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INTERNATIONAL 





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The World’s Daily Newspaper 

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London, Tuesday, June 3, 1997 



No. 35.537 


Jospin Builds Up Suspense Over European Policy 

New Leader Moves Cautiously on Cabinet 



Ourtci Plalmi/Rfiun 

Lionel Jospin, center, celebrating Monday the Socialist Party's return to power in the French runoff elections. 

Communists Sniff Heady Scent of Power 

Party, Holding Seats Jospin Needs, 

Is Barg aining Hard Over Coalition 

By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Tones Service 


PARIS — Comrannist participation in the government of a 
major West European industrial country sounds like a Cold 
War anachronism. 

But, with the Soviet Union gone, the French Communists, 
with 38 seats in the new Parliament, are no longer the 
totalitarian colossus they seemed in the decades immediately 
after World Warn. 

And their leader. Robert Hue, a bearded man with the 
physique and sense of humor of a Friar Tuck, is no loyal 
follower of the likes of Stalin. 

Without Communist support, the new Socialist prime 
minister, Lionel Jospin, cannot put together the 289-seat 
majority he needs to govern. And Mr. Hue drives a hard 
Utica! bargain; as Mr. Jospin can probably attest from many 
lours of negotiations witb him on a common electoral plat- 
form and now a government program. 

Mr. Hue spent much of Monday at the party’s modem 
headquarters building near the Place Stalingrad, named for 
the great World War II battle, thrashing out his party’s 
strategy in negotiations with the Socialists. The Communists 
would be prepared to join the government, he said, if they 
reached agreement 

"We are taking action to get Lionel Jospin and the Socialist 
Party to make commitments," he said. 

Mr. Hue added that the Communists' policy-making na- 


£ 



See COMMUNISTS, Page 8 


► OHlhUThr KjhtffraKrt 

Robert Hue, the leader of the French Communist 
Party, answering questions Monday about the vote. 


McVeigh Guilty in Oklahoma Blast 

He Faces the Death Penalty in Deadliest Terror Attack in US. 


Cinfiiru /i ito Sufi Fnm Dufuitbn 

DENVER — Timothy McVeigh was 
found guilty on all counts Monday in the 
bombing of a federal building in Okla- 
homa City in 1995 that lolled 168 
people in the deadliest attack on ci- 
vilians in U.S. history. 

-After deliberating 23 hours over four 
days, the jury of seven men and five 
women found the 29-year-old Gulf War 
11 x 16130 guilty of 1 ! counts of murder 
and conspiracy. He could get the death 
penalty. 

/•Mr. McVeigh wore the same impass- 
ive expression he had when he was 
attested. Hands clasped tightly and 
pressed against one cheek, elbows on 
the table. Be remained seated and stared 
at the judge as the verdict was read. No 
one comforted him or said anything to 
him during the reading of the verdict. 

As the jury was polled, the foreman 
Mated at Mr.' McVeigh. Two jurors ap- 
peared close to tears. 

. Cbem erupted outside the courthouse 
and a* die bombing site, where about 500 
people gathered to bear the verdict Vic- 
tims' relatives hugged and wept 
-.fat Washington, President Bill Clin- 
10? said the verdict heralded “a very 


important and long overdue day for the 
survivors and famil ies of those who died 
in Oklahoma City.” 

"Today, I say to the families of the 
victims, no single verdict can bring an 
end to your anguish,” Mr. Clinton said 
in a written statement. ’‘But your cour- 
age has been an inspiration to all Amer- 
icans. Our prayers are with you.” 

Judge Richard Malsch of U.S. Dis- 
trict Court told the jurors they would not 
be sequestered for the penalty phase. 

Afterward, Mr. McVeigh was escor- 
ted out by four U.S. marshals. He shook 
the hand of the lead attorney, Stephen 
Jones, and the two exchanged 
whispered words. 

The verdict came just over two years 
after the thunderous explosion on April 
19, 1995. that shattered lives and 


brought terror to the nation. 

Prosecutors contended that Mr. Mc- 
Veigh drove a Ryder rental truck loaded 
with a 4, 000-pound fuel-and-fertilizer 
bomb to the Alfred P. Murrah Federal 
Building and set the fuse in a twisted 
plot to avenge the FBI siege against the 
Branch Davidian sect at Waco, Texas, 
exactly two years earlier and spark a 
second American revolution. 

The bomb went off a 9:02 A.M., 
turning a routine morning at work into a 
swirl of flying glass, collapsing walls 
and crumbling concrete. Nine floors 
collapsed into an area the size of three, 
crushing the victims. 

Among the dead were 19 children, 
most of whom had just been dropped off 

See TRIAL, Page 8 


Arms and Drug Traffic Keeps 
Burma’s Door to Ghana Open 




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9 “770294^8bT0'S5 


PYIN U LWIN, Burma — Fifty-sev- 
en years ago. the main road through this 
small resort town east of Mandalay 
served as a gateway to the famous 
Burma Road, a vital supply line through 
the jungle for war materiel being 
shipped north by the United States and 
its allies into China for use against the 
Japanese, 

Today, the ratted, two- lane highway 
is still being used to transport arma- 
ments, but the flow has been reversed: 
Chinese-made weapons arc coming 
south on Japanese-made trucks at the 
behest of the military government of 


Burma, which uses some of the aims to 
help keep its citizens under strict con- 
trol, according to Western officials. 

Burma’s generals became notorious 
in 1988 for brutally suppressing student 
protests and in 1990 for annulling a 
democratic election that was won by an 
opposition party. Since then they have 
been able to forge normal economic 
relations with few developed countries. 

"Only the door to China has been 
open” without interruption since then, a 
diplomat said in Rangoon. As a result, the 
government has relied heavily on 
weaponry imported from China — and 
lately from Russia as well — to keep its 

See BURMA, Page 8 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — Lionel Jospin, the Socialist 
leader, put off announcing any specifics 
about future French policy after he was 
designated Monday as die new prime 
minister by President Jacques Chirac. 

Mr. Jospin was moving cautiously, 
giving no quick clue about the exact 
political coloration of his government or 
precise political agenda. 

On Monday he left France and 
Europe in suspense about how the So- 
cialists intend to implement their cam- 
paign pledge to change the rales for 
introducing Europe's planned single 
currency, the euro. 

Mr. Jospin has not elaborated on his 
laconic statement Sunday night that his 
government would “reorient” France’s 
European policy. 

In practice, analysts said Monday, the 
French voters' revolt is likely to con- 
front European leaders with a painful 
choice between a “political euro" with 
many member countries and no euro at 
all. 

That prospect was seized on Monday 
with public gusto by Foreign Minister 
Lamberto Dini of Italy. At a European 
Union meeting, he said that the French 
electoral outcome pointed to postpone- 
ment of the euro's launching and en- 
hanced chances that the Italian lira 
would be one of the founding curren- 
cies. 

French Socialists deny any intention 
of scuttling the euro, brandishing their 
historical credentials as the political 
party that has backed European unity 
more staunchly over the years than any 
other. 

But they have not spelled out how 
they intend to cany out their campaign 
pledge to make Germany loosen the 
financial criteria for membership in the 
single currency. The French want to 
allow more scope for member countries 
to use inflation and deficit spending as 
temporary stimuli to promote growth 
and create jobs — and say that other 
governments want the same shift. 

Technically, the French proposal 
could fall within a hroad interpretation 
of the blueprint for monetary union, 
European Commission officials said 
Monday in Brussels. But political real- 
ities are liable to be resistant to such 
diplomatic suppleness, especially in 
Germany, analysts said. 

How the Socialists handle their ob- 
jections to the German-led plan for the 
euro will be critical for the future of 
European integration. Politically, it far 
outweighs European leaders’ decision 
in the mid- 1 980s to dismantle tariff bar- 
riers and start turning the Continent into 
a single market. 

Mr. Jospin said that he would form a 
government "soon, within a week,” 
giving himself time to pick a cabinet and 
decide the tricky question of the terms 
of how the Communist Party could be 


AGENDA 

TV Bouts Raise 
Stakes for Clinton 

An extraordinary series of tele- 
vised negotiating sessions between 
lawyers representing President Bill 
Clinton and the Arkansas woman 
suing him for alleged sexual har- 
assment could hurt, not help, the 
chances of an out-of-court settle- 
ment, legal specialists say. 

The possibilities for any quick 
reconciliation appear to be slim, 
lawyers said Monday, despite the 
notion that a settlement is inev- 
itable. Page 3. 


The Dollar 


New You Monday a -IP.M. pievtous does 


DM 


1.7305 


1.7082 


Pound 


1.6357 


1.B405 


Yen 


116.55 


116.25 


5.7645 



-41.64 


change 


7289.40 


S&P 500 


7331 04 


Monday fi « P.M prewouadoaa 


-1.95 


846.33 


845-28 


PAGE TWO 

Small Victims of Deadly Air Bags 

THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

No Answers for Divided Canada 

Books Page 4. 

Crossword - Page 3. 

Opinion ...... — ~. — Pages 6-7. 

Sports - Page® 2G-21. 

Sponsored Sccdon Pages 16-16. 

THE CZECH REPUBLIC 


The Intermarkat 


Page IS. 


The iHT on-line http://vvivw.iht com 


brought into government. 

Theoretically, the Communists’ seats 
are needed for a leftist majority in Par- 
liament, but in practice the Socialists 
and their non-Communist allies can 
push through some legislation alone. 

On crucial European issues, the So 


EU ministers express concern for 
integration process. • Dignity of 
French presidency suffers a blow. 
Page 5. Investors take Socialist 
victory in stride. • Fears about 
planned privatizations. Page II. 

cialists could expect center-rightists to 
cross the aisle and more than make up 
for lost Communist support. 

Both leftist parlies engaged in polit- 
ical curtsies Monday as they sought to 
avoid being blamed for disharmony. 
The Communists' goodwill could be 
particularly helpful in moderating trade 


unions' demands and defusing social 
unrest, but an agreement to disagree 
might suit the Socialists. Even outside 
the government, the Communists will 
probably be on good behavior to protect 
the party's new image as a constructive 
component of a broad, nondoctrinaire 
left and a cooperative partner for the 
Socialists. 

Good relations with the Socialists 
have become the acid test for broad 
French public acceptance of the Com- 
munists as a small but legitimate polit- 
ical force. 

In contrast to the smooth-sounding 
mesh as the Socialists geared up for 
power, the French right sank into deeper 
disarray as the mainstream factions ar- 
gued about how to react to the National 
Front. 

The center-right parties are worried 
about being kept out of power indef- 

See FRANCE. Page 8 


Pressure Builds on Kohl 
As Europe Shifts Left 

Bonn-Paris Partnership on Euro Challenged 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tunes Scnice 


BONN — With the Socialist victory 
in France, Europe’s political landscape 
has shifted and most of all for Ger- 
many’s Helmut Kohl, the Continent’s 
longest-ruling leader whose vision of a 
single, strong currency to underpin 
European unity now seems challenged 
as much by the about-face in Paris as by 
bruising political battles at home. 

From a Europe dominated only a few 
weeks ago by forces as conservative as 
his own Christian Democrat-led coali- 
tion, Mr. Kohl now surveys a swath of 
uncertainty from the May 1 triumph of 
Tony Blair's untested Labour Party in 
Britain to the rise of a Socialist gov- 
ernment in France. Of the European 
Union's 15 governments, only two, 
Germany and Spain, are now led by 
conservatives. 

[In a congratulatory telegram 
Monday to Lionel Jospin, Mr. Kohl 
urged the new French prime minister to 
pursue European unity. The Associated 
Press reported. "The further deepening 
of European integration is a key factor 
in meeting the challenges ahead of us,” 
he said. 

("I am certain that, also under your 
leadership, Germany and France will 
cooperate closely and with trust in their 
well-tested partnership in the building 
of the common European house,” Mr. 
Kohl said.] 


"For me,” Germany's foreign min- 
ister, Klaus Kinkel, said Monday. 
“Germany and France remain the most 
important partners." He was repeating 
an article of faith that looks increasingly 
frayed by the looming question of 
whether Germany and France still 
shared the same vision of far deeper 
integration symbolized by a single 
European currency, the euro, supposed 
to be introduced in 1999. 

That timetable, many German com- 
mentators and politicians said Monday, 
may now be in doubt simply because the 
French Socialist leadership has pledged 
itself to seeking a single currency with- 
out the austerity that Bonn says is es- 
sential if the new money is to be a 
serious replacement for its rock-hard 
Deutsche mark. 

And, for Mr. Kohl, long viewed as the 
leading champion of European unity, 
the issue goes far beyond high finance: 
For him, die single currency is the bed- 
rock of a Europe bonded irrevocably 
together, an issue, he likes to say, that 
will decide whether there is “war or 
peace in the 21st centuiy.” 

The mood of uncertainty surrounding 
the introduction of the euro has been 
further clouded by a deepening dispute in 
Germany itself over- Bonn's plans to 
revalue its gold reserves so as to meet the 
strict fiscal criteria for joining the new 
currency. 

See EUROPE, Page 8 



Kicrv htenyftniirp 

Naomi Duncan, left, who had been evacuated from Sierra Leone, being 
greeted by her daughter Soraya at Stansted Airport near London. 

Combat in Sierra Leone 

Nigerians Move to Restore Elected President 

where insurrectionist soldiers and mem- 
bers of a rural armed rebellion had made 
their headquarters after unseating the 
country's democratically elected leader, 
Ahmad Tejan Kabbah. 

Shortly after the shelling began, Ni- 
gerian soldiers stationed at Freetown’s 
international airport announced that 
they had captured the airfield, which 
they said would be used to rush in 
reinforcements. By midmoming, wit- 
nesses said that jets of the Guinean Air 
Force had arrived to join the fighting, 
and could be seen attacking positions 
held by die coup leaders. 

Despite its far superior firepower. 


By Howard W. French 

New fynt Tunes Service 

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — After a 
morning of heavy naval bombardment, 
fighting broke out Monday in the Sierra 
Leone capital, Freetown, as a West Af- 
rican force led by Nigeria sought to put 
down an eight-day-old military coup. 

[At least 49 people, mainly civilians, 
were killed in Freetown in the Nigerian 
naval bombardment and in clashes pit- 
ting Nigerian troops against Sierra Le- 
one soldiers and rebels, hospital source 
said, Agence France- Presse reported.; 

At first light, a Nigerian warship po- 
sitioned offshore began shelling the 
headquarters of the Sierra Leone Army, 


See COUP, Page 8 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, J UNE 3, 1997^ 

PAGE TWO 


A Blow at 200 Miles an Hour / Deadly Air Bags 


Small Victims of a Flawed Safety Device 


Spain Opens Graft Triai 
Of Former Police Chief 


By Warren Brown 
□d David B. Ottawa 


W ASHINGTON — Robert Sanders was 
driving his Dodge minivan in Mary- 
land last fall — with his 7-year-old 
daughter, Alison, strapped in the pas- 
senger seat beside him — when the force of decades 
of public debate over air bags came home in a few 
terrible seconds. 

Mr. Sanders fumbled with his radio trying to find 
the Redskins football game and Alison squeezed out 
of her shoulder harness to help. “By the time l 
looked up, the light turned red, 1 ' Mr. Sanders re- 
called, “out I was in the intersection.” Slamming 
on the brakes of the 1995 Caravan, he hit another car 
head-on at 9 miles ( 14 kilometers) an hour. 

The crash did little more than dent the van’s front 
fender and hood. Mr. Sanders’s two sons in the back 
seat were unharmed. But the impact set off the 
Caravan’s front seal air bags, a much heralded 
safety feature when Mr. Sanders bought the vehicle. 
The air bag on the driver's side bag did not harm Mr. 
■Sanders, but on the passenger's side, Alison was hit 
by a burst of gas that packed the force of 200 miles 
an hour as the bag deployed. She died the next day. 
Oct. 16, 1996, of massive brain injuries. 

Alison Sanders is one of a long list of casualties in 
a long war over air bags in the United States, deaths 
that steadily accumulated during the early 1990s as 
the bags became standard equipment on American 
cars. The technology has been credited with saving 
1,900 lives since 1986 and reducing the risk posed 
by front-end collisions. 

But because of the deaths involving children, 
public confidence in a technology that cost as much 
as S3 billion to develop has diminished. The forces 
that once fought over whether to make air bags 
mandatory are wrestling over what to do next. 

Mr. Sanders, a Baltimore lawyer who has become 
a full-time crusader for air bag safety, has not 
forgiven himself for the inattention that caused the 
crash. But along with grief and guilt, he also feels 
outrage. ‘‘How was I supposed to know that air bags 
could kiU?" he asked. “I bought the minivan with 
air bags because I thought they saved lives.” 

According to a list kept by the National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administration, there have been at 
least 39 deaths of children caused by air bags, 
among them Alison’s. Most of the accidents in- 
volved crashes at less than 1 5 miles an hour. 

The safety agency still contends that air bags are 
responsible for reductions in fatalities in front-end 
collisions for drivers and passengers older than 1 2. 
But the agency’s administrator. Ricardo Martinez, 
acknowledged in congressional testimony early this 
year that front-seat bags, designed to a one-size-fits- 
att standard, now are killing more young children 
than they save. 

Automakers are caught between the need for a 
quick fix and the costly demands of improving air 
bag technology and working it into their production 
lines. “Anything we do involves a trade-off.” said 
Elliott Hall, vice president of Washington affairs for 
i Ford Motor Co. “It’s a mess.” 


and David B. Ottaway 

WushinftiM Past Service 


in America equipped with dual-front air bags, after 
the vehicle crashed at 35 miles an hour into a 
delivery track. The infant, who was unbelted, had 
been thrown into the car's instrument paneLThe 
safety agency speculated that the infant was “im- 
demeaih and in front of the air bag,” and was killed 
by blows to the head. 

The accident, combined with other air bag-re- 
lated lawsuits, caused GM to stop installing the 
devices, which w ere not selling well as optional 
equipment anyway. 

Except for those offered in luxury European cars, 
air bags disappeared from the U.S. market until Lee 
lacocca, then chairman of Chrysler Corp., saw an 
opportunity to capitalize on the Europeans* fa- 
vorable experience with air bags in the hue 1980s. 



fee safest cats on the road. Volvo officials had long 
warned that fee air bags they woo required to install 
in cars sold in the United States were too powerful 
and posed a threat to children. 

Diana died of massive head injuries caused by the 
passenger air bag, the safety agency reported. 
Though there bad been suspicions of other air bag- 
related child deaths, Diana’s was fee first name on 
fee government air bag fatality list 

Other deaths soon followed. From March to 
December of 1994, six children younger than 9 
years old died from air bag deployments in low- 
speed crashes. 

A complex battle pitting the safety agency, car 
makers, insurers and consumer advocates ensued. 
The battle centered on two issues: should car own- 
era have an easy way to turn off air 
bags, and should car makers be 
forced to develop ‘ ‘smart,* ’ but more 
expensive, air rags that would not 
harm children? 

The safety agency has decreed 
feat such “smart'' bags must be 
available by Sept 1, 2001, and it is 
expected, within fee next few weeks, 
to give vehicle owners fee option of 
deaedving their air bags by cutting 
fee wires or using an ooroff switch. 


Defendant May 


to Death Squads 


- ! ?:■ i 


CfepiMtp OieSafiFnn Departs 

MADRID — The former head of 
Spain’s Civil Guard, Luis Roldan, went 
on trial Monday for embezzlement m 
the first of a series of cases against 
senior officials of fee former Socialist 
party government _ . 

The Roldan scandal was one of fee 
worst of a series of affairs feat 
blackened fee reputation of Rime Min- 
ister Felipe Gonzalez’s Socialist gov- 
ernment before its defeat by tbccon- 
servative opposition in March 1996. 

Mr. Roldan, director-general of fee 
Civil Guard from 1986 to 1993, sat 
impassively in National Court as his 
trial began on charges feat he took 728 
million pesetas ($5.1 million) in kick- 
backs, stole 352 milli on pesetas m cov- 
ert funds and failed to pay 815 million 


^ ~ ~ 

had been in line to be interior transfer, j *] l 1 


UAU IM 41 “ mmw w — -j : — | 

was dismissed, ttulgoverameat lawyers j 
° P toA^i I ^?^ y ifc Roldan foiled to ' 


pesetas in taxes. 

T -aiwr this month. Colonel Juan Al- 


berto Perote, former deputy bead of 
mili tary intelligence, will be tried for 
theft of documents in fee murky case of 
fee death squads allegedly employed by 
officials against Basque separatists. 

Jose Bamomievo, fee former Social- 
ist interior minister, also faces trial in 
connection with fee organization of fee 
death squads. • 

The Roldan affair became public in 
November 1993 when fee newspaper 
Diario 16 revealed that fee Civil Guard 


T he paradox of the air bag 
debate is feat fee push for 
greater auto safety has 
moved back where it began: 
a focus on seat belts. Government 
agencies have geared up once again 
to try to persuade Americans to 
buckle up. In fact, some safety of- 
ficials argue that air bags would nev- 
er have become aproblem if they had 
been used as designed — in concert 
with seat belts and shoulder har- 
nesses, as they are used in Europe. 

Seat belt-usage figures in die 
United States vary, depending on tbe 
source. According to state rqxuts, 68 
percent of U.S. drivers and passen- 
gers buckle up. But safety agency 
officials say that the real figure, based 

ou studies of traffic fatalities, is closer 

Kanrr^/iwvwneiorRM to 50 percent, even though every state 
except New Hampshire has laws 
mandating the use of seat belts. 

I is For his part, Robert Sanders ar- 

i • gues that the problem with air bags 
v 0/1 tur stems from greed — that American 
Mis, automakers, for purely financ ial rca- 

hed. sons, installed the cheapest bags pos- 

sible, devices “inherently defective 
for small women and children.” 

Mr. Sanders, who has filed a federal lawsuit 
a gains t Chrysler in Detroit, said automakers should 
live with the guilt “that their years of inattention to 
bad air bag design helped to kill Alison and those 
other children.” 

Chrysler declined to comment. Other automakers 
say Mr. Sanders's claim is unfounded, that their 
bags were designed to meet federal safety standards 
and always have complied with them. . <. 

Still, for Mr. Sanders, there is only one way to 
atone- for iris own error, the moment of inattention 
that led to his daughter’s death. 

‘ ‘I have a moral obligation to do everything in my 


Robert Sanders became a crusader after his 
daughter Alison, died of injuries caused by an air 
bag in a minor accident from which his sons, 
David, left, and Matthew, emerged unscathed 


INCE the invention of air bags in the 1960s, 
feere- had always been concern that the 
, devices could cause serious harm. Air bags 


k-/ deploy in about l/20th of a second at speeds 
of 96 to 200 miles an hour, depending on a vehicle’s 


of 96 to 200 miles an hour, depending on a vehicle’s 
brand and size. But that theoretical concern became 


focused by reports of an accident in Indiana involving 
a 7-week-old infant in 1973. 


The unidentified infant, an agency report said in 
1984, died in a 1973 Chevrolet, one of the first cars 


Mr. lacocca vowed to make Chrysler the first U.S. 
company to put air bags in all of its vehicles, a move 
that was applauded by some safety experts as an 
easy way to protect Americans, a high percentage of 
whom refused to use seat belts despite campaigns 
touting the devices’ effectiveness. 

By 1996, 21.6 million vehicles, or 1 1 .4 percent of 
all registered vehicles, had dual-front hags, ac- 
cording to the safety agency, and by this fall, air 
bags are to be standard equipment on all new cars. 
That has exposed more children and small adults, 
such as women forced to sit close to fee steering 
wheel, to dea* and injury. 

On April 4. 1993, 6-year-old Diana Zhang in 
Ohio was fatally injured when her mother plowed at 
7 miles an hour into a car that had abruptly stopped. 
Hie girl was sitting unbelted in tbe front passenger 
seat of a 1993 Volvo 850 GLT, considered one of 


answer ft summons to appear before an { 
'*rrnmir" 1 g nwgidr*^ having apparently , 
fledateoad. The folkwing monfe he was ' 
interviewedal an undisclosed location by < 
fee daily El Mnndo. He threatened to ! 
“tell a 4” notably about fee govern- \ 
meat’s role in fee dea th squads. i 

The ensuing political storm resulted ! 
in fee resignation, of Interior Afinistiar | 
Antoni Asuncion. ~ . 

Mr. Roldan was finally arrested in J 
Laos oaFebniaiy 28, 1995, handed over ; 
to Spanish police in Thailand and' 
brought back to Madrid H^fomdcnffs.. ; 

Once in jail, the fannh*poljce chief' 
began to talk. He said he had been! 
closely involved wife the .death squads, ; 
notably in the kidnapping tfnd murder of ■ 
two Basque separatists in' 1983, and he I 
accused several Socialist leaders of in-) 
volvement- . « 

In May 1996 be said Prime Minister! 
Gonzalez “knew everything” about the ; 
death squads. But five manfes later, fell- . 
lowing his election defeat, Mr. Gonzalez | 
was cleared by the Supreme Court. ■ ; 
Mr. Roldan’s trial is eagerly awaited ■ 

U., 4.. for rMn-JatirtncftmioKr' 



^hi>f had faked his q ualifi cations- Mr. 
Roldan, who only a few months before 


produce. But judicial sources said it; 
might be adjourned after opening! 
Monday as a result of delaying tactics) 
by fee defense. (AFP. AP)> 


Ciller Bid for Early Takeover 
In Turkey Faces Roadblocks 



power to warn other parents of the dangers of air 
bags to children, ana to pressure automakers to 
correct fee design defects that caused fee problem,” 
he said. ”1 am a father in mounting, and this is my 
therapy.” 


The Associated Press 

ANKARA — Several roadblocks lay 
cm fee path Monday to Deputy Prime 
Minister Tansu Ciller’s goal to taking 
over as prime minister a year ahead of 
time from Necmettin Erbakan, who 
heads modem Turkey’s first Islamic-led 
government. 

Mrs. Ciller announced Sunday that 
she would succeed Mr. Erbakan later 
this month and lead the country to early 
elections. 

Turkey's generals have been pres- 
suring Mr. Erbakan to curb his measures 
to put an Islamic s tamp on officially 
secular Turkey, and secularist support- 
ers of Mrs. Ciller have been defecting 
from her True Path Party to take their 
distance from her alliance wife him. 

. The two leaders joined in a coalition 
11 months ago after making a' deal that 
Mr. Erbakan would turn over fee reins to 
Mrs. Ciller in two years. 

But President Suleyman Demirel said 
in a statement Sunday that he did not 
recognize the power-swap procedure 
and would invoke his constitutional 
powers in deciding who to designate 
next as prime minister. 

Parliament also has to approve an 


election date ahead of fee regularly; 
scheduled appointment at fee polls, • 
which is supposed to be in 2000. i ^ 

The defections cost fee coalition its; r 
parliameataiy majority, and Mrs. Ciller! 
and Mr. Erbakan have been trying io| - 
win over a small rightist party to give) 
them fee votes they need. j 

But that party is setting conditions for- - 
its s up port: reduction of fee threshold of ' 
proportional representation in elections: 
from 10 percent to 5 percent, to better; 
ensure its chances of gaining seats. 

The Great Unity party also said it! 
would not support an election date earii-4i 
er than December, and Mr. Erbakan; 
reportedly has been pushing for Oc-i ~ 
tober. He apparently is eager to hold; 
elections before fee Supreme Court de-; - 
tides at fee end of fee year whether the: ■ 
Welfare Patty should be shut down be-; :. 
cause of its pro-Islamic polities. ; - 
’ In any case, the daily HurriyCt re-J ? 
ported, Mr. Erbakan would xefrise to- . 
step down if Parliament refuses to ap-- 
prove an early election date. Mrs. Ciller; • ; 
a pro-Wes tem former prime minister 
who has been haunted by corruption _ 
allegations, apparently wants to wait as 
long as possible, even until March. • 





That Hurt 




■H j«*oh 

-A.-.-r. . -<■ . 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

New Strike Vote at BA EK&SBa 


LONDON ( AP) — The union representing 
9,000 ground workers at British Airways said 
Monday that they would vote on whether to 
strike over management’s plans to contract 
out more in-flight catering — raising the 
possibility of two walkouts at the carrier. 

The Transport and General Workers Union 
said results of the vote would be revealed June 
30. three daw after the union announces the 
outcome of a strike vote by S-500 cabin crew 
members embroiled in a pay dispute. 

The unions say they could ground British 
Airways heading into the peak summer sea- 
son, but the airline says it has plans that would 
let it operate throughout a strike. 


man for the company said. Cathay was await- 
ing the arrival of engine parts from fee Rolls- 
Royce factory in Britain. 

The line said it was operating 89 percent of 
its scheduled flights, having canceled 1 1 on 
Monday. Cathay and Dragonair, its smaller 
sister company, announced May 24 that they 
were suspending Airbus A 330-300 flights 
after five failures of their Rolls-Royce Trent 
700 engines in six months. 


Bomb Kills 7 
At a Market 
In Algiers 


Moscow Police Seize Phony Vodka as More Die of Poisoning 


— *■***,« 

- -■»*-* . 

'■r *im.m m 

jA. tfm* 

- h i i» ■aa iUU 


Uncollected garbage was piling up in 
Athens after trash collectors began a 48-hour 
warning strike Monday, the second one in a 
month. * MP) 


Cathay Pacific Hopeful 


HONG KONG (AFP) — Cathay Pacific 
hopes to put some of its grounded Airbus jets 
back into the air as soon as Tuesday, a spokes- 


After increasing prices threefold for the 
British handover to China on fee night of June 
30. several hotels in Hong Kong have started 
cutting their rates, hoping to fill rooms not yet 
reserved. The Hong Kong Hotels Association 
said that 5.000 to 6,000 of its members* 
34,800 rooms remained unsold with 28 days 
to go. (AFP) 


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Reuters 

ALGIERS — A bomb 
exploded Monday in tbe 
Bouzrina market in the 
Muslim fundamentalist 
stronghold of Bab el 
Oued in central Algiers, 
killing seven people and 
wounding 37, security 
forces said. 

Less than three hours 
after the blast, journalists 
in fee city's Aurassi hotel 
— they are in Algeria to 
cover Thursday’s gener- 
al election — heard an- 
other explosion. This ap- 
peared to come from the 
western part of fee city’s 
center. No details were 
immediately available. 

On Sunday, two 
bombs ripped through 
buses in central Algiers. 
Officials said at least 
seven people feed and 77 
were wounded. Newspa- 
pers Monday put the toll 
at 1 1 dead. 

An estimated 60,000 
people have been killed 
in violence since January 
1992, when the author- 
ities canceled a general 
election dominated by 
the now-outlawed Islam- 
ic Salvation Front 

Thursday’s ballot is 
seen by President Liam- 
ine Zeroual and his gov- 
ernment as a way of end- 
ing fee years of crisis. 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Tbe police seized a freight train here trans- 
porting 240,000 bottles of fake vodka made from industrial 
alcohol, officials said Monday. 

The train, with 20 freight cars of the fake vodka, arrived at 
a rail station from fee republic of North Ossetia in southern 


a ran station rrom the republic ot North Ossetia m southern 
Russia, city police said. The shipment could have been sold for 
12 billion rubles (about $2 million), a police spokesman said. 


12 billion rabies (about $2 million), a police spokesman said. 
The police were trying to find who was behind tbe shipment. 


Meanwhile, three more people died from drinking bootleg 
alcohol in the eastern Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, bringing 
the death toll to 22. Twelve others people were in an emer-i 
gency unit of a local hospital. 

The rash of poisonings began Friday, when five people 
' feed. Tbe victims lived in the same section of town and had 
bought vodka from a private seller who worked out of aq 
apartment The bottles contained methyl akohoL 
The police have arrested several people. 




WEATHER 


Europe 


Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by AccuWeether. 


Bnouia tarn 

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Windy, rainy and cool 
weaHier la expected boom 
N ew England Wednesday 
Brough Friday as a storm 
moves slowly northeast- 
ward alonQ the Atlantic 
Seaboard. U wM remain dry 
and very warm to hot from 
■he Southwest Into the 
Plains with plenty ol sun- 
shine. 


Europe 

Cloudy and cool weather 
along with some rain Is In 
store for much ol esalam 
Europe from ScendNiavta 
eastward Into western Rus- 
sia and southward into 


Turkey. Mainly dry and 
warm from Hungary south- 
eestward to Greece. Some 


Asia 

Maktly dry and warmer in 
Be^ng and Seoul with sun- 
shine. A weak storm will 
cross northeastern Asia 
bringing showers to 
Manchuria and southwest- 
ern Russia Thursday night 
and to Tokyo by Friday. 


K. Lumpur 
K. ranter 


showers are likely In 
France and southern 
Spain. 


and to Tokyo by Friday. 
Rainy weather will continue 
w parts of southeastern 
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end dry. 


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AUSTRIA 

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1,456 : 

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Hold Key to Death S, jUU(i 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 1997 PAGE 3 

1 

LT V. J 

THE AMERICAS 



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Sale of Jets 
By Belarus 
Doesn’t Fly, 
Peru Finds 


By Calvin Sims 

Sew York Times Service 

«. UMA — Call it a case of bar- 
.gain-budter's remorse. 

Last year Peru’s generals 
(scoured the discount market and 
ifound the perfect deal to mm the 
neighbors green with envy: not one. 
•not two. tot a dozen top-rated jet 
-,-fighters for just 5350 million. 

£r Now they’ve begun taking de- 
livery. but there’s a problem. The 
: planes may never be ready for com- 
rbaL It toms out that they come 
ywithoat a warranty or service con- 
i tract. 

s r The planes are Soviet-built MiG- 
-29s. by far the most modem in Latin 
America, where the United States 
rhas long tried to forestall a high- 
-tech arms race. But they were not 
-‘bought from Russia, where they 
5 -were built. They were bought freon 
Belarus, Which these days has to 
trely on the Russians to service its 
•>own air force. 

1 . And the Russians, who would 
-have liked to make the sale them- 
9 selves, are simply refusing to ser- 
v vice merchandise bought from a 
competitor. 

Toe Peruvian generals have been 
deeply embarrassed by the comic- 
opera aspect of the affair, but in 
some ways it is not funny at all. 

Peru is a desperately underfin- 
anced country where poverty is 
widespread and the blunder high- 
lights how its powerful military can 
override pressing domestic needs, 
» even as it risks setting off an aims 
, -race that could heighten tensions 
and strain the budgets of Peru’s 
.'equally impoverished neighbors. 

For just those reasons the United 
-.States has long refused to sell high- 
i tech warplanes in Latin America — 
although it is now reconsidering 
Kthat stand, given the entry of framer 
."Soviet arms dealers into the com- 
petition. 

So it was a surprise in Latin 
America when diplomats and mil- 
itary sources revealed how Peru, 

- having engaged Belarus as an arms 
--supplier, came to find that Russia. 

- .its big competitor next door; was 
1/doing its utmost to sour the deaL 

j. Last week Russia confirmed that 
•ir would not cooperate- with .ser- 
vicing the aircraft,' sxyingthat was 
up to Belarus. . » -oin c ■ 

h" “But military and diplomatic' 
-■sources say that Belarus is in no 
'.position to provide service. With- 
"ont technical support, upgrades and 
..a reliable supply of spare parts from 
{".the manufacturer, the new squad- 
jr.-Ton is unlikely ever 10 perform the 
complex combat missions for 
which it was designed. 

“Buying those MiG-29s from 
Belarus was like buying a refri- 
gerator at a rummage sale and then 
realizing after you get it home that 
boot only is the warranty nontrans- 
ferable but you can’t even get spare 
parts,” said a local military expert, 
who has close dealings with Peru’s 
k Air Force. 

Peruvian government and mil- 
f-itary officials declined to comment 
rax the MiG-29s, but they are said to 
be furious with Belarus for not se- 
| curing a service commitment from 
^The Russians before selling the air- 
craft. 

| Military analysts said that 8e- 
Ljarus did nor approach die Russians 
|_j about maintaining the MK3-29s un- 
Hil after Peru had already received 
’ four of the planes. 


As Canadians Vote, No Answers Emerge for a Divided Nation 


By Howard Schneider 

Washington Past Sen-ice 

TORONTO — In the months fol- 
lowing the 1995 secession referendum 
in Quebec, Canada was filled with for- 
ums and debates, chat groups and tele- 
vision specials, political maneuvering 
and private discussion, over what could 
be done to heal the divide between its 
French and English cultures. 

A year-and-a-half later, as C anadian 
voters went to the polls Monday in the 
first federal election since French- 
speaking Quebec nearly voted to form 
its own country, a de facto answer has 
emerged: not much. 

Far from demonstrating any progress 
on the issue of how to unity the country, 
the five- week campaign that ended with 
the election Monday fortified compet- 
ing and seemingly irreconcilable vi- 
sions of the nation. 

The parties fielding parliamentary 
candidates in the race frequently dis- 


cussed Quebec and the referendum re- 
sults, but none presented a platform, an 
idea, or an initiative that garnered na- 
tional backing on what to do. 

The likely result for the next gov- 
ernment, therefore, will not be so much 
a mandate as a muddle, with a faction of 
separatists returning to office from Que- 
bec, a faction of hard-line anti-sepa- 
ratists from the western provinces and a 
Liberal Party likely to remain in power 
but with reduced stature. 

Prime Minister Jean Chretien, who 
heads the Liberal Party, may have cal led 
the election expecting an easy victory 
and little controversy. Instead, it gave 
C a nadi ans a chance to show how deeply 
split they still are when it comes to the 
question of how and even whether to 
keep the country together. 

Michael Bliss, a historian at the Uni- 
versity of Toronto, said everybody 
knows that “not much can be done 
about national unity” because of the 
division of sentiment in different parts 


of the country. Ideas like designating 
Quebec as a “distinct society” in the 
constitution, for example, get battered 
in Quebec as inadequate and trounced in 
the west as a sort of reverse discrim- 
ination. 

Canada’s traditional political parlies, 
such as the Liberals, are thus left puz- 
zling in the middle. 

Tire debate over French sovereignty 
has influenced political life in Quebec 
since colonial times and has framed 
Canadian politics since the separatist 
leader. Rene Levesque, and his Parti 
Quebecois won control of Quebec’s 
provincial government in 1976. Since 
then, Canada has looked for a formula 
that would give Quebec the control it 
wants over its own economy, language 
and culture, while keeping the Canadian 
federation intact 

Broad constitutional accords were 
crafted twice by politicians but failed to 
gain public acceptance because of the 
same factional divisions evident in the 


current campaign. When Quebec asked 
its citizens in October 1995 whether 
they should begin negotiating indepen- 
dence from Canada, 49.5 percent said 
yes, a result that shocked Canadians 
elsewhere with the realization that the 
separatists were serious. 

Mr. Chretien was widely criticized 
for underestimating their strength, and 
if he had a master strategy for dealing 
with the issue, the electoral campaign 
could have been the setting in which to 
offer it Instead, he has promised to 
solve the country’s problems one at a 
time and make Quebec happy in the 
process. Support for his party has been 
steadily eroding. 

Jean Chares I, leader of the Progres- 
sive Conservatives, Canada's tradition- 
al Tory party, talks passionately on a 
personal level about the evils of sep- 
aration but says little about how he 
would prevent it. Likewise, the New 
Democratic Party leader, Alexa Mc- 
Donough, felt she could rise above the 


fray by talking almost entirely about 
jobs and social programs, but she con- 
cluded the campaign uncertain of win- 
ning even her own seaL 

As a barometer of the public mood, 
the two parties tbai are most likely to 
hold their own are offering the starkest 
versions of the Quebec sovereignty de- 
bate: the Bloc Quebecois separatist 
party and the western-based Reform 
Party. 

After a disastrous start that drove 
away even some ardent sovereignty 
supporters, the Bloc intensified its mes- 
sage that this election is the prelude to 
another referendum, perhaps in 1999. 
The party’s support rebounded, and the 
separatists may send 40 or more mem- 
bers 10 the federal House of Commons 
to fight for the country's dissolution. 

In the west, the Reform Party also 
began the campaign trailing badly but 
focused its message on Quebec, saying 
the separatists should not be coddled, 
and also enjoyed a surge in support 


Airing of Suit Against Clinton Raises the Stakes 

Opposing Lawyers ’ Bouts on Television Jeopardizes Chances for a Settlement 



By Brian Knowlton 

International Herald Tribune 


Robert Bennett, for Mr. Clinton, 
appearing on “Meet the Press.” 


WASHINGTON — An extraordi- 
narily public negotiating session be- 
tween lawyers representing President 
BiU Clinton and the Arkansas woman 
suing him for alleged sexual harassment 
could hurt, not help, the chances of an 
out-of-court settlement, legal specialists 
said Monday. 

In a rare televised spectacle, lawyers 
for the two sides appeared on nearly 
every Sunday morning talk show, pro- 
gressively refining and redefining their 
demands as they were questioned about 
comments made only minutes earlier on 
other programs. By the end of the day, 
the possibilities for any quick recon- 
ciliation appeared to be slim, lawyers 
said Monday, despite the quickly emerg- 
ing conventional wisdom in Washington 
that settlement is inevitable. 

In taking their cases to the air, A.E. 
Dick Howard, a specialist in constitu- 
tional law at the University of Virginia, 
said “both sides clearly hoped to create 
an atmosphere in which, if not the 
judges, at least the parties to it could be 


Grandson Is Suspected in Fire 
That Hurt Malcolm X Widow 


By Frank Bruni 

New York Tunes Service 


NEW YORK — Betty Shabazz, the 
widow of Malcolm X, was in extremely 
critical condition Monday in a hospital 
in the Bronx, with burns over 80 percent 
of her skin, after a fire at her Yonkers, 
New York, apartment that law enforce- 
ment officials said was deliberately set 
by her 12-year-old grandson. 

The officials, speaking on condition of 
anonymity, said that shortly after the fire 
was reprated at about 1 :40 AM. Sunday, 
the police found a 12-year-old wandering 
the streets in nearby Mount Vernon in a 
daze, his clothes reeking of gasoline. 

The police later determined dial the 
youth was Ms. Shabazz’s grandson Mal- 
colm. who had been in her care and was 
missing from her apartment when fire 
fighters arrived, these officials said. They 
said the youth was apparently angry at his 
grandmother because he did not want to 
live with her. He was not hurt. 

