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INTERNATIONAL 





PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World's Daily Newspaper 


Paris, Wednesday, July 23, 1997 


No. 35.580 


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Jggr&is^ Greenspan Blessing 
ISfSpSs Spurs U.S. Markets 

Fed Chief Predicts Low Inflation 


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By Mitchell Martin 

Inti-mtUiirtuI Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Alan Greenspan, 
. chairman of the U.S. central bank, served 
up a tonic to investors Tuesday, saying 
the Federal Reserve Board had revised 
its forecasts for the American economy 
to show faster growth and slower in- 
flation than it predicted six months ago. 

Stocks and bonds rallied along with 
an already strong dollar, which cracked 
the 1.82 Deutsche mark barrier, as the 
Fed chairman told the House of Rep- 
resentatives Banking Committee that 
central bankers "anticipate that the 
economy will grow at a moderate pace in 
i the second half of this year and in 1998 
and that inflation will remain low." 

Mr. Greenspan was delivering the Fed 
chairman’s semiannual report to Con- 
gress, known as the Humphrey-Hawkins 
testimony after the legislation that man- 
dated iL According to the Fed report that 
was the basis for Mr. Greenspan's testi- 
mony, "Federal Reserve policymakers 
have revised upward their expectations 
for grow* of real activity in 1997 and 
trimmed their forecasts of inflation. This 
combination of revisions highlights the 
extraordinarily positive conditions still 
prevailing more than six years into the 
current economic expansion. ' ’ 

He said that although low oil prices 
and a strong dollar were partly respon- 
sible for the good performance, it also 
i might reflect “more durable changes in 
our economy, notably a greater flex- 
ibility and competitiveness in labor and 
product markets and more rapid, tech- 
nology-driven gains in efficiency." He 


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The Dollar 


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1.6605 
114.95 
6. 142 

Tuesday dose 
8061.65 


Tuesday 9 4 PM. 
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1.7963 

1.6787 

116.15 

6.0565 

provtousdoee 


previous does 

912.96 



Boeing Merger Set to Fly 

EU Expected to Approve Deal After Concessions 


CM Juno/Thr Pro- 

Alan Greenspan, the Federal Re- 
serve chairman, sees solid growth. 


ByTomBuerkle 

Intel Buntwirf Herald Trihumr 

BRUSSELS — Boeing Co. appeared 
set to win European approval for its 
planned merger with McDonnell 
Douglas Corp. after making last-minute 
concessions to Europe's antitrust chief 
Tuesday, people involved in the ne- 
gotiations said. 

These people said the breakthrough 
involved Boeing dropping its status as 
exclusive supplier of aircraft in long- 
term contracts with three major U.S. 
airlines. It was expected to enable the 
European Commission to endorse the 
deal, valued at around $14 billion, at a 
meeting here Wednesday, these people 
said. 


European approval of the merger 
would avert the possibility of a dam- 
aging rranS- Atlantic trade war centered 
on Boeing and Europe's Airbus Indus- 
trie, two of the world's most politically 
sensitive and technologically advanced 
corporate entities. 

Boeing's new ventures stay close to 
aerospace. Page 13. 

The development is said to have fol- 
lowed high-level political interventions 
that underlined the stakes involved. 
President Bill Clinton, who last week 
threatened trade retaliation against 
Europe if the merger was blocked, tele- 
phoned Prime Minister Jean-Claude 


Ulster Peace Threatened by Rift on Disarming 


Protestants Oppose a Sinn Fein Return 
To Talks Before a Commitment on Arms 


V • v nology-dnven gams in efficiency.' He 

W T 1 Kipper A ai& added. "In essence, the economy may 


p - ... be experiencing an upward shift in its 

r or t lit* t .alVIKO II ionger-range output potential." 

‘ 1 Such optimism is unusual from Mr. 

Greenspan, who spent much of last 

P 4 ; x . . . winter questioning the strength of the 

financial markets. On Dec. 5, when he 

*7' ‘ : , r : ; _t suggested that investors might be dis- 

‘ }■ playing "irrational exuberance'’ that 
rrr;:... V ~ bad "undnly escalated asset values," 

‘ '■ ■ the Dow Jones industrial average was 

, " ... trading near 6,400 points. After his 

* ^ comments Tuesday, the index of Amer- 

ft- . ican blue-chip stocks jumped more than 

-’■A - - 130 points to rise above 8,000 in late 

iVci’i •. - ... trading — about 25 percent higher than 

; ft*. • ‘ it was when he made the “irrational 

;>c:: • ■ ' "" exuberance" comment, 

ft. r. : • His comments were well received in 

■v . the bond market. The yield on the 30- 

i .„ : - * • . - year Treasury bond fell to 6.41 percent 

u-j’ '• from 6.54 percent late Monday, taking it 

down to the lowest level since Mr. 

c„'r. . See GREENSPAN, Page 14 


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Caifaird In Our Sh# Firm Diifvxin 

BELFAST — The peace effort in 
Northern Ireland suffered a new set- 
back Tuesday as Britain acknowledged 
that pFO-Unionist Protestant politicians 
would block proposals to be voted on 
Wednesday on how guerrilla groups 
should surrender their weapons 

The faltering peace process, which 
got a boost Sunday when the Irish 
Republican Army declared a cease- 
fire, came under a further threat when 
the Protestant majority’s most hard- 
line leader, the Reverend lan Paisley, 
vowed to take his party out of the peace 
negotiations and declared the Northern 
Ireland peace process "dead in the 
water." 

The Northern Ireland secretary. Mo 
Mowlam, said after Mr. Paisley met 
Prime Minister Tony Blair in London 
on Tuesday that she had not given up 
hope about the vote Wednesday, in 
which peace talk participants wifi de- 
cide on a British-Irish proposal that the 
"decommissioning" — or surrender 


— of weapons be taken up by a sub- 
committee. in parallel with the polit- 
ical negotiations. 


But she added: "It is becoming less 
clear, and more likely that there won't 
be an agreement tomorrow after- 
noon.” 

Mr. Paisley, leader of the pro-British 
Democratic Unionist Party, called on 
the province’s largest party — the Ul- 
ster Unionists — to join him in voting 


against the proposal. He said his party 
would leave the peace talks after the 
vote on guerrilla disarmament. 

His party is the second largest rep- 
resenting the pro-British Protestant 
majority in Northern Ireland. A smal- 
ler party, the UK Unionists, withdrew 
from the talks Monday. 

The weapons proposal deals with 
ways the Irish Republican Army would 
start disarming during the negoti- 
ations, which are to resume SepL 15. 

The Irish Republican Army began 
an open-ended truce Sunday in ex- 
change for Prime Minister Tony 
Blair's promise ihat Sinn Fein, the 
political arm of the IRA. could gradu- 
ally be introduced to the talks. 

The unionists oppose allowing Sinn 
Fein into the talks without a firm com- 
mitment from the guerrillas to hand in 
the guns and explosives they have ac- 
cumulated in their 28-year war against 
British rule in Northern Ireland. 

The Sinn Fein president. Gerry 
Adams, urged the Protestant Unionist 
parties to stay at the conference table 
and join Sinn Fein in trying to bridge 
the gulf between them. 

"What are they afraid of?” he 
asked. "Can they not have the courage 
of their convictions and sit down with 
their neighbors, their fellow citizens, to 
try to work out a resolution of these 
difficulties?" 

Northern Ireland’s leading unionist, 
David Trimble, leader of the Ulster 


France’s Socialism With a Market Edge 

New Finance Minister Strives to Balance Investors and Party Ideology 


By Alan Friedman 

IntenuiitHMl Herakl Tnharte 

PARIS — A day after earning the 
wrath of French industrialists by or- 
dering higher corporate taxes, France’s 
hew finance minister demonstrated 
Tuesday that his brand of socialism had 
a market agenda as well. 

In an interview, Dominique Strauss- 
Kahn bluntly acknowledged that his gov- 
ernment would not be able to bring down 
the country’s 12J percent unemploy- 
ment rate before die aid of 1998. And he 
urged labor to become part of the solu- 
tion, saying that French workers had to 
leam to become more mobile. 

Mr. Strauss- Kahn also vowed to help 
reduce public spending by tackling wel- 
fare reform this fall, indicating that 
companies would not be expected to 
bear the foil brunt of reducing France's 


yawning budget deficit The finance 
minister’s remarks, on these and other 
issues, provided a first public glimpse of 
his maikei orientation. 

The election on June 1 that raised the 
Socialist leader, Lionel Jospin, to the post 
of prime minister heightened investors’ 
fears, for the most part still undimin- 
ished, that France’ s new government was 
not prepared to come to terms with the 
urgent need for economic reforms. 

An aide to Mr. Strauss-Kahn was 
eager Tuesday to stress the minister’s 
"pragmatism," as well as his attent- 
iveness to a world economy in which the 
fate of a government’s policy can easily 
be at the mercy of financial markets. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn, sounding ■ more 
like a foreign investor than the finance 
minister in a distinctly leftist govern- 
ment. said that “a great deal of re- 
structuring in the public sector, in the 


labor market and in the welfare state has 
not taken place in France as much as it 
has in other countries." 

Asked to comment on the U.S. dol- 
lar’s strength against the French cur- 
rency, Mr. Strauss-Kahn said: “I can’t 
make any comment on the franc. But I 
think the process in currency markets 
has now stabilized. The current strength 
of the dollar against the franc is neither a 
tragedy nor a good thing. We just have 
to cope with financial markets. At cur- 
rent levels, I expect the big movements 
are now at an end.” 

Remarking on France's record un- 
employment level, he said, "I think un- 
employment will be flat at the some level 
for some time and will decrease from its 
current level at the end of 1998." He 
conceded that his new package of def- 

See FRANCE, Page 6 



Kcran Duhcflvfftfoici 


Ian Paisley of the Democratic Unionist Party after meeting Prime 
Minister Tony Blair on Tuesday. He said the peace process was “dead." 


Unionist Party, toid Mr. Blair on Mon- 
day that the IRA must start handing in 
its weapons or the talks would fail. 

Mr. Trimble insisted that he must 
keep his options open. 

’ 'We are not in the mode of walking 
out,” he said. "We are there to try and 
achieve things. If it’s a genuine cease- 
fire. a genuine ending of violence, then 


what is the problem in handing over 
weapons? Indeed, that is the whole 
point of the exercise. K is a litmus test 
for the IRA." 

Despite the expected rebuff on 
Wednesday, the government remains 
committed to Sept. 15 for the start of 
peace talks, the secretary for Northern 
Ireland said. I Reuters. AFP. AP) 


AGENDA 

Clinton Nominates Envoy to Britain 


PAGE TWO 

Moscow's Magnificent Makeover 


INTERNATIONAL 

7 he Kitican and Nad Gold 


Page 7. 


Books Page 10. 

Crossword ........ — Page 10. 

Opinion — . Pages 9-10 

Sports Pages 20-21. 


The Intermarket 


Pagall. 


WASHINGTON (AFP) — Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton has nominated the 
head of the Small Business Admin- 
istration, Philip Lader, as ambassador 
to Britain, foe White House said Tues- 
day. 

Mr. Lader, who has also served as 
assistant to the president, was co- 
founder of foe annual Renaissance 
Weekend retreats for political, reli- 
gious and business leaders attended by 
Mr. Clinton. If his nomination is con- 
firmed by foe Senate, be would replace 
retired Admiral William Crowe. 


Yettsin Rejects Measure to Curb Religion 

President Boris Yeltsin of Russia In its first comprehensive review of 

on Tuesday rejected a bill, opposed by persecution of Christian groups 
the United States, that would have around the world, foe U.S. govem- 
imposed tough new curbs on religious meat sharply criticized China for sup- 
freedom in Russia. pressing religious worship. Page 7. 


Juncker of Luxembourg, which holds 
the European Union presidency, while 
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright 
lobbied on Boeing's behalf in a call to 
Klaus Kinkel. the German foreign min- 
ister. 

"I think there's a way to work this 
out." Mr. Clinton said Tuesday in Wash- 
ington. "I am hopeful that by Wednes- 
day. when the commission meets, that nn 
agreement will have been reached.” 

Stuart Eizenstat. the U.S. undersec- 
retary’ of state for economic affairs, who 
has been closely involved in Washing- 
ton's lobbying efforts, said. "We think 
that progress has been made and we 
hope there will be a clearance given to 

See BOEING, Page 6 


Italian Court 
Jails Nazi 
For 5 Years 

55 Captain Whs Freed 
After a Trial Last Year 


By Celestine Bohlen 

Nii r YurL Times Service 

PORTOFERRAIO, ITALY — An 
Italian military court Tuesday handed 
out prison sentences to two former Nazi 
SS officers for their part in a civilian 
massacre outside Rome in 1 944. putting 
to rest the longest running, most emo- 
tionally charged and legally contentious 
of Italy's war crimes trials. 

Just one year after a similar tribunal 
set him free, igniting a storm of protest 
across Italy, Erich Priebke, 83, a former 
SS captain who was extradited from 
Argentina in 1995, was given a 15-year 
prison sentence, which was reduced to 
Five years due to mitigating circum- 
stances. 

Mr. Priebke’ s lawyer said he would 
appeal the verdicL His client is now 
under house arrest at a Franciscan mon- 
astery outside Rome. 

Karl Hass, an 84-year-old former SS 
major, was given a 10-year sentence, 
which was reduced to eight months. 
Since he has spent ihat much time under 
arrest before and during the trial, Mr. 
Hass' was due to be set free. 

The verdict and the sentence againsr 
Mr. Priebke. who had helped organize 
the March 24, 1944, execution of 335 
men and boys in reprisal for a partisan 
attack on German soldiers in Rome, was 
greeted with satisfaction by members of 
the victims' families, and leaders -of 
Jewish groups in Italy. 

Seventy-five of the victims, most of 
whom had been rounded up from Nazi 
jails in occupied Rome, were Jewish. 

"The number of years is not im- 
portant," said Julia Spizzichino, speak- 
ing to reporters at foe courthouse in 
Rome. She lost seven relatives in the 
massacre. "Whar is important is that 
Priebke’s name will always be asso- 
ciated with shame." 

Mr. Priebke escaped justice for his 
role in the massacre at foe AnJeatine 
Caves, where he has admitted to having 
shot two of the victims in the back of the 
head, when he fled Italy for South 
America soon after the end of World 
War H. 

His commander, Herbert Kappler, the 
Gestapo chief in Rome who was re- 
sponsible for foe executions, was tried 
and sentenced to life imprisonment. But 
he managed to escape Italy shortly be- 
fore his death, having been smuggled 

See NAZI, Page 6 




|aTs* t 


Americans Hit the Road 

Economic Boom and High Dollar Spur Tourism 

" Rv " extremely busy travel season, early 

signs this summer show U.S. consumers 

X are hitting the road in larger numbers 

WASHINGTON — American fam- and paying higher prices, travel agents 
ilies are flocking to Orlando to celebrate and other industry specialists say. 
Disney World’s 25th anniversary. Otfa- The strong U.S. economy is fueling 
ers are packing planes to Italy and foe travel boom: With low inflation, 
France. And so many tourists are head- solid economic growth, a strong dollar 
ing to New York that it is' no easy task to and a surging stock market, consumers 
find a hotel room there. feel that mey have money to spend. 

Even cornpared with last summer’s * ‘You’ve really got a favorable set of 

circumstances fix' consumer spending 
Newsstand Prices generally,” said Joel Prakken, an econ- 

“ : 1 7 omist at Macroeconomics Advisers. 

Andorra ^ — ^*000 • ‘You’ve got strong gains in employ- 

France .™_Jia00 FF Saudi Arabia. ..10.00 R. ^8 1 bave w do ** 

Gabon 1100 CFA Senegal. 1.100 CFA clothe themselves. Eventually, when 

Italy. ? sn n y ^ SpakL_ 225 ptas those needs are met, they can think 

Ivory Coast. 1.250 CFA Tunisia -1.250 Din about things like travel.” 

Jordan ...1.250 JD UAE. .10.00 Dirh Americans continue to shift money 

Kuwait -.700 Fils U.S. MU. (Eur.). -AI^O into vacations as part of the country’s 

— economic expansion, foe third-longest 

t B since World War n. Many Americans 

» * . — particularly those bom during the 

baby boom in about foe first two de- 
cades after World War D — have 
amassed wealth over foe past several 


WASHINGTON — American fam- 
ilies are flocking to Orlando to celebrate 
Disney World’s 25th anniversary. Oth- 
ers are packing planes to Italy and 
france. And so many tourists are head- 
ing to New York that it is' no easy task to 
find a hotel room there. 

Even compared with last summer's 

~ Newsstand Prices 

Andorra- — .10.00 FF Lebanon- IL 3.000 

Antilles 1JL50FF Morocco 16 Dh 

Cameroon...! 500 CFA Qatar ....iaoo Rials 

Egypt..:. JEE5J30 Reunion 12J50FF 

France — — -10.00 FF Saudi Arabia. ..10.00 R. 

Gabon 1100 CFA Senegal™-.. 1.1 00 CFA 

Italy. 2^00 Ure Spain-.- 225 PTAS 

Ivory Coast. 1.250 CFA Tunisia _1-250 Din 

l Jordan ...1.250 JD UAE.__. -.10.00 Dirh 

Kuwait — —700 Fib U.S. MU. (Eur.)....S1^0 



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Visitors cooling off at Trafalgar Square in London on Tuesday. A 
record 9.5 million Americans are expected to visit Europe this summer. 


years from rising incomes and growing 
investments, and travel is an immediate 
way to treat themselves and their fam- 
ilies. 

An estimated 230 million trips will be 
taken by Americans during June, July 
and August, up 2 percent from foe same 
period a year earlier, according to a 
survey released in May by foe Travel 


Industry Association of America and 
foe American Automobile Association. 

While the increases from last year are 
modest industry experts point out that 
the summer of 1996 was a record travel 
season. 

“We have had more miscellaneous 
See TRAVEL, Page 17 


U.S. Links Hun Sen Allies 
To Cambodia Drug Trade 


By Nate Thayer 

Wushln/inm Pusr Service 

PHNOM PENH — When a prom- 
inent businessman and senior adviser to 
Second Prime Minister Hun Sen was 
implicated in an attempt to smuggle 
seven tons of marijuana out of Cam- 
bodia recently, a top official in foe gov- 
ernment’s royalist faction vowed to 
seek his arrest. 

“The court is preparing documents to 
arrest him now. Ho Sok, foe secretary 
of state for the interior, said of the 
businessman, Mong Refoy. 

Mr. Hun Sen responded with a blunt 
warning: Anyone trying to' arrest Mr. 
Mong Refoy. who had contributed more 
than $45 million to Mr. Hun Sen’s de- 
velopment projects, should "wear a 
steel helmet," he said. 

The warning turned out to be proph- 
etic. During a coup two weeks ago in 
which Mr. Hun Sen ousted his rival co- 
prime minister. Prince Norodom Ranar- 
iddh, Mr. Ho Sok was hunted down by 
Mr. Hun Sen's forces and killed with a 
bullet to the head. 


According to Western anti-narcotics 
officials and Cambodian sources, Mr. 
Hun Sen has surrounded himself with 
suspected drug traffickers who bankroll 
his projects, lavish gifts on him and 
other leaders and seem bent on turning 
this country of 1 0 million people into an 
Asian narco-state. 

In recent years, Cambodia has grown 
into a major transshipment center for 
Southeast Asian heroin, a significant 
exporter of home-grown marijuana and 
a haven for money laundering. At least 
120 tons of Cambodian marijuana were 
seized in Europe last year, and hundreds 
of tons more are believed ro have gotten 
through, ami-narcotics agenrs say. 

Cambodia has become "foe single 
fastest-growing narcotics trans-ship- 
ment poirn in foe world,” three U.S. 
senators asserted in a letter to Secretary 
of State Madeleine Albright last 
month. 

Calling foe drug trade a “critical 
threat" to Cambodia’s government, 
people and future development, they 

See DRUGS, Page 6 


>n 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


A New Potemkin Village? / Moscow's 850th Anniversary 


City’s Magnificent Makeover - on the Outside 


By Daniel Williams 

Washintnn Post Service 


M OSCOW — Just across from 
the Russian Parliament, pros- 
titutes were arrayed in various 
colorful costumes — hot pants, 
athletic outfits, bikini and net-stocking 
combos — as is usual on these warm, long 
summer evenings. 

When a couple of policemen strolled by, 
many of the women pivoted on their high 
heels, rushed into parked cars and were 
driven away quickly by brawny men. 
mostly in T-shirts: 

Not long ago, the appearance of a couple 
of callow -looking cops would not have 
frightened the women. But these days, 
things are different As part of an effort to 
spruce up Moscow in advance of cele- 
brations for its 850th anniversary later this 
summer, the sidewalks must also be clean 
of prostitutes. 

“Yes, they want to protect the tourists 
from us,” said Galia, 22, who said she went 
to the comer frequently to feed a gray cat 
named Smoke. 

The assault on the prostitutes — there is 
no law against prostitution in Russia — is 
emblematic of how the city's makeover is 
turning Moscow into a Potemkin village. 
Of course. Russia inven- 
ted the Potemkin village. 

The term refers to a polit- 
ical tactic used originally 
by Grigori Potemkin, a 
lover and adviser of Cath- 
erine the Great; in ad- 
vance of her inspection 
tours, he would fix poor 
villages superficially so 
she could declare every- 
one prosperous and go 
home satisfied with the 
wisdom of her reign. 

Mayor Yuri Luzhkov 
of Moscow, who is or- 
chestrating the an- 
niversary preparations, 
seems to have something 
of Potemkin in him. 

Grimy buildings all over 
the city are getting a paint 
job. Railway stations thar 
are sooty inside and 
littered with drunks are 
bright and clean on the 
outside. The undersides 
of bridges that are in 
danger of crumbling from 
lack of maintenance have 
been spray-painted silver. 

Rusting factories that 
have stopped functioning 
have been given a new 
gloss. 

Mr. Luzhkov, who most observers say 
has his eye on the presidency, calls the pre- 
anniversary cleanup campaign Project Light 
Facades. His brush has touched numerous 
city landmarks: the Kiev railroad station, the 



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Manezh exhibition hall near the- Kremlin, 
theaters and other buildings on and around 
Tverskaya Street, and the huge. Stalin-built 
skyscrapers that are turning vanilla instead 
of their usual drab gray-brown. 


A prostitute working the streets in Moscow* above* near former 
KGB headquarters* and another , left, being held in a police celL 
The city is cracking down on prostitution as part of its makeover. 


Opposition to the project centers on its 
costs — in the millions of dollars, at a time 
when hospitals are crumbling, teachers are 
underpaid and crime is rampant — and on 
its skin-deep quality. The sweep of die 
prostitutes is also strictly for looks. There is 
no pretense of reforming the women or 
even protecting their health. Muscovites 
assume the police are pan of the racket. 

“We cannot be shamed before the whole 
world when people come for the 850th 
anniversary celebrations,” Internal Affairs 
Minister Anatoli Kulikov said at a recent 
news conference. 

M R. KULIKOV claimed to be 
shocked at the level of pros- 
titution within sight of the 
Kremlin, particularly in front 
of Parliament. A Mend, Mr. Kulikov said, 
had tipped him off. 

"All in all, there were about 500 of 
them!” he said of his discovery. “They 
nearly dragged me out of my car. It was a 
-good thing the doors were closed ” 

In the past, City Hall has tried to resolve 
a homeless problem by rounding up vag- 
rants and transporting them-beyond the city 
limits. 

So far no such drastic action has been 
taken against the prostitutes. On a few 


nights, groups of women have been hauled 
by bus to lectures given by officials from 
the central city district. One official, Al- 
exander Muzykantsky, warned that "pes- 
tering of men on the street must stop,” 
according to newspaper reports. 

“On the eve of the anniversary of Mos- 
cow, we cannot reconcile ourselves to the 
fact that a normal man cannot go near the 
Kremlin or the Parliament, because of the 
concentration of girls for sale," he said. 

In any case, die sex traffic, with its lure of 
quick money in hard economic times, has yet 
to be diverted from the heart of the city. 

The other night, three women standing in 
front of the Intourist Hotel — where the 
KGB used ro employ call girls to com- 
promise foreign visitors — seemed un- 
razed by the campaign. 

“I heard about it," said one. 

"I saw it on television," said a second. 

"We know nothing,” said the third. 

Galia, who was again feeding Smoke, the 
cat, in front of Parliament, said that even the 
anniversary would not long dent the work- 
day. "I don't have any complexes about it. 
People have to do what they have to do to 
survive. The police just come and go." 

Sure enough, the women who had fled 
the policemen returned to their curbside 
practice. 


A Tale of Slavery 
In Modern Times 

Deaf-Mutes in Mexico Lured 
To New York and Exploited 


By MarkFineman 

Li‘S Angela Tims Service 

MEXICO CITY — The 
mother of Ismael Santiago 
Garcia wept as she pleaded 
last year with her 22 -year-old 
son, a deaf-mute, not to leave 
Mexico City and go to the 
United States with a man they 
knew only as Senor Paolerti. 

“With tears in my eyes I 
cold him, ‘You shouldn’t go 
because you don't know this 
man.* " the mother. Juana 
Ofelia Garcia, said in a radio 
interview here Monday. "But 
when they're young, boys 
don’t always know what 
they’re doing.” 

And so, Mr. Santiago left 
on May 9, 1996, paying his 
own way — either, to Los 
Angeles or to New York — 
she still isn’t sure which. 

Three months later, she 
went on. an envelope arrived 
with photographs of her son 
but there was no note or return 
address. 

Then, after a year without 
news, Mrs. Garcia and dozens 
of other relatives here heard 
reports Sunday that their 
missing deaf-mute sons, 
daughters, sisters and broth- 
ers might be among scores of 
Mexicans who. the police 
said, were held as virtual 
slaves in New York City. 

The police allege that 
members of the Paoletti fam- 
ily — many of them deaf and 
mute themselves — coerced 
57 Mexicans under threat of 
beating, to sell key rings and 
trinkets forSl in subways and 
at airports. 

New York officials said 
Sunday some of the Mexicans 
said they had been kid- 
napped. 

Four members of the Pao- 
letti family were among sev- 
en suspected Mexican smug- 
glers arrested Sunday. 

Four of the seven were ar- 
raigned Monday in federal 
court in New York. They 
were charged with conspiracy 
to recruit, transport ana con- 
ceal illegal migrants. If con- 
victed, each could face a sen- 
tence of 10 years for every 
migrant involved. 

The police, were still 


searching for Reinaldo Rus- 
sian Paoletti, the alleged pat- 
riarch of the group accused of 
smuggling dozens of detf- 
mute Mexicans into the 
United States and keeping 
them in two small New York 
apartments while forcing 

them to work 18-hour days 
for a fraction of the profits. 

Relatives and educators of 
the deaf and mute in Mexico 
City where many were re- 
cruited, reacted with outrage 
and despair. For some, it con* 

firmed their worsr fears. - 

What is more, several re- 
ligious leaders and educators 
who work with the deaf and 
mute here said they knew of 
other groups that have re- 
cruited" the he aring and 
speech impaired from Mex- 
ico's squalor with the prom- 
ise of big money in the United 
States. 

None, however, indicated 
that the recruits had been kid- 
napped. 

Most said they were con- 
vinced that hundreds of Mex- 
ican deaf-mutes have been re- 
cruited as trinket vendors in 
recent years and might be liv- 
ing under similar conditions 
in other U.S. cities. 

“I know of others who 
have gone to the United 
Stales, including people from 
this institute, who have gotten 
trapped in this deception,” 
said the Reverend Martin 
Montoya Garcia, director of 
the Rosendo Olleta Institute, 
a church school in Mexico 
City that educates low-in- 
come deaf and mute people. 
" So for me, this is not strange 
or unknown. 

"I've heard of other op- 
erations in Mexico City. 
Monterrey. Guadalajara and 
Torreon. In April, when I was 
in Torreon. I talked to deaf- 
mute children at another in- 
stitute. I heard rhem talk 
about a person called La 
Gringa who invited them to 
come with her to the United 
States.” 

Father Montoya, along 
with other educators and so- 
cial workers, said many of the 
recruits were taken by bus to 
the border and smuggled into 
the United States. 


travel update Health Step or Sacrilege? Bison Kill Sparks Bitter Debate 


Palestinian Airlines Inaugurated 

GAZA (AFP) — Palestinian Airlines was to make its first 
flight Wednesday between Amman, Jordan, and the Egyptian 
airport closest to the Gaza Strip, the earner’s director-general 
said Tuesday. 

The inaugural two-hour flight was to depan from El Arish 
on the Sinai Peninsula, said the official, Fayez Zaydan. 

The airline has two Fokker 50 planes donated by the 
Netherlands thar can each carry 48 passengers. Within the next 
few weeks, the carrier will start flying to Istanbul, Jidda, and 
Lamaca, Cyprus, Mr. Zaydan said 

Threat to Marshall Islands Flights 

MAJURO, Marshall Islands ( .AFP ) — International flights to 
the Marshall Islands are in danger of being stopped by a dispute 
between the government and island landowners, who nave 
padlocked a gate to the airport fuel -storage station in Majuro. 

Continental Micronesia, which links Majuro w ith Honolulu 
and Guam, said it would have to bypass the airport if planes 
could not refuel. 

Turin is planning to offer free books to passengers during 
streetcar rides, city hall officials said. The operation, to start in 
September, is aimed to bolster interest in literature. (AFP i 

Brazil and Thailand have signed an agreement ex- 
empting Tourists from both countries from visa requirements, 
officials said. • AFP > 




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1 1 


Don't miss it. A lot happens there. 


By Dana Hull 

Washington Post Semcr 

YELLOWSTONE NA- 
TIONAL PARK — Last 
month, they counted the bison 
here again. Only 1,692 re- 
mained. That was down from 
3.436 in October. 

As the country’s first na- 
tional park celebrates its 1 25 ih 
anniversary this summer, and 
tourists swarm through its 2.2 
million acres (900.000 hec- 
tares l. the bison that are one of 
its main attractions are at the 
center of a hitter debate about 
wildlife management. 

Many bison starved to 
death during the region's un- 
usually harsh winter. As the 
remaining animals migrated 
north and west in search of 
food, they left the boundaries 
of Yellowstone — and the 
legal jurisdiction of the Park 
Sen- ice — and entered 
private land or national forest. 
There more of them. 1.0S4. 
according to Yellowstone of- 
ficials. were shot outright or 
sent to slaughter, primarily by 
Montana agents who feared 
they would" spread a devast- 
ating disease to cattle. 

** Montana was shooting 
about as many as we were 
losing to cold weather." said 
Michael Gauldin. a spokes- 
man for the Interior Depart- 
ment. “And most of the 
shootings occurred on public 
property, on land owned by 
the Forest Service.” That 
agency is pan of the Agri- 
culture Department. 

The killing of the bison has 
outraged conservation, envi- 
ronmental and animal rights 
croups, which maintain this is 
the largest slaughter of the 
wild animals since their near- 
extinction in the 19th century. 


An activist splashed Ag- 
riculture Secretary Dan 
Glickman with bison entrails 
in Montana this spring. The 
Fund for Animals has called 
for a tourism boycott of the 
state. And American Indian 
tribes thar revere the animal 
as sacred consider their death 
a sacrilege. 

"It's a disgusting and rep- 
rehensible situation,” said 
Mark Hecken. executive di- 
rector of the InterTribaJ Bison 
Cooperative, a coalition of 42 
American Indian tribes. 1 ‘Over 
the past five years federal and 
state agencies have conspired 
to kill 3.000 buffalo.” 

Bison, a shaggy broad- 
shouldered type of buffalo, arc 
not an endangered species. 
More than 150,000 exist in 
public and private herds in the 
United Scales and Canada; 
most are raised for meat. But 
the Yellowstone herd, which 
began with 23 animals in 1 902. 
is unique. "It's the only pop- 
ulation that remains free-rang- 
ing.” said Wayne Brewster, 
deputy director of the Yellow- 
stone Center for Resources. 

Many wild bison as well as 
elk cany the bacterium that 
causes brucellosis, a disease 
that can cause miscareiages in 
domestic cattle. Brucellosis 
can be passed to humans in the 
form of undulant fever through 
unpastcuiized. infected milk. 

Although transmission of 
brucellosis from bison to 
cartle is possible, cases of 
transmission of the disease in 
the wild have yet to be doc- 
umented. Conservationists 
contend that policy is being 
dictated by hysteria rather 
than scientific evidence. 

Livestock officials respond 
that there is enough circum- 
stantial evidence to support the 


risk of widespread infection. 

The Agriculture Depart- 
ment's Animal and Plant 
Health Inspection Service is 
working to eradicate brucel- 
losis, with 1998 as a target 
dale. "Eradicating brucellos- 
is from domestic cartle has 
been a 65-year. S3 .5 billion 
effort." said Patrick Collins, 
a spokesman for the service. 
"It's a very real threat. Bison 
and elk are the last reservoir 
of the disease, and 50 percent 


of the Yellowstone bison 
have brucellosis.” 

Thirty-seven states have 
achieved a “brucellosis-free" 
status from the inspection ser- 
vice. Montana, where agricul- 
ture and livestock are main- 
stays of the economy, received 
the states in 1985. The cer- 
tification allows ranchers to 
sell cuttle on the open market 
without having to complete 
costly testing procedures. 

"We've spent over S30 mil- 


lion to reach our ‘free’ status." 
said Larry' Peterson, president 
of the Montana Department of 
Livestock. "It gives us the 
ability to export cattle without 
many restrictions, and we do a 
lot of trade with Canada. 
There's a strong economic im- 
pact if we lose that status." 

The deaih of the bison is 
particularly painful for Indi- 
ans. who would like to see 
buffalo restored to their lands. 
A "preferred alternative" 


plan now under consideration 
includes a provision to makej_ 
bison that test negative for" 
brucellosis available to tribes 
that want to establish herds. 

"We understand what's 
happening to the buffalo be- 
cause the same thing 
happened to us," said Fred 
DuBray. a Lakora from the 
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. 
"There was a time when gov- 
ernment policy was to kill Na- 
tive Americans on sight." 


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THE AMERICAS 


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-> Bj: V. • T 1 •’■' :- • 




Republicans Aided by Taiwan? 

Foreign Group’s Gift to Conservative Think Tank Is Linked to Taipei 


By Guy Gugliooa 

Washington Poa Service 

WASHINGTON — The government 
of Taiwan served as the intermediary for 
a $25,000 contribution from a foreign 
foundation to a think tank run by the 
Republican Party, according to docu- 
ments examined by The Washington 
Post 

Haley Barbour, writing in his ca- 
pacity as board chairman of the National 
Policy Forum, sent a letter to Taiwan’s 
chief representative in Washington, 
thanking him for the 1996 contribution 
from the Pacific Cultural Foundation. 

Receipt of the contribution has been 
acknowledged by Mr. Barbour’s office, 
but documents show the transaction was 
handled by the Taipei Economic and 
Cultural Representative Office, the 


Taiwan government’s official presence 
in die United States. 

Mr. Barbour’s office said the former 
chairman was unsure how the contri- 
bution came about Mr. Baibonr. who 
served as c hairman of both the Re- 
publican National Committee and the 
National Policy Forum during the 1996 
campaign, will appear this week before 
the Senate Governmental Affairs Com- 
mittee, which is investigating campaign 
fund-raising practices. 

[Prosecutors have told the Senate 
panel that three of four Buddhist nuns to 
whom Republican investigators want to 
grant limited immunity may have been 
more than just pawns in a scheme to 
launder illegal foreign Democratic 
Puny donations, committee sources say. 
The Associated Press reported. 

[The committee met in closed session 


POLITICAL NOT 


Tuesday to consider giving partial im- 
munity to all four nuns to clear the way 
for them to testify about a fund-raiser at 
a California Buddhist temple attended 
by Vice President A1 Gore.J 

Democrats have contended that the 
Republican National Committee used 
die National Policy Forum to cover up 
illegal foreign contributions to the Re- 
publican Party. Republicans say that as 
an educational, nonprofit organization, 
the forum did nothing wrong in ob- 
taining foreign contributions. 

The Pacific Cultural Foundation is a 
private, nonprofit organization known for 
cultural exchange programs and for spon- 
soring trips to Taiwan for members of 
Congress. The source of the organiza- 
tion’s funds is not known, but some news 
reports have described it as having close 
links to the Taiwanese government 


2 Top Aides Criticise Drug Policy 

WASHINGTON — Attorney General Janet Reno and 
the While House drug-policy director have recommended 
to President Bill Clinton that the possession of crack and 
powdered cocaine be treated with less disparity in man- 
datory federal sentences. 

But they have stopped well short of urging that this 
disparity, which treats possession of small amounts of crack 
far more harshly, be eliminated altogether, although the 
White House drug official, the retired General Barry Mc- 
Caffrey, said Monday that he personally favored doing 
so. 

With their recommendation, whose adoption would re- 
quire congressional approval, Ms. Reno and General Mc- 
Caffrey have stepped into one of the most contentious and 
protracted debates in tire long war against drugs: whether 
there is justification for harsher penalties for crack than for 
powdered cocaine, a policy that in practice has tended to 
treat blacks more severely than whites. 

The two officials said federal judges should be required 
to impose a minimnm prison term of five years on de- 
fendants convicted of possessing 25 grams of crack or 250 
grams of powder cocaine. At present, that mandatory min- 
imum sentence applies to thresholds of 5 grams of crack and 
500 grains of powder. The proposal, then, would narrow die 
gap from the current 100 to 1 down to 10 to 1. (NYT) 

‘ Legend ’ to Head CM Operations 

WASHINGTON — Saying that the mission of the CIA is 
“to pursue die hardest targets that threaten American 
interests around the world,” die newly installed director of 
central intelligence, George Tenet, has said he will bring a 
legendary espionage operative back to the agency to run the 
troubled Directorate of Operations. 

A former chief of station in Moscow and Beijing who 
speaks Russian and Chinese fluently. Jack Downing is 
“legendary in the operations directorate in terms of his 
stature and what he expects of people,” Mr. Tenet said. 


A former Marine who served in Vietnam, Mr. Downing 
worked for 28 years in the operations directorate, but Mr. 
Tenet’s predecessor, John Iteutch, passed him over for a 
higher position and he retired. 

“ Ar the end of the day, this is an espionage organization,” 
Mr. Tenet said Monday. ‘ ’It must generate information that 
is unique and makes a contribution against each of those 
targets. Otherwise I don’t know why we are here.” (WP) 

Jail Too Tough onMcDougal? 

LOS ANGELES — The American Civil Liberties Union 
has charged that federal authorities are unlawfully holding 
Susan McDougal in a Los Angeles County jail in hopes that 
‘ ’barbaric’ ’ conditions there will coerce her to testify in the 
Whitewater investigation. 

Mrs. McDougal. who was a partner with Bill and Hillary 
Clinton in the Whitewater real estate venture in Arkansas, 
was convicted last year and sentenced to 24 months in 
federal prison on federal charges in the Whitewater in- 
vestigation. She is being at the request of the 

Whitewater independent counsel, Kenneth Starr, on a con- 
tempt of court citation for refusing to testify before a 
Whitewater grand jury. 

Citing federal appellate court rulings that incarceration 
of aperson for civil contempt is supposed to be “remedial” 
in nature and not punitive, the union petition, filed in U.S. 
District Court by the group’s Southern California branch, 
said Mrs. McDougal* s confinement here violates her con- 
stitutional right to due process. (WP) 


Quote /Unquote 


Newt Gingrich, the House speaker, saying conservatives 
should not ’“pick artificial fights” with Bill Clinton while 
the president is embracing Republican initiatives like cut- 
ting taxes, balancing the budget and restricting welfare: “If 
he wants to take our plays, hand them to him. Don’t make it 
hard for him. If he wants to join our huddle, welcome him 
in.” (NYT) 


Report Faults 
Pentagon on 
Risks to U.S. 
Troops Abroad 

The Associated press 

WASHINGTON — Although Amer- 
ican troops abroad are safer than they 
were before terrorist attacks in 1995 and 
1996 killed a total of 24 servicemen in 
Saudi Arabia, congressional investiga- 
tors have concluded that they are still 
vulnerable because the Department of 
Defense has not set mandatory security 
standards. 

“The fu ndamental point remains: 
DOD-wide standards are needed to as- 
sist co mman ders in protecting their 
forces from terrorist attack,” said the 
report by the General Accounting Of- 
fice, the investigative arm of Congress. 

The question is nor whether terrorists 
will strike again, but when, where and 
how, military officials told investiga- 
tors. 

“Terrorism is very difficult to com- 
bat, but there are many things we can do, 
and we have done many of them,” said 
Representative Ike Skelton, Democrat 
of Missouri, who requested the study in 
October. “I’m convinced that we need 
to be more consistent’ ’ 

The report said U.S. officials bad 
made significant progress on troop se- 
curity in the Middle East for example 
by moving thousands of troops to re- 
mote desen facilities from populated 
areas and sending families home from 
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Bahrain. In 
Turkey, an off-base apartment building 
for troops was closed because it was 
considered too vulnerable. 

Investigators visited all five main 
U.S. military commands around the 
world and traveled to about 30 overseas 
sites where U.S. forces are deployed. 

Among the lapses the report cited 
were: 

• New dormitories in one country are 
near a heavily traveled public road, 
presenting the same risks as the bombed 
Khobar Towers barracks in Saudi Ara- 
bia. Officials are considering dosing 
the road or building a tunnel to reroute 
traffic. 

• In another country, a 51.9 million 
facility was under construction along a 
city street with no standoff, or buffer 
space between base facilities and the 
land off the base. None of the off-base 
facilities in that country met the ad- 
visory guidelines in the Defense De- 
partment’s anti-reirorism handbook. 

• A leased headquarters building un- 
der construction in the United States is 
so unsafe that officials have suggested it 
be relocated. 






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lif^i 


Paul Sum: V'.iw.-JPrr-. 


BLAST — An explosion in a gas main in Indianapolis set off a fire 
that killed one person, destroyed six houses and damaged 50 others. 


Away From 
Politics 

• Miami Beach police officials are 

fending off criticism that they may 
have had evidence of Andrew Cun- 
anan’s whereabouts days before the 
killing of Gianni Versace. A pawn- 
broker has said that Mr. Cunanan. on 
the FBI’s most wanted list since June 
12, pawned a gold coin on July 7, 
leaving his real name, hotel address 
and thumbprint on a document mailed 
to the police within 24 hours, the 
pawnbroker said. {NYT} 

• Canadian fishermen ended a 
three-dav blockade of an Alaskan 


ferry in Prince Rupert. British 
Columbia, after Ottawa assured them 
it would try to resolve a dispute over 
the alleged overfishing of salmon in 
Alaskan waters. About 400 fishing 
boats had blocked the ferry Malaspina 
since Saturday. f Reuters ) 

Israel has received approval to 
market a version of its l : zi semi- 
automatic rifle in the United States 
after a 10-year ban. An Israeli official 
confirmed ^ report that Israel Military' 
Industries had developed a model of 
the Uzi that fires only single rounds 
and cannot be converted to being a 
fully automatic weapon. The United 
S tales banned the import of automatic 
weapons in 1987 because of their 
increasing use in crimes, t Reuters) 


In a year’s time 


it will be a Rolex. 








Every single Rolex begins its life as a solid ingot of 18 ct. gold, 
platinum, or stainless steel. Then, while the massively strong Oyster 
case is being sculpted from the solid metal, the self-winding movement 



'that beats within is painstakingly constructed. Every single part of 
the movement is tested, inspected, and cleaned ultrasonically over and 
over again. In all, it takes a whole year to create a Rolex. Not such a 
long time, perhaps, for a watch that is engineered to last a lifetime. 


*«*$£*? 



f 


EOLEX 

of Geneva 


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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


In a First for China, Hong Kong Lawyers Mount a Challenge to Rule 

Mr and the Turkish invasion of Cyprus ia 

— ■ ~ 1 at Zlnnn tTnan T It. luatv !»<• nihn .C ItlCf ■"■rtlrtrti-i [ AAVMtinr Htfic PsTtPn 9C inwvers surff?i»nlv entered the case. Then* in a daylong argument, Mr. -.re invofviiis the Goofed- 


By Edward A. Gargan 

A irw fort 7twt> Strive 

HONG KONG— Barely three weeks 
after China resumed sovereignty here, a 
constitutional challenge to the very 
foundation of Chinese rule — including 
the validity of the court system, the 
system of common law and Beijing's 
appointed legislature — landed Tues- 
day in the laps of three senior appeals 
court judges. 

The case, stemming from a criminal 
trial, is the first legal challenge to the 
Hong Kong government and pits the 
territoty's chief legal officer against 
some of the mightiest legal minds from 
the Bar Council, the professional as- 
sociation of banisters. 

Heard in a packed courtroom, die 
case marked the first time since the 
founding of the People's Republic in 
1949 thk lawyers directly discussed 
fundamental issues affecting both 
China's constitution and the mini-con- 
stitution. the Basic Law drafted for 
Hong Kong. 

"These are fundamental issues," 
said Nihal Jayawickrama. a professor of 


law at Hong Kong University who is 
assisting lawyers preparing die chal- 
lenge to China's laws. 

“The government came fully pre- 
pared.” the professor said. 

For months, there have been rum- 
blings within Hong Kong's legal com- 
munity that a constitutional challenge to 
Beijing's plans for the territory, espe- 
cially the scrapping of the elected leg- 
islature and replacing it with an ap- 
pointed body, would be mounted. 

Both legal professions in the British 
tradition, the barristers who argue cases 
and the solicitors who advise clients, 
strenuously opposed the appointed 
body of lawmakers, the so-called Pro- 
visional Legislative Council, maintain- 
ing it is not consonant with the Basic 

Law. 

