. (Bloomberg, Reuters, AP} 

■ EU and U.S. Assail Korea on Cars 


European and U.S. automakers joined 
forces to tty to persuade Seoul to roll back a 
“frugality campaign” that they said was 
blockuig their entry into the South Korean 
car market. Asia's largest outside Japan, 
Ageoce France-Presse reported. 

fafnillfe Blum, secretary of the European 
Automobile Manufacturers* Association, 
and Aiit^w Card of the American Auto- 
mobile Manufacturers' Association met witii 
Korean offidals but said they had made no 
progr^. Seoul insists that die frugally cam- 
paign is a dtizens* movement and has noth- 
ing to do with the govemmenL 


ngsS.W aii.’::.!-.., r'^-r rr-.'iiiQ 

-tXTL i.',-'. r.’’. 


Hanoi Official Urges State to Seek Private Capital 


Agence France-Presse 

HANOI — Finance Minister Nguyda Sing 
Hung has called for the creation of more joint- 
stdt^vCcinpanies and the privatization of 
stajt^owned conpanies to .try to ensure 
growth, a report said Wednesday. 

t>Q its frontpage, the official Vietnam News 
quoted Mr. Hung as saying, “It's time for the 
government to push for private investment” 
He add^ '*We must accelerate the for- 
mation of joint-stock companies with shares 
sold largely to the population.” 

Mr. Hung said his idea might meet with 
resistance at some levels of government, in- 


PEIPSI: New Fast-Food Concern Plans Expansion 


yhr a‘r.:» '■-'4* ‘ "*• 
yf.— A'.--'-/ 

f T:i i-itt -<r*. 


Continued from 11 


■ ~ ^ mid-1990s, its pattern 

was volatilfry, with resuhs 

tied almost con^letely to the 

>. i.:* cw " success of re newest 
..:f products. 

i}). Analysts predia that Mr. 

: • -k )! Novak will try to nra around 
:?■ 'li ^ Pizza Hut using methods that 
i'Sl.':' wodeed at KFC after he took 
■•'J h 0 ''®r there in 1994. At KFC, 
I he poked up die decor, in- 
; stituted intensive traimng 

fjr .-r.y programs to inipiove service, 

' pushed new products sudi as 
' • ; chidteD pot pies and directly 
- : tookonBos^Maiket,aunit 

i' of Boston Chicken lac., by 
selling mix-and-match buck- 
: ^ ete of Tender Roast chicken 

parts to consumers who did 
=T N not want to buy a whole or 
:.J> half of a chicken 
’''• * Mr. Novak has already in- 
stituted - a $50 million re- 

vanQnng tk Pizza Hut's 

menu, service and.ambiance. 
In addition, at he has 
I-;- f' % qudled a rebellion among 
L i7f 'f. longtime fiandiisees angemd 
-.-.y SrT- a. at enem adimant on dieir ter- 
. 4 ? litdry from new KPC outlets 
r and has adopted a generally 
benevolent attitu^. toward 
them, in contrast to Pq»iCo's 
old imperious waiys. He is , 
— ' — likely to do the same with 
franchisees fOTlricon’s other 
J 'j chains. 

“David Novak is a super 
; J: ^ ' '‘leader, and 1 made the 

i rj: ;3‘ ■ pofit last year diat I've ever 

;j: i) had,’’ said Pete Harman, an 

-.iz i:' owner of 265 Pizza Huts in 

four'Westezs 'states and a 


'.X-: 

ujr 

.‘W.5 

’Z?T. 

JJ,-- 

:k 

-’-a:?- 

sc-'S.-y’- 


_;;y 


’“.-r-V" 


Vienna 


.5:” r'-'r-r-;' 


‘P- Wellington 


re;r. 


alnt>ad, and Mr. Peaison said 
Tricon would use its large 
cash flow to expand overseas 
even more than PepsiCo did 
“Internationally, we are like 
Mc^nald’s back in 1980.” 
Mr. Novak said ”Our op- 
portunity is huge.” 

Mr. Pearson returns to the 
fast-food fray after more than 
a demde in less consumer- 
driven pursuits. After resign- 
ing fi^ PepsiCo in 1985, he 
lectured oo competitive 
strat^y and managemeot at 
Harvard Business School un- 
til his retirement last y^. In 
1 99 1 , he became a prindpal of 
the New Yack ravate invest- 
ment-banking Arm Clayton. 
Dubilier & Rice Inc. 

Mr. Novak is deferential 
toward his new boss, saying 
that he suggested Mr. Pearson 


during the search for a chair- 
mazt ”i have known him for 
10 years, and l’4e seen him in ' 
action,” Mr. Novak said 
“and I'm looking forwaid to > 
learning from hm” 

Mr. Pearson, at P^iCo’s , 
headquarters in Purchase, and 
Mr. Novak, to KTC's 
headquarters in Louisville, 
Kentucl^, talk two or three 
times a day on the phone. 
“When we both cooclu^ that 
David is ready to take over on 
his own.'dien I'll hand him the 
baton,” Mr. Pearson said 
But before be leaves, hfr. 
Peaison vows to prove die 
doubters wrong. The new 
.company, be says, represents 
“a great challenge, a chance 
to prove to the world dial this 
business is ev^ bit as good 
as we thought it was. ” 


ADVEBTISEMENT 


ADVERnSDMEIVr 






Zurich 




fonxier plaintiff in a now-re- 
solved fianch&ees’ lawsuit. 


aSS = _ t''- 

AirS'.'i"'’ ' a 

iv '■ - 

3aef '-Si.*, f 

f rJ-S 


1 

I? 

ITS* 




• .r 

-J- 


Mr. Harman jxedicted diat 
“drere win be a whole new 
attitude toward us in the new 
company.” • 

The thrust , of the emn- 
paiiy's strategy is targeted ex- 
panrion — and ficron the 
skei^ics wfaO 'Wray about a 
glut of fast-fpbd outlets. 

Tricon srillalso aim to grab 
more of the $62 . billion in 
sales in die intemational fast- 


I KAlfBU CORPORATION 

(CPRa) 

I TIv ■■mI— ihil a from 
JiIt 25. 1997 >1 Ku-Aaoditie N.Vn 

AiuteraiiB, divl epD. no. S? 
beeonmiiiiM ^ on "AmdaviO of the 
WBs Kineka Corpontiaa (Kancgah^ 
Chemiea] Indiutneo Co. Lt4). will be 
pnablewilli Dflc. 4^ per CDEL rm. 
IM chb 0 ^ vhh I&, ^70 per CD1L 
raw. LOOO per reewe S1JB.77, 

etpfi Yen SSO p. AJ a^ded^oo of 
Jnpneie Yen S2.S0 » DBn OSl 

per GDB«. IM ^ Yoi » D8( 
9J0 pv CuR icpr. Tm At. IRthoet an 
Affiibiit 20* Jsm«e t« “ }« “ 
DSf. 1.Z2 per 0)B rm. 100 aha. Yoi 
^ rofirUMjwCBR le^JWO 

ibOa TQ& i)R 

AAcr3a09J997 Ae dhidend v91 oolr.lf 
nd nndcr deAwiwin ofZfl* Jap-to-V^ 
DOl 4^ DBa MjU Kn. IN ari 

maeeeedMee vitfa Die JapaacK tax 

‘ ^iiHCT mDAM nEPOStTABY 
' .COnPANYN.V. 
Aaneterdem, July 11, 1997 


CASIO eOMPirmi GO., LTD 

<a>Rg) 

Fk tm d erM uJ MHOBneea that ei hn 
Jnly 2S, 1997 al Kaa-AsaoeiaUe N.Y_ 
Anaterdaoi. dir. ran. no. 97 
(aerMQwnied hr an '‘AnidaTil'^ of the 
CDRj Cam Compnier Co. Ltd viP be 
parable wHb D6n 1845 per CDR repr . 
100 1 ^ with Du. iLuO per CuB. 
repr. I4M ^ (iHt, per rec-dtfe 9103.97. 
0 «a Yes 1X50 p. inJ after dednethw of 
T5« JapaneM In ^ra 187,50 » DSs. 
XM per CDB r^. 100 d». Yen IXISf 
— Due 32^0 per CDK rnw. 1.000 ihs. 
Witbevt «D Affidavit 8M Janmeie tax » 


Yra 250.- » Dill. 4SB per CDB repr. IN 
shi. Yen Z50X- > DATaSJIO pCT CDR 
nr. IjON 4^ w31 be dedneled. 

30MJ997 the dividend wtB ottb be 
paid under dcdncfionofZOIbJm. to with 


Dfb. 17 ^j Dfie. 173 ^ nep. IN rad 
1.000 she., in aeeordanee with the 
Japueae to roabtiona. 
AMSraUIAH DEPOSTEARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Ameterdnni,July 11, 1997 


-'^2 c '-i. 

strrj ' . 


