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Heralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST " a f” ' 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


Paris, Wednesday, June 4, 1997 


Bonn Gives In to Pressure and D 



No/35,538 



French Communists to Back Jospin 


By Barcy James 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — The leadership of the 
Communist Party has recommended 
joining the government of Prime Min- 
ister Lionel Jospin, who assumed office 
Tuesday, assuring him of a majority in 
the National Assembly. 

The Communist national committee, 
recommending that rank-and-file mem- 
bers endorse its decision, did not spell 
our the conditions under which the party 
would join the government for the first 
time since the early 1980s. The party 
said it would announce Us decision 
Wednesday after local branches had 
voted. 

Socialist Party officials said Mr. 
Jospin would complete his cabinet on 


Wednesday, but did not confirm that it 
would include Communists. 

The Communist Party, which won 38 
seats in the 377-member National As- 
sembly, is opposed to joining the Euro- 
pean single currency- _ 

But a senior Socialist Party member, 
Elisabeth Guigou, confirmed that the 

Socialists, face the challenge of 
reviving French politics. Page 7. 

government would respect the timetable 
for joining European monetary union, 
while insisting on changes in the criteria 
for membership. 

“Of course we mu st respect this dead- 
line,” said Mrs. Guigou, when asked 
whether France still planned to join the 


single currency on Jan. 1, 1999,' in the 
first clear indication of France 's position 
since the change of government. 

However, Mrs. Guigou, a former 
minister of European affairs who was in 
line for the same post io the new gov- 
ernment, said France would attempt to 
“fill out” the criteria for establishing 
the single currency, giving particular 
emphasis to job creation. 

After meeting with Mr. Jospin, Robert 
Hue, the Communist leader, asked for 
‘ "guarantees' * rather than imposing con- 
ditions to meet Communist demands, 
which include &500 franc ($87) increase 
in die national minimum wage of 6,407 
francs a month, a two-point reduction in 
die 20.6 percent value-added tax and a 

See FRANCE, Page 7 


By Edmund L. Andrews - 

New York Times Senice ; 

FRANKFURT ■ — The German gov- 
ernment on Tuesday ‘abandoned its 
mach criticized plan to cut its budget 
deficit this year by revaluing gold re- 
serves, & last-ditch bookkeeping ma- 
neuver that Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
had hoped would help his country qual- 
ify far the new single European cur- 
rency, die earn: 

The reversal marked a surrender by 
the government to the formidable cen- 
tral bank, the Bundesbank, which crit- 
icized die plan last week as a departure 
from sound monetary practice and as an 
intrusion on its own independence. 

Beyond being a major embarrass- 
ment fOT Mr- Kbmar^ Finance Minister . 


Theo Waigel. econoraists-sard, the re- 
treat means that Germany now has little 
chance of meeting the strict fiscal re- 
quirements far 1997 that it has itself 
insisted be the basis for deciding which 
countries can qualify for the new earn. 

, Thai is likely to force a significant 
change in- the assumptions underlying 

The Bundesbank's powerful 
‘ message. News analysis^ Page 13. 

the euro, which is .sch e duled- to begin 
replacing currencies like the French 
franc and the Deutsche mark in 1999. 
Germany has been Europe's' scolding 
schoolteacher on fiscal policy, insisting 
that countries not be allowed to par- 
ticipate in thie euro unless they meet 


exact , and nonnegotiable financial tar- 
gets. Germany has been adamant, for 
instance, that for countries to participate 
in the common currency in 1999, they 
must aetdeve-a budget deficit in 1997 
that is no bigger than 3 percent of their 
gross domestic product. 

But without either a miracle or a slew 
‘of new o De-time maneuvers, Germany's 
budget deficit this year is too big to 
satisfy Bonn-’s own demands and Mr. 
Kohl must either decide to relax his 
government's stance or to surrender to a 
delay in . introducing the eiiro. Econ- 
omists say that a. common currency 
would be unworkable without Ger- 
many’s participation. 

“Thar chances are slipping oat of 

See GOLD, Page 7 



From the Wounded, Rage 

Oklahoma Blast Victims Seek the Death Penalty 


By Rick Bragg 

New York Tones Senice 


fed AudncJu/Thc A-wcmcd Ptw 

Diane Leonard, whose husband died in the Okla- 
homa City bombing, celebrating the guilty verdict. 


OKLAHOMA CITY — After the ex- 
plosion, people learned to write left-handed, 
to tie just one shoe. They learned to endure 
the pieces of metal and glass embedded in 
their flesh, to smile with faces that made 
them want to cry, to cry with glass eyes. 

They learned, in homes where children 
bad played, to stand the quiet. They learned 
to sleep with pills, to sleep alone. 

With the conviction of Timothy McVeigh 
in a Denver federal court, with cheers and 
sobs of relief at the lot where a building once 
stood in downtown Oklahoma City, the vic- 
tims of the most deadly attack of domestic 

Oklahoma City case is a rare UJS. study 
in home-grown terrorism. Page 2. 

terrorism in U.S history learned what they 
had suspected all along: Thai justice in a far- 
away courtroom is not satisfaction. 

“1 want the death penalty,” said Aren 
Almon-Kok, whose daagbter, Baylee, was 
killed by the bomb a day after her first 


birthday. Pictures of die baby, bleeding and 
limp in the aims of a fire fighter, became a 
symbol of that crime, of its cruelty. 4 4 An eye 
for eye. You don’t take lives and get to keep 
your own.” 

Mrs. Almon-Kok saw the announcement 
of the verdict Monday on television at her 
mother’s house, then went immediately to 
the site . of her daughter's death, where she 
was joined by some people who had lost 
children in the bombing and by others who 
had just felt drawn there. 

•She said how happy she was with the 
verdict, but ha /face was stricken, haunted. 

“I cried, and I cheered,” Mrs. Almon- 
Kok said. 

“I don't think there will ever be closure. I 
love her so much and I miss her, still, a lot 
Baylee meant die world to me.” 

In what some people here see as poetic 
justice, the powerful image of Baylee, taken 
by an amateur photographer, will be used by 
prosecutors in the penally phase of the trial 
in Denver to try to send Mr. McVeigh to his 
death. ■ 

Throughout Oklahoma Cityand die little 
See VERDICT, Page 7 



Oouj CidllciMpncc Rmx-PtciK ' 

Ronnie Trent consoling his wife, Barbara, whose -parents were lolled id the 
Oklahoma City bombing, after a jury announced the McVeigh guilty verdict. 


Marines Evacuate 1,200 
From Sierra Leone Chaos 

Forces Humiliated, Nigeria Is at Crossroads 


By Howard W. French 

iVnv York Times Sen ice 

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — One day 
after fierce fighting erupted in the Sierra 
Leone capital, Freetown, U.S. Marines 
flying helicopter rescue missions evac- 
uated more than 1,200 foreigners Tues- 
day from a site close to the worst com- 
bat. 

The evacuation was mourned from a 
U.S. warship, die Kearsarge, which has 
been patrolling off the coast- The rescue 
was the third of its kind since a military 
coup overthrew an elected president on 
May 25. setting off a wud spree of 
violence and looting by rebellious sol- 
diers in Freetown. 

The latest evacuation was required 
after a Nigerian-led West African mil- 
itary intervention aimed at restoring ci- 
vilian rule backfired badly Monday, as 
rebellious soldiers routed Nigerian 
troops in several positions after heavy 
fighting, and reportedly took large num- 
bers of prisoners. 

With the completion of the Western 
evacuation from Sierra Leone, diplo- 
mats said that the country’s crisis was 
shifting into a new phase in which Ni- 
geria. West Africa f s military — and 


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poll 

faced stark choices about its future com- 
mitment there. 

As the embarrassing setback proved 
Monday, prevailing over Sierra Leone’s 
battle-hardened forces could require a 
mach larger and far more costly de- 
ployment than the 2,000 or so Nigerian 
soldiers sent to Sierra Leone so far. 

Landing in the seaside suburb of Ab- 
erdeen, about 3S0 Marines cordoned off 
the beachfront with concertina wire, 
placed the area under heavily armed 
guard, and loaded the terrorized for- 
eigners onto helicopters for transport to 
the Kearsarge. an amphibious assault 
ship, which diplomats said would later 
cany them to neighboring Guinea. 

The scene of the two previous evac- 
uations by the Marines, the nearby 
Mammy Yoko Hotel, was almost totally 
destroyed in a day of ferocious combat 
Monday. In that fighting, about 50 
lightly armed Nigerian soldiers were 
pitted against 150 or more fighters from 
the Sierra Leonean Army and a rural 
rebel force that has joined in the coup, 
the Revolutionary United Front. 

The Sierra Leonean forces attacked 



of rebel positions by Nigerian warships. 
Although the numbers could not be in- 
dependently verified. Sierra Leone ra- 
dio reported Tuesday that 80 civilians 
had been killed and 100 wounded in the 
Nigerian bombardment. 

With more than 600 foreigners shel- 
tering in the basement of the Mammy 
Yoko Hotel, witnesses saicL the Sierra 

See COUP, Page 7 


AGENDA 

Clinton Lawyer Sees 
‘Smear’ Bid by Starr | 

Responding to a magazine article. 

Bill and Hillary Clinton’s lawyer has 
accused Whitewater prosecutors of hy- 
ing to “smear” his clients by leaking 
secret information from grand jury pro- 
ceedings. 

In a letter to Kenneth Starr, the pros- 
ecutor in charge of the Whitewater in- 

r 'ry, die lawyer, David Kendall, said 
t comments made by prosecutors in 
the article flouted grand jury secrecy 
rules “aimed at preventing precisely 
this kind of leak-and-sraear damage.” 

The article also said prosecutors had 
made “no attempt to squelch specu- 
lation that they have weighed the pos- 
sibility of indicting ’ ’ Mrs. Clinton in the 
case. Page 3. 

U.S. Probes Collusion 
Among Art Dealers 

Justice Department investigators 
have subpoenaed financial documents 
freon more than a dozen prominent 
Manhattan art dealers and from 
Christie’s and Sotheby’s auction houses 
in what appears to be a wide-ranging 
antitrust investigation. 

Several of the dealers said they be- 
lieved that investigator are looking in- 
to the possibility of collusion and price 
fixing among art dealers buying at auc- 
tion. Page 10. 

Books - Page 3. 

Crossword - Page 12. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 



Sports 


Pages 20-21. 


Aror Dc4cfl/A«cux ftratr-Prc-e 

DISMISSED — Steffi Graf leaving the court Tues- 
day after losing to Amanda Coetzer. It was Grafs 
first French Open quarterfinal loss since 1986, 

EUROPE .... Pages. 

Britain's Blair Denounces Creation of'fForkle&s doss* 


TheMermarkot 


The IH i on-line http://«wv;. iht.com 


Page 4. INTERNATIONAL . 

One Arab Real-Estate Dealer's Hamming Night 


10. 


Chretien Hangs On 
To Power in Canada 

Liberals Win a Slight Majority; 
Quebec Separatists Lose Seats 

By Anthony DePalma 

New York Times Service 

TORONTO — Canadian voters have returned Rime Min- 
ister Jean Chretien to power, giving him a slim partiamentary 
majority and a weak mandate to continue with the severe fiscal 
austerity that has practically eliminated the country's, huge 
federal deficit, while entting deeply into Canada's revered 
social programs. ' 

Mr. Chretien’s Liberal Party won 1 55 of the 301 seats in the 
new House of Commons, barely enough to form a second 
consecutive majority government, and 19 fewer seats than the 
174 that it controlled in the previous government. 

The Reform Party increased its seats to 60 from 50, the Bloc 
Quebecois d ro pp ed to 44 seats from 50, the New Democratic 
Party rose to 21 from 9, and the Progressive Conservatives 
increased to 20 seats from 2. One independent was elected. 

Mr. Chretien and bis centrist party received overwhelming 
support from Ontario, which has undergone severe b udget cuts 
and a drastic overhaul of social services. The Liberals took 101 
of the province’s 103 seats. 

They also did better than expected in Quebec, where the 
separatist parry. Bloc Quebecois, split its support with a 
revitalized Progressive Conservative Party, opening room for 
the Liberals. 

Mr. Chretien squeaked out a narrow victory for his own sear 
in die Quebec paper-mill town of Shawirugan, a seat he has 
held for most of the past 30years. The lead kept changing hands 
between himself and his separatist opponent. Yves Duhaime. 

The results show that Mr. Chretien, 63, has won pan of the 
gamble he took by calling die election one and a naif years 
before bis term ended, convinced that he could build on the 
sizable majority that, the Liberals enjoyed in Ottawa. Mr. 
Chretien said he wanted a mandate for another term to 
complete the overhaul of the Canadian economy and to 
prepare for a new challenge on Quebec independence ex- 
pected before the year 2000. 

“In this campaign we talked about keeping this country 
strong and united. Ml Chretien told supporters at his home 

See CANADA, Page 7 


Dissident vs. Dissident Reveals Fragility of the Chinese Movement 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Post Sen* e 


BEIJING — For 20 years, the names of the 
Chinese dissidents Ren Wanding and Wei Jing- 
sheng have been closely linked. 

Both were active in the Democracy Wall move- 
ment of 1978-79, when they plastered political 
tracts on a wall near the leadership compound of 
Bering's Communist Party. Mr. Wei was jailed in 
1979 and Mr. Ren soon followed for publicly 
protesting Mr. Wei’s arrest. In 1988, five years 
after his release. Mr. Ren again called for Mr. 
Wei’s release and wrote an essay challenging the 
Communist Party to “let the people decide their 
future through the bullot box.” 

Now, after another prison stint for speeches he 


gave during the 1989 demonstrations in Tianan- 
men Square, Mr. Ren has resurfaced in an un- 
expected way: with a sharp attack on the im- 
prisoned Mr. Wei. 

Mr. Wei has been nominated for the Nobel 
Peace Prize, but Mr. Ren has said that he would 

Two labor activists have been sentenced to 
prison for three and a half years. Page 6. 

“sully” the award and that giving it to him would 
be “stupid and nonsensical.” 

Human rights activists here interpret Mr. Ren's 
attack not as an indictment of Mr. Wei; but as an 
indication of the feeble state of the Chinese de- 
mocracy movement on the eighth anniversaiy of 


the June 4. 1989, crackdown that ended the demon- 
strations in Tiananmen Square. With people tike .. 
Mr. Wei and the student leader Wang Dan serving , 
long prison sentences, there are no forceful voices 
left inside China to drown, out Mr. Ren’s note of 
jealoasy, bitterness and disillusionment. 

Amnesty international contends that 303 people 
are still in prison for their roles in the 1989 protests. 
Bao Tong, the most senior party member linked to ■ 
the protests, has been released but was forced to. . 
move out of Beijing and wits deprived of his 
political rights. Chen Zimin®, branded as one of the 
“black hauls” behind the 1989 protests and then 
the articulate leader of a creative policy research 
organization, is effectively under house arrest. 
Others live in exile. .... 

Remnants of the democracy movement have • 


fallen . to bickering among themselves about 
strategy. Mr. Ren, for example, asks whether Mr. 
Wei should have taken precautions to avoid his 
curisnt prison stim. which began in 1994. 

-“He doesn’t think about what the effects of his 
activities are on the movetnent.” Mr. Ren said in a 
telephone interview. “He doesn't think carefully 
about the function, the usefulness of his sacrifice.” 
Mr. Wei’s intellectual abilities are “average." he 
added, and Mr. Wei “is not China’s Mandela.” 

Merle Goldman, a professor at Boston Uni- 
versity who has written extensively about reform 
here, said:;” I think the tragedy of June 4. 1989, 
proved that it is impossible to cany out genuine 
poirtical reform within the existing Leninist party- 

See CHINA, Page 7 



;■ --- -• 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 1997 

PAGE TWO 


The McVeigh Verdict / A Bombing Made in the U.S.A. 

The Shock of Terrorism 
Bisen From Native Soil 


By Glenn Frankel 

Hicttitgiufl Post Service 


W ASHINGTON — In the 221 years 
since the 13 colonies declared their 
independence, Americans have 
fought on their own soil to escape a 
king and to shatter and restore the union. There 
have been vigilante violence, violence against 
Indians, agrarian uprisings, criminal violence, 
racial and ethnic violence, family fends, lynch- 


ings. urban riots, serial killings and political 
assassinations. Violence, the black activist H. 
Rap Brown once famously said, is “as Amer- 
ican as cherry pie:” 

But pure terrorism is not. The act of driving a 
van laden with explosives to the front of a 
government building and setting the fuse, in- 
discriminately murdering dozens of men, wom- 
en and children for an ostensibly political pur- 
pose. is such an awful event, that at first 
Americans could not believe it was home- 
grown. Suspicions turned toward the Middle 
East, toward someone or something outside 
Americans’ borders and psyches. 

The verdicts Monday confirmed that the 
Oklahoma City bombing was indeed an Amer- 
ican acL and they constituted an American re- 
sponse — a jury of 12 people heard the state's 
evidence, listened to the accused person's de- 
fense and then reached a unanimous finding of 
guilt. 

For relatives of the victims and for many 
others as well, the verdicts were an act of healing 
and redemption — an attempt not only to restore 
a tarnished legal system but also to confirm an 
American consensus that violence in the name 
of politics is wrong. 

The Oklahoma City bombing revealed a dark 
undercurrent in American society of angry, ali- 
enated people who deeply resent and fear their 
govemment. “Reminds me a little bit of Yel- 
lowstone Park,” a defense lawyer, Gerry 
Spence, said recently on television. “There’s all 
these waters boiling and eventually some of 
them pop up.” 

Wearing a T-shirt that proclaimed “Sic Sem- 
per Ttyannis” (Thus Always to Tyrants), 
Timothy McVeigh set out that morning in. April 
1 4*)5 not just to damage a building but to destroy 
a political system. According to the testimony of 
his friend Michael Fortier. Mr. McVeigh 
planned to spill as much blood as possible. He 
intentionally set the fuse not during the middle 
of the night, when the Alfred P. Murrah Federal 
Building would have been all but empty, but 
during a peak hour of work, when it was certain 
that many federal workers would be killed. 

M R. FORTIER said that Mr. Mc- 
Veigh compared these employees to 
“storm troopers" in the movie 
“Star Wars. He said that Mr. Mc- 
Veigh told him, “They may be individually 
innocent, but because they were pan of the evil 
empire, they were guilty by association.” 

The point was a simple one: that the federal 
government was evil, that the death of S4 people 
during the 1993 siege of the Branch Davidian 


sect near Waco, Texas, was ef-. . 
fectively a government declara- 
tion of war a gains t die American 
people. 

Although he pleaded ■ not . 
guilty, it is clear that Mr. Mc- 
Veigh saw the bombing as both 
the spark for a national uprising 
and a logical and necessary re- 
sponse to the government's own 
violence. 

11115 has seldom happened in 
the past A list of bombings in the 
United States going back 75 years 
shows that, however misdirected 
or bizarre, most of those attacks 
had a clear target and limited 
aims. 

Where the goals were ambi- 
tious and plainly terrorist — such 
as the “anarchist'' bombing in 
Wall Street in 1920 that lolled 40 
or the attack on the World Trade 
Center in 1993 that killed 6 — the 
perpetrators were usually for- 
eigners with a cause they felt the 
United States was impeding. ■ 

T HE OKLAHOMA City 
bombing produced by far 
the largest single toll of 
terrorist deaths on Amer- 
ican soil. But almost as shocking 
was the fact that the man respon- 
sible came from an unremarkable 
American background. Timothy 
McVeigh was a lonely and trou- 
bled boy who grew up in a working-class com- 
munity in western New York state. He ex- 
perienced many of the vicissitudes of modem 
young Americans — he grew up in a broken 
home in a town where factory jobs were drying 
up. 

With limited prospects at home and at work, 
be did what millions of young men have done for 
generations — be joined die army. But that 
institution also had changed. Mr. McVeigh 
found no home, but he learned some of the s kills 
and met some of the men who allegedly would 
aid him in his troubled journey to Oklahoma 
City. 

Somewhere along the way. his personal ali- 
enation turned political and his disaffection 
hardened into hatred. He became a denizen of 
the militia underworld, a subculture of a sub- 
culture. where paranoid conspiracy theories and 
firearms made a lethal mix. 

Although most Americans were stunned and 
outraged. McVeigh sympathizers on the fringe 
have remained loyal. For months the Internet has 
been alive with conspiracy theories. 

One contributor to a news discussion group 
on the Excite World Wide Web site wrote Sat- 
urday that “there was so much evidence to at 
least suggest prior knowledge if not direct gov- 
ernment involvement in the bombing." that if 
Mr. McVeigh were found guilty, “I'd have to 
say that the defense team sold out for some 
reason.” 







Another contributor suggested that “if be is 
guilty of anything to do with this, I don’ c think he 
is alone. It appears to me that the feds were in on 
it too.” 

Conspiracy theorists recently posted a pur- 
ported recent photo of the Ryder truck on the 
Internet, insuring that it was never used in the 
blast and now was hidden in a secret army 
compound 

Others say a study proves that the amount of 
explosives in the van could not have been suf- 
ficient to cause the devastation. 

Such notions are not surprising in a country 
where polls indicate that 49 percent of the public 
believes die CIA was involved in President John 
Kennedy’s assassination and '9 percent suspects 
that the 1969 moon landing was a hoax. 

What is more striking is the degree of out- 
raged consensus that immediately arose after the 
bombing. The. Waco congressional hearings, 
which produced much testimony about federal 
incompetence during the siege, did not resonate 
politically. Few seemed prepared to support 
critics of federal law enforcement in the af- 
termath of Oklahoma City. 

“Most of the violence in American history 
has at least some logical target or purpose.’ ’ said 
David Rothman, a social historian at Columbia 
University. 

“But Oklahoma City just seemed wrenched 
out of any context. It’s not part of the American 
tradition. It’s more pathology than politics.” 


Muslims 

Hoping to Sta 


By Jonathan C. Randal 

VfaUngtt mi Post Service 



IIKI 


Serbs 1 


S ANSKI MOST, Bosnia — On the military 
map, colored grease-pencil arrows stab north 
across Bosnia’s cease-fire hues. The map. 
drawn by Alessandra Morelli of the officeoi 
the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, 
illustrates widely shared fears that Muslim 
refugees, increasingly fed up with promises 
and no action, will force their way home to 
what is now Serb-held territory with poten- 
tially bloody results. 

Thousands of refugees returning <p Bosnia 
from abroad are pouring into what Ms. Mo- 
relli 's map labels the “major impact area — 
a triangle of land with its apex in this Sana 
River city in northwest Bosnia and its lep 
reaching 32 kilometers (20 miles) to the 
southeast and southwest. . 

The refugees are seeking to return to their 
homes, which are now occupied by Serbs, but 
Muslim officials, assisted by a crisis center 
that works from 7 A.M. to 9 P.M., are fry ing to 
find housing for them in Muslim-held Sanski 
Most and outlying districts. 

Western military specialists speculate that 
if Muslim troops resume hostilities against the 
Serbs, now protected by international peace- 
keeping forces, any such drive will be pre- 
ceded by local incidents involving huge num- 
bers of refugees attempting to cross the lines. 

If successful, the theory goes, the i ncide nts 
could spark a panicky retreat of Serbs from the 
entire western half of Serb-held territory and 
not just from the Muslim returnees’ homes in 
nearby Prijedor, Bosanski Novi and Banja 
Luka. 

Muslim officials make no secret that re- 
turning refugees are being deliberately dir- 
ected here to increase what one regional may- 
or joyfully called “the critical mass” and Ms. 
Morelli referred to as a “parking lot rapidly 
becoming a pressure cooker.” 

Officials here acknowledged that concen- 
trating Muslims wi thin kilometers of the 
cease-fire lines is social engineering meant to 
impress the Serbs. The 1995 Dayton peace 
agreement provides for refugees to return to 
their homes, but this has been ignored, And 
the peacekeepers, in refugee eyes, decline to 
enforce iL 

Mehmet Alagic, a military leader during 
the Bosnian war and now the mayor of Sanski 
Most, routinely tells visitors that be has ho 
qualms about increasing the refugee intake. 
He speaks openly of grouping several families 
in a single house, often with 10 persons in a 
room. 

Sead Cirkin, who organizes Prijedor 
refugees from an office in Lusci Palanka 24 
kilometers west of here; said he would gladly 
move out of his office “to make way far 
another returning family" and would wel- 
come “an explosion, because something has 
to be done to help us go home.” 

Yet each successive — and often dis- 
gruntled — family is putting added pressure 
on limited housing and job opportunities. • 

The area’s population, after the large Serb 
minority’s exodus in October 1995. is almost 
entirely Muslim and is higher than the prewar 
figure of 61 .000 residents. Plans are afoot to 


bring in 20,000 more returning Muslim 

refugees^ , ’ . rj i 

As man y as 5-000 arc said to have arrived so 
far the yearby bus or car, and many thousands 
more are expected when the school-year 
ends. .■ 

Foreign governments eager to cut back 




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Doc Cheatham, a Trumpet Player Who Became a Jazz Star, Dies at 91 


By Peter Watrous 

AVu York Times Service 


NEW YORK — Doc Cheatham. 91, a- 
lyrical, elegant trumpet player whose career 
blossomed when he was in his 70s and who 
then became one of the best-known jazz stars, 
died Monday at George Washington Uni- 
versity' Hospital in Washington. 

An indefatigable player, Mr. Cheatham 
performed last weekend at Blues Alley, a club 
in Washington. 

Mr. Cheatham emerged in his own right in 
the late 1960s as a brilliantly sensitive im- 


proviser and leader of stellar small groups. He 
became an acclaimed performer in small 
clubs, large concert hails and jazz festivals 
throughout the world; His solos were admired 
for their spare lyricism. 

Bom in Nashville. Tennessee, Adolphus .An- 
thony Cheatham started playing music when be 
was 15. In the mid-’20s, he moved to Chicago 
and began to play with regional bands. 

In 1931 he became a member of Cab Cal- 
loway’s orchestra at the Cotton Club in Harlem. 
In the ’60s he led his own group in New York 
and performed with Benny Goodman ’s quintet, 
where he emerged as a significant improviser. 


When he was in his late 60s. he left the 
Latin orchestra of Ricardo Rey to rededicate 
himself to jazz. He formed a new band, and in 
1974 he opened the Nice Jazz Festival in 
France for George Wein. an engagement that 
helped to re-establish Mr. Cheatham on the 
international scene. 

But it was not until 1980 that he became a 
genuine star. He became a perennial at the JVC 
Festival, at Carnegie Hall’s jazz programs and 
at Lincoln Center's jazz programs. 

’ ‘When I ’m gone,” Mr. Cheatham said in an 
interview for The New Yorker in 1982, “it’ll 
be just about over, my kind of playing." 


For example, state governments in Gennany, 
desperate to reduce the costs of caring for 
more Bosnian refugees than the rest of Europe 
combined, have begun cutting ctff scdal se- 
curity payments to them and rescinding res- 
idence permits to force their return home. 

A 53-year-old woman who retaroed from 
Germany last month with her son said she was 
“too scared” to challenge the Serbs in her 
home town and was angry with local officials, 
whom she accused of demandaig the equi- 
valent of S3.000 to allow her to stay in die 
room she had found in the city. 

As she spoke, a retired couple got into, then 
out of, a minibus that is used to show new- 
comers around available housing, much of it 
as far as 25 kilometers from the city. 

“My husband has a heart condition and 
must be in the city,” the woman shoaled. 

But Djevad Cusic. a retired engineer. hi$ 
wife. 7-S riflh. and their 20-year-old son, 
J asenk o. seemed pleased with the two-romp 
second-story apartment the committee had 
found them in a Serb-owned house in anearby 
suburb last week. 

“We saw bigger places, but they were 
farther out and needed doors and windows,” 
Mr. Cusic said. 

. “We'were smart to come when we did. This 
is big enough for us.” 


Algeria on Alert 
For Vote Violence 


by Our StJffFrmi Dtsporbe 

ALGIERS — The authorities in Algeria 
ordered some schools closed Tuesday and 
told residents to report suspicious packages 
and cars in an effort to stem the bloodshed 
from rebels’ bombs before the legislative 
election Thursday. 

Since Sunday, bombings attributed to 
Muslim guerrillas have killed at least 22 
people and have wounded mare than 120 in 
Algiers, the capital. 

In a statement published by local news- 
papers, the Interior Ministry urged Algerians 
to show “extreme caution” and report sus- 
pect cars or packages to die security forces. 

The warning came as Algeria began a man- 
datory 48-hour “cooling off” pause from 
electioneering after a campaign by 39 polit- 
ical parties for the 380-seat National People's 
Assembly. ’ 

The vote will be die first legislative election 
since civil war broke out with Islamic ex- 
tremists in 1992. The uprising began after the 
military canceled polls that the Islamic Sab 
vation Front was poised to win. 

The Front is now banned, and a new con- 
stitution forbids the use of Islam as a tool to 
win public office. Parties seen as front-run- 
ners include the National Democratic Rally, a 
group of supporters of President Liamine Zer- 
oual. and the Movement of a Peaceful Society, 
which has fundamentalist leanings. 

In its orders Tuesday, the Interior Ministry 
told Algiers schools to suspend classes for 
young students from midday Tuesday until 
Saturday. Le Matin newspaper attributed the 
order to * ‘extreme tension” in the capital, i 

Earlier, the Interior Ministry ordered mar- 
kets to close — one of the bombs this week 
went off at a crowded market in Algiers's Bab 
el Oued district, reportedly killing 1 1 people 
— and banned trucks from the capital's 
streets. (Reuters, AFP) * 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


New Terminal at Prague Airport 

PRAGUE ( AP) — .Amid expectations that its capacity will 
double, the international Ruzyne Airport opened its new 
terminal Tuesday. 

The terminal is expected to increase the airport's annual 
capacity - to 4.8 million travelers, from 23 million. 

Wider Smoking Ban on U.S. Flights? 

WASHINGTON l AP) — On the 10th anniversary of the 
U.S. law banning smoking on most domestic flights, a group 
of lawmakers wants to stop smoking on ail flights beginning in 
the United States. An expanded ban is one of two anti-smoking 
measures proposed Tuesday by three Democrats — Senator 
Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey. Senator Dick Durbin of 
Illinois and Representative Henry Waxman of California. 

The number of tourists visiting the United States hit a record 
high in 1996, the Commerce Department's Tourism Industries 
office has announced. About 46.3 million travelers visited the 
United States last year, up 7 percent from 1995. I Reuters l 

Changle International Airport in.Fuzhou, the capital of 
Fujian Province in southeastern China, is scheduled to open 
June 23. the Xinhua press agency reported (APj 

Cholera has killed about 350 people in Tanzania over the 
past five months, the Health Ministry said Tuesday. (AFP) 


Europe 


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WTO 18*64* 
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Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 



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North America 

Chilly wealher will remain 
entrenched across eastern 
Canada and the northeast- 
ern united Stales, while 
very warm to hot weather 
is expecieo across the 
southwestern United 
States hto the Plains, wUh 
sunshine and mainly ary 
weather Rainy and cooler 
weather will move into 
wee tem Canada 


Europe 

Cloudy, damp end cool 
weather s expected across 
eastern Europe ham Scbjv 
d/nevia to western Russia 
southward inns Turkey. 
wh*e mainly dry and warm 
weather is m store tor Hun- 
gary southeastward Into 
Greece. Cool, wet weather 
will move into the British 
Isles. France and parts o< 
Spain. 


Asia • 

A small siorm will move 
across northeastern Asia 
producing showers in 
Manchuria and southwest- 
ern Russ /a Thursday night 
and Into Tokyo by Friday. 
Beijing and Seoul Should 
be mainly dry and warmer 
with some sun. II will be 
hot and dry m India, but 
tainy In southeastern 
China. 


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Africa 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 1997 


PAGE 3 



THE AMERICAS 



Seri ^ ® nton lawyer Assails 
'■ ‘Smear’ by Prosecutor 



POLITICAL NOTES 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The lawyer for 
President Bill Clinton and his wife, Hil- 
lary. on Monday accused the White- 
Water prosecutor's office of violating 
grand jury secrecy rules in a bid to inflict 
‘■‘leak-and-smear damage*’ on his cli- 
ents. 

- In a letter to the Whitewater pros- 
ecutor. Kenneth Sian, that appeared to 


mark a dramatic change in approach, the 
daan article in 




lawyer. David Kendall, saic 
The New York Times Magazine quot- 
ing unnamed lawyers from Mr. Stan's 
office contained “plain violations of 
grand jury secrecy rules imposed on 
prosecutors. 

“The comments of you and persons 


in your office direcrly and indirecdg 




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quoted in the magazine article flout 
these obligations,'’ Mr. Kendall wrote. 
“Grand jury secrecy rules are aimed at 
preventing precisely this kind of leak- 
and-smear damage.” 

- Mr. Starr’s office did not immedi- 
ately respond to a request for com- 
ment. 

The article quoted unnamed prose- 
cutors as saying that cooperation by the 
Clintons' former Whitewater partner, 
James McDougal, led to new docu- 
ments about Mrs. Clinton's legal work 
for Mr. McDougal's failed savings and 
loan and “the truthfulness of her state- 
ments to federal investigators." 


The article also quoted the unnamed 
prosecutors as saying that Mr. Starr's 
recent court declaration that a grand jury 
had heard "extensive evidence of pos- 
sible obstruction” referred to the two- 
year disappearance of Mrs. Clinton’s 
law firm billing records. 

The magazine reported that Mr. Starr 
'‘provided background assistance for 
this article but declined to be quoted 
directly." It also reported that "lawyers 
in Starr’s office make no attempt to 
squelch speculation that they nave 
weighed the possibility of indicting" 
Mrs. Clinton. 

The latter provoked a sharp retort 
from Mr. Kendall. “You well know that 
you have no evidence whatsoever that 
Mrs. Clinton had anything to do with 
any 'disappearance' " of billing re- 
cords, he wrote. 

The letter marks a change in strategy 
for Mr. Kendall, who has generally re- 
sisted attacking the Whitewater pros- 
ecutor. 

Mr. Kendall alludes to the change in 
the letter, noting that in the past he has 
handled disputes with Mr. Srarr in 
private letters but that the weekend ar- 
ticle “leaves me no choice but to re- 
spond publicly." 

The letter does not indicate whether 
Mr. Kendall planned to take any further 
action concerning the alleged disclos- 


Feeling Nostalgic - and Old 


WASHINGTON — There comes a moment dur- 
ing a television special on President Bill Clinton — a 
sepia-tinted, reverential account of the “rockm’est” 
president’s taste in '60s and ’70s music — when a 
smile drifts over Mr. Clinton's face a nd his gaze slips 
into the distance beyond the interviewer. 

‘ ‘Every time I hear the Mamas and the Papas,’ ’ the 
president says wistfully during the program, ' *1 think 
about Georgetown, I think about college, I think 
about 'Monday, Monday’ and all those old, great 
songs." The program, "Bill Clinton: Rock ’n* Roll 
President," was broadcast Tuesday in the United 
States by the cable television network VHl. 

VHl's special plops Mr. Clinton down at turning 
points in modem American music, at least through 
Fleetwood Mac. But it also illustrates a subtle shift 
over the last five years in Mr. Clinton's generational 
politics and musings. from an emphasis on youth and 


dunkin' about tomorrow to an emphasis on maturity 
and frettin' about retirement. 

Bill Clinton is growing old. Or, at least, that is 
what he keeps saying, in idle observations dropped 
into unrelated puolic remarks. 

“He's seven years younger than I am and has no 
gray hair," Mr. Clinton grumbled recently about the 
new British prime minister, Tony Blair. (NYT) 


The Cost of Greater Safety 


NW, and parts of State Place. South Executive 
Avenue. Madison Place and E Street to protect the 
White House from a vehicle bomb. 

The report calculated the cost of the closing to the 
city government at about $412,000 a year in lost 
parking meter revenue and higher expenses in rerout- 
ing buses. But the potentially greater costs related to 
lower retail sales and property tax values were not 
covered. 


A Treasury spokesman, Howard Schloss, said the 
report followed federal environmental law, “whi< 


• WASHINGTON — The full impact of the closing 
of streets around the White House on Washington's 
economy and traffic will probably never be known, 
according to a federal report released Monday. 

The Treasury Department report, which took 
nearly two years to complete, was supposed to ana- 
lyze some of the economic and transportation effects 
of the May 1995 dosings. 

President Bill Clinton closed off the two blocks of 
Pennsylvania Avenue between 15th and 1 7th streets 


'which 

I^UUAI ~ “ . ■ , 

does not include such detailed economic impact 
analysis." 


Quote /Unquote 


President Bill Clinton, in a message to the families 
of the victims in the Oklahoma City bombing after 
the conviction of Timothy McVeigh: “’No single 
verdict can bring an end to your anguish. Our prayers 
are with you." (API 


Industry Splits on New TV Ratings for Children 


By Paul Farhi 

Washington Post Service 


ures. 


WASHINGTON— In asplit with the 
rest of the television industry, several 
cable and broadcast networks are pre- 
paring to modify the U.S. industry's 
program-rating system to include on- 
screen symbols that specifically alert 
viewers when a program contains sexu- 
al material, violence or foul language, 
industry sources said. 


Some networks plan to add the letters 
S, V or L to their current ratings over the 
next few weeks, the sources said 
Monday, a change that the industry until 
now has unanimously resisted. The let- 
ters — for sex, violence and language — 
are to appear at the start of programs 
along with the ratings — such as TV- 
PG, meaning parental guidance is sug- 
gested — that now appear. 

The split reflects the industry's in- 
ability to resolve a dispute over the 


rating system, which has been in place 
since January. Major broadcasters, in- 
cluding NBC and CBS, remain opposed 
to any modification. On rhe other side, 
the cable executive Ted Turner and 
probably ABC and the Fox network are 
ready to go forward with the changes, 
several executives said. 

"If everyone starts going their own 
way, it’s going to have a catastrophic 
effect on rhe whole system,' ’ one person 
involved with the industry group that 


developed the ratings said. ‘ ‘The minute 
we do that, we're going to have al- 
phabetical chaos out there." 

But a network official said, “There's 
no way the two groups can gel together 
and agree on this." 

By adding the S-V-L ratings, broad- 
casters hope to mollify critics in Con- 
gress and in educational and parents’ 
groups who say the current system does 
nor offer parents enough information to 
guide children's viewing choices. 


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Away From Polities 


• Betty Shabazz, 63, widow of the slain civil 
Malcolm 


its leader 

X, remained in critical condition in a New York 
hospital as her 12-year-old grandson, Malcolm Shaba zz. 
faced indictment at a court hearing on charges that he set the 
fire that burned 80 percent of her body. (Reuters) 


• Jonathan Levin, the son of Time Warner's chief ex- 
ecutive, Gerald Levin, was found dead in a pool of blood in 
his New York apartment after co-workers at Taft High 
School in the Bronx, where Mr. Levin, 31, taught, alerted 
neighbors that he had not reported for work. ( AP ) 


• Three gang members were convicted of killing a 3-year- 
old girl, Stephanie Kuhen, who was caught in a spray of 
lunfire v 


gunfire when her family took a wrong turn and drove into 
gang territory in Los Angeles in 1995. (AP) 


• The convicted spy Harold James Nicholson, who is to 
be sentenced this week, should serve just under 24 years in 
prison, rather than life, because he has cooperated fully with 
government investigators, federal prosecutors say. (AP) 


An Ed FranuVrhr New Yink Thun 

Malcolm Shabazz, 12, who is accused of setting a fire that has left his grand- 
mother in critical condition, leaving Juvenile Court in Yonkers, New York. 


• Patrick Rogers, who killed a police officer in 1985 crime 
spree, was executed by lethal injection in the first of a record 
1 1 executions set for June in Texas, officials at the state 
prison in Huntsville said. (Reuters) 


U.S. Seeks Herb-Stimulant Curbs 


By John Schwartz 

Washington Post Senire 


WASHINGTON — The 
Food and Drug Administra- 
tion has proposed rules aimed 
at reducing risks posed by a 
popular herbal stimulant that 
has been linked to seizures 
and deaths. 

Products derived from the 
herb ephedra are sold as an 
aid to weight loss and for a 
treatment of allergies, and 
they are popular among 
young people as pep pills. 
The stimulants are also called 
Ma huang, Chinese Ephedra 
and Epitonin and are sold un- 
der such product names as 
Herbal Ecstasy and Ultimate 
Xphoria. 

Since 1994, the Food and 
Drug Administration has re- 
ceived more than 800 reports 


of side effects from products 
made from ephedra, includ- 
ing irregular heartbeat, sleep- 
lessness, anxiety, tremors and 
headaches. Extreme reactions 
have included seizures, heart 
attacks, strokes and two 
deaths. Ephedra contains 
ephedrine, which is a stim- 
ulant. 

Under the proposed rules, 
manufacturers of products 
containing ephedrine alkal- 
oids would have to limit the 


amount used to less than 8 
milligrams per dose. Products 
also would be required to 
cany warning labels instruct- 
ing consumers not to use 
more than 24 milligrams of 
the stimulant in any one day 
or to use die product for more 
than seven days. 


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race, crime 

AND THE LAW 

By Randall Kennedy. 53R 
panes. S 30. Pantheon 

Reviewed by 
Richard Bernstein 


R ARELY if ever has any- 
one systematically and 


cogently addressed as many 
of the vexing issues persisting 
in American society as Ran- 
dall Kennedy does in "Race, 
Crime and me Law." 

■ A professor at Harvard 
School and the founding 
editor of Reconstruction, a 
pluralistic review’ of the issue 
of race. Kennedy has written 
a book thar is deeply in- 
formed, all encompassing in 
its transracial humanity, and 
firmly anchored in a kind of 
impassioned common sen : : 

- Indeed, the book is so welJ 
argued that it is hard to ima- 
gine any politician or scholar, 
or for 'that matter any Su- 
preme Coon justice, staking 
out a credible position on the 
matters ii discusses without 
taking Kennedy’s positions 
into account. 

Kennedy sets out several 
purposes in . “Race, Crime 
and the Law," among them to 
uncover the common ground 
that conservatives and liber- 
als land often blacks and 
whites) tend to neglect. He 
asks, for example, when is it 
permissible for police to use 
racial discrimination as they 
try to prevent crime or ap- 
wrongdoen. Eveiy- 
knows that police in 
Many cities are more apt to 
stop a young black man for 
questioning than they are a 
young white man. Some com- 
mentators and ervil right* ad- 
*xhr portray tint pffirtfoe 
as institutionalized racism, 
while others (including fa5* 
era! courts) justify it as an evil 
accessary to the greater sociti 
of crime prevention. . 


In approaching this issue. 
Kennedy, unlike some critics 
of racial selectivity in law en- 
forcement, readily acknowl- 
edges that young black men 
do commit more crime than 
their white counterparts. He 
makes no excuses for that, 
and he refuses to condemn the 
reflex of many people to be 
more wary of blacks on the 
street than of whites. 

Heraises the example of the 
police officer who “detains 
the young black man disem- 
barking from an airplane be- 
cause me officer believes drat 
the young man’s race is one of 
the signals indicating that he is 
probably engaged in drug traf- 
ficking.” Then the critical 
question: Is that a reasonable 
discrimination from which so- 
ciety as a whole benefits? 

Kennedy’s answer is that it 
is not a reasonable discrim- 
ination, and as he builds his 
argument, always taking ac- 


police practice," not just a 
part of itthattakes place when 
there is a “compelling jus- 
tification." 

Here Kennedy speaks elo- 
quently of the humiliations 
mat law-abiding black people 
suffer at the hands of police. 
He argues that the courts’ tol- 
erant attitude toward police 
behavior "nourishes power- 
ful feelings of racial griev- 
ance against law enforcement 
authorities that are prevalent 
in every strata of black com- 
munities" and that serve to 
divide the country along hos- 
tile racial lines. And he con- 
tends that current police prac- 
tices run contrary to the 
difficult but laudable goal of 
making race less important 
rather than more important in 
judging individuals. 


J^ENNEDY, who man- 


"race card” in criminal trials, 
as in the OJ. Simpson case. 
He demolishes the argument, 
in vogue among some legal, 
scholars, that black jurors 
should fight for racial justice 
by refusing to convict black 
defendants accused of non- 
violent crimes, even when 
they believe the defendant to 
be guilty. 

Such a conception of "the 
irresponsibility of blacks 
would impose upon African- 
Americans a disability from 
which they were free even 
during the era of slavery," 
Kennedy argues, “the disab- 
ility of being perceived as 
people wholly devoid of mor- 
al choice and thus blameless 
for purposes of retribution, 
the same way that infants, the 
insane and animals are typ- 
ically viewed as morally 
blameless." 

And all along, Kennedy 
never loses sight of his basic 


ages to be both scholarly 
and readable, subjects other 
count of alternative points of questions to the same kind of purpose, which, as he puts it, 
view and never Ignoring con- careful, reasoned scrutiny. He is "to facilitate the emer- 

. .. *._* SJ - j:* the death penalty, 

itionofjur- 


tradictory evidence, iris dif- 
ficult to disagree with him. 

