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INTERNATIONAL 





' Tbe World’s Daily Newspaper 

Albright 
^ Makes Case 
For China’s 
S Trade Status 

; - Or^ by ^Engagements 
Z Con US. PressBeyingy 
C She Advises Congress 


By Brian Knowlton 

Intenufriuiuil Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Secre^ of 
State Madeleine Albright, taldng her 
' case to Congress for preserving China's 
most-favor^nation trade status, ar- 
Tuesday that eng^ement with 
China was the best way to influence 
Beijing on issues ranging from Hong 
Kong to human i^ts. 

She said that seeking to isolate C hina 
would damage U.S. strategic interests. 

‘^Engagement does not mean en- 
dorsement,” Mrs. Albri^t said. The 
United States has made stxne progress 
in its dealings with China, she sai^ and 
revocation of China's mo$t-iavored-aa- 
tioD trade stams, ''would slam into re- 
verse the trend toward greater coc^jer- 
adon.” 

As if to demonstrate that U.S. in- 
terests could be asserted without jet^ 
atdizing the huge and growing trade 
relationship, she confirmed that she 
would boycott the swearing-in of die 
Hong Kong legislature appointed by 
Beijing as it was not democratically 
selKtM. 

Mrs. Albright has been invited by die 
British colo^al authorities in Hong 
Kong to wimess die reversion of sov- 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THH'I^ASHiriiGfqN POST 

^ Sris, Wednesday, June 11, 19W \Vi/ J 

— __v vWfliW y 




m. 


No. 35.544 




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. . 

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Marqinir/11l- Aminiilpd 

Mrs. Albr^t testif 3 diig Tuesday, with Ms. Barsbefdty in the bad^round. 

ereigp^ to China, on Jnly l.InBeijing, fight for renewal will not be an easy one. 
officials had litde comment on her de- Tro committee chairman. Senator Wil- 


cision, saying that attMidancg at the 
event was optional. 

Mrs. Alraight insisted that U.S. 
policy in die trade detete was being 
wven by the long-term need for a pro- 
ductive strategic relationsh^ wiA 
China, a nation of 1.2 billion people. 

“People thmk it's a tradeoff between 
human li^ts and cade pob'cy,” she 
said, addmg: “The strategic relation- 
shro — that is the issue he^” 

Mrs. Alight, who testified almig 
with die U.S. trade representative, Oiar- 
lene Barshefrky, received a warm, bi- 
partisan welcoTO from members of die 
Senate Finance Committee. AU those 
who spoke either support President 
Bill Clinton's planned ooe-y^ exten- 
sion of trade privileges Giina — 

same rights, enjoyed by most conntnes 
— or said the status should be made 
pennanenL 

But senators also indicated that die 


u^t tor renewal will not be an easy one. 
The committee chairman. Senator Wil- 
liam Roth, R^blican of I^ware, 
fuedicted that the debate in Cmgress 
would be “more contentious” than any 
since the law requiring annual reviews 
took effect in 1980. 

• And Senator Robert Ke^, Democrat 
of Nebraska, said that his phone had 
been “rin^g off the hook” with calls 
from people opposing trade wiA China 
because of hnman-ri^ts abuses there. 

The House Democratic leacto, 
Richard Ge|duudt of Missouri, predicted 
Saturday diat die lower cbambff, which 
voted overwhelnungly last year to renew 
most-favmed-natioa status ftx China, 
m^ht vote this year to revoke iL 

An overflow crowd attended • tbe 
hearing Tuesday. Interest groups from 
ri^t left have mobilized to protest 
Chinese dxirtiou practices or arms ex- 
port or failure to enforce intellectnal 

See ALBRIGHT, Page 9 


A Black Box\ in Every Car in U.S.? 

Safety Board Also Wants Laws Forbidding Children in Front Seats 


Z. ..ByMatibewL.Wald_ 

7^ NfwYvrkTJmesSemte 

WASHINGTON — The National 
Tnai^^tion Safety Board reccm- 
Tuesday that auto makers put 
“bW boxes” in cats, somewhat l&e 
'thktiiies used on airplanes, to gadier 
Artir bn die kinds of accidents that 
- cajBedte worst injuries. 

. 'Ra^ asked the 50 American states 
IbrfU^ it illegal fora child to sit in die 
frott seat of a car. 

K^^tVith its recmnmendations, tbe 
Agency, best known for its investi- 


gations of plane crashes, has moved to 
play aTOle in resolving a profatouthat 
icdescribed as 20 times larger, in tenns 
of lives lost, even diougb it is of lower 
profile than aviation d^asters. 

Thousands fewer Americans each 
year would die if adults wore their seat 
belts and m^ sure that children were 
properly restrained and in the back 
seat, the board said. 

It is uncertain how .many states 
would be willing to enact new laws 
forbidding childrra to sit in the front 
seat 

:The board, which has only advisory 


powers but can issue recommenda- 
tions to anyone, historically has made 
most of its recommendations to (he 
Federal Aviation Adnunistration, the 
Federal Rmlroad Administration, the 
Coast Guard and similar regulatory 
agencies. 

In its reconunendations, it called on 
Holl3rwood to always show children in 
die tok seat, a^ properly buckled. It 
also told the American Society of 
Newspaper Editors that all reports on 
fatal car crashes should describe 
whether the people who died were 
properly rBStrmned. 




Peruvian President’s Luster Is Dulled 

Fujimori Confronts Protests Stirred by P&verfy and Corruption 


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By Diana Jean Schemo 

New XwA 7&iifj5^i'cv 

. LIMA — Eager to show what a man 
of the p^le he was, I^ident Alberto 
Fujimori drove his jeep high into the 
dusty slums where ci^'s poor Eve. 
With his country's two most important 
guests in tow, lie roQed over stretches of 
new road and pointed out freshly built 
schools. He into swarms of' 

cbeer^ modiers and youngsteis, who 
scrambled to touch his sleeve. 

But after the president and the dig- 
nitaries liad gone, die people who re- 
mained ^Mthind spoke of a desperation, 
for jobs diat was not about scmiols-or 
roads oc a presidential handshake. 

“He comes once every five years,” 
WEly Saavedra, a father of twa 
"Od^ when he needs somediing.” 

Lett than two months after Peruvians 
treated him like a conquering hero for 
' the end of tbe siege m the Japaiw 
Embassy here and sent his popularity 
soaring in polls to 69 pment, Mr. 
I^Jimori finds himself faring an in- 
creasingly hostile riectorate. Now dre 
polls show that his approval rating has 
plummet^ , to 39 percent — exutly 
tPheK it was before die mzlita^ fre^ 
host^ea ai the onbassy in a daos^ raid 
diat hmu ght him worldwide acclaim. 

Now,^ die first time in seven ye^ 
in Mr. Fujimori is nnfroating 
pol^ pPDttsts stirred by the nation^s 
pervasive pover^ stmoe of hts 
reeeat arfowa . . 

These have been inedia exposes abcw 
coir uigim , iniiinga and tofture byTifae.. 
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It was to places like the soup kitchen 
that Mr. Fujimori invited dre United 
States' special envoy, Thomas 


'• '.A. 


*i •• 


--i- . 


ment, on one of the president’s locally 
farnons “windkhield tours” dmmgb the 
slums. And it is in those riaces (hat ±e 
discontent that simmered after be left 
helps ca^idain ^ di^ in die president's 


- seven years of his fiscal austerity 
program, f(« exampl^ have left count- 
less young fathers lilre Mr. Saavedra 
wailing on die sidelines, praying for a 
job. . 

According to figures published last 
week in Gestioo, amiancial newqiroer, 
19 percent of all Peruvians, w 4.5 million 
pet^le, live in ex tr e m e pmrerty, without 
canitatinn, wattT, cleCtTlcity Of gaS. Half 
the population lives below die poverQr 
level, up from 38 percent in 1985. 

Political analysts say the president, 
feeing popular protests for democrat 
for tte firet time since taking office in 
1^, is ata turping point The slack that 
he was once granted, in die name of 
overconing terrorist violence and right- 
ing the economic shambles left by his 
predecessw, qipears to be running out 

- “Only IS percent of all Peruvians 
either dont know, don't care or think 
we’re liviitt in a democracy,*’ said 
Hernando <fe. Soto, .an economist who 
was an adviser to Nfr. PupmexL The 
gutting of the constimtional. Tribunal, 
however, was “tfie last straw ” for many 
people. 

See PERU, Page 9 



.■ 


President Alberto FiyimorL 

his hold 00 power. And the president 
i*aTTie iinHgr diplomatic aod domestic 
criticism when Ids congressional ma- 
jority dismissed duee judges who had 
ruled aguost his bid xo run for a third 
term in 2000. 

• But die mori pervasive thr^ to Mr. 
Fujifflcwi's popiuarity can be in 
pl jicft^ like me CamatKms soiop kitchen, 
an unlit shack more cave duin house, 
where tbe hot hutches that' sell for 40 
.cents are gone by .1 

Throu^out.me cbuntiy, thousands of 
. soim kiteo^ like die Cainatioos began 
wim the eebnoime crisis of the 19»0s,' 
Now, people faece said, crisis has 1^ 
come a way of lifa 


A Deal on Euro Takes Shape 

With a Pledge on Jobs, France Would Ratify Pact 


By Alan Friedman 

/Bffnwitmhi/ fitnild Triftwirr 

PARIS — A compromise that would 
allow European monetary anion to pro- 
ceed on schedule, in exchange for a 
pledge to make employment the Con- 
tinent's ti^ priority, appeared to be 
emeiging Tuesday night after a day of 
frantic negotiations between the leaders 
of Ffence and its European partners. 

Senior German, French and Dutch 
officials said Tuesday that the newly 
elected Socialist government of France 
was now prepared to drop its threat to 
delay endoismg an agre^ent that is 
crucial for introducing the single cur- 
rency. 

In exchange, European leaders would 
endorse a writtoi commitment to put job 
creation and economic growth at tbe top 
of Europe's agenda when they gather 
for a summit meeting next week in 
Amsterdam. 

That commitment would take the 


form of a new chapter on employment to 
be inserted into the Maastricht treaty on 
European integration. 

Emerging from separate meetings 
with I^sident Jacques Chirac and 
Prime Minister Lionel Jospin on Tues- 
day night, the Dutch prime minister. 
Wim Kok. said that France's new S()- 
ciriisi-Ied government had told him it 
could accept a single currency stability' 
pact next week at the summit meeting of 
European Union leaders in Amster- 
dam. 

Mr. Kok, the host of that meeting, 
acted TUesdav as a mediator between 
Paris and its European partners. 

His visit to Paris came jusr 24 hours 
after France's new finance minister, 
Dominque Strauss-Kahn, had asked for 
a delay in tbe signing of the stability 
pact, which would impose tough sanc- 
tions on single currency members that 
run excessive deficits after the euro is 
inaugurated. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn and other French 



' JSL 

mmmym 


officials had previously argued that ii 
would be impossible for Paris 10 sign the 
pact before June 19, when it presents its 
economic policies to Parliament. 

“The French goveinmcni lold us they 
do not have to wait for the prescniation 
before the National Assembly.” Mr. 
Kok said at a news conference alter 
talks with Mr. Jospin. 

Mr. Jospin, in turn, told reporters ihai 
‘ ‘there are efforts 10 be made. 

“We will make them." he added. 

Mr. Kok said that bolh French Iroders 
had shown a '‘firm will” to achieve a 
deal by this weekend. He said that the 
Dutch finance minister. Gerrit ^im, 
would be preparing the compromise 
language. 

Aides to Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 
Germany had been especially worried 
about the threat by Mr. Strauss-Kahn 
and additional comments Tuesday 
morning by Pierre Moscovici. France’s 

See EUROPE, Page 9 


\ '■* " .■'...'■..s' 



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* ' 4 




Workers demonstrating hi Paris on Tuesday in an appeal to the Jospin government to make jobs its priority. 


Manila Court, 
With Tie Vote, 
Dooms a New 
Ramos Term 


CnfMtffOwU^FnmDape^iift 

MANILA — The Philii^ine Su- 
preme Court stopped a move Tuesday 
by supporters of Fiesideot Fidel Ramos 
to cha^e the constitution to allow him 
to run iw a second tens next year. 

T^ court voted, 6 to 6. with 3 ab- 
stentions, on a motion that it reconsider 
a previous ruling against a campaign to 
amend fee coustitution. The tie upheld 
the nevious decision. 

“ Thank God,” said Edgardo Angara, 
an oppo^on seoauv who ht^ies to run 
forpresident next year. ‘ ‘It would have 
divided fee nation down fee line.” 

Miriam Santi^o, a contender for 
next May's election who narrowly lost 
to Mr. Ramos in 1992, said, “Se^ the 
word to all investors, domestic and for- 
eign: political stabiliw is assured now 
and in.fee immediate future.” 

Ms. Santiago, a foimer judge, is 
among at least a dozen politicians who 
havedreadyferown their bats in the ring 
to become fee country’s third president 
since fee end of the Marcos dictatorship 
in 19K. There is no clear front-runner, 
and some are likely to be viewed with 
distaste by foreign Investors. 

Mr. Ramos has repeatedly said he 
will not seek a second tenn ana will stro 
down as scheduled on June 30, 1^8. 
But he has done little to discourage the 
group behind a campaign to get him to 
run again, and critics say his dose aides 
are behind in 

Supponeis of the campaign want to 
remove term limits frmn the cousti- 
Qiliai fortte president and ocher elected 
offidals. They say Mr. Ramos has been 
snecessM in inqirovmg political sta- 
bffity and economic groi^ and feat 
voteffB should be given 'the choice of 
electing him agam. 

Other elected officials who fece their 
own term limits have supported die 

See RAMO&'Page 6 


AGENDA 

U.S. to Sell ‘Stingers’ to South Korea 


WASHINGTON (Reuters) — The 
United States said Tuesday that ii 
planned to sell 1.065 shoulder-fired 
“Stinger” anti-aircrafl missiles and 
213 launchers to South Korea for 
$307 million. 

Tbe Pentagon oorified Congress 
that Seoul had r^uested the Stingers 
for defense against any attack fiom 
North Korea. It would bt fee first such 


MwVoUt 

PM 

Pound 

Van 

FP 


The Dollar 


Tije8diye4PJU. 

1.7185 

1.63B5 

112.38 

5.8065 

TuBBdiyclow 

753927 


pfwtoKrictp 

1.7065 

1.6373 

11&90 

5.7655 

pmlouGCloee 

747aio 


transfer of fee sophisticated we^ns 
to South Korea. 

The missiles, which can be fired by 
a single soldier whh the launcher rest- 
ing on a shoulder, find and track their 
targets after launching. They are made 
by the Hughes Missi^ System Ca. a 
fevision of General Motors Corp. 

Congress is expected to approve 
fee sale wife little opposition. 

PAQETWO 

Cold J^ver in the Russian Wilds 

THE AMERICAS Page 3. 

Drfense Pleads in Bombing Case 


TuBBdRy 0 4 P.M. pnviouBdon 
86528 8m!91 


Books 


Crossword 

Page 13. 


Pages 10-11. 

Sports 

Pa^ 22-23. 

The Intermarket 

Page 4. 

1 The IHT on-line 

http:y''vvv.'w.iht.com | 


Kenya’s Moi, Once Invincible, 
Faces a Rising Tide of Dissent 


By James C. McKinley Jr. 

New York Times Service 

NAIROBI — Wife opposition leaders 
tiireatening more violent protests like 
fee one thtu rocked this coital recently, 
a protracted battle over constitutional 
reform is looming in Kenya, threatening 
to oversha^w or even do^ presiden- 
tial elections later this year. 

Eight months ago. President Daniel 
arap Moi’s position tq^jeared unassail- 
able. OjTOsition leadm were rolintered 
along ethnic lines, unable to a sii^le 
candidate to challenge fee man whbl^ 
ruled Kenya for 19 yei^. '^fe his polit- 
ical enemies divided, it lotdted as u the 
president would win re-election easily. 

But now it appears tiiat calls for re- 


beleaguered Kenyan middle class, who 
are weary of the nation’s steadily de- 
clining econcxny and the rampant cor- 


ident less power have caught fire wife fee 


What remains unclear is whether the 
opposition can harness feat anti-gov- 
emment sentiment and rally behind a 
candidate capable of winning the elec- 
tion, diplomats said. 

'‘We are seeing a groundswell of 
frustration and an^er against the current 

f ovemraent,” a diplomat said. “But I 
avoi’t seen the o^qiosition offn an 
alternative yet.” 

A confluence of political interests 
have fueled fee current tide of popular 
opinion against Mr. Moi. the diplomats 
said. Several influential church leaders 
have joined wife human rights advo- 

See KENYA, Page 6 


Rough Diamonds in Japan Send an American Umpire Home 


" By Kevin Sullivan 

WiaA&ittMfynSeviee 

TOKYO ^ It was an ermeriment feat was 
supposed to bring the United Sates and Japan 
closer fogefeer. Instead, il ended wife pnDching 
and shemng, a shower of gaibege and a new 
cukoxal betiveeo two countries feat can’t 

quiie seem to figm each ofeer (NR. 

Di Mnro, fee first American ramiie ID woik 
foU rime m JapmeM ptofossioiial baseball, is leav- 


ing Japan jnsi three monfeg into fee season because 
of m oo-firid fraois in \riuch several {fetyers and 
coaches shoved and strudt him dofeig a game. 

uJs. baseball officials caU^ Di Muro home 
over fee incident Monday, bringing a sMr.end to 
what had started as a prantising exdjange between 
two countries wliose dealing in evoyfeing from 
semicondnetors to whale meat are often mam l^ 
cultural misunderstteidings. 

' AHbough Japan is one of tbe world's least 
violat societies, manhawHiing of unqures ~ ab- 


solutely taboo in the United States — is relatively 
commonplace here and is an accepted way trf 
gia^’ng feem to fihang e feeZT Calls. 

Di Muro, whowaslnvited to J^mn this season to 
help improve the quality of Jmmese onmiring, aid 
be aod American baset^ officials be bad cmisulted 
were “shocked” by Thursday’s dusnq), which in- 
volved at least five Japanese players and coatfees. 

The Americans were inci^lous feat none of 
fee players or coaches involved was fined or sus- 
pended. Only one, a player who struck Di Muro in 


the chest once wife his fist and swung at him a 
sew^ time, wm given a letter of reprimand. 

EX Muro said Ameri^ of ficials would not 
allow him to continue working in a league wliere 
pte.yers can rough up umpires without ixieaniiieful 
punishment 

“What vnil tbe next guy be allowed to do if I call 
astrike — take a bat to my head?” Di Muro '>9 
saidinaointeryiew. 

See UMPIRE, Page 23 


jS-i-;.!.-.- . 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 1997 


PAGE mo 







Russia’s Gold Fever / Call of the Wilds 


Kamchatka’s Future: Paradise Lost? 


E SSO. Russia — The basic view from 
this mountain village has not changed 
for 7,000 years, since a giant reservoir 
of molten lava crested over to form the 
mighty peak of Asia's largest and most active 
volcano. Eag les and falcons dance through the 
crisp air. Not far away, the world's biggest 
population of grizzly bears forages for salmon 
as big as dogs. 

There is nothing else in Russia, and little left 
on earth, like Kamchatka. A peninsula the size 
of California, with just one long, partly paved 
road, it has more earthquakes and live vol- 
canoes — including Asia's biggest and most 


By Michael Specter 

Nn York Times Serruv 


active, Klyuchevskaya Sopka — than any- 
where else. Thanks to its fertile riv’ers. lakes 


where else. Thanks to its fertile riv’ers, lakes 
and seas, the region accounts for nearly half the 
ftsh produced in Russia. 

But while Kantchatka. in Russia's Far East, 
is one of the last pristine places on the planet, it 
has been left that way by accident. 

More than 8.000 kilometers <5.000 miles) 
from Moscow, the region was protected by the 
Soviet Union because it was home to a nuclear 
submarine base in the p)ort cit>' of Petro- 
pavlovsk-Kamchatsky. For decades it was off 
limits to all but natives, sailors and fishermen. 
The staggering wealth that lies beneath the soil 
— gold, silver, platinum and more — has never 
been touched. 

But the temptations have never been greater, 
because every year Kamchatka draws closer to 
death. 

“There is a way to save Kamchatka," said 
.Alexander Orlov, die chief of the regional 
administration's department of eneigy. min- 
eral resources and communicatioo. “And 
everybody knows what it is: We have to dig for 
gold. 1 myself want as much wild nature as 
possible. We all do. But first of all. people 
should have a good life. 

“To live here we need development. With- 
out it. we should just turn this place into a wild 
park or game reserve and move away. Because 
if they slay, people are going to starve." 

The collapse of communism, hard as it has 
been on many Russian provinces, has put 
special pressures on Kamchatka. Unique in so 
many ways — it is. after all. so far east of 
Moscow that it is almost west of Moscow — 
Kamchatka nonetheless presents the most 
striking example of the impossible struggle 
remote regions face in adapting themselves to 
the realities of the new Russia." 


The subsidies, incentives and discounts that 
Soviet leaders doled out for living in Siberia 
and the distant north are gone now. and nothing 
tha t people did here in the old economy makes 
sense anymore. 

Petropaviovsk-Kamchaisky, where 300,000 
of the region’s 400.000 people live and where 
almost no produce grows and everything must 
be imported, is among the nation's most ex- 
pensive urban areas. Bread here costs three 
times as much as in Moscow. Unemployment 
is nearly 30 percent In winter, an apple costs a 
dollar. ' 

The Ashing industry in the world's largest 
salmon spaw'mng ground, which accounts for 
more than 80 percent of Kamchatka's workers, 
is buckling under Ae costs of transporting its 
catch ,back to the populadon centers in the 
west. ' 

There is no longer any money in hunting 
because it costs too much to ship meal. 
Reindeer breeding, a way of life in the north for 
at least a thousand years, is also on the verge of 
di^pearing. 

The regional government has become so 
impoveri^ed it can no longer pay hunters a 
bounty to kill woU'cs, which have multiplied 
rapidly and decimated the herds. 

But the pressure to find a way to make 
Kamchatka prosper competes with the know- 
ledge that once digging here begins, one more 
natural paradise will abnost certainly be lost. 

“I am sure there are places on this planet as 
wild, beautiful and diverse as this." said 
Yelena Dulchenko, a geologist with the 
Kamchatka Institute of Oology. “But 1 just 
don't know where they could be. If they dig for 
gold here they will ruin Kamchatka forever." 


We are a colony and Moscow 
can only take from us." 

That is why it is no longer 
possible to ignore the most ob- 
vious source of wealth in 
Kamchatka. There are fnim 
500 to 1 ,000 tons of gold here, a 
figure that, while not enormous 
by world standards, could bring 
in as much as $10 billion. 

"It's not going to change the 
world gold rnarket." said 
Samuel Romberger. professor 
of Economic Geology at die 
Colorado School of Mines. 
‘ ‘But it might excite a bunch of 
Western adventurists." 



'MI|» 





C ANADIAN, Americ- 
an and Russian 
companies have all 
been eager to start 
digging, and the right has 
already become messy. Many 
of those who want the region to 
grow, or at least to continue The port 
supponing humans, say tour- pptrnnat 
ism is the only way to do II 
Since the peninsula has 30 BJtmchai 
active volcanoes, one of the fiMrvihir 
world's great geyser fields, • . *’ 

lens of thousands of rivets and importec 
lakes, and every type of animal Russians 
l^m sea otter and sable to the ,, j,/,- 

world’s biggest eagles, tourism **ruan a 

seems to make a lot of sense. 

But with no roads, the only way to move 
about the peninsula is by helicopter. Visiting 
the Valley of the Geysers by helicopter — 
where more than 200 geysers spout, bubble 
and boil into the sky — can cost $2,000 for a 
few hours. 

A round-trip plane ticket from Petro- 
pavlovsk-Kamcbatsky to Palana, the ncvthem 
administrative center, is S400. Many families 
do not earn that in a year. 

There are few hotels outside the capital 


G old fever sometimes makes de- 
bates seems simple, and it would be 
easy to portray the battle for 
Kamchatka as a .struggle between 
those who wish to preserve the earth and those 
who are eager to plunder it. 

But the people here have an obvious rev- 
erence for their surroundings and a strong 
desire to protect them. They also have bleak 
prospects for the future. 

Moscow can no longer afford to support 
places like Kamchatka."lf it survives, it will 
have to find a way to do it alone. 

“We are forgotten by the federal govem- 
ment." said Gennadi Devyatkin, head of the 
local administration in the gold-producing re- 
gion in central Kamchatka that includes Esso. 
“Forgotten e.xcept when they want our fish. 







The port city of 
Petroporiovsk- 
Kamchatsky\ where 
everything must be 
inqtorted, is among 
Russians most expensive 
urban areas. 


KAUCHATKA 

>•. A 


.... 


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Petropaviovsk-Kamchaisky-, in part because 
the island is in the center of a major earthquake 


the island is in the center of a major earthquake 
zone and the cost of building hotels that can 
withstand earthquakes is huge. 

Fishing is the only industry here to prosper. 
More than a million tons were hauled Iran the 
seas near Kamchatka in 1996 — a record catch 
and one that specialists here feel is too large 
even for such nch waters. 

This year the Russian govemnieni permined 


quotas that are even . • • . y 

higher, though, be- rir'- ' ''Pehqdj^tetwk-er.. 
cause with little v .« . 

else in tl« way Irf J 

income, fishing is r > 

ali most people 
have. That is w^y 
so many residents 

have reluctantly turned dieir hope to mining. 

The ejects of mining are difficult to predict 
New techniques reduce pollntion immensely 
— but perhaps not enough to protect 
Kamchatl^ 


I T is not possible to extract gold from the 
earth without flus hing large amounts of 
heavy metals into the surrounding water. 
Fish eat them, bears eat the fish — and 
both would suffer badly, as would pec^le. 

"The conditions tere are fra^e and 
unique." said Igor Revenko. a leading bear 


i biologist with the Kamchatka In- 
' srituteof Ecology. Mr. Rei'eidEohas 
been tnkmg a bear census here for 
— ."i. . . i a 5 g^>enil years, attenqriiag to under- 
^ stand why this appears K> be Aebe^ 

-• \ , Y place on earth for them to live. 

Revenko said that the mines 
’ here would be exhausted within 30 
years — a figure that regimal oiin- 
rSiffSm' ing supponers do nor contesL 
Then, ifthe natural splendors of the 
peninsula are affected, the possi- 
bility of using the place as an tour- 
ist spot may no lo^er exist. 

! “Personally.overthelongnin.'' 

said, “I think there 
pTvao* would be more money in lour- 
. '. y 1 ism." 

v\T This year, in an attempt to pro^ 
tect those areas of Kamchatka that 
are Duly wild and most in danger. Unescn put 
nearly 4 million hectares ( 10 million acres) oq 
its list of protected World Heritage Sites. But it 
has not made everyone here happy. 

"Everyone has a plan to save i^mchaika." 
said Alexander Rechednikov, a 50-year-old 
hunter in this town of 300 families. "But they 
are not saving it for me. I can't make a living 
hunting anymofne. 1 can't fish. There are no jobs 
to offer, none. So why don't the good rich 
people from everywhere else in the world leave 
us alone and let us decide what to do in our own 
land?" 


jiaiilii Bombing 

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U.S. Would Raise Taxes on Air Tickets 

Republicans Want International Travelers to Foot $34 Billion Bill 


Iraqi Leader’s Son 
Leaves Hospital 


4th Graders in U.S. Make Grade 


rih' /Unit unil Tress 

WASHINGTON — Air travelers ar- 
riving in or dep^ng from the United 
States will be payinga bit more per ticket 
if the House Republican ia.x proposal is 
approved, and one airline indusuy ana- 
lyst said proposed changes in ticket taxes 
could lielp pad some carriers' profits. 

The Republican tax bill would raise 
$33.7 billion from assorted airline ticket 
and fuel taxes through 2002. a big part of 
the revenues in the ^5 billion net tax-cut 
plan unveiled by the chairman of the 
House Ways and Means committee. Bill 
.Areher ofTexas. The committee is sched- 
uled lo vote on the measure this week. 

The major clianges would be for over- 
seas travel, where ah imemational traveler 
could face an extra S 1 6 in taxes per ticket. 
The bill proposes to raise the S6 inier- 
national depute fee to S 10. and impose 
a new SIO fee on imemational arrivals. 
Those changes ore expected to bring in 
S4. 1 billion over the five-year period. 


Travelers now pay a 10 percent tax on 
commercial airline tickets, a $6 a ticket 
tax on international departures, a 6.25 
percent tax on domestic air cargo and 
excise charges on noncommercial avi- 
ation fuel. The taxes brir^ $20 million a 
day to the Airpon and Airway Trust Fund, 
which finances airport modernization. 

The Republican bill proposes a vari- 
et>' of technical changes, such as re- 
ducing the 10 percent ticket tax to 7.5 
percent bui adding a $2 per segment of a 
flight, such as one takeoff and landing. 
Mr. .Archer said the change was de- 
signed to make the tax more equitable on 
the carriers that use the federal aviation 
system most frequently. 

"The revenue thai's raised out of 
whai is now the ticket tax will continue 
lo be roughly the same." he said, "al- 
though the fonnula for implementation 
is different." 

One induserx* analy.«i agreed that ep- 
ical trax-elers would not notice the change. 


“1 don't think John Q. Public is going to 
see much of a change at all" ifdte bill 


see much of a change at all" ifthe bill 
becomes law. said Tom Parsons, editor of 
Best Fares magazioe in Arlington, Texas, 
whidi follows the travel industry. 

But Mr. Parsons predicted that the 
change could pad airline profits, since 
some carriers would be iikely to continue 


charging the current 10 percent levy and 
keep the 2.5 percent mfference in the 


keep the 2.5 percent difference in the 
proposed lower rate for themselves. 

“The big airlines shouldn't have too 
much difficult)' with this because they 
can put 2.5 percent back in their pock- 
ets." he said. 

Auoiher big change would be the im- 
position of a 7.5 percent tax on bulk 
purchases of airline tickets by credit card 
companies, which purchase' tickets un- 
der “frequent flier" credit card agree- 
ments. "When they buy tickets, they do 
not pay a ticket tax.' ' a Ways and Means 
panel spokesman said of the card compa- 
nies. “It’s a gigantic loophole." 


Reuters 

BAGHDAD — Iraq's newspa- 
pers published a ph^ograph Tues- 
day showing President Saddam 
Hussein's oldest son. Uday, leav- 
ing a hospital on cruK^ies netuly six 
months after an assassination at- 
tempt. 

In the photograph published in 
all Iraqi news{X^rs. inciuding'Ba- 
bel, which is owned by Uday Hus- 
sein. he was accompanied by his 
you^er brother. Qusay, and the 
Iraqi doctors who treated him. 

Ine official Iraqi press agency 
INA said Monday that Mr. Uday 
left Ibn Sinaa Ht^piml in Baghdad 
after a “ftiU rccoveiy." 

