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INTERNATIONAL 



PUBl4sAl£D WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


Paris, Friday, July 18, 1997 



Space Error Disables 
Mir Guidance System 

‘Shut It Down! 9 Mission Control Shouts 
As Fatigued Crew Disconnects Key Cable 


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By Michael R. Gordon 

Nrnt York Times Service 

MOSCOW — A crewman aboard 
the stricken Mir space station mis- 
takenly disconnected a critical cable 
Thursday, disabling the guidance sys- 
tem that allows the station to gather 
solar energy and precipitating yet an- 
other crisis. 

“Shut it down! Shat it down!" 
screamed a controller at the mission 
control center outside Moscow, urging 
the crew to turn off the lights, heating 
and communication systems to con- 
serve vital power. 

With that order the crew was almost 
back to where they had started from 
after their June 25 collision in space. 

They were stumbling around in a 
clammy, darkened space station using 
flashlights to find their way. Deprived 
of power, they shifted to the Soyuz 
space craft docked alongside to talk to 
ground control. 

Those communications were not al- 
ways pleasant As tension built inside 
Mir, some of die Russian ground con- 
trollers lost patience with the fatigued 
Russian and American crew. 

"This is a kindergarten,” Vladimir 
Solovyov, the mission director, 
muttered testily after an exchange with 
the three-man crew. (Page 7) 

But for all of foeprobtems, Russian 
and U.S. space officials stressed that 
die mishap was not life -threatening. 
There were no immediate plans to 



evacuate Mir. Instead, the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration 
announced Thursday that it had gran- 
ted permission for the American crew- 
man on Mir, Michael Foale, to train for 
a lengthy space walk to restore power 
from the Spektr module, which was 
damaged in a collision with an un- 
manned cargo craft. 

NASA wili not make a formal de- 
cision (» whether to proceed with the 
repairs until Mr. Foale and Alexander 
Lazutkin, the Russian flight engineer 
on Mir, carry out a full-scale rehearsal 
in their space suits. 

But it seems clear that NASA is 
prepared to authorize the repairs, bar- 
ring a major setback. NASA specialists 
in Moscow have concluded that the 
Russian plan for repairing Mir is tech- 
nically manageable and does not pose 
excessive risks. 

Rank Culbertson, the former shuttle 
commander who oversees the Amer- 
ican and Russian space cooperation, 
emphasized Thursday that Mr. Foale 
would have ample opportunity to train 
before undertaking the mission. 

Still, Mir has become a delicate is- 
sue for the Clinton administration, 
which has been generally eager to co- 
operate with the Russians but is also 
under fire by some lawmakers who 
consider the station too dangerous. 

"As far as we know right now," 
President Bill Clinton said Thursday, 

See MIR, Page 7 










VUfcair MatatWAgencc r\ «n u. - Tiuu«- 

Vladimir Solovyov, the Mir mission director, studying a model of the 
stricken space station Thursday at mission control outside Moscow. 


A Suspect of a Thousand Faces 

Man Sought in Versace Murder Wasn't Violent, Friends Say 


E I. RyaVIhe Amminti PM 

A store clerk in West Hollywood, California, 
taping up a wanted poster for Mr. Cunanan. 


By Todd S. Purdum 

New York Times Service 

SAN DIEGO — He had a thousand stories and the 
faces to match. He was gregarious and charming, 
boyish behind wire-rimmed glasses, always quick to 
organize a party or pick up a check. He was loud and 
boastful, rumpled and pudgy despite expansive 
clothes, a bit of a snob with no visible means of 
support. 

He brandished long Davidoff cigars, but seldom 
drank anything stronger than cranberry juice. He had 
been openly homosexual since high school, but 
showed off pictures of a woman and child he described 
as his fanner wife and daughter. His own mother 
called him a "high-class homosexual prostitute,” and 
he was apparently kept by wealthy men, but he com- 
plained to friends that he could not get dates. 

la the bars and boutiques ofHiUcresr, the lively gay 
enclave of Los Angeles, acquaintances recalled all that 
and more about Andrew Phillip Cunanan, whom they 
knew as a smooth-talker named Andrew DeSilva. 

But none of them saw any trace of the violence that 
has made Mr. Cunanan, 27, the sole suspect in a cross- 
country killing spree that has so far left five men dead, 
the last of than the Italian fashion designer Gianni 
Versace. 

[Hundreds of FBI agents in Florida and around the 


Chinese Police Break Up 
Big Protests by Workers 


• AGENDA 

Thai Officials Raid Foreign Brokerages 



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CaavOed by Or SaffFmm Dhpacha 

BEIJING — The police in south- 
western China dispersed thousands of 
angry factory workers who staged 
protests tiiis month after their employers 
declared bankruptcy, officials said 
Thursday. 

A few of the ringleaders were ar- 
rested, said an official of the govern- 
ment of Mumyang, a city in southwest- 
ern Sichuan province. 

But he dismissed a report by the New 
York-based organization Human Rights 
in China that said that 100,000 people 
had been involved in protests in late 
June and early Jnty and that paramilitary 
People’s ArmedPoticehad been used to 
break up the demonstrations, wounding 
more than 100 people and detaining 

about 80. 

“Just one or. two people who were 
posting up big-character posters and 
stirring up the crowd were arrested," 
the official said. “The rest were dis- 
persed and no workers were hurt" 

Worker unrest is one of the greatest 
fears of China's Communist Party lead- 


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ership. Reports of protests by dis- 
gruntled workers have surfaced increas- 
ingly in China in recent years as 
economic reforms have resulted in lay- 
offs from lumbering state factories 
China’s leaders this year placed the 
revamping of money-losing state en- 
terprises at the top of their economic 
a gBnrfa pushing through with bank- 
ruptcies mat they bad delayed for years 
for fear of social unrest 

Human Rights in China said in a 
faxed statement received here Thursday 
chat the workers took to the streets in late 
June after three state-run enterprises de- 
clared bankruptcy. 

In more than a week of demonstra- 
tions, the group said, workers said that 
company officials had embezzled un- 
employment benefit funds, and appealed 
to die government to protect then sub- 
sistence rights. The authorities imposed 

See CHINA, Page 7 


Moving to stamp out what they 
called damaging rumors about Thai- 
land's financial crisis, officials raided 
at least two foreign brokerages in 
Bangkok on Thursday. Squads of uni- 
framed police searched the offices of 
Nomura Securities Co. and ABN- 
AMRO Hoare Govett, searching 


desks, reading computer files and in- 
terrogating and photographing em- 
ployees, witnesses said. The raids 
drew accusations from some foreign 
brokers that the government was using 
scare tactics to keep the foreign in- 
vestment community from passing 
along unpleasant news. Page 13. 


Woolworth Ends Its 5-and-10-Cent Era 


Woolworth Crap., whose founder 
created the 5-and-lQ-cent store concept 
more than a century ago, became the 
last U.S. company to leave that busi- 
ness, saying it would close its 400 
remaining general-merchandise shops 
and convert a quarter of them to spe- 
cialty retailers. The original concept 


RAGE TWO 

U.K. Pistol Shooters Blast Ban 

THE AMERICAS Pag© 3. 

A Twisted Tale of Two Sisters 


was that all the household goods in the 
store would be sold for 5 cents or less, 
and the fort store, which foiled, was 
called the Great Five Cent Store. The 
founder, Frank Winfield Woolworth, 
opened a second store in Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania, which caught on, and he 
added 10-cent goods. Page 13. 

ASIAJPAHFIC Rage 4. 

ASEAN Seeks Cambodia Solution 

EUROPE PageS. 

Bosnian Serbs Threaten NATO 



No. 35,576 


Clinton Warns EU 
Of Trade Conflict 
Over Boeing Deal 

President Hints at Retaliation 
If Antitrust Officials Bar Merger 


United States were on the case Thursday, and Attorney 
General Janet Reno appealed to the public for help in 
the hunt, news agencies reported. 

[A man fitting the general description of Mr. Cun- 
anan was seen running away Thursday from the site of 
another murder, north of Miami International Airport. 
The FBI was investigating, bnt there was no link 
established to Mr. Cunanan. 

["He’s not your run-of-fhe mill spree or serial 
killer.’’ said Lieutenant Dale Bars ness, head of the 
Minneapolis police homicide unit "He's very in- 
telligent, very cunning, a con man." Mr. Cunanan is 
also a murder suspect in Minnesota. 

[New York City offered a $10,000 reward for 
information leading to his capture.] 

"We knew him as such a mild-mannered person," 
said George Kalamaras, manager of one of Mr. Gui- 
anan's favorite haunts, a restaurant called California 
Cuisine. It was there, ar the end of April, that Mr. 
Cunanan’s friends threw a going-away party fra him 
after he told them he was moving to San Francisco. 

But instead of going to San Francisco, Mr. Cunanan 
bought a one-way ticket to Minneapolis, where he 
stayed with a former lover, a 33-year-old architect, 
David Madsen, and arranged a rendezvous with an old 
friend, 28-year-old Jeffrey Trail. ‘ 

See VERSACE, Page 7 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — Trans-Atlantic ten- 
sions over Boeing Co.'s takeover of 
McDonnell Douglas Crap, escalated 
dramatically Thursday after President 
Bill Clinton intervened for the first time 
in the controversy. 

The president warned of U.S. trade 
retaliation if European antitrust author- 
ities sought to block the Boeing-Mc- 
Donnell deal 

At the same time, however, Mr. Clin- 
ton expressed hope that there would be a 
last-nunure settlement before the EU 
Wednesday deadlin e. 

"I'm concerned about what appear to 
be the reasons for the objections to the 
Boeing-McDonneli Douglas merger by 
the European Union," he said. 

"It would be unfortunate if we had a 
trade standoff with them,'! he said "But 
we have a system for manag ing this 
through the World Trade Organization, 
and we have some options ourselves 
when actions are taken by Europe in this 
regard.” 

Mr. Clinton spoke in the wake of 
discussions Tuesday by senior admin- 
istration officials. 

The U.S. trade representative. Char- 
lene Barsbefsky. Commerce Secretary 
William Daley. Transportation Secre- 
tary Rodney Slater and the president’s 
two top economic advisers met at die 
White House to consider possible re- 
taliatory steps, officials said. 

The measures could include stiff tar- 
iffs on Airbus Industrie airliners sold in 
the United States and filing a WTO 
complaint against the Europeans, al- 
though no conclusions were reached. 

President Clinton's comments fol- 
lowed a renewed warning by the Euro- 
pean Commission that it would block 
the deal next week unless Boeing made 
substantial new concessions id ensure 
that the merger was not an unfair dis- 
advantage to Airbus, the European con- 
sortium. 

President Jacques Chirac of France 
reiterated his support for the commis- 
sion's stand at a meeting Thursday with 
foe 20-member EU executive agency in 
Brussels. “You must be firm," he told 
them, officials said. 

The high-level interventions raised 
the risk that political brinkmanship over 
the merger could spiral out of control 
and lead both sides into a damaging 
trade war, even though senior U.S. and 
EU officials contended that Boeing and 
the EU commission were not that far 
apart on the substance of the case. 

The major stumbling block was Boe- 
ing's reluctance to drop its status as 


exclusive supplier in long-tram con- 
tracts with three major U.S. airlines — 
American, Delta and Continental. 

"It would be a shame if there were 



Stephen Jafl&Agmcc RawAne 


President Clinton announcing his 
choice erf General Hugh Shelton, 
right, to succeed General John 
Shafikashvili, left as chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Page 3.- 


In Apartheid Inquiry, Many Only Relived the Pain 



By Suzanne Daley 

New York Tbnes Service - 

WYNBERG, South Africa — Dee Dicks says she 
almost never cried in the 12 years since club-wielding 
police officers kicked in the doors of a friend’s house, 
where she was hiding after an anti-apartheid protest, 
and hauled her off to jaiL 

Mas Dicks was 17 then and on the verge of gradu- 
ating from high school. But instead she was prosecuted 
and sentenced to three years in prison. There, treated as 
a common criminal rather than a political detainee, she 
was locked up with murderers and thieves, and sub- 
jected to strip searches. 

Two months ago, site told her story to South 


Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission. These 
days, she says, she is constantly in tears. 

"It was very traumatic to relive it," she said re- 
cently, her hands, trembling slightly, clasped around a 
cup of tea. "Now, I can actually see it m my mind. 
Before the bearing 1 never cried. But now, I cry all the 
time." 

In the last 18 months more than' 2,000 victims of 
apartheid-era brutality have told their stories to the 
commission in hundreds of public hearings around the 
country. The hearings fra the victims, which ended last 
month, were supposed to be a chance for those who 
suffered anonymously to finally be heard. 

After stepping down from stages bright with spot- 
lights and laced with microphone cords, many victims 


said they -felt better for speaking out But that sense of 
relief was often short-lived. 

■Victims’ advocates, psychologists and workers for 
the Truth Commission say that within weeks or 
months of testifying, many victims have complained 
of sleepless nights and recurring nightmares. 

Moreover, many feel a growing anger ar a process 
that reopened old wounds but gave than little support 
afterward. Some victims wanted, even expected, con- 
crete help like pensions and job training. Early on, 
commission officials had said they could help victims 
with personal needs — medical operations, a leaky 
roof — but no such assistance has materialized. 

See TRUTH, Page 7 


not a solution because in reality they are 
so close," said an EU official, who 
spoke on condition of anonymity. 

"It’s far from clear what would be 
done" in terms of retaliation by Wash- 
ington, one U.S. official said. 

But in a sign (hat the administration 
has not given up hope of a settlement, 
senior State Department officials 
worked feverishly to tty to bridge dif- 
ferences between Boeing and the EU 
Commission following the breakdown 
Tuesday of direct negotiations in Brus- 
sels. 

Stuart Eizenstai. undersecretary of 
state for economic affairs, spoke by 
telephone with the EU competition 
commissioner, Karel van Miert, and 
proposed a joint U.S.-EU monitoring of 
Boeing to prevent it from using ex- 
clusive contracts to lock ap the Amer- 
ican market for commercial jets, U.S. 
and EU sources said. 

Mr. van Miert was said to have re- 
buffed the offer as insufficient, but con- 
tacts were continuing. 


U.S. to Seek 
3 Seats for 
Poor Nations 
On UN Council 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Times Service 

UNITED NATIONS. New York — 
After months of inaction over bow to 
make foe UN Security Council more 
reflective of foe world, foe Clinton ad- 
ministration is to recommend that three 
permanent seats be given to developing 
nations, according to a senior U.S. of- 
ficial. 

The decision to move beyond a five- 
year-old policy of supporting perma- 
nent membership fra only Japan and 
Germany came in a new administration 

Battle lines on UN reform. Page 7. 

review that also gave foe go-ahead to 
Bill Richardson, foe U.S. representa- 
tive, to begin pressing for quicker action 
on restructuring foe council. 

[The Slate Department spokesman, 
Nicholas Burns, said Thursday that the 
developing countries chosen for mem- 
bership should come from Asia, Larin 
America and Africa, The Associated 
Press reported. 

["The United States is not making 
any recommendation about which coun- 
tries should fill these new permanent 
seats,” Mr. Bums said. “We expect this 
to be actively discussed throughout next 
year.” He said it was up to foe de- 
veloping countries to decide whether to 
choose a permanent representative or 
rotate countries in and out of foe seats 
for foe three geographical areas.] 

The five current permanent members 
are Britain, China, France, Russia and 
the United States. Ten other council seats 
are held fra two years by countries se- 
lected from regional groups. The council 
is foe only body in the organization with 
the power to order military force and 
make other binding decisions. 

"The fact that they are prepared to 
accept developing countries as perma- 
nent members is a progressive move," 
said Prakash Shah, India's represen- 
tative, who was at a meeting Wednesday 
during which Mr. Richardson outlined 
his ideas. 

Razali Ismail. Malaysia's represen- 
See UN, Page 7 


The Dollar 


Haw York 

DM 

Pound 

Yon 

FF 


Thureday 8 4 P.H. 
1.793 
1.6733 
115.975 
6.0565 

Hwd^f does 
8020.77 


minday O 4 p.M. 

931.60 


prwk)U8do88 

1.7914 

1.6767 

115.62 

6.0504 

8038.88 

previouadMB 

B36-56 


Books Page 9. 

Crossword Page 9. 

Opinion — Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 20-2L 


The Irrtermurkst 


Pages 5*. 


[The IHT on-line http://www.iht.con1 


1 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1997 



page mo 


British Sport Cries Foul l Outrage at a New Gun Law 

Target Shooters Blast Pistol Restrictions 


By Warren Hoge 

JVtn* jivt Tunes &t> ire 

B IS LEY. England — There is 
a sureness to this place, with 
its sweep of green Fields, 
striped wind pennants flut- 
tering from high masts and people 
ambling along leafy paths and lolling 
on the covered porches -of their Vic- 
torian bungalows. 

Never is there more of a sense of 
permanence here than in July, the 
month that Bisley Camp is the site of 
the Imperial Meeting, the event that is 
to target shooting what Wimbledon is 
to tennis. 

But this year. July has taken on a 
new and unsettling significance for 
the members of the Bisley commu- 
nity, causing them to focus their at- 
tention more on the present and the 
future than on the annual reaffirm- 
ation of traditions of their sport, 
reaching back to archery tournaments 
in the 14th century. 

■'it's a bloody disaster is whar it is," 
said Roger MiQuni. a partner in G.E. 
Fulton & Son Registered Gunsmiths. 

Under a law passed last year, start- 
ing July l and continuing until Oct. 1. 
owners of pistols larger than .22 
caliber must turn them* in to police 
stations around the country', ana next 
summer the pistols exempted from that 
ban will be confiscated under a new, 
more stringent (aw now moving to- 
ward certain adoption in Parliament. 

Both laws tighten restrictions on 
gun ownership in a country with a 
police force famous for going unarmed 
and with laws that were already the 
strictest of any Western country's. 

But two nationally traumatizing 
events — the killing of 14 people on 
the main street of the Berkshire town 
of Hungerford in 1987 by a man with 

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Target practice on the range at Bisley, where a ban on pistols larger than .22 caliber, approved after two 
mass killings, has an gered gun owners. Roger Millard, left, a gunsmith at Bisley, called the ban a disaster. 


TV N*:* YitV Tint-. 


a rifle, and the massacre of 16 school- 
children and their teacher by a man 
wielding four handguns in the Scot- 
tish town of Dunblane in March 1996 
— produced a public and political 
demand for action. 

Under far-reaching laws existing at 
the time, machine guns, self-loading 
rifles and semiautomatic shotguns 
were illegal and others types of fire- 
arms like pistols, revolvers, rifles and 
shotguns required a certificate of good 
‘'character' 7 and a dean record from 
the police renewable every' five years. 

I N both the Hungerford and Dun- 
blane incidents, however, the 
killers had licensed weapons, 
leading to a perception that the 
laws were not sufficient. 

“Of course, the problem wasn't the 
law. ir was the lack of enforcement of 
the law." said C.C.C. Cheshire, a re- 
tired lieutenant colonel in the Royal 
Tank Regimenr and chief executive of 
the National Rifle Association, which 
has its headquarters here. “Neither one 
of those men would have had weapons 
if the police had done their job." 

In Dunblane, the constable who 
had approved rhe killers certificate 
admitted his failure and resigned from 
the force. 

Dismay and anger have taken hold 
of the shooting enthusiasts who flock 
here over what they perceive as the 
demonizaficn of their sport and its 
membership. 

“We are all parents, and the fact that 
this was a ghastly thing to have 
happened sent a shock wave through 
this community too." Mr. Millard said. 


He now provides valuations of pistols 
to be turned in. and he wanned to a 
question about the nature of the people 
bringing in their guns for assessment. 

"Lawyers and lorry drivers." he 
said.. “doctors and dustmen, soldiers 
and solicitors, one in a wheelchair and 
a couple of Lady shooters. What I 
haven't seen, and am unlikely to. is 
the villain in the black balaclava who 


Dismay has taken hold 
of enthusiasts over what 
they see as the demon- 
ization of their sport. 


wants his handgun valued before do- 
ing over the local sub post office." 

Albie Fox, owner of an embroidery 
store catering to shooters and director 
of the Sportsman’s Association, said. 
“The gun culture in the U.K. is what 
people see on television from Amer- 
ica. and that has become what people 
perceive us to be." 

Unlike its namesake in the United 
Stales, the National Rifle Association 
here is not a lobby but a charity. Prince 
Charles is its president, and one of its 
missions is “defense of the realm." 

The organization says it welcomes 
restrictions on ownership like those 
proposed by an independent govern- 
ment commission set up after Dun- 
blane that would have required gun 
owners to keep weapons locked in one 
of the approved 2.1 18 clubs. 

Mr. Fox said his association not only 


was not against gun control, but it also 
favored creation of a firearms board to 
control licenses. Hiere are 200,000 
legally held handguns in Britain that 
will have to be turned in or taken out of 
the country. Estimates of illegal hand- 
guns. which will not be reached by the 
law, stan at one million. 

The government has promised 
compensation equal to 75 percent of 
the list price of weapons turned in, 
starting at £150 ($25u) for what Col- 
onel Cheshire called “common 
garden" pistols to more than £1,200 
for guns with higher valuations be- 
cause of their historical value or elab- 
orate construction. 

Businesses and clubs that shut down 
or suffer losses will get no compen- 
sation, and some of them are planning 
to take their cases to European Com- 
munity courts. The ultimate cost to the 
government is estimated at anywhere 
from £150 milli on to £500 million. 


M ANY gun owners are tak- 
ing their weapons abroad, 
and some of the 139 pis- 
tol clubs are relocating to 
countries like Belgium. France and 
Switzerland. Target shooting with 
rifles, a large segment of the sport, is 
unaffected by the new laws, and the 
government has said it will give spe- 
cial dispensation to foreign pistol 
teams coming to Manchester for the 
Commonwealth Games in 2002. 

The British national pistol team, 
long an Olympic force, will also be 
allowed to compete. But to comply 
with the new law. it will have to train 
abroad. 


US. Study Lowers Cost 

Of Curbing Emissions 


By John H. Cushman Jr. 

New K»rt Times Service 

WASHINGTON — After tinkering 
with computer models for more than a 
year, the Clinton administration has pre- 
dicted that efforts to combat global 
warming by limiting the emissions of 
greenhouse gases wtil have a much less 
dramatic effect on the economy than has 
been projected by industries that oppose 
restraints on energy use. 

The analysis opened what is expected 
to be a long campaign between now and 
the end of the year. 

International negotiators are sched- 
uled to meet in Kyoto, Japan, in a cam- 
paign to build support for a binding 
treaty would limit the eiiiissions of 
greenhouse gases. 

Any measures to reverse tire steady 
growth of these emissions — mostly 
given off by burning fossil fuels to drive 
cars, generate electricity and heat build- 
ings — would probably involve the 
biggest government, intervention in en- 
ergy markets since oil-exporting coun- 
tries dramatically raised prices in the 
1970s. 

But the administration's computer 
models suggest that the economic side 
effects of trying lo curb an increase in 
these emissions would be only half as 
severe as those projected in a recent 
study by economists at Charles River 
Associates for the American Petroleum 
Institute, a lobbying group for fuel pro- 
ducers. 

Critics who say die administration is 
moving too fast on global warming have 
warned that mines and factories would 
close, inflation would rise and pro- 
ductivity would fall under the economic 
shock. 

But another school of thought holds 
that energy conservation can pay for 
itself and that new technologies could 
be found, offering major economic 
gains — hot to mention avoiding more 
flooding, drinking-water shortages and 
famines that could come with a heat-up 
in global warming. 

As the administration tries to decide 
bow fast and how far to cut emissions, 
the question of the treaty's economic 
fallout is being asked with increasing 
urgency in Congress, which has ulti- 
mate authority over energy policy. 

The Senate would also have to ratify 
any treaty. 

‘ In a staff paper, the White House has 
determined that energy policies aimed 
at cutting emissions ought, over rhe next 
few decades, shave a fraction of a per- 
cent from the nation's economic 
growth, followed by a recovery — or 
might, if implemented cleverly, have 
barely a discernible effect or even a net 
economic benefit. 

“It just boils down to this: If we do it 
dumb, it could cost a lot. but if we do it 


smart, it will cost much less, and indeed 
could produce net benefits in the long 
run," Janet Yellen, chairwoman of die 
Council of Economic Advisers, said ata 
congressional hearing. 

Expressed in terms of energy costs, 
the projections found that stabilizing 
emissions at 1990 levels by 2010, for 
example, would require steps equiv- . 

. alent to charging about $100 for everjjj i 
ton of carbon emitted when a fossil frier 
is burned. 

That would be like raising a tax on 

f I ~ „ 11 


a tax on coal of $52.52 a ton and a tax on 
natural gas of $1-49 a thousand cubic 
feeL 

Bur the projections, administration 
officials said, are put in terms of taxes 
merely because that is the easiest way 
for economists to model things that are 
even more complex than the tax coder 

Nobody seriously expects the White 
House to propose a big gasoline tax 
increase. ; 

Lagos Pressing 
U.S. Diplomats 

The Associated Press 

LAGOS — The national chief of po- 
lice wants to question the American 
ambassador ana members of the U.S. 
Embassy staff about a recent series of 
bombings. 1 

The police chief, Ibrahim Coomasie. 
has not said why he wants to question 
Ambassador Walter Carrington about 
the blasts, which have killed at least IQ 
people, though authorities have sug- 
gested U.S. diplomatsmay have known 
about them in advance. 

Nigerian officials have not offered 
any evidence linking the diplomats tc 
the explosions. 

The military government of Nigeria 
has blamed the bombings on the coun- 
try's main opposition group, the Na- 
tional Democratic Coalition. 

The authorities want to extend their 
investigation to countries such as Bri- 
tain and the United States, where Ni- 
gerian dissidents have been active. 

Mr. Coomasie acknowledged that the 
Americans would have to waive dip- 
lomatic immunity before they could be 
questioned. 

The U.S. Embassy said Wednesday it 
had received no request for Mr. Car- 
rington or any other diplomats to waive 
their traditional immunity. 

In a statement, the U.S. Embassy 
reiterated a condemnation of terrorist 
bombings and expressed willingness to 
cooperate with the Lagos authorities. 


Jew Is Unrepentant Over Pig Drawings 


The At* m iuieti Fre j« 

JERUSALEM — Wearing 
the emblem of an outlawed 
anti-Arab group in court, a 
Jewish extremist said Thurs- 
day that she did not regret trig- 
gering Muslim protests by dis- 
tributing drawings depicting 
Mohammed, the prophet of 
the Muslim religion, as a pig. 

“1 don't think he was a pig. 
but the way they use him is a 
piggy way." Tatiana Suss- 


kind. 26. said of Muslims. 

Miss Suss fund's leaflet, 
pasted on shutters of Arab- 
owned shops in the West 
Bank town of Hebron in June, 
set off clashes in which 
dozens of Palestinians and 
several Israeli soldiers were 
injured. It also triggered 
Muslim street protests in sev- 
eral other countries, including 
Bangladesh and Iran. 

Miss Susskind's trial was 


In this Saturday’s 

T H : ; e 

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postponed after a brief open- 
ing session so that she could 
undergo a psychiatric exam- 
ination requested by both 
sides. 

Sean Casper, her lawyer, 
said his client's behavior had 
raised questions about her 
mental slate. 

Thin and tired-looking after 
several days of fasting to 
protest her treatment in jail. 
Miss Susskind wore a yellow 
T-shirt showing a clenched fist 
j inside a Star of David, symbol 
j of the extremist Kach move- 
! mem. Miss Susskind said she 
I had drawn the emblem on the 
shirt. 

Miss Susskind. an art- 
school dropout, has said she 
put up the leaflets to protest 
Palestinian rioting. 

She said that she did not 
regret her action and that 
Arabs should be put on trial 
for inciting- violence against 
Jews. 

"I'm sorty they did not 
bring to trial the mufti of 
Hebron, who has called for 
the killing of Jews in the name 
of Mohammed." she said, re- 
ferring to the city's chief 
Muslim cleric. 

Outside the courtroom. 
Miss Susskind held up a new 
drawing she had made in jail 


This way to 



Don't miss it. A iol happens there. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


showing two pigs, one throw- 
ing a firebomb and the second 
standing on what appeared to 
be the Koran, the sacred book 
of Islam. 

Her next bearing is sched- 
uled for Aug. 3. 

Miss Susskind has beeo 
charged with inciting to rac- 
ism, insulting Islam, support- 
ing a terrorist group and en- 
dangering lives by throwing a 
stone at an Arab driver. She 
faces a maximum sentence of 
26 years in jail. 

■ Peace Talks Rekindled? 

A European Lbiion spokes- 
man said Thursday that the 
EU was trying to set up a 
meeting between the Pales- 
tinian feader. Yasser Ara/at. 
and the Israeli foreign min- 
ister. David Levy, on ending a 
deadlock in Middle East 
peace talks, Reuters reported. 

Israeli and Palestinian of- 
ficials confirmed that both 
Mr. Levy and Mr. Arafat had 
been invited to a meeting in 
Brussels on Tuesday of the 
EU's 15 foreign ministers. 

Such a meeting would be 
the highest-level lsraeli-Pal- 
estinian comact since Mr. 
Arafat and Mr. Levy met 
briefly at a conference in 
Malta in April. 


Strike Is Called at Channel Tunnel 

COQUELLES, France (Reuters) — French labor unions 
said Thursday that they would stage a one-day strike next 
Wednesday against the operator of the Channel Tunnel. 
Eurotunnel SA. 

The unions rejected a management offer to meet nexi 
Thursday to discuss their demands for higher salaries, bonuses 
and a work week of 35 hours instead of 37 Vi hours. 

The walkout would be the first daylong strike at the tunnel, 
where a two-hour strike was held Nov. 18, hours before a fire 
in the tunnel severely curtailed its operations. 

The Eiffel Tower stayed closed for a second day Thurs- 
day as management met with workers to try to end a strike at 
the Paris monument. Hundreds of tourists were turned away. 


Workers are protesting the firing of a colleague who was 
accused by a British tourist of manhandling her when she 
became dizzy and tried to leave an elevator. ( Reuters- 

Australia has an image problem^aid the chairman of the 
counuy’s Tourism Task Force, John Brown, arising from the 
remark of a maverick Parliament member that Australia couTd 
“swamped" by Asians if immigration were not halted. Po- 
tential visitors must be told that the views of the Parliament 
member, Pauline Hanson, are not backed by most Australians. 
Mr. Brown said. (AFP) 

Continental Airlines said it had received permission from 
the Department of Transportation to start nonstop service next 
April between Moscow and Newark International Airport, 
which serves the New York City area. (AFX ) 


WEATHER 


Europe 


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3173 

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19-06 

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38100 

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15/59 1 


39-102 

18-64 a 

41100 

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K*yaa*> 

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42*107 

3475 a 


Forecast for Saturday through Monday, as provided by AccuWeather Asia 


user & *v;- 


UrrvjMonilWY 


UrwKMU, 

MM 


jAiiraom mil ™ fcS 

North America Europe 

A Iron* heading slowly A nice weekend ahsad isr 
souih will end the heat Canaan and most at the 
from New York w Detroit Br.nsh isles yurn sjm* str- 
and Chicago Saturday. shine arc ie’'-. 0 »’atj>e* m 
than it will be comfortaofe the 20s. Most c* Scarsr. 
with sortie sunshine into navi a Fiance a-£ Spain 
Monday. Tnundeistorms will also do oiaasant 
will lorm along I he front Cloudy and cod aresi 
Irom me Carotnas into the aayem Eu*ooe .-.its scan- 
Gull States. Hot ana dry ing rains tram rhe Balkans 
from The Southwest to me and Romania lo southern 
southern Plains Poland 


*** A 


Asia 

Hof ar.d humid weather anil 
c sntirue across Koiea and 
mes: cl Japan Friday and 
Satu'day through Monday, 
including Seoul and Tokyo 
Beijing and an et nonneos<- 
err. China anil be 
mm scattered showers and 
thunoerstems South-cen- 
tral China a-r- eastern 
T.oet w.;. nave soaking 
ram 


North America 


arctniogo 

MoO 

BW* 

ClKB>)D 

Oahu 

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36iyT pl>M pc 
3iw is-m i 
JGrtT 2271 pc 
35T95 1MS1 t 
J2-OT 17*021 
30*S 2271 pc 
Ml 23-73 Pi 
dww tot* s 

52-69 2S-T7 i 


Tun Km un 
High Low W 
OF OF 
18*4 1 1-52 PC 
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*■475 !E.5'i m 
2 *> 7 ’> 17-42 pc 
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11-91 IWSB 
24.75 ISO cc 
JIM 2373 a.- 
3A33 21 "3 pc 
Jl-89 '7>b2 PC 
31-91 


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Today 

High Low W 

or or 
roe loucc 
270C ->491 
31 * I 24-75 p? 
Ji--*7 21-70 pc 
»:•! 22 -i r 
1 Qi 2&82 I 
22-1 14 57 » 
2t 73 T3IS S 
!*K 3 19 1 
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M’W 23-7 J 4 


Tomorrow 
High Low W 
CfF Cfl= 

2675 17 621 
ifel.4 "C-Muc 
335-1 26 79FC 
33 4C !■*■* 2. 
3371 21-Jrc 
i;-T(r j? m pc 

24‘7t 14-57 K 

257- -55 ? k 
£ r7; 1 1 52 pc 
25 77 1’ 42 pt 

3144 lWtiili 


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bans 1 '.* 

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Calcwta 
C'.wq Mji 
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Hanoi 

Ho Ch. Uirh 

►tengKofig 

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JAona 

Karachi 

K Luraw 

K. Knofcalu 

Morita 

tt*a b»eu 

PtiiKun Panfi 

Phufcel 

Rangoon 

SuOIlf 

Shanghai 
Sirigup typ 


4^*119 

Coon Timh 

Cjvifrtancn 

HuUi.t 

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Today 

High LowW 
OF OF 
41 10* 2170 s 

30 B6 21 - 70 pc 

31 88 2V77 i 

sms :srj s 
2l5.«r »7h« 
31 88 28.79 r 
XV9 1 2373 c 
30*6 2-ST77 pc 
31-88 26.791 
3C B9 2475 I 
29 84 25-77 r 
43(109 2H.B2 S 
3188 23 73 pc 
34.93 27*D pc 
UW 23*73 pc 

31- 99 21.70 pc 

31.-M 2*71 r 
37-58 2C/79I* 

32- 89 24-75 Mi 
31-98 25*77 i 
30*8 24.75 < 
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32*89 267? c 
31*8 2271 pc 
3289 2*75 pc 
:«T79 M.68 pc 
30-86 36-79 r 


27*0 16-51 S 
14.-57 Me , 
2V 78 19*6 s 


Tomorrow 
High LowW 
OF OF 
41106 24.75 ' 
29-84 18 64 4 
32 89 2577 . 
3B82 26-7; t 
28.-B2 26 79-1 

28- 82 2577 • 
34 93 23--?p-. 
29*4 2577 pi 
31*88 27-fli; •: 
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29 64 2 4 75 r 

41-106 29-64 a 
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34*3 28/82 4 
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29- 54 2173 i 
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sn-9now. He?. W-Wojmer ah map*, toncaata and dan pratldM by AeeuWuthar, tnc. 0 1997 


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1355 

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1152 

7*44 pr 

s»i*wy 

14-57 

9*23 PC 

14.53 

T46W 


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LNTER.N VTI0N.4JL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1997 


PAGE 3 


Emissio° E/.5. Audit Uncovers 
^ i-nwu. „ s ,„ u , A Morass at Medicare 

Overpayments in ’96 Totaled $23 Billion 

tlw^pKjecfmn" f ? rtT ^ of e * ■'“* By Robert Pear Congress — $115 billion over fr 

emissiorK '?*S „ £ JU .nd ihJ**. vi »w* **"*• ° r an ave ™g* »3 billion 

pv ,m n L a le\ e i. f «*• year. Congress is considering maji 

“aitfnr P* e * ' v ould r C g Ulr ^ X ' WASHINGTON — In the firs! com- changes in Medicare, including 
' inn ° 2 2rgin ^ J bnm < .prehensive audit of Medicare, federal '“means test” and an increase in ihe a| 
« ■ hi- T 00 tfr n»k-d . investigators have found that the gov- of eligibility’, to prevent the progra 

eminent overpaid hospitals, doctors and from going bankrupt before bat 

I hat WOlild tv 1 ’ -Other henlih r*nr«» nrnuiHerc la«t vear hv (wMnwt dbm t !r 


Qarural gas nf s'j jV J|l,ria ne .. The books and records of the Medi- 
fect ~ A ihou.^ -care health insurance system for the 

But the project] elderly and its contractors were in such 

officials said, dre n v "disarray that they could not be rhor- 
ihereiv becj^- ln . pughly’audited. said June Gibbs Brown. 
- for econontistVif. 41 1 ‘ ,hc saj inspector general of the Department of 
c\*cn more c^n-nl n ‘" d ' ! Health and Human Services. She said 
Nohod\ ilr.o '* ^ riljn Ariji ■ Wednesday that there was no way to tell 
House »o -iro- ■ if ' how much °f the overpayment resulted 

incrrt.e. •" N !h *™"! fraud 

The estimate of improper payments. 

based on a review of a sample of actual 

-j- "v claims, is substantially higher than prior 

I o Ofrvc 13,, • _e,stima * cs by health policy experts. It 

A 1 0Sfi|h «ends to confirm the suspicions of el- 
derly people who say their Medicare 
I j W "TY • | bills are riddled vrirh errors. 

1/Il)l0]hn| The amount of improper paytnenis 
I detected bv the inspector general is. bv 


LAGOS Th i , , , i ^ lfe . 

A -‘! s l " ih- 

ambassador and men, her .£ 

- “*< 

. The police ch-ef. ibr.jh.n-r.. 

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:ne!^ss ■:-:;h:. ( t : j l : Lli V 1 

people, -.no- ‘ 


detected by the inspector general is. by 
coincidence, the same as the amount of 
savings to be extracted from Medicare 
under the budget bill now pending in 


Army General Shelton 
Is Joint Chiefs Nominee 


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r.wfiW/n Ohi S’jjj Font Dujvi.i** 

WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton nominated General Henry 
Shelton of the army on Thursday to be 
the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff, a choice that emphasized the 
military's new variety of nonconven- 
tional threats — terrorism, insurgen- 
cies and sabotage. 

“He has distinguished himself as a 
decorated soldier.” Mr. Clinron said 
of the general who commanded the 
U.S.-led military operation in HAiti in 
1994. “From Vietnam to Desert 
Storm, he has proven his skill and 
courage in combat.” the president 
said, adding that General Shelton was 
a "tl linker” with a “unique perspec- 
tive’ ' on the security challenges Amer- 
ica could face in the coming years. 

General Shelron, who as com- 
mander of special operations oversees 
the army’s Green Berets, the navy 
Seals and other elite forces, is unlike 
the tankers, pilots or sailors who have 
served as Joint Chiefs chairmen be- 
fore. 

In a recent article published by the 
Pentagon, General Shefton said his 
troops were “not designed to win 


wars single-handedly, but they can 
help prevent and deter them. ” For the 
next decade, the nation can expect 
“operations short of war” to dom- 
inate its security concerns, he added. 

Admiral William Owens, former 
vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs, 
described General Shelton as a “sol- 
dier’s soldier” who has served in a 
range of command positions and is 
suited to an environment in which the 
military faces new noncombat roles. 

Senator Strom Thurmond of South 
Carolina, the Republican chairman of 
the Senate's Armed Services Com- 
mittee, praised the general as “a good 
man” and. when asked whether Gen- 
eral Shelton's confirmation by the 
Senate would go smoothly, replied. 
“I think so.” 

General SbeJton emerged as a 
front-runner for the job after Sec- 
retary of Defense William Cohen’s 
initial choice. General Joseph Ralston 
of the air force, withdrew from con- 
sideration last month. 

General Ralston decided not to 
seek the post after reports that he had 
an affair while separated from his 
wife in the 1980s. (AP. NYT) 


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Gunmen Kill Mexican Editor 
Who Reported on Corruption 




■" By Molly Moore 

Wtnhmmon Past Service 

" MEXICO CITY — The editor of a 
Mexican newspaper that aggressively 
"reported on drug trafficking and gov- 
ernment corruption was gunned down in 
-front of his office in northern Mexico. 

Benjamin Flores Gonzalez. 29. editor 
of the newspaper La Prensa in the bor- 
der town of San Luis Rio Colorado, 
- about 30 miles (30 kilometers) south of 
.Yuma, Arizona, was ambushed by a 
carload of four men. 

One of the men leaped from the car 
and fired an AK-47 assault rifle at Mr. 
Flores just steps away from the front 
door of the newspaper’s offices, ac- 
cording to reporters at La Prensa. The 
gunman then grabbed a .22-caliber pis- 
tol from an accomplice and fired three 
shots into Mr. Flores’s head as the editor 
lay on rhe ground, witnesses said. 

The attack Tuesday afternoon was 
characteristic of gangland-style murders 
by. drug traffickers. The police said no 


arrests have.been made in the case. 

Associates said Mr. Flores had re- 
ceived death threats after publishing 
sensitive stories about corruption and 
drug trafficking. He was the 23d Mex- 
ican journalist murdered since 1984 in 
circumstances that colleagues believe to 
be related to their reporting, according 
to the New York-based Committee io 
Protect Journalists. 

“We have exposed many drug traf- 
fickers and criminals, but also govern- 
ment officials, police and military,” 
said Jesus Barraza, a La Prensa reporter. 
“So the assassination could have come 
from anywhere.” 

■ Charges Dropped Against Salinas 

In another prominent Mexican scan- 
dal, a judge dismissed a money-laun- 
dering charge against the older brother 
of farmer President Carlos Salinas de 
Gortari, Reuters reported. Prosecutors 
called, the judge's ruling on behalf of 
Raul Salinas de Gortari on Wednesday a 
mistake, and vowed to appeal. 


THE AMERICAS 


Bv Robert Pear Congress — $115 billion over five 

Yu* ToHfi Sennet ****** ° r an avera ? e of.523 billion a 

year. Congress is considering major 

WASHINGTON — In the first com- • changes in Medicare, including a 

shensive audit of Medicare, federal “means test” and an increase in the age 

festigaiors have found that the gov- of eligibility, to prevent the program 

iment overpaid hospitals, doctors and from going bankrupt before baby 

i nar would be i* other health care providers last year by boomers need it. 

gasoline of about Zf] .. billion, or 14 percent of all the Auditors found a $4.5 billion “com- 

or - electricity of 2~cem 1 fTlone >' s P ent the standard Medicare putation error” in the agency's estimate 
a tax on cc*a] D f 5 , 5 ; s •« V program. of unpaid claims. They found that con- 

aarural sac nf S) 4 o k,na no .. The books and records of the Medi- tractors sometimes mixed up Medi- 

fect “ • 1I Wr n : care health insurance system for the care’s two mist funds, for hospital care 

lerly and its contractors were in such and doctors* services. Other contractors 

■array that they could not be rhor- confused amounts owed to the gov- 

ghJ> audited, said June Gibbs Brown, ernmeni with amounts owed by the gov- 

ipector general of the Department of eminent. The contractors, typically 

■tilth and Human Services. She said private insurance companies, review 

ednesday that there was no way 10 tell claims and pay bills for Medicare, 
w much of the overpayment resulted The report made these points: 
m fraud ■ Controls over cash are loose. 

The estimate of improper payments. Checks were signed by people who had 
>ed on a review of a sample of actual no authority to do so. 
inis, is substantially higherthan prior • Hospitals and clinics received the 
imates by health policy experts. It biggest share of improper payments, 35 
:ds to confirm the suspicions of el- percent of die $23 billion. Most of the 
lv people who say their Medicare remainder went to doctors (22 percent), 
[<; are riddled u irh errors. home health agencies (16 percent). 

Hie amount of improper paytnenis nursing homes ( 1 0 perceni ) and medical 
ecied by the inspector general is. by laboratories (6 percent), 
ncidence. the same as the amount of • Medicare’s vast computer systems 
ings to be extracted from Medicare have so little security that records can be 
Jer the budget bill now pending in easily altered or destroyed. 



Lhrf V.vmWJhe VmojicJ Pit-- 


An Oakland police officer searching for clues in a case that started out as 
an investigation of a firebombing but became more bizarre as it went along. 

Tale of 2 California Sisters 

One, a Grime Fighter in Oakland, Is Dead; 

The Other Is Accused of Stealing Her Identity 


By Maria L. La Ganga 

L‘S Angles Tmus Ssn t«v 

SAN FRANCISCO — On its face, it 
is a twisted tale of two sisters — tales 
both of heroism and of murder, of 
money and of false identity. 

On July 1, the bungalow of an Oak- 
land anti-drug activist, Stevie Allman, 
was firebombed. sending her to the hos- 
pital with bums over 15 percent of her 
body. Her two dogs, a pit bull and a 
Chihuahua, died. 

It was the dreg dealers, she exclaimed 
from her hospital bed. and the Oakland 
police department hopped to. declaring 
that it was * ‘taking this as an offense nor 
only against her bur the entire city.” 

Governor Pete Wilson offered a 
$50,000 reward and donations poured in 
from an admiring public. 

The 52-year-old activist exhorted her 
neighbors. “Please stay involved. Join 
the neighborhood watch.” 

But on Tuesday, the Oakland police, 
tipped that something was amiss, got a 
search warrant and found a body in the 
burned house. Under questioning, the 
antidrug activist admitted she was not 
Ms. Allman after all. She was really the 
woman's younger sister, Sarah Mitchell 
— a woman with an arrest record in 
welfare fraud and prostitution. 

That same day, Ms. Mitchell was 
charged with murdering the sister she 
had impersonated, dismembering the 
body and stuffing it in a small freezer. . 

The motive was money. 

On Wednesday, the thick plot 
thickened further as the police tried 10 
figure out which of the sisters they had 
worked with for a year, trying to clear 
the working-class East Oakland neigh- 
borhood of crime. 

'“Now we're not sure who was work- 
ing with the police” an official said. 

Was it Ms. Allman? Or was it 
someone else who had helped the po- 
lice, delivering video tapes of drug 
transactions and other activities shot 
through the living room curtains. 

One signal that there were problems 
in the accounts they were hearing was 
the governor’s reward. Surprisingly, no 
one came forward to claim it In ad- 
dition, efforts to link drug dealers with 
the crime were going nowhere. 

Under questioning, Ms. Mitchell in- 


sisted at first that she was Ms. Allman. 
But then her fingerprints were found to 
match a set in the state's computer files 
linking her to a 1970s prostitution con- 
viction and a welfare fraud arrest under 
rhe name Sarah Mitchell. 

She was arrested Tuesday morning 
on suspicion of forgery. By Tuesday 
afternoon, the police had obtained a 
search warrant for the house. They 
opened the freezer, and a charge of 
murder was added to the case. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Senate Votes to Keep 
Anti-Drug Ratings 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Sen- 
ate has rejected an administration- 
supponed plan to scrap one of the 
most disputed tools in the nation's 
drug-fighting arsenal, the annual cer- 
tification of other countries as co- 
operative or not. 

The 60-10-38 vote to reject the bill 
nonetheless demonstrated wide- 
spread congressional dissatisfaction 
with the annual process of passing 
judgment on other countries’ drug- 
fighting efforts. Still, sponsors of the 
measure said a majority of senators 
were persuaded to vote against it out 
of fear of being portrayed at re-elec- 
tion time as soft on drugs. 

Many lawmakers have come to ar- 
gue that the annual State Department 
review' of other nations’ ann-narcot- 
ics efforts- has aggrieved friendly 
countries while doing little to keep 
dregs from entering the United States. 
But a vote to scrap that program 
would have been a far-reaching 
change in national policy on a major 
issue adopted with little'public input 
because there were no bearings on the 
measure. ftt’Fj 

Gingrich Foils Foes 

WASHINGTON — The reign of 
Newt Gingrich, speaker of the House 
of Representatives, began to take on 
complexity worthy of a 
Shakespearean monarch when the 
Georgia Republican won a public 
show of support from rank-and-file 
colleagues while questions arose 
about whether some of his lieutenants 
have been exploring ways to depose 
him. 