He allows that basing sus- 
picion on race is understand- 
able; he allows further that 
since blacks are more, often 
the victims of crime than 
whites are, blacks as a whole 
desperately need effective law 
enforcement. The federal 
courts have a confusing record 
on this issue, but as Kennedy 
puts it, most have ‘ ‘concluded 
that race can appropriately be 
used as a factor of suspicion in 
determining the likelihood 
that a person is engaging in or 
has already committed crim- 
inal activity." 

Still, Kennedy concludes 
that the harm of even the b«t- 
imennoned racial discrimina- 
tion by the government is 
greater than the good. For one 
trying, he notes that federal 
court decisions have made 
“race-dependeni decision- 
making" a “normal part of 


the racial composit 
ies, the inequality of punish- 
ments meted out ro blacks and 
whites. 

He tries to define and cir- 
cumscribe the use of the 


gence of a polity that is over- 
whelmingly indifferent to ra- 
cial differences, a polity that 
looks beyond looks." 


■Richard Bernstein is on the 
staff of The New York Times. 


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Turespana and the 
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INTERNATIONAL H ERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 1997 

EUROPE 


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Blair Unveils Campaign 
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v"7 By Sarah Lyall 

;» Nftr M Times Smicr 

LONDON — Prime Minister Tony 
ilair bas denounced a culture of de- 
■pendency on government that he said 
'has created a “workless class'* of 

- people in Britain who live off the state 
1 and have no motivation to find jobs. 

- Mr. Blair, who has resolutely moved 
his party away from its old working- 
! class roots and remodeled it as a centrist 
; movement that he calls “New Labour.” 

! said one of die cornerstones of his gov- 

• eminent would be getting people off 
; welfare and putting them to work. 

• In doing so, he called Monday for a 
; “radical shift incur values and attitudes” 

' f and said that the welfare state, long as- 

- sociated with the old Labour Party . had to 

■ change along with the times. 

• “Earlier this century, leaders faced the 
^challenge of creating a welfare state that 
could provide security for the new work- 

- ing class,” he said. “Today, the greatest 
..challenge for any democratic govem- 
'ment is to refashion our institutions to 
•bring this new workless class back into 

• society and into useful work.” 

" Mr. Blair's speech, which was de- 
livered in the Southwark housing proj- 
lect in South London, had been leaked in 
■•advance to the Sunday newspapers. 
*News stories about the advance copy of 
•the speech caused a furor over the week- 
-end when several papers reported that 
3tbe plan would force thousands of Bri- 
-tain s single parents to get jobs or face 
Closing their benefits. 

- But Mr. Blair stopped short of that 
"position in the actual speech Monday, 

• saying only that single parents should be 

■ jeocouraged to find new jobs through 
^•government programs. 

The prime minister's remarks came 
as his Labour government, which swept 
j*into power with an overwhelming ma- 
jority a month ago, prepares a major 
{"overhaul of the country's welfare sys- 
Ctem. In its review, Mr. Blair said, the 
{•government would ask simple questions 
;“about all of Britain’s benefits: ‘ 'Do they 
;*give people a chance to work? Or do 
'-they trap them on benefits for the most 
^productive years of their lives?” 

Britain now spends about 13 percent 
’-of its gross domestic product, or about 
•£98 billion (5160 billion) a year, on its 
;-social security system. According to 
! •government figures, 5 million people of 
working age live in homes where 
^•nobody works, and more than a million 
•-adults, out of a population of 58 million 
. '.people, have never had a job. 

• Britain has no minimum wage. A 
■ 'I single parent with one child receives 
labour £88 a week in cash and is eligible 


for other benefits, such as subsidized 
housing. 

Among Mr. Blair’s proposed solu- 
tions is to impose a windfall tax on the 
profits of privatized utilities, which he 
says would raise about £3 billion that 
could be spent on job programs for 
young people. 

Under the program, about 250,000 
unemployed people between the ages of 
18 ana 25 would be given the chance to 
work for a charitable organization, for 
an environmental task force set up by 
the government or at a job in the private 
sector, for which their employer would 
receive £60 a week from the govern- 
ment. Those without job skills would be 
given vocational training. 

But Mr. Blair warned that young 
people would have responsibilities of 
their own. “There will be and should be 
□o option of an inactive life on benefit,” 
he said. “Where opportunities are giv- 
en, for example, to young people, for 
real jobs and skills, there should be a 
reciprocal duty to take them up.” 

Mr. Blair called for an “ethic of mu- 
tual responsibility” in Britain. He said- 
“It is something for something. A society 
where we play by the rules. You only take 
out if you put in. That’s the bargain.” 

A spokesman for the prime minister 
said that unemployed youngpeople who 
did not accept one of the options offered 
might face cuts in their benefits. 



Pope Calls for a Europe 
That Includes Everyone 


' •' St. 


Pasl MdSiin/Ibr Pra- 

LOCKED OUT — Gerry Adams, president of Sinn Fein, the Irish 
Republican Army’s political wing, outside Stormont Castle in Bel- 
fast as new talks on the future of Northern Ireland resumed there 
Tuesday. Britain refuses to let in his party until the IRA calls a truce. 


The Assii-iuictl Press 

GNIEZNO. Poland — European in- 
tegration will not succeed unless all 
former Soviet bloc countries are invited 
to join and the needs of the jobless and 
poor are dealt with. Pope John Paul II 
told the presidents of seven central and 
eastern European countries Tuesday. 

"Europeans must take it upon them- 
selves to cooperate more fruitfully, to 
strengthen peace among themselves and 
surrounding them,” the pontiff told the 
presidents of the Czech Republic. Ger- 
many, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia. 
Lithuania and Ukraine at an audience in 
this town in eastern Poland. 

Without specifically mentioning 
NATO or European Union expansion, 
he stressed that “no country, not even 
the poorest, can be left out of the com- 
munities that are now being created. ’ * 

And he said the “enormous tasks” of 
strengthening democratic institutions, 
economic development and internation- 
al cooperation “will be fully realized 
only when they ensure such standards of 
living that would allow human beings to 
develop their full potential.” 

After their 20-minute audience with 
the Pope, the presidents described the 
meeting as extraordinary. ‘ ‘The fact that 
seven presidents met today with the 
Pope proves that we are searching for 
paths to peace and cooperation on the 
continent,” said Lithuania's president. 
A1 gird as Brazauskas. 


While the Czech Republic. Hungary 
and Poland are expected to be invited 
this year to join NATO, other former 
Warsaw Pact members in worse shape 
worry they will not be welcome. EU 
expansion, meanwhile, is proceeding at 
an even slower pace. 

During his 1 1 -day tour of Poland that 
started Saturday, the Pope has not shied 
away from criticizing the high unem- 
ployment and increasing poverty that 
have accompanied the former Soviet 
bloc's shift to free market economies 
and race to qualify for acceptance into 
Western institutions. 

At a morning Mass attended by the 
presidents and 250.000 pilgrims. John 
Paul also declared that Europe would 
never achieve "authentic unity” if its 
Christian roots were ignored. 

The Mass commemorated the mil- 
lennium of the martyrdom of Si. Adal- 
bert. a Bohemian seen as an advocate of 
European unity, who is buried in 
Gniezno's cathedral. 

Pointing to the “tragedy” that fol- 
lowed the breakup of Yugoslavia and 
this year's Albanian crisis, the Pope said 
the Iron Curtain had been replaced by 
"another, invisible wall” of fear, ag- 
gressiveness and prejudice. 

“The recovery of the right to self- 
determination and the growth of polit- 
ical and economic freedom is not suf- 
ficient to rebuild European unity.” he 
said. "A new openness is needed.” 


BRIEFLY 


Cyprus Protests Flights by Turk Jets 

NICOSIA — Cyprus filed a protest with the United Nations on 
Tuesday that three Turkish warplanes had flown through its airspace. 

"Turkey has opted to go down the road of provocative moves and 
the violation of international law and order,” said a government 
spokesman, Manolis Christofides. 

Turkey is conducting air and naval maneuvers in the eastern 
Mediterranean, and the overflights were believed to be connected to 
the exercises. 

Cyprus contends that the overflights are a violation of a moratorium 
on military planes overflying the island, which it agreed to in April 
under U.S. pressure. Turkey made no similar commitment (AP) 

Yeltsin Wags Finger at Moscow Mayor 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin of Russia on Tuesday chided 
the popular, outspoken mayor of Moscow, Yuri Luzhkov, telling him 
“not to quarrel with the government” 

“I keep a constant eye on Moscow and you,” Mr. Yeltsin told Mr. 
Luzkhov at the Kremlin, Interfax reported. 

Mr. Luzhkov has accused the federal government of reneging on its 
promise to help organize the celebration this summer of the 850th 
anniversary of Moscow’s founding. “The Russian government has 
spat on our festival,” he said. 


Mr. Luzhkov, who is thought to have one of the best chances to 
replace Mr. Yeltsin in the 2000 elections, frequently speaks out on 
issues that reach beyond his mayoralty. (AFP I 

Italian Backs Czech NATO Bid 

PRAGUE — Foreign Minister Lamberto Dini of Italy said Tuesday 
that he unequivocally supported the Czech Republic's candidacy to 
join NATO and the European Union. 

“2t would be wrong to think th3t the enlargement of NATO would 
destabilize the alliance’s relations with Russia,” he said. 

Mr. Dini added: “The NATO-Russia charter opens the way to 
enlargement in agreement with Russia, which has become a partner of 
the alliance. And we fully support the Czech Republic’s bid to join 
NATO, both politically and in terms of military cooperation.” (API 

Belgians Said to Identify Body Parts 

BRUSSELS — Body parts left in garbage bags by a serial killer in 
southern Belgium have been identified as the remains of three women, 
a source close to the investigation said Tuesday. 

The prosecutor’s office refused to confirm the information, saying 
it would identify the victims in 10 days. 

Fourteen garbage bags containing neatly severed Female body parts 
have been found in the Mons area since March 22. (AFP I 


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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JUNE 4, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


2 Chinese Dissidents Get Jail Terms 

After 6 -Month Delay, Activists Are Sentenced to 3V2 Years 


The Aumnned Press 

BEIJING — After a delay of more 
than six months, a Chinese court has 
announced it is sentencing two labor ac- 
tivists to three and a half years in prison, 
human rights groups said Tuesday. 

Li Wenmina. a former magazine em- 
ployee, and Guo Baosheng, a philo- 
sophy student, were put on trial in 
November on charges of trying to sub- 
vert the government. 

They had been held in detention since 
they were arrested in May 1994 for 
trying to start an independent labor un- 
ion and distributing an unofficial jour- 
nal to migrant workers. 

The trial was delayed twice before it 
concluded in November, and reporters 
were not allowed to attend. Afterward, 
the Shenzhen Intermediate People’s 
Court refused to announce the verdict 
and sentence. 

Last week, the court finally released 
information about the sentence, which 
was lighter than expected, the Infor- 
mation Center of Human Rights and 
Democratic Movement in China said in 
a statement Tuesday. 

Under Chinese law. the two men 


faced a minimum of 10 years in prison. 
The Hong Kong-based rights group said 
the court relied on an article of the 
criminal law that gives courts power to 
pass a lesser sentence. 

Another group, Human Rights 
Watch, said in a statement that die 
charges were trumped up. It condemned 
the sentences as violations of. interna- 
tional human rights standards. 

Mr. Li is dne to be released on Nov. 
1 1 . and Mr. Guo on Dec. 3. according to 
a statement from the New York-based 
rights group. 

Spokesmen for the court and the pros- 
ecutor's office in Shenzhen, near Hong 
Kong, refused Tuesday to confirm the 
sentences or release dates. 

“This information cannot be re- 
leased.” a court spokesman said. 

In another development related to its 
human rights record, China said Tuesday 
that it would be up to Hong FCong'spost- 
colonial government whether to permit 
protests marking the Chinese military's 
crushing of demonstrations in 1989. 

Hong Kong residents have used com- 
memorations for victims of the crack- 
down to register fears about China and 


its resumption of sovereignty over the 
territory on July 1. 

Thousands of Hong Kong residents 
marched Sunday, and another demon- 
stration is planned for Wednesday, the 
eighth anniversary of die military assault 
on student-led protesters in Beijing. 

A Foreign Ministry spokesman, Cui 
Ti ankai , said the kind of demonstrations 
that could be held next year would de- 
pend on the Hong Kong Special Ad- 
ministrative Region, the formal name 
for the postcolonial territory. 

“It will be bandied according to 
Hong Kong's laws.” Mr. Cui said. 

The incoming .postcolonial govern- 
ment has introduced laws tightening re- 
strictions on protests. After July 1 . dem- 
onstrators will need permits, instead of 
just notifying the pofice. 

The future leader of Hong Kong, the 
shipping magnate Tung Chee-hwa, has 
promised not to restrict demonstrations 
as long as they' are peaceful and legal. 

Inside China, the days surrounding 
the anniversaries of the crackdown re- 
main a sensitive time for Chinese lead- 
ers, who fear any protests could spark 
widespread unrest 



fhtyn BtvWAgcnc: Fn»<Pitw 

A soldier, left, questioning a man on Tiananmen Square in Beijing on 
Tuesday, a day before the anniversary of the massacre of activists. 


Sale of Arms to Iran Is Legal 
And Appropriate, China Says 

Reuters 

BEIJING — China defended on Tuesday what it called 
transfer:. of small amounts of conventional weapons to Iran, 
describing them as appropriate and legal. 

A Foreign Ministry spokesman. Cui Tiankai. when asked 
about repons of Chinese sales of anti-ship missiles to Iran, 
said. “Regarding the transfer of conventional weapons, in- 
cluding missiles. China has adopted a long-standing attitude 
of prudence and responsibility." 

Mr. Cui said any sale should not harm the peace, security 
and stability of a region. Ir should also strengthen the defense 
of the country involved but not exceed its needs. 

China in general notified the United Nations of exports of 
conventional weapons. Mr. Cui said. He gave no further 
details. The United States imposed a trade and investment ban ' 
on Iran in June 1995, accusing it of sponsoring terrorism, a 
charge that Tehran denies. 

Iran opposes the U.S. military presence in the Gulf and says 
Washington falsely accuses Tehran of expansionism in the 
region to scare its Gulf Arab allies into buying more U.S. 
w eaponry. 


| BRIEFLY 

# 




Seoul Officer Autopsied 

SEOUL — An autopsy on a South Korean 
riot policeman killed during campus violence 
cast doubt Tuesday on reports he was clubbed 
to death by students and supported student 
claims he was killed by a police vehicle. 

The senior prosecutor. Shin Gun Soo, said it 
was possible the officer was hit by a pepper-gas 
launcher, as students maintained. But he added, 
“His death was still caused by the students." 

Earlier, a leftist campus group dial or- 
chestrated the violence Monday issued a 
statement saying the 21 -year-old policeman 
was one of four who were run over by an 
armored tear-gas launcher. (Reuters) 

Manila Journalist Killed 

MANILA — A journalist who specialized 


in exposing drug syndicates and police cor 
rupuon was shot to death in a taxi on Tuesday 
as. he struggled with his assassin, the police 
said. 

The killer of Danny Hernandez, the news 
editor of People’s Journal Tonight, a popular 
tabloid daily, was probably a bit man, the 
police said. 

Mr. Hernandez had been receiving death 
threats from people whom he suspected were 
members of drug rings, according to his col- 
leagues. His death was the latest in a string of 
murders of Philippine journalists. ( Reuters ) 

Burma Frees Dissidents 

RANGOON — Burma’s military regime 
on Tuesday freed hundreds of pro-democracy 
supporters who had been detained last month 
to prevent their leader. Daw Aung San Suu 
Kyi, from bolding a party congress. 


Opposition sources, speaking on condition 
of anonymity, said most of the 316 activists 
believed to have been detained were released. 
But the status of several opposition supporters 
re main ed unclear. (AP) 

Taleban Foes Reorganize 

KABUL — The anti-Taleban alliance that 
was nearly defeated in a reversal of fortune 
last month has been restructured and renamed, 
an opposition spokesman said Tuesday. 1 
“Now we h?ve created the United Islamic 
Front for Salvation of Afghanistan," said 
General Homayoon Fauzi, contacted by tele- 

S bone in the northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif. 
Ie said the head of the new group had not yet 
been appointed. 

The group replaces the previous opposition 
coalition that was headed by the ousted war- 
lord Abdul Rashid Dustam. (AFP) 


India Moves T 
Its New Missile [»•' 1 
Near Pakistan 


fre 


By R. Jeffrey Smith 

Washington Past Serrice 


WASHINGTON — India has moved 
a handful of medium-iangchallistk Mis- 
siles to a prospective launching she near 
the border with Pakistan, raising new 
concerns in Washington that the two 
enemies may have entered a provocative 
phase in their long-standing arms- race 
U.S. officials have disclosed • 

The missiles, called Prithvis. can 
cany conventional bat not nuclear war- 
heads. U.S. intelligence agencies have 
concluded that fewer tarn a dozen are 
now located near the city of Juihmdur in 
the state of Punjab m nor&west India. 

The site is a long way from the factory 
where most of the Prithvi components 
were produced, at Hydoabad in south- 
ern India, and constitutes a serious 
ratcheting-up by the Indian mifiiary of 
its historic rivalry with the Pakistani 
armed forces, the officials said. 

They expressed uncertainty about 
why the missiles were moved at a time 
when senior Indian and Pakistani of- 
ficials have started moving toward re- 
ducing of tensions. But one U.S. official 
said that Indian military officials "ma\ 
have felt some pressure" from legis- 
lators who began agitating publicly for 
deployment of the Prithvi as soon as its 
flight tests were completed this spring. 

Speaking about the effort to prevent a 
missile race on the South Asian sub- 
continent, a U.S. official said, "It looks 
like that’s starting to come unraveled.’’ 

Some intelligence officials described 
the movement of the missiles as the fust 
operational deployment of the Prithvi 
since its development began more than a 
decade ago. But ocher officials cau- 
tioned that they did not know if all of the 
equipment and troops needed to fire the 
missiles were also at the site. One said 
“the best judgment" was that the re- 
quisite gear was not there. 

“We know that die missiles have 
been moved, and in the wrong direc- 
tion.” a U.S. official said. 

Another said: “This is going to 
prompt a bad reaction — even an over- 
reaction" in Pakistan. 


;\M l' : 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JUNE 4. 1997 


PAGE 7 


mm 


India 
Its Nt 

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I i - . *t 
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Can Jospin’s Socialists 
Revive French Politics? 


INTERNATIONAL 



By Joseph Fitehett 

Jnifriuttuiujl Herat J Tribune 



r 4Crin->l' 




. - >L A - 

rgantee 


»b-k i.» Stirt 

-:■> i L* 

; 

tin ’■!>>' 

- . ;• 


PARIS — .Could the new Socialist 
• gcvemment turn out to be more effective 
thin its conservative predecessors in 
modernizing France’s economy and re- 
jnvicorarins its political life? 

the question surfaced Tuesday, albeit 
timidly, as business leaders and com- 
rseotators waited for Prime Minister Li- 
unel Jospin to indicate how he intends to 
, sroceed. 

The second in command at a major 
french bank said: “The people around 
..Jospin are not naive about global eco- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

. nomic realities and they are probably in a 
better position to ease through changes 
.than the right — if they want to.” 

■ Like most businessmen, the bank of- 
.ficial is alarmed by the Socialists* 
pledges to curtail economic liberaliz- 
.ation, halt moves to privatize France's 
bloated public sector and channel more 
.'profits into workers' pockets. 

But commentators looking for a silver 
, lining were heartened by Mr. Jospin's 
insistence that reforms should be irtro- 
duced over time, not as a hasty popjlist 
move. A cautious approach may also 
help the Socialists use their prograns as 
leverage for concessions — for exanple, 
increasing flexibility in a rigid labo? mar- 
ket or by adjusting social benefits. 

Prominent in French memory is the 
precedent of the Socialists' first period 


in office, when President Francoisdit- 
ternuid. two years after winning elction 
in 1981 on a joint platform wit die 
Communists, dropped his ideolgical 
agsnda and set a centrist course deigned 
to keep France in step with Germny and 
pursue European integration. 

In the next five years, the Scialists 
modernized many features of tfe econ- 
omy. terminating the inflationar system 
of wage indexation, ending priccontrols 
ind freeing foreign currency echanges 
— changes that had been tabo for con- 
servative governments. Comii? from the 
left, the shift was generally rcepted as 
necessary, even by many unins. 

But die Communists demmeed the 
government’s shift to auterity and 
bolted from the coalition, a>etback that 
helped cost die Socialists ie next par- 
liamentary election. But men they re- 
turned to power, succe&ve Socialist 
governments stuck to tfcir new pro- 
European orthodoxy of conomic lib- 
eralization, carrying may center-left- 
ists along. 

As a move toward ae center, the 
Socialists' embrace of te market econ- 
omy helped establish heir credibility 
with a broader electoral. And it is cred- 
ited with instilling a nw economic so- 
phistication on the le’ and fostering a 
recognition, still new to many French 
people at the time. aar. business, not 
government, is the only sustainable 
source of wealth ancfemployment. 

That thinking has >ot perished among 
the Socialists in ther four years out of 
power. But they re min far from sharing 



IV. jl T ix jiii \f-mi Iranrr-IV—- 

Mr. Jospin sending off Alain Juppe on Tuesday after the departing prime minister vacated his Hotel Malign on office. 


the British Labour Party’s readiness to 
replace government intervention with 
laissez-faire policies. Instead. French 
Socialists believe that a strong state role 
is part of the nation's culture and that 
government largesse can be used to pro- 
mote gradual convergence between un- 
ions and business. 

“These guys are not promising to 
change the world,' ’ said Francis de Witt, 
editor of La Vie Francaise, a financial 
magazine. “They're saying that they 
want to modify the future — which is 
going to take time and cost less.” 

Other analysts said, for example, that 
the Socialists eventually will be forced 


by economic reality to proceed with pri- 
vatizations, including that of France- 
Telecom, that they have pledged to halt. 

“No French government can balance 
next year's budget without the 50 billion 
francs from selling Franco-Telecom.” 
Mr. de Witt said. 

More generally. Socialist economists 
recognize that state ownership severely 
handicaps companies from seeking for- 
eign alliances in such sectors as airlines 
and defense, where the dominant inter- 
national players are private companies. 

But in any future privatizations, the 
government will repackage its approach, 
eschewing the company-to-company 


FRANCE: Corrmunist Party Recommends Joining Jospin, Assuring Him of Majority 


IT -i -44 171 420 








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Continued from Page I 

job-creation program. 

Although the Socialists and Commu- 
nists reached a pre-election jact, Mr. 
Jospin is awaiting the results cf a public 
finances audit next week and a law re- 
vising the 1997 budget next nonth be- 
fore moving ahead with campaign 
pledges, notably to create 701,000 jobs. 

The Communists last enteed the gov- 
ernment after the 1981 legidative dec- 
dons, but they left in 1981 when the 
Socialists under President Fancois Mit- 
terrand veered to the right 

During the campaign leading up to the 
elections last week, the S*cialists said 
that they would push for arelaxation of 
j 1 the strict conditions for joiring the Euro- 
pean single currency, indicting the re- 
, quirement to hold the national deficit to 
no more than 3 percent a ;ear. 

France’s deficit this yar was expec- 
. ted to be at least 3.4 penent, leaving a 
hole that the previous corservative gov- 
ernment had intended replug with the 
proceeds from the sale a Fiance Tele- 
com. the state-owned clecommunica- 
lions company. The saleias been put off 
with the victory of the Socialists, who 
had promised to halt tic previous gov- 
ernment’s program of pivatization. 

Mrs. Guigou said thil the Treaty on 
European Union ‘ ‘mustbe completed on 
certain points,” including a “chapter on 
jobs.” 

“Institutions must te reformed to en- 
able Europe to decidt and to be more 
democratic.” she said 

The Socialist Party spokesman, Fran- 
cois Hollande. said tfat France was not 
seeking a modification of the Maastricht 
treaty, but of the way it is applied. 

The conservative opposition plunged 
. into a leadership crisis following the 


members of die Gullist party. Rally for 
the Republic, ciied for Mr. Juppe's 
removal as party! eader. 

Mr. Jospin, manwhile. worked on the 
formation of hucabinet, which was ex- 
pected to haveabout 15 members, in- 
cluding as maty as five women. Mr. 
Jospin made i dear that he wanted a 
government fie of the corruption that 
has dogged pevious administrations. 

After coopleting his cabinet, Mr. 
Jospin is exjected to attend a meeting 


Friday of European social democratic 
parties in Mahno, Sweden. He is sched- 
uled to meet with Prime Minister Tony 
Blair of Britain on June 11, to attend 
French-German summit talks in Poitiers 
on June 13, and to represent France 
along with President Jacques Chirac at 
the European Union summit meeting in 
Amsterdam on June 16 and 17. 

Mr. Jospin’s immediate priority is the 
reduction of the 12.8 percent unemploy- 
ment rale. But in a disappointing check to 


that plan. PSA Peugeot Citroen SA, 
France’s biggest carmaker, announced it 
was laying off more than 2.800 workers. 

At the same time, Renault SA. which is 
46 percent state-owned, said it would 
proceed with plans to close a plant in 
Belgium, with the loss of 3,000 jobs. Mr. 
Jospin said during his campaign that if he 
were elected, he would use the state's 
weight to make Renault reverse its de- 
cision. The issue could come to a head at 
a shareholders* meeting next Tuesday. 


sales favored by conservative govern- 
ments — often seen as sweetheart deals 
by some sectors of French opinion. 

The crumbling credibility of the 
mainstream left and right is blamed for 
the increasingly violent strike tactics of 
farmers, truckers, even bank employees, 
and for the increasing virulence of Jean- 
Marie Lc Pen's extreme rightist Na- 
tional Front. 

Mr. Jospin promises to be the an- 
tidote. “He may be the man who re- 
conciles the French with politics." the 
conservative newspaper Le Figaro said. 

Mr. Jospin's aides say that conser- 
vative governments failed in reform ef- 
forts because they provoked confron- 
tation instead of engaging in dialogue. In 
contrast, they said, the idea of nego- 
tiating lies at the heart of controversial 
Socialist proposals to create 700.000 
new jobs and to mandate a shorter work 
week at the same pay. 

None of those proposals will go into 
effect, the aides said, until they have 
been shaped by a national jobs con- 
ference this summer involving unions, 
employers and government in a search 
for common ground. “ Getting them 
pregnant” is a phrase that Mr. Jospin’s 
aides have used to describe the Socialist 
tactic. 


McVeigh Judge 
Moves to Bar 
Testimony 
Inciting Jury 

The Asuhined Press 

DENVER — Saying that he wanted io 
avoid “a lynching,’ r a federal judge 
barred testimony Tuesday during the 
penalty phase of Timothy McVeigh's 
trial from any bombing victims who 
were emotionally influenced by previ- 
ous witnesses. 

"Care must be taken here to ensure 
that the next phase of the trial be one 
within proper constraints.” Judge 
Richard Matsch of U.S. District Court 
said during a hearing on penalty-phase 
motions. 

The judge said he would prohibit any 
testimony that would inflame or incite 
the jury. “The penalty phase hearing 
here cannot be turned into some type of a 
lynching.” he said. 

TTie federal Victims Rights Act al- 
lows crime victims to attend trials and 
testify about the impact the crime had on 
their lives. But Judge Matsch said that he 
believed the law allowed him to restrict 
any witness he determined was preju- 
diced through testimony during the guilt 
phase of the trial. 

Mr. McVeigh's attorneys asked Judge 
Matsch on Tuesday to prohibit all testi- 
mony from bombing victims and rela- 
tives, calling their views “tainted with 
inflammatory trial testimony.” 

Heading into court Tuesday morning, 
a prosecutor. Vickie Behenna. said that 
the penalty phase could be the most 
difficult pan of the trial, because Col- 
orado jurors have been reluctant to sen- 
tence convicted killers to death. The 
state has five persons on death row. 

The jurors can sentence Mr. McVeigh 
to death by injection, life in prison or a 
lesser sentence determined by the judge. 
Some jurors expressed reservations 
about the death penalty during the jury 
selection process, but all said they could 
impose it if justified. 

if tbe jury amnoi unanimously agree. 
Judge Matsch can impose a sentence of 
up to life in prison without parole, if the 
jury decides Mr. McVeigh should be 
executed, the judge cannot overrule it. 



VERDICT: Oklahoma City Victims Demand the Death Penalty 


The A*»-iiud Pre« 


• decisive electoral defeat of former Prime Timothy McVeigh, found guilty in the Oklahoma City bombing, pho- 
Minister Alain Juppe. Several senior tographed in a county jail hours after the explosion on April 19, 1995. 


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GOLD: Bonn Retrectsjon Revaluing Reserves as Way to Join Euro 


Continued firom Page 1 

• their funds." said Michael Lewis, ax 
; economist for Deutsche Morgan Gre»- 
‘ fell. “There are no good options.” 


die Bundesbank would have recalcu- 
lated the value of some of its gold re- 
serves from their cost at acquisition to 
current market prices. That would have 
/translated to a paper profit of about $23 
’ of which would have been 


Mr. Waigcl pul on the best front p«- , billion, half 
. sible Tuesday, renewing his call or ; transferred to the federal government 
more spending cuts and an accelersed • this year 


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..program to sell off govemment-ovjed 
'■ companies. Mr. Waigel said he hopd to 
take in an extra S6 billion this ye? by 
selling off pan of the government's take 
in Deutsche Telekom, the state-omed 
telephone company. He and othrs in 
-- * Mi. Kohl’s Christian Democrats co- 
alition have also begun pr es si n g fir oth- 
er sources of increased revenue, s£h an 
1 .increase in the tax on mineral ois and 
gasoline. 

But tax increases are highly fflpop- 
ular. given that Gentians alredy pay 

- some of the highest taxes in ttovorid, 
and they are fiercely opposedjby the 
junior partner in Mr. Kohl’s cotr-right 

- coalition, the Free Democratic farty. 

An increasing number <rf ixSoouial 
Germans have begun aigningtiiat the 
^ • -country should retreat from is singie- 
cxinded focus on precise numbers and 
look more at the underlying stoilinc and 
, -direction of a country’s fiscs and eco- 

" nomic policies. 

. ” We have been of the vie* for some 
. ' lime lhat the deficit in 1997 ull be about 
V3 or 3.4 percent of gros domestic 
• product, hugely because o continued 
*~-fligh unemployment,” said dieter Ves- 
per, -senior economist at .w German 
Imtitute fm Economic Rcsarch. an in- 

' dependentrcwarchwgaiHitKKxinBer- 

lin. But over the middle tem. Germany 


.HttsTietmeycr, has hindf repeatedly 
that countries shouMie judged less 
nn the exact numbers ab more on the 
*>i5iaiiu&ility” of thdrJConomtcs. In 
' n Wsic#ses.iK has usediBt argument as 
* way to discourage cosines like Italy 
v Spam from using bocieeptng tricks 


But the plan ran into staunch op- 
position from Mr. Tietmeyer. 

Tuesday, Mr. Waigel and Mr. Tiet- 
meyer met in Bonn and hammered out a 
"compromise" that gave the Bundes- 
bank everything it wanted- Under the 
plan, the revaluation would be delayed 
until 1998 — too late to be applied to the 
1997 deficit. Mr. Tietmeyer had never 
objected to a revaluation in principle, but 
had objected to using the paper profit to 
help Germany solve its euro problem. 


John Schmid of the I nt emotional H cr- 
ald Tribune reported earlier: 

The retreat Tuesday marks the latest 
setback for the Bonn government after 
unions and opposition parties for the past 
year have stymied Mr. Waigel's budget 
cuts and austerity measures. And it per- 
petuates the image of policy desperation 
for Mr. Kohl, who faces a national elec- 
tion next year. 

“It still leaves Waigel in a complete 
hole in terms of the budget deficit, the 
same fiscal hole he was in three weeks 
ago,” when the revaluation idea was 
proposed, said Darren Williams, econ- 
omist in London at UBS Lid. in London. 
“But in the meantime, he has managed 
to severely damage his own credibility 
and the credibility of the German gov- 
ernment.” 


Continued from Page 1 

towns that surround it, the people who 
lost something in the explosion said the 
same thing, over and over: lhat the ver- 
dict is a victory on paper. 

It ensures that Mr. McVeigh will pay 
for his crime somehow. The penalty 
phase of his trial, the battle for his life, is 
what counts here. 

The same federal jury that took four 
days to convict Mr. McVeigh will now 
decide whether he will die by lethal 
injection or live in prison. 

As the days dragged by and no verdict 
came, some victims began to fear the 
unthinkable. It had happened to the 
Goldman and Brown families in the O.J. 
Simpson murder trial, they warned each 
other. It could happen here. 

Instead, a great many people talked 
about renewed faith in the justice sys- 
tem. 

”Jt was beautiful,” Jannie CoverdaJe 
said about the prosecution’s case. Mrs. 
Coverdale lost two grandsons in the 
bombing and became one of the most 
visible examples of its cost Aaron. 5, 
and Elijah, 2. died in that avalanche of 
concrete as they played in the building's 
day-care center on April 19. 1995. 

Mrs. Coverdale went to the trial every 
day in Denver. "It was like they had a 
puzzle they were putting together." box- 
ing Mr. McVeigh in, she said of the 
prosecutors in a telephone interview. 

The survivors and victims talked 
hopefully of another victory in the pen- 
alty phase. How, once the jury is privy to 
so much pain, can it deny them Mr. 
McVeigh’s life? 

Ronald Fields, who tends the news- 
paper printing press at The Daily Ok- 
lahoman, lost his wife. Chip, who 
worked in the federal building. 

“All she lived for was her family, her 
garden and her home,” Mr. Fields said. 
“He took away my past, my present and 
my future." 

It was the same with Tina Tomlin in 
nearby Piedmont, who lost her husband. 
Rick. Her entry in the phone book, two 
years after his funeral, still reads “Rick 
and Tina.” 

“I can take a step toward healing,” 


Mrs. Tomlin said. But, if the jury votes 
for his execution, “there will be joy. I 
only wish they would let me do it.” 

Mr. McVeigh’s act taught some 
people here how to haie. But the hatred 
he delivered in his rental truck is not the 
chaos he hoped for. 

People joined, across lines of color 
and money and religion, against him. 
against the militias, against conspiracy 
rhetoric that, before this, had been so 
much less menacing to them. 

“He got the attention he wanted, but 
he did not win.” Mrs. Tomlin said. "If 
anything, he brought us closer, people of 
all races.” 

Their hatred is like a laser, glowing, 
steady, narrow. Even the ones who say 
they do not hate him said, in the next 
breath, that they want him to die for the 
damage he caused. 

Jim Denny and his wife, Claudia, saw 
both of their children. Brandon, now 5, 
and Rebecca, now 4. badly injured in the 
explosion. 

Rebecca received 133 stitches above 
the neck. Brandon, who had a quarter- 
size hole blown in his head, spent 17 
days in intensive care and endured four 
brain surgeries. 

"We’ve never had any anger," he 


said. “Our system will show that there 
will be accountability. The justice sys- 
tem works.” 

He will testily at the penalty phase. He 
thinks the death penalty is the only ac- 
ceptable penalty, the only reasonable 
one. His children were too young to 
understand what happened to them. One 
day. he said, they will ask, and Mr. 
Denny said he would tell them the truih. 

Sometimes, he said, Rebecca talks 
about “the bad building. About the thun- 
der and the lightning." 

Later in the evening, victims, sur- 
vivors and people who just wanted to be 
part of this good news gathered at a tree 
near the bomb site. The tree, shredded by 
the blast, had appeared io be dead, little 
more than a tall stump. 

But it now seems to be thriving. Here 
in Oklahoma City, people see it as a 
symbol, a sign that in the middle of so 
much destruction, life can begin again. 

Bud Welch, 57, lost his daughter. 23- 
year-old Julie Marie, who, he said with 
pride, spoke five languages. He is one of 
the few people who does not want Mc- 
Veigh to die. 

“My little girl was killed 40 feet from 
where we are now standing," he said. ”1 
don't need another death.” 


CANADA: Chretien Hangs On to Power 


‘ 10 (peace up their 
mejef ha* always 
?_ Mr. Wane!'* 
P^wai mean-, 3 oer 
iiikfcf the pri 



: But Mr. Ticl- 
.Careful nut to 
lhat "3 

revaluation. 


Continued from Page 1 

district in Quebec late Monday, “and 

that we will do.” 

But the election did not turn out to be 
the cakewalk Mr. Chretien had envi- 
sioned when he called it in late April. 
The Liberals lost support throughout the 
campaign as the four major opposition 
parties focused on the prime minister’s 
failure to scrap unpopular taxes as he bad 
promised. Tne Liberals were also 
hammered for their austerity budgets, 
which reduced spending on health, wel- 
fare and higher education by $10 billion 
a year, and for their inability to lower the 


that while voters complained 
budget restraints, many agreed with Mr. 
Chretien’s approach of focus.ng on 
eliminating the budget deficit 

Mr. Chretien could face a rocky peri- 
od of confrontation in the next Par- 
liament, given that Reform, a rightist 
populist party, won the second highest 
number of seats. Perhaps articipatmg 
the strife to come, the prime irimsier pul 
out a call for unity among the panics. 
-The Canadian people expert all of us 


to carry oui our responsibilities in ac- 
cordance with long-standing Canadian 
values of tolerance, openness, gener- 
osity and inclusion,” he said. "That I 
will do." 

The Reform Party sprang from the 
prairies and mountains of western 
Can ada but was unable to gain ground. in 
Ontario as its leaders had hoped. 

“The reduced support for the govern- 
ment is surely a warning that the gov- 
ernment must heed," said the Reform 
leader. Preston Manning. 4 ‘The warning is 
that you cannot break your promises.” 

Reform lakes a hard line on Quebec 
separation. As the official opposition in 
the House of Commons, it will have 


part)’ left no doubt that the bitter struggle 
for Quebec independence was not over. 

“I 'm convinced more than ever that the 
future of Quebec lies in the sovereignty of 
Quebec.” said Gilles Duccppe, the leader 
of the Bloc Quebecois. 

The short campaign never really 
caught the attention of voters, who sus- 
pected Mr. Chretien of opportunism by 
calling the election so early. The prime 
minister also was criticized for calling the 


I Canadian Election Results 

Number of seats in the House of 
Commons and percent of popular vote 


New 

Democratic 
Party 
21 seats 
71% 


Bloc 

Quebecois 
44 seats 
11 % 


Progressive 
Conservatives 
20 seats 

19% j 



CHINA: The Fragile State of Activism 

Continued from Page 1 

state. The forces against political change 
are too strong, and the forces calling for 
change too weak, to prevail." 

The government is taking no chances. 

Last weekend, the police sealed off 
Beijing University to isolate the campus 
on which the 1989 protests began. The 
effort hardly seemed necessary given the 
conservative student opinion these days. 

One student asked recently. “What’s the 
point of wasting your life in jail?” Al- 
though he sympathized with the goals of 
Mr. Wang and Mr. Wei. he said he saw 
no productive result to such sacrifice. 

This anniversary of the 1989 protests 
falls between rwo key events: the death 
of the senior leader Deng Xiaoping and 
the autumn Communist Party congress, 
which takes place every five years. At 
one time, democracy advocates hoped 
that a reassessment of the 1989 protests 
and liberalization might be possible after 
the death of Mr. Deng, who ordered the 
crackdown that resulted in the deaths of 
hundreds if not thousands. 

Analysts scoured President Jiang 
Zemin 's eulogy at Mr. Deng 's memorial 
for signs of a change in the verdict on the 
protests, but Mr. Jiang has remained 
vague on the issue. 

“To hold firm the ideas of Deng is to 
hold firm the ideas of Marx and Mao,” 


Mr. Jiang said Thursday to senior party 
officials at the Central Party School 
graduation ceremony. “We must con- 
tinue to push forward reform of the 
political system.” 

Some analysts say that even if de- 
mocracy supporters could muster enough 
strength, it might not be the best time for 
protest, “Demonstrations for democracy 
in the post-Mao era have proved to be 
counier-productive,” Mr. Goldman said. 
“The reactions against them have un- 
dermined so many of the gains." 

The party’s reaction against demon- 
strations in 1986 led to the purge of Hu 
Yaobang. a party leader who advocated 
reform. The 1989 crackdown ended a 
decade of public political debates and 
the establishment of relatively inde- 
pendent political research organizations 
that could influence policy-making. 

It foreshadowed the pursuit of personal 
gain. Chinese have immeasurably more- 
freedom in economic and personal realms 
than in earlier rimes, but cannot cross the 
line into politics, which the Communist 
Party regards as its monopoly. 

’ ‘The decade of the 1990s has brought 
more cultural, individual and social 
freedoms, but there is much less political 
freedom than existed in the 1980s," Mr. 
Goldman said. “That is the tragedy of 
the June 4 events.” 


COUP: Marines Evacuate 1,200 Foreigners 


HIT 


election while a good part of the province 
of Manitoba was facing a histone flood. 

New laws made This the shortest cam- 
paign in Canadian history, and one of the 
molt tightly controlled. News outlets 
were prohibited from reporting poll re- 
sults for 72 hours before the election, so 
they would not influence voters. Voting 
hours were staggered across the country, 
and the media were prohibited from re- 
porting results of early voting in any areas 
where polling places were Mill open. 


Continued from Page 1 

Leonean forces lay siege to the building 
throughout Monday, attacking it with 
heavy machine guns, mortars and rock- 
et-propelled grenades. 

“I have never seen anything like that in 
my life, and hope never to see anything 
like it again,” a Lebanese man who had 
taken refuge in the hotel said in a tele- 
phone interview. “The building was cm 
fin; from all of the hits we had taken, and 
we were just left to shudder through the 
whole day. Many of us assumed lhat our 
lives had reached their end." 

At day’s end, however, a ceafe-fire was 


negotiated that allowed the foreigners to 
leave the hotel in a convoy set up by the 
International Red Cross. With the foreign 
refugees taking up shelter in another 
hotel, Washington ordered that a third and 
probably final evacuation be mounted. 

Among the evacuees were about 30 
Americans, believed to be among the 
bsl U.S. citizens in the country, and the 
British high commissioner to Sierra Le- 
one, whose departure signaled the clo- 

According to international and Sierra 
Leonean radio broadcasts, there was m 
new fighting in Freetown on Tuesday 


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PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4. 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


'‘"I 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PI Bl.UlIbU WITH Tilt NEW YORK TIMES .\Nb TlIP W-VWilMTTVN nWl 


Japanese Are Used to tin Long Ann of the Stat 

_ Il_! ^ * JL V f w rl» M- wi«v has a lonfi historv. Dunn) 


Straight Balkan Talk 


Secretary- of Stale Madeleine Al- 
bright promised a new level of candor 
when she took charge of American 
foreign policy. She delivered during a 
weekend visit to the Balkan region. In 
remarkably blunt conversations with 
the leaders of Croatia and Serbia, she 
made plain that they had failed to carry 
out many of the provisions of the 
Dayton peace agreement 
Mrs. Albright employed a vocab- 
ulary not commonly used in diplomatic 
discourse, especially in public com- 
ments by secretaries of state. At one 
point she told a startled Croatian cab- 
inet member that she was “disgusted'” 
by his government's failure to prevent 
violent attacks against Serbian re- 
fugees trying to return to their homes in 
Croatia. '“You should be ashamed of 
yourself.” she lectured Jure Ganic. the 


reconstruction minister. Earlier she 
had accused him of lying. 

She told Franjo Tudjman, the Croa- 
tian president, that he had not shown 
“moral leadership.” and she Ieciured 
Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic 
about “stonewalling.” Both men have 
brazenly thwarted a host of Dayton 
provisions, including those promising 
peaceful resettlement of refugees, de- 
velopment of a free press and surrender 
of political and military leaders in- 
dicted for war crimes. It will be hard to 
secure a durable peace in Bosnia with- 
out their compliance. 

Mrs. Albright's remonstrations and 
the more determined U.S. policy behind 
them may not budge the Balkan leaders. 
But they can no longer complain that 
Washington's views are unclear. 

-THE SEH YORK TIMES. 


The McVeigh Verdict 


Americans learned after the O.J. 
Simpson trial that it is unwise to pre- 
dict what any given jury will do. So as 
they gathered around radios and tele- 
vision secs Monday afternoon ro hear 
the verdict in the McVeigh case, ten- 
sions were running high — nowhere 
more so than among "the groups of 
bombing victims and survivors wait- 
ing in Denver and Oklahoma City. The 
verdict of guilty on all 1 1 counts was 
not really a surprise, given the strength 
of the government’s carefully con- 
structed case. Bui it was at least a relief 
for those who hod waited for justice for 
more than two years. 