Neither Britain nor the United States 
recognize the legitimacy of the Pro- 
visional Legislature, contending that the 
body is not provided for in law and that 
it illegally supplanted an elected leg- 
islature. 

Beijing dismissed die elected legis- 
lature because it disapproved of the 
electoral arrangements devised by the 


last colonial governor, Chris Patten as 
well as the triumph of democracy ad- 
vocates. 

The constitutional challenge begun 
Tuesday was the result of defense ar- 
guments made before a lower coon in a 
criminal case involving the theft of a 
gold Rolex watch at the Macau ferry 
terminal. 

Thai initial robbery case became 
more complicated when the police ar- 
rested the defense lawyer on charges of 
obstructing justice. His lawyers, in de- 
fending him , argued in lower courts that 
since July 1 . when China assumed sov- 
ereignty of Hong Kong, that there has 
been no valid legal system — that the 
common law system has ceased to be 
the law of the land — because of con- 
stitutional problems with the Provision- 
al Legislature. 

The two defense lawyers leading the 
case appeared completely out of their 
depth when Daniel Fung, the solicitor 
general. Hong Kong’s chief legal of- 
ficer, took command of the govern- 
ment’s case. 

But. after some early legal skirmish- 
ing, several of the territory’s leading 


ASEAN Delays Ruling on Cambodia 

Group Caught in Crossfire Between Ranariddh Backers and Hun Sen 


iTnwfHWM Uw&^ffF/rw CXiponim 

KUALA LUMPUR — The Asso- 
ciation of South East Asian Nations 
failed to reach a consensus Tuesday on 
what approach to take with Cambodia 
daring the group’s annual meeting. 

Supporters of First Prime Minister 
Norodom Ranariddh called for ASEAN 
to bar Foreign Minister Ung Huot from 
representing Phnom Penh at the meeting 
Thursday. 

Second Prime Minister Hun Sen 
named Mr. Ung Huot to replace Prince 
Ranariddh as first prime minister after 
he had ousted the latter in a coup that 
began July 5. 

“Mr. Ung Huot cannot represent Cam- 
bodia at this week’s ASEAN meeting in 
Malaysia because he only represents 
Second Prime Minister Hun Sen and has 
no credentials from First Prime Minister 
and Funcinpec president Norodom 
Ranariddh, whom he has betrayed by 
endorsing the illegal and bloody coup 
d'etat," the newly formed Union of Cam- 
bodian Democrats said from Bangkok. 

Prince Ranariddh announced die for- 
mation of the group Saturday. It consists 
of his party and three others' and seeks a 
nonviolent, diplomatic solution to the 
political crisis in Cambodia. 

Rodolfo Severino, the Philippine for- 


eign undersecretary, said ASEAN for- 
eign ministers would have to decide 
Wednesday whether to allow Mr. Ung 
Huot to attend the annual meeting. 

“It was not a disagreement," he said 
about the decision to refer the matter to 
the ministerial level. “It was an un- 
certainty as to how to deal with he 
situation and we felt that we needed 
more authoritative officials to deal with 
that" 

In Phnom Penh, the Foreign Ministry 
said Mr. Ung Huot would travel 
Wednesday to Koala Lumpur, where he 
would meet with the secretary-general 
of ASEAN, Ajit Singh, and several of 
the foreign ministers. Mr. Ung Huot was 
foreign minister before the coup. Cam- 
bodia. which has observer status at 
ASEAN, was to become a full member 
Wednesday, but its admission was post- 
poned indefinitely after the coup. 

Tbe Union of Cambodian Democrats 
urged ASEAN “not to send any wrong 
message and provide any encourage- 
ment to Mr. Hun Sen by receiving his 
puppet Ung Huot. " 

ASEAN groups Brunet Indonesia, 
Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore. 
T hailand and Vietnam. Burma and Laos 
will be admitted Wednesday. 

Mr. Hun Sen accused a general in 


lawyers suddenly entered the case. 

“The bugles were blown, ’ ’ said Kev- 
in Egan, one of the original defense 
lawyers, who is accustomed more to the 
rough-and-tumble of criminal proceed- 
ings than to the more cerebral realms of 
constitutional argument “The cavalry 
is coming.” 


Then, in a daylong argument, Mr. 
Fung, bedecked in the silk robe that was 
worn by Queen’s Counsels under Brit- 
ish rule and wearing a horsehair wig, 
proceeded to lay out the Hong Kong 
government's case for its constitutional 
existence. 


and the Turkish invasion Qyras m 
1974 u> a case involving the Coafed- 
££ “ the wake of the U& Civil 

War 

“It is die height of absurdity to cast 

doubt about the legal sysrem senate a 
stare <rf chaos in the name of iterate of 
Sw” argued Mr. Fung m defaaeof 


Sco SgT 6 ' Marshaling an array of historical ev- law ” argued Mi- rung 

The legal contest in Courtroom One idence and legal precedent, from Cap- Hong Kong s w 

of the Appeals Court, the second- tain Charles Elliot's planting ;of foe :Un- “One should not 

highest court in Hong Kong, was a ion Jack on Hong Kong island m 1 84 1 to people under the banner 

spectacle of contrasts and ironies, a rulings by China’s rubber-stamp Par- ia W ." . ^ 

theater of colonial traditions and be- liament, Mr. Fung insisted that the ram- The lawyers challenging me : consn- 
havior onder a seal of Chinese suzer- man law has endured and that China jmjgnai questions who jouwo me case 

ainty. properly installed a new legislature we re working late into Tuesday mgm to 

“Your lordshin" was the conven- here. build their arguments, which they were 

At one point, Mr. Fung argued that t0 present Wednesday. - . 

even if the court was to find Beijing s *r 0 what the ruling,. the de-- 


spectacle of contrasts and ironies, a 
theater of colonial traditions and be- 
havior onder a seal of Chinese suzer- 
ainty. 

“Your lordship” was the conven- 
tional term of address to tbe three 
judges, and- fellow lawyers were in- 
variably called “my learned friend.” 

Oratory, conducted in the best 
Oxbridge accents, was peppered with 
British argot — “a belt and braces po- 
sition’ ’ — and deft forays into Latin — 
“I proceed ex abundanti cautela or 
“out of an abundance of caution." 

The drama bore no relation to legal 
proceedings in the rest of China, where 
constitutional arguments are unheard of 
and the common law does not exist. 


legislature illegal and all the laws it has 
approved invalid, the court would none- 
theless be compelled to confirm the 
legislature's existence to prevent chaos 
in Hong Kong under what he called 
“the doctrine of necessity. " 

Buttressing his argument. Mr. Fung 
plucked at cases arising from war, re- 
bellion and civil unrest, from Southern 
Rhodesia, what is now Zimbabwe, to 
the U.S. invasion of Grenada in 1983 


cisioa almost cofainly wiO be ^ppeated 
to the Court of Final Appeal, Hong 
Kong's highest court. „ __ 

“If we’re even remotely right, Mr. 
Egan said, “a certain amount of chaos 
flows. It’s in the best interests of Hong 
Kong for this to be argued at the highest 
level. I’ve got faith in the judges we’ve 
got. It's not a politicized judiciary 
yet.” 


Taiwan and various gangsters of aiding 
his rivals and said Tuesday that he 
would temporarily shut Taiwan’s trade 
office and scrap plans for air links with 
Taipei. The trade office handles rela- 
tions in the absence of official ties be- 
tween Taiwan and Cambodia, which 
recognizes Taiwan’s rival, China. 

The prime minister did not name the 
general or the gangsters but said the one- 
week closure would allow investigators 
“to find out who is really involved in 
this incident.” 

Taipei repeated denials Tuesday that 
it had provided any help to the losing 
side in the coup. “To say that our office 
in Cambodia engages in activities other 
than trade promotion, much less pro- 
motes tenor, is false.” Foreign Minister 
John Chang said. 

Low-level clashes between Mr. Hun 
Sen's troops and forces loyal to Prince 
Ranariddh continued in foe far north, 
bat the prince's soldiers are rapidly run- 
ning* out of ammunition. 

Muonavong Sritanyarat, a Thai Red 
Cross official at the border with Cam- 
bodia, said that from 5,000 to 30,000 
Cambodians had gathered at the border 
hoping to enter Thailand. They appar- 
ently were running out of food, he re- 
ported. (AFP. Reuters . AP) 








Ahn Yung J.-o'Ilir Viawnicri P»--« 

KOREAN DIPLOMACY — Former U.S. Senator Sam Nunn, center, and James Lanny, a former U.S. 
envoy to Sooth Korea, left, talking with Foreign Minister Yoo Chong Ha of South Korea of their recent trip 
to North Korea. They said Pyongyang wanted more food aid but would not change its communist system. 


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Ex-Rivals Join Forces in Papua New Guinea 





; Aluitici^ : ^ ReadiDgs in. the News ■ 



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In- Ow Siflf Fnm i DujvHha 

PORT MORESBY. Papua New 
Guinea — The leader of Port Moresby, 
Bill Skate, was elected prime minister of 
Papua New Guinea on Tuesday after he 
dropped promises since June elections 
not to join forces with parties he had 
called corrupt. 

Mr. Skate, leader of the small 
People's National Congress and gov- 
ernor of ihe National Capital Disinci. 
vowed immediately after the Parliament 
vote to investigate charges of corruption 
among bis new allies, the two parties 
that made up the previous government 
of Sir Julius Chan. 

"We will fight corruption, but not 
destroy our own people." he told law- 
makers. "We will ensure that our gov- 
ernment will be transparent." 

"We will not be vindictive, but we 
will look at all the issues," he added. 

Mr. Skaie defeated a former prime 
minister. Sir Michael Somarc. by 71 
votes to 35 in the South Pacific coun- 


try's new 109-seat Parliament. Mr. 
Skate had promised since the elections 
in June that he would not ally himself 
with the former governing coalition, 
which he accused of corruption and crit- 
icized for hiring foreign mercenaries to 
put down a nine-year-old secessionist 
rebellion on the island of Bougainville. 
800 kilometers (500 miles) north of Port 
Moresby. 

When the luring of the mercenaries 
was revealed in March, the army re- 
belled and there were riots in Port 
Moresby for several days. Tbe prime 
minister. Sir Julius Chan, resigned 
while an inquiry was conducted into the 
affair but later resumed office, saying he 
had been cleared of any wrongdoing. 

Sir Julius and 15 other ministers in his 
government lost their seats in Parlia- 
ment in the June elections. 

Asked how he could reverse himself 
and join with the former coalition, Mr. 
Skate said: "Papua New Guinea has its 
own way of playing politics. It is not for 


foreigners, outsiders, to come here and 
dictate how we run our politics.'* 

Mr. Skate also pledged to work for 
peace on Bougainville. 

* ‘The people of Bougainville are cry- 
ing out for peace." he said. “My gov- 
ernment will listen to whar they want. It 
is up to BougainviUeans to find a solu- 
tion to the problem." 

Bougainvillean rebels said thar as a 
sign of goodwill they would release five 
Papua New Guinea soldiers held hostage 
since September 1996, according to a 
rebel statement released Tuesday by the 
New Zealand Foreign Affairs Ministry. 

The statement, which said the hos- 
tages would be handed over Wednesday 
to New Zealand government represen- 
tatives on board the frigate Canterbury, 
was signed by the commander of the 
Bougainville Revolutionary Army, 
General Sam Kauona; the rebels’ chief 
of operations, Ishmael Toroama. and 
their southern commander, Peter Nagu- 
ou. (AP. Reuters ) 


China Weighs 
Clone Prospect: 
Giant Pandas 

The AaiMOirJ Prrs* 

BEUING — Gianr pandas 
mate but once a year, pro- 
ducing at most two cubs, only 
one of which usually survives 
— reproductive habits that try 
the patience of zoologists 
working to save the threat- 
ened species. 

Frustrated with the failure 
of other artificial breeding 
methods. Chinese scientists 
are considering the possibility 
of cloning the animal that has 
become a symbol for en- 
dangered species everywhere. 

"If we really can succeed 
in cloning them, then it will 
really work much belter than 
the current methods in in- 
creasing their numbers," 
Chen Dayton, a zoologist at 
the Chinese Academy of Sci- 
ences. said in an interview 
with China’s state-run Cen- 
tral Television. 

Chen Dayuan did not say 
that cloning research had be- 
gun. just that it might be a 
promising way to save the gi- 
ant panda from extinction. 

Giant pandas are native 
only to China, and only about 
1 .000 survive in the wild. The 
shrinking of ihcir habitat and 
poaching have devastated the 
species, spurring efforts to 
develop artificial breeding 
techniques. 

The announcement in Feb- 
ruary that researchers in Scot- 
land had succeeded in cloning 
an adult sheep drew attention 
to China's own research 


Afghans Flee Fighting 
For Towns Near Kabul 

KABUL — A growing tide of civilians 
fled Tuesday from towns north of the 
Afghan capital as fierce battles raged be- 
rween the fundamentalist Taleban militia 
and rival forces, with anti-Taleban fighters 
claiming gains around a district center. 

Residents streaming south reported an 
overnight attack by fighters loyal to a 
former defense minister. Ahmed Shah Ma- 
soud. on the town of Qarabagh, 50 ki- 
lometers (30 miles) north of here. 

A spokesman for Mr. Masoud said his 
fighters had broken Taleban defenses and 
were nearing Qarabagh. 

"The Taleban had established a defense 
line around Qarabagh. which we broke 
today.” the spokesman said via satellite 
telephone. (AFPt 

2 Koreas Agree: Gifts 
Of Food Weren’t Sold 

SEOUL — The two Koreas finally found 
something Tuesday they could agree on: 
North Korea did not sell food donations it 
received free from abroad for its hungry 
people. 

TTie rare agreement came as three South 
Korean Red Cross officials left Seoul for 
Beijing, where they planned to meet North 
Koreans to discuss sending more desper- 
ately needed food aid. 

Japanese news media reported last week 
[h.u a North Korean ship had docked at a 
Japanese pon and unloaded 1.300 tons of 
corn believed to have been received as aid. 

Bui boih the North Korean press agency 
and ihe South Korean Foreign Ministry said 
their investigations had found the shipment 
io be a commercial deal between a Chinese 
exporter and a Japanese company. ( APi 


UN Assails Expulsions 

GENEVA — The United Nations 
refugee agency said Tuesday that it had 
protested to Bangladesh over what it termed 
a “disgraceful" forcible expulsion of 
mostly Muslim refugees back to military - 
ruled Burma. 

A spokeswoman. Pam O’Toole, said that 
nearly 400 people, including women, chil- 
dren and sick "were rounded up indis- 
criminately," taken to the frontier and 
made to cross. 

' 'This kind of conduct is a disgrace.' ' she 
said at a news briefing. (Reuters) 

VCWCES^Fronr^sia 

Szeto Wah. chairman of the Hong Kong 
Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic 
Movements of China, calling on Tung 
Chee-hwa, chief of the new Special Ad- 
ministrative Region, to relay an appeal to 
Beijing to release a leading Chinese dis- 
sident, Wang Dan. whose relatives say he is 
ill: "He must do this if he is to meet his 
responsibilities and serve as the represen- 
tative of the SAR government." (AFP) 

Kang Fan-ting, a Defense Ministry 
spokesman in Taiwan, playing down any 
tnreat by Chinese naval maneuvers in the 
East China Sea: "The Defense Ministry 
closely monitors all of the Communist 
forces* exercises and training activities. 
Our compatriots can set their hearts at 
case-” (Reuters) 

Tohap Simanungkaiit, acting chairman 
of the Indonesian Labor Welfare Union, on 
Jakarta's refusal to permit foreign medical 
care for the independent and unrecognized 
union's leader "The refusal of the gov- 
ernment to give permission to treat Mucthar 
Pakpahan overseas is clearly a political 
decision." ( Reuters i 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 


PAGE 5 



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FRANKFURT AN DER 
ODER, Germany — Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl assured 
flood-stricken Eastern Ger- 
many Tuesday that it could 
count on full government 
support, in a visit that came as 
authorities ordered the re- 
gion's first evacuation since 
the flooding began. 

“Now the point is to do 
everything that we can do to 
help the people here," Mr. 
Kohl said in this city of 
80,000 people along the bor- 
der of Poland. He was on his 
way to visit the nearby town 
of EisenhuettenstadL 

Thousands of soldiers, res- 
idents and other volunteers 
added to the 1.5 million sand- 
bags reinforcing a 160-kilo- 
meter (100-mile) waterlogged 
dike, but the water broke 
through in spots, flooding cel- 
lars and low-lying streets. 

About 150 people in the vil- 


lage of Aurith —gust south of 
Frankfurt an der Oder and 100 


kilometers east of Berlin — 
were ordered to leave for fear 
of a major break in the dikes. 


The evacuation of hun- 
dreds of villagers living close 
to an increasingly unstable 
dike on the Oder began 
shortly after Mr. Kohl's visit 

"It’s a terrible catastrophe 
for the entire region, for Ger- 
many and Poland," the chan- 
cellor said. 

"The situation is critical," 
he said, “and the people 
should know that we will do 
what’s necessary.” 

Water levels rose during 
the day along the length of the 
Oder, and officials said far- 
ther evacuations were likely. 

The flooding has killed 
about 100 people in neighbor- 
ing Poland and the Czech Re- 
public in the past two weeks. 

The death toll in Poland 
rose to 56 overnight with the 
discovery of four more bod- 
ies. Four people are still miss- 
ing, and about 140,000 in Po- 
land have been forced from 
their homes. 

With the crisis easing in the 
Czech Republic, rescue crews 
drained the eastern region of 
Moravia so that people could 
return home. (Reuters, AP ) 


BRIEFLY 


Cosmonaut’s Health Improves 


MOSCOW — The Russian commander whose ir- 
regular heartbeat added to the crisis of confidence of the 
Mir crew has recovered and is now in satisfactory health, 
space officials said Tuesday. 

Ground controllers cited crew stress when they an- 
nounced the postponement of delicate repairs to the 
orbiting spacecraft's power system until next month, 
when a fresh pair of Russian cosmonauts is due to arrive 
on Mir. 

The commander, Vasili Tsibliyev. and his fellow cos- 


monaut, Alexander Lazutkin, began physical training 
Tuesday to get in shape for their Aug. 14 return to Earth's 


Tuesday to get in shape for their Aug. 14 return to Earth's 
atmosphere and gravity, the mission control spokes- 
woman, Veza Medvedkova said. 

“It is a very quiet day for the crew,” said a spokes- 
woman for the National Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration, Cathy Watson, adding that the team was 
engaged in “minor maintenance." 

The crew has suffered a series of accidents and mal- 
functions in recent months, including a collision with a 
cargo ship. (AP) 


i Jan*. j f jrmtr ii Belgrade Said to Target Media 

!*€tUib 1 ■' '.l.cir rctrnnr; BELGRADE — The Serbian authorities have stepped 

E change its i «“iiTtuni>! up harassment of independent media in advance of elec- 


BELGRADE — The Serbian authorities have stepped 
up harassment of independent media in advance of elec- 
tions in the fall, closing down at least a dozen independent 
radio and television stations across the country, op- 
position media said Tuesday. 

Over the past week, the police have shut down small 
stations in the towns of Pancevo, Kraljevo, Krusevac and 
Trsxenik. On Thursday, state inspectors, flanked by po- 
licemen, barged into their premises, claiming the stations 
had no broadcast licenses, they said 

Meanwhile, a Canadian member of the NATO-led 
peacekeeping force in Bosnia-Herzegovina apparently 
shot himself to death, the authorities said Tuesday. The 
bombardier, Robert Daniel Viaiette, 33, was found dead 
and alone in his quarters Monday after fellow soldiers 
heard a loud noise and went to investigate, a NATO 
statement said. (AP) 


German Call for Jailed Iranian 


BONN — A group of exiled Iranian writers urged 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl on Tuesday to intervene in the 
planned trial of an Iranian newspaper editor who has been 
charged by Tehran with spying for Germany. 

The German-based Iranian Association of Authors sent 
an open ietter to Mr. Kohl asking him to protest the jailing 
of Faraj Sarkubi, editor of the monthly Adineb. which 


means Friday. Mr. Sarkuhi was arrested in April. 

The writers said Tehran’s decision to put him on trial 
was a direct reaction to a verdict by a German court in 


i on trial 


April that ruled that Iran's leadership had ordered die 
killing of a group of Iranian Kurdish dissidents in Berlin 
in 1992. Iran says it was not involved. (Reuters) 


For the Record 


The remains of a British pilot, who was shot down 
over the Netherlands during World War EL were 
discovered in die wreck of his plane Tuesday by the Dutch 
Army, a military spokesman said. Arouhd 2,000 Allied 
and German warplanes are believed to be still underwater 
or buried in the Netherlands. More than 220 have been 
recovered by the Dutch Army since 1960. - (AFP) 


.v .. ;vr— 

- .. ., *ri£ > 


Mafia Wife Urges Way to Reform 








Agenee France-Pfesse 

ROME — The wife of a 
leading repentant Mafioso 
has called on other Mafia 
wives to urge their husbands 
to reform, with the threat of 
leaving them if they don't. 

“I ask women who still live 
in Mafia families to have the 
courage to change and to con- 
, N vince their husband, or their 
^father, to change. Andif they 
stay as they are, it would be 
better to leave them." Rosalia 
Basils said in an Interview. 

She is the wife of Vincenzo 
Scarantino, jailed for 1 8 years 


last year for his role in the 
July 1992 killing of the anti- 
Mafia judge Paolo BorseU- 
ino, who was blown up in his 
car in Palermo. Mr. Scarant- 
ino has since expressed re- 
morse for his action, - 


English 

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THETORUrS DUTJ WHESBtfER 







A Voice for Wales 

U.K. Offers Plan for New Assembly 



Reuters 

LONDON — The govern- 
ment unveiled plans Tuesday 
for a 60-member Welsh as- 
sembly with a £7 billion 
($11.7 billion) budget and 
power over schools, hospitals 
and other services in a nation 
of 3 million people. 

■ The assembly, which is to 
be elected in May 1999 if it 
gets a positive vote in a ref- 
erendum to be held SepL 18, 
fleshes out Prime Minister 
Tony Blair's commitment to 
transfer some powers from 
London to Britain's regions. 

Details of plans for a Scot- 
tish Parliament, which unlike 
the Welsh assembly will have 
the power to raise or cut taxes, 
are to be published Thursday. 

“We believe it is right to 


ment in London. The new as- 


sembly will be located in the 
capital, Cardiff. 

The government said the 
Welsh secretary, Ron Davies, 
would not be bound by the 
assembly’s views. 

But Mr. Davies, who will 
continue to sit in Mr. Blair’s 
cabinet, said the plans offered 
Wales a new beginning 
alongside other successful re- 
gions in Europe to set its own 


strategic-priorities. 

“An elected assembly will 
give Wales a voice — in Bri- , 
tain and Europe — after years 
of neglect," ne said. “It is an 
opportunity we must have the 
confidence to grasp.*” 

Forty members of the as- 
sembly will be elected by the 
plurality system used in Bri- 
tain’s national elections. The 
other 20 will be chosen under 
a German-style system of 
proportional representation. 

Opinion polls suggest there 
is a majority in favor of a 
Welsh assembly, in contrast 
to 1979, when a similar pro- 
posal by the previous Labour 
Party government was rejec- 
ted by a 4-to-l margin. 


decentralize power, to ooen up 
Hovemroent. to reform Parlia- 


■ Minhiu Kirtw+H/TV Uooratnl ftw* 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl on Tuesday striding over sandbags in Frankfurt an der Oder, along the Polish border. 


government, to reform Parlia- 
ment and to increase individu- 
al rights," Mr. Blair said in the 
paper setting oat the govern- 
ment’s plans for Wales. 

Wales will remain firmly a 
part of Britain, sharing a com- 
mon legal system with Eng- 
land, and will continue to 
have 40 seats in the Parlia- 



Athenee Palace Bucharest Hilton, October 29-30, 1 997 


Romania is increasingly attracting the attention of the international investment 
community. To assess future investment potential and to highlight the reforms 
Romania is putting in place in a bid to position itself as one of the more exciting 
investment opportunities in the world, the International Herald Tribune will convene 
a major investment summit in Bucharest on October 29-30, 1997. 


President Emil Constantinescu will give the opening keynote address of the Romania 
Investment Summit He will also host a special . dinner for speakers, delegates and 
guests on the evening of October 29 at Cotroceni Palace. 


The fact that President Constantinescu has agreed to support this summit as an 
integral part of the Romanian government’s efforts to attract foreign investment 
is a measure of the importance of the summit. 














PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


TV Station, Protected by Thousands, Becomes Latest Flashpoint in 



By Calvin Sims 

New York Times Serrkr 


LIMA When leftist guerrillas 
bombed Frecuencia Latina TV here five 
years ago, killing three employees, the 
owner of the television station, Baruch 
Ivcher. enclosed the station with a con- 
crete wall 20 feet high and persuaded the 
government to post soldiers and tanks 
outside. 

The soldiers who once guarded die 
station, which die guerrillas accused of 
being pro-government, may soon be told 
to storm it, as part -of what many Pe- 
ruvians say is a government crackdown 
on news organizations that broadcast 
reports critical of President Alberto 
Fujimori's administration. 

But to take control of the station. 


troops would first have to break through 
the scores of journalists and thousands of 
supporters who have held a vigil there, 
sleeping on mattresses and cots, because 
of rumors that the military is planning a 
raid. 

“We will defend this siation with our 
very lives if we have to," said Ivan 
Garcia, news director of the station. 
“The only way they’ll get in here is by 
using tanks to blast through the door or 
helicopters to come through die roof.” 

Inside the station, which was rebuilt in 
1992 after the attack, it was business as 
usual, but with a new sense of mission. 
Reporters and producers, working 
doable and triple shifts, scurried through 
die hallways racing to get die latest news 
of their plight on the air. 

“When your job is to report the news. 


it’s a bit uncomfortable when all the 
sudden you become the news.'* said 
Fernando Viana, editor in chief of Fre- 
cuencia Latina TV. 

-Technicians have positioned cameras 
on die station's roof to monitor any 
suspicious activities or, in the event of a 


citizens, Mr. Ivcher could lose his con- 
trolling interest in Frecuencia Latina. 

But the Fujimori government's de- 
cision to revoke Mr. Ivcher 's citizenship 
has been criticized here and abroad 
Thousands of Peruvians, wearing blue 
ribbons to show their solidarity with Mr. 


ness — eveiyrhing except the press. 
Mrs. de Soto said. “If we allow him to 
take our right to be informed, what will 
we have left?" 

In a telephone interview from Miami, 
where he fled last momh after receiving 
death threats, Mr. Ivcher, who was bom 


his government is with tanks and sol. 

The government has said it canceled 
Ivcher 's citizenship because of 


EL% 




Mr. 


omissions in the application forms and 
lack of proof that he had given up his 
Israeli nationality, Bui his naturalization 


nobonsto show their solidarity with Mr. death threats, Mr. ivcner, wno was oom “3r were s isned and approved m 
illiaiy raid, to broadcast an incursion Ivcher, have gathered daily outside, the ■ in Israel and became a Peruvian citizen documents gelaunde Teny, then 
live. television station to express their sup- in 1984, said that if the government 19 JS 4 oy rem who ^ 


The station became the focal point of 
Peru's worst political crisis in recent 
years after the government stripped Mr. 
Ivcher of his citizenship last week, ap- 
parently in retaliation for investigative 
reports that exposed torture and cor- 
ruption in the militaiy and illegal 
wiretapping by the national intelligence 
agency. 

Because Peruvian law requires own- 
ers of television stations to be Peruvian 


port for Frecuencia Latina, 1 which m 
recent years has gained a reputation for 
exposing corruption. 

Carmen de Soto, a nurse, said tbar 
when her brother was falsely accused 
last year of being a terrorist, she called 
producers at Frecuencia Latina, who in- 
tervened on his behalf and convinced the 
police that he was innocent. 

“Fujimori controls everything in this 

country — - the judges. Congress, busi- 


m _ 

succeeded in. taking over Frecuencia 
Latina, no media organization in Peru 
would be free. 

“I am just an easy target that the 
government is using to send a message to 
all other television channels and pub- 
lications in Peru that it will not tolerate 
free, independent, honest reporting." 
Mr. Ivcher said. “This demonstrates chat 
there are no rights left in Peru and that 
the only way Fujimori knows how to run 


BOEING: EU Expected to Approve Merger 


Continued from Page 1 


the merger. 

-‘Boein g has been flexible and has 
made every effort to meet” the Euro- 
pean Commission's concerns, Mr. 
F.i7«nstgt said in a telephone interview. 

A senior EU official, who spoke on 
condition of anonymity, said: “It looks 
good. Boeing has accepted to eliminate 
the exclusive contracts' ’ that had been a 
concent of Union officials. 

Foreign ministers of the IS EU na- 
tions were optimistic about a resolution 
after being briefed at their regular 
monthly meeting here by Karel Van 
Miert, the EU competition commission- 
er who is in charge of antitrust matters. 

1 ‘There remains a very real possibility 
that it will be possible to reach agree- 
ment,'' said Robin Cook, the British 
foreign secretary. Mr. Kinkel and Abel 
Matures of Spain welcomed a “certain 
opening’* in Boeing’s stance. Lamberto 
Dini of Italy spoke of “a disposition to 
find an accommodation.*’ 

The deal will strengthen Boeing’s po- 
sition as the world’s largest maker of 
commercial aircraft and America’s 
biggest single exporter. At the same 
time, it will ensure that the U.S. market 
remains open to competition from Air- 
bus, the consortium comprised of 
Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG of Ger- 
many, Aerospatiale of France, British 
Aerospace PLC and CASA of Spain. 

But it remains to be seen whether the 
removal of the exclusivity clause from 
those contracts will provide Airbus with 
any real opportunity. Airlines have been 
moving toward what are effectively sole- 


supplier arrangements to reduce oper- 
ating costs, and the three U.S. carriers — 
American, Continental and Delta — will 
still benefit from low prices by virtue of 
placing big, long-term contracts with 
Boeing, industry analysts said. 

“What it means is that Airbus has new 
opportunities to bid." said Wolfgang 
Demisch, an analyst at BT Securities in 
New York. “But the hurdles in terms of 
price are going to be very, very big." 

The Boeing-McDonneU combination 
will simply step op pressure on the Air- 
bus group to transform its loose part- 
nership into a single company, a move 
that Chancellor Helmut Kohl urged last 
week, Mr. Demisch said. So far efforts to 
do that have been stymied by the dither- 
ing of the French government overplans 
to privatize the country’s defense and 
aerospace companies. 

The proposed antitrust settlement 
would require other concessions from 
Boeing intended to prevent it from abus- 
ing its dominant market position. 
Sources said the measures were likely to 
include maintaining Douglas Aircraft as 
a separate subsidiary to minimize Boe- 
ing’s advantage in bidding for contracts 
to replace the aging McDonnell jets in 
service. worldwide; licensing key patents 
and intellectual property for airliner 
components to competitors; and provid- 
ing greater details of government aid to 
European regulators. 

Mr. Van Miert declined to comment 
before a press conference scheduled for 
Wednesday, but a spokesman confirmed 
that Boeing had made “substantial" 
concessions that took care of Mr. van 
Mien’s main concerns. 



UirM WMnl lYr- 

Mr. Strauss- Kahn presenting a government audit of public finances Monday, at which he announced new taxes. 


FRANCE : Minister Balances Socialism and Market Economics 


Continued from Page 1 


DRUGS: U.S. Suspects Hun Sen’s Allies 


Continued from Page I 


said Phnom Penh “must take decisive 
action to halt the flow of narcotics 
through its borders and prosecute all 
government officials involved in nar- 
cotics trafficking.’’ 

So far, however, die traffickers and 
corrupt officials have operated in Cam- 
bodia with near impunity. Of particular 
concern to the United States lately have 
been the activities of Theng Bunina, 
Cambodia’s most powerful tycoon and 
president of its Chamber of Commerce. 

His Cambodian investments, which 
include a bank, hotel and import-export 
business, are estimated to be worth more 
than $400 million. He also owns a major 
holding company in neighboring Thai- 
land, the Thai Boon Rong Group. 

Mr. Bunina has showered Cambod- 
ia's leaders with cash and gifts, includ- 
ing black Mercedes limousines, an air- 
plane and helicopters used by Mr. Hun 
Sen and other top officials. And, ac- 
cording to a confidential U.S. govern- 
ment document, Washington believes 
Mr. Bunina is also involved in drug 
trafficking and has banned him from 
entering toe United States. 

Mr. Bunma denies any such involve- 
ment. In a recent interview with Fortune 
magazine, he challenged accusers to 
produce evidence and arrest him. 

Mr. Mong Retoy also denies being a 
drug trafficker. “Many people have 
tried to harm me in this way before,” he 
said. “They have alleged I and Theng 
Bunma have provided Hun Sen funds to 
construct schools, temples, roads and 
bridges through smuggling of drugs. 
This is untrue." 

In an interview with The Washington 
Post, Prince Ranariddh said Hun Sen 

t ets “millions of dollars" from Mr. 
Unma and Mr. Mong Rethy . * ‘They are 
drug traffickers,” he asserted. "The 
Americans know well. Now the admin- 
istration doesn't seem to care.” 

A close ally and financier of Mr. Hun 
Sen, whom he often accompanies on 
trips abroad, Mr. Bunma travels on a 
diplomatic passport and holds the title of 
economic adviser to Cbea Sim, the act- 
ing head of state and chairman of the 
governing Cambodian People’s Party. 
In 1994. Mr. Bunma provided S3 mil- 


lion in no-interest “loans" to the gov- 
ernment to pay for military expendit- 
ures, according to Finance Ministry 
documents. He has financed the repairof 
Mao Zedong Boulevard, one of the cap- 
ital’s main thoroughfares, and has paid 
the salaries of much of the Cambodian 
armed forces since early 1997, diplo- 
mats and Cambodian officials say. 

A 1995 U.S. State Department report 
on Cambodia said: “There are indica- 
tions that some high-level military of- 
ficials and powerful businessmen who 
give financial support to politicians are 
involved in heroin smuggling.” 

A U.S. official familiar with that report 
said it referred to Mr. Bunma. “We con- 
sider him a major trafficker,’ ’ said another 
senior U.S. anti-narcotics official. “We 
have followed him for a long time." 

Var Huoto, Cambodia’s ambassador 
in Washington and an ally of Mr. Hun 
Sen's, acknowledged rumors about Mr. 
Bunma’ s involvement in drug-running, 
but declined to respond to the allegation. 
“We are the victim of trafficking from 
abroad," he said. 

In a report to Congress in March, the 
U.S. State Department praised Cambod- 


icit-cutting measures unveiled Monday, 
including 22 billion francs ($3.63 bil- 
lion) of higher taxes and 10 billion francs 
of spending cuts, would not “do any- 
thing directly’* for unemployment bin 
said that “we have to reduce the deficit, 
which has indirectly a positive effect.” 
The French labor market's main prob- 
lem, Mr. Strauss-Kahn said, “is that we 
have to make people more employable, 
which means not only more skills but 
more geographic mobility.” 

Addressing toe politically delicate is- 
sue of welfare reform. Mr. Strauss-Kahn 
said the main responsibility would lie 
with Martine Aubry . the employment and 
social affairs minister, who would spear- 
head a conference this autumn bringing 
together trade unions, business and the 
government. Bur he was blunt in his own 
assessment “The reality is that French 
people are really attached to the welfare 
system. We have to correct some parts of 
it, perhaps in pensions and health. We 
certainly have to reform it, and this is 
obviously an issue for discussion in the 
autumn, with consequences for the 
budgets in 1998 and 1999.” 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn also said that in pre- 
paring next year's budget he would avoid 
an increase in toe country's overall tax 
burden, except perhaps in the wealth tax. 
He said he would insen incentives aimed 


at spurring investment in information 
technology and in nurturing the growth 
of a venture-capital culture in France. 

For Mr. Strauss-Kahn, 48, a Socialist 
who is at ease in the boardrooms and 
executive suites of France, life these 
days is something of a high-wire act. His 
challenge is to engineer enough fiscal 
discipline to keep France on track for 
Europe's single currency while adhering 
to the principles of leftist ideology. 

To achieve these contrasting goals he 
must be a skilled politician at home and 
abroad. He appeared to offer an example 
Tuesday when he said he would ask for 
“no new money" in seeking a coordin- 
ated European policy on unemployment, 
an issue to be discussed at a November 
Europewide jobs summit that is mainly a 
French initiative. 

“What I am hoping for is not new 
money but a reallocation of European 
Commission funds.' ’ he said, “but I have 
no hope for this at the November summit 
“I do hope that we can agree on that by 
next year, when there will be another jobs 
summit in Birmingham." 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn also indicated he 
was aware of the need to bridge the gap 
between the hard-line German view of 
monetary union, almost a religious fervor 
about bringing deficits down to 3 percent 


might come out at 3.2 or 3.3 percent 

He got some help Tuesday from Lux- 
embourg's premier, Jean -Claude Junck- 
er, whose country holds the rotating pres- 
idency of the European Union and who 
emerged from a meeting with Prime 
Minister Jospin here and said there was 
room for a “political” interpretation of 
single-currency conditions. “The 3.0 
percent deficit target is not an absolute 
condition," Mr. Juncker said. 

In Frankfurt, meanwhile, German; 
finance minister H Theo Waigel, said 
in some extreme cases, countries with a 
deficit exceeding the 3 percent level 
might qualify for monetary union. 

‘Only in extreme cases can the deficit of 


ny’s 

that 


3 percent of GDP be exceeded," Mr. 
Waigel ! 


r aigel said in prepared remarks. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn also soughr to offer 
reassurances to French industry, which 
was in a plaintive mood Tuesday, with 
Jean Gandois, the president of the CNFF 
employers' federation, calling for fewer 
tax increases and more spending cuts in 
the 1998 budget Mr. Strauss-Kahn 
stressed toe temporary nature of the 
newly announced increase in corporate 
taxes from 36.6 percent to nearly 42 
percent, saying the government would 
"keep its word" on this matter. He also 
said the increase of capital-gains taxes 


of gross domestic product, and his own ' for companies — from 19 percent to 
admission, repealed in the interview nearly 42 percent — would not apply to 
Tuesday, that the 1997 French deficit companies engaged in restructuring. 


addressing its drug trafficking and trans- NAZI: Italian Military Court Sends 55 Captain Priebke to Prison 

it problems.” The report certified toe 


Cambodian government as "folly co- 
operating” on countemarcoiics efforts. 

But according to Interpol documents, 
toe seizure by foreign law enforcement 
authorities of drugs originating in Cam- 
bodia increased in 1996 by more than 
1.000 percent over J995. Foreign au- 
thorities are especially concerned about 
large shipments of heroin that cross from 
Laos and Thailand to Cambodia's long 
seacoast. The traffickers “are using gov- 
ernment planes, helicopters, military 
trucks, navy boats and soldiers to trans- 
port heroin.” said a U.S. official who 
tracks toe Cambodian drug trade. 

"There are definitely more drags 
coming through Cambodia this year than 
before, but what can I do?” said Ska- 
davy M. Ly Roun, toe police officer who 
heads Cambodia’s national anti-drug 
force. 

He said serious enforcement was next 
to impossible because of political in- 
fighting. corruption and toe involvement 
of powerful figures. 


Continued from Page 1 


Mars Probe Reported ‘Back on Track’ 
As Contact Is Renewed With Pathfinder 


The AmxLiieJ Press 

LOS ANGELES — NASA engi- 
neers said Tuesday that they had re- 
solved communications problems that 
caused them to lose contact with the 
Mars Pathfinder over the weekend. 

Weather data and photos flowed 
back to Earth on Monday and again 
today. 

"This morning we got data, quite a 
bit of data," said the mission manager, 
Richard Cook. “We think we’re back 
on track.” The lander and toe rover 
themselves are “extraordinarijy 
healthy.” he added. 

Mr. Cook said a series of mlscues 
caused toe most recent problems, 
traced to toe way ground controllers 
used the Deep Space Network of an- 


tennas in California. Spain and Aus- 
tralia to pick up signals from Pathfind- 
er. The network operators have been 
told what equipment changes were 
needed, he said. 


Engineers also reported that toe 
Pathfinder computer had confirmed 


receipt of new software that was ra- 
dioed up to avert computer resets that 
plagued the mission on July 10 to 14. 

Matthew Golombek. the project 
scientist, said that despite the glitches 
the mission has performed superbly 
heading into its 1 8th day of oper- 
ations. 

Pathfinder, he said, has “effective- 
ly acquired in toe first two and a half 
weeks what wc expected to receive in 
the first month of operations.” 


out of a military hospital in a suitcase by 
his wife. 

Mr. Priebke was discovered living a 
quiet life as an innkeeper in an Andean 
mountain resort in Argentina, where he 
had been living under his real name, and 
even traveling to Europe, including to 
Italy, with a German passport. 

He was found by an American tele- 
vision crew, and after a legal battle 
against his extradition to Italy, was put 
on trial in Rome in April 1996. 

That trial, which ended just a year ago. 
found Mr. Priebke guilty of a reduced 
multiple homicide charge that, under 
Italian law, had lapsed under the 30-year 
statute of limitations. 

Technically. Mr. Priebke was sei free, 
but the uproar in Italy, and tn Germany 
where he was also wanted on war crimes 
charges, was so great that the Italian 
justice system had to scramble for ways 
to save its face, and keep Mr. Priebke 
behind bars. 

Eventually, after more legal confu- 
sion as the" case bounced between a 
civilian and a military’ court, a new trial 
against Mr. Priebke — who in March 
was transferred from a jail in Rome to 
the monastery where he 1 ives — began in 
April in the bunker-siyle courtroom on 
the outskirts of toe city. 

Many critics at the end of toe last trial 
charged that it had been mistake to try 
Mr. friebke in a military court where toe 
judges could be more sympathetic to a 
defendant who claimed he was only fol- 
lowing orders. 

Although that line of defense was said 
Tuesday to have been one of the mit- 
igating circumstances that led tn the 
reduction of the sentences, the two men 
were convicted of crimes against hu- 
manity. which have no statute of lim- 
itations. Several leading Italian lawyers 
welcomed the verdict as confirmation 
that the laws against such crimes will 
never be allowed to expire. 

Neither Mr. Hass nor Mr. Priebke 
were present at the sentencing Tuesday. 


but the mayor of Rome. Francesco Ru- 
telli. was there. He said. “Today we can 
be sure that there will be no white- 
washing of the alrocilies of die Nazis." 

■ Sentence Called ‘A Joke’ 

Shimon Samuels, director of Inter- 
national Affairs for toe Simon Wicsenth- 
ai Center, in Los Angeles, which hunts 
former Nazis, said the verdict gave him 
"partial satisfaction” because it showed 


war criminals could not rest easily, wire 
agencies reported from Rome. 

But he described as “a joke" the 
length of time Mr. Priebke would ac- 
tually have to serve once mitigating cir- 
cumstances and concessions had been 
taken into account. 

“A lire sentence would have given a 
strong symbolic message.” said Tullia 
Zevi. leader of Italy’s Jewish commu- 
nity. ’ i Reuters. AP) 



that there had been no irregularities in 

the procedure. " v. 

Mr Ivcher said that by revoking his 
citizenship, the government was frying g 
to place the station under the control of 
his partners. Mendel and Samuel 
Winter, who own a minority stake. The 
Winter brothers, who did not. return 
phone calls to their offices, are widely 
considered to be pro- government. . 


BRIEFLY 


Surgery Said Due 
For Saddam's Son 


AMMAN. Jordan — Saddam 
Hussein’s eldest son, Udai, is to 
undergo surgery in Cairo to remove 
a bullet from his spinal cord; the 
result of an ambush m Baghdad last 
year, a Jordanian newspaper report- 
ed Tuesday. 

In a dispatch from Cairo, the pa- 
per, A1 Rai, cited unnamed sources 
as saying that Egyptian authorities 
had given “the green light to the 
hospitalization of Udai Saddam 
Hussein in Cairo on humanitarian 
grounds." - 

Udai Hussein, 33, was dis- 
charged from a Baghdad hospital on 
June 9. six months after gunmen 
sprayed his car with bullets.' Iraqi 
officials said he had made a foil 
recovery. (AFP) 


UN Will Expand 
Inquiry in Congo 


UNITED NATIONS, New York 
— Secretary-General Kofi Annan 
has agreed to broaden an inves- 
tigation into alleged massacres in 
Congo to include periods during the 
rule of toe former dictator. Mobutu 
Sese Seko. 

. The United Nations is planning to 
send a team to Congo, formerly 
Zaire, to investigate allegations that 
the forces of Laurent Kabila killed 
thousands of Rwandan refugees in 
the eastern part of the country. Mr. 
Kabila's forces deposed Marshal 
Mobutu in May. 

Mr. Kabila had refused to allow 
the UN mission unless the inves- 
tigation looked into alleged killings 
before his revolution. In a July 15 
letter to Mr. Kabila, made public 
Monday, Mr. Annan said investi- 
gation would include alleged vi- 
olations in the east of the country, 
beginning in March 1993. (AP) 


Ex- Contras Disarm 


MANAGUA — In a remote 
mountain region in northern 
Nicaragua, 387 rebels have sur- 
rendered their weapons to President 
Amoldo Aleman. 

' The rebels disarmed Monday in 
the village of Ayapal, 360 kilome- 
ters (225 miles) north of Managua. 
They were believed to be toe last of 
the former contra rebels to put down 
their guns for a second time. The 
contras surrendered in 199Q, but by 
the next year many had rearmed to 
protest what they said was a failure 
by the government to help them 
return to civilian life. Mr. Aleman, 
who took office in January, prom- 
ised land and financial help. (AP) 


Impatience in Haiti 


PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — 
The caretaker prime minister, 
Rosny Smarth. has threatened to 
quit working if President Rene Pre- 
val does not appoint a successor by 
early next month, a lawmaker said 
Monday. 