Mr. Gingrich was greeted with a 
standing ovation when he arrived at 
Wednesday’s closed-door meeting of 
House Republicans, according to 
lawmakers. He then triumphed in 
routine votes over internal party mat- 
ters that had come to be seen as a 
referendum on his stewardship and. to 
a lesser extent, that of the other Re- 
publican leaders. 

In the most important vote, the race 
for House Republican Conference 
vice chairman. Representative Jen- 
nifer Dunn of Washington state 
scored a solid 129-to-85 victory over 
Representative Jim Nussle of Iowa, 
who ran his campaign as a refer- 
endum on the leadership’s perfor- 
mance. 

But as Mr. Gingrich was proclaim- 
ing House Republicans to be “a uni- 
fied team.” other lawmakers con- 
firmed undisclosed meetings that 


House Republican leaders held with 
dissident lawmakers, underscoring 
what a precarious perch the speaker’s 
chair is for Mr. Gingrich. i WP ) 

House Grabs Bach 
Scientists 9 Money 

WASHINGTON — The House of 
Representatives has voted to dock the 
National Science Foundation’s 
budget to cover what it paid for a 
study of why people don't want to run 
for Congress. 

Lawmakers by voice vote ap- 
proved an amendment Wednesday 
that reduced the proposed $3 J billion 
foundation budget tor fiscal 1998 by 
5174,000. about the same amount if 
spent for the study on why some 
people qualified for public office 
choose not to run because of public 
perceptions of politicians. (WPl 

Who Opposes Wbld? 

WASHINGTON — A group of 
Republican House members are urg- 
ing a leading senator to drop oppo- 
sition to a Republican governor's be- 
coming an ambassador for a 
Democratic administration. 

Representative Benjamin Gilman, 
chairman of the House International 
Relations Committee, and 22 other 
House Republicans on Wednesday- 
asked Mr. Gilman’s Senate counter- 
part. Jesse Helms. Republican of 
North Carolina, to hold a hearing on 
whether Governor William Weld of 
Massachusetts should be ambassador 
to Mexico. 

Mr. Weld has not yet been nom- 
inated. but the White House an- 
nounced Wednesday that President 
Bill Clinton will fight to have him 
confirmed despite opposition from 
Mr. Helms, who heads the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee. (API 

Quote /Unquote 

President Bill Clinton, upon sign- 
ing for the third time a waiver on 
provisions of the Helms-Burton Act 
that would allow Americans to sue 
foreign companies for using property 
confiscated by Havana: “we have 
made significant progress. We are 
forging an international consensus on 
concrete steps to clear the way tor a 
new era of democracy and prosperity 
tor the people of Cuba.” 

Senator Jesse Helms, in reply: 
“Through its failure to enforce this 
provision, the administration has is- 
sued what amounts to an effective, 
and in fact. an unlawful 
waiver.” (APi 



Athenee Palace Bucharest Hilton, October 29-30, 1997 

Romania is increasingly attracting the attention of the international investment 
community. To assess ftiture investment potential and to highlight the reforms 
Romania is putting in place in a bid to position itself as one of the more exciting 
investment opportunities in the world, the International Herald Tribune will convene 
a major investment summit in Bucharest on October 29-30, 1997. 

President Emil Constantinescu will give the opening keynote address of the Romania 
Investment Summit. He will also host a special dinner for speakers, delegates and 
guests on the evening of October 29 at Cotroceni Palace. 

The fact that President Constantinescu has agreed to support this summir as an 
integral part of the Romanian government’s efforts to attract foreign investment 
is a measure of the importance of the summit. 




* ‘ ‘■-’■'lift?*. 

iFt ittEeU. r 


‘ f ; / 


Away From Politics 

* -* The space shuttle Columbia touched down in Florida at 

y sunrise Thursday after completing a research mission left 
■- unfinished in April (Reuters) 

• • The VS. Air Force has issued a terse press release insis ti ng 
. *ihat the band leader Gletin Miller died in a plane crash in the 
■ -Channel. “A German newspaper, Bild, claims it knows the 
^ -‘tree’ cause of death,” the statement says, referring to the 
paper’s story drat Mr. Miller died of a heart attack in the arms, 
of a French prostitute in i 944. ‘ ‘The report is incorrect.” 

: (WP) 

. • Rangers from the National Park Service began a historic 
'effort this week to round up 2.000 feral sheep and ship them 
from Santa Cruz Island, off the California coast, to the 
mainland. (LAT) 

/ • Chimpanzees not needed for science experiments should 
be placed in zoos or preserves rather than killed, a' committee 
of the National Research Council said. It said patting the 
.animals to sleep was unacceptable because “they are more 
,f ■ 1 ike humans than other laboratory species,’ ’ adding, “Simply 
pur. killing a chimpanzee currently requires more ethical and 
•scientific justification than killing a dog.” {AP) 

^ '• Four mining fatalities on a single day, in Virginia and 
•Pennsylvania, have prompted federal officials to order na- 
tionwide mine inspections. (AP) 

> Three Cuban men accused of fencing a pilot to fly from 
near Havana ro Florida have been acquitted of air piracy 
‘charges. Leonardo Reyes Ramirez, 28, Adel Regalado Ulloa, 

' - 23, and Jose Roberto Bello Puente. 23, had faced a minimum 


of 20 years in poison. The Tampa. Florida, jury deliberated for 
less than an hour. * (AP) 

• Two weeks after its ban on gas-powered leaf blowers 

took effect, the Los Angeles City Council has voted to delay 
enforcing the new law until January to give the police time to 
figure out how to make the whole thing work. (LAT) 

• The American Camping Association has agreed to pay $1 

a year to the American Society of Composers. Authors and 
Publishers, which licenses millions of songs, including 
“Happy Birthday” and “God Bless America,” so that each 
of the youths at die 2,000 summer camps it represents can si ng 
songs around campfires. (AP) 


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ASIA/PACIFIC 


ASEAN Seeks a Solution in Cambodia 


Cmjdnt by Our S&iff Fnm Diawrio 

BEUING — Southeast 
Asian diplomats won approv- 
al Thursday from King Noro- 
dom Sihanouk of Cambodia 
and support from China to 
mediate in the struggle for 
control of Phnom Penh. 

“We hope we can play a 
role ro bring the parties to- 
gether and see if there is any 
way their differences can be 
reconciled.” Foreign Minis- 
ter Ali Alatas of Indonesia 
said after the Association of 
South East Asian Nations del- 
egation met with the monarch 
at his Beijing residence and 
then with Foreign Minis ter 
Qian Qichen of China. 

But the coup leader in 
Cambodia, Second Prime 
Mfoister Hun Sen, said he 
would not back down and dis- 
missed criticism of his re- 
placement of the king's son. 
First Prime Minister Noro- 
dom Ranariddh. 

Following a cabinet meet- 
ing that featured his nominee 
for new first prime minister. 
Foreign Minister Ung Huot, 
Mr. Hun Sen shrugged off the 
United States' rejection of the 
appointment. 

"The main concern for us 
is to please the Cambodian 
people,” Mr. Hun Sen said. 

Mr. Alatas, along with For- 
eign Ministers Prachuab 
Chary asarn of Thailand and 
Domingo Siazon of the Phil- 
ippines, arrived in Beijing late 
Wednesday for an audience 
with King Sihanouk and 45 



Hun Sen, left, greeting Ung Huot as Justice Minister Chem Snguon looks on. 


minutes of separate discus- 
sions with Mr. Qian to seek a 
peaceful solution to Mr. Hun 
Sen’s coup of July 5. 

"The king clearly gave his 
blessing and support for 
this,” Mr. Alatas said, "and 
Mr. Qian said the Chinese 
government hoped ASEAN’s 
efforts would be success- 
ful.” 

But Beijing edged closer 
Thursday to recognizing Mr. 
Hun Sen's coup, as a Foreign 
Ministry spokesman, Tang 
Guoqiang, urged Cambodi- 
ans to work out a solution. 

Mr. Qian also said China 


opposed any excessive out- 
side interference. 

"We hope various parties 
concerned follow the guide- 
line of national reconciliation 
advocated by Sihanouk, re- 
store tranquillity as soon as 
possible and make concerted 
efforts for peace, stability and 
development in die country,’ ’ 
he was quoted as saying by 
the official Xinhua press 
agency. 

But, he added, "What has 
happened in Cambodia be- 
longs to internal affairs.” 

After the ouster of Prince 
Ranariddh, ASEAN decided 


last week to postpone Cam- 
bodia's scheduled admission 
to the regional association 
this month. 

Mr. Alatas said the de- 
cision was a temporary one, 
while Mr. Hun Sen said from 
Phnom Penh that he was hop- 
ing for swift admission m 
“the coming days.” 

"ASEAN does not intend 
to interfere,” Mr. Alatas said. 
“Our efforts cannot be con- 
strued as taking sides.” 

“We did not pass judg- 
ment on who was wrong or 
right, but there were armed 
clashes, high tensions and in- 


stability and under these cir- 
cumstances, we thought it 
was a wise thing to postpone 
Cambodia’s admission as a 
full member,” the foreign 
minister said. 

Following talks in the 
Chinese capital, the three- 
ministers were to go to Bang- 
kok to meet Friday with 
Prince Ranariddh, then, fly 
Saturday to Phnom Penh for 
talks with Mr. Hun Sen. 

Mr. Hun Sen urged King 
Sihanouk, who is undergoing 
medical treatment in China, 
to return home to preside over 
the elections — another way 
to legitimize his govern- 
ment. 

King Sihanouk has insisted 
that he will not cake the side of 
his sou, Prince Ranariddh, al- 
though he has demanded an 
end to the torture and killing 
of Mr. Hun Sen’s opponents. 

Outnumbered and out- 
gunned, forces loyal to Prince 
Ranariddh have been retreat- 
ing across northern Cambod- 
ia. They have said they are 
r unning out of ammunition 
but will make a stand south of 
the Thai border. 

Mr. Hun Sen's military ad- 
viser, Mol Roeup, said 
Phnom Penh was discussing 
an end to hostilities with the 
pro-Ranariddh forces. But an- 
other Hun Sen supporter in- 
volved — Kang Heng, the 
deputy governor of Sierh 
Reap province — said there 
had been no progress. 

CAP. AFP, Reuters ) 





nnnHH. —*» DuusU £ Oirratf A jcim; Fnncr ftar ; 

Mr Narayanan and his wife, Usha, celebrating Thursday in New Delhi after * 
he was elected president by Indian legislators. The post is largely ceremonial. - 


India Presidential Vote 
Breaks a Caste Barrier 

NEW DELHI — Kocheril Raman 
Narayanan was proclaimed president of In- 
dia on Thursday, becoming the first Hindu 
"untouchable” to hold the post of head of 
state. 

Mr. Narayanan, 75, won nearly 95 per- 
cent of the vote Monday, domestic news 
agencies said, defeating the former chief 
election commissioner, T. N. Sheshan. Mr. 
Narayanan, who is now the vice president, 
will be sworn in after the five-year term of 
President Shankar Dayal Sharma ends next 
Thursday. 

Nearly 5,000 national and state law- 
makers voted in the election in 27 Indian 
states and union territories. (AFP J 

Macau Cautions China 


North Korea Rejects Protest Over DMZ Clash On Sending In Troops 


CtitffHlrd by Our Stuff Frvui Dvpaadm 

SEOUL — The United Na- 
tions Command protested 
Thursday to North Korea 
over a clash Wednesday in- 
side the demilitarized zone, 
but the North rejected the 
protest, the command said. 

The rejection came as the 
United States and China said 
they hoped that the incident 
would not derail preparatory 
peace talks scheduled for 
Aug. 5 in New York, which 
could prevent future clashes 
on the tense border. 

Jim Coles, a spokesman, 
said the UN Command had 


delivered the protest to the 
Korean People’s Army at the 
truce village of Panmunjom. 

He said the Korean dele- 
gation “did not accept the 
protest" 

Mr. Coles said that the note 
specified that the shooting 
had taken place within the de- 
militarized zone between 
Nfarth Korean troops and 
South Koreans under the UN 
Command, and that the North 
Koreans had violated the 
armistice. 

The North has declined to 
recognize the UN armistice 
since June 1995, saying it was 


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a relic of the Cold War and 
should be replaced with a new 
treaty between Pyongyang 
and Washington. 

The United States has re- 
fused, proposing instead four- 
party peace talks — among 
Washington, Beijing, the 
North and South — to work 
out a permanent peace on the 
peninsula. 

Asked if the incident 
would disrupt those talks, 
Tang Guogiang, spokesman 
for the Chinese Foreign Min- 
istry. said they would “begin 
soon." 

“We hope all sides in 
Korea will safeguard peace 
and stability and deal with the 
situation calmly," he added. 

The fighting Wednesday, 
which involved rifles, mor- 
tars and heavy machine guns 


and left several North Korean 
soldiers wounded, demon- 
strated the urgency of the 
talks, which If successful 
would lead to foil peace 
talks. 

Michael McCurry, Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton’s press sec- 
retary, said that the * ’ongoing 
hostility” and absence of a 
peace agreement between the 
two Koreas are “precisely the 
reason why the president and 
the president of the Republic 
of Korea advanced the pro- 
posal for four-party talks.’ ’ 

He added: “.We hope that 
the dialogue that we are seek- 
ing to foster will create a more 
secure, safer, more peaceful 
environment on the Korean 
peninsula. That’s the answer 
to incidents such as the one 
that's occurred.” 


The U.S. Senate voted 
unanimously Wednesday to 
halt additional economic aid 
to the North if it again vi- 
olated its armistice agreement 
with South Korea. 

Senator Frank Murkowski, 
Republican of Alaska, won 
approval for an amendment to 
a foreign spending bill that 
ordered President Clinton to 
certify that North Korea is in 
compliance with the 
armistice for nine months be- 
fore any additional aid is de- 
livered. 

Officials in Seoul said the 
border incident had not 
hindered a test run by two 
South Korean boats, a tug and 
a barge, to a proposed nuclear 
reactor site in North Korea. It 
arrived safely on Thursday 
morning. ' (AFP, Reuters) 


LISBON — The governor of Macau has 
said no provision exists for China to base 
troops in Macau after the Portuguese ter- 
ritory reverts to Beijing’s rule in 1999. . 

After talks here Wednesday with Pres- 
ident Jorge Sampaio of Portugal, Governor 
Rocha Vieira said the presence of Chinese 
troops in tile enclave was not provided for in 
the joint declaration signed by China and 
Portugal in 1987. 

‘ “Tbe absence of troops in Macau at the 
present time allows us to think that there 
will not be any after 1999 either," Mr. 
Vieira said. 

He acknowledged, however, that Beijing 
would have the final say on questions of 
defense and foreign affairs after tbe hand- 
over on Dec. 20, 1999. (AFP) 

North Korea Lifts Ban 
On Japan Home Visits 

TOKYO — North Korea said it would lift 
a ban that has prevented Japanese women 


ho are married to North Koreans from leav- 
ing the country to visit their homeland. 

The official North Korean press agency, ' 
KCNA, said late Wednesday in a dispatch •' 
monitored here that arrangements were be- ' 
ing made to allow the women, estimated to J 
number about 1,800, to visit Japan soon. 

Most of the women, now in their 70s, 
married their Korean husbands in Japan and r 
followed them to North Korea from 1 959 to ' 
•1 982. They were caught in a deterioration in , 
ties between the two countries, which have 
no diplomatic relations. (Reuters) * 

Smoking’s Toll in China < 

BEUING — Lung cancer deaths in ! 
China have been rising an average of 4 .5 • 
percent a' year since 1990, an official of the 
Chinese Association on Smoking and 1 
Health said, and the number of smokers has j 
steadily grown over the last decade. < 

From 1984 to the end of last year, the * 
proportion of the population that smoked «' 
increased by 3.74 percentage points, to 37.6 ; 
percent, the official said. Early deaths, lost 
productivity and treatment of tobacco-re- \ 
lated illness cost 70 billion yuan ($8.4 bil- 
lion) in 1994. up from 15.9 billion yuan a ,, 
decade earlier. ■ " (Reuters) < 

77 Killed in Sri Lanka : 

COLOMBO — A battle set off by a * 
Tamil rebel attack on a stretch of highway ' 
in nonhem Sri I-anl-a killed at least 77 • 
people from both sides, a military spokes- \ 
man. said Thursday . 

“There was close-quarter fighting with j 
mortars and small arms.’’ said the spokes- • 
man. Brigadier Saraih Munasinghe, ; 

Seventeen government soldiers were *i 
killed in the battle Wednesday near 
Nedunkeni, 340 kilometers (210 miles) 
northeast of Colombo, he said. More than 60 
rebels also were lolled, he said. Government ! 
forces have captured about one-fourth of the 
88-kilometer highway in two montfas of try- 
ing to open a land route into the government- 
controlled Jaffna Peninsula. . (API 1 


Young Japanese Travelers Turn to Asia for Adventure 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Yusuke Ush- 
ioda just can’t imagine him- 
self walking behind a tow- 
guide, camera at the ready at 
each must-see landmark. 


looked down upon — or sent 
their armies to conquer. 

"For a long time, the Jap- 
anese admired the West and 
that’s where they wanted to 
visit” said Toshiharu Nishi- 


Like an increasing number kawa, editor of a popular 
of Japanese youths, when travel magazine, Chikyu-no- 


planning a trip abroad, he 
sought adventure and spon- 
taneity. His answer a journey 
into the backwaters of Asia. 

Industry experts say a new 
breed of young Japanese, 
traveling alone and on shoes- 
tring budgets, are shying 
away from the regimented 
group tours that are a hall- 
marie of Japanese tourism. 


Arukikata, which translates 
as How to Walk the Globe. 
“But many Japanese are fi- 
nally beginning to realize 
they can nave much more fun 
in Asia." 

Mr. Ushioda. 22, had no 
itinerary when he traveled 
alone to India. Instead of re- 


feel intimidated by big and 
tall Westerners,” he said. 

Tbe trend is definitely shift- 
ing toward Asia, said Hidelri 
Kumon, a spokesman for HIS. 
a large travel agency. 

"People can feel comfort- 
able about cultural similarit- 
ies but have exotic experi- 
ences at the same time, and 
they like both,” he said. 

Banned for centuries by the 
feudal government, travel 
abroad grew just a few de- 
cades ago when Japan began 
to rise from the ruins of World 
War II as one of the world’s 


counting the wonders of Cal- richest nations. 


cutta or the Taj Mahal, he 


The increasing number of came back boasting that the 
young Japanese travelers to highlight of his trip was a 


other Asian countries may 
also be a sign of a deeper 
change in the way Japanese 
view their place among the 
Asian neighbors they once 


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A backlash against such ri- 
gid supervision and conspicu- 
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trend toward Asian travel. 

Kisei Kobayashi, who re- 
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different from what they 
already have at home,’’ he 
said. 

“In Asia, economies are 
surging and people are smil- 
ing and full of energy. And 
yet, there are still a variety of 
problems, including poverty 
and political instability. That 
political hodgepodge is what 
makes Asia so interesting.” 


The Foreign Ministry has puf^ 
out a video and pamphlet uz^ 
ing Japanese travelers to re- 
main alert. • 

Jiro Akiba, who quit bis joh< 
to go on a three-month Euiu^ 
ian journey last yearihadhijgii 
video camera stolen but saj®J 
he learned a valuable lesson/ 
“I’ve always wanted to seB 4 
the places I only knewfiorh) 


But the thrill of going into TV,” he said. “I could really 
the unknown alone is nor see while I was in some of the - 
without risk, especially for poorest countries that-thertf 
young people accustomed to are more precious things than' 1 


the safety of Japan's cities, material wealth.” 

Burma’s Leader Meets 
With Opposition Party 

R euters of the meeting. ‘ ‘But this is ntg i 

RANGOON — The mil- a dialogue with the SLORC?- 
itary leader of Burma met Without Suu Kyi included in 


with the chairman of Daw 
Aung San Suu Kyi’s party on 
Thursday, but the talks did 
not signal the start of a polit- 
ical dialogue, government 
and National League of De- 
mocracy officials said. 

The meeting between 
Lieutenant General Khin Ny- 
unt, head of the ruling State 
Law and Order Restoration 


any talks it is not dialogue.” 
“But we welcome talks in 
general," he added. “Wfi. 
would also welcome any dia- 
logue with the SLORC tf it is 
in the genuine spirit of re- 
conciliation.” 

It was nor immediately cleat?; 
why Daw Aung San Suu Kyi- 
was absent from the meeting. 

A council spokesman said 


Council, and Aung Shwe of the discussions were heldin a 
tne democracy party and two cordial atmosphere, and they 


other senior members was the 
first between top military 
rulers and the opposition 
since Daw Aung San Suu Kyi 
was released from six years of 
house arrest in July 1995. 

Party officials said the 
meeting was arranged so Mr. 
Aung Shwe could explain to 


centered on the country’s 
political and economic situ- 
ation. " ■ i 

When asked whether he 
would call this the start of a 
dialogue between the two 
sides, the spokesman said: “I 
won’t term it that way." 

Tbe council has detained 




the military government that and later released thousan ds 
tiie party and Daw Aung San of National League of De- 


Suu Kyi were not involved in 
terrorist activities and that 
they had not received foreign 
financial assistance from 
some Western countries. 

In June, General Khin Ny- 
unt accused the league of ac- 
cepting S85.200 from two 
covert U.S. agents this year, 
j He had also linked the league 
and exiled opposition groups 
to bombings in Rangoon. 

The National League of 
Democracy has denied both 
charges. 

“Yes, they went to talk and 
explain their position to the 
officials," U Tin Oo, the 
league’s vice chairman, said 


mocracy members and curbed 
the party’s political activities. 

A statement issued by the 
league after the meeting said 
that General Khin Nyunt had 
advised the party and Daw 
Aung San Suu Kyi not to cre- 
ate unnecessary unrest or dis- 
turbances and not to confront 
the council or obstruct its ac- 
tivities. 

“U Aung Shwe explained 
to Khin Nyunt that the NLD 
does not accept foreign as- 
sistance on principle. Aung 
Shwe also suggested to Khin 
Nyunt that it would be good 
for him to meet Suu Kyi,"’ the 
statement said. 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1997 


PAGE 5 



EUROPE 


For EU Hopefuls to East , 
Many Hurdles Remain 





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By Peter S. Green 

International Herald Tribune 

PRAGUE — As the euphoria of win- 
ning a chance to enter the European 
Union recedes, the potential EU mem- 
bers are bracing themselves for a dif- 
ficult passage that will involve deep and 
in many cases painful reforms, leavened 
with a massive dose of EU aid. 

The EU’s invitation on Wednesday to 
. five Central and East European coun- 
4 tries,, — the Czech Republic, Poland, 
Hungary, Slovenia ana Estonia — to 
begin negotiations to join the Union in 
the future was accompanied by assess- 
ments of the reforms the countries would 
be required to begin undertaking. 

The long lists of reforms included 
such areas as capital-markets regula- 
tion, industrial restructuring, nuclear 
safety, inflation eradication and farm 
reform. 

“It’s a hell of a lot of work, but 1 think 
we have been aware of it before,'* said 
- Pavel Telicka, chief of the EU depart- 
,ment at the Czech Foreign Ministry, 
adding that the assessments were “a 
useful minor.* 

The Czechs, for instance, are being 
told to clean up their opaque financial 
: markets and strengthen corporate gov- 
> emance. 

Like several other applicants, the 
Czechs will also be required to imple- 
ment reams of EU regulations, which will 
require reforming their legal system. 

Poland will face its biggest hurdles in 
agriculture. One fourth of die country’s 
population tills the earth, many with 
horse-drawn plows. Bur Piotr Nowina- 
Knopka, vice c hairman of the Parlia- 


ment’s EU committee, said the Poles 
would not be able io reform their ag- 
riculture alone. He added, however, that 
the EU's Common Agricultural Policy, 
which provides subsidies to EU farm- 
ers. would benefit Polish farmers, but 
could also act as deterrent to reform. 

He said: “I can understand the Polish 
fanner who says: ’Why should I change 
if I will be comfortable under the CAP. 
The impetus to change should come not 
only from Polish politicians but also 
from the EU.” 

Poland's banking sector also needs 
reform, and the EU's assessment cast 
doubt on the ability of the country’s 
large state-owned industries to face se- 
rious foreign competition. 

Estonia won points for deregulating 
trade and prices, and for its privatization 
efforts. But its bureaucracy was de- 
scribed as one of the main stumbling 
blocks to EU admission. 

EU country officials say many East 
European countries lack experienced 
civil servants to negotiate with Brussels 
and implement EU regulations. 

“Many of these countries still need a 
civil-service law, and they have a great 
deal of difficulty attracting the kind of 
competent and talented people they 
need to make accession work/* said an 
EU official, who spoke on condition of 
anonymity. 

The Czechs have hired a former EU 
commissioner, Henning Christophersen 
of Denmark to help them prepare for the 
negotiations on EU admission. “We also 
have to be sure that our institutions at 
home are ready to implement and en- 
force the legislation,” Mr. Telicka said. 

Hungary was singled out for further 





GROUNDED — The German cruise ship Hanseatic awaiting rescue 
Thursday in the Arctic. A Norwegian coast guard cutter pulled it off 
the rocks, allowing the 145 evacuated passengers to get back on board. 


improvements in the environment, cus- 
toms, and reform of its energy sector. It 
was warned that it must rein fri its budget 
and trade deficits, but overall was one of 
the most highly praised candidates. 

Slovenia, which has the highest per 
capita income of the five candidates, 
was told to moke its economy more 
flexible. The EU said more enterprises 
would have to be restructured, along 
with its banking and finance sectors, 
before Slovenia would receive badly 
needed foreign investment 

Overall, the assessments said strug- 
gling heavy industries, inefficient farm 
sectors and bloated public sectors would 
probably be the biggest challenges to 
the applicants. 

To help the countries along, the Com- 


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Gonzalez Admits ‘Dirty War, 9 but Denies Approval 


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By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Timts Sen-ice 

MADRID — Felipe Gonzalez, who 
has been accused of condoning a 
‘ ‘dirty war* ’ against Basque separatists 
after he became prime minister in 
1982, has acknowledged for the first 
time that state authorities may have 
gone too far in their struggle to curb the 
widespread violence. 

Anti-terrorist killings could have 
been carried out by police and para- 
military forces then, Mr. Gonzalez said 
in an interview with The New Yotk 
Times, but only because the fledgling 


democracy after the 36-year Franco dic- 
tatorship was too weak to stop them. 

He went on to deny that be had ever 
been asked to approve such actions by 
the military or the police against ter- 
rorists, as at least one convicted lower- 
level official has charged. 

Mr. Gonzalez was the head of 
Spain's government for 14 years, until 
his Socialist Party lost last year’s elec- 
tions. He spoke on condition that be nor 
be directly quoted, but he made similar 
allusions in a recent interview with the 
Spanish newspaper El Pais. 

Stare violence from 1983 to 1987, 
commonly referred to here as the 


Idventure 

±ty T-r 

tw. ' ' tie ! y ■ •• r f-;£" 
me- xe r:: 


CNN Rejects Demand to End ETA Web Link 

Reuters 

MADRID — Cable News Network has rejected a request from the Spanish 
government to remove a link from the cable channel's world Wide Web site to 
that of the Basque guerrilla group ETA, according to people close to the 
government. 

“The government has sent a letter to CNN to say ETA is a terrorist 
organization and die direct link to it on the Internet should be removed,” an 
official inside the office of Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar said. 

In rejecting Spain’s request, Steve Haworth, a spokesman for CNN, said it was 
standard practice to provide a link to the Web site of an organization in the news. 
He said CNN would gladly add links to any Web sites at the Spanish gov- 
ernment’s request, but he said: “We don’t plan to take off the links that they 
asked us to take off. We believe more information is better than less.” 

Spain is still in shock at the recent ETA slaying of a municipal councilman. 


“dirty war,” claimed 27 victims, some 
mistakenly assumed to have been 
Basque terrorists. Basque separatist vi- 
olence is said by the Spanish authorities 
to have taken 800 lives since 1968. 

Mr. Gonzalez said that the only ex- 
tralegal police or military actions that 
occurred during his prime ministership 
were those he had been unable to find 
oar about and stop. 

The police and the military at the 
time were still dominated by officers 
appointed during the dictatorship, he 
said, and reactionary senior officers 
attempted a coup in 1981 to tty to stop 
the government from giving more au- 
tonomy to the Basques and other re- 
gional populations that had grown res- 
tive under the Franco regime. 

Mr. Gonzalez, now 55, previously 
denied any knowledge of how a shad- 
owy organization called the Anti-Ter- 
rorist Liberation Groups, formed in the 
early 1980s, apparently with police 
and military support, killed 27 people 
they believed were terrorists, until it 
stopped operations in 1987. 

No charges have been brought 
against Mr. Gonzalez, but a score of 
police and military officials under him, 
including a former interior minister, 
have been charged, and several have 
been convicted. 


Last winter the Spanish Supreme 
Court ordered the government to de- 
classify a trove of documents relating 
to the Anti-Terrorist Liberation 
Groups, so that prosecutors could use 
them as evidence. The prosecutors 
have not excluded the possibility of a 
case against Mr. Gonzalez. 

if he has to answer one, he said, he 
will aigue that putsches and the dirty 
war were both responses to terrorism, 
and that as prime minister he managed 
to stop the first two but not the last 
“People don’t want to understand 
that we inherited a state apparatus in its 
entirety from the dictatorship,” he said 
to El Pais, “that terrorist aggression 
was continually inciting the forces of 
counterrevolution. ’ ’ 

■ Blast Rips ETA ‘Safe House’ 

An explosion erupted in an apart- 
ment believed io be a hideaway for 
Basque ETA guerrillas on Thursday, 
Reuters reported from San Sebastian. 

With Spain still angry over the slay- 
ing of Miguel Angel Blanco Gam do, 
the police reported a blast possibly 
triggered by bomb-making materials 
in an ETA “safe house” in Durango. 
The people in the apartment fled. The 
police said they found weapons in foe 

apartment. 


tnnnt 2 


THE INTERMARKET 


Serbs’ Threats Keep 
Bosnian Pressure Up 


mission recommended a massive trans- 
fer of cash and know-how. requiring 
spending of about 2.7 billkm Ecus ($2.98 
billion; annually, mainly on training 
projects, infrastructure, and agriculture. 

Economists said the candidates would 
not attract the subsidies and transfers that 
Spain and Portugal won when they joined 
foe Union, or that have propelled growth 
in Ireland, especially at a time when the 
EU was under pressure to cut subsidies to 
its own poorer regions, its own heavy 
industry is failing and unemployment is 
over 10 percent across the Union. 

“There is no mood in the core of 
Europe to take on partners who will be 
expensive burdens." said Roger Mon- 
son, chief equities strategist for Daiwa 
Europe Ltd. 


By Mike O'Connor 

Wot YorL Times Sen-ite 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina 
— The Bosnian Serb authorities are 
threatening widespread retaliation 
against NATO soldiers if they try to 
make further arrests of war crimes sus- 
pects. UN officials said. 

NATO officers have privately 
warned the Bosnian Serb authorities 
that they will respond militarily if the 
Serbs retaliate against the international 
force in Bosnia. But the officers say they 
are deliberately leaving vague the ques- 
tion of precisely what circumstances 
would trigger a NATO reaction, and 
what form it would take. 

In public statements, Bosnian Serb 
leaders have denounced the arrests, but 
at foe same time they have uTged people 
not to retaliate. News coverage and 
commentaries on state-controlled Bos- 
nian Serb television and radio, on the 
other hand, have been inflammatory. 

News broadcasts call the NATO ac- 
tion illegal and, in a message calculated 
to generate widespread antipathy to- 
ward the Nonh Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization, suggest that any man who 
served in the Bosnian Serb Army during 
the war that ended a year and a half ago 
could be subject to arrest. But only the 
handful of people indicted by the war 
crimes tribunal in The Hague face ap- 
prehension. 

After increasing their alert status on 
Friday, NATO forces returned to nor- 
mal by Tuesday. 

Pamphlets threatening attacks on 
NATO forces have appeared in several 
towns. One pamphlet says, “Somalia 
was too gentle.” in a reference to the- 
killino of 18 U.S. Army Rangers in 
Somalia after they sought to arrest the 


leader of one of the factions there. A UN 
official said police had been seen dis- 
tributing the pamphlets in one town. 

Apart from the NATO forces, the 
largest international group in the Ser- 
bian-held pan of Bosnia is the UN po- 
lice monirors, numbering about 800. 
Many of them are Americans. There are 
about 200 other foreigners who reg- 
ularly work for international agencies in 
Bosnian Serb territory. 

The threats are a familiar tactic. The 
Bosnian Serbs were able to stop air 
strikes against them in 1995 by taking 
UN peacekeepers hostage. Fear of re- 
taliation has often crippled the peace- 
keeping mission. Until last week the 
prospect of retaliation against NATO 
soldiers or international organizations 
was used as an argument against ar- 
resting war crime suspects. 

“The Serbs are very good at this 
game,” a senior UN official said. 
“They know they can promise to co- 
operate, but then someone throws a 
grenade here or makes a small attack 
there, and it all keeps the pressure up.” 

■ British Base Is Attacked 

Several explosive devices were 
hurled at a British base in Bosnia on 
Thursday in the fourth apparent retal- 
iation for a NATO operation against two 
Serbs indicted for war crimes, Reuters 
reported from Sarajevo. 

The devices — possibly hand gren- 
ades — were lobbed into the base's 
parking lot in foe Bosnian Serb-con- 
trolled town of Banja Luka, Western 
officials said Thursday. 

British peacekeeping soldiers fired 
warning shots and detained four sus- 
pects after the incident, a NATO officer 
said. The suspects were turned over foe 
Serbian authorities. 


BRIEFLY 


No Statue for Le Pen 

STRASBOURG — The French ex- 
treme-rightist leader Jean-Marie Le Pen 
paid tribute to Joan of Arc before an 
empty pedestal Thursday after her 
statue was whisked away for repairs to 
thwart an earlier demonstration. 

Mr. Le Pen denounced as “a base 
political maneuver” the decision by 
Catherine Trautmann, Strasbourg's 
former mayor and now foe French cul- 
ture minister, to remove the statue in 
April when his National Front held a 
congress in foe city. The statue is to be 
replaced in foe autumn. 

Mrs. Trautmann made it clear at foe 
time that she was exasperated that Mr. 
Le Pen had “annexed’ ’ Joan of Arc as a 
symbol for his anti-immigrant move- 
ment (Reuters) 

Cyprus Police Plans 

NICOSIA — The Turkish Cypriot 
leader, Rauf Denktash, has proposed 
setting up joint Greek and Turkish Cyp- 
riot police units to monitor foe buffer 
zone on foe divided island. 

Mr. Denktash said such a force was 
necessary with the approach of the July 
20 anniversary of the Turkish invasion 


of the island, traditionally a time of 
tension between the Greek and Turkish 
Cypriot communities. 

“1 will propose the establishment of 
joint Greek and Turkish special police 
units, to work together with the UN 
peacekeeping force in foe buffer zone,” 
he said Wednesday on returning from 
talks in New York. ( Reuters i 

10 Russian Cadets Die 

MOSCOW — A three-story dormitory 
at a military school in the Siberian city of 
Tomsk collapsed just before reveille 
Thursday, lolling 10 cadets and injuring 
dozens more, foe authorities said. 

Forty-three people were hospitalized, 
10 in serious condition, said Tatyana 
Timoshenkova, a spokeswoman for the 
Emergency Situations Ministry in Mos- 
cow. One cadet remained trapped under 
the debris Thursday evening. 

The daily 6 AJVf. wake-up call was 
only minutes away at foe time and many 
of the 120 cadets in the dormitory would 
have been outside had the collapse come 
a little later, officials said. The building, 
constructed before the 1917 Bolshevik 
Revolution, was pan of a militaiy com- 
munications college run by the Russian 
Army. It last underwent repairs in the 
mid 1950s, officials said. ( AP ) 


S’ +44 171 420 0348 






GENERAL 


RES. REAL ESTATE 


w- Personals 






OfTSHOflE C0VANES. For im Os- 
due or advice Tot London 44 1B1 741 
1224 Far 44 161 748 655846338 

wfeuntemoxi* 




Legal Services 


WOflCE HWY CERTFED 
W or Fax (714) 9684)665. Wta 16767 
rfitun Bird. ti37, Huttigton Beach, CA 
92648 USA- MQl - vmim®pmsxm 


-OV0RCE BM DAY. No bard. Wife 
;Btt 377, Sudboy, IM 01776 USA. Tot 
.50BW4M387, ftc 506M4SO1B3. 


Announcements 


. BARBIE AS 24 

AU 18 AIUET 1807 

' fta Hkxs 1YA on dnjob bcata 
* £■' > Aaduction dspotita srdannde) 

.. taNfcCfl las barons Matais ■ 

ifl* ‘ | FMNCE {am C) W FBI - 7VA 2D*« 
. \ GO: 868 FDD*: 2£3 

^ SC97. 5S4 SCSft 5,17 


BSIII3 

iff 




Auctions 


■ The Wbftfo Laraoit DMtor 
of Astonsta AnnuafeU 
Presorts an ufyhol Hfcfcricoi Docunonl 
Aucfcn. Wow our Ujr luttafed 86 pap 
catalog ol 560 tnsnl sfrnd Mstartcol 
cbcuwrts on Vo Manet 

bflprfwwflsBefjnftiljtDiyiWB 


■■ 

i! 

■ 

r :v r 

jjf*' * 

: 

,r: 


'«Mfl-TVAI7,5%(B>uf8*j 

• GO: 05C9 - FOOT: 03475 

AUJBU6ME (am I) DIM - TVA 15% 
-aw/- G: . . 

“ fia ifls 
ZONE B - 1 : 

GO. ISS SCSI*: 1,43 

SWEffl-F: ; : . 

GO: 101 - SCSP; 1X8' 

JOHEN-F: 

SCSP: 137 

aw/v.-Gf- 

GO: 1JB FOO 070 

BELOCXE sn RM - TVA 21% ' 

GO. 21.74 FOO, 10£8 

- SCST. 32 SB SCSft 3ttff . 

' HOLLANOE (an£}NLGff -TVA 175% 
GO: 1289 F0D: 0600 

SC97 1,897 SCSft. 1^88 

ItjJXBUBOURG Ofl LUR! -TVA 15% 

GO 1096 • 

■ESPAGffi (zone A| « PTASHVA 16% 
' GO: 8267 

SCOT: 10155 SCSft. 102,41 


ABUT AUTO DB» FRANCE: Waotert 
FF500. 7 daw ff1500-Tot Parts +33 
(Oil 4368 5555. Rb (D}1 4353 9529. 


Business Opportunities 



C0HPAMES A TRUSTS 
UBfflGRATKM’ASSPORTS 


OFFSHORE BANK 


with con g apondRi U rel a ti o n s hi p. 

X mnnw n^il 1w-<?nB A 

Immediate delivery. US $00,000. 

Nassau, Bahamas 

Tek (242) 394-7080 Fte (242) 394-7062 
Agents Wanted Worldwide 


Tefecommunicatfons 


New Lower 
International 
Rates 

Germany 31 cents 
Japan 38 cords 
France 33 cents - 
UK 20 cents 


"NoSel Up Fees 
*No Unhuns 
' Sk Second BHng 

• at-tai UuHnaal Customer Saws 
■ATSTOu* 

^ iMmB 

Where Sttodwb an Sat, ml Hod 
19 Tflfc 1-206590,19)1 
fee 12065801981 
Ewa/t lnfe4llalfcacfc£Ofc 
mLfaflM&enn 


Import/Export 


RELIABLE SUPPLY - Constncba ma- 
iwafcwmrtfeecl Seatood*HoVdried 

CansuniaWflfaundiy pfwfucls. PIoka 


Business Travel 


Ist/BusJiHSa Ctssa Frequanl Trawetors 
WMMda Lfe to 50% off. No coupons, 
no reartctkm&. Imperial Canada Tek 
1-514-341-7227 Fat 1-514-341-7880 
e-mail address lrnpeTfalOlogtn.net 
taUpAnvJog&LnatftivefM 


Business Services 


Lowest Inf I 
Telephone Rates! 

Cd The USA From: 

Germany SU3 

UK SO 25 

France 5032 

Svtasrtand 5036 

Snden J02S 

SautAoUa M9 

Can For Al Raes 
25% Commission 
Aperts Welcome! 

KallMart 

Tfit 1-407-777-4222 fe e 1-407- 777-6411 

MpdtypnamMiM 


YOUH 0FFEE H LfflOOH 
Bond SQBd - Mai, Phone, Fax, Telex 
Tfit 44 171 290 9000 Fta 171 499 7517 


Wafers Capb! Finance AvafcMfl 
for Owfimmem Projeds and 
Govemmert Companies 
that are for sale. 

Large Projects or SpedaBy 
Also, long Term Ftama tar 
Urge and Smal Ccnaries 
No commi ssi on Urtl Funded 

REPRESENTATIVE 
Needed to act as Liaison 
Please repfjr in Engfch 

VENTURE CAPITAL CONSULTANTS 
Innatreert bankers 
18311 Vashn BM, Sufat 999 
Endno, CaWonfe B1436 UAA. 
Fn Nu (818) 905-1688 
TaL (BIB) 7890422 
Kobnt Sr. Assoc Deta O.a Leiystad 


DINING OUT 


Employment 


Domestic Positions Available 


BABTHTTKG IN THE U&A. Fan* ta 
a Mnrfiem aiub of CNca^ b seating 
Ihra-tn chldcare lor 2 yang cMdren. 
Cal Ji or Rafe 047) 6733518 or RAX 
(847) 6734916 


Domestic Positions Waited 


COUPLE, (Bpederced, chautteuribdder. 


Engfeh. Td Paris *33 (0)1 4353 4596 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ails work 


Commercial Premises 


TtfflMO, My, vary cartel avenue, peri- 
od house, stinrb Rat, 572 sqjil with 
odgliEl vaxten tore and stucco. 3 en- 
trances, pitae parting area - affic 70 
tqm ■ 2 ceBaa. Private and conDdordal 
negotiation, no agencies. Write owner: 
FAC. Sas. Fartno Pooa 26103 Cremo- 
na. 14- 


fteaf Estate Services 


Costa Rica 


COSTARICA 

We sei 247 ha on tie Pacft 
Coast «ti private bead; 
near domestic afiporL 
Price : 11882,470000 
T«t +33 (UJ1 4633 5252 Fax 4633 9898 





Financial Services 


SOLUTIONS 

Coraaa 


' 'HFii ' |ft' • i ■. i •! 


(Chna-Taiwan4tong Kona^Salaysla-Sm- 
gapere. wtfi Heed Oflia » the PMp- 
pines). Tflfc 163-2} 72I32Z2; 7217501, 
72253B2. Fax (SM) 7227158 


BANCOR 

OF ASH 

Us MHamees k> secure tuning 
Bc vtatte projects 

VENTURE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 

Long term crtawal 
Smiortetl Gfliantees 

fee fl!32) 6TM284 
Td: fo2) 894-5358 


(Cormsaon earned 0^ WO Fundti® 

fetes Commfcaai Assured 



Real Estate 
for Sale 



Become owner of a Tahitian burgakw, 
wfii lot in the coconut pa baderig 
tagoon. Rertats aaand. Tax advantages 
tar French naSonafc (bf Pons), kteiie- 
(ion by Fax : *09 56 49 96 


Bahamas 


nWATEBLAWM 
TAX HAVBFBAHAIIAS 
On le sptandd land & saa park in Exit- 
mas, ere d (he most magnicBl (stands 
100 jwcert private la far safe. 35 hoes, 
5. beaches. 1 tan, 3 cottages. S55U 
Faxte5K4B06 


Caribbean 


MAGNJFiCOrr ESTATE CARBBEAN, 
Angola, B.W.1. 3 1#4 acres naJerbort 
12 nSon or exchange tor shnbr in 
Monaco, French Riviera or Parts. Tel. 
USA; 212-717-5380. 


Germany 


SOUTHERN GERMANY, BAVARU 
60 km south of MinwJi. near Tyidatti 
border. 200 yew oti lucuriousty moder- 
nised and renwated country hotse wflh 
6,000 sqm d land, smal torafl and he- 
ar. private location and unobatreded 
view. 300 sqm bring space, 250 sqm 
usable space, 80 sqm. bring mom wft 
gatoy and open araque sandstone fire- 
place, antique wood paused country 
style Mi mom with Had sine, 3 mi- 
bfe badmms, rtaubta car^akmg, core 
pietely separate 2-room apanmsm wth" 
tafsoam Dtea (ram owner. 

DM 1,690,000. 

Contact TeL +4M752-14® 
or Fax +4W7S2-586 


Greece 


KYTHKJS Loutra, a stone bad 4-bed- 
man 140 sqm. house on 2 floors, 2 ve- 
randas, MrgftMng mom. 2 Meters, h- 
lemal&aoenH) shower. 2 wes Funfehed 
or unfurnished. Panoramic views. 1 min 
bum beach. Ti Athens +30 i 2814906 
Tot London *44 (0)171 352 0629 


UMQUE OPPORTUWTY 15th Carauy 
house m Kastro. Stans m Greece, iha 
la? tniy peaceful and badbonal Greek 
island vflbga Seasida kcaiian Magical 
atmosphere inusuaf and beaittri arcf»- 
tecture. Apply to Norite Anderson *44 
171 435 6802 or nwffla@aikief50ft- 
tenttexoiA. 


THE INTERMARKET 
Continues 
on Page 6 


9 

























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1997 


tnTlimt 2 THE INTERMARKET 


smmmm wm mmmm 


RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE 


+ 44 171 420 0348 


SPAIN 


FRANCE 


Beautiful House 

GOLF CLUB COSTA BRAVA 

fc-nunful fully fumhbAi linwc mJ 
wnh (prJcn ml + hwtatxaiR. huh- 
mol' Hfj; tirtnysmai ividi frcupLiV. 
Jihnmmi: if<di c&rangjntn. In addaim 
•me loan Mh fireutuv 
hilly upuMud ^ kfhen. isirajsr. swim- 
imn'sprad. W hij iwaws iimciuili 
tV.umtuI in™ Mir mnuntUfc. -mil 1* 
min. n to? l*jdK« . 
siiuJiwl «i 1‘ihmiwn Gr4 Guh Own 
Boij ijjtwr yj-lfiniiwui nt-.irbr 

Price £410,000 

Rtf /cun Fm >L .11 n Rriidrj n"t> 
Mi I'nlmi ii Ain ukku +|«m 
fas -ITi'CIIN' 

Phone- fc« AM'i 

>_r 

Btireri ** L avn. Rtcbiuu if' If 
Su Cnmrti dAiu Curxu >nua 

nf ton Kr«jn 

Fix 1S3 


PARIS 

SQUARE AVENUE FOCH 

(private lane] 

IN HISTORICAL TOWNHOUSE 

luxurious renovation, 3 apartments: 

120, 160 & 300 sq.m. 