Even if the verdict had been dif- 
ferent. there would be no room for 
complaint about the way this trial was 
run. Judge Richard Matsch was in firm 
control throughout, and his demeanor 
and strong leadership were reflected in 
the conduct of the attorneys and jurors. 
All the participants appeared deter- 
mined to preserve the dignity of the 
courtroom and to keep in mind' at every 
moment the gravity of the occasion and 
their own responsibility to conclude 
the matter fairly and without undue 
delav. This, of course, is how trials 


ought to be conducted and usually are. 
The odd thing is that it is necessary at 
all to remark on the absence of laissez- 
faire judges. publicity-hungry lawyers, 
squabbling jurors and book contracts. 

The word "closure” was much ban- 
died about Monday afternoon, as in 
' ‘ Even though you lost your young wife 
and beautiful baby in the explosion, 
don't you have some sense of closure 
now that the trial is over?” It's the 
wrong word. For the victims and sur- 
vivors there will never be a resolution 
of their loss, a conclusion to their grief. 
But there was a sense of justice, a 
renewal of faith in the system so reviled 
by the now convicted mass murderer. 

In spite of the rage of a nation and 
the enormity of his crime, Timothy 
McVeigh was not rushed to judgment. 
He was accorded all his rights, in- 
cluding Fine lawyers and an eminently 
fair trial. The jurors took the time to 
weigh all the evidence, and although 
that" worried some of the Oklahoma 
City families on Sunday, the jury 
reached a verdict that seems right in 
every respect, and must be enormously 
condoning to the survivors. 

"—THE WASHINGTON POST 


A French Warning 


French voters did more on Sunday 
than force President Jacques Chirac 
into an unwanted and unwieldy gov- 
eming partnership with the Socialist 
opposition. They also sent a warning 
likely to resound through Europe, es- 
pecially in other high-unemployment 
countries of the European Union like 
Germany. Italy. Spain and Greece. 
Governments that demand cuts in the 
welfare slate to meet the eligibility con- 
ditions of a single European currency 
do so ai considerable political risk. 

That warning must now be carefully 
weighed by German Chancellor Hel- 
mut" Kohl," who plans to run for re- 
election next year. The French vote w ill 
also be studied by Italy’s ruling center- 
left coalition, w hich plans to cut pen- 
sions to quality- for the currency. Lionel 
Jospin, the French Socialist who was 
named prime minister Monday, will 
find it hard to reconcile his new gov- 
ernment’s spending for jobs and pro- 
tection of social benefits with France’s 
commitment to the single currency. 

It now seems likely that the timetable 
for introducing the new currency , the 
euro, as early as Januaty I OQQ w ilj hn\ e 
to be reconsidered. That is equally true 
for the requirement that the budget de- 
ficits of qualifying countries not exceed 
3 percent of gross domestic product. 
The question is how far those rules can 
be stretched without making a single 
currency unworkable in practice. 

French voters are among Europe's 
mn-i resistant to revisinu the common 


postwar social contract. Their belief in 
France’s ability to maintain its distinct 
national identity* and culture has sur- 
vived the emergence of a globalized 
economy and membership in an in- 


creasingly integrated European Union. 
:llts like job security, high unem- 


Benefits 

plovment pay. paid medical care and 
early retirement are considered hard- 
won achievements. Many economists, 
however, blame this svsrem for France's 


double-digit unemployment rates, 
ice the 


Since the early 1980s. politicians of 
left and right have been punished at the 
polls for policies suggestive of the Mar- 
garet Thatcher model of individual risk 
and reward. Left-wing voters began 
flocking toward the far-right, anti-im- 
migrant National Front after the So- 
cialists embraced austerity budgets 15 
years ago. Chirac attracted many of 
these disillusioned voters in 1995, run- 
ning on a Gaul I ist platform of con- 
servative social values and a strong de- 
fense of the paternalistic welfare state. 

But ihe policies that worked for de 
Gaulle in the postw ar decades proved 
unworkable in the !990s Chirac ab- 
ruptly repackaged himself as a budget- 
cutting free-marketeer, an approach 
voter* have decisively rejected. Chirac 
and Jospin now find themselves under 
many of the same pressures that des- 
troyed past governments. Even if the 
euro is delayed or its conditions eased. 
France faces a painful adjustment of its 
high expectations. 

— THE \FA\ 1 OKK TIMES 


Other Comment 


Hurdler for Foreign Policv 


[The .American] Constitution is 
unique in creating a government w Inch 
enshrine* the “separation of powers." 
This mean* that we require a national 
consensus before we ean create or sus- 
tain a major foreign policy . 

With the end of the Cold War. the 
public's interest in foreign policy has 
shrunk. In the recent election, only 2 
percent of the American people felt 
that foreign policy was the most im- 
portant issue. By contrast, in 198-1 
some 3l> percent of the public thought 
so ... The disappearance of the Soviet 
threat has left the field open to de- 
mesne interest groups that have their 


own special axes to grind. Thus do- 
mestic constituencies acquire an ex- 
cessive influence over our foreign 
policy. A* a direct result, our foreign 
policy lacks coherence. 

That tendency has in recent years 
been reinforced by the weakening of the 
traditional concept of America as. a 
melting pot. That results in a loss of the 
>ense of common purpose on which we 
mu*i depend to establish a national con- 
sensus. Ethnicity has become the norm. 
To speak of the national interest in the 
abstract \s simply to invite a rebuke. 

— Fi mmr Defense Secretary 
J times 5, litcswger. in a 
. .»iw,vu i mem address at the 
L'iu\er\!t\ , it . Nor th Carolina. 


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RICHARD NK CLEAN. J.v .£ C>., ■ 

MICHAEL C.ETLER. / hist.- 


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P RINCETON, New Jersey — Why 
do the Japanese not eagerly em- 
brace the ideals of free markets, de- 


By Sheldon Garon 


;has st 


regulation and consumer sovereignty? 


Japan's business community has 
welcomed the guiding hand of the gov- 
ernment in industrial policy. Few out- 
siders realize the extent to which the 
Japanese state has also promoted eco- 
nomic development by actively man- 
aging and mobilizing society itself. 

To most Japanese officials and busi- 
ness people, the country’s ability to 
compete in the next century rests in good 


markets or an. end to the inefficient 
distribution system, but for a massive 
government campaign to “educate” 
consumers to spend less money on 
goods. Consumers, the manifesto com- 
plains. have brought about the cotin- 

UIaK ftAiiinA ir^n 


tty's high price levels, paying top yen 
Hess of quality. 


a on maintaining safe streets, intact 
lit 


ies, die work ethic, low welfare 
spending and high rales of saving. These 
favorable conditions are not expected to 
endure by themselves, but to depend on 
the government’s continuing efforts to 
mold the behavior of the people. 

Only by recognizing the widespread 
commitment to “social management” 
can we make sense of the current Jap- 
anese debate over deregulation. 

Take die Blue Bird Plan put forward 
by the leading employers’ federation. 
Nikkeiren. Echoing American free-mar- 
ket thinkers, die proposal boldly seeks to 
eli mina te government regulations that 
raise production costs ana erode inter- 
national competitiveness. 

Yet in attacking high prices, the 
business federation calls not for freer 


for brand names regardless ... 

The Blue Bird Plan recommends 

g ains t following either the U.S. or the 
iropean economic models. Japanese 
must find, in the words of the song, 
their own “blue bird” of happiness. 

In no other democracy has die gov- 
ernment mobilized the public behind 
strategic economic policies as success- 
fully. Campaigns to promote house- 
hold saving are a prime example. The 
Japanese on average save 1 3 percent of 


disposable income. 
Wit 


ith great fanfare 1 1 years ago, the 


government announced plans to stint 
tla 


ulate consumption. Yet Japan remains 
the only advanced economy with an 
official agency devoted to encouraging 
saving. Established in 1952, the Cen- 
tral Council for Savings Information 
works with local schools and civic 
groups to inculcate habits of thrift 
The government has successfully 
dampened public expectations of more 


terous welfare 

u4y. Social spenw* e — ------ i , 

eds the population ages, but Japai has 
thifar avoided many of die costMiat 
W»em nations pay to institutionalize 
ihefotil or support the independent 
livii of healthy seniors. \ 

** mi 55 percent of Japanese aged 
J older were living, with tlfcr 
uuiu«n in 1994. The comparable . 
ures tree dropped below 20 percent In 
West»j societies. _ ' 

■ In adeft public relations — 
spann^the last two decades, 
and a ^operative media have 
suadedfe public that only if families! 
panicolity wives, continue to care foi. 
the eldet will Japan escape the risingj 
costs of ititlements. 

Womdplay central roles in the gov- 
emment’Fsocial management Mil- 
lions belbg to local associations. 
These soratimes take issue with na- 
tional poiiies, but for the most part 
provide the^ound troops for tire many 
official campaigns. They promote 
household iwing, discourage use of 
credit cardsVnd assist the police in 
crime preverion. In addition, women 
constitute thdvast majority of the 5 
million “voluteers" whom the central . 
bureaucracy hi aggressively recruited 
to serve as unqid social workers. 
Japan's preodupation with managing 


society has a long history. During 
firaibalfof the 20th century, few ara. . 
life escaped supervision by the sde. 
People woe exhorted to save mote. 1* 
fewer imports and work harder to av 
relying on public assistance. 

Flourishing brothels became ins 
ments for strengthening the nau 
State regulators explained thaiiketi 
prostitution served to satisfy the ur 

of husbands and thus preserve fair , 

units- Prostitutes enabled single men \ 
forgo-marriage, and thus to avoid tb* 
costs of supporting families and so re ' 
duce aggregate national consumption. 

Japan became a more democrat! 
polity after World War B. but many c. 
the cozy relationships between the state 
and civic associations persist today. 

There is somshing appealing about . 
the government and local activists work- if 
i ing together to improve communities or ‘ 
\ieach methods of sound personal fi- 
ance. On the other hand, close relations 
aween the state and civic groups in- 
hibit the rise of more independent move- 
ments that might challenge the gov- 
rnment’s anti-consumer orientation 
id miserly welfare programs. 
iFor bener or worse, these patterns of 
serial management remain a funda- 
mental fixture of the Japanese political 
economy. 

Los Angeles Times 



Prtil 


.‘JL-j/. j.* 
. -a**- .my 

? . V. 




. •- 




The French Have Their Say: Bold, Vmgeful and Impractical 


W ASHINGTON — The 
consequences border on 
the cosmic: France’s bristling 
rejection of President Jacques 
Chirac's conservative coalition 
in parliamentary elections calls 
into question the future of Euro- 
pean integration, the pace of 
economic globalization and im- 
pending reform of NATO’s 
military structure. 

Not bad for a Sunday's work, 
mes amis. You French voters 
have shown that you still count 
in a world of seemingly inex- 
orable. impersonal political and 
economic forces. 

You punished Mr. Chirac 
and his prime minister. Alain 
Juppe, for deceiving you, even 
if it means leaving the French 
political scene in chaos, making 
it unpredictable and a drag on 
Europe's economic recovery. 

Which it does. You have 
taken a road that is at once 
vengeful and romantic, as he- 
roic a gesture of cutting off 
one's ne: to spite one’s visage 


By Jim Hoagland 


as I ean remember. You have 
wrought an unworkable polit- 
ical situation that you will have 
to go back to the polls to rectify 
in a year or two. 

Mr. Chirac, elected comfort- 
ably two years ago, and who 
still has five years to go on his 
presidential mandate, clearly 
did not believe that you would 
do this. He called these elec- 
tions a year early because be 
thought he could keep control 
of the National Assembly now. 
with a reduced conservative 
majority, whereas he was likely 
to lose in 1998. You voters just 
as clearly did not like this elec- 
toral opportunism. 

As m so much he does. Mr. 
Chirac's instincts were laudable 
and his vision faulty. From day 
one of his presidency he has seen 
time as an ally he controlled. 
When elected in 1995 he was the 
only Western leader “with a 
foot firmly planted in the next 


century.” as an aide said. He 
wonld be president at least until 
2002. He and Mr. Jupp6 could 
wait, ride out bad polls, get their 
parliamentary ducks in a row for 
the next five years. 

Even after public protests 
forced them to drop a tentative 
effort to overhaul the expensive 
welfare system, Mr. Chirac and 
Mr. Jupp£ temporized, failing to 
cut the 12.8 percent unemploy- 
ment rate as they had repeatedly 
promised to do. They did not 
seem even to try seriously to 
fulfill their campaign promises 
in their first two years. 

Now the victorious Socialists 
have made their own undeliv- 
erable promises, swearing to let 
you keep your favorite govern- 
ment-financed programs, in- 
crease government employ- 
ment and cut the deficit. 

The novelist Philippe Labro 
got it right in telling me last 
Friday that the right would lose 


Sunday: “We French 
mapable of making tl 
eftnges in our lives that tl 
try of the new global ect 
noty demands. So now »•< 
chage governments insteat 
evet two years and pretend we] 
are Ranging our lives. * ’ 

Chirac and Mr. Jospin 
mustViow cohabit in their sep- 
arate Works of political fiction 
undenrour vengeful eye. 

In ctlltno this election before 
he had fesults to show, Mr. Chir- 
ac discarded an observation 
made rrfre than a decade ago by 
the late tnmanuel de Margerie. 
then Finch ambassador in 
Washington: “Treat a French- 
man as if pu have fooled him or 
cuckolded him, and you will 
have anieremy for life.” 

Mr. Jupfe paid the price for 
your fedir* that you had been 
fooled in 1195. One of the best 
foreign niliisters France has 
had in thi. ijalf-century. he was 
politically 1 ' unconvincing as 
prime miiister. He came ro 


symbolize a political class ihav 
you seem to feel has lost touch, 
with your concerns and lives. 

You punished (he Socialists | 
in 1993 by giving Mr. Chirac’s-. 
neo-Gaullists and their center- 
right allies a huge majority at, 
Parliament. Now you punish, 
the right by voting in a working ; 
[majority of Socialists. Comrauy 
\nists and Greens that wilL 
tong other things, freeze Mr. 
s attempts to reintegrate 
into NATO's military 
/ing. They are lukewarm m 
stile on a single European, 
:ncy and other provisions 
' the Maastricht unity treaty. •„ 
iThe late President' Francois- 
itterrand, who was as devious 
ptient and cynical as Mr. Chir* 
fs straightforward, impulsive, 
impressionable, manipa- 
laid power sharing with d& 
liar. It will be an unsustainable 
ontal for Mr. Chirac. He can] 
onlr hope that you will rcmentj 
k 1r. Jospin’s promises. \ 

The Washington Post. J 


' ■*-. •. 

■ - 

A*r-' 

4»# I .1 

•; 

.-v 7 - • 


- 1 






• -• •• •' 
/ _> 
-’•v;.’ : 

y;\.' -yey >■ ** 

. -i- -f.- -- fO-. ' 
."i 


V 


The People of Hong Kong Should Focus oil the Longer Term 


H ONG KONG — Britain 
can take enormous pride in 
Hong Kong. Never before has 
colonial rule ended with such 
prosperity and so rich a civil 
society. For this reason alone, 
Hong Kong’s prospects, at least 
in the short term, are good. But 
what lies beyond that? 

There is a worrying erosion 
of civil liberties in the territory, 
yet the main focus of attention 
should be the longer-term chal- 
lenges. China and the outside 
world can affect the outcome, 
but the key lies in the will and 
wits of Hong Kong's people. 

The most important chal- 
lenge is how to reshape the 
economy. Like other developed 
East Asian economies. Hong 
Kong has to leant to live in an 
increasingly competitive world 
with a "hollowed out” indus- 
trial base. Many of its industries 
have shifted to neighboring 


By Gerald Segal 


southern China, where land and 
labor costs are lower. • 

The business leaders who 
surround die chief executive- 
designate. C.H. Tung, often 
seem short of ideas about how . 
to enhance Hong Kong's com- 
petitiveness. It is far from clear 
that rule by business tycoons 
will be better at meeting the 
future challenges than rule by a 
distant London and a first-class 
local professional civil service 
with a laissez-faire approach. 

The competition among the 
business interests in Mr. Tung’s 
team largely explains their lack 
of credible economic vision. 
Some talk of a "new industrial 
policy” with echoes of China: 
others of a “high-tech” Hong 
Kong. Yet others note the need 
to improve the environment. 

All agree that housing policy 


needs to be improved to reduce 
rents and attract more talented 
workers. But there are some in 
Mr. Tung’s team who will lose a 
fortune if real reform is under- 
taken and land prices fail. 

An efficient service econo- 
, my, let alone a high-tech Hong 
' Kong, will need to raise stan- 
dards of higher education. Yet 
Mr. Tung’s team speaks of 
more investment in primary 
education. A brain drain in re- 
cent years and fear among local 
university staff that Chinese 
rule will erode academic free- 
dom make Hong Kong less 
reily than Taiwan, South 
Korea or Singapore for post- 
m das trial competition. 

The current obsession with 
short -term challenges to human 
righti and democracy also ob- 
scures the difficult questions of 




Toward a Color- Bli 



enca 


W ASHINGTON — ”1 
have a dream.” said 
Martin Luther King Jr. 34 
years, ago. “that my four tittle 
children will one day live in a 
nation where they will nor be 
judged by the color of their 
skin, but by the content of 
their character." 

That was a call for a color- 
blind society. But over the 
years, instead of doing all they 
could to demolish distinctions 
of race, government agencies 
have emphasized them. Now 
at last things are changing. 

Two trends are accelerat- 
ing. one social and one legal. 
The first is that more and more 
blacks are manying whites. 
The second is that affirmative 
action is crumbling. 

In 1993. one in eight Af- 
rican-American marriages in- 
cluded a white spouse. Since 
1970. the number of children 
in homes with a mother and 
father of different races has 
quadrupled. 

The trend could lead, as Jim 
Sleeper writes in Harper's, to 
“the implosion of the identity 
of blackness — and, with ir. of 
whiteness.” 

The Office of Management 
and Budget will soon decide 
whether to recommend a 
"multiracial” box on govern- 
ment forms. Representative 
Tom Petri. Republican of 
Wisconsin, has introduced le- 
gislation he calls the ‘‘Tiger 
Woods Bill’ ’ to require such a 
checkoff in the next census. . 


By Janies K. Glassman 


Mr. Woods, the sensational 
young golfer, considers him- 
self multiracial. "Growing 
up, I came up with this name: 
I'm ‘Cablinasian’ ” — since 
his heritage is one-eighth 
Caucasian, one-fourth black, 
one-eighth American Indian, 
one-fourth Chinese and one- 
founh Thai. 

In this he is not much dif- 
ferent from other Americans: 
nearly all of us are gloriously 
mixed and the better for it, 
genetically and culturally. 

But government racial 
policies force us to define 
ourselyes as white, black, His- 
panic or Asian. The purpose 
may be benign (to track the 
progress of minorities), but 
the effect is vicious (to re- 
inforce strict racial identity, 
the way segregationists did). 

If a "multiracial” box be- 
comes an option, I will likely 
check it off myself. My Rus- 
sian forebears surely mixed 
with all sorts on the steppes. 

Robert George, who is 
black and an aide to Speaker 
Newt Gingrich, asks. "Has 
the time come to dispense 
with the boxes altogether?” 
At any rate, the new box will 
be the beginning of the end for 
the whole ridiculous architec- 
ture of race-counting. 

But the main effect of the 
multiracial checkoff is that it 
will doom affirmative action. 


already oh the run. Last month, 
law schools in Texas and Cali- 
fornia. which have just barred 
race as a Consideration in ad- 
missions, reported a sharp de- 
cline in thei number of blacks 
and Hi spare cs they were ac- 
cepting into text year's classes. 
The UCLA\ School of Law, 
for instance, accepted only 21 
African-American applicants, 
down from 104 last year. 


Those figo 
also refreshin] 
nerly. a black 
University of 
of regents, well 
the unmasking 
daily engjnee 


but 


■s are sad 
Ward Con- 
lember of the 
lifomia board 
med them as 
f an “artifi- 
system 


... of 

preferences thao has been 
propping up diverW" He ad- 
ded: "If we really Want to help 
those black and Latino kids, 
we will give rhemlome tough 
love and get themlchanneled 
into being able to compete," 
The Clinton administration 
is hustling to craft neW rules to 
preserve affirmativenction in 

contracting, despite new court 
decisions that severely limit 
the practice. 

“On the one hand}” said 
Mr. Conneriy, a man 4f guts, 
and principle. * There ari those 
who say that race matters, that 
we have to use race t 
beyond race. Then, the., 
those of us who beiievi 
President Kennedy sai 
1963, 'Race has no pla 
American life or law/’ ’ 

It’s time to choose. 

Washington Post W i Her* Group 


lacd m 


y>\ /V \ 




political refoni The grudge 
match between ie British gov- 
ernment and the ncoming team 
over the legaiitybf the Provi- 
sional Legislarurdis insignific- 
ant when compaid with how 
groups in the newfegislature to 
be elected by July l|98 will form 
political parties anevie with the 
chief executive aalhis Exec- 
utive Council for rei power. 

According to the lasic Law, 
half the new legislate will be 
fully elected in 2001. If two- 
thirds of the legislatte agree, 
and the chief executiJ assents. 
Hong Kong can thel have a 
fully elected PartiamAt on the 
basis of universal liOfage. 
How would such a bcl' relate 
to an unelected chief extutive? 
Will Hong Kong have eVctions 
for a “chief minister, "iy ith a 
real cabinet and a tnajcfciy of 
seats in Parliament? ’ A 

Such far-reaching denric rat- 
io reforms are there for tii tak- 
ing, but die people have tokree 
on their design and then vcfefor 
them. If they are determinn to 
defend their rights undeiyhe 
Basic Law, they can makqfoe 
current debates about their 
ited democracy seem like be 
detritus of colonialism. V 

Yet another challenge is hi 
to deal with what some of N 
Tung’s advisers call “Beijinj 
shoe-shiners." The chief ext 
utive is often pilloried for beit 
China’s poodle, but, as anyor 
who meets him knows, he is bl 
nature a careful conservative ii 
a Confucian mold. 

He needs no instructions 


?. ei W 

dissic 


to take a rough line on 
nts or street protests, be- 
cause the naturally stresses the 
impomnee of obligations to so- 
ciety Imore than individual 
lights.But his advisers acknow- 
ledge tke problem with son^e of 
their nlmber ithe shoe-shiners), 
who art too quick to try to _ 
Beijingland do not think 
enoughlabout what is bestlfor 
Hong Kbng. When China itfelf 
is so decentralized and divifcd 
on majoj policy issues, there kre 
mevitabt shoe-shirvers pid- 
dling different policies. 

In suc| circumstances, there 
is vimielin Mi. Tung seeking 
support Horn Beijing to contiol 
interests m neighboring Guaig-' 
ince which want a 
e of Hong Kong's 


dong P: 
larger sli 
economic 
need po 
Beijing if 
Chinese 
doing busi 
or the m; 
companies 
by advenis: 


ie. He will certainy . 
erful friends h ■ 
ie is to control tie 
ed forces .who an 
s in Hong Kong 
and “red chip"; 
ho are muscling u '. 
g their high-Jeve j 


contacts in China. 

These are\all challenges dial 1 
Hong Kong ban meet. But if it 
continues to focus on short-term 
issues, especially debates about 
the rights and Wrongs of the past, 
it wiU be poorly placed to meet 
the longer-term challenges. 


The writer, a senior fellow ai 
the International Institute for '. 
Strategic Studies and director 
Britain's Pacific Asia Program, 
contributed this comment ro the 
International Herald Tribune. 


IN QUR PAGES: 100, t AND 50 YEARS AGO ^ 


1897: Crisis in Spain 

MADRID — The Cabinet met 
under the presidency of the 
Queen Regent. Senof Canovas 
del Castillo made a long state- 
ment as to the position of affairs 
in Cuba and the Philippines and 
internal and economic policy. 
Finally the Premier dealt with 
Spain s relations towards the 
United States and concluded 
that it was on account of dif- 
ficulties connected with all 
these questions that the cabinet 
had resigned The Queen Re- 
gent begged Senor Canovas to 
continue to direct affairs until a 
solution had been arrived at 


>y the American Ambassador, 
[t is the only medal ever con- 
erred by the Government of if* 
United States on any city, and 
fill be bestowed in the name of 
le Congress and the People of 
United States as a mafk of 

f ierica’s appreciation of the 
or of its defenders. 


1|47: Reds Rebuked 


1922: Verdun’s Medal 


PARIS — Imposing ceremonial 
and utterances of generous im- 
port will accompany rhe hand- 
ing of the Congressional Medal 
to the City of Verdun. The 
presentation will be made in the 
presence of the French Premier 


PIUS — Premier Paul Ra- 
mlier accused the French 
Cdtmunist party of inspiring 
strips in strategic industries 
antlnsking the downfall oI 
theFourth Republic. In the 
;est political attack oi luj ’ 
lomhs’ leadership, ; 

ie Communists waw a®; £ j 
national "catastrophe 

S eating work stoppage* ^ in 
:eries and power plants- 
the legislature's extreme 
/, he said: "If you have 
-..sat policy, let us 

as I am concerned I am 


here tfcefcnd the Republic- 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 1997 


PAGE 9 


OPINION/LETTERS 


inn of the Sta^ Gore-Gephardt Polmics: 

: A Necessary Delate 




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W ASHINGTON — The de- 
late that sprang up last 
ueek-tew een Vice President AI 
(jon: and Dick Gephardt, the 
Hour minority leader, is impor- 
iant yr the United States and — 
jespe the doubters — valuable 
forte Democratic Party. 

Vhen Mr. Gephardt dissented 
lomyand publicly from the Clin- 
ronadministration’s policies on 
til? budget and on trade with 
Cfna. Republicans were quick to 
glut that the Democrats were in 
Siirtay. When Mr. Gore fired 
hi: with an equally tough speech 
0 <Jew Hampshire, some Demo- 
cns grumbled that the contest for 
tf 2000 nomination was begin - 
D ig ar least two years too soon. 
f ! What both seem to forget is that 
nen important issues are at stake, 
is an obligation for leaders — not 
selfish indu Igence — to speak out 
ildly and clearly on their views, 
hat is what Mr. Gephardt and Mr. 
[ore have done. Bravos ro both. 

[ The context for the argument is 
se incomplete effort by Bill Clin- 
bn to redefine the thinking of the 
Jeraocratic Party. In his 1992 
.{unpaign. the president empha- 
sized opponunity. responsibility 
• land community — traditionally 
f" Si'inlconservarive values. But he won 
“■ -'■mJ the fight without really winning 
i he argument. His principal op- 
ponents for the nomination — 
Jeny Brown and Paul Tsongas — 
were far from mainstream Demo- 
crats in their own thinking, and 
President George Bush was a man 


convincing hparty. A survey of 
1996 Democtic convention del- 
egates by T Washington Post 
and ABC Ms found that most 
opposed thwelfare cutoff and 
that most fored bigger govern- 
ment and tore services, even 
with high' taxes, over smaller 
govemmewith lower taxes. 

On all »e issues. Mr. Geph- 
ardt has hn a consistent cham- 
pion of totional Democratic lib- 
eralism. 'hen the welfare bill 
was on - House floor in July 
1996, hup posed it because, he 
said, it w “too weak on the work 

requiremts’ ’ and *‘too tough on 

the indent children who will 
end up ying the price when their 
parencarmor find jobs . 1 ’ 

Wh Mr. Clinton and the Re- 
public! leadership agreed on the 
budgcast month (in negotiations 
from'hich Mr. Gephardt and 
otheiemocratic leaders were ex- 
clude. Mr. Gephardt charged 
tfiaiiad "a deficit of principle, a 
defi of fairness, a deficit of tax 
jusP and, worst of all, a deficit 
of illars" — implying that it 
baJced only on paper. 

i is is not a one-sided debate. 
MGore, in a powerfully argued 
a cess to the Nashua, New Hamp- 
sfc. Chamber of Commerce, 
nle the case that the admints- 
rion’s budget and trade policies 
: exactly the righr medicine. 

In the last seven decades. Mr. 
jre pointed out, Nashua's econ- 
ny has shifted from companies 
tat "sewed blankets, stitched to- 
ether shoes, hammered out kegs 


The Insane Rage of ‘Patriots’ 


M ODESTO, California — 
’“Lady, you would be so 
easy to kill.” 

More than three years later, 
these words still haunt me. 

My assailant growled this 
threat as I lav in the darkness on 
the floor of "my garage, stunned 
and dazed from being beaten, 
kicked and knifed. Then he put a 
gun to my head and diy-fired it 

several times. 

This was no random attack or 
botched burglary. The man who 
all but killed me was a member of 
a disciplined organization with a 
specific mission. And. bizarre as 
it may seem. I had been targeted 
because of my job. 

1 am the elected clerk-recorder 
of Stanislaus County in central 
California, a sleepy-sounding 
title until paramilitary groups 
discovered that harassing and in- 
timidating officials like me is a 
way to attack the basic workings 
of government. 

One of their tactics is to try to 
file liens against the property of 
Internal Revenue Service em- 
ployees and other officials they 
regard as the enemy. 

In California alone, clerk-re- 
corders in 49 of the state's 58 
counties have reported threats 
ranging from fist-pounding in- 
timidation to verbal threats of 
harm. This is part of a guerrilla 
war against democracy going on 
far below the level of an Okla- 
homa City bombing. 

With all reverence for victims 
of that artack, I often felt while 
following the trial of Timothy 
McVeigh that the events are re- 
lated in spirit if nor in facL 
My nightmare began in early 


the country was ready to replace. 

In his first two years. Bill Clin- nd barrels and manufactured 
ton passed a budget and several :aps for milk bottles” to ones that 
other measures very much in ' ‘assemble cutting-edge com- 
■keeping with old Democraticputers, engineer electronic sys- 
' thinking and one big piece of Ie- terns and components, perform 

sisiation — the North Americar tests on circuit boards and design 

Free Trade Agreement — oi avionic systems.” Policies that 
which he was allied with Reput made sense in the past need ro atop Expulsions 
■licans against his party's congre? change just as dramabcaJiy, be 
sionai leaders and the majority i said, for the United States to con- 


By Karen Mathews 

1992. 1 was approached on sev- 
eral occasions by a small group 
of individuals who demanded I 
record various illegal docu- 
ments, usually fictitious "com- 
mon law” liens against property 
owned by IRS employees or lo- 
cal elected officials. I. of course, 
refused to do so. 

After that, my staff and I be- 
came targets of threats and hos- 
tile acts. 1 received anonymous 

MEANWHILE 

telephone calls at the office and 
at home. A fake bomb was placed 
under my car. Bullets were fired 
through the office windows. A 
single bullet was mailed ro my 
home with a message stating. 
"The next bullet will be directed 
at your head.” 

Then came the artack in my 
garage on Jan. 30. 1994. that 
changed my life. 

"Do your job. Record our doc- 
uments,” my assailant said over 
and over. "You are a messenger 
to all the recorders, lliis could 
happen to them, too.” 

Aside from my feelings of 
fear, anger and disbelief. I was 
totally "perplexed about who 
would go to such extremes to 
terrorize a county recorder. My 
nonpartisan office handled few if 
any controversial matters. 

The answer came more than a 
year later, when, after exhaustive 
efforts by FBI and IRS agents 
and local law enforcement.Vme 
people were arrested and charged 
with various federal crimes. 


including the attack on me. 

All nine were members of the 
Juris Christian Assembly, a shad- 
owy group specializing in tax 
protests and other resistance to 
government. 

My assailant was an Oregon 
man with militia connections 
who came to Modesto, as the 
inquiry later showed, to terror- 
ize me. He had previously 
been accused of threatening 
two California state senators. 
Last month, a federal jury in 
Fresno. California, convicted 
him and the eight other defen-, 
dams. They are currently await- 
ing sentencing. 

Although I was relieved when 
the verdicts were announced, 
my emotions were constrained. 
My life has changed. I now 
carry a gun and have been 
rrained in martial arts. For the 
last three years, guards were 
with me 24’ hours a day. Even 
though my attacker is going to 
prison. 1 still live under heavy 
security. 

Other recorders I know are 
being threatened. A man recent- 
ly told a county clerk in the 
San Francisco Bay area: "You 
know what happened to that 
woman in Modesto. You better 
be careful.” 

According to the Justice De- 
partment. every county in Cali- 
fornia h 3 s formal militia croups. 

I*m most familiar with"what is 
happening in California, but the 
problem Is nationwide. The re- 
cent siege of the "Republic of 
Texas” group essentially began 
with "paper terrorism" — the 
filing oi togus liens. According 
ro the Anti-Defamation League, 



anii-govemmeni extremists are 
using "common law" courts and 
similar tactics in at least 23 
states. 

It is difficult to comprehend or 
convey the anger and crazy sense 
of misguided patriotism em- 
braced by these people. 

For example, after J refused tf 
record one man's illegal "com 
mon law" lien, he told me. ” Yoi 
are guilty of treason.” He the.i 
snarled. "I am a sovereign cit- 
izen of the Republic of Califor- 
nia. not the corporate United 
States, and the laws you enforce 
restrict my God-given rights." 


-.1: \l ■ |... t. I'm. ■ 

As 1 begin my life anew. I 
still find it hard to discuss, some 
of the details nf what happened 
to me. 

But 1 feel an anger that won't 
go away, not only against the 
self-styled patriots who haras-, 
us. but also against those who 
express or tolerate a certain 
"populist” support for anti -gov- 
ernment extremism. 

The »i 'riier m ihc clcrk-iv. tini- 
er ‘t Slum shiny Ci>inir\. Ctili- 
cl — nunrihittcJ this 
The Yen Y, >rk 


torrid. Sin 

oHM'/ir ti 

Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


congressional Democrats. 

Once the Republicans to- 
- over Congress in 1995. Mr. Cl 
ton shifted even further, declari 
that the "era of big government 
over” and proving it by signii® 
■ Republican bill ending rhe/- 
.ear-old New Deal guarantee a 
velfare safety net for everyn- 
?»eni mother and child. 

• Mr. Clinton was unopposeor 
■enomir.ation in 1996 and h:an 
msv time in the electionJut 

igain. ie won the fight worn 


unue to prosper. 

• “Bat believe it or not,*' Mr. 
Gore said in a clear reference to Mr. 
Gephardt, “some people would 
like io snatch defeat from the jaws 
of victory” by rejecting admin- 
istration budget and trade policies. 

This is not a barroom brawl or 
an exercise in clashing egos. This 
is a vital and overdue debate be- 
tween two able antagonists about 
the direction of America’s oldest 
and largest party. It's about time. 
The Washington Post 


Regarding "Tact Aside, Al- 
bright Berates Balkan Leaders" 
June 2): 

Despite the presence of thou- 
sands of NATO troops, no one 
seems to have the courage or 
power to send the Balkan war 
criminals to the International War 
Crimes Tribunal in The Hague. 

Meanwhile, some Croatian and 
Bosnian refugees in Europe are 
being forced to return home be- 
cause peace has allegedly been re- 
established. 

Until the major war criminals 


are sent to The Hague, no refugees 
should be expelled or have their 
work permits revoked. 

RONALD HALBRIGHT. 

ThaJwil, Switzerland. 

Subsidies, Us? 

Regarding "A Trans-Atlantic 
Air Battle" I May 23): 

The irony and inappropriate- 
ness of the EU commission as- 
sertions seem almost blatant. 

Perhaps an ideal market share, 
to assure consumer protection, 
would be 50-50, but 60-40 is cer- 
tainly not a "dominant share": 80- 


20 would indicate dominance, and. 
anyway. .Airbus is catching up. 

I'm not surprised that the 747 is 
preferred by airlines, since I have 
not yet found anything Airbus has 
in the air to be quite as comfortable 
as the 747. 

And who is complaining of U.S. 
subsidies? I shudder to think what 
we taxpayers in France, and else- 
where in Europe, are paying for the 
Concorde, as well as for Airbus. 

Boeing and McDonnell may 
not be guiltless, but competition 
has thrived in the U.S. market. 
Although three companies may be 
better than two. I don't believe a 


supportable case for restraint of 
trade has been presented by the 
EU anti-trust commission. 

JACK STEARN. 

Maisons-Laffilte. France. 

Bring on the Show 

Over the last week, commen- 
tators have indicated that the 
United States could not sustain the 
spectacle of the president endur- 
ing a prolonged civil suit with 
Paula Jones. 

On the contrary, one need only 
glance at most daytime television, 
prime-time programming or 


mich of the print media to realize 
thi American public would love 
nahma better. 

This could be ihe best thing 
siice the O. J. Simpson trial. 

Since all of the presidents since 
Dvight Eisenhower have so de- 
based the dignity of the office, 
eah in his own way (with Bill 
Clnton one of the most egregious 
ofenderst. it is difficult to argue 
th;t we should show a little'Ve- 
sp-ct for the office. They blew up 
th.t bridge themselves long ago. 
Brng on the show. 

EDWARD W. CUTTER 
Li «s Aneeles. 


s cm the Lon mt Term 




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So how Donna Merritt, a supervisor in one qkMir'f 5 /?" 
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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


For Araj) Real-Estate Dealer, a Narrow Escape From Deah 


By Joel Greenberg 

JViH Kiri Tinti* Sen icr j 

JERUSALEM — Fora mail probably 
lucky to be alive. Asad RajaBi was re- 
markably at ease Tuesday when he got 
up from his afternoon nap to j?reer vis- 
itors at his plain stone hoifse on a 
parched hillside in East Jerusalem. 

Dressed in pyjamas and sip; ing thick 
coffee from a tiny cup. Mr. R ijabi. 65. 
showed no outward sign that he ud come 
dangerously close to joining tht ranks of 
Arab real-estate brokers killed after be- 
ing accused of selling land to Ji ws. 

In the dead of night last Sun ay. men 
presenting themselves as Palestinian se- 
curity agents came to his hnise and 
summoned him to the West Bank town 
of Ramallah. but they were stopped on 
the way there by Israeli police, me men 
were arrested and Mr. Rajabi rimmed 
home to an uncertain future. \ 

In less than a month since tre Pal- 
estinian Authority announced hat it 
would impose the death penalty tor the 
sale of land to Israelis, three Amhreal- 
estate dealers have been found slim in 
the area of Ramallah. which is dnder 
Palestinian rule. I 

The authority has denied invdlve- 
ment in the killings, and says tharany 
death sentences will be passed by Pal- 
estinian courts. \ 


But the Israeli police assert that a 
Palestinian security chief and his men 
were involved in two of the slay ings. 
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 
said that a warrant had been issued for 
the arrest of the official, identified by 
the Israeli media as Colonel Tawfik 
Tirowi. the head of General Intelligence 
Services in the West Bank. 

Mr. Rajabi knew the latest murder 
victim. Alt Jamhour. who worked in a 
cafe in the Jewish pari of Jerusalem. The 
cafe is near the Israeli land registry 
office, where Mr. Rajabi would visit on 
business. 

Mr. Rajabi brokered real-estate deals 
to supplement his income from a news- 
paper and cigarette stand near the Old 
City of Jerusalem, he said. He had no 
office, and the deals were often ne- 
gotiated in cafes, always between 
Arabs, or between Jews selling to 
Arabs, but never the other way around, 
Mr. Rajabi insisted. 

The Israeli police say that Mr. Rajabi 
was apparently namedby Mr. Jamhour 
as his associate in the sale of an Arab 
house in East Jerusalem to a Jewish 
settlement group. 

When Mr. Jamhour was found shot in 
the head on Saturday, Mr. Rajabi re- 
called. *T was surprised because I knew 
him: I was astonished." 

“I didn’t fear for my own life, be- 


cause I didn't do anything wrong," he 
added. "But I thought that you can’t 
trust any government. Arab or Jewish. 
Neither the Arab side nor the Jewish side 
gives security, -and people are scared. " 

Mr. Rajabi said he stopped his real- 
estate dealings shortly after the Pal-, 
estinian Authority announced the death 
penalty last month "so people wouldn’t 
get the wrong idea." 

Blit somebody did. 

At about 1 A.M. on Sunday, Mr. 
Rajabi recalled, men who identified 
themselves as agents of Palestinian mil- 
itary intelligence knocked on the door of 
his family home in an area of East 
Jerusalem known as the Peace Neigh- 
borhood. The men asked Mr. Rajabi to 
come with them to the Palestinian gov- 
ernment headquarters in Ramallah. 

"I asked them if they had a warrant, 
and they said. ‘No, we have orders.’ " 
Mr. Rajabi said. 

He said that he refused, and that there 
was a half-hour argument, which his 
family joined. 

"The men insisted that I have to come 
quickly," he said. "I called my brother, 
who tried to persuade me to go. I was 
afraid that there might be trouble be- 
tween the children and the men because 
they have guns and things might not end 
well. So I changed into my clothes and 
went along. It was the best alternative." 



Gravesite of Fortner Israeli Prime Minister Is Vandalized 



[tool tfrr4u.'AgcxKr Hm«-Pirvv 

The scene at the grave o Menachem Begin of Israel on Tuesday after vandals poured a black substance 
on the stone and left be ind a note calling him a Nazi. The grave at the Mount of Olives cemetery in 
Jerusalem is attacked at cast once a year, apparently by rightists who condemn Mr. Begin’s signing of a 
peace treaty with Egypt n 1979. Mr. Begin, who died in 1992, was prime minister from 1977 to 1983. 


U.S. Puts Top Art Dealers on the Spot 

Justice Departme it Looks Into Possible Collusion and Price Fixing 


1 


By Carol Vogel 

\.H J.'ii fill., \ .V.i'li . 


NEW YORK — Justice Dk 
investigators have subpoena. 

•urtment 
i truck- 


loads of financial document ft >m more 
than a dozen prominent Man I man art 
dealers and from Christie's ai i Sothe- 
by’s. the world's largest auc io houses, 
in what appears to be a w deranging 
antitrust investigation. \ 
Several oF the dealers, who iterated 
in the United States and abroad, aid this 
week that they had been servu with 
subpoenas. On the basis oJ qtistions 
asked of them and their law yeL they 
said they believed that ime>lieair-» are 
looking for the possibility of colusion 
and price ft sing among art de.de! buy- 
ing at auction. I 

"Being served with a subpoena. I hiclt 
is a request for information, is n»i an 
indication that a particular party \ ne- 
cessarily a target of an invest igaim. 

h has long been rumored fn lit an 
world that some dealers try to buy A the 
cheap. b> forming rings who .igrt to 
refrain from bidding againsi oruLn- 
othor. The practice, "bid pooling.! in- 


hibits prices from reaching their fair 
value at auction. Then the dealers resell 
the work at an exaggerated profit and 
sometimes split the difference. 

“People in specialized businesses 
like the an business that are far away 
from the mainstream of milk and ce- 
ment don't necessarily think of them- 
selves as subject to the laws that were 
designed to protect the public against 
robber harons." said Donald Baker, a 
law yer and a former head of the antimist 
division of the Justice Depanmem. 
"And thus they come up surprised." 

Gina Taiamona. a spokeswoman for 
the Justice Department, would say only 
that "the antitrust division is looking ar 
the possibility of anti-competitive prac- 
tices in the tine an auction industry." 

Several dealers confirmed receiving 
subpoenas, but refused to comment fur- 
ther. Others referred inquiries to the An 
Dealers Association of .America, which 
declined to comment. 

It is believed that about two dozen of 
New York’s most prominent fine an 
dealers, specializing in areas like Old 
Master* jnd Impressionist, modern and 
American art. have heard from the 


Justice Department, among them 
Richard Feigen. William Acquavella, 
Otto Naumann, Newhouse Galleries, 
Simon Dickinson, Hirechl & Adler, Ne- 
whouse Galleries, Knoedler & Co., CoJ- 
naghi, Kennedy Galleries. Robert 
Haboldt and Herman Stockman. 

On Monday Christie's, the London- 
based auction house, reported in a filing 
it made with the London stock exchange 
that it had been subpoenaed. 

The filing said that Christie’s un- 
derstood "that other U.S. auctioneers 
and several prominent New York art 
dealers have also been required to 
provide documents. Christie s is co- 
operating with the Justice Department’s 
investigation. Christie's believes that it 
has acted properly at all times." 

A spokesman for Sotheby's confirmed 
that it had received a subpoena. "Sothe- 
by's i& of course working with the Justice 
Department in providing the relevant in- 
formation." rhe spokesman said. 

People familiar with the investigation 
said the department was focusing 
primarily on claims of wrongdoing 
stemming from dealers’ practices, 
rather than those of auction houses. 


Unicef Feais Loss of Its Independence 


Bv Barbara Crosseile \ 

' \.i. 1,-A 1 

UNITED NATIONS. New York l 
As the United Nations prepares for ift 
broadest restructuring in its history . ill 
executive director of Unicef has uk.i 
the unusual step of warning publicll 
that, under the proposed changes, ih* 
aaenev is in danger of losing its ml 
dependent voice for children around ihd 
world. I 

The director. Carol Bellamy, aril 
.American, told Unicef s executive! 
board that, under plans now being con-1 
side red. the agency’s activities would 
be folded into a group dealing with 
social and economic development. Oth- 
er Unicef functions would he taken os er 
by a separate emergency relief team. 