Mr. Uday was reported to have 
been- seriously wounded by gun- 
men as he was driving I^. 12 in 
the Mansour district of Baghdad. 
He undcTNent several operations, 
the last in April on his leff leg. 


The AsstKiuied Tress 

WASHINGTON — American foudh- 
gradera are doing slightly bener in sdeoce 
and mathematics than eighth-graders, 
scoring above the intematio^ average in 
both subjects on tests comparing them 
with foreign students, accoiding to a 
study by a private research group. 

Presideni Bill Clinton hi^li^ied the 
Study's results at the White House on 
Tuesday as part of his push for national 
testing standards to measure what 
American students know. 

The findings were based on math and 
science tests given to students in 26 
countries and reported by the Third In- 
ternational Mathematics and Science 
Study. But the report did not include 15 
countries that were used in a similar 
TIMMS study in November that ana- 
lyzed tests given to eighth-graders in 4 1 
nations. Switzerland. France. Russia, 
Sweden and Germany were among the 
countries that participated last year but 
not this year. 

In science, American fourth-graders 
ranked third behind students in Korea 
and Japan and were trailed closely by 


Austria. Australia, the Netherlands and 
the Czech Republic. 

The fourth-graders tanked 1 2th out of . 
the 26 countries in math. The Americans 
were outranked by students .in Sings- 


I laities Em 


Hv 1 .J9n‘ 


pore. Korea. Japan and Hong Kong 
Students in the Netherlands, the Czeu 


Republic. Austria, Slovenia, Ireland. - 
Hu^ary and Ausn^a also scored high- 
er than Americans. The researchers cau- 
tioned that the rankings were inexact . 
because of the differences in scoi^ 
methods among participaiing countries. . 

Last year’s rqx>rt on ei^ib-gradeis 
ranked Americans 28th in math tests . 
given to students in 41 countries, la 
science, they finished in the top half of . 
the list, at 17. 

Researchers said they analyzed the 
amount of homework ass^n^'-'tiiiK 
spent watching television, curricula and 
teacher education and training, but no 
single factor emerged as significant - , 

Education Secretary Richard Ril^ 
said it was clear that "math at eighi ‘ 
grade Is a weak link," and that adopting ’Hr);/;,, 
nalionai standards would go a long way 

toward rectifying that. 


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tra\t:l update 


WEATHER 


New Train Service to Paris Airport 


P.ARIS (.AFP I — Rail authorities have started a new non- 
>top train serx'ice linking central Paris directly to the Chark's 
de Gaulle uiTpon every 15 minutes at key times, a spokesman 
said Tuesday. 

The RER trains will run four times an hour from die Gare du 
Nord. weekdays from 9 .A.M. lo4:.^OP.M. and 6:40 P.M. lo^ 
P.M.. and vteekends from 7 .A.M. to 9 P.M. 


The Kuwait .Aircraft Engineers and Pilots Association said 
its 620 numbers decided to stop work every Tuesday until 
their demands for higher pay were met. They will also delay 
nights for an hour every day beginning Wednesday. 


Europe 


Forecast for 'mursdB)r Ihrougih Saturday, as provided by AoeuWeather. Asia 


U.S. to Step Up Airline Fire Safety 


Pilots Strike at KuMTiit Aii'ways 


KUW.AIT ( .APi — Pilots and engineers of the state-owned 
Kuwait .Airways walked off their jobs Tuesday, forcing the 
airline to cancel all its depaning flights and suonding Dtou- 
sands of passengers. 


WASHINGTON lAP) — The Federal Aviation Admin- 
istration is requiring inaccessible airline cargo compartments 
to have fire detectors andextii^uishers by 2()b 1. A final rule is 
expected by the end of the year. 

The Val'uJet crash in May 1996 that killed 1 10 people in 
Florida focused anention on the danger of fires in cargo com- 
partments. putting pressure on the agency to tighten its'Tules. 

The Mexican government issued tropical storm warn- 
ings from Puerto Angel to Acapulco and ordered several ports 
closed, as forecasters predicted that a fast-fonning system 
would soon .strike the southern Pacific coast. lAPl 


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Have you been to 


River blindness, a disease caused by a parasitic worm, has 
ren detected in Mozambique for the rirst rime, in the central 


been detected in Mozambique for the first rime, in the central 
Milange district, the nalionai board of health said. tRciitersi 


INTERMARKET 


Swiss tourists will be able to travel to Hungary on their 
persona] identity c:irds beginning June 19, (he Hungarian 
Foreign Ministry said. lAFP) 


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North America Europe 

Stmnr and hot ThuisdBy in Cool waher is in sm lor 
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a;eu ol me om U"* U.S. ThursOay end Frida/. 
-ThunderMorms will bring Cloudy end re<ny lot rnuch 
heevy downpours (torn qI The Btttsn ItiM. Sunny- 
Ohio to Ailiansae on Fn- and very worir ' horn 
day. itw* 10 the East Coest Poland into the Beliic 
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Saiurdav Unseosonably Tuitcay. Hoi irt ^s>n end 
oooi m ihe Paeihc North- seumern Ftsnee Pleasant 
wKi IP Italy. 


Asia 

Thursday through Saturday 
wiN be hot aru] mainly dry 
In northeasiem Cnra near 
Belling. Warm end huirvd 
westMi will aHect ToXyo 
with clouds, some sun and 
a ihundersiorm possible 
each day. Seoul wiii be 
parily sunny Rainy in 
seutherr* India, but hot and 
dry n northern irtde 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 1997 


THEMtERICAS 


McVeigh Friends Testify He Was a ‘‘Loving’ Child 



PAGES 


By Jo Thomas 

Ne^ Vffrk Times Service 









..6^ 
.. .*» 






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. DB*fV£R — Lav^eis for Umothy 
, ‘McVeigh, in their bid to spatb his life, 
! have called childhood his god- 
‘ mother and soldiers who served with 
I him io the army to tell a federal court jury 

• that be was a lively, aiffectionate child 
; who grew up to be a peafect sol^. 

*‘He was a clov^ always a happy 
J persw,*' said Vicki Hodge, who grew 
! im with Mr. McVmgh io Pendletoii, New 

■ Yoriu outside Bo^o. She lived across 
i tbestreti from his family, she said, and 

■ was his'fnend from die time they were 
I both in die fourth grade, played “king of 
I the moDOtain’* widi other neighborhood 
I children, and ate dinner at each other's 
I bouse. 

Linda Daigier, Mr. McVeigh’s cousin 
d godmother, said the Timothy Mc- 
Vei^ “that peo^e have beep describe 
[ Log Isn't the Tim l know.” 

• SSiecontinued: “Heisfiinnyandveiy 
I lovmg. 1 don’t diink he ever came to my 

■ house that he didn’t give me a hug. He 


' ! and godmo 


has his family’s uncradidonal love. That 
isn’t scmi^hiDg you can just turn off/ ’ 

Master Sergeant James David 
Hardesty called Mr. McVeigh “one of 
the standouts” amtmg the soldiers in die 
infantry conqwiw where be was a pla- 
toon leader at Port Riley. Kansas, in 
1989 and 1990. 

Mr. Hari^^ said he saw “a lot of 
potential in him — all die leadership 
qualities, driv^ derennination.” 

Mr. MeVei^ was “a bit arrogant,” 
but in this he was like the best soldiers, 
Mr. Hardesty said. have self 

pii^.” 

^ testimony Tuesday, Mr. Mc- 
Veigh’s lawyers tried to make jurors 
unr&stand lus rage over the FBI si^e of 
the Branch Davidian conqioiind in 
Waco, Tbc^ Tie Associated Press re- 
ported. 

[Ad editor of Soldier of Fonune 
magazine testified duct the govermnoat 
kn^ wommi and childreo wem in die 
compound. About 80 people died there 
inafire April 19, 1993, exaray two years 
before the Okl^ma City bombing.] 


In their opening statement Friday, de- 
feat lawyers ^ they hoped that the 
tesdmonjr by friends and relatives would 
show *e jury that Mr. McVeigh, 29, was 
not a “monster” and would persuade 
them to vote against a sentence of 

Heath. 

' On June 2, a jury of seven men and 
five women convicted Mr. McVeigh on 
1 1 counts of murder and conspiracy in 
the bombing on April 19, l^S, that 
.IdUed 168 people and injui^ hundreds 
m(»e. 

Tie jury has already heard from vic- 
tims of the bombing, who told their 
suffering and the carnage caused bv the 
blast 

Among the soldiers who tes tified 
about Mr. McVeigh's prowess as a sol- 
dier was Ian Thompson, who now wmlu 

in New Y oik City as a paiidng attendant 
He served as a gunner wito Mr. Mc- 
Veigh’s unit and described him as “a 
soldier’s soldier,” a man who was “a 
cut above the rest” 

“Whenever you have something to 
do,” Mr. Thompson said, “he would 


always go ahead and fece it head on, do 
it, even though sometimes me and the 
rest of the crew, we’d back away from 
it.” 

Lynn Di^zga, who lived four houses 
down frtun die McVeigh fami ly in 
Pendleton for years, told the jury that 
Mr. McVeigh played with her sons 
when they were all children and liked to 
come by and chat when he was older. 

Just before Mr. McVeigh lefr for the 
war in the Gulf, Ms. Dr^rzga said, he 
stopped by. 

Althou^ he was always ready with a 
smile or a joke, she said, as he lefr “he 
turned around and said, ‘Mis. D. I'm 
coming home in a body bag.’ ” 

WhM she protested that be would not. 
she said, “tears welled up in his eyes.” 

“He-walked away, vezy slowly,” she 
added. “It was like my own son was 
leaving.” 

She put a yellow ribbon on a maple 
tree in yard. 

“No one knew what it was for but Tm 
and L” she said. “] put it up, and didn't 
take it down until he returned’’ 


Atlanta Bombings 
Believed Linked 

Inquiry Ches Lefters Sent to Media 


By Kevin Sack 

I New York Times Service 

ATLANTA — Leaders of 
' a tarit force investigating a 
series of bombings in Atlanta 

■ say that they are “all but pos- 
; itive” that die same persen or 

• p^le planted bomte at a ies- 
; bian nightclub and at a build- 

■ iog boosing an abortion clin- 
; ic, and that they have 
! “increas^ coafidence” that 
; diose inciifents were linked to 

the explosion last summer at 

• Centennial Olympic Park. 

At 'a news conference 

■ Monday, officials widi the 
i multiagency task force also 

released excerpts from, one of 
' the nearly identical letters 
. sent to four news organiza- 
tions immediately a^ die 
n^tclub bombing. 

The letters, written with a 
black felt-tipped pen, claimed 
that the attack Feb. 21 at The 
Oibaside Lounge and the 
bombing Jan. 16 at the Sandy 
'Springs Professional Bnild- 
ing , which houses the Atlanta 
-Northside Family Planning 
Services clinic, ’ ‘were carried 
- out by imits df die Array of 
God.* The letters did not 
-meniim the Olympic Park 
boinl^g. 

• Rx more than 15 years, 
'some people talung rc^pon- 
sibiliw for bombing of abof- 
' tioncuEdcs have clmmed to be 
meoibers of a militant leli- 

"gioas cell referred to as die 
‘“Army of God.” Some of 


those p^Ie have been coa- 
victed in such attacks, al- 
though experts on extremist 
groups question whether that 
orgaoizatioii exists. 

Jack Oaulttm, the FBI in- 
spector who leads the tadc 
force, said thm agents were 
now “reasonably certain” that 
the author of the tetters was 
involved in the bombu^. 

Mr. Daulton r^sed to say 
why agents' have concluded 
that the letters were legitim- 
ate. But investigators have 
said in tire past th^sectioos of 
the letters, which were not 
made public Monday, con- 
tained onpnblicized details 
about the composition of the 
bombs lefr at the nightclub 
and the abortion clinic. 



Donn DnniaHm^nic AaocUed 

REVISITING COLD TIMES — Sergei Khrushchev, center, son of the former 
Soviet leader, with- Julie Nixon Elsenhower, a dai^hter of former President 
lUchard Nixon, and her husband, David Eisenhower, grandson of former 
President Dwight Eisenhowmr, at a Cold War ctmference in Irvine, California. 


Cohen Now Forced 
To Expand Search 

WASHINGTON — Having lost 
the leading candidate for Joint Chiefs 
chairman to a furor over adultery. 
Defense Secretary William Cohen is 
broadening his search for a potential 
nominee for the top military position. ' 

The candidate. General Joseph Ral- 
ston of the air force, took himself out 
of the running on Monday to be the 
next Joint Chief: chairman, but said he 
would continue as ihe vice chairman. 

A Cohen aide, speaking on con- 
dition of anonymity, said that Mr. 
Cohen would now have to look fur- 
ther for candidates. General John 
Shalikasbvili, the current Joint Chiefs 
chairman who plans to retire SepL 30, 
recommended General Ralston 
succeed him. 

Under congressional directives, 
Mr. Cohen must choose the chainnan 
from a limited list of senior officers, 
primarily the chiefs of staff of each 
service and war-fighting generals and 
spirals. 



Ri« Eifenunb/nv A’noaiftl Pib» 

General Ralston arriving Tues- 
day for work at the Pent^on. 


Clinton Focusing on Latins 

After Term of Ne^ect, Pk’esident Tries to Make Amends 


Haiti’s Embattled Prime Minister Quits 


By Larry Rohter 

New ybrkllines Service 


MIAMI — Capimlating to several 
mondis of strikes and violent protests 
calling his removal, tire jxime min- 
ister of Haiti, Rosny Smarth, has 
resigned after complaining to Parlia- 
ment tiiat forces loyal to former Pres- 
ident Jean-Bertrand Aristide had sought 
to undermine him. 

The move came less than a week 
before a runoff Section for the Haitian 
Sena^ in w^h Mr. Smardi’s stew- 
aidsh^ is virtually the only issue. The 


prime minist^ and the parties backing 
him maintain that Aristide supportm 
rigged the vote against him. In his resig- 
nation speech Monday, Mr. Smarth por- 
trayed tumself as a victim of petty polit- 
ical squaUtding. 

“1 wa*t agree with the way the game 
is being play«), without principle, witii- 
out etUcs,” be told the Natrou^ As- 
sembly. “For that reason. I dunk it is 
time another team takes the reins." 

Mr. Smar^ an agronomist who lived 
in exile during the era of the Duvalier 
family dictatexship, was appointed 
prime minis ter IS months ago I^s- 


ident Rene Preyal, whom Mr. Aristide 
handpicked as hte successor. But almost 
from die day be took office, Mr. Smarth 
has been criticized by the Aristide camp 
for the economic and social policies he 
pursued. 

Arguing tihat Haiti’s poverty and de- 
pendence on foreign assistance gave it 
little maneiuverability, Mr. Smarth en- 
dorsed plans to i^uce government 
spending and privatize nine state-owned 
enterprises. 

But Mr. Aristide has repeatedly com- 
plained that these policies hurt the in- 
terests of Haiti’s hqpoverisbed masses. 


POLITICAL 



WhUe House Rules Out 
Quick Fix on Flood Bill 

genetic research witbont isolating the sanc- 
ti^ of the individuaL 
He endorsed a lull tiiat would ban human 
clonii^ for five years, allowing time, Mr. 


Clintoa said, to “coatinue the national dia- 
logue” on cloning. 

The bioethics panel, which inclndes sci- 
entists, religious scholars and ethidsts, did 
n(M recommend a ban (m animal clon^, 
nor did it pitqiose a legislative ban against 
private reseaicbers using cloned embryos, a 
practice already barred for federally fin- 
anced research. (WP) 


WASHINGTON — The Clintoa admin- 
istiaticm ruled out any quick compromise 
Tuesday on a vetoed disaster-aid bin and 
blamed Rqiublicans fix the delay in getting 
relief aid to disaster victims. 

‘They’fo going to have to back down,” 

Tfioe Pn^dmt Ai G<m said. “It is erneU it is 
outrageous and it ought to su^ right now.” 

The Senate majority leader, TYent Lott, 
and President Bill Clfoton Miked by tele- 
fdione (m Monday after tile president vetoed 
the ^.6 b^on spendix^ tnil because of 

xeii^. Mr. Lott offered a quick House Panel Approves 

Changes in Medicare 

make-U.’-* He to reveal details of 

thepTOTosal. 

The iterns die White House found ob- 
jecti(»abie' are a provision to bar a gov- 
ernment rinsing fall, but at spending 
lev^ beneath whai is contemplated m a 
recent balanced-budget accord, and a p^ 
posal .to bar the Census Bureau fitxn using 
sampling techniques. Such tecbniqnes are 
touted as |xovidiug a mexe accurate census 
of the poor and minorities. (APi 


President Backs Ban 
On Human Cloning 

WJ^HINGTON — A national law ban- 
nog human cloning is needed to |xx>tect die 
‘’mffacleoflife'’fiomthe8Cceteiati^nish /v. t 

fif yUtr^ Pw>=wient Bill Clintons^ as be ■ fJUOte/ L/nqUOte 
eadorsed a of a hioediics 

pa ti j pi studying the issue last 

after Scottish researchers cloned a 


WASHINGTON — Tie House Ways 
and Committee has approv^T^ 

gitifltinn to maicft sweating cha^cs in the 
Medicare heaidi program that would keep it 
solvent foe a deoule and offer new be^ 
inaiirwnfi^t optioDS to 33 million elderly 
Ameticaiis. 

Ihe measure, which would cut Medicare 
jq ymHing by $115 UUjou and open the 
program to more health maintenance or- 
ganizations and other forms of managed 
care, was tqiqnDved by a vote of 36 to 3. 

The White House generally supports the 
bin rq^xoved.by the committee Monday. It 
till lequircs a vote of the full House, and 
the Soiate is working on swiilar legis- 
lation. . (f^) 


ro cl one a humakbeing is 
iBiaco^^&y'dangeraus to llte. dxUd and 
fflOK^y onacceptable to oiff soei^/'.Mr. 
f^SKfO said Moo^ as he acented the 
npdi of die Natimial Bioethics Adviso^ 
C anmkria ft. “1 bdieve Strongly tiiat ti^ 
CQfiehiaeQ reflet a 


MV4w>ri McCnny, PTesidoit Bill Clin- 
t)oa*s qiokesman, on the possibility of a 
vidx to dte.^^fte Houre tfais'week 1^ the 
gotferTigff Woods, udio sonbbed the pies- 
Masters victory by refusing to 
apenH X RoMnson cei^ration with 
him: “You know, tins guy’s got a lot on bis 
imiid infe wants to ccncentrate on winning 
die Open, Itfaink that’s probably pretty 

got^.senseaalnspart.” (WP) 


Away From Politics 

• A Department of Defense employee was arrested after he 

rode a bite to his office, pulled out a semiautomatic rifle and 
opened fire, killing (Xie worker and wounding another outside 
the Monter^ Presidio Logistical Support Center south of San 
Francisco, officials said. (AP) 

• A pilot paid to scatter cremated remains from the air 

instead left as m^ as 5,000 boxes of ashes in a storage unit, 
accor^g to California authorities, who are searching for A1 
Vieira, 52, of Discovery Bay, Califcxnia. (AP) 

• The FBI has told the families of the 230 people killed on 

TWA Fli^t 800 last year that no evidence has been found that 
a criminal or tenorist was reqioasible. (AP) 


By Diana Jean Schemo 

Nevf York Times Service 

LIMA — When Thomas 
McLarty took over as Wash- 
ington’s special envoy to Lat- 
in America in December. 
lj.S. policy resembled noth- 
ing so much as a game of 
hopscotch, with each square 
home to anoAer irritanL 

Relations wife Colombia 
had been difficult for years, 
wife U.S. officials insisting 
that President Ernesto 
Samper, Aough cleared by 
his nation's Congress, look 
millions of dollars from Ae 
Cali drug cartel. 

Latin American officials 
disturbed by these charges 
were even more unea^ over 
Washington’s yearly laliig of 
counnies’ anti-narcotics ef- 
forts, which has twice lumped 
Cokmbia wiA pariah oatkxis 
like Nigeria and A fghanhaan. 

The Helms-Burton law, 
aimed at some foreign com- 
panies that do busuess wiA 
Cuba, was anexher sore romt 
And Ae promise of Ae Sum- 
mit of Ae Americas m Miumi 
m 1994, Aat Ae NorA Amer- 
ican Free Trade Agreement 
would be Ae start ot a vast 
free trade area from Alaska to 
Aigeotioa. was stalling. 

None of Aose problems 
have disappeared. But A 
naming Mr. McLarty to bis 
post, the White House ap- 
pean eager to reverse what 
Latin American leaders saw 
as neglect during Mr. Clin- 
ton's first term, to signal 
its keen mterest m trade issues 
over some of Ae oAers. 

Mr. McLarty, who was Mr. 
CUnttm’s chief of staff daring 
his first term, was on hand for a 
meeti^ of the Organizatkm of 
American States here 1^ 
we^ He described his rote as 
providing “tiie kind of per- 
spective that goes to Ae center 
ctf President Clinton’s agenda' 
througbout the region.' ’ 

“Let's not exp^ all of our 
eoeigies and focus all of our 
time and effort on Aese issues 
that we may have respectable 
disagteemems about,” Mr. 
McLarty said. “And where we 
do have disagreements, fine, 
te’s talk throu^ them.” 

Mr. McLarty, SI, said he 


*' 


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would probably hold the spe- 
cial envoy’s job until the sum- 
mit meeting scheduled for 
Santiago, Chile, next March, 
wAch is being seen as a kind 
of moment of tniA for free 
trade m Ae Americas. 

Brazil — whose four-na- 
tion SouAero Cone trading 
group, Mercosur, has been 
growing rapidly — is nipping 
at the heels of the Umted 
States. At a recent meeting of 
ministers to Ae proposed 
Free Trade Area of the Amer- 
icas m Belo Horizonte, 
Brazil, the U.S. Trade Rep- 
resentative Charlene Barshm- 
sky said Brazil should move 
to Asband Mercosur alto- 
gether, and threatened to walk 
out, 5^ Eduard Gamarra, a 
professor of Latin American 


stuAes at Honda Atemation- 
al Umversity. 

The Braulians, who have 
been tiymg to slow down 
hemispheric miegration. flatly 
refu^ to disband the group, 
and instead won agreement for 
a gradualist aj^xoach toward 
mtegration by 2005. 

Cimton did not visit 
Latin America during his first 
term, but Mr. McLarty said 
the lapse did not signal a lack 
of mteresL 

“If you look at his actions 
— the passage of the NAFTA, 
meeting of the Miami summit, 
the support of the Mexico peso 
crisis — if you lorric at those 
specific events.” he said, “I 
would say actions speak 
louder Aan words, or even 
jAoto oi^xxtunities.” 


% 


FOP SAIE OB LEASE: 

An ISLAND (?) 
in the iniditlle of 
Western Europe? 

Are you lookirH] for on otoody buST-ouf. peisorwi. forrily 
or^d/or corporate “Home-Base" tocoted in the heart 
of Western Etrope? 

Would ttw Ideed (for you) be a courrhy-estcite property 
which combines Me uMbnofa in CM Worid Cfxmn 
with Me ultimata In New World (unetlonalltY, 
cmariMas end Mh>sfrucfura? 

\AAiat would descrise *Me idaar. for you? 

Would It be located within a one hour's cMve from Bom. 
Antwerp. Brussels and Luxembourg?... 

Would tt be located within a three hours *5 drive from 
Frankfurt, Amsterdam. Colds. Parts and Eiso-Dlsney? 

Would the prlrviipal ‘^OMWbridFsoftne'ofthe property 
Irtclude a completely restored 37 room Chateau 
ond on 16 room Pavilion de Chosse (both with 
indoor, heated, marble swimming pools): Guest 
apartments located in o seporate bulding. a 200 
year old Manicured Pork, private deer habitat. 
worid-dass Indoor and outdoor tennis courts, and 
your own 9 hote/17(X} yard golf course, plus fully 
equipped gymnasium, formal outdoor 
entertainment pavilion, croquet coixt, and gardens: 
ponds, fountains, topiary hedges, hand-laid 
masonry drives and pathways etc. Office faclittles 
and access discreetly separated from residentbl 
spaces and focStles? 

Would the prfndpoi *New Wdrfd Feahaas" Irtclude: Ihe 
ufffmofe In functionality, amenities, and hi-tech 
Infrastructure such as: dual (IIOv and 220v) 
electrical power sipply systems. Rber Optic cobles 
oTKj hfroproperty TV cable and dlQttal telephone 
systems connecting (underground) the Chateau. 
PaWon de Chosse. Office complex, ond the guest 
aportments which grace the property: A “super- 
quiet*. superbly engineered. Chateau Air 
PuHflcatton system (down to 1 micron level). M- 
Corttrol. Cortdtlonlng and HumidMcotlon systems: 
Multi-zone sound systenre, samas. steam showers. Irv 
the-floor hot water heating, high pressure water 
systerm: Choteau and apartment buBdbig elevators. 
Helicopter pod and hangar (heated); A property 
peifrnater that Is fenced, gated, and electror^cally 
secured, etc.? 

Would thm be on efficient, motivated, and multilingual 
(French. German. 8( Enfiteh) stoff cteody M place, 
who are already trained and experienced in all 
OBpecis of molntaNr^ orxl operating the pr^>erty? 

Such o Dfopaitv Aw e hgs been un der Inteiwa 
resforotion and dewetooment ter Ihe past nlna- 


Atthough this property Is not on Isiond with water around 
it. - tt is o 69 ocre b l and el secuiPf, privacy, charm, 
AffieffonaBy, and luxmy, - located the very heart 
of Western Eixope - with already dev^oped and 
operational amenities. Infrastructure, and 
experienced stetff - capable of supporfog a quoity 
of life and a standard of living. - rorely found 
onywh^e. 

The owner is re-locating to Asto, and is anxloix to seB. 
Seong Price is sttsstontially below boM replacement 
cost and owners investment to dote. Price, 
brochure, and video are available. Agents and 
prospective purehosers are invited to contact 
ownervio 

Fox Cti 1-345-945-5369. 


OlequBsh far oorinaenlloStYwa be respected.) 


% 





PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HE^LD TRIBUNE, ^DNESDAY, JUNE II, 1W7 


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I'ar.i it ^uebi? :-.dh sandesi tp EOOLI 
03<a»HeERS • PtAZZAlE CADORHA 
11 • JJiLAtlO ■ TsL-FAV . 3; ;• 


USED LEVS 50140M17. AH coF 
orsdiaihs Ciea iioin USA ner 
nanbnoty recramjed dealer. Phone 
3 t(K:33-1300 ?I0-23}.IU3 USA 


SHALL ARMS AMMUNITION/UIUTARY 
eQUfmiem and supplies loeesi pites 
vdAne jrhr FAX USA .954474^866 


LEVI sors. Used and Nee auaiirr 
leans drea iiom the USA Honest and 
Reiiacile Fai Sl?3^6-?749 USA 


DOHUUCAN CIGARS 9 styles hand 
tolled vdiuxe purchases only 
Teleisc uSA.»t4:J 3336 


Asia & Pacific 
Mining Ventures Inc. 

(NASDAQ OTC) 
FAX: (N. AMERICA) 
604-920^16 


BUVMG OUTlfT FOR THE LARGEST 

“redna Cfncinii- c'anded J Lu'uni 
> 7 C'j.ls ‘ F:a<ar>:ea "smiencs eaicnes. 
pen; -.iwiaure ir,-stai hanobaj^ 
cDca irames siro^aises ime oaars 
Gu:ci *a; He-jer 'Caii^ '.Vedj»M:cd 
S'.vaio'.'M Heien: Fetra^-ne Pr^ 
Wt'iik: ei; jltVa. traciN'j 
C c5i\ T-i ujA .:.:;:.9d"--:'5'"3 ra« 
L'ji AH caUs WSied 

ic. uiFoii .-jrAlince 


CIBAN CIGARS IN STOCK. LONOOirS 
FillEST CIGAR MERCHANTS TH *i 
iv’n s:?i;4: Fa* « icin S92:3: 


USED LEVI 501 JEANS • All cpiois 4 
orades Rv pnee W FAX M-iol.jWo 
OSA fi£Cya£Y/tAB 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
WMGRATIOKIPASSPORTS 


Business Opportunities 


CASKETS 

American Cashel in eqmt 

a f^peieniatr.e 

Cy aVrr-arjn tai m 11“ L'S 

16OJI SOMew 


2nd PASSPORTS ' Dnvirij Lcences 
Dese-^Camc'jnaje PassportsSeoei 
Sank Ai'poum: G'J P 0 Box 70302 
Athenj i6ci0 Greece Fai aSKlSl 
NiiD -m.v^Pai-rr.c.’ie'. am 


Ban«ia-Accounun^5«craanai 
Vai HNisiniion-irrAnng 
Maii-nvoe.^ Sences iVortf.-Mle 


2ND PASSPORT S10K Also EU 
Diplomanc Orr.efs Licences Email 
cxei^uneineipn Fa* -rs-j-wi "ii: 


AUTOMOBILES 


CaoriftMCM 




Alltcd Ewner Slioel to 
CH4K■27An■G^ 
fai oraa?i%» 

Toi oiijos ee 10 
nma TAX-FREE usoa 
ALL LSADIN.^ MMS&& 
3anitf oav leguii.-iron peoabie, 
ion^.ibi« ue w 9 yvjiB 
Wo dKo to^^er Cim uith 
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Auto Rentiils 


RENT AUTO DERGI FRANCE: VVeelen! 
.-rW- ' days ^15M Tel °ans -33 
1O1I Uit Fa* iO)l 43S3 «29 


Auto Shipfting 


Automot^les 


SAVE ON CAR SHIPPING. AUESCO. 

hntC-ifl: : Ani«erD Seignm To/Rorn 
US ^.ca RcTiai fkyRo saihM Flee 
W-l Tel 'a* .as-eiST 


AN OPPORTUNTTY tor Kgli Acnnen 
4 cutired Denetaerv b ledimd 
to tpoftsdr Ra anWnua nelnni 
and cenfUen poys Imu^ Die 
maa presbpDus scbooi and Unheruv 
Suppot and coimpnen & reiurn tiii die 
MOstaaon and paiicoaeon n mee 
MuaUon. Ths vtyciRarv el rungle 
A 1 D> BRmSH ROYALTY and Mentiery 
d tan Partemeneiv Houses 
TNepDone or la* 44 (C>)T7 i td: 


Aubis Tax Free 


SALE: MERCEDES CL 600 

iSJi?r iLh Jue' =i?gaitte 
ERAN2 N?.'. EnteraD 3lKN 
.'Ji3 Unreoisieied Fijy toaded 
Ta»irih 5»-!Jifiedei deals' 0?L 2S9v 
■HTj * ca DS. ; »! 
r-irrac: M G ']p -le Kairj). Ucicades 
Tel: ,3l-77-382 9999 
Far -31-77-07 2546 


TERCOIBI IS SEEKMG 

business p4t:0e aiih ra otf 
emhus^m ter opamn 
Finanoai and ccoiiRbai actiwih> 

IT. ML B L F G6 D 
Fy tfDcnraiign Tet f3li(<i:9 JZi7.:o: 
E-mail letromn^ ^mreiiil 


TRANSCO BELGIUM 


aYEARSWDBWEA 
CARS TO THE WQRU) 


nf m2<t£j ita iriDdeis 
Etpen Sales • Regisbaton 
. ctsuoru 


YOUR Oim COMPANY IN 
SWITZERLAND 

2UnlC.M‘ZUii\UaRN 


In la I Kf-1 


FERRARI 456 GT 

94 ijw ilt. cucLinetaiii:. oei^ 
leaner m-nt csnftiop sei; '/.n oket 
LiSnj-.VvCft-Sij 7cira 
Tel SfliceTard -41 41 44531:3 
^a< a'.'.C^ra -1. 41 44531 >J .'RJ'Vni 


TraiBto :t Vossf'cl'4-51' 
jns] ATLerp Beipiur. 
Tec -Si 3 bUfJ-K- 
Fa* -XJWSas: 


Baarerspaste 36 t>-c3ti(i2UO 
Tl -11 711 s:S9 ri ‘41 41 710104? 


