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INTERNATIONAL 


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The World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 
R Paris, Friday, July 25, 1997 


No. 35.582 


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Suicide Seals Killer’s Deadly Secret 

Cunanan Shoots Himself in Houseboat Near Ikrsace’s Mansion 


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i Andrew Phillip Cunanan 

• The Avnlunl P»> 

A picture shown on the FBI Web site Thursday after Mr. Cunanan's 
body was found. The site listed information on the suspected killer. 


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MIAMI BEACH — An enigma through the end, the 
suspected serial killer Andrew Cunanan shot himself 
to death, leaving unanswered why he would have 
wanted to kill the designer Gianni Versace. . 

The Miami police confirmed Thursday that the 
body they had found on a houseboat was that of Mr. 
Cunanan, bringing to an end a three-month- long na- 
tionwide manhunt. 

Mr. Cunanan achieved notoriery when be was 
named the suspect in the slaying in broad daylight of 
Mr. Versace on July 15, but he was already being 
sought in the killings of four other men. 

“All across the nation, our citizens can stand down 
and breathe a sigh of relief," said Richard Barreto, the 
Miami Beach police chief. “The reigD of tenor 
brought upon us by Andrew Cunanan is over.” 

Dozens of police officers and FBI agents besieged a 
two-story houseboat in Miami Beach late Wednesday 
after its caretaker reported seeing someone resembling 
Mr. Cunanan on board and hearing a gunshot. 

After, a four-hour siege, agents threw in tear-gas 
grenades and stormed the boat, where they discovered 
the body of a man dead from a single gunshot ro the 
head. 

“The shot to the face made the identification of the 
body much more difficult," said Mayor Alex Pen e las 
of Dade County. “In addition to that, the only other 
available method of identifying the body was fin- 
gerprints." 

Chemicals from the grenades also added to the time 
it took the police to identify the body. 

Mr. Barreto said that he could not immediately 


confirm that Mr. Cunanan had shot himself but added 
that the police had no suspects in his death. 

A .40-caliber handgun similar to the one used in 
three slayings attributed to Mr. Cunanan was also 
found inside the houseboat. Mr. Barreto said. 

The authorities who surrounded the boat for hours 
said they believed that Mr. Cunanan had been dead the 
whole time. 

"I’m very glad that he’s been stopped," said Stan- 
ley Trail, rhe father of Jeffrey Trail, one of the men Mr. 

The houseboat's owner is wanted in Germany. • 
The suspect got the attention he craved. Page 12. 

Cunanan is believed to have killed, “and that nobody 
else got hurt when he got stopped. But I take no joy in 
his death. That doesn't help me at all. 

“That’s one of the bad things about him dying like 
this; Nobody will be able to ask him," Mr. Trail said. 
“Nobody will be able to tell me why this 
happened.” 

Investigators said they had found no suicide note, 
leaving unsolved the mod ve for a cross-country killing 
spree by Mr. Cunanan, who had been described by his 
mother as a “high-class prostitute." 

"We were probably prepared for something like 
this," said an FBI spokeswoman, Coleen Rowley. "A 
person who is using desperate means and exhibiting 
this kind of violent behavior, you have to be prepared 
for a very violent conclusion." 

See CUNANAN. Page 12 





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Andrew Cunanan 's body being wheeled from 
the houseboat Thursday in Miami Beach. 


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g Tough Talk 

Fails to Aid 

Currencies 

■ i ■ ; 1 . . 

■ Asian Leaders Assail 
‘Rogue Speculators’ 

. By Michael Richardson 

j: (i . . r International Herald Tribune 

- ' - SUBANG JAYA, Malaysia — 

Southeast Asian political leaders angrily 
assailed a fresh wave of speculation 
' fci against their currencies Thureday, urg- 

: . ing united action against a “security 

:: V •; : : ii. - threat” and “a well-planned effort to 

undermine" the region’s economies. 

Despite the comments, several region- 

v ‘ al currencies fell to fresh lows as traders 
i «•• 'i u <-- - discounted the likelihood that any ef- 

■ fective new curbs would be imposed. 
Analysts said that a meeting in 

. . . Shanghai on Friday of central bank of- 

:: jlcials from 11 Asian and Pacific coun- 
•r: - tries was not expected to result in a plan 

China has a different problem: an 
undervalued currency. Page 13. 

for a coordinated counterattack against 
speculation because the costs would be 
nigh and it would have Uttle chance of 
success. 

Prime Minister Mahathir bin Moha- 
mad of Malaysia on Thursday blamed 
“rogue speculators" for what he said 
was “a well-planned effort to undermine 
the economies of all the ASEAN coun- 
tries by destabilizing their currencies." 
Opening a meeting of the Association 
, 2’ of South East Asian Nations here, he 
called for a “common stance" to sup- 
port currencies with the backing of un- 
specified new regulations. 

Foreign Minister Prachuab Chaiyas- 
ara of Thailand branded currency spec- 
ulation a "security threat," while his 
Indonesian counterpart, Ali Alaias, said 
- he also questioned the motivation be- 
hind “the onslaught of speculation." 
The Thai finance minister, Thanong 

■ Bidaya, said for the first time that 
• Bangkok would consider borrowing 

from the International Monetary Fund 
or Japan. He did not specify the size of 
. any possible loans. (Page 13) 

Despite this talk, the Singapore dollar 
. — considered one of the region's 
strongest currencies based on economic 
.. v funda m e nt als — hit a 32-month low 
against the U.S. dollar after Finance 
Minister Richard Hu said that its value 
would be set by market demand, a com- 
•• mem taken to mean that the country's 

.central bank would not intervene. 

'* The Malaysian ringgit also touched its 
lowest point against the dollar since the 
.Thai baht was floated on July 2, a move 
that sent tremors through the region's 
financial and stock markets. The baht — 
which has lost almost 20 percent of its 
value since the float — and the In- 
donesian rupiah also fell sharply in early 

See ASIA, Page 12 ■ 


Newsstand Prices 

Andorra.- 10.00 FF Lebanon --JJ.3.00C 

Antilles 12.50 FF Morocco- 16 Dh 

Cameroon „1 £00 CFA Qatar 10.00 OR 

Egypt EE5J50 Ranion 12£0FF 

Franca 10.00 FF Saudi Arabfcu.-10 SR 

Gabon 1.100 CFA Senegal 1.100 CFA 

liflfy- -2300 Ure Spain 225 Ptas 

Ivory Coast. 1250 CFA Tunisia 1250 Din 

Jordan 1250JD UAE 10.00 Dh 

Kuwait .700 Rte US. MB. (Eur.)....£1 20 



After Wales, Scotland 
Gets Home-Rule Plan 

Decentralization Would Leave 
Most Power in London’s Hands 








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Cabinet members at the prime minister's residence Thursday to announce a plan for Scottish devolution. Among 
them, Foreign Secretary Robin Cook, third from left, and, on his left the Scottish secretary, Donald Dewar. 


Europe’s Low Rates 
Help Dollar Climb 

The dollar hit a six-year high 
against the Deutsche mark and rose 
a gains t other major currencies 
Thursday after the central banks of 
Germany and Switzerland left rates 
unchanged. But the Bundesbank 
hinted it could act soon. Page 13. 


The Dollar 


New Yotfc WKirwsday 9 4 PM. previous dose 

DM 1.826 1.8245 

Pound 1.676 1.6805 

Yen 115.675 114.95 

FF 6.1475 6.142 


Wednesday dose previous ctoaa 
+26.71 8088.36 8061.65 

change Wednesday C < P.M. previa* doee 

+2-8 930.71 933.91 


Policy Shift by Beijing? 

Restraint Over Cambodia Heartens Neighbors 


By Michael Richardson 

Internal tonal Herald Tribune 

SUBANG JAYA, Malaysia — When 
Vietnam invaded Cambodia in 1978 to 
oust the Chinese-backed Khmer Rouge 
and install a pro-Hanoi government in 
which Hun Sen became foreign minister 
and later prime minister, Beijing in- 
tervened decisively. 

It launched a reprisal attack into 
northern Vietnam that lasted several 
weeks and caused great damage, and 
Chinese weapons and money sub- 
sequently played a key role in strength- 
ening anti-Vietnamese resistance forces 
in Cambodia. 

By contrast, Beijing’s response to the 
political crisis in Cambodia triggered by 
Second Prime Minister Hun Sen’s oust- 


ing this month of First. Prime Minister 
Norodom Ranariddh has been metic- 
ulously restrained — so much so that 
Southeast Asian officials said Thursday 
that it marked' a major change in 
Chinese policy toward the region. 

"China does not want to become re- 
engaged in external problems," an of- 
ficial of an ASEAN country said, 
adding, “They have told us that they 
will support whatever ASEAN does" to 
settle the conflict and restore stability. 

Southeast Asian officials said Thurs- 
day that China’s stance on Cambodia 
showed that it was willing to let coun- 
tries in the region take the lead on mat- 
ters affecting regional stability, despite 
its rapid rise to great power starus. 

See CAMBODIA, Page 12 


By Fred Barb ash 

Washington Past Service 

LONDON — The British govern- 
ment completed proposals Thursday for 
the most far-reaching decentralization' 
of authority in the nation's history, giv- 
ing voters in Scotland and Wales the 
option to create elected home-rule leg- 
islatures to manage many of their own 
affairs now controlled by the House of 
Commons in London. 

Referenda will be held next month in 
both places, with current polls suggest- 
ing easy approval in Scotland, where 
nationalism is strong, and a closer con- 
test in Wales, where the demand for 
autonomy is weaker. 

If passed by the voters, approval by 
the House of Commons will probably 
follow swiftly, according to most ob- 
servers. And by January 2000, new par- 
liaments may be sitting in Edinburgh 
and Cardiff. 

Decentralization, to bring govern- 
ment closer to those it serves, was a 
central plank of the Labour Party’s cam- 
paign platform. The United Kingdom 
comprises England, Scotland, Wales 
and Northern Ireland. Currently, the 
House of Commons and various bur- 
eaucracies responsible to it make all the 
important decisions of government. 

Scotland and Wales voted down 1 ‘ de- 
volution" proposals in 1979, although 
polls show a dramatic change in opinion 
in both places since then, in part because 
of alienation in both regions from the 
policies of the Conservative govern- 
ment in power from 1979 and to 1997. 

“Only the most blinkered devolu- 
tion^ could deny that this contains the 
elements that could lead to a break up of 
the United Kingdom,” Michael An- 
cram, the Conservative's spokesman on 
constitutional issues, said in the House 
of Commons on Thursday after La- 
bour’s plans for Scotland were an- 
nounced by the government's Scottish 
Secretary, Donald Dewar. 

"This is a grear day for Scotland,” 
said George Galloway, a Scottish MP. 
“Somewhere beyond the rafters is a 
whole host of heroes who have fought 
for home rule in Scotland. They will be 
cheering this on." 

The government unveiled its propos- 
al for Wales last week. 


Swiss Bank List Backfires 

Action Seen Revealing ‘ Years of Indifference’ 


AGENDA 

Supreme Court Justice Brennan Dies 


ATs* t 



By Alan Cowell 

New runt Tunes Service 

ZURICH — Karl-Josef Schmidt is a 
director of a highly renowned publish- 
ing company in Germany whose stan- 
dard work on German grammar, the 
“Duden,” is, he said, "as well known 
as McDonald’s." 

So it came as a surprise to him when 
he was tipped off by a reporter that his 
company’s prewar name, F. A. Brock- 
haus, appeared on a list of dormant 
accounts published by Swiss bankers on 
Wednesday in an effort to wriggle free 
of the opprobrium attached to their han- 
dling of such assets, including those of 
Holocaust victims, since World War n. 

“Anyone who wanted to find us 
earlier only had to buy one of our books 


to see where we were,’ ’ he said. 

Rolf Brack was bemused to discover 
that the name of his grandmother, Elise 
Brack, was on the list of 1,756 accounts 
and 1,872 names that the Swiss 
Bankers' Association published after 
mounting criticism that Swiss banks 
prevented heirs, including Holocaust 
survivors, from gaining access to the 
S43 million said to be held in them. 

Mr. Brack, 69, a retired chemical plant 
employee, lives in Rheinfelden, which is 
divided by the Swiss-German border. 
His father lived there. His grandmother, 
Elise, lived just across the border in 
Karsau and he grew up with her in Nazi 
Germany wheat, be said, “it was not very 
pleasant to be a Swiss under Hitler." 

See SWISS, Page 12 


One of the most influential jurists 
in American history, William J. Bren- 
nan died at the age of 91, seven years 
after retiring from the Supreme Court 
with nearly 34 years of service. 

Justice Brennan was noted as a 

New Team of Leaders 
Installed in Albania 

TIRANA (AFP) — The leader of 
the Albanian Socialist Party, Falos 
Nano, was named prime minister of 
Albania, officials said 

Mr. Nano was appointed prime 
minister by President Rexhep Mej- 
dani, who was voted into office earlier 
Thursday by Parliament, which lifted 
a state of emergency. 


strong advocate of individual rights. 
He served during eight presidential 
administrations and took part in 1 350 
Supreme Court opinions that helped 
define the nature of the constitutional 
rights of all Americans. Page 12. 


RAGE TWO 


from Inner City to Kenyan Schools 

THE AMERICAS 

Page 3. 

Republicans Apologise to Gingrich 


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Sports 

Pages 20-21. 

The Intermarkei 

PageB. 

j The IHT on-line 

http://wvAV.iht.com | 


Under the devolution proposals, 
Scottish and Welsh assemblies would 
choose an “executive,” and would 
have significant say over such issues as 
education, economic development, 
health care (except abortion) ana local 
government 

Scottish voters will be asked to de- 
cide in their referendum whether their 
new assembly should have the power to 
vary income tax rates by 3 percent, up or 
down. 

Welsh voters will not be given such 
an option. 

The House of Commons will retain 
sole control over such matters as foreign 
affairs, defense, welfare and industrial 
relations and mil continue to have 
nearly exclusive authority over taxing 
and spending, allocating most of the 
money available to the new assemblies. 
It will also remain the supreme authority 
of Britain, entitled to overrun] acts of the 
new assemblies. 

England has a population of about 48 
million people; Scorland, about 5.1 mil- 
lion; Wales, 2.9 million and Northern 
Ireland, 1.6 million. 


Rebel Leader 
In Algeria 
Reported Slain 


CiMnpitnl b\‘ Our Stiff Frimi Pis/Ukhrt 

ALGIERS — The security forces 
have killed the leader of Algeria's most 
violent Muslim militant group, Islamic 
militants and sources close ro the se- 
curity services said Thursday. 

Antar Zouabri, the 27-year-old chief 
of the Armed Islamic Group, and sev- 
eral of his followers were trapped in a 
tunnel and killed Tuesday near the town 
of Tipaza, about 100 kilometers (60 
miles) east of the capital, Algiers, ac- 
cording to supporters and one source 
close to the security services. 

The reports of his death could not be 
Independently confirmed, and his death 
has been reported before. 

If true, Mr. Zouabri would be at least 
the eighth leader of the terrorist group to 
die since December 1992, when the 
group issued its first communique. One 
leader, Mansouri Me liani, was executed 
by a firing squad in 1993. 

The Aimed Islamic Group is held 
responsible by authorities here for the 
deaths of thousands of civilians, often in 
night attacks earned out with the utmost 
brutality. 

Mr. Zouarbi took over as leader of die 
rebel army in July 1996 after the death 
of. Djamel Zitouni in an ambush. De- 
scribed as bloodthirsty and brutal, his 
leadership coincided with an escalation 
in attacks on villagers in the plains south 
of Algiers. 

Such attacks have killed more than 400 
people since early June, when pro-gov- 
ernment parties won the first legislative 
elections since 1992. Islamic parties have 
been banned from Algerian politics. 

The Armed Islamic Group, which 
consists of dozens of cells that operate 
in secrecy, is the most violent faction in 
the five-year-old insurgency that has 
left more than 60,000 people dead. 

(AP. Reuters, AFP ) 





INTERNATIONAL HERA^ TRIBUNE, FRIDAY; JULY 25, 1997 

PAGE TWO 


From the Inner City / To the Kenyan Countryside 

Boys From Mean Streets Get 
A Chance to Learn in Africa 


By Stephen Buckley 

Washing ron Past Service 


L 


AIKIPIA, Kenya — Until a few months ago, 
Michael Gam brill, 13, could not write a coherent 
sentence. His spelling was atrocious, his thoughts 
muddled beyond recognition. Asked to describe a 
simple scene last year, he wrote: 

“It was a man wher like reptile. So he was thaing a hick 
in the forest. In he fan a egg. So he hared home.*' 

Eigh t months later, after intensive work in reading and 
spelling in a school 10,000 miles from his Baltimore home, 
Michael described the same scene: “A man found a large 
egg in the forest. He picked it up and cane it away. He took 
' the egg to his home. He sat the egg on the table." 

Michael's extraordinary progress is the fruit of a novel 
experiment undertaken by the Abell Foundation of Bal- 
timore. 

That the foundation opened the Baraka School nearly a 
year ago is not novel; education is one of the organization's 
passions. What is novel is die school’s location: a tiny, dirt- 
road-and-tin-shack town in the middle of north -central 
Kenya. That is, the middle of nowhere. 

The foundation hopes to save boys from inner-city 
Baltimore by sending them to school in a setting where they 
can avoid the pitfalls of violence-addled neighborhoods, 

a safe" environment, a back-to-fiasics^ teaching philosophy 
and lots of one-on-one attention will revive these students’ 
interest in academics during their early teenage years — 
typically a tumultuous stage of their lives. If this experiment 
in Kenya works, the foundation plans to build other such 
schools around sub-Saharan Africa and in die Caribbean. 
Education activists and other philanthropic groups have 
already contacted Baraka officials about how to start sim- 
ilar schools. 

"We can’t reach everyone” in Baltimore public schools, 
said Susan Kikwai, a Kenyan who helped organize the 
school and helps run it "But it’s a beginning.” 

Ms. Kikwai is one of two Kenyans on the Baraka faculty; 
the other four teachers are American. She and other school 
officials stress that although cross-cultural experience is 
one purpose of the school, academics is its reason for 
being. 

Michael is not alone in his academic progress. Most of 
the 18 boys at the school this year improved their reading 
scores by two grade levels. Those who were barely doing 
subtraction have vaulted to fractions, word problems and 
decimals. Each was tested by the Baltimore city school 


system to ensure he had learned enough to advance a grade, 
and each passed. 

f * A lot of people think, ‘Isn *t it nice, we’re taking kids out 
of the city,' ” stud Laura Doherty, whose husband, Chris 
Doherty, was the school's first headmaster. ‘ ‘They may get 
this wonderful experience but won’t be able to find a job. 
Then what? If they didn't learn to read and write, they're 
doomed. The school part is why we’re here.” 

Of the 18 boys who attended Baraka, all were from 
Baltimore, and most were from poor and working-class 
families. Only two live with their natural mother and father. 
Some boys have parents who have steady jobs and are active 
in their communities. Some have parents who are drug 
abusers; others have siblings who are gang members. 

Antione Lewis, 13, said the school mew him because "I 
wanted to change ray life.” 

"I wanted to get away from the streets of Baltimore, ” be 
added “I wanted to go someplace to leant bow to be a 

man. " 

No hard rules govern whom the school accepts, bat 
Baraka officials seek students who are poor and working- 
class and are struggling academically. They also generally 
shun students who have already had major jousts' with the 
law. 

They want boys who are bright but need support, as well 
as mar ginal students who may blossom under intense, 
instruction. And, of course, they are looking far students 
most likely to adapt smoothly to life so far from home. 

The school sits in the shadow of Mount Kenya, and the 
150 acres of grounds are dotted with yellow and orange 
flowers, mango and guava trees, olive trees and bou- 
gainvillea. All over the empty green spaces, birds frit and 
chiip. Butterflies float and dip. 

T HERE IS NO television in this town 150 miles (240 
kilometers) north of Nairobi, the capital, so the 
boys must be creative in their recreation. They hunt 
for frogs and turtles. They gather dung from 
termite hills — for use in art class. 

"In die city, they feel like they have to act tough," said 
Kate Walsh, head of the Baraka School project and edu- 
cation program officer for the AbelfFoundation. founded in 
1953 by A.S. Abell Co., which then owned the Baltimore 
Son newspaper. "Here, they don't have to act tough. They 
can be little boys." 

But the reality of Baltimore’s streets has struck home for 
the Gambrills. While Michael was in Africa, three good 
friends were shot dead. 

“That’s why I’m glad he’s over in Africa,” said Tammy 



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James Nadabi teaching four of his Baltimore students, who were sent to the Baraka School 
by the Abell Foundation. Away from inner-city strife, the boys can concentr ate on learning. 

Gambrijl, 36, Michael's mother, sitting in their small 
apartment in the Droid Hill section of Baltimore. “That 
might have been him shot, one of those times. I know where 
he's aL I know he's' safe.” 

Some mothers allowed their boys to come here in pan to 
grapple with their own violent st reaks , Donca Crockett, 14, 
arrived with a reputation for a powder-keg temper; last year 
at Dunbar Middle School, he fought repeatedly and was 
suspended five times. In one incident, he punched a teacher 
in tne jaw. 

At Baraka, he had one fight this past school year. 

Faculty members describe the friendly boy with big 
hands and a shy smile as one student who was always on 
time to class and got along well with other students. 

“I’ve learned how to get along with people, how to stop 
getting into fights,” he said. “I learned how to count to 10 
when I’m about to go off." 


They also learn discipline. Everybody wakes up at 6:30 
A.M; there are seven hours of classes, and a mandatory 
study period nightly. Lights are turned out at 9 PJVL 

This world is eight time zones and thousands of miles 
from Druid HilL 

Michael Gam brill grew up in a housing project and 
stayed out of trouble until a couple of years ago. his mother 
said. 

“Once he started middle school, he started getting into 
fights, started talking back to the teacher," Tammy Gam- 
brill said. “He used to hang out with some friends, and 1 


would tell him, they’re going to leave you behind. I ou the 
one gonna get caught eveiy time.” 

N onetheless, when Michhel called from Booker T. 
Washington Middle School one afternoon, 
sr wBgromg , “I'm going to Africa, I'm gomg to 

Africa,” her response was.' ‘Yeah, righL But he 

appeared to be serious, and soon she was saying, it you 
really want to go. I'll let you go.” „ . 

At first, Michael had what Chris Doherty called a 
white-hoc b utning supernova hatred” for the school. He 
tried to run away several times. 

He eventually warmed to the place. Thai came in part 
because three boys whom Michael had befriended were 
sent home after a few weeks for, among other things, 
starting fights and fires. Suddeoly, Michael enjoyed learn- 
ing Sw ahni and chess. His reading and spelling greatly 
improved. 

His letters went from gibberish to this: 

“You should expect my behavior to be changed. My 
attitude changed by me not going off on teachers anymore, 
and I do not tty to get into fights for the fun of it." 

When Michael came home last month, a Christmas 
wreath hung on the apartment door. A Christmas tree stood 
in the living room, with a two-foot high Valentine’s Day 
card and an Easter basket beneath it. Tammy Gam brill 
missed her son. But that will not stop her from sending him 
back to die Baraka School in the fall. 


! ! 




Ar 


Polish TV Station Scores With Western-Style Flood Coverage 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


By Dean E. Murphy 

LosAngeks Times 

WROCLAW, Poland — 
Twenty stories above the 
Oder fever, whose ravenous 
waters have been devouring 
this weary Silesian city for 
nearly two weeks, an ex- 
hausted man in a camouflage 
vest tends a mug of nasty- 
looking coffee. 

Jacek Scioblowski’s office 
is a jumble of wading boots 
and discarded rain gear. Cel- 
lular telephones are rechar- 
ging in every outlet. 

“The cameras roll in right 
where you are standing,” Mr. 
Scioblowski tells a visitor, 
who is squeezed between his 
desk and a pair of doors. "That 
way, I can pass on the most 
important news as quickly as 
possible. And if I am lucky, 1 
get three hours of sleep." 

As Poland and much of 
Central Europe wrestle with 
the region's most devastating 


natural disaster on record, the 
overworked 37-year-old 
broadcaster and his fledgling 
private television station are 
serving up a textbook lesson 
on the role of the free media in 
a democracy in distress. 

Poles are being provided 
by the great floods of 1997 
with their first experience in 
crisis management, freedom- 
style. The enormous success 
of TV Lower Silesia’s non- 
stop flood coverage fits a pat- 
tern of democratic break- 
throughs, and some setbacks, 
as the former Eastern Bloc’s 
biggest democracy feels its 
way through the most serious 
national calamity since Gen- 
eral Wojeiecb Jaruzelski de- 
clared martial law in 1981. 

“Inmany ways, we are see- 
ing the best of democracy,” 
said Stanislaw Huskowski, 
deputy chairman of the Wro- 
claw City Council. 

“Under communism, we 
not only had a totalitarian re- 


gime, bat we had no means of 
communicating and helping 
each other out — no insti- 
tutions to rally around.” 

The newly independent 
media, from TV Lower 
Silesia here in Wroclaw to 
Radio Vanessa in a small 
town near the Czech border, 
have provided an unprece- 
dented grass-roots link 
among ordinary residents. 

Spurred by the gravity of a 
deluge that has filled more 
than 100 people across Cen- 
tral Europe, two-year-old TV 
Lower Silesia has become the 
most authoritative source of 
flood information in this re- 
gion of 750,000, the largest 
urban area to be hit by the 
flooding, now in its third 
week. 

The station's standard fare 
of steamy Latin American 
soap operas and U.S. films 
ana crime series has given 
way to news and public ser- 
vice programming, at times 


around the clock. The blunt- 
speaking Mr. Scioblowski 
has become the conscience of 
Wroclaw, lecturing residents 
about doing the right thing 
(don’t imperil your neigh- 
bor’s bouse to save your own) 
and calling to task agencies 
and institutions deemed too 
slow in helping out 

“Private television is now 
a power in this city — every- 
one is watching,” said Mr. 
Huskowski, the city council- 
man. 

“It has been the only con- 
necting tissue between all the 
groups trying to deal with the 


Comparisons with martial 
law are unavoidable. Televi- 
sion also played a defining 
role then, but of a hugely dif- 
ferent character. There were 
no 


i private stations. 
Government 


if-employed 
journalists were required to 
wear military uniforms. And 
democratic activists, includ- 


In this Saturday’s 



Practical 

Investing 



uying stocks 
in other countries. 


lOTERNAnONM. 



THE WORLDS DAILY NEWSPAPER 


Big Winner in U.K. Decides 
There’s No Place Like Home 

Agcnce France-Presse 

LONDON — A 71 -year- old caretaker woo a com- 
petition Thursday that gave him a vacation anywhere in 
the world — worth up to £10,000 — and opted for a 
British seaside resort 150 miles from his home. 

Dennis Isaacs, from King's Lynn in the easr of Eng- 
land, was offered such destinations as the Bahamas, Bali 
or Barbados by Barclays Bank, which organized the 
competition. But be chose a fishing trip to Bournemouth 
for him and his wife, Kathleen, 80. Thar will be followed 
by a bus trip around Scotland and a visit to the British 
Channel island of Guernsey. 

“I prefer not to get into the hassle of traveling abroad' * 
explained Mr. Isaacs, who has never been further afield 
than France. 

A spokeswoman for the Bournemouth town council 
commented: “Sensible man.’ ’ 


mg Mr. Scioblowski. then a 
Wroclaw law student, were 
rounded up and put in pris- 
on. 

The dearth of official flood 
information, and a nagging 
perception of an uncaring 
central government, ' has 
served up a democratic lesson 
of a different sort for politi- 
cians in Warsaw. The rating 
former Communists and their 
allies were slow to recognize 
the immense proportions of 
the disaster, and once they 
did, were nearly paralyzed by 
their own ghosts from the 
pasL 

Apparently fearful at least 
in part, of reviving memories 
of martial law just two 
months before September’s 
parliamentary elections, the 
government had rejected calls 
for an official state of emer- 
gency in flooded areas. 

But in a late-night session. 
Parliament last week hastily 
amended the old statute to 
give President Aleksander 
Kwasniewski the authority to 
sidestep the martial-law pro- 


visions if astateof emergency 
were declared. 

■ Germany Gets Respite 

The Oder gave eastern Ger- 
many a respite from major 
new flooding Thursday, al- 
lowing thousands of soldiers 
and rescue workers to focus 
on bolstering dikes. The As- 
sociated Press reported from 
Raizdorf, Germany. 

More high water, driven by 
weekend rains over Poland, 
had been expected for Thurs- 
day but was apparently 
delayed, and river levels sta- 
bilized, officials said. 

Defense Minister Volker 
Ruehe toured the area and 
said he was ordering another 
1,300 soldiers to flood duty, 
raising the total to 8 ,300, in 
what he called the army’s 
biggest disaster relief oper- 
ation in postwar Germany. 

A prime danger spot was 
Ratzdorf, where the Neisse 
River flows into the Oder. 
Cellars and yards were under 
water, but most of the 330 
residents were staying. 


Strike Wreaks Havoc in Israel 

JERUSALEM (AFP) — Air, rail, telephone and postal 
services in Israel were paralyzed Thursday by a general strike 
by public sector workers protesting Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu’s privatization policies. 

All flights to and from Ben Gurion airport near Tel Aviv 
were canceled Thursday. In addition, international calls were 
disrupted and work in Tel Aviv's business center and on the 
stock exchange was hampered. 

Air, rati, port refinery, water, electricity, postal and military 
industry employees, 60,000 in all, walked out to support striking 
telephone company employees after the communication min- 
ister ordered them back to work under emergency laws. 

Cool June for Hong Kong Hotels 

HONG KONG (Bloomberg) — Hong Kong had only 70 
percent of its hotels filled in June, compared with an average 
occupancy rate of 90 percent in previous months, the tourism 
association said. 

A spokesman for the association said that misconceptions 
about accommodation before the transfer of sovereignty to 
China led tourists to believe that all hotels were fully booked 
and that higher room rates were levied for the whole month. 

Pilots for Portugal’s TAP airline, complaining of being 
overworked, have warned that they may refuse to man dozens 
of flights during the country's peak vacation season over the 
next two months. The action could affect 10 to 12 flights a day 
and cost the airline $60 million, derailing the money-losing 
company ’ s five-year recovery plan. (AP ) 


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shine will return to the mld- 
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with a lew apony thunder* 

storms. Hot and humid 

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A norm wW bmg showers 

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and Romania this week- 

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then a storm wil bmg coal 

and damp weather mto the 

British Isles by Monday. 

Sunshine and hear will 
return to Madrid. 


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Typhoon Rosie, heading 

north through the Philip- 

pine Sea. witi likely strike 
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end with devastating 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 



Memo Shows Clinton 


In Fund-Raising Role 


President Requested List of Donors to Call 


By Don Van Natra Jr. 

New York Turn s Service 



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Washington — President Bin 
Clinton personally requested a list of 
potential contributors whom he offered 
. to call to try to raise SI million for the 
Democratic National Committee early 
1 last year, according to a White House 
memorandum recently turned over to 
| congressional investigators. . 

Several days after making that re- 
quest, Mr. Clinton was presented with a 
' list of donors that the Democratic com- 
mittee thought would' be especially re- 
ceptive to an appeal from the president, 
the memorandum said. 

In the weeks after Mr. Clinton had 
asked to call the donors, five people on 
the president's list gave $50,000 and 
$100,000 checks to the Democrats, ac- 
cording to Federal Election Commis- 
sion records. 

For example, on Nov. 27. 1995, Mr. 
Clinton was asked to call August Busch 
IV, the vice president of Anheuser- 
Busch Cos., to request a $100,000 
check, according to a Democratic fi- 
nance call sheet given to the president. 
Two weeks later, Anheuser-Busch con- 
tributed 5100,000 to the Democratic 
National Committee . Recording to Fed- 
eral Election Commission records. 

A spokesman for Mr. Busch said he 
would not comment on the documents 
or on his donations. Nine others on the 
list said Wednesday that they had not 
received a fund-raising call from the 
president. 

Mr. Clinton has said he cannot recall 


whether he made fund-raising phone 
calls in the months leading up to the 
election last year. But the documents, 
which include handwritten notations 
and the president's characteristic left- 
handed check marks, provide new de- 
tails about his active role in his party's 
frenetic efforts to raise money. 

They also show that Vice President 
A1 Gore may have had a greater per- 
sonal role in fund-raising for the last 
campaign than either Mr. Gore or his 
aides have acknowledged. One memor- 
andum, for example, shows that Mr. 
Gore collected 5372,500 in one after- 
noon in six calls placed from Demo- 
cratic Party headquarters. 

Federal law prohibits the solicitation 
of donations on federal property to aid 
specific candidates, which is known as 
hard money. But the money raised by 
Mr. Gore, and possibly Mr. Clinton, was 
so-called soft money, which is unreg- 
ulated donations to political parties for 
"get out the vote" activities and other 
uses. However, some critics say soft 
money was actually used by Mr. Cliuton 
to help his campaign as well as the 
campaigns of other Democrats. 

The role of Mr. Clinton and Mr. Gore 
will almost certainly be highlighted by 
the Republicans on the Senate Gov- 
ernmental Affairs Committee, who plan 
to focus their campaign-finance inquiry 
on soft money at hearings this falL 

The White House special counsel, 
Lanny Davis, said officials checked 
phone logs and could find no record that 
Mr. Clinton made the fund-raising 
calls. 



Away From 


Politics 


• The Constitution, the 200 -year-old 
naval frigate known as Old Ironsides, 
emerged unscathed from its first sail- 
ing under its own power in 1 16 years, 
as structural tests and divers found no 
damage from Monday’s sailing. (AP) 


m |n a stunt to promote coin-collect- 
ing. U.S. Treasurer Mary Ellen With- 
row and other officials will spend 10 
rare coins, with a total collector value 
of about $1,000, at New York busi- 
nesses, leaving them in circulation for 
.collectors to find. (AP) 


■ Richard Jewell, the former At- 
lanta Olympic Park bombing sus- 
pect, having won settlements from 
NBC and CNN, has sued theNew York 
Post for $ 15 million, charging it libeled 
and defamed him. Mr. Jewell -was 
cleared of wrongdoing. (AP) 


EM, PWe M VRr«icr> 

TERMINAL — While pulling a coal train across a bridge over a rain-swollen creek in Charlotte, North 
Carolina, this locomotive plunged into the water. Nearby residents were evacuated when fuel began to leak. 


• The clinical trial of a hoped-for 
AIDS cure has been abandoned by the 
National Institutes of Health. Too few 
were signing up to try the drug, Kem- 
ron, and too many were dropping out of 
the study. (WP) 


Clinton Sticks to Nomination 


’ Oil;-- ’i 




Apologetic Republicans 
’ Rally Around Gingrich 


By John E. Yang 

Washington Post Service 


ML UPDATE 


k> Havoc in Israel 


WASHINGTON — After two weeks 
of turmoil and intrigue. House Repub- 
licans closed ranks around their leaders 
as die House speaker. Newt Gingrich, 


firmly reasserted his authority. 

His contrite lieutenants offered apo- 
logies for not having moved more 
•.quickly to put down a plot. 

• The repentance came at a closed-door 
session Wednesday night in a packed 

-meeting room in the Capitol basemenr 
that lasted nearly three hours. • 

• It was as much religious revival as 
political caucus — with confessions, 

• pleas for healing, talk of sacrificial 
.■heads and even a verse from the Bible, 

cited by the speaker, abour blessing 
one’s persecutors. 

"It was fabulous,” the smiling Mr. 
Gingrich said as he left the session, 
relishing the peace of the moment. "It’s 




ir Hou£ Kona Hotet 




,u'* i \v 




• “We resolved to forgive and forget, 

/to move on. to get on with the agenda 
' and keep this leadership,” said Rep- 
jeseniative James Greenwood of 
■ ■ r- f "Pennsylvania, a moderate. 

' “We’re moving in the right direc- 
• : = ' tion,” said Man Salmon of Arizona, one 

of the dissident Republicans who had 
_ : :: ' talked of removing Mr. Gingrich. 

; The House majority leader, Richard 

• 'Armey of Texas; the majority whip, 
; •’ r Tom DeLay, and the House Republican 
. - • "Conference chairman, John Boehner of 


about “hypothetical” scenarios for suc- 
ceeding him and for not haying alerted 
the speaker about the conniving, law- 
makers said. 

At one point, Mr. DeLay confessed 
that he had told the renegade congress- 
men he would have voted with them to 
remove Mr. Gingrich from the speak- 
er's chair. Then he turned to the speaker 
and apologized, according to law- 
makers who were at the Wednesday 
night meeting. Mr. DeLay told col- 
leagues that his actions had been “a 
serious mistake in judgment." 

Outside the meeting, a spokesman. 
John Feeheiy, said Mr. DeLay was 
“physically, mentally exhausted” at 
the time he talked to the dissidents. "He 
made the statement but immediately re- 
gretted saying it,” Mr. Feeheiy said. 
"He didn't mean it” 

Mr. Armey acknowledged that his 
relationship with Mr. Gingrich was 
sometimes difficult, lawmakers related, 
saying that he awoke some days not 
liking the speaker. But he was quoted as 
having said that was no different from 
other people working closely together 
under similar circumstances. 

The whole affair was * ‘one giant mis- 
' understanding,” concluded C. W. Bill 
Young of Florida. 

"Eveiybody took a role" in culpa- 
bility, said Robert Ney of Ohio. "There 
was no finger-pointing. 7 ' 


WASHINGTON — president Bill Clinton defied 
Senator Jesse Helms by following through on his 
promise to nominate Governor William Weld of 
Massachusetts, a Republican, as ambassador to Mex- 
ico, a selection that started as a gesture of bipar- 
tisanship but now looks like an exercise in futility. 

Mr. Clinton had hoped that picking one of the 
nation’s most high-profile Republicans for a prom- 
inent diplomatic posting would build a bridge to the 
Republican leadership in Congress and help usher in 
an era no longer dominated by party politics. But 
even before the nomination papers were signed 
Wednesday, the president discovered that internal 
Republican divisions can thwart his desires just as 
easily as partisan combat. 

Rarely has a presidential nomination arrived in the 
Senate in worse shape. Few senators of either party 
are volunteering to lead the charge for Mr. Weld, and 
the White House, while promising a fight, privately 
harbors little optimism for what one administration 
official acknowledged looks like a "hopeless mis- 
sion.” Mr. Helms, a North Carolina Republican, has 
vowed to block any vote on the nomination, and as 
chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee he has 
the power to carry out that threat. The Republican 
leadership has indicated it has no appetite for in- 
tervening. 

The battle pits two larger-than-life personalities in 


a war of wills over what it means to be a Republican. 
On one side is Mr. Helms, the keeper of the con- 
servative flame. On the other, Mr. Weld, a colorful 
Brahmin from Boston, a libertarian who cuts taxes 
but also supports abortion and gay rights. ( WP) 


The filings also show that several cabinet mem- 
bers had much more modest holdings, (WP) 


New U.S. Ideas for Africa 


A Cabinet of Millionaires 


WASHINGTON — About half the members of 
President Bill Clinton's second-term cabinet have 
assets of more than SI million, according to annual 
financial-disclosure forms. This is far more wealth 
than the average American family and is about the 
same proportion of "millionaires” as Mr. Clinton 
had in his first cabinet 

Designed to prevent conflicts of interest the dis- 
closures also serve as approximate net-worth state- 
ments. A review of filings for 1996, for instance, 
shows that Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin and 
Erskine Bowles, the president’s chief of staff, were 
the wealthiest cabinet members. 

Mr. Rubin reported family assets, mostly in trusts, 
totaling more than $57 million and perhaps more than 
$80 million. A former co-chairman of the invest- 
ment-banking firm Goldman, Sachs & Co., Mr. Ru- 
bin reported making $26.5 million in income from the 
firm in 1992 before he joined the administration as 
Mr. Clinton's top White House economics adviser. 

Mr. Bowles needed 1 18 pages to list his family 
assets, which total at least $30 million and could be 
more than $60 million. 


HARARE, Zimbabwe — Jack Kemp has called for 
a shift in African development policies, saying the 
continent should form strong regional trade blocs and 
foster economic freedoms, as American political 
leaders proposed prescriptions for Africans. 

The former Republican vice presidential candidate 
made his proposals Tuesday, a day after the Reverend 
Jesse Jackson and other black American leaders called 
on Washington to develop a Marshall Plan for Africa, 
saying the United States had a debt to the continent 

Mr. Jackson's comments seemed certain to raise 
expectations for a visit to Africa by Mr. Qinton. The 
president, who Mr. Jackson said would travel to 
Africa in the next few months, announced a policy 
last month that sought to promote growth in sub- 
Saharan Africa through trade and investment in- 
centives rather than loans and aid. (API 


Quote /Unquote 


Newt Gingrich, after two meetings at which House 
Republicans closed ranks around the speaker and 
several lieutenants offered apologies for not having 
moved quickly enough to bead off an attempt to 
replace him: "It was fabulous. It's over." (WP) 


Environmental Deals Are Annoying Congress 


By Joby Warrick 


Uto/unsro/i Post Service 


At the end, lawmakers approved a 
solution, offered bv Jim Kolbe of Ari- 


Ohio, apologized to Mr. Gingrich and 
their Republican colleagues for having 


_their Republican colleagues for having 
"participated in discussions about oust- 
ing Mr. Gingrich, for having talked 


resolution, offered by Jim K,olbe of Ari- 
zona, pledging the party "to unite with 
its leadership to continue its work.” 

In a statement, the speaker said he 
hoped the session would put the matter 
to rest 


WASHINGTON — Charles Hur- 
wirz. a Texas millionaire, was vowing to 
cut down the world's largest private 
stand of ancient redwoods, one by one, 
unless the U.S. government met his 
price, which included, on one particular 
day, the island of Alcatraz in San Fran- 
cisco Bay. 

"I’d tear down that crumbling old 
building,” Mr. Hurwitz told negotiat- 
ors, referring to the abandoned prison on 
the island, "and I'd put in a nice 
horeL" 

State and federal officials rejected the 
Alcatraz proposal but they agreed last 
fall to give Mr. Hurwitz cash — more 
than 5300 million for 7 ,5 00 acres (3,000 
hectares) of environmentally sensitive 
lands in California's northern Hum- 
boldt County, including about 3,000 
acres of old-growth redwoods. 

The price is roughly twice the amount 
the government spent last year on ac- 
quiring parkland across the nation. 

While the Clinton administration 


contends the de.al was fair and necessary 
to protect one of the nation's environ- 
mental treasures, the kind of “green- 
for-greeneiy” trade that Mr. Hurwitz 
negotiated is arousing controversy. 

Mr. Hurwitz. a junk-bond financier 
turned timber magnate, is one of a string 
of entrepreneurs who have sought cash 
or other concessions from the govern- 
ment in the last year by threatening to 
destroy environmental resources or to 
create eyesores in public parks. 

The resulting negotiations yielded 
settlements that are considered major 
environmental victories by the White 
House, including the purchase of Mr. 
Hurwitz’ s Headwaters Grove in North- 
ern California and a $65 million set- 
tlement to halt a projected gold mine 
near Yellowstone National Park. 

Some members of Congress are balk- 
ing at appropriating the money to pay 
for such deals. The House last week 


voted to strip the Interior Department of 
a $700-million appropriation that in- 


a $700-million appropriation that in- 
cluded money for Mr. Hurwitz. 

Perhaps die most widely known swap 
of government assets for resource pre- 


servation is the settlement last summer 
between the Clinton administration and 
Crown Butte Ltd. 

Government officials agreed to 
award Crown Butte $65 million from 
federal oil and gas royalties in exchange 
for its abandoning plans to develop a 
gold mine three miles (five kilometers) 
from Yellowstone National Park. 

It is the Headwaters redwood deal 
that has caused the most consternation. 

The land was owned by the Pacific 
Lumber Co., whose 200,000-acre hold- 
ings included six groves of rare, 2,000- 
y ear-old redwoods. 

Mr. Hurwitz, who controlled the 
United Savings & Loan of Texas when 
it failed in 1988, was counting on the 
trees to keep his business empire afloat. 
He had put together a $900-million 
package, financed largely by junk 
bonds, and acquired Pacific Lumber in a 
hostile takeover in 1985. Soon after- 
ward, he moved to liquidate the assets, 
including its trees. 

Environmentalists seethed when the 
company doubled the pace of logging 
and began making plans to cut down the 


redwoods. There were dozens of 
protests and at least 14 lawsuits. 

Unable to cut the trees. Mr. Hurwitz 
tried a number of unsuccessful efforts to 
get the government to buy them. 

Mr. Hurwitz sued the government, 
claiming that environmental restrictions 
amounted to a wrongful taking of his 
property without compensation. 

He announced a Sept, 15, 1996, dead- 
line to begin cutting down some of the 
old trees if a settlement was not reached 
He even established a self-described 
conservation group to lobby the gov- 
ernment to buy the land. 

Finally, after intervention from Sen- 
ator Dianne Feinstein, the California 
Democrat, a deal was struck that ap- 
peared to offer something for every- 
one. 

Politicians would be able to claim 
credit for helping save the giant trees. 
Mr. Hurwitz and a smaller timber com- 
pany received S380 million. 

the Texan agreed to drop his lawsuit 
and abide by a government-sanctioned 
plan for managing the rest of his 
193,000 acres. 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 


Keeping Fit at Home 


i&r-: ■■■■"“ 


First the baby-boomers 
joined gyms, spas and racket 
clubs in record numbers, try- 
ing, to stay lean and mean on 
those muscle-building -ma- 
chines. Then came children 
and promotions and greater 
demands oh time, seemingly 
leaving no choice but to sur- 
render to ‘ flab. But ever in- 
-genious, the boomers have re- 


fused to give in: More and 
more, they are bringing die 
gym home. 

Home gyms — defined as 
being at least two pieces of 
health-chib-quality equip- 
ment — are being built in 
record numbers, Michael 
Woods, a Tufts University 
exercise physiologist, told 
The Boston Globe. In alL 19 
million Americans say they' 
exercise at home at least twice 


a week — up 85 percent from 
1987 — ana many use high- 


1987 — ana many use high- 
quality equipment 
Typically, people buy one 
machine for cardiovascular 
work and a second to build 
strength through resistance 


training. That can get expens- 
ive. Norm Katz, 59, a Boston 
businessman, and his wife, 
Myma, 56, a retired graphic 
artist, have a $3,000 treadmill 
with a color television moun- 
ted near it They also have a 
52,000 resistance machine, 
free weights and a wooden 
sauna. But many home exer- 
cisers note that a year’s health- 
club membership for two can 
run up to $4,000 a year. 

What about the social cost 
of losing the chance to be seen 
at the gym, healthily glowing 
on the Stairmaster? "To be 
honest," said one Massachu- 
setts home exerciser, Vicky 
Rellas, 42, * ‘I don’t really feel 


like I belong at a gym any- 
more. That whole scene is for 
single people.” 

Short Takes 


style and blow-dry a wom- 
an’s hair, law or no law. 


A mail’s haircut is not a 
woman’s haircut — well, 
sometimes — but the law in 
Massachusetts prohibits 
charging women more than 
men for a basic haircut, re- 
gardless of hair length or styl- 
ing. So far, barbers and styl- 
ists don’t seem to be getting 
the message. A state survey 
found that women are 
charged $20.71 on average, 
while men pay $14.76. Salons 
say that it takes more time to 


A big collectors’ market 
has emerged for memorab- 
ilia from the world’s airlines. 
Enthusiasts haunt air shows 
or flea markets for old airline 
timetables, swizzle sticks, 
stewardess’s uniforms or pi- 
lot's wings. One of the more 
familiar denizens of these 
shows has one of the stranger 
collections. Niek Vermeulen 
has accumulated 8,000 air- 
sickness bags — a world rec- 
ord, not surprisingly, accord- 
ing to the Guinness Book of 
Records. Mr. Vermeulen, 
says the Los Angeles Times, 


has a bag with a gin rummy 
scorecard on it, and another 
labeled "Doggy Bag." ("As 
if you’d use it and bring it 
home to your dog," he said.) ' 
One bag that eludes him is the , 
type used on the space shuttle. 
■Anyone up there listening? '! 


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PAGE 4 


**• *• 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


T y 


coon Admits to Role 
In Cambodian Coup 

Supporter of Hun Sen Says He Financed 


Ouster With $1 Million in Cash and Gold 


By Nate Thayer 

Washinfrun PvstSerrir t 


PHNOM PENH — A powerful Cam- 
bodian businessman and suspected drug 
kingpin says he gave more chan $1 mil- 
lion in cash and gold to Second Prime 
Minister Hun Sen and his allies to fi- 
nance a coup that ousted Prince Noro- 
dom Ranariddh this month. 

Theng Bunma, reputedly Cambod- 
ia's wealthiest man and a staunch sup- 
porter of Mr. Hun Sen, told Western 
journalists in an interview in Phnom 
Penh last week that he had called Mr. 
Hun Sea during the July 5-6 coup to 
offer his support. Among those present 
at the interview was an Australian tele- 
vision news crew, which made a tape 
available to The Washington Post 
“I gave him, Hun Sen, $1 million to 
do whatever to control the situation.*' 
Mr. B unma told the reporters. “He 
asked me if 1 had die money in Cam- 
bodia. I said no, but I would send 100 
kilograms, 220 pounds, of gold in a 
plane into Cambodia." That amount of 
gold is worth about $860,000. 

Mr. Bunma, who is president of the 
Cambodian Chamber of Commerce and 
owns holdings worth an estimated $400 
million in Cambodia, also said he paid 
three renegade members of Prince 
Ranariddh's Foocmpec party $50,000 
each to support Mr. Hun Sen’s coup. 

The tycoon made it clear that he saw 
the takeover as good for his business 
interests, but he did not explain why he 
was revealing a role in bankrolling it 
The U.S. government thinks that Mr. 
Bunma, in addition to owning a hotel, a 
bank and an import-export company in 
Cambodia, is the country’s biggest 
heroin trafficker. 

In the interview, Mr. Bunma reit- 
erated his previous denials of involve- 
ment in drug trafficking. “I was accused 
of being a drug trafficker, and I am 
telling you , drug trafficking. I really hate 
that," he said. “I have never done it" 
Mr. Bunma has challenged his ac- 
cusers to produce evidence. 

In a briefing in Washington on Tues- 
day, however, Nicholas Burns, the State 
Department spokesman, said, “We 
have reliable reporting that he, Theng 
Bunma. is closely and heavily involved 
in drug trafficking in Cambodia.*' 

He said the United States “does not 
have evidence that links Hun Sen him- 
self, personally, to these accusations of 


narcotics trafficking” but that “we 
think the Cambodian government can 
do a lot more to purge itself of obvious 
corruption in the government, of ob- 
vious linkages between members of the 
government and narco-traffickers." 

In an interview with The Washington 
Post on Saturday in Bangkok, Prince 
Ranariddh charged that Mr. Bunma and 
another wealthy suspected drug traf- 
ficker, Mong Re thy, have long been 
bankrolling Mr. Hon Sen. “He gets 
money from , them, and they are drug 
traffickers,” Prince Ranariddh said. 

“I ask now that President Clinton 
make public the investigation of the 
Drug Enforcement Administration on 
drug trafficking in Cambodia,” Prince 
Ranariddh added. “The DEA knows 
clearly.” 

“The mafia is now in charge in Cam- 
bodia." Prince Ranariddh said, refer- 
ring to “people like Theng Bunma, who 
is very, very powerful.'' 

[The Cambodian government said 
Thursday that it was taking strong mea- 
sures against the illegal drugs trade, and 
rejected The Post's report of alleged 
links between the trade and government 
leaders, Reuters reported. 

“The Royal Government of Cam- 
bodia has taken strong and firm mea- 



MneburZBkvtyTbcAmciaKilPlca 

JOY IN JAKARTA — Supporters of Megawati Sukarnoputri, an Indonesian democracy activist, marching 
Thursday after a court ruled that a lawsuit could proceed against the police and rivals of her party. 


as a result we arrested many drug 
tickers,” Khieu Kanharith, the secre- 
tary of state for information, said in a 
letter to The Washington Post] 

During the coup, more than 300 of 
Mr. Hun Sen's troops, backed by tanks, 
were dispatched to protect Mr. Bunina's 
property. In the interview last week, Mr. 
Bunma expressed appreciation for that 
action ana support for Prince Ranar- 
iddh's ouster. 

“I say what Hun Sen did was correct, ’ ’ 
Mr. Bunma said. "Why? One reason. 
Take the example of my hotel.” Prince 
Ranariddh’s troops wanted to destroy it, 
he said, but Mr. Hun Sea ‘ ‘put three tanks ' 
and soldiers around to protect it.” 

Mr. Bunma said that he gave $50,000 
each to three Funcinpec politicians op- 
posed to Prince Ranariddh — two pro- 
vincial governors. Toon Chhay and 
Duong Khem, and a minister of state, 
Ung Phan — co “encourage them” and 
cement their support for the coup. 

Western military sources say Mr. 
Bunma has provided Mr. Hun Sen re- 
cently with Russian-made helicopters to 
ferry troops to front-line positions. 


Blows Against Patriarchy in Japan 

Divorce in Shoguns’ Clan Highlights a Change in Attitudes 


By Teresa Watanabe 

Las Angeles Times Srmcv 


TOKYO — In the annals of Japanese 
samurai history, few names ring with 
such glittering tradition as the Tok- 
ugawa. The powerful clan unified the 
nation in 1603 after 100 years of ra- 
pacious civil war, provided an unbroken 
string of 15 shogun rulers for three 
centuries and symbolized the pervasive 
influence of ie, the male-led family lin- 
eage system. 