" Unicef and the United Nations High 
Commissioner for Refugees are con- 
cerned that they will be significant Iv 
alicred in a reshuffling that is intended 
to streamline and strengthen the Untied 
Nations. 

In a separate proposal that raises dif- 
ferent concerns, the High Commission- 
er lor Refugees may become the co- 
ordinator for all international relief, 
picking up new responsibilities that 
some officials believe could dilute the 
image of the agency, which is known as 
the world’s strongest advocate for dis- 


placed people. 

Unicef. until now . has maintained its 
own operations overseas, dealing with 
governments on issues strictly related to 
children, including immunization and 
education. I is reputation has enabled 
Unicef. which depends on voluntary 
contributions, to raise more than $300 
million annually from private sources in 
addition to government donations. 

"If Unicef is obliged to seek per- 
mission or clearance before acting for 
children." Ms. Bellamy said Monday, 
“then this organization would be a 
markedly different Unicef." 

She said Unicef ’s effectiveness de- 
1 pends on its "independent entity and 
voice." 

Plans for restructuring the United Na- 
tions will he made public in mid-July by 
Secretary -Genera! Kofi Annan, who has 
already proposed administrative 
rlijitges that, are within his power to 
nake. The larger reorganization must 
je approved by the General Assembly, 
he furum of the 1 85 member nations, 
mi the international politicking and turf 
cars have already begun. 

"Unicef has a very- special relation- 
iip with political leaders," said Robert 
nuth. executive director of Britain’s 
ommittee for Unicef. one of 36 national 
uieis that raise money for the agency. 

"By having direct access to pres- 


idents. national and provincial premiers 
and ministers of health and ministers of 
social welfare." he said, "Unicef can 
ger things done." 

UN officials planning the reform un- 
der the direction of Maurice Strong, a 
Canadian who organized the Earth 
Summit in Rio de Janeiro five years ago, 
say that they are well aware of the 
importance of Unicef s appeal. 

"Everyone is very sensitive to the 
need to keep the brand name, so to 
speak, and visibility of the individual 
components of the United Nations, 
many of which do have considerable 
name recognition and public appeal," a 
high official involved in the restruc- 
turing said. 

* ’Of course Unicef is at the top of that 
pile with generations of work and fund- 
ing. The last thing that anyone warns to 
do is jeopardize dial." 

The proposal would abolish the 
United Nations Department of Human* 
itarian Affairs, which is based in New 
York and has had trouble dealing with 
international emergencies, and transfer 
those and other functions to the high 
commissioner's headquarters in 
Geneva. The high commissioner’s job, 
now held by Sadako Ogata of Japan, 
would be expanded to include respon- 
sibility for coordinating a wide range of 
emergency programs. 


Mr. Rajabi, his brother and a few of 
his sons piled into two family cars along 
with the security agents, and headed out 
toward Ra mallah 

"I got scared," Mr. Rajabi said. “I 
wondered whether these might not 
really be Palestinian police, whether I 
might be interrogated, jailed, tortured, 
maybe killed, or perhaps I’ll get a bad 
reputation and be labeled a traitor." - 

Two of the Arab real-estate brokers 
killed recently had been summoned pre- 
viously by the Palestinian police for 
questioning about suspected land deals 
with Jews. 

About lOrninutes after the cars pulled 
away from Mr. Rajabi’s bouse, they 
were stopped on a dark road by an Israeli 
jeep that sped by and blocked their path. 
Israeli police in civilian clothes aimed 
guns at the passengers! "They said, 
'Stop! Get out of the car with your hands 
up,’ ’ ’ Mr. Rajabi said. 

He was immediately singled out by 
the Israelis and put aboard a jeep, while 
his relatives and the men who 


summoned him were spreaded on 
the cars and frisked. The IsralpoUce 
later announced that they had JE^p. 
ted a kidnapping attempt antSd ar- 
rested six men, four of thenVm C d 
Palestinian security agents. I . 

Did Mr. Rajabi feel like hL^ a 
brush with death? "Maybe yjand 
maybe no,” he said. "I didn’tow 
what was going on," | 

Advised by the Israeli police nd go 
back to his newspaper stand. Mr. fehi 
is staying home for now, after spelng 
a day lying low at a friend's housHe 
says he is not afraid, and would foo 
Ramallah if he were summoned ile 
daytime with an official warrant, i 
B ut the summary killings of H 
dealers was criminal he said. \ 
"There is no law, and no justice.' V 
said. '.‘There has to be an investigatil 
a trial with a lawyer, with the press] 
band. There has to : be proof — tfl 
• cannot be done easily. And people d 
be executed by mistake. That’s why 
bate the death penalty." 




E-. 



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THE WORLD'S DAILY NEWSPAPER 









INTERNATIONAL HER ALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. JUNE 4, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


PARE II 


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A Jewel of Sicilian Baroque Art Is Crumbling 







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By Celestine Bohlen 

New Yu ri Tunes Service 

NOTO, Sicily — li was pure luck ihai 
no one was in the Noto cathedral the 
night more than a year ago when the roof 
fell in. But that was the only fortunate 
aspect of an otherwise sorry tale that is 
still unfolding, as workers pick through 
the rubble and local officials quarrel 
over who was to blame. 

It was not the first time that bits of 
Noto’s architectural heritage crumbled. 
A minor earthquake in December 1990 
sent cornices tumbling from the town’s 
facades, blocking traffic. Months be- 
fore. a wing of the Jesuit College build- 
in® collapsed. 

Even then, there had been warnings 
for years that this jewel of Sicilian 
Baroque architecture — sometimes 
known as ‘ ‘the garden of stone" — was 
dying from neglect. 

But when the roof of the Cathedral of 
St. Nicholas crashed to (he ground on 


March 13, 1996, it roused fresh con- 
cerns about the sad condition of this and 
other cultural treasures in Sicily. Scaf- 
folding is up around many of Noto’s 
most famous edifices. Some critics say 
that restoration is so slow, so laborious 
and so enmeshed in Sicily's notoriously 
languid bureaucracy that it cannot keep 
up with the pace of decay. 

■' Unfortunately, restoration is not 
moving very rapidly.” said Raffaele 
Leone, the mayor, noting a recent wave 
of anger against a regional cultural ad- 
ministration over the slow rate of work 
on the cathedral. "They pushed through 
an urgent plan for rhe cathedral, but ir is 
only recently that they chose the ar- 
chitects for the restoration. Basically, 
we have lost a year." 

In 19S6, experts began warning about 
the state of historic buildings in Noto 
and other baroque towns in this south- 
eastern region of Sicily. The area is still 
a bit off the tourist path, at least com- 
pared with the heavily congested towns 




MIND 

GAME. 






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of non hem and central Italy. Palaces 
were emptied as noble families died out. 
moved away or. in some cases, settled 
into a few rooms, leaving dust to gather 
in ghostly ballrooms and darkened en- 
tranceways. Nor does the local Roman 
Catholic diocese, which owns 2 1 
churches in an area inhabited by 
210,000 people, have the money to 
maintain its properties. It has handed 
over all but routine maintenance to a 
government bureaucracy not known for 
its efficiency. 

In tact, several major restoration 
projects are under way in Noto — most 
notably at the Palazzo Nicolaci. famous 
for its balconies held up by fancifully 
sculpted creatures. Restorers of the 
palace are copy ing 18th-century' tech- 
niques to refurbish it. 

Francesco Samalucia. who heads the 
architectural section of the regional cul- 
tural affairs administration, bristles at 
the criticism that (he state has been idle, 
but he can only shrug at the complaint 
that it is slow. ‘ 

“There seems to be a lot of hurry, 
wondering why things haven't moved 
any faster," he said, “but when you 
hurry you risk not seeing important 
things. It is not enough to do a nice 
drawing full of pretty curves for a re- 
construction that won't stand. You need 
time. 

"In a week, you can duplicate the old 
project, but it could turn out to be as 
unstable as the original. And you can't 
plan a new dome and roof quickly." 

Some say that the cathedral was 
cursed with bad luck from the moment it 
was built, in the early 18th century. In 
fact, the harmony of Note’s golden- 
hued ensemble — with its streets lined 
by palaces, convents and churches, all 
made in the same style, all in the same 
tinted local stone — is owed to the 
devastating earthquake of 1693. which 
compelled the citizenry to rebuild their 
town from scratch. For this reason, it 
remains a fairly pure and rare example 
of 18th-century town planning. 

Behind a triumphant baroque facade, 
recently restored and miraculously still 
standing, the cathedral was a Noto rar- 
ity: a stylistic hodgepodge. Its first 
dome collapsed in 1750 for reasons that 
were never determined. The first re- 
placement crumbled in 1848. 

The second replacement was built in 
1870. but only a third of it remains, 
looking like a broken egg silhouetted 
against the bright Sicilian sky. 

The interior was redone in the 19th 
century, and in the 1950s and 1960s 
local painters added decorations. These, 
in the opinion of local an historians, 
were simply ugly. 

There have been other recent 
changes. A concrete roof was added in 
1952 to protect the cathedral from rain. 
Architects say that by any modem stan- 
dard this was a blunder. 

"They didn't see the problem at the 
time." said Biagio Gennaro. a surveyor 
for the local Catholic diocese. "But now 
they realize that the roof they put in was 
too heavy. This time, it wasn't the cu- 




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Noto’s cathedral, open to the skies since the roof fell in more than a jear 
ago. Restoration work is “not moving very rapidly." the mayor laments. 


pola that fell, but the roof over the 
nave.” 

What makes the latest collapse so 
compelling is that it did not have to 
happen. A year after the 1990 earth- 
quake, $2.3 billion was allocated to 
southeastern Sicily by the government 
in Rome to repair damage and to modify 
both public and private buildings so 
they might better withstand quakes. 

Although the situation had been char- 
acterized as an emergency, another year 
was spent preparing the list of public 
monuments entitled to the earthquake 
aid. among them the Noto cathedral, and 
another three years to prepare the con- 
tracts for repair work. Seven years after 
the earthquake, only about 20 percent of 
the money has been spent, said Rocco 
Sciara. a lop aide to the Rome-appointed 
prefect based in Syracuse who has been 
charged with coordinating the cathedral 
restoration. 

In 1992. priests at the cathedral de- 
tected a series of cracks in a pillar, added 
in 1952 to support the new concrete roof 
and then hollowed out to make room for 
an internal staircase. Stale engineers put 
Three metal rings around the pillar, and 


the cathedra! was reopened although the 
area was kept closed off to the publu. 
“We knew there were problems." Gen- 
naro said. “We saw the cracks, but no 
one thought they were serious. No one 
said the church should be closed." 

Now the Italian government has al- 
located SI 1 million for reconstruction 
of the cathedral, four times the sum set 
aside earlier to make it earthquake-res- 
istant. Emergency work has been done 
to secure what remains of die dome and 
the steeple, and crews are clearing the 
site. They are sifting through and cata- 
loguing ‘each stone, both to help ar- 
chitects find the cause of the collapse 
and to help local prosecutors de/ermin.* 
whether negligence was involved. 

Reconstruction will not be completed 
until sometime after 2000. but local 
residents hope access will soon be re- 
stored to the tomb of their patron saint. 
San CoiTado Confalonieri. a 14th-cen- 
tury hermit. It was removed intact after 
the collapse. 

"People are very attached t«« ihc 
saint,' ’ Mr. Gennaro said. * ‘and w e hope 
he will be back in the church in August, 
when the rubble should be all gone." 


Mobutu Swiss Billions Just $3.4 Million 

After a Search, Banking Supervisors Discount These Wild Stories' 


GENEVA — Swiss banks have 
found only $3.4 million in assets be- 
longing to Mobutu Sese Seko. the 
toppled ruler of Zaire, including foreign 
shares, bonds, securities and a safe de- 
posit box yet to be opened, a banking 
supervisory agency said Tuesday. 

The sums reported by banks, after a 
search ordered by the Swiss govern- 
ment. were just a fraction of the billions 
that Kinshasa's new rulers allege Mar- 
shal Mobutu has hidden in Swiss 
banks. 

The Federal Banking Commission, 
the country's banking supervisor, said 
in a statement that six banks reported 
assets worth 4.8 million Swiss francs 
held by Marshal Mobutu, his family or 
people and companies associated with 
them. It confirmed that the assets bad 
been frozen. 

Marsha] Mobutu was toppled Iasi 
month by rebels, whose leader. Laurent 
Kabila, took over as president and re- 
named the country’ Congo. 

Daniel Zuberbuehler, the deputy di- 
rector of the banking commission, said 
that it considered the matter closed. 

He acknowledged that returning the 


funds to Kinshasa's new government 
could take years under Swiss legal pro- 
cedures. 

“As the banking supervisor, basic- 
ally we are satisfied," he said. "1 don’t 
think we can order any other search, i 
think we have done more than anyone 
else in the world." 

Switzerland froze Marshal Mobutu’s 
assets, including a 30-room mansion in 
Lausanne with a market value of more 
than $5_5 million, hours after he fled his 
capital last month. 

The new rulers of the vast central 
African country have called on the 
United States, France. Belgium, Aus- 
tria. Liechtenstein and Portugal to fol- 
low suit. 

In a newspaper interview last week. 
Congo's new justice minister, Celestin 
Lwangi. alleged that Marshal Mobutu 
had 1 1 billion Swiss francs in assets in 
Switzerland. 

Mr. Zuberbuehler dismissed "these 
wild stories." 

"There are no billions." he said. “Of 
course they can say anything but these 
would be dreams. It would be nice if 
Mobutu had billions here, but he prob- 
ably has spent the money." 


The Federal Banking Commission 
declined to name the banks holding 
Marshal Mobutu's funds. 

But Mr. Zuberbuehler said the bulk of 
the money, more than 4 million Swiyt 
francs, was at one bank in two "fm 
accounts."' 

■ Mobutu ‘Doing Fine' 

Marshal Mobutu is '“doing Fine" in 
exile in Morocco, The Associated Press 
in Paris quoted his son as having said 
Tuesday. 

Nzanga Mobutu, in a telephone in- 
terview, refused to give any information 
about the plans of his father, who tied to 
Morocco last month. , 

Marshal Mobutu, who ruled Zaire foi 
32 years, has undergone Treatment for 
. prostate cancer during the hist year. He 
and about 40 members of his entourage 
remain under heavy police protection at 
a hotel in Skhirat. 20 kilometers t ] 2 
miles) south of Rabat. 

The former leader of Zaire arrived in 
Morocco on May 23 from the West 
African nation of Togo, where he had 
taken refuge after Mr. Kabila's forces 
captured Marshal Mobutu's jungle 
palace in Gbadolite. 



Kenyan Legal System Assailed 

LONDON — An independent report into the Kenyan 
legal system has recommended sweeping changes after 
discovering widespread corruption and human rights ab- 
uses. 

William Goodhart, one of the authors of the International 
Bar Association report, said at a news conference Tuesday 
that its primary concerns were the independence of the 
judiciary in Kenya and rhe harassment of lawyers. 

Mr. Goodhart said that corruption, at various levels, was 
also a major worry along with proposed legislation on the 
freedom of the press and the registration of political parties 
and other societies. 

The report called for changes in the appointment of a 
chief justice, the establishment of a commission to in- 
vestigate and weed out corruption and the recruitment of 
more judges from private practice. It also urged the govern- 
ment to speed up appeal hearings and to review the role of 
the attorney-general and pretrial procedures. {Reuters) 


Iraqi opposition leaders in London had been sharply 
critical of the Iraqi attempt to strike an oil sale on British 
soil, saying it would have handed Mr. Saddam u major 
propaganda coup. .{API 

Mexican Rebels Won’t Disarm 

MEXICO CITY — A violent rebel group said Monday it 
had pulled back its troops and would take no offensive 
actions before congressional elections next month, but 
rejected an appeal to lay down its weapons. 

In a statement published in the daily La Jomada. the 
Popular Revolutionary Army said it would try to avoid 
clashes with Mexico’s army, but would keep its weapons to 
defend itself. 

It blamed the army and what it called the growing 
militarization of the southwestern state of Guen-ero for the 
clashes. “We don’t have any intention of interfering in the 
electoral process," said the statement signed by Com- 
mander Antonio, a rebel leader in Guerrero. * fAP) 


U.K. Snubs Iraqi Oil Executives For the Record 


LONDON — Iraq tried to send five oil executives to 
London to negotiate its first petroleum sale here since the 
Gulf War. but Britain rejected the request Tuesday. 

British companies can buy oil from Iraq under the United 
Nations oil-for-food arrangement, but the Foreign Office 
Laid the businessmen will have to cut their deals elsewhere 
because it will nor admit anyone with close ties ro the 
recirne of President Saddam Hussein. 


The United Nations World Food Program will end a 
six-month operation to airlift home thousands of Rwandan 
refugees from ihe Democratic Republic of Congo by the 
end of this week, a UN spokeswoman said Tuesday ti\FPi 

About 120,000 Colombian doctors, nurses and health 
workers went on strike Tuesday to proiest the government’s 
failure to fulfil the terms of a wage deal. < Reuters I 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4. 1997 
PAGE 12 


STAGE/ENTER TAINMENT 


iP&&i 


Rewriting 
The Rules 
Of Folk 


Singer-Writers 


Seek New Voice 


By Ann Powers 


:**'.*■ 


N 


EW YORK — The praise 
greeting the singer-song- 
writer Ron Sex smith's 1995 
debut album included one 


critic's announcement that it contained 
"some of the best new folk writing 
since Beck." Since Beck? Beck may be 
the hippest poh ester-clad punk-rock 
soul man in pop. but few folk devotees 
would declare him a descendant of 
Woody Guthrie. 

Buthis fans know that Beck. 26. who 
brought the world "Loser" three years 
ago. began his career on the folk circuit, 
with an acoustic guitar and crooning 
songs like "Cyanide Breath Mint." 

Sexsmith. who is 33 and whose music 
would sound at home in a folk-rock 
enclave, nonetheless relishes the asso- 
ciation. "It's a little weird." he says. 
' But 1 relate to it much more than to 
being compared to Jackson Browne." 

Over the last couple of years the role 
of the singer-song writer has undergone 
a quiet transformation. A handful of 
young artists are forgoing the protective 
en\ irons of the rock band and the hip- 
hop studio, trying to win rhe world with 
little more than voice and guitar. 

• 'Nobody wants to be called a singer- 
songwriter." says Elliott Smith. 27. 
u hose three solo albums have made him 
a popular bard on the underground rock 
scene. "There's this whole history of 
boring, drippy stuff. It's kind of a 
trashed renm." 

When the genre solidified in the early 
1970s. ii> practitioners were turning 
folk -music stylings into something 
more pop and more personal. As the 
counterculture waned, literary-minded 
musicians used the style to commu- 
nicate well- wrought home truths. Then 
came soft rock, a commercial phenom- 
enon that culminated in banal hits. 

Today's innovators cull from the 



New Nostalgia on Record 


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Ben Harper, Ani DiFranco and Ron Sexsmith. clockwise from top left. 


munity-based music that expresses 
what's going on." 

DiFranco's popularity is the 
strongest proof that the singer-song- 
writer still fulfills a vital function in the 
emotional life of contemporary music. 

The tradition’s originators commu- 
nicated pure-heartedness by using rustic 
imagery, personal confession and sub- 
dued musicianship. Today, the best 
singer-songwriters speak very differ- 
ently. using the streetwise idioms of the 
urban, polyglot and commercial worlds 
where they live. 

This everyday language can be dis- 
armingly simple. In "Pretty Little 
Cemetery" Sexsmith describes a visit 
he paid to a Toronto graveyard with his 
young son. Over a lilting melody that 
recall's a Shaker hymn. Sexsmith relates 
the boy's guileless declaration to an old 
couple passing by: "This is where you 
go to when you die. my papa told me so/ 
The old man says, ‘Yes. we know.’ ” 

It's a simple moment, and Sexsmith 
offers it unadorned. His songs resound 
with such details, unadulterated by 
flow ery prose or elaborate references. 


A N affinity for the alternative is 
hardly ’ surprising among 
artists who came of age in the 
early '90s. Woodstock and 
Monterey Pop are not signposts for this 
generation. For the most part, their style 
Ts grounded in the subculture of the 
1980s. the same milieu that produced 
Kurt Cobain. 

If any legendary countercultural mo- 
ment makes sense to them, it’s Bob 
Dylan's decision to "go electric" at rhe 
1965 Newport Folk Festival. Dylan's 
embrace of the electric guitar horrified 
folk purists and exploded the possib- 
ilities for singer-songwriters. 

"It was one of the best moments in 


singer- songwriter heritage, but they are 
also determined to challenge it. Ani 


also determined to challenge it. Ani 
DiFranco. 26. whose eight albums top- 
ping 750. t.itiu sales make her the most 
* uccvssful of the new singer-snng- 
u riters. takes an e\p.msi\ e view . 

"1 consider rap and punk and folk to 
be connected.” she sa\>. “It’s corn- 


rock- and-roil,*' says Smith, whose own 
subtle tales of bohemian street life had 
the opposite efFect on the aggressive 
Northwest rock scene, making what was 
once loud quiet. 

"It's a big. discredited gray area, but 
that's why it’s fun.” he says of the genre 
he's exploring. "You can do all kinds of 
things with it." 

DiFranco pushes the limit differently, 
she has no problem with the small world 
of folk festivals, but her style and subject 
matter go against its grain, recalling in- 
stead the bold new feminism of rockers 
like Courtney Love. Her newest release, 
“Living in Clip,” testifies to the power- 
ful spark she has set to an old form. 

Ben Harper. 27, similarly refreshes a 
familiar role, that of the sage African- 
American storyteller. He injects his mu- 
sic with funky backbeats and writes love 
songs as whimsically skeptical as his 
revolutionary songs are idealistic. 

“To me. folk music is not a dulcimer 
or banjo; it's not a sap boring you to 
death on an acoustic guitar." he says. 
"Run DMC is folk hip-hop. Jimi 
Hendrix is folk rock.” 

On his third album. "The Will to 
Live," Harper makes good on his am- 
bition. exchanging his former acoustic- 
heavy sound for full-blown electricity 
— just as Dylan did in 1965. 

DiFranco puts it this way: "Give 
somebody a blowtorch, send them out to 
the woods, and say make a fire. That's 
not hard. That’s rock with the amplifier 
turned up to 11 . But send them out with 
two sticks, and say make a fire.*’ She 
pauses to laugh out loud. "Now that,” 
she says, using a term that evokes daring 
for her generation, "that's punk 
rock.” 


Ann Pow ers, ti pop music critic, wrote 
this for The New York Times. 


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•By Bernard Holland 

Neu Yivt Tuna Si’n tee 


N EW YORK — The city of 
New York has sent me a new 
booklet on recycling; and be- 
mg civic-minded, I have es- 
tablished my green area (newspapers, 
threatening letters, press releases) and 
my blue area (empty beer cans, empty 
wine bottles, empty aspirin jars). 

I am especially proud to be in the field 
of classical music, which is recycling 
with the best of them. Just as ground-up 
applesauce jars now gleam in road sur- 
faces, nothing musical is being wasted. 

A case in point; the arrival the other 
day of four CDs boxed together by RCA 
Victor. On them, an awful lot of Richard 
Strauss is being performed by an awful 
lot of Fritz Reiner and the Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra. No squandered re- 
sources here. Reiner made these record- 
ings more than 40 years ago. and it's nice 
to know that like shirt cardboard, they 
keep turning up in fresh guises. 

First it was in the form of long-playing 
records. When listeners finally bundled 
them up and left rbem on the curb, record 
companies came by in their trucks and 
milled them into compact disks. 

Not only is this good ecology, it 
doesn't cost much. The companies gen- 
erally own the tapes, and paying for re- 
use rights is a lot cheaper than hiring the 
Chicago Symphony again. 

Leafing through the new releases sec- 
tion of the’ Schwann/Opus catalogue 
shows just how busy recyclers have 


been. There is a lot of old in^enew. 
Sony Classical has reconfigured someo 
its natural resources 
* *The Music of Beethoven, TheMu 
sic of Brahms,” "Ite Music of 
Schubert." Colin Davis. Eugene Or 
mandv and Philippe Entremont seem 
strange bedfellows, but what brings 
them together is that Sony owns their 

^Thesttateg/, then, is not to create butto 

rearrange. Put old things in comfortable 
places, or maybe even new ana unusual 
ones. I note in the catalogue a release 
entitled "Chopin With Ocean Sounds. 
That should move off the shelves. 

One old theory* — and it has made 
record companies lots of money — says 
that we learn about apiece by listening to 
different interpretations (as many, in 
other words, as the labels can put in 
record stores'). The strategy may be run- 
ning out of room, or backfiring. 


I THINK listeners are beginning to 
figure out that there is little added 
wisdom to be had from the 1 9th new 
recording of the Brahms First Sym- 
phony: that our image and our know- 
ledge" of Brahms is mostly in our heads, 
and that every interpretation of Brahms 
is simply a reminder of what has grown 
within us, another imperfect flicker on 
the famous wall inside Plato's cave. 

We have become as sarurated as a 


Staten island dump. Offering to the pub- 
lic six releases of W alter G ieseking play- 


ing the "Emperor" Concerto only dulls 
our love of Beethoven. One consolation 


selves : out ot the market, n was 
discovered that recording w as not nearly 
so expensive in Britain. Suddenly V tenia 
offered even lower prices, then Prague. 

We are almost to the point of para- 
chuting a flat-fee conductor and a tape 
recorder into Irkutsk or Tashkent and 
hoping to hire orchestra musicians for a 
song, or at least some vodka. 

Thai is how budget labels find you a 
brand new Brahms First: not a great or 
even a good one bur. lor a budget-con- 
scious public, an acceptably bad one. 

Recycling suits classical music these 
days. We can't get enough of old com- 
posers or old performers. There is the 
tantalizing aura of the "golden age." 

I had a colleague, now in another end 
of the -music business, w ho regularly 
wailed that everything around him was 
remble.but rhat everything far away was 
not. I am tempted to send him Reiner- 
Strauss. He would tike the fresh, shiny 
cover and could moan over lost beauties. 
New nostalgia. It is keeping the record 
companies in business. 


BRITISH THEATER 


Reviving the ‘English Chekhov’ 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


L ondon — it was 

the drama critic Hil- 
ary S purling, who 
more than 20 years 
ago campaigned to have the 
plays of Rodney Ackland rec- 
ognized as some of the 
greatest of the century, and 
since then she and the direc- 
tors Sam Walters and Frith 
Banbury have brilliantly con- 
tinued the fight without as yet 
achieving outright victory. 

Banbuiy, now in his 
middle eighties, was sadly too 
ill to complete the current 
production of Ackland's 
"After October” at the Min- 
erva in Chichester, but Keith 
Baxter has in his absence 
come up with a rich and rare 
revival of the drama that, in 
Ackland's lifetime, was his 
only real West End hit exactly 
60 years ago. Then, it was 
Ackland himself who played 
the role of the young dram- 


atist whose long-awaited first 
night turns out to be a fiasco. 

Ackland is thought of by 
some as the "English Chek- 
hov.” Other dramatists of 
these immediately pre- and 
postwar years also bad the 
Chekhov” label hung around 
their dramas, notably Wyn- 
yard Browne and N.C. 
Hunter, but while they are 
now seldom if ever revived — 
and for good reason — Ack- 
land continues to simmer 
away, a playwright of resent- 
ment and suppressed rage and 
real dramatic talent that 
should see him safely into the 
next century. 

True. "After October” 
owes perhaps a little too much 
to Noel Cowaitf’s "Hay 
Fever," written a decade 
earlier: that play too is about a 
scatty actress, her poetic son 
and assorted visitors to a gen- 
teel kind of madhouse, but 
there all resemblance ends. 
Ackland rewrites Coward in 
blood and bile, his people 


have never known success 
and are never likely to. but 
they occupy an intriguing bor- 
derline along which the old 
drawing-room comedies sud- 
denly confront the new terrors 
of the postwar theater. 

The Chekhovian parallels 
are easily drawn; everyone in 
"After October" wants 
something they are clearly 
not going to get in this life, 
whether it be theatrical suc- 
cess or romantic happiness or 
just a decent hot meal. The 


e aches with reality; Ack- 
I had been a lodger in the 
house of the actress Mary 


Merrall, who is clearly the 
inspiration for the role played 


here by Dorothy Turin. In a 
strong cast Nick Waring 
plays the son, with Murray 
Melvin as the equally failed 
poet who represents his con- 
science. If Baxter’s produc- 
tion sometimes becomes a 
little manic in its determina- 
tion never to bore latter-day 
theatergoers, that is a small 
price tojpay for the return of a 


can. though it richly deserves a 
Shaftesbury Avenue address. 

Also on the read at present 
is "Mrs. Warren's Profes- 
sion" in a sturdy if not hugely 
exciting production by Alan 
Strachah for the Touring Part- 
nership. a group of regional 
theaters that have wisely- 
formed themselves into a net- 
work of shared costs. Penelope 
Keith stars as the unrepentant 
brothel owner in the play dial 
(though rather less powerful 
than "Widowers' Houses" or 
"Major Barbara.” with which 
it shares the common theme of 
' 'distasteful' ' moneymaking i. 
all the same, remains one or 
Shaw’s briskest and most 
timely of dramas. Carolyn 
Backhouse is suitably unfor- 
giving as Vivie. first of the 
modern feminists, but this re- 
mains a dutiful rather than rev- 
elatory revival. 


A T the Piccadilly. 
"Steaming” is an 
equally brisk bur 
rather more point- 
less revival of Nell Dunn's 
1970s hit about the six women 
staging a poolside protest at 
the" threatened closure of their 
public baths. Like many sur- 
prise hits of rhat period, this 
one really doesn't stand up to 
a revisit, especially as the clo- 
sure of public baths no longer 
seems to be very high on the 
national agenda at" a time 
when hospitals and schools 
are the greater danger. All the 
same, six nude women can 
usually be relied on to sell a 
good many tickets in Soho, 
and there are intelligent per- 
formances here from the gar- 
gantuan Julie T. Wallace. 
Sheila Reid as her minuscule 
mother and Diane Langton. 
who eventually takes to the 
flying trapeze in a forlorn at- 
tempt to give the play the end- 
ing it has always lacked. 


The First Capital Records Beaties Album 

Meet The Beatles 

The First Afcum by England’s Phenomenal Pop Combo 


real curiosity. 

Tn the end, the resonances 


This outstanding original LP album was cut in high fidelity by Capital 
Records in 1963, T 2047, even prior to the Beaties first appearance 
on the Ed Sullivan Show. The record is in pristine condition and has 
never been played. The sleeve is also original and in perfect concfi- 
tion, with cover photo, face pictures of the four Beatles by Robert 
Freeman, and states. "You've read about them in Time. Newsweek. 
The New York Times.' 1 Here's the big beat sound of that fantastic, 
phenomenal foursome." “Meet the Beatles!” On the sleeve back side 


Beatlemanic style songs which are 1 Want To Hold Your Hand", "I 
Saw Her Standing There". This Boy", It Won’t Be Long”, “All I've Got 
lo Do", "All My Loving", "Don’t Bother Me’. “Little Chikf , “Till There 
Was You". Trad Me Tight", "I Wanna Be Your Man" and "No( A 
Seoond Time". Even the Capital dust cover is original and In perfect 
condition illustrating current Capital recordings by Frank Sinatra 
Peggy Lee, Ray Anthony, The Beach Boys. Nat King Cole and Al 
Martino. 

To be sold to the highest offer. 

Fax: 49 201 25 11 82. 


here are not so much of Chek- 
hov or Coward but rather of 
an American '30s classic like 
Saroyan's "The Time of 
Your Life” or Kaufman- 
Harr’s "You Can’t Take It 
With You,” plays full of 
weird and wondrous eccent- 
rics but shot through with a 
deep kind of melancholic 
nostalgia, that sense of a 
world about to disintegrate at 
least partly because of its own 
lethargic inability to face the 
new realities. If Ackland had 
ever written for an American 
audience, he’d have been 
filmed by Preston Sturges or 
Frank Capra and you can't do 
much better than that. 

This week. "After Octo- 
ber” moves to Greenwich for 
a month; catch it there if you 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

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BUSINESS/FINANCE 



WEDNESDAY, JITNE 4, 1997 


PAGE 13 






'***'*»* h»-h. 

Vaclav Marhoul, who was recently replaced as director-general of the Barrandov film studio, right, which faces serious financial difficulties. 


Famed Czech Film Studio Finds Its Future Fuzzy 


By Peter S. Green 

InierHiiiioiuil Her did Tribune 


P RAGUE — A few weeks ago. 
Vaclav Marhoul, 37, die direc- 
tor of Prague’s legendary Bar- 
randov film studios, was flying 
high. His struggle to transform the 50 
hectares (about 12S acres) of sound- 
stages, back lots and editing rooms 
from a state-subsidized monolith into a 
dynamic group of profit-oriented 
companies called AB Barrandov AS 
.finally seemed to be bearing fruit. 

On one stage. Liam Neeson was 
stoning in a film version of "Les 
Miserables.” On another, Julia Or- 
mond was being pursued by a Russian 
cavalryman in “The Barber of Siber- 


ia,’ * a Barrandov co-production. A film 
production and distribution venture 
seemed to be doing well, and Mr. Mar- 
houl was hunting for a partner to build 
a theme park on the studio’s back lot. 

But in early May, Moravia Steel, the 
provincial ironworks that backed Mr. 


MEDIA MARKETS 


Marhoul financially when be took over 
the studios, called in its markers. It 
dismissed him and replaced him with 
its own appointee, a former chairman 
of the steelmaker. 

Mr. Marhoul 's tenure at Barrandov 
could serve as a cautionary tale of the 
hazards of doing business in the new 
Czech Republic, where the difficulty 


of gaining venture capital often forces 
entrepreneurs to mortgage their futures 
to finance their deals. The trouble at the 
studios, where the Czech -bom director 
Milos Forman made some of his best- 
known films in the 1960s. also points 
up the difficulty of insulating cultural 
institutions from the turbulent tran- 
sition to a market economy. 

Moravia maintains that it intends to 
preserve the studio's role and that the 
ouster of Mr. Marhoul was prompted 
by a desire to protect Moravia’s in- 
vestment after he had run up huge 
losses. Mr. Marhoul countered that the 
losses were an accounting trick and 
that Moravia had used the studio's 
buildings as collateral for loans to cov- 
er losses at its steel mills. 


A spokeswoman for the ironworks 
first denied that, then conceded that the 
studio carried an 800 million koruny 
($24.2 million) mortgage. 

“A company with 170 million 
koruny losses last year cannot support 
anything.” Moravia's vice chairman, 
Rudolf Ovcari, said of the studio. * ‘The 
new director was installed at Bairan- 
dov just to let it support similar activ- 
ities in the future.” 

Since his ouster. Mr. Marhoul has 
been forecasting the demise of Czech 
cinema. “I’m afraid they are going to 
cancel the production and distribution 
business and just rent out the hall to 
other productions,” he said. 


See MOVIES, Page 17 


Wal-Mart Heads South 
Of Border for Growth 


Retailer to Invest $1.2 Billion in Mexico 


(b'Sutffnan OwJUllOT 

NEW YORK — Wal-Mart Stores Inc. 
said Tuesday that it would invest $1.2 
billion to acquire a controlling stake in 
Cifra SA, Mexico’s largest retailer, in a 
deal that would be its biggest move yet to 
expand outside the United States. 

Under the agreement, Cifra will first 
buy out Wal-Mart ’s stake in a joint 
venture between the retailers in Mexico, 
which includes 145 stores and restaur- 
ants. Wal-Mart will then make an offer 
for stock in Cifra. after which Wal-Mart 
expects to own a controlling stake in (he 
Mexican company. 

Wal-Mart began its joint venture with 
Cifra more than five years ago. It was 
the first push outside the United Slates 
for Wal-Mart, which now operates 314 
international stores and is the world’s 
largest retailer. 

Wai-Mart's expansion has come as 
other U.S. retailers have scaled back 
their presence in Mexico, which is still 
recovering from the deep economic 
slump triggered by the currency crisis in 
late 1994. This year. Kmart Corp. has 
sold its Mexican stores for 590 million 
and Sears. Roebuck & Co. has sold a 60 
percent stake in its money-losing Sears 
de Mexico operation. 

Wal-Mart’s approach has been to 
move slowly and methodically to leant 
as much about foreign markets and cul- 
tures before expanding more aggress- 


Bundesbank’s Message to Europe: We Are the Monetary Police 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — In forcing the government 
of Chancellor Helmut Kohl to back 
down from its plan to revalue Gentian 
gold reserves, the Bundesbank has sent 
apowerful signal across Europe that it is 
now back in business as the de facto 
arbiter of European monetary union. 

‘ ‘The Bundesbank has now been em- 
powered to police Maastricht prop- 
erly.’* said David Roche, president erf 1 
London analysts Independent Strategy. 

Mr. Roche and other economists said 
they expected the German central bank 
to serve as referee over Europe’s fiscal 
rigor from now until the currency’s in- 
troduction in January 1999. 

”1 think the Bundesbank’s hand has 
now been immeasurably strengthened,’ ’ 
said David Marsh, director of European 
strategy at investment bankers Robert 
Fleming. “The Bundesbank will now 
make it quite clear that monetary union 
can only go ahead on the basis of a strict 
interpretation of the criteria, and that 
includes other European nations. In the 


past, tile Bundesbank had the power to 
influence from the background. It now 
has power to influence from the fore- 
ground.” 

The Bundesbank's victory thus not 
only reasserts the German central 
bank’s authority at home and dimin- 
ishes the moral authority that Mr. Kohl 
and Finance Minister Theo Waigel have 
to preach fiscal rigor to other European 
partners. In broader European terms the 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Frankfurt-based central bank could 
soon be in a position to police and even 
oppose any weakening of Maastricht 
treaty terms by France, Italy and others 
as well. 

The reason for this is that the Bundes- 
bank will be called upon in early 1 998 to 
give its opinion, along with other central 
banks and the European Monetary In- 
stitute. as to how satisfactorily the single 
currency terms have been observed for 
1997. While this opinion does not have 
the force of law, it- could prove decisive 
in political terms. 


For example, if the new government 
of Prime Minister Lionel Jospin is lax in 
meeting France’s single currency tar- 
gets, or, if its seeks, as Mr. Jospin prom- 
ised during die election campaign, to 
water down the terms of the fiscal sta- 
bility pact that is supposed to act as a 
discipline on member governments 
once die euro is introduced, the Bundes- 
bank could raise objections next year. 

“What the Bundesbank has done in 
the past week,” said Alison Cottrell, 
senior economist at PaineWebber in 
London, “could be a kind of dress re- 
hearsal for what they would do in 1998 
if the government looked like it was 
selling oui for a weak euro. If the French 
try and reopen the stability pact that 
really is a nonnegoriable area for the 
Germans, and if it is a case of ne- 
gotiation or bust then I think it will be 
bust, meaning the 1999 starting date for 
the euro goes bust.” 

Several economists stressed Tuesday 
that the Bundesbank's domestic victory 
would almost certainly mean that its 
opinion about other nations next year 
could make or break the single currency. 


“In 1998 the Bundesbank can use its 
power and influence by saying that Ger- 
man monetary stability is endangered 
by other countries either failing to meet 
the criteria or by meeting it in a manner 
that the Bundesbank considers to be 
unsustainable,” Mr. Roche said. 

“What 1 think could happen is that 
European politicians will try and calm 
everyone down with empty declarations 
for the next six months,” be added. “By 
that time it will be dear that France and 
Germany's budget performances are 
drawing apart and then either the mar- 
kets will realize that the Bundesbank is 
going to blow the whistle, or, altern- 


atively. the Bundesbank will simply do 
so in 1998.” 


■ Sweden Says No to EMU 

Sweden said Tuesday it would no! 
join the European Union's single cur- 
rency in 1999 but sought to keep the 
door open for membership some time in 
the future, Reuters reported from Stock- 
holm. 

Prime Minister Goran Persson said at 
a news conference that the EU's project 
for a single currency was too shaky and 
that public opinion in Sweden, one of 
the EU’s newest recruits, was solidly 
against membership. 


ively. The investment in Cifra “falls 
very much in line with Wal-Mart’s 
strategy of being fully in control of 
every part of their operations.” said 
Kurt Barnard, president of Barnard's 
Retail Marketing Report. 

“We are certain that the synergies 
and the combined efforts resulting from 
this merger will enhance our growth 
opportunities, increase our leadership in 
the market, and help us assure the lowest 
prices for our customers,” said Henry 
Davis. Cifra’s chief executive. 

Wal-Mart, which is based in Ben ton - 
ville, Arkansas, has opened stores in 
other Latin American markets, includ- 
ing Argentina and Brazil, and has also 
moved into Canada. China and Indone- 
sia. The retailer’s expansion program 
began paying off in the fourth quarter 
when the international unit reported its 
first quarterly profit, $65 million. 

The Mexican company will continue 
to be called Cifra after Wal-Mart buys 
its stake. 

Cifra *s stores, as well as those of the 
joint venture, will continue to operate 
under the same names, including Aur- 
rera. Bodega Aurrera, Superama. Sub- 
urbia, Vip’s, Sam's Club and Wal-Mart 
Supercenters. Aside from the 145 retail 
outlets in the joint venture. Cifra in- 
dependently operates 228 others. 

Cifra, which was founded in 1958. 
employs nearly 50.000 workers and had 
sales of $2.9 billion in 1996. Wal-Mart 
had sales of $104 billion last year, op- 
erating more than 2.300 stores world- 
wide. The companies had said Wal- 
Mart was in t alks to acquire the stake on 
April 23. 

In the first step of the transaction, 
Cifra will pay a $300 million dividend 
to existing shareholders. Then the joint 
venture will be merged into Cifra, with 
Wal-Mart receiving shares of Cifra 
Series A and Series B common siock for 
its joint venture interest. 

Wal-Mart intends to make a public 
tender offer on the Mexican Stock Ex- 
change for the additional Cifra Series A 
and B voting shares at a price expected 
to be the peso equivalent of between 
$1.89 and $2.03. 

After the merger, which is subject to 
shareholder approval, Wal-Mart said it 
would own a majority interest of the 
voting stock. { Bloomberg , AP. AFX ) 


Daewoo: Eastern Europe’s Car Giant? 


By Peter S. Green 

Ihh rrauvnal Herald Tribune 


PRAGUE — Daewoo Corp., South 
Korea's manufacturing giant, is poised 
to become the largest automaker in 
Eastern Europe, with billions of dollars 
already invested in local automakers. 

The* company is racing to catch up 
with regional leaders such as Volks- 
wagen AG. Fiat SpA. Dacia RA of 
Romania and Avtovaz of Russia, ac- 
cording to recent research reports. 

“Daewoo is obviously taking over.” 
said Elaine Hardy, director of a new 
regional study by Harbour Wade 
Brown, British auto-industry analysts. 
“They’re really going places, and the 
automakers from Japan and Western 
Europe are losing out.” 

Analysts say Daewoo is using low- 
paid, highly skilled workers 10 target 
Western Europe’s car markets as well as 
the growing economies of Eastern 
Europe. If it meets sales targets, it could 
become one of the world’s top 10 car- 
makers. 

“I think they are using Eastern 
Europe as a launch pad to attack West 
European markets,” said Tim Arm- 


strong, an automotive analyst with DRI/ 
McGraw Hill. 

Daewoo executives said recently that 
the company planned to produce about 
2.5 million cars a year — 1.5 million 
overseas and I million in Korea. As 
wages and living standards rise at home, 
the company has been building up ca- 
pacity in Eastern Europe. 

Daewoo already makes cars, light 
trucks and pans in Poland, Romania, the 
Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, 
Russia and Ukraine. It has also said it 
would consider projects in Bulgaria and 
Croatia. 

By 2000. Daewoo wants ro build 1 
million cars annually in Eastern Europe, 
Ms. Hardy said. 

A report by DRI/Plan-Econ rates 
Daewoo as Eastern Europe's fourth- 
largest car maker, behind Volkswagen, 
Fiat and Dacia. But some analysts say 
Daewoo’s plans are tooambitious. 

“I think they axe overestimating the 
capacity of the market to absorb their 
production,” Mr. Armstrong of DRI 
said. For now, much of Daewoo's pro- 
duction consists of assembling kits from 
Korean-made parts. Thar has left it vul- 
nerable to the vagaries of transition econ- 


omies. At the Daewoo plant in Craiova, 
Romania, 10,000 unsold cars fill the 
fields around the factory after a collapse 
in the local currency, the leu, effectively 
tripled the price of a new Daewoo. • 

Daewoo says it has sold fewer than 
400 cars in Romania this year. 

Dacia, the local rival, uses mostly 
Romanian parts and saw production rise 
20 percent in the first two months of the 
year, to 1 6,294 vehicles, as the cost of a 
new Dacia fell in dollar terms. 