Serieertands Porsche Boxeiar Rental* 
WeeLenSs FRLici SFi6j-j-7 days 
5^:03 !C day's SFIl^l^CD iRt'd^ 
> .4r?#:-ri9:« =;i -jitw::?*; 


25 YRS OCEANWIDE MOTORS 

.fOddiRie ^ shCOng ‘S AUDI 
Mefcedes 5lir.V Porsche Can Germair,- 
>i9-:il-dJ>i6J6or b*Ctl-454 


RELIABLE EUROPEAN CONNECmN 
Assstance ana Rar^esenaiipn 
Trade 4 Fhnriee 
Feaswtf Agreement Foiiob-u) 
CcnfrienDalily oaranteet 
EMC • Tel: *33 ( 0)1 4 S 56 05 22 
FAX *33 (OH 47 05 -14 08 


TAX FREE EunpMIS RESSTRATION 

N: ’’■a-.ei R' Cor*! & a’ it* platft un- 
fiTi.iiK -a. —1 jj ^5 75 TH 37 


ATK WORLDWIDE TAX FRQ CARS. 

I sitpc*^ • legenaiai oi nes a 
used as alK NV Termiiei 40 29.^) 
ciaiSi-'-aji Beixm Pnone *3:: 3 
545500; Fa* *32 3 e457lv9 ATK. 
since :9s3 


IhShInel LADES A GENTLEMEN 
Tsned «siQcsie 
r re d an ce AgeaWR^iiignuflyH 

CD-C PC6 JJ4, CH-e056 Zundi 
Fa*. -»i 1 371 71 -r-e 
e-nu4 luldlj .iiccxriKfien.enm 


AFC Enterprises. 



800 848-8248 ext 81 
or 770-3S3 3363 ext 81 


.■urpon-aMTHipnoi 

Amic«rdaii/Nethei1aiid8 

fa - E\(*cllrnl Lorailon 
Ptol (tif Liad) for ttalr 

\ppni\lmatH> ITI.inki sq.m in 
build liir hiiit-l ulth cniurvMxr'eft- 
iri'. iiiritvs. (S|N'i-i.ilh lilfih lit'h 
rifaifs fur ilirTt'n-iil nLiIrrlal.^ 
Iiifiirmniiiin and piiper.-* 
klo»l<Taiaaii*iiroperl,v 

WIrMrnjtnind 18 
46.1N0 IkHiHilt Oruan;t 
‘lrl.lf*-MR-|0)*Xli7l --IGIGO 
Fht li • *49 - |Ol • 2N7 1 • 46279 


fnTCT7T3^ 


DC SEEKS ACTIVE PARmERS 

for crealnn ot Nghlv 
prolnable proiaas, 
opemina IBC centers in 
USA, ASiA. AFRICA A EUROPE 
All new conoeple & 
Mcepironai prinucia. 

Tkl: PARIS -*33 (0]1 41 05 07 06 
FU: PARIS *33 (0)1 «r 58 55 17 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 


READY HADE COe .Fm AOMIN 
TRADE DOCUMENTS AND IC 
BANKING A ACCOUNTING 
CHINA BUSINESS SERVICES 


Ccrtacl SMa Ho lor rtnedata 
senos tr ompanii oexMa 
NACS LTD. Room 1 106. Albixi P&za 
24 Gtarr.iiie Road. T^. Kowtnn. 
Kong Kord e-nak nacjChksuoana 
Tel: BSU7S1223 FtX 27324373 


WEB OFFSET FOR SALE. 
Wood. 4 uneec bcoioi. 64 pa9H 
J5.C>00 coo«4 labioid ImmeiMte 
■Mven SW pralxma Corfao Soon 
Tet i34-ii 571 4945 Fee S>i 205S 


AGENTS WANTED! To $el US Cotpo- 
laim & LLCs Irom UOO lal mchue) 
Corpoiale 'Conjulling Ltd Teleptwr 
3 K->:M 5 I )0 IX Fat JCC-SSMOK 


OFFSHORE COUPAMES. For tree ho- 
chure <ji 3a.'ice 'ei landon 44 1 BI 74i 
1224 Fa< 44 161 749 q9A&^38 
emeraoMonceuX 


FW YOUR FAVORITE CIGAR 

on WWiVClGARiHLiBCH 


IMPORT S EXPORT COMPANY IN 
LAUSA^mE a patme) e you are 
riwefted please to* • 4 i.:i.«oi ijr 2 S 


SEEK TO BUY BAHAHUM BANK la 

one -H gut -dienis Vine to 6 q< 3 CM 
IHT NatflvCeds* Fioice 



SWISS 6 <mH 0 RE BANKS. Fa n- 

tcrmainn can now Gerrtany Tel -49 
117221 807 527 Fax -4? i23)) 779 36l 


TURKISH GROUPS awae pmiede Imm 
an couNnet 'Xi'^in industry ere 
Please lai *90 212 24975FI hr onaih 


roiecoininu/wcatfons 


GioOeNei pmaieto owned panneiship 
eah on* at ihe US's Mroesi caUe Tv 
(nr.iderL seeks to exoand ns ini 
CatiacL wholesale prooam Only e>pe^ 
lencad ctibsA ipraois 'judi nnnim 
moehy IraHL ne^ a^ply The is tor th* 
serous camacii mseiiei or nasier ageni 
iDQhng n impnne then market oosdion 
and nw^ns To reoeiv-e an d-.'ennni of 
ou Txcoaih. please conad Karen Yavt 
via tax' ai. 610-323-OEiO a E-mail 
dnet«mnhiiiixt com 


:kanback 


r417MAMW.w 
swnxWA Hiie 


The Original & Largsel Obcoum 
Tetecamnnlcaliani Congmiqi 


Tel: 1^599.1991 


Fax: 1^06599.1961 
Emelk WeClallieriLeoffl 
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The New ffa)f of S^hig Fhx to Fox. 
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to BEST DATA LINE TELECOM, 

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417 Second Avenue West • Seattla. WA 9S11 9 USA 
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AganttnragtAt/Nnian eweeiTBleQadiY , 


WWW.TELECUCOM 


I'Si' Vi0.35-V;0T0 s.>'.‘i. 223 F'tx: 5'035“.9F-n/' 3':dv 2.nnnr,r.ccm 


BUSINESS OPPS 


Wellknown 

Gennan Clinic for sale 


Contracts with all 
public sickness func^. 

Omnia Medica Munich: 
Fax +49-89-16 78 28-11 


IDEA OR 

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SUPPLIER OF WELL 
KNOWN BRANDS 



BAPUtE STATE BUUMNG 
ADDRBS 

Qiln bwtMit omdUily. 
EmmIi^i ■ NY pw u nc B in 
the tmrtf ■ bo»4inM«n 
buHdWi^.lMIraoehmcL phone 
Brwmnng. evrimnoe 
roem. Tumtohad nVnHxncae. 




Business Services 


ASSET PROTECTION 

0%ing a in;ue rangd of servi*Bi to 
oueKos umtlon m Canadtan prMe 
cogNrabont. nW octax and perttok) 
mraslinffu. Our him gKOalzes n 
granting maugmst wd slmnktki 
ovevc« finhn um & spKic 
icgubmeo of (Mnsas cmths 
F a fflOY tfonr aBun . ptoasr corud. 

L GimiM CJLJUA (UJL) 

Ftoc Caedi (416) 9S»)r83 
E4M: grunmldtiKVxi 


•U. & CDRP SEEKS m togonal kmai- 
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ov tor Northern Bnme, n denlop an- 
enures eiih riuja depamiM shm jt- 
mdy comacied by la. Capiial of me- 
inn USS SOdOO 6 neotod. M pnAs 
rar sufetontlal. For mfoRiutai [Mse 
bx 431 TD 3S5 4967 NL 


Capita! Avaiiabte 


Amolo ambkicam.Ckouf 
.rue — 


BUSNEBS CONNECTIONS 
NEW YORK CnY4LSA 
LOOiWG R3R HBCHANDtSE, 
Aroqon. Rnaanaioi. Bi:^ We g 
212.7176852 USA 


US COVANY pedenng to a Grow 
sadished 30 yen ago, «■ souce al 
^ gf manutatiurM goodt and 
msaridi tor a imdea conireaDa 
Brasvii (USAi. Ire lUtainli TN- 
1305)374028. Fa I3Q5)374«1» 
E-Mtf ittamScanetinei 


PRCUECT FINANCE 
VENTURE CAPITAL 
GLOBAL COVERAGE 
NO MAXIMUM 
BROKERS WELCOME 
ftr Q gpaale Bc ochoa rt 

MORlBbOl Mk 
T«t 444 1334 201 366 
Far «44 1S24 301 377 
You ve veorne to van ua. 


YOUR OFFICE H THE CARIBBEAN 
Fvi phone, donde to Ow CefeOeatv 
Peaonai and nrfdaiBi sam. 
Odiei ladle 2214060 


CAPITAL CORP. 


MLA 

CopaaiB Rnaican 
Vetum CapiM 
rAMMel 


2NO PA^PORTS. Via hee « 
banioig hacK door 10 Spam 4 EU 
Ajmii an ntooia Td 37Z 50883136. 
Fax 972 4 8667029 a E^' 
<Ba8spat8paaspatdft.a> 


Tel: O0t-407'24M360 


Fax; 001-4{I7-248^)037 USA 


YOUR OFFIK n MANHATTAN 
Sih Ave. mal haaSng. inMuti 
Kiaphatv toe 4 trsislenia lax, emad. 
Tto. 1-2124134199 FV 1-212421-958 


GLOBAL PROJECT RMPW6 
VENTURE CAPITAL-JOINT VENURES 
-PROJECT RNANCING 


YOUR OFFICE W QUBOH. Senteed Ql- 
ftoes. Uai. Phore & Fax. Olfem Co 
Formalin. PnsNtous Afidreu Tat 
*353 111 475 lesi hr (1) 475 1889 


HAUNG LISTS by Serge 4 Cortooiy 
Einpaan buelnees md conemr dan 
Tet -M 1312262998 Pal 44 1312267901 


Tab 444 113 8787 560 
Fac 444 113 2727 580 
Feea are ro requested priorto 
ar der ri hnfeig being nade 


NEED euBpoi n Em^Guanaa? Fv H 
Fex'Ehiail our U&AsWl pros to Betin 
OM 30 85422B9lMuBcDmM«ve com 


SECOND PASSPORT 
Pne toto enet 
PASSPORTBmFREECQM 


YOUR omCE IN LONDON 
Bora Snei • Mal none. Far Teto* 
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flREVOCABlE BANK 
FE8P0NSBLE FUKNNG 
ASAMST SlVTABLE GUARANTEE 
■NMUM USStOJMOjOOO 
TYPICAL COST 5^ 

LESS CN UUKER AMOUNTS 
NORSXDajYERY 
RORMEETWGFAX 
444 101171 470 7205 


Tax Services 


COMPUTE YOUR Ud. INCOME TAX 
eidiBlon. on edensai hied isiu ov 
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E-mal KLAflINCPARiaiKdper com or 
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Rx InnsbhM PmgranK 
nori ri Rnto Avstafiie 


Tfniffi AosurK Kokins ai 

Seen US 8 Euopean Bar* 


Eumpean Bar*s 
IK (212) 758-1221 
Broken tnvied 
rv. NY 10152 USA 


EXPAT nCOME TAX USTS. Inc 
Rehns an! mlaM semees ^ Rol 
- 33 10) t 4413 8944 FS 4563 2496' 

uiraan t44 nt m 7s SOB 


*ninrBiATE s unuuhed " 
Capkai arabrie fci 

ALL Eunaisaoia^ 

UK U.S Si rnTno nex. 


hfl CndiQ 

(717) 397-74W lUS F/«l 
f6|ttomn&[eeon.ooni Oneiwo 


CQIUePCtAL INTI BANKM LTD 


CREDfT 

KFO; FAX -.30 t 32 43 527 


Wanted 


LOAN OF USS100 MllIION wuned 
prmie ta* guawiy ta ONE 

^R ID W-<JP hydal pow piara ^ 
"10*4, Tgffai .a (ft 4 50 5i 23 27* 
IO 16 80 718 754 


commercial FUNDING 
FOR AU. PROJECTS WORLOWDE 
VerTtomEddv Capkn 
Buates&^erm Leons 

W +44 iOillS 942 7846 


MMETWAL/BUSIKESS FMANCE 
todtoiw tor any vtgM rmeds miU- 
; ag _^x i>nai synopse to Enriim 10 
Corporate Advancae (-.H^iJTa^iaoo 


LOANS 860 000 TO 810 mm o u 


[CANADA IMMIGRATIONi 



IJ\W OFFICES OF COLIN R. SINGER, AHorncy 

Si, <'. l!;, r.iii SI V.I .1 i "N 

MiiiiSn-.il, H' ■- 1 II V 1 I ' ' HI-' 1 1 ‘ -.I.'. ■ ' - -.rjr 


Canada's tearSnginUmet law firm* 
World Wide Web Site: http:/^www.singar,c«/ 


BUSINESS OPPS 


I’lisirn's-s. Opportiinilv 


(Graniu betery in Latin America) 


Mou Dudon ii]dare> ID LaDD .Ainaicj. SUM of lbs aiw K-Jhoplrai' and BKhiDai. It iih 
ijtt axaapns L'SS5 mUIuD/V'taL aitb die pKsbilitx' m DUiua-« iTvm tM.'SS''!5 nil- 
IkiL m ibhK Vxwe. ia aiMrprise gearnl for Iwh die UonkNk' arid exi«n nutlin-. 
Livaml elne to i^uniws and iiuiii peel Ciciliiie». dK loJosin ivtvemes m aaimv 
tune mo cut and polisbed Jabs, (ilex anJciiMx^ize maierialt uf die hiphefl ipiatax. all 
len ikaratileiDilKL‘.S.A.Eigi.peiuidEaaiaDD»rkeb 'Tbecvnpm^ itosa«g*»icr\ 
in lito U SA. »hicii dhlribiiles us pniJKis iteniphimi Ncnb .AneiKa Wg cnadtf 
1^ over offer for L'SS lO mlbra oiu' . due 10 Ji« enil'icatifla i.4 die pnucqoi s acDM- 
h'. Sdnie ftnanciilg mmlaNe. Ideal oppMUnitv for mve^r niihine ut e\paid iiK). 
BID a pcJiiioilv' stable crain KidtsTHdecmiiiiv andamiii {mteoiLd. 


lmrlraeJI*'nlt|il!e|kll1^f^.*hlHUo^Jfe»^>lh^Ulnr^t" -Bl5INESSOPPOKR'Nm'~ 

c.j.^ei.MU vr,».s n aim 1 xtt — 


INCORPORATE 


Protoct Ybur Ptreonal Aateia 
tocorpema m any siaia nriudng 
Detomm. Nsmla 4 Wyommg 
LLCTa iLmad Labtoy Compantosi 
In aa tofla as 48 haws 

CorpoTite Agents, Inc. 

FU Olfil 998-7078 
CenmuSsn* ISO INC 
hasJ'aMKComecuia eem 


302-998-0598 


UNUIITB) CAPITAL 

FOR PROJECTS 
M APPROVED COUfTRIES 
Rjndng tf Bank Guaiartees and 
Other nmai inarmiati 
Lues ri OtoS «B IMatiKe ScEutas 
llia.nOMHsnUSD,ltollB. 


ALSa ASK ABOUT THE 
SniinCANT CONTRACia 
REIURNS AVAILABLE 
FOR PARIKPATnil IN OC POOL 
.lfo»llllmUSD.NDlla& 


hmmriioMl Fuidhg SrivimB, Ik 
1-804{e0-4646 Ear 14042004647 
Wilr mwA-og 
EAbi hntitqOfeuig 


PROJECT RNANCING 

vmnCtohri-jDnVtoeifes- 

No Itadnun - Bmton PtotoctadL 


fUL INTERNATIONAL 
Tel: 001-242^1649 
Rk 0l}1-7t6-77»92l)Q 


UNLIMITED HTL FUNDM6 f LCMNS 
(Gommmaai pnlM Arance - siait-iip. 
dentaiiiient) migi Prm Irienaunil 
Euepm FtoancMi Sowixa To tomee 


you pnijeri / laquan to ». CROWN 
INST. toe. via tor + ZOSj^en lUSAi 


Financld Services 


FUNDING PROBLEMS? 


tor 

saunoNS' 

Conari 


BANCOR 

OF ASM 


rareeet Id smn htodtog 
vtotto tniecn 


VBmiRE CAPrTAL 
EQUrmOANS 
REAL ESTATE 


Lmg tem oolaieiBl 
Swporad Guannees 


Fac ^8108284 

TW: {$3^684^ 


(Conimation ewned Orff igxn RmAigi 
Bntaf ConvMBiii Araumd 


WORLD WIDE FINANCING 


‘Conmndal Moioages 
*VMm CapU^ 
*810011 Loms 
*P ra|Kt hnifeig 
*UBmefCriA 
'Aceounts RKahable f^mndng 
*Pifiratt PbeenwA 
*PuHlc Sheila 


Tel: (212) 75M242 
Fax; (212) 758-1221 


Waicame 

375 Park Ave., NY. NV lOtSS USA 


Rehnato Roaner 
Soneunes Reqnd. 


FINANCUL GUARANTEES 

totonnee / Reinuenx bar fe ti 
guaianto br quBMed 

htoMS praiBcb. 

Tet S0l-!l9S3iSS 
Far 561-9993226 USA 
"MhcoptivnittieiaiLnai 


U.S. DOllJkRS AVAILABLE 


FINANCING AND BANKABLE 
GdtoantKa tor vtobto pnjede, SIM 
toVtonuni FAX bunuse sunmm 10 
hMURM BaritoQ, 214442^070 Q8A 
Samu nq^ ^ bmieis aaeoM 


CAM Ltd 


& 

Dominica 


• financial 

- residential 

* rental services 

- Onshore Packages 
(government introduclinos, 
Travel documents. 




phone -14131 7511765 
tax -fdlJl 7510631 


aUYBIS NEW Lcra. one )•». tto 130 
banks 10 SiOODU 0 Uciareti 
*1-714440-3444 


Rnandal Investments 


■ ';5r. -I^Ka-' i-sd’" 

.w^war trfc 

if St 

‘S 

t i'V 'frf* 

■C, Jut iRMa *^'W Wiesai 
itv .w ^ f H# 


BffORE SENDNG UPFRONT ffiES. 
to gel a loan or a bani guaane^ 
Iw oir bee dDcuranatai 
PAX 1 305 754 641S. REF. HT 3 


Diamonds 


ROUGH DIMIONDS. Wa «B R» fSan 
ash tar gem gimiv. Ahtsn onw 
Mtine ony 954 474-3B66 USA 


j j-fc-r 

Mm 

■F t . -"frfr-tr-^xxa 'aseiair 




Senticed Offices 


YOUR OFFICE IN PARIS 


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>1 Beijing Warns 
Tokyo Not to 
Rock Region 
With U.S. Pact 


r ■ mplnl (n* I'W ihgf Ftr-mCnapuh Ai'x 

BEUING — China told Japan on 
Tuesday to “team fhe lessons of his- 
lor}'” tUid to -avoid destabilizing the 
.Asla-Pacific region as it raises its mil- 
itary profile and strengthens a security 
alliance with the Unitra States. ' 
Washington and Tokyo have un- 
veiled plans to revamp their strategic 
relationship and widen potential mil- 
liaiy cot^ration — always a hi^ly 
sensitive issue for China, which 
suffered greatly from Japanese aggres- 
sion in the 1930s and 40s. 

The new* security alliance "should 
not overstep the two sides' boundaries, 
nor destabilize the two countries' neigh- 
bors," a Foreign Nlinisny spokesman, 
Cui Tiankai. said Tuesday at a news 
conference. ‘Tt should not complicate 
matters of r^ional security." 

Japan sent diplomats to Beijing on 
Sunday to cry to ease Chinese fears 
about proposed changes that could re- 
sult in Japan's aiding U.S. forces in the 
event of a regional conflict 
The new guidelines do not include a 
combat role for Japanese troops, but 
could lead to Japan deploying mine- 
sweepers outside combat areas or re- 
pairing U.S. planes and ships. 


i.'W] 1.1,1 


international herald TRIBLINE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


PAGE 5 






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T>u|MUBi NtiMifei«w'nic AmvimrI Prrv. 


A LEVEL-HEADED VISIT — Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto of Japan, right, telling Boris 
Nemtsov, Russia's first deputy prime minister, in Tokyo on Tuesday that he likes t^l guests to sit down. 


Japanese government officials say 
they cannot define the specific geo- 
^phical area where such region^ con- 
tingencies could take place. 

"It's qnite difflcult to draw a very 
clear line,'* a Japanese Foreign Ministry 
official said Monday. "How far — 


BRIEFLY 


1.600 kilometers or 1300 kilometers? 
We don't know," 

Jap^ has said r^»atedly that the 
guidelines are not aimed at any par- 
ticular country. China would not want 
Japan helpmg U.S. forces during a con- 
flict over Taiwan. 


PhilinninJ*^ nn^ ^Sw»tMn/%Tdi involving iniipino workers in Sing^re would be handled 

r UfUl outgapore quickly and would involve Filipino officials. (AP) 

Mot^JohnproveB^laUomhip Rd^hPuthlnU, Sri Lanka 


MANILA — The Philippines and Singapore signed a 
series of agreements on Tuesday aimed at improving re- 
lations that were strained by the hanging of a Filipino maid 
two years ago. 

"We have not only mended dte tear in *e fabric of 
friendship, we have also nurtured a new climate of mutual 


COLOMBO — Nearly 500 Tamil rebels pushed into 
^vemmeni-held territory in northern Sri Lanka on Tuesday 
in a fierce batde that forced Sri Lankan troops to retreaL 
The batde was a setback for tl^ government troops, who 
had been able to advance just 10 miles (6 kilometers) into 


trust." P^ident Fidel Ramos of the Philippines said after a the north since mid-May, when they opened an offensive to 
meeting with Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong of Singapore, capture a 55-mile stretch of highway. They are trying to 
Mr. Goh said his visit, originally set for 1995, was open a road link to the government-controlled Jaflria Pen- 
intended to “make up for lost time" after the furor over iosula, now accessible only by air and sea. (AP) 

Singapore's execution of the maid. Flor CootenipJacioiL «-r « n « 

Both leaders agr^ that it was time for their countries to put JfOT tilB JxCCOTu 
the incident behind them and renew ties. 

Miss Contemplacion was convicted of killing another At least 10 people, including two ethnic activists and two 

Filipino maid and her4*year-old Singaporean ward in 1991 . Sunni Muslim militants, were ^ed ina surge of violence In 

Pakistan, the police in Karachi said Tuesday. fRemers) 


Many people in the. Philippines believed that she was not Pakistan, the police in Karachi said Tuesday, 
guilty, ar)d mass protests forced the government to witb- 


guiliy, ar)d mass protests forced the govenunenr to with- 
drau its ambassador from Singjqrare, which responded by 
doing the same. 

Mr. Gob said he assured Mr. Ramos that future problems 


Separatist guerrillas killed 18 Indian soldiers and 
wounded 10 otiiers in an ambush 'Hiesday in the remote 
northeastern state of Tripura, the police sa^ (Reuters i 


Many East Asian countries, u’hich 
were devastated by the Japanese mil- 
itary in World War II. also are uneasy 
about the prospect of a militarily re- 
surgent Japan. ‘ 

"Japan's political inclinations to- 
ward its .Asian neighbors create an es- 
pecially sensitive issue." Mr. Cui said. 
"We hope that Japan will learn the 
lessons of history, limit its military 
activities and follow the path of peace 
and stability." 

Last week defense policymakers 
from Japan's governing Liberal Demo- 
cratic l^rty briefed the Chinese foreign 
minister. Qian Qichen. on the U.S.-Ja- 
pan defense plans. 

Japanese diplomats said a senior of- 
ficial from the Foreign Ministry in 
Tokyo visited Beijing on Sunday and 
Monday to e.xplain tM plans to their 
counterparts in the Chinese government 
and the People's Liberation Army. 

Officials were al^ sent to brief the 
government in Seoul. 

The South Korean Foreign Muusiry 
said Monday it would not tolftrate Jap- 
anese troops on its soil and d»nanded to 
know the details of the new pact 

Foreign Minister Yukihiko Dceda of 
Japan said Tuesday that Tokyo would 
follow up the missions to C^ina and 
South Korea bv briefing other Asian 
nations. Officials from washin«iOD are 
expected to visit China to brief leaders 
on the new alliance, but U.S. diplomats 
in Beijing said it was not yet clear when 
they would arrive. (AP, Reuters, AFP) 




Supercomputer Sales: 
Fears Arise Over China 


By Jeff Gertb 

Nt'w t'Vl Tiwi-' .S, n‘n« 

WASHINGTON — Since President 
Bill Clinton deregulated the export of 
computers in 1995, China has bought 46 
American-made supercomputers and 
many more that are nearly as powerful, 
according to government officials. 

The newly acquired computers could 
be used by the Chinese to design more 
efficient or lighter nuclear warheads 
that could be put on missiles capable of 
reaching the United States, ,U.S. of- 
ficials and nuclear experts said. 

Several officials said they had sus- 
picions — but nod'ireci evidence — ihai 
China was asing the powerful com- 
puters for this putpose. 

Clinton administration officials who 
defend the 1995 policy said they be- 
lieved that the civilian purchasers in 
China were making sure the equipment 
was not diverted to mUiiary uses. 

Gary Samore, the senior director for 
nonproliferation and export control at 
the National Security Council, said: 
"We don't have any information that 
these computers are being used by the 
Chinese for militar)' purposes, includ- 
ing nuclear weapons.'^ 

At the same rime, Mr. Samore said, 
there are no formal military or intel- 
ligence investigations of that question, 
llte government's knowledge, he said, 
is drawn largely from the computer 
companies. 

There are disagreements among U.S. 
officials atoui the importance of the 
Chinese purchases of supercomputers. 
But Gary Milhollin. a nuclear expert in 
the private sector, said of the 46 su- 
percomputers. "For the first rime these 
give China access to a larger number of 
computers in this range, and that's a big 
jump for the Chinese.’* 

The supercomputers sold to China 
would allow the countn* to improve its 
nuclear weapons significantly by pro- 
cessing huge amounts of data from tiny 
underground nuclear weapons rests. 
These" tests are currently banned by in- 
temationai treaty but the higb-p>erfor- 
mance computers would allow Ute 
Chinese to conduct weapons tests with 
explosions so small that they would be 
undetectable b}' outsiders, according to 
U.S. government officials. 

Under the 1995 policy, most super- 
computers sold for civilian purposes do 
not need to be licensed for export by the 
federal government. Exporters con- 
sequently cannot be required to crack 
how they are used. 

The disclosure earlier this year that 
American companies had sold super- 
computers to two Russian nuclear fa- 


cilities prompted Congress to ask for an ! 
accounting of how many had been sold 
to other countries. 

At the lime, the Republican chairman 
and the ranking Democrat on the House 
National Security Committee asked the 
president to "refrain from further" de- 
regulation of supercomputer exports 
and ro reassess the national security 
risks of allowing e.xponers to decide 
who mav huv supercomputers. 

"We’thii^ many of the supercom- 
puters sold to China are being integrated 
into the military weapons development 
area in a way that is going to make their 
weapons more sophisticated and lethal 
and this could jeopardize our own na- 
tional securit^• interests." said Senator 
Thad Cochran, Republican of Missis- 
sippi. the chauman of a Senate sub- 
committee overseeing the issue. 

Clinton administration officials said 
they were satisfied uith deregulation. 
They argued that it would be nearly im- 
possible fi»r the United States effectively 
to prex'ent the Chinese fiom obtaining 
these computers from other sources. 

The Commerce Department has been 
investigaiina last year's sale by Silicon 
Graphics of a supercomputer that per- 
forms almost 6 billion operations a 
second, operating at 10 times ihe speed 
of the fastest personal computer, lo a 
Chinese science academy. 

TTie company says the buyer is a be- 
nign civilian instinition. but according to 
nuclear experts, the academy has other 
functions, including helping China de- 
velop long-range missiles. The Justice 
Deplutment is also investigating another 
Silicon Graphics supercomputer sale in 
1996. to a Russian research institute that 
also seiv'e.s as a nuclear weapons lab- 
oratory. the officials said. 

"One reason I ran for president was 
to tailor e.vpon controls to the realities 
of a post-Coid War world." Mr. Clinton 
wrote in a September 1993 letter to 
Edward McCracken, the chief executive 
officer of Silicon Graphics. 

In his 1992 campaign. Mr. Clinton 
received important political support 
from executives of high-technology 
companies, including Mr. McCracken. 

"nte undersecretary of commerce for 
export administration. William 
Reinsch. said the depianmem was in- 
vestigating some cases of unlicensed 
export of supercomputers to China and 
Russia, which could uncover more in- 
formation about how the computers are 
being used. But he insisted the relax- 
ation of controls was a realistic solution 
since rapid changes in the flexibility and 
availability of computer technology 
make it easy for purchasers to circum- 
vent controls. 










Bucharest, October 29 ft 30, 1 997 

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President Emil Consianiinescu will give the opening keynote address of the 
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V\r,E 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY; JUNE 11, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 



wm 


Brazzaville Fight Rages 
As Foreigners Fly Out 

FrendiKei^Rimux^ Open for Evacuation 


Aiietuv Frtmi'cPfvui/ 

K[NSHASA, Congo — Congolese 
Army troops fought opposition milida- 
men for a sUth straight day Tuesday in 
.Brazzaville, Congo Republic, as hun- 
dreds of foreign nationals left the c^tal 
a French miliiaiy spokesman said Thes- 
day. 

