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INTERNATIONAL 


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The World's Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND 'TOE^WAi^NGTON POST 
"r London, Tuesday; June 10, 1997 l^fi' ' \ 


No. 35.543 


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Lts Brakes on the Euro 


Paris Wbn^t Be Ready to Ratify Pact Next fPkek 


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By Edmund L. Andrews 

Wcw' York Tmei Senh t 

LUXEMBOURG — One week after 
the French Socialisi Parry scored its 
stunning election victory, the new 
French government told the rest of the 
European Union on Monday that it could 
not yet ratify a previously negotiated 
agreement that is crucial for launching 
Eufotc's single currency, the euro. 

Calling for a "new balance" between 
the old goal of economic stability and a 
newer need to create more jobs for 
Europe’s 18 million unemploy^ Fi- 
nance Minister Dominique Sirauss-Kahn 
said his government needed both more 
time and stronger measures aimed at 
relieving unemployment before France 
would go along with the new plans. 

The announcement abruptly tor- 
piedoed the carefully laid plans by Euro- 
pean heads of state to formally approve 
the measure at a summit meeting next 

ni-knvkcmc eik^T A m on l ... vtemaGciwmwAgenxiians-Picsie Week in Amsterdam, and raised new 

B01uilLK& SIN AKLED — French fnukers blocking the French-Swiss border near Basel on Monday. In a replay questions about whether the euro wUI be 
^ a protest last year, the truck drivers are demandinfi higher pay and better workins conditions. Fase 5. delayed or peihaps even scrapped. 


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It also marked the most dramatic ev- 
idence yet of a shift in European polit- 
ical orthodoxy, following the recent 
ouster of conservative governments in 
both France and Britain. 

Thus far. Germany has dominated the 
entire debate about launching the euro 
by derrtanding that its neighbors adopt 
the austere economic and monetary 
policies aimed almost exclusively at 
stifling inflation. But that consensus :q>- 
peared to be cracking Monday, in favor 

Chancellor Kohl vowed efforts to 
save his German coalition. Page 5. 

of a new tilt toward job creation and 
economic growth, possibly through 
more relaxed economic policies that 
Germany has adamantly resisted. 

“The fact of the maner is that eveiy- 
onc now acknowledges that jobs are 
now at the center of the agenda," said 
Gordon Brown, Britain's new chancel- 
lor of the Exchequer. 

Within minutes of the news Monday. 






) Where Discretion Rules^ 
3 A Tolerant Take on Sex 

v' Aduh^ Uproar in U.S. Military Bemuses Allies 



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By Roger Coheu 

yVew K>ft Times Semce 

' PARIS — Major Bruno Mignot says 
be has a lot of time for Americans, 
gave the French a haaid in World War I; 
th^ helj^ out again in World War IL 
built up what he concedes is a 
“veiy big power" in what be views as 
‘"a very short time." But the recent 
' upl^vals over sex in the American 
tmliiary have left him deeply . per- 
plexed. 

"Fcm' a French officer, it is ^)solutely 
astounding to think tl^ adulteiy can 
; 1(^ to dismissal from the army," the 

Candidate for UJS. Joint Cbtefs of 
Staff drops out Page 3. 

■ majarsa^"WhaudoesaduItearyhaveto 
do witb.being a B-S2 pilot or a com- 
petent genentl? Of couise we admire 
Amoica, but when we see all this we do 
ooteavyiL" 

The peccadilloes and related prob- 
lems m a succession of American of- 
ficeis ~ ffom First Lieutenant Kelly 
Flinn, the B-52 pilot who left the service 
after ^ was accused of adultery and 
disobedvnee, to General Josq)b Ral- 
‘ ston, -a leading contender to head the 
: Jt^duefs of Staff before revelations 
that he had had an affair a decade ago — 
have ttiided to confirm the old French 


view that Americans are overgrown 
children when it comes to sexual mores. 
Sex is a private matter here, and the 
French are disciplined about discretiofL 

Outside a military barracks on the 
outskirts of Paris, several young coo- 
scripts expressed amazement at £e go- 
ingi^n in the American armed forces. 
On joining the army recently, they were 
lectured for three days about honor and 
respect and the dangers of drugs. 

“But sex did not come into it, not 
once," smd Vattan Vongsavanthong, a 
Frenchman of Laotian descent He was 
interrupted by a fellow recruit who de- 
clared that “if we delved into sexual 
habits, there would be no mere French 
Army!” 

Imt. at least, is the somewhat macho 
myth. Like any army, the Rreueb re- 
quires order, and whatever impinges on 
it is not long tolerated. There is a Rule of 
General DireipUne that does not men- 
tion sex, adulterous or otherwise, but 
whose prevailing etiiic makes it clear 
that a liaison that interfeies witii service 
and Ae mission cannot be loIeratecL 

“The basic rule is that if the service 
does not suffer, then sex is a private 
question," said Major Henri Dumont, a 
spokesman fca the Foreign L^on. 
“And it seems to work beouise in 20 
years in the army, I have never known 
problems like those in America." He 

See ADULTERY, Page 4 


With a Bit of Ingenuity, 
North Koreans Find Food 








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* . By Teresa Wataoabe 
' and Hyungwon Kang 

Los Angeles Tunes 

~ -UNPA, North Korea — Devastated 
by flooding that swept away her hmne 
two years ' ago. Yang Soo Bok now 
Sliuggles with a more pernicious hard- 
.ship: a nationwide fora shortage that 
hu ieduc^ government rations to less 
than one-fourth of a bowl of coromeal a 
^y. 

;-:Yet UoQming in the garden of ^ 
house is a cornucopia of 12 crops, in- 
folding' lettuce, pamidun, com ai^ 
She has two fruit trees and also is 
fusing a pig and tfarw chickens. 
.r.Miss. Yang's private food supply, 
-bhich fe^ her household of thrre, is 
fmoftteeffexis across North Korea to 
stave off starvation amid dwindling aid 
Sum the Cwnnuinist regime. 

'"^-Asslow foinine grips ibis land, giving 
'O^to seiuational arm unconfirmed re- 
perb cannibalism, child-selling ai^ 
aundrbds' of thousands of deatiis in 
.4utfyii^~areas. a- rare visit to North 
pEDvided a diffi^eot natiraal pw- 
vafi of" seff-control and - stoic 
of creative ways to survive. 
'-Residmts here said they are coping 
ViA Hie food shorties ^ gatho^ 
rn^'WHtfio roots to a^to rice, grinding 
cem cdislo powdo* fn* cakes and using 
' a ^weal stir-lriedw made intonoodles. 
I^are dipping into private reserves of 

-'1; ••• New^tend Prices ; 

foia^;...:.'!i}00 Din Malta 

Nigena.. 189.00 Naka 
gaBMu.l4^aKr. Oman — 1250 Rials 

niflnd....;li00F.M, Qatar laOOFbals 

^Niiu a65 Rep.lrriand...nS1iX]; 

...^ 020 Saudi Arabia .10.00 R : 
Baipt :."j:i^ ^ s. Africa ...ris -i^yat; 
Jonkn.ju..l2SOJD UAE....-~ 10.00 

SH. 160 U.S. Ml (Eur.) ^ l20 . 
Wtel' — ,.„700 FSs 2inbM..-.ZiniS30i30' 


hoarded rations and selling off house- 
hold goods to bay food in the swell^ 
numl^ of private markets that officials 
Imgan to tolerate last year. 

Ibe (xi vate efforts are not confined to 
Miss Yang and her neighbors in Unpa 
County, one of the nation's breadbas- 
kets. In the capita, Pyongyang, where 
workers in sunglasses and neat suits 
scurry to work on buses, the terraces of 
concrete apartmeot buildings have been 
transfotmed into tiny vegetable plots 
and i^hit hutches. 

“Eating wild plants is nothing new 
— it's just (hat we're eating more of it 
these days," said Li Sung Snk, a 50- 
year-old Pyongyang resideoL “It's not 
easy. But our people are fiimly united to 
overcome this nadonal.difticulfy." 

No one knows precisely whether it is 
these private efforts that are keeling 
mass starvation at bay. North Korean 
officials acknowledge scattered cases of 
starvation demhs amcmg the eldmly a^ 
tile spread of malnutrition among chil- 
dren, some of whom were woefiiUy thin 
and had di^lo^ brown hair and 
white patches on their faces. 

In 'Uop^ where people have su^ 
tained tfarai^ves with chewy moantain 
anowTOOt and sour but edible plants not 
xKxmally eaten, as manyas 30 children 
are hospitalized every 10 days fx* mal- 
nutrition, said Cho Hyun Sook, •.-i.-air- 

See SURVIVAL, Page 7 


DU 


Tne Dollar 


ManSiYe4Pji. pwwiatBeow 

1.7065 1.7253 

1.6373 1.632 

HZ90 114.40 

5.7855 52194 







ltiMiesv^*PM pwwtouBClaw 

. 88221 BSf^ 


Night Brings 
Terror to 
Sierra Leone 


By James Rupert 

muMiagian PasfServiire 

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone — By 
the standards of the well-off, James, a 
government bureaucrat in h^ thirties, 
didn't have muck His career had fur- 
nished his cramped, two-room slum 
house with a television and a boombox 
and yielded some spare cash that 
would have been useful when his preg- 
nant wife gives birth. 

But at 2 A.M. Friday, two men with 
guns shot their way in, blowing the 
thumb off James's right hand, and stole 
it aU. “They said tiiey had information 
that 1 had money" and "told me they 
were oh a military mission ~ 'Op- 
eration Pay Yourself,’ ” James said. 
When they found his gold bracelet, 
“they checked it and asked me how 
many carats it was," then took it, he 
said. 

James, a muscular man, sat In his 
living room, his hand heavily band- 
aged. “Tm only telling you this if you 
wra't print my full name or this ad- 
dress,' * he said. “If the People's Anny 
finds I have talked about this, they can 
come ba ck , and no one will protect me 
or my family." 

Tbe People’s Army is the name 
claimed by Sierra Leone's new mil- 
itary rulers — an alliance of the army 
and a rural rebel movement, the Rev- 
olutionary United I^QL The military 
overthrew Ahmad Tejan Kabbah, the 
civilian president, two weeks ago, 
largely because of poor pay and con- 
ditions for soldiers, and invited the 
rebels to join in. 

Since then, aighttime tenor has de- 
scended on E^eetowiL Each day in the 
streets, markets and churches, resi- 
dents furtively exchange new reports 
of killings, looting and rape. 

Since British colonial days. Sierra 
Leone has suffered the crime and hu- 

See TERROR, Page 4 




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(fln. M«n/ni- 

Sierra Leonians at a rally in Freetown to protest foreign intervention. 

In Africa^ a New Will 
To Confront Problems 


By Howard W. French 

Nr*' Yetb Times Serthf 

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — For de- 
cades, few major decisions were made 
by AMcan leaders without first care- 
fully consulting powerfoJ foreign pat- 
rons, be they former colonial masters in 
Ranee or Britain or Cold War su- 
perpowers in Washington or Moscow. 

But in recent weeks, two crises have 
shown what many political analysts on 

IVEWS ANALYSIS 

this continent and abroad say is a sur- 
prising new determination by many 
African countries to take command of 
their own regional affairs. 

The first crisis culminated in the 
overthrow last month of the longtime 
dictator, Mobutu Sese Seko, in Zaire, 
now Congo. 

Now a Nigerian-led West African 
intervention force is trying to reverse a 


military coup against an elected gov- 
ernment in Sierra Leone. 

The analysts say that African coun- 
tries have begun moving with unac- 
customed forcefulness to settle prob- 
lems that threaten regional stability, 
ushering in what one senior Clintra 
administration ofticial called Area’s 
“post-post-colonial era." 

This newfound political activism 
grows out of a sense of a profound 
vacuum left by the collapre of the 
Soviet Union and a progressive aban- 
dofunent of Africa by the West, and is 
based on a notion that the development 
and security of one country carmot be 
isolated from wh^ is h^pening in 
surrounding countries. 

The two recent African interven- 
tions have not only come without the 
support of outsiders, they luve been 
conducted in the face of warnings 
against them by the West. 

See AFRICA, Page 4 


currency traders around the world furi- 
ously began translating the fears about a 
delay in the euro into the language of 
dollars and Deutsche marks. In the ar- 
cane but well-established playbooks for 
currency speculation, that meant selling 
off dollars and buying up Deutsche 
marks because the mart: was now less 
suddenly likely to be replaced by the 
newer and somewhat wciiker euro. 

The value of a dollar opened at 
1.7220 DM Monday morning and 
quickly dropped to 1 .7 1 20. (Page 1 1 ) 

Diplomuis from rruuiy countries took 
pains to preach "understanding" for the 
new French government, adding that 
France had not said anything to un- 
dermine the basic principles of the euro 
and were merely looking to shore up 
support for goals that all governments 
.support, at least in principle. 

“The French need lime in order to 
define their own position." said a Ger- 
man diplomat, who asked not to be 
identified. 

See E1120PE, Page 4 


Shells Rain 
On Center of 
Brazzaville 

France and U.S, Strive 
To Evacuate Citizens 


By Howard W. French 

Niir ii'fk Timr*Scnicc 

ABIDJ.AN, Ivory Coast — In a fifth 
day of fighting betw'een the national 
army and a militia Iwal to a former 
head of state, mortar fire rained down 
un the center of the capital of the 
Congo Republic. Brazzaville, as 
France and the United States struggled 
to evacuate their citizens from the 
city. 

AcconJing to radio reports from the 
city, government forces loy.i] to Pres- 
ident Pascal Lissouba fired rockets and 
mortars Monday from a hillside area 
into downtown areas held by forces 
controlled by the former bead of state, 
Denis Sas.sou-Nguesso. 

Government troops were also re- 
ported to have engaged in heavy loot- 
ing of business districts in the city. 

With the two sides struggling for 
control of the city in heavy street frght- 
ing. reports from French milit^ 
soiiures in Brazzaville said that the city 
had been cut in two, with barricades 
manned by heavily armed Fighters de- 
lineating a jagged, shifting fironL 

Fighting broke out in Brazzaville 
last weeL when Mr. Lissouba de- 
ployed soldiers under cover of dark- 
ness to surround the home of Mr. Sas- 
sou-Nguesso. his longtime political 
rival. Shortly after daybreak Thursday, 
witnesses said, goverrunem troops at- 
tacked Mr. Sassou-Nguesso's resi- 
dence, but the former president was 
able to flee and quicldy rallied his 
forces to launch a strong counterattack 
that seems to have caught the gov- 
ernment by surprise. 

With presidential eleaions sched- 

See BRAZZAVILLE, Page 4 


Caviar Whrs Decimate Sturgeon 

In the Caspian, a Gutted Industry Staggers Toward Collapse 


By Lee Hockstader 

Washington Post Service 

ASIHAKHAN, Russia — His mouthfril of gold 
teeth arrayed in a broad grin, Vova stepped over the 
carcasses of his latest catch — four glistening Caspian 
Sea sturgeon, armor-plated, freshly gutted and still 
writhing in die grass. 

“The river fee^ os!" Vova enthused, as heedless 
of the twitching of the giant fish as he is of foe death 
throes of Russia's once migbfy caviar industry, a 
massacre to which he was contributing. 

Using a fflfoy plastic tu^ his friend Gmya set about 
straining, rinsing and saltii^ foe stnigeons' yield, 1 1 
kilograms (25 pounds) of pearly black caviar. Tlie 
half-honr raocranre in titeu* trau-strewn back yard 
will net Vova and his friends a delicious tiinngr and 
maybe $200 once they sell the roe to smi^leTs. At the 
most fashionable purveyors of fine fbodsin London, 
New York or Paris, this caviar might fetch $13,000 — 
or double that when it comes from the even rarer white 
sturgeon called beluga. 


Here amid the shabby viUages in southern Russia’s 
Volga River della. 1 100 kilometers (700 miles) south- 
east of Moscow, it is the peak of foe sturgeon spawning 
season, a six-week spring free-for-all during which 
legal fishennen, Russian border guards and police 
anned with assault rifles compete with a small army of 
poachers like Vova. Their quarry is caviar, one of the 
world's costliest items and most prized fo^ruffs. 

“It'S the taste of paradise," said Seigei Bogdanov, 
sous-cbef at Czar's Hunt, a chic restaurant near Mos- 
cow. "To eat caviar — on bread, or with vodka, or 
with pancakes — this is trueb^piness." 

It is hard to say who is winning foe caviar wars. By 
all indications, tte big losers are the sturgeon — and 
the wealthy caviar lovers from Japan to Washington 
who are willing to pay up to $2,5(10 for a kilogram of 
the frnesL 

The Caspian, an inland, body of salt water that is 
home to 90 pucent of the world's stuigeon, is sor- 
rouiided by Iran, Turkmenistan and Azerbaijan at the 

See CAVIAR, Page 4 


AGENDA 



1 ^ 





Prosecutor Seeks Stronger Verdict on Serb 

THE Hague (AFP) — nie cUef found guilty of crimes against human- 


THE Hague (AFP) — Ihe chief 
prosecutor id the UN war crimes 
tribunal ordered an appeal Monday 
against a conviction passed foe 
court against a Boauan Serb, Dusan 
Tadic, an official commumqud said. 

The grounds tor araeal appw to 
strengths the case nx stiffening a 
sentence against Mr. Thdic, who was 


from Jaskici, a Bosnian village. 


nUkETWO 


Muhammad AU: The Douce Goes On 

THE AMERICAS 

No Plot Found in 

Pages. 

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iM Hncfaudn/TlM WdMngkM Aw 

A fisherman removing the caviar from a stur- 
geon near the Volga ^ver in southern D»ggia 


Mood ReUef Bill Vetoed 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Presidmt 
Bill Clinton vetoed abill Monday to send 
$5.6 billion in disaster relief to flood 
victims in the Midwest, saying he ob- 
jected to unrelated provisions attached to 
it by Republicans m Congress. 

The white House spokesman, Mi- 
chael McCurry, said the president 
"urges Congress to remove these ex- 
traneous provisions" from the bill 




PAGE TWO 



Perception and Deception / Hiuhamntad Ali crt 


The Tempo Has Slowed, 
But the Dance Goes On 


By David Maraniss 

Wahington Post Service 


B ERRIEK springs. MJchigan— No 
words ai fiisL The gre^g comes 
from his eyes, diea a handshake, light 
as a butterfly, followed 1^ a gesture 
that si^, ‘‘Follow me." He has just popped 
out the back doK tsS his fann house wearing 
green pants and a light broWn wool pullover 
with sunglasses tucked coolly into the mock 
turtleneck collar. He is canymg an old black 
briefcase. His hair is longer than usual and a tnt 
uncombed. He starts walking toward his of- 
fice, a converted barn on the lower end of the 
dicular driveway. 

He moves slowly, lurchiim slightly forward 
as he goes, never a stumt^ but sometimes 
seeming on the verge of one. as thou^ his 
world slopes downhill. He opens ±e door and 
stands aside, following, not leading, on the 
way upstairs to his second floor ofiioe. 
Halfway up, it becomes clear why. He sticks 
out a band and catches his visitor's foot from 
behind. The old trip-up-the-stairs trick. 
Muhammad Ali loves tncks. 

At the of the stairs is the headquarters of 
GOAT. Another trick. It is Ae playfrilly ironic 
acronyin for Greatest of All Time, Incorpor- 
ated. Ali wants Ae woiid u> know that he is just 
another goat, oos living thing m this vast and 
miraculous universe. But mso the greatest 
there ever was. He is SS, his mouA a^ body 
slowed by Parkinson’s disease, yet still ar- 
guably Ae best known and most beloved figure 
in Ae world. Who else? 'Ihe Pope? Nelson 
Mandela? Michael Jordan? Ali might wm in a 
split decision. 

Even Ae most dramatic lives move m cycles 
of loss and recovery. 

Last summer in Atlanta, when Ali stood 
alone in the spodight, Ae world watching, his 
hands trembling, and lit Ae Olympic flan^ he 
began anoAer cycle, pertu^ his ultimate 
comeback, as emotional as any he bad staged 
in Ae ring against Joe Fraaer or George Fore- 
man. For 16 years he had been letiiid from 
boxing. During that time be bad gone through 
periods of bmedom and uncertainty. Not 
be was passd, but Ae world tends to forget its 
old kings wbm new ones come around 
He l^t going as best he could. Ids healA 
deteriorating, spreading good will wiA his 
sxniline eyes. Dying to keep his name alive. 
Then, fmally, his moment airived a g ain , fust at 
Ae Olympics, Aen at the Academy Awards, 


where he bore silent witness to “When We 
Were Kings,” the Oscar-winning documen- 
tt^ about his dramatic heavyweig^ cham- 
pionship fight in October 1974 against F<ore- 
man in wh^ was Aen Zaire. 

The shimmering house of movie stars 
seemed diminished prqx>stieroas, 

^en Ali rose and stood befrne th^ Yet some 
saw in Aat appearance a hint of Ae mandlin: 
poor Ali, enfeebled and paunchy, dragged out 
as ano A ct melodramatic H<dlyw<^ gimmick. 
Was be real or was he memo^ was left 

of him if he could no longer float and sting? 

Quite a bit, it turns out. No sorrow and pi^ 
from the champ. He says he cherished his 
perfonnaoces at Ae Olympics and Academy 
Awards more than anyone could know. Pub- 
licity is his lifeblood, more important to him 
than any medicine be is supposed to take. 

“Pr^ keeps me alive, man.” he says, wxA 
an honesty that softens the edge of his Ma 
“Press keeps me alive. Press and TV. 
Olympics. Academy Awards. ‘When We 
Were Kings.’ Ke^ me alrve." 

When tire producers sent him a videotape of 
“When We were Rings,'* he sAck it into his 
VCR at home and watdied it day after day. At 
a recent autograph exirava^nza in Las Vegas, 
he conducted his own cx>U by comparing his 
line to Aose for Tun Brown, Paul Homung, 
Bobby Hull and Ernie Banks. Twice as long as 
any of them. Staying alive. And the biggest 
life-saver of all: that night in Atlanta last July, 
36 years he had first danced onto Ae 
world scene as the brash young Olymiric 
champion, Cassius Marralius Clay. 

Long after the torch scene was over, Ali 
would not let go. He went beck to 1^ suite vriA 
his wife, Lonnie, and a few close fliends. They 
were trr^ ematioDally drained frtm the sur- 
prise, anxiety and thrill of the occasion, but Ali 
would not go to sieip. He was still holding the 
long white and gold torch, whldi he had kept as 
a prized memento. He cradled it in his arms, 
turning it over and over, just looking at it. not 
saying much, sitting in a big chair, smiling, 
hour after hour. 

“I think the man was just awed — just 
completely awed by Ae whole experience,” 
Lonnie Afl recalled. “He was so excited. It 
took forever for him to go to bed, he was on 
sochahigh. Hefounditvecy hard to comeback 
down to earA. There was just such a fabulous 
response. No one expected Aat** 

By Ae time he ana Lonnie retumed to Aeir 
farm house here m southern Michigan, die mait 


was already hacking up, QooAng in at tenfold 
Ae previous pace. Letters firom everywhere. 
The return of a trembling Ali had unloosed 
powerful feelings in people. They said A^ 
cried at his beauty and perseverance. 'They said 
he reminded thm of what it means to stand up 
for something you believe in. Ksabled people 
Old sixties activists. Republicans. Black. 
Write. Christian. Jewish. Muslim. A little boy 
frtMn Germany, a boxing fan from Eo^and, a 
radiologist from Sudan, a secretary irmn Saudi 
Arabia — Ae multitudes Aanked him for 
giving Aem hope. 

W HEN ALI readies his ofitce, he 
rak« his cusAosary chair against 
Ae side walL 'There is work A be 
done, Ae room is ovCTcrowded 
wiA memenAs A be signed for charity, and his 
assistant, Kim Forburger, is waiting fat turn 
wiA a big blue felt pen. But Ali has something 
else in mind ri^t now. 

“MmmmmiiL Watch this, man.** he says. 
His, voice sounds like the soft, slurred grumble- 
whUpCT of someone trying A clear & throat 
on die way out of a deep sleep. Conversing 
wiA him for the first time, oiw unavoidably has 
A say. “I'm sorry, what?” now and th^, or 
simply pretend A understand him, but soon 
enou^ one adjusts, and it becomes obvious 
that Paridnson's has not slowed his brain, mily 
his moAr skills. 

He walks toward Ae doorway and looks 
back wiA a smile. , 

“Oh, have you seen Muhammad levitate 
yet?’* I^rburger asks. She suddenly becomes 
the female assistant in a Veg^ act. WiA a 
sweep of her band, she says. ‘ ‘Come ovct here. 


Uini 


Stand right ivtVmd him. Now watch his fed. 
Watch his feet” 

Ali goes still and silent, meditating. His hands 
stop shaking. He seems A radiate somethii^ A 

mystical ama? Ever so slowly, bis feet rise obm 
Ae floor, incfa, three in^^ rix ipdies. His 
hands are not «*^«ching anyAxD& “Ehhhh. 
Pretty heavy, mmmm,’' he sajrs. His visitor. 
familiar wiA Ihe lore of All's leviGtiions, yet 
easily duped, watches slack-jawed as Ae cfaanq) 
floats in the air for several seconds. 

Come over here, Ali motions. To the side. 
“Look,** hesays. He is not really levitat^. of 
course. He managed A balance himself 
pCTfectly , Parkinson’s notwithstanding, all 250 
poun^ him, on the tiptoes of his Ti^t foot, 
creating an optical illuwn from that 

boA of his feet have lifted ofi Ae ground. 

The tricks have only just begun. He hauls 
out a huge gray plastic Aolbox, opens it and 
peers inside. His hands now move wiA Ae 
delicacy of a surgeon selecting the correct 
instroment from bag. For the next quarter- 
hour, he performs tire simple, delightful tricks 
of an at^ireotice magician. Balls and coins 
appear a^ disappear, ropes change lengths, 
sticks turn colors. “Maaaim! Maaannl 
Heavy!** be says. 

W^t is going on here? In h is just Ah 
amosiog himsetf wiA magic tricks Aat be has 
bees dmng over and over for many years for 
anyone w!AConiesAseehun.BDtlieisalso,as 
always, making a more profound point He has 
tranderted his old boxi^ sldlls and bis poetry 
and his homespun {Ailosophy A anoAer realm, 
from words A magic. 

The world sees him now, lurching a bit, 
slurring some, getting old. trembling, and re- 


disea$ej Reformer champion^ 
shtnm in ihe bam uAere he once 
trained forfi^d^ w sdU 
arguably ^ kiioun and r. 

magi beloved in the wM 
Who else? The Pape? Ndson J 
jlfauipfay Michael Jordan? .^ 
n^^mnindsplddeasS^ 

calls that unspeakably great and goi^om and ,, 
garznlous young man Aat he o nce’ was. He * 
understands that contrasL he« sayh^ 
nothing is as. it appears. Ltfe is 
of perception and deception. 

Pom and philoeoptaeiR cedteugilaie this, 
and boxers know it intuitively. shadow^ 
boxing before the Foreman fight: “Geme eet^. 
me, sodtCT. Fm dancin’! 1*00 danca*l No, fm,. 
not here. I'm Acre! You’re out, sndni”)’ 
Back when be was Cassius Qay, he^cetended' 
Aat he demenfed before fi^boog Stxuty, 
r iftnn because he had heard that the only cons* 
who scared big'bad Soruty in {uison were tiie 
madmwL By acting crazy, he not only ujected’. 
a dose of fear inA IJstoo, he took some out of- 
himself. Uie is a trick. .... 

Perception and deception. He has returned^ 
A his chair m Ae c^ce. wiA Ins blaA 
briefcase on his lap. Slowly and cacduDy he.r 
opens it up and looks inside as tiioi^ & is ; 
examining its contents for Ae first time. 
Tucked in die upper compartment is lus . 
passport Paikinson^s has not slowed his. 
travds. He*s at home no more tiian 90 days a- 
year. Washington, Los Amgeles, Umisville, 
Las Vegas in a week, doing good deeds. He 
visits SCTiools, campaigns against child abuse. ' 
for mote Parkinson’s funding, for peace and 
Alerance. Everyone wants to see the champ. 
Germany is clainonng for him. Its national, 
television nerwrfrkjust ran an hour-long docu-* 
mentary on him. 

Next A Ae passport is a laminated tradine 
card. He lifts it out and studies it There’s ^ 
next A Sugar Ray Robinson and Joe Louis.- 
“1^ of Ae greatest fighters in the world,” he 
says. He pauses. “MnmimiiL BoA dead.” 

Ali Amtrft a lot about deaA. Aging and deaA 
and life after death. His pt^osophy is at once • 
selfiA and selfless. Publicity k^ps him alive. * 
He wants A stay alive so that m can make 
people haj^ and do good deeds. And “good- 
dee^ are tlu rent we pay for our bouse m. 
heaven.” 

He is tftarhing and preaching now. A new . 
poetry, slower, no Aymes. stream of cco- 
sciousness, deeper meaning. 

Stacked in rows aU»g Ae botAm are a- 
collection of little leaAer books, five of Aeniv 
in red and pink and green. It turns out A^ are ■ 
Bibles. Why he needs five in a Mefcase is not 
clear. What he does wiA Aem is part of the- 
mystery of Muhammad All. 


Illl 


UN Mission Questions 
Fairness of Algeria Vote 

The Assoeiaud Press 

ALGIERS —A United Nations mission A monitor fairness 
in Ae elections last week in Algeria has cast doubt <xi the 
neutrality of the voa counting. 

The UN mission criticized Ae use of mobile booths that 
were used A gather votes frotn Ae NorA African countty's 
scattered population. Ihe portable booths accounted for 5,000 
of Ae 35.000 voting sAtions. 

Parries close to Ae military-backed government won a 
majority of seats m Ae legislative elections, Ae first since Ae 
beriming of a bloody five-year insurgency. 

Opposition parties have charged Ae government wiA bal lot 
stuflmg. and even a pro-govenunent party has denounced 
what it called irregularities. 

The UN mission's 1 20 observers considered the conAtions 
of Ae mobile voting booths “not sufficient to guarantee 
neutrality,'* Ae United Nations said in a stetemenL 

On Saterday, observers from the Organization for African 
Unity called Ae votingprocess “clear.” 

PiWident Liamine ^roual on Suiuday repeated Ae gov- 
ernment's position that the vote bad talwn place under fair 
conditions and expressed his "satisfaction” wiA the tallying 
by state electi(xi authorities. “'The success of the June 5 
legislAive elections, despite Ae threats and savage acts of 
terrorism, belonp to die people,” he said. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


SUMMER PARIS SPECIAL 



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Oiina Restricts Travd to Hong Kang 

BEIJING (Reuters) — China has issued tighter rules on 
already restricted travel from the mainland to Hcmg Kong to 
prevent a flood of visitexs eager a witness Beijing's le- 
sum^xion of sovereignty over Ae British colony, officios said 
Monday. 

“Hong Kong is too small- A receive Ae number of people 
who want A witness Hoag Kong's retura,” said an official of 
Ae Hoag Kong and Macau Affairs Office. 

The restrictions will be in place from June 15 to July 15, 
while transit stopovers would be banned frxxn June 30 to July 
2. Flights, however, would remain unchanged. 

Italian Museums to Extend Hours 

ROME (AFP) — Most Italian museums will remain open 
untfl U P.M. during Aree months tius summer. Culture 
Minister Walter Veltroni said Monday. 

Mr. Veltroni said extending opening times from June 15 A 
Sept. 15 would place Italy “as Ae avant-garde of Europe" m 
Ae promotion of its artistic wealA. 

Vienna Maintains Tourism Boom 

VIENNA (Bloomberg) — Vienna is hoIAng its position as 
aptmular imcraatioiial Aurismdesemation, Aough Pra^e zad 
Budapest are dravring increased numbers of foreign visitors. 

A survey by the Institute forTourism and Leisure, in Vienna, 
said Ae number of overnight stays, at more than 7 million, was 
28.6 percent higher Aao in Prague or Budapest in 1995. 


Supporters of Pope’s Attacker 
Give Up Hijacking in Cologne 


Gas Fires Banned i 
For Mecca Pilgrimis 


‘ The Avtxitjsed Press 

COLOGNE— Two hijackets seeking 
publicity for Ae Turk who shot 
Jolu Pwl n in 1981 surreodered at 0> 
logne airport Monday, freeing 80 crew 
CTid passengers aboard ao Air Malta jet- 
liner. 

An airport spokesman said Ae two 
men surrentfered their weapons and left 
Ae plane nearly three hours after it 
landra m Cologne. None of the pas- 
senras or crew were hort. 

‘*jfiie tw Iddcappeis case out of the 
airplane with their hands and sur- 
lendeted A pc^ce,” the spoknman said. 

One of Ae meu had claimed A have a 
b(xnb, but the police said it was a feke. 

Ulrich Oranitzka. a police officer in 
charge of the operation, said at a news 
conference the Turkish hijackers wasted 
A make “a statement of solidarity” for 
Mehmet Ali Agca. the Turk jailed m 
Italy for shooting Ae Pope, so be woold 


feel “be has not been abandoned.’” 

Mr. Granitzka denied an earlier police 
statement by the police Aat the hijackere 
were pressing for Mr. Agea’s release. 

A police spokesman said they bad 
demanded ai television mterview to pub- 
licize tiieir deman^ indicating tb^ 
would surrender imm^ately after 
speaking a Ae media. However, the 
drama ended before any mterview was 
amnged. 

Bve puseogers, uchiding an elderly 
woman wiA hMt ironble. were released 
about an hour after Ae flight landed. 

'The police said Ae plaw bad six crew 
membM and 74 pas^gers: 17 Turks. 
32 Libyans, 22 Maltese, a Russian, an 
Amerit^ and a German. 

The airport was notified by die pilot 
around 3:30 A.M. that Ae Boeiog 737- 
300 eo route from Malta A Istanbul had 
been hijacked and was beaded A Co- 
logne. a spokesman said. 


Agence Frimte-Presse 
.lUYADH — Saudi Arabia on Mo^ 
day announced a ban on Ae ure of bot- 
tled w for cooking during the aiuii^ 
Mhsliinpflirimage A Mecca to avokf a 
repetition of Ae ^ Aat killed more Am 
3(i0 people m April. 

“Staxting from the next pilgrimage;'' 
in 1998, ‘*gas rin^ and gas cookers will 
be totally banned m the holy places!” 
said Ae direc Ar general of civil defend 
General Mohammed ibn All SubeilL ■ 
The pilgrims in and aronnd Mecca id 
eastern Sa^ Arabia ‘ ‘will have to 
do wiA cold meals or do Aeir cookug 
outside Ae holy places.” be told tbe 
newspaper Al Madina al Munawara. ; 

He al^ said tiie au Aorities were con- 
sidering rmlacing the do A tents, usedjo 
accommoebte hundreds of thousands of 
pil^ims, wiA firqnoof materials. The 
fire April 15 during the hajj, or anoi^ 
pilgrimage to Islam's holiest sites, wns 
spuked by a pilgrim cooking on a gas 
ring, Ae authorities said. ; 


liiii 

■I'lr 


WEATHER 


Eleven people were injured when a Japan Airlines MD- 1 1 
plane hit severe air tuibuleoce over central Japan on its way m 
nom Hong Kong late Sunday, Ae police said Moneby. (AP) 

AUnited Airlines jet wiASl people aboard veered 'inAan 
abrupt climb after coming wiAm a hdf-mile of a private plane 
near O'Hare International Airport in Chicago. Two mght 
attendants were injured. (AP) 

Iran has tripled the number of air corridors for civilian 
airlmeis passing tiuough its airspace after upgrading its radar 
system, aviation officials said Monday. (AFP) 

The company that controls Singapore’s landmark 
Raffles Hotel, Raffles Holdings Pte. Ltd., plans to buy 
Brown's Hotel in London for about 105 million Singapore 
dollars (S73.4 iniAon) from Granada Group PLC. (AP) 

U.S. dtizeiis should postpone travel to the Republic of 
Congo, the State Department has warned, because of fighting 
and looting in Brazzaville, the capital. (AFP) 


4 f( Suite Hotel 

/gur Rssidcnce in the heert of 
Zurich, very ceneroui, eieoontcnd 
diihnguisned. Asfc lot offer. 


N'oriitrcm 1, CH-5C06 ZyrkH 
?ricr,e0:/363 36do 
To OI/SAZ J6 26 


death pfonCE 


HaWiltBidtMrkwidi 
oMim to dGadi d 

UATHIDA 

duchess OF ARGYLL 
Who lassed nay 01 
fib Jim 1987 in 
Ttobmiia 
taka phtt in (iwab 
on WBtoida]r, ll9i Jun 
in Vaito (Rano^ 


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Forecast for Wednesday tfirDugh Friday, as ptovided by AceuWeatheK Asia 



North America 

Stfwy and hot 
and Thuraday from New 
Yorfi Id WaaMngton. D.C.. 
bui >1 may ihundentonn 
Friday. Boston may reach 
35 degreea Wadneadey. 
Oien eooler with thunder- 
Biorms likely. Thunder- 
siorma will brinp heary 
downeom from Cmhoma 
to southern IBnoe. Cool In 
theNortmest 


Europe 

Wann m norttiwsat Empe 
Wedneaday with strong 
mundarstORns, then cooler 
Thuriday and Friday. 
Sunny and vwy wann from 
Poland into the Baltic 
reaon. but cool widi tfnw- 
eis from the Balkm into 
Turiiey. Remaining hot m 
Spain and aouihern 
FiancS’ ItBly anil be nice 
wtti some sunshine 


Asia 

Partly to mostly sunny and 
very warm in Beijing 
Wednesday through Fn- 
day. Tokyo will be warm 
and humid with eonM sun 
and the chance of e thun- 
oeietorm each dw. Pardy 
eunny In Seoul. Fulham 
India will have showers 
and heavy downpours, but 
the north will reitiain hot 
and dry. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUN E, TliESDAY, JUNE 10, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 



PAGES 


'Adulterous General Won’t Seek Post 


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tf Ui iJt a hfifit .i 

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The Asfvcutted Press 

WASHINGTON — General Jose|A 
jUlston removed himself Monday from 
consideration as chairman of the Joint 
Chi^ of Staff because of an adulterous 
pffair 'moie titan a decade ago, admin- 
istration afficiais said. 

General Ralston made the decision 
after conferring with Defense Secretary 
WUliam Cohen and trying to save his 
career by seeking support on Capitol 
HiU. 

The lawmakers were not supportive. 
^ ^ four-star air force general in- 
fctfined Mr. Cohen of his intentims. 

General Ralston, 53, had an adul- 
teroQS affair with a civilian while he was 
a student at the National War CoUeee 
and separated from his wife in the mid- 
i980s. It became public last week. 

Ofiicials said he had been reluc tant to 
remove himself from consideration for 
the top job. 

‘*He's been getting letters and call* 
from old friends telling him to hang 
tough, that this would blow over,’' said 
an official who spoke on condition of 
anonymity. 

Gooeral Ralston made phone calls 
seddng snppm and headed to C^tol 
Hill to deto^ne whether his candidly 
could survive accusations that the 
PeoU^on has a double standard on adol- 
lety and is treating him more leniently, 
the official said. 

In addition to meeting with Mr. Co- 


h^ he spoke with the cunent Joint 
Chiefs chainnan; General John Sha- 
Ukasbvili of the army, to whom he is 
demty. 

Senator Dan Coats, R^niblican of 
Indiana and a senior member of the 
Armed Services Committee, met 
imvately with General Ralston for 45 
minutes to review **both sides" of the 
adultei^ matter, a spititesman saiA 

Critics have accused die Pentagon of 
a double standard, saying others such as 
First Lieutenant Kelly Flinn of the air- 
force have been singled out and pen- 
alized for aduhety. 

Even those who say that General Ral- 
ston’s affair with a civilian woman in 
(he 1980s while he was separated from 
his wife should not disqual^ him from 
ptpmotioii, cooc&iled that in the cunent 
climate be had little choice but to step 
aside. 

Senator ONmpia Snowe, R^blican 
of Maine and a member of the Armed 
Services Committee, the panel must 
approve the administraocxi's nominee 
to head the Joint Chiefs, sairi General 
Ralston’s case might have been con- 
sidered differently *’in an i so lated con- 
text" 

Mr. Cohen caused a fnesmnn of crit- 
icism from women’s groups and mem- 
bers of Coiffiress when he said recently 
that GraeraTRalsion's affiur with a CIA 
employee 13 years ago did not dis- 
qualify him as a leading contender to 


succeed General Shalikashviii. 

He subsequently tempered those re- 
marks, and on Saturday set up an in* 
d^ndent commission to smdy how 
militaiy law applies to consensual sexu- 
al relations. 

Pentagon officials said last week that 
General Ralston was still determined to 
fight for the nomination but that was 
before he was aware of the criticism the 
Pentagon was taking. 

General Ralston’s supporters also 
pointed out that his case was very dif- 
ferent from that of Lieutenant Flinn’s. 
She faced court-martial and ultimately 
was discharged from the air force not 
<mly because of her adulterous affair but 
also because she disobeyed an order to 
end it and lied about it. 

Lieutenant Flinn, in an interview in 
Newsweek magaune, said the military 
followed a different standard for Gen- 
eral Ralston. Two names that have since 
^erged as possible candidates for the 
job are Admiral Joseph Lopez, com- 
mander of navy forces in Europe and 
General Wesley Clark of the army, bead 
of the U.S. Southern Command 

Mr. Cohen is not expected to an- 
nounce a decision until aher he returns 
from a trip to Europe starting next week. 
Pentagon officials dismissed reports 
that General Shalikashviii might be per- 
suaded to stay in his post for another 
two-year term. He is to leave in the 
autumn. 



Air Force Scrambling 
To Keep Young Pilots 

Complaints About the Stress of Service 
And Lure of Airline Jobs Spark Exodus 


By Bradley Graham 

Wj,ihingi 0 n Ptat Semtv 


Sipjn AaMVnK ,V..,«ianl IHcv. 

Genn’al Ralston and his wife arri- 
ving in Washington. He cut short a 
trip to return to discuss his career. 


Church Arson Inquiry Shows No Sign of Conspiracy 


er 

ie 


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By George Lardner Jr. 

Wushutgiem Past Sen-in 

WASHINGTON — A federal task 
fcMce set up last year to deal with church 
buinii^ has reponed that almost 200 
suspects have been arrested, more than 
75 percent of them since the panel’s 
creation, but that the evidence thus far 
does not support fears of a national 
consfuracy. 

In a rqxHt to President Bill Clinum 
commemorating die first anniversaiy of 
the National Church Arson Task Fence, 
officials of the IVeasury and Justice 
panmmts said they have opened 429 
investigations of arsons, bemhmgs and 
affemp^ bnnbiiigs at houses of wor- 
ship dating back to Jan. 1, l^S. Almost 
four out of 10 (37.8 pen^t) of those 
attacks were at predominantly black 
clniiches, and more than three-quarters 
of the black churches were in the Soufli. 

While "the arsons at African Atner- 


*n‘ti /Vi 




lean chnrehes raised signiffcant fears 
about an increase in raeSUy motivated 
crimes,’ ’ the task fmee s^ the attacks, 
“at both African American and other 
houses of worship, were motivated by a 
wide array of factors, including not only 
blatant racism or rdigions Inured, but 
also frnancial profit, burglary and per- 
sonal revenge." 

Only a few of the fires were linked by 
craunm defendants. Charges of con- 
spiracy have been filed "in a limited 
numb^ of cases," bat thereport said tbe 
conspiracies have tended tote confined 
to tbe small geographic areas where the 
arsons have occun% 

Members and fonner members of 
hate groups, soch as.tfae Ku Klux Klan, 
have been found guilty of church arsons 
in "a handfiil of cases," the task force 
said, but most of tbe 1 10 defendants who 
have been convicted in thepast two-and- 
a-half years fen- 77 of the fires were not 
found to be members of hate groups. 