But in Poland, the region’s largest 
market, with 373.542 new -car sales last 
year, Daewoo's sales of both South 
Korean and Polish models rose 494 per- 
cent in the first three months of 1 997, to 
28,228 vehicles, according to DRI/ 
PI an- E con. 

Rather than build all-new factories, 
Daewoo has been buying stale-owned 
automakers from governments eager to 
privatize. 

Eastern Europe is one of the world’s 
fastest-growing car markets. DR] re- 
ports that 1.9 million cars were sold in 
1996, up from 1.6 million in 1995. By 
2000, Mr. Armstrong said, the region’s 
consumers will be buying more than 2.5 
million new cars a year. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


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CtMp m Amundan London AMoa Am and Zoridi batgt « oaeraatew «» Kart at* 

« Xb Mr tout*. * Tu Mr * »« " O- ** «*** 


Ubfd-Libor Rates 

Sate 


Fraoch 


June 3 

DflOor D-Moft 

Franc 

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FtOK 

Y*n 

ECU 

l-Bwnfli 5Vi-S*t 7°r» T-* 

*5-1 


3I4-3M 

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m-7 



44a-4V8 


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Coaaqr hr* Onwv 
‘mm 0.990* Grmanx. 

IJ193 HntltHtl 
1JUJ O Oa aj. fiirt fc * 

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3290 kttt 
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27400 

77439 

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80705 

34064 

1X04 

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Cmmcy Nr* 
Mclpcm 7907 
ILZMgatf* 1 *543 
JWKW 7-1059 
PBLptM MM 
MMiMy 3-22 
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XmnUt 57710 
SHAftlfll ITS 
Snf.1 14311 


S.MT.IBU 

S.K 0 MNH 

SwtdLtaMO 

TbmdbS 

Tlaa tot 

TaUcNfln 

UAEMftan 

Vam-toia. 


TntS 

44*85 

wan 

7 77* 
27.88 
M81 
i4)48a 
34735 
48U0 


Key Money Rates 

BlWSMB CtaS* Prv 

Dbcoartrato 
Prim rote 
FMWOKHtfS 
fMqrCDsdnkri 
IIMayCPdtafan 
3ma8iTnaBiiTMI 

1- fWIHonTTba 

2- ytflr T ranw ry Mi 
5-rwrTmmtittH 
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HHwrTi avii r w fc 
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Marti Lynch 3Moy 8* 


5330 S_00 

8*.: >15 

S'.j 5*1, 
SL75 549 
548 543 

496 4L8D 
545 547 

4.18 *J1 
647 550 

653 456 

652 *55 

6SI *90 
5.02 M2 


Britan 

Book tws« nrtt 
CaBmwMr 
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3-medti into freak 
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4<6 6W 
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1-aartb Mafaaik 
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3.10 110 

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DbCMrtrato 
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l-annttlBMrta* 
3-nmft tatariank 
bdooeOn interbank 
iMjMrewtbati 


050 050 

IUS 044 
054 054 

056 056 

045 045 

1X3 277 


3W 3 1 * 
$40 554 


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Lfnca. Bank at Takyo-Miiivblibi. 


CawnfgfwH. CietttDmnefs. 


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BM. PJO. argo 


to 9tmr (tamer 

• 43* 14319 14338 

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1 1530 
14734 


1148? 11430 

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•.Vjoni r Of tmujp i Pant). Bon * m rjtfo-MitudLsCi t Tc*r>:- 


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450 450 

108 108 
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3.18 318 

322 123 

581 S39 


34425342.75-055 
342 SO 34X05 -OK 
NmYMft 34650 34570 .040 

U&dallan per ounce, tendon attend 
firing* ZvfiOi one New York cptmna 
and chung prices. New York Com 
lAopj 

Sumer aw 5 


Global Private Banking 


EREVER YOU GO, WHEREVER 


YOU MAY BE, YOU’LL FIND THAT 


REPUBLIC SPEAKS YOUR LANGUAGE 



Ifedr/iimirlie, uf KrfuUir 
Xalltmul H. II Jr » ) XW V«* 

iSi navi >. I. in (inwni. 


Our multilingual account officers are at your 
service in some three-dozen financial centres 
around the world- And though they speak many 
different languages, all are committed to one 
fundamental principle: to protect our clients’ 
capital as we safeguard its purchasing power. 

It is a simple principle upon which we base 
our brand of financial conservatism: private 
banking built upon rigor, discipline and prudence. Tbis 
sophisticated conservatism, vigorously pursued, has created 
a global private bank of exceptional stability, capable ' 
of weathering the roughest storms. 

Indeed, Republic's capitalization ratio, 
on a risk adjusted basis, is two times as great 
as that required by the world's international 
banking regulators. 

To our way of thinking, it is security as 
well as return that we must ensure each day. 

And in the process, to provide a unique quality 
of service, understanding and discretion. 



fmlii lleujijnarlfi. nj 
KepuUif XdtivHal Kn it 
X.-m > net in ,\W W. 


|H Republic National Bank of New York- 

Strength. Security. Service. 


A Sdfru It Jill* ' Min Y,.f l- ■ IviKW ■ Ijuitl.m ■ Ifrmnf ■ Ki-irul ’ Hmrl> 1 1 ill- ■ liii.-im- \in- ■ Cat mmii l,l.i 1u ) r • Cupt-iiii.iA-n ’ Gilirjlljr 
Cntt i-n^-v " ll.tw Kihu * lal--" -1 -' " Li- ' I jT^.ui.i ’ I .iiM-iiilvHiri ' M-iiiil-i ' Cilv * Mijmi ■ MiLu • M.uiU- Cjrl,. • M.ml.t iJ v „ 

M.-Iilr. il ■ M.— ■ Xj'-Jii ■ I’j'i* ‘ iVrili * I’iihIj J.-I * Kin Jf |iiiu-ii.' ' S.iilli.i£>t ■ Sin4d|Nin- ’ Stiliin * r.ii|i,-i * T.iU.« • I iir,.ii| a i • >'itr,.'l. 


WlJii -Vii.iuf fun! .l\, imi. 


J 





JPAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 





Don’t Worship 
Java, Gates Says 


'S^\ 


By Mitchell Martin 

Inienuiituuil Hewitt Tribune 


J F M A M J 
1996 


J F M A M J 
1906 


'Exchange 


jenrsE . 
jwse- 
ifi ysE ' • 

flVBE • • Composite 44&3S 441,53 : +q:i9 

■ . Nasdaq Coropteite- 1384.91 ■ 1404.77- : : >1 <41 
AMEX Market Value -6054)2 6Q7.t7- - >Q.30 ' 

Toronto TSE index 6432.70 • 3#&$0 +0,42 

SaaP&uto Bovcspa 1111042 11349,62 -2.11 

MextcoCtty Botea 40594S2 4005^1 +tj* 

Buenos Aires Marvat 787.30 79CL87 -0.44 

Santiago IPSA Genera} 572SL41 5742.22' “ -0-29 

Caracas Capital General 7042.69 6855.41"* +2.73 

'Source: Bloomberg. Reuters inh.-mui.-nai HmUTrihun 


The Dow 
S&P5QQ 
S AP 100 
Composite 


Tuesday ft** - .. %• i 

04 PM Ctase -CHaiige 
7312.15 . 7289.40 ■ + 63 t 
84 & 4 S 848 . 33 ' ; v ^t 0 

8 S &84 826.90 -Oiiit 

442.36 441.53 + 0.19 


ATLANTA — Bill 
Gates, chairman of Mi- 
crosoft Corp., said Tuesday 
that the computer industry 
would not adopt Java as the 
sole language of program- 
ming. putting him at odds 
with executives of other 
leading companies. 

Mr. Gates, speaking at 
the Spring Comdex hade 
show, said it was unreas- 
onable to expect all existing 
programs to be re written in 
Java and that certain appli- 
cations would continue to 
take advantage of features 
in other operating systems. 


including Apple Computer 
Inc.'s Macintosh and Mi- 


IntcnuiiiHul HmU Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• Humana Inc. agreed to buy Physician Corp. of America 
for $400 million in cash and assumed debt to expand its 
business in Florida and Texas. 


• Signet Banking Corp. said it would eliminate 1 ,135 jobs, or 
about a quarter of its work force, and sell 59 branches to try to 
lift its slumping earnings. 

• Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. said it had acquired from No- 
' vartis Pharma AG the worldwide development and marketing 


rights for two protease inhibitor compounds that ultimately 
could be incorporated in treatments of patients with acquired 


could be incorporated in treatments of patients with acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome. Terms were not disclosed. 


immune deficiency syndrome. Terms were not disclosed. 

• United News & Media PLC said it had acquired PR News 
Service of Chicago. It did not disclose the price. 

• MCI Communications Corp. said it was offering a flat-rate 

service plan in 40 U.S. states that would hold local phone 
charges below those offered by the regional Bell operating 
companies. fi/wm/vn*. AFX Reuters 


Inc.'s Macintosh and Mi- 
crosoft’s Windows family. 

On Monday. Jeff Pa- 
pows, president of Lotus 
Development Corp., said 
the future of the computer 
industry depended on “the 
religious insistence of 100 
percent-pure Java" appli- 
cations. Java allows pro- 
grammers to write software 
that can run on different 
operating systems. 

Mr. Gates’s response 
was: “I think it’s a little 
strange to get religious 
about this: there are user re- 
quirements. ' ' He added, 
“Whenever people want to 


write applications, they 
ought to have a choice.” 


ought to have a choice.” 

Lotus is a subsidiary of 
International Business Ma- 
chines Corp., which is part 
of a loose alliance of compa- 
nies that are seeking to wrest 


control of the industry’s 
agenda from Microsoft. Be- 
cause its Windows system is 
so pervasive in desktop 
computers, Microsoft has 
boat able to dominate other 
parts of die industry. 

Mr. Papows had said that 
Microsoft had “near- 
monopolistic” power over 
desktop products. 

“Java,” he said, “is the 
universal environment for 
an applications renais- 
sance.” The language, de- 
• veloped by Sun Microsys- 
tems Inc., occupies a ruche 
similar to that of Unix, 
which was widely used in 
scientific and other high- 
end computing, but which 
suffered from having many 
different versions. 

“If we screw this up,” 
said Mr. Papows, likening 
Java to Unix, “we’ve lost, 
our last chance.” Mr. Pa- 
pows warned that Microsoft 
might develop its own ver- 
sion of Java. 

The debate over Java is 
related to the outlook for 
network computers, which 
would mainly be used for 
accessing the Internet or 
corporate systems known 
as intranets. Java is seen as 
the natural choice for net- 
work-based computing, 
and its widespread adoption 
would pressure Windows. 

Executives of several 
companies that make net- 
work computers, at a panel 
discussion Monday, iden- 
tified Java capability as a 
key requirement of custom- 
ers. 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — Viacom Inc. on 
Tuesday named John Antioco, the top 
executive at Taco Bell Corp., as chair- 
man and chief executive of its ailing 
Blockbuster Entertainment chain of 
video and music stores. 

Mr. Antioco, 47, who has no expe- 
rience in the video business, is leaving 
Taco Bell eight months after being named 
president and chief executive. He had 
•been a top contender to run all of PepsiCo 
Inc.'s restaurants, including Kentucky' 
Tried Chicken and Pizza Hut. analyst’s 


said. Effective immediately, Mr. Antioco 
is to take the positions vacated last month 
by Bill Fields, a former executive of Wal- 
Mart Stores Inc. whose plan to expand 
Blockbuster into other types of retailing 
lost favor with the Viacom chairman, 
Sumner Redstone. 

Mr. Redstone is seeking a quick fix 
For Blockbuster's 61*00 stores, which 
have struggled as Wal-Mart and others 
have gone" into the business of selling 
low-priced videos and compact disks. 

“Blockbuster has had fits and starts 
and changes in direction.” Dennis Me- 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


June 3, 1997 


Hkjn Low Latest Chge Opail 


CORN (CBOT) 

$IH0 bu nwwnum- cptiti net Du4fk*J 


Jul 97 

7TB'. 

274 

2771- 

-J’: 115.980 

500 97 

a."; 

1ST 

747 

-2’. 

Jl+2) 

Dec 97 

2 *0’. 

1 57 

7S»'. 

•lli 

109 777 

Mar 1 * 

:**'» 

3*3' i 

US'* 

-1'. 

11X34 

Mav ?e 2*9'* 

:tr, 

W.: 

• n. 

1.388 

Jilin 

273 

vo 

771 

-n. 

3.409 

Sea ?8 



:«o 

-2 

1 


High 

LOW 

La teal 

Chgo 

Optll 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) 



iVOdOtov-cmnsorict. 




Jill 97 )9J0 

74+0 

77X0 

-0+5 

10712 

5en9» 81X5 

»9.00 

7955 

*045 

7+58 

Nov 97 8X50 

81.30 

82.10 

-0W 

3.755 

Jon 98 85.90 

61.75 

U90 

-010 

1+30 

pt soft* NA 

Man's, voles : 

3+11 


'Job's dw m 

31.505 

up 735 




Hgh Law UrfeaJ Chgt OpM 


Mgh Law Late* Cfcge Opint 


GERMAN GOV. BUND OJFFE) 

□tA23WX»-pftonO0pct 

Jun97 101.48 10085 101.45+ 046171530 

Sep 97 100+3 99X2 10041 «L60 99.751 

Est. antes: 37W82. P re*, soles: 241817 

Pie*, open Ini- 272.281 off +527 


3-MONTH EUROURA (UFFE) 
m_l mHftafl - P& of IOC pet 
Jim 97 9X22 9X15 5x21-^ 007 93X20 
Sep 97 9X45 93X5 93+4 ♦ 007103+53 


Dec 97 9X46 93J6 93145*009 55438 
Mir 98 9XW 93168 9X79 * 0.12 37.175 
Jun 98 9X88 9X72 9X86* 0.16 3+243 
Sep 98 9X91 9X73 9X88 * 0.17 9X20 
Est. softs: 71X10. Prey, sales 7+441 
Prav.openMj 331X52 up 2X49 


Es.saw NA MW* soles 41.844 
Man's open -nt 7T6.19; oft JOB 


SOYBEAN MEM. ICB0T1 
100 rons- aoaars oct h*’ 

MV 287 JU Mitt 7*110 —LID 47X9* 

Aug 97 26X50 7*4 20 7J4J0 —130 17.1*« 

Sen *7 747.50 244.50 24500 -110 11.132 

0 OV 23150 3000 230W —150 10.710 

Dec?? mm 2150 CXU —2.20 20 SB 

Jan98 271 SO rood 720 00 —1.50 1JM 
ES soles NA Men s sates 21+74 
Mon's acm mf 112.181 aft 794 


GOLD (NCMX) 
too inii ai - oou*> ee* ho, or 
Jim ?7 34450 34150 3000 -070 
Alt ?7 34970 -OBO 

*U9?7 387.10 345 CO 34570 —AM 
Oa?7 349 JO MO00 348J0 -0J0 
Dec 92 35130 15070 350 JO -080 
FePtt 35X30 -0® 

Acr 98 35570 -0® 

Jun9B IBM 3S8J0 358X0 -480 
A\ib98 3*1 10 -0X0 

Es MOes NA Man's, sales 15.737 
Men's ooen.m 1504)12 off 374 


LONG GILT (UFFE) 

LSUJ00 - pts A 32r*Js oflOO pa 
Jun 97 11X17 112-28 11X14+ 0-25 82X44 
Sep 97 11X2711X3011X23 * 0-27135.706 
ESI. sale* 12S.m. Piw.sde* 49X24 
Prev. open Inf-' 217,950 off 5X89 


10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 

FFSOaoOO-phaflOOpa 

Jim 97 129.40 129.50 129.40 ♦ 0X8173302 

Sep 97 127X0 126.90 127.7a *0X4 44X23 

Dec 97 96X2 96X2 97X0 + 0X4 0 

Est. sales 236*417. Open Int4 217XZ5 up 

498. 


SOYBEAN OIL ICBOT1 

M BOO ibv pf* B 

Jul 97 JJ T2 7180 2135 -079 
Aug97 JJ 40 MIC JJ05 -015 

5eo»7 J453 2120 21X3 -027 

Oct 97 ? J 5 J JJ 25 74 25 -03 
Dec 97 24.71 24 40 24 52 -all 

Jan 98 74.75 24 *7 74 47 -0 08 

Est setes NA Mon v sales 12+34 
Mon's cnen in' 101-507 # *74 


SOYBEANS (CBOT! 
uwo du w«™m- twin w avuiet 
14 97 875 85’ 8*0 -IS 1 . 

Au9 97 829 817 813 -IS 

Sep 97 73* Ttf; :n', _3>, 

No*?- *>*', 6S3'; 471’. 

Jan 94 *99 *n>: 4»S -I 

Est sdes NA Man's sales 45.845 
Mjnsogen re 18X717 a* 1251 


HI GRADE COFFER (NCMX) 
T5.0M lav- cent* p*r *» 

Jl« »* 117 10 114X0 117 10 
Jut 97 11740 11+15 117 10 

A*|97 1ISJQ 11480 11125 
Sn>»? 11440 11120 113X5 
OCJ97 111.90 

NDv97 11010 

Dec97 109 40 1UU 10910 
Jtin 98 10710 

Pea ’8 105X0 

Est sees N A Mon s sales 
■Man's open an 58X91 tjB 77 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 

I TL 200 m non • pts aM oa pa 
Jun 97 129X5 129X0 129X0 + 0X2 46,151 
Sep 97 130.90 129x5 130.90+ 1.15 52X84 
Dec «7 N.T. N.T. 103X5+ 0L57 


Ed. sales 13+002. Prev. sales: 89.«22 
Piw. open W4 110,735 up 7X78 


EURODOLLARS (C4AER) 
SI iruisn-rrsaf tOOpci 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

SXOODum^wnvn- cemsper bus/ir- 
JUI9f MS J*0' i 3*7 -I'j 

Sata 37P t 38*': 348 

Dec *7 383 L*3 W-j 

Mar 99 3K 3« MIL- 

Ed. sdes Ni Men's sdes 14.177 
Man s wen 'if Ht-ifiJ go 534 


SILVER I NCMX 1 
UMMroviu • cemsoee 

Jun?7 

Id 97 i’4J0 44? « 
See 97 J79 DO CTi 0 
De>:?7 4*500 4KW3 
Jcti?8 

.VarW 49000 3E.G0 
7JICV9B 

Jd9J 50000 «t« 
Est sales N.a .Men's 
I.Vm’i'Wnnr 9| 434 


471.10 -IB 4 
471 JO -100 57X25 

477.10 - 290 8.052 

48140 -in) 7.« 
«330 -140 17 

490X0 -7X1 6.M3 

49190 -100 2.743 

497X0 -150 7.387 

■ sdes 17.150 

on m 


Jun 97 

9+19 

9418 

9418 


40B+I2 

A<l?7 

94.13 

9+11 

9413 

-001 

15055 

Aug 93 

M.0/ 

9405 

9107 

*001 

7X57 

Sep 97 

9+tO 

93.99 

*4.02 

- (102 477X21 

Dee «/ 

91 B0 

937* 

9380 

-0Q3 177.52* 

Mot’s 

9168 

91*4 

93+8 

*a03 779.JW 

Jun ?8 

9156 

9152 

»1XS 

*aa? 231109 

Sep98 

93+7 

*142 

*3-46 

•003 181+50 

Dec 96 

93 JS 

93X2 

9134 

*003 125.142 

Mot 94 

*3X4 

93X1 

93X4 

-am 

*9+41 

Jun ?9 

9129 

91X4 

9139 

-003 

80+93 

See 99 

9125 

9127 

9315 

*003 

*7+5* 

E» wfcs NA 

Man's sates 

375+41 


Mon’s open ini 

2.736+7J UP 

48 



Livestock 


PLATINUM (NMER) 

SO TO. 3: - flotiors per Tov m 

Jul 97 itfiD 39900 *170 -300 U.080 

CL- 97 397JB DO 00 39030 —4.50 4.77) 

Jen 98 194.00 384X0 384X0 —ISO 1274 

Est. sales n.a. Mon's, sales 1.977 

Mon swen ni 70.131 oft Ml 


BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

«7.S00 naurxft. * nor paura 
Jim 9 7 1.6377 1X310 1.4340 
Sen 97 1*348 1X304 1 4314 
Dec 97 14788 

E si. sales a A Man's, sales »X31 
Aton'sooentre 41X31 off 4*7 


COTTON 2 (NCTN) 

SUM) as. -cants per a. 

Jul 97 71*5 72X0 73X2 -104 33X38 

0097 75J» 7+55 7+85 *a» +773 

Dec 97 7190 75X9 7SJ4 *003 27.142 

MtrW 74.95 7*65 7+95 * 0X5 +196 

MOV 98 77X0 +0JJ7 1.112 

Est. sdes NA Mon's, sates 18,209 
Man's aoenirt 73X44 oft *49 
HEATING OR. (NMER) 

41000 oat. con’s pot oat 

Jut 97 5*40 SI -50 5+85 -1X7 37X7+ 

Aug 97 5*70 5500 5SJS -1X» 11X08 

Sep 97 S7J0 5190 5*15 —1.34 9X91 

Od 97 57.90 5*75 57 00 -1X4 9.214 

Hoy 97 5825 S7J0 57.70 —1X4 8.5*2 

Dec 97 58X5 »45 -1.1* 13X89 

Jon 98 595) 58 X5 5BJ5 -l.M 7X49 

Fe698 S9.I5 5845 58.70 -094 3.154 

Mar 98 58X5 57X5 57 50 -0.79. 4.140 

Es. sdes NA Man's, sdes 14X7* 

Man's oo m an 122X7? oft 1284 
LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

1 XOO bw - Oo*ars MT uw 

MV 31X2 2038 20X2 -0X4 99.150 

f*®-? ^ ** S4X72 

Sap 97 21X5 20X8 2UI -OJ1 13X57 

0097 21.02 20X7 20J7 —9 JO 19X82 

N0V97 B.9B 20X5 20X1 —43.51 18X51 

Dec 77 20.92 20X1 20J2 -4M4 14J9I 

Jan98 2065 20.40 20X2 -049 17X69 

FC09S 20 43 20X8 20X8 -048 7423 

MCT98 XtA 20 49 20X0 —0X1 4442 

A«r98 2050 20X4 2036 -040 4.205 

ES. sates NA Mans, sdes 53.019 
Alan's open HU 401.122 up Mr 
NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

104900 mm ant's, s ear rrvn otu 


CATTLE (CMER) 

anno ® 

jun?; *4 40 *J9; mi; —(it: te.jji 


Aug?’ *440 *3 92 M3 -007 45.157 
Oc”7 *3 00 »ir CF -0 45 MX07 


Q*c?7 mss 7C00 •■»)r -04j 10451 
Fn?8 71 20 7095 :iC -025 5X81 


Aar 93 71? S 72N 71® -427 2X07 

ES sdes 19.751 -Mon'S wns 30.4*1 
r.tan s ocen th 1BJ.0O4 ett 30 


dose Previous 

LONDON METALS (LME) 

DoOara per metric fan 
Atuntnom (HigU Grade) 

Spot 155103 1514.00 1585.00 158*00 
For- 1577X0 157000 1*02.00 1603.00 
warn 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100 . 000 aoUarv. 1 twCOn dr 

Jun ?7 J3M 72M .7M) 

Sep 97 7348 J2B8 7324 

Dec 97 737* 7145 73*5 

Es soles fLA. Man's sales 10.MI 
AVn'sapenmt to«I off 168 


Jut 97 

1135 

1080 

2005 


Aus 77 

1140 

10*0 

1115 


Sep 97 

1141) 

1090 

1120 


Oct 97 

7.155 

2W5 

1130 


Nov 97 

2J» 

1245 

1275 


Dec 97 

1410 

2J8D 

1400 


Jan 98 

74*0 

1425 

1450 


Fean 

1XA5 

2X35 

2X60 


Mar 98 

2X30 

1200 

1225 


+4Y98 

20*5 

2080 

10*0 

3X71 


Capper Cattmdn (HteA Grade) 

Spat 2535 00 253000 25399- 25*1": 
For- 247500 2479X0 2583.00 2SB4 00 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 


60,000 an - BOT v 




AM 97 

7**5 

7*92 

77.15 

- 0*7 

It 2*9 

Sep 97 

77 40 

;*rs 

97 10 

—0 45 

2.172 

0CS97 

77 SO 

77 00 

77.30 

-ox: 

3.4F 

NCV *7 

^oa 

73« 

7873 

-040 

1.920 

Jen 92 

.■95) 

79 10 

.■9.J5 

-015 

495 

MOT?fl 

raw 

7J-85 

7190 

-on 

97 

Es: sates J-301 

Man's stfes 

1+75 


Man's cwn in' 

19 217 

UP 239 



H0GS4jMB (CMER) 




tO POO iCi ■ c+-ni4 DC* *t+ 




Jill 8’ 

81 13 

B2? 

8177 

-010 

8.434 

Jin?; 

sna 

81 77 

82(5 

• 0X5 

10137 

A'.U >7 

60 J3 

79 3S 

*103 

-017 

8 1*7 

<>3«7 

■3.95 

"\ 97 

Tin 

-aa2 

5.905 

Dec 97 

rooo 

*9 39 

6**5 

-002 

J.S59 


want 

Load 

Soai MO.OO *11.00 611X0 613.00 
Far- 62X00 623X0 623 ^ *24X0 


GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

USOODnytas S per mar* 

Jun 99 5KB 5776 5794 77X77 

Sep 97 5845 5815 5831 12X98 

Dec 97 I«8? 5662 5873 SO* 

Es4 sates HA Mat", sdes 56X72 
Mon's ucenurt 90JN8 up 9082 


Far- 622.00 623X0 623' 7 624X0 

ward 

Nickel 

Sod 705500 70*5X0 *915.00 6925X0 
Far- 71*500 7170.00 7025X0 7030X0 


Far- 71*500 7170.00 7025X0 7030X0 

wart 

Tin 

Spot 5*15X0 5*25X0 5550X0 5560.00 

For- 5670.00 5*95.00 5*05.00 5*1000 

ward 

Ztec (Speckri HlsB Grade) 

spot iron lanxo ijojxo i;xhoq 

For- 132+00 1325X0 1327X0 13271* 

want 

High Low Oow Olpe OdW 


Es- sows nxsi won's, sees 11X83 
Mon sacen.W 3.1 3*8 oft iit 


PORK BELLIES ICA4ERI 

d) OOOips -cmisnY 0) 

Juf 57 u2f. jtjo -an 

Aug’.' B 5« M.'S 39 25 -075 

FeoOJ 79LJ -}.D .-055 -Q.I7 

Ev ’tan : 9i? Mon’-, smes : 6» 
f.lon s open .n* : 99* o’* m 


US T. BILLS (CMER I 

Si rraB-an- pH of Icoo-Tt 

Jun 97 94.95 «97 »4?4 

Sep?-" 9444 94*4 94 A* •{ 

DeC 91 94.43 

Es: scuts MA -‘Adi s soles ns 
Man's open int 9S3J ofl ISO 


4.097 
003 5.707 

1+2 


COCOA (NCSE) 

t9rT'..TT-r. l^r-, J |*f -rr. 


WI97 

1452 

1HI 

U49 

76 829 

&»?; 

IJ») 

:+" 

I4H 

-3 14X38 

o*.v 

IXI 

w 

'SIS 

-1 >8.(14 

Mar 9? 

i;j* 

Ij44 

ISAS 

-! ;i.l/6 

M=yW 

iS*r 

ijt: 

lie; 

-1 0497 

MU* 



(X 

-1 555 


5 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

1 100.000 erin- p’s 8 Utfts atlUDiid 
Jim 97 105-47 105-41 105-49 - 08 1 1S.202 

Sec V 105-34 105-35 105-34 -OS 1D.440 

0«D7 IK-14 105-1+ 105-14 - 07 450 

Es* ides NA Men’s. sd« Si.J&t 
Mon s open int 774 747 nfl 4845 


Mon'-. (Denim 9+5*5 0* *35 
COFFEE C (NCSE I 

J-’-tWas - r.i-n».i«, iB 


18 TR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

SldUHO pr.nT.lv A nmlsM 100 pci 

Jun 77 in; -78 IP/-T0 W7-.V - 07 182JS5 

"jtev 107-n Hjr-oa io7-ii - 07 us-ut 

CMC 97 104-27 rat-27 104-27 -03 1,189 

Es 1 sates NA Men's sdes 108.731 
Mdiscomire 3M.404 df 1705 


7«« 


•io;s 

11.6*1 

US TREASURY BONDS tCBOT) 



7J6 00 

713 3S 

AM 

8.125 

’■'*vi-vi(Kt+na-o»', liw. cf iiBdci 


I9’9S 

!B7« 19704 

-ilO 

l»7 

km*: 110-17 

110-01 

no -ti 

■ 09 

M7+78 

iso?; 

i;;» W809 

• 605 

; 1*6 

5«** 110-431 

I0W-20 

IIO+U 

■ II 


1 '205 

i*:m i-'res 

■405 

in 

ir lov.ji 

109-0* 

109-2) 

• 12 


s 11 <Rs Mwi safts 

i:.«js 


Mcr99 


109-01 


;jbo 


5UGAR-9K3RU2 II (NCSE) 


EM sdes NA. Mon'i sales 371.4J7 
Monsnommt 53X57 o« W 


ra . p*« TI 

113* 

1148 

•0U 


UBOR 1 -MONTH (CMER) 

Um.ii.n- w o» lOOnet 

II JO 

112* 

■CIO 

57X13 

>»i97 *1 30 MB 9J30 

1109 

11 IS 

■90b 

28X-3 

MV 9431 g»;) UJ1 

MCI 

11 06 

■0* 

6 5+. 

Aug? T WI9 94 1* M 18 

r.wn 

IMS’* 

5 sole-. 2*986 
ue 570i 


FV idles NA Mon's Witt 1896 
MonvoDMn.ni y. ST? ij& 833 


JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

1 1 Smi IBot* t wr >00 rirri 

Am 97 8667 XS7T 6631 7+290 

Sep 97 S7M X703 6749 0BS6 

Dec 97 6860 X8S5 WS 683 

Esi.sdes NA. Men's sdes 17X70 
Man's com mi B+U0 up 471 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

1 25.000 franc-,. S per ti one 
Jun?7 Tfll8 4958 6?/0 40.114 

Sec ? 7 7074 /an 7052 4J19 

Dec 97 7;j? 7170 71» 4S2 

Efi. sdes NA Mao's sdes 22X41 
Man's (Dm id 44.943 on 340 a 

MEXICAN PESO (CMER) 

500X00 mr. s per peso 
Jun V .12575 12555 17540 14.776 

SOP97 .12100 .12075 12075 11546 

Dec 97 .11640 .11637 11*37 7X24 

Est sotei NA Mon's sdes +1«7 
Mon's open rtf 18 407 tu <05 
3-MONTH STERLING (UFFE) 

ESKIMO -pa 01 100 PCI 
Jun 97 93J7 9135 93J7* 0X7110257 
SepOT 9121 93.1+ 9120 * 0X5108X68 
Decor 9105 9108 9104 > 0J» 96x13 
Mar OB 9193 92X6 91W* OJK 60+15 
Jun ?B 92JJ 917* 92X3*0X7 4+33+ 
Sep 98 97.76 97.69 92.76 + 0X7 31192 
D« 98 92.71 92X5 92.71 + 0X7 27X74 
Ent. safes: 70065. Prw.soles: 31.75+ 
Pm.openlrttJ 536.240 up 2970 
3-MONTH EUROMARK (UFFE) 

DMI mBDon-plsof 100 pet 
Jun 97 94X1 96X0 96X1*0X131+775 
Jut 97 N.T. N.T. 94.79 * 0X1 1^97 

Am) 97 N.T. N.T. 96.74*0X1 101 

Sep 97 90.75 96.72 96.75 * 0.03213X1$ 
Dec 97 96X4 9*X» 96 j 5++ 0.05230337 
Mar 98 WXJ 96+6 9653 * 007217.731 
Jun 98 9+3* 9+27 9+25 + 0X6151306 

Sep 98 9+15 9+06 901J+ 0X9130084 
Dec 98 95X9 95.00 9588 * 0X9 84033 
Est. sales. 151,711. Preu. sdes: 84X90 
Pie*, open Int- UT3J7X off i?5 
3- MONTH PIBOR 1 MATIF) 

FF5 million -pKal 100 pd 
Jun 97 9053 96+2 9052*0)3 6+58) 
Sep 97 96.48 9+40 9+47 *010 57.113 

Dec 97 9+48 9+40 9047 * 010 3+387 

Mar 9g 96u*l 9+3+ 9+4*000 27.799 
Jim 90 9030 9+24 96X0 * 0X8 7+42+ 
Sep 98 -7013 «+09 9+13 * 0X7 22,161 
Dec 98 95.94 95X8 95.93 + 0X6 15X15 
Mar 99 «X9 95 X* 95X9*006 13X30 
Jun 99 95X5 90+3 95X6 * 0X6 7JB3 
Est. Sdes. 120571 Open hit.: 279X28 off 
SX« 


ES. soles NA Mon's, ides 48AU 
Man's (man Dt I94XS2 aft 1013 
UMJEAOED GASOUNE (NMER) 

CAM «d. <cm per gal 
Jul 97 *105 *1.15 61X0 -149 4+2*8 
Auo97 *190 4625 4040 -137 17X33 
Seo97 6 iX$ 940 99X0 —1X7 5x58 

Gel 97 59.10 58.00 5BJ0 —1.12 XI91 

Nou97 SUM 5738 57AS -0.97 1,735 

Dec 97 i» 00 57 JO 57 JO -09* 1998 

Ev. series NA Mon's, ides lint 
Mon's anon W 77X41 off 584 
GASOIL (IPE) 

UX. (Jdtara permdrtc tan -tots ot 100 tens 
Jun 97 17150 169JS 170X0 —4X0 1+747 
Jul 97 175L2S 171X0 171X0 -3JS U74+ 
Aug 97 176X0 17350 17350 —3X0 +504 
Sep 97 17000 175.75 175J5 -125 5X15 
Oct 97 IBOjOO 178X0 176X0 -3X0 +821 
New 97 18150 179.75 17950 -2.75 2X46 
rw 97 182 SO 180.25 1B05Q - 2 X 0 7X38 
ESI. soles: 17X95. Open Wj *0476 up 917 
BRENT OIL OPE) 

U5. dodam per banal- lots anxoobanvta 
Jut) 97 19.® 1088 1090 -062 50340 

Aug 97 1959 19JB 19.06 -053 4+454 

SeD97 19X9 19.19 19.19 -049 12X96 

Od97 19.72 19.28 19-TX -0+6 0827 

Nor?/ 19.72 19JS 19X8 -0.42 +177 

Dec?7 19.68 19X8 19X0 -036 11.947 

Jam 19.48 19X3 1954 -034 0291 

Feb?8 19.38 19X8 19.17 -037 +640 

Est. sales: 56X00 Open Inhl59.913aft 1.765 


Slock Indexes 

SAP COMP. INDEX (CMER) 

500 ■ non 

Jim 97 bu® 841.78 MJO *2X0163X21 
See 97 84209 65 1 JO 85850 *165 30JI7 
DOC 97 849 J9 84188 86030 *415 3*8 
EU sates N.A. Man’s, soles <8.4(8 
Mm's open ml 198JP gtf 2534 
CAC 40 (MATIF) 

FF200 per Index pqlttt 

Jun 97 261 7X 2585.0 2404X + 33X +0527 
Jut 97 26075 25800 2802X * 325 1674 
Sep 97 2*240 2607.0 2617X t 34X 1+958 
Eat. sde» 21^50 Open hit. 69593 oft 
1X4+ 

FTSE 108 (UFFE) 


Jun 97^ +571.?^7X 45510 + IX 67X37 
Sen 97 4595.0 45*45 4585X * 25 9.929 
Dec 97 K.T K.T 4636X * 3A 733 


Ed. nles: 17X50 Pie*, sates 20383 
Prair.Qoen krt- 78X99 us 2.7S5 


Commodity Indexes 

Close PratMos 
Moody's 1X0620 I.W7X0 

Reuters 2.007 KJ ’ 2X09/40 

DJ. Futures 1615+ 16055 

CRB 24044 2407+ 

Santa- MUM. Associated Prcs& London 
InTl Financial Futures ErcAange lari 
Prtmkvm F nnenof 


Blue Chips Rise, but Tech Shares Slip 


aJ»>* 


EurrnM 


■v - i- «*+**-» 


CimoMbrOur Sbtf Fnm DupsrOn 

NEW YORK — Blue-chip shares 
rose slightly Tuesday as routs in tech- 
nology and tobacco shares overshad- 
owed a rally in oil issues. 

Computer, semiconductor and soft- 
ware issues slid after the disk-drive maker 
Seagate Technology and die telecom- 
munications equipment maker Cabletron 
Systems warned of disappointing sales. 

Philip Morris, down w at 4214, led 
tobacco shares lower after Newt Gin- 
grich, speaker of the U.S. House of Rep- 
resentatives, said there was no better 
than a l-in-3 chance of congressional 
approval of any settlement of smoking- 
related lawsuits. - 

Chevron rose 1% to 71^ and other 
energy issues advanced, furthering a 
seven-week rally that has sent many of 
the stocks to records. Oil and gas de- 
mand is expected to expand this year as 
European economies recover and Asian 
markets grow. 

“The outlook for second-quarter 


gamings is very strong, and that’s at- 
tracting money to the sector.” said Kar- 
en Johnson, an analyst at Banc One 
Investment Advisors Corp. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was 
up 22.75 points at 7,312.15. Advancing 
issues outnumbered decliners on the New 
York Stock Exchange by a 7-to-5 ratio. 

The Nasdaq composite index, which 


U^, STOCKS 


is heavily weighted with computer-re- 
lated stocks, was down 19.88 points, or 
1 .4 percent, at 1 .384.91 . 

Cabletron slumped 1514 to 3014, and 
Seagate fel!3H to 38)4 in active trading 
on the New York Stock Exchange. In 
Nasdaq trading, meanwhile, Intel 
slumped 4 M to 145, and Cisco Systems 
was 3 1/16 lower at 64%. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index was 
off 0.88 points at 845.48. 

Bonds prices rose after a Federal Re- 
serve official and two economic reports 


suggested the U.S. economy was losing 
steam. The price of the benchmark 30- 
y ear Treasury bond rose 12/32 to % 30/ 
32, pushing its yield down to 6.87 per- 
cent from 6.90 percent Monday. 

Robert Pany, president of the San 
Francisco Federal Reserve Bank, said 
the economy was slowing from the fust 
quarter’s “rapid” annual growth rate of 
5.8 percent. ... 

Reports indicating sluggish retail 
sales as well as a drop of 0.1 percent in 
the Conference Board’s April index of 
leading economic indicators also 


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Ford rose % to 38 amid expectations 
that the automaker would post its biggest 
quarterly profit ever for the second 
quarter. 

“This is a market driven by earnings, 
and earnings are still growing,” said J. 
Thomas Madden, chief investment of- 
ficer for domestic equities at Federated 
Investors. “We’re still in a long-term 
bull market.” (Bloomberg, AP) 


..r.-*** -j; 

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■-.-v * 


German Gold Accord Fails to Fire Mark 


Irettrh t 


Bloomberg Nem 

NEW YORK — The dollar was little 
changed against the mark Tuesday after 
Germany’s government and central bank 
reached a compromise on valuing the 
country's gold and currency reserves. 

The government, bowing to Bundes- 
bank opposition, agreed to delay by a 
year its plan to reduce its deficit by 
revaluing the reserves at market prices. 

But the Deutsche mark did not get 
much of a boost from the deal because 
there were still plenty of doubts about 


The dollar was quoted in 4 P.M. trad- 
ing at 1.7278 DM, down from 1.7305 


DM on Monday, when the dollar gained 
1.3 percent against the German cur- 
rency. 


MFR Inc., a money management and 
consulting firm, said, “The probability 


fora broad and sloppy euro is increasing, 
and that is clearly bad for the mark.” 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


Europe's plan for a single currency, es- 
pecially after the Socialists won the 
French election Sunday, traders said. 


“People are not sure what to make out 
of the deal yet,” Ivar Bjomstad. head of 
foreign exchange at Den norske Bank, 
said. “With all the uncertainty about 
EMU,” he said, referring to plans for 
European monetary union, “owning dol- 
lars is the right thing to do, I believe.” 

Richard Koss. currency strategist at 


and that is clearly bad for the mark.” 

The dollar could rise to 1 .75 DM in the 
next two weeks, he said. As for the yen, 
“the U.S. and Japan are happy where it 
is and probably want it to stay there,” 
Mr. Koss said. 

Against other currencies, the dollar 
was quoted at 116.025 yen. off from 
i 16.650 yen, at 1.4376 Swiss francs, up 
from 1.4326 francs, and at 5.8255 
French francs, off from 5.8381 francs. 


"V". 

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The pound was quoted at Si. 6347, up 
slightly from $1.6345. 


AMEX 


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Taco Bell Chief to the Rescue at Blockbuster 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The tap 300 mas* odtve stores, 
up to It* dosing on WaB Street 
The Associated Press 


Stria mp Um Uriel. Oqe 


Alpine, an analyst with Josephthal. Lyon 
& Ross. said. ' ‘He's got to figure out how 
to use the power Blockbuster has/ ' 

Mr. Antioco is best known for his 
tenure at Circle K Corp.. the largest U.S. 
operator of company-owned conveni- 
ence stores. He led the company out of 
bankruptcy with a public offering at $16 
a share and sold it three years later to 
Tosco Corp. for $900 million, or $29 a 
share, in cash and stock. 

Mr. Redstone is hoping for similar 
growth in value at Blockbuster, the 
largest U.S. video chain. 


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U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


Most Actives 


Dow Jones 


Indus 7)6+51 7342-70 725328 7317.75 *22.75 

Irons J MM 2ms* 246+09 267043 -04 

U* 721-00 ~V1TJ 220JO 722J3 tU2 

Cooip 2267.15 2X7X5 226+63 2277.99 *331 


Standard & Poors. 


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IftOuStrtals 1003X9 9907+ 999X8 99+21 

Troup. 617X0 612X0 613.13- 617X7 

IMBtles 191+5 192.11 192X4 I92J2 

Flnatice 9SA5 9+26 UM 9S67 

SPS00 851X4 8+4+1 846X6 845X8 

SP 100 831.15 024X0 82094 82048 


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561+6 55+ H 56047 
« 5J9 400.50 404.07 
275-51 77294 27+10 

403.10 391.13 4014+ 


Nasdaq 


HIT* tM UM 

1397-4? 138+75 138+89 
11J7J2 1131-25 113187 
1491.92 1481.78 148512 
IS31-S3 1524.80 153DJU 
1RI0L5B 1797+0 IB IQ-00 
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1,000 Jobs 
To Go as 
Racal Net 
Plummets 


Bloomberg News 

LONDON — Racal Elec- 
tronics PLC said Tuesday it 
would cm 1,000 jobs, about 7 
percent of its woifc force, and 
consider selling businesses or 
merging them with rivals as it 
reported that second-half earn- 
ings fell by more than half. 

The defense and telecommu- 
nications company warned of 
the decline in April and said the 
trend would continue in the first 
half of the current business year, 
which began April 1. It attrib- 
uted the lower profit to falling 
military radio sales and the cost 
of revamping its data-products 
unit, which sells computer net- 
work systems. 

Racal softened the blow with 
a pledge to hire advisers to re- 
commend ways of reshaping 
the company. Sir Ernest Har- 
rison, 7 1 , the chairman, who has 
a history of selling or spinning 
off businesses in Iris 31 years at 
the helm, promised a reorgan- 
ization that would benefit 
shareholders before he retired. 

Pretax profit fell to £19.2 mil- 
lion <$31.4 million) in the six 
months ended March 31, ccan- 
pared with £40.3 million a year 
earlier. The weakest spot was 
the data-products unit, Racal's 
biggest in terms of sales. It was 
the centerpiece of Racal’s plan 
to wean itself from risky military 
contracts in favor of fast-grow- 
ing markets for products that are 
used to link coqxwate computers 
to each other and the Internet 

■ De-La Rue’s Profit Falls 

De La Rue PLC’s shares 
dropped 13 percent to close at 
421.5 pence after the British 
banknote and security printing 
company said dial second-half 
net profit fell 44 percent and 
that business would stay weak, 
Bloomberg News reported. 
Second-half net profit for the 
year ended March 31 fell to 
£34.4 million as margins eroded 
at its banknote business. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, W EDNESDAY. JUNE 4, 1997 

EUROPE 




Enron and ENEL Plan Italian Power Venture P 



estor’s Europe 


CoopIMttyOirSuffFnmiDbpaictn 

ROME — ENEL SpA, Italy’s 
state-owned electricity utility, and 
the Houston-based utility Enron 
Coip. said Tuesday they would form 
a 5 trillion lire ($2.94 billion) 
power-generating venture to take 
advantage of openings in Europe's 
electricity market 

Under a preliminary agreement 
ENEL will contribute the power 
plants, and Enron will pay to upgrade 
and expand the plants. The new com- 
pany will be capable of generating as 
much as 5,000 megawatts of power, 
ENEL executives said. 