'i - Jbod maricot. PiepsiCo's res- 
^tanrant busines. has added 
TOO units a year mtemation- 
jlo 'A ^ ally in the past five years, and 

.£i_ ^ th^ oronss win he acceler- 
;•': J at6d,^.Hov^$iakL 

KFC .'already gets moref 
•'!r ''.‘i' Ihan half its . sales from 


Peter Catranis 

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A .. 


Very briefly: 


• Hopewell Hrrfdin^ Ltd,*s shares fell 3.9 percent, 
to 4.90 Hong Kong doUara (63 cents), after South- 


ern Co. said it had sold an unprofitable power plant 
to the Hong Kong company. Separately, bankers 


• Hong Kong’s police charged Kevin Wallace, a 
former executive in Merrill Lynch & Co.*s 


to the Hong Kong company. Separately, bankers 
said GS Superhighway Holdii^ Ltd., a sub- 
sidiary of H<^iewe^, planned to raist $600 miUira 
to fund a road project in southern China. 


ravate-baoking unit, with money laundering but 
fri^ him after an executive from National Aus- 
tralia Bank Ltd. paid his bail 
• China’s grain production this year will be below 
1996 levels because of a worseirag drought in the 
northeastern and central pans of the country, a State 
Statistics Bureau agricultural official said, 
to Telekom Malaysia Bhd. plans to buy at least a 10 
percent stake in Sistem Televisyen Malaysia Bhd., 
Malaysia's top commercial broadcaster, to try to 
Ixoaden its reach in the media indus^. Telekom 
will pay about 102 million to 107 million ringgh 
($39.9 nvilli fMi to $41.9 million) to buy the stake 
from Malaysian Resources Corp. 


in each trade, a move that analysts said may make 
the market less transparent and could hurt trading. 


to Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index added two red- 
chip stocks, or shares of Ch&ese conqjanies listed in 
Hrag Kong: China Resources Enterprtee Ltd. 
and Cheung Kong Infrastructure HoWngs Ltd. 


' Hong Kong has the atnliiy to build more than 
00,0(10 apraments a ytar te alleviate the housing 


short^e, die territory’s frnancial secretary, Donald 
Tsang, said. The announcement came after Tung 
Chee-hwa, Hong iGing's chief executive, pledged 
to allow constructira of at least 85,000 apaitments 
a year to deal with the shortage. 


to Jakarta’s stock exchange plans to discontinue its 
practice of disclosing idmtities of brokers involved 


to India’s gross domestic product grew a greater- 
tban-expected 6.8 percent in the 12 mon^s that 
ended in March, according to a revised estimate. 

to Australia joined several other countries, includ- 
ing the United States and New Zealand, in re- 
questing World Trade Organization consultations 
over India's import restrictions on 2.700 items, 
to Hitachi Ltd. plans to scale back its production of 
1 6-megabit dyimiic random-access memory mi- 
crochip to cope with a slumping market, according 
to news reports. 

• Toyota Motor Corp. is considering opening a 
representative office in Moscow this year and pro- 
ducing vehicles in Russia in the future. 


Reuiers, Bloomberg, AFP 


The Leading Russia Investment Fund 


eluding the Communist Party, which has 
made state-led growth a foundation stone of 
its industrialization policy. 

“1 understand this damage the rights 
of some state irumagers and adm^straiors,' * 
he said, “but tius is the only viable way at the 
moment to develop die national economy.” 

Mr. Hung's renuuks came amid widespn^ 
indications that Vietnam's ecomxny is losing 
Steam. Its growth in industrial production 
tuinbied to 1 .7 percent in the first haff from 1 0 J 
percent a year earlier, and siaie-owned steel 
and cement plants have stociqiiles of unsold 
ou^t despite emergency import bans. 


Ranked Number One in the World 

Among Hedge Funds by Managed Account Report lnc.=^ 

Among International Equity Funds by Nelson Information lnc.=*=* 
Among Russia Funds by Micropal Emerging Market Fund Monitor*** 
Among Overseas Funds by Lipper Analytical Services International Corp.**** 



$795,000,000 

The Hermitage Fund 


is closed for new subscriptions as of July 7, 1997 


Net Asset Value Per Share increase since inception on April 22 , 1996 
Net Asset Value Per Share increase since January 1, 1997 


72533% 

237.59% 


StartingAugust 1, 1997 we are pleased to announce the opening of 


The Hermitage H Fund 


Hermitage Capital Management Limited 


Republic New York IntemationanVust Co Ltd 


Russian Represratative OfBce 
9, Dmitrovsl^ Pereokrft 
Moscow 109031 
Ihisaia 


RepuUic NatUMOal Banlr R iiiMing 
RoeduPre 
St. Peter Port 

Guernsey, Channel Idands GYl ILU 


* MArch31.i996toMareb31.I997 ** MarefaSI, i996ioMarefa31. 1997 
••• April30, 1996»Miy30,1997 ••”JaDuaiyl,l997ioMarch3I.1997. 


Past performance of the Rennitage Fund is not an iudicatioii or guarantee of future perfomtance of the Hermitage f1 Fund. 
This document U not an invitatioD to subscribe for units in the Heimitage II Fund, and is by way of information only. 
The sale of units in The Hermitage U Fund may be restricted in certain jurisdictims. 






I 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1997 




Wednesday’s 3»45 P.M. 

n» lan mosHraded Notional Mattel securSes 
In tens of doite vabek updoM twice 0 yeo^^ 

TteitssocteBtfABss: 

















































































































































































































THimSDAy, JULY 17, 


World Roundup 


An American Rider 


M»i«Fa]b(siaar F^n jovs Fling at Fame 

TENNIS Thomas Muster, playing I J ^7 

fw the first dme since mid-June, 

« Frenchman Wins the Stage 
j^jn^ d Oerman Still Wbars Yellow 


TENNIS Thomas Master, playing 
fw the first dme since mid-June, 
fai'lflri Wednesday msfaake his clay- 
court slunm, losing to Alb^ 
Portas, &4?/-S, in the second round 
of the Mercedes Cup in Stuttgart 

Muster dominafed <» c lay for two 
years, but he has lost eight match^ 
on the surface season. His nisti- 

ness showed against Porhis, a Span- 
iard ranked No. 50 in the world. 

Bcxis Becker, the seventh-seeded 
local hero who has announced his 
gradual retirement beat Karim 
Alami, 7-6 (7-5), 7-6 (7-5). (AP) 

2 Ride lodD Sunset 

FOOTBALL Charles Haley and 
Jay Novac^ two Dallas Cowboys 
with eight Super Bowl rings be- 
tween ^tn, retired Tues^y be- 
cause of similar back injuries. 

Haley, 33, had 97Vi sacks in his 
1 1 -year career and is- the only play- 
er to own five Super Bowl rings. 

Novacek, 34, a ti^t end who 
tniw-ri last season with a degen- 
erative back condition, caught a 
club record 339 pasw. 

'*rve been fighting depre^ion 
for a long time because of this in- 
jury, but you know. I’ve had a 
pretty good career,” Haley said. 
“It’s time to move on.” (APi 

Cards Release Valenmela 

ffAcpnaii. Fernando Valen- 
zuela, the Cy Young Award win- 
ner, has been placed on uncondi- 
tic^ release waivers by the St 
Louis Cardinals. 

Valeokieia, who claims to be 36, 
began tbe season with San Diego 
b^xe a sK-playu trade on June 13. 
Tte left-han^ went 0-4 with a 5.56 
earned run average in five starts for 
the Cardinals and is 2-12 overall, 
leading the majors in losses. (AP) 

Baggio Heads for Bologna 

BOOCER Roberto Baggio said he 
will be moving to serie A side Bo- 
logna next season from AC Milan. 

• Yuri Pohrebuyak. head cquch 
of Ukrainian premier division club 
Metalurg Manupol, was banned for 
life Wednesday for beating up the 
referee and one of the linesmen 
who officiated over his side's home 
defeat Sunday. (Reuiers) 


By Samuel Abt 

Inienutiomil HeraU Trilmne 

P erpignan, France — George 
H^capie enjoyed about 45 
minutes of Celebris Wednesday 
afternoon, which, when all was said and 
done, was still three times what Andy 
Warhol promised every American. 

What if Hincapie, 24, and his three 
corapaniofis in a Tour de France break- 
away were eventually caught? That 
pens constantly. The important thing 

TeUE Di F eanci 

was that Hincapie, a native of New Yoric 
who lives in Charlotte, North Carolina, 
was at tbe front of tbe race, showing tiie 
colors of his U.S. Postal Service team 
and attempting to leave his persoi^ 
mark on the bluycle race. 

Like the remaining 175 riders, all six 
Americans in tiiis 8 ^ edition of tiie 
Tour are crying to do (he same as Hin- 
capie. Their success can be measured in 
thin slices: Just get^g through Che 
Pyrenees and reddling tbe day off 
Thursday aC the halfway mark m the 
three-week race is an accomplishment. 