POLITICAL 


Overall, federaL state and local law 
enforcement agencies have arrested 199 
people in connection with 150 of those 
429 attacks, an arrest rate of 35 percent. 

James Johnson, assistant Treasury 
secretary for enforcement, said at a 
news conference that this was "tre- 
mendous progress," more than double 
the 1 6 percent arrest rate for arson cases 
in general 

Since last June, Mr. Johnson added, 
tbe rate of attacks on both black and 
white churches has fallen dramatically, 
but reports of new arsons keep coming 
in. The task force luu (^)eoed 50 new 
investigations since March. 

TWenty-five defendants were found 
guilty in federal court of arson attacks, 
including 14 who woe convicted on 
criminal civil ri^ts charges. The cases 
included the brought under tbe 
1996 Church Arson Prevention Act, 
which gave feder^ prosecutors greater 
power to pursue burnings and desec- 


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Tax Cut for Workers^ 
■Not for BureaucrcUs ’ 

' WASHING-rON — The Honse 
Wai^aod Means chairman. Bill Arch- 
’ ei^aaijfoDday propr^ tbe largest tax 
cut since 1981, offoiing relief for fam- 
_ ilies vdih college-bound children, in- 
' vestexs and businesses. 

"The tax relief package we will 
consider represents a solid first step 
' toward a smaller ^vemment for bu- 
reaucrats in Wasttijagton and a larger 
payidieck for workm in the heazt- 
la^" said Mr. Aidier, Republkao of 
, Texas. . 

The $85 billion jackage is ambi- 
r tipos. It includes a 5500 per-child tax 
credit for children under age 17 and 
' abo^ $35 billion in tax relief to help 
, fimflies send children to college. 

The bill pn^xrses reducing die 28 
percent capital gains tax to 10 percent 
^ tor couples earning less than 54 1 400 a 
year, which Mr. Archer said would 
boiefii 5 miUimi Americans. Above 
that, die rate goes to 20 percenL 
- DemoenUs criticized the proposal as 
providing nothing for the woikmg 
poor, setting die stage for a heated 


partisan battle that is likely to extend to 
the 1998 elections. "Republicans have 
siphoned off many of the gains from 
our current fertile economic climate 
and deltveied them directly to the 
rich," Democrats on the Ways and 
Means Committee said m a statemenL 

Mr. Archer proposed a tax credit of 
up to 51400 to help parents pay for 
coUege as well as a 510.000 de^tion 
paid through edncatioiial investment 
accounts. 

Tbe Clinton plan negotiated with 
R^bli^ congressional leaders con- 
tains no investment accounts. (AP) 

House Republicans 
Unveil Health Plans 

WASHING-rON — House Rqjnb- 
licans have offered a $16 billion plan 
to provide health care for uninsured 
children, but they said di^ could not 
cmnpletely fulfill diedr promise to set 
aside $1.5 l^on to hem low-income 
eldCTly people pay heuth insurance 
premiums. 

The Republicans said th^ had been 
uuahle to find all the tnoney needed to 
keq> diat promise;, which is part of the 
bipartisan budget agreement reached 


last month by President Bill Clinton 
and congressional leaders. The agree- 
iDem said tiiat Congress would provide 
$14 billion in the next five years "to 
ease the impact of mcreasing Medicare 
premiams on low-income beoeficiar- 
ies." 

But House Republicans said 
Sunday that they had found only $400 
million for this purpose. That is the 
amount provided in le^slation the 
House Commerce Committee expects 
to approve this week. 

The decision on this issue will affect 
three million elderly people with in- 
comes 20 percent to 50 percent above 
die offidm poverty level . — that is. 
with annual incomes from $9,468 to 
$11,835. (NYT) 

Quote /Unquote 

Louis Freeh, the FBI director, say- 
ing he plans to remain involved in 
high-profile cases despite criticism 
about his role in the FBI ’s questioning 
of Richard Jewell, suspeette and then 
cleared in the Olympics bombing case: 
" I will be on the phone and take cfaaige 
of cases, as I have, whenever I think 
it's appropriaie for the leader of the 
FBI to have that presence.” (AP) 


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ration at houses of worship. Officials of 
the National Council of Churches, 
which brought aneniion to the issue, 
commended members of the task force 
’ ’for the thoroughness and scope of their 
investigation and for the speed of their 
response when we called for assist- 
ance." 

The panel jnclude.s officials from the 
Department of Housing and Urban De- 
velopment, whose job is to help the 
council and other groups with rebuild- 
ing efforts, and Federal Emergency 
Management Agency officials, whose 
assignment is to promote local and state 
prevention programs. 

Of the 199 people arrested, 160 are 
white, 34 are black and five are His- 
panic. Eighty-ihree of them were ju- 
veniles. ranging in age from 6 to 17, and 
60 were IS to 24 years old. Of the 1 10 
people convicted. 94 were white and 13 
were black: the races of three of those 
arrested were not available. 


WASHINGTON — Mounting num- 
bers of young pilots are fleeing the U.S. 
military for well-paying commercial 
airline jobs after less than a decade of 
service, many complaining that a de- 
terioration in the quality of military life 
in the post-Cold War era has m^e a 
longer service career less desirable. 

So far this year, the 588 U.S. Air 
Force pilots scheduled to leave exceed 
the 479 who exited in ail of last year. 
The depamires are raising costs by for- 
cing the Pentagon to pay larger bonuses 
to entice pilots and expand the pool of 
new aviators to keep cockpits filled. 

Defease officials say the exodus is 
p^y a function of increased hiring by 
civilian airlines. But pilots are also leav- 
ing because of dissatisfaction with the 
intensified stresses and eroded benefits 
of present-day U.S. military service. In 
large pan, this is caused by a rise in 
prolonged assignments abroad. Junior- 
ranking pilots are increasingly reluctant 
to stay beyond their minimum eight- or 
nine-year duty obligations. 

While the military branches have 
faced mass flight of pilots before, no- 
tably in the late 1 970$ after the Vietnam 
War and again after the 1991 Gulf War, 
those were temporary occurrences. By 
contrast, the current mro has the mak- 
ings of a long-term trend, ptrimarily be- 
cause commercial aviation demand is 
likely to remain strong. 

Forecasts call for majm* civilian air- 
lines to hire 2,500 to 4,200 pilots a year 
for the next five years, reflecting in- 
dustry expansion and mandatory retire- 
ments at age 60 of pilots who started 
flying during the Vietnam era. 

"We see some trends in airline hiring 
that tell us this will be a longer-term 
problem," said Brigadier General John 
Regni, director of air force personnel 
policy. "Their demand w0 far exceed 
the number of pilots we have who could 
leave voluntarily.’' 

Last year, the' air force experienced a 
drop from 86 percent to 77 percent in the 
proportion of pilots staying in the ser- 
vice between their sixth and 1 1th years, 
a traditional measure of retention. The 
U.S. Navy and Marine Corps expect to 


experience declines in their retention 
rates soon. 

Most alarming for the longer run, the 
share of air force pilots accepting bo- 
nuses to extend their serviw commit- 
ments beyond the initial obligation fell 
to 59 percent last year and is running at 
43 percent tiiis year. 

Given the potentially uoprecedentte 
scale of the exodus, the air force is 
considering an unusual plan to influence 
airline hiring panems dtrecUy by of- 
fering to compensate firms financi^y if 
they pass over younger military aviators 
in favor of employing older ones. 

Under the plan, which grew out of 
talks among military and civilian rep- 
resentatives, the air force would con- 
tinue paying the salaries of retired se- 
nior pilots tor several weeks as they go 
through initial commercial aircraft 
training. Airlines that participate in the 
delayed hiring program also would re- 
ceive points bumping them up on the 
priority list of companies that share in 
government hauling contracts. 

In return, the airlines would ag^ to 
give preferential treatment to military 
pilots who have served at least 15 years. 
A 15-year span has the advantage of 
fulfilling many air force staffing needs 
while still allowing pilots to leave at a 
young enough age. typically in their 
mid-30s, to develop second careers. 

For their pan. pilots who agree to stay 
in the tnilit:^ longer would be assured 
the opportunity while on active duty of 
obtaining an airline transpon rating, is- 
sued by the Federal Aviation Admin- 
istration and mandatory for airline fly- 
ing. TTiey also would be promised air 
force assistance in landing an airline 
job. And, upon reaching the 15-year 
mark, they would be eligible for a 
$100,000 separation bonus or possibly a 
package of early-retirement benefits. 

Air force leaders have yet to ai^nove 
tbe plan, which is scheduled for review 
by me service's four-star generals this 
week. Moreover, the plan would require 
a host of legislative changes. Eaily in- 
dications on Capitol Hill suggest a re- 
luctance among at least some legislators 
to make too many exceptions for militaiy 
pilots by granting them a 15-year early- 
retirement provision or setting senior avi- 
ators up as a preferential hiring group. 


Away From Politics 

• Much of Betty .Shabaxz’s burned 

flesh has been replaced with artificial 
skin, althou^ the widow of Malcolm 
X remans m critical condition. Mrs. 
Shabazz underwent a fourth operation 
to remove and replace skin that was 
burned June 1 in a fire at her apartment. 
Uie operation was successful, with 72 
percent of Mrs. Shabazz's burned tis- 
sue having been removed, said a 
spokeswoman at Jacobi Medical Cen- 
ter in New York. (APi 

• A man fatally shut while walking 
with his wife just two blocks from the 
Rose Festival on the waterfront b Port- 
land, Oregon, was hit by a stray bullet, 


the police said. Kenneth Bryan 
Sbanafelt, 39. of Vancouver, Wash- 
ington, was shot in a street crowded 
with families and couples leisurely 
walking to and from the festival. The 
police said initial indications were that 
the bullet came from a shooting be- 
tween two groups of men five blocks 
away. (API 

• The police used a phony movie to 
make arrests in Boston. They sent 
letters to 3,800 people want^ on 
charges ranging from shoplifting to 
drag dealing, and invited them to be 
extras in a movie. The suspects were 
told they could make more than $200 a 
day if they showed up at the South 
Station bus tenninal for the filming of 
"The Rocky Marciano Story," said a 


police spokesman, Jim Browning. He 
said 54 of the 97 people who responded 
to the mailing showed up. They were 
met by police officers posing as em- 
ployees of the fictitious Crown Pro- 
ductions and escorted onto buses — 
which look them to police headquar- 
ters. (APjl 

• Florida was the top choice In a piril 
asking Americans where they would 
choose to live if they could te in any 
state except the one they live in now. 
The next most frequently mentioned 
states were Arizona, California, Col- 
orado. Tennessee, North Carolina and 
Hawaii, in that c^er. be Harris Poll 
said. I^evious surveys have found that 
most people preferi^ to stay in the 
states where they already lived (AP) 


Kerinedy Apologizes for Family Troubles 


By Sara Rimer 

New Vort Times Servit'e 

SA1£M, Massachusetts 
— After hours of chatter and 
complaints that the state 
Deniocratic Party’s issues 
convention was dragging on 
too Iong« silence enveloped 
the crowded halL Represen- 
tative Joseph Kennedy 2d. 
be charismatic inheritor of 
be state’s most famous polit- 
ical name, be man who 
everyone bad bought would 
have a lock on his party’s 
nomination for governor in 
1998, was at the podium. 
And his voice was breaking. 

"1 had a marriage bat 
didn't work out," Mr. 
Kennedy said to the 2,000 
delegates in be arena at 
Sa)^ State College here. "1 
can’t tell you, and 1 can't put 
into words, how sorry I am 
about that T said bings bat 1 
wish Td never said and I did 
things 1 wish I had never 
done. I’ve told you, I've bid 
Sheila. I've told anyone who 
cared how sorry I am." 

Mr. Kenntey's second 
wife, Beb. was seated on be 
stage behind him. 

Not a whisper could be 
heard among the delegates. 
“On be maner of my brob- 
er," Mr. Kennedy went on. 
"I’m so very sorry, so very 
Sony for what has 
happened" to be bate-sit- 
^s ftmuly. He added "I 
extend to them be deejKst 
apolo^ that 1 can sum- 
mon.’ 

"1 love my brober," he 
continued. "I will always 
love my brober, and 1 will 
stand wib my brober." 

The Democratic faithful 
responded wib a bunderous 
ovation. Then, his voice sud- 
denly steady, the six-term 
cmgressman went into a 
rousing political stump 
speech. 

He did not give details 
about his divorce, or about 


the baty-sitter's family or 
about bis brober — he did 
not even name Michael 
Kennedy. He did not have 
to. 

For weeks bere have been 
almost daily media accounts 
about Sheila Rauch 
Kennedy’s recently pub- 
lished book, in which she de- 
scribes her former husband’s 
attempt to be granted an an- 
nulment by be Cabolic 
Church, and of be affair bat 
Mr. K^inedy's younger 
brober, Michael, allegedly 
had with his children's teen- 
age baby-sitter. Tbe Norfolk 
County district attorney 's of- 
fice is investigating be al- 
leged relationship, accounts 
of which first appeared in be 
Bostem Globe. 

It is too soon to know how 
the congressman’s apology 
will play outside be arena 


here, where the party’s two- 
day convention ended 
Sunday. But it maiked the 
start of his effort to shore up 
be Kennedy franchise bat 
has dominated politics in 
Massachusetts for decides. 

After what will be eight 
years of Republican rale un- 
der Governor William Weld, 
be Democrats want, more 
than anything else, to reclaim 
be statehouse. Until re- 
cently, victory had seemed 
very likely under Mr. 
Kennedy, the eldest son of 
be slain Robert Kennedy, 
and be nqbew of ^waid 
Kennedy, be senior senator 
from Massachusetts. This is a 
state where no Kennedy has 
ever lost an election. 

Barbara P^ish, an altern- 
ate delegate, said after Mr. 
Kennedy's speech: "We 
were all stunned and very 


happy about bose apologies. 
It was just wonderful be way 
he did iL Most politicians 
don't do bings like that" 

But wib the barrage of 
media reports about the trou- 
bles of his family, Mr. 
Kennedy is now facing a 
strong challenge from tbe 
state's attorney general, 
Scott Harshbarger. 

Recent polls show bat Mr. 
Kennedy's family problems 
have hurt his standing among 
voters. And random inter- 
views wib delegates here in- 
dicated that fen^e voters, in 
particular, were concerned 
about be attitude among 
Kennedy men toward wmn- 
en. 

Gail Bartlett, a delegate 
from Lowell, said she was 
not Impre^ed by his apo- 
iogy. "He’s running 
scared,' ’ she said. 





.••'i . 




PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


White House Pins Hopes for Second-Term Success on 






By David S. Broder 

WMhiliplM PiVI SvfVHV • 


WASHINGTON — From ihe oui»ide, 
it looks ro many as if the plot line of 
President Bill Clinton's second term has 
turned into “llte incredible Shrinking 
Agmda." with minuscule initiatives 
posing little challenge for a White House 
staff worn out by the bigger battles of the 
past. 

But shepherds of Mr. Clinton's do- 
mestic program — and the president 
himself — sa^^ their goals are much 
grander th^ critics suggest. They tty to 
make die case that, if he succeeds in 
buildlns on the bipartisan budget agree- 
ment. historians may look back at hi.s 
eight years as a pivotal point in re- 
orienting government operations and so- 
cialjHilicy for a new era. 

The prospect of meeting this chal- 
lenge simultaneously stimulates and ex- 
hausts Mr. Clinton's domestic aides. 
There is a sense of weariness in the 


White House staff — "Governing is 
hard work, and you don’t feel the same 
excUement as when y<w fir^ utke the 
reins." is how one Clinton aide, well 
into his fifth year of White House duty, 
pul iL But such newly minted cabinet 
officers as Transponaiton Secietary 
Rodney Slater and Housing and Urban 
Development Secretary Andrew Cuomo 
and even veterans lite Health and Hu- 
man Services S«:Fetaiy Donna Sh ataia 
communicate far more enthusiasm about 
their agendas. 

"At the end of eight years here," Ms. 
Shalaia said, "we will te able to point to 
genuine gains in the nation’s economy, 
its health and its welfare. There will be 
fewer kids sick, fewer parents poor and 
the elderly will be living longer and be 
better cai^ for. There will be funda- 
mental changes this president will leave 
a&his legacy." 

White House aides say that the budget 
agreement, virtually the only substantial 
domestic accomplishment of the first 


live innnt hg of the second term, makes 
room fbr some of Mr. Clinton's prom- 
ises, including a variety of tax cuts, 
eduouioii sufeidies and incroses m 
some youth programs. Mr. Clintou is 
iilaft poshing hard to move -2 millioo 
mote people off die welf^ rolls uid 
into jobs and to raise education standards 
for America's schoolchildreiL 

He will also, they insist, tackle the 
chaUei^e cf cefonmng endtleaient pro- 
grams to assure that Social Security and 
Medicare will be solvent when he and 
millions of odier baby boomers begin 
readung Tetitement age in less than IS 
years. 

Ih^ acknowledge, however, diat no 
plans exist for wl^ or bow the en- 
titlement problem, sidMte{:^)ed in the 
budget agreement, will be taclded. And 
allies on Capitol Hill express doubts 
about how nkely Mr. Qinton is to 
achieve his wdfare-to-work and edu- 
cation goals, noting that success 
depends on cooperation from people the 


president can exhort but not control 

While administration officials con- 
(rede that Mr. Clinton’s goals are now 
more modest — “realistic** is the word 
they prefer-^ than tbe ambitious agenda 
he broD^t to Washington in 1993. they 
msiat he ^ has a goM chance to leave 
behind a substantially redes^ied gov- 
ernment and a inuch-imnx>v6o nation. 

Some even maintala 1^. C^ton 
is defining a new style of prestdenciaL 
leadership, setting a model for an era of 
lowered govenuittotal activism. Donald 


Baer, head of strategic planning at tbe 
White House, said: “Clinton realizes 


that leadership is not about spending 
money or imtehing big govenuxtentpio- 
gra^, but drawing attention of relevant 
decisioa-makers to tbe st^udons that are 
out there, if parents, teachers, govern- 
ment and business wc^ together." 

tliis is a far cry from the prescriptive 
a(^)roach that characterized Mi. Clin- 
ton’s first ^ars in trfSce. symbolized by 
the massively detailed ti^th re^rm 


plan that died without a coogressiooal 
vote in 1994. That fiasco and tbe^- 
sequent R^blican takeovff of 

gress forcM him to rethink his snat^M 

and accept incremental change as tM 
most Washington will allow except in 
crisis times. 

The Uoqffint for the second term, 
kept close at hand in many White House 
om^, is die State of the union address 
delrvered Feb. 4. . ^ 

la that lengthy **call for action, die 
president began with the balanced 
budget plan and then unrolled a menu of 
initiatives from campr^ finance re- 
form to a “victims’ ri^ts" constim- 
donkl araendroent and a rescue plan for 
the District of Cohurdna. 

But the uppermost on Mr. 

Clinton’s mind, according to his asso- 
ciates. are assuring that jobs can be 
found for the millio ns of women who 
will be forced off the welfare rolls by 


siandaids," as he put it in the addresa 


Those subjects recur freqpenk on 
Mr. Clinton’s-sdiedulc. On May ^ for 
CTffifn pift, he assendded more.diitt 100 
bu sin pw leaders at the White House lo 
announce a pubiic-privaie pacfrieiafa^ fo 
find jote for peqiie leaving wet^ Se 

noted the agreement indtides 
S3bUlioo (over fiw yearn) for job sab- 
in bigh-uiieinploym^ areas and 

$6(X> million in tax crednsforeo^loyets 
who hire workers off die welfare roUs. 

But he readily concerted that “tbm^s 
no way in the wwld we’re go^ to get^ 
a million such hircs 2(w with gov- 
enuneat finandng alone. 

■ Skeptics such as Senator Daniel 
Patrick Moynihan, Democtat of New 
York, say, “They can talk all they want 
at the White House, bu when these 
people are cot off welfue benefits, e yy 
are going to have a hellish tiine. All the 
president can do is try to get privaje 
enterprise to do what .^vemmeiii itself 
always has had to do.* 


the legislation be signed last August 
aofj “a nftrirwial crusade fbr education 


iia*** 


, 4*9 nil 

- w t en ap s 


idi|» 

9k 


.-V-'. --ie#: afe-i 


.L r.* Jf l. 

- '•r' 

■ r.- -■Li'rje:-. .ss£^-i? 


TERROR: Nightmares in Sierra Leone 


Continued from Page I 


man rights violations that accompany 
repressive rule and desperate poverty. 
And during a six-\’ear civil war in- 
volving the Revolutionary United Front, 
"there was a panem of human rights 
violations by both sides," said Sulaiman 
Tejan-Sie, president of the Civil Liber- 
ties Congress here. Villages were burned 
and civilians were tortured and killed. 

But last year, after the couniry' elected 
Mr. Tejan Kablxih to end four ye.irs of 
military rule, "human rights violations 
were reduced," Mr. Tejan-Sie said. 

Since May 25. however, renewed mil- 
itary rule has brought a surge of violence 
— and some of the atrocities previously 
seen in the countryside have come to the 
capital. 

Mr. Tejan-Sie said that on Kennedy 
Street, where he lives, gunmen have 
looted three houses in the last few nigfiLs. 
Typically, gunmen bang on a door" and 
demand to be let in. fr they arc not. 
"shots are fired," he said. "This makes 
the neighbors hide in fear. There w ill be 
no w itnesses." 

In one attack on Kennedy Street. 
Philip Neville, a jouraalisi, was beaten, 
and his house was looted, according to 
Mr, Tcjan-Sie and others. Mr. Neville 
has gone into hiding. Many politicians 
and lawyers — and Ihe miiiiary junta's 
most prominent critic. forrtKr Foreign 
Minister Desmond Luke — have left 
their homes to sleep elsewhere. 

"Our hearts are m our mouths." said 
a doctor at a city hospital. The Armed 
Forces Revolutionary Council, which 
the soldiers have declared to be the gov- 
errunem here, "has not got contml.^' 

Residents said they believed that 
many of the looters are soldiers and 
rebels. One medical source said his hos- 
pital udmined one girl with her fingers 


chopped off — a puaishment guerrillas 
in the bush inflicted m those they de- 
cided were enemies. 

But some said the attackers probably 
include criminals the army fre^ from 
prison and armed during the coup. "If 
you supponed the coup that day. you got 
a gun,*^ said the hospital employee, who 
asked not to be named. 

Colonel A.K. Sesay, a member of the 
ruling council, acknowle^ed that the 
nighttime marauders may include mem- 
bers of the military. "We agree we can’t 
vouch for everyone among them," he 
said. He conceded that the army armed 
hundreds of criminaJs during the coup, 
saying simply, "that was unplanned." 

Colonel Sesay was unsure how many 
have been arrested for looting and as- 
saults. but he said he was certain that all 
those caught up to now have been ci- 
vilians. except for one. He stress^ that 
die junta established "anti-looting 
squads" lost week to patrol at ni^t. 

The squads use looted four-wheel- 
drive pickup trucks and sport utility 
vehicles, some of which have the logos 
of their previous owners — intemarionaJ 
relief agencies — painted over. They 
cruise the streets crammed with as many 
as 1 0 men in various degrees of uniform, 
armed with automatic nfres, machine 
guns and rocket-propelled grenades. 

The team.s do not inspire confidence 
among residents. "We <iy nut know that 
they are any belter than those who are 
attacking us." said a lawyer who is 
hiding from the nighttime assaults by 
sleeping in a looted and abandoned 
hotel. 

So far. the junta's elTorts to exert 
control has mostly produced bloodshed. 
On Monday, a man was found dis- 
membered in a slum district. Neighbors 
said he was killed by the People’s 
.\rmy. 




BRAZZAVILLE: 

Shells Raining Dotm 


Continued firom Page 1 


Hopes Dimmed 
For Mideast Talks 



uled for late July, tension had already 
risen sharply between canaps loyal to die 
two men, and diplomatic eft>rts had 
be en under way for weeks to defnse the 
situation before fighting between heav- 
ily aimed militias couloeni^ 

Western and African diplomats said 
that Mr. Lissouba, a former plant ge- 
neticist and longtime poUtidan, has 
engineering ways m preserve his power 
ever since the last bout of fighting in the 
country, in 1993. notably by empoying 
Israeli experts to train a loyalik pres- 
idential brigade, and by refusii^ to 
countenance the creation of an inde- 
pendent electoral commission that could 
guarantee a credible vote. 

For his pa^ Mr. Sassou-Nguesso, a 
former Mancist leader and one of the rare 
A^can heads of state to suirenderpower 
throu^tlte ballot box. in 1992, has been 
wock^ just as determinedly to recon- 
quer the pittidency. Toward this end, 
diplomats said, be has used his personal 
fortune to maintain a heaviW aimed 
private militia known as the Cobras to 
maintain coDtrol ovcT much of hls native 
northern Congo and serve as a coun- 
terweight te Mr. Ussouba’s troops. 

you have in Congo is a 
rich state in de^ decay," s^ a senior 
WestAfricandiplomat. “Unfortunately, 
there are no saints in this picture. Tbe 
name of the game in Congo is be^ in 


JERUSALEM — 'The Palestin-' 
ians dashed hopes Monday for a 
compromise with Israel over Jewish 
settlement constructimi, which 
could permit a resunoption of peace 
negotiations frozen since March 18. 

Ihe top Palestinian negotiator. 
Saeb Eiakat, said that after meeting 
with the Palestinian leader, Yasser 
Arafat, gaps between the two sides 
remained despite positive state- 
ments by Egyptian officials after a 
Sunday of Israeli and Pal- 
estinian negotiamrs in CalTO.(AFP) 


Red Army Suspects 
On Trial inBeirut 


tenoes of up to 10 years in jalL 
Kazua Tcrfilra. Haruo W 


Kazua Tcrfilra, Haruo Wako, 
Mar^ Yamamoto, Kozo Okamoto 
and Masao Adachi raised their fists 
in salute as they arrived at the court. 

A group of 1 36 lawyers who have 
ofiered to represent the five without, 
fees has ask^ Beirut to give the de- 
fendants political asylum. fReuters) 




charge so that you and a few pec^ from 
your ethnic group can profit mnn the 


Residents trying Monday to flee Freetown, where people gather each 
morning to ftirnvely exchange new reports of killings, looting and rape. 


your ethnic group can profit from the 
country’s huge oil earnings." 

After the death Sunday of a French 
soldier, France flew about 800 reinforce- 
ments into Brazzaville on Monday to 
assist in die evacuation of its nationals, 
estimated ax 2,000 people. 


Albright S(^s Thaw 
Depends on Castro 


AFRICA: Recent Crises Push the Continents Nations to Attempt to Deal With Their Own Regional Problems 


Continued from Page 1 


"The outride world has withdrawn, 
and is marginalizing .-Africa," said Fran- 
cis Deng, a former Sudanese foreign min- 
ister, now a senior fellow at the Brooking': 
Instiiute. "But what .Africans are saying 
is that we don't core if you approve or not. 
Sure, it would be nice if you helped us 
solve some of these problems, but if not. 
we are going to do it for ourselves." 

McArthur DeShozer. a National .Se- 
curity Council adviser on Atric.'i for the 
Clinton administnition. said: "There is a 
feeling among the leaders of the con- 
tinent that they wont to provide for them- 
selves. and this Ls very healths . They ;ire 
concerned about an image of .Africa that 
relics on outsiders to come in and provide 
for them, and of .Africans '.vh«i can't do 
anything for themselves. The only way to 
Tlx this fs being re.sponsible for their own 
problems, and uliimaiely. being more 
accountable to their own people." 

In Zaire's crisis, which becan lust 


October. Wa.shington .nnd London ap- 
peared to acquiesce in the decision by- 
Rwanda and Uganda to invade their 
western neighbor to br^k up the Hutu 
refugee cainps from which attacks had 
been mounted for two years against 
Rwanda's Tuisi-led government. 

But once that objective had been 
achieved. calLs from Washingion for 
Uganda and Rwanda to scale back their 
intervention fell on deaf ears. 

Instead, sensing on opportunity to 
knock off Marshal Mobutu, whose gov- 
ernment. with heavy Western assistance, 
had been a source of instability for much 
of .Africa for three decades. Uganda and 
Rwanda plowed ahead, stepping up their 
investineni in the rebellion by 
Laiureni Kabila. 

Not only did Washinslon's calls for 
Ugiindan and Rwandan moderation fail, 
but a number of other .African countries 
jumped on Mr. Kabila's bandwagon. 
.And laic in the war. Westeru diplomats 
say. Angola's leaders flatly told Wash- 


ington to mind its own business after tbe 
United States warned Angola to curb its 
intervention on Mr. Kabila’s behalf. 

For many of Zaire's nughbors, se- 
rious ecoiKKuic concerns ranl^ just be- 
hind security issues. In Angola, for ex- 
ample. an anu-govemment rebellion that 
was supported for more foan two de- 
cades by Marshal Mobutu had used 
Zaire as a conduit for huge amounts of 
diamonds smuggled out of Angola. 

".African countries will no longer 
listen to you if they know there is no 
seriousness behind what you say.’* said 
Amii Omara-Otunnu, a Uganda his- 
torian at the University of Connecticut. 
"Nowadays, there is a widespread sense 
that the international community isn't 
really concerned with what is happening 
in Africa, and that is siving people a 
keen sense of how far Uiey can go and 
what they can get away with." 

Somediing similar happened again 
last month, after Mr. Kabila's victoiy, 
when Western countries that had long 


supported the Mobutu dictatorship 
beg^ urging the leader of tbe newly 
b^nized Democratio Republic of the 
Congo to quickly OTgwize elections. 

But Mr. Kai^ enlisted other African 
counoies, from Uganda to South Africa, 
to run interference for him. He argued 
dtat Congo had fallen too deeply into 
chaos to organize an election before some 
national reconscruction was achieved. 

"The year is 1997 and not 1887," 
said Julius Nyerere, tite fbrmerpresidrat 
of Tanzania, and an influential African 
elder statesman. "It is personally of- 
fensive fOT any African to bear outsidera 
presume to lecture us on our own affairs 
at this stage in our hi^ory.' ' 

Much the same tone of indignation 
conld be heard from Nigeria recently 
after that country. Africa’s most pop- 
ulous, mounted wh^ came close, in its 
initial stages, to a unilateral military 
intervention in Sterra Leone. 


and used a warship to ferry foreigners 
out of tbe capital, Freetown. 

“Those countries which bad empha- 
sized the need for hasty elections are 
now primarily concenied with evacu- 
ating their nationals." said tbe Nigerian 
foreign minister, Tom Dtimi, wh^ lo- 
maiks seemed aimed at Washlngtoo. 

For many outside the continent. Ni- 
geria’s intervention upeared at first 
blnsh to be little more tnaa a plc^ by one 
of Africa’s harshest milita^ dictator- 
ships to gain greater international ac- 
cq>taDce by restoring a democratic gov- 
ernment elWwbete. 

But other motives have cocne to the 
surface that paint a far inore complex 
picture. For years, Nigeria has invested 
heavily in peacekee;^ in Siecra Le- 
one’s neighbor, Liberia, and allowing 
Siena Lec^ to spin out of control now 
would endanger a political transition in 


MOBILE, Alabama — The',' 
United States is tnierested in thaw-’ 
ing its relations with Cuba, Sec- 
retary of State Madeleine Albright . 
said Sunday, but the next move is up 
to President Fidel Castro. 

"There’s nothfog Ttxoantic about 
Fidel Castro." Mrs. Albright told 
about 750 business and political . 
leaders here. “Tbe way Castro treats . 
his citizens is totally out of st^ witii 
what hacoens in the rest of the 
world," Sirs. Albright said. But she i 
added that “tbe United States would '| 
very much like to have a different ; ' 
pohey toward Cuba. ’ ’ ( Reuters} , 


Pinochet Released 
After Hospital Stay 


Washington expressed disapproval, 
saying it p^ened a peaceftil semernent. 


Liberia that is supposed to culminate 
next month with mat country's first 


democratic election. 


SANTIAGO — Chile’s former 
military ruler, Gener^ Augusto 
Pinochet, is in good health in spUe . 
of a fainting speU, his doctor says. 

General Pinochet was telexed ' 
Sunday after a day in the hospital is ; 
Arica, in nortiiem Chile, where the ’ 
81-year-old oflicer had traveled fbr 
military ceremonies. Ibe general, 
who hu a TOcem^rer, fitted Sat- 
urday at a dunner in his honor. (AP ) ' 


ADULTERY: Where Discretion Rules, a Tolerant View of Sex 


Continued from Page 1 


said he could not recall an otiicer's or 
solder's being cashiered for adultery . 

.About 7 percent of the M>ldiers in the 
French Army arc women, compared 
with 15 pereem in the United Stales. In 
Britain, too, women account for 7 per- 
cent of the miiiiury personnel. In Italy, 
women are not allowed into the army. 
Thus Europeans, on the basis of nunii- 
bers. are grappling w ith a narrower is- 
sue. 

But the approach is also tundamen- 
taliy different in that neither the French 
nor British armies ideniiHes .iJultery us a 
military offense. 

The U.S. military often considers ii a 
crime under Article l.’4 of the Uniform 
Code of Mililaty Justice, alihnush the 
word “adultery" does not appear m the 
article. But for much of the rest of the 


world, pragmatism tends to outweigh 
principle: ix’havior is governed more by 
understandings than written regulations. 

"Of course we frown on adultery, but 
we live in the real world, and people 
have real relationships." said Major Mi- 
chael Devlin, a spokesman for the Brit- 
ish .Army. " It is only if .army discipline is 
affected char we consider disciplinary 
action." 

For example, in a celebrated case in 
Sir Peter H.'trding. then the chief of 
the Defense Staff in Britain, resigned 
after his adulterous affair was made pub- 
lic. in general, said a naval official who 

sp<.ike on condition uf anonymity, adul- 
tery can he detrimental to a career. "If 
you are a naval officer," he said, "and 
want to he an admiral, then adultery 
w on 'i do y \>ur career much good. 

In Rrjzil. Colonel Joel Ferreira 
Pedreira. a spokesman for the Armed 


Forces High Command, said there was 
nothing in army regulations that made it 
illegal to commit adultery, nor was there 
any formal policy governing relation- 
ships between men and women. 

"Nothing,” he said, "forbids me from 
having sex with a lieutsiant in a motel” 

But. he added, if honor or internal 
discipline is affected by a liaison, then 
punishment is possible. 

An army, of courae, is a reflection of 
the society from which it emerges. After 
all, France had a president and com- 
mander in chief who chose to introduce 
his teenage illegitimate daughter to the 
nation a few mmichs before he left office. 
The decision by die late Francois Mit- 


Far Right Sets Back 
Tuiks^ Election Plan 


CAVIAR; Is Sturgeon Nearing Extinction? 


Continued from Page 1 


Ream 

ANKARA — ATuikisfa far-right 
party said Morejay it would not join 
a caretaker government sought by 
the crumbling Istamisi-l^ coali- 
tion, jeopardizmg die ^liance’s 
plans for early elections. 

“We have broken off the talks,” 
said Mehmet l^rici, depu^ chair- 
man of the Grand Unity Party. 
"There Is no question" of tbe party 
"joining the govemmenL" 


The govertunoit was relying on 
le party’s suppim to get me nec- 


terrand caused only very mild ripples. 
"Is it possible that a general in the 


"Is it possible that a general in the 
French Army would have an illegitimate 
child from an adulterous relationship?" 
asked Major Mignot. “Why not?" 


the party's suppim to get me nec- 
essary parijameniary approval for the 
eiectiems. Prime Minister Necmettin 
Erbakan and his conservative part- 
ner, l^nsu Ciller, announced June 1 
that they were seeking eariy dec- 
tions. have not bwn set 


EUROPE: France Tells E ll Partners It Needs More Time to Consider Single Currency 


soodiem end, Kazakstan and Russia in 
the north. Here on Ae Rossiao shore, 
where most of the sturgeon are found, 
the sea is overfished, fomed by pollution 
aixl threatened by oil «tploration. Ex- 
perts say Russia’s caviar industry, the 
largest in the world, may collapse w itfiin 
five years. 

It already is shriveling at an aiamung 
rate. Tbe industiy piesents a case study 
of how the breakop of tbe Soviet Union, 
Russia's rusting levers of state control 
and the sudden* in^wverishmeni of 
workers are having some undesirable 
results with international consequences. 

“If nothing cb^es and the planned 
development of oil goes forwariL then in 
two or three years there won’t be enough 
sturgeon to sustain a fishing industry," 
said Vladimir Ivanov, direinor of the 
Caspian Fisheries Research Institute in 

AcmlrUoi, 


eggs. Dams also blocked the sturgeon 
friMTi reaching spaw ning grounds. By tbe 
late 1980s, die sturgeon population was 
in a nose dive. 

With tile dissolution of the Soviet 
Unioa in 1991, a long-standing agre^ 
ment whh Iran not to overfish tiie Qspi~ 
an collapsed. As poverty spread throu^ 
the Caspian region, many people saw 
sti^eoQ as a kind of instant cunency. 

Tne drastic increase 'm poacbl^ has 
cut the official stuigeon catch in the 
Caspian Sea from 23,000 tons a year in 
the mid-1980s to just 3,400 tons last 
year, and reduced caviar production by 
more tiian 80 percent in the same period, 


Astrakhan, tbe regional capital. 

In the West, the dwindfing stocks of 
Caspian sturgeon have driven caviar 
wees op by more than 35 percent in 
three years, making an already exor- 
bitantly expensive item unaffordable to 
all but a few. 

J^viar allows people to feel opulent, 
to feel ihai they’ve made it," said Eve 
Vega, head <rf operations for Petrossian, 
caviar retailer and inroorter in 
the W^t. "But with tbe wild, wild west 
mentality now going on in Russia, we’re 
going to have a r^problem soon." 

During the Soviet era, the raoduction 
of caviar, as of everything else, was a 
tigh tly controlled state monopoly. 
Poaching was rare and quality control 
was stricL 

But even then, the sturgeon of the 
^pian were at risk. Beginning in tbe 
1960s. Soviet factories along tbe Volga 


Continued from Page 1 


"Who can c.xjvct them to have 
reached a position after haviut: been m 
power lor only a few (la.vs?" 

It remained unclear whether the 
French retreat marked the start of a true 
crisis or just a poliiicnl hiccup of the kind 
that European lcuder.> have been able to 
smooth over dozeni: of times before. 

Theo VV'aigel. Germany's embattled 
finanee minister, ulu.' iv desfvruiely try- 
ing to resolve his own country's acute 
budget deficit problems, told reponers 
Monday th.'it the French had not rai<u.Hi 
any questions that were in principle trou- 
bling. 

'*We base been diseussine ihcM.* 


sues for years." he said, rattling off a 
long list of European agreements on 
conunon goals ot job promotion and 
econocnic liberalization. 

Nevertheless, the startling turnabout 
immedintely heightened the fears of both 
political leaders* and investors that the 
French Socialists would upset the already 
strained con.sensus among Europ^n 
leaders alxiui the need fbr low inflation 
and liii.ssc/-faire cconomie policies. 

"The market it buying up D-marks on 
the idea of a delay." said Janies O’Neill, 
chief currency economist at Goldman 
Sachs in London, adding that the new 
worriei. were probably well overdue. 
"The inarkei has relied far too much on 
the crazy idea that the EMU would go 


ahead no matter what because the polit- 
ical will Was there." he said. 

At issue Monday was an important 
ag^metu known as the Growth and Sta- 
bility Pact that European leaders tiiought 
they had hammered out last December, 
after long and bruising negotiations be- 
tween Fiance and Oern^y. 

The pact is supposto to create die en- 
forcement mech^sm that will be used to 
make sure that countries ke^ their gov- 
ernment dcGcLts aiKl their inflation rates 
low. It would impose huge fines on coun- 
tries that let their government deficits 
climb above 3 percent of their gross do- 
mestic product and only gives leeway to 
countries that are experiencing serious 
recessions or depressions. 


The pact largely reflects the German 
preoccupation, with pr^rving a strong 
currency and low inflation. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn did not call 
Monday for a renegotiation of the sta- 
bili^ pact. Indeed, he did not outline any 
position at all. Rather, be told the other 
European finance ministers here that his 
government could not adopt a formal 
position until the new prime minister, 
Lionel Jospin, presents his agenda to the 
Fren<tii Pvliament on June 19. In the 
procew, however, Mr. Strauss-Kahn 
made if clear that his government wanted 
greater clarification and more explicit 
commitments to the goals of prorrtoting 
faster economic growth ancf job cre- 
ation. 


L3P 


' ‘If they fully develop the oil industry 

in the (Tnsnian nno. r-in <E9f«>iv sav there 


in the Caspian, one can safely say there 

won’t beany more sturgeon,” said Li<^ 

Vasiliyeva, director of a sturgeon hatch- 
ery south of Ascrakhao. 


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BEIRUT — Five suspected Jap- 
anese Army g^eirillns went on 

trial Monday in Beirut on charges of 
passport forgeary and illeg^ entry to . 
Lebuon that carry possible sen- 


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River pumped vast amounts of pollut- 
ants into its water, oblivious to the cob- 


setmences for the fish that swam as mart 

ae b a/V) IrilnmntATv ,.r>Ki,ia,. »i-> lav th^.ir 


as 2,400 kilometers upriver to lay their 
eggs. Dams also blocked the sturgeon 


Kttf 

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according to government figures. 

Since 1993, the Russian police haiw 


posted SOO officers around the Vole’s 
delta ev^ spring, and each year they 
attest a few thousand ooachers, seize a 


attest a few thousand poachers, seize a 
coitole of tons of caviar and close several 
underground caviar processing plants 

But the police are fighting a losing 
battle, for just a handful of people ever 
go to prison. 

But experts worry that even the most 

draconian measures may fail in tbe face of 

the latest ihr^t to stuigeon: pl^ for vast 
oil exploration and H rillin g in the Cayafl 
by Azerbaijan ai^ Kazakstan. If that hap- 
pens, the largest remaining supply of tte 
world’s stuigeon, which evolve 250 mil' 
liCHi years ago, could go the way of Amtf- 
Ican sturgeon in tte Great Late, whidi 
disappear^ early this century. 


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Kohl Vows He’ll Fight 
|!'o Salvage Coalition 

y. 

free Democratic Allies Resist Tax Hike 



PAGES 




By John Schmid 

ItUernitioiul HeruU TrUtanr 


I'li FRANKFURT — As bis political 
allies fdl into a public aiguinent over 
^ government's budget crisis. Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl on Monday vowed 
■tb work “with full power” to ease The 
strains that are pullingathis 14-year-old 
Iboalition. 

v The infighting, which centers on a 
’possible tax increase, has left Mr. Kohl 
f$tniggling .to keep Us center-ri^t al- 
iiaoce together while Bonn cop« with 
'jpecoid unemployment and scrambles to 
'^uare its finances to meet the require- 
^heots of a single European currency. 

Ibe dispute is seen as weakening 
R(^ ahe^ of three international sum- 
it meetings in the next two wee^. 


¥. 