Enron's move represents the 
latest move by U.S. utilities to se- 
cure positions as Europe’s electri- 
city market is deregulated. Last 
month, Southern Co. said it would 
buy a stake in Bewag AG, Berlin’s 
power utility. In recent years, U.S. 
utilities have bought seven British 
electricity distributors. 

With the exception of Britain, 
where big energy consumers can 
choose suppliers, and where 


homeowners will soon get the same 
opportunity, Europe’s major coun- 
tries are still dominated by a few 
large electricity monopolies. 

But that has started to change. All 
15 member nations of the European 
Union agreed last year to a timetable 
for competition, although it allows 
individual countries to drag their 
feet, analysts say. 

“This is an indication that Italy 
will be playing the game of lib- 
eralization,” said Andrew Stevie, an 
analyst at Daiwa Europe. 

Mr. Stone said the agreement 
would allow ENEL to modernize its 
power plants and offset its probable 
loss of market share when it was 
forced to compete with others as the 
Italian market opened up. 

The EU directive says that by Jon. 
1, 1999, large industrial companies 
that use more than 40 gigawatts of 
power an hour should be free to 
chose their suppliers. Such users ac- 
count for about 22 percent of the 
market. A year later, the market 
above 20 gigawatts per hour is to be 


opened, expanding the market seg- 
ment open for competition to 27 
percent. By 2003, the threshold 
drops' to nine gigawatts peT hour, 
taking in 33 percent of the market 

In Italy, power stations cost about 
1 billion lire for each megawatt of 
generation capacity. The agreement 
is the latest joint venture spear- 
headed by ENEL’s chairman. 
Franco Two, who vowed when he 
joined the company last June to find 
international partners in telecom- 
munications and power generation. 

‘ ‘Taio is trying to privatize parts of 
the company without going directly 
to the market, which in this political 
climate would be impossible,” said 
Antonello Di Mascio, an equity ana- 
lyst at Nusa Sim in Rome. “These 
accords are moves to liberalize the 
market in gradual bits.” 

In recent weeks, ENEL an- 
nounced plans to form a similar 
power-generation company with 
ENI SpA, the state energy company, 
that also will produce 5,000 mega- 
warts of energy — enough to supply 


the needs of about 5 million people 
— and is to be listed on the New 
York Stock Exchange. The ENEL 
accofo will give Enron another base 
for its European retail electricity 
business. The company is already 
active in Britain, where it has built 
power plants and trades electricity. 

ENEL, which stands for Ente 
Nazionaleper I’Energia Elettrica, is 
the largest utility in Western Europe 
after Eiectricite de France, with a 
capacity of about 60,000 megawatts 
of electricity. Although that ac- 
counts for more than 80 percent of 
Italy’s power, the country still im- 
ports electricity. ENEL, which re- 
cently announced a record profit of 
1.27 trillion lire for 1996, was due to 
be privatized by the end of the year, 
but the notation has been postponed, 
and no new timetable has been set. 

Some utility analysts say the 
company should be split into its 
production, distribution and trans- 
mission activities, but unions are 
fighting to keep it in one piece. 

( Bloomberg . Reuters) 


French Union Is Open to Telecom Share Sale 


Crtuptitd In Ow Sug Frail Dupatckc 

PARIS — As France Telecom 
awaits the new government’s de- 
cision on privatization, a pro-So- 
cialist union official said Tuesday 
that the sale of shares in the phone 
monopoly would not be “ incom- 
patible” with its role as a public- 
service operator. 

Speaking on a Bench radio pro- 
gram, Nicole Ncflat, g ene ral secretary 
of the pro- Socialist CFDT union said: 
“What is at stake is giving guarantees 
of being a performing company oa a 
French, European and international 
scale, and at the same time to guar- 
antee its mission of public service.” 


“The opening of capital, which is 
not to say 100 percent privatization, 
because the state will still be there, 
does not appear to me to be in- 
compatible — on condition the state 
wishes it so and watches over it — 
with true missions of quality of pub- 
lic service,” she said. 

The pro-Communist CGT union 
on Monday had called fora hah to the 
sale of shares in France Telecom. 

On Tuesday, Chair man Michel 
Bon said in a message to staff that 
the privatization of France Telecom 
officially had “been suspended.” 

“If the privatization were to begin 
on June 5 as planned, we needed the 


green light from die government 
Monday, Mr. Bon said. “We ob- 
viously did not receive the green 
li g ht, following the change of ma- 
jority.” He was alluding to the So- 
cially victory in recent elections. 

Meanwhile, Compagnie Generate 
des Eanx’s subsidiary Cegetel said 
Tuesday it would invest 5 billion 
francs ($860 million) over the next 
three years to extend networks and 
mount a challenge to France Tele- 
com in its bid to secure 20 percent of 
the French domestic market 

Phillipe Germood, managing di- 
rector, said Cegetel had 7 billion 
francs in cash and could lean on its 


Amstrad Climbs on Payout Plan for Investors 


Bloomberg Nctvx 

LONDON — Shares of Amstrad 
PLC rose after the maker of con- 
sumer electronics and computers 
said it would fold itself into Viglen. 
its personal-computer unit and re- 
turn at least £200 million ($327 mil- 
lion) to shareholders. 

For each Amstrad share, share- 
holders will get one Viglen Tech- 


nology share; a pro-rata share of 
Amstrad’s 69.7 percent stake in 
Betacom PLC, a consumer electron- 
ics company; 163 pence of loan 
notes exchangeable for cash, and a 
share of the proceeds from lawsuits 
against two disk-drive makers, Sea- 
gate Technology Inc. and Western 
Digital Corp. 

The proposal is the latest move by 


the Amstrad chairman. Alan Sugar, 
to refocus the company on its core 
business. 

Amstrad, which was first to bring 
low-cost personal computers to Brit- 
ish consumers in the 1980s, got into 
trouble by diversifying into a range of 
other electronics businesses, and in- 
vestor confidence returned only 
when die company started downsiz- 


ing this year. “It makes sense,” said 
Michael Styles, an analyst at Credit 
Lyonnais Laing. “There may be a 
little more to go on the share price — 
it depends on what you think Viglen 
is worth.” 

Amstrad shares rose 13J5 pence in 
late trading Tuesday to 277. The 
stock price has surged 90 percent 
since the beginning of the year. 



BEt*20 


Copenhagen Stock Wadwt 


811.99 807.48 +Q3ff 


2#K).77 , £269.31 +050 


3£2*74 3,605.62 +056 


577.13 575; 17 +054 



Source: Telekurs 


lnk*nuiii<nal HmU T rihuix- 


strong parent groups. Generate des 
Eaux has a total 44 percent stake in 
Cegetel, British Telecommunica- 
tions PLC has a 26 percent stake, 
SBC Communications Corp. has an 
indirect 15 percent and Mannes- 
mann AG a direct 15 percent. 

Mr. Germond said he expected 
Cegetel to be the only rival to France 
Telecom in January 1998. 

Bouygues Telecom, meanwhile, 
with its allies V EBA AG of Ger- 
many and STET of Italy and possibly 
Lyonnaise des Eaux. is expected to 
become France's third telecommu- 
nications operator, but the timing of 
the plans is not set. (AFX. Reuters ) 


Very brief ys 

• Anglo American Corp. of South Africa’s net profit for the 
year ended March 31 rose 62 percent, to 7.1 1 billion rand 
(51 .59 billion). The company, which posted 2. 1 billion rand in 
one-time gains from asset sales, said record diamond sales at 
its De Beers associate and growth in mining, finance and coal 
had bolstered its earnings. 

• Carlsberg AS, Denmark’s largest brewer, said first-half 
pretax profit rose 17 percent, to 870 million kroner ($132.2 
million), as investment income rose 60 percent, to 338 million 
kroner. Operating profit rose to 532 million kroner from 530 
million kroner, sales rose 8 percent, to 9.21 billion kroner. 

• French producer prices rose 0.3 percent in April from 
March and fell 1 .4 percent from a year earlier, evidence that 
companies were unable to raise prices amid weak demand. 

• Germany’s Cartel Office fined 14 electric-cable makers, 
including Siemens AG, two Alcatel Alsthom SA units and a 
subsidiary of ABB Asea Brown Boveri Ltd„ a total of 265 
million Deutsche marks ($153.9 million) for fixing prices. 

• Eastman Kodak Co. and Heidelberger Druckmaschinen 
AG of Germany plan to jointly develop ways to speed the 
transfer of information from the computer screen to the 
printing press. Terms were not disclosed. 

• The European Union's competition commissioner, Karel 
Van Miert, said Lyonnaise des Eaux SA's acquisition of 
Compagnie de Suez SA could proceed after Lyonnaise 
agreed to sell its Belgian waste- management businesses. 

• Vodafone Group PLC, a British cellular-phone service 
provider, said second-half pretax profit rose 7.5 percent, to 
£287 million, as its customer base rose to about4 million from 
3 million a year ago. 

• National Grid Group PLC, which runs Britain’s electricity 

network, said pretax profit rose 12 percent, to £591.4 million, 
in the year that ended March 31. as it cut costs and reduced 
losses in its telecommunications Unit. Bloomberg. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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Tuesday, June 3 

Prices in local currencies. 

Telekurs 

High Low Close Prrr. 


Amsterdam M***?*!- 9 ! 

ProtoOKWMa 

AflN-AMJW 34.40 3L70 34 JO 3U0 

Aegon 1+6.90 14340 145J3J 145 

Ahoitf 149 14630 147 JO 148J0 

AboMobel 75650 254J0 255J0 254.70 

Boon CO. 11850 11SJ80 118 11470 

3470 3440 3640 3670 
M0 9BJ0 99 JO 9840 
392 38750 38950 387 
OSM 192 >81 19QJ0 19070 192.10 

33.10 3170 3180 3190 
82 KLM 8150 8170 

46.10 64.90 4550 65.10 
6540 63» iSM 4140 

325 ma 32430 
Hoomiasaa 9098 96.90 9850 97J0 

HurfDaoriB 17150 16850 169 17050 

MG Caw 8770 85.90 1740 87.10 

5470 5540 56 56 

4050 40.10 4040 4OJ0 
69 7070 6870 
47 4770 47 JO 
304 301.00 30250 30150 
257 250 254 252 

PMOHQk 11370 11080 11370 110 

Parana 9340 92 9220 9190 

RambWHdg 19850 197 198 197 

Rotaco 176J0 173 173 17470 

Rodomeo il^l 40.70 41.10 61.10 

Rotoeo im.10 181 181 17150 

Rons* 11140 11140 11140 11080 

J*W8 Dutch 379 JO 375J0 37750 37740 

Uiunercn 37970 374JB 378 37770 

112 lOSJO 112 10080 
64 4150 4370 4190 
n*fin<w 23420 23220 23160 23160 


ASM-AMW 

Aegon 

AhOitf 

AboMobel 

Boon Co. 

BdjBtescW 

QMon 

DorthchePot 

DSM 

EMer 

FoAArmv 

Gehna 

C-Braceva 

H oo mu f tf 

HSrtw 

Hoogowasfaa 

HurfDootfB 

MG Gwp 

KU6 

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OaGdnkn 

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RtmdsWHdg 

Robeco 

Rodomco 

RoHoeo 

Raw* 

MS 

VendaUl 

VNU 

munnew 

Bangkok 

AW Mi Sue 

BotfokBiF 

tanCooeaif 

SoaCamBkF 

T arciOT g io 

ThaSa&F 

UtdCtm 

Bombay 

BaMAtM 

^c 0w “ 

AtaonaufTel 


177 

172 

172 

175 

220 

217 

212 

214 

26.75 

28 

2BJ0 

2X50 

320 

314 

316 

322 

532 

520 

524 

ns 

131 

T28 

178 

131 

3975 

» 

W 

» 

39 

37 JB 

VM 


112 

W9 

no 

112 


tatBktao 

Brussels 

ssar 



Frankfurt 


gw 

ST*** 


367 MUD 
US U40 
V 3 MM 
4U5 64J8 
5441 as 
1 7220 7TJ0 
4830 UJ4 

as *2 


SETUOsSUSt 
PavteK 54135 


SwattUalBUI 

ItatonrSTSlM 

905 88025 884 862 

12H 114250121250 111473 
43150 477 JS 42873 426 

93 92 92 91 JS 

49275 472 47750 43650 

29150 28550 287 28550 

310 30250 301J5 303.75 
32275 3U 31975 30675 
1875 ISTi 
408 3«9 


High 

QatedieBank 96J0 

OeulTdetora 38 JO 

DnsdMrBonk 6110 

Freseofa* 355 

RsstflhBMetf 14870 

Fried. KTupp 321 

Gehe 12550 

Hddefcglrrt 166 

Hwkripfd 9775 

HEW 485 

Hodtef 7130 

HoechsJ 6ftS 

Knrctatt 606 

Lnhineyer 7575 

i Mt 1225 

LuWbimi 2850 

MAM 508 

ManessKI) 72550 

MidaBge9eisctiaft3645 
MOro 181 

MunaiRuediR 4675 
Preussig 466 

RWE 7550 

SAPpM 319.10 

Schedno 17970 

SGL Carton 242 

Staera 96.13 

§<^yf.(AgQ 1510 

S wx U uflar 900 

Tby««n 4© 

Veto 9750 

VEW 520 

Vtoq 777 

VoSnogcn 114750 


Helsinki 

EiaoA 

HuttaaUl 

KemHn 

Kesko 

MertnA . 

MeiraS 

Mete5ataB 

Nesie 

NoWaA 

Orion-YMyniae 

(MoKuhomiA 

UPMKyimas 

Vbfend 


Hong Kong 

% 28J0 

Pucsfic n~ 


Bow 


QBnaUgM 4180 

b&L as 

FWPOCBC 1055 


BEL49M«c22iaj7 
PnriNK: 2269 J1 

16000 16075 16000 
6290 6310 6300 

9730 9820 9720 
. 3265 BOO 

14J00 14350 143S0 
179S 1820 I80S 

7770 7W0 7850 
3546 3570 3570 
6810 6660 6890 
3080 3105 3100 
5410 5750 5730 

14000 MBS 13975 
WOO 16900 14600 
12600 12650 12451 
4970 4990 4990 
Mitt 18150 191150 
3280 3305 33D 

21500 21625 2130 
IW5 OT5 ISm 
94150 94450 


Copenhagen a-JJggg 

BBar* 307 302 306 303 

aasi s & s>s 

392 3U 392 X 

638 419 425 630 

a 340348 33H62 337163 3JW0 

gSHUB 9 74X100 234765 236766 23S00G 

ftSJhdB KBD 1030 TOO JW0 

«UlU 703 695 700 J»J8 

****** m *s too m 

_: r m mmn m 

-DoDaka 27J4S 310 321 B1 

fflWa 366 3M 360 355 

frtataU * 367 362 366 3fl 


96.10 96J8 
3825 3BJS 
61J5 61 AS 
354 352 

146 16040 
318 320 

124S7 125 

160 161 
9675 97 

682 682 
7150 73J0 
67.90 66J4 
606 607 

75 75J0 
1216 1216 
2828 28J5 
33480 508 

722 72380 
3635 3644 
187 187-55 
4425 6475 
460 66150 
7470 7530 
317.20 318 

17330 179 JO 
25730 25830 
97 JO 98JJ3 
1510 1510 

890 900 

399 40030 
97.21 9735 
518 520 

773 775 

1138 1146 


PiMtae 388132 
30 4430 47 

02 223 224 

SO 5130 5170 
l50 77 74.90 

50 1730 17J0 
147 16730 148J0 
30 4130 41 JO 
135 13630 135 

145 346 34530 

50 211 209 

30 10330 104 

119 11940 12030 
L30 96 9330 


HM9 SMV 14768.17 
Prarioes: 1499099 

8.70 8J0 8.90 

2aQ5 28.15 2830 
1140 11A5 HAS 
7630 78 

2440 2640 
4130 4180 4160 
46 47 JO 45.90 
4130 42 4130 

9,95 1040 935 

1475 1430 lilD 
9130 9130 9125 
BJS BJS 9J0 
7125 7415 7675 
1170 1185 1190 
2870 29J25 2880 
T7JSJ 1745 1775 
438 4.15 475 

224 227 233 

64 6675 63S 
25.10 EJ0 2i95 
2270 2190 2185 
19A0 1970 1995 


OUHtaltatt 278 2.70 270 2.75 

Peart OrteaM 278 163 .270 270 

SHKPKp* 9875 *6 9575 9775 

Sun «Hdg* 536 MS 52S 525 

StMUHdCa 93S &J0 8.90 975 

ShChMPosJ 740 7.15 7.15 745 

SmmPocA 70 6630 <875 6975 

Wbaif Hdgs 3670 3540 36 3640 

WtatoST 1970 TWO 19X8 1970 



High 

LOW 

dose 

Prar. 


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LN 

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SA Breweries 

12875 

127 

177.75 

12675 

Vendarac Lxvts 

459 

447 

447 

445 

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49 

48.75 

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7.7 J 

271 

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55.75 

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7.97 

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21X33 

207 

2W 

205 

WSomaHdgs 

114 

117 

114 

112 

Tiger Ods 

7650 

76 

7650 

76 

tasetey 

470 

463 

465 

465 






WPP Group 

251 

243 

248 

244 


High Law Close Pro*. 


Kuala Lumpur c awtate iufj 

r Prwtooc 111797 

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Gotfnq 1330 1110. 1120 13 

Mol BanJdng 2730 3675 2730 *675 

MoilrrtlSWpF 6.10 595 6 590 

PefconosGcs 935 9J5 940 940 

Proto 1160 1190 1190 1140 

PiAUcBk 4.10 194 410 194 

tenons 3J4 161 370 186 

Resorts Wold 830 a.15 130 B.15 

RcahwosPM 2730 27 2775 2775 

875 US 
1110 1230 
1110 11J0 
21 2030 
. 9.15 M0 


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London 

AtayNoll 

ABeaDanecq 

AngSanlWHr 

a3oGto« 

Assoc Br Fflads 

BAA 

Bodays 

Boss 

BATlnd 

BanlrScnStod 

BlwOrde 

BOC Croup 

Boca 

BPfilnd 

BrttMrosg 

Brit Always 

BG 

Bril Land 
BriPefm 


16.10 16.10 
1320 13 

2730 1675 
6 530 

940 940 
1190 1140 
410 194 
370 186 
830 8.15 

2775 2775 
125 BJS 
1160 1240 
12 1190 
20.90 2030 
9.10 8.90 


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BritTefecom 

BTR 

Bunnah CSStnJ 
Burton Gp 
fnMfWlMto 
Cadbwy5dn* 
CarttoCaai 
Corral Unioa 


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HongLungpHr TSJ0 

970 

HeademLd 7675 
HKChtoCat U0S 
HKSecifc 2960 
HXTeWconn 1775 

tesr a 

HutobooWTi 6675 
HyiraDw 26 

JAnmBHdg 2190 
" IPS 19.90 


GmlAcddart 

G6C 

GKN 

G&bb WeUeoaw 
Granada Gp 
Grand Mat 
GRS 

GwemlsGp 

Gatoess 

GUS 

Hap 

HSBCWdg* 

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Jakarta 

M&D tan 

S Henan 

GHtogCcam 


PmtatfMl 

72SO 6790 »90 6700 

1975 1908 1950 2000 

1650 15TS 1600 1650 
U750 MfiS 10S75 TOW 

W, SS 

5500 5400 5500 5500 

7225 71JS 7225 7150 
10650 9850 9900 9800 
5730 56GB 3625 5700 
AOO 6C60 4TO 6075 


Legal Gaol Gq> 

UoydsTSBGp 

LaajVtatir 

MakiSpaneef 

«EPC 

MtrasrrABct 
Notional Grid 
Mcri Power 
NatWest 
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Oronga 

P80 

Pearson 

Pfltogtai 

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RoWrockCp 
Rani Grace 


Johannesburg 


RaownHdgt 

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RMCGnop 

RBBstaS 

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4670 
W5 5450 
7795 7U0 
4U0 MS 

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UUO M4jB W8 H6 
4875 49.15 49J0 4SJ0 

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BUS S3 S6J0 8195 


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Berio* I 

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29175 20930 
28075 70 

303 806 

18850 18650 
« 1595 
6150 4795 
25 2475 
M0 15730 
37 3740 
85 3110 
a 1995 
114 114 

SITS 5A3S 
3075 X.15 
3.W 213 
W30 STS 
349 346 

12525 12525 
1725 1675 
106 TO 

ns aw 

BUB 8775 
46 45.93 
<073 4075 
7150 7175 


Ssuatt 


Master 

rrtimifa — 

xavotn 

Sal Hie— 

ScotPowr 

Socodcar 

Scwn7»J 

SMTiaaspR 

Stbc 

Sa te Hapbaw 

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SdtaU 
Stem Eta: 


TaWAlyta 

T«ko 

TteMSWWtr 

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TIGnto 

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IM6NT 

UUAaaraoci 

UMNews 

UMUMBn 


Madrid 

Acerfmi 

ACESA 

Aguas Baadai 


FT-SET 00:4557 JO 
Pr*rio*v«42Ja 

076 B40 842 

416 415 433 

670 677 6J0 

612 613 618 

1.19 17D 1T0 

579 SJ6 532 
573 SJ0 407 

1170 1137 HJO 
732 775 738 
5J6 SJ9 546 
157 335 378 
405 406 415 

1009 1017 1077 

688 7J4 6J6 

377 133 139 

12.13 1270 1278 
684 697 693 

275 2.15 276 

590 696 599 

007 7J2 776 

535 536 667 

131 131 133 

611 429 438 

195 1.99 190 

1075 10J1 1043 
IJ1 1JZ 172 
490 494 5.10 

520 578 S41 

5.1 B 572 575 

665 671 671 

6.70 6.71 ‘ — 

ZS 3J6 ‘ _ 

434 450 466 

3.96 196 398 

1142 1131 1135 
SJ6 542 SM 

675 6A4 677 

131 131 138 

635 U9 875 

135 136 145 

1043 KL« W33 
1198 1204 1270 

535 663 835 

535 573 538 

272 273 277 

453 464 434 

166 S. 71 669 

676 627 644 

530 552 539 

1737 17.77 1W12 
601 8.17 612 

US 172 173 
JOi 7.16 689 

244 2J9 

8J3 683 9 

240 242 244 

421 487 415 

573 532 683 

179 173 1£8 

497 106 5M 

SJJfl 117 IM 
1346 1259 1348 
222 273 275 

5 605 613 
7JB 774 776 

7SSI 7.10 7JS 
2J6 207 2J5 

636 649 641 

7 772 7.13 

1,17 171 

630 637 632 

435 461 672 

5-90 4W 601 
6J8 642 636 

475 479 430 

BJ2 IU3 834 
370 374 m 

592 699 601 

278 279 2J3 

673 675 6J0 

273 173 296 

995 9.11 9.13 

136 139 W1 

671 SJ1 672 

1078 1079 1042 
4S 664 460 

145 148 335 

346 150 397 

1695 1695 17.16 
690 691 6J7 

336 337 375 

1SJ 1AI ~ 
778 7J1 
UJO 11.95 11J6 
947 930 930 

172 176 176 
1034 1066 1037 
730 736 735 

3J7 197 402 

670 675 633 

978 940 9. 

<3 48 6; 
339 13? 372 

^ -5 °\ 
IS IS % 
« ’S 

IS 695 6B9 


Bcnesfc 

Bfflitinlef 

Bco Centro Htap 

BcoPopter 

BajSanfimdBf 

C£PS* 

Conflnente 

tnaesa 

FECSA 

GasHolunfl 

rherdrola 

Ptycn 

Rapsal 

SwOonaEtec 

Tahocaleta 

TUstadca 

Unto r—im 

NAdBKCtoant 


Manila 

ApalaB 
Arala Lfflid 
BiiPMlplSl 
C6P Hares 
MnnSaEJaeA 
Metro Bank 
Pelran 
PO Bark 
PNLDngDW 
SonMJguelB 

SA PriSe Hdg 

Mexico 


BanccdB 

Cemex CPO 
CffraC 

EmpModecra 

GpoCm A1 

GpoFBanner 

Goo Fin tnbtfraa 

KrotbOartAie 

TaMsaCPO 

THMecL 


A 8 eon 2 nAsric 
Ben Csoun ftal 
Bco Ftdewaa 
BanfiRMUfl 
Benetton 
CiHSDttofcro 
Etfcaa 
ENI 

Rat 

Generai Asak 
IMI 
INA 
IWaas 
bset 

WfiSobancn 

MootoHoa 

Oflvert 

Parookd 

Pire# 

PAS 

RotoBaxa 
5 Potto Torino 
SM 

TetaKTi ItoSo 

TIM 


Montreal 

BaMeOCM 

CdrTtaA 

OSUfllA 

CTRriSTC 

G«n Metro 

Gt-WestUfas 

tagifO 

toestasGip 

Lotto* Cos 

Hot! Bk Canada 

Power Core 

fWW 

QuebrarB 

Rog«ComnB 

RaiOlSkCdB 


1836 1893 1616 1BJS 


Petal tata 55637 
Previous.- 667 JI 

4400 25500 26390 
1790 1800 1785 

5800 5830 5780 
7330 7500 7260 
0340 10S40 10300 
1490 1495 1490 
3730 26300 23400 
6410 6675 6630 
0790 31450 30990 
2680 12850 1 2280 
5000 5100 5040 
2710 2710 2750 
7510 7581 7550 
1030 11290 11090 
1250 1295 1250 

8630 28900 23630 
1715 1760 1725 
2480 2700 2900 

4120 4190 6150 

UJ5 1395 1385 
7350 7400 7370 

4155 4215 4170 
1270 1 285 1270 
2045 20a 2070 


PSE MBS 288278 
Preview 282172 

19.75 19 JO 19.75 20 

2175 2075 21 21 

143 158 151 143 

1075 950 10 W 

92J3 92 9230 92 

590 575 575 590 

7 JO 7.10 7 JO 770 

265 260 26230 265 

SQ5 795 795 305 

7930 78 7830 7830 

770 730 7.70 770 


MsUet325M6 
Pto toll mil 


43W 43 

2620 2670 
3140 35JS 
3690 3690 
1735 UVi 

m 26 vs 

3935 39J5 
2835 28.15 
1940 m 
1638 1615 
3235 31 JO 
3DW> a M 
3595 2570 
7.90 790 

6UD 9Pk 


JOk 4M 
2630 2620 

& a 

1730 17M 

2W 2840 
39 -S » 

XUS 2615 
)9J8 19325 
TAM 1630 
3230 VM 
30V> 30V6 
25J5 2 W 
790 795 
5995 59 JO 


HtaktoAH 
KreswAsa 
Nenfc Hyd» 
NonkaSagA 
N)>coned A ■■ 
Orkla Asa 
PteBGwGve 
SagaPeteA 


TlWBBO f Off 
StontaidAse 


Actor 

AGP 

AlrLkntoe 

AkredAWb 

Axa-UAP 

Banadre 

BIC 

BMP 

Camrl Plus 

CCTTEfclOf 

Casino 

CCF 

Cetotan 

ChrisfiooDta 

CLP-Dtodo Fran 

CredflAtfato 

Danone 

EH-Aquriolne 

EridartoBS 


Gen. Eon 

.Kown 

Le®Ttmd 

LOrt* 

LVMH 






PnrflxisA 

Pernod Rlcard 

Peugeot CS 

PtnauO-Print 

Pmnodes 

Renoidt 

Rrad 

Rh-POutencA 

Sanofl 

SctoKHW 

5EB 

SGSTMHXI 
Ste Generate 
Sodexho 
StGabaM 
Suez 

Sjmthetobo 
TtwrasonCSF 
Total B 
D*or 


Sao Paulo 


CAC41: 262449 
Previous: 140135 

796 

171 167.90 
903 
NO 621 
JO TAi JO in Att 
kS7 671 660 

886 880 
'30 23070 228.90 
773 997 973 

196 3910 3938 
165 272 264.90 

30 234J0 239 

01 650 618 

S3 898 890 

560 553 535 

LT. iff 1273 
195 901 8S4 

106 £19 600 

8S7 831 

9 890 
•05 610 620 
584 494 700 

176 389.90 37890 
153 755 770 

156 358 35670 

09 995 938 

141 2181 2168 

02 1440 1418 

565 S3 553 
JO 31940 313JO 
.10 35640 35690 
190 290 300 

156 565 577 

151 2470 2638 

W4 2067 1990 

124 12970 12650 
502 1560 1500 

30 18930 18730 
JO 499 JO 514 
70 298 28190 

J05 1050 1019 

.10 479 JO 687 
993 596 410 

550 2490 2733 

778 792 B01 

LSI 28770 28620 
— 686 696 

153 

124 535 537 

86 84J0 
Q5 34570 342 


48.10 ax, 
18J0 1730 
30.15 2935 
1272 1230 
3945 3935 
4680 6635 
173 170 

2730 2740 
27.90 2690 
11770 11620 
1600 1774 


MIRT4taMflCKl208JO 
Pirates: 1215801 

000 10790 1090S 10888 
Q40 335 3305 3300 
1450 4320 4450 4380 

225 1195 1204 1205 

BSD 23350 23750 23500 
555 2520 2555 2545 

040 7865 7920 8000 

P710 8550 6450 8S5 
1725 5630 5710 5650 

1350 2B900 28950 29200 
1950 14770 14820 14940 
390 2360 2380 
310 5240 5295 

4>0 7280 7290 7345 

B5Q 97S0 9784 9730 
069 1051 1057 1058 

7 JO 6B3 483 490JD 

!4E 2390 2445 105 
840 3775 3825 3770 

1360 13100 13170 13010 
«0 17100 17750 17050 
015 10640 10955 1Q630 
1620 0520 8600 8S20 
1680 6610 4655 4625 
1125 5010 5105 5000 


BmdescoPid 
Brahma PH 

Pfd 

PH 

Capet 
Eleiiabin* 
IteHBCaPH 
“SwvkJas 

PM 

PnOsfoLux 

Souza Cruz 
Telebrns PM 
Tetartg 
Tekrl 

JM 1 

UslBlmsPU 
CVRD PM 


Doom 

Daewoo Hoovr 
Hyundai Eng. 
Kb Motors 
KansBPwr 
Korea E*± Bk 
Korea Mod Tet 
LGSemfan 
Pohong Iron SI 
SamsoogDtor 
SsmsMsaEbc 
ShMatW 


Singapore 


OUWKHU7 
Pittas: 6«UB 

06 13330 136 136 

.173 W? 17130 169 

2680 2660 2660 3470 
2830 a 2UQ 28 
Wl 140 140 13? 

4470 44 66SD 46 

414 408 409 JO 411 

345 36230 365 364 

257 2S4 2SJ J57 

102 9S3D 101 99 

632 626 624 nta 

312 S04 312 303 

UO 144 14630 149 

139 la 139 13(30 
505 500 505 490 

47.10 46J0 4630 4730 


AdaftlC Brew 660 
CerrinsPoc 8J0 
Oy Dev» 1330 
CydeCortw 1450 
DotaFomH* 074 

.ten ltm 
DBSLmiT Sure. 
Fnaeritewe Tl3) 
HKLood* 264 
JartMaSKHi' 6J0 
JaMSMiegie* 372 
Knaei *35 

KeppdBreik 3to 
KmdFA 47B 
Lata .430 


OS Unto — ... 

Partway Hdg ^ 

SemmaDO 7^5 
SbgAkfo 

SUSf w. 

Sag Tech Hd 6to 

StogTdeaanm 2S 
TWLttBar* 3J8 
uu [ndustrtt 1-14 
UMOtaBhF 1530 
WlBgTMKdgs 432 
~fe05.dtta& 


Stockholm “p'taSSSS 


BedntoxB 
Ericsson B 
tames B 
Incenftre A 
birestor B 
MaDoB 
Hofdbmtei 
nvanVUriahn 
ScmcNkB 
Sant B 
SCAB 

S-E Banker) A 
StarocfioFiTs 
SiamskoB 
SKFB 

Spartxsiken A 
SxtstwwekA 
Ham A 
Sv Handles A 
Volvo B 


High Lew Odm Prev. 

459 456 4SA30 457 

279 JO 276 779 278 

260 25150 255 257 

696 690 693 494 

391 385 38730 385 

242 23830 23830 242 

24030 235 239 240 

274 268 27130 274 

20930 20330 207 20230 

22230 218 22T30 218 

14830 166 16730 1443) 

8330 B0 8330 B1 

271 26530 268 249 

319 300 31730 315 

177 16830 175 175 

15330 150 153 151 

190 190 190 190 

11530 11430 115 US 

217 21130 21530 21330 

217 214 27530 216 


5X00 4930 
6030 »J0 
14.10 1530 
51QJ0 501.00 
55800 55400 

535.00 527 JO 
357 30 352.040 
25400 26800 

158.00 15400 
3110 3470 
1075 10.15 

14930 14675 
17600 167.99 
1BO.O0 170J» 

367.00 34100 
36070 3600 

1.14 1.12 

2X90 2110 


sss 

22000 20900 22000 21200 
14000 14800 1*000 moo 
WOO 28000 3400 28SOO 
6660 6280 4600 6400 
4060m 399000 400000 408000 
38000 34000 37000 37000 
58000 57100 572 5 58000 
64000 45100 45800 45500 
46900 6S700 65800 66600 
11400 11000 11300 11000 


Sydney 

Amcor 

AHZBHofl 

BKP 

Boroi 

Brambles Ind. 
CBA 

CCAraafil 
Cotes Myer 
Corantcn 
CRA 
CSR 

Fosters Brew 
GoadmtHi Hd 
IClAustraOa 
Lend Lease 
MIMHrte 
Not AustBark 
Ned Mutual Hdg 
News Carp 
PadficDunbp 
Pioneer InK 
Pub Broadcast 
SIGeoroBank 
WMC 

WestpocBUng 
WoodSeP rt 
Wootaorths 


Taipei 

Catoy LHe Ins 


asssj^ 1 

FWBrmk 
FanooMPtoto 
htoa Non Bk 
Mt Cason BL 
Nan Yo Ptena 
Shin Kong Ufa 
Tohmi 

UHwScroElec 

UtdWsHCHn 


Tokyo 

A^l^onAIr 


AlOrdtertrarinXiO 
PntfWB 30570 


875 835 
974 9 

19.14 1BJ0 
471 407 

2170 2X49 
1X90 1X85 
1531 15.17 
676 615 
734 7J5 

2179 21.10 
487 475 

■Lib 239 
1.76 173 

T2J0 1110 
2630 2615 
1.95 130 

19.01 1869 

133 1-89 

531 585 

X82 372 

459 450 

7.19 7JB 
870 803 
832 814 

7J5 638 

1170 1030 
402 190 


845 875 
9.12 975 

1M7 19.15 
412 473 

2160 2X40 
1196 1336 
1530 15-35 
616 626 
7J9 736 

21.12 21 JS 
482 483 

244. 244 
174 1.74 

1114 1115 
2630 2675 
1.92 1.97 

1890 1888 
130 1.90 

5J6 509 

178 176 
435 435 

7JB 7.12 
811 802 
818 833 

692 7.12 
1035 11J6 
195 403 


Pirates: 206690 

35 630 640 

15 BJ0 815 
30 1140 1330 
40 1440 140 
n 073 074 
40 1890 1850 

& nil 

55 255 163 

75 680 685 

72 372 178 

X 6JS 65S 
?3 180 186 
» 476 472 

20 470 422 
20 1820 1840 
75 9J5 975 

» 7 690 

15 775 775 

50 1150 1270 
ID 770 770 

96 408 198 

54 158 239 

34 138 138 

n 1.13 1.13 

» 1530 1530 
14 426 4J4 


Asahi&or*. 

Ah*i Own 

AsnNGtes 

Bi Tokyo Mftsn 

Bk Yokohama 

BrW^stoe 

Canon 

ChubdEfcc 

OiugokuEJec 

Dal Nipp Print 

D*i 

DoMdiiKang 

Dahra Bank 

DmnWHtt 

DofwoSec 

DOI 

Deruo 

EmtJapajRy 

Ffatt 

frame 

fSBe* 

Fed Photo 


at 

juaT'”* sa iSaSsti 


HadtBunlBk 

HHodd 

Hondo Motor 

IBJ 

Ml 

BodjD 

Oo-Yokode 

JAL 

Japan Ttaoao 
Ju» 

Kojhn 

KrandEtoc 

tei 

terasoHHvy 

KDMSM 

wrtowppRy 

K&taBteuwy 

KtaSM 

Kondw 

Kuboto 

xssr* 

g* 

s® ? 


378 

363 

373 

363 

686 

IMA 

678 

HUl 

680 

482 

InU 

871 

lOJO 

■852 

16JO 

852 

1630 

865 

sn 

861 

870 

867 

1680 

1650 

1650 

1620 

1040 

1020 

1020 

1040 


The Trib Index wwMriwop.MN»yoAte 

Jan. t. 1992= 100 Laval Change % change year to dole 

% change 

World Index 166.23 ^<J.17 +0.10 +11/16 

Regional Indoxoa 

Asla/PacHic 124.81 -a30 -024 +1.12 

Europe 172.75 +0.99 +056 +7.17 

N. America 192.90 -0.02 -0.01 +19.14 

S America 156.81 -1.66 -1.05 +37.04 

Industrial Indexes 

Capital goods 202.20 -154 -0.76 +18 JO 

Consumer goods 186.80 +1.07 +058 +15.72 

Energy 197J8 +024 +0.12 +15.56 

Finance 123J1 +0.02 +0-02 +6.31 

Miscellaneous 169J3 -0.15 -009 +4.61 

Raw Materials 181.70 -0.08 -0.04 +3.60 

Sen** 157J7 +0.13 +0.00 +14.97 

Ufflies 143.61 +0.69 +0.48 +0.10 

The International Hamid Tribune Workt Stock Max O tracks the U.S. doltor vetoes at 
290 kBwnaatonsft' kwwtate stocks from 25 countries. For mom Information, a free 
hooter Is amfiote by writing to The TtibMax % t8l AmnmCMtlas Oa Gotta 
92S21 NauOyCedax, Franca. Compiled by Bloomberg Nam. 


Kgh 

Mitsui Fwtan 1540 

MIUul Trial 915 

Murata *Mg 4480 

NEC 1660 

Nftan 2090 

WkkoSjK 


Stock Market todac 825578 
Pirates: 0197 JB 

4850 146 146 14630 

11B 11650 117 11550 

69 6730 68 6850 

11850 116 117 11530 

30 2940 29 JO 2940 
1 1630 114 115 114 

74 72 7350 72 

116 113 11430 113 

67 65 66 65 

77 76 7630 76 

9150 8950 90 9050 

123-50 120 12430 119 

5630 5550 36 56 

7850 7730 7850 7730 
6730 6630 67 67 


Mttrri 225:2056816 
Prates: 20451 35 
1220 1230 1220 

753 755 765 

4360 4360 4420 

778 778 780 

668 676 669 

1150 1140 1160 

2040 2050 2060 

592 607 594 

24» 2700 1590 

3000 3000 3920 

2080 2090 2100 

2050 2050 2070 

2360 2440 2350 

770 770 794 

1330 1350 1420 

453 462 465 

1390 1430 1400 

893 900 883 

5320a 8860a 8820c 

2920 2960 2770 

5650a 5720a '5760a 
2310 2340 233) 

4150 4220 4150 

1550 1560 1550 

4740 4750 4710 

1450 1470 1450 

1100 1100 1120 

1260 1270 1270 

3530 3550 3580 

1430 1450 1460 

■US 145 in 

614 619 619 

6690 6730 6700 

500 SOD 507 

7040a 9060a 9070a 

3840 3870 4010 

669 679 678 

TOO 2260 2250 

1570 1590 1580 

510 511 516 

3S1 356 347 

701 702 705 

1170 1200 1170 

325 228 226 

55 890 887 

562 565 565 

8400 8510 8370 

2050 2050 2060 

TO 386 391 

4» SOI 507 

2160 2170 21 Oa 

3630 3710 300 

3220 2230 2230 

1310 1320 1320 


Nippon Steel 
N Isa*! Motor 
NKK 

Hamm Sec 
NTT 1090b 

NTT Data 4470b 

OJ Paper 
Osaka Gas 
Ricoh 

Rohm _ 11900 

Safcura Bk 
Sank)® 

Samoa Bank 
SraiyoEtec 
Secant 
SeftuRwy 

SeUsuICnen 

SeUsul House 1200 

Sevan-Eleven 8470 

Sharp 1550 

ShftakuElPwr i960 

Sh total — 

SWrv+teCh 
Shfcekto 

SttaokaBfc 
Softbank 
Sony 10100 

Sumitomo 1070 

Sumitomo Bk 1700 

Suastt Cheat 5M 

SunaomoEtoc 1870 

SuraCMeW 
SumS Trust i, w 

TafehoPharm 3110 

TakedaOna 3070 

TDK 9100 

TahoUiEIPwr 2050 


Totai Bank 1010 

Tokio Marine 1430 

Tokyo El Pwr 2290 

Tokyo Elec&on 5850 

SSS. “ 

Totten 

Toppnn Print 
Torwiad 
Tostata 
Tostan 

Toyo Trust 

Toyota Motor 3470 

Yranaoudd 3020 

vxmiKJtMoo 


law data 
1480 1520 
0B9 910 

4550 4550 

1640 1650 

2030 2050 

707 710 

9000 9150 
908 912 

600 600 
345 347 

792 BOO 
245 250 

1370 1370 

1060b 1070b 
44006 4410b 

SB m 

307 309 

1540 1550 

11800 11900 
726 730 

3730 3740 

1480 1490 

498 499 

B2M 8320 
5970 6050 

1220 1240 

1190 1200 

B430 8470 

1530 1530 

1950 I960 

700 702 

2940 2960 
1720 1730 

1150 1160 

7680 7960 
9940 10100 
1040 1050 

1670 1690 

493 <99 

1840 1850 

J12 316 

1070 1070 

2990 3060 

3020 3020 

9010 9058 
2030 2030 
97B 990 

1400 1430 

2270 2280 
5710 5710 
310 313 

676 689 

1440 1460 
1630 1650 

799 

720 727 

889 809 

3420 3430 
1930 2970 


Moore 

NewMdflB Net 

Noranfalrc 

Norcen Energy 
Nthan Telecom 


jggr 

Rogw^'SntdB 

EP* 

Tdlsman Eny 

Trek B 

Tttefltebe 

Ttow 

Tbomsari 

T arPom B ank 

TromaBa 

TranxCdaPIpe 

Trimark FW 

TitecHdn 

TVX Goto 

WesKnostEny 

Wadon 


Vienna 


CradttmjtPW 

EA-GeneraO 

EVN 

FkigtK*4l vfiat 

OesfEteSMz 

VASHM 

VATedi 

WteoabergBau 


High Low i 
J» 3040 
57 54K 

30J85 3H5S 
3345 3110 
1181* 117H 
1135 111* 

26M 26 V. 

291* 291* 

24.10 2335 

24.10 2X65 

1430 1414 

1121* 110.05 
4335 42M 

3640 36 

25-90 25 

56J5 55 

5714 5675 
3K* 34.15 
46J0 45-10 
30M 30» 

42M 421* 

2470 2414 

321* 3130 
42J5 41 JO 
16.05 151* 

27/40 27 

MW 54J5 

30.10 2930 

835 81* 

2SJ0 2505 
92 87 


ATXtataC 129882 
PmtettlSSUS 

94* 71X20 946 722 

495 488.10 49110 49430 

3040 2951 3048 3050 

1775 1711171245 1725 

53115 517J5 518 521 

16131560.10 1583 1589 
869 B53J5 867 86125 

S993B 5S0 SSI 561 

21« 2111211930 2135 
2507 2476 2476247730 


Wellington ro srahtec gwxi 

9 PmnoOK2356JB 


AkNZaaUB 479 477 477 479 

Brterty tori 1JS 1J4 1J4 1JS 

Carter Hoff anf 138 342 348 348 

FMdrChBUg 406 435 4J6 405 
FMcflOlEny 490 464 <U5 435 
FteWOlFerel 1J4 1.90 1J3 Ui 

FMdtt3lPnp*r 3J7 131 3J6 3J6 

UanNabzi 170 333 333 188 

TdecomNl 7 JO 6.91 675 497 


UanKaBni 

TdecomNl 


Toronto 

AbUblCon. 