The president of Haiti’s Senate, 
meanwhile, accused Mr. Preval of 
delay as pan of a plan to return his 
mentor, farmer Presidenr Jean- Ber- 
trand Aristide, to power. (AP) 


6 Egypt Police Shot 


MFNYA. Egypt — Six Egyptian 
policemen were killed in an attack 
here Tuesday by toe fundamentalist 
Islamic Group, toe police said. 

Two civilians were seriously in- 
jured in the attack, the deadliest 
against Egyptian police officers in 
more than two years, they said. The 
attackers sprayed automatic gunfire 
at a checkpoint at the entrance to 
Mmya. 250 kilometers (155 miles) 
south of Cairo, before fleein° in a 
car. * 

Security officials also said Tues- 
day that the police had arrested Mo- 
hammed Mahmoud Zahran. a re- 
gional leader of the Islamic Group 
wanted in toe killings of 1 2 Chris- 
tian farmers in the south. tAFP. AP) 


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Vatican Accused of Storing Plundered Nazi Gold 



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• LOS ANGELES — The Vatican 
stored 200 million Swiss francs, mostly 

• in gold coins, for Croatian fascists just 

• after World War II to keep the money out 
of Allied hands, a declassified U.S. doc- 

• ument indicates. 

The release of the 1946 document 

• marked the first rime in a year-long hunt 
" of U.S. national archives by researchers 

that the Vatican has been mentioned in 
'' connection with gold looted by the Nazis 
or their allies. 

The Vatican denied the accusation 
. Tuesday. “There is no basis in reality to 
■■ the report,” said the Vatican spokesman, 

' Joaquin Navarro- Vails. He said it was 
- based on an anonymous source “whose 
’ reliability is more than dubious.” 

The fascist Ustaehi who controlled 
Croatia as a puppet government for the 
Nazis during the war exterminated hun- 
Vdreds of thousands of Serbs, Jews and 
Z Gypsies, and historians have denounced 
the Vatican for maintaining ties to the 
• Croatian regime led try Ante Pavelic. 

A Croatian cardinal was convicted by 
the postwar Communist government of 
abetting war crimes. 

The document, disclosed by research- 
ers working on a documentary for the 
cable network A&E Television, is an 
internal U.S .Treasury Department memo 
that had been kept secret for SO years. It is 


among IS million U.S. documents related 
to the safekeeping of Nazi-plundered 
gold, mostly by Swiss banks. 

“Approximately 200 million Swiss 
francs was originally held In the Vatican 
for safekeeping,” says the memo, dated 
OcL 21, 1946, from a Treasury agent, 
Emerson Bigelow, to his superior. Harold 
Glasser. who is identified as director of 
monetary research. 

If the 200 million Swiss francs were 
still held today, it would be valued at 
about SI 70 million and would be worth 
hundreds of millions more in accumu- 
lated interest. 


The document surfaced after the A&E 
producer, Stephen Crisman and Gaylen 
Ross, finished a two-hour documentary 
on Switzerland's handling of Nazi gold, 
which is to be shown on the cable channel 
Saturday. 

The program details shipments of gold 
ingots by the fascist Romanian govern- 
ment to Swiss banks to keep them from 
the Allies and the dealings of the se- 
cretive Bank of International Settlement, 
which was ran by an American, Thomas 
McKittrick. Mr. Ross, the producer, said 
the bank laundered gold for the Nazis in 
Switzerland. 


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Ads for Holocaust Victims 


CiimpUrd bv Ow SsfiFnmi OKpatcka 

NEW YORK — A list of owners of 
dormant Swiss bank accounts dating 
from World War n is to be published 
Wednesday in newspaper ads around 
the world, a spokesman for the Swiss 
Bankers' Association said Tuesday. 

“These will be names of account 
holders as well as others who might be 
affiliated with a particular account, such 
as a joint name or a power of attorney.” 
Michael Freitag, the association’s 
spokesman in New York, said 


GreviHe -fanner of the Holocaust Edu- 
cational Trust welcomed the decision 
but said it was late in coming. 

“If banks had ever seriously looked 
for owners, then they would have saved 
years of suffering for thousands of 
people,” he said. 

The ads are being published in sev- 
eral major newspapers from South 
Africa to North America. 

Money that is still unclaimed a year 
after the ads have run will be given to 
charity . (AP. Reuters} 


He provided a copy of the memo on the 
Vatican to The Associated Press, and 
other researchers vouched for its authen- 
ticity. It was declassified on Dec. 31, 
1996, according to a stamp on the 
memo. 

Other documents establish that Mr. 
Bigelow received reliable information 
from the American Overseas Special Ser- 
vices, precursor of the CIA, on Nazi 
wealth held in specific Swiss bank ac- 
counts. 

The memo quotes a ‘ ‘reliable source in 
Italy,” apparently an American intelli- 
gence source, as saying the Ustasha or- 
ganization removed 330 million Swiss 
francs from funds it bad confiscated in 
Croatia, then part of Yugoslavia. 

The memo says that 150 million Swiss 
francs were impounded by the British at 
the Austrian-Swiss border and that the 
balance was held in the Vatican. 

While stating that as a fact, the doc- 
ument cites rumors that a considerable 
portion of the money held by the Vatican 
was sent to Spain and Argentina through 
a Vatican “pipeline." 

But it adds that the rumors might be a 
“smokescreen to cover the fact that the 
treasure remains in its original repos- 
itory’ ' at the Vatican. 

A number of Ustaehi, including Ante 
Pavelic. fled to Spain or Argentina after 
the Nazi defeat. ( Reuters. AP) 



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SANITATION GAP — UNICEF's executive director, Carol 
Bellamy, commenting Tuesday in London on the agency's annual 
report on child health and other issues. It said half the world's 
population does not have access to a toilet or decent latrine. 


U.S. Report Details Persecution of Christian Groups in Russia and China 


By Steven Erlanger 

New York Times Sen'icc 


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WASHINGTON — In its first com- 
prehensive review of persecution of 
Christian groups around the world, the 
U.S. government sharply 
China 
and urges 
Russia to veto legislation restricting re- 
ligious freedom there. 

The State Department report issued 
Tuesday was prepared at the behest of 
Congress, which last year demanded “a 
detailed summary of United States 
policies designed to reduce and elim- 
inate today's mounting persecution of 
Christians throughout die world.” 

The report, which covers 78 coun- 
tries, concentrates on difficulties faced 
by Christians but broadens its mandate 
to discuss, at least briefly, the perse- 
cution faced by other groups, such as 
Tibetans in China and animists in Su- 
dan, who, like Christians there, have 
been forced to convert to Islam. 

Congressional Republicans have been 
using the issue of persecuted Christians 
as a way to criticize the Clinton ad- 
ministration’s policies toward China and 


Russia, most recently in the debate over 
renewing C hina 's trade status. 

Unlike the yearly human-rights re- 
ports, which also look at religious per- 
secution. this report tries to describe 
actions taken by the United States to 
promote religious freedom and to 
“eliminate religious discrimination, in- 
tolerance and persecution throughout 
the world, with a particular focus on the 
situation for Christians, as requested by 
Congress.” 

Secretary of Stale Madeleine Albright 
has also instructed American embassies 
to give more attention to questions of 
religious freedom in their reports and to 
stay more closely in touch with leading 
religious figures, both those at risk and 
others, around the world. 

A senior administration official, who 
spoke on condition of anonymity, ex- 
pressed discomfort at the mandated fo- 
cus on Christians alone, as did some of 
the 20 members of the Advisory Com- 
mittee on Religious Freedom Abroad, 
which Secretary of State Warren Chris- 
topher established in November 1996. 

The committee, which includes 
members of most major faiths, was es- 
tablished as a response to growing crit- 


icism by Christian groups, most of them 
politically conservative, and similarly 
minded representatives in Congress. 

“The great lesson absorbed by the 
tyrants of the world from the collapse of 
the Soviet empire is that it was the 
churches that contributed to the demo- 
cratization and collapse of the empire, ’ ’ 
said Nina Shea of the human-rights 
group freedom House. “So you see a 
pattern of persecution in places like 
China and Saudi Arabia.” 

Representative Sam Brownback, Re- 
publican of Kansas, wants to make this 
new report an annual event, and Senator 
Arlen Specter. Republican of 
Pennsylvania, and Representative Frank 
Wolf, Republican of Vir ginia, have 
sponsored a bill dial would create an 
office of religious persecution monitor- 
ing in the White House, with its director 
to be confirmed by the Senate and pos- 
sessing the power to impose sanctions. 

While the bill is considered unlikely 
to pass, it reflects the concern about 
religious persecution in a post-Soviet 
world that the administration is moving 
to embrace. 

In China, the report says, constitu- 
tional promises of religious freedom are 


regularly violated. “The government of 
China has sought to restrict all actual 
religious practice to government-au- 
thorized religious organizations and 
registered places of worship,” it says. 

While enforcement is uneven, and 
religious groups have grown rapidly. 
China has cracked down this year on 
unregistered Catholic and Protestant 
movements. It has raided and closed 
several hundred groups that worship in 
members' homes, detaining group lead- 
ers for long interrogation and beating 
some of them. 

Four underground Roman Catholic 
bishops have been imprisoned or de- 
tained, and many Catholic priests have 
been searched and religious articles 
seized. The official .Catholic Church 
registered with die Chinese government 
does not recognize the authority of the 
Pope, so Vatican-affiliated Catholics 
are considered unregistered. 

In response, the American govern- 
ment says it has raised religious free- 
dom issues at every opportunity in bi- 
lateral meetings at every level, 
sometimes raising specific cases of in- 
carcerated Christians. 

The president, vice president and sec- 


retary of state have met the Dalai Lama, 
the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader. 

In Iran, die report says, official op- 
pression of evangelical Christians in- 
creased in 1996, while four Baha'is re- 
main in prison under death sentences, 
convicted of apostasy. In Israel. Je- 
hovah’s Witnesses have been harassed 
and attacked, and they and the Unifi- 
cation Church are banned in Singapore. 

In Saudi Arabia, freedom of religion 
does not exist, and the government pro- 
hibits the public and private practice of 
all non-Muslim religions. In Russia, the 
administration is concerned over new 
legislation restricting religious freedom 
there for the first time since the fall of 
the Soviet Union. The legislation, 
passed by huge majorities in the leg- 
islature and awaiting Mr. Yeltsin’s sig- 
nature, would restrict religions not reg- 
istered 15 years ago, in the Soviet era. 
when the official ideology was atheist 
and religious activists and dissidents 
were persecuted. 

Under the legislation, full rights 
would 1 go to Islam, Judaism, Buddhism 
and Russian Orthodoxy, which is the 
state religion, while Baptist groups that 
worked with a state-sponsored orga- 


nization would be acceptable. 

But independent Baptist groups, for 
instance, along with groups like the Mor- 
mons and Pentecostals, would not be. 
because they were cot registered; they 
would not be able to own property, pub- 
lish literature or hold public worship. 

President Bill Clinton, officials say. 
has raised concerns about the law in 
many recent conversations with Mr. 
Yeltsin, who says thai there may be 
constitutional problems with it. 

■ Russia Defends Religion Rill 

A Justice Ministry official said the 
bill Untiling the rights of minority re- 
ligions in Russia did not infringe on the 
rights of foreigners, Agence France- 
Presse reported from Moscow. 

Gennadi Monokhov, head of the min- 
istry’s department for public and re- 
ligious organizations, told the Interfax 
news agency on Monday that the bill 
“does not envisage any limitations on 
the religious activity of foreign citizens 
who observe Russian law." 

But, he said. "The state has the right 
to know who is doing what on its ter- 
ritory and whether laws and human 
rights are being observed." 




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J PAGES 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 

EDITORIALS /OPINION 


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Jtcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


Pf'BIJKflt.D »mi Tia* Nf» VOHK TIMF-1 .\W» THF WASHINGTON' fOSt 


Pointless Budget Deal 

The current budget negotiations be- creases kick in immediately, while 
tween Bill Clinton and Congress are spending cuts are postponed, 
often portrayed as an epic struggle over According to me Committee for a 

how to cut taxes, trim spending, invest Responsible Federal Budget, a cor- 
in education and balance the budget for porate-financed nonpartisan group, the 
the fust time in a quarter-century. But a budget would be balanced by 2001 if 


less flattering version would note that 
the roaring economy is already driving 
the deficit close to zero, making a final 
deal superfluous if not harmful. In- 
deed, the deficit could be eliminated 
quicker if the budget deal collapsed. 

Some of the budget deal's potential 
provisions smell rancid. An unfair al- 
location of very steep Medicate cuts 
could damage urban hospitals that train 
doctors and care for the poor. Various 
proposals would create tax dodges for 
wealthy investors, eviscerate tax col- 
lections a decade from now, encourage 
colleges to raise tuition, and starve 
nearly every discretionary spending 
program. No one need mourn if the 
members of Congress who harbor mis- 
givings. from Senator Phi] Gramm of 
Texas on the right to Senator Paul 
WelistoneofMinnesotaonthe left, or a 
president pushed to his limit by ex- 
cessive tax cutting for wealthy fam- 
ilies. decide to scuttle the deal. 

With tax revenue soaring, this year's 
deficit may fall below $45 billion, a 
pittance in a $7 trillion economy. Al- 
though the budget deal would even- 
tually trim the deficit, it would actually 
slow deficit reduction next year be- 
cause its tax cuts and spending in- 


Congress merely locked current 
policies in place. Under the budget 
deal, it would take one year more to 
achieve balance. Either way, the deficit 
will eventually rise again, to large 
numbers, early next century. 

It may be asking too mucb for Con- 
gress. or the president, to admit pub- 
licly that die budget plan has gone off 
track. But the booming economy ought 
to change the dynamics of the ne- 
gotiations, by making a final deal less 
important Fratricide among Repub- 
licans after the failed coup against 
House Speaker Newt Gingrich could 
further alter the dynamics. President 
Clinton negotiates with a weaker 
speaker, but one who can no longer 
afford to jeopardize bis tenuous hold 
on conservative allies. 

Mr. Clinton has vowed to reject 
many of the Republicans' tax proposals 
that either open huge holes in the 
budget or favor the wealthiest families. 
If he recognizes that the budget deal is 
at best of marginal value, he might 
stiffen his resolve to beat back the worst 
excesses of the Republican plans. If the 
Republicans then threaten to back out 
of the budget deal, so much the better. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Pacific Asians Really Aren’t Working Together 


H ONG KONG — A meeting of 
officials from the Association of 
South East Asian Nations and their 
counterparts from other parts of Asia, 
North America, Europe and Aus- 
tralasia, in die ASEAN Regional For- 
um on security diis coming Saiurday 
and Sunday in Kuala Lumpur, will 
stimulate self-congratulation about 
growing regional coherence in Pacific 
Asia. But the reality is very different. 

As the recent political turmoil in 
Cambodia shows, and die perils of a 
more assertive China suggest, regional 
institutions are at best fragile. Of even 
greater concern to Asians must be the 
region’s repeated failure to tackle eco- 
nomic issues that will define die rules 
and character of future commerce. 

First there is the failure of Asians to 
cooperate, as they said they would, to 
defend currencies that come under 
speculative attack. Devaluations, es- 
pecially in Thailand and the Philip- 
pines, demonstrate that even the Jap- 
anese will not bail out fellow Asians. 

Second, the pace of global trade lib- 
eralization continues to be set primarily 
by the United States and the European 
Union. Negotiations on financial ser- 
vices and information technology re- 


By Gerald Segal 

veal thar once an EU-U.S. deal (some- 
times also involving Canada and Japan) 
is made, the global system follows. 

Asian voices, apart from Japan's, are 
little more than background noise when 
the. new rides are framed for a service 
sector that accounts for more than half 
of output in advanced economies and 
will increasingly characterize foe econ- 
omies of Pacific Asia. Asians will have 
no one bur themselves to blame if they 
find that foe international rules were 
written in foe Atlantic world. 

Progress in agreeing on global ac- 
counting standards illustrates how EU 
and U.S. authorities set the agenda and 
regulations that will govern foe world's- 
stock markets. The process of Atlantic 
leadership is also evident in the 1 2-year 
gap between foe Big Bang deregulation 
k London’s financial center and early 
stem in a similar direction in Tokyo. 

Third, Asians are absent from ne- 
gotiations on setting rules for the In- 
ternet. Some of the key talks take place 
at the International Telecommunica- 
tions Union, but it is American and 
European governments and especially 


companies t hat /all the shots. Rules 
about electronic money and commerce, 
encryption and tax systems are being 
hammered out between foe United 
States and the European Union. 

Asia has a real interest, because pro- 
jections suggest that its market in In- 
ternet commerce will grow quickly in 
the next five years. Don’t be surprised 
if Asians are soon complEtining that the 
rules of the superhighway were set in 
foe Atlantic world. 

* The recent corporate agreement on 
digital video disc technology suggests 
more of foe same. Europe and North 
America each have one standard, bat 
Pacific Asia ended up with fivfc. 

There seem to be two major reasons 
for die failure of the region to get 
organized. One is that most states have . 
only recently become industrialized. 
They are still enamored of stale power 
and state sovereignty. Such Victorian 
powers are psychologically ill- 
equipped to accept foe argument that 
sovereignty heeds to be surrendered 
andpooled for a common good. 

Then are also deep-seated reasons 
for regional division. China, with more 
than 60 percent of Pacific Asia’s pop- 
ulation, is an obvious candidate for 


regional leadership, but precisely be- 
cause of its potential power it arouses 
much fear. Japan, with stock market 
capitalization larger than foe rest of the 
region combined, is unwilling to lead 
and distrusted because of its past record 
of military aggression. 

ASEAN desperately wishes Co 
punch above Its weight but remains 
burdened by a diplomacy of foe lowest 
common denominator. 

It is hard to see how such deep di- 
visions n » o be bridged. One important 
experiment comes from foe Asia- 
Europe summit process in which Euro- 
peans, who coot ornate their position, are 
far foe first time prompting Asians to 
caucus without Caucasians. There _ is 
glen evidence of growing economic in- 
terdependence within Pacific Asia. 

But if, as expected, foe Asians con- 
tinue to prove incapable of effective 
regional coordination, they will have to 
learn to be much more committed ar- 
chitects at foe global level. 

The writer, a senior fellow at the 
International Institute for Strategic 
Studies m London and director of Bri- 
tain's Pacific Asia Program, contributed 
this comment to the Herald Tribune. 


The Swiss in the 1940s Were No Worse Than the Rest of Us 


Northern Irish Bog 


The IRA, the Catholic terrorist 
group in Northern Ireland, called an 
“unequivocal" cease-fire over foe 
weekend. This opens foe way to par- 
ticipation of its political arm. Sinn 
Fein, in negotiations conducted by the 
British and Irish governments. Chair- 
man of these intended but not yet “all- 
party'' talks is the former U.S. judge 
and senator George Mitchell. He has 
enunciared six princi pies of democracy 
and nonviolence that in coming weeks 
the IRA must meet. As desperate for 
respite as most Irish appear to be, it is 
best to check easy optimism. The polit- 
ical road is long and does not ne- 
cessarily lead to permanent peace. 

The immediate problem lies with the 
IRA, whose goal is to rejoin British 
Northern Ireland to independent Ire- 
land proper. The IRA broke its first 
cease-fire in displeasure at British in- 
sistence on its prompt disarming. Bri- 
tain then, for various reasons, changed 
governments, electing one prepared to 
accept “decommissioning" parallel 
with negotiations rather than prior — 
3 significant and so far unrequited con- 
cession by Labour Prime Minister 
Tony Blair. What now will keep the 
IRA from resuming its savagery over 
a further frustration? 

The answer lies in foe continuing 
tension between the Irish people’s mil- 
itary and political selves. In this in- 


ternal struggle for power, the killers 
have so far prevailed. 

The other major problem lies with 
the Protestant Northern Irish majority 
demanding continued union with Bri- 
tain — a majority with its own terrorist 
cells. A pervasive fear of British aban- 
donment defies London's constant re- 
assurances of fidelity to the majority 
will apd accounts for the hard Protestant 
line on the disarming of the IRA. If this 
particular issue is somehow eased, as it 
must be quickly for anything else good 
to happen, then others will pop up. 

The word "peace" embodies pop- 
ular aspirations, but "prolonged 
trace" better describes foe unavoid- 
ably incremental route that any suc- 
cessful negotiation must take. North- 
ern Ireland's Catholics aspire to Irish 
sovereignty in foe North, its Protest- 
ants to British sovereignty. But there 
can be only one flag per. pole. That 
irreducible fact dooms any early reach 
to settle die sovereignty question and 
leaves as foe central agenda item the 
elaboration of interim terms that 
neither guarantee nor preclude each 
side's ultimate ambition- Extra home- 
rale powers and a new limited say for 
Dublin are commonly mentioned. 

But this is to leap ahead. The cease- 
fire must be affirmed, consolidated, ex- 
tended, built on. That is foe first task. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


W ASHINGTON — The 
current wave of vilific- 
ation of Switzerland, most re- 
cently abetted by a U.S. gov- 
ernment report, is overblown 
and basically warped. A public 
image is being created of the 
Swiss as virtual Nazi collab- 
orators. This is false. 

In writing these views, I 
should note that I was foe 
Nuremberg war crimes trial 
prosecutor directly responsible 
for cases against German 
bankers, and I spent two years at 
that work. My cases had no 
Swiss components or angles. 

Switzerland has maintain ed a 
policy of neutrality and non- 
alignment in European and 
world affairs for hundreds of 
years. Thai was . its official 
policy also in World War fi. I do 
not know where the sympathies 
of most Swiss were directed 
during foe war, but foe country 
is foe oldest democracy in the 
world and has a pluralistic pop- 
ulation of German, French and 
Italian background. 


By Walter J. Rockier 


Were some Swiss pro-Nazi? 
Probably. But foe United States 
. had its German American 
Bund, Britain its Cliveden set 
and Mosleyites, and France foe 
Vichy government. 

During World War II, 
Switzerland had a population of 
about4 million ana industries in 
fiatiands adjacent to Germany. 
For most of foe war its territory 
was completely surrounded by 
Germany, German-occupied 
territories and German troops. 
It had a small and presumably 
efficient army, but one thar at 
best could omy have stung, not 
bitten, foe German military. 

It has been charged that foe 
Swiss were culpable during the 
war in foot (2) they aided the 
German war effort, 12) their 
banks accepted forty Nazi 
money and gold, and (3) they 
did not do much for Jewish 
refugees. Moreover, after the 
war Swiss bankers impeded ef- 
forts to release bank deposits of 


Jews who were murdered by the 
Nazis. Undoubtedly some of 
those charges are true. But by 
what standard shall Swiss cul- 
pability be judged? 

The Swiss did not signifi- 
cantly arm Germany during foe 
war. The Germans did it Ger- 
man factories produced Mess- 
erschmitts and Heinkel 
bombers; Krupp and Daimler- 

Benz maHa tanl-K and arfillwty 
Farben produced the poison gas 
for Anschwiiz and Treblinka. 
Through coerced labor, foe 
Germans got their manpower 
from all of Europe; by conquest 
they had foe use of almost all of 
Europe's factories and re- 
sources (plus high-quality steel 
coming from Sweden). 

The Swiss did not facilitate 
German trade for arms abroad. 
The Nazis obviously got very 
little ip weapons or munitions 
from Brazil. Argentina, Sooth 
Africa or anywhere else on the 
globe outside occupied Europe. 


Allegations to foe contrary are 
hard to follow. 

The charge that Swiss banks 
accepted money looted by the 
Nazis is probably true. So did 
French banks. Italian banks, 
Swedish banks, and so would 
any other banks, including 
American and British banks, 
were these countries not at war 
with foe Nazis. A -substantial 
aspect of the business of bank- 
ing for profit is acceptance of 
deposits without regard to the 
history of the money being de- 
posited. Swiss bankers are not 
unusual in this practice. 

It is sometimes charged that 
Swiss banks accepted Nazi gold 

teeth of murdered Jews or from 
Jewish wedding rings, jewelry 
and such. In feet, foe German 
Reichsbank collected such gold, 
and I prosecuted a vice pres- 
ident of the Reichsbank in 
charge of this grisly operation. 
Very likely a substantial amount 
of this gold was melted down 
and reappeared in gold bars. 


For Blacks in America, Slavery Is Recent History 


Protecting Dolphins 


At issue in the U.S. Senate next week 
is protection of dolphins in foe Eastern 
Pacific Tropical Ocean. Scientists do 
not understand why, but these mammals 
like io swim above schools of yellowfin 
tuna, the kind that end up in your sand- 
wich. For years, fishermen caught tuna 
by targeting dolphins; more than a half- 
million dolphins per year once died in 
circle nets. Videotapes of their suffering 
led to a consumer outcry, which led to 
congressional action; a bon on tuna 
from countries that allow boats to use 
such methods, and a "dolphin-safe'' 
label for tuna caught by other means. 

Now foe countries that fish in foe 
Eastern Pacific have agreed to protect 
dolphins, not by abandoning circle nets 
but by freeing dolphins before hauling 
tuna on board. Under a U.S.-negotiated 
pact, they allow international observ- 
ers aboard, and these observers certify 
that foe number of dolphin deaths has 
plummeted to perhaps 4,000 per year. 
(More than 9.5 million dolphins swim 
these seas.) The nations also agreed to 
reduce foe by-catch of other species, 
such as sea turtles, whose deaths may 
not elicit as much sympathy among 
U.S. consumers but which also are 
important to the marine ecosystem. 

So far, these nations are following 
the guidelines voluntarily, although 
they still have no access to foe U.S. 
market. Now the Clinton administra- 
tion wants Congress to endorse foe pact, 
allow’ these countries to resume selling 
tuna in America and grant them foe 


"dolphin-safe” label — as long as ob- 
servers certify no dolphin deaths. The 
House has endorsed diis approach. 

Opponents of foe bill in the Senate 
say they might lift foe embargo, but 
they don’t want to extend foe dolphin- 
safe label to tuna caught in circle nets. 
They question observers’ ability to be 
certain that no dolphins have died. And 
they argue that even if there is no 
dolphin mortality, foe stress of foe hunt 
and encirclement causes barm. 

The measure has split foe environ- 
mental community. Organizations such 
as Greenpeace and the World Wildlife 
Fund endorse foe administration bill. 
They point out foal denying the dol- 
phin-free label to foe new, careful style 
of circle-net fishing will encourage oth- 
er methods of fishing that may lead to 
even greater by-catch of turtles, sharks, 
young tuna and other important spe- 
cies. They also warn that, without ac- 
cess to the U.S. market and foe dolphin- 
safe label, voluntary compliance will 
fall off, and foe great progress of foe 
past few years will be lost. 

The administration bill calls for a 
study of foe dolphin population — 
currently depleted but not endangered. 
If the “stress” of circle-net fishing 
really affects foe species's health, the 

g ict could be revised in a few years. 

□r in foe meantime foe United States 
is not foe only market for tuna. Amer- 
icans' best chance to protect dolphins 
is an international approach. 

— the Washington post 


N EW YORK — Bill Clinton 
has earned a boatload of 
scorn since suggesting that he 
might apologize for slavery, as 
some in Congress have sugges- 
ted. Critics from both left and 
right argue that such an apology 
would be trivializing, empty, 
arrogant and racially divisive. 

The dominant view is that 
there is essentially nothing to 
discuss, since foe American 
Civil War closed foe issue and 
foe slavers and foe enslaved cue 
long since dead. 

But all the noise suggests that 


By Brent Staples 


foe issue is very much alive. 
The terms of emancipation are 
nearly as explosive today as 
during foe 1860s. when they 
dominated public conscious- 
ness and nearly tore the gov- 
ernment span. 

The facts of the period have 
been papered over in myth. 
These days, every schoolchild 
thinks that Abraham Lincoln 
freed foe slaves at one fell 
swoop — and for moral reasons. 
In fact, foe Emancipation Pro- 


Is Class the Problem ? 


By Richard Harwood 


■^jyASHINGTON — Is it 


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Is 

time, and is it possible, to 
change foe debate from a pre- 
occupation with race to foe lar- 
ger consideration of social class 
as foe primary unresolved prob- 
lem in American life? 

The gross disparities in in- 
come. education and career op- 
portunities are real. "We 
nave,” former Labor Secretary 
Robert Reich has said, "foe 
most unequal distribution of 
wealth of any industrial nation 
in foe world." 

This reality, with its impli- 
cations for equal opportunity, 
transcends race and other 
minority classifications. 

The bottom rungs in 1995, 
for e; 

43 
Asian 

families who were living at or 
below foe official poverty level. 
These families consisted of 19.5 
million children and adults. 

That same year, however, 
they were also populated by 5.3 
millio n white families consist- 
ing of 25.4 million children and 
adults with foe same low stan- 
dards of living and opportunity. 

The burdens of poverty tend 
to be long-lasting among all 
groups, foe exception being 
Asian-Americans, who have 
foe highest median family in- 
comes and the highest levels of 
educational attainment. 

"Social mobility" obviously 
exists in America. Individuals 
of all races and ethnicity are 
constantly moving from one 
class to another. But upward 
mobility is not automatic and is 
far less common, regardless of 
race, than is often assumed. 

Being bom poor is a burden 
hard to escape. A study by 
Samuel Bowles and Herbert 
Ginns found that "of 1,000 
children bom into the bottom 
10th, only four will make it 
to foe top 10th.” 

Many economists say that foe 
white middle class has been 


shrinking in foe past quarter- 
century because of relatively 
stagnant wages and foe loss of 
well-paid blue-collar jobs. 

As for foe poor, Richard Koh- 
lenberg writes: “One would 
think, with all our social re- 
forms (a stiff inheritance tax, 
progressive marginal tax rates 
and welfare payments to foe 
poor), that America has done a 
fairly good job of addressing 
inequality of wealth and in- 
come. But foe evidence sug- 
gests foe opposite.” 

Mr. Kanlenberg, a lawyer, 
teacher and former senate aide, 
argues in a recent book, "The 
Remedy,” that foe time has 
come for a major change in 
dealing with unequal opportu- 
nity in America. He proposes a 
new form of "affirmative ac- 
tion" based on social class 
rather than color and ethnicity. 

The principal beneficiaries of 
present-day programs of af- 
firmative action, racial di- 
versity and racial preferences in 
hiring, college admissions and 
contract set-asides for minority 
entrepreneurs have been mid- 
dle- or upper-class people. 
Blacks on the bottom rung have 
benefited far less. 

Public opinion polls show 
little support for racial prefer- 
ences in their present form. An 
inclusive class-based approach 
to affirmative action would, in 
theory, create a powerful trans- 
racial political base of support. 

But there are many problems 
involved. Who among benefi- 
ciaries of the present system 
would lose out? How would 
class be defined and prefer- 
ences determined? Where 
would the political leadership 
come from? 

The present system has been 
□o cure for the enduring curse of 
poverty and inequality. If the 
coming dialogue on race merely 
recognizes this reality, that will 
be progress of a sort 

The Washington Post. 


clamation freed only the slaves 
in rebellious states. Lincoln 
himself call ed it a military tactic, 
acknowledging that moral is- 
sues were in no way involved. 

The slavers and foe enslaved 
are certainly gone from foe 
scene. But African-American 
families that have shown even a 
casual interest in history can 
give chapter and verse on rela- 
tives who were bom in slavery 
or just afterward, and on the 
costs they paid. 

In foe Staples family, for ex- 
ample, mine is foe first gen- 
eration to come of age without a 
flesh and blood former slave 
somewhere at foe extended fam- 
ily table. That people in their 
40s have this experience makes 
foe issue a current one indeed. 

My maternal great -grand- 
mother, Luella Holmes Patter- 
son, was bom of a former slave 
and her master — and shipped 
off foe plantation when foe wife 
got wind of her. As a grade- 
schooler, I visited Luella often 
in Hollins, Virginia. 

A few towns away lay foe 
farm of my paternal great- 
grandfather, John Wesley 
Staples, who was conceived in 
slavery as well; he was bom on 
July 4, 1865, at the dawn of 
emancipation. He died 10 years 
before my birth but was re- 
membered to me in stories and 
pictures. As recently as 10 years 
ago, he and his wife, Eliza, were 
foe subject of a pamphlet writ- 
ten for a family reunion. 

John Wesley met emancip- 
ation whh his life still in front of 
him. But among his neighbors 
and in-laws were ex-slaves who 
came to freedom landless and 
old or simply broken by foe 
experience. My uncle Mack, 
who will be SO in December, 
remembers them welL 
When l asked him about the 


The confiscations were in ac- 
cordance with federal law. Sus- 
tained and accelerated, the land 
grants would have created black 
capital and independence almost 
immediately and precluded 
much of foe corrosive poverty 
that still grips foe black South. 

President Andrew Johnson 
was nearly impeached, in part 
for obstructing Congress on Re- 
construction. Meanwhile, he 
canceled Special Reid Order 
2 5, returning land to white own- 
ers and condemning blacks to 
de facto slavery. 

In many places, foe eviction 
process was long and bloody. 
As foe ex-slave Sarah Debro 
said of foe period: “Slavery 
was a bad thing, and freedom, of 
the kind we got with .nothing to 
live on, was bad. Two snakes 
frill of poison. One lying with 
his head pointing north, foe oth- 
er with his head pointing south 
... Both bit foe nigger and they 
was both bad.” 

My fafoer and uncles grew up 
steeped in accountings like that 
For 250 years African-Amer- 
icans were deprived of free- 
dom, basic education and the 
right to accumulate wealth, 
which they could have passed 
on to their descendants. 

This histoiy would have left a 
wound in any case. But foe 
wound is open and running be- 
cause foe country refused to 
atone materially when ic had the 
chance. . 

In that sense, at least my 
Uncle Mack is right about foe 
apology. No amount of talk can 
alter the past 

The New York Times. 


However, nothing about foe 
bars would betray their origin, 
and I do not believe that Swiss 
bankers can be accused of con- 
spiring with the German SS to ■ 
get foe gold, or that foe hankers 
had much information about the 
detailed operations of foe Nazi 
concentration camps in Poland. 

As for the claims of survivors 
to deposits of foe murdered per- 
sons in Swiss banks, the Swiss 
bankets seem to have behaved 
badly, but like bankers. They 
would not part with foe money 
except upon strict proofs. (De- 
tails of unclaimed pro- 1945 ac- 
counts are now to be released.] . 

For many of these accounts, 
there were and are no claimants, 
and that undoubtedly has 
pleased foe bankers. Have they 
been insensitive and glad to < 
profit? Of course. Why would . 
anyone expect otherwise. 

Apart from some clucking of 
tongues, who worried about the- 
fate of Jews during and imme- 
diately after the war? And what 
country extended itself partic- 
ularly to provide aid and redress 
to survivors? 

Nor long before the war, foe 
Western powers met at Evian, 
France, to discuss foe problem 
of Jewish refugees. The prob- 
lem was not solved. The United > 
States, Britain and France an- ] 
nounced that they were in no . 
position to accept substantial ; 
numbers of Jewish refugees. ! 
Switzerland did admit some • 
Jewish refugees before the war 
(but only; I believe, if they • 
brought in substantial assets). ; 

The Swiss government has . 
now recognized foe appropri- ; .... 
ateness of redress to Jewish sur- ! 
vivors. As a moral matter. • 
neither foe hankers n or that ; 
government ought to benefit fi- • 
nanciaiiy from foe murder of; 
Jewish depositors. The estab- . 
lishraent of a fund for Holo- 
caust survivors out of such ac- 
counts serves two purposes: It ■ 
benefits a class of victims, and it 
deprives some Swiss of unjust • 
enrichment. The Swiss govern- ; 
meat and foe bankers appear to ■ 
have accepted these principles. ; 

On balance, foe Swiss per- 
formance during foe war was • 
not glorious, but the position of 1 
Switzerland was obviously dif- 
ficult. In uo sense were foe 
Swiss criminal If they did not 
behave like Danes, who did? 

Let us leave histoiy intact 
without the latest revisionism 
about foe Swiss. The Germans 
earned out their war and the 
Holocaust without the collab- 
oration of Switzerland. 


/ 


The writer was a prosecutor 
at the Nuremberg War Crimes 
Tribunals (1947 to 1949) and 
first director in the Office of 
Special Investigations, U.S. De- 
partment of Justice (1979- 
1980). He contributed this com- , 
ment to the Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Murderous Plot 

PARIS — A truly surprising 
apology brewing in Congress, murder case has jusi been tried 
UncleMack could barely con- before the Pas -de-Calais Assize 

Courts and has resulted in a 
double condemnation to death. 


tain himself: “They can keep 
the apology. What good is it? 


They promised us 40 acres and 
foe mule. None of our people 
ever got that" 

"Forty acres and a mule,” of 
course, is a rallying cry from 
1865. It originated during Sher- 
man’s March to the Sea. Over- 
whelmed by black families that 
abandoned the plantations to 
follow him, Sherman issued 
Special Held Order 15, declar- 
ing foe Georgia Sea Islands and 
a 30-mile (4$~laiometer) strip 
of rice country a black settle- 


Aecording to foe Figaro, a wom- 
an nam ed Bachelet, a wineshop- 
keeper of Averdoingt with 
whom business had gone badly, 
arranged foe murder of two old 
people who were reputed to have 
a goodly sum of money in their 
possession. Her nefarious 
design was carried into execu- 
tion with foe aid of her son; a 
smith named Udval, and last but 
not least, foe mayor of foe com- 
mune. Mine. Bachdei and Udv* 
al were both sentenced to death. 


swindling the American Gov- 
ernment and residents of 
Michigan to the extent of nearly 
$500,000, through the promo- 
tion of a fake insurance com- ■ i 
pany, the self styled “Earl of ! « 
Dunblane" has been arrested ■ S 
here. The “earl’s” arrest was ; j 
brought abour by the arrival • £ 
here of a woman who said she j g 
was his wife and booked a room . £ 
for him at a fashionable bote}. ; ? 

1947: Shaw Outraged ' ' 

LONDON — Bernard Shaw 
joined today [July 23] in con- 
demning a recently recorded 
broadcast by foe British Broad- 
casting Corporation of a Span- 
ish bullfight. In a letter to The 


{ 


A: A 

1 


of rice counuy a black settle- al were both sentenced to death, ish bullfight. In a letter to The 
raent. Each family was to get 40 the woman's son to hard labor Daily Telegraph he asked for a 
acres and the loan of an army for life and the astonishing nro* “public inquiry into the mental ’C-a 


army 

mule to work it 
Other generals and federal 
officials followed Sherman's 
lead, realizing that land was the 
only hedge against starvation 
and renewed bondage. 


nicipal officer Rob am to ten 
years’ penal servitude. 

1922: Fake Aristocrat 

MONTREAL — Charged with 

4 


public inquiry 
condition of foe BBC,' ’ adding: 
4 'In my early days, England was 
proud of having abolished bear 
bailing and all such savageries, 
and had made bullfighting a 
national reproach to Spain.” 


9* 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 


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Life on the Road in America in the Bad Old Days 


B ALTIMORE — The first railroad run 
in the United States was made by a 
little engine that could, the Tom Thumb, 
pushing an open car carrying 36 men 
equipped with notebooks and pencils. 

The ride, 13 miles from Baltimore to a 
place called Ellicot's Mills, was the be- 
ginning of a line called the Baltimore and 
Ohio. But I was less interested in the trains 
than in the writing instruments, which the 
passengers were asked to use to write 
simple sentences to see if the h uman brain 
could function at high speeds. 

Wanting to know more about what 
happened on that day, Aug. 28, 1831, 1 
tracked down a biography of Peter 
Cooper, the man who built die little engine 
and also created Cooper Union, the col- 
lege in New York City. But my attention 
was diverted by Cooper's accounts of his 
week! on g, prerailroad horse-and-camage 
trips south from New York, where he was 
a member of the city council, to Bal- 
timore. This is the way it was in “the good 
old days, ' ' as reported by Edward Mack, a 
Columbia University professor who wrote 
“Peter Cooper" in 1949: 

* ■ In winter the whole journey was made 
by great lumbering coaches carrying nine 
inside and one or two outside, with four 
good, fast horses changed every 10 or 12 
miles. In summer there was a break at 
Trenton, N J.. whence a steamer earned 
the passengers to Philadelphia to pick up 
another coach for Baltimore. Once. Peter 


By Richard Reeve? 


said, the coach got stuck in the mud and 
the passengers 'had to get out and pull a 
fence down that we might use the rails to 
piy the stage out of the mud with.’ 

Another mishap was caused by a 
swollen river. “Peter's stage got over the 
bridge, guided by the rails on the side, but 
the next one missed the bridge and was 
carried downstream, the ladies having to 
be pulled out through the windows." 

Professor Mack continued: "Accidents 
were not the only danger in the still half- 
domesticated countryside, and Peter once 
came very near losing his life. Returning 
home in a one-horse wagon through New 
Jersey just before sundown, and wanting 
to go another 12 miles so as to get home 
the next day, Peter saw three men standing 
right in the middle of the road in front of 
him. The road was so narrow and 'at such 
a point of the hill' that he could not turn 
around and had nothing to do but meet 
them as well as he could. 'I took my pistols 
out at once, laid one of them on the seat 
and took one of them in my hand. With the 
lines in one band and the whip and the 
pistol in the other I drove slowly up to the 
first man and then gave the horse a severe 
cut of the whip and he sprung with such 
violence that he knocked the man down 
and ran over him.' One of the other two 
men tried to stop the flying horse by 


grabbing hold of the shaft, the other the 
from of the wagon. 'I did not get too for 
when the wheel ran right over him, nearly 
throwing me out of the wagon. I do nor 
know what became of the third man.' " 

No wonder Cooper and most everyone 
else wanted railroads. American roads 
were famously rough and dangerous. 
After a bouncing ride of 10 days through 
the South, Alexis de Tocqueville, the 

America's byways were 
famously rough and 
dangerous in the days 
when local authorities 
called the shots. 


young man who would write "Democracy 
in America," asked a prominent South 
Carolinian why American roads were so 
bad compared to those through the most 
rural parts of Europe. 

The American, Joel Roberts Poinsett, a 
former congressman who would one day 
be secretary of war. answered: “It's a 
great constitutional question whether 
Congress has the right to make anything 
but military roads. ... It's the states that 
often undertake to keep up the roads tra- 
versing them. Most frequently these roads 
are at the expense of the counties. In 


general our roads are in very bad repair. 
We haven't the central authority to force 
the counties to do their duty. The in- 
spection. being local, is biased and 
slack." 

It is well to remember things like that in 
these times when returning the power of 
central government to local government 
bodies is all the fashion in America. Func- 
tions like transportation were centralized 
in the first place because states and 
counties resisted measures that would 
help the commerce of any other juris- 
dictions. South Carolina did not want 
good roads into North Carolina. 

In fact, it was not until the 1950s tbatthe 
United States built interstate highways. 
That happened because the president, 
Dwight Eisenhower, had the credibility as 
a war hero to sell interstates as essential to 
national defense. The question was, in 
effect: How will we get tanks to Long 
Island if the Russians invade? 

So was born the national defense high- 
ways, as they were and are called. 

Back to the ride of the Tom Thumb- 
One of the first American passengers, 
John H. B. Latrobe, wrote: “Excited gen- 
tlemen of the party pulled out memor- 
andum books, and when at the highest 
speed, which was 18 miles an hour, wrote 
their names and some connected sen- 
tences to prove that even at great velocity 
it was possible to do so." 

Universal Press Syndicate. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


.••■y.r*. .ni*.- 


Bigger Isn’t Better 

Virtually everyone seems to 
agree that NATO enlargement 
represents a key Clinton foreign 
policy achievement and indeed 
one of the critical decisions of the 
post-Cold War era. At the same 
rime, numerous complaints have 
been raised concerning the ab- 
sence of public or — as far as one 
can tell — even intragovernment 
debate concerning die pros and 
cons of this rather fateful devel- 
opment. 

There are certainly many un- 
resolved issues concerning who is 
to join and when, and huge dif- 
ferences on tiie costs and how they 
are to be shared. Butperiiaps most 
disconcerting is the dissonance 
between various parties' publicly 
stated objectives and other, only 
thinly disguised under-the-table 
motivations. The United States 
claims it wants to enhance se- 
curity -in Central and Eastern 
Europe by including its newly 
democratic states; but what it is 


also seeking is a new market for 
its defense industry as well as the 
survival of a veto-free alliance 
that can address Bosnia-type 
problems in the future. Western 
Europe claims to share the U.S. 
interest in security, but its basic 
objectives are to keep the United 
States engaged and Germany 
safely within the alliance, while it 
also clearly prefers to offer NATO 
expansion rather than member- 
ship in the European Union. 

How security anywhere is en- 
hanced by creating a new division 
between insiders and outsiders, 
fueling Russia's nationalist sen- 
timents, endangering the fate of 
SALT-2 in the Duma andpushing 
Russia into the arms of China re- 
mains totally unclear. What is 
dear is that we currently have the 
Russians over a barrel and are 
therefore able to buy them off 
temporarily with vague promises 
of NATO consultation. 

What is also clear is that a long 

S ieue of countries is forming, in- 
uding not only Romania and 


Slovenia but also the Baltic states 
and — who knows? — other 
members of the CIS (besides 
Ukraine) that wish to distance 
themselves from Russia. 

President Bill Clinton has char- 
acterized Russia's acquiescence 
as “a historic step closer to a 
peaceful, undivided, democratic 
Europe." But a new iron curtain is 
coming down, this time of the 
West's making. Can we really af- 
ford to dismiss George Kerman’s 
warning that we will live to regret 
this "historic step"? 