Eaga to rroair French-German le- 
l^ons, Mr. Kohl will meet f^ident 
rjacques Chirac and his new Socialist 
I jmoK minister. Lionel Jospin, in Frmce 
' (X) Friday. He dien attends the European 
I Union's sominit meeting in Amsterdam 
Jon June 16 and 17 before flying to 
> £>eDver for the June 20-22 meeting of the 
1 Group of Seven industrialused narinna 
j TVo German newspapers have re- 
I ported that Mr. Kohl's aides drew up a 
; confidentiaJ crisis study on the pos- 
jsibility of a government collapse and 
I early elections. Another new^p^jper re- 
Jport Monday quoted coalitiba^hices 
' as saying Mr. Kohl had offered to resign 
; four times last week to force his team to 
‘ find agreemenL 

I The government denied all the re- 
J ports. 

• Sources in Bonn also said that Mr. 

I Kohl might consider a radical cabinet 
; shake-up this fall in an effort to restore 
. hamumy in the cabineL 

Despite the denials, threats and le- 
; criminations within the coalitiob have 
imade clear that Mr. Kohl's Christian' 
; Democratic Party and its junior co^- 

• tion parmer, the Free Dmocrats, have 
! grown dissatisfied with each other’s ap- 
; proaches to cutting the deficit 

■ The pro-business Free Democrats in- 
' sist they will leave the govefmment if 
; Theo Waigel. tiie Christian Derhocratic 

• finance minister, tries to browbeat them 
! into accepting a tax increase.- 

Moving to counter a growing public 

• impression that be carmot control bU 
; own supporters, Mr. Kohl on Monday 

vowed that the coalition will survive. 

Following his weekly gathering with 
; party leaders. Mr. Kohl’s spokesman 
' said the chancellor prooiisira In the 
! meeting ”to woiic with foil power bn dte 

1 3-.1 . ■ » .'i! ■f'-i'. <v:' 


BRIEFLY 


solutions 10 the problems in the co- 
alition.” 

-Mr. Kohl does not see any alternative 
to the current political constellation, his 
spokesman said. 

Joining attempts to soothe fears of a 
coalition break, the Free Demooats on 
Monday also put aside their militant 
anti-tax langu^e to wodc to the 
rifts within the govemraenL ’’The co- 
alition will stick together,” said 
Wolfgang Gerhardt, chairman of the 
ftee Democrats. 

The rhetoric of solidarity contrasted 
sharply with accusatims as recently as 
Sunday, wbeir the general-secretary cf 
Mr. Kohl’s Christian Democrats, F^er 
Hintze. warned the Free Democrats of 
“political suicide.” 

The ftee Democrats, meanwhile, 
said that they -would profit politically by 
go^ into opposition. According to 
Rainer Bniederle, d^ty.chainnan of 
the party, a' coalition break would 
sharpen the Free Democrats’ pro-bosi- 
oess political profile and haiwi diem a 
projected 15 percent of the vote in next 
year’s election, up fttHO just over 5 
[percent in current opinion polls. 

The promises of goodwill, however, 
stopped short of offering solutions to the 
budget crisis, which German commen- 
tators say amounts to tiie most serious 
threat to the survival of Mr. Kohl's 
govemmenL 

Bonn’s budget grqi, more than 20 
billion Deutsche marks ($11.5 billion), 
could wreck Germany’s entry into 
Europe’s single currency. 

The Hamburger Morgenpost report- 
ed Monday that Mr. Waigel met former 
Chancellor Helmut Schmidt last 
Thursday to discuss tiie possible for- 
mation of a grai^ coalition between the 
Social Democrats and the Christie 
Democrats if the Democrats 
leave. 

Mr. Schmidt’s office confirmed that 
the half-hour nieetiDg took place, but 
declined to ccxmnent on its substance. 

Mtxiday’s declarations of solidity 
did not l^t speculation that die co- 
alition is in trouble. 

Erwin Teufel, the Christian Demo- 
cratic state premier of Baden- 
Wuerttemberg, said he expected the co- 
alition to survive, but cautioned that the 
budget dilute was a tiireaL 

’’The situation reminds me of 1966,” 
Mr. Teufel said, refening to the last tune 
a coaiiticMi made up of Christian Demo- 
crats and Free Ctemocrats broke up. 
"No one wanted the coalition to end 
dien either, but it just happened.” 



ON TRIAL — Ccrimiel Juan Alberto Perote, ex-No. 2 in the Spanish 
secret service, arriving Monday at a Madrid court, chained with 
stealh^ papers related to the ^^dirty war” against Basque separatists. 


French Truckers’ Protest 
Reverberates in Europe 

Borders Are Blocked Over Pay and Hours 


PARIS — French truck drivers set up 
dozens of fiontier barricades on 
Monday, disrupting tiaffic from Ger- 
many tb Portugal in a protest for better 
pay and wurl^g conditions. 

French drivers, often cooperating 
with their colleagues from nei^boring 
countries, p^ked trucks across the 
Spanish. Italian. German, Belgian and 
Swiss borders. In many places only 
private cars were allowed to go through 
the blockades, which caused long traffic 
jams. 

Spanish truck drivers blocked three 
border crossings with France and one 
with Portugal as pan of the push to 
secure new European Union rules lim- 
iting their working hours and stand- 
ardizing benefits like sick pay and earli- 
er retirement. 

Morning rush-hour commuters were 
stuck behind “operation snail” protests 
on the Spanish-French border, in the 
French .Alps and in pans of the web of 
highways that surrounds Paris, the Na- 
tional Traffic Information Center said. 

Some national highways in central 
France were completely blocked, for- 
cing drivers onto sm^ler local roads and 
village streets. 

Two of France’s largest unions have 


Winner Rejects Idea of New Irish Vote 


Reuiers 

DUBLIN — Bertie Ahem, whose 
Fianna Fail party was a narrow winner in 
the general election, on Monday brushed 
aside speculation of another elMtion and 
said he was determined his minority 
government would last its lenn. 

-”Tbe aim will be to have a four- or 
five-year government,” M-. Ahem told 
Irish radio as he pnqiared to carry out his 
caiT^gn promises to cut taxes, reduce 
crime and bolster the peace process in 
the British-ruled province of Northern 
Ireland. 

Mr. Ahem, whose center-right alliance 
with the Progressive Democrats won $1 
of Parliament's 166 seats, said he hoped 
independent parties, im whose support be 
will nave to rely, would be mindful of the 
need for political stability. 

“I would hope most of them would 
be concerned about how long the new 
Parliaroeatcanlast,”hesaid. “Wehave 
to get an arrangement that will last in the 
longer term.” 

1^. Ahem expects sympathizers 
among the seven independents electtxl 


would back his government program in 
return for support for their local agen- 
das, such as rural road-building and oth- 
er development, political sources said. 

Financial markets took the election of 
a minority government in stride. Ana- 
lysts said the absence of a majority in 
^Uament was mildly negative but they 
foresaw no drastic change of economic 
course. 

Mr. Ahem will be formally voted in 
as prime minister when Parliament re- 
convenes June 26. The vanquished cen- 
ter-left coalition of Prime Minister John 
Bruton will form a caretaker admin- 
istration until theo. 

The outgoing finance minister, Ruair 
Quinn, told Reuters HnanciaJ Televi- 
sion in Luxembourg he hr^ed the new 
government would maintain Ireland’s 
economic boom and was confident it 
would give the same backing m Euro- 
pean economic and monetary union. 

”1 hope that they will maintain the 
progress we have put in place and I 
would be reasonably confident that by 
and large they will,” he said, while 


attending a European Union finance 
ministers' meeting. 

“The commitment of the Irish gov- 
ernment to the single currency project 
— the incoming government — will be 
the same as the outgoing government.” 
Mr. Quinn said. 

Mr. Ahern's plans to make former 
Prime Minister Albert Reynolds a key 
player in his efforts to rebuild the North- 
ern Ireland peace process were mocked 
by a leading member of the province's 
pro-British Unionist community. 

Ken Maeinnis, security spokesman 
of the ulster Unionist I^rty. the 
province’s biggest political group, said 
Mr. Reynolds, who helped broker a 
1994 truce by the Irish Republican 
Army in its war against British rule, was 
a discredited politician. 

Mr. Reynolds was forced to step 
down in 1 994 in a dispute over top legal 
appointments with his Labour P^ al- 
lies. 

The IRA broke the truce in February 
1996 with a bomb in London that killed 
two people. 


also called for a national day of protest 
Tuesday to demand that Europesui Un- 
ion members make employment a high- 
er priority. 

*‘We work 80 hours, we get paid for 
56 at the most” said Roger Poletti, 
secretary-general of the truckers’ sec- 
tion of the independent Workers Force 
union that called the stoppage in France 
along witii the DemocraticiJibor Fed- 
eration, a pro-Socialist union, and the 
Communist-dominated General Labor 
Corif^eration. 

“There’s not just driving,” Mr. Po- 
letti said, complaining about the work 
load of drivers. “There’s waiting time 
— loading, unloading, customs etc. 
There are plenty of other jobs that the 
bosses don’t pay for and don’t want to 
take into account.” 

The stoppage was called before a So- 
cialist-led government was swept to 
power in parliamentary elections in 
France last week, ousting the center-right 
cation of Ftesident Jacques Chirac. 

French truckers accuse employers of 
backtracking on promises they made to 
end a 12-day strike last year. 

*rhe protesters hope they will get the 
support of the new transport minister, 
Jean-Oaude Gayssot, a CommunisL 

Mr. Gayssot’s chief aide was due to 
meet representatives of the unions and 
employers later on Monday, his office 
said. 

In the southwest, truckers blocked the 
Biriatou crossing to ^ain. forcing cars 
to be diverted around Saint- Jean-de-Luz 
on the Atlantic. The barricade was lifted 
late in the morning. 

A truck blocked access to the Mom 
Blanc tunnel in the Alps, letting only 
small vehicles drive through to Italy. A 
dozen trucks completely breaded the 
road leading to the Frejus tunnel linking 
France and Italy. 

Near Strasbouig in eastern France, 
French and German trucker drivers set 
up a barrier on a bridge over the Rhine 
River. French and Swiss truckers also 
blocked a crossing at Saim-Louis- 
Basel, creating a 2-kilometer ( 1 .2-mile) 
traffic jam. 

Felix Perrolaz. head of the Swiss cus- 
toms service, said more than 100 trucks 
were backed up in the protest. 

ircneh truckers say employers have 
failed to respect the d^ last year that cut 
the retirement age to 55 from 60 for 
drivers with 25 years experience. 

They also say the employers have not 
respected other promises involving sick 
pay. travel expenses, union rigb^ts, a 
bonus and a ban on driving their rigs on 
Sundays. 


Pope Prays at Tomb 
Of Parents in Poland 

. KRAKOW, Poland — Pope John Paul 
Q embarked on ihe final day of an emo- 
Donal visit to his homeland Monday, 
praying at his poreuts’ tomb here and 
visiting the room where he lived as a 
yonog priest. 

On the last day of an intensive 1 1-day 
Knif. the Pape also celebratni Mass early 
Monday at the chapel of the castle of 
Wavel, where he celebrated his first Mass 
after being ordained on Nov. *2, 1946. 

Throughout the tour, the 77-^ear-old 
Pope, whose health has been in re- 
cent years, has been acemnpanied by his 
peist^ physician. His spokesman,' Joa- 
quin Navarro- Vails, said Monday that the 
Pope was feeling well although “is no 
the Pope of 15 years' ago.” (AFP) 

Swiss Will Repatriate 
Bosnian Refugees 

ZURICH — The Swiss govenuoent 
virill press ahead with plans to' repatriate 
thousands of refugees from Bosnia-Her- 
zegovina, even though many cannot re- 
turn hnra^diately to hometowns that are 
coniroUed by ewer ethnic groups, the 
cabinet said Monday. 

The cabinet defended its policy of 
providing financial assistance to reftigees 
who return voluntarily while holding out 
the prospect of eventually expelling oth- 
ers who refuse to leave (xi their own. 

The c^inet decided in January to send 
back single people and childless couples 
among the 18,000 Bosnian refugee in 
Suiizeriand, most of them, Muslims. 
Nearly 3,000 had returned volontarily by 
May 23, officials said. (Reuters) 

Sicitzerland and E U 
^ Sign Customs Deed 

LUXEMBOURG — Switzerland and 
the European Union signed an agreement 
■ Mmday to cooperate more closely (Mi 
ciutnns-eoniroL 

^teemeni, due to take effect July 
i,?sfiows'auti)(Mxtie$ to exchange more 
mfijhfnatiftn and gives thetti additional 
powen in the fight against smi%gln%. the 
swiscusKsnsauthOTty saidi (Reuters) 

‘ U^. Soldier's trial 
Starts in Oermarey 

-DARMSTADT. Germany — A U.S. 

^ray sergeant acQised raping or sexu- 
’ ally harassing female Rcniis went on (rial 

Jf-.heie Monday in the second militaiy court 
' pnieeiedif^toexanuncanegBtiraisofsexu- 
' .>1 at a Darmstadt training center. 


, Seismt Paul Fuller,^, of Columbus, 
chafed with 17 cothtts, includ- 

Davis 

fnd another sergeant i»ve been charged 
MLtitt abttte A trial has not yet 

Weai ordered f(M the tb^ (^) 


4* 


it that the 


Pra^e Alliance 
Awaits Fate in 
Confidence Vote 


Reiaers 

mtAGUE — Hie Czech government faces 
a confidence vote in F^riiameot tiiis week that 
will detennine the fatuie of die embattled 
prinM minister, Vaclav Klaus, and his eco- 
nomic program. 

Mr. Klaus’s three-party, center-right co- 
alition controls only 100 seats in tiie 200-seat 
lower house and even members of the gov- 
ernment have been driving hard bargains fix' 
their support in the vote, which could come as 
early as Tuesday. 

“The only thing we can sw for cerrain is 
that it is going to be very doM,” said Jiri 
Pehe, a pctiitidil an ' 

‘*^tidiinkttls 
government w31 win,” be 

If Mr. Klaos lost the vote, he would be 
obliged under the constitution to step down, 
Mr. raie said. 

Coaliti<Mi leaders and later the fall gov- 
ernment were meeting to hammer out a sales 
of budget cute that form part of an austerity 
program one patty wants adopted in exchange 
for its suppQ^ 

After the coalition leaders* meeting 
Moixlay, Mr. Klaus said, “We discussed the 
willingness of our three political parties to talk 
al^t cutting state esqpenditure at a session of 
the government diis afternoon.” 

Deputy mme Minister Josef Lux’s Chris- 
tian Democratic Union has said it wants the 
government to adopt the [xogram that was 
agreed (xi by coalition leaders late last 
month. 

The (Tirigrian Democrats also want to post- 
pone measures to deregulate rents and oiergy 
{xioes were accepted in March. 

The Christian Deax>cratjc Union and the 
Civic Democratic Alliance of Micbal 
Zantovsky are insisting on a balanced bn<j[get, 
but Mr. luans said die diffeteoces were not 

ingHq yi p""*”hie_ 

In a clear leftirence to the Christian Demo- 
cratic Union, 1)^ Klaus warned waverers over 

the wedteod that ftuluie to sm^rt tiie gov? 
eminent woiild be a leap into mie unknciwn. 

“If anyone wants to let the govenunent falL 
of cooRB he has tiie right azid& stiei^ to do 

so, but 1 wonld ask him not to tate a into 
the daik, not to leap into the unknown, to 
know what comes next,” Mr. Klaus said in a 
television dtecussUm. 

Mr. iClaus called tiie confidence vote last 
wedc after two weeks of tufonlence in the 
foidgn exchange maikete. 

Speculatois, alaimed at widening current 
account and ti^ ctefidts and growing polit- 
ical uncertainty, sold the Czech koruna short, 
lading tte central bank to float tiie currency 
oaMay27. . ,1 

Coalition leaders agreed to a swe^ing cab- 
inet reshuffle tte neict dtty and tiie auste^ 

program, whictii called for bucket cuts totaling 

some 20 billion koruny (S603.7 miliion) along 
with wage freezes. 

The krtmna strengthened slightly against 
the dollar and Deutsche mark Monday on 
signs that the govenunent wonld win the vote 
anil on positive economic data, traders said. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 






« '-ii 



7 --^. 



PAGE? 



^nh V* VH Tin 


The Great Wall at Badaling is a bazaar of souvenir kiosks, inundated by the commercialism sweeping China 

Mammon Cracks the Great Wall 

A National Symbol Is Swamped by Tourists and Kitsch 


By Serb Mydans 

WrH- Yurt JlmtW Service 




BADALING. China — At the foot of 
the Greu Wall of China stands a statue 
of a man whose image is known around 
the wcx-ld. It is Colonel Sanders, im- 
peccable in white suit and goatee, hold- 
mg a jumbo tub of Kentucky Fried 
C&ken. 

The massive wall, which has held the 
line for centuries against barbarian in- 
vaders. is capitulating now bef^e an 
onslaught of commercialism that is 
sweeping through China. 

In addition to the American chicken 
outlet, the entrance to the wall here, 70 
kilometers (45 miles) northwest of 
Beging, is a bazaar of souvenirs and 
kitsch, where tourists from around die 
world can take pictures of one another 
riding in a sedan chair, mounting a 
camel or dressed in the bright robes of a 
Manchu prince. 

-T CUmbed the Great Wall” T-shirts 
hang in rows at kiosks that also sell 
Deng Xiaoping cigarette lighters, furry 
panda toys, green stone Buddhiis and 
Great WaJl b^eball caps. 

Hawkers offer parchment documents 
cenifyi^ that the bearer was actually 
heie;V ■ ' 

Ohaplaza below the wall, a placard is 
upd^ daily, counting dow'n the days 
UD^die "return to the motherland” at 
mic^ght June 30 of Hong Kong, the 
Britteb colonial outpost where money- 
making Is already well entrenched as a 
guiding philost^hy. 

Lc^ a symbol of China's greatness. 


rtions of the wall have been trans- 
brmed in recent years into an emblem 
of the country’s eager entry into the 
international marke^lace. 

The bastion that was designed to keep 
foreigners out is now doing everything 
to lure them. Mwe than 5 nSiion people 
visited Badaling last year, choking the 
nearly mileiong section of wall iSte a 
slow, jostling subway platform. 

They spent an estimated SIO million 
on souvenirs, entrance fees, restaurants 
and the pay toilets that the wall’s en- 
trepreneurs have put in place. More 

didn’t bdieve they 
could do it. You can’t 
take a picture that 
doesn’t indude someone 
dse taking a picture.’ 

tourists visited two other restored sec- 
tions near die capital — cme of them 
reached by a new cable car — making 
the Great Wall the country’s leading 
tourist attraction. 

For all its ovetpoweiio^ solidity, the 
wall is surround^ iiusinformaiioa 
and mystery. 

"Let us beware of the myth of the 
Great Wall,” wrote Arthur Waldron, a 
historian who wrote “The Great Wall of 
China: Bom History to Myth” in 
1990. 

The wall is not a single structure 
snaking across China, he wrote. It was 


Jailed Burmese Opposition Leader Is Dead 
From Heart Disease, Rangoon Announces 


AgetKe FrMve-Presse 

BAiTCKOK — A senior Burmese 
onbsuion leader imprisoned since 
1991 for political crimes has died of 
bein'dise^, Rangoon autiKMities said 
Mo^y. 

Tin Shwe, 67, was a central com- 
miQQCjnember of the National League 
foe Democracy and chief party organ- 
izer hi its Mandalay division. The party 
is Ihdby Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the 
Nobel I^ace laureate. 

. .U_lla Sfawc was serving a prison 
sentence for "instigation of civil un- 
rest’* and for attempting to "form a 
parallel government.'' He died at Ran- 
goonOeneral Hospital on Sunday. 

An official information sheet re- 
ceived here said U Tin Sbwe had been 


receiving treatment for heart problems 
and had been hospitalized twice this 
year. 

U Tin Shwe had been sentenced to 20 
years in prison for his role in a demon- 
stration by league supporters, students 
and 2,000 BudSiist memks in Mandalay 
in August 1990, a colleague reached by 
telwhone at the Thai border said. 

Ine rally was peaceful until the mil- 
itary opened fire on the crowd, killing 
two of die monks, league members 
said 

U Tin Shwe sent letters of protest to 
local authorities and the ruling military 
State Law and Order Restoration Coun- 
cil. He was later arrested and served his 
sentence in the notorious Inseio prison 
in Rangoon, party colleagues said 


not built more than 2,(XX) years ago as 
the guidebooks claim. It did not hall a 
Mongol invasion. And it caimot be seen 
from the mocm. 

Its length is a matter of dispute, with 
published estimates ranging from 2,500 
■ miles to 6,500 kilometers, it is actually a 
patchwork of sections, the most famous 
and impressive of which were built in 
the late Ming Dynasty, which ended in 
1644, using mud. brick and stone. 

Only atout one-third ^ the wall is 
intact today. Some battlements have 
been dismantled by villagers to build 
homes and pigpens, according to the 
official Chinese press. E^)rtions have 
been dynamited and used for the con- 
struction of roads, buildings and reser- 
voirs. Other mud fortifications have 
simply disintegrated into the surround- 
ing fields. 

Mao Zedong elevated the wail to the 
status of a national icon, initialing the 
first modem attempts at preservation in 
the 1950s. 

In 1984, Deng Xiaoping, his eye 
newly focused on foreign tourist dol- 
lars, started a 10-year "love our coun- 
try, repair our Great Wall" campaign 
that brou^l major restoration to me 
three sections near the capital. 

At Badaling. where sp^ial platforms 
have been built along the wall for scenic 
picture-taking, the structure has been 
restored so thoroughly that many of its 
building blocks are new. 

The results can be a disappointment. 

"They've turned the Great Wall into 
a cheap tourist attraction,” said a 
Filipino visitor who declined to give his 
name. ”1 didn't believe they could do it. 
You can’t take a picture that doesn't 
include someone else taking a pic- 
ture.” 

But much of the power of the wall 
survives, especially in the late afternoon 
when most tourist buses have departed, 
and especially at the less-ii^uently vis- 
ited sections at Mudanyu and Jinshan- 
ling. 

"It was fantastic," said Tracy Wag- 
ner, of Lexington, Kentucky, on an 
ternoon visit recently to Mudanyu. 
"And with the sunlight, it just gave you 
a chance to view the moontains and to be 
impressed by how much work it took to 
put the wall up." 

Even (he Filipino visitor said be was 
moved, despite the crowds. 

"You get a sense of history, of great- 
ness," he said. "You realize why they 
call it the Great Wall — because it is 
great, in size, in power. It’s so im- 
pressive a structure that even the crass 
commercializadon doesn’t stop you 
from feeling its greamess." 


SURVIVAL; North Koreans Find VPhys to Cope With Shortages 

' Continued from Page 1 


wnnah of. the county's economic ad- 
nnnistiadon unit. 

.The International Committee of the 
OoK estimated recently that mal- 
hhirition afRicts 16 percent of Ae 
Wsple in North Korea, compared widi 
w pscent in India. 

---"foinost countries, if they were con- 
fiKiiii^.wjth an serious a food shortage 
Korea is facing at this moment, 
would have seen megadeatbs 
ly?.' said Tun Myat, a frequeni 
r-'fo North Korea as a represen- 
i the UN World Food ftt?gram 
' ' I Rome. "But people there have 
'^lo^ coping mechanisms.” 
such dMionstrated survival 
sltilhf.shaip differences of opinion are 
OBei gifig over how well die North 
'Koreans can susiaip themselves undl 
ifae a^tnn rice har\'cst. Uisi week, the 
P riya m announced that 
fbod stocks were deleted in half the 
10 public distribatioa.cent^ 
vdttdt serve three-fourths of the civilian 
popolation, with the rest due to be gone 
iiyJBne20. 

L3 million ions of food aid 


Korea can make do undl the autumn rice 
harvests by relying on summer crops, 
such as potatoes and com, and new 
harvests of Ixirley. 

In any case, most experts agree that 
no matter how much emergency food 
aid is poiu^ into North Korea, long- 
term, systemic problems are certain to 
conunue bedeviling this land of 23 mil- 
lion people. 

In recent years. Pyongyang has 
sought to improve worker incouives 
and cre^ yields, allowing ^rmers to 
keep 30 piercent of their harvests. But 
the sin^te fact of its geogr^hy — lim- 
ited arable land and a harsh climaie — 
make it virtnaUy impossible ever to ex- 
pect self-s^ciency in food, said John 
Dyck, a U.S1 Agri^ture Department 
spwialist on North Korea. 

Mr. 1^'ck said that a ^wing pop- 
ulation lower crop yi«ds caused by 

soils had for^ North Korea 
into dqyen^DCy on imports by the mid- 
1980s. 


be ginning with the 1991 Collapse of the 
Soviet Union, North Korea’s major sup- 
plier of fiieL 

The resulting shortages of fuel idled 
tractors and fertilizer factories as die 
country began sliding into its agricul- 
tural crisis. And a continued lack of 
fertilizer, fuel and farm machinery sty- 
mies efforts 10 coax more from the 
land 

"We are not getting the supply of 
crude oil, gasoline and diesel fuel in a 
timely manner,” a Pyongyang ofBcial 
said, adding that it took more than four 
hours to make the 120 kilometer (76 
mile) journey from the camtal city to the 
north^ border area of Sinuiju, which 
was heavily hit by flooding from the 
Yalu River. But, be said, "instead of 
flskiM for outside help, we are trying to 
be seff-sufticienu” 

The fuel problem, however, looms as 
one of the largest ob^cles in getting the 
growing supplies of international aid to 
the hungry populace. 

In a recent trip to North Korea, mem- 


tobeinthissituatioa — r 

every yw and 1 3on't know how long bers of the Los Angeles-based Korean- 
aid ^ be counted on to meet the gap,” American Sh^g Movement saw train 
Mr. Dyck added “TTie main pr(£lems cars filled with grain left idle on tiie 

’’About I 3 million ions of food aid are the rest of the economy and the side of±Q because 

trading sysi^^^,has to be Nor^l^ lacked Ore fuel to transport 

caasi«M*eB to be avoided,” tte or- able to buy the food it needs. ihemacross. 

. Three yeiu^ofdisasten^ hailstorms 

in 1994 and flc^ in 1995 and 1996— 
wiped outmuch of North Ktroa’s south- 
breadbasket. Those events came 


lP5>TTaTifK» 

the' South Korean government, 
that noithemers can survive on 
fewercalones thw the Wotid Food Fro 
8mm .^ys. calculated that North 


ero 


arnid upheaval in the world outside. 


The soup's own 1,000 tons of com 
eventu^y was moved across the Yalu 
River into Sinuiju oitiy after the or- 
ganization made specif arrangements 
with China. 


A Critical Moment’ for Security 

Beijing^s Reaction to U.S,-Japan Accord Is Awaited 


By Michael Richardson 

tnlernununal HrruU fnfrwic 

SINGAPORE — By sending envoy.s 
to China and other pans of Asia starting 
Monday to explain proposed new se- 
curity cooperauon guidelines, Japan and 
the United States are seeking to head oft 
reactions, especially from China, that 
could m^e it difficult to sustain the 
Pacific alliance. 

Analysis say Beijing’s long-standing 
acquiescence to the American presence 
in the region may change to hostility if 
nationalist hard-liners in the ruling 
Chinese Communist Party and the mil- 
itary can convince moderates that the 
strengthened U.S.-Japan security pact is 

really aimed at China. 

"This is a critical moment for the 
established Asia-Pacific security or- 
der," a Southeast Asian official said 
Monday. "It will be much more dif- 
ficult lo develop a new strategic equi- 
librium and arrangements for maintain- 
ing it if Beijing is not a cooperative 
player.” 

tJ.S. officials said the new military 
coopCTarion arrangements with Japan, 
described in an interim report completed 
over the weekend, were not aimed at 
China and should not be of concern to 
Beijing. 

But Jape's Kyodo news agency said 
that ihe guidelines "appear lo allow the 


U.S. to get Japan's assistance when the 
former dispatches troops in an emer- 
gency on the Korean Peninsula, the 
Taiwan Suaits, the disputed SpraiJy Is- 
lands In the South China Sea or ;my- 
where else in areas surrounding Ja- 
pan.” 

Qina has already showed the di- 
rection in which it is prepared to move to 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

counter what some Chinese say is a 
containment strategy against Beijing. 

Chinese officials indicated recently 
that Beijing wants multilateral security 
arrangements — in which it would have 
a major .say — to replace U.S.-fcd bi- 
laierat alliances in the region. There are 
five such ulliunces: with Australia, Ja- 
pan, the Philippines, South Korea and 
Thailand. 

Ralph Cossa. executive director of 
Pacific Forum CSIS. a think tank in 
Honolulu affiliated with the Center for 
Strategic and International Studies in 
Washington, said that China's short- 
term aim in criticizing the U.S.-Japan 
alliance was to "chip away" at its base 
of support, including among Japanese. 

"A Japan that is not under the U.S. 
security umbrella becomes less accept- 
able to Asians generally," who fear a 
resurgence of Japanese armed might, he 
said. "Titai might help make China 


BRIEFLY 


Landslides Kill 50 
In India 5 Sikkim 

GANGTOK. India — Heavy rains 
collapsed buildings and triggered 
landslides, reportedly killing at least 
50 people in eastern India. 

More than 2,000 families have 
been left homeless by the rains that 
destroyed hundreds of houses 
overnight in the mountainous Sikkim 
state, the Press Trust of India news 
agency said Monday. The chief min- 
ister of Sikkim, Pawan Kumar, was 
quoted by the agency as saying that at 
least 50 people were killed. 

Indian soldiers were helping ci- 
vilian rescuers search for survivors 
and provide medical assistance. 

United News of India, quoting the 
police, said the dead included eight 
people who were buried when a four- 
story building and two government 
residences collapsed in Gangtok, the 
capiuil of Sikkim. 

rains also disrupted power and 
.water supplies in most ports of Gang- 
tok, the Press Trust said. {APi 

Thai Press Mocks 
New Media Panel 

BANGKOK — Thailand’s press 
voiced concern and derision Monday 
over a new media monitoring panel 
set up by the government to keep tabs 
on reports deemed damaging to the 
"national interest." 

One respected newspaper said the 
move was a "sign of desperation" 
from the embattl^ administration of 
Prime Minister Chaovalit Yong- 
chaiyut and was an attempt to in- 
timidate media that are critical of the 
government. 

The 15-member paiwl — which 
includes Interior Ministry, intelli- 
gence and police officials — is to meet 
for the firat time Tuesday when its 
mandate and working practices will 
be discussed, officials said. fAFP) 

Warplanes Pound 
Advancing Taleban 

JANGHAL BAGH. Afghanistan 
— Jets pounded soldiers of the TaJe- 
ban government on Monday, trying to 
halt their advance toward a city north 
of Kabul, the coital. 

Despite the onslaught, however, 
the Taleban said its troops had cleared 
opposition forces from the outskirts 
of the strategic town of Jebul Siraj, 90 
kilometers (55 miles) north of Ka- 
bul 


Jebut Siraj is u strategic prize be- 
cause it ties on the Salong Highway, 
Afghanistan's only north-south 
artety, MPl 

Politician Linked 
To Bhutto Is Killed 

LAHORE, Pakistan — A politician 
in the opposition Pakistan People's 
Party, led by Benazir Bhuno, was shot 
to death in the Punjab provincial cap- 
ital of Lahore on Monday, the police 
said. 

They said unidentified gunmen, us- 
ing vehicles decorated with PPP elec- 
tion posters, intercepted Haji Iqbal 
Ghiirki at about 1 A.M. as he was 
returning home. 

Mr. Ghurki. a candidate in a pro- 
vincial assembly by-election due lo 
have taken place Monday, leaped 
from his car and ran down an alley, 
but his attackers pursued him, shot 
him with automatic weapons and es- 
caped, the police said. 

Mr. Ghurki, who was in his mid- 
40s. was transport minister in the pro- 
vincial government controlled by the 
People’s Party until November, when 
President Farooq Leghari dismissed 
Miss Bhutto on charges of corruption 
and misrule. fRcuicrs) 

For the Record 

Mounl Karangetang on the 
northern Indonesian island of Siau 
spewed sudden puffs of hot clouds, 
killing two people and seriously in- 
juring another, a report said Monday. 
The 1,784-meter (5.958-foot) vol- 
cano spewed hot clouds early Sunday 
killing a couple and seriously burning 
a man who were watching lava flow 
onto its slope, according to the Antara 
news agency. (AFP} 

The deadly vims that has hit 
Malaysia’s eastern stale of Sarawak 
on the island of Borneo has killed 21 
children, a senior minister said 
Monday. Health Minister Chuah Jui 
Meng also confinned that the virus 
was Coxsackie virus B. (AFP} 

The second son of President 
Kim Young Sam of South Korea 
will go on trial on June 23, lawyers 
said. Kim Hyun Chul was jailed last 
month on charges of graft and tax 
evasion. Lawyers for the prosecu- 
tion said they and the defense were 
informed Monday by the criminal 
division of the Seoul District Court 
that the trial of Mr. Kim, 37, would 
open June 23. (AFP) 


more acceptable, if only as a counter- 
weight." 

Saioshi Morimoio, a senior research- 
er at the Nomura Research Institute in 
Tokyo, said tliat since the collapse of the 
Soviet Union and the end of the Soviet 
mi]iiar>' threat to Japan, "explaining the 
purpose of the bilateral alliance with the 
U.S. has become more difficuit in Japan 
and the number of Japanese who feel 
that they can live without the alliance is 
Increasing." 

In April, the Chinese and Russian 
presidents signed a declaration in Mos- 
cow formally endorsing "a new mul- 
tipolar world" that would balance U.S. 
muscle. Both sides were careful to call 
their relationship a "strategic partner- 
ship." not an alliance. 

But Masashi Nishihara. professor of 
international relations at the Japan’s Na- 
tional Defense Academy, said he was 
concerned about the implications of the 
China-Russia axis. 

"Tlic .’Strategic partnership between 
them actually means Russia's Increased 
dependence upon China as a critical 
arms buyer." he said. "How China will 
behave once it acquires substantial high- 
quality weapons from Russia is a serious 
security mancr. If tensions grow be- 
tween the Japan-U.S. alliance and the 
Sino-Russian partnership, we will see 
the emergence of two power blocs in the 
region." 


China Defends 
Its Record 
On Religion 

Hcuicrs 

BEUING — China on Monday de- 
fended its record on religious fre^om, 
saying that American critics unfairly 
distort its image. 

Accusing critics of looking at China 
"through die wrong end of a tele- 
scope," it said (he nation was home to 
more than lOOmillionfollowersof vari- 
ous faiths and probably published more 
Bibles than the United States had. 

"China grants full rights to freedom 
of religious belief." said Ye Xiaowen. a 
senior official of the Bureau of Re- 
ligious .Affairs of the State Council, or 
cabinet. 

"We see the United States big and 
clearly through our telescope." he told 
reporters. "But some people in the 
United States look through the wrong 
end of their telescope and they see 
China small and badly." 

Mr. Ye made the remaiks as con- 
servative American Christian groups 
gathered forces to block renewal by 
Congress of China's mosi-favorcd-na- 
tion trade status. 

The powerful Christian Coalition has 
come out against renewal of the trade 
status, which accords the lowest pos- 
sible duty to billions of dollars worth of 
Chinese goods imported into the U.S. 
marker, l^sident Bill Clinton has said 
he would renew the privileges, which 
Washington gives to almost aU of its 
trade partners. 

Representative Richard Gephardt, 
the House minority leader, who opposes 
renewal, said he believ^ the House 
might vote to overturn the status in 
China's case. 

The Chinese official did not mention 
the debate over the trade status, al- 
though his statements echoed the theme 
of a long report by the official Xinhua 
press agency, saying allegations of re- 
ligious persecution in China were slan- 
derous and made with ulterior motives. 

Religion has made a revival in recent 
years as Beijing has relaxed controls 
over groups, once suppressed as sub- 
versive. But Beijing still keeps a close 
eye on religious activities and insists 
t^t believers practice their faith 
through officially coniroifed or 
sponsored religious organizations. 

The Chinese official said that China 
had printed 16 million Bibles, and had 
1 8,000 Christian clergymen and 1 2,000 
churches. He said there were about 4 
million Roman Catholics in the nation. 

























ASem-c Fiau.PiBw 


A photc^^ph published by a Seoul newspaper said to be of a Nordi Korean woman crossing the Ttimen Ri^ 
into China in May to escape famine. The paper obscured the faces the woman and the Chinese man aiding her. 







PAGES 


TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 1997 


EDITORIMS/OPINION 


Hcralii 


INTKRNATIONAL 



niSiJKHKU WITH THi; NKW YORK TIMKI AMD TIIK WAKHINGTOA KST 


,^ribun(. America Has an Interest in the Peace Process 


t/nenctim 




India’s Missile Move 


Wh> (tid India move missiles up to 
its bolder with Pakistan? American 
diplomais quietly tried to get die In- 
dians to undo that apparently unpro- 
voked initiative and were told that there 
was insufficient sttxnge space back at 
the production site. It is bare to take that 
explanation at face value. The Indians 
are wise in the ways of the voladJe 
nuclear politics of South Asia. They 
had to know that the step would be 
received in Pakistan as a provocation 
demanding some sort of response. 

The few Kthvi missiles at issue were 
moved up without any son of warheads, 
and without fuel, and they present no 
immediate military threat But in the 
single place in the world where two 
nuclear-rea^ stales have a potentially 
war-grade political dispute (Kashmir) 
going, the move is cause for concern. 

The more so because in recent 
months India and Pakistan have re- 
sumed serious talks, including a meet- 
ing of the two prime ministers, Nawaz 
Sl^f of Pakistan and L K. Gujral of 
India. Some tentative business was 
done, and, perhaps more important at 
this early point the two publics 
showed support India's military has a 
tradition of faithful service to civilian 
power, but that does not altogether 
di^l the suspicion that elements 
within it wanted to signal reservations 


about the pace of the new diplomacy 
with Pal^ian. There is a continuing 
debate within India about the country’s 
nuclear fiiture. A school of ’’hawics” 
favois loosening the military and polit- 
ical restraints on the national program 
and moving toward a more explicit and 
politically assertive policy. 

American strictures on India’s nu- 
clear affairs commonly are t^cen in 
New Delhi as evidence of a conspiracy 
to assert American hegemony and keep 
India irom fulfilling its destiny. This is 
imaginative and farfetched, and lends 
itself to shrillness. In ^ct. what U.S. 
policy seeks to encourage in Sou A Asia 
IS a s^ement of regional disputes and 
a concentration on domestic growth. 

Just the other day Presideut Bill Clin- 
ton went out of his way to express 
appreciation of India's growth; “In not 
very loi^," be said, “it wiU be bigger 
than Chma." This process, he added, 
has created new o^xxtunities for In- 
dia '$ “membership in all kinds of tfiing g 
in the future and for partnerships.' ’ 

Here lies a vista that can only be 
clouded by nuclear gestures. It is not 
too late to move back the errant mis- 
siles. Meanwhile, Pakistan should not 
rush toward any sort of symbolic re- 
sponse. Talks between the two coun- 
tries should be put back on track. 

— r/f£ WASHINGTON POST 


Lott Can Take It 


Sometimes a politician's achieve- 
ments are best defined by the enemies 
he makes in his own camp. The Senate 
majority leader, Trent Lon, angered 
conservative Republicans last year by 
making deals with the DenKxrrais to 
enact a minimum wage increase and 
health insurance reform. Hiis year he 
upset the right wing again by Peking 
the treaty to curb chonical weapons 
and the accord to balance the federal 
budget without absurdly large tax 
giveaways or the evisceration of social 
programs. The last straw for many 
conservatives was his recent audacity 
in questioning the ouster of Kelly Fllim 
from the Air Force on charges stem- 
ming from adultery. 

V^en Robert Novak. George Will, 
William Kristol and other ideological 
enforcers of die right start nipping at a 
fellow Republican, you can be sure that 
their victim has committed the sin of 
independence. 

In a scathing attack in the current 
issue of the Weekly Standard, Mr. 
Kristol levels the worst possible insult 
against Mr. Lou, calling him a “Clin- 
Kmian" Republican. 

The warning from Mr, Kristol, 
foimer aide to Vice President Dan 
Quayle and guru of the social con- 
servative right, could be seen as a cri de 
co«mrover die Republican leaderstup's 
inclination to abandon ideology in fa- 
vor of achieving results. There is a fine 
symmetry here, since the liberal wing 
of the Democratic Party is also dis- 
affected from President Bill Clinton's 


But these positions are not enough for 
the senators who favor the all-or-noth- 
ing approach, leavened by camptugns 
of personal insult. 

As for the budget deaL Mr. Lott and 
Mr. Clinton agreed to deep cuts in do- 
mestic spending even thou^ they fell 
sbcMd of the Republican assault of 1995 
on the social ^ety net The tax cuts, 
too, were less than what the Repub- 
licans originally wanted, forcing some 
hard choices over how to apportion the 
Si 35 billion total among various 
claimants, especially the well-to-do. 

The attacks on Mr. Lott can be 
viewed as an opening shot in the next 
battle between the social-issue con- 
servatives, who favor tax credits for 
children, and the traditional WaJ] 
Street Republicans, whose priority is 
to lower the capital gains tax. Mr. Lott 


has not signal^ which way he would 
lean and may have a di^ult time 


eagerness to compromise. 

Mr. Lon is under attack from the 


right even though he is probably one of 
the most conservative legislative lead- 
ers to have emerged in recent times. He 
is enthusiastically pro-military and 
anti-abortion. He opposes government 
r^ulation. campaign finance reform 
and the social programs that have pro- 
tected the poorand elderly for decades. 


lean and may have a difficult time 
deciding. The Democrats might ac- 
tually be able to exploit hie dil^ma if 
disgruntled Democrats offer the S5()0- 
a-chUd income tax credit beloved of 
Republican conservaiives, even as oth- 
ers in the Republican leadership push 
something srnaller for children in order 
to placate the Wall Street crowd. 

The criticism of Mr. Lott is most of 
all a prelude to the next presidential 
campaign, as conservatives like Sm- 
ator Phil Gramm, Mr. Quayle ai^ 
Steve Forbes prepare to stake out the 
territory of the true believers and derail 
a potential Lott candidacy by charging 
him with weakness and eagerness to 
compromise. But if the economy keeps 
surging ahead, Mr. Lon will have am- 
munition as strong as Mr. Clinton did 
in the last election. 

In the meantime, one should not feel 
too sorry for Mr. Lou. He is probably 
strong enough to handle the insult that 
he is more interested in results than in 
empty posturing. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Victory for Cents 


The New York Slock Exchange an- 
nounced last week that it will sian 
listing the price of stocks in dollars and 
cents. That might not seem note- 
worthy. given that dollars and cents are 
the currency of the realm. But share 
prices have long been listed in dollars 
and fractions of dollars; eighths, qixir- 
ters and halves. This quaint habit is 
said to date from colonial limes, when 
Spanish dollars were divided into 
“pieces of eight" The results haven't 
so quaint For investors. 

Dealing in fiuciioas is confusing, 
the more so now that some exchanges 
are moving to sixteenths. More to the 
point the long-standing refusal of the 
New York exchange to adopt decim- 
alization was costing investors a lot of 
money. That is so because in many 
instances traders in stock charge a 
premiunt or “spread,” which is die 
difference between the price they pay 
for a stock and the price at which they 
resell it. Right now*, the smallest pos- 
sible spread is one-eighth of a dollar, or 
12.5 cents. With decimalization, the 


smallest spread would be a pienny — 
although spreads of a nickel nuy be the 
more common minimum. 

The change will put a lot of money in 
the pockets of investors — at least $2 
billion per year and possibly much 
more, according to expert estimates, ft 
will F^uce profits by as much for Wall 
Street firms, which is why they resisted 
the change for so long. But some 
brokers believe that the benefits of the 
new system will attract enough new 
business to make up in volume for 
what is lost in profit margins. 