VS2&* 

AiMtewi Eivl 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Nan Seta 
BentefcGokt 
BCE 
BCTatefflOfn 
BtocfteaPtw* 
BantederB 
BmainA 
Caroeai 
QBC 

CdnftatlRol 
CdnNatltos 
Cdn Date Pet 
Cdn Pacific 
Comtoco 
D«faxa 
Dcariar 
DanabuoA 
DoPontCda A 
Edpcr Group 
EuraHevMnp 
FabfnFM 
Rtaabta. 
Fletehcf Q&A 
Franca Nevada 
.Guff Cdg Has 


f- M 


Lnewai Group 
MoanlBU 
Magna MIA 


TS5 Itastrita 6428J3 
Pirataat;MB4J8 

2560 2495 25 25.10 

33JD 3135 3155 3130 
4935 4916 4935 49M 
IBM 1735 18.15 18 

S3* S3 5135 SS* 
5870 5770 58A5 5730 
3415 3346 3BJ5 3410 
3870 3770 37M 3770 
31 JO 3IJD 311* 311* 

34 34 34 3M 

29 28* 2195 2195 
3185 3455 34M 3480 
56 53H 5170 54.10 
3110 33H 33JB5 3180 
5816 57 JO 58.10 57.95 
36M 35K 35J0 361* 
3170 3140 3130 3145 
3735 3670 3740 361* 
3870 38* 38.90 3870 
3630 2670 3645 2570 
UJO TUB UJO 11.10 
30Ki 2W* 3M »10 
3340 321* 33 32H 

2330 22V! 2170 2X80 

4Ut- 40L60 41V, 4019 

340 3J9N 339Vi 340 

M5 B» » BJS 
23V) 2115 2216 23H 

7190 72 7270 7190 

12» 176 1240 1240 

6930 67.90 49 66.15 

4414 4440 4440 

rim S3 m jnta 

1UQ 1X55 1X66 1B3S 
43 4SJ0 4690 46 

2045 20 20J0 3M 

7« 7330 7160 7430 
1295 121* 121* 1270 


Wlsor Horton njo iiJ7 UJO lljs 


Zurich 

Sr b 

w* 

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CYTERISATIQNAL HERALD T RIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 1997 W 

ASIA/PACIFIC ^ 

Chinese Quest: ‘Fun Places’ 

Department Store From Mao’s Era Rushes to Keep Up 




PAGE i: 


Rreun Ra&KO/Rrmn 


Struggling to Keep Land Developers Away 

A Filipino Catholic nun protesting Tuesday against plans by Fil-Estate 
Properties Inc. to convert farmland south of Manila into golf courses. Separately, 
regulators denied Fiiinvest Land Inc. a permit to build a satellite city near Manila 
and fined the company 50,000 pesos (S 1 ,900) for violating environmental laws. 
Fiiinvest said it would appeal the decision, but its share price tumbled 8 percent 


Blii-ibny Am 

BEIJING — When Wang Xiaowei went shop- 
ping for a summer dress this week, she turned up 
her nose at the bronze bust of a model worker 
outside Beijing’s oldest department store and hur- 
ried up the street to a shop run by Galeries La- 
fayene of France. 

‘‘I like shopping in fun places." the 36-year-old 
Beijing resident said, fingering a pink linen dress 
that, at 1.200 yuan ($145). costs more than her 
monthly salary. 

The store she passed up. the 42-year-old 
Beijing Wangfujing Department Store! "is fa- 
mous. but it got left behind." she said. "Look at 
that bust of the model worker outside — how 
old- fashioned!" 

But that old-fashioned store, founded just six 
years after Mao Zedong led the Communists to 
victory in 1949, is at the heart of the most popular 
stock sale ever held in Hong Kong, audit is moving 
rapidly to ensure that it will not stay old-fashioned 
for long. 

Wangfujing is lining up American suppliers and 
hiring American consultants to help it shed its 
stodgy image. It hopes to team up with the likes of 
Gap Inc. and American fast-food chains to bring in 
shoppers, and it hopes to increase the number of its 
stores by 15 times within three years, using the 
S280 million raised by its parent company, Beijing 
Enterprises Ltd., last week. 

The company's target: families with monthly 
incomes of 1,500 yuan to 2.500 yuan ($180 to 
$300) who want to' do all their shopping in one 
place. Its aim: to be China's Sears. Roebuck & Co. 


or Wal-Mart Stores Inc. — only more profitable. 

The company has reason to move fast. In an 
economy growing at 15 percent a year, intense 
competition kept sales growth at just 0-8 percent 
last year ai Beijing Wangfujing Depanmem Store 
(Group) Co. 

"Being the oldest and most famous doesn't 
mean you're the most suited to consumers’ 
needs," said the general manager, Zheng Wanhe. 
"We’ve got to adjust." 

Wangfujing Department Store still bears hall- 
marks of state planning. Down its aisles of glass- 
framed counters, ladies* underwear is sold next to 
ping-pong paddles. Buy an item and you have to 
pay at a separate counter, where receipts are made 
in triplicate. 

"As you go through our Beijing store, remem- 
ber that is not our future, it’s our past,” said Todd 
Andersen, who left the consulting firm McKinsey 
& Co. to become the store's executive vice pres- 
ident of merchandising a month ago. 

Many investors are" willing to buy that — in- 
vestors applied for 1,000 times as many shares as 
Beijing Enterprises made available — although 
some warn that the plan is far from being a sure 
success. "I’m not that bullish.'* said Ann Shih. an 
analyst at Kleinwort Benson Securities (Asia) Ltd. 
“There are so many new stores in Beijing, and for 
people outside of its home city, it's just another 
new name." 

On the other hand, "China’* market, with 1.2 
billion people, is huge." Mr. Zheng said, "and 
with 4 trillion yuan in savings, people have real 
spending power.* 1 


Hashimoto Sets First Targets for Spending Cuts 


■.'’•fth/M Our iias From Do^h ba 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashi- 
moto took ihe government's first concrete step 
Tuesday toward reining in one of the world's 
highest fiscal deficits. 

Mr. Hashimoto. who last year called reducing 
the deficit his top priority, announced targets to 
curtail spending, some of them in areas such as 
public works, defense and social welfare that 
have been considered sacred cows. 

"I want the nation to understand that we have 
a responsibility to the next century’s generations 
to solve the fiscal deficit,” Mr. Hashimoto said 
after the cabinet approved the targets. 

The move came as economists warned that 
failure to cut the deficit would tax future growth. 
The deficit has swollen as the government has 
poured as much as 66 trillion yen ($567.74 bil- 


lion) into public-works projects since August 
1992 to stimulate growth, with limited success. 

Economists estimate that the deficit equals 6.4 
percent of gross domestic product, far surpassing 
the U.S. deficit of 1 .5 percent of GDP. Japan ‘s goal 
is to cut the deficit to 3 percent of GDP by 2005. 

Mr. Hashimoto’s plan calls for the government 
to trim next year’s general expenditures by 0.5 
percent, or 200 billion yen, from this year's 43.8 
trillion yen. Public-works spending is to be cut by 
more than 10 percent over the next three years, 
and social welfare spending is to be cut by 
reducing medical coverage. 

Japan also is to cut its midterm defense-spend- 
ing package of 25.15 trillion yen by 920 billion 
yen over the next three years. 

Assistance to developing countries is to fall by 
about 10 percent, its first decline in two decades. 


Indonesia and China are the biggest recipients of 
Japanese aid. 

Some economists said the plan did noi ad- 
equately address subsidies for farmers hit by the 
liberalization of Japan 's farm sector under global 
trade agreements, t Bloomberg. A FP. Reuters J 

■ Nomura Chief Confesses, Reports Say 

Hideo Sakamaki, the former Nomura Secu- 
rities Co. president, has confessed to authorizing 
subordinates to make 38 million yen ($327,000) 
in illegal payoffs to a racketeer. Japanese media 
reported, according to Bloomberg News. 

He made the confession during questioning by 
prosecutors, who arrested him Friday on suspicion 
of authorizing lower-ranking employees to pay 
money to Ryuichi Koike, a reputed sokaiya. dr 
corporate blackmailer, the reports said. 


. Seoul Panel Recommends Independent Central Bank 


Our Sub Fmh Dis/Uk hn 

SEOUL — A presidential commission re- 
commended Tuesday that South Korea free the 
control of monetary policy from political in- 
fluence by granting its central bank indepen- 
dence from the government. 

President Kim Young Sam declared his sup- 
port for the refoims. but analysts questioned 
whether he would have the authority to cany 
them through before his term ended in February. 
His influence has been limited by a string of 
corruption scandals, a series of financial failures 
among the country ’s largest corporations, and the 
slowest economic growth since 1993. 

The panel called’for the central bank governor 
to head the Bank of Korea’s policy-setting mon- 
etary board, a position now held by the finance 


minister. The move could result in more stable 
inflation, which has fluctuated greatly over the 
past few years, because it would lessen the pos- 
sibility of manipulating interest rates to promote 
economic growth our of political expediency. 

"A stronger central bank will make the econ- 
omy healthier by providing a stable and con- 
sistent monetary policy," said Lee Seung Ho, a 
fund manager at Daehan Investment Trust Co. 

The commission also proposed other steps that 
analysts said were intended to limit the Finance 
Ministry’s influence over the economy. 

The panel suggested creating a unified fi- 
nancial watchdog board to replace the three sep- 
arate bodies that currently oversee banks, se- 
curities houses and insurers. Those three groups 
now report to die Finance Ministry, which is 


expected to fight any efforts to rein in its power. 
The unified board should be under the direcr 
control of the prime minister and the head of the 
board should have ministerial rank, the com- 
mission said. 

Mr. Kim ordered the cabinet to draft legis- 
lation based on the proposals and to submit it to 
the National .Assembly this month. 

But Lee Keunmo, head of research at ING 
Barings, said, "I'm wondering who will really 
listen when a lame-duck president orders reforms 
to be implemented." 

Lee In Hyung. research director at LG Eco- 
nomic Research Institute, said, "I doubt they will 
be implemented because the proposals have been 
prepared in haste by a lame-duck government." 

( Bloomberg , Reuters } 


MOVIES: Crisis for Czech Studio Land Sale 

Continued from Page 13 loans and venture capital dif- *| • 

ficult to raise in the Czech lc VllVOfl 1Y1 
Moravia has vowed to Republic, Mr. Marhoul -LT-U-AA^U. 1 U 
maintain the studios' opera- turned to a little-known pro- 

tions as the country's leading vinciaJ firm called First Silas |_l fvwwfY It g\nff 
film-production center. Investment Fund, which XXUJJfijL XVUI K 

Riit Mr Fnrmnn whn nu’iK Mnravin Steel Tn re- L' C/ 


Continued from Page 13 

Moravia has vowed to 
maintain the studios' opera- 
tions as the country’s leading 
film-production center. 

But Mr. Forman, who 
made- "The Fireman's Ball" 
and "Loves of a Blonde" at 
Bairandov before emigrating 
to America, questioned 
Moravia’s artistic creden- 
tials. "It** only a matter of 
time before they discover that 
film projection depends on 
having little holes all along 
the edge of a film and they 
entmsf film production to an 
expen on sieves." he said. 

He criticized Mr. Marhoul. 
however, for having put the 
studio in its tenuous position. 

"The business arrogance 
of Moravia Steel doesn't sur- 
prise me. but the naivete of 
those w ho allowed it to end up 
owning most of the shares 
does." he said. 

In fact, many Czechs say 
thar Mr. Marhoul has only 
himself to blame. 

Like many other budding 
Czech capitalists. Mr. Mar- 
boul , a graduate of the FAMU 
film school m Prague and a 
one-time rock band manager, 
had little experience in busi- 
ness when tie became chief 
executive of the studio in 
1990. His fast-talking, profit- 
motivated attitude raised the 
hackles of a sedate and com- 
fonaWe film industry that bad 
spent four decades of com- 
munism riding on govern- 
ment subsidies. 

Mr. Marhoul fired the di- 
rectors, producers, camera- ; 
men and technicians on Bar- 
randov's staff, encouraging 
them to come back to work as 
private contractors. 

.. The move may have saved 
Bairandov from collapse when 
state subsidies were cut, and it 
seemed to put Banandonr an 
track to profit. But Mr. Mar- 
hou! fell out with Mr Forman 
2 nd the. other Czech film in- 
dustry stats who had helped 
ban privatize the studios., and 
he was Wished out in 1994. 

He fought his way back, 
mounting a muIumiUtOu-dol- 
lar hostile takeover of Bar- 
hikJqv. Bui with both bank i 


loans and venture capital dif- 
ficult to raise in the Czech 
Republic, Mr. Marhoul 
turned to a little-known pro- 
vincial firm called First Silas 
Investment Fund, which 
owns Moravia Steel. In re- 
turn, Moravia wound op with 
SO percent of Bairandov. 

Mr. Marhoul says he does 
not know why his partners 
suddenly turned on him. 

Regardless of who is to 
blame. President Vaclav 
Havel suggested in one of his 
regular radio chats to the na- 
tion that without a film in- 
dustry. the Czech soul would 
be impoverished. 

"Does this mean it makes 
no difference to us whether 
films would be produced in 
the country, and whether we. 
once a great film power, 
would have our own studio 
with a respected name?" Mr. 
Havel asked. Some dungs, he 
said "should not be com- 
pletely left to the mercy of 
market interests.” 

Ladislav Verecky, a cul- 
tural critic and commentator 
at the newspaper Prague 
Mlada fronta Ones, said the 
episode was a useful lesson 
for the country as it embraced 
capitalism. 

“You should not be that 
confident in your owners’ al- 
truistic feelings," he said, 
"because art is not what they 
are actually primarily inter- 
ested in. It’s money that’s die 
first an here." 


G-wysZi-rf bt Our SujfFtun Dujvnkn 

HONG KONG — Hong 
Kong began its final land auc- 
tion before its return to 
Chinese rule in front of a 
muted audience Tuesday, but 
the prospective buyers’ re- 
serve eventually gave way to 
avid bidding, showing select- 
ive confidence in the property 
market, analysts said. 

Developers kept a stony si- 
lence for 15 minutes when the 
auctioneer asked for 5.2 bil- 
lion Hong Kong dollars 
($671.6 million) for a plot 
measuring 571.848 square 
feet (51,466 square meters I in 
the beach side area of Stanley. 

The site on the southern 
side of Hong Kong island w’as 
eventually sold io a consor- 
tium led by Paliburg Holdings 
Lid. for 5-5 billion dollars, 
below analysts’ predictions. 

There was more enthusiasm 
when the government opened 
bidding for a 79,675-square- 
foot waterfront site in Hung- 
hom on the Kowloon penin- 
sula at 3.8 billion dollars. 

Cheung Kong ( Holdings j 
Ltd. and Hutchison Wham- 
poa Ltd. snapped up the site 
for 6.06 billion dollars, above 
expectations. (Reuters. AFP) 


CURRENCY & CAPITAL 
MARKET SERVICES 


SOVEREIGN 
(FOREX) LTD. 

SWISS BROKERHOUSE 

n8. Rue du Rhflne. 

1204 Cenive 

24 HOURS FOREX DESK 

• Interbank Conditions 

• No Commission 

• Capital Return Guarantee 

• Higher Return on Investment 

• Daily Market Comment 

• Individual Credit Line 

• 20 Years Experience 

• Confidentiality Guaranteed 
According to Swiss Law 

Inquiries: 


Phone: ++ 41 12 14 6322 
Fax: ++ 41 41 728 0809 


Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrico 
del Rio Lempa (“CEL”) 

Autonomous Public Service Institution of 
The Republic of El Salvador 
Considering: 

I. That CEL Is the owner of the share capital of the following 
companies: Compania de Alumbrado Eltatrico de San 
Salvador, S.A. da C.V. (CAESS. S.A. de C.V.), Compania 
de Luz Eldctrica de Santa Ana, S. A. de C.V. (CLESA. SA. 
de C.V.), Distribuidora de Eiectiicidad del Sur, S.A. de 
C.V. (DELSUR. S.A. de C.V.), and Empresa Eldctrica del 
Oriente S.A. de C.V. (EEO S.A. de C.V.); 

II. That in accordance with Legislative Decree No. 1004, 
dated the seventeenth of April of 1997, and published in 
the Diario Ofidal No. 76, Volume 335, dated twenty-ninth 
of the same month and year, CEL is enabled to transfer 
the shares which represent the share capital of the 
above-mentioned companies; 

Therefore: 

In accordance with Article Three of Legislative Decree No.1004. 
We inform: 

That, following the third publication of this announcement will 
begin the process for the sale of shares that are the properly of 
CEL and which represent the share capital of Compania de 
Alumbrado Electrico de San Salvador, S.A. de C.V. (CAESS, 
S A. de C.V.), Compania de Luz Electrica de Santa Ana, S.A. 
de C.V. (CLESA, S A da C.V.), Distribuidora de Electricidad del 
Sur. S.A. de C.V. (DELSUR, S.A. de C.V.). and Empresa 
El6ctrica del Oriente S.A. de C.V. (EEO S A de C.V.); 

4th June, 1997, 

First Publication 


Cable Television, jnc&xfing:. 

Headend Products. Software, 

Transmission Products, Analogue 8 Dig ital 
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SMrtMfeMMa, me. * One Tectmotegy Partway, South 
Nonanes, GA 30092-2367 


FIDELITY GLOBAL SELECTION FUND 

Soci6i6 d’Invesrissement a Capilal Variable 
Kansallis House - Place de I'Etoile 
B.P. 2J74. L-102J Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B 27 223 

NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING 

Notice is hereby given that an Extraordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of Fidelity 
Global Selection Fund Sicav (ihe “Company") will be held at the registered office of the 
Company in Luxembourg on June 13. 1997 ai 1 1.00a.m. to consider the following agenda; 

1. To hear the report of the auditor to the liquidation. 

2- To approve the report of the liquidator and of the auditor 10 the liquidation. 

3. To grant discharge 10 the liquidator and to the auditor to the liquidation. 

4. To grant discharge to the Directors in offiee at the date of liquidation. 

5. To resolve the close of the liquidation of the Company. 

6. To resolve to keep the records and books of the Company for a time of 5 years at the 
regisiered office of the Companv. 

7. To note that proceeds which have nor been distributed will be transferred to the Caisse 
des Consignations to be held for the benefit of the persons entitled thereto. 

If you are not able to attend the above Extraordinary General Meeting, you are urged 
to execute and return a proxy to the registered office of the Company prior to the date 
of the meeting. Proxies can be obtained from the registered office of the Company. 


Fidelity 


Investments 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

16000 - 

15200 — 

14400 -} 

A— 

12800 — VJ - — 


Singapore Tolq 

Straits Times Nito 

: 2250 j4| — 22000 

2200 -- VL 21000 

2150 L ™ 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 


2050 

2000 


‘j"FM A M J 1950 J F M AM J l,UUU J FM A M J 
1996 1996 1996 

Index Tuesday Prev. % 1 

Close Close Change! 

Hang Seng •• 14,760.17 14,990.90 -1.54 J 

Straits Times 2^61^"” 2,06090 ' ^002 1 

Ali Ordinaries 5M>13.60 2.625.70 ^046 1 

Nikkei 225 20,563.16 20.451.85 To £4 1 

r Composite 1>12fc83 1,117.97 +6.79 1 

SET S5&57 563.35 -1.£ 0'| 

Composite index . 766.06 758.39 +i.0ij 

Stock Market Index 8^55.78 8,197.30 +0.71 1 

PS£ .. *802,7$ 2,820.72 -0.64 1 

Composite Index 698.40 699.73 -0 19 

NZSE-40 2,349.43 2.356.80 -0.31 

Sensitive Index 3JB38J5 ”3, 810.92 +0.73 

Intfnuii.'nj! mh».i. 


20000 - 

1»D0l 11 


Exchange Index 

Hong Kon g Hang Seng ■■ 

Singapore Straits Times 

Sydney All Ordinaries 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 


Tuesday 

Close 


Bangkok 
Seoul. . 
Taipei 
Bferula 
Jakarta 
Wellington 
Bombay 
Source: Telekurs 


SET 

Composite index 


India Proposes 
3-Year Plan for 
Rupee on Markets 

Ctwfifof M OnrSutfFnni Daput' hr, 

BOMBAY — India should make 
the rupee a fully convertible cur- 
rency in three years, a central bank 
advisory panel said Tuesday, but 
bankers and economists said the 
goal would be a difficult one. 

A committee appointed by the Re- 
serve Bank of India listed conditions 
that needed to be met before the 
rupee could be made convertible. 

They included an average infla- 
tion rate of 3 percent to 5 percent for 
the three years until 2000 and a 
reduction in the fiscal deficit to 3.5 
percent of gross domestic product 
by the 1999-2000 financial year. 

"These are very difficult numbers 
to achieve, going by our past record, ' ' 
Subir Biswas, senior treasurer at 
ABN- AMRO Bank, said. "It might 
lake more time than three years.'* 

Analysts pointed out that the In- 
dian inflation rate had averaged 6 
percent to 7 percent recently and had 
seldom fallen below 5 percent. 

Analysts nevertheless said they 
expected the central bank governor. 
C. Rangarajan, to follow the rec- 
ommendations. as he had picked the 
committee of five prominent econ- 
omists. Making the currency con- 
vertible would stimulate foreign in- 
vestment. make it easier for Indian 
companies to raise money for ex- 
pansion, the panel said. 

(Bloomberg. Reuters. AFP ) 


Very brief y: 

• Philippine Airlines reported a net loss of 1 .4 billion pesos 
($54 million) from January to March, the last quarter of it - 
fiscal year, compared with 1 .2 billion peso loss in the previous 
quarter. The carrier's revenue grew S percent from the pre- 
vious quarter to 7.9 billion pesos as expenses rose 9 percent !»• 
8.9 billion pesos. 

• Indonesia's merchandise trade surplus narrowed more than 
expected to S243.3 million in March, its lowest point in nine 
months. Separately. Indonesia's inflation rate accelerated tu 
5.20 percent in May, compared with 5.05 percent in April, u 
government official said. 

• China International Trust & Investment Corp.. China's 
biggest investment company, plans to invest in Shanghai 
infrastructure projects, in part to raise the profile of its Hong 
Kong -listed unit. CIT1C Pacific Ltd. 

• The Thai government plans to announce a financial-aid 
package next week for the Alp ha tec Group, which has been 
unable to raise ftrnds to finish the country's first computer 
memory-chip production plant after its partnership with T exas 
Instruments Lqc. collapsed last month. 

■ The U.S. International Trade Commission ruled that 
Samsung Electronics Co. infringed two U.S. patents held by 
SanDjsk Corp., a maker of computer memory devices. The 
commission has banned the import into the United States of 
components containing Samsung's flash-memory chips. 

• Global One Inc. and Kobe Steel Ltd. plan to offer in- 
ternational phone services in Kobe on a test basis in the 
autumn, before the opening of Japan's international phone 
market. Global One is a venture berween France Telecom 
SA, Deutsche Telekom AG and Sprint Corp. 

• Hong Kong's Independent Commission Against Corrup- 
tion will have the word "independent" stripped from its title 

r r*L: * 1 tl . *1 j 


1 ivu »*uj uiv v<viu uiwv^viiuwiii iiL’iii 11^ 1111^ 

after Hong Kong returns to China on July 1 . The change drev 
fire from the panel’s new chairman, who said the terrirory 's 
anti-corruption squad must keep the word to show it will 
continue to fight graft without fear or favor. Mvmkve. Aft' 



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Advertisement international funds June 3, 1 997 

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QuDtatfM* aupptind by fund group* to Mleropal Pprii (toJ: 39-1 40 28 OS 09) service soonsored bv 

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PAGE 20 


World Roundup 


Bailey Apologizes 


ATHLETICS Donovan Bailey says 
he is sorry he “stooped so low" in 
mairing remarks about Michael 
Johnson after Bailey’s triumph over 
the American sprint star. 

Bailey, who received Sl.S mil- 
lion for winning the 130-meter 
showdown at the Sky Dome, called 
Johnson a “chicken'' and a “cow- 
aid’’ in TV interviews after Johnson 
pulled up with a leg injury. He also 
insinuated that Jo hns on was feign- 
ing injury. 

Donovan, the world 100-meter 
record-holder said he deeply re- 
gretted the way he reacted. “1 saw a 
couple of comments that I made on 
TV and I thought: ‘That’s not me. 
That's not right. 1 " 

Johnson's appearances in the 
U.S. and world championships are 
in jeopardy because of the injury, 
which was described as “a severe 
pull in his left quadricep.’’ (AP) 


A Slaney Challenge 


athletics — Mary Decker 
Slaney filed a complaint with the 
U.S. Olympic Committee, claiming 
the drug test that prompted her sus- 
pension was flawed and discrim- 
inates against women. The USOC, 
in turn, demanded that USA Track 
& Field, the sport's national gov- 
erning body, respond by Friday, 
either by scheduling a hearing or 
taking other action. (AP) 


Dortmund Chief Quits 


soccer Borussia Dortmund’s 
president, Gezd Niebanm, stunned 
the European Cup winners Tuesday 
by announcing that he planned to 
step down. Nlebaum, 4S, whose 
trophy-laden 1 1-year tenure has left 
him with hero status in this Ruhr 
Valley town, said he would not be 
seek re-election at the club’s annual 
meeting this Ml. He ascribed the 
move to the growing responsibilities 
of the president's Qosmon.(Reuters) 


Gualdi Sprints Home 


cycling Mirko Gualdi pre- 
vailed in a three-way sprint of un- 
heralded cyclists Tuesday to win 
the 17th stage of the Giro d'ltalia 
while Ivan Gotti finished in the 
main pack nearly six minutes be- 
hind and retained the pink jersey of 
the overall leader. (AP ) 


Us? Panic? Flyers Ask 


hockey During the NHL play- 
offs, radical change can be inter- 
preted as a sign of panic, especially 
when it occurs in the championship 
round. The Philadelphia Flyer 
coach, Teny Murray, mode a major 
move, saying he was switching 
goaltenders. Was he panicking in 
sending Ron Hextall to the bench in 
favor of Garth Snow after a loss to 
the Detroit Red Wings in the opener 
of the Stanley Cup finals. "I think 
every time we lose, we change the 
goalies,'* Hextall said, quickly 
adding that he was kidding. (NYT) 


Now IPs Nicklaus & Son 


golf Jack Nicklaus wilt make 
another piece of U.S. Open history 
next week. Never, until now . have a 
father and son qualified to play in 
the same Open, but Gary Nicklaus, 
28. has qualified for a spot in the 
tournament. (WPi 


lieralbj^^.Sribune 


Sports 




WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 


Defending Champions Trip Over Their Feet of Clay 

Graf and Kafelnikov Join List of Vanquished Seeds 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Hertlld Tribune 


PARIS — Every day another leader is 
deposed, the influence of money and 
traditions diminishing with each 
passing shot. Steffi Graf oat Yevgeni 
Kafelnikov out The two defending 
champions were replaced in the French 
Open quarterfinals Tuesday by a little 
South African and a pait-tune surfer 
from Brazil. 

The Brazilian. Gustavo Kuerten of 
Florianopolis, a beach town with a third- 
division soccer club and — much more 
famously now — the No. 66 tennis 
player in the world, won eight games in 
a row while coming back to upset No. 3 
Kafelnikov, 6-2, 5-7, 2-6, 6-0, 6-4. 
Kafelnikov was the last seed in the top 
half of the draw which began 10 days 
earlier with Pete Sampras, Thomas 
Muster and Alex Corretja. 

In their place are the semifinalists 


Kuerten and Filip Dewulf, a Belgian 
qualifier ranked No. 122 who still 
doesn’t quite get it. Asked how he was 
planning to spend his winnings, he said, 
will do the same as usual with the 


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Yevgeni Kafelnikov, who lost his quarterfi- 
nal match Tuesday to Gustavo Kuerten. 


money. I will buy compact disks." The 
only seed remaining is No. 16 Sergi 
Broguera of Spain, the 1993 and 1994 
champion who hasn't won a tournament 
in three years. B ruga era plays a Mo- 
roccan, Hicham Arazi, in a quarterfinal 
Wednesday. 

“It's really sad that all the top guys 
are losing in the early rounds, but that's 
what tennis is today,’ ' Kafelnikov said. 
“To be honest, when 1 won the third set, 
I felt like the thing is going to become 
much, much easier. But when he broke 
me, I realized, ‘God, what have I done?' 
I find it very hard to get back into the 
match.” lust two weeks ago, Dewulf 
wasn't sure he would be play- 
ing in the French Open. He 
advanced through three rounds 
of qualifying matches just to 
win a place in the 128-man 
field, with his 6-2, 6-7 (2-7), 6- 
4, 6-3 victory over No. 65 
Magnus Norman of Sweden, 
Dewulf became the first qual- 
ifier to reach a French Open 
semifinal in the Open era. The 
other two qualifiers to go as for 
in Grand Slam tournaments 
have been Bob Giltinan at the 
Australian Open in 1977 and 
John McEnroe, who made his 
breakthrough at Wimbledon 
the same year. Neither of them 
made it to the finaL 
The majority of the upsets 
have Men on the men's side, 
but none of them have been as 
weighty as the 6-1, 6-4 victory 
by No. 11 Amanda Coetzer of 
South Africa over No. 2 Graf. 
It was Grafs first quarterfinal 
loss at Roland Garros since 
1986. In the following year she 
began her run of five French 
Open titles, including the last 
two, and 21 Grand Slam titles 
rterfi- overall, which is second-best 
erten. of all time. This loss will drop 


Graf to No. 3 in the world rankings next 
week, the first time she has been out of 
the Top Two since March 1 987, 

The current No. 3, Monica Seles, will 
move tro a place after her 3-6, 6-2, 7-5 
quaztcmnai victory against her Amer- 
ican compatriot No. 12 Mary Joe 
Fernandez. Fernandez played dynam- 
ically until the penultimate game, when 
she was broken on the way to her 15th 
straight loss to Seles. Seles will face a 
semifinal against No. 1 Martina Hingis, 
who won her first Roland Garros 
quarterfinal by 6-2, 6-2 against No. 6 
Arantxa. Sanchez Vicario of Spain, the 
two-time former champion. 

The 5 foot 2 inch (1.57 meter) Co- 
etzer, who has won only four tourna- 
ments in her career, represents an ab- 
erration in Grafs career. Coetzer’s 
name doesn't fit in the jigsaw puzzle of 
Grafs great opponents. Only nine 
women haveever been able to win three 
or more matches against Graf; Coetzer 
has been able to do it in the last four and 
a half months, seizing on Grafs re- 



. , : t -, ; 


covery from a knee injury. In January 
Coetzer beat Graf, then No. 1, in the 
fourth round of the Australian Open, 
ending Grafs run of 45 victories in 
Grand Slam tournaments. Graf was then 
sidelined for three months. Three weeks 
ago she returned to face a 6-0, 6-1 
drubbing by Coetzer, the worst loss of 
Grafs career. 

Graf appeared to be stabilized the 
following week when she overcame Co- 
etzer at the preparatory tour event in 
Strasbourg. But it became obvious 
Tuesday that Graf, who will turn 28 
before Wimbledon, can't recover as 
quickly from injury as she used to. 

“1 was really nervous starting off the 
match, making a lot of mistakes, feeling 
very uncomfortable, unsure of all my 
shots,” Graf said. "It's just the state I’m 
in at the moment 1 don’t seem to have 
any self-confidence when 1 go out there. 
I need to have that playing against her. I 
know she’s not going to make mistakes. 
1 know it’s me who has to do the points. 
1 just don ’t seem to find the patience and 
the belief in my shots.” 

It was not a sluggish match. The 25- 
year-old Coetzer was at her consistent 
best from the beginning, chasing down 
everything and forcing Graf to come up 



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with shots she is not yet ready to per- 
form. Coetzer broke ahead 4-0 as Graf 
made 29 unforced errors in the opening 
set, a symptom of hemorrhage advanced 
by all of tiie deuces and rallies played 
underpressure. 

A rain delay gave Graf almost an hour 
to recover after falling behind by a 
break, 3-1 in the second set “Even 
during the break I did not find a positive 
attitude,” Graf said. She was altogether 
more patient, more exacting of herself, 
but even at her best she was no better 
than Coetzer's equal. In die final two 
games they broke each other, with Co- 
etzer winning her first match point as 
the result of a trio of forehand errors by 
Graf. 

Graf predicted that Coetzer would 


Why Players Cannot Serve Soccer and Mammon 


PARIS — Ronaldo, the Brazilian, is 
the most coveted goal scorer on earth. 
He is also the best paid soccer player of 
this or any other era. 

The two go together even in a team 
game because goals win matches and 
win championships. Why then has Ron- 
aldo gone AWOL when his dub, his 
principal paymaster, FC Barcelona, 
needs him most? 

The Spanish season is at its cres- 
cendo. Last Sunday, without Ronaldo, 
Barcelona lost, 2-1, at lowly Hercules 
while Real Madrid won, 5-0, against 
Extremadura — and so the 10-month 
marathon of league play lilted decis- 
ively toward Madrid. 

There are still two games to play, but 
Ronaldo will be unavailable. He will be 


European Soccer/U. ob Hughes 


playing for Brazil in a tournament in 
France that is effectively a rehearsal for 


is tiie world champion, yet it sells its 
colors, its heritage, its name to Nike. 
The American sportswear company is 
paying Brazil $200 million over 10 
years and Nike determines where and 
when Brazil performs. It demands tiie 
presence of Ronaldo, who is on the top 
rank of Nike sponsored sportsmen, 
along with Michael Jordan. Tiger 
Woods and Pete Sampras. 

In soccer, as in those other sports, we 
are discovering that Nike buys more 
than a logo on a shin. It manipulates, it 
influences, it coarsens the ethic of tiie 
paid player and the sport 

Soccer administrators in Europe are 


in his teens and surgery may not save 
him the next time. 

His agents are selling pieces of him. 
We hear almost on a daily basis that 
Intemazionaleof Milan is about to make 
him soccer's most expensive trade, a 
deal that amounts to $70 million in part 
for Barcelona, in larger part for Ron- 


their utmost to win any match? Why, in 
Hercules* case, would they not work to 
the limits of their ' skill and strength 
when they are in danger of losing their 
own place in the top division? 

The fact that Barcelona appears to be 
built singularly around the presence and 
the goals of one phenomenal player. 


U.S. Scores? 

Look Around 


By Jennifer Frey 

Washington Post Sen-ice 


Ronaldo, asks deep questions about the 
Catalan club’s team building. 


aldo, give or take the agent’s cut. 

I admire his wonderful ability to cake 
on men and score goals front all angles, 
all distances. I less admire the salesmen 
who move him around like some exotic 
butterfly, unable to settle and enjoy a 
sense of belonging. 

The latest rumor is that Josep Lluis 
Nunez, Barcelona's elected president, is 
begging Nike to intervene this time in 
the Catalan club’s favor. Nunez fears 
losing the goals of the playing god. He 
fears that even more after last Sunday. 

So the clothing company holds all me 
aces. It has moved into a vacuum where 
no rules were framed to anticipate remote 
control by firms with vested interest 

There are other, sinister influences ai 
work on the Spanish peninsula. Ac- 
cording to reports, the Hercules players 
who defeated Barcelona were each paid 
a $45,000 bonus — by Rea] Madrid. 
The inducement if it was indeed paid, 
would not be a first Ii would not be 
illegal. 


France that is effectively a rehearsal for 
the World Cup a year from now. 


waking up to die fact that it might lose 
control or its competitions — or at least 
the men who play in them. “It is a really 


The games Brazil are playing — 
against France, Italy and England — 
count for nothing. 

But no-one can give back Barcelona 
the points, or the almost certainly lost 


1997 Spanish League title. A week ago, 
Ronaldo was again playing for Brazil, 


Ronaldo was again playing for Brazil, 
this time in Oslo. Brazil was not too 
interested in the outcome; its players 
treated the match as an exhibition and 
surrendered. 4-2. to Norway. 

So why was Ronaldo posing in 
Scandinavia, instead of sweating for 
Barcelona? Because he is governed by 
Team Nike. 

That is what we should call Brazil. It 


dangerous situation when a private 
company takes control of a national 
team, or a national icon like Ronaldo,” 
admitted a UEFA spokesman Tuesday. 

That administrator doesn't know 
what can be done, or even whether it is 
desirable for UEFA or FIFA to attempt 
to step in between players, sponsors and 
officialdom. 

While we dither, Nike takes advan- 
tage. Ronaldo is flown on a regular 
monthly basis to Latin America and 
back, missing training at Ins club, miss- 
ing vital games, missing sleep. He is 
making a buck while he may, mindful 
perhaps that he had a serious knee injury 


Catalan club's team building. 

But if the opposition needs to be 
bribed by a third team to play its best, 
then sport surrenders the very principles 
on which it is founded. Once again, 
there is no statute that forbids the offer 
of inducements from anyone to make a 
team try their best 
It would be different if someone 
offered the money fora team to lose. But 
with such cash piles around, with such 
ruthless business practices entering the 

S sport, are we so sure that what took 
dace in Spain last week was entirely 
egal? 

From TV highlights, the Ex- 
tremadura defense and its goalie seemed 


sloppy, even negligent against the 
mighty Madrid. Someone of suspicious 
mind might wonder just how far Real 
Madrid's largesse extended that fateful 
Sunday of the season. 

Spoil, like Caesar's wife, has to be 
seen to be above suspicion. When soc- 
cer allows the moneyed hands of busi- 
ness to dictate its terms, it can only lose 
credibility. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. 


But it stinks. Why should profes- 
sional players respond to offers to run to 


PARIS — I want to know how 
many home runs Ken Griffey Jr. has 
bit for the Seattle Mariners. I want 
to know if the Baltimore Orioles are 
playing as well as they were when I 
came to the French Open for the 
beginning of what will be two 
months of U.S. sports deprivation. 

Desperate, 1 asked my new 
French friend, Jean-Louis, a local 
restaurant Owner. ‘ ‘Where can I get 
sports scores?” I asked timidly, 
after he gave me dinner one night 
Jean-Louis blew smoke in my 
face. “Sports?” he asked. “He 
waved his hand dismissively. 
“That is not important” 

I have been told that Griffey is 
universal, that sports practically 
rule the world these days. So I went 
in search of Philippe Bourn, the 
dean of French sports journalists. I 
asked Bourn what the hot sports 
topics are in his country. He men- 
tioned the French Open. He men- 
tioned the European Cup. 

“The NBA?” 1 squeaked, al- 
most afraid to mention tiie topic. 

“Ah, the NBA,” Bouin said. 
“For the kids, maybe, I think it 
might be important, but not for 
people my age.” 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 


BriKmora 
New Vert 
Toronto 
Detroit 
Boston 


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f.Uwaukee 
•Kansas Qty 
-WbCOflO 
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Radke. Ritchie [71 and StdnbotJs OXUver. 
Whiteside (0) and l.Renrtgucz. w— D. Oliver 
3-6. L— Radte4-5 HRs-Tc*1H. Nevraan [4], 
I Rodriguez (6). 

Toronto 000 000 OOD-O 2 0 

SM»o lfiO 001 10*— 3 2 o 

Andujor. Quamtia (71 and Santiago: 
RJohnsan and D. Alban. W— R. Johnson B- 
1 L— Angular 0-1 HRs— Seattle, Guffey Jr 
1251. 

Detroit Itfl 410 Dio-8 io 0 

OataaiM 030 oot 113-7 n o 

Mwrtitar, Soger (71. To Janos (S.r, M. Mycro 

Wi, BracaU C91 and Gawnm. Kandy. 

Jonnsan (5). Groom (61- Muhtar (91 ana 

Gg-WISOBB. ff-MocNcr. « L— Kosov, I- 
6. Sv— Broca? (2). HRs-Oata, Stain IS). 
McGwire (211. Del, D. Cruz uj, Hnmcim (41. 


31 24 SM 6 

29 25 537 TV t 


■Atlanta 37 18 573 - 

- Florida 33 22 593 4'.i 

•WMVwk 31 24 564 6 

-Montreal 29 25 537 Th 

■PIHIOdcIpKd 19 35 -352 176 

central avranN 

-Pahtajiflh 31 1! 4J1 - 

-Houston 37 20 482 ’i 

St Louis 24 3Q Mi r„ 

•Chicago 33 32 .410 4 

■CKKlnnafl 20 3S 464 7 

* WEST DtvwON 

1 San Francisco 31 23 574 — 

1 Colorado 31 24 564 %i 

*Lm Angela 27 27 500 4 

‘Son Diego 24 30 444 7 

! MONDAY'S UHUCOAIS 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

‘NwHYotK 3» m 111-5 H 0 

'Boston 001 100 000-2 B 1 

, Well MUM (HI M. Rhera S) and Poods 

,SMEilwhni(7loidHaKliimHaHetmgfl). 

, tt— L-«de.64.&t— M.RNW DO- 
.Chicago 110 000 033-4 14 0 

( MDwat*H 000 021 020-3 I I 

„• Alvarez, C. Coillllo [61. McElrov IB). SUMS 
Jfti, R. Htmandex {91 and y; arteries, Ram 
-IB): Kart. Patton (71. VDane [U, Do. Janos 
19} and Mathanv. tovts [9J. W-SHw 3-0. 
L— Do Jones 3-1 Sv-R. Hoflundw Oil. 


RATIONAL LEAGUE 

Ln» Angeles 000 M0 0»-0 4 0 

KMHtM 0U ON 20i-2 6 0 

Nome, Oswta 171 and Prince. Wall unto 
(8) and Auanus. VV— WaA2-2. L-Noma S-S. 
Sv— Lima fl). 

Pfflshwgh too 000 oot-2 » 0 

Chicago mo in io* —3 ? i 

Ueher. WaWnusc (7! ■ Prion (71 and 
Kendall- MufraSand, TAdntm (fl) and 
Houston. W— Mumoliand 5-L L-ucter 7-7, 
Sv—T Adams IB'. HRs— Chicago. B Biawn 
(21. Plttihuigti. E. Brawn (2J. 

San Dugo ON 020 000-5 10 I 

A nento 101 000 200 — e 10 0 

H .Murray, Tl.\VoiroO IT), Burrows IB), 
Hoffman (91 and Flaherty; G .Moddun, Clonti 
{It. Erabrec (9) end EiLPcrez, J Lopez [Si. 
W~R Manor. 1-0. L-G. Maadin. 6-2. 

Sv— Hnttmon (M 

San Francises 000 000 003—2 9 0 

Florida 000 230 00x-4 7 O 

GareieE. Arocha (6), Tovarez (X and 
Jcnwre A.Lrittf. Cook [61. Pus* ell 18). Hen 
(9; and L Johnson. W— A L&wr, 5-3. 
L— Gardner. 4-2. HR— FfcjrrJft Shefflrid (6). 
Montreal 010 301 303-10 13 0 

NMVarti 000 OBO 000-0 5 1 

CPersz end FloWien M.deiK Trtta* (7), 
Manuel ft) and Hundtay. W— C. Perez 5-4. 
L— M. dark 54. HRe— Montreal Fl e t ch er 
II BL H.Rodriauax lift. V. Guerrero ffi. 
Orevkik (11. 

Colorado 021 034 lOD-ll 12 0 

St. Louts 000 050 101—7 11 1 


Butter McCuny (6), M. Munoz (71 .S. Reed 
<83. Leskanic (9) and MomMilng.- 
DnJadtson, Beltran fa). Pettovoek (6), T. 

J Mathews raj, Faseas (91 and LampUn. 
W-auiM 1-1. L— OnJotfcsori M.HRs-SL 
Louts. Lankford (10). Cotorad* Burts (13), 
Gatanapa (151. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg. 
FThomaChW 53 IBS 44 72 389 

Justice Oe 49 167 X 64 .383 

WOarkTe* 42 149 26 56 576 

Cara Sea 52 191 33 49 .341 

I Rodriguez Tax 51 212 35 75 354 

Surhaff Bat 43 159 25 55 346 

GAndcuonAna 51 310 27 73 JJ43 

Roberts KC 47 167 20 57 341 

Ramirez Clo 43 157 22 52 531 

JuFranarCle 47 173 30 57 531 

RUNS— SoWRUorns, Now York. 4& Griffey 
Jr. Scam ■* 4 a- a, Rodriguez, Seattle. 47; F. 
Themes, Chicago 44r ToCksrt. Detroit a 
Knob lauds Minnesota ill Edmonds, 
Anaheim. 4& T. Martinez. New York, 40; 
Haiti ns. Anahalm. 40. 

RBi-GriHry Jr. Seem* 43; T. Marfan. 
New York. 57; TpCfcffc Detroit SCt F. 

T Homos, Chicago. 41 Bella Chicago. 47: 
McGwra Oakland. 4 ii Jusflte Cleveland, 
44 

HITS— I. Rodriguez. Tam 7St A. 
Rodriguez. Soothe. 74: G. Anderson 
Anartolm, 71- BeWMatm. New Yurt, 72 F. 
Thomas, Otiagn 7% T. Mattncz. New York. ■ 
40: Griffey Jr, Scoflte <tk E. Martinez, 
Seattle. 49. Cora, Seatila 69. 