Malcolm is the son of Qubilah 
Bahiyah Shabazz, whose legal problems 
during the last two and a half years have 
kept die Shabazz family in the news and 
were apparently responsible for Mal- 


colm being raised by his grandmother, at 
least for a while. 

Qubilah Shabazz was indicted in 
January 1995 on charges of plotting to 
kill the Nation of Islam leader Louis 
Fairakhan, whom Betty Shabazz has ac- 
cused of playing a role in Malcolm X’s 
assassination in 1965. Qubilah Shabazz 
was 4 when she saw her father killed in 
the Audubon Ballroom in New York. 

The indictment against Qubilah 
Shabazz was dismissed last month at the 
expiration of a two-year period during 
which prosecutors had required her to 
seek 
and 

clean criminal record. 

For some or all of that time, her son had 
been sent to live with relatives in New 
York while Qubilah Shabazz moved to 
Texas, according to friends and news 
accounts about her plea agreement. 

There were contradictory accounts 
from friends of the family on Sunday 
about Malcolm’s status in the family. 
Some said he had been reunited with bis 
mother, and was simply in New York 
last week to visit his grandmother, oth- 
ers said Betty Shabazz, 61. had main- 
tained custody of him until now. 


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influenced.’’ In the end, he said, both 
parties are under great pressures to settle 
the case — but also considerable coun- 
tervailing pressures not to do so. The 
stakes are clearly higher than when a 
settlement was nearly reached two years 
ago. 

The suit against Mr. Clinton was filed 
in 1994 by Paula Jones, a former Arkan- 
sas state employee who alleges that in 
1991, Bill Clinton, then the state’s gov- 
ernor, summoned her to a hotel room, 
exposed himself and sought oral sex. Mr. 
Clinton has denied the charges, while not 
explicitly denying that she might have 
been summoned to the room. 

Ms. Jones, quoted in the Newsweek 
magazine that appeared on newsstands 
Monday, showed no sign of backing 
down. “I want him to admit what he 
did.” she said. 

Her lawyers, Mr. Howard said, were 
probably emboldened by die Supreme 
Court ruling last week that found that a 
president was not immune to civil suits 
based on allegations unrelated to bis 
official duties. The ruling allowed the 
Jones complaint to go ahead in federal 
court in Little Rock. Arkansas. 


Away From 
Politics 

• Heavy rains pushed creeks 

and rivers out of their banks in 
Ohio and West Virginia, for- 
cing hundreds of people to 
flee their homes. Two people 
were missing. (AP) 

• In what could be a har- 

binger of an increase in the 
price of a first-class stamp, 
the Postal Service has con- 
firmed that it has begun print- 
ing rate-change stamps. A 
Postal Service spokesman 
said the Bureau of Engraving 
and Printing recently began 
printing millions of “H 
stamps,” the nondenomin- 
ated stamps that would be 
used temporarily after a rate 
increase from the current 32 
cents. iWP) 

• Two helicopters flying off 

the southern coast of Louisi- 
ana collided and crashed, 
killing a pilot and injuring the 
other. The authorities did not 
know the cause of the acci- 
dent, which occurred about 
120 miles southwest of New 
Orleans. (AP) 

• Vandals released thou- 
sands of minks from their 
cages on a fur ranch near 
Mount Angel, Oregon, and 
many of the animals then died 
of exposure and from fighting 
with each other. An estimated 

8.000 to 9,000 animals were 

freed in what may have been 
the largest “eco terrorist” at- 
tack on the mink industry, 
said Marsha Kelly, spokes- 
woman for Fur Commission 
U.S-A-, an industry group. 
Militant animal -rights activ- 
ists say the multi million -dol- 
lar fur industry raises fur- 
bearing anim als inhumanely 
and kills them only to satisfy 
human vanity. (AP) 

• An F-86 fighter jet 
crashed in a fireball before 

50.000 people watching an air 
show in a Denver suburb, 
killing the pilot, officials said. 
The Korean War era SabreJet 
foiled to pull out of a steep 
dive and plowed into the 
ground 300 yards from the 
nearest spectators at Air 
Show Colorado ’97. No one 
was hurt on the ground- (AP) 

• The Supreme Court has 
set the stage for an important 
ruling on police immunify by 
ag reeing to study a civil rights 
lawsuit against a California 
sheriffs deputy who acci- 
dentally killed a teenager dur- 
ing a chase. The justices said 
they will review a federal ap- 
peals court ruling that, if up- 
held, would force Sacramento 
County Deputy James Smith 
to defend himself at trial 

insi allegations that he vi- 
the dead boy’s rights. 

(AP) 


Susan Low Bloch, a professor of con- 
stitutional law at Georgetown Uni- 
versity, said that the urge to settle must 
be very strong, because “they're both 
going to suffer” if the case leads to 
sordid charges and countercharges pub- 
licly aired. 

But if Ms. Jones's lawyers thought 
Mr. Clinton’s attorneys would be 
pressed by the Supreme Court ruling to 
seek an out-of-court settlement, Mr. 
Howard said, the spectacle Sunday 
might have had a reverse effect. 

“The publicity raises the stakes even 
further.” he said. “My instinct right now 
is it will drive the two parties apart.” 

Ms. Bloch agreed, saying, “I 
wouldn't expect a settlement soon.” 

Both sides — but particularly Robert 
Bennett, who is representing Mr. Clinton 
— were combative on the Sunday pro- 
grams. He said that the president had 
done nothing wrong, would not apo- 
logize, but might donate money to a 
charitable cause in order to put the case 
to rest. 

Mr. Bennett also made it clear that if 
Ms. Jones’s attorneys pushed the case to 
trial and raised allegations of past sexual 


improprieties by Mr. Clinton, he is pre- 
pared to attack Ms. Jones's reputation, 
including attempts to profit from the case 
by seeking book and movie deals. 

“When all the questions are 
answered.” Mr. Bennett said Sunday on 
CNN, “the president of the United 
States will not be embarrassed. 1 believe 
Paula Jones will be.” 

Ms. Jones's lawyers, Gilbert Davis 
and Joseph Cammarata, insisted that she 
requires an apology for Mr. Clinton's 
alleged entreaties, and that they would 
strongly recommend to her that she hold 
out fra* a cash settlement, though she has 
said that all she wants is to clear her 
name. 

Ms. Bloch of Georgetown questioned 
whether Ms. Jones's lawyers were ne- 
cessarily giving her disinterested advice. 
Both she and Mr. Howard noted that 
Gilbert Davis is a Republican candidate 
for attorney general of Virginia. 

* 'The temptation must be enormous,* 1 
Mr. Howard said, “for him to play it for 
all it’s worth." 

if no settlement is reached, Mr. Clin- 
ton’s lawyers must file a formal response 
to the suit in the Little Rock court. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Japan Posting on Hold 

WASHINGTON — The former House 
speaker. Thomas Foley, waited months for 
word on whether he would be named am- 
bassador to Japan. A few weeks ago. he goi 
“the call.” Though it wasn't from the pres- 
ident, only the national security adviser, it 
was good news anyway. 

But there has been no official announce- 
ment, and opposition is simmering from 
business people who find Mr. Foley loo 
pro-Japanese. 

The previous ambassador, Walter 
Mondale, was seen as Japan-friendly, but Mr. 
Mondale had Edward Lincoln as his senior 
economic adviser, and the business crowd 
apparently deemed him tough enough on the 
Japanese to be a sufficient counterweight. 

Mr. Lincoln is gone now and has been 
replaced by Kent CaJder, an equally bril- 
liant scholar but not seen as ‘ ‘anti’ ' enough 
to please the Japan skeptics. No one's say- 
ing the nomination is dead, but there may be 
a dustup. The embassy has been vacant 
since December. (Al Kamen, WP) 

Congress in Cyberspace 

WASHINGTON — As the sun breaks 
over the Pacific Northwest, Representative 


Rick White. Republican of Washington, sits 
at his desk tapping on his laptop computer to 
check the feny schedules for his trip home. 

Mr. White. 43, is among a handful of 
congressmen who personally depend on the 
Internet and is one of the chief proselytizes 
encouraging fellow members to acquaint 
themselves with a medium they are being 
called upon more and more to oversee. 
About 25 pending bills relate to die Internet. 
More than two-thirds of the members have 
set up “offices” on the World Wide Web. 

Last year, Mr. White, founder of a bi- 
partisan, bicameral Internet Caucus that has 
grown from 20 to 97 members, called Con- 
gress “lost in cyberspace.” Now, he says, 
there has been ‘ ‘a real sea change in Con- 
gress'* in terras of understanding the In- 
ternet and being open to it (WP ) 

Quote /Unquote 

Wendy Lazarus, co-director of die Chil- 
dren’s Partnership in Santa Monica, Cali- 
fornia, on politically active parents who are 
increasingly demanding that politicians ad- 
dress the needs of their children: “Chil- 
dren's issues are poised to become die new 
third rail of American politics, along with 
traditional issues concerning seniors, such 
as Social Security and Medicare." (NYT) 



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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY JUNE S, 1997 




HOW PROUST CAN CHANGE 
YOUR LIFE: Not a Novel 
By A Iain de Botton. Illustrated. 197 
pages. $ 1995 . Pantheon Books. 
Reviewed by 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 

O NE doesn't usually think of Marcel 
Proust as the author of a great self- 
help book. Unless of course what you 
admire most about "Remembrance of 
Things Past" is its usefulness for killing 
huge amounts of tune. 

Alain de Bonoo, a novelist, doesn't 
take quite such a crassly utilitarian view 
in bis delightfully original work of lit- 
erary criticism, “How Proust Can 
Change Your life: NotaNoveL” But he 
does come close in places. 

For instance, in Chapter 3, called 
“How to Take Your Time," be points 
out that one reaction to die great length 


BOOKS ^ 

of Proust’s famous novel was die "All- 
England Summarize Proust Competi- 
tion," once presented by the Monty Py- 
thon troupe in the belief, as de Botton 
puts it, that "what had originally taken 
seven volumes to express could reas- 
onably be condensed into 15 seconds or 
less, without too great a loss of integrity 
or meaning, if only an appropriate can- 
didate could be found." 

De Botton's tongue is only partly in 
his cheek here. The point of this chapter 
is that Proust really does teach important 
lessons in how to slow down life and see 
its details more clearly. And to illustrate 
the point, de Botton too takes his sweet 
time here. 

He quotes the longest sentence in 
Proust’s novel, which he insists on re- 
ferring to by its literal translation from 
French. "In Search of Lost rime." 
rather than by die more poetic but in- 
accurate “Remembrance of Things 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


V IS WAN ATHAN Anand beat Valeri 
Salov in Round 5 in the Dos Her- 
manas International Tournament 
The system of attack that Anand chose 
against the Sicilian Defense with 6 Be 3, 
7 Bc4 and 10 O-O-O, derives from the 
Yugoslavian grandmaster Dragoljub 
VeGmirovic, who always solved prob- 
lems of strategy with wild adventure. 

After 1 1 g4. there have been many 
attempts to displace the white queen 
rook with ll.~Nd4 12 Rd4 e5 13 Ro4 
Qd8, yet 14 g5 Ne8 15 Rhgl Bd7 16 
Nd5! Bb5 17 Bb6 Qd7 18 Qg4 gives 
White clear positional superiority. 

The challenging knight sacrifice with 
12 Nf5!? dares Black to survive after 
12...ef 13 Nd5 Qd8 14 gf Nf6 15 Bb6 
Qd7 16 Rhgl. 

Although White’s early setup is de- 
signed for a mating attack, after the 
cautious 12..Nc5, it may be best for him 
to take the bishop pair with 13 Ne7 Ne7 
and mount positional pressure with 14 
Qd2, as Anand prefers here. Black's 
alternative, 13...Qe7, lets White resume 

SALOVffiLMX 


his attack plan with 14 g5, planning 15 
Qpi5, 16 Rg3 and 17 Rh3. 

Anand’ s 14 Qd2 has been answered 
by I4...e5, but after 15 Qd6 Qd6 16 Rd6 
Nb3 17 ab Bg4 18 Rb6 Rab8 19 Bc5 
Rfe8 20 Bd6 Nc8 21 Ra6 be 22 Bb8. 
White is a pawn ahead. 

Salov yielded a pawn with I5.~Ng6 
16 Bd6 Qc6, hoping to make something 
out of his pin on die d rile. 

Anand returned his pawn with 17 f4!? t 
aware that I7...Ne4 18 Ne4 Qe4 19 Qa5 
Qe3 20 Kbl b6 21 Qh5 Bb7 22 Rhfl 
would present him with a threat of 23 f5, 
while 22.~Nf4? 23 Rf4 Qf4 24 Bf4 Rdl 
25 Bel Rad8 26 Qe5 wins for White. 

Salov's 21...Qe4 threatened 22~.Nf4 
as well as 22...a4!? with a powerful coun- 
terattack. But Anand landed the first blow 
with 226! Ne5 23 Be5 Qe5 24 Rhel Qd6 
25 fe fe 26 Ne6! Qd2 27 Rd2 Rd2 28 Kd2 
Kf7 29 Nd4 Bg4 30Nc6 Bf5 31 Re5Kf6 
32 Ra5, winning a decisive pawn. 

On 42 Kf2, Salov gave up. One pos- 
sible finish would have been 42...Kfo 43 
b6 Ke5 44 b7 Bb7 45 Nb7 Kd5 46 Ke3 
Kc6 47 Na5 Kb5 48 Nc4 Kb4 49 Nd2 
Kc5 50 Kf4. 


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Position after 21 ...Qe4 



SICILIAN DEFENSE 


me 

Bade 

Vldte 

Black 

Anand 

Sakv 

Anand 

Salov 

l e4 

C5 

22 S 

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2ND 

Ncfi 

23 Be5 


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od 

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Qd8 

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25 fe 

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dB 

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m 

27 Rd2 

Rd2 

7 Bc4 

Be? 

28 Kd2 

Kf7 

8 Bb3 

04 

29 Nd4 

& 

9 QeZ 

afi 

30 NcS 

Bft 

10 600 

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31 Re5 

KM 

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32 VM 

Ra5 

12 NS 

NcS 

33 Na5 

Be4 

13 Ne7 

Ne7 

34 C3 

S.. 

14 Qd2 

RdS 

35 Ke3 

Bbl 

15 Si 

NgS 

36 Ne4 

h5 

MB* 

QcS 

37Nd2 

Bb7 

1714 

bS 

38Ne4 

KgS 

18 e5 

M 

39 dJ 

b4 

IS Ne2 

85 

40 Ndfi 

BdS 

20 Nd4 

NW 

41 b9 

8* 

21 ab 

Qe4 

42 KQ 

Resign* 


s;f- Vf. - - 7 ••• • 


Past" He recalls the novel's publishing 
history. He describes what Proust ate for 
breakfast. He explains why Proust liked 
to read railway schedules. In short, de 
Bottcn takes the local train to his point 

Elsewhere his tongue is more firmly 
in his cheek, as in Chapter 2, “How to 
Read for Yourself,” where he recounts 
how Proust’s father, the distinguished 
Dr. Adrien Proust set a family precedent 
for successful self-help books with bis 
“Elements of Hygiene," among his-34 
books. This work was complete with 
drawings of how ladies ought to exercise 
by swinging their arms, by balancing on 
one foot and by jumping off a wall, 
which illustrations de Botton whimsic- 
ally reproduces. 

More often, however, his tongue isn’t 
in his cheek at alL De Botton, the author 
of three novels — the latest "Kiss and 
Tell," to be published next mouth by 
Picador — explores Proust’s irritation 
with cliches in Chapter 5, “How to 
Express Your Emotions." “The prob- 
lem with ciicbfis,” de Botton writes, “is 
not that they contain false ideas, but 
rather that they are superficial articu- 
lations of very good ones." They in- 
sulate us from expressing our real emo- 
tions. 

In a matching chapter, “How to Open 
Your Eyes," de Botton comments on 
how the narrator of Proust's novel re- 
calls his disappointment as a child over 
the difference between his romantic im- 
age of the seashore and its workaday 
actuality: “Though the narrator expe- 
riences a particularly extreme gap be- 
tween his surroundings and his internal 
conception of beauty , it is arguable that a 
degree of discrepancy is characteristic of 
modem life.” 

De Botton continues: “Because of the 

change, the workfis liable to be full of 
scenes and objects that have not yet been 
transformed into appropriate images and 
may therefore make us nostalgic for an- 
other, now lost world, which is n<X in- 
herently more beautiful but might seem 
so because it has already been widely 
depicted by those who open our eyes." 

In Chapter 4, “How to Suffer Suc- 
cessfully,” de Botton catalogues 
Proust's many psychological and phys- 
ical afflictions, not least of which was 
his “unwillingness to get out of bed," 
where he would put his head under the 
blankets and, as he liked to say, “sur- 
render completely to wailing, like 
branches in the autumn wind.” 

Did Proust exaggerate his Bis? Many 
thought so, but he challenged these skep- 
tics by declaring regularly for the last 16 
years of his life that he was about to die. 
In 1922, at the age of 51, he succeeded, 
leaving behind a 3,000-page master- 
piece duu de Botton describes as “a 
practical, universally applicable stwy 
about how to stop wasting time and start 
to appreciate life." 

By characterizing “In Search of Lost 
Time” with amusing superficiality, de 
Botton has succeeded in showing us 
some of the novel’s greatest depths. 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt is on the. 
staff of The New York Times. 


Taleban Orders Iran 
To Shut Its Embassy 

The Associated Press 

KABUL — The fundamentalist Taleban regime ordered 
Iran on Monday to shut its embassy here and accused Tehran 
of backing the Taleban ’s enemies and “destroying peace and 
stability in the country." 

A Taleban statempt gave Iran 48 hours to shut the embassy 
and e vacuate its nationals. 

The Taleban has accused Iran of supporting the anti- 
Taleban alliance, led by a former Kabul military chief, Ahmed 
Shah Masoud. 

“Iran’s military advisers are helping the opposition, and 
Iran is destroying peace and stability in the country," the 
statement said. “They are waging a Cold War against our 
people.” 

No one at the Iranian Embassy would answerfoe telephone 
or open the gate to reporters Monday, but It is believed there 
are a small number or low-level Iranian diplomats still there. 

Many of Afghanistan’s minority Shiite Muslims are part- 
ners in the anti-Taleban alliance. Most Iranians are Shiite 
Muslims. _ ■ • • _ 

Iran has denied giving military assistance to any waning 
faction in Afghanistan, but says it has sent humanitarian aid. 

The Taleban militia swept into Kabul last September, 
gaining control of two-thirds of the country. It is under heavy 
attack, however, on three fronts, including along the Iranian 
border in western Afghanistan. 

. Several Taleban sources said that the Taleban has sent 
reinforcements to the border area and to the front line north of 
Kabul. 

Last week, the Taleban briefly took control of northern 
Afghanistan, but later fell out with its Uzbek allies, apparently 
after it tried to disarm them. 

At least 300 Taleban soldiers were slaughtered when their 
Uzbek allies fenced them out of the northern city of Mazar-i- 
Sharif. 

There were reports of heavy fighting between the Taleban 
and its former Uzbek allies near Pul-e-Khumri, about 180 
kilometers (1 10 miles) north cf KabuL 


In ‘Greenhouse Effect, 9 
Maybe a Green Thumb 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The possibility that the “greenhouse 
effect" is causing Earth’s temperature to increase fans raised ‘ 
the specter of all sorts of catastrophic consequences, from 
massive flooding caused by rising sea levels to disease out- 
breaks from shifting climates. 

Now, a study suggests that “global wanning" may be 
having some beneficial effects, at least in Australia. In the 
May 29 issue of Nature, Neville Nicholls of the Bureau of 
Meteorology Research Center in Melbourne estimates that 
higher temperatures may have helped increase the wheat crop 
in Australia. ■ 

Since 1952, Australia’s average wheat crop has increased 
by a half- ton perhectare(2.4 acres), Mr. Nicholls says. During 
that same period, average temperatures across Australia are 
believed to have risen by 0.58 degrees centigrade, while mean 
annual minimum temperatures heated up by 1.02 degrees 

centigrade. 

After performing^ calculation aimed at accounting fornon- 
ciimatic variables that could influence crop yields, such as 
changes in fanning practices, Mr. Nicholls estimates that 30 
percent to 50 percent of the total increase in wheat yield may 
have been from climatic change. Wanning temperatures could . 
bolster wheat crop yields by decreasing the frequency of 
severe frosts, which, in fact, have become leas frequent in 
recent years, Mr. Nicholls says. 


BRIEFLY 


Indonesia Sends Troops to Isle - 

JAKARTA Indonesia has deployed at least 3,00(1 , 
troops on Madura Island before a new vote that wa£ 
ordered in response to rioting set off by the governing . 
Golkar party's sweeping general election victory'': 
Thursday, the police said Monday. 

The General Election Commission will conduct the 4 
voting at two locations bn Madura, off the Eas t Java coast,'^ 
on Tuesday. 

Muslims backing the United Development Party rioted ' 
after the elections, destroying ballot boxes, and violence.'* 
continued through the weekend. , ( Reuters ) 

Civil Servants Protest in Dhaka . 

DHAKA, Bangladesh — Growing protests over ' 
changes to foe working week and a delay in announcing , 
new pay scales set off clashes Monday between. ; 
Bangladesh government employees and foe police. ^ 

Witnesses said force protesters were injured as tfae^ 
police used batons to disperse thousands of employees * 
calling for the restoration of Thursdays as a half day off " 
and Friday* as a full day off. ‘ f 

Last week, the government changed foe weekend to/, 
Friday and Saturday, saying it would give employees “ 
more time to take care of family matters and would reduce, 
fuel costs forgovemment transportation. But foe changesj t 
also require employees to work longer hours Sunday ' 
through Thursday. ( Reuters fl; 

Papua Legislator Kidnapped :.! 

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea — A member." 
of the Papua New Guinea Parliament has been kidnapped a 
while campaigning for national elections on the seces-' 
sionist island of Bougainville, the government said i 
Monday. :i 

. John Momis, foe member for Bougainville in Par- * 
lianaent, was abducted Sunday by members of foe Bou-, r 
gainviUe Revolutionary Army, die government said. * ; 

A member of his staff was taken with him at Tinputz, a 
regional center on north Bougainville, it said- Mr. Momis.j 
is a strong supporter of foe Papua New Guinea gov-j 
eminent on foe issue of Bougainville, where rebels have.’ 
been fighting a secessionist war for nine years. J 

The rebels have said they plan to disrupt foe June 14~. 
election. - ( Reuters L i 

Moscow Offers Arms to Manila ^ 

MANILA - — Russia has offered to sell foe Philippines 
fighter jets arid guns to help modernize its armed forces, 11 ] 
Foreign Undersecretary Rodolfo Severino said Monday. -• 

Mr. Severino visited Moscow last weekend and spoke: . 
with toeRussian deputy foreign minister, Trigori Karasu.< : 
He said the Russians offered “all kinds of things, fronw 
fighter aircraft to small arms.’’ ’I 

Manila has earmadeed $2 billion for foe military mod- 1 
emization program, with spending to be spread over 15 - 
years. (Reuters} 

Vietnam Lists Anti- Vice Results - 

HANOI— Vietnam on Monday catalogued foe results' 1 
of 15 months of efforts to root but vice in Ho Chi Mlnh 
City and said foe streets were 70 to 80 percent cleaner of ’ 
“poisonous cultural activities.” ■ 

The Saigon Tunes Daily quoted a report issued by foe* • 
city’s Culture and. Infonnation Department as saying 487 
brothels ‘had been closed in foe former Saigon and 40 ■ 
brothel owners arrested. It said that 120 prostitutes were'" 
undergoing re-education and that 62 "pleasure seekers” ' 
had been fined. 

It said nearly. half a million' videos were confiscated. - 
along with 73,724 illicit books or periodicals. ( Reuters) ' 

■ . i-. ' . ’ *J ■ ■-'fif .! 






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INTERNATIONAL HE RALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 1997 

FRANCE TAKES A LEFT TURN 


PAGE 5 


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Chirac on the Rocks After Failing to Heed Which Why the Winds Blew 



Seoul OlTi^jn 
! Dies in Ciasli i 
1 At Universltv 


• By Roger Cohen 

Ww Yufl Times Service 

;-■ PARIS — It was not just Ranee’s center- 
v -right government that was swept out of office by 
a remarkable Socialist resurgence. It was also 
the previously unassailable dignity of the pres- 
„ jdential office and the coherence of the French 
- right as a political movement. 

:- Lionel Jospin’s Socialists are not Tony 
t. Blair’s Labour Party. They have said they will 
create 350.000 jobs in the state sector and 
; suggested they will halt the country’s prival- 
i Rations. By voting — — 
ibis party back into NEWS ANALYSIS 

-•office just four — 

years after it suffered a crushing defeat, the 
v french have thus expressed their deep reser- 
i-vahofls about the American-led economic re- 
-forms they see sweeping the world. 

Far from suggesting opportunity, globaliz- 
i ation is widely equated here with menace and 
■.iwith the country's 12.8 percent unemployment 
rate. 

“The essential message is that our entire 
‘'political system is in crisis,” said Philippe 
Segirin, a leader of President Jacques Chirac's 
defeated Gauliist party. “The French continue 
to look for the means to master the new world 


that is upon them and that they do not want to 
eqjuate always with regression and loss of 

That message has been clear enough for a 
while. But, in a gross miscalculation, Mr. Chir- 
ac failed to heed the disoriented national 
mood. 

IBs decision to call elections 10 months early 
in an effort to secure a rightist parliamentary 
majority for the remaining five years of his 
presidency and then to place his deeply un- 
popular prime minister, Alain 
Juppe, at the head of the cam- 
paign, backfired disastrously. Seldom, il 

Seldom, if ever, has a 
French president shot himself COnspiCUC 

so conspicuously in the foot conseonpi 

The institutional con- 
sequences already appear far- 
reaching. This was Mr. Chirac’s election, spe- 
cifically willed by him, and he lost it By 
committing such a blunder, the president has 
punctured the aura that has surrounded the 
pivotal office ef the Fifth Republic since it was 
founded in 1958. 

De Gaulle, who fashioned the presidency to 
his ambitions, declared in 1964: “The undi- 
vided authority of the state is entirely conferred 
on the president by the people who have elected 


him.” He added: “There is do other anthority 
- — ministerial, civil, military or judicial ■ — ■ that 
is not conferred and maintained by him.” 

For almost four decades, and certainly under 
Mr. Chirac’s wily predecessor, Francois Mit- 
terrand, this extraordinary concentration of 
power has been maintained. The president, all 
powerful, has stood above the fray. But because 
of an inept campaign in which he took part, ami 
now an ignominious defeat, Mr. Chirac appears 
to have placed himself in a situation of un- 


Seldom, if ever, has a French president shot himself so 
conspicuously in the foot* The institutional 
consequences already appear far-reaching. 


precedented weakness. 

It is already clear that in the initial period of 
cohabitation with a Socialist prime minister, the 
balance of power will be very much with the 
newly installed Socialist leader endorsed by the 
people against the specific will of the pres- 
ident 

Although there have been other such co- 
habitations, including Mr. Chirac’s own period 
as prime minis ter under Mr. Mitterrand from 


1986 to 1988, none has previously emerged in 
circumstances so personally demeaning to the 
head of state. 

How Mr. Jospin will exploit this new situ- 
ation is not yet clear. 

France's position today is full of contra- 
dictions to which the Socialist program appears 
to offer no ready solutions. The country is 
formally committed to European integration 
and to die euro, die single currency — ob- 
jectives that in turn seem to require privat- 
izations, deregulation and 
austerity — yet it has voted 
mself SO for a party that has expressed 
clear reservations over these 
economic policies. 

Nonetheless, Mr. Jospin is 

likely to enjoy a honeymoon 

of several weeks. His promise 
of a “profound renovation of public life” ap- 
pears sincere and deeply felt 

It is precisely because the outgoing prime 
minister, Mr. Juppe, and Mr. Chirac missed this 
disenchantment — to which Mr. Jospin was 
attentive — that anger in the French political 


right was at such a high pitch on Sunday. 
Nicolas Sarkozy, a Gauliist, came closest to 
pointing the finger at the president and at Mr. 
Juppe by declaring. “I am convinced that it is 


not our ideas that were defeated today but the 
manner in which they were presented. ” 

That manner did indeed appear often to be 
entirely lacking in coherence. For two years, 
with a crushing parliamentary majoriiy behind 
them. Mr. Chirac and Mr. Juppe veered between 
promises of reforms designed to cut the state's 
role in the economy and equally vehement 
promises that the unusually stare-heavy French 
economic model would not be touched by the 
government. 

France, it is said, is hard to reform, preferring 
upheaval to gradual change. Certainly there 
were repeated strikes over the attempts to touch 
anything, from the state-owned railroads to the 
social security system. 

But the government's uncertainty about 
which direction to take has been palpable, fi- 
nally finding expression in Mr. Chirac 's bizarre 
decision to entrust the last week of campaigning 
for his cause to Mr. Seguin and Alain Madelin, 
a team as unlikely and apparently incoherent as, 
say, a ticket composed of Mario Cuomo and 
Rooald Reagan. 

Indeed, the exposure of the paralyzing splits 
on the right between a Gauliist wing that is 
attached to a strong French state and a reformist 
wing that believes in market reforms was one of 
the most striking aspects of the campaign. 


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Jospin: Back From the Wilderness 

: Considered a 6 Loser 9 9 Socialist Leader Displays His Tenacity 



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; By Charles Trueheart 

> Washington Past Service 

\ PARIS — As he feced a boisterous 
£rowd of supporters Sunday night far 
{be first time as the next prime minister 
pf Ranee, Lionel Jospin wore a char- 
acteristic look of wide-eyed surprise, as 
if he could not quite believe the at- 
Jtendon or the new reality that drove it. 
j He was not alone in his surprise. The 
[Socialist leader, who became die head 
;of the French government Monday 
morning, comes to his new responsi- 
bilities after a quarter-century in politics 
during which he has been underesti- 
mated constantly, and written off mare 
| than once. Forma - Culture Minis ter 
Jack Lang, who now hopes for another 
cabinet job, once called him “a 
Joser.” 

* Only two months ago, before Pres- 
ident Jacques Chirac made tbe calam- 
itous decision to (all elections, Mr. 
-Jospin’s leadership of tbe Sorialist 
Party was widely held to be erratic and 
nnsure. 

[ That apparently false im pre ssi on of 
lim as a man too gentle, hesitant and 
cerebral for the political big leagues 
4day have emboldqie^JWf^Ghfrariq^ 
•$»ke his reckless corineT 
" ^“Everyone thought he was a marsh- 
mallow,” said Philippe Labro, a broad- 
casting executive and author who is no 
partisan of the left 

“But the man has shown he has 
fiber.” 

Francois Mitterrand thought so, too. 
Setting out to run for president of France 
in 1981, Mr. Mitterrand picked Mr. 
Jospin to succeed him at the head of the 
Socialist Party for reasons that are every 
bit as pertinent today, with the new 
.leftist majority that includes an influ- 
ential and demanding bloc of Commu- 
nists. 

Of Mr. Jospin, Mr. Mitterrand said, 
“He was tbe only one I could trust, if the 
Communists pounded the table, not to 
hide underneath it.” 

Mr. Jospin’s first days on the cam- 
paign trail this spring seemed to confirm 
the conventional wisdom that the So- 
cialist Party, still shaken from its le- 
gislative rout in 1993,Mr.Jospin’spres- 

• idential loss to Mr. Chirac in 1995, and 
the death of the Socialist patriarch Mit- 
terrand in 1996, was discredited, rud- 
derless and uninspired. 

With his quiet command of the So- 
cialist Party program and the disparate 
allmce of Communists, Greens and 
others who will form his new majority 
in Parliament, Mr. Jospin managed to 
tom that impression around and hand 
Mr. Chirac’s center-right majority a 
sunning defeat whose consequences it 
will have to suffer for as long as the 
president remains in office. With Mr. 
Jospin's accession to prime minister. 

! France will embark on hs third and 
probably its longest period of political 
“cohabitation” with a president of the 
mam adversary party, the Rally for die 
Republic. 

Mr. Jospin, who will turn 60 next 
month, owes this astonishing reversal of 
fomme in large part to Mr. Chirac’s 
pom- judgment, but also, more distantly 
and paradoxically, to the reputed ar- 
rogance of the man he is replacing. 

: outgoing Prime Minister Alain Juppe. 
That tale, already becoming legend, is 
noted in Mr. Jospin’s trajectory in, and 


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; A former diplomat and university 
pmfesscr, Mr. Joqnn rose through the 
. Sorialist Party ranks under Mr. Mt- 
tqrand during the 1970s, eventually be- 
coming Ins anointed successor as first 
. secretary, or leader, of the party in 1 981 . 
, la 1988, at the outset of Mr. Nfitter- 
rand’s second term, Mr. Jospin quit the 
: P*dy post and was named (fcpuly gov- 
.auunetK lender and minister of edu- 
. cation, Ms only major government re- 
qxHaibilaies before now. 

But his reiationship with Mr. hfit- 
krcaad was cooling already. Mr. Jospin 
; *nt . disenchanted with the imperial 
hsmemor had adopted, and he had 
jog hi* stomach for the party intrigues 
• on hadekvated one after another of his 
QO&eagues to the prime ministership he 
he deserved, cTwotrf than, Midiel 
; xocatd and Laurent Fabius, are now job 


’ Socialist Leader Di 

parties to power in the National As- 
sembly. 

During the ensuing brief retreat from 
political life, Mr. Jospin sought to re- 
vive his youthful ambitions for dip- 
lomatic service, and to get away from 
Paris, die party, and a failed marriage. 
(He has since remarried.) So, Mr. Jospin 
asked Mr. Juppe, then die French for- 
eign minister, for an ambassadorship, 
reportedly in Prague. But Mr. Juppe 
stalled, ignoring die entreaties of a 
proud and vanquished political oppo- 
nent. 

Had Mr. Jospin been shipped out to a 
French embassy, be would not have 
been at loose ends a year later when 
Jacques Delors, the framer European 
Commission president, decided not to 
seek the Socialist Party nomination for 
president in die- upcoming 1995 elec- 
tions. 

But since he was otherwise unem- 
ployed and, friends said, bruised by his 
treatment, Mr. Jospin abandoned his 
retirement and returned to the leader- 
ship of tbe party, die path that put him on 
the road to the prime ministership. 

Along with a reputation fra tenacity, 
he also has one for integrity, even a 

■ v jr *••••/• ■■'••• 
tr.V. ■ j- - -V 

EU Anxious 
For a Signal 
From Paris 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

LUXEMBOURG — European Un- 
ion foreign ministers expressed cau- 
tious optimism Monday that the new 
Socialist government in France would 
not derail the process of European in- 
tegration, but privately they acknowl- 
edged concerns over the prospects for 
monetary union and the reforms re- 
quired for die bloc’s enlargement. 

The guarded comments at the min- 
isters’ monthly meeting here reflected 
uncertainty over the direction that Prime 
Minister Lionel Jospin will chart for 
France, given the contradictions be- 
tween his professions of faith in Europe 
and his rejection of die austerity re- 
quired for a single currency. 

Calling the result potentially “very 
dangerous,” one senior EU official said 
that if die Socialists “do what they say 
they will do, it will create a threat to 
monetary union, or start it on a very 
weak basis.” 

Most minis ters were hoping for clues 
to Reach policy from Mr. Jospin’s 
choice of foreign minister, who is ex- 
pected to be announced later this week, 
and whether be would signal a will- 
ingness to conclude a treaty on EU re- 
form in two weeks in Amsterdam. 

In individual reactions. Foreign Min- 
ister Lamberto Dim of Italy was at ease 
with the results of die election. He said 
the So rialis t victory had increased the 
chances of a delay to monetary union 
that would enable Rome to join a single 
currency ai the outset 

The French electorate gave voice to a 
much-broader public discontent with die 
monetarist agenda set by the Maastricht 
treaty, which gave countries “too brief a 


certain moralism. One newspaper pro- 
file liken ed him to a “Swedish pastor” 
— in this case, a six-footer who has a 
passion for playing basketball. 

In a political atmosphere shot through 
with corruption scandals — this was as 
true under Mr. Mitterrand’s Socialists 
as it is under Mr. Chirac's center-right 
entourage — Mr. Jospin has enjoyed a 
* ‘Mr. Clean” image dial is often derided 
as sanctimony and hnmorlessness. 

Those traits of rectitude, according to 
friends and political associates, spring 
from his strict upbringing in a pacifist 
household of Protestant faith. His father 
was a school administrator charged with 
delinquent and troubled youth, and his 
mother, who is still living, a midwife. 

On government integrity, Mr. Jospin 
said in a magazine interview a few 
weeks ago, “I have clear principles, 
even elementary ones. I learned them 
from my parents, but also at school. I 
think they should guide our comport- 
ment just as they guide our Republic. 
That is, between the moral principles 
that 1 saw written on the blackboard in 
my classroom and those that the state 
should impose, there should be the 
closest relationship.” 



Jadk D*fa«gina0teBcn 

Alain Juppe arriving Monday at 
the Elysee Palace to tender his 
resignation as prime minister. 

period” to reduce their deficits and 
tackle the structural deficiencies in labor 
and welfare policies that are at tbe root of 
Europe’s joblessness, he said. But he 
said any move to change that agenda 
would have to come from France, or 
Germany, where the government is reel- 
ing over its plans to revise the country’s 
gold reserves as a way to meet tbe 
treaty’s criteria. 

“Italy will not be the country to de- 
mand a change of tbe timetable,” Mr. 
Dini said, referring to the scheduled 
January 1999 start date for the euro. 

Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel of 
Germany said the Paris-Boon axis at the 
heart of Europe would survive intact, 
noting that the Maastricht treaty’s blue- 
print for the euro had been thrashed oat 
between Chancellor Helmut Kohl and 
the late President Francois Mitterrand, 
Mr. Jospin’s Socialist mentor. 


French. Women Double Share of Seats 


; nr 1992. Mr. Jospin quit the cabinet, 
;gd the following year he lost his par- 
fesneotaty «aim die Hauto-Garocneof 
f lOterijanesi Prance is the electoral dc- 
_«icfe &at brought the center-right 


Reuters 

' PARIS — French women nearly 
doubled their tiny share of seats in the 
National Assembly after tbe Socialist- 
led election victory Sunday. 

Final results on Monday showed that 
wo m en had won 62 seats, or 10.7 per- 
cent of the 577-member National As- 
sembly, helped by a Socialist and Com- 
munist policy of fielding female 
candidates in 30 percent erf all districts. 

Women had just 32 seats, or 5.5 per- 
cent of the total, in the outgoing Par- 
liament, the lowest in the European Un- 
ion. Yet, Ranee is so far adrift from 
most of its EU partners that the surge 
was enough only to lift it past Greece 
into 14th {dace m die 15-nazion group. 
Sweden tops the list, with women hold- 
ing more than 40 percent of the le- 
gislative seals. 

The Socialist leader, Lionel Jospin. 


who was named prime minister Monday, 
has said that his government would seek 
to bolster the role of women in gov- 
ernment, including more cabinet posts. 

“If there is a government of change, 
then it will be a government in which 
women will have major posts,” Mr. 
Jospin said last month. 

Among prominent Socialist women 
are Maitine Aubry, who is likely to be 
named employment minister, Elisabeth 
Guigou, a possible social affairs min- 
ister and Catherine Trautmann, fevered 
to take over urban affairs. 

France has had one female prime 
minister, Edith Cresson, a Socialist who 
lasted a scant 10 months before resign- 
ing in 1992 with her popularity at a 
record low. 

French women also trail in business. 
Tbe heads of France’s 200 biggest French 
firms are, without exception, men. 



ipiZiA j : • 



(jr 



JKBOiWilVr kitn/Rculm 

Lionel Jospin, the new French prime minister. Hanked by his principal Socialist Party leaders as they 
reviewed newspaper commentary at a recent election gathering: From left, Bernard Kouchner, Segolene 
Royal, Dominique Stranss-Kahn, Mr. Jospin, Martine Aubry, Jean-Marc Ayrault, Catherine Trautmann 
and Jack Lang. Mr. Jospin is thought likely to choose from among this group to fill his cabinet 


BRIEFLY 


EU to Keep Envoys Out of Iran 

LUXEMBOURG — The 15 European Union nations 
agreed Monday to keep tbeir ambassadors away from 
Tehran unless Iran welcomed all of them back, in- 
cluding the German and Danish envoys who were told in 
April not to return. 

The EU envoys were withdrawn after a Ger man court 
ruling April 10 that linked Iranian leaders to the 1992 
assassination of four Iranian dissidents in a Berlin 
restaurant. When the ambassadors decided to return to 
Tehran, Iran told the German and Danish envoys to stay 
home, citing what it called tbeir governments’ anti-Iran 
views. As a result, none of the EU envoys returned. The 
EU foreign ministers agreed Monday that as long as Iran 
was not ready to allow all 15 ambassadors to return, 
none would go back. (AP) 

Goldsmith Is Critically III 

PARIS — Sir James Goldsmith, the British-French 
businessman who amassed a fortune as a corporate 
raider, is critically ill wife cancer in a hospital near Paris, 
a person close to him said Monday. 

Sir James, 64, first suffered pancreatic cancer in 
1985. Its recurrence was kept secret while he led his 
Referendum Party in tbe six-week campaign for Bri- 
tain’s general election May 1 , the British newspaper The 
Times said Monday. Tbe party, campaigning against 
further integration of Britain into fee European Union, 
garnered more than 800,000 votes but failed to win a 
seat in Parliament in the election, which resulted in a 
victory for the Labour Party. (Reuters) 

U.S. Army Sex Trial Begins 

DARMSTADT, Germany — The first of three U.S. 
Army sergeants accused of mistreatment or assault 
pleaded not guilty Monday to charges that he had raped, 
sodomized and harassed women at a training center in 
Darmstadt 

Sergeant First Class Julius Davis is charged in a 
military court wife six counts of rape, one of attempted 
rape, one of forcible sodomy and several counts of 
cruelty toward a subordinate and indecent assault 

Disclosure that fee U.S. military's sex scandals had 
Spread to Europe came in February, when fee army 
disclosed that 1 1 soldiers had lodged complaints against 
instructors at fee training base. (AP) 

Blast Shakes Albanian Capital 

TIRANA Albania — A large explosion shook cen- 
tral Tirana on Monday, leaving more than a dozen 
people hurt It was unclear whether the blast had been 
politically motivated. 