Tel 1 33 (0)1 44 55 50 00 
to + 33 IS] 1426055 91 


bouhgoqSe 

Nsat 0|on. SO mtts ton Ganna, 
bsautfui fu*y (unshed vSa, walled 
landscaped garden along mar. wtih 
nuts, 5 teflrams, 3 bats, aat-in 
HKhen & tarty room, (fen, be fern, 
dm firepots. haaWi sttnraii 
pool 3«ar garage, balcory covered 
tenaca Hire refer, ready 




te Hire refer, ready system 
By owner FF3200flD0 
Tk +33 [Q3 80 <7 59 88 
8Q 47 50 93 


f A.B.V.L, 


Gerald Kremer 


Your REAL ESTATE Aqont in PARI' 


Will Ito* nstturl! Fur vou 
& will estimate tlwr prapfflv 

1W.: 33(0) I 53 20 08 50 
Fa\.: 33(0)1 53 20 08 GT 
• Fnaim Wivnfvr 



Real Estate 
for Sale 


French Provinces 


THE INTERMARKET 
Starts 
on Page 5 


40 HOI by boat from QUtBERON. on 
small Atlantic Island *th no cars. 
HOUSE in naarai dwa sating in enr- 
ronmentaly protected zone, nflti unob- 
stened ocean vtew & tired access to 
the beach. FF2M. 433 (QJZ 9730 6733 


BRITTANY ESTATE on is acres land 
win a pond. 75 sqm same house, At- 
tics to r» fined. Price F 600,003 Tat 
MaHre Bowles 1® m 97 47 42 78 


BRITTANY, near QllNPER. 2 km tom 
sea & bwchesi R*r fomfehed deader 
house, Smewashed, bun i960, rev brae 
vfldhen. bathroom, WC. 4 living, 

2 badraoms Attic lo be toed into 

3 baftwms. (iumng water]. Garage + 
large storage mom .Lame lawn wfflt frul 
trees Fisting port FR 500,00(1 visits 
by owner: August MKJia. « July 26ft 
+33 (OK 82 K S3 50. July 2Hft 0 1 
August 1st; +33 (0)1 45 24 65 30: 
August 5flt-31st +33(0|2 SB 87 41 05 


BUY WTHOUT C0MMS90N 
Freer Recafce reffJarty. at your home, a 
■setectoi of real estate c a r wpu tdng to 

S demand. Ls Partmafre Europuwt 
r Uontpefller cedes 05, France 
Fa* 4awt7NBI»«mjndJHN 


TOWNHOUSE 190) CENTURY ft* ren- 
owned bordering river Saone. 30 km 
from Lyon 10 main rooms. 41/2 bath- 
room Garage 360 sqm. Hiring space. 
3.000 sqm. gardem FF2 mfaiTel +33 
(0)1 45 63 33 63 Fax +33 (0)1 45631771 


CASTLE N LOT - 25 HA PARK, bam 
115 sqm swimming pool 775 sqm. 
rastneturad by owns archied FF6.5 
jnflon TO +33 (0)6 B0 43 45 23. Wrf) 
stt Wpjrpereawanadoafcrdwsal 


London 


EXQU6T1E PENTHOUSE APARTMENT 
m exclusive Hampstead netg^borfwod 
mth breatttaldng views over London. 
Compietery redaorafatf to 
Ugh stancEDil 2 dote bedrooms, each 
wft ensure bdhroom (one will Turtfeh 
stem badL Balu rnfl^ shower, IWF 
ed rrartfe floor) hilly eqdpped kMwn. 
agscfous reception, study. Ngh vauted 
ceffiras, private south fadng terrace. 
£45fllCD. ttso waiabte tor ran bettfr 
hdy tumshed n sleek modem style by 
Hamxts & Roche Bobols, a £3^00 per 
month. Tet Lcmtai +44 171 435 393S. 


Great Britain 


H0ME5EARCH LONDON Lai us 
search for you. We find homes / Rais 
to buy and red and provide corporate 
relocation services. For Indhnkfuals 
and companies. Tel- +44 171 83B 
1066 Fax + 44 171 B3B 1077 
lapJArerwhomssearoti oauMum 


Paris and Suburbs 


16tti, beauttftjl ISO sqm. ^anmem n 
residential greenery, quel dee recaption, 
3 bedrooms. 2 baths, large balcony. 
FF5J50000. Tfi#r +33 {0)1 42 24 S2 72 


FACING BOB DE BOULOGffi.23 sqm 
sfudb. bam. resttonttti. quto. chammg. 
FF57W. Tel: +33(0)1 43 45 85 07 




FRENCH 

MAGAZINE 

FOR 

PRESTIGIOUS 
REAL ESTATE 


D E M E U R K S & 





FOR SALE, all over France: more than 300 
chateaux, residences, vineyards, houses with 
character, estates on the French Riviera. 

For each advertisement: 

- a minimum of one color photo. 

- a detailed description in French and English. 

You will receive the last issue by air mail by 
sending your business caid and check for US$1 5 or 
£ 8 to: 

DEMEURES ET CHATEAUX 
19230 POMPADOUR - FRANCE 


STRUTT & A 

PARKERS 

44 171 239 0959 7W- S3 

Free 44 171 246 1230 Fax; 33 


VALBONNE AREA - COTE D'AZUR 



. . rare property, one ot'die very tew la; 
Alpes Manumes.is now on [he nurbrt 


>ne of die very tew large private estates remaining in the 
is now on the market tor the bnt dine in 30 vraa. 


Dating tom the >>ih renairu this secluded and seaur Dnnuinr ronssts of 
a principal ox bedroom residence, three guest houses, three caretakers cot- 
tages and ocher outbuildings, surrounded oy some 30 acres of beautiful gat- 
dens. woods and olive erovis. 


ST JEAN CAP FERRAT 

Nta via on 2 levels, m the hem at 
Cap. Fra areal stye. 5 bedrooms. 

3 baths, tong, (feu equipped klcheru 
makfs room, study, gangs. Logs 
terace. seavieH. sow east expoa/e, 
1,9)0 sqm. freed grounds with passirfe 
swimming pool Rice FF n ntikm 
HUE AN OFFER ... 

HUBER 6 PABINffl FRANCE 
TEL: +33 0Q4 83 01 66 94 
Fax +33 (0)4 93 01 42 36 


FRENCH RIVIERA 
12 Ion CANNES - 25 kin NICE 
Between st?a and nxxrsain 
Character MAS Uy renovated 400 sqm 
6 bedrooms. 4 baths, tongs, Owing, 
wraca 11000 sqm landscaped park 
Otoe trees, rose garden... Pool, soiaitun. 
alarm *-cs parttm F 1(5 ntibn 
Om»r+3at0)4^40 Wl Fax -83707150 


ST PAUL DE VENCE, 15 mins ahport 
Vfc Hto tms&i view. 170 sqm on 2 
levels 3 bedrooms. -1 bath. 2 loUei 
rooms Celar. garage, terrace 2200 
sq.m, pine garden. Pool posatoe. 
FF15M. Mrasme lo owner Tel. +33 (Ojl 


HIGH CUSS VILLA 


Real Estate Services 


SOUTH OF FRANCE - RIVIERA: Very 
eKpenenced, retabto. French, tn-detatnai 
arvaBable a manage yar estate Impec- 
cable credentials and eipenencerf at 
organising all aspects of an affluent 
Sfetiyte Tal Pais +33 fffll 45 03 22 97. 


BEAULIEU SUR HER 
Bestti 260 sqm. dkftiBL kip floor of 
Itgh bass tu«ng nee view over sea 
3 bedrooms. 3 baths. 2 showers, tong, 
equated tauten, alarm, 
a. 30 sqm terrace. FF45oa,000. 
HUBER A PARTNER FRANCE 
TEL +33 0fl4 93 01 66 94 
Fax +tt K04 93 01 42 36 



BEAULIEU SUR HER 

3400m apartment htyi class, character, 
hdy renovated, about as sqm., spacious 
by+xi. Top toot Garage, celar. 

SEA VIEW Fl.600000 
HUBER A PARTNER FRANCE 
TCL +33 (0)4 9301 68 94 
Fax +33 (K4 93 01 42 38 


RARE i M THE HEART OF 
ST JEAN CAP FERRAT 

Splendd aparanem of 3 levels 
of 230 sqm plus 80 sqm. of sotewm 
lenace wth hHi ptag. telephone and 
barbecue. Large recaption mom. dating 
area, toed Mcftn 3 berJooms. study. 
Private ll and ca part with 
tfreoaccess b the apartment 
' Etegan ireerta deoortfon 
OUstarKtang view cf die ha bays. 

WUHJ.COD 

TUBER & PARTNER FRANCE 
TEL’ +33 (0)4 93 ffl 66 94 
Fa +33 (OH 83 01 42 38 


HEART OF CAP FERRAT 
Witter edge propaiy FF1SM 
Faneafc tocatov seavtea vfla . FF15M 
Seaton) - prrqtie bach 1 FF8M 
NEAR MONACO 
Vteertrara property • boa access 
Mamflcwf property seatw 
both at price. 
HAUSSHANN Group 
Teti+33(QJ4B20O 49 49 
Fax +33 (fl) 4 83 89 40 68 
MoUk +33 (9 £ 07 74 3D 39 


CAP MARTIN NEAR MONACO 

Large i -bedroom apatmem 
plus 40 sqm garden lenace eft an 
exeepdonaJ view, mrertso tang me sea 8 
Ihe kgrts of Morse Carta This rent 
is stiufeed in a smaB eidusne bfect 
featuring prwacy. searty S a roof 
top pool Phots and plan ausiattis. 
Pitt FF23M Mil garege S Store room 
Phone Owner +33 KM S3 28 96 36 


KYSKS 
Great Lotatm 
VBa in pates candtxn. 
• 4 rooms. 3 Mbs 


Spectacular sea vtan 
FFZ650JH3 

Ttf +33 (0)1 43 29 45 07 
Fit +33 P|1 40 51 81 56 


CANNES -FRANCE 

m 7DOO stun paK 
STONE BUILT PROVENCAL STYLE 
CHARACTER HOUSE ON ONE LrVEL 
350 sam. sea raw. excetait Eocsla 
PlMl +33 (D)4 93 E814 01 
Fax +33 (0)4 92 97 02 16 


15 km tram ADC on PROVENCE, 3 ha 

ESTATE 200 Kjnt actww house su- 
perb lay-out 100 sq.m. tong, blferd 
room, 6 bedrooms. 3 balhs. equipped 


43 54 08 31 Fax +33 W 43H 0830 


FRENCH RIVERA. 40 mbs NEE, 200 
sqm. besttdB on 3,500 sqm. grounds, 
magnflcenl raw. 4 double baboons, 3 
hffliocims, warning pool, access to pri- 
vate lennts and lake beach Aston pnee 
FRL3M Owner +33 W 94 78 53 34 


FORMER SHEEPFOLD, 125 sqm. tong 
spats. 25 ha. 125JXB sqm) enclosed S 
treed land, water, eteanetty. Iqfephone. 
Very calm sea. 17 tons Canes, i hour 
Nice airport. FR, 650.000 Tet +33 
IW 93 60 25 3« Fta (0)3 94 70 54 17. 


UAGAGNOSC near Grasse. 25 ton 
Nkra/Cannes exceptional small vdla 2 
fisdrocois. bah + shower rooms, fwng 
mum + fireplace, central healing on 
5 000 sq.m, south re raced oirra-iml 
gwe Tel. +33 IW S3 <0 17 15 


ONLY S15M00 FOB "PIED A ’TERRE' 
in CANNES. 70 sqm apartment tong 
room - 2 bedrooms sea new. wafting 
distance to beach and shops. South 
view. calm. pool, closed garage Call 
turner a +33 10>4 92 98 6930 


FEW KUS FROM LES BAUX. small ri- 
tage house, qua. cordons, superb ran 
60 sq.m. + garage. FF6J0.003. FAX 
owner +33 [0)4 SO 49 (M 46 


NEAR CANNES - Antted sals superb 
vfla 600 spun wtBr 14.000 sqm. pari 
svumming pod. tennis. Bremniajang view 
on sea 6 mountains. Rental posable. Tel 
+33 (0)146 25 24 50. Fax (0)141109359 


LE CASTELLET Historical medieval vB- 
tage. 12 tap ®a. surrounded by towards 
75 sq.m, house, 2 bedrooms, 2 balhs, 
ported condton. Tet +33 (0)494326715 


ST PAUL DE VOICE, properly on 1 lev- 
el. 4 bedrooms, 4-car basemen. 3.701] 
sq.m, parte, pool, qdet ff:, 950.000. 
LV.C. TePFax +33 ®4 93 20 22 44 


PROVENCE; Ah tends of properties. 
Ptoase ask to- Mrs Wagner. Agence 
Auquier, F-84210 Si doer. Tel +33 
«H 90 66 07 53 Fax 90 66 12 35 


NEAR ST TROPEZ, o«w dfars andem 
stone hues tasti4i% dacoted. 5 bed- 
rooms. pool 1.700 sqm land, peaceful, 
and vneyarda FF2M +33(0)4 94782066 


NEAR MONACO Several «jlas tor sale 
need restoring. FF5-7 M. Azur Agence. 
Td +33 (0)4 9341 4177 Fax 9341 5100 


NICE, furnished studto for sale, vwy 
cotoorcUa. ridt in die center Tet +33 
(Q4 83 68 27 33 before 8 pm 


Monaco 


EZE- VILLAGE 

Betww Nca and Monaco, sr4Wb 
5-roan duplex, 123 sqm., beauWiri 
dacorason, parfea condteon, 200 sqm. . 
privae rorien. pool and peift, max. 
VIEW® and VILLAGE FFMOOMO 
DOm mOBIUER 
Tel +377 93255A25Fax93S02627 


388 sqm, 3 bettooms. 31B baths, 
mart* entrance. Bxary. 3 iretoor partang 
spaces. 3 cetera, large terraces 
tabutous raw of madtenanaan and 
Motoco Has na been iwd h since 
USS12M renrwaon For tale by owner 
Tel: *33 m 0B 37 03 0i 


MONTE-CARLO STAR, facing the sea 
Poled "pfe* dans TeatT 
r^t on the Casino Squaro 
tedudng pariong and cellar 
FR500.000 

Estittehrity ARN (377) 83 30 88 59 


RENTALS 


RELAIS DE LA REEVE SA & JOHN TAYLOR 

offering at 

CANNES 

42 LA CROISETTE 

^ln a unique residence between the Carlton Hotel & Festivals 
Palace. 16 apartments. 3 rooms, highly luxurious, superbly 
equipped, renting furnished. All sen-ices available. 

Tet Louis FORTIN I 

Tel: +33 (0)4 93 06 60 OO or +33 (0>* 93 38 OO 66 
Fax: +33 (OH 93 06 60 20 or +33 (OH 93 39 13 65 


CANNES (OS) 

100 METRES CRdSETTE 
inavwy hWidass raateriM 
Renting weekly new apabnet®. 
Unequipped from 2 roais lo 5 rootra. 
Oi*teX- Air ctMooraiq 
T.Vm reteptee. Reception 
Hotel sendees "a la cane* 

Press test from fTfcfi*. 

Send tor free brochure & internal on. 
CfTAOINES, 

. ‘CANNES CflOfSETTE* 

87 me tf AiMm 06400 CAWIES. 
Tet (33) 9306 2777. FJH93SS3CS4, 



GOLFRG ON ITS RTVtERA - Exclusive 
apabmiiL 2 double bedrooms. 2 tens, 
targe leraces, swfrmng p««. lewis 
courts, 10 tons beaches and Cannes 
AM tABLE AUGUST Please ring owner 
■*33 (0)4 92 9? 17 33. 


COTE D’AZUR, Tourrettes sur Loup, 
nett villa. 3 double bedrooms, msuie 
tarns, narqr room, pooftg gftfenfcea' 
rural «w. 16 Aim to B Sep EiKJM. 
From 6 Soft WM. Tet owner office 
+33 (OH W37560. home (0)1 47537S0 


CANNE5 taxury eparhww te steeps 5 

3 Beds. 2 bams, pod. FF5.000 - ff? 500 
per vredi Td owner *33 (QH 9338 S33 


LUBE ROM charming ok] home, ferrao. 
£Wt 3 acres. Td *33 M 9030*306 
Fat +33 (014 90208950 


Monaco 


MONTE CARLO nee 250 sq.m, apart- 
men Panorama, seartns RRRfflW 
rnonlti + charges INTERMEDIA Td: *377 
93 30 66 B4 Fa +377 93 50 45 52 


LA* 


PARBCflE DE LA MUS10UE, chanting 
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coSngs. Guenflai, tsbr, ready tonwe- 
BL FKOOQO. Tfiffax +33 (0)1 43021367 


UNIQUE M ST a0UD. OWNER SELLS 
HOUSE 300 sqm. on garden 1500 sqa 
anii^anowfings private access to 
Pat FF&5 M. isgteraa. Tel +33 (ffli 
4602 415eFax¥(0)146(E32 0e 


1«i HETRO GEORGE V, rue Bassano, 
treestone buffing, Pled a Tara, 50sqm 
charming, Sri) flooritop Boor, SL tuny, 
fireplace, ell comfort, owner FF1.150M. 
Tel +33^147234562, rnaMf£J)6033334M 


1ST - ST. HONQRE, NEAR VBOOME. 
Freiiiglats Ixater lor Iromsateu p^d 
a terra. 56 sq.m. Ffl .480,000. Owner 
Tet +33 (0)1 <260 3352 (answertM ma- 
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- • — — 



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Real Estate 
for Rent 



Tty M BEAlflm TOWNHOUSE, 3rd 
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KELLES, LOUSE, frrrWred Us. short 
term posstBy. BF 23.900 aO induded. 
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RICHMOND HILL * * * ' * 
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over Ihe Thames. VM toctiad for good 
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GENEVA, LUXURY FURNISHED apart- 
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Tire bnt location 

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cable TV, mmfoare, sale, hardryas. 


I.H.T. Headers S 


“S 


Special Rate: 570 FF for two pers. one night all inducted 
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Charming rooms arid apartments giving onto the square 
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•AVERAGE DISCOUNTS fOR HERALD TRIBUNE READERS - 


Room 

Length of stay July 


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August 


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July August 




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PARIS 

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Reuters 

KOROLYOV, Russia — For a brief 
moment Thursday, the flight director, a 
veteran cosmonaut himself, lost patience 
with the crew of the crippled Mir space 
station, which is fighting for survival 
after its power system malfunctioned. 

“This is a kindergarten." said a frus- 
trated Vladimir Solovyov, the bead of 
the Mission Control center outside Mos- 
cow, after ending a conversation with 
the crew of the Mir station, who bad set 
off a new crisis by mistakenly unplug- 
ging a vital computer. 

“Have you switched off 
everything?" he shouted during a radio 
linkup as crewmen sat in the Mir's es- 
cape capsule. “Switch off everything cm 
the leftside]" 

Experts crowded around terminals in 
the computer-filled central hall hying to 
figure out a solution to the latest chal- 
lenge. 

“There is a tension in a hall," said an 


engineer. “But there is no panic. We are 
under constant pressure with something 
new happening every day.“ 

Yet five rows of monitors on the wall 
were Wank throughout the day as the 
Mir, deprived of most of its energy after 
the incident, was unable to transmit 
video data. 

Outside the main Mission Control 
hall, Russian and National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration officials sat 
under a bust of Vladimir Lenin and a 
mosaic of the first man in space. Yuri 
Gagarin, as they examined detailed pho- 
tos of the Mir interior. 

“You're over-stressed and it would 
be good if you could remember 50 per- 
cent of whai 1 say," a Russian told a 
NASA official. 

Tension in Mission Control peaked as 
the orbiting crew came into radio contact 
every hour or so as they passed over radio 
relay stations on their orbits of Earth. 

“What alarm is that going off?" Mr. 


Solovyov asked the crew at one point. 

A small crowd of engineers gathered 
at the side of the room to watch. Some 
gave quick advice as they watched the 
seconds tick away ro the end of the 
communications window. 

Many expressed confidence that the 
problem could be overcome. But with 
the power off in the station’s main mod- 
ule and the oxygen supply limited, the 
crew were clearly working against the 
clock to save ihe station. 

Officials said the pressure and tem- 
perature inside Mir should be fine for 
two or three days more and the oxygen 
supply could last five days. 

Mission Control officials said they 
had weathered similar crises before. 

* ‘The situation is no worse than it was 
when they turned off the orientation 
system after the crash on June 25," said 
Viktor Blagov, the deputy flight direc- 
tor. ‘ ‘This is not the first occurrence and 
we have always succeeded before." 


— «: . 

-s~2~ 








Mars Rover Scoots 
Toward New Rock 

CmpUrdb* Cka Si^qf Faun Ayurfen 

PASADENA, California — The 
Sojourner rover moved Thursday 
toward the martian rock scientists 
have dubbed Scooby Doo, complet- 
ing a 3.5-meter leg of its longest 
excursion on the planet's surface. 

Scientists and engineers at 
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
in California said the rover would 
first chemically analyze the soil be- 
tween Scooby Doo and Yogi, the 
rock that was its last target When it 
reaches Scooby Doo, it will make a 
l CLhour analysis of the rock, using its 
alpha proton X-ray spectrometer. 

The Pathfinder lander, which car- 
ried the rover to the martian surface, 
resumed normal transmission of 
data to Earth late Tuesday and early 
Wednesday with no repeal of com- 
puter trouble that had temporarily 
halted communication three times 
in a week. 


MIR: Crew Disables Guidance System 


Continued from Page 1 

“they have gotten control of things and 
there seems to be no immediate crisis." 

Mr. Clinton said the United States had 
not yet decided whether to send astro- 
nauts to Mir in the future. “It's loo soon 
for me to draw a conclusion," he said. 

The mishap Thursday has forced yet 
another delay in the repairs. After sev- 
eral postponements, Russian officials 
had hoped that the repairs could begin 
July 24 or July 25. Now, however, they 
expect them to be delayed by several 
additional days ai the very least. 

First, the crew needs several days to 
recharge the solar batteries. This is done 
by firing the jets of the Soyuz space craft 
docked alongside the space station to keep 
Mir's solar arrays direrted at the sun. 

Also, the crew has been instructed to 
take the weekend off and get more rest.. 
That is an implicit recognition that fa- 
tigue is believed to have played a role in 
the mistake Thursday . The Russian crew 
members were reported to have had a 
sleepless night. 


“This was purely human error," Mr. 
Solovyov said. 

The problem began when one of the 
crewmen — Russian space officials de- 
clined to say just who — yanked a cable 
while preparing for the repair mission. 

The cable disabled the computer that 
controls Mir's orientation, and the space 
station started to drift, Mr. Culbertson 
said. A backup system failed. 

With the solar arrays no longer poin- 
ted ai the sun, power was drained out of 
the space station's batteries. Light, tem- 
perature control and oxygen generation 
equipment was shut down to save en- 
ergy. Data transmissions to ground con- 
trol were cut off. The crew moved to 
Soyuz and used its systems to com- 
municate with ground control. 

The mission control center and the 
Mir crew worked quickly to reorient the 
solar arrays by firing the jets on the 
Soyuz rocket. Thursday evening, Rus- 
sian officials said that the batteries were 
being recharged and that they hoped to 
restart the gyroscopes that control the 
space station on Friday. 


The Mir 
Complex 


DETAIL 

SHOWN BELOW 



SOYUZ 

CAPSULE 


A Bailout Option 
During the repair, 
Tsibliyev will be at 
the controls of the 
Soyuz transport 
module, with life 
support and 
electrical systems 
running in case an 
accident makes 
escape necessary. 


A New Hatch for the Space Station 
(And Maybe a New Repairman) 

in a proposed Internal spacewalk" aboard the Spektr module, damaged 
when it was struck by the Progress cargo ship on June 25, Mir’s crew will 
try to restore electricity to the rest of the space station, much of which 
has been running on halt power since the accident 
Under the plan described below, the American astronaut Michael Foale, 
would replace the ailing Russian commander, Vasin Tsibliyev, who would 
stay in the Soyuz capsule to prepare for a possible evacuation. 


The New Hatch 

After the accident, electrical cables had 
to be disconnected to seal oft the 
damaged Spektr module from the rest of 
the ship. A new hatch plate fitted with 
outlets will allow the cables to be 
reattached, through airtight connections, 
I. )o cables leading to batteries in Mir. 



SOYUZ 


THE REPAIR 


0 Wearing spacesuils, 
Foale and the other 
Russian cosmonaut. 
Alexander Lazutkin, 
will enter the node, 
seal off the other 
modules and 
depressurize the node. 


0 Lazutkin will 
open the hatch 
to the Spektr 
module, check 
inside for 
hazards and 
find cables he 
plans to 
reconnect 


SoonxrNASA 


0 Lazutkin will entet 
Spektr and retrieve 
about 10 cables, 
including three from 
the undamaged solar 
panels. He will 
connect them to 
sockets on the 
Spektr side of the 
new hatch plate. 


OAfter Lazutkin 
returns to the 
node, the hatch 
will be shut and 
sealed and Ihe 
node 

repressurized. 


0 After performing 
leak checks to 
make sure that the 
new hatch is 
airtight, Foale and 
Lazutkin will return 
to Mir. Tsibliyev will 
shut down Soyuz 
and return to Mfr as 
well. 


Sirs- 


TRUTH: Apartheid Inquiry Did Not Always Relieve the Pain Battle LillCS DtOWII aS UN Tries Refor 


Continued from Page 1 


i" ■ ■ vais-at- 
,-ne>:*r5-- 1 
■ - i-' H l..’*L i 
-liriM! 

• I 


5 i ivi.:i More galling for many of die victims 
is that, while they have received nothing, 

_ dozens of those responsible for murder 

?rr ’■anirdai'.laag I * and torture have already been set free by 
the commission. 

“They get a lot of attention at the 
■ hearing," said Viola Lengner.one of the 
commission's “briefers,” whose job 
. . r i.n, n,K i ^ been to prepare victims to testify and 
>s one of the people. to whom victims, 

tend-to turn weeks biter. “Bm afterwards 

nobody cares." 

Officials of ihe Trauma Center for 
-Victims of Violence and Torinre. a non- 
1 profit group dial offers services to vic- 
tims in the Cape Town area, say 50 to 60 
percent of the dozens of victims they 
' have talked to in ihe last year have said 
_ they suffered difficulties after testifying 
or expressed regret. 

“My inqnession is that the commis- 

le 


i 



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gory and h ear tbreaking stories 
the victims have told have gripped this 
J. country and may have eahghtened those 
i! who had failed to see the extent of the 
brutality of die former government- For 
that reason, the commission may be do- 
ling the nation and future generations an 
immeasurable service. But many of 
- - those close to the process have bqgxm to 
j- question whether ihe commission has 
i done the mdividnal victims ranch good. 
ff/i ! ' Psychologists point out that going 
“ • pubhcmaynotbegoodforevaybody.lt 
can fulfill the need an individual has ro 
tell his experiences and “be heard by 
important people. Bur it can also 
^reawaken oW fears. 

“You are not walking into a tfaera- 
_ panic situation when yon go tofheTruth 
Commission," said Trudy de Ridder, a 
— ' clinical psychologist at the Tranma Cen- 

DJSCOUji^ x tar. ’You are wafldng onto a stage and 


that is extremely anxiety-producing. 
They are surrounded by beautiful table- 
cloths and flowers and it’s a public oc- 
casion. So is the sense of relief they feel 
afterwards because they told about their 
tra nma or because the ordeal of going 
before the commission is finally over?" 

The commission, which is expected to 
disband in January and issue a report in 
March, is an attempt to heal the wounds 
of the past without the expense and 
poDtical divisiveness of. trials. 

It was charged with three jobs — 
uncovering the truth about what 
happened, offering amnesty to those 
who confessed their role in atrocities and 
mating recommendations for repara- 
tions. Armed with the stick of subpoena 
power and the carrot of amnesty, it is 
easily the broadest, most powerful such 
commission ever created. In other coun- 
tries, like Chile, such commissions have 
simply taken testimony from victims in 
private. 

But victims ’ advocates, psychologists 
and Truth Commission workers say that 
the commission, assembled in haste and 
with nothing to model itself on. has often 
been insensitive to the victims — treat- 
ing the bearings like a cure-all when they 
actually can be quire painfoL 

For one thing, many victims really did 


not understand that they had a choice not 
to go public. Although the commission 
had merely sent out letters of invitation, 
many of die poor and uneducated saw 
only the fine stationery and the official 
seals and thought that they were ob- 
ligated to appear. 

In several cases, Mrs. de Ridder said, 
commissioners put enormous pressure 
on victims to testify because they wanted 
noteworthy events illustrated by people 
who had been there. In at least two cases, 
she said, victims who were reluctant to 
come forward suffered psychotic epis- 
odes after testifying. 

In another case, the commission sur- 
prised a group of mothers with a video- 
tape of the scene where their sons were 
murdered. The tape showed close-ups of 
their sons' mutilated bodies. One of the 
mothers became disoriented and had to 
be taken from the hearing room to a 
hospital. 

Reparations may well soothe the vic- 
tims — and many are still hopeful. Early 
on, the commission, noting that South 
Africa was still facing enormous finan- 
cial problems, talked of symbolic re- 
parations such as monuments or schol- 
arships in the name of victims. But in 
recent months, the commission has 
come out in favor of pensions. 


I "VwflxW V SufffnwDopiarhn 

UNITED NATIONS. New York — 
Germany and France on Thursday ap- 
plauded the sweeping reform plans for 
the United Nations bureaucracy an- 
nounced by Secretary-General Kofi An- 
nan and promised to support the mea- 
sures folly. 

But the plan was greeted with skep- 
ticism by developing countries and out- 
right opposition by conservative critics 
in the U.S. Congress. 

Third World diplomats said they 
feared that change would be limited to 
cutbacks in development programs they 
strongly support. U.S. critics want such 
programs eliminated and rhe United Na- 
tions scaled back even further. 

Senator Rod Grams. Republican of 
Minnesota, said the plan “represents 
nothing more than the status quo” and 
that Congress must prevent the United 
Nations mom becoming "a country club 
for diplomats." 

But Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel of 
Germany said Mr. Annan was sending a 
positive signal and it was now up to die 
1 85 UN members to throw their support 
behind the proposals. 

"We cannot allow the impetus that 
the secretary-general has given to the 


reform with his report to be talked to 
death,” Mr. Kinkel said. “We need a 
slimmed-down, efficient UN today more 
than ever.” 

In Paris, a Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man. Jacques Rumraelhardt, said France 
would support Mr. Annan in his attempt 

‘We are not interested in 
mere cost- cutting.’ 

to flesh out proposals that “for the main 
part were suggested by the European 
Union." 

' ‘We will be vigilant to ensure that the 
fruits of the reform benefit countries of 
the Third World first of all, as the sec- 
retary-general has promised,” Mr. 
Rummelhardt said- 
On Wednesday, Mr. Annan proposed 
the most sweeping organizational 
changes in UN history, vowing to 
streamline the bureaucracy, reduce staff 
and cut budgets. The plan seeks to re- 
duce administrative costs by 30 percent 
and enable the United Nations to con- 
tinue its work with 25 percent fewer 
employees than in 1985. It also recom- 
mends that the General Assembly 


shorten its annual session, revise its 
budget formula and appoint a commis- 
sion to study changes in the UN Charter 
and independent UN agencies over 
which Mr. Annan has limited control. 

The Republican-led U.S. Congress 
has refused to pay the S870 million 
it acknowledges the United States 
owes the United Nations unless specific 
changes are made at the world body. 

But UN officials say some of those 
demands require approval of other UN 
members that do not share the Con- 
gress’s views. 

“We are not interested in mere cost- 
cutting," said New Zealand's UN rep- 
resentative, John Powles. “And we most 
emphatically disagree with suggestions 
which would leave the United Nations 
with a diminished role in the world." 

In order to win congressional approv- 
al for paying the arrears, the Clinton 
administration must convince critics that 
Mr. Annan’s plan represents a firm com- 
mitment to restructure the world orga- 
nization. But many of Mr. Annan's pro- 
posals require the approval of the 
General Assembly, where developing 
countries are the majority, and those 
nations' objections will have to be 
answered. (/fearers. AP) 



CHINA: Thousands of Angry Workers Protest Bankruptcies 


UN: U.S. Backs a Bigger Security Council 


Continued from Page 1 

a curfew before bringing in paramilitary 
forces, the group said. 

An editorial in the official Mianyang 
Daily accused hostile foreign and do- 
mestic forces of stirring up trouble. 

A Sichuan dissident, Li Bifeng, 33, a 
former tax officer in Mianyang, has writ- 
ten an open letter calling on international 
labor organizations to intercede on be- 
half of the workers. Human Rights in 
ChuiasaidL 

In his letter, dated July 16 and made 
available by die rights group, Mr. Li 


urged the labor organizations to press 
Beijing to abide by its promise to the 
Chinese people to safeguard their right 
to subsistence. He also urged the un- 
conditional release of all workers de- 
tained in the protests, medical treatment 
for those wounded and severe punish- 
ment for corrupt officials responsible for 
the collapse of the state industries. 

Officials reached by telephone at local 
factories acknowledged that several 
thousand people had taken part in the 
protests July /, but said that the city had 
calmed down since. The demonstrators 
were mainly from three silk and textile 


plants that had gone bankrupt, they said. 

“Several big state-owned enterprises 
have declared bankruptcy and the work- 
ers and their family members launched 
the protests so that they can ensure a 
basic standard of living," the Mianyang 
city official said. “They are asking for 
new jobs, but the government can only 
give jobs to some of them. We can only 
resolve such problems step by step, in 
line with the bankruptcy law." 

Human Rights in China said the police 
were maintaining tight control in the 
town, with many of the detained workers 
still in custody. (Reuters, AFP ) 


Continued from Page 1 

tative and the president of the UN Gen- 
eral Assembly, has been urging the Gen- 
eral Assembly to move faster in 
expanding the Security Council, which 
has not changed in size since the 1960s, 
when most developing countries were 
still emerging from colonialism. 

The United States still has some dis- 
agreements with developing nations 
over the final size of the council and the 
question of whether veto power would 
be limited in any way. Washington wants 
a council confined to no more than 20 or 
21 members, doubling the permanent 


members to 10 but keeping non perman- 
ent seats at 10, or maybe adding one. 

The United States and other countries 
say a large council would be unwieldy. 
Mr. Razali has proposed increasing the 
council to 24 members by adding five 
permanent and four nonpermanent seats. 
The current permanent members of the 
Security Council have veto power on 
matters of substance. The United States 
insists that its veto not be weakened, but 
diplomats said Washington was prepared 
to him over to a panel the decision on how 
to deal with vetoes for new members. Mr. 
Razalt's plan would deny the veto to all 
new members. 


Indian Rarty Drops 
Threat to PhD Oat 

Reapers 

NEW DELHI — The shaky gov- 
cening coalition in India overcame a 
four-day crisis Thursday when a 
regional party barked off from a 
threat to quit Prime Minister Inder 
Kumar GujraTs government. 

The problem ended after leaders 
of the 15- party United Front co- 
alition agreed that their squabbles 
could only help rival Hindu nation- 
alists in a li lceiy midterm election, 
alliance leaders said. 

The Dravida Munoetca Razha- 
gam party decided sot to press its 
threat to withdraw its four ministers, 
said the information and broadcast- 
ing minister, Jaipal Reddy. 

“2 would say the problem Is 
over,” Mr. Reddy said. 

Resolving a key difference wifo a 
communist coalition partner, the 
party endorsed a United From de- 
cision to deny admittance to a 
breakaway group of Mr. Copal's 
Janata Dal tarty, foe Rashtriya 
J anat a Dal, alliance JraArs said. 

The United Front has 178 law- 
makers in foe Parliament’s 545- 
member lower bouse and gets vial 
supportfor its minority tule from foe 
Congress (1) Party, which las 240 
deputies. ^ Congress itself was thrown 
out of power in elections in 1996s 


VERSACE: Murder Suspect Is Recalled as Pudgy and Boastful 


BRIEFLY 


Continued from Page 1 

On April 29, Mr. Trail’s body was 
found, followed by Mr. Madson’s body 
four days later. Both had met violent 
deaths. 

The authorities said they believed that 
Mr. Cunanan stole Mr. Madson's jeep, 
drove to Chicago and killed his third 
victim, Lee Miglin, a 72-year-old real- 
estate investor. 

Driving Mr. Miglin’s stolen Lexus, 
foe authorities said, Mr. Cunanan wound 
up in an isolated Civil War cemetery in 
Pennsville, New Jersey, where he shot 
foe caretaker, William Reese, 45, and 
Bed in his red pickup truck. 

The FBI placed Mr. Cunanan on its 
IB-most-wanted list, and there were un- 
confirmed reports of his sightings, from 
California, to Oklahoma and Florida. But 
no thin g concrete came up until Mr. Ver- 
sace was shot and the police found 
bloody clothes and the red pickup truck 
near foe scene. 

Mr. C unanan had earlier been charged 
in foe Madson death and on Wednesday 
he was charged in the killing of Mr. 
Reese. . 

Law-enforcement officials said they 
knew of no motive to link the killings. 

By all accounts, Mr. Cunanan moved 
in a rast crowd. But from an early age. he 
akn seems to have been determined to 
standout 

Mr. Cunanan grew up in Rancho 
Bernardo, a middle-class suburban com- 


munity north of San Diego, the youngest 
of four children of Modesto and Mary- 
ann Cunanan. His father is a Philippine- 
born U.S. Navy veteran who later be- 
came a stockbroker. 

Mr. Cunanan attended an elite prep- 
aratory school in La Jolla, California, and 
studied French and theater. He seemed to 
delight classmates with his flamboyance, 
once attending a school function in a 
patent-leather red jumpsuit, a gift from 
the much older man who was his date. 

He graduated in 1987 and his class- 
mates voted him “Least Likely to Be 
Forgotten." He enrolled at the Uni- 
versity of California at San Diego, but 
when his father fled foe country under 
suspicion of financial wrongdoing, Mr. 
Cunanan dropped out of school to follow 
him to the Philippines. 

By 1990, be was living in an ex- 
pensive home near Berkeley, California, 
that friends said did not appear to be his, 
and spinning tales of his wealthy family 
and its Philippine sugar plantations. 

“My first impression of him was 
someone who was kind of snobby and 
had a lor of money.” said Tim Barthel, 
an owner of Flicks, a gay video bar in 
Hillcrest where Mr. Cunanan passed 
time. Mr. Barthel said Mr. Cunanan 
peeled off hundred-doilar bills readily, 
drove luxury cars and always paid in 
cash. 

Mr- Cunanan often picked up the tab 
for parties of four and fi ve people, buying 
round after round of drinks or dinners of 


more than $1,000, but he seldom ap- 
peared with a date, Mr. Barthel recalled. 

Even as Mr. Cunanan partied with a 
younger gay crowd in Hillcrest, he also 
spent time with older, more closeted gay 
men in the oceanfrom enclave of La 
Jolla, where he lived with an older man 
for some time until last fall. 

Lieutenant Jim Collins of the San 
Diego police said they did not believe 
Mr. Cunanan was a prostitute for hire, 
despite what his mother had said about 
him. Instead, the lieutenant said, Mr. 
Cunanan had been kept by wealthy men 
in succession. 

[A police inspector who interviewed 
Mr. Cunanan 's father said Thursday that 
he had denied his son was a "high-class 
prostitute,” Agence France-Presse re- 
ported from Manila. 

[The inspector. Celedonio Morales, 
said that according to the father, his son 
“was educated in a Catholic school and 
could not be capable of doing" what his 
mother had described.] 

Sometime in the Iasi few months, ac- 
quaintances said, Mr. Cunanan began 
changing. He put on weight, and began 
adding vodka (o his cranberry juice at 
Flicks. His hair, once carefully molded, 
was often unkempt. 

“He started to look disheveled," Mr. 
Barthel recalled. 

Mr. Cunanan told friends he was mov- 
ing to San Francisco to pursue a ro- 
mance, and be spent several days there in 
late April. 


Kenyan Opposition 
Plans Mass Actions 9 

NAIROBI — An opposition- 
backed alliance unveiled a series of 
' ‘mass actions" Thursday to rest Pres- 
ident Daniel arap Moi while welcom- 
ing talks with him on constitutional 
reforms. 

The list of actions included a rally 
in Mombasa, Kenya's second-largest 
city and a center of its tourism in- 
dustry, on July 26. There also are to be 
a national general strike and sit-in on 
Aug. 8. 

The plans were read at a news con- 
ference by Willy Mutunga, co-con- 
venor of die National Convention Ex- 
ecutive Committee, a grouping of 
opposition parties, human-rights or- 
ganizations and other bodies demand- 
ing reforms. (Reuters) 

Bus With Refugees 
Attacked in Ossetia 

MOSCOW — A bus carrying 
refogees back to their villages in 
southern Russia was attacked with 
grenade launchers Thursday, injuring 
17 people in a region where ethnic 
tensions are high, news agencies re- 
ported. 


Ten of the Ingushi passengers 
aboard were seriously wounded in the 
attack, carried out in North Osseria, 
foepolice reported. 

The refogees were returning to sites 
in North Ossetia, near Chechnya in 
Russia's turbulent Caucasus. 

Ruslan Aushev, president of the 
Ingush Republic, deplored the attack 
as “aimed ai upsetting stability in the 
zone of the Ossetian-Ingush con- 
flict," the Interfax news service re- 
ported. (AP) 

China 9 s Trade Status 
Easily Clears Senate 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
overwhelmingly approved a nearly $ 1 
billion increase in foreign aid Thurs- 
day while endorsing the Clinton ad- 
ministration's decision to extend 
favored trading status to China. 

The 91-8 vote came minutes after 
lawmakers rejected a nonbinding 
measure that would have put the Sen- 
ate on record against a decision to 
extend normal trading privileges to 
China. 

The so-called sense of the Senate 
resolution cited Chinese human- 
rights abuses, exports of weapons to 
“rogue" nations, reported attempts to 
influence the U.S. political process 
and an unbalance in trade. (AP) 


■i.: rtS- 




\ 






PAGES 


FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribune 


Pima shed wish the mew hkk times end the Washington post 


The UN Argument 


If the purpose of reform at the 
United Nations were merely to make 
the world body a more efficient con- 
veyor of the diplomatic, peacekeeping, 
developmental and other services it 
provides its 185 members, then the 
argument would have been wrapped up 
years ago. fit budget and management, 
the United Nations has been worked 
over before, and the changes now re- 
commended by the secretary-general, 
Kofi Annan, take the organization fur- 
ther along, although they do not meet 
all the “benchmarks” set unilaterally 
by the U.S. Congress. 

But of course efficiency is not what 
the argument has been ail about. The 
real issue goes to the symbolic role that 
the United States plays in the world. 

The United States is die single su- 
perpower. the most modem as well as 
the most powerful country, the one 
more than any other with deep interests 
in what goes on practically everywhere 
in the world. Should it therefore dictate 
to other members, define their com- 
mon agenda, insist on prevailing? Or 
should it use the United Nations as a 
forum in which to cooperate as much 
as possible on shared interests, in 
which case a more conciliatory mode 
of engagement is required? 

To put a point on it, is the United 
Nations to reflect the world view of 
Senator Jesse Helms, who has said he 


believes the organization represents a 
conspiracy to ttin umkh American sov- 
ereignty? Or is it to represent the main- 
stream view of die organization as a 
place where important American in- 
terests, although scarcely all of them, 
can be usefully defended and advanced 
by working with the other members? 

No doubt the table of organization 
proposed by Mr. Annan could be fur- 
ther revised. No doubt some additional 
jobs could be closed down without 
serious harm to the organization. It is 
fair to put the United Nations’ internal 
procedures, to additional tests, even 
painful ones. But it is not fair — it is 
disrespectful — for die U.S. Congress 
simply to demand that the UN sec- 
retary-general impose changes, such 
as reducing die American share of the 
budget or crediting the United States 
for money it has spent on its own to 
support peacekeeping. These changes 
quire me formal an 


amendment of sep- 


require 
arate treaties. 

This whole business of UN reform 
has gone on for a very long time and 
with a heavy impact on the organi- 
zation’s functioning. Mr. Annan’s pro- 
posals may not be the last word, but 
they provide a reasonable basis for early 
American resumption of a full role in 
serving its interests and accepting its 
obligations at the United Nations. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Big Picture 


While Senator Robert Torricelli, 
Democrat of New Jersey, tries to re- 
member his birthday and Senator John 
Glenn, Democrat of Ohio, jokes about 
his astrological sign, more serious 
members of the Senate Governmental 
Affairs Committee keep getting sev- 
eral lessons a day in the operation of 
the most reckless presidential fund- 
raising operation in recent history. 

One such lesson came on Wednes- 
day with the revelation that one of John 
Huang's bosses at the Commerce De- 
partment, Jeffrey Garten, considered 
him unqualified and recommended 
that Mr. Huang be “walled off” from 
China issues smce he had no need for 
that information in his job assignment. 


ton 

was 


's approval. Although the public 
s paying Mr. Berger ro handle for- 


eign affairs, he regularly participated 
in weekly White' House campaign 

public 


Despite these qualms. Mr. Huang was 


not only placed in a sensitive Com- 
merce post but was given access to 
intelligence information after a back- 
ground check that failed to examine his 
overseas connections. 

On Tuesday the committee learned 
that Sandy Berger, then the deputy 
national secnrity adviser to the pres- 
ident, met with Eric Homng, a Hong 


Kong developer, after Mr. Hotung’s 
wife made a Si 00,000 contribution to 


the Democratic National Committee. 
The DNC chairman. Don Fowler, cited 
the donation in urging that Mr. Berger, 
now the national security adviser, hear 
Mr. Hotung’s views on American for- 


eign policy in Asia. 

Lanny Davis, a White House law- 


yer, categorized that as just another 
routine White House visit Mr. Davis’s 
description is shockingly true, but it 
does not place this particular com- 
promising meeting in the big picture of 
1996 that die committee is assembling 
in mosaic fashion. If anything, that 
picture is more disturbing than it 
seemed a few months ago. making the 
need for campaign finance reform all 
the more urgent. 

In the 1996 campaign the White 
House integrated money-collecting, 
presidential scheduling and policy- 
making. ail with President Bill Clin- 


straxegy meetings. Although the publ 
paid Harold Ickes, the deputy chief of 
staff, to help run the executive branch, 
the committee has established that he 
conducted weekly meetings with the 
DNC financial team. 

In campaign years there is always 
overlap. But what this White House 
seems to have invented was top-to- 
bottom integration of government and 
campaign functions under tight White 
House control. Mr. Davis and his col- 
leagues like 10 maintain that all this was 
perfectly harmless because no Clinton 
administration policy decisions were 
made to satisfy donors. Perhaps not, 
but as the evidence of overlap increases 
the idea of immaculate policy-making 
is getting hard to accept. 

Clearly, the campaign operation 
showed little regard for tide sanctity of 
national security activities. We learned 
earlier this year that Mr. Fowler would 
not take “no” for an answer when he 
wanted to do a favor for a donor. In the 
case of Roger Tamraz, an international 
oilman under criminal indictment in 
Lebanon. Mr. Fowler reached all the 
way into the CLA to help get him an 
invitation to the White House. The 
DNC brushed aside the concerns of 
White House aides about the stream of 
questionable Chinese visitors invited 
to the White House. 

Alone among committee Demo- 
crats. Senator Joseph Lieberman of 
Connecticut acknowledges that he can 
see the picture that is being steadily 
filled in. Mr. Glenn is retiring and 
doesn't seem to care whether his con- 
stituents accept his blinkered analysis 
of the committee’s evidence. But one 
would think that Mr. Torricelli, a fresh- 
man who already has a reputation for 
wanton money-raising, would be wor- 
ried about casting himself as the de- 
fender of the ever more indefensible. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Comment 


For Adult Education 


New and Old in Europe 


Providing all children with the skills 


and knowledge needed for lifelong 
learning is [an] essential first step, but 


complementary measures are needed 
to provide basic education also to the 
millions of youth and adults who have 
not yet acquired this necessary foun- 
dation for their lives. 

Efforts have on the whole been con- 
centrated on expanding primary 
schooling but. with few exceptions, 
have virtually ignored literacy and oth- 
er basic education programs for adults, 
which are seriously underfunded. This 
neglect can have serious consequences. 
A world divided between haves and 
have-nots is neither just nor stable. 

— Jacques Odors, 1 waring in the 
Unesco quarterly EFA 2000 

(Education for All). 


I ft one wax-, the NATO summit re- 
cently held in Madrid marks a turning 
point" in European history. With full- 
fledced membership in the Western al- 
liance for Poland, the Czech Republic 
and Hungary now certain, and the pros- 
pect of timber eastward expansion evid- 
ently only a matter of time, the chasm 
which divided Europe for half a century 
is finally being filled in. Yet in another 
way Madrid symbolized continuity by 
reaffirming American predominance in 
the alliance: that only those three coun- 
tries were invited to join was a decision 
imposed by Washington. 

The era of a Europe whose fate ul- 
timately lies in the hands of overseas 
were, which began in the ruins of 
iVorld War 1, is still by no means over. 

— AVue Zurdier Zcimr.g f Zurich). 