“More imptxtant than anything is 
just to finish this thing,” said Bobby 
Julich, 25, a Colorado native who lives 
in Sacramento, California, and rides for 
the Cofjdis team based in Prance. 

“The Tour is a huge experience,” he 
said. “I never thon^t it would be tiiis 
big.” 

Only one American ranked among 
the t(^ 10 finishers of Wednesday's 
stage. 192 kilometers (1 19 miles) down- 
from the principality of Andorra to 
Perpignan in the south^t of France. He 
was Frankie Andreu, 30, a native of 
Dearborn, Michigan, who also rides for 
C^idis. Andreu finished eighth after a 
mass sprint for fourth place. 

The winnerof the st^e was Andrea's 
and Julich’s teammate, Laurent Des- 
bieos, a Frenchman, who was timed in 5 
hours 5 minutes 5 seconds in hot and 
sunny we^er. Carlo Flnco, an Italian 
with MG, was second. Sergei 
Oucscbakov, a Ukraine with Polti, was 
thini. 


Outschakov crossed the line frist in a 
sprint by tbe three after tiieir late break- 
away succeeded, but was disoualified for 
inteifering with Desbiens. Just as the 
Ukraine was raising both aims in what he 
thought was victory, the Fxenclbman was 
raising his right haM to signify a 
He was upheld when fDm of tbe finish 
clearly sb^ed Outschakov swerving to 
his left to block his Cofidis rivaL 
The main group of pmsuers crossed 
18 seconds later, and Frederic Mon- 
cassin finally reccwded the sprint “vic- 
tory” he has soughtaU year. 'Too bad for 
tte Frenchman it was for fourtii place. 

Jan Ullrich, a German with Telekom, 
continued serenely in the overall lead- 
er’s yellow jera^ ^ 2:38 over Richard 
Virenque, a Freochman with Festina. 
Abraham Olano, a Spaniard with Ban- 
esto, is third, 4:46 b^ind. 

Ovonight, Virenque was docked 
with a 20 -secoxid time penalty for re- 
cehuDg water illegally from his team car 
near the finish and then abscrfved. Judges 
ruled that the water had been pouml 
over his bead — legal — and not given 
him to swallow — a criminal act 
In adifition to Julich and Andreu, the 
nine-man C^dis team includes Kevin 
Livingston, anativeof St. Louis who 

lives in Austin, Texas. With Hincapie 
on U.S. Pos^ Service are Jemis- 
(», 32,. of Salt Lalre City and Tyler- 
Haunilton, 26, of Massachusetts. 

Andreu is riding his sixth Tour de 
France and has finished all so far, a 
testimony to his toughness. Hincapie is 
in tus second Tour, and the others are in 
thw first 

Their roles vary, according to team. 
U.S. Pdstai Service has two leaders, 
Slava Elumov on the flat and Jean-Cyril 
Rnbin in tiie mountains, and the Amer- 
icans ride support for tiiem. 

“My job is to make sure Robin ar- 
rives in good position at the first 
climb,” Jemisrai explained. “I have to 
give everytiiing I’ve got” 

Cofidis, however, has no leader since 
Tony Rominger breke his coUaibone in 
a crash last week and withdrew. So 
Julidh, Livingston and Andreu are more 
free to ride for themselves. 

Overall, alter this 11th of 21 daily 



Lain-nl Rrhouri/'nir -famiMnlFYntf 9 

The Tour de France pack climbing out of Andorra up the Envalira pass toward Perpignan on Wednesday. ^ 


stages, Livingston ranked 33d; Julich, 
40m; Jetnison, 73d; HamOton, 78th; 
Andreu, 80^ and Hincapie, 13^ Liv- 
ingston and Julich, the two strongest 
climbers in this group, were in^ressive 
iu the second of two stages in the Pyren- 
ees on Tuesd^, finishing 15tb and 23d 
respectively. 

“I needed to find my legs and I didn't 
until the second or thiid climb of the first 


day in the Pyrenees, "Julich said before 
tiie start'Wednesday. “By then it was ' 
too late. 

“Yesterday I felt much better. Vlfiien 
1 realized 1 wasn't going to make top 
five or top 10. 1 saved myself a little 
bit 

“Today I feel fine. I think my legs are 
going to feel bener for the time, tri^ and . 
theAlps.” 


. -A long and uphill time tria^ or 
dividual race agunst the clock, is sched^g 
uled Friday. The Alps.b^in Saturday.* : 

' Julich summed up the Americans*^ 
gene^ feelings: “Going up those 
cliint» yesterday, it was like *Wow!' 

J 'm ha vzng goose bttzrqis tiiiolring 1 ’m itf ■ 
the Tour de France, it’s one of the. 
hardest st^es in years and 1 don’t feel sb^ 
bad. This is good.” T . 


Win a Free TWp 
Johnnie Walker R 






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17 - 7-97 


WTEVUTKIttLi 


Scots Await a Champion of Their Own 

Can Montgomerie Win at Home? The Answer Is Blowing in the Wind 


By lao Thomsen 

liuemational Herald Tribune 

T RCX>N. Scotland — 
The wind that carved 
out tbe character of 
Scotland, iacidentaliy creat- 
ing golf, blows now in salty 
puffr across the Scotsman's 
chin. On Thursday he will try 
to calm himself agaiost the 
bluster and tie up the strings 
of his upbringing in a fast 
pretiy bow. 

“There's nothing that's 
secret about the fact that I 

OpBN Golf 

know my way around bens, 
and I know wl^ I'm doing on 
tiiis golf course,” Colin Mont- 
gomerie, the 34-year-old Scot, 
said as he readi^ himself for 
tte 126th British Open, which 
begins Thursday and ends 
Sunday. “It’s just a matter of 
trying to go out there and 
prove it It's son of obvious 
rm O.JC physically and lecb- 
nicaJly. it’s just mentally 
wh^er I can cope with the 


public pressure, and the pres- 
sure that's been put on, arid the 
pressure, with all respect, by 
yourselves. ' ' He was speaking 
to the reporters who had filled 
a tent to hear him speak with 
such painstaking honesty. 

Tim predicament is best 
understood going backward. 
Monegomerie for the last two 
months has been playing the 
best golf of his career. He has 
never, despite three e.xtended 
challenges, most recently last 
month at the U .S. Open, never 
won a major championship. 
As a teenager he grew up 
about 150 yards from the 
links of Royal Troon, which 
he has played “thousands of 
times.'' Because be seems to 
understand the course so well, 
he has been challenged to be- 
come the first “real” Scot to 
win the British Open since 
James Braid in 1910. 

Mon^omerie seemed to be 
of two ntinds about tbe weath- 
er he £^w up with. The top 
player in £un^ for the last 
four years, availed of the most 
scientific equipment and train- 





■ . . «-. 


V-':-. 

•S4y 


TEEVOaUjrSOAIUrNEVSPAFm 


frtxmxiP'97 

JOHNNIEPtVALKEH 


^:)^e^onal H^d Tnt^e editor 
Sarm^|w tias be^^Mii^albout bicy- 
cle r^gjor two d^^ides,Jn his dew 
bor^i he levers the 1 996 pro bicycle 
racing se^ - one of the most drama- 
iti hfetoryi^nath the Ke and snow of 
fc ra^ in Marchto. the swelter- 

heat atfe ^'mmer the 

. :^ok foHows me races and the racers in 
L^orid once descrited as 
job. in the woM- 

, Glory (US$t 4 -^) can 
be ord'erad ibraugh quality bookstores 
everywhere Off rpm: 

fi/lototboolts International, POB 1 , v 
Osceola. Wisconsin, USA 54020 . i 


ing. and a freckled orange tan 
th^ no Scottish summer could 
pf^uce. he was asked a few 
days ago how much wind he 
would like to find blowing at 
Troon. “None, really,” he 
said. “I like this type of weath- 
er." It was calm at the time. 


^If you go to 
Augusta youM 
never see a weed 
like that. But it‘'s 
the weeds that help 
make this course.’ 


Soon after he arrived at 
Troon, his feelings changed 
as surely as the coastal gales. 
“Possibly it w'ould favor me 
if it remains breezy, because I 
happen to know. I’ve played 
this course in all types of con- 
ditions.'' Montgomerie said. 
“Possibly in practice some 
people are only going to play 
the course when the wind is 
blowing in one particular di- 
rection. but this isn't the di- 
rection it usually blows.'’ 
When the wind blows as it 
has done throughout (he prac- 
tice rounds this week, it tends 
to relieve the game of its 
swagger, its sense of self-im- 
portance. It then becomes the 
game the Scots invented in 
the first place some four or 
five centuries ago. They* seem 
to be the same people they’ve 
always been, unimpressed 
fads and other such trends. On 
such issues Robert Bums, the 
poet of two centuries ago. still 
speaks for them. 