The explosion damaged a cafe near the Defense 
Ministr y and the headquarters of the Socialist Party. 
Hospital officials said 16 people were hurt but none 
seriously. 

The police declined to comment on possible motives. 
The care's owner is Lush Perpali, a Socialist leader and 
a hi gh- ranking official in the Interior Ministry. (AP) 

Don’t Forget Poor, Pope Urges 

LEGNICA, Poland — Pope John Paul II on Monday 
paintwt a bleak picture of life for the economic orphans 
of Poland’s post-Communist prosperity, saying many 
were suffering from poverty, ho m elessness and un- 
employment. 

He urged political and business leaders not to ignore 
the old and fee disadvantaged who have struggled since 
the fell of communism in 1989. 

He made fee comments to 300,000 pilgrims in fee 
southwestern town of Legnica on the third day of his 
return to his homeland. (Reuters) 


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PAGE 6 


TTJESDAXKINES, 1997 


EDHORIALS /OPINION 


lieralb 





PUHJUSHKD WITH THE NRW YOU TIMES AND THE WAHNNCTON POST 


nbnm f This French Revolt Could Be Good for Europe 




tzz: 


Gang Up on Bribery 


The developed nations of the world 
have promised to outlaw bribery in the 
pursuit of foreign contracts. This may 
not seem so remarkable, until you coo- 
sider that at the moment such bribes are 
not only legal tat also tax-deductible 
in many countries. And it was not all 
that king ago that Americans who pro- 
tested these bribes and spoke of rem- 
edying the situation were greeted only 
with a sigh of derision and exasper- 
ation by those elsewhere in die world 
who engaged in die practice. 

The United States passed the For- 
eign Corrupt Practices Act more than 
two decades ago, making it illegal for 
U.S. companies to bribe foreign of- 
ficials to get business. Eva since, 
many American basiness executives 
have complained that the law puts 
them at a disadvantage because com- 
petitors from PanaH» France or Japan 
are not similarly constrained. (Other 
business executives, it is worth noting, 
have praised the law for giving them a 
good excuse not to pay bribes.) The 
Clinton administration has refused to 
consider making U.S. law more le- 
nient, instead lobbying other nations to 
follow the honorable U.S. lead. 


This is more than an issue of lev- 
eling the playing field for American 
business, though. As the OECD (the29 
developed countries afNorth America, 
Europe and Asia) said in a statement 
last month, “Bribery hinders compe- 
tition, distorts trade and harms con- 
sumers, taxpayers and the efficient 
honest traders who lose contracts, pro- 
duction and profit. ’ ' Most of all it hurts 
developing countries, where corrup- 
tion may enrich a small ruling elite 
while bequeathing shoddy construc- 
tion or goods to most of foe nation. 

The OECD pledge to criminalize 
such tribay is only a first step. The 
developed nations now must make good 
on their promises to draft and submit 
legislation to their parliaments by this 
time next year and to see it enacted into 
law by the end of 1998. Moreover, the 
value of any anti-bribery code will be 
limited until all nations, rich andpoar, 
accept it, under the aegis of foe world 
Trade Organization. But certainly poor 
countries will not take kindly to any 
lecturing until foe developed nations got 
their laws in order. That is why foe 
OECD agreement is key. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Rights in the Americas 


Human rights commissions appoin- 
ted by governments are generally timid, 
but the Inter-American Commission on 
Human Rights is an admirable excep- 
tion. Countries recently criticized by 
the commission, like Peru and Mexico, 
are now pressing to restrict its activities. 
Guatemala is trying to get a politician 
closely associated with past military 
repression appointed to the organiza- 
tion. The Untied Slates must campaign 
vigorously atthis week's meeting of foe 
Organization of American States in 
Lima to defeat both efforts. 

Although the commission cannot 
enforce its decisions on unwilling gov- 
ernments, its complaints and reports 
have helped get offensive laws 
changed and brought relief to victims 
of abuse. Commission actions have led 
Argentina to repeal legislation inter- 
fering with free expression, Mexico to 
introduce independent election mon- 
itoring, and Colombia to compensate 
victims of an army massacre. 

Critics of the commission's aggres- 
sive investigations would narrow its jur- 
isdiction over individual cases, impose 


new secrecy rules and mate it harder for 
private organizations like Amnesty In- 
ternational and Human Rights Waich to 
become involved in cases. 

The rights situation in the Americas 

S tter, but there are still serious 
in countries like Pern, 
and Guatemala. Die com- 
mission’s monitoring is a useful tool 
for pressuring the laggards. 

Guatemala’s n ominatio n of Fran- 
cisco Viilagran Kramer to’ be one of 
seven commission members also 
threatens foe group’s effectiveness. 
Mir. Viilagran was vice president dur- 
ing one of Guatemala’s Woodiest re- 
gimes of foe early 1980s. His gov- 
ernment leveled Indian villages and 
burned the Spanish Embassy to kill 

three more suitable nominees for the 
three vacant commission seats. 

The need fix’ U.S. leadership is one 
of Bill Clinton's favorite international 
themes. A strong show of leadership in 
Lima coold reinforce human rights 
protection throughout the Americas. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Keep Pacific Skies Free 


It may come as a surprise that in at 
least one economic sector the United 
States enjoys a sizable trade surplus 
with Japan. That sector is commercial 
aviation. U.S. airlines outperform their 
Japanese competitors to the tune of $5 
billion each year. Knowing that, it 
might seem even more surprising that 
U.S. officials would consider nego- 
tiating away some of the U.S. advan- 
tage. But such a danger exists. 

In most of the world, U.S. policy- 
makers seek “open skies” — short- 
hand for opening up the overregulated 
world of international aviation and al- 
lowing airlines to offer as many flights 
as the market will bear. The Clinton 
administration has achieved such 
agreements with many European and 
three Asian countries, aiming for more 
service at lower prices. 

Air traffic between Japan and the 
United States, however, remains 
shackled by an oft-amended 1952 
treaty restricting the number of flights, 
the airlines that can provide service 
and the airports they can use. Prices are 
higher than they should be, and many 
cities have far less service than they 
need. Consumers in both countries suf- 
fer. so does bilateral trade. 


understandable reason: Its airlines (es- 
pecially Japan Airlines), long coddled 
and overregulated by an intrusive bu- 
reaucracy, are inefficient and unable to 
compete in an open market 
Until reoenthr, U.S. officials held 
firm on open skies as a goal, but re- 
cently they have suggested a willing- 
ness to compromise. This reflects Ja- 
pan’s success in dividing the U.S. 
airline industry. Some companies, es- 
pecially those not favored by the ex- 
isting treaty, would be happy to sell out 
the principle of open trade in exchange 
for more flight slots. In particular, they 
are willing to give away, on an “in- 


terim” basis, existing U.S. rights to fly 
to Japan and from there to other points 
in Asia. But the national interest would 
be ill-served by such a deal, because 
the growing Asia market is key to the 
future health of the U.S. airline in- 
dustry as a whole. 

Japan has legitimate com plaints 
about the 1952 treaty, foisted on it at a 
time when it could hardly negotiate 
from strength. The proper response, 
though, for Japanese as well as Amer- 
ican consumers, is not to re jigger the 
regulations but to open aviation mar- 
kets on both sides or the Pacific. U.S. 
negotiators should stick to that goaL 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


But Japan remains adamantly op- 
posed to real liberalization, and for an 


Other Comment 


Wavs to Radicalize Islam 


All religions produce extremists. 
Hindu zealots do terrible things in In- 
dia and Sri Lanka; Christians commit 
atrocities in Northern Ireland. Islamic 
extremists lend to thrive in places 
where conventional politicians have 
failed, heroes are few and hope has 
vanished. That may be in Algeria or 
Afghanistan; it may be in Turkey, or 
France or even Indonesia. 

One way to nourish Islamic extrem- 
ism is to stamp on the harmless ex- 
pression of Islamist ideas. Turkey's 
generals have been doing that in pur- 


ging foe army's ranks of officers with 
views similar to those of the country’s 
Islamist prime minister. 

Another way is to exclude Muslims 
from foe larger society. That is what 
has been happening to the many out-of- 
work Muslim youths who live on the 
outskirts of French cities. 

A third way is to exploit ignorance 
and fear of non-Muslims for political 
ends. That may be happening in In- 
donesia, where discontent with misgov- 
emment risks being Islanuzed, over- 
whelming the traditional good temper 
of the country's 167 million Muslims. 

— The Economist ( London j. 


LYTEKNAT10NAI. 


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Co-Chairmen 

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JW7. /rmicnoaa/ Herald Triune. Ail ngko retercei ISSN: 0294-8(62. 


P ARIS —The French left's return to 
power coold prove foe best thing 


I power coold prove foe best thing 
that has happened to Europe since the 
Maastricht treaty was signed in 1991- 
Since 1991 the European project has 
been foundering- Unemployment and 
economic slump have accompanied the 
plaintive reiteration by governments of 
a received economic wisdom that de- 
mands competitive austerity. Even the 
Germans now have rebelled. 

Critics accuse foe French electorate 
of inconstancy, voting left, then right, 
now left again. The voters in fact have 
been entirely consistent They have 
voted repeatedly for the same things: 
employment, growth, social justice, 
Europe, honesty in government 
Lionel Jospin’s Socialist alliance 
was elected cm Sunday by malting es- 
sentially the same promises that 
Jacques Chirac made when success- 
fully campaigning for the presidency 
two years ago. The voters have not 
reversed themselves. The politicians 
failed to do what they promised to da 
Elected in 1995, Mr. Chirac named a 


By William Pfaff 


is in serious 


I poor , prime minister who ignored the pres- 

worid [dent’s campaign promises (with the 


president's acquiescence) and conduc- 
ted, maladroiny arrogantly, the 
same economic austerity program that 
his predecessor, Edouard Balladnr, had 
been carrying out with discretion and 
political prudence. 

Mr. Jospin is a realist In 1981 he told 


the Socialists, flushed with the enthu- 
siasm produced by their most brilliant 
doctoral victory since foe Popular 
Front’s in 1936, that “foe mutations of 
industrial society are unstoppable," 
awl that the economic crisis “is an 
objectiverealityfoatcan’tbealteraiby 
simply willing it to change/ * 

He has been elected with encum- 
bering allies. However, thanks to bis 
political adroitness, foe ecologists and 
(internally divided) Communists heed 
him more titan he needs them. 

Mr, Jospin has promised foe French s 
demand-led, job-creating recovery. He 
intends before summer to bring busi- 
ness and labor leadership (the “social 
partners,” as the French say) together 
with foe new government’s economic 
minis ters to establish a cooperative 
program for such a recovery. 

The incoming prime minister has 
promised to respect France’s Maas- 
tricht treaty obligations. He and leaders 
of the German Social Democratic Party 
last week made a joint call for a more 
“social” Europe. The Bundesbank, for 
its part, is now reliably reported to want 
the European single currency post- 
poned if mat is necessary to establish it 
on a politically and economically solid 
foundation. 

fTharw.TInr f fe fnyirt K ohl, whose par- 


trouble because of bis govot^nents 

moposal tomateawpffrevjl^nrf 

Germany's undervalued gold reserves, 
so as to meet foe Maastricht criteria that 
Germany itself set for currency mem- 
bership. It is foe German public, sij 
ferine rising unemployment, which 
now provides the mam obstacle to the 
single currency, not France s voters. 

If a Jospin government begins to 
create jobs through demand-stimula- 
tion, without inflation, Germany and 
Ac rest of Europe will be tempted to 
follow siriL European integration 
might then be relaunched on terms ac- 
tually popular with Europe's voters. 

The Jospin program could fail, ob- 
viously. But job creation in conditions 
of competitive deflation has already 
failed in continental Europe. That is 
why electorates are in a quasi-msur- 
rectional mood. 

The intelligen t right sees tins. The 
man who would have been France’s 
p rime minister had foe right won, Phi- 
lippe Seguin (now bidding to takeover 
the Gaullist movement), makes it plain 
that his, too, would be a “more social” 
Europe. A page has been turned. 

Hie human drama of this election 
has been that of Mr. Chirac’s ruination 


century was the instrument of his quest 
for the presidency. 

His decision to call parliamentary 
elections earlier than necessary was 
politically explicable. His subsequent 
conduct was not. Calling for change, he 
offered sameness. Asking for a “new 
San,” he radiated defeatism. 

After losing foe fira-round vote on 
M^25,ite jettisoned hfe prime minister 
and leader, Alain Juppfi, and 

promised leadership of a new govern- 
meat to two men not only opposed to his 
past policies but standing for mutually 
contradictory solutions. Mr. Sdgtrin be- 
lieves in reflation and postponement of 
the single currency. Alain Madelin, foe 
other of Mr. Chirac's nominees, is foe 




r a w 









rig ht's most ardent 'supporter of free 
market nolicies. It made no sense, as 


market pOUCieS. It tDi 

the public recognized. 


the public recognized. 

Mr. Chirac, a bulldozing executive, 
had always seemed to lack foe gravity 


***** 9F- 

j 8A 


of his presidency, now apparently con- 
demned to five years’ ‘‘cohabitation” 


with the left, and his destruction of foe 
neo-Gaollist party, which for a quarter- 


ywi vision of a president. But-foe- pres- 
idency is what he wanted, only to dis- 
cover, or so it seems, that he could not 
handle it. Thus, on Monday morning he 
handed responsibility for France’s fu- 
ture over to Mr. Jospin. — the Socialist. 
One imagines that he did so with relief. 

One concludes that, subconsciously, . 
handing over responsibility is what all of i 
this has been about. France’s voters 
again gave Mr. Chirac what he wanted. 

International Herald Tribane. 

6 Los Angeles Tunes Syndicate. 


* m /!&*■ 

. _ A at* "V- ■* 

■ - V jB-.wuwiL : 





The West Shouldn’t Leave the Baltic Nations Out in the Cold 


* m . 




=-• ■&■-***, 


N EW YORK —As the Balt- 
ic nations of Estonia, Lai- 


X \ i c nations of Estonia, Lat- 
via and Lithuania ponder the 
prospect of NATO expansion, 
they fear that they wall once 

5 become the orphans of 
s. They were last aban- 
in 1940, when the Soviet 
Union forcibly annexed them a 
year after S talin and Hitler 
secretly agreed to place them 
under Moscow’s dominion. 

This time, just a few years 
after regaining their indepen- 
dence, they face rejection by foe 
United States and its European 
allies. In a needless rush to ex- 
pand eastward, NATO plans to 
give diem a polite brush-off, at 
least for now. That alone is rea- 
son for die U.S. Senate to ques- 
tion foe whole NATO scheme. 

Ibis is not purely a matter of 
diplomacy orhistoiy.lt is also a 
matter of conscience for Amer- 
ica. The United States never of- 
ficially recognized foe Soviet 
annexation, and throughout the 
Cold War considered Estonia, 
Latvia and Lith uania to be cap- 
tive nations. Their people 


By Philip Taubman 


dreamed of a day when they 
would be 'free ana could take 
tiieir place in aEurope no longer 
defined by ideological warfare 
and military alliances. 

The power of those aspira- 
tions was tangible to any visitor. 
On my first trip to Estonia in 
1978, & local tour guide em- 
ployed by Intourist, die Soviet 
tourist agency , started to recite a 
carefully scripted account of 
Estonian history as we drove 
through Tallinn. It celebrated 
Soviet rule and belittled a peri- 
od of Estonian independence 
earlier in the century. Her de- 
livery slowed, then stopped as 
she choked on the false words. 
She coold not go on. 

When I returned in 1986 as a 
Moscow correspondent for The 
New York Times, I was quickly 
guided by Estonian journalists 
into an underground world of 
resistance to Soviet control. 
One Tallinn resident invited me 
to his apartment one evening. 
With a mixture of fear and 


pride, he tamed on his televi- 
sion set, pointed the antenna 
across foe Golf of Finland and 
illegally toned in to a news 
broadcast from Helsinki 

In I ithuania, a film director 
bravely entertained me with 
vodka, smoked sturgeon and 
tales of Soviet censorship. 
Later, as the forces of indepen- 
dence gainari strength, 200,000 
Lithuanians streamed into the 
streets of Vilnius in defiance of 
the Soviet occupation. 

In Riga, tire Latvian capital, 
tire Soviet political machine 
could not stop pens of thousands 
of citizens from co n verg in g one 
evening at Freedom Monu- 
ment, a memorial to the inde- 
pendent Latvia that existed 
from 1920 to 1940. The crowd 
roared with approval when foe 
traditional red and white Latvi- 
an flag was raised. 

Today the free states of Es- 
tonia, Latvia and Lithuania are. 
not considered ready for NATO 
membership, ostensibly be- 


cause their armies are un- 
developed. The real reason is 
that Russia is allergic to the 
prospect of NATO edging so 
close to its borders. 

The Clinton administration's 
misconceived idea is to proceed 
with NATO expansion while 
giving the Baltic nations vague 
promises of future considera- 
tion. This summer NATO will 
offer membership to Poland, 
Hungary and die Czech Repub- 
lic, and possibly Slovenia and 
Romania. If a two-thirds ma- 
jority in foe Senate approves, 
expansion will become effec- 
tive sometime in 1998 or 1999, 
min im die Baltic states. 

That would be far more dam- 
aging to the confidence of these 
small countries -than skipping 
NATO expansion altogether, or 
postponing 1L 

Ojars Kalnins, Latvia’s am- 
bassador in Washington, fears 
the consequences of a NATO 
rebuff. “Ourbiggest concern is 
the perception of rejection, ft is 
not so much that we fear a Rus- 
sian invasion if left ontside 


NATO’s security umbrella. Of 
greater concern is the psycho- 
logical impact perceived rejec- 
tion will have on our populaoe, 
and our continuing commit- 
ment to pro-Western reforms 
and democratization.” 

There arc many reasons to 
wander about die wisdom ef 
NATO expansion. It cannot 
help tat isolate Russia at a mo- 
ment when democracy and free 
markets there remain vulnerable 
to nationalist opposition. The 
cost of military modernization - 
as the alliance moves east will 
strain member countries, many 
of whom already face growing ^ 
budget deficits. No' military - 
threat compels expansion now. ; 

The Senate debate will no - 
doubt deal with these and at- .. 
tendant matters. At some point, i 
die discussion ought to rum to 
the Baltic states and America’s 
obligation to them. One measure 
of a great power is bow it treats 
the weak. NATO expansion is 
going-to stun three of Europe’s 
mosl'vtjInerabLe nation&. 

i_ ~ • TheNewYorkTimes. "- • v 


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Tjc-.nqt f ii fc p y 

Vi*, ft* | 


* • - — ~ 


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7V.K- ■ 




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J -i 


Forgetting That Russia’s Nuclear Weapons Are the Problem 




W ASHINGTON — Now 
that Bill Clinton has 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


forced Boris Yeltsin to say 
“uncle” to NATO expansion, 
there is really only one relevant 
question left Will NATO ex- 
pansion be remembered for 
what it is — a quaint farce, 
driven by domestic American 
politics and bad imitations of 
Dean Acheson — or will it ac- 
tually be dangerous? 

Are we just present at a bad 
joke, or present at foe disaster? 
That will be determined by one 
issue: Will Russia go ahead with 
its nuclear aims control agree- 
ments with the United Stales, 
despite NATO expansion? 

Clinton officials point to foe 
feet that Mr. Yeltsin signed the 
American-dictated NATO-Rus- 
sia charter last week as proof 
that everything will be O.K. 
Nonsense. All the charter 
proves is what we already know, 


which is that America won the 
Cold War and can get a dod- 

^^The issue is no^hethei^we 


can get President Yeltsin to say 
“uncle" to oar silliest ideas. It 


“uncle” to oar silliest ideas. It 
is whether, despite NATO ex- 
pansion, we can still get him to 
implement (hose tilings that are 
really important to us. What is 
really important to us are the 
things that go “boom” and are 
aimed at us — thousands of 
Russian nuclear weapons, and 
loosely controlled nuclear ma- 
terials, still in the hands of a 
crumbling Russian military. 

Had President Clinton, Sec- 
retary of Defense William Co- 
hen and Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright spent as 
much time on the threat that 
does exist, Russia’s massive 
nuclear arsenal, as they have on 


the threat that doesn’t exist, a 
Russian invasion of Poland, 
America would be a lot better 
off today. But they haven't 
Specifically, America and 
Russia signed the START-2 
treaty in 1993. That treaty en- 
joins them to slash tiieir arsen- 
als of long-range nuclear 
weapons from 7,500 each down 
to 3,500 each, with both elim- 
inating their huge land-based 
missiles that carry up to 10 war- 
heads each. The U.S. Senate 
ratified the treaty in 1996. The 
Duma, Russia’s Parliament, has 
yet to take it up. 

The 64,000 ruble question is, 
Will the Duma act on START-2 
now, despite NATO expan- 
sion? I called Alexei Arbatov, 
deputy chairman of the Duma’s 
defense committee, to find out 
Russia has a powerful incenr- 


Toward Rule of Law in China 


By Qiao Shi 


Mr. Qiao chairs the Standing Committee of 
China's National People's Congress. 


B EIJING — An important reason why the 
Cultural Revolution took place and tested 


U Cultural Revolution took place and tested 
10 years was that we had not paid enough 
attention to improving democracy and foe legal 
system. It was from mis bitter experience that , 
by the end of foe 1970s, we began to stress the 
need to improve the legal system and laws, to 
maintain the stability and continuity of this 
system of law and make it very authoritative. 

According to foe constitution of China, all 
power in the country belongs to the people, and 
the people exercise state power through the 
National People's Congress and local people’s 
congresses at various levels. 

To ensure that the people are the real masters 
of the country, that state power is really in their 
hands, we must strengthen these institutions 
and give them full play. [AndO it is necessary to 
improve grass-roots self-government so that 


people can manage their own affairs. 
We have formulated a large numb© 


We have formulated a large number of laws 
“ on ethnic minorities, rights of consumers, of 
the disabled and women, on compensation for 
bring wronged by authorities, an foe rights of 
those bring prosecuted — so that now we have 
laws to goby for the main aspects of social life 
in China. In March of tins year, the criminal 
law was systematically amended at the session 
of tiie National People's Congress to better 
embody the principles that punishment should 
be prescribed for specific crimes, that pun- 
ishment should fit the crime, and that all should 
be treated equally before the law. 

Any infringement upon laws by foe law 
enforcers, overriding of laws by administrative 


authorities or perversion of justice for personal 
gain must be stopped. 

Years ago, Deng Xiaoping declared that 
improving democracy ana the legal system 
were an important component of building so- 
cialism with Chinese characteristics. We will 
continue our vigorous efforts on. this path. It 
will be a long process. 

China has undergone great changes, but it is 
still a developing country with a large pop- 
ulation, a poor economic foundation and un- 
even regional development It will take the 
work of several generations to modernize 
China, which we do not see happening at least 
until the middle of the next century. 

To develop, China needs a long-term, stable, 
peaceful international environment. It is of 
particular importance for China to maintain 
good relations with all its Asian neighbors. 

China has always stood for the equality of 

countries, big or small, and it has opposed any 

form of hegemonism, power politics or in- 
vasion and expansion. China will never be- 
come a superpower. 

Different countries have differing social 
systems, values and levels of develo pmen t, but 

we all exist on tiie same planet Mankind has to 

take a stand together, throngh thick and thin. 

China and the United States are permanent 
members of the UN Security CounciL 
Strengthening our cooperation is in the in- 
terests of foe two countries and tire world. We 
hope to work together with the United States 
Recently, thanks to foe joint efforts of bo* 
countries , relations have improved, and there is 
good momentum in this improvement. 


ive to sign START-2, he notes. It 
is much weaker than the United 
States today, but under START- 
2 tiie United States would have 
to reduce its nuclear arsenal 
down to tiie same rough level as 
Russia's. For Russia, some of 
whose missiles are becoming 
obsolete, that is a good de&L 

However, NATO expansion 
has triggered an emotional na- 
tionalist backlash from some 
Duma members, who say: 
“Let’s keep all our nukes out of 
spite. If the United states won’t 
respect, us, maybe at Least it will 
still fear us.” 

Therefore, Mr. Arbatov says, 
the key to Russia's ratifying 
START-2 will be how Mr. 
Yeltsin sells foe NATO-Russia 
chatter that the United States 
forced on him. 

“The charter is ambiguous. 
We hope Yeltsin can come to 
foe Duma and say that this 
charter would result in conven- 
tional force reduction, a non- 
deployment of tactical nuclear 
weapons by NATO and a real 
Russian veto on NATO issues, 
like peacekeeping, that af fori 
Russia’s interests. 

“If Yeltsin can deliver that 
interpretation — and not be 

contradicted by the West 

then I think the charter and 
START-2 can both pass the 
Duma. But Yeltsin personally 
will have to lobby fen 1 them, 
which he has not up to now. 


“If this doesn’t happen, if the 
est gives its own humiliating 


f 




West gives its own humiliating 
interpretation of the charter, this 
will begin a serious rift and there 
will be a desire to retaliate by 
freezing arms control treaties." 

One thing Duma members 
win want to bear from Mr. 
Yeltsin is whether this first ex- 


mm 


pected expansion of NATO -to 
Poland, Hungary and the Czech 


Poland, Hungary and the Czech 
Republic will be foe last. 

“If this is not the last round. 
It undercuts the value of tiie 
charier for us,” says Mr. Ar- 
batov. “One of our primary 
goals, if we can’t stop this 
NATO expansion, is to at least 
stop any foUow-on, or delay it 
until the day when our relations 
really have changed and no one 
is afraid of NATO." 

Whether President Yeltsin 
can push through the Duma 
both the charter and START-2, 
while the Clinton team is telling 
hard-liners in foe United States 
that the NATO-Rossia charter 
gives Russia no vetoes and that 
NATO expansion will proceed 
right up to Russia’s border, is 
unclear. 






Hi \ III. ||S 

ini \ \y 


And that is the point: It's 
unclear 1 . The Clinton team is 


expanding NATO without be- 
ing certain how it will affect 
America’s most important stra- 
tegic objective — getting rid 
Russia’s nukes. That is so reck- 
less it takes your breath away. 

The New York Times. 




Trihimc 


IN OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Trade Congress 

PARIS — The President visited 
Philadelphia with two Cabinet 
Ministers and many Central and 
South American diplomatists to 
open (he International Commer- 
cial Congress. The subject of the 
Congress and the Commercial 
Museum also opened is to aid in 
foe <^eloinnent of commercial 

and industrial prosperity. This is 

an attempt to extend trade re- 


gyroan recalled that in the sev- 
enteenth century die Church was 

commanded by act of Parliament 
to hunt down witches. He further 
gave his judgment that most of 
tiie occult phenomena were due 
to that extremely interesting and 
elusive entity known as foe 
“subconscious self." ' 


1947: Marshall’s Order 


Lations between the United 
Stares and South America, 
where E ng l a n d is thought to 

monopolize too large a share of 
business and influence. 


1922: Scots on Spooks 


PARIS — Hard-headed Scots- 
raogave no use foe “spooks." 


The above remarks are adapted from an in- 
terview conducted by Nathan Gardels and dis- 
tributed by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 




w Hits 

bom at wtak, prying into the 
whys and wherefores of aiteged 
spmtnal manifestations. Acler- 


WASHINGTON — Secretary 
Of State George C MwshaJ 1 
ordered cancellation of foe war 
used half of the $30,000,000 
credit to Hungary, where a pro- 
Communist regime has just 
been established with Russian 
support. The credit was granted 
for die purpose of buying 
American surplus property- Re- 
garding the new Italian regirQP 
formed by Alcide de GasperL 
Mr. Mars hall said: “We shall 
continue to give aid to the Itali- 
an people, who have demon- 
strated their sincere faith in the 
democratic processes.” 


IU® i; i:! VIII ,|M 

'' Him m 




H . 


-tribune 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY JUNE 3, 1997 


PAGE 7 







Should American 



W ASHINGTON — Richard America 
warns two tilings itodersiood First, 
his reparations idea is not a legislative 
proposal — not even a refined pablic 
policy proposal Second, he means it to be 
taken seriously. 

Mr. America (yes. it’s his real name) is 
an adjunct lecturer at the Georgetown 
University School of Business who, for 
nearly 30 years, has been pushing the 
notion that America owes a debt to the 
victims of discrimination — and that die 
debt needs to be acknowledged. 

He's even written a book on the snbject 
“Paying the Social Debt: What white 
America Owes Black America.” 

It isn’t that he expects it ever to be paid, 
or even calculated precisely. But be does 
believe that acknowledgment of the 
debt — “the present value of the benefits 
of past injustice” — might help us in 
America get beyond the circular debates 
over affirmative action, set-asides and en- 
forced diversity. 

“If whites say, ’We believe slavery was 
wrong, and we’ve outlawed it’ and ‘We 
believe discrimination and race-based 
denial of opportunity are wrong, and 
we’ve outlawed it,' then they are left with 
a moral problem,” Mr. America said in an 


amages td BldcMW 


By William Raspberry 

interview last week. “Are yon entitled to . 
keep what amounts to ill-gotten gains?” 

He goes beyond the obvious answer — 
No — and tries to calculate the amount of 
the accumulated indebtedness. “I’ve tried, 
to show that it's ‘possible using census 
data, the work of economists like Lester 
Thurow and certain mathematical models 
to estimate broadly haw much whites have 
benefited from their whiteness since, say, 
1930 and then to pluck in some assmnp- 


enougiL courage to use it in their legis- 
lative proposals.” ' 

The point: “It would move us away 
from, the idea of affirmative qction as 
some sort of societal altruism and provide 
a solid justification for doing 'whatever 
needs to be done to help the victims of 
disrrfriiinariou overcome these, disadvan- 
tage. Also, the money shouldn't go to 
individuals but, over a . generation, , be. 
spent as investments — in education and 
training, in economic development, in 
equity-based housing.” . 

There are, of course, huge problems 


the irony that he and L descen- 
its of slaves, might be ‘siihskluring the 
descendants of slaveholders. On the other 
hand, he recognizes the impossibility of- 
determining who benefited jrom discrim- 
ination and who lost — and how .much. 

■Justice Clarence Thomas used to tril o£- 
beihg in a boyhood card game in which, it 
turned out, one boy was dieating- As soon 
as the cheater was nailed, everybody 
grabbed for the pennies in the pot— and. 
then they set about trying to figure out a- 
fair way of redistributing the tool. -The 
cheater would have to pay, of course, but 


. b , or course, huge problems cheater would have to pay, or coarse, out 

cions about slavery going back to 161971 ■ with such a scheme — not the least of what about the lucky kid who wasahead of 


come up with an estimate of between 5 and 
10 trillion dollars in present value.” 

The aggregate of all personal income 
taxes paid for 1995 income was only 
$613.1 billion. 

Mr. America doesn’t expect his own 
huge projection to escape challenge from 
economists and accountants who might 
want to question some of the assumptions, 
or the compounding of the “debt” or 
some other aspect of his calculations. 
* ‘Let them tear at it and then what survives 
would go to journalists, who would start 
calking about it/Apd if it finds reasonably 
fertile ground, .politicians migjjt find 


which is deciding who owes what to 
whom. For instance; Mr, ' America be- 
lieves that Asian immigrants (leaving 
aside the Chinese laborers who helped to 
bttild the railroads) generally have reaped 
the benefits of a mature economy ulti- ' poor a hand he had 
□lately built on black slave labor. Others 
— r. African or West Indian immigrants — ■ 
may suffer disadvantages that have their 
roots elsewhere. 

Instead of trying to sort all tiiis out, Mr. 

America would make the reparations a 
surtax on people in the ten 3($racent of 
income^ — and target the' b^aqrns toward 
tboMf in .the bottom 30 p^rcenti He ap= 


the game in spite of the cheating? What 
about the one who spotted the rfwatiiig 
early and only bet after the cheater had 
folded? What about the player who fool- 


ishly stayed in every pot, rib mama- how 
tad? And whataberaftbe 
cheater, who must have won at least a 
hand or two on . merit? 

Nobody could figure out how to set 
matters right So, according to Justice 
Thomas, they simply brought out a dif- 
ferent, on marked deck, extracted a 
of no further cheating and resumed, 
game. 

; . The $&SuBgfon Pott- . 


Epp a Man of Arms, 
Leii a Peace-Builder 


By George: E Will 

f ^WKJ^rVn^nia — . 

JLriias atgnably the grfea 


He structive war, is remembered 
greatest Iprimarilyfor an act exemplifying 
American, of this century, al- America's modem penchant for 
"-though he Hever : sought elective : -‘global meliorism. ’ 

- affibe and tiki notreceiye the po- - That phrase is from Walter A. 
: srtiba hftjteo&t wanted, command. _ McDouall, professor of history 
-of OperatimUverlord on D-Day. and international relations at the 
It was his -for the asking, but he. 

-would not askftir whar Fresideot 
Franklin Roosevelt was reluctant' 
to grant — - permission for George 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


| On Switzerland 


Regarding “Swiss Neutrality 
Was a Fraud " (Opinion, May 23) 
by Thomas L. Friedman: 

Mr. Friedman overshoots the 
mark when he summarily de- 
nounces Swiss neutrality during 
.World War H as a moral fraud. 
.Thanks to its neutrality, Switzer- 
land managed to keep foreign 
1 troops from its soil, thereby sav- 
^ing innumerable lives. This was 
no small feat by a little country 
.encircled by hostile forces, which 
•were kept at bay by an elaborate, 
{dissuasive defense strategy. 

Oneofthees6entiaJ elements of 
- this strategy was die laundering of 
eNazi gold The assertion that this 
Jielped prolong the war is unsub- 


stantiated polemics. Let us not 
forget the awful preccd ip g-ap- 
peasement policy of the big 
powers toward Hitler: That was 
the original moral offense. 1 

Reproof of Switzeriarid for its 
moral failing is relevant to a later 
stage, after die war, when its rep- 
resentatives tried to bold on to me 
profits from the gold laundering 
as well as to German property it 
controlled . , 

There was a saying among the 
Swiss during the war that the 
country worked all week, tong for 
Nazi Germany, but prayed on 
Sunday for an Allied victory. 
Once this was achieved, however, 
die government could not — to 
my dismay — bear to officially 
acknowledge its indebtedness to. 


the Allies, to whom we owed our 

enduring freedom. 

Yet regardless of the motives 
for this reluctance — national 
pride, fear of- provoking on war-; 
ranted financial demands — 
Switzerland provided consider- 
able humanitarian aid to a pros- 
trate Europe. 

ANDRE 5- MEYER. 

Belp, Switzerland. 


war 

Nazi 


were blasted out of their 
ilacency-by- the bombs at 
Harbor and a declaration of 
it-thp United States by 
_iany(K - *• 

! V. ROBERT KEAGY. 
Kusnacht, Switzerland. 


WHAT 15 YOUR COMPLAINT, MY 
PALESTINIAN BROTHER? ARE YOU 
ROTTING IN AN ISRAELI JAIL, 
5UFFERNG 15RAELI PUNISHMENT 
AND CEN50R5HP? 

NO! YOU ARE SAFE IN A 
PALESTINIAN JAIL 
ENJOYNG PALESTINIAN 
PUNISHMENT AND 
CEN50R5H1P! 



How can Americans who con- 
demn the Swiss for the “immor- 
ality’.’ of their neutrality when 
surrounded by brutal enemies 
during World War II account 

'K pky? How far beck do you go to 

owu Congress, 

wise to forger? - 

GUNNAR ADLER-RARLSSON. 

Anacapri, Italy. 


If Switzerland doesn't agree to 
pay “amends’' for sins commit- 
ted half a century ago, the Clinton 
a dminis tration “can freeze an ap- 
propriate portion Of the $86 bu- 
tton in public and private funds 
that Switzerland invests in the 
United States” (Editorial, May 
15). 

Isn’t this a' dangerous. game to 


\Cattett Marshall to leave his side. 

Even tins 'spring, with Mar-' 
shall’ s name being invoked more 
titan at any time since his death in 

. .MEANWHILE 

1959; or sincehe received the No- 
. bel Peace Prize in 1953, he is not 
‘ . reajjy being given his due. But, 
then, it is difficult to rake the full 
measure of Marshall, the man who 
became a cadet here at Virginia 
, Institute 100 years ago. 

Mutorfl?-- .WSjsluJr .museum that . 
. - .fgetstire VMI parade ground is a 
' suitably understated memorial to 
a man whose starchy reserve (“I 
have no feelings except those I 
reserve for Mrs. Marshall”) 
masked a drive and steely im- 
patience that repeatedly served 
tire nation. 

fiefpce Secretaiy of State Mar- 
shal’ joined the' other, 
degree recipients at Harvard 
.years. -agothis week (the group on 
June 5, 1947, included T. S . Eliot, 
Omar Bradley and J. Robert Op- 
in France, where my- father was penhehner) to deliver the address 
treated like a c riminal, or with'., that would attach his nam e to an 
German camps, where some of act of statecraft, he had already 


sympathizers who seek to show 
that everybody was bad -— “they 
afl did it”? 

- For- example, to compare -a 
Swiss intemmentj camp, where 
my uncle managed to obtain a 
PhD. in economics, with a camp 


churches, secure within their con- 
tinental fortress, right up until 


% MMtCEfUWwAagdM'nam SjwUcw. 


The U.S. report on Swiss deal- 
ings with Nazi Germany is wel- 
come as an unusual diplomatic 
step in which countries are re- 
quired to defend their moral re- 
cord 

This should lead to new dis- 
cussion on an even larger moral 
question: Why did the Allies al- 
low the Nazis to kill tire Jews? 

The official answer is that, 
n< «t taswat ttoestagtootog 

>3TwaB,itbl!AdbMitDighS(totve 
fi^azdfcad thenragqate* <£ower if theyo 
hddtintenreaad cm behalf ofnth® 
Jews. 

This explanation is so absurd as 
to defy -belief that it has until now 
gone 'unchallenged. There were ; 
so many sources of information 
about the murder of the Jews that 
it is unreal to soggest that rev- 
elation of (his secret would have 
blown tire cover of some spy or 
another. 

• PAUL DIXON. 

Dublin. 

Could it. be .that among those 
now . criticizing Switzerland’s 
wartime behavior are former Nazi 


my uncles were simply extermi- 
nated, is.juat mind-bo gg lin g . 

A little perspective is needed oil 
what happened 50 years ago* 
Though the idea may not please 
everyone, some countries were 
not as bad as others, not by a long 
shot. .. . . 

HENRY BLUMENFELDk 
Gif-sur- Yvette, France. 

- No one will ever know as mudi 
about World War II as Winston 
. Churchill did in 1944, when — on 
Dec. 3 — be wrote to his foreign 
secretary: 

“Of all the neutrals Switzer- 
land has the greatest right to dis- 
tinction. She has been the sole 
international force linking the 
hideously sundered nations and 
ourselves. What docs it matter 
whether she has been able to give 
us the commercial advantages we 
> many to the 


achieved greatness. 

. faFtancein 1917 a furious Ma-. 
jor Marshall exploded at General 
John Joseph Pershing for what 
Marshall considered unmerited 
criticism of another general Per- 
shing responded by making Mar- 
shall an organizer of. the -American 
.offensive. After tire war, in which 
116,000 . Americans died, the 
army shrank to 130,000. Mar- 
shall, pot in charge of the officer 
training school at Feat Benning, 

. Georgia, refined infantry tactics, 
stressing mobility and the initi- 
ative of junior officers. The 
‘ ‘Benning revolution” produced 
200 future generals. Including 
Omar Bradley, Joseph Stilwell 
and Matthew Ridgway. 

Eighteen, - nations had armies 
larger than America's — it had 
only 40 tanks — when Ma rshall 




(.jherseif 


University of Pennsylvania. The 
nreliorist impulse has J two 
premises. First, America has a 
mission to make the world better, 
because the American model of a 
pluralistic commercial republic is 
universally valid. And exporting 
the model is in tire national in- 
terest because spreading bour- 
. geois civilization, with its pre- 
occupation with prosperity, is tire 
way to tranquilxze a murderous 
wood. 

- Fifty years after tire genesis of 
the Marshall Plan, the American 
model is more broadly embraced 

,- Marshall's plan teas , 
a presentation of 
the American model 
to a world in need 
of it. ;• 

than ever before, but Americans 
are less interested in, or confident 
about, their ability or even their 
right to influence the courses of 
other countries. And some schol- 
ars question whether the plan’s 
$13 billion was crucial to 
Europe's recovery. 

Western Europe’s agriculture 
and industry soon exceeded pre- 
war output, but 80 percent of the 
capital invested in those years was 
European. And regarding foreign 
aid generally, an exhaustive study 
by the London School of Eco- 
nomics concerning 92 developing 
nations concludes that “no rela- 
tionship exists between tire levels 
of aid and rates of growth in re- 
cipient countries." Rather, for- 
eign aid has discouraged the 
lowering of tax rates and other 
barriers to growth while “increas- 
ing the size of recipient govern- 
ments and lining the pockets of 
elites.” 

Those who subsequently pro- 
posed Marshall Plans for the 
Mekong Delta and America’s in- 
ner cities and other places have 
exemplified a " governmental 
hubris that was not characteristic 
of Marshall or the other giants of 
their heroic era of American state- 


fence among her mountains, 
in thought, to spite of race, largely 
on our side.”. . 

... S. SCHAERER. 

Bern. 


Letters intended for publica-' 
don should be addressed "Letters 
to the Editor" and contain the 
writer's signature, name and full 
address. Letters should be brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


became army chief of staff .oh 
SepL-1, 1939,tiiedayGeraiany 

PolaacLUjss th^n four ( craft. Thoserealists did not think 
MuviuflfcgNHfc Marahalt .Plan as relevant 

jm'in vpte^gf ^.beyond fee shattered societies of 

ioimtains, ano. . virtually' cGsbantfing the. army:' ‘western Europe.’ with their bour- 
The House voted,. 203 to 202, to 
extend conscription. - - 

Marshall abolished tire senior- 
ity system, forcing upward of 500 
colonels into, retirement to make 
way for- younger men like Dwight 
Eisenhower and George Patton. 

Rescuing the nation from im- 
provident disarmaments was 
Marshall’s vocation: As secretary 
of defense he doubled the size of 
-the army in .the six months after 
the outbreak of the Korean War. 

■' Yet this man of arms, organizer of 
victory in mankind’s most de- 


‘Westexh Europe,' 
geois traditions on which to re- 
build; . 