Major Alexis Jarraud, contacted by 
telephone, said that French forces were 
stniioned at Brazzaville .airport, 50 
meters away from die new clashes, 

KENYA: 

Battle Over Reform 

Continued fh>ni Page 1 

cutes and charity directors to caU not 
only for a new consiirarion, but also for 
the repeal of colonial-era laws giving the 
government sweeping powers to detain 
people, break up demonstrations and 
huniss opposition groups. 

tDpposition politicians who have joined 
tlic reform moveinent have long com- 
■ plained that the eiwtoral rales under the 
constitution give them almost no chance 
of winning an election against Mr. Moi. 

*nie constitution requires a president 
to gamer at least a quarter of the vote in 
five of Kenya's eight districts. This di- 
lutes the power of the two largest tribes 
— the Luo and tiie Kikuyu — who are 
concentrated, in two heavily populated 
districts. The election rules also do not 
require a president to get a majority of 
the votes cast, which means a member of 
a minority tribe like Mr. Moi can win as 
long as he hammers together a plurality 
of smaller groups. 

The reformers have been pushing for 
an amendment that would require a win- 
ning candidaie'to get at least half of all 
the votes cast, wmch would help can- 
didates from the laiger tribes. 

The opposition ^o wants the con- 
stitution to allow for coalition govern- 
ments. Kenya has a winner-take-all sys- 
tem. giving Mr. Moi all the cabinet seats 
and power even though his party can at 
bvr-si win only atout 40 percent of the 
vote. A change would open the door for 
other opposition leaders who cannot 
ii majority to form a government with 
oiher opposition parties. 

On May .^1. Mr. Moi showed he was 
willing- to take a hard line against the 
reformers. Riot policemen crushed a 
protest by about 1 .000 people with tear 
gas and rubber bullets, setting off two 
Jii} of looting and unrest. 

On June I . he promised to consider 
repealing the Public Order Act. which 


alliiws troops to use force to break up 
unlicensed protests. But even as he made 
the announcement, his anny kept several 
opposition leaders, who had promised a 
second protest, under house arrest. 

"It's going to be a very rough sum- 
mer." a diplomat said. 


which followed an overnight lull. 

In a telephone conversaaon with 
Agence France^Plesse in Kinshasa, dur- 
ing which die' sound of gunfire was 
clearly audible in the background, he 
added that combat troops were 
f^ashnikov assault rifles. 

A Congolese radio journalist also said 
that fightii^ was continuii^ in the center 
of the capital at around 2:30 P.M. 

*'It has calmed down a little, but there 
is still sporadic fating," the journalist 
added. 

Supporters of the opposition strong- 
man, Denis Sassoo-Nguesso, mean- 
while, asserted that Congolese govern- 
ment forces were canyiog out “ethnic 
cleansing" and said diat hundreds of 
bodies were piling up in Btazzavtlle. 

* ‘The bodi^ are being counted by the 
hundred," General Sassou-Nguesso's 
supporters said in a stacement broadcast 
over a radio station controiled by the 
opposition mili tia. 

llie statement also claimed the gov- 
ernment forces were bound to be de- 
fear^ saying the opposition militia con- 
trolled large parts of the capital, 
including the seat of government. 

M%jor Jarraud said that since Monday, 
about 700 foreigners, mostly French, 
had been flown out to Utaeville, Ga- 
bon. 

France, the former colonial power, 
sent hundreds of troops to Braaaville on 
Monday, but offidals emphasized that 
they bad been sent to protect French and 
otiier foreign natioous and would not 
intervene in the rioting. 

By Tuesday night, £e French troops 
were all expected to be in place, bol- 
stering die French force there to more 
than l,200-soldier5. 

Major Jarraud sdd the French troops 
were not being attacked: "We are not 
targeted. They are firing at each other." 

The major added: "The soldiers are 










French soldiers at the Brazzaville airport, which they are keeping t^en. 
for the evacuation of foreigners. France has sent LJOO soldiers. 


protecting the turport. We are managing 
to keep die runway safe for takeoffs/* 

The Ofg^ization of Afiican Unity 
called Tuoday for an immediate cease- 
fire in Brazzaville, saying the situation 
bad deteriorated. 

French tro<^ have resumed ^upiog 
expatriates in safe areas in Braaaviue, a 
ta^ that was abudoned after a French 
officer was killed and five were 
wounded Saturday. 


The Congolese government tried 
Tuesday to reassure foreign in 

Brazzaville, "eqiedally the French," 
and insisted in a statement read on the 
radio tiiat there was no xenophobia in tile 
coital. 

Casualties ^ civilian and militaiy ^ 
are expected to be high, but so for the 
violeare has prohibit^ medical and hu- 
manitarian worlreis from venturing 'into 
the streets. 


M Tennis 

m * • *- '"l " ' 

CoDtm^ 


T . . T J • . . 


Petrie’s for BidfoEa^ -Nipd-. 

aighes tiiat a cur- . 
rent law- aD^fCoasdtnthTnal refoieo^ 
dumsifpetific^ieii cofiect die. signatures' 
of 4 milnoi^^^^, or It paceit-^ ^ 
roistered. v^^l.liie.gEp^says.iz has 
amassB^ti naKSm signatures 

But the St^neme Cburt 

ruled fiiftt ftck^alh^'clian^ only to 
local msLngthj^-siantt^^not to the 
natiomi cbidsti^idB. It xahl :ihe Com- 
mis a^ acc^ 

Under con^tutioa ap- 
proved in 198^ president is lirniied 

to a single ;n}^^.tenn..Sen 2 h 6 rs can 
serve s of two six-yeaf tehns. 

compared to tiim ibrefr<year tenns 
memben of .-AC^Hbuse of Riepiesen- 
tatives. . 'Sr,;- . 

The lmitswece:tGq>o^ after the 20- 
yeai rale Fetdiaand' Marcos- in . an 
effort fo avoid ih£ire dictatins. 

Under Mr. Ramos, elected in 1992, 
tiie Philippines has made significant 
snides reward political and economic 
stability. Mr. Ramos dei^plated major 
industries and opaied np the economy re 
foreign competitioB. 

The refeums increased (xoniomic 
growth by 6.8 percent in 1996. up from 
0.34 perc^tin 1991. 

The move to chai^ the constitution 
has been rmposed by the inflnential Ro- 
man Calbouc. Chuntii, many business- 
men and political' opponents of the 
Ramos administraiioiL 

Tuesday’s decision "settles once and 
forall the nnaetrling querikm of wlitic^ 
stabilx^ in the Philippines.'' 1^. San- 
tiago said. Besides b&g a presidential 
comender. she is cbaiiwbaian of tiie 
Senate committee on constitutional 
amendment 

"It’s instant death Ramos and a 
mad scramble for 1998," said Nelson 
Navajero, a political analyst. . 

The fractious opposition paities may 

have a hard hariring one nanrfiHata 

to rqilace Mr. Ramos. (AP, Reuters) 


Sierra Leone Junta Denies It Wants Libyan Military Aid 


TraifaW Ar dto rn « MfuMn 

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone — The 
military junta hinted Tuesd^ at a crack- 
down on the press as it sou^t to counter 
repots that it had turned to Libya for 
military support. 

Declarations read on state-run radio 
also threatened merchants with "strin- 
gent measures" if they did not control 
prices of food and other necessities. 
Prices have soared since, tte May 25 
military coup. 

Sixteen days after soldiers overthrew 
President Ahmed Tejan Kabbah's civil- 
ian govenunem. little has changed in tte 
capital- Civil servants and otii^ refuse 
to go to work, either unable to get there 
for lack of transport or staying away from 
their jobs to protest the coup. 

The self-proclaimed hc^ of state, 


Major Johnny Paul Koromah, had 
thr^tened mass dismissals if people dui 
not return to woik Monday, tot there 
was no sign that his warnings had any 
effect 

Banks and government ofiices were 
closed again Tues^. The few shops that 
(^lened had long line of cnsiomeis eager 
to buy what littie tfa^ could affcml 

The junta also dismissed as a ‘'blatant 
lie" an allegation that it would have 
stepped down in exchange for payment, 
a spokesman said Tuesday. The spokes- 
man said the envoy who made the ac- 
cusation had been dismissed. 

"This is just an atiempt to confuse 
people," a junta spokennan said of re- 
manu made Mon^y by Sierra Leone's 
representative to tto United N^ons, 
James Jonah. 


hfr. Jonab had alleged at a press con- gone to 
ferenoe that a p^off had been airan^ fiota Mr 
as part of a U.S.- and Britidi-brokCTed Storie 
agreement that foil apan afto: the mil- ters mus 
iiaiy’s new rebel allies rgected it .ptqn^ 

'‘This is an imagination by J(Muh in a rotming 
bid to keep his job, but the people of A dd 
Sierra Leone are boiond to see mrou^ Sundayi 
the ploy/* the spokesman said. its uei^ 

Mr. Jonah "Im DO business speaking laJe'Diei 
for Sierra Leone at the UN,* ’ the spokes- sway nd 
man continued, adding thu he had been port for 
replaced by his'deputy.Hotobah During, assault n 
The spokesmans^ that the ambassador power, 
to the Uoiied States, John Leig^ had Fears 
been replaced as weU. the ooe 

In its broadcast. Major Koromah’s the lack 
Aimed Foxes Revoluhonaiy Council Most re 
denounced a local newspaper’s leiport fitting 
Monday that a council delegation nad ' people. 


gone to Libya to seek miEtaiy backing 
fr^ Moanmar Gadhafi. 

Stories on "such sensitive state mat- 
ters must be cross-checked witii foe ^ 
.ptqniate anthofities to avoid misin- 
romung tiie publu^" the radio sa'id. ' 

A delegation visited Ivory Coast on 
Sunday re tty to drum up suppm among 
its DcighboiB and was expect in Ghana 
late 'Diesday. The goal of foe tour was re 
sway neighboring countries against sup- 
port for another Nigerian-led railiiaiy 
assault re remove Major Koromah from : 
power. 

Fears of a Nigerian attack similar to 
the one of June 2 have contributed to 


(AP.AFP) 


BRIEFLY 


Tur^ ArePhmning 
Iraq Security Zone 

DIYARBAKIR. Tiiriwy — The 
Turkish Army plans to set up ..a 
‘*secimty none’- iii- oorfoem Iraa 
where ft has been hoaiing Kurdish 
separatist rebels for a monfo. a eiu- 
itaiy source said here Tuesday in 
soudieasiem Turkey. . v 

"Thearmy will riot pull out before 
• creating a security zone in the north 
. of.Iraq to.fuev^ tiie return of ter- 
rorists in foie region.'fr’Mn which ibey 
will ‘ have b^ dislodged,'* foe 
source said on condition of anooyre- 
ity. He was reforring to membecs of 
the Kurdistan Woreers Party who 
have bett fighting since 19S4 to. 

create a KnidUh homeiaod in 'Turkey 
and . Iraq. More' than 25,000 people 
have died in tfaie c<»tfliet since foeri. 

The source said the iumy would 
set im foe buffer zone with an allied 
IraqiKuidlsh faction, the Kurdistan 
Democratic Party led by Massoud 
Baizani. (AFP) 

Algeria Clears Why 
ForNewCkwenunent 

ALGIERS' — . The government 
resigned Tuesday, as expected, in 
response to foe dections last week 
drat yielded die couutiy’s first mul- 
tiparty ParliamenL 

Prudent Liamine Zeroiiai ac- 
cepted the resi^iatiotts of Prime 
Muifeter Ahmed Ouyahia and his 
cAinet, Mr. Zeroual's office said, 

. but Mr. Quydhia was adted to stay 
on in a carmaker capacity. 

The election was the first for the 
Nation^ People’s Assembly since 
the sulitazy caneded an eleraon in 
19^ that the Islamic Salvation 
Pnmt was poised to win^ triggeriM 
a civil war in which abran 60,000 
pet^le have died (^P) 

Canada Expulsions 
Are Badced in Chile 

SANTIAGO — CSiiie has no ob- 
jection to to Canada to expel 
about 2,000 Cbiieans who falsely 
ciftintM political asyinm, tto foreign 

minietw aniH ratting foeiT Haims of 

posecotion "ridioilous." 

; Jose Miguel Insulm said Monday 
the thousands of Chileans who gone 
to ranada in and 19% de- 
manding political asylum so they 
could stay and work had damagto 
Chile's intcmatirmal reputation. 

Canada, which ti^tened up visa 
requiremeiits for Chileans Last year 
in the face of the influx, says h 
already has deported "several hun- 
dred" people whose asylum claims 
it Sound to bo false. About 2,000 
more are awaiting rulings on ifaeu' 
claims, Mr. Insulm said 

"Tlte logical dung is to depon 
them aU, because they entered 
Canada under false pretenses,** he 
said (Reuters) 


THE INTERMARKET 


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Personals 


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11*9 kiM n oKel 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY’, JUNE 11, 1997 


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EUROPE 


Moscow^ s Ambitious Mayor Finds a New Way to Network 



BRIEFLY 


By Alessandra Stanley 

NrH‘ York Tui)t.s Ser^'icr 

MOSCOW — A new Russian tele- 
vision network has made its debut on the 
airwaves, and while much of its pro* 
granuning — news shows, popular old 
Soviet movies and Latin American soap 
ope^ — is routine, its financial and 
political backing are noL 

The network. Center TV, is owned 
ssnA ojserated 1:^ the ciQr of Moscow, and 
its main goal is to spread the image of 
Moscow's powerful mayor, Yuri 
Luzhkov, across Russia. 

‘^ere is no independent televi- 
sion,” the new director of Center TV. 
Anatoli Lysenko, a well-known pro- 
ducer, told reporters. “It is a politicized 
business.” 

Mr. Lysenko said he would support 
Mr. Luzhkov if he decided to run for 
president in the year 2000. 

As his new interest in television pro- 
gramming suggests, Mr. Luzhkov, 60, 
seems to have m^e up his mind 
already. 

So far. Center TV, which took over 


. I 


the signals of two poorly rated local 
stations, only broadcasts in the Moscow 
region and Ryazan, 180 kilometers 1 1 IS 
miles) away. . 

But the network hopes to expand its 
rwge throughout much of central Rus- 
sia by ^tember, when Moscow cel- 
ebrates its 8S0th anniveisaiy — a multi- 
million-dollar extrava gant that will 
also serve as a showcase for the may- 
or. 

The networic is merely the most am- 
bitious of a series of recent moves by 
Mr. Luzhkov to position himself to re- 
. place President Boris Yeltsin. It is the 
most visible sign yet that the Russian 
presidential campaign has already be- 
gun. 

Mr. Yeltsin won re-election a year 
ago, mostly with the help of the two 
majtx* networks, ORT, in which the state 
retains a SI percent stake, and the 
privately owned netwoik N^. Center 
TV is the mayor's attempt to coun- 
terbalance the rival networks that are 
unlikely to support his early insurrec- 
tion against the powers that be in the 
Kremlin. 


The other main politician openly 
flaunting his presidential ambitions is 
Alexander Lebed, the popular former 
ganeral and nationalist who served 
briefly as national security adviser be- 
fore being ousted for insubordination. 

The energetic, iron-willed Mr. 
Luzhkov won re-election last summer 
with 90 percent of the vote. He is a 
democrat, and has almost always sided 
with Mr. V eltsin against his Communist 
and extreme-nationalist opposition. He 
has been an autocratic ruler of Moscow, 
demanding the fealty of the banks and 
companies that do business in the cap- 
itaL But as a politician, he is a populist 
who loudly differs with the president on 
issues that have gut appeal to the vast 
majority of Russians. 

Last month, when Mr. Yeltsin 
traveled to Kiev to sign an agreement 
with Ukraine that would recognizB 
Ukraine's sovereignty in Criii^ Mr. 
Luzhkov was harshly critical. He in- 
sisted that Sevastopol, the Crimean cap- 
ittti, must remain a Russian city, even 
though it was formally handed over to 
Ukraine in 1954. 


Mr. Luzhkov even traveled to 
Sevastopol this spring and held an anti- 
Ukraine rally for erhnic Russians living 
there. 

The mayor has also lashed out at the 
new economic reforms being ushered in 
by D^uty lYime Minister Anatoli 
(Rubais and his ally Boris Nemtsov. 

The new reform team in the Russian 
government wants to try to cut back the 
S17 billion a year it spends'subsidizing 
rents and utilities — which eats up 30 
p^ent of the state budget. Most Rus- 
sian housing still operates Soviet-style, 
with tenants spending on average only 6 
percent of (heir income on household 
expenses. 

In April, the government issued a 
decree that would oblige residents of 
government-owned buildings to pay 
Too percent of their housing costs by the 
year 2003. The government promises to 
continue and expand subsidies to the 
poor, but the entire program, if carried 
out, promises to turn Russia’s bousing 
ma^et upside down. 

it is not a popular reform. 

In fact, Moscow has been annually 


raising charges for utilities, including 
the telephone. But last week, Mr. 
Luzhkov won a significant concession 
from Mr. Yeltsin, who promised to al- 
low Moscow 10 introduce its own ver- 
sion of housing reform; The first rent 
increases would not take effect until 
after the year 2000. 

That vieforj' did not improve rela- 
tions between Mr. Luzhkov and Mr. 
Nemtsov, 37. the highly popular former 
governor of Nizhny Novgorod, who is 
often cited as a potential presidential 
candidate. 

The rivalry can turn petty. Mr. Nemt- 
sov, who joined the government this 
spring, is comniuiing from a govern- 
ment dacha to work every day because 
he cannot move into the government- 
owned apartment that comes with the 
job. The city has not yet approved his 
petition for a Moscow residency per- 
mit 

"It's not that big a problem for it to 
lake this long to solve.” Mr. Nemtsov's 
press secretary, Andrei Pershin, said. 
“Apparenily, there are some hidden 
obstacles.” 


Pope Returns to Roots in Krakow 


By Celestine Bohlen 

li;rt Tunfi Servitv 


KRAKOW. Poland — Many of the 
600 or so guests who gathered the other 
night to celebrate the 600th anniversary 
of the Theological Faculty of Jagiel- 
loniao University were old firiends and 
iwiner colleagues of Karol Wojtyla, the 
one-time archbishop of Krakow who left 
in 1978 to become Pope John Paul IL 

In many ways, these members of 
Krakow's intellectual elite have re- 
mained his toughest judges, applying 
the standards he set for himsefr as an 
eneigetic and inquiring student, sem- 
inarian and priest 

And on his current visit to Poland — 
far more than on his previous one, six 
years ago — the Pope has reminded 
these old friends of the youno man that 
he once was. with interests far beyond 
politics. 

The man they remember studied 
philosophy, wrote plays and poetry and 
hiked in the mountains, even as he 
began testing limits imposed first by 
Poland’s Nazi occupiers and later by its 
Communist rulers. 

As on his other return trips here — 
this is his seventh — the Pope has 
reminisced openly, making no secret of 
his homesicimess for Poland. 

“Every return to Poland is like a 
return under the ri^ of the parental 


home, where every linie object reminds 
me of what is closest and dearest,” he 
said several d^s ago. 

But when k came to Krakow in 
1991, many admirers felt that he had 
been given bad advice by Polish clerics 
and that as a result he adopted a nar- 
rowly focused, combative tone about 
the dangers of a permissive society that 
struck a false note. 

This time, with parliameniary elec- 
tions coming in the autumn, his visit 
could easily have become a weapon in 
the local church's battle with the ciuTcnt 
government, made up of former Com- 
munists. 

Instead, many here say titat on this 
1 ^ the P(^ avoided Ae coo^nta- 
tio^ tone he used in the past 

Except for a strong attack on abor- 
tion, which he speaks about everywhere 
he travels, and an equally strong defense 
of the use of Cathouc symbols in public 
places. Pope John Paul largely k^t his 
spiritual message away from the realm 
of politics. 

In a letter addressed to Polish bish- 
ops. the Pope clearly urged diem to 
leave politics, economics ^ culture to 
the lay members of the church. The 
church may offer its believers spiritual 
guidance, he said, but should not take on 
their role. 

Jacek Wozniakowski, who as editor 
of the journal 2inak accepted articles 


from the priest who is now the Pope, 
said that at first Father Wojtyla had bwn 
reluctant to take part in locd affairs. 

‘ ‘ I remember we had to convince him 
he had to read the press at a time when 
all he was reading was his mystics and 
his rtMTiantic writers, whom he knew 
very well,” Mr. Wozniakowski said. 
“He used to say that the press should be 
read by people who are involved in 
politics, that wasn't him.” 

As Krakow's archbishop, be became 
more involved, stepping intocontinui^ 
battles with the Communist authorities 
over permission to open new churches 
and educate more priests — and de- 
fending his flock when no one else 
would. 

“All along be has thought that if the 
church mixes in politics, it should only 
be because there is no one else to per- 
form the task,” Mr. Wozniakovl^ki 
said. “Now he Is very keen to see the 
church going back to its proper work, 
which is to be a spiritual guide. 

“He feels, of course, that politics 
should be imbued with moral values, bnt 
he understands there are those among 
the clergy who mix in politics much too 
much.” 

■ Half-Million Bid Pope Farewell 

Chanting “Stay with us. stay with 
us.” half a million Poles tum^ out 
Tuesday on the final day of Pope John 



M mum u Sanhikcni/Thc .v.4xianl Pic-- 


Officers of a Polish anti-terrorist squad examining an icon on an altar 
before the arrival (^Pope John i^uJ U at Krosno, Poland, on Tuesday. 


Paul’s pilgrimage to his homeland for a 
tumultuous farewell. The Associated 
Press reported from Krosno, Poland. 
“My years in Rome have not ex- 


tinguished my love for this land.” the 
Pope said as he lingered at the end of his 
last Mass, held at an airport in tiie moun- 
tain town of Krosno. “God bless you.” 


Greece and Russia 
Announce Accord 

SALONIKA. Greece — Greece 
and Russia announced a joint ini- 
tiative Tuesday to convene high- 
level meetings between southeast- 
ern European countries and inter- 
national organizations. 

Greece's foreign minister. 
Thcodoros Pangalos, said. “Since 
there are already initiatives in the 
region by the United Slates and 
European Union, we thought it 
would be u good idea to have a 
common action with Russia.” 

The two nations hope the plan 
will pave the way for Ru.ssia's par- 
ticipation in a regional economic 
union. The pact was announced 
during a two-day summit meeting 
of Balkan officials. (API 

3 Shot in Belfast 

BELF.AST — Three young Prot- 
estants were being treated in a hos- 
pital for gunshot wounds to the 
knee, the police said Tuesday, mark- 
ing a return to terrorist “punishment 
shootings" in Northern Ireland afler 
a respite of several weeks. 

The men. aged 17. 19 and 24. 
were found in an alley in West Bel- 
fast. where they had" been “knee- 
capped.” a spokesman said. 

Early Monday, a 24-year-old 
Catholic had to have a leg am- 
putated after a similar attack. 

(AFPi 

Mass Grave Found 

ZAGREB, Croatia — War- 
crimes investigators have un- 
earthed 68 bodies from a mass 
grave in the village of Lovas near 
Vukovar in Croatia's last Serb-held 
enclave, officials said 'Tuesday. 

exhumations were carri^ out 
last week Iw UN war-crimes in- 
vestigators and Croatian officials. 
Officios say they believe the victims 
were Croat civilians executed in Oc- 
tober 1991 during the war between 
Serbs and Cnaacs. (AP) 

Shooting in Bilbao 

BILBAO, Spain — A man was 
shot in the headTuesday in Bilbao in 
an apparent attack by ETA Basque 
sqxtratisi rebels, the police said. 

The Basque police said three at- 
tackers apfvoached Javier Perez, 
40. while he was walking his dog 
and shot him. He was i^en to a 
hospital where he is undergoing 
surgery, officials said. (Reuters} 







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Klaus Wins 
A Key Vote 
la Prague 


By Peter S. Green 

tatenunoHdl HtrjfJTrihunr 

• .-PRAGUE — Prime 
• Mimgter Vaclav Klaus 
survived a vote of con- 
fit fencff in his recently 
shuffled goveniment 
Tuesday by one vote. 

Dqxioes in ibe 200- 
sieat legislature voted, 
101 to 99, for Mr. Klaus 
in a FoU’Call. One law- 
maker came in a wheel 
chair to cast his ballot. 

Growing economic 
problems have under- 
mined the Czech econ- 
omy, and Mr. fOaus has 
seen faith in his govern- 
ment plunge. 

Mr. Klaus had won the 
key suppot of ^ coali- 
tion partner, Jo^ Lux, 
lea^ of foe Cluistian 
Democratic Union. 

Before parliament 
met. Mr. Klaus said that 
Mr. Lux had agreed to 
budget cuts of 16.S bil- 
lion koruny ($494.3 mil- 
lion). on top of 25 J bil- 
lion koruny of cuts 
agreed in April. 

“We will still face 
great {soblems in imple- 
menting these cues,” Mr. 
Klaus said. He appeared 
to have given in to Mr. 
Lux by agreeing to index 
some social benefits to 
inflation. 

Mr. Klaus shuffled his 
cabinet two weeks ago, 
and ' has iniroduced two 
rofrnio. packages in two 
nxxsfos. But few details 
of ibe packages have been 
made public, and analysts 
say foey worry that even 
the Hetory for Mr. Klaus 
on Tuesday is no guor- 
aptft; that all the neces- 
saiy lefonns will come. 


Unity Treaty Ratified 
By Emsia and Belarus 

The Assocuied Press 

MOSCOW — The Pailiaments in Russia and Belarus both 
v(^ overwhelmingly Tuesday to ratify a treaty that brings 
foe two nations closer together but stops short of creating a 
single state. 

The agreement, previously signed by the presidents of both 
countries, calls fcH* closer economic, politietti and military ties 
between Russia and its western neighbor. 

The R ussian Parliament's tipper chamber voted. 144-0 with 
three attentions, to ratify foe treaty, which received approval 
last week in the lower bouse. In Belarus, the Council of the 
Republic gave foe agreement a unanimous vote. 

The deal appears to have broad public support in both 
Russia, which has a ix^ulation of almost lS(i million, and 
Belarus, which has 1(} n^on residents. 

Bnt Russian liberals have warned the Kremlin against 
forging close ties with Belarus’s aufooritaiian president, Al- 
exander Lukashenko. In Belarbs, nationalists oppose foe deal 
on the ground that it threatens the country's post-Soviet 
indq>endence. 

Ttc union galls for foe two ccxintries lo coordinate eco- 
nomic and military activities, create joint energy and transpon 
systems and possibly introduce a common currency. A cooncil 
of leaders from both countries is to outline joint ^licies. 

Russia and Belarus have removed customs b^ers but 
otherwise have done little toward real integration since form- 
ing a “ccnnmuniiy” a year ago. 

Mr. lashed out at his Moscow critics during foe 

ra^cation hearings Tuesday, accusing unidentified Russian 
officials of watering down the agreemenL 







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TANZANIA 


• » - 
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..... 


Industries Revive as Privatization Takes Center Stage 

Practically every sector of the economy is being tt'ansform^. The new gox’emment policies are attracting irtv^or int&estfrom all over the world. 


W aiy of foreign investment for many years, the 
United R^ublic of Tanzania is now busy bura- 
ishine its imaiK as a caoital-fnendiv nation. Pres- 




T T ishing its imajge as a capital-fnendly nation. Pres- 
ident Benjamin Mkiq^ is determined to sp^ up the de- 
velopment of this laige East Aincan country's rich potential. 
The govenmient is pursuing a raft of refbnins that could soon 
put Tanzania at the fbrefiont of Africa's modem states. 

Investors are responding to the government's policies. 
Australian, Chadian and AiHcan mining companies are 
already committing substantial sums to developing tire gold 
resources that lie in Hie ancient soils south of Lake Victoria. 
Other intemation^ tirms have ambitious plans for infia- 
stnicture. tourism, manufacturing and farming projects. 

It is a sign of the times diat the multiparty Parliament in 
Dares Salaam will this month debate a simplification of the 
tax regime, largely in response to the demands of foreign 
companies. 

Investors might noL however, get everything they want 
because the International Monetary Ftuid is putting pressure 
on the gov ernment to step up revenue collection and improve 
the country's macroeconomic management. 

“We have accepted the regimen of fiscal and monetary 
discipline, and we have pass^ with flying colors," says 
Finance Minister Daniel Yona, referring to Hie International 
Monetary Fund's recent release of a S40 million tranche of a 
three-year enhanced structural adjustment facility approved 
last year. The IMF's endorsement was seen by investors, 
crcditois and donors alike as a strong measure of con- 
fidence. 

Mr. Yona points out that the macroeconomic benchmarks 
are being met: Inflation stands at about 1 S percent and is 
forecast to fell below 10 percent in Hie coming months. Hie 
exchange rate has been stable at about 6^ Tanzanian 
shillings to the dollar for the past year, economic growth has 
increas^ from 4 percent last year to a probable 4.7 percent in 
the financial year ending June 30 and the recovery of foreign 
exchange reserves has been helped by a favorable res- 
cheduling of foreign debts. 

The government is also continuing to privatize a number 
of public sector companies. 

Like many African countries. Tanzania is susceptible to 
droughts. Nevertheless, the country might not be &r fiom 
achieving a balanced revival across all hs productive sectors 
— including hs agricultural base. built on cotton, coffee and 
tea — as well as mineral production, manufacturing and 
services. 

Analysts say that the first results of foreign direct in- 
vestments made in Hie past five years will sl^w over the 
coming 1 2 months in the fonm of a rapid rise in gold exports 
and a sharp revival in the production of goods and services for 
the domestic market. 

Newly established inv'estors include Coca-Cola, R. J. 
Reynolds. South Afiican Breweries. Sheraton IntemationaJ 
and some companies owned by the Aga Khan. 


a proposed listing of public 
sector compwy stetres. A 
special feature of Tanzania's 
privati^Aion process is the 
conunitment to make shares 
available to ordinaTy 
people. 

Now that the long-mn- giss 
ning shift ftom socialism to 
capitalism has been ap- ^ 
proved even by the former 
president, Julius Nyerere. 
who remains influential in 
the affairs of the country, it 
seems likely to run its 
course. 

“It has taken time to 
people on the side of di- 
ve^ture, bur we are winning 
the argument." says 
Yona. ** Most areas are up for 
sale. We have already dis- 
posed of the beer, cigarette \ 
and cement industries, and - 
now we are concentratu^ on 

parastatals like the airline, harbors. National Milling Cor- 
poration and sisal industries." 

The job of deciding the future of the 200 firms remaining 
in the public sector rests with Hie Paiastatal Sector Reform 
Commission, chaired by Ceoi^ Mbowe. Mr. Mbowe is 
committed to selling or reforming all Hie companies in his 
charge within the next 12 monHis if possible, although he 
admits to encountering some continuing resistance from 
company manors and pol iticians. • 

^th a strong majoiiy in the Tanzanian Parliament fol- 
lowing his election in the autumn of 1 995, Mr. Mkapa has 
enou^ support to continue the economic reform process Hiat 
has b^n pursued at di fluent speeds fbrmoredi^ lOyeais. 
His strong mandate has help^ him drive the process for- 
ward, as he feces only fiagmented opposition. - 


Stock exchange debut 

A further round of new investment is expected to result from 
the privatization and commercialization of the telecom- 
munications. power and banking sectors, scheduled for the 
coming months. The process will be facilitated by the launch 
ofTanzania's firet stock exchange by the end of the year and 


Building boom 

Evidence of die benefits of reform can be seen clearly in the 
capital city of Dar es Salaam, where a construction boom is 
under way. South Afiican and South Korean firms have taken 
the lead in putting up tall office buildings and modem 
housing projects. 