But although the fabled clan still sur- 
vives, the patriarchal traditions it rep- 
resents are being shaken by divorce, 
democracy, economic downsizing and 
other modern developments. 

Just ask Takako Nagaoka, impec- 
cably coiffed and dripping in diamonds 
— and in the nobility of being a Tok- 
ugawa wife for 17 years. 


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On 



HONG KONG — A landmark legal case on the 


egai ca.' 

legitimacy of the Beijing-appointed Provisional Leg- 
islature closed Thursday with the three presiding judges 
promising a ruling Tuesday. 

Solicitor General Daniel Fung wrapped up the three- 
day hearing in the case, which also questioned the body of 
common law by which the legal system in Hong Kong 
operates. (AFP) 


Vietnam Reacts to Disorders 


HANOI — Vietnam said Thursday that the authorities 
in northern Thai Binh Province were taking steps to 
restore order in the area after reports of some of the 
Communist-ruled country’s most violent unrest in 
years. 

A Foreign Ministry spokesman, in the first formal 
statement on the troubles, said officials had been dis- 
ciplined over the matter. (Reuters) 


3 Die in Air Attack on Kabul 


KABUL — An air raid on Kabul on Thursday lulled 
three people and wounded two others as Afghan op- 
position ground forces moved to within rocket range of 
the capital, travelers and witnesses said. 

The plane swept low over the capital and dropped a 
single bomb close to the Ariana Hotel. (Reuters) 


Colombo Drops Legislator Plan 


COLOMBO — Sri Lanka announced Thursday that it 
was withdrawing plans to cut the number of legislators. 

But it said it would push ahead with a new constitution 
expanding powers for minority Tamils in an effort to end 
the civil war by Tamil separatists. (AFP) 


Accord on Loan to Pakistan 


ISLAMABAD — Pakistan and the International Mon- 
etary Fund said Thursday that they had agreed on a 
structural adjustment program that could provide Is- 
lamabad a loan of at least SI .6 billion. 

The fund’s director for the Middle East, Paul Chabrier, 
said at a news conference that the loan would involve two 
separate programs with differing interest rates. (Reuters) 


Seoul Rebukes Japan on Boats 


SEOUL — The South Korean Parliament lashed out at 
Japan on Thursday for the seizure of Korean fishing boats 
in disputed waters, demanding an apology and com- 
pensation. 

The 299-member Parliament unanimously adopted a 
resolution calling for the immediate release of two de- 
tained South Korean captains and steps to prevent die 
repetition of “such illegal acts.” (Reuters) 

VOICES From Asia 


Tang Guoqiang, a Foreign Ministry spokesman in 
Beijing, on a U.S. report criticizing lack of religious 
freedom in China and other countries: “There are almost 
100 million followers of all religions and China's re- 
ligious policy enjoys widespread support in the pop- 
ulation. But Western countries like the United States do 
not have die necessary comprehension about the situation 
of religion in China. ’ ’ (AFP) 


Sarath Munasinghe, a Sri Lankan spokesman, de- 
scribing a rou t of die Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam: 
“The LTTE are on the final ran. They will keep on 
running and we will keep pushing them.” (Reuters) 


Alter years of tension, fed by such 
taboos as the temerity of a mere wife to 
speak her mind, her marriage to the 
grear-grandson of Japan’s last shogun, 
Tokugawa Yoshinobu, fell apart this 
year in the first divorce among direct 
descendants. 

The messy affair, which she says in- 
volved $10,000 in debt amassed after 
her husband was laid off, has tarnished 
the family's legendaiy name. Her cus- 
tody of the couple's two sons, and their 
adoption of her maiden name, lias left 
the Tokugawa with no direct successor. 

But her boys don’t care, she says: 
Products of a new age, they want to 
succeed via their own efforts, no t through 
the crutch of a famous clan name. 

“The values and thinking of the Tok- 
ugawa family don’t fit the present era,” 
said Miss Nagaoka, 42, herself a de- 
scendant of die princely Hosokawa clan 
that produced former Prime Minister 
Moriniro Hosokawa. “To them, the hon- 
or of the household is more important 
than an individual’s happiness.” 

As go the Tokugawa, so goes Japan. 
Households in China and Korea still 
embrace many elements of the Con- 
fucian, male-dominated family succes- 
sion system — holding the eldest son in 
highest esteem to continue the lineage. 


perpetuate the family name, inherit die 
family 


family property and preside over an- 
cestral rites. Under this system, new 
brides are absorbed into their husbands' 
households — often under the eagle eye 
and steely thumb of mothers-in-law who 
ensure that the younger woman adopts 
the way of the clan in everything from 
cooking styles to laundry methods. 

But Japan is leading Asia in spawning 
economic and social changes chat are 
rapidly weakening this way of life and 
even paving the way for greater mat- 
riarchal sentiments regarding 
everything from birth to death. 

Baby boys are still preferred 
throughout most of Asia. In South 
Korea, for instance, experts suspect that 
an unwanted female fetus is the reason 
behind many of the 30,000 abortions 
performed annually. But in Japan, 76 
percent of couples in a 1992 govern- 
ment survey said they prefer a girl. 

The preference for girls represents a 


U.S. Seeks 
To Mobilize 
Pressure on 
Cambodia 


* 



By Robin Wright 

Las Angeh? Time* 


LOS ANGELES — In the strongest 
indication yet that the United Slates 
plans to play hardball with Cambodia ’s 
current leadership. Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright has pledged to use 
U.S. leverage to ensure that Prime Min- 
ister Hun Sen restores the country’s 
previous coalition government and ob- 
serves the rule of law. 

Mis. Albright, who stopped in Los 
Angeles en route to a meeting with 
leaders of Southeast Asian countries in 
Malaysia, said she would try to mobilize 
“broad international pressure” on 
Cambodian authorities to restore the 
1991 Paris peace agreement that es- 
tablished the coalition government, al- 
low all political parties to operate freely 
and conduct fair elections scheduled for 


significant turnabout from 1982, when 
the majority wanted a boy, and reflects 
both a desire for daughters to care for 
parents in old age and the clout of wom- 
en in Japanese households today, ana- 
lysts say. 

The Justice Ministry is fighting to 
amend civil laws to alio w women to keep 
their own names after marriage, another 
challenge to ie traditions. Younger wom- 
en overwhelmingly support the proposal 
— just as they increasingly reject calling 
their husbands shujin. or master, in favor 
of the more neutral donna, or husband. 
The proposal was lolled this year under 
fierce opposition by Shinto religious 
groups and conservative members of die 
Liberal Democratic Party, but backers 
vow not to give up. 

The eldest son’s role in caring for 
elderly parents also is being shaken as 
once-powerfiil economic incentives to 
do so — inheriting family property — 
have all but disappeared under postwar 
laws mandating a democratic disburse- 
ment of family assets. 

An increasing number of parents are 
living with married daughters instead- — 
the proportion has more than doubled to 
26 percent over the past decade — in 
part because of the strong mother- 
daughter bond and because men report 
far less friction with fathers-in-law than 
women do with mothers-in-law, the 
Life Design Research Institute in Tokyo 
reported in June. 

Traditional burial customs are in flux 
as more women refuse to be buried with 
their husbands' ancestors and are seek- 
ing after-life liberation in their own 
graves. Minako Ikezoe is one: The 42- 

^er husband six years ago by buying her 
own grave as a gesture of independence 
from ie traditions. Her two daughters 
have declared that they intend to follow 
in their mother's footsteps. 

Indeed, younger women are the 
agents of change: Among those in their 
30s, 20 percent desired their own graves 
compared to 17 percent who wanted to 
be buried in their husband's ancestral 
tombs, according to a 1994 study by the 
Life Design Research Institute. But 
women in their 60s still showed a strong 
preference for their husband's tombs. 


next year. 

“The international community was 
right to invest in peace in Cambodia, 
and we are right to insist now that the 
government in Phnom Penh live up to its 
obligation to respect democratic prin- 
ciples," she said Wednesday in a speech 
to the Pacific Council and the Los 
Angeles World Affairs Council. 

The international community spent 
more than $3 billion to fund a United 
Nations peace effort and the country's 
first multiparty elections in 1993. 

Mr. Hun Sen, who was part of the 
coalition government that resulted from 
that election, staged a coup this month 
that established him as the nation’s top 
leader. 

The coup against Prince Ranariddh, 
who won the 1993 elections and held the 
post of first prime minister until he was 
forced to flee the country this mohth, is 
expected to be the top U.S. issue during 
Mrs. Albright's meetings with leaders 
from the Association of South East 
Asian Nations, which begin this week- 
end. 

Washington supports an ASEAN of- 
fer to help mediate in Cambodia, which 
had its invitation to join the association 
suspended after the coup. 

[Mr. Hon Sen said Thursday that 
ASEAN had made a “big mistake” in 
putting off Phnom Penh's admission, 
Agence France-Presse reported from 
Phnom Penh. “We have to know wheth- 
er ASEAN needs us or whether we need 
another,” be said, hinting that 


f'l 


"Hi 1’iih 

New T< 


one 


Phnom Penh may be forced to look 
beyond its immediate neighborsfor sup- 
port and investment. 

[Mr. Hun Sen made the remarks in a 
Khmer-language interview with Radio 
France International that was recorded 
late Wednesday and rebroadcast Thurs- 
day on Cambodian radio. 

[His comments came as UN inves- 
tigators. acting on an anonymous tip. 
unearthed in a gully at Pich Nil about 
100 kilometers (60 miles) southeast of 
Phnom Penh the bodies of two blind- 
folded Cambodians who had been shot 
in the head in execution style. It ap- 
peared to be the first hard evidence of 
alleged reprisals against supporters of 
Prince Ranariddh and his royalist party, 
chough UN officials have said they have 
reliable reports of killings of 35 to 40 
royalist supporters.] 

Mrs. Albright also had tough words 
for Burma, which along with Laos was 
admitted 10 ASEAN on Wednesday. 

“The authorities there are among the 
most repressive and intrusive on 
Earth,” she said. 

In April, President Bill Clinton im- 
posed a ban on new U.S. investments 
in Burma in response to a pattern of 
what the United States said was ‘ * severe 
repression” by the military govern- 
ment. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 


Talks Outline New Pact 
For Forces in Europe 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Hio/iincfiw flat S enit r 

Washington — Negotiators 

from the United States, Russia and 28 
European countries have agreed on the 
outlines of a new treaty to further reduce 
military forces and equipment 
throughout Europe. 

The treaty would replace a 1990 
agreement known as die Conventional 
Forces in Europe Treaty, which estab- 
lished a rough balance in conventional 
forces between NATO and the Warsaw 
Pact. 

The agreement, overtaken by the 
breakup of the Soviet Union, the end of 
the Warsaw Pact and die planned ex- 
pansion of the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization, will be replaced by one 
that sets limits for each European coun- 
try and for U.S. forces in Europe. 

The United States is pleased because 
the new agreement, negotiated in Vi- 
enna, did not give Russia several con- 
cessions it had sought in earlier talks, 
including a collective limit on die equip- 
ment deployed by NATO, American 
officials said. 

In addition, the officials said, the new 
agreement will not limit NATO’s ability 
to send reinforcements into the territory 
of new members in future crises, senior 
officials said. Moscow had sought re- 
strictions on the movement of NATO 
troops and equipment into Poland, Hun- 
gary and the Czech Republic, former 
member states of the Warsaw Pact 
slated to join NATO. 

The 1990 treaty resulted in the elim- 
ination of more than 50,000 tanks, ar- 
tillery pieces and 'other combat equip- 
ment, said Robert Bell, senior 
disarmament official on the National 
Security Council. 

The new limits on tanks, aircraft, 
artillery pieces and other non-nuclear 


weapons to be maintained in Europe 
will achieve totals that are lower still, he 
said at a White House briefing Wednes- 
day. The details are to be negotiated 
over the coming year. 

Senior officials said the replacement 
talks for the conventional forces treaty 
were the key to bringing Russia into the 
European security corral with the 16 
members of NATO and the non-NATO 
parties to the original agreement 

The old treaty, for example, set equal 
collective Limits on NATO and Warsaw 
Pact weaponry, and the Russians 
wanted a new collective limit to be 
applied to NATO. 

The Russians pressed that demand in 
negotiations preceding the signing of 
the NATO-Russia “Founding Agree- 
ment” this summer. The -United States 
refused on the grounds that Russia could 
not be allowed to influence the military 
decisions of the Atlantic alliance. But 
the Americans held out the prospect that 
the Russian concerns could be ad- 
dressed through the conventional forces 
treaty negotiations, in which Russia was 
a full partner. 

Under the new agreement, “each 
country will be given its own individual 
ceiling for how much equipment it can 
have," Mr. Bell said. 

In addition, he said, “We have 
agreed, among all 30 states, that at the 
end of the day, when this new agreement 
is finished and all the national ceilings 
have been set, the total amount of com- 
bat equipment that will be in Europe 
will be significantly lower than the total 
amount that had been allowed by the 
original 1990 treaty.” 

Mr. Bell said the new limits would 
“not necessarily” reduce U.S. troop 
strength in Europe because “we have 
the right to have a lot more equipment in 
Europe today than we have deployed 
there.” 


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Italians Mourn a Killer 

Nation Rallies Against U.S. Execution 




Mmc.i tUvagU/Thr \fuowl Pier. 

An activist protesting the death penalty watching a video screen in 
Rome on Thursday that showed a police mug shot of Joseph O'Dell. 


r. tJvr Surf f mat Poj*»-hn 

ROME — Italy on Thursday 
mourned Joseph O’Dell, a convicted 
rapist and murderer executed in Vir- 
ginia who spoke no Italian, had no con- 
nection to Italy and yet became a ral- 
lying point for the country’s fervent 
stand against the death penalty. 

The extraordinary support for Mr. 
O’Dell in Italy, where most U.S. ex- 
ecutions go onnoticed, resulted from a 
mix of strong opposition to the death 
penalty, an appeal by Pope John Paul U 
for Mr. 0‘DeU, who was Catholic and a 
sophisticated public-relations campaign 
by his supporters here. 

Up to 1,000 people gathered in the 
Campo dei Fiori early Thursday for a 
nighttime vigil around a giant statue of 
Giordano Bruno, a poet condemned by 
the Roman Catholic Church as a heretic 
and burned there at the stake in 1600. 

Giant screens showed a live broad- 
cast on RA1 television. When the news 
of die execution was announced early 
Thursday, some people wepL A banner 
read, “The death penalty is murder, not 
justice.” 

Flags flew at half-staff in Palermo, 
Sicily, whose mayor, Leoluca Orlando, 
had championed Mr. O'Dell’s cause, 
and the city offered a place in its oldest 
cemetery for the convicted killer. Mr. 
O’Dell’s bride, Lori Urs, a paralegal 
whom be married hours before the ex- 
ecution, said she wanted Mr. O’Dell 
buried in Palermo. 

Mr. O'Dell, 55. was executed for the 
murder of Helen Schaitner of Virginia 
Beach, whose body was found Feb. 5, 
1985, in a field near a nightclub where 
she had gone dancing the night before. 
She had been pistol-whipped, raped, 
sodomized and strangled. 

In his final statement, Mr. O’Dell 
said: “IwanttosaythistoEddie Schart- 


ner. the victim's son. 'Eddie, I did not 
kill your mother.’ ” 

After being strapped to a gurney, Mr. 
O’Dell said it “was the happiest day of 
my life because 1 got married to my 
wife.” 

The execution took place after Gov- 
ernor George Allen of Virginia turned 
down Mr. O’Dell's clemency petition 
and the U.S. Supreme Coun rejected his 
last-minute appeal by a 9-to-0 vote. 

The Pope, President Oscar Luigi 
Scalfaro of Italy and the Italian and 
European parliaments had urged Mr. 
Allen to stop the execution. 

Mr. O’Dell was administered a lethal 
injection at about 9:10 P.M. Eastern 
daylight time and was declared dead six 
minutes later. 

He appeared haggard and frightened 
as be was strapped to the gurney. At one 
point. Sister Helen Prejean, author of 
“Dead Man Walking” and his spiritual 
adviser, leaned over and placed her 
hands on his chest, as if blessing him. 

A career criminal. Mr. O'Dell was on 
parole from Florida on robbery and kid- 
napping charges when he was arrested 
for abducting and murdering Ms. 
Schartner in Virginia. Ms. Schartner, 
44, was an employee of V irginia Natural 
Gas and the divorced mother of one 
child. 

He was arrested after leaving some 
bloody clothing, including a shin, and 
jacket, at a girlfriend's house. She 
turned him in after learning (hat the 
killing had occurred near clubs Mr. 
O'Dell frequented. 

Earlier, Mr. O'Dell and Ms. Urs, 41, a 
law student at Boston University, ex- 
changed vows through the bars of his 

f irison cell as a death-row chaplain of- 
i dated. For security reasons, the new- 
lyweds were not permitted to touch. 

(Reuters, AP) 


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British University Students 
Face New Test: Tuition Fees 


By Sarah Lyall 

New York Times Strvicr 

LONDON — For the first 
time, Britain plans to impose 
tuition fees on all college stu- 
dents. effectively abandoning 
the country’s long-held com- 
_• mitment to free higher edu- 
cation for everyone. ' 

The proposal, to charge up 
to $1,600 a student a year, 
may seem laughably modest, 
but because the plan also 
7 means that students would no 
longer be eligible for govern- 
ment grants covering room 
and board, student groups say 
many graduates will be faced 
with debts of more than 
$16,000 after three years in 
; \ college. 

’ ' In a nation where free edu- 
cation is considered as much a 
basic right as free health care 
or social security benefits, the 
announcement Wednesday 
was taken as a further sign 
that Prime Minister Tony 
Blair's government is intent 
on dismantling many of die 
most sacred vestiges of Bri- 
tain ’s old-style welfare state. 

Liz Llewellyn, a spokes- 
woman for the National Un- 
ion of Students, said the pros- 
pect of leaving school deeply 
in debt will deter many young 
people from attending college 

1 “We’ve always been told 
that if you choose to go on 
with your education,” she 
said, “the state should pay, 
because yonTI give so much 


back to the state by getting a 
better job and paying more in 
taxes.” 

Education and Employ- 
ment Secretory David Blun- 
kett said Britain’s universit- 
ies, which face a collective 
deficit of up to $3.2 billion in 
the next decade or so. had 
fallen into a financial crisis 
that could be addressed only 
through raising taxes or im- 
posing fees. 

“Change is essential if we 
are to maintain the skills and 
research base of our coun- 
try,” he said. “We cannot 
defer action to another gen- 
eration.” 

T uition at British universit- 
ies is now free to citizens of 
Britain and other European 
Union countries; room and 
board is paid for by a com- 
bination of government 
grants, student loans and pa- 
rental help. 

Postgraduate and part-time 
students and students from 
outside the EU already pay 
tuition fees. 

In most other EU countries, 
university costs are paid for 
out of taxes and governments 
spend a comparatively higher 
percentage of gross domestic 
product on colleger-level edu- 
cation. But not even in Ger- 
many, for instance, where 
(here has been considerable 
pressure to reduce social 
spending, has the government 
proposed to levy university 
fees on students. 

Under the British govern- 


ment’s plan, all but the 
poorest students would be ex- 
pected to pay tuition of up to 
$1,600 a year, as well as sev- 
eral thousand dollars for 
room and board. 

Student loans, to be paid 
back according to income and 
over a number of years, 
would be available for every- 
one for tuition and bousing 
and living expenses alike. 

Some students said 
Wednesday the new charges 
would put an almost unbear- 
able strain on their already 
shaky finances. Others said 
that while they would benefit 
from the more relaxed loan 
repayment schedule, they felt 
the government had abdic- 
ated a basic responsibility. 

For a number of years, Bri- 
tain’s universities have been 
warning of an impending fi- 
nancial crisis. While the num- 
ber of students has increased 
drastically, government aid to 
universities per student has 
declined. 

Some colleges at places 
like Oxford and Cambridge 
have their own endowments 
and have soldiered on with 
relatively few problems. Oth- 
er institutions have had to 
scrimp and save. 

There are virtually no 
private universities in Britain. 
Before university level, stu- 
dents can attend either state- 
financed schools or private 
schools, where tuition in 
some cases equal those of 
elite American prep schools. 


Your Guide lb 
1 29 Ibp French Companies 


.*^1 

w 




DBOOK 


C!SE13»SS3r„T«SJS0E75? 


Published by the International Herald Tribune, the 1997 edition includes detailed 
profiles of all the companies in the SBF 1 2D Index. 

The SBF 120 Index includes the CAC 40 plus other major firms. These are the 
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Each profile includes: head office, CEO, investor relations manager, company 
background and major activities, recent developments, sales breakdown, shareholders, 
subsidiaries and holdings in France and internationally, 1992-1996 financial performance, 
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Updated annually, rile Handbook is indispensable for anyone who needs to know 
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Return your order to International Herald Tribune Offers, 37 Lambton Road, London SW20 0LW, England. 

For faster service, fax order to: (44-181) 944-8243 CARD N° = „EXP. 


Please send me copies of French Company 

Handbook 1997atUK£50 (US$85) per copy, including 
postage in Europe. 

Three or more copies, 20% reduction. 

Outside Europe, postage per copy: North America/Middle 
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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1997 


tulBfit 2 M THE INTERMARKET 


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Jr' 






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Far +33 (0)4 S3 09 84 89 


LOUVEOMS- West Paris 

VERY MGH CLASS PR0PEHTY 
READY TO UVEfi 
350 sqm BcrapUona! house in perfect 
conffiton. 5 badooms wtfi bath, 
scudpped Wrtwn and drosstag. 
flnapfaoe. alarm 5000 sqm superb 
pert, tennis. Astana FF8 iribi 
Tflfc +33 (t?1 49 B0 Z7 73 (office) 
Fax +33 (0)1 49 80 25 82 


| mahogany, the kitchen butt m itaBan gran- 
i «o. Japerieae stone garden tritfi pond and 
wooden bridge, swhnming pool covered, 
heated air and water. Fiji security wtti 


- heated air an« 

observation cameras. CONTACT : Fax no. +361 88 824 44 


DRABflONT near ST RAPHAEL 

Vay nfce construchon 
For phetos & lorafon corned on liflema 
WpMarttm aabmfctamtnltiBr 


PARtSOTEDE LA UUSIOUE. chaining 
2/3+oam ftac, hJy renovated, doutfe to- 
ng + bedroom ■paiquer. ftaptacee, ligrt 


ertras. euaj 
to. FS%000. 


i. GuanSan. ate, ready to more- 
tUJOO. Trtft* +33 (0)1 42C2T3&7 


I F til de senp oon at die progeny an video tape VHS/PAL wtH atmatod to you upon your l 
requesL Price; USS 2^00,000.-. non negotiable. ( 


Real Estate Services 


isc£Sl& 


YOU OWN A PAOPEHTY N FRANCS 
Cfcr services oo«r b yixr absence: 
Mtarienmce. dealing, gasdening. repafcs 
fokw-up of bis, goremrosn taxes ..els 
PLEASE DO NOT HESITATE 70 
CONTACT US FOR MORE DETAILS 
FAX +33 (DM 50 95 94 34 
Teh +33 (0)4 » 96 35 35 
7 Dcmatne de Crevto F-74160 Boesey 


NORTH CHARBffE 
Deep in nrai Fiance, but only 2 1/2 
hows from Paris on Die TGV. Subsdantlal 
Honor House teRy ranwsted by an 
American to r^m arfort aarxtoda 
Standing on a M top In 10 ha. Bowrad 
part. Spectaoiar riew. Guest house 
also MV renovated Tend 7 bedrooms. 
3 iwqttms. FF3,75000Q. AABtanal 
land av^Bfcte Mudng tnAs arefiard. 

Bioctxire avaltabta no request 
TeL tamer. +33 (0)545318474 office or 
(0)545316473 bom Fta (0)545318787 


ST PAUL DE VERGE, 15 mins airport 
Via wtt beaurti vtwr, 170 sqjn on 2 
levels. 3 bedrooms. 1 bath, 2 lolet 
rooms. Cete, garage, terrace. 2^00 
sq.m, pine garden. Pool possible. 
FF15M. Message to manr Tflfc +33 (0)1 
43 54 06 38, rat +33 (0)1 4354 0®0 


1581 METRO GEORGE V, n» Bassano, 
freestone Mfifig, Red a Tate, Steqm 
charming. 5th Hoor/top floor, fe. sunny, 
fireplace, al condort owner FFi.isOM. 
Tel +33(0)147234562. mobKQ603093ffi4 


FORMER SHEffFOU), 125 sqm. Mng 
space, 25 ha. (2SD0Q sqm) enclosed & 
tread taref water, etecMofay, feteptone. 
Very calm area 17 Ions tores, 1 lur 
Nice airport FF1fl50,000. Tel: +33 
(0]4 93 60 25 34. Foe 10)3 04 70 54 17. 


1ST- ST. H0N0RE, NEAR YEND0ME. 
Prestigious location for farenacutaiB ptod 
a term. 56 sq.m. FI .480,000. Owner 
Tet +33 ffit 4200 3332 {answering res- 
ettne) or *33 (0)6 6043 6180 (nttfe). 


PROVENCE: All kinds ol properties. 
Please ash tor tts Wagner. Agence 
Auquiei. F-04210 SI (Sder. Ter +33 
(0}4 90 66 07 53 Fax 90 68 12 36 


UNK2UE 91 ST CLOUD, OWNER SELLS 
HOUSE 300 sqm oi garden 1500 eqm 
SEdbsfre suwnfogs private access to 
Pert. FF83 M. wgotistta. Tri +33 (0)1 
46 02 41 56 Fa* +33 (WT 46 02 32 00 


BMTTAMY, near QLUfPSl 2 ton hat 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


sea A beaches FiAr furnished character 
house, imewashed, buffl 196G very large 
kitchen, bathroom. WC. + living. 

2 bedrooms. Attic lo be filled bAo 

3 bedrooms, (running water). Garage + 
targe storage roam. Large fawn with fault 
trees FBwg port. Ft ,500.000 Visits 
by owner: Atbia SMIsl Juh m 
+33 (0)4 92 93 50 50: Jtty 28th tl 
Augud 1st. +33 (0)1 <5 24 65 30; 
August Sttv31sb +33(0)2 98 87 41 05 
Loaudy. typical Bnttany 


NEAR ANTIBES. Beautiful 4-bed vflb. 
private pool, 10 mns tfica airport 
£2S0jD0a Tet 33 (0)4 93 22 95 63 


FACING BOS DE BOULOGNE, 23 som 
state, brih, residential. qrieL chairing. 
FF570K Tet +33(0)1 43 45 B5 07 


Polynesia 


TAHTVMOOREA-FRENCH POLYNESIA 
Become owner ol a Tahtean ttmgatow, 
wflh W. hr the cocomrf grow oodBrig 
lagoon Rentals assured. Tax advantages 
tor French nefionds (tot Pans). Worm- 
Son by Fax : +889 56 49 96 


WCE, tnmtehed stutiEto for sale, very 
comtoriaHe. m in the carter. Tet +33 


HE SAINT LOUS, exceptional bordering 
water, sunny side, Max. 4 bedrooms. 4 
bate +33(0)1 55429034 rente* poasUe 


(tv 93 B8 27 33 before B pm 


Germany 


Switzerland 


BRITTANY ESTATE on 15 acres land 
vttiapond. 75 sqm stone house. Al- 
lies to be Rtsd. Price F 000,000. Tat 
Main Bouifes +33 (0)2 97 47 <2 78 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE OR RENT 
You office and kourious vita 
in HairtMD&mtany newnodem 
house, twgti ebss presdgioiB, 
hfiMiom B rooms ki famous resktanca 
HKA CORPORATE TRUSTEES 
Tel +49 40 667170 Fta +49 40 B663858 
Hri 040667170-1 OTronAna . 


LAKEGam&m 

Safe to totkren ariftanzed 

oar spwcWty shea 197S 


Bahamas 


CLOSE L£ TOUQUET. Barmin Aim. 
Hah buy apamrst half hour Catafc 
(deal golos & tamffies. Garage & 3 mns 
lo bearii £9G500 Tal 44(0)171 731 1193 


Airacdre properdw. «wtoo*nw views 
1 to 5 botanns, from 5Fr 200.000. 
REVAC SJL 

52, MortMlant CH-1211 GENEVA 2 
Tel 4122-73# 15 40 Fn 734 12 20 


Great Britain 


PRIVATE ISLAND H 
TAX HAVEN4AHAMAS 
On tha sptandd land A sea pert m Exu- 
mas, one of toe most rm^Aat carets 
100 percent ptwae is tor sale. 35 acres. 
5 beaches, i tagoon, 3 cottages. SSiU 
FnMWW 


French Riviera 


French Provinces 


HOUGMS 

Ctenrita Provencal via nth open view 
twer vfcge. SeauBri 3J00 sqjn. pa k. 
pool Daotta lecopftm. 4 bertoaBS, 

4 baths, raretelart aparansnL 
FFfijOaOQO. Ret. ITS. 


HOMESEARCH LONDON Let US 
ssaich tor you. Wa find homes / fiats 
to buy and real and provide corporate 
retocatan servees. For indmduals 
and companies. Tel +44 171 838 
1066 Fa + 44 171 838 1077 
tnpitetajhonBSBtachccujtotiQm 


VERBIER • UNIQUE CHALET. Ven 
baauffiul In old vnorttamenork, 450 
sqjn. Lwafy, quiet sila. 1.400 sq.m . 
land. Fat owner +41 z? 771 11 21 or 
cal +41 27 771 60 30. 


USA General 


Greece 


BOURGOGNE 

NteD^SO/rinstora&WM. 
beauUui Uy htotehad via, waled 
tondscapsd ganten along river, nth 
WHS, 5 bedrooms. 3 baths, eat* 
tattoen & laundry room dsn. bto Mng, 


! 9J0HN : 
imoR ; 


55 UCtesetle. 06400 Camas. 

Tel +33 tDM 93 38 00 66 F* 9339 1385 


GfSECE • MYKONOS - 0RN0S. 

On seashore, by isolated beach. 5 trin. 
rtwe tram tonvafapon 4 vias 100 sam. 
escti 3 bedrooms, i bathrooms, Mohan, 
finngtffflg iw»L Stonge, targe verav 
da. ganten. barbecue. £ arger As. 160 
sqm each, ptos 2 bedrooms & bath- 
rooms. optional snnmng pooL Spac&c- 


1S00 ACRES FOR SALE 150 mfes Irom 
ftew York City, in the most beautflm 
Cats HI Mountain area. 5 bouses hity 
rented, meadows, norland, 2 ponds, 
end a number o> springs. Asking 
51.750,000. Generous terms avafette. 
Wrta Mendeie Ferre, 224 W 30th 9„ 
New Yort. NY 10001 or Fffic 
(212) 2380620. 


USA Residential 


dkvg with (replace, heated swinning 
pool Scar garage, batoony covered 
terrace, tone cefer, uacuty system. 
Bromam&W 
Tat +33 (0)3 30 47 59 88 
Fn +33 (0)3 80 47 SO S3 


uarvtewon Aegean Far +301 6844751. 
TeL +30 S3 SOW) (moMei. 


« MIN by boat from QUKROH. on 
small Attaiac island totti no care, 
HOUSE to natural dune seeing in eito- 
ronnertaiV praeewd zone, wlh unote 
sflvcted ocean view & dtect acctss to 
the betfi F2M. +33 (0)2 9730 6733 


CAP MARTIN NEAR MONACO 

Large 70 sqm apartment 
plus 40 sqm ganten terrace irih an 
arapfaal view, overioddng toe sea & 
toe KjpB of Monte Carlo Tl* us 
is sHuaterf n a smaU ataustve ttoch 
fetounm prtracy. securty & a root 
up pod Pwos and (ten aretefe. 
Pdcec h^ 3M toft jsrage A store room. 
Phone M. Bat +M 93 28 57 28 


Monaco 


MONTE-CARLO STAR fating Dm : 
Perfect Weds dans reaii* 
ngM on the Caste Square 
AteSno parting end cete 


EtetwMty AF1N (377) 93 30 98 59 


DIRECT FROM OWNS! 
LUXURY BRICK HOME, ntfi many ame- 
nrtss such as itter swimming poo/. 8- 
car garage, etc. Twrtiedroom apamnem 
atacheo. 45 std bam toth 2-bedraom 
apartment and office For sale or trade 
for anythtei or value Must wffi Onto 
Si 2 mitt on. Located in 8W Mdt 15 
nin. bom South Bend. MD. and IS hr. 
from Chicago bop. WE finance. Please 
cal Sheri ii US to fttiH&W) or 
Fax *1*21 9^62-3212. 



200 p nijors md 36 c.r c-v nembet'i wi ! j ?i"id nn r^-cjntdc 
or v i ro ' ■ : ; ? c r r u r d c : 1 ' 0 r c. 0 p 1 tor ~ ! c c'n d n:or-< in '.‘n : 5 t n ■ 1 y 
fi 01 Mi 5 priheo ***** The 1 : 1 e n c i 1 1 : 1 5 cc re : n o o y o ■ The 
C's:no Roy.i! il sc r for civ: end 0 : r!io 

czswjry- Dccen-ibo r 99. 


S~;ie by Time ro privr-ro i'-dividi consi":^ mcluOeO 
start: ru. $ 1 9.000 per we eh for n enbin for 2-9 poopk* for ■■■ 
period of 30 yenrs 


„ . . InlrmaUDn.'il Trrrlr- Fir-jw.- Hiv/co 

Spot City international R y 


33. avt-nuo des Ciiamps-niysees Paosfieuvelviog IS 
75003 Pans - France 1105 BE Amstcrdoro • Holland 

Tel. + 33 <0} 1 72 25 C3 02 Td r ?1 fOj 20 403 lo 02 

T.u: T 33 10: 1 42 59 34 Sij Fa*. - 31 ;0) 20 551 19 02 



Lebanon 


HOTEL AL BUSTAH. East of Sarat. 
5 Star deluxe Exceptional tocaflon. secu- 
rity, -contort, line oasre, conventions, 
business services, sate&le TV. IB nin 
transfer from arport free UTELL Fax: 
(961) 4-072439 I (+33) (0)1-47200007 


BREATHTAKHG VIEW OF NEW YORK, 
20 IL gfeas wall: Central Park & Chy. 
Linikwsly hrtened: piano, fax. cable. 
For business, musician or honeymoon 
couple. 1 Mock. to Carnegie Hal. 2 to 
Ledeman. 5 to Ltocoh Center, Muse- 
ums. Thealere. Werth. Monthly. 3 day 
weekends (fliHmtmj or long term. 
T4 212-262-1581. Fax: 7168B44142 


Days fain Hofei-M Bergen, New Jersey. 
Luxury alternative to New Yort CRy el 
budge; pita Doubles S89 jOO 5 rate to 
nwflowi Manhaton. 201-3^3800. 


SEDONA, ARCOttA Where the perfect 
c&rete, mxiteins aral suisas are 
pst of YQUR UFE 659 tare in town, 
adjacent U.S. Forest with main resi- 
dence. studio house & guest house. 
Paula at The Prudential roottitBs R.E 
1-800-373-2912 Ext 429. Far. 
520392-6403; pmedOwCsadonanet 





OASIS M WEST LOS ANGLES. House 
for Sale 3 bertoom. 2 bath. pool, spa, 
fireplace, B8Q. peach tree ant (papas. 
Close to Sony and Fox Sludios. 
USSZ79.00G F» Owner tor more decals 
at 954602-0688 or cal 954-202-Q433 


tdesl accoromodsttoft stuto6 bedrooms 
Ousiy and service tasrrad 
r£m)YTD MOVE H 
Tel +33(0)143129800. Fax (0)143123808 


BREATHTAKING 106 acres with 3bed- 
roocr stone house in N-Y State. Spectac- 


itoar 360 degree vews, i-ecre swrorng 
pond, roAng fields A woods IMS NYC 


I fields t woods IMS NYC 
I. Tel/Fax +33 (0|1 46341089 


Boats & Yachts 


MOTOR YACHT 'MONTE CARLO 40' 
Bud) 1990. as new. moored south ol 
Fiance Cnismg speed 32 knots. 
Completely equRKd nffii al options 
• Generator, air randtafing. 
Lanqdt 1250M - WWto 3 «t 
2 x 550 HP GM Ubo Dl 410 houe. 
Master cabin with all amenUre. 
television. CO. radio, kfehenotte. 
refrigerator, fcwnafcer etc. 

Asking price: F 1200.000. 

Cal PafW +33 (0)1 45 04 98 GO 
Fax: Pari# +33 (0)1 40 72 77 45 


7th, RUE de LHUE, kwifous dupkei 
(200 sqm + 1 stuflo) 
tar people who fte lo atetaii 
ki exclusive area wlh views over 
Oreay Musaun. Double renpttan, 

2 double bedroonB, tttf: fflings. 
vast enameled feray and cuptaaids, 
numerous rtessknE. 

Bargain at F17/)0(Hno. (wth charges) 
FF35QA00 outgoing tar 
i m proanwto made. 

Tafc +33 (OS 09 78 03 30 
Ftoc +33 fSH 47 05 19 E9 


AT HOME IN PARS 


PARIS PROMO 
Apartments to rert furnished or not 
Sabs & Property Managameti Sewces. 
25 Av Hoche 75008 Paris Fv 01 -45011 020 


Td; +33 (0)1 45 63 25 60 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


Holland 


CAP rT ALE • PARTNERS 
Hamterted epaky apanmac. 
al store Pans and sttxrts 
Tet +33 (0)1 42 66 35 60 
Fat +33 m 42 68 35 61 
Mta help you besrf 


REN7WUSE H7EWA7IONAL 
No 1 1n HoBand 

for (sanil hrtstied houseSfflas. 
Tat 31-206448751 Fax- 31-206+65909 
NTwreji 1021, 1083 Am Amfleudam 


7th ORSAY, elegant, ryiei streeL 100 
sq.m 1 bed room doutfs Mtgm ing; 
toyedstudy. tree paddnglaB conveniences 
Fax. cable, fiiooq. nee. AugiSAbidi 
is TeL (0)1 4651 5847 Fta 4551 4622 


14th, ALESUL 5eff 97-May S& 60 sq m 


HOMEFMERS INTI Herengracht 141 
1015 BH Amserdam Tef +3120.6392252 
Fax: 6392^2 E-rraiwoonsetedCtipnl 


19th c. bddng. Balcony, chare, uri. 
view. Hg fwtag <i bed), bertoom, bam. 
Sl^OQftito Owner Tel: +33 KD145413241 


SOUTH OF LATIN QUARTER, 115 


sqm* 3 bedrooms, double fete, tetany 
on ganten. Free now. FFi3.50ff Tek +33 
09 74 65 /mi 43 31 T4 28 


VENICE ZATTERE ELEGANT apart- 
mere wtfnenace kfealtor twa MaiSMy 
rent. Tel- (39^) 071778 or 39 41 
5231331 


1ST, character, equipped 2 rooms, 4in 
Boot wbBmb. Free now Stol/tara term. 
Tet +33 m OM 7161 ) (0)1 tie 2885 


London 


8th , BIENFAJSANCE, 4tfl Door, quite, 
sun. tartng/2 badrooms. bath, ttchnatte. 
Cortatege. Teh ((fi 1 4563 3588 emfeves 


SHORT STAY APARTMENTS 
LiRuy 5 star Mel apamnents to rate 
veto, wth extensive heaSh dub and 
SckiuninD pod. central garden and car 
parting. To Id from i day to 3 months. 
Od Ptea Estates 4+ (flfirr 372 0057 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


PARIS CENTER Sept. 1st modem high 
dare U, 2-room duplex, 63 sqm view, 
quiet. FilOO + charges. (0)3 222 3237 


Switzerland 


Mexico 


VALLE DE BRAV0 115 hts Mffiks Oy 
typical Wage, supew ninl shed VILA 
faring lake mlh tautna. 4 bedrooms, 2 
Inrt^sndenl stales swimming pool with 
lacuzzi. paddle tennis, boat, god dub 
irmtxrsklcaX & Mte ijwrrartal 
USSlOWm Fax Ueu» 52o Si 5273 
or Fax Paris +33 1011 43 S 48 B1. 


GENEVA LUXURY FURNISHED apart- 
mens From suflos to 4 bedroom s . Tet 
+41 22 735 6320 fta +41 22 736 2671 


Paris Area Furnished 


BEVERLY HILLS - BataMy fairteBP 
apanmem, ready to mne in • 3 bed- 
rooffB. big isra», panorant views. 200 
sqm Finest bukkng in town - 24 hour 
smnfe. vaM pariteg. poof A arercee 
room. Rant-. LorraWnn term Mtaknun 3 
mentis Perfed tor axsotes. Trt- Pans 
+33 (0)1 47454385 Fax 10)1 47455785 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
Tel; +33 (0)1 47^0.30.05 


DEAL CORPORATE PENTHOUSE 
Duplex Parwanfc waw ot NYC. 

3 beacon. 3 1/2 matte bafts, located 
in NJ. 10 iron. Iran Wdftwn 5450ft 
month. Tel: 201 -854-461 7/8S&-4476 


BRECKENRDGE, CO. Chatet-te torn 5 
bedroomsM baths, 350 sqjn. steeps 14+ 
SZIOQWl hiy equniea Tek +38946- 
.37952. e+iBlpah»r61okfiinpfiX]Allrii 


FRENCH RIVIERA RENTALS 


pei. ATS DE LA REEVE SA & JOHN TAYLOR 

offering Jt 

CANNES 

42 LA CROISETTE 

■lasfs ’ 

equipped, rendng funoshed-.UI services jrauarac. 

TeL Louis FORTIN ' | 

Teh +33 C0)4 93 06 60 00 or +33 93 38 00 66 

Fax: +33 CO>4 93 06 60 20 of *33 (cfe 93 39 13 65 j 


PfQ^niiMTTHAVEL 1 ACCOMMO DATIONS 



Luxury in the heart 
of the Lee Valley. 

A family n/i courory house - M*Mor*:aJ to 
Mchate Conns, w poster bads. 20 mm 
drive from Cork Ai w. : 

W +353 10)21 88 6S 66 F=« 33S &Q4 I 


NY LOFT STYLE carter of PWs, 2 bed- 
rooms, 2 bafts, modem ttchsn. duplex, 
top taw. araat garaga S^Wit 
SSOOftmo. fe +33 (0)1 42 96 18 81 


Caribbean 


ST, BARTHSafY, F.WJ- OYER 200 
PRIVATE VACATION VILLAS - beacth 
trart to hllside with poote. Our agents 
have inspedBd aO vitas personally. For 
rorentelons ai a Bsrisi SL Marih An- 

C Baitsitos, Musdque.-ttn Vteqkn Is- 
. Call WIMOWSiBAflTH - U.S. 
(401)849-801 2/tax 847-6290, hom 
FRANCE 06 90 16 20 - ENGLAND 0 
-000-89-8318 


PARIS NEAR BASTILLE, 90 sq.m. 4 
rooms, steeps 5 2BJOT 'to 3OT6. 
FF5000.'weex. FF800Q/2 wHka, 
FFlSOCairvrti, Wald postetta. Tot +33 
(0)1 43 38 90 56.(0)6 60 90 03 12 


#aln 

r ; - 

Irourn 




HEAR VEtfiCE, UOGUANO- House «fe 
qanlen. steeps 4. SSftdav. SSOO/week. 
Tte- +39 00 65745924 or (J41 3900108. 


JACMEL, HATH - Erfravtanary. "ttflonc 
house by sea in lovely tranquft torn. 

W ort term. InaxpaneW Tefrfax 
43458996 or Tel +1 2129791240 


Scotland 


French Provinces 


BEAJOLAIS NEAR LYON - Stay m 
<bUCti mm sat ki (m paiUatxL For 
hrtlw details Ttefiax +33 (D)4 74015066 


UNO LUXURY FIVE ' service 8a& 
Georgian townhouses ceraral Edrtxa^i 
Cenoerpe. vote) parting, etc. Mematon- 
al festival 16-30 August. 1st daapa 4= 
£1.60ftweek / 2nd sleeps 2= 21,00ft 
week. Tet +44 (0) 131 557 9906 


French Ffiviera 


CANNES Inn Bjanment via dens 5. 
3 beds, 2 bafts, pod FF5.00G - FF7500 
per week. Tei omor +33 (Q4 9338 7533 


SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA on fcV * 
tamous 3TO St Promenade, luxury apart- 
mero, afl amenlles. day/vreek/montfi, 

Tel: 818373^130 or 
KfpjTwebdesiffitanYapartm^ 


Paris A Suburbs 


FACHG NOTRE DAME - superb 3+oom 
apartment, al comforts, AugusKSepL 
Week or. month. Teh +33 (0)t 4278 
3030. 


THE INTERMAHKET 
Continues 
on Page 9 


NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. 1 
week to 1 year. Greet Locations. Call 
RBBCMqm: 212-44M223, fta: 212- 
4469226 E-Mai athoratwo4att.com 


Real Estate Wanted/Exchange 


BE TOWN EAST 60'S NYC - Be 
high cefflng shxSo in brownstona 1 
Una Bvateba Cal 212-75D47B4. 


SWAP NYC APARTMBfr wift sharing 
'Baf home paradise, home pool, cook, 
(kfeer eto. For NYC eqtaualent Md Oct- 
Dec 07. Fta ffi-361 -974357 


GENERAL 


DINING OUT 


nibian 


P AUS 4*1 


3ts *Sl! 


BREAD, WINE, CHEESE 


Cham dtawr, radrife, hndua 
X IW Genftm rttanvin (M6 
ftU 01 A7M7J2 {mayiny, Am- only). 



^ NEW 
* BALAl 


Tnvjgrd' 

^mmi wn ied 


^ fodoi&Pdridmri 

fetaiunL 

(for, Morntta (for* 


LE BUBOQUET 


U dM hrsf irf ^r.f'-Sar.criai^rfrfe 
for (famr or o drink. 

GaKranoadota nm al a reameftia pica. 
IS. niw Wfend L r. 01 4S4&SKS4. 


KIRANE’S 


Naw hfa Rnltuttafil fero Mofntdah. 
Bajootl spadofibs from PHidU. Vwv 

'"Smss-.tesy?’' 

„ «.P fep*ff 153 lo FF 199 
BS, or. (fai Tamac, - Tab 01 45 74 40 21 


pars 7th 


THOUMJEUX 


da canard. Afa- 
79 ru« S+Oonrinlqu 



Hcralb"S^Sribunc 


TBETORLITS UMU 'WfefiVPER 


PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 


towoMt immediate^ andwrce payment is made your ad 
appear wifhin 48 houre. All major Credit Cards Accepted. 


EUROPE 


RANCEMh Ptro. 

W.: (01) *1 4393 85, 
fac to 1) 41 43^70 
Lulu a UOMdttdwWaDm 
GHWAW. AUSnBA A CMRAL EUROPE; 


EUROPE 


Uh^WiCBgfeftotan 
^•(01711836 4801 


19712500 

197125020 


united states 


BELOUte A LUXEMBOURG Wat 

TPS®.*" 1 

fbc 301/48 53 357 


FMAMh HdjirJa 

W 35896(^826 

Fo*. 358 9 446 508 
nAtt MJqno, 
w 5K3I5738 
583 33938 

f®JOILANDS: Amderdam. 

U 31 206841080. 
f w. 31 20.6881374 

NOftMtoT A SWED04 A DB4MASX: 

Rw. 1^155 9)3072 


NWYOfiJG 

Tolfw (BOO) 572-721 2 
LATIN America 

BOUVlA:5(aeo Out 

fftp ISPl-iSsB 1 w 
SWaLSooPoA, 

W. 8534133 

Fax- 952 8485 


°&^ 0 t^ E7,3ir 

MgXftE EAST 

asia/paohc 
hong KING-. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


PAGET 


Yeltsin’s War on Corruption Is Short on Weapons 




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By Daniel Williams 

Pmt S en n «■ 

MOSCOW — Returns are in 
from one of the government *s recent 
major efforts to fight corruption, and 
the results are not very promising. 

By June 20, a deadline set by Pres- 
ident Boris Yeltsin in April, gov- 
ernment functionaries, including 
elected regional governors, were sup- 
posed to have filed declarations de- 
tailing income and financial worth. 

On Thursday, a team of Mr. 
Yeltsin's corruption busters said 
that even in the central Kremlin ad- 
ministration not everybody had 
filed. And in the provinces, there 
was a virtual boycott: Only a third of 
the governors made declarations, 
which for (hem was voluntary. 

Some of the responses seemed 
fantastically undervalued. Russian 
reporters took skeptical note of the 
declaration of Boris Berezovsky, 
Mr. Yeltsin'snationai security chief, 
who is reputed to be one of Russia's 


wealthiest business people. His total 
worth in (and and stocks was listed at 
the equivalent of $39,000. according 
to documents published in the daily 
newspaper Kommersant Forbes 
magazine recently estimated his 
wealth at $3 billion. 

Mr. Berezovsky's press secretary 
rook a Solomonic view of the dif- 
ferences. The declaration in Kom- 
mersant was "probably accurate,” 
bnt he didn't fully dispute the For- 
bes estimate, either, in a telephone 
interview, he said he didn't know 
whether Forbes was righL 

Such an apparent discrepancy 
threatened to make a mockery of a 
campaign that is, by media count, 
Mr. Yeltsin's fifth ami-conuption 
drive. The response to the call to 
declare total worth was "not ideal,” 
acknowledged Alexander Lipshitz, 
deputy presidential chief of staff. 

Speaking at a press conference, 
Mr. Lipshitz and other government 
representatives tried to lower ex- 
pectations- that even success in col- 


lecting declarations would have 
made a huge impact. 

*' A marriage certificate does not 
guarantee marital fidelity. Simil- 
arly, the factor of filing a tax dec- 
laration is not a cure-all of corrup- 
tion.” said Georgi Satarov. a 
presidential adviser and one of a 
team of officials trying to implement 
a series of anti-graft measures. 

Mr. Satarov expressed hope that 
at least by trying to keep track of the 
worth of government officials, they 
could curb the scope of corruption. 

Corruption in Russia takes a large 
variety of forms. Bribery, tax eva- 
sion. embezzlement, sweetheart 
sales of state property and resources, 
insider loans, smuggling. Excused 
by some as growing pains in a com- 
plex transformation from a central- 
ized to a market economy, the scale 
is nonetheless eye-catching. 

The most recent big allegations 
center on the disappearance of hun- 
dreds of millions of dollars meant to 
finance of jets for sale to India. 


The suspicions that government 
officials and their friends are profit- 
ing wildly from illicit deals coin- 
cides with tales of late and paltry pay 
for pensioners, soldiers, teachers 
and other state employees. As a re- 
sult, an atmosphere of public cyn- 
icism seems to be enveloping elect- 
ed government. New decrees and 
anti-corruption campaigns create 
little enthusiasm. 

"These measures are unneces- 
sary. because everything worth 
stealing has already been stolen/’ 
observed the weekly Literarumaya 
Gazeta. 

With tones of disbelief, newspa- 
pers recently reported the tax dec- 
laration of the first deputy prime 
minister, Alexander Kokh, who in- 
cluded in liis income $100,000 for a 
book he wrote called "Privatization 
in Russia: Economics and Politics.” 
The publisher was listed as a Swiss 
company. 

The book has never reached 
bookshelves, and aides of Mr. Kokh 


said they were not sure it ever 
would. 

Later. Prime Minister Viktor 
Chernomyrdin released figures for 
his net worth. Including a car, it 
totaled about $46,000. He listed an 
annual income of $8,100. Since Mr. 
Chernomyrdin has long-established 
lies to Gazprom, a naturaJ-gas giant 
and Russia's biggest company, 
many had a hard time believing the 
modesty of his declared wealth. “I 
may be out of touch with the times, 
but I own no securities or real estate 
abroad,” he said in explanation. 

Mr. Yeltsin has issued numerous 
decrees to fight wrongdoing, but 
they usually lack teeth. The finan- 
cial worth decree seems no excep- 
tion. For example, failure to file a 
declaration of wealth and income 
brings no criminal punishment. Mr. 
Yeltsin will decide later whether 
any "administrative measures” will 
be taken against scofflaws, said 
Yevgeni Savosiyanov. deputy head 
of the presidential administration. 


Netanyahu Shifts 
• On Golan Tactic 

Cabinet Members Assail Bill 


AL 


GwiplrdhyOtir Stuff Firm Pujvtilfrs 

: JERUSALEM — Prime 

— Minister Benjamin Netan- 

.i,:. ; . yahu scrambled Thursday to 

: . ", distance himself from legis- 
lation aimed at blocking any 
Israeli withdrawal from the 
Golan Heights after the bill 
bitterly divided his govem- 
aaa8in> ■ . menL 

Mr. Netanyahu, who voted 
~ • for the first stage of legis- 

•-.v | lation when it was approved, 
43 to 40, by the Parliament on 
Wednesday, told state radio 
he now wanted to tone it 
down. 

, , , „ „ The bill stipulates that any 

i cRMAEr move to withdraw from the 
Continues * Golan must be approved by a 
" ’ • two-thirds* majority in the 

cn PageS . Knesset, or 80 of the 120 

— 1 1 members. He would change 

this to 61, a simple majority. 
h He also said he wanted a 
, public referendum if any 
V ' agreement was reached with 
- Syria over the Golan, a stra- 
tegic plateau overlooking 

northern IsraeL 

" Israel captured the Golan 
’ "• r:uT in the 1967 Six-Day War and 
annexed it in 1981, despite 
..... international condemnation. 

Syria said Thursday the 
measure could destroy any 
hopes of a resumption of 
peace talks between the two 
- " j. " **==** enemies. 