The plan was at least a catah 
of confidence, psychotherapy 
a continent to shock, and a 
presentation of the American 
model to a world in need of it If 
you seek a monument to Marshall, 
and to America’s xneliorist im- 
pulse to the immediate postwar 
period, look around and see what 
you do not see — German and 
Japanese militarism. That is no 
small monument 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


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sas 1 . 






PAGE 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 3 , 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


J 

T 


Britain Accepts Blame in Irish Famine 


The Associated Press 

DUBLIN — Prime Minister Tony 
Blair of Britain has acknowledged his 
country's blame for the Irish famine 
250 years ago. 

“Those who governed in London at 
the time failed their people through 
standing by while a crop failure turned 
into a massive human tragedy,” he 
stud in a weekend message to the or- 
ganizers of a rock festival in Ireland 
marking the famine and celebrating the 
Irish diaspora. “We must not forget 
such a dreadful event” 

Prime Minister John Bruton of Ire- 
land praised Mr. Blair’s words. “This 
is a very good statement,” he said 
Sunday. “While it confronts the past 
honestly, it does so in a way that heals 
for the future.” 

Mr. Blair, the leader of the Labour 


Party, came to power in the election 
May 2. He is the first British prime 
minister to acknowledge the role 
played by Britain doting the famine. 

The organizers of the festival called 
“The Great Irish Famine Event,” con- 
torted him before the festival, asking if 
he would send a message supporting it 

In a video recording shown at the 
festival Saturday, President Bill Ctin- 
too of the United States called the fam- 
ine Ireland’s greatest disaster. President 
Mary Robinson of Ireland litacandte at 
the festival in memory of the dead, 
declaring: “Commemorating the great 
famine is a moral act of remembering 
and of honoring by our generation.’’ 

The famine has left a bitter legacy 
between Ireland and Britain.' Histor- 
ians have argued for generations over 
the degree to which Britain, which than 


ruled Ireland, contributed to (he dis- 
aster. During the famine, British au- 
thorities continued to allow food to be 
exported from the country. 

Mr. Blair said in his message: “The 
famine was a defining event in die 
history of Ireland and of Britain. It has 
left deep scars. 

“That one million people should 
have died in what was then put of die 
richest and most powerful nation in the 
world is something that still causes 
pain as we reflect on it today.’ ’ 

The famine resulted from failure of 
the Irish potato crop each year between 
1845 and 1851 due to a disease called 


blight 

Mon 


lore titan a million .of Ireland’s 8 
million people perished during the 
famine, the death rate reaching its 
height in 1847. 



Ageax fasKoPivc 

Mr. Blair, left, on Monday with a former Finnish prime minister, Harry 
Holkeri, center; and George Mitchell, a former Ui». senator from Maine 
who is serving as a mediator hi sectarian peace talks in Northern Ireland; 


COMMUNISTS: Bargaining in France 


Continued from Page 1 

tiouaL council had adopted a resolution 
proposing that the party take part in the 
government subject to agreement on 
policy. The resolution was due to be put 
to grassroots Communist organizations 
at meetings Monday night and discussed 
again at another national council session 
Tuesday 

Unlike 1981, when the Communists 
joined the Socialist government of Pres- 
ident Francois Mitterrand, the prospect 
of their participation did not send a mor- 
tal scare through the financial commu- 
nity this time. 

The leading French employers’ lobby, 
the CNPF, said it would remain “ac- 
tive” and “vigilant” and warned the 
new government against doing anything 
to harm France's competitiveness on 
world markets. 

“People figured on the possibility of a 
leftist victory and covered themselves, 
so we don’t expect an immediate im- 
pact,” said Serge Grzybowski, exec- 
utive officer of the Banque La Heoen, 
which specializes in residential real es- 
tate investments . 

‘ ‘Communist participation in the gov- 
ernment doesn’t really add any partic- 
ular concern,” he continued, “it just 
may make it take a little longer for it to 
see (he inevitability of continuing to- 
ward closer European integration.' ' 

The Communists have opposed the 
common European currency plan that 
was the reason for the austerity policies 
that voters rejected Sunday. 

Mr. Hue warned supporters that win- 
ning would be only the beginning of 
what promised to be a difficult time for 
this leftist government, with a 12.8 per- 
cent unemployment rate that President 


Jacques Chirac promised, but failed, to 
bring down, producing defeat for his 
conservative government 

The left raised expectations greatly 
durum the campaign, promising 700,000 
jobs, half of them in the public sector,- for 
young people; a reduction in the work- 
week from 39 to 35 hours without lower 
salaries, and an increase in the minimum 
wage — all without raising taxes. 

Mr. Jospin has warned enthusiasts 
that it could not all be done at once. 
“What we want is to be able to show at 
the end of five years, when it comes time 
to render accounts, that unemployment 
has gone down, that inequalities have 
been reduced and that French society has 
become more humane,’’ he said. 

Mr. Hue disagrees. 

“A new policy of the left has to be 
translated into action quickly or the dis- 
appointment will be terrible,” be said 
Friday. 

There will have to be an immediate 
reduction in the workweek, he said, “at 
the very beginning of the legislature,” as 
well as an immediate increase in the 
minimnm wage and a reduction of the 
20.6 percent French sales tax. 

All this, economists say, might pro- 
duce growth and jobs in the long run, but 
in the short term they call it a recipe for a 
huge increase in the French budget def- 
icit 

President Chirac has pledged, 
however, to reduce that to 3 percent of 


year to qualify France for membership in 
the euro, the European Union's pro- 
jected common currency. 

It is scheduled to replace the French 
franc, the Deutsche mark and die cur- 
rencies of other countries that have 
joined by the start, Jan. 1, 1999. 


EUROPE: Pressure Building Up on Kohl 



Continued from Page 1 

It is the urge to meet the criteria that 
has inspired Mr. Kohl and his finance 
minister, Theo Waigei, to raise money 
by revaluing gold reserves, provoking a 
profound split with the Bundesbank and 
stirring a political hornet’s nest even 
within the governing coalition. The 
French election result merely compoun- 
ded the sense (bat Bonn is running 
against a groundswell of European sen- 
timent far more worried about jobs and 
social benefits than about the rigors of a 
single currency. 

Europe's left, the newspaper Frank- 
furter Rundschau commented Monday, 
“does nor want any more austerity for 
the euro because of the social problems 
involved.” 

Indeed, Werner Hoyer, a senior figure 
in the same Free Democratic junior co- 
alition party as Foreign Minister Kinkel, 
said Monday that Bonn should “see 
what has happened in England and 
France as a warning " to a government so 
mired in what he called “bickering” that 
it has thus far proved unable to produce 
economic reforms to address Germany’s 
near-record unemployment. 

Against those uncertainties, leading 
German officials greeted the outcome of 
the French vote more with a brave face 
than with any clear acknowledgment that 
Mr. Kohl's (beams may be in jeopardy or 
that, on the distant horizon of October 
1998, storm clouds are building for Ger- 
many’s next scheduled national election. 

■ German Socialists on Offensive 

John Schmid of the International Her- 
ald Tribune reported from Frankfurt: 

Germany’s Social Democrats re- 
doubled their attacks on Chancellor 
Kohl's government Monday by seeking 
a parliamentary vote to demand the 
resignation of Mr. Waigei. 

The attacks coincide with persistent 
speculation that the coalition, together 


since 1982, could be careering toward a 
split. In Bonn, this has created a guessing 
game about how seriously Mr. Waigel’s 
unpopular budget policies threaten the 
stability of the government 

Speaking after an emergency budget 
meeting late Sunday chaired by Mr. 
Kohl, Mr. Waigei said Monday that he 
saw no danger that the center-right co- 
alition would fell apart. He and other 
coalition members, however, acknowl- 
edged that the parties foiled to resolve 
the prickly question of ho wand whereto 
cut the budget deficit 

With fears of a coalition break already 
on fee front pages of German news- 
papers, fee Social Democrats exploited 
the volatile climate over the weekend 
and challenged Mr. Kohl to call early 
general elections. 

“The economic and finance 
of the Kohl government have 
the Social Democratic party leader, Os- 
kar Lafomaine, said in a weekend in- 
terview. 

“The coalition is so split that it is not 
capable of acting," he said. "It would be 
good for Germany if it cleared the path 
for fresh elections.” 

On Monday, the Social Democrats 
joined the pro-ecology Greens party in 
introducing a move to bring atwutMr. 
Waigel’s dismissal through a parliamen- 
tary vote. 


Tn^ IcMM/ltur* 

A truck removing furniture Monday from the Hotel Matron, the Pans 
offices of the departing French prime minister, Alain Juppe. The 
victorious Lionel Jospin w31 take over the post in a ceremony Tuesday. 


AT A GLANCE 


March to the Left 

President Jacques Chirac's conservative coalition was routed Sunday 
in the second round of the French elections, leaving Parliament firmly 
in control of fee Socialists and other leftists. 


DEPARTING PARLIAMENT 


Social st Communist Other Other 
Party and Party and left right 
allies 61 allies 24 14 13 



NEW PARLIAMENT 


Communist 
Parly 38 



The New York Time* 


FRANCE: Jospin Foils to Offer Specifics on European Policy 


Continued from Page 1 

iniiely because of the newly virulent 
hostility of the Front. 

It threatens to do to the right what the 
Communists did to the French left in 
,1960s and 1970s, when they split the 
leftist vote and frightened Off potential 
centrist votes. 

That prevented the leftists from win- 
ning national elections until 1981, when 
the Socialists embraced the Communists 


and then lured away their voters once in 
government Some French conserva- 
tives want to try similar tactics with the 
National From. 

Delay to provide an economic breath- 
ing space might be an acceptable com- 
promise for Chancellor Helmut Kohl, but 
only if the French Socialists couch their 
reservations in a form that allows German 
leaders to preserve publicly the notion that 
(he policy remains basically on track. 

Ge rman public opinion associates 


Europe’s southern rim with soft money 
and lax financial management, so Italian 
participation could damage the credib- 
ility of the euro in Germany and jeop- 
ardize the whole venture, analysts said. 

European leaders, notably Mr. KohiL- 
seem to have no eye-catching alternative 
up their sleeves to maintain the mo- 
mentum for integration if the euro plan 
goes awry. They have invested all their 
political capital in fee euro as a stepping 
stone to unity. 



BRIEFLY 


Opposition in Kenya 
Plans ‘Illegal’ Rally 

NAIROBI — Kenya's opposition 
parties, civic bodies and dutch groups 
said Monday that they would bold an 
“illegal” rally in the coastal resort of 
Mombasa on Saturday in a campaign to 
force President Daniel arap Moi to in- 
troduce minimal constitutional reforms 
before elections later this year. 

The announcement at a news confer- 
ence came as hundreds of heavily armed 
police patrolled a section of Nairobi after 
the government blamed street hawkers 
for weekend rioting. That rioting began 
after the police broke up a peaceful op- 
position rally Saturday called to press for 

GAZA TENSIONS — An Israel soldier and a Palestinian dem- C °^w^ b \Sf c ^^e'to demonstrate to 
onstrator arguing Monday at a protest against Jewish settlers who the president that Kenyans want minimal 
fenced off land in the southern Gaza Strip outside their community, reforms before the general elections,” 


fiQn Nut 


COUP: 

Nigerians Attack 

. Continued from Page 1 

within, hours of its start fee Nigerian-led 
offensive began encountering stiff re- 
sistance from the combined forces of the 
Sierra Leone Army, and rebels of the 
Revolutionaty United FronL And by late 
afternoon, Nigerian ground forces were 
reportedly pmned down and under 
heavy attack in several places. _ 

In their most perilous position, about 
50 Nigerian soldiers fought a pitched 
battle against a vastly, larger rebel force 
to defend one of the city’s international 
hotels, fee Mammy Yoko, which had 
been used in recent days by fee U.S. 
Marines as a staging ground for the 
evacuation of more man 1,000 Amer- 
icans and other foreigners from fee 
country. 

At least six Nigerian troops, were 
killed or seriously wounded during the 
defense of fee hotel, which has become a 
refuge for about 1,000 foreigners' who 
were not able to leave fee countiy, in- 
cluding West Africans, Lebanese and a 
handful of foreign journalists. 

The International Red Cross had 
brokered a cease-fire covering fee hotel 
audits grounds early Monday afternoon, 
but it quickly fell through. Witnesses 
said later that the beachfront hotel had 
taken mortar fire and was burning. 

[poring die brief cease-fire, hundreds 
of civilians besieged in fee hotel since 
midmonung were evacuated, an AFP 
correspondent reported.] 

“They started firing within one hour 
of the cease-fire and now there is shoot- 
ing everywhere,” said a man in hiding at 
fee hotel who answered fee telephone. 
“The Nigerians are trying their best, but 
if they don’t get .reinforcements .soon 
they will have to give tip. If that happens, 
things will be very bad for us.” 

Sierra Leone's coup, which ended a 
mere 14 mon ths of democratic rule, took 
place (m May 25, and was mounted by 
junior army officers who sprung other 
officers and common criminals from a 
Freetown prison, aiming them for an 
attack on Mr. Kabbah’s government. 
Late in fee first day of fee uprising, 
Johnny Paul Koromah, a 33-year-old 
major who had been imprisoned for a 
previous coup attempt, was named as the 
country’s new leader. 

The elected president fled to 
Guinea, from where he appealed to 
Nigeria and other regional powers to 
Intervene on his behalf. Within hours 
of his overthrow, Freetown, already a 
ramshackle and desperately poor city, 
was in the throes of some of the worst 
looting this region has ever seen, as 
roving bands of drunken soldiers sys- 
tematically pillaged neighborhood 
after neighbo: 


BURMA: « 

Door to China Open- 

Continnedfroro Page 1 
-mDUaiy forces equipped for offensives 

aggingr jpqirgiftpt elhni g miiwri riftK and IQ 

preseiyedtomesito.btder. - 

Buying- military equipment .from 
. China is only one of .several ways feat 
Burmabas been able to evade a Western- 
led embargo on trade. 

Narcotics "merchants in China also - 
. have- played, a .helpful role in Burma’s 
■ cxHitmuedexpOrt of near-record levels of 
opium gum for' heroin production, and 
wealthy investorsfrom a few other Asian 
nations have been spending jnst enough 
money on new Burmese hotels, real es- 
tate, mining and manufacturing projects 
to keep theeountry’s economy afloat. . 

The economic or political support 
Burma gets from other Southeast Asian 
countries and from China has “effec- 
tively Annulled the West's attempt to 
induce domestic political change through 
pressure,” ~ :J **—*-*-*■ 


international 


said Muthiah 


Mr. Kabbah rose throughout West 
Africa and beyond, and the prospect of a 
military intervention grew, fee coup 
leaders invited the head of fee Rev- 
olutionary United Front, Corporal Foday 
Sankoh, to have his men, guerrilla fight- 
ers noted for their war atrocities, to join 
their rebellion. 

After issuing a call to his men to join 
the rebellious army in a radio interview 
last week. Corporal Sankoh, who has 
been held in a hotel in Nigeria since 
March, was taken to a military camp 
near the Nigerian capital, Abuja, where 
he is being held incommunicado. His 
call was quickly answered, however, as 
more than 1,000 of his fighters streamed 
into Freetown from fee bush to join the 
insurrection. 

Western diplomats said they believed 
that an agreement to end the uprising 
was at hand late Sunday but fell through 
when Corporal Sankoirs forces vetoed a 
proposed settlement. Hours later, fight- 
ers from the Revolutionary United front 
made an armed incursion into the 
Mammy Yoko Hotel. 


in Hawaii. _ 

Besides providing access to weaponry 
and economic breaming room, Burma’s 
China connection also gives it important 
refuge from fee world’s disapproval, ac- 
cording to a diplomat 

“If they keep deepening the relation- 
ship, Burma .will always have China to 
turn to" if needed to veto trade sanctions 
that might be sought by the UN Security 
Council, he said. 

-Exact figures on C hina ’s military 
trade wife Burma' are elusive. The re- 
lationship is not openly discussed here. 
But the shipments include hundreds of 
millions of dofiara’ worth of tanks, pef- 
. sonnel carriers, rockets, mortars, artil- 
lery, assanlt rifles, grenade launchers, 
trucks, attack aircraft and helicopters, 
according to a recent analysis by An- 
drew Selth, an Australian defense in- 
telligence official, with which officials 
from two other governments con- 
curred. 

China also has sold Burma naval ves- 
sel, including some armed wife anti- 
anise missiles, and has trained Bt 
military personnel. Members of the ruling 
junta signify the importance they attach to 
this relationship by making a rare public 
appearance each year at the Chinese em- 
bassy's national day celebration in Ran- 
goon. 

Although most artillery and other 
heavy armaments have been deployed-in 
rural areas, some of the Chinese-made 
tanks and automatic weapons have been 
used in displays of force aimed at dis- 
senters in major cities. Western and lotfal 
sources say some of the Chinese arnla- 
meats have entered the country near fee .■? 
town of Mongyu, then south along tffe^ 
road to Lashio before passing through 
the teak forests and coffee plantations 
around here to reach Mandalay, Burma s 
, second- largest city. . . .. , 

Much of Burma's arms purchases 
evidently baye beeq financed py China 
- at discounted liHer^t rates, according, t p 
these sources. But China may also have 
been paid in valuable Burmese goods, 
such as timber, agricultural' product^, 
minerals and gems. 

The road north to China also is fre- 
quently used to transport opium glim 
derived from Burmese poppies. Chinese 
narcotics merchants then smuggle jt 
else wherein the region and later ship the 
resulting heroin to the United Stares, 
U.S. officials say. j 

Some of die drug profits allegedly 
have been plowed into commercial in- 
vestments or been used to help buy fixjd 
for troops and import additional 
weapons. Having been blocked tiy 
Washington and its allies from gainiilg 
access to international loans, “the re- 
gime is essentially depending on drpg 
money to get it through” and keep fee 
economy afloat, according to a longtime 
foreign observer in Burma 

The United States, Britain and Gep- 3 
many, which formerly equipped muchfof 
fee Burmese Army, imposed an em- 
bargo on military trade wife fee coi * 
beginning in .1988, after the 
military officials who bad ruled 
country wife an iron fist since 1962 
officially stepped aside in favor of mqre 
direct rule by active military personnel. 

The Clinton administration, citing fee 
forced closure, of all Burmese.uaivei^it- 
ies and other government measures to 
stifle dissent, last month expanded con- 
trols on U.S’. trade with Burma by bar- 
ring most new investments by American 
firms in commercial and energy proj- 
ects. It also has lent rhetorical support to 
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, fee 1 99 1 Nofel 
Peace Prize laureate and democracy ac- 
tivist in Burma whom the regime has 
barred from making public speeches' or 
meeting with foreign reporters. , 

Her calls for worldwide economic 
isolation of fee countiy have had no 
apparent impact on China or Burma's 
other Asian neighbors — just this week- 
end, the Association of South East Asian 
Nations voted to admit Burma. 


f: 


said Gibson Kamau Knria, a lawyer wife 
fee coalition National Convention for 
Constitutional Reform. ( Reuters ) 

Arabs Assail Turks 

CAIRO — The Arab League secre- 
tariat, condemning Turkey’s military op- 
erations in northern Iraq, demanded 
Monday that it withdraw immediately. 

Thousands of Turkish troops poured 
into northern Iraq on May 14 in pursuit of 
separatist Kurdistan Workers Party 
rebels, who use fee region as a base for 
raids into southeast Turkey. (Reuters) 

No Winner in Bolivia 

LA PAZ — General Hugo Banzer Su- 
arez, Bolivia’s dictator from 1971 to 1978, 
has emerged as the top vote-getter in pres- 
idential elections. But be foiled to win a 
majority and feces a congressional voce to 
decide the race. (AP) 


TRIAL: McVeigh Faces the Death Penally 


Continued from Page 1 

at -fee building’s day-care center 

Immediately after fee bombing, there 
was speculation among members of the 
public that the attack, like fee World 
Trade Center bombing two years earli- 
er, was the work of foreign terrorists. 

The arrest of Mr. McVeigh instead 
cast a spotlight on America’s militia 
movement and like-raiaded rightist ex- 
tremists who see Waco and the 1992 
FBI siege- at Ruby Ridge. Idaho, as 
evidence feat fee federal go v ernm ent is 
extinguishing the constitutional rights 
of its citizens. 

In the speedy 15-day government 
case, prosecutors called people close to 
Mr.- McVeigh, from, his. sister to his 
fiietfes, who testified that Ire divulged 
detailed plans to bomb the building 
memfos before fee attack and; devoured 
fee anti-government novel "The Turn- 
er Diaries,” which describes the de- 
struction of a federal building to spark a 


civil war. 

The government also produced rent- 
al documents, phone records and wit- 
nesses who identified him as the man 
who rented the Ryder truck under fee 
alias Robert Kling. 

The defense countered that Mr. Mc- 
Veigh was tried on fee basis of lying, 
opportunist witnesses and scientific ev- 
idence tainted by FBI mishandling and 
lab contamination. It stressed dial fee 
government . had no witnesses who 
could place Mr. McVeigh at the bomb- 
ing site. ; * 

But Mr. McVeigh’s attorneys were 
barred by the judge from pursuing fee 
its most controversial theory — that fee 
bombing Was part of a larger conspir- 
acy involving ; overseas terrorists 'or 
American white supremacists. ’ 

Mr. - McVeigh was arrested 75 
minutes after fee explosion about B0 
miles north of fee blast site for failing to 
have a license plate.on his car. 

(Reuters, AP) 


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TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 1997 
PAGE 9 



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■- fiscada's Que Viva melange of fruits ( above left) and flacon ( below), Lolita Lempicka with daughters and (inset) her apple scent flacons, £ 
• Hermes’s fragrance of green oranges and Ricci’s tomato eau de toilette vaporizers, and Castelbajac's bird houses ( lower inset). 7: 

V. i 

3 New Scents — Good Enough to Eat j 




By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — The sweet 
smell of mangoes 
wafts over the scent of 
_ flowers. Sniff! There 
Is a delicious whiff of orange, 
pineapple, fig and plum — 
even of ripe tomato. 

' ' This is a Sunday lunch? A 
picnic in Provence? Side or- 
'ders with the barbecue? • 
**’No — these sumnief seems 
‘ cone from a bottle. Fancy 
flacons from high-profile per- 
fume houses now contain far 
more than flowers of the field. 
And this season everything is 
coining up tutd frutti 
■ Last week’s “L’Art du 
3ardm,” the garden show in 
•the Parc de Samt-Cloud, was a 
moment for perfumers to pro- 
mote their wares. Four orna- 
oaental gardens were dedic- 
ated to fragrance, from Lolita 
Lempk&a's rococo pavilion 
and lilac path to Cacharel's 
'‘tnuhicolored modernistic 

4hd abstract screens, fashion 
designers also took part, with 
ffean-Charles de Castelbajac 
‘ offering bird houses in his sig- 
haturc primary coins. 

The most dramatic state- 
ment was the topiary snipped 
‘jnto the shape of perfume 
fyottlcs, go that the signature 
-silhouette of Dior’s Dolce 
Vita or Hermes's orange-tree 
: bottle created a walkway of 
herbaceous sentinels. For the 
^idtimate touch of luxury and 
-^sophistication, this garden, by 
'.Ibe magazine L'Offiriel, also 
'had marble heads draped in 
'tendrils of ivy, in which 
*hestkd leaf- and- flower dia- 
Jmond pins from Boucheron 
and Van Cleef & Arpels. 

Yet the most appropriate 
'/image of summer 1997 might 
fiave been more humble: a 
■Jcent- bottle in a potager, or 
and-vege table garden. 

9 ■ ^HE fruity con^osi- 
!V' ■ dons mark a break 
/. I with the watery, light 
JL fragrances that have 
J^o far dommaied the 1990s. ! 
They also suggest the way 
forward. lust as fashion is fi- 
>*uaUy. coming out of its min- 
itnahsr period, so perfumes 
■.Me taking on a new richness, 
%feite keeping the lightness 
that makes them modem. . 

. *T wanted something sen- 
i Hoal,- but fresh,” said 
. tempsdea, posing in her 
l&rfea with her three daugh- 
ras, aikl holding in her palm 
appie-riiaped book, with 
j^tacoy of leaves. With a 
and tonka bean base 
ygsl Kp notes of anise, violet 
3jd ins, Ae fragrance seems 
JfiHdtaiDebloeaL 

You Want an “ttSWe” 
tteuner -fr ag rance? What 
j jhStt h &a Ricci's salad bowl 
jSfinirtRO, mim and basfl with 
^podEa^pbenytaLes Belles 
« jti ccg Or the fruity Es- 
(fee Viva, with apple. 
PWaa frait, pineapple, fig. 

6h cs - nectars adnde 
tfdrenge Verte from 
"twr *- a fruit oodgail of 
i &*8g&kz$m. and mmAmm; 

- wMo^i^ icy Joggle, nun* 
u ii mango , ear- 
worn »d cuntiflc a waft of 


fatrr* thf Ih'tith 


a. 4 - 

af;V'i - 


, - r *' 

* " 5 " 

. -i i— ■ k 


... 

*if; • 




kumquats in Lalique’s Claire 
de Nilang, and a black currant 
top note among the mimosa in 
Gueriain’s Champs Elysees. 

The current taste for what 
die French call "gourmand” 
fragrances started in 1993 
with the childhood smells of 
chocolate and caramel in Thi- 
erry Mugler’s Angel. Then 
Bnlgari brought out its Eau 
Parfumee with green tea 




notes, and "edible” cinna- 
mon, peach and apricot ap- 
peared at the heart of the vo- 
luptuous Dolce Vita. Sig- 
nificantly, Calvin Klein’s 
best-selling CK One unisex 
fragrance had pineapple and 
papaya as top notes, and 
Chanel's Allure had citron 
leading the floral facets. 

The focus on fruit has 
helped to enrich florals with- 
out re-creating the heavier 
"florientals” that went out of 
fashion as the clear water fra- 
grances swept in. Klein’s CK 
Be caught tire new sensuality 


with a mix of peach and 
magnolia. And Jean Paul 
Gaultier gets a s imilar effect 
fra summer with an alcohol- 
free version of his fragrance. 

The aquatic, ozone notes 
that summed up 1990s fra- 
grances seem to be fading, 
with floral bouquet now cre- 
ating the freshness. Gucci's 
Envy has a fluid mix of 
magnolia, lily-of-the- valley 
and jasmin. In Le Monde est 
Bean, Kenzo creates a. 
Fren chJ apanese blend of 
magnolia, cherry blossom 
and jasmine, while Celine's 
first fragrance. Magic, has a 
rich and exotic mix of 
Amazonian lily orchids, cori- 
ander, clementine and musk. 

Pure florals still exist, but 
they are increasingly special- 
ized, like Chanel’s Jasmine 
(dating from 1933 and dis- 
tributed only through its own 
stores), or the flower bou- 
quets of Amuck Goutal. Oth- 
ers include the new L’Eau de 
Camelia Chinois (available in 
the two Paris boutiques of 
Maitre Parfumeur et Gander); 
the Joseph Parfum do Jour, 
created by tire British Pen- 
haligon company for the re- 
tailer Joseph, and La Rose 
Sainte, a fragrance that dates 
back to Queen Elizabeth 1 and 
is sold by Hanods in a Royal 
Worcester china bottle. 

Perfume’s progress from 
royalty through the rich and 
rarefied to the wider public, 
has accelerated in this century . 
The concept of perfume for the 
people reaches an apotheosis 
m New York on Thursday 
with a “Fragrance Fun Day” 
in a tent at Lincoln Center. 
Donna Hanover, wife of May- 
or Rudolph Giuliani, will open 
the event, which will include a 
high-tech demonstration of 
capturing the fragrance of liv- 
ing flowefs and a children’s 
sniff- and-guess play area. 

It is part of tire celebrations 
of 25 years of the Fragrance 
Foundation, founded by An- 


nette Green, who hosts Tues- 
day the gala ceremony of the 
annual Fifi awards, which 
crowns the industry's most 
creative perfumes. 

The anniversary underlines 
how far fragrances have come 
since the eariy 1970s, when 
the market was dominated by 
a few names and the average 
woman would splash on a few 
drops for an occasion. Chang- 
ing tastes have also held a 


mirror up to changing times, 
from the opulence of the '80s 
through the plainer ’90s. 

But as fragrance goes back 
to the orchard and the garden, 
maybe it is just a turn of fash- 
ion's wheel. For 25 years ago, 
the most significant launches 
were Chanel’s No. 19, with its 
pungent florals and mosses, 
and Estee Lauder's Aliage, a 
fresh green mix of jasmine 
with a touch of spice. . 


mm#* 

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2 EB 333 CCS 


ART 



L*J> 

23 ® 3 Bi 3 » 


f : r 


vSq^jH A Flaming Case of Kitsch 

- Rembrandt's Altered States 

> The Great Aucti on War 
Sleuths Among the Stalls 

Souren Meukian if you missed it in the fifT, look for it 
Arts Editor on our site on the World Wide Web; 


http://www.iht.com 


IflrettAT .n TRIBUNE WORLD YOUTH FORUM 
ALUMNI association 

50th ANNIVERSARY REUNION 

NEW YORK 
AUGUST 7 -10, 1997 

If you were, or you know someone who was, a participant 
in the Herald THbmie/Wwrld^ Yurth Fomin (either Dec- 
March or summer programs), pleas e cont act us for details 
of the Association and tire reunion; IBT Box 293, 92521 
NemHy Cedex or 

Catherine Marin (33 I) 47 72 12 15 
qtltfri i m i nj ir in @conqigservexom 

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TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 1997 


Beyond Development: 
Rediscov ering Nature's Wisdom 

The 2005 World Exposition, Japan 


PAGE 11 


■ ! Paris Is Not Burning, Yet 

Most Investors Take the Socialist Victory in Stride 


By Erik Ipsen 

Intenumtmal Herald Tribune 

., LONDON — Investors and industrialists 
bdd their nerve Monday, discounting the like- 
lihood of - harmful deviations in French eco- 
nomic policies by the new Socialist prime min- 
ister, Lionet Jospin, and his leftist coalition. 

- For some it was simply a matter of priorities 
J- of choosing between slow-acting reforms 
and money in the bank. 

. “We would welcome changes to make it 
easier to do business hoe, like a lightening up 
op sane of France’s social charges,** said Amy 
porter. European marketing manager for Sun 
Microsystems Inc. in Paris, acknowledging 
that she saw no such changes in the offing. 

- “But the real thing that we are looking for 
is growth in the French economy.'* 

- Some investors and analysts, both in France 


Waigel, Under Fire, 
To Seek Accord With 
Bundesbank on Gold 


Reuters 

BONN — Finance Minister Theo 
/ Waigel. eager to defuse a feud with the 

• Bundesbank, said Monday that he hoped 
to reach an agreement with the central 
bank on his plan to revalue Germany's 

H gold assets. 

Bat he said the government would not 
: retreat from its plan to raise billions of 
: Deutsche marks by assigning higher val- 
ues to Germany’s reserves to help the 
: country satisfy the economic criteria for 
. launching Europe's planned single cur- 
rency. The Bundesbank has about 95 
million ounces of gold in its reserves, 
r valued at 13.7 billion DM ($8.20 billion), 
: compared with a current market value of 
more than 55 billion DM. 

"We will discuss this with the Bundes- 

• bank,’* Mr. Waigel said, adding that the 
dispute centered on whether to revalue the 
reserves in 1997 or 1998. “We will tty to 
do this in mutual agreement,” he said 

Mr. Waigel’s plan to retire old debt 
with an injection of funds from die 
Bundesbank has been heavily criticized. 

Mr. Waigel said that although he was 
seeking an agreement with the Bundes- 
bank, he would proceed with Bonn's plan 
to revalue the gold reserves even without 
- its assent. 


and abroad, expressed dismay at an election 
that they believed marked die drat h of eco- 
nomic reform in France. Yet after several 
years of fiscal screw-tightening from the ous- 
ted conservative government, many business 
people seemed inclined to welcome the 
chances of a slight easing and of the faster 
economic growth and softer French franc that 
might be expected to result. 

Reflecting investors’ measured response to 
the outcome, the Paris Bourse on Monday 
recovered from early losses of more than 2 
percent to end with a gain. The benchmark 
CAC-40 index rose 17.51 points, to 2,601.45. 

Some analysts saw in me market's initial 
drop an opportunity to load up on underpriced 
stocks, “lama buyer of French stocks on all 
rumors of Comm unis t ministers in the gov- 
ernment,'’ said Nicholas Stevenson, Euro- 
pean equity strategist with SBC Warburg. 

Anything that frightens the horses is good 
forme.” 

History suggests that France’s equity mar- 
ket may actually fare better under the So- 
cialists. Hermann Schweizer, managing di- 
rector of Julius Baer Investment Management 
in Zurich, pointed out that share prices went 
“nowhere out up”. in France dunng the last 
leftist government- “French industry has to 
become more competitive, just like the Swiss 
and the Germans, no matter what government 
is in power,” Mr. Schweizer said. 

Other analysts insist that Mr. Jospin has no 
intention of so hobbling French industry with 
additional social costs that the only choice for 
businesses would be to move out or close up. 
The voters have roundly rejected the old gov- 
ernment and its policies at the polls, but the 
prospects of the new government en g a ging in 
radical policy pioneering appear slim to most 
analysts. The distance between right and left in 
France has narrowed sharply, much as it has in 
Britain, where die Labour Party's victory a 
month ago met with little alarm from busi- 
ness. 

“In 1981, the philosophies of right and left 
were very different,” said Pierre Bonelli, 
chief executive of Serna Group PLC, a Brit- 
ish-French computer-services company. 
“Now it is a matter of nuances, of alittle bit of 
this and a little bit of thaL” 

Even if Mr. Jospin and his cabinet were to 
seek greater changes, analysts say, they would 
quickly find that more than party philosophies 
have changed. By most accounts, French politi- 
cians no longer have quite the power and policy 
latitude they once enjoyed. France now has an 
independent central bank that steers its own 
course on monetary policy, and despite fresh 
doubts, Europe appears to remain on course for 
economic and monetary union by 1999, for 

See CHANGE, Page 15 



France Telecom Halts IPO 

Stocks of Privatization Candidates Tumble 


A * v * ' * *' 



Pml HacfeftKcmen 

HALIFAX FLOATED — Jon Foulds, chairman, 
left, and Mike Blackburn, chief executive, outside 
London’s stock exchange on Monday. Page 13. 


Ccmslrd far Qw Sktf Fmm Divan hn 

PARIS — France Telecom announced 
Monday that it would delay its initial public 
offering until a new government was in- 
stalled, as stock prices of companies slated for 
privatization fell sharply. 

But the Paris Bourse was able to shake off 
an early slump as* investors reacted to the 
Socialist victory in France's parliamentary 
elections. But analysts expressed concern 
about long-term prospects for French stocks, 
especially in light of the delay on France 
Telecom shares, which were to have been 
priced Thursday for the offering. 

The CAC-40 Index rose 17.5 1 points, or 0.7 

P ercent, to 2,601.45, after falling as much as 
3 percent in early trading. 

Renault shares rose to 126.50 francs 
($21.99), gaining 2.70, despite concerns that 
the new government might force the auto- 
maker to cancel die planned closing of its 
plant in Vilvoorde, Belgium. Renault's trade- 
union delegates in Belgium will meet Wed- 
nesday with representatives of the French 
Socialist Party, said Georges Jacquemijn of 
the ACF trade union at Vilvoorde. 

But defense and financial stocks fell after 
the opposition ’s victory raised concern that the 
program of selling state assets will be halted. 

Losing issues ranged from financial compa- 
nies being reorganized for sale, such as the 
commercial bank Credit Lyonnais and state- 
owned insurer Groupe des Assurances Na- 
tional, to companies already on the block, such 
as the electronics maker Thomson CSF, which 
fell 1 1.50 francs to 153, and their prospective 
buyers, including Lagardere SC A. 


“It’s impossible” for the public offering to 
start Thursday, a France Telecom spokesman 
said- “We need a green light today, but I 
suppose we will have to wait.’’ 

The newly named Prime Minister Lionel 
Jospin, head of the Socialist Party, said last 
month during campaigning that the party 
would block the France Telecom stake sale if 
it won. He later softened his stance, saying he 
was not categorically opposed to a sale. 

The previous center-right government 

counted on the France Telecom sale to raise 
between 30 billion and 50 billion francs in 
what was expected 10 be the country’s biggest 
initial public offering. 

' Its cancellation would make it harder for 
France to meet budget -deficit and debt re- 
quirements to qualify for European monetary 
union. Revenue from the sale was to help 
reduce government debt. 

“The new Socialist government will lake a 
number of symbolic measures, including a 
suspension of the privatization of France 
Telecom and Thomson CSF.” said Elie Co- 
hen, an economist at the National Center for 
Scientific Research. "The key word here is 
suspension: The sales will resume once the 
Socialists carry out their audit of France's 
public finances.” 

The French jobless rate remained at a re- 
cord 12.8 percent in April for the third month, 
the government said Monday, as businesses 
remained reluctant to hire amid sluggish 
growth. The national statistics office Insee 
said the number of job-seekers rose by 4,000 
in April, to 3.21 million, after a rise of 4.800 in 
Marc h. ( Bloomberg . Reuters J 


Rockwell, Turning Civilian, Plugs Into Electronics 


By Claudia H. Deutsch 

Nr* York Times Service 

NEW Y< : \K. - II ' as f 1 better 
year than RuckWc:- . ^niational 
Corp. had any right to expect: Its older 
modem technologies have sold well, a 
technological glitch with its newer 
ones was easily solved, and robust 
economies in Europe and North 
America translated into great sales for 
its factory- automation systems. 

The barrage of small, sweet sur- 
prises pushed the company’s second- 
quarter earnings above forecasts. 

But wait a minute. Rockwell's 
earnings dependent on modem sales? 


On economic fluctuations? What is 
the maker of the B-l bomber doing in 
a commercial world like this? 

Hyperventilating, actually. 
“We're in high-profit businesses 
with a lot of flexibility, but we sure 
don’t have the buffers we once had,” 
said Donald Beall, Rockwell Inter- 
national Corp.'s chief executive. 

Late last year, Rockwell sold its 
$3.1 billion aerospace business to 
Boeing Co., thereby jettisoning its 
defense work, with its money-in-the- 
bank long-term contracts and rich 
cash flow, as well as its high-growth 
commercial satellite business. 

Mr. Beall said that in September he 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


Bonn Is Right to Overrule the Bankers 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 

W ASHINGTON — The German government’s 
badly explained plan to revalue its gold re- 
serves to help the country qualify for the 
European single currency, the euro, has 
caused widespread confusion. The idea has provoked anxi- 
ety among supporters of a strong euro, glee in Italy and 
howls of rage from Germany’s dour central bank, the 
Bundesbank. 

Bur the plan is not as shocking as its critics make out Its 
implications are far less important than the electoral victory 
Sunday of the French Socialists, who want to dilute the 
1 criteria for euro membership much mare fundamentally. 

frooscaUy. the clash between Bonn and the Bundesbank 
may in foe end make it easier for the center-right German 
government to reach an accommodation with its new 
Socialist partners in Paris. 

By rejecting the Bundesbank’s views on gold, Bonn is 
asserting the primacy of elected politicians over central 
bankers, a point foe French Socialists have insisted on with 
regard to the management of the euro. 


who have charged that the currency will be run by unelected 
bureaucrats, are now applauding the Bu nde sb ank — 
hugely because it has thrown what they hope will be a 
spanner in foe works. 

Mnch more understandably, other European Union 
countries, such as Italy, which have long had to endure 
■economic lectures from self-satisfied German officials, are 
gratified by what they see as Germany's deviation from its 
own stria fiscal standards. 

The German bookkeeping device is widely — though 
pre ma t ur ely — interpreted as increasing the chances that 
Italy and others will join the euro fry making “creative 
acco un ting” more acceptable in deciding which countries 
should participate. 

That is precisely why some Germans are so outraged. 


The government’s move seems to put Germany on a par 
with Latin countries, which Germans have traditionally 
regarded as spendthrift and irresponsible, as well as to 
imply that the euro will be too weak to be an acceptable 
substitute for foe mighty Deutsche mark. 

Many Germans have accordingly supported foe Bundes- 
bank's protests that foe plan is improper and constitutes 
unacceptable interference with foe independence of the 
central bank. 

But the Bundesbank is fussing too much. As John 
Llewellyn of Lehman Brothers in London points out, the 
Bundesbank does not own the gold — its job is to hold foe 
gold in trust and manage it for foe German nation. 

Germany has gold stocks because it has prudently and 
systematically spent less than it has earned, except in foe 
years after German unification in 1990. It is perfectly 
appropriate to value these assets at something like today's 
prices when measuring Germany's net worth. 

In any case, profit from revaluing the gold would not go 
into the current German federal budget but into a special 
fund for Eastern Germany that counts under foe EU’s 
budgetary criteria for joining foe single currency, according 
to Ge rman officials. It should not mean that Bonn could no 
longer demand fiscal and monetary discipline from its 
European partners. 

The dispute with the Bundesbank is not unprecedented. 
The government has in foe past overruled the bank on major 
issues of European integration, including German partic- 
ipation in the European Monetary System, the exchange-rate 
arrangement established in 1979, and on the East German, 
mark's conversion rale when Germany was unified. 

It is fully entitled to do so again. Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
has quite righdy made the single currency his overriding 
European policy priority. He must now persuade the Ger- 
man people to support him. 

The Bundesbank is, at least in principle, in favor of foe 
euro. Instead of creating unnecessary difficulties, it should 
be working hard to make the proposed new currency a 
success. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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would spin off Rockwell's automot- 
ive business to shareholders, remov- 
ing an additional $3.1 billion in rev- 
enue and Rockwell's last vestige of 
predictability. 

Its remaining businesses — semi- 
conductors, automation and avionics 
— have hitched their futures to the 
highly variable star of electronics. 

“They’re now depending on really 
volatile businesses for a huge part of 
their growth, ” Howard RubeL, an ana- 
lyst at Goldman, Sachs & Co., said. 

The prospect, however, does not 
seem to faze Mr. Beall. None of the 
businesses that make up the nearly $8 
billion miniconglomerate that is the 


PRIVATE BANKING 


new Rockwell are global leaders, but 
he has promised that they will be. 