This change, which will take effect 
no earlier than a year Irom now, came 
about because of pressure from Con- 
gress and from Steven M. H. Wallmao. 
a member of the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission, who long cham- 
pionra the idea. Because more and more 
' Americans are stock owners, cither di- 
rectly or through pension and mutual 
funds, investor {xolectioo has become 
almost a consumer issue, lliis reform 
represents a victoiy for consumers. 

— THE WASHlNOrON POST 


4^ INTtlINVTIliMI M 

Hcralo=^is=.enbttne 


ESTiXBUSUED ISS7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Clh/irmen 

KATOARINEP. DARRpW , \heChmrmun 

RICHARD McCLEAN. PuMishcr Jc Chirf Execiiin-e 
MICHAEL GETLER, Enranit- EJihv 


• W.UiTER W ELL-S, Mdikimn Editor • PAUL HORVTTZ. ilrpurv Mnmiginv Eiliti* 

I KATHERINE KNORR and CK^UiLES MfrCHELMORE. Depnrf b4bu<rf • SAMUEL .ART and 
C.ARL GEWIRTZ. Urturs • ROBERT J. DONAHUE. Edttcr of Hu EduorkilPdga 

■ JONATHAN GAGE, Biuuu'ssanttPmmc EiSmr 
• RENE 60NDY, Deputy PiMulkr 

• JAMES McLEOD . .Adienumg Dinrur • DIDIER BRLiN. (. /nwAi/hvi Duvciur 
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W ASHINGTON — It is hardly 
news to sav that the oeace oro- 


Vt news to say that the peace pro- 
cess is faltering. It may still be news to 


By Breat Scoweroft 


say diat without a drastic change in the 
role being played by Washington, it is 
very iikelv to coUaose. 


very bkely to coU^pse. 

What happened to the hope of the 
1991 Madrid summit? What happened 
to the promise of the 1993 Oslo ac- 
cords? miere is the lift from Israell- 
Palestinian leconciliation of 1993 and 
die nonnalization of Israeli-Joidanian 
relations of 1995? Were all thff sfr fra- 
gile flowers from the spring of change 
destined to shrivel in the scorching brat 
of Israeli-Palestiniaa mislnist? 

The Madrid summit, which launched 
the present Mideast peace process, was 
a direct oa^j^di the Gulf War. 
American policies a^ actions during 
that conflict earned the United States 
the confidence and trust of both Arabs 
and Israelis. It also left the PLO, which 
badly misjudged that confrontation and 
its con^uences, in serious need of 
rehabilitation. The election of Yitzak 
Rabin as prime minister completed the 
iogretfrents for progress. 

Mr. Rabin was one of the giants of 
our time. From his tough beginning as 
military commander in die legendary 
Six-Day War, he had matured in a 
manner which combined that loud- 
ness with wisdom. 

By 1992 he seemed to have adopted 
two principles for dealing with foe gen- 
eration-long confrontation with the 
Arab world. The first was that the no- 
tion of Israel living permanently in a 
sea of bitterly hostile Arab states was 
imolerable. That had to be changed. ■ ■ 


The second principle, stenuning per- 
haps from his experience with the in- 
tifo^ campaigns, vitas that the tradi- 
tional notion m a greater Israel which 
somehow mt^;cated West Bank Pal- 
estiiuans would not woric. The two 
peoples were ocK yet ready to live in- 
teispersed witii each other.. 

iWe twin conclusions led him to 
accept the notion 'of ad eventaal^ 
autonomous Palestinian oitity. And, in 
a dramatic departure from ti^tion, he 
also concluded that to'ieach his ob- 
jectives for Israel he had to do business 
direetiy with the PLO. 

Ail this was surprisin^y re- 
ceived in Israel and met with almost 
universal approbation elsewhere, l^r 
the first time since the creation of the 
state of Isi^, virtually all the Arab 
states indicated their support both for a 
process to reconcile Israelis and Pal- 
estinians (Oslo) and for their own ul- 
timate acceptance of Israel. . 

Mr. Rabui's philosophy does not sq>- 
pear to be shared by Benjamin Net- 
anyahu. He appears determined to stop 
the Oslo process well short of its go^ 

— and Palestinian nationalism well 
short of a viable, if demilitaiized, state 

— but in a manner in which Yasser 
Arafat rather than he himself can plau- 
sibly be seen to be the cause. 

Netanyahu's straregy, if it ex- 
ists, seems to be to take actions, such as 
opening the tunnel alongside Muslim 
holy p&es in Jerusalem or beginning 
construction of the Htf-Homa housing 


project in East Jerusalem, which he 
surely must know will be firovocative. 

’^Provocation” is a strong term, but 
the manner in which Mr. Netanyahu 
has acted makes it apt Mr. Arafat has 
almost no levaagi&fo t^ly in response 
to su^ actions. What he can do is turn 
the people out into the streets. 

Tnis, in turn, allows Mr. Netanyahu 
to remind the worid that the agreed 
basis for negotiations is land for peace 
and securiQr, and k> point out that 
people throwing rocks in the streets are 
clear evidence that there is no security. 

The fact that Hamas and jteibap& 
other terrorist groups back and act with 
the demonstrators makes die situation 
more coaq^licated, since terrorism can 
never be condmed. It also makes the 
Netanyahu case mudi more dramatic 
and compelling. At the same time, while 
Mr. Ai^t's relationship with Hamas is 
not clear, Hamas appears at least as 
serious a threat to lum as to Israel. 

Not that Mr. Arafat is blameless. He 
has indeed left commitments unful- 
filled — (Homineotly including change 

the PLO charter. This, as well as 
man y of hls actions which. at a min- 
imum, indicate tolerance for violence 
and terror, do not inqiire confidence. 
But his stake in die Oslo accords is 
hi^ For taim, Oslo is die only game in 
town, and its demise would be a serious, 
if not fatal blow to his aspirations. 

Likewise for the United States. U.S. 
credibility in the region built up by the 
whole process, begmoing with the Gulf 
War, is on the line. The Arab states 
want tbe Arab-Israeii problem to go 
away, and so support the Oslo process. 


Should Osk) collapse, they would sop. 
port the Palestinians, casting Isiw 
ba^ into isolation. • 

Confidence in die United Staitt 
would plummet, and willin^iess . to 
share ri^ and burdens with it not only 
in die Middle East but also in die Gidf 
wtxild dis^ve. Chaos, violence and 
terror could sweep the area, posing 
grave costs to the United States and 
jeopardiang its n^y and inmevtant. 
interests in the region as a whole. 

Mr. Netai^ahu dora no. q^iear to 
have anything like the same irost-ben- 
efit analysis. Wlule accratwwidi vis- 
ible reluctance Mr. lUbin^ craclu- 
sions about dealing with the PLO, he 
a naiTOwly circumscribed deal on 
Hebron and then apparently because he 
saw no other way out, rather than be- 


'.m. 

it*- 


cause he accepted the Oslo principles. 

At this critical juncture, die United 
States needs to assert the ablate pri- 
ority of its own interests in ihe Miodie 
peace process. It never should 
provoke connontation with Israel, but, 
as in the case of settlement loan guar- 
antees during the Bush administration, 
this sometimes is unavoidable and 
not prevent significant acconiftiish- 
ments or continued close relations. 

America cannot dictate wbai Israeli 
interests are, but it is time to make clear 
to Israel that America's own interests 
are directly and heavily engaged, and 
that it fully intends to protect them. 


ne writer hyu national security ad- 
viser to President George Bush. He 
contribuied this comment to the In- 
tematianalJierald Tribune. 


A 

With Real Politics in Iran, It’s Time for Real Diplomacy 


W ASHlNCrrON — lused 
to believe that there were 


VV to believe that there were 
two Islamic fundamentalist 
countrira that could resist the 
tug and pull of glol^ization. 
One was Iran, braause it had 
oil, and the other was Sudan, 
berause it had nothing. 

Wrong, at least atout Iran. 
Consider its l^esi election. 

Tbe fact that Iranians sifted 
through their presidential can- 
didates, iden^ed Mohammed 
Khatami as the one relative 
moderate, and then vot«^ for 
him in overwhelming numbers 
(70 percent) is remarkable. It 
says two things. 

One is bow much the public 
— urban and rural, rich and 
poor, men and women — had 
come to resent the rank incom- 
petence. corruption and suffo- 
cating r^ression of hard-line 
IsUuTUC traders. The other is 
that the aUme and pressures of 


By Thomas L«, Friedman 


globalization are still acting 
uprai Iran, even in its isolation. 

Merchants know that their 
country's semi-quarantine is 
limitii^ their opportunities. 
Youth clearly understand that 
it is limiting their horizons. 

The Voice of America has a 

Persian- lan guag e call-in show, 
in which I ranian s from all Over 
their country telephone Wash- 
ington just to chat about their 
problems. They are knocking 
on the world’s door. 

They want to be part of the 
most profound global trends, 
from open trade to civil society 
to cultural experimentation. 
And they demonstrated it by 
electi^ die first Iranian pres- 
idential candidate with his own 
Web site (www.khataiiu.com). 

Here is anodier sign of how 


iog of trade, finance and in- 
formation systems — creates a 
powerful network of economic 
rules, pressures and opportu- 
nities that countries have to 
open themselves to. 

' Over time, that network will 
punish any country thu over- 
indulges eidier its body or its 
souL For instance, France is 
overindulging its b^y, by try- 
ing to maintain a cushy litetyle 
widtout the resources to sustain 
iL Iran can be said to be over- 
tnchilgir^ Its soul. 

That doesn’t mean that Ira- 
nians want to retnm to tbe 
sterile, anti-Islamic imitation 
of the West that tbe shah 
ofTered. But Mr. Khatami was 
elected, in part, because Ira- 
luans sensed that he is not 
afraid of striking a* new baJ- 


Iran can “learn’’ from the 
WesL which has “a superb 
civiliution” that has iiiflu- 
enced all parts of the world. 

He may discover when he 
tries to act on his mandate that 
the Iranian Islamic system is 
much like the old Soviet sys- 
tem — everything is connected 
to everything else, and once 
you by to reform it, you expose 
all of Its contradictions. 

Iran can't modecruze its 
economy without opening 
more to Western business 
practices and contacts. If it 
opens up on that scale, how 
does it iM E>ale Carnegie in and 
keep Madonna out? 

This election demonstrates 
that Iran's leadership Is under 
some real pressure Irom with- 
in. The Clinton team is right to 
insist that Iran stop supporting 
tmorism. building nuclear 
. weapoBs. and .oppo&mg : Mid- 


east peace. The question now 
is: Is Washington more likely 
to accelerate change by laying 
down demands and isolatira 
Iran until it meets diem in ful!, 
or by laying down demands 
and responding to any Iranian 
gestures, overtures or positive 
statements? 

I think it's the latter, because 
there is now a real parmer in- 
side Iran — that 70 percent — 
who not only share die Amer- 
ican interest in an Iran that is 
better balanced, but are trying 
to do something about iL 

If the West re mains stand- 
offish, it gives more leven^e 
to the most dangerous Iranian 
leaders, who want to keep Iran 
isolated from the West 

There is real politics going 
on in Iran today, and where 
there is real politics there can 
also be real cuplomacy. 

Tfif Nevt York Timn. 


Two Denver Snimuiteers Have Something to Show the Others 


N ew YORK — When the 
leaders of the wealthiest In- 


X V leaders of the wealthiest In- 
dustrial democracies met for 
their annual economic summit 
meetings in the 1980s. they 
heard sermons from Ronald 
Reagan and Margaret Thatcher 
about the magic of the free mar- 
ketplace. Now. in an odd turn- 
about. this month’s meeting in 
Denver will likely revolve once 
again around the American and 
British leaders, but with a dif- 
ferent story to tell. 

Almost alone among the 


By Steven R. Weisman 


summit members. BUI Clinton 
and Tony Blair lead healthy 
economies with low unemploy- 
ment rates and a centrist polit- 
ical doctrine recently endorsed 
by voters. 

Unlike their feUow leaders in 
Europe and Japan, they have 
fashioned a formula for cuibing 
government spending while 
promoting economic growdi 
and preserving some remnants 
of a safety net. 


Their success may prove chi- 
merical (Mr. Blair has barely 
started governing), but for now it 
is the envy of die other leaders. 

Conditions in France. Ger- 
many, Canada, Japan and Italy 
are not precisely parallel to 
those in Britain and America, 
but aU face a frindamuttai prob- 
lem of controlling cosdy social 
welfare programs that their cit- 
izens are reluctant to give up or 
even see diminisbed. 


The recent elections in Can- 
ada and France have sp^ed 
trouble for anyone advocating 
more austerity at a time of high 


unetMloyment, even though 
the Canadian prime minister. 


the Canadian prime minister, 
Jran Chititien, squeaked 
through with a victory. 

Tile conservatives led by 
President Jacques Chirac in 
France were dneated, and now 
Mr. Chirac must govern with a 
Socialist prime minister. Lionel 


Joroin. ChanceUor Helmut 
Kohl of Germanv could en- 


A French Wrench in the Euroworks 


N ORDWUK, Netherlands 
— The shifr of power in 


— The shifr of power in 
France came as a disconcerting 
surprise to its partners, panic- 


By Flora Lewis 


has lived through the problem 
of opposing presidemia] and le- 
gislative power twice before, is 
misguided. The constitution 
faifr to define clearly the re- 
spective powers, and complic- 
ates intra-govemmental rela- 
tions by providing a seven-year 
term for the president and five 
years for the National As- 
sembly, which the president can 
dissolve at wUl (but not more 
often than once a year). 

Mr. Chirac was in Mr. 
Jospin's shoes the first time. It 
was painful, and he and then 
President Francis Mitterrand 
Lived through it because both 
recognized that, as a French 
commentator smd, the law of 
survival was the opposite of 
survival in the wild West — the 
one to draw first would lose. 

But in the constitutional mist, 
personality is all important Mr. 
Mitterrand was devious, secret- 
ive, prepar^ to bide his time. 
Mr. Chirac is a bulldozer and a 
plunger, as his attempted trick of 
calling a snap election showed. 

Mr. Jospin Is a sober-minded 
politician with a reputation for 
integrity in scandal-disgusted 
France. But his campaign pro- 
gram promises economic good- 
ies that he won’t be able to de- 
liver without renewed inflation 
and much greater debu and his 
alliance w^ the Clommunists 
wrakens his hand on Europe. 

He said once that ‘ 'the center 
in Fiance is like the Bermuda 
triangle — anyone approaching 
it disappe^.’’ He may have 
changed his mind now, but he 
must rely on others who remain 
ideological. 

So, once again. Fiance is go- 
ing to be a problem for its part- 
ners as well as for itself. Glob- 
alization may be irresistible, but 
national politics does its best to 
be endure. 

& Flora Lrwn. 


ularly just when critical long- 
term decisions have to be rnade 


term decisions have to be made 
For Europe and the changing 
world. It is a reminder that 
however linked and entwined 
global forces have become, pol- 
itics remains the domain of 
single nation-states, whose 
voters go their own ways. 

Concern about France dom- 
inated conversation at the an- 
nual meeting here of the In- 
terAcUon Council, a group of 
former heads of government 
seeking to use their experience 
of power and their freedom 
from its constraints to advance 
good policy advice. 

German Social Democrats 
were considered badly boxed. 
“The British showed a thor- 
oughly reformed, modernized 
socialist parly could win, suul 
the French show a scarcely re- 
formed Socialist Party can also 
win, and only Germans can’t.” 
said one ex-leader. 

Who knows? Helmut Kohl, a 
Christian Democrat, is die most 
consistent, dominant European 
leader, but he has a fragile ma- 
jority and domestic poUtical 
troubles. He just bad to back 
down on the accounting ab- 
racadabra of revaluing Ger- 
many’s cold reserves so that its 
1 997 budget deficit would meet 
the now dubious Maastricht 
limit of 3 percent of GDP. 

Voters everywhere are dis- 
gruntled with their political 
class. Naturally ins are blamed 
more than outs, but none inspire 
great confidence, and the gap 
between people politicUms 
keeps growing. French electors 


punished President Jacques 
Chirac for caUing on unsched- 
uled. tactically motivated vote 
and For nondelivery on the ex- 


travs^ant promises of his 1995 
presid^i^al campaign. 

But it doesn't mean they 
think much better of the So- 
cialists, who now have to find a 
way of TuU^ with him. 

The continued advance of tbe 
demagogic, xenophobic Na- 
tional Front, which expresses 
plenty of grievance but offers 
no constructive policies, shows 
that the French vote was above 
ail a protest With blatant cyn- 
icism, its slyly provocative 
leader Jean-Marie Ce Pra, who 
is on the far right, told his voters 
to oust Mr. Chirac’s center- 
right coalition in the ninoffs, 
leaving him to claim that his 
voice was decisive. He is an 
increasing danger for French 
democracy and civil society. 

, To the extent that there are 
signs of a broad trend beyond 
voter disaffection, it is refiiral to 
accept retreat fir^ any of the 
benefits conferred by the post- 
war welfare states, as Britain 
aixl America did. to face tiie 
new demands of global eco- 
nomic competition and the 
reign of a heartless maikeL 

London's Tony Blair and 
Paris's Lionel Jospin are going 
to put a lot more emphasis on 
the “social contract' ' to accom- 
pany Europe's continuing 
transfonnatioD. 

_ It is more likely that con- 
ditions for establishing the 
European single currency will 
be bent than that the 1 999 dead- 
line will be deferred. Even if 
both lake place, the single cur- 
rency is surely coming, because 
it is needed, but the political 
difficulties have grown. 

A certain initial conqilacency 
on how France will cope with 
another "cohabitaiion.'^on the 
grounds that the Fifth Republic 


Kohl of Germany could en- 
counter similar resistance in 
elections next year. 

Voters in all the major in- 
dustrial democracies — as well 
as in Russia, which will be rep- 
resented in Denver by Boris 
Yeltsin — are ambivalent about 
what needs to be done to breathe 
life into their economies. 

Throughout the 1980s, the 
Europeans and the Japanese 
lectured Mr. Reagan about the 
virtues of a balanced budgeL 
Now that Mr. Clinton has 
worked with a Republican Con- 
gress to bring the budget into 
line, France and Germany are 
struggling hard to live up to 
what they used to i»each. 

Under Prime Minister Ryu- 
caro Hashimoto, Japan, too, is 
facing the n^ to undo some of 
its social safely net in order to 
compete in the global economy 
— in J^ian's case, without re- 
lying too heavily on exports that 


simply anger its trade partners. 
But the unstated concern among '• 
many economists is that soci^! 
programs like pensions, healtl^ 
benefits, unemployment insuj«> 
ance and job guarantees are at~ 
the heart m what has kept Japan . 
and Germany stable and pros- ' 
perous for a half-century. 

It is easy to deride Mr. Clin:', 
ton and Mr. Blair as Ton Demo- ' 
crats, but they have found aii'^ 
idiom with which to argue that" 
government spending restraints ' 
and deregulation are necessaiy, ' 
and to ir^e it look humane on 
the margins. Any innately lib-' 
eral impulses in Mr. Clinton, of/ 
course, are kept in check by a'^ 
Republican Congress. 

But the political formula per- 
fected by Mr. Clinton and Mr. 
Blair has one thing in common 
with that of I^. Reagan and- 
Mrs. Thatcher, namely its sense 
of optimism. Both leaders ar- 


ticulate a vision of prosperity^ 
that can be reached if the right ! 


steps are taken today. 

where they depart from their 
conservative predecessors is in' 
insisting that sacrifice be shared . 
and that government invest in. 
research and education to pre- , 
pare for the global economy. 

Europe and Japan wiU prob- . 
ably have to find their own ver-: 
siofls of these qualities of lead- 
ership if they are to overcome; 
their economic malaise. 

The Neu York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897: Silverites’ Plan individual States to exercise al 


PARIS — The Silver Repub- 
licans at Chicago have passed a 
string of resolutions, quarrelled 
with the Biinetallk Union, ad- 
mitted a delegation of bimet- 
allic women and held a secret 
session to discuss tiie terms on 
which they will sell out to the 
Bryanites. The resolutions are 
for free coinage at 16 to 1, im- 
mediate bimetallism, every 
debtor to choose whether he 
will pay in silver or goli and a 
national executive convention 
to be called. 


individual States to exercise al) ^ 
legislative powers not granted 
specifically by them to Con- 
gr&s. Meanwhile, the reform of , 
child labor is a crying need. In; 
some of the States children can 
be made to wrak in mills or 
factories from nine to eleven 
hours a day, and can be em- 
ployed In mines and quarries. • 


1922: Child Labor 




PARIS ~ In its effort to reg- 
ulate child labor under the pre- 
sumed authority of the interstate 
comumeice clause of the Con- 
stimtion, the United States Con- 
gress has been twice rebuked by 
the Supreme Coun. TTic highest 
court of the United States has 
simply defended the right of the 


1947; Saar Currency ; 

PARIS — The French 
of Foreign Affairs announced , 
that the Saar will have its owp ' 
currency. Exchange of German, 
marks for the new Saar marks 
will begin, at parity, within five^ 
days. This monetary measure 
will facilitate the eventual eco^^ 
nomic attachment of the Saarto ' 
France and will help control thd _ 
recent influx of German marks-' 
into the territory. France has 

redrawn the Saar'sfrontitf 80 as ' 

to include communities inba^ 
iied by Germans en^ioyed in 
the territory's coal mines. 


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international HER ALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 




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^Other^ Americans Help Break Down Racial Barriers 


W ASHINGTON — In 1990, ihe 
Census Bureau offered Americans 
{be choice of 16 racial categories. The 
main groupings were white and block, 
which 92 percent of the population chose. 
The remaining categones were Native 
American, Meut and Eskimo, 10 vari- 
ations of Asian and Pacific Islanders and 
“Other.'’ Some 9.8 million Ainericans. or 
4 percent of the total population, chose 
“Other* * rather than one of the estabi isbed 
monOrRicial cutegories — as compared to 
fewer than one million in 1970. 

This number will continue to expand. 
Since 1970. the number of mix^race 
children in the United States has quad- 
nipled. And there are six times as many 
intetmarriages today as there were in 
1960. Indeed, some sociologists predict 
that, even within a generation, Americans 
will begin to look more like Hawaii’s 
blei^ racial mix. 

h's time to acknowledge Ihe increasing 
number of multiracial Ainericans — not 
only because douig so gives us a more 
accunue portrait of the populaiion, but 
because it will help to break down the racial 
barriers diat now divide the country. And 
the place to reco^iize these new All- Amer- 
icans is with the next census in the year 
2000. Although the actual count will not 
begin for another two years, die decision 
about which racial categories are to be 
will be made Ibis year — and it is already 
the subject of considerable controversy. 

The “Other” category has never been 
fully recogniz^ as an independent group- 


By Axiutai Etzioni 

ing. When the Census Bureau released its 
1990 data fw use by the govenuneot, it 
modified ’ ' the figures by elinUnatiog the 
“Other” category and leclassifyiDg its 
members according to the mono-racial 
categories. 

Since the “Other” categoiy U not sat- 
isfactory, and since dropping the wh^ 
social cmstTuction of race does not seem 
to be in the cards ■ — however peisuasive 
the arguxnents for a colorblind society — 
why not introduce a new “multua^*' 
category? 

The very idea infiuiates some leaders 
of the African-American commtmiQr. 
Ibrahim K. Sundiata, ebq jrmy" of the i^- 
rican and Afro-American Stupes Depart- 
ment at Brandeis Universi^, argues ^t it 
reflects a drive to undermine blai± soli- 
darity. He fears that in cities where blacks 
now hold majorities, the new category will 
divide them and undemaine their dom- 
inance. But his argument overiomes the 
fact that nobody-will be forced to give up 
their racial allegiances; citizens will still 
be free to check the box. of their choice, 
even if tiie new category is added. 

African-American leaders also object 
to a multiracial category because race data 
are used to enforce civil rights legislation 
in employment, votin g rights, hou^g and 
mortgage lending, herdlh care services 
and educational opportunities. They 
worry that the category could decrease the 


.numbu of blacks in the nation's ofHcial 
statics, ai^ Abs undermiiie efforts to 
enforce anti-discriminatiwi statutes, as 
well as undercut numerous social pro- 
granu based on racial quotas. 

It is probably true tiiat if large numbers 
of Ammeans removed ibonselves from 
recognized mirmity categories in frivor of 
a multiracial categoiy, fh^ would be 
some loss of public fluids, set-asides in 

new multiracial census 
category could be a step 
toward greater social 
cohesiveness. 

federal contracts and affirmativ^action 
jobs for cenain groups. Bat the social costs 
of encouraging people 10 define themselves 
by then- race are even greater. And the 
political giinmidc of aligning pec^e to a 
racial calory tiiat Iheyliave avoraed by 
dioosing “Ollier*' is downright (fi^tonesL 
In addition, there are strong sociolo- 
gical reasons to favor the creation of a 
multiracial category in the 2000 Census, 
as well as abandoning the practice of 
modifying raciai numbers. Introducing a 
multinteial cat^ory would help soften the 
racial lines that now divide America by 
mairing diem moFe like transitory eco- 
nomic differences rather tfian harsh, im- 
mutable caste lines. 

Sociologists have kmg observed that a 


major reason the United States experi- 
ences few confrontations along lines of 
class is that people in America believe 
they can move from one economic stratum 
to another — and regularly do. For in- 
stance, workers become foremen, and 
foremen become businessmen, who are 
considered middle class. There are no 
sharp class demarcation lints, based on 
her^ty, as there are in Britain. 

But confrontations do occur along ra- 
cial lines in America because color lines 
seem rather rigid. 

If the new category is adopted and, if 
more and more Americans choo&e it in 
future decades, it will help make America 
look more like Hawaii, where races mix 
freely, and less like India, where castes 
still divide the peculation sharply. And 
the blurring of racial lines will encourage 
greater social cobesiveness overall. 

If a multiracial category is included in 
Census 2000, in the future we might think 
of adding one more category, that of 
“multiethnic” origin, which most Amer- 
icans might wish to check. Then we would 
have recognized the full importance of my 
favorite African-American saying: We 
came in many ships, but we now ride in 
the same boat 

The writer, a professor at George Wash- 
ington Univvrsiiy, is the author of “The 
New Golden Rule" and the founder and 
director of the Communitarian Network. 
He contributed this comntent to The Wash- 
ington Post. 


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


flligeria's Position 

I Regarding “Abacha's Ambi- 
lipns" (Editorial, June 7): 

I The real strategic position of 
Nigeria in West Afoca needs to be 
spelled our more accurately. 

! Nigerian troops in Sierra Leone 
ahd Liberia are just the tip of the 
iceberg. 

: Nigeria has troops in Gambia; 
it financed the elections of sol- 
(jbers-tumed-presidents in Chad 
and Niger, and it has a secret 
ruilitary pact with Guinea. 
Through frequent closures of 
ihc common border, and threats of 
the use of force. Nigeria has 
secured considerable influence 
o\'er the democratically elected 
government of Benin. Fuuilly, by 
supplying crude oil, Nigeria has 
enormous influence if not power 
over most West African govern- 
ments. 

■ The true picture of Nigeria is 
lim it is a medium power in the 


world and a superpower in West 
Africa. 

There is very little that the in- 
ternational community can do 
about ±e status of Nigeria in West 
.Africa. Regardless of who roles 
Nigeria, the couatry possesses the 
means and desire to be a medium 
power. It is the purposes to which 
this power is applied that should 
be of utmost importance to the 
international community. 

The e^torial is right that it is 
not the love of democracy th^ 
brought General Sani Abacha's 
forces to Liberia and Sierra Le- 
one. The motive is the desire to 
install governments in West 
Africa that wiU be beholdoi to 
General Abacha. 

Protecting those governments 
from military overthrow has be- 
come part ^ the Abacha equi- 
valent of a Monroe £>octrine in 
West Africa. 

What the international commn- 
nify should be bracing itse/f foris 


what happens when a West Af- 
rican government, subservient to 
General Abacha, is defeated in a 
democratic electioiL Would Gen- 
eral Abacha’s forces aUow the 
new government to take office? 
Would they under mine the oew 
governraent? 

The only w^ for the interna- 
tional community to cope with Ae 
medium power status of b^geiia is 
to insist that Nigeria be governed 
by a democratically elected gov- 
ernmenL 

A BOLAJl AfONYEML 
London. 

The writer was Nigeria’s for- 
eign minister from 1985 to 1987. 

Slovenia and NATO 

Regarding “NATO Expansion, 
or the Whitewater of Clinton For- 
eign Policy” (Opinion, May 20) 
by Thomas L. Friedman: 

American dedsion-makers and 


the American public may have 
certain donbts about enlarging Ae 
NorA Atlantic Tteaty Organiza- 
tiixi, aigumg in particular that Ae 
alliance is overextending itself, 
financially as well as geograph- 
fcally. 

^ one hand, they see prospec- 
tive members as fiziwciai burdens 
who would need assistance in 
raying their Aare of NATO costs. 
On Ae oAer hand, they fear that 
new members — former members 
of Ae Warsaw Pact — would only 
antagonize Russia. 

Ae auAor forgets to 
mention Ae positive case ^ Slov- 
enia, which is considered one of 
Ae prospective candidates for Ae 
first round of NATO enlargement. 
Our status as Ae per-capita 
wealthiest country in Cratral and 
Eastern Europe gives credibility 
to the political decision to assume 
Ae necessary costs of member- 
sh4) and to contritote our share to 
the aUiaoce’s budget 


BOOKS 


agto 


{1)1. Otlmt RAME: 

till \finu The Ascent of Qare Boothe Luce 


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Ksat- 


By Sylna Jukes Morris. lUustraied. 56/ 
poses. S3p. Random House. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 

H er life story reads like a JudiA 
Kranlz novel: poor, illegitimate 
daughter (A a salesman and a sometime 
call girl makes a brilliant mairiage and 
ascends to Ae heights of New York 
society; when tiiat marriage collapses, 
she moves on to oAer conquests wi Aout 
missing -3 beat “Money!” she ex- 
claims. 'i need it and Ae power it 
bpings, and someday you shall hear my 
oume spoken of as — famous.” 

( In Aort order, our heroine acquires a 
suing of eminent suitors, beewnes Ae 
editor of a glamorous magazine, marries 
die bead of a publis hing empire, earns 


millions as a Broadway playwright, 
travels Ae world as a wartime reporter 
and eventually gets elected to Congress. 
She becomes as famous ftx- her caustic 
wit as for her beauty and ambitioiL 

The name of t^ real-life femme 
fatale, of course, is Clare BooAe Luce, 
the auAor of “The Wraaen,*' Ae one- 
time editor of Vanity Fair and the wife 
of Henry Luce, Ae founder of Time 
magazine. Tn “l^eforFame,’' the first 
installment of a projected two-volume 
biography by Sylvia Jukes Morris, Mrs. 
Luce emerges as a woman very much 
like Ae charactms in her own plays and 
fiction: cold, hard, manipulative and 
heartless, alternately cjwcal and sen- 
timental but always narcissistic, a wom- 
an consumed by her own ambitions. 

In addition u> conducting extended 
mterviews wiA Luce before berdeaAm 
1987, Morris was also granted access to 


CHESS 


By Robert Byme 




: ■ .fk-tSii 




D mitri Gurevich beat Gabriel 
Sefawartzman in the final round in 
the 1997 National Open Tournament, in 
Las V^a.s, Nevada. 

I Afrer 9 Nc3, a typical Queen's Gam- 
bit .Accepted has arisen. While has an 
endgame drawback, an isolated d4 
pawn, but a lead m mobilization that can 
produce, middle-game attacking 
chances. Black’s task is to finish the 
nnbili^on of his forces ib soon as he 
cm, particularly his qu^ bishop. 
Tberef^ore,.9...a^ 10...b5 and n.~Bb7 
are qilied for, with the additional use 
Aai they {xevent a breakthrough iviA 
dS. Yet ScAwartzman neglects to de- 
velop ihis key piece. . — ^ 

The position after 13...NdS was 
teacbed m a game between Ludek Pach-' 
uBn and Dan Abe Yanovsky in Net- 
aava. Is^. 1973. It has been known 
e^-since as very favorable for White. 

Moreover, Gurevich's 14Bd2BgS IS 
Bh3Ba2 l6Qd2Qf6 17o4maybeevcn 
nrbiigothanPachinan's 14Be7Ne7 IS 
Q£3 Qd6 16 Bb3 Rb8 17 c4Nf6. 

: After- 29- g3, an excha^ wiA 

SCHWAmZMAMBLACk 




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19.. .NeS 20 de would let Gurevich take 
control of Ae d file wiA his rooks. If 

20.. .Qe7, tiiere could follow 21 Bc2, 
when 21...Bd7 loses a piece to 22 Qd3 
and 2 1 ...b6 loses a rook to 22 Qe4. Also, 

21.. Rd8 22 Rd8 Qd8 23 Rdl Qe7 24 
Qd3 g6 2S Qd8 Qd8 26 RdS K:g7 27 Be4 
produces a fetal immobilizing pm of tiie 
black bishop. 

On 24 Radi, Schwaitzman could get 
his Usbop out nei Aer by 24...Bd7 25 cS 
NfS 26 dS! ed 27 QdSl nor by 24...b6 25 

cSNf5 26c6! 

Drivmg the black tenight off wiA 

33.. .fo was a temporary triun^ but 
aft^ 34 N64 Nd5 35 Nd6 Ae white 
kni^t became even more unpleasant 

Afrer Gurevich put maximum pres- 
sure on Ae black center wiA 37 SI, 
there followed 37..JQi8 38 BdS ed 39 
Qc7 Kg8 40 Rde2 g6 41 Re?!, and a 
flo^ of white pieces took over the 
sevenArank. 

. Afrer 42.~Be4, Gurevich crushed all 
resistance wiA 43 -Nf?!, principally 
threatening 44 Nb61 Qh6 45 Qf7 mate. 
After 43-.K117 44 NdS Qg7 45 .Qb8 
would have left black a rook down. 
Schwartzmah gave up. 

QUEEN’S GAMBIT ACCEPTED 

vUie Biadt Vlite Bleck - 
GuievlA Sdfttean Gnvvlch Sck’ZBira 


Iteif 

-. 1 . . 


~ - euicviCHnfiMrE 

Pfli'iiMonafttrC.-'.^ 


1 KB 

2 e* 
Se3 
4Be4 
5d4 
6ed 
7M 
BQtf 
• NtS 

10 Rdl 

U NeS 

12BeS 

JSbc 

MBdZ 

ZSBbS 

16 

17 0< 
U QeS 
lags 
ao(4 
D RdZ 
8Qe4 


DOB 
24 Radi 
2Sc5 
.8Ng4 
27Ne3 

28Kg( 
8Be2 
30 Bel 
21 NeS 
32Qa3 
-38Qa5 
3<Nc4 
35NdB 
TIRel 
3715 
30 BdS 
38QC7 

40 Rded 

41 Re!7 
41SU7 
43Nf7 
44 Ndl 


her letters, diaries and scrapbooks, and 
she has used that access — along wiA 
her own copious research to cre^ a 
goss^. novdistic portrait of the writer 
as a hungry young adventuress on the 
make. As quoted 1^ Morris, Ae excerpts 
frran Mrs. Luce’s private papers are 
highly damning. 

Aj^in and again, we are treated to 
self-dramatizing declarations of ambi- 
tion (“1 shall make the world and his 
wife envy me!”); self-mtying put- 
downs of others, like her first busied 
(’T married a weak, stupid drunkard 
wiA noAiitg to recoomend him beyond 
a pleasant smile, money and a fairly 
equitable diroosition”). and manipulat- 
ive pleas for andmtanding (“by 
wounding you, 1 canse yon to n^ more 
than ever the solace of my love”). 

Althou^ Morris tends to dramatize 
her mate^ rather than analyze it, the 
few passages in which she steps back to 
prerv^ an overview suggest a profound 
disillusionment, or distaste, for her sub- 
ject She argues diat Clare Bootiie grew 
up’”tainted by distorted values,” neg- 
lecting her own tatents while becoming 
“paAoIogicaliy hungry fru* adolaticm, 
weahh power.” 

Certainly Luce’s life, as laid out m 
these pages, is crammed vdA enough 
drama for several miniseries. There is 
her unh^y childbood wiA a haidess, 
s^-alxsorbed feiher and a voracious 
mother intent on manying her off to a 
millionaire. Dad, a would-be musician 
turned salesman, disappeared from ho- 
life when she was 9, and his absence left 
her whh a sense of beii^ “onwanted, 
unloved, unwevAy of bei^ loved.” 

Ho- motiier’s obsession wiA wealA 
and feme, however, would be inte^ 
aiiMtir 20, Clare had spurned a nian 
she rea^ loved fev being too “willfuL 
high^ninded and poor” aixl Tnarrierf a 
rich, hard-drialdag playboy named 
Getnge Brokaw, for whom she felt little 
but content The decision, Ae wrote, 
“violated the altar of my soul.” 

Having served his purpose — gii^ 
Clare access to moo^ and high sodeiy 
— Brdraw was socm divraced. A sim- 
ilar patton quickly developed wiA 
Don^ Keeman, the managmg editor at 
Vani^ Fhir, who was Aen Clare 
Brokaw'sbe^. 

Once her position at the magazine, 
was secure, Chue began to poll away 
from Freeman and focus her attentions 
on the maaied financier Bernard 
BaiuctLAfter Freeman died fmn imur- 
ies suffered in a car accident, uare 
Bndcaw his job a$ nunaging 

editor. In old a^ Moms writes, she 
martft Ae daim — .widtout ieal sub- 
stantiation — that Freeman had com- 
mitted suidde over her. 

As “Rage for Fhme” progresses, Ae 
stories — m^ofAem pure som opera 

rapidly pite up. By tite eodi^of Ae 

volume, the reader is inclined to agree 
wiA one of Clare BooAe Luce's own 
more nxxose self-assessments: that she 
was “woiAlesAiAallow.insiBcerawhh 

evexyooe,” inchidiiig hefseJL 

Micfdko Kakutani is on die su^ of 
TheNewYorkVmes. .w 


Cancer War’s Emphasis 
Should Be on Prevention 


Bv Daniel S. Greenberg 


The Slovenian case also fits 
well into Ae alliance's noncon- 
frontaiional policy toward Russia, 
smee our country was never a 
member of Ae Soviet bioc or Ae 
Warsaw Pact, nor would its in- 
clusion into NATO bring Ae al- 
liance any closer to Russia's bor- 
ders. 

Furthermore, Slovenian mem- 
bership in NATO would prxrvide 
strategic and logistical benefits, as 
it would be the only cootinental 
link between Ae present NATO 
and Hungary, a likely member. A 
successful tiilatei^ cooperation 
already exists among Slovema. 
Italy and Hungary. 

As a memb^ of NATO, Slov- 
enia also would play an important 
stabilizing role in souAeastem 
Europe. 

JANBZDRNOVSEK. 

Ljubljana, Slovenia. 

The writer is the prime minister 
cf the Republic cf Slovenia. 


W ashington — over 
many years. lohn C. Builar 
3d has .spoken unpalatable truilis 
about the war on caneei . Jermine 
it a failure in reducing deaths and 
calling for more research on pre- 
vention. even if that means less 
research on cures. 

A physician and biObiaiistician, 
Dr. Bailor made himself unwel- 
come wiAin the U.S. govern- 
ment's health establishment by 

MEANWHILE 

showing, in clear numbers, that 
the quest for improved cures 
hadn't succeeded. Many cancer 
treatments are effective, he em- 
phasized. but despite the expendi- 
ture of billions of research dollars, 
improvements for treating most 
cancers have been negligible. 

Dr. Bailor niised this argument 
at a time when politics, pushed by 
cancer lobbies and patient groups, 
had eagerly embraced cancer re- 
search .^s a sacred enterprise, ren- 
dering pessimism impermissible. 
Moreover, research on cures of- 
fended no one. while the scorch 
for carcinogens in indusiriol ef- 
fusions and food inevitably pro- 
voked a backlash. 

Dr. Bailor's analysis wiis 
greeted wiA a curious mixture of 
disdain and Himsy assurances that 
preventive research was already on 
a par wiA curative re.search in the 
government's order of pnoritic.s. 

He later moved on to academe, 
and now. located in the Depan- 
ment of HealA Studies at the lini- 
versiiy of Chicago, he is back on 
the subject wiA u blockbuster re- 
port, "Cancer Undefemed, " co- 
authored with Heather L. Gomik. 
in a recent issue of the New Eng- 
land Journal of Medicine. 

Dr. Bailar's negative conclu- 
sions conflict with the impression 
of wondrous progress that re- 
searchers. anxious for public sup- 
port. regularly convey to a hope- 
ful pubUc via a gullible press. If 
good news repitris could heal, the 
scourge of cancer would long be 
gone, obliterated by excited ac- 
counts of new’ insights into Ae 
origin of cancer and new therapies 
— Just around the corner. 

Yes, there have been some im- 
provements in treatment. Dr. Biul- 
ar concedes, and research for 
cures certaioJy should continue. 
Aough with a lesser claim on the 
budget. But. overall. Dr. Bailar 


asserts. Ac life-extending effects 
actually have been extremely 
small, and "the .salient fact re- 
mains that age-adjusted rales of 
dcaA due to eweer arc now barely 
declining." 

From 1991 to 1994. the article 
notes, morlulity rate.^, adjusted 
for the aging of Ihe population, 
did full by one percent. But that 
was after a rise of 6 percent m 
nwriality between 197D;md 1994 
— a perktd that included two de- 
cade.s of the heavily funded war 
on cancer. 

Cancer deaths per KtO.OOO ot 
population totaled 199 A, 1986 
and 200.9 in 1994. the auAors 
p«.>ini out. noting that cancer cur- 
rently causes about 530.000 
deaths per year In .America. 

Dr. Bailar recalLs that when he 
expressed doubts about the cur- 
ative strategy in 1986, he was 
hammered with the argument Aui 
"new re.seurch findings were on 
Ae way" and would shortly make 
:ut impact on the death toll. Bui a 
decade later, the sad slaiisiies be- 
lie that promise, the article states, 
and arc grounds for doubt toward 
the cuireni round of expeciuiions 
about molecular wizardry spawn- 
ing long-elusive cures. 

"In our view." the co-authors 
slate, "prudence requires a skep- 
tical view of the t.acii as.sumpiion 
that marvelous new treatments are 
jusi wailing to he discovered." 

Cancer prevention, they ac- 
knowledge. remains in large pan a 
.scieniillc mystery, but that's all 
the more reason for a broad re- 
sc.'irch effon extending from be- 
havioral studies on cancer- 
promoting lifesiyle.s to Ae iden- 
rincation of genetic predisposi- 
tions to cancer. The auAors 
add that "m an age of limited 
resources this may well mean 
cunailing efforts'- focused on 
Aerapy." 

Dr. Bailar makes no grand 
claims. Will a .shift to preveniion 
"ultimately succeed in the way 
Aai treatment research was ex- 
pected to succeed?” he and his 
colleague ask. "There is no guar- 
antee "that it will,” they reply, 
adding.. "The ultimate results 
may 1^ as di.sappoiniing as those 
to dale from treatment efforts, but 
it is lime to find out.” 

The writer is editor oj Srience 
A Government Keptwt, a Wash- 
ifigiftn new.t/euer. 




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fcat-LBcHKi 


Clockwise from top l^: Aurelie Blot; Cyril and Axel Motsch Courtiere: Maeve, Oonagh and Joseph Devitt Tremblay; Valentine Menkes (no relation to Stay Menkes); Aymeric Angles and Pauline de Berf^er; Raphael Delacroix; ■ 
Pia Duvigneau; Hermes president Jeart-Loms Dumas withXavier Molly and Clemence Michaud: AUxde Maintenanta^ Olivia Lapierre; Philippe-Henri Rambaud. . 