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A Welcome European Shift to Interdependence 

1 ° man- in the world. wlly-oBly. When ■ 


ALZBURG — There is a remark- 
able parallel in attitudes to plans fora 


By Flora Lewis 


governments of a critical lever in man- 
aging their economies, but it does pnta 


single European currency and for ex- 
‘ in of NAT 


pansion of NATO. Ostensibly the two 
attitudes are in no way linked, but it is 
strikingly predictable that people who 
oppose one are likely to oppose the 
otter, and the same with those in favor. 

This suggests an underlying bond, 
which I am becoming convinced has to 
do with an assessment of history, a 
basic philosophical outlook. 

For all the pompous statements of 
achievement at the Madrid NATO 
summit this month and the pretense of 
the Amsterdam European union sum- 
mit, which inevitably invite cynicism, 
these two projects do signal a profound 
and unprecedented change in foe life of 
Europe and North America, compa- 
rable to the momentous decisions taken 
in the early years after World War II. 

The fundamentals are not much dis- 
cussed At a well attended conference 
here of the World Economic Forum’s 
regional meeting on Central and East- 


everything, but without it there’s noth- 
ing else.” And the participant added, 
for moneta 



era Europe, the implications were ar- 
’etail. 


gued in much de 

One German participant did offer a 
late Coan< 


quote from the 
Brandt, who said. 


iBncellor Willy 
“Peace isn’t 


“The same is true for monetary sta- 
bility.” But otherwise, the shape of 
trees to contemplate in implementing 
the new course obscured the forest. 

In terms .of NATO, it is true that 
never before has a system of collective 
security in Europe really worked. 

Originally, NATO was a form of 
collective security but organized to as- 
sure a balance of power. When that 
broke down, as a balance of power 
always does if only because myriad 
change is inevitable, the meaning of 
NATO was necessarily transformed. 

It is i d le to say that it should best be 
kept as the robust, single-purpose al- 
liance it started out to be. For that, ir 
would have to find or invent a powerful, 
centralized new enemy. No one wants 
that, a n d instability or terrorism or the 
other menaces are real but diffuse. 

Something similar is true forfoeeuro. 
A single currency, beyond the control of 
a single organized political power, 
which die European Union is not going 
to be in die foreseeable future, deprives 


it is not surprising thar a lot of peopte 
back away from what they consider the 

risks of such great change. 

They know what is, and while there 
is much they don’t like about the status 
quo, they can see « and.smefl it and 
think tbev can coant on it. But they do 
not consider the risks of failing to 
change as nations evolve. 


ing the world, willy-nilly. When we 
can send a gadget to poke around Mars 
and tdl us what it’s made of, there is 
something incongruous about saying 
we don’t dare tamper with the way 
states are used bo dealiag.wifo each 
other in order to extend their peoples' 
safety and capacity to produce. 

Nor can anyone guarantee that die 


The wreckage of those who thought 
they could make 


the world stand still 
litters historv. But history is adorned 
with the achievements of those who 
decided that die time was ripe to try 
something more than what exists. 

Of coarse, a few more countries in 
NATO now and a few more than that 
early in the next century is not the end 
of foe road for European security. Nor 
will foe euro of itself transform foe 
European Union into so effective 
power. Bat they are logical steps lead- 
ing in foe direction already well 
launched toward creating new systems 
to assure peace and economic vitality. 

And they are in die direction of in- 
terdependence that technology is tak- 


rneam to address — doraioeering and . 
dangerous nationalisms, obstacles to 
productivity and commerce. .■ 

For my part, f think it is much better 
to strive than to quaver, as the naysayers ; 
seem to feel more comfortable doing. 

It is wefl to take a step at a time, » 
prepare with utmost care, asthe space 
adventurers do. The past cannot be un- 
done. but tomorrow's history is oms to 
make, if we choose. That perception 
forms foe hidden link between these two. 
great initiati ves. They need to be de- 
bateri in detail Theywillaffect foe daQy 
lives erf a great many people and. if they 
succeed, inspire others in others parts of 
foe world. As with all major change, 
they will cause some short-term pain. 
But foe longer term is exhilarating. 

<2 Flora Lewis. 







Corruption as a Way of Life — but Indonesia Can’t Afford It 


-M L • 


J akarta — WelL some- 
body has to be first. Unfor- 
tunately for Indonesia, it’s In- 
donesia — regularly rated the 
most corrupt country in Asia. 

A friend in Jakarta tells me 
corruption runs so deep here that 
“they actually give you a re- 
ceipt for your bribes — really. ” 
He gets his immigration papers 
renewed each year. “I pay foe 
bribe and get a receipt The ac- 
countants in my office want 
documentation, and the official 
I pay off provides it” 

Sadly, bribes or cronyism 
have come to infect virtually 
every economic interaction in 
this country, whether it is build- 
ing a bridge or getting a job. 

The tone is set from the top. 
President Suharto’s family 
owns a slice of virtually every 
major Indonesian industry — 
airlines, television stations, 
power plants, toll roads, tele- 
phones, even a national auto 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


production project protected by 
special tariffs. No wonder a lo- 
cal joke has it that foe Suhartos 
have everything — except a 
sense of shame. 

An Indonesian writer says his 
son Died to renew his driver's 
license foe other day but found 
it impossible to do it legally 
because there were so many 
middlemen in front of the 
counter offering to “expedite” 
the transaction. 

The government wants to de- 
regulate foe economy but can’t 
because so many bureaucrats 
depend on payoffs for applying. 


Why so much corruption? 

* * feudal 


Partly it’s a legacy of the 


power system of Indonesia. 
Partly it’s the transition here 


from a more centrally controlled 
economy to a free-maricei one, 
which creates all sorts of pos- 
sibilities for officials to demand 
bribes from a burgeoning pri- 
vate sector, where wages for ex- 
ceed those in government. 

At foe civil servant level, cor- 
ruption is an ad hoc safety net 
for the poor. The driver of the 
“Free Inter-Terminal Airport 
Shuttle” bus scrawled a sign 
above his seat that said “4900 


gans. Mr. Suharto has always 
p racti c ed sound macroeconom- 
ics. so Indonesia has a 15 per- 
cent growth rate, and almost no 
inflati on or budget deficit. 

But foe termites of corruption 
are busy eating away the foun- 
dations. Indonesia’s natural re- 
sources will not last forever. 
And recent statistics show that 
its competitive edge in low- 
wage figh t manufactured ex- 
ports is being eroded by even 
lower-wage Vietnam. Eastern 
Europe, Mexico and China. 

Indonesia will have to move 


non that while foe country has 
been growing rapidly, growth U 
not being shared fairly at. all, 
and this is slowly eroding the 
legitimacy of the regime. As 
long as foe good times roll and 
the government can keep rais- 
ing the minimum wage, anger 
w5i be containable. But when 
growth eventually slows, and 


if 

•Hi ~ 


••a 


y .. 1 






some real unemployment bites. 

rith its shrunken 


or ignoring, regulations, 
s ha 


Indonesians have a saying: If 
your neighbor takes your goat, 
whatever you do don't take him 
to court, because by the time 
you get done paying off the po- 
lice and the judges you will end 
up losing your cow as well. 


rupiah' ’ ($21, which he pointed 
lishly 1 ‘ 


out to me when 1 foolishly tried 
to get off without paying. 

For now , Indonesia's great 
natural resources (oil, forests, 
mining) make up for many in- 
efficiencies that corruption 
brings. Amid all the shenani- 


up to more knowledge-intens- 
ive, value-added industries and 
services. It win not be able to 
attract enough higher-tech in- 
dustries to provide a higher stan- 
dard of living for its 200 milfion 
people wifo corruption, dysfunc- 
tional conns, domestic mono- 
polies and a lack of competitive 
bidding for major projects. 

There is a widening percep- 


the regime, wii 
legitimacy, will have a hard 

rim e- managin g foe downturn. 

Thar is foe real long-term 
threat to stability. You can see a w 
hint of it in foe number of gov-*^ 
eminent police stations torched 
in recent pre-election rioting. 

Indonesia has a lot going for 
h — bountiful resources, a rea- 
sonably educated population 
and virtually no brain drain. Bur 
it will never be all it can be, let 
alone all it will need to be. with- 
out a sense of shame at the top. 

The Sew York Times. 


. . 

iJfiSU"'- 

s »*;■" 

* r.v 

-jai-i- 

if- " 

s i-e •.fed 
;Ja- jNV . ' ; 


; r.o 


: -err 
.~c 


Let’s Have an Anti-Bribery Convention That Really Works 






.stair : 

:c*x: L 


W ASHINGTON — Nego- 
tiations are under way in 
Paris on an international con- 
vention to outlaw bribery of 'for- 
eign government officials in or- 
der to get business. The an- 
nouncement at foe end of May 
that the 29 members of foe 
OECD had agreed to negotiate 
was greeted with such acclaim 
that it could seem everything 
was over but the celebration. 
That is far from true. It will be a 
long time, if ever, before the 
Champagne is poured. 

The fact is that nothing has 
been agreed upon but that there 


By Seth GoMschlager and Stanley J. Marcuss 


will be negotiations, which now 
are in their earliest stages. It is 
in the details that the difference 
lies berween a meaningful 
agreement and one that is 
merely window dressing. 

Twenty years ago, foe United 
Slates outlawed international 
bribery by adopting foe Foreign 
Corrupt Ihuctices Act. Ir imposes 
stiff criminal penalties on Amer- 
ican companies that bribe for- 
eign government officials to get 
business, or that fail to maintain 
internal controls and accounting 


systems that deter employees 
funds to fi 


from creating slush 
nance company bribes. 

Other countries have failed to 
follow foe U.S. example. The 
upshot js that U.S. companies 
by some estimates are losing 
billions of dollars in contracts to 
foreign competitors who see 
bribery as nothing more than a 
cost of doing business. 

Getting foe Foreign Corrupt 
Practices Act on the books was 
no easy task. It took several 
years to get foe first version 


Opposition Chores in Taiwan 


T AIPEI — Hong Kong’s 
handover appears to have 
raised Beijing's hopes that 
Taiwan's rerum to the main- 
land will come sooner rather 
than later. Vet Taiwan's op- 
position Democratic Progres- 
sive Parry, which favors in- 
dependence. sees itself on u 
roll that may propel it to vic- 
tory in national elections. 

The first step is county mag- 
istrate and city mayor elections 
in December. The DPP now- 
controls cities and counties 
with half of Taiwan’s popu- 
lation. Most analysis believe 
that it will increase its standing 
at this key local level. 

Should the party go on lo 
win the legislature or pres- 
idency. thaf would be deeply 
troubling to China. Hard-line 
elements in Beijing, including 
the military, would probably 
argue that the time had come 
to renew military pressure on 
Taiwan to prevent a formal 
declaration of independence. 

So far. foe DPP does not 
appear to have given much se- 
rious thought to its future deal- 
ings with China. It should. 

DPP commentators mod- 
estly attribute their improving 
prospects more to the weak- 
ness of the ruling Nationalist 
ram. foe Kuumintang. than to 
DPP strength. More than any- 
thing. the KMT suffers from 
an image of corruption and 
money politics. By contrast. 
DPP ’ local administrators, 
who tend to be more idealistic, 
have often gained reputations 
for clean government, or at 
least avoided graft chorees. In 
a recent poll, foe DPP for the 
first time surpassed the KMT 
in overall support. 

A new law and order issue 
also hurts the KMT. The pub- 
lic holds ir responsible be- 
cause foe parly controls the 
central government, which 
has prime authority for fight- 
ing crime. The kidnap and 
murder of a )2-vear-t»Jd in 


Bv David G. Brown 


moderate. But the DPP has not 
dissociated itself from the pro- 


April prompted big demon- 
strations in Taipei calling for 
President Lee Teng-hui to ac- 
knowledge the KMT’s fail- 
ures in combating crime, and 
for the resignation of Prime 
Minister Lien Chan. These 
protests were organized by 
private groups, but the DPP 
was the political beneficiary. 

Superior organization is 
also reckoned to be a DPP 
strength. Even KMT leaders 
envy ihe DPP’s ability to find 
popular candidates, such as 
Mayor Chen Shui-bian of 
Taipei, who is only one of the 
incumbents whom ihe ruling 
party sees no real chance of 
beating. The DPP is also cred- 
ited with being better ahle to 
unite its factions behind can- 
didates once they are chosen. 

So confident are DPP mem- 
bers about prospects in Decem- 
ber that they are planning 
ahead to the legislative elec- 
tions scheduled for 1998 and 
the presidential poll in 2000. 

But DPP members adntii 
that there is still broad public 
reluctance to give the party 
control of national affairs, for 
fear that us pro- independence 
stance would provoke a con- 
frontation with China. This 
public reluctance is a major 
obstacle to the party's hopes 
of eventually winning foe 
presidency. 

So DPP officials have been 
playing down the indepen- 
dence issue, recognizing that 
it hurt their candidate in foe 
1996 presidential election. 
Mayor Chen, whom many 
consider likely to be the 
party’s next presidential can- 
didate. has studiously avoided 
the independence issue and 
focused on local concerns. 

The DPP hopes that the 
founding of ihe new Taiwan 
Independence Pany. TIP. in 
} 9% « ill help u appear more 


independence stance foal is so 
anathema to China. This was 


shown most recently by its co- 
sponsorship wifo Ihe TIP and 
other pro-independence orga- 
nizations of a “Say No to 
China’’ rally on June 2 S. 

The promising electoral 
prospects arc altering foe 
DPP’s position on constitu- 
tional reform. The party 
prefers a shift to a presidential 
system, but has in the past 
strongly supported the legis- 
lature’s role in approving the 
nomination of the prime min- 
ister under Taiwan's present 
system. Rethinking the issue 
from foe perspective of a po- 
tential ruling pany. it now in- 
dicates (hat ir can accept rhe 
KMT’s proposal to end the 
legislature’s right to approve 
the prime minister. DPP aides 
say Taiwan will need a strong 
president to deal with China. 

The shift from opposition to 
governing would present 
many challenges. To minim- 
ize future risks for Taiwan, foe 
party needs to do two things. 

First, it should make hard 
decisions about what ns main- 
land policies would be in of- 
fice. It should spell out a po- 
sition which makes clear that a 
DPP government would not 
pursue independence. Doing 
that would be in the party’s 
interest, given prevailing pub- 
lic doubts about tile wisdom of 
seeking independence. Bui cla- 
rifying the point will certainly 
alicnaic some supporters. 

Second, the DPP must de- 
velop channels for informal 
communication with China. 
Such channels are all but 


nonexistent now. 


The writer, a fanner l.' S 
Jiplnnitii who is a mvinv i/.i- 
Miiime at the Asm Pacifn 
/'» */i r y Center in ll< islunginn, 
i minihuiCil this ■ ( unman ft* 
the He rah! Tribune. 


enacted in 1977. and another 1 1 
difficnlt.years for Congress to 
adopt amendments to correct 
the defects of the original act. 

The version of foe law that 
emerged in 1988 is a highly 
detailed statute which attempts 
to answer such important ques- 
tions as who is a foreign gov- 
ernment official, what consti- 
tutes a bribe, whether com- 
panies should be responsible for 
commission agents who bribe in 
order to deliver deals, and the 
circumstances in which pay. 
ments to expedite routine gov- 
ernmental action, such as get- 
ting permits or papers pro- 
cessed. should be permitted. 

In a world in which a gov- 
ernment official could be a min- 
ister of commerce, foe bead of 
the state-ow ned airline or the 
leader of the opposition party. 


and in which finding ingenious 


ways of greasing palms to get 
things done may be an ingrained 
part of foe culture, it is important 
that a criminal statute leave no 
ambiguity as to w ho is covered 
ami what is or » not permined. 

The task for negotiators in 
Paris is daunting. Twenty-nine 
countries with different systems 
of law and culture must agree on 
a convention that they can sub- 
mit to their legislatures 

Recent history at the OECD 
shows that most countries will 
not budge as long as they can 
get away with doing nothing. 
More than a year ago. OECD 
member countries committed 
themselves ro eliminate tax de- 
ductions for bribes. Little has 
happened since. The United 
States remains the only major 
country chat denies its compa- 
nies foe ability to write off 
bribes on their lax returns. 


Negotiators now have three 
different proposals : on their 
desks: one draftedby foe United 
States, another by foe French 
and Germans and a third by the 
OECD staff. A tendency to ac- 
cept foe lowest common de- 
nominator win arise in order to 
reconcile differences among foe 
proposals. Politically, there will 
be pressure co get whatever can 
be had so that an appearance of 
progress in the fight against , 
bribery can be maintained. v 

la fact, though, no agreement 
may be better than a flawed 
agreement. 

The U.S. act has two power- 
ful disincentives to bribery that 
none of the proposals to be con- 
sidered at foe OECD contains. 
One is a requirement that 
companies keep books and re- 
cords that accurately and fairly 
reflect their transactions. The 
other is that they have systems 
of internal accounting controls 
that provide reasonable assur- 
ances that management's in- 
structions are being earned out. 

These requirements give foe 








U.S. auditingprofession power- 
ful tools for ferreting Out sin: 


ferreting out slush 
funds for bribes, and stiffen the 
spines of accountants in de- 
manding explanations for am- 
biguous accounting entries. 


-'•iif:,. 


Ur GoldscMaqer is a ini yer 
based in Paris. Mr. Marcuss. a 
lawyer based in Washington. 
vi .75 counsel to the relevant Sen- 
ate snhi nnmurtec w hen the For- 
eign Corrupt Practices .-ti t wax 
adopted. Both work with a co- 
alition of L'.S. companies trying 
to secure international cooper- 
ation in the fight against bribery. 
They contributed this comment 
to The Washington Post. 








IX OC R PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1097: Off for the Pok* 


STOCKHOLM — As the ufod 
conditions were more favorable. 
Mr. Andrec and his companions 
left in (heir balloon for foe North 
Pole. The balloon was christened 
the Eagle. Mr. Andree. foe 
Swedish engineer and explorer, 
proposes to attempt to reach foe 
Pole by taking advantage of a 
southerly w ind He nude the at- 
tempt Iasi year, but after waiting 
in vain for twenty -one days for a 
favorable wind, he postponed his 
voyage until this year. 


soKUkv which they had taken 
out was cancelled after they were a . 
on foe high seas, foe company 
stating that the full perils of the 
tnp were not realised when the 
insurance was written. 


1947? American Films 


1922: Gold Plan Fails 


NEW YORK — The reuse gerfd- 
xrekers from Katonah. New 
York, who started last month tc» 
rediscover a river in the Belgian 
Congo, the bed of which “is 
paved »i(h cold nuggets." arc 
returning from Europe empty- 
handed. They were unable to ob- 
tain a concession from the Bel- 
gian Government, and the in- 


PARJS Enc Johnston, pres- 
ident of Ihe Motion Picture As- 
sociation of America, said that 
foe United Stales should “help 
Europe buck into production, 
rather than make any country 
foe recipient of international 
dob.” He said American pro- 
duction had doubled, while pro- 
duction of foe rest of foe world 
had fallen 50 to 80 per cent 
>mee before the war. He de- 
plored foe restrictions against 
the showing of American' films 
in many parts of the world, say- 
ing that foe American motion 
picture industry^ is still the only 
link between America and some 
of the countries of the world like 
Poland and Czechoslovakia. 







'^pendoii,. 

fS^vori d . 
cm*nd agad ; Vr.,11. 

^tang mconi'^^^ 
*® don'* dire u ° Uj bbr!' 1 ^ 
are used 

°*ter m order to-v^ ,n 2 w' 

^£ 1 ^L C ^> S^tel 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1997 

OPINION /LETTERS 


PAGE 9 


Speaking Out About Persistent, Subtle Racism 


•■fu™ anacaoacm " in ^irrJ c 
__?°r «« amone o u E?0 

“* systems is ih e . ^‘•“Iice ,1 
resolve the t 

«> address ^ 

nation -• m lnet iiS 
praJuctiv!^ and1r";^ v <Sj : 
Fcr my pan. i ^ *' 
tosmve than ro a ;;;• J * «-■ ir, tih . 

««» tof«2 mors 
. ft L ' ’well ro take ■■ " 

prepare with urmoVJ^f 

advexaure^ do. The ^ ? Js "** 

dow, but iorr:orr.-. v ■"" t 
•Jake, tf «e ch^-' ^ 4’ 

forms the hidden 1- r ■ . u J* a !W 
ar«iai inramves KJ, ' 

^ m derail Tv?r> ^ ^ 
ifves ora great man . nl .fi** 1 ** 
saceeed, inspire o;'n'-‘ ""■ r C **U. 
** world As wiih’.h 
Urey will cause somr^:'^ ;,| f- 
Bcr she longer r« !' : - , '’\ , ' tc nni-' 
- . _• •••'=‘-n ! iar aiais f 


W ASHINGTON — This 
conversation on race 
that President Bill Clinton 
wants us Americans to have 
may be a little tougher than 
some of us thought. 


By William Raspberry 


attempt ro describe the angst 
some of us feel at times of 
national celebrations. I 
likened America to a series of 


I've been having a son of ethnic, racial and religious is- 
off-and-on conversation on lands whose inhabitants, over 
race in this column for three time, become less islanders 


decades now, and ... 

Weil, let me start at the be- 


and more citizens of the main- 
land. Americanization, I sug- 


ginning. 1 wrote a Fourth of gested, is the process of de- 
July column in which I talked populating those islands until, 
about the s rid -existing barriers finally, they exist only as re- 
that keep some black Amer- treats for such special occa- 
icans from feeling fully ac- sions as St. Patrick's Day or 
cepted by die white-dominated Oktoberfest. 
society. It wasn’t just action- Among the points I had 
able discrimination or overt hoped to make was that de- 
racism I had in mind but what population requires mutual- 
the laie Red Heffner, a civil ity. Ethnics may decide to 


rights booster, once described 
as sometimes “feeling like a 
bastard at a family reunion. ' * 

I thought that might have 
been a problem for some 
readers, ft apparently wasn't. 
What was a problem was my 


venture from the limiting 
comfort of their islands, but 


pose of an analogy is to com- 
municate, and if min e doesn't 
communicate. I’m willing to 
drop it. 

But I would like to try 
again to make the point that so 
many of my readers missed 
— especially those who took 
issue with my conclusion that 
real integration is “a question 
only white people can an- 
swer.” 

One gentleman quoted Fre- 
derick Douglass: "When we 
are noted for enterprise, in- 
dustry and success, we shall 
no longer have any trouble in 
the matter of civil and polit- 
ical rights." Another was 
rather less subtle: 

"Give me a break You 


they cannor mandate their can be an American and be an 


own acceptance. 

I won't defend the island 
analogy, or spend much more 


individual at the same time. It 
is sad that blacks can’t decide 
what to be called (Negro, 


time explaining it. The pur- colored, black, brown. Afro 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Americans'), whether to be 
‘equal’ or ’special.’ minority 
or included, to move in or live 
in ethnic communities." 

Was Douglass right? It 
seems clear enough to me that 

No matter how 
voelboff or 
educated, some 
American blacks 
still feel ‘like a 
bastard at a 
family reunion / 

“enterprise, industry and 
success" can take us a long 
way and are plainly worth 
pursuing. But ir seems 
equally obvious that there 
have always been enterpris- 
ing and industrious Americ- 


them black — who have been 
constrained to remain on their 
ethnic islands. 

I have some sympathy for 
the man who is exasperated at 
the frequency with which we 
change what we wish to be 
called. But can be truly be- 
lieve that it is within the 
power of black Americans 
(that it was, at an earlier time, 
within the power of Jewish or 
Japanese Americans) to de- 
cide whether they w ill be 
“equal” or “special,” 
minority or included? 

Does he believe, as several 
readers suggested, that the 
question ofinclusion/exclu- 
sion turns principally on the 
behavior, preparation and at- 
titude of blacks and that it is, 
therefore, a question blacks 
must answer? 

The few minutes I’ve just 
spent trying to verify that Dou- 
glass quote turned up a fistful 


The ‘Prom Mom’ Phenomenon 
Predates Our Libertine Age 


B OSTON — My friend drops the news- 
paper stony on my desk with a crisp 
announcement: “Well, here’s another one 
for you." 

“Another what?" I ask without looking 
up. 

“Another ‘prom mom,' " he says 
grimly, in the generic language usually re- 
served for headline writers. 

I pick up the paper and see another New 
Jersey dateline, another teenage mother, 

MEANWHILE^^” 


Can’t Afford), 


alu jy > :ier. ’ 
■zvnorn- S-cn 
T.5 per- net 
most no ini : 
'it- Leg.::* 

rrewjoa iorg , 
ie foun- :he 

*■-. ■ -i 

forever, r. ... ■ 
C-v- lhii urev. 

IE iOV. - vTlIT.C 

red ev- ;he :• 
J? svec i : 
Eastern : 

X? nxnr : 

r-iaisiK- r._r.: : 
nes- ,ir.d ernn :: 
afele :r. rex 
ess .is- ir.: 
xr star.- :: — : 
•nullMG M’.ri' 
k*Td2C- V 

rr*trv> •* .=. 
‘JXTU-ve . r.-: 
n*. ;'-j: j 

perccr- 


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. • •• • Z-lTi Ji 
"i t; 


Helping Africa geria, Kenya. Libya. Sudan. 

1 ° Somalia, Gabon and so on. 

Every few years, senior claiming that “no-nonsense. 
World Bank or United Na- accountable pragmatism is 
tions officials announce that now the rule" is not just a 
Africa is on the verge of eco- misstatement but outright ri- 
nomic success, and that sound diculous. 
economic policies, intro- While the Ivory Coast, 
duced or imposed by inter- Ghana, Uganda and South 
national financial institu- Africa are examples of recent 
tions, should be credited. “A political and economic stabil- 
New Africa Is Generating iiy, it is rather premature, to 
Success and Hope" (Opin- say the least, to take these as 
ion, June 21, by Callisto Ma- signs of African political and 
dervo and Jean-Louis Sarhib) economic revival, 
is a case in point Not only is political and 

It does not matter that some economic progress fragile, 
of their predecessors wrote but the basic social, political 
similar articles 20 years ago, and economic ills of the con- 
lauding economic policies tinent have not been ad- 
launched in Zaire and other dressed. So-called sound eco- 
West African nations — nomic policies are not going 
which became basket cases to redress historical, cultural 
within a short period of time, and ethnic injustices, nor is 
Other such articles lauded continuous interference (or 
the now-discredited “struc- involvement) by former co- 
tural adjustment" economic lonial powers — or. for that 


cessed foods and consumer- 
good imports on them, which 
makes their economies un- 
sustainable and essentially 
dependent on Western coun- 
tries. 

Hope for the future will rise 
when non-Africans stop sup- 
porting regimes of their 
choice and let Africans de- 
velop their culmres. econo- 
mies. and political and social 
systems not as images of 
Western concepts but as re- 
flections of the real needs of 
the people of Africa. 


ans — by no means all of of other Douglass quotes I 

could use to advantage — in- 
^ c j ud ijjg plaint that “in all 

die relations of life and death, 

we are met by the color line." 

My purpose, though, is nor to 
acts of the despots who rule win a debate but to advance 
much of the continent. mutual understanding. 

ERNST G. FRANKEL. Let me menrion again that 
Cambridge, TV special that the news- 
Ma&sachu setts. caster Tom Brokaw recently 

- . did on the Chicago suburb of 

The writer, a professor at Matteson . -p* s f orv , umlsu . 

the Massachusetts Institute of ^ weU , u was of black 
Technology, worked in Afric a c^go^, seeking a better 
on development projec ts for ^ ^^e^and their 
more than 2} years. fami)ifs moviDg f omtriy 

white suburbs. These were 

China’s Hinterlands pe°P ,e with education, social 

graces and money. They 
Regarding “ China’s Eco- could, I am sure, have found 


The trillion dollars and but They're Working" (Opin- 
more of development “aid” ion. July 3} by Pieter Bot - 


nomic Reforms Are Gradual nice homes in Chicago's best 
but They're Working" (Opin- majority-black neighbor- 


Real I v Works 


policies developed by the 
world Bank about 10 years 
ago, which similarly failed to 
deliver, practically all the 
countries supposed to have 
benefited from structural ad- 
justments fell prey to eco- 


nomic policies are not going 
to redress historical, cultural 
and ethnic injustices, nor is 
continuous interference (or 
involvement) by former co- 
lonial powers — or. for that 
matter. Western or Commu- 
nist do-gooders — going to 


dumped onto Africa during 
the past 20 years has been 
largely wasted and. in most 
cases, continues to be wasted. 
The average per capita in- 
come in Africa in real terms 
has not improved and Afri- 
cans are by and large not only 
worse off and more indebted 
today but also less free. 

Let us stop interfering in 


telier: 

Mr. Bottelier correctly as- 


hoods. 

But they wanted to leave 
their ethnic island and lay full 


serts that economic reforms claim ro the America we all 
have transformed China, but hope one day to see. 


another infant bom and gruesomely dis- 
posed of in a bathroom. 

This time the 16-year-old is not at a prom 
but at a bus terminal on an Atlantic City tour 
of casinos. What shall we call hen Casino 
Mom? 

Hits time the girl is not a local high 
school student but a Dominican sent to New 
York to stay with family friends. This time, 
most importantly, the 6-pound, 10-ounce r . , . , 

baby delivered and abandoned in a toilet •*/! Colonial America? mor€ 
bowl is not yet dead and the charges are not women were executed 
yet murder. , . . . _ 

My friend knows that I have been col- under infanticide laws 
leering these stories — some eight of them j.. 

over the past year and a half. Not out of than under any Other* 

morbid tabloid’ curiosity, but with the hope 

that some sense will emerge from this access to sex education, to birth control 
senselessness. and abortion, when pregnant teenagers 

A college freshman gives birth secret- go to school and single mothers raise chil- 
ively with her boyfriend. dren in the limelight, shame survives. In- 

The baby of a teenage girl is found in her deed, - it's making a much applauded 
grandfather’s garage. A 1 7-year-old ’s new- comeback. 

born is discovered^ her gym bag. And of It isn’t shamelessness, but shame and its 
course, there is the New Jersey “prom cousins guilt, dread and desperation that run 
mom,” who left the dance floor to go into beneath the refusal of some girls to ac- 
labor, dropped the baby in die trash and knowledge their pregnancy, their labor, 
returned. their newborn. Ir is the psyche's ability to 

These are pregnancies that went un- block out reality — what we call "deni- 
noticed and unacloiowledged even in their aL” 

last months, even in prom gowns. These are One of the few who have actually studied 

girls who went through labor and delivery "prom moms" accused of infanticide, 
on their own. These are newborns, dead or Dr. Margaret Spinelli of Columbia med- 


By Ellen Goodman 

s the news- issue." Or that they treat it as a libertine 
'ich a crisp consequence. 

mother one Three hundred years ago, at the height of 
Puritan rule in Massachusetts, the elders 
sut looking feared a rash of infanticides. In 1692 they 
passed a law making it a capital crime for 
he says any “lewd woman" to conceal "the death 
usually re- of a bastard child." 

“Whereas," wrote the lawmakers, 
lOtherNew “many lewd women that have been De- 
ge mother, livened of Bastard Children, to Avoid their 
Shame and to escape Punishment, do 
secretly Bury or Conceal die Death of their 

Children," any unmarried woman whobur- 

omely dis- ied a newborn was presumed guilty of in- 
fanticide unless a witness said the child was 
)t at a prom born dead In colonial America, more worn- 
ic City tour en were executed under such laws than 
ten Casino under any other. 

Perhaps the real wonder isn’t that we 
local high have strayed so far from our roots, but that 
«nttoNew we haven’t- In today's era of presumed 


achieve lasting resolution of their affairs and propping up 
th? continent’s ills. Hope in unrepresentative regimes. 


nomic demise and political ran Africa or investment/aid 
turmoil. Somalia was a shin- commitments by the Paris 

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jng example in the 1980s, as 
were Liberia and Sierra Le- 
one. as well as others later in 
the decade. 

As late as 1991, die di- 
rector of the International 
Monetary Fund contended 
that IMF-imposed reforms in 
Zaire were producing posi- 
tive real growth. 

While Callisto Madavo 
and Jean-Louis Sarbib, World 
Bank vice presidents, recog- 
nize in their article that recent 
events in Zaire, Congo and 
Sierra Leone were disastrous, 
they claim that significant im- 
provements in political sta- 
bility and a shift to democracy 
have underpinned social 
peace in much of Africa. With 
more than half of Africans 
ruled by military dictator- 
ships or other repressive or 
nonrepresentative govern- 
ments, such as those of Ni- 


Leners iniended for pub- 
lication should be addressed 
"Letters to the Editor” and 
contain the writer's signature, 
name andfulladdress. Letters 
should be brief and are sub- 
ject to editing. We caiuiot be 
responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


the future is not built by a new And, most important, let us 
U.S. policy to promote trade encourage and facilitate intra- 
and investment in sub-Saha- African trade, 
ran Africa or investraent/aid Had Africa been enconr- 
commitments by the Paris aged to process its own re- 
Club, nor by forgiveness of sources and maximize intra- 


millions of dollars worth of African trade, the continent’s 


debt. 

Hope is built by allowing 
Africans to rule themselves, 
by encouraging them to trade 
with each other instead of ex- 
porting all their valuable raw 
resources to Western coun- 
tries and then dumping pro- 


coan tries might today be in 
the forefront of developing 
nations. Instead we continue 
economic colonialism and 
handouts, which together do 
more to undermine represen- 
tative nation- and institution- 
building in Africa than all the 


the benefits hardly extend to 
China's minorities. 

In a two-month trip 
through rural inner Mongolia, 
Tibet and Xinjiang Uygur, I 
found that the for-profit 
People's Liberation Army ex- 
erts a medieval force over its 
fiefdoms. Witness a Tibetan 
farming population often 
pressed into road gangs; riot 
troops with submachine 
guns guarding government 
installations from the Uygurs 
and Kazaks; truck drivers 
forced to transport military 
supplies free of charge, and 
soon. 

Little wonder that the 
concept of the rule of law 
seems most alien in China's 
borderlands. 

DOUGLAS KREMER. 

Zurich. 


As it turned out, their uew 
neighbors seemed less inter- 
ested in the enterprise, in- 
dustry' and success of the- 
newcomers than in their col- 
or. There seems no doubt that 
Matteson will soon become 
virtually an all-black (albeit 
affluent) community and that 
the black families’ quest for 
integration will be frustrated. 

My complaining readers 
would have understood in- 
stantly if the rebuff had been 
enforced by burning crosses 
or Klan marches rather than 
by decent, family loving, 
likable white people who, 
nonetheless, couldn't wait to ( 
move to a yet more distant 
suburb. 

Isn’t this worth talking 
about? 

The Washineioii Pan. I 


alive, but all abandoned. And there are 
charges — murder, manslaughter, aban- 
donment — all duly filed 


ical school, describes them as "very cut 
off." So cut off. so isolated, so emotion- 
ally disconnected that when they went 


My friend has a cryptic explanation for into labor, they thought it was something 
these stories: evil. He offers ir to me again, they ate. 


in a preemptive strike against my attempt 
to understand these mothers and accused 
murderers. 

He is among the outraged who count the 
horror tales as proof of~ a throwaway so- 
ciety. The op-ed pages are replete with 
those who describe the “prom moms" as 
“logical" extensions of a sexually edu- 
cated and liberated pro-choice and planned 
parenthood shamelessness. 

But I have been a journalist too long to 
believe that eight stories make a trend I've 
been at it too long to think that something is 
new because it has happened now in a 
suburb. 

Gloria Feldt, the president of Planned 
Parenthood who has become fodder for the 
“prom mom” media mill, finds it "be- 
wildering that people think this is a new 


Does that bewilder us? Dr. Spinelli says, 
“It is bewildering. That's why we should 
give more credence to psychopathology 
than a criminal act." Indeed most countries 
now send such women to treatment, not to 
the gallows. 

My friend does not want to hear me say 
that there is a difference between evil and 
illness, that understanding is not forgiving. 
I too believe that there are evil acts, people 
who just kill. But my “prom mom" file 
doesn't read like that. 

It’s filled with young life stories, 
each painful, tragic, different Today I 
add another with a New Jersey dateline. I 
wait for the details with the absolute 
certainty that lives are never as simple 
as sermons. 

The Boston Globe. 



BOOKS 


MARTHA STEWART 
Just Desserts: 

The Unauthorized 
Biography 

By Jerry Oppenhcimer 
illustrated. 399 pages. $24. 
William Morrow & Co. 
Reviewed by Janet Maslin 

N OW it can be told: Little 
Martha Stewart ate 
Gulden’s mustard on white 
bread as an after-school 
snack. And back when she 
was Martha Kostyra of Nut- 
ley, New Jersey, the town that 


question, Stewart also spoke 
precociously in shrill movie 
dialogue of the no-wire- 
h angers variety. “That's all 
my mother does, stand in 
front of a hot stove cooking,'' 
the future food and lifestyle 
guru supposedly exclaimed. 
“And what does she have to 
show for it? She works like a 


moved out because he wanted 
to be able to make coffee 
without being watched by a 
film crew. 

Stewart makes an easy tar- 
get, having held out an ideal 
of butter-chum perfection in 
these microwave times. (“I 
really want people to get out 
their sewing machines 


peasant I want more out of again," she once opined. "I 
life, and I'm going to get know we don't have time, but 


icy, new jci^cy, me town uuu heimer calls “a reputable 
Jerry Oppenheimer’s sharp- popular literary rorm," 
clawed biography also iden- flourish. 


city (as the mulch in which 
Stewart's empire grew) have 
sent this unauthorized biog- 
raphy flying out of stores. 
And there’s nor a beach in 
America where such a col- 
orful feat of character assas- 
sination won't be met by at 
least surreptitious interest. 

For if Gppenheimer has 
done dirty work, he has done 
his homework too. He 
presents Stewart as a tireless, 
unscrupulous self-promoter 
who, in creating the corporate 


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43 One UHlon 
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47 Gained a lap 
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26 Local theater, 
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32 Scrooge's 
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37 Trunk Items 

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tifies as the birthplace of Lib- 
rium and Valium, she may 
have preferred Nancy Drew 
books ro ihe classics. She 
once stabbed her brother with 
a pencil. She failed to land the 
clown’s role in a class pro- 
duction of ' ‘The Little Engine 
That Could." 

If Oppenheimer and his 
400-odd sources for "Just 
Desserts" are to be believed, 
which is sometimes an open 


it." just thinlcing about it is a step presents Stewart as a tireless. 

Get it she did. And now get in tbe right direction. ” ) No- unscrupulous self-promoter 
it she does, thanks to an ai- tions like these border so who, in creating the corporate 
mosphere in which this breed closely on satire that a parody omelet that is now Martha 
of biography, which Oppen- of her magazine, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, 
heimer calls “a reputable and Stewart Living, showed how has broken many an egg. 
popular literary form," can homeless people could While going on to tell scan- 
flourish. garden in grocery cans and dalous stories of Stewart's re- 

Tapping into a mother lode, take advantage of shifting cipe plagiarism, her spotty ca- 
of spite, and allowing any sunlight. reer as a Kmart pitenwoman 


has broken many an egg. 
While going on io tell a 


By Alan Truscott 

O NE reason that the teach- 
ing of bridge in Amer- that concluded the season 
ican schools has lagged be- were David Young, Ben 
hind the teaching of chess is Schweitzer and Oppin PaiL 
the lingering Puritan feeling The diagramed deal helped 
that cards are the devil's tick- Young score his victory. He 
ets, leading inevitably to reached a sound six-spade 


anonymous source to unload 
with impunity, he depicts 
Stewart in a Santa’s work- 
shop filled with disgruntled 
elves. They reveal that the 
queen of hand-painted gift 
wrap is actually tormented by 
acute workaholism, insom- 
nia, shady business dealings, 
a family that resents her and 
an abused ex-husband who 


BRIDGE 


sixth, seventh ' and eighth 
graders at the East Side 


O PPENHEIMER, whose 
last book was an equally 


While going on to tell scan- 
dalous stories of Stewart's re- 
cipe plagiarism, her spotty ca- 
reer as a Kman pitenwoman 
and her supposedly nonprofit 
remodeling of an old house 
(she solicited volunteer help, 
made a remodeling video and 
then put ihe place up for sale at 
a substantial markup). Oppen- 


v/ last book was an equally (she solicited volunteer help, 
uncharitable look at Ethel made a remodeling video and 
Kennedy, goes further by also then put ihe place up for sale at 
sniping at Stewart for the kind a substantial markup). Oppen- 
of ambition and tenacity that heimer offers wall-to-wall digs. 
mig ht be lauded in a biog- Stewart, he maintains, threw a 
raphy of Bill Gates. Natur- breakfast tray at her husband on 
ally, her ego, the writer’s Mother's Day. She was spotted 
cruelty and our own compli- at Loe hm a nn ’s soon after her 

father’s funeral. She stole the 
— ^ idea for basket-weave frosting 

chi wedding cake. She spoke 

condescendingly of immigrant 

gardeners and gay waiters. 


Luckily, Young was not 
put to this test. West led a 


Middle SchooL The three club, and the nine won in 
winners of the tournaments dummy. 


But the most damnin» and 
best-substantiated complaints 


ib, and the nine won in are all too aptly homemade, 
mmy. ‘ T don’t think mv mother ever 

Now, the ace and king of thought of me 'as her little 
spades were played, and the girl,’’ says her grown daugh- 


top clubs were led. The club ^ Lexi. "It’s like the movie 
queen was ruffed out, and star with the boyfriend and 


X«i>|HMi>rtwn 9—S 

ONeut York Times/Edited by Will Sheris. 


Solution to Puzzle of July 17 


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gambling. But in modem 
times most bridge is of the 
duplicate variety, with no 
cash involved, and the United 
States is catching up with 
Europe. 

In New York City, the pro- 
gram organized by Barry 


contract by efficient 


South thought he would make 
all the tricks . However, the 
second diamond winner was 


Europe. South hands would make a 

In New York City, the pro- grand slam, but here South 
gram organized by Barry would have been in serious 
Rigal of the Greater New jeopardy if West had led the 
York Bridge Association and unbid heart suit The declarer 


after his strong artificial two- raffed, preventing the over- 
club opening received a pos- trick, 
itive three-diamond response. 

On a good day, die North- « 


by Anita Straus of Library- 
Power was a great success; 
About 3G schools took part in 
die last year. Schools inter- 
ested in participating next 
season should call Anna Za- 
goloff at (212) 7344815. 

One of the busiest bridge 
teachers in. the program is 
Sidney Rosen, who taurfir 
one class to fourth and fifth 
graders at Public School 158 
on the Upper East Side of 
Manhattan, and two others to 


would have taken the ace and 
would no doubt have gone 
down to defeat by playing 
three rounds of trumps ending 
in dummy and attempting to 
cash the top diamonds. 

That would have been very 
unlucky. To add insult to in- 
jury, South would then have 
discovered that he could have 
made the slam by making the 


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nobody knows who he is. 
That’s me." 

The scandal factor was 
already a consideration when 
she proposed her life style 
magazine to Time Warner. 
But the corporate view was 
sanguine. As one of his many 
‘ ‘informed source’ ’ inter- 
viewees tells Oppenheimer: 
“In the end we felt that the 
great American public 
wouldn’t care." 

Janet Maslin is on the staff 
of The New York Times. 


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Pioneer Tourists 


: Trickling Into Iran 

Visitors Are Welcome, Caution Is Key 


By Stephen Kinzer 

iVw >ont 77#W4 Sen-irr 


T EHERAN — It has been many 
centuries since visitors to Persia 
were confidently told "Esfahan 
nesf-e jahan," which means 
"Isfahan is half the world." Anyone 
who has been there, however, can un- 
derstand and almost believe that boast 
The first step into the cavernous Im- 
am Mosque in Isfahan is one of those 
moments for which travelers live and 
die. Surely this is one of the world's 
most magnificent buildings. The portal, 
flanked by two minarets that soar more 
than ISO feet (45 meters) into the air, is 
a sumptuous banquet of dazzling colors, 
omate designs and masterpieces of 
flamboyant calligraphy by Ali Reza Ab- 
bassi, a brilliant artist who' was 
renowned throughout the Muslim 
world. Overhead is a honeycomb of 
tiled niches, studded with stalactites 
decorated in a pattern of tiny white 
flowers against a rich blue ground. 

Inside, cupolas, columns, walls and 
ceilings are covered with exquisite and 
brilliantly colorful tiles, their patterns a 
riot of imagination and fractal intricacy. 
Arching domes in variations of egg and 
onion shapes are elegantly styled, dec- 
orated in shades of blue, white and gold. 


Visitors can easily imagine the awe pil- 
e felt upon arriving here 


grims must have 
three centuries ago. 


the royal square The Imam 
Mosque is the anchor of a vast quad- 
rangle known as the Royal Square, said 
to have once been the largest public 
plaza in the world. Its other grand edi- 
fices are the Mosque of Sheik Lotfollah, 
a smaller but no less astonishing coun- 
terpart to the Imam Mosque, and the Ali 
Qapu Palace, another masterpiece of 
17th-century Islamic architecture and 
design. Royal personages used to watch 
from the palace as polo games, festivals 
and even public executions were staged 
in the square below. Today visitors 
spread picnics among the lawr& and 
fountains, ride horse-drawn carriages 
around the perimeter, and shop in the 
scores of handicraft stores that have 
sprouted in the arcades that once housed 
a great bazaar and trading post. 

One aspect of this complex, however, 
immediately strikes the visitor as odd. 
On the day I visited, my only company 



was a handful of local students and a 
small group of Japanese tourists. Oth- 
erwise the Royal Square, once abustling 
commercial hub and later a powerful 
tourist attraction, was almost sepul- 
chrahy quiet. The reason, of course, is 
that this is Iran. Since the 1979 Islamic 
Revolution, few tourists have dared to 
venture here, among them almost no 
-Americans. 

That is now beginning to change. At 
least two American companies are now 
running tours to Iran, and the recent 
election of a new president. Mohammed 
Khatami, who ran on a platform of 
opening the country to outsiders, sug- 
gests that the trend toward openness wUI 
continue. After too long a pause, Iran is 
welcoming Americans again. 

"Welcome" is actually the right 
word. My trip to several Iranian cities 
and towns in May was free of any un- 
pleasantness. and" Americans I met who 
w ere on a tour reported that they too had 
been received with unreserved friend- 
ship. I heard the phrase ".America very 
good" several limes, and when I jok- 
ingly told my new acquaintances that I 
was from "the great 5atan.” they 
looked dismayed and took pains to as- 
sure me that no one they knew viewed 
the United States that way. 


I NDIVIDUAL tourism is still dif- 
ficult unless you have a friend in 
Iran who will accompany you. so it 
is best to join an organized tour. These 
may be booked through European or 
American travel agencies, which offer 
small group tours. 

Although the United Slates maintains 
a trade embargo against Iran t expanded 
by President Clinton in 1 995 ). it does not 
prohibit travel. Nonetheless, there are no 
diplomatic relations between the two 
countries, which means that there is no 
U.S. Embassy to assist visitors in emer- 
gencies. The Swiss Embassy in Teheran 
maintains an interest section that rep- 
resents the United States, but it does not 
offer a full range of consular services. 

The other constraint that may give 
foreigners pause is the strict behavioral 
code that Iran's ruling mullahs still en- 
force. Visitors may not legally import, 
buy or consume alcohol." Habits that 
might seem harmless elsewhere, such as 
playing cards or holding hands on the 
street. are frowned upon. Women must 
keep their hair covered and wear loose 
ankle-length cloaks over their clothing. 
But women who are "properly" 
dressed may walk freely on the streets, 
alone or in groups. 


For travelers who can adapt to these 
strictures, Iran offers great riches. Is- 
fahan remains the most irresistible of its 
cities and one of the most fascinating 
destinations in the Middle East The 
Imam Mosque and other buildings 
around the Royal Square courtyard are 
only its best-known attractions. Parks, 
bridges, tombs and cemeteries, a 
labyrinthine b nMar and even an Ar- 
menian cathedral combine to reflect die 
scope of past glories. 

Nearly all visitors to Iran arrive in Te- 
heran, which is served by several major 
airlines, including Lufthansa and Turkish 
Airlines, Teheran is a modem and not 
especially attractive city, and aside from 
its bazaar, the main attractions are mu- 
seums. Among them are the archaeolo- 
gical museum, which traces the 7,000 
years of civilizations that have flourished 
in this ancient land; the Abgineh Museum 
of Glass and Ceramics, where a rich col- 
lection of ceramic and crystal objects is on 
display, and the Reza Abbas i Museum, 
whose hoard of gold beakers, bronze jew- 
elry and Islamic art make it perhaps the 
city's most rewarding. 