The second commercial city. Mwanza, is also developing 
rapidly, with banks.and oHier services moving in. Citibank 
Tanzania, for example, will open a second brai^ Hiere next 
month. 

“As investors come in and as Hie free market reforms get 
under way, they are improving Hie pro^cts for services." 
says Emcka Emuwa. Citibank's managing director. 

“More projects will come up as privatization of the 
parastatals progresses," says Tom Bowen, manager of Stan- 
dard Chartered Bank Tanzania. "There is a strong com- 
mitment on the part of Hie government, which is willing to 
talk to any investor." 

Mr. Bowen anticipates that Hie enormous growdi in Hie 
mining industry over the next few years will be followed by 


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fiirHier investments in fann- 
ing and manufecUiring. par- 
ticularly f^m South .Afntiftn 
companies. 

New gold piod^on 
from the ore-rich Gcita re- 
gion south of Mwanza; Ja 
port on Lake Victoria) will 
' start next year at the Golden 
Pride mine Hiat a Canadian/ 
Australian joint venture is 
establishing. The venture, 
Samax and Resolute Sam- 
' ' antha, plans to start wife 
output of 1 60,000 ounces of 
; gold a year. 

OHjer companies, includ- 
ing Sutton Rewurces, 
Pangea and Ashanti Gold- 
fields, are preparing ,fe^- 
bility studies on similar 
' mining operations in the 
gold Irelt 

Mining companies have 
recently won attractive 
terms in a deal struck wife Energy and Mines Minister 
Abdallah Kigoda. who approv'ed exemptions from import 
taxes during construction and reduced sales taxes and import . 
duties after fee grace period expires. 5 

“Ever since our project was established, we have had 
support from fee high^ level." says Jeremy Pearce, fi- 
nancial director of Samax. 

"Over fee next feree to five years, Tanzania will be^ to 
score some successes that will be noticed intemationally," 
says investment consultant Frank VogJ, vfeo form^y 
worked for fee World Bank. 

"If Uganda has done it then Tanzania can do h. It is very 
encouraging feat there are senior people of great integrity and 
that it is possible to achieve clean and tran^arerit d^s." 

Conceding that there is some bureaucratic inertia, Mr. Vogi 
urges compariies to be patient and reminds feem of fee 
procedural delays before projects are ^proved in fee United 
States — delays that are actually con^iaratively short in 
Tanzania. 





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now the presklen^ votes ti the 199SelecSoa 


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Zambia, now being constructed, will make Tanzania a foil 
member of the Soufeem Afiican Power Pool. 


Power projects 

The World Bank's country director Ibr Tanzania, Jim Adams, 
says feat Tanzania's approach to private sector participation 
in utilities such as telecommunications and power will set it 
apart in Africa and vrill show feat high levels of efficiency are 
H^ norm. A pioneer electricity-fiom-gas project for Dar es 
Salaam is alr^y under construction Independent Power 
Tanzania Ltd., owned ‘by Tanzanian and Malaysian in- 
vestors. 

As a member of both the expanding markets of the South 
Afocan Development Community and the East African 
Coopmtion initiative, Tanzania is in a good position to 
intensify its supply of such services. 

The state-run Tanzania Electricity Supply Company is 
preparing to buy and sell power wife private sector compa- 
nies and neighboring countries. An interconnection with 


Welcome mat in fee wilds 

Ofeer areas of potentially rapid development ^ agriculture 
and tourism. (^vemmOTt ministers are taking a positive 
view of fee interest that Soufe African and other formers and 
ranchers have feown in acquiring long-term leases on state- 
own^ land. 

Tourism is developing fast. Tanzania's Sereiigeti and 
Ngorongoio game parks have long been an extra attraction 
for tourists visiting Kenya. Yet increasing numbeis of people 
are visiting Tanzania exclusively, taking in little-known but 
exceptional attractions that include the vast and remote 
Selous, /^ca's laig^ game reserve: fee chimpanzees of Hie 
Mahale mountains on the shores of Lake Tanganyika: and fee 
"spice islands" of Zanzibv and Pemba. 

New hotels and game lodges are ^nging up to meet fee 
surge in demand, which is expected to reach Iralf a million 
visitors by fee year 2000. 


fllleiial Iniiiil 


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//'•. f.-i truffithu 


- I"'' • 








“Tanzania" 

HU5 produced in its etuiren' by the Adi^tising Di^tamnem 
of the Intematiot^ Herald Tribune. • 
Writer: Ridtard Synge, based in Cantbridge. England. 
Program Oikector; Bill Mahder. 




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BNTERNATIOim HERALD TRlBim, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 1997 


page 9 


By William Drozdiak 

Washinxitm Poa Senice 

RUSSELS — Less than a month 
he^ the leaders of NATO meet in 
Madnd to choose new members, an in- 
tense debate is gripping the alliance over 
wbetfier to balance expansion to the east 
witti a “southern strategy" that would 
embrace countries in areas where 
Europe iaces its gravest security risks. 

The United States has argued that only 
the Czech Republic, Hungary tmd Po- 
land should enter NATO in the first 
wave. Althon^ President Bill Clinton 
has reached no final decision, top U.S. 
officials say a small group of new mem- 
bers is preferable bemuse it would keep 
costs down, be easier for the alliance to 
absorb and encourage also-ran candi- 
dates to believe a second wave of ex- 
pansion may follow shortly. 

But the American view is being chal- 
lenged by a majority of membera wfio 
feel that incoqrorating Romania and 
Slovenia would make £e alliance more 
responsive to threats of instability. They 
say that Slovenia's place in the Balkans 
and Romania's exposure to the Black 
Sea make them imiwrtant beachheads in 
two of Europe's most volatile regions. 

[Chancellor Helmut K(^ and other 
centrist European leaders called Tues- 
day for Romania to be included in the 
firat wave of new NATO members. WiJ- 
fiied Martens, bead of the European 
Peoples’ Party, said in Suasboutg, Reu- 
ters rolled. 

[“Everybody, above all the heads of 
government, supported Romania’s can- ' 
didacy in the first wave," he said after a 


meeting of party leaders that was at- 
tended by Mr. KohU Prime Ministos 
Romano Prodi of Italy, Jean-Luc De- 
haene of Belgium and Jean-Claude Jun- 
cker of Luxembourg and the Spanish 
foreign minister, Abel Manites.] 

At a gathering last month of NATO 
foreign ministers in Sinha, Portugal, 9 of 
16 governments e:quessed support for 
admitting the two southern states along 
widi the three consensus candidates 
from the east. And the relative aigu- 
ments over whether, and how, to balance 
the enlargement have become hot- 
ter with the approach of the Madrid 
summit meeting. • 

“A balance in the alliance is im- 
porlant, but not every group of new 
members needs to be balai^d," the 
N.A’TO secretary-generaL Javier Solana 
Madariaga, said in an ioter^dew. "We 
must remember that we are talking about 
enlargement as a continuing process, not 
a one-time event." 

Mr. Solana is conducting a final re- 
view this week of the 12 countries that 
have applied to join; He has asked for the 
tottom-iine positions from each *of 
NATO's 16 member governments be- 
fore he makes his own fecommendadon 
next week about who should be included 
in the first wave of enlaigemeoL 

“I see my role as a catalyzer for 
NATO members to reach a consensus,’ ’ 
he said. 

At the meeting in PoitugaL the U.S. 
secretary of stale, Madeleine Albright, 
stressed that enlargement roust not be 
seen as "a once in a lifetime event like 
that arrival of the Hale Bopp comeL" 
She warned that such a perception would 


INTERNATIONAL 









RMm UaMnit|fA«nerruiu4^iM 

BIG EASY BOUND? — Ukrainian soldiers arrivi^ in Frankfurt en 
route to NATO peacekeeping training exercises in Louisiana. ’The 
exercises involved soldiers from 22 «>Dntries, many of them former 
Soviet bloc countries, under the Partnership for Peace program. 

provoke “a mad scramble to get cm ive and create greater complications for 
board In Madrid and a crushing sense d» alliance's integrated comniandstruc- 


dis^)pomtmeat among those lefr be- 
hind." 

U.S. officials say a five-oadon ei^ 
Jaigement would be much nuHie expens- 


ture. It would also trigger fears, they say, 
among the Baidc states. Bulgaria and' 
others left out in the first wave that any 
subsequent expansion would be delayed 


indefizutely:. And, nM least; such larger 
scale changes couid4ow doubts in die 
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particulariy among-.the altiaace's Medi- - 
, teiranew stat^^ aboatthedes^bUity of 
a BT iitfaftm CTpai^ finn- f<> .sii n p l»»niwitf the 
eastern, mpy^j^adi&iqa, Slovaala and 
Ronuinia-hayfe efie^ve-.cafUT- 

pai^ sbowiag-ti^.aiAt^y tojoBL 

As die wieaiduest nation on. a per. 
capite basts In aU of Omtrai and Eastern 
Europe, SLoYeaia.wDoldhaye.zio trouble 
fooriog-tte bill for NATOmembershb. 
As a frmuerpao of Yugo^via, it would 
arouse, no antagonism from Russia be-, 
cause it never belonged to ^ Warsaw 
PacL And in terms of geograiAy, it 
would provide the aBianoe's only 
connecdoD to Hungary. . 

Those who back Slovenia's bb say it 
would give NATO a direct stake in 
kan securi^ and thus he^ stabilize onie 
of Europe’s most oiitHilent regions. 

The Romanian crusade for member- 
ship, in some ways, has been the niost 
remarkable. Since die election in 
Novembin' of Presideot Emil Con- 
stantinescu, Rexoaniahas accelerated its 
traasidon ^m a badward UKalitarian 
state toward a thriving fiee-auriEct de- 
mocracy. 

The country has been one of die al- 
liarice’s most ardent suitms and was die 
first country to develop' a. NATO-com- 
patible battalion. It has settled, all out- 
standbg border disputes and questions 
of minority rights with Hung;^, Mol- 
dova and Ukraine. The Romanians have 
also been active peacekeepers, sending 


p nntinggnt.c tit Al b^i^ Angokiand Bos- 
nla-Heizegorina. . 

... In’a bid-to bring iis.miliiafv 

liia hmen t up to NATO Standards. K»>- 
mania has wozked hard to upgrade and 
now devotes ne^y 3 percent of its 
national pi^ua to defense. That pr^ 
. rartion is double wbat Hungat^* and 

Republic now spend on their niil- 
itaries, ' 

And whfie public support has wan^ 
in. Hungary and the C^h- Republic, 
with qiinion polls showing only a slight 
Riajority in favor of NATO membership. 
Romania appears to be wLTdly enthu- 
siastic, with 9 out of 10 voters saying 
they want to join the alliance. 

The former monarch. King Michael, 
has been allowed back into the country 
to servers Romania’s chief advocate to 
the NATOcountoes, while former ath- 
letes like the Olympic gymnast Nadia 
Comenici and the tennis star lUc Nusiase 
have also been eolisied as celebniy en- 
voys to whip up support abroad. 

U.S. officials have adopted a low-key 
approach to the dentate, fearing that any 
hravy-handed moves to dictate their will 
in favor of a stnall-scaie enlargement 
would generate antagonism from Euro- 
pean .aUies. and complicate the nitifi- 
.cadon debates in foreign parliaments. 

“NATO enlargement is a great leap 
into die unknown, and it will be anything 
but easy to make it wevk," a senior 
adminisoation facial said. 

“We think it makes the most sense to 
start small, and we are confident that a 
consensus will emerge around the least 
common denmninaior of countries that 
are ready now to join the alliance. 




Paris to Review Cases 


Move May Spare Them From Deportation 


A/jemv Fraatv-Pmst 

PARIS — The new leftist government 
will review the cases of illegal immigrants 
deprived of residence and working papers 
by strict laws pused ^ the pr^ous 
conservative administration. Prime Min- 
ister Uooel Jospin's office said Tuesday. 

It said it was appointing iean-Michel 
Galabert, 66. an honorary member of the 
Council of Slate, to undertake case-by- 
case sradies of illegal inimigrants. Mr. 
Galabert will examine die cases accord- 
ing to criteria announced last September 
by a National Consultative Commission 
on Human Rights, a communique said. 

Under the Jospin decision, from 10,000 
to 40,000 pe^le, most of them Africans 
threatened with deportation, might be al- 
lowed to remain legally iii France. 

A Jospin aide, Jacques Ri^udiat, 
held a meeting earlier with a delegation 
of illegal immigrants who had just com- 
pleted a protest march from Ai^ouleme, 
in southwestern France, to Paris. 

The imniigrams attracted public sym- 


pathy last year by occuj^ing Paris 
churches and staging hungn stifices be- 
fme being evicted by securiw forces. 

In its election campaign last month, 
the Socialist Party said it wonld repeal 
the anti-immigration laws passed by 
former interior ministers, Charles 
Pasqua and Jean-Loiiis Debre. 

■ S^piin Elected to I^ty Office 

Philippe Seguin was elected Tuesday 
by the GauUist party. Rally for the Re- 
public. as its parliamentary floor leader, 
a key st^ in his bid to seize die party 
leadership from former Prime Mii^ter 
.Alain Juppe, Reuters repotted. 

Mr. Seguin. .the fonner National As- 
sembly sp^er. was the sole candidate 
for the job. despite tfivisioos within the 
Rally for the Republic over the unex- 
pected electoral clefeai June 1. 

Mr. Seguin has made a formal bid for 
the party leadership. Mr. Juppe, who is 
under intense ixe^re to quit, has not 
siud whether he will run for re-election. 





♦ ♦ * ♦^•• 4 .^ 



Wnlmi/Ili- Vk 


Soup kitchens like the Camatioas are botstering protests that Mr. Fujimori is ignoring Peru's poor. 


PERU: -(4 Tunung Point? 

Continued flroui Ps^e 1 

“Before, the things Fujimori may have done that 
weren't following die rules, people saw them as nec- 
essary ot required to end the violence, " he said. “ Now. 
there’s a sense that these measures are being udten in 
tenns of personal interests and ambition.’' 

Last wedc, a broad base of opposition leaders, 
students and wotiters turned out by the thousands in 
protests the couniiv had not seen in at l^t a decade. 
ThePcmdfical Catholic University of Peru took out a 
newspaper ad to decry foe dismantling of the con- 
stitution court 

News media repo^ of loiiuie, killing and cor- 
'ruption by the intelligeiKte services have triggered 
crackdowns, wifo jouroalisis complaining that tbey 
have received deadi threats and harassment in the form 
of sudden {xoblems wifo die bureaucracy. 

Mr. Fujimori himself lashed out last week at the 
news mefoa. using a speech at a meeting here of the 
Organization of American States to accuse some jour- 
naUsis of taking Ixibes "to attack these who try to 
eliminate coiTuption." 

Smne do not rule out Mr. Fnjunori moving toward 
greater democracy under pressure from Wa^ington. 
foe broadening opposition and the streets. Until now, a 
fonner ally of foe president noted, there has bran no 
counteibafance to foe rqnessive tactics of the military 
and intelligence branch^. 

But foe misgiviDgs over the president's respect for 
such institutions as foe courts, foe press and the op- 
position appear to have grown, and pushed Peruvians 
neara brraiung point. 


Tories Face 
New Vote on 
Next Leader 


The .Asstk‘itiie>t Press 

LONDON — TTie Conservative 
Party faces a second round of voting 
to choose a new leader to succeed 
former I*riine Minister John Major 
after no candidate came close to a 
majority in Tuesday's balloting by 
Tory lawmakers. 

Tlie former chancellor of the ex- 
chequer, Kenneth Clarke, led the 
field of five with 49 votes, with the 
former Welsh secretary', William 
Hague, close behind with 41 votes. 

Jefon Redwood, who resigned 
from the cabinet two years .'igo to 
run against Mr. Major, had 27 votes; 
former Social Security Secretary 
Peter Lilley had 24. and former 
Home Secretary Michael Howard' 
had 23. A second ballot will be held 
on June 17. 

Nlr. Howard and Mr. Lilley im- 
mediately quit the race, and threw 
their support behind Mr. Hague, 
ai^s for the two men told Britain’s 
PA News Agency. 

Others can also join the race. 

If no candidate wins a majority' on 
the second ballot, there will be a 
run-off between the two leading 
contenders a week later. 

Mr. Clarice. 56, had been expected 
to get the most votes in the first 
round, but he will have trouble pick- 
ing up additional support from back- 
ers of more conservative candidates. 

Mr. Clarke has been an advocate 
of the European Union and had re- 
fused to rule out British participa- 
tion in a single currency, much to 
the consternation of the party's right 
wing. Mr. Hague, Mr. Howard and 
Mr. Redwo^ are against the single 
currency, known as the euro. 

Mr. MajcH- announced his resig- 
nation as party leader immediately 
after the Wdslide victoiy of the 
Labour Party in foe elections on 
M^ 1. 

party's own survey of le- 
gislative constituencies found that 
269 chairmen supported Mr. 
Cl^e. compared with 178 for Mr. 
Hague. 25 for Mr. Redwood. 20 for 
Mr. Lilley and iU for Mr. Howard. 

Mr. Clarke was also backed by 
177 Conservative members of foe 
House of Lords, well ahead of Mr. 
Hague's total of 43. All 17 Con- 
servative members of the European 
Parliament supported Mr. Clarke. 


EUROPE: With Pledge on Jobs, France WovJLd Accept Euro Deal 


Continued from Page 1 

new minister for European Affairs, that 
Paris wanted a “real delay'* to consider 
its position on the pact. 

Mr. Moscovici warned Tuesday that 
Paris would resist pressure to s^ree to 
the stability paa at the summit meeting 
in Amsterdam next Monday and Tues- 
day. 

While France had said it was not 
trying to rewrite foe pact, top aides to 
Mr. Jospin made iLclear that they wanted 
more lime to ensure that the Europe- 
wide accord would correspond to the 
Socialist election pledge to give a higher 
priority to crearing jobs and to avoiding 
any more austerity measures. 

Mr. Moscovici had stressed in his 
remarks that "things are rather clear in 
our mind." 

He said that “if there has been a 
change of majority" in the recent French 
elections, “it is to change policy." 

In a remarkably r^id sequence of 
events Tuesday, a top aide to W. Kohl 
said Bonn could not accept any dilution 
of the stability pact Wolfgang 
Schaeuble. head of the (^ament^ 
group of Mr. Kohl’s governing Christian 
Democrats, also warned the Frendi goy- 
enunem that it could cause alarm in 
financial markets. He said he hoped 


Fiance would “remain as reliables part- 
ner as Germany in the European Un- 
ion," 

Another German officiaL speaking on 
condition of anonymi^, had said that if 
France tried to make substantial changes 
in die stability pact "then it would 
change foe sense of European monetary 
union eutiiely." 

This official said Bmin vras hoping 
that President Chirac would enter foe 
debate "to make sure that France sticks 
to its commitments." 

By Tuesday afternoon, after meeting 
wifo Mr. K^ President. Chiru an- 
nounced chat he wanted foe stability pact 
to be agreed to. as scheduled, at foe 
Amsterdam summit meeting. 

At foe same tune, there were signs of 
foe scramble to meet France halfway and 
defuse foe potential crisis over the 
euro. 

The parliamentary ^ups of Mr. 
Kohl's center-right coalition signaled a 
shift in long-standing policy by calling 
for Bonn to aj^nove a propped em- 
ployment chapter in a revised Maastricht 
treaty. The jobs chapter has been ommig 
Mr. Jospin's key demands. 

Meanwhile, word leaked from Brus- 
sels foat foe European Commi^ioc pres- 
ident, Jacques Santer, was said to be 
planning to offer a compromise to Mr. 


Li Shuxian, Nurse Who Married 
Last Chinese Emperor, Dies at 73 


Ream 

BEIJING — Li Shuxian, the widow of 
China’s last emperor, died of lung can- 
cer in Beijing on Monday, the official 
Xinhua press agency said T^sday. She 
was 73 years old. 

Li was foe second wife of Aisin Gioro 
Pu Yi, foe last enqieror of China’s Qing 
dynasty that end^ in 1911 with the 
founding of a republic. She met Pu YL 
who was known as the Emperor Xuan 
Tong during his Ixief reign 1908 to 

1911, when she was a nurse while he was 
in hospital after the 1949 Communist 
takeover. They married in 1962. 

She led a quiet life, virtually retiring 
from public view after Pu Yi died in 
1967. She af^^eared briefly in Atuil 1993 
to bury the ashes of her husbandin a new 
graveyard among the tombs of his an- 
cestors on the outskirts of Beijing. 

Mathilda, 71, Was Widow 
Of the 11th Duke of Argyll 

PARIS (Combined Disratches) — 
Mathilda, the Dowager Duchess of 
Argyll, died Friday in Paris of a stroke. 

Tile duchess was foe widow of ian 
Campbell, the 1 Ifo Duke of Argyll and 


the 2Sfo chief of Clan Campbell, who 
died in 1973. They were married in 
1963. shortly after tte duke divorced his 
third wife, Maxgaret, in one of So>l- 
land’s most celebrated divorce cases. 

The duchess was bora MafoUda Cost- 
er Mortimer in 1923 in Litchfield, Coa- 
oecticuL Her parei^ were divorc^l 
shortly after her birth and she was 
brought up by her grandmotber in Paris. 

(AF,Nrrj 

William Emerson, Ex-Director 
Of Franklin Roosevelt Libraiy 

NEW YORK (NYT) — WUliara 
Emerson, 74, a military Tiistorian and 
fonner director of the Franklin 
Roosevelt Library in Hyde Park, New 
York, died Monday of a heart attack in 
Poughkeepsie, New Yorit. 

Mr. Emerson, a chronicler of Mr. 
Roosevelt's presidency, directed foe li- 
brary from 1974until 1991, 

Fred Mattson, 76, a chemist at 
Procter & Gamble who left his mark as a 
researcher on cholesterol and hean dis- 
ease and as one of the two accidental 
discoverers of the calorie-free fot sub- 


Jo^in when . he visits Paris on 
Thursday. 

According to reports of the compro- 
mise propos^ France would be asked to 
agree to the stability pact in exchange for 
a formal commianent at the Amstodam 
summit meeting chat foe pact be less 
stringent and include a greater enqiliasis 
on jobs and growth. 

Eurc^ieaa Commission officials said 
that such a comptmiiise would be 
enough to satisfy foe concerns of the 
Josfxn team and allow ii to claim a 
viCToiy for a more “social Europe" in 
domestic and European terms. 

"1 think foe French will be given 
enough to claim victory, but nothing foat 
is le^ly binding," an official in Brus- 
sels said. 

Mr. Moscovici. in his remarks, bad 
predicted that a French-Gennan summit 
meeting Friday in foe French city of 
Aiders would be "foe stan of operation 
troth." 

On Tuesday night, a French officiaL 
speaking on condition of anonymity, 
said the statements Mr. Strauss-Kalm 
and by Mr. Moscovici "hod clearly put 
on foe pressure and caused fear on foe 
part of our European piartiiers.’ ’ 

The French aide said Paris was now 
satisfied foat “the Ceirnaxis have 
changed tbeir position on foe employ- 


A compromise wpold ALBRIGHT: 

aUow the Jo^in team Call to Renew Pact 

to efaim a ■victory for a Continued from Page 1 

more social Eun^e property rights- of Western firms or 

in domestic and P”®* ® rig; 

abuses. 

Enrope'Wide terms* Albright insisted that a vote 


meat cfaa^.".He also acknowledged 
foat Mr. had played the role of 
mediator. 

“An accOTd is now possible by Am- 
sterdam." said foe Fiencb official. He 
said further discussions would be held 
by Mr, Jospin. Mr. Chirac and Mr. K^ 
at the French-Gennan summit meeting 
Friday. 

In Bonn, a senior German official also 
coofitnied the compromise pl^ and 
said Tuesday night mac “we hope this 
will be eno^ for France to be con- 
tenL" 

Until foe compromise began to take 
shape, doubtera had outnumbered the 
optmists Tuesday. 

Eric Chaney, a fonner French Treas- 
ury ofiicial who is now chief economist 
at the Paris office of Morgan Staail^, 
said foe Joroin government could not 
easily satisfied. “They ooean what they 
say,” Mr. Chan^ observed 


’.He also acknowledged 
had played the role of 



Rni/ <ei m i 

U Shuxian at her husband’s tomb. 

stihite olestra. died on May 27 of lung 
cancer at his borne in San Diego. After 
leaving Proctor & Gamble in -1979, he 
became a professor of medicine and 
director of the lipid research clinic at foe 
University of C^omia at San Diego. 

Reid Shelton. 72. who originated foe 
role of Dadtfy Warinieks in the Broad- 
way production of “Annie," died of a 
stroke Sunday in Portland, Oregon. He 
appeared in many Broadway musicals 
^er making his debut in 1932-iB “Wish 
You Were Here." 


Ex-Black Panther 
Gets Bail in Murder 

The Associated Press 

SANTA ANA, California — A 
fonner Black Panfoer who spent a 
quarter centufy behind bats in foe 
murder of a school teacher was ordered 
released on $23, (XX)* bail Tu^day a^ 
be told a judge he was grate^l for foe 
chance to be free -and would ^ipear for 

any fnture.hearings. 

A lav^ for Geronimo Pratt, foe 
former B lack Panther, had roggested the 
51^ saying it was symbolic of foe 
time has client had spent in pnsiyi. 

Mr. Pratt said he was riartlra^ fo 
trying to find out ufoo killed the teacher. 

' Caroline Olsen, was muideied on a 
Santa Monica termis court in 1968. 

He maintained that he was raQroaded 
on foe murder charge as the FBI tite 
police sought to underiooloe foe Blade 
Panther movement in C^iforiua. 

The 1972 conviction was overtutn^ 
in light of new evidence foat foe chirf 
witness against him was a po lice ahtfpB r 
.iafbnnant who had lied under oatL 

Tbejudgeonteredixosecatorstoeifoer 
gw bfr. a new trial or drop foe case, 

llte district attorn^ said he would appeal 
'the decirim because be saw no new ev- 
idence foat Mr. Pl^. was not guilfy. 


Continued from Page 1 

property rights- of Western firms or to 
press for a tougher stance against rights 
abuses. 

Mrs. Albright insisted that a vote to 
renew most-favored-oation status for 
China was not a vote fo turn American . 
backs on Chinese human-rights con- 
cerns. 

“Our iiffiueace wifo them" on mat- 
ters such as human rights, "will increase 
geometrically wifo our engagement with 
foem," she said. 

Mra. Albri^t said that narrowly tar- 
geted tracte stuictions and forceful but 
limited actions — such as Mr. Hinton's 
di^jatching of two aircraft carriers to the 
Taiwan Strait last year to protest Chinese 
saber-rattling ahead of Taiwan elections 
— were far more effective than a blanket 
protesL 

She advocated “working together 
wifo C hina where we can. being honest, 
even biont where th^ resist." 

Mrs. Albright said that “revocation 
would affect policies across foe board, 
harm our interests as much or more than 
China's, and imperil iimocent bystand- 
ers snch as Hong Kong and Taiwan.'* 

Revoking the trade status, Mrs. Al- 
bright said, would weaken Chinese re- 
foonecs while strengtheoing those “who 
have been seeking to fill foe country's 
ideological void wifo a belligerent na- 
tionalism." 

She said it would jeopardize Chinese 
cooperation on snch issues as ensuring 
peara on foe Korean Peninsula and deaf 
ing wifo environmental concerns. 

Nfrs. Allxight said she ho|^ Con- 
gress would renew China's trade priv- 
fleges befwe her trip to Hong Kong, 
saying that a vote for revocation before 
she leaves would leave her with “no 
credibility and very little leverage." 

CoDgr^ has until Sept. I to pass a 
joint lesoltition disapprov ing renewal, 
should it decide to do so. If foe president 
vetoes the resolution, Congress has IS 
leusladve days to override the veto. 

Baisheftky, foe trade representa- 
tive, ^ tiiat it was through engagement, 
and qiedfically through negotiations for 
Cbio^ acoessioa to the World Trade 
Organizatioo, foat the United States can 
best make progz^ in opening Chinese 
markets and msui^ that China “accepts 
the rule of law as it to trade. ’ ’ 

Revocation of C^iiese trade priv- 
ileges, she said, would cany a h^vy 
cost Duties on iniports from China 
would jump.to.aboul 44 percent, from 
the cui^i 6 percent. 

“U.S. consumers would pay $390 
million more each year for low-end 
goods," including shoes, apparel and 
small electronic appliances, she' said 







PAGE 10 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Keralb 


rsTERNATIONAL 



j^nbuttei 


niUSHEB wmi TOE NEW \TOIK TWIBS ATO TMt WAMIDKnfA POST 


Economic Suspense 


The American economy co ntiimes 
to confound die economists. They 
worry that the news is too good to last 
— aad then it does. Sooner oc later they 
^ doubdess be, right; either die low 
inflation rate or six strait years of 
expansion, or both, will end. But when 
will that h^pen, and what has the 
trade-off become between growth and 
inflation in the current economy? 
Those are the questions. 

The Labor DejMirmieflt reported on 
Friday that unen^loyment fell last 
month to 4.8 percent of the labor force, 
a 23-year low. Most economists doubt 
that die rate can that low without 
fueling inflation. Employers compet- 
ing for workers in a d^t labor m^et 
bid up wages, then try to raise prices to 
cover the cost. But this time around — 
so far, at least — wage increases and the 
inflation rate have both been modest 
Meanwhile, the es^iansion has idso 
begun to help low-income groups, 
w£ch in its early stages it was slow to 
do. The poverty rate, the welfare rolls 
and now the numba* of long-term un- 
enwloyed are all headed down. 

'^y no resurgence of inflation? Just 
about evetyone has a favorite partial 
explanation — luck, the policies of 
the Federal Reserve and/or of the Clin- 
ton adminisnation, increasing global- 
ization of the economy wherein low 
wages elsewhere serve to drag down 
wages in the United Stales, the shift 
toward a service economy, changes 


in the makeup of the workforce. But 
because no one knows for sore what is 
happening, no one knows for sure bow 
long U may be before inflation takes 
off. the Federal Reserve then stm on 
Ae brakes and die business cycle re- 
asserts itself. 