^ ^ Day at the Races: Elegance in the Younger Set* 


Aa IS^LAND (?) 
in the middle of 
Western- Europe? 

Are you looklno for on ctwody buir-otrf, peisonal. forrAy 
and/or corpoiot© ’Horre-Bose* locoted h tho heort 
of Westem Europe? 

Would ffie Idsof (for you) be a country'estcrte property 
which combines ihe uMmdfe In Old Wdrid Charm 
with 1/10 ultimata In New Mforfd tunetlonallfy, 
amenOlascndMta-tirueiun? 

What would describe *!lti 0 khoT. for you? 

Would It be located wtthln o one hotr's cAfve from Bonn. 
Antwerp. Brussels otkI Lucemboug?... 

Would It be located within a three houis'5 drive from 
Frankfut. Arreterdom. Calais. Parts and Euro-Disney? 

Would the principal "Old tVoifd Features” of the property 
Include a completely restored 37 room Chateau 
ond on IB room PON^on de Chosse (both with 
Indoor, heated, morble swimming pools): Guest 
apartments located in a separate buBding. a 200 
year old Monfcurwd Park, pri^e deer habitat, 
worfo-cfoss Irvtoor and outdoor tenrris courts, and 
your own 9 hole/ 1700 yard golf course, plus fully 
equipped gymnasium, formal outdoor 
entertainment pcf^n. croquet cout. and garders; 
ponds, fountains, topiary hedges, hond-lold 
mosoniy drives and pathways etc. Office focBttes 
ond access discreetly sepoioted from reedenttol 
spoces and focBtles? 

Would the pftndpaf "Vow World Foaturat" Include: Itia 
uttffflofs In turictionallty. amenities, and hl-tech 
infrastructure such as* dual (IIOv end 220v) 
eiecMcoi power si^tpfy systems. Fber Qpffc cobfes 
and titra-praperty TV cable and digital telephone 
systems connecting (underground) the Chateau. 
Povfflon de Chosse. Ottice complex, ond the guest 
oportments which grace the property: A 'super- 
quiet'. superbly engineered. Chateau Air 
Punficotion system (down to 1 micron leveO. Air- 
Control. Conditioning and Humidification systems: 
Muitt-zorre sound systems, sounos. steam dKJwers. h- 
the-floor hot water heating, high pressure woter 
systems: Chateou and apartment biMng elevators. 
Hehcopter pod and hangor (heated): A property 
perimeter that e fenced, gated, and electronicaliy 
secued.etc.? 

Would there be on efficient, motivoted. and rmJltlngual 
(Rench. GermcjT. & Ehgtrsh) staff aSeody irr plaee, 
who are olreody trained ond experienced In on 
aspects of mointdrifnQ ond operating the property? 


Although this property is noron idand with water around 
It. > It b a 65 acre 'akatd at seeurVy. pdvaey, Oiotm, 
Aeteflbnatffy. evid taxury, - located n ihe vary heart 
of Western Europe - vtrirh already developed oid 
opej-e/ienel amenities. Infrostructure. and 
experienced staff - capable Of appomng a quQlty 

of life ondio standard of living. - rgrely found 
siywhere. 

The owner ts re-locating to Asia, ond is anxious to sell. 
Seltftg Price Is substanrtaiy below bbffi replocerrtent 
cost ond owners Investmenf ro date. Price, 
brochure, ond video ore ovaiiabia. Agents and 
prospective purchasers are invited to contact 
owner via 

Fax Qt 1-345-945-5369. 

(Psquesb for conrMenffiotty wiir be respected.) 


By Sip^ Menkes . 

hitemae&iialHendd Tribuni ' 


C HANHIXY. Fnaca — 
Tckchtdins were throKiibg, 
hooves were pmioding aira 
feet were piodng daintily 
across the red clay scattered on 
France's green grass. 

They were tiny feet in smart Maty 
Janes, sturdier in well-poUsh^ 
leaflier sandals, and fest-grawing 
feet in natty suede oxfords. 

What, no sneakers fcMr the kids on 
this Sunday out at the i^encb races? 
No baseball c^? Nor T-«hirts. 
sweftt shirts and jeans? 

Nothing showed more clearly the 
gap between Anglo-Saxon and Gal- 


lic attitudes than how the chDdren 
.were dressed for the Plrix deDiane. 

^iB Herme^^osored, . Jiorse 
race, held 4t Chantilly. 'as ifiis 
y^'s th^ne an homa^ 

•— whh impmled palm trees etched 
against tite blue an Afiican vil- 
l^featuring ethnic crafts and a jjde- 
past of the Sen^ese Red Guard. 

But die children, who make the 
annual event a family aifair, were 
dressed to uphold me . traditional 
standards of French style. 

For girls that meant a dress: 
cfaedced, flowered and smocked for 
the smaUeist; feesh, white cotton for 
yoong women bresakmg adolescent 
bud The hafy were dai^ slrattv. 
For the boys, the clothes were 


equally ne^ and dAy: shirts with 
::coliai5 (and often neckties) worn 
w^ kbaU pants or tiiose long, 
~l^gy"sh<Mts beloved of bid colo- 
nials. To reinforce the African 
rneme, the favored bats were the pith 
helmet or the more femitiaT 
panama. 

Parents of more recalcitrant kids, 
who live in casual spwtswcar, loi^t 
wcmder how the French jxurents do 
it; get their chUdren to dress smart 
and stay that way? The answer must 
lie in me genes. ^ the same sense 
of proprie^ and impeccable turn- 
out could be seen in the meoswear. 
Even if the women often succumbed 
to silly hats and daow-off clothe^ 
me men were universally elegant in 


tail<»ed jackets, fancy vests and the 
ubiquitous panamas. - - ~ 

true that the childrra dress . 
up for me 6ccaslb&,**'Ma‘Jean- 
Lbuls Dumas, president of Hennes. 
as he toured me stands a£ African 
crafts, from weaving ifarough 
paint^ glassware, dnd visited foe 
nuxsery set op by children’s per- 
fumer Tartine et CSiocolat. There, 
tiny tots were tXiU pristine in shirts, 
Tompeis and with Itets in place. 

Ihe only real competitioa for el- 
qgaitce came from me coloiful 
clothes worn by the entourage of 
EUsabem Diou^ wife of President 
- Ab^u ^ouf of Senegal; Her foun- 
dation, which raises money to teach 
Seoegidese children traditional 


crafts,. was the charity benefitiag 
fixan the event. 

. Taldug me Afeican theme seri- 
ously were a few .fashionable folk, 
-includmg Madame Carven, who 'at 
87 spc»t^ a let^aid-print suit and 
hunter-s hat Qothes were often ip 
sand and safari colors or riiades of 
brown from mnd through tree baric. 
MUUoery effects include jungle an- 
imals on crown or brim and hats that 
were just wild: raftia creations witji 
heaps of exotic fruits, parakeets nest- 
ing in unraveling straws and veils 
mat looked 10ce mosquito nets. 

But the genuine Afiican head- 
dresses, (nude and female) in vivid 
col^ pattems inevitably stofe 
ihe.annnal millineiy show. ! 


‘Les Girls’ and les Faux 

On the Road With Kenny Lane Jewels 


By Sozy Menkes 

Intamauniai Herald Tribime 


P ARIS — The Kenny 
Lane road show has 
hit Europe aiul **Les 
Gris” (his name for 
adoring dient-frieods) have 
lined up in four cities. Last 
moom Rome (*‘$00 close 
fiieiids”) and Madrid (70 
people for an intimate dinmex). 
Next week London w^ his 
friend Nan Koiqmerfor cock- 
tails at Christie's and a party 
thrown Sally Aga Khan. 

Now it is Fnmce’s turn to 
get the leopard-print drapes 
and an Ali Baba cave of fake 
Jewels spanning 30 years. 

“Who’-s coming to the 
party?” Lane said Monday, 
as be reeled off society names 
slated to attend Wednesday’s 
nar^ at Christie’s. ”Le tout 
Paris — and anyone who 
doesn’t come will be in ter- 
rific disfevor.” 

Lane has laid out hb col- 
(xful life and woii; in “Faldng 
It” (published by Hany R 
Abrams). It is an apt titl^ for 
the kid from Detroit, who 
graduated as an arriiitect, be- 
came a shoe designer in die 
19S0s and then moved into 
jewelry, has parlayed his busi- 
ness into an np^e social 
life. Selling feke rocks to Jac- 
queline Onassis, the Duchess 


of Windsor, Ivana Thunp ai^ 
more recently the millionairB 
socialite Mouna al Ayohb Is 
tte retail equivalent of sdUng 
ice cream to Esldmos. 

Keonem Jay Lane Inc. is 
not just a ca^ and intimate 
busmess making jewels foria- 
mous Mends — even if Lane 
drops their names as casually 
as Brooke Astor mapped an 
emerald from her necluace at 
her 95m birthday pa^. (Ac- 
cording to Lane's spirited ac- 
count, it was found me next 
day in a vacuum bag.) 

Between the Rome party 
and the ftris do, there was a 
quick trip back to New York 
to appear ou the QVC shop- 
|riag channel, whme Lane h^ 
starred and snrvived for seven 
yeais. How much did he 
make? The quizzical eye- 
brows rise and me moum 
toms into a moue. 

*‘One point four . . . one 
point five,” he says. That is 
million bucks, folks, and he 
appean every two moaths for 
four or six hours a time. 

Well, wouldn’t you bay a 
filigree earring or a coral pin 
&om die nian who put the 
three-stiaod pearis - round 
Baib^ Bush’s neck and got 
ftesideot Clinton (yes, jazz- 
playing BUI) to wear a pin 
shaped like a saxophone? 

“Men usedto wearjeweliy 


— drinif of the maharajas,” 
says Lane, ^o was famously 
photographed by Lord Snow- 
don in die 1960s looking like 
a Cossack prince in baifoles, 
bangles and beads. 

He describes his signature, 
bold meces as ’ ’inveored em- 
niC; meaning the brash Byz- 
antine-s^le pectmals, the 
chinoiserie carved jade 
fects and me vivid Indian 
gems. Often these ideas were 
“brarowed,” like an Indian 
neddace o^ed from MaieUa 
Agnelli’s original or Maltese 
crosses first taken op by Coco 
Tbey were worn en- 
thusiastically by fashion guru 
Gana Vreeland, who pro- 
moted Lane and his woric 

When Vre^nd died, her 
Maltese cross cuff bracdets 
were auctioned o^ as was die 
fiariiy KJL necklace he c^ied 
for Jadde Ooassis frmn the 
original her husband bad given 
her. (Triunp ifid the oty y ite 
and had dangty paste eairiiigs 
copied in gonstraies.) - 





'■.,P 


r 


-» , 


tT.rf. ■t.- 







1.^ I 





■r . 


: » 







W HY, after, all 
these years of 
rubbing up 
against me jew- 
els of me rich andfamoQs, did 
Lone nevermotte fKxn Me to 
the real thing? 

“You don't have the free- 
dom,” he s^; citing secu- 
rity. “And Fin mo to 
pick up an. emerald if it falls 
I on the floor!” 

Lane’s son^ooa jewels 
laid out in “Fairing It” are as 
I colorful as Ms anecdotes. But, 
shopping channel audiences 
aside, is there a imiket pos^ 
eighties for ail that flash? 

“1 know women ~ I know 
what m^ want,” Lane sayis^ 
“They want m look i»etty, 
look good, look exttmragwt 
The . younger generation 



JoeFItchett 

Political 

Correspondent 


POLITICS 

Impeccable sources, 
intelligent, behind the scenes 
and at the heart of issues. 

tf you missed his reporting in the 
HT, look for it on our ^ on the 
Work! Wide Web: 



m 






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fdi'pt 

■ '■ V; i- 


'fit 







e-ftUng «.’• HMiy 


d^*wili ^!Ll**S^!ill t^ Snowdon’s exotic 1 960s portrait of Keruieth Jay Lane; above right, with Nan 
see the first Httle line. . . ” Kcmpnerfor New York magazine in 1994; and Spatash-mspired earrings. 



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BUSINESS/FINANCE ^ 


TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 1997 


RAGE 11 


1 

11^ ‘i’ !!'e? 



i?" 

Vi-. - 



iRiibin Seeks 
iTo Bolster 
iThe Dollar 

Japan Trade Tension 
\ on Currency 

• ■ CanfiMbyOirS»^Fiiminap»'in 

I ; WASHINGTON — Treasury Sec- 
'retaiy Robert Rubin, reacting to recent 
jnirmoil in currency mariEets, said 
: Monday that U.S. support for a strong 
'dollar lud not chang^. 

“We favor a sin»g dollar as we 
itdways have and for the reasons we 
'Always have," Mr. Rubio said during a 
White House news conference. A strong 
dollar "helps keep infladon down, it 
; belre keep interest rates down." 

• comments came as the dollar was 
' lower against odier major currencies on 
! concent over Japan’s growing trade sur- 
;plus and the possibility that the single 
i European currency will be delayed. 

! Hie dollar closed tu 1 12.900 yen in 
;late New York trading , down from 
' l}4.400yen.EarlierinTokyothe dollar 
. hit 1 12300 yen, a six-month tow. 

' The dollar was at 1.706S E)eutsche 

• marks, down from 1.7253 DM. It was at 
1 5.76SS French francs, down from 

S.8194 francs, and at 1.4385 Swiss 
' ^cs. down from 1.4497 francs, liie 
; pound rose to $ 1 .6373 from S 1 .6320 
1. Traders said the dollar's decline was 
triggered by concern expresUd last 
week, by Mr. Rubio and Charlene 
,Barsbe£sky, the U.S. trade r^ireseota- 
, live, over Japanese economic policies. 
'Ms. Barshefsky, whose doUar-related 
comments are cleared by Mi. Rubin’s 
mdes, said Friday the United States 
Twould not tolerate" an increase in Ae 
' U.S. trade deficit with Japan. 

; Mr. Rubin, meanw^e, has re- 

• peatedly said the United States will not 
hny or sell dollars to affect the country’s 

balance. Washington "does not 
believe in anybody using dieir currency 
for trade policy," he has said. 

"Rabin has staked his credibility for 
years on the notion" of nonintervention, 
bid Richard Koss, a currency strategist 
3 MFR Inc. in New York. But with the 
..heads of the Group of Seven industrial 
nations meeting in Denver next week, 
currency traders are concerned because 
jhe disagreement with Japan "appears 
to be over something real," be said. 

' ■ (Bloomberg, Bridge News) 










■ ' ... V 


Microsoft Set to Invest 
|1 Billion in Cable Firm 

Comcast Deal Expands Services Via TV 


l^in Pediii k/llifr 

Voxware employees playing a game of laser tag with the Arm’s president, Mr. Goldstein, second from left 

Codes and Clout: An Internet Fable 


By Steve Lohr 

/Vw Yari ' Tines Service 

NEW YORK — In November 
1993, at the age of 40. Michael Gold- 
stein had the kind of job oAer that fit 
naturally with his Harvard M.6.A. and 
ids stint ccmsulting for McKinsey & 
Co.: a $200,000 offer, plus bonus and 
stock options, to become chief tech- 
nology officer for a major interna- 
tional advertising agency. 

Yet a consultant mend urged him to 
at least take a look at another option — 
a company whose only assets were 
some incoipoiation papers aiKl a 
young coir^terprogrammer. Its tem- 
porary headquarters was a tiny, 
second-floor office above a liquor 
store on Chicago's South Side. 

So Mr. Goldstein visited the young 
software author, Gerard Aguilar. His 
innovative programs translated human 
speech into the digital language of 
ccKTiqiuters and then decoded' it for 


listening. Intrigued, and sensing there 
was potential in Ae spe^h-coding 
software, Mr. Goldstein joined Mr. 
Aguilar a few months later to pursue a 
high-technology eanepreneuria] 
gamble — at a fraction of the salary the 
advertising agency had offered. 

Soon af^, the comply changed its 
name from the ung^y Advanced 
Communications Technologies Inc. to 
the more polished Voxware Inc. And 
since then, almost everything else 
about the company has changed. 

In 1995, Voxware shifted course 
and bet its ^tuie on the Internet It has 
moved to a verdant office park near 
Princeton, New Jersey, luted research- 
ers from Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and Bell Laboratories and 
attracted $1 million in investments 
from Netscape Communications 
Corp. and Intel Corp. 

Lbt October, Voxware sold shares 
to the pnbUc, an offering that raised 
$20 million. But the conqjany’s prom- 


ising start has yet to be translated into 
financial success. For the nine months 
ended in March, Voxware lost $6.3 
million on revenues of 55. 1 million. Its 
shares traded late Monday at $5,125, 
down 32 percent from die offering 
price of $7.50 a share. 

AH this the unprepossessing 
stall, the tie-in to the Internet, the 
reliance on high-powered personal 
connections and the splashy public 
offtfing — makes Voxware typical of 
the dozens of companies that followed 
the path of Netscape, which went pub- 
lic in August 1995 and instantly made 
"Internet miliionaires" of its employ- 
ees. 

In the last year, investcx^' enthu- 
siasm for Internet-related compames 
has swung in cycles, but it has cooled 
considerably overall. Even Netscape, 
the giant among Internet start-ups, is 
trading at half the price of a year ago 

See START-UP, Page 15 


I'loptM M Our Suff Fmu Du/im 

REDMOND, Washington — Mi- 
crosoft Corp. said Monday it would 
invest $1 billion in the cable-television 
company Comcast Corp., a move de- 
signed to bring high-speed Iniemei 
hookups and programming to cable tele- 
vision Customers. 

The move is the latest by the com- 
pany's chairman. Bill Gates, to distribute 
Microsoft Network and other products 
over the Internet and television. 

During the past year, Microsoft has 
made a push into the rnarkei for com- 
bining TVs and PCs to expand the de- 
mand for its software and its Internet 
services, which include the MSN on- 
line service: MSNBC, a joint venmie 
with General Electric Co.’s NBC TV 
network, w'hich provides 24-hour news: 
and an Internet Web site, travel, fi- 
nancial and car-buying services. 

Micrasoft agreed in April to pay $425 
million for WebTV Networks Inc.. 
which lets customers connect to the 
global computer network through their 
televisions. 

Microsoft is betting that it can over- 
come the financial and technical hurdles 
that have plagued Tele-Communica- 
tions Inc. and other cable companies in 
providing high-speed Internet access. 
Comcast needs the cash infusion to im- 
prove its network so it can send such 
interactive programming to its 4.3 mil- 
lion customers. 

Terms of the deal call for Microsoft to 
invest $500 million in Comcast com- 
mon stock and the rest in convertible 
preferred stock. That works out to a 
stake of up to 1 1 .5 percent of Comcast. 

"Microsoft’s track record hasn't 
been spectacularly successful as a con- 
duit of information," said Robert 
Broadwater with the investment bank- 
ing firm of Veronis, Sublet & Asso- 
ciates. " In the cable industry, there is no 
shortage of demand for money." 

Microsoft's muscle and deep pockets 
give it an advantage over most cash- 
strap^ cable companies. It already has 
said It plans to spend SI billion on 
interactive services over the next three 
years. 

Shares of Microsoft climbed $ 1 ,06 to 
$125,125. while Comcast gained $3.25 
to $21.50. 

"Microsoft warns to determine both 


the PC and the TV markets." said John 
Aronsohn. senior analyst at the Yankee 
Group, a technology researcher. 

The move is expected to accelerate 
investments by other cable operators in 
high-speed Internet services. It also is 
seen as approval of cable's future as a 
main conduit for the Internet, analysts 
said. 

"This is an endorsement by the tech 
community .of which Microsoft is pro^ 
ably the best representative," said ' 
Douglas Shapiro, an analyst at Eteutsche 
Morgan Grenfell. "It won't just be the 
resources of the cable companies, bur 
rather the weight of the entire PC and 
software industries." 

Comcast, which is based in Phil- 
adelphia, has been active in searching for 
ways to combine cable and high-speed 
Internet access. 

Mr. Gates said he will work closely 
with Comcast's president, Brian 
Roberts, to develop the strategic and 
technological direction of Comcast 

‘ ‘Our vision for connecting the world 
of PCs and TVs has long included ad- 
vanced broadband capabilities to de- 
liver video, data and interactivity to the 
home." Mr. Gates said. 

Comcast is one of several cable 
companies investing in the Home Net- 
work an on-line Intemei service that 
provides access through cable. 

(B/i>tjmherg,APl 

■ Cablevision fiat’s N.V. Units 

CablevisicMi Systems Coip. agreed to 
buy most of Tele-Communications Inc.'s 
New York-area cabie-TV units for al- 
most $1.09 billion in stock and assumed 
debt, sending Cablevision's shares soar- 
ing as much as 22 percent, Bloomberg 
News reported from New York. 

Cablevision is paying about half of 
what the TCI units aie worth, investors 
said. The purchase furthers Cablevj- 
sion’s strategy of building systems in 
New York, Boston and Cleveland — 
some of the biggest media markets in 
the United States. 

ITie transaction gives Tele-Commu- 
nications a 33 percent stake in Cable- 
vision. whose SportsChannel will help 
TCI complete a web of regional STOits 
networks that TCI owns with News 
Corp. It also helps TX21 cut its $14 billion 
debt by 4.8 percent 


Tliiwlcing Ahead /Commentary 

West Needs United Approach to Iran 


' By Reginald Dale 

‘ huemaiiothil HeraU Tri/ume 

• WASHINCjTON — The recent rash of trans- Atlantic 

• disputes over economic sanctiras is more than an iiritant in 

: ' relations among the United States and its European allies. It 
is preventing the West from developing a coherent global 
strategy now that the Cold War is over. 

Washington and its allies share the same overall ob- 

- jective — to promote the 5|vead of fiee-maricet democracy 
and turn hostile nations into friends. The disagreement is 
over Ae means. 

The United States — and especially Coogre^ — be- 
lieves sanctions can help topple undesirable r^hnes or at 
teist curb their v/orst behavior. The Europeans prefer 
ecmiomic and political engagement, and have angered 
Washington by resisting £e latest wave of American 
saoctitHis against Cuba, Qbya and Iran. 

Washington accuses the Europeans of putting com- 
mercial advantage above principle by continuing to trade 
with "rogue states." Eun^ieaiis say sanctions risk driving 
those countries to greater isolation and extremism. 

Two things, however, are clear Neither wproach has 
had much success in changing the bdiavior of uie regime 
in question, and the West’s influence would be far greater if 
it presented a united frcmL 

Now there is a chance to do just that — and Iran is the 
place to start. Although Wastwgton and Brussels have 
mv^ted much time effort in an uneasy truce over 
Washington’s latest sanctions against Cuba, that is only a 
sideshow. 

. The real strategic challenge is Iran — an important oil 
. supplier and regional power lying between Russia and die 
Gul^, next to the emerging nations of the formerly Soviet 
Cen^ Asia. 

An unusual confluence of circumstances should help the 

West to forge, a new and improved Iranian policy. 

' month’s i?l ‘?*‘rif>nc have highli^ted moderate tendencies in 

. Iran, while Europeans have been sfaakeh by a German court 


finding that top Iranian officials have l^n involved in 
terrorism. 

As a result, the Europeans have edged closer to the U.S. 
position by suspending the ' ‘critical dialogue’ ’ with Tehran 
that has so vexed Washington, and taking limited dip- 
lomatic and security countermeasures. 

Eurc^'s actions are hardly very bold. But th^ come as 
an increasing number of Americans are concluding that the 
tough U.S. line against Iran is ineffective, and American 
business is mounting a powerful canqiaign against eco- 
nomic sanctions in geneim. 

The U.S. sanctions against Iran are looking increasindy 
like the 35-year-old economic embargo of Cuba, which has 
hurt but not crippled the island’s economy and helped to rally 
support for Fidel Castro’s figging Communist regime. 

At the same time, the new U.S. administration contains 
fewer senior officials, like former Secretary of State War- 
ren Christopher, who are still personally aggrieved by the 
Iranian hostage-taking of 1979. 

President Bill Clinuxi says there will be no American 
concessions until Iran improves its behavior, but he hints at 
"reconciliation" if it does. That is abandoning the initiative 
and allowing Tehran to set the pace. 

It would be much better for the West to draw up a 
roadmap for the fuore conduct of its relations with li^. 
complete with an agreed check-list of sanctions for ob- 
jectioo^Ie Iranian actions and rewards for good behavior. 

Mr. Clinton should propose such a plan at the summit 
meeting of the seven leading industrial countries plus 
Russia in Denver later this month. That would certainly 
clarify whether the Europeus really want to solve the 
problem — or keep their trading advantage over die Amer- 
icans. 

It woold also test the mqilicaiions of Russia’s expanded 
role in the annual summit meetings. Moscow would prob- 
ably prefer that Iran and the United States remain enemies. If 
that means that the so-called Summit of the Eight cannot 
make decisions to promote strategic Western interests, the 
West will have to find anotber forum in which to do so. 


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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HF.RA T.n TRIBUNE, TUESDAy, JUNE 10, 1997 


.-fi * 


M. j»m . 

r y I 


THE AMERICAS 




30-Ye^^r T-Bond YieW 



MW 

-Jea 



Clinton Bogs Down on Trade 



Bv David E Saneer The trade deficit with Japan, a 

Prablem Mr. Clinton describe as 
— ciuaal during nia nisi term, is on 
WASHINGTON — After the (he rise again. But the post of am- 
CliotM administration’s string of bassador to Japan has remained 
successes on ciade and in^national empty for six months, depriving 
ecoD(OmicissQes,itsefFcMistoopen ^ adiramstraiion of its key ne- 
marimts around the wwld have hit gotiator with Tol^o on issues of 
major obstacles here and abroad, deregulation and enforcement of 
raising questions about vriiether its - ■ ■ 






foreign policy agenda risks losing 
tiie economic edge that niarkgd 
Ptesident Bill Clinton's first term. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 
more than 20 t^reements struck in 


Intense negotiations over the first term. 
China’senliymtotheWorldTcade And, after mondis of dithering. 




Souree: Btoombaig, Reutais 


■ikwJHmUTMMc 


Organization have bogged down, White House officials reluctantly 
all tHitextix^ishing Mr. Clinton’s coocloded late last month that 
hpi^ that &ijmg would ag^ to passing the budget mu^ come 
major changes in its protectionist ahead of a long-delayed effort to 
woncxnic structure before Pr^ renew “fast track" le^lation (hat 
ident Jiang Zemin visits Wash- givtf the administratioo authority to 
ingtoa tfiis year. negotiate many new trade accords, 

Clunese officials have told their including a long-promised excw- 
Washington counterparts that the sion of Che North American Free 
campaign finance scandal is to Trade AgreemeoL They now plan a 
blaine, because the investigations major push in Congress in the fall, 
into foreign efforts to influence the but die le^lation faces consider- 
1996 ptesideotUd campaign have able t^rposition and probably could 
made any Asian trade deal suspect not pass in 1998. an election year, 
on Capitol Hill. One result of these delays is 


increasingly clear Other countnes 
are racing to t^ advantage of the 
growing pwception around the 
world, that America's trade push 
has slowed. Canada and Mexico 
— twfo other signers of NAF- 
TA — are strikii^ their own trade 
deals in Latin America, argtnng 
that they cannot wait for the U nited 
States to act. France and other 
members of the Euron^ Union 
are taking advantage cu the Amer- 
ican trade arguments with China. 

With the U.$. economy still in 
ovodrive. the threat of restricting 
access to the American market if 
U.S. companies are not given re- 
ciprocal access abroad is potent 

"It's a shambles." Jeffrey 
Garren, the undersecretary of com- 
merce in the administration’s first 
tenn. said of the second-term trade 
efforts. "What was once a vig- 
orous approach to comroercial di- 
plomacy has been eviscerated. The 


Stocks Extend Rally < 
Into Record Territory 


■ij 


Economy ond Profits Fuel theBise i 


^*^*»*» 

NEW YORK — Stocks rose to a 
recttd Monday for a second day. as 
low inflation and strong prtffit 
growtii continued to attract in- 
vestors. 

Buyouts in the financial services 
group by BankAznerica and Safeco 
spurred optimism that American 


companies will take steps to im- 
prove their already healthy bottom 
lines. 

"The investment environment is 
quite favorable," said Edmuud 
Blake, a money manager at Pin- 
nacle Associates Ltd. "We have 
benign inflation, we have good 
earnings, and we have a pretty good 
econofw." 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age topped 7.S00 for the first time, 
but it ciMed 42.72 points higher at 
7.478J0. Its previous record was 
set Friday at 7A35.78. 

The S&P SOO-stock index rose 
4.92 points to 862.93. The tech- 
nology-heavy Nasdaq gained 7.32 
points to 1,412.16. 

The recent rally in bonds is giv- 
ing stocks a boost, investors said. 

The benchmark 30-year Treas- 
ury bond fell 21/32 to 97 1 5/32 for a 
yield of 6.82 peccenu up from 6.78 
percent on Friday. 

A decline in the dollar weakened 
bonds, amid concern that non-U.S. 
investors would be less interested In 
buying U.S. stocks and bonds. 

"Momentum begets momentum. 
Bonds are hitting some profit-tak- 
ing, but stocks are not." said Lorry 
WachteU a market analyst at 
Prudential Securities. 

Meanwhile, comments from 
Federal Reserve Bank of New York 
President William hteDonough fed 
optimism that the economy may 
slow enough to keep the Fed from 
raising interest talcs again Soon. 

Mr. McDonough said he saw 
second-quarter U.S. economic 
growth "slowing down consider- 
ably," while wage and inflation fig- 
ures "remain excellent." His com- 
ments came after the annual 
meeting at the Bank for Interna- 
tional Settlements in Basel. 
Switzerland. 

"I’m fairly convinced we won’t 
see a rate increase" on July 1-2, 
when Fed officials next meet to 
discuss rate policy, said Alan Day. 
at Stratevest Croup in Burlington, 
Vermont. "The more I look at the 
data, the more I become convinced 
inflation isn't as big a threat as we 


campaign scandals have made the 
whole administration cower about 


whole administration cower about 
China. And in Congress, the polit- 
ick ftxmdation for a broad trade 
policy has crumbled." 


Very briefly: 


• The U.S. Treasury, tespooding to increased consumer 
demand and a shrinking tradget deficit that reduces the need 
for borrowing, will seU five-year inflation-index^ notes in 
July and October and reduce tiie numb^ of auctions for 10- 
year fixed-rate notes. 

• Sprint Corp.*s board ajiproved a ‘ ’poison pill ’ ’ plan to deter 
unwanted takeover offers or ^et tiie highest price for sbar^ 
holders if the igteMwmiiintrarinais coiiq)aay is acquired. 

• Atlas Air Inc ordered 10 Boeing Co. 747-400 freighter 
aircraft to expand its fleet through 2(W1 in a transaction worth 
about $1.7 biilioo. The Golden, Colorado-based freight air- 
liner a^ took an (^)tioik to 10 arUiticmal 747s. 

• Lockheed Martin Cop. said it was unlikely to invest in an 


Safeco to Buy Insurance Unit 


Airbus Industrie project to develop a oew p^senger jet tiiat 
will compete with Boeina Co.’s 747. 


will compete with Boeing Co.’s 747. 

• General Electric Co. agreed to buy a Brazilian unit of 
International Business Machines Corp. for an undisekMed 
price as a part of GE's plan to expand its conqjuter-services 
business in Latin America. • Btoomberg 


CdifaM ^ lAr ftffiMrS 

INDIANAPOLIS — Safeco 
Corp., a West O^t property-cas- 
ualty insurer, said MontUy it had 
agr^ to pay $2.82 billion for Lin- 
coln Nation^ Corp.'s property and 
casualty insurance unit. 

The move reflects die fierce com- 
petition in dieproperlyosualiy busi- 
ness, where companies are finding 
that acquisitions are one of the few 
ways to expand after most premium 
rales have slumped for a decade. 


The deal will create a company 
with combined 1996 revenues of 
SS.9 billion. Safeco will pay $47 a 
share for each share of the unit, called 
American Stales Financial Corp. 
Shares of American States closed al 
$45,375 on Monday on the New 
York Stock Exchange, up $7.25 fimn 
the previous close. 

Seattle-based Safeco is best 
known in California, Washington 
and Oregon, where it is a seller 
of auto and home policies. It has 


been attempting to expand by ap- 
pointing more independent agents. 

Am^can States, an India^pol- 
is-i»sed insurance firm, operates in 
more than 40 states through 4.800 
independent agents. 

"This is a good deal all around." 
said Ira Zuckerman. insurance ana- 
lyst at Nutmeg Securities. "It gives 
Safeco a similar business with dif- 
forent geography, and it gels Lincoln 
Nadoi^ out of a business they didn't 
want to be in." {AP, Bloomberg) 


Weekend Box Office 


Bank America Moves for Margins 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — "Coo Air'’ HnminafiffH the U.S. box 
office ova the weekend, widi a grass of $25.5 million. Fol- 
lowing are the Top 10 mooeyinakers, based on Friday's ticket 
sales and estimated sales fix Salnrday and Sunday. 


1. Con Air 

(TmcftSMePIdfaieu 

STUirOon 

1 The Lest Werid Jurassic 

(UoHenaO 

SIOJirniliDn 

3. Addldid to Love 

/NtarnerSraeJ 

S33ninkMi 

A Buddy 

Ode Raman the- 
twcu) 

S3.7inllEan 

S.GoneFIsMn' 

(HaejfwoodPkinna} 

53.1 ruffian 

6. Trial end Emr 

atemUneOieatt) 

52.7irffian 

7. Austin PoNui* 

(MewLhieaimna) 

SKmlUion 

E The FHRi Etanwnt 

(Camhkandaat 

lU ninkui 

9, Bieokdom 

(ftranewiO 

81.9 mllhm 

(EUgrUor 

fUnhmjuO 

lUmilbft 


Btoomherg News 

SAN FRANCISCO — 
BankAmerica Corp., in a bid to 
enter high-margin businesses and 
leave less profitable ones, has 
agreed to sell a consumer-finance 
unit and buy the investment bank 
Robertson. Stephens & Co. 

The third-largest U.S. bank said it 
would sell Security l^cific Finan- 
cial Services to Commercial Credit 
Co., a unit of Travelers Group Inc., 
forSl .6 billion. It also agreed to buy 
die San Francisco-based Robertson 


Stephens for $S4Q million in cash in 
order to build its stock-underwriting 
capability. 

"These are both part of an ini- 
tiative to dispose of businesses that 
underperform relative to the bank's 
goals and get Into more profitable 
businesses," said R^hael Soifa. 
an analyst at Brown Brothers Har- 
riman&Co. "It’s acoincidence that 
both happened on the same day. 
Security Pacific has been on the 
market for several months." 

BankAmerica 's stock posted a 


gainofSi to close atSl^. 

Travelers shares were up 62.5 
cents at $58.^. 

BartkAmerica joins other com- 
mercial banks that have taken ad- 
vantage of new Federal Reserve 
Board rul» allowing them to earn 
more from higher-margin securities 
businesses. Bankers Trust New 
York Ccxp. agreed to buy Alex. 
Brown Inc. for$1.7 billion in April, 
witile Swiss Bank Ccm. agreed to 
buy OilioQ Read & Co. for $600 
mulioo last mondi. 


think it is- ■> 

Stocks climbed for the mesy jf 
die some reasons tiwy rose FikiS 
when a repon on JoIm showed^' 
economy growing at a pace likeiy& 
keep profits rolHist wxAoot .99^ 
ing inflation. ' "* 

‘The market looks fae,*’ aal 
Sean Martin, head trader at A. Ga^ 
Sch^ing & Co. "P^oide stUI 
money to pul 10 woik.^’ . " 

News that Microsofr would in- 
vest $I billion in Conk^ hfrgi] 


U.S. STOCKS 


other cable companies, vdiicb baie 
been among the worst-p^onning 
stock groups in recent ytm, Ma> 
CFosoft's cash infusion warseen Us 
a vote of confidence in n ipdasiiy 
burdened with high debt and heavy 
spending on equijHnenL Mon cah^ 
operators have posted loues year 
after year. 

Tele-Communications A shares 
rose 1 to 16 1/16 and Cablevisicri 
Class A shares soared 9V% to 44Vt. 
U.S. West Media Group rose 1 to 
21 %. : 

American depositary' receipts di 
Abacan Resource were the most 
active in U.S. trading, falling 3 9/US 
to 214 after the Canadian oil andg& 
producer said oil production would 
be lower than expected and co% 
higher, dragging its cash flow be- 
low analysis' forecasts. 

Westinghouse, the owna of tHe 
CBS television netwoik, rose l%io 
2114 after Alex. Brown & Sore 
rated its shares a "strong boy" 9 
new coverage. 

Shares of Proaer & Gamble rote 
2% to 139%, and Merck gained l)^ 
to 93M. Barron's magazine repott- 
ed that those stocks were among 
top holdings of Houston-based in- 
vestor Fayez Saiofim. whose m- 
stitutional accounts returned ^ 
percent a year on average for ite 
three years ended in March. T 

Sbt^s of Rayfoeon rose % to 
50%. and Texas Instruments rose 2 
to 89% after Raytheon agreed b 
delay its S2.95 billion purchase if 
Texas Insmiments's defense busi- 
ness until June 30. while the compa- 
nies resolve lingering federal as- ; 
titrust concerns. J 

Arivaneed Micm Devieec mse'2 I 


1: 3^" -• • :-..y 






pT- 

•I ^*. 


- -r Tva*-- •• ■ f 




.. !'■ !t*« 


V ^ 

- 




Advanced Micro Devices rose:2 * 
to 40% after Digital Equipment ssd 
it would begin selling PCs using ^ 
K6 microprocessor, at a cost 14 
percent less than machines based on 
chips from Intel, f Bloomberg, A?\ 


' ■■ 

" -.iW 
* V 

t: t ■■= 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Monday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The lap 300 most gcHw 
up to nie dosfcig on WoO Street. 
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Jun77 12744 12OJ0 13746 6 0.14 121798 
Wp97 12814 12744 127.70 6 114 90*53 
Oec77 77.04 7744 9446 -014 875 

Efi.iaklK 210580 
Op«l H.- 2&024 up 2S7. 


Industrials 

COTTONKNCnU — 

30404 cortltw, IS. 

JUI97 7140 71 90 7113 -425 AR 
0077 7445 7440 7407 -014 441 


/- 1:. , -4 


DKt7 75.15 7445 7474 -OJI XM 

Mar90 74.10 7547 75.90 -030 4*7 

MmrTI 7*45 7045 7440 -035 1.14 

Esi.30ln NA Fri'OMlH I5J«9 
Fri’topmn 744SI (ID 1052 


ITAUAN GOVERNMENT BOND (LIFFE) 
171.200 Piaicn • phol 100 pd 
S9P77 I30«0 12935 I29J7 -0.74 01700 

DsC97 102.75 IIIL75 ID17Z -046 ISO 
Bsi. tom: 67460 Pm. tda- 51444 
Pm. epin fell ; 02450 up 1445 


BJROOOUARS (OMBU 
ti mmi pifwicopg. 
Mv«D 5130 7tJ4 5135 


JlAie 7135 XUl 51B 
sepoD na nil oii* 


44*6 47 

inu 112 

4n 45*6 

4766 47>* 
IM 1696 
I4«6 171^ 
SSM 57Vt 


41947 4I4AS 61947 -4.99 

Dow Jones Bond 

Fwwu TWn 


20 Bonds 
lOUtBiics 
lOIndusMols 


Ve* 

MHt 

ww 



C47I 

4* 

SH 


•6* 

901 

lOH 

*N 


•9. 

ime 

«*H 

4*Nw ift* 

-tD 

10374 

lion 

IIB 

405 

2ft 

31** 

23H 3JH 
B*k 31** 

elN 

■ft 

UN 

Ijr* 

46 

4202 

46 

BN 

44H 

-•H 

S4S4 

Jft. 

TON 

78N 

'V. 

4M 

7SH 

JJ't 

Ift 

«7H 


SOYBEAN OIL rCBOT) 

6II.901 Ib6- cuno atr « 

All 97 73.50 2194 7339 -OS 

*1(997 23.44 ZliO AM -034 

Sw97 2345 2131 na -02 

0097 2375 7140 23.75 -013 

D«c97 MH 21.73 S90 -023 

Jon 91 XIS 73.95 2115 —432 

Eu. soles NA. Fri-vsniB 17.992 
Fri'seoenirt 103.046 vp IV? 


SOYBEANS IWTT) 

Vm Dm RinuTWTi- mekacupmlM 

Ad*? SO 01515 ail —305 

Aw97 786 744 7Tt*i —171* 

S«97 7|a 70S 789){ —II 

NovfT 487 475 479 —74, 


HI GRADE COWER (NOMX) 
7S4BB «*.• cwm oar IB. 

Ain?7 117 25 11430 11775 
Jul97 IIIOD 11440 11735 
AU077 11550 IIS45 11545 
S«p97 11470 11140 11445 
OC99 nUS UIIB II1J5 
N06«7 II07D non 110.95 
D9C«r 107.95 moo 107*5 
Jv98 107.90 10790 107.70 
FeefO IQ435 

Esi Ides ILA Fn’s.vaes 4.! 
Fri'sppenii* 5A535 SI 090 


DkDO n.» 7112 7112 
MvOI 7114 7112 n.12 


HEAT1NBOR.(NMER7 
4U0PPC4. cam per pM 
JU97 5105 5130 SIAI -El? 

Aue77 5175 aOD a.16 -OJI 

5CP77 SL75 5175 Sin -0.14 

00 77 5430 54.10 5430 *ILM 

NW77 55.70 5475 55J5 -00) 

D(c77 S4J5 55.75 S&TO -Om 

JOITB 57JD 5440 5440 tOU 

PeOI 5730 S4JD S4J0. (044 

Mo-IO 5430 5570 SOS ,074 

EE.itfes HA. Frl'fcsoln 54478 
Frl’SOpMiim I34.IS7 UP B14 








L -xa. «. 

. n.' 

-• 'Sr iS i. 