The glittering crown jewels are ex- 
hibited in the headquarters of the Melli 
Bank. They include a gold belt crafted 
around a 175-carat emerald, a crown set 
with 3380 diamonds, and an 88-pound 
globe inlaid with 51,000 gems. Those 
interested in more recent history may 
visit the mausoleum where the leader of 
the Islamic Revolution, Ayatollah Ruhol- 
lah Khomeini, is buried, and the former 
American Embassy where diplomats 
were taken hostage in 1979 and held for 
444 days. The embassy building is not 
open to the public, but die sight of it can 
soil inspire emotion in Americans. 

Iran’s greatest archaeological site is 
Persepoiis, about 400 miles south of die 
capital near the modern city of Shiraz, 
just over an hour's flight from Teheran. 
It was the seat of a powerful dynasty of 
Zoroastrian kings who ruled this region 
2.500 years ago, and even today its ruins 
convey a sense of royal power. Some of 
the 36 stone columns, which once stood 
60 feet high, remain more or less intact, 
as does the “Gate of All Nations" 
through which envoys from vassal 
states came to pay tribute to Darius the 
Great and his successors. Bas-relief 
panels show scenes of these tributes, 
with scores of figures wailing in line to 
pay homage, each dressed in native cos- 
tume and each bearing a special gift. 
They are a veritable catalogue of ancient 
peoples; Elamites leading a lion. Path- 
ans and Sogdians with camels and an- 
imal pelts. Babylonians with cloth, 
Egyptians with a bull, Armenians with a 
large vase, Assyrians with spears and 
Cificians with omate cups. 


Other Destinations 


Besides the pleasures of discovering 
Persepoiis, visitors may 


Isfahan and 
travel to the lush Caspian coast, to the 
imposing citadel of Bam in the south- 
east, or to the country’s rwo holiest 
cities. Qum and Meshed. Foreigners are 
welcome in both cities, although a 
couple of shrines are dosed to non- 
Muslims. The day I visited Qum, which 
lies 75 miles south of Teheran, happened 
to be during the period when the death of 
Imam Hussein, a seventh -century Shiite 
martyr, was being commemorate d. A 
procession of men and boys dressed in 
black slowly moved toward the gate of 
the city's main shrine, ritually flogging 
themselves as they chanted" hypnotic 
verses commemorating Hussein's sac- 
rifice. It was a potent reminder of the 
spirituality that still survives in Iran. 

English is not widely spoken. Taxis 
are available at the major Teheran hotels 
(about S5 for a single destination within 
Teheran if the trip takes less than an 
hour), and drivers are usually willing to 
take passengers to outlying cities. 

.Air travel is astonishingly cheap; a 
one-way ticket between Teheran and 
5hiraz, for example, costs the equivalent 
of S27. At airports, however, individual 
foreign travelers are likely to be asked to 
show papers giving them permission to 
travel outsideThe capital. Permits should 
be obtained from Iranian consulates be- 
fore arrival. Travel agencies might be 
able to help with them in Iran. 

A reputable travel agency in Teheran 
that is interested in doing business with 
Americans is Caravan Sahra. The man- 
aging director. Javad Zolfaghari, may 
be reached at (98-2 1 ) 750-2229. fax ( 98- 
21) 767184. A nine-day trip from Te- 
heran, visiting Qum, Yezd. Persepoiis 
and Isfahan, including a night at the 
Abbasi Hotel, ranges from S 1 353 for an 
individual to $374 a person in a group of 
more than 25. 

Imagine a country that was well 
equipped to deal with tourists 20 years 
ago and hasn't done anything since, and 
you will have a good picture of what is 
available in Iran. The big hotels in Te- 
heran have post-revolutionary names, 
but many people still refer to them as the 
"old Inter-Continental." etc. They are 
fraying but adequate. Nightly rates are 
around S100 for a double room. 

In each Iranian city there are decent 
places to dine, although few if any are 
outstanding. Most restaurants do nor 
offer menus printed in languages other 
than Farsi, but many serve buffets. Try 
khorcsh. a slowly simmered stew served 
with rice. There are various kinds, of 
which a favorite is kltoresh feseniun. 
made with chicken or duck in 
pomegranate juice, garnished with wal- 
nuts. Hearty soups \ash) are often an 
important part of Iranian meals. Fruits 
and vegetables come m salads or 
wrapped in leaves itry Jolmeh sib. 
apples u rapped in grape leaves i. 



Minors in Flight: 

How to Avoid Byways 


By Susan Keselenko Coll 




WASHINGTON — Par- 
ents who travel fre- 
quently with children 
may be hard-pressed to 
believe there is anything more torturous 
than being locked in an aircraft cabin 
with a fidgety, inconsolable youngster. 
But no sooner do children grow into 
pleasant traveling companies than par- 
ents are faced with a new set of anxieties 
— sending children on their own. 

The sight of an unaccompanied 
minor, often sporting a plastic, pouch- 
like necklace containing travel docu- 
ments, is an increasingly familiar sight 
in airports around the world, partic- 
ularly in the summer months. 1 Children 
may be taking advantage of special sum- 
mer airfares to travel to and from camp 
or to visit relatives. Nicole Couture- 
Simard of Air Canada notes another 
reason for what she sees as an increase 
in children flying alone. "We’re seeing 
the single [parent] syndrome here,” she 
says, explaining that children of di- 
vorced families often nse air travel as a 
means to ferry between parents. 

Although there are no government 
regulations pertaining to die care of 
minors en route, most airlines have de- 
vised their own guidelines. David Fus- 
cus of the Air Transport Association 
notes that children flying unaccompan- 
ied is a subject "airlines m general pay a 
lot of attention to." 



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Learning the Rules 


And while a random survey of do- 
mestic and international airlines 
demonstrates more similarities than dif- 
ferences in company policies, parents 
planning to send their children unac- 
companied are advised to call ahead as 
each airline may have its own require- 
ments, ranging from advance notific- 
ation and extra booking fees to the pro- 
visibn of medical certificates, or 
possibly the requirement of an escort for 
children under a certain age. 

Lu fthansa, for example, provides a 
lengthy set of guidelines governing un- 
accompanied minors. The airline claims 
to have more than 30 years of expe- 
rience in handling unaccompanied 
minors and transports about 40,00b each 
year. Lufthansa will accept children be- 
tween the ages of 5 and 12, and charges 
an additional 50 Deutsche marks (528) 
per flight segment The airline provides 
a special check-in desk at the Frankfurt 
airport, as well as a services lounge for 
unaccompanied minors. 

British Airways will accept children 
5 and older on single-sector flights; chil- 
dren 6 and older may travel on con- 
necting flights when there is Jess than 
four hours between flights. British Air- 
ways also offers an "auntie" service in 
which parents can hire escorts for chil- 
dren of 3 months to 5 years. 

Singapore Airlines. Air France. Air 
Canada and Delta Airlines all report 
similar policies, each with minor vari- 
ations on booking and age require- 
ments. AH airlines provide cabin crew to 
escort the child at the destination until 
the authorized adult meeting the child 
arrives. Airlines generally recommend 
that parents remain in "the departure 
lounge at takeoff until the plane leaves 
the ground. Many airlines limit the num- 
ber of unaccompanied minors on any 
one flight for safety 


on the wrong Delta Airlines plane while 
transferring to connecting flights in At- 
lanta. On the first occasion, he wound up 
in Pennsylvania instead of Utah, where 
he was to connect again for a flight to - HD 
Washington State. On the second 
casion, he was boarded on to a plane 
bound for Los Angeles instead of Wash- 
ington State, but was savvy enough to 
spot the mistake before takeoff. 

Huth encountered yet another break 
in the system when she registered an 1 8- 
year-old visitor from the Republic of 
Georgia as an unaccompanied minor in 
January this year. The young woman 
spoke no English and was traveling 
from Florida back home with three 
plane changes along the way. Because 
of her age, Huth believes, Delta per- 
sonnel did not realize that she needed 
assistance even though she was wearing 
an identification badge. The young 
woman. Ana Koridze. missed her con- 
nection at New York’s JFK airport, and 



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From the top. the omate Imam Mosque in Isfahan: the mosque’s tile- 
covercd interior, and a Tourist sketching bus- reliefs in Persepoiis. 


HE logistics of booking the flight 
is one thing, but the "emotional 
coaching for both parents and 
children is quite another. Vicki Lansky, 
in her book "Trouble-Free Travel With 
Children." provides useful advice on 
how to make travel less stressful. She 
suggests visiting the airport ahead of 
time, lor example, to show children how 
to read arrival and departure monitors 
and help them get oriented. She also 
suggests surveying the boarding area for 
friendly faces 'u ho might befriend the 
child en rnuic. 

Even with the best-laid plans, 
however, things can go w rong, as one S- 
year-okl hoy who frequently 'travels be- 
tween divorced parents on opposite ends 
of the United States found out. His moth- 
er. Diane Huth of Fort Myers. Florida, 
explains that twice in the’ space of six 
months since December her sun was put 


NO disasters "I was very upset," 
says Huth. "The procedures are in 
place, but what happened with me was a 
serious of breakdowns," Huth is re- 
luctant to disparage the system for trans- 
porting minors, however, as it is a pro- 
gram on which she must rely several 
times a year. :r ~- 

"Delta has assured me it was a freak 7 • -rf - f . •• - , ; -S-. -- - 
thing, ’ ’ she says, and * ‘fortunately there : : ■ ■ i y *- 

were no disasters.” 

Delta declined to respond to several 
calls regarding Huth’s description of her 
experiences. 

While Huth’s experiences demon- 
strate that parents must prepare for the 
possibility that things can go wrong, 
more often than not things run smoothly . 
and these days airlines seem to go out of 
their way to develop programs such as 
Air Canada's Skyriders club, or Air 
France's Planctc Bleue. to cater to chil- 
dren by providing special meals and 
audio entertainment and travel kils. 

And while putting a child on an air- 
plane can be a terrifying experience for 
parents, it can be the adventure of a 
lifetime for a kid. Joanna Magginas's 
daughter had a great lime when she flew 
by herself as a kindergaruier from 
W ashington to Greece on Olympic Air- 
w - ay s. Magginas reports that her daugh- 
ter received lots of special attention, and 
she plans to send her again this summer 
to visit relatives. 

"The only thing in the back of my 
mind was. ‘What il something happens 
to the plane?* " she said, reflecting the 
inarticulate worn in the back of every 
parent’s mind “Bui I knew she’d be 
taken care of." 





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DINING 


The Simple Life: A Bistro, a Chef, an Ardoise 


^“onal Fesa , 


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Bv Patricia Wells 

l> vi >..i in.it lit r,:. J 


P ARIS — It\ many a chef’s 
dream to open a compact bis- 
tro with no menu, no printed 
wine list, simply an ardoise, a 
blackboard on which one starts anew 
each day. cooking according to inspir- 
ation. the season, the market. Young 
Pierre Jay — mosl recently of Chez Jean 
and before that at the famed Tour d' Ar- 
gent — seems to be living thjt dream. 

Since spring. Jay Ills been starting 
anew' each da;., creating classic, simple, 
inspired fare in a bare-bones bistro fit- 
tingly named 1/ Ardoise. li you're look- 
ing for plush surroundings, efficient ser- 
vice and a relaxed atmosphere. go 
elsewhere. But if it's bustle. clbow-io- 
elbow bistro ambience >ou‘re after, give 
1/ Ardoise a try. Be warned: The non- 
descript dining room can be stuffy, 
smoky and crowded to excess, and the 
totally disorganized service may appear 
to come right our ««| a Jacques Tati film. 


Go instead for the bargain 165-franc 
iS28) menu, the well-priced wines isev - 
cral al 70 to SO francs a bottle! and dw 
honest cuisine. Thick, meaty, highly 
seasoned terrines are back, and Jay offers 
a deliciously moist and manly temne of 
rabbit and hazelnuts that is all hut perfect; 
I missed the crock of comichnns 
and wished he had been a bit 
more aggressive with the season- 
mg. A refreshing salad of toma- 
toes and assorted vegetables ar- 
rives as a giant tonialo sniffed 
with carrots, locks. and herbs. 



BIRD OF DISTINCTION A nuillt-COHrse 
roasted pigeon is sublime. The liny bird 
is partially boned, and the innards are 
cooked to"a confit and spread on A 
bed of lamb's lettuce and mixed gieeiis 
soaked up the nch. meaty sauce, and a 
crown of crisp, thinly sliced potatoes is a 
w arm, w dooming counterpoint. 

Classic terrines of fine gras, a beef 
filet wirh morels, a lovely lob-tvr slew 
i with a reasonable 75-franc supplement ) 


lake the cuisine out of the ordinary . day- 
to-day serviceable bistro fare. 

Dessert fans will love the caramel- 
ized liillon tie francs, a mix of cream, 
strawberries and caramel layered m a 
fanciful champagne glass. 

Treasures from the wine Iim include 
die feminine, elegant 1 9% Rcur- 
ie from the Domaine du Yissoux 
« 130 francs) and the meaty 1995 
Cotes-du-Rhone Domaine Gra- 
menon (75 francs*. 

Another trendy spot drawing 
crowds is the se' eral-month-old 
Cafe d ’Angel, nor f.ir from die 
Arc de Triomphc. The food is less so- 
phisticated and less sure-footed than at 
L* Ardoise. but the decor is appealing, 
the service rapid and efficient and dmcr.s 
are sure to find something u> please. 

From the ardoise. diners can choose a 
la carte or from the bargain menus <be- 
gmningai 75 francs al lunch lime and 150 
at dinner.) 1 rclislwd the refreshing 
"carpaccio" of lotruiloes and zucchini, 
alternating rounds of the two vegetables 


bathed in a iemon-nch vinaigrette, lots of 
cracked white pepper and a shower of 
cmvtN A second carpaccio of tuna was 
along the same vein, with a dressing of 
oil and lemon, the same coarse pepper 
ant. chives, and a mound of Provencal 
mixed greens m the center. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. JULY 18. 1997 


RAGE 11 


THE FREQUENT TRAVELER 


MOVIE GUIDE 


Space Tourism: Ready for Liftoff? 


By Roger Collis 

httenhJitt'nal HrralU Tribune 


ONT pack your bags yet. 
But serious people la the 



aerospace and travel industry 
are taking the idea of space 
tourism seriously. Pundits predict that 


the first space tourists could be in orbit 
by 2005. Tourists would travel by 
■ ‘space plane’ ’ to 1 ‘space hotels” 200 to 
300 miles (320 to 480 kilometers) above 
Earth. NASA’s Space Shuttle is capable 
of flying 60 to 70 passengers on each 
flight, m fact this was envisaged by 
Rockwell engineers in the design of the 
Shuttle 25 years ago. 

There seems to be plenty of interest 
from armchair astronauts. More than 40 
percent of Americans yearn for an “out 
of this world" vacation, according to the 
1997 Yesawich, Pepperdine & Brown/ 
Yankelovitch Partners National Leisure 
Travel Monitor, based on in-depth in- 
terviews with 1,500 U.S. households. 

Fony-rwo percent of those surveyed 
say they are interested in a space cruise 
that would offer amenities similar to an 
ocean-going cruise ship while 34 per- 
cent specificaUy say they would be in- 
terested in a two-week vacation aboard 
the Space Shuttle and be willing to 
spend (on average) $10,800 for the trip. 
Aviation Week & Space Technology 
magazine recently reported similar sur- 
veys in Japan. Canada, Germany and the 
United States that found “an enormous 
unsatisfied desire among the general 
public to travel in space." 

“Space travel is about 10 to 15 years 
away if NASA and the private sector 
develop the necessaxy research and tech- 
nology,” says George Diller. NASA 
spokesman at die Kennedy Space Cen- 
ter at Cape Canaveral, Florida. *T think 
you'll see commercial initiatives, but 
it'll be pricey. Ten thousand dollars 
won’t get you to the launch pad. You’d 
probably be looking at something closer 
to S50.000 for a trip lasting an hour, 
allowing the passenger to experience 
weightlessness for about 15 minutes.” 

Seats and Windows 

For space flights alone. Bob Citron, a 
former aerospace executive and director 
of the Foundation for the Future in 
Bellevue, Washington (an organization 
dedicated to scholarly research on life 
during the next millennium), speculates 
that S3 billion to S5 billion would be 
needed to buy 24 to 45 space tourist 
vehicles, four or five launch sills and 
staffing for 1 .000 to 2,000 flights a year 


with ticket prices of up to $50,000. “A 
Space Shuttle vacation is certainly real 
in terms of consumer interest.” says 
Dennis Marzella, senior vice president 
at Yesawich, Pepperdine & Brown. 
“The technology is there, but it needs to 
be adapted to accommodate tourists — 
comfortable seats and big windows.” 

Patrick Collins of the University of 
Tokyo and the Japanese Rocket Society, 
speaking at the International Symposi- 
um on Space Tourism in Bremen, Ger- 
many. last March, estimates the devel- 
opment of a reusable, vertical takeoff 
and landing rocket for passengers would 
cost $10 billion and take six to seven 
years. "We need a lot of windows and 
we .need bars, and the Japanese need a 
karaoke bar,” Collins says. “A gym 
with padded walls for zero-gravity 
sports would be a really fun place.” 

THE 'KOTOL' projict Space plane 
designs may draw on the experience of 
“Hotol,” a pilot project of British 
Aerospace and Rolls-Royce a decade 
ago. Hotol was to have been a 5Q-to-60- 
passenger plane that would take off 
from conventional airports. After ac- 
celerating through Macb 5 to 80,000 
feet, the plane would leave the atmo- 
sphere, continue to accelerate and be- 
come a satellite itself after reaching 
250,000 feet — about four times the 
cruising altitude of Concorde — and an 
orbital velocity of Mach 25 ro 30. Max- 
imum flying time, ground to ground, to 
anywhere in the world would be about 
70' minutes. Unlike the Space Shuttle, 
such a space plane would need no ex- 
ternal fuel tanks and would re-enter the 
atmosphere and land under its own 
power. A space plane would be ideal for 
picking up and delivering rourists to a 
space resort en route. 

Space Islands Project has an in- 
triguing scenario for a space resort hotel 
based on a "20-year-old Rockwell idea” 
for joining up a dozen or so of the Space 
Shuttle’s empty external fuel tanks into a 
wheel-shaped space station. Each ex- 
ternal tank measuring 28 feet in diameter 
and 154 feet long (a tad shorter than a 
747 fuselage and walls four times thicker 
than those of the Mir space station) 
would be divided into three decks. The 
space station could accommodate 300 
people in “cmise-ship conditions." 

“The external tanks would be joined 
up end to end in the form of a ring with 
two more t anks joined up passing 
through the center like an axle through a 
wheel, like the orbiting Hilton in the 
1969 movie, "2001: A Space Odys- 
sey.” says Gene Meyers, director of 


Space Islands Project, "a loosely knit 
group of engineers, educators and ar- 
chitects,” in West Covina, California. 
“The station would take about an hour 
and a half to make a complete orbit of 
the Earth, but tbe ring itself would be 
spinning like a roulette wheel at about 
one revolution a minute thus developing 
artificial gravity. People would live in 
the outer ring where they would ex- 
perience about half of normal gravity — 
they’d just be half their normal weight 
— so they could use bathroom facilities 
and suchlike at pretty well normal con- 
ditions. The central column section 
would be zero gravity. This could be the 
entertainment and recreation center, 
which guests could visit for an hour or 
so at a time. You’d have windows in the 
central column to view the Earth. 

"There are lots of entertainment pos- 
sibilities at zero gravity. Astronauts 
have found that blood that is normally 
drawn down to your lees is son erf 
released and drifts upwards. Astronauts 
legs become thinner, their chests ex- 
pand by two to three inches, their faces 
nil out and wrinkles disappear. Shots of 
men in their forties before launch and an 
hour after launch look like father and 
son. Shannon Lucid, a 53-year-old 
American astronaut in the Russian 
space station last year, said she looked 
20 years younger in space.” 

M EYERS and his group are 
looking to corporate sponsor- 
ship to meet the $ 10 billion to 
$15 billion cost of building the first 
space station. "You’d need about 16 of 
these exremal tanks. If we can get 
companies like Coca-Cola and General 
Motors to sponsor them for $500 million 
each, you’d cover big chunks of your 
costs for the first station; the second 
station would cost roughly half as much, 
and the third and fourth stations would 
be about 10 to 15 percent less. 

"Space Islands Project is privately 
funded right now. We’ve budgeted $20 
million for this first push to bring in 
some of the larger sponsors. The pay- 
back for them will be enormous. Coca- 
Cola, for example, spends $8 billion a 
year on marketing. So we’ve suggested 
that if they were to pay the cost of a 
shuttle launch — $400 million to $500 
million — they could have tbe external 
tank painted white with their logo 
splashed all over iL This would give 
them two to three years of broad in- 
ternational exposure. We’re talking to 
Carnival Cruises, Hilton Hotels, Uni- 
versal Studios, Radisson Hotels and 
Disney to support the project.” 



Nicolas Cage as parolee Cameron Poe in the Simon West thrill ride “Con Air “ 


Con Air 

Directed by Simon West. U.S. 

The thrill-ride genre is a study in short- 
hand. "Con Air”: convicts on an air- 
plane. Cameron Poe: He’s our hero. 
Here’s what we know about Cameron 
(Nicolas Cage, looking fabulous): He 
loves his family. Heprotects women. He 
sounds like Elvis. There are Christ-like 
overtones to his hair weave. He makes 
origami birds in his jail cell. He must be a 
really nice guy. Another kind of movie 
might fill in a few blanks, but the thrill 
ride needn’t bother. It has too much else 
to do: staging an air war over Monument 
Valley, sending Cameron fleeing fire- 
balls in slow* motion, breaking lots of 
breakaway glass, finding interesting new 
forms of demolition. (Ever see a plane 
crash into a Las Vegas casino? Now you 
can.) The thrill ride also has its own brand 
of sight gag. as when a corpse falls from 
an airplane and causes a comical traffic 
accident And one of the drivers had just 
washed his car! Thrill rides don’t often 
make more sense than beer commercials, 
which they stylistically resemble by in- 
sisting that every frame look slick and 
pack a visual wallop. But some are better 
titan others. The colorfully written "Con 
Air” is a solid chip off "The Rock,” 
pumped up and very well cast, with the 
pretuness and polish of advertising art. 
All of the principals normally work in 
films more interesting and human than 
this one. which gives "Con Air” a touch 
of the subversive and turns it into a big- 
budget lark. Imaginative actors like John 


Cusack, Steve B usee mi. Ving Rharoes, 
Colin Meaney and John Malkovich show 
off 


entertaining quirks even when play- friend’s" happ 
characters who aren’t much more forgive the Pre 


ing 

rhan tattoos and nicknames. As for Cage, 
he neatly embodies the noble hero while 
winking literally and figuratively 
through this role, and his charismatic 
performance gives the film the center it 
urgently needs. (Janet Muslin. NYT) 

My Best Friend's 
Wedding 

Directed by PJ. Hogan. U.S. 

After moping about in the drab British 
dramas, "Michael Collins" and "Mary 
ReiBy,” Julia Roberts comes back home 
to romantic comedy. Unfortunately, her 
extravagant good looks and screen-swal- 
lowing charisma are somewhat wasted on 
“My Best Friend’s Wedding," a mis- 
begotten attempt to update the genre that 
only proves the enduring — if not down- 
right inviolable — appeal of the boy- 
meets-giri scenario. Director P J. Hogan ’s 
follow-up 10 the offbeat, Australian, 
ABBA-scored “Muriel’s Wedding.” this 
mainstream American variation is also 
wildly unromantic and sappy with silly 
’70s love songs. Hogan's instincts are 
right, but the genre has grown stale in this 
more sexually permissive, more socially 
fluid age.' Scripted by Ron Bass (“Wait- 
ing to Exhale' ’), the story revolves around 
die wicked machinations of Julianne Pot- 
ter (Roberts), a food critic determined to 
stop an old flame's marriage. Thus, she 
hatches any number of schemes, most of 


which backfire, in a cruel, largely hu- 
morless campaign to wreck her "best 
friend’s" happiness. While it’s easy to 
forgive the Pretty Woman anything, her 
chicanery would make more sense if the 
milquetoast Michael O'Neal (Dermot 
Mulroney) were worth the fuss. All’s fair 
in love, so they say, only what Michael 
and Julianne share is not romantic passion 
or even real kinship, but a neurotic at- 
tachment. (Rita Kcmptey. WPi 

Angel Baby 

Directed by Michael Rymer. Australia. 
A folly disguised as an ordeal, "Angel 
Baby” tracks the inevitably tragic 
course of a mentally ill Australian 
couple who believe not only that they 
have been touched by an angel but that 
they are about to give birth to one. The 
source of this information will confound 
scholars: They leam it by decoding the 
celestial data encrypted in the big board 
on "Wheel of Fortune.” Kate (Jac- 
queline McKenzie) and Harry (John 
Lynch) meet in a therapy group in the 
midst of young adulthoods racked by 
instability and sustained only by phar- 
maceuticals. They have an almost in- 
stantaneous connection, but the horror of 
the film comes in watching them pursue 
a feckless destiny impervious to the cau- 
tions of family and mental-health pro- 
fessionals. What fails utterly in “Angel 
Baby” is the director's ability to connect 
us with these people. We do not wish to 
cry for them, but merely to escape 
them. (Stephen Hunter, WPI 


SUMMER FESTIVALS 


ARTS GUIDE 


In this last festival column, 
the Arts Guide lists major music 
festivals ■ due star'; in August 
and September in Europe and 
North America. 

Antwerp 

Flanders Festival, lei: (32) 3-232- 
8428, fax: 225-1 282. Aug. 23-31 : A 
part of the Flanders Festival that 
has been offering ancient classical 
and contemporary music in various 
Belgian cities since April, the festfval 
in Antwerp revives the music of the 
French court between the m«-15th 
century and 1515 with masses and 
motets by Johannes Ockeghem. 
Paul Van Novel is the conductor in 
residence and some of the per- 
formers rnctude the Tallis Scholars. 
Voce Poetic*. Collegium Vocal e 
and Ensemble GiDes Binchois. 

Rerun 

47. Berliner Feetwochen, tel: (49) 
30-254-89-100. fax: 89-230, Inter- 
net : httpy/wwwJberiinerfastspiele. 
de. Sept 6-30: Plays, dance pro- 
grams and exhibitions In addition 
to recitals and concerts. The Ber- 
liner Philharmonlsches Qrchester 
performs Hans Werner Henze’s 
Symphony No. 9 (Sept. 11), Mozart 
and Berlioz, under John Ehot 
Gardiner (Sept. 16 and 17). and 
Mahler's Symphony No. 2 under 
Claudio Abbado (Sept 26). An- 
dres Schiff plays six evenings of 
Schubert's sonatas and Alfred 
Bren del performs fn a program In- 
cluding Busoni,. Lite, Schumann 
and Haydn (Sept 21). 

Bbw w»i « 

Flanders Festival, tel: (32) 2-548- 
9595, fax: 548-9590. Sept 10 to 
Oct 26: The Brussels part of the 

Festival welcomes Mstislav 
Rostropovich ■ who conducts 
Prokofiev's "Romeo and Juliet" 
performed by the Ballet of 
Lithuania. The roster of trisiting so- 
loists mdudes Daniel Barenboim 
(piano), Isaac Stem (violin) and 
Anne-Sophie Mutter (violin). 

Edinburgh 

Edinburgh International Festi- 
val 1097, tel: (44)1 31-473-2001, 
fax: 473-20-02. Aug. 1-30: The 
Royal Opera Covent Garden 
presents a new production of 
Rameau's "Platee" (Aug. 11, 13, 
14) and VerdPs “Macbeth" (Aug. 
12, 15, 16). The Scottish Chamber 
Orchestra presents Tomas -Bre- 
ton's zarzuela “La Verbena de la 
Patoma." BaHet programs include 
works by Twyla Tharp, Regine 
Choplnot and Jlri Kylian. At the 
Greyfrlare Kirk, Peter Hurford 
presents 15 concerts surveying 
Bach's organ musk: (daily Aug. 1 2- 
30. except Sundays and Mon- 
days), The roster of conductors In- 
dudes P/errs Boulez, Valati Ger- 
giev and Bernard Haitink; among 
the soloists to be heard, Andras 
Schiff and Alfred Brendei (piano), 
Sergei Levffin (violin), Bryn Terfel 
(baritone) and. Anne Sofie von Ot- 
ter (mezzo-soprano). 

Lmz, Ausrnui 

Brucknerfest 1997, tel: (49) 732- 
775230, fax:7612-201 Sept. 13 to 
Oct. 5: Numerous performances of 
Anton Bruckner's music: a concert 
version of Wagner’s “Siegfried," 
under Martin Stoghart with Hilde- 
gard Behrens. Wolfgang Fassier 
and John TanHnson (SepL 19): 
Bernard Haitink and the Wiener 
Phiharmoniker close the festival 
with Mahler's Symphony No. 9. 

Lucerne, Switzerland - 
Internationale Musftdestwochen, 


tel: (41) 210-3080. fax: 210-9464. 
Internet: htto-VAvww.switch.ch/mbc/ 
LucemeMu6ic.htm). Aug. ; 16 to 
Sept 10: Orchestral concerts by 
the Royal Concertgebouw Orches- 
tra Amsterdam under RiocanJo 
Chailly (Aug. 25 and 26). the Ber- 
liner Philharmonlsches Qrchester 
under Claudio Abbado (Aug. 31 and 
Sept 1 ), the Orchestra Fllarmonica 
della Sca/a under Riccardo Muti 
(Sept. 5 and 6) and the Wiener 
Philharmoniker under Carlo Marla 
Gfulini (Sept. 9 and 10). 

Rotteroah 

Rotterdam Philharmonic Ger- 
giev Festival, tel: (31) 10-217-17- 
89. fax: 411-62-15. Sept 18-26: 
The highlights of this festival, un- 
der artistic director Valeri Gergiev, 
are Richard Strauss's “Salome" 
(Sept 18. 21 . 26) with Ljoeba Kaz- 
amovslcaja (Salome) and Nikolai 
Poetilin (Jochanaan); a symphonic 
concert of works by Bartok, Lrtz 
and Ravel, with Zoftan Kocsis, pi- 
ano (Sept. 20); Schubert and 
Shostakovich pieces performed by 
the Borodin Quartet (Sept. 23) and 
a performance of Russian music 
by the chorus and orchestra of toe 
Maryinsky Theatre of St Peters- 
burg (Sept. 24). 

Stresa, Italy 

Setttmane Mualceti di Stresa, tel: 
(39) 323-31095, fax 33006. Aug. 
22 to Sept 19: Performances take 
place in the Teatro del Palazzo del 
Congress*. Semyon Bychkov and 
the Gustav Mahler Jugend- 
orchester open toe festival with a 
Beethoven and Shostakovich pro- 
gram (Aug. 22). I SoUsti della Scala 
offer an evening of Strauss, 
Schoenberg and Brahms chamber 
music (SepL 14). The RAI choir 
and orchestra, under Eliahu Inbal. 


concludes toe Settimane with a 
performance of Beethoven's Ninth 
(Sept 19). - 

Vevey-Montreux 

Festival de Musique, tel: (41)21- 
963-54-50, fax: 983-25-06. Inter- 
net http://www.montreux.ch/festl- 
val. Aug. 29 to Sept 17: The fes- 
tival — held in toe Auditorium 
Stravinskf, toe Theatre de Vevey. 
toe Montreux Palace — is celeb- 
rating the human voice: Vocal so- 
loists indude Anne Evans (sop- 
rano) and Robert Hale (baritone) 
anging Wagner (Aug. 31): Brigitte 
Baileys (mezzo) and Matthias Go- 
eme (baritone), conducted by 
Vladimir Ashkenazy in a Mahler 
and Brahms program (Sept 4) 
and Vessel fna Kasarova (mezzo), 
in a Berlioz evening (Sept. 14). 
The roster of visiting conductors 
also Include Claudio Abbado with 
the Berliner Philharmonisches 
Orchester (Sept 2), Emmanuel 
Krivine leatSng the Camerata Aca- 
demics Salzburg with Joshua Bell 
playing Mendelssohn's Violin 
Concerto (Sept 4); and Daniel 
Barenboim , who plays toe piano 
at the same time he conducts 
the Staatskapelle Berlin (Sept 13). 
Other soloists indude Paul Agnew 
(tenor). Jin Pel dmann (soprano) 
and Barbara Moser (piano). 

Washington 

Beethoven Festival, tel: (202) 
467-4600. Internet: htfe:// 

kennedy-cwter.org. SepL 5-21: 
Leonard Slatkin and the National 
Symphony Orchestra perform all 
nine symphonies, as well as a re- 
construcOon of the first movement 
of the unfinished Tenth. Piano son- 
atas and quartets are also per- 
formed. 


AUSTRIA 


CANADA 


VrwHfl 

Palais Harrs ch. tel: (1 ) 523-1 753, 
closed Tuesdays. To Sept 21: 
“Das Capri cdo als Kunstprinzip." 
Documents the treatment of un- 
usual, amusing and fantastic 
themes in toe visual arts, music 
and literature. Features works by 
Goya, Pietro Longhi and Ardm- 
boldo. 


BELGIUM 


Brussels 

Palais des Beaux-Arts, tel: (2) 
507-8466, dosed Mondays. Corv 
trnuing/To Aug. 17: "Alberto 
Burn." Hia experience as a pris- 
oner of war In Texas had a strong 
Influence on toe Italian a rtrsl (1 91 5- 
1995), Inspiring the use of tom 
sacking, tar, burnt wood and plastic 
In his work. The exhibition brings 
together 100 works. 


Montreal 

Musee des Beaux-Arts, tel: (514) 
285-2000, dosed Mondays. To 
Nov. 16: “Asterix, toe Exhibition ." 
Created in 1959 by Albert Uderzo 
and the late Rene Goscinny. the 
Asterix comic strips have become 
wortd-famous for their satirical 
slant on life viewed from a small 
Gaul village In 50 B.C. The ex- 
hibition combines drawings by 
Uderzo with objects from antiquity 
such as Gallo-Roman stone and 
bronze sculptures and items that 
found their way in the backdrop of 
toe books: a menhir, a scythe, a 
lyre and several helmets. 


FRANCE 


BRITAIN 


Lonoon 

Hayward Galleiy, tel: (171) 261- 
0127, open daily. To Aug. 17: “Tat- 
suo Mlyajima: Big Time." A series 
of installations by the Japanese 
artist (bom 1957) who uses red. 
blue and green light-emitting diode 
numbers that flash on toe walls or 
glide across the blackened space 
like fireflies. 

The National Gallery, tel: (171) 
747-2885. open daily. To Sept. 14: 
“Themes and Variations: Sleep." 
Contrasting Interpretations of 
sleep and the sleeping figure in a 
selection of paintings. Features 30 
paintings by Bellini, Raphael, Boti- 
celli, Jan Steen, Poussin, Dutch 
painter Gabriel Matsu and others. 


Pams 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: 
01 -44-78-1 2-33, dosed Tuesdays. 
To Sept 29: "Les Ingemeurs du 
Slede." From the earliest metal 
construction to the latest building 
technology, from Gustave Eiffel lo 
Peter Rice, a display of large mod- 
els and architectural documents il- 
lustrates the works of the engineer- 
builders of the 20th century. 
Fbndstion Cartier pour I’Art 
Contemporain, tel: 01-42-18-56- 
50, closed Mondays. Continuing/ 
To Nov. 2: “Amours.” The expres- 
sion of love as depicted in drawings, 
paintings, videos and sculptures. 
Features works by Brancusi. In- 
gres, Watteau. Klimt photographs 
by Brassai and Mapplethorpe. 
Institut du Monde Arabe, tel: 01 - 
40-51-38-38, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/ To Oct. 5; “Jordante: 
Sur les Pas des Arch eclogues." An 
exploration into the past of Jordan 
from toe Ommeyad castles of toe 


7th century, toe Byzantine mosa- 
ics. the Roman period that followed 
the Nabatean expansion, and toe 
Iron and Bronze ages. 

■ GERMANY 

Berlin 

Martin-Groplus-Bau, tel: (30) 
324-50-78. open dally. Continu- 
ing/ To July 27: “Die Epochs der 
Modeme Kunst 20. JahrhunderL" 
A presentation of the many faces of 
Modernism through 400 paintings, 
assemblages, sculptures, install- 
ations and video sculptures by 
more than 100 artists. 

Kassel 

documents X. Continuing/ To 
Sept. 28: Follow the “parcoure" 
laid out for the viewer throughout 
the city to see the works of, among 
others, Christine Hill (USA), Ro6e- 
marieTrockel (Germany), Siobhan 
Hapaska (Ireland) and Gerhard 
Richter (Germany) as well as toe 
British team of “Art & Language." 

■GREECE 

Thessaloniki 

The Museum of Byzantine Cul- 
ture, tel: (31 ) 86-85-70. open dally. 
To Dec. 31: 'Treasures of Mount 
Athos." In the Cultural Capital of 
Europe 1997, an exhibition of 
1.500 paintings, icons, illustrated 
manuscripts, miniatures and con- 
secrated vessels from Mount 
Athos, the 1 ,000-year old commu- 
nity of 20 monasteries of the Order 

of St Basil of the Orthodox Eastern 
Church. 

mu n^ Eiz 1 

Dublin 

Irish Museum of Modem Art, tel: 


(1 ) 671-8666. dosed Mondays. To 
Nov. 2: "The Pursuit of Painting." 
More than 50 paintings that ex- 
emplify the purpose of painting: 
making reality visible by present- 
ing objects, figures and spaces on 
a canvas. Features works by 
Balthus. Bonnard, Lucian Freud. 
Helion. Moran di and Lupertz. 

■ ITALY 

Venice 

LVII Venice Biennale. Continu- 
ing/ To Nov. 9: In more than 30 
pavfflons, a one-man show by U.S. 
artist Robert Col escort; 1 2 paintings 
by the Portuguese artist Jullao Sar- 
mento: large paintings by Helmut 
Federie from Switzerland: aborigin- 
al paintings in the Australian pa- 
vilion and oils by the Russian artist 
Maxim Kantor. among others. 

J JAPAN ZI 

Tokyo 

New Otani Art Museum, tel: (3) 
3221-4111, dosed Mondays, ex- 
cept July 21. To Aug. 31: “Japon- 
ism in Prints." More than 50 prints 
by European artists such as Felix 
Vallotton and Pierre Bonnard re- 
flecting the influence of Japanese 
prints. Also Included are works by 
Henri Riviere (1864-1951), who, 
inspired by Hokusai's "36 Views of 
Mount Fuji" created his own 36 
views of toe Eiffel Tower. 

■ LUXEMBOURG 

Musee National d’Art et d’His- 
tolre, tel: (352) 47-93-301 , closed 
Mondays. To Aug. 17: "Paul 
Strand; The World on My Door- 
step. 1950-1976.” In the 1 950s toe 
American photographer moved to 
France and embarked on a series 


of photographs of France. Italy. 
Egypt, Romania. Ghana and Mo- 
rocco. The exhibition features 150 
black-and-white works. 

B SPAIN 

Barcelona 

Museu d'Art Con tempo rani, tel: 
(93) 412-08-10. dosed Mondays. 
To Sept. 24: 'Tony Cragg." This 
exhibition focuses on works from 
the first half of the 1 980s, in which 
the British sculptor (bom 1949) 
used bits and pieces of everyday 
objects to produce recognizable 
forms and figures on walls. 

B UNITED STATES 

Washington 

National Gallery of Art, tel: (202) 
737-4215, open daily. Continu- 
ing/ To SepL 28: "Millennium of 
Glory: Sculptu reof Angkor and An- 
cient Cambodia." Approximately 
90 objects dating back to the 6th 
century. 

dosmo SOON 

July 20: "Ancient Faces: Mummy 
Portraits from Roman Egypt" Brit- 
ish Museum, London. ■ 

July 20: "Serenisslma: The Arts of 
Fashion in Venice from the 13th to 
the 18th Century." European 
Academy & The Accademia Kali- 
ana, London. 

July 20: Tales from the Land of 
Dragons: 1000 Years of Chinese 
Painting.” Museum of Fine Arts, 
Boston. 

July 21: "Des Mecenes par Mll- 
liers: Un Siede de Dons par les 
Amis du Louvre." Musee du 
Louvre, Paris. 

July 21: "Pierre Bonnard." 

Bunkamura Museum, Tokyo. 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1997 


Referred to Committee 

In the wake of John Walter's fall from executive 
grace, AT&T has entrusted daily operations to 
one committee while another searches for Mr. 
Walter’s replacement Here are the committee 
rosters: 




JOHN ZEGUS 


DAN SOMERS 
FRANK IANNA 
GAN. MCGOVERN 
JOHN PETRJLLO 


JEFFREY WETTZEN 


Vice chairman, senior executive vice president, 
general counsel (chairman of committee) 

Senior executive v.p., chief financial officer 
Executive v.p., network and computer services 
Executive v.p.. consumer markets 

Executive v.p., corporate strategy and business 
development 

Executive v.p., business markets 


KENNETH DERR 
WALTER ELISHA 
DONALD MeHENRY 


RALPH LARSEN 
THOMAS WYMAN 

Source : Company reports 


Chairman, chief executive, Chevron 
Chairman, chief executive, Springs Industries 

President, IRC Group; former U.S. Ambassador 
to the United Nations 

Chairman, chief executive, Johnson & Johnson 
Retired chairman, S.G. Warburg 

The New Ywk Tint* 





John Walter, l^t, sealing a deal with Guido Rossi, president of STETSpA in Rome. AT&T and the Italian phone company formed an alliance July 2. 

Leaderless AT&T Tries Again to Chart a Future 






t 1 


By Mark Landler 

Nch- York Times Serrirr 

NEW YORK — AT&T Corp.’s top 
management has been plunged into tur- 
moil at a time when the company is 
grappling with unprecedented chal- 
lenges that include a steadily eroding 
share of the long-distance market. 

Barely tune months after he was re- 
cruited to lead the largest U.S. telephone 
company, John Walter resigned ab- 
ruptly Wednesday as president and 
chief operating officer orAT&T. 

Mr. Walter, whose contract called for 
him to succeed Robert Allen as chief 
executive in January, quit under pres- 
sure after AT&T’s 
board told him it had 

— lost faith in his per- 

WATCH formaqce and that he 
would not get the top 
job. “He didn’t have the intellectual 
leadership to lead AT&T,” Walter 
Elisha, a member of AT&T’s board said 
Wednesday evening. “He’s a bright 
guy, but the complexity of the business 
is far greater than be might have real- 
ized.” 

Mr. Walter’s sudden departure 
amounts to a keen embarrassment for 
AT&T’s board, which anointed Mr. 
Walter as the company’s future leader 
after conducting an executive search. 

Not die least of the fallout for AT&T 
is Mr. Walter’s lavish severance agree- 
ment:’ For nine months of weak, he will 
get a one-time payment of $3.8 million, 
plus the $22 million in compensation for 
leaving his previous job as chief ex- 
ecutive of the printing company R. R. 
Donnelley & Sons Inc. 

Mi. Allen, who had been under 
mounting criticism from Wall Street 
even before Mir. Walter was brought 
aboard, will stay on as chief executive 
while the board conducts yet another 
search for his successor. 

AT&T’s general counsel. John Zeg- 


lis, will replace Mr. Walter as president 
and chief operating officer. A rising 
star, Mr. Zeglis is considered the lead- 
ing inside candidate for Mr. Allen’s 
job. 

The appointment of Mr. Walter last 
autumn had been a controversial one. 
given bis lack of telecommunications 
experience. But after news broke of his 
ouster Wednesday shortly before the 
close of trading, AT&T’s stock price 
rose. 


Mr. Elisha declined to list the de- 
ficiencies in Mr. Walter's performance, 
saying that AT&T’s eight independent 
directors came to the conclusion that he 
was tiie wrong person for the job in a 
series of meetings that began in April 
and ended Wednesday morning. 

Mr. Allen did not take part in the 
morning meeting, but had recently re- 
commended that Mr. Walter not be pro- 
moted to chief executive. 

Mr. Walter was informed of the de- 


Under Allen, Black Marks 
For Blue-Chip Phone Giant 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — Shares in AT&T 
Corp., which once were recommended 
for widows and orphans, have lagged 
well behind the rest of the market while 
Robert Allen has been at the company's 
helm as chairman and chief executive. 

America’s most widely held stock, 
under Mr. Allen's direction, seems to 
have missed the biggest bull market in 
history. 

Mr. Allen took over AT&T in April 
1988, when the company's shares traded 
near $18. They closed Thursday at $35, 
down $13125, for a gain of just under 
100 percent from when Mr. Allen took 
the helm. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, 
meanwhile, has risen from about 2,000 
points in April 1988 to more than 8,000 
this week, a 300 percent gain. 

hfr. Alien's first big move came in 
September 1992, when AT&T bought 
the computer makes - NCR Corp. for $7.48 
billion. NCR's value fell by half under 
AT&T’s ownership, even as AT&T 
pumped $ 2.8 billion into the maker of 


computers, automated teller machines 
and electronic cash registers. AT&T spun 
the unit off to shareholders at the end of 
last year, giving them one NCR share for 
every 16 AT&T shares they held. 

Mr. Allen made some smarter in- 
vestments as well. AT&T bought the 
cellular pioneer Craig McCaw’s wire- 
less phone company for $1 13 billion in 
1994. Today, it remains America’s 
largest wireless-service provider. 

And when AT&T spun off Lucent 
Technologies Inc., its equipment unit, it 

S ve shareholders one share of Lucent 
r every three AT&T shares. Lucent’s 
stock has almost tripled since Lucent’s 
initial public offering in April 1996. 

Mr. Allen, who had said he would 
retire next year, now plans to remain at 
AT&T indefinitely while the com- 
pany’s board searches for a successor to 
John Walter, the company’s president 
and chief operating officer, who 
resigned Wednesday. 

Mr. Walter’s departure will give Mr. 
Allen more time to polish his legacy, 
analysts said. 


Woolworth, the Last Holdout, Drops the 5-and-10s 


By Mitchell Martin . 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Woolworth Corp., 
whose founder created the 5-and-10- 
cent store concept more than a century 
ago, became the final U.S. company to 
leave that business Thursday, saying it 
would close its 400 remaining general- 
merchandise shops and convert a 
quarter of them to Foot Locker and other 
specially retailers. 

Investors seemed pleased, as Wool- 
worth stock rose $ 2,375 to close at 
$27.4375. But there was a feeling of 
nostalgia for the stores, a fixture in 
American downtowns since 1879. 

“It’s the end of an era, that's for 


sure,” said Mary Lou Bttrde of the 
credit-rating agency Standard & Poor’s 
Corp., “but they were losing money.” 

Tne original concept was that all the 
household goods in the store would be 
sold for 5 cents or less, and the first 
store, which failed, was called the Great 
Five Cent Store, in Utica, New York. 
The founder, Frank Winfield Wool- 
worth, opened a second store in Lan- 
caster, Pennsylvania, which caught on, 
and he added 10 -cent goods. 

The pricing stru ct u re did not last, but 
the stores flourished and spread world- 
wide, along with competing chains, 
such as Lams ton, Kress, Rose and S.S. 
Kxesge. Kresge, whose founder closed 
all his stores for an hour on the day Mr. 


Woolworth died in 1919, metamorph- 
osed into Kmart Corp. in 1962. 

That, according to Kurt Barnard, a 
retail consultant and president of Barn- 
ard's Retail Marketing Report, in Scotch 
Plains, New Jersey, was the beginning of 
(he end for the 5-and-10 style retailers. 
“It died when the discount department 
srore industry came into being and im- 
mediately captured the hearts and the 
pockets of most Americans,' ’ he said. 

Woolworth will turn abroad. It 
severed its links with its British op- 
erations in the 1980s, but it still has 
about 374 small department stores in 
Germany, which representatives of a 
major shareholder said would be can- 
didates for divestiture or other actions. 