The Fed itself is uncertain. Pub^ 
to its credit, it has been engaged in a 
kind of Hamlet act in recent months. It 
wants to suppress inflation but not cre- 
ate unnecessary economic sla^ 
Where, in a choked economy, is &e 
right dividing lin^ 

The economy's strong perfo rmance 
has had an effea — we would argue 
that it is a less healthy one — on fiscal 
policy as well. Hie balanced budget 
plan on which the president and Con- 
gress have agreed assumes that the 
growth of the past six years will con- 
tmue uninterrupted, and no matter that 
it already has last^ longer than die 
modem average. A recession or even a 
weakening of growth blows a hole not 
just in die budget but also in such 
undertakings as welfare reform, which 
requires that states put certain per- 
centages of welfare recipients to work 
each year or forfeit federal funds. 
Where in a weaker economy do the 
jobs come from? 

The American business cycle may 
be in a kind of abeyance. But it is a 
huge mistake to pretend, therefore, that 
it been repealed. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Waiting for NATO 


Next month the Western military 
alliance that faced off against the So- 
viet bloc during the Cold War will take 
its first major step toward knitting 
Euk^ together ^ain. NATO nations, 
which include die United States, 
Canada and most of Western Europe, 
will invite at least three formerly Com- 
murtist nations — Hui^ary, Poland 
and the Czech Republic — to begin 
a process that will eventually bring 
them into the alliance. This will be a 
milestone in bringing stability to 
Europe and giving newborn demo- 
cracies their ri^tful place. 

ft will be only a first step, however. 
The expansion of NATO will have to 
be ratified by the Parliaments of all 16 
current members, and the debates are 
likely to be lively. Morebver. many 
other democratizing nations want or 
will want membership in NATO. This 
first expansion cannot be the last 
In both regards, a Republican- 
sponsored measure to be considered in 
the House of Representatives this week 
would make a positive contribution. 
The bill would put C^gress on record 
again supporting NATO enlargetneoi. 
It would ^nphasize that such enlarge- 
ment is not aimed at Russia but should 
take place alongside the buildup of a 
cooperative relationship with Russia 
— although not to the point of in- 
fringing on other countries' rights. 


Most important, it would make clear 
that the U.S. Congress wants NATO’s 
door to stay open after this first round 
of enlargement — and that Romania 
and the Baltic lepuUics of Estonia, 
Latvia and Lithuania should be con- 
sidered prime candidates if they are not 
invited in the firat round Specifically, 
the bill would make those countries 
eligible for modest assistance the 
Drfense Department to help them meet 
the eligibility requirements for NATO 
membership. 

All of this is consistent with Clinton 
administration policy, but it can only 
help to have the Republican-led Con- 
gress reaffirming its support and. 
when ^propriate. prodding in the ri^t 
direction. 

The European Security Act of 1997. 
as the bill is known, is sponsored by 
Repneseotaave Benjamin A. CHlmaa, 
chairman of the IniemationaJ Rela- 
tions comminee, and co-sponsored by 
a number of other top Republicans, 
iocludina Majority Leader Dick 
Arniey. Hteir advocacy reflects a wel- 
come bipartisan consensus on the is- 
sue. A big mar^ of suppon for their 
bill would provide impoiWit political 
and psychological cornfoit for the re- 
forming ocuioiis of Eastern Europe that 
rightly aspire to join their fellow de- 
mocracie.s to the west. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Can Adams Deliver? 


Gerry Adams, the president of Sinn 
Fein, cannot compl^ about recent 
political developments in Britain and 
Ireland. His own party, the political 
wing of the Irish Republican Army, did 
well in the recent Irish and British 
parliamentary elections. More signif- 
icantly. The new British prime minister, 
Tony Blair, and the probable new Irish 
prime minister. Bertie Ahem, are 
likely to push for a Northern Ireland 
peace senlement. 

With President Bill Clinton in the 
White House, alt three governments 
sponsoring the Northern Ireland peace 
effort are now- led by men with whom 
Mr. Adams has declared he can work. 
That auspicious alignment puts a 
pow'erfiil burden on him to deliver 
promptly the unequivocal ERA cease- 
fire that he has long promised if the 
sponsoring governments demonstrate 
good faith. 

Since the IRA broke an earlier 
cease-fire in early 1996. suspected or 
confirmed IRA attacks have killed at 
least five people and injured hundreds. 
The IRA's return to violence forced the 
exclusion of Sinn Fein from the all- 
party Northern Ireland peace calks that 
began a year ago and resumed last 
week. Little progress can be expected 
without Sinn Fein's participation, 
which in turn depends on a resumption 
of the IRA cease-fire. 

Britain's new government has 
already made a conciliatory gesture by 
allowing its officials to meet with Sinn 


Fein representatives twice last month. 
It is also working to minimize pro- 
vocations in Nortbem Ireland's com- 
ing season of parades celebrating past 
sectarian battles. 

But it is unreasonable to expect any 
British government to admit Sum Fein 
to the p^ce talks until the IRA re- 
pudiates its terror tactics and demon- 
strates that a new cease-fire will be 
reliably maintainedl Nor can repre- 
sentatives of Northern Ireland's Prot- 
estant majoric}', whose participation is 
essential to any peace agreement, be 
expected to sit down with Sinn Fein 
until they can be assured that a new 
cease-fire will be lasting. 

Mr. Adams's attempts to {mi. 
primary blame on former Prime Min- 
ister John Major of Britain for the 
breakdown of die IRA cease-fire was a 
crude attempt to deflect blame from the 
IRA itself. Similarly, his implication 
that John Bruton, the defeated Irish 
prime nunister. was responsible for the 
negotiating stalemate conveniently ig- 
nores the Bruton goveromeat’s enorts 
to win new British inducements for an 
IRA cease-fire. 

However sympathetic Mr. Blair 
and Mr. Ahem are to legitimate Cath- 
olic or Republican grievances in 
-Northern Ireland, they cannot move 
the peace talks forward in the face of 
continued IRA terror. Now is the time 
for Mr. Adams to show that he can 
deliver a cease-fire. 

—THE NEW XORKTiMES 


iicral0:5i^r<fcnbunc 




£ST-\BUSHED /.w’ 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
K.ATH.ARINE P. DARROW. IW aunrHum 

RICH.-\RD McCLEAN. Publisher & Cine} Execuiive 
MICHAEL GETLER. E\et uint' Etliior 

• W.'U.TER WELLS. Mtnuiging E<iiW • P.AUL HOR\TrZ, Depniy Mjiugiuti Ediior 
> KATHERINE KNORR arm CHARLES MTTCHELMORE. Dejwiy EJitcrs • SAMUH. .AST and 
Carl GEWTRTZ. EJnitrs • ROBERT J. P(^AHL^ EAtur i4tlie Edinnil ^ges 

• JONATHAN G.AC£. Business tUid Fintiwe Edii>}r 
• RQiE BQNDY. FtiNuiKT 

■ J.AMES NkLEOD. Aihenniiii} Piu-aur • DIDER BRUN, CirtviJihm Direour 
Dinvintr bi Puhih-iJfHM - Rii-lKmf MrC/nm 



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The Policy Is to Encourage China to Cooperate 

A' i\n *n¥~ 


W ASHINGTON — The annual By Madeleine K. Albright 
congressional debate concerning 

China’s reaHtTi^ status h egt m - Some iha wnttr ts US. stcrcfory of stotf. 

argue diai we should suspend noimai , 

trade fTiiiwte pr^iicies on further down the road toward full ob- 

human rights, market access, military «flr_ 


exports other matters change. T^ 
administration is convinced tiiat our in- 
terests are better served a frank dia- 
logue wifo China in which differences 
are aired and opportonMes m establish 
common grouno are ei^csed. 

Let me explain why. 

The fiinire of U.S.-Chinese relations 
will depe^ primarily ou how China 
conducts itself as its economy grows 
and its regional influence expa^. Our 
Miicy is to encourage China to acc^t 
merely that it will find more security 
and prosperity if it abides by inter- 
national rules than if it does not. 

CuireoUy, China is productively co- 
gged with the interaational commu- 
nity in some areas. It helped gain ap- 
proval of a irea^ hanning explosive 
nuclear tests. It ts helpiiu to prevem 
instability on the Korean Peninsula It 
has su{^>orted peacekeeping operations 
in Cambodia els^here. 

It has acc^ted in principle, although 
not yet folly in^lemeoted, effective ex- 
port contrdis on sensitive technologies. 
It is actively eogag^ in discussions to 
enter the World Trade Organization on 
commercially acceptable terms. 

We would like to see China travel 


servation of iuteniational norms, par- 
ticularly those on human rights. Bul 
ghrau the undemocratic nature of its 
goveronKOt, we expect that movement 
to be gr»iual, ana would be. dis^ 
poinied, but aot suiprised, by sefoacks. 

We are convinced, bot^ver, that 
pTOffVSS is more iilmly to result from 
diafofue than &om a quixotic effm to 
isolam a nation single-handedly. We 
fflus recall throne of every five human 
beings on tills eartii lives in China. 

•Those who oppose continuum nor- 
mal trading relaDons have Iq^timate 
concerns, whi^ the adnuaistration 
ftiUy shares. But ibe tool they have 
dmsen is fess scalpel than wrecking 
ball . Tliey proceed fiw the fiagUe hope 
that unikieraily imposed ira^ sanc- 
tions would cause China to chai^ both 
its dom^c and its foreign policies. 

The administration preoe^ from the 
realistic convktion titac revoking 
China’s trade status would derail pro- 
spects for U.S.-Chmese cooperatitm 
on issues important to America's stra- 
tp^c iorerests, ranging from dismantling 
Norm Korea's mrcle^ program to en- 
couraging dialogue between Beijing and 
T^pei to controlliog nuclear prt&er- 
ation to safeguarding the globu envir- 


onment to crackmg down aa mterna- 
Tinnal KXTiv, dfugs asd Clime. 

Esdiog Don^ trading relation 
with would — as democtanc 

leaders in both plac« anesc — seyerdy 

Aftf y tfl g ft fiee market economies. ^ 
Taiwan e^ecially Hong Kong. , 

'nieHoogl&iiDggovemmentfaasefe- 
• rimat ed that this step might cut as much 
as $30 bilUon of me territory's trade, 
eliminate as many as 85,000 jobs and 
reduce economi^growtii by htuf . These 
losses would weaken. Hoog^ Kong just 
ivhen it most needs to assert its stiengfo 
and autonmny. 

Moreover, China, would surely re^ 
against U.S. effioits, endong^ 
ing more foan 170.1^ high-payit^ 
American jobs. And hljgher tarifra on 
our low^mst Chinese imports would 
add more ti>an S500 million to Amer- 
ica’s shopping bilL 

Critics say that disrupting commeroe 
with China is to .uphold U.S. 

principles. I believe strongly that our 
strategic dialogue can both protect 
American interests and uphold our 
principles, ^vid^ we are honest 
about our droerences on human rights 
and other issues and provided we use a 
mix of targeted incentives and sanc- 
tions to narrow these differences. 

in coniiast, elimination of China's 
noimal trade status, rather than advan- 
wng human rights and foe rule of law, 
would actually harm those in the soci- 


ety most dedicated to their promotioo. 

Whatever the debate’s outcome, 
Chiira wiU be a lisiDg force in Asian aod 
world affaiis. History leaches die wis- 
dom of encouragnig emaging powers 
m becc^ pari of in(enraaoQar«n^fr> 
meats fw settli^ dilutes, fecUhaui^ 
shttteA eccmomic growfo and establish- 
ing standaitis of iniemational bduvior. 

Domestically, we should not let foe 
rfiff>f i>.nges voiced in the current debate 
obscure j^reement oa long-term gMls, 
Whefoer our particular interest in 
CMn*. is diplomatic, security, cranmer- 
cial or humanitari^ our oveiridiitt 
objective ^ vo encoun^ mChiiuiM 
reject for foe rule of law. 

you are a business person, you win 
care whether China’s legal struenire 
respects individual rights, and whether 
the politTc^i environment is stable. 

It you are a military plannw , yon will 
want to see China moving ahi^ whh 
reform because you know that an qten 
society contributes to peace. 

If you are a human rights actixist, 
you will welcome foe long-term lib- 
eralizing effects of eTqranded com- 
merce. a strong private sector and a 
broad dialogue between China and foe 
world's det^racies. 

And if you are secretary of state, you 
will be dmeimined to move ahead on ^1 
fronts, encouraging foe fiill iniegratioo 
of C-bina into mt intenuitional system. 

The Wt/shmgroH Aw. 


Japan: A Broadened Military Role Isn’t Likely Anytime Soon 


T okyo — Despite coo- 
cems in foe Asia-Pacific re- 
gion about China’s growing 
power, and suspicion that the 
credible presence of U.S. mil- 
itaiy forces may not last far into 
foe 21st century, the chances of 
Japan playii^ a wider security 
rale seem slim. 

The cautious political and 
public reactions to foe weekend 
publication of an interim report 
on revised guidelines fra mil- 
itaiy cooperation between foe 
United States and Japan confirm 
Japan's hesitancy about being 
sem even as an assistant region- 
al policeman. 

Critical reactions from China 
and other Asian neighbors that 
suffraed under la^ese mili- 
laiy occupation before and dur- 
ii^ World War H, as well as foe 
constraints of foe postwar con- 


By Roger Buckley 


stitutioa imposed by America 
and its allies, are likely to 
strengthen {ucifist tendencies 
among Japanese and limit what 
foe government of Prime Min- 
ister Ryuiaro Hashimoto may 
want to do to broaden military 
cooperation wifo America. 

The Clintoo administrarion 
wants a more forthright accept- 
ance by Japm of what Wa^- 
ington perceiv^ to be the se- 
curity realities of East Asia. But 
changes to the alliance will 
probably be modest The actual 
results ^ the Clinton-Ka^timo- 
to joint declaration ou security 
in Apiti 1996 are more likely to 
be lifted to broad political gen- 
eralizations than to bring craf- 
crete measures to extend joint 
cooperation in a regional crisis. 


It may be infuriating for of- 
ficials in foe Pentagon and foe 
State Department, but no Jap- 
anese leader is likely to em- 
brace an alliance that requires 
any radical change from lap^ 
More intense discussions wifo 
Washington on defense collab- 
oradOD may lead only to in- 
crementd c^ges in joint plan- 
ning and defini^ foonatiue of 
Japanese logisti^ support for 
U.S. forces in a crius tm or 
around the Korean Peninsula. 

Japan is determined not to go 
to war again, other than in foe 
most rarely event that its 
home islands, territorial waters 
or airspace are invaded. Public 
distrust of the Japanese mlli- 
tary.knownas the Self-Defense 
Forces, is still prevalent. Stu- 


dents are waiy of a career in the 
forces because of entrenched 
pacifist sentiment in society and 
the hardslups involved. 

Such views are reiofiraced by 
critical comment from China 
and Soufo Korea. OffTcials in 
BeHing have denounced foe 
U.S.-JapaDese guidelines as a 
relic of foe War, while 
Seoul takes die position that 
Japanese minesweepers should 
not enter South Kraean waters 
even during a possible emer- 
gency on die peninsula. 

Regional opposition but- 
tresses foe portion of Japanese 
who want to retain a narrow 
interpretation of the country’s 
1 947 constitutioa They caution 
the government against making 
any dramatic departure from 
existing defense policies. 

The cabinet’s immediate pri- 


ority is to solve the siimneriiig.i 
dilute over Okinawa and con- 
tain public orax)sition to the bit- 
terly resenira U.S. bases in Ja-- 
pan's southernmost pefecnire. , 
Relocating some of the bases to-' 
ofoer pam of foe counny will 
require time and tact. 

Any widening of Japan's re-, 
sponsibilities in a regional se- 
curity crisis will take years of 
close consultation. The “softly.. 
ioSdy" approach is the best way . 
forward. If Washington wishes 
to encourage a more outward- , 
lottiring Japan, the next Amer-^' 
ican ambassador tn Tokyo will 
find that patience is required. 

The vniier. who teaches Ms-' 
lory at the Iniemational Chris- • 
riah University in Tokyo, ion- 
tributed this coninient to the 
Herald Tribune. 


France: Their High-Cholesterol Regimen Has Worked So Far 


S AN FRANaSeX) — The 
French paradox used to 
refer to foe way French people 
eat delidous high-cholesterol 
food yet stay thin and have few- 
er heart attacks, while Amer- 
icans glumly pick at healthful 
carbs and keep getting fatter. 

After foe June 1 elections. 
“French paradox" could refer 
to French theories of economics. 
The new Socialist prime min- 
ister. Lionel Jospin, promises m 
address the future retainii^ 
the iudulgent social policies of 
foe past. ^ to reduce foe deficit 
by shortening the workweek to 
35 houra and raising foe min- 


By Diane Johnson 


imum wage. All fois drives 
Americans mad, of course. 

Remember how people used 
to mutter about high suicide 
rates in Sweden’s welfare state, 
puritanically implying cause 
and effect? Americans are al- 
ways being told it is inevirable 
that people move oa to foe 
mean. lean, downsized world of 
the future, with foe unfit drop- 
piira by foe way. 

foe deftrat of John Ma- 
jor's govemmeni in Britain and 
Jacques Chirac’s conservatixre 
ution in France came when 


voters were given a choice, of- 
ten specific, between an 
American economic model and 
conception of sociew and what 
s eemed foe rather old-feshioned 
lefty social proiections people 
were used to. 

Their answer was “no" to 
Americao-style capitalism, and 
to the violent, deteriorating so- 
cieties they think it produces. 1$ 
there a messa^ here? 

One reason we Americans 
are confiised by foe paradoxical 
refusal of the Freocb to sub- 
scribe to what we have felt to be 


No Refuge for a Grandmother 


N ew YORK — She lies 
semi-couscious In foe 
burn unit of Jacobi Hospital in 
the Bronx. She breafoes 
through a hole in her throaL 
Her prognosis is uncertain. 

Betty Sbabazz never had to 
go out in search of evil. It 
always seemed to erupt right 
inside her tent. 

It came after her in foe very 
places where she was inclined 
io relax and lower her guard, 
where she had reason to be- 
lieve that at least for a little 
while she and her family 
would be safe. 

Thirty-two years ago. early 
on a Sunday morning in Feb- 
ruary. Sister Betty, as she was 
known to those close to her. 
and her husband. Malcolm X, 
were awakened by foe sound 
of smashing glass. ' 

They were in their modest 
home on 97fo Street in East 
Elmhurst, Queens. There bad 
been death tiueats. Now foere 
could be no doubL A fire- 
bomb. and thea another, and 
then a third had bwn hurled 
through the plate-^ass Uvii^ 
room window. *1110 house was 
on fire. 

Malcolm, always a com- 
manding presence, rounded 
up foe couple's four terrified 
and screaming young daugh- 
ters and led foem and his wife, 
pregnant with twins, out a rear 
door. The family stood in foe 
cold and watch^ as much of 
foe house was destroyed. 

One week later, on Sunday 
afternoon, Feb. 21, 1965, Sis- 
ter Betty and the girls — Ai- 
lalah, 6. Qubilab.J, Ilyasah, 3, 
and foe year-old Camilah — 
were seated near foe from of 
foe Audubon Ballroom in 
Harlem as Malcolm strode 
onto foe stage waited for 
the applause to die down. At 
foe last minute he had asked 
Sister Betty to bring the girls 
to the ballroom for ms speech. 


By Bob Herbert 


The family, he said, would be 
among friend. 

Malcolm had just begun w 
speak when the assassination 
occuiredL As Alex f&tey 
wrote: 

' 'In foe bedlam of shouting, 
screaming, running people, 
some ran toward the st^e. 
Among them Sister B«Ty 
scrambled up from whrae she 
had forowQ tas body over her 
children, who were shrieking. 
She tan crying i^sferically. 
'My husband! They're killing 
my husband! ' " 

Malcolm died from a shot- 
gun blast that was followed by 
a barrage of .38- and .45- 
caliber bullets. 

That kind of violence has a 
long shelf life. Two genera- 
tions later, people are still be- 
ing bit by the gunfire. 

Two years ago, Qubilah 
Shabazz, who has fought 
more or less losing tomes 
wifo alcoholism and ofoer 
problems, was implkattd in 
a plot to kill Louis Farrakhan, 
who she believed was in^rtic- 
ated in foe plot to kill her 
father. 

.A cocaine addict and gov- 
ernment infomMr named Mi- 
chael Fit^trick posed as a hit 
mw and helped autiutities 
gain evidence a^lnst Ms. 
Shabazz. 

He also stooped to foe cruel 
depths of allowing Sha- 
bas’s son Malcolm, 10 at foe 
time, to believe that 1». Mr. 
Fitzpatrick, would many 
Qubilah and thus be a father to 
young Malcolm. 

Percy Sutton, a clo» friend 
of the Shabazz family fra 
more than three decades, re- 
membered how that xA^nt: 

“It was so sad. Tlus Uitie 
kid, he ended up feeling guilty 
because he tried to persuade 


his mother to marry this guy. 
The guy told him, ‘We'll have 
our own house.' And Mal- 
colm got all excited and be 
said, ‘I’ll have my own bed- 
room?' And foe guy said, 
’Yes. you will.' “ 

So bow do you deal with it? 
You are 8, 9. 10 years old and 
your world has foe stability of 
an ocean wave. Your grand- 
fafoer was the victim of one of 
the most notorious murders of 
foe centDiy. Your fhther van- 
ished years ago. 

You have emotional prob- 
lems, tike some oibera in your 
family, and frightening feel- 
ings that you don’t begin to 
know bow to handle. 

Your mother drinks, and at 
some point hook^ up with a 
guy who beat her. 

Now you are 11 or 12, being 
shipped here and there, and 
notmog about the worid 
makes sense. Except maybe 
the gang in Texas tnat seems 
to care about you. 

But you are in New Yoik. in 
Yonkers. Wifo your grand- 
mother. A good woman, bm a 
grandmother ooDetbeless. 

Violence, fatberle&sness. a 
(foiid's sadness, more Wo- 
tence. The story of our time. 
The boy snapped and lit foe 
fin that consumed his grand- 
mother. 

Betty Shabazz her en- 

tire adult life trying to shep- 
herd her family th^^ the 
worst kinds of treachery and 
violent betrayal. 

Eight days ago she fell at foe 
bands of someone she could 
hardly have loved more. 

Once again, perhaps for 
the last lime, something ter- 
rible rose Dp to greet tUs vali- 
ant woman as she sought a 
moment's respite, a brief ces- 
sation of the turmoil, in a place 
where she thought she was 
safe. 

The New Tort Timet. 




an inevitable economic model 
is that we have allowed our eco- 
nomics to be tangled up with 
our (Judeo-Protestani?) ideas of 
morality. We are a self-right- 
eous. motaUstic nation. 

It’s “ri^t" to work hard. 
Gain is “good ’ ‘ The idle do not 
“deserve" handouts. We 
Americans are never pragmatic, 
and' often adopt social policies 
that are anther efficieDt nor hu- 
mane because, given a choice, 
we would rather be right than 
safe ra comfortable. 

The French don't seem to 
. have fois moralism problertL 
Tb^ are good dt managing 
par^ox. hfeybe it comes from 
their form of rather self-indul- 
gent Roman Catholicism, 
which allows foem to confess 
and continue, and pays little ai- 
tention to restrictive roles about 
divorce ra contraception, for 
example, but does seem to take 
seriously notions of humanity 
and brotherhood. 

And beyond, or in spice of. 
religion, they seem to have foe 
idea that life should be pleasant. 
Everyone should have five or 
six weeks of vacation. Babies 
stay in the hospital for a week or 
more to give mother and child a 
good start Working mothers 
have day care. 

Early retirement for people 
who work at hard jobs (and 
those who don’t) is supported, 
despite inconveojent strutes by 
the people who ate asking m 
quit at age 50 or 55 wifo gen- 
erous pensions. 

A Jospw supporter was 
quoted dining a campaign rally 
on May 30 as saying that 
“people have a right to a little 


utopianism nowadays." mean- 
ing that they have earned it after 
the hardships of foe goveni- 
mem's feeble attempts at belt- 
lightening. 

Those efforts were never con- 
vincing, and never expbined. 
V/ill dte French eventually have, 
as we say, to pay the pip^ 

Ceruun things about France 
may not suit us. A French cit- 
izen accepts a certain tneasuie 
of confonni^ to achieve social 
harmony. Diversity is not par- 
nculaily admired — they at- 
tempt to be inclusive by treaiing 
each person, whether Mali 

or Morocco, as French. 

We, in our fashion, can jeerat 
utopianism, but foe French have 
manned their hieh-cboiesteiol 
utopia rather well up to now, as 
their superb infrastructure of 
trains and metros, their Vuii- 
tons and Chanels, their sump- 
tuous museums and low crime 
rate attest. We could do well to 
look at their successes instead 
of. Protestant nation that we are. 
gloomily contemplating hell. 

The writer, who divides her 
lime between Paris and San 
Francisco, is author most re- 
cemtyof the novel "LeDivorce." 
She contributed this comment to 
The New York Times, 


Letters imetiOed ft>r jniNi- 
iviion should be addressed 
"Leden to the Editor" and 
contain the writer's signature, 
name and full address. Letters 
should be brief and are siibjeci 
to editing. We cannot be re- 
sponsible for the return of hh- 

soUched manuscripis. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897; Cuba’s Status 

Washington — • Home rule 
is President McKinley'^lan for 
foe settlement of the diffi ^itiy in 
Cuba. The Pr^ldent asked if 
General Gomez and foe insur- 
gents, who have decided foey 
would accept noAing but inde- 
pwidence, would take autonomy 
local seltovemment and 
ucedora from ^>anish taxation. 
S^taiy of State Calhoun re- 
plied that he believed a 'prepon- 
derance of sentiment among foe 
^ban people would co ny ei 
General Gomez and ofora lead- 
ers to accept such a proposition. 

1922; Police Entente 

PARIS — The need of both na- 
tion^ and intemational co-op- 
eration in the detection and 
prehension of c riminals was 
emphasized by Police Cotmnis- 
sioner Richard Enright, of New 
York Qiy, His mission to 
Europe is twofold; he comes to 


inspect and study foe police sys- 
tems of Paris, Rome. Berlin, Vi- 
enna, Munich and London, and 
to take back with him whatever 
will inpx>ve the methods in use 
at home; and to e^lish friendly 
relations with foe police heads of 
foe diiferent countries and se- 
cure an international entente fc4' 
the protection of foe law. 

1947: Burma March 

RANGOON — Elaborate ef- 
forts were mode to protect y 
Aung San.presidentof the Ann- 
Fascist People’s Freedom 
League, as he marched at titt 
head of a “march to freedom 
tiirough Rangoon. A letter 
threatening death warned the 
Burmese leader to dn^ attempts 
to wifodraw living allowance 
from government servants. ''U 
the Constiment Assembly red* 
to achieve its ends, the coun^' 
must be prepared for a further 
fight and for any eveucuahty. 
Aung San said. 







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international herald TRIBITVE, WEDNESDAY. JinVE 11, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


R4GE 11 




«> 




Military Life Is Not Fair^ Especially for Adulterers 


W ASHJNCjTQN — Senator Tom 
Daschle, the Democratic leader in 
the Senate, has propounded a new rule of 
fairness. If you hap^n to think that LieU' 
tenant Kelly Flinn was unfairly booted 
ftom the air force then, in all faiths, you 
.have IQ treat General Jose{^ W. Ralston 
just as unfairly. It would be only fair. 

The Daschle rule — an insistence that a 
bad rule be "t^lied similarly” — 

The French laugh at such 
American puritanisnu but 
this situation isn^t funny. 

quickly caught on in Washington where, 
as we all know, life is not.supposed to be 

fair anyway. 

There were, however, some in this cap- 
i{al who saw things differently. One, of 
course, was the embattled d^ense sec- 
retai>'. William Cohen, who persisted in 
wondering what General Rabton's infi- 
delity in the 1980s has to do with his 
competence to, if it came down to it, blow 
up the world. He stood by his man until it 
became clear that no one else would and 
00 Monday General Ralston wididrew. 

Another was Representative Jane Har- 
tnan,. Democrat of California. She had the 
effrontery to suggest that General Ral- 
ston’s case was not identical to Lieutenant 
FUnn’s. The lieutenant had been ch^ed, 
in addition to adultery, with disobeying an 
order and lying to her commanding of- 
ficer. No such charges have been leveled 
at General Ralston. 


By Richard Cohen 

At the highest reaches of the Pentagon, 
it is conceded that the air force botched the 
Flinn case. Instead of seeing her as a 
young officerin a swoon for a heel and not 
using her best judgment, she was treated 
like a regular Benedict Arnold. 71131 was 
unwise, ^though not necessarily wrong. 

Make wbai you will of the Flinn case, it 
has little bearing on General Ralston. The 
retirement of Major General John £. 
Longhouser is a bit closer to the marie — 
but his case is almost never mentioned by 
those citing the unfairness doctrine. 

The good general was the commanding 
officer at the Aberdeen Proving Ground 
where, it seems, a sex -abuse court-martial 
a day is in progress. The military’s hot line 
brought down General Longhouser. He 
had an affair, a caller alleged — and 
indeed the general had. He was separated 
at the time, but no matter. He cashed in his 
chips and left the army. 

It was,, in fact, the affair about the 
Longhouser atfair that prompted Secre- 
tary Cohen to'finally say ‘‘enough.” The 
Pentagon was registering a 3 on the 
Richter scale from ofTicers quaking that a 
hot-line call would fuiger them. In jusr 
recent weeks, two generals and one ad- 
miral hod been brought down by such 
charges. The search for sex abusers had 
turned into a hunt for adulterers. The posse 
had become a lynch mob. 

Every so often, Washington goes a bit 
nuts — and this is one of Aose moments. 
Sometimes the issue is nannies, some- 
times smoking dope and always — always 


— sex. The French laugh at us and that 
makes for a funny feature on the TV news, 
but this is no laughing matter. Good 
people who want to do good things for 
their country are rewarded with ridicule. 

To Secretary Cohen, General Ralston 
seemed a good place to draw the line. 
True, the man himself had once canned a 
subordinate for adultery, bur all adulterers 
are guilty of hypocrisy and, besides, we 
don't know the circumstances. We do 
know, though, that Genera) Ralston's own 


infidelity, which occurred while be was 
separated from his then-wife, has nothing 
at all to do with his competence as an 
officer. 

No matter. Lieutenant Flinn has been 
treated unfairly, maybe General Long- 
houser. too. Now it is General Ralston's 
turn. It turns out tliat Washington is 
Shakespeare's kind of town. “Fair is foul, 
and foul is fair.” he has the witches say in 
Macbeth. 

The WiiMnvhvi Pom 


From the Real to the Ridiculous 

W HEN William Cohen was offered lous puritanisi 
the too defense iob. one thing he did itary careers. 


vv the top defense job. one thing he did 
Qot wor^ about was having to manage the 
conversion of the Department of Defense 
into the Department of Deportment. But 
just as Les Aspin, Bill Clinton's fust 
Pentagon boss, was impaled on the issue of 
homosexuality in the military, so Mr. Co- 
hen has been hung out to dry on the age-old 
perils of policing male-female relations. 