AnOI 7112 TDD 9107 
Septi 7107 no* 7104 


DkDI tub 7117 7177 

More 7102 7177 7177 


AaiB 7175 7175 7175 

SnV 7172 7171 7171 


DkB 71H TIM Till 

EslsiAk NA Fri^sdn 1.1 

Frt^openim l eA 274IB7 


Au997 786 744 77|6^ —17 

S«97 7|a 70S 78l)i —I 

NdvfT 482 475 479 —7 

Jonft 483 477 48l‘.6 -I 

Ep.stpes NA Fr-fscoe 7930 
Fr.sPDenrfO in.m ad 7731 


Trading Activity 


Nasdaq 


■s *9 
4.. 46k 

M 4«k 
766| W* 


316 m 
3W 19h 
IKk in 
I7N 164 

6.I 


Ik -h 
4(k .W 
i6k 4k 
3P6 

■w* *W 

2P| -D 


r* 76| 
»I6 ]|*k 

3 tlWk 


UMiseun 
HdwWGb 
N ew Laws 


1456 176* «d6W<064 

U!2 7% Deam 

,413 ITT una wHt e g 


^^9 9 VlPJOIMTIfW 

XB2 XU9 TcWtWBS 

91 9S Nmt 


4 

Market Soles 


17*6 iito 

ICT4 1641 

3116 I7H 

SSS6 5777 

IS4 195 

« 61 


WHEAT (CBOn 

SA09 Du cnMmnr* 0,9*6 per BwfM 
A1177 3W 1541s 3FH *9 444Mi 

>DW 377 34512 370*.. -Ms IfJJO 

Ok97 389 3B »8«4 17314 

Mar9| 392V, 3B 20 -7 2.24 

Esi senes riA. Prt^sMe* 2IJa4 
Fri'scpenin 42.737 w 74s 


SR.VER(NCMX) 

Un IroT M • canr. mt Tror e* 

Jun77 BiOO 474.90 47340 -4.30 7 

A497 48100 46*50 47*00 — 4J0 SHOO 

^9; 48450 47500 0040 -OlO lOAOO 

Dk97 erzSO saiao BUO -390 7.742 

Jan90 930 -3J0 17 

Msfi (wn mst 49110 -170 os» 

way 70 SO&OO 499.00 494J0 -3.50 ZJU 

A49I S04J0 SOUN 50050 -3J0 14H 

Estsdm NA Fri'liom HAS 
Fri'vopenW 84.790 oH 5877 


BRmSI FOUND (CMSU 
67. SB DDunoi, 6 Dir mnd 
Anvr 1J37S iBOe ijau 
StDl7 IJ344 IASS I.4BD 
Dec 97 IJNO IJI5D IA294 
Efe.M4e6 NA Frrs.sp|es 20409 
FrrssmH «ui7 w I7I5 


UEKT SWEET CRUDE (NMBU 
IMOHN.* dailarspvrBM 
JUI77 >874 1040 1148 -Oil 

AU077 17JI 1075 17JI -OlO 

S(P77 19.44 17.14 I7JI -AM 

0077 17.51 I7.V 17 J9 -OOl 

NDV77 IfM I7JI I7J3 -Ml 

Dk 97 17.50 1940 1741 -Ml 

JolfO I7JD 17.41 1945 -OD 

FcDTO 17.77 1748 IfM -OM 

Mv98 17.73 1940 I7.B -001 

IWrfO 1975 1747 1747 -005 

ES. 90)06 NA Rt*! soles 147.779 
Ri'iePWlM 4064*3 up 12457 


S; . •..••• 

- -.T ±- 


I'; ii. 4 


» UN 
AW 4l*a 
IM l2Vk 
BN 36* 
21) 2(6 


m u 
1261 m 
i6Vi m 
Sfk 5N 
lllk Ills 

I4(S 1461 
16k I 
II mk 

36k 3 

Dt 34 
IV. |v« 
III ID 

*lk 46* 
37W 3» 


IM 

1211 M, 
IM -N 
5* 

Hu 4( 
li* .66 
I 4k 

im 4k 
3ta Tik 


Adumes 
DediMd 
yMtlllMGd 
Tbw issues 
NewHi«H 
New Lows 


1BI 2)9 
277 205 NYSE 

■0 Its Amc* 

Nosdoq 


•jf -j, imoaq 
4 I fti m d K pf s i 


47Q.U 58039 

T2M 37.12 

51005 58*01 


1261 IM 
H f« 

N 947 

I* W 
66* F6l 

ms in 
M Ti 
IM m 


I* 

M •<« 
3Mk 4* 
fW ‘W 

IlH 'I* 
II *11 


Vk M 

flk 916 

14 UM 

1416 IJW 
3 PI 

S6li UN 
1947 IfN 
n i«k 
tU TN 
12*7 in. 
317 35* 

-4>S ON 
7* M 


M 

917 -97 

IBS -N 
UH •* 
IN •(* 
UH -M 
19*7 -H 

m 


Tin UN 4**7 
TM «> SM. 

«i II in* 

m Ilk iVk 

3m 269k t4N 
1*4 I3N IM 
W IVk 1,7 
4(6 26. 26. 

244 lOA m 
<4 17 m 

147 1*7 ilN 

*>f Ml, Jfk 
3H M 5V. 

IM i;l IM 

1661 ITN l66( 
2» r't 27N 
IIB ML 9!, 


I2H 4l 
167 «N 
4fM 

767 .17 


97N P 

IS* 1*6 
4N JU 

|6k I'l 

Kk IV. 
KF.7 im 


Dividends 

CompOBY Per Aiiff Rec Pof 

IRREGULAR ■ 

Advance FM . .OB 6-30 7-15 

BimiKrti CbItdI b 1.007 6-13 7-31 

CopMWoUdGrw . 3i 6^ M 

Nohms Bol Tcvgd _ .105 6-13 6-37 

STOCK SPUT 
Remoc Inc 3 for 3 spur, 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Idon Sottwore 1 lor iSmeise N>lii- 
INCREASED 

CopsleadMtg Q 475 6.20 6-30 

Holy Corp 0 .15 6-30 7-7 

Nop Plan Realty Q 3*25 6-20 7-8 

INITIAL 

EastCroup Prop n _ J3 a-19 oJO 
REDUCED 

GreemmchMiiii M .054 7-33 7-35 

recuUr 


Livestock 

CATTLE ICMER) 

AJn77 4195 *3d> 416 -030 

Aue97 4610 <115 43.17 ^042 

0097 47)0 44J2 «« -027 

DeC97 49*0 «9je 4750 -0.15 

FebfO n.7S JOB 706 -005 

AurW 7150 7127 7130 

Ed.soles NA Fn% stfes I4B2 
Frrspppiire lol.ioi oN *ll 


PLATINUM (NMER) 

W irei p*. peain eer we. m. 

A4«1 459 » 41700 61.10 -aS) 13.26 

0(2«7 429 00 6000 4SiO —130 S.IS7 
An98 474(10 41550 41*10 -130 l.n 
EP.iaiK NA. FVi'S.s6es 4.IM 
Ri's«s*n.i* I9.7B oti 125 

LONDON METALSUWP PlWlW 
DHiors pw metriclcfi 
AAinroum mtoh C roBe ) 

Spot ISSfw ISBN 1572.00 157100 
Forward 140SI* 16043)0 155«.00 1577.00 

|pSf*' 2552310 

Fonraid 2407.00 2408 JO 24063X) 267.00 
Lvori 


OWADIA N DOLLAR (Ol4ER> 
lounoonAors. s Dw C6i <er 
An 77 no 7310 7210 

S6f7 7274 7254 72S 
Dec77 7315 7275 7275 
EE.iWes NA Fi1's.iale5 27.325 
Frl^enwiW 47,444 eft 1081 


NATURAL 6*5 (NMER) 
ie.«oe(nm Wu’s. 9 aarrnn oiu 
Jul77 1195 1125 116 

Aiig77 UOS 1150 116 

Sep97 1185 116 1154 

00 77 1190 11B 1170 

Maw77 1330 1300 1308 

Dec97 1445 1435 146 

Jai78 1520 1480 1495 

Feb90 1415 260 1410 

MorSI 1390 1275 1380 


id 

V 'I 'i 

fi.- s?5i', • » 1. 


• sys y ; = 

:: .4-. 

- cSbu* w; 


■■ 


-I"! ::S 


CompBiy 


Agree Rnihr 
MCinousf 


CahindMS RNy Tr 
Ena RHourccA 


xn BH 
11*. I7H 
3lk Mk 
IW. Itk 
I* « 
a 2»» 
in 17 
4«k 4* 

SIS «t 
26Vk 2516 
7*4 7* 

Id P* 
■9k Vh 


6IS 58 
lOM Wi 
14‘, ITi 
M SM 
PVi 9* 
w* it;, 
)M IK 
4tVk 43«k 


E quity ResideniMl 
rleoteellnd 


0 6 6-30 7-17 

0 J15 6-lft 7.3 
O 305 4-30 6-25 
S .15 7-0 7-14 

0 B2S 6-37 7-11 
Q .13 6-2i 7-7 


FranUinSelRIlvA 
GendiSlncAq 
Gewernl ( 3ieni 
HuHnuLinca 
CreenwidiMun 
OreenvMi Mun 
Grail Bras A. 
CrertBiOBB. 
HoluCorp 
Higli Inco Opport 

IlKoODlWrt 
Houflsa Ind 
indepcndnt 
Logicon Inc 
ManfiHaJohn 
Mcdermottlntl 
HewAinHi 
One Uborty Prap 
PledmMNNatCae 
Smith Bom Int 
SBom Intermcd 
SBam Inlenned 
SBamMuniFd 
SBomMviBFd 
Taubmon Cemers 
Toni Sysieim 


Rec Pay 


6-30 7-IS 
*•20 7-7 

6- 10 7-3 

0-13 »ao 

5- M 8-39 

7- 23 7-26 

6- 20 7-1 

6- 30 7-1 

7-7 7-18 

7- 2J 7-25 

S-37 

7- S 9-26 

8- 15 ^10 

7-31 
6-20 7-2 

6-25 7-M 

6- 16 7-1 

B-16 6-38 
*-» 7-1 

«-94 7-IS 
7.23 7-25 

7- 22 7.25 

9- 33 9’Tt 
7-22 7-35 

5- 26 

6- 30 7-18 

^20 7-1 


FEB1ER CATTLE (OMER) 
nun Ilk - cism Dcr Bi 
Atn97 744) 74(D HK '■EtO 

5ep91 7*6 750) 7193 -017 

0097 7485 7435 716 

NWTT 113) V» 77.e -M) 

AnfO 7930 7118 nto 

worfe TtlU 786 ?86 

Ev SONS NA Fr<'v VOW) LAS 
Frcsopenim 11.518 off ^1 


Spot eaojD a?ao mvi sovi 

nrword tf7J0 640J0 645J0 646J0 

7)5510 TWM 7735M 723SJID 
Forward 7Z7OJ0 727SJ0 7330J0 7340J0 
Tin 

%pel 506518) SS75J0 5705J0 STISJO 
Rmrtf 561000 5615.00 5730X0 574100 
ZKlSpud^MGradD) 

Sperf ^iSaX 1333J0 134769 1340*7 
Fwvoid 1356.00 13S7J0 ISTIJO 1372J0 


EBOMANMARK (CMER) 
H Sia MUme UySwer we l u 
AmTT J077 J77S JiST 
Sw77 3716 3034 3m 

Dk 77 3717 jrs 3739 
ED.mes NA Frrs.seles 6353 
R/soPcnlnt lOLTB up 8BB 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

1S3 rnmien ven, * par m van 
Jin97 0945 J70 3ia 
SeD97 306 JB2 0771 
Dec97 316 306 30B 

ES>.l6fs NA Rfisoles 35.(31 
FtTsoponM 11930 up 505! 

5WB5HUMC(CMBI} 
iZ&MBfraPCSr S per fewe 
Junf? J010 0903 3951 

SepB JW 3910 JIBS 
Dk 97 7165 716 716 
gr.Rits NA Rfs.sal*s 31.7fi 
PrTsoBonW 4630 up ISU 


Apr9l 116 116 IMO 

E$(.satK NA FrYs-iCies 236 
FrYsopenim 1*4,078 up tw 




UW-EAOmGASOUNe (NMER) 
6300 DDl. nnmpw eel 
JulB 576 610 SL30 -0.93 

Aua97 576 S4J0 566 -032 

Sep97 546 556 5534 -051 

OdB B.I5 546 5434 -031 

Nav97 546 5L14 54.14 -034 

Deco 5LJS 06 536 >331 

Est.iaies NA PrYisoies 9.758 
Frl'sdpfnint 7436 UP 264 


*■ : ' LT ff -t 


\ jS r 
riSr;- 


HOGS^m (CMSEI 

sijn ib.k- ccnis ai!> Id 
Ain97 91.]) 6JI 1947 -06 

AjIB 416 77.90 BIS -16 

Aue97 7990 7810 186 -1-17 

OciJJ 71.7) 6X5 1155 -OJI 

Ok 91 «7.90 4L9 48.47 -16 

Evsoles NA Fn's.sel« 73M 
FrrsdcmaD 6.404 oH 145 


Htoh LOW One Oiee opM 


MEXtCMiPEsotaNeo 

SD03B pespb S par paw 
Ann .12500 .lOMO .1367 
900 97 .11405 .1)710 .1)715 
OlC77 .lists .11505 .11545 
». soles NA Finsdes l«,lis 
FTrsooenuil 6132 uo 844 


F0RKBB3.IES (CMER] 

S.on . <ann sw W, 

All71 0510 R<7 81«7 ^16 

-'av M73 116 8335 -087 

^91 ,Mjs 7«0 7412 tOJ! 

NA 17*4 

Fir^ooenirt Ml* uo R 


Flnaneia) 

UST.BU3(CMB) 

SI nwren- e(* W rn per. 

Junto Tiff M7I M.B *033 436 

Scpto 7435 9437 .9437 -002 ^ 

Decto HA 7(35 -031 10 

ED.SMB NA HVluNs 740 
Prrsooenliv I off ibb 


5 VH TREASURY (OOn 
II 00300 pOl- en B 4616 or 16 Dd 
Junto 104-11 105-67 10543 -IS 41371 
S«d 77 105-6 106-45 105-47 —IS 14176 
□Kto 105-44 105-02 IIIH5 -U 502 

eo.mIh NA Pnxims 123.132 

pri'ionnlni 224.7W up 7179 


yjfJRTH STERUNO (UFFE) 
canooD • pN oi 16 fid 

W7; 93.1) 936 936 -035 

U171 726 926 -0.07 
^2 UlOl 72 75 72.75 -06 

SepH 9276 9271 6.70 -037 

D«98 W./2 91(7 9166 ^07 

75358. Piv«.so|Ds; 61.741 
Piw.opunnt.: S513M up &321 


GASOIL (IPEI 

U.S dalianpormefnclan-lob6l6taif ^ 
Am97 1*3.00 18^.75 14030 -425 1*^ 

Jul77 1(L» lAIJO I4I.7S -430 

Aug 97 I6&25 1636 1675 -^30 

54p97 I67.M 16S6 I6&7S -46 

Oel97 169 25 litM IM25 -3 74 AfW 

Nov97 ln.00 I70JS 1»3S -3J0 w* 
D*<«7 1726 I7IJ0 17130 -36 A716 
Eel SUM }%4W. Pm. tdci .2336 
Pm gp,,ilnl *67.519 up AW 

BRENT OIL OPE) 

U3. doEdis on bonel - tob d# LOW IWRfc ,, 
JiHyto 17.78 1734 1736 -AW 4^ 

Aug 77 )&(t3 1777 1732 -ElO fL« 

Sm97 1832 1034 1834 -OW 1^ 

3377 I8J7 1132 1831 *004 « 

N0977 1830 1035 1835 aOlt Jg 

Doe77 1037 1845 10.44 *312 I'g 




.. . ;v. - 

a« 




la^r 1045 «»** ■i™ 

SSI 'if. iiS 


D-oniwri; iMparauawle OBmnt per 
9liMADR< g pof iii li In Conadni hndw 
ra-raonodyi q-qwiiiert B s-wral iniiel 


COCOA INOej 


2716 Jt 
in* 

4*k 

40* 

2SN •* 
Pk n 


ft ft 

m m 

6*9 49k 

IN In 
IN I* 
25* B 
41* 49, 

9 IN 
Wk W6 
dn tm 

4M 4fH 

M n 
6* 5N 
Ph 4 


■** 

24 

ttk -N 
5N ■(» 

W*. .k* 

276* 4S 


2 * ft 
2ta 2* 
•4** IP* 
29 m 
12 llWa 
UH IM 
IP* 2IN 
»«• 30*9 
i:* IVk 
2** ft 
IVk I 
17 1466 

n IN 
II ION 

21) 2n 

iiVk ir>( 
IIN UN 
I7N I77> 
15*1 I5N 
I4N I2*k 


Stock Tables Exploined 

Soles flaxes (R unoffletot Yeorlv highs and kms relied the previous 9 nods plus tin euren) 
week.lAiindiielaNsttiiHtngdapWheieaspllorsnd«Buldendanaundngia2Spnanlarmoie 
MS Ooei poRL ihe yeoiB MBlHoni range ond dvidond ore mown lor the new sloBs oniY. Uidea 
tfhnwm MdeG lOtos of dmderab are annual (fistxnemoits hosed en the MesI dedanKm. 

0 - dividend olso extra (s). b - annual rate of dividend plus siedi dividend, c - liquidating 
dividend, ce - P£ anedsTRAjd- called, d- new yenify low. dd- loss m the 1^12 months. 
0 - dividend declared or poid bi precedhig I2 mentlis. I - annual rote, incicpsed on losl 
dedamhan, g - dividend In Canadian fundL subjecl lo 1 SN. non -residoiKe i • divrdond 
dectorad oflor splb-up or slodt (dvidend. | • dividend paid rhte year. «m»lvd. defnred. or no 
ddion taken ol talnl (Mdmd meeling. k - dividend dedared or paid Ihta yeor. on 
ocniinutalivc bsue with dhrMenas in amon. to • aniKial rol^ rodveed on lest dcclo r qllon. 
n - new Issue In ihe post 52 weeks. The nign-iew range begins wHh the start of trading. 
Ad - nexi day deOvery. p • Initial dhndenft annual rata vnknowa PTE - price-odmings ratio. 
0 ' dosed-end mutual hind, r- dividend dedared or paid In preceding 12 montiu, plus stadk 
dividend s • stock spCi. Dividend begins with dote el spliL ds - sales, t - dividend paid in 
suck in precerang 1 2 months esltmoted ash value on ei-dividend or ee-dlsirlbu1ian dote, 
u • new yetrriy high, e- trading haDca. vi - in bonkrvplcy or rvcMvership or being leorganlTOd 
under ihcBonkniplcr Act orscoirIliesasBu mod by svdicompenie&Md- when dtairtbuled. 
M - when bweiV ww ■ with womnls. x - ex-dividnid or ox ilglils. xdb - ck-dlstribution. 
n* - wllhciul vrarnnits. y- ex-dlvfclGnd and sales in lull yw - yield i- sotas in luP. 


1437 

1410 

lOO 

4 17 

1473 

Wl 

un 

i lA 

tail 

IS! 

ISIO 

*14 

tail 

IS7S 

ISli 

* IS 

15*1 

tatf 

1)41 

* IS 



1)01 



18 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

*110400 arm- eta & TMA e4 100 DO 
Junto 108-17 lOB-OS 101-04 -ll 04J]I 
Sentom-oo 107.19 l07-n -ll ibhu 

Decto 187-11 110-10 107-11 -i| 7m 
EA.sc4n NA RtLSotaf I8I3I3 
FrYsoeOrtM 345.407 uB 1ID41 


Njk. rns.Mws IV 
FrOoBenim «a.4B W1 MH 


COFFEE ClNCSE) 

77. iOO *&» - act IB 

Auto 25(,go 215 a CSIM ’1435 
Seoto Di» }UM B140 '7.« 
Dfsto 1934) IU6 19X30 '835 

yorf# 11000 i7Md 17890 -rji 
taov98 I76J0 77402 17430 '030 
EH Min NA FrAsoin 7.754 
Fr.sflBenmi ji.)o an 1474 

SUGAr-Wopu) II (ncsEI 

M?004I^...^^B( !> Kk!, Id 
A»to II V II V 1).« 

OCto II.)7 IIJ2 II Jl .0«S 
J»n 11.20 ii.ii Ml? -aos 
Mov98 HOT lljg 11.V *302 

Eai.iWes NA nm MOds toAM 

Frrsooertuir Kj.ifg ^ 


USTREASVRV BONDS (CBOT) 
i4ea.9 i oo.aiP nh ASftdvDrwopai 
Junto 1)1-20 110-30 Ill^N ^20 lauiM 

Scsto 11(4 1)^11 11^17 —30 iflji 

DectoliD-27 IIMS 11034 *17 24!^ 

MvTOIOT-B Ito-B 107-28 -20 2^ 

ES.4C405 NA Ri’s.sotas 733314 
Frr»openlm 509340 up 274tr 


l-gpNTH EUROMARK (UFFE) 

Otal mirm ol 100 pd 

7634 9634 (401 I97M7 
iun^v 9633 9634 4003 1>»7 

S« 2Jil *fl31 331149 

D«to 9L73 9e.70 46.70 -001 2^774 

teu 96.43 *0.03 Iii563 

74.26 9420 7*21 -00313774* 
2‘*’9^®S.97 4594 75.75 -am 'gt,^ 
Esi. Mis T40377, Pm soln: 121,728 
Prev. open ini . I.4to3l9 up lTB 


Stock Indextt 

SIPOOMP.INDEX (OUIER) 

Jun«rWJD MlJli 04130 
Soto 876.00 BTUO 87100 ^ 

De«W 80100 11130 OI23l_*l« 
Bd.iatas NA Fri'kodiH 91.7*7 
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Morn 9341 Ma >030 

9W1 9633 7430 *030 

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JlHto 27310 26443 26663 -» 

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Dk 77 47013 47673 47773 *580 
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Pmv open xiL 017*1 up 116! 


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PAGE 14 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 199 


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I 

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{chny's Pirates 
Pon’tFearLaw 


; By Richard CovingtcM 

^leful M ihf Htrafd Tribune 

■ HONG KONG — Joseph 
Cbu runs a thriving trade in 
pirated audio; video and com- 
puter compact disks from a 
near the Sham Shui Po 
6ubway s^'in. Kowloon. 

He has plenty, of. imitators, 

and plenty of business. Over 
dk last six weeks. 15 pirate 
disc factories have opened in 
the colony, churning out hun- 
dreds of disks a week, -said 
iui>C1uan Giouw, regional di- 
Kctor of .the InterhatiODal 
federation' of the Phono- 
graphic Industry, a group diat 
represents 1 3(1) record pro- 
ducers in 74 counties. 

The equipment used in 
these facKwies was 'originally 
Intended for China, Mr. 
Giouw said, but was' set up in 
Hong Kong after Beijing, un- 
der pressure from U.S. trade 
officials, began a crackdown 
on pirate CD factories.oa the 
mainland. 

. With dozens of cl^ly 
packed shops, the Golden 
Computer Center, where Mr. 
Ou has bis store, is one of the 
city’s busiest shopping malls. 
Cc^ies of Microsoft's OfQce 
.97 con^uter programs and 
video disks of *‘Liar, Liv” 
and other Hollywood ftlms 
fly out of the stalls for SO 
Hong Kong dollars ($7) each, 
a- fraction of their retail price 
elsewhere, if they are avail- 
able at all. 

. And experts here say the 
lucrative business was likely 
40 continue to flourish after 
'the Chinese take charge on 
July 1. 

Indeed, Mr. Chu professes 
indifference to the eftect of 
coming Chinese rule on his 
business. 

“If the aurhorities close us 
down here, we'll simply pop 
up somewhere else,^' he 
srid. 

‘ Under a proposed law that 
is being debai^ in the Hong 
Kong legislarare, anycHie ex- 
porting unlicensed material 
.Vould be subject to fines of 
Up to 50 JXX) Hong Kong dol-' 
l^per copy and four years in 
^ said J^ter Cheung, as- 
sistant director of the 
colony-s intellectual proper^ 
depai^nt. .Possession of iK 
^gal copying equipment 
GoiiJd re^t in Hoes of 
5Q0,0(X) dollar, be said. 

StiU, the law would not 
pemiit rights holders to sue to 
close the pirate • boutiques, 
^en tdnqrorarily, he saitC be- 
cause that would anger land- 
kxds. 





■■ - 

k:" ■ 

\ , 



CixlfMbyOirSiifFiauDupiueiUf 

TOKYO — ^ Japan’s most powerful 
business group said Monday it had sus- 
pended 'Nomura Securities • Co. ' and 
Dai-Jchi Kangyo Bank Ltd. as' mem- 
bers for 12 months for their roles in a 
widening payoff scandal. 

. The unfffBcedented action by the Ja- 
pan Fedmtion of Economic Organ!- - 
zaiions,' or .Keidanren, against' major 
fin^iai institutkms follows the indict- 
ment of two former Nranura executives 
and the- arrest of' four Dai-Ichi exec- 
utives last week. 

Keidanren officials said the decision 
was made at a meeting of the group'’s - 
disciplinary committee aft^ requests 
by Nomura and Dai-Ichi Kangyo,- 
adding that the 'suspension of both 
companies would take effect Tuesday. 

“All participants in the meeting 
agreed that the action was* essential in-, 
view of the series of scandals, which 
have shaken- public trust in business 
circles," Ketdanren's chaiiman, Sboi- 


China^s Urgent Hunt 
For New Oil Sources 

Import Needs Seen Doubling by 2000 


No Longer Rivals — Just Friends 

Mickey Kwtorvl^ the forroer U3. commerte secretary cm a private visit to 
Tokyo, being greeted Monday by Prime Minister Ryiitaru Hashimoto. ITie 
two became ftiends.deslHte their nations* disagreements over trade policy. 

Nomura and DKB Shunned 

Japan^sTopBusimess Group Suspends Both for a l^or 


chiro Toyoda, said. “We hope that the 
companies will put forth effective pre- 
' ventive measures that are acceptable to 
society.’’ 

A Keidanren spokesman said it was 
only the second mne that members had 
been su^nded and the first time that 
such action had been taken against ma- 
' jor financial institutions. 

Sep^tely, the Ministry of Finance 
is considering barring Dai-Ichi I^gyo 
ftom underwriting its bonds, according 
to a report in tbe-daiJy 'Nihon Keizai 
ShintijuQ. Damage to earnings Of Ja- 
pe’s founh-laigest bank would be 
- slight, analysts said. Commissions 
from underwriting accounted for less 
than 23 percent m Dai-Ichi Kangyo’s 
total revenue in 1996 of 2.1 trillion yen 
($18.4 billion). 

“This is a symbolic penalty." said 
.. Nozomu Kunishige, a senior analyst ai 
Lehman Brothers Japan Inc. “It won't 
have a large effect on profit.” 

(AFP. Bloomberg) 


By Steven Mufson 

Wi^inglon Amt Ser\irr 

BEUING — China is negotiating 
long-term oil-supply contracts with 
Middle Eastern countries and is con- 
sidering the establishment of a stra- 
tegic reserve to meet its ^wutg 
thibt for imported petroleum, 
Chinese officials say. 

The official China Daily Business 
Weekly said Sunday that China will 
need to import nearly a million bar- 
rels a day by 2000, twice the current 
level. With the domestic oil Industry 
struggling to maintain production at 
about 3.1 million barrels a day. im- 
pons will have to increase sharply to 
keep up with China's rapidly ex- 
panding economy. 

The report comes at the end of a 
week m which China agreed to in- 
vest $5.2 billion in foreign oil-ex- 
porting countries to secure future 
suj)pUes. Hie sum is an important 
commitment for a developing coun- 
try such as China, which is trying to 
lure investment to its own domestic 
projects. 

“China needs a stable crude-oil 
supply, reliable sea transportation 
lines with oil tanker fleets and suf- 
ficient loading, storing and pro- 
cessing facilities." said Zhu Yu, 
president of the China Petrochem- 
ical Consulting Coip., the research 
organization for China Peuochem- 
ical Corp.. the state oil company. He 
added that “the reserve is crucial 
because the g^ between domestic 
production and demand is widen- 
ing" and that “without a reserve, 
China could be affected by drastic 
market fluctuations." 

China was self-sufftcient in oil 
from the mid-196()s, after the dis- 
covery of the huge Daqing oilfield, 
throu^ the mid-l^s. With 
Daqing having reached auiturity.oLl 
exploratitKi.offshore and in China’s 
nc^west 1^ not produced discov- 
eries big enough to maintain self- 
sufficiency, which was once a 
much-valued political goal. 

So today's economic planners ap- 
pear reconciled to growing impons 
and are moving to strengthen ties 
wiA suppliers. Last Wednesday. 
Iraq and China signed a $1.2 billion 
contract to develop the billion-bar- 


rel Ahdab oil Held in southern Iraq. 
Reports from Iraq said the field is 
ultimately expected to produce 
90,(KX) barrels a day. China is also 
interested in the development of the 
Hlfay field in southern Iraq, which 
could produce about 2S0,(^ bar- 
rels a day. analysts said. 

Development of both fields was 
disrupted by fighting during the 
Iran-Iraq war In 1980-1988 and the 
Persian Gulf war in 1990-1991. 
American and European oil compa- 
nies were among those that con- 
ducted initial exploration' of those 
fields in the late 1970s. 

Also Wednesday, Kazakstan an- 
nounced a $4 billion oil deal with 
China National Petroleum that in- 
cludes an ambitious plan for an oU 
pipeline to China's northwestern 


Samsung Motors Denies Plan to Acquire Rival 


fleufen 

SEOUL — Samsung Motors Inc. bowed to 
strong criticism from its competitors Monday and 
backed away, from a dispute ov^ the ne^ to 
restructure the country’&^^ggling auto industry.- 

“We are not interested in any merger and ac- 
quisitian deals and have no plan to s&Ss. .them,' ’ a 
Samsung Motors spokesnuin, Han Jae Yo^ said. 
“We are already busy enough in proceeding with 
our schedule projects." 

Samsung’s statement followed an uproar last 
week over a leaked internal report suggesting that 
restructuring was needed to avert a possible crisis in 
the auto, industry, stemming from too much in- 
vestment and uns^le demand and supply. 


The Samsung report was interpreted as an atten^ 
by the automaker to win support for a possible hostile 
t^eover of an existing raanufacmrer. Kia Motors 
Corp. was considered me mostly likely target 

But the report, widely publicized last week, 
brought strong condemnaticMa from existing tn- 
diisby players. 

Kia threatened to sue Samsung for asserting in 
the report that Kia was experiencii^ ‘ ‘managerial 
conflicts." 

Earlier on Monday, Hyundai Motor Co. and five 
other South Korean automak^s vo w«l to take joint 
action against Samsung! 

. Chung Mong Kyu, chairman of the Korha Auto- 
mobile Manufacturers’ Association, said. “We are 


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Ainj^tang Province. 

China's slate oil company has 
promised to invest $4 billion in the 
Aktyubinskneft oil enterprise over 
the next 20 years, with $585 million 
to be invested from 1 998 to 2003, in 
renim for a 60-percent share in the 
company. Current output of 44,000 
barrels a day will double by 2000, 
according to Chinese estimates. 

An oU pipeline from Xinjiang 
through Ka^stan could mark a 
shift in plans for China, which is 
developing a major oil field in Xinji- 
ang’s forbidding Taklimakan 
deseru China originally planned to 
build a pipeline from Xinjiang to 
eastern coastal regions, but expense 
and technical difficulties have 
dimmed mat prospecL 

China is also exploring prospects 
in Nigeria. Following a visit by 
Prime Minister Li Peng to the Ni- 
gerian miiit^ government. 
China's state oil company is pre- 
paring for exploration and produc- 
tion there. 

The oil deals follow a series of 
political gestures ^ China toward 
those nations. Beijing has signed 
political and miliu^ agreements 
with Kazakstan, calling for stronger 
ties and a reduction of troops along 
their common border. China also 
came to the defense of Nigeria when 
the West African nation was crit- 
icized for throwing out election re- 
sults and engaging in human rights 
abuses. 


still thinking about what measures we will cake. But 
Samsung must publicly apologize for dissemin- 
ating false rumors." 

Mr. CThimg, who is also chairman of South 
Korea’s largest automaker, Hyundai Motor, said 
Samsung was not qualified to discuss the restruc- 
turing issue because Samsung could be the cause of 
overcapacity. The six companies said the Samsung 
Group should be first to leave the industry if 
restructuring became inevitable. 

The statement was jointly issued by chief ex- 
ecutives of the manufacturers' association, Hy- 
undai Motor Co., Kia Motors Corp., Daewoo Mo- 
tor Co.. Asia Motors Co., Ssang^ng Momr Co. 
and Hyundai lYecision & Industry Co. 


Very briefly: 

• The Tokyo Stock Exchange reprimanded Bandai Co. for 
inadequate financial disclosure in connection with its abrupt 
cancellation last month of a plan to merge with S<^ En- 
terprises Ltd. The stock exchange took no action against 
Sega. Bandai directors said May 26 that the merger would 
proceed, then announced its cancellation the following day. 

• Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. said it had deveiopoi 
technology to produce high-definilion digital videodisks with 
more than five limes the storage capacity of standard disks. 
Matsushita, whose products are sold under die National and 
Panasonic brands, has not yet set a date for commercial 
production of the ^sks. 

• Vietnam has allowed a small break in the state post and 
telecommunications monopoly by licensing a joint-stock 
company to provide networks and services in Ho Chi Minh 
Ci^. The company, Saigon Post & Telecommunications 
Joint Stock Corp^ said it was aiming for a 5-peFcent maricel 
share by 2000. 

• Telekom Malaysia Bhd. will buy a 20-percent stake in 
Samart Corp. for 1.86 billion baht ($77.8 million), making 
Telekom a panner in Thailand's fourth mobile phone netwoik. 
Telekom, Malaysia's largest telecommunications company, 
also will buy a .33 percent stake in Samart 's new cellular phone 
company, Digital Phone Co., for 4.9 billion baht. 

• MBf Capita] Bhd., Malaysia's biggest finance company, 
has applied to the Finance Ministry for approval to begin 
merger talks with rival Suria Capital Holdings Bhd. in a 
move that analysts said could speed consolidation in the 
country's financial services industry. afp. Reuieri,. Bioombtrfi 


Lucky Film to Offer Shares 


BEUING — China's biggest domestic producer of ftlm 
plans to offer shares to the public in a bid to elude an 
American suitor and competitor, Eastman Kodak Co., 
analysts and industry officials said Monday. 

China Lucky Film Corp. wants to offer A shares to 
domestic investors to raise cash to compete with the U.S. 
company, which has long sought control of Lucky as part 
of a deal thai would give it a commanding share of the 
growing Chinese market. 

“We need funds to expand our market share." said 
Zhou ricai,a Lucky I^Im official. “The door is still open 
to Kodak but any decision would be made on the basis of 
whether it is in the national interesL" 

China’s official media said Sunttey diat state-run 
Lucky was hoping to offer stock to the public to increase 
sales of its pnoiogr^hic film, which have lost ground 
because of competition from foreign manufacturers. 

Lucky executives did not say how many shares would 
be offei^ or bow much money would be raised. 


START-UP: Can Voxvoare Succeed Where Other ff^b Firms Fail? 


Continued fri>in Fagfi 11 

wd only a few dollars above 
1(5 offering price. An analysis 
by Morgan Stanley & Co. ‘of 
57 Iniemet-relat^ conro- 
toies that went public after 
Netscape found that . their 
stock-maiket value had fallen 
$1.2 billion. Only 1 3 of them 
bow trade above their offer- 
ingprices. 

• Ibe. drop in these stocks 
p^y reflects a reconsider- 
ation of the cranmerctai out- 
look for tile Intern^ the 
worldwide, largely unregu- 
lated network of ctm^ters. 

• While it is generwy ac- 
Imowl^ed that the Internet 
will bring a revolution in bow 
goods, entertainment and in- 
fonnation are distributed and 
purchased, it is ai^thing but 
clear ^st when this technol- 
ogy w^ create big, new busi- 
nesses — ^and timing is crit- 
ical to tile l^on ^ small 
bopefiiis. 

- So .fia/it has been an 
anxious 'and 'exhilarating run 
for tte^Voxware 'te^ .whose 
o^-work get-togethers are 
n the bla^ light of laser-tag 

C ss, not ibe' dim lights of 
restaurants. 

Strainiog to fashion a busi- 
ness, t^ have had to de- 
yek^ (ff.hcm skills in in- 
novation, ^ lifemanship and 
even hi^-technok^ ataies- 
tnanriiip, since a crucial el^ 

: oent (tf Voxware’s' success 
htvolves thecare and courting 
of bofh Netscape- and Mi- 
nosoft, sttpeipowers . and 
nicheiteinies in w markk ibr 


Internet-related' products and 
services. “When you start a 
company, you tend to. tiiink 
that •gqii^ public is the end," 
said .(^Idstein, now 43 
and the prudent of Voxware. 
“By fhe time You go public, 
you ^realize'Tt’s just tiie be- 
ginning." 

Voxware owes its begin- 
ning as mnch.lo luck and con- 
nections as to technology. 
Mr. Aguilar origin^y ap- 
plied for a job as a research 
aggistant at Lockheed Martin 
Corp., wt^king on taiget-loe- 
ating radar. But the military 
cMitractor was not impressed 
by either the grades br the 
credentials of the engineeiiiig 
graduate student from the 
Florida Institute of Technol- 
ogy. 

Iriced by the rejectuxi; Mr. 
Ag^ular ticiried himself In a 
fren^ of pr c»a mm ing in the | 
Sfrag of 19^, and came np 
mih a ' spmh-coding pro- 
gram: 399 lines of C program- 
ming language, with which he 
coded ‘‘T^fary a Uttie 
' Lamb-'"^and‘pl^ed it.fr^ bis 
• eooqiuter’a SKskeis.- 

“It soundM-^-irjfbbpi at 
first, but'. 1 I . bad' 

somedtiiig,"' recalled!' -Mr- 
AguiWi 30', now Voxwaie’s 
vice pcesidrat of research and 
deveiopmeot. 

A: ^oop call frbm ..Mr. 
Aguilar to ^ iM’Mher-in-iai#, 

. Jemw Davis, an execotive'at 
a private -merchant hank in 
New 'set -the ffnaimi^ 

. wheels-ih motion. 

Mr.DaviSj a fonnerbaiti^' 
at Moiga^. -.Stanley and'ra 


ADVISORY SERVICES 


The Global Fnhds s 

Servicing Institutional 


Vesto^s 


BahnJtbCstraaBe 22 

Tdr41limi586 


CH-8001 Zurich 
Pax 41 1222 15.81 


meduate of the ' Kellogg 
.Graduate School of Manage- 
ment at Nortiiwestern Uni- 
versity, agreed to see if he 
could help Mr. Aguilar start a 
business. He talked to a 
couple of friends, and they 
talked to a few others. : 

Tliose calls put Mr. ^uilv 
and his software in touch with 
an informal yet invalnable 
network of people from eHte 
busine^ schools, consultan- 
cies, Vrature capital corapa-' 
nies and software makers. 


The biggest coutingent is in 
Silicon Vall^, but.th^ are 
on both coasts, and they com- 
municate regularly by phone 
and e-mail. They are mainly 
men, and mostly in their 30s 
and early 40s. 

“The software business is 
a small town — amazingly 
personal and incestuous in 
smne ways,’’ said David 
Roux, an executive vice pres- 
ident of Oracle Corp.. a Har- 
vard M.B.A. and a member of 
the board of Voxware. 


Soci4t4 Aaonyme 


fi^gisiered Office: Liucemboing - 2, Boulevaid Royal 
R.C. Liixembouig B-6734 

NiMlce to Shareholden 

payment OF DIVIDENDS 

(a pitiM Mwipnnc marked IFINT. the fonner name of the company) 


..riie. annual general. me^hig' of ^andwldeia held on June 4, 1997,' 
''' listHved ttrpiy ft divided oT USS 3.8S per ordinary share and 3J0 

pCT |^ «» K igi«i i i rfwm fnr the ycM ended Dec e mber 31. 1996. 

Sinteu inieiiiQ diyidend of USS. 0.80 per ordinafy sbeio and U$$ 0.9p 
^prefo^ share was paid on'Dedembef '9, 1996, a Rnal amount of 
MJS 3 . 2 X)S per oidina^ share and ofUSS 2A0 per prefamd share IBS 10 
-• be paid. ' ! ' 

final dividaid be payable, subject to the laws ai^ le^adoas 
.^pUribteioeaehcoustry.staidi^Juiie 13,-1997, against suiender of 
coupon DO. 39 IFINt of Ibe ordinary share ceriifieaies and coupon no. 1 8 
' 'iFINT of the preferred share certiiieaMs at ibe offices of the paying 

a ywiK Haed below; 

!- in Luaemboiirg: B'anque Inrenutiinaie k Lvx4;nihourg; 

. - 'ntltalj^airibeleatlinglwhs; 

inSwiBeriuitCrfMSuisse,3ancaConimercialeludlanaStd8se; 

in FcanceLLawid A Cie^ 

T- in dwftdeial Republic of GcnnanjrCommeizbaok: 

-■ in Oieai-Beitiin: SBC Warburg* hazard Brothers & Co.; 
in the Nediertands: aBN- AMRO Bant 
-in Belgium: Banque Bnixellcs LainberL. - 

'Shareholdm sboidd be aware that in the ^ of 1997 the Company 
-. will issue lew onlinaiy share eenifleaies. with new coupons attached. 

The P r in c i p al .Paying Agdii 

Banque Inteniiitionale & LuxMibouig 
. SoeiEtd Anonyme . 


Annouaements 


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fadbatatondkeoai 

MMJmnflLQOB 





































EtjROPt 


Serbia Sells Slakes 
In Telecom Concern 

Italian and Greek Firms Buy Shares 


Cae^iedbfOarStfPumDbsiKba 

BELGRADE — Serbian Post and 
Cmnmunjcations sold a 49 percent 
stake in it s telec ommunications di- 
vision to STET SpA Italy and 
OUB of Greece in a deal worth over 
$900 million, a Serbian official said 
Monday. 

*'Tbe deal was signed, as we 
plann^" said Dia^ Peric, the 
Serbian conuiaDy's deputy g eneral 
manager, hfr. Peric stud STET 
bought a 29 percent stake and OTE a 


Gassprom Plans 
Second Issue of 
ADBsfor V.S. 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — r The Russian 
natui^ gas monopoly RAO 
Gaqffom plans to place its 
second issue of American de- 
posita^ receipts on the New 
York Stock Exchange in early 
1998, Interfax news agency re- 
ported on Monday. 

Gaqjfiom’s securities man- 
ager, Eduard Ivanov, was 
quo^ as saying that the size of 
die issue had not yet been de- 
cided. Intedax gave no deu^s 
and Gazprom omcials were not 
available for comment 

Gaqirom has issued Amer- 
ican depositary shares to cover 
about 1 percent of its stock and 
foieignets own a total of about 
2Dercent. 

Each American depositary 
receipt which covers 10 un- 
derlying shares, was priced at 
$15.75 at issue last October and 
closed on Monday at $18.42 in 
London. 


20 percent stake in the Serbian tele^ 
com concern in what he described as 
a * 'parineiship deal.’ ‘ The total price 
of transaction was 1 .368 billion 
Deutsche marks ($90 2.8 bill ion). 

TOmaso Tommasi, STET's man- 
aging director, said: “Negotiatjons 
were concluded successfully. We 
are satisfied because the deal is 
positiv e for the funher expansion of 
STET activity in'Central and ^t- 
em Europe." 

Id Rome. STET said it would pay 
893 million DM for its stake, with 
OTE, Greece's national telecommu- 
nications concern, paying 675 mil- 
lion DM. OTE said the purchase 
would not jeopardize its domestic 
modemization program. 

It was the first major privatization 
deal done by Serbia, after legislation 
was adopted last mondi to divide 
Serbrn's most valuable asset into 
postal and releconunuiications ser- 
vices. The law enabled the govern- 
ment to establish a separate tele- 
communications company eaiiarf 
Serbija Telekom prior to tte sale to 
STET and OTE. Those companies 
are to pay 80 percent of the purchase 
price of their stakes imrnediately, 
with the remainder to be paid in 
1998, said Serbia’s minister for pri- 
vatizalion, Milan Beko. 

Mr. Beko said the acquired cash 
would be used to develop technol- 
ogies for the company, but the poUt- 
ica] opposition to Mr. Milosevic has 
ciaim^ the money may go to his 
campaign. Elections are scheduled 
to take place at the end of the year 
and sources say the money could be 
used to mi gaps in budgets and pay 
overdue pensions and salaries to the 
vast state sector. 

The oppmition bad demanded 
that more bidders take part in the 
privatization, and accus^ the gov- 
ernment of undervaluing the com- 
pany and choosing buyers solely for 
their readiness to come up with the 
cash quickly. iReiuers, AP) 


Frintemet? Paris Court Stalls 


By Daniel TUIes 

Spenal to the IHT 


PARIS — Can France regulate 
Internet content originating on 
French territory? The answer to 
that question will be 1^ for an- 
other day, because a Paris court on 
Monday dismissed a lawsuit on 
procedural grounds brought 
two French language public in- 
terest associations against Georgia 
Tech Lorraine, the French caii^)us 
of Atlanta’s Georgia Insritute of 
Tedinology. 