GUSTAV RANIS. 

New Haven. Connecticut. 

Regarding "American Arms 
Makers Lobby for NATO Expan- 
sion" (June 30i : . 

After the ideals and ideas pro- 
claimed by the NATO expansion- 
ists, U.S. defense lobbyists now 
weigh in: Eastern European coun- 
tries need arms and ammunition 
from Uncle Sam so they can 
proudly consort with their NATO 
allies. 


Meanwhile, these countries can 
sell their second-rate armaments 
to Third World countries, rebel 
groups and tribal factions, for the 
cataclysmic diversion of all. 

Senators, forget the perk barrel; 
remember the pine box. 

WILLIAM GREENWAY. 

Paris. 

Reform in Kenya 

Regarding “ Kenya Needs Re- 
forms " (Editorial, July 17): 

Kenya, like many countries and 
institutions, needs reform to meet 
the challenges of the future. 

Like all cultures in the West 
and elsewhere, these reforms take 
place in a cultural milieu. The 
direction and tempo of successful 
reforms largely depend on the 
mood and perception of its diverse 
cultural, social, economic and eth- 
nic composition. Violent de- 
mands for change do not always 
receive popular support and could 
be harmful to the course of reform 
crusaders. To demand changes vi- 


Celebrating the Rebirth 
Of Germany’s Jews 


By Robert B. GoIAmann 


olently is both unconstitutional 
and undemocratic. 

As for the 1992 presidential 
elections. President Daniel arap 
Moi won with 38 percent of the 
vote, defeating seven chal- 
lengers. 

S.A. LOYATUM. 

Paris. 

The writer is the Kenyan am- 
bassador to France. 

48 Hours and More 

Regarding "British U-Turn on 
EU Social Rules Has Little Effect 
— Now " (May 13): 

The article incorrectly states that 
tiie European social chapter bans 
48-honr workweeks. The working 
time directive does not prevent 
people from working more than 48 
hours a week. As long as there is an 
agreement between management 
and employees, anyone can work 
for more than 48 hours a week. 

MARCELLO LEONARD! 

London. 


N EW YORK — When the 
election of a new head' of a 
Jewish community makes nation- 
al news, it is clear something im- 
portant is ha p pe ning in the place 
of Jews in that country. 

The country is Germany, and 
the news was that Andreas 
Nachama was elected president 

MEANWmLE 

of the community board of Ber- 
lin's 10,000 Jews. 

What is significant is that in no 
other country is the role of the 
Jewish community and the alert- 
ness to issues concerning Jews as 
keenly felt as in Germany. In large 
part, of course, this is because of 
the shadow of the past that hangs 
over the country. But there is.also 
a distinctly positive and prom- 
ising side to what is happening. 

A half-century after a German 
government attempted — and al- 
most succeeded — in wiping out 
Europe's Jewish population, a 
prize was bestowed on Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl by the head of Ger- 
many's Jewish community. The 
prize was named for the last Ger- 
man Jewish leader before the lights 
went out — Rabbi Leo Baeek — 
and celebrated the rebirth of a Jew- 
ish community that by the end of 
this decade could reach 100,000. 

Germany’s Jewish community 
has grown from a few ragged sur- 
vivors in displaced persons camps 
in 1945 to more than 60,000 today. 
This story, largely untold outside 
Germany, represents a turnaround 
in history mat few would have 
anticipated when the war ended 
and that even those directly in- 
volved have yet to fully grasp. 

Problems remain: The past will 
always darken tiie relationship be- 
tween Germans and Jews. There 
also remain unsettled issues, such 
as unmet compensation claims 
from Jews, mostly in • Eastern 
Europe, who have not benefited 
from the $60 billion that Germany 
has so for spent on restitution. And 
not all is sweetness and light in 
relations between Jews and non- 
Jews in Germany. 

This latter issue was high- 
lighted at a two-day conference in 
New York in May. Speakers from 
Jewish communities in various 
German cities: academic experts 
from die United States, Israel and 
Germany, and American-Jewish 
spokesmen covered a wide range 


of issues. Significantly, skinhead 
and neo-Nazi violence received 
scant attention. The number of 
incidents has dropped from more 
than 6,000 five years ago to less 
than 1,000 last year. The problems 
that will t g ke time to resolve go 
deeper. 

As Micha Brumlik, bom in 
Germany and now a professor at 
Heidelberg University, put it 
"We are no longer sitting on our 
suitcases, as the saying went. But 
it is not clear to me how to identify 
myself: as a German Jew, as a 
Jewish German or as a Jew in 
Germany." Mr. Brumlik said he 
and many other Jews cannot feel 
German but want to participate in 
the life of the country. The next 
generation, he said, will probably 
see themselves as German Jews. 

Another conference participant 
urged that Jews in Germany “de- 

Germany's Jewish 
community has 
grown from a few 
ragged survivors in 
1945 to more than 
60,000 today. 


velop their identity beyond the 
Holocaust" 

Among the major concerns of 
Germany’s Jewish community is 
the integration of Jewish immi- 
grants from the former Soviet Un- 
ion. Many Russian Jews, who 
know little about Judaism after a 
life in an atheistic society, find it 
difficult to be comfortable in the 
generally Orthodox mili eu of Ger- 
many's Jewish community. But 
neither do they feel German or 
Russian. 

Another issue is discrimination 
against Jews and other minorities 
in Germany, where a distinction 
between Germans and “foreign- 
ers" persists. “German" is 
defined in terms of ancestry by 
blood, nor place of birth or nat- 
uralization. As a result, the nation 
has not come to terms with the 
pluralistic society it has in fact 
become. 

The writer, who represents the 
Anti-Defamation League, con- 
tributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


5iS- v-- 
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When children have access 
to safe water, 
it can wash away 
a lot of tears. 


According to UNICEF, nearly 800 million 
additional people-more than ten per cent of the 
world's population-have gained access to safe 
drinking water since 1990. 

What refreshing news. 

Because when a source of pure water is close at 
hand, children are less likely to suffer from poor 
hygiene and rampant diseases. Including the 
diarrheal ailments which cause the deaths of some 
2 million under-five-year-olds each year. 

And when a source of pure water is close at 
hand, mothers are able to spend more time 
nursing and educating their children instead of 
walking long distances to procure water. 

Still, more than 1 billion people remain 
without access to safe water. Yet the solution can 
be as simple as a hand-operated pump atop a 
neighborhood well, provided through the efforts 
of UNICEF and other organizations. Whose 
programs based on working together with local 
communities have been quite successful. 

As a company that 
believes living and working 
together for the common 
good, we at Canon appre- 
ciate the involve- 
ment of UNICEF 
and others in 
mobilizing local 
initiative to effect positive changes at the 
community level. As a company that has long 
been associated with photography and visual 
communications, we also appreciate the 
difference between anguish and bliss, sorrow 
and joy, tears and smiles. 

It is the happy difference that water can make'. 

And it is one that we hope will increasingly be 
seen through the viewfinders of our cameras. 


j 


Canon 


Water for children, 
peace for the world. 


A message from the honorable Kofi A. Atman. 
Secretary-General of 
the United Nations 


The world is begin- 
ning to recognize that 
conflict has many roots, 
that peace rests on 
economic and social 
stability. Creating such, 
stability is not merely a 
matter of projects and statistics. It is above all, a 
matter of people, real people with basic needs: 
food, clothing, shelter, medical care and water. 

Among these needs, safe water is basic. Water 
is the essence of life, but can be deadly if 
contaminated. A safe source of water can help 
alleviate some of the worst aspects of poverty and 
give children the chance to grow up healthy in 
body and mind. 

Children need clean drinking water and they 
hare a right to dean drinking water. That right is 
enshrined in the 1989 Convention on the Rights 



of the Child. 


A 2^.4. Annan 


Help UNICEF help diildrm. 



United Nations Children's Fund 


For more ii formation, please contact jour nearest UNICEF office 
or National Cbmmimx far UNICEF. 

This column Is donated by 
Canon and the International Herald Tribune. 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 
PAGE 10 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 


iThe Legends and the Reality: Brad Mehldau 


By Mike Zwerin 

Inumamnal Herald Tribune 


P ERUGIA, Italy — 

The contract be- 
tween Herbie Han- 
cock’s “New Stan- 
Idard All-Stars'* and the 
Umbria Jazz Festival spe- 
cified suites. Perugia's Bru* 

■fani Hotel has 14 soites and 
; a$ many stars as a hotel can 
! get How many stars can all- 
star jazzmen get? 

Never mind. John Scofield 
and Michael Brecker on gui- 
! tar and saxophone held star- 
- eyed contact while exploring 
’ a unison funk line based on a 
• tone by the Artist Formerly 
' Known As Prince. Hancock's 
all-stars also standardized 
Lennon and McCartney and 
‘ Stevie Wonder. Jack De- 
■ Johnette and Don Alias on 
‘ drums and percussion proved 
that two all-star rhythmers are not better 
than one. 

“The Legends" performed the fol- 
lowing night. The legendary Eric 
‘ Clapton was at the top of the lineup, 
followed by Marcus Miller, David San- 
born, Steve Gadd and Joe Sample. We 
were supposed to be impressed with our 
. good fortune being able to hear Clapton 
just playing the blues with the guys. And 
we were. 

Jazz is eccentric music. If eccentricity 
were to be held against the great jazz 
improvisers there would be much less 
great improvisation. The synthesizer 
■ virtuoso Joe Zawinul is so eccentric that 



the past Despite his glowing 
reviews, Joshua T 


Mehldau shows increasing maturity and popularity. 


They hold his eccentricity against him. 

The 39-year-old baritone singer Kevin 
Mahogany summoned die image of Billy 
Ecksrine's voice coming out of a de- 
fensive tackle's body. Hearing him sing 
standards such as “My Foolish Heart" 


with so much sensitivity, you marvel at 
die breadth and depth of it ; 


: all. 


Redman re- 
luctantly let him go for this 
reason after some years in his 
band. And one reason for 
Mehldau’ s currently increas- 
ing maturity and popularity is 
the fact that he is now able to 
make positive personal 
choices. 

Lately Mehldau has been 
investigating the more or less 
uncharted territory of impro- 
vised polyphony. You ought 
visualize concentric rows of 
colorful blossoming Bowens. 
But Mehldau is also pale and 
thin and vulnerable and you 
might also wonder how long 
the flowering will continue. 

Claude Nobs, director of the 
Montreux Jazz Festival, beard 
Mehldau in the Petit Theatre of 
the Swiss Majestic Hotel earli- 
er in the season as pan of the 
"Jazz Acoustic" festival, one 
of many Montreux spin-offs. Nobs liked 
what he heard and asked him back. 

Nobs trusts his ears, and he makes up 
his open mind quickly. Famous for 
bizarre juxtapositions, he loves to stretch 
the possible programming. Mehldau 
flew from Perugia to Montreux via 
Rome and Geneva. It was a bard round 


the audience of Keith Jarrett Such su- 
perficial analyses are not totally wrong. 

The audience was flattered to have its 
intelligence catered to. (Nobs had an- 
ticipated that; his juxtapositions ate not 
as bizarre as they seem.) When they 
realized that they actually liked this in-, 
rellecrual music, die audience was proud 
to show it off. There was important 
applause. They particularly liked his 
polyphonic rendition of Lennon and 
McCartney’s “Dear Prudence” 
(Mehldau is working on an album of 
Beatles songs — talk about “new stan- 
dards.’’) He would never have bad such 
a strong positive reaction in die Amer- 
ican heartland, or at least he never has. 

After a recent solo concert in Little 
Rock Arkansas,] 
with 

is obviously cultured but they 



really get it and so they are obviously 
not culm 


C&xopBiar 


he renders predictability volatile. He 
acoustidzes electricity. His i 


; ego, always 
cocked and ready to fire, irritates critics. 


The young lion Brad Mehldau was 
squeezed with his trio ahd an Amadeus, 
an Italian-built stretched concert grand 
even longer than a Boesendorfer, on an 
intimate stage in an under-ventilated an 
movie house. His habitual cigarette was 
not Han g in g from his mouth and he 
explained that it was in deference to 
sure-fire secondhand smoke in such a 
room. Such self-control is newfound. 

He has had problems with excess in 


trip in 24 little hoursin order to open for 


short minutes for die Italian pop 
■ Vasco Rossi in Stravinsky HalL 
Jne way or another, Mehldau is 
reaching more, and more influential, 
people. His impressionistic style and 
head-hung slopra-shoulder posture at 
the keyboard reminds sane listeners of 
Bill Evans. And the mere fact that he 
played solo acoustic piano improvisa- 
: Italiai 


nous reminded some I talian pop fans in 


Itured. They resented him for re- 
minding them of that. 

But he said that he had just not been 
able to get inside the music in Montreux. 
His last set in Perugia had ended at 2 
A.M. the night before and he was tired. 
Alitalia’s schizophrenic 
announcements 
back and forth on a sweaty 
packed track in the Rome airport on the 
way up that afternoon, had not helped. 

He kept seeing himself from another 
perspective on stage — from outside, as 
it were, as though be was in a B-movie 
about a jazz piano player. It was tike he 
was acting me part of a sensitive mu- 
sician rather than being one. And the 
role separated him from his muse. 

Once Brad Mehldau learns the dif- 
ference between role and reality, there 
will be no stopping him. 

Meanwhile, the festivals go marching 
on. 




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safe 

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Darren Tighe and Ashley Jensen in Simon Block s Chimps. 




betore ana ne was area. . # 

Back to the Riviera: 
Dance and ‘Divorce’ 


By Sheridan Motley 

International HeraU Tribune 


Ls 


Wagner Lampooned, Hilariously, in France 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 


M ontp ellier , France — 
Oscar Straus is above all a 
composer of the twilight of 
Viennese operetta and its 
transplantation to Hollywood ("The 
Chocolate Soldier"), andhe may be best 
known for his score for Max Ophuls's 
19S0 film classic “La Ronde,” but he 
has fallen into oblivion. 


It is precisely that oblivion that makes 
him a likely candidate for revival at the 


annual Montpellier-Radio Fiance fes- 
tival, which is largely dedicated by its 
director, Rene Koering, to the propos- 
ition that there is a lot of interesting and 


even great music locked away in his- 
tory's bottom drawer. 

"Die Lustigen Nibdungen” was 
Straus' first operetta, written when he 
was still a Berlin cabaret pianist, in 
collaboration with a librettist with the 
pseudonym of Rideamus. As the name 
suggests, it was a send-up of Germanic 
legend and Wagner's use thereof 
(mostly “Siegfried”), although Straus’ 
music is unfailingly charming, with 
only the mildest allusions to Wagnerian 
methodology. 

It also was a lampoon of the crasser 
aspects of German society under Wil- 
helm II. and Straus’ portrayal of Ni- 
belung society, a success after its 1904 
premiere in Vienna, began to run into 


virulent nationalist opposition as the 
war approached. Death came apparently 
with an ill-advised revival in Vienna in 
midwar, 1916. 

What was staged here hilariously, in 
die outdoor Cour Jacques Coeur as 
“Ces Sacres Nibelungen,” might not 
have been easily recognized by Straus. 
Koering did a very free ‘ ‘translation' ’ of 
the book, borrowed from Wagner and 
various lampoons of Wagner, and 
staged the result himself as something 
like a historic legend in the manner or 
Asterix, in a musical presentation that 
owes as much to Spike Jones, Gerard 
Hoffoung or P.D.Q. Bach as it does to 
the composer of record. 

Siegfried, who in Wagner is already a 


bumptious lout, is even more so here, 
but heartily accepted as a suitable suitor 
for the nymphomaniac Kriemhild be- 
cause his many shares in the Nibelung 
hoard are on deposit in the Rhine Bank 
at 6 percent. Brunhild’s notion of mar- 
ital bliss is to batter the wimp Gunter 
regularly (one up-to-date touch being 
that she bites him on the ear). 

The Forest Bird returns from the Club 
Med at Bayreuth and busts into Elisa- 
beth's aria from “Tannhauser” before 
predicting to Siegfried that he will not 
die — no one dies in operettas, but also 
because the Nibelung shares go bust so 


ONDON — For those of ns 
who still believe in tire heritage 
as well as the sheer survival of 
p the British stage musical 
against ail the financial ana other odds, 
something just wonderful is happening 
tins week on the main stage at 
Chichester. Back in 1965, “Divorce 
Me, Darling” was the 1 0-years- laier 
sequel to Sandy Wilson’s -*1116 Boy 
Friend, ” one that died a rapid death in 
the West End not least because that 
winter of Julie Christie in "Darling” 
and the Rolling Stones with "Satis- 
faction” was scarcely die one in which 
to arouse much nostalgic interest in the 
long-lost world of the 1930s Riviera. 

But now Paul Kenyson 
brings us tile first revival of what 


[IRITIS H 


I guess Hollywood might have 
called "Bov Friend JL” All the 
characters from the original are 


T H E AT E 


there is no longer any profit in Uncle 
Hagen bumping him off. 

Among me gags, musical and oth- 


BOOKS 


.BEER BLAST: 

Twenty Years of Fads 

and Follies in 

the Battle of the Brews 

By Philip Van Munching. 309 
pages. S24. Times Business. 

Reviewed by 
Jonathan Yardley 
'T’HIS amusing and insmict- 
I ive analysis of the self- 
destructive machinations of 
the American brewing in- 
dustry is the work of an au- 
thoritative source: a third-gen- 
eration member of one of the 
country's more prominent im- 
poned-beer operations. Until 
three years ago. when Philip 
Van Munching and his broth- 
er, Christopher, were squeezed 
out by new- management, the 
importing and distribution of 
Heineken beer was handled, 
with conspicuous success, by 
the Van Munching Company, 
a name well known to con- 
sumers of up-market suds. 
That company's day is now- 
done, but the family ’s interest 
in and knowledge of the busi- 
ness have not faded, os this 
book attests. 

"Beer Blast" is part busi- 
ness manual and part personal 
memoir. As the former, it is a 
cautionary tale about the 


snares and delusions of 
“marketing,” as the word is 
now commonly understood in 
American corporate culture. 
As the latter, it is an engaging 
recollection of how beer used 
to be distributed and sold, and 
of some of the people who 
were prominent in that line of 
work, ranging from a small 
cast of characters named 
Busch to competitors who 
struggled, with varying de- 
grees of success, to challenge 
itaheuser-Busch's domina- 
tion of the American market. 

In the United States, if not 
in a more sophisticated beer- 
drinking environment such as 
England's or Germany's, two 
salient realities cannot be es- 
caped. The first is that all beer 
tastes pretty much alike, so 
success has less to do with 
quality than with image and 
brand loyalty. The second is 
that beer-drinking in America 
is largely the province of 
young males — "guvs.” as 
Dave Barry calls them — so 
advertising and promotion 
must be geared to this mar- 
ket's high testosterone and 
low contemplative life. That 
explains Spuds MacKenzie 
and the Bud Bowl; when "a 
20 percent chunk of all beer 
drinkers" consumes "about 
70 percent of all beer sold." 


there are no depths to which 
/ill not sij 


the industry will not sink in 
order to capture its attention. 

This fixation on the guy 
market coincides with ‘ * a new 
era in the brewing industry, 
one in which the marketer 
would play a role as large as 
that of the brewmasteroreven 
the sales manager,” with de- 
cidedly mixed results. With 
Philip Morris taking over 
Miller, and with Anheuser- 
Busch suddenly in the grip of 
a small army of newly minted 
MBAs, what had been * ‘a rel- 
atively straightforward and 
unsophisticated industry' ’ 
suddenly fell into the hands of 
people who knew nothing 
about beer but fancied that 
they knew everything about 
how to sell it. The result was a 
proliferation of new products 
and 15-minute fads, only one 
of which showed any real 
staying power. 


light 


BEST SELLERS 


N»» \ort» Then 

lio is fused «.t. rcjros frrni rarer 
than 2 ,cv *0 hniimi thrmgfrvi tin 
United Sixes W?cii on lw arc on 
ncxcssziU Cdcsrcumr 


FICTION 


m- 

Dat 

1 SPECIAL. DELIVERY 
h> DaftcUc Sled 

2 PLUM ISLAND. S 
Nclsrei EfcNfclte 

3 FAT TUESDAY K 
Slfkfra Srimn . . 

4 THE PARTNER, fa> Jobi 

Grisham 

SUP ISLAND, fis Anne 
Kncn StJJjm .... _ .. 

6 LONDON, frs EdajjJ 

Rtiterfod 

7 THE NOTEBOOK, hi 
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PCKfM avis . .. 

9 COLD MOUNTAIN 
CTurios France — . . . 

10 THE PRESIDENTS 

DAUGHTER. tn Jack 
Hieein* 

11 PRETEND YOU' DO*T 

SEE HER. I* Man 
Hicpro Clark It' 


lalAnt! 

«l DBlM 


4 11 


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HiEgrra ClaA 

12 -me LAST HEROES S 

WEB GnSfm 

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Gorier . . . J 

14 SNOW IN AL Gl ST. t<s 

Pttc Httull J4 

15 DECEPTION UN HlS 
MIND S Elirjfah 
Gnjr 


5 THE PERFECT STURM 
H Sehawuc Ivr.tx . 

4 THE BIBLE OVC£ J* 
Mufur! Drxnn 
5 BRAIN DROPPINGS. H 
Ce.-T7c Carlin 

6 THE'GtFT OF FEAR. S 
Garni *■ Pec*?; 

7 MIDNIGHT IN THE 

GARDEN OF GOOD 
AND EYQ. in J;,*- 
Bcrend! . . 

I CONVERSATIONS 
WITH GOD B.--A !. S 
Neale DiwaU ftjjO . 

I JUST AS J AM. A* Sin. 
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einrer .. 
TOK.M *r. 
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FTBElsJr * 

U WITHOUT A DOUBT, f-- 
Mama Gait »uti Terra 
Cismcr 

14 fNDERBf.lSS Sc far. 

Man ' 

15 CONVERSATIONS 

WITH GOD B.-3* I N 

Vale D»uy Uj!<ch 


!0 


beer, in- 
troduced on a national 
scale by Miller and success- 
fully imitated by Budweiser. 
As Van Munching astutely 
points out. light beer mei 
clear, if previously unrecog- 
nized. consumer demands: 
for a beer that had fewer cal- 
ories and for one with reduced 
alcohol. Light beer meant that 
people could (a> drink the 
same amount of beer with less 
effect on their weight oribi 
drink more beer with less ef- 
fect on their sobriety. 
However one may feci about 
the taste of tight beer, its spec- 
tacular success is easy to ex- 
plain: it gives people what 
they want. 

Bur the success of light 
beer put ideas into the minds 
of tire marketers. Unable to 
distinguish between real con- 
sumer demand and artificial 

demand whipped up by ad- 
vertising. they assumed that 
the success of light beer could 


be replicated over and over 
again, so long as the brewers 
could trot out new products. 
This resulted in, among other 
tilings, "dry” beer and "ice" 
beer and, most ludicrous of 
all. “clear* ’ beer, all of which 
were rushed into distribution 
without — or so at least it 
seems — any discussion of 
the basic questions any new 
product should raise: Does it 
meet a real demand and is it 
any good? 

It is self-evident that the 
lessons Van Munching 
learned during his years in the 
beer trade have far broader 
application. What is true of 
the selling of beer is no less 
true of the selling of just about 
anything else. Van Munching 
poses what he calls "the El- 
even Basic Laws of Beer 
Marketing.” among them be- 
ing: "stan with a good 
product"; "beware of small 
changes in qualify: they can 
add up to disaster"; "know 
w ho your customers arc. and 
speak lo them in your adver- 
tising"; "don't sacrifice ex- 
isting customers for new 
ones": "don’t change for the 
sake of change”: and "be- 
ware advertising agencies 
bearing bold new ideas.” 

Those precepts are nothing 
more or less than plain old 
common sense, vet it’s amaz- 
ing how little respect they get 
in' contemporary American 
commerce. The recent histor- 
ies of the automobile and pro- 
cessed -food industries, to 
name just two. are littered with 
the corpses of forgotten 
products. People are not as stu- 
pid as marketers imagine them 
to be: they will noi buy what 
they don’t warn or need, and. 
given the choice, they will buy 
a good product miner than a 
shoddv one. Sic transit Zima. 


erwise. there is an occasional allusion to 
real history. Siegfried arrives by auto 
with a horn that sounds his signature 
hom call. It seems that Kaiser Bill was 
such a Wagnerian that one of his auto- 
mobiles had just such a klaxon. 

Koering managed to get some very 
fine singers to join in tire tomfoolery 
while amply giving Straus his due. 
Michele Lagrange was in glorious voice 
as Kriemhild, the flamboyant Francoise 
Poller lent her weight, vocal and oth- 
erwise. to the aggressive Brunhild, 
while the Swedish tenor Christer Bladin 
sang heroically as the loutish Siegfried. 
Gilles Yanetti pulled off an astonishing 
double turn as the ambulant Forest Bird 
and as a Hitlerian major domo of the 
Nibelung household. 


back in Nice, only this time to 
get divorced or bombed or bank- 
rupted; the innocence of die ’20s 
has given way to a darker and more 

3 lex world of the *30s in which 
e are now frantically dancing away 
from something horrible rather than to- 
ward something magicaL 
The sheer, long-neglected brilliance 
of Sandy Wilson is that he exists and 
operates on the very borders of memory 
and mockery, slyly commenting on this 
prewar period even while he is ostens- 
ibly celebrating it- In that sense, his 
songs are far more subversive titan they 
first appear, elegant little musical time 
bombs that explode just when yon least 
ithem. 



suckers are a nerdish young book il- 
lustrator i Darren Tighe) and his alto- 
gether more together, achieving, tougher 
girlfriend (Ashley Jensen). As they set 
out on whai is clearly an already unequal, 
uneasy and uneven domestic partnership 
brought on by her pregnancy, their new 
bony is invaded by Nicholas Woodeson 
and Fraser James as a couple of door-to- 
door paint salesmen obsessed with clos- 
ing whatever deal they can actually make 
in tire circumstances. 

Block is a young and scabrously 
funny writer who made bis name at the 
Royal Court a couple of years ago with 
an equally black comedy about obsess- 
ive table-tennis partners; this time he is 

happy to watch two unsteady partner- ^ *• 

ships (dot of die hopeful sellers and the ~ 4 ;»: r : ; y^S*- 

prospective buyers) disintegrate under raf- 
the weight of their own in-fight- 
ing as each of the quartet 
struggles unsuccessfully to 
achieve some hopeless suprem- 
acyover tire other three. 

There is, admittedly, only jost 
about enough plot here to keep 
the drama alive at all, as for 
much of tire time we just watch four 
bleakly funny character sketches. And 
in the end there can be no real winners or 



■ r ST ‘ Y- -fi 


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f0S SUNOS 
JlD i 

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“953 


jA-BSCV* iiAlt-- 


losers, just four total misfits trying to 

therifnot 


,S5aWrWtWLTA^Y 

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-SiTh £ 
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E 


NRIQUE DIEMECKE’S solid 


conducting kept this mixed bag 
together, Koering settled a few 


wogner and 
rkral brush in 


accounts with Wa 
staged it with a broad farcies 
the comic strip sets and costumes of 
Herve and Richard Di Rosa. 

The festival continues to Aug. 3 with 
musical rarities that include concert per- 
formances of Ernest Bloch ’s ‘ ’Macbeth ’ ’ 
and Britten’s "Rape of Lucretia,” con- 
certs of Rachmaninoffs liturgical music, 
of works by John Adams, and Hungarian 
and Romanian gypsy music. 


expect them. 

Kenyson has gathered around him 
the greatest musical cast I have seen in 
nearly 40 years of Chichester; led by tire 
ageless, timeless Uliane MontevecchL 
tire company also includes Rosemary 
Ford, Tim Flavin, Ruthie Henshall and 
Andrew Halliday as the would-be di- 
vorcees. the veteran Jack Tripp and Joan 
Savage as the loony aristocrats leading a 
troop of keep-fit tap dancers for reasons 
never explained, Marti Webb as tire 
requisite American heiress and Linzi 
Hately as the maid made for all oc- 
casions. 

True, if David Needham’s choreo- 
graphy were any more camp they'd have 
to dance the whole thing in tents, but 
then again who now "takes the lunch- 
time plane from Croydon’ ’? 

At Hampstead. Simon Block’s 
"Clumps” is the suburban English an- 
swer to David Mamet's "Glengany 
Glen Ross." where tire salesmen meet 
the suckers only to indulge in an orgy of 
mutual self-destruction. This tune the 


ares 

JVnAUkSIA? 


W:-; 


work out how to escape each other 
also themselves. But as Woodeson de- 
velops his ex-chicken fanner into an 
incompetent and unwilling sales shark, 
it is like watching Willy Loman in a 
vaudeville sketch. The death of this 
salesman and his clients, at least spir- 
itually and morally, is what gives 
“Chimps” its boundless energy and 
resourcefulness. Attention must be 
paid, if only to Block's realization that 
m this constant war of attrition there are 
in the end no buyers or sellers, just a lot 
of very confused people desperately try- 
im to reach the secret of life’s bargain 
offer in case irreally exists. ^ ? t& r 7 

. Finally, there is the launch of a new k =.- 
Shakespeare Festival with the most 
spectacular "Henry V" 1 have ever 
seen on stage; up and indeed over the 
12th-century battlements of Barnwell 
Castle near Oundle. the former home of 
the Dukes of Gloucester. Geoffrey Dav- 
ies put together a company of actors and 
archers (led by Robert Hardy as a defin- 
itive Chorus and Nigel Wrights on as a 
sturdy King) who, as the cannons roared 
and the arrow s soared through the even- 
ing sky. brought this play about the 
disciplines of war into a ‘whole new 
arena of pageant, parade and fireworks 
display. In 'its debut season. Barnwell 
has already given Shakespeare’s Globe 
and Regent’s Park severe open-air com- 
petition: tf you missed it mis summer, 
book early ibr next. 


.V.i; 

"■* ’ S k* 


7 ,a ®SZ . 

■ •** sac aipf* 


SS*®** atnna 






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CROSSWORD 




Jonathan Yardley is on the 
stuff of The Washington Post. 


v 


ltar> Oroerihem 
12 INTO THE SIC 


Living in the U.S.? 


;a 


NONFICTION 

1 ANGELA S ASHES. S 

Frank MhCcwt 

2 INTO THIN AIR. by J«i 

K/akxirt 


I 4J 


2 71 


ADA ICE. HOT> -TO 
■AND AflSCELL A NECH. S 
JMARSANDVEV.SO. 
■ADATLh. L-SaGm . a 

2 SIMPLE AR>,ND.AVJ£. 

ft> Sarah Bar BrtxrxjLk I 

3 EIGHT *EEK5 TO 

OPTIMUM HEALTH N. 
Arsfasw »s! * ; 

4 NILS .ARE Ft' SNA 

The Krf*we CJ Drone*; 
5hm»' ' 


Now pxinted in New York 
for same day 
delivery in kev cities. 


To subscribe, rail 

1-800-882 2884 




fl k -VJCMT ;< A >!!■*■* • t 

Hcralo^tSfc-ttnbunc 


. THf NURLir> DlllS munpapi r. 


ACROSS 
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aBoctnmtha 

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Patsy 


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Oiingaare 
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leaser 


aa Rabat 

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39 Things 10 sirov 
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colors 


KXRANE’S 

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*5. Avenue daiTamw 
75017 Peril 

Tel: 33(0)1 *5744024 


at Bouquet 

aa Coro , money 
mtnonwT'BT’ 
38 Overly 
inteB.gent 

seBeeebelTs 

Fernandez 

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« Patron swni of 
Norway 

ai Truckers, 
psrtiaps 

*s Trounces 
48 TeWt* 1 * activity 
48 Eccentric 
4* l970K,nkefVT 

■e Wrapped (upi 
ei «S battle site, 
tor anon 

R4 1962 MitChum/ 
MecUmt'An 
■a Kind ot clause 


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a Partisan tutt* 

10 Utmost 
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saEnwalogeparf 
34S»rtchtr*>nga 
38 Ear par 
37 Pnys. activity 
MCatcpypartor* 
song 

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43 Rally 
nr. presses 
MTlStD 1 ’ 



C Yp w For* Times/ Edited by Will Shorts. 


"fi 


SolatlOB to Ptmle of July 22 % 






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prog-am 
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’ \ 


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London 

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Fbc §44 M 171 233 1519 

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RESTAURANT FOR SALE BY OWNER 
Petted family operation 1 2 banquet 
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FINANCE AVAILABLE FOR 
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BUSINESS/FINANCE 



YASMCA KC 600 DOTAL GUSJU 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 


PAGE 13 


Seeking Diversity, Boeing Sticks to Its Roots 


By Adam Bryant 

New Yurt Times Sehice 


NEW YORK — In the aerospace 
business. Boeing seems invincible. By 
placing big bets on new aircraft and 
paying close attention to research and 
engineering, it has grown to dominate 
its industry by a wide margin. 

When it has tried to diversify outside 
the notoriously volatile aircraft in- 
dustry, though, it has a remarkable 
history of missing the mark. 

Through the years. Boeing Co. has 
made everything from windmills and 
hydrofoils to rail cars and computer- 
controlled buses. In its early days, it 
even tried making furniture. And while 
most of these ventures were considered 
technical successes, they all drained 
cash until the company ended them. 

Now. undeterred, Boeing is break- 
ing out into new areas again. But this 
time the company finally appears to 
have learned from its mistakes. In re- 
cent months, the Seattle-based Boeing 
has announced a number of new ven- 
tures — such as selling corporate jets 
and training pilots — that suggest that 
it has decided to stay close to its 
aerospace roots. 

“Boeing has learned that if it 
reaches too far afield, it gets burned,'* 
said Wolfgang Demisch, aerospace 
analyst at BT Securities. “So it is try- 
ing to somehow extend its presence by 
building on its existing franchises.*' 

If successful, the new ventures could 
help smooth out the cyclical swings 
that have long buffeted Boeing’s stock 
price and the size of its work force. 

That search for balance was a big 
reason Boeing, announced in December 
its intention to acquire McDonnell 
Douglas Corp., whose strength in mil- 
itary contracting should complement 
Boeing’s commerrial-aircraft business. 
B ut that deal , scheduled to be completed 
early next month, has encountered sharp 
criticism from tire European Union. 


And Boeing has another kind of prob- 
lem — tire land any company would 
love to have, ft expects to generate such 
hefty profits in coming years that it will 
be forced to find new uses for all the 
cash. On Monday, it reported second- 
quarter net income of $334 million mi 
revenues of $929 billion. The results 
were short of analysts' expectations, but 
that is probably just a blip on the radar. 
And tins time, Boeing is not waiting to 
stan searching for nevy businesses only 
after aircraft orders have slumped and it 
is straggling to kero its workers busy. 

“That is a significant difference be- 
tween the past and where we are 
today," said Lawrence Clarkson, pres- 


ident of Boeing Enterprises, a division 
created in January to seek out and 
manage new ventures. 

Boeing, for example, is now in the 
corporate-jet business. The idea grew 
out of conversations between Philip 
Condit, Boeing's chairman, and John 
Welch, chairman of General Electric 
Co., a big supplier of engines to Boeing 
as well as a big buyer of jets for its 
aircraft-leasing division. 

According to Boeing executives, 
Mr. Welch had already committed to 
buying two 737s for coiporaie use, but 
mentioned to Mr. Condu that they still 
lacked the range of traditional, smaller 
corporate jets. 


A Commercial Success 

Most of Boeing’s revenues come from the 
sale of commercial airplanes, although 
the pending acquisition of McDonnell 
Douglas will make the military and 
aerospace sector a bigger contributor to 
its bottom line. 

199 6 REVENUES 822.7 billion 
MILFTARY AND AEROSPACE 
Other 0.8% 

Helicopters 
and 
plan 


Boeing then set 100 engineers to 
work designing a 737 with the most 
modem wings and bigger fuel tanks to 
get its range above 6,000 miles (9,600 
kilometers). 

Offered this new capacity. Mr. 
Welch immediately switched his order 
to the new version and, convinced such 
a plane would appeal ro other exec- . 
utives, joined Boeing as a partner to 
start Boeing Business Jets. 

The planes, at about $38 million to 
$40 million each, are approximately the 
same price as the smaller, rop-of-the- 
line corporate jets made by Gulfstream 
Aerospace Corp. and Bombardier Inc. 

At a news conference last year to 
announce the venture. Boeing officials 
had planned to say they expected to sell 
six to eight business jets a year, but Mr. 
Welch persuaded them to push the 
estimate to 10 a year. None of them 
were right. In the first year, Boeing has 
taken orders for 20 corporate jets. 

Perhaps the strongest validation of 
the new market for large corporate jets 
came from Boeing's biggest rival Air- 
bus Industrie, which announced last 
month that it, too, would start selling a 



ECONOMIC SCENE 


Chinese ‘Miracle’ Confounds Predictions 

High Growth and Low Inflation Breed Optimism About Restructuring 


By Seth Faison 

New York Times Service 


B EUING — China’s economy is 
growing at an amazingly rapid 
pace, yet it confounds econ- 
omists by stirring up remark- 
ably little inflation. Reaffirming China’s 
claim as die fastest-growing economy in 
the world, officials from the State Stat- 
istical Bureau announced Tuesday that 
China's economy grew at a 93 percent 
rate in the fust half of the year, while 
inflation fell to 1.8 percent. 

‘‘Miraculous,’’ said David O’Rear, a 
regional economist in Hong Kong. 
"Either they have been tremendously 
successful in bringing down inflation, 
or else the data are all wrong." 

Although economic statistics in 
China are seriously incomplete, foiling 
to account for an enormous under- 
ground economy, foe twin trends of high 
growth and low inflation are clear. They 
point toward foe possibility that Chinese 
leaders can somehow grow their way 
out .of the deep economic uncertainty 
posed by a failing state sector and its 
danger of massive unemployment. 

Fast growth is now taken for granted 
in China, as the economy has chugged 
along at an average of 12 parent growth 
over the past five years. Rising exports 
again played a big role in die fust half of 
tins year, growing a whopping 26 per- 
cent, to $80.8 billion, while imports were 
steady at $63 million. 


But foe plunge in inflation — from 24 
percent force years ago to almost noth- 
ing now — has surprised even the most 
optimistic of economic forecasters, who 
keep adjusting their Inflation projec- 
tions downward. 

Qiu Xiaohua, chief economist and 
spokesman for foe State Statistical Bu- 
reau, predicted Tuesday that China’s 
retail price index rise only 2 percent or 3 
percent this year, for below the 6 percent 
officially predicted a few months ago. 

One reason is that a bumper harvest 
has depressed grain pices, which in 

‘Either they have been 
. tremendously successful 
in bringing down 
inflation, or else the data 
are all wrong. 9 

China account for a major portion of foe 
retail price index. 

But many economists award a big 
chunk of credit to the tight policy 
Launched by Deputy Prime Minister Zhu 
Rongji in 1993, who personally took 
over as head of China's central bank at 
foe time. 

With inflation high and foe outlook 
wildly uncertain, taking responsibility 
for foe economy was a move that 
prompted many political analysts to pre- 


dict it would end Mr. Zhu's career. 

Instead, it made him. With his spark- 
ling economic success, Mr. Zhu is now 
widely expected to succeed Li Peng as 
prime minister early next year, when 
Mr. Li is required to step down after two 
five-year terms. 

One of the largest dilemmas facing 
China’s leaders is how to handle the 100 
million workers in the state sector, 
where only a small portion of enter- 
prises tom a profit and where govern- 
ment subsidies are foiling fast. 

Ever nervous about worker unrest, and 
the challenge to Communist Parry rule it 
would pose, leaders are grappling with 
the question of whether large-scale lay- 
offs should be done now, while economic 
growth is hi gh and inflation is low. 

Street protests broke out in Sichuan 
Province this month when workers at a 
foiling company accused managers of 
embezzling unemployment-relief funds, 
but such unrest is still relatively rare. 

Ye Zhen, chief spokesman for the 
State Statistical Bureau, said that more 
than 10 million urban workers lost their 
jobs in the first half of this year but that 
roughly half of them had found other 
employment 

Mindful of the vulnerable nature of 
an economy in transition, Mr. Ye de- 
scribed foe economic news Tuesday as 
“advancing in the midst of stability." 

He said, “We have achieved the high 
growth and low inflation that we have 
aimed at for years/’ 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


July 22 


I £ UL FI. UI tfl is IF- r« a 

AsHtardw tun ua vaa am ww — ter ui» uw nws isr 

Brussels 3MZB. ' «UI 3UOS UZB 2.1M* I8W — Ml* MS 

Frankfurt um 3 me — 096 SIDS* UB UW USD 1313 Vim 

London fq) . WS ' — 3BM mm a ;ogc nn3 &3XJ2 142 102517 2JW B5J77 

Madrid ‘ U25H JSLM HIM 2tW5 84H* UM 46783 WW* ra - s 2'. , ™?!!5 

Mfcn lAfifl mm ma »n * — . kuo am mm ■» J J* 

NeW York ft) — MlBSo 1JMS 4U2V74J0 1651 3745 1MB 1M* 1SUU 

PO* . M1H . HUS!' 22U — 13457* 1995* 0.1431 4.1W 52«- 443 UK* 

Tokyo . . : ncu mx ue wjs .m sm zihi »» — 

Toronto ■ IJff am US 624 U7T 14307 53457* M2B MM* — - 
Zorich 1427 2415 UOS 02419 UBS* 17235 JJC4* — 13W* 1K7Z2 

1 ECU iHKUB4 UOS U» 1®22 12329 4M7 !i» BUI? ■ 

1 SDR . U21 . Mtit ■ 1*51 - UH MttS WU 51.1177 1027 ISMS ■«» 
OostogsinAmskidm, London. MMm Paris mdZutkts Mags ktcNKrcontasNewYMkatS 

PM aid Toronto rules d3P-M 

or 7b buyooepoontt & rottayamiiaOac "Vote of in fltfiL- not quoted M-4_- not noBatHe. 

Other Dollar Values 

Comer .. Firs-. Offlmqr ' .Mrs COnyoqr pars. ; Omwcy Fw* 

Ararat pen OJ999 CmkdtK 28U7 MriLpen 7.375 S. Mr. rand 45732 

Atttnlns 1J492 Hoag Kangs 7.7475 N-ZeatandS 1.5205 5.Kor.«ran 89Z45 

AttManedk J27S9 ■ Hung. Sorter. 19222 Non*, tew* 7.4707 And. town 7.7841 

Betas rod 1JB11 . Indtaempee 35485 PfdLpen 2U5 TttmS 27.92 

CUd*s>y» 82311 Morapteb 26352 FoBdztotr 247 TUkdd 3025 

CBEfbtaraw 34 jCI MAE 06686 Port, escudo 18125 TuctfebBrc 15015. 

Danish tom 6905. taratfrtak, 15314 RnsraMe .57872 UAEdMra 2673 

Egypt pound 32898 Km fear 030 Son*r*d 17505 VMO.M*. 492J5 

Ha. wards 43054 Matey, ring. 2633 Stag.* 1MS7 

Forward Rates . 


3May Mriny W»t 

115X3 HAW 11425 

1.4802 14758 1-4707 


kj 38-doy U-day 9Moy Cantocy 

d Storing . 14723 bS7W 14688 Japawnyen 
•nsdoBw. ' 12782 12760 12738 Swtafrmc 

(die nude UNO 12063 12025 

met: IMG BmkCAmaadnaJ; Master Bonk (Brussels/; Banco CammaclaJe tbGana 
Ufc Banjos Ha Francs (Purtsi; Bank of Tokyo-MDsub&tU (Tokyo); 


U bid- Libor Rates 22 

Swiss PNndl 

DoBor D-Mark Franc Stoflng Franc Yen ECU 

T-raontti 59^-5% 3yw-3tt Ui-IM 3 Y»- 3 to W-V*. 4V4.4Vi 

imorth 5M-5M 3%-3V» 1V»-1 Vo 7-TV« 3tTW-W« To- Hr* 4H-41A 

6-monkr 3*. 31* m- m TOs-7Vo 3V*-3te 4k-U 

1-9BQT 541-6 3M-3V« 1M-1M 7U-716 VU-3H 4W-44H 

Sources: Beater* Lloyds Bank. . . „ 

Rates appBabt* to btiabank flbpcsfls ofsl nmm mfeftnwn for eqeMmtk 

Key Money Rates 

Unfed State 
Discount rate 

Prime rata 

Fodorof tends 

90-day CDs dootan 
ISMoyCPdoden 
SnonthTWosotybiU 
l^torTraaMyOB 
2-ynrTiafBWy M9 
5-yearTrs(Bvry note 
7-pear Tteovy note 
WfoarTWasorynata . 

3S^ear TreaHTY Pond 
MonB lyndi 3May RA 5LW 

Jugal 

Dbcomdrate 
Coftnony 
iHnoolti Interbank 
MhSi tetartamk 
draoatlitBtertank 
MyiarMtw) 
ftnwHr 
LnMHrt rote 
Caanooeg 
1-nMlfetetertnak 
Jiwra thtete r konlt 
6aoaHiteMf«anK 
10-ywBaad 


Cta * 

Fret 

Britain 



520 

520 

Bnk base rate 


M 

BV* 

8Vi 

economy 

Wi 


sw 

59k 

7-racBtti fatertami 

6* 

m 

521 

521 

24Mfii fflfeftmk 

720 

720 

520 

520 

toMiilb bitertanfc 

7V* 

7Vh 

529 

413 

10-raarGfit 

721 

726 

534 

S39 



522 

SPT. 