DOUBLES— Spragua Taranto, IQ,- Q. 
Nell NerrYarii. ifc A. Rodriguez. Seattle. 1% 
BeWIIUorwL New Yorit l7:QambLDakland 
tfc Clrflla Mlhnukea 4 an fled wan 15. 

TRIPLES— Gflfddpona Boston, & Alcoa. 
Anatahn. * 11 oreHed whh 3, 

HOME RUNS— Griffey Jr, Seattle, 25.- 
MeGwtre, Oakland 21; T. Martinez, stew 
Yak, 2ft ToGorh Detroit 17) Justice. 
Owelnnd 16. M. Voughn. Beaton, 14: F. 
Thomas, Chicago, 13; Md. W Unarm. 
Cleveland 13. 

STOLEN BASEi-fl.LHunttt Detroit 27) 
Kmbfaudk HfanewtDi 77; Nixon. Torontd 
21; T. Goodwfat, Kansas CSy, 2ft Durtariv 
Chfcooo. 1 5; Burnttz. MBwouksa 13t VUqueL 
Cleveland 13. 

PITCHING O OrKhtaBj-CteiNW. 
Toronto. 1 (Wl 1500, 155; Key. Bohtmoro, 9-1. 
m 23ft Erickson, Brifltrerodl.flBR 2.9* 
R. ajotinsan. Satfte 8-1, 589, 24& 


Mussina, Baltimore, 7-1. Z75. 173; Wtt 
TexiB. 7-2, J7& 3L59; Didumv AnatKim. 6-2 
-75A3.78. 

STRIKEOUTS— RaJormson, Seattle, 105; 
Cano. New Yarik 97: Applet Kansas City, B1 
Oofnens, Toronto, Bft Ahnrez. Chicago. 6ft 
Henfgork Toronto, 6* Musstoa Balttmam 
66 . 

SAVES— RoMyere. BaMmore, 17) M. 
Rivera New Yarik 16; DoJonea Milwaukee, 
11- Wet-tekrnd Terns. 12 AguBera. 
Minnesota. 12 1 R- Haraandaz. CUcoga )1; 
Chorttofk Seatlte IQ. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS 

C AB R H Avg. 
LWaflwrCol 53 197 53 Bl 411 

GwyretSD S3 206 34 94 AM 

Bla user Alt M 171 11 03 303 

Lofton Alt 55 238 45 92 MS 

BaitffoFla 52 1M 22 67 342 

CdenagaCal 51 201 «9 08 338 

Seoul Mon 45 164 35 55 335 

H Rodriguez Man 53 301 33 67 J33 

OartrdNYM 53 196 39 65 .332 

Piazza LA SO 169 SB 56 33t 

RUNS— L. Walter, Cotoroto. 51 
Griorrogft Colorado, 49; Lofton, Atlanta 45; 
Bigflto. Houston. 41- Buria. CokmJda 4ft 
EcYouno, Cokrrada 39; Bagwed Houston 
39; OSenm Haw York. 39. 

RBI— Galarraga, Cotaimfft 5ft SagwelL 
Houston S3; L Writer, Cotoradn 4ft Kent 
5anFranascn4ftAhM,Fforidd4ftBktieftEi 
Catorodd 4ft Cwyrev Son Dteon 43. 

HITS— Gwyna San Okga B « Lofton 
Atlanta, B2; L Walker, Catorada 81; O. 
Sanders. CfndnnotL 72; Ec Young, Catorada 
6& Blosta Houston, 6ft Gtforraoa Colentto, 
68 . 

DOUBLES— Crudzi Hone k, Montreal. 21,- 
BanBa Florida 21; H. Rodriguez, Montreal 
19: Cfaytan, St Louis. 19i Bragna 
PWWdefpfild 17; Bagwefl, Hairston. 17) 
MorarWIrA PtHknMpfikk 17) L Writer. 
Catorada 17. 

TRIPLES— W. Guerrero. Las Anoete, & 
Wdraadk Pfttsboiglk ft 0. Sandora. 
Cbrdnnatl a De. Shields. 51. Louis, ft 
Tudm Attenta, 4: McRoa QUana * 1 1 om 
fled trim X 

HOME RUNS— Beoweft Houston >7) L. 
Walter, Caknda 1ft Galanaga. Cotonda 
ift cattfia, caknda tft SOM aifo«d 1ft 
Burks. Catorada ift Hundtay. New Yorit 12. 
STOLEN 8ASES-D, Sondefi, Clrtdnrtflll 

3Di womedt, Plft)buiolb2fl) Loftak Wantd 
17r Da SWekto, St. Louto. 1& Chyton, St. 


Loo te, tft McCrodun. Catorada 1ft 
Grudzielanek. Motoreal 1ft I- Walter. 
Catorada 1ft Dunstoa Chicago. 13. 

PITCHING (7 Deastaas)— P. JMamux 
Montreal 8-1. J89. 1 36t Margie, Atlanta. 7-1. 
■875. 345; B. JJonea New Yorik 9-2 m 
232; Estes. Son Fmndsca 7-2. .77ft 277; 
Kke. Houston 6-2 .75ft 214; Gardner, San 
Fmndsca 6-2 75ft 251; G. Maddux. 
Atlanta, 6-2 -75ft 1.9B. 

STRIKEOUTS— Schilling, PhftnddpNa 
9ft Noma. Las Angeiea Bft A. IBenea St 
L“fft 82; K. JBrowa Florida BU P. 
J Marll naz. Montreal 7ft Reynold*. Houston, 
71; S ta tllemynk St. Uxris. 69. 

saves — B« h, son Franrisca l» Nm 
Florida 1* ToWotttHL Los Angeles. 14; 
JoFranco. New Yorik 14: BMtaQca 
PtiHadelpMd 12; Wohlers. Atlanta. 1ft 
Ecteraley,StLi»fs.ll. 


VertpwnUlLAinareandVIkB 6. Brofl naro.lt. 
BalBu 7. Gasperard It. Scrigna; ft Faresla It, 
Mapri all si; 9. Ffrwssa tf» RosMary at 40 >z 
10. Dtavankui, Rua, Roetotto iai. 

0VBwiLil.GattUt.Saeat7Bh.27 m.23 
sj 2 Tonkev, Bus- Mope! at 51 sz 3. Leblanc 
Fr. Prill 3rtQr A Shafer, Kazak. Asks 3H0; 5. 
Mlceft H.AW4flft6.Girertri, It. Poffid:i7) 7. 
dl Grande. It. Mapel 756 1 ft BeUl It. Bces- 
dnlat 8:17. 9. Meretak Brig. Pottt 9-JOi 1ft 
Gontdno Ukr. AKI l(h2&. 


U5. 7.12; 11 . Fred couptua uj.6,74-12 Brad 

Fawnv UJ. 6.7ft u Nick Faltkv Britain, 6.7ft 

14. Scott Hodv U& 647; 15. Davis LovaUX. 
5ft* 16. Bernhard Longer, Gentwty, SJOs 17. 
Jeaper PamovOk Sweden, 576: l& Steve 
Jana 57S 19. Ian Woasnam. Britain, 54ft 
20. VIJay Slngtk FIJI 57ft 


SOCCER 


■IAWWE8E LE4UaU£S 

eWTULUUUNM 


Yoxult 

Hlreehfana 

Oiunichl 

Honshln 

Yokohama 

Yairiun 


w 

L 

T 

Pd. 

GB 

a 

19 


-5H 

_ 

25 

20 



556 

2JD 

23 

23 

— 

.500 

4.5 

33 

24 

— 

4W 

54) 

M 

23 

— 

465 

6J0 

18 

a 

— 

391 

9J 


II.WIHII IDMIU 

Yakulti Yomluril 
Hiroshima ft HansWn Q 
Yokohama 9, ChunkJiD 

MCtneuMOi 


w 

L 

T 

Pd. 

GB 

38 

IB 

— 

m 



22 

18 

— 

ssa 

3J) 

24 

24 


JflO 

541 

Ham 23 

24 


489 

5.5 

n 

1A 

1 

435 

741 

u 18 

27 

1 

4W 

9j 

WHMrsnmff 



'i raimvou m 

Oriel Lotte2 
■ Nlpgon Horn 1 Dakri 3 


CYCLING 


Girod'Italia 


Leering ptadnge in ZOOJan 17h mmh of 
Are Vra (TteHa from DaUrint to Varofie: 

1. GuaidUL Pritt 4 h. 27 m. 4T « j 2. Pout, 
It. Cantina Toko *J.' 1 GonzofaftCri. Kahne 
ftt.- 4, Pk»IL It. Braselriat of 31 «.- $. 


muMMUtnirondip 

Slondkiae for 1807 Rydw Cup to be 
played Sepwantrar 20-28 at VUdarrama In 
Sotogmta. Sprin. Top 10 flnbhare m 
quaBfy le#r 12-nun teamo. IAS. captain Tom 
Kfta raid European captain Sow BiUnm 
tell Meet two playera at larga to complate 
eactitBam: 

UNITED BTATTS 

J2.™ 1 Tom iehman 

BS6JS6; 3. Mark DMfiaro B0175ft 4. Bred 
Frnon 727500; 5. Scott Hacft 71 5786; 6. PM 
Mkketoon 659786; 7. DntsLmralll 638J00: 
ft Tommy Tote 6aM8ft 9. stave Jams 
579JB* 10. Mark Breaks 549.79fc n. Raid 
Stankowsk] SXU33i 12, Jfm Pun* 492400: 
13. DwW Duval 47200* 14. Tam Wteon 
'412000) IS. Fred Cauplas 39BJJ36. 

EUROPE 

I. Ian Waasnank Woles 44*766 

I Cotfn Montgonwrie, Scoflonti, 399,708 

3. Damn Ckute N. Ireland, 371451 

4. Bernhard Longer, Germany, 337,890 

5. Mlgual Angel Martov Spain. 317JJ54 

6. Por-UWk Johansson, Sweden. 312315 

7. Thomas Blank Denmark. 289,165 

ft Castanflna IZoccd. llahL 28*735 

9. Loo Westwood Ena land 25*333 
ML Puri Braadtwret England 220«91 

II. Jtree Maria OtaadKil Spain. 19ftOZ7 

II Frier Mitdw il England 191318 

13. Sam Tonanav SooMand 1 81344 

14. Jean VOn deVride, Franca 17*926 

15. Mow Chapman England, ikubt 

MWWOMLORMKMIM 

pflerWoodky i.VJV; 3 . rtm Uhmon. US. 
Mark OTWoara,lU. 7.67; 1 0. PMMfctataotv 


Zaragoza 2 Afletica Madrid 3 

"S » POW* 

5®®™°. Depotflwi Coruna 7* Real 
<i . A ^7' cs l * a * M 71f WWefa BIBwa 
a! Sodatod » Voteticto 

R«<ng sarv 
Espanyol 4& ovtorta 
Spwflng GQon 46; Raya 


Buffalo— R eleased LB Mark MffiWea. 

Chicago— R eleosed S Mark Canter. 

DAUAS-Slgned WR Anthony AUtar. Re- 
signed RB Herachel Writer and S BM Bales 
to 1-yeor cortrads. Ratoawd C Ray Don- 
aktsan. 

Detroit— R e-rig ned DLMSce VYeflS. 

Miami— A greed to terms wtth R8 Dewayne 
Dotson on l-yearaontiad. 

N*W Orleans— S igned LB EmeriDtam to 

'■year cantred. AnMunced Bwf CB Bfkto 
Bowmen has toff team. 

Philadelphia— 5 Igtred WR Mtahoei 
Tuttpsoa WR Rwssefl copriand and TE Jim- 
mto Jotmon to l-nar contads. Released 
WR Jasper Strang. 

mrsBURstt-AgtMd to twins Nffl* VWl 
Courtney Hawkins an 3-year contred. 


Courtney Hawkins on 3-yeor contrett 

sMDiEco-SIgrwtlCB Paul Breited 102- 

year centreef md WR Andre CWeritm to j- 
year contract Did nof renew tender afwrto 
TE StonranMItetielL Withdrew temtoraftos 
to RB Kevin Boule and LB JoeCwiunlng*. 


TRANSITIONS 


TENNIS 


AHBMCAK LEAGUE 

Gfllcei R HP 
STiLirvl Brnw,BB,,w 5 f"" 1 15-rtoy dto- 

National league 

NL-Sittpendod Lzb Angrier, Darken 2B 
WWiGwirera 8 gamas and fined nkn 
f0r “riled hot in 

JUTO 1 9CJITW. 

, *JW MBTS-Put ss Rey Ontonrs on 

«S£m£i r**" 1 *— 

gSSESSn.'BS 

CaMn Mature to S oanton -WIBin fleura. 

KAsmiAu 

NAHONAL BAHKETBAa ASdOCIAnOH 

-_^?l*™ WEB 7 A C0U i| Td Houston Raftgte 

IWJAN LEAGUE 

oSS!5St s,fln * 1 c *** °«***-*™ 

MOIHU 

NAItoHALPaonuU. LfiAGUE 


French Open 


OUARIEHFMALS 


WJ. Cre. (tot Dragoffte Bom.**** 

6-2. 

Coalzor (ULftAf. dri.Gmf(2J,Ger.6-li6-4. 

Saks f3), UJ. def. Fernanda n2L UA 34 

6-17-5. 

Hingta (lLSwftt drtSOfldM Vleorio Ml. Sp 
6-26-ft 

■ MCN'SStMOUd 

Dewiilt Brig. def. Norman. Swtfri 4-7 O- 
7).64,«. 

Kuertoa B»ft te. KefoWtow C3J. Rup S - 

7, 2-4, Aft 64. 

MUPfl CNMPHtt 

Woodbrtdgo aid Wbotffarda (1), Awhofto 
deL L*och and Start {7J. U A d-ft 7-tf (7-0; 
EWngh and Jtoartiuta £ZL Nrih. del. EdB* 
andFkKW4AustiV7C6^).6^.6-2 

Arnold and Oreanki Aig. del. CattnrwB ana 

Rota 5p. 4-6, M, 6-4. 


SuteWMdfiufcM.QxdwdeLOreaKBGQnd 
DwWi (14), Noth. 6-26-3. 
HJrailijp.ortdfltniiHimUld), lnd.d»TKo«- 
nlkan, Rol and KnowM ®). Boh. 7* M. 
Raymond and Qolbrotth a). US. dw. 
Orittan, and MacPheraoiL Ausft. 6ft *4. 


* ra#. ■;!»* 

.-r 1 FWli Iwr * 


- tsmm 

f, 


-tejri -N V: 


J^gur- 1 h-MlhlHV tevuv fr^n-riiw 

Amanda Coetzer celebrating her 6-1, 6-4 victory. Tuesday over Steffi Graf . 


‘‘probably not” go onto win the tour- 
nament Coetzer will meet No. 9 Iva 
Majoh of Croatia in the semifinal, Ma- 
joli beat Ruxandra Dragomir of Ro- 
mania, 6-3, 5-7, 6-2. 

■ Amazing Technicolor Flayers 

Kuerten and Kafelnikov made a col- 
orful pair on Center Court, The As- 
sociated Press reported. Kuerten wore 
his usual outfit or blue and yellow shirt, 
blue shorts, yellow socks and blue 
shoes. In a gesture to tournament of- 
ficials who asked him to wear 
something white, he swapped his yel- 
low bandanna for a predominantly 
white one. Kafelnikov wore a blue, 
white and yellow shirt, blue shorts, 
white socks and yellow shoes. 


- . 

• vMk.iMtalf 

-•rrt -A l> * 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY JUNE 4, 1997 


PAGE 21 


1 i 


SPORTS 


A Sparkling Johnson 
Blanks the Blue Jays 


The Associated Press 

Only two bioop hits in the sixth in- 
ning separated the Seattle Mariners* 
Randy Johnson from his second career 
no-hitter. 

He was sensational on a Monday 
night in the Kingdome when Ken Grif- 
fey 'Jr. hit his 25th home run of the 
season, tops in the majors. 

“He’s in a league of his own,” the 
Mariners manager Lou Piniella said 
after watching Johnson pitch a two- 
hitter in a 5-0 victoiy over- the Toronto 
Blue Jays. “Randy can pitch a game for 
you as well as anybody.” 

For 5'A innings, Johnson (8-1) looked 
like he was going to pitch a perfect 
game. Then Alex Gonzalez and Tilso 
Brito, Toronto's Nos. 8 and 9 hitters, got 

their bloop hits. Johnson walked Jacob 
Brumfield to lead off the seventh, and- 
Brito and Otis Nixon leading off the 
ninth. The Blue Jays hit the toil out of 
the infield only rive times. 

“He was Randy," the catcher Dan 
Wilson said. “He was awesome." 

Making his 1 2th start of the season. 
Johnson struck out nine and pitched his 
first shutout and first complete game 
since late in the 1995 season, when he 
won the AL Cy Young Award. 

Ysnfc«m 5, Rad Sox Z Paul O’Neill 
went 3-for-4 and drove in the go-ahead 
run in the seventh inning, and David 
Wells pitched seven solid innings to 
lead New York over Boston. 

After losing the opener of the four- 
game series, the Yankees won the next 
three games 

With the score tied, 2-2, in the sev- 
enth. Bemie Williams and Tino Mar- 
tinez hit one-out singles before Vaughn 
Eshelman relieved Aaron Sele (6-4). 
O’Neil] followed with a line drive to 
right. 

Wells (6-3) allowed six hits in winning 
for the fifth time in his last seven starts. 

Ha nger * 8, Tarns 0 Darren Oliver 
pitched eight strong innings and Ivan 
Rodriguez went 3-for-5 with a home run 
as Texas shut out visiting Minnesota. 

Oliver (3-6), who had lost five of his 
previous six decisions, gave up five hits, 
struck out six and walked one as the 
Rangers beat the Twins for the fourth 


straight time. Matt Whiteside pitched a 
perfect ninth for Texas. 

The Rangers had six doubles and two 
homers, including Warren Newson’s 
two-run shot in the sixth. Domingo 
Cedeno went 3-for-4 and Will Clark 
wait 3-for-5 as Texas had a season-high 
18 hits. 

Tigers 8, Athletics 7 The Athletics’ 
Steve Karsay gave up seven earned runs 
for a second straight start and Lost for the 
sixth time in seven games, ft was in- 
dicative of the Oakland pitching prob- 
lems that his job on the starting staff was 
still safe. 

“Expect him to go out some nights 
and not have the hop," the Oakland 
manager Art Howe said of Karaay after 
the loss. “That's happened twice. The 
other games, he’s been all right. Xm not 
taking him out of die rotation." 

Thanks to home runs by Bob Hamelin 
and the rookie Deivi Cruz and some 
dutch final-inning relief from Michael 
Myers and Doug Brocail. the Tigers 
held on. 

The surprising Tigers have won 7 of 
10, while die A’s lost for the seventh 
time in nine home games. 

Brian Moehler (4-4) pitched six 

starr^ver Oakland. He allowedTfour 
runs and seven hits before leaving with a 
7-3 lead after giving up two singles to 
start the seventh. Mark McGwire hit his 
21 st homer of the season and 350th of 
his career feu* Oakland. 

White Sox 8 , Brewers 5 Chicago won 
and Albeit Belle lost In danger of being 
swept in the four-game series in Mil- 
waukee, the White Sox came from be- 
hind and won on Mike Cameron’s two- 
run double in a three-run ninth inning 
Monday night. “Those guys just won’t 
go away," Frank Thomas said of the 
Brewers, who have beaten his team four 
oat of five times this season. 

With the score tied, 5-5. in the ninth. 
Frank Thomas singled with one out. 
That gave Belle another chance at keep- 
ing his 27-game hitting streak alive. 

But Belle ftied out to go 0-for-3 with 
two walks, ending the streak, the longest 
in the majors tins season. 

• Ram on Monday washed out the 
game between the Baltimore Orioles 
and Cleveland Indians for a second 
straight day. 



Utah: ‘Unforced’ Errors 

jazz Could Improve and Surprise Bulls 


By Michael Wllboa 

TkaMigawi Fen Service ~ 


CHICAGO — There’s .a certain 
rhythm to the NBA playoffs where the 
Chicago BuSsare concerned. In all four 
series the Bulk have played This post- 
season, they've narrowly-won Game 1 
— fast over .the Washington Bullets, 
then Atlanta, then Miami and now Utah. 
Opponents' refrains in tire postmortems 
have been identical: “If we had just 
done what wc usually do well, we would 
have won Game 1.” . 

Of course, tfaeif logic is flawed bo- 


or fs 


David Weils of the Yankees pitching against the Red Sox at Fenway Park. 


Awaiting League Ruling, 
Galarraga Stays in Groove 


The Associated Press 

It might take an entire league to stop 
Andres Galarraga. 

Galarraga hit his fifth homer in seven 
games Monday ni ght as the Colorado 
Rockies beat the St. Louis Cardinals, 
1 1-7. But he might be suspended by the 
National League later mis week for 

NL Roundup 

charging the mound in a game Saturday 
against the Florida Marlins. 

The Rockies' manager, Don Baylor, 
said, “It’ll be a shame if he gets sus- 
pended because be is in such a groove 
right now.” 

Galarraga’s three-run homer in the 



Japanese Pitcher Shows Rust 


IVur MuhKi Vpttr f'noo-IVri 

Irabu, the pride of the Yankees. 


The Associated Press 

TAMPA, Florida — It was easy to 
spot Hideki Irabu among the dozens of 
New York Yankee prospects spread 
over three practice fields. He was the 
guy who moved the crowd. 

A large media contingent, many of 
them reporters and photographers 
from Japan, his homeland, tracked his 
every move before and after he threw 
45 pitches in a simulated game 
Monday. 

Catcher Blaine Phillips said Irabu's 
fastball was impressive, although it 
was the pitch he had the most difficulty 
getting over the plate. 

He worked three simulated innings 
of 15 pitches each Monday, facing 
nine batters and a 10th, who took one 
pitch. He allowed one hit. struck out 
one and walked two. 

“It’s been seven months since I 
faced a Live hitter,' ’ he said through an 
interpreter. 

The 28-year-old right-hander with 
the richest contract ever given a major 


league rookie — a four-year, $12.8 
million deal that he signed last week — 
showcased a fastball that tops 90 miles 
an hour (145 kilometers an hour), a 
slow, big-bending curve and a sharp- 
breaking forkbail that frustrates hitters 
anticipating pare speed. 

“It’s not easy to pick up the rotation 
on that pitch," said a Yankee prospect, 
Homer Bush. “You see it and say, 
‘Oh, nice fastball' Before you know it, 
it's out of the zone." 

The workout also drew favorable 
reviews from Yankees’ officials. 

“I like everything about him,” said 
the pitching coordinator, Billy Connore. 
“I like his makeup and his determi- 
nation. He’s got heart and desire, and 
wants to be a Yankee. Thai's No. 1.” 

Irabu, a former top pitcher in Japan, 
has not pitched in a game since Oc- 
tober. He was caught in Umbo while 
the San Diego Padres worked out a 
trade with the Yankees, who hope to 
have him pitching in New York by the 
All-Star beak in July. 


fifth was measured at 426 feet — 103 
feet shorter than his blast two days ago 

in Miami FOOT inning s after hitting that 

tape-measure homer against* tire Mar- 
lins, Galarraga charged the mound after 
being hit by a pitch from .Dennis Cook. 

Galarraga’s 15th hooter of the season 
gave the Rockies a 64) lead. The Car- 
dinals rallied with five runs in the bottom 
of the fifth, including a three-run homer 
by Ray Lankford. But the Rockies pulled 
away with four runs in foe sixth. 

PmSm s. Braves 4 Heath Murray got 
his first major-league victory as San 
Diego beat Greg Maddox and the Braves 
at Atlanta. 

Mariins4,CHants2ltt Miami, AlLeiter 

S itched seven strong innings and Gary 
beffield homered to lead Florida over 
San Francisco. 

Ciriu 3, Hra t w 2 In Chicago. Brant 
Brown went 3-for-3 with a solo home 
run to lead the Cubs to a third straight 
victoiy. Brown, recalled from the 
minors on May 23, is 8-f6r-13 (.615) 
over his last five games. 

Astros 2 , Pojgti o Donne Wall and 
Jose Lima combined on a six-hitter and 
Brad Aosmus hit a two-run' double as 
the host Astros snapped a'three-g&me 
losing streak 

Expo* i o, o Carlos Perez pitched 
a six-hitter for his second career shotoqt 
as Montreal ended New York’s four- 
game winning streak. 

• The .Cindnnati-Philadelphia game 
was postponed by rain. 

■ 8-Game Suspension for Dodger 

Wilton Guerrero, the rookie second 
baseman of the Los Angeles Dodgers 
tried to beat one of baseball’s, most 
sacred rules and got caught.’ 

Guerrero was suspended for eight 
games and fined an undisclosed sum by 
the NL president, Leo Coleman, for us- 
ing a corked bat. Guerrero admitted he 
knew the bat was corked before it 
shattered when be grounded to second 
Sunday in a game in St Louis. 


cause the Bulls, by design, don’t allow 
yon to do what you usually do welL 
They didn't get to be four-time cham- 
pions by watching teams go repeatedly 
to their strengths. Miami, for example, 
never got major points from Alonzo 
Mourning because die Bulls prevented 
him from doing what he usually does. 

But Kaii Malone and John Stockton 
believe they’re different. We usually 
associate unforced errors with tennis. 
But Utah's players and coaches are con- 
vinced it was mistakes that the Bulls 
didn't even elicit that were largely re- 
sponsible for Chicago's Game 1 victory 
Sunday. Utah’s players and coaches be- 
lieve Malone will jnake more shots 
Wednesday in Game 2, and they believe 
Stockton will not. commit seven 
turnovers, or anything close to dial 

The Utah folk simply believe they’ve 
got smarter, tougher, more experienced 
players who know top modi to repeat 
the same mistakes, and that it all starts 
with Stockton and Malone, 

. They’re probably right. Utah is dif- 
ferent from Washington, Atlanta and 
Miami. Utah is differeatfrotn the Lakers, 
Trail Blazers, Suns and SuperSonics, 
too, which are foe.teams die Bolls beat in 
their previous NBA Finals. At least 
Jordan believes so._“Tbere is no sense of 

p ^ nip. m thfim " he “ and thgfmakfte 

them dangerous. They are aware of 
where they are and maintain the poise it 
takes to be a great challenger. I’d have to 
say that Utah is the best fundamentally 
sound, all-around team we've played in 
the finals.’ ’ Jordan, rarely goes out of his 
way to compliment anybody. He never: 
seemed particularly impressed with At- 
lanta or Miami, though he was with the 
Bullets. But Jordan knows Stockton and 
Malone are going to show up huge Wed-, 
nesday night, and so do they. 

. There are a lot of impostors in sports, 
bat there are no indications that Stocktoa 
and Malone are among them. They’ve 
demonstrated too much resourcefulness, 
too much stick-to-it-iveness to get this far 
and disintegrate. The Bulls zealots from 
coast to coast believe this series is going 
to be over quickly, now that Scottie Pip- 
pen has shown hunseifhealthy enough. I - 
believe Stockton 'and Malone are going 
to 'put Utah on the scoreboard Wed- 
nesday and make this a tough series. 

. “We don’t know if we’ll ever have 
the chance to get back here again," 
Stockton said before practice Monday. 

The Lakers had been in the finals so 
many times before that they never ex- 
hibited that sense of urgency in 1991. 
Portland had been once before, and its 
players thought during the 1992 series 
they’dbe making a habit of going to the 
finals. Charles Barkley was in his first 
year in Phoenix in *93, and the Suns 
presumed there would be encore cham- 
pionship performances. Seattle, with 
Shawn Kemp, and Gary Payton just en- 
tering their prime, still feel they’11 get 
back here, as they did last season. 


■ * Malone and Stockton are as old as; 
dirt, and they 'know tfris is probably thfi 
only chance they will get to win a title. 
They arenot gomg to come up with any 
new wrinkles between now and Wed- 
nesday; they will just practice and pre- 
pare and concentrate on doing what they 
do better.* . * : * 

“We’tt bounce back,” Malone said 
“Thar’s foe nature of this team. We don’t 
have aay fear about anything and we 
arai't in awe of anybody. We have to 
make, them play us. 1 don't have any 
excuses. Everybody has them, so why use 
one now? Who said just because you're 
the MVP means you’re going to make 
two free throws? I missed a ton of them 
during foe regular season and made a ton 
of them during the regular season.” 

Malone missed eight of his first nine 
shots Sunday, even though be said that 
* ‘ they were better looks than I got in the 
Houston series.” He figures that, as a 
result, Phil Jackson will start the game 
with the same matchup: Luc Longley on 
Malone. ’ ‘I expect that, and I’m looking 
forward to it,” Malone said, doing 
everything but licking his lips. 

Nothing Pippen add Jordan did de- 
fensively surprised Stockton. He played 
against them during the 1992 Dream 
Team summer. But be didn’t practice 

Jordan-plus-Prppen-plus-Roa 
Harper is 6 feet 6. He did nice 
on Mookie Blaylock, even better 
work on Tim Hardaway and was tough 
on Stockton in Game 1. Every time 
somebody asked Stockton how he made 
seven turnovers Sunday nighr, Stockton 
answered with a glare. He rarely shows 
emotion, but you could see the fire 
raging in him as if questioning his mis- 
cues offended him. 

There -is, of course, another key figure 
in what Utah will do Wednesday: Jerry 
Sloan. He’s got enough common sense to 
know his team has to work Jordan and 
Pippen harder, but enough hardheaded- 
□ess to stick with the majority of his day- 
to-day program, ft was funny when Pip- 
tola Malone, “The Mailman doesn’t 
ivex on Sunday,” before Malone 
trussed crucial two free throws. And 
while the Bulls probably will win this 
series, foe mail flows {Hetty well on Wed- 
nesday, which is an entirely new day. 


Butts’ Coach, Wants 
Just One More Year 

■ The Associated Press 

CHICAGO — Phil Jackson 
wants to sign for just one more year 
to coach the Chicago Bulls, while 
the team’s owner, Jerry Reinsdorf, 
• would prefer to- sign Jackson to a 
long-term contract for rebuilding 
purposes, the Chicago Sun-Times 
reported Tuesday. 

Michael Jordan, who has said he 
will not come back to the Bulls next 
season unless Jackson does, plans 
to ask for $36 million for next sea- 
son, according to a Chicago 
Tribune report that cited sources 
close to Jordan: 

Jackson told the Son-Times he 
had re3d that the Bulls' manage- 
ment said it didn’t know what he 
wanted to do. 

‘ ‘But I know what I want to do,” 
he said. “This is the team I want to 
stay with. This is a dpb that we 
built-” 

Jackson, 52, added that he could 
not connnit.to a long-term contract 
for health and personal reasons. 




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Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* WEDNESDAY JUNE 4, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Of Wine and Noses 


Tony Randall as ‘the Guy Who Stayed Behind 


By Russell Baker 


of just over S336 a bottle, but 
it was the high-end stuff that 


By Rick Lyman 

Aw York Times Struct 




W ASHINGTON — I just 
bought a bottle of wine. 
I almost.paid $4,810 for it. I 
.don't normally go dial high. I 
•always say that paying more 
Than $13 for any bottle of 
rfwine is showing off. It's onlv 
;wine, right? 

* It’s for easing down ham- 
burgers, chicken, ravioli Wa - 
'jei will do the job too, but it's 
•duller. Who sits around having 
'a lovely dinner conversation 
over a pitcher of water? 

; Some people use coffee. I 
•did once. But then I some- 
times used martinis, too, in 
those days. Two man inis be- 
fore dinner hit the spot so well 
ihat another maruni or two 
-during the meal often seemed 
.irresistible. 


interested me: specifically, a 
Pomerol that sold at $4,810 a 
bottle. 

Just before stepping into 
the local wine shop. I’d seen a 
bumper sticker saying. “Life 
Is Too Short to Drink Cheap 
Wine." To which I said si- 


N EW YORK — Tony Randall 
stands a few feet into the 




" -2 - if'.V V , * V . 




ffl': f*- 


lently: “Absolutely right! The 
world is full of people drink- 


ing wine that costs just over 
S336 a bottle while I. with life 
running out. am slumming 
down in the S13 range.” 







That was a long rime ago. I 
moved ahead and learned 
about things like premier cru. 
bottled at the chateau and ap- 
pellation controlled. These 
are on everybody's tongue 
nowadays of course, but back 
then it awed your liquor deal- 
er when you pulled words like 
that on him. 

Mature wine wisdom now 
has me operating in the S 10 - 
$13 range, which will buy a 
decent Virginia cabernet 
franc or Santa Barbara 
chardonnay. Thai’s why I was 
amazed by a recent New York 
Times story about one of 
those auctions for the filthy- 
rich. held in London. 

Somebody had accumu- 
lated 18.000 bottles of wine. 
Rich people now do these dis- 


To the wine-shop owner 
aloud 1 said. “Mike, I want 
one of those $4,810 Pomer- 
ols." He said was I kidding. I 
said absolutely not; if he 
would take a second mort- 
gage on my house I would 
give him S13 down. He said 
what food are you going to 
drink this $4.8 10 stuff with? I 
said the same food all $4,8 1 0- 
per-bottle wine drinkers drink 
it with. “What is that food, 
Mike?” 

"Beats me,” he said, nat- 
urally. because what person 
anywhere on any of the major 
continents could conceive of 
a food that could live up to a 
$4,810 wine? 

I would have bought it any- 
how. It would show an amus- 
ing lack of pretension to drink 
it with fried liver or a fri- 
casseed chicken with dump- 
lings. Life after all is short 
"Too short to drink cheap 
wine,” I would tell my wife. 



■?§ . 

teisw! 


XN stands a few feet into the 
traffic crush of Eighth Avenue, 
looking for a taxi to take him back 
home to the Upper West Side. 

“A couple more minutes and 
then I’ll take my hat off,’ ’ he says. 

“Someone will stop and offer me a 
ride. They always nave. Oh, I do it 
all the time. I’m shameless.” 

Randall. 77, looks a bit like a 
tweed test pattern, with a glen plaid 
coat, a bright red tartan tie and a 
checkered, short-billed hat The 
face and the lanky body, the one 
from “Mr. Peepers” and “The Odd 
Couple” and all those Rock Hud- 
son and Doris Day movies, is still 
there, under ail that Scottish noise. 

The ride uptown, connecting the 
theater district with the Upper West 
Side, follows the axis of Randall's 
world. The founder and artistic di- 
rector of the six-year-old National 
Actors Theater has just left a stu- 
dents’ marinee of his latest pro- 
duction. a revival of “The Gin 
Game” and he is heading to the 
neighborhood where he has lived 
for more than four decades. 

Leonard Rosenberg was 18 • - - 

when he left Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Tony Randall and a fellow Upper West Side stroller taking a break on a Broadway bench. 




Hollywood. But I wouldn’t move. ! 
thought that if I ever moved, I 
would never be in the theater 
again. 

“So I became Mr. New Yorit, 
the guy who stayed behind.*' 

In 1991. after 10 years of talking 
about starting a nonprofit national 
theater. Randall says, he decided he 
had to act ”1 kept talking afeout it 
and hoping that someone else 
would do it and then hire rae.” he 
says. “But finally I realised dta-n* 
one would do it unless Dined to do- 
it myself.” - X' 

It has been a rocky, au-eonsurtv- 
ing endeavor, forcing, fedfik to 
spend much of his tixfte raising 
money. Corporate sponsors, can 
call on him for free appearances, 
and they often do. 


In six years, the National Actors 
Theater has yet to have* produc- 
tion that turned a profit. Last year, a 
l revival’ of “Inherit the Wind’ ' 
seemed well on its way v butGecqge 
C. Scott became ill and-Jadio drop 
out, and the productioa^Sosed. • 
Randall says he hopes -Tbe Gin 
Game,” starring Julie Harris and 
Charles Duming. will be the theat- 
er’s first moneymaker. Its three 
Tony nominations brought an im- 
.'.nKnfrrt nrv-.vri.-naK. proveraent at the box office. With 
k on a Broadway bench. luck, Randall says, next year it will 

be able to return to its original plan 
says. “Suddenly, with Broadway of producing three plays a year, 
going strong and radio and ail of “You’ve got to be an imprac- 
tbese new television programs, for tical dreamer to fry- - to pur 




came to New York to study acting, 
changing his name to Tony Randall 


my neighborhood in my lifetime in 


and moving into a small apartment just two words,” Randall says, 
on Riverside Drive. Except for a "Lincoln Center." 


gusring things. You know, 
buy up all the great art. all the 


buy up all the great an. all the 
Jackie Kennedy relics, hide 
them in vaults so nobody can 
ever get at them, then auction 
them for incredible profits. 

The New York Times said 
the 1 8.000 fetched an average 


Well, if you have to ask you 
can’t afford it. I said forget it, 
Mike. He said no sweat as he 
didn’t have any anyhow, but 
if I itched to spend big. try 
this, he said. 

It was a Virginia chardon- 
nay. Fifteen dollars. I bought 
it. 

\,-ir IcvZ Times Sen u e 


short stint io Peter Cooper Village 
and four years in the army, he has 
lived on the Upper West Side ever 
since. 

For 30 years he lived in the San 
Remo on (Tenoral Park West at 73d 
Street with his first wife. Florence. 
When she became ill and needed 
almost constant care, they moved 
to a larger apartment several blocks 
uptown, in the Beresfbnd. Florence 
Randall died in 1992. They had 
been married 54 years. 

In 1995. Randall married a 
former intern of the National Act- 
ors Theater. Headier Hanlan. now 
26. On April 11. they had a daugh- 
ter. Julia, the first child for both. 

’ * I can tell you what happened to 


“Lincoln Center has had such a 
civilizing effect on the whole West 
Side. The opera, the music, the 
vitality on the streets, the book 
shops, all of the things that make 
life worthwhile." 

He knows that a price has been 
paid; many barbers and cobblers 
and mom-and-pop shops have dis- 
appeared. “Instead, there are res- 
taurants in every block.” he says. 
"And they are always jammed. 
People sit out there on the sidewalk, 
even in winter. It amazes me.” 

On an average day off. if the 
weather js decent. Randall walks 
across the street and into Central 
Park. His new wife introduced him 
to Rollerblades, and he tried them 


for a time. "Finally, some woman 
passed me and turned around and 
yelled. ‘You must be out of your 
mind!’ I decided she was right. 
Now I go bicycle riding." 

Randall was just beginning to 
get some traction in toe theater 
when he was drafted in 1942. 
“When ! came back four years 
later. I had to start over.” he says. 




says. “Suddenly, with Broadway 


toe first time there was work 
enough for everybody." 

He remembers riding the Third 
Avenue El up to 114th Street and 


something together like toe Na- 
tional Actors Theater,” Randall 
says. “You ’ve got to be a nur. If I 
was hardheaded and realistic, I 


walking over to Pathe Studios, wouldn’t have started it. You ve 
where he filmed his first television got to be a bit of a fanatic. 


later, I had to start over,” he says, series, “One Man’s Family,” with He is finished with films and 
“But I can’t complain. The same Eva Marie Saint It was his next television series, he says, and plans 
t hing happened to 7 million other series, “Mr. Peepers,” that made to dedicate the rest of his life to his 
guys.” him a star. He ana Florence moved' family and the National Actors 

He returned from the army to a to toe San Remo, a tonier address Theater, with the occasiorul stage 
new apartment at 90th Street and and within walking distance of the role. tHe played Scrooge in a S12 
Central Park West that his wife had Broadway theaters. million production at Madison 

heard about from a co-worker. He “Then, overnight, everything Square Garden last Christmas and 
went back to work, getting some changed,” Randall says. Televi- says he hopes to do the role again 
roles on Broadway, on radio and sion shows converted to film, and this year.) 
eventually on early television. toe entire industry moved to toe “No, this is it for me now.” he 
"My entire generation of actors West Coast. “In one year, every says. “I’m finally doing what I 


new apartmenr at 90th Street and 
Central Park West that his wife had 
heard about from a co-worker. He 
went back to work, getting some 
roles on Broadway, on radio and 
eventually on early television. 

“My entire generation of actors 
got their start on television,” he 


million production at Madison 
Square Garden last Christmas and 
says he hopes to do the role again 
this year.) 

“No, this is it for me now.” he 
says. “I’m finally doing what I 


young actor in New York moved to want to do.’ ’ 


PEOPLE 


T HE singer Bob Dylan was re- 
leased from an undisclosed hos- 


■ . 

mm ( 








X leased from an undisclosed hos- 
pital over the weekend and is re- 
cuperating at an undisclosed place. 
Dylan. 56. is expected to make a full 
recovery in four ro six weeks from a 
potentially fatal lung infection, ac- 
cording to Elliott Mintz. his spokes- 
man, and Columbia Records. They 
said he was treated for pericarditis, 
an inflammation of the sac that sur- 
rounds the heart, brought on by his- 
toplasmosis. a fungal infection of 


will, which left most of his S2.4 
million estate to his three biological 
daughters with the novelist and poet 
Louise Erdrich. In court papers. 
Madeline Dorris said her father 
lacked the mental capacity to ex- 
ecute his will six weeks before he 
committed suicide on April 1 1 . She 
said he had been clinically de- 


Garfunkel. “I would like them to 
feel the wonder of it. When you look 
at your sleeping child, you think 
what is he. what did we give him and 
what will he become?" 


pressed for several years, under psy- 
chiatric care and hospitalized for 


chiatric care and hospitalized for 
suicidal tendencies. 


the lung. Dylan canceled a European 
tour due to open Sunday in Cork. 
Ireland. Columbia, in a statement, 
quoted Dylan as saying: “I’m just 
glad to be feeling better. I really 
rhoughr I’d be seeing Elvis soon.” 


GREETING LAS VEGAS — Nicolas Cage waving to 
fans before attending the premiere of his new film. 
“Con Air.” at the Hard Rock Casino in Las Vegas. 


The adopted daughter of Michael 
Dorris is contesting his will just 
days after having sued his estate on 
accusations that the writer sexually 
abused her as a child. Madeline 
Dorris and her adopted brother. Jef- 
frey. were excluded from Dorris’s 


Art Garftinkel. half of the folk- 
rock duo Simon and Garfunkel, is 
joined by his wife and 6-year-old 
son on a new album being released 
by Sony this week. The album. 
"Songs From a Parent io a Child,” 
includes vocals by Garfunkel’ s 
wife. Kim Cermak Garfunkel. and 
their son. James, as well as con- 
tributions by pop artists Billy Pres- 
ton. Merry Clayton and John Se- 
bastian. “I want parents to feel the 
magnificent poetry that a child rep- 
resents, the genetic union,” said 


Christoph von Dohnanyi. music 
director of the Cleveland Orchestra 
since 1984. has signed a multiyear 
extension to his contract, which was 
to have expired in 2000. Dohnanyi. 
67. a native of Berlin, was chosen 
principal conductor of the Philhar- 
monia Orchestra of London last fell. 
He has said that job wifi not affect 
his Cleveland duties. “In all of my 
contracts, it says Cleveland is my 
priority." Dohnanyi said. “But it is 
important for me to have one or two 
places in Europe where I feel at 
home.” 


vous with a woman in a New York 
hotel room. This week's issue in- 
cludes a transcript of what pur- 
portedly was said in the hotel room. 
Last month, the Globe printed pho- 
tos it said showed toe sportscasier 
groping a 46-year-old married 
woman. Kmart pulled that issue 
from its stores. The Washington 
Post reported shortly afterward that 
the Globe paid toe woman $75,000 
to entice Gifford into toe hotel room. 
Gifford and his wife, the talk show 
host Kathie Lee Gifford, have not 
denied the authenticity of toe fuzzy 
photos, taken from a videotape, but 
have asked for privacy. 


Neither Kmart nor Wal-Mart 
stores will carry the supermarket 
tabloid Globe as it follows the story 
of Frank Gifford and his rendez- 


Snoop Doggy Dogg has been 
sued by his former manager 
Sbaritha Knight, who says she was 
not paid her 20 percent share during 
a rime when toe rapper earned 58 
million. Knight is the estranged wife 
of Marion (Suge) Knight, toe 
Death Row Records magnate who is 
serving a nine-year prison sentence 


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for violating probation for a 1992 
assault. She is running toe record 
company, which is besieged by 
multimillion-dollar claims from 
creditors and a federal investigation 
of alleged links ro drug trafficking, 
money laundering and extortion. 
The singer, whose real name is 
Calvin Broadus, is “spending large 
sums of money on frivolous items 
and objects,” ihe lawsuit contends. 


Two Estonians spent 61 hows 
telling nonstop jokes in a weekend 
that reportedly earned them a place 
in the Guinness Book of Records. 
Valdo Jahiio. 25. and Erkki Kdu. 
27, radio journalists from Tartu, en- 
tertained each other — and the pub- 
lic — : from Friday morning to 
Sunday evening. Their performance 
beat by one hour the previous mark 
for joke-telling pairs, set in Sou* 
Africa in 1988. the Baltic News Ser- 
vice said. A Peruvian. Felipe Car- 
bonel, holds the solo record of 100 
consecutive hours, set in 1990. 




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