The newspaper of Syria’s 


ruling Arab Ba'ath Party said 
the bill was "extremely dan- 
gerous provocation.” 

Some of Mr. Netanyahu's 
ministers attacked the bill, 
saying it did nothing to im- 
prove the chances of ending 
the year-and-a-haif long 

freeze in talks. 

Defense Minister Yitzhak 
Mordechai- said: "I regret 
what happened yesterday. 
Voting for this law at this time 
is not necessary.” 

"We should be sending 
clear signs to Syrian Presi- 
dent Hafez al-Assad to per- 
suade him to come and ne- 
gotiate,” said Mr. 
Mordechai. who did not lake 
part in Wednesday’s vote. 

Foreign Minister David 
Levy earlier described the bill 
as "superfluous and counter- 
productive.” 

He said the bill could cause 
damage to Israel, and was 
“was liable to be exploited by 
elements abroad who try by 
any and all means to sow 
doubt as to Israel's intentions 
for peace.” 

Mr. Netanyahu tried to 
bring his ministers into line 
Thursday. "The Foreign 
Ministry does not follow its 
own personal little foreign 
policy.” he said, and the 
“government should be 
united. ’ ’ f AFP, Reuters) 


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By Diana Jean Scheme 

fie ve York Times Service 

CARTAGENA DEL 
CHAIRA, Colombia — A 
state official in this remote 
pueblo in a rebel-dominated 
region in southern Colombia 
has a photo. It shows him with 
eight leaders of the Patriotic 
Union, a leftist opposition 
party bom during peace ne- 
gotiations between the leftist 
rebels and the Colombian 
government 12 years ago. 

One by one, the people in 
the photo have all been 
murdered. He -is the only one 
still alive. 

“All of them were killed," 
said the official, who declined 
to be identified out of fear for 
his safety. “In different cir- 
cumstances, but none acci- 
dentally. It was physical ex- 
termination.” 

Although the Patriotic Un- 
ion is a legal party, most of its 
elected officials are now 
afraid to be identified with it. 
In all, more than 4,000 leaders 
and members of die party have 
been killed since its birth. 

The dead include most of 
the presidential candidates 
the party has fielded, seven 
members of the House of 
Representatives, two senators 
ana thousands of regional and 
municipal office holders. Last 
year, one member was 
murdered on an average of 
every other day; those who 
are left.refer to oae-another as 
"survivors.” 

The killings have picked up 
as Colombia prepares for mu- 
nicipal elections in October, 
with the targets becoming not 
oniy party members but, it 
seems, whoever might vote 
for them. In the eastern and 
northern parts of the country, 
particularly die Uraba zone, a 
strategic corridor for drugs 
and weapons, rightist death 
squads are waging a cam- 
paign of exiemunation, ter- 
rorizing residents .and fre- 
quently forcing them to flee. 

In other South American 
countries like Venezuela, the 
power to elect local leaders. 


instead of having the central 
government appoint them, 
has invigorated national pol- 
itics with younger faces and 
fresh ideas. But in the 10 
years that local elections have 
been in effect in Colombia, 
they have become a kind of 
baptism by blood. This time, 
too, democracy seems to be 
spinning backward as ballot- 

lug^tist^iramilitary units 
and leftist guerrillas alike 
have banned unfettered elec- 
tioneering in the zones they 
control. The paramilitaries i 
have forbidden not only mem- 1 
bers of the Patriotic Union but i 
any leftists or Communists i 
from running for office. The j 
guerrillas have outlawed ' 
campaigning by anybody, and 1 
both sides have declared can- 1 
didates “militaiy targets. ’ * I 

Robin Kiik of Human 
Rights Watch/Americas 
likens the brutality to a “lan- 
guage of violence,” integral | 
to the country's overall polit- i 
ical dialogue. “All of the 
groups use that language to 
pursue their ends, and when 
they feel massacres is the 
right word to use, they will 
use. it,” she said. 

While the coming elections 
are for municipal offices, the 
political stakes for the nation 
as a whole are high. Ernesto 
Samper, the embattled pres- 
ident, is entering the final 
year of his terra, and he has 
proposed renewing peace ne- 
gotiations with the Revolu- 
tionary Armed Forces of 
Colombia, a guerrilla group 
known as the FARC for its 
Spanish initials. 

Critics of the Patriotic Un- 
ion in the military and para- 
military groups say the party 
is simply a civilian cover for 
FARC guerrillas. The party, 
in fact, was created in 1 985 by 
the FARC and the Commu- 
nist Party as a group in which 
former guerrillas and other 
Marxists could enter political 
life during peace talks be- 
tween the guerrillas and the 
gove rnm ent of Behsano 
Betancur. 



BRIEFLY 


Kenyan Police Break Up Clash 

NAIROBI — Police inside the Kenyan Parliament 
opened fire Thursday to disperse young supporters of 
opposition parties who clashed outside the compound 
with supporters of the governing party, witnesses said. 

Fifty youths shouting slogans in support of the gov- 
erning Kenya African National Union and about the same 
number of youths allied with opposition parties threw 
rocks at each other on the road outside Parliament in the 
center of the capital. 

The police fired in the air ro disperse the opposition 
supporters. It was unclear whether they had fired live 
ammunition or blanks. Three people, including a police 
officer, were injured by stones. ( Reuters i 

Taylor Is the Victor in Liberia 

MONROVIA — Charles Taylor was declared the 
victor Thursday in the elections in Liberia, completing his 
conversion from warlord to president. 

Mr. Taylor said earlier in an interview with BBC radio 
that he was ready to offer jobs to some of his 1 1 rivals in 
the presidential and partliamentary elections that were 
held Saturday, wrapping up an accord that ended seven 
years of civil war. 

Two rival leaders in the war vied with Mr. Taylor in the 
elections, but he specifically mentioned the runner-up in 
the presidential balloting, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, a former 
United Nations official. 

"1 intend ro use the talents of most of the fellows that 1 
have respect for, including Ellen,' ' he said. {AFP ) 

An Exit From African Republic 

PARIS — France has decided ro close down its gar- 
rison in foe Central African Republic as pan of a new 
policy of reducing forces and commitments in Africa, rhe 
Paris daily Liberation reported Thursday. 

The decision is to be announced to President Ange- 
Felix Patasse by Defense Minister Alain Richard when he 
tours several African capitals next week, it added. 

Officials of foe new Socialist administration have 
publicly spoken of a “reorganization” of the French 
troop presence in former African colonies, as well as of 
"disengagement,” but they have not been specific. 

Liberation said the troubled internal situation in the 
Central African Republic, where part of the army has 
mutinied and holds some areas of the capital, Bangui, was 
one reason France had decided to pull oul (Reuters) 

Hot Line for Seoul and Moscow 

SEOUL — South Korea and Russia agreed Thursday 
to set up a telephone hot line between their presidents ro 
help promote peace on the Korean Peninsula, foe Russian 
foreign minister said. 

Foreign Minister Yevgeni Primakov, on the first day of 
his three-day visit here, also said that Moscow supported 
foe four-nation peace talks that are to involve North and 
South Korea, foe United States and China. (Reuters) 


Package Bomb Is Sent 
To Politician in Ulster 


The AuwumoI Prci» 


SUSPENSE — This new car became a traffic casualty Thursday before it ever had a chance to hit the road. 
It rolled off the transporter at right after an accident near Bristol, England, ending up hanging in the air. 

General Saw Mating, Burma Strongman, Dies 


The Associated Press 

RANGOON — General Saw Maung, 
68, who headed Burma's military junta 
when it seized power in 1988, died of a 
bean attack Thursday. 

The general had been in poor health 
for a long time, and had resigned as 
chairman of foe junta in April 1992 for 
medical reasons. An official announce- 
ment at foe time stud his health bad 
4 ‘become severely unpaired by the stress 
of work and heavy responsibilities of the 
state. * * The report, and the suddenness of 


his resignation, came amid rumors that 
he had suffered a nervous breakdown. 
He was rarely seen in public thereafter. 

His replacement was Senior General 
Than Shwe, who still heads foe junta, 
officially called the State Law and Order 
Restoration Council, or SLORC. 

Bom in December 1 928 in foe northern 
city of Mandalay, U Saw Maung joined 
foe army in 1949, a year after Burma 
gained independence from Britain. 

He worked his way up foe ranks, 
becoming a battalion commander with 


foe rank of major in 1967, five years after 
General Ne Win overthrew a democrat- 
ically elected government and installed 
single-party rule. 

From 1975 to 1976, he fought against 
communist insurgents and ethnic rebels 
along the border with Thailand. In 1 976, 
he became a brigadier general, and in 
1981 an adjutant-general. He became 
armed forces commander in 1983. 

He was named defense minister in foe 
brief mid-1988, and became chairman of 
foe junta that seized power in 1988. 


Reuters 

BELFAST — A package 
bomb was sent Thursday to a 
prominent Protestant politi- 
cian who opposes foe activities 
of both Irish Republican Array 
and unionist guerrillas. 

The device, packed with 
explosives and ball bearings, 
was sent to Robert McCart- 
ney, leader of the small, pro- 
British U.K. Unionist Party. It 
was "crude but viable," foe 
police said, and could have 
caused injury. It was deac- 
tivated. 

Mr. McCartney, who was 
on vacation abroad, said on 
BBC radio that he was in foe 
dark as to who might have 
sent the bomb. 

The U.K. Unionists walked 


out of foe current round of 
peace talks on foe future of 
Northern Ireland because foe 
IRA's political wing, Sinn 
Fein, would have been per- 
mitted to participate before 
the IRA surrendered any of its 
guns and bombs. 

Adam Ingram, foe North- 
ern Ireland security minister, 
said the bomb did not rep- 
resent a breach of the cease- 
fire declared over the week- 
end by the Irish Republican 
Array. 

Meanwhile, foe police in 
Northern Ireland said Wednes- 
day that they had found about 
eight kilograms (18 pounds) of 
explosives and jars for bombs 
in a roadside ditch in Pomeroy, 
County Tyrone. 



Korea Summit 

September 10-11 

World Water: 

Financing for the Future 

September 30-October 1 


Seoul 


Istanbul 


As an extension of the news and 
commentary the International Herald 
Tribune brings to its readers, the 
newspaper has a successful and highly- 
respected worldwide summit and 
conference program that focuses on 
economic, social and political issues. 



Romania Investment Summit Bucharest 
October 29-30 

Oil 8: Money Conference London 

November 18-19 

i 

Southern Africa Trade Gaborone 

8 Investment Summit 

November 18-19 


For further information on any of these events, 
please contact Brenda Erdmann Hagerty, 
Internationa] Herald Tribune, 63 Long Acre, 
London WC2E 9JH. 

Tel. (44 171) 420 0307 Fax: (44 171) 836 0717 
E-mail: bhagerty@iht.com 


THE WimLD S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


,1 



EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Ertbttnc 


PCBUSNED WITH THE NEW \ORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Meddling, Meddling 


You may have noticed a story re- 
porting that the European Union has 
given preliminary approval to the 
mega-merger between Boeing Co. and 
McDonnell Douglas Corp. This may 
have struck you as odd: Both compa- 
nies are American, and the tl.S. Federal 
Trade Commission gave its approval 
three weeks ago. Who asked the Euro- 
pean Union for its opinion anyway? 
Welcome to a world of blurring sov- 
ereignty and transnational regulation. 

National economies are more and 
more intertwined, while big corpora- 
tions are less and less rooted. in any 
single country. Set your tax too high, 
and a company will pick up and 
move. As a result, governments have 
less and less power to control the eco- 
nomic and social circumstances of 
their own citizens — and so feel temp- 
ted to reach out and try to set rules 
beyond their own bonders. But, de- 
pending on how this temptation is ac- 
ted upon, it isn't a bad thing. 

The U.S. House of Representatives 
reacted with outrage to Europe’s 
threatened interference in the Boeing- 
McDonnell merger. The European Un- 
ion could not actually have blocked it, 
but it could have levied crippling fees. 
In the event, Boeing made concessions 
on the structure of the merger and the 
way it will conduct business, and so the 
Union backed down — but not before 
the U.S. House, by a vote of 4 16 to 2, 
warned Europe against “an unwarran- 
ted and unprecedented interference in a 
United States business transaction.” 

In fact, the United States does more 
interfering than any other country. 
Congress has passed legislation that 
seeks to punish European companies 


doing business in Iran, Libya or Cuba. 
U.S. antitrust authorities have chal- 
lenged mergers in Europe and anti- 
competitive practices in Japan. At this 
moment the United States is pursuing a 
case at the World Trade Organization 
that in part challenges Japan's Big 
Store Law — almost a zoning matter 
— on grounds that it makes life dif- 
ficult for Kodak. U.S. unions and hu- 
man rights groups try to stop compa- 
nies from investing in countries mat 
don’t permit freedom of association 
and collective bargaining. Cities and 
states are refusing* to do business with 
European companies that, to take one 
example, do business with Burma. 

Many of these efforts are core-sided 
or disingenuous. Some U.S. concern 
about foreign workers, for instance, is 
nothing more than veiled protection- 
ism. Europe’s supposed antitrust wor- 
ries on the Boeing-McDonnell merger 
were mostly about defending the 
weaker home team. Airbus Industrie. 

But many of these “unwarranted and 
unprecedented interferences” — in all 
directions — represent early steps to- 
ward international rules fora new, glob- 
alized economy. With companies no 
longer under any one nation’s control, it 
is natural that what was once con- 
sidered purely national will enter die 
international arena — not only antitrust 
and competition law but also labor 
rights, corruption, environmental stan- 
dards, accounting rules and much more. 
International rules will protect every 
country but also require every country 
to give up some sovereign control. You 
can expect plenty of controversy as 
nations seek die right balance. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Both Parties Do It 


Just as the U.S. Senate hearings into 
1996 campaign finance abuses turned 
on Wednesday to Republican mis- 
deeds, the White House was embar- 
rassed by disclosures about its own 
frantic campaign lo raise money. The 
more that is learned about fund-raising 
efforts, the worse both parties look. 

On the Democratic side, the latest 
revelations show that both the White 
House and the Democratic National 
Committee were set to put President 
Bill Clinton on the telephone last year, 
at his own suggestion, to solicit 
$100,000 and $200,000 donations 
from at least 10 wealthy supporters. 
Many of them headed corporations af- 
fected by government regulation. 

Such direct telephone solicitation by 
Mr. Clinton, presumably from the Oval 
Office, would have been both un- 
seemly and improper. Like Vice Pres- 
ident AJ Gore’s fund-raising calls from 
the White House, it would almost cer- 
tainly have violated the laws prohib- 
iting the use of federal property to raise 
campaign funds. 

The White House says it can find no 
record that Mr. Clinton actually made 
the calls outlined in a memo to him 
from his ubiquitous political operator. 
Harold Ickes. That the idea was even 
entertained by Mr. Clinton and his 
aides shows how pervasive the money- 
raising had become. 

The documents also show the 
Democratic National Committee’s 
clear disdain for laws limiting con- 
tributions to candidates, as opposed to 
political parties. Marvin Rosen, tbe 
DNC finance director, advised Mr. 
Clinton in one memo that while one 
potential donor should be asked to con- 
tribute to the party treasury, “she 


wants to be certain that her contribution 
goes directly to support your campaign 
efforts." It is hard to believe that At- 
torney General Janet Reno still sees no 
need to appoint a special counsel to 
investigate the fund-raising abuses. 

While all this was brewing in Wash- 
ington on Wednesday, Democrats on 
the Senate Governmental Affairs Com- 
mittee eagerly turned to Republican 
conduct last year. The Democrats ’ most 
significant act of the day, however, may 
well have been their willingness to let 
the committee grant immunity to five 

E tial witnesses, some of them 
hist clerics of modest means who 
made large contributions to the Demo- 


crats. Immunity was appropriate in this 
case because the Justice 


apnate m l 
Department, 
which opposed the step, failed to 
demonstrate that the individuals were 
likely to be prosecuted anytime soon or 
were critical to its investigation of the 
fund-raising scandaL 
Before the week is finished, the pub- 
lic should get a good glimpse into a 
scheme operated by the Republicans 
that involved a supposedly independ- 
ent partisan think tank that received 
collateral for loans and eventually out- 
right grants from a Hong Kong-based 
family. The Democrats and the Re- 
publicans on the committee should join 
in a bipartisan effort to press Haley 
Barbour, the former Republican lead- 
er, to disclose all the contributions to 
the think tank, not just the ones that 
have come out so far. 

Once the public realizes that both 
sides engaged in abuses, tbe way will 
be clearer for Congress to curb the flow 
of large contributions that corrupt the 
political system. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Mexico but Not Thailand 


Central to the American economic 
success story, in addition to a sound 
domestic economy, is the omnipres- 
ence abroad of the almighty dollar. 
Anything that erodes America's in- 
ternational currency, as it were, is 
alarming. Asia may now be moving 
from a dollar to a yen zone. Does 
anyone care? 

I asked a Washington official why 
the United States rode to the rescue of 
Mexico but not of Thailand. There was 
a chuckle and then this: “Thailand’s 
not on our border." Correct, it’s in 
Asia — far away, right? Not really. In 
this age of globalized markets and In- 
ternet communication, Asia is no 
longer a slow boat to China away. 

So mark down last week as at least 
a long footnote in the lowering of the 
U.S. profile in Asia. Y es, the American 
economy is healthy right now, but not 


ican polity, 
of the Asi: 


ive effect of the Asian campaign-giv- 
ing scandal is only beginning to be- 
come apparent. Little good and a lot of 
bad wifi come out of it. 

— Tom Plate, commenting in 
the Los Angeles Times. 


Violence Against Women 


Violence against women is, quite 
simply, the most widespread human 
rights violation in the world today. It 
has many faces, from the open violence 
of physical or sexual assaults on fe- 
males of alJ ages to tbe passive vi- 
olence of neglect which denies young 
girls the health care, food or education 
enjoyed by their brothers. The fact is 
chat everyone colludes in the conspir- 
acy of silence surrounding this issue. 

— Charlotte Bunch, director of the 
Center for Women’s Global 
Leadership. Rutgers University. 


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©/W7./wenwmnM/ Herald Tribune. All rights reserved. ISSN. 029441052. 



A Freeing Global Breeze Through the Window 

n m , ... it almost doesn't matter. The really 



By Thomas L. Friedman 


.j not always 

it could save this country from the dead 
handof the Suharto regime, which after 
30 years in power is a spent force, 
without enogyor ideas. 

Wimar Witoelar, a popular Jakarta 
talk-show host, described the Indone- 
sian revolutionaries to me as those 20- 
and 30-year-olds, most of them edu- 
cated and working in the private sector, 
“who want to get rich without having 
to be corrupt and who want to have 
democracy but don’t want to go out in 
the streets and get killed for it." 

What is interesting is their strategy. 


with great relish on how the United ‘JSSaSTta 'tadooesia is 

States and Japan are taking Indonesia md it is the one 

before a W<5d Trade Organization ataady JSSS^m sector by 


before a world iraoe urganwaauu “TLj ^foe private sector by 

stiiutions, and the less arbitrary, c orru pt court to protest the fact that Indonesia s , . - -jgey ^ plugging 

i be. national car factory — controlled by fowa vTK 


and autocratic it will be able to be. 

Their strategy, in short, is to Gul- 
liverize the Suharto regime by glob- 
alizing Indonesian society. 

As a military analyst. Juwono Su- 
darsono, put it: “The global market 
will force upon us business practices 
and disciplines that we cannot generate 
internally.” Or as another reformer 
here remarked to me: “My son and I 
get our j revenge on Suharto every day 
by eating at McDonald’s.” 

Indonesia's “globalationaries" ra- 


the president’s son — is being pro 
reeled by all sorts of tariffs out of lin 
with WTO 


iro- 

ie 


into the world in ways that 
will over time, redefine both politics 
here and tbe limits of wjwt^po^fole— 


with WTO norms. . Suharto. 

Many, of course, have made a sim- 

ilar argument about China — that the In the mean B*£ „***« n f onen- 


ilar argument about China— that the marcoM*™ ’ of ODen . 
moreitis integrated into the global wants “ 
economy, the more open and pluralistic mg up and democratizing^ 
it will inevitably become. But what is 


rviwt u m aiugj - niuvuwoia J . ui 

The regime allows no space for a demo- ' elude young entrepreneurs who wel- 


cratic opposition to emerge. So what the 
pro-democracy, pro-clean- government 
forces are relying on is not a revolution 
from below, not a revolution from 
above, but a revolution from beyond. 

Their strategy is to do everyihing they 
can to integrate Indonesia into the glob- 
al economy on the conviction that the 
more it is tied into die global system, the 
more its government will be exposed to 
the rules, standards, laws, pressures, 
scrutiny and regulations of global in- 


come foreign investment here so dial 
any move the Suharto regime makes 
with the domestic economy, and any 
shenanigans it might try, will have in- 
ternational implications, and human 
rights activists who use the Internet to 
get their stories out and whose hackers 
occasionally break into — and alter — 
government web sites. 

The Indonesian press cannot directly 
rebuke the Suharto regime for its 
rampant nepotism. So instead it reports 


i nter esting about Indonesia is that it 
isn’t outsider? malting this argument 
to justify their business dealings here. 
It is Indonesian reformers making the 
argument as a self-conscious political 
strategy. 

So globalization has many dark 
sides, from environmental degradation 
to widening the gap between rich and 
poor, but what you see in Indonesia is its 
most important upside — the ability to 
generate pressure on autocratic regimes 
when no domestic space is available. 

While everyone is focusing on the 
question of whom President Suharto 
will appoint as his next vice president 
and likely successor, I would argue that 


aTLTaT^^mdtifac^ed 
strategy. It has to wort, with military 
officers who want to professionalize 
their ranks, give protection to the non- 
governmental human rights organiza- 
tions when they come under attack for 
reasonable activities, and find every 
way possible to- encourage countries 
tike Indonesia to integrate with the 
[obal economy and institutions, rather 
lan cutting them off, which is idiotic. 

It would be nice if every democracy 
movement could be led by a hero like 
Andrei Sakharov. But you have to wort 
with what you’ve got. and around here 
the biggest agents of change are the 
globalutionaiies. 

The New York Tones. 


,Uli 

Mil 


Big Changes Are Under Way, Amid Millennial Comic Relief 


P ARIS — A thousand years 
ago, as a new millennium 
neared, the Western world was 
seized by panic. There was a 
sense of awe and great danger as 
the calendar’s pages turned in- 
exorably to the intimidating 
number 1000. Many people 


Bv Flora Lewis 


predicted the apocalypse. They 
didn’t 


see how lime could just 
keep going on. 

Once again, there is fear of 
disaster when the zeroes line up, 
now at 2000 — but of a very 
different land of tronble. It is 
not an act of nature, nor of di- 
vine wrath, expected on tbe 
fateful day. It is quite simply a 
massive computer jam-up that 
will block or jumble all manner 
of accounts and transactions 
and cost several billion dollars 
to set right. 

Computers, it seems, were 
not given a sense of enduring 
time but a rather more medieval 
mentality. Their programs 
count years by the last two dig- 
its . takin g the initial 19 for gran- 
red. So, the experts say, they are 
likely to panic. 

There is something hilarious 


about this totally man-made af- 
fliction of the information ma- 
chine. The millenni um no 
longer frightens people, they 
have mastered far greater num- 
bers, but they forgot to teach 
computers the little trick of an 
unusual date. 

It is a reminder of how many 
kinds of time the modem world 
has to deal with. 

Pathfinder’s reports on its vis- 
it to Mars have surprised sci- 
entists with how much its geo- 
logy resembles Earth’s, in- 
cluding at one point probably 
torrential water flows that 
strewed rocks around and carved 
valleys. How did Mars lose its 
climate, how long ago? Was it 
something sudden or a gradual 
change, and why has Earth so far 
evolved so differently? 

These questions involve no- 
tions of tune that have no rel- 
evance to the human life span, 
our basic point of reference, and 
yet we can entertain them ra- 
tionally, even if they seem be- 
yond emotional grasp. When 


time is too short or too long for 
commonsense perception, it 
can only be dealt with intel- 
lectually. But in between there 
are myriad measures of time 
which Invite, indeed demand, 
human decision. - 

Visiting Indonesia, New 
York Times columnist Tom 
Friedman noted with anguish 
the problems of how to trade off 
time in that vast country’s de- 
velopment. Its economy is ex- 
panding rapidly, already redu- 
cing the number of people in 
absolute poverty from 70 to 30 
percent of its now 200 milli on 
population. But it is being done 
at tbe cost of dramatic, wanton 
destruction of a lush tropical 
environment 

Indonesians argue, as people 
in developing countries every- 
where are wont to do, that they 
should not be penalized as they 
try to catch up with comfortable 
industrial countries which, hav- 
ing polluted massively to reach 
high standards, now lecture 
about the need for conservation 


and ecological sensitivity. Mr. 
Friedman can foresee that as a 
large middle class emerges in 
newly created wealth, so will 
the concern for preserving the 
delights of the country’s natural 
endowments. But, he asks, will 
it be too late? Will the forests 
and foe flowers be gone, beyond 
hope of renewal? Where will 
the time lines of devastation and 
awareness cross? 

It is becoming understood 
now that these are global issues, 
everybody will be affected by 
other peoples’ decisions on the 
trades in time. As societies and 
economies gain the extraordi- 
nary powers of modernity by 
becoming more complex, so 


does dependence become un- 
udable. 


avoidab 
Even a little thing like foe 
date set on a computer turns into 
an unexpected vulnerability. Of 
course, the West's Gregorian 
calendar is not foe only one in 
use. Arabs and Israelis and oth- 
er cultures will be plodding on 
in prosaically numbered years 
when the Christian third mil- 
lennium arrives. But they are 


already too Tinlrari into foe dom- 
inant global net not to feel the 
impact, too. 

In Paris, the Eiffel Tower dis- 
plays a huge lighted sign telling 
off foe number of days to go to 
foe 21st century. It isn’t far, 
only foe next Olympics, the 
next U.S. presidential election, 
not perceptibly the end of any- 
thing, just carrying on. 

The big changes in how foe 
world works and how people 
live have already started, foe 
trends subsumed in the awk- 
ward term “globalization” are 
discernible and gathering mo- ^ j 
rnentum. President Bill Clinton Ca - 
uses a bad metaphor in speaking f 
continuously of * *a bridge to foe 
21st century,” because a bridge 
can be built only between two 
known points, usually from 
both sides. But he is right that 
the direction and dilemmas 
ahead look clear, enough. 

Except for -foe computer 
glitch. Well, it’s encouraging if 
1000 years after whax was sup- 
posed to be the end of the world, 
that’s the worry. 

<& Flcra Lewis. 


Pay Heed to This Swiss List, for the Sake of Maximum Truth 


W ASHINGTON — I con- 
fess I looked first for my 
own name: Cohen. And then, 
remembering that it was not al- 
ways spelled that way. I looked 
for Kohn (the spelling in Po- 
land l and then for Cohn and 
then for other family names, 
some of them no longer in use. 
none of them even belonging to 
people who were in the least bit 
wealthy anyway. 

I am speaking, of course, of 
the names on Swiss bank ac- 
counts dormanr since World War 
II that may have been opened by 
Holocaust victims. They have 
just been made public. 

In an unprecedented move, 
foe Swiss Bankers Association 
broke with its stem tradition of 
secrecy and on Wednesday pub- 


By Richard Cohen 


lished the list of more than 2.000 
names in newspapers around foe 
world. Not made public is how 
much money is contained in 
those accounts. The Washing- 
ton Post, citing Swiss banking 
sources, says around $40 mil- 
lion — but that does not include 
the interest that has accrued 
since the Holocaust. 

The ad refers to “World War 
H-era accounts" but it is be- 
coming clearer and clearer that 
foe era has not yet ended. The 
Swiss have discovered that fact 
to their chagrin and dismay. 
Their little country, all moun- 


tain and myth, turns out not to 
;thes 


have been foe storied redoubt of 
decency in wartime Europe but a 


massive hockshop where des- 
perate Jews deposited foeir 
wealth in secret accounts that 
were, it is now clear, conveni- 
ently forgotten. The Swiss had 
little interest in paying interest 

But die flwiss were not alone. 
The Portuguese made money on 
foe war and so did Spain and 
Sweden. The role of foe United 
States, the government as well 
as financial institutions, is not 
yet dear, and now there is ad- 
ditional reason to wonder about 
foe Vatican. 

Just recently, a document 
was discovered by a researcher 
for the Arts & Entertainment 
cable television network sug- 


Americans Dislike Euthanasia 


By Ezekiel J. Emanuel and Linda L. Emanuel 


C HICAGO — Despite rul- 
ing that there is no con- 
stitutional right to assisted sui- 
cide, foe Florida Supreme 
Court acknowledged last 
week that the Legislature 
could allow doctors to help 
patients die. Last month foe 
U.S. Supreme Conn took a 
similar position, saying foal 
while it round no constitution- 
al right to die, states were free 
to legalize assisted suicide. 

Those who favor euthanasia 
took heart from these de- 
cisions. But states are not 
likely to take this route. No 
state has been poised, waiting 
for court approval, to lead the 
charge for assisted suicide, not 
even Oregon, where the move- 
ment has been strongest. 

Since 1995, nearly 50 bills 
have been introduced in more 
than 20 states concerning as- 
sisted suicide, but none of the 
bills calling for legalization 
have passed. 

Indeed, the trend is just the 
reverse. Since 1989, 16 states 
have adopted laws expressly 
prohibiting assisted suicide. 
Florida, for instance, passed a 
law in 1995 specifically stat- 
ing that helping someone com- 
mit suicide is foe equivalent of 
manslaughter. Last year Iowa 
and Rhode Island also made 
assisted suicide illegaL 
Today 35 stares have laws 
that explicitly criminalize eu- 
thanasia and doctor-assisted 
suicide. In nine other states 
and foe District of Columbia, 
helping someone die is con- 
sidered illegal based on pre- 
cedent established in case law. 


Even in states that have been 
pioneers in establishing pa- 
tients’ rights to refuse artifi- 
cial life support — such as 
Massachusetts, New Jersey 
and New York — lawmakers 
have made clear that they are 
not going to sanction doctor- 
assisted suicide. 

In Oregon, where voters 
narrowly approved the 1994 
Death With Dignity Act per- 
mitting doctor-assisted sui- 
cide, foe tide appears to be 
moving in foe same direction. 
The Oregon Medical Associ- 
ation, which took a neutral po- 
sition on foe idea three years 
ago, decided last spring to op- 
pose foe act. 

Because of legal chal- 
lenges. the Oregon measure 
never went into effect. Un- 
comfortable with the flaws in 
the law, the Oregon Legisla- 
ture voted last month to send it 
back to voters in November. 

There is historical preced- 
ent for blocking efforts to 
sanction euthanasia. From 
1890 to 1906 there was tre- 
mendous public debate in the 
United States about legalizing 
it. In 1905 a bill attempting to 
do that was introduced in Ohio 
— “An Act Concerning Ad- 
ministration of Drugs etc. to 
Mortally Injured and Diseased 
Persons." But the Ohio Leg- 
islature rejected it the follow- 
ing year, and with this defeat, 
euthanasia all but disappeared 
from the public agenda until 
the last few years. 

Polls show that a majority 
of Americans support doctor- 
assisted suicide in cases of un- 


remitting pain — in the ab- 
stract But this support 
dwindles when people are 
asked about permitting it for 
other reasons, such as when a 
terminally ill patient feels that 
life is meaningless or is wor- 
ried about being a burden. 

Legislators understand that 
deep down foe public is am- 
bivalent about euthanasia. 
That in part explains why they 
are not rushing to legalize iL 

State lawmakers are also 
wary of such legislation be- 
cause they know that it is dif- 
ficult, if not impossible, to 
completely ensure that pa- 
tients who request help in dy- 
ing are making an uncoerced, 
rational choice after all treat- 
ment has been provided. 

So instead, states are in- 
creasingly focusing their at- 
tention where it belongs: on 
improving care for the dying. 
At least eight states have 
adopted measures to make it 
easier for doctors to prescribe 
narcotics and other medica- 
tions for people in pain. And a 
number of other stares are 


considering similar action. 
We don't need doctors to 


help people end their lives. 
What we need is a willingness 
to use foe power of medicine 
to improve the final days of 
the terminally ill. 


Ezekiel J. Emanuel is as- 
sociate professor of medical 
ethics and medicine at Har- 
vard Medical School. Linda L. 
Emanuel is vice president for 
ethical standards at the Amer- 
ican Medical Association. 
They contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


gesting that the Vatican stored 
about $130 million for the pro- 
Nazi puppet government of 
Croatia to keep it out of Soviet 
hands. The Vatican says it did 
no such thing. 

Whatever foe case, it is clear 
that foe history of World War II 
and foe Holocaust is still bung 
written. The newspapers just 
this week had more about the 
legacy and impact of World 
War II than they did about foe 
longer-lasting (and more re- 
cently ended) Cold War foe 
Swiss bank accounts, the doc- 
ument relating to the Vatican, 
and, in Italy, the conviction of 
two former Nazi officers for the 
1944 massacre of 335 men and 
boys, 75 of them Jews. They 
were, they both insisted, afraid 
for foeir own lives and, yes, 
merely following orders. 

It may seem at times that this 
doubling back through history 
is silly. The past is past, let it go. 
But there is justice to be done, 
victims to be compensated (if 
possible), heirs who deserve to 
get what they should have com- 
ing and, most poignant perhaps. 
Holocaust survivors in the old 
Iron Curtain countries who will 
now for foe first time get help. 

But the issue is not, and never 
has been, money, or even 
justice. To my mind, this last 
sweeping up before that era’s 
survivors are all gone is an at- 
tempt to instruct, to show the 
enormous breadth of the Holo- 
caust. We may never really un- 
derstand foe killers, foe mur- 
derers of infants, for instance, 
but we may fmd a piece of 


ourselves in bankers looking to 
maximize profit and in ordinary 
people preferring not to be trou- 
bled by the miseries of others. 
We all recognize foe urge to 
treat foe stranger as a bit less 
human than ourselves. 

President Bill Clinton, refer- 
ring to the Vatican document, 
said foe United States will press 
ahead in its search for foe funds 
of Holocaust victims. “We’U 
keep working on this until we 
do everything we can to make it 
right," he said. 

"It” can never be made 
right, of course — not now, not 
at this late date. And that is not 
what foe president means' any- 
way. The search is only inci- 
dentally for foe guilty or for 
some lost funds. It is, funda- 
mentally, for the truth. 

In October foe Swiss will' 
publish anofoer list of dormant’ 
accounts, this one of Swiss cit- 
izens or residents who may have ' 
been used as proxies by Jews 
afraid to use their own names. 

The Swiss, understandably, • 
are growing resentful, but they 
have fessed up slowly and only ■ 
under pressure — one gener- 1 
anon troubled at having to ac- 
knowledge what it did, anofoer 
troubled by what was done. 

There is, though, one more- 
list to be published, and that is' 
one we shall never see: foe 
names of ordinary Swiss, oth- 
erwise good people, who shook 
hands with evil and thought that 
time would wash away the 
stain. Not so. The stain will 
survive foe hand. 

' The Washington Post. 



IN OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS Am 


1897: Threat to Labor 


PARIS — The Figaro, in a lead- 
er article, says: “Socialism has 
its system" for foe enormous 
mass of artisans who. by foe 


in ^ 


competition of Indian. Japanese 
andChin 


lese cheap labor, will be 
forced out of wort and thrown 
upon the streets of the man- 
ufacturing cities of Europe and 
America: "This is to make in- 
surgents of them." Conserva- 
tive politics must also discover 
a different solution. “To give 
back to foe soil that multitude of 
arms which would restore its 
former prosperity, to raise to foe 
rank of small proprietors these 
desperate and sullen poor — 
that is the problem." 


enins a general strike unless foe 
Reich measures are approved by 
foe Bavarian Government in 
foeir entirety. A provisional 
compromise has been effected, 
according to which Bavaria will 
approve foe laws, while entrust- 
ing their observance to Bavarian 
courts. According to this solu- 
tion, neither foe Reich courts* 
nor foe Reich police will be re- 
cognized in Bavaria. 


■» i. 


1922: Bavarian Crisis 


MUNICH — A critical situation 
has developed over the laws 
passed by foe Berlin Govern- 
ment for foe defence of foe Re- 
public. The Socialists are threat- 


1947: Opera Tragedy ' 

PARIS — A Romanian doctor 
attempted to commit suicide by 
towing himself from foe 
second balcony of foe Op&a- 
Comique. A letter from the phy- 
sician, who is expected to re-,. 

cover, enclosed C0 F ies of leners ’ 

ne had sent ro President Truman, 
and Premier Petra Groza 
or Romania, in which he said his 
wire and daughter were unable to 
leave Bucharest. He asked them . 
tor help in getting his family past 
foe Iron Curtain” into Paris. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1997 


PAGE 9 


OPINION/LETTERS 



The Great Airwave Heist: 
A Not-Made-for-TV Tale 


By William Safire 


W ASHINGTON — The use 
of government power to re- 


‘■aiw 11 ‘he main power is ah abuse of paign finance reform, he irritates 

"5 uo ^ ’■*' 1,1,1 pro- power. That insult to democracy Republican pols; by attacking the 

i i " e?r,c,Cr,lii 2iii- was the essence of the Watergate ethanol subsidy, he hurts his 

tra! W i. *■" :: a VST. scandal a generation ago and is at 

— ’• lij J , r fh* rnra nf Hvliiu'c nomnoi™ 



A, -'rk *S; the core of today's campaign fi- 
!,h - r ^ nance scandaL 

In the same way, the broadcast 
media’s use of their power to pro- 
tect themselves from competition 


Comic Relid 


\!r 


•.* ? liJ 


■». v. 


r.-r-ti.: 

•;t ;hr 

ri. h. 
rv 

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S.\ 
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LXllUUlll 


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In this budget- 
balancing era, 
broadcasters have 
managed to rip off 
the taxpayer for 
billions . 


and to enrich themselves at public 
expense is an abuse of media 
power. 

This week, we Americans are 
seeing (though not on television) 
the broadcast lobby's triumph in 
Congress. Behind closed doors of 
* House-Senate conferences, fin- 
ishing touches are being put on the 
most blatant example of corporate 
welfare: the multibillion-doUar 
giveaway of our digital airwaves. 

Because TV stations dictate lo- 
cal coverage, the broadcast lobby 
strikes bipartisan tenor in office- 
holders’ beans. Fearful of the 
value put on channels by the recent 
auctions of pans of the spectrum, 
the broadcasters' trade association 
and its 1 0 major players hired 1 74 
registered lobbyists, from Tommy 
Boggs and Ann Richards on the 
left to Haley Barbour and Tom 
Korologos on the right. 

To such skilled persuasion, add 
cold cash: In the past two years, 
according to the Center for Public 
Integrity, this portion of the 
lobby's "spectrum grabbers" 
donated $7.6 million to federal 
campaigns and party committees. 

This week's payoff is sweet. 
Broadcasters who already have 
been given, at no cost, a monopoly 
to broadcast on an old, analogue 
frequency are being given — free 
— six channels on the high-defin- 
ition, digital spectrum that be- 
longs to the public. No other lobby 
in this budget-balancing era can 
proudly point to such a taxpayer 


rip-off. worth billions. It's like, tect and extend media monopol- 
giving Yellowstone National Park ies. We journalists must ask 


■ 'U 


- '1 


io timber companies. 

With Bob Dole replaced as ma- 
jority leader by broadcaster- 
friendly Trent Lott, one lone sen- 
ator tried to resist the giveaway. 
John McCain, Republican of Ari- 
zona. was flattened by the broad- 
cast lobby's steamroller; as he 
puts it, bis record on this “is un- 
blemished by victory.” 

Mr. McCain is becoming the 
patron saint of mavericks. By 
pushing for liability reform, he 


ourselves: Where were we during 
this abuse of power? 

The New York Times. 


invites the fuiy of the trial law- 
yers’ lobby: by sponsoring cam- 
ign finance reform, he irritates 


chances in an Iowa caucus, and by 
resisting the thundering herd of 
broadcast lobbyists — 29 from 
CBS alone — he jeopardizes the 
television exposure needed for 
any national cam p ai gn. 

"What troubles me," Mr. Mc- 
Cain says, 1 ’is that the voters nev- 
er got a clear picture of this 
giveaway on television." 

It’s true that ABC’s John Mar- 
tin had one piece, but the only 
spectrum piece 1 saw, on NBC. 
ridiculed the failure of one auc- 
tion, with no reference to the 
many other public auctions of li- 
censes that tripled expectations. 

Reed Hundt, outgoing chair- 
man of the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission — a Gore man, 
but market-oriented — has been 
against giving the broadcasting 
moguls a free ride into the fi- 
nancial future. "It’s bad enough 
thar broadcasters are being given 
both digital and analogue chan- 
nels in perpetuity, without paying 
money or m-kind,’ ’ he says. 

* ‘Worse is that there have been 
no major televised discussions of 
the issue. The number one miss- 
ing piece in the puzzle is, why 

Media power 
pressured and paid 
government officials 
to protect and extend 
media monopolies . 

wasn’t this story about TV 
covered on TV?" 

Your favorite news anchors, 
network and local, and your high- 
rated magazine shows did not 
conspire to suppress coverage of 
the grab of public assets by their 
employers. Nothing so dramatic. 

They, and their producers, and 
the owners of theirstations (which 
often include newspapers) simply 
failed in their obligation to fully 
report, and to seek adversarial 
comment on, die triumph of die 
broadcast lobby. 

Media power pressured and 
paid government officials to pro- 


Letiers intended for publica- 
tion should be addressed “Letters 
to the Editor" and contain the 
writer s signature, name and full 
address. Letters should be brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 



Bt XlLuiTbr Sun Ifkhiaoir). CaT Stafii-Br. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A Bad Bosnia Plan 

In his foreign policy recipe for 
the Clinton administration. Ivo H. 
Daalder ("Three Bosnia Options, 
and Muddling Isn’t One" Opin- 
ion. July 19) righdy points out that 
the Dayton peace agreement is not 
being implemented. He suggests 
three options for the United Stares 
in Bosnia: "It can leave and risk 
war; it can stay and risk being 
there for another decade or more, 
or it can negotiate a new deal." 
Mr. Daalder opts for the third 
choice. 

It is true that some in Bosnia are 
pro-Dayton and others are anti- 
Dayton. The Bosnian Serbs. Mr. 
Daalder writes, "have no inten- 
tion of abiding by Dayton's 
terms,'’ while the Muslims "em- 
phasize the importance of refugee 
returns and other integrauonist 
elements of Dayton." 

But to dismiss the peace pro- 
cess by saying that instead of 
resolving the conflict, Dayton im- 
plementation is but its "continu- 
ation by other means” is to show 
an ignorance of conditions on the 
ground. It is the parties’ noncom- 
pliance with Dayton that consti- 
tutes the continuation of their con- 
flict. Bosnian Serbs are leading in 
noncorapliance, with the most 
blatant refusal to cooperate with 
The Hague tribunal, the most vi- 
olent rejection of refugee return 
and the most notorious fraud in 
voter registration for September 
municipal elections. 


Mr. Daalder is right: Muddling 
through is no longer an option. 
But, as if convinced that appeas- 
ing the thugs is better than mud- 
dling through, he proposes a new 
deal: ‘ ‘The Serbs couldget a small 
part of the territory they currently 
hold in eastern Bosnia and be 
granted independence The re- 

mainder of Bosnia would be in- 
tegrated into a single stare with 
strong provisions guaranteeing 
minority rights. Transitional se- 
curity would require an interna- 
tional — including U.S. — mil- 
itary force.” 

This looks like a rump Dayton 
for a rump Bosnia. This "rump" 
scenario also raises several ques- 
tions: 

• What happens to western 
Bosnia, now exclusively Bosnian 
Serb? 

• How could ‘ ‘the remainder of 
Bosnia” be integrated into a 
single stare if the present Bosnia- 
Herzegovina cannot? 

• Who would obtain and then 
enforce those strong provisions 
guaranteeing minority rights if 
this is not now being done? 

• What is this military force 
that would be required for tran- 
sitional security, if not a creature 
whose maiden name is IFOR/ 
SFOR? 

• How long is this military 
force going to remain in Bosnia 
and how will it at some point solve 
the withdraw/stay dilemma, 
which now seems unsolvable? 

Frankly, this renegotiation of 


Cleaning Up Cyberspace 
For Children’s Benefit 


By Ellen Goodman 


Dayton sounds like a downgrad- 
ing of the agreement, or rather a 
reward for (he ethnic cleansers 
from eastern Bosnia for their non- 
cooperation. This plan would be- 
stow on them an independent state 
and create a mini-Dayton, equally 
difficult to implement in a trun- 
cated Bosnia and among alienated 
non-Serbs. 

. ANNA HUSARSKA. 

Sarajevo, Bosnia- 
Herzegovina. 

The writer is a political analyst 
with the International Crisis 
Group, a nongovernmental or- 
ganization monitoring the imple- 
mentation of the Dayton peace 
agreement in Bosnia. 

Made in the USA 

Regarding “Another French 
Chance to Make Idealism Work " 
( Opinion . June 18) by Carlos 
Fuentes: 

The Parisian May of 1968 may 
have shaken die world, but the 
events that culminated in France 
began early in the 1960s on the 
Berkeley campus of the Uni- 
versity of California. Students 
named Jack Weinberg and Mario 
Savio began demonstrations in 
1964 that ended with the uni- 
versity’s acceptance of students' 
right to free speech on campus. 
Other students flare-ups followed 
in Europe and elsewhere. 

J. G. RICHARDSON. 

Paris. 


B OSTON — At the center of 
the Children’s Room of the 
Boston Public library there is a 
banner announcing "Welcome 
Curious George." It hangs ap- 
propriately enough over a display 
of the books that celebrate the 
famed monkey's high jinks. 

This is how we think of li- 
braries. of course. Safe havens for 

MEANWHILE 

the curious. Places where kids do 
some literary exploration. 

But nearby is a small bank of 
computers. There, a very curious 
George of the human variety surf- 
ing the Internet could find some 
very, very curious stuff. 

There, George could go in 
search of Baznbi and find an 
XXX-rared dear. There, George 
could type in "breast” and find 
everything from cancer to chicken 
recipes to swim strokes to "Horny 
Babes on Aphrodisiacs.” 

This is a dilemma of the in- 
formation age. The Internet has 
.been compared to a library where 
all the books are scattered across 
the floor. On this same littered 
floor are X-rated magazines and 
adult videos. 

"All the good and bad you find 
in (he world, you find on die In- 
ternet.” says Bernard Margolis, 
the president of BPL. The ques- 
tion is, he says. "How do you. in 
accommodating technology, cope 
with what it brings?" 

As head of the oldest publicly 
supported library in the country 
— 150 next year — he feces this 
new variation of a familiar prob- 
lem: “How do you protect the 
most impressionable among us 
from things that are bad?” 

Mr. Margolis is a veteran of the 
wars between censorship and free 
speech. His first battle was waged 
as a child when he read the for- 
bidden "The Catcher in the Rye" 
with a flashlight under the covers. 
As a librarian in Colorado 
Springs, he battled conservatives 
who wanted to ban "Father 
Christmas'' because the Santa 
character preferred cognac to milk 
and cookies. 

As the Internet "happened," 
he recognized that there are 
‘ ’folks who believe the prime rea- 
son the Internet exists is to dis- 
tribute pornography. ’ ’ And yet he 
also understands that "the library 
was seen as a safe place to send 
kids." And today, it seems a little 
less safe. 

In many ways, parents today 
see the communications revolu- 
tion as a coup d’dtat. The power to 
guide children, to shape and 
screen the cultural messages, was 
taken from our hands by the tele- 
vision in our living room and now 
by the information superhighway 
running through home, school 
and library. 

When Mr. Margolis arrived in 


Boston in March, there were 
many who wanted to ban sexually 
explicit material from the Internet 
itself. 

Hie Communications Decency 
Act passed Congress with near 
unanimity. 

The mayor of Boston deman- 
ded that libraries censor the Net. 
The First Amendment defenders, 
including the American Library 
Association, rightly objected to 
electronic censorship. 

So the first public library in 
America came up with what Mr, 
Margolis likes to call "the Boston 
Solution." It simply divided the 
Internet into two eoitions.One, an 
unfettered free-for-all for adults. 
The other, a filtered "children's 
room" with sites as edited as kid- 
die bookshelves. 

Last month, the Supreme Court 
toppled the Communications De- 
cency Act, ruling that the Internet 
was protected by the First Amend- 
ment 

Last week in Washington the 
president came out in favor of a 
"virtual toolbox" of blocking 
technology to use at home. 

The Boston Solution remained 
standing; indeed it’s become a 

Internet filters 
aren’t perfect: Like 
coffee filters, they 
let some grounds 
through. 

model of a way to protect children 
without shackling adults in the 
libraries we share. 

There are, to be sure, flaws in 
this system. Mr. Margolis com- 
pares Net filters to coffee filters: 
"Inevitably there are still grounds 
in the bottom of the cup. If science 
can’t filter coffee, how can they 
filter something as complex as 
the Internet?" 

The library's Cyber Patrol soft- 
ware has not yet caught up with 
"Homy Babes." Sometimes it 
mysteriously filters out a Web site 
on fighter planes or volcanoes. It 
doesn’t do what die American Li- 
brary Association can do: offer a 
list of preselected family-friendly 
Web sites. 

But for the moment, we seem 
doomed to some technological 
arms race. We fight the side effects 
of escalating technology with es- 
calating technological defenses. 

Libraries today are no longer 
book museums but community in- 
formation centers. So they will 
remain at the center of a struggle to 
maintain freedom of speech and 
protect children. For now, the 
Boston Solution is working. But 
for the last word, maybe we should 
turn from George to Alice: It’s 
getting curiouser and curiouser. 

The Boston Globe. 


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v 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1997 


Aloha! Summer Celebration 

This Is the Season of Festivals in Honolulu 



By Jocelyn Fujii 



ONOLULU — Honolulu res- 
idents are endlessly amused 
by die mamjanders' penchant 
for proclaiming Hawaii sea- 
sonless. Local people know it's spring 
when gardenias and pikake (jasmine) 
reappear and the air around Chinatown's 
lei stands is thick with their heady fra- 
grances tempering the scents of burning 
mugwort, dried herbs and fresh fish. 

Hand-painted “Mangoes 4 Sale” 
signs beckon along country roads, and 
the voluptuous fruit, along with litchis, 
bulge on trees, all the better to fuel the 
picnics and festivals of summertime 
Honolulu. 

Islanders know they can count on 
these things despite the wilting morale 
induced by a beleaguered economy and 
the second-highest cost of 
living in the United States 
(San Francisco is first. New 
York City third). But at the 
beaches and parks, music, 
hula, feasting and festivals 
are a balm for the spirit: The 
barbecues are alight, and the 
ocean is at its wannest 

One summer celebration is 
the annual tribute to the man 
who ruled as King Kame- 
hameha V in die 1860s. The 
death of Lot Kamehameha, a 
self-proclaimed nativist and 
take-charge king, in 1S72 
ended the 77-year-old Kame- 
hameha dynasty, but his leg- 
acy continues at the Prince 
Lot Hula Festival, which is 
holding its 20th anniversary 
this weekend. 

Lot was all for die Hawaii- 
an monarchy and did what he 
could to revive Hawaiian tra- 
ditions such as the hula and 
the native religious practices 
suppressed by missionaries. Lot Kame- 
hameha would be proud to see the re- 
surgence of things Hawaiian celebrated 
at the tree-shaded Moanalua Gardens, 
where loyalists and hula enthusiasts 
gather every summer in his name, on 
grounds owned by the estate of Samuel 
Mills Damon, a prominent missionary. 

Food and Festivals 

At Ward Seafood on Sunday, from 9 
AJVf. to 4 P.M. chefs, seafood and keiti 
(children’s) hub share the limelight at 
three adjacent festival sites in the Ward 
Avenue-Ala Moana Boulevard area. 
Awaiting the hungry: seafood from top 
chefs ($2 tastings), cooking demonstra- 
tions, a Hawaii-food-products fair, and 
a chance to taste nine types of fish, side 
by side and simply prepared so that the 
subtle tastes and textures are easier to 
compare. Free, except for the food; call 
(808) 591 -841 1 for information. 

Across town in the Diamond Head 
area, summer is in lull swing with the 
Waikiki Aquarium's fund-raising con- 
certs on Aug. 6 and 27. at 7:30 P.M. on 
its outdoor stage, right by the ocean. 
Hawaiian musicians (The Makaha Sons 
and Ka’au Crater Boys respectively) 
and traditional Hawaiian dancers will 
perform at sunset Spectators can spread 
picnic suppers on the lawn and watch 
the sun set over the ocean and cast a 
golden halo on Diamond Head. Tickets 
are $15; Waikiki Aquarium, 2777 
Kalakaua Avenue, (808) 923-9741. 

Across the street from the Aquarium, 
at the Waikiki Shell in Kapioiani Park, 
Natalie Cole will sing during “An Un- 
forgettable Evening With the Honolulu 
Symphony,” with Charles Floyd as 
guest conductor, on Aug. 1 at 7:30 PM. 
Reserved seats are $50 and $75; lawn 
tickets, $20. For tickets and informa- 
tion, contact Honolulu Symphony, 677 
Ala Moana Boulevard, Suite 606; (808) 
538-8863. Tickets may also be charged 
through The Connection, (800) 333- 
3388. 