“Five years from now, we’ll be 
twice our size and a world-class player 
in commercial electronics,” he said. 

Mr. Beall insists that Rockwell is as 
nimble as any other company, and 
some of his competitors and customers 
concede that, for a defense contractor, 
it is. But for an electronics player? 

“Real speed and urgency are just 
not things you become proficient in 
overnight," said Iain Morris, a vice 
president at Motorola Inc., which uses 
Rockwell’s modem chips. 

See ROCKWELL, Page 15 


We’re not just on the map. 
We’re all over it. 


It’s not only our vast worldwide 
network that keeps us at your 
side at all times. 

It’s our total commitment to serving 
your unique demands, wherever 
you may be. 

From the time we opened our 
first office in Switzerland in 1876, 
Credit Lyonnais has earned an 
enviable reputation for Private 
Banking based on dialogue and 
personal relationships. 

The founder of Credit Lyonnais, 
Henri Germain, expressed it most 
succinctly when he created the 
bank's motto: 


*Dbfar Values 

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PM* 1307 n*ft* UOU Mtflftft US wm.be*t. JSX50 

HftcAVM IlM— .rUy 1515 51—5 U3M 




'Business is people, not just 
figures'. 

This has been the very essence 
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We listen well to our clients' pri- 
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diverse and fast-changjng finan- 
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Your banker must make 
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Providing innovative 
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■I^IH 


Our Geneva subsidiary, specialized 
in Private Banking since 1376. 

Credit Lyonnais' Private Banking 
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The combined strength of these 
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Let’s talk. 


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CREDIT LYONNAIS 


Private Banking Network: 

Switzerland: Geneva tel. 41 22/705 66 66 - Headquarters for Credit Lyonnais International Private Banking 
Basletcl41 61/284 22 22 » ZURICH TEL 41 1/217 86 86# LUGANO TO. 41 91/923 M 65 
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Investor’s America 

amm 


The Dow 


3Q-Year T-Bond Yield E 


Will Microsoft Quit internet? 


1( 


* i * 


Giant Ponders Future of Troubled MSN Service Provider 


Dollar in Deutsche marks fl Dollar in Yen 


By Leslie Helm 

Los Angela Tunes 



Very briefly: 


SEATTLE — After months of 
customer complaints about poor 
service, undelivered electronic 
mail ' and h illing problems, Mi- 
crosoft Corp. executives have be- 
gun discussing whether the com- 
pany should get out of die Internet 
service provider business, people 
close to the company say.’ 

Microsoft denies it has plans to 
drop its Microsoft Network busi- 
ness, known as MSN, “at this 
time.'* But Jeff Sanders, market- 
ing manager Tor MSN, said he 
could not '’guarantee" that Mi- 
crosoft would be in the Internet 
access business for the long term. 

In the meantime, Mr. Sanders 
said, Microsoft is committed to 
offering quality service. ‘‘Even if 
access is not a long-run business," 
he said, the software giant still 
must 1 to develop the sophisticated 
billing technology it needs to sell 
its on-line products. 

There already are signs that Mi- 


crosoft’s focus is on offering MSN 
as a content package for other In- 
ternet service providers. MSN will 
be offered, for example, on the 
(©Home Network, which is de- 
veloping a cable modem service 
for high-speed Internet access. 

While the communications side 
of the Internet is far less important 
strategically for Microsoft than the 
content, pulling out of the business 
would be a rare and humbling re- 
treat. 

Since revamping MSN last year 
in hope of becoming second only 
to America Online Inc. among In- 
ternet service providers, Microsoft 
has rapidly built up the business 
and now has 2.3 million custom- 
ers. But with competition increas- 
ing, few companies are making 
money providing Internet access 
service, and MSN has repeatedly 
run into problems. 

In April, the company shut its e- 

inail service for several * days to 
increase its capacity, prompting a 
flood of complaints. In March, 
customers with addresses starting 


with the letters T through Z did not 

get mail for days when the server 
handling those addresses was tem- 
porarily down. In addition, many 
customers also find Microsoft's e- 
miiil software difficult to use. 

Mr. Sanders said Microsoft Net- 
work had resolved its billing and 
capacity problems and would in- 
stil new e-mail software this sum- 
mer. He also insisted that the com- 
pany was “generating accurate 
bills,*’ despite some customer 
complaints in that area as well. 

Jesse Beret, an editor atZDNet, 
an on-line technology magazine, 
said, “Billing is their Achilles’ 
heel” A former Microsoft man- 
ager told Mr. Bcrst he was having 
so much trouble getting a response 
from customer service on an over- 
billing matter that he had a friend 
hand-deliver his message to the 
appropriate person at Microsoft 
Even then, Microsoft could not 
resolve the problem and insisted 
the customer continue to pay bis 
monthly fee pending resolution of 
the issue, Mr. Berst said. 




i ifcSa ttl £1 


May from 54.2 in April, suggesting 

that the economy may not be siowing 
enough to keep inflation at bay. Ana- 
lysts said the Federal Reserve Board 

might use the report to justify higjber 
interest rates when it meat July L 
“The biggest factor stock in- 
vestors are ta king into account is 
whar the Fed will do next," said 
Joseph Stocfce, head of eq uity in- 
ves tmen ts at Meridian Investment 
Co„ which oversees $2 billion of 
stocks. ‘ ‘Any time data comes out a 
little stronger than expected, that 
will make investors nervous." 


.■ * Enron Corp. said it would pay a total of $440 millio n to 
Phillips Petroleum Co., BG PLC of Britain and the I talian oil 
3 consortium Agip SpA to settle a lawsuit involving a gas- 
supply contract. 


■* • Shell Oil Co. and Mobil Corp. will consolidate their Cali- 
fornia oil production operations, firing 270 people and cutting 
i, other costs to save an estimated j million a year. 


Pepsi Says It Won’t Spin Off Bottlers 


Bonds were largely unaffected by 
e report, with the benchmark 3fr- 


^ • Christies International PLC said it intended to raise $75 
, million in long-term debt through a private placement with 
.' U.S. institutional investors. 


hotels and an office building for about $128 milli on, expanding 
the number of its hotel rooms by almost 25 percent 


• Japan has approved several new air routes for Federal 
Express Corp. between the United States and Asia but 
refused to relax overall restrictions on flights between Tokyo 
and the rest Of Asia. Return. AFX. AFP. Bloomberg. AP 


Comftitd by Od- Suff Fmet DUpnrAn 

NEW YORK — PepsiCo Inc. 
denied Monday that plans to re- 
organize its North American bever- 
age business by creating a separate 
unit for its company-owned bottling 
operations would lead to a public 
offering of the bottling business. 

A company spokesman. Brad 
Shaw, said that the reorganization 
was in no way a prelude to a spin- 
off. 

“This is a new way to structure 
the business to bring added re- 


sources, focus and management tal- 
ent to each aspect of the business." 
he said. 

But some industry analysts said a 
spin-off would free up capital and 
other resources Pepsi would need to 
better compete with Coca-Cola Co. 
in the United States and in inter- 
national markets. 

“They need to shed themselves 
of those operations," said Ross Col- 
bert, president of Haas Financial 
Corp. “They feel the pressure of 
having to respond. 1 * 


The separate bottling company, 
to be called Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co-, 
will have its own executive staff, 
which will report to the head of 
Pepsi's North American beverage 
business, Mr. Shaw said. Pepsi said 
it would not report the bottling sub- 
sidiary's results separately. 

Shares in PepsiCo rose $1 to close 
at $37.75. 

PepsiCo has announced plans for 
a spin-off of its fast-food restaurant 
operations — Pizza Hut, Taco Bell 
and KFC. , (AP, Bloomberg) 


the report, with the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond rising 3/32 to 96 
19/32,- lowering its yield to 6.89 
percent 1 from 6.9G" percent Friday.. 

“We tried to- find a shred of ev- 
idence of good news;” said Gerry 
Thane lius, a bond trader at Dreyfus 
Corp., “and there wasn't one.” 

"The market is getting over jit- 
ters created by the NAPM report" 
said Hugh Johnson, chief invest- 
ment officer at Fast Albany. 

“This is a key leading indicator 
of the economy and inflation a nd is 
watched very closely by the Federal 
Reserve. A rise in this index is bad 
news for deliveries and could mean 
upward pressure on prices before 
long." 


Weekend Box Office 


The AsMtKuted Press 

LOS ANGELES — “The Lost World: Jurassic Park" dom- 
inat'-d the U.S. box office over the weekend, with a gross of 
S32.6million. Following are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on 
Friday’s ticket sales and estimated sales for Saturday and 
Sunday. 


Dollar Surges on Expectations the Euro Will Be Weak 


1. The Lost World Junta* 

•< Pork 

2. Addicted Id Love 
1 Gone FtHdn* 

i. Trial ond Error 
5. The FrfIJi Element 
, 6. Austin Powers 

7. Bradtdown 
i &- Fortier's Day 

9- Liar Liar 
. lO.'nitaeVbrttau 


(Warner BrosJ 
(HaOywood Pictures) 
(NemUmOmsO 
(Colombia Pictures) 
(New Unc Cinema) 
(Paramount) 
(Warner BmsJ 
(Universal} 
fnmmmrO . 


summon 
Summon 
SSmflfiofl 
Mmffllon 
04 trillion 
SUtnilGafl 
SL7 million 
sii miuiofl 
summon 


CoeStdni by Qvr Swff Fn/or Dtykacha 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
gained against other major curren- 
cies Monday after the Socialist- led 
victory in France's election fanned 
concern that Europe’s planned 
single currency would be weak. 

The Socialists have said they will 
resist the austere debt and budget 
limits required for monetary union. 
Many traders said other European 
countries could follow suit, and that 
■ could- result. in a weaker euio. 


The new currency, Peter von 
Maydell of Union Bank of Switzer- 
land said, “will come about with 
participation of a large number of 
countries, including Italy, Spain and 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


Portugal, and withont strict respect 
for the Maastricht treaty criterion., 
limiting public deficits to 3 per- 
cent" of gross domestic product 
— ^ Th ee^^sHredibilityis going to.. 


be a joke,” John Beer ling, chief cur- 
rency trader at Norwest Bank, said. 
“If you believe foe euro’s going to 
be weak, then you’ve got to go to the 
dollar — it’s the best place to be." 

The sell-off of European curren- 
cies hit the Deutsche mark hard, with 
the dollar rising to 1.7305 DM in 4 
P.M. trading from 1.7062 DM on 
Friday. The uncertainty on Euro- 
pean monetary union “is benefiting 
the dollar and foe sterling," said 
Chris Iggo^i&BZWiSeairities, “be-/ 

•*'{ *i-< «»•: iL=d 


cause of the talk ofpossible delay 
and of softening of die criteria." 

Against other European curren- 
cies, foe dollar rose to 5.8400 French 
francs from 5.7645 francs and to 
1.4330 Swiss francs from 1.4145 
francs. The pound fell to $1.6357 
from $1.6405. The dollar also rose 
to 11635 yen from 116.25 yen. 

“Broad-based dollar buying has 
caused it to go up a little bit against 
foe yen,” Mr. Beerling said. . 

«-w *i (AFPrSIoomberg) 

'* n lutfr 

Sr-a Id fcttD WX. aa:- 


— foe lowest in 23 rears. Signs foe 
labor market is coatiig coaid ease . .. .. 
concern foe Fed will raise rates. ■■ 1 ~ 

“Eveayone is on held imtil Fri- 
day,” said Leonard Invito of J&W r \ 

Seligraan & Co. ; 

Shares df totocco coiMaiucs ■ ' ’ ;/ 

dropped after a judge in Florida . / . : 

rejected two motions sought by foe - i' ( h u 
iirfustry in a lawsuit over- second- ' ■ t}. 

hand smokeand concern spread that .■J.. , / it « ;a 
cigarette makers’ demand for pro- ■ J!" •*' 
tection from smokers’ lawsuits 
might scuttle seven months of set- 
tlement talks between foe industry 
and various states. 

Philip Morris fell VA to 47%. • 

But computer shares; still rising 
in foe 'aftermath of Compaq's an- - - 
nounCemrart Friday that it saw 
strong4eriiand for its personal com- 
puters, helped lift the technology- 
heavy Nasdaq composite index by 
331 points, to 1,403.83. 

Compaq fell % to 10714, while 
Intel declined I 23/64 to 150 9/64. 

Micron Technology rose 1% to 
43% and LSI Logic gained % to - - 

42% after the companies said they ' 
would team up to develop specialty . — . 
logic chips with memory compon- 
ents built into them. 

Informix rose sharply after Hew- 
lett-Packard said it would offer the 
company’s software with its next 
line of computer systems. Hewlett- 
Packard rose \Vi to 53. 

Memc Electronic Materials rose 1 
7/16 to 10 7/1 6 after Unisil agreed to ... 
buy the company’s Santa Clara, 

California, silicon wafer plant, en- 
abling Mono to cut costs by con- 
centrating semiconductor wafer pro- ’ 
duction at its South Carolina plant. 

Boston Chicken fell 1% to 16 ’A 
after foe operator and franchiser of - 
Boston Market restaurants said it 
hadcut 1 15jobs at its support center | 
to reduce costs, resulting in a 


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Monday's 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 mod odfw shoies. 
up to the dosing on WoO Street 
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Indexes 


sH Dow Jones 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


June 2« 1997 


wall Um uim ‘chat opu 


H%n Um Uteri ChgD OpM 


HWl Low Lotas) Cbgo OpW 


Trara. K8SJM Mftja U«jn 2U1JV -1U3 
un mss him tom n1.11 -am 

Comp znui UmjT 2270.19 227J4I -1173 


Standard & Poors 


Indwstriate 

Transp. 

Utfflte* 

Fteanoe 

SP500 

SP100 


m an* *H 

—100053 999 JM 

- 61083 613.13 

- 19118 192-34 

- 9i01 -MM 

- 84828 04456 

- 82470 B2494 


w* HUB 
59650 3tH 

54406 44U 

52931 3f*k 
4WK 4M 
45354 2tM 
41417 OV» 
40012 110U 
34979 m 
33793 MH6 
3309 6141 
33564 1744 
mi isu 
3H07 J7J4 
11065 SOW 
30519 53V4 


HWl Law Latest Oigi Optel 


4» 43H 

in mw 

4W* 42W 
106h 107*1 
29*1 30n 
SM S9*4 

«» «m 
m» Ini 

i7w im* 
SAW IM 


CORN (CBOT) 

W»o bu mtaiunfc ewm oor buMwl 

an vvh vva m +va us.m 

S*»97 260 257V. 2S9W +356 31^23 

DK97 2S8W 255W 25nt +456 109.727 

Mar98 244% 261% 244 +456 1X23A 

mm 247% 24556 26756 +4% I JO 

-M9B 27156 24856 271% +1% HOT 

Sente 258 1 

Est.wles NLA. FWi sotes 47JU9 
FrTi open Inf 278521 up 729 


ORANGE JUKE WCTTfl 
14000 tea- arts nw ■*. 

JUI97 79J8 1450 77JB +045 14581 

Sod 97 82J0 749C 79.18 7,471 

NOV 97 DUO IU5 BUB +020 46*4 

Jinn 87 JO 84.75 BUO -428 UU 

Est.sries MA. FWS-SdB 1070 
Fifsopeninl 20,770 up 60 


6ERMAN SOV. BUND OJFFE) 
DM23U)0Q'ptaari00pct 
Jtn97 100J2 100 l 49 I«L77 -9 008211,173 
S*p 97 99 JM 99^45 99J3 + 008 UA 35 
Dec 97 NX N.T. 9073 + Ora 
FiO W teK 250494 Pnv.MteK 22TJD0Q 
Piev.apen MU 274808 op MD4 
18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS CMATIF) 


- • -;*r -irgi epte' 


Industrials 


Jun *-00217X478 
^MtaE 1 «M80 . Opm mu 7I48Z7 up 


GOLD (NCMX) 


NOIroroi.- dawn per teoriu. 

JUn97 3*420 3040 343J0 —1.10 

JUI97 345j00 —IM 

Aw 97 34740 34620 34&5Q — lj® 

0d*7 3*9 JO 349 JO 349 JO -1.10 

Dec 97 3S2JO 35120 35U0 -1.18 

Fepte 3SL10 -UD 

Awn 3SL50 

Junte 359.10 

Amite 341.90 -1J0 

Est- 50*86 NA Fit's, arias 39.731 
FirsonwiM 15DJ26 Off 3243 


COTTON 2 CNCTN) 

54080 tes^ sens ner B. 

Jed 97 7090 7175 7334 +091 34794 

Oct 97 7528 74L3S 74J85 +073 4.740 

Dec 97 TUN 7525 7573 +070 M2U 

MorSI 77.15 7498 7698 >043 4J94 

MOV 98 77 JO 7731 7793 >043 1J82 

Estsriei MA. Frfs, soles 14216 
FfT8BPaiW 74J92 up 591 


i r •«■> 
* 48* 


Nlgk Mi US (W 

44307 440.44 44134 -024 

542-36 558J4 56044 -OOl 

48341 «1J* 48149 -147 

775JB V3JM 274J0 ,023 

401.12 VJM 397 J4 -1.19 


Nasdoq 


* Nasdaq 


M0BJ5 139490 1404,77 +445 

113083 113148 II3L57 ,AJH 

148438 10295 148627 +244 

1S32X5 133007 1S34.W 1»4 


1S32X3 133007 1S74.W 1»4 

ITO4I 1791.97 1MI.Q +640 

938.14 92096 935.04 +191 


w Mat 

21X77 154W 
1MIJ IM 
99529 SOW 
83144 29% 
7D31 4BW 
68041 I0W 
46399 115% 
40876 0 
64*57 " 27W 
0970 56A 
48613 125% 
47276 1IW 
45221 25W 
<2144 <7H 
<0401 47U 


I0W 14M 
1SW WW 
41% «VW 
J»W 28*1 
W* 67V* 

9 jS ■<>*■ 

II2M 113W 
«» . « 
25W 34%. 
53K 55% 
13M 124W 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CSOTl 
W hn- donors Dir lor. 

All 97 293.50 28486 28720 —13 47294 
AW 97 271-50 36630 21808 — 1J0 17,10 
Sen 97 24050 245J0 5*7-10 -040 11.122 

0097 233JO 23170 23298 >070 10710 

Dec 77 22620 22150 22580 +040 2DJ30 

JotM 22290 219 JO 221 JO +180 2Jffl 

BL sates MA. FiYLsries 22J63 
Firs open at 1TL475 off 29 


TTAL1AN GOVERNMENT BONDLUFFE] 


ITL2D0 mlBton - pb oTIOD pet 
Jn 097 129.301 M73 129.18 + OJ8 6&S83 
Sep ?7 129.85 128-75 12973 + 075 <X074 
Dec 97 N.T. MT. 10100 + OCM 


Ert-anhu: KBaL ftm. arias; 95096 
Prav. open Infc: 111J57 off 1,752 
-EURODOLLARS (CMBQ 
si mUBoiv-nMol 100 ocr. 

Jun97 *419 94.18 941B 


SOYBEAN OS. (CBOT, 

HJBOtoS-CWsparlb 

MM 97 2420 2142 2414 +0J6 

Al® 77 205 2181 2430 +034 

Sep 97 3459 2X95 24SJ ,0J8 

OdW 2450 34J0 24X7 +042 

Dec 97 3428 3410 2463 +040 

JrilW 2475 244) 2475 +034 

Est. sales NA Frfs.sotes M773 
Fri’sopenM 102, IS off 1139 


Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bands 
lOUHOItes 
lOIndostriab 


P i Tbdor 

On Ndm 

103.12 I02J3 

9972 9970 

105.01 10S7B 


27509 81* 
12)08 85% 
11351 79% 
9126 2914 

MTV 2314 
7877 18% 

4573 71% 

4557 9% 
5457 m 
41M 19% 


(W 0% -V* 

B4U*D 84U -Vo 

a SS j! 

32% 23% +11% 
in'* iw, m, 
20% 21 +M 

9VW 4* 

a . 3 +%l 

» W % 


SOYBEANS (CSOTI 
unhiratanpn-drniMrhRiw 
AS 97 887% 165 07516 -616 

AW97 83816 822% B26 _«* 

®8P 97 735 728% 732% 

Now 97 493% 60< 091V6 +6% 

Jon« 05 487 694 + 616 

ES.Jrias NA FtTLsates 43J93 
Frfsocoiiit 181 HI Off 1711 


HI SHADE COPPER (NCMX) 
KMitarcMieva. 

-tan 97 117JD 115J0 11780 —160 

Jul 97 11070 ll&re 117.16 —175 

Ann 97 USAS 11425 115X5 -LOS 

Sep 97 114J0 IIXD0 — 1JD 

0097 11278 11135 11125 —185 

NOV 97 11039 -1X0 

Dec 97 109JD 10080 1090 —1X0 

Jon9| 187X0 — 1J0 

FebW HSSO -IX 

Estsdes NA FrTLsries 10.136 
Firs open in 58.91B off 2237 


9118 

9110 

411555 

te.ll) 

9112 

11674 

9U6 

9106 

U0 

93.97 

9199 

-101 471506 

VAH 

9177 

377J10 

9341 

9145 

awo 

9X0 

9354 

+OJ1 237 J47 

930 

9343 

UDJB 

9129 

9132 


9X21 

fire 

99J63 

9134 

9124 

-OOl 81652 

vuo 

9322 

-am 67.202 


Trading Activity 


Nasdaq 


1% 4% 

74% 2414 

41% <1** 

13% 13+1 

UN 32% 
2% 2% 
ll% IK 
W% 18-% 
i3.« in 
n i 
i% » 
ij ir-% 
2>i 74 

U1 14% 

i% in 

4% i» 


64% ♦% 

24% 4. 

11 % 
irv. 

JH +% 


AOwno+d 

Dkb««3 

ynowngml 

Jon owes 
New Kota 

New Lons 


812 8» Uodmgea 

3355 UJi Total bsuea 

206 us NewWgM 

7 io New Lows 


*M 2153 

ISO 1840 

2217 1741 

5457 5734 

120 151 

67 46 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

WOW minimum- nm (o bwhet 
M97 365 3S4V4 3HP6 +V6 46XX 

Sep 97 372 343V. 347% +14 15J04 

OecW 382 375 378V. -16 14X63 

Mgrre 384 379 381 1,991 

Eri.soJes NA FfTi.snlm 15X27 
FfPsapenW 81,180 up 653 


SILVER CNCMX} 

S4I0O mnr BL- centi per «v m. 

-tan 97 467 JO +2.50 44 

Jul 97 4733)0 44750 469JB +2X 99.134 

S*P97 477 JO 473J0 47420 +2.10 7J94 

Dec 97 4S3J0 480J0 0070 +IJ0 7X45 

JonN 4BL70 +1.70 17 

*£-■» +IX M4T 

MovW 491 JO +L» 2J43 

Join Max +470 un 

Erf. soles NA F+rs. antes 73.904 
AfsapenM 91,933 OP 1425 


MarketSales 


Iw. •>% 
16% •% 
12% t% 
TV, .% 


14% 

n - 

14% •% 


AOfoncefl 

OecMlM- ■ 
uncnanoca 
Ten nun 
Nnh« 
New Lorn 


319 219 

234 ZJ9 NYSE . 

im 190 Antes 

7 J? ^ & 

5 / tnmBaom. 


435.99 633-22 

2088 30JJ8 

529.14 71X77 


« 37 1 

n% e«% 

17% If 
It 1 + 
I". !’• 


» 2% 2% 

1279* Mat 

271 M+U Mb 

!£ 15% 15 

992 19% lb 

IM 1% 19% 

15J 10% It* 

*1 5% |% 

222 TU 9% 

.287 19% lte 

1084 319% 20% 

IB 17% 17% 

SO ». 9* 

K IV. It. 

« ijj m 

YUt 17% UVi 

121 11% lot 

ta h>. }&% 

231 11' • M 

n 17% 12 % 

W «f. 1% 

fU II 14% 

ua 14% 14% 

sea 3S% 21% 

a in ik 

1U 19% 1% 

as ran rm% 

£4 V% % 

ri IH fi 

21809 Ilk K 

US 17% T7+% 

1*7 141% If-'. 

14 17% 177, 

to 179% 17% 

SO B% J« 

95 =| 1 

899 % % 


4*. >% 

n *m 
213 •% 

IM *tl 
M. 


Dividends 

Company 


Per Amt Rec Poy 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


IRREGULAR 

ABonce Bitgj _ .1625 6-10 7-18 

epurtarids PLC 6 J43 6-6 8-15 
Deswrt Indus .. M 6-16 0-30 

Tii-CanSnental .. .957 6-10 7-1 


IPs +N 
2M 48 
Mk *% 


STOCK SPLIT 
Montson MhM eJfor ispit 

REVERSE STOCK SPUT 
EcoTvre Teds Iter 7 nw et M Bpfli 


Engin Support 

SowySpnire 


S .0135 6-30 7-31 

a a 6-ifi 


Suffolk Bncp n 


INITIAL 

. .165 6-13 7-1 


17% •% 

149% -V, 

179% .+% 

17% -Ik 
27% •% 


4=h. 4+. 

91» SY- 31 

4'% 4k 

lte. tu 

138 17% |T 

•5 =% 

It. 4 ; 

op io% iew 
an a- 
nc ii% n% 
457 47% <■ -. 


4t. .V% 

a% ji 
47. +V% 

1% .-% 
in. -it 


v-.- i. 
I'l 4% 
J ■ 5 

1‘1 411 

un in. 

4% 4% 


4% 

s% 

2% 

4% 

1% 

• 

4 % 

4T 

9U 

♦x 

-te 

.H. 


i 

/vi 


1% 

l 

3X 

-X 

W% 

10% 

MM 


27% 

7TL 

27* 


1IX 

lln 

1IX 

+'•» 

II 

10 % 

H 

•X 

JOM 

29% 

29X 

-X 

2«k 

29L 

J9te 

■X 

1% 

IX 

1% 

«% 

IX 

X 

.X 

... 

UM 

IN 

Uu 

«% 

14X 

14%* 

IPX 

X 

4% 

n 

4 

• I* 

II 

ip* 

um 

_ 

19% 

ute 

I2X 

•X 

Hr 

.31. 

M 

• M 

11% 

1IM 

III. 

*x 

Q?« 

I1X 

11X 

-)■ 

raw 

um 

18% 

■X 

14% 

In 

in 

-X 

14% 

16 

im 


f*H 

16 

14% 

•te 

15% 

ISX 

in. 

■X 

11% 

13% 

11 % 

•I* 

Ot. 

Ilk. 

ISX 

+% 

Wfe 

12% 

nx 

• X 

19% 

1YX 

19% 

X 

14X 

I4X 

14X 

-X 

■4 

X 

ta 

X 

IX 

.'ta 

■X 


11% 

m 

I1X 

•X 


AN B Corp 
Boston Acoustics 
DuffPtieto UfTxFr 
FriFedIFind 
Fund Am En 


REGULAR 

0 .15 4^13 630 

s O .125 6-20 7-25 

Fr M .08 6-16 6-30 

O .Q7 6-13 6-27 

Q -20 6-9 6-18 


Hancock Pal Sel 
HaverflehlCeep 
Hi YU Income Fd 
Joachim Bncp 
Kemper HI IncoTr 
Kempv Inter . 
Kemper Multinifkt 
Kemper Muni I ixo 
Kemper Stud I naa 
Kemper 5001 Muid 

MwwvAir 
MuniA6«F6 

N YTmE xerapl 
Nonpuil Corp 

Paipiapo Bncp 

POgiim Am Pim 
Psydtemeifla 
SraboartGorp 

SkyBoeCorp 
Snyder OH 

SttmtBoncore 

Statewide Fin 
StoiAndge drill 
Wstm Star Tip 


M .1031 6-0 

O .14 6-13 
M JM 6-16 
O .125 6-13 
M .075 6-13 
M .055 6-13 
M .0725 6-13 
M .0725 6-13 
M .147 6-13 
M -068 6-13 
QJ12S 7-15 
M .0665 6-16 
M .*03 6-16 
S JJZ 6-12 
Q .23 6-6 

M ,0695 6-9 

_ M 6-16 
■O X> 6-M 
Q .15 6-18 
O .065 6-13 
0 .08 6-17 

O .10 6-12 
Q .128 6-12 
Q .10 6-16 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CMBU 

«U»0 fcv- oenu oer to. 

JnW M.97 64J7 MAO — 0J3 

Aua97 44.92 6425 4U0 -042 

OQ97 4A27 6737 4002 -032 

D6C97 10X2 TOJ0 7042 —OH 

FeBW 71 JS 71 JB 7127 +017 

Aprte 7110 7195 7107 +005 

gl-solea 15.945 Frf'L sates 16808 
RTsopeniit I0M34 UP 777 

FSDSt CATTLE ECMSR1 
teXBOtak- cants Hr to. 

Align tub tjx run — 05 a 

Sep 97 77.75 77X5 77JH - 0 AS. 

Oct 97 77X5 27 JS 77X2 -035 

New 97 79 JS 7055 79-12 -002 

Jenn 79J5 79 JQ 7* JO -015 

Morte 19.00 TJ.eai 71.18 

ja-soies 1X8 Fit's. sides I.Tre 
FfTsopeniit 19,179 up 2M 

Hoes-Leco (CMB0 
0J9oin.-cei*ip6rta 

81.10 BUS 80J7 +DJ7 
JulW 01JO KUS 81.80 +1.15 

Aon 77 80X0 77X5 0030 +007 

O09T jm 7L80 n» +Q.9S 

Det77 7aS0 49.10 49.97 +080 

Es sates 11,943 Fit's. tries 9X55 
FrPiopenW 39X11 if 448 


PLATUAJBI (NMERj 
50 iny at- dapgn per frow oc. 

JM97 0100 371 JO 39070 -LSO 14.232 
0097 377J0 391 JO 39X70 — 2J0 4,7 79 
JrilW 39070 38580 39070 —1.50 1-234 
EAsriBS NA Frfosries 3JH 
FfTsepanM 20272 off 107 


LONDON METALSCLME) 


. 2612J0 

248100 248000 254280 254100 


ESUriw NA FrTABM 6Z7J8I 
FrfsopenW 2,73MB up 15354 
BWDSH POUND (CMER) 

C20H pounds, l par pound 
Jon 97 1X410 1X294 1X342 
Sep 97 1X340 1XZS4 1X106 
Dec 97 1X342 

Estsriei NA Fit's. ides 4JH 
Frrsopnlnt 41,998 up 441 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 
10MM drtlm,S par Cdn. car 
JunW Jm -7254 7278 

• Septe 7338 7303 7322 

Dec97 7377 7358 7378 

EH. tries NA FiTk-SOteS 9J42 
Frfs open kit 78X09 off 1576 

6C8MANMARK (OHER) 

1ZS4M0 mono, t per morli 
-tan 97 JSW J777 J7B4 
Sepw JB15 J819 

Dec 97 J374 .5844 J876 

^■Sries NA Frfs. sales 22,7S5 
FrTS open ini BUM up 818 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

1 IL5 meean via I pr Ha wan 
>0197. -8650 -85B2 XM0 , 

Jtepte-:Xna J895 J7D4 

■Deere *05 «5 t® 

Eftsotes NA FrTs. soles 14,100 
Ftfs open bit 83X42 off 345 


HEAT94COX. (NMSU 
42XNpeLcenH pm- aoi 
JUI97 54X0 SM 5M5 +0X1 

Aug 77 54JS 54J0 5690 + 0X1 

Sep 97 57X0 57.05 9X0 +0J6 

pore 5EC9 5BJ0 58J0 +QJ1 

Nov 97 ».W 5*75 HUM hui 

Dec 97 »X0 5978 *05? 

Jain 60-28 S9J0 40J0 +0X4 

R|b» 97 JO BJ5 +044 

MorM JUS 5870 5*30 +1X4 

». sries NA Fit's, soles 39JJ8 

Frfs Open bit 12X343 off 4942 

USKT SHEET OtUOE OtMED) 
lXOOtM-daParsperPM. 

■*497 71.17 2M4 2U9 +021 

Al* 97 21 J* 2071 7122 +021 

S(pW 2122 30.91 Jl.12 +0.11 

Octw 21.17 2027 2125 +009 

NovW 2U9 21 JB 21 j87 +014 

Decor 2L07 2081 2UB +017 

Jonte MJ5 20J7 2095 + 015 

R*W 2020 BUS J0J0 +0.15 

MOTte 20X5 20X5 20X5 +0.15 

Apr te, 2DJD 28X0 KJS +OI5 

gt.sries NA FrYXsotes 88JB3 
FrrsapenM 40X735 off 7342 


*••• "pur m* 


- re. » w 

^ i 




4 t 

= -* . 


NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

— 

— 


uum ixn biu*x 1 pr iran biu 



• 

Jul 77 U10 

3115 

3125 

3MB 

1. 


Aliy 77 U15 

IDS 

3145 

23JM 



Sep 97 2310 

310 

3 MS 

1*254 



Odre un 

1130 

1TO 

T9JS4 



Nov 97 2235 

3280 

U90 

1293 



OecW 2A45 

3410 

200 

am _ 



Jan 98 200 

2*450 

2*640 

nai 



FeOW 2295 

2240 

3340 

1744 



MOT9B 3J55 

32» 

1220 

42*7 



AprW.. 1105 

3088 

ION ' 

1344 



Est.sries na 

FfTtelrite 34J48 



+ «... 




« - r 


FYfsopenbV 197J66 off 5t32 




M 611 JO 61100 AXQ 0 6Z7-00 
Forward 623V. 624J0 63400 6MJ0 

NrteBI 


S3™. J»514 132414 

ransuil 1327 JO 132714 134&na rtmni 


I 1327 JO 132714 134BJD i^V4 

H»B*i Ln» due Chge OpM 


PORK BQJJE5 (040) 

«U8n tat.- owns per ta. 

MW B9.W 84X5 HJO +112 

£22 »■» 0W8 +i.9o 

Frt» 79J7 7675 7937 +2J2 

&t tries 2X44 Wi, soles X441 
FfTsopenint i33A off 419 


o-rnuMb b-OBBrextaHte anamt per 
sIwtfADRi B-paypOta In Cmdlan Itendsj 
a-manBiN; q^ u atertn s-semh»nuol 


Financial 
UST.UXS (CMBU 

(1 mOBen- Ms of 100 pet. 

Join 94.95 M.93 MM 

S*P97 MJ7 *4X2 94X3 

Dec 97 94X8 

a.sries na FirxsaiBB uoi 

Ffriaocnini 9,984 us 257 
SYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

rite- PB A #*«» of m per 
JOI97HE-51 105-30 105-41 +01 

5WW185J7 105-16 185-25 iffi 

105-12 105-12 + 85 

it“Si ^ >KX<5 

FrreapRinx 229J92 up 5*24 


SWISS FRANC (CMER) 
l Uoea frsnM. S par franc 
A*i97 7093 X971 XS92 43J0 

50)97 7T74 7050 _7D73 4.272 

Dec 97, JISO J1S0 7158 4 § 

EsLsries NA Frfs. sales 11312 
FWsopenlnt 51351 «BM 

•4BDCAN PESO (CMBU 

SBLOOp PMas, s pm pan 

Jun 97 .12567 .1250 .12540 14774 

Sep 97 .12100 .12060 .12087 wm 

Dttte .11640 .11625 .1^ 

saw+.s*-r%— 

£18 

l«c97 9XOI 72.96 9Z99 -nm wxw 
92JK (Mai. 

0-01 46X47 

iw% xrs zsrr. -r 0J1 31155 


UNLEADQ2CASOUNE (NMER) 

42X00 pal. CMOS par gal _ '■* 

-tal 97 63J0 62X0 63.10 +979 435511 

AW77 42J0 61X0 61J5 +0J0 UX» i, 

Sep 97 41X0 60.70 6L20 +0J5 SJB j 

0097 *85 1198 

MwW 5*65 58X5 SXS +0JS 1,737 

DecW, 5770 1956 

Est. sides NA FW* sales 42JS7 
FtfsepenW- 78X86 off 4447 
CMOIXOPE) 

Ui. doAors par meMrton - tats of >00 tens 
Jon 97 174J0 I71JS 174J0 +158 1M49 
JU197 17125 173J0 175125 *1J0 11JP v 
AU#97 177J»175J» 177J0 +1J5 1128 
Sep97 17BXO 177J0 179JM +1X0 c. 

OtJ97 IfiOSO 17175 181 JO +1J0 4X1B 
Nw97 182JO 18050 1*225 +1J0 130 
Doc 97 18100 181.25 18380 +1X0 7X02 
Est. srieKI 1555. OpSi tetri4X09 up 380 




i:- x 


■■ 3 








mmm 


MW98 STS i 9 

Jim 98 

92X9 92X6 92X9 + 0J1 a 
D«98 92X3 92X1 92X4 + OJ1 2 
30952. Pnev. sales: sli m 
P m. open ML: 531270 off 354 


BRENT OIL aPE) 

UJS. dollars per banal -lots oflJOO bomb 
July 97 19X2 19JJ 19X2 +ai2 61, Ml 
AU097 19J1 19X6 19J9 +8.10 42,77® 
Sep 97 1978 19X7 19X8 +089 12X39 

Od97 19X0 19X0 19.70 +007 8J2S 
N*w97 1976 19X8 19J0 +087 4181 

0«97 19.7® IMS +0J7 ll.« • 
Jon98 1970 19X0 19X0 +OM 

F*b98 N.T. N.T. 19X4 +009 4660 

Ea safe 23^3 Open U161X7* Off 622 


■ "i?c j 

1 f 

_ . *• 1 - * » 4^ 

:■ ** 
- - >f * 7* 4J 


' ?-! % w 


"Ji 


WWffTTHEUROMAlUC OJFFE] 
DM1 wriniMi- nfKfii imapi ^ 


Stock indexea 
SB** COMP. INDEX (CMBQ 

3»xh«tax \ 

Jon 97 8S3.9Q B4L00 851 JO +*te 1&7» i 


DMlmnoo-ptlOflOOpri 

jtejT 96X1 96 l 79 96J0 UnefL 7162K4 
J«I97 96JB 9*38 96JB UMk GW 
»B-85!_T0I 


Stock Tables Explained 


weekbutnanielatesrto(Srigdoy.WliBeospHorsloakdMderriimuirilngte2SpeicBntarnm 
te been paid Pie rears NqIHow tooge aid dhtdend orestetamfar He dm steda onlf. Unless 
amenriso nried rains of (Mttends an onnuol tOsbureemn* toted on to lateri deeffnaSaiL 
o ■ (fivideno also extra (s). b - annual rate of (fiviOefid (Hus stock dMdeML C- IkmNJallng 
dlwtend- cc - PE excMd999.eU - called, d - new yearly Im*. dd - loss In 1t» Wt 12 monttls. 
a - dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 months, f - annual rata increased on km 
dedarallon. g - dividend in Canaifian tends, subject to 1 SX, non-midenfie in. i- fiWdend 
dectomdaftnrsplit-up or stock (ffvldend. i - dhridendpaid thb yoor. omUted. deferred, or no 
action taken at latest tBvWend mcotino. k - dividend dedared or paid IWs year, on 
acamuiloilw Issue wffh dividends in aneare. m ■ amwol rata induced on Iasi deck] ration, 
n - new issue In the past 52 weeks. The tngti-loir ranfle begbts wflh Hie skrt ot trading, 
nd ■ next day deffvery. p - initial (fivrdeftd annual rate unknanm. P/E - prtee-eomlnos ratta. 
q -domd-end mutual fund r- dividend dedared or paid In preceding 12 months, plus slock 
r&vl Send- S- stock spa Dividend beginsiwltti dole of spa sis- soles. 1 -tflvtdand paid in 
stock |n preceding IQ morths. sstWiflteiV ctoh vokic on e».dWWend or ra-ctaWbunan oata. 
u- new yearly high.«- tradiag haffed. vl - In bankruptcy orrecoivonMparbelng leoreaniind 
under the Bankruptcy Ad, or securlftes assumed by sodi companies. wd-wnfflidlsMbutott 
wj - wtien iS6u«VWW - wBti warronK x - ex-dhrideod or ax-rights, xdb - ra-disWbirttan. 
XW - yntlwut wtrraris. y- ax-dhrktend and sales In hAL yld - yield, z - sates In fufl. 


Food 

COCOA (NCE} 

* w& " S IW ton 

Juire 1467 1445 WJ _28 

'480 um -16 

ISS ,SM ■ ,su -n 

Jtarre 1552 ISO IMS —16 
1563 — M 

Jul 91 ijn 

.6.79* Fri'S-nHS 6.143 

Frreemnim ssjoo off » 

03FfE£C (NC5E) 

KxL - (nn dct ki 

JulW 37500 2*7J0 25US -42X5 
rare 71100 224X5 -075 

ISIS WHO 171.95 — T.fS 
Movte ITOJO I 54 JB ujjg —20 
Eri. sales 12.930 FrltasMs lll« 
FWiupenlnr mm qr isu 

SUCAIMWRLDll fNCSE) 
riWper to. 

ittm H-S U »J 11<U +0.17 

BiBjB 85 


10 YIL TREASURY (CBOT) 
neojos prv+- pfi g. Anas a* in oa 

SUSIE'S I®' 13 W -2> *04 

SepWW7.B 104-28 107-05 +01 

Dec 97 lQb-n 

BIL soles NA Ws. soles iisxs 
Frfs Open ini 359X11 up 71 K) 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT3 
? & oi loo p« 

JwreiM-14 109-25 118-04 ,n 

S!- n ,WL » +ia 

Dk 97 1D9-M tOT-fld 107-11 +u 
Morn in-29 

^sries NA Frys. sates £*ia 
RrrsDpenim mum up 9121 


Junre 85X90 846.00 551 JO 
SepW 0050 BSSJD 8S9X8 tUX VM 
Dec 77 MX8 06650 8ft» +W* 108 
*a«S NA FrTs. sate* WW30 
Fri'i Open Irf 38TJ91 UP SOW 




■*.» -vi or 


££S$UndL^ 

^P»0 IM7 96JM 9AJ5 
gee 98 9&S1 9SJ7 9S79 
Mar 9? 95X5 95X2 9SJ3 
■bra *9 95J9 95L26 9127 

«awp- PwAsoies: istiso 


CACAO CMATIF) 

9f3 +SS *n3m 


s 

'•* ■* .-•« 


-, -W..+ 


LIBOR 1-MONTH (CMER) 
OMUon- pa « laopct. 