Frame 



&JS7 

417 

latenmBoo rate 

2.10 

3.10 

&11 

&20 

GUI noser 


3Ui 

4.15 

426 

1-mofltii Mtitafli 

3tt 

31* 

6 M 

434 

3-aentt otebonk 

3V» 

3V* 

529 

528 

6-uwhiUi tetertank 

34* 

3* 



KHfwrOAT 

5J9 

453 

020 
a u 

024 

020 

046 

Savrcet' Reuters. Bloom Sera, Meatt 
Ljmch. Bank af Tatyo-M nsi/bistn. 

OnmieabanliOaWLjitntai! 

063 

067 

255 

063 

067 

226 

G °W 4M. 

PM. 

Ws* 

Zorich 32525 

32720 

turn 



London 33620 

ran 

♦225 

420 

420 

Km York 32400 

TKSfl 

—060 

22B 

326 

US. doBaa percurx?. London pfScM 

X10 

3.15 

112 

3.12 

1UnaB2ttMi tad Mew York opening 
tnsfaosAV prices; U» ttvt fima 

323 

125 

MoffJ 



524 

523 

Source: footers. 




Tobacco Giants Lead 
Parade of Profit Gains 

Disney and PepsiCo Show Solid Results 


r *■ npakt/ ta ( W rud Fr, w Air Art 

Two big U.S.-based food and tobacco 
companies reported strong second- 
quarter results Tuesday, with Philip 
Morris Cos. posting a 13 percent gain in 
profits and RJR Nabisco Holdings 
Corp. pulling into profitability after a 
restructuring. 

Philip Morris said its net income rose 
to$ 1 .84 billion from $ 1 .62 billion a year 
earlier. The company, which makes 
Marlboro cigarettes. Miller beer and 
Kraft foods, said revenue climbed 5 
percent to $18.4 billion. Ir said tobacco 
revenue grew 1 1 percent, io $10-2 bil- 
lion, while food sales declined 1 .2 per- 
cent, to $6.9 billion, mainly because of 
currency fluctuations. 

RJR Nabisco, frhose business- :is 
about evenly split between tobacco'and 
food products, said it had net income of 
$243 million, reversing a year-earlier 
loss of $27 million that included a $428 
million charge for restructuring the 
company’s sales force. 

Tne company, which abandoned its 
controversial Joe Camel advertising 
character this month, said revenue 
edged up 2 percent, to $4.29 billion. 

Tobacco sales, fueled by the Camel 
brand, rose 3 percent, to $2.1 billion, 
while food sales crept up to $2. 1 9 billion 
from $2.18 billion, helped by its Oreo 
and other cookie brands. 

Philip Morris shares were up $2 in 
late trading at $42.50. 

In other earnings news: 

• Walt Disney Co. said earnings rose 
18 percent in its third quarter on strong 
video sales for its “101 Dalmatians" 
film and record attendance at its theme 
parks. 

Net income rose to $473 million from 
pro-forma profit of $401 million in the 
like quarter last year. Revenue rose 2 
percent, to $5.2 billion. The year-earlier 
results were adjusted to reflect the ac- 
quisition of Capital Cities/ABC Inc., 
now called ABC Inc. 

• PepsiCo Inc. posted a 13 percent 
gain in second-quarter income, to $656 
million, as improved performance in its 
snack-food and restaurant businesses 
offset a flat period in soft drinks. Rev- 
enue was about unchanged. PepsiCo 
said North American soft drink sales 
were lower than expected because of 
cold weather and intense competition. 


■ Pharmaceutical companies also pos- 
red gains in the quarter, with U.S.-based 
companies helped by rising drug sales 
lhat offset the effect of a strong dollar on 
overseas receipts. 

• American Home Products' earn- 
ings rose 17 percent, to $459. 1 million, 
on a slight increase in sales, to $3.50 
billion from $3.49 billion. 

• Bristol-Myers Squibb's profit 
rose 13 percent, to $738 million, led by 
strong sales of pharmaceuticals and 
beauty-care products. 

• Schering-Plough Corp.'s profit 
rose 1 S percent, to $373. 1 million, on 
strong sales of its allergy drug Claritin 
and its cancer treatment fntron A. The 
drugmaker s sales rose 16 percent, to 
$1.72 billion. 

• SmithKline Beech am PLC said 
second-quarter profit rose 1 percent, to 
£231 million ($387 million) as the 
pound's strength and higher costs over- 
shadowed growth in prescription drug 
sales. The company also announced a 2- 
for-1 stock split. Its shares closed 49 
pence higher, at 1,219.5, in London. 

• Warner Lambert's second-quarter 
earnings rose 8 percent, to $231.4 mil- 
lion, helped by increased sales of the 
anti-cholesterol drug Lipitor and the dia- 
betes drug Rezulin. Sales rose 9.8 per- 
cent, to $1.97 billion, as sales of the two 
new drugs made up for a 5 percent de- 
cline in ^les of over-the-counter drugs. 

• Bell Atlantic Corp. said second- 
quarter operating profit rose 1 1 percent, 
to $513.9 million, as the company in- 
stalled more phone lines and added cel- 
lular customers. A charge of $ 1 5 million 
for a write-down of Bell Atlantic's in- 
vestment in CA1 Wireless Systems Inc. 
resulted in net income of $498.9 mil- 
lion. 

• Northern Telecom Ltd. said its 
second-quarter profit soared 46 percent, 
to 2 1 7 million Canadian dollars ($ 1 57.3 
million), because of increased demand 
for its telecommunications equipment. 

• UAL Corp_ parent of United Air- 
lines, said net income rose 22 percent, to 
$376 million, butNorthwest Airlines’ net 
fell 33 percent, to $136.2 million. Both 
said business had been affected by the 
reinstatement of a 10 percent ticker tax. 

• Texaco's profit tell 5.4 percent, to 

$571 billion, because of lower oil and 
gas prices. ( Renters. Bloomberg) 


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I 




PAGE U 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


inves tor’s America 

: The Dow -M 30- Year T-Sond Yield 




F M A M J J 
1987 


Vw 

1 F M A M J J 
1997 


Exchange 

index 

Tuesday. 

Prev. 

% 



©4PM- • 

Qose 

Change 

NYSE 

The Dow 

8061,65 

7906.72 

+1J5 

NYSE' 

S&P500 

mat 

912.98 

;+2is 

NYSE 

sap too 

914.60 

694.27 

+227 

NYSE 

Con^osito 

483.B9 

474.50 


U.S. 

Nasdaq Composite 156188 

1536.24 

+1^0 

AMEX 

Martel Value 

634^0 

63040." 

■■ .40,60. 

Toronto 

TSE Index 

6718.00 

6646J0 

+UQ7 

Sfro Paulo 

Bovespa 

1215008 

111422 

+9.05 

MaxieoCity 

Brtsa 

463087 

4574.75 

+123 

Buenos Aires MorvaJ 

812.77 

789.30 

+227 

Santiago 

IPSA General 

5633S7 

562558 

+0.14 

Caracas 

Capital General 

9B2&2* 

9121.50 

+1.15 


_ " T ,, ! — I Greenspan and Profits ' f 

BAT to Acquire Mexican Firm Lift Shares t0 a Record 


f 'Wfthillti f for Sul f 'mi hrs 

MONTERREY. Mexico — 
BAT Industries PLC said Tuesday 
it had agreed to pay SI. 71 billion 
Tor Cigarerra La Modems, Mex- 
ico's biggest cigarette maker, 
vaulting it past its rival, Philip Mor- 
ris Cos., in the Mexican market. 

The world's major cigarette 
makers are scrambling for new 
markets to compensate for the rise 
of anti-smoking sentiment in the 
United States, "where a proposed 
settlement of health liability claims 
from smokers would require to- 
bacco companies to make annual 
payments of billions of dollars. 

The latest battleground is Mex- 
ico, whose economy has grown 
steadily in its recovery from the 
collapse of the peso in late 1994. 
Last month, Philip Morris paid 


$400 million to raise its stake in 
Cigatam, Mexico's second-biggest 
cigarette maker, to 50 percem from 
29 percent. 

'“It’s a market that everybody 
wants to get into — the country's 
in economic recovery, and the 
forecast of growth in the Mexican 
tobacco marker is very good for the 
next 10 yearn,” said Tim Young, 
an analyst with SGST Securities. 

BAT said the acquisition of CI- 
garerra La Modcma from Empresas 
La Modema SA would add $140 
million to its trading profit in 1998 
and have a neutral effect on earn- 
ings in the first full year. 

‘“This acquisition offers us the 
rare opportunity to buy a sizable 
and very profitable player in a 
growth market,’ ’ BAT’s chief ex- 
ecutive, Martin Broughton, said. 


BAT'S shares rose 14 pence in 
London to close at 531 ($8.91 1. 

BAT said the acquisition price 
included $1 billion in cash, a loan 
note of $500 million and the as- 
sumption of about $212 million of 
debt. Under die deal, BAT would 
receive 50 percent of Cigarerra La 
Modema's shares, and Cigarerra 
La Modema would get an option to 
redeem die rest of its shares held by 
Empresas La Modema. 

The acquisition eliminates what 
had been a weak spot in BAT’s 
dominant position in Larin Amer- 
ica, where if accounts for about 60 
percent of cigarette sales. 

Cigarerra La Modema makes 
more than 50 percent of the cig- 
arettes sold annually in Mexico, 
the world's 15th-largest cigarette 
market. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Source. Bloomberg. Reuters inb-nMiniui HcnhJ Trtuh.- 

Very briefly; 

Barrick Profit Falls on Low Sales 

TORONTO (Bloomberg) — Barrick Gold Corp. said Tues- 
day that second -quarter profit fell 10 percent because of lower 
production and sales. 

Net income fell to $62 million, or 16 cents a share, from $69 
million, or 19 cents a share, a year earlier. Revenue declined 4 
percent, to S3 12 million. 

“ Barrick ‘s disci pi ined financial pol icies place the company 
in a unique position despite a significant decline in gold 
prices,” said John Carrington, the company's president 
Barrick. which is surpassed only by Anglo American Corp. 
of South Africa in gold production, said second-quarter gold 
production fell 7 percent to 73 1 ,360 ounces, and the amount of 
gold sold declined 5 percent to 742244 ounces. 

TWA to Cut 4% of Work Force 

ST. LOLUS (Bloomberg) — Trans World Airlines Inc. said 
Tuesday it would cut about 1.000 jobs by December, or about 
4 percent of its work force, because newer aircraft would not 
require as many mechanics and people supporting operations. 

The airline will soon be getting the first of 20 new Boeing 
Co. 757 jetliners, 15 new McDonnell Douglas MD-80s. at 
least one Boeing 767-300 and a dozen or more used aircraft 

• Wal-Mart Stores Inc. will close 48 Bud's Discount City 
stores, resulting in a second-quarter pretax charge of $40 
million to $50 million. 

•Pennzoil Co. again rejected Union Pacific Resources 
Group Inc/s hostile S6.4 billion bid, saying the two-tier cash 
and stock deal was aimed at coercing stockholders. The latest 
snub come after 65.1 percent of Pennzoil’s shareholders 
backed pan of the 584-a-share cash and stock offer. 

• Reynolds & Reynolds Co. plans to take charges of as much 
as $25 million in its fourth quarter, ending in September, to 
dose factories and distribution centers as it seeks to cat costs. 

ZAP. Bloomberg. Reuters) 


CIBC to Buy Oppenheimer & Co. 


C.mpUnl ht lUr SuffFnmi DbfwrAn 

TORONTO — Canadian Imper- 
ial Bank of Commerce, Canada's 
second-biggest bank, said Tuesday 
its CIBC-Wood Gundy Inc. broker- 
age had agreed to buy the Wall 
Street brokerage Oppenheimer & 
Co. for $525 million. 

The Canadian bank will pay $350 
million for Oppenheimer at the clos- 
ing of the transaction and an ad- 
ditional $175 million over as much 
as three years to retain important 
employees. Oppenheimer is owned 


by its senior managers. 

The combined organization will be 
called CIBC Oppenheimer Corp. Mi- 
chael Rulle, chairman and chief ex- 
ecutive of CIBC Wood Gundy, will 
become chairman and chief exec- 
utive of CIBC Oppenheimer and con- 
tinue to head wood Gundy's U.S. 
operations. 

Stephen Robert, Oppenheimer 
chainnan, and Nathan Gantcher, the 
president, who together own almost 
40 percent, will become vice chair- 
men. The transaction, which is sub- 


ject to regulatory approval, is ex- 
pected to close by tbe end of the 
year. 

Buying Oppenheimer provides 
CIBC with an investment banking 
unit that focuses on stock sales and 
merger advice for medium-sized 
companies. The New York-based 
securities firm also has 650 brokers 
serving wealthy individuals. 

CSC shares rose 90 cents to 
38.80 Canadian dollars in late trad- 
ing on the Toronto Stock Ex- 
change. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


GtefSta/M Our Sniff Fnmfh^uibr. 

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks ral- 
lied to a record Tuesday after the 
chainnan of die Federal Reserve 
Board, Alan Greenspan, suggested 
tbe central bank would not raise 
interest rates soon and after large 
consumer companies reported On- 
expectedly strong earnings. 

Mr. Greenspan said the econo- - 
my ’s performance had been “ex- 
ceptional” and that it had more 
room to grow before inflation be- 
came a worry. 

“He's given everybody ail the 
more reason to buy,” said Warren 
Simpson, a portfolio manager at 
Stephens Capital Management. 
"Ail those comments are bullish.” 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age rose 154.93 points to 8,061.65, 
passing its closing high of 8,038.88 
set last Wednesday. Advancing is- 
sues outnumbered dec liners by a 5- 
to-2 margin on the New York Stock 
Exchange 

The Standard & Poor’s 500- stock 
Index rose 20.97 to 933.91. The 
Nasdaq Composite Index, which is 
dominated by computer companies, 
gained 27.64 to a record 1 .563. 87- 

Bonds also rallied, with the 
benchmark 30-year Treasury bond 
priced at 10226/32, up 1 22/32. that 
pushed the yield down to 6.41 per- 
cent from 6.54 percent. 

Kevin McC unlock of Dreyfus 
Corp. said Mr. Greenspan’s com- 
ments were “a huge sigh of relief 
for the market” 

“There’s no reason 6.25 won’t 
be tbe next stop” for the 30-year 


bond yield. Mr. McClintock said. 

"Greenspan had every opportu- 
nity to say something unsettling to 
the market's psychology, and he 
chose not to do it."* said Robert 
Stovall, president of Stovall/ 
Twenty-First Advisers Inc. 

Bank, brokerage and finance- 
company stocks paced the rally. 

115. STOCKS 

Chase Manhattan. Citicorp, Merrill 
Lynch. Travelers Group and J. P . 
Morgan advanced. 

International Business Ma- 
chines. which failed to impress the 
market with a mostly strong profit 
report late Monday, was dowa 
Some analysts found IBM's 4 per- 
cent revenue growth disappointing. 
But other personal -computer 

stocks, which led the market to re- 
cords last week, rallied. Dell Com- 
puter, Compaq and Gateway 2000 
advanced. 

Boeing led the gains after Euro- 
pean Union sources said Boeing 
was ready to scrap exclusive agree- 
ments with three U.S. airlines to 
win EU approval of its purchase of 
McDonnell Douglas. 

Better-than -expected earnings in 
the airline and rail industries pushed 
up Burlington Northern Santa Fe 
and UAL, the parent of United Air- 
lines. Norfolk Southern rose after 
the company announced a 3-for-l 
stock split. Lockheed Martin rose 
after the defense contractor posted a 
3 percent earnings increase for the 
second quarter. ( Bloomberg, AP ) . 


GREENSPAN: Markets Rise After Fed Chief Gives a Rosy Outlook for Growth and Low Inflation 


Continued from Page 1 

Greenspan's December alarm. 

Stock and bond prices were mod- 
estly higher before the Tuesday 
testimony, but the dollar was already 
posting strong gains. It extended its 
rally against the main Continental 
currencies as the outlook for a strong 
common currency faded. Although 
dealers were naturally reluctant to 
take positions before Mr. Greenspan 
spoke, fears of a weak Euro out- 
weighed worries about potential Fed 
actions, analysts said. 

' “One has the sense that Europe is 
going to have a soft Euro, and they 
keep fudging the numbers, and 
people don't really believe in that 
keep hedging back into dollars,” 
said David Ethridge, a currency ana- 
lyst with MMS International. 

Trading in the Deutsche mark 


was especially active, Market News 
reported, with investors abandoning 
the currency in favor of the yen, the 
British pound and the dollar. The 
dollar rose to 1.8245 DM from 
1.7963 DM late Monday. 

It also rose to 6.1420 French francs 
from 6.0565 francs and to 1.4830 
Swiss francs from 1 .4750 francs. The 
pound rose to S 1 .6805 from $1.6787. 
The dollar slipped, however, to 
1 14.95 yen from 1 16. 15 yen. 

Mr. Greenspan warned in his pre- 
vious Humphrey- Hawkins testi- 
mony in February that the Fed 
would raise interest rates if it 
thought there were inflationary pres- 
sures in the economy, whether or not 
these had visibly translated into 
price increases. The central bank 
subsequently raised its target for 
short-term interest rates in March to 
5.50 percent from 5.25 percent 


Since then, however, the econ- 
omy has expanded without signif- 
icantly pushing up prices for goods 
and services, puzzling many econ- 
omists but delighting those in- 
vestors who held onto their stocks 
and bonds. In tbe first quarter, the 
grosstiomestic product grew at a 4. 1 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE " 

percent annual rate, although its 
growth was projected to have 
slowed in the second quarter to a rate 
somewhere above 2 percent 
The Fed said it expected the econ- 
omy to grow this year at 3 percent to 
3.25 percent, np from the 2 percent 
to 2 J percent range it predicted in 
February. The central tank said in- 
flation this year would be below the 
1996 level of 2.9 percent. 

The unemployment rate, mean- 


while, has fallen to 5.0 percent in 
June from 53 percent in December, 
yet companies are not engaging in 
ruinous bidding wars for good 
workers, and corporate profits have 
been strong in the second quarter. 

Bruce Steinberg, chief economist 
of Merrill Lynch & Co., explained 
this situation by saying the U.S. econ- 
omy had returned to “the paradigm 
of competitive capitalism. ’ 7 
According to Mr. Steinberg, de- 
flation was more typical than in- 
flation in the 19th and early 20th 
centuries. “It was only in the post- 
World War H era, characterized by 
oligopolistic market structures, in- 
trusive states, and overly flexible 
monetary standards, that persistent 
inflation was entrenched.” 

But because of “globalization, 
rapid technological change and de- 
regulation,” Mr. Steinberg says in 


an advisory to Merrill's clients, ‘ 
companies cannot now raise prices, > 
so in order to increase their prof- | 
liability, they must cut costs and ■ 
raise their efficiency. U.S. com pa- ; 
rues apparently have been able to do ! 
this in recent years. ; 

An implication of this theory is ! 
that current U.S. interest rates are - 
too high, given the lack of inflation. ’ 
Indeed, American rates are higher • 
than those in most other major econ- ' 
omies with the exception of Bri- ! 
tain. ) 

The high level of interest rates, ! 
coupled w i th worldwide demand for ‘ 
American stocks and bonds, makes ! 
the dollar an attractive currency for • 
international investors, especially ‘ 
with the economies of the Conti- 
nental powers being slow and the 
likelihood that a common European 
currency would be weak. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The top 3QQ most active shore* 
up to the dosing on Wall Street. 

The Assocatod Press. 


5*1 nn u» w orgi Indexes 

sw iR if if* * Dow Jones 

U337 ** * * +* 

Ol IX A, n _ Indm 7VXU1 

1 M ix Pi m 4* Tram 2 m *64 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


July 22, 1997 


High Low Latest Owe OpInJ 


High lorn Latest Chga OpM 


it H 41 HIS u. u, d| 

S IX _ Intel 791B41 BU&CT IWLD B041 ai + 154.93 PhlMarC 

Jft -H Tram 2*4*64 ZMUtt 7tn.lt IWisi ,66.18 IBM* 

TJX. IWV J| UK mil 731H 229.91 ZD-M »Z<7 PHMICa 

IM HD _ Carp 2M11 4 M83.lt 2421*3 2481-48 +47JI AT^Ts 


Wl Law Latest Ow OpM ORANGE JUKE (NCTW 
~ _ . ~ IMHO ka.~ ante parte. 

Grains sm >*7 tsxo 71® : 


Sates M«n Loi 1 M engt 


LuTn± 
... IBM Sr* 

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Standard & Poors 


X! Si. Grain* sent? 7S60 7150 71*5 —IX 

,a ? &». Su Sin :«* J£r M*"* S&vSS is 

It 34H ISM + 11* Wff W? Wfte UWtKwiM 21.911 La M 


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lMWlte-owite parte. FFSHUKO-rttoflOOpd 

SM>*7 KAO 7130 7115 —105 19X81 S «*7 130X4 13040 13070 *«U8 *»7! 


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136 49*. 47’, 

343 ir« If* 

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654J1 646-54 64&40 466.93 BoftTPn 

19fm l«J[ 196.91 199-59 pfiir* 

103 55 102.13 10197 I05JO ElCodaX 

9I5JB 907.12 91194 933J1 

895 AS B8&18 894.13 914-60 

tete* Lte. Ote NQSdaq 

484.11 474.47 *9J» Wonni 

A15JG 60146 6153 *11-86 pu, 

SS-S ♦ , IB Kawn* 

289.M 2BU8 789.04 ,5.96 MCAhe 

447.13 43170 44l.9f » 8 JA oSoSi 

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S3 IK 

Hw. uo- iw tft 3Com 

564.01 153155 1508* 47765 

23451 imiD 123437 .1165 gTJOU 

67138 165968 146565 *665 2*9/2. 

689 a 1676.16 1476 16 5.70 °*»* 8 "* 

W1D 1990.94 179X03 +1X15 "MMCte 

99064 981.49 98974 ,979 


45340 M X fflt 3UX +VX 

45236 29ft 28*. 29U +1*. 

44843 6216 59ft 6 B*V. *W 

445*1 6 ft* 67V. Aft +14X 


Es>. totes HA. ManT*. tales 65. 183 
Man^awikif 76Xf5i up an 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 


SOYBEAN MEALCCBOr) OOLOINCMX} 

nonn.-cMnparKn lOOtWOX-tlBIkrtnarlTOvat 

JUI97 27150 271 JM 777 JO +150 T.737 M71 W30 


Apr 98 334.10 33188 33360 -JL3B 1773 
Jun9B 31970 336JB 336J0 —436 7J7D 
Atm 91 JEMS -XSB 7r*19 

Ext. tales NA. Mon's, stees 47AM7 
Man's spwiiar 2TX4W off MB2 


63478 63038 634.18 * 378 

Dow Jones Bond 


•a W- 


93914 721* 67 «m -7ft MUk NJL Man’s, tales 23.7K Apr 98 334.50 33188 333J0 -030 5,173 

»» JSJ 3J2 1 ®: SrtSnB# 116.161 afl M» xn« 3»J0 336JB »» I -MB 7*^0 

99563 SI ^ m5S + 1% SOYBEAN OH, (CBOT 1 BXlOteS ALA. NUrft.&£ 47^02 Ta Olir 

S8W Iw 12 iSf +T»: .» ». aiAM air MB 2 XU UUT Ilciitlt 

526] I 56*6 5446 56ft +10X Alt 77 2165 7T68 21^8 —110 IM .. „.„ r J 

^o jlte 10 U Stow 3X05 21 JO 21J3 -416 T7643 7SJ00«»..cteitentete. Due to tech nipd p rc 

1 S’ ® Is ss a 1 ss as ss as, ss as ®s ds a ■ " 

37* 32 ft 37*. -** 22 jo 2270 2 X 20 -ii7 us< Sep 97 km losjs hmj 5 —ljo 2 u» available at press tune. 

&r.S*S UA. Man's. sete* OJW ' Ocf77 SO 103 OSAO VOA5 — 1A0 

“ SES K S S -d! is SEKSK’tSSS 

VOL lnn ... n, SOYBEANStCBOn Jon 98 10 X 45 -IjB 7 « SS"?™ IaSTTjBB 

aL m «. PBH" MI-70 10X50 KOTO -MO 632 "so JjSS rbnn 

89 Si 9 , h”^q +rH * MV m* 70 77Bft *1 m Mv 98 W26B 101-70 BUS -MB 7J63 H2S ^ 

1 OT 1 S' Mv Si* “ Aup97 744ft 730 735ft — Jft 24»0 EstSteesNA. Mon's.nM; SJS) Tex, 

ST ^ *2 S 5m 9? 457ft 638 244ft —ft 11779 A uftmW 47 WM rte 411 


To Our Readers 

Due to techn ical p robletr 
at the source, LIFFE was ur 


BT.stftts ha. Maa’s.s&t njw 
Main open Ira IM470 up 626 


CdoOccip 870 late 25ft 7W. 

^ Sp isr 


Wte.MrdLo.LMCi.. SOYBEANS (C8071 Jon 98 88345 -14 

Ad. dST nZrai .iaT m ' r * TX * T, ~ .■*"** ” r ^ uW, * < . F*J)9B N27B 10X50 HIX70 -14 

m ® 91 iS ”^4? +rH ' Jul97 779ft 70 778ft +1 992 Mor98 W26B 1017® WJ5 —84 

^ & - AWj? 2 7»ft -Jft 2U40 Est-SOte* ' N-A. Mra'Llria STB 

13$ ^ ft ft -5 saow £»***£*-? Mortomnw 47704 off 411 

2te 6ft. 69k 4ft Now 97 604 593ft OT *4 73J09 

Sft 25ft W. -V. Jm98 6B7 590 SHft +2 ISMS StVEB 040*0 

10 ft 9ft IM +ft Estsraes NJL Man^tctes 445S7 sjooin»waB^«art*pertenw«L 

E « 4% + -ft .44756 - 77 MW .* M ^ gJB fJJ 

59*6 n 29 4ft WHEAT (CBOT) S«p97 43400 4Z5J5B <3030 ; «jS 

— 5JWteifntilmwrn-c>nKan'&uAgl Otc97 44X00 43258 43650 +45 


4X500 pe un nt. i per pound 
Sep 97 1^796 14486 14J53 


Mon^gponW 6X612 off 589 


CANADIAN DOIXAR (CMER) 

1TOV uvii PC* mniviniwim • ___ a 1 , d. 

Jill 97 ■ 431 JO 427.50 427.50 +4S0 141 7*. 

AU097 427 JO mi M 'ttw 

!2% SI5 US SS S£ W OT5 7346 


Trading Activity 


OecV 44X80 43X58 <5650 +450 15JX 


EELWIet HA. MOTS. SOUS 1942 


High. Urn 

Latest Cbge OpM 


AiOV 97 55.10 

5*JM 

5478 

+029 

16X86 


Dec 97 5*n 

S5J0 

55X8 

+024 

17.133 


Jan 98 5*41 

5*00 

5*86 

+014 

1*803 


Feb 96 5*75 

5*33 

5*33 

+009 

7X08 


MarfR 5*10 

5*53 

55X3 

+004 

*961 


Apr SB 54X0 

5*Z> 

5*23 

-am 

3X11 



25673 



Mon'S open m/ 

ts*jn 

Ite 11041 



LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMBB) 



lxaa bbL- diftrs psr DU. 




Aw 97 19J9 

18-99 

19X0 

-0.18 

2DX» 


S+p 97 19X4 

19J) 

1968 

+0X6 

8*195 


Qd 57 19JB 

1969 

19X5 

+8X5 

4*593 


NOV 97 19.72 

19X6 

7963 

+OX7 

2*325 


Dec 97 19.72 

19X8 

1964 

HUD 

ASM 


Jan 98 T9J5 

1964 

I9J5 

+*M 

25X03 


F »98 19JS 

1967 

1975 

♦ 8X8 

12X08 


Mtr 9H 19X7 

1967 

1967 

-am 

5755 


Apr 96 19*4 

1964 

1964 

—0X8 

5318 


MovH 19 JO 

1965 

1970 

-0X5 

7X75 


Est.Kfej NA 

Mrart. sates 

108X87 



Man's open int 

41X169 

Off 4Q9 



NATURAL GAS (NMBU 




UL «0 mm Oluft, * psr mm bs« 




Aug 97 1135 

2078 

1117 


30694 


Sep97 2X90 

2X55 

2X73 


33,161 


Oct 97 X10S 

2X61 

1 D» 


2*031 


Nov 97 2250 

2228 

2734 


12383 


Dec 97 1395 

X370 

UBO 


15612 


Jon 98 1440 

2400 

261/ 


U3K 


Eebtt 1355 

1310 

2635 


10707 


MorM 2250 

2220 

2230 


*773 


AprSB 1125 

X095 

11 W 


3766 


Mav« 2JW0 

X075 

1075 


3X74 


Ed.Mries NA 

Men’s, sotes 

51,981 



Man's anon lot 

30*224 

UP 4449 



INLEADB3 GASOLINE INMBJ) 








Aug 97 NL45 

59-70 

AMD 

—0X3 

2*754 


Sep97 SLZ) 

5760 

yx« 

+032 

26635 


Od97 5*40 

55.90 

5*41 

+039 

9X55 


Nov 97 55X1 

55.40 

55X1 

+044 

*397 


Dec 97 55J0 

55X8 

55.15 

+020 

7X98 


Jon 98 5525 

55X0 

55X5 

+068 

5.779 


Feb 96 


5575 

+0X8 

1638 


Md-N 


SU5 

+058 

1278 



SiP 97 3S3 36ft 34916 +9ft 42JJJ Vtr93 40 JO 44UB **UO *450 9^10 MortwmW 43014 up 621 


Nasdaq 


SK mm 

^ b sacs? 


132 20 ir> 19ft 


is D l* £ -t BSuSr 


m ?+i 7 ft 

W 1» ft 

IX Hft 10ft 
2» » 9. 

1102 ft ft 


Market Sales 


743 NYSE 
37 Amax 
7 Nasdaq 
tnmiSore. 


Dec 97 365ft 354ft 343ft +9» 385*5 

Mar 98 374ft 368 I» +fft 7,979 

Esl.sotes KA Man's. setes 23JB7 
Ndm Pid. Mur's cpenW 94766 UP 2046 
r777 1827 

if£ ^ 

5SU 572b 

'g 'g Livestock 

CATTLE (MEW 
404)00 eu.- C6HM P«r IP. 

Aub97 1630 4557 1577 -037 30721 

"**■ Oct 97 69.35 6562 fis.70 -055 36J63 

c "S OK” 7XW TIM 71.10 -062 HJ80 

FMl 98 7377 7380 73.10 -€J5 9 JIM 

31W Apr 98 7SS 74B7 74.95 -050 XB9 


IJS JS GERMAN MARK KMBQ 
M 93 45C00 4SI30 4SB30 +458 2J253 issuRmiift liwna* 

Esr.sc** NA Man's, sales 5JB1 M OT aTjJ 

Men's open tra 90836 IB 499 DecV7 5576 5534 55 


Esr.saes NA Mars soles sjbi 5ep97 Mra 5588 53a 

Men's open Ira 9U36 in 499 See 97 5576 5534 5537 

n Amaiu (mmfui MarM 5596 5571 5571 

i. . . Elf.SOles KA Mon’s, sates 1X964 

M W 42X00 41800 471 JO +7J0 335 Mart nppnirt 11*293 Ite 6702 

HI’S f!3 !-S JAPANESE YQI (CMEH) 

3 ?w.12i2 tit , '®° 

cSLSawS NA. Mans sales 664 SBP97 J750 565D 8741 

MNrtepeninr 1X786 un 05 Dec 97 ma eat Ma 

Morn 190 MOS JOB 
Esl sales ka Mart.Kfes 8*ui 
Men's open ira 58.195 off 544 


535J1 JuaM 7X12 7150 71 SI -455 X611 LOHPON META LS (LM H 


414M *JU 91ft nun ,2ft. 
1147 S9«V S8 >. 9Wm *1*. 

IN II'. lift lift 

164 I ft 1ft 1ft .ft 

lW 21’l 20H 71ft .U 

129 lift lift ir* -ft 

1161 *• 'I. As 

225 I ft lft 1ft J* 

in lift lift iin s .n 

BO 2- 2H 2ft .Vs 


J Dividends 

£ Company 


Par And Roc Pay Company 


Esl sates HMO Men's, sates 0282 
Man'scpenlrt 98.922 Ite 2153 

PEBSi CATTLE (CMBU 
30.00111111 runt, per ti 

Per Aim Rec Pay aw97 no bus bxw -067 lasit 

_ ' Sep 97 8X40 8165 81.98 -077 3.168 

n T? l«\ rf 0097 8250 IS SIM -0J2 4636 


SWISS FRANC (OMBl] 

Dalian par metric hsi 

AtenmOfM Grade) SrnV mo ^64 MS 

Seal 158JI0 15893)0 15853)0 159680 OK 97 5866 6MB 6HB 
Ktward MOM M1O00 16103)0 T611J» Mqr* 5T31 

OtppraCeHiadM ODpt Grads) Easatas KA MVitte 7647 

Spilt 239SLOO Sra.00 24701)0 2473JJ0 Monftapenii# 55647 Ite 901 
Forirat 230000 230160 2327310 2328JB 
Land MEXICAN PBO (CMER) 


Ed. sates KA Mon’s. sc*K 2X714 
Morrtoeenirt 8L004 up HD7 


114557 GASOIL OPE) 

1719 U5. dollan per metric lai -kOsai 100 tom 

Til Aup97 1643X1 16X25 16100 +225 14494 

Sap 97 14575 164-00 164J5 +275 10305 

Oa 97 16775 146.75 167-00 +04® 33)71 

Na»97 140.25 14X50 16875 +050 5,755 

Dec 97 17075 170.00 17075 +050 10477 

Jon 98 17TJ25 171JW 1713* +050 6659 

56J47 Feb 98 171 J5 17050 170.75 +050 4161 

1706 MarM ITOtW 14950 169-25 +050 r.734 

222 EtL sales: 11619. Pm. ados : 9.116 
Piw. open H+ 7QJK2 oil 818 

BRENT OILOPEl 

1 175. doflon per Panel -tote of iJWObanvts 

5X002 Sep 97 itfjl 1812 I8J2 +073 80835 

1J92 Da 97 1864 1870 18J9 +0.10 20162 

953 Nw97 1043 1X33 1861 +0.11 1L25B 

Dec97 1853 1043 1051 +0.11 17633 

Jlpi« KT. N.T. 1853 +0.11 133XD 

FtiJSS 1850 1868 1859 +0.11 S2B8 

Mam 1865 1865 1869 +0.11 2665 


rm«Tw»,Dn. 71 , Gtlifoftf iW«S O .1) 7-31 6-13 uni mw C7S _an wn Spat 63X08 4JT3J3 66X08 66X00 OOMpamsparpawa Est sales- 19.211. Pie*. Miet : 1864S 

ssras"" s:iiss ts sssj-™- s ■ l s 7 s si £« s ^ s ^ ^ Sr -ss -:s :iss sts ids — — 

STOCK SPUT Kntahl-Riddor Q 70 8-6 H- 1 B S? IL- jjm iu£w. ^u* Spot 665060 6*603)0 664CLOO 6695310 Mtr 98 .11685 .11620 .11485 4251 


.ST .X STOCK SPUT 

ne. .5 Fbsftonlc IBnote 3 far 2 spBL 


Kntahl-Rid 

MAPCOInc 


B 0 r- 2 w Jft .Vs Rod Brick SyiI l pi share purchase rtatrt far ffiOtanH* 

ITT l*. lft lft -ft eocti ehm of ementofi held. MWAmE — 


121 lift IJft lift -ft 

111 9ft 9ft Pt 

1W Sft Pi Sft -ft 

IM in lft 8 * -lft 

IPS JJ** 37ft 37ft -ft 

141 91, 9ft eij .ft 

lot 2 ft 2 ft n -ft 

MO PV Wt 37* -ft 

2225 Sts lft PI -ft 

W l'e 1 lft -ft 

141 lift, lift lift 1 

986 16ft I6'i It's 

ItIB 38ft n 29ft -ft 

sn. w** «• nr* -ft 

ik w » m -ft 

615 16+ 13ft lift -ft 

Ul 7ft 6ft Aft .ft 


Schwab Chatks 3 lor 2 spfit 
TX Repiaivri Bn A 3 hr 51 spiff. 


S M + Mor98 8U0 8375 H2S -095 

19 all? 2697 Mart-sdn 3668 

Q 70 Vs 820 2*621 W 241 

0 JS .%? HOGS-ljerai (CMBU 

» J3? r-31 8 J 0 aoenteo-canaperb. 

Q .17 86 8-29 auo«7 BUS BUB 8035 -1.00 


6*5060 4640310 666500 649500 Mtr 98 .11685 .11620 .1148$ 
4765.00 67703)0 4800JM 680500 EsLsates KA Min' 1 . nfci 3J2B 

Mart oean lot £668 ail 15 

53333)0 erwnn mean 538500 

5J15 ' m 5X35110 WWimiPIBORtMATIR 


Stock Indexes 


INCREASED 

Gtenway Find Q -20 7-31 8-)5 


wKimpT nra 

IBS Find 

ft Leviathan Gca 
■*» OppentemerCnp 


■****> Om™ 

Q .20 7-31 8-15 PG&Ecwp 

□ .10 8-27 9-16 Peoples find 

O 65 7-31 8-14 _ . 

D .95 7-31 8-29 SecinBy Cqp fnd 

Q .19 >1 8-11 SkySneCaip 

O .15 8-15 9-7 5Tud8n9LnM 

Q .1) 1031 11-10 Student Ln 


Q J0 7-28 B-IO ext 97 7178 7X30 7245 

9 -645 6-4 8-15 OeC 97 TUB 49-25 40 J 


Jot 4 ft tf. I? TRRnd O .15 8-15 9-7 Student LnM 

u in jg in JS VtowTedi Q .1 1 10-31 ii-to Studentlji 

n w> in in Sunstoml 

'» »• S; -ft INITIAL TCFRjd 

ui im u 7ft .vs FstBoifcllftiQon _ .18 9-12 10-1 usTivst 5 * 0 ^ 

IS !!i !»• !?& Pori Wopre Win _ JO 9-10 10-1 Si™ 

S ’IS 1 'P* 'It ; ToUandBkn . .05 B-5 8-19 S^L. 


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Commodity Indexes 

dose Preview ’ 
Moody's 1.53460 l^5J0 ' 

Reutera ’ 1^8440 1^7^ 

OJ. Futures 147.19 14*59 • 

CRB 235.09 23161 - 

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Do you live u\ Norway? * 

Fora hand-delivered subscription 
on the day of publication in Oslo and Bergen, 1 

call 00 33 1 4143 9361 

HeralbSSribunc 

THE ROBOTS mm NKWBIRPKH 




an< * Pro|~ 

s to a Rg,, “Corporate Crises Hit 

t y /South Korean Stocks 

ep.-c t;-_; . r r r , 1 . - r - * 

iX- v'f . ;! Fears Center on Ssangyong and Jinro 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23. 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC — — = 


Malaysia’s New Captain: 


PAGE 15 


L) r.-.r, t. . ■ »«. ««**«/» »i*u.-.rtig6ai ““fiwi wngu/mcraie, wiucn aas 

Mur*.-*.' • r irill P t conglomerate. around 3.2 trillion won of debt. 

; r Share prices fell on fears that the But creditor banks said Tuesday 
._-r ' h- chain of corporate collapses would they would not extend the bailout 

.! : t : • : grow, analysts said. period for Jinro beyond Sunday. In-. 

| l ' nr,: Fueling the sense of crisis was stead, they plan to suggest extending' 

v.-... . ' : •>’ news that creditors of the troubled its period of principal payments and 

~ : -v Jinro Group would not extend its Teaucing its interest payments, a 

r ‘‘ V: v-- 2 - : 1 m M,J ‘ bailout; benefits beyond Sunday's bank executive said. 

, ■ ‘ "jPp>- expiration date, even though the Analysts said the move would 

7 ' ' riJi W. conglomerate’s troubles were far lead to a default by Jinro because 

- : ,7.^:. from over. financial institutions woald call in 

? ■ 7 ' ,;r • C- •• ,r . Cki; South Korean banks in April their loan payments. 

'-itUi. formed a committee to help keep The Korean Composite Stock In- 
i''-- afloat certain companies facing dex closed 2 percent lower, down 

VCMi 5 . : . . ' . J ” r ‘- :-n. r - heavy debts. Under the banks’ bail- 14.95 points at 725.98. AH 10 listed 


links' 


' Reuters 

SEOUL — South Korea's cor- 
t- porale crisis deepened Tuesday as 
Kia Group received emergency 
\ loans pending a formal rescue plan 
and rumors hammered Ssangyong 
Group, the country’s sixth-largest 
; conglomerate. 


out agreement, credit lines of 
companies designated for rescue 
would remain open even after they 
defaulted on debt payments. 

The first beneficiary of the agree- 
ment was Jinro, the country’s 19th- 
largest conglomerate, which has 
around 3.2 trillion won of debt. 

But creditor banks said Tuesday 
they would not extend the bailout 
period for Jinro beyond Sunday. In-, 
stead, they plan to suggest extending' 


-r H,.-. ; 

ar,; » \j. 
N. 


‘'bnp 

Hi.' • » v , 

. ■*- * ► 


Profits Dwindle 
As Thai Banks 
Suffer Slump 

Ctmq&d by Our Stuff Fmt DafUKhn 

BANGKOK — Three big 
Thai banks saw their first-half 
profits drop sharply as they were 
hit by slowing economic growth, 
tight liquidity, deteriorating as- 
set quality and a property slump, 
analysts said Tuesday. 

Bangkok Bank PLC, the na- 
tion's biggest bank, said first- 
half profits fell 16 percent, to 
8.6 billion baht ($28 1 5 million) 
as loan growth slowed and pro- 
visions for bad loans doubled 

Siam Commercial Bank PLC 
said first-half earnings dropped 
14 percent, to 3.7 billion baht, 
while Thai Farmers Bank PLC’s 
profit fell 1 9 percent, tq 5 billion 
baht. The effects of Thailand’s 
July 2 currency devaluation will 
not be revealed until banks re- 
port second-half numbers. 

Separately, Finance One 
PLC posted an unaudited loss 
of 5.23 billion baht, compared 
with a profit of 850.31 million 
last year. (Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


« : r l \ 


bank executive said. 

Analysts said the move would 
lead to a default by Jinro because 
financial institutions would call in 
their loan payments. 

The Korean Composite Stock In- 
dex closed 2 percent lower, down 
14.95 points at 725.98. All 10 listed 
Ssangyong Group shares declined. 

Kia Group said it would cut the 
□umber of its domestic affiliates to 
13 by merging and selling units and 
would raise 3.1 trillion won ($3.46 
billion ) by selling real estate to try to 
rescue itself. 

Creditor banks agreed Tuesday to 
extend 160 billion won in emer- 
gency loans to Kia to keep it in 
business until a committee of banks 
could formally adopt a rescue plan, 
Korea First Bank said. 

As a condition for additional loans 
to Kia, creditors would ask the com- 
pany’s current management to re- 
linquish its management rights. They 
also said Kia should carry out a more 
drastic downsizing program and sell 
the unprofitable Asia Motors Co., 
which makes buses and trucks. 

Analysts said Kia’s self-rescue 
package to slim down ami sell assets 
amounted to a temporary bandage. 

“Kia has the wrong manage- 
ment," Rhee Namuh, head of re- 
search at Dongbang Peregrine, said. 
“Unless 1 the management is 
changed, Kia’s turnaround looks 
unlikely.” 

Kia’s woes combined with rumors 
of cash-flow problems at Ssangyong 
also roiled currency markets, where 
nervousness about the companies 
sparked buying of dollars. 

A Ssangyong spokesman denied 
that the group was in trouble. 

“That’s just a vicious, groundless 
rumor that is going around,” be 
said. 


Bloomberg Nm s 

KUALA LUMPUR — The eldest son of Prime 
Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad has his work cut our 
for him. 

The son, Mirzan Mahathir, wants to double the size 
of his maritime empire by buying pan of Malaysia's 
largest shipping line, Malaysia International Ship- 
ping Corp., from the state — but that's the easy part. 
Then Mr. Mirzan, a former SaJomon Inc. trader, will 
have to meet the expectations of investors, who are 


will have to contend with critics who say he gets 
breaks denied to others because he is the prime 
minister's son. 

Mr. Mirzan recently received the central bank's 
permission to negotiate for the purchase of a con- 
trolling stake in Malaysia International Shipping, and 
investors are awaiting the details, which may come 
this week. 

People are watching to see whether "life will be 
made easy for Mirzan,** said Bruce Gale, regional 


looking to him io cut costs and improve earnings at manager of Political & Economic Risk Consultancy 


the lumbering shipping company. 

“He means business,” said Afwida Malek, who 
manages about 350 million ringgit ($136.8 million), 
including Malaysia International Shipping shares, at 
Commerce Asset Fund 


Managers Sdn. ( ne 

“There’ll be more alien- Mirzan Mahathir seeks to double wi 

tion to the bottom line, r , . _ iL . . Su 

whereas now it’s run tue size oi nis maritime empire. tro 

more like a public ser- glc 

vice." Other investors of 

agree. Malaysia International Shipping's share price not sought control of a major- 
has gained 17 percent in the past month, amid talk that Malaysia International Ship 
Mr. Mirzan wanted to buy into the shipping line. company listed on the bench 
Mr. Mirzan’s transport empire has expanded at a index. It had profit of 477.3 ti 
rapid clip. He is chairman and top stockholder of on sales of 2.4 billion ringgit. 