“He expressed what evcr>- 
Scotsman loved to express,” 
said Joe Campbell, a marshal 
who is supervising holes J, 2 , 
17 and 18 at the Open. “He 
was a man of enormous wet- 
nesses, but he was' totally 
devoid of hypocrisy.' ' 

Campbell, besides being a 
member of Royal Troon, is 
also honorary president of the 
World Bums Federation. 
With his umbrella he pointed 
across the first fairway at a 
puir of bunkers. 

“These are not man-made 
bunkers,” he said. “Bunkers 
like these were here already, 
j TTwy were hole^ in the ground 
I with sand in them blown in 
from the beach. When they 
j started playing golf the play- 
I ers played around them.*' 
Then with his umbrel la the 


Bumsian pointed at his feet M-*! 
a long weed. 

“If you go to Augusta iir^ 
America, which really .is.a-<, 
beautiful, gorgeous cours^--^ 
you'd never see a weed like!.' 
chat.” he said. “But it's tb&' 
weeds that help make this 
course, and it's the weeds thar' 
Bums celebrated. The dai 5 )C'' 
the thistle, the mouse — all 0 ^' 
the ordinary things people-* 
never mentioned, these were.- 
the things he wrote about He* 
wrote about nature.” 

The sea was browix {md--* 
white-capped at his back, and^ 
all before him Royal Troon^ 
seemed relatively empty. On'' 
such a practice day at the U.S.^1 
Open, the course would have^ 
been sold out and over^ 
whelmed. Here, tiie playera^ 
were being told that the^Q 
would be attended when tbe 1 
score was kept and not before; ) 
that they were important crur 1 
cially, for what they di^ asi 
opposed to who ttey are. ; 

Since World War 1 thei^ 
have been three British'Op^4 
champions of Scot blood, buP^ 
two — Jock Hutchison (the# 
1921 champion.) and Tommy 
Armour (1931) — had 

already moved overseas and . 
become US citizens, and thq 
third, Sandy Lyle ( 1 985), wa;^- 
bom in England and repte^- 
sented England intemation^ 
ally. So it all comes down UT- 
Monegomerie, who h^- 
missed the cut in four of his 
^t five anempis at the Brit-^ 
ish Open. His competitioo^i 
will include a field of peaking - V 

major champions Tiger • ' 

Woods, &nie Els, Greg Nor- , 
man and Tom Lehman, th^* 
defending titlisL ) 

If he is in contention on^ 
Sunday. Montgomerie wHl \ 
have to take on a back-nine as ) 
difficult when the wind is--‘ 
blowing as any finishing holes 
in major chari^itxisfajp golf. 

Adding to the expectations,,., 
will be the mirroring footstep 
of his father, James Mont- 
gomerie, tbe club secretaiy Of” 
Royal Troon who is retiring 
next month and has promiSM 
to follow his son this week for 
as far as the tournament takes 
them, ff the Scotsman wins, 
which is to hope against hope, sfif 

his every shot will be uuced 
bMk through his father, along 
the contours of tbe old graz- 
ing land (hat became his fe- 
iher's course, back through 
Ae enduring spirit of the 
poet, and into the face 
of the carving wind. 









SPORTS 



13 Runs in 7th 









A 


The Associnted Prest 

The San Francisco Giants 
had to catch a lli^t to Hous- 
ton. They weren't exactly 
running to get there. 

' That’s bmuse they were 
too busy running around the 
bases tSiesday night in San 
Diego. 

, <. Ibe Giants scored 13 runs 
'* setting the modem Nation- 

al League record for runs in a 

;BA«l»AllKoBMDUy 

seventh inning — in a 16-2 
rout of the Padres. The inning 
took 52 minutes, and 19 bat- 
ters faced W pitches. 

San Francisco scored sev- 
en runs before J.T. Snow 
grounded out for the ilrst out, 
drawing a loud, derisive cheer 
irom the crowd of 28,539. By 
then, the Giants led 10-2. 

- Four Giants scored two 
runs each, and even the start- 
ing piteher, Kirk Rueter, got 
on base and scored. The only 
regular not to score was 
Snow, who struck out with 
-^the bases loaded for the 
second out. 

*‘l was trying to speed the 
game up," Snow jok^ "We 
l^ve a flight to catch. ' ’ 

^Tbe inning finally ended 
one batter later when Jeff 
was forced on Stan Javi- 
er’s grounder. Javier, who 
ojpen^ the inning with a 
single off die loser, Andy 
i^^by, batted three times. 

‘ PMIms 8, BnwM 1 Mike 
Lieberthal ctove in a career- 
tugh four runs and Garrett 
"a four- 
complete 
l^gue 

- . - . . won in 
Atlanta to end a mne-game 
losing streak against die 
Braves. 

■ Lieberthal hit a three-run 
homer in a six-iun sixth in- 


ning and Mickey Morandini 
had three hits, helping the 
Phillies to just iheir fourth 
win in 27 games. 

John Smole allowed a sea- 
son-hi^ eight runs — seven 
eam^ — and nine hits in 

eight innings . 

Expo* 5, Marlins O A rook- 
ie, l^tin Hermanson, al- 
lowed just five singles for his 
fust career shutmit, walked 
none and struck out a season- 
high nine of his former team- 
mates as Montreal won in 
Miami. 

Heniy Rodriguez, Ryan 
McGuire, Chris Wid^ and 
Doug Strange drove in runs 
for Montreal. 

Pirates 4, Mou 3 In Pids- 
burgh, the pinch hitter Mark 
Johnson hit a run-scoring 
double and scored on Tony 
Womack’s double in the sev- 
enth, and another pinch hitter. 
Turner Ward, singled home 
the go-ahead run in the 
eighth. 

Car&iais 7, Reds 4 In Cin- 
cinnati, Ray Lankford hit two 
upper-^k homers — a first 
in what is now called Ciner^ 
IHeid. His two-run homer in 
the first and solo shot in the 
third helped St. Louis to a 5-0 
lead. 

Astros 5, Cubs 3. In Chica- 
go, Bill Spiers's three-run, 
pinch-homer off Mel Rojas 
with one out in the ninth lifted 
Housuxi. 

With Houston trailing 3-2, 
Sean Berry led off the ninth 
with an ic^eld single. Craig 
Biggio walked wi£ one out 
and Spiers, batting for the 

g itcher, I^iryl Kile, sent an 
-2 pitch into the left-center 
field bleachers, Rojas's flflh 
blown save in 14 chances. 

Dodgors 6, Rockies 5 In 

Denver. Todd Zeile homered 
for the third time in two days, 
raising his season total to 20, 



Keeping the Chart on Irabu 

The Reviews Are Mixed After Yankee^s 2d Victory 


By Murray Chass 

York Times Sen-iee 


Al BdnnaqmB At 

The Reds* Erk Owens arriving safely at third base in Cincinnati after a passed ball, 
deq>ite the efforts of Danny SheaTTer of the Cardinals. St Louis won nonetheless, 7-4. 


and Mike Hazza drove in two 
nuis as Colorado lost its 1 1th 
in 12 games. 

Chan Ho Park allowed 
three runs and seven hits in 
€tVi innings. Lany Walk^ 
was O-for-4, dropping him to 
.406. 

In the American League: 

Angols 6, BsnQort 2 Jason 
Dickson, the only rsason the 
Aj^els are in the playoff race, 
may be heachng for some hon- 
ors himself. 

Just past the midpoint of 
the season, he moved halfway 
to becoming die first Amer- 
ican League rookie to win 20 
games since Bob Grim in 
1954, leading Anaheim to its 
eighth consecutive victory as 
it beat Texas. 

‘Tm just trying to go out 
there and have quality starts 
every time out," Dickson 
said. "I mean, 20 wins is un- 
heard of. Maybe a guy like 
Roger Clemens is on a pace 
like that He’s got a shot at it, 
but it's still tough." 

Dickson (10*4) allowed 


one run and eight hits in seven 
inning s, stranding runners at 
third in the fourth and 
fifth innings. Texas got its run 
off hhn on i^ll Clark's 
leadoff homer in the sixth. 

Athloties 8, Marmora S 
Mark McGwire hit his major 
leagne-leading 32d homer, 
tying Joe DiMaggio for 42d 
place on Che career list at 36 J . 
McGwire also drove in four 
runs as Oakland beat visiting 
Seattle. 

Jamie Moyer (9-3) lost for 
the first time since May 29, 
•allowing flve runs and eight 
hits in six irmings. He struck 
out six. 

Orielos8,BlueJays4 Lenny 
Webster drove in four iuo$ 
and hit one of four homers off 
Juan Guzman - at Camden 
Yards as Baltimore completed 
a two-game sweep. 

After Br^ Anderson 
homered leading off the game 
and Webster Ut a two-nm 
shot in the second irtning, suc- 
cessive homers by B. J. 
Surboff and Jeffrey Ham- 


monds in the fourth put Bal- 
timore ahead. 6-1. 