The Dmnse of the French Lan- 
guage and the Future of die JErreoch 
Language groups charged in a com- 
plaim tewght last year that die uni- 
veisi^’s largely ^ giish - iangimgft 


site based in Metz violated a 
19^ French law mandating the use 
of French in all sales of "goods and 
services'* on Preodi territoiy. 

The law, and the sabsequent 
suit, sheeted growing ctmeem 
among many Ftench ova* die di- 
minished role dial Rendi lan- 
goage and culture play in con-! 
temporary life. 

In dismissing the suit, the 
presiding judge ruled that the two 
private associations had not been 
qualified to lodge the (xiginal 
complaint Judge Michele Sonin 
said the relevant 1994 law stqi- 
ulated that any suit needed to be 
initiated by the government The 
suit had, in part, asked for damages 
of 4,000 French francs ($687). 


Left untouched was die issue of 
whether French law ^lied to cy- 
berspace. Industry nguies show 

tfinr about 90 percentOTall net sites 

are in English, and only 2 pezeent 
' areiaPTench. 

Beyond procedural arguments, 
the attorney for the univ^rily said 
the World Wide Web could not be 
tresued in the same fashion as tra- 
ditional media, in because of 
ite ability to link to sit es any where 
in the world: As such, ^ttsn a prac- 
tical perspective, it would be jxpr 
possible to translate all materi al 
accessible on the Web throa^ the 
Geoi^a Tech Loiraine site into 
Reach. 

The plaintifEs have 10 days to 
appeal today’s ruling. 



f-SBOO-" — ■ —7^ 4800 - 

: 3500- m 

i 3400- “ibJ — 'i 4«0 



k fflOO — «Q 0 

i 



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F M A M 

■ ■ Close 







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• Stock Eitehanga 


>mBTSL. 




CACAO 


647,46 
4 , 686.7 0 

566 : 99 """ 574 ;^^“:^ 
2,886.20' 2,719^ -1. 


Growth in Airport Traffic Lifts BAA 


•s’SX16 


• . ••ATX 




3 , 088.82 3 ,C 
1 , 298 A 3 t,! 

3,393-20' 


CimfMlijfOiifSi^FiniiDupaclia 

LONDON — BAA PLC, which 
operates seven British airports, in- 
cluding Heathrow near London, 
said Monday that its |xetax profit 
jumped 43 percent in die fourth 
quarter on growth in passenger 
travel, spend^ and landing fees. 

Pretax pi^t before one-time 
items rose to £63 millicm ($102.5 
million) in the three months ended 
March 31. The number of people 
(raveling dvough BAA’s aiiports 


rose 4.6 percent, to 98 million, fix' the 
year, overcoming a stronger pound. 

Full-year pretax profit rose 10.2 
percent to £444 miliion. The figure, 
in line with expectations, excluded a 
£40 million tmaige to pay for in- 
terest that accumulated b^use of 
delays in buUding a fifdi teTminal at 
Heathrow. 

But BAA’s chief executive. Sir 
John Egan, said a public inquiry 
would &lay (he opening of the new 
terminal until at l^t 2004. Sir 


also voiced suppext for the first tinw 
for the controversial planned alli- 
ance between British Airways PLC 
and AMR Coip.’s American Air- 
lines and said he expected it to win 
regulatory approvaL 

"It seems to be no different coor 
ceptually from the alliances that 
already exist, ’’ he said, referring to a 
pact between Lufthansa AG of Ger- 
many and UAL Corp. ’s United Air- 
lines. BAA shares rose 2^5 pence to 
540. (Reuters, Bloomberg. AFX) 


Source: Tetekuis 

Inunviuiwtl HoaUTrSu^ 

Very briefly: 

. . . 1 


Atlas Copco to Buy U.S. Firm 


■ iimfUfd hy iV 5ktf ftcp) Ol^iurlm 

STOCKHOLM — Atlas Copco 
.AB, a Swedish maker of industrial 
machinery, said Monday it would 
buy Prime Service Inc., the second- 
largest machinery rental company in 
the United States, for $1.16 billion 
in a bid to enter the growing U.S. 
machineiy rental market. 

Atlas Copco will pay $32 a share. 


or a total of $900 million, and as- 
sume $260 million in debt to com- 
plete the purchase. 

"This is good news, as they are 
buying a company that is In a seg- 
ment which is growing," said Mats 
Larsson, an analyst at Swedbank. 
Atlas CopM shaius climbed to 214 
kronor ($27.45) on Monday from 
4 JO kronor on Friday. 


Prime Service operates 122 rental 
equipment locations in 14 states and 
reported 1996 revenue of about 
$330 million. Atlas Copco, with 
21,000 employees worldwide, is 
among tile worid’sehief suppliers of 
products and services for air and gas 
compression, industrial manu^c- 
turing, and light construction and 
demolition. (Bloomberg, AP) 


•The proposed merger between Aerospatiale arxl Dassault 
Aviatiw SA will not be announced at the Paris air show thk 
month. The deal has been delayed because of the advent of( 
Socialist government in France, Dassault said. i 

• Dow Jones & Co. and Datastream/lCV, a unit of Priiaad: 
Corp. of Britain, merged their London news operations fc 
pr^jaiation for a new joint service. Primaik/Dow Jones Equ^ 
ies Service, to ioti^uced later this year. 

• Antenna Hungaria Rt. Hung^'s stare-owned broadcas ■ 

ing company, says it. wants to talk with Concert Con • 
mankations Services, a joint venture of British Teiecoiq- 
munications PLC and MCI Communications Corp., about 
apartnei^p. ■ 

• LM Ericsson AB of Sweden and Nokia Oj of Fmlaifj 
announced their support for a Jr^i^ese proposal to developa 
new cellular standi for toe 2]st century. 

• Ecuador, toe world's largest banana exporter, urged dje 

Enropean Union to change its banana impqning practices ^ 
toe wake of a World Trade Organization ruling that Europeto 
restrictions violated trade rules. \ 

• Mannesmann AG, the German telecommunications coi^ 

ramy. witiidrew its bid to buy up to a 70 percent stake d 
R etevision SA, toe Spani^ telecommunications comparik' 
that will compete with Teirfoaica de Espana SA, Retevisicj^ 
said. AFP.AFX.BJoonhefi 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low Oow Pnt. 


High iMt OBM Prev. 


High Low Chae Pm. 


High Low Oosi Pm. 


Monday June 9 

Prices hi local cumndes. 

TaieKiifs 

High Low CbiK pm. 


Am^erdam 


ABN-AMRO 


AheU 

Ak»M)M 

BomCa 

MWBscva 

OMciv 

DmibdwPd 

OSM 

Diwtef 

FolliAanf 

Cabnrics 

&aracon 


Ha 

HoopMaem 

HunfOai^i 

INCCkoup 

KLM 

KMPBT 

KI’H 

Nnioa 

OoCiMm 

PIOIraEl K 

Sn^Hdg 

Mea 

BaQaBKO 

hMlHB 


hndlMUi 

Unamren 

VmOsIrll 

VNU 

iKlcra 


AEXiadn:BZ»03 
PmrtOM: 124.43 

VjK 3U0 
147J0 144 

1MJ0 ISLSD 
3020 2«U0 
1I7J0 11SJD 
3BZ0 37J0 
lOIJD 77.10 
39LS0 390 

177.a-1f4.IO 
3130 SJD 
■L70 tIJD 
W 4SJD 
oa U30 
OhM 74a 
337.90 33170 
10440 10140 
147 144 

9070 B9JD 
S440 S170 
4130 42JD 
74a 73a 
4900 47.70 
307a SUSS 
TSt 2090 
119.10 11140 
7420 7U0 

20190 2 oaa 

179J0 17M1 
12.70 4110 
1«3J0 XtUC 
11120 111J0 
3U 319 
30590 ToiM 
iloa 104a 
_47 45.90 
239a Z3sa 


3490 3441 
14470 l^a 
153 lAn 
24ia a4oa 
11440 117.4 
30.10 37n 
ma 99 
39i»a9a 
19UB 194 
3m '3110 
<1.90 <1.10 
4490 4&10 
6SSi 45.20 
95a 95 

nsJD 33< 
105.10 1014 
144 i4sa 
9410 <9.20 
55a 5410 
41N 4140 
TIM 7140 
49a 4.10 
JBIX 3044 
2S4a 25430 
117a n7a 
94/U 94 

202 20130 
179.70 177a 
42J0 42 

KUO wa 
nia Ilia 

W.90 3M 
H44n oo 
iwa 109.90 
46a 4sa 
237 23490 


High 

Und6 im 

LuRMlU 31J0 
MAN S14 

ManiMMum 72950 
Metoggeswiicinn 38 

MOo 177 

Mundi Rued R 4745 
PmKSOQ 04 

RWE 74.95 

SAPpM 319iD 

SdierMn lB9a 
SGLCoten 217a 
S twiK i i i 99JR 

SpHUga-CABl) 1500 
SuartMdar 905 

. 'SS 

vEw;: , .S32 

ViM.j ■ 789 

Wlbaegeu 1217 


Lew Oese 

12W 1291 

30a 30.70 
509 5toa 
721 724 

37a 37.90 

I9la 19190 
45B0 4585 
900 S03 

74 7110 

31 7a lira 
1814 IBZa 

2XLa mg 
9910 9115 
100 lOO 
770 903 

•»s.io jQsa 
970 , 770 

sao ..-sw 

783 784 

1180 - IW 


PlW. 

1316 

3oa 

$12 

7290 

370 

195.10 

4700 

9» 

74.10 

3140 

18470 

239 

77A5 

isn 

775 

470 

980 

5230 

7000 

1201 


Helsinki 

HEX General buhRSlUl 


Prevnus: 07881 

EmoA 

r 

4650 

46 50 

4el0 

HutdaBOiii 

a: 

rj 

;j7 

20 

Kernre 


S.96 

5?0 

520 

Kesko 

19 

7750 

re 

7750 

MerasA 

i7m 

1750 

17511 

170 

Metre B 

10 

145 

U750 

145 

Melw-SertoB 

41 


050 

070 

Neste 

137 

u: 

137 

137 

NokkiA 

355 35050 

354 34150 

Ottan-YMymae 

210 

209 

204 0850 

OukHuimpuA 

106 JO 

lOLSP 

lOeJO 

104 

UPMKynsnene 

10 

120 

ma 

121 

lAdiiwt 

910 

0 

040 

0 


Bangkok 


SETIaaeeS3846 
Pievtan: 53062 

AdvMiBSic 

163 

IS 

158 

IS 

Banqlek0F 

SO 

302 

202 

206 

KniigThol Bk 
PTTb^ 

aa 

332 

3825 

S6 

270 

30 

77 

S8 


484 

460 

464 

4M 

Stan Com BkF 

113 

IQS 

107 

105 


28.25 

3S.7S 

779 

7875 

ThdAUwon 
nm Farm BkF 

380 

340 

3875 

Tia 

121 

114 

117 

lU 

viD unei 

10 

a 

10 

102 


Markets Closed 

The Hong Kong. Sydney 
and Taipei stock markets 
were closed Monday for a 
holidav. 


Bombay 

BehlAiiia 
HkMusI Lewar 
HindutlPahn 
indDwBli 
nc 

MW wn ooarTd 
Rdkece^ 
SMWBk India 
SMAudwinr 
Tain Eng Len 


885 

12390 

43575 

9525 

48725 

279 

312 

31725 

1825 

4010 


ndae 38350 
PiwiMK 03444 

860 8610 892 

1187 131 42512350 
420 43S2S 4290 
93 94 7175 

481.25 484 4850 

27025 27025 27US 
30525 31025 3060 
311.75 31175 3130 
18 18 18 
395 39725 403 


Jakarta 

Cnmpostte inOeu 6920 
Pnvieos: 69803 

Ashe Inh 

7000 

6850 

6850 

CASH 

6k inri Indon 

1975 

1935 

1925 

I95U 

BkWegnw 

105 

1SS 

1600 

UZS 


10250 

10175 

10175 

1037.9 


050 

WS 

3025 

06(1 

indotdod 

5475 

547.5 

5475 

U5U 


7550 

7500 

7500 


Somnoewei HA1 

10325 

101 25 

10175 

10350 

Semen Ciestk 

5556 

SS2S 

SS2S 

5600 

Teieitomurikasi 

3925 

3900 

1925 

aso 


Johannesburg 

PWWb: 7ztL17 


Brussels 

Alnwni 

Bom hid 

BBL 

CBR 

Coburl 

DafMdRLIon 

Ijectiqbe l 

ElaeidOnQ 

ForhsAG 

Cemfl 

GBU 

CanBonqiw 

KicdieMonk 

Pali nll HO 

n wr e t fln 

Rorea Beige 

SqcGeiBWg 

Sdimr 

TradOM 

UCB 


BEL-20 IObl 233924 
Preiam: 23H.93 


1«800 

6470 

9020 

3440 

1400 

1060 

7720 

OM 

7110 

3270 

soa 

14475 

16200 

I25U 

soa 

10225 

3435 

23800 

15715 

99250 


16200 

6390 

96a 

33a 

14475 

I8IS 

7660 

045 

6970 

3190 

5760 

142a 

1544 

12425 

OIO 

loin 

3355 

22S7S 

IS62S 

9800 


I6S0D 161 75 
64a 6370 
9an 970 
3435 330 
I4S7S 1450C 
180 lU 
7700 7660 
354$ 3SO 
710 699 
3355 1140 

5830 5770 

14375 I437S 
leOrs IS27S 
1259 12475 
509 920 
I0I7S 1019 
3370 330 
2379 2U9 
15675 1SS75 
9919 97400 


Copenhagen “SSigig 

BGBonk 331 325 326 370 

CoitabsgB 3U 379 MS 
CodonFun 090 089.11 890 «0 

Doom 402 39$ 399 397 

DanDonekeBli 640 633 630 W 

EOS Swendbig B 347347 337743 34SOO 33600 

OrS 1912 B 24200 23SDO 241341 233500 
FLSIiWB 1011 a 909.01100175 1003 
KoOUifUinne 
NoNHAkB 
SealwsBa-B 
TeMOnaeAB 


Affidgonild 

Angiai^CaQl 

An^oAfn-Coio 

AnwoAfflGoM 

AnoloAnilnd 

AVMIN 

Bmlow 

CCa Sniilh 

Defieeis 

Dfwt un tem 

FftMoHBI 

Gannir 

GF5A 

Impenol Hdgs 

IrwwrQiel 

Ikzv 

Jamwes Indl 

LIbartr HdK 

LibetvLHa 

LiMJIeSliiil 

Manrca 

Nofnpok 

Neikai 

PcmbmndICp 

Rkhemonl 

RusiPtoOnun 

SABKwem 

SonuncM 

Sosd 

5BJC 

Tiger Oob 


39.85 30a 
2970 296 

275.75 277a 
JOS 0186 
195 19a94 
15.95 15.75 

400 470 
350 25 

163 I6l 19 
37.18 36 75 


350 

090 

111 

579 

31.25 

315 

50.75 

352 


3532 
30 45 
112 
57 
31.10 
113 
5753 
351 


1025 IZ74J 
1725 17.13 
IM75 lU 
189 1789 
9025 890 
4623 4590 
6131 61.75 

79.75 70 
133 til 12 

J9H 49 

57.75 5650 

21456 713 

TOO 7M3 


7925 7925 
2970 2970 
274 274 

304.75 384.75 
19025 19025 
16 16 
4785 47.85 
250 25.70 
162 162 
37 37 

ISO 3550 

2060 oa 

1120 112.9 

56.75 56.75 
31 II 

113 1>3 

9 58 

3490 34950 
17875 17825 
1725 1725 
10425 10475 
17.90 1740 
90 90 

4590 45.00 
6725 62 75 
79 n 
IS 13: 

4920 4920 

57 5 7 

213 713 

77.75 77.75 


Kuala Lumpur comitu: 1117.20 

Pimovf: 111721 


711 

699 7040 

702 

7S 

773 

776 

732 

90 

964 

90 

•vl 

350 

V7 

346 

10 

365 

3f» 

.199 

960 

30 

3S 

30 

01 


Frankfurt 


AMBB 

ASda 

ASaniHdg 

ABom 

BkBeitn 

BASF 

Boyer Hypo Bk 

Bay.vcKBBtanL 

Bow 

B e m adorl 

BOiiOg 

BMW 

gtAGCajonin 

Qnnuieribuia 

MMorBoiz 

DeguHO 

DnilRiwBink 

DMTWdua 

DndnvBdnk 

Rnmlvi 

Re senlu sMed 

mecLKnia 

Cehe 

HoidelOgZnit 

HanfcelpM 

HEW 

«0- ■ 

nOCRMC 

Hoadol 

Kontodl 

Ldmeyer 


OAXi 366783 
Pmlooi: 36*529 


AMMB Ha« 

17.0 

1710 

17 JO 

170 

Gcnlimj 

iiai 

13 10 

130 

1110 

Aid Bcnkma 

77.75 

2'J5 

27 25 

SJS 

MdlntlSlripF 

50 

5 75 

575 

895 

Petranos Gas 

111 

90 

9.x 

9J0 

Pnton 

130 

13 

13.0 

13 

PubbcBk 

144 

186 

3.86 

]«4 

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148 

142 

142 

IJO 

Resorts VAuld 

80 

90 

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RoOinMns PM 

76 

250 

2S.7i 

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Sitle Darby 


940 

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1250 

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111) 

n.40 

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1210 

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010 

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4 

05$ 

8.-3 

8.95 


1410 

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140 
10 0 

1402 

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37S50 

365 

365 

3075 

London 


PT-SE im. 468870 


150 

1610 

1625 



3885 


085 

a.0 



863 



6860 

6495 

45.15 

65 

Abbey Ndl 

Itb’ 

bti2 


580 

580 

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580 


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4.23 

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00 

71.10 

21.40 

An^ltSA^rieiei 


66l 


nn 

690 

6845 


6885 

Arnov 

AuoGraw 

a 10 

6Wi 


bSfi 

94 

*3 

4150 

00 

1 ‘.’6 

1.25 

1.26 

174 

410 

43 

43 

43 

5*U 

■iS.* 

S4.'< 

s;a 

1473 

1366 

1366 

l£9 

BAA 

842 

5.:$ 

;JC 

ui 

169 

M 

l«4 

168 


1711 

1181 

11.92 

11 ;? 

49.0 

490 

4*40 

490 


7jr 

7.45 

745 

T-U 

IV JS 

134a 

i3sa 

13885 

BAT Old 

80 

$47 

5.52 

.5 4/ 

S0 

840 

84a 

B&20 


107 

168 

3h£ 

34:> 

104$ 

am 

0.0 

wm 


4.1V 

ill) 

ll> 

41/ 

40.45 

a95 

wins 

4815 


lUJS 

10 20 

100 

IUJ5 

6t.«S 

61 

61 IS 

6ia 


760 

7 ft’ 

7(W 

701 

360 

366 

365 

364 

BPBM 

3J5 

j.32 

J.JJ 

JU 

140.0 

ima 

I40JS 

160 

BniAemsD 

13J7 

I2J2 

fiSA 

111! 

3S 

350 

350 

3500 

BrriAinMrs 

7.a 

7.25 

7J? 

77? 

176.0 

1780 

12850 

1240 

BC 

ri7 

2.0? 

Li; 

/.16 

167 

i65a 

166 

166 

Urttlfifwl 

6 

5.0 

8«e 

899 

970 

060 

97a 

4860 

Brit Penm 

7i5 

747 

:j2 

752 

483 

4n 

483 

483 

BSkvB 

50 

US 

5.95 

.5 96 

74a 

7150 

74a 

74 

Brh StrH 

U9 

I4fl 

1.41 

I'm 

njs 

6910 

64.10 

083 

BrH Teleceni 

4 71 

46) 

40 

856 




60 

BTP 

10 

I85- 

145 

mH 

75 

7850 

74a 

78U 

bunnon laOsne 

10.15 

1C 03 

10 On 

lOJB 


BurliinGp 
Coble Wlndatt 
CoiMurr Sdiw 
Coiflan Comm 
Comml Unlan 
Compnt^ 

CounoUde 
Otuns 
EtoctraconpoOHOs 4.1 5 
EMI Gimp IIJ* 
Enany'MWp 
Enlcrameoi 


1.33 

5.75 

523 

SJS 

7.11 

7 

142 

4*7 


163 

7.70 

156 


CeulAcdderd 

GEC UB 

GKN I0L73 

QfBD WeilaMie lUe 
OMnodaGp - 
GimdiHel. 

ORE • 

GremdltGp 
CUniwH 

C-l'S 

Hoys 

HSKKkhp 
la 

Impl TobDOo 
fmgfcber 
Lodbrato 
L 0 id Sec 
Lama 

LedoIGwilGrp 
'JoydsT5BGp 
LuOKVority 
tAwis Spneer 
MEPC 

'AemwAssal 
NatmMlGifd 


Non Power 
NdtVIMst 
Nod 

Oianoc 

P&O 

Peanon 

Peiunglon 

r^MNfGen 

Premier Famdl 

Piudental 

PaNiDCk Gp 

RanhCraup 

Recur Cdm 

Redlond 

Read Inti 

RenloKi iiiiliid 

RemenHdqe 

Reenm 

RMC Gmup 

Pdlb Porcr 

P<iralBi.Scui 

PTtreg 

Rowl 4. Sun Al 

Sointiiy 

Sansbury 

Sdimden 

ScoiNcwaisnc 

ScotPoner 

Senricor 

Savani TronI 

Shel Transp R 

Siebe 

SmiHi Nephew 
Smith KIne 
Sminis Ind 
SflieniElac 
Skigacaach 
blond ClHilw 
Tote & Lyle 
Tesco 

Thomef Walci 
31 Coup 
Tl Group 
TenUum 
Unlever 
UtdAuimmce 
Old Nnn 

Uid UtHIRS 


897 

870 

107 

Ml 

587 

645 

sa 

1871 

862 

309 

740 

227 

884 

2.78 

45$ 

6.30 

I.W 

515 

&25 

1170 

119 

844 

819 

7.» 

113 

832 

7.15 

1.19 

6a 

469 

652 

69 

49 

852 

329 

807 

222 

894 

2.77 
9.28 
221 
825 
1055 
481 
326 
323 

16a 

675 

3.77 
283 
7.7S 

1207 

9A7 

1.72 

1085 

7.K 

427 

693 

968 

425 

176 

7.02 

$16 

$29 

7.71 

1620 

473 

784 

6«3 


Vendeme Lx ub 422 


yodnierw 
Whitbread 
vmiBmHdK 
Wob cic Y 
WPPCnwp 
Zarwea 


190 

7.a 

3.U 

429 

225 

19.15 


121 

524 

sa 

sa 

695 

6.92 

327 

486 

4A 

1120 

525 
895 
184 

10.16 

12a 

• 883 
SuM) 
2.77 
427 
5.73 
425 
573 

isa 

889 

384 

712 

U? 

873 

221 

480 

6 

la 

sa 

S.I9 

1325 

216 

5.15 
785 
7.12 
110 
623 
7.03 

1.15 
626 
461 
625 
623 

421 
824 

la 

195 

226 

636 

224 

9.15 
147 
623 

loa 

471 

326 

3.48 

1620 

422 
170 
la 
726 
1195 
956 
128 

1871 
7 74 
4 18 

ea 

645 

453 

172 

685 

526 

527 
226 

16 70 
4 65 
773 
653 
445 
386 
778 
1.11 
422 
351 
isa 


123 

sa 


121 

524 


899 

897 


7.9 

149 

8a 


611 

194 

511 

521 


840 

125 

599 

131 


920 

423 


Madrid 


Balsa toOCfe 5680 



PnvioesiS780 

AlXniKt 

7800 

27110 

mm 


fl''E9A 

IfU) 

170 

IT0 

182$ 

Aouds Boreden 

TM 

S9 

ISM 

580 


810 

7S« 

789 


BBv 

1I7U 

1000 

mm 


BaiK&to 

150 

150 

I.W 

1530 

Bdiikinter 

WW 

2SS0 

2S.'i» 

25830 


jam 

4775 



Geo Pmilat 

33dW 

316m 

$7360 

3270 

BsSomofider 

N.T 

NT 

NT 

1330 

CEPSA 

0m 

sno 

510 


•lomiiwnie 

790 

am 

790 

7970 


770 

7480 


760 

Emlesa 

1170 

II30C 

II3C0 


FEC5A 

139 

IWi 

ism 

1140 

CosNalunl 

700 

7870 

TftWI 

29260 

iBpfgreio 

1810 

1726 

1775 

1700 

Piys 

7830 

260 

7/0 

THIS 

RepM 

6S0 

630 

M0 


SevritonaElec 

149 

l«0 

140 


Tnboslere 

790 

72!« 

730 

250 

Tetvioni/d 

4405 

iT-K 

47V 

4340 

UtMMFmea 

IW 

120 

120 

ISS 

v’deiK Cermnl 

085 

309 

2055 

200 

Manila 


PSEtadeK 277837 



PnviMM 2762a 

AyukrB 

14 

19 

19 

1875 

•mGU Lond 

2ia 

21 JO 

710 

2l-7$ 

BkPhtolsI 

181 

159 

159 


CAP Hmdvs 

9U 

90 



AldiiM Elec A 

4150 

00 

0 


/AeiruBatik 

55$ 

540 

59 


P’.'lran 

70 

210 

710 


POBmik 

760 

2$$ 

355 


PiuiLunDKt 

BIO 

mu 

AIK 


$011 MlQUH h 

73 

050 

7ia 


5M Pnine Hdg 

/a 

2J0 

7a 

70 


Mexico 

>‘.lfd A 
BonacciB 
i>tne« CPO 
ulraC 

Emp r.lodcrrm 

CpuCOIMAI 

GporBcemui 

Gpa Rn Inburu 

Kenb Qari Men 

TereinsaCPD 

letMviL 


Ui 10 
19 36 
31.30 
I2.a 
39 20 
47.75 
1.91 
3830 
JO ID 
117a 
1882 


5X1 sa 

524 522 


7.05 

896 


1« 329 

409 488 

813 388 
11.4 1124 
S21 560 

898 6.99 

126 124 

9.19 9.15 

326 UD 
1021 1816 
1132 1281 
886 ‘ <80 
526' 521 

187 ,2J9 
420. ^ 422 
5a ' 571 
844 837 

sa SJO 
182$ 1828 
859 822 

185 387 


Milan 

Means Assic 
Ben Comm hd 
Bod Rdaurmn 
BcadRomo 
Bawthm 
Oedito lliiliim 
Edlsan 
ENI 
RM 

Gnatal Astic 

tMl 

INA 

Italgas 

MeS^ 

MedubaiHo 

MnidaiSswi 

Ofcveir^,- 


MIB1ManDHees1216Sa 
neihNiK 12277a 


726 

25U 

875 


Rrtf 

RAS 

Reb Banco 
S Poelo Torino 
SW 

Tebam ItgU 
TIM 


10995 

3470 

430 

1189 

33400 

2635 

7840 


2B9W 

14790 

2445 

5200 

72a 

9725 

1045 

4» 

2475 

38M 

1290 

1820 

loom 

860 

4650 

5245 


10670 10760 
3405 3420 

020 mo 

1130 1144 

22700 327in 
2575 2615 
7555 760 

86N 0885 

5745 SB45 
2 BS 00 »sn 
IffiO 14390 
200 249 
.090 5040 

7110 7215 

9360 9548 
lOtr 1025 • 
-400 . 481 
2265 2310 
3B0S 38a 
17700 12810 
17093 18095 
106a 106SS 
8315 8535 

44BS 4625 
5105 5165 


109a 
3470 
4325 
1179 
232a 
2635 
7765 
8725 
san 
28700 
147a 
2420 
5155 
7715 ' 
96a 
' 1038 
- -482 
24a 
300 
129m 
183m 
10860 
8510 
46» 
5120 


CeMlem 
CMsIkin Dior 
CLF-OeidoRnn 
OedflAoticata 
Danone 
EI-AiMhikK 
EildnntaBS 
EuDdnin 
Eanjhjnna 
Cm. Eoux 
HowB 
Inwlal 
Lnidige 


Lt 
LVMH 
Lym Eoux 

PodnsA 
Pernod Rrcard 
Reii^at 
Pfmutt-Priid 


175 375 

4a 453 


801 

1.93 

809 

sje 


1346 1155 
116 123 

SJ7 816 
819 7.73 

7.33 7J» 

113 3.11 

6J3 4a 
7JI7 7JI7 
I.IS 1.18 
678 645 

464 445 

839 836 

845 649 

834 


Montreal 

Bee Mob Com 

CdnTeeA 

CWiUlflA 

crniiswc 


ladotfrioliMdR: 331828 
PiarlDBS;3M872 
42a 41.40 4140 4170 
26^ 8815 2815 3840 
3840 3sa 3Sa 3845 
3890 36a 3890 3890 


Renault 

Raggri 

Rh-PoWeiKA 

Somifl 

Sdndder 

SEB 

SGSThetmm 

SteGenende 

Sodadn 

SIGObdin 

Suez 

Synlhelabu 

TnotnmCSF 

TWdlB 

UsMor 

VdMo 


687 

•137 

5W 

1300 

949 

462 

877 

9.15 

640 

741 

41740 

832 

305 

1053 

2363 

1495 

560 

mm 

• J71 
305 
577 
2673 
2190 
141 

ins 

204 

564 

312a 

1082 

460 

630 

2935 

858 

391 

735 

16110 

580 

99.90 

367 


6W 

930 

565 


601 
917 

549 

1263 1280 1246 
930 M3 936 

647 

843 

9 


671 

911 

543 


631 

839 

9 


6a 6.55 
n2 728 


4DU0 

706 


651 

871 

9JIS 

UO 

732 

409 

am 

390 


406 
810 

378a 3Bia 
998 1016 1045 

Tim 2220 2243 
1426 1457 1479 

537 539 548 

31Ba 333 334 

^•3M -S9a365J0 
28830 m90 302a 
557 Sm 569 
2563 2643 acm 
zin hro zi74 
13110 134 13890 

1691 irra 1707 

104.10 2m 201.10 

545 545 sa 

3Q1I0 30170 306a 
1054 1059 1077 

443.10 4S890 445 

611 613 634 

28a 2863 29m 
815 nr 828 
28aa 281.70 286 

712 712 713 

i5sa isaa iisa 

549 563 564 

9ia 94 9810 

am 3S2a is* 


Cycle Conlage 
DiilwFamliit* 
OBSliaitign 
DBSLoiJ 

riOSa NBQVO 

HKLmd* 

JordMolheM” 

Jord Stridegic ' 

K^ipel 

KepndBoiik 

KeimtlFWt 

KmMLiind 

OraCfcicte 

CrsUrriDnAF 

Porkiiay Hdgi 

Sembowonp 

SbigAhfocelipi 

SbigLond ■ 

SbigPienF 

StngTeehlnd 

ShM Tebounnii 

TatlABoM 

UldfaWuHilal 

UMOGaaBkF 

WhigTdHdgi 

^UVAeoUen. 


14a 14a 
oa 0 l 74 
1878 laa 
440 442 

loa ioa 

108 292 

BJO 8 
4J)6 184 

83S 825 
178 176 

4a 878 

its 1520 
945 925 

80 84S 

850 8a 
1170 iim 
70 -• 7 
29.10 2t3D ' 
4 ' 198 

m z» 

142 130 

1.14 1.12 

16 1590 
434 418 


140 140 
024 877 

180 180 
464 460 

1060 100 
199 195 
M5 UO 
10 194 

83S 83S 

176 178 

478 484 

4 408 

150 I54D 

S 92S 
40 
40 490 

120 120 
7 7.10 

29.10 390 
4 198 

la 161 
10 136 

1.13 1.14 

16 isa 

434 416 


StocMiolm 


AGAB 

ABBA 

AsliDoman 

AstmA 

AOoiCapnA 

AuhWw 

EiKlnlaiB 


SXUMs:308883 
PmiMB; 30860 

1IW 102 103 103 

1110 109 1120 110 

218 ri6 2160 2160 
1310 130 ia 1290 

218 2110 217 2100 

311SD 3D£0 3D0 3070 

463 4SS0 4570 40 


829 

321 

897 

127 


890 877 

175 20 

9.10 925 
151 247 

822 812 
I0J1 1041 
481 470 

IS IS 
IS 10 
1865 16 67 
874 60 

175 170 

20 IS 
70 70 

11.97 12 

US 40 

10 172 

10.75 1874 
7 7/ 7.75 

430 424 

4.S 689 


923 

434 


174 175 

8S b.n 

814 5 07 

536 840 

7.60 20 

160 160 
466 40 

7.76 70 

859 60 

4M 4J6 
1«7 3.U0 

707 777 

113 113 

466 467 

IS 20 
14.10 IBS 



Gdz Metre 

ChWiBl Uieco 
liteiMu 
InvedonGrp 
LoblawCos 

NotlBhConoda 

PewerCurp 

Power 

OumewB 

RnqaiComniB 

Ro^BkCdo 


17.95 

MIO 

39vt 

aw 

19.90 

1725 

33 

Ub 

26b 

uo 

6019 


170 17.90 
99to 3D 
390 0'<i 

an 28.0 

19>6 19.90 
189S 1895 
an s 

31.90 3110 

a 28a 
8 8.a 

990 990 


17.90 

39b 

39.10 

280 

190 

1716 

33b 

310 

as'i 

70 

tt40 


Sao Paulo 


BtvdeienPM 

BndBnPflg 

CemlgPfd 

C^PM 

Cdpd 

EMmbns 

MdUbwieoPfd 

UgM Senidos 


Oslo 

Aker A 

BeniesenPrA 

Chitiihiiin Bk 

ETmnorskeBk 

EOfm 

HdisiunilA 

KwiernmAso 

Norsk Hvdre 

NonKeapgA 

NveonwdA 

OrhluAsaA 

PirilmCeoSvc 

VigBPiinmA 

Schrbgm 

TransocennOA 

SrorebrundAw 



OBXIndH:647rt6 


Prevtoos! 64038 

140 

136 1389 

140 

173 

169 10 

169 

240 

24.40 24a 

24a 

ajo 

a ajo 

00 

I4Z 

laa laa 

laa 

4450 

4830 440 

44J0 

422 

vs 02 

msa 

385 

376 383.9 

37S 

am 

255 256 

796 

107 

Kua losa 

l» 

575 

$69 S73 

567 

S7 

S3 313 

314 

145 

143 143a 

1440 

144 

142 143 

141 

1 524 

520 524 

SS 

1 480 

4830 489 

46a 


1 PM 

PduEstoLiiz 
SMNodanal 
Souza Crr 
T ebbnisPhl 
Tdemlg 

TelSr 

TelespPM 

Unbmm 

VaniiniisPM 

CVRCPM 


8.90 

84&M 

540 

650 

180 

4900 

9250 

5340 

3940 

2660 

1710 

35.70 

100 

100 

1840 

1650 

M)0 

390 

1.15 

2178 


80 

8230 

540 

410 

1190 

488m 

5200 

3780 

U10 

1630 

350 

100 

1470 

1740 

1610 

TWy i 

390 

1.13 

230 


iimia 

113330 

80 • 80 
8330 8400 
540 5470 
450 8190 
180 180 
4860 4860 
92101 5250 
5340 S19.99 
ni0 3590 
2640 259.99 
1700 1610 
3581 3899 
10.70 lOio 
I4U0 14870 
1840 17UQ 
1640 
rea 33721 
390 »0 
1.14 1.14 

230 ZLIO 


ErkamB 

HeieiesB 

IncenOreA 
khimtorB 
MoOdB . 
NorAinkai 


SonMiL 
SconiaB 
SCAB 
S-E BonlnnA 
SRandhiRn 
ShanWnB 
SKFB 

SporbunlwnA 

StaMiypalekA 

SIhbA 

SvHonSaA 

VetnB 


20 

3a 

2S2 

238a 

697 

60 

394 

30 

' 247 

• 2» 

• 240 

233 

27)a 

240 

SA 

212 

222 

220 

166 

162 

n 

02 

277 

20 

30 

335 

18450 

laoa 

16$ 

ima 

10 

10 

U7a 

114 

239 

224a. 

209a 

207 


282 286 
341 346 

on 686 

192 391 

261 242 

237 236 

269 268 

_2I3 213 

2210 220 
163 1640 
S2 S2 
268 27Z9D 
335 334 

in 1800 

163 164 

1M 10 
ils 1160 
^ 2240 
208 20850 


Tokyo 

APnematn 

MNhiponAir 


BifeadMw4119J4 
Prenoos: <16085 

4;45 d.10 480 
180 18.0 I«J6 
».0 300 310 

110 I 1 JD n.a 
a 7$ a 75 »a 

470 4735 47.75 
10 10 1.93 

»0 380 an 

29 U 79.0 3DJ5 
11800 1160 1)840 
18.66 lOm 180 


Paris 

Acai 

AGF 

AbUquMe 

AkntetAMh 

Aa-UAP 

Boncdire 

BIC 

BNP 

CmioinH 

Canafaur 

Couno 

CCF 



CAC40; 26880 
PRftaos;2719JS 

m 

OfA 

ns 

879 

17S.0 

169 

171.10 

10 

944 

916 

S9 

Ml 

Ml 

624 

624 

643 

149 

3V0 34ia 

345a 

690 

671 

Ml 

6n7 

02 

805 

893 

905 


Via 

775 

778 

IS2 

1019 

1062 

4074 

300 

3940 

300 


7mm 

338.10 

387 

241 

187 JO 
t42 


Seoul 

Oncom 

5o«vr» Heavy 
Hyurwd Eng. 
KnMoton 
KwmElPwr 
KdrmEshBk 

LGSemcon 
Pnhonginmst 
Snmiung Disiay 


CobwomMkttsji 

vnma«is7ts0 

9900 9600 9650 9700 
8650 Aim BS80 BMO 
2180 2000 2160 2120 
1640 1990 0 1620 1590 
3010 2900 2950 29700 
69n 640 690 639 
390000 389000 38800 
3760 3600 M70 3^ 
5900 5360 S660 sm 
4650 4540 4620 Sm 
6800 6690 6700 M0 
1170 1100 1150 1130 


Singapore 


S WMT^ agggjI 
PmkobMgug 

^.P« :_Biew 850 8 m 6 a 6 a 

8J0 B B ftlQ 

OtyOeme 13.9Q 134 A , 3 .^ ^ 


AsdAl 
AooNQiegi 
AuMGtaH 
OkTokynMilHi 
BkYbkDhoma 
BridgeMane 
Canon 
OiuboEtoc 
OnigetaiElK 
DnlT^Pilid 
Dobi 

Dal-4dilKang 

OaMofimk 

OofanHdUK 

DoNnSec 

DOI 

Dmno 

EdM.Japonfty 
Eiloi 
hnue 
IBmk 
IPbolo 


SSST'*' 

HanduMatM 


1210 

79 
4470 

785 

671 

11 a 

3110 
575 
2690 
3040 
2120 
200 
• 2420 

80 
120 

466 

1370 

BB9 

800a 

390 

9900 

2270 

430 

1560 

47m 

i4m 

110 

i2n 

340 


NbM 215: 20233 a 
PmtNSfMISJS 
115 1310 

740 745 70 

4M 440 in 
770 785 70 

,60 460 in 

1140 1140 110 

ago 200 SOD 

JS SB? 

360 3630 260 

SSS 29n 3060 
as 2120 210 
StoO 2» 200 
SgO 2« 200 

7B7 798 79S 

ino 1290 }& 
40 466 40 

130 130 \m 
- BP 88 8 80 

toOn 800 9080 
^ ^ »W 
5^ 9890 5770 
22 a 220 2270 
4Za 430 43a 
19n 150 150 

460 460 470 
00 140 140 

100 iim 1090 
120 120 120 
3410 340 sm 


The Trib Index 


Pnees as at 3.00 P M New V'lyk tonei 


yavtodmi 
%chinB|> 
V13.6S 

k 

■•■9.971 
621351 
+38.5^ 

I 

621.3^ 
■•■ir-9a( 
• +.1734! 

. ...■fa4rf 
6445 
.+S3G! 
6l7.74| 

■»o.7a 

1 

TTu triiEHnatfaria/ HWraM TriOwnd MMrUShxk tnaezeiracurnp U£ cMmr values dTl 
WO fmmaoonuJIlfnvustaoie stocks iromSScaumres Formor9>ivopnatian.ahe9, 
booMnwavafeMyty writing ID TTipTrMIndeic 107 Aimnue Cndries de GjuUk * 


Jdn. 1. 1002^ roa 

Lewi 

Chenge 

%clMn9e 

World Inctex 

169.56 

+1.63 

40.07 

ne^onm Mdnum 

Asia^cHic 

126.16 

+096 

+0.77 

Europe 

177£7 

+157 

+1.12 

N. America 

196.80 

+1.86 

+0.95 

S. America 

158.56 

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PAGE 18 


^ IlcralbS^nbune 

Sports 


TUESDAY, jmE 10, 1997 


Wo RLD Ro UHDUP 


Vicenza for Sale 

SOCCER A bankruptcy court put 
Vicenza, the Italian Cup winner, on 
sale Monday for around 20 billion 
lira ($12 iTiillion\ 

The court published advertise- 
ments in the national Corriere della 
Sera and the local Giomale di Vi- 
cenza newspapers inviting offers 
by June 16. 

The move follows the bank- 
ruptcy of Trevitex. a company con- 
trolled by the Dalle Carbonare fam- 
ily. which also owns the club. 

Family members, along with Gi- 
anni Sacheno, a former club pres- 
ident. face fraud charges in the wake 
of the Trevitex collapse. ( AFPj 

Slaney Entry Accepted 

ATHLETICS U.S. officials will 
accept the suspended runner Mary 
Slaney 's entry into this week's na- 
tional championships. Duffy Ma- 
honey, the meet's director, sud 
Monday. The American federation 
would not say whether it would 
-defy a suspension imposed by the 
International Amateur Athletic 
Federation and permit Slaney to run 
In an event that starts Wednesday. 

"I have an entry, it is in on time 
and I have not received any in- 
structions that it not be accepted," 
said Mahoney. 

Another U.S. official, who asked 
not to be named, said Slaney would 
be allowed to run only if she ob- 
tained a court order. 

Slaney was suspended by the 
lAAF last week pending the out- 
come of hearings Into alleged dop- 
ing. (RcMtrsi 

-I Jiad Break for Prinosil 

TENNIS Thomas Muster ad- 
vanced into the second round of the 
Gerry Weber Open in Halle, Ger- 
many. on Monday when his op- 
ponent David Prinosil broke his 
foot sliding on the grass court. 

prinosil. a German, uas leading. 
6-3, 0-1, at the Wimbledon tune-up 
when he v^ as injured chasing a ball. 

Michael Siich criticized the courts 
after he struggled past a fellow Ger- 
man. fiemd K^bacher.4-6. 7-3, 6-2. 
The courts were built five years ago 
to replicate the lawns of Wimbledon, 
which starts in two weeks. 

"It's the old problem. I slipped 
all over the place." Stich said, "it's 
damn dangerous to play underihese 
conditions here." (AP) 

•Jason Stohenberg. who reached 
the last four at Wimbl^n last year, 
was knocked out of the fust round of 
the Queen's grasscourt event in Lon- 
don by- Jens Knipppichild. 