“Jr’s on to Germany,'* said Alfred 
Kingsley of Greenway Partners LP, 
which owns just under 5 percent of 
Woolworth’s shares. He and his partner 
Gary Duberstein said that Woolworth 
management had been paring unprof- 
itable di visions, and they singled out the 
German stores as the biggest remaining 
problem. 

Mr. Kingsley and Mr. Duberstein 
said the Gennan stores had about $2 
billion a year in sales but had been 
unprofitable in recent years, even 
though the company owned many of the 
sites. They suggested Woolworth might 
convert some of these stores to Foot 
Lockers and might consider selling 
them to other retailers. 


PAGE 13 


Bangkok Police Raid 
Foreign Brokerages 

Officials Say Source of Rumor Is Sought 


cision shortly before the meeting by Mr. 
Elis ha and two other directors. He met 
again alone with Mr. Elisha later in the 
morning. Mr. Walter, 50, then exercised 
a clause in his contract .that enabled to 
leave with a large severance payment if 
he was not elevated to Mr. Allen’s job 
by January. 

In a statement released by the com- 
pany, Mr. Walter defended his qual- 
ifications. “I believe I am perfectly 
qualified to be CEO of AT&T right 
now,” he said. “I have worked tire- 
lessly on behalf of the shareholders of 
AT&T.” Mr. Walter did not respond to 
a request for further comment. 

But executives with knowledge of the 
company said Mr. Allen and AT&T’s 
directors began to have doubts about 
Mr. Walter almost from the moment he 
came to work last November. These 
executives said Mr. Walter, who made 
his name at Donnelley as a salesman, did 
not immediately immerse himself in the 
mechanics of the telephone business. 

“Bringing a nonseasoned person into 
AT&T at a ticne like this was fraught widi 
risk.” said Eric Strumingher, an analyst 
at PaineWebber. “This industry has an 
enormous number of moving parts.” 

One executive said Mr. Allen had 
suspected Mr. Walter had a role in leak- 
ing details of the $50 billion merger 
negotiations widi SBC Communica- 
tions Corp. to The Wall -Street Journal, 
which first repotted news of the talks in 
late May. But Mr. Elisha said be did not 
believe Mr. Walter was responsible for 
the leaks and that the issue did not play 
a role in the board's decision. 

As for the coming search, Mr. Elisha 
said die board had appointed a com- 
mittee of himself and four other di- 
rectors. Mr. Elisha, who is chairman of 
Springs Industries, said the board had 
not set a timetable for its selection. But 
this time, he said, the candidate would 

See AT&T, Page 14 


By Thomas Crampton 

Speriul to ihe Herald Tnhunc 

BANGKOK — Moving brusquely to 
stamp out what they called damaging 
rumors about Thailand’s financial crisis, 
Thai officials raided at least two foreign 
brokerages in Bangkok on Thursday. 

Squads of uniformed police searched 
the offices of Nomura Securities Co. 
and ABN-AMRO Hoare Govett, 
searching desks, reading computer files 
and interrogating and photographing 
employees, witnesses said. 

The raids drew immediate accusa- 
tions from some foreign brokers that the 
government was using scare tactics to 
keep the foreign investment community 
from passing along unpleasant news. 

Officials said they were trying to 
trace the source of a fax message 
spreading what they called the false 
rumor that five Thai comrhercial banks 
would soon be closed. The speculation 
jolted the stock market last week, 
prompting official denials. 

An adviser to the prime minister said 
those proven guilty of intentionally 
damaging the interests of the country 
should be punished. 

Some foreign brokers and a diplomat 
suggested that Thai officials were re- 
acting to the downside of foreign in- 
vestment that is not always easily ac- 
cepted in Southeast Asia: the free flow 
of information, bad as well as good. 

Th ailan d has had one of most free 
presses in Asia since die mid-1980s, but 
some interpreted the raid as intimidation 
tactics intended to damp bad news about 
the slowing economy and the nation's 
financial difficulties, the worst in more 
than a decade. 

“They are too concerned with their 
short-term image,” a spokesman for the 
opposition Democrat Party, Abhisit 
Vejjajiva said. "'The raid reflected the 
government's inability to understand 
civilized manners in dealing with the 
rule of law.” 

The adviser to the prime minister, 
Virachai Techavichit, vehemently dis- 
agreed, saying: “These are completely 


different issues. If it has been proven 
beyond a reasonable doubt that 
someone has intentionally damaged the 
country by spreading false information, 
they should be punished.” 

Thirty policemen, some high-rank- 
ing, went through ABN-AMRO’soffice 
questioning and photographing tele- 
phone operators, receptionists, analysts 
and top executives, witnesses told The 
Associated Press. 

“These are deliberate scare tactics,” 
said one broker, who asked not to be 
identified. “When brokers said ‘buy 
Thailand,' they welcomed us, but when 
we say ‘sell,' they begin to ask what we 
are doing here,” 

On hearing of the searches, some 
brokerage houses shut down early, and 
one foreign analyst shredded a doc- 
ument he had promised to give to a 
reporter. 

“The rules have really changed 
now,” Jhe analyst said. 

“This is sadly typical. Blame toe 
foreigner and let toe Thai go,” one 
diplomat said of the raids, a stark con- 
trast with the gracious treatment many 
visitors here are used to receiving from 
individual Thais. 

In the current financial crisis, for- 
eigners ranging from the currency 
hedge-fund manager George Soros to 
the financier and former arms dealer 
Adnan Kbashoggi have been prominent 
targets of official spite. 

This week, the recently resigned fi- 
nance minister Amnuay Viravan took 
potshots at the media, saying: “The me- 
dia is a factor in the spreading of rumors 
and damaging toe economy. I am sure 
some of the media is in the pay of cur- 
rency hedge foods.” 

On July 2, Thailand floated toe baht 
after a series of attacks by currency 
speculators who Thai officials say were 
led by Mr. Soros. 

Amid great protest in toe Thai press, 
the interior minister recently set up a 
media monitoring center intended to 
find who was reporting incorrect or mis- 
leading news abont toe Thai govern- 
ment and economy. 


Outlook on Taxes Throws 
Paris Bourse Off Stride 

One-Time Increase Is Expected for Businesses 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The French cabinet re- 
viewed a range of new austerity options 
Thursday that officials predicted — and 
toe stock exchange anticipated — 
would lead to a one-time increase in 
corporation taxes. 

France may need to raise about 40 
billion francs ($6.61 billion) in new 
revenue to meet the criteria for joining 
toe European single currency next year, 
which stipulates that the budget deficit 
not exceed 3 percent of gross domestic 
producr. The present level is expected to 
be announced at about 3.6 percent when 
toe government discloses details of a 
financial audit to toe National Assembly 
on Monday. 

A spokesman for Prime Minister Li- 
onel Jospin said it would be “logical” 
to expect higher corporate taxes and toe 
cancellation of income tax cuts that had 
been promised by toe previous, con- 
servative government 

The new Socialist-led government 
said this month it was considering ask- 
ing profitable companies to make an 
extra effort to meet the deficit target 
The spokesman said toe cabinet had 
discussed nothing Thursday beyond 
what had been proposed earlier in the 
month. 

Mr. Jospin has put off making any 
economic policy pronouncements until 
completion of toe audit But the boom- 
ing French stock exchange seemed to 
take offense Thursday at reports that the 


government would raise toe tax on cor- 
porate profits to 40 percent from 36.6 
percent — with higher social security 
contributions a possibility as well. 

The Bourse’s CAC-40 Index, which 
crested above 3,000 points for the first 
time Wednesday, finished down 29.42 
points, or 0.98 percent on Thursday at 
2.958.59. But the bond market rose on 
expectations that toe new taxes would 
enable the government to hit the single- 
currency criteria. 

The secretary of state for the budget 
Christian Sautter, predicted that the 
audit would reveal a deficit of slightly 
more than 33 percent of GDP. Thar 
implied the requirement to raise new 
revenue, given me government’s pledge 
not to Impose further cuts in govern- 
ment spending. 

Although toe single-currency criteria 
allow some leeway to countries that are 
heading in the right fiscal direction, 
former Finance Minister Otto 
Lambsdorff of Germany said in an in- 
terview with the Paris newspaper Le 
Figaro that a deficit above 3.5 percent 
woald make it “out of the question '* for 
France to join toe single currency in 
1999. 

But President Jacques Chirac of 
France insisted in Brussels that the 
country would meet toe target on time. 

The government also was likely to 
freeze 19 billion francs of personal tax 
cuts that bad been promised by toe pre- 
vious government, a step predicted by 
Finance Ministry officials earlier in the 
month. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


( [ UL 111 M U U to O Pn** 

AnstBfdn HUT 13M U341 Q33S MIS' — MS* 13® UOT* W L3JT* 

Brasstfc 3USB HJK SMS UH MBS* MJUS — BfllS OSS] 2MI SMB 

R uufcin i u« uK — am aiar urns no 1 izia iju* uns ua* 

LmSm CbJ LS713 2«5J HUM 19110 U06 SUBB 2 Mi MUU9 UM BUB 

MnMd UTAH 2SUF1 BUM SUB M»' UJU 4072 H0M 0950 ‘ IMS ■— 

MHU IHUB MWS 014 WJ» — KUO OSO U77JB U* UM2 H5S 

New York CM — UEBa VO UM IMUO UOt 370 ION 11SJ7S 13M ISMS 

Paris UH7 Mills UK — 0305* law 1104 4flW Slur UM uta m 

TaMfO IUJS HSJB MW H23 U9 SUS XU37 7171 -- ■ W» MJ 

Toronto 1X78 23022 07378 IBM 0ff»* U8T9 03719-02293 IMtf* 

Zurich MK U78S OIK UlO 8JW- 0734 IASS* — 1®* U* 

1 ECU . IIB OiW UMS IOC 1*2375 1B81 <12579 WH BUN IM 
1 SDR U7D U23B 2*58 8324 £9051 UM 5090! MSB UM13 LNW 

CktaagsInAaiaBnbm, London, Maa,PaAianilZorktsrt±igsinediereulmNewYoikat4 

PM.andTonnloiutosaf3PM. 

a To Hoy ana ooumtb: 7b buy onedaaacUnBsof UK MjO.‘ net quoted; «/L- not ataOmt 

Other Dollar Values 

Camacr Pari Can — c y Pari Camay Par* Omaaqr P"* 

AigaaLpasa 09986 -.Cnaktmc. 281.02 Max. paw 7J73 S-JUT.iand «S3S 
AwtraHaoS 13589 Hoag Kami MW M.ZaatondS 1-5138 5.Kor.wea B&45 

AusMMSdL 11637 H nap. fatal 19209 Horw. born 7-4433 SvaaMmna 74204 

Bnoantd U»06 MfamnpM 35J1 Pb*.peso 2955 lUmaS 7734 

CUaa aa yaon &3219 1nda.nipMi- 2477.5 PatfstiiMf ISO - TMMt VM 

end) Ham 3430 • lifclit 0.6681 Paflaseodo 181.38 TUrtashBro 153500. 

DonJsfa krona 6S284 bnnidak. 35547 Rwsntta 5191 JO UAEdMon 14715 

Egypt- paond 1393 Kwdn 030 SoHtfriyal 3.75 VanoukeW. 49250 

Fin. markka £2971 Motor- itaf. 2J93 S to*.* 1-4482 

Forward Rates 


UHd-Libor Rates Ju, y 17 

SMa Frosrt 

Dollar D-Mark Pmc Stating Franc Yen ECU 

1 -month 3-3W lW-IMt 606*. &>Vk 3H-3H Vt-’A 4V*-4V* 

3-manth 5tt-5*k 3Vi- 3V* ivw-lto »-7 31* -3* *a - Vu 4H-«* 

troorth SM-5«VW 3VU ■ 3 ¥m IVu- 1 V, 7Vu - 7V* 3W-3fe M-to 4Vk-41i 
1 -year 5«W.-6 3*fe-3nt 1M-1M 7V0 ■ 7*ta 3to - 3M M-Vu 4¥W-4Y» 

Sources' Reuters, Lloyds Batik. . . . .. 

Rotes owacBt* tt Interbank deposits at SI mBBon mkilawm torequtiakid). 


5. Afr.rand 
S.Kor.wod ' 
Swad. krona 
THmsS 
Thai baht 
TUrtashKra 
UAEtirtaan 
Vann. boBv. 


Carraacy Khtay' (May yartay omaacy 

Poand Storing 1MS2 1.6433 1.6605 Japowwytn 

OMfinMto 1.3704 13673 13654 SartHftme 

D«ibdw nark 1.7914 1.7874 1.7838 


wWtay May «May 
115J7 11537 114J7 

1-4757 1-4704 1.4654 


Sources Jt/G Bank (Amstirdami.' tntosua Bank (Brussel Bmca Cmmerckde nadana 
USBanje Baapto ae France CParisX Bans of TokyodWtiubM (Tokyok 


Key Money Rates 

UaBadStetoa Ctesa Ptev 

tUscaoatrato 530 5.00 

Pda# rata 8 to avk 

Fariarol fWMb 5M 5Vu 

MUfay CPs d — t f t 540 5j61 

180-nay CP datoars S-SO 551 

3 mooSi Troasory Mi £07 £05 

1- yaarTnasarybH 531 5L22 

2 - yaar Traatarr HB 5LB5 5-86 

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38-wor Ttiisny bond &4fl 648 

Man* Lynch MHtayRA 508 5.08 

Japan 

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(AugJ 

Source: Hfrters. 


Lucent Buying Octel 
For Voice-Mail Boost 

Cmpilnl Or Otr Stuff Fnmt DafureUn 

MURRAY HILL, New Jersey — Lucent Technologies 
Inc. said Thursday that it would acquire Octel Com- 
munications Corp. for $1.8 billion in cash in a move to 
beef up its voice mail, fax and messaging technology 
business. 

Lucent said it would pay $31 a share for Octel, a leader 
in voice-mail products. The price is a 16 percent premium 
over Octet's Wednesday closing price of $26.75. 

Octel shares closed at $30,125 Thursday, up $3,375. 
Lucent shares closed at $86,125, down $2.5625. 

Combining Octel with Lucent’s messaging unit will 
create a business with more than $ 1 billion in annual sales 
and will target a $5 billion industry that is growing at a 
rate of 20 parent a year, Lucent said 

Lucent is a leading maker of phone equipment. 

The acquisition will result in a “significant" one-time, 
noncash charge against Lucent’s fourth-quarter earnings, 
the company said. It said the acquisition would be “neu- 
tral” to earnings in the first foil year of operations and add 
to earnings thereafter. 

Robert Cohn, founder, chairman and chief executive of 
Octel, will become president of toe new messaging uniL 

The transaction is expected to be completed by the end 
of August. ( Reuters, AFX, Bluomhcrg) 


Private Banking 

Banks & Independent Asset Managers 
In Switzerland and Liechtenstein 

The Wemlin Directory 1997 

This leading reference book on asset management is 
updated annually with the collaboration of the banks and 
companies themselves. The 640 page 1997 third edition 
covers virtually all major institutions in Switzerland and 
Liechtenstein, together with a 'numbeT of independent 
asset managers in Switzerland. In all, 128 Banks and 57 
Asset Management companies. Details include assets 
under management, shareholders, names of executives 
with their area of responsibility, financial data, plus a rank- 
ing of banks by commission income. An index of 2900 
executives with their telephone numbers completes the 
data base for easy reference. The introductory comments 
by the author on trends and developments in asset man- 
agement will be of utmost interest to the investor and the 
professional alike. 

Order,your copy now from: 

The Wemlin Directory, by Dr. Gunter Woumle 
P.O. Box 3777 - 121 1 Geneva 3 - Switzerland 
Tel: +4122 310 57 44 - Fax: +4122 310 57 45 
Price: CH F 1 90.- (plus shipping) 




PAGE 24 


INTERiVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 28, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 



I The Dow 


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Dollar Marches to New Gains Against Mark 


CvapMhy Our Sag Firm Dapaatn 

NEW YORK — The dollar con- 
tinued its upward march against the 
Deutsche mark an Thursday as Ger- 
man officials maintained a policy of 
mild indifference to their currency’s 
weakness. 

The dollar also gained against 
other major currencies, particularly 
the yen after Japan said its June trade 
surplus was smaller than expected 
The data left Japanese exporters 
with fewer dollars to sell and allayed 
concern over trade tensions with the 
United States. 

The dollar was at 1 15.975 yen in 
late trading, up from 1 15.620 yen 
the day before, and at 1.7930 DM, 
compared with 1.7914 DM. 

The dollar was also at 1.4808 
Swiss francs, up from 1 4750 francs, 
and at 6.0565 French francs, up 
from 6.0450 francs. 

The pound fell to $1.6733 from 
SI- 6787. 

The Bundesbank sought Thursday 
to cool currency-market speculation 
against the Deutsche mark, but ana- 
lysts said more weakness was likely 


if the German authorities went no 
further than verbal intervention. 

Hans Tfetzneyer, the president of 
the Bundesbank, said he was watch- 
ing developments “very carefully" 


and 


the mark’s correction 


: or the most part, exchange-rate 
developments are the reside of cor- 
rections, which were necessary," 
Mr. Tietroeyer said in Frankfurt. “I 
hope now that it will not come to an 
overreaction." 

His comments followed a state- 
ment Wednesday by Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's cabinet that Ger- 
many was in touch with other mem- 
bers of tire Group of Seven leading: 
industrialized nations on the rise of 
the dollar against the Deutsche 
mark. The dollar rose to 1 .SO DM on 
Tuesday, a six-year high. 

The. currency moves, the state- 
ment added, reflected economic 
fundamentals as well as speculation 
before European economic and 
monetary union. 

But beyond the hint at consulta- 
tion with its G-7 partners, Bonn 


threatened no concrete action to 
prop up the mark. 

On Thursday, a Bundesbank 
council member, Hans-Juergen 
Krupp, reinforced the official view, 
calling the Deutsche mark’s recent 
drop a “correction" from the post- 
war highs it reached in March 1995. 
■ Currency strategists said the mild 
tone of comments by both Bonn and 
Frankfort this week showed Ger- 
many was prepared to live with a 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

weaker mark and that action in the 
form of currency intervention or in- 
terest-cate rises was not imminent. 

German exporters, meanwhile, 
stressed the need for a strong arid 
stable Deutsche mark to hold down 
the prices of vital imports. 

“A weaker Deutsche mark hurts 
companies by raising the cost of 
imports," Gu enter Albrecht, head 
of the economics department at the 
German chamber of commerce DI- 
HT said. "If the downward trend of 
the mark continues, the Bundesbank 


will certainly have to take some 

action.' . . 

Traders said Japan s trade figures 
showed the dollar's 8 percent drop 
against the yen since early May 
couki be reining in Japan's trade 
gap, which had swelled in the past 
couple months, sparking concern 
among CJ.S. officials. . . . 

“At least it raises the possibility 
that the yen has strengthened 
enough to ease trade tensions," Mr. 
Koss said . 

Traders are now awaiting a U.S. 
report on Friday that is expected to 
show the trade deficit widened to 
$10.2 billion in April as exports 
slowed. 

' Also on Thursday, the chancellor 
of the Exchequer, Gordon Brown, 
said Britain's entry to the single 
currency faced "formidable 
obstacles.” Echoing his Tory pre- 
decessor, the Labour official said- 
B riiain should only join "if the eco- 
nomic decisions are right, not on the 
basis of a timetable that has been set 
politically." 

f Reuters . Bloomberg, NYT) 


Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


Inmuiiinal HcraU Ttohmc 


Very briefly: 


McDonnell Douglas’s Profit Jumps 

ST. LOUIS (AP) — McDonnell Douglas Corp. said Thurs- 
day its second-quarter earnings rose 3.7 percent as a favorable 
resolution of stare tax issues offset costs related to its pending 
acquisition by Boeing Co. 

The aerospace manufacturer reported net earnings of S 1 95 
million, or 93 cents a share, on revenue of S3J56 billion for the 
quarter ended June 30, conwared with $188 million, or 87 
cents a share, on sales of $3.26 billion a year earlier. 

Boeing's purchase of McDonnell Douglas is due to be 
completed Aug. 1, although strong opposition to the merger 
from the European Union has created uncertainty about the 
completion date. 

Burlington to Buy Louisiana Land 

NEW ORLEANS (AF) — Burlington Resources Inc. said it 
would acquire Louisiana Land & Exploration Co. for S2_5 
billion in stock, creating a giant independent petroleum ex- 
ploration and production company. 

Houston- based Burlington also said it would assume $500 
million in LL&E debt, bringing the value of the deal to $3 
billion. The acquisition is expected to close in three months. 

Burlington officials said the acquisition would give it 
strong offshore and onshore petroleum operations in the Gulf 
of Mexico and Kansas, Oklahoma and North Texas and the 
San Juan Basin, which straddles the Colorado-New Mexico 
border. 

• A New York Stock Exchange seat sold for $1 .35 million, a 
$ 1 75,000 increase from foe previous sale July ] . The highest 
price ever paid for a seat was $1.45 million on May 7, 19%. 

• Time Warner Inc. and US West Inc. decided to remain 

partners, calling off talks to restructure their Time Warner 
Entertainment partnership, which is about 75 percent owned 
by Time Warner and includes four-fifths of Time Warner’s 
cable systems. Bloomberg, Reuters 


Shares Slip as Profits Battle Profit-Taking 


Ci’CfUnl bw Ow Sug Fwm DfljwVi 

NEW YORK — Stock prices fell 
Thursday as a stream of stronger- 
than-expected earnings reports 
failed to overcome profit-taking by 
investors after Wednesday's record 
rally above 8,000. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
fell 18.11 points to close at 
8,020.77, with declining issues out- 
numbering advancers by a 7-to-6 
ratio on foe New York Stock Ex- 
change. The Standard & Poor’s 500- 
stock index fell 4.99 to 93 1 .60. 

The Nasdaq composite index, ' 
which has set record highs for 10 


straight sessions, fell 11.65 to 
1,568.98, hurt by declines in 3Com, 
Ascend Communications and MCL 
Merck, McDonald's, Polaroid 
and Sears all rose after announcing 
second-quarter earnings rises. 
Coca-Cola shares also gained after 
the company reponed second- 
quarter earnings rose 9.9 percent. 

But the big events of the day were 
expected after the closing bell, when 
Microsoft and Sun Microsystems 
were to release their results. Both 
companies’ shares were higher. 

On Wednesday, technology 
shares led a broad rally spurred by 


more good news on company 
profits, inflation and interest rates. 
The Dow gained 63 points, breaking 
above the 8 ,000-barrier less than 2V& 
years after it first crossed 4,000. 

There was tittle reaction to Thurs- 
day’s economic news. The Coro- 

U-S. STOCKS ~ 

merce Department reported that 
housing starts rose 4.8 percent in 
June to 1.48 milli on, slightly more 
than expected, but foe May estimate 
was revised to a steeper 6.6 percent 
dec tine. 


The Labor Department said new 
claims for jobless benefits fell by 
28,000 last week to 349,000. But die 
less volatile four-week average rose 
to 348,750, the highest since the 
period ended Jan. 18. 

Bonds were little changed, and 
yields hovered at seven-month lows 
amid confidence inflation will re- 
main tame, even as reports showed 
housing, employment and manufac- 
turing may be picking up. 


The price of the 30-year Treasury 
bond finished at 101 26/32, down 4/ 
32, pushing the yield to 6.49 percent 
from 6.47 percent. (AP, Bloomberg) 


AT&T: Phone Company Embarks on New Search for Leadership and a Future 


Continued from Page 13 

take over from Mr. Allen imme- 
diately. 

People with knowledge of foe 
company said foe board wanted to 
move swiftly. They said that in ad- 
dition to Mr. Zegtis, a leading can- 
didate for the job is George Fisher, 
chairman and chief executive of 
Eastman Kodak Co., who recently 
joined AT&T’s board. 

These people noted that Mr. Fish- 
er had not been named to the search 
committee, which would have forced 


him to withdraw his nam e from con- 
sideration for chief executive: 

Mr. Elisha acknowledged that foe 
board had made a mistake in choos- 
ing Mr. Waller. But he added. "At 
the time he was recruited, ail of us as 
independent directors believed he 
was foe best candidate for the job." 

Although Mr. Allen played a 
pivotal role in choosing Mr. Walter, 
he was mum Wednesday about his 
departure, issuing no statements. 

Analysts reacted to Wednesday's 
news with almost weary resignation 
as foe latest in a skein of discour- 


aging developments at AT&T. 

Despite 51 billion in investments, 
AT&T has been able to offer local 
service in only four U.S. states since 
foe Telecommunications Act of 
19% opened up the country' tele- 
phone market 

Those heavy investments have 
weakened profits, which have 
suffered this year from stiff com- 
petition in AT&T's core long-dis- 
tance business and investments in 
other new business such as wireless 
services. 

The succession crisis began last 


August with the resignation of Alex 
Mandl, once considered Mr. Allen ’s 
heir apparent, who left to run an. 
small wireless company. 

While some said foe plan for Mr. 
Allen to step down immediately 
would remove an impediment that 
hampered last year’s search, others 
said Mr. Walter’s rocky ride might 
dissuade top-flight candidates. 

As for Mr. Walter, his lawyer, 
Robert Barnett, said: "Mr. Walter's 
services will be in great demand In 
foe future, in my view. John Walter 
will be just fine.” 


Market 
Smiles on 
Apple’s 
Results 


CimfMlnOmStigFirmtMrpitats 

CUPERTINO, California — 
Shares in Apple Computer Inc. 
rose Thursday in their first trad- 
ing since the battered computer 
maker surprised Wall Street by 
reporting a small er-than-expeo- 
ted lossfor Us third quarter. 

Apple’s loss grew to $56mil- 
lion in the three months that 
ended June 27 from $32 million 
a year earlier. Still, that was 
better than analysts had pre- 
dicted, and it allayed fears that 
the pioneering computer com- 
pany was on the veqge of col- 
lapse. 

“It’s not good news, but- it 
does show one thing: They’ve 
got rid of foe worst of the red 
ink," said Tim Bajarin, pres- 
ident of Creative Strategies Re- 
search International in San 
Jose, California. 

Revenue for the quarter fell 
to $1.74 billion from $2.18 bil- 
lion a year earlier. Butit was up 
from $1.6 billion for the first 
three months of 1997, lifted 
mainly by sales to U.S. schools 
and to Japan. Apple announced 
the figures Wednesday after the 
stock market closed. 

Apple has lost money in six 
of foe past eight quarters. The 
company has been hurt by com- 
petition, high costs stemming 
from its production of both 
hardware and software, product 
delays, and mistakes in judging 
demand. 

Since the abrupt dismissal 
last week of Apple’s chairman 
and chief executive. Gilbert 
Amelio, concerns had mounted 
that the board had acted in the 
face of a potential financial 
meltdown. 

The company’s stock 
plunged briefly to a historic low 
of $12.75 before rebounding to 
close Wednesday at $16.4375 
in Nasdaq trading, up 50 cents 
for the day: 

Apple shares closed at 
$1730 Thursday, up $1 .0625. 

Apple executives said foe 
company's cash position was 
still strong, with slightly more 
than $1 billion bn hand. 

(NYT, AP. Bloomberg) 


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U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


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124643 123694 1237.07 
WM34 166676 1 47045 
14V3JJ9 148243 168047 
19*9 47 178157 1 9B115 
1005.14 W2.I7 77U7 


■2-2B 

*1.78 

•443 

-510 

•14 


-145 

-1089 

■7.77 

•MS 

-545 

■1144 


WOT 

43864 


43439 437.34 -04? 


Dow Jones Bond 


29 Bonds 

MUtilAn 

ICIrtmttals 


104.14 

101.58 

106.71 


*0M 

*002 

•d.M 


KM* 
OC« 
MttlWI* 
Sim Mk:i 
MO 
3Com 
QwwJunn 

Oan 

cm 

cwc«, 

AKSW 

ak*c 

Asparels 

WattOn 

OtoOb 


AMEX 

Harter 

5PDS 

fSF* 

AW, 

Motors 


wS* 

77076 36ft 
7jll« STM 
BRfl 77ft 

wap 

43SB9 181, 
573'3 21ft 
54745 32*. 
51687 57ft 


84 87ft 
,30ft 30* 
146ft 140ft 
45ft 46 

3SW. 36 

MStS! 

12ft 131* 
7716 m> 
144 15Dft 
51*. 52ft 
16fti 17ft 
17 17 ft 
326. 3n. 
56 56*. 


+3 

-Ml 
+ 1 
-1ft 
-2ft 
-*» 
♦ 1ft 


Graini 

corn (awn 

5000 bu irtolmum- awsiw busM 
M<n 267ft XPh 2tm 
Sep 77 2S3 245ft 247ft 

Dec 77 254 UiVi 248ft 
MOTH 262 254ft 256ft 

Mov 98 366 257ft 262V, 

JUI9I 367 343 344ft 

SCOW 29 255ft 256ft 

est.srtes NA. Wecr*.50ks 72J06 
Wed's open int 29JKI ofl 5403 

SOYBEAN MEM. (CB0T1 
I 0 D fom- Mnisr Mn 
All 77 27138 26550 K7JD 
AW77 24L50 31160 242.90 
Sop 77 22430 moo 217J0 
OOT7 20*30 20030 20030 
Dec 77 17&00 17230 17330 
Jon 78 19630 17040 17150 
EsI. ides NA. Wetfs-sries 21.062 
Wed's acen tar 1)5334 up 1376 

SOYBEAN OL tCBOT) 


7JT4 

43J30 

14M78 

28J71 

5343 

4471 


3.706 

264)48 

17.115 

UJ17 

36.747 

W7I 


HOgti Law Latest Cage OpM 

ORANGE JUKE (NCTTi) 

15400 114.-011 sasrte, 

Sep 97 75.10 7175 7JJB -0.9S 19J07 

NW77 77.35 7630 76JS -1.19 6.777 

Jan 78 ODJO 79.45 79 JO -an 2.767 

Mtrw 8X40 8245 aua -run mob 

ES.wJks NA Wed’s, soles IJSO 

Wed's open Int 31437 up 134 


High Low Latest Chge Optat 


•ft" 




Jri?7 

2U3 

21.77 

an 


Aug 97 

22.4J 

win 

72U5 


See 77 

72J9 

3230 

32 21 


Od*7 

2264 

2225 

TJM 

•1 

Dec 77 

2281 

J24S 

2246 


Jan 78 

32.78 

33-58 

225* 


Est. sales na wed's, sates 1X803 
WM 1 * open kit 102,259 pH 70372 


669 
*L2S» 
16486 
14JW7 
4BJ7 J 
5471 


Metals 

COLOCHCMX} 

100 irm at - cfcOtors per »wv oi 
A4 77 324« 

Aug 77 32530 31X40 324.70 
5® 97 32540 

OOT7 32670 321J0 376J0 
Dec 77 32840 32240 328 JO 
Feb 98 23040 32840 3X150 
Apr78 XO.70 327 JO 332.70 
Jinn 33570 279.30 31510 
Aug 98 33740 

ED. soles NA. Wed's, sales am 
Weffsopenlnt mm up 4699 

M GRADE COPPBl (NC 8 AX) 
04N6i.-cMswr6 
All 97 109 JO 10630 >08.70 


4640 7 

-440 104JI0 

‘AM 2 

•■AID 11.131 
- 620 43.137 
*640 11428 
*A5D 5.133 
*650 7.472 
640 1555 


wt HM L» PM SOYBEANS (CBOn 

25142 tv. 

17559 73'9» 

IWt 6*» 

1*478 7 
8721 28*. 


6587 

ss 


S"N SI. 
9ja B 9J*» 
6ft 
A’. 6 *. 
77ii 785s 
5 S». 
7»» 

»■ l'l 

4i* 4 1 * 

XU 3Ki 


iOOP bu mwnum- cun ptr Ou%hcl 

Jill 97 

TBS 

777 

724ft 

AMI 77 

7S4 

733 

738 

Sea 77 

658Y. 

641 

644ft 

NOV 77 

414V, 

SffTVj 

4m 

Jen 78 

611ft 

401 

MOV. 

E0.5Ol» NA 

WetTl-KUn SI. 759 

W«Ti open 4 ff 

I46.S47 

ua 1311 


Trod/ng Activity 
NYSE 


! < 
IP, 


en M =1 


Wfflfi 

sec-iM 

u 

scnvei 

fic« Ltsr. 


AMEX 


J7M 

1584 

555 

307 

543 


„5Ee 

303 


Nasdaq 

Aown c«j 
Dedm<w 
LWKlri 
Intel issues 
Hew 4ron, 

So Low, 

Market Sales 


I4W 

1877 

2100 

4*07 


xm 

1887 
I W0 
5777 


WHEAT ICSOT) 

5 M7bU nwirui). asm P" lwiM< 
AAV 371 373 3» 

5ep77 335 3X3 333ft 

Dec 97 347V, 3*5 34/ 

Mar78 3Hft 354ft 3S7 1 . 

Ed softs NA werfs sates l»./» 
Wetrsopen«> 9IJ14 up 467 


Livestock 
CATTLE KMERI 
eaJHI ■ onH per te 


2.171 
34.116 
11377 
71 .739 
14.774 


777 

42436 

37474 

6.79S 


AUB77 10700 mm 106.75 
Sep 77 10460 MOJO 10445 
OOT7 10525 1(3360 H35J5 
Nov 77 104,75 10340 104.95 
Dec 77 W175 16480 10175 
Jan 78 HU 95 

Feh» W 2 J 0 

UterTS 10170 10420 WTO 

EsI. tales NA wetfs. sales i 
Wnrsaamittf 47JM7 o» 970 

SILVER (NCMX) 

UMIrwm -(inHiwN>iii. 

All 97 431 70 41450 431 70 


*190 4,717 


Aug 77 
Sep 77 43650 
Dec 97 43] 00 
tenia 432.40 
Worn 437 50 
MQyTS 44a 60 
M «8 44440 


47110 
4)4-50 4MM 
474 00 43470 
43000 432a 
41700 43680 
41700 4J0M 
43800 444 40 


Esl tries NA weirs tries 
WM'soacnH 101.707 UP 2."! 

PLATMUM (NMER) 

tetm.’o/ - <Mkji , mv nn, a. 

Mil 401 .TO 41100 408 n 
Od 77 37450 B3 50 39170 
■ten 71 38810 38400 38870 
Esl sates NA Wed'S sates i 
Wetfs oaen rt 17.138 off 200 


*270 

J-496 

*26$ 

22 J 66 

*23$ 

1477 

* 22 $ 

1.354 

♦16$ 

7.646 

■1.85 

742 

*1 70 

632 

-160 

JJJ1 

7.S73 

•430 

l« 

•600 

&7J80 

• tn 

15310 

-610 

X 

•620 

74J7 

■420 

7.164 

-42S 

7.067 

14 1?.' 
U 

-650 

377 

-150 

7.713 

-1 » 

1J79 

ns 


umeairaieFB 

csaooo - OH 6 , 37 nds of 100 pd 

Sep 97 USDS 1)4-36 114-73 *(W9 173.771 

Dec 97 N.T. NT. 114.11 toe? 1,113 

Estsrias: IR127. Piw. sates- 47.72T 
PniY. open W - 1 76 104 rit 46 6 
10-YEAR FRENCH 60V. BONDS (MATIF3 

FFsaaooo ptsdioopd 

s«77 13040 13024 130.44 * 0.30 209.911 

Dec 97 9726 7893 99.16 *032 4367 

MorTO 78J8 7838 7854 *032 0 

Est srier. lift 195. 

Open lot: 3I4J7B up 327. 

(YAUAN GOVERNMENT BOND OJFPH 

irLTOOmilUon pfial 100 pd 

5ep«7 13675 IJ5J4 r |6 44 rOEI RJX573 
Dec *7 NT. NT 108J0 *047 2J52 

ESI sates. 52.748 Prev sates: 46508 
PrwopenW. igs.925 up 511 
EUROOOUARS (CMER) 
f ( m«tan-pts ri 108 PO 

Aug 97 9436 7125 9425 23,917 

Sep97 9431 7423 7423 531.704 

Dec 97 W.09 9406 94D6 464097 

Mot 98 TAW MOD 7401 JXJH 

JWlM 9175 91 97 Tin 24*767 

Sep « 9106 7103 7183 2 W. 7 I 9 

Decte 9175 Tin 7JJJ 157.183 

Mor 79 9275 9im 7171 120.773 

JunT9 7173 7167 7J.67 90.779 

5ffl97 7168 7365 7345 77 A0 

OK 77 7162 7119 TJJ9 70.240 

Ed. tries NA Wed's, sales 376 J37 

Wed's open M 2 700.97J up 1U26 

BRITISH POUND (CMER | 

62. 500 paunes . I per caano 
Sn>77 16754 1&616 1 6690 42 403 

Dec 97 1 6467 1 5560 1 4637 
7Aar7( 16572 

Esi. sates U.«63 Wed's sam 7JU 
Wed’s open ^ 614*3 ofl 8 « 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 
inOWtlofstes lr»»C9fi Uir 

Sen 77 mi -so ?ni 

Dec 97 .US '31? TJi; 

wot 7 i .nti ;is jw 

e-J sees M-S9J '.VedSUtes 9.711 

Wrtfscpmji' c: l» lii* 


High Law Lomu Chge aplnl 


Industrials 


COTTON zmeno 

aw»0 me- oantl POT 4 l 

Oct 97 748$ 74.H 

Dec 97 7484 74.15 

Mar 98 7605 75.45 
Mar 98 7663 76.15 
-lo! 98 77.15 7&B5 


7478 *060 1X249 

!4JB *0 SS 46477 

71W *061 961* 
7663 *0161 2662 
77.16 *860 1^83 


Est sates NA Wad’s, sries 5631 
Wetfsopenlnf 77778 oR JlB 
HEATING OR. (NMB4) 

424K8 peucom per pal 
Au9j7 K* 5168 5X89 
SfiP 97 5490 5120 5433 

<W97 &V 5150 5498 
Mov 77 5430 55.35 Win 

Dec 97 S7.W 55.80 5663 

Jon 98 5760 5425 57.18 
Pet) 98 57.75 5460 57.41 

Mor 78 5/m a75 J463 

Aor 98 55 9Q 553 } an . 

5st. wtes Na Wed’s, tries 23638 
Wetfsopenini 153,640 OH 2029 

UGHT SWEET CRUDE INMER) 
KaajtnL- oorum ocr hot 
Aug 77 ?:,X 1763 2000 

Sep 97 BU3 1760 2063 

Or 97 2017 1978 BLOO 
NuvTJ 20.17 1987 If.gj 

DtCW 2ttU J96S 19. « 
ten 98 20.10 2000 »ne 

PepTI 2007 2000 &as 

Mot« 2003 19.75 2003 

Am 98 2003 2000 Mon 

Mur 78 2X03 2000 BUB 
Es*sstes HA. WOtfs. soles 


+1J1 3041? 
*0-98 27622 
+008 31518 
*063 15,725 
♦n i} u&n 
*IU 8 14J92 
*0JI 7672 
+068 UM 
+063 1981 


8 » Wed’s epenun 414101 up 5741 
Natural gas [NMER) 

1? 1 p*' •*“ 

4i*77 2 225 2.152 2)7J 


+035 60386 
-037 74928 
+036 45643 
+016 21,936 
*CtU 4 MW 
*017 M322 
+03J 11313 
+088 1 M 
*OM 5318 
+0LU 7376 
IT2653 


41.431 

:.773 

ss: 


Pionw. 



11 " 



dev 

Fi*v 


■HO* 

Vr«f. 


fm 

4 <4 





• 00 

CHK 6 - 

s’ 

-» 



37* 


NYSE 

63467 

7W.93 







7723 


*• 

1C I 

•n 


- v n rm “ ?rj 

n 

9 

73 

J 

NOMtaq 

tom&ons. 

70389 

836 JO 


lei 

m 

ID 

780 

2S4 

212 

PSri 

41) 

in 

ra 


S3 

£1 

sri 

im 

18S 

■H 

W 

S 

u« 

ITT 

a 


lea 

1» 

win 

% 

'IS 

ffl 

1SS 

na 

1UJ 

B51 

1'ri? 

171 

ris 

21 
A 
1 IS 

a 

771 

is 

'« 

fi+J 

E4 


it :i 
11 « li- 
e's 4- 
7'. r - 
nr, re, 
S-. ft 
*1 v« 
1* !'. 
» 

!]»« TTVr 

S9*fc 

lift lift 
I .* ift 
I* I II: 
ir. 


Dividends 

CotRpaiT Pe» Amt Rec Par Canpany 

IRREGULAR 

Dcsc.V.GRhod .16385 9-15 9 30 
Ne* Media . .03 7 72 7-25 

STOCK SPLIT 
Fa Nrthm Cap 2 iw I spW. 


rrs. 
I ’ft 
M 


Fit TTcrim Bq> 3 lor J spa. 

2 la : ".. 
McantJe Bo® 3 ftr 2 spOl. 


lossndiSv 


t-.« 


Ift 


( far I split. 
... . . CB3fSr2si 
?hutfljC«p2fpMspa. 

STOCK 
M 2 J--U 


‘.’jfSaalti BnCp 


B4 8-27 


s< 

11 1 

11 ■ 


4ft 

II* 

Hft 

C 


a • 

15ft 
M>. Gs 
lift II* 
li , I1» 


■7; 


1? 


1] II 
17ft 1*4 
21 1 

2 - 1 

(■ ti t 
1ft 1ft 
13, TO-, 

4*1 l'l 

r t+i 

12 U ir, 

t*i I-* 

r r- 

« 


r-s 

lift 


ITS 

O ■ 


ir, 
'I* 
:< 1 


*•* 

:2ft 

*<1 


REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Ccrtc+minl Bncpl forlOrcvencspU. 

INCREASED 

FflCltOrtcrCp Q .M 9-19 10-14 


MVVstmBnqj 


a 32 7-38 8-5 


INITIAL 

WNoflCpSCn .. .10 7-2S 8-8 

KSBnepn _ .15 725 8-3 

Hentoge FctSvc n . .10 7 29 8 - 1 ? 

Mertnnds Bohn . .IS 7-30 B4 

REGULAR 

AsMgsdIK C 375 8 -W 9-15 


Copdol Bnq> LW 
Clunlef OneFncl 
CrioptolGas 
FFDFnd _ 

Fst SodthwistFa 
HarihSiosBk 

Nubcplnc 

FerConj 

Hit Donalds C«»p 
McramrieBonc 
//, made Group 
NeftYoik Tones 
New rent GoM 
NnemnilMlMU 
Noruiini Tmsl 
Da den Cup 
Perm Entente 
Reap* lire Cp 

SIGCORPFnc 

ScfnmfaChartei 

MmrinWMmBs 

yorGMPtnrs 

Rerens Fncl 

St Joseph LfPwr 

SoimiPWBalm 

SeuttiTrvstCora 

TrsnsdninceSpR 


HMri iOd 


P *1 

r Am 

1 ROC 

: Pay 

O 

.10 

B -1 

9-1 

O 

25 

86 

873 

a 

J35 

119 

9-15 

a 

4175 

7-31 

8 IS 

o 

06 

7-74 

81 

0 

.14S 

779 

8-12 

0 

.19 

8-18 

93 

a 

XI 

93 

9 15 

o 

082S 

8-79 

9-17 

a 

43 

9-10 

T 0 -! 

a 

.03 

774 

731 

a 

.16 

9-3 

9-19 

a 

1 ? 

7-30 

878 

0 

.12 

7-30 

8-28 

a 

IB 

9-10 

181 

o . 

3125 

9-17 

183 

a 

JO 

9-J 

9-15 

M . 

1575 

B-l 

815 

a 

S& 

8-22 

9-20 

a 

.as 

8-14 

878 

0 

10 

833 

9-5 

Q 

55 

8-1 

814 

a 

30 

9-15 

181 

a 

24 

8-4 

818 

0 

.1ZS 

s-r 

8 IS 

a 

25 

833 

18) 

M 

16 

7-31 

815 

to ai 

tewl 

'par 



Aug 92 

6670 

66.17 

14 $7 

—002 

33437 

0097 

UM 

69 17 

6957 


34 J80 

Dec 97 

7110 

7132 

7157 

•0.H 


WP 

7150 

7305 

73J0 

•003 


Af+*B 

7127 

7500 

75J7 

*005 


*“>98 

7785 

7175 

n* 

*005 

2.46* 

EU soteft 11.160 WtafllriH 

74J4S 

teinamei 

97 JM 

OB 461 



FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 







Aw 97 

EMU 

11.70 

•3-75 

•065 

UL990 

Sen 97 

8271 

11 75 

0.72 

*043 

2«l 

0097 

CTO 


8387 



NW 97 

0.97 

IB 25 

8385 

-017 

2297 

Jones 

84.70 

8435 

8467 

*0.03 

1.624 

More 

•145 

D00 

844 

•030 

770 


LONDON METALS (L«eT 
CUhn pci mclnc ton 
AAiednori (Hhw Smtel 
5pft ISifr, I Sir- 1537' ISM . 
Konrad 1577 a) israaa vm qo isMijn 
Copper Canada, (Wak Com 
teal 24Q10I /tesaa :443 m .'a* 00 
717000 277100 2JM00 .TsSiW 


Fanrad 

Load 

'tew 

Fansard 

NKM 

■n* 

Spot 

F«*ftanl 


*27' > 

OI7 00 


MB'.- 

440 00 


62? no 

M 0 on 


679 m 
641 oa 


671001 672ooa <41,00 Mjoao 
687 S 00 6030 00 S7+5M 6715 00 


NMrw'ADlfc UBtnth in CMafiaBlamiu 
■» a wn lBl p B^ j prtprtit tesn-wuwri 


54- 5»ft 


I-. 4-j 

t *” 4*1 

IT* IC s 

Xft ;ti. 
3 1 n 
a*, r-. 
X’> ,T4 


IS, 

z 

a-l 

.T4 


IS. ’si. 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sales figures are wiriBciaL Y 00 I 9 rngns, and taw leflecj n» jrrvdovs Smdorimthcotmti 
^TwKbirtrKriteWesttraSnqdoy.WneinqqaBorrtettiftr k lendaiPUtiangloSprtCfrtOTrnoff 
hc& been poldllteiteOiShigli-kwiwige end cSwlendatesiioam lor aw new stocks oniT. Unless, 
ritienusc nried irios ri dMdends are nri risfatoserrcrtB bawd on B» tam> Oectamtoi 
a - dividend oho odre (sj B ■ onnvfll rate rt rindend ptoi stock dividend, c • ttquidntinq 
fli* 8 l«iacc- PPescerdsW.OM- co IfctLd- new vtodv kite, dfl- loss m the kjsnjmocrtns. 
• - dtvidmd declared or paid in orrcctfang I? montnv < - annual rale, incteascd on krsl 
dodoralion. 9 ■ dividend m Ccnotficn funds, subfecl to 15% nan-mUciKe tax. I - drtidend 
dcdoied after spH -vp « stock dnndentL | . dividend paid Ws near, omitted, deferred or no 
odea teJcen el WesJ dividend inert J 19 . t - dfodend aodatvc or paid ttris tvgr. an 
acarniuloLvc Issue wOti dnMenifs « arrears. ■ - annual rate, reduced an Iasi dcrtannion. 
n • new issue m The P «1 S3 weeks. The tegh-tow range begins irflfi the start of trootaa 
nd - next day deLvwy. p - auhal dnrtaend annual We unknown. P/E ■ pree-parangs ratio, 
g - dtocd-ind muluol fund, r - dividcnct Oectarrd Of paid m prewimg 1 ? month-, plus slock 
dlYittend.*- stack split Omdcnd hetpns with dote of sdW. if* -soles f- dividend poidm 
slDdi n PKeding 13 montos. estimated cadi value on cx-dwideod orw-dislrtouiion data 
o-newyecrtrtucti.v-tradinohnlted ri.MtonkraBfcywircrivcrshipofBeiiigMtafganiiad 

uitoer me Bankruptcy Act. orseevntin ossumed bv sudi compomes. wd - when drilnbuted. 
wi - wfrn me - »»h wonrrrfv x - e»-d/vnfcnd or ei rWtll. «#» - cx-duTrtavtwn. 

nr - tfitncui worranis. i- ci -dividend end sales m ML rid - ytcid X - sales in luS. 