JunW 9U0 9427 9430 
■W 97 BUS 94a 9624 

M«« 9UD X17 94.10 

JJA . g«- ««« 5JW 
Frrsopeninf 35X08 up 7243 


E 3LiaiEc 8094a Prav. sates: 155,150 
Prav. open Wj 1X71773 op I®b 

JonW^Si£l»ml2^J + 4J0 42X94 
Jul 97 26143249SJ 2569J 

^Sates: 41578. Open kit: 71X37 off 


160X19. Open to*: 285X77 off 4S 




OJFFE) 
C»*P.-JcgAa2nd8L. 
2-ai 12-1X11 


+.M1 94983 


Rt nnl«i - 1 la ~ 16 UndL 2ZL839 


isja on 

*J* pWTH E UROURA (LlPFgi 
ircimnan-ptBorioOK} 

@ 9 B i-ffi S 

sg-gg IS 

^,*2“ *w*- Prev-soteK WX6S^ 
Prav- open int; 328X03 


Jjra^«»jfSmX4550fl-71X 
SepW 4677J46KJ4582L5— S® &S 
DOC97 4694J 4694J4633J0— 72J 532 

soles; 19X39. Pwv-K*Kl7Jt9 
Prav. open kAs 7SJ44 off 887 


v 


Commodity Indexes 


*;r; t y 

• • <r n *1 

• « ri A It 

■+' *■ w > i+ 


g«K ! „S4 

ou.™,™ «g gg 

■ JoKOsrs^AsaocMeaPtesitMi^" 1 V 
Futures Eadtano*^ 
NMtohHuaEadmiga. 


y st nr 


. tete.--.5te 




^ 'V ’ * -* 

n t 

5- a* ar rem- - .j* 

n *2 1 £ 





i 


r 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY JUNE 3 , 1997 



EUROPE 


Lockheed and Russia 
Link Up in Satellite 
And Phone Venture 


>; CMfM^O^SaffFrtmtDdpa^Ki 

MOSCOW — The new joint ven- 
i turebylatet^mtnikafRnssiaandan 
I' international subsidiary of Lode- 
heed Martin Carp. will become a 
okey rival of other international tele- 
v commonicatioas companies, die 
- ; head of Intersputoik said Monday. 

{. ■ "I think leading inter natio nal 
•-telecommunication firms may far** 
difficulties in competing with the 
- new joint venture,*' its general di- 
i .rector, Gennadi Kudryavstev, said. 

He said Lockheed Martin Iota--' 
sputnik Ltd., which will be baaed in 
; London, planned to launch the first 


?1 


Daimler Denies 
Talk of a Stall 
In Airbus Plan 

Bloomberg News 

LONDON — Airbus Indus- 
trie's plan to turn itself into a 
stand-alone company is on 
track despite press repeats that 
the process Iras stalled, one of 
the group’s biggest sharehold- 
-ers said Monday. 

Daimler-Benz Aerospace 
AC, which owns 38 percent of 
the aircraft maker, said there had 
been “no change” in the 
strategy set forth in January, 
when Airbus's chief sharehold- 
ers agreed to make die company 
a single entity by 1999. 

The remark suggested that 
there had been no delay in the 
timing of die restructuring, as 
reported by the German news- 
paper Welt am Soontag. The 
paper said a May 27 meeting of 
Airbus’s directors had decided 
to postpone die action. 

Theodor Benien, a spokes- 
man for Daimler-Benz, said be 
expected that “this can be real- 
ized” by 1999. 

Airbus . referred questions 
over the story to its primary 
shareholders, including Aero- 
spatiale of France ana British 
Aerospace PLC. Neither had an 
immediate comment. 


Lockheed Martin A210Q satellite on 
a Russian-made Proton booster in 
late 1998. 

“The probe will provide South- 
east Asia, die Middle East and Rus- 
sian regions with telecommunica- 
tions services," be said. 

Mr. Kudryavstev said the venr 
tore’s first board meeting would 
held this month in Moscow. He de- 
clined to say how much money his 
company had invested in -die ven- 
ture, which Lockheed Martin In- 
ternational has said will generate 
$300 millio n to $500 milH onin an- 
nual sales by 2001. 

The former Soviet Union formed 
Intersputruk in 1971 as a multina- 
tional effort to provide telecommu- 
nications services, mainly to such 
Communist countries as Cuba, Po- 
land and die Czech Republic. It has 
22 members and competes with In- 
telsat, a Washington-based interna- 
tional telecommunications network 
tlnti has 139 member countries. 

‘Tatersputmk, through and 
its member countries, has access to a 
number of excellent orbital locations, 

entire world,” 
said Cynthia Boeke, editor of Vk 
Sa tellite magarine jo Maryland. 

The satellite locations that Inter- 
sputnik has reserved with the In- 
ternational Telecommunication Un- 
ion are directly over the Equator, an 
advantageous location. 

If the venture can launch 15 satel- 
lites and lease space on tbemfor 
voice, video, data and fax services, 
said Brian Dailey, a vice president of 
Lockheed, annual sales could surge 
to $1.5 billion in five to 10 years. 

Lockheed refused to say what 

utalfft it hwd in %. v w'hnw | ^iimrMg 

have said it would have about 70 
percent The venture is Ihe latest 
move by Lockheed Martin to 
strengthen its ties with Rmm ft 
started working with Moscow sev- 
eral years ago, leading to a joint effort 
to the Proton i»nnrfi vehicle. 
Last year, Lodcbeed said it would use 
Russian pn its new Adas 

rockets. The venture is part of a 
growing number of partnerships be- 
tween Russia and companies in sev- 
eral other countries, including the 
United States. ( Reuters , WP, 

NYT, AP, Bloomberg) 


Balance Sheets: Hot Coutafe 


Bloomberg News 

MILAN — Italy's top fashion 
designers are putting the finishin g 
flourishes on mar most important 
creations to date — their balance 
sheets — in anticipation oi initial 
public stock offerings. 

Afteryears of running their cou- 
ture and ready-to-wear Bouses like 
family firms, Giorgio Armani, Gi- 
anni Versace, Valentino, Cerruti 
1881 and Gianfranco Ferre are 
considering initial public offerings 
to take advantage of investor de- 
mand for luxury-goods makers. 

The success of offerings by 
Gucci Group NV and Bulgan SpA 
in the past two years has made it 
clear to designers that investors are 
as wflling to snap up their stocks as 
movie stars are Co don. their fancy 
gowns on Oscar night 

“The boom in financial assets 
worldwide has created a lot of 
wealth, and when that happens, 
people buy more Porsches and 
fancy clothes than they buy car- 
amels,” Pio Benetti, an equity as- 
set manage?- at Ducato Gestioni in 
Milan, said. 

Last year, fashion was net only 
one of the sexiest industries in Italy 


ro 
-Tper- 


butalso one of the 
an 
cent 

Fashion ocuutB tuee.7. 1 percent 
last year, to 26 trillion lire ($15.4 
billion), according to the trade 
group Moda Industrie. That 
brought a surplus of 18 trillion lire 
to Italy’s trade balance. * 

Giuseppe Modenese, vice pres- 
ident of Milan’s Chamberof Fash- 
ion, said, “The great interest of the 
financial wo rld m I talian fashion g 
connected, to the amazing devel- 
opment, practically without a blip, 
over the past 20. years of names 
I ilra Versace, Armani and Ferre.' ’ 

Yet the path to public ownership 
is a long catwalk for many RaHan 
designers — especially those that 
fanned out important aspects of 
their businesses, including retail 
stores, to licensees and other 
companies. 

Just last week, the designer 
Romeo Gigli his company 
was in talks to be acquired. 'while 
the designer’s clothes and jeans 
grace the figures of many a fashion 
buff on the streets of Paris and 
New York, years of mismanage- 
ment left Mr. Gigli’s company in 


poarfinaucfal shape andwfeb only, 
two stores of its own. j / V.. * 

Bruce Beffiore, an investment 
banker ja'Gallo Advisories in M> 
hm l wirf- * ^Designers have to dean' 
up then aces, jest like industrial , 
companies going public db. That' 
means' they have to ope** up to 

financial anrtitnr g and .’think in 

terms of minority shareholders — 
.not an busy fade/* . 

Over the past few years, Italy's 
top designers, have brought in 
bankers and advisers to dean up 
their accounts and simplify the way 
their companies are structured. 

Tbose mat have m&de the j u mp 
to public ownership have been well 
rewarded fix their efforts. Shares of 

the Rome-based jeweler Sulgari 

have surged 372 perceniriccetiieir 
debut in July 1995. Gucci, toe 
Florence-based leather-goods and 
clothing maker, has seen its duties 
soar 323 percent since its October 
1995 offering.' 

Of course, trends in fashion can 
fade, and what is hot one year is out- 
toe next Add that mix to the volatile 
wodd of growth-stock investing, 
and the risk of getting burned is as 
high as toe potential f 


Halifax Debut Sees Record Trading 


Coo%*kdbr &*• Staff From Dt&Bdaa 

LONDON — Halifax PLC be- 
came die third-largest British bank- 
ing company Monday when toe 
mortgage-leading giant floated its 
shares on the stock exchange. 

Shares in Halifax opened at 7745 
pence ($12.67) a share, far above toe 
most optimistic forecasts, though 
they finished at 7345 on record 
volume of 700 millio n shares. By 
comparison, total trading on die 
London exchange averaged about 


900 million shares a day over the 
past six months. 

The successful debut made Hal- 
ifax, which was founded in 1853, 
Britain’s eighth-largest listed com- 
pany, below British Telecommuni- 
cations PLC, with a market value of 
almost £185 billion. 

The stock’s surge produced a 
windfall for the 55 millio n Halifax 
members. To change its status, Hal- 
ifax turned members into sharehold- 
ers by distributing free shares to 


toftrry “ft’s a s forming start for Hal- 
ifax, but the question is bow long it 
will hold these levels,” Philip Har- 
ris, an investment manager at Albert 
E. Sharp in Birmingham, «n«t. 

Analysts said the pace of the 
shares was higher than most valu- 
ations of the company based on fun- 
damental earnings analysis. They 
said the surge reflected demand by 
pension funds and others who 
needed to add Halifax shares to their 
portfolios. ( Bloomberg , AFP ) 


Price Fall Widens Grundig’s Loss 6°/o 


AFX News 

FUERTH, Germany — Gnindig AG said Monday 
that its net loss for 19% widened 6 percent, to 631 
millio n Deutsche marks ($377.8 million), from 1995 
because of higher provisions and falling prices. 

Sales fell 6 percent, to 3 j billion DM, and operating 
losses increased 33 percent, to 382 million DM. 

But the German consumer electronics company said 


j a loss of less 
than 100 milli on' DM for 1997. Gnindig also said it 
would restructure the company in three stages. 

Gnindig had predicted m March a 1996 net loss of 
only 553 millio n DM. 

Philips Electronics NV «nnnnnr«d this year that it 
was withdrawing financial support for Gnmdig after 
pumping money into the company since 1984. 


Source; Telekom 


IntemoiioaaJ Herald Ttitaac 


Very briefly: 


• El A1 Israel Air-fines should be completely privatized by toe 
end of 1998, according to a government plan. Ten percent of 
the offering will be sold at a 5) percent discount to employees. 
The government will maintain a block of controlling shares in 
order to protect national interests after the sale. 

• AO Avttivaz, Russia’s biggest carmaker, plans to raise 
funds by issuing American depositary receipts and Euro- 
bonds. The company needs billions of dollars to upgrade its 
models and pay off debts to toe government 

•The European Commission approved a deal to end a 
dispute, over Norwegian salmon im p o rts. There will be no EU 
anti -dumping duty, but the five-year deal includes a minimum 
price and a rise in toe export dnty oa Norwegian salmon. Oslo 
also agreed to limit export growth to about 10 percent a year. 

• Condor Flugdienst GmbH, toe package-tour airline unit of 
Deutsche Lufthansa AG, said pretax profit fell 25 percent, to 
108 miliu m Deutsche marks. ($64.7 million) in 1996 as fuel 
costs rose and jprices stagnated. Condor carried 6.46 million 
passengers, a nse of 7 percent Revenue rose 3 percent to 2.1 
billion DM. 

• Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co. said the 
French gove r n m ent approved its plan to unite its En glish 
Channel ferry service with that of Stena Line AB. The deal 
still needs clearance from toe British government and toe 
European Commission. 

• Amer Oy, the Finnish company that owns the sporting 
goods brands Wilson and Atomic, said Lord Moyne, or 
Jonathan Guinness of toe British brewing family, would pay 
301 milli on markkaa ($58.7 million) for a controlling voting 
stake in the company. 

• De Beers of South Africa said about $150 milli on worth of 
Russian diamonds that it owned and was trying to export were 
being held by customs officials for inspection. 

Bloomberg, Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Mtfi lorn On Pm. 


M 


Monday* Ji u>e.Z 

Prices In local cunendes. 
TeMntrs 

Mgb Low aow 


Deurtdw Bmk 
DNtTdEJmo 
DHsdntr Bct* 


Amsterdam 


ABN-AMRO 


AEXtadec 807X8 
PmtaK7MJ7 


l.Atao Nobet 
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Bab Western 
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Bo*dnM 
DSM 
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IMG Group 
KLM 
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Koratadt 


Unde 
Lufltiaaa 
MAN 


1SS50 
Mandi RoeckR 4*50 
Prcussog 461 

RWs 7AM 

SAPOtt 3T3 

Sdrnring 177 JO 
SGI. Carbon 254 

Sternea* 97 JO 

SpriogattoeO 1510 

Suadzucter 897 

Ttarssen 392 

Vabo 97.15 

VEW 51* 

Vtag 780 

VoKEWogen 1129 



12525 12150 .136X5 12&S) 
4BJ0 4L50 4S 50 MS) 
5£5fi 5450 55JS 5475 
5BIC- • • • 205 300 ■ JOS 200 

Boer Oat* 7425 74 . 74 74 


Hite U* OOH Pm. 

teteiUi* 445 451 445 470 

Vodotane U3 2J0 Z71 2J1 

Wttttnod 757 705 757 754 

WBmiHda 115 no in -ui 

Vtoterfey 449 440 445 4J5 

WPPGram 2X4 2X0 144 2X0 

1050 1558 1558 1154 


Kite tew Dm pim. 


tew aw pm. 


Kuala Lumpur 


AMMBHdgt 
Carting 


1410 
1X30 
27 JO 

NWiMSMpF 4 

940 

_ 1340 

:Bk 358 

020 

Rothmans PM 27 JO 

Slrae Dartw &AS 

TmsKoaiMal TZ70 

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U«&igino*ra 2090 

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231.10 


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r'AdvUoSw: 

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177 173 ITS 17S 

220 216 716 220 

3025 fflJO 2050 2975 
324 318 322 IB 

528 510 S18 534 

115 131 131 132 

29 JO 2875 2* 2X75 

3575 3425 3875 3825 
127 124 124 122 

115 111 112 113 


Helsinki hex 


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HuhtandUl 

Kemka 

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MteaB 

Mtba-SmkiB 

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47 

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226 221 JO 

224 

226 

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51 

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50.10 

73 

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1790 

17 JO 

17X0 

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145 14BJ0 

146 

42.10 

41X8 

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131 

135 

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347 339 JO 34£J0 334X0 

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300 

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104 

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104 111 JO 

12050 

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Hong Kong 


Bumamm 

Camay PodBc 
OwmgKonB | 
CKMmtnjd 


To Our Readers 


Due to technical problems 
‘at the source, Bombay stock 
prices were not available for 


Brussels 

fitssid 

CBR 

Si*" 

. rlhdraSna 
'Porte AG 
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i-GBL 

‘•Gen Banova 
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Pmfcxrc 224777 
14075 15975 14000 15950 
5330 4250 4300 4300 
9900 9510 9720 9510 
3320 3220 3300 3205 

14400 14250 14350 14200 
1805 1750 1805 1755 

7900 7B40 78S0 

3570 3550 3570 

#950 OS90 4890 
3100 3085 3100 
5750 5448 5738 
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12475 12400 1149) 1MJ0 
«75 4*70 4990 4965 
1 Q 250 10050 I 0 HW raw 
3350 3255 3280 3258 
21700 213» 21500 21300 
15SB 155M 15575 15475 
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5420 

13975 13925 
14400 14525 
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£95 

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190 

8X0 

78J5 

78.75 

28X0 

28X0 

11X5 

11X5 

11X5 

11X5 

80X5 

79 

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79J0 


7455 

74J5 

41X0 

39.10 

41X0 

3BJ0 

46J0 

44X0 

4590 

44X0 

<3 JO 

39X0 

43 JO 

»B 

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*90 

9.95 

995 

15.15 

14X0 

l£10 

14X0 

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93 

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77 JO 

7£50 

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7590 

13.95 

13X0 

1190 

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28X0 

2790 

78X0 

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1795 

17.15 

17X5 

17X0 

£35 

235 

4XD 

231 


433 

735 

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20.10 

19.90 

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5050 

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4110 

2X8 

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7X5 

7X6 

7X5 

170 

2X0 

7X5 

97X5 

9£M 

97X5 

9SJ0 

£30 

5X0 

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£» 

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9 

9X5 

7 JO 

7X0 

7X5 

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3650 

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19X0 

19.10 

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447 

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535 

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423 

1030 

7.13 

348 

12^1 

7Sa 

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402 

735 

Ut 

1^ 

443 

2JH 

1040 

1J5 

115 

150 

142 


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3J8 

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GKN 

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GRE 

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Gas 
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kapl Taboos 


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Marts Sptsmsr 
me PC 

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NdtPoiia- 


Copenhagen 

v BG Bank 304 300 303 302 

CatabwaB 395 3B1A2 m 38S 

Codon ran 900 885 891.69 900 

Damco 3B9 383 387 386 

Den Donate Bk 420 4|4 420 6)842 

Q^amSrgB 340000 340000 34QM0 Uan 
O/S 1912 B 235900 225000 235000 227000 

’r FL5 Ind B 1060 1040 1060 1050 

Am 

j s a s 

k.Tryo BcdEOi 3034 350 355 3 S 6 

UMdoonwfcA 342 334 3 C 348 


Jakarta 

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B4 Negara 
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499.73 
PnataKR 4*488 


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4725 
2050 
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10850 
3050 
. 5525 

7258 

10QS0 

5825 

4125 


4450 

1*75 

1400 

10550 

3025 

5500 

7100 

9750 

5700 

4050 


4700 4450 
2000 KCC 
169> 1490 

KOTO 10500 
MS) 3000 
SCO 5473 
212 

9800 9<25 
5700 5B0D 
4075 4100 


11JS 

152 

4J0 

143 

9J» 

349 

1045 

12J3 

075 

172 
181 
445 

173 
149 
541 

19 J» 
117 
185 
720 
140 
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1.93 

5.U 

124 

14JI9 

129 

151 

7J2 

743 

107 

451 

7J3 

UU 


FT-fE18k 4548Ji 


843 842 

428 432 

173 6X0 

4.11 4.13 

I. 19 UD 

54* SJ2 
4J7 447 

II. 18 11 JO 

743 748 
1* £44 

348 3JB 
4JB 4.15 
18JS 1027 

431 43| 

138 2L39 

1033 1033 
132 193 

2X4 2X6 

£95 19 * 

139 734 

142 147 

1J2 153 

07 431 

157 UI 

10J0 1043 
1J2 1J2 

495 £10 

540 541 

SJ8 £25 
US 4JI 
474 477 

3J0 33) 

£ ^ 
1148 1145 
542 541 

430 477 
141 1X3 

474 475 

340 345 

MJ8 1063 
12J0 1120 
US 165 
544 548 

123 177 

454 454 

£47 £69 

643 644 

£57 159 


Premier Panel 
Piwtarffal 
RottrKk 


RacW 


Johannesburg » iMwteb g*>” 


fertfikjM 

RntesHdge 

SJcGawp 

'£88* 


Amrtgentd fits 
AngioAaCoal 

WS2S 

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Frankfurt 

~.AM8B 
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Umwg 
Attma 
BkBertn 
- BASF 


_ □ AX' 3(0542 
Pmten: 354744 


6 ’ 

*■ CnmMnbank 
DrtnhrBera 
Oagtma 


1640 

182JO 

346 

1575 

3955 

64P0 
55 
72.10 
4 M5 
94J0 
4093 
1412 
1<4 
49 
ma 
BtH 


1^ 

3050 

ISS5 

38.W 

6115 

mo 

7000 

67.12 

92 

4050 

1392 

166 

AOS 

13240 

83 


1439 1425 
18U5 17W8 
36SJ0 3(1 JO 
1560 1576 

39 39.15 
64J0 43 

54JO 54J5 
71.90 7030 
47 JS 4025 
9350 71 

4150 A 
1404 139* 
144 . 16S 
OJO 5020 
13180 131 JO 
8195 BOS 


CG.SmA 

Da Been 

OrfetaMi 

FttNaABK 

Cenoor 

GRA 

MpeiUlMpi 

IbteaCoa) 

JatmniKlna 

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Bco Unho Hfrp 4473 

Baa rapifla- 30690 

BcDSattmcfcT 12440 

CEPSA 5080 

Cjxtioarte 2790 

Cora Mate* 7700 

Ewksa 11170 

FEC5A 1275 

Go* Natan) 7*950 

ttw dwi u 1715 

Pryai 2910 

fisrad 6170 

SmdlanaEfeC 1400 

Tabocatam 7400 

TaJBfaDlca 4230 

Union Fenae* 1290 

VWteC Crate* XUS 


Ayala B 

AfaiaLand 

HPMkM 


PM Long OW 
SwiMfeualB 
SMPrimaHdg 


Mexico ■■•te 


AM A 47.25 

BonoodB 1752 
CmO>Q 2950 
OmC 1254 

EmpModeraa 39.10 
GpoCanoAl <£QS 
T~rn rnrrwr 1J3 
GooHitnbarto Z74S 
KfebOwfcMm 2745 
ToMmCPO 115J0 
IrtMnL 1754 



P5E 

taOte; 2830X3 


PMtttetMM 

30 

19X5 

30 

20 

21X5 

2DJ5 

21 

23 

164 

162 

143 

143 

TO 

9X0 

10 

10 

93 

91 JO 

92 

92 

5*0 

SIS 

590 

595 

730 

7.M 

7X0 

7X0 

316 

260 

265 257 JO 

810 

770 

80S 

780 

79 

78JQ 

7BJ0 

79 JO 

7X0 

7X0 

7 JO 

7 JO 


U U3 U5 UD 
9 JO 096 925 8.99 

1920 1BJH 19.15 IBM 
427 4.16 423 4.19 

2351 2345 1350 Z155 
14J1 1388 1X96 14.13 
1£* 1520 1£35 1520 
6J0 £14 626 £13 

756 7 JO 756 7 JO 

21 JO 7124 ZUS 2153 
483 426 483 482 

255 257 254 158 

124 120 124 1J0 

11H 1110 1115 .1115 
26 JO 36 2625 26X2 
188 183 187 186 

188* 1855 1881 1821 
U4 189 153 US 

£89 £81 58* £83 

177 353 326 357 

48*" W 18 W 
7J2 £95 7J2 £97 

L04 788 002 BX3 

051 823 033 049 

7.19 7X7 7.12 7.13 

11.13 1085 11X6 11X9 
£06 4X1 4X3 4XB 


The Trib Index 

Jwi. 1. 1982 -100. iW ‘ 

WortdlndBK — ttftOB-*'— 


125.11 

171.76 

192.92 

158.47 

203.74 
185-73 
197.04 
123.79 
189^8 
181.78 

157.74 
142-92 


Prices as at 3:00 PM New Yak am. 
Y. Chang* 


yawtoctete 

. . %ctanga 

MX72 fO.44 • +11^5 


Askt/PaaOo 
Europe 
N. America 
& America 
ImhiatiW bKtexas 
Capital goods 
Consumer goods 
Energy 
Finance • 
MbceBsneous 
Raw Materials 
Service 
umies ■ . 


+156 

+ 0.21 

+0^8 

+1.15 

+0.90 

+058 

+1.99 

+0.83 

♦1.78 

•O.IO 

+034 

+ 0 - 88 . 


+ 1.10 

+ 0.12 

♦0.35 

+0.73 

+0.44 

+0.15 

+ 1.02 

+0.68 

♦1.07 

-0.05 

+ 0.22 

+0.62 


+1.36 

+635 

+19.15 

+38.49 

+1920 

+15-05 

+15.42 

+629 

+4.70 

+3.« 

+1437 

-0-38 


77w MamaHonat Mote/ Tribune Worid Slock Max C tracks me (J.S. OoBar vatuas of 
SeOhtomaitonaBylnvoaabtosackatrcni26cainttfa3. Fo rnwnlntoma i ian J afr9e 
taaMW fs awriaUa by writing « T7w Trib Max, 181 Avmue entries de Qrnria, 
e2S2! NMriyCwtax. France. • Compiod Oy Bloomberg News. | 


39*734 



Sao Paulo 


i*nmWwii 

BteteteH 


nmw 


Milan 


Mil 


Bn< 

BcaRdauasa 
Bend tana 


1802 18X2 
LOB £12 
323 173 

489 
2J0 2J9 

885 9 

243 146 

412 415 

£36 £83 

144 1JI 
5X1 5X4 

£13 £16 

1351 1351 
2JS 125 
5.12 £13 

7 JO 7J6 
7 JO 7J5 
1X4 2X5 

£37 £41 

7X3 7.15 

1J0 UO 

642 £42 

455 422 
£93 6X1 

£36 £36 

US 4JQ 
451 154 

122 123 

4 £81 

133 2J3 

£76 £86 


WJ5 1052 
456 


3X4 phi 

ll* si 


Genesis Ai* 
W. 

(NA 

viiSkti 


RAS 


StatTete 

sw 

TrtacenMo 

TIM 


10930 

10700 

10880 

3340 

3290 

3300 

4400 

4300 

4380 

1TJ0 

im 

1203 

23950 

23350 

33500 

2545 

2495 

2S45 

8060 

mo 

8000 

0146 

8460 

8916 

5690 

5505 

5650 

79300 

28700 

79208 

15050 

14750 

14940 

2385 

2350 

2355 

5325 

5155 

5280 

7400 

7200 

7345 

MOJO 

*515 

9730 

1066 

1030 

lose 

495 

485 

490JD 

2445 

23*0 

2435 

3/70 

3440 

3770 

13100 

12850 

13010 

17200 

W10 

17820 

won 

HMD 

10630 

1605 

I400 

S5X 

4480 

4M0 

467S 

5040 

«80 

5000 


12158X1 

H 887 JQ 

10780 

3335 

4365 

1206 

23700 

2520 

8030 

8450 

san 

29000 

14820 

2340 

52)5 

7290 

9635 

1035 

493 

2415 

3690 

12900 

17070 

106H 

830 

4645 

4970 


JPM OM 851 8X0 854 

iPW 777JM 760X0 764X0 777X0 

I PM 5050 49X0 50J0 49J0 

CESPPU 60JD 59X0 S9XT 6020 

Court 15J0 15X0 15X0 15J0 

artebrae^ 509X0 50SX0 509X0 «SXC 

BoubancoPfd 560X1 5S0X0 560X0 5gX0 

tSwrtda* 538X0 535X0 S3SL90 S3SJ0 

351X0 350X0 351X0 351X9 
I P« 258J0 253X0 253J0 256X0 

158.00 15£9b 157X0 15640 

3£60 3£20 3£50 35X0 
1015 9X5 H.10 . 9X6 

148X0 14750 14080 147J0 

170.00 143X0 16659 161X6 

166.01 16450 166X0 16SX0 
368X0 362X0 361® 367X0 

37X0 3658 3640 3£99 

_. U4 1.U U5 1.14 

CVROPM 23JO -2350 8350 2345 


Seoul 

Dmai 101000 95000 99500 

Daewoo Heavy 8180 7458 700 
HnadrtEog. 221 *0 20100 D200 
K& Motor* 16800 15700 16100 
Korea B Pwr 28600 27000 28500 

Kc«MTd 419000 3760OT 400000 1 

\8£fr*-K»m 

S22 tss 

$2S5& 




Tokyo 



lMtert 125 ,8481X5 


Prortam. raowxi 

1220 

1170 

1220 

1170 

767 

754 

766 

7 65 

4410 

4420 

4420 

4490 

700 

765 

710 

761 

669 

461 

669 

648 

1140 

1140 

1160 

1130 


Singapore 


Prertm: 2*4141 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


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PAGE 15 : 


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Hanbo Chief Gets Prison Term 

Scandal Created ‘Chaos’ in South Korea, Judge Says 


Yon Sail BMgWiutcn 

Chung Tae Soo at his sentencing hearing Monday. 


By Sonni Efron 

Los Angeles Tunes Servic e 

A court in Seoul sentenced the former chairman of the 
collapsed Hanbo conglomerate, a former South Korean 
cabinet member and eight other business people and politi- 
cians to prison terms Monday. 

“Your wrongdoing has caused agreat shock to the Korean 
people, harm to the country's economy and chaos in so- 
ciety,” Chief Judge Son Ji Yol told Chung Tae Soo. 74, the 
patriarch of Hanbo Group. 

Mr. Chung, who suffered a stroke after his arrest, was 
sentenced to IS years in prison. His son, Chung Bo Keun, the 
current Hanbo chairman, was sentenced to three years. 

The Chungs and the others sentenced Monday were 
expected to appeal to South Korea’s Supreme Court. 

Prosecutors had sought a 20-year term for the elder Mr. 
Chung, who has been convicted twice of bribery but has 
refused to name those to whom he gave his trademark apple 
crates stuffed with cash. 

Hanbo Steel & General Construction Co., a subsidiary of 
Hanbo Group, South Korea’s 14th-largest conglomerate, 
collapsed in January, with debts of $5.8 billion. The court 
heard evidence that Mr. Chong had made payoffs totaling 
millions of dollars to bankers and to senior lawmakers of 
both parties in exchange for loans to the overextended steel 
company. 

Prosecutors, saying they had tracked the trail of corruption 
to President Kim Young Sam's closest aides, last month 
arrested the president's son Kim Hyun ChuL 

Opposition leaders have alleged that Mr. Chung was a 


major donor to Mr. Kim's 1992 election campaign and to the 
campaign of a disgraced former president, Koh Tae Woo. 
But Mr. Kim has refused to identify his campaign donors; he 
said in a speech Friday that it would be impossible to sort out 
such financial details five yearn after the election. 

“Our society should use this opportunity to break from a 
past where morality and reasoning were lacking,' ’ Judge Son 
told tfaedefendants, “and move toward a better economy and 
society." 

Nine people in addition to the two Chungs eight people were 
given prison sentences, and four were fined in addition. 

Kim Woo Suk, a former minister of home affairs, was 
sentenced to four years in prison. Hong In Gil, a lawmaker 
from the president’s New Korea Party, was given a seven- 
year sentence and lined $1.1 million, the amount the court 
found he had accepted in bribes. Two other New Korea Party 
lawmakers drew three-year terms and fines. 

Kwon Roh Kap of the opposition National Congress for 
New Politics was sentenced to five years in prison and fined. 
Three former presidents of Korea Fust Bank and of Chohung 
Bank, all of whom were convicted of accepting bribes in 
exchange for loans 10 Hanbo Steel, were handed four-year or 
five-year terms. Hanbo’s former controller was given a two- 
year sentence that was suspended for four years. 

Initial public reaction indicated that South Koreans still did 
not believe prosecutors had done enough about corruption. 

“If the prosecutors end the Hanbo investigation with this 
sentencing," said Kang Yong Foo, a financial worker, ‘ ‘the 
next administration will have to reinvestigate the case, 
because we still don’t know who pressured the banks to loan 
and why." 




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3 Dividend 
Will Rise 
, At Leaner 
Nippon Life 

Cat^Onl fn- Osr Sutf Fran Dapacha 

TOKYO — Nippon Life Insur- 
ance Co. said Monday it would raise 
its dividend for the first time in 
seven years, breaking with a de- 
cades-old practice in which the sev- 
en major Japanese life insurers all 
fix payouts at the same leveL 

A spokesman for Nippon Life, the 
biggest Japanese life insurer, said it 
would increase its dividend pay- 
ments to individual policyholders 
for the year that ended March 31. 

“It is the direction we are fol- 
Z1 i lowing,'’ the spokesman said, adding 
* that details of the increase would be 
made public next Monday when top 
life insurance companies are to re- 
lease their earnings for the year. 

The spokesman said the increase 
reflected the fact that the company 
hStf-nearly finiSHHTTOlH&g'OfF its 
bad loans and had managed to re- 
_I duce costs through restructuring, in- 

cluding job cuts. 

The dividend announcement 
■ came as Nippon Life said it would 
—t contribute 53J25 billion yen ($456.8 

million) to a fund being assembled 
by the finance industry to bail out 
Nippon Credit Bank Ltd. 

Nippon Life said it would buy 25 
billion yen of new common stock and 
325 billion yen of preferred stock to 
be issued by Nippon Credit. 

Nippon Life also said it would 
give Nippon Credit 25 billion yen in 
subordinated loans. Subordinated 
loans have a lower priority than se- 
cured loans when a debtor’s assets 
are distributed in the event of bank- 
ruptcy. (AFP, Bloomberg) 


Resurgent Chip Exports Cut Seoul’s Trade Gap 


Ct^MbyOurSmffFnmDbttaKlKS 

SEOUL — The trade deficit shrank 52 percent 
in May from a year earlier, to $686 million, as 
chipmakers led a recovery in exports, die Trade 
Ministry said Monday. 

Semiconductor exports rose 8.8 percent, to 
$1.49 billion, their first increase in 13 months, on 
stronger sales of 16- megabit dynamic random 
access memory, or D-RAM, chips used in per- 
sonal computers. Computer chips account for 18 
percent of South Korean exports. 

“It appears the semiconductor export prob- 
lem, which has been the major factor behind the 
ballooning trade deficit, has eased to some ex- 
tent," the ministry said. 

Han Dong Moon, a spokesman at LG Semicon 
Co., said, “Demand is catching up with supply 
because of the introduction of new PCs and other 
products." 

Economists forecast continued growth in ex- 
ports, especially as Samsung Electronics Co., LG 
Semicon and other chipmakers increase sales at 
the expense of their Japanese rivals as a result of 
the rise in the value of the yen. 

‘ ‘With the yen strengthening, ‘ ’ said Kim Dong 
Su, an economist for the Ministry of Trade, 
Energy and Industry, “we should see good ex- 
port growth in the second half of this year. 

“One reason that exports may continue to be 


strong is that the foreign-exchange movements 
usually affect die country’s exports almost di- 
rectly after about six months." 

Exports other than semiconductors, however, 
rose only 3.2 percent, compared with a 9.6 per- 
cent rise in ApriL 

“A rise in export growth has continued in 
heavy industrial and chemical-products sectors 
such as automobiles, steel products and pet- 
rochemical goods," the minis try said. 

“But the growth in light industrial exports 
such as shoes, textile products, toys, dolls, plastic 
goods, leather and fur products has slowed." 

Imports fell 2.5 percent, to $12.36 billion, with 
imports of raw materials, such as crude oil. 
dropping 8J5 percent. Imports of capital goods, 
such as machinery, declined 7 5 percent, to $2.91 
billion. 

Imports of consumer goods, including golf 
clubs, cigarettes, and cosmetics, slipped 6.2 per- 
cent, to $823 million. Ministry officials said the 
trade account would improve in the next few 
months through a steady recovery in exports and 
slower growth in imports. It has forecast a full- 
year deficit of $14 biOicm, compared with $20.62 
billion in 1996. 

For the first five months of 1997, exports fell 
1.1 percent, while imports rose 2.2 percent com- 
pared with the same period last year. The trade 


Hopes for Rate Cut Push Australian Stocks to a Record 


Qmyvirtl by Okt Sstff Fmm DiqxiidKS 

SYDNEY — Stock prices rose to 
a record high Monday amid spec- 
ulation that tiie central bank would 
reduce interest rates, cutting compa- 
nies’ borrowing costs. 

The benchmark All Ordinaries in- 
dex rose 152 points to close at 
2,625.70. Within the 348-stock in- 
dex, 136 stocks rose and 1 13 fell. 

“With a low-interest-rate envir- 
onment and low inflation, you are 
probably looking at the prospect of 
some rebound in earnings,” 
Richard Sharp, investment director 
at HSBC Asset Management, said. 


“Wife low to falling interest rates, 
it’s a good backdrop." 

Retail spending, reported Friday, 
fell fora second consecutive month 
in April, raising concern that the 
economy was not gathering steam as 
rapidly as expected and sparking 
speculation about a further cut. 

“The major focus on the market 
is going to be the Reserve Bank's 
next move,” said Mark Fordree, 
head of the Sydney trading desk at 
ANZ Securities, referring to the 
country's central bank. “There is a 
lot more speculation there will be a 
further rate cut.” 


nomic growth and ultimately com- 
pany earnings. 

Directors of the Reserve Bank of 
Australia are to meet Tuesday. 

Shares in Australia & New Zea- 
land Banking Group Ltd. rose 26 
cents to close at 9.25 Australian dol- 
lars ($7.04). The bank reported last 
week that its first-half net profit rose 
24 percent, to 615 million dollars. 

“I think there is a flow-on from 
last week's result," Alastair Hunter, 
analyst at JB. Were & Son, said. 
* ‘There’s still positive sentiment to- 
ward tiie stock. We’ve slightly up- 


ROCKWELL: A New Focus CHANGE: Few Fleeing Paris 


Continued from Page 11 be No. 2 to Siemens AG of Continued from Page 11 


c r -■ 




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Rockwell is not new to any 
of its businesses. Its automa- 
tion business revolves around 
Allen- Bradley, which Rock- 
well bought in 1985, and 
much of its avionics business 
has grown out of Collins Ra- 
dio, a 1973 acquisition. 

It has made chip sets for 
modems for 20 years. Its non- 
aerospace research invest- 
ments have grown steadily, to 
$691 million last year from 
$571 million in 1994. 

But until now, these divi- 
sions were icing on a gov- 
ernment contracting and 
automotive cake. Now, they 
— and customers as disparate 
as makers of consumer pack- 

S airplanes and cellular 
nes — represent 
ell's future. 

Thus, each is seeking new 
ways to cut costs and grab 
market share. European of- 
fices now must coordinate 
with the home office in Seal 
Beach, California. Engineers 
sow must develop compon- 
ents tim can be used in sev- 
csd product lines. 

Rockwell is also adrfing 
new companies — and new 
cukares — at a brisk pace, 
<£« as a digests Reliance 

Bectik; Co., the elecrric motor 
a bought in 1995. 
Irhssjst bought Brooktnse ; 
Cap„ which nukes modem , 


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OO fquie B such » Rockwell 
whoee &ottaro line has held 
fltm for yeaus. 

hfe, Bctll en p n w twe that 

Bockwdffean at best strive to 


Germany in Europe. In Japan, 
he would settle for being in 
the top five. Still, half of 
Rockwell’s automation sales 
now come from outside the 
United States. 

But Rockwell’s most 
closely watched market-share 
fight is between its $1.7 billion 
semiconductor business — the 
world’s dominant maker of 
chip sets for facsimile modems 
— and U.S. Robotics Carp., 
the leader in the faster-grow- 
ing market for high-speed mo- 
dems that provide high-speed 
access to the Internet. Rock- 
well sells chip sets to compa- 
nies that make modems; U.S. 
Robotics, which is being ac- 
quired by 3Com Carp., makes 
its own modems. 

U.S. Robotics and Rock- 
well modems cannot send or 
receive to or from one another. 
Each company ass um es that 
the more customers it signs up 
now, the more likely that the , 
industrywide standard will 
lean toward its technology. 

Many analysts say the mo- 
dem race is too close to call 
and that, with other technol- 
ogies proriding Intern et 
speed, its outcome may be 
less portentous than die 
hoopla suggests. 


International 

Franchises 


which aspirants must still 
measure up to stria standards 
of fiscal probity. What is more, 
markets themselves have be- 
come far more demanding. 

“I doubt that it is practical 
or possible for any govern- 
ment now to follow economic 
policies radically different 
from those of their pea 
group," said Anthony Parker, 
European fund manager at 
Kleinwort Benson Fund 
Management. 

Still, the victory of the left- 
ist coalition makes the path 
toward economic reform in 
France uncertain at the least It 
would appear to put off at- 
tention to France's high social 

crate, hs ineffieiwit lab or mar- 

kets and its bloated state bu- 
reaucracy. For some critics, 
this signals a continuation of 


France's industrial decline. 

“Companies look at the 
cost of doing business in 
France, and really, it doesn't 
make sense to locate there on- 
less the chairman’s wife in- 
sists on living in Paris," said 
Mike Johnson, an American 
businessman and author of a 
recent book of the difficulties 
of doing business in France. 

For managers of French 
companies eager to shm down 
and survive the rigors of global 
competition, the new govern- 
ment could spell trouble. 

Analysts said the car- 
makers PSA Peugeot Citroen 
SA, Renault and some of 
France’s biggest banks still 
needed high-level political 
approval to make pamful but 
potentially life-saving cats in 
their work forces. Those ap- 
provals could now be harder 
to come by. 


Announcements 


BARBIE AS 24 

AU S JUM 1997 
ftix Hoc TYA an devise bale 
(laducllon deponHe sur demande) 
Rmptaea In tames ertoieuis 

HMNCE (zone CJ on FRI - TVA 20£% 
GO: 3,73 FOD 1 : 2£6 

SCS7: 5.43 SCSP: M2 

UK enA -TVA 17.9*0018%} 

GO: OS254 POD 1 : 0£475 

ALLBIAGNE (zone I) Dili - TVA 15* 

ZONE / - S : 


Attention visitors 
the 


f you enjoy leading the 1HT 
when you travel, why not 
also get h at home? 


GO 1,06 
ZONE J- 1: 

GO: W 

zone fs-F: 

GO: 1/Q 

ZtWEff-f: 

SCSP: 1# 
ZUE IV - G: 
GO: US 


SCSP: 1.45 
SCSP: 1,41 


FOD: Ofl 


mThc Inienmarket. 