The defense secretary is a ^histicaied 
man, well aware of the vagaries of human 
nature. His novels and his poetry acknowl- 
edge the role of passion in personal and 
political lif^e. Cohabitation was not un- 
knovim among his colleagues on Capitol 
Htill, and he numbered among his close 
friends Senator Gary Hart of Colorado, 
who was chased out of presidential pol- 
itics by his extramarital affairs. 

But nothing in his past prepared Mr. 
Cohen adequately for the roller-coaster 
ride real and serious problems of 
sexual intimidation and abuse to ridicu- 


lous Puritanism that wrecks valuable mil- 
itary careers. 

— Dot It/ RnhliT. fommcntiiiR in The 
Was/im'^ton Post. 

A military unchecked by a moral code 
is asking for chaos that unnecessarily risks 
the lives of our young men and women in 
uniform. However, if is a reach to ascribe 
a “palpable” effect on good order and 
discipline to the known facts of General 
Ralston's Indiscretions, an affair with a 
civilian woman 13 years ago. 

This differs from the case against Lieu- 
tenant Flinn. Her actions, beyond adultery, 
involved fraternization with an enlist^ 
man. disobeying a direct order and lying to 
her commander. That these acts would be 
deemed prejudicial to good order and dis- 
cipline should surprise no one. 

— Charles Moskos, a miliiary veteran 
and professor of siH'iolofiy at 
Noriliwcsicrn Univcrsiry. eommeniing in 
The WashinKion Post. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


brkt‘(! So Fa 


On China 

Regarding “Don't Let Sfarc~ 
Mongering Make China a Foe" 
(Opinion, May 31) by Ezra F. Vo- 
gel: 

Having lived and worked in 
Beijing for three years now and 
having observed the changes 
taking place in China for an even 
longer lime, I feel Mr. Vogel 
sketches a rather emotional ^ 
rose-colored image of the country 
^ even while c^ling for a “halt 
to tite emotional, one-sided re- 
porting on China.” 

The progress and transforma- 
tion in China over the past few 
years do indeed make many for- 
eigners believe these must and do 
go hand in hand with prograss in 
the free expression of opinions. 
I Wrong! This is still a totalitarian 


regime with hard-line attitudes to- 
ward issues such as human rights 
and the situatitxi in Tibet 

True, it is not in any.peison's or 
country’s interest to create “1.2 
billion enemies.” The West must 
keep up dialogue and reasoned 
discussion to wi± the prob- 
lems of an increasingly interde- 
pendent world. 

But does dialogue not {^up- 
pose a preparedness to admit mis- 
takes and readiness to learn from 
one's counterpart, to be as open 
and frank, as possible and to re- 
think and meditate on one's own 
value system? Is there really no 
such th^g as universal values? 

Oar wish for continued trade 
with and invesiraeat in China 
should not lead us to kowtow to 
-the Chinese and hush up problems 
in Older to spare them the im- 


pression that we are being over- 
critical. If China wants to be taken 
as a serious partner in the concert 
of nations, it needs to learn how to 
play fair. 

CHRISTINE LUTZ. 

Beijing. 

The critical writings of Western 
journalists and analysts are by no 
means intended to create an en- 
emy, as Mr. Vogel implies, but to 
pr^ China to improve its record, 
in human rights as well as La re- 
specting the sovereignty of neigh- 
boring countries. 

The disturbing trend is not that 
over the past few months a grow- 
ing number of publications have 
reported on a beUigerent China. 
The disturbing trend is China's 
aggressive posture itself. Com- 
mentators did not invent these ag- 


gressive moves: China held the 
largest military exercises ever in 
the ‘Taiwan Strait: China has en- 
croached on the Spratley islands, 
repressed the Tibetans and is 
slowly strangling freedom in 
Hong Kong. 

Condoning China's repression 
and aggr ession will only invite a 
more belligerent posture. China 
can become a fully accepted 
member of the international 
community if it leams to respect 
the rights of its own people, as 
well as those of Titet. Hong 
Kong and Taiwan, among 
others. 

MH-CHIN CHEN. 

Chevy Chase, Maryland. 

His Own Fault 

Vittorio Emonuele. pretender 


to the throne of Italy (Letters. May 
29}, understandably defends his 
grandfather, suggesting (cor- 
rectly) that if the king and Mus- 
solini were equal in the hierarchy, 
it was the Duce who made all the 
decisions. 

What the grandson fails to 
point out is the reason why his 
grandfather ultimately lost his 
throne. 

He had the chance in 1922. 
when Mussolini issued an ulti- 
matum to the prime minister, to 
declare a state of siege. 

Caring only about his throne, 
the king refused to do so and in- 
stead entrusted Mussolini to form 
a new government. If he had put 
democracy fust, he would not 
have lost his throne. 

DAVID WINGEATE PKE. 

Paris. 


[n Africa, a Battle Rages 
On Ivory and Elephants 


Bv Gerd Behrens 


C amps bay. South Africa — 
When the members of the 
Convention on Iniernaiional 
Trade in Endangered Species 
meet in Harare. Zimbabwe, from 
June 9 to 20, they will be facing an 
agonising decision. Should they 
continue the ban on the ivoiy' trade 
— and thus, as its supporters 
claim, protect the elephant? Or 
should they lift the ban in coun- 

ME.4N WHILE 

Dies where the animal is not en- 
dangered? 

Tlie commercial trade in ivory 

was prohibited by the convention. 

called CITES, in 1989. Due to 
rampant poaching. Africa's ele- 
phant population had dropp'd 
dramatically during the praceding 
decade. Irom 1 .3 million to 
625,000. 

In 1989. Loxculontu africaiia 
was listed with other highly en- 
dangered species such as the chee- 
tah.^ the leopard and the rhino- 
ceros. 

With 138 members. CITES re- 
sembles an eco-UN. Criiicb speak 
of an elephantine bureaucracy, 
but since the ivory ban was en- 
acted the number of pachyderms 
has stabilized and today is es- 
timated at 580,000. (In A.sia. there 
are only about 45.000 to 50.000 
elephants leh today.) 

Enter the three ■■aboliiionisi” 
countries: Botswana, Nanubia 
and Zimbabwe. Their combined 
elephant population is 175.000 
and increasing. In some places, in 
fact, the tuskers are cramped for 
space. Smbabwe is home to 
66.000 elephants, although its 
ecosvstem can suppon only 
40.000. 

The three countries have pro- 
pose a selective lifting of the 
ivory ban, applying only to their 
countries and only to ivory ob- 
tained through the natural mor- 
tality of elephants. Illegal trade, 
they argue, should not preclude 
le^ tr^e. 

As the Harare conference 
gets under way. a debate rages. 
In the Green corner is Dave 
Curry, director of the London- 
based Environmental Investiga- 
tion Agency. 

' ‘The ban on international trade 
in ivory has been a huge success." 
hesald. “Evenapanial relaxation 
would send a message to poachers 


that ivory tnuie is back. This 
would disaster for elephant 
populations across the v*'o con- 
tinents.” 

Many Africans have not taken 
kindlv to being lectured from afar. 
Never shy to lambaste the West. 
Prasident Roberi Mugabe of Zim- 
babwe claimed that Western con- 
cern lor (he elephant amounted to 
ecocolonialism. 

“We must resist the recolon- 
izaiion of our countries under a 
facade of programs to s^eguard 
the global environment,” he said 
— in shon. Western animal rights 
activists should climb down from 
iheir ivory tower. 

Is the Western love affair with 
the pachyderm what James P . 
Pinkerton, a former aide to Pres- 
idents Ronald Reagan and George 
Bush, calls enviromaniicism'? The 
Greens, he writes, have “posi- 
lioned the flora and fauna of the 
Evih as the new oppressed pro^ 
leiariat.” 

It goes without .saving that the 
Western elephantophile views the 
tusker in a different light from the 
African subsistence farmer who 
has an entire year's crop 
trampled. 

“Elephants are nice animals." 
a peasant was overheard saying, 
“but thev are bad neighbors.” 

Dr. Malan Lindeque. Nami- 
bia's foremost authority on ele- 
phants. feels that animal rights 
activists miss the point. 

“CITES completely Ignored 
the most insidious and irrever- 
sible threat to wildlife in the 
world.” he said. “And that is 
habitat loss.” 

In Namibia, more than half of 
the elephants w'ander outside na- 
tional parks, into human habitat. 
Only if the elephants are worth 
more to people than the damage 
they do — only if they are seen not 
as a pest but as an asset — w'ill 
conservation stand a chance, says 
Dr. Lindeque. Thus Namibia 
wants to let local communities 
profit from the proposed sale of 
ivory'. 

The only way forward, it 
seems, is ihrou^ a' modus vivendi 
for man and animal. 

The writer, Sfiddeuisehe Zvi- 
rung's correspandent in snuihenj 
Afrieii. eunirihuicd this comment 
to the Inicrnaiionai Herald 
Tribune. 


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herald tribune, 
W^DNESDAV, JUNE 11, 1997 
i^GE 12 


STAGE/ENTERTAIISfMENT 



Class Act: 
Hancock 
+Shorter 

2 Jazz Greats 
Just Do It 


By Mike Zwerin 

/ilTfnh/Hiiiii// HtiuUTtiluinr 

P ARIS — Herbie Hancock and 
Wayne Shorter were iraveling 
through Western Europe Iasi 
week promoting their new duo 
album “1+1” (to be released on July 1 
by Verve). 

They looked comfortable with the 
designer-clad luncheon crowd in the 
RiU Hotel, although they laughed more. 
Hancock led the conversation. Shorter's 
considerable power is behind the scenes 
and based on articulation and aspect 
more than impulse or quantity. Not that 
Hancock is necessarily the reverse, but 
amplitude counts a lot with him. It is 
doubtful that their casting hod required a 
verbal or even a conscious decision, h 
was yin and yang. They are both prac- 
ticing Buddhists. 

Asked about their new album. Shorter 
replied: “We just went in and did it." 
Sounds simple. 

"Wayne writes with simplicity." 
Hancock explained. “But there's al- 
ways that spice of his in the voicings he 
chooses. And he writes them ..." He 
stopped for emphasis; “. . . in pen. Not 
pencil. Pen." 

Shorter writes the exact notes he 
wants playted rather than the habitual 
permissive shorthand chord symboh. 
“Most piano players reduce the written 
chords to ^mbols." Hancock explained. 
“They think this gives them more free- 
dom. And most of the time it does. 

"But I learned back in 1967 we 
were doing 'Nefeniti' with Miles." He 
turned to Shorter. "Remember?" Hancock 
continued; "I learned tftat I'd better pay 
attention to Wayne's exact notes. There's 
more to Wayne than meets the eye." 

Hancock was enigmatic, like a 
private eye weighing elusive clues; "1 
learned that there's always something in 
there I have to learn. Then little by little 
I move away from what he's written. 
But rather than change a whole lot of 
notes. 1 u.se my touch on the instrument 
us my entry'- Because there's really 
enough freedom in there already.*' 
Shorter s.'tid "I'll shiA the weight 
uf tile notes sometimes. The way 
the ninth chords move, for exam- 



W'cA /if Shorter (left) and Herbie Hancock: The exact notes. 


pie. I call it my 'nightclub' sound." 

His voice resembles the soft. Finely 
woven te.xture of his tenor saxophone 
tone; the tinkle of glasses and cutlery in 
the room w'as growing louder and he had 
begun to address die seasoning of his 
sal^. He was hard to hear. 

Had he said “nightclub" or “ninth- 
club?" 

“Nimh-clubl?" Hancock laughed 
and took a sip of wine. ‘ "That sounds like 
something Wayne would say. That was a 
Waynism." They laughed together. He 
turned to Shorter: "You mean that Satie 
kind of thing?' ’ Shorter nodded. There is 
great complicity between them. 

You should know that Shorter lost his 
wife — they had been extremely close — 
on TWA Flight 800 from New York to 
Paris. Bereavement still weighs on him. 

Hancock and Shorter were at the cre- 
ative center of the Miles Davis Quintet 
in which — with Ron Carter, bass, and 
the late drummer Tony Williams — they 
definitively expanded the hannonic and 
ffrythmic vocabulary of jazz. Modem 
jazz hannony today sounds like their 
younger brother of theirs. You wonder if 
they feel as though they are forever 
catching up with themselves, and if it 
bothers them what they do about it. 

“Riy attention to the moment" Han- 
cock replied. "We ay to set up external 
things to do, so that we can get an honest 
connecti<Mi between die two of us and die 
music." 

The album was recorded six hours a day 
seven days in a row in Hancock's home 
snidio, where he could play his own be- 
loved Hamburg Steinway piano. 

"One day we didn't play anj^ng at 
all. we were Figuring things out" Short- 
er said. "And one day we were tired. I 
said. ‘Let's go and get some rest* " 

"I’m into a lot of projects right now," 
Hancock suddenly remembers that he 
"should be promoting" his recent ap- 
pointment as artistic director of a new 
jazz program "under the umbrella" of 


the Thelonious Monk Institute in Los 
Angeles, where he and Shorter both live. 
"We're not trying to copy Lincoln Cen- 
ter," he emphasized. "I’m not the fo- 
cus. It's not going to be a platform for 
me in any way." 

And next month, his all-star band 
with Michael Brecker. John Scofield, 
Dave Holland. Jack DeJc^etie and 
Don Alias will play nine festivals in a 
row. take a day off and then do another 
nine. Generally he avoids touring that 
hard but the group is "kind of ex- 
pensive and that's the only way to make 
the bottom line work." 

In that sort of simation. he prefers to 
play the same set of tunes in the same 
order every night because it "eliminates 
one of.ihe variables." 

“There are more constants," »id 
Shorter. 

"We can concentrate on ..." 

Shorter u'ore a sly grin: * 'Concentrate 
on Constance." 

". . . on the music." Hancock was 
abashed to find himself sounding so 
serious. 

A fter an interruption 1^' a 
waiter, Hancock went cm to ex- 
plain ^1 concenoaiing on the 
music involves first and fore- 
most beirtg democratic: “This is one 
value of jazz beyond the music itself." 

" People share ideas and listen toeacb 
other." Shorter added ' 'You have to be 
democratic or you can't play the music. 
Qtherw'ise it will end up Uke what has 
been going on in Lincoln Center.** 

Did he nwan to be controversial about 
the controversial politics of Wynton Mar- 
, sails, who directs the Lincoln Center jazz 
program, or what? Remember. Hanxick 
had already disassociated himself from 
that program w'hiJe describing his ow*n. 

Ask^ to explain what he meant. 
Shorter said: "1 only mean that otherwise 
it's a dead-end street. Cul-de-sac.** Then 
he concentrated on his dessert. 


Lewis and ‘Yankees’ Go Home! 


By Sheridan Morley 

' iiiirrntmoml Henild Tribune 

L ONIXDN — For those of us still 
hopelessly, obsessed with the 
Broadway musical past and 
present, "Damn Yankees'* 
( Adelphi) has, like 'the only other Adler- 
Ross score ("The Pajama Game)." al- 
ways been something of an embairass- 
ment. Both have had long and rich lives 
across almost half a century, and both 
have always seemed to me deeply ter- 
rible, Ihou^ Americans always main- 
tain that, being respectively about base- 
ball and garment-facto^ industrial 
unrest, tiiey simply do not travel well. 

The cutrent ro^ show revival stars 
J^ry Lewis, another American taste 1 
have never managed to acquire or un- 
derstand. and it t^es us back to those 
terrible pre-1980s when all we ever got 
fn»z) Broadway were exhausted tours, 
as though the West End were jiisi one 
mme (&te on the map somewhere 
vaguely between Boston and Baltimore 
and a long, long time after the originaL 
The current prrauction was created for 
Broadway only a couple of seasons ago. 
but it alrrady looks terminally tired and 
relies on a vaudeville routine from 
Lewis in the second half that , would 
have been badly dated (and probably 
already was) in a Palladium turn circa 
1955, which is precisely the period of 
tills Mostly show. 

L^is a skin-crawling mix of ob- 
sequiousness and arrogance, and his per- 
formance as the devil in this weird Faust 
rerun Is at best perfunctory; (he night I 
was there, he gave the impression tii^ he 
would be pho^g his pemrmance in. if 
be hadn't somewhere mislaid his phone. 
The lest of a hugely undistinguished cast 
others respectmlly around him. waiting 
mr sometUng to happen, which it never 
does. 

"Damn Yankees" is tiie one people 
mean when they say tiiey hate American 
musicals, and it remains as lethally in- 
adequate as it always was. If you still 
believe, as I do. in the general greatness 
of the form, stay away from tiiis one. 

Atthe Hampstead. “All Tilings Con- 
sidered'' is a ^t fuE-lengtb play by Ben 
Brown and it is exactly what you'd ex- 
pect if you had locked the young dram- 
atist in a master class with Alan Ayck- 
bourn. Simon Gray and Tom Stoppard, 
from Gray he h^ unashamedly bor- 
rowed Butley, the worid-yrea^ uni- 
versity professor forever being invaded 
1^ importunate smdenis expecting him to 
teach them something: from Stoppard we 
have a rapid guide to philosophy through 
the ages, and from Ayckbourn's sub- 
urban sitcoms, the hilariously ghoulish 
prospect of someone being constantly 
interrupted just as they are on the verge of 
taking their own life. 


Bruno Villien's "Nocturne for Lov- 
ers," is a 1^4 of music-drama recital 
tha t would havre been a better bet for 
BBC Radio 3 or the Edinburgh Festival 
on a hot Sunday afternoon. - 
• The story is the familiar, doomed u- 
fair of George Sandaod Frederic Cl^m. 
as played out throu gh letters and diari^ 
by Caron the eqi^y charismatic 
soloist David Abramovitz, but there is 
little that even they can do to.redem an 
uncharacteristically leaden trai^atioa by 
Gavin Lambert. There is a lot of laleni'on 
stage here, but none of it has anything to 
do with the writing or witfi Kado 
Kosizer's equally lea^ direction. 

□ 

"If it ain't broke, don’t fix it.” Thus 
. TVevor'Nunn called his first press con- 
ference as .director-designate of the Na- 
tional Theatre, where as of Oct. 2 he 
inherits from Richard Eyre the mosr ^ 
presti^ons role in British theater. ;* 

Nunn's theme was one of continuity': 
there will be no bloodbath, many di-, 
rectors and designers and. indeed, pro- 
ductions,ofthecurrentFegimewillcon- 

Jerry Lewis in “Damn Yankees.*' tinue on the South Bank under hisj. 

management, which is not altogether 
What is interesting about Brown is snrprisi^ given that Nunn is inheriting, 
the tremendous confidence with which the National at the very height of its 

he has borrowed these over-familiar in- critical and commercial form. 

gi^ents and turned them into a mix all His plans do, however, suggest a 
his own. directed (first for Ayckbourn's greater commitment to botii regional- 
Scarborough Theatre and now for Lon- ism and internationalism, much in keep— 
don)byAlanSiTachan.whohasbrought ing with that of the new govemmenL-?* 
together a group of magical character There will, for instance, be an imme- ' 
actors to flesb out Brown's collegiate diate association with the Comedie^ 
low table. Francaise, which will bring to the Na-r... 

There's the weli-meaning college ttonal' Marivaux's "Les Fausses Coa-..[ 
chaplain (Timothy Kighcley, forever or- fidences. ’ ' Also from Pnris, comes Peter--* 
dain^ by God to say just the wrong Brook's staging of "Oh! Les Beaux 
thing at the wrong time), the well-mean- Jours" starring his wife, Natasha;.i- 
ing spinster librarian (Susie Blake), the Parry. 

LU-meaning tabloid journalist (Jane Nunn's own first production for the-. • • 

National will be of a new Christopher 71 L 
BRITISH THEATER Hainpton version of Ibsen's "An En-..: 

— emy of the People" starring Sir lan-j 

Slavin). the hopelessly rakish fellow tu- Mc^Uen, who goes on to double as.„ 
TOT (Michael Lumsden), all surrounding Captain Hook and Mr. Darling in:* 
Christopher Godwin in a magic, manic Nunn's version (with director John. • ; 
peiformance as the philosophy tutor Caiid)of“PeterPan''astiieNationars. * 
whoM initial impolse to do away with Christmas treat. f 

himself becomes all too comprehensible Other highlights of the '97f 98 season 

once you get to know the people who are will include a new Michael Frayn playt 
determined to stop him. and revivals of Coward's "Private., 

"All Things Considered" is that cur- Lives" and Rodgers-Hatnmerstein's- 
rent rarity, a highly commercial West "Oklahoma", to maintain the Nation-; 

End comedy about a angle subject, and al's strong commercial presence. There 
it will have, I suspect, a long London will alsoT be new plays from Frank, 
life. McGuinness, Ken Campbell, Kevin 

At Cliiche^r, heralding a summer of Elyot and, perhaps most inoiguing of 
rare and remarkable divas (Liliane all, a hitherto unstaged Tennessee Wil- 
MontevecchL Julie Christie, Kathleen liams, "Not About Nightingales.". 
Turner. Natalia Makarova), we have the which was discovert in manuscript by 
welcome return to the British stage of 'Vanessa Redgrave and will be staged in ' ' 
Leslie Caron. It would have been even partnership with her Moving Theatre. ^ 
better (0 have had her back in a play; Company and .the AUev Tlieaire o^ 
whatwe have instead, at the Minerva in Houston. 








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is about to leave the family's 
affqile house a few miles west 
of Nashville and join the Con- 
federate Army. Just before he 
leaves, he enacts a silent ritu- 
al: "He put his hand and held 
it there on top of mine on the 
fence rail. 1 thought of it as the 
laying on of my commission, 
the moment of my resolve to 
act. us far as I was able at ten 
years old. the part of a grown 
man. Even the thought was a 
heavy burden." 

.Almost immediately after 
the father's departure, federal 
forces take Na.shvi]Ie and, un- 
der General William Starke 
Rosecrans. establish a heavy- 
handed occupation the strin- 
gent terms of which include 
"a loyalty oath, a card index 
on every citizen in the county, 
breaking and entering houses 
at all hours without pretext. 


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NASHVILLE 18f4: 

Tbe Dyiug of the Light 
By Mihlison Jones. 129 pages. 
S/7.95. J.S. Stvulcrs Jh Co. 
Reviewed by 
Jonathan Yardlcy 

L ike Stephen Crane, who 
wrote that great b^e 
novel "The Red Badge of 
Cciunige" witiiout having 
been in battle himself. Madis- 
on Jones has written in 
"Nashville 1864" an e.xoaor- 
dinurily vivid, utterly believ- 
able book about a Wtir in which 
he neAvr fought. Since Jones's 
military serv'ice was in Korea 
as a military policeman tvfbre 
the outbre^ of w:ir there in 
1 ‘950. it >cemA unlikely that he 
ever saw combat anywhere. 
1'ei you would never knou' 
that from this book, which has 
tile loiik of n minor classic. 

It i> ihe lUlh novel by 
Junes, whose first was pub- 
lished four decades ago. Two 
uf his bouks. ".An Exile" 
ll%7) and "A Ciy of .Ab- 
sence" il47H. received de- 
sert'ediy admiring reviews. 
< but ilieii his career flattened 
out. Jones is now in his early 
7(')s. but this spare, evocative 
narrative ha.s the energy of 



The Prototype- 


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sending people (including 
women) to the penitentiary 
and to Northern prison camps 
because of dieir politics . . . 
and other policies I could 
name." 

The Moore household is 
not seriously threatened by 
the occupation, though there 
are occasional distressing in- 
cidents. but as the war wears 
on Steven's mother — strong, 
courageous, loving, deter- 
mined — slowly begins to 
wear under the pressure. 
When one of her two young 
daughters falls gravely ill, she 
ftoolly succumbs to Steven's 
wheedling (uid pennits him to 
set out in search of his father. 
This he-does witii his friend 
and contemporary, a slave 
named Dink. 

H ere we are on honored 
ground. The story of two 
friends, one -white and one 
black, going off together to 
face unknown dangers, has its 
roots in that most paradig- 
matic of American novels. 
"The .Adventures of Huckle- 
berry Finn." and recurs in 
various forms in the work of 
William Faulkner, li encap- 
sulates in miniature many of 
the greatest themes of Amer- 
ican history and literature, 
from tbe burden of slavery 
and race to tbe longing for 
exploration and tbe new. It is 
momentous business, and 
Madison Jones rises to it. 

"It’s going to be aiielluva 
fight around here." a Con- 
f^erate sniper says as he 
warns the boys to "get back 
home quick and slay there." 
That is an undersiaiement. 
"Over tbe course of now 
nearly four years of the war." 
Steven writes nearly 40 years 
later, "1 had often heard de- 
scribed and had further imar 
gined many of the horrors that 
occur in battle. But my inner 
vision of these things was 
little preparation for experi- 


ence of the things in them- 
selves.** 

The boys have only the 
vaguest idea where they mean 
to go. and eventually they 
have utterly no idea where 
they are. What they do know 
is that they are together, 
friends in the way that white 
and black boys were in the 
South in those days: friends, 
real friends, but also master 
and slave. As they progress 
toward what Steven will see 
in retrospect as "my long 
nightmare," the delicate bal- 
ance of their relationship 
slowly changes. When they 
are briefly captured Yan- 
kees and encounter a black 
soldier. Dink defiantly an-' 
nounces that he, too. is a Con- 
federate. He does not stay one 
for long. 

Steven Moore is presented 
as a man of hU own times, not 
of ours, and must be accepted 
as such. It is passible that 
Madison Jones shares, at least 
to some degree, .some of the 
views of the antebellum 
South (hat Moore expresses 
here, but those opiniems have 
their legitimacy and should 
be heard fairly. 

They ore. in any event, ul- 
limaleiy immaterial to what 
Madison Jones has accom- 
plished here. His real subject 
has nothing to do with the 
political or moral issues 
raised by the Civil War. 
everything to do with tbe cost 
that conftict exacted upon 
Those caught up in it. some by 
choice,, sume unwittingly. 
Brief though it is. "Nashville 
1 864' ' is populated by a lacge 
cast of th^ughly believa^ 
characters, it moves forward 
with irresistible natrative 
force, and it Is written in pr(»e 
of Ihe utmost elegance. It is. 
in all respects, .x splendid 
piece of work. 


Jonathan Yardiey is on the 
.vuff of The Washhigron Post. 


Living in the U.S.? 

Now printed in New York 
for same day 
deliwry in key cities. 

To subscribe. caU 

1 - 800-882 2884 

i k IMTIIXITIliMI M . 

IicralOiiii^Cfcnbune 


, THE woRUrs n\iiy nf.hsiimm-.h 




sVGo 11< 


Milo 




WiXi 






j 4.. : ■ '■■■ 

f; , 1. . . 


nfd^TIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
^'fESDAl'. JUNE 11, 1997 


STAGE/ENTER TAINMENT 









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»:/•• y. 

V. • 'J'.swif. • 


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m-\jSSiL 






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JUian Watson and Gilles CachemaiUe in new Paris production of "The Marriage of Figaro." 




^Figaro | in 20th-Century Dress 


By David Steven; 

InienMiii’niil HertilJTrihi !«■ 

P ARIS — it is a risky usiness to 
fool around with the me frame 
of Mozart's “The M trriage of 
Figaro," so closely i: the action 
linked to &e social realities of the pre- 
revolution^ late-lSth centuF. 

Yet in his production at t e Theatre 
des Champs-Elysees. witl William 
Christie and his Arts Flor sants en- 
semble as musical partne s. Robert 
Carsen succeeds most of th lime, de- 
lineating his characters so iharpiy in 
their mi^m dress guise tha they come 
aoDss as freshly seen rathe than over- 
familiar. The production, o ginally for 
the Grand Theatre in Bo: leaux four 
years ago, was restaged ;re almost 
tnm scratch. 

We seem to be in mid- hli century 
tnd in England. Count A naviva. el- 
igantly tailored, vain ai I arrogant, 
night be a junior ministi in a Tory 
:abinel (in real 2(nh-cen iry life his 
. lareer will surely be inie jpted when 
ie is caught in the wroni b^). Cher- 
- ibino is an English scht Iboy in the 
:(uiches of rampant adoleKnt hormon- 
il imbalance. Don Bartolowiih attach^ 
rase, might be an insuraije agenL The 
Tountess and Susannabre credible 
nends and aJiies in intri«e despite the 
fnmloyer-eniployee relapnship. 

the occasional sight bg b brought 
out, like a camera for a f ick snapshot 


hit century 
naviva. el- 
I arrogant, 
in a Toiy 
iry life his 


and the second act finale goes over the 
top by giving the rage and frustration of 
the Countess-Susanna-Figaro trio de- 
structively violent physical expression. 

The sets, by Charles Edwards, show 
the inside of a sparely furnish^ manor 
house from dinerem angles, and the 
garden scene of the final act has a some- 
what surreal air, peopled by a platoon of 
undressed shopwindow mannequins. 

Christie's precise and dramarically 
oriented direction provided the produc- 
tion's musical motor. His period in- 
strument ensemble produced a lean but 
not undernourished sound, and most of 
the singers provided the appropriate un- 
written embellishnaetits. 

The cast, vocally excellent and con- 
vincingly acted, was headed by William 
Shimell and Rosa Mannion as the Al- 
mavivas. and Lillian Watson and Gilles 
CachemaiUe as Susanna and Figaro. The 
first-class gallery of secondary charac- 
ters include Stafford Dean's secure and 
sonorous Barrolo, Anne Howells's Mar- 
cellina hanging tightly onto fading 
beauty. Eirian James as the wildly li- 
bidinous Cherubino, and Jean-Paul Fou- 
checourt and Michel Fockenoy in 
shrewd vignettes as Basilic and Cuizio. 


To the MC93 theater in Bobigny, 
Peter Sellars brought a strange double- 
bUl pairing Kurt WeiU and Bertolt 
Brecht’s first collaboration, the "Ma- 
hagonny Songspiel," and an extended 


Dance of the Last Emperor 






Bv Alison Dakota Gcc 


H ong KONG — Aisin Gioro 
Pu Yi. ihe wretched last em- 
peror of China, was trans- 
formed from a historical foot- 
note into an international superstar by 
Bernardo Bertolucci's spectacular 
movie. NowPu Yi's life has been turned 
into a controversial ballet, with perfect 
and provocative timing. 

Choreographed by Wayne Eagiing. 
the artistic duector of the Dutch Na- 
tional Ballet and fonner star soloist of 
the Royal Bailer in London, the lavish 
Two-hour production premiered at the 
Hong Kong Cultural Center last week, 
three weeks before the niniover of Hong 
Kong to Chinn. 

That “The Last Emperor" was more 
than just an ordinary ballet was made 
apparent by the opening night crowd, 
including a number of spectafors in retro 
Chinese'fashion — w omen in cheong- 
sams and men in silk Mao jackets and 
Western trousers. The house was nearly 
full, a rarity' for (he Hong Kong Ballet, a 
small troupe of 3S dancers that has been 
graduaUy emerging as one of Asia's 
better componiejk. 