Ed tries MU weds tries 439? 
WMTseaenM 24686 off «B 

HOCS-ltem tOUERJ 
40 JMa Bn - cents eef *1 
WU 837? 

Aug 97 BUS «35 ISO *0.19 

0097 7460 TIB 74JB *017 

Dec 97 71.18 7860 7817 — OUT 

FritRI 6955 UK >801 

ES.sriK 5.577 WWfvsriK 5.792 
\Mrs open mt 36.770 m 177 
POM BELLIES (CMBO 
0 OOP lbs- rente nwte 
Jul77 mu 8545 wn >230 

Aug 77 8547 me Si 42 •UO 

Fed 91 JlIP 71.15 JJ17 +165 

Ed. sates USB Weds sates U79 
WeCTSBPCnrt SAB Off 157 


Food 

COCOA (HCSEJ 
IB memc ken - 1 uar ion 
SeP 97 1540 

Dec 97 106 
M*r« 105 
Mar's use 
juin iw 
Sep 78 MB .... 

Est.sries 10336 WWS sates 5687 
wed > imnH HD. 71 ; Off W 


33M 

11.916 

126«4 

5.282 

1.719 


470 

43(6 

915 


337507 539500 M.TJrtl iJSOOO 

« 5*?P 0D wnoa s^nou 

XlK isprari Nigk CroM) 

Spat 1508 O0 1509 JO ie. 1472 

Friftaw 151000 1511 UD IteSOO 147700 

Htgfl Ln Oovr cihh- opnl 


Financial 

US T. BILLS (CMER) 
lliMAen i»f,a*l®pr» 

SM77 9471 M87 Mgs 
DOC?/ 747/ 74 75 74H 
Mor 78 74 6| 

&Jsrin HA Wad-s sates 187 
Wnrsspcnrt B.I3J uo a 


7,509 

612 

3i 


226666 
7 470 


1576 

1634 

-43 

31.738 

1571 

1583 

-43 

23J09 

1417 

1417 


21.767 

U37 

1637 

-43 

18.110 

uss 

14B 

—43 

1.178 

147$ 

WJ 

-43 

3.70V 


COFFEE C (NOE) 
p,Mte ■ rente pot B 

Jri77 17000 18600 1869# -0.35 320 

5«I?; Ml JO 15960 168.44 -IJ» IUB 

Dec 97 f»J0 14735 WM - 6 M 5 .in 

MotM MOW 13800 13L» -015 JIM 

Mow 91 117 SO 114 40 IU« —LIB 9J9 

Eusrim J6U VMLsrin 
weds open eit II, W «> 737 

SUOAS-MRLD It (NCSEJ 

H76«BV-ra*mraB 

0077 II Jl 11.15 HI* -4.14 «.7W 

Mar 71 1148 lUS 1135 -812 45676 

Mov 96 11 H 1116 II* -OBJ MAH 

MM II a II" "" -»*. 

tst son 14.510 Weds tries 
WWSMJrtirit 156621 vP *08 


i YR, TREASURY (CBOT1 
JI09.OM rrm- Ote A Anns ol l« pci 

Sl»7/ 10/-77 107-09 107-11 
QOC 77 107-07 104-SJ 106-50 
MarM tel 

NA w«rs. sates 31.701 
Wed's Boen in) 2 28,136 up 1770 

»»R. TREASURY (CMT) 

1 IW,HO<vm- re, a Jlnti e* loo per 

5JOW 110-42 107-21 W7-26 351.723 

OK7/im-?J 107-15 107-16 -01 tac 

M®’* ... 109-04 -01 228 

w.',rie-. NA Wfffs sates 71*10 
Wed's aorn iri 368716 up 55*3 

US TREASURY BONDS <OWT| 

I'lH’IW OBO-tn, & ITndsol no Pdl 

»>9J nun 114.17 in-ji -01 sm.m 

Der 7.' 114-21 114-06 114-M -01 B.7II 

M»W1M.« 114-01 114-00 Jigfi 

JunMUi-21 lij-18 113-31 887 

EM -teas NA Wed's sales 465.510 
WrtTsnpenuu 552 . M Up 27166 

L IBOft 1 -MONTH ICMER) 

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:3 .Mobility coupled with the capacity to take advantage of market opportunities quickly and flexibly - that’s the way to succeed on global 


._. \ markets. Which is why Huls AG is sending us into the market as an independent limited liability company from January 1, 1998. Clustering 


.. * 4*i 


a j[ major activities in the field of olefin chemicals into a single independent company with clear market focus is only one of the many 


V£?:P measures to feature in the Global Fitness Program of Huls AG which in future will take on the role of strategic holding company. This 


opens up whole new market opportunities, paving the way for us to reach our ambitious goal of becoming a leading supplier worldwide. 


Watch this space for the name under which we’ll be starting out. Olefin Chemicals Division of Huls AG, Marl, Germany. 




Dtrc over The Link To Life 


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AP3jh r n Irt-. ; 


PAGE 15 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1997 






















PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 18, 199 


EUROPE 



EU Sees Asian Snag in Finance Trade Pact 


GENEVA — The European Un- 


But Upturn 
Is Forecast 


ion said Thursday it was happy with 
an enhanced US. proposal for a 


Anglin/ fe 0 *rS.rfFm> Pajvrhr- 

PARIS — SGS-Thomson 
Microelectronics NV said 
Thursday its profit for the first 
half was down almost 50 per- 
cent from the same period last 
year but that it expected an im- 
provement in margins in the 


provement in margins in me 
fourth quarter. 

The French-Jialtan concern 


said its first-half net income fell 
to S1S2.6 million from S351.I 
million and that its second- 
quarter profit also fell about 4S 
percent, to $92.1 million. 

The second-quarter earnings 
equaled 66 cents a share, in line 
with a forecast made in the com- 
pany's profit warning June 5. 

Still, SGS-Thomson failed lo 
match growth at U.S. rivals In- 
tel Corp. and Texas Instruments 
Inc. as it continued to depend 
too much on the European mar- 
ket and on standard micropro- 
cessors. which cany lower 
profit margins than custom 
chips, analysts said. 

SGS-Thomson. which re- 
ports its results in dollars, also 
suffered from the strength of 
the U.S. currency. 

The company also an- 
nounced an agreement with 
Alcatel Alsthom SA, Europe's 
biggest telecommunications- 
equipment company, to make 
and sell high-speed' communi- 
cations systems. 

Shares of SGS-Thomson 
closed Thursday at 537 francs 
($88.83), down 24. The stock 
rose 1 1 percent in die previous 
two days.( Renters. Bloomberg) 

■ Roost for Thomson-CSF 


global financial services accord, but 
it warned that the pact could still 
founder if Asian countries tighten 
curbs on foreign investment in the 
industry. 

The warning, which specifically 
pointed to Malay sia, was issued as 
members of the World Trade Or- 
ganization began two days of talks 
on the deal, which faces a deadline 
of Dec. 12 for completion. 

The EU s top negotiator, Hans 
Friedrich Beseler. said the Union 
was pleased with the U.S. proposal, 
submitted Monday, which would al- 
low foreign financial firms a level 
playing field in the country. The 


U.S. had torpedoed an agreement in 
1 995. claiming that commitments to 
opening markets, particularly by 
emerging economies, were not 
strong enough. 

“The main stumbling block was 
the uncertainty about the U.S. po- 
sition.” Mr. Beseler said. The 
United States has the world’s largest 
national market for financial ser- 
vices and is therefore vital for a 
global deal. 

Mr. Beseler added, however, that 
he was worried about the direction 
of proposed banking, insurance and 
securities legislation in certain 
Asian countries, including Malay- 


posire of whar we are trying to do. 
he said. 


Malaysian moves aimed ar for- 
cing out foreign firms in its financial 
services market * ‘are exactly the op- 


**This could be a serious problem 
if .other countries follow suit, and 
there are signs that Malaysia is un- 
fortunately not alone,” he said. ‘‘In- 
donesia, and perhaps others, may 
also be going m that direction.” 
Jeff Lang, the U.S. deputy trade 
representative, is scheduled to visit 
seven Asian capitals in August, in- 
cluding Bangkok, Jakarta and Ma- 
nila. to squeeze out better deals. 

Earlier this week, U.S. officials 
also warned that Asian and Latin 
American reluctance to open mar- 
kets for banking, securities and in- 
surance could wreck any hopes for a 
deal. And a deal, big powers argue, 
would benefit developing countries. 
Mr. Beseler, director-general for 


commercial policy in the European 
Commission's external relations de- 


Commission's external relations de- 
partment, said the Japanese offer to 
open its markets included •'signif- 
icant improvements' ’ that met many 
EU concerns. 

He indicated that, although the 
latest Canadian package did not go 
much further than its offer in the 
1995 talks , Brussels was ready to 
wait for the new government in Ot- 
tawa to settle in and make more far- 
reaching proposals. 

But Mr. Beseler said South Korea 
was “not as forthcoming as we 
would like it to be,” while Brazil— 
the major financial service power in 
Latin America — was showing re- 
luctance to allow in new banks and 
insurance companies from outside. 

(AFP. Renters) 


Chief of Finmeccanica Resigns 


B.\iv>:\ Ti ‘mis 

ROME — Bruno Steve, the chief 
executive of Finmeccanica SpA. has 
resigned, six weeks after a new 
chairman was put in above him at 
the state-controlled defense and en- 
gineering company. 

Finmeccanica said Thursday that 
Mr. Steve resigned because he 
“considered that he had fulfilled his 
professional experience at the com- 
pany after having assured continuity 
at a'delicate moment. " 

Finmeccanica did not say who 
would succeed Mr. Steve. 

In a board shuffle in early June, 
Mr. Steve was kept on as chief ex- 
ecutive. though a new chairman. 
Sergio Carbone, v. as given extended 


powers and a new position of vice 
chairman was filled by Alberto 
Lina. 

Mr. Carbone replaced Fabiano 
Fabiani, who resigned in late April 
after the Italian government holding 
company that controls Finmeccan- 
ica criticized his management and 
imposed a reorganization on the 


company, Italy’s second-largest 
manufacturer after Fiat SpA Mr. 


manufacturer after Fiat SpA Mr. 
Steve was not singled out for crit- 
icism at the time. 

Mr. Steve has held various po- 
sitions in state companies since the 
(9S0s. The government of Prime 
Minister Romano Prodi, elected a 
year ago in April, has recently swept 
out several leaders of state-run busi- 


nesses, replacing them with figures 
from universities, law or private 
businesses. 

Mr. Carbone is an international 
lawyer. A professor, Gian Maria 
Gros -Pietro, in Jane was made chair- 
man of Istituto per la Ricostruzione 
Indus trial e SpA. the holding com- 
pany that controls Finmeccanica. 

Executives from private industry 
have been brought in to run the state 
electrical utility Enel SpA and tele- 
communications company Stet SpA. 

Finmeccanica in 1996 had a net 
loss of 540 billion lire ($309.6 mil- 
lion). Tt is 63 percent owned by IRJ 
and 23.3 percent by a group of 
banks. Only 13 percent is publicly 
traded. 


Thyssen AG 
Announces 
Share Issue 



Source: Tetekurs 


Marks & Spencer to Get New Sites 


. «.'• will. J .HrtV- - l'-\ \r$n 



Thomson-CSF shares rose 
6.5 francs, or 4.02 percent, to 
168.10 after France’s finance 
minister said the government 
would give up majority control 
of the defense electronics com- 


pany eventually. Bloomberg 
News reported. On Friday thrf 


News reported. On Friday thef 
government canceled plans to 
auction off its majority stake 
and said it would reorganize the 
French defense industry with 
Thomson at its core. 


LONDON — Marks & Spencer 
PLC said Thursday it would buy 19 
stores from Linlewoods Organisa- 
tion PLC in a deal that is likely to 
mean job cuts at Linlewoods. 

Marks & Spencer. Britain's 
biggest clothing retailer, said the 
£ 1 92.5 million (S522.5 million ) deal 
would be a boon to its long-held 
plans for expansion. 

The company has repeatedly said 
that it is looking for sites for new 
stores in Britain' and has expressed 
frustration at the lack of space avail- 
able. The new sites, spread 
throughout Britain, will open pro- 


gressively throughout next year, 
Marks &Spencer said. 

“This is the icing on the cake for 
Marks & Spencer,’* said William 
Culiiim, analyst at Paribas Capital 
Markets. The purchase will lift an- 
nual sales by 5 percent at relatively 
little cost, he said. 

Marks & Spencer has no stock or 
staff obligations under the agree- 
ment with Linlewoods, which 
means that 1,700 to 1,800 Little- 


to Marks & Spencer’s existing ex- 
pansion plans, the company said. 
The sale is subject to the final ap- 
proval of Linlewoods shareholders. 

For Linlewoods, the sale is the 
latest in a series of changes in the 


wake of falling profit at its clothing 
retail business. The privately held 


woods jobs are likely to disappear, 
industry analysts said. About 80 per- 
cent of these jobs would be part- 
time. 

The new stores will be in addition 


company put its 135 stores on sale in 
March. It plans to convert those it 
does not sell to outlets for its own, 
products and to concentrate on its' 
other businesses, including catalog 
shopping and soccer betting pools. 

Marks & Spencer’s stock closed 
in London at 592.5 pence, up 5.5. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg ) 


Bloomberg News 

DUSSELDORF — Thyssen 
AG, the largest diversified 
steelmaker in Germany, an- 
nounced Thursday dial it would 
sell up to 3 million new shares, 
raising as much as 13 billion 
Deutsche marks ($725 million) 
to help pay for its reorganiz- 
ation. 

The company said its super- 
visory board approved its re- 
quest to increase its capital by 
up to 10 percent. At the current 
market price of 43 1 DM a share, 
the sale could raise 13 billion 
DM. 

The so-called book-building 
phase of the sale, during which 
the company canvasses in- 
vestors for potential interest in 
the shares, is scheduled to take 
place during the first two weeks 
of September, Thyssen said. It 
has hired Commerzbank to 
manage the share of sales to the 
public. 

The company said it warned 
to raise the capital to expand 
one or more of its most prof- 
itable activities. Thyssen is in 
the middle of a reorganization 


Very briefly;: 


• British Steel PLC will launch a stock-buyback program, 
after months of denying it would spend some of its £785 
million (SI 3 billion) of available cash on helping its share ,-i- 
price rebound from the effects of the strong pound. The "• 
steelmaker did not say how much stock it would buy back. 

• Jefferson Smurfit Corp. had a loss of $4 million in the 
second quarter, largely because of a slump in prices for 
newsprint and corrugated containers. 

■ Granada Group PLC won control of Yorkshire-Tyne 
Tees Television, a station belonging to the ITV network of 15 
regional licensees. Granada said its bid of £675 million for the 
station had won acceptances representing 53.2 percent of 
Yorkshire's share capital 

• International Business Machines Corp. and Gemplus, the 
world's leading maker of so-called smart cards, signed an 
agreement to cooperate on marketing, sales and development of 
products using smart-card technology. 

• Komercni Banka said the recent floods in parts of the 

Czech Republic would hamper the economy, lowering 1997 
gross domestic product growth to the bottom of a forecast 
range of 1.5 percent to 23 percent. ■ i 

• Daimler-Benz AG is seeking an international partner fonts 
un pr ofitable Temic Telefunken Microelectronic GmbH 
unit but declined to comment on a report it was seeking to sell 
most of its stake in the microelectronics concern. 


• MAID PLC said it would develop information services for 
British Telecommunications PLC’s new intranet service. 


under which it is selling or clos- 
ing 23 of its original 68 units to 


ing 23 of its original 68 units to 
focus on its most profitable ac- 
tivities in flat steel, auto parts, 
elevators, production systems 
and machinery. 


Intranet Complete. Separately, Reuters Holdings PLC said it 
would deliver up-to-the-minote news for the network. 

• Shimoda Capital Advisors unveiled a new fund, the 
Shimoda Russia/NTS Investment Fund, to invest in small 
Russian companies as well as companies in Romania and 
some former Soviet states. 

• Nestle SA's first-half sales rose 1 7.5 percent, to 333 billion 

Swiss francs ($22.58 billion), on favorable currency rates and 
Stronger sales volume. Bltxmibert>. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Low Close Pre*. 


Httft Low Oom Pr*v. 


HI*! Low Oosa 


Hmn Low Oosa Prey. 


The Trib Index 


Prices as at 5:00 P M AtewVortrwne 


Thursday, July 17 

Prices In local currencies. 
Tetekurs 

High Low Close Pro*. 


High l 
CKAGCotorwo 205 
Commer70onli 5430 
DdmterBeru 15130 
Dequsso 97.50 

Deutsche Bonk I07.9S 


Amsterdam AEXtejoa 

Prov km: 96*25 


OeutTetetam 44.65 
Dresdner Bank 7440 
Frcsenlus 363 

FtnrakBMeiS 157 JO 
Fried. Krupp 353 JO 
Gehe 12250 

HaddbgZmt 153 

Henkel pfd 106 


ABN-AMRO 

Aegon 

AhoM 
AtaoNobct 
Boon Co. 

Boh weucw 
CSMcva 
DonfcdwPet 
□SM 
Elsevier 
F orth Am ev 
Cckwin 
&• Bre con 

nwnwii 

Hoogovenscvo 
Hurd Douglas 
ING Group 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 

NadltoydGp 

Nutnao 

OceGrldJen 

PMIpsElec 


RniKfetodHrJg 

Ro6ecn 

RoJuiiiui 

RoSneo 

Rarer* 

UnfevcrcvG 

Wendalntf 

VNU 

Walters KJ on 


46 A0 4420 
162 15520 
191 JO 18320 
im 280 
169 158 

<2.60 40.90 
103A0 10150 
N.T NT. 
73430 220 

3750 36 

99 94 

75 70 

73.90 6990 
11650 110.10 
333 326 

122.70 116J0 
(LT. NT. 

103J0 100.10 
71-30 69.90 
<7 JO 4550 
8630 8460 
67*) 64.70 
340 33450 
264 258 

162J0 157 

10560 10260 
229 225 

702 199.60 
67.80 66.90 
201 JO 20050 
117 117 

45650 41620 
1 1550 114 10 

47.70 46 10 
275 267.10 


4450 46 

155 SO 15850 
18170 18590 
28150 78480 
1S»J0 16170 

41.10 41.90 

102 103 
N.T. 426.90 

271.10 730.80 

3640 36 

94 97 

70.90 73.90 

69.90 73 

110.10 111.70 

326 328 

11680 118.90 
N.T. 17J 
101 103.10 

70.10 70.(4) 

46 4590 

85.10 85 

65.10 68 

335.70 337 

258 26380 

157.10 157.80 

103 10460 
775 22650 

19950 200 

67 JO 67 H) 
201 20010 
117 117 

446J0 45330 

1T460 1 75 

47 46«0 

770 765 


203 19» 

5420 5325 
1S2.W 151.50 
9*20 94.90 
10760 107.75 
4iJ5 43.90 
74 74 

362 3k 
15450 15033 
343*3 353 

1Z2JG 122 


Liberty Hdgs 
Libert/ Life 
UbUtoSlrat 
■Minora 
NcrnwK 

Necfccr 

Rembrandt Gp 
Richemont 
fli/sl Platinum 
3 4 Brew eries 
SammtDr 
Snsd 
£5 1C 

Tiger Oats 


385 380 

I45J5 146 

1780 18 

9885 99 

1BJD IB. 70 
100 JO 100 JO 
4510 4195 
7025 7350 
7X7 5 75 

13925 141 JO 
41 7S 41.75 
5S7S 5925 
21825 718 

7BJ0 79 


Madrid 


Bohn Mac 61L32 
Previous: 623J2 


162 16 1 
1C5.70 104® 
4*5 465 

80 33 

3410 8408 
6*4 663 


Hoechst 65 JO 

KontoUt 7C5 

Laftmeyer S3 

Linde 1342 

Lufthansa 3580 

"■CAM 553 

vtannesrnmn Si< 

f.VtodgesefcchaB 39.10 
Metre 222 

Mundi Ruecfc R 6530 

Preussag 576 

RWE 7540 

SAP pfd 434 

Setemq 20180 

5GL Carbon 250 

Siemens 1 1° 

Swinger (AkH 1660 

Suertudrer 902 

Thyswn 441 

Veoa 10520 

VE«I 567 

Viol) 799 J0 


London 


FT-SE )«0:4949J» 
Previous: 4MU0 


S3 SU0 
1320 1318 
34.96 2&:0 
S3 542 

S14J0 797 

3820 38/5 
21820 219 70 
653 5370 
572J0 574/5 
75 75 

.422 479 

70250 207 

IS 257 
11625 US 75 

jmo !«60 

921 sc: 

AjjJC 42 
132/S ;:5G5 
565 56- 

r«4.«C 79e 

1445 1475 


Vofcsaagen 145940 


At bet Noll 
ACieaDonwa 
An$on ftofer 

Arg&S 
-5d0 Group 
Assoc &r Foods 


Bortovs 
Bess 
BATIrra 
Bur* Scotland 
3h* Grata 
BGC Group 

Booh 
aFBttW 
5rt Aetcsp 
Sri Cur.TCfS 


Helsinki 


HEX Gnuerct men; 33023 
PmoDS: 349953 


Bangkok 


SET mdex: 45*28 
Nmmttiu 


Adv MaSvc 
Bangkok Bk F 
Krunq Thai Bk 
PTTEjprcr 
Stair torrent F 
Stem Com BkF 
Tetecomcsio 


265 254 254 752 


3325 24JD 3475 36® 


Thai Air.voys 
Tboi Form Bk F 


430 

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no JTJ 

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13* 

126 

131 12! 

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3875 

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156 

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120 MB 


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Huntnrockil 
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Kesko 
Monts A 
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242 23£ 

53 31 *: 


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Brit Pehn 
BSirvB 
EntSSwl 
Sr.t Tc^com 
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Csncass Gp 

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8 890 

4X7 4X7 

783 7.93 

630 &32 

1X3 1X5 

5 42 J46 

5.95 4.W 

12.B3 1107 
842 843 

535 536 

433 436 

423 479 

1033 1033 
8.10 814 
302 3£U 

1334 1334 
632 6.S8 


Acerinox 

ACE5A 

Agues Baraton 

Areentario 

BEV 

Bcnesto 

BonkOltw 

Bca Cento Hlsp 
Bco Popular 
Bco Son kinder 
CEPSA 
Conti nenle 
CorpMoptre 
Endeso 
FECSA 
Got Nulu rul 
Ibentota 
Prycn 
Repsol 

Sevt Dona Elec 
Tobacnlera 
Tetefonen 
Union Pima 
VbtencCemenl 


77600 77790 
1840 1845 
6060 6)10 
9070 9100 

13040- 13)«0 
W70 1470 

26600 26600 
6140 6150 

35070 35370 
4505 4520 
<900 4930 

3500 3550 
9200 9740 
12430 17*33 
1250 17® 

31650 316® 
1765 1770 

3260 3320 
6450 6510 
1475 1475 

BOBO BIX 
*300 4315 
12® 1245 

2530 2560 


Accor 
AGP 

AlrLtaalde 

Alcala Aistfi 775 746 750 762 Sv Handles a 

A XA-UAP 389 385.10 385.70 384X0 VofwB 

Bananre 737 774 726 723 

BtC 978 966 970 947 

BNP 261.20 254 256.10 25830 

OmolPhis 1174 1135 1135 I16S 

Cixretour 4415 023 4230 4373 Svdnev 

Casino 300 287.10 294.® 297 7 < 

CCF 261 25160 259 JO 258® 

CeMetn 710 699 702 703 

Chnstran Dior 1035 1015 1029 1030 AN2 Bklng 

CLFDeao Fron 580 568 572 577 BHP 

Credit Agricotc 1256 10 1256.101 256. W 1257 Bond 
Dcnone 1000 978 9 79 999 Brombkes Ind 

EN-Agitltaine 694 675 683 674 CBA 


SCAB 174 172 1 77 JO 171 i, n ■ loop — ioO 

CAG40- 2958J9 S-E8or*enA 93 JO 91J0 92 91 Jan 1.1892-100 

PmSHSlWAl Shnrvfic Fors 339 325 325 337 

Skanska B 357 3® 356® 353J0 World Index 

957 944 944 948 5KF B 220 216 218 216 


209 JO 205 JO 208 205 JO SpartxmkenA 180J0 174 174 180 Bogtarwl liKtaXM 

975 950 953 975 SfcreA 133 129J0 13750 13IL50 -cia/PjaHfir 


255 Z52J0 15750 252J0 
2I4J0 210 210 272 


Sydney 


Asia/Pacific 
Europe 
N. America 
S. America 


AB Ortfiwiries: 2469 JO imtusMel Indexes 
Provbws: 2646X8 j _ . . 


Capital goods 


BJ6 849 BJ4 8X6 ’ 3 

io.it 9.84 995 9.78 Consumer goods 

1861 1827 18X6 1819 

*4)8 4 4 L 02 tnergy 


1000 978 979 999 Brambles Ind 2485 26 J6 26X0 26JS Finance 

694 475 683 674 CBA 1656 16J5 16.48 16J3 nnancs 


End Orta BS 

Emtdnnev 

Eurofunnel 

Gen East 

Hovas 

tmetei 

Lntargc 


694 675 683 674 CBA 

889 B57 857 870 CC AreoW 


8 40 820 825 8x0 Coles Myw 
*.90 6 60 6.90 6 60 ComakB 


15.15 1480 15.05 14.70 I Miscellaneous 


776 760 760 755 CSR 

417 JM70 40420 421 Fosters Bren 


2X1 147 

656 6X0 


7.09 806 

443 445 


1X3 1 J9 

430 441 


198 2 

io.i: 1CJ0 

1J2 \S3 


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587 896 


4^ 49? 

633 655 


618 518 

110 115 


542 S A' 

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13 75 1036 
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7 7 IS 

172 ITi 

9 35 945 


C re ■Vedcn'o 
■‘szms :< 
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391 3e5 

;o25 

i:j= 1343 
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Bombay 


Seoses 30 Uo: 4IP3X1 
Prevwos: 41B1C 


Hong Kong seng.- 

Pmnccs. m ao 


G'uvns's O: 
C-k rn*ss 
f. ,c 


e.;a 624 

790 295 


443 465 

6 18 e 7) 


Baku Auto 
Hswust Lower 
WndwrPeflm 
Ind Dev Bk 
(TC 

f.ohonogorTd 

Rcbancelnd 

State Bk true 
Steel Authonlir 
Tala Eng Loco 


868 3I7J0 865 333 75 

1359 1335 1242 JST344J5 

48? 483 486Ji 4S7JJ 

97 95 «6 75 94 75 

5TJJD 496 S10 25 5»ii 
287 280 J3 2E3 ^6J0 
351 75 347^5 353.75 349 M 
338® 3282S 336 ® 3 
2475 :x 2475 liSi 
J06SD J?S 406® 405 


Brussels 


BEL-20 IMa.- 2S41X0 
Prewon: 2831.11 


~racfPrc;s 515 

SkEcSTAic 
Cwto PkAc :j i : 

Oicun; Kcn^ '6 :j 

CK Introsm/c Is 51 

Com Lrahl 44 l 

Otic Parrfi: 47 J 

DaaHeno Si 4t • 

First P0C.K 9 1 

Hong Lung Dev 
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Honactson Imr 6 

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■.’3.-6SS mercer 


«“ tr 

264 2(X 

420 421 


701 7.CS 

1 69 1 «1 


Mmoml 
Borea wo 
8BL 
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Cotniyt 

DcitoTe Lion 

ElKtrabel 

EMndbio 

Foitn AG 

Gevoerl 

GBL 

CenBanque 

fanfiettsj* 

Petrafina 


16400 }«X0 
7990 73® 

«20 96 SO 
E® 3185 
19450 IB9W 
2020 1985 
7770 7720 
3640 3530 
82® 8110 
3795 XJO 
M5C 5940 
147^5 14725 
15E5 15075 
14175 1 3675 
5020 4945 
11100 1C97S 
1570 3530 
219® sis® 
15100 14875 
153000 14SW0 


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7090 J930 

9740 9710 
31«0 32ZI 
193® WOO 
1985 1980 

7720 7730 

3640 3WP 
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147® 14225 
1»?5 IXS0 
14176 13C50 

5020 4940 

1 1000 10975 
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2190Si 255® 
15325 14875 
14S5K 146300 


HkChnoGgs Is, 24 

hk Ektctnc 31 :: 21 4; 


Hr. Tofecjmrr ! J Ji r= 


Hwnell Hdgs S J5 

HSBCW?, 

Hvtcthstn mH 68 
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r 9 Previous: 640J3 


Markets Closed 


BGEonk 
CortsbergB 
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Den DonsLeBk 
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KobLuflfaovne 
NvoNonTisli B 
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378 372 

985 979 

415 437 

774 714 

432000 425000 
332000 285000 
26S 7 40 


780 770 

801 777 


1010 999 

414 3?t 


Tryq B daCO 
Unuoramt 


431 dll 
445 43 1 


3B 70 
377 374 

*Si 980 
412 413 

iso 

426800 410000 
303000 235300 
TtS 240 
780 775 

SSI 773 
1005 IDS 
414 395 

426 419 

444 439.it 


The Jakarta. Kuala Lumpur 
and Seoul stock markets uere 
closed Thursday for a hoi- 
idav. 


Johannesburg u*ow:: 

Plwnwui. r 


MiST-iq-mitf 2ks 33 li Z 


Frankfurt 


DAX.-4237J1 
Previous: 48 1J4 



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ArWos 

AAenzHr^ 

AHune 

BkBcttoi 

BASF 

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Bay VCfwnsoonk 

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Balsa tadn: 4*45. )* 


PreHoav 47*7X3 

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57® 

56 40 

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20 E0 

19 87 

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19 78 

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3865 

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13.94 

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55 60 

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3190 

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116 10 11500 115® 

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21 00 

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20.95 

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Pnrvkws 14J8T09 

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1*930 

16500 

16870 

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4S4S 

4390 

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5985 

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1569 

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27800 

27000 

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3535 

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10200 

10290 

10770 

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6980 

6815 

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385® 

36400 

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16050 

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76® 

7595 

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A’atJ^borxo 

131® 

12190 

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11935 

A’ontaliKm 

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1171 

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495 

470 

277 

465 

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25® 

2475 

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15715 

15300 

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211® 

21650 

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14600 

14710 

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117® 

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5890 

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709 773 78D 793 GoodmmRd 

39J 380 381 391.70 ICI Australia 

1183 1133 IMS 1170 LendLepse 

2574 2479 2492 250 MlWHdos 


680 

*70 

6.74 

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*75 

6.75 

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*83 

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2J9 

156 

2J6 

257 

1.89 

IJB2 

188 

1.82 


12/8 17J5 12/8 12J5 
28.25 2782 2825 27 70 


Level 

Ctianga 

% change 

yaarlodate 
% change 

181.76 

+3.67 

+2.06 

+21.87 

132.10 

+2.39 

+1.84 

+7.02 

ISO 50 

+3.00 

+T.60 

+1&IS 

212.41 

+ 4.10 

+1.97 

+31.19 

173.59 

+9.34 

+5.69 

+51.70 

23655 

+7.89 

+3.45 

+38.40 

202.87 

+1.94 

+0.97 

+25.67 

199.53 

+6.27 

+324 

+16.88 

13729 

+2.73 

+2.03 

+1789 

181.39 

+3.05 

+1 71 

+12.12 

193.33 

+381 

+2.01 

+1023 

169 96 

+3.59 

+ 2.16 

+23.78 

173.11 

+3.23 

+1 90 

♦2067 


Cr: 


1B3 1133 1145 11J Lend Lease 2B.25 77 K 2BZ5 27 70 Tlte Ircenabant 1 Heraa TtSme Wo*sSKxk tnt»x & ran* rtie US dollar values of 

S tt™ HolA^lank 19X5 1915 19 26 1913 SB0 ■ nJemal,Cr f^y -'■•rttsrtt&e ST5*5 ^71 25 CCWfTPS For TOKP iNomUDSn a 0W 

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X8 38ZI0 38480 38J60 ttortCi? ” UJ 23 IS 4M L«eHW»Ctacftw ComfXed Btoonben Hems 

4)9 400 « 4X3 408 PoOhc Duntap 


Pernod Rtcoid 31 3 JO 307 M 307.20 308 JO Pta»w«f 


631 tzi 63J 4M 

3/9 3/3 3/5 166 

4 95 479 495 477 


High Low dot* Prw. High Low Oosa Prev. 

1*450 11000 1 1GC0 10700 Nthcm Taccom 14565 143*6 1J7* 146/0 
855 E28 Bid 850 Nova 12J5 12JP 12J0 1135 

570 S65 568 565 Onex 29 95 2905 29 95 29.05 

355 ??' 355 28 2790 2790 27.95 


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Pramodes 
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7970 2875 2858 2900 RtoTMo 


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Nn 

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Stock MorM Moc 9571/0 OsokoGcs 
Previous: 95*4/1 Rceh 


850 840 &5C 851 Pcho Cdo 

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1540 1500 l» 1493 Pka Peihn 

iisa list lira H7n FcroshSm* 

50®b 4900b 49326 4J£Lb Pcndr sancc 

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29.95 29 05 29.95 29.05 
28 2790 2790 27.95 
2160 2110 2340 23J0 
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13 12J0 13 IMS 

111'* 110 111 11065 

3610 35/0 3580 36 

3*7 35 35 3515 


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Mna Non Bk 
mtl'iomm Bk 


Sao Pauio BuretwoWIn: 17499.90 

Promts: 12*40.90 


Shin Kowj L.fr 
Toman Semi 


BradescoPM 
Brahma PW 
Cem*gPM 


1100 10J5 1071* 10 70 Tote# 

85500 845 00 845 OO 8«0ri K!2Slt!S?{2 

59® 5/90 5779 58 97 Dirt World Chm 

T520 ■•3/0 74 B0 MW 

2101 20J0 21 01 71 00 


Ekjtrobrr. 6« 00 56301 57300 19400 Tokuo 

itouBancoPfd 62500 A05 00 *0500 62500 *w»vyu 


ItouBancoPId 62500 605 00 60500 62500 ■wy- 
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LrgWpar **000 44007 44400 460 Wl UnonWo 

PerobresPW 372 01 206 00 321 01 30000 MlNwponAIr 

PQl'kstD Lu7 18901 184/0 169 00 1B4 02 Anr»0> 

5<d Na'janol it 00 2U0 3599 3a.® A-.oMBart 
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Tetebres Pfd IUJ0 156 00 15600 IMjOO A«hi Glass 

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Tetal 172 90 158 00 165® 177.99 Bk 'rokoham 

THtnpPfd 37500 MHO 37700 374.00 Brktoestnw 

Urtbanca 4200 42 00 4200 42® Canon 

Ushmnas Ptd 1784 12 J5 17® *2.79 ChuboEler 

CVRD PW 2850 2740 7840 2810 Chunoku Etc 


172 99 15800 16500 172.99 Bk 'rakohOflU 
37500 3*380 37700 374.00 Brktoedonc 

4280 47 00 4200 42® Conan 
1784 12 J5 17 iO 12.79 CTWDu Eler 


7850 2740 78J0 7810 Chunoku Elec 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JULY 18, 199 




ASIA/PACIFIC 


frgyfon 

.^fTSElOO 

*'4KS — _ 


•;*«> 
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33H _ 


**«, S5* 


Rise in Japan s Surplus Slows 


'yMf 


F V A" 
1997 


‘ f l >g|iWh i.V Ssijr FimDivva 

TOKYO — Japan's Trade surplus 
widened by 934.21 billion yen 
(S8.08 billion f last month, the Fi- 
nance Ministry said Thursday — a 


For the first half of the year. Ja- 
pan's overall surplus grew 28.4 per- 
cent, to 3.98 trillion yen, the first 
half-year nse since 1993. 

The dollar rallied above the 1 16- 


-r> 1*8 a * 

"SB* & . 

.•5M7 

: 

S*, 

T ^V' 

62 4>- • 
' 

2,958.59 a q2,->- “ 


27.7 percent rise from a year earlier yen level shortly after the release of 


fcMatfcet. 


EttO , “ 
fc Exchange 
[EL^ 

L*H> ■ 




C will launch a ii.xk.huih- 
nyiag i! would spend 
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it Corp. r.ac a lr i. h }t 

gely because of u Wf 

igared container*. r n to 

PLC won control of Yorkd™ 
ration belong tr.c l0 ine ify 
rranada said :i< b\d of £f,7s m.,, 
.veprances rerre^ni*" • 
apiiai. ■“ " - P®f 

does* Machine- Uurp. jjij fjen^ 

ate on narwRaj. >,;r.-^ de . f S 
t-cara techno. ^ 
a said th- recent .j. ;r . ri „ , 
Alid hamper the cror..-::-, 

- « 2 :o'.v tr. to *hc Pfiiun .'. 
t to 2 5 percent. 

* is >eek:nc -m! n^. ? 

c Telcfunken Microeltctrunkt 
comment or. a rep. .• „ J? %CrkEt - 
thc aucrofltv::-.*.- ..-.v.-m ' 

.! 'AOUlb. d; »c*\T :"! *fr* 

unicat it ms PL«/\ 

Separate; y. Reuitrt Hidings PU: 
*-the-miru!e r,:- • : • k:xki 
d Adtisors cr ,i r. s » m 
ilS investment Fund. 


but a much smaller increase than 
analysts were expecting. 

The trade figures sent the dollar 
higher against the yen in Tokyo 
trading as worries about renewed 
U.S.- Japanese trade tensions faded. 

The effects of a weak yen also 
spilled over to the Tokyo Stock Ex- 
change, lifting stock prices in the 
wake of a record-breaking run on 
Wall Street as investors went after 
export-led blue chips such as autos 
and electricals. 

The latest figures marked the 
thin! consecutive monthly rise in 
Japan's surplus in merchandise 
trade. But the increase from the 
1996 month fell far short of the leaps 
of 222 percent posted in May and 
164 percent in April. ' 

Total exports in June rose 12 3 
percent from a year earlier, to 4.12 
trillion yen. amid strong demand for 
autos, office equipment and chem- 
icals. Imports rose 8.7 percent, to 
3.12 trillion yen. 

The ministry continued to blame 
slower import growth largely on an 
increase in the consumption tax from 
3 percent to 5 percent on April I. 

Analysts said the slower rise in the 
overall surplus was a good sign amid 
concerns that Japan 's trade surpluses 
might be ready to balloon again, 
renewing friction with Washington. 

The trade surplus with the United 
States, Japan’s biggest trading part- 
ner, widened 26.8 percent, to 373.14 
billion yen, its ninth consecutive 
monthly rise. 

The surplus with the European 
Union surged 101.1 percent, to 
187.5 billion yen. Exports to EU 
countries swelled 15.8 percent, to 
625.7 billion yen. while imports fell 
1 .9 percent, to 438.3 billion yen. 


the trade Figures and closed in 
Tokyo at 116.35 yen. up from 
1 15.62 yen Wednesday. 

The Nikkei 225 -slock index rose 
160.51 points to close ai 20,519.25. 

(AP. AFP) 

■ Japan Car Firms Under Fire 

The head of a U.S. auto-industry 
trade group accused Japan of failing 


to live up to its promises to open up 
its car market. The Associated Press 
reported. 

“U.S. -Japan automotive trade 
panems are sharply deteriorating,*' 
the president of the American Auto- 
mobile Manufacturers Association. 
Andrew Card. said. 

In the first half of this year, sales 
of motor vehicles in Japan by the 
Big Three U.S. automakers — Gen- 
eral Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. 
and Chrysler Corp. — were down 
13.6 percent from a year earlier, to 
52.559 vehicles, according to the 
group's figures. 




//£ 9 * k 

s 1 


\ rls — 

itSrsssi 






Hong Kong ■ 
Hang Seng 

17000- 

16000— 

15000 Kph 

14000 — 

,3WoV V “ 

12)00 F M A M J J 
1937 


Singapore 
Straits Times 


M A M J 


t\t:- 17000 


F M A MJJ 
1997 



IlMIlr/lltr \>«r uT.-d Hns» 


Currency dealers in Tokyo transmitting their orders Thursday. 


Exchange 

Hong Kong 
Singapore 
Sydnay~ ■ ~ 
Tokyo 


Nomura’s Scandals Depress Profit as Revenue Drops 


Ciiifikit h\ i>ur Stiff FuwlhytlkAM 

TOKYO — Nomura Securities 
Co. on Thursday reported a sharp 
drop in revenue in the three months 
to June as clients kept Japan's lead- 
ing brokerage house at arm's length 
over a payoff scandal. 


Nomura reported a nearly 1 3 per- 
cent decline in revenue to 109.4 bil- 
lion yen ($946.4 million). Its parent 
pretax profit fell 4.1 percent from a 
year earlier to 34.9 billion yen. 
Nomura attributed the decline to 
fallout from the arrest of a former 


president, Hideo Sakamaki, and oth- 
er top executives for illegal dealings 
with a corporate exTonionist. 

Meanwhile, Daiwa Securities Co. 
said its parent pretax profit fell 39 
percent from a year earlier, to 15.3 
billion ven. in the three months to 


June. Nikko Securities Co. posted a 
pretax loss of 1.9 billion yen in the 

? uarter, in contrast to last year's 
9.2 billion yen profit. Yamaichi 
Securities Co. will report first- 
quarter results Friday. 

(AFP. Bloomberg ) 


Kuala Lmnpw Composite ' 


■Seoul 
Taipei ' 
Manila 

Jakarta ~ 
Wellington ' 
Bombay 

Source : Telekurs 


'index' .' Tfcwsday '■ -Provr. % 

s -, C toS&'.v, -Cloae Changa 

• Hang Seng . 15,7&&5S :15,44S,G2 +1.69. 

Strafe Times- ■ +0.14 

AH Ordiowfes J ■; !.* 2,669,79 "I' £648.40 ^0.88 

" ? - ■' ; -.-.fel9-2S: 20,85^74 +0^ 
r : - f.fi^oeed T- - t.ftRQg 

• set • •■■ ■ . ee&66 . ■ 

rCompo^ index 738.72 T"" - "" 1 " 

StoiA MaitetlmfeK 9i57li® 9.544^ ^+059 
PSE Y ’ .2^62038 ■ 2JS&J3B ' +1 28 

Composte tndex ' Closed 723.50. 

N2SE-4 Q . . ' 2M4JBB ' 2,477.49. +0,68 

Sensfflve fixlex : "ttJL 4,183.42 "T. .- . : 

IrkruUivliI HciaU Tnhuiw 


Korean Banks’ Losing Half Very briefly: 


term C Fruihv-Pinsc 

SEOUL — South Korean commercial banks had 
an overall net loss of S87 A million in the first half 
of this year, reflecting their high level of non- 
performing loans caused by corporate bank- 
ruptcies, bank regulators said Thursday. 

Korea First Bank, the main creditor of the failed 
Hanbo and Sammi groups, was the poorest per- 
former. with a 5400 million loss, the Bank Su- 
pervisory Board said. The second-biggest loss was 
posted by Seoul Bank, with 5147 million, much of 
it attributed to loan losses since January, when 
Hanbo, the cou nay’s 14ih-largest conglomerate, 
collapsed under 55.8 billion of bad debt. 

Ten of South Korea's 25 commercial banks had 
losses in the first half, the agency said, outweighing 
the 15 who had profits totaling 5553 million. 


Thai Seeks Japan Banks 9 Aid 


. as we-i j? ^ 
slates 

full' valsis res j 

S Nitkoci v’-u : 
JW 


..i k'trut 

-?r; ! k'V*? 
.u^s^a. 




C&uptMby l^xr Sufi Frnri Dupuxim 

TOKYO — Thailand's finance minister 
called Thursday on Japanese banks to lend 
more money to Thai companies and to join 
any international loan groups that may be 
formed to rescue the conncry’s crippled fi- 
nancial industry. 1 

The official. Thanong Bidaya. also un- 
veiled plans to stan a deposit-insurance pro- 
gram and other measures to shore up Thai- 
land’s financial institutions. 

In a speech to representatives of 21 Jap- 
anese banks, Mr. Thanong did not make aplea 
for Japanese government aid as he had been 
widely expected to do. But he did ask Jap- 
anese lenders to “continue and increase the 
credit lines extended io Thai borrowers, both 
financial and corporate." 

The finance minister said Thailand did not 
need direct financial help from Japan right now 
because its economy was ‘‘fundamentally 
sound” and should stabilize within a year. He 
said the Thai baht had stabilized to a greater 
degree than be had expected since the gov- 
ernment allowed the currency to float July 2. 

Mr. Thanong’s visit followed more than a 
week of media speculation about whether 
Thailand would seek billions of dollars from 
Japan and other nations to help its indebted 
financial companies, spar its economy and 
increase its foreign-currency reserves. 

The official said the purpose of the visit to 


tfs =r:5i v.“ 



Thais Brace for Drought 

El Nino Pattern Threatens Rice Crops Across Asia 


Welling 1011 


Zurich 


.'fJu •*. 

e:. f: 


By Thomas Crampton 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

BANGKOK — The rains across South- 
east Asia have been late and sparse because 
of the El Nino weather pattern, threatening 
agricultural production and pushing the is- 
sue to the top of the regional agenda. 

The delayed rains are not yet a disaster 
for rice production; but pose a problem for 
Thailand, which is already suffering its 
worst financial crisis in a decade, as well as 
Indonesia and die Philippines, said Chan 
Ling Yap, a rice specialist at the Food and 
Agriculture Organization in Rome. 

“If the rains don't come this week there 
could be a real problem," Ms. Yap said. 
"Even when they do come, lare rains mean 
a delayed harvest." 

The drought is expected to be a priority at 
nexi week's meeting of top officials from the 
Association erf 1 South East Asian Nations. 

[Major Thai crops including com, soy- 
bean and sugar cane have been hard hit by 
die dry spell, gover nme nt and industry of- 
ficials told Reuters on Thursday. 

[More than 640,000 hectares (1.6 million 
acres) of farmland In 22 Thai provinces 
have already been affecied by the pro- 
longed dryness, according to Ananta Dalo- 
dom, deputy permanent secretary of ag- 
riculture. More than 70 percent of the first 
com crop was damaged by lack of rain.] 

The periodic El Nino phenomenon is 
caused by a warming of the surface waters in 


India Relaxes 
Satellite Rules 

i 

Reuters 

NEW DELHI — India on 
Thursday ended its state 
monopoly on satellite use and 
ownership, allowing private 
companies to use transpon- 1 
ders on state satellites and 
permitting private asere to es- 
tablish commercial commu- 
nications satellites, 

The government said it had. 
approved a policy to 
strengthen the growth of satel- 
lite communications systems. 


die eastern Pacific near the equator, which 
changes wind and other global patterns, 
wreaking havoc on crops. 

This year if has been blamed for in- 
creased rain in the southern United States 
and a lack of rain in southeastern Africa. 

On Saturday. President Fidel Ramos of 
the Philippines directed government agen- 
cies and die public to conserve water and 
warned of a long drought 

In Thailand, die rains should have come 
in late May, but forecasters were now hop- 
ing they would arrive by early August, said 
Smith Tumsaroch. the director general of 
the meteorological department. 

Fanners in Thailand have already been 
warned to delay planting rice until early 
August, more than one month after die 
usual planting rime. 

“The situation is very bad,” Mr. Smith 
said. “Instead of having the rains come to 
northern Thailand, they have gone eastward 
into China.” 

Jumrubb Intacbaisri. director of the Thai 
Department of Agriculture's Center for In- 
formation, said the drought had already cut 
the country's rice crop by 10 percent. * ‘If the 
r ains do not come soon, it will affect ex- 
ports," he said. 

Vichien Petpisit, director of the Rice 
Research Institute, said national stores and 
a possibly bounteous off-season crop could 
make up for production lost during the 
regular growing season, but rice farmers 
would still suffer. 


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• The Philippines’ trade gap contracted for the 
Third month in a row in May. easing concern that 
mounting imports will leave the peso vulnerable to 
more speculative attacks. The trade deficit nar- 
rowed 11.5 percent, to S973 million, as exports of 
the country s biggest dollar-eamer. elecrronics. 
soared and import growth slowed. 