IWkis 8, Whito Sox 4 In 
Minneapolis. Brad Radke 
(12-5) had a no-hitter for flve 
innings and woo his eighth 
consecutive start He didn’t 
allow a hit until Mike Camer- 
on’s leadoff bloop single in 
the sixth, allowing tfarm runs 
— one earned — and five hits 
in seven-plus innings. 

Tigers 7, Rod Sex 5 Damion 
Easl^ tied the score with an 
eighth-inning homer at Fen- 
way Park and Melvin Nieves 
hit a two-run shot in the 
12th. 

Bosttxi came back from a 
4-0 deficit with th^ runs in 
the fourth and one in the sixth, 
and Wilfredo Cordero homer- 
ed for tiie second consecutive 
game. 

Brewers 5, Royals 2 Dave 
Nilsson homered twice and 
Scott Karl (3-10) won for the 
flrst time since May 23 as 
visiting Milwaukee sent Kan- 
sas City to its 13th loss in 14 
games. 


NEW YORK — Telephone calls to the 
hotel and to the ballpark in Boston did not find 
Brian Hunter. Too bad. Tbe Detroit Tigers' 
center fielder deserved to hear firsthand that 
his comments about Hideki Irabu last Tliurs- 
day maybe weren’t so outrageous after all. 

Proclaiming brashly that Irabu was not 
"ready for the major league level" while 
ev^one else in the Tigers' clubhouse was 
paising him or at least being diplomatic. 
Hunter said the J^anese pitcher’s success in 
his major league debut that night was 
tenqrered by the fact that he was pitching 
against the inexperienced Tigers. 

"You get a team witii a little more ex- 
perience, he’s not going to have that success,” 
Hunter said. "You’ll see." The Indians, he was 
told, would be Irabu's next opponent Tuesday. 
“Yeah,” he responded, "chKk that out.” 

So Cleveland came to Yankee Stadium 
with one of the league’s most explosive of- 
fenses, and check it out: flve runs, nine hits, 
three home runs and four strikeouts in flve 
irmings, compared with two runs, five hits, no 
hmne runs, nine strikeouts in innings last 
Thursday. 



Hmn fUf llHiinb/\pliir I’ranrr'IVwr 

Hideki Irabu reacting to a balk call. 


Even so, Irabu got the victory as Tino Mar- 
tinez hit his 31st homer, a three-run shot, and 
the Yankees got 17 hits for a 1 2-6 victory. 

Matt Williams was asked, "Do y<Mi wonder 
where some of the comparisons came from, 
the Japanese Nolan Ryan?'* 

The third baseman, whose three-run home 
run turned a creditable performance by Irabu 
into a m^iocre outing, replied: "You guys 
are reaUy searching. What are you, down- 
grading him already? Is be 2-0? That speaks 
for itself. That’s all that matters. Fm sure 
other pitchers have given up nine hits and flve 
runs. too. Nolan Ryan probably did once or 
twice. He’s a good pitcher." 

The Indians emerged from their flve- inning 
encounter with Irabu wi^ nvix^ assessments, 
but the worst anyone said was that be was a 
“regular" pitcher. 

"He doesn’t have anything that we haven’t 
seen before,’' said David Justice, who struck 
out. grounded out and singled against Irabu. 
"He's just a regular pitcher." 

“We have some decent hitters,” said Pat 
Borders, the Cleveland catcher said. "You 
can't make too many mistakes. Except for 
Williams's home run. we got two runs in five 
innings. That isn't bad against this club.” 

"He was throwing a lot of flist-pitch fast- 
balls," said Marquis Grissom, who hit one for 
a home run at the scan of the flftii. "That's 
why you have to do your homework, go out 
and ^ what the guy's doing, see if you can 
get a pattern. In that situation 1 was looking for 
a fastball.” 

Both the Indians and the Tigers have noted 
that Irabu hasn't thrown the fabled fastball that 
5uppo.s6dly has been clocked as high as 99 
miles an hour. The Yankees said Tu^day that 
Irabu started out throwing 95 but tailed off to 
88 and 89 in the withering heal and humidity. 

"He has just a regular fastball.” Justice 
said. "When I was 0-2, I was looking for 
something off spe^ because I knew if he 
threw a fastball, 1 could stiU hit it” 

■ Lee Smith Retires From Baseball 

Lee Smith, baseball 's career leader in saves 
with 478, announced his retirement from 
baseball TSiesday, before Montreal's 5-0 vic- 
tory over Florida, Tbe Associated Press re- 
ported from Miami. 

Smith, who dep^ed quietly for St. Louis 
after tall^g to Felipe Alou, the Expos’ man- 
ager, led active relievers with 1,016 relief 
appearances, and his 1,022 games made him 
just the fourth major league pitcher to appear 
in more than 1,000 games. 


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Scoreboard 


Their Om 

Bioicinu; in th^ 


BASEBALL 


Major Leaoue Stamdimos 

AMRIOUtUMMM 

EABtOnnStON 

« L Pet 6B 

Bottinwie 57 33 .633 — 

KewYorfc 53 39 571 5U 

Totonto 43 46 M3 IVh 

OekDlt 43 48 .673 14Vk 

eosfcm 40 52 .435 18 

cavnutoivKuw 

CIcmkmd 48 38 .558 • 

CMd^o - - 47 44 5TA 3M 

MHwmkee 43 45 489 6 

Mlnnesoln 40 51 440 lOK 

KansasCny 37- ' 51 400. 12 

WEBTDIVISIOH 




Seattle 

52 

41 

SS9 

_ 

Anaheim 

SO 

42 

M3 

Ito 


Texas 

45 

46 

MS 

6 


OoMond 

38 

57 

JOO 

15 

Ifil 

• 

luneiiRLUikevH 


• 

EASTOmSKNI 




w 

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Pd. 

GB 


Attanto 

59 

34 

.634 

_ 

• hi 

Ftoitaa 

S3 

38 

saa 

5 


NwYoA 

Si 

4i 

JB4 

736 


‘^torrtieoi SO 

rStttodelphlo 26 

41 

64 

M9 

289 

8 

31K 


eaifniM. DmsKNi 




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PltabOlVh 47 48 511 

HoKtan 47 47 500 

SUjbuIb 45 47 489 

Chiejnnaff 40 51 440 

OOogo 38 55 409 

WE8TDIVMON 

San,FrBodwi . 53 40 570 

LoiAngelei 50 43 538 

Cotarado 44 SO 468 

Sa Diego 42 51 451 11 


1 

2 

9K 


3 

916 


TUeSMUrS UMWCOiaB 
AMEMCAH LEAOUE 

Omaane 001 m no-6 13 8 

NCWVM 036 000 40&-12 17 0 

Nogy. Wsithers O), MDiman (7). Phink (7) 
md Bofdens Irabu, Mendoza (6) ondGlraitB. 
WMmbu, 2-a L— Nagy. 9-6. Sv-Mendozo 
(U. HRb— O ewekmd, Grfssoin (5), 

Mo.\nnttiins Q2>. T. PcfiMndra (4). Ne* 
Yh*;, T. MoitliKZ (SIX Cmfls (61. 

SeoMe 881 008 0«MI 10 0 

Oahtand 381 801 12»-B II 3 

Moyec M. /Moddux W. <3iorHon (8) and 
OaWkm- MoMer (5). D. Johnson 

(7)c Graom (8), Taylor (8) end GaVraHoms. 
-W~Mohlec 1-8. L-Moyct Sw— Taylor 

(17). HRs-Ooktand, Staks CIS). IMSmlm 
(32), GoWnBons (3). 

Oetrett X10 000 010 MO-7 14 1 

Bedon 001 301 100 000-5 14 1 

(12 lnnlng»):Orivora5. Mlcel (5). M. Myras 
(6),Braoidi{8).ToJones ODcndCoBonouiir 
lAWbeek (9]; (Sordon, B. Heniy (7), Slooimb 
(10), Wasdin (ID and HuHebeig. 
W-TeJona M. L— Wosdto SS: 

HRfr-Dedoil Nieves H3), Eflsiey ()4). 
SeslMi, Corden (13). 

Ibreote 010 010 080-4 4 0 

BsMnere 120 308 DOXf-O 13 0 

Guzouiv AndiOor (4) and B. SonMogo; 
BoskM Rhodes (6), Mills (9) and Wehder. 
W^-Boskle 5*3. L^-Guzman 3-6. 
HRo-TbranM Carter (12), C Ddgade (19), 

S. Gieen (10). Ba mm or* ByAndenen (91, 
SurtioiT 03), Hammonds (151. Webster (4). 
CMcaiO BOO 008 030—4 6 0 

Mbmeseta OIO 580 OM-8 15 1 

Norarra, C CostWo (6) end Fabragae; 
Radk* SwIndeU (A Tnmifaley (8), (SuorriodB 
(9) and Steinboch. W n ndhe 12-5. 