Ltd., which advises foreign companies on investing 
in Southeast Asia. If Mr. Mirzan gets the stake on the 
cheap, he said, they will “start muttering about undue 
political influence." But in contrast to some other 
countries. including 

neighboring Indonesia 

seeks to double where President 

... . Suharto’s children con- 

ntime empire. jj-qI several large cou- 

glome rates, the children 

of Malaysia's leader have 
not sought control of a major-company before now. 

Malaysia International Shipping is the 1 Oth-largest 
company listed on the benchmark Malaysian stock 
index. It had profit of 477.3 million ringgit last year 


Konsonium Perkapalan Bbd., Malaysia's largest 
road-freight company, which last year bought a 63 
perceat stake in DiperdanaCorp., Malaysia’s second- 
largest shipping company, for 1.1 billion ringgit: 

“He's already the country’s transport giant.” 
Jenny Yeow, an analyst at Merrill Lynch & Co., said, 
and the shipping-company stake “will strengthen his 
position.” 

If Mr. Mirzan gains control of the shipper, he will 
also shoulder the burden of bolstering Malaysia’s 
ports and shipping industry — keys to stemming the 
country's widening current-account deficit. He also 


Diperdana said July 10 ir had received central bank 
approval to negotiate the purchase of the govern- 
ment’s remaining 29.35 percent stake in Malaysia 
International. The talks are continuing, company 
executives said. 

In moving up from being Malaysia's second- 
largest shipping operator to the largest, Mr. Mirzan 
would add more than 60 ships to his banner. 

The government has made no secret of its intention 
to improve the competitiveness of the country's 
shipping and port industries, which are losing cus- 
tomers to Singapore. 


Hong Kong Moves to Bolster Currency 


Agence France-Presse 

HONG KONG — Turbulence on 
Southeast Asia's currency markets 


against the American one, the Hong 
Kong Standard reported. 

Andrew Fung, a spokesman for 


forced Hong Kong to try to shore up Commonwealth Bank of Australia, 
its currency's value to head off spec- said he interpreted the authority's 


ulators, dealers said Tuesday. 

The Monetary Authority,' the ter- 
ritory's de facto central bank, in- 
tervened in the wake of currency 
plunges elsewhere in the region. 

The authority is understood to 
have sold so-called exchange fund 
bills in the market, reducing the sup- 


moves as a “preemptive strike” 
against speculators. A Monetary Au- 
thority official declined to comment. 


Hoi^Korig 
Hang. Seng 

17000 


Singapore 
Strafe Times - 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 


F m a m j j 
1997 


F M A M J 
1997 


F M A M J J 
1997 


, Hong Kong HangSeng : 15^.78 15,536,30 -0.58 
Singapore ’ Straits Timas 1,950.51 i,95a75 - -O.Ol 

Sydney WtOktoaifes : 2,656.40 2£53.4G "'+0.il 

Tokyo . . " ~ Nikkei 225 : 28,157.02 20,349,32 -0.46 

Composite ..^ ■ 1,016^1 1.02 2£t. -0.46 

■•iarjglcok"' ~ .. ~853i7* * +058 

Seoul ’ ' • ! Comjroatetndex -,725.98 742.15 i*i8 

TaipeP ; ;;v . £88 

Manila 7 ■ PSE ' ~ 2,656.73 2,64834 +0132 

Jakarta' ^ Cor^»^ ; -0.13 

WeBmgton V Ngsk-49' . !/ £#53.62 2,459.28 -0.22 

Bombay 7 ' ' 'Linsklt/a index.- ~ 4J8S3S -U 54.28 +0.77 


: 15JW6.7S 15,536,30 -038 
"■1,950.51 ' 1,95075 -O.G? 
: 2$5&40 ^2^a^ +0-t1 
~ 28,157.02 20.249.32 -0.46 
-1.G22JS?. -0,46 
' r m78 ~®3 v37*’ +058 


742.15 ■ 


Jakarta 

Wellington 


Source: Tetekurs 


Intrnuiiivul Herald Trihvw 


to the dollar, weakened from 2.6165 
to the dollar the day before. The Thai 
baht ended at 30.90 to the dollar and 
the Philippine peso at 28.15 to the 
dollar, slightly weaker than their 
closing levels the previous day. 


Very brief ys ^ 

• China's zinc producers could face huge trading losses after 
misreading the world market for the base metal, officials said. 
A publication issued by the official Xinhua news agency said 
several Chinese smelters had sold short as much as 250,000 
tons of zinc that they did oot own in the expectation that prices 
would fall, but prices have risen to a seven-year high. 

• Japan's leading index of economic activity in May stood at 
33.3 points, up from 5.6 points in April but still below the 
boom-or-bust line of 50 points for the fifth consecutive month. 
Economists cited the effects of the rise in the consumption rax 
in April. 

• Sanyo Electric Co. will invest 15 billion yen ($129.14 
million) to double production capacity of flash memory 
microchips to 8 million units a month. Meanwhile, LG 
Semicon Co., the world’s seventh-largest memory-chip man- 
ufacturer. will start mass production of a smaller version of its 
benchmark chip this month to cut costs. 

• Marubeni (Thailand) Co. postponed about IOjoint-ven- 

tune projects in the country because of an increasing inability 
of Tnai companies to pay their bi Us. Reuters . Bloomberg, afp 


thority official declined to comment. 

Money market rates closed high- m . . w , zjr • tit • Os 

er, with the interbank ovemight in- lovota to invest More in Lor Navigation Systems 

terest rate at 6.375 percent, com- J cj J 


terest rate at 6.375 percent, com- 
pared with 6.25 percent Monday. 
Elsewhere in Asia, the Indone- 


ply Hong Kong dollars in hope of sian rupiah, which dropped 5.9 per- 


strengthening the exchange rate. 
The increased demand for U.S. 


cent to a record low of 2,650 to the 


Bloomberg Netrs 

TOKYO — Toyota Motor Corp. is stepping up 
its investment in technologies that wiU teU trav- 
elers where to find the nearest gas station, avoid 


dollars prompted the authority to at 2,597 to the doUar Tuesday. 


U.S. dollar Monday, ended stronger traffic jams and eventuaUy program cars to drive 


push up interest rates on ovemight 
bank borrowings denominated in 
Hong Kong doUars to tty to make 
the local currency more attractive. 


The Singapore dollar also ended 
si ightiy firmer, at 1 .46 10 to the U.S. 
dollar compared with 1 .4634, but the 
Malaysian ringgit closed at 2.6202 


themselves. 

Japan’s largest automaker will establish a com- 
pany, Toyota Media Station Inc., to transmit 
weather forecasts and other information to 
vehicles equipped with, the company’s navigation 


system, Hiroshi Okuda, Toyota’s president, said. 

Toyota will take a 52.75 percent stake in the 
company, which will have a capitalization of 2 
billion yen ($17.2 million). Keith Truelove, a 
spokesman for Toyota, said future growth in die 
auto industry would be in providing “value- 
added services.” 

An analyst at Deutsche Morgan Grenfell said 
last month he expected 3.5 miltion cars to be 
equipped with navigation systems by 2000. 


E.- WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


HJgb Low due Pit*. 


Hlflh Low draw Pro*. 


Tuesday, July 22 

Prices in toed currencies. 

TdeJcurs DnsdnorBonK 

Higli Low Close Pnnr. 

Fifed. Kropp 

Amsterdam ABugacwag HdMbgzmt 

PlwhO*»31-M Henkel pM 

ABN-AMRO 4&30 45J0 4830 44.90 

Aegon 15640 15U0 TS 149 JO 

Ahold 6120 «MQ 61.90 6000 

AkmNobei 287.90 285 285J0 2B2J0 

Bran Go. 


BranCo. 15BJ® 152 1S6J3 151 

Bote Wesson 41 JO m.m 4U0 40J0 


High Low Oom Prev. 

Deutsche Bonk 11B 11120 11&A5 1D8J0 
Doit Tristan 43.10 4U5 42J0 4245 
Dresdnsr Bank B5J0 81.90 8X60 77 JO 
Fltsonh* 363 KB 363 35850 

FmsenfcjsMed 154 15190 15190 15020 

Fifed- Knipp 319 315 318 317 

Gehe 119.00 rojo 117.60 ns 

HehtefcgZmt 163 161 162 M0 

Henkel pW lOOJO 9880 10050 97_5f> 

HEW 451 451 451 451 


SA Breweries 

Ml 

140 

141 

141 

VbndaaM Lx uts 

4® 

436 

436 

Sam mar 

43 

4X75 

-a 

s 

Vodafone 

103 

2.95 

2.95 

Sasal 

59® 

58® 

59 

wr^hroad 

BJ8 

8® 

X35 

SWC 

221 

21 825 

218 

218 

WBBaneHdgs 

X32 

X2B 

3J9 

Tiger Oats 

77® 

76® 

76J5 

76J5 

Wolseley 

432 

437 

4® 





WPP Group 

233 

230 

233 


2135 2080 2090 2183 


CSMcw 100 99.20 99 10030 

DordhchePet U4J0 111.10 113310 109J® 


.... .DSM 
. .. *. Eherier 
- is Fortls Amw 
Cehunks 
., G-BiOCCW 


HocttaH 

80® 

W 

80® 

KUO 

Hoedisf 

82® 

80® 

82.10 

80® 

KanSailt 

691® 

67B 683® 

675 

Lohmeyer 

86 

82 

86 

85 

Linde 

13® 

1283 

1283 

12/2 

Lufthansa 

34® 

3X90 

3405 

32® 

MAN 

537® 

538 

SW 

538 

Mannesmana 

805 

790 

793 

782 


Kuala Lumpur ******* igam 

Pmnoos: 102167 

AMMBHOfp 15 UJO 1480 15 

GoiHng 1220 1180 11.90 1180 

AM Bonking 36 25J0 2575 2575 

Mol InflShipF 670 6J5 670 670 

PetranosGos 9 870 8.90 875 

Pratan 11 JO ia90 11 11.10 

Pubic Bk 3.96 378 196 388 

Rcnong 348 330 344 332 

ReswnlAfartd 875 8.05 810 815 

RflthnonsRAA Z7 27 27 Z7 

8J5 840 

UJO 1050 
1060 1030 
19 1&S3 
820 770 


**; IMG Group 
— - KLM 

KHPBT 
-' KPM 


!aa ,,il, 


TO TO IM an nnj cn Ml rru /TJ iu 

tS* -L «feWueseflsdwB38iq 3750 37 JO 3770 

9710 9L5D H*** 221 21750 220 209 

?r5! *5 IrtS .Its! Munch Rueck R 6730 6540 6600 4530 

25 "-S PretSog 548» SU 5*3) 541 

. 73JM 71 72JD 70.70 muc 7 au\ 7 , 7.711 

jjS SS ” ’HjS ” 3 ^ n L 1 ?™ SAP pH 415 40680 414JD 40570 

! htora^BGia 11 non 11860 * 117 Sduskm 1900 19150 195 191 JO 

~ «t 1 HI <nin SGL Carbon 2475-1 • 239 242J0 23650 

, t«nwws Siemens 11845 11830 11570 11360 

102 7 ? S Spi- 0 jgay (AxsO MW 1675 1 OT W 5 

J M H SuedaiCker 915 906 906 904 

8850 M fom M Tlwssen 4|4 41050 41050 . 409 

S M Veto 101^ 99 JO 9965 99 

vSSswogen MM 1390 13M 1404 


Shoe Dmfay 
TriekomMal 
Tenono 
UtdSiflineen 
VIL 

London 


1480 15 

11.90 1180 
2575 2575 
670 670 
890 875 

11 11.10 

3.96 388 

844 112 

810 815 

27 27 

845 845 

1070 11 

1830 1850 
1870 1860 
831 770 


46J0 UM 45.70 &L30- 
8120 8180 8120 
67 JO 66-TB 6680 65.90 
337 33181 334.6® 331®3 

Ukm 


IMUBMJU WWW 1 /W 1 7JW 771 77A 7 RT 

OceGfirfen 259 JC 250JB 25B 251 ,21 iS 

PbfflpsQec 153 1 47 JO 15870 148 VoBawo 9«' I*® 1W 1»5 1*4 

Prtrgiwn 106 TO 99 JO 101.90 101 

RflndstadHdg 221 JO 219 221 JO 221 

Robeco 19780 197 JO 19770 195J0 Helsinki HEX Ganoid ante: 3431 JO 

Rodmnco 66.90 6620 66J0 6680 rieiSIIHU 

RoHnco 198 19770 198 19B40 

Rorerio 117J0 11770 1l7J0U46C«>T77SnMA J& JL J& <™0 

Unlever cw 437.K! 41150 43670 43040 Huhtoniddl 230 228 228 228 

Vendexhdl . 111.98 109 111.90 1TO90 Kendra 51 50 51 3149 

raw JOO 45.10 4560 45JD Kesko 77 76 7660 77 

WUtenKIOM 281 JO 27660 280 274 AAertdA 2280 2080 n 2000 

MsfmB 169 JO 164 169 JO 165 


Bangkok 

AdvhdoSvc 
Bangkok Bk F 


Thai Airways 

ThcdFivmBkF 

UHConm 

■J Bombay 

f Bsax* 

s ntnoosi Lflw 

1 - fftNhKtPeflni 
j- IndQwBk 
■ ITC 

AAdhflmrosrTri 
RritanceTnd 
State Bk India 
Sled Authority 
TotoEng Loco 

Brussels 


Neste 

SET fedac IS97B Nokia A 
Previous: <5137 OHon-YMyjKoe 


ISnsoA 4B 47 48 47.90 

HuMonaHI 230 228 228 228 

Kendra 51 50 51 5049 

Kesko 77 76 7660 77 

Mcrta A 2280 280) 22 2000 

Metro B 169 JO 164 169 JO 165 

Metaa-SeitaB 4660 4150 44J0 416B 


238 

218 

226 

242 

244 

230 

238 

242 

36 

34 

3X75 

35 

408 

406 

406 

408 

570 

556 

570 

570 

135 

124 

133 

126 

43® 

4X35 

42J5 

42 

55® 

49® 

55® 

55 

147 

1 ® 

145 

147 

120 

114 

119 

117 


tScsca Ind 

BBL 

CBR 

Comiyt 

DrihateeUon 

Etedrabel 

Etedrofino. 

Faria AG 

Gevaeri 

GBL 

GenBanqw 
. Krerfeteank 
iPofeofea 
■"-Powerfin 
Royote Beige 
SoeCwBog 
setmr 
TrocMtri 
UCB 


16*50 15800 
7960 7850 
9700 9530 
3250 3150 
19200 W10B 
1975 1950 
7820 -7720 
3650 3505. 

am m 

3305 ’ 3260 

6010 . sm 

14850 14735 
15600 15000 
145® 

5030 4985 
11225 11050 
3575 3455 
22175 21975 
151 75 15000 
-142800 137000 


***** 


t Copenhagen shek Mecu&u 

° Pf«*leni:Ml.ll 

389 374 387 372 

375 347 347 . 349 

971 968.06 970 940 

„ 403 1 387 393 369 

Dm DonMeBHc ., 770 757 74437 754 

MSiwtaS ^000 420000 420000 405000 
OS 1912 B 292000 287000 290500 284000 
/ FLSWB MO 240 24838 2» 

IQte LidBjW W 771 754 755 761Ji 

NrotairtskB 79? 70S 793 790 

— “ — 974 ■ SKI 970 965 

395 3M 393 390 

-409 400 405 400 

A ■ 425,10 - 418 422 M 


Frankfurt . dax: < 23042 - 

Pmtaos <11X48 

■V- ' AMBB 1855 1820 1855 1853 

Adidas 220 217 2T8JQ 21L5Q 

... * AttvuHdg 458 440 455 JO 41950 

- • ABara . 178 176^1 17B 174J0 
y'K BkBertn 4055 XM 4820 39J20 

- a-1 BASF 4940 68*0 6840 68 

-ill Barer Hypo Bk 7175 71 7X45 <670 

V Bay.vWeMbanK 9i70 89 JO 9540 8X70 

tow 7420 7X30 7X50 72J8 

BmarsM 89 87 JO 8740 85JO 

Bewg 3820 37.90 37 JO 38 

BMW 1470 1455 1462 1451 

CKAGCatenla 189 187 188 180 

Caroroeaboni 6480 60J0 63 5610 

Dander Bern 147 J® 14540 14620 147.75 

Degusn 93 91 JO 91 JO 91 


\OH 




136 133 136 134 

47746 415 423 42SJ0 

198 197 198 198 

104 10X80 1CLM 1M 
13X40 130 13160 130 

90 8650 89 JO 8680 


Previous: 15S3&3B 


SMtai3Bted«c41l629 
PlwfeOK 4154JB 

929 JO 909J5 92875 922J5 
1357 131 3 133675 131 5JC 
489 J82JB 488 462J8 
96 94 96 95 

509 504 553J0 50425 

277.50 264 267 JO 270® 

349 JO 346 34675 347 

339 323J® 32725 32725 
2425 24 24 24 

40X50 39X25 *0025 396 


BEL-28 tedero 2539 J2 
Previns: 249440 


16100 16200 
7960 7940 

9660 9SSS 
3220 3165 
191® 19175 
1975 1975 

7780 77® 

3565 3620 
8040 8060 
3305 3290 

5990 6m 
14825 14800 
15400 15073 
14550 :142® 
5030 4990 
11100 11000 
3575 3475 
221® SO® 
15175 150® 
1428® 1398® 


□DC 
Doo 

Rill 

Hang Lung De* 
Hang Seng Bk 
Hendenoatnv 
HendenonLd 
HKOdnaGas 
HKEledric 
HKTeteconm 
Hopewell Hdgs 
HSBCHdr 
HuteWson 
Hyson Dev 
JatmsonBHdg 


NewWbridDev 
Oftortal Press 
PBorlOrtental 
SHK Props 
SkunTakHdgs 
SknLandpi. 
58)0000 Post 

Swire PacA 
Wharf Hdgs 
Wteefex* 


Jakarta 


Astro Inn 

BklnHIndM 

Bk Negara 

GudangGw ni 

ta doc pn i fi d 

tadaiood 

Ireteat 

SanpownaHM 

Sown Giro* 

T ■ 4 n fc m 1 1 n i iW uni 

laemrnwwa 


8 J 0 

IU>5 

&10 

8.15 

3X30 

3730 

32® 

32® 

15® 

74® 

14® 

73 

Iftl 

tm 

2 XW 

25 

25.15 

75® 

4430 

43W 

4420 

44 

4630 

45® 

46.10 

4630 


47 4530 45J0 
9 JO 9.10 9.15 

14 1X90 1195 
117 11X50 1I4J0 
840 8.15 &3S 

4625 66 66J0 

17 16J5 1650 
31 JO 30 JO 31 JO 
2045 19J0 70 

4.98 420 428 

262 2 S 8 — 

6635 6535 
2X85 23.60 2180 
2M9 22J0 22 JO 
1840 lass 18.49 
48 JO 47 JO 48 
103 233 2.93 

142 TJ7 1J2 
88J0 87.75 B8J5 
665 4J8 440 

7 JO 7 JO 735 
7M 7 JO 730 
68 66J5 66J0 
3130 3140 31 JO 
1735 1735 17 JO 


CM*as8etadw 71144 
Pnvtom: 7124« 

81® 8025 80® 8200 
1825 13® 1800 WO 
1475 14® 1475 14® 
9330 9200 5OT 9M0 
43® 42® 4300 4250 

M® 5350 5W M» 
7475 74® MOO 75® 

9225 9025 99® 90® 

48® <825 4825 48® 

3925 38® 3875 3925 


Johannesburg A iMag Tgo-jj 

AmdaonM BkE 3110 32® 32J0 32JO 
Anglo A hiCdoI 240 259 260 M 

^iaAm-Cofp 2® 258 . S9 JW 

AngtoAmGoM 251® 249 2S5JD 255J0 

AndoAMlnd 196® 196 197 197 

14® 1440 1435 1435 
55® 5435 55 55 

2350 1525 2S20 2530 

De Beers 165® 1642! 165 165 

3235 32® 3335 3125 
39 JS 39 39.10 39.10 
1935 19.10 19 19 

94 94 95 95 

teased Hdgs 4235 S1JS 6131 .6135 
‘ ^ 21® 21® 2115 2115 

117 107 114 -114 

65® 65 <5® 65® 

t rmir nwp 392 385 793 393 

UberiyiST 14835 146® 148® 148® 
LfcUfeMrot 17® 17® 17® 17® 
MUnoreo 97 96 9735 7735 

NmVdk 18® 1835 T8® 18® 

Nedov 100® 1® 10035 10035 

83SSS 1 * *5 £1 ns JS 

Rust PloSmun 7150 7435 - 75 75 


Abbey NaH a® 

AUfedDonecq 4J3 

Angfem Water 845 

Argos 647 

Asda Group 147 

Assoc BrFrads 5® 

BAA 197 

Bandore 12® 

Boro 8X5 

BAT Hid 537 

BankSa*md 431 

Blue dirie 423 

BOC Group 1075 

Boob 842 

BPS fed 3® 

BtOAerosp 1X20 

BriiAlreare 6 J 0 

BG 155 

Bril Land 6.19 

BritPeftn 8.12 

BSkyB 435 

BrtlSteri 1J7 

BritTelecnm 425 

BTR 1.97 

BunnahCasAal 10.45 

Barton Go 134 

Coble Wfefass 615 

CodbUiy Schw 187 

Caritoa Cram 4.79 

Comad Union 7.W 

ComxnsGp 617 

Oowniids X07 

Doras 5J2 

Etedroconpaneire 436 
Energy Group 6J2 

EnferoroeOa 6.90 

FamOjtadal IJ9 

Gent Acddeid 892 

GEC 332 

GKN 9.92 

GkKtWeRoone 1X51 

Grenada Gp 737 

Grand Wet 630 

GRE 236 

GreenalsGp 434 

Gwkiioss 6J0 

GUS 621 

Han 681 

HSBCHWgs 20J5 

ia 9J< 

hnal Tobacco XB1 

KbraSsber 7® 

UnfirfSk® 2 M 

LnndSoc 937 

Lavno 1 66 

Legal Gad Gtp 4JB 

Lloyds TSBGp 674 

Lucm Verify U5 

Maria Spencer 537 

ME PC 495 

MreanfAsEBi 1235 

NflfoulGrid 157 

NallPwer 535 

MflJWtsJ 8J5 

Nad 7® 

ItawtcblWon 117 

Orange X13 

P&O 634 

Pearson 632 

Pffldngtan 1® 

PowerGen 7.93 

PiCT&fFwddi 435 

Prudential 184 

RnfltrockGp 7® 

Rot* Group 336 

RedtBCokn 9® 

Retfland 
Reedtnfl 
RffltoMWW 112 

Ratten Hdgs 612 

Ronro 
RMC Group 
Robtoyce _ 

Royal Bk Sort 648 


U?SunAI 


Barlow . 

CjGLSobMi 

De Bears 

DtM ontern 

FstHadBk 

Gmaar 

GFSA 

Impoiid Hdgs 

btgwsCoal 

hear 

JatwruesIncB 

UbertyHti^ 


SaJnsftury 431 

Sdmdeo 1735 

5catNwaisM 7JB 

Sent Power 454 

Secular 
Severn Trent 
ShdiTronspR 4® 

Siebe 937 

SfluttiNepMw 13} 

SraBtiKSne 12J1 

SnfltBbld 
SteemElec 
Sfagncoodt 
Stand Outer 
Tate 1 Lyle 
Tern 

Tirroes Water BW 

3t Group 4® 

T1 Group 537 

TanUns 3® 

Uiritaver 17.10 

Utd Assurance 428 

UtdNMK 682 

UtdUKBfa 7.10 


FT-SEW: 484630 
Pimloa*: 480S30 

834 838 842 

443 431 445 

738 738 737 

636 641 635 

1® 146 146 

154 5JB 5L56 
5® 5.94 535 

1238 1236 1245 
8J15 123 BM9 

115 £31 617 

422 430 422 

417 419 417 

10® 117» 10J9 
810 825 819 

3jH1 100 
1X10 1X10 1118 
6J1 636 874 

248 2JD 153 
610 610 614 

ao 5 a» bj» 
425 430 425 

1 ® 1 ® 1 ® 
415 423 415 

192 1.94 1.95 

loss mw true 

1® 131 131 

697 613 699 

539 883 689 

431 474 475 

636 676 676 

612 612 614 

192 199 X08 

543 6 « 536 

432 435 431 

647 648 650 

ah? tos a® 
1 ® 1 ® 

878 888 891 

158 161 3® 

9® 9® 9.97 

1X19 1137 1127 

737 734 737 

5.90 622 6 ® 

18? 298 237 

585 £« I® 

604 610 604 

678 STB 539 
1935 19.93 1993 
9.16 9® 9.17 

173 173 180 

7.10 7.12 7J6 

236 2® 2® 

S3 233 % 

417 420 417 

657 66 B 631 

1 ® 1 ® 1 ® 
538 684 677 

490 492 497 

1248 1248 U® 
2 ® 236 2 ® 

5® 531 5J© 

859 864 8 ® 

7® 735 732 
XII 114 114 

ZJ27 ZOB 2® 
612 622 617 

6S3 630 666 

122 130 122 

7® 737 7 33 

436 485 490 

531 671 661 

7® 737 7® 

3® X46 341 

943 9® 947 
295 2.98 297 
699 613 632 

206 110 236 

692 608 695 
Z® 138 246 

9® 9.70 9® 
LIB 221 123 

634 641 633 
9® 10® HUM 
474 480 480 

XU L9S L87 
424 438 424 

1735 1735 1737 
7.14 7J7 

443 447 4® 

245 245 235 
836 832 832 
4® 430 434 

933 9.78 9® 
135 136 134 

1132 1120 1132 
727 740 721 
455 462 433 
7JS 725 7® 

939 992 934 
427 628 427 

415 423 420 
7® 800 7® 


3 IDS 
1699 T7JU 
423 424 

671 682 

6B7 7 93 


Madrid 


Baba index: 61 Xl 6 


ftxvknts; 59X33 

Acerinox 

27450 

26910 

77100 

26720 

ACESA 

1840 

1/95 

1825 

1795 

Agnas BataHor 

6oaa 

/mn 

fM n 

6060 

Aroentorti 

BBV 

B65D 

13190 

8520 

12700 

86® 

12810 

8560 

17810 


1470 

1445 

1470 

14® 

Bonfcfotor 

26990 

25000 

75501 

25500 

BarCenboHisp 

6300 

5730 

6200 

5900 

Bar Pop s* 

357® 

34940 

35750 

34600 

Bar Santander 

4590 

41*1 

45/0 

4325 

CEPSA 

4900 

4810 

4825 

48/5 

Canfifoeide 

3650 

Ml 

36® 

3570 

OrgMcpte 

U8U0 

12220 

8660 

11900 

8/00 

12210 

8680 

11890 

FECSA 

1325 

1340 

1325 

1240 

Gas Natural 

31900 

30010 

30370 

30370 

Iberdrola 

1755 

1705 

17® 

1695 

Prycn 

3290 

3175 

3245 

3275 


6400 

6251) 

64m 

6250 

SnUkmaEiec 

1490 

1-475 

1485 

1450 

Tnbaadera 

8100 

/U50 

7770 

/HUU 


4205 

41® 

4205 

4IIU 

Union Fcnasa 

1245 

12® 

1245 

12® 

VUenc Cement 

2545 

2515 

2545 

253,5 

Manila 


PSE todex: 265X73 


Prevtobfc 264X24 

Ayala B 

1X25 

17® 

1BJ5 

17® 

Arab Land 

8kPh#pbl 

23 

22JS 

2X75 

22 75 

156 

1 B 

155 

156 

CAP Homes 

9® 

XW 

9 

9® 

«o«b Elec A 

m 

83 

84 

83JS0 

Metro Bank 

560 

.545 

SHI 

555 


6® 

6.10 

6.10 

610 

PCIBank 

233 

m 

730 

238 


950 

941) 

9® 

940 


60 

58® 

59® 

59.® 

SMPrneHdg 

730 

7® 

7® 

7® 

Mexico 


Baba index: 4616® 


Previous: 4S90J2 

AJtaA 

woo 

54® 

54® 

5X40 


2035 

19® 

20.10 

19® 

Cemex CPO 

3X25 

37® 

MW 

37.15 

amc 

1X40 

1X18 

13,18 

1X30 


48® 

44® 

47® 

44® 


5X90 

54® 

54® 

54.0(1 

GpoFBconwr 

231 

234 

234 

2 M 

Gpo Rnlnbuna 
XhnbCtarLMex 

35® 

35.10 

3535 

3X70 

3X10 

men 

3X90 

3X15 

TetevtsoCPO 

108® 105® 107.70 106® 

TeMAexL 

19® 

19® 

19® 

1936 

Milan 

MlBTUKureCB: 14928® 


Prevlovs: 14626® 

AteonaAssfe 

16280 

1S930 

15930 

16000 


4470 

4C1AU 

44® 

4400 

Rm RriflffTWB 

61® 

6U60 

6im 

cm 

BCD tfi Roma 

1488 

1435 

1461 

1431 

Bcfwtton 

289® 

tJSSO 

28900 

27300 

Cwfltolbflano 

3645 

3570 


3600 


B960 

mm 

88® 

8765 

EN1 

10500 

10300 

IOCS 

10335 

fw 

6435 

6310 

6385 

6785 


37400 


3710U 

36000 

mi 

16990 

16125 

16/60 

16070 

1KA 

1770 

2600 

2720 

7640 

Ke. 

59® 

5830 

8065 

5935 

8170 

5790 

8095 

Medtobenm 

12800 

12500 

1771 ID 

12390 

Montedison 

12® 

1216 

1242 

1206 

OMR 

4W 

460 

461 

461 

Pormnfct 

2540 

74/5 

2535 

7490 

PM 

5025 

4840 

5000 

4/40 

RAS 

1579 

15550 

15665 

I554n 


rtya 

228® 

2309 

2299 

5 Pnoto Torino 

146® 

14455 

145oi 

I42U0 

SM 

11880 

10700 

10/iU 

I0/1U 

TIM 

6020 

5920 

5955 

5805 

Montreal 

iKtemres index: 3545J9 


Previous: 354X73 

Bee Mob On 

49 

46lb 

49 

m 

CrkTbeA 

teas 

2640 

263S 

w 

OtoUtBA 

3935 

39® 

39® 

ms 

CTFWSvc 

45 «* 

41 Vi 

41V: 

42Vr 


1480 

1035 

184 

IX® 

GtWest Lifecn 

32, W 

37 «r 

32 Vi 



43JM 

47® 

47® 

4X85 


31 vy 

31U 

31K 

3185 


3014 

2HM 

mw 

m 

Nail Bk' Canada 

184 

IU 

IXUb 

1785 

Rower Coro 
Powa-FM 

3614 

3470 

3630 

34 

36U 

34.10 

36W 

34 

77® 

7/35 

2/35 

2/35 


9® 

9® 

9® 

9® 

Royal BkCdo 

6 m 

U'h 

6/Jb- 

UJO 


DmnonkcBfc 
EBwm 
HufetandA 
Kramer Am 

Moot Hydro 
Haste StogA 

OikkAnA 
PtebnGeaSw 
c — PeflrnA 

sted 

TraraaoeanDH 
Storebrand Asa 


OBX Mae 67611 
Premasi 67852 

147 150 147 

189 1B9J0 1® 

25® 2630 26M 
3020 3040 3020 
147 US 146® 
JO 47 45 

434 436 436 

389 390 388 

283 286® 280 

135® 136® 136 

543 545 537 

367 370 361 

142 141 142 

140 T40 144 

603 605 605 

47® 4840 47® 


High Low Ckwa Pnrr. 


PariS CAG-40: 2921.13 

t Previws: 287412 

Accor 925 * 908 924 917 

AGP 201® 198 200® 19630 

AvLknnfe 953 933 953 938 

Alcafri Ablh 767 734 748 741 

AXA-UAP/RM 391® 382.® 39050 381® 


High Law Qou Pro*. 


Bantu be 717 702 715 704 

BK 9® 955 980 945 

BNP 252® 246® 249® 24630 

Coni Plus 1113 1087 1103 1085 

Cam-four 4194 4112 41® 4072 

Casino 287 282® 28X70 284 

CCF 262 248J0 261.50 250 

CeMen 695 675 6B5 681 

Christian Dior 1000 992 997 986 

CLF-Dada Fran 5B3 575 577 589 

Credit Agitato 1260.10 1255J01260.101260.10 
Danone 953 M3 951 Ml 

EM-Aqutkrine 664 655 663 659 

ErtdaniaBS 881 853 B7B 853 

Euiwfisney 140 625 14S 170 

Eurahmri 6J0 6® 670 635 

Gen. Earn 731 714 725 721 

Havas 405 39660 401 JO 399.® 

I inettd 814 786 806 792 

Lafarge 399 386® 308 3® 

Legrand 1205 1152 1197 1T40 

LOreal 2500 2452 2®5 244! 

LVMH 1580 3539 1559 1564 

Suez Lyra 684 667 681 U9 

EauVRM 

Midien B 369® 35610 366.10 356 

Portias A 4C2J9 399 402® 398 


Sanafi 

Schneider 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
Sodexho 
StGobabi 
Soar 


BiadescoPW 
Brahma P« 

' ■ Pfd 


Ccpef 
Etetrobros 
lloufaracoPM 
UgmServlcJos 

pSStLpu 

rcKiiuia no 

PoaSsta Luz 
SUNadofial 
SauznCruz 
TofcbnisPId 
Telendg 
Teterf 
TetesnPU 
UnflHBtCD 
iWmJncsPW 
CVRD Pfd 

Seoul 

Dacom 

Daewoo Hoovy 
Hyundai Eng. 
Kia Motors 
KoranSPwr 
Korea Endi Bk 
- Keraa Mob Td 
LGSemksn 
Pahang bon St 
Samsung Ostoy 
Samsung Etc 
Staten Bonk 


10® 9.90 

831X00 815® 
w nn 54 ® 
72® 69® 
19® 1640 
556® 51600 
590411 560.01 
546® 52600 
434® 42BJ9 
3015® 289® 
196® 190® 
3699 34® 
9.90 9® 

154® 144® 
179® 169® 
156® 14401 
347® 22201 
41® 41® 
12® 11-20 
26® 26® 0 


10® 9® 

625.01 Bia® 
5530 52® 
71® 67® 
19J5 19® 

545® 505® 
590.00 560® 
53600 528® 
432® 42X00 

301.99 283® 
192® 180.10 

253)1 34® 

9® 9® 

151® 142® 

179.99 165® 
15X® 14631 
340® 320® 

41® 40® 
12® II® 
27® 7630 


Composite fadne 725® 
Previous: 74032 

101000 98000 1000® 101 000 
7790 7470 7500 7700 
317® 209® 21000 21400 
12200 119® 12100 17103 
27200 26600 269® 27200 
5390 4890 5060 BIO 
S01000 490000 498000 SD3000 
38500 375® 381® 385® 
64300 625® 641® 642® 
466 U 456® 461® 460® 
695® 6 7800 69U0 688® 
9690 92® 93S0 96® 


Singapore 


Asia Pi* Brew 
CerebmPac 
OfyDnfc 

Cyan Carriage 
Dainr Fora W ■ 
DBS' 

DBS 

Frosa&Htaw 

HKLflnd* 

Jam Mathew 
Jonl Strategic 
Keood 
KeppelBank 
Keppef Fek 


OS Union 
Partway Hdgs 

Sing 

SlngPressF 
Sing Tacit lod 
SlngTeteanwi 
Tati® Bank 

UW Industrial 
UMOSeaBkF 

WEngTalHdgs 

\inUJLdaBtn. 


685 5® 

6 ® 655 

1190 1180 
1280 1230 
080 080 
20 1930 
438 460 

10® 10 
236 232 

685 6 ® 
158 330 

680 630 

170 3J8 

A96 492 

432 420 
1150 14® 
935 9® 
635 630 
7.10 SM 
1330 1130 
7® 7 JO 
3060 27® 
X84 176 

274 2 m 

289 287 
1.13 1® 
16® IS® 
436 416 


685 670 

535 6® 

1380 11® 
1270 1230 

an a® 

19® 19® 
468 iSt 
10® 10.10 
2J3 - 232 
6.95 7 

334 156 
665 6 ® 

330 338 
494 494 

432 420 
15® 1630 
9 30 935 
635 6 ® 

695 SX 
1150 1150 
725 7® 
2730 28® 
376 386 
274 2.70 

288 2 ® 
1.13 1® 

16® 16.10 
416 422 


Stockholm 


SX 16 lodec 348329 

Pmhw MM-12 


AttasCopcn A 
Autaflv 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson B 
Hermes B 
Incentive A 
Investors 
ffcDoB 
Nortfennken 
Phann/UpioiKi 
SondviB 
Scania B 


238-24X50 
2?1J» 292 

625 625 

322 330 

333 34530 
675 077 

410 417 

266 269® 
257 264® 
287® 291® 
247 257 


Eitrohmnri 
Gen. Earn 
Havas 

I metal 

Lafenge 

Legrand 

L<5S 

LVMH 


Midien B 369® 35610 366.10 356 

Portals A 4C2J9 399 402® 398 

Pernod Rtanri 3Bfi m 307® 302 

Peugeot CO 598 5® 589 579 

Pinout-Print 2flW 2790 2835 2829 

Promodes , 2539 2500 2514 2477 

Renault 164® 156 164® 155® 

Rexel 1780 1664 1697 1700 

Rh- Poulenc A 24690 240® 244.90 242® 


553 536 551 533 

338 33X20 33620 329 

1043 1025 1039 1016 

528 506 514 52B 

m W3 738 710 

31® 306» 3149 3346 

B41 B33 834 831 

1670 1470 1635 16® 


SyntMdbo 779 7el 767 760 

TtomsonCSF 169 165-58 147.70 J64&8 

Total B 588 575 586 575 

Ustear 117® 114)0 116® 114 

Voteo 403 39? 400 397® 


S&. Paulo -TSjsS-liKJ! 


SCAB 

170 

167 

170 

167 

S-E Bantar A 

91® 

W 

91 

89® 

Skamfia Fors 

321 

317 


316 

SknmtoaB 

34B® 

345 

346 

SKFB 

230 

216 

230 215® 

Spabanken A 
SfcraA 

178® 172 1® 

132® 127® 132® 

172® 

128 

SvHandfosA 

253® 

749 

25X50 

251 

WwB 

213 

206 

2)3 

204 

Sydney 

All OManrias: 265640 
Pmtoroc 265X40 

Amcor 

8J2 

X45 

X47 

X® 

ANZBking 

10.11 

9.99 

1X08 

1006 

BHP 

1X14 

1/83 

17J4 

18.10 

Banal 

-602 

X95 

401 

X95 

Bromateslmi 

•>6 US 

■4681 

2645 

2651 

CBA 

1637 

16.15 

1642 

1622 

CC AmaH 

16.12 

1580 

1612 

1691 

COIes Myer 

6 ® 

649 

651 

A 4V 

Conrakn 

686 

6 M> 

685 

686 

C5R 

582 

490 

582 

491 

Fosters Brew 

2 ® 

2 ® 

2 ® 

2J7 

Goodman FM 

1.90 

187 

1 ® 

1 ® 

lOAiistnria 

12J3 

1234 

1239 

1270 

Lend Lease 

27.99 

27® 

2739 

2781 

MIMHdm 
Not Ausl Bank 

1 J 6 

1.74 

1.74 

1.76 

19X2 

19.20 

19® 

19J2 

NrriMrtwtHdg 

2.14 

7.11 

2.14 

2.10 

Hows Corp 

613 

609 

611 

616 

Pndflc Dunlap 

333 

X56 

3J7 

162 

Pioneer InH 

5 

483 

495 

485 

Pub Broadcast 

7.91 

/Jf 

784 

i.n 

HO TWO 

21 J 1 

21.18 

21.77 

2182 

51 George Bra* 

X47 

8.40 

8M 

881 

WMC 

782 


un 

/.« 

VftatpocBUng 

VtowtedePet 

0 

11.14 

IM 
11 M 

7.90 

11 « 

7.98 

11.12 

TVOOWDrinS 

4.14 

4113 

4.14 

4U3 

Taipei 

Stock Motet iadiK 955X40 
Previous: 983X77 

OriTwy Life fas 
QwngHiwBk 

157 

151 

151 

157 

135 

12 / 

17/ 

133 

Chfc.i Bk 

84® 

80 

80 

84 

OdraDwelpinl 

180 

175 

176 

175 

CWno Steel 

3X10 

30,70 

m.m 

31® 

FtetBaik 

136 

130 

1® 134® 


69 

6 / 

67® 

69 

Hug Non Bk 
fonCororo Bk 

137® 

132 1319 

IS 

73 

70 

10 ® 

70 

Nan Ya Plashes 

77® 

73 

73 

76® 

Shin Konq Life 

124® 

116® 

118 

124® 

Taiwan Seroi 

154 

138® 

139 148® 

UtdwScro Elec 

51 

49® 

49 9 

.50® 

151 

140 

144 

146® 

Uld WDrU Chin 

a 

66 

66 ® 

67® 


Tokyo 

AJtnornota 
AM Nippon 7 


Nifcai 226 20157® 

Previns: HMUO 


AsoNBank 
Audd Chein 
Asahi Glass 
Bk Tokyo Mfisu 
BkYakaiuina 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
OiubuEfec 


DfflNlppPrmt 

Dairi 

DaLldiiKang 
Dahmfirmk 
Dohro House 

Dtmw Sec 

DDI 

Denso 

East Japan Ry 
Eisai 
Fanuc 
FaflBank 
Fug Photo 


Hsd^mlBk 

HRodil 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

Ha-Yokarfe 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 

Jusco 

Kaflrno 

KmuriEtec 

Kao 

KawasaMHvy 
Kcwa Steel 
KteUNteiRy 
JOrin Brewery 
Kobe Steel 
Komatsu 


AGAB 107 IBS® 107 107 

ABBA 109 107® 109 107® 

AssiOaman 236 230 23* 234 

Astro A 152® 147® 151® 146 


Kyushu EJec 
LTCB 
Maroteni 
Moral 

Meter Carom 

Matsu Elec Ind 

Matsu Elec Wk 

Mitsubishi 

Mitsubishi Oi 

MUsubbhlEl 

MRsuUltdEst 

MHsubUilHw 

MflwWsWMot 

MBsutrisNTr 

Mthuri 


1170 lltf 
7® 735 

3500 3380 

918 905 

617 590 

im mao 

2270 2230 

618 606 

2780 2740 
’337® 3310 

2040 2010 

awo 1980 
2620 2590 
795 

1540 1500 
614 
1340 1330 
890 860 

8320a 8198a 
2870 2B1D 
W in 55 asa 
M! 2S90 
4650 4520 
16® 1620 
4750 4670 

1670 1630 
11® 11® 
1300 1260 
3510 3460 
1740 1710 
439 425 

575 568 

6870 6730 
520 511 

8750a 0570a 
3460 3400 
610 607 

2210 2160 
16® 1630 
525 517 

345 337 

677 672 

1140 11® 
197 
B46 821 

513 5® 

9560 92® 
2000 19® 
540 5S 
507 502 

2050 2010 
4790 4690 
2390 239 
1390 139 
1300 1270 
347 335 

675 664 

16® 1630 
843 827 

795 777 

1810 17® 
1090 1060 


11® 1170 

748 737 

33® 3510 

905 912 

590 60S 

tm io® 
2270 22® 
616 616 
2770 2810 
335D 339 

2040 » 

2000 1990 
2600 2610 
816 791 

1510 1530 
609 615 

1340 1330 
866 899 

8230a 8!8»3 
2830 1870 
5580a 5630a 

3420 2610 

4630 4640 
M» 16® 

■MM 4830 
16® 1690 
11 ® 11 ® 
1280 1310 
3470 3390 
1720 17® 
434 433 

572 564 

6830 6940 
516 510 

B750a S7E0a 
3440 3380 
607 626 

2210 21® 
16® 16® 
525 516 

345 340 

677 675 

11® 11® 

199 198 

879 837 

509 514 

92® 9570 
2000 2000 
530 547 

504 505 

20® 20® 
4710 «» 
2370 7390 
13® 13® 
12® 13® 
336 340 

669 659 

16® 1620 
834 833 

790 795 

17® 18® 
1090 1080 


The Trib Index A*w4 t rfa(»p.«NreY«tii» 

Jan. r. r 99?= TOD. Laval Change % change year to date 

% change 

World Index 179.50 +322 +1.83 +20.41 

Regional Indexes 

Asia/Pacfflc 132.02 -0.19 -0.14 +6.96 

Europe 189.38 +2 85 +1.53 +17.48 

N. America 211.87 +4.81 +2.32 +30 JB 

S. America ' 168.70 +11.45 +728 +47.43 

Industrie Inde xe s 

Capitol goods 230.7 1 +3.40 +1.50 +34.98 

Consumer goods 199.83 +2.49 +1.26 +23.79 

Energy 198.06 +4.60 +2.38 +16.02 

Finance 137.09 +2.80 +2.09 +17.71 

Mscattaneous 178.50 -035 -020 +1034 

Raw Materials 192.73 +4.78 +2.54 *9.89 

Service 167.60 +4.10 +2.51 +22.05 

Utilities 168.27 *4.41 +2.72 +15.90 

Ths International Herald Trt)um Woriti Stock Index V tracks rtw U 5 doUar values ot 
260 mtemaoonaffy inveetaUB atockB Irotn 35 countries For mote mfarnianai. a tree 
bo&da Is ovaiublo by wntrtg to The The index. 181 Awmt& Charles de GauBo. 