• The Reserve Bank of Australia’s governor. Ian 
Macfarlane. released a rare public statement in 
trying to defend Hugh Morgan, a bank board mem- 
ber and managing director of the gold-mining corn- 


rumors that the unprofitable company was set to be 
absorbed by rival Foxtel, which is half-owned by 
News Corp. 

• Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. will buy the 
radio and television stations of Heritage Media 
Group for 5630 million once the merger between 
Heritage and News Corp. is completed. News Corp. 
said. 

• Shares in Asia Food & Properties Ltd., a unit of 
Indonesia's Sinar Mas Group that stepped in to 
acquire the assets of Singapore’s Amcor Holdings 


pany WMC Ltd., denying there was any conflict of Ltd. when that company collapsed a year ago, were 
interest between Mr. Morgan s role in the bank s scheduled to begin trading in Singapore on Friday. 


interest between Mr. Morgan's role in the bank's 
recent bullion sales and his position as a gold- 
industry executive. 

• Australis Media, an Australian pay-television 
broadcaster, saw trading in its shares suspended on 
the Australian Stock Exchange on Thursday amid 


meeting to extend $5.3 billion in loans next year to 
the country, more than the $5.2 billion it had 
requested. Indonesia relies on low-interest loans 
from developed countries to help pay for large 
infrastructure projects and now has about 5100 
billion of public and private foreign debt. 

• China-Hongkong Photo Products Holdings 
Ltd., the sole distributor of Fuji brand film products 
in Hong Kong and China, said net profit fell 16 
percent, to 204 million Hong Kong dollars (526.3 
million), in the year that ended in March as sales in 
China declined 

• Malaysia's moves to award nationals majority 


The decision to list in Singapore was seen as pan of stakes in companies, often through disirwesting 
a trend for Indonesian assets to move to that ex- foreign holders, runs contrary to efforts under way 


a trend for Indonesian assets to move to that ex- 
change. where the new company will be among the 
largest companies traded 
• Indonesia's major lenders agreed at their annual 


to reach a global financial-services pact, a trade 
official of the European Union warned. 

Bloomberg. AFX. Reuters. AFP 


Japan had been merely to “update and ex- 
change views" with Japanese bankers and 
officials about the state of the TTiai economy. 

Japan is Thailand’s largest trading partner 
and investor, and Japanese banks hold about 
half of the foreign-currency debt issued by 
Thai companies. 

The dollar reached a record high against the 
Thai currency of 30.80 baht this week, a rise 
of about 20 percent from the narrow range it 
had traded in for several years. The dollar 
closed Thursday in Bangkok at 29.80 baht. 

But Hiroshi Mitsuzuka, Japan’s finance 
minister, said this week thai Asia’s currencies 
were not in danger and that Thailand’s de- 
cision to let the baht fall would ultimately 
' stabilize the economy. (Bloomberg . A P) 

■ Manila Plans to Borrow From IMF 

The Philippines said Thursday it would 
borrow from the International Monetary Fund 
to replenish its foreign reserves, which have 
been depleted by a costly effort to defend its 
currency, the peso, from speculative attack. 
The Associated Press reported from Manila. 

The central bank ’s governor, Gabriel Sing- 
son, said the amount to be sought would be 
announced Friday. 

About 51 billion is available to Manila from 
the IMF, and the Export-Import Bank of Japan 
has indicated its willingness to contribute a 
farther $450 million. 


The Leading Russia Investment Fund 

Ranked Number One in the World 

Among Hedge Funds by Managed Account Report Inc.* 

Among International Equity Funds by Nelson Information Inc.** 
Among Russia Funds by Micropal Emerging Market Fund Monitor*** 
Among Overseas Funds by Lipper Analytical Services International Corp.**** 



$795,000,000 
The Hermitage Fund 

is closed for new subscriptions as of July 7, 1997 

Net Asset Value Per Share increase since inception on April 22, 1996 
Net Asset Value Per Share increase since January 1, 1997 


72533% 

23739% 


Starting August 1, 1997 we are pleased to announce the opening of 

The Hermitage II Fund 


Hermitage Capital Management Limi ted » Republic New York International Trust Co Ltd 

Russian Representative Office Republic National Bank BuBding 

9, Dmitrovsky PereuJok RueduPre 

Moscow 103031 SL Peter Port 

Russia Guernsey, Channel Islands GY1 1LU 

» March 31.199610 March 31. 1997 ** March 31. 1996 io March 31. 1997 

*•* April 30, 1996 to May 30, 1W7 January 1.1997 to March 31.1997. 

Past performance of the Hermitage Fbnd is nor au indication or guarantee of future performance of the Hermitage II Fund. 

This document is not an invitation to subscribe for units in the Hermitage II Fund, and is by way of information only. 

The sale of units in The Hermitage II Fund may be restricted in certain jurisdictions. 




. tfiii, , if, isi, Minn & f, itttib fi Hi, Hj, 






























































































































































































PAGE 20 


^ 2teralb^£ribune 

Sports 




FRIDAY, JULY 10, 1997 


World Roundup 


Windblown Troon Tests Golf’s Greatest Names 


Kuerten Withdraws 

TENNIS Gustavo Kuerten, the 
French Open champion, and Boris 
Becker dropped ont of the Mer- 
cedes Cup in Sfattgair on Thursday 
because of injuries, white six Span- 
iards reached the quarterfinals of 
' the clay-court event. 

The only non-Spaniards in the 
last eight were Karol Kucera of 
Slovakia, who upset fifth-seeded 
Marcelo Rios of Chile 6-4, 6-4, and 
Yevgeni Kafelnikov, the second- 
seeded Russian, who beat Francisco 
Clavet of Spain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2. 

Kuerten, the eighth-seeded 
Brazilian, was trailing Felix Man- 
tilla of Spain. 4- 1 , when he quit. 

“I had a lot of pain in the ribs," 
Kuerten said. “I tried to play but 
the pain was too strong.” 

Becker pulled out with a leg in- 
jury just before his match against 
Albert Costa of Spain. 

Sergi Bruguera, Alberto Be- 
rasategui, Alex Corretja, and Albert 
Portas all advanced. (AP) 

• Andre Agassi's return after a 
70-day layoff ended after one 
match when he lost, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4, to 
the unseeded Doug Flach in the 
second round of the Legg Mason 
Classic in Washington on Wednes- 
day. Agassi looked sharp in the first 
set but then weakened. (Reuters) 

Kami Says He’s Ready 

SOCCER Nwankwo Kami. Inter 
Milan's Nigerian striker, reuimed 
to Italy on Thursday and said he 
was ready to play again after a heart 
operation. “I feel good and I'm 
sure of playing for Inter,” he said. 

• S man Pearce has been given a 
free transfer by relegated Notting- 
ham Forest to allow him to return to 
the English Premier league and en- 
hance his chances of selection for 
the England team. ( Reuters ) 

Celtics Cut Dino Radja 

basketball • Forward -center 
Dino Radja was placed on waivers 
by the Boston Celtics and reports 
said he was expected to sign with 
Panathinaikos in Greece. (AP) 

• Bob Weinhauer, who joined 

the Milwaukee Bucks as an assist- 
ant to coach Chris Ford last August, 
was appointed the franchise's gen- 
eral manager. (AP) 


T! 


But Some Stars 
Savor Weather 
And Adversity 

By Ian Thomsen 

hatrituiMiu l Itcruhl Tnhmic 

IROON. Scotland — Above at 
lunchtime a vat of gray paint had 
been kicked over and was seeping 
its way across the blue sky. Down below 
the sea kicked up, the wind whistled at 
anyone trying to walk back to the club- 
house, and Jack Nicklaus. remarkably, 
was feeling more vital. 

Dragging around Nicklaus. 57, as he 
began his turn back toward the club- 
house Thursday was a charm bracelet of 

British Open 

lesser famous names, one linked after the 
other — Greg Norman. Tom Watson, 
Fred Couples. Payne Stewart — all of 
them under par by three or four strokes 
early in the opening round of the 1 26th 
British Open. Nicklaus, meanwhile, was 
2-over par already as he trudged sadly up 
the hill of No. 10. Once the longest hitter 
in the game, he had hit two drivers up this 
hill and was still short of the 438-yard 
hole. As he passed a single fan clapped 
slowly, sympathetically, and Nicklaus 
returned a smile of sincere thanks. 

Altogether there were five holes of 
par-4 pointing into the wind on the back 
nine — and Nicklaus. who was the Tiger 
Woods of his day, could reach none of 
them. 

He would bogey two of them to 
stumble to 4-over par, and yet he con- 
tinued to move around the old course 
resolutely, like the senior citizen who 
follows one detour sign after another 
without caring about the delays. 

The most obvious difference in Nick- 
laus is that his ambition is no longer 
obvious, and he is in no hurry. At the 10th 
he chipped up the hill to within a stride of 
his par, which he sank as a passenger 
train came rattling along (he tracks that 
pass the southeast comer of Royal Troon, 
and someone in the train probably was 
shouting, “Hey, tint's Jack Nicklaus!” 

Nicklaus paid the train no mind. After 
the bogeys he came up with a birdie at the 
par-3 14th. He walked up the hills lean- 
ing forward, tottering a bit, waving in the 
direction of every applause. At the 16th 
he holed out from a greenside bunker for 



lljm Ihitln llu- l— u«- ■! IS*— 


Tom Watson playing out of a bunker to the eighth green Thursday in the first round of the British Open. 


birdie and wound up with a credible 73. 
Around him the lesser names were be- 
having less famously — Norman giving 
up 2 strokes on the back side to finish at 
2 -under- par 69, in a tie with Couples, 
who was 3-over on the back. Slew an 
came home in 40 for 2-over. 

Watson didn't hit a green in reg- 
ulation on the back nine. He shot 33-38, 
finished at 71, and pointed out, “Jack 
Nicklaus shot even par on the back side, 
and that's quite a feat.” 

With wind like this. Royal Troon is 
divided roughly in half — the front nine 
feels as if it's downhill, and the back 
nine is, according to Couples, “about as 
hard a nine as you'll ever play.” 

‘Tve always felt that the British 
Open hasn't had enough wind the last 
couple of years,” Norman said. 
"Nowhere else in the world do you get 
to savor this. You've got to imagine 
shots, you've got to picture the snots 
that you want to hit. How many shots did 
I have, 37 on the back nine? Probably 15 
of them were shots I don't practice.” 
For Nicklaus to shoot even par on the 
back side was no sensation. But his 
score was like ballast and he himself 
became the anchor of a tournament that 


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had been making some amazing prom- 
ises — Colin Montgomerie being one of 
them. Montgomerie shot a disappoint- 
ing 76 on his home course, going 7-over 
par on the last dozen holes, and he seems 
more likely to miss the British Open cut 
for the fifth t ime in six years than win his 
first major title. 

The hope that the top players would be 
in contention on Sunday was not ruled 
out. Norman seemed to be in the best 
shape. He was followed around the 
course by his swing coach, David Lead- 
better. whose clients also include Ernie 
Els, who shot a disappointing 75, Nick 
Price, out of touch after a 78, ami Nick 
Faldo, who will retain hope of winning 
his fourth British Open with his opening- 
round 7 1 . Leadbetier says he knows how 
to predict when Faldo is about to make 
the run at a title. 

"Normally it’s when he's a bit up- 
light,” Leadbetier said as he walked 
behind the ropes amid the public gal- 
lery. “When Nick is relaxed, actually, 
it's a bit of a problem. He blew up at a 
couple of people last week, so he seems 
to be ready.” 

One of Leadbetter's former clients, 
the 1991 British Open champion Ian 
Baker-Finch, was on his way to an in- 
credible opening round of 92 — 2 1-over 
par — which was followed by the Aus- 
tralian's quick withdrawal from the 
tournament. Baker-Finch had six 
double-bogeys and a triple-bogey while 
shooting 44-48. He didn't decide to 


enter the tournament until Wednesday^ 

"1 think the problem for him is fear," 
Leadbetier said sympathetically. “Like 
a race- car driver who's afraid of crash- 
ing, or a skier who is always worried 
about coming off his skis.” 

Then shouldn't Norman also be a 
captive of such fear, having lost so many 
major titles on the final day? Yet here he 
was, putting himself in that position 
again. Leadbetter admitted that both 
Norman, 42, and Faldo, who turns 40 on 
Friday, had been inspired by the surge of 
Tiger Woods. 

"No great athlete likes to be told he's 
slipping, that he's losing his skills.” 
Leadbetter said. “He’ll always say. If I 
do a linle bit of this, fix up that. I can be 
right back up there again.” 

In the meantime, Nicklaus moved 
along, not really in contention but not 
far from it. At last the familiar blend of 
applause and whistling came up the 1 Sth 
fairway and then fell to silence as the 
statue of Nicklaus stood over his ball on 
the last green. From the first tee across 
the way his head and right shoulder 
were hidden behind his crouch. The 
other shoulder moved. There was more 
applause and he walked around the 
corner of the clubhouse and out of 
sight. 

After a suitable pause an announce- 
ment was made; “On the tee: Tiger 
Woods.” The air sounded as if it was 
ripping around his opening drive and the 
past became the present, just like that. 


Tiger Woods 
Goes Long 

TROON, Scotland — .. Tiger 
Woods's opening round in the Brit- 
ish Open on Thursday contained, a 
triple-bogey seven, two birdies in' 
the last three holes and a drive he 
estimated at 435 yards. He finished 
with a one-over-par 7 ftp trail lead- 
ers Jim Furyk ana Darren Clarke.by 
four strokes. Ian Baker-Finch.-the 
1991 champion, went around in 9Z 
■ 21 over par, and then withdrew. . 

Woods found bunkers twice at 
the firs! hole but still saved par, At 
the 557-yard fourth, with the wind 
at his back. Woods unleashed the 
drive that went well over 400 yards, 
and even though he two-putted 
from 12 feet, he got a birdie. . .. - 
He collected lus second /birdie at 
the 577-yard sixth, the longest hole 
on any Open course. He missed the 
green on the 126-yard postage- 
stamp eighth, where he made a bo- 
gey - 4 and then had a 7 at the par-4 
1 1th, but he birdied die par-5 16th 
and the par-4 18th. - 

No player broke par on the wind- 
whipped back nine, but Clarke, of 
Northern Ireland, and. Furyk. an 
American, both finished level par 
for the home stretch after bogey ing 
the 18th. 

"I'm glad to come m even par,” 
said Furyk- “It's really tough com- 
ing in. ” 

”1 got off to a good start, and 
then as soon as I stood on the 10th 
hole, it was a case of trying to hang 
on,” Clarke said, i love the con- 
ditions like that. 1 am used to it.” 
"Believe me. I'm delighted.” 
Norman said after carding a 2-uh- 
der69. “It was a long, hard day. We 
played (wo totally different 
courses. -We were hitting six-irons 
240 yards downwind and six-irons 
120 yards into the wind.” 

Davis Love HI and Jesper 
Pamevik were among four players 
at 1 -under 70. while Tom Watson. 
Curtis Strange, Nick Faldo and Ian 
Woosnam were at 71. Bernhard 
Longer finished at 72. along with 
Tom Kile. Colin Montgomerie, the 
Scottish favorite, shot 76. 

Baker-Finch. 36. went out in 44 
and came back in 48. His round 
included a triple bogey, six double 
bogeys, five bogeys and no bird- 


ies. 

*i 

said. 


tried 


% 


(Reiners, AP. AFPi 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Stanptmgs 

AMUICAN 1UOW 

EAST DIVtStON 



W 

L 

PU. 

CB 

Baltimore 

57 

34 

.4 3b 

— 

New York 

53 

30 

Sit 


Toronto 

43 

47 

An 

13', 

Detroit 

43 

49 

Ml 

14V. 

Boston 

41 

52 

.441 

17 

CENTRAL DIVICION 



Cleveland 

49 

36 

j5*3 

— 

Chicoqo 

47 

45 

-511 

4'.. 

Milwaukm 

43 

44 

.483 

7 

Mlmesaia 

40 

57 

.435 

IP. 

Kansas City 

37 

52 

414 

13 


WEST DIVISION 



Statue 

S3 

41 

.564 

— 

Anaheim 

51 

42 

548 

f, 

Te*as 

44 

44 

joo 

4 

Oakland 

39 

57 

.406 

15 

NATIONAL UAOIR 



EAST DIVISION 




w 

L 

Pet. 

CB 

Atlanta 

60 

34 

638 

— 

F tort Ai 

5J 

J8 

581 

S 

New Yoi* 

SI 

42 

548 

B 1 

Montreal 

SO 

47 

543 

V 

Phitodetohia 

77 

64 

.297 

31'. 


Houston 
Pittsburgh 
St. Louis 
Cincinnati 
Ch«: aw> 


C EXTRA! OCVBKM 
08 47 

47 V- 
41 40 

41 SI 
J9 Si 
WST DIVISION 


SOS 

SOS 

484 

446 

415 


BulKnqer.M. Valdes 16). Torres (B>. Delia rt 
CB) and Fletcher; ScNWng and Lieberthal, 
W— Schilling, 11-8. L— BuIBnger, 6-9. 
HRs — PMfacMphto Rolen (72/, Brogna 

cm. 

Colorado 000 100 000-1 5 0 

AtkMta 000 100 Clx-2 9 0 

Thomson, Dipolo (8), M. Munoz <S) and 
Monworimj; Gtavmc. Wohlers (9) and 
Edd-Percz. W— Gkwinc. 10-5 L— Dipola 3- 
3. S*— Wohlers (23). 

Los Anijefcn 000 010 BOO-1 I 1 

Rendu 101 003 0QX-S 9 I 

Noma Osuna (6) and Piazza KJ Brown 
and C Johnson. W— IG. Brown. 9-*. 
L— Noma 9-8 

Chicago M0 M0 000—6 10 0 

NuwYatft 003 020 000— S 7 1 

JeC-orualez. Wendell (AI. R. Totis I7». T 
Adams 17). Pojas (9) and Sovik. Reynoso, 
Udlc IS). Crawford (7). Koshraado (9) and 
Hundley W— Jc Gonzalez. 7-3. L— Reynoso, 
6-3. Sv— Rows (fOl HP— New Vor*. Otonid 
(141. 

San Francisco 000 0)0 000—1 4 3 

Houston 300 401 DO*— 8 II 1 

Fnulkc. Johnstone (4j. R Rodrwjuer 
Poole 18) and Bcrryhill, Johnson ( 71. 
Hampton and Ausnrus W— Hampton, a-t 
L— F oullv. I 4. HR— Houston. Boqar rji 
Son Diego 100 000 021-4 B I 

Si. Louis 010 000 200-3 7 1 

HriclKKt# Bruske (Zj. Hoftnnn *9, and 
Ftoherty. Moms. Fossas >8). T J Motor *•, 
ffli mid OiiHirp. 'V— BnilM*. 2 0 L-T 
J Mathews. 4-4. S»— Hntmwn 120; 

Japanese Leagues 


Peter 0 MoHey. Ausll. 


33-HJ-73 


San Francisco 

S3 41 164 — 


UNIUL LKAOUK 

Pet 

CB 

Las Awj>.-te 

50 44 AJ2 3 


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L 

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CoJurndo 

44 51 .463 V 

Yakult 

48 

29 

■ 

A?1 

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San Dvao 

43 SI .457 10 

Hiroshima 

JV 

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0 

52 •" 


WIDNKSOAT'O UNIS CORKS 

Yokohama 

V 

3H 

0 

496 

in- 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Hansom 

16 

jn 

t 

474 

it 

Boston 

300 IDO 000—4 11 0 

Churacto 

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47 

p 

468 

17 

BaltMMre 

000 NO 010-1 10 0 

Yomiuri 

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45 

0 

422 

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PA CUFIC 18 AGUE 



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BALTIMORE -RreoDcd INF Aaron Cedes 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 18. 1997 


PAGE 21 


FR ">AY|| 


SPORTS 


Naijj es Armstrong Returns, 
— But as a Spectator 

Tiger Jf'o 0 1 Cancer-Stricken Cyclist Admits 
Goes Lotto ' ^ uture Is ‘Kind of Wait and See’ 


utir -W- 


‘a irh .< onu 
-r* j;m Fu 


TROo\ v • By Samuel Abt 

W'.w - ‘ •'*v | >: !jr. I ImemxJiii’tuil iieruU Tribune 

hOpi-n.n,. . 1 ' T 

» h 0n — or. PI T - ETIENNE, France — Her- 
at.--. ' aided by the hum of their 

hrj-.- hr, I.!' 1 M ' wheels, the riders of the Tour de 

1 ji 4 ' ■J 1 "' j k/ France were leaving Andorra, 

tf-.n—'.p - Hr,- ' chatting andjoking as they do before the 
ur . l- V j r 1 iijnJ daily battle really starts. 

\ l ' ' J ' ,rr iTi ( On the sidewalk, just before the riders 
rr-']. . ° n " ‘- ^ Fiu t turned a comer and began to pass out of 
. sishr, Lance Armstrong had stood, a 

!"/ J;; ‘ v - nh.| r J n ‘ spectator. This was not his battle now. It 


If 

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j has not been since October, when Arm- 
strong. the 25-year-old Texan who has 
)* won two stages’ in the Tour and became 
9 world professional road-race champion 
at the age of 22, was told he had testic- 
* ular cancer that had spread to his lungs 
:l - and brain. 

' !, j He has not ridden in a professional 
race since then.. After months of suc- 
■ cessful chemotherapy and continuing 
: - checkups, he is sitting out this season 
because his doctors fear that arduous 
physical activity at this point might al- 
low Uie cancer (o recur. 

Armstrong joined this Tour as a vis- 
i tor. participating mainly in a ceremony 
+ to honor his former teammate. Fabio 
: .t Casanelii. who was lulled in a crash in 
the Pyrenees two years ago. 

'£ “It’s a strange feeling, but I’m com- 
- fortable just being a spectator right 
now.” he said in an interview while he 
spent two days with the race this week. 

"It’s not difficult for me” — he 
slowed and chose his words carefully — 
” to come and watch.” 

> Even when the thought is that banal. 
Armstrong is unaccusromedly slow to 
.. respond to some questions. Often the 
t reply is full of uncertainty, as he is. 

”It ’s kind of wait and see, ’ ’ he says of 
his future. “I’m still being monitored 
every month, and so far, so good.” His 
blood was last checked for signs of 
disease two weeks ago in Austin, Texas. 

. where he lives. Early in August, hp will 
go to Indianapolis for his three-month 
: checkup and tests in depth. 

• ‘My doctors have told me to rest this 
year,” he said. “Whatever happens 
after this year, it’s going to happen. I 
still consider myself a professional cyc- 
. list.” 

He has a deadline to know how long 
•, he will retain that status. 

“It's October,” he said, “a year after 
I was diagnosed, in line with the 
. checkups and how they go. The doctors 
pretty much dictate everything. Yeah, 
they do. 

”The further I go there, the more 
a clear my future will be: whether J’ll ride 
again, whether I won’t ride again, 
whether I can ride again.” 

Being cleared to ride and wanting to 
do it are two different things, of course. 
'* Armstrong knows that a year off his 
bicycle, excepr for inrenru ttent training, 
will not be overcome quickly or easily. 
Although he has not gained much 
weight and looks fit and happy, he says 
his muscle mass has turned soft, 
i Asked if he had brought a bicycle 
i with him to Europe for training rides, he 
looked amused. No. he said, he left it 
behind. 

“I’ve been training so hard,” he ex- 



mas- 





-*v/\ 


, -*c- iA » ■ 



plained with a big, self-mocking smile, 
“that 1 have to taper off for a while.” 

If he cannot return to the top level of 
the sport, he often says, he does not want 
to return at all. 

More important, he is watching his 
health. 

“I feel great, super. 1 really do. I feel 
better than I did a year ago.” And, he 
continued, he is enjoying life. 

“I’m having a blast,” he said. “I’m 
doing exactly what I want to do.” 

That includes playing 4 ‘a lot of golf,' * 
traveling for a week in North Carolina 
traveling with the Wallflowers band and 
visiting Spain with a girlfriend. He went 
to Madrid, San Sebastian and 
Pamplona, where he watched the run- 
ning of the bulls, before joining the 
Tour. Afterward he was returning from 
Andorra to Madrid and planned to fly 
back to Austin on Saturday. 

Armstrong said he was living day ro 
day and long-term at the same time: 
“Absolutely. When I wake up, I try to 
live every day fully and all out as best I 

T his is an uncertain time 
for me. Ym kind of 
floating in terms of my 
career and my future and 
my professional life and 
my health. 9 

can, but I’d be lying if I said 1 didn’t 
think about what I’m going to be doing 
10 years from now.” 

His options are varied. 

“I have a bit of a financial cushion,” 
he says, “but I don’t have the mentality 
to sit around and do nothing. I'll find 
something.” 

Those options include enrolling at the 
University of Texas, minutes from his 
home in Austin. 

“I’ve thought about it a lot.’ ’ he said. 
“Business is the logical subject- 1 could 
also study medicine, because that makes 
a lot of sense for me, but it takes so long. 

I wouldn’t mind studying law but prob- 
ably business. 

“It's an option. I have a lot of options, 
though, and that’s a nice position to be 
in. Riding again is an option, staying 
involved in cycling is another, with 
American industry people.” 

Which sounds best? ne was asked. 
“None of them sound bad,” be 
replied guardedly. 

But which is best? 

After a long pause, he said: “Good' 
question. Sneaky too.” 

He meant that he knew he was being 
pressed to say whether he preferred to 
race again. 

“I don’t know which sounds best. 
This is an uncertain time for me. I’m 
kind of floating in terms of my career 
and my future and my professional life 
and my health. 

. “It’s really uncertain, so until there’s 
some certainty. I’m not going to force 
myself to think about the future too 
much.” 

Not many hours later, he was stand- 
ing on the sidewalk as the Tour began to 
whir by, and then he was gone too. 



\ll>n hwiirmlawH'iiifi* 


Jeromy Burnitz of the Brewers scoring on a fielding error. The throw eluded Sandy Alomar of the Indians. 

McGwire Regains the Lead in Homers 


The Associated Press 

With two swings, Mark McGwire 
passed two Yankees and couldn't have 
cared less. 

McGwire hit his 33d and 34th homers 
to regain the major-league lead from 
New York’s Tino Martinez and move 
past Joe DiMaggio on the career list as 
the Oakland Athletics beat the Kansas 
City Royals, 11-3. 

McGwire connected for a three-run 
homer off Mike Perez in the fourth 

AL Roundup 

inning to tie Martinez, who hit his 32d 
and 33d homers in New York’s 11-5 
victory in Chicago. 

Oakland's slugger then broke that tie 
by homering again off Jeff Montgomery 
ro lead off the eighth. 

The home-run race is on, right 
Mark? 

“Who really cares? Why would that 
be such a big deal at this point? Why 
would that matter? I don’t play this 
game for individual accomplishments,' * 
McGwire said. 

It was the 39th multi-homer game for 
McGwire, tying him with Andre 
Dawson for 17th place on die career list. 
He now has 363 career homers. Dimag- 
gio had 361. 

‘ ’He’s one of the most dangerous bats 


today, if not this era.” the Royals' man- 
ager, Tony Muser. said. “He's a home- 
run machine.” 

Jose Canseco struck out in all five of 
his al-bats for the Athletics, tying an 
Oakland record. Combined with his 
three strikeouts Monday, he tied a ma- 
jor-league record with eight whiffs in 
consecutive games. 

“I don’t know what’s wrong. I’m 
trying to figure it out. Maybe I’m going 
blind,” Canseco said with a smile. 
“Somebody’s got to make the outs.” 

Tank*** 11, White Sox 5 In Chicago, 
Martinez hit his fourth career grand 
slam, off Wilson Alvarez on an 0-2 pitch 
in the seventh following Derek Jeter’s 
single and walks to Luis Sojo and Paul 
O’Neill. 

Martinez, who had 31 homers with 
Seattle in 1 995. connected in the third to 
set a career high. 

Mariners 8, twins 7 In Seattle, the 
Mariners rallied for a victory for the 
25th time this season when Russ Davis 
hit a two-run single with one out in the 
ninth. 

The Mariners, who scored five runs in 
the eighth to take a 6-3 lead, needed to 
come from behind again after the Twins 
scored four times in the top of the 
ninth. 

Rangers 6, Blue Jays 0 In Arlington. 
Texas, Darren Oliver pitched his second 


career shutout and Will Clark doubled 
twice and drove in three runs for 
Texas. 

Oliver scattered eight hits in his first 
complete game and shutout this season. 
The right-hander, whose other shutout 
came against Toronto on June 8, 1996, 
is 5-0 with a 0.95 earned run average in 
his career against the Blue Jays. 

Rod sox 4, Orioles i Sieve Avery won 
his first decision since April 22 and 
Mike Stanley hit a three-run homer off 
Jimmy Key as Boston won in Bal- 
timore. 

Avery, making his third start since 
coming off a two-month stint on the 
disabled list, allowed one run and eight 
hits in seven-plus innings. 

Indians 4, Browers 3 In Milwaukee, 
the rookie Jaret Wright pitched six ef- 
fective innings and Brian Giles homered 
as Cleveland won for die fifth time in six 
games. 

Wright (2-0), making his first start 
since cutting his finger July I trying to 
bunt, allowed two runs and three hits. 

Angels 5, Tigers 3 In Anaheim, Todd 
Greene hit his first two home runs of the 
season in consecutive at- bats and Chuck 
Finley won his fourth straight start as 
the Angels won their ninth straight. 

Finley (7-6) shrugged off homers by 
Melvin Nieves and Travis Fryman to 
scatter seven hits in seven innings. 


49ers and Packers Sign Defensive Help 


The Associated Press 

The San Francisco 49ers and the 
Green Bay Packers improved their de- 
fensive backfields by signing veteran 
free-agents. 

Rod Woodson, an All-Pro comer- 
back, signed with San Francisco on 
Wednesday, while Seth Joyner, an 
All-Pro linebacker, hooked up with 
Green Bay. 

Woodson, who spent 10 years with 
the Pittsburgh Steelers, is a seven-time 
Pro Bowl selection and NFL defensive 
player of the year. 

He became a free agent after last 
season, when he returned from a ca- 
reer-threatening knee injury that had 
sidelined him for virtually all of 
1995. 

Whodson had additional surgery 


Feb. 1 on his reconstructed right knee. 
Doctors removed a bone chip, and 
Woodson said his knee felt the best it 
has since the injury. 

“Last year, I was going on one leg a 
lot,” he said. “This year, I have two.” 

Terras of his three-year deal were 
not released. 

In allowing Woodson to get away, 
the Sieelers lost another accomplished 
player in the free-agent market. Chad 
Brown, also an All-Pro linebacker, 
had left Pittsburgh earlier to sign a six- 
year, 524 million deal with Seattle. 

'Brown was among the 89 unres- 
tricted free agents to switch teams 
during the five-month signing period 
that ended July 15, according to an 
NFL report issued Wednesday. 

Joyner has played in three Pro Bowls 


and is entering his 12th NFL season. 

Joyner, who had played in Phil- 
adelphia and Atlanta, signed a four-year 
deal reportedly worth $6 million. He is 
expected to replace George Koonce, out 
following reconstructive knee surgery. 

Joyner, 32, is reuniting with Reggie 
White, his teammate and buddy with 
the Eagles, in hopes of finally reaching 
the Super Bowl. 

“He’s really a nice piece of the 
puzzle for this season far us,” said the 
Packer coach. Mike Holmgren. “He’s 
still a very, very fine football player.” 

One player who is staying put is 
Shannon Sharpe who signed a three- 
year, $7.2 million contract with the 
Denver Broncos that will make him 
one of die highest-paid tight ends in 
the NFL. 


‘Buzz Saw 5 
Cuts Down 
L. A. With 
One-Hitter 


The Associated Press 

The way Kevin Brown is throwing, a 
no-hitter is possible anytime he 
pitches. 

Brown, who no-hit San Francisco on 
June 10, pitched his first career one- 
hitter Wednesday night in Miami, lead- 
ing the Florida Marlins over the Los 
Angeles Dodgers, 5-1. 

4 ‘He was like a buzz saw,' ’ said Brett 
Butler, the Dodgers left fielder. 

Brown (9-6) faced just two batters 
over the minimum, allowing a leadoff 

NL Roundup 

single to left by Raul Mondesi in the 
fifth. Brown then retired his final 15 
batters. 

‘■This was not a nighi when I felt 
dominant out there,” Brown said- "I 
was happy with the results, but I felt this 
was a night when I had to make my 
pitches because 1 didn't have the feeling 
that I even had last outing.” 

He struck out eight and walked one in 
his fourth complete game of the season. 
He has allowed one earned run or none 
in 10 of 20 starts this season. 

PhniMs 6, Expos o Cun Schilling 
pitched a four-hitter in Philadelphia for 
his first shutout this season. He struck 
out seven, raising his league-leading 
total ro 176. and walked none in his 
fourth complete game. 

Scott Rolen and Rico Brogna 
homered for Philadelphia, which won 
consecutive games for the first time 
since May 17-18 against Houston. 

Bravos 2 , Rockies i In Atlanta. Chip- 
per Jones singled home die go-ahead run 
u the eighth and Tom Glavine won for 
the fourth time in five derisions, allowing 
one run and five hits in eight innings. 

Colorado has lost five straight and 1 2 
of 1 3. Atlanta won for just the third time 
in seven games since the All-Star break. 
Larry Walker went 1 for 4, dropping his 
major league-leading average to .404. 

Reels 7, Pirates 3 Jon Nunnally, ac- 
quired Tuesday from Kansas City, 
homered and drove in three runs in his 
first National League start. 

Astras ft, Giants i In Houston, Mike 
Hampton pitched a four-hitter to win his 
third straight decision as the Astros won 
for the fifth time in seven games since 
the All-Star break. The Giants have lost 
five of seven since the break. 

Padros 4, Cardinals 3 Ken Caminiti 
singled home the go-ahead run with two 
outs in the ninth as San Diego rallied 
from a 3-1 deficit in St. Louis. 

Cubs 6, Mata s Sammy Sosa, the 
Cubs’ right fielder, made a running 
catch with the bases loaded to end the 
seventh and catcher Scott Servais had a 
key pickoff in the eighth as visiting 
Chicago stopped its four-game losing 
streak and sent the Mets to their third 
straight loss. 

■ Mels Fire General Manager 

Joe Mcllvaine was fired as general 
manager of the Mets, the apparent vic- 
tim of a personality conflict with the 
team’s co-owner, Fred Wiipon, and the 
manager, Bobby Valentine, The Asso- 
ciated Press reported from New York. 

Steve Phillips, 34, was promoted 
from assistant genera] manager to Me li- 
vable’ s job. The Mets are enjoying their 
first winning season in seven years. 


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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1997 


POSTCARD 

In the Ring Sans Bull 


•By William Claiborne 

Wuikunnm FnsrSi-ruft 

C HULA VISTA. Califor- 
nia — In the exotic and 
dangerous world of bullfight- 
ing, it has been axiomatic for 
centuries that only those with 
Latin blood have the passion, 
skill and courage to become a 
matador and face the fear- 
some Bos Taurus. 

But that was before the ex- 
plosion in popularity 1 of "ex- 
treme games" and the found- 
ing of the California 
Academy of Tauromaquia 
here, an amateur matador 
training school for Anglos. Its 
students are bent on high-risk 
adventure while engaging in a 
sport that has cult status in the 
Mediterranean and Latin 
America but remains ana- 
thema ro animal rights activ- 
ists in the United States and 
elsewhere. 

□ 

The academy's students in- 
clude Jim Koustas. 28. a soft- 
ware developer from Denver 
who has never been to a bull- 
fighr but hungers to participate 
in this "wonderful, tragic play 
between man and beast.” Tri- 
cia Slane. 23. a pet groomer 
and aspiring actress from 
Batavia, New York, initially 
joined the academy hoping to 
advance her acting career but 
showed so much natural talent 
and enthusiasm that she will 
become its first graduate next 
month. Soon afterward, she 
will face cows in bloodless 
ring exercises in Mexico. 

Since the academy opened 
this spring, its students have 
been training at a sandior play- 
ing field at an elementary 
school here, 10 miles south of 
San Diego, but engaging in 
nothing more lethal than flou- 
rishing their bright red capes at 
instructors brandishing a pair 
of bullhorns. Bullfighting is 
illegal in California and else- 


where in the United States, 
and Coleman Cooney, a taur- 
ine aficionado who co-foun- 
ded the academy, says he's not 
interested in provoking animal 
rights activists by staging even 
bloodless fights here. 

Consequently. Slane 's fi- 
nal lest will take place in 
nearby Tecaie. Mexico, 
where she will have to perfect 
her cape techniques against a 
half-dozen young cows be- 
fore being declared ready to 
fatally plunge her sword be- 
tween a "fighting bull's 
shoulder blades. 

“I think she can do it. She's 
naru rally athletic. >he's ded- 
icated and she has the desire. 
She has what they call 'gu- 
sano.' the w orm. It gets in you 
and you become obsosed 
with fighting a bull.'' said 
Peter Rombold. Sfane's in- 
structor and a veteran amateur 
bullfighter with 40 kills under 
his belt before he co- founded 
the academy with Cooney. 

The 5 1 -year-old Rombold. 
who said he became hooked 
on bullfighting at ace 14 
when his fathe~r took Rim to 
Tijuana's Plaza de Toros, said 
he had to struggle for years to 
overcome an entrenched cul- 
tural bias in the predomin- 
antly Latin world ot bullfight- 
ing and became what Cooney 
calls "an .American origi- 
nal.' ' one of only about a naif- 
dozen active Anglo amateur 
matadors who have made a 
sizable number of kills. 

Cooney. 40. said he be- 
came a bullfighting * ‘fanatic” 
while living for seven years in 
Spain. There he was pro- 
foundly affected by the 1984 
fatal goring of Pa'quirri. the 
first major Spanish bullfighter 
killed in the ring in years. 
Cooney bought a season tick- 
et ro bullfights, then became 
an aficionado practico. find- 
ing small bulls with which to 
hone his skills before becom- 
ing an amateur matador. 


The Flippo Tour of Dallas With Doug Swanson 



• -I— 




By Sam Howe Verhovek 

;Wm Yoik Twin Sen-ti e 

D ALLAS — You want the Flippo 
tour?" asks Doug J. Swanson, author 
and creator of Jack Flippo, a down-and-out 
Texas private eye. He points the car west 
into the Dallas night, away from the gaudy, 
neon skyline of downtown, over the mud- 
ditch Trinity River and into a neighborhood 
of factories, fleabag motels and dingy 
doughnut shops. 

At one time. Jack Flippo. the chief char- 
acter in Swanson's three crime novels, was a 
young assistant district attorney in Dallas, a 
man with a ftiture. One serious "libido- 
driven mistake” and a few lesser wrong nuns 
later. Flippo is prow ling the seedier side of 
Dallas, with forays into the city's better- 
known. big-rich side. He peeps in keyholes 
and digs up din. while engaging himself in a 
philosophical struggle to presene his in- 
tegrity. or some shied of it. "He looked on 
his conscience as something that crashed in 
the jungle." Swanson writes, "but was still 
sending out weak Maydays.” 

Flippo intersects with many of Swan- 
son’s other distinctive Dallas characters, 
including Buddy George Jr., a motivational 
speaker fond adulterer and blackmail target) 
with a pompadour "the size of a canned 
ham" and hand-tooled baby-blue cowboy 
boots. A constant font of corny dictums — 

"You triumph when you combine ‘try’ with Author Swanson loitering hy a seamy Dallas motel like the ones in his thrillers. 
*umphT* — Buddy makes his money on 

Dallas freeway. "So l think maybe the contrast here is 




people who come to his Wayupper seminars, where he sells 
his book. ‘‘Birth of a Salesman!" "Jesus was a salesman." 
Buddy tells his crowds. "Sure he was. People say he has 
millions of followers. I like to think of 'em as customers." 

With the Flippo series — "Big Town" (1994), “Dre- 
amboat" (199?) and "96 Tears" 1 1996. all HarperCollinsj 
— Swanson. 44. has drawn acclaim for his zany writing 
style ("crime fiction slathered in broad comedy." Pub- 
lishers Weekly says). “Big Town” won the British Crime 
Writers Association prize for besr first novel. 

As much as any human being in the Flippo series. Dallas 
is a central character in the books, but with a twisted and 
clever reflection of its vaunted self-image as the ultimate city 
of money and deals. Everybody has a hustle here. Even low - 
life criminals are upwardly striving in Swanson's Dallas; 
those who blackmail Buddy George listen to his motivational 
cassette tapes and ask him for more and more money. 

"Dallas is not an artistic place — it's a business place," 
Swanson explains, and the pervading sense of money's im- 
portance may give his desperate, scrambling characters a 
greater edge.' “You’re expected to come here" and work and 
make your money and be a productive citizen and be con- 
servative. and all that." he savs as the car zooms across a 


stronger. And that seems to fit with what l*m trying to do." 

None of the action takes place in corporate boardrooms or 
the conference areas of luxury hotels, which would explain 
why bis little tour of the Dallas inspirations for his novels is 
like no sightseeing tour offered by Gray Line. This tour 
includes two storefront tarot parlors, an inexpensive Sal- 
vadoran restaurant and a very budget motel on Fort Worth 
Avenue, which helpfully advises its clientele that drug 
deaLing and prostitution are not allowed. Also on the it- 
inerary is Brownie's Coffee Shop, an east Dallas hangout 
with eight colors of vinyl seats. In real life, a collection 
agency and a beeper-repair shop are just above the place: in 
the books, the coffee shop is called Greenie's. and Flippo' s 
office is upstairs. "You could imagine a somewhat le- 
gitimate detective winding up up there." Swanson says. 
"Somewhat legitimate.” 

His writing is a sort of Sunbelt no ir and cocks an amused eye 
at some of the urban Southwest's small absurdities, like the 
Timberpork Hill apartment complex along a Dallas freeway — 
"nowhere near timber, park or a hill.” the author observes in 
"Big Town." 

The plots are heavy on double- and triple-crosses and 


other twists. "Sure I gave you my word.” a 
swindling lawver explains to his clients in 
"Dreamboat." “But all guarantees are sub- 
ject to change.” Even friendly conversation 
has an edge. "I won’t lie to you except it's 
to sell commercial real estate." says a man 
Flippo meets in a bar in “Big Town.” 

The books raise an intriguing question; Is 
Dallas a natural place to set a crime novel? 

Maybe, though while Hollywood is in- 
(crested in Swanson's plots, it may just 
change his setting, Sreven-Charles Jarfe, the 
producer who has optioned "Big Town' ’ and 
who plans to begin shooting the film late this 
year said be would probably set the whole 
thing in San Diego. More picturesque. 

Swanson, who lives 45 miles north of 
Dallas with his wife, Susan Rogers, and 
their two children, says he takes no offense. 
"I can’t imagine the books not being in 
Dallas, but a movie is a different creature, f 
don’t think it would work so well in Clev- 
eland or Toledo, because the Sunbelt, the 
sense of quick money, is such a big in- 
gredient. San Diego's O.K. It’s really beau- 
tiful but it does have its own sleazy side." 

In the main, Swanson's Dallas characters 
are not moneyed like J.R. Ewing in "Dal- 
las.” "People keep telling me I should write 
about the real Dallas rich,” he says. *Tve 
thought about ihaL But I would have to make 
it somebody who had money and who is 
losing money. I just couldn't imagine hav- 
ing a lot of fun with someone who has had it 
alfin life and continues to have it. and is not 
desperate. I need desperate people to write about.” 

Most of Swanson’s characters are Texas types. In 
"Dreamboal" Flippo is called on to investigate a drowning 
in Lake Dolph Brisco, and the East Texas Sheriff is no help 
at all ( for a reason >. Rex Echols, a friendly guy who owned a 
topless bar called the Melon Patch Ranch with the deceased, 
seems intent only on making up country music lyrics: 

It hurts to admit it. but one thing I Jo know 
If cheatin' was a fel’ny. I'd live on Death Row. 

There are a few out-of-state characters, including an overlarge 
tough guy and recurring nemesis of Flippo. Theodore N. Tunsua 
2d, known as Teddy Deuce, die ‘‘unemployable son of a dentist” 
from Queens. Swanson says his inspiration for Teddy Deuce was 
a real -life New Yorker he encountered in Brooklyn when he was 
in the New York bureau of The Dallas Morning News. 

“He worked at this toy store in Paik Slope." Swanson 
recalls. “We used to call it Toys or Else. He was this big 
muscle-bo undguy with tattoos. Anyway, one day I was in then? 
with my son. who's maybe 4 years old, and this big guy is on the 
phone behind the counter, and he says. ‘Yeah, the judge told 





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David Letterman interviewing New York cabbie Qurbe Munir Tirmizi. 


PEOPLE 


T HE Broadway musical ‘‘ Victor/Victoria,'' 
based on Blake Edwards's film in which a 
woman pretends to be a man pretending to be a 
woman, is closing early. Julie Andrews had played 
the lead role until June 10. when Raquel Welch 
took over. Although Welch was to play the part for 
as Jong as six months, she received lukewarm 
reviews, and the producers said the show would end 
after the matinee on July 27. 

□ 

The Detroit rappers whose lewd album was 
pulled from scores last month by a nervous Walt 
Disney Co. have resurfaced at a new label. The duo 
Insane Clown Posse had been signed to Disney's 
Hollywood Records, but when Disney executives 
learned of the content of the hotly anticipated label 
debut “The Great Milenko.” they ordered a recall 
six hours after it went on sale on June 24. That did 
not stop the album from selling 18.000 copies. 
Island Records, whose roster includes U2 and the 
Cranberries, has emerged as Insane Clown 
Posse's new home. 

□ 

An honest cab driver got his reward in the form of 
an appearance on the David Letterman TV show. 
Qurbe Munir Tirmizi, a native of Pakistan, had 


been driving a taxi in New York for only one week, 
when acustomer left her life savings. $35,859. in the 
back seat of his cab Iasi weekend. Tirmizi turned it in 
to the authorities and when the 7 1 -year-old customer 
offered him a reward, he turned it* down. ... On t lie 
same Broadway block where NBC put up a billboard 
ofasmilingjay Leno proclaiming rba) he sNo. J in 
the late-night television ratings. CBS struck back 
with a billboard of its own. It features Letterman 's 
gap-toothed grin and the boast that his * ‘Late Show” 
is No. 3. “We put it up for the same reason we do 
everything else. It made us laugh.” said Rob Bur- 
nett, executive producer of Letterman ’s show. No 
word on whetherTed Koppel is plotting a billboard 
of his own. His "Nightline" is No. 2. 

□ 

More than 120 books from the family library of 
Mark Twain sold at auction for S200.500. The 
books were bought by Mark Twain House, the 
mansion in Hartford. Connecticut, where Twain 
lived and which is now a museum. 

□ 

John Fogerty can still draw a crowd despite an 
1 1 -year gap between album releases. Fans lined the 
street to glimpse Fogerty as he filmed a music video 
at a train depot in Mount Pleasant. Tennessee. The 


video is for ‘‘Southern Streamline." a song on 
“Blue Moon Swamp.” his first solo album since 
"Eye of the Zombie" in 1986. Fogerty and his 
bund. Creedence Clearwater Revival, put out hits 
like “Proud Mary” and ‘‘Bora on the Bayou” in 
the 1960s and ’70s. 

□ 

Merle Haggard is following the doctor's orders 
and canceling his July tour dates. Haggard, 60. has 
been recovering from heart surgery this month to 
fix a clogged artery. He said he wanted to fully 
recover before resuming the tour, but he’s not 
planning a long rest. A date in Alabama has already 
been rescheduled for Aug. 3. 

□ 

The actor Parker Stevenson and actress Kirstie 
Alley may get their divorce, but it won’t happen in 
Maine. A judge dismissed the Maine divorce ac- 
tion. saying Alley’s primary residence is in Cali- 
fornia even though the former "Cheers” star owns j 
two houses in Maine. A California divorce woulo 
favor Stevenson, who is requesting financial sup- 
port from .Alley. California laws require the couple 
to split assets equally. In Maine, only wealth ac- 
uired during the marriage is contested. Alley and 
tevenson have been married 14 years. 



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