L— Novara 7-8. HRs— CldCDg* F. Tisunos 
(21).Mftiaesa(a, R. Kelly (2). 

MBMHkee 100 Oil 020-5 0 1 


Kararaiaiy OOO 020 MO-2 « 0 
Karl Wkkiiian (SI VBone (6), DoJones 
(9) ond Mollieny; Appier, Costan (8). Obon 
(9) ond Modwlune. \HMKoi1 3-10. 
L— Appier 6-1. HRs— Mllwaiilree, Buraltz 
n3),N33Kin2(n). 

Texas 008 001 ODI-C f I 

AMdieim 050 080 1M-6 |8 1 

■CHM Whiteside (2). (SiHidenon (7) and I. 
Rodrlgiiez; DkJaon HollZ (B). Hosegam (R 
Old LeyiOz. W-DIckson lOA. L-K. HOI 5-7. 
HRs— Taos. W. Clark (I Oi. Nevnon (6). 

MATIOHAL LEAGUE 

HMStoo IMMI 000 803-5 9 0 

Chkage 000 3M 000-3 I 0 

KB* CotbKffl (91, Mogixvde (9) ond 
Euseblcc Fdstecr R. Tolls (8), Roloe (N and 
Houston. W-IOte, 123. t-Rolas, 03. 
Sv-Mognante (1). HRs— HaustOA Siders 
Q). CMccma Dunston (6} 

Us Ae gela 101 on 110-4 12 0 

CMeredo on Ml 211-5 11 0 

Prafc, Hoi (7), Gvtivk! (8). ToWoneH (9) 
and Fiona; HBaBeyy Leskanic (7). MflCurry 

(8) and JeJeed Morwiralng (9). W — P o i k 7- 

5. L— R. BoBey 8-7. Sv-TaWMieO (23). 
HR— toe AngelM, Zele CHO- 
PbOodllMin 000 085 088-8 10 8 

Attrata 801 000 000-1 4 1 

smuenscw ond UebeMit Smolte C Fra 

(9) ond EettPera. W Stepb eni en 34. 

SoBlh »AHR-PliltadelpN*LJeb«ttnl n3). 
Meotreai 000 010 220-4 10 0 

FMda 000 000 000-8 5 2 

Hermoneon and WMgcR Soundetx HuNen 
(7), WMsenoM (9) end CJahnsnn. 
W— Honranson 4-4. L— Soanders 2-Z 
NewYeik 180 an 000-3 7 0 

PMsbdigb 001 000 2»-« 9 0 

MHdil AewedD (7) and Hundtois SdimWt 
auMansen (8), Loleellp 19) and Kendall. 
W— ChrMIORsen )-(L L Acavedo 1-1. Sv — ' 
Lolselle (131. HR— New YOtk, Boeiga (Q. 


St. LAMS 212 020 000-7 9 I 

Gednall 002 081 018-4 12 8 

ALBenea, Beltmn (fi>, T. JAloOrews (7), 
Fo«w (8), Eckeisley (8) and DHeDcet 
Tomkoi, FeJtodriguez (41 Remflnger (5], 
SulBvan (7), BeIndD (9) and J. Oliver. 
W— ALBenes 9-7. L-Tomko 5-2. 

Sv— Eckeisley (21). HRs— SI. Louis, 
UmkfDrd2(22). 

Sm FreiKbeo 000 102 (I3WL-16 16 0 
Son Diego 108 100 000-3 5 2 
RiKdec Towmz (7), D. Henry (8), Beck (91 
and R. Wlldns, Jensen (B)i Ashby; P. Smilb 
(7). BafchelarlT}, Bergman (7), Cvnnone (9) 
and Fkiberty, Roniera (7). W— Rueter 6-1. 
L-AshbySA. HR»--5in Prnndsn Bonds2 
(23). Son DIega CbminNI (9). 

4apane$e Leagues 



w 

L 

T 

Pet 

.68 

Ybkutt 

48 

29 

1 

A22 

— ■ 

Hlnshiira 

38 

35 

0 

J21 

8 

ybkehama 

36 

37 

0 

.493 

10 

ChudcM 

37 

41 

0 

A74 

11)6 

HonSMn 

36 

40 

1 

J74 

11)6 

Yoiiduil 

32 

45 

0 

416 

16 

M 

one 

w 

IBRteWa 

L T 

Pet 

.GB 

Sefbu 

J3 

32 

2 

J71 


Oibt 

40 

30 

2 

.569 

VI 

Dolel 

42 

35 

0 

.545 

2 

Nippon Ham 

38 

40 

1 

487 

6V6 

Kkdelsu 

32 

43 

1 

428 

11 

Lotte 

29 

43 

2 

403 

12W 




HanshhiaYbkuiri2 
HbeeMmo 10, Chuiildil I 
Ybkehofflo 9, YbmM 4 

RACne LEAGUE 
Kkdeliu7,Orb(4 
SeIbH&Daleil 
Nippon Horn ^ Lotls 2 


CRICKET 


MnmjUMiDaE 
GLAHOROAN vs AUBTRAUA 
3-CMW IMTCH. ISTCMV AT1EA 
WEDNESDAY. Dl CARDNT. WALES 
Ausbalkl: 282-4 

Asia Cup 

SNUdCUUnW BAHOIAMSM 

WEDNESDAY, W COLOWBO. sm LANKA 
PaUstnit; 31 P-5 (SOmwsJ 
Bangladesh: 210011 out (Ml. _ 

PokMon mm faly 109 rur& 


CYCLING 


Tour de France 


Lowing piedrgs In t02 fcHeraewr e . 
(1IM nBes), 11m raege at die Tow de 
France from Andorm (0 Perpigrwn: 

1 . Lowrail DeWMens, Franc* (Mdte 5 IL 5 
m. S &; Z Carlo PbiciL Italy, MG Tedmogyra 
slj 3. Sergei OutacliokeH, Ukrein* Polti s.1.; 

4. Frederic Meneasstai, France, GAN ol 18 s.- 

5. Erie Zabel GernxmK Tetekonv 6. Moita 
TraveisonL Italy, MeicataiM Unor 7 . Fabta 
Bakhifft Italic MG TtdHwBymr A Frankie 
Andrea U.S., CoBdlSi 9. Adiim Baffi, Italy, 
U5. Poatab 10. Gtanba Ptarobnn, 11^ 
BMBcolAt 

ovBiiALlj 1. Jan Ulkidb Geimenw 
Tolslum60lL6nLl7&;l Richard Vbenquw 
Franca Festtao el2m. 38 s. behlnib 3. Abra- 
ham Otana SpolA Bonesta 446; 4. Blame 
Rita, Dennwik, T el cl am4S3r 5. Mam Pon- 
toiA italK Merootane Uno A. r emondo 
Escaifla Spebv Kelnie S46r 7. Louirad Du- 
taux, SwHzertand, Festlna 6d)ta 8.0scarC> 


menzlml SwUzerlml Mopel 7.<Kfe 9. 
Francesco CoaograiKle. Italyi SoecoT^ia 
Codric Vosseur. Franca GAN 7dl . 


GOLF 


JOHHsiiE rauxn wVDn CUP 

Standinae lor 1997 Rydnr Cup to bu play- 
ed SepL 20-28 ra VAhlename in Sotogrsnde, 
Spain. Ibp 10 linieherB wB qualify for 12- 
man law ns . US. captain Tom Kits end Eu- 
rapeon captain Sava BaUastaros wM r-Hect 
two players it large to compMs aach warn: 

. . UMTIEO BTAIES 

I. Tiger Woods 1165Jno poinis 1 Tom 
Lehman I0I&286; a. Mark Q-Meoni 801 -250; 
4. BradFcDom 72750(k S. Scott Hoch 721 .953; 

6. Jkn Furyk 69750(k 7. Tommy Tolies 
689J86; 8. Phil MIckelsan 659m 9. Dovls 
Love III 655.167) ID. Justin LeomnI 5BB500; 
II. Sieve Jones 579386; 1Z Jeff Moggert 
566625; 13. Mak Braoks 549.7S(b 14. Paul 
Stankowski SCB.Tai 15. David Duval 
47a000. 