8Z521 NstMyCedBx. France. Compiled by Bloomberg Nows. 


High Low 


Mfeflri Fudosn 

1510 

1490 

1510 

15® 

MBtulTnis) 

815 

790 

fl>4 

015 

WirotoMfo 

4020 

4700 


4840 

NEC 

1 M 0 

16® 

1640 

169 

Nikon 

19/0 

1930 

1970 

1970 

NHteoSec 

m 

693 

no 

725 


Nintendo 1 

Sir 

Nfppwi Steel 
Nissan Motor 
NKK 

Women Sec 
NTT 1 

fnTDotn * 

08 Paper 
Osaka Gas 
rauh 

Rohm l 

Satan Sk 

Sanfcyo 

SanwaBanh 

Sanya Elec 

Searni 

SetouRwy 

SetataCIrem 
SekbuJ House 
Seven-Eleven 
Sharp 

SlAaku El Pm 

Shimizu 

SNn-efcuOi 

SNseido 

Shizuoka Bk 

SoflbanK 

5 ony_ . 1 

SumBoroa 

SuralorooBk 

Sun*) Ctem 

SunutomoEfec 

Suns Metal 

SumHTnEt 

TafehaPturm 

Takcdadtea . 

TDK 

TohakuBPwr 
Tokul Bank 
ToWoWVirino 
Tokyo El Pwr 
Tokyo Electron 

Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo Carp. 

Tanen 

Toppon Print 

TorayLnd 

Toshroa 

Tostera 

TopTras? 

Toyota Motor 
Yornanouctil 
orxUXb b:xUXX) 


S67 540 
340 33S 
815 808 
MO 215 
1530 14® 


10500 109® 
824 870 

547 567 

340 335 

815 
219 220 

1490 15® 


1150b U20b 1140b 1140b 
4980b 4870b 4940b 4950b 


627 

617 

624 

629 

30? 

290 

300 

302 

1600 

1570 

15K) 

1610 

12700 

item 

177110 

130® 

B56 

036 

851 

857 

4360 

4270 

43® 

<170 

1*70 

169 

1660 

16® 

520 

513 

518 

513 

8660 

8670 

B£» 

86® 

5690 

5660 

5690 

57® 

1030 

1020 

1030 

1(120 

1170 

11® 

11® 

11® 

90® 

BBS) 

90(10 

9(1® 

1490 

1470 

1480 

1470 

IWO 

1930 

1940 

1930 

643 

631 

640 

633 

33® 

3270 

3370 

3330 

109 

1070 

1820 

1070 

13® 

17® 

1240 

1270 

TO® 

6980 

7000 

70® 

1U0OU 

10500 

107® 

107® 

II3U 

1090 

11)0 

11.10 

1880 

IH5U 

1HKI 

18® 

492 

484 

492 

470 

19® 

1930 

19® 

1970 

812 

208 

7H9 

3® 

1230 

1210 

1210 

1220 

3490 

32® 

.14® 

3280 

34® 

347D- 

930U 

9040 

91® 

93® 

1970 

199 

19® 

1920 

1140 

1120 

11® 

11® 

1450 

1430 

1440 

14® 


224(1 

22® 

22® 

71® 

67WJ 

6H70 

7310 

790 

292 

298 

79S 

m 

AW 

670 

6® 

1300 

1280 

1280 

1290 

1000 

18W 

10® 

18® 

an 

778 

7® 

7V7 

750 

739 

743 

752 

2870 

2770 

2770 

29® 

933 

919 

975 

91(0 

3490 

3440 

3460 

3431.1 

3130 

3080 

3110 

30W 


Toronto 

AMtttCus. 
Afcertn Energy 
Alcan Atom 
Anderson Enpl 
Bk Monteal 
Bk Nava Scotia 
BamckGaU 
BCE 
BC Tetecomm 
Btactem Ptomti 
BombunflwB 
BrasconA 
Cameco 
□BC 
Crto NirilitoB 
CdnfWRes 
CdnOcddPri 
CdnPncic 
Qninai 
Dafasca 
Oamtar 
DenatareA 
Du PontCda A 
Edper Group 
EunNnMng 
FafafnFH 
FrewnMdge 
RetdierChaiA 
PnnmNBmda 
GuHCriaRes 
Imperial 09 
face 

IPL Energy 
LaMawB 
Laewen Group 
MaaniDBli 
MognoM A 
Memanex 


TSE lothsMah: 6674® 
PtttfMM: 6647J9 

27.15 26.70 27.15 2630 
31ta mm 30.90 31® 
4835 47.70 4835 47 JO 
17 16ta 16V 17 

56® 56® 56J5 56fe 
M S3V: 64 6330 

3135 3035 3&BS 3035 
411* 41® 41U 41.10 

34**1 331* 34t* 34 

34® 35J5 3SJ5 
,3P* 3110 32JS 31.® 
3535 35® 3530 3530 
® 50J0 ® 

38® 3815 38® 37.® 

fl® o® en 

34.® 34.55 34® 34® 
-3516 3110 3S30 3?* 
39® 3895 39® 38® 
38U X 38® 38 

30® 2Wt 29® 29.85 
1195 124 im 12® 
31U 31.10 31.10 3H* 
_,31 » ®W 31 

23® 3135 2330 
. 4J 42W 42W 4110 
3® 397 397fo 398 

27 27® 27 

2130 2X10 23® 23 

6Z® 62® 6230 62.15 
1U5 11® 1135 II® 
6^2 67M 681* 68 

«® 4030 4035 4035 
HJ® SO 90-10 ®10 
21 2030 21 2035 

48M 4810 4840 48*4 

19> 19® 19.15 lW* 
m 88 89® 88 

1X85 12<* 124* I2ta 


Moore 

Newbridge Net 
NatmdoUic- 
Naicen Energy 
Nttwrn Teteam 
Nairn 

Oner 

Puncdrv Petlm 
PetroCda 
Placer Dome 
PoraPrilm 
Potash Sask 
Renaissance 
MaAigoai 
RogemC ontetB 
Seagram Co 
ShefCdaA 
S unarr 
Tafcmnn Eny 

Tefegtohe 

Tdus 

Ttemson 

TwO oroBonk 

Transalto 

TransCda Pipe 

TriirariiRni 

TriiecHahn 

TVXGald 

Westerns! Eny 

Weston 


2810 2816 

67 6815 
27H 78 

31W 32 

134.15 1351a 
11 ® 12 
31 <6 32 

7716 27te 
2X05 2115 

22.70 22.90 

1245 121* 

1011* 10185 
■Ta w 3iA5 

33 3340 
m 2535 
5230 52.90 
2005 20J0 
35.95 3140 
41 -N 42 
27 2740 
48 50.70 

15.70 26 

3340 3414 

OM 4XB5 
1648 1655 
27® 28 

66 6716 

29J5 29.70 
A JO 614 
27 27.10 
92 92 


Vienna 

BoeMer-Uddeh 

CrerarasIPM 

EA-General 

EVN 

Runhnfen Wtefl 
OMV 

Oest Elektitz 
VAStoW 
VATeOl 
Wcnabero Bou 


ATX tertob l«844 
Prevnas: I408J4 

1031 1007® 102X10 992 

526® 520.15 522J9 571® 
3500 109 JS 3455 3530 

1628 1607 16141618.73 

515 506.05 511 5T0 

16® 1636 1656 1636 

865 858 860 859J5 

619-05 60S fit® 602 

2594 2550 7565254X90 

2610 25® 2609 25® 


Wellington resE-atadaeun® 

Previous: 2459 JB 


AirNZeddB 

450 

441 

445 

450 

Briefly hwt 

1.36 

1-34 

U4 

115 

Carter Holt onl 

XJO 

360 

338 

170 

FtetdiOiBJdg 

442 

436 

442 

436 

HeWiQiEtiy 

4.93 

436 

490 

4Rfl 

FtetdiCh Foist 

1 J 8 

1.96 

1.96 

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138 

3-16 

3J7 

130 

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3JU 

179 

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3.79 

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7X2 

7J1 

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7.33 

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11JS 

11.70 

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11J5 

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57IMBC3U420 
Prewtfc 3S21S6 

ABB B 

2320 

2258 

2270 

2270 

Adecco B 

564 

545 

563 

545 

AlUSMfSW R 

1391 

1360 

1387 

1356 

Azes-SsronoB 

2240 

21 ® 

22 ® 

2793 

AMR 

079 

mu 

875 

875 

BuerHdg B 
BoMsaH^R 

3225 

2710 

2215 

2212 

3430 

3390 

3400 

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1190 

11/5 

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C 8 w Spec Drera 135J0 132.75 1 3X50 

179 

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1006 

955 

1005 

954 

CrdSubsoGpR 

195 

191 

19150 IB9JD 


539 

538 

539 

530 

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4795 

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595 

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Novate R 

OertknBureiR 

PmgesaHIdB 

PharmVdriB 

Richemont A 

PireWK 

RodwHdgPC 

SBCR 

Sdrindtor PC 
SGS B 
SMHB 
SubaR 
Swiss RaraR 
SwfesatrR 
UBSB 
WSdertharR 
Zurich AssurR 


1893 1871 1875 1B65 
2351 2300 2309 2292 
159 163 15175 

2015 2001 M15 BOO 
885 875 8® 870 

23® 22® 2291 2286 
317 310 315 310 

14390 14260 14330 14165 
406® 399® 405® 399 

18® 1800 1825 1819 
30® 3100 3025 3050 
843 825 830 831 

1167 1145 1154 11® 
21® 2066 2095 2078 
1S48 1KW 1828 1797 
1658 1638 1654 1630 
1391 1371 1381 1376 

584 575 5® 574 













































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 


PAGE 17 


EUROPE 




.. ,v— •. 


Vi .-*• 


* . 

-. V’ 




■- 

;« . •' : 


German Stocks Lead 
As Europe’s Markets 
Reach New Highs 


CvmplrrHn Ore SufFrrei Dopatrhn 

FRANKFURT — The bench- 
mark DAX Ibis Index climbed 
nearly 4 percent to a record close 
Tuesday as investors anticipated 
further consolidation in Germany’s 
banking sector. 

The rise in German shares, along 
with the strong dollar and gains on 
Wall Street, also propelled other 
European bourses to strong finishes. 

Hie DAX rose 157.68 points, or 
3.8 percent, to 4,297.64, its biggest 
one-day jump in nearly five years. 

Bayerische Vereinsbank AG and 
Bayensche Hypotheken- & Wech- 
sel-Bank AG announced plans 
Monday to merge and create Ger- 
many's second-largest bank. The 
new bank would be one of Europe’s 
five largest, and analysts expect fur- 
ther basic mergers. 

“The speculation centers on 
Commerzbank,” said Norbert 
Barth, an analyst with SaL Oppen- 
heim Jr. & Co. “They are the last 
truly independent bank. I am con- 
fident they will not remain alone.” 

1 Analysts said there was specula- 
tion that Deutsche Bank AG was 
selling its auto holdings to financ e the 
purchase of Commerzbank- shares. A 
Deutsche Bank spokesman declined 
to comment 

Vereinsbank led the rise, surging 
1 2 percent to close at 95.60 Deutsche 
manes (S53.24) a share. Deutsche 
Bank, Europe's largest bank, rose 7 


percent to 116.65 DM after Gold- 
man, Sachs & Co. raised its rec- 
ommendation on the bank. 

Hypo-Bank jumped 10 percent to 
73.45, Commerzbank soared ^per- 
cent to 63.00, and Dresdner Bank 
AG rose 7 percent to 83.60. 

In Paris, investors shrugged off 
Monday's announcement of an in- 
crease in corporate income-tax rates 
to 41.6 percent from 36.6 percent to 


help close the deficit The CAC-40 
index closed up 47.01 points, or 1.6 
percent, at 2.921.13. Dollar-sensi- 


tive exporters such as the retailer 
Carrefour SA and die cosmetics gi- 
ant L’Oreal SA led the gains. 

The rising dollar also helped the 
Dutch stock exchange, which is 
dominated by multinational corpo- 
rations such as Royal Dutch/ShelL 
The Amsterdam Exchanges Index 
rose 29.28 points, or 3.1 percent, to 
close at 960.62. 

Italian stocks readied an all-time 
high as Telecom Italia SpA led a 
surge prompted by steady consumer- 
price figures that showed the econ- 
omy was rebounding without the 
threat of inflation. The all- share Mib- 
tel index readied a record dose of 
14,928, up 302 points, or 2 percent. 
The Mib30 Index of Italy’s largest 
companies reached a closing record 
of 22,701, up 506 points, or 2.3 per- 
cent Telecom Italia accounted for 
about one-fifth of the indexes' rise. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Russian Economy Picking Up 

IMF to Find More Currency Reserves and Tax Receipts 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — An International 
Monetary Fund mission arriving in 
Moscow on Tuesday will find the 
economy in better shape than pre- 
vious delegations have, analysts 
said. 

Currency reserves are up. the 
ruble is steady and inflation is con- 
tinuing to slow. More important, 
taxes are flowing into government 
coffers as a new team of reform- 
minded ministers is putting pres- 
sure on big.corporations to pay up 
and restructure monopolies. 

The payoff in unambiguous 
economic growth is still to come, 
and millions of ordinary Russians 
have yet to benefit from die im- 
provements. But with Russian 
markets at or near record levels, 
foreign investors are taking ad- 
vantage of the improvement. 

“The IMF is arriving in par- 
ticularly positive circumstances,” 
said Thomas BaJastrery, director 
of research at Austria’s Creditan- 
stalt Investment Bank in Mos- 
cow. 

Over the last 1 2 months, the fund, 
in hopes of encouraging Moscow to 
mend its ways, has repeatedly 
delayed payments of its SID billion 


three-year credit because revenue 
was running below budgeted levels, 
undermining fiscal policy. 

But in June tax revenue was 
running at 30 trillion to 34 trillion 
rubles ($5.19 billion to $5.88 bil- 
lion), die amount that had been 
budgeted for the year, and was 
double January’s receipts of 14.5 
trillion, Mr. BaLastreiy said. 

“There’s no reason for the IMF 
not to release the money,” since 
“inflation and money supply are 
on target,” said Per Maelstrom, 
director of research at the broker- 
age Brunswick. 

The team from the monetary 
fund is conducting a quarterly re- 
view of the Russian economy to 
decide whether ro pay out a $700 
million tranche of its loan. 

The government paid off 22 tril- 
lion rubles in pension arrears last 
month, and President Boris Yeltsin 
has also vowed to pay off public- 
sector wage arrears by next year. 
Many workers have not been paid 
for months. The federal govern- 
ment owes 7.7 trillion rubles and 
has promised to help out regional 
governments, which owe 2S.6 tril- 
lion. 

Inflation slowed to 14.5 percent 


year-on-year in June. The year-on- 
year rate has dropped every month 
since mid- 1995, when it was 225 
percent 

The improved climate enabled 
Russia to raise 10-year funds on 
the international market when it 
issued its third Eurobond, last 
month. Ministers say improved tax 
revenue may enable Russia to 
shelve plans for a further bond 
issue this year. 

• But obvious black spots remain: 
privatization is being conducted in 
murky conditions, and gross do- 
mestic product is not growing. 

I Scandal Hits Unikombank 

The Russian central bank de- 
manded the dismissal Tuesday of 
three directors of Unikombank and 
imposed restrictions on its bond 
trading, asserting that the bank had 
mishandled federal budget funds, 
Agence France-Presse reported. 

Central bank officials told the 
Itar-Tass press agency that the fed- 
eral banking supervision commit- 
tee had demanded the dismissal of 
the Unikombank chief, Nina 
Gaianicheva, her first deputy, An- 
drei Glariozov, and another 
deputy, Sergei Pashvykin. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frafttarr ■ " London . 

Dax 



F M A M J J v 
1907 5 


F M A M J J 
•1997 


■■■ 

ijjj 


F M A M J Ji 
1997 



Source: Tetekurs 


Inicraamnal Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


Analysts Say LVMH Could Prevail 


Car Sales Lift Volvo’s Profit 


C j ei p U rd byOrrSicgFnmbbpak&s 

STOCKHOLM — Volvo AB 
said Tuesday that its net profit rose 
48 percent in the second quarter as 
< r strong car sales and asset disposals 
outweighed losses in its U.S. truck 
division. 

The automaker also said the 
strong dollar bolstered its first-half 
profit, which rose to 1.96 billion 
kronor ($252 million) from 1 .33 bil- 
lion kronor in the year-earlier 
quarter. 

Pretax profit, the figure most 


widely watched by Swedish in- 
vestors, more than doubled in the 
first half , to 7.95 billion kronor from 
3.86 billion kronor a year earlier. 

Volvo said earlier that its first- 
half profit would include one-time 
gains of 3.03 billion kronor from its 
sale of its stake in the Pripps 
Ringnes brewery and of 221 million 
kronor from the sale of a stake in the 
airline SAS. 

Volvo’s shares closed at 213 
kronor, up 9. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


Ctm^nledby Oar Staff Perm Dapmrim 

PARIS — Hie chairman of 
LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuit- 
ton SA, Bernard Arnault, looks set 
to derail one of the biggest mergers 
in British corporate history and 
oblige G uinn ess PLC and Grand 
Metropolitan PLC to swallow his 
plan for a three-way alliance, ana- 
lysts said Tuesday. 

People fa miliar with Mr. 
Arnault’s plan said Tuesday that 
LVMH, the biggest single share- 
holder in both Guinness and Grand- 
Met, had sold some of its stake in 
Guinness to buy more GrandMet 
shares in order to exert more in- 
fluence over the companies’ planned 
£24 billion ($40.29 billion) merger. 

An LVMH spokesman would not 


say how many Guinness shares Mr. 
Arnault had sold or how many 
GrandMet shares he had bought 

LVMH also declined to confirm 
reports that Mr. Arnault was trav- 
eling to England this week, possibly 
Thursday, to try to convince Gum-, 
ness and GrandMet shareholders 
that his plan would generate more 
value than would the creation of a 
sprawling conglomerate. 

Mr. Arnault, whose company 
owned 14.2 percent of Guinness and 
6.4 percent of GrandMet as of Mon- 
day, wants to hold 10 percent of 
each company, analysts said. That 
would enable him to call special 
shareholder meetings to push his 
plan to merge their liquor businesses 
with LVMH’s Moet Hennessy 


Champagne and cognac unit. 

Hie sources said Mr. Arnault was 
waiting for a go-ahead from Britain's 
takeover panel to present details to 
investors on his proposal, which be 
broadly outlined this month. 

Mr. Arnault has criticized the 
GrandMet-Gninness merger since it 
was announced in May and has re- 
commended creation of a company 
that would concentrate on LVMH’s, 
Grand Mel’s and Guinness’s liquor 
businesses. Mr. Arnault said last 
week he wanted LVMH to own 35 
percent of this new company. 

Guinness shares closed at 598 
pence, down 11, while GrandMet 
rose 14 to end at 622. LVMH shares 
closed at 1,559 francs ($257.41), 
down 5. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


• Italy’s industry minister, Luigi Bersani, confirmed that 
Ansaido SpA, an energy concern owned by Finmeccanica 
SpA, a state-controlled conglomerate, was studying the pos- 
sibility of joint ventures with South Korea's Daewoo Corp. 

• Dassault Systemes SA, a French maker of design software, 
said its second-quarter net profit rose 54 percent, to 77 J million 
francs ($12.8 million), and cited its U.S. marketing strategy. 

• Commercial Union PLC plans to buy Credit Agricole 
Indosuez SA’s 56 percent of Union Financtere de France 
Banque SA for 1.3 billion francs to increase its market 
presence in France. 

• France’s industrial production fell a greater-th an -expected 
1.6 percent in May from April, and manufacturing output 
dropped 1 .7 percent as production slowed in the weeks before 
national elections. The decline was led by the automobile 
sector, where production fell 3.2 percent 

• The Confederation of British Industry said the country's 
economic and business interests would profit if Britain even- 
tually joined a single European currency, but it recommended 
against joining at the scheduled beginning of European mon- 
etary union in January 1999. 

• The Bank of England should give testimony before the 
House of Commons’ Treasury select committee after every 
quarterly inflation report, the chancellor of the Exchequer, 
Gordon Brown, said. 

• Ukraine plans to sell shares of its most attractive companies 

in international auctions, the acting director of the State 
Property Bind said; adding Aar tenders for international banks 
to manage the auctions would be extended wi thin two to three 
months. Reuters. Bloomberg 


Americans Ride the Dollar to Europe 

Strong Currency Helps Spur a Forecast 9.5 Million to Cross Atlantic 


By Barry James 

Imemationa l Herald Tribune 


PARIS — Shifts in relations be- 
tween currencies are causing a tourism 
boom worldwide. 

Encouraged by the buoyant U.S. 
economy and the strength of the dollar,. 
Americans are traveling to Europe in 
record numbers this year, and a 20 
percent appreciation of the British 
pound againsi the Bench franc has 
produced a sudden 20 percent increase 
in cross-Channel tourism. 

“Currencies are always the big 
factor in tourism, 7 ’ said Geoffrey Lip- 
man, president of the World Travel and 
Tourism Council in London. “We are 
bullish about the industry almost 
everywhere.” 

Although there is evidence that Jap- 
anese tourists, who have become 
known as big spenders, are tightening 
their belts because of economic prob- 
lems at home, tourism in Asia is grow- 
ing at a rate of 8 to 10 percent a year, 
varying from country to country, Mr. 
Lipman said. This is double the growth 
rate in Western Europe. 

China is emerging both as a major 
destination, with an estimated 50 mil- 
lion visitors this year, and as a source of 
tourists. Around 4 million Chinese 
people are expected to travel beyond 
their borders mis year. 

According to the European Travel 
Commission in Brussels, which com- 
piles statistics from tourist departments 
of 27 member countries, at least 9.5 
milli on Americans will visit Europe 
this year — half a million more than 
last year's record number. 

Spain remains the leading European 


year 


travel attraction, followed by France. 
Italy and Britain. But although the 
firming of the dollar makes the United 
States more expensive for foreign vis- 
itors, it remains the top international 
travel destination. 

The popular tourist destinations of 
Europe, such as Florence, Venice and 
Paris, were bursting with tourists even 
before most Europeans began their 
own summer vacati ons. 

Medieval towns with narrow 
cobbled -streets are crowded with 
people. Venice, for example, expects to 
attract well over 400 visitors this 5 
for every resident 

City officials are battling to control 
the human tide — for example, by 
banning buses from crowded urban 
areas in Rome and Florence as well as 
in Canterbury, England. 

“There may eventually have to be 
some sort of licensing system, al- 
though very few places have reached 
that level yet,” Mr. Lipman said. 

Although die perky dollar malms 
Europe seem cheaper to Americans 
than it has for a long time, Ac benefits 
are not all one-way. For example, 
many tourist attractions that used to be 
free now charge often quite hefty en- 
trance fees. Canterbury Cathedral, a 
favorite spot for American visitors, 
even charges to step inside the grounds 
surrounding the church. 

But generally speaking, according to 
Walter Leu, executive director of die 
European Travel Commission. 
“Americans are starting to realize that 
Europe is good value for their money 
again. It is becoming reasonably 
priced.” 

Mb’. Leu said Americans were es- 


pecially welcome because they spent 
between two and four times as much as 
the average European tourist. He said 
the Americans were increasingly headed 
for cultural events and festivals. 

This is good, he said, because “100 
uneducated tourists cause more harm 
than 10,000 educated ones.” 

The tourist boom is good for jobs. 
Dublin has increased its number of 
hotels from 81 to 93 over the past two 
years and still has trouble meeting de- 
mand. A further 14 hotels are planned. 

Tourism accounts for about 5 per- 
cent of gross domestic product in the 
European Union, and this appears set to 
rise. The European Commission, the 
EU’s executive body, plans to sharply 
increase its funding in support of the 
tourist industry. 

Mr. Lipman said tourism's contri- 
bution to gross domestic product in 
Europe was probably in the region of 
12 percent, including construction 
spending and enhanced retail sales. 

“We believe that we are generating 
more jobs than any other sector,” he 
said — probably as many as 2 million 
jobs in the Elf 6ver the next 10 years and 
even more in Eastern Europe, where 
facilities still lag behind the need. 

Mr. Leu said tbe European travel 
sector was in tough competition with 
Asia, America and the cruise industry 
and had to offer quality and value for 
money to get people to come, and come 
back. 

Hie tourist boom in Eastern Europe 
that followed the collapse of commun- 
ism is ebbing, Mr. Leo said, and East 
European destinations will have to 
realize that “they most increase the 
quality and not just raise the price.” 



STRATEGY: Branching Out 


Ym W l LLllU/RfPlCTT 

RENAULT VOTE- — A man casting his ballot Tues- 
day on whether to accept a take-it-or-leave-it layoff 
plan at a plant the company plans to close in Vil- 
voorde, Belgium. Workers approved the referendum. 


TRAVEL: Low Inflation, Strong Economy and Booming Markets Prompt Many to Hit the Road 


Continued from Page 13 

-modified version of its A3 19 
as a corporate jet. 

In January, Boeing Busi- 
ness Jets was folded into the 
new Boeing Enterprises di- 
vision, which has moved 
quickly into other ventures. In 
March, it joined forces with 
Flightsafoty International, a 
company acquired last year by 
the investor Warren Buffett’s 
Berkshire Hathaway Inc., to 
train commercial-jet pilots. 
And in May, Boeing Enter- 
prises agreed ro a joist venture 
with Aero Vodochody AS, a 
Czech manufacturer of mil- 
itary jet fighters. 

Mr. Clarkson said Boeing 
Enterprises was considering a 
number of other businesses. 
One is heavy maintenance of 
aircraft, work that many air- 
lines prefer to form out to 
subcontractors. If it proceeds 
with that idea, Boeing may 
find itself competing against 
some of its airline customers. 
Lufthansa AG, for example, 
handles heavy maint enanc e 
for more than 100 airlines. 
Lufthansa said it did not see 
Boeing conflicting with its in- 
terests unless Boeing went 
after some of its maintenance 
clients. 

Boeing executives de- 
clined to predict how much 
revenue Boeing Enterprises 
might generate in coming 
years. But Nicholas Hey- 
mann, aerospace analyst at 
Prudential Securities, has es- 
timated that Boeing Enter- 
prises could take in $5 billion 
by 2000, with operating profit 
margins of about 20 percent to 
25 percent. He also predicted 
AatAe division would grow 8 


percent to 10 percent a year. 

One thing about Boeing’s 
new strategy is clean Boeing 
will now leave behind fewer 
curiosities for historians. 

When Ae aircraft industry 
slumped in 1918 after Ae end 
of World War I, far example, 
Boeing tried to augment its 
modest plane-building busi- 
ness by making flat-bottomed 
boats called sea sleds and fur- 
niture like dressers and 
phonograph cases. 

The next big push to di- 
versify came after World War 
a when the company tried 
the turbine-engine business. 

In Ae late 1960s. when 
business was so slow that Boe- 
ing at one point went 18 
months without getting a 
single order, Ae company built 
passenger and military hydro- 
foils, wind-powered turbines, 
public-transit equipment, even 
police radio scramblers. 

But as demand picked up 
for planes, particularly with 
airline deregulation in 1978, 
Boeing eventually left all 
these businesses to focus on 
the products and customers it 
knew best 


Continued from Page 1 

travel,”, said Laurie Winkel- 
man, president of Jaguar 
Travel Group in Alexandria, 
■j, Virginia. “We’re seeing 
- people who haven't fraveled 
in possibly Ae last two or 
three years.” 

Italy and France are prov- 
ing particularly appealing this 
season to travelers eager to 
take advantage of Ae strength 
of the dollar againstEuropean 
currencies, agents said. The 
; dollar was trading near 6.06 
francs on Tuesday, compared 
wi A about 5.06francs a year 
ago, and at 1,749 lire, up from 
1,515 lirein 1996. 

In Ae United States, Dis- 
ney World has been’ a big 
draw for families, as have na- 
tional parks in California and 
\ Arizona and cruises to 
Alaska, travel agents said. 

- But Ae boom, is not evenly 

spread. Some tourist sites, in- 
cluding several national 
parks, have had slight de- 
clines in Ae number of vis- 
itors. Yellowstone National 
Park in Wyoming, for ex- 


ample, has bad a 5 percent 
drop for the first six months of 
Ae year, while the Grand 
Canyon has experienced a 2 
percent decline. 

But in general, more travel 
is leading to fewer vacancies 
and higher prices, travel 
agents said. Prices for hotels, 
food and airlines in boA Ae 
United Stales and overseas, 
they said, have risen over Ae 
. past year. Hie overall cost of 
traveling in Ae United States 
rose 3. 1 percent in May from 
Ae year-earlier month, ac- 
cording to the Travel Industry 
Association’s monthly price 
index, while Ae consumer 
price index rose 2.2 percent 

Airline ticket prices also 
have jumped, rising 6.5 per- 
cent in May from a year earli- 
er. according to Ae industry 
group’s index, but Americans 
are still flying. 

Airlines’ load factor, or Ae 
percentage of seats filled per 
flight reached 71 percent in 
May, up 3.1 percentage 
points from a year earlier, ac- 
cording to Ae Air Transport 
Association of America, an 


airline industry trade group. 

Consumers are willing to 
pay more as long as the econ- 
omy remains strong, industry 
specialists said. That is linked 
closely to the “wealA ef- 
fect” in which consumers do 
not mind spending more be- 
cause the value of their in- 
vestment portfolios has risen 
enough to make them feel 
richer, several economists 
said. 

Hie “wealA effect” in Ae 
minds of many consumers 
'"reduces the imperative for 
savings because Ae market 
has done it for them,” said 
Mr. Prakken of Macroeco- 
nomics Advisers. Consumers 
“don’t have to sell the stock 
to do Ae spending,” he said. 

Disposable income, or Ae 
income an individual has left 
after paying expenses and 
taxes, has grown steadily in 
the United States since 1994. 
For Ae first quarter of 1997, 
disposable income rose 333 
percent, to $5.1 trillion, ac- 
cording to the Commerce De- 
partment. 

For a time, Americans dir- 


ected tbe extra cash toward 
such big-ticket items as hous- 
ing, education, automobiles 
and household appliances. 
But as Ae economic good 
times continue, people are 
shifting more money toward 
summer vacations. 

Consumers are approach- 
ing travel with an eye toward 
“value banting,” said Bar- 
bara Katz, senior travel coun- 


selor at Ae American Express 
Travel office in Boston. 
“Consumers are more fo- 
cused on getting an experi- 
ence and value for tbe dollar 
rather than the cheaper 
price.” 

For example, travel agents 
said, cruises to Alaska have 
grown in popularity over the 
past several years, largely be- 
cause they appeal to travelers 


wbo want a special experi- 
ence, as Aey take in majestic 
views of the state’s landscape 
from onboard or go back- 
packing once the ship docks. 

Crystal Cruises is nearing 
capacity on its six 12-day 
cruises to Alaska this season, 
although prices ran from 
$4,136 to $14,891 per person 
in a double-occupancy room, 
a spokesman said. 


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IWcover Ike L/*k To life 












PAGE 20 


^ ItcralhS&ilmnc 

Sports 


■WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 


•e 

p -5 


ii 


World Roundup 


Ronaldo Can Move 

soccer FIFA, the governing 
body of world soccer, cleared the 
way Tuesday for Ronaldo, the 
world’s roost expensive player, to 
join Inter Milan. FIFA decided dial 
the 20-year-old Brazilian striker 
was free of any contractual oblig- 
ations with Barcelona and author- 
ized the Italian Football Federation 
to register Ronaldo with immediate 
effect as an Inter player. (Reuters) 

Coach Is on the Run 

soccer The coach of Metalurg 
Mariupol, the bottom team in the 
Ukrainian Premier League, is on 
the run from the police after being 
banned for life for allegedly beating 
a referee Last week. 

Police units were dispatched to 
the city of Luhansk after reported 
sightings of Yuri Pohrebnyak, but 
so far they have not cracked him 
down, Olexander Tkachenko, a po- 
lice official, said Tuesday. 

“No one has seen Pohrebnyak 
since the incident," said Ivan Hai- 
voronsky, an official with the soc- 
cer authorities for Ukraine's Don- 
etsk region. “He’s simply 
disappeared." 

Pohrebnyak was banned after al- 
legedly leading a mob that attacked 
die referee and a linesman in their 
hotel room after a 5-2 home loss to 
Vorskla Poltava. (Renters) 

Portuguese GP Canceled 

formula one The rescheduled 
Portuguese Grand Prix was can- 
celed Tuesday. 

The race had originally been 
schednled for Oct. 26, but was re- 
placed with the European Grand 
Prix at Jerez, Spain, when it ap- 
peared that safety work at the Estoril 
track would not be finished in time. 

The Portuguese Economy Min- 
istry then said the track would be 
ready Nov. 9. 

FJA, which runs the sport, said it 
needed unanimous approval from 
the teams for the new date. Although 
a majority were in favor, sane, 
thought to include McLaren, Ferrari 
and Sauber, voted againsL(Rcuters) 

Jayasuriya Blasts Century 

cricket Sanath Jayasuriya 
hammered a 108 off 83 balls Tues- 
day to set Sri Lanka on its way to a 
-ran victory over Bangladesh in 
an Asia Cap match in Colombo. 

Jayasuriya powered Sri Lanka to 
296 for four in 46 overs. He hit 24 
runs in one over against bowler 
Akram Khan facing die last five 
balls and striking two 6s, then two 
4s and then another 6. Bangladesh 
made 193 for eight. (Reuters) 



Hard-Headed Business 



Soccer ShotiH Think About Players’ Brains 


soccer need its 


Tread examined^" - 

I ask that in two different frames of 
mind- There is genuine cause for con- 
cern when a team doctor contends that 
Jurgen Klinsmann, Germany’s captain. 


w< 


Cyclists riding under sunny skies in the Swiss Alps on Tuesday in the 16th stage of the Tour de France. 

Lotto Rides on Sunny Day’s Dark Side 

Team, Whittled Down to 4, Seeks Simply to Survive the Tour 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 


F RIBOURG, Switzerland — What 
a grand morning h was in the Alps. 
Birds sang in the fir trees, die sun 
glinted off distant glaciers, the breeze 
brought the scent of fresh-cut hay in 
meadows speckled with wild irises. 

Bah, or a word to drat effect, said 
Jean-Luc Vandenbroucke, no reader of 
Wordsworth. Instead he is the directeur 
sportif, or coach, of the Lotto team in die 
Tour de France, a job roughly com- 
parable to captain of the Titanic. 

Starting with nine riders July 5 like all 
22 teams In the bicycle race. Lotto has 



I)rn.i Cnvi.Ttv Avacuinl 

Sanath Jayasuriya setting off 
for another run' on Tuesday. 


lost men to all conceivable causes ex- 
cept kidnapping. 

One rider was banished for failing a 
drug test, another fell sick and had to 
quit, and then three finished so far be- 
hind in the stage to Courchevel on Sun- 
day that they were eliminated. 

None of the other major teams have 
so few riders left in the Tour. 

“A gray day, but not a black day," 
said Vandenbroucke, who honed his 
chromatic distinctions while traveling 
down this path two years ago. The black 
day occurred when five Lotto riders 
were disqualified for lateness in crossing 
am Alpine finish line in the 1995 Tour. 

That left his active roster at two men. 
Vandenbroucke well remembers the 
embarrassment of leading just those two 
riders through the final stages of die 
three-week Tour, so he is relatively up- 
beat about having the luxury of double 
that number. 

Nevertheless, his eyes were red- 
rimmed — perhaps from loss of sleep — 
when he spoke in an interview about the 
latest problem. “It was even worse 
when we were down to two riders," he 
said in a low voice. “I hope we can get 
all four to Paris" where the Tour ends 
Sunday. “I hope four, I really hope." 

Lotto’s chances improved Tuesday 


when the pack of 143 men crossed the 
last major climbs during a 181-kilometer 
(1 13-mile) trip from the French resort of 
Marzine to the Swiss city of Fribourg. 
Once the race returns to the mother coun- 
try Wednesday, the roads will be more or 
less fiat and favor the riders’ chances of 
reaching the Champs-Elysees. 

This 16th of 21 daily stages, con- 
ducted in continuing sunny and warm 
weather before big crowds, was won in a 
sprint by Christophe Men gin, a French- 
man with La Francaise des Jeux. He 
finished about two bicycle lengths 
ahead of Franck Vandenbroucke, a Bel- 
gian with Mapei who is the Lotto lead- 
er’s nephew, in a time of 4 hours, 30 
minutes, 1 1 seconds. Richard Virenque, 
a Frenchman with Fes tin a, the man in 
the best climber's jersey and the No. 2 
rider overall, was third. 

Jan Ullrich, a German with Telekom, 
was 1 1th in the sprint and on troubled-in 
the yellow jersey of die race's leader, 
with 6:22 over Virenque. But Bjame Riis, 
a Dane with Telekom and die defending 
Tour champion, cracked on the day’s 
major climb, the Croix Pass, and dropped 
from fourth place to seventh overall 
That appeared to end the battle for 
third place, which was the only battle 
remaining. Marco Pantanu an Italian 
with Mercatone Uno, remained in third 
and seems untouchable in the long time 
trial Saturday on the flat. 

It was Pantani who noticed that Riis 
had fallen behind in the climb. The 
Italian put the pedal to the metal and 
began opening a gap that finally left Riis 
6:12 down at the finish. 

No Lotto rider was prominent in the 
stage because survival, not risk-taking, 
is the corporate strategy now. 

Staring sullenly out the window of his 
hotel at the explosion of nature’s won- 
ders, Vandenbroucke denied that he was 
crashed. Disappointed, yes, but only up 
toapoint. 

“For the Tour, I'm disappointed," he 
said. “For the season as a whole, no. 
We’re a team with a moderate budget, 
which isn't enough to do well in the 


Tour de France." His team gets about 
S3 million a year from its sponsor, the 
Belgian national lottery, and thit is 
about half of what most other reame in 
the race spend. 

“But we’re first in the World Cup,” he 
continued, referring ro the series of pres- 
tigious one-day races, known as elastics, 
in the spring and fall. “We have a team 
for die classics. Normally you ’d have one 
team for the classics, another for the 
Tour, but for us, that’s impossible'' be- 
cause of budget. 

Still, he went on, “on paper, we came 
to the Tour with a strong team. But we 
lost our best climber, Andrei Teteriouk, 
because he was sick. And then there was 
Abdou." Djamolidine Abdoujaparov, 
an Uzbek who has won nine. Tour 
stages, tested positive In a doping check 
and was ousted from the race before 
being fired by Lotto. 

“He was a rider I counted on,” 
Vandenbroucke said. “He was a key 
rider for the Tour.” . 

Outside, the Lotto flotilla of four 
team cars, a supply truck anda small bus 
was being whittled down to the vehicles- 
needed for four riders and their support 
Staff. Vandenbroucke was glum. 

Nothing Left to hope for? 

“To continue surviving, ’ ’ he replied. 
“Without riders in the race, what can 
you hope for?” 


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was put at risk after suffixing a con- 
cussion aid was obliged to play within 
four days without neurological screen- 
ing. 

Machismo overriding sanity. 

Then there is Paolo Di Canio, a wing- 
er hypnotic on the ball, yet so erratic he 
is something of a head case. 

First, Klinsmann. On his debut for 
Tottenham Hotspur against Sheffield 
Wednesday in August 1994, Klinsi was 
knockedout by a fearful clash of heads. 
Patrick Keating, the doctor attending 
him. Said Klinsmann WHS UDCODSCiouS 
far three minutes and showed signs of 
. an epileptic fit 

In most contact sports, concussion 
si gnals automatic suspension imtil the 
fear of brain damage is eliminated. Soc- 
cer, while demanding that players head a 
fest-moving ball, is retarded in logic; no 
authority cares sufficiently to guard 
against percussive blows to the brain. 

Klinmrmnn is as cerebral as soccer 
players come. When he arrived at Tot- 
tenham, the English insinuated that he 
was a “ diver, ” a performer who feigned 
injury. He proved a point He had a 
headache, he was bloodied, but he “in- 
sisted’ ’ on playing against Everron four 
days later. He scored twice. 

A couple of months — and perhaps 
mercifully not a matter of days — later 
he suffered another concussion, body- 
checked by Mark Bosnich, Aston 
Villa’s hot-beaded Australian keeper. 
By then “Our Jurgen" had earned his 
badge as a full member of the British 
macho set. 

He appears to have gotten away with 
it. He didn’t develop migraines; be 
hasn’t forgotten how to score; he’s had 
lucrative seasons in Munich and is mov- 
ing on to Sampdoria in Genoa. 

But the medic who watched over him 
on that Sheffield pitch has not fared so 
welL At a London industrial tribunal last 
week Keating claimed he was construc- 
tively dismissed “because I was not 
prepared to bend the rales and com- 
promise die health of play era. ” 

Keating, a general practitioner, ac- 
cused Alan Sugar, who runs Tottenham 
Hotspur, and Tony Lenaghan, the team 
physiotherapist, of ignoring his advice 
to consult a neurologist before allowing 
Klinsmann to head a ball. - 
“Lenaghan told me I was vety naive 
about the politics and economics of the 
situation, A Keating told the tribunal. 
“The physiotherapist told me the club 
was very angry wim me and that I was to 
keep a low profile." 

In a statement, Lenaghan denied 
those remarks, and insisted that a spe- 
cialist examined Klinsmann “as soon as 
theplayer was prepared to see him.” 

Inis rebuttal, and the club's assertion 
that it was ‘ ‘ludicrous to suggest health 
was less important than money,” were 
not cross-examined. The bearing was 
dismissed on the technically that the 
doctor, who resigned after being 
dropped from first team duty, bad only 
part-time employment at the club. 

Keating may seek redress in the Euro- 
pean Court Meanwhile, Klinsmann’s 
concussion might concern 300 of the 
world's best paid players earning Eng- 
land’s high pound. 

Part of die grumbles Fabrizio Ravan- 
elli, the Italian striker, had of his first 
season with Middlesbrough was about ' 
medical backup. He is reputedly paid 
$64,000 a game, yet when he tweaked a 
hamstring he flew home to Italy to have 
it massaged. 

On Tuesday, Ravanelli suddenly re- 
versed his decision to quit Middles- 


brough. We may never know whether 
his doubts were in the head, the heart or at 
the bank balance. His mutterings are^ 
die money is fide but tire games are 
too furious and too many, and the prep- 
aration backward. 

Still in dispute, in limbo and in Italy, 
is Paolo Di Canio. From bis agent’s nest 
in Florence, Di Canio says he might 
need treatment for stress. 

It is self-induced. His style is a throw- 
back to individualistic wingplay. He 
pleases the crowds, but he cannot settle. 

He has played in Rome, Naples and 
Milan. He thrilled to deceive in Glasgow 
where Celtic lured him for $4.5 million. 

In white boots — and once golden 
ones — he dazzled and he disrupted. For 
some reason, referees sent him off for 
fighting or for foul language; for some 
reason Celtic fined him two weeks' pay 
for a one-player rebellion against Fer- 
gus McCann, the club chairman. g , 


has a kindly side, donating those gold 
boots id an auction for a children's char- 
ily, and shunning publicity for doing so. 

Di Canio is the epitome of the soccer 
showman — pleasing the gallery rather 
than conforming to the team plan, giv- • 
ing to underprivileged kids, yet, say 
Celtic, going absent at crucial times to 
extort more money from his club. 

Celtic says Di Canio wants more than 
the $20,000 weekly salary he agreed to 
for the next three years. Di Canio, ab- 
sent without leave while the team re- 
hearses for a UEFA Cup game in 
Cardiff on Wednesday, thinks hims elf 
above the cause. 

In Belgrade, also Wednesday, FK». 
Partizan is due to contest a Champions , 
League qualifying match against NK 
Croatia Zagreb. The teams have been 
rivals for decades, but this is the first 
meeting since Yugoslavia broke apart. 

Wednesday is thus a milestone, a 
sudden test of security and feelings after 
die Serb-Croat war. “This is a chance 
for football to bring two countries to- 
gether on the field of play,” enthuses 
Gerhard Aigner, general secretary of 
UEFAi the governing body of European 
soccer. ' ‘a great opportunity to improve 
the relationship between two countries 
which have been in conflict.” 

Idealism, through sport, is the goal. 
Let os pray the players keep their heads. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Tini.es of London. 

■ Serbian Police Put on Alert 

The Serbian police have been put on 
alert, and tough security measures have 
been imposed on the sold-out Yugoslav 
People's Army stadium for Wednes- 
day’s European Cup match between 
Croatia Zagreb and Partizan Belgrade. 

All fans will be searched and objects as 
small as cigarettes fighters confiscated, 
said Zaiko Zecevic, Paitizan’s general, 
secretary. Car parking has been banned 
within a circle of a radius of 500 metres 
(550 yards) around Partizan ’s stadium. 

Hie two teams agreed last week not to 
allow each others’ fans to travel to the 
away matches in the two-legged meeting 
but some said they would try to attend. 
The Yugoslav embassy in Zagreb has 
refused to issue visas to Croatian fans. 

Marijan Vlak, che Zagreb coach, said 
he had told his players to ignore taunts. 

“We realize we aren't going to the 
theater all sorts of thing s are going 
to be shouted at us from the stands,” he 
said. “But they can't hurt us as long as 
they don't invade the pitch. ” 

‘ ‘The war started with soccer riots, " 
said Nenad Bijekovic a Partisan direc- 
tor, referring to a clash between Croatia, / 
then Dinamo, and Red Star Belgrade in • 

1 990 when ZvoninurBoban, the Zagreb 
star, kicked a policeman. “We hope that 
the still -existing tensions will formally 
end with this soccer match.** 

Daca Mihajlovic, a Partizan fan, said: 

* ‘We’ll call it the truce. We badly miss 
the good old days when we fought gal- 
lant battles with Croatian fans in the 
stadiums..” (AP, Reuters . AFP) 


. I 


No. 99 Is Trying Hard 
To Leave Past Behind 


The Associated Press 

Play after play. No. 99 in 
the blue jersey is stuffing 
thing s in the middle of the line 
or hustling to chase down a 
runner. 