The Hawaii International Jazz Fes- 


tival, which ‘runs from July 31 through 
Aug. 3, has a new home this year the 
Hawaii Theater. Built in 1922 in the 
Beaux-Arts style as a vaudeville movie 
palace, the theater reopened a year ago 
after a $22 million restoration of the 
interior. Concerts start at 7 P-M. arid 
include the singers Linda Hopkins and 
Marlena Shaw and die saxophonist 
Ernie Watts. Tickets are $10, $18 and 
$25; Hawaii Theater Box Office, 1130 
Bethel Street, (808) 528-0506, or The 
Connection, (800) 333-3388. 

The Bankoh Ki Ho Alu Festival has a 
new home, too, on the grounds of the 
104-year-old Bishop Museum, at 1525 
Bernice Street, Kalmi, (808) 847-3511. 
The world’s finest players of slack key 
acoustic guitar converge Aug. 17 for an 
all-day celebration of this soulful 
Hawaiian tradition. The music’s 
unique, lingering resonance is created 



NTT 


by slackening the strings for a variety of 
tunings, a technique introduced by 
Spanish and Mexican cowboys in the 
1830’s. 1 1 AM. to 5 PM.; $14.95. 

Chinatown is now in full bloom with 
the harvests of summer. Exotic fruits — 
sapodilia, soursop. dragon’s eye. litchis, 
pirie mangoes — disappear quickly at 
die Maunakea Marketplace, at the 
corner of Maunakea and Hotel streets. 
The takeout counters next to the market 
display a feast of ethnic cuisines, from 
Italian to Vietnamese to Filipino. 

The Bishop Museum is showing an 
interactive exhibit called “Ocean Plan- 
et," developed by the Smithsonian In- 
stitution, through Oct 5. A Hawaiian 
princess founded this four-story, bva 
rock museum, the world’s greatest re- 
pository of cultural and natural artifacts 
from Hawaii and the Pacific. Feathered 
capes worn by kings, a grass house, 13 
milli on insect specimens, a 50-foot 
sperm whale skeleton and rare wood 
implements are among the permanent 
" P-M. daily; 


exhibits. Open 9 AM. to 5 
admission, $14.95; telephone. 
847-3511. 


(808) 


HAWAIIAN ARTISTS There are no grass 
houses or pre-Westem works at the 
Contemporary Museum, one of 
Hawaii’s preeminent cultural treasures; 
its six galleries, David Hockney pa- 
vilion, Oriental gardens, cafe, gift shop 
and newly opened Biennial of Hawaii 
Artists, through Sept 21, are the lure. 
The works of six of Hawaii’s foremost 
artists in various media are on display in 
this 1925 architectural marvel in the 
Tantalus neighborhood, a gracious, for- 
ested residential area with views of Dia- 
mond Head. The museum is at 2411 
Makiki Heights Drive. (808) 526-0232. 
Open Tuesday to Saturday 10 A.M. to 4 
P.M.; Sunday, noon to 4 PM.; $5. The 
third Thursday of each month is free, 

Hotel rates in Hawaii remain high, 
but this is die off season, which means 
lower prices than (he December through 
April high season. 

The Diamond Head end of Waikiki is 


Otani Kaixnana Beach Hotel, 2863 
Kalakaua Avenue, (800) 356-8264, fax 
(808) 922-9404. The 125 rooms, in pas- 
tels and tropical decor, are on die third to 
ninth floors of an atrium-style building 
and have balconies a nd small 
ators; some have kitchenettes. Doui* 
from $110. 

In the budget range, foe Royal Grove 
Hotel, 151 Uluniu Avenue, (808) 923- 
7691, fax (808) 922-7508. as pink as foe 
Royal Hawaiian Hotel, is a tad frayed at 
foe edges. But it is two blocks from 
Waikiki Beach, dean, convenient mid 
friendly, with foe usual amenities 
(phone, kitchenette, air-conditioning, 
TV), as well as apooL Guests who can do 
without fluffy towels and room service 
will enjoy foe price: doubles are $57. 

At the top of foe list of places to eat is 
Alan Wong’s Restaurant, the shrine of 
Hawaii regional cuisine, oa 
foe fifth floor at 1857 South 
King Street, (808) 949-2526. 
Here you can *dine indoors 
next to an open kitchen, or in 
a glassed-in terrace with 
mountain and street views. 
Specials include ahi iumpia , 
fresh scallops in saffron 
sauce, and grilled opakapaka 
(pink snapper). Wong should 
get a medal for his rose-apple 
sorbeL Dinner for two with 
wine: $120 to $160. 

At A Pacific Cafe, Jean- 
Marie Josselin, triathlete and 
master chef, shows how he 
lost 40 pounds while serving 
feasts at four restaurants. His 
new light menu is a coun- 
terpoint to foe regular selec- 
tion — with such offerings as 
tiger-eye sushi tempura, but- 
ter-tender rib-eye steak and 
foe signature sesame-crusted 
mahim ahi — not designed for 
deprivation. Dinner for two 
with wine: about $120. The restaurant, 
decorated in shades of blue and gold 
with lamps made with beach glass, is at 
Ward Center, 1200 Ala Moana 
Boulevard, (808) 593-0035. 

In an industrial area toward the air- 

g Dit." at 580 North Nimitz Highway, 
am Choy's new Breakfast, Lunch and 
Crab is one of the busiest spots in Hon- 
olulu. A diner by day and a crab house 
by night, it serves superb king crab legs, 
fresh oysters and stone crab, unusual for 
Hawaii, in a huge room with brewery 
vats, an oyster bar and an authentic 
wooden sampan that serves as a dining 
area. 

Enormous servings are Choy’s sig- 
nature. Fried poke (fresh tuna) omelet 
and wok-cooked chicken and saimin 
(noodle soup topped with crab and con- 
diments) are noteworthy items for 
breakfast or lunch. Dinner for two with 
microbrew been about $90. Breakfast 
and lunch are much less. Telephone: 
(808) 545-7979. 

At Hawaii Seafood Paradise, 1830 
Ala Moana Boulevard, (808) 946-45 14, 
you may be the only non-Chinese diner. 
Among foe crowd-p leasers are nine 
types of duck (foe Peking is superb), 
sizzling platters, 228 Cantonese and 
Szechuan items.(including an excellent 
prawn soup that's not on foe menu) and 
the hours — open until 3 AM. Dinner 
for two with beer, about $50. 

Inland from Waikiki, not far from 
Alan Wong’s, is Jlmbo’s, 1936 South 
King Street, (808) 947-2211. Custom- 
ers must bring their own alcohol to this 
noodle house, which has fewer than a 
dozen tables. Homemade noodles come 
in savory, smoky homemade broths, 
with tasty vegetable and chicken top- 
pings. The menu also includes cold 
noodles, fried noodles and steamed-rice 
dishes called donburi. Dinner for two: 
about $20. 


Agents Fujcc* Piwc 


Jocelyn Fujii, author of ** Under the 
Hula Moon" and a resident of Hon- 
olulu. wrote this for The New York 
Times. 



The Great Wall at Mutianyu, -where a convened sentry post offers hotel accommodationfor $18 per person. 

On the Great Wall, a Great Hotel 




By Richard To mlins on 




EEJING — There are several 
good reasons for arriving late 
at the Mutianyu Great Wall, 
about two hours drive from 
Beijing. The coach parties of jet-lagged 
tourists are on their way home, as are the 
its who hawk everything from 



feudalism” to the locals — one of foe 
forbidden activities, along with littering 
and smoking, listed on a large notice 
board at foe entrance to Mutianyu. 

For those in foe know, late afternoon 
is also foe right time to check into one of 
foe Great Wall’s lesser known attrac- 
tions: foe Mutianyu Great Wall Casrle 
Villa. Established 18 months ago, foe 
villa is a restored and converted sentry 
post, offering hotel accommodation at 
around $18 per person at a site where 
soldiers once guarded the Middle King- 
dom against foe Mongol hordes to foe 
north. The manager, Li Shunbao, says 
he. can accommodate 50 people, and 
advertises a dance hall and a karaoke 
room as part of the package. 

Beauty in Tranquillity 

Well, it’s not quite that fancy: foe 
karaoke room doubles up as foe lounge, 
and F never did find foe dance hall. But if 
you’re looking for peace and quiet, 
beautiful scenery and clean air — rare 
commodities in China — Li's isolated 
establishment takes some beating. 

The first challenge is to find foe hotel. 
Don't take foe Mutianyu cable car, un- 
less you can’t face a short uphill hike, 
because it will deliver you to the wrong 


section of the wall, some five sentry 
posts from die villa. Instead, after pur- 
chasing your ticket to visit foe wall ($2 
for foreigners), follow foe steps that lead 
up die hm. Halfway up, die steps branch 
in two directions, and in true Chinese 
fashion, there is no sign post to say 
which is the correct route. Turn right, 
and you will shortly arrive at foe wall. 

Ignore any peasant who tries to sell 
you water at lz renminbi a bottle (a 400 
percent madcap), turn right again and 
proceed along foe wall to foe next-but- 
one sentry post, which is, unmistakably, 
the Mutianyu Great Wail Castle Villa. 
The whole journey takes about 40 
minutes, and at the other end, Li will be 
waiting to greet you. 

FIRST, THS RAD raws Since this is 
C hina , let's deal with the downside of a 
night on the wall. There are clean wash- 
basins and lavatories, but not exactly en 
suite; if you need to pay a visit, it's a 
short walk outside foe main sentry 
house to an adjacent building. So this is 
not a place to spend more than one night, 
especially given foe droves of toarists 
who pass through during foe day. Better 
to book a room for foe following day in 
a Beijing hotel for that ail-important 
post-Great Wall -hot shower. t . 

Now for the selling points. They be- 
gin with Li, who is remarkably un- 
sal esmanlike for a Chinese hotelier. He 
is happy to offer you tea or something 
stronger on arrival, but just as pleased if 
you simply want to shoot the breeze 
with him for a few minutes. Although Li 
sees no need to take yoiir passport de- 
tails (standard form in all Chinese ho- 
tels), it’s a good idea to bring it, and also 
a name card to add to his collection. At 
foe weekend, he reports, foe villa fills up 


with local visitors, and if group karaoke 
is not to your taste, it’s better to book 
between Monday and Thursday. 

T HE restaurant advertises “roast 
game, local food and fast food," 
and once again Li is pleased to 
oblige. But as he says: * ‘I'm foe manager 
as well as foe cook and the waiter, which 
is why I always advise guests to bring 
their own food- " This rejuly isn’t a prob- 
lem. On a summer evening, it’s infinitely 
preferable to bring a picnic and a bottle .* 
of wine (Li will lend yon wine glasses), 
tramp up the steep incline and contem- 
plate foe wall as foe sun goes down. 

Of all China’s historical achieve- 
ments, foe Great Wall was the most 
stupendous and, ultimately, foe most 
fntile. Built to keep out the Mongol 
armies, it failed in its primary task; in 
1213 Genghis Khan penetrated foe wall, 
reaching Beijing three years later. 
Today, the wall is perhaps best pictured 
as foe world’s greatest monument to foe 
siege mentality — a ribbon of bricks and 
stones stretching for thousands of miles 
until it peters out in foe deserts of west- 
ern China. 

Back at foe hotel the guest rooms 
sympathetically capture foe spirit of the 
setting. The brickwork is bare: and the 
lighting is subdued. You'll probably 
wake early; as the sun rises over foe 
hillside. In high summer, it's advisable 
to check oat before the heat of foe day. 

Once down foe hill, a peasant will 
doubtless try to sell you an “I Climbed 
the Great Wall" T-shirt. 

Welcome back to New China; your 
villa retreat is over. 


Richard Tomlinson is a journalist 2. 
based in Beijing. 



Lrm- fUnmaWTbr Me* Ynrti Time" 

In Southampton, the dance floor at Jet East is the place to be seen , never mind the $300-a-couple minimum. 

Wretched Excess in Hamptons 


By Davidson Goldin 

Se*' York Times Senice 




tearfad N«i»rHEipkiicT 

Hula shows are a big part of the entertainment at the beaches and parks, as are music .feasting and festivals . 


OUTHAMPTON, New York 
— Most Saturday nights. Matt 
) Handler and seven friends from 

his summer house reserve a 

table adjoining foe buzzing dance floor 
at Jet East, the newest place to see and be 
seen in the Hamptons. 

Handler, a 27-year-old natural-gas 
broker, thinks it’s a nifty idea. "You go 
on foe dance floor, come back and foe 
alcohol is still sitting there waiting for 
you,” he said. But that table has a price: 
With tax and tip. Handler’s party coughs 
up $1,000 on jaunts. 

With a booming Wall Street just 100 
miles (160 kilometers) away, many 
yo ung clubgoers don't seem to blink at 
the latest extreme in a place known for 
extremes. This summer, popular 
ni ght clubs in Southampton have added 
lounge areas — complete with ban- 
quettes and tables and seats in the form 
of king-size beds —to spaces otherwise 
stingy with places to rest your pups. But 
foe tables come with a high minimum 
charge, which covers expensive liba- 
tions sold only by the bottle. 

Chaiges vary. For example, at Jet East, 
which opened this season, two people 
would pay a $300 minimum; a table for 
eight carries an $800 minimum. 

The Tavern, another popular late- 
night spot in Southampton that intro- 


duced a lounge area this year, charges 
$500 for a table for two or more, and 
M80 wants $200 for the first four people 
(add $200 for the next one to four). 

"Truly, I never thought it would get 
like this out here," said Terrence Cas- 
sidy, 52, foe chairman of National Wire- 
less, a communications company, who 
was a guest of friends in foe Tavern. 

Club owners are well aware that they 
have foe economy to thank for what has 
turned into a booming business. 

“People are making more money and 
feeling better than foe last couple of 
years, and they’re going out and spend- 
ing more money,” said Gordon Von 
Brock, an owner of the Tavern. “As 
opposed to a traditional cocktail-wait- 
ress bar, we make it feel like your own 
living room." 

bottle-only sikvici Club owners 
say it was just a matter a time before 
bottle-only service made its way from 
Manhattan to the beach. The concept of 
serving full bottles instead of cocktails 
originated some 20 years ago in Saint- 
Tropez and spread to other European 
resorts, including Cannes and Ibiza. 

City and beach club owners say foe 
idea was popularized in New York City 
with foe opening of the midtown club Au 
Bar in 1987 and spread to the South 
Beach section of Miami Beach. Then last 
fall, several new Manhattan clubs, in- 
cluding Jet Lounge, Chaos and Cheetah, 


began offering bottle service at tables. 

Bur unlike foe beach, most Manhatta 
clubs don’t have minimum char°« 
based on the number of people at a tab’ll 
instead, they require each table to order; 
least one bottle, whether for two or 12. 

With bottles at the Southampto 
clubs costing from about $200 foralow 
end vodka or gin to S600 for a high-en 
Scotch or Cognac, it is not hard to rear 
nummum charges. On a recent Satuida 
night at Jet East, the popular combir 
anon seemed to be a S250 bottle of Kelt 
Une vodka, which retails for $20, mixe 
with orange juice or cranberry juict 
Mixers are complimentary. 

For those not willing or able to buy 
sea l fo® typical $20 cover chars 
provides access to the dance floor an: 
standing room only at the bar. Be 
there s a catch: Clubgoers without tab! 
reservations — - or their names on 
guest list, showing they are known ti 

of ‘.kTISSL 01, promoter5 — spend mud 

of foe mght waiting outside in line. 

It shard as hell to get into this place 
so the mm^ums are definitely wort! 
£ft Bnan Abramson. 33. a Man 
harran eqmiy trader, who paid $125 on i 

feiTS y "! 8hl f* )“* share of a table a 
n ♦ L JusI look at all the girls. ’ ’ 
w A ut " ot f, v eryone is comfortable witl 

£5L“ S represenls - “It's a m 

HkkT-i r»r^ C1S ? Vc ’” Mid Shrew 
E C £d!’ ■ Coiurabia Records employ 
ee. This is very Roman.” 


J 




jf 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JULY 25, 1997 


R4GE 11 


LEISURE 


Traveling East in Europe? Get Ready to Wait at the Borders 



By Alan Cowell 

•Vtnryi'ril 7wir.\ Semt f 

ERUN — Europe’s passporr- 
free froniiers were supposed ro 
shift eastward a little this sum- 
mer when Austria was to join 
the so-called Schengen group of Euro- 
pean Union countries that permit free 
movement across their borders. But the 
message from motoring organizations 
and diplomats to travelers is: Don’t hold 
your breath for sudden changes on the 
ground. 

The reason is that Germany has not 
been satisfied with Austria's ability to 
police the borders it shares with Hun- 
gary, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. 

And so, the border between Austria 
and Germany will still be subject to 


passport controls and spot checks, mean- 
ing that motorists can expect delays of 
up to one hour in the summer high sea- 
son at the main crossover point between 
Salzburg and Munich. 

[The problem should be resolved next 
year following top-level talks last week 
at which April 1. 1998, was set as the 
dare for lifting border controls between 
Germany, Austria and Italy.] 

Germany had objected to granting 
membership in the Schengen group to 
Italy and Greece as well, arguing that 
their “outer” frontiers, in the parlance 
of the European Union, are simply too 
porous to prevent an influx, in particular, 
of refugees from strife-tom Albania. 

The Schengen idea dates from March 
1 995 and is supposed to be a step toward 
European unity. Named for the town in 


Luxembourg where it was signed, the 
Schengen accord foresees unhindered 
travel among European member states, 
provided there are very strict identity 
controls at airports, seaports and land 
borders for travelers arriving 
from countries outside the ^ 
European Union, including the 
United States. 

That, in effect, divides the 
European Union's frontiers in- 
to "outer” frontiers with the yu 

rest of the world and “inner” 
frontiers where, as in some 
parts of northern Europe, border stations 
have already been dismantled, and mo- 
torists simply drive from one country to 
another without stopping; the booths and 
barriers where passport officials used to 
stand have disappeared. 


MOVIE GUIDE 


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Face/Off 

Directed by John Woo. US. 

“Face/Off, " John Woo’s 
third Hollywood movie, is the 
maddest, most enjoyable 
blockbuster of the summer. A 
delirious mixture of spectac- 
ular gun battles, furious ex- 
plosions and breathtaking 
stunt work, it’s also one of the 
strangest stories to ever get 
the green light at a Hollywood 
studio. You have to take your 
hat off to Paramount Studios 
for allowing such inspired 
weirdness to see the light of 
day. Of course, with the en- 
thusiastic participation of 

stars Nicolas Cage and John John Travolta, left, and Nicolas Cage in "Face! Off.’ 
Travolta (as well as the box- 



office success of Woo’s previous film, filtrate the prison, hook up with Pollux these towering structures, as the radars 
* * Broken Arrow”), they must have felt and pump his "brother” for information, probe for a signal — ■ the slightest, tiniest 
some confidence in the project. But still. Twisted? Demented? Completely unbe- sound — from the heavens. This mo- 


FBI agent Sean Archer (Travolta) has 
spent six years searching for Castor Troy 
(Cage), a psychotic terrorist who killed 
the agent's young son. Finally, he in- 
tercepts the killer as his private plane 
prepares to leave. Although the terrorist 
is surrounded by a helicopter, armored 
vehicles and SWAT gunmen, he forces 
the pilot to attempt a takeoff. A gun- 
blazing, incendiary scene follows, leav- 
ing corpses strewn across the runway, 
the plane smashed up and Troy appar- 
ently dead. Case clo^d? Of course not 
The FBI I earns that, just before the air- 
port incident, Troy and his equally 
psychotic brother, Pollux (Alessandro 
Nivola), wired a nerve-gas bomb some- 
where in Los Angeles. In two days, an 
agent tells Archer, this lethal payload 
will flatten everything for a square mile, 
then pepper the city with fallout “a tad 
worse than Gulf War Syndrome.” Only 
tight-lipped Pollux knows the secret. 
What to do? A crazy suggestion is made 
— the kind of wacky, out-of-this-worid 
idea that only director Woo would go for. 
Thanks to cutting-edge (so to speak) 
laser surgery. Archer can literally, and 
seamlessly, trade faces with Troy. By 
pretending to be Troy, Archer can in- 


lievabie? Sure, bur what's your point? 
It's also extremely funny and brilliantly 
executed. ( Desson Howe. WPl 


A Simple Wish 

Directed by Michael Ritchie. U.S. 

Fairy tales aren’t what they used to be. As 
demonstrated by “A Simple Wish,” the 
flesh is willing, but the spirit is weak. 
Enchantment flickers only intermittently 
through this well-intentioned but bland 
comedy about a little New York City girl 
and her fairy godmother. The gimmick, 
which is high on concept analow on 
execution, installs Martin Short in the role 
of the wand bearer,' a fellow named 'Mur- 
ray, depicted at the outset as the sole male 
in his godmothering class and a first-class 
fool. So small wonder that when little 
Anabel Greening (Mara Wilson) conjures 
him up to help her widowed father. Mur- 
ray inspires more doubt than awe. To 
complicate the plor, the director, Michael 
Ritchie, and the screenwriter. Jeff Rofo- 
berg, have tossed in Kathleen Turner as 
Claudia, a power-hungry wicked witch 
who manages to steal all the godmothers’ 
wands except Murray’s, and some in- 
eptitude on Murray’s part that transforms 
Anabel's father into a bronze statue in 


BOOKS 



Jliptolis 


ANARCHY ONLINE: 

, net crime/net sex 
By Charles Plan. 367 pages. 
$14. HarperPrism. 

Reviewed by 
Mark Baechtel 

O PENING as it does with 
the image of beefy cops 
forcing their way into a 
skinny hacker's house to 
seize his computer equip- 
ment. “Anarchy Online: net 
crime/net sex” flags its sym- 
pathies early.. 

It’s clear that Charles Platt, 
writer of software, author of 
numerous books and contrib- 
utor to Wired magazine, sides 
.with those who think the only 
good Interna is a completely 
free Internet. His heroes are 
hackers, libertarians, people 
so committed to free speech 
that they fight expensive 
court battles or risk impris- 
onment ro ensure it He seems 
to regard recent legislative at- 
tempts to cleanup the content 
of on-line worlds much as 
19th-century cattle barons re- 
garded encroaching farmers’ 
fences across their wide-open 


By Alan Truscott 

H ALF a century ago, the 
English twins. .Robert 
and James Sharpies were 
* thought to be the world's 
strongest partnership -of 
brothers. 

Now that title appears to 
belong to two Indiana ex- 
perts, Dennis and Jeriy Cler- 




In the International Team 
Trials in New Orleans in 
June, they played well for the 
Malcolm Brachman team. 

On the diagramed deal, 
which helped them defeat the 
Richard Schwartz squad, foe 
Clerkin brothers, North- 
South, bid three no-trump. 

West led a spade, which 
rode around to the queen. The . 
diamond ace and queen were 
led and West, held up his 
king. .. . 

The first key moment ar 7 
rived when foe spade seven 
was led at foe fourth trick. 

. South intended to finesse 
the ten, which would allow 
him to establish dummy's 


ranges — as unwelcome in- 
trusions to be resisted. 

Any story with such heroes 
must also include villains, and 
Platt finds plenty of them: 
cludess legislators whose at- 
tempts to regulate foe Internet 
reflect their ignorance about 
the very thin g they’re trying to 
regulate, power-h angry law- 
enforcement types, research- 
ers who play fast and loose 
with the facts to convince us 
that there are boogeymen in 
our virtual closets, wannabe 
arbiters of public morals, and, 
of course, the media. Con- 
sidered together and on Plan's 
terms., they are a bumbling 
and venal cabal, bent on 
smearing foe on-line world, 
staying in power, keeping the 
rest of us dumb and. docile, 
and loading their pockets. 

Platt is right to call for scru- 
tiny of this group, and for 
close examination of propos- 
als to regulate the Internet — 
foe ill-considered Communi- 
cations Decency Act just 
ruled unconstitutional by the 
Supreme Coon and foe Clin- 
ton administration's right- 
fully criticized Clipper Chip 


BRIDGE 

diamonds, bur both west play- 
ers, Paul Soloway and Mac 
Jacobus, rose to the occasion 
by playing foe king. This 
blocked South from using foe 
diamonds, and after South 
won with foe ace foe position 
was as shown in the diagram 
atright. 

At one table. South led a 
club from foe dummy at this 
point 

East put up foe jack, and foe 


NORTH 
+ A1D4 
9875 
o Jim*- 
*10 6 


WEST 

* K 8 6 53 
9Q3 

* K7 2 

* A 5 3 


EAST 

492 

0 10 9 E 4 2 
0 853 
*QJ8 


initiative being prime ex- 
amples. But foe problem with 
the picture he presents — as 
with any black-and-white, an- 
gels- vs. -devils scenario — is 
thai real life isn’t quiie so 
clear-cut- Platt argues his case 
passionately and marshals an 
impressive array of facts to 
support it, but there is 
something a bit too shrill, too 
round, in his argument, and 
foe facts bear a closer exam- 
ination than he gives them. 

The main issues at play in 
“Anarchy Online” are foe in- 
dividual's rights to privacy 
and freedom of expression. 
To state the matter simply. 
Net purists believe that what’s 
on their hard drives or in their 
e-mail should be none of any 
regulator’s business. They 
should be permitted to move 
about freely in foe on-line 
world, to keep files on any 
subject they choose, and to 
discuss those subjects freely 
with like-minded individuals. 

Fine in theory. But reality 
has its down side. For instance. 
Plan applauds hackers who 
use foe Internet credo, “in- 
formation wants to be free,” 


king was taken by foe ace. 

West established his 
spades, and had foe diamond 
king as an entry to score his 
spades and defeat the con- 
tract 

Jerry Clerkin did better. He 
led the diamond jack and 
threw his spade jack. 

West Led a heart, and South 
won. 

He then led a club, and foe 
defense was helpless. 

South's clubs came into 
play before East’s hearts, and 
the game was made. 


NORTH 
4 10 
<7875 
^ J 10 9 
*10 6 


SOUTH (D) 

4QJ7 

9AK J 

AQ 

4K974 2 

Neither skit was vulnerable. The blcJ- 
dlng: 

South west North East 

2 N.T. Pass 3 N.T. . Pass 

Pass Pass * 

west led ifte spade ave. 


WEST 
* 8 S3 
9Q3 
4 K 
*AS3 


EAST 

4 — 

3 10 9 6 A 2 
45 

* Q J8 


SOUTH 

* J 

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claiming foe right to look into 
any system they can gain ac- 
cess ip and post any infor- 
mation they choose. But when 
these hackers exercise their 
rights, foe information they 
post sometimes includes — as 
Plan freely admits — stolen 
credit card numbers, private 
phone records and illegally 
copied compu ter programs . 

Plan also claims that foe 
hysteria whipped up about cy- 
berporn and foe on-line ac- 
tivities of pedophiles has been 
vastly overblown — a media 
dodge calculated to sell papers 
and airtime and a pretext for 
repressive regulation. Ac- 
cording to him, pornography 
on-line is nowhere near as ubi- 
quitous, as nasty and as easily 
accessible as foe forces of cen- 
sorship insist it is. 

A QUICK trip to one of the 
Web’s many search en- 
gines counters this assertion. 
Input a key word for any type 
of sexual congress, and the 
tens of thousands of hits yiel- 
ded show that porn, while it 
may not make up foe bulk of 
foe information available on- 
line, does represent a signif- 
icant presence. 

It’s wrong to say that the 
Internet is a dangerous wil- 
derness populated chiefly by 
sex fiends and swindlers, but 
it's naive to insist that there are 
no dangers on-line and that 
Netizens are all much-ma- 
ligned freedom fighters who, 
if left to themselves, will get 
along in peace and harmony. 
Virtual society, bring open to 
all, tends to arrange itself 
along the lines of actual so- 
ciety, and, as in real society, 
there are few places you 
should go unwaiy or unpro- 
tected. It's a sad truth but a 
truth nonetheless that, while 
most of us will observe self- 
evident laws of social inter- 
course and discourse, predat- 
ors do walk among us wbo 
will steal, abuse or mali- 
ciously damage property, just 
because they can. It is to curb 
such abuses that society's 
members agree — hopefully 
through the process of free and 
open debate on which the In- 
ternet was founded — to trade 
some freedom for safety. 

Mark Baechtel writes fre ■ 
quemly about the Internet 
and computers for The Wash - 
ington Post. 


But the agreement has always been 
contentious. Only seven European coun- 
tries — France. Germany, Belgium, 
Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal 
and Spain — signed up in foe first wave 
in 1995. Others, notably Bri- 
s-. tain, are opposed because they 
think foe agreement will enable 
criminals ~and illegal immi- 
grants to cross Europe at will. 
Ej 4n And when the Greek Par- 
f~^ liament voted recently in favor 
.♦A I - of the Schengen arrangement, 
foe decision came only after 
wide protests, from groups as disparate 
as civil rights organizations and foe 
monks on Mount Afoos, that foe accord 
would permit authorities to pry too 
closely into the private business of trav- 
elers. 


This fear of a European “Big Brother” 
has emerged because Schengen countries 
are linked by an ambitious computer net- 
work providing i mmigra tion authorities 
at the outer frontiers with rapid access to 
a database of a staggering 10 million 
names, purportedly the same criminals 
and illegal immigrants and asylum 
seekers foe British wish to keep at bay. 

diplomatic wrangling Indeed, it is 
Geimany’s past questioning of Austria's 
ability io police its 800 miles (1,300 
kilometers) of outer frontier that will 
keep the controls between Austria and 
Germany intact this summer. 

The German stance irritated many 
Austrian motorists, who had been looking 
forward to the idea of driving unobstruc- 
ted from V ienna straight across Germany, 


ARTS GUIDE 


France and Spain to Lisbon without once 
having to show their passports. 

Indeed, the Austrian government took 
it as a diplomatic slight inspired by Ger- 
many’s domestic politics and had 
threatened to hold up other European 
Union business in retaliation. 

There may also be headaches for other 
travelers, particularly those seeking to 
enter Austria from Hungary, as Austrian 
immigration officials, who will be 
backed by soldiers, beef up their controls 
in anticipation of their full membership 
in the Schengen agreement. 

Motorists driving from Hungaiy to 
Germany may run into double delays — 
first at foe Himgaty-Austria border, then 
at foe Austria-Germany border — foe . 
opposite of what foe Schengen agree- 
ment was supposed to achieve. 


Central Park. “A Simple 
Wish” may be about magic, 
but it is far from magical. 
(, Lawrence Van Celder. NYT ) 

Contact 

Directed b\ Roben Zemeckis. 
US. 

Two images in “Contact" ’ en- 
capsulate foe movie at its 
finesr and most foolish. In the 
first instance, we see a metal- 
lic forest of satellite dishes 
rising out of the New Mexico 
desert, the dishes’ enormous 
bowls .cupped toward foe 
yawning unknown. The deaf- 
ening silence around them is 
broken only by foe desert 
wind, and the creaking of 


sound — from foe heavens. This mo- 
ment is wordless, it’s awe-inspiring; and 
it taps into our vulnerable desire to know 
what's beyond the celestial horizon. But 
the second, infinitely more recurrent im- 
age brings us mundanely back to earth: 
Jodie roster in sanctified close-up. 


.acme. U.S. Jodie Foster in sanctified close-up. 
hey used to be. As There she is — as astronomer Eleanor 
imple Wish,” the “Ellie” Arroway — staring enraptured 
le spirit is weak, at a glittering night sky, while her sort- 
inly intermittently of-date for the evening. Palmer Joss 
itioned but bland (Matthew McConaughey), sits Byron- 
few York City girl ically alongside, and music swells rev- 
er. The gimmick, erently in the background. “There are 
cept and low on 400 billion stars out there — just in our 
in Short in the role galaxy alone,” she breathes, as if nar- 
row named Mur- rating a Discovery C hann el special, 
er as the sole male * ‘Contact,’ ’ based on Carl Sagan ’s book 
ss and a first-class of the same name and directed by Robert 
r that when little Zemeckis, evokes the mystery of the out- 
i Wilson) conjures there. But the best moments occur when 
>wed father, Mur- — as in reality — we’re still in foe dark, 
ibt than awe. To As soon as the movie gets to its version 
director, Michael of a punch line, it turns into another 
writer. Jeff Roth- Hollywood vehicle spinning aimlessly 
ithleen Turner as in space. While foe movie doesn’t qual- 
ity wicked witch ifv as an awful waste of space by any 
J the godmothers’ means, it has so many creative black 
's, and some in- holes that you'll have to weigh foe en- 
ut that transforms tertalnment odds before making this 
bronze statue in journey. (Desson Howe, WP) 



A David Suter sculpture, exhibited on Long Island, cmdMiro's “ Woman and Bird," in Martigny. 


M AUSTRIA 

Vienna 

KunstHausWten, tel: (1) 712- 
0495. open daily. Continuing/To 
Aug. 4: “Karl Schmidt-Rottluff." 
Paintings, watercolors. drawings, 
graphics and sculptures by the 
German Expressionist (1884- 
1976), one of the founders of the 
“Die finicke'' group in 1 &05. 

E BRITAIN 

Glasgow 

Burrell Collection, tel: (41) 649- 
7151, open daily. To Aug. 31: 
“Europe in India: Mughal Paintings 
and their European Prototypes." 
Details the European influence 
upon the art of the courts of the 
Islamic rulers of India from the 16th 
to the 19th century. Under their 
tolerant rule, a mixture of Muslim, 
Hindu and Christian art was en- 
couraged, as reflected in the mini- 
ature paintings and the ivory sculp- 
tures on show. 

London 

British Museum, tel: (171) 323- 
8525. open daily. New permanent 
gallery devoted to Roman Britain: 
The four centuries of Roman oc- 
cupation left a wealth of artifacts 
and treasures that have been ex- 
cavated ever since. The exhibits 
include jewelry, silver plate, coins, 
military equipment and writing tab- 
lets dating back to the first century. 
National Gallery, tel: (171) 747- 
2885, open daily. Continuing! To 
SepL 28: "Seurat and the 
Bathers." Early works by the 
French painter (1859-1891), in- 
cluding “Bathers at Asnieres." as 
well as preparatory drawings and 
til sketches. 

Tate Gallery, tel: (171) 887-8000, 

open daffy. To Sepl 14: "Francis 
Towne." More than 80 watercolors, 
drawings and til6 paintings by (he 
British artist (1740-1316). Un- 
known In his lifetime, the land- 
scape painter was rediscovered In 
the 1920s. 

■TRANCE 

Lille 

Palais des Beaux-Arts, tel: 03- 
20-06-78-17, closed Tuesdays. To 
Aug. 30: "Dessins tfltalle." More 
than 120 Italian drawings from the 
15th to the 18th century. Features 
studies, landscapes, portraits, ar- 
chitectural drawings and 
"veduias" by Botticelli. Filippino 
Uppi, Raphael. Titian and Guardi, 
among others. 

Marseille 

Musea Cantinl, tel: 04-91-54-77- 
75. closed Mondays and holidays. 
To Sept 21: "Carl Andre." Works 
by the American Minimalist artist 
(bom 1 935). Since the late 1950s, 
the artist has been working with 
rough materials such as bricks, 
Hies, metal plates, which he ar- 
ranges directly on the floor. 

Paris 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: 
01 -44-78-12-33, closed Tuesdays. 
Continuing/ To Sept. 29: 
"Fernand Lager." More than 200 
paintings and drawings that high- 
light Lager's affinity with architec- 
ture, ballet and literature as well as 
his strong political commitment 
Institut du Monde Are be, tel: (01 ) 
40-51*38-38. dosed Mondays. 
ConHnuing/To Aug. 31: “Soudan: 
Royaumes sur le Nil." An explo- 
ration of archaeotoglcaMTnds from 
Sudan, 

Musee Zadkine, tel: 01-43-28-91 - 
90, dosed Mondays and holidays. 
Continuing/ To Sept. 14: "Ao- 
rebate Mime Parfait L'Arttste an 
Figure Libre.” Depictions of ac- 
robats by painters, sculptors and 
photographers such as. Odder. 
Chagall, Leger, Man Ray, Picasso 
and Mapplethorpe. 

B GERMANY 

Berlin 

Kulturfonim, Tiergarten, tel: (30) 
266-2190. dosed Mondays. To 


Oct. 31: The Franks: Precursors 
of Europe." The migrating Ger- 
manic tribes called the Franks First 
united In a kingdom under Clovis 
and the Catholic banner in the 5th 
century to be partitioned after 
Charlemagne in the 9th century 
Into what would become France 
and Germany. More than 1,000 
glass items, jewelry, manuscripts, 
weapons and funerary pieces doc- 
ument the origins of the Franks, 
their conflicts with the Romans In 
the 3d century, the emergence of 
the kingdom, their daily life and 
religion. 

Bonn 

Kunst- und AussteHungshalle 
der B undes rep u biik Deutsch- 
land, tel: (228) 7294-1. dosed 
Mondays. Continuing/To Oct. 19: 
"Sigmar Ptike: Die Drei Lugen der 
Malerei (The Three Lies of Paint- 
ing)." Approximately 180 works 
representing all the phases and 
genres ot the a rust from 1 962 to the 
present 

Wuppertal 

Von der Heydt-Museum, let: 
(202) 563-6231. dosed Mondays. 
To Oct 5: "Vienna 1 900: Portret en 
Interiaur." Viennese art between 



Ossip Zadkine's "Les 
Acrobates," in Paris. 

1870 and 1918. Features more 
than 100 paintings including por- 
traits by Klimt, Schiele and Gerstf, 
and interior scenes by Hans 
Makarl. 

B ITALY 
Florence 

Museo di Storia della Fotografla 
Fratelli AUnarf, tel: (55) 213-370, 
open daily. To July 31: "II Secolo 
Cinesa." A photographic survey of 
China in the 20th century. More 
than 120 black-and-white works 
depict the.dedlne of the Imperial 
power, the Mao era and the stu- 
dents upheavals of the 1 980s. 

Padua 

Museo Civico, tel: (49) 875-1105, 
dosed Mondays. To Sept. 30: “Da 
Padovanino a Tiepolo." 170 paint- 
ings of the 17th and 18th centuries, 
which have been selected for their 
historical significance. The exhib- 
ition includes artiste of the Bo- 
lognese and Venetian schools of 
art who have been influenced by 
Tintoretto, Pietro della Vecchia, 
and Caravaggio. 

B JAPAN 

Tokyo 

Bridgestone Museum, tel: (3) 35- 
83-0241, closed Mondays. To 
Sept. 28; "Georges Rouault” In- 
fluenced by the French Catholic 
writer Leon Bloy, Rouault de- 
veloped a somber style which gave 
his religious subjects a humane 
and spiritual qualify. Later I n his life, 
graphic works became his primary 
interest and his illustrated books 


remain the main components of his 
work. The exhibition features oils, 
watercolors and prints. 

Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art 
Museum, tel: (3) 3443-0201 , open 
daily except Aug. 13. To Aug. 17: 
"Costumes de )' Opera de Parts." 
On loan from the Paris opera 
houses, more than 100 costumes 
designed by tratftional stage cos- 
tume designers such as Chagall 
and Cocteau, and by contempor- 
ary couturiers such as Jean Paul 
Gaultier. 

Yokohama 

Yokohama Museum of Art, tel: 
(45) 221-0300. dosed Thursdays. 
To Aug. 31 : “J.M.W. Turner. 1775- 
1851 . On loan from the Tate Gal- 
lery, approximately 100 works, in- 
cluding til paintings and watercti- 
ors by the British painter. 

B LUXEMROU RO 

Casino Luxembourg, tel: (352) 
22-50-45, dosed Tuesdays. To 
Sepl. 21: “Un Bel Ete.” An ex- 
hibition of works that were selected 
randomly, without any thematic, 
ideological or aesthetic guidelines, 
tt brings together works by 20th- 
century artists such as Edward 
Hopper, Picasso, Mike Kelley, Ger- 
hard Richter, Andy Warhol and 
Bruce Nauman, among others. 

B NKTMIRLA N D S 

Amsterdam 

Rijksmuseum, tel: (20) 673-21 21 . 
open daily. Continuing/To Aug. 3: 
"The Nude: Pnnts, Drawings and 
Photographs." Throughout the 
ages artists have been inspired to 
portray nude figures In many var- 
ied themes: Biblical scenes, the 
gods and heroes of antiquity, and 
finally the nude becoming a subject 
in its own right 

B SWITZERLAND 
Basel 

Kunstmuseum, tel: (61) 271- 
0445, dosed Mondays, May 1. 
ConUnuIngfTo Aug. 24: “Durer, 
Holbein, Grunewald: Old Master 
Drawings of the German Renais- 
sance from Berlin and Basel." 
More than 150 drawings by Durer, 
Holbein the Younger and Grune- 
wald, as well as some of their con- 
temporaries. offer insrght Into Ger- 
man draftsmanship of the 15th and 
16th centuries. 

Martigny 

Fondation Pierre Gianadda, tel: 
(26) 22-39-78, open daily. Con- 
tinuing/ To Nov. 11: "Joan Miro."A 
retrospective of paintings, gou- 
aches and watercolors, sculptures 
and ceramics created by the Span- 
ish painter (1893-1 983). 

j UH I T E P S T AT E~S~ 

East Hampton, New York 

Morgan Rank Gallery, tel: (516) 
324-761 5, To July 28: “Relativity." 
Sculptures by David Suter, a fre- 


quent contributor of illustrations to 
the International Herald Tribune. 

Houston 

Menfl Collection, tel: (713) 525- 
9400, dosed Mondays and Tues- 
days. Continuing/To Aug. 31: 
"Braque: The Late Works." Fea- 
tures 45 paintings by the Cubist 
painter Georges Braque (1862- 
1963). 

Los Angeles 

Museum of Contemporary Art, 
tel: (213) 626-6222. dosed Mon- 
days. To Od. 5: -Jeff Wall." For 20 
years, the American artist has 
worked in large-scale transparen- 
cies mounted in light boxes that 
depict scenes using locations, sets 
and actors. In these works are 
merged the narrative process of 
traditional paintings and the con- 
ventions of 20th-century photo- 
graphy. 

New York 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, tel: 
(212) 570-3791. dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/To Aug. 3: "Cartier: 
1900-1939." Traces the evdution 
of styles since the creation of the 
Maison Cartierin1847. 

Solomon R. Guggenheim Mu- 
seum, tti: (212) 423-3840, dosed 
Thursdays. Continuing/To Aug. 
24: "From Durer to Rauschenberg: 
A Quintessence of Drawing, Mas- 
terworks from the Albertina and the 
Guggenheim." Ten drawings by 
each of 17 artists that offer a critical 
and historical look at the role of 
drawing in these artists' oeuvres. 
Features works by Raphael, 
Rubens. Rembrandt. Klimt, Kand- 
insky. Jim Dine and Francesco 
Clemente, among others. 

Washington 

National Gallery of Art, tel: (202) 
737-4215. open daily. To Sept. 28: 
“WinslowHomerandthe Civil War: 
Recent Acquisitions." The Amer- 
ican painter 11 836-1910) covered 
the Civil War (1861-1865) for Harp- 
er's Weekly and his illustrations 
were among the first widely seen 
images ol the conflict 

CLOSINC SOON 

July 27: "Paul Delvaux, 1897- 
1994." Musee d'Art Anden, 
Brussels. 

July 27: "Afrikanische Kunst: Die 
Sammlung Arman." Rauten- 
strauch-joest-Museum, Co- 
logne. 

July 27: "Picasso: The Early Years. 
1692-1906.” National Gallery of 
Art, Washington. 

July 27: "Krishna: The Divine Lov- 
er." Whitechapel, London. 

July 27: “The Age of Modernism: 
Art in the 20th Century." Marfin- 
Gropius-Bau, Berlin. 

July 27: "Amelia Pelaez, Frida 
Kahlo, Tamils do Amaral." Fun- 
dacion La Caixa, Barcelona. 

July 27; ‘'Chinese Contemporary 
Art, 1997." Watari-um Museum, 
Tokyo. 


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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


William J. Brennan Dies: Liberal Force on High Court 


- 

I •- 

J > 

lv **• 


» '.'V i 

• '• .a 


By Linda Greenhouse 

New York Times Service 



■ r:t 

, * t 


Hr AHorialnfftn* 

William J. Brennan, in 1991. 


WASHINGTON — William J. Bren- 
nan, 91, the retired Supreme Court 
justice who was one of die most in- 
fluential jurists in American history and 
a primary architect of the individual- 
rights revolution in the law through the 
1960s, died Thursday. 

Justice Brennan moke a hip last year 
and contracted pneumonia during his 
rehabilitation. 

Although he never served as Chief 
Justice, die Supreme Court on which he 
was apivotal force for nearly 34 years was 
in many respects the Brennan Court 

He was a towering figure in modem 
constitutional law, the author of numer- 
ous landmark opinions through his 
powers of persuasion and force of in- 
tellect, the prime mover behind many 
others. When he did not prevail, his 
voice in dissent was strong. 

The Supreme Court ana the country 
had changed around him by the time he 


A Phantom in Crime: 


Case for Psychiatrists 


‘The Motivation for This Is a Death Wish’ 


CemfOrd by Ow Staff Fmwt Dbpoirhes 

MIAMI BEACH — Witty, intelligent 
and charming to his friends and lovers, a 
scheming, narcissistic killer to law of- 
ficers, in the last few days of his life, 
Andrew Conanan finally got the atten- 
tion he craved. 

His face stared out from wanted 
posters, magazine covers and newspaper 
front pages across the United States. The 
most-used photograph showed a slightly 
chubby, olive-skinned visage, wire- 
rimmed glasses and short, dark hair. 

After the. murder of Gianni Versace 
outside the Italian fashion designer's 
mansion, the suspect became a phantom, 
haunting the country. 

Cunanan-spotting had become a na- 
tional obsession. He was reported to 
have been in New Hampshire, North 
Carolina and South Dakota. 

The FBI's Cunanan phone line re- 
ceived nearly 670 “ substantive ” tips in 
the first three days. None bone fruit 

Among those most relieved by the end 
of the manhunt were the officials in 
Miami's multibillion-dollar tourism in- 
dustry. 

The July 15 slaying of Mr. Versace in 


Germany Seeking 
Houseboat Owner 


needs,” said Rami Mossed, a psycho- 
therapist for the Jewish Board of Family 
and Children Services in New York 
City. 

“By killing a celebrity he can achieve 
higher fame. At the core of this is the 
need to be a celebrity himself.” 

Robert Ressler, the renowned former 
FBI serial killer profiler, put the situ- 
ation in plainer language: “The mo- 
tivation for this is a death wish.” 

“He is suicidal.” Mr. Ressler de- 
clared. 

If the police are correct, he killed once 
— a friend from San Diego named Jef- 
frey Trail — and then could not stop. 

Even before die Versace killing, Mr. 
Cunanan was on die FBI’s Ten Most 
Wanted list, and the FBI heralded die 
end of its manhunt Thursday by striking 
out his photo on the World Wide Web 
site where it posts pictures of its “Ten 
Most Wanted” fugitives. 

A diagonal tied banner saying 
“FOUND DEAD” cut across die Cun- 
anan picture. The FBI has used the same 
graphical device to announce the capture 
of other suspects. 

“That is his destiny,” said an aunt of 
Mr. Cunanan, Barbara Carlos of Manila. 
“That is his life. We are saddened. 

“I did nor know that he will turn up 
like that.” she added after the police 
found die body aboard a houseboat 

But others were far more certain of the 
outcome. 

“When he is located,” predicted Joe 
Conley, a former FBI agent, a day before 
the body was found, “he is going to 
orchestrate his own violent confronta- 
tion. ’ ’ (Reuters. WP. AP. AFP) 


The Associated Press 

LEIPZIG — The owner of a 
Miami Beach houseboat in which 
the Versace murder suspect Andrew 
Cunanan was found dead is wanted 
in Germany for fraud, a prosecutor 
said Thursday. 

Records showed that the house- 
boat. which had been vacant for 
several months, was owned by 
Thorsten Reineck, who also was lis- 


ted as the owner of the Apollo Spa, i 
say health club in Las Vegas. 


gay health club in Las Vegas. 

A Europe-wide arrest warrant 
was issued for Mr. Reineck. 49, 
formerly of Hamburg, on fraud 
charges involving up to $111,000, 
the Leipzig state prosecutor, 
Norbert Roeger, said. 

Mr. Reineck moved to Leipzig 
after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 
1989 and opened a gaming hall, 
according to a report in the German 
newspaper Bild in early February. 
The report said Mr. Reineck also 


bought into the Leipzig brewery 
“Leo-Braeu,” which later went 


“Leo-Braeu,” which later went 
bankrupt. Bild said Mr. Reineck 
was under investigation for evasion 
of nearly $280,000 in taxes. 

Mr. Roeger declined to confirm 
the tax evasion allegations, citing a 
current investigation. He said his 
office has not sought Mr. Reineck's 
extradition, but would consider iL 


CUNANAN: Suicide Seals His Secret 


Continued from Page 1 


Attorney General Janet Reno and 
Louis Freeh, the FBI director, thanked 
the public for its help in the manhunt. 
They said Mr. Cunanan 's death “brings 
to an end a vicious crime spree that cost 
the lives of innocent victims.” 

German authorities, meanwhile, said- 
the owner of the houseboat is a fugitive 
wanted on fraud charges. 

Jack Levin, author of three books on 
serial killers and head of Northeastern 
University’s Program for the Study of 
Violence, said Mr. Cunanan would 
probably still be on the loose if he had 
followed his previous method: lull and 
run. That he stayed in Miami more than 
two months was a sign that Mr. Cunanan 
was becoming increasingly confident 
and arrogant 


The suicide indicated “that he had 
exhausted his list of enemies, that he had 
done the work he had set out to do. and 
that it was time to die,” Mr. Levin said. 

Residents near the houseboat had re- 
ported seeing a man matching Mr. Cun- 
anan’s description after Mr. Versace was 
shot to death on the steps of his Miami 
Beach mansion. The houseboat is about 
a mile from die hotel where a man fitting 
Mr. Cunan art’s description stayed for as 
long as two. months before tire slaying. 

m Minnesota, Mr. Cunanan was 
charged in the death of a former lover, 
David Madson, and was suspected of 
killing Mr. Trail, a friend. He also was 
charged in the deaths of a Chicago de- 
veloper, Lee Migtin, and of a New Jersey 
cemetery caretaker, William Reese. The 
four kiUmgs took place in late April and 
early May. (AP, Reuters, AFP) 


Do you live m Helsinki? 


For a hand-delivered subscription 
on the day of publication, 
call 00 33 14143 9361 




.TMFTOBUTS DUD NKV5MFKR . 


retired, at the age of 84, on July 20, 1990. 
But Justice Brennan's vision of the Con- 
stitution and the role of a federal judge 
remained unwavering. 

Tlie court may have chipped sway at 
some of the 1350 opinions mat bore his 
name , and at others that were marked by 
his influence, but his legacy remained as 
the high watermark of an expansive vi- 
sionofthe Constitution and of the trans- 
formative power of law. 

As Justice Brennan described his vi- 
sion in a 1987 speech, he believed that 
foe Constitution — particularly foe 1 4th 
Amendment’s due-process clause, 
which he did more than anyone else to 
infuse with modem vitality — existed to 
guarantee “foe essential dignity and 
worth of each individual." 

Justice Brennan’s tenure on the Su- 
preme Court, spanning eight presidential 
administrations, was extraordinary in 
both length and dimension. Only five 
justices served longer. 

Named to the court by President 
Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1956, Justice 


Brennan, the son of Irish immigrants, 
left a legacy that is visible everywhere in 
the law and in American political and 
social life. 

It ranges from foe one-person, one- 
vote doctrine that ended foe established 
Older in foe nation’s legislatures, to the 
decisions that transformed the Consti- 
tution’s equal protection guarantee into 
a weapon against sex discrimination, to 
cases that opened foe federal courthouse 
doors to penetrating scrutiny of foe qual- 
ity of justice dispensed at foe state and 
local levels. 

Justice Brennan joined the Supreme 
Court in the immediate shadow of the 
landmark school desegregation decision. 
Brown vs. Board of Education, in 1954. 

There was still much work to be done 
to end foe regime of segregation. 

He wrote several opinions that were 
crucial in carrying out the .principles of 
foe Brown decision, including Keyes v. 
School District No. 1 of Denver, winch in 
1973 applied the Brown ruling to a North- 
ern school district for the first time. 


For his first 13 years on the court. 
Justice Brennan served under Chief 
Justice Earl Warren. 

Commentators on the Warren Court, 


But while he was frequently in dis- 
sent, his role transcended Aat of an 
embattled defender of the hberal faith. 
There were few areas of the law that 


which dramatically expanded foe role or 
foe federal courts and foe Constitution in 
protecting individual liberties, have 
identified Justice Brennan as foe cenrer 
. of gravity of that court's liberal majority, 
“foe catalyst for some of foe most sig- 
nificant decisions during his tenure,” in 
foe words of Bernard Schwartz, a law 
professor and historian. 

* ‘if we look at justices in terms of then 
role in foe decision process.” Mr. 
Schwartz wrote in Judicature Magazine 
in 1995, Justice Brennan ‘/was actually 
foe most influential associate justice in 
Supreme Court history.” ■ 

The center shifted under Chief 
Justices Warren Burger and William 
RehnquisL 

The liberals lost their majority and 
Justice Brennan became foe spokesman 
for a w ing of foe court that was often 
outvoted and usually on the defensive. 


did not feel his impact. 

One of his best-known opinions. New 
York Times v. Sullivan, reshaped foe 

law of libel. . . ' • ■ ■ - ' ' 

In that 1964 decision, foe : court rated 
that even when foe press publishes false 
statements about public officials, the 
First Amendment permits no fmdrng of 
liability unless the official can show that 
foe statement was deliberately false or 
published in reckless disregard of foe 

^Justice Brennan retired after suffering 
a mild stroke, his second, and his phy- 
sician advised that he faced the prospect 
of a major, disabling stroke unless be 
stopped working. . 