Knippschild. ranked No. 105 in 
the worid, beat the 14th seed. 7-5, 
3-6. 6-2. {RatUTS\ 



~Ce(fnc Koline returning to 
Kenneth Curlsen on grass at 
the Stella Artois Chanpionship. 



Will Grass be Greener 
For Surprise Ghamps? 


By Ian Thomsen 

/Arrmuriomi/ Herald Tiihuiie 


Ur..<w (rjMv-i'MM 

Pedro Reyes of Chile, left, was a handful for Ariel Gracianni of Ecuador in a World Cup qualifying game. 


PARIS — So, the new surwising 
French Open champioh was asked, what 
do you do next? 

“My next dream?*' said Iva Majoli, 
the 1 9-’ycar-old Croatian who upset top- 
seeded Martina Hingis in the Roland 
Garros final. '*My dream is to win Hrst 
round at Wimbledon. 1 never won a 
match at Wimbledon, not juniors, not 
doubles, not singles." 

It is the naxure of her sport, empha^zed 
all the more by the vast prizes at stake, 
that Majoli could reach the top knowing 

French Open Tennis 

that she will resume major tournament 
play two weeks later at Wimbledon at 
the bottom. On clay, she was unbeatable 
over the last fortnighr, on the Wimble- 
don grass she will be vulnerable. 

“I said to myself. O.K.. I’m going to 
die on the coun at Wimbledon just to 
win that first round." she said. But then 
she expressed a lesson learned by both 
first-time Grand Slam champions over 
■he weekend: "Maybe 1 can start play- 
ing well if I win that first match.’' 

As proved by the ninth-seeded Majoli 
and me even more shocking men’s 
champion, the ujtseeded Gustavo Kuer- 
ten of Brazil, it is sometimes better to 
lack experience. Each of them played 
with a needom. a liberation envied by 
the more famous — and more worried 
— contenders. 

In the fourth round. Majoli recovered 
from a S-7. 0-4, 15-40 deficit to fifth- 
seeded Lin^ay Davenport of the United 
States. Kuerten had to win three major 
upsets in a row, the first of them a 
comeback from 0-3 in the fifth set 
against Theunas Muster, fifth seeded 
and a former champion. Thereafter, his 
miracles seemed more reasonable. 

But there is more to the trend they 
rode than the mere nothing-to-lose free- 
dom availed to all underdogs. Both of 
them seemed fresh at the end of the two- 


week slog — Kuerten especially, in the 
{Kuvious- four rounds, he bedi 
through 19 sets, one short of the nyn - 
itauiA, yet m the fmal he played widr> 
zest b^ond the jaded Seigi Bniguera of 
Spain, who was seeded i6th, upending 
the former champion in straight sets. * 

Periiaps Kuerten was fiesb^precis^ 
because he had been so unsuccessful m 
the earlier toumameots, losing in the 
first or second round most times. The 
frnal was just the 49th touinameni 
match of his career. 

The upsets of Roland Garros wde 
surely pan of a larger trend. Bmgueca in 
this tournament and Richaid Krajicek 
last year at Wimbledon — when he 
became a major champion for the fint 
time — were bodi seeded at tiie lau 
minute because of injuries to higher- 
rated players. In the last four Grand 
Slam events, the only men’s finalists to 
have Hgured in the original seedings 
have b^n No. I Pete Sanuxas (who 
won the U.S. and Australian Opens) and 
the current world No. 2 MichMl Chang 
(loserof the U.S. Open final). 

Sampras will be die favorite at 
Wtmbiraon. His third-round loss at Ro- 
land Garr^ has given him time ao 
freshen iqy. and he will be motivated 
since his run of three successive 
Wimbledon titles was brolren by 
Krajicek of the Netherlands last yea'. 
But Sampras will have to be more vi- 
gilant than ever about the uncommu 
threat from the likes of Kuerten. 

Kuerten has beexMne a target himseff. 
Ranked No. 66 in the worldcoining ioto 
Roland Garros, he is now No. IS. ‘‘I 
know how ttifricult it will be after I wm 
this, because every player will want to 
beat me more and more,’’ Kuerten sakt 

As for Majoli, who has moved up t) 
No. S this week, she will enter the 
courts with much slimmer chances than 
No. 1 Hingis or No. 3 Steffi Graf. 

"I feel I could fight with them for that 
first place." said Majoli of the race for 
the world rankings. “I think I'm ready. 
Thai's my next goal." 

After Wimbl^on. 


Argentina Wins 
Key Cup Game 


Heuien 

Argentina, which has suffered sev- 
eral hiccups in the Worid Cup^u.*)liri«rs. 
took a big step toward tlie finals next 
year in France when it beat Peru 2-0 
while its rivals drew. 

The games Sunday between Uruguay 
and Cdombia. Venezuela and Bolivia 
and Ecuador and Chile in the South 
American group al I ended I • I . 

Argentina climbed to second place in 
the nine-team group and increased the 
gap between itself and the chasing pack. 
Colombia is third. Its draw in Mon- 
tevideo ended u string nf three losses. 

Chile, which plays five of its remain- 
ing six games at home, played without 
its suspended striker Ivan Zamoruno but 
gained a point in Quito. 

In Buenos Aires, gixils before and after 
halhime. by Heman Crespci and Diego 
Simeone. gave Argentina the victory. 

Mexico closed in on a berth in the 
World Cup with a M.i victory in £1 
Salvador. Mexico leads the six-team re- 
gional qualifying group in northern 
.America. Costa Rica is .second ansi the 
United States is lied for third with Canada 
and Jamaica. The top three le.'ims ad- 
vance. 

In Tehran on Monday. Syria beat 
Maldives 12-0 in an Asian zone World 
Cup qualifS'irtg match. 

The Syrians scored only one goal in 
the first half, by .Agha .AnT. hut picked 
up speed in the second half. 


Rider’s Dream Falls Short on Sycamore Street 


InieriHiiitHhil HerjU Tribune 

P riTSBURGH — When the race 
was over, nobody, and certainly 
not Josh Smith, could say chat his 
dream haddied on the Sycamore Street 
Hill, There was no question, though, 
that his dream was bom there. 

"1 saw this race the first year they 
ran it. in 1 99 1 . and wanted to do It ever 
since," Smith said before the Thrift 
Drug Classic bicycle race Sunday in 
Pittsburgh. He wt^ 1 4 years old in 1*99 1 
and had ridden over on his bicycle from 
home, about 1 5 minutes away. 

"I do well on lhai hill." he said. "I 
know it pretry well." The hill rises 350 
feeit IG7 meters) in a kilometer 1 0.6 of a 
mile), or a grade of about 15 percent. 

But Smith .seemed modestly undaun- 
ted. After ail. he has won the Sycamore 
Street Challenge three times, setting 
the course sp^ record in 1994. “I 
think the hill has less potential to beat 
me than the other riders do." he said. 

That was one reason he was in the 
race — to see how welt he measures up 
to the other riders. He is 20 years old. n 
former University of Pittsburgh stu- 
dent who dropp^ out last winter to 
train and race full-time. 

"1 feel that a.s long ub I'm getting 
bettor every year, progressing. I'll keep 
doing it. lliis will be my seventh year 
of racing and 1 seem to be doing berier 
and better every year." 

Mainly, he said, he has learned that 


Cycling / Samuel Abt 


he can gel g*Kxl results in American 
racing. 

"‘fne Tour de Totwia, the Killing- 
ton stage race and Rtchburg. I’ve done 
them and 1 did well." He was I3ih in 
the road race in Altoona, Pennsylvania. 
Iasi year. "I was in the from ^up with 
a lot of good pros, so 1 was happy wJdt 
that and feel conridem that 1 can hold 
my own with a lot of U.S. pros. 

"But with the Eurc^:ieans. 1 don’t 
know," be said. 

Seven European teams, including 
such powers as Mapei and Saeco. had 
Stoners among the 144 in the race. It 
was the first of four in the Tour of 
America to be run in iNinnsylvania this 
week, including the CoreSlales 
USPRO Champkmriiip in PhU- 
adelphia on Sunday. The Europeans 
ore drawn, of course, by the money, 
including $75,000 in fnizes in the 
Thrift Drug Classic — far bener Ih^ 
almost any one-day race in Europe. 

Friendly and aniculate. Smith ad- 
niiited that he was worrying about the 
Europeans. He knew that be would find 
out quicUy whether they had come to 
race or to vacation. 

"1 think in the firai 20 miles" of the 
108-mile < 172-kilometer} race "we'll 
find our how fast it’s going to be." he 
said. "Ithink they'll uy to string it out 


early. It’s going lo be a big field and 1 
don^t think the front-runners are going 
10 want too many guys bitting the hill 
together." 

The first 20 miles were to be run on 
a flat circuit through the ethnic South 
Side of Pittsburgh and the final S8 
miles on the same circuit with the 
Sycamore Street Hill included. 

**1 just want to Hnish the race, slay in 
and stay as close to the front as I can, 
try to be there on the climb. I'll try to 
get there near the front, feeling good, 
so I can show my stuff on the climb." 
he said. 

He would have many people to show 
his stuff to. he added. He would be the 
firsl native of Pittsburgh in the race 
since 1992. 

* 'It’s going to be a great experience, 
however it turns out. lo be there on my 
city’s streets in front of a hometown 
crowd." he said. "Everyone's behind 
me, a lot of guys from the area I’ve 
ridden with, they’ve fioaily got 
someone to cheer for.ru have a pretty 
good cheering section. This is the big 
one, this is the race that’s known in 
Pittsburgh. 

“I’ll ride as hard as I can and do the 
best I can. I’ll give everything I can lo 
Hnisb the race. I’m not planning on 
leaving anything on the course at all." 


He didn’t. By the third of the 1 1. 
climbs, he was far behind, losing more 
ground each time he got to Sycamore ' 
Streei but continuing to move up iLsI 
hill. His eyes were dull and his face* 
empty as Ke rode over the words "Josh- 
Go" painted on the road and he didn'L 
seem to bear the cheers from his fam-' 
Uy, friends and fans. 

Smith lasted bravely through eighii 
climbs, the last man among about 40 
ridera left in the race. For most of the- 
day be rode alone, with no teammate to. 
pace or relay him, nobody to offer si" 
draft and a respite behind their bicycle:-. 

Finally, just before the feed zone on ■ 
the Boulevard of the Allies, he waS' 
overtaken and passed by the five men,, 
who were leading the race. 

Being lapped means teing disqual-' 
ified. As a marshal waved him down. 
Smith coasted into the feed zone and ■ 
was forced to t^uiL 

“I stayed in it as long as 1 could," he. 
said later, near the finish line on Carson 
Street, as he watched the race the way^ 
he had ail the other years — a spectator 
despite the number on his bicycle. 

“The team wanted me ro quit but 1 
wanted to stay as long as I could. 

“It's a different Teague." he ad- 
mitted. "We goi on the hill and they 
just accelerant away from me." 

He looked, as the riders say. wasted 
but he also looked like a rider. 

’TU be back." he promised 




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Scoreboard 


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SNIJUIKATOIM 

U WTCRNAnOyiAL. 1 BT DAY 
LEEWARD nLANOS VS. SRI LANKA 
SUNDAY. ST JOHN’S. aimauA 

sn Lonks 192-0 dodored 
l-Nward Isbnds: 30-2 


Kempeh Open 

Rinol scorn whh lelaifon to par Sunday of 
S I J mUon KMipar Upon, ptayed on 73K& 

yard (6,4(B-ffleian. PvTI TK at AvMal 
comohiPoiamaa. Uaryland: 

Justin Leonard. U5. 09-09.0007-274 

Mark Wiebe, U.S. 

Oreg Nornian, Austl. 

Nick PriCD Zimbabwe 
Nick FGda, En«l. 


Milw5prinoer/U.S. 
DAWelbisiau.s. 
Tim Heiioa U.S. 
Jim McGowm IJ.S. 
Loren Roberta U.S. 


0947-66-73-275 
66-71.73-07-^ 
60-72-/3-d7-a77 
73^-68-71-277 
0B-7(L67-73-?77 
09-67-75-07-27S 
09.7D-72-O7-an 
72-09-OL09-278 
7lk09-09- 70-278 


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STAMOMOCi Soutti AIrtca 1 0 poinb; Corf 

go Kk Zambia Sf R^ubK of Congo Z 
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■ASSBJUA 

NAnONALLEAQUE 

AKimiA-Signed LHP Josm J»»»'^ 
Jetm Adams. RHP Seth Totw LHP 8^ 
Aboyn, C Jeremy auHw OF Jude C«ms> 
and RHP Wmam Jones. . 

SAN piBeo-Ptoced LHP Steilkig Hiitb- - 

cocken1May<fi9abledlbLdotedJii»e& s. 









international herald tribune, TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 1997 


SPORTS 



FACE 19 


H I k!,., 
*- ■* » 1. 


In the Eleventh Hour, 
^ he Greeiiej Utah Conies Through 

ijS^ Chailipgj Stockton Keys Rally to Tie Series 


By Michael WUbon 

WBshingian Post Stnice 


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r-r SALT LAKE CITY — It’s been a 
.Jong, long time since a Chicago Bulls 
tpam led by Michael Jordan needed a 
.•playoff game and conldn’t get it. 

Sure; somefimes the Bulls goof 
.around and play arrogantly and give 
away a game now and then, even in the 
ADStsoson. But that wasn't Ae case at 
rj^ta Center on Sunday. 

. .• The Bulls went as hard as th^ could, 
•jbr as long as they could, wt A as many 
tcombinations of {dayers as Phil Jackin 
^ could throw at Utah. Jordan got hot, the 
..Bolls ttxA a five-point lead u Ae final 
.two minutes, and jnst when it aroeared 
;Ae Bulls were on Ae brink m a fifA 
•championship season, Ae Utah Jazz 
. stonDM back and dorrdnated Ae final 90 
;secoDd5 to take Game 4 fhmi Ae Bulls, 

- 78-73 , before as loud and as passionate a 
.'crowd as you'd ever hope to bear. 

I,. Now it’s Ae Bolls who get to spend 
.-Ae next two days wondering what went 
wTMig and whether they can fix things 
•ID reclaim control of this series. 

— For Ae first time in Ae 19^, it's Ae 
Bulls who are faced with a chsuacter 
•check. Not smce 1988 in a five-game 
' s^es against Cleveland had the Bulls 
been caught firom behind after winning 
•the first two games of a series.. Any 
series. 

But it wasn’t Jordan and ScoAe Pip- 
pen making Ae critical plays on Sunday, 
ft was John Stockton and Kail Malone. 
.-Stockton, m particular, has shown him- 
self to be just as good in Ae clutch, at 
least in th^e playoffs, as Jordan. 

• TheBuUstocrita71-661eadwiA2:39 
to play. During a break, Jacksw saw 
•Pippea gaspmg for breaA and put Jud 
. Buechler, Ron Harper and Luc Longley 
itoius Jordan and D ennis Rodman) on 

• Ae court for maximum de&nse, wiA 

• spMial attention paid to Stockton. But 
.wiA Ae shot clock ninning down, 
Stockton simply heaved a 28-foot (8.4 
. meter) shot over Ae 6-f6ot-6-iiich Haip- 

~ ~er, tvingmg Utah to 71'69 and easing 
■Ae sense of panic seepmg mto DelA 
Center. And Stockton wasn't thioogh. 
Yes, Jordan came down and hit a 
^ fadeawayJumperoverBiyonRusseUto 
^ve Ae Bulls a 73-^ lead wiA 2:01 

■ remaining. And when Jeff Honiacek 
! missed for Utah and Rodman grabbed 
’ ; the rebound wiA 1:45 to play, you just 

• figured it was Ae ending we've alreaijb^ 
i seen dozens of times: Bulls hang close, 

• win thriller, take control of series. 

I But the Bulls have a big problem. Ihey 
I can'tscme. Sunday, they sfaor4ZpatceQL 

• ; Harper can't seem to scwe. We know 
- 'Rcx^h can’t score, but he also had just 

; ooeofiensive rebound. Randy Brown is a 
; ddeoiAre specialist, Tom Kultoc has be- 
; I come wzrAless. and Steve Kezr has W 
; his stroke at Ae worst po^le time. That 
. ; leaves Jordan and PippeiL 
. • I Bin Jordan, who^s been settling hr 
. I too much fcx' his jump shot instead of 
‘ going to Ae basket, had no fiee Arows 
! ^ day. True, he delivered 12 of Chica- 
l^go'sl^t 14pomts, but wiA just over 90 
■ • seconds left he tried a ^m move and 
.. ;Slodami, timing the move to perfection, 
.'Stole tile ball. '‘Probably caught Mi- 

• cfaael by soiprise t^ John was there 
. I that quickly,'' Honiacek said. 

; Stockton was fouled and fait only one 

• of two free Arows. But when Pippeo 
I missed a three-pointer oa the next pos- 

■ sessira, Stockton grabbed die rebound 


Utah 78, CHiCAao73 


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and was friuled by Pq^ien. Two more free 
tiiFOws got Utah to 73-72. Jordan missed 
once again, and Aen Stockton delivered 
the play of Ae game — one which will 
undoubtedly be called “Tbe Pass” 
around here for Ae next 100 years. 

Stockton grabbed Ae reboimd, took 
one dribble and without breaking stride 
threw a pass past Pippeo, over iCukoc 
and Jordan, to Malone. Steve Young, 
Ae San I^cisco 49ers’ quarterback 
and anoAer favorite son of Utah, 
couldn’t have thrown it any more pu*- 
fectly to his star recover, Jeny Rice. 

“It was a lot of Astance it had to 
travel,” Stockton said. “I had to jnst 
watch it and watch it. I was relieved 
when it finally hit his hands. I’m not a 
cerebral player when I’m out there on 
Ae floor. 1 just play. Michael was Ae 
guy I saw. 1 turned ro the floor and 1 saw 
his posititxi, Isaw Karl’s position. Once 
he has position^ he’s the best in the game 
at gett^ the ball." 

The pass was too good, even for 
Jordan to reach. Malone caught it and 
laid it off Ae glass for a 74-73 Utah lead 
wiA 44J S€«onds to play. The pass 
strangled the BuUs, who never re- 
covered. 

Russell, at 6-7, stayed in hnoni of 
JOTdan on the next possession and made 
him pass toHaiper, who had to pass to 
Kerr, who missM a three-pointer. In Ae 
final seconds, after Malone lut twofoul 
shots (yes. Malone hit two foul shots). 
JcHdan rimmed a Aree^inter Aat 
would have tied iL 

The Bulls couldn't score for the final 
2:01 — not a ba^ct, not a free throw, 
nothing. The Jazz defense was too tight 
on Jordsm, too ti^t on everybody. Hor- 
nacek, at ^3, held his own ^qgainst the 6- 
7 Piroen. Russell helped Jmdan into an 
1 l-for-27 shooting nighL 

This series may be tied 2-2, but Utah 
has anoAer home game left wiA which 
to go ahead. The Bulls haven’t trailed in 
a chium>ionshxp^series since Game 1 of 
the 19^ NBA Finals. For tbe first time 
since Aen, an opponent has made it 
tou^ 

Utah has put Ae Bulls in a position 
^ere till’d better play like chai^oas 
because Acre’s a ch^euger staoAng be- 
fore them diat will not go away qui^y. 



Wiebe’s Yips Donate 
Kemper to Leonard 


By Thomas Boswell 

WiahiasitHi Post Sen ice 


Jeff HiynetTAgnu riBKC-Pie^v 

John Stocktcm of Utah driving around Dennis Rodman of the Chicago 
Bulls. The Jazz evened tiie NBA cbampitniship series at two games apiece. 


WASHINGTON — The chilling 
power of golf is captured at its rawest in 
whar happened to Mark Wiebe at the 
Kemper Open. 

There is no game where it becomes so 
clear that, A Ae end, Ae sport often 
breaks the man. Is that the poAt of Ae 
exercise? 

Wiebe sat alone in Ae scorer’s tent 
Sunday evenAg, staring straight ahead, 
as Justin Leonard, Ae winner, was A- 
traduced to Ae crowd around Ae 18A 
green. Throughout Leouard’s speech, 
Wiebe never moved. As fans headed to 
thefr cars, he still sat m the posture of 
The Thinker, except Aat he was Ae golf 
equivalenr. The Sufferer. 

On the table were a bottle of water, a 
golf visor and a strip of white paper wiA 
18 numbers in sequence. The Iasi two 
were “4” and “5.” They shoAd have 
been ”3” and "4.” 

He had just missed two puns of tap-in 
lengA — 24 and 30 Aches — to b^ey 
Ae 17A and 18A holes, and throw away 
the $270,000 Kemper title by one shot to 
Leonard who had waited A that same 
tent as Wiebe handed him Ae crown. 

Wiebe’s puttal Ae 17A truly seemed 
too short for anyone to miss. He power- 
lipped it, then seemed numb with dis- 
belief. By Ae 18A green, however. 
Aere was a hint of Asasier in Ae air as 
soon as his 22-foot attempt at a wAn Ag 
birdie trickled a few turns past Ae 
lengA at which a pun is unmissable, if 
any distance in golf is that short. 

As Wiebe Imed up his putts on the 


Bonds Bolsters Giants With 2 Homers 


The Assixkiied Press 

On an explosive day on Ae West 
Coast, Bany Bonds hit two home runs 
as San Francisco beat Atlanta, 5-3, 
while m Los Angeles, Ae pitcher 
Pedro Astacio argued with Ae 
Dodgers’ manager. Bill Russell, dur- 
Ag a 9-3 loss to St. Lou A. 

Bonds, batting just .188 A his last 
eight games, grounded out A As first 

Baseball Rqundup 

at-bat Sunday. But Ae National 
League's three-time Most Valuable 
Player liked his swing agaAsi Ae 
league's 1996 Cy Young winner, JcAn 
Smoltz, and foil Aat good Aings were 
on Ae way. 

He was righL Bonds homered A his 
next two at-bats, givAg him 29 games 
wiA more than one home run A his 
career. 

"I folt really good at Ae plate. I just 
felt locked in. I felt like I could have 
done anything,” he said. 

Jeff Kent homered and hit a tie- 
breakAg smgle A Ae eighA innmg as 
host San Francisco stopped Atlanra's 
four-game winning streak. 

Smoltz had no trouble at the plate. 
He singled three times and is batting 
.424 (14-for-33). 

Caidbwls 9i Dodgers 3 After Tom 
Lampkmgave Sl Lou A a 5-0 lead wiA 
a le^off homer A the fourA innAg, 
Russell went to Ae mound and had an 
animafftH conversation wiA Astacio. 

When Ae inning ended, AstacA 
sprAt^ to the dugout and sUunmed hA 
glove gainst tte bench. MomenA 


Ater, he got Ato a heated exchange 
vri A Russell and had to be restraAed by 
the third base coach, Joe Amalfitano. 

AsAcio then went to the clubhouse. 
He later returned to Ae dugout and 
apologized to Russell. 

‘T was just frustrated and 1 knew I 
made a mistake,” AsAcio said. 

The Dodgers lost for the nAA time 
A 1 2 games, a slump that has Ae team 
on edge. 

“It *s just frustrating times,’ ’ Russell 
said. “F^ple are gomg to show emo- 
tion and yew leam from thaL” 

Astros 9, Padros 0 Darryl Kile 
pitched hA second shutout of Ae sea- 
son, limiting host San Diego to five 
AA. Kile (7-2) won hA sbcA straight 
decision. Sean Beny. Tony Eusebio 
and James Mouton homered for Hous- 
ton off Fernando Valenzuela. 

Tony Gwynn extended hA AttAg 
streak to 1 8 to tie Ted Williams, a San 
Die^o native, for 56A on Ae career 
Aa Ust wiA 2,654. 

BxposBiCidisdF. P. Santangeloand 
Mike Lan^g At run-scoring doubles 
A Ae bottom of the nAA innmg, lifl- 
Ag Montreal over vAitAg CAcago. 

RocldM 7, Marfins 8; Riarims 9, Itoc^ 

■as 1 Andres Calaira^ drove A three 
runs and JAm Burke pitched sA shutout 
innings as Color^ won Ae first game 
of a doubleheader. Alex Fernandez 
pitched SK shutout AnAgs and struck 
out 10 A Ae raA-sfaortened nighiciq). 

Rad Sox 1 % Indians 6 A Boston, the 
most productive innAg by Ae Red Sox 
A nearly three years — a nine-run 
fourA — overcame Geveland’s base- 
steaJAg flurry. The Indians built a 5-0 


lead after three innAgs wiA sA steals, 
incluAng three by Matt Williams. 

Athletics 7, Bhis Jays 5 A Toronto, 
Mark McGwire hit hA 24A home nui 
and Geronimo Berroa had a three-run 
shot for Oakland. 

Angsts 8, IWins 6 Tim Salmon 
homered A Ae sAA AnAg, Aen 
doubled durmg a five-run sevenA, as 
Anaheim won A MAneapolA. 

Oriolas 2, UThito Sox 1 A Chicago, 
Jimmy Key won his lOA gr^ wiA 
seven strong innAgs for Britimore. 

Royals 4, Rangers 2 In Kansas Cit)r, 
Jose Offennan had his eighA multihit 
game A nine starts and doubled during 
a four-run second for tbe Royals. 

/u games reported in later editions 
Mon&ty: 

Mwiners % Hgers 0 Randy Johnson 
took a no-Ana- Ato the eighA inning 
and struck out IS as SeanA shut out 
Detroit Johnson, who underwoit back 
surgery A Ae off-season, has not al- 
lowed a run A 30 consecutive innings. 

Yankees 3, Biewers 1 Paul O’Neill 
hit a two-run homer and Tmo Martinez 
had a bases-empty shot, lead Ag David 
Cone (7-3) and New York to a three- 
game sweep of visiting Milwaukee. 

Phillies 3, Phraies 2 Curt ScAllAg 
agam rescued Philadelphia on the 
road, despite Ae defensive exploits of 
Pittsburg’s rookie right fielder, Jose 
GuilleiL Guillen threw out a niimer at 
Ae plate A the sAth, Aen made a 
sensational, juggling catch on Mickey 
Moiandini’s drive wiA Ae bases 
loaded to end the nmA. 

• The New York Mets and Ae Reds 
were rained out A CAcinnati. 


18A, from every angle but underneath, 
the crowd empaAized so vAcerally that 
fans could not keep Aemselves from 
trying to help. 

“Breaks left, Mark!” yelled one. 
“That’s right,” answered another. They 
couldn’t save him. His pulled putt 
whiffed Ae hole. 

Finally, Wiebe faced Ae crowd and 
even sigried a few autographs. “I’m 
speechless. 1 don’t know what to say,” 
said Wiebe, who bogeyed three of Ae 
last four holes for a 73-275 finish and 
the $162,000 runner-up prize. 

“1 knew what I had to do and I didn't 
do it, ” he said. ‘ ‘ It was my loiimainem to 
win or lose and 1 lost. When you hit putts 
like that, you’re not meant to win.’ 

The journeyman hasn’t won a tour- 
nament in 1 1 years. For Ae last 13 years, 
he averaged about $200,C)00 a sea- 
son on tour. Bui, for a pro, w'limAg — 
not Just cashAg checks — is Ae test by 
which your colleagues judge you. That 
brings its own kmd of p^r pressure. 

Wiebe was also playmg on allergy 
medication Aat can cause shakes and a 
poundAg heart. “It's not fon when you 
feel your hands shaking," he said. 

Wiebe. 39, doesn’t have a face for 
sadness. It's Imed and weaAered, but 
merry. He's a burly. 6-foot-3 redhead 
with a fiery goatee and mustache who 
would look at home as one of those aging 
outlaws in Waylon JenoAgs's band. 

Yet, below Aai relaxed surface. Ae 
reality of golf wmild always poke out its 
often simstcr face. 

That subliminal pressure never 
showed A Wiebe's full swAg. He was 
splendid from tee to green all day. But it 
infiltrated his putter — the club that had 
gotten him Ato Ae lead A Ae first place. 
His thr^puns at Ae eighA and ninA 
holes for bogeys were a prelude. 

Wiebe doesn’t have Nomian’s rip- 
pling physique. And he didn't pick up a 
golf club at Ae age of 3, as Woods did, 
and swing it like a Byron Nelson A- 
stniction film before he had a lesson. 

Instep Wiebe hits a bit from Ae top 
and comes across Ae ball at impact like 
an Average Joe. It's afive-handicapper's 
swAg, but polished until it's scratch. 

As Wiebe sat A Ae tent “just trying 
10 collect myself,*’ he tried .to digest Ae 
full range of As day. “I'm very dis- 
appoAtra. Extremely,’* he said. “But 
in cranch time, I At some Ace shots.” 

In golf. Aere’s no place to Ade. And 
Aat's the honor of it. 



RnhMu BiaraTThe Aweiaed Abb 


Mark Wiebe missing hA first putt 
on the final hole in Kemper Open. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


SME WlSSt. you tss.: MDHI 

SMtS JVeSES N3MM& 1 OH 

DO &yr wfk\T RSR va lAife 


IN TUE WEWnME, I'VE GST 
10 Q!) M2CM(0 UXMNE UV£ 
I'VE GOT musi: i hope 


HW>PV?.' VOO SUFrePME/ 
WHSCS W( EIGHT SUCKS?:: 








PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL ElERALD TRIBUNE; TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Your Duty to Talk 


Peter Fonda Finds a Bit of the Henry Within 



W ASHINGTON — You 
see it in almost everv 


VV. see it in almost every 
newspaper sto^: **Mr. Squab 
(or whatever his name is) was 
not available for comment,” 
or “Mr. Squab 
refused to talk 
to this report* 
er.” 

As more and 
more wrong- 
doers refuse to 
talk to the me- 
dia, reporters 

Stanley Fischer told tob/'l 
don't understand it. I make a 
call to Squab, and I'm very 
polite on the phone, and 1 tell 
him 1 want to discuss his dal- 
liance with a married female 


and the public's right to 
know. As a oewspapenman I 
am obligated to write the 
mull, the whole truth, and 
nothing but whatever else 
h^p^ when somebody is 
messing around." 

“You said the politically 
correct thing. The Supteme 




Court mves newsptqjennen 
the ri^t to questton other 


Americans abont what hap- 
pens behind their closed 
doors. I would luUe to live in a 
country where people keep 
secrets from each cKber." 


jMkey at Belmont Race 
Track, and he won't talk to 
me. Do you know what he 
said? It was none of my damn 
business.” 

“He shouldn’t have sud 
that AAer all. you are a news- 
paperman. and it is his duty to 
discuss his misbehavior with 
you.” 

“That’s what 1 told him. I 
said we knew he was fooling 
around in Louisville during 
the running of the Kenlucl^ 
Derby, and it would be better 
for him if he came clean. ' ' 


Fischer said. “Yon know 
Carole Gartros, who says she 
was checkmated by an Ar- 
gentine chess player in a 
Beverly Hills hotel?” 

“I don't know hu person- 
ally." 

“Weil, I called her this 
morning to have her spiU the 
beans to me, and she referred 
me to ber lawyer, it's dis- 
gusting the way diey treat die 
press.” 

“There should be a law 
that makes it mandatory to 
talk to someone from die Na- 
tional Enquirer,” 1 said. 

Fischer replied, “I don't 
want to be in a profession 
where people accu^ of be- 


“Whai did he say to that?” 
“He wanted to know who 
said he should come clean. I 
told him it was mv business 


ing up to no good treat you 
like dirt." 


$57,000 for Monroe Gown 


r/h' AumviI/a/ press 

BEVERLY HILLS, CaU- 
fomia — Marilyn Monroe's 
evening gown from “How to 
Marry a iJ I i onairc' ' sold for 
more than $57,(KX) at a 
Christie's auction. Claudene 
Colbert's Osoir for “It 
Happened One Night" didn't 
make a dime. 


like dirt." 

I said. “I remember the 
days when subjects talked to 
the press because diey were 
afraid if they didn’t the re- 
porter would write somediing 
awful about them. Now those 
you call won’t speak at all." 

Fischer sai^ “It's not the 
same business it used to be. 
Instead of people facing a 
scandal bead on, they'd rather 
hide behind drawn window 
shades and give us the finger. 
My question is, if th^ make 
themselves unavailable to the 
pen, how do they expect to 
avoid us sticking them vritfa a 
sword?” 



By Jamie 

NewYori-niHfsSerekt 


L OS ANGELES — His voice 
shook at firsL apti kc reached 




Jal« BnnIeMCaMa 

Peter Fonda in *'Ulee's Gold": Comii^ to tmns whii a remote and 
inexpressive father by playh^ a remote and inexpressive 


J-^shook at first, apd he reached 
for ha drink. “Sherry.” said Peter 
Fonda, the who became an 
icon of the 19d0s a$ m^Juana- 
smoidng, mohxcyclo-driyn^ Cap- 
tain America in “Easy Rider" ai^ 
the innocent who embraces LSD in 
die f»ycfaedelic film “The Trip.” 
“I jiat like sbeiy," he explained. 
“It does wnerhtng U) my mouth 
malfw* all kinrtg of things pos- 
sible there." 

In foot, Fonda, 57, ai^iears to 
need litrie help when h cofines to 
talking. His fatoer, Henry Fonda, 
wbo died in 1922, may have been a 
man of few words, but Peter Fonda 
is a speed-talker. Words, lilv 
swarms of bees, surround him. It's 
as if — in additioD to his lanky 
body and nacrow faix ^ he in- 
herited the store of sentences left 
unsaid his father, “the silent 
tezror.” as Fonda caDs him. 

“You dmt't have to piy anything 
out of my dad," said PetCT Fonda's 
daughter, the actress Bridget 
Fonda. ^There was a lot of 
there, and you can't eicpect it to just 
be gone. He wants to be seen for 
who be is and is always trying to 
explain himself. I think if he could 
be tele^thic. he would be." 

verbal flurries are pre- 
cisely what you don't see in 
“Ulee's Gold,*' a film by Victor 
(“Itoby in Paradise") Nnnez that 
was praised when it appeared at the 
Sundance Film Festival early this 
year and will (q)eii in 13.S. theaters 
on June 13. As Ulysses Jackson, 
Fonda plays a dour, antisocial and 
uncommunicative man who re- 
treats into the world of beekeeping 
after his wife dies and his son is 
imjxisoned for robbery. 

“Thank God Nick Nolte tuned 
the part down," said Fonda, who 
h»l come to Los Angeles from his 
ranch in Montana, where he lives 
with his second wi&, Becl^ Crock- 
ett, whom be married in 1975. 
“After I finished reading the script, 
I tiiougb t. I'm the only one who can 


play tins role. The |xobl^ tva$ I 
didn't know how to convince ViCr 
tor, because I'm so exubezant and 
not ai all TtcalcitraaL’’ 

Fonda ended op ofifrring to .tse 
his freqneiUpflier miles to tavd to 
Hollywood to meet widi Nunez, 
who indeed, need some per- 
suading. “I was awaro of Pelei^s 
repntaSoD as toe Candidek" said 

Nunez. ‘^Inxnoslof hisscreenper^ 

formances, he's played toe I 
think you'ean respond to a 
fisted totter by bemg a down, and ' 
I rhintf Peter did toaL But I was 
loolding for a quieter place in him, 
and I to o p g^* u was toere. 1 had to 

meet biro to see. And whatUearped 

as we 'went along is that Peter is a 
synthesis of sage and fooL" 

It may be omy in Hollywood (ot 
according only to Hollywood's 
system cu rendering psychological 
truths) a fn»n can come to 

terms wtto a remote and inexiness- 
ive toiher by playing a remom and 
inexprasive ratoer in a movie. 

' “The first time I read wWi Peter, 
he had kmg hairin apony^ and a 
Horley-Davidsoo sweatshirt,*' said 
Christine Dunford. who portrays 
Fonda's daughter-in-iaw in 
“Ulee's Gold.” “But when we 
went to wodc in Florida, he’d cut all 
his hair off, and he was wearing 
wire-rinuned glasses, aiul I kept 
thinking, he's embracing his adult- 
hood. He spent most ^ this life 
defining himself by his rebellion. 
But fio^y he was sure enough of 
himself to not feel lost behind the 
eyeglasses of his totoer.” 

Nunez pat it this way: "T think it 


Tte son of Henry and toe young- ' 
er brother of Jaoe, Foo^ 
lieaced a. difficult cWhflwod.-! 






was toenmeutic for Peter to play a 
character like his totoer.- His abiliQr 
to understand that person from toe 
inside, as well as to ondesstand him 
from toe receiving end, is part of 
Font's grovring up.*' 

As for being a father himself, 
Fonda woold ratoer have erred on 
toe side of too moch openness. ' Tm 
achild myself, and I'm voy close to 
my chfldren," he said. “Tb^ were 
aware of toe fact toat any momeot 
toey mi^t be identified as someone 
they weren’t, and I tried to fortify 
against that." 


heWas' wyeais old wbeams Bioih-'< 
ff, Ranees SeyuvmrBrokaw.ooiin- ' 
atia^ suicide in a memal bospiial. 

than a year tor, stoile hb 
fiither was honeymoomng in 
Enrope wito his toiid win. Sunn 
BlaoefaanLPeter shot liimsesif in toe 
stomach with a .22-caIibef pistoL 

“Nfy parents," Fonda began, 
toen paused to co nect himsi^. 
"^o, 1 only had one. The peo|3e 
who claimed owneish^ and oot- 
trol over my Hfe all wonoered, didi 
do tofor aOentioa? Butyon shoot 
ydurs^ in your band or nxrt if you 
want atten&on, not the way I did h! 
That was an aeddeoL Otoa* peo^ 
put a suicide spin cm it. But i dhm't 
know mother had commitled 
suicide. I thought she had died of a 
heart attack." 

After moving to Omaha and liv- 
ing wito his aunt (Henry's sister) 
and his uncle, he enrolled at the 
University of Omaha and be^n to 
appear in plays. When be was 2 1, he 
won an award from toe New York 
Drama Critics' Circle fo' “Blo^ 
Sweat and Stanley Poole," his first 
Broadway role, and married Susan 
Brewer, toe stepdaughter of Noah 
Dietrich the ngbt-hand man to 
Howard Hughes. By toe time te 
was 26, Fonda was toe fiuber of two 
children, Bridget and Justin, and an 
outspoken b^ever in toe toera- 
pentic use of LSD. 

He wraked in movies qiorad- 
ically over the years, made com- 
mercials for motMcycles in J^m, 
where he is known as Peter Hraida, 
and directed several modest films: 
“The Hired Hand," “Idrtoo Trans- 
fer" and “Wanda Nevada," toe 
only film in which he appeared 
with 1^ fatoer. 

“I'm not chasing fame," he 
said. “I was bom famous. If I were 
digging ditches today, the guys at 
the other end of toe ditch woold 
say: ‘You knowwtio that is?That*s 
Jane Fonda's brother.' Or Henry 
Fonda's son. No matter what, ru 
never escape that" 






iiiina •'> 








i ...V '• 


.Kir •■rsrty^ 




SrtW* ' 

i-r’. ■ 'fiit b tb f tmt 


PEOPLE 


■ r.- M atejanisiMi.jrat. 


H ot LIPS Houlihan and Zero won't 
be toere. but two of their TVeo-stars 




X X be toere. but iwo of their TVeo-stars 
will be when toe U.S. Army medical unit 
that inspired toe movie and the long- 
ninning Korean War television series 
M*A*S*H dLsbands W^nesday. On 
hand for a sentimental salute when toe 
43d Mobile Army Surgical Ho&piral 
folds its tents will be Larrv linviHe, 


who played (he role of Major Pc^ 
Bums, and Oarid Ouden, who played 


Bums, and Oarid Ogden, who played 
Major Charles Winchnicr 3d. as well as 


man said be “had no infoTmatioD" about 
toe reports. Jogger and Hall, who have 
tiuee children, now between 4. and 13. 
separated last year and Hail threatened to 
divorce toe 53‘year-oid Rolling Stones 
singer because of his hi^y publicized 
infidelities. Jagger returned to toe family 
home in October, and Hall said at toe 
time that she loneed for another txiby. 
' ' Being a mum is to greatest tojitg I have 
ever done," she said in an interview. 


focal point of debate about toe lifestyle of 

Britain’s royal family Prince Ctouies 

comes jost behind toe England soccer star 
Paul Gascirigne and a TV soap chaiacter 
(Gram Mitchell of “EostEndera”) in a 
list of Britain’s worst fathers, acemding 
to an oinnioa poll published Monday. 
One in five people taad Charles's por- 
enticig skills left a lot to be desired and be 
did not deserve a Father's Day card, toe 
survey of 675 teenagers by Harris said. 


spotting," is to pl:^ tiw rt^ein the “Star 
Wars" prequel. which wQi begin filming 
this summer in London, according to 


Entertainment Weekly. Other casting 
calls answered: Uam Neeson as a Jem 


calls answered: Uam Neeson as a JedH 
master and Nat^ie Portman as the 
mother of Luke Skywalker and Princess 
Leia. “Actually, I reidiy want to play 
Princess Leia.” McGregor said. “Stick 
some big pastries on roy head. Now toat 
would be interesting." 


S t 



Blark Hox'lnMm 


M*A*S*H producer luirry Gelbart. 
The six ofneers and 60 enlisied per- 
sonnel of toe 43d will nwve out of its 
latest home, ai Psongtaek. between 
Seoul and toe Korean demilitarized zone, 
replaced b>' a more rmxlem Depmeds 
(Deploj'obfe Medical System). 


Mick .lugger's wile. Jerry Hall, is 
expecting a baby less than a year after the 
couple were rvconciled, British news- 
papers said on Monday. The Daily Mir- 
ror quoted doctors as'.saying that Hall, 
who will be 41 next month, was nearly 
three months pregnanL Jngger's spokes- 


Queen Elizabeth fl has told Prince 
Chmies to pay toe way for his fiiends on 
his farewell cruise on toe royal yachu 
Britannia. Charles plans a tbrce-day 
cruise through the South China Sea and 
the Fbctfic to the PhiUppines after rep- 
resenting the queen at June 30 ceio< 
monies maiking Britain's handover of 
Hong Kong to Qiiiia. “The queen was 
consulted and gave permission for the 
three-day trip," said a palace spokes- 
woman. “But she said the additional cost 
of toe extra people were to be paid by him 
and not the taxpayer.” The yacht, due to 
be scrapped at the end of toe year, is a 


A Danish violinist won the Queen 
Elisabeth international music prize for 
young musicians. Nikolai Znaider, 24, 
was awarded toe prize for his peifor- 
niance in Brussels of works by Debussy 
and Sibelius. The jury selected him 
from 12 finalists competing for toe 
S14.000 first prize. The annual prize is 
awarded in memory of the Belgian 
queen who died in 1965. 


Ever wonder what Obi-Wan Kenobi 
looked like as a lad? We will soon know. 
Ewan McGr^or, toe star of “Train- 


Saudra Bullock is still making big 
money as a movie star. Still, she’s 
second-guessing herself over toe last 
couple of movies she made, both box- 
office bombs blistered by critics. “I 
look back on oert^ choices that 1 made, 
and 1 wonder If I did it out of toe working 
actor's desperation to just take anything 
that comes along. I allowed myself, 
several times, to ten^iocre." Bullock 
said about “Two if by Sea" and "bi 
Love and War." So toe actress fired ber 
ad>riser$ last year. She stars next in 
toe action sequer“Spe^ 2." for which 
she’s making a r^TOrted $12.5 million. 


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Hall and Jagger are to be parents agaia, according to British newqiapers^ 








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Sliaia 

Kenya* 

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■■020.79SU11 
088049-8011 
• 09804S4011 
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51IHZII0 

.. 177-1905727 
1-8QB-1Q 


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0191 

0 - 800-10 

■0-800«4n23 









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