EUROPE 

I. Conn Menigomerfa Scot 815,03838 points 
L Ian Wooenam, Woles 495,21219 

2 Oomm Ctarka NJjMond -42189035 

4. Lee Westwood, E ngkiid 40O3sai 7 

5. Bemltaid Longer, Gramony 3644)27.96 

6. TTiomoB Btam, Denmwk 33&2) 159 

7. Per-Ulrlk Jehanssoiw Sweden 3245BS30 
a Miguel Angel Morllrs Spain 

9. CoctaMlne Rocen. NMy 300.71529 
ia tari Broodiwnt England 254,84458 

II. Jose Marta Otazobol Spain 247,33456 
12. Sam Toiranca Sooltand 2ia32l3l 
ia Ignocto Gwrida Spoin 212,801.22 

14 Peter MHchea gngkmd 202.77307 
la Mark Jamea Englond 195,79956 


TRANSITIONS 


BASEBAU 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

NEW YORR-Pul OF Bernte Wlinoms on 1 5- 
day disabled 1st retroodive to July 13 Re- 
called OF Scott Pose from Coiumbua IL 

DAKLAMCL-Pui RHP Mike Oqulst on 15- 
doy disabled Bst. Gillad up RHPOary HougM 
from Edmontorv PCL Designated INF Scott 
Sheldon lorasslaMnenl. 

NATXHUL LEAGUE 

CM KAiw— Traded RHP Frank Cnsflllo to 
Cotarado for RHP Matt PooL Recalled RHP 
Dove Swrvtrbaugh frera Iowa, AA. 

GtNCINNATi-Traded RHP HeCtorCanosco 
and RHP Scott Service I0 Kansas fiorOF Jon 
NuntvEyond INF-OFOvtsSlynes. 

MONTtEAL-Announced retirement of 
RHP Lee Sinllh. 


NATIONAL BAAKErBALL ASSOOATION 

MiNNESOTA-Signed Flip Sounden, gen- 
eral monoger and coocN In 5-yeor contract 
extension. 

HEW JERSEV-Agreed to leniis wllh G Sam 
CnsseB on multiyear conkod. 

PtilLADELPHW-Re-sIgnedG Doug Greflon. 

PHOENix-signed GStephen Jadtson Id i- 
yeorcontnid. 

VANCouvEa.Re-signed G ChriE Robln- 
sea to 2-y«ir conlnxl 

POOTBAU 

NATIOHAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

AtoOHA-slgned WR Kovin WIBIams and 
S ErIcCasHen l-yeorcuntrade. 

BALIAS AiwBunced relitement of DE 
Charles Holey and WR Joy Novocek. 

NEW YORK JEis-SIgned G Lament Bums 
to2-yeorconfrnd. SIgrwd OT Riefc Teny to3- 
yeorcontrad. 

MiNNESOTA-Slgnefi G Randall McDaniel 


1o4-yeor contract Signed RB Robert Greea 
NEW ENOLAND -Re-Signed DT Chad 
Eaton and FB Rupert Grant. Signed RB 
Sedrfck Show ond S Chrta Carter. 

prmBURGH -Signed WR Corey HoUdoy. 
OT Paul Wffggins and WR MBk Adams. 
Agreed to lentB with CB Chad Scott on 5-year 
contract. Agreed to lenns wilh WR W9 Block- 
weU and RB George Jonm. 

SAN DIEGO — Agreed to terms with T 
Raleigh Roundtree on 3-year contrad ond T 
OanM Pdmerta 2y«ar conliad. 

ST. LouB-Woived CB Anthony Porker. 
Signed CB Ryan AIcNeK. 

HOCKir 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
AJUHEiM-'Agieed to terms yvith C Espen 
Knulgen on 1 -year contrad 
eostoN-Agreed to terms with F Ted Do- 
nate on 1-yenr contrad. 

OTTAWA -Signed C Derek Armstrong to I* 
yeor conhod and G JanI Hurme to muttlyuor 
centrgd. 

FHIUDELPHtA FLYERS-Signod G Nool 
iJttle to 7-year centred and CCraig Darby to 
2-year contrad. Signed D Luke Rldioirison. 
sr. LBUB— Signed G RIdi Parent 
SAN JOSE -^ned D Bill Hou<derte4-year 
contrad. SIgiied D Rtohoid Biwuion and D 
AndM ZyuakL 

TAMPABAY-Signed D Pavel Kublno, C Ed- 
iKiid Pershin and C Vddim Ybponchinteev. 

VANCOWEB CAHiiOB-Signed F Uibomir 
Vak and Signed D (Srant Ledyard. 


ALABAMA-AnnouneedG Rabaon Braagty 
will not return to womerre boskdball team. 

MissiBiPPi-Siaiied men's bosketbaO 
coach Rnb Evans to 2-yenr cun tnid exten- 
shiiw ttiiDugh 2D003001. 

seUTH FLORIDA— Extended the contrad of 
Sett) (iieertti^ mem boWetbaU coodt 
through 2001 -2002 seoson. 


, BENNK THE MENACE 

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ElVIEKIAlNBlEfliT 
.\ppears evciy XVednesday 
in Ihc Intennarkct. 

To advertise conlad 
Sandy O’Hara 
in our New York ofRcx: 
Telj (1-212) 752 3890 
Kax: (1-212)755 8785 
or your ncarck IHT oflicc 
or r^resetHative; 













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PAGE 20 


ART BUCHWALD 


Relatively Speaking 


V ENICE — What 1 like 
most about Italy is that 
eveiTone has a relative in the 
Lioit^ States. This is partic- 
ularly meaningful when you 
go shopping. I walked into a 
jewelry store 
on $L Mark's 
Square the oUi- 
er day and was 
gree^ warm- 
ly by the own- 
er. 

His first re- 
mark to me 
was, “I love 
Ai^cans. 1 
have a cousin who lives in 
Boston. His name is Ac- 
capello. Do you know 
him?" 

Now it's foolish to tell 
someone in Italy that you 
don't know his cousin in Bos- 
ton, so I replied, “Accapello 
is a good man — Boston's 
best.” 

□ 

The Jeweler smiled. “Ev- 
eryone knows Johnny Ac- 
capello. There's another Ac- 
capello in Newark, New 
Jersey. He is not even a cous- 
in, but he’s always claiming 
TO be a relative. So because 
you know John AccapelJo in 
Bostcm 1 will give you a 20 
percent discount on ail our 
gold gondola necklaces — 
the same as I gave Henry Kis- 
singer.” 


Egypt Writer Honored 

Agimt Fnunv-Pnrue 

CAIRO — The newly re- 
stored home of the Egyptian 
writer Taha Hussein opened 
Tuesday as a museum, the 
culture ministiy said. Taha 
Hussein (1889-1973), who 
was blinded by disease at age 
6, wrote a large number of 
literary studies and novels, 
some of which have been 
made into films. 


I said, “Anyone who 
would do this is truly a cousin 
of the great AccapeUo from 
Boston.” I point^ to a Sl 
M ark's chaim bracelet. 

“How much is this in dol- 
lars?" 

He took out his calculator. 
“For the French. $175 — for 
you $95.*' 

“That’s a good buy. but 
why would you do this?" 

“I don't ^ve any relatives 
in France." 

□ 

I bought a set of gold ear- 
rings and then went to a res- 
taurant for lunch. By an un- 
believable coincidence, our 
waiter. Umberto, turned out 
to have a brother in Los An- 
geles who worked in a 
restaurant similar to the 
one we were in. Naturally. 
Umberto asked if we knew 
him. 

“Of course, we know 
him,” I replied. “He is the 
only one we allow to grind 
pepper on our food.' ' 

He was ours for the even- 
ing — nothing was too much 
trouble. He told the owner we 
kbew his cousin. This moved 
the headwaiter to send over a 
bottle of Chianti on the house. 
It was a happy meal, and Um- 
berto was delirious to know 
that he was actually serving 
people who had been served 
by his brother. 

Q 

This is the way it has been 
all through our travels in 
It^y. To avoid hurting 
people's leeiiiigs. we admit- 
ted to knowing countless rela- 
tives. You cannot imagine 
what it has done for our trip. 

If Angel Fioro in Pitts- 
burgh is reading this, your 
cousin Carlo in Verona gave 
us a discount on a set of Mur- 
ano dessert pbtes that he has 
only ever given to Sophia 
Loren. 




Abdullah Xbrahim on Ja^ and 


By Mike Zwerin 

laiemattatul Hertiid Tnbwu 


P ARIS — Abdullah Ibiabim has a softly 
musical [)utch acceiU. His n»ter, tone 
and choice of vocabula^ can get mystical 
His eyes are misty at times. Bear in mind, 
though, that there is always a twinkle in 
them, even during the soious stuff. Which 
there's a lot of. Even his silliness can be 
serious, and there’s a lot of 
that too. Is be questitming 
our ability to understand his 


mysticism, or is he josc being 
itimofit? 


mystifying for the 

Wh^ do refrigerators 
have to do with jazz, for ex- 
amfde? 

“With refrigerators there 
are no more seasons. 

Everything is artificially preserved. On the 
oOxet hand, one reason jazz music is so vital 
is that it's always in season. It's fresh, Init it*s 
only ripe once. It cannot ^ preserved. 

“A refrigerator is kind of tike a record 
player. They bodi serve a purpose, to pre- 
serve. But they do not present ftesh 
products. 