In 1995, Justice Brennan s former law 
clerks honored him by endowing foe 
Brennan Center for Justice at New York 
University School of Law, a nonpartisan 
litigation and research center. 


jiri^ 




front of his home in the heart of Miami 
Beach’s tourist district was a blow to a 
region that promotes itself as a visitor's 
paradise, but seems constantly to be 
fighting off foe effects of its stubbornly 
high violent crime rate, including the 
killings of foreign tourists. 

“Th is is a great relief for foe city of 
Miami Beach: we’re accustomed to 
greeting tourists, not searching out 
killers.’' said foe Miami Beach mayor, 
Seymour Gelber. “The last 10 days have 
been rather dreary.” 

If Mr. Cunanan was indeed Mr. Ver- 
sace’s killer, it is unknown why he did 
iL 

Theories have been thrown around. 
What is certain is foat at 27 he was a man 
in a profound decline, losing his looks, 
estranged from his mother and father , no 
longer involved with his “sugar daddy” 
boyfriend, out of money, with few close 
friends. 

Something made him snap. 

The case spawned an industry of long- 
distance Andrew PhiUip Cunanan psy- 
choanalysis. 

“This is a man who bas no superego 
and has no conscience and has no in- 
ternal mechanisms to stop him from 
achieving any kind of narcissistic 




ASIA: 

Currencies Battered 


Continued from Page 1 



Rmfcui lUhnWAgencc RmflM 

Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir, left, is greeted by Foreign Minister All Alatas of Indonesia as the 
foreign ministers of new ASEAN members, Somsavat Lengsavad of Laos and U Ohn Gyaw of Burma, look on. 


SWISS: Publishing List of Dormant Accounts Backfires on Banks 


Continued from Page 1 


* ‘There are not many banks in Rhein- 
felden and not many Bracks.” he said. 
“It’s a bit strange foat no one at foe 
banks” told him anything about how his 
grandmother, who died in 1946, left 
behind an account now registered as 
dormant 

Neither Mr. Brack nor Mr. Schmidt 
are Jews. But their experiences illumin- 
ate foe central dilemma faced by Swiss 
banks in publishing the long list of 
names in 40 newspapers in 28 countries 
and on the Internet. 

By displaying what Georg Krayer, the 
head of foe Swiss Bankers' Association, 
called “sincerity and transparency,” foe 
Swiss banks are hoping to restore con- 
fidence and protect business interests 
threatened by criticism of their actions as 
callous and unworthy, particularly to- 
ward Holocaust survivors. 

But foe very publication of evidence 
that so many accounts languished for so 
long after the end of World War II with 
no attempt to find their owners shows 
that their critics were, in the view of 
some Swiss commentators Thursday, 
absolutely right 

“There is only one word for these 
years of indifference to foe victims: 
mean,” said Juerg Schoch. a commen- 
tator at the newspaper Tages- Anzeiger. 

Even foe conservative Neue Zuercher 
Zeitung commented that, with the pub- 
lication of foe list, “foe anyhow dam- 
aged reputation of the banking com- 
munity, and also of foe entire Swiss 
financial establishment, has been done a 
further unnecessary disservice. ” 

Indeed, it said, “as long as foe black 
sheep of the banks are not also named on 
a list, efforts at damage control will be a 
Sisyphean task.” 

The list evokes a somber and mys- 
terious bygone era. Here are names of 
French aristocrats in Paris and titled 


Germans listed as resident in Vukovar, 
Croatia, businesses in Bucharest and 
Shanghai, echoes of a world darkening 
with war in which many sought to hide 
assets from foe Nazis, not even daring to 
speak openly in from of their families 
about Swiss deposits. From a time be- 
fore widespread air travel or compu- 
terized banking, foe published list seems 
to evoke secretive voyages by train to 
deposit money in foe presumed safety of 
Swiss banks. 

“After the death of my aunt after foe 
war, there were always rumors going 
around in my family about money in a 
numbered account in Switzerland” 
Mario Mangelsdorff, 69, told a Berlin 
newspaper Thursday. 

The rumor had it that his aunt, Kafo- 
erina Mangelsdorff, had somehow spir- 
ited money to Switzerland on behalf of a 
Jewish sister-in-law. 

Now, his aunt's name is on foe list and 
he plans to find out whether the rumors 
are true. 


■ Leading Nazis Appear on List 

Names of leading Nazis are on foe list 
of unclaimed accounts, reports said. 

The Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los 
Angeles, which hunts Nazi war crim- 
inals, said foe list of 1.756 names could 
include eight leading members of 
Hitler’s regime, including Willy Bauer, 
a henchman of Adolf Eichmann; Her- 
mann Esser. foe Reichstag deputy pres- 
ident: and Heinrich Hoffmann, a Hitler 
aide. 

The list also includes supporters of foe 
dictator Francisco Franco of Spain. 

The Simon Wiesenthal Cenrer in Vi- 
enna said Vojtech Tuka, prime minister 
of the German-installed Slovak govern- 
ment of 1 939 to 1 945, was on foe list He 
was sentenced to death after World War 
II and executed. It said he was respon- 
sible for foe deportation of 1 00,000 Jews 
to Nazi concentration camps, including 


Auschwitz and Treblinka. 

In Madrid, foe newspaper £1 Pais 
questioned a former foreign minister and 
Franco’s brother-in-law, Ramon Ser- 
rano Suner, whose name also appeared. 
Now aged 96, he said they were “old, 
inactive accounts” opened before 
World War II and never closed. 

“My children studied in Switzerland 
and I put small amounts of money in foe 
accounts,, pocket money,” he said. “I 
have never had anything to do with Jews. 
I’ve never received anything from them 
or their families.” 

The list named dozens of people’ from 
prominent families in the French no- 
bility. Among them was Henri de 
France, apparently the wartime head of 
foe Bouibon-Orleans dynasty, whose 
descendants include the current claimant 
to the French throne. 

Other prominent titled people on the 
list whose names read like a page from 
the blue book of French peerages: La 
Rochefoucauld, Talleyrand, Malet. 
Salignac Feneon. La Sabliere, Glatigny, 
Chavagnac, Chasseloup-Laubat 

The list appeared Wednesday in 
newspapers from New York to London 
to Moscow, but it made little news in 
Israel, in part because foe names were 
not published by any newspaper there. 
The reason was not entirely dear. The 
Hebrew daily Ma’ariv had scheduled a 
full list in Thursday's issue. The Eng- 
lish-language Jerusalem Post noted that 
foe list would appear in Friday’s paper. 
The biggest-circulation daily. Yedioth 
Ahronoth, also said it would publish the 
names Friday. 

Michael Freitag. a spokesman for the 
Swiss Bankers Association, said that 
Ernst & Young, the accounting firm 
handling the dormant accounts, had re- 
ceived about 2.700 calls as of mid-af- 
temoon Thursday. Most of the calls were 
received in the Basel and New York 
offices, be said. (AFP. IHT. NYT ) 


trading on Thursday before recovering. 

Analysts attribute foe baht ’s weakness, 
which quickly spread to other regional 
currencies, to a coming report on foe bad 
debts of Thai financial institutions and 
poor half-year results of banks. They ray 
that with so many regional currencies 
under attack, most, of the monetary au- 
thorities taking part in foe Shanghai meet- 
ing were likely to be too busy guarding 
their own currencies to take part in a 
sustained joint intervention. ■ Countries 
represented include Australia, China, 
Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, 
New Zealand, foe Philippines. Singapore, 
South Korea and Thailand. 

-Desmond Supple, head of Asian cur- 
rency research at Barclays (BZW) Glob- 
al Foreign Exchange, said there might be 
“vociferous verbal support” from foe 
S hang hai meeting on foe need for cur- 
rency stability, "but market conditions 
mitigate against a successful currency 
market intervention,” Agence France- 
Presse reported from Singapore. 

Mr. Supple said that all Southeast 
Asian economies burdened with current- 
account deficits were vulnerable to cur- 
rency weakness. 

Angus Armstrong, regional econo- 
mist at Deutsche Morgan Grenfell, said 
that if foe countries ‘ ‘want to really stop 
currency speculation, they have to fun- 
damentally alter their economies and 
rely much less on foreign capital,” 
Bloomberg News reported. 

“If countries are intent on running 
current-account deficits, they are going 
to have to borrow money and foat money 
can leave if it doesn’t like foe funda- 
mentals,” he said. 

The ringgit fell to a three-year low 
against foe dollar July 18 after its central 
bank ceased defending it through higher 
interest rates. That defense left Malaysia 
with its highest interest rates in about a 
decade, as well as a drop of 12.4 percent 

— equivalent to more than $2 billion 
dollars — in foreign-exchange reserves 
in foe first two weeks of July. 

While the countries forced to effec- 
tively devalue their currencies tills month 

— Thailand, the Philippines, Malaysia 
and Indonesia — were worried foat high 
interest rates would choke growth and 
make their exports uncompetitive, ana- 
lysts said they were now concerned that 
instability would frighten investors away 


and pat economic recovery at risk. 
Mr. Mahathir wanted toar the 


Mr. Mahathir warned rh ar the com- 
mitment of regional governments to lib- 
eralize their financial and trading sys- 
tems was being called into question by 
foe speculators. 

“Our economic fundamentals are 
good, yet anyone with a few billion 
dollars can destroy all the progress that 
we have made,” he said. “We are told 
we must open up, that trade and com- 
merce must be totally free. We want to 
embrace borderlessness but we still need 
to protect ourselves from self-serving 
rogues and international brigandage.” 


U.S. Now Suspects 
Iraqi Gas Reached 
100,000 Troops 


CAMBODIA: Beijing’s Restraint Is Seen as Major Shift of Policy 


By Philip Shenon 

New York Times Service 


Continued from Page I 


They said Beijing's backing for rhe 
efforts of the Association of South East 
Asian Nations to broker an end to the 
political crisis in Cambodia would also 
help ensure that ASEAN's mediation is 
not elbowed aside by a more powerful 
parallel effort of the United States. 

The U.S. attempt to create a coordin- 
ated approach to Cambodia is led by its 
special envoy, Stephen Solarz, a former 


congressman, who held talks Thursday 
in Bangkok with Thai officials and 


in Bangkok with Thai officials and 
Prince Ranariddh. He later flew to 
Phnom Penh for talks with Mr. Huh Sen, 
scheduled for Friday. 

Mr. Solarz will report the results of his 
consultations in Asia to Madeleine Al- 
bright, foe U.S. secretary of state, when 
she arrives in Malaysia for meetings start- 
ing Saturday with foreign ministers from 
ASEAN and other countries, including 
China, Japan and foe European Union. 

Mrs. Albright said Wednesday that 
her No. 1 goal in foe meetings was 
restoring a coalition government in 
Cambodia. (Page 4) 

During foe Cold War, China aroused 
the suspicion, and often the outright ire, 
of Southeast Asian countries by provid- 
ing material and moral assistance to 


Communist parties trying to subvert and 
overthrow established governments. 

While such aid ceased more than a 
decade ago, regional states have remained 
wary of China's military modernization 
and far-flung territorial claims. 

The Chinese foreign minister, Qian 
Qichen, was quoted recently by foe of- 
ficial Xinhua news agency as saying, 
“What has happened in Cambodia be- 
longs to internal affairs.” At foe same 
time, a Chinese Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, Tang Guoqiang, said that 
China would “never become involved 
in Cambodia's affairs.” 

Referring to powers — such as China, 
foe United States, Japan and France — 
that are concerned about the Cambodian 
crisis, Ali Alatas, the Indonesian foreign 
minister who heads foe ASEAN me- 
diation team, said Thursday thatfoey 
had reached “general agreement” that 
since ASEAN should have "primacy” 
in dealing with foe matter. 

He said foat although there was a con- 
vergence “in general terms” between 
foe American and ASEAN positions on 
Cambodia, there were differences in cer- 
tain areas, including Washington’s de- 
cision to suspend part of its aid to Cam- 
bodia and consider a complete halt to all 
but humanitarian assistance. 


“We don’t believe in sanctions eas- 
ily,” Mr. Alatas said. “Whereas in de- 
veloped countries. Western countries, 
one of their first, almost instinctive, re- 
actions is to stop aid.” 

Cambodia had been scheduled to join 
ASEAN on Wednesday at foe same time 
as Burma and Laos. But the group de- 
cided by consensus to delay Cambodia's 
admission on foe ground that force was 
used by Mr. Hun Sen to upset a form of 
government put in place by the inter- 
national community and legitimized by 
elections in 1993 sponsored by foe 
United Nations. 

The United States and the European 
Union, which have imposed economic 
sanctions against Burma, had asked 
ASEAN to defer Burmese membership 
until the military regime in Rangoon 
took credible steps toward ending re- 
pression and restoring democracy. 
ASEAN ignored foat call, contending 
that it would be an unwarranted inter- 
vention in Burma's internal affairs. 

Officials said that ASEAN still 
wanted Cambodia to become a member 
when a satisfactory settlement of its 


political conflict was in place, partly 
because the group believed it coukl in- 


because the group believed it coukl in- 
fluence Cambodian developments more 
effectively foal way. 


Washington — a new study 
by the Pentagon and the Central 
Intelligence Agency has concluded 
that nearly 100,000 American mil- 
itary personnel might have been ex- 
posed to low levels of nerve gas as a 
result of foe U.S. demolition of an 
Iraqi ammunition depot shortly 
after the 1991 Gulf War. 

The study suggested that ail those 
who were in the region at foe time 
should be warned of possible health 
risks, officials said. 

The study sharply increased foe 
government’s official estimate of 
foe number of soldiers who may 
have been exposed to a cloud of 
chemicals from foe depot, which 

“°™ U P by US - soldiers in 
March 1991. 

The Defense Department previ- 
ously estimated that about 20 000 
troops were within 30 miles’ (50 
of the sire and encour- 
aged them to seek special medical 
attention^ It cautioned that foe num- 
ber could rise. 

The new study still does not re- 
K , m, e ,? e ,7 VSte J 5 ' ofthe health prob- 

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Amid Crisis, 
Yuan Holds 
Its Ground 

Instead, Beijing Fights 
A Rise in Its Currency 

By Philip Segal 

Special to the Herald TCibune 

HONG KONG — As China plays 
host Friday to central bankers from 1 1 
Asia-Pacific countries that are hying to 
come to grips with the region's recently 
turbulent currency markets, Beijing has 
a different problem; holding down a 
currency that appears undervalued. 

Traders continued to barter southeast 
Asian currencies Thursday. And while 
some weakness has briefly spilled over 
into the yuan, the Chinese currency for 
the most part has held steady, with the 
dollar quoted at 8.3209 yuan Thursday, 
compared with 8.2982 at the start of the 
year. If not for persistent intervention by 
Chinese authorities, the dollar would 
have fallen to 8.00 yuan, economists 
say. 

“We don’t look upon the yuan as a 
weak currency in any way or form,” 
said Arup Raha, a strategist at Lehman 
Brothers. “Yet at the same tune, I don’t 
think China wants to see it appreciate, 
especially in light of the fact that a lot of 
their competition now have weakened . 
currencies.” 

Thanks partly to continued strong 
flows of foreign investment into China, 
as well as singing exports, analysts see 
little downside risk for the yuan this 
year. But the much harder question for 
businesses investing in China, eyeing 
the country’s still poor but potentially 
vast consumer market, is what the yuan 
will be worth in three or five years. 

The main reason China has not seen 
even a nibble by speculators this month 
is that the Beijing government does not 
allow it The yuan is fully convertible 
for investors who need to buy it to 
purchase things in China and to pay 
their Chinese workers, but it is not freely 
tradable on the open market Exporters 
have to sell their foreign currency to ODe 
of 16 authorized Chinese banks. 

Yet what if China opened the doors 
and allowed full convertibility of die 
yuan, which is not expected before 2000? 
“There would be substantial depreci- 
ation pressure," said Connie Leung, an 
economist at BZW in Hong Kong. 

The Economist Intelligence Unit is 
forecasting that the dollar will rise 32 
percent to around II yuan by 2001. 

Despite devaluations in other Asian 
countries, another factor leads some 
economists to die conclusion that the 
yuan needs to fall — inflation. 

Inflation erodes die value of a cur- 
rency, and China's inflation rate topped 
24 percent in 1994 — though it has 
tumbled since then — even as U.S. price 
rises were in die low single digits. In 
theory, the yuan should have depre- 
ciated against the U.S. dollar, but that 
has not happened. 

Part of me reason, economists say, is 
that China has become much more ef- 
ficient because of more than $100 billion 
in foreign direct investment this decade. 
How much of the yuan’s appreciation in 
real terms is due to efficiency is 
something economists find extremely 
difficult to measure, not least because 
Chinese statistics are so unreliable. 

In the meantime, what could batter 
the yuan in the short term would be less 
foreign direct investment than die gov- 
ernment is counting on. The next five- 
year plan for China projects foreign 
direct investment of $50 billion a year, 
money the country desperately needs to 
fund its massive. infrastru c lure needs of 
more than $600 billion over the next ten 
years, according to the World Bank. 

The foreign investment target may 
tom out to be too ambitious. Disbursed 
foreign direct investment in China has 
risen throughout this decade, to an all- 
time high, of $42 billion last year, bur 
pledged money peaked in 1993 and fell 
by about 20 percent in 1996. New funds 
for venture capital raised in Hong Kong 
and China fell 36 percent in 1995. 

Figures released Tuesday by the State 
Statistical Bureau showed a 48.7 percent 
fall in contracted, or pledged, invest- 
ment in Oiina in the first half of die year, 
compared with the first half of 1996. 



LmnI IlM^Ln^ 

In an earlier era, this Maidenform ad's caption read, “I dreamed I was made over in my Maidenform bra.” 

Maidenform Slumps Into Chapter 11 


By Jennifer Steinhauer 

New York Tones Service 

NEW YORK — In the world of 
apparel, few things are as complicated 
as a bra. It may have 20 pieces and 
come in more than a dozen sizes and 
colors. Fit is extremely important — 
no woman is going to buy a bra and 
take it to her tailor to have it altered. 
All of this makes production a real 
headache. 

Production, far removed from the 
shopper's eye, is what probably led to 
the downfall of Maidenform World- 
wide Inc., which filed for protection 
from creditors under Chapter 1 1 of the 
U.S. Bankruptcy Code on Tuesday 
night, and the same thing could 
threaten other intimate-apparel 
companies that do not keep an eye on 
the back office. 

Efficiency is important to all cloth- 
ing makers, but it has become increas- 
ingly essential in the intimate-apparel 
business, where a few giants have be- 
come dominant in the past five years, 
using size to achieve economies of 
scale and production efficiencies. 

Maidenform was doing a fine job of 
staying ahead in fashion trends, but it 
ran into trouble getting products from 
the design room to the factory to die 
retail store on time, people with know- 
ledge of die company said. Production 
problems spiraled down to the balance 
sheet. 

“Money is made and lost in keeping 
your manufacturing going," said Lee 


Chaden. chief executive of Sara Lee 
Corp.'s intimates division. 

Sara Lee is the biggest player in the 
$10 billion American intimate-apparel 
business, with about 29 percent of the 
market; Wamaco Group and VF Coro, 
have about 7 percent each. Closely 
held New York-based Maidenform 
has 3.5 percent, on sales last year of 
about $400 million, and dozens of 
smaller players pick up the rest 

Victoria’s Secret a unit of Intimate 
Brands Inc., says it has a 10 percent 
share, but several companies make its 
apparel. 

Over the past five years, the biggest 
players have become aggressive with 
acquisitions in America and in Europe. 
VF cited intimate apparel as one of the 
key growth areas contributing to the 
strong second-quarter earnings that 
die company announced this week. VF 
was recently holding talks on acquir- 
ing Maidenform, but the negotiations 
collapsed. 

Each company has tried to make the 
most of new fashion trends in an area 
of apparel that is least driven by fash- 
ion. The Wonderbra, a Sara Lee 
product that made cleavage fashion- 
able again, invigorated both that com- 
pany and the many competitors that 
copied the design in 1994 and 1995; 
and sales of so-called shapewear, a 
relatively new type of product that 
functions more or less as a newfangled 
girdle, grew 12.7 percent last year. 

Designer licenses for underwear 
lines also have become a key point of 


competition. Maidenform sells appar- 
el under the Oscar de la Renta name. 
Wamaco has the Calvin Klein license, 
and Sara Lee recently acquired the 
rights to make Ralph Lauren intimates, 
which are hitting the stores now. 

But most important is the manu- 
facturing of bras. According to NPD 
Group, a market-research concern, 
bras accounted for $3.6 billion, or 
more than a third, of the intimate- 
apparel industry last year. Unlike other 
items of apparel, which in their 
simplest forms can be put together 
with a few seams and a zipper, bras are 
extremely complicated to make, and 
their production requires careful man- 
agement. 

“Bras are one of the most complex 
pieces of apparel," said Adelle Kirk, a 
manager at Kurt Salmon Associates, a 
management consulting firm that spe- 
cializes in the apparel and retail busi- 
nesses. “There are lots of different 
styles, and each style has a dozen 
different sizes, and within that there 
are a lot of colors. 

“Further," she said, “there is a lot 
of product engineering. 

You’ve got hooks, you've got 
straps, there are usually two parts to 
every cup, and each requires a heavy 
amount of sewing. It is very com- 
ponent-intensive. ' ’ 

To manage this complex produc- 
tion, bra makers have to wring the 
most they can oat of each component 

See BUST, Page 17 


Steady Rates in Europe 
Help the Dollar Climb 

Bundesbank Signals Readiness to Act 


C.vqilnlhr Our SUfFmm CUtpJk ftrt 

NEW YORK — The dollar climbed 
against most other major currencies 
Truirsday after German and Swiss cen- 
tral banks left interest rates steady, bur 
market worries of an imminent German 
rate rise persisted and knocked ihe U.S. 
currency off its peaks in late trading. 

The dollar hit a six-year high againsr 
the Deutsche mark, topping out at just 
under 1.8400 DM in European trading 
and a 43-month peak against the Swiss 
franc before investors squared some of 
their positions and locked in some profits. 
The dollar also reached its highest level 
this year against the French franc and 
topped 116 yen. 

Comments this week from Federal 
Reserve Board officials praising the ro- 
bust growth and low inflation of the 
U.S. economy have helped the dollar 
continue its strong rally against most 
European currencies. 

Some dealers said the dollar may 
have given up some ground in late af- 
ternoon trading because of fears that 
Germany's central bank may raise in- 
terest raies in two weeks. 

The Bundesbank said at its last meet- 
ing before a four-week summer recess 
that it would keep its monetary policy on 
hold, in line with expectations, but the 
central bank also dropped a subtle hint to 
financial markets that it could act rap- 
idly if a policy change were needed. 

The central bank left unchanged both 
the growth target for its main monetary 
policy indicator, M3 money supply, and 
all its leading interest rates. The Lom- 
bard rate stayed at 4.50 percent, and the 
discount rate at 2.50 percent. 

But. apparently wary of giving .the 
impression that the central bank would 
have its hands tied during the summer 
break, the Bundesbank fixed its main 
money market rate, the securities re- 
purchase or “repo" rate, at its current 3 
percent only for the next two weeks. 

Although this was no cause for alarm 
in itself, it marked a break with tradition. 
In the past, during periods when the 
central bank has kept a close rein on its 
repo, the Bundesbank has usually set the 
rate for the whole holiday period in 
advance. 

Analysts interpreted the Bundes- 
bank ’s comments and decision as a subtle 
warning that while tire bank saw no rea- 
son to take action now, it could do so at 
anytime. 

That, in cum, is meant to keep the 
markets nervous about driving the dol- 
lar too far, too fast, traders said. 

The bank also drummed home that it 
was paying close attention to devel- 
opments on financial markets, where 
German shares have soared 50 percent 
this year and the Deutsche mark has lost 
20 percent against the dollar. 


“As in the past, the Deutsche 
Bundesbank will check signals eman- 
ating from the development of the 
money supply in the context of a broad 
analysis oral! data relevant to prices," a 
statement from the central bank said. 

“In doing this, it will pay special 
attention to the external value of the 
Deutsche mark and events on the fi- 
nancial markets alongside data from the 
real sector." July figures released Thurs- 
day showed annual inflation creeping up 
to 1.8 percent from 1.7 percent. 

The prevailing view in the market is 
that the German government tacitly sup- 
ports a weaker currency as a way to 
stimulate exports and support the econ- 
omy. Exports have become the sole en- 
gine of the German recovery at a time 
domestic demand and investment is 
weak and unemployment stands at a 
record 4 million. The German economy 

See DOLLAR, Page 14 


Thailand 
Considers 
IMF Loan 


Aftence Franre-Pressc 

BANGKOK — Finance Minis- 
ter Thanong Bidaya said for the 
first time Thursday that Thailand 
was considering borrowing from 
the International Monetary Fund or 
Japan to bolster liquidity. 

After weeks of market specula- 
tion that Bangkok would borrow 
$10 billion to $20 billion to help the 
cash-strapped economy, Mr. TTian- 
ong said the ministry was consid- 
ering asking for loans without spe- 
cifying their possible size. “The 
ministry will not tell the press if we 
decide to borrow," he added. 

Mr. Thanong said he would sub- 
mit a package of economic mea- 
sures to the cabinet Aug. 5 aimed at 
lowering lending rates, helping fi- 
nance companies and dealing with 
the fall of the baht since it was 
allowed to float July 2. 

Mr. Thanong’s statement helped 
the Stock Exchange of Thailand 
Index rise 2.72 points, to 634.00. 

The Thai baht ended at 32.25 to 
the dollar, little changed from 
Wednesday’s all-time domestic 
low of 32.31 to the dollar, a 
Bangkok Bank dealer said. 


Greenspan’s Second Thoughts: A Bout of Rational Exuberance? 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New Yort Tunes Sen-ice 

W ASHINGTON — He was 
concerned about the lofty 
level of stock prices when 
the Dow Jones industrial 
average was at 6,400 late last year. But 
when Alan Greenspan assessed the 
economy for Congress this week, the 
Federal Reserve Board chairman hardly 
mentioned Wall Street — even with the 
Dow now bursting through 8,000. 

What changed? 

Through his silence this week about 
the risks of a stock-price bubble, Mr. 
Greenspan may have been conceding that 
tite market had been right after all. What 
is more, he appeared to acknowledge thar 
he was wrong last December when he 
coined the phrase “irrational exuber- 
ance" to describe investor psychology. 

Investors, at least, seemed to take it 
that way. Stocks rallied after his state- 
ments, in part because Mr. Greenspan 
waved no red flags and characterized 
the economy as humming along at a 
near-perfect pitch. 

Many economists say his concerns 
have been assuaged by the strong profits 
American businesses have posted this 


year, making stock prices relative to 
earnings less inflated than they might 
have seemed 

The strong corporate earnings per- 
formance appears to meet the test that 
Mr. Greenspan himself laid out when he 
sought to explain his "irrational ex- 
uberance" comments daring congres- 
sional testimony in March. “Analyt- 
ically,’' he said at the time, “current 
stock-price valuations at prevailing 
long-term interest rates could be jus- 
tified by very strong earnings -growth 
expectations." 

Since then, corporate America has 
posted robust increases in profits, gen- 

WALL STREET WATCH 

era ted for the most pan by solid im- 
provements in sales and productivity 
rather than by finan cial gimmicks. 

4 ‘Greenspan said earlier this year that 
he’d accept the view that stocks are 
reasonably priced if we saw that ex- 
pected profits or profit margins were 
ultimately realized," said David Jones, 
an economist at Aubrey Lanston & Co. 
in New York. “That's precisely what 
happened He set up the criteria and 
essentially they were met." 


To some extent, Mr. Greenspan may 
have been reluctant to raise the subject 
again because of the storm of criticism 
that burst upon him after his statements 
in December. Trent Lott, the Repub- 
lican leader in the Senate, asked whether 
the Federal Reserve’s independence 
needed to be reviewed. Many small 
investors asked what business the Fed 
chairman had trying to talk down the 
value of their portfolios. 

But economists who follow the de- 
bates within the Federal Reserve and 
speak to officials there said Mr. Green- 
span also seemed to change his outlook 
gradually during the winter and spring. 
They said he asked a lot of questions 
about corporate profits and spent a lot of 
time studying reports about strong earn- 
ings and low inflation. 

Mr. Greenspan’s thinking may also 
have changed after the market fell al- 
most 10 percent in March and April and 


then promptly rebounded with no ap- 
parent damage to the economy, the fi- 
nancial system or investor confidence. 

Mr. Greenspan’s thinking may have 
been influenced by research suggesting 
that stock prices were not excessively 
high by historical standards when the 
climate of low inflation and steady 
growth were taken into account along 
with strong profits. 

If the outlook for corporate profits 
has improved, it would support the the- 
ory floated by Mr. Greenspan, most 
recently daring his testimony this week, 
that big investments in technology by 
businesses were paying off with pro- 
ductivity gains. 

Increased productivity would not 
only help explain and support higher 
corporate profits but also help explain 
why the economy has been able to grow 
steadily without inflation even though 
unemployment has fallen below the 


levels at which rising prices have his- 
torically started to destabilize the econ- 
omy. 

Mr. Greenspan made clear he was not 
yet ready to fully accept that theory, and 
other Fed officials continued to argue 
thar the old rules governing the rela- 
tionship among inflation, unemploy- 
ment and growth bad not changed. 

But three of the Fed’s key policy- 
makers, in their own congressional 
testimony Wednesday, agreed with Mr. 
Greenspan that the path ahead, while hot 
without some risks, is as clear as any 
central banker is likely to ever depict 
it. 

“The economy as a whole is func- 
tioning amazingly well;" the Fed's 
deputy chairman, Alice Rivlin. said. 

Laurence Meyer, a Fed governor, was 
even more upbeat “The performance of 
this ‘good news’ economy," he said, “is 
enough to make you want to cheer." 


Rolls-Royce Looks Beyond ‘Fat Cats’ 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


July 24 Ubid-Libor Rates 


July 24 






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Doafati krone 49947 tentefifMb 34134 SmsraWa 57900 UAEdktm 34727 

Eflfptpoand 3J898 RawttV 030 Saadriyal 07503 Vrn*. bottr. 49325 

Ra. markka -54071 Moter.rins. 24445 Stos-S 14772 

Forward Rates 

-CHiMey Jw*y Mr conaaqr »mw amor tmw 

Pound Sterile 14714 14497 14479 Japammytn 11547 M-tfc 1U48 

Canadhni dollar . 13782 U7S9 1.3735 SMttfiWK 149M 14910 1^42 

Deahctowak 14352 14313 14277 

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(MOonl; Bmque rip Francs (PotisJr Bonk of Tokyo- M/wb&M (7 otyai- 


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Saunas iMM {Jorrfs Bank. 

Rates appUcubte Do MerSank Oepaslts at 51 mlOon mmknum (arequtmhnt). 


Key Money Rates 





United Status 

Oa» 

Prev 

Britain 



Discount rota 

540 

540 

Bank basa rata’ 

fl 4 

tfk 

Prim rata 

BM 

8te 

Coll manor 

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49b 

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59k 

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Franca 



2 ^aarTmsnryua 

544 

541' 



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444 

444 

Intarvoflltoo rate 

110 

110 

7-year Trwawy note 

448 

448 

CaN noser 

m 

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4.13 

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MafTBLpdito-fbrRA 

5.10 

549 

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39k 

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Discount rote 

CnHimmy 



10-|car OAT 

555 

552 

050 

042 

050 

042 

Sootch: Renters. Bleoaben Mrrriff 
Lynch. Boat it Totpo-MIfi ahlthl. 
Omneahank CradbLiwinnte 

l-mitti Interbank 

054 

054 

Gold ^ 



3-montfe Interbank 
6-aiMtt> interbank 

043 

047 

053 

047 

PJIL 

CVgc 

lfluyaar Gael toad 

UR 

241 

Zwfcb 32045 

32110 

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Parang 



London 32140 

32145 

—345 

Loafnrrirafe 

450 

450 

Now York 32340 

32340 

UndL 

COD money 

345 

345 

Its. dbflara per ounce London DfBdal 

l-montb interbank 
3-raonth interbank 

Old 

117 

110 

115 

BxBtas Zurich and Nmt York opening 
and dosfotf prices NiM YOfK Cmex 

6-aonft interbank 

348 

123 

toaOJ 



10-year Bund 

575 

5.74 

Source Asvters. 




Reuters 

FRANKFURT — Rolls-Royce, a 
badge of wealth and privilege on four 
wheels, hopes to be a bit more po- 
litically conect with its first totally new 
model in nearly two decades, which is 
due by the turn of the century. 

Graham Moms, chief executive of 
Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Ltd., said 
Thursday that lie wanted the British 
carmaker's new model to have “more 
socially acceptable shapes." 

“To some people it has become an 
icon of a social past," Mr. Morris said of 
the Rolls-Royce, often considered a 
work of art that embodies about as much 
luxury as one can expect in a car. 
“Some people would say it is positive, 
some people negative. Obviously with 
the new product, we recognize that and 
want to move forward.” 

Mr. Morris is generally tight-lipped 
about the new model, die first new 
vehicle to be introduced by the maker 
since 1980; when it brought out the 
Silver Spirit 

“We have realized the fact thar the 
products must move with the times but 
also maintain their link with the heritage 
of. the Rolls-Royce and Benrley 
marques,” Mr. Morris said of the new 
model, which will be offered under the 
Rolls-Royce and Bentley brand names. 

“It will be priced competitively," he 
added 

Rolls-Royce appears to be feeling the 
pressure to change with die times, par- 


ticularly in Western Europe where 
flaunting wealth has begun to take a 
back seat. 

The social changes have been par- 
ticularly smmg in Britain, where ex- 
ecutives with skyrocketing salaries have 
come under public fire. 

“TTie British press unfortunately 

The carmaker is planning 
a ‘competitively priced 9 
model in a bid to attract 
more buyers and raise 
sales in the coming years 
by about 50 percent. 


keeps on saying that fat cats buy Rolls- 
Royces,” Mr. Monis said. "That is not 
true." 

"The heads of major corporations 
who used to drive our cars can no longer 
do so because shareholders demand that 
they lower their vision and be a little bit 
more prudent,” he said 

Mr. Morris said the carmaker’s cus- 
tomers are often businessmen in their 
50s who own their own cars or people 
who have inherited wealth and spend 
their money as they like. 

“We are tending to find that our 
buyers are owners of a business or major 
shareholders of a business, both me- 


dium and small-sized that have been 
successful, worked hard," Mr. Morris 
said. 

“We still obviously get people who, 
through family or history, have acquired 
wealth," he noted 

Bur Rolls is searching for new buyers 
to fulfill Mr. Morris’s goal of raising 
sales in the coming years by about 50 
percent from the 1996 level of 1,744 
cars, in part with the help of the new 
model 

The company is owned by die en- 
gineering group Vickers PLC and is no 
longer connected to Rolls-Royce PLC, 
the maker of jet engines. 

One step has been to revamp the 
carmaker's dealer network by paring 
down the number of locations and mak- 
ing them more exclusive. 

“We are not really a car dealer, we 
are in the luxury goods segment," Mr. 
Morris said, comparing Rolls-Royce to 
an expensive tailor who can make a 
product fit the needs of individual cus- 
tomers. 

The new dealerships will have salons 
where customers can build their own 
Rolls-Royce or Bentley from scratch 
from a dizzying array of options, or even 
create some of their own. 

“About 50 percent of the cars we 
now sell are individualized," Mr. Mor- 
ris said. “It is our desire that in the 
future this would rise to 1 00 percent and 
the layout of our new dealerships is a 
hope to do just that." 






PAGE 14 




r \ 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1997 



THE AMERICAS 



m 









V 130 

ite 

: F M A M J J 

v 'rw 

1 110 F M A M J J 


Investor’s America 




30-Year T-Benci Yieid 


1997 


1SS7 



Source: Btoombetg, Reuters 


littcnalhml Herald Trftmne 


AOLSays No to Telemarketers 

On-Line Firm Drops Plan to Give Out Phone Numbers 


Ci wyiM Oar Sniff Fnmt Dtijvichn 

NEW YORK — Bowing to a 
surge of criticism, America Online 
Inc. on Thursday dumped a plan to 
hand over members' phone num- 
bers to telemarketers for pitching 
goods ranging from automobile 
services to travel destinations. 

But AOL said it was consid- 
ering having its own employees 
call members to sell other compa- 
nies' services. 

Privacy advocates had assailed 
the plan to give our phone numbers 
as .an invasion of privacy, partic- 
ularly because AOL previously 
told its more than 3 million mem- 
bers that it would keep such in- 
formation private. 

AOL’s arrangement with two 
major telemarketers — and the 
sharp criticism it aroused — un- 
derscored the sensitivity of pri- 
vacy concerns in an age when de- 1 
tailed information can be spread 
quickly and easily. 


AOL, in an on-line statement to 
its members, said that “upon fur- 
ther reflection, we today decided 
to change our plans' ' and would no 
longer rent out phone numbers. 

The company reached a 550 
million marketing arrangement 
last month with the telemarketer 
CUC International Inc. of Stam- 
ford, Connecticut - 4 

Tel-Save Holdings Inc. of New 
Hope, Pennsylvania, made a sim- 
ilar $100 million deal with Amer- 


a new low in turning subscribers 
into a commodity." 

AOL shares closed ai $65.25, 
down $1.75. (AP. WP) 


I Network Firm fights Back 


ica Online in February. 

ating from i 


Before retreating from its po- 
sition, AOL said it wonld make it 
easy for members to opt out of the 
plan before calls were to begin this 
autumn. But privacy advocates 
said the move did not go far 
enough. 

"Their disclosure is not good 
enough," said Jean Ann Fox, the 
director of consumer protection at 
the Washington-based Consumer 
Federation of America. "This sets 


Computer users hying to reach 
the World Wide Web site of Net- 
work Solutions Inc., the company 
that largely controls the assigning 
of Internet addresses, twice this 
month have found themselves at a 
different site, one that rails against 
tile company, The Washington 
Post reported. 

On Wednesday, Network Solu- 
tions took. the unusual step of ask- 
ing a U.S. District Court judge in 
Alexandria, Virginia, to protect its 
own addresses. 

The -company received a tem- 
porary restraining order that forbids 
the founder of AltezNIC, Eugene 
Kashpureff of Belfair, Washington, 
to redirect Web users who are try- 
ing to reach Network Solutions. 


Stocks Reach a Record 


On Strong Tech Profits 


Very briefly: 


Gatorade Helps Quaker Profit Rise 


Boeing’s Concession: Little Impact Seen 


CHICAGO (AP) — In its first earnings report since ridding 
itself of Snapple Beverages, Quaker Oats Co. said Thursday its 
second-quarter profit rose 1 8 percent, to $75 milli on, on strong 
sales of breakfast cereals ana its Gatorade sports drink. 

Revenue was $1.4 billion, down from $ 1 .48 billion because 
of the sale of Snapple. Quaker sold die fruit-drink company to 
Triarc Cos. in March for$300 million, three years after buying 
it for $J. 7 billion. 

Quaker's stock closed at $47,125, up $2. 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Boeing Co.’s 
main concession to the European Un- 
ion — giving up its exclusive 20-year 
contracts to supply planes to Amer- 
ican, Delta and Continental airlines 
in return for approval of its. acqui- 


sition of McDonnell Douglas Crap. 

"setter 


Foreign Investors Quit Brazil Stocks 

SAO PAULO (Bloomberg) — Foreign investment in 
Brazil's Bovespa exchange fell 20 percent from ayear earlier in 
the first 18 days of July as investors pulled out of the market on 
speculation that Brazil would devalue its currency. 

Foreign investment fell to 1.14 billion reals ($1.05 billion) 
as of last Friday from 1 .45 billion reals at the end of June, the 
ch ange ' s first drop in foreign investment this year, as almost 


— will have little practical effect 
years to crane, analysts say. 

They say that the airlines, having 
placed orders for the next 20 years. 


still want the jets they have ordered. 
There are incentives to remain with 
one maker, including reduced train- 
ing costs for pilots and mechanics, 
and lower costs with carrying spare 
parts for only one brand of aircraft. 

Boeiqg acceded to European de- 
mands that the exclusivity clauses be 
dropped so that Airbus Industrie, the 
European consortium would not be 
frozen out of competition for new 
orders for so many years. But Airbus, 


would have to offer strong incentives 
to airlines to complicate their fleets 
with new aircraft types. 

“That will be a powerful force in 
deferring the airlines from making 
any radical changes,' 1 said Edmund 
Greenslet, an analyst at ESG Avi- 
ation Services. "It’s going to be a 
tough sell, but not an impossible 
sell.” But he added, “For the next 
five years, even 10 years, I don’t 
think it means anything." 


GvfaMfe Off Sk^FnmPotW* n 

NEW YORK — Stocks rose to 
record levels Thursday as Digital 
Equipment led a rally in personal- 
computer shares after reporting un- 
expectedly strong profit. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age, which was off 94.30 points 
earlier' in the day, closed up 28.57 
points at a record 8,116.93. Ad- 
vancing issues barely led dec liners 
on the New York Stock Exchange. 

• Broader market indexes also Fin- 
ished higher. The Standard & 
Poor’s 500-stock index rose 3.77 to 
close at a record 940.33, and the 
Nasdaq, Composite Index gained 
*1.65 to finish at 1,569.30, recov- 
ering from an early 14-point drop. 

Stocks rallied this week after the 
chairman of the Federal Reserve 
Board, Alan Greenspan, told Con- 
gress the U.S. economy was per- 
forming exceptionally well without 
much inflation, suggesting the cen- 
tral bank will not need to raise in- 
terest rates soon. 

“Earnings continue ro come in in 
line or better than expected, and you 
still have an economic environment 
that is nomnfiationary.” said 
Gregory Place, head of trading at 
Rodman & Reoshaw Inc. “We are 
going to continue to move high- 
er." 

Concern that the rally had left 
shares overvalued sent stocks lower 
earlier in the day. Investors were 
also worried by signs of shrinking 
profit margins at Microsoft and the 
strong dollar's growing bite on 
sales of exporters such as Min- 
nesota Mining & Manufacturing. 

A rising dollar reduces the value 
of foreign sales when they are trans- 
lated from the local currency into 
dollars. The dollar is ar six-year 


hjghs against the Deutsche mark as 
investors expect thank common 
currency planned for Europe will be 
weaker than the mark, the dominant 
currency on the Continent. 

"You're really stoning to see a 
lot of these big companies feel the 
effects of the dollar, which con- 
tinues to go up.’ ’ GUIGught, a 

money manager at Allied Invest- 
ment Advisors Inc., which oversees 

£6 biHion. ^ , _ , 

Avon Products. Colgate-Pal- 
molive and Dow ChemiMj [also re- 
ported that the strength of the dollar 


US. STOCKS 


DOLLAR: Steady European Rates Help U.S. Currency to Continue Its Climb 


exi 

313 


ion reals of foreign investment left the exchange. 


Continued from Page 13 


• Microsoft Carp, lost an appeals-court decision in a case 
brought by free-lance employees who wanted to participate in 
the software company’s stock-purchase plan. The 9tb U.S. 
Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Microsoft could not 
exclude the people it had used as free-lance software testers or 
production editors or for other work. The case has been closely 
watched by other high-technology companies. 

• General Motors Corp. and the United Auto Workers 
negotiators resumed talks over a strike that has caused GM to 
close an assembly plant because of a parts shortage. 

• ServiceMaster LP acquired Rollins Inc.’s Orion Plant- 

scaping and Lawn Care units, bolstering its TruGreen-Chem- 
lawn division. ServiceMaster declined to say how much it had 
paid in the cash transaction. Bloomberg, Reuters 


grew 1.4 percent in the first quarter. 

“ft is difficult to see them wor- 
ried about inflation with 4 milli on 
unemployed in Germany," said 
Christopher Potts, strategist in Paris 
at the Cheuvreux de Virfeu invest- 
ment house. "It has become ap- 
parent to many people that they are 
pushing on an open door." 

That view was reinforced by the 
Bundesbank's vice president, Johann 
Wilhelm Gaddum, who was quoted 
Thursday as saying that the central 
bank viewed the dollar’s recent rise 
“with a certain concern” despite its 
favorable effect on exports. 


Since starting the year at 1.5400 
DM, the dollar has risen 19 percent 
against the mark, which in turn has 
lifted foreign orders to Gennan busi- 
ness by a welcome 10 percent, ac- 
cording to official statistics. Orders 
in Germany, reflecting a stagnant 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


domestic economy, have risen only 3 
percent in the same period. In 4 P_M. 
trading, the dollar was at 1 .8340 DM, 
compared with 1.8260 DM at the end 
of the day Wednesday. 

Meanwhile, the dollar rose to 
1.5065 Swiss francs from 1.4845 
francs amid predictions of strong 


U.S. growth combined with low in- 
flation and expectations for contin- 
ued economic weakness in Switzer- 
land. It was the first time die dollar 
had bought more than 150 Swiss 
francs since December 1993. 

The Swiss National Bank also 
added money to the banking system 
Thursday, as it has done on a regular 
basis to try to weaken the franc and 
bolster the struggling economy. 

The Swiss central bank left its 
benchmark discount rate unchanged 
at its record low of I percent on 
Thursday, as expected. Switzer- 
land ’s low interest rates are intended 
to make franc-denominated deposits 
less attractive. 


Against other major currencies, 
die dollar rose to 0.1845* Hunch 
francs from 6.1475 francs and to 
116.095 yen from 1 15.675 yen. The 
pound fell to $1.(7742 from $1.6800. 

The dollar has gathered strength 
against European currencies ' on 
lingering concern that the planned 
single currency, or euro,, will be 
weak. 

Several nations hoping to join 
European economic and monetary 
union, including Germany and 
France, are struggling to fulfill strict 
entry rules that include reducing 
budget deficits to 3 percent of gross 
domestic product 

(Reuters, AFP, IHT) 


hurt profits in the second quarter. 
Avon said revenue rose 8.5 percent 
in the second quarter and would 
have risen 12 percent except for the 
U.S. currency's strength. The stock 
fell, although the cosmetics com- 
pany’s earnings met expectations. 

Colgate-Palmolive said revenue 
rose 6 percent in the quarter and 
would have been up 9 percent if the 
dollar had been stable. The stock 
rose on better-tban-expected earn- 
ings per share. . 

Dow Chemical fell after the com- 
pany said second-quarter earnings 
fell 5.3 percent because of lower 
prices for chemicals and the 
stronger dollar. 

Digital Equipment, among the 
Big Board's biggest gainers, rose 
after the company said it earned 
$123.9 million in its fourth quarter, 
reversing a year-earlier loss and 
continuing a string of gains set in 
motion by its 1996 restructuring. 
The company also said it might buy 
back as many as 15 million shares, 
or 10 percent of the outst anding 
stock. 

Airtouch Communications was 
higher after the cellular telephone 
service company said second- 
quarter profit almost doubled, beat- 
ing estimates. 

Xerox shares fell after the maker 


earnings rose 15 percent on 1 
sales of digital copiers, beating ex- 
pectations. 

Pitney Bowes shares fell after the 
company announced that second- 
quarter earnings rose 11 percent on 
higher sales of office equipment 
Stocks lacked impetus from the 
bond market, where falling yields 
since May have aided the stock 
rally. The yield on the 30-year 
Treasury bond was at 6.42 percent, 
down from 6.43 percent Wednes- 
day. The price was 2/32 higher at 
102 18/32. 

• (Bloomberg, AP, Reuters) 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Thursday’s 4 P.M. Close 

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9V 

10 

♦M 

IQl 

4ft 

4M 

4V 

-1* 

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2M 

1» 

19k 

ft 

1179 

9V» 

9 

9 

ft 

»i 

19k 

ilk 

IMS 

+H 

M 

JWk 

Ml 

3M 

♦ft 

7a 

3M 

3JV 

33k 

♦Vk 

2715 

16 v» 

11 

m 

♦M 

nr 

!**■ 

u 

14ft 

♦99 

s 

Jft 

2ft 

3ft 

ft 

rv 

7ft 

IV 

♦k 

lire 

6*k 

«* 

Ak 


148 

27V 

im 

27* 

-IM 

£5 

21ft 

w 

20M 

W71 

4ft 

3ft 

i 

ft 

HO 

2f* 

3V 

Jft 

♦M 

48* 


Bft 

2M 

ft 

112 

lift 

11 

lift 

+V 

1«D 

1*. 

lh 

1ft 


no 

J?* 

SV 

Sft 

ft 

46*4 

29V 

SHi 

2Hk 

ft 

5*4 

S 

49k 

S 


J9* 

ft 

ft 

H 

_ 

ISO 

19k 

1ft 

1ft 

_ 

118 

Bft 

Z1U 

2799 

♦M 

2959 

12 

lift 

iw 

<V 

IS 

* 

*ft 

2SM 

*ft 

B 

ift 

-IM 

ft 


PV. 

Mk 

*v 

♦Vk 


Sofa HW Urn UM aw Indexes 


Most Actives 


July 24, 1997 


Httgh Low Latest O 190 OptnT 


Wgti Low Latest Chgo OpM 


hBffil Low Lotus! Oige OpinJ 


1» llte 

Ml *Vk 

wii » 
Z7V, Utt 

sm m 

15 14V 

» sc 

Wk 10k 

Si 7M 
ji* . 3 
n m 
n t 
lift 10ft 
V. II 

tv. W 


Dow Jones 

Opn M|* Uw Uni CW 

imus nun raw 7ma tm.« +»57 

Trans 290*94 2909.14 287169 2899 j04 4L73 

VO 231-33 232-OS 73044 23143 +06* 
Coup 2487,45 24MAV 2M2.1S 2491-51 *-3.90 


NYSE 


High Low Latest Chge Opt* ORANGE JUICE (NON) 


CdlHCA 5 
PtdMws 
DWOI 
AlfToudi 


Standard & Poors 

Prrtoos TM*t 

Wjk liw awe 4 PM. 

Industrials I11SL55IHBZ7I106.19 1100.61 
Tronsp. 67340 66630 670.76 669/9 

LWtles 19939 19736 197.56 J97.B4 

Finance 10639 105.30 10S59 107.37 

SPOT 941-30 93198 93616 940.32 

5P10Q 92101 914.74 91649 918J92 


Vat 

84478 

77734 

77378 

477W 

41193 

57774 


IBMJ 

M*mto 


52180 

58734 

4i577 

42552 

42464 

sim 

41371 


NWk 

44** 

ffl 1 

MM 

44W 

141V 

44V 


3SV» 36ft 
«te 43V 
40ft 42*te 
2£VS 31ft 
59ft 
44 
41V. 
_ _ 140V 
4|lk 43Va 

ISP* imwoss 

BOV 79ft, 79ft 
55 54V 54V 

72ft 70V* 72ft 
ffft BIN 
14 14 


Grains 


57774 44ft 42ft 
54393 43ft 411* 
55295 141V 138ft 


far 


+S£ 

-in 

jvi, 

tn 

♦ii 

♦V 

-V* 


coRNicaon 

MOO bun* nimum- cords aw bushel 
SOP 97 3J7 343 743ft -3ft 44,183 

Dec 97 247V4 341ft 344 -4* 1S2.W8 

Ualt 254ft 251ft 2SZft —3ft 21371 

May 98 280ft JSTft 258 -Oft 5,917 

Jurat 20 VTft Kltt — 7ft 9/04 

Sep 98 251 254ft 255ft ~i 1,145 

Dec 98 281 259 259ft -1ft 5J» 

Est. sates NA Wed's, sales 5U» 

Wed's open M 20058 up M91 


15JU bs.-c«m per to. 




Step 97 7SM 

7*00 

7449 

+055 

10956 

Nov 97 77w*0 

7*9 

7*75 

+09 

7J96 

Jon* ante 

7980 

79 JO 

+045 

3300 

Mar* Din 

82.40 

RL40 

+005 

Z3BQ 

Era. sates NA 

wetfs. sales 

1,917 


Wetfs openM 

31,925 

vp 1*7 



LONS GILT CUFFS 


C5M0D - oft & 32nds DflQO pet 

97 115-23 11506 115-11 -4WJ7 184091 




Metals 


* 


NYSE 


Nasdaq 


U» 

437-77 48123 487JI 


yt«r 

France 


♦i-H 

^ , 4W.ft +124 

44129 43659 440-18 4M 

28621 711534 287.14 -054 

44925 44221 449.0 +447 


MedWLflf 


Nasdaq 



90YBEANMEAL {CBOH 
lOO tom- iMtorsMrton 

A Wf7 W9JB 244JH «9J0 <170 3(205 

SeP 97 22400 22050 22118 +2JB 17.134 

Oct 77 20400 »U0 20230 +020 14101 

Dec 97 19700 19350 19520 38.921 

Jtain (MM (9138 19320 5261 

Mar* 19180 HMD 19200 —100 7,9(0 

Est-sdes NA. wetfs. sates 15317 
wed's aaen kit U41B4 ott im 


GOLDCHCMX) 

ISO nra- aaUan wear ox. 

Ju(97 32130 

AUB97 32920 32U0 32300 

Sep 97 32450 *aw 

0077 37100 XOOO 32550 fflM 

Dec 97 moo 32440 327.10 +020 

Feh98 33488 32701} 32920 +020 

Apr 98 33130 33120 3313 +0.10 

Junn 33480 33220 33140 

Aug 73 334JK? -0.M 

Ed.sdes 95000 Wed's. sates 54.931 
wed's open int 206507 up 1S4 


61 

64959 

2 

0288 

61.157 

10040 

5.T7B 

7M 

ua 


mil ji# 


MSMK97M 


1571.03 I _ 

174144 123425 1247.73 „. 