To *dver1»c contact Judith King 
m our New Ibrk office 

TfeL (1-212) 752 3890 
F*c {1-212} 755 8785 
or four tteareitlHT office j 
<g re pra eiuri «e. 


JAPAN PACIFIC FUND 

SICAV 

11, rue Aldringen, L-1 1 18 Luxembourg 
R.G. Luxembourg B 8340 

AVIS Iff CONVOCATION 

Mesdames et Messieurs las Actionnaires sont convoqu§s 
par le present avis A r Assemble G6n6rale Statutaire de 
notra Socfcte. qui aura lieu le 18 juin 1997 A 1&30 heunes au 
siege social wee Pordra du jour suh/ant : 

MORE DO JOOR 

1. Rapports du Consol cfAdmmistration et du Rdviseur 
rfEntraprises. 

2. Approbation d o? comptes amStds au 31 mars 1997 et 
fixation du dividends 

3. D&hargeaux Admirastrateurs. 

4. Divers. 

Lee dtetstonseoncemant tous las points de Pordre du Journe 
requMrant aucun quorum- 3es seront prises fi la s fan pie 
majority des actions pr^sentes ou reprdsentoes k 
tAsswxiMe. Chaque action donne droit k tin vote. Tout 
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deficit for the first five months widened 25 
percent, to $9.56 billion. 

( Bloomberg . AFP, Reuters) 

■ Hanshin Construction Goes Bankrupt 

Hanshin Construction Co. was declared in- 
solvent, three days after it asked to be pat into 
receivership, a creditor bank said, according to an 
Agence France-Presse report. 

Seoul Bank, Hanshin 's key creditor, said the 
company had gone bankrupt after failing to honor 
bills totaling 21.6 billion won ($24.2 million). 

Its collapse rekindled fears of a suing of fail- 
ures by building companies. Hanshin has 3,000 
subcontractors, assets estimated at $1.4 billion 
and debts of $1.2 billion. Hanshin and other 
housing companies suffered a serious blow when 
the Hanbo business group collapsed under debts 
of $5.8 billion in January. 

South Korean banks signed a pact last month to 
prevent unnecessary bankruptcies. But the pact 
led to talk of a credit crisis as nonbanking in- 
stitutions, which offer loans without collateral, 
rushed to recall credits. 

So far this year, the Hanbo and Sammi steel- 
making groups have gone bankrupt, and Jtnro 
Group, a food, liquor and industrial conglom- 
erate, and Dainong, a textile and department-store 
company, have sought bailout loans. 


graded numbers from what we had 
after briefings from management 
last week." 

A dealer at a Sydney-based in- 
vestment bank added, “ANZ is get- 
ting all the attention after its result 
last week." 

Coles Myer LttL’s shares rose 13 
cents to dose at 6.26. Investors are 
banking on a turnaround at Coles 
Myer, Australia’s largest retailer, 
Mr. Sharp of HSBC said. 

Broken Hill Proprietary Co., Aus- 
tralia ’s largest publicly listed com- 
pany, rose 29.2 cents to end at 19.15 
dollars. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Very brief lys 

•Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index closed at a record high of 
14,990.90, up 233.09 points, led by property developers amid 
optimism that a government land auction Tuesday would 
snow strength in real -estate prices. Separately, an official said 
Hong Kong would make more land available for high-end 
housing developments in 1997 and 1998 in hope of satisfying 
demand for such developments and stabilizing their prices. 

• Thailand's finance minister, Amnuay Viravan, said the 
Bank of Thailand was studying a plan to facilitate mergers 
among companies in the ailing finance sector. His comments 
followed a denial by the central bank that it would compel 
locally registered finance houses to merge. 

•Thailand’s consumer price index rose a smaller- than-ex - 
peered 4.3 percent in May from a year earlier, the annual 
inflation rate was unchanged from April and slower than a 6.1 
percent increase registered a year earlier. 

• Daewoo Corp. bought 40 percent of Kazakstan's telecom- 
munications monopoly, Kazaktelekom, for $137 billion. 

• Japan, a major creditor of Burma, granted a 2 billion yen 
($8.6 million) loan to the military government in Rangoon, 
shortly after the Association of South East Asian Nations 
agreed to make Burma, Cambodia and Laos members of 
ASEAN, effective next month. 

• Hyundai Motor Co., Kia Motors Co. and Daewoo Motors 
Co. sold fewer vehicles at home than overseas in May for a 
second consecutive month. Their domestic sales fell 11 per- 
cent from April, while exports rose 10 percent 

• India's Securities and Exchange Board fined Morgan 
Stanley Asset Management India Ltd. 200,000 rupees 
($5388) for violating mutual-fund regulations. 

•China's deputy prime minister, Zhu Rongji, plans to meet 
with New Zealand investors and officials during a five-day 
trip aimed at increasing business and investment oppor- 
tunities. AFP. Bloomberg, Reuters 

Giordano Is Fined $12 Million 

Bloomberg News 

HONG KONG — Giordano International Ltd., a Hong 
Kong-based retailer, was fined 93 million Hong Kong 
dollars ($12 million) by the Chinese authorities for vi- 
olating customs and commerce rules, the company said 
Monday. 

Giordano, whose expansion in China has met repeated 
obstacles since its former chairman, Jimmy Lai, criticized 
Chinese leaders, said it was appealing the fines and had 
not taken any losses yet 

In 1994, Mr. Lai published an open letter in his Next 
magazine that criticized Prime Minister Li Peng of China 
for sending tanks to crush the 1989 democracy protests near 
Tiananmen Square. Giordano outlets in Beijing and Shang- 
hai were closed later by die authorities. 

Giordano’s shares fell 6 percent, to 4.375 dollars 
Monday. The stock had gained more than 10 percent over 
the past month on speculation that China-backed in- 
vestors would buy a stake in Giordano to speed its 
expansion on the mainland. 


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THE CZECH REPUBLIC 


k view of ncoat events, It 
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■ am Mv of the Czech 
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muaptoymmttamjust 
com of the advantages 
aoloyed by the Czech 
popMkm. la onfy aovea 
yean, the county to* 
become eBgWo for 

ammbenhlpktthe 
Earopean Unto. Whatever 
the tmxt weeks map bring, 
the Czech RapaUWaaoBd 
lundaneatals anrf record of 
A,Miiwji0u( areootltkety 
to evaporate ovomUrt. 


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Riding Out the Economic Storm 


The Czech Republic's strengths include political stability and a high rate of capital investment 


T his is a critical time for 
the Czech Republic. 
Since h patted ways 
with Slovakia in 1993, the 
country’s stable democracy 
artd soaring economy had 
made it one of the leading 
nations in the CEE (Central 
and Eastern Europe) region 
and put it on die fast track to 
NATO and EU membership. 

Recently, however, a 
downturn in Ihe Czech Re- 
public’s economic perfor- 
mance — including a grow- 
ing trade deficit and a slump 
in industrial production — 
has put the country's mon- 
etary unit, die Czech koruna, 
at die mercy of currency 
speculators. The koruna is 
now trading at 15 percent 
below its value against the 
U.S. dollar at die same time 
last year. 


To allow (he koruna to find 
its natural level, the central 
bank last week expanded the 
currency's fluctuation band, 
delinking it from the German 
mark and the U.S. dollar. 


Sweeping reforms 
To alleviate the problems 
causing die slump, die Czech 
government has instituted a 
sweeping program of reform. 
Several of its provisions are 
highly controversial; many 
others are long-awaited and 
highly acclaimed. 

The next few weeks will 
be decisive in determining 
whether these measures will 
be enough to turn the econ- 
omy around and assure die 
future of the current govern- 
ing coalition united under 
Prime Minister Vaclav 
Klaus. 


Nonetheless, given the 
Czech Republic's solid fun- 
damentals, the current weak- 
ness should be short-lived. 
The latest available forecasts 
from die OECD and the 
Czech Statistical Office pre- 
dict that die county will re- 
gister a satisfactory rate of 
GDP growth in 1997 and re- 
turn to fall- throttle expansion 
in 1998. 


Great expectations 
.In 1995, the country recorded 
an impressive performance. 
Year-end results included a 
rise in GDP of 4.8 percent, an 
unemployment rate of 2.9 
percent, a rise in industrial 
production of 8.7 percent and 
a national budget surplus. 

The country’s privatiza- 
tion program had succeeded 
in modernizing capital stock 


while spreading corporate 
ownership among the 10 mil- 
lion Czech residents. 

Many observers predicted 
that this upward trend would 
continue into 1996 and that 
the country’s naggingly large 
trade deficit would right itself 
once the corporate sector had 
less need for the industrial 
equipment necessary for 
modernization. 

The results did not live up 
to these high expectations. 
The trade deficit continued to 
grow, and at the end of 1996 
had risen to 8.6 percent of 
GDP. Poor financial manage- 
ment led to a number of 
bankruptcies in the banking 
and manufacturing sector. 
This was accompanied by the 
arrest of several top business 
leaders involved in bribery 
and corruption scandals. 


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. While the optimism ex- 
pressed in early 1996 was no 
doubt exaggerated, the cur- 
rent sweeping dismissals are 
also probably an overreac- 
tion. 


Solid fundamentals 
Despite the fugh-profile 
problems, by world stan- 
dards 1996 was still a good 
year for the Czech Republic 
in terms of certain key in- 
dicators. In 1 996, the country 
registered GDP growth of4.4 
percent and an increase in 
manufacturing output of 6.8 
percent 

The strong rises in per- 
sonal and corporate incomes 
registered m 1996 not only 
incited a buying spree of for-' 
eign-madc goods, but also in- 
creased the country’s tax rev- 
enues by a further 11.4 
percent helping keep foe 
budget deficit down to a 
commendable -1.6 percent, 
one of foe lowest in Europe. 

Capitol investment is a 
particular area of strength. In 
1995* inward foreign invest- 
ment amounted to an im- 
pressive level of $2.56 bil- 
lion. It should be kept in 
mind, however, that this fig- 
ure was swelled by a one- 
time deal: foe acquisition of a 
major equity stake in SPT 
Telecom by a Dutch-Swiss 
consortium. 

In 19%, a record number 
of foreign investors brought 
the yearly total to $ 1 .4 billion 
— and foe country's total 
since 1990 to a highly re- 
spectable S7 billion, accord- 
ing to the Czech National 
Bank. 

Domestic companies in- 
vested $1 4.3 billion in capital 
stock in 1996, perhaps foe 
best result recorded by foe 
country in its brief history. 


mendous amount of capital 
being invested in foe coun- 
try’s capital stock by both 
domestic and foreign in- 
vestors. 

The Czech government's 
years of fiscal prudence have 
left it with a gross indebted- 
ness amounting to 1 8 percent 
of total GDP, well below foe 
Maastricht criterion for ad- 
mission to Economic and 
Monetary Union. 

Though unemployment 
has risen to 4.3 percent, it is 
still one of the lowest figures 
among the world’s industri- 
alized countries. 

Standard & Poor’s rating 
service has no plans to 
change the nation's current 
“A” investment-grade credit 
rating, as Bloomberg News 
reported on May 24. 

According to current 
OECD and Czech Statistical 
Office forecasts, 1997 will be 
about as good a year in the 
Czech Republic as in the 
United States, Germany, Bri- 
tain and Japan, all of which 
are slated to record 2.5 per- 
cent to 3 percent GDP in- 
creases. 

Looking ahead to 1998, 
the Czech Ministry of Trade 
and Industry is anticipating 
GDP growth of 3.5 percent to 
4.5 percent, about foe level of 
foe pre-crisis era. 


Looking ahead 

While currently running 6 
percent lower than m 1996, 
manufacturing output is set 
to rebound in foe second half 
of 1997 because of foe tre- 


prague 


ffQ/ CZECH REPUBLIC 

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At a Glance#^- 

Area ; 

78,864 square kilometers 

Population i 

103 million 1 


m mm 


President .sj 

Vfclav Havel % 

Prime Minister Js 

Vaclav Klaus " > 

Capital 

Prague ( Pop. 1 22 million) _ 

Other major cities - 
Brno (Pop. 392,614) 

Ostrava (Pop. 33 1 304) 

Plzen (Pop. 174,676) 


***» .«# *■*' M 


allow foe three-party, center- 
right government to stay in 
place to implement the eco- 
nomic recovery program an- 
nounced on April 16. 

This program includes a 
comprehensive mixture: of 
quick-fix and long-term 
measures. The list of short- 
term measures was headed 
by foe impleme n tation of im- 
port deposits on foodstuffs 
and consumer goods, which 
went into effect on April 21. 

These deposits amount to 
20 percent of the goods' total 
value and are paid by Czech 
importers into an interest- 
free bank account for a 1 80- 
day period. This move has 
drawn sharp criticism from 
foe country’s consumers and 
from the European Commis- 
sion, which sees it as a breach 
of the EU)s fine trade reg- 
ulations. 

Other qudek-fix measures, 
however, have won praise, 
including a 5 percent across- 
the-board slashing of public 
sector expenditures and a 
freeze on wages in the gov- 
ernment and at state-owned 
companies. Further budget- 
ary austerity measures are 
expected to be announced. 


Political stability 
In contrast to foe other CEE 
countries, the Czech Repub- 
lic has not experienced wild 
swings between the conser- 
vative and reformed Com- 
munist blocs, and foe result- 
ing changes in policies. 

Prime Minister Klaus's 
victory in the June 1, 1996 
elections, though slim, has 
made him one of foe longest- 
serving heads of state in the 
Western world. 

Mr. Klaus hopes that last 
week's reshuffling of the 
cabinet, including the nam- 
ing of Finance Minister Ivan 
Pilip and Minister of Trade 
and Industry Karel Kuhl, will 


The right stuff 
Before April, the Klaus gov- 
ernment had been criticized 
for its failure to address foe 
underlying problems of foe 
Czech economy, including 
the too-tight interlinking of 
the public, banking and cor- 
porate sectors, which was 
cited as a brake to a true 
privatization program and 
the development of a stand- 
alone capital market 

The long-term measures 
instituted in April have at- 
tempted to address these cri- 
ticisms. These measures, 
welcomed by the internation- 
al business community, tight- 
en up corporate accountabil- 
ity regulations as well as 
bankruptcy procedures. 

In addition, they greatly 
expedite foe privatization 


process and increase foreign f .1 . 
investor access to the Czecfc ' T ' ~ 
economy. One measure wjg y - 
set up an independent co% ; . 

mission to supervise foe uny 
ruly Czech securities and - 

capital markets. The com- v 
mission will introduce aqj . . 
enforce international opera% 
ing standards, monitor trad- - r “\ . 
ing, formulate and enact eq> _ 
ablmg legislation, and certify . 
all funds, asset managers and 
any other participants in ' 

Czech market ^ 

The reforms also give tnf : - • • 
country's business commw r 
nity some valuable growty : 
incentives. 3 r ~ " 

As of January 1, 1998,% - :j 
maximum rate of corpora^ 
taxation will fell from 39 pe^ :: r 
cent to 35 percent Exporter ; --r 
will benefit from a further 
range of credits and payment - 

guarantee instruments, plus ■ 
foe aid of foe new trade prcjj - - 
motion agency, CzechTradji - • 
which began operations ag - 
May 1. Some observers atg - - 

not convinced that foe Klatjs Z 

government has foe will J 
make its ambitious measures 
stick, but most are taking a 
positive view. '-p 

Says Marico Musutip, ,\T I \i 
chief executive officer of the A 
Vienna-based Creditanstaft 
Investment Bank: “Virtually - 
every country in Western 

Europe is currently undergo- 

ing a protracted phase of 
painful restructuring, sarjje 
tiling also recently expert 
enced by the United State jl 
and Japan. * C__ 

“It was naive to think fojf L : ; 
the Czechs, despite t hey ILT 
strong underlying furufaf 
mentals and good initial pa- 
fonnance, would never need ■' rT '-“ 
to undergo one of they _ 
own.” ' 

“It would be even more y-~ 
naive to expect that this ham- £ ~ 

working people, who hatyp j - v 
repeatedly demonstrated ija ^ : * r ~ 
great resiliency, will not 
manage to overcome a sbojt ^ 
period of economic adjust f' 
ment,” he adds. • x 







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Banks Open to Foreign Investors 

O ver the next 12 als, principally a very low Swelling incomes caused do- Four” ban 
months, for the inter- rate of foreign indebtedness mestic demand to increase Ceskoslovez 
national financial and a relatively eood stock of 9.4 nercent nrtumrna am lv*nLm 


O ver the next 12 
months, for foe inter- 
national financial 
community, foe Czech bank- 
ing sector will be among foe 
most interesting markets in 
foe entire, highly interesting 
CEE,” says Marko Musulin, 
CEO of Creditanstalt Invest- 
ment Bank, the investment 
banking arm of foe Vienna- 
based financial services gi- 
ant 

That is quite a statement, 
considering that the country 
is going through foe most 
severe economic crisis in its 
short history. What is so at- 
tractive about the Czech Re- 
public? 

Says Alarich Fenyves, 
member of Creditanstalt's 
board of directors, rcspon- 
siblc for international bank- 
ing: “One-half of foe story is 
that foe country started out 
foe posvCommunisn era 
with very good fundament- 


als, principally a very low 
rate of foreign indebtedness 
and a relatively good stock of 
industrial capital. A further 
built-in asset is that foe 
Czechs have traditionally 
been good savers. 

“Since then, a consider- 
able amount of capital has 
been created in foe country, 
by both foe prospering cor- 
porate and consumer sectors. 
Add in the feet that the coun- 
try is seriously under-banked 
m terms of loans outstanding 
versus GDP,” Mr. Fenyves 
adds. 

Czech National Bank stat- 
istics support Mr. Fenyves’s 
view. On foe heels of an 8.5 
percent increase (in real 
terms) in 1995, average 
household incomes in the 
Czech Republic rose a fur- 
ther 5 percent in 1996. 

This was parlayed into an- 
other strong rise in the av- 
erage household’s net worth. 


Czech teleshopping firm 

find products for teleshopping selling 
on the Czech market. If you have some interestino 
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phone 00420-02-2491 9023, fax 00420-02-2491 3095 
address: N Shop, a.s„ Spflena 55, 110 00 Prague 1. 


Swelling incomes caused do- 
mestic demand to increase 
9.4 percent, powering a 12.2 
percent expansion in busi- 
ness sector output and a cor- 
responding 12.4 percent rise 
in gross investment in capital 
assets. 

The bottom line is tiyt 
over the Last four years, the 
Czech private sector has ad- 
ded on capital whose total 
value represents a 55 percent 
increase. 

The Czechs’ financial fun- 
damentals are very firm. The 
footing of foe country’s 
banks would seem less so. In 
1 996, the Czech banking sec- 
tor expen enced a number of 
failures and setbacks. 

Several small banks were 
propped up by the Czech 
government* s banking sector 
stabilization program, which 
includes a public sector in- 
stitution providing liquidity 
to snuggling banks by pur- 
chasing their nonperforming 
assets. Agrobahka Praha, the 
country’s fifth largest bank, 
also had to be rescued. 

As tite country’s financial 
analysts hasten to point out, 
these failures and “prop- 
ups,” though highly publi- 
cized, were not of central im- 
portance because the banks 
involved were small. 

Some four-fifths of foe 
country’s financial business 
is conducted by its “Big 


14 , 

Four” banks: Komercty, -* . 
Ceskoslovenska obchodw - 
banka, Ceska Sporitelna anp v 
Investicni a Postqvni Bankg. • 

For these institutions, ■■ 
1996 was a tolerably good % : '- 
yearon the whole, with towfif 
profits but stronger per forny - r- : 
mg loan and equity portfo- v. .. 
lios. 

In what would seem to be? 
paradox, the failures anjl ■: 
sluggishness in the banking V . ‘ 
sector help to explain foe fa- '> - 
temational banking sector s 
avid interest in foe Czech fi- 
nancial and banking ccanmi> b? 
nity. ; J . 

Despite Hs reputation as-a ' 
“closed store,” the Czejfi 
banking sector has actually . 
been anything but shut to' 
eign investors. • 

All but 11 of foe country? .. 

50 banks are cither f??-" r 
pletely or partial^ own®” ^ - \ . . 
non-Czech financial lwuses • < 

Included atnoog eqinty ^ - 1 
stakes held by foreigners is a 

22 percent share fa Komeretp • 

owned by a nuxture of laigp 7 
banks and private investors! 

Says Pavel Kysilka, the 


KONOb 





vwuuai i/aiiA. a T m 

M Itis truethatafixrttoinfl^ 
of foreign capital, technol- 
ogies and, most of all* ; 

nagerial expertise is one of , 

foe major preconditions -• 

tiie further developtnent <? 
Our country's ‘ banking q - 
sector." • 4 ;> 

■1 ■' 


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SPONSORED SECTION 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 3 , 1997 


PAGE 17 


Bo haml* 

CZECH REPUBLIC 

Moravi 


THE CZECH REPUBLIC 


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At a Glanck 

A»k\ 

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I he growing bread* In 1995, Czech exports 
and international rose by a s mashin g 50 per- 
reacb of the Czech cent. with a further 3.5 per- 
jjusmess community is keep- cent rise in 1996. 

jog the country’s manufac- T1 *“* 

hired goods competitive on 


wold markets and allowing 
Export totals to rise. 

Though 1997 has brought 


That was a respectable fig- 
ure, especially considering 
die context in which it was 
achieved. 

The import totals of both 


Czech Republic its share Germany and Austria, re- 
Gf economic revases and sponsible for 45 percent of 


the Czech Republic’s export 
sales, tailed to grow substan- 
tially during the same two- 
year period. 

Until recently, the Czechs 


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irnaiiet upheavals, this year 
•the country will reach an ex- 
1 .troDely important milestone 
i -by becoming foe first among 

: . the 19 CEE (Central and vw« 1 vvwiu;,ui«w 0 ,is 
' f ^Eastern European) nations to were feeing a problem that 
graduate beyond the dev el- the Germans know all too 
■ jppmental stage of intema- 
i feonal industrial transition. 

j This occurs when a coun- 
< ay stops being primarily, a 
Supplier of raw materials and 
sani-finished goods. The 
- leritical point is readied when 
• (manufactured goods amount 
ko more than 50 percent of 
(jptal sales abroad. 


greenfield investment in 
Plzen. 

When fully oper ational, 
the facility will produce up to 
2 million television sets a 
year for the European mar- 
ket 

Foreign investment 
Interesting though foe export 
figure is, it doesn’t begin to 
describe the most important 
change in the Czech man- 
ufacturing setnon its growing 
breadth of products and pro- 
ducers. 

One example is foe auto- 
mobile industry, which has 


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Consumer products 
Computers, cars, machine 
tools, ball bearings and other 
foch manufactured goods ac- 
dounted for 42 percent of foe 
Czech Republic's total ex- 
ports in 1995. 

hi 19%, the figure rose a 
farther 5 percent, putting foe 
chantry on course to pass foe 
■$0 percent mark some time 
toward foe end of foe yean 
<’ This is a notable achieve- 
ment, especially when foe 
country is considered to lave 
problems competing suc- 
cessfully on world markets 
because of its yawning trade 
deficit. 

It must be remembered, 
however; that foe trade def- 
icit has two components. One 
bf them is foe import figure, 
fthich has risen astronom- 
jeahy. 

The export figure, how- 


well: trying to con densate 
for foe effects of a strong 
currency. 

Before the central bank 
delinked it last week, foe 
Czech koruna had been tied 
to the Ge rman mark (two- 
thirds) and foe U.S. dollar. 

The rise in 1996 was 
strongest in foe advanced in- 
dustrial goods category. In 
addition, last year saw record 
output and sales for a number 
of major domestic manufac- 
turers. 

Also contributing to foe 


■ brer, is also rising — not a 

» enough to subs tantiall y offset rise in exports was the fiist- 

foe surge in imports, but time contribution made by 
- enough to demonstrate that 
’’ ~ foe Czech Republic’s prod- 
*'•. - "acts are still viable cm world 

■ markets. 


new production facilities set 
up by outside investors. 
Prominent among them: 
Matsushita's $66 milli on 


received $1.5 bdllicm, nearly 
a quarter of all foreign direct 
investment made in the 
Czech Republic over the last 
six years. 

This inflow was kicked off 
by Volkswagen’s purchase of 
a controlling stake in Skoda 
Automobfiova. All told, VW 
has committed itself to in- 
vesting S25 billion in the 
company. 

Since other auto- 
mobile giants have followed 
VW’s lead, including Dae- 
woo, in a $350 milli on 
takeover of Avia, a Czech 
truck producer; Hyundai, 
through * partnership with 
Skoda Plzen; and Renault 
which acquired Karosa, a bus 
manufacturer. ' 


More than one-third of 
Europe’s largest automotive 
suppliers have also moved 
into the country with around 
70 manufactu ring and as- 
sembly facilities saving yir- 
tually all of the world's lead- 
ing car producers, according 
to Czechhrvest 

While the manufacturing 
plants producing supplies are 
located in the Czech. Repub- 
lic, most of the production 
facilities assembling foe 
automobiles are located 
abroad. Thus the growth of 
the automobile supply in- 
dustry is tied directly to foe 
rise in exports of manufac- 
tured goods. 

In 1990, exports of auto- 
motive supplies were statist- 
ically insignificant. In 1996, 
they amounted to $350 mil- 
lion This figure is forecast to 
reach $500 minion in 1997. 

High technology 
The Czech Republic is a 
growing source of advanced 
technologies for foe region. 
Czech automotive “sup- 
plies” often take the form of 
entire automobiles and light 
trucks, sent as CKD (com- 
pletely knocked kits) to Po- 
land, Russia, Belarus and 
other CEE countries for as- 
sembly. 

The Czechs’ voracious ap- 
petite for computers is one of 
the main causes of foe import 
deficit. 

The country’s purchases 
of PCs, workstations and 
mainframes have risen fitm 

virtually nil in 1990 to just 
under $1 billion in 1996, re- 
ports foe Sueddeulsche Zeit- 
ing, which also notes that this 
figure rose nearly 50 percent 
over foe last 12 months 
alone. 

Without the Czech Repub- 
lic’s new-look computer 
hardware manufacturing in- 
dustry, foe import figure 
would probably be a lot 
woise. And thanks to it, it is 
going to get much better 
soon. 

Without the computers. 


Fast Trains and Superhighways 

•!. 

The new SuperCity train line is speeding up sendee on the country's rail network. 




- 4 -. •- 


n Investors 


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I n foe heart of Europe, the 
Czech Republic has one 
of foe most tightly woven 
fail grids in foe world 
•^Virtually every single 
Czech co mmuni t y and pro- 
faction facility is served by 
country's 9,400 kflome- 
tbs of trade 

" l This extensive grid, 
"though slow, is beneficial for 
foe environment, because 
some 40 percent of all freight 
■Is transported by rail rather 
foanby road (foe comparable 
‘figure for Western Europe is 
H 6 percent). 

rllM ujuHS 

tfow the country is taking 
action to speed 19 rail ser- 
vice. Since last fall, some 
travelers have been able to 
take foe trains of foe new 
SupaCity line, which travel 
at an average speed of 90 
kikmeters (56 miles) per 
'Hour and cover foe 360 ki- 
Jdmetasbetween Prague and 
‘Ostrava, die capital of 
Moravia. 

SupaCity is quire an ac- 
‘fiomplishmeiit in terms of 
speed as well as comfort, af- 
■fqtdability and punctuality. 

■*' A first-class ticket — the 
only class on foe train — 
feasts $13. Since the Super- 
l CSty makes no Slaps along 
3he way, it is usually on 
’9 s *. 


Warsaw, Vienna, Nuremberg 
and Munich with the eastern 
Czech Republic. 

This ambitious program 
will only be accomplished if 
current projects are realized 
on schedule and if the nec- 
essary outside funding, to be 
supplied by both the EU and 


rent 4 1 4 kilometer grid in foe 
shortspace of only eight 
years. 

Investors, however, find 
this timetable credible. 
Demand for property adjoin- 
ing the planned routes is 


skyrocketing, as are prices. 

Meanwhile, Prague’s busi- 
ness journals are awash with 
announcements of new, 
highway-side logistic parks, 
hypermarkets and facilities 
for light industry. • 


vestors, actually materializes. 

Credible timetable 
This is an especially big “if” 
in foe case of the superhigh- 
ways projects, which involve 
tripling foe length of foe cur- 


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“%hin foe next three years, 
Si^wCiiy-fevel service will 
: to become the aormon 
• country’s four main cor- 
ns (tf international tzans- 

. Accofiog to die Czech 
.rf Transport, the 
'ftmadtag of key segments 
yfe e cot rid ors' trade will 
ttne beat camrfeted by 
2860. 

f gy 208;. da Czech rafl 
%wodt is sfaied to be od a 
-with those in . Western 


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1 ^Bcnratiootl conldor 
' 'Jhe shntiion is shnalar for 
« Czech Rqxfofic’s road- 

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• ^Jjjyd^awl^theendof 
: y05, foe coutery’s fear grain 
5* ^espatt roa e a will form 
pen of a single, ratified' s&* 
P^bighwtty grid linking 


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the Czechs would not have 
been able to turn in such a 
steding performance in their 
balance of services. 

Over foe last six years, 
eight major manufacturers 
have started up in foe Czech 
Republic. 

Like their co un t e rp ar ts 


cers import many of their 
computer components from 
Asian suppliers. 

Several of the Czech man- 
ufacturers are showing 
growth, leading local busi- 
ness journals to call them foe 
“Czech Compaqs.” Promi- 
nent among is Multisys 

Group a.s., whose sales are 
currently growing at a rate of 
25 pe rc e nt 

In an interesting fillip, foe 
Asian suppliers are them- 
selves increasingly produc- 
ing in the Czech Republic. 
Japan’s Alps Electric has 
formed a keyboard manufac- 
turing joint venture with 

Tesla R lanslffl, a fmrfi r rom- 

terpart 

Software 

Software is also being pro- 
duced in foe Czech Republic, 
and an increasing amount of 
it is going to customers out- 
side the Czech Republic. 

Software is stiD not clas- 
sified as a product, but as a 
service. Hus helps explain 
foe Czech Republic’s excel- 
lent performance in foe ser- 
vices category. 

Also powered by a strong 
rise in tourism, this balance 
showed a $ 1.8 billion sur- 
plus. One of die companies 
making a contribution in this 
area is ComAct Bohemia, 
which was founded with the 
hrfp of German start-up cap- 
ital anil produces riata man- 
agement and location soft- 
ware. 

The list of its customers 
reads like a Who's Who of 
internati onal business. It in- 
cludes Deloitte & Touche, 
foe worldwide business ser- 
vices company, and Allianz, 
Europe’s largest insurer: • 


*t Harm maiher.ottdoor tables abound in Bmo, site of the country's biggest trade fair. 


Fair Goes International 

The Brno Trade Fair attracts record numbers of visitors. 


T he Czech Republic's venerable trade 
fair sector has been thriving in the 
post-Communist era. 

Surges in both domestic and foreign ex- 
hibitors and visitors have propelled Brno, foe 
country’s leading trade fair venue, to 70-year 

hi gh*; 

In fact, file southern Czech city of Brno 
now rivals current leader Leipzig for primacy 
on the whole Central and Eastern Europe 
trade fair scene. 

Strong growth 

Bmo Trade Fairs and Exhibitions Co. Ltd. 
operates the country's principal fairgrounds. 

After an initial, post-Communist slump in 
the eariy 1990s, the Bmo authority has grown 
steadily. In 1996, its 51 trade fairs and ex- 
hibitions attracted 17,707 exhibitors. 

Their stands occupied more than 500.000 
square meters (310.000 square miles) and 
were visited by just over a milli on people. 

These figures are all significantly higher 
than those of 1 995, and in some cases double 
those of 1992, the year the authority began its 


great turnaround, according to the Munich- 
based newspaper Sueddeutsche Zeitung. 

Reaching out 

The Bmo authority has achieved this growth 
by reaching out and spinning off. 

To attract new segments of exhibitors to its 
main ticket event, the International Engi- 
neering Fair (held every year in September), 
the authority has stepped up its recruiting 
activities in Western Germany and Western 
Europe. 

Continuing its pattern of setting up small, 
more specialized events, foe authority spun 
off foe International Construction Fair from 
the International Engineer Fair in 1996. 

Other new and forthcoming events include 
trade fairs centered around the 1CT (infor- 
mation and communication technologies), 
food processing and furniture industries. 

In addition to Bmo. trade fairs are held in 
many locations in the Czech Republic, in- 
cluding Prague, which alone has three major 
trade fair venues. Important events are also 
staged in Plzen, Ostrava and Olomouc. • 



PAGE 18 


SPONSORED SECTION 


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SPONSORED SECTION 





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The spa town of Katovy Vary h West Bohemia is only a two-hour bus ride tom Prague. 

Hot Springs and Romantic Castles 

Magnificent landscapes . centuries of history and sporting activities draw tourists 


*41 

•J 


T ourism is big business in the Czech Republic. Rev- dependent barons) and other notables traveling east td 
enues from tourism were $2.6 billion in 1995 and Prague. \ 

climbed to $32 billion in 1996. Prague remains a For centuries, the first stop for Prague-bound dignitaries 
nuyor destination for die country’s 76 million foreign vis- was the town of Cheb, and the same is true for many modem 
1 vJIi 0 “Jpy ca P lta] nch cultural heritage and visitors. Founded in the 11th century, it has been rebuilt a 
aipnitectural diversity. . number of times during its 800-year history. Today, Cheb is a 

Beyond the capital, the country s six regions — north, charming historic town with Romanesque, Gothic and 
soufii, east and west Bohemia and north and south Moravia Baroque vestiges < 1 

°f activities - . Mighty Karlstejn, 25 kilometers (15 miles) from Prague] 

Magmficent landscapes beckon to devotees of environ- was built by Matthias of Arras in the 1 4th century for Charles 
°j?l oor ac ^ vrties ' whilechmning vil- IV to house the crown jewels and to protect the capital. It has 
lagjsand histone castles provide much fodder for classic also been restored several times, and its massive fortifications 
v ’ ; '■•••. - elpqqpntly attest to its protective role. J 

^L Ue J br n £ ne ™ us mus,c ’ . fibn “J East of Cheb, Kozel offers a change of pace. Built in the 

5l5^ rtS u!2 h !f B ? t5 . g° If ’ ^ 1 8tfa «*““* this elegant hunting lodges designed in 

&iSSJ” brag ’ horeeback ndmB - b ' cydmg - * vss aS2*ae £2“ j-5^ 1 


f - 


■T,’V a 


hanp-cxlidlno ** ^ . p*L ,uu . s uuucmans siyie ot spienaia miormality. * 

hang-ghding and more. n South Moravia, right along the Austrian bolder, an* 

TfckWttiewator' Valtice and Lednice, two residences of die powerful LiechW 

TpechR^ 5° ~ of which 

Th Q T* ? cIe JS cd arc the Lednice. located 7 kilometers fromVkltice, was thef£3y5 
^SS a SfS^t ? [ SpaS . m “K summer residence. One of the Czech Republfo’sm^S 

^ M y ianske “far castles, Lednice offere romantic interiors, la^SfS^ 
m i? e S centory became Gothic exterior decoration, added in 1840, and the world’s 
and E^Ps ehte^° ^ memberS ° fthe Habsbui S Ingest minaret outside of the Muslim world. • ! 

As p opular tradition would have it Karlovy Vary’s hot ' 

^seous springs were discovered one day by a hunting dog of ^ t , 

Charles rv, toe energetic king of Bohemia and Holy Roman 
Emperor who built a town on the spot in 1350. Over the 

centimes, faithful visitors have included Peter the Great t 

Goethe, Bismarck and Karl Marx. GENERAL INFORMATION 

Between taking the waters on the spa’s idyllic hillside site CZECH Rfpiiri ir 

and 1 adminng the Belle Epoque architecture of its buildings. KEPLBLIC 

modem tourists can sample die charms of the town, including Ministry of Industry and Trade 

the famous shopping street, the Stara Louke. Na Frantisku 32 

Described by Goethe as an earthly paradise, the CZ-1 10 15 Prague 1 

Frantiskovy Lazne spa was founded in 1 793 and named for Td.: (420-2) 24 85 11 II 

the Habsbuig Emperor Franz I. The surrounding woodland is Fax: <420-2) 22 3 1 1970 

suitable for excursions, and the peaceful town holds some INVESTOR servipfs amh 

gems of Neoclassical architecture. UIUK atKViCES AND INFORMATION 

Like Karlovy Vkiy. Mananske Lazne’s cityscape is a most CZECH INVEST 

pleasing ensemble of styles, ranging from Classic to Art Czech Ao^ r rtr c ■ , 

Nouveau. Built in 1790, it is the youngest of the famous L h Ag^y for Foreign Investment 

- Fax": (420-2) 24^ ISM 

The king’s way CZECH TOURIST AUTHORITY 

TheCzech Republic is home to over 1,000 castles. As Staromestske nam. 6 

outposts of the sprawling Holy Roman Empire, these struc- CZ-1 1 0 1 5 Prague 1 

tures not only served as protective fortresses, but also as Te, - : <420-2) 248 12 85 29 

accommodations for princes, archbishops, Freiherren (in- * Fax: (420-2)231-4227 


.. 

: .-r -T 

— 1S£\ 

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■ ■ ■ 1 

• : at** .. 

: * *1 

4T ..Vf 

■— i " 

■* 

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•- — — -* 


-■> — tin# 


General information 
Czech Republic 

Ministry of Industry and Trade 
N a Frantisku 32 
CZ-1 10 15 Prague 1 
Tel.: (420-2) 24 85 11 II 
Fax: (420-2) 22 31 1970 

Investor services and information 

Czech Invest 

Czech Agency For Foreign Investment 
Politickych veznu 20 
CZ-112 49 Prague I 

Tel.: (420-2) 24 22 15 40 

Fax: (420-2) 2422 18 04 

Czech Tourist Authority 

Staromestske nam. 6 
CZ-1 10 15 Prague 1 
Tel.: (420-2) 248 12 85 29 
Fax: (420-2)231-4227 


• 

■ 1 u 


riH+t. • 


The Czech Republic Is On-Line 

\l fSS life in the Czech caf 

lounoeR. hanlr rtffixw ln , hotels, 


^ W -- •: 


i„ , . — , — LL^m ii, uuicis, arrport 

lounges, bank offrees or restaurants. Today, however Web 

^!^^ ch ® ns ’ businesspeople or anyone planning to 
visit *e Czech Republic for business or plLsure OTibbtain 

a wealth of information on-line. m 

Czech centers 

Maintained by the country’s Ministry of Foreign Affaire and 
^cultural u^tutes known as “Czech Centere,” the Czech 
Republic s official Web site (http-yAvww.czech.cz/) offers 
everything from foe wonderfully colloquial “Practical Info 
for Toimsts to foe very detailed “Doing Business with the 
CzechRepublic.” The site offere a daily news service and a 

powerful, search ™giae. Among Ihe Web siteTLny hy- 

S t0 TraVd WWW Senrer; which feahLs^ 

notel reservation service. d 

Other Web sites offer the same service, plus listings nf 
ernrent cultinal offerings in foe country (http : //W? a j f 
v^tufiLcz and http-y/www. travel.cz). A ninbe^jfWeb «W 
also serve as invaluable on-line guides to all foe practical 


of daily life in foe Czech capital of Prague. The most 

Getting down to business ; 

^ tt P ://w ^-centraleuiope.c»m) is a ; 
‘ nformati °n on Central and Eastern 
inurin' on-line briefing for busines^ieople, 

f !? V ^ JLinkies ’ weather bifffe or anybody else 
foe PPR d Sf cch Republic — or any other location in 
th* . reglon - Presented in an attract! ve. Webzine format; 

« ,s ^ comprehensive and topical as a good daily 
1 S. ‘I ***? bf ^tensive classifieds and useful hy; *• 
periinks. Professional investors wishing to follow the Czech ; 

# 1 5? ub «Ei sec HF ,lics and capital markets have their choice of ;■ 
Web sites (http://www.aspekt.cz/ and http:// 

Exctanm' 0 ?' T t5 ,atter is focused on the Prague Stock 
nange. Czechlnvest is the country’s investment recruit; 
nrSSj® TTL ?. lf Web site (http-7/www. czech in vestcom) 
fop c* u ovcrv,ew of foe agency’s services and of 

Czech Republic’s various regions, business sectors and 0 
business development corporations. • l 


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“1” ' o - .WEL-. i 


was produced in its en Unto bv the A A^^^n^ PUBL,C " 

_ Program Director: BUI Kfahder. 













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125 NOMURA INTL (HONE KONG) LTD 

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124 NORTH STAR FUND MANAGEMENT 

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PAGE 19 



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PAGE 20 


Sports 


- ssir ---'*■ -i- . 


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TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 1997 r 


World Roundup 



Fontanelli, leading, sod his teamr 
mates driving the breakaway. 

Fontanelli Holds On 

— CYCtiNQ Fabiano Fontanelli 

hnn g rtn fn win in a rinplrn g finish fn 

die 16th stage of tbe Giro d’ltalia on 
Monday. Fontanelli held off Fabio 
RoscioU and Angelo Lecchi after a 
158 kilometer (98-mile) leg across 
flat country to Dalmine. 

The first four held off tbe < 
which had chased for the i 
kilometers after six riders — four 
of them, including Fontanelli. mem- 
bers of tbe MG-Tedmogym team — 
broke away at a feeding station. 

Ivan Gotti remained first overall, 
51 seconds ahead of the Russian 
Pave] Tonkov. (Reuters, AP) 

Iran Wins, 17-0 

SOCCER Iran humiliated Mal- 
dives, 17-0, Monday in the biggest 
victory in World Cup history. Hie 
previous record was- set in 1981 
when New Zealand beat Fiji, 13-0. 
Karim Baqeri scored five goals for 
Iran and Hameed Astely four. 

The game was the opener in Asian 
qualifying Group 2, which also in- 
cludes Syria and Kyrgyzstan. 

• Karabakh Agdam. which has 
not been able to play in its home city 
since the Nagorno-Karabakh war, 
won Azerbaijan’s place in die Euro- 
pean Champions League even 
though it did not win the national 
league. 

Azerbaijani officials said 
Monday that the better perfor- 
mance of Karabakh’s youth teams 
meant that Neftchi Baku, which 
won the league tide, finished 
second under the new * ‘club cham- 
pionship'’ aggregate system. 