- “It's more ecological to eat fiesh fruit in 
season. Right? With a refrigerator, to hell 
with the seasons. Nowadays, you ask people 
what phase the moon is in a^ nobody can 
give you a clear answer. But d^'t! kiMw 
what Che fh^n lamb chops in thrir re- 
frigerator cost in the supermarket." 

Followed by a very serious twinkle in- 
deed. 

Playing jazz piano in Capetown during the 
days of apartheid, the young Ibrahim was 
called Dollar Brand. As far as his peers were 
concerned, anything Am^can had to do 
with doUara. 

While on a European tour in 1962, be was 
“discovert." It was a heavy discovery — 
his first album, produced in P^s, was narr^ 
“Duke Ellington Presents the Dollar Brand 
Trio." 

On his way in a big way in more ways than 
one. Brand convert^ to Islam (“it helped 
me discover a sense of the natural'"), and he 
married die singer Sathima Bea Benjamin. 
They are still married. 

His World Music-before-tbe-term al- 
bums, “Anatomy of a South African Vil- 
lage” and “A^can Portraits," attracted 
wide positive international attentioru De- 
spite increasing governmental pressure in 
reaction to their politics, he and Sathima 


His musical 
portraits opened a 
window to South 
African society 


maintained a base in Cq)eti)WQ. For two 
years he ran a muste sdirol in Swaziland. 
Exile beckoned when 1^ piece “Maiinen- 
berg" was picked up as a sort of anthem 
during an oj^ing in Soweto. 

He played Lincoln Center, Carnegie HalL 
the Museum of Modem Art and the Vil~ 
Vanguard with John Coltrane, Ornette Co( 
man, Elvin Jones, Don Cherry and just about 
eveiy name that counted. theme of his 
mixed-media composition 
' "Kalahari Lib^uon Op- 

era" was "to open a win- 
dow to South African so- 
ciety. It is about a dream for 
aht^ierfriture." 

Hjs reputation was solid. 
He won polls. But he could 
not go home again — until 
^‘we made our way back to 
Capetown just after our president was re- 
leaMd from prison." 

In a certain sense they had never really 
left. Whether they were inside or ontside, it 
was always the same agenda. 

They always knew that the previous 
struggle was really minor compared to the 
one that would come next: “Thestnig^e we 
actnally face now is about reconciuation, 
humanity, reconstruction: about building a 
nation. 

“South Africa is the flashpoint of the 
entire planet. Because human beings dis- 
criminate everywhere. Apartheid is sml with 
us everywhere in some form or another. 
Sooner or later, there has to be an eruption. 
Tlie raessure must be released, or it wilTblow 
up. llie truth must be dealt vrith. So what is 
happening in our country is important for 
evefyone. We have an opportunity to be 
useful." 

In a certain way his present can be de- 
scribed as “wbat happens after a happy 
ending." In Novemter the Zurich Sym- 
phony Orchestra will play some of his com- 
positions, re-scored for symphonic instiu- 
mentadon. There is a project with the 
Munidr Philharmonic. And he is helping to 
build a Capetown Syinphony Orchestra; 

“Hie orchestra will stress the synergy 
between our cultural experience in South 
Africa and the jazz and classical music of the 
world.” Note that his home culture comes 
He has reversed the old colonial order. 
He is renecting upon the reversal of con- 
siderably more than that: 

“In Capetown now, we are teaching mar- 
tial aits as well as jazz. A Japanese swords- 


Ibrataim, once known as Dollar Brand, believes in entrepreneurship, not job& 


mao once said: *Under the sword lifted high, 
thm's hell to make you tremble. But go 
ahead with it f^Iessly and you’ll find bliss.’ 
We jazz music’ians are the modem samurai. 
It's all about courage and faith.” That 
twinkle again: “And bliss." 

“The person who has enough faith to risk 
bis last hundred buclcs in abusiness project is 
thinking like a jazz musiciaiL In either case, 
who knows what's going to happen next? 
We must encourage that sort of dynamic. 
Most people do not have faith in diemselves, 
and so are satisfied with having a 
job." 

A moment of meaningful silence: “I read 
the scriptures. Not once did I see anything 
about a job. It says ‘^work.* That is not the 
same thing. A jazzman does not have a job. 
He is an entrepreneur. His job is to take 
risks. 

“In jas colleges, people have jobs teach- 
ing ja 2 z. How does that work? Can people 
with jobs teach young musicians how not to 


have a job? They should reach 
eurship. How to start your own 
Kids learn that and they'll play b 
think^arlieParkerhadajob?- 

“I haven't had ajob since I was 14. If you 
offer^ me one I’d refuse iu Because tiien 
what would I play about? You have to play 
what you live, and life involves taking 
chances. If you can improvise a chorus of 
'Donna Lee' then you are also c^iable of 
operating your own company. 

“A 2^year-o1d kid figures out a new 
gimmick in his garage and he opens his own 
company and becomes a millionaire. Would 
you call that kid in die garage unemployed?. 

“We have a whole ^ture of unemploy- 
ment now. This culture says that yon must 
have a job. Thousands of young people walk 
around all over the planet viith master's 
degrees looking for jobs. It’s stupid. They 
should be taught how to be entr^neneurs. 
Don't Mice ajob wiiii a record company. Stan 
your own record company." 


INTERNATIONAI HERALD TRIBUNE, THttRSDAV nT¥.v i? lOO? 


s-r- ' 




PEOPLE 


Chan, fresh frx>m a shopping spree, at his premiere. 


H and in hand, Michael Jackson and his 
farmer wife. Lisa Marie Presley, arrived 
back at his Knightsbridge hotel afrera sold-out 
London concert She had stood at the edge of the 
stage throughout Jackson’s musical extravag- 
anza at Wembley stadium. *nie two had not 
been seen togetiier since their divorce last year, 
and in November. Jackson married Deborah 
Rowe, who gave birth to the couple's son. 
Prince, in February. Last week JackscHi took 
Rowe ^ong to Sheffield in northern England 
for the first of the four concerts of his current 
tour, his first in Britain in five years. For the 
second England concert, on Saturday, only 
60.000 ticlrets were sold for the 7S,000-ca- 
pacity Wembley. 

□ 

When Jackie Chan arrived in New York fOT 
the opening of “Operation Condor," which be 
directed and starred in, he stepped off the Con- 
c^e and found that his lugg^e was mining. 
The solution? Go shopping at Barneys. Nm only 
did Chan have to find something suitable for the 
premiere at the Ziegfeld Theatre, he was also 
going to appear on David Letterman's show. 
The marUaJ-arts star made “Operation Omdor" 
in 1991. It's being released in the United Stares 


now because of the success of several of Chan's 
oAer films, including “^Supetcop." 

□ 

One of two men charged with trying to extort 
money from Elle Maepherson says he was her 
“boy toy,” not a bursar. A lawyer for Michael 
Robert Mischler said his client was an invited 
guest at the model 's borne and trailer last montb 
in Los Angeles. “He siay^ with her six 
times," the lawyer said. “His statements are 
that he just found out he was used as a 'boy 
toy .' " A co-defendant. William Ryan Holt, 
2o. {beaded not guilty last week to extortion and 
attempted extortion charges. 

□ 

Some members of Jacques Cousteau's fam- 
ily objected Wednesday to the publication of 
the underwater explorer's last book, saying it 
had been rushed into prini after his death last 
monti). “We are anguished by the speed with 
which this disheartening media coup was 
staged, in disregard of ail that is e.ssential in the 
pub^licaUoD of an important work," said a letter 
faxed to news media in Paris. It was signed by 
seven members of the Cousteau fanmy. in- 
cluding his son, Jcan-Micbel Cousteau, and 


four grandchildren. The letter was not signed by 
Cousteau's widow, Francine, who su{^ 
ported the early publication of the book. Cous- 
teau had been working on “*The Man, the 
Octopus and the Orchidea" for 16 years when 
he died on June 25. It had been scheduled for 
release in Septemter. 

□ 

Cilia Black, (he '60s pop singer who went on 


to TV stardom in Britain, was anything but 
speechless when she collected an honor 
Wednesday from Queen Elizabeth IL "You 
know me, I did oU the yapping." Black told 
reporters outside Buddogharo Palace, showing 
off her OBE. * 'I told her my life story. . . . T saw 
that glazed look and I thought, 'It's time to shut 
up. " ' Black is reputedly one of the highest-paid 
stars of British TV as host of “Blind Date." “1 
just love what 1 do and to be noticed for it — this 
IS the icing on the cake,' ' she said. * *J 'm that old 
ginger fur ball who got the cream." 

□ 

The jazz trumpeter and composer Nat Ad- 
deiiey had his right leg amputated in an emer- 
gency operation after ius foot became swollen. 
The 65-year-old Adderley has diabetes. 


Si. 4 mi IliHi.wWITir ^WOCNU^ ISn,' 

Presley and Jackson in London. 


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Spain 


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Eoypt*(Calro|t 

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