147845 147142 1(7845 +445 

148840 148125 1484.04 +U7 

201324 200195 201322 t9JXI 


99424 


9Sft» 


*&M 

Jft 


+tk 









AUB 97 

7165 

21 JS 

zu* 

+U3 

16.9*7 





54P9? 

I1M 

TIM 

am 

+<UM 

17.101 

iiv? 1. 

■SvS 

TT 


Ort 97 

8.95 

21J1 

21.92 

+006 

UJ87 

HUM 

78JV 

7W» 

ft 

Dec 97 

22.16 

2*02 

2111 


«,*2 

62 




Jan 98 

22J2 

22J2 

2122 

-030 

5.9*1 


WOIADE QOPfER (NC7W3 
75400 tes.- cents per b. 

M71 109.90 WM 10990 


ft AMEX 


HWk Uw Unt aw. 
43740 43187 63723 <248 


AMEX 


AtariV 2ZJI 2245 2252 
Est. sates NA Wed's, sales 10.907 
Wed’s open int 10X620 up 13 


2 M 


Dow Jones Bond 


SPDR 

Br 


OOK 

10437 

101.83 

10Indastitai5 106.91 


rwter 


9A 

XCLUd 


20 Bands 
lOUtnmes 


10426 

101.72 

106.79 


Keanes 

AmOW 

SSS"*- 

vioca 


v*l nm 
40041 94teJ 
1 5380 10ft 

12U9 67. 

5592 M4 
5441 42ft 
5398 10V 

*71 4ft 
4770 29ft 


97K» 94V. 

8ft 9ft 
A 88> 

fa u 

289V 291* 
5 t 
5BV 62V 

9V» 1014. 

3ft 4 
28*. 29ft 


SOYBEANS HOOT} 

SM bu mtn*mu«ft- asMi Mr bushel 


Trading Activity 


NYSE 


Nasdaq 


Aug 97 754 

73* 

79 

+13 

23J65 

Sep 97 455V, 

MZM 

653ft 

+6 

14.216 

Nov 97 US 

S» 

401ft 

-1ft 

73,963. 

Jan 98 608 

600 

604 

—ft 

15,192 

MV 98 615 

609ft 

614ft 

-ft 

*104 

Efl. sotes NA 

Wetfs. Srtes 

4240V 


Wetfs wen int 

13t7W 

Off 1804 


WHEAT (CBOT) 




J4MN Du mfriHvKtfn- ootki dm- Ixnftei 


Sep 97 w 

353 

358ft 

+ lft 

42,700 

Dec 97 372 

365ft 

371ft 

+ 1 

41.999 

Mar 98 381 

375ft 

380ft 

-ft 

9.131 

May* 300 

377 

39 

-2ft 

UM 


+200 

4k* *7 H720 W6.W WM H.9S 

Sea 97 11798 10550 10720 <120 

0097 10620 .10*50 10670 <2L2B 

10630 +2jOO 
+280 
10*60 +2.H 
10190 <195 
Mar 98 MOX MIX HXL20 +1J0 

Est. s*et i,oco wed's, sates 7472 
Wed's open Int 46625 off 1337 


NBV97 

Dec 77 70540 MOO} 70520 
JOI98 
Fed 90 


3.128 
3333 
21,422 
1448 
I JO 
7509 
746 
637 
250 


Od 97 H9I 
DOC 97 9414 
Mar 98 9411 
Jun 98 9*52 
Sep 98 9193 
Dec 98 9182 
Ma-99 9X80 
Jon 99 9176 
Sep 99 ,9323 
Dec 99 9356 


23289 

531,415 

2591 

463532 

32750 

268405 

707,572 

161.788 

1263*3 

run 

784M2 

71J17 


SLVBKNCMX) 

UKkmK-cwBPfrliwn. 

Jill 97 42S*0 4253)0 4254S -150 

Ana 97 *2550 —IS) 

Sec 97 44100 42600 47880 -IjO 

Dee 97 45UD 43380 43U0 —1J0 

Join 4KS0 —120 

MarW *5150 *3980 M0.«1 -IX 

May 90 «um —ix 

JU*98 4*8.00 -IX 

ES.sates 25800 Wetfiiotes 8824 
Wed'S open W 94852 ell 277 


IX 


63.971 

881 

799 


59873 

15897 

20 

9842 

2876 

Z074 


40814 

7836 

576 


Thtat 


W 3ft 
TV 7ft 
74V 7ft 
2«k 2 

9ft »ft 
9 8V 
14h 19k 

Mft 75V 
25ft 1* 

8ft IVl 

9ft n 
We ft 
4ft «l 
Bft 7ft 
15k 1»k 

4ft 4V 
2W ttft 

S 9ft 
33ft 
Ift 1ft 
1ft 1ft 
171k 14ft 
19ft 19ft 
ft V 

& ft 

a 

2ft A 

nvt liw 
i ft 

511 5ft 
ft ft 

5ft 5V 

SSf 

»eji sf* 
aft m 
im im 
ft ft 

lw ift 
DU lift 

m m*. 

5® SVW 
11V lift 
l4h 14ft 

27* a 

MV MW 

10* IM 

m me 

Hit 71ft 
lift 14ft ' 

r TW 
7ft 

IIW lift 
Mft lift 
HH m 


MS 


. U88 
IMB 
.54? 


AjMaiOM 
Decvwd 
Uncmnoed 
Thu issues 




Mewl 


1*23 2133 

1799 ISIS 

2142 ISM 

5384 5732 

174 307 

99 78 


Est.sotes NA. Wed's. sdes 36026 
Wed’s open int 99X1 Up 2206 


Livestock 


AMEX 

AdtancH 


Market Sates 


C*mt 

% 

Pitaw. 

£9 

NYSE 

Tfeto, 

V* 

575*2 

174 

172 


25-24 

728 

37 

6 

768 

*1 

5 

Nasdaq 

InmMSons. 

68244 


69128 

3631 

74488 


£* 


CATTLE (CMERJ 
4B8B0 «»6- cants per to. 

Aup97 6787 6682 67 S3 +0J2 29^11 

CM 97 7050 6989 7045 <085 39X8 

Dec 97 7Z2S 71/Q 72X *032 17870 

FBI) 98 7145 73L30 7142 +020 9,255 

April 7550 7520 +0.13 3-llf 

Jra)98 71.91 7180 71 JO +0LW 2846 

Est.5Ptei 17,760 Wars, rotes HM 
Wed's open int 1 028*2 up 1560 


PLAT«UM (NMBR) 
a vnv r.- aaem par hw cm. 

-M97 427JM 4I1J0O 4BC20 <120 264 

00 77 41100 40530 41120 +A00 «U9* 

jbi9o «i jo mro *01 jo +iflo i,m 

Est. soles NA Wetfs- m&k 1,16* 
Wecrsopeniit 1X716 up ill 


□OM 

LONDON METALS (LMO 
DttempenaeSfcnm 
AtenteBB (Hiok Grate) 


Pnwfous 


(HWGi . 

5pol 144.00 164400 1627-00 162HJX) 

Fontwd 164100 164930 163SK 163930 


Cm per C uft eB ee «Mte| Grate) 

Spot 2334.00 B39O0 235100 235700 

Foment 22997M 229000 228100 228 SO 0 


Dividends 

Company Par Amt Rec Pay 

IRREGULAR 

MedevaPLC b 8-1 10-21 


I CATTLE (CMBO 


Company 


STOCK SPUT 
Allied Prod 3 for 2 split 1 . 
Hooper Holmes 2 lor I spBt. 


U+jg Moron J nc * for 3 
Madttnzie 


._ .‘HnZforli 
OReter ADte2forl sp 
Pran i VA 2 lor 1 spW. 

SCB Computer 3 fir 2 split 

Vfato Corp 2 fori split. 

STOCK 

lntemwgnGan . 2% 8-26 9-16 
INCREASED 

AndwrBncji « .16 8-1 8-15 

RracfaiyTrlntl Q J3 8-11 8-22 

HWicoreRBy D JO 8*4 9-15 

NBTBanawp Q .17 9-3 9-15 

Pnnrfdent Bkshra Q J3 7-28 8-8 

RepubScSecRn 0 .05 8-11 8-25 

UmanSdnCalQt Q .-Q 9-5 ?C -3 


Per Amt Rec Pay 
REGULAR 

Am General Cp 
Apt Invest 
Astoria fin 
Bar State Gas 
Bawdier Inc 
CIGNA Corp 
CTGResoaraes 
Century Bnca NC 
Community Bisn 
Clown Poc 

Eastern Entefpr 
Eaton Cam 
-tnr ctWtge Inc 
nteraratePwr 


+117 


Lockheed Marlin 


Meny Landlnv 
MCNE 


REDUCED 

Premier Bncshrs O A9 8-6 8-20 


Mcaanur News 
Sea Cantata A. 

Sea Contain B. 
Security Cmi Poc 
Suburban PmpOM 
TRW Inc 
Tedmnlnc 
WPLHsMnas 


O 

-35 

8-4 

9-1 

Q 

4625 

8-7 

8-14 

a 

.15 

8-15 

9-2 

Q 

495 

8-15 

9-1 

a 

JO 

9-10 

10-1 

Q 

.83 

9-12 

70-10 

Q 

46 

9-12 

9-26 

Q 

40 

8-15 

8-29 

□ 

.16 

*6 

B-15 

Q 

.533 

B-5 

8-14 

a 

M 

9-2 

J0-Z 

Q 

M 

6-4 

8-25 

Q 

.19 

8-28 

9-10 

Q 

42 

8-20 

9-22 

G 

40 

9-2 

MO 

Q 

49 

9-15 

9-30 

Q 

205 

8-11 

8-25 

3 

.095 

9-10 

10-1 

0 

.1925 

8-S 

8-22 

5 

.175 

8-5 

8-22 

a 

425 

B-13 

8-27 

0 

40 

8-1 

8-12 

a 

41 

M 

9-15 

0 

JS 

9-12 

10-1 

a 

-50 

8-4 

8-15 


Aug97 8115 

SepW ffi-93 

0097 8252 8285 8190 <085 

Nov 97 BAM 8155 8185 +020 

Jdl«8 BIB® 8355 8U0 +027 

Mar 98 SITS 61*0 8175 +SJ7 

Est. sates 1938 wed’s, tales 4,741 
Wed's open Irt 25,253 up 151 


10.734 

1237 

3-37* 

1.742 

850 


Spot 43100 63500 

Forward 44700 64000 

Mcfete 

Sort 647000 4 *9000 
Hvamd 67802)0 678500 

Ite 

Spot 530500 531500 
R e ward 53S5O0 5345.00 
Ztec (SpecW .fc Craft) 
tewt 150000 159100 
ftniraid 155000 1559J» 


63*00 

4473)0 


435310 

64B3M 


46553X1 646500 
6770310 677100 


5330310 53403)0 
53853)0 5395A0 


15733)0 1575.00 
155100 153500 


HOeS-Lnp(CUER) 

40800 bs- earn* par ns. 

Alia 77 *1.55 79.95 B1JD +1J5 

0077 7160 7285 7157 +1.15 

Dec 97 69 B0 49.05 49,75 +062 

Feb 98 48JB 67 JS 48.17 +8L57 

Apr 98 6190 4125 43.72 +087 

Est. softs 8,9*6 Wed's, soles U23 
WetTsmenW 35,966 up *51 


11,509 

13.951 

S805 

2801 

U» 


Htfl Law Close Chge Opkit 


Financial 


POfiKSaJJBICMSU 


JUl 77 85J0 8*50 8580 +180 VI 

AU097 B4.ro 8188 B4.W +33B 4J84 

Feb 98 7110 70.15 72317 +1.97 1.197 

ESI. soles 1843 Wed's, srtes 2J0* 
NpfsopenW 1786 off 224 


US T. BUS (CMERJ 
si ndteen- on at 100 pa. 

Sep 97 94.92 94.71 94.72 7,715 

Dec 97 9AS* 9A81 9*81 -OBI 652 

MarfS 903 X 

Est. soles NA Wed’s, srtes U6 

Wed's ooenint W73 nfl « 


5 VR. TREA5URT {CBOT7 

tl 003)00 Brin- prs 8. **hs Ol 1 00 pet 

Sop 97 107-3! 107-20 107-26 +S1 221257 

Dec 97 107-12 107-98 107-11 +02 MM 

ttrtt -01 

Est. antes NA Wed'S. 5Ms XJBl 

W«rs open w- 231473 up 1566 




INITIAL 

LeggMasonlncn . .11 10-9 10-27 


a-OMwfrtMwradeiiitedHMtf per 
stnn^ADR) p-payaHele CanAra fuedw 
pwaanIMn wmrtertft s^oalaiBredl 


Food 


m 

4ft I 
IM 12ft 

in* lift 

a* 4i 

*ft 41* 

Ift Ift. 

m tv* 

4ft 4V 

as ft 


3000A (NCSE) 

10 nwtneions - 1 aar ton 




Stock TnWes Explained 

Sales Ileum ora unoffidnL Yearty Wghs okI tows reflect lt» previous J2 write i*is flic arant 
week, bvtnotlhe WeSttfOiftig day. Where aspB orstocX rtvirfcrK) amour . ;) to 25 percent or more 
has been paU the yeas higMcw mgo aid efivktetid ore shown fcr*» new stods only. U tiles 
altienrise noted ides tf dWdends are annual tfisbusemonte based on ttw latest deckmteon. 
a - dirtdend also extm (si. b • annual rate of ifinfdend phis stoc* Addend c - nquidaflng 
dividetid ec - PE aceods 99.cM - called, d • new yeaoty law. dd - lass in the loot 12 months. 
t - dividend declared or paid ta preceding 12 monfe. I • annual rate, increased on last 
dedarerton. g - ifivftfcnd in Canadian fUm& subtect to 1 5% non-residenee fin. i ■ dividend 
(tedtated after spnt-up ar stock dMdend. j - dividend paid this year, omitted, dsfenod, er no 
action taken at latest dteifeftd meeting, k - dividend dectoed ar paid ttris year, an 
aocumofcritwe issue with dividends in atreais. m - amuat mta reduced on last dedmriicn. 
n - new issue in the past 52 weeks. The Wgh-tow range ^ Itegtns wftti ttw start ol trading, 
od -nea day deUvory.p- Initial dWidenttormual rate unkncwri. P/E- priCMamings ratio, 
g -dased+»drraihial hind r - dhtdend dedoiwt or jwU in precwHng 1 2 monte plus slock 
dMttend. s - stock spliL DMaend begins with date af spIB. 8te - ules- 1 - tfividend paid in 
stock In preceding 12 monte estimated cash value on « -dividend or ex-dlslrlbulten date, 
a - new yearty high. * - traefing hotted, vt • in bankruptcy or reeviverehip or betng reorganized 
underthe Bankruptcy Ad, or securittKossumed bysuch compares, wd- when distributed, 
fed - when issued/ ww - vrilh lmmte x - ex-cfivldend or ex-righh. taSs - ex-dstrtoutton. 
xw • wfltnut wammts. y- ex-dteldend and spin ki telL ytd • yieid. x • sales In ML 


+19 auss 
♦ If AS* 
*18 2W64 
+16 UU*3 
+ 16 IJ*5 

+16 3.7BS 

ist. srtes NA WteTs-sotes 1373 
ftrfsopolW 99J47 ofl 77 


tep97 1518 148 (516 

3c 97 1546 195 1564 

*r9B 166* 1575 U02 

riov9B W1 MS '140 

kl19e 1638 1613 1638 

iepn 1658 ia 1658 


78 TR, TREASURY dawn 

S1083W) ann. pn & 32ndi rt loo pa 

Sep 97 111-12 1 HMD 118-05 345*09 

Dec 97110-00 109-14 W9-2B +01 IZ296 

Mar 91 709-28 + 01 98 

Est. sales NA WBd's.srtes 8V9 

Wed'sramH 37BJD UP 7656 


XFFEECUKSO 

1804 -JJB '1,951 
Me 97 141JD0 15SJ8 Mtt* +JU 

AarSB U8J0 14*68 l«-» tig It* 

Mvte 14U0 1*115 14125 tUS 801 

fits J 38.75 13600 13895 +195 437 

%M8S NA. WCtfi. sole* 8^64 
vetfsopanH 21577 up 2 S 

IIGdJMMRU>» (HOB 
WMfBSL^epMrarta -O® >88^ 

Apr 90 Tl-B 11-67 H-2 

Hurts 17.78 HR U-2 *5« ’HS 

rt?8 71A8 IL55 l\£ *Ug SM6 

•st. srtes NA W8tfs.sate5 l7.7U 
/etfscswiH 1793)71 us 1325 


US TUGASURT BONDS {GWT7 
u pd-tiauM-pM samfc ar wuoai 
Sep 97 115-20 linn US-10 -R 497^08 

Dec 97 115-07 114-00 114-30 -02 39,311 

Mar 98114-21 114-16 H4-2T — R 16347 

Jim 98 114-09 -02 792 

Ed. sates na Wetfs. srtes 405305 
Wetfsepenint 555.185 up 284 


UBOR 1 -MONTH (CMER) 

Uminon- pnoMOO pet. 

AUB97 94J* 94JJ4 21511 

Sep 97 906 905 »OI 9,156 

0d97 94,3* 903 9433 3.934 

Est. soles na Wetfs. srtes 5.H0 
WetTs open W 40J27 up 384 


GERMAN GOV. BUND OJFFE) 

DMzsaoas-ptsrtiaopd 
Sap 97 10M8 102J7 1010S -0.17 2763799 
Due 97 10155 102.15 102.18 -0.15 HL449 
^.saies; 19&778. Piw. sales: 2143W9 
f*m open h.: 284,748 all 4531 


Doc 97 11507 114-29 11AO0 -007 33738 
Eft-sola* 7M09. Ptwr-Wile* 127.258 
Pter.ijpenlnL: 137,129 op 1S093 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1F) 
FFSOOOOO - pti oflQQ pci 
Sep 97 131.16 130-44 130.78 -0J4 20&404 

Ore 97 100.02 99 J4 9948—0.12 4953 

Mur 98 99.14 99.14 993H — 0.12 0 

Est srtes 1733*2. 

Open Wj 21057 ottl.912. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND OJFFE) 

(TLOTraBtan-phaflOOpd 

Sep 97 U&3S 137.76 1 VM -0,15 110090 

Ok 97 109.69 )0M9 109^7 -O.JS 2452 

Est. sales 56329. Ptw.sate* 48.213 

Pnv. open tat; 1115+2 up 1.487 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI mman-prsaMOOpct. 

Aug 97 9*29 94JB MJ8 
5ep97 9428 9427 9427 

— 9A2D 9420 
9U2 9413 
9438 94JB 
93.98 9UH 
Tim 9191 
W78 93AI 
9176 1379 

9173 9175 

9149 9172 

93jC 9165 

B*. srtes NA Wed's, srtes 415^79 
Wetfs open int 2J20.94S up 6611 
BUTTON FOUND (CMER) 

C2.S90 Dowmtb 1 par pound 
SepW 14778 16644 17008 
Dec 97 UUO um 1.4450 
Mrt» 14590 

Est. srtes NA wetfs. soles 9J71 
Wetfs open tat 64051 on 1574 
CANAJMAH DOLLAR (CMER) 

IOMM doecn, X per Cdn, aw 
SepW 7266 72*4 7260 

DecW 2296 7280 7293 

Mar 98 7320 J301 7320 

Est. sales NA Wetfs. sates 7,188 
Wetfs open int 44137 up 672 
GS1MAN MARK (CMER) 

1 Z&WO maU t per merk 
ten .S9H J*a .1468 1241*0 

D«W J519 -5*87 Sill TJOB 

Mar 98 J55B .5558 3533 54* 

Est.safts NA Wetfs. srtes 34,198 
Wetfs open W 12HJ77 off 2549 
JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

125 mu Ian m>. I per 180 yen 

Sep 97 8715 8667 8477 aw 

Decw ma mu mm 1 . 7 ® 

Mw 98 £90* 310 

Era. sales NA wetfs-sates 16724 
wetfs open M 5BJ20 or 113 * 

5WBB FRANC (CMERJ 
lKJW (rate*. I per Iranc 
S»W ^780 A657 6444 54*17 

Dec97 M40 jm sm 1J« 

.MrtW 4803 943 

Esi. roles NA Wetfs.sotes toja 
Wetfs open W 57JHO up 429 
MEXICAN PESO (CMBU 

man poses. Spar peso 

Sep 97 .12540 .12580 .12557 

DBCW .12125 .11175 .12125 

Ml* .11732 .1MN .11732 

Era.srtes NA wecr&.srtes Bjn 
Wetfs open W 3042 w 97 
3-MONTH STERLING (LIFT El 
£9m» - pJS Ot 100 JXJ 
Sop 97 9183 9280 9280 — OOI 1283)14 

Dec 97 9287 9282 9282 ^-081 124699 

SJS SS 5^2 4401 10J > 7T1 

92m 9280 9280 +082 72*48 

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2-3 ♦*» ‘‘UM 

St? Sr 2 

92-77 9272 9273 +0.01 77.756 

Est series: 87822. Piev.Wto: 159,739 
Prey, open W-- 424280 off 1893 
3-MONTH EUROMARK OJFFE} 

DM1 mMon ■Ms®’ tODpd 
AuoW M80 9480 94.76 -084 IJ34 

SeP 97 96.78 9672 96.72 -03)4 290073 

0*397 9689 9688 9684 —006 

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3-M0NTH EUR0URA (UFFE1 
ITL1 m 8 Bon-phrt IWpd 
SepW 93J3 93J6 9124 -cm jne ,+j 

Due 97 9176 9385 9387 -009 BMM 

MOTW 94.14 9404 9406 -0377 3MH 

Jun98 9444 9473 94 J 6 30 ^, 

SepW 9464 WJ4 UftJU -007 liSi 

DOCW 9480 9466 9467 —0381 343 * 

Ert. safes: 56096 Prey, rotes; 5i,l79 
Piw. open W: 359.2S5 off 2,910 


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*m *3477 

+ij» mow 

+1A5 2855 
+095 1,53* 


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+0-14 3UH 
+014 243M2 
+0.14 17437 
+0LM 14JT9 

+aw 144 * 

+014 
+119 
—0-53 


7,958 

7,111 

3409 


' Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTIO 
SUMte-aerteperlb. 

Otf 97 75JB 7445 7581 
Due 97 7572 7475 7583 
Mar 98 7*35 7595 7*80 
May 98 7785 7*20 7745 
■M98 77J0 77J8 7778 __ 

Era.srtes NA Mtetfs.sraes 44U 
Wetfs arentat 75406 up 690 

HEATnaOLOOWER) 

42808 oat. cents per art 
A*H 97 SUB 5110 5139 

Sep97 54Ji SUB SU77 
Oct 97 5*75 5430 5*82 

Nw97 H80 5SJS S547 
Dec 77 5045 5*10 5*27 

5*90 5*68 5*77 

F** 57.15 5*80 5*87 

Mot* «JS 5*00 5*12 

Apr* 5*05 5*87 5*47 

g?- jrtm NA wetfs. srtes 73471 
WstfsnvnM 153451 up a* 

L1GNT SWEET CRUDE WMBU 
I8» bOL- datars perbbl. 

Sep 97 1932 1941 19J7 

0097 1987 1987 193* 

NouW 1938 1972 1938 

°ra»7 1935 WJ5 1932 
ten* 9.95 .1930 19.95 

Feb 98 I9.9B 1984 1936 

Mar* 1937 1935 T9J7 
ffrW 19.99 »3S 19.99 

May* 2001 1939 20311 

JUi98 2030 1936 2IUB 

Ed.srtes NA Wetfs.srt« ro, 

Wetfs open int 41UC aft *963 

NATURAL GAS OUtER) 

IMOOmm ows, t periren btv 
Aw97 2.175 1148 2.175 
Sep 97 Z130 2395 2.118 
Oe+97 2T3S 7.106 
Nov 97 2280 2353 

Dec 97 2820 2400 

ten 98 2855 2435 

feb* 2J80 2JS5 
Mar 98 2270 2J55 

Apr 93 2.145 2_\25 

gtey* 1J» 2390 

^ 67.266 

Wetfsaaenct 208,178 Off 392 

^EAOGD GASOLINE (NMBD 
fWTWBrt cents oer pal 

Sf & 21 +'■» 24848 

®- 30 S884 mSS +085 BU?S 

? JD 5478 57319 +0l30 BU4) 

Nw97 5*30 SS75 5*14 +833 

Draw 5*00 55.® 5589 

J"2 5400 Sjl ° 5Lal +072 

r*® 5*21 +032 

Jter® 5*76 +1)7 

^sotes NA Wetfs. srtes 34408 

Wetfs open w 87j« up iflj 

GASOIL UP® 


+*14 93420 
+0.14 40311 
+0.13 28836 
+0.13 48858 
+O.I3 25769 
+ail 12831 
+ 0.12 
+012 
+012 
+0.11 
76,971 


53573 

54M 

74* 

28471 


2.131 

2273 

3830 

2AS5 

2370 

2265 

1133 

2095 


W4X 

3*627' 


16404 

14839 

10493 

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3,727 

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4602 

7733 


18*B 

31356 


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19764 

12,949 

4X6 


Aim 97 
Sep 97 
0097 
No* 97 
0« 97 
Jan* 
Feb* 
Mar* 


APIS 

*738 

10791 

*882 

4882 

2112 


Mar* 
Jim 98 
Sep* 
Dec* 
M« 99 
Jun 99 


1*5.73 14*73 16375 +075 JO. 289 
1*7^ 16675 167.00 
169-00 16875 16075 +075 
1702S 16940 17Q7S +531 
17175 171J» 171.75 +040 
17150 17200 172J0 +S 75 
17275 171.75 17200 +«4S 
T71JS 17040 17040 ^ 
rales: 12255 . PlW. sates : 12871 
Pw. open Hj 77, 1 15 up 

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l??, 1 - W« rt 1400 bararis 

ortw ’SHI ]|t9 — rm 

Har97 list 1+47 

Pt37 1848 1058 

1 BM 1885 
f!*” 18.70 1L64 

Mor» 1885 1882 


Aug«7 
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— 197 
D«W 
Mar* 
Jon 98 
SepW 
Draw 
Mar 99 
ten 99 
SepW 
DraW 
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1842 +O.T1 11840 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1997 


PAGE 15 


EUROPE 


Arnault 
Pitches 
His Plan 
In London 


Cmt*lnJln Our Stiff Fam Pa/utcUs 

LONDON — Bernard 
Arnault, chairman of LVMH 
Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton 
S A, took his show on the road 
Thursday, visiting major share- 
holders of Guinness PLC and 
Grand Metropolitan PLC here 
to push his plan for a three-way 
merger of the companies. 

Mr. Arnault, who has been 
dubbed a "Machiavellian 
French tactician" by die British 
press, said merging the three 
companies' beverage busi- 
nesses would lift operating 
profit and reduce costs. 

He wants to merge his com- 
pany's Moet Hennessy cognac 
and Champagne business with 
the liquor units of Guinness and 
Grand Met, setting up a com- 
pany with more than 60 billion 
francs ($9.73 billion! in annual 
sales. 

Mr. Arnault’s plan would 
have the merged company, 
which would include such 
brands as Moet et Chan don 
Champagne as well as Grand- 
Met's Smirnoff, Gilbey's, J&B 
and Bailey's and Guinness's 
Johnnie Walker, Dewar’s, Gor- 
don’s and Tanqueray drinks, to 
be floated in Paris and London. 

His proposal is aimed at 
heading off a planned merger 
between Guinness and Grand 
Met that would leave LVMH on 
the sidelines. 

LVMH is the largest share- 
holder in both companies and 
now holds 11.06 percent of 
Grand Met and 123 percent of 
Guinness. Those holdings allow 
Mr. Arnault to call extraordinary 
shareholders ’ meetings of both 
companies. Guinness and Grand 
Met. which were cool to Mr. 
Arnault's proposal when it was 
first announced, have said they 
will make a formal response to 
it, but no date has been set 

LVMH did not say which 
shareholders Mr. Arnault vis- 
ited Thursday. 

(AFP, Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Italy’s STET to Pay ITT for Cuba Property 


By Tom Buerkle 

hurnuiiiutkil HrralJ Tribune 


BRUSSELS — Hopes for a solu- 
tion to the trans-Atlantic dispute 
over American sanctions on Cuba 
appeared to brighten Thursday after 
a decision by the Ita lian te lccom- 
m uni cations company STET SpA to 
compensate ITT Coip, for property 
se ized by the Castro government. 

STET, whose full name is Societa 
Finanziaria Telefonica, had been 
threatened with U.S. sanctions under 
the Helms-Buiton Act because it is 
one of the biggest foreign investors in 
Cuba, owning a stake in the telephone 
system that the Communist govern- 
ment seized from ITT in 1961. 

But a s a re sult of the payment, 
which STET did not disclose but 
which sources put at around $25 
million, the State Department an- 


nounced that the Italian company 
would be exempted from Title IV of 
the Helms-Bunon Act. Thai pro- 
vision allows the U.S. government 
to deny visas to executives of for- 
eign companies that invest in ex- 
propriated assets. 

U.S. and EU officials each 
claimed victory over the settlement, 
which was agreed last week but only 
disclosed late Wednesday in Wash- 
ington. The settlement “sends a 
clear signal to foreign companies in 
Cuba using confiscated U.S. prop- 
erty that they wLU either have to 
reach agreement with U.S. national 
claimants in order to obtain autho- 
rization, or face visa denial/exclu- 
sion sanctions," Nicholas Bums, 
the State Department spokesman, 
said in Washington on Wednesday. 

But spokesman for Sir Leon Brit- 
tan, the trade commissioner of the 15- 


nation European Union, sajd Thurs- 
day that the deal had exposed Helms- 
Bunon as a "toothless" attempt to 
impose the United States' economic 
embargo of Cuba on its allies. 

"It "is clear that with this deal, 
STET will be allowed to continue to 
operate, and expand, in Cuba, so I 
would say this is firmly in line with 
European policy,” the spokesman, 
Peter Guilford, said. 

In private, however, officials wel- 
comed the settlement as a possible 
breakthrough, with one EU official 
calling it “a face-saving way to 
back away from this dispute." 

Senator Jesse Helms, the law’s 
sponsor, welcomed the settlement, 
saying it showed that “the price of 
doing business in Castro’s tropical 
gulag has just gone up." 

Washington and its European al- 
lies have been seeking to defuse 


Surprising Strength at Electronics Makers 

Phone Sales Lift Ericsson Profit Takes Off At Phi Ups 


Ccmpiird by Our Slag From Pispaxhn 

STOCKHOLM — LM Ericsson 
AB said Thursday its second-quarter 
net profit rose a greater-than -expec- 
ted 45 percent as mobile-phone sales 
doubled and market share rose. 

But Ericsson, the world’s third- 
largest telecommunications equip- 
ment maker, said it would cut "a 
few thousand” jobs in its fixed-line 
division to increase profitability. 

Profit after taxes rose to 2.79 bil- 
lion kronor ($3563 million) on a 44 
percent increase in sales, to 72.8 
billion kronor. The figures reflected 
a 102 percent jump in sales of cel- 
lular telephones and mobile termin- 
als, to 18.34 billion kronor, the com- 
pany said. 

Pretax profit rose to 4.08 billion 
kronor from 2.68 billion kronor. 
Analysts had been expecting a 
pretax profit of 3.07 billion kronor. 

Ericsson competes with Nokia 
Oy of Finlan d and Motorola Inc. of 
the United States for dominance of 
the world’s mobile-phone markets. 

Ericsson’s new orders in the 
year’s first half rose 39 percent, to 
87.76 billion kronor, and it had a 
market share of about 12 percent in 
the mobile-phone market last year, 
Salomon Brothers Inc. said in a re- 
port last week. 

"Sales were much better than an- 


ticipated," Ericsson's chief exec- 
utive. Lars Ramqvist, said. "I'm 
quite optimistic we can grow market 
share. Now it's at least 16 percent. 
The next step is 20 percent." 

But Mr. Ramqvist said he was 
unhappy with the results of the In- 
focom Systems division, which 
makes traditional fixed-tine tele- 
communications equipment. 

* ‘Further restructuring in the next 
six months,'* including job cuts, 
"should see a considerable im- 
provement in profit” in the division, 
he said. 

He declined to give a specific 
number for job cuts. The metal- 
workers union said this week that 
Ericsson's plans would result in 
8,000 lost jobs. 

Mr. Ramqvist said the company 
bad already cut 8,000 workers from 
the division in the past 18 months, 
moving many workers to other di- 
visions. But the company as a whole 
is adding 1 ,000 workers a month to 
keep up with demand for mobile 
phones, he said. 

"We are really respecting our 
competitors, so our restructuring 
will have to be very, very strong," 
Mr. Ramqvist said. 

Ericsson shares closed at 353 
kronor, up 24. 

(Bloomberg. AP. Reuters) 


Citnptlrd tn Qw Sug Firm Dii/vkhn 

EINDHOVEN, Netherlands — 
Philips Electronics N V on Thursday 
posted an unexpectedly large 
second-quarter profit that investors 
and analysts agreed reflected Chief 
Executive Cor Boonstra’s 10- 
month-old streamlining as well as a 
weaker guilder. 

Profit at Europe’s biggest elec- 
tronics maker more than doubled, to 
693 million guilders ($336.6 mil- 
lion) before one-time items from 
304 million guilders a year earlier. 

Philips has sold or reduced its 
stake in unprofitable businesses, tak- 
ing a charge of 760 million guilders a 
year ago on the cost of the revamp. 
Consumer and professional products 
units accounting for half its sales 
have returned to profit, and its semi- 
conductor orders outpaced ship- 
ments, a sign business is improving. 

"We have confidence in Mr. 
Boonstra,” said Frank Verhees. a 
fund manager at Fords Investment 
who said his company had from 5 
percent to 8 percent of its 5 billion- 
guilder Dutch portfolio in Philips. 

It was the second consecutive 
quarter of improvement since Mr. 
Boonstra took over last October at 
Philips, which makes the Norelco 
and Magnavox brands in the United 
States. Sales rose 6.7 percent, to 


1 7.25 billion guilders. The company 
acknowledged that some of the ben- 
efit had come from a 13 percent 
surge in the value of the dollar 
against the guilder during the 
quarter that more than made up for a 
decline in the value of the yen. 

As part of Mr. Boonstra ’s an- 
nounced strategy to discard un- 
promising or peripheral businesses. 
Philips during the past year has sold 
its 25 percent stake in the Danish 
television and stereo-equipment 
maker Bang & Olufsen SA, reduced 
its stake in the unprofitable Gennan 
radio maker Gnindig and put nine 
smaller Dutch units up for sale. 

“We've probably handled 50 
percent to 60 percent of the problem 
children, and there’s still a lot to 
go,” Dudley Eustace, vice chairman 
of Philips, said. 

At PolyGram NV, Phillips’s 75 
percent-owned film and recording 
business, profit stagnated at 148 
million guilders. "We are watching 
very carefully to see what the results 
are,” Philips’s chief financial of- 
ficer, Jan Hommen, said. .“We 
would like to see PolyGram gen- 
erating the same sorts of returns as 
the rest of our business." 

Philips shares jumped 5.7 percent 
to close at 171.30 guilders in Am- 
sterdam. (Bloomberg. AFP. AP) 


Investor’s Europe 


tensions over Helms-Bunon since 
both sides went to the brink of a 
trade war over the issue last year. 
European governments consider the 
legislation an unacceptable U.S. at- 
tempt to impose its law on foreign 
partners, a view shared by Canada 
and Mexico, whose companies also 
have been targeted for sanctions. 

The EU agreed in April to drop its 
complaint against Helms-Bunon at 
the World Trade Organization in ex- 
change for a pledge by President Bill 
Clinron to seek Congressional ap- 
proval to waive the Title IV sanc- 
tions. That trade-off hinges on both 
sides reaching an agreement for 
resolving disputes over expropriated 
property by October. So far, U.S. and 
EU officials have had only prelim- 
inary discussions on the issue at the 
Organization for Economic Cooper- 
ation and Development in Paris. 


Frankfurt 

London 

Paris 

DAX 1 

FTSEiOO Index 

CAC40 

4400 

5200 

3200 

4200 I 

4000 / 

5000 , 

. 300(3 -V 

. 3800 J 

4800 mAT 

” A tJ 

3800 fJT 

4600 W V 

3400 kLfJ 

3200/v v 



M A M J J 

ma m j j . 

2400 p M A M j j 

1997 

1997 

1997 


Exchange- Index 


Thursday 
. Close 


Prav. 

Close 


' ' % 

Change] 


Amsterdam AEX ' 

98&2S 

988.48 .. 

-033. 

Brussels BEL-20 

. 

2.601,55 

..^-77 

FWnkftirt DAX • 

: 4,335.74 

4 t mX8 

.rim 

Copenhagen Stocfe Wariest 

Wa58 .. . 

.652^9 

-0.72 

JfebW u -v HEX General .... . 

3i5ffl8.84 

3^89.10 

+1.15 

Oslo .- # .oBx ; 


690.45 

-oil 

London 'ftS&IOQ; - 


■4^74.50 : 

-02 7 

Madrid Ew#»nsp 

■ mjBQ- 

612.76 

-1 28 

Mtan IftEflB... 

• : .. 

.15163 


Paris.- . OAC40 

: 2,973.53 

3,003-53. 

-1.06 

Stockholm SX1§ 

. 

3.S25.B2 

+0^0 

Vteona ATX • 

: M38JS 

1,«2.76 


airfeh ... SPl J - .. • ■ 

- 

3.7Q858 

+0.01 

Source: TeJekurs 

Inhrnuthvul IkiJd Tnhuii- 

Very briefly: 


• Britain’s trade gap with the rest of the world shrank by nearly 
50 percent in May, to £508 million ($854 million), but the 
Confederation of British Industry, the country’s top business 
group , warned that the improvement would be short-lived, with 
export orders tumbling as a result of the strong pound. 

•British Telecommunications PLC’s regulator, OfieL, told the 
company it would add a condition to BTs license requiring it to 
submit a certificate every year to prove that the company does 
not neglect British customers in its drive for global expansion. 

• Commerzbank AG’s first-half operating profit, which is 
profit after risk provisions but before taxes, rose 23 percent, to 
1.63 billion Deutsche marks ($890 million), helped by a gain 
in interest income. 

• Bayerische Vereinsbank AG posted a 15 percent increase 
in first-half operating profit, to 765.7 million DM. partly 
because of the boom in financial markets. The bank, which 
plans to buy Bayerische Hypotheken- & Wechsel-Bank 
AG, said it was confident of a good fail-year profit. 

• Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, which makes BMW and 
Rover cars, said deliveries of its BMW brand in the first half of 
1997 rose 10 percent, to about 350,000 units. 

• Elf Aquitaine SA, France’s largest oil company, plans to 
sell its remaining 1.2 percent stake, or 2.87 milli on shares, in 
the carmaker Renault SA. taking advantage of the stock’s 
recent rise in price to finan ce its own growth. 

• Endemoi Entertainment Holding NV bought 45 percent 
of Zeppelin Television SA, a Spanish television-production 
company; the price was not disclosed. 

• McDonald's Restaurants Ltd., the U.S.-based fast-food 

operator's British unit, pleaded guilty to polluting a creek with 
sewage and was fined about $10,200 after failing to honor 
promises to clean it up. The company was also ordered to pay 
court costs of $3,875. AFP. AP. Bloomberg. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


SA Breweries 


Thursdays July 24 

Prices In local cutrendts. 

Tetokuts 

HI sb Law Owe Prov. 


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ABN- AMRO 
Aegon 
AtaW 
AtaoMobd 
Boon Col 
B ob Wesson 
CSMOO 
DonJbdiePel 
_ DSM 
> Elsevier 
, Forth Amw 
’ GebonJa 
&aracew 

: BET 

Haogovemon 

HurdOaugkB 

IMG Group 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

OcedMen 

PhUpsEkc 

Potwrom 

Rtm&adHdg 

K0O8C0 

RodomcD 

Rofincp 

Rorento 

RoytSDirttfr 

Unuevercva 

Vends HI 

VNU 

WottenKlom 


48.40 
161 . 157 
6540 6160 
29630 28&40 
165 14530 
4A30 4140 
101 98 

11530 11221 
23130 22630 
3830 3730 
99 96JD 
7130 7130 
7530 7X40 
11730 11420 
330 371.90 
12130 11930 
N.T. N.T. 
10*30 10150 
71 7030 

4630 4420 
8530 8330 
6630 6460 
342 33730 
26130 2® 

177 165L60 
10570 10340 
223- 218 
20630 20450 
67.90 <630 
20640 206 

121 1W.10 
11330 11030 
4S2 44630 
11190 112 

40 46 

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Stem Com Bk F 
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Thai Form BkF 
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222 

244 

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402 

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BgtojAirto 

HteXsJ Lever 
Hindoo Pertra 
W Dev Bfc 

rrc 

MabonognrTel 
Hefimcelnd 
State Bk Indta 
SteriArthHflir 
Tata Eng Loco 


Sam 31 Mac 422637 
Pnvtaac 4251.13 
92730 905L25 91730 919 

1400 1370138450136423 

503 489 49135 495 

9535 94 9450 9330 

521 50930 51CL75 51150 
28435 27730 279 277.75 

365 352 352 35930 

tkt: 324 run 32930 

2430 2175 23.75 2425 
40935 39535 39125 406 




Brussels 


BEL-28 Mac 29138 
Preview: 248136 


‘ i -S 

• *■ . ,4, ’ 







Barcol 
BBL 
CBR 
CWuyt 
DeflnheUon 
EtodmM 
Etedrafina 
ForfisAG 
Gevoert 
GBL 

GenBaupe 
, KndiattHOi 
■ Petarf&ia 

* Poworfln 
Rapes Beige 
SocGarBag 
Sdwy 
Tractate! 
UCB 


16975 16750 
0070 7970 

9860 9760 

3370 3300 

* 18 
TWO 7830 
3670 3640 
2250 8090 
3400 3350 
6120 5950 

T5075 14825 
16500 15950 
14800 I442S 
5020 4990 
11400 11200 
3780 3675 
■22875 22673 
15150 14975 
147600 141000 


16900 16650 
8020 8030 

9800 9900 

3340 3375 
19300 19175 
2000 2010 
7880 7880 
3655 3650 
‘ SJJO 8220. 
3390 3360 

SOSO 6110 
VSH5 15000 
15975 16500 
14525 14725 
4990 5010 
11300 11350 
3780 3700 
2M7S 22725 
15100 15050 
143600 147300 


Copenhagen 


Start tadee 647.51 
Putins 65129 


BGBank 


- .v- 


■fV': * 


400 380 . 380 . 395 

-372 360 360 371 

Mw F ob 1005 990 1005 99SL75 

Oma OO 790 ■ 392- . 395 

Den DansfcB BJi 777 764“ 769 773 

QftSvendbrgB 421421 419D0D 420420 425000 
WS 1912 B 295000 290000 290290 290000 

l*S 245 2S0J3 

KobLrttaw Ml 740 74845 . 749 

KWMorthfcB 79540 775 780 7B5.9B 

SOptBBto B 991 979 989.53 993 

TefeDonrtB . 40. 395 397 399 

TiwBaOta ■ 411 406. 410 411 

UnaonmarfiA . ' 433 '420- '423 430 


Frankfurt 


DAX:«35J4 
Previous; 4406J9 


AMB8 

tunas 

AttmzHdg 


. . 209 JO 

■jt- j« , AJSoflzHdg 486 
: V \ Mona 18150 

8k Berta 4hlQ 
BASF 71 JO 

Bayer Hype Bi 7770 
Bar.VbHBlnnk 103 jo 
B arn 78.10 

Btiendftf 91 

Bevwg 40 

BMW 1501 

CXAGCotata 194 
Comuartank 6150 
Dataller Ban 151 JO 
Degussa 9690 



1350 
20650 
468 
178J0 
4070 
70.90 
75 
95 
75.10 
B7JB 
38M 
1490 
182 
61.50 
147 JO 
9560 


470 493 

18157 17870 
4.90 *170 
7170 71 JO 
7&40 7940 
1025) 115 

7&70 7775 

a 92 

3&90 38 

1497 1499 

182 1975) 
62 65 

148 1450 
96JO 95 


AEXUK98US 
Preview: 98MB 


49 49.90 
159 161 

*120 65.00 
2410 294 

14570 16150 
4430 41.90 
10070 10020 
11470 1155) 
227 JO 23070 
3750 3840 
9740 9850 
7180 7180 
74.10 75 

117 118 

326 32130 
121 JO 120.70 
N.T. 935) 
10240 104 

7050 7040 
45 4670 
85.18 84.70 
65 66JD 
339 70 341 JO 

260.10 36170 

171 JO 162.10 
10*80 105 

220 223 

20*5) 202-50 
67 JO 6650 
206 20X30 
121 119 JO 
112.90 11150 
448 450JO 
113 11190 

47.10 46.70 
272 27740 


Hi* 

Deutsche Bart 12150 
DeutTetakom 4155 
Diesdner Bart 8*30 
Fiwarttt 360 

FrasenlusMed la 
Fried. Knipp 325J0 
Gehe 116J0 

HetdeibgZmt 162 
Hente pfd 10*5) 
HEW 451 

Hochfef 79 

Hoedat 8770 

KnotadT 683 

UJmeyer 85JD 
Unde 1360 

Luflhcnsa 36.40 
MAN 562-50 

ManeHnam 813 
MetaJgesefcderfl 3840 
Mefeo 96JD 

MyndiRueckR 6680 
Preussog 570 

RWE 78-50 

SAPpM 438 

Schema 199-50 
SGLQAon 250 
Siemens 12240 
Springer Itaefl 1673 
Soadzucter 899 
Thwseti 427 

Vtha 10380 

VEW 578 

Vtog 775 

Vtaikmartn 1*37 


Une Oase 

111 119 

4110 4370 

82-50 S3 

355 359 

1*9.50 150 

320 325-50 
115 115 

157 157 

101.10 10470 
451 451 

77.10 78-50 
86 86 

666 666 
825) 825) 
1295 1295 
3575 3430 
555 560 

793 801 

38-10 38.10 
91 9X90 
6500 6500 

5655) 568 

77 7740 
*30 433 

195 19670 
M3 250 
11940 120 JO 
1673 1673 

895 897 

*17.50 423 

10230 10240 
571 578 

768 773 

1422 1423 


Piev. 

126 

4170 

8380 

355 

153 

317.7D 

116-30 

156 

102-80 

451 

77 

88 

688.5D 

87 JO 
1375 
3545 
563 
807 
3830 
218 
6680 
565 
7120 
431.30 
200J0 
M3 
12015 
1673 
895 
41 B 
101 30 
570 
774 
1402 


Saso! 

SB1C 
Tiger Oats 


High 

LOW 

dOM 

Pm*. 


High 

Low 

dose 

Ptwr. 


High Low Close 

Prev. 


1*1 

14050 

14075 

14075 

Vendome Lx uts 

457 

A.S0 

450 

*53 





ti 

4150 

43 

43 

Vodafone 

199 

X94 

X96 

X9B 

Paris 


EledrakaB 

59 JS 

5850 

9925 

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Whfttmad 

X48 

aj5 

847 

840 



219J5 

217 

219 

219 

Wllkjnra Hdus 

X33 

128 

130 

330 


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8DJ5 

7950 

7X75 

78J5 

Woisdey 

450 

444 

444 

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Accor 

937 921 922 

937 






WPP Group 

147 

243 

2*5 

245 

AGF 

21*50 70550 209.10 

205 

Investor B 





Zeneca 

2063 

20 

20*0 

20J2 

AlrUqude 

979 956 9*9 

96* 

MoOoB 


High Lew dote Prev. 


Kuala Lumpur 

AMMBHdgs 
Genfing 
Md Banking 
Mol Inti SMpF 
PeftawsGas 
Proton 

PiAfleBk 
Renoog 
Resorts Wtartd 
Rothmans PM 

Tenajn 
IIHEntf 
YTL 


1490 

14.70 

741# 

1470 

12 

11J0 

11.90 

UJ0 

£ 

2415 

2£75 

2SJS 

N.T. 

NX 

N.T. 

870 

945 

915 

945 

«J5 

1130 

11 

1130 

11 

4J4 

194 

4 

3.M 

350 

342 

346 

348 

7.95 

7J0 

7.95 

7JS 

28 

27 

2B 

27 

8-55 

B45 

850 

850 

11.10 

10J# 

1080 

1090 

11.1# 

10JC 

1090 

1080 

19 JO 

1070 

18J0 

.19 

815 

710 

815 

810 


Helsinki hex 


Pietiewt >*1>.T 


SET ie* 

Previous; (31 78 

208 212 210 

238 2*2 240 

» 3375 32JD 

396 398 402 

S28 588 532 

124 1U 125 

37 JD 39 JO 3X25 

49.75 5050 SI 

138 147 139 

118 120 118 


EnsoA 

HotitanaMI 

Kendra 

Kesko 

MerttoA 

MdroB 

Meint-SariaB 

Neste 

NrttaA 

Orion- YMyrnae 

Outokumpu A 

UPMKynunene 

Vabuet 


49 
235 
51 JO 
77 
2*30 
172J0 
45 
139 
*56 
199 
10X90 
134 
90 


4870 4870 
228 228 
49.90 SO 
76 76 

2340 2430 
168 168 
*230 *3 

137 139 

423 *4*30 
19150 79330 
-103 10X50 
132 1 32.10 
89 89 


4U0 

235 

50 

7640 

2130 

172 

4*50 

138 

425 

19B 

104 

13330 

89.90 


Hong Kong 


Bkl 

Goto? PodSc 


au 

OtaxUgM 

OTcPocSc 
DmHenaBk 
FWPadHc 
Hang Lung D« 
Hang Seng Bk 
Henavtsontav 
Henderson Ld 
HK China Gas 
HK Electric 
HUTeJecwisn 
HopeweBHdgs 
HSBCHdtP 
HufchisonWlt 

JahnsanElHdg 

OriarWPren 
Petti Oriental 
SHK Praps 
ShunTrtHdgs 
Sian land Co. 
StfiOdnaPesJ 
SwfrePocA 
Wharf Hdg$ 

WBetiock 


875 
32J0 
15 
7675 
26 
4540 
46J0 
*7 
MS 
1470 
J18 
BJ0 
69 
1670 
3270 
2035 
i 05 
267 
7075 
2X95 
2X60 
1946 
5075 
3 
178 
7175 
460 
735 
7J0 
6975 
31 JO 
17J5 


8.18 

32.10 

1440 

73 

2530 

4460 

4630 

4440 

970 

1405 

115 

B40 

67.75 

1640 

32 

20 

483 

262 

6975 

2170 

2295 

1905 

4970 

290 

173 

9050 

450 

740 

7J0 

<775 

3130 

17J5 


015 8.15 

3170 3270 
1475 1480 
7535 7475 
26 2X30 
4470 4X10 
4670 4640 
4690 4630 
935 975 

1410 1405 
115 117 

840 830 

68 68 
16J5 1635 
3240 31 JO 
20 7040 
4JB 4J8 
263 365 

7075 6875 
2180 2X75 
2340 2290 
19.10 1805 
*940 *970 
252 2.93 


London 

Abbey Non 
Alltec Domecj 
Antflon Water 
Arpos 
AsdaG 
ArsocBrl 
BAA 
Bordoys 
Bose 
BAT tad 
BartSatimd 
BJueOrde 
BOCGraO 
Boob 
BPS tad 
BrtlAerasp 
BritAIrnys 
BG 

Bril Land 
BrtPeflm 
B&kyB 
BrtStael 
BrtTeieeoo 
BTR 

BunnabCoshoi 1040 

BariooGp 136 

CabteVtetess 
CffrtucvSchw 
Carlton usTue 
Cnmnri Union 
Compos, Gp 
CourWls 

Dfarre 

Etertocsraponeris 438 
Energy Grow 633 

ErterprtseOO 692 

Fora Colonic* 1.70 

GarfAcdderri 9.10 

G€C 168 

GKN 1QO* 

Gtaro VfcHcome 1157 
GnsrodaGp 738 

Grand Md 
GRE 

GreenaSsGp 
Gataness 
GUS 

HsSlHItlgs 
Cl 

linpiTQbaca 
Klirofister 
Ladwoke 
Land Sec 
Lismo 


FTJE10I; 48(24< 
Pravieate 487450 


831 

461 

B.I2 

641 

130 

X72 

607 

1184 

160 

X37 

443 

419 

tva 

8 . 1 * 

119 

1134 

640 

2ja 

613 

•28 

433 

136 

*31 

1.96 


612 

5-92 

49B 

633 

61A 

193 

380 


177 

91 

433 

745 

755 

6975 


178 

9030 

463 

745 

750 

67 


Legal GenlGrp 
UoydsTSBGp 
LuaisVarSy 
Marts Spencer 
MEPC 


634 

106 

457 

607 

619 

5J0 

2045 

976 

176 

7.17 

238 

942 

in 

431 

670 

X93 

498 


MewrvA&sti 1150 
Natanai 


3140 3130 
I7JS I7J5 


Jakarta 

CeraprafttefaaniM 
PntirtK 71819 

Astra Wt 

8100 

7850 

7850 

8125 

BkMilndon 

1890 

1775 

) in 

1850 


1450 

1*00 

1*6 

1425 


9MS 

9*00 

9450 

9375 


4300 

*100 

*175 

4300 


5390 

5300 

5300 

5450 


7»9 

760# 

7740 

7440 


W9 

9200 

9224 

9225 


4125 

49/4 

5075 

5025 

Ttitinrauniaai 

4000 

3900 

3924 

*000 


(Grid 
Manpower 
MalWesJ 
Nad 

NarttCh Union 
Orange 
P&O 
Peacson 
PHtatioc 
PowerGen 
PtBBda FOrnefl 570 
PrudenW 697 
RoitaKkGp 
(tort“ 


165 

688 

844 

736 

128 

111 

630 

678 

133 

730 


Johannesburg "JJgjJSIg 


ArnsIgamMBks 

AngaomCoai 

ssrss 


AV 
Bflriow 
CG. SorUh 
DeBeen 
Drwfaoiem 
FtitWBk 
Genav- 
GFSA 

hnperialHdgs 

IngwoCoti 

bar 

Johmfeslnffl 

UberirHttas 


r S&nt 
Minorca 
Nanprt 
Nectnr 

RtmtawAGp 
Rkhemant 
Rud PWtaura 


3430 
260 
nt 
245 
19730 
14 
55 
2535 
1*430 
31 JO 
3975 
17 
9175 
4150 
2475 
XID 
6S7S 
388 
14650 
17JS 
96 
1&50 
10075 

4X60 

70.75 

7575 


3330 3X45 
260 260 
26175 26130 
23930 248 

197 197 

,1175 1475 
5450 55 

2575 2530 
16330 16* 

3075 32 

39.05 3905 
1&» 19 

8930 92 

61 6125 
2130 2425 
301 109 

64M 4650 
387 387 

14475 14650 
1730 I7J5 
9430 9650 
1870 1830 
9975 100J5 
4X35 4X60 
7075 7075 
7430 75 


3145 

2*0 

2*130 

24 

197 

1425 

55 

26*0 

1*4 

32 

39.05 

19 

92 

tav. 