(AP, Reuters) 

Possible Scientology Fine 


t-Thg-I tntiart Club Inter 
Milan feces a fine after advenise- 
ments for the Church of Scientology 
were displayed during its UEFA 
Cup final second leg match with 
Scnalke on May 21 in Milan’s sta- 
dium. 

UEFA, European soccer ruling 
body, has asked Inter to explain the 
matter. Gerhard Aigner, UEFA’s 


Inter won Id be fined if it admitted to 
allowing the Scientologists to place 
banners behind tbe goals. (AFP) 


Revolution in Paris, 
Unseeded Masses Rise 

Kuerten Joins the Sans Culottes 


By Ian Thomsen 

Intenatloaa! HcrddTribtme 


PARIS — What must the former 


be thinking as they look 
around at the riff-raff mingling in the 
quarterfinals of this French Open? 

Three of tbe quan g fm alifls — Mag- 
nus Norman of Sweden, Gustavo Kuer- 
ten ofBrazO and Galo Blanoo of Spain — 
have never won a regulation tour event in 
&iaihve^ (They probabiy wouldn’t know 
a dessert wine from anaperitifl)'Kjialai 
will be visiting his first quarterfinal of 
any kind. Blanco, ranked No. Ill in the 
world, had won ooe match in six toor- 
nanatts this year bef o re he arrived at 
Roland Gams. In die last eight days be 
has lo6t only three sets. 

' In the old days the lower classes knew 

their place when they came to Paris, 
Wimbledon or New York. Hus week a 
record six nonseeds have made it the 
quarterfinals, joining No. 3 Kafelnikov 
and No. 16 Broguera, which is a Grand 
Slam record in the Open era. The pre- 
vious low of three seeded quaiterimal- 
ists had been set at the 1994 U.S. Open 
and equated last year at Wimbledon. 

On Monday, the revolutionary move- 
ment brought the clinical execution of 
No. 2 Michael Chang, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3, 64, 
by Broguera, following a ridiculous ar- 
gument between their coaches that 
spilled onto the court 

Hicham Arazi, a. Moroccan ranked 
No. 55, destroyedNo. 7 Marcelo Rios of 
Chile, 62, 61, 5-7, 7-6 (7-4) — an 
upset aided by an homiong rain delay 
(die first rain of the tournament) before 


the fifth game of the fourth set. Arazi is 
the only qnaxterfinalist to have a won an 
ATP Tour event this year. In March he 
won a «mall tournament at Casablanca 
and with it the prized letters of transit to 
Roland Garros. 

Everyone agreed this would be the 
least predictable French Open in years, 
but no (me predicted anything like this. 
Filip Dewnlf, the Belgian qualifier. No. 
122 in tbe world, walked across the 
grounds Monday in his tennis whites, 
almost unnoticed amid the mas ses. On 
Tuesday Dewnlf will be on center court, 
playing Noonan for a place in tbe semi- 
finals. The following quarterfinal will 
feature the defending champion, Kafel- 
nikov, against Kuerten, who was plan- 
ning to wear all blue and yellow at the 
most famous tennis stadium in France. 
The tournament director has been plead- 
ing with Kuerten to put on something 
white. 

“X have to play with these clothes, I 
have no more clothes to play in,’ ’ Kuer- 
ten said. “I promise him I can use die 

bandanna in white That 1 ^ rim on ly thing 

I have in white.” He thought for a 
moment. “My underwear is white.” 

He advanced Monday with a 5-7, 61, 
62, 1-6, 7-5 upset of Andrei Medvedev, 
the woddNo. 20 of Ukraine. Their match 
had been suspended because of darkness 
at 2-2 in the fifth set Sunday night “I 
dream (ike five times I lose the match," 
Kuerten said. The following afternoon 
he bnflta two-game lead, only to give up 
that advantage along with bis next three 
points on serve. Medvedev needed to 
win me of three break points in order to 
be serving for the 



Erit Wwb» - 

Michael Chang sliding Monday to play a backhand against Sergi Broguera in Paris. Chang, seeded No. 2, lost- -" 


“I just hit five balls unbelievable, 
five winners,’.’ Kuerten said. “I think I 
didn’t dunk. I just play.” 

Kuerten then broke the Ukrainian to 
earn another day against the highest 
seed extant 

Patrick Rafter, won, 62, 5-7,61 , 62, 
against his countryman Mark Wood 
forde to become the first Australian 

qnar rrj-fm*1i«rts mr*» Peter McN amar a in 

1982. Blanco, in his first Grand Slam 
event, produced a 1-6, 61, 7-5, 64upset 
of Petr Korda, die Czech. 

There are no Americans left — thanks. 


lastly, to Broguera, 26, who has not won 
a tournament rince 1 994, the year he won 
his second successive French Open title. 
Broguera hadiost four ofhis six previous 
matehes against Chang. This rime his 
relaxed approach grew more and more 
frustrating to the American as the branch 
wore on. Bruguera tends to stand far 
behind the haseline ami gnmclfft his fore- 
hand with one foot high off the ground, 
leaning back like someone on a tar stool 
reaching deep in to his pocket for 

change ' 

It was against this backdrop that Carl 


Chang upset the Biugnem. Carl is the 
older brother and coach of die 1989> 
French Open champion. In the second 
game ofthe final set, Bruguoa looked upri $ 

to his father shouting to him from the-* 
coach's box as fathers do. According foil 
observers. Cart yelled down at Broguera*" 
on the court, "Don't look at your rather 
all the time, he’s coaching you.” -f M 

Luis Bruguera yelled back at Carir; 
Chang to be silent. Sergi looked up from 
the court and said, " Are you silly?” «.l 
He might have said the same thing ter* 
the seeding committee. .-o 




After Delays, 
It’s Singh 
In the Rain 


The Associated Pro* 

DUBLIN, Ohio — Vijay Singh re- 
sumed his third round in the Memorial 
Tournament with an eagle Monday and 
went on to win therein-shortened event 
by two strokes. Singh fired a 5-under-par 
67 in the final round to finish on 202 . 

After three days of heavy rein and 
several suspensions of play . Singh, from 
Fiji, claimed his first tour victory in two 
years, ft was worth $342,000. 

Greg Norman and Jim Furyk tied for 
Second at 204. Norman’s closing effort 
was an 8-under-par 64, which stretched 
over three days. 

The tournament was cut to 54 holes 
after more than 4 inches of rain hit 
Muiifield Village Golf Club on Sat- 
urday and Sunday. Play was suspended 
Sunday afternocm after co-leaders Singh 
and Scott Hoch had hit their tee shots at 
the 539-yard, par-5 1 1th hole. 

JackNicklaus, the 57-year-old design- 
er of the Muiifield Village course, con- 
tinued his strong play to finish with a 69 
at 8-under-par 208. He tied for eighth. 

Tiger Woods finished at 5-over 221 
after a third-round 74 that included a 
quintuptehogey 9 on his 12th hole. 

John Daly, making his first appear- 
ance matour event since his seco ad stint 
in alcohol rehabilitation, finished last 
among those who made tbe cut He shot 
an 80 in the closing round for a 227. 



World’s Fastest Man? It’s a Limp Affaifi 


By Jere Longman 

New York Tones Service 


Donovan Bailey sprinting 
home in the 150-meter race 
against Michael Johnson. 


TORONTO — The race fa- tbe title of 
world’s fastest man, which nearly became 
a fiasco because of financial problems and 
a threatened withdrawal by Donovan 
Bailey, turned out to be no race at alL 

Bailey won in 14.99 seconds Sunday at 
150 meters as MichaelJohnson pulled up - 
with a limp, an apt metaphor for the 
hobbled state of track and field in North 
America. 

Bailey, the Olympic champion at 100 
meters, would have very likely wan even 
if Johnsoa had not pulled up at 80 or 90 
meters with what he called a strained 
quadriceps muscle. Running on the inside 
lane of a two-lane track, Bailey seared out 
of the blocks and seemed to catch Johnson, 
the 200-meter Olympic champion and a 
supposed superior curve runner, in the first 
five strides. 

Exiting the turn at 75 meters, wife a 
partisan crowd of about 30.000 urging him 
on at the Sky dome, Bailey held a lead of a 
stride. 

Could Johnson catch him after Bailey’s 
stunning start? No one would ever know. 
Johnson began limping. There would be 
tto riveting race to the tape. 

Each sprinter is to receive a $500,000 
. appearance fee. Bailey is now due a $1 
million prize as the winner. 

But Ire cheapened his victory by com- 
plaining beforehand about tbe tight radios 
of the curve, threatening to withdraw. 1am- 
basting organizers for *‘deceitfulness" 
and issuing a statement that he would be 
running “under mental duress.” The 
event was billed as a dunce to supply 


much-needed visibility to a moribund 
sport, but much of the exposure was not 
what track and field wanted. 

Johnson, of (he United Stales, has lost 
tire seeming invincibility that came with 
Olympic victories at 200 and 400 meters. 
He shook hands with Bailey afterward^ but 
tbe two did not speak otherwise. They 
appear to truly dislike each other. 

Bailey, of Canada* looked back near the 
finish and waved to Johnson as if to say, 
“Come on.” Later, he accused Johnson of 
feigning an injury when he realized he 
would be beaten. 

“He didn’t poll up; he’s a chicken,” 
Bailey told Canadian television imme- 
diately after the race. “He’safiaid to lose. 
We should run this race again so I can kick 
his rear one more time.” 

Given a chance to soften his remarks 
later, Bailey declined. 

“He knew he was going to get 
hammered after the first 30 meters so he 
had topull up," Bailey said. 

Johnson, whose injured leg was heavily 
bandaged afterward, refused to be drawn 
into a war -of words with Bailey. Ofthe ; 
“chicken" remark. Johnson said: “That’s 
saying a lot about what kind of person be 
is. I'm going to show you what kind of 
person I am. I’m not going to address 
that” 

Hie race Sunday grew out of the fact 
that Johnson’s world-record time of 19.32 
seconds over 200 meters at the Atlanta 
Olympics was faster than a doubling of 
Bailey’s world-record time of 9.84 
seconds at 100 meters. 

But promotional and financial prob- 
lems by die Magellan Entertainment 
Group nearly scuttled the race as late as a 


few days before it was run. A financial-* 
restructuring was required to ensure pay-u’ 
raent to Johnson and Bailey, and a bailout * J 
of more than $1 million by a local busi- 
nesaman, Edwin Cogan, was necessary tor. 
pay outstanding bills. ■ 

“They weren't experienced," Cogan ^ 
said of Magellan’s president. Giselle.'; 
Briden. and- her partner, Salim -Khojaii 
Britten’ s previous experience was in foe*.' 
motivational seminar business, ancLKhpjav 
is a former stockbroker. “They were rook- 
ies,” Cogan said. “It wasn't a place to** 
practice.'' .■ 

The race was broadcast in 56 countries**; 
But the atmosphere for the five-event und- 
dercard was eerily somnolent. This re-?* 
sembled exactly what it was not supposed-, 
to — a standard track meet, with long^ 
stretches of inactivity and dead-air time. If_* 
such a match race happens again, Bailey,! 
said, “it will have to be organized by 
people with track and field knowledge.” m 
I t was clear from the start that Bailey*, 
was in this race to win. If he had not turned * 
to taunt Johnson at the end, hie likely 
would have run faster than the unofficial 
world best of 14.93 seconds, run in 1991: 
by John Regis of Britain. * , 

“I’ve always said this race was not 
going to determine who the fastest man > 
is,” Bailey said. “All it was going to do 
was shut Michael Johnson up.” 

Johnson said he felt a cramp coming 
around the turn that * ‘kind of grabbed my 
leg and let go." He said: “I tried to keep 
running, and then I felt it again. It was & 
little more intense.” i 

* ‘This is what happens in sports. People 
get injured,” he said. “Whether it’s aij 
injury or whatever, I lost the race.” i 


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1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 1997 


SPORTS 


n 1 ..■* i i 









Whiten Hits 
His Stride 
In Boston, 
:As a Yankee 



PAGE 21 


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1 The Associated Press 

* . } A couple of years ago, Mark Whiten 
<s & rap out of chances with the Boston Red 
» Sox. 

*-.. :On Sunday, he kept getting them at 
- - • Fenway Park and finally came through 
a^inft his former team. 

v" "* n ■]£ ^Whiten, who grounded into a force 
pby at the plate _with the bases loaded in 
• £» the 10th, hit a tie-breaking home ran in 

“■ * - 1. 

^ thfe 15th inning that led the New York 
Yankees to an 11 >6 victory over the Red 
Sox. Whiten played for the Red Sox in 
199S and was hitting .185 with one 
borne run in 108 at- bats when he was 
traded in midseason. 

;■ "There’s always satisfaction to beat 
up on your old team,” said Whiten, who 
bas played for eight major-league clubs. 
“The way I played here, then to come 
back and do something positive, is 
great." 

1 Whiten had a pinch-hit single during a 
three-run rally that put the Yankees 
■-v ahead 5-4 in the ninth. Nomar Gar- 
ciapana tied it with a run-scoring triple in 
thebooom half, and it took five hours and 
28 minutes before there was a winner. 

-Wads Boggs and Mike Stanton also 
delivered against their former team. 

Boggs, a five-time American League 
batting ebampkm for Boston, hit a three- 
run homer to cap a six-run 1 5th and made 
it -1 1-5. He was in an 0-for- 15 slump and 
was booed before connecting. 

"It shut up a lot of people behind home 
plate," he said. "J’ve got a long way to 
go. It was just something to build on." 

Stanton, who played for the Red Sox 
in 1995 and 1996, pitched 3 % scoreless 
- innings and struck out a career high five 
batters. Kerry Lacy, traded from Texas 

to Boston for Stanton last July 31, gave 

up the home run to Whiten. 

7, white Sox 4 Albert Belle 
homered to extend his hitting streak to 
games, tying the White Sox record 
sec by Luke Appling in 1936, and Frank 
Thomas hit two homers for Chicago. 
• Milwaukee won at home, however, 
helped by two-run homers from Jeff 
Cinllo and Jose Valentin. 

.* Ma nnMn ^ T iB qra i 1 Mike Blowers and 
Alex Rodriguez homered in a three- run 
eighth inning at LheKingdome as Seattle 
.stopped a three-game losing streak. 
.. Norm Chariton, who had blown his last 
three save chan cy put two runners on 
. base in the ninth, and Bobby Ayala 
. relieved for his first save. 

AIMotica B, Btuo Jays 2 Mike Oquist, 
who has split time in the majors and 
minors for five straight seasons, came 
. within one out of his first big-league 
. shutout as host Oakland beat Toronto. 
Only Otis Nixon’s two-out, two-run 
stoglein the ninth prevented Oquist from 
pitching the Athletics' first complete 
game of the season. Mark McGwire hit 
. his 20th home ran for Oakland. 

Twins s, Angsts 4 Terry Steinbach 
homered twice to put Minnesota ahead, 
andtheTwins’ bullpen protected the lead 
with 6% scoreless innings at Anaheim. 
'.'Royals 8, Rangsrs 2 Joe Vitiello and 
Jeff King homered and Jose Offerman 
had three hits as Kansas City won at 
Texas. 

• Cleveland at Baltimore was rained 
out 



Jordan’s Buzzer Shot Sinks Jazz 


By Mike Wise 

New York runes Service 


CHICAGO — Karl Malone opened 
the door for Michael Jordan, and the 
world's greatest basketball opportunist 
sent the Utah Jazz down ro a deflating 
defeat in Game 1 of the National Bas- 
ketball Association finals. 

Jordan sent the United Center into a 
state of delirium again, squaring up and 
making a 20-footer with the out- 
stretched aim of Biyon Russell in his 
face as the buzzer sounded on Sunday 
night, a shot that gave the Chicago Bulls 
an S4-82 victory and a 1-0 lead in the 
four-of-seven series. 

Malone, the league's most valuable 
player, made the shot possible by miss- 
ing two free throws with 9.2 seconds 
re mainin g and the game tied at 82. 
Jordan sailed high for the rebound and 
pulled it down. 

With 7.5 seconds left, the Bolls called 
for a time-out. After the inbounds pass, 
you-know-who received the ball at the 
top of the circle. Guarded by Russell, 
Jordan used a crossover dribble to get 
free and then let fly the deciding shot. 

It swished through and wound up in 
the hands of Malone, who, like a lot of 
his teammates, could not believe his 
misfortune. 

Jordan led everyone with 3 1 points on 
13-oI-27 shooting. He added eight as- 
sists. 

Scottie Pippen, playing on a sore left 
foot, was awesome as Jordan’s coun- 


terpart He scored 27 points, grabbed nine 
rebounds and had four blocked shots. 

The final two minutes were frantic, 
with Pippen and John Stockton trading 
three-point bombs. Pippen’s, from the 
left wing, came with 1 minute 1 1 seconds 
left and gave Chicago an 81-79 lead. But 

NBA Finals 

Stockton responded with 5.17 seconds 
re maining , dropping in an uncontested 
shot from deep on the left wing. 

Jordan was then fouled with 35.8 
seconds remaining, but missed the 
second of two free throws. Stockton 
missed a long three-pointer on Utah’s 
next possession, bat Malone outhustled 
Dennis Rodman for the rebound, and 
Ro dman was called for the foul. 

Malone finish ed with 23 points and 

15 rebounds and made eight of his last 
1 1 shots after a slow start. Stockton had 

16 points and 12 assists. 

Stockton's approach resembled a sur- 
geon's. He used precise movements, 
attacking the basket at just the right 
time, putting just enough spin on his 
shot and just enough velocity on his 
bounce pass. A pick- and -roll play run 
by Stockton and Malone with Jess than 
eight minutes left in the third quarter — 
Malone dunked viciously — halted a 
Bulls run and startled the crowd. 

Pippen, meanwhile, showed amazing 
grit, swiping at passes on the defensive 
end and hitting for 12 points in the third 
quarter. He stole a pass and raced to- 


ward the basket in the final seconds of • 
the quarter, laying the bail in but coming 
down awkwardly on his injured foot. , 

With Jordan" straggling mightily, * 
Chicago never needed Pippen more. « 
Jordan had hit only nine of 21 shots 1 
through three quarters, and missed • 
many easy jumpers. 

It was as if he did not know what to do ; 
with people such as Jeff Homacek and • 
Howard Eisley assigned to guard him; 
he looked like a running back who sees * 
such a big hole that he just freezes up. 

Pippen, who scored seven straight 
points for Chicago to opwn ihe third 
quarter, had become the biggest question 
mark surrounding the Bulls the last four 
days. He had not practiced since suffering 
a soft-tissue tear on the bottom of his left 
fool in Game 5 of the Eastern Conference 
finals against Miami. The Bulls were 
fully prepared to be without him for 
Game 1 and 10 rely on Toni Kukoc. 

But Pippen went from walking 
gingerly, and wearing a rubber protective 
sandal, on Saturday to running out for the 
player introductions Sunday night. Al- 
though he picked up two fouls early in 
the first quarter, he moved fairly well. 

But midway though the second 
quarter, he took a pretty handoff pass 
from Jordan on the left side of the free- 
throw line. He quickly took flight ahead 
of everyone for the dunk. 

The athleticism he showed might 
have eased the concerns about him, but 
the way Pippen slowly ran back upcourt 
was not encouraging. He was hurting. 


A Real MVP (Not Malone) Shines 


By Michael Wilbon 

Washington Past Service 


Pmi JcwrO/Tbr Axaooj&od Pits* 

Chicago’s Michael Jordan releasing the game-winning shot over the 
outstretciied arm of Utah’s Bryon RuiseU in the opener of the NBA Finals. 


Rockies 9 Pitcher Gets 4 Hits 
And a Victory Over Miami 


The Associated Press 

John Thomson found the secret to 
winning in the major leagues: Drive in 
more runs than you allow. 

The rookie right-handed pitcher 
went 4-for-4 with three runs batted in 
and pitched a seven-hitter for his first 
victory Sunday, leading the Colorado 

NL Roomdup 

Rockies to a. 9 t 2 victory over, the 
Marlins in Miami. 

Thomson's first major-league hits 
raised his average to .400, just behind 
teammate Larry Walker’s .407. 
Thomson (1-4) was recalled from 
Triple-A Colorado Springs last month 
and had lost each of has previous starts. 
He struck out six and walked two. Of 
his 120 pitches, 89 were for strikes. 

San Diego 6, Houston 3 In Houston, 
pinch hitter Tony Gwynn singled 
home two runs, and Ken Carainiti hit 
a two-run double as San Diego rallied 
after being down 3-0 in the eighth for 
its third straight victory. 

Cubs 7, Reds 1 In Chicago, Jeremi 
Gonzalez won his second straight start 
since being promoted to the majors and 
Ryne Sandberg drove in three runs. 
Gonzalez, 22, gave up three hits in five 


scoreless innings, striking out seven. 

In games reported inlatc editions. 
Monday : 

Mats a, Phillies 5 New York com- 
pleted a three-game sweep of Phil- 
adelphia before a crowd of 42.058 — 
the largest at Shea Stadium since 
opening day last year — as the Mets 
won for the 15th time in 20 games. 

Dodgms 6, Cardinals 1 Mike 
Piazza, Eric Karros and Todd Zeile hit 
. consecutive ..borne. . runs .. as Los 
Angeles ended an eight-game road 
losing streak. 

The Dodgers' rookie second base- 
man, Wilton Guerrero, was ejected in 
the first inning for using a corked bat. 
He shattered it while grounding out to 
lead off the game and, while picking 
up the pieces, the plate umpire noticed 
that it had been altered. 

Braves 4, Giants 3 Ryan Klesko 
homered in his third consecutive 
game and Jeff Blauser hit a tiebreak- 
ing borne run in the eighth inning as 
Atlanta beat San Francisco. 

Pirates 11, Expos 2 Jose Goillen’s 
homer finished off Pittsburgh's five- 
run first inning and Francisco Cor- 
dova, given some rare offensive sup- 
shook off a shaky start as the 
ties beat visiting MontreaL 


CHICAGO — This is what the most 
valuable player does. He takes the ball 
with less than five seconds left in the 
game, he creates his own shot against 
the other team's best defender, and with 
the clock ready to expire, he scores the 
winning basket, the trail flicking the net 
after the final buzzer has sounded. 

The MVP wins games. The MVP 
doesn ’ t miss a pair of fool shots with 9.2 
seconds left in Game 1 of die NBA 
Finals. 

Karl Malone is a wonderful player. 
Michael Jordan is the Most Valuable 
Player. The Best Player. The Greatest 
Ever Player. Not by ballot, by perfor- 
mance. 

It was Scottie Pippen who said, "I 
guess the Mailman don't deliver on 
Sunday.” 

The MVP award should never be 
awarded based on what happens during 
the regular season, because the regular 
season in pro sports isn't the end-all and 
be-all. The playoffs are; the champi- 
onship series especially. 

Karl Malone was voted the 1997 
MVP, and based on his regular-season 
performance it was a reasonable choice. 
But with everything at stake, with Game 
1 of the championship series just sitting 
out there waiting to be taken, MaJone 
missed two free throws and Jordan 
drained a jumper to win the game and 
add — ridiculous as it sounds — to his 
legend. 

Even though everybody from Utah's 
coach to the 12th man knew Jordan 
would take the last shot, there was noth- 
ing the Jazz could do. Nothing Bryon 
Russell could do. The natural first ques- 
tion we all had for Jazz’s coach, Jerry 
Sloan, the toughest and meanest de- 
fensive guard to ever play in the NBA, 
is, "Why not double-team Jordan?" 

The Bulls’ coach, Phil Jackson, was 


so sure Utah would overload on Jordan, 
he put Steve Ken-, Toni Kukoc, Jud 
Buechler and Pippen on the court. No 
center, no Rodman, just shooters. "I 
thought they might be necessary in case 
Michael got doubled," Jackson said. 

Sloan said he thought about double- 
teaming, but also thought about 
Jordan’s team-high eight assists in the 
game and decided: “We thought we'd 
play ’em as straight-up as we could. . . 
Probably made a mistake." 

Uh.yes. 

This is the Lenny Wilkens Rule: 
Make somebody other than No. 23 beat 

‘Michael -wanted the ball 
in crunch time and he 
made h. It’s hard to 
argue with that,’ 

you. Anybody else. Make Kukoc shoot, 
make Kerr shoot, make Buechler shoot, 
even make Pippen shoot Or make 
Jordan. force a shot over a double - .or 
triple-team.' ’ 

"T^ was surveying the defense," Jordan 
said, "looking for the double-team. The 
double-team never came. 1 was surprised 
they didn't double-team. They gave me a 
one-on-one opportunity." 

We asked Jordan to give every detail 
of what went into making the game- 
winning shot We asked Malone about 
two missed free throws. 

Someone wanted to know about other 
options off the play the Bulls started to 
ran with 7.5 seconds left, after Jordan 
grabbed the rebound of Malone's second 
missed free throw. "That play has a lot 
of options," Jordan said. "But once I 
got tiie ball, Phil knew the options were 
limited. There was only one guy." 

Jordan smiled that smile. There have 
been times when he passed off, such as 
in Madison Square Garden with the 


clock headed toward :00 when Jordan 
fired a pass to Bill Wennington for the 
dunk to beat the Knicks in his comeback 
season. But mostly he takes it and 
mostly he makes it. 

"Everybody in the arena knows 
you're going to take that shot," Jordan 
said. “Everybody watching TV knows 
you're going to take it. And yet, you're 
able to come through in that situation. 
It’s an unbelievable feeling." 

In their postgame remarks, you could 
tell everything you needed to know 
about the difference between Malone 
and Jordan. 

"It was agonizing," Malone said of 
his two missal free throws, "but it 
never should have come down to that." 
And then Malone, just like his coach, 
talked about previous missed oppor- 
tunities, turnovers, blown jumpers. 

Jordan didn't wait to be asked about 
the one free throw he missed with 35.8 
seconds to play that left the Bulls tied 
instead of ahead by one. "I was kicking 
myself,” Jordan said, plain and to the 
point 

Jordan added that he thinks of all the j 
> missed game-winners before he thinks • 
‘ about the ones he’s made. But if Joidan 1 
has nightmares about the misses, all 
defenders can recall are the makes. Ask 
poor Bryon Russell. Jeff Homacek had 
been on Jordan much of the night and 
given him some trouble, too. But on the 
last possession, Homacek and Sloan 
believed Russell should be the guy. "He 
did what Michael Jordan is known for," 
Russell said. “Backbreakers." 

Even on the night when Pippen is the 
best player on the team, as he was 
Sunday, Jordan was the MVP. 

When asked who is the most dom- 
inant player in the game, a somewhat 
defensive MaJone said: "What do you 
want me to say. Michael Jordan? It's 
obvious, it's Michael Jordan. Michael 
wanted the ball in crunch time and he 
made it. It's hard to argue with that.” 


I DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



aw*****'* 

IMAM**.** 

Vv 

•tav.i 1 r ■ • 

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PACE 22 





‘Titanic’ Night at the Tonys 

N« York Tunes Service 

N EW YORK — In a season teeming with new mu- 
sicals, ‘Titanic" drew away from the pack, w inning 
the Tony for best musical, as well as four other awards. It 
was a moment of sweet vindication for the $10 million 
musical whose budget, technical problems and improb- 
able subject earned it more than its share of taunts and 
labored jokes. 

Otherwise, it was anight for revivals at the 5 1st annual 
Tony Awards. "Chicago." which leapt into life as a 
conceit revival and became a runaway hit on Broadway, 
atterly dominated the awards in the musical categories, 
winning six awards, including best revival of a mnsicaL 
James Naughton was named best actor in a musical Bebe 
Neuwirth was named best actress in a musical and Walter 
Bobbie completed his triumph by winning the Tony for 
best director. 

The British production of "A Doll's House," by 
Henrik Ibsen, was named best play revival. Janet McTeer 
won a best-actress Tony for her performance as Nora and 
her co-star, Owen Teel, was named best actor in a featured 
role for his performance as TorvaldL Anthony Page won 
the Tony for best director of a play. 

As widely predicted. Christopher Plummer won as best 
actor for “Barrymore.” 

The Tony for best play went to Alfred Uhry's "Last 
Night at Ballyhoo.” 


PEOPLE 


■pxESPITE an attempt by animal rights 
LV protesters to ruffle some feathers. 
Kenny Rogers was married to longtime 
girlfriend, Wanda Miller, at his private 
estate. People for the Ethical Treatment 
of Animals had two protesters in chicken 
suits outside the estate to press its claims 
that suppliers for the Kenny Rogers 
Roasters restaurant chain were cruel to 
the birds. Rogers, 58, and Miller, 30, 
were wed in a traditional ceremony in-, 
side one of the bams on the estate in east 
Georgia. The wedding was Rogers's 
fifth and Miller’s second. 

□ 

An aspiring screenwriter says 
Michelle Pfeiffer stole his ideas and 
osed them in the movie "Dangerous 
Minds." Lawrence Booker contends 
portions of a story he wrote about inner- 
city high school students, "Banio 
Kids," appeared in the 1995 film. He is 
seeking 575,000 in damages. The 
movie’s credits say the film is based on 
the book, "My Posse Don’t Do Home- 
work,” by Marine-tumed-teacher Lou- 
Anne Johnson, portrayed by Pfeiffer. 


Booker says he is the father of the little 
girl the actress adopted four years ago in 
an arrangement that lets birth parents 
stay in touch with their children. Booker 
says the child’s mother had a copy of 
"Barrio Kids" when she visited the 
actress in June 1994. 

□ 

A Roman Catholic bishop in the Phil- 
ippines says there was a worrying tend- 
ency among brides to reveal a little bit 
too much of themselves at church wed- 
dings. Bishop Teodoro Bacani was 
quoted by the Philippine Star as com- 
paring it to wearing a swimsuit to a 
function at the presidential palace. "Do 
things in the right place,” he warned. "I 
don’t want this practice to spread." 

D 

As a boy. Virgil Coriz never knew his 
longtime pen pal was a movie star. To 
him. Kurt Russell was just a nice guy 
who shared his interest in hunting and 
fishing and made time to write him let- 
ters. In Albuquerque, New Mexico, for a 
film festival Russell got a chaoce to 


finally meet Coriz. now a 23-year-old 
university student majoring in electrical 
engineering. They started exchanging 
letters almost 10 years ago. Joining Rus- 
sell at the International Family Film Fes- 
tival were Ted Danson, Sally Field, 
Mary Steenbur-geo and JoBeth Wil- 
liams. The fund-raiser benefited Futures 
for Children, a group that promotes edu- 
cation in Indian communities, including 
Santo Domingo Pueblo, where Coriz 
grew up. Coriz got in contact with Rus- 
sell through the group. 

□ . 

Farrah Fawcett wants to get a few 
things straight: One, she and Ryan 
O’Neal aren’t getting back together. 
Two, she never stole another actress's 
clothes in a squabble over a man. "I 
never saw the girL I have never seen her 
clothes,” Fawcett says in the TV Guide, 
accusing supermarket tabloids of ped- 
dling false reports. She denied stealing 
clothing or destroying nude photos of the 
actress Kristen Amber in a jealous riff 
over the movie director James Orr. as 
Amber reported to police in May. 


THE GRAND ENTRANCE — A copy of the Sphinx 
floating in the Tagus River at Lisbon to announce the 
production of Verdi’s opera “Aida” in July.; 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Operation Adultery 


W ASHINGTON — The 
Pentagon has had to 
make its toughest decision 
since Desert Storm: Does it 
want its troops to make love 
or war? 

The debate began over a 
female B-52 air force pilot 
who tried to do both and 
caused all sorts hbh| 
of havoc in foe 

was discussed 

in the war room ■||j|3r9 

Chiefs of Staff. 

meeting, as the Budbwald 
policy made 
there could affect the entire 
U.S. defense structure as we 

know it. 

Infantry General Germane 
spoke: “We cannot have oar 
military engage in adultery 
when we don't know what 
China intends to do about 
Hong Kong." 

Air Force General Debora 
said, "If our troops had been 
involved in illicit relations on 
Pearl Harbor morning, we 
would have lost all our 
ships." 

Colonel Bean, the histor- 
ian, said, “We did lose all our 
ships." 

Admiral Dehorn replied, 
"It was Sunday morning and 


Liquid Monopoly 

Reuters 

AALST, Belgium — Five 
members of a Belgian diving 
club claimed a Guinness 
Book of Records entry for 
playing Monopoly under wa- 
ter, the Belga news agency 
said. 

The members of the Aalst 
diving club completed play 
after 30 hoars and 15 minutes. 
Belga said, breaking the pre- 
vious record of 9 hours and 30 
minutes. 


the adultery was consensual, 
so the navy cannot be 
blamed." 

Marine General "Skip” 
Kowling said, “We’re not 
talking about sex, gentlemen. 
We’re talking about a good- 
looting pilot of a B-52 who 
has just had a fight with her 
boyfriend and decides to 
teach him a lesson," 

The admiral said, "I don’t 
believe there is anyone in this 
room who hasn't dallied once 
or twice in his career. What 
we’re trying to avoid, for mor- 
ale purposes, is a PFC making 
love to a major, or vice versa. 
Our mission is to keep our 
troops from falling in love 
with each other in Somalia." 

Army General Wellborn 
said, "Exactly my thoughts. 
Foxholes should not become 
motels for our pilots." 

□ 

"Do we have anything in 
the budget to reward the 
troops for not fooling 
around?" 

“We do, but we’ll have to 
cancel foe F-22 fighter pro- 

K ifwe distribute bonuses. 

ik what we should do is 
have the president go on foe 
air and announce, as com- 
mander in chief, that he will 
not tolerate any hanky-panky 
in foe U.S. armed forces." 

One of foe generals said, 
“Are yon sure that is a good 
idea?" 

A paratroop colonel said, 
"I think we should tell any- 
one who is caught in the hay 
that he or she will immedi- 
ately be sent to foe front’ ’ 
The admiral said, "The 
navy’s position is, "Damn all 
adnltery and foil steam 
ahead." 

The air force general said, 
"We’ve gone further than 
that. We are telling ail our 
troops: If anyone asks yon to 
engage in a love tryst, Just 
Say No.” 


Hunter Thompson 


By Frank Brnni 

New York Tunes Service 




Eqr-3»s»: - 


W OODY CREEK, Colorado. 

— The front gate to Hunter $. 
Thompson's log-cabin-style ranch 
is flanked by two hunks of metal 
folded like origami into shapes re- 
sembling vultures. These twin 
sentries convey both a promise and 
a threat: You are entering the realm 
of foe seriously weird, and you may 
not get out alive. 

Inside, Thompson is doing his 
bit to live up to that billing. There is 
a tumbler of Scotch on a kitchen 
counter in front of him, plus a shot 
of tequila, not to mention a tall 
glass, of some chartreuse -colored 
concoction called Toni’s Kick-a- 
boo Joy Juice, in addition to a pipe 
with a bowl shaped like a human 
skull Its contents smell suspi- 
ciously unlike tobacco. 

Thompson partakes of each, 
pausing afterashor of foe tequila to 
reflect on the way foe finest dis- 
tilled spirits attain a common 
smoothness. 

"The best of all foe liquois, at foe 
top, taste more alike, more like each 
other,” he says as he drags on one 
of his beloved Dunhill cigarettes, 
which arc quasi-permanent append- 
ages. "It’s like fiction and non- 
fiction — the pyramid theory." 

Thompson is speaking not just 
about literature in general but also 
about his own work, which has 
occasionally straddled foe line be- 
tween foe imagined and foe reaL 
And if this self-analysis seems n tad 
self-impressed, it is timely. 

Villard Bodes has just released 
"The Proud Highway," a collec- 
tion of letters he wrote between 
1955 and 1967, a span of time 
taking him from his late teens to the 
age of 30. It is exactly foe kind of 

& backward into a writer’s 
q that is typically reserved 
for foe most revered artists and 
even then appears after they die. 

Next month, just in time for his 
60th birthday, the cameras are 
scheduled to start rolling on the 
movie version of "Fear ana Loath- 
ing in Las Vegas," his 1971 ac- 


:*:.;** 


mumbles, mutters 
making itdjgfcn&fo: 
virtually in 


him 


ter firm- 


Rm! Ov-ifey. t'bowgcuifc'n/ Aaptu. tor Tbn 

Hunter Thompson at home, with car and stuffed wolverine. 


foe results. 

"Iliad a pretty 

be grumbles stone typical 
de, "tot ridstn?*:? ■ 

vBriokky offers a deareryvftw of 

He says 


foatfoe letters werefifce sS'aest 
^egg’ ’ to be redeemed atti. iatixdafe. 
£t.“-Yon don’t associate Hunter 
with foal almost analfy 
Tj&entive collecting of4fetngs,” be 
/acknowledges, .tot he adds: "He 
-.fradly believed, in- his gifts as a 
writer. So, he would save everything 

and methodically file f£qgB/ ( 

The resulting book serves as a 
resunder that before " Thompson 
transmogrified into ah eccentric 
pop-icon, as famous for bis fast- 
dnying, drug-taking, profanity- 
spewing persona as for- his Writing, 
he was first and foremost ari orig- 
inal vivid prose voice. The wicked 
humor and bracing political con- 
victionof the letters in “The Proud 
Highway” laid the groundwork for 
“Hell’s Angels, “Fear 'and 
Loathing in Las Vegas” and “Fear 
and Loathing: On the Campaign 
Trail ’72,” Thompson’s earliest 
books and, as time would prove, his 
most famous.-. 

If his career seems frozen in foe 


count of a drag-addled odyssey 
through America’s capital of 
kitsch. The talent involved is A- 
list Terry Gilliam directs, and 
Johnny Depp plays Thompson. 

How does Thompson feel about 
all this? For all his self-destructive 
shriek, Thompson appears to care 
deeply, and in an entirely conven- 
tional way, about his regard and 
legacy as a writer. 

“The Proud Highway” would 
not exist had Thompson not made 
carboa copies of all foe letters he 
wrote as a budding writer and tod 


he not packed away and carted 
around these pounds of corres- 
pondence through the decades. 

The book is 661 pages, and its 
editor, a New Orleans scholar and 
writer named Douglas Brinkley, 
said it represented only 1 in 15 of 
the letters Thompson kept. There 
are enough left over, he said, to fill 
at least two more volumes. 

Thompson has trouble answer- 
ing how at such an early age he was 
struck by the impulse to save all 
these documents. But then, be is oot 
so good with questions of any ki^cL 


lives. His ragtag collection of 
motor vehicles includes two blaz- 
ing-red vintage convertibles and a 
BMW motorcycle, all from the 
early 1970s. He likes to drive them 
late or early, when he has foe roads 
and stars to himself . 

Many of the innumerable knick- 
knacks scattered everywhere com- 
memorate tiie early 1970s, from the 
dartboard with a Richard Nixon 
bull’s-eye to campaign buttons for 
George McGovern. They jockey 
for space with photographs, draw- 
ings and clippings pertinent to 
milestones in Thompson's career. 

There are also more than a dozen 
fire, extinguishers. Thompson is 


fondof usingthese instruments and J 
was recently arrested in Boulder. ; j 
Colorado, for doing so during a-!* 
roeeto-ctim-live-jperfonnance in aT 
theater there. 

" In his own home, there is no such 
threat of punishment, and as he sits 
on a bar stool.m his galleylike kit- ■ 
chen, he finds and fiddles with a 
small extinguisher. 

Deborah Fuller, his secretary, 
assistam and personal caretaker of 
sorts for more than a decade, enters 
the room and turns pale. 

“Please don’t spray it. Hunter!* * 
she pleads. Too laie: A cloud of 
chemicals rises into foe air. 

Mach of this abstruse blather is 
to be expected: par for the gonzo 
course Less predictable is Che ex- 
tent to which foe night devolves 
into an orgy of self-worship. . 

After Thompson and a half- 
dozen friends — including the 
sheriff of Pitkin County, which in- 
cludes both Woody Creek and As- 
pen — finish watching a basketball 
playoff game , Thompson passes 
around an advance copy of Rolling 
Stone that includes an excerpt from 
“The Proud Highway." 

- Drawing everyone’s attention to 
a passage in foe front of foe 
magazine appraising his career, he 
instructs the sheriff, Roberr 
Braudis, to read it aloud. 
Thompsoo hoots and claps at foe 
most complimentary parts. 

“That's a pretty. spirited' love 
letter for Rolling Stone," 
Thompson notes. . . 

All foe while, an electronic ticker 
incessantly repeats a programmed 
sequence of words by Thompson, 
from “The Great Shark Hant,” on 
fact fiction and William Faulkner. 

- The birds that offer the best com- 
mentary on his state of mind, and of 
a visitor’s experience of it, are not 
foe inanimate, ones at the gate tot 
foe live ones inihe yard: peacocks. 
Cawing loudly and fanning their 
tails,- these imported specimens 
seem to flaunt their singular colors 
as they invite foe world to take note. 

In so doing, they support the adage 
that most pets reflect and resemble 
their owners, or vice versa. 


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an* calling from. 

I Dial the phone number You're calling. 

3 . Dial the calling card number listed draw your name. 


sscr 


seas 


83S OOO 



EUROPE 



ttstriato 

.822-9IJ3-011 



Baljtan*,. 

H00-1K-H 

UdM Kingdom a_ 

.. oao-awni 

tack RejmfcffcA.. . 

flWMW.101 


0MMW811 

France..., - 

- —Q-MMMfll 

MIDDLE EAST 


Serarey. 

- 913W010 

Egflt*icain))? 

- 510-0200 

Greece* — 

- BM00-1J11 

terse) _ 

....177-1 BO-2727 

Wind 

i-swssmoi 

SatfhlraOiao 

1 -880-18 

Italy* 

- 172-mi 

AFRICA 


Mtartinds* 

0800*022-8111 


.. 81*1 


755-5042 


0-800-10 

Spain 

..WM-11 

Sffljtfi Africa ...: 

M8MM123 




Cart find the AT&T Access Number for the country yon're caSing from? Just ask any operator foe 
AT&T Direct* Service, or vigour Teh shear bttp-y/wvwJgua mA i-gve ie r ; 


Tiiaa*— cowiw 

tmcncalff to e® d i cJS ■> 1 * FJ i*K m «Uuii iliip kud 01 fH araftat toa tm oB tr C i bn daMfa Mf Jpe •McifeM «Mt d m ftaciaj h dU 




HWa 


fctii rrlhi-f-i-ira*VmtrlH oft fnti uni 




stays mainly in the plain.