Christian Peter, clearly the 
most visible newcomer in the 
New York Giants’ training 
camp, is taking full advantage 
of a second chance. 

“This has been a lot of 
fun,” said the former Neb- 
raska nose tackle, out of foot- 
ball last season after a bout 
with alcoholism and legal 
problems ranging from sexu- 
al assault to urinating in pub- 
lic. 

‘Tm having a good time, 
but I feel rusty. I red as long 
as I stay focused and study 
and weak hard, irw3I all come 
into play.” 

New England selected 
Peter in the fifth round of the 
1996 draft, but cut him days 
later after craning under fire 
because of his legal problems 
at Nebraska. The foaner New 
Jersey prep star signed with 
New York in December. 


‘Tm doing the best I can. 
If it’s nor good enough, ar 
least I can look at myself and 
say I did the best I could,” . 
Peter said Monday after. 
practice at Albany, New 
York. “I can't change what 
has happened in the past. I can 
just go forward, that’s what I 
plan on doing.” 

Peter joined the Giants 
after agreeing to participate in 
a rehabilitation program that 
included substance abase 
treatment and psychological 
counseling, treatment for at- 
tention deficit disorder and a 
to complete his un- 
luale degree. He did all 
that, and is off to a fast start in 


.1 


would say from the first 
day I laid my eyes on Chris- 
tian, he is one guy who bas*ti 
gotten better every day , ” saidt'-' 
Denny Marrim, the defensive 
line coach. “He has done 
everything and even more 
than we have asked. He 
knows he has a second chance 
and he is making the most of 
it" 



t 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1997 


PAGE 21 


*EDNEs 


SPORTS 


Alvarez Fans 4 Tigers 
In Inning as Sox Win 


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7Vre Associated Press 

Wilson Alvarez became the first Chicago 
White Sox pitcher to strike out four baiters in 
an inning a$ the White Sox beat the Detroit 
Tigers, 3-0. 

►; *T don't think about that," Alvarez said 
'after becoming the 28th pitcher in modem 
, Major League history to post fourstrikeouts in 
an inning in the team's Monday night victory. 
. ‘ But I like to be in the history book when the 
, Whire Sox win." 

* In the seventh inning, Tony Clark was first 
up for Detroit — and die first to strike out. 

.Then Phil Nevin fanned on a wild pitch but 

* Baseball Roundup 

.reached first base safely when the catcher 

* couldn't handle the ball. Alvarez (9-7) then 
. struck out Melvin Nieves and Orlando Miller 
. to end the inning. 

Alvarez worked 7‘A innings, striking out 

* nine and giving up three hits. He has won six 
of his last seven decisions. 

Frank Thomas, who ended a 1 -for- 13 
slump with four hits Sunday at Baltimore, hit 
‘ a two-run homer in the First inning. Thomas 
went 2-for-3, raising his American League- 
. leading average to .375. 

Yank ms 7, Browers 3 In Milwaukee, Andy 
Pettitte picked off two runners to increase his 
league-leading total to 1 1 as he won his fourth 
! straight decision. 

* Pettitte (12-5), who gave up three runs and 
nine hits in 634 innings, has not lost since June 

'21 at Cleveland. 

New York took a 3-0 lead in the First inning 
] with the aid of two errors, three stolen bases 
‘ and a hit barter, then added a run in the second 
on Pat Kelly’s double. 

After Milwaukee closed to 4-3, the Yan- 
kees added three runs in the ninth on con- 
| secutive run-scoring singles by Paul O'Neill, 
Tine Martinez and Charlie Hayes. It was 


Martinez’s league-leading 92d run batted in. 

Ortolos 5, Rangers i Rafael Palmeiro put 
Baltimore in front for good in Texas with a 
two-run homer to back Jimmy Key’s six-hit 
pitching for six innings. 

Key (13-6) struck out seven and walked one 
to puu out of a tailspin during which he had 
lost five of six decisions. Key outpitched 
Darren Oliver, who allowed four runs and six 
hits in 6!/5 innin gs. 

Rad Sox a, Indians i Steve Avery had a no- 
hitter for five innings and won his second 
straight start as Boston took three of four in 
Oeveland. 

Avery, who hasn't pitched a complete 
game since May 1996 with Atlanta, didn't 
allow a hit until Julio Franco singled leading 
off the sixth. The left-hander allowed one run 
and four hits in 7V6 innings, pitching into the 
seventh for the third straight time. 

In the National League: 

Pinto* 3, Ptullo* 2 The fans at Veterans 
Stadium in Philadelphia got their last look at 
Darren Da u Iron in the Phillies dugour and 
gave him a standing ovation. 

Later Monday, when they cheered Curt 
Schilling's 15-strikeout performance, that too 
might have been a farewell. 

Schilling, the subject of several trade ru- 
mors, set a National League record for 
strikeouts this season. But the last-place Phil- 
lies lost to the Pirates when a rookie, Kevin 
Polcovich, hit a tiebreaking home run in the 
seventh inning. 

Before the game, the Phillies traded 
Daulton, who began playing for the team in 
1983, to Florida for outfielder Billy McMil- 
lon. 

Padres io. Marlins 2 San Diego whacked 15 
hits, and the Marlins turned to the outfielder 
John Cangelosi. He pitched a scoreless ninth 
inning, but it was too late to save the game. 

San Diego’s Wally Joyner went 3-for-4 
with two walks. He scored twice and stole two 


• - . * N , 

- 1 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 

AMUI CAM lAAOdl 

EAST DIVISION 

W L Pc*. GB 
Baltimore 39 37 415 — 

Hew York 56 41 577 TA 

Toronto 45 49 479 13 

- Detroit 45 52 464 14 'a 

Boston 45 53 .459 T5 

CENTRAL DIVISION 

Oevetand 51 41 .554 — 

Chicago 50 47 515 3H 

Milwaukee 45 49 479 7 

■ Minnesota 44 52 458 9 

■ Kansas CHy 38 55 409 13* 

WEST DIVISION 


TV ' ■■ 


Seattle 

55 

43 

-561 

_ 

* Anaheim 

54 

43 

-557 

'ft 

Texas 

47 

50 

485 

TV, 

Oakland 

40 

60 

400 

16 

•UB10IUU.UULMM 



EAST HVB ION 




W 

L 

PcL 

GB 

' Atlanta 

63 

36 

.636 

— 

Florida 

56 

41 

-577 

6 

New York 

56 

42 

371 

6'A 

Montreal 

52 

45 

.536 

10 

Phtiadetphla 

29 

67 

302 

32!* 

CENTRAL DtVBKJN 



Houston 

51 

48 

J15 

— 

Pittsburgh 

49 

49 

500 

1W 

5f. (juris 

48 

50 

A90 

Z6 

Qntinnati 

42 

55 

433 

B 

'Chicago 

41 

57 

418 

9'n 


WEST DIVISION 



SanFronclSU 

55 

44 

-556 

— 

' Los Angeles 

52 

47 

525 

3 

r San Diego 

47 

52 

475 

B 

Colorado 

45 

55 

450 

lOVi 




MONDAY'S UHUCOUf 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Boston (HI 100 100-3 B 0 

Cfevetand DM Ml BOO-1 4 0 

Avery. Coral (8L Sbcumb 19) and 
Haffeberg; Jr.Wright Mesa (7), M. Jackson 
(9) and S. Aioroar, Harden C5). W— Avery 4-2. 
L— Jr. Wright 2-1. Sv-S locum* (15). 

Offeago 200 010 000-3 10 2 

Detroit 000 000 000-0 4 0 

Alvarez, Karchaet (g), R. Hernandez (91 
and Karkovfce; Ju.Thampsoa Jamb (4) and 
WafeedL W— Ahnroz.9-7. L— Ju.Thompsoro 
8-7. Sv— R. Hernandez (25). HR— Chicago, F. 
Thomas C 3). 


New York 310 000 003-7 12 1 

Milwaukee 000 Ml 200-3 9 2 

Pedate. Nelson GO. Stanton (W and Gtaardt 
Ftarie. Adamson (6), wktanan (91 VBone (9) 
and Motheriy. Stinnett (8). W-PeMHe 12-5. 
L— Finite 1-2. 5 v— Stanton (1). 

Baltimore ON 002 210-5 8 0 

Tens 100 ON 000-1 8 0 

Key, TroMathews (7), Orosco (8). A. 
Benitez (8) and Webster} D -Oliver, X. 
Hernandez (7), Voeberg (8) and I. Rodriguez. 
W— Key 134. L— D. OBver 6-10. 
HR— Baltimore, R. Palmeiro (19). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Qndaatl OH 011 100-3 7 0 

New York 010 002 02x— 5 4 0 

Burba. Routing er <6), Sullivan (7) and J. 
OOver; flJ Jones, McMfchaef (8), Franca <91 
and Hundley. W— McMIdrael 7-7. 
L-Sulllvan 1-3. Sv-Franco (25). 
HRs — Cincinnati Nunnafiy £2), J.OIIver (8). 
New Yolk. Everett 2 (ii). 

Pittsburgh (MO 002 100-3 7 1 

PtrikNMpMo ON 200 000-2 8 8 

Loaiza Ruebel (7), M. Wilkins (7), La be Ho 
(9) and Osflc Schilling, S rower (9). Spradlin 
(9) and LfeberihaL W— Loaiza. 7-7. L — 
Schilling, 11-9. Sv— Lofaello (14). HRs- 
— Pittsburgh, A. Martin (83. Polatvich (2). 
Los Angeles 003 ON 010 0-4 6 1 
Atlanta 110 100 IN 1-5 14 2 
no lnntng$)°Nomro Radinsky (7), Hall (8). 
Guthrie (9)i DreWort (10) and Princes Gtavlne. 
C Fan (7), Wohlers (9), Emhree 00) and 
Edd .Perez. W— Emfcren 2-1 . L-Orettart 3- 
1. HRs— Los Angeles, Mondesi (21), Karros 
(23). Atlanta McGrtff (13). 

San Diego 012 Ml 420-10 T5 0 

Florida 000 101 000-2 5 1 

Hitchcock, Broshe (6). Boctitter (7). 
Bergman (9) and Romero KJ-Brown, 
Hutton (7). Cook (8), Cangelosi (9) and C 
Johnson. W— Hitchcock, 6-5. L— KJ-Browa 
9-7. HR— Florida Sheffield (12). 

Coiorada ON IN 300—4 10 1 

Montreal NO 101 105-8 10 2 

Thomson Dlpota (7), NL Munoz (8), 5. 
Reed (ffl. Holmes (9) and Je.Reecb Bufflnger. 
Telford (7), D. Veres (B). Urbina (9) and 
WMger. W— Urbina 3-6. L— Hohnes 3-2. 
HRs— Cotoroda, Bichette 04). MantreaL 
Santangeto (5), H. Rodriguez 09). 

San Frundsce 600 100 Ml— 2 7 0 

St. Louis 304 0W 00*— 7 13 1 

Faulk* Roc (3). Johnstone (4), Paale (77, 
Beck I8J and BJohnsorv Morris, Frascatore 
(81, Beltran (9) and Lomakin. W— Morris 76. 
U-Foulke 16. HRs— San Frandsco, a 
Johnson (1). St. Louis, Govffl (12). 


AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 
FThomas ChW 84 309 68 116 375 

SAtamarOe 74 273 42 96 352 

WCtark Tex 84 306 45 106 346 

ON Bill NYY 91 337 58 114 338 

I Rodriguez Ten 93 383 63 129 337 

M Vaughn Bos 77 284 59 95 335 

Justice Cle 74 262 48 87 332 

EMartinezSea 98 352 72 117 332 

Coro Sea 91 356 67 11B 331 

Ramirez Cle 84 3)1 50 101 325 

RUNS— Knobtaudv Minnesota 79s E. 
Martinez. Seattle. 72; Garctaparra Boston 7ft 
Jeter; New York 69; Griffey Jr, Seattle, 69: F. 
Thomas, Ctdcoga 6& Durham, Chtcaga 67; 
T. Martinez, New York, 67; Cora, Seattle, 67. 

Ml— T. Martinez. New York. 92; Griffey Jr, 
Seattle, 39; F. Thomas, Chicago, 8& 
McGwire. Oakland. 7% Tod ark. Detroit 77; 
J. uGonzaJez. Terns, 77; Belle Chicago, 77. 

HITS— I. Rodriguez, Texas. 129; 

Goictaaana. Boston, T2ft Cora, Seattle. 118; 
Jetec New Yorta 1 1 7: G. Anderson, Anaheim, 
117i E. Martinez, Seattle. 117; F. Thomas, 
Chicago, 116. 

DOUBLES— Cora Seattle. 31; O. Nelli 
New York. 31; JhVotenfiiv Boston. 3ft R. 
Davis, Seattle. 28, OrilJa Milwaukee, 27; I. 
Rodriguez, Texas; 27; A. Rodriguez, Seattle, 
26. 

TRIPLES— Garclapana. Boston. 8; Jeter, 
New York, 6. Bum*. Milwaukee, 6s 
Knoblauch. Minnesota, 6. Offermorv Kansas 
City, ft Vtzquot Cleveland, 5t AScea 
Anaheim, 5. 

HOME RUNS— McGwires Oakland, 34 T. 
Martinez, New York, 33b Griffey Jr, Seattle, 
3(6 Thome, Cleveland, 26; Buhner, Seattle 
25.- T. a Clark. Detroit. 2 i F. Thomas. 
Chknga23. 

STOLEN BASES— B. LHunter, Detroit 4& 
Ninon. Toronto, 42; Knoblauch. Minnesota, 
3& T. Gaodwtav Kansas CBy, 32; Vlzquel 
Cleveland. 23; Durham, CMcaga 21; A. 
Rodriguez, Seattle 3a 
PITCHING (11 Dadskm)— RaJohnsotv 
Seattle 134 M7.233; Oemene Toronto. 15- 
3 333, 162; Moyer. Seattle, 10-1 .769.474 
Radke Minnesota, 13-5, 722, 36& Dldaaa 
Anaheim, HM. 714 335 Mussina, 

Battlmaie 10-4 7U 337; D. Wells, New 
York. 10-4 714 348,- Cone Now YoiK 10-4 
714 249. 

fTRIKEOUTS— RaJohnsare Seattte 19&- 
Cone New YmK 1 76. aemens. Toronto 166; 
Mussina Boltbiwro 13&- Appier, Kansas 
Qty, 127; C. Finley, Anaheim, 123; Fassero, 
Seattle 114. 



Yankees Whiten 
Held in Sex Case 


"B»il PhP'Tb' iMxuinl Krr« 


Jon Nuonally of the Reds stretching to hit a single against the Mets at Shea Stadium. 


bases. Needing a home run to complete the 
cycle, be filed out against Cangelosi. Can- 
gelosi became the first position player to pitch 
for the Marlins. He allowed just a walk. He 
pitched for Pittsburgh in 1 988 and Housion in 
1995, and has given up only one hit in four 
shutout innings. 

Expos a, Rockies 4 Henry Rodriguez broke 
a 7-for-76 slump, hitting a grand slam with 
two out in the bottom of the ninth inning in 
Montreal. Rodriguez was 0-for-4 in the game 
and hitless in his last 13 at-bats when he hit a 
J-2 pitch from Dairen Holmes just inside the 
right-field foul pole. 

Hots s, Rods 3 Carl Everett hit two home 
runs at Shea Stadium, leading New York to its 


fifth straight win. The Mets moved within 
one-half game of Florida for the National 
League wild-card spot. 

Bravos s, Dodgora 4 Jeff Blauser singled 
home the winning run with two outs in the 
bottom of the 10th at Atlanta. The Braves went 
6-6 on their longest home stand of the season. 

Cardmaia 7, Giants s Gary Gaerti home red. 
doubled twice and drove in three runs as the 
Car dinals won in Sl Louis. 

The Car dinals won three of four from the 
National League West leaders. 

The San Francisco leadoff hitter Darryl 
Hamilton was ejected for arguing a called third 
strike to open the game; Giants manager Dusty 
Baker also was thrown out in the dispute. 


By Jack Curry 

Nor Yurk Times Service 

MILWAUKEE — Mark 
Whiten, an outfielder for the 
New York Yankees, has been 
arrested for investigation of 
second-degree sexual assault, 
the police said, saying the 
charge arose from an incident 
at the team 's hotel in the early 
morning hours last Saturday. 

Sergeant Earned Lucas 
said that an investigation had 
pointed to the second-degree 
sexual assault of a 31 -year- 
old Wisconsin woman at the 
Pfister Hotel. The police 
would not disclose any fur- 
ther details Monday. 

The alleged incident took 
place two days after Whiten 's 
wife gave birth to the couple’s 
second child. 

A police official said the 
district attorney’s office 
would review the case begin- 
ning Tuesday and decide if 
charges would be brought. 

Second-degree assault was 
described as a class C felony, 
carrying a maximum penalty 
of 10 years in prison. 

The Yankees declined 
comment on the case, the 
second sex-relared arrest of a 
Yankee player at the same 
hotel. Luis Polonia was ar- 
rested therein 1989 for having 
sex with a 1 5-year-old girl. He 
pleaded no contest to a mis- 
demeanor charge, serving a 
60-day jail sentence. 

Whiten, 30. missed two 
games on this road trip to re- 


5AVES — M. Rivera, New York, 30; 
RaMyan. Baltimore, 27; R. Hernandez, 
Chicago. 2& DoJone& Milwaukee, 23; 
Wettetand, Texas, 19; Agutiera, Minnesota 
IS; Taylor, Oakland, 17. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 
LWa&erCd 96 359 90 141 393 

GwymSD 94 384 64 148 385 

Piazza LA 94 337 57 120 356 

Joyner SD 79 275 42 95 345 

Lofton All 68 288 51 99 344 

Blauser Alt 95 323 61 110 341 

MaGraaeCtiC 88 316 50 104 329 

Lankford StL 78 289 59 94 325 

AffanuNYM 87 298 44 95 319 

Goto nago Col 96 376 72 1)9 3)6 

RUNS-L Walker, Cotoroda 9Ct Biggin. 
Houston, 85; Galarraga Coiorada 72; Banda 
San Francisco, 71; BagweiL Houston, 69, 
Ototud New York. 6& EcYoung, Coiorada 
67. 

RBI — Galarraga Colorado, 93; BagweiL 
Houston, 88; Gwyna San Diego, 85, L 
Walker. Cotoroda 83; ChJora Atlanta 74 
Kent San Frandsca 71 Lankford. St. Louis. 
71; Sosa, OUcngo. 71. 

HITS— Gwyim, San Diego. 14&- L Walker. 
Colorado, 141; Piazza Los Angeles, 12ft 
Biggto Houston, 12ft Galarraga Cotoroda 
119; C. hJones, Atlanta, 114 EcYaung, 
Coloroda 113. 

DOUBLES— Grodzlekinek. Montreal. 3& 
Morandtni, PhSaoelphia 31; Lansing, 
MantreaL 3ft Bagwell Houston, 29; Snow, 
San Frondsca 2& L. Walker. Cotoroda 2ft 
Lankford. St. Louis, 27; Bonlfla Florida 27; 
Gwymv San Dlega 27. 

TRIPLES— Woraadt Pittsburgh. 9. De. 
Shields, 5L Laura 9r w. Guerrero Los 
Angeles, ft Ronda Pittsburgh, 7; D. Sanders, 
GndnnafL 7; Tucket Atlanta ft EcYoung, 
Cotoroda (s Dauttorv Philadelphia 6. 

HOME RUNS— L Wafker, Coiorada 2ft 
BagweiL Houston, 2ft CastSUa Coloroda 25,- 
Bonds. San Frondsca 24 Galarraga 
Coiorada 24 Karros, Los Angeles. 2ft 
Lankford, SL Louis, 22; Hundtoy, New York, 
22 - 

STOLE N BASES — O. Sandero ClndrmatL 
4ft Wbmack, Pittsburgh, 37; D. eShletas. SL 
Louis. 37; EcYoung, Coloroda 2ft 
McCracken, Coiorada 23: O. Veras, San 
Dlega 2ft L Walker, CotonOo. 23. 

PITCHING 01 DedstoM)-Neagle, 
Atlanta 13-2. 367, 131; Kite. Houston 13-3, 
312, 13ft G. Maddux. Atlanta, 13-3, 312, 
24& Judea Montreal 1 7-3, ,7B& 33ft Estes. 


Son Francisco. 12-4, ,75ft 3.04 J- HoirtMoti 
San Dlega B-ft -727, 434 Gardner, San 
Frondsca 10-4 .714353. 

STRIKEOUTS— Schilling, PWladetphia 
191; P. J Martinez, Montreal 1 7 ft AIBenes, St 
Louts, 15ft Noma. Los Angetea 151; K. 
J Braun. Flon-da 13& Kite. Houston, 12ft- 
Smoltz. ABanta, 125. 

SAVES— Beck. San Frondsca 3ft Nero 
Florida 25c JoFranca New York, 25; 
Wohlen. Atlanta 24 ToWarrelL Los Angeles. 
23; Edcer-sley, St Louto 2ft Hoffman, San 
Dlega 22. 

Japanese Leagues 


Satentar* Gone 
British Columbia 21, Winnipeg 17 


CRICKET 


Asia Cup 

Ml LANKA VS. MMMADUH 

TUESDAY. IN COLOMBO, 8M LANKA 

Sri Lanka; 29M (46 avers) 

Bangladesh; 193-8 (461. 

Sri Lanka wan by 103 runs. 



w 

L 

T 

Pcf 

.GB 

Yakub 

49 

31 

1 

611 

— 

HirostiiTna 

40 

37 

a 

519 

7Vi 

Yokohama 

38 

39 

a 

4914 

9Vi 

Chunkhl 

39 

43 

0 

476 

11 

Hanshln 

37 

42 

i 

469 

IV* 

Yomiuri 

35 

46 

0 

432 

14 'A 


MUReiUUMH 




W 

L 

T 

Pet 

.GB 

Orix 

42 

32 

2 

-56 6 

— 

Sdbu 

44 

34 

2 

.563 

— 

DaM 

42 

38 

0 

-525 

3 

Nippan Ham 40 

41 

1 

494 

6 

Kintetsu 

35 

44 

l 

444 

914 

Lotte 

31 

44 

2 

416 

11 'A 

MONDAY'S IU0in 



CENTNAL LEAGUE 




Yomlurt 4 Yakvti 3 
Yokohama ft Hiroshima 1 
ChunicN 3, Hanshln 1 

PACIFtC LEAOUE 
Nippon Ham ft Orix 2 
Kintetsu 8, Selbu 2 


FOOTBALL 


CFL Stanmnqs 

KASTOH DIVmOH 

W L T PF PAPtl 
II 3 1 0 6 88 101 

310 6 108 85 

g 1 3 0 2 97 104 

n 0 4 0 0 70 107 


Montreal 3 1 0 6 88 101 

Toronto 3 1 0 6 108 85 

Winnipeg 1 3 0 2 97 104 

Hamilton 0 4 0 0 70 107 

WESTON MVtSKMN 
Edmonton 3 1 0 6 110 81 

British Catorobfo 3 7 0 6 102 88 

Saskatchewan 3 2 0 4 82 92 

Grigory 1 3 0 2 88 87 

Friday* Gone 
Calgary 22. Saskatchewan 13 


CYCLING 


ToubdeFhance 

Reeirits Tuesday In 1»1 ton (112-B-mltos), 
18th stage between tog from Itorine, 
France to Fribourg, Switzerland: 

1. Chrtstophe Mengln, France, La Frarr- 
calse des Jetn 4 hours. 30 minutes, 11 sec- 
onds; 2. Franck Vandenbroudta Belgiunv 
Mapet3. Richard Vrenqua France, Fesflna; 
4. Gtaiducn Piero bon, Italy; Batik; 5. Laurent 
□ufaux, 5wttzerfand, Fesflna- 6. Francesco 
Casagrande, Italy, Soeca; 7. Abraham Oiana 
Spairo Baneste 8. Uda Bolts, Germany, 
Telekom,- 9. Marco Pantartl Italy, Mercatone 
Unas lft Orlando Rodrigues Portaged. 
Bonesta all same time. 

OVERALL: 1. Jan Ulrich, Germany, 
Tdekcmffi h.29ro.l0s.-lV1renqueat6^2 
behind; 3. Pantani Ifclft 4. Fernando Es- 
carlbv Spain, Kelme iftOft- 5. Oiana 16:4ft 6. 
Casagrande 17:14.- 7. Blame RSs, Denmark. 
Tetekam 18.-07; ft Jose Jimenez, Spairo 
Banesto 23:4ft 9. Roberta Conti, Italy, Mer- 
cator* Uno 282ft 10. Dufaux 29-36. 


JOHNNIE WALKER RYDER CUP 

Standings tor 1997 Ryder Cup to be 
played Sept 26-28 at VWdemxw In So- 
ingrande, Bpaln. Top iDfHahero wDl qindHy 
tor lire 12-man teams. US. captain Tom Kite 
and European esptato Sew Ballesteros rail 
select two ptayere at largeio com plate each 
team; 

UNIT® STATS# 

1. Tiger Winds 1165300 paints.- 2. Tom 
Lehman 101638&- 3. Justin Leonard 88650ft 
4. Jim Furyk 837J00; 5. Mark O-Maato 
80135ft 6 Brad Fawn 727.50ft 7. Scott Hadr 


721.95ft 6 Tammy Tolies 689386 9. PM 
Mldurison 659386 10. Davis Lave III 657.167; 
11. Stove Jones 579386 1ft Jeff Moggert 
56662ft 13. Mark Breaks 549.75ft 14. Paul 
StankowsM 50333ft 15. David Duval 470000. 
EUROPE 

I. Colin AAontgamerle, Sari. 825300.78 points 
ft Darren Clarie, N.lnriand 57689035 

3. Ian Woasmm. Wales 50ftS74.69 

4. Lee Westwood, England 430658.1 7 

5. Bernhard Longer, Germany 371377.96 

6. Per- U MX Johansson Sweden 33003530 

7. Thomas B|om. Denmark 327,011 J9 

8. M to u el Angel Martin. Spain 32440030 

9. Costantino Rocca, Italy 30151539 

10. Jose Marta Otazabal Spain 26L834JM 

I I. Pod tag Harrington, Ireland 258,01534 
IftPauf Broadhurst England 256644JS8 

13. Sam Torrance. Scotland 219,02131 

14. Ignodo Garrida Spain 211601 32 

15. Maik.JamS6 England 2I0259E6 


TENNIS 


WU RANKINGS 

I. Martina Hlngfe, Swftzertand, 5,778 points 
ft Jana Novotna Czech Republic 1559 

3. Monica Setes, U3jl]Bl 
4 Iva Mate ll Croatia 1165 

5. Steffi Grot Germany. 2^80 

6. Amanda Coeber. South Africa 21545 

7. Unitary Davenport US- 2,437 

8. Arantxa Sanchez VIcaria Spain. 2336 

9. Ante Huber, Germany, 2356 

10. Mary Pterte, Franca 2201 

II. Condiha Martinez, Spairo 1.973 

12. Irina Splrlea Romania 1.857 

13. Mary Joe Fernandes, U.S< 1,708 

16 Brenda Schullz-McCarttiy, Neffu 1.593 
15. Kimberly Pa Ui. 1363 

Alto RANKHWS 

I. Pete Sampras, U3< ft3B8 points 
ft Michael Chang, lift, 3.743 

3. Goran Ivanisevic, Croatia 2788 

4. Alex Corretja Spam, 2326 

5. Thomas Muster, Austria 2412 

6 Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Russia 2224 
7.5ergU3iuguero Spain 2192 

8. Thomas Enqvtst Sweden, 2148 

9. Marceto Rios, Chila 2,143 

10. Cartas Maya Spain, 2085 

II. Boris Becker, German* 1.918 
12 Gustavo Kuerten Brazil 1,859 

13. Mark Phitippoussfe. Australia 1,820 

14. Felix Mantilla Spairo 1,815 

15. Richard Krajicek, Nefhertarete, 1,752 


turn to Clearwater, Florida, to 
be with his wife, Sheri, who 
gave birth to a boy, Devin 
Anthony, on Thursday, 

Manager Joe Torre also de- 
clined to discuss the situation. 
When Torre was asked if 
Whiten was expected to 
travel with the Yankees back 
to New York after Monday 
night's game, he simply said, 
*T hope so.’’ 

Early this season, George 
Steinbrenner, the Yankees' 
principal owner, said he was 
upset with Whiten for accom- 
panying the pitcher Dwight 
Gooden to a strip club in Ar- 
lington, Texas, on May 17. 
Gooden left the strip club by 
himself and fought with a cab 
driver after a dispute over a 
$4.20 fare. The pitcher 
avoided a possible misde- 
meanor assault charge by set- 
tling out of court. 

■ New Baseball Chief 

Paul Beeston, president of 
the Toronto Blue Jays, is 
about to be hired as baseball's 
chief operating officer, a 
move that could lead to Bud 
Selig accepting a permanent 
term as commissioner. The 
Associated Press reported 
from New York. 

Beeston, president of the 
Blue Jays for nearly eight 
years, plans to move to New 
York and run the commis- 
sioner's office on a day-to- 
day basis while Selig contin- 
ues to operate out of his office 
in Milwaukee. 


TRANSITIONS 


BASKETBALL 

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
dehvcr— S igned F Tony Battle to 3 year 
contract, 

AiUAMi-Signed G curies Smith to 3-year 
contract. 

PHILADELPHIA— Signed F Marin MlDc 
UTAH-SIgned G Jocque Vaughn to 3-year 
contract. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FObTBAU LEAOUE 
rurrzmw— Waived DT Blaine Berger and 
LB Wesley Leasy. Released LB Devon Mc- 
Donald, OL Ben Kaufman and WR K.O. 
KeakriuW. Announced 5 Eric Caste OL Allen 
OeGraffenreid and DL Matt Rice left camp. 

Atlanta— Released C Darius SmJtlv OT 
Bob Goltra and S Sean Boyd. 

Buffalo— R eleased WR Kendall James 
and DB Dwayne Provo. 

CAROLINA— Placed LB Jon Ev|en on re- 
serve-retired list 

Detroit— Signed RB Bony Sanders to 5- 
year contract. 

MEEN bay— Claimed SS Sean Boyd off 
wavers from Falcons. Released CB Matthew 
Darsett. Signed DE Ellkrit Fortune. 

Houston— S igned Floyd Reese, general 
manages to 4- year contract extension 
through 2001. Waived WR Derek Russel 
iNDUNAvaus-SIgned WR Levi Kaotoluhl 
off waivers from the Arizona 
Miami- S igned WR Scott Miller to 1-year 
contract, Released C Cat Dixon. 

NEW youk JETS-SignedLfl James Forrior 

to 5-year contract Terminated contract of LB 
Bobby Houston. Activated QB Glenn Foley 
from phvskatty unable to perform list. 
Oakland— S igned DB Cafvtn Branch. 
PHILADELPHIA- Released C Marc Lamb. 
SAN Ol ECO— Released WR Jimmy Oliver 
and WR Stove Daniels. Signed WR Damian 
Johnson. 

sah FRAMCisca— Waived P Tucker 
Phfflps. 

TAMPA BAY- Signed WR RehJel Anthony to 
6-year contract amt CB Anthony Porker and 
OL Frank Middleton to 3-ywr contracts. Wot- 
vedCB diaries Dlmry and LB Warded Rouse. 
HASHINCTOn — Signed WR Fehnon Matva 
Hoaur 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
buffalo— N amed Undy Ruff uadi and 
signed him to muttiyear contract. 

caloart— Named Rich Preston assistant 
coach. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


60 AUIAY. 

„ 006 ! V 





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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY JVLY 23 , 199 


OBSERVER 


A Rube Kind of Thing 


A Painter’s Russia: ‘More Awful, More Exciting 


By Russell Baker 


W ASHINGTON — I am 
sitting in a car trying to 


tt sitting m a car trying to 
make a telephone call. Shame 
to say, the car is not maneu- 
vering in heavy traffic. It is 
sitting in a parking lot with 
the motor off. 

For months now I have 
been watching people make 
Telephone calls from moving 
cars in heavy traffic, and I 
want to learn how to do it. 

I’d like to be as good at it as 
the woman who nearly killed 
me outside the supermarket 
last Thursday. She spun the 

steering wheel so adeptly at 
the last millisecond that she 
left me intact, despite leaving 
a mote of fender dust on my 
trousers. What was remark- 
able was that not for an insrant 
did she let concern about an 
imminent death disturb her 
phone chat. 


simple jobs must admire 
Rube GoJdbetg as a prophet 
The car telephone illustrates 
the case. 

First, would any sensible 
person make a phone call 
from a car unless our elec- 
tronic Rube Goldbergs had 
made it possible? There are 
only two good reasons for be- 
ing in a car One, you don't 
have to encounter an airport 
to get where you’re going: 
two. it’s a great excuse for 
being unavailable by' phone. 

Sensible drivers yearning 
for a telephone chat simply 


By Roderick Conway Morris 

Herald Tribune 


V ENICE — *T don’t like the 
word ’mainstream.’ which 


seems to be so popular these days,” 
says Maxim Kantor. whose vig- 


pull up to the next phone 
booth. Our demonic urce to 


booth. Our demonic urge to 
fulfill the Rube Goldberg 
prophecy overcomes good 
sense. 


The point, before I forget it. 
is about the prophetic wisdom 
of Rube Goldberg. As every- 
one should remember. Rube 
Goldberg had a genius for de- 
vising absurdly complicated 
machinery to perform the 
simplest tasks. Imagine a 
maze of machinery more in- 
tricate than an oil refinery, 
whose only purpose is to drop 
a marble into a tin can, and 
you know what Rube Gold- 


berg was up to. 
The charm o 


The charm of his work lay 
not only in the absurdity of his 
designs, but also in their in- 


And so I sit here in this 
parking lot studying two prin- 
ted pages of instructions for 
making a telephone call from 
a car. The mind is stunned by 
the realization that millions of 
Americans, many of whom 
don’t even know who their 
congressman is, can do this 
complicated task. And do do 
it every day. 

Worse, it never occurs to 
them to laugh at how nutty it 
is, to despair at how dumb it is 
to let the telephone into the 
precious private space behind 
the wheel, to shudder at how 
dangerous it is to be deep in 
phone chatter when an 1S- 
wheeler is making its lunge 
for the fast lane. 


genuity. Studying an infin- 
itely complex Rube Goldberg 
blueprint for transporting a 
freshly laid egg from the 
chicken to the frying pan. you 
marveled. Y es, you told your- 
self. it could probably work if 
you really needed a machine 
to get an egg to a pan. 

Anyone at grips with the 
machinery we now use for 


Anyhow, if we must have 
the thing in the car. why didn't 
it occur to the phone guys to 
set it up so that, when it was 
taken in hand, a voice would 
say: “Operator here. If you 
are in trouble I will get help 
immediately. If not, get off the 
phone before you kill some- 
body, possibly yourself.” 


says Maxim Kantor. whose vig- 
orously executed, complex oils fill 
the Russian Pavilion at this year's 
Venice Biennale. “Because 
someone who makes something 
original can't be in a ‘stream’ of 
any kind. I’m deeply convinced 
that there are two types of artists. 
Those who can create something 
alone, out of themselves, and those 
who are in ‘streams,’ or groups. 
And I don 't think that real art can be 
produced in a group, in a crowd." 

Kantor has stayed outside the 
mainstream with considerable suc- 
cess. After the Biennale, which 
closes Nov. 9, his work will be the 
subject of a major retrospective 
opening at the Pushkin Museum in 
Moscow this autumn and going on 
to the Schira Kunsthaile in Frank- 
fun in March. 

“1 can never remember a time 
when I did not have a pencil or 
brush in my hand.” says Kantor. 
39. who was bom in Moscow of a 
Jewish faiher and Russian mother. 

He had his share of problems 
with the Soviet system. “They said 
that my paintings showed I didn’t 
like people, that they were anti- 
social.” He was refused entry to 
the Artists* Union, which deprived 
him of die right to buy painting 
materials at state shops, and had to 
exhibit at clandestine venues. His 
canvases were sometimes seized 
by the authorities. 

Yet Kantor. a warm, lively char- 
acter with a quick sense of humor, 
is anxious to play down his role as 
an opponent of the regime. 

“I certainly saw being an artist 








Mirk L -nvJ’fu- i-t -M.-'n. 


Maxim Kantor and his painting ‘‘Rebellion of the Pygmies” at the Venice Biennale. 


as involving struggle,” he says, 
“but even though 1 nod many close 
friends who were dissidents. I nev- 
er really thought of myself in quite 
this w-ay — partly. I suppose, be- 
cause there was always a danger 
that being a dissident could become 
a profession in itself.” 

Bv what he sees now as a mi- 


raculous stroke of luck, Kantor 
caught the eye of Henri Nannen, 
editor-in-chief of Stem magazine, 
art collector and founder of the 
Kunsthaile at Emdcn. “He came to 
Moscow in 1987, looked at my pic- 
tures, liked them and was the first to 
buy diem. 1 am incredibly indebted 
to this man, because in this way 1 
was able to begin to sell to German 
museums, and avoid getting en- 
tangled in the gallery system/’ 
Although Kantor can now afford 
to move to the West, he has decided 
to sic out Russia’s anarchy and in- 
creasing criminality, together with 
his wife. Lena, a magazine editor, 
and their 16-year-old son. “I think 
it is a son of duty to put up with 
these conditions, which in some 
ways are not so dreadful.” he says. 
' ‘After all, I am a Russian, and I am 
among the people I grew up with, 
the people f love.” 

Kantor regards his art as con- 
taining a strong religious element. 


He paints from life, but in a style 
that might be described as 
heightened realism. “When I de- 


pict what I see. 1 try to instill it with 
a symbolic value above and beyond 


reality. When I started to paint I 
wanted my canvases to be a kind of 
memorial, a monument to the 


people I love, who were oppressed 
but who kept their dignity and re- 


but who kept their dignity and re- 
mained true to themselves. And I 
tried to paint silent figures, in a very 
dry way, as though I was working 
in stone, or creating something like 
a Fayyum portrait.” 

The artist's earlier works, which 
include some extraordinarily in- 
tense portraits of members of his 
family, as well as the old, the poor. 


undergone significant changes. 

“When we entered this chaotic 
period of Russian history. I began 
to paint in brighter, more express- 
ive colors, because reality in Russia 
had become in many ways more 
dangerous, disgusting, awful, but at 
the same lime, more exaggerated, 
more exciting. Some people think 


Kantor, by the “troika” passage in 
Gogol’s "Dead Souls.” a mystical 
celebration of Russia, pan of which 
mns (in Nabokov's translation): 
“Ob troika, winged troika, tell me 
who invented you? Surely nowhere 
but in a nimble nation could you 
have been bom . . . the road gives a 
shiver, a passerby stow short with 
an exclamation of fright — and lo, 
the troika has wings, wings, wings 
..." Thus Kantor’s macabre modem 
troika has come skidding to a bah, in 
a hail of bullets and welter of gore, in 
his words, “the symbol of a country 
that has lost control of itself and its 

sense of direction." 

This combining of observed 
reality with enduring literary, 
philosophical and artistic reson- 
ances also emerges on some large 
canvases, dominated by an infernal 
red, in which Kantor represents to- 
talitarianism and its disintegration, 
such as “State” and “Rebellion of 
the Pygmies.” whose sources are 
as wide-ranging as Eastern Ortho- 
dox Judgment Day icons and Pla- 
to’s “Republic.” which, in turn, 
said Kantor. led him to draw upon 
Greek Red Figure vases. 

Indeed, he deplores postmodern- 
ism 's abandonment of traditional 
art in general and the ideals of 
Greek an in particular. “The con- 


sequence has been the rejection of 
individuality in art, ” he says. 

“The point is that postmodern 
art has become salon art, directed at 
a very restricted circle of people, 
and the avant garde simply doesn’t 
exist any more. When everybody is 
radical.’ then nobody is radical, 
when everybody is ironic, then 
nobodv is ironic, and when every- 
body/s a revolutionary you have a 
very stable, very boring regime,” 
Kantor says. 

“Postmodernism is driven by 
the idea that the greatest value is 
freedom of expression, but it has 
reduced an to complete nonsense, ’ * 
he adds. “And I really believe that 
after so many years of struggle for 
human rights and freedoms, the 
next great struggle should be for 
human responsibilities — which is 
an even more exciting prospect.” 


that the kind of things that are going 
on. the \ iolence, the gangsterism. 


the inmates of prison camps, hos- 
pitals and mental wards, ana wintry 


scenes of buildings and factories, 
were dominated by grays, dark 
blues, greens and yellows. Since 
the fall of communism. Kantor’s 
palette and subject matter have 


are suitable subjects only for TV 
and (he sensational press, not for 
art. But 1 don't agree. Look at 
Goya, who dealt with terrible 
scenes, terrible subjects, and cre- 
ated out of them great art.” 

Among the many arresting 
canvases on show at the Biennale, 
one of the most startling. ' ‘Death of 
a Salesman,” is of a gleaming co- 
baJt-biue car. its passengers shot to 
death through the bullet-holed wind- 
screen. The image seems straight 
from a shock newspaper or TV pic- 
ture. but was as much inspired, says 


A'rif York Times Sen we 




PEOPLE 


T HE supermodei Naomi Campbell 
wept openly Tuesdav as she arrived 


X wept openly Tuesday as she arrived 
for the funeral of Gianni Versace, the 
Italian designer who was slain a week 
ago. Scores of international celebrities 
converged on Milan to bid a last 
farewell. Elton John stood in silence 
for 15 minutes in front of the urn con- 
taining Versace’s ashes, then burst into 
tears and had to be coaxed away by 
Gianni’s brother. Santo. Princess Di- 
ana. a fan of Versace's glamorous, sexy 
clothes, flew in for the memorial Mass. 
All morning, friends and colleagues 
filed through the courtyard garden of 
the designer’s Milan palazzo to pay 
their last respects — among them the 
skier Alberto Tomba. the choreo- 


The American singer and actress 
Whitney Houston received emergency 
treatment at a hospital on the Italian 
island of Capri after cutting her face on 
rocks w hile swimming, hospital sources 
said. Houston, who starred in the block- 
buster movie “Bodyguard.’’ had minor 
surgery on her left cheek. “We have 
stitched the wound, and it doesn’t leave 


any unsightly traces on her face.” said 
Dr. RafTaele Federico. Houston has 


Dr. RafTaele Federico. Houston has 
been on a Mediterranean cruise with her 
husband. Bobby Brown, and friends. 


eluded such rock aristocrats as Ray 
Davies. Paul McCartney. Rod Stew- 
art and Tina Turner. . . Former Beatle 
McCartney, now Sir Paul, has made his 
most ambitious foray yet into the world 
of classical music, composing a 75- 
minute symphony that will have its 
world premiere at London's Royal Al- 
bert Hall in October. The symphonic 
poem “Standing Slone" will be per- 
formed by the London Symphony 'Or- 
chestra and chorus on Oct. 14. 


grapher Maurice Bejart. the model 
Carla Bruni and the designers Karl 




Elton John, right and a bodyguard at Versace’s Milan home Tuesday. 


Lagerfeld, Carla Fendi and Tai Mis- 
soni. Campbell flew in from South 
Africa and went to pay her respects 
carrying a single white rose. The rock 
star Sting was also in town. Versace. 
50. w as shot to death by a lone gunman 
on the steps of his mansion in Miami 
Beach. Florida. 


The Beach Boys’ 1967 hit “Good 
Vibrations" has been voted the greatest 
single ever by a jury of 140 rock music 
professionals, the rock magazine Mojo 
reports in its latest issue. Written by 
Brian Wilson with words by Mike 
Love, the summer- of- love bit outscored 
the Beatles* doublc-sider “Strawbeny 
Fields Forever ‘Penny Lane." also of 

1967. Bob Dylan’s "Like a Rolling 


Stone." the Ronettes* “Be My Baby," 
and Marvin Gavv’s “I Heard it 


Through the Grapevine." The jury in- 


Jamie Lee Curtis was m the House 
of Lords to see her husband take his seat, 
but she reportedly only uses the title 
Baroness, to which his peerage entitles 
her. to book tables in posh restaurants. 
The American actress watched from the 
visitors* gallery as her husband, the fifth 
Baron Haden-Gucst. took his seat for 
the first time. He swore the formal oath 
of allegiance to Queen Elizabeth II, 
w ho is only present for state openings of 
Parliament. Until last year. Baron 
Haden-Gucst was piain Christopher 
Guest, movie actor and scriptwriter. He 




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Noel Gallagher, the guitarist and 
composer of the British rock group Oas- 
is, is among a host of celebrities invited 
July 30 for “drinks and nibbles” at the 
London home of Prime Minister Tony 
Blair. Gallagher and his wife. Meg 
Matthews, are among various show 
business personalities who back the La- 
bour government or have recently con- 
verted to "Blairism.” Also on the guest 
list for the party at 10 Downing Street 
are the actor Michael Caine and Alan 
McGee, the head of Oasis' record com- 
pany who pumped £50.000 (S80.000J 
into Blair’s election campaign. 


After jusi over a week battling ice and 
fog. the polar explorer Will Steger has 
abandoned his attempt to moke a solo 
summer trek from the North Pole to 
Canada. Why? “The conditions are 
sobering." he messaged by e-mail. 


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