2425 

109 

4650 

3B7 

14650 

1735 

9650 

1830 

10075 

4X60 

7075 

75 


Rsdaaf 
ReedUt 
RadoUMtal 
RetimHdgs 
Reran 
RMCGraop 
RabRoia 
RonfBkSari 
RlZreg 
al&SunAn 


Stinsbury 
Schraders 
ScotNewcasfle 
Sarf Power 
Seairicor 
Sevan Trad 
ShdlTmspR 
Sebe 

SnSb Nephew 

SmflhKfne 

Sntihstad 

Stten Dec 

SlageoKh 

Stodawfer 

TUe&Lyte 

Tesm 

Ttanes Water 
3 Group 
TI Grow 
TartfiB 
Unffever 

Mr* 

UMUfflteS 


60S 
330 
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zse 
633 
111 
624 
143 
935 
130 
659 
10332 
610 
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429 
1613 
732 
455 
154 
9.15 
438 
10.14 

1.77 

1231 

73 

462 

7.13 

1073 

420 

434 

8.18 

4J7 

615 

103 

1735 

429 

1 

759 


610 8.14 
448 437 

734 7.94 

627 6X 
146 130 

643 644 
X95 697 

1134 1138 
825 834 

X23 322 

477 433 

415 417 

11.13 1174 
7 JO 7JS 
111 118 

1120 1125 
620 622 
228 iffl 
606 607 

618 620 
475 *76 

134 135 

418 4JD 

151 1.94 
1025 1029 

121 123 

4 601 

X83 X86 

478 478 

670 683 

612 612 
184 187 

53B 534 

424 434 

648 649 

684 68* 

138 139 

9J>1 9.07 

330 3-67 

9.93 1023 

1341 1341 

735 726 

615 619 

197 106 

453 453 

X90 S98 

556 614 

575 677 

20.1? 3ai6 
877 9-08 

370 170 

69B 724 

152 238 

927 942 

239 174 

471 475 

636 638 

IJ4 134 
579 525 

493 498 
1231 1138 
257 ISt 
539 521 

641 833 

722. 776 

119 124 

208 108 
621 673 

668 670 

177 120 

729 729 
499 Ml 
XJ0 194 
7J3 7J8 

240 145 

935 931 
1W 257 
421 625 

207 208 

XS* 616 
133 241 

933 933 

224 130 

431 641 

975 937 

506 106 

195 4 

4» 43S 
1700 17.94 
776 730 
443 447 

2A 239 
8.90 B.W 
426 433 
903 iai6 
175 175 

72.10 1123 
733 737 
456 458 

70S 7.06 

1002 1002 

424 424 

425 435 

7.93 7.9B 

478 481 

£05 &» 
2.98 259 
17.18 1735 
423 425 

691 696 

7.15 733 


839 

456 

7J4 

643 
146 
174 

603 

1107 

644 
537 
440 
414 
1132 
616 

613 
1333 

439 

144 

611 

627 

438 

137 

430 

156 

HU0 

135 

620 

688 

434 
674 

614 
699 
535 

435 
649 
691 
139 
699 

170 

WJ6 

1332 

775 

613 

299 

436 
559 
611 
S.77 

2023 

937 

370 

725 

234 
942 
237 
425 
682 
139 
X94 
496 

1277 

233 

537 

671 

732 

337 

111 

638 

601 

132 

734 
5 

583 

7J8 

148 

936 

206 

632 
2.15 
597 
tm 
970 

235 

633 
1006 

£07 

4 

434 

1614 

739 

<47 

652 

697 

438 
1003 

176 

1230 

735 
460 
7.18 

1020 

429 

439 
611 
488 

513 

204 

1732 

433 

$ 


Madrid 


Betooradec 60*59 


Pm*KL-4717* 

Acerinox 

28200 

27170 

77540 

28000 

ACESA 

1B00 

1/10 

>r/o 

1795 

Aguas Barteton 

40*0 

4910 

4940 

6000 

Aroetriario 

BBV 

88*0 

1390 

8600 

1390 

B/20 

1390 

8840 

1391 


1505 

1445 

1470 

1500 


8640 

7890 



Bco Centro Hlsp 

6780 

6100 

6110 

6320 



344*0 

34400 

35250 

Ba Santander 

*455 

42S0 

4784 

4*60 

CEPSA 

4884 

4824 

4040 

4890 

Conhnerrte 

3765 

3600 

3660 

3765 

Car^Mcptre 

8750 

315# 

i 

8410 

3040 

B760 

3)20 

FECSA 

1300 

1230 

1270 

1320 

Gas Natural 

BOO 

»I0 

7510 

7910 

Iberdrola 

1730 

16/0 

168(1 

1725 

Prycn 

3245 

3085 

J1W 

3)80 

Repsd 

6370 

6200 

6230 

6370 

SevfltanaEtec 

1*75 

1*40 

1440 

1475 


8110 

7800 

/94U 

8140 

Teteforico 

*2*5 

4060 

4044 

4210 


1235 

12)0 

1220 

1230 

Vataic Cement 

2454 

2410 

2430 

2545 

Manila 


PSE 


572-10 


PratiMB; 2*7637 

AyatrB 

18 

1730 

18 

18 

AvciaLand 

BkPhUpIsl 

2X75 

21J5 

2175 

23 

156 

154 

146 

158 

C1P Homes 

880 

■3 

8*0 

xao 

MmdoEkcA 

83 

12 

8X50 

Metal Bank 

555 

445 

540 

560 


630 

6 

6.10 

660 

PClBar* 

234 

228 

228 

229 

PULragDiti 

924 

915 

9M 

920 

SanMIgutiB 

59 JO 

4630 

56.40 

5940 

5M Prime Hdg 

730 

730 

7 JO 

74 0 

Mexico 


Beta 

tadac< 

OMJ2 


PretiOUS: 4742.T2 

AtbA 

SB.10 

56M 

5810 

57.00 

[bwH B 

21-50 

21 JO 

2110 

2120 

Cemex CPO 

3930 

39 JS 

39 JO 

3940 

OfraC 

113* 

US 

1X34 

1122 


4630 

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4&J0 

GpoCdrsoAt 

57.90 

4600 

57.90 

56J0 

GpoFBcomer 

235 

24* 

2J8 

X70 

GpaHn Irtauno 
UnbOtiiMex 

3870 

V JO 

38*0 

37 JO 

3X70 

3X00 

•WAS 

3X00 

TefevtxaCPO 

119 JO 

115J0 

11870 

11X20 

TtiMexL 

2040 

19J4 

2OJ0 

19J8 

Milan 

MlBTtkqetilcsi 1580630 


Pretions: 151*880 

Afleonza Assk: 

16800 

16100 

16480 

16705 


4480 

*380 

4*40 

*490 

BcaRtteurara 

66*5 

6070 

4070 

6280 


1563 

1487 

1510 

1*85 


29700 

28700 

28700 

38700 


3650 


3*30 

3615 


8995 


H6Q4 

9155 

ENI 

10670 

10410 

10*60 

10570 

Rti 

6540 

4225 

6235 

6330 


38250 

37650 

38150 

38300 

•Ml 

18825 

'SIS 

18300 

17800 

INA 

2760 

2700 

2720 

IWgas 

Medksel 

6020 

8400 

5815 

820# 

4814 

825# 

5860 

8405 


12850 

12350 

12564 

12805 

Mantedaon 

124* 

1701 

1201 

1231 

OSvetfl 

490 

*40 

461 

441 

PotmaW 

27JD 

2495 

7595 

263) 

PJreS 

5165 

*906 

4905 

SOSO 

RA5 

15900 

14450 

15550 

15750 


23500 

21750 

31790 

7715# 

5 Paata Torino 

!4«5 

14410 

14H94 

1*750 

.Tetecort ttoUa 

121® 

11450 

11796 

1199/ 

TIM 

6275 

6100 

6155 

4190 

Montreal 

bxfastrtols Mac 343736 
Prevtoes: 344939 


49.15 

4B Si 

48)4 

49.15 

C*TseA 

77-15 

77,35 

S7J5 

2745 

CtaUBA 

39.15 

3935 

39J5 

3940 

CTFralSvc 

gpt 

42W 

47(4 

47 

GaMebo 

1834 

1865 

1865 

1880 

Gt- West LBecn 

3?» 

37 

j?ta 

37** 


4215 

41.95 

47 

*7to 


33 

s 

33 

33 


2865 

2035 

2040 

2835 

Not Bk Canada 

18 

I/M 

I/to 

18 

PwtefCorp 
(tower Fan 

38 

3Sto 

HAS 

351* 

37to 

35ta 

376# 

34** 

OaebecarB 

2T3 

27X5 

77V; 

7765 


10J4 

W* 

10J4- 

9*i 

RnytiBkCdP 

67 JO 

USD 

6760 

67.9S 


Oslo 

Aker A 

BeraesenDvA 

Oratorio &k 

DeonorakeBk 

Eton 

HaHeodA 

KvaeraarAsa 

Nonk Hydra 

Norte Sag A 

NfvnnedA 

DridoAtaA 

Pefta GeoSK 

Saga Petal A 

sdfeted 

TranHceaiOA 

StaRtaandAsa 


149 

193 

2730 

3130 

149 

aisn 

439 

405 

291 

146 

554 

407 

14650 

145 

595 

49.10 


OfiX Wee *8903 
PlWfadte *9045 

14630 147 14930 


18B30 189 

2640 2670 
3070 3130 
148 14830 
4450 47 

435 434 


193 

2640 

30.60 

147 

44 

438 


lAlsdi 
AXA-JJAP 
Bistanlre 
BIC 
BNP 

Canal Plus 
Carrefour 
Casina 
CCF 
Cetetem 
ChristianDior 
CLF-Deda Fran 
Credit Agricote 

Danone 

EH-AtMtof* 

EridankiBS 

Eurafisnev 

Euratumel 

Gen. Eon 


804 

400 

769 

1000 

27180 


780 787 779 
394 39430 396J0 
740 741 7*8 
974 997 999 
243 26X60 27490 


bnetof 

LataTge 

LOTantJ 

Krajl 

LVMH 

5uuLvraEain 

MlcWin B 

PmtotA 

PanodRlcard 

Peugeot at 

Ptamtifrt nt 

Promotes 

Renaufl 

Reel 

RtvPtriencA 

Scnofi 

5dirriter 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
SteGeoenie 
Soitocho 
51 Gobain 
Suer 

Synftett o 
TnomsonCSF 
Tori B 
Utiner 
Valeo 


1160 1128 1154 1137 

4268 4150 4150 4250 

780 277 27830 277 

290 27640 286 282 

692 646 670 690 

10*4 1026 1038 1028 

582 564 544 582 

1265 1265 1265 1292 

972 957 957 965 

685 465 665 678 

885 B40 842 888 

8J5 8J0 8.75 830 

7 675 6.90 6J5 

747 715 737 725 

40130 39630 39630 400.10 
826 808 826 812 

410.40 39830 405 40620 

1256 1206 1208 1236 

2554 2*51 2453 2547 

1647 1411 1612 1626 

70* 695 498 704 

373 34230 371 36630 

430J0 422 *2430 430.70 

311 30110 306-50 31130 
655 623 648 616 

2882 2800 7800 23*0 

2472 2585 2585 2603 

1B6J0 175 17930 179 

1700 1660 1660 1684 

251 24610 24830 25130 
573 552 557 559 

350 338.10 339.60 343 

1078 1046 1065 1073 

524 516 518 524 

79d 771 775 783 

3115 3051 3055 3115 

849 84* 84* B63 

1735 1690 1690 17J0 
7B5 772 778 772 

16940 161 16130 16630 

6IB 601 *0* 611 

125 11930 125 12030 

401.90 39X10 396*0 401 


Ncrdbanken 

PtajrrVU^tahn 

Santa B 
SCAB 

S-E Banken A 
SkaraSoFois 
Skarckn B 
5KFB 

SparbantenA 

5* HcntflesA 

VttvoB 


29430 

630 

370 

350 

675 

436 

276 

27130 

29X50 

367 

234 

176 

93 

341 

348 

23330 

18030 

13230 

266 

21830 


293 293 

615 620 

32730 353 

33230 335 

670 672 

42630 429 

271 272 

267 26630 
290 294 

256 261 

228 230 

172 174 

9050 9030 
327 330 

343 3*5 

226 229 

172 17230 
12830 129 

258 9SR5Q 

213 21430 


293 

628 

329 

341 

675 

427 

273 

27130 

293 

263 
232 
17S 
93 
33* 
34* 
232 

17730 

13230 

264 
219 


Sydney 


AB Ontotif* ; 817629 
PieVtoUte 268140 



Sao Paulo Taipei 


Stack MOM todtt 9473^2 
Prntodtr938UM 


BndesaiPCd 
Brail ma Pfd 
CerwaPft 
CESPPtd 
Copet 
Etetrobras 
toubanarPfd 
Light Serridas 


;Ptd 
PauSstaLaz 
SktNodonat 
SoaBCmz 
THebrasPto 

IS" 

TtievPM 
Unibanro 
UsmtinasPfd 
CVRD Pfd 


1130 
82000 
59JI 
7430 
1930 
590.00 
61030 
5*7 JO 
45000 
317.X 
19X01 
3600 
1130 
159.99 
T84J0 
J6DX 
370 JO 
4)30 
12.90 
2930 


1130 
81699 
5730 
7130 
19 JO 
56100 
609.99 
540.00 
445J1 
309 JO 
19X00 
3530 
10.98 
15600 
ISO® 
15235 
367 JO 
40J0 
1230 
28J0 


mo mo 

81699 82000 
59 JO 58J1 
72J0 72.99 
19 JO TO A9 
568J0 578J0 
609.99 60X00 
547 JO 54600 
44X01 469.90 
312J0 306J0 
195J0 19X01 
3X40 3X70 
11-35 10 J) 
15600 161 JO 
I BUI 18000 
157 JO 155J0 
36199 362J0 
4099 4099 
1231 1235 
29-39 2730 


GrtoyLifetaB 
QrannHwaBk 
ChtaoTungflk 
China Dewtori 
China Steel 
FiralBaik 
Formosa PkjsSc 
HuaNanBk 
tndCartmBk 
Not Ya Plastics 
Sirin Kong life 
TatwanSeri 
Tatung 

UldrticraBK 
17td World Chki 


152 

M7 

151 

148 

123 

118 

123 11940 

78 

75 

7740 

7640 

137 

12840 

136 

130 

31 JO 

31 

31 JO 

3160 

124 

118 

12240 

m 

64 

65 

66 

65 

12840 17140 

127 12440 

48 

66.50 

68 

tj. cn 

73 

71-50 

73 

7140 

117 

112 

116 

113 

1*3 

13640 

143 

134 

«J0 

48J0 

4860 

4840 

120 

114 

1 2D 11240 

65 

63 

6440 

64 


Seoul 

Dococn 

Daewoo Heavy 
Hjindai Eng. 
KmMrtn 
Boren ESPyw 
K orea E*cb Bk 
SKTeiecorn 
LGSeriran 
Pohoag ton St 
SamungDUay 


Caaa»sBelsdee;739J4 
Prevtoas 73058 

lObOOO 960X100000 98000 
7770 7460 7700 7550 

21500 20000 21400 21000 
122M 11500 12100 I21M 

27200 24800 27000 272X 
5150 4840 5070 5060 

498500 *61000 4700X *99000 
39400 37300 39600 37900 
64000 62500 62500 642X 
*6900 46200 46800 468» 
49000 68000 69000 68500 
9700 9410 9690 10000 


Singapore stmas tans: i wits 

Pratioos 1?7669 

Art) AicBiew 185 5J5 185 X85 

CerebaiPas 610 130X80X30 

OtyDevds 1610 iwo 12.70 1* 

“ ‘ “ ‘ 13 12-80 12.90 12-70 

083 0J0 0J1 0J1 

2030 HJO 2040 2030 

6*2 67? 672 67* 

1040 UUO 1040 1050 

2J6 153 233 232 

690 630 4J5 680 

170 338 338 334 

665 635 645 660 

180 17! 174 172 

694 692 6W 692 

650 64* 644 432 

_ 1X60 1X30 1X40 1530 

OS Union AF . 9.90 930 935 985 

PartaiavHdx 675 <30 430 4J0 

SwtaNBng 7.15 70S 7.15 7.15 

StagAJrlwejgn lira 1X70 IXJD 13J0 

SingLmd 7J5 740 770 730 

StagPressF 28.10 2730 2770 2770 

StagTechlAd 3J2 376 382 178 

SngTeteawm 276 172 27* 273 

TWLeeBMi, 2JB 2J7 2J8 2J8 

UtdindusMd l.is 7.14 1.15 1.15 

UtdOSeoBLF 1650 1620 1&30 1640 

WngTolHdgs 424 616 420 616 

*;lo I/JLiftAra, 


□a sir Form Ini' 
DBS foreign 
DBS Lot? 
FnaerA Heave 
HKLand* 
JonlMaiteM* 
Janl Sndegic* 
Keppef 
KeppdBart 
KeppdFtis 
“ Land 


Tokyo 

Afkuooto 

MNppenAir 

AMhT&OTk 
AeaMCbeni 
Asahi Glass 
Bk Tokyo MRsa 
Bk Yakahrana 
Bridgestone 

SSSeix 

ChuaokuEiec 
Dal Kipp Prinl 
DoW 

DaUchl Kang 
DahraBartk 
Daton House 
Da)vra5« 

DO! 

Denso 

Ead Japan Kr 

Fug Bart 

HachluniBk 

Hifadri 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

IHI 

llodw 

tto-Yototo 

ML 

Japan Tobacco 
JUSCO 
Kcp™ 
KansdElec 

8S5BT 

WnkIMppRy 
KUnBraaenr 
Robe Sled 
Kwatov 
Kubota 

Kyccera 
Kyushu Bee 
LTCB 
Maubal 
Marti 

MabaCotM 


396 39440 

<01 




Matsu EleeWfc 

284 

143 

538 

as 

146 

538 

290 

lti 

54? 

Stockholm 


5X16 Mob 3*4X45 
PreMMK3S25J2 

Mitsubishi 
Mitsubishi Ch 
MBsubstoEl 

398 48X93 

406 

AGAfi 

TIO 

108 1084# 109 

MJsubbhiEst 

147 

147 14440 

ABBA 

111 

10440 107 110.50 

Mitsubishi Hvy 
MSsrtiiMMti 

143 

145 

1*4 

teSDcrarafi 

734 

225 225 23050 

590 

W) 

590 

Astro A 

155 

143 MS 15340 

Mitsubishi Tr 

4U0 

*9 

49 JO 

AHasCepcoA 

245 

225 228 239 

MfcUl 


7140 

753 

35X 

923 

402 

1060 

2280 

606 

2790 

3510 

2040 

2000 

2430 

912 

1510 

400 

1400 

872 

8280a 

2850 

5400a 

2470 

48*0 

I6S0 

4790 

1700 

11« 

1290 

3*40 

1750 

*30 

571 

4910 

540 

9000B 

35*0 

422 

2250 

1490 

521 

348 

<72 

1130 

202 

BZ8 

504 
94*0 
1980 

525 

505 
2050 
4880 
2390 
1420 
1300 

336 

449 

1790 

BSD 

779 

1810 

1090 


MW 225: 2*28623 
PreMsas: 2013031 
1140 1150 1150 

747 751 754 

3500 3520 3500 

910 920 910 

593 599 598 

1050 1060 1060 

2230 2260 2250 

602 605 606 

2760 2790 2770 

3400 3510 3380 

2020 2030 2020 

I960 2000 1980 

2610 2620 2420 
890 90S 842 

1*60 1470 1490 

593 59* 595 

1370 1380 1370 
855 855 862 

B220a 8270a 8240a 
28)0 2830 2820 
5290a 5310a 5440a 
2430 2430 2620 
4460 4860 4620, 

1420 1440 1430 
4700 4790 4650 
Jiff 1*70 

11 a 1120 1130 
1280 1290 1290 
3550 3650 3510 
1490 1730 1480 
422 *30 434 

5*0 570 571 

4830 6900 6900 
535 S3? 52? 

8BOo 8970b 8830a 
3480 3530 3540 
608 618 420 

2190 2230 2200 
1430 1480 1630 

ai 52i 

343 335 

_ 473 670 

mo iiM mo 

199 202-198 

807 828 BO* 

499 503 503 

9380 9430 9290 
I960 1960 1970 
504 506 523 

490 500 -507 

3020 2040 3010 

4540 4870 4530 


517 

335 

444 


2350 _ 
1390 13 


2340 

1410 


12* 1290 1300 

320 324 331 

442 464 <70 

1720 1790 1700 
841 848 B43 

765 770 794 

1770 1790 1780 
10* 1090 1080 


The Trib Index 

Prices as otSMJPM Now York tmo. 

Jan. ». 1992= TOO 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to date 
% Change 
+21.28 

World Index 

180.87 

-1-23 

-0.68 

Regional Indexes 

Asia/Pacific 

132.70 

+0.20 

+0.20 

+7.51 

Europe 

190.85 

■227 

-1.18 

+18.39 

N. America 

211.94 

-2.00 

-0.93 

+30.90 

S. America 

Industrie* Indexes 

175.79 

+1.61 

+0.92 

+53.62 

Capita! goods 

232.94 

-1.90 

-0.81 

+36.29 

Consumer goods 

20050 

-1.54 

-0.76 

+24.20 

Energy 

197.98 

-1.12 

-0.56 

+15.97 

Finance 

137.98 

-1 29 

-0.93 

+18.48 

Miscellaneous 

183.92 

+2 JO 

+1.55 

+13.69 

Flaw Materials 

195.37 

-1.04 

-0.53 

+11.40 

Service 

169.22 

-1.13 

-0.66 

+2323 

umes 

269.43 

-0.27 

-0.16 

+18.10 

The International Hoiakt Trauuie Worm Stock index O racks ttw US. denar values ot 

280 IntemaionaBy tnuestaUa stocks from 25 countries. For mote information, a free 
booklet is /tvaOabte by wnttrn » Tf» Tift index, rflt Avenue Charles oe Gaube. 

32521 NmAByCeOax, France. 

CompHartby Btoonbenj News. 

High 

Lore dose 

P rev. 

High Lev 

dose Prey. 


1400 

789 

4710 

1450 

1980 

*99 


15* 1590 
770 7B* 

4710 4710 
1620 16*0 
1950 1980 
485 488 


10900 >0700 3 WOO 


1530 

789 

*710 

1630 

1950 

700 

10800 


Moeve 

Newbridge Net 
Narandalnc 
Horcen Energy 
Nthem Tehran 
Nava ■ 

Ctaex 


849 

83? 

849 

835 



5*6 

54/ 

5*3 

Peba Cdo 


333 

334 

335 



798 

870 

BOO 

Pear Petal 


719 

271 

221 

PUtedrSa* 

1590 

1560 

15/0 

1530 


1150b 

1130b 

1140b 

1140b 


Min 

4VJtt» 

5110b 

4950b 

Rogers Cantei B 

635 

677 

634 

631 


30U 

W7 

298 

297 

Stall CdaA 

1450 

1 WO 

1640 

1590 


13000 

12900 

13000 

12600 

Talisman Em 

824 

HQS 

8)3 

824 

Tec* 8 

4420 

4350 

4360 

*360 

Tetegtobe 

1700 

1440 

1680 

1660 

Teh* 


5ecora 8770 

SetouRwy 56*0 

SefcistiCfeni 998 

Settsui House 1200 

Seven^Jevwi 9100 

Sharp 1490 

ShftokD El Pwr 1910 


507 514 

8700 87*0 

5600 5640 

984 985 

1190 1200 

9060 7110 

1*70 1480 

1900 1910 
433 644 

3323 3*20 

1780 1790 

1250 12*0 

6980 *990 

10700 10800 
1050 1070 

1870 1910 

«6 496 

1920 1930 

292 296 

1170 1170 

3290 3330 

3390 3420 

9100 9100 

1940 1940 
1140 '1140 
1450 1470 

2210 2240 

6760 6850 

292 292 

674 485 

1780 1300 

1890 1910 

7B4 802 

730 738 

7780 2810 
926 932 

3*90 3530 

3130 3160 


5)2 

8840 

5640 

1000 

1180 

9090 

1*90 

1900 

432 

3350 

1810 

1250 

7050 

10700 

1080 

1880 

*97 

1940 

291 

1200 

H40 

3430 

9030' 

1950 

1130 

1450 

2220 

6840 

295 

474 

1290 

1910 

784 

733 

2790 

& 

3130 


Thomson 

TerDoaiBank 

Trauaita 
TransCda Pipe 
Trimark Finl 
Trine Hahn 
TVXGtid 
Wes to ns! Eny 
Weston 


2BVi 

71 

29.45 
32ta 

14X65 

1105 

32 

27.05 

2420 

2160 

1170 

107.15 
3510 
34^0 

26 

5190 

21.45 
381* 
41 JO 

29U 

SOW 

2X20 

3*1* 

*5 

1X70 

28110 

70W 

301* 

6-30 

27.15 
WJ 


27*4 27.90 
69 JO *9 JO 
2914 2930 
3130 32 >4 

13930 1*0 

11.95 12 

32 32 

27 27 

2190 24 

2110 22W 

1235 1170 
104W 107.15 
35 3X10 

34.10 34'* 
26 26 

5X40 5X40 
21 21 Ur 

38 38.10 
41-20 41 JO 
281V 28.95 
50JO 50 JO 
24 26-05 
3335 33* 

4435 *4*6 

1635 1630 
2730 2735 
69Vj TOW 

30.10 30.20 

6.10 630 

27 27J5 
92W 9435 


2X30 

7035 

291* 

321* 

1411* 

3ZW 
27 JS 

24.10 
W*< 
1230 

10X90 

3X05 

34b 

2535 

21b 

*5 

JR 

26.10 
34 

40* 
1635 
2X10 
70 
30J® 
635 
27 JS 
92b 


Vienna 

BceMer-UdiMt 

CredttondPM 

EA-CeneraB 

EVN 

Flu ghofen Wien 
OMV 

OestEleBra 
VA Stahl 
VATedi 
Wtenerberg Bau 


ATX tadac 143MJ 
PratieaB M52JB 

1041 1025 10281054.10 

573 54X80 56X90 54X10 
349) 3325 3369 346Q 

1644 1616142430 1443 

530 534-50 526 52* 

17451706.95 1716 17*0 

87230 866 067 873 

626-25 613 615 626 

2694 2615 2445 2481 
2480 2620 2435 2665 


Wellington nsE^atadBciffut 


trx lOtt tr.x 1500 


AJrNZeaJriQ 
Briefly lovl 
Carter Htii ad 
FtetdiChBldg 
FtatohChEny 
FtekhDi Foret 


Prevtoos: 2484.97 


Toronto 

AMW Cans. 
Albatr Energy 

AJcnnAJum 
AnkreanEni 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Nova Scotia 
Barrie* Gold 
BCE 

BC Telecomm 

Btacftera Pham 

BoH i bartterB 

BrasamA 

CoroecD 

CISC 

CdnNaHRrt 

CdnNatRES 

CrinOcddPti 

CdnPadfc 

Caeitaco 

DoIokd 

Dortiar 

ConabueA 

DuPadCdaA 

E riper Group 

EuraNevMng 

y-’-* — r.-i 
rtUllLU rttl 

Fatoanbridge 
Flridier ChaBA 
Franco Nevada 
GuKQtaRes 
Imperial OB 
bra 

LtirtnvB 
Loewi Group 
MaanilBldl 
MagnaloflA 
Metones 


TSEIndwMtil; <75X23 
PnriHKiHLii 


A55 451 4S3 451 

1-36 135 136 134 

178 3J2 176 174 

434 430 *30 434 

A« 4J8 493 487 

— 1-98 1.97 1.97 1.97 

ftetehOiPdper 142 337 332 339 

tjgnNrtwn 3J4 333 184 185 

TckraniNZ 730 731 738 733 

WflSMHOilon 11 J5 1132 1132 11.70 


27.95 
31ti 

51.15 

16.95 
571* 

6*30 
3X40 
4X30 
3*35 
39 
32 
3S70 
5*1* 
3930 
73>6 
3430 
35fc 
4X30 
40135 
31 tv 
1» 
3X20 
3130 
2X90 
41 JO 
397 

28.95 
2X30 
4X40 

10.95 
69V1 
til* 
501* 

21 X 

1940 
91 V. 
1115 


27*4 27 JO 
3130 31M 

4935 49M 
J4M 16.95 
57 57!* 

64.15 441- 

29J5 3030 
4130 4130 
331* 341* 

39 39 
31=70 31 JO 
3X35 35J0 
Silk 5* 
38.10 38J0 

69.70 6W 
3440 3430 
3460 3X45 
4X40 4X90 

40 4030 

30.70 3W 
1X65 1X70 
31.45 3X20 
-21 

2X80 2190 

41 41U 

395 395 

28J0 28J0 
231* 23hi 
43 42 1* 

10.70 1030 
48L40 4V 
40.90 41.15 
5015 5030 
2130 211k 
■*»« 

19 JO 1930 
9060 9090 
124 1X05 


27.80 
31 JS 
5060 
?4* 
5730 
6*ft 
304 
4X10 
34.90 
38 
32 
3X55 
51.05 
39 JO 
67.10 
3455 
3X40 
4X10 
39* 
3070 
1X65 
3W 
311* 
2X85 
42 
397 
20*5 
23* 
6X35 
1095 
48* 
41 JO 
5030 
1130 
49 
1X40 
9060 
1X80 


Zurich 

ABB B 
Adecco B 
AhsuisseH 
Arasa5eranoB 

Afci R 

BaerHdaB 
BaMsefldgR 
BRVisian 
Oba Spec Chen 
OorianfR 

Ens-Chenie 

ESECHdg 

HoMabrakB 

UectifenslLBB 

NesMR 

Novartis R 

OerflrnButiiR 

PtngesaHdB 

PtianaVtanB 

RjdWfltortA 

PbtiQPC 

Roche Hdg PC 

SBCR 

ScHncHerPC 

SGSB 

SMHB 

SulzerR 

Swiss RritoR 

SvmMirR 

UBSB 

Winterthur R 

Zurich AsiurR 



SPl WEB 37WL81 

Preti«*.-37#aJS 

2370 

7258 

2270 

2270 

57* 

548 

5/1 

i/I 

1*01 

1383 

IJV5 

1400 

7738 

2148 

■mi 

772(1 

875 

860 

m 

UTS 

?7» 

2S5 

2255 

2264 

3565 

3505 

3550 

3525 

12*1 

123# 

1235 

■230 

141 

13475 136.75 

141 

1085 

10*2 

1078 

1050 

20575 

540 

201 JO 20X75 
539 5*0 

■a 

6900 

6750 

6840 

6825 

4850 

*680 

4850 

4850 

1344 

1316 

1331 

1336 

400 

597 

597 

598 

1909 

1841 

1894 

1895 

2473 

2387 

700 

7444 

144 

156X5 

164 

161 

7070 

20)0 

7010 

7015 

926 

901 

925 

907 

2370 

2308 

2370 

2310 

316 

312 

316 

314 

14900 

14500 

14750 

14515 

4?6 

417 42X50 

til 

1870 

1830 

1851 

1830 

3115 

3050 

3090 

JIM 

MS 

846 

867 

8*6 

1159 

1170 

lt?9 

1165 

7145 

2115 

2123 

212R 

I8W 

1842 

1865 

1881 

I/O* 

1687 

1691 

1698 

1449 

1473 

1436 

1490 

402 

598 

599 

600 


l 





















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. JULY 25. 1997 


PAGE 17 



ASIA/PACIFIC 






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Kia Considers Selling 
Its Asia Motors Unit 

Move Could Restructure Industry 


(■•Hqihdbt Our Skiff Fit*i Pitpith hn- 

SEOUL — Kia Group, a South 
Korean conglomerate placed under 
bankruptcy protection by its cred- 
itors. said Thursday it might sell an 
automotive unit as pan of its effort 
to stay afloat. 

> The sale of Asia Motors Co. 
would probably spark a reorganiz- 
ation of South Korea 's auto industry, 
the world's fifth-largest, by opening 
the door to a merger or acquisition. 

“Kia is positively considering the 
sale of Asia Motors, as creditors 
suggested," said Min Jae Ki. a group 
spokesman, a day after the company 
said it would not sell the subsidiary. 

The group said it dismissed 23 
nonpermaneni advisers Thursday as 
pan of its plan ro trim 30 percent of 
its executive staff to cut costs. 

It also submined a letter to cred- 
itors pledging that the group's chair- 
man, Kim Seen Hong, and 20 other 
top executives would step down if 
they failed ro improve kia's op- 

f Seoul Pumps Up 
Faltering Banks 
With Ready Cash 

Bloomberg Nms 

SEOUL — The government said 
Thursday it would pump 1.5 trillion 
won (SI. 58 billion) into its crum- 
bling banking system, including the 
first cash injection into investment 
banks for la years. 

The money, which will be de- 
posited by the Ministry of Finance 
and Economy for 15 days at low 
interest rates, is intended to keep 
A open credit lines ro cash-starved 
companies that might otherwise col- 
lapse. More money may be made 
available if required. 

Many South Korean companies 
have scaled back investment at home 
because of a slowing economy. 
Some banks say there is more need 
for foreign exchange than for South 
Korean won; many plans to raise 
capital overseas have been put on 
hold as the country's financial prob- 
lems have raised borrowing costs. 

Banks decided last week to freeze 
S10 billion of debt owed by Kia 
Group to prevent Kia, South 
Korea's sixth-largest industrial con- 
cern. from failing. A series of bank- 
ruptcies among leading companies, 
including Hanbo Group and Sammi 
Group, have drained the resources 
of creditor banks. 

“We hope the money will help 
improve the banks ’ short-term liquid- 
ity." Park Hyung Soo, an official at 
the ministry, said. The deposits cany 
annual interest rates of 10 percent, 
rather than the 15-day interbank rate ■ 
of 12 percent. One trillion won will 
be deposited at 32 commercial banks, 
i) including Korea First Bank, Kia’s 
-• main creditor. The rest will be given 
to investment banks. 


nations. But they did not elaborate 
on the liming of the conditional 
resignation or the sale of Asia Mo- 
tors in the lener. 

Creditor banks, led by Korea First 
Bank, called on Kia to give up ma- 
nagerial rights and surrender stock 
owned by its executives in return for 
additional emergency loans. Kia' 
owes financial institutions $10 bil- 
lion. They also called for the dis- 
posal of Asia Motors. The commer- 
cial-vehicle division, to raise 
working capital. 

"It is unavoidable for Kia to sell 
Asia Motors in a bid to survive," 
said Na Byung Rok, a spokesman at 
Korea First Bank, “without that 
sort of step, creditors will be un- 
willing to aid Kia." 

Kia bad said it would sell assets 
valued at 3.1 trillion won ($3.47 bil- 
lion) and cut the number of its sub- 
sidiaries to 13 from 28 through mer- 
gers and sales to improve finances. 

Die LG Research Institute 
warned Thursday that a sburdown at 
Kia Motors and Asia Motors, whose 
combined sales amounted to 8.3 tril- 
lion won last year, would cut 1.5 
percentage points off South Korea's 
1 997 growth rate and throw £70,000 
people out of work. 

The private research institute run 
by LG Group said the closing of the 
rwo companies would cut the na- 
tion's gross domestic product 
growth to 4.7 percent from an ex- 
pected 6.2 percent this year. 

Meanwhile, Mazda Motor Corp. 
of Japan, one of the major foreign 
shareholders in the group's flagship, 
Kia Motors Corp.. said it would 
remain in the company despite Kia's 
crisis. Mazda and Ford Motor Co. 
together own 16.9 percent of Kia 
Motors, the country’s third-largest 
automaker in 1997 domestic sales. 

Asia Motors shares rose 280 won 
to 3,790 Thursday. Kia Motors was 
unchanged at 12,100 after falling 
5.2 percent in the past week. 

Also on Thursday, tens of thou- 
sands of union workers at South 
Korea's largest automaker, Hyundai 
Motor Co., voted not to strike but 
instead to accept a wage agreement 
with management 
A total of 72.51 percent of the 
voters were for the agreement 
which gave them a 7.76 percent 
wage increase. The union had de- 
manded a 9 percent increase, while 
management had offered 5 percent 
(Bloomberg. AFP. Reuters) 

■ Ssangyong Talks to Daimler 

Ssangyong Group and Daimler- 
Benz AG said they were holding 
talks on raising the German com- 
pany’s stake in cash-starved Ssangy- 
ong Motor, Reuters reported. 

The companies’ executives said 
the results of the negotiations were 
expected in about a month. 

Ssangyong Motor has had huge 
losses that it says are related to in- 
vestment in new models. Ssangy- 
ong’s debts are estimated at 3.2 tril- 
lion won. 



Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., the 
world's largest home-electronics company, is also the 
closest thing Japan has to Walt Disney Co., where a 
revered founder — though dead — still looms large. 

That is why unseemly charges of nepotism at Mat- 
sushita last week got big play in the newspapers. A 
former president, Toshihiko Yamashita, charged that 
the company's new executive vice president, Masayuki 
Matsushita, got his job last year because he was the 
grandson of the founder. 

The flap spoils the celebration of a turnaround in the 
company’s fortunes, hurts its image and could place a 
cloud over its future. Ike home-electronics giant is 
currently struggling to adapt to new trends such as the 
spread of digital technology, analysts say, and perhaps 
only a family member can tinker with the traditions 
established by the founder, Konosuke Matsushita, in a 
250-year business plan he laid out in 1935. 

Konosuke Matsushita was an orphan and high- 
school dropout who founded the company in 1918. He 
had a hit with bicycle lamps and went on to make 
batteries and radios before World War H After the war, 
in which Matsushita made wooden products for the 
military, the company's product lines mushroomed, 
extending to such items as vacuum cleaners, tape re- 
corders and stereo and color television sets. 

The founder filled 46 books with his management 
philosophy, which preached that companies should 
shoulder social responsibilities. His egalitarian man- 
agement style was widely emulated in Japan, and he 
became revered as the country's “god of business.’' He 
died in 1 989 at the age of 94. 

The very next year, the company made a huge 
misstep, buying the Hollywood movie studio MCA Inc. 
for $6.1 billion. The culture clash between brash Hol- 
lywood types and sober Japanese executives led to few 
hit films, though, and in 1995 Matsushita sold 80 
percent of MCA ro Seagram Co. for $5.7 billion, $400 


BUST: U.S. Bra Maker Maidenform Tumbles Into Bankruptcy Bank to Review China Dam 


Continued from Page 13 

— for example, by getting the same type 
of strap or color palette to work for five 
different bras — and manage their fac- 
tory orders carefully. 

With so many pieces involved, co- 
ordination is especially important Order 
inefficiently, and factories can lie idle 
for long periods, only to be over- 
whelmed at the last minute and unable to 
keep up with the workload. This results 
in not getting the products to the store in 
time — and several retailers have com- 
plained over the past year that, while 
they liked Maidenform’s lines, they 
were having difficulty getting the 
products in time to sell them. 

Maidenform, which like other compa- 


nies in its. field looked for growth 
through acquisitions, did not carefully 
manage the integration of operations 
when it bought a 92 percent stake in 
NCC Industries, another intimate-appar- 
el company, in 1995. 

"That acquisition diverted manage- 
ment’s attention, and they were not real- 
izing the synergistic benefits, which in- 
cluded cost savings in the back office 
and in operations, ’’ Ted Stenger, the 
new president of Maidenform, said. 

Further, the company was making up 
for inefficiency by overspending, had 
tapped out its bank loans and was not 
ready ro make a $4 3 million payment on 
senior notes due in September. 
Moreover. NCC had a shortage of ma.- 
terials needed ro make the apparel. 


which slowed production and stunted 
distribution, causing sales to decline. 

NCC lost $1.3 million in the first 
quarter, and its sales declined 46 per- 
cent. 

Maidenform will now consolidate 
several divisions to try to cut costs and 
get more performance from those di- 
visions. 

.Analysts say that because of its strong 
product lines and brand name, Maid- 
enform may very well emerge from 
Chapter 11a viable player, but only if it 
turns its focus on production issues. - 

"In the old days,” said Laurence 
Leeds, an analyst at Buckingham Re- 
search Group, "if yon did fair, you had a 
nice business. But now if you do fair, 
you go home.” 


SHANGHAI — The U.S. Export-Import Bank hopes 
to reassess China’s Three Gorges hydroelectric project to 
try to help U.S. exporters win contracts ro build the 
waterworks, an Ex-Im Bank official said Thursday. 

The bank’s board of directors decided in 1996 not to 
offer financing to China to purchase land-clearing equip- 
ment from the United States because of a lack of in- 
formation about the environmental impact of the dam. 
which would be the world's biggest waier-control project 
"There's a lot more to this project, and I'm very 
hopeful Ex-Im Bank can get the material that it needs in 
order to assist in future contracts where we can con- 
tribute, ” said Annmarie Emmet, the bank's business- 
development officer in China. 

C hina is reviewing tenders from several foreign con- 
sortiums. largely excluding the United States, to supply the 
first group of generating units for the project and will 
announce the winners tins month, Chinese officials have 
said. "We may have missed this round, but we would like 
to be in on future contracts,” Ms. Emmet said 
China is the second-largest recipient of Ex-Im Bank 
financing, receiving around $1 billion annually. 


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BREAKING SILENCE — J unichi Ujiie, president of Nomura Securities Corp,, Japan's largest 
brokerage, entering a room Thursday for a hearing at which he told Ministry of Finance officials 
for the first time that his company had paid a racketeer. He said Nomura had paid $33 million 
to Ryuichi Koike, an extortionist who blackmails companies, to buy his silence at a shareholders’ 
meeting. The hearing was the final step before the ministry decides on a penalty. The 
government could close the brokerage for as long as six months or revoke its operating license. 

The Name Game at Matsushita 

Founder’s Grandson Advances Amid Charges of Nepotism 


million less than Matsushita had paid for the U.S. 
entertainment conglomerate. 

That embarrassment followed a scandal in 1991 that 
- similarly sullied Matsushita's reputation, when, a sub- 
sidiary was found to have lent money to a stock spec- 
ulator. That cost the president, AkioTanii.his job just as 
he had begun ro steer Maisushita toward more so- 
phisticated electronic products such as computer mi- 
crochips. 

Profit at Matsushita slid through most of the 1990s as 
consumers spent less during Japan’s slowdown that 
began in 1989. But a rebound in sales of home ap- 
pliances such as televisions and washing machines has 
allowed the company to post stronger profits. The yen is 
weaker, exports are booming, and Matsushita is tapping 
into demand for a raft of new products such as computer 
monitors and high-fidelity minidisk music players. The 
share price has risen 25 percent so far this year. 

But Matsushita’s ability to milk home appliances for 
revenue faces a threat from competitors elsewhere in 
Asia, who are honing their skills as producers of low- 
cost televisions and audio players. 

That is why its chairman, Masaharu Matsushita, 84, 
is using the company's 2 trillion-yen war chest to invest 
in promising new fields such as semiconductors and 
computer components. 

Amid its turnaround, the company does not need a 
fight over succession now. But that is what it got after its 
former president, Toshihiko Yamashita, 78, last week 
termed the promotion of Masayuki Matsushita, 51, to 
executive vice president last year “strange" and added, 
“He became a vice president only because he is a 
grandson of the founder of our company.” 

The younger Mr. Maisushita won appointment as a 
managing director after a stint heading the company’s 
washing-machine division. The executive vice pres- 
idency is only one step away from being president, and 
from there it is only one more step to his father's job as 
chairman. 


1997 1997 1997 

Exchange •• index Thwwfey ^ ' 

. .. .Cks*' Cfosfe : Change 

Borig ftphg; BgngSfrBQy ,1539.23 7S,73&at >Q.ta 

Singapore; Strafe Times. -1,981.23 

Sydney - : 24>76*2ff' •-027 

T okyo Mtfctei-2a5 • 2fr28&23 ■ aftia&sf . «ft.77 

; ! ■ +1:14 

Saout- ;■ .: :-;^:pom|TOett© t«dex V< 73004..." 73&5B +1.16 

mm: 2,m&. “$5? 

Jakarta - •Ctoa^te : fe , ^-«koS ■ 718,19 ' 

We&agtnn ■ -MBSEr#)" ' TVmB 230 2,48p7 +029 

Source; Tetefcurs ta«eraali«iul Herald Tnhuru 


Very briefly: 

• Yaohan Japan Corp., a financially troubled Japanese re- 
tailer, saw its stock soar 45 percent on news that its main 
suppliers had pledged to continue delivering goods to tbe 
supermarket chain. 

• Japan's real -estate companies said shares rose 4.4 percent 
as a group after the nation's most powerful business group 
called for cuts in property-relared taxes. Property leasing 
companies like Mitsubishi Estate Co.. Mitsui F udosan Co. 
and Sumitomo Realty & Development Co. led the rise. 

• Sony Corp. is expected to report a first-quarter pretax profit 
of 57 billion yen to 80 billion yen ($493 million to S692 
million), compared with 43.8 billion a year earlier, supported 
by the residual positive impact of the yen's weakness along 
with strong sales of audio and visual products, analysts said. 

• South Korea’s securities houses, including joint-venture 
brokerages, recorded 70.7 billion won ($78.9 million) in 
combined losses in the three months ended in June, the Korea 
Stock Exchange said. The figure compared with a profit of 
97.7 billion won for the 33 houses in the April-June period a 
year earlier. 

• Thailand’s stock exchange said it would go ahead with its 
plan to relax its limit on daily stock-price movements to 30 
percent from 10 percent as of next Friday. afp. Bloomberg 


Thais Set Deadline for Hopewell 

Bloomberg News 

BANGKOK — Hopewell Holdings Ltd.’s contract to de- 
velop a transit system in Bangkok “could be canceled" if the 
Hong Kong-based construction and energy company does not 
present a viable financing plan by the end of the month, a Thai 
government official said Thursday. 

Hopewell said last week it could nor complete die long- 
delayed project as planned because of adverse economic 
conditions in Thailand and the drop in the value of the baht. The 
company is meeting London bankers this week to seek funds. 


Mondays 

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PAGE 30 


Sports 


World Roundup 


Bulk Keep Jackson 

basketball Phil Jackson will 

remain the coach of (he Chicago 
Bulls for at least one more year, at a 
reported $6 million, the second- 
highest coaching salary after the $7 
milli on Rick Pitino will make in 
Boston. 

The deal should assure that Mi- 
chael Jordan will return to the team. 
Jordan, who is a free agent, had said 
he would return to the team only if 
Jackson was coach. 

“Phil only wanted to coach one 
more year, and we only wanted Phil 
to coach one more year, ’ ’ said Jerzy 
Krause, Bulls general manager. 

Last season, Jackson was paid 
$2.75 million as he lead Chicago to 
its fifth title in seven years. 

(NTT, AP) 



Iota GfleV Agave Pnooc-Pitss 

England batsman Mark But- 
cher ducking a fast delivery. 

Late Strike by Australia 

cricket Pace bowler Glenn 
McGrath of Australia dismissed 
Nasser Hussein just before the 
close of play Thursday to give Aus- 
tralia a slight edge over England the 
first day of the fourth test in 
Leeds. 

England finished on 1 06 runs for 
three wickets. Because of rain, only 
36 of the scheduled 90 overs were 
bowled. 

• 5 aura v Ganguly scored 73 
Thursday to help India reach the 
final of die 'Asia Cup in Sri Lanka. 
Bangladesh made just 130 and India 
reached that target off 20 overs for 
the loss of one wicket. (Reuters) 

Muster Tumbles 

tennis Thomas Muster of Aus- 
tria suffered another blow on his 
favorite clay surface Thursday when 
he was knocked out of the Generali 
Open in Kitzbuehel by Slava 
Dosedel, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4. (Reuters) 

Sanders Deal on Hold 

football Barry Sanders's re- 
cord $34.5 million contract with the 
Detroit Lions was rejected Wednes- 
day by the NFL because the $1 1.5 
million signing bonus represents 
too big a percentage of the running 
back's salary. 

The Lions responded by trying to 
restructure die contracts of at least 
three other players so they could 
rework Sanders's contract and fit it 
under the salary cap. 

Red Wing Out of Coma 

ICE HOCKEY Vladimir Kon- 
stantinov of the Detroit Red Wings 
is out of the coma he has been in 
since a June 13 crash but is not yet 
fully awake, doctors said. (AP) 

Lomu Says He’ll Be Back 

rugby union Jonah Lomu said 
he plans to start playing again neat 
month. The giant New Zealand 
winger has not played since he was 
diagnosed with a rare kidney dis- 
ease in 1996. (Reuters) 


A ‘Servant’ Wins 18th Stage 

One U.S. Rider Mulls His Chances at Lifelong Goal 


By Samuel Abt 

Internatio nal Herald Tribune 

M ONTBELIARD, France 
— Another support rider 
seized the moment and 
won a daily stage of the Tour de 
France after a long solo break- 
away. 

• Frankie Andreu, an American 
rider, could only ride far behind 
and envy him. 

The winner of the 18th stage 
was Didier Rous, a Frenchman 
with the Festina team. Rous has 
done heavy labor for his team in 
this race, setting the pace for its 
leaders, sheltering them from the 
wind and chasing down their op- 
ponents. He does not rank in the 
top group of domestiques, like 
Neil Stephens, Festina’s winner 
Wednesday, but is rated a better 
. climber, which was necessary in 
this stage over four hying as- 
cents. 

Andreu, who rides with the 
Cofidis team from France, was 
realistic about the mountains. 
“They’re not for me,*' he said 
before the stage. “Same thing 
yesterday — I was in two or three 
breaks but was dropped on the 
climbs." 

As he acknowledges, Andreu is 
running out of opportunities to 
fulfill his highest goal — his first 
victory in a Tour stage. 

“The last two days are dead 
flat, for the sprinters," he said, 
not bothering to discuss his 
chances in the long time trial on 
Saturday. 

Not until the 84th Tour de 
trance ends Sunday in Paris will 
Andreu know whether he was right 
about the other stages, but he was 
spot on about the one Thursday. 

He finished 62d, 5 minutes, 29 
seconds behind, after Rous took 
off about halfway through the hot 
and humid, 175.5-kilometer 


(109-mile) journey from the 
charming city of Colmar to Mont- 
be Liard in eastern France. 

Rous completed his ride in 4 
hours 24 minutes 48 seconds, so 
clear a winner that he celebrated 
by whipping up the huge crowds 
along tne road as be waved his 
arms to encourage cheering and 
then imitated a man conducting a 
band. 

Life is so much fun for a rider 
who finishes first by 5:09. Second 
was' Rous's Festina teammate, 
Pascal Herve. 

Third, a second later in a sprint, 
was Bobby Julich, another Amer- 
ican with Cofidis, who has been 
riding extremely well this last 
week, gaining strength, it seems, 
as he grows confident that he will 
finish his first Tour. He remained 
in 18th place overall among the 
140 riders remaining of the 198 
who started the Tour. 

There was no change in the 
higher levels of the overall stand- 
ings, where Jan Ullrich, a Goman 
with Telekom, easily survived a 
few bad moments on the climbs to 
retain his lead of 6:22 over 
Richard Virenque, a Frenchman 
with Festina. 

Those climbs have been An- 
drea’s undoing as he strives for 
his first stage victory. 

“This Tour has been either 
dead flat or mountains," he said 
in an interview, and he is neither a 
climber nor a swift sprinter. He is, 
however, a superlative team 
worker and a man with a repu- 
tation for never quitting. Any- 
body who saw the bicycle road 
race at the Olympic Games in 
Atlanta and remembers the man 
alone in fourth place, chasing die 
three medal winners far ahead and 
holding off the pack behind, has 
seen Andreu at his best. 

This is the sixth Tour for him, 
and he has finished all five pre- 
viously. 

“It’s important to me to finish 
something that I start, let it be a 


one-day classic or the Tour,' ’ he 
said. “Here especially. ft's the 
Tour de France, the biggest thing 
around, a three-week race. 

‘ To me it’s an accomplishment 
finishing, although I wouldn't say 
it’s as much as winning a stage 
would be. But it's still an accom- 
plishment. It’s not an easy thing to 
finish. Every' day you’re going all 
out and on top of that effort, 
you're going on for 21 days." 

To answer a trivia question, An- 
dreu does not bold toe American 
record for finishing the Tour. That 
belongs to Andy Hampsten, his 
former teammate who retired last 
year and who happened to be vis- 
iting Andreu ’s hotel to say hello to 
friends earlier this week. Hamp- 
sten, twice fourth in the Tour, fin- 
ished eight of the races and won a 
stage which finished at the top of 
the prestigious Alpe d’Huez. 

“Go for it,” he said to Andreu. 
“Break my record." 

Andreu shook his head. 
“That’s not my pressing goal." 
he said “To win a stage — that’s 
the main thing. I don’t show up 
for the Tour dunking 1'ra going to 
put another notch in ray belt for 
fin ishing , I show up hoping to win 
something.” 

He has come close twice. The 
first time was in a sprint into Bor- 
deaux in 1993; the second on the 
Champs-Ely sees in 1994, when he 
was caught and passed with about 
400 meters to go after breaking 
away from the entire pack 

“Other than a stage victory in 
the Tour," he said “I'm happy 
with my career. I think I've made 
the most of the talent I have. I 
work hard, I train hard and 1 make 
the most of what 1 have. 

“It's a great thing to be a cap- 
tain and do the races for yourself, 
but I realize I'm never going to be 
a captain of a team. I’m never 
going to be a world champion. I 
have to be realistic — if I can help 
someone win a race, that's what 
I'll do." 



Ja.fcy Nacjtcien/RaMCT* 

Didier Rous of France riding toward a victory in the 18th stage of the Tour de France. 
Jan Ullrich of Germany held on to the yellow jersey and ‘a lead of more than six minutes. 


Ecclestone Relishes His Winning Whys in Formula One 


By Brad Spurgeon 

International Herald Tribune 


I N LESS than an hour on a recent 
Grand Prix weekend Beraie Eccle- 
stone, the little man with the thick 
glasses and messy full head of straight 
sliver-gray b air who owns Formula One. 
was interrupted nonstop by telephones, 
walkie-talkies and important visitors. 

Among those who climbed up the 
steep steps of his silver-gray bus with 
the tinted windows — sometimes called 
“The Kremlin” — to seek an audience 
were the former president of the In- 
ternational Automobile Federation, or 
FIA; the director of Ferrari team: the 
heir to the Honda Motor Corp. founder, 
tiie organizer of the Japanese Grand 
Prix; and the owner of the Arrows 
team. 

This weekend at the German Grand 
Prix in Hockenheim, Ecclestone risks 
being even busier in any given hour. 
Germany is one of the two countries — 
the other being Britain — where he 
plans to float his private company, For- 
mula One Holdings, on the stock market 
this autumn.. 

During the moments when Eccle- 
stone was not interrupted be talked 
mostly about the future of the sport, a 
subject, thanks to the coming flotation, 
on the minds of many in Formula One. 

Ecclestone himself seems little wor- 
ried about that future. 

“Formula One," he said, is like “big 
stage for a pop concert Teams come and 
go over tire years, like stars come and 
go. Elvis died, things still went on. 
When I go, the same thing will happen 
— Formula One will continue." 


A pop concert it may be. But while 
Elton John last year is said to have 
earned £12.8 million ($21.5 million), 
Ecclestone hauled in £54 million. For 
that he was called the world's highest 
salaried executive; the flotation is likely 
to bring him personally up to £1 bil- 
lion. 

In response to critics who caii it a self- 
enrichment plan, he said he was pushed 
into the flotation by the Formula One 
teams and the FIA. They wanted to 
know what is going to happen when the 
Ecclestone, who is 66, leaves. 

Formula One is in the name of his 
wife, Slavica, 37, who put the company 
in a family trust If he were to die, he 
said, Slavica would be in charge of the 
mt, and “that would have been a 
;er." 

But the teams are not happy about his 

CUL 

“There’s no cut," he said. “The 
agreement that we operate under has 
never changed." 

' First signed in the early 1980s, the so- 
called Concorde Agreement named for 
the site in Paris of the FIA headquarters, 
divides the teams’ share of TV rights 
and other spoils. Several teams palled 
out last December, inch' ding Williams 
and McLaren. 

“What it amounts to is the teams 
would like to steal some of the busi- 
ness," Ecclestone said. “They’ve got a 
contract" 

But while Ecclestone would also like 
to provide for his two girls, aged 9 and 
13, from his marriage with Slavica, he 
has no intention of leaving the show that 
most of those in the sport agree he is 
single-handedly responsible for making 


the success it is today. 

“My wife says I’m gojng to die in here 
and they're going to have to dig a big 
grave and bury me in the bus," he said. 

That bus is the mobile center of an 
ever-expanding empire. The son of a 
trawler-skipper in Suffolk, on tire east 

*We should have another 
bloody great sign saying: 
“If you smoke, it’s going 
to loll you.” So, they’ve 
got the advantage then of 
having a free advertising 
anti- smoking campaign.’ 

coast of England, Ecclestone earned a 
degree in chemical engineering at 
Woolwich Polytechnic in London. 

By 21 he was running his own used 
motorcycle and car business. He 
brought the Brabham Formula One 
team in the 1970s and won two con- 
structors’ titles. 

He is credited with bringing the busi- 
ness approach to a sport that was a 
pastime for rich gentlemen. (He is now. 
of course, a rich gentleman himself, 
owning several properties around the 
world, including a picturesque inn in 
Gstaad, Switzerland.) After becoming 
president of the Formula One Con- 
structors’ Association in the 1980s, Ec- 
clestone obtained from the FIA the 
sport’s world television rights. He fur- 
ther increased his power when his friend 
and former business associate. Max 


Mosley, won the presidency of the FIA 
and Ecclestone became vice-president 

He has shown a gift for being able to 
anticipate the most profitable directions 
for the sport, 

“It’s better to know in life what’s not 
right,” he said, "rather than what’s 
right. So you can put that right" 

' Team owners may complain about 
the way Ecclestone has set up the flot- 
ation by team owners, but most in the 
sport have a high opinion of his abii- 
ity. 

Mosley has said Formula One is 
“very lucky to have Bemie Eccle- 
stone.’ ’ Eddie Jordan, a team owner, has 
said, “History proves Bemie is invari- 
ably right." 

Ecclestone says he considers himself 
an entrepreneur. 

“When Henry Ford started Ford he 
was an entrepreneur," he said. “And 
it’s a company now." 

Just how far does he think Formula 
One can continue expanding? 

“I’ve no idea," he said. "It’s like 
anything. You have to either stop, or 
keep improving. So we keep doing 
things.” 

Of course, other forms of racing keep 
doing things too. The American CART 
series — formerly IndyCar — is be- 
coming international, with races in 
Brazil, Canada, and Australia, and it is 
planning races in Japan and Europe. 

“It's a different formula," said Ec- 
clestone, brushing off the potential 
threat as he would a pesky fly. “It’s like 
American football comes into Europe, 
and you ’re going to get people watching 
it. Formula One is like soccer. It works 
everywhere.in the world." 


The biggest recent problem for the 
sport has been the introduction of laws 
in Europe and Canada restricting to- 
bacco advertising. For Ecclestone it is 
just another example of how the world 
changes, and Formula One adapts. 

“I was one of those guys that was 
saying ‘Go east, young man,' rather 
than west," he said, referring to his 
support for a Grand Prix in Japan 20 
years ago. He now has plans for more 
races in Asia. 

A clause in the contract with every . 
Grand Prix venue allows Ecclestone to r 
withdraw the race should local laws 1 
threaten sponsorship. If tobacco laws 
make it impossible to advertise in 
Europe, Ecclestone said, * * We’d have to 
simply slim down a little bit our Euro- 
pean operation and move where we 
don’t have the problem." 

If he had his way, though, he'd fight 
advertising with advertising: At the cir- 
cuits, in addition to signs advertising 
tobacco, “we should have another 
bloody great sign saying: ‘ If you smoke, 
it's going to kill you.’ So. they’ve got 
the advantage then of having a free 
advertising anti-smoking campaign." 

Ecclestone himself has never 
smoked. 

“And I'm exposed to tobacco ad- 
vertising all the time," he said. “I don’t 
believe that it’s got anything to do with 
advertising. I think it’s just really a 
brand-sharing operation. In Sweden 
they banned it and the consumption 
went up.” 

After the interview, Ecclestone 
walked the paddock. “You all right?” 
he asked, “You w innin g**” 

Ecclestone is clearly winning. 


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Partizan Beats Croatia 
In a Milestone Match 


Carfulfdfy Our Staff f- nm Diipukitn 

Just four weeks after last 
season ended, the European 
soccer season kicked off again 
with the first-leg, first-round 
qualifying games of the UEFA 
Cup and Champions Cup. 

There were 35 matches 
Wednesday. The most atten- 
tion focused .on Belgrade, 


Soccek Roundup 


where Partizan played Croatia 
Zagreb in the Champions Cup. 
It was the match between the 
two old rivals in the Yugoslav 
league since war broke out in 
Yugoslavia six years ago. 

Tight security measures en- 
sured that the only action was 
on the field, where the hosts, 
Partizan Belgrade, delighted 
35,000 fans with a 1-0 vic- 
tory, thanks to a close-range 
shot by the forward Dragan 
Isailovic in the 84th minute. 

Zagreb’s manager, Mirko 
Novosel, said he was pleas- 
antly surprised by the wel- 
come his team received from 
Partizan officials. 


Romanian champion 
Steaua Bucharest struggled 
for a 3-3 draw with Bulgaria’s 
CSKA Sofia. Steaua, the 
Champions Cup winner in 
1986, needs an away victory 
in the return leg at Sofia on 
July 30 to advance. 

in Azerbaijan, Widzew, 
the Polish champion, beat Ne- 
fctch Baku in temperatures 
over 30 degrees centigrade. 

Rangers, the Scottish 
champion, was far loo strong 
for their hosts, Gi-Goto of the 
Faroe Islands. But the 
Rangers' 5-0 victory was 
marred by a rib injury to the 
Danish star Brian Landrup. 

Dynamo Kiev of Ukraine 
won at home against Barry 
Town of Wales, 2-0, while 
Georgia's Dynamo Tbsilsi 
won away against Crusaders 
of Northern Ireland, 3-0. 

In the UEFA Cup, Grass- 
hoppers defeated Coleraine 
of Northern Ireland, 3-0. in 
Zurich. 

Hadjuk Split, the Croatian 
champion in 1995, began its 
challenge for the UEFA Cup 



IVur Kujmi/x/Rf kiicr, 

Robert Prosinecki of Zagreb, right, fighting off Goran Trobok of Partizan. 


with a 4-1 victory in Lux- 
embourg against Greven- 
macher. 

The amateurs of Principal, 
Andorra’s first-ever entry in 
the UEFA Cup, lost 8-0 to 
Dundee Unitea of Scotland. 
The home team includes 
bricklayers, van drivers, a 
travel agent and a driving 
school instructor. 


“Overall, I’dhavetosaywe 
are quite happy,” said Andres 
Zapata, the Principal coach. 

South America Both Copa 
Libertadores semifinals were 
evenly balanced after the first- 
leg matches Wednesday. 

In Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 
Cruzeiro beat Colo Colo of 
Chile, 1-0, with a seventh- 
minute strike from Marcelo 


after a howler by Marcelo 
Ramirez, the Colo Colo goal- 
keeper. Ramirez dashed out 
of his goal only to lose the ball 
and leave Marcelo with a tap- 
in into the unguarded goal. 

In Buenos Aires, defender 
Claudio Ubeda scored twice in 
the second half to give Racing 
Club a 3-2 victory over Peru ’s 
Sporting Distal. (AP, AFP J 


Argentine Gets 
Havelange Vote 

Renters 

Joao Havelange has 
backed an Argentine. Julio 
Grondona, as his successor as 
head of FIFA, the governing 
body of world soccer. 

The 80-year-oid Brazilian 
is to retire as FIFA president 
next year. Grondona is the 
head of the Argentine Foot- 
ball Association. 

“Julio is a great friend — 
he’s like my brother,’' 
Havelange said in Buenos 
Aires, where he also backed 
the city's bid to p/ay host to 
the Olympics. “He’s a great 
leader who may continue 
along the road I took many 
years ago if he is elected pres- 
ident of FIFA. 

“But before that we must 
fight, especial ly against Euro- 
pean countries who want to 
place their candidates at the 
helm of world football." 

Lennart Johansson of 
Sweden, the head of UEFA, 
which runs European soccer, 
has already announced his bid 
to replace Havelange, 

Grondona is a FIFA vice 
pres ident and chairman of 
FIFA’s finance committee. 



i 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1997 


PAGE 21 




SPORTS 


lu T 






i . tas 


Clemens Shows Class, 
Not Age, as Jays Win 

He Gets 16th Victory vs. Brewers 


* JiSih.-..- • 

and a ;c.\; 


’•urdc Fr t - 
<~n >i\ man 


The Associated Press 

In less than two weeks, Roger Clem- 
ens will turn 35, but age is not slowing 
down the three-time Cy Young Award 
winner. 

Clemens became the major leagues’ 
first 16-game winner Wednesday night, 
pitching eight scoreless innings to lead 
the Toronto Blue Jays to an 8-0 win over 
■the Milwaukee Brewers. 

Clemens (16-3) needs just two more 
victories ro match his victory totals in 
the 1991 and 1992 seasons. He won 

Baseball Roundup 

his last Cy Young Award in 1991, when 
he was 18-10. and should easily pass 
that victory total this season. No other 
American League pitcher currently has 
more than 13 victories. 

Once again, the light-hitting Blue Jays 
.didn’t give Clemens much support, get- 
ting just four hits. But one of them was 
Joe Carter's 10th career grand slam. 

Clemens also had some help from the 
inexperienced Milwaukee pitcher, Jam- 
ie McAndrew (1-1), called up from 
Triple-A Tucson earlier in the day. He 
walked three batters in the first inning 
and hit two others with pitches. After 
McAndrew walked five straight batters 
in the fourth, including Orlando Merced 
with the bases loaded. Carter hit his 
second grand slam of the season to give 
the Blue Jays a 7-0 lead. 

Clemens lowered bis major league- 
leading earned run average to 1.54, giv- 
ing up seven hits to win his fourth 
straight start. He struck out seven, 
walked two and did not allow a runner 
past second base. 

“Roger made some quality pitches 
when he had to,” Blue Jays catcher 
Charlie O'Brien said. 

Athletics 5, Red Sox 2 Don Wengert, 
pressed into starting duty at the last 
minute, held Boston to one run over five 
innings as Oakland snapped a four- 


Scoreboard 


game losing streak. 

Wengert. who was sent to the bullpen 
after going 1-6 with an 8.03 ERA as a 
starter, scattered seven hits. 

Scott Brosius hit a solo homer and a 
sacrifice fly, and Damon Masbore and 
Jose Canseco also homered for the A's 
at Fenway Park. 

Mariners 6, Indians 3 in Cleveland, 

Omar Olivares won his first start for 
Seattle as Ken Griffey Jr.’s streak of 
games without a home run reached a 
season-high 13. 

Olivares, acquired in a trade with 
Detroit on Friday, allowed two runs and 
seven hits in 634 innings. 

Griffey, who has not homered since 
July 5 when he hit his 30th. was l-for-4 
with a double and a sacrifice fly. 

Royals 5, Twins i In Minneapolis. 
Tim Belcher became the first Kansas 
City starter to win since June 27. pitch- 
ing into the eighth to snap Minnesota’s 
five-game winning streak. 

Belcher, winless in six starts, scattered 
seven hits in seven-plus innings and al- 
lowed only one runner to reach second 
through the first six innings. 

Kansas City won for just the third 
time in 21 games. Royals starters were 
0-14 since Kevin Appier beat Milwau- 
kee nearly one month ago. 

Orioles 3) Rangers 2 Jeff Reboulet, 
who entered in the 10th inning, singled 
home the go-ahead run in the top of the 
12th as Baltimore completed a three- 
game sweep. 

Geronimo Berroa drew a lea doff walk 
in die Orioles' 12th. stole second, took 
third on Chris Hoiles’s fly bail and 
scored when Rebouler bounced a one-out 
single over Texas's drawn-in infield. 

Yankees 5, Angels 4 Anaheim second 
baseman Luis Alicea threw away a 
grounder in the bottom of the ninth 
inning as New York won its third 
straight. 

After the Yankees wasted a 4-0 lead. 
Chad Curtis doubled down the left-field 



TW WonJ.iJ Pim 


The Marlins' Gary Sheffield diving safely back to first base during a pickoff attempt as Florida beat the Reds. 


line against Shigetoshi Hasegawa to 
open the ninth. Jorge Posada then 
grounded to second, and after fielding 
the ball. Alicea watted for Hasegawa to 
reach first, but threw wildly as Curtis 
scored on the error. 

Tigers 8, White Sox 6 In Detroit, Matt 
Walbeck and Damion Easley each hit 
two-run homers as the Tigers overcame 
a four-run deficit. 

Willie Blair allowed Five runs and 
nine hits in seven innings to win his fifth 
straight appearance. 

In ihc National League: 

Marlins b, Reds 1 Florida knew it was 
adding a potent bar when the Marlins 
traded for Darren Daulton, bur it probably 
didn't figure on getting fleet feet, too. 

In his first start for Florida, Daulton 
showed off his surprising speed. He hit a 
run-scoring triple and later dashed home 
to score with a jarring slide as the Marlins 
ended a three-game losing streak with a 
victory over the Reds in Cincinnati. 

The Marlins acquired Daulton on 
Monday from Philadelphia. 

Bobby Bonilla and Charles Johnson 
homered during a five-run sixth inning. 
The burst included Daulton’s seventh 
triple of the season — he began this year 
with 17 triples in 3.235 lifetime ar-bais. 


<i tin Oi 


Major League Stan pinos 

AMERICAN UAOCJE 

EAST DIVISION 


\ • : . ■ 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Bdtbnare 

61 

.37 

A 22 

— 

New York 

58 

41 

586 

39. 

Toronto 

47 

49 

590 

13 

Detroit 

47 

52 

575 

I4V4 

Boston 

46 

54 

560 

16 


CENTRAL DIVISION 



Cleveland 

52 

42 

553 

— 

Chicago 

50 

49 

505 

4-A 

Milwaukee 

• 45 

51 

,469 

8 

Minnesota 

45- 

S3 

559 

9 

Kansas aty 

39 " 

56 

511 

13-6 


WEST DIVISION 



Seam* 

56 

44 

560 

— 

Anaheim 

54 

45 

545 

17, 

Tens 

47 

52 

575 

8'A 

Oakland 

41 

61 

502 

14 

NATIONAL LUOai 



EAST MVTStON 




W 

L 

Pd. 

GB 

Attartto 

64 

38 

527 



Florida 

57 

42 

576 

SVx 

New York 

57 

43 

570 

6 

Montreal 

52 

46 

531 

10 

PhlkMtelpNa 

29 

69 

296 

33 

CENTRAL DIVt8l ON 



Houston 

53 

48 

525 

— 

Pittsburgh 

49 

51 

590 

3V. 

5t. Louis 

48 

52 

580 

414 

Clnannatl 

43 

56 

534 

9 

Chkago 

43 

58 

526 

to 


-■j-y.:;- ■ - 


WEST DIVISION 

Son Francisco 57 44 564 — 

Los Angolas S3 48 -525 4 

San Diego 49 S2 585 fi 

Colorado 46 55 -155 fl 

WIMBMfl UNIMMH 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Chicago M 010 MI-6 11 0 

Detroit 006 020 Mt-B 10 0 


Baldwin T. CastiBo 171, Clemons (8) and 
Fab regas. Pena (8); Blair. Brocafl (8j. M. 
Myers IB), ToJones (81 and Walbeck. 
W-Bloir. 9-4. L— Baldwin. M0. 
Sv — ToJones (18). HRe-Chicoga Baines 
02), O-Guillen 12). Detroit Easley (IS). 
Walbedc 121. 

Anaheim OOO 004 000-4 9 1 

New York 022 000 001— 5 10 0 

Watson, P. Hards [7], Holtz (7), Hasegawa 

(8) and Krerter, TtLGreene (9); Gooden, 
Mendoza (6), Stanton (8), Nelson (8J and 
Posada. W— Nelson, 3-5. L— Hasegawa. 2-5. 
HRs— Anohem Salmon (18). New York. 
Hayes 17). 

Milwaukee ooo ooo 000—0 ■ i 

Toronto >00 510- OOr— 8 4 0 

McAndrew, Adamson (4). A. Reyes (7). 
VSkme (8) and Unto Qemetra. Quantifll (9) 
and Ofliten. W— Clemens. 16-3. 

L— McAndrew, 1-1. HR — Tor. Carter (13J- 
Oaktand 002 100 110-5 11 0 

Boston 001 000 100-2 11 0 

Wengert Haugftf (6), Groom (8), Taylor 181 
and Moyne Wakefield, Mahay <B>, Hudson 
18) and Halteberg. W— Wengert 5-9. 
L-Wokeflekt 4-1 1. Sv-Taylor, (18). 
HRs— Oakland, Mashore (3). Canseco (20), 
Brosius (9). Boston Garctoparra US). 
Kansas aty 040 001 000-5 10 0 
Minnesota 000 000 100-1 1 0 
Belcher, Casian (8), j. Montgomery (9) and 
MLSweeney: Hawkins, Fr.Rcdrtgirez (2). 
Trombley IB), Ritchie (9) and Stetnbadi. 
W— Belcher, 9-9. L— Hawkins. 2-6. 

Seattle 000 102 210-6 11 1 

Cleveland on ooo Ml— 3 11 1 

Olivares, Chariton (7), Ayala (8), Hoizemer 

(9) and Do. Wilson; Colon Mormon (7). Mesa 

(7), Assenmacher (B), Plunk (9) and Borders. 
W— Oflrares, 6-4, L-Coloa 2-4. 
5v— Hoizemer (1). HR— Seat. Sorrento (20). 
Baffireore 100 BIB 0M Ml— 3 11 o 

Texas 000 020 000 000-2 9 0 

Mussina, TeMothews (91, Orosco (9), A. 
Benitez UO), RaMyere (II) and Hailes. 
Webster (12); Witt Gunderson (8). Wettetond 


(9j, Patterson (ID and H. Mercedes. I. 
Rodriguez (10). W-Po-Myrn. 2-3. 
L— Patterson 6-4. HRs — Baltimore.. R. 
Palmeiro (21). Texas. L Stevens (||). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Atlanta 000 000 010-1 5 0 

Chicago DM 200 Olx-3 1 0 

Millwood C. Fox (8) and J. Lopez: Tapani 
Patterson (81. T. Adorns IB). R. Tatis (B). 
Ro|as (9t and Houston. W— Tapani 1-0. 
L— Mfllwood 1-2. Su— Rojos (13). 
HR&— Ationia, Bautista (2). Chi a. Sosa not. 
Philadelphia 30) 000 000—4 9 3 

San Francisco 307 600 00x— 16 15 t 

M .Letter, Ruflcom I3j. R. Hants (4), 
Gomes (6), Brew (83 and Parent 
Lieberthal (6); Estes. Carlson 16). D. Henry 
(8), R-Rodrfguez (9) and R- Wilkins. 
W-Estes 13-4.L— M. Letter 5-11. HRs-San 
Frandsca Bonds Qt>). Mueller (4). 

Florida 001 005 020—8 12 I 

aachntr ooo ooo 010-1 7 2 

AFemanda. Powell (9) and C. Johnson- 
Morgan, Sullivan (6). Fe.Rodrig uez (8) and J. 
Oliver. W— A. Fernandez, 11-8. L-Wtargan, 
3-8. HRs—Florida Bonilla (10). C. Johnson 
(10). Cincinnati, R. Sanders 19V 
Houston 3M 201 010-7 It a 

St Lout* 001 010 000-2 5 0 

Holt Magnante (5). Lima (9) and Ausmus 
5latnemyre. Frascotore (S), Beltran (6). 
Ludwick (7), Petkovsek (9) and Lampkin. 
W— Magnante, 3-0. L— Sfafttemyre. 9-7. 
HR— Houston. T. Howard (31. 

Pittsburgh 001 0M 000-1 4 2 

San Diego 241 000 20&-9 14 0 

Uebec. Christiansen (2), P. Wagner □), 
Ruebef 0), Sadoacsky (8) and Krndaik 
P5mittv Bergman (B) and Romero. W— P. 
Smith, 4-1. L— Ueber, 6-T0. HR— Son Diego. 
Romero (2). 

New York QT0 100 000—2 9 1 

Los Angeles 000 010 000-1 4 0 

Bohanon. Lidle (6). McMichael (8), 
Jo-Fronco (9) and Hundley: D -Reyes, Osuno 
(6), Dretfert (9) and Prince. W— Bohanon 2- 


I. L— O. Reyes. 1-2. Su— Jo. Franco (261. 
HR— Los Angeled Prince 12 ). 

Japanese Leagues 

ALL-STAR GAME 

Pacific 0M 021 0M - 3 6 0 

Central 020 300 01k — 6 9 0 

Ntshhjuchi (Lions), Gross (Flghtere) (3). 
Hoshmo [Blue Wave) (5). Toyoda (Lions) (6). 
Nomura (BlueWave) (7), Takashi IshE 
(Lions) (8). Shanoyanagi (Fighters) (8) and 
rton [Lions). Jojima (Hawks) (5); Masa 
Yamamoto (Dragons), Yoshii (Swallows) (3), 
kuwata iGtonfs) (6), Yomauchl (Carp) (7), 

Sasaki (BayStaro) (8), Sun Dong-yol 

(Dragons) (9) and Furuta (Swallows), 
Tanfehige (BayStots) (7). W — Yamamoto 1- 
0. L — Nrehiguchi 0-1. HRs — Central. 
KWoharo (Gtants) 0) (2). Matsu I (Giants) 
d). A — 31.194, (sW 


UEFA CUP 

PBEUWNART ROUND. FIRST LEO 
GROUP D 

Neuchatef Xamax 7. Tiligul Tbaspol 0 
Grevenmadierl, Hajduk Split 4 
Inter CableTel Canfltf a Celtic 3 
Mypa-47 Antalankoski l, AppaJL Limassol 1 
GROUP c 

KR Reykjavik Z Dinamo Bucharest 0 
Vojvodlna Novi Sad a Viking Stavanger 2 
Grasshoppers 3, Coleraine 0 
Bohemians Dublin ft Ferencvaros 1 
GROUP D. • 

JaMonec 5. Kara bo kh Agdam 0 
Odra Wodzislaw 3, Pobeda Prilep 0 
Daugava 1. VPnJdo Poltava 3 
Group E 

Hit Garia 2 Otelul Galatl 0 

UlpestAKI KlaksvikO 

Brann Bergen 2, Neflodilmlk Burgas 1 


Padres 9, Pirates i Tony Gwynn went 
2-for-2 and raised his average to .390 
before leaving after the third inning 
because of tightness in his left ham- 
string. He was pulled as a precaution, 
and San Diego manager Bruce Bochy 
planned to rest him Thursday against 
visiting Pittsburgh. 

Gwynn hit a run-scoring single in the 
first inning and a two- run double in the 
second. He appeared to hurt himself later 
in the inning while running to third. 

Rookie Mandy Romero went 3-fbr-4 
with a home run as the Padres won their 
fourth in a row. 

Mats 2, Dodgers i Fill-in starter Brian 
Bohanon pitched five tidy innings, and 
retie ver John Franco escaped a ninth- 
inning jam as New York won at Dodger 
Stadium. 

Bohanon allowed four hits, including 
Tom Prince’s home run. 

An error and a passed ball gave Los 
Angeles a runner ar second base with no 
outs in the ninth. But Franco struck out 
Eric Karros and retired Todd Zeiie on a 
fly ball and Wilton Guerrero on a 
grounder for his 26th save. 

Astros 7. Cardinals 2 Houston com- 
pleted a 5-0 road trip as Thomas Howard 
homered and drove in three runs. The 


Astros won three times in Montreal and 
twicein Sl Louis and have won seven in 
a row on the road overall. 

Cubs 3, Braves i Kevin Tapani made 
an impressive debut for the Cubs, albeit 
three months later than they had hoped 
to see him. in beating Atlanta at Wrigley 
Field. 

Tapani signed a three-year, Sll mil- 
lion aeal in the off-season after winning 
13 games for the White Sox last year. 
But he had finger surgery in April and 
did not come off the disabled list until 
Wednesday. 

Tapani allowed five hits in seven- 
plus innings, striking out nine and walk- 
ing none. He had retired 14 straight 
batters when Danny Bautista led off the 
eighth with a home run, cutting the 
Cubs’ lead to 2-1. 

Giants 16 , Phillies 4 Barry Bonds hit a 
grand slam and Bill Mueller had four 
hits and drove in five runs as San Fran- 
cisco romped at home. 

Bonds and Mueller both homered 
during a seven-run third inning. Bonds, 
who has 26 home runs this season and 
360 in his career — one short of Joe 
DiMaggio for 43d place on the lifetime 
list — left after the fourth inning with 
the Giants already ahead 16-4. 


Bid to Buy 
Islanders 
Results in 
Fraud Case 


The Asst* iiitcd Press 

UNIONDALE, New York — In a 
case described by prosecutors as “a 
tangled web of lies and broken prom- 
ises,” John Spano faces fraud charges 
stemming from his attempt to buy the 
New York Islanders. 

“Mr. Spano, in an attempt to buy the 
Islanders, made several false statements 
overestimating his net worth, which 
were relied upon by Fleet Bank, the 
NHL, as well as John Pickett,” the 
Islanders’ owner at the time, said a 
prosecutor. Joseph Conway, on 
Wednesday. 

Spano returned Wednesday from a 
vacation in the Cayman Islands for ar- 
raignment in U.S. District Court in Uni- 
on dale on charges of wire fraud and 
bank fraud. He was ordered released on 
his own recognizance pending the post- 
ing of a S3 million bond. 

After the hearing, Spano’s lawyer, 
Nicholas Gravante Jr., declined to com- 
ment. He has said that Spano is in- 
nocence. 

Spano is accused of making fraud- 
ulent claims to obtain the SS0 million 
loan from Fleet Bank that he used ro buy 
the team from Pickett in April, making 
false statements to support his loan ap- 
plication. committing fraudulent acts to 
close a related deal to buy the team’s 
cable-television rights and spending 
several hundred thousand dollars of the 
team’smoney. If convicted on all counts 
against him, Spano faces up to 30 years 
in prison and a $250,000 fine. 

Spano, 33. was given NHL approval 
to purchase the Islanders from Pickett 
for $165 million in January, but was 
suspended from day-to-day operations 
of the team last month, after Pickett said 
he missed a scheduled $17 million pay- 
ment. On July 1 1 , Spano forfeited his 
ownership of the team. 


IUKORIAN CUP 

Corstructorul Chisinau 1. MPKC Mozyr 1 
Pynic Yerevan a MTk Budapest 2 
Steaua Bucharest 3. CSKA Sofia 3 
Vafletlu.l, Skotita Riga 8 
Deny aty 0, Mari bar Branik 2 
Crusaders I. Dynamo Tbilisi 3 
Gl Gatu 0, Glasgow Rangers 5 
Sion 4, Jeunesse Esch Luxembourg 0 
uawnrcAbous cm> 

SEMIFINALS 

Racing Club 1 Sporting Cristat 2 
Cruzeiro 1. Cola Cola 0 


Tour pe Framce 

Lading nroulte Thuraday In the 1 755km 
(101 -Smiles) iBtti stage Colmar to Montbe- 
tad: 

I. Dfdler Rons, Franca Fesffno.4 hours, 24 
minutes, 48 seconds Z Pascal Henre. 
France, FestintvfcW behind. 3. Bobby Juildw 
United Stales. Cofltfi*, same time, 4. Laurent 
Romo France, TVM, sJ. 5. Angel Castro 
Spain, Banesta, a.t. s. Jeon-Cyril Robin. 
France, U5. Postal Service s.1, 7. Laurent 
D U faux, Switzerland. Putina. 5:1 Z 8. Danlele 
Nardefio. Italy. Mapei, 5:14, 9. Manuel Bel- 
tran, Spain, Banesta sJj 10. Laurent 
Modouos, Franca Latin 5:16. 

overall, i. Jon Ullrich. Germany, 
Telekom, 9038:01 Z Richard Virenque. 
Franca Futtna. &2Z 1 Marco Ponton I. Italy. 
Mertntone Una 10:13,' 4. Fernanda Escortfn, 
Spain. Keima 16d% S. Abraham Diana 
Spain, Banesta Ifoflfc 6. Francesco 
Casagnmia Italy, Saeca r7:I4.- 7. 0 fa roe 
Rfls, Denmark, Telekom, 1 8riJ7i a J use Maria 
Jimenez, Spain. Banesta 23^2i 9. Roberta 
Conti, Italy, Mercatone Una 2830; I0 l Lau- 
rent Dufmm, 2929. 


ASIA CUP 

INDIA VS. BaWQLADESH 
THURSDAY, M COLOMBO 
Bangladesh 130-843 were 
India 132-1 IS overs 
India def. Bangladesh &y 9 wickets 
India to face Sri Lanka .in the final. 
FOURTH TUT 
ENGLAND VS. AUSTRALIA 
THURSDAY, SI HEADING LEY, ENGLAND 
England 106-3 


baseball 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Baltimore -Assigned C Tim Laker to 
Rochester. IL 

Chicago -Recalled RHP Chris Clemons 
tram Nashville, AA. Put RHP Bill Simas on 
15-doy disabled fist. 

Milwaukee -Put Marc Newfletd on 15- 
day disabled Sst. Recalled LHP Jamie McAn- 
drew from Tucson, PCL. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Cincinnati -Reinstated 3B Terry Pendle- 
ton from 15-day disabled list and gave him his 
unconditional release. Optioned INF Jeff 
Branson to Indianapolis AA. 

MONTREAL— Annou need resignation of Ed 
Creech director at scouting, effective at end 
at this season. 

NEW YORK— Bought contract of LHP Brian 
Bohanon from Norfolk, IL Optioned OF 
Shawn Gilbert to Norfolk. Transferred RHP 
Rick Trilcek horn 15-day to 60-day (Bsabied 
list. 

SAN Francisco —Signed RHP Jason GrilE 
to a 1998 minor- league contract. 

Pittsburgh— Recalled RHP Paul Wagner 
from Carolina SLOpttoned RHP Jose Silva to 
Calgary. PCL 


MEIOTMll 

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 

Chicago -Agreed to terms with Phlt Jock- 
son, coach, an 1 -year contract extension. 

Denver— S igned F Tony Battle to 3 year 
contract. 

golden state -Named Rad Higgins as- 
sistant coach. 

MIAMI— Signed G Charles Smith to 3-year 
contract. 

Orlando —Signed F Johnny Taylor. Re- 
signed F-C Amol McCaskBL 

Philadelphia— Signed F Marta Mlllc 
Signed F Ketau Stewart. 

TORONTo-Re-sIgned F Carlos Rogers to 5- 
year contract 

UTAH-Signed G Jaajue Vaughn to 3-yeor 

“ nt^K, ■ FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

Arizona— Waived DT Blaine Berger and 
LB Wesley Leasy. Released LB Devon Mc- 
Donald OL Ben Kaufman and WP K.O. 
Kectaiuhi. Announced S Eric Castle, OL AHen 
DeGrafferirekf and DL Matt Rfc» left 
camp. Re-signed OL Ben Kaufman. 

ATLANTA— Released C Darius Smith. OT 
Bob Go! tro and S Sean Boyd. 

Baltimore -Signed C Matt Cravens. 

buffalo— R eleased Wfi Kendall James 
and DB Dwayne Provo. 

Carolina— Pul LB Jon Evjen on reserve- 
reltred list. Signed LB SedricClart. 

CINCINNATI -Waiwd S Kenny Wilkins, 

DETRorr— Signed RB Barry Sanders to 5- 
year contract 

green bay— Claimed SS Sean Boyd off 
wo wets from Falcons. Released CB Matthew 
Domett. Signed DE Elliott Fortune. 

HOUSTON— Signed Floyd Reese, gerieral 
manager, to 4-year contract extension 
through 2001. waived WR Derek Russefl. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Signed WR Levi Kealatuhi 
off waivers from the Arizona 

KANSAS -Signed LB- DE Roy Jacobs to 1- 
year contract Signed DE Dan Wffiams. Put 
CB Jomes Hasty on reseive-tfld not report 
list. 


M [AML-Signed WR Scott Miner to 1-year 
contract. Released C Cal Dbcon. 

NEW ENGLAND -Signed WR Michael 
Dritleln. Released G Marquln Bivins. 

NEW YORK JETS-Signed LB James Farrior 
to 5-year contract. Terminated contract at LB 
Bobby Houston. Activated OB Glenn Foley 
from physically unable to perform fist 

Oakland— Signed DB Calvin Brandt 
Philadelphia — Released C Marc Lamb. 

SAN Diego — R eleased WR Jimmy ORver 
and WR Steve Daniels. Signed WR Damion 
Johnson. 

san franci*co— W aived P Tucker Phillip 
and FB Jeff Mackovicka. 

TAMPA BAY— Signed WR Reidel Anthony to 
6-year contract. Signed CB Anthony Paricer 
and OL Frank Middleton to 3-year contracts 
Waived CB Charles Oimry and LB Warden 
Rouse. 

TENNESSEE -Re-signed WR Derek Rus- 
sell. 

WASHINGTON— Signed WR Felman Malvo. 

HOCKEY 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 

BUFFALO— Named Unity RuH coach, and 
signed him to multiyear contract 

Calgary— Named Rich Preston assistant 
coach. 

L05 ANGELES— Re-sjgned LW Don Bytsma 
tol-yeorcontrad. 

NEW YORK ISLANDERS— Srgned RW Dane 
Jadcson 

PHOENIX —Signed D Don Foe fit to 3-year 
contrad. 

PITTSBURGH -Named Mike Eaves. Dan 
Jackson and Tony Word assistant coaches. 

TORONTO— Re-signed F Sergei Berezin Too 
mutftyaarcanfrad. 

COLLAGE 

iowa state- A nnounced DeAndre Harris, 
senior basket baH guard, will transfer to an- 
other school. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1997 


POSTCARD 


Camping in Crimea 


Without Yiddish, What Future for the Forward? 


By Michael Specter 

New York Tima Service 


Y ALTA, Ukraine — 
There is a kingdom of 


A There is a kingdom of 
children set above the rocky 
coast here, a Crimean won- 
derland surrounded by spruce 
and bathed in the sweet 
breezes of the Black Sea. 

Millions of Young Pion- 
eers, Soviet children draped 
proudly in red kerchiefs and 
bursting with socialist ideals, 
always considered this place 
— the Artek Youth Camp — 
thepromised Land. 

For those lucky enough to 
be plucked from their factory 
town or collective farm (or to 
have powerful parents), a 
month at Artek was the 
highest reward that die work- 
ers ’ state could bestow upon a 
promising youngster. 

“For the children of the So- 
viet Union this place was 
heaven on earth,' ' said Sergei 
Goncharov, director of inter- 
national programs at Artek, 
which is host to 5,000 campers 
each summer month, ‘it’s 
still heaven. It's just heaven 
for different people now.” 


longer thunder across the 
coastline. The open-air aud- 
itorium where Nikita 
Khrushchev, Leonid Brezh-- 
nev and -Yuri Gagarin spoke 
now offers film festivals and 
rock groups. T-shirts by Calv- 
in Klein have appeared 
among the usual uniforms of 
blue and white. 

These days if you want to 
spend a month at Artek you 
need to come up with $1,000. 
That’s not much if your father 
owns a villa in Cap d’ Antibes. 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Post Service 


N EW YORK — Some of this city 's most 
prominent editorialists, academics and 
intellectuals lately have been waxing nos- 
talgic about a New York institution now 
personified by a half-dozen elderly men 
hunched oyer rickety, ancient typewriters in 
a charmless office. 

. These men — not all in the- best of health 


and able to put in a full day’s work — are 
what remains of die Yiddish staff of the 


Very different people. 
When Soviet leaders wanted 
to show off the ruddy per- 
fection of their next gener- 
ation, Artek was always the 
display case. Even if you 
were among the chosen — the 
best student in your class, per- 


haps, or die beaming child of 
a Hero of Soviet Labor — you 


a Hero of Soviet Labor — you 
were permitted to come here 
just once in a lifetime. 

But as Bungalow 5 goes, so 
goes the nation. Fifteen years 
ago there were 30 million 
Young Pioneers in the Soviet 
Union, all between 7 and 16. 
Far fewer than 1 percent of 
them ever made it to Artek. 
Now if you have enough cash 
you can return each year. 

Socialist theme songs no 


Opened in 1925 with 80 
campers and the notion that 
there was no better place for a 
youngster to stay healthy and 
learn the value of self-reli- 
ance, Artek grew to become 
an institution with its own 
orchards, dairy, far mland s and 
2,500 full-time employees. 

The Communist rituals are 
gone now. No more ideology 
classes or inarches through 
the potato fields in gas masks. 
Instead of hoping to listen as a 
powerful party boss from 
Moscow describes the next 
wave of history, children now 
have the opportunity to take 
classes in management, mar- 
keting and sales. 

They can I earn to sail and 
occupy themselves with other 
formerly bourgeois pursuits 
like archery and tennis. (Polo 
has been discussed but so far 
found impractical.) 

Summer remains the favor- 
ite time here. The fruit is fresh 
and the tomatoes aze abund- 
ant The smell of honeysuckle 
mixes with the ocean breeze. 

“Communist or capitalist, 
this place is where I want to 
be," said Marina Oierenyen- 
ko, a 21-year-old counselor 
who has worked at Artek for 
four years. “I don’t care about 
the ideology, and I don 't think 
the kids do either. I doubt they 
ever did. It’s a camp, after all, 
not a battlefield.” 


what remains of the Yiddish staff of the 
Forward, or Der Vorwaerts. once celebrated 
as the most influential foreign-language 
newspaper in the United States. 

Now marking its 100th anniversary amid 
growing uncertainty about its future, the 
Forward is known as the paper that did its job 
so successfully that it has come to the brink 
of putting itself out of business. 

To survive into a second century, the 
Forward has had to start thinking about ways 
to reinvent itself. It is experimenting with 
moves away from Yiddish! seeking to attract 
new audiences with editions in English and 
Russian. 

The English edition, in particular, has 
aroused considerable interest because of its 
aggressive, no-sacred- cows coverage of Jew- 
ish affairs under its editor, Seth Lipsky, a 
graduate of the Wall Street Journal's editorial 
page, and his staff of young reporters. 

The English version doesn’t always sit 
well with many old-line readers who find 
Lipsky’s combative conservatism jarringly 
at odds with die Forward's foundations in 



N-'f'V- 1' ...I 

a* t 'h- . 

' * v ’■ ‘JkV 

- :i 



English-language newspapers. , His ; message, 
ramed into the Forward, deah with i assun- 
Srion as necessary and inevitable for sur- 
vival in the new world. 

Shan built a devoted readership firom 
sweatshop laborers .and pushcart peddlers 
with detailed, colorful coverage of New 
York's politics and its nascent labor mov*. 
mS*. Md he added a high-toned sute, pub- 
Shing the work of the best Yiddish poets 
andnovelists. One, Isaac Basheyis Singer,. 

?S^relebb^k^bW . 

But the Forward's basic message was un- 
derscored by Cahah’s lead edironal on his. 
first day as editor: "Send Your Quldrentp 
College if You Can, but Don t IfA :.,Ttam : 
Become Disloyal to Their Parents. It set fee 
tone for future Forward articles that would 


rone ioi : — _ , ■ 

attempt -to act as a bridge between America 
and the shtetl. They covered ev^y-coa- 


auu LUC 3 IIKU. JUVJ , ' 

ceivable subject . including one, Funda- 
mentals of Baseball Explained to Non-/ 
Sports,” which came complete with a dia- 
gram of the Polo Grounds. . . 

B v far the most popular and famous tea- - 
tare was the "Bintef Brief” ( Bundle of 
Letters”), where readers wrote in to seek 
advice about their most personal concerns 
and aspirations. 

If me people who wrote to me Buitel 
Brief’ have a present-day counterpart, it, is 
the immigrants from the former Soviet Un- 
ion, whose population in the New \ ork area 
has swelled to almost 400,000 in recent years.. 
An estimated 95 percent of them are Jewish,' 
and in December 1995, the Forward began a. . 
weekly Russian edition to cater to tneir_ 
needs, with a circulation now of 10,000. /V-; 

It carries a heavy dose of news about die • 
Russian immigrant community, particularly, 
its problems of adjustment. It even carries 'a 
Hebrew lesson in each issue. . 

As to the descendants of those earlier 
immi grants who were the Forward’s original 
audience, they are largely successful busi- 
ness and professional people. 

The English edition, a weekly established 
in 1990, is hoping it can lay the foundations 
for a new kina of paper by establishing with 
the new generation the same bonds of pas- 
sion for Jewish issues that existed between 
their forebears and the Yiddish Forward. 

It has a ways to go. Its circulation is only 
about 25,000, and it loses about $1 million a 
year. StiU, Lipsky optimistically insists that 
it .is not unrealistic to harbor hopes erf 
someday becoming a daily. 




' - * •• ■ .*; 



socialism and trade unio nism. They say that 
while the name on the masthead of the Eng- 


while the name on the masthead of the Eng- 
lish edition may be the same, the newspaper 
itself is not. To them, the Forward's identity 
cannot be separated from the language ana 
culture that the grear waves of nun-of-the- 
century immigration brought to this country 
from East European Jewish communities. 

More than 2.5 million Yiddish- speaking 
Jewish immigrants poured into New York 
from 1880 to 1925, and many learned how to 
be Americans from the Forward. At the 
height of the newspaper's influence, its daily 
circulation of more than 250,000 stretched 
from New York into the sizable i mmig rant 
communities of Boston, Philadelphia, Chica- 
go and Los Angeles. And it used this in- 
fluence to become a key player in shaping the 
modem American labor movement and lead- 
ing the Jewish immigrants from European- 
inherited socialist politics to the New Deal. 


Editor Strigler, seated left, and his staff, left to right: Lipsky; Russian editor 
Vla dimir Yedidovich; managing editor Joseph Mlotek; m a n ager Harold OstrofF. 


“For people like me, the Forward is part 
of a culture; something that’s in my genes,” 
said Hyman Bookbinder, long the American 
Jewish Committee's representative in Wash- 
ington. “I was brought up in a Forward 
home, where my parents, who came from 
Poland as teenagers, looked to the Forward 
for what amounted to their high school and 
college education.” 

In 1947, the Forward’s 50th anniversary 
celebration packed Madison Square Garden. 
Today, the editor of the Yiddish Forward, 
Mordechai Strigler, worries that the paper, 
which became a weekly in 1983, might nave 
to cut back further and go biweekly or even 
monthly. 

The grandchildren and great-grandchil- 
dren of the original faithful have moved on. 
For the Yiddish edition, there remains only a 


geriatric generation whose imminent 
passing effectively will mark the dying out 
of Yiddish as a language with any currency 
in the United States. 

“It’s not just that the young people don't 
read or speak Yiddish,” said Strigler. "We 
are almost out of people who can write 
co mmanding ly and persuasively in Yiddish 
about politics and literature and culture. 
Many weeks I have to write more than half 
-the newspaper myself. I fear what the future 
will be." 

His anxiety is, in many ways, a testament 
to the vision of Abraham fahan, an auto- 
cratic but brilliant editor who ran the paper 
for more than 50 years. Cahan arrived in 
New York from Lithuania in 1882 and 
quickly acquired a gift for writing in English 
mat enabled him to become a star reporter for 


?' * . 

; -vIa,*, 




* 


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AG 




PEOPLE 



Mqcd Jatei/Rcnicn 

THE ROYAL TOUCH — Queen Noor of Jordan lighting the torch of a 
festival of the arts in the ancient Roman city of Jerash on Thursday. 


F_ pHE magician David Copperfleld is 
X suing Paris-Match after the French 
weekly reported that he had paid the 
supermodel Claudia Schiffer to fake a 
romance with him. Filing the S30 mil- 
lion lawsuit in Los Angeles, Copper- 
field said that Schiffer would be doing 
the same. The magazine’s claim that the 
romance was a sham “is absolutely 
false in every respect," the suit con- 
tends. 4 ‘Mr. Copperfleld and Ms. Schif- 
fer met on the job, fell in love and plan to 
many. . . They are nor pretending any- 
thing to anyone.” The article in Paris- 
Match said that Schiffer was paid to 
show up at Copperfield’s Berlin magic 
show in 1993. "There is no such con- 
tract and never has been,” Copper- 
field’s lawsuit states. The magician is 
also seeking punitive damages against 
Herbert Becker, whom the suit de- 
scribes as “a spiteful and vindictive 
former magician’ ’ who is “monstrously 
envious of plaintiff’ s success. ’ ’ The suit 
alleges that Becker- provided Paris- 
Match with fake documents. Copper- 
field said he would contribute any 
award to charity. 


Hollywood and Washington come to 
ind when people think ofRonald Re- 


mind when people think ofRonald Re- 
agan. But several Illinois towns hope to 
change that by marketing their Reagan 
connections to tourists. They plan to 
promote a Ronald Reagan Roadway that 
tourists can follow to visit key sites in 
Reagan’s life — his birthplace, boyhood 
home and college — - as was done for 
Abraham Lincoln. “The Lincoln sites 
are well-developed. Die void is Pres- 
ident Reagan’s area right here.’ ’ said the 
mayor of Eureka, Illinois, Joe Seran- 
gefi. Reagan was bom in Tampico and 
grew up in nearby Dixon, both about 90 
miles ( 145 kilometers) west of Chicago. 
He graduated from Eureka College. 


lion, but then undermined the authority 
of the director, Roman Polanski, by 
demanding rewrites. Travolta, the 'star 
of “Pulp Fiction,” walked out five days 
before filming started. Polanski tried 
but failed to get actors like Sean Penn 
and Robert De Niro. The movie was 
never made and producers said they lost 
S50 million in pre-production costs. 


The Thunder Roadhouse in West 
Hollywood. California, a Sunset 
Boulevard biker bar partly owned by the 


Elizabeth for his services to children's 
literature. Michael Bond, 71, whose 
books about the bear from “deepest, 
darkest Peru" have been sold all over 
the world, became an Officer of the 
Order of the British Empire (OBE) in a 
ceremony at Buckingham Palace. Bond 
saw the queen without his muse — a 
stuffed children's bear in trademark 
blue duffel coat and yellow hat, who 
remained outside in the writer’s car. 


John Travolta has reached a set- 
tlement with two production companies 
in a S50 million breach-of-contract law- 
suit, Daily Variety reports. Terms were 
not revealed. Travolta was sued by 
Mandalay Entertainment and Liteoffer 
Ltd. after he left the movie "Double” 
last year. The companies said he had 
verbally promised to star for S17 mil- 


Boulevard biker bar partly owned by the 
"Easy Rider” stars Peter Fonda and 
Dennis Hopper, was gutted by fire in a 
blaze that investigators said was caused 
by electrical problems. There were no 
injuries. Damage to the restaurant-sa- 
loon, which was dosed at the time, was 
estimated at S400.000. The Thunder 
Roadhouse has been a haunt for the 
show business biker crowd and RUBS 
— Rich Urban Bikers. 


The creator of Paddington Bear has 
been honored in London by Queen 


The Chinese- American architect | 
I.M. Pei, the creator of the glass pyr- ; 
amid at the Louvre in Paris, will donate ! 

fee bulk of his professional papers to the ; 

Library of Congress in Washington, li- 
brary officials said. Pei, 80, who also j 
numbers fee Bank of China tower in 
Hong Kong and fee east wing of fee ] 
National Gallery of Art in Washington. t J 
among his commissions, will ship his* 
writings and drawings to the library r 1 
over fee next few years. Pei has received 
numerous awards for his buildings in- 
cluding fee 1983 Pritzker prize, con- 
sidered fee Nobel prize of architecture. 



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Every count!}’ has its own AT&T Access Number which 



makes calling home and to other countries really easy. 


Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country 


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you’re calling from and we’ll take it from there. And 


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be sure to charge your calls on your AT&T Calling 




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Card. It’ll help you avoid outrageous phone charges 


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on your hotel bill and save you up to 60%? Low 


rates and the clearest connections home 24 hours 




a day. Rain or shine. That’s AT&T Direct ' - Service. 


stays mainly in the plain. 


Check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


Steps to foBov for easy calling worldwide 

1. Just dial the AIST Access Number for the country \ou 
are calling from. 

1 Dial the phone number you're calling. 

3 Dial tbe calling card number listed above your name. 


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Beigiam* 

Cash RspubllCA 

Franca 

Germany 

Grwca* 

Ireland □ 

Italy* 

Netterlawte* 

RmuHa**(MDicaw)» 

Spain 


Sweden 

.022-903-011 SvJtmrfanil* 


MOB-1 00-10 Unite* Kingdom a. 

0042-000-101 


020-7S5-611 

. 0800-804)011 
0500-89-0011 
0890-890011 


oooo-Booen . 


MIDDLE EAST 


00000-1311 


Israel 


.1 -000050-000 sgftfi Arabia c ... 

.. . 172-1811 — 


.5100200 
177-100-2727 
1000-10 



08000220111 — . 

755-5042 Ghana 

900-9900-11 South Africa 




0191 

0-800090123 


Cunl find the AT&T Access Number for ihe counny you're calling from? Ju&i ask any openuw for 
AT&T Direct- Service, or visit our Teh sfte at h ftp ■Jtwvrwxn. co m/trave ler 


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