Eagling's work, which is the first full- 
length production (o have been created 
for~ihe Hong Kong Ballet, attempts to 
transform the pageantry of imperial and 
revolutionary China into a dance drama, 
moving through the Pu Yi's experiences 
and probing his enigmatic character 
along the way. 

The narrative unfolds in 1 against 
an imptosing backdrop that threatens to 
dwarf its dancers — enormous bamboo 
screens with film projections of the Im- 
perial City. The 2-year-old Pu Yi. in u 
bright imperial-yellow silk robe, is be- 
ing installed as emperor, a mere infant 
ruling the Qing dynasty's corrupt 
household in the Forbidden City in 
Beijing. The ballet then pivots on his 
removal from the throne and the dy- 
nasty's collapse in 1911. and follows 
him through an epic personal history', 
ending with his metamorphosis into a 
zealot of the Comntunisi Party . 


Bach cantata titled “Dialogue Between 
Fear and Hope After Death." 

The pairing, or the ratiemaie of it. has 
something to do with a view of the 
Weill-Brecht wc^ as a kind of mock or 
profane cantata, wriih certain affinities 
with Bach's Lutherian tradliion, but the 
two do nor make a comfort:U>le duo. 

The “^^ag4M)Dy Songspiel" con- 
tains the kernel of what eventually be- 
came the “Mahagonny" opera, with a 
half dozen of Brecht's poents inter- 
spersed widi instrumentaf numbers. Sel- 
lars gave it a production that in its sini- 
pUcity must have been much like the 
original at Baden-Baden in 1927. Four 
men and two women in evening clothes 
mounted on a platform that rolled for- 
ward on the stage, but otherwise liiile 
action. It was sung in English trans- 
lation, except the lines that originally 
were in Brecht's quaint English ("Is 
here no telephone? “K 

For the Bach, the men took off ihe'u- 
black ties, and the singers ^rfomied the 
cantata “O Ewigkeit. du bonnerwori." 
interspersed with parts of othercani^as. 
accompanied by supufluous gesturing. 

Lorraine Hunt. Mary Westbrook- 
Geha. Frank Kelly. Sanford Sylvan. 
James Maddalena and Vincent Dion 
Stringer made up the vocal sextet, and 
Craig Smith cimducted the Emmanuel 
Music ensemble, using the sante m- 
struments for both composers, which 
produced some unaccustomed sonor- 
ities for Bach. 


T he ballet is cenainly no 
homage. Eagiing. like others 
who have reviewed the fallen 
monarch's history , takes a crit- 
ical view. “Pu Yi had no moral fiber." 
he said. In his choreo^phy. Eagiing 
spins the ironie.s of Pu Yi's fate, casting 
the emperor as a prisoner — not only of 
a series of institutions and regimes, but 
of life itself. “He was Imprisoned by the 
pe^le he was ruling." lugling soi’d. 

ugling took on the project at the 
request of Stephen Jefferies, the Hong 
Kong Ballet's artistic director. The two 
have known each other for 30 years, since 






Hv A -.i-iHs-ni .j 

Wc/v/ii' Eagiing with Fci Leung {Pu Yii and Frankie Un (his second wijer 


they were friendK rivals and co-mem- 
bers of the Roy.'il Ballet. Both moved on 
to anisttc directorships on different con- 
tinents. but they always looked for the 
chance to work together again. .A year 
ago. Jefferies cal]^ uiih the opportu- 
nity'. 

“He said uc should make the most of 
the amazing amount of publicity' that 
would be generated by Hong Kong's 
handover loChina." Eagiing s.iid. They 
wanted to create something especially 
for the Hong Kong Ballet, a production 
with which (he troupe could travel in- 
lemaiionally. Jefrerie> suggested “The 
Last Emperor." “But he also said we 
should c.Kpeci to get a lot of Hack." says 
Eagiing. "This could be an emotive 
subjecr for Beijing." 

Eagling's ballet is not the first artistic 
take on the bnttle character. Haw ed judg- 
ment and se.NUul ambiguity of China's 
last imperial ruler. In Benolucci 
funred Pu ^'i's life sioty into the film 
“Tltc Liisi Emperor." which won the 
Oscar for best picnire. Eagiing studied 
the film and also scoured such chronicles 
of Imperial life as "Twilight in the For- 
bidden City ." by Pu YI's Scottish tutor. 
Reg inaid Johnston, .'uid "From Emperor 
to Citizen.' ' Pu Vi's autobiography. The 
ballet follows the movie closely, and Su 
Cong, one of the three composers of the 
film's Osc:u-winnmg mu.sical score, 
also wrote the ballet's score. And it is 
clear that Eagiing owes a considerable 
amount to Bertolucci's woik. 

Like Benolucci, Eagiing also ex- 
plores Pu Yi's se.xualit) . One especially 
beautiful scene has the emperor entering 
his bedroom ro find his iwo w ;ve« watt- 
ing for him. “But Pu Vi is not in- 
terested." Eagiing said. “So the two 
women engage in a female pas de deux. 


a display of their deep \ earning to get 
him to show some attention." iPu Yi 
was m^irried again toward the end of his 
life: his widow. Li Shuxian. died in 
Beijing at the age of ?3 on Monday.) 

"The Last Emperor" is more of an 
aesrhetic journej’ than a political or in- 
tellectual one. Still, it has gotten mem- 
bers of Hong Kong's artistic community 
talking. "In Hongkong, there has been a 
lot or discussion about censorship .'ind 
self-censorship." said Mok Chiu Yu. co- 
ordinator of the Hong Kong-based Asian 
People's Theater Society. "I like this 
ballet's approach. We :ill applaud ;inisis 
who are pushing limits while ihey c.'in." 


B ut not everyone praises 
Eagling's choice of '•ubjeci 
malter. “I don'i know whj. 
you would choose Pu as a 
subject now said Louis Vu. director ol 
performing arts at the Hong Kong .^rt 
Center. "Thi.s production is like tJ>c 
Barbie doll that was created especially 
for the handover. She's dressed in a 
Qing dynasty costume. So where's the 
Hong kong connection? Our job as 
anisrs is to confront subjects that people 
don't want to touch — like Hong 
Kong's colonial history or its identity. 
It's time to think about Hong Kong." 

Eagiing maintains a different view. 
* ‘We wanted to tell a Chinese .story he 
said. "I don't think Beijing is going to 
object. We've got no “homosexual 
scenes, no nudity. Besides. China 
doesn't have a problem viih how (hey 
treated Pu Yi. At least they .illowed him 
to live. They chopped off people’s heads 
for much Ie.sy’' 

A/isofi Duki'ht Gee r.« n HfUg 
based jnurnulisi. 










< 9^ -.a V 


The Finisihed AiUcie 




.Jnf ronicity, even with each of the eight 

^ sliding up and down at more than 

Wetteved in ■ ‘, j» l^red times a second under explosive 

niir r- ’’V, that can measure up to 5.7 tonnes. preudeamfthren 




ttthrtr fanin on 

• •_ rtllTi'' — 


A Powerful Korngold Revival 


By Paul Moor 

hiirrnjii.oiul HfiM Trlhi'v 


B erlin — .Although as a 
prodigy Erich Wolfgang 
Komgold may not nave 
matched Mozart, he did launch 
bis career more sensationally than even 
Felix Mendelssohn, who at 16 com- 
posed a miraculous string Octet and at 
17 the evergreen Overture to "A Mid- 
summer Night's Dream." 

A Vienna Court Opera production 
made Komgold an intemaiional 
celebrity at 15. Hitler’s Third Reich and 
World War 11 prevented complete real- 
ization of his gifts, but his birth's cen- 
tenary has brought a long overdue 
Komgold renaissance. 

Berlin's Deutsches Symphonie Or- 
chester has an admirably pro-Komgold 
record. In 1 988. CTuistopher Keene con- 
ducted it in the Berlin premiere of 
Komgold's SO-minute Symphony in F 
sh^. Op. 40. and several w’eeks ago its 
chief conductor. Vladimir Ashkenazy, 
revived Komgold's adaptation of 


Mendelssohn’s complete incidental mu- 
sic for that same Shakespeare comedy. 
Now .Ashkenazy has also revived 
Komgold's only symphony, a neglected 
masrerpiece among JOth-century sym- 
phonies. Komgold. an ardent natural- 
ized American, dedicated it to the 
memory of Franklin Delano Rooseveli. 

On the one hand. Komgold prospered 
as a composer of incidental music for 
films in Hollywood, where Max Rein- 
hardt had brought him from Vienna in 
1934 — providentially providing him 
life-saving asylum before Hitler's an- 
nexation of Austria. On the other hand, 
wretched luck poisoned his postwar ef- 
forts to re-establish himself in Europe 
with such major works a-s his only sym- 
phony. 

The catalogue of Komgold's works 
indicates he used film ^ores as re- 
positories for material until he remmed 
to interpolate it into other, more ab- 
solute works. His Symphony's power- 
fully tragic third rnovemeiit includes 
rich thematic excerpts from three major 
films, "The Private Life of Elizateth 


CROSSWORD 


and Essex," “Captain Blood" and 
"Anthony Adverse." with "Kings 
Row" also reappearing in the finale. 

After (he war Komgold quit Holly- 
wood to return to Vienna, but disap- 
pointment and disillusion there drove 
him back to Hollywood for good in 
1955. Earlier, one glib New York critical 
donkey, assaying the lushly Romantic 
violin concerto Jascha Heifetz commis- 
sioned. performed and recorded, lacked 
the character to resist the temptation to 
dismiss it as “more com than gold." 

By 20th-ceniur\' standards. Kom- 
gold's Symphony falls stylistically 
betwixt and between, exempllh'ing his 
inability to regain the European acclaim 
su important to him. Efostwar European 
composers, intoxicated on Schoenberg's 
dodecaphony banned by the Nazis, un- 
fairly patronized the grown-up prodigy 
as an obsolescent moldy fig. The current 
Komgold wave indicates that his time 
may have finally come — 40 years after 
his death. .Ashkenazy's vivid perfor- 
mance of Komgold's S>'mphony made 
his own advocacy passionately clear. 


ACROSS 

1 They re not to 
De beheved 
a Mahce 

n Fool with 8 daw 

1 4 Good- looker 

15 Kino of roH 


16 Star lor 
Yasrsemski 

iz'TOpsjs : 

can play' 

15 Slue Eyes' 
Singer . ' 9S2 
so Deserves 
2S Comics cry 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 

Fuirttfied apanmonts. 3 moifhs or 
more irhmshed. lesidanttal areas. 


23 Balm ingreOien: 
24 'Blue Moon 
corrjooser 
2T Janet ol the 
Justice 
Depaamen! 

26 Be a pain 
28 Madcap 
KScarleti'shome 
35 Biblical giti 
3» Leave 
siack-iaweo 
40 Story ol Jesus 

42 Kernel earner 

43 Set down- 
4s Queens 

Stadium 

46 The good guys, 
inacnaseliim 

47 VCR button 
49 Shooter 

61 'The Blue 
Knight auThoi 
ssBOsTVboy 

59 Operated 

60 Push beyond 

limits 


5 Done Him 

Wrjng' 11933 
tiimi 

7 Propelled as a 
raft 

6 Bury 

9 Assumed 

10 Directional 
suiiit 

11 Manual laborer 

12 Hale 

13 Pouilly-Fuisse 
and others 

19 Notched 

21 Seasonal visnor 

25 Bellows 

26 Edith Evans lor 
one 

29 Erase, as a PC 
file 

30 Leather ' 
workers TOO! 

31 King Features 
competitor 

33 Stadium sound 

34 Crosswmd 
direction, ai sea 

36 Classic car 

37 Salt-N-Pepa s 
music 



TelPans: f33 (0)14225 32 25 
PaxPans: +33(0)145 633709 


62 'Blue Chips' 

31 Divs. ol days 

actor 

40 Tiniest 

65 Bull Prefix 

compt»ni 

66 ' Wheel ot 

41 Gentle ones 

Fortune' 

44 Alabama native 

request 

46 Pluck 

67 Shoreline 

46 Prefix with 

irregularity 

(ogicaf 

68 Encourageo. 

SO Thickly 

with "Oh' 

erttangleo. as 

69 Trap. With 'in' 

hair 

TO Oaier cnasers 

51 Old Testament 

71 Scouts' work 

book 

62 imagine 

S3 Attach dog 

[>OWN 

command 

seMazeoans 

1 Swindle 

56 Pot 

2 Even bigger 

amounts 

3 Pong maker 

sa Meter reaaer's 

4 Imitation 

reading 

5 Stew 

*• '^'XJk in 


hori* by Hieii rwrr^ 

C ^elr York rimctt/Etliipd by fTilt Shorlt 


Solutiiin t<i Pu/./lv ufJiine 10 




19 pi‘- 


61 Appears to 
agree 

63 Bite 

64 Sorbonnp 
summer 


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Hcmib l-El Sribttnf 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


ij®' 


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 1997 


RAGE 15 


t. 

^ert Coin 
I’or a Quick 
(iime Story 

f» J 

fmall French Presses 
r ry Novel Marketing 


By Brad Spurgeon 

Special la the HeraU Trihnne 


P ARIS — The Paris Metro is 
not knowD for crime, but tfae^ 
days it is selling crime whole- 
sale. Crime stories, that is, in 
the form of 64-page books sold fi^ 
cwdy-bar vending machines at the 
palawle price of 10 francs ($1.75) a 
volume. A quiet marketing revolution 
is going on amoi^ the sm^ presses 
devoted to the crime novel, of which 
the “Metro-Police” series is an ex- 
ample. 

In a genre dominated by British and 
American writers, the mystery maricet 
in France has traditionally b^ most 
lucrative for English translation rights. 
Translations have been the mainstay 
since 1927 of the publisher Le 
Masque, a unit of Matra Hachette SA 
that is Che world's leading seller of 
Agatha Christie titles outside the Eng- 
ii^ market. 

. lYanslations from the American 
hard-boiled school have k^t Eldons 
Gallimard’s Serie Noire line thriving 
since 194S. Several other specialist 
collections, imprints of larger publish- 
ers, have exisi^ for decades and owe 
their success primarily to translations 
as weU. 

But in tile past couple of years, 
small presses have sprung up all over 
(be country, specializing in 
homegrown murder stories. M witii 
the Metro-Police series, their success 
has been due to original maiketing 
approaches. | 

The leading seller d^ng these 
small presses is Editions paleine. 
company was created injl^S to pub- 
lish a new series of crinie novels fea- 
turing a character whos^ nickname is 
it. Poulpe. or the ociopijs. 

Each book is writienjby a different 
French crime writer, n^y of whom 
are well known here, 'me writers are 
asked to maintain tiiW ovra style 
while keeping to the cmracteristics of 
^ main ch^cter arm his world as 
mtfhned in ihePoulpeyjSihle^'-aauKr. 
page guide. 1 

Jean-Bemard PonyJtiie editorial di- 
rector. has become a b^iseller w vtii Ids 
book, the first of the ^es. 

“The crime no«l survives in 
France at 8,000 copKj^’ be said, ' ‘ As 
soon as you pass SjOOO copies. it*s 
considered a victor)! If you arrive at 



Olivier Breton, director of Editions de la Voute, had a best-selling idea. 

20,000, you're a recognized writer. If story by a well-known writer and ooo 
you get to 40,000, you’re a star. With by a {veviously unpublished, un- 
‘La Petit Ecuyere a Cafte' of the known writer. 

Poulpe I'm at 40,000. So frnally, at SO ‘"rhat way," be said, "tiie cus- 

years old, I can say I’m a star!" tomer buys a ptovm writu^ and has a 

Each Poulpe has beeu selling more discovery to rnake at the same time." 
than 10,000 copies, and tiiere are more 'The Metro-Polke collection fea- 
tfaan 40 titles in print. A Poulpe film is cures a mix ofestablished and obscure 
scheduled to start shooting in France writers. Olh^ Breton, directorof the 
tills aotunin. Tbe hero of the series, small-press Editions de la Voute, con- 
wbose real name is Gabriel Le- ceived of the idea to sell the books as 
couvieur, is a Raymond Chandler- reprints of 1^0 French pulp stories, 
style character who goes around ti)Wg But after sitting aconiiacT with tiie 

to solve crimes or correct injustices vending-machine company Selecia, 


sisellerwvtiitus 

rries. 

i survives in 


MEDIA MARKETS 

and taking swipes at the extreme right 
in France in the nocess. 

Because of Le Potiipe's success. 
Baleine created anotiier series starring 
Le Poulpe*s girlfriend, Cheryl, and 
written entirely by women. 'Ibe pub- 
lisher now projMts a similar series in 
the scienoe-fretion field for next y^. 

Another small press with an original 
packaging idea involving two kinds of 
crime writers is Editions de la Lou- 
piote. Francois Bnaod, its director, at- 
tended several- crime. writing festivals 
and met many writers, ' both well 
known and unpublished. 

"I read a lot of good writing by the 
unpublished writers and tfaou^t 
maybe 1 could do somc&jiog to fa^p 
them get published,’ ' be said. 

' So he created his "Zebra” collec- 
tion that packages under one cover a 


story by a well-known writer and orte 
by a {V^iously unpublished, un- 
known writer. 

“'That way." he said, "tiie cus- 
tomer buys a provm writjeir and has a 
discovery to make at the same time." 

'The Metro-Polke collection fea- 
tures a mix of established and obscure 
writers. Olivier Breton, directorof the 
small-press Editions de la Voute, con- 
ceived of the idea to sell the books as 
reprints of 1^0 French pulp stories. 

But after signing aconliacT with tiie 
vending-mac^e company Selecta, 
he decided (o promote cunen( French 
crime writers, too. 

Since the series began selling in the 
Metro in early March, he pub- 
lished stories in alternate weeks by 
wncers reprinted fnsm the 1930s and 
by current writers. 

New titles appear eirery Tuesday in 
139 vending machines and have b^n 
selling 3,000 copies a week. The pub- 
lisberforesees evenuaJ sales of 6X)00 
as more veuding machines cany the 
novellas. Because the new releases 
replace the old ones, the publisher has 
bwn receiving ealTs from readers who 
want Co buy up all the volumes they 
missed before they discovered the col- 
lection. Many have been sold out. 

Gerard Delteil, the editorial dixec- 
tor, said aU subjects are permitted iu 
the stones wi& one exertion: "in- 
security and bombings in the Metro." 
These were vetoed in advance by the 
Metro autiiority. the RATE. 




4 Former Dai-Ichi Executives Arrested 



! 


By Velisarid Kattoulas 

Imrrmmtahil tjivkt Tribune 

TOKYO — Prossutors arrested four 
former executives f Dai-Ichi Kangyo 
Bank on Tuesday ii a widening payoff 


■m 


scandal, as die b( 
bigger unveiled 
menl sbake-up in 
To restore c(»ii| 
fmancial sector. Pj 
Hashimoto urged] 
digging" fOT infi 
dal,- which has 1« 
ensnared NtMnua 
pan’s biggest brat 
“All the pus sp 
from the finan^ 
moto was quota a 
is having a bigm] 
industry as a ^ 
problem." I 
The scandaljas 
araiionstodereiilai 


t (pan's second- 
cond manage- 
in a month, 
nthe country's 
inisterRyutaro 
utors to "keep 
n <xi tiie scan- 
arrests and has 
rities LkL, Ja- 
as well, 
squeezed out" 
d sector, Mr. Hashi- 
as saying. "This case 
npact on the financial 
toie is a serious 


etnneided widi prep- 
ite Toio^o 's antiquatra 


financial marks and make them as com- 
petitive and txaspiarent as diose of Lon- 
dtn and Nevptuk, hardening official 
dete m^ tiorp resolve the problem. 

Nevenbels, many analysts said thqr 
douixed wmiCT (xosecuttxs would 
sver get to dmttom of the payoffs and 
illegad loans* Ryuichi Koilre, the rack- 


eteer at the center of the three-montii-old 
affair who was arrested last iziontiL 
The scandal tqipeais "so huge tiiat 
it’s systemic rather than specific," said 
a foreign analyst who asked not to be 
identified. "When it gets diat big, you 
can't do much about it" 

Japanese media have lepoited dial Mr. 
Koike and scores of la-wxnakers and bu- 
reaucrats were on a list of diems who 
were bdog given special treatment by 
Nomma. The reports have said Mr. 
Kdke also had ties with other top Jap- 
anese brokoages. 

I^secutois said they had arrested 
Akira Kanazaw^ a former vioe pres- 
ident of Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank; Tsuneo 
Uctuda, anotiier fmmei vioe president; 
Yasuyoki Tetasawr^ a fmmei managir^ 
director, and Keoji Tluiaka, a former 
managing director who is now piesident 
of Jusco, a supermarket chain affiliated 
wifo L^-lchi Kangyo Bank. 

Prosecutors saio they suspected that 
the four had violated Ja^’s commer- 
dal code by making illicit loans as pay- 
to 1^. Koike, the soAeiya who was 
airest^ last month. Japanese law bans 
such payoffs to sokaiya, who exfort 
mor^ frenn cmnoaiues by threaceniog 
to disrupt shareholder meetings. 
Prosecutors said the four siri appar- 


ently frumeied 39 separate loans totaling 
8.8 billioa ^ ($77.8 millioo) through 
Daiwa Shinyo, a financia] institution u- 
fiHated witfr ^-fofai Kangyo, to Mr. 
Koike’s younger bimber, Yosbinori 
Ifoite, who was also anested last montiL 
Tuesday’s anests, which Japanese me- 
dia Mid bolsvred suspidons that the 
top management was involved in 

grgnriat camft a«s the h ank anOOUDCCd 

a new executire line-up that it said was 
untainted tiie affair. 

Public outrage over the scandal has 
already fcxced the bank to drop plans for 
a management shufDe chat would have 
promo ^ Ichiro Fujha. a vice president, 
to president. He has adnxined that he 
Im^ of tiie bank's Olid! loans. 

ingtMrf, Katsayuki Sugita, 54, a man- 
aging directed, Btice over as pres- 
ident June 27, the bank said, becorning 
tiie youngest presideut of one of Japan's 
lea^ng commercial banks. Twenty-one 
of the bank’s 40 directors — including 
tiie chairtnan, Tadashi Okuda, cbe pr^ 
idem, Kaisuhiko I^mdo, and Mr. Fujita 
— will step down, the txuUc said. 

"It is extremely regrettable that the 
scandal has lowned our credil^ty,'' 
the bank said ft said it would create a 
commitree of outside auditors and take 
other steps to preveoi future scandals. 


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mtti klawo Vrv* futmnim i 


Renault Sets Up Study on Car Plant 

‘Significant’ Activity to Continue at Vilvoorde, Company Says 


By Barry James 

Iniernaittnuil flvruU Tribune 

PARIS — As thousands of workers 
demonstrated here for a Europe with a 
sodal conscieuce, Renault announced 
Tuesday it was appointing an independ- 
ent expert to review iis decision toclosc 
an auto plant in suburban Brussels. 

The expen. who is id deliver her 
repoit by the end of this month, will 
examine other options for the f^tory, 
which has about .^,0(X) Renault wotkers 
and hundreds of others who work . for 
subcontractors. 

The automaker said it would close its 
Belgian operation immediately if the 
e;^it agreed with .its assessment that 
tins was economically necessary. 

But it said, without giving details, 
that a “significant industrial activity" 
would continue at the modem plant at 
Vilvoorde. 

Renault workers who came from 
Brussels to demonstrate outside the 
company's board and shareholders’ 
meetings said they were disappointed 
with the decision, which left them in a 
state of uncertainty. 

The Belgian workers joined tens of 


thousands of people from several other 
European countries marching in Paris to 
dem^ action on creating jobs. The 
new Socialist government in France has 
pledged to mt^e the fight against un- 
enroloyment its top priority. 

Priim Minister Lionel Jospin prom- 
ised during his election campaign that 
he would push Renault to reconsider its 
decision to close the plant July 3 1 . But 
the state owns only 46 percent of 
Renault’s shares, and although it has an 
important voice on the board, it i$ not in 
a position to halt the closing. The 
spokesman for the Socialist Party, Fran- 
cois Holiande, said that m the final 
analysis the decision on whether to 
close the plant remained with Louis 
Schweitzer, Renault's chairman, who 
also is a SocialisL 

Despite having a successful range of 
models, including (he subcompact 
Twingo. the family-sized Megane and 
the luxurious Safrane. Renault lost 5.25 
billion francs ($910 millionl last year: It 
said that the closing of the Belgian plant, 
where production costs are higher, and 
cuts of about 2.700 Jobs in France were 
need^ to restore it to profitability. 

The stock market, which earlier re- 


warded Renault's layoffs by bidding up 
the company's stock, punished rhe com- 
pany for signs that it might be wavering 
in its resolve. Renault shares have fallen 
4.64 percent in the past three trading 
days because of fears the new gov- 
eroment would succeed in pre-^suring 
Renault to drop the closing plans. The 
shares continued to drop Tuesday, fall- 
ing 6.20 francs to end at 127.80. 

But people close to management said 
they were confident that the outside 
e.xpert — Danielle Kaisergniber of 
Bernard Brunhes Consulting — would 
support the automaker's decision to 
close the plant after seeing the evidence. 
She is to examine not only Renault's 
figures but also proposals put forward 
by unions to cut working time and sal- 
aries. Renault executives have dis- 
missed the union proposals, saying that 
a shorter work week will not rolve the 
real problem, which is overcapacity at 
too many factories. 

It was unclear what Renault meant by 
"industrial activity" continuing ai the 
site, and whether Renault itself would 
create the jobs or would sell the facto^'. 
But it appeared unlikely that the activity 
would save all current jobs at the plant. 


Boeing Gets ContinentaVs Pledge 


CtwvMn/brOvrStf rm OefwrAn 

HOUSTON — Continental Airlines 
Inc. said Tuesday it would buy 3S Boe- 
ing Co. jetliners valued ai $4 billion, in a 
d^ that makes make Boeing its sole 
■supplier for 20 years. 

Ik exclostve agreeroent will be Boe- 
ing's third with a major U.S. airline after 
Delta Air Lines Inc. and AMR Corp.’s 
American Airlines. 

A loyal Boeing enstomo' with no Air- 
bus aircraft in its fleet. Continental had 
been expected to give the order to Boe- 
ing. CKtinenlal's chairman, Gordon 
Betiinne, a former Boeing executive, said 
last month thaf Boeing an edge over 
rival Airbus Indusuie to win the order. 

"Continental now has a fleet plan 
that makes us competitive in every mar- 
ket well into the next century," Mr. 
Bethune said. 

Boeing shares rose S 1 .625 to 57.625. 
Continental shares fell $2.25 to 
$34,125. Separately, Boeing won more 


<AtvJ 

SotffCP. ABufers, 


business when American Airlines said it 
would buy seven Boeing 777 wide-bo^ 
planes valued at $1 billion, based on list 
prices, as part of its own 2(Vyear ex- 
clusive agreement with Boeing. 

Barbara Kracht, an Airbus spokes- 
woman. declined to comment on Con- 
tinental’s order but was critical of Boe- 
ing's exclusive-supplier contracts. 

“We think exclusive doils are anti- 
competitive. not allovring airline cus- 
tomers to benefit from the fruits of com- 
petition in the long term," she said. 

Continental's order could provide 
more ammnnition for Karel van h^eri, 
competition commissionerfortbe Euro- 
pean Union, who has said Boeing’s 
sole-sui^lier agreements could prompt 
the Ell to oppose the company's 
planned purchase of rival McConnell 
Douglas. (B/oomherg, AFX, AFP) 

■ BA Heada for Makeover 
British Airways PLC announced a 


Global Private Banking 


three-year makeover Tuesday, encom- 
passing new services, products, aircraft 
and facilities and expanded employee 
trainui|. l^e carrier said it would invest 
about $10 billion over the next three 
years, although most of that will be 
spent on Boeing jets whose purchase 
was previously announced. The airline 
said it would add 43 aiicrafl: 29 Boeing 
747-400s, nine 777s and five 757s. 

The airline's makeover wilt be its first 
facelift since BA swapped the national 
flag for the logotype it has used since 
1984 — a crown and a picture of two 
griffins, mythical beasts that are part 
Son and parr eagle, holding a banner 
reading “To Fly to Serve.” British Air- 
ways said it had set aside $3.2 million 
for its new images and overall design. 
The actual fleet makeover is to cost $98 
million over three years, although much 
of that would have been spent anyway 
on regular painting, the company said. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg. NYT. AP) 


At 


REPUBLIC, MANAGING 


YOUR ASSETS IS A DIALOGUE, 
NOT A MONOLOGUE. 


floaJnimrtm v/ M^paUlp 
NmtiomJ Hrnmlt Sew lv>5 
f S miee r l S.A. m (•.mem. 


In fact, we consider asset management 
a team effort, with you as tbe key member of 
that team. Your particular fmancial needs, your 
objectives, belp us determine tbe winning strategy. 
Our fundamental goal: to protect your capital 
as we safeguard its piurcbasing power: 
t It is a simple principle upon wbicb we base 

I. m lotfwciv. 

our brand of financial conservatism: private 
banking built upon rigoi^ discipline and prudence. Tbis 
sophisticated conservatism, vigorously pursued, bas created 
a global private bank of exceptional stability, capable 
of weatJiering tbe roughest storms. 

Indeed, Republic's capitalization ratio, 
on a risk adjusted basis, is hco times as great 
as that required by the world's international 
banking regulators. 

To way of thinking, it is security as 
well as return that we must ensure each day. 

And in tbe process, to provide a unique quality 
of service^ understanding and discretion. 


Republic National Bank of New York* 

Strength. Security. Service. 


Monbnl 







PAGE 16 


INTERNATZONAL WFBAT.n TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAT, JUNE 11, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


ft. ..mk:: 


30- Year T-B'ond Yieid 


Microsoft’s Goal: 
Keep Growing 


Earnings Optimism Powers Shares 

CewfMbrOvSi^FMDiiiukiKi pTofit foT thc secoiid Quaiier wQuld oot control of 8201XK)TCisubscriba. 

NEWYORK— Stocks charaed into match expectations. “Yoocan^ethec^forthe|iiiBBi 


profit for the second quaner would not control of 820DOO TCi subscribe, 
match expectations. “YobcanmakeihecasefortheiniQet 


■ '*- • 130 - 

t — iin . .. 


By Steve Lohr 

Nrw Yprk Twin Stnkt 


m'"a 'm' J J ' F 

■ M A 

29B7 



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I CBTseea-'' 

Source: Btoomberg. Reuters 




Iniaiuiii4ul HcnU Tribone 


Very briefly: 

Wachovia to Buy Jefferson Bank 


WINSTON-SALEM, North Carolina (Bloomberg) — 
Wachovia Corp. agreed Tuesday to acquire JefTersoa Bank- 
shares Inc. for SS42 million in stock as the North Carolina 
bank makes its long-awaited expansion into Virginia. 

'nie 20th-laigest U.S. bank said it would pay 0.62S share for 
each share of Jefferson, based in CharlottesviUe, Virginia, and 
with S2. 1 billion in assets and 96 branches. Wachovia's offer 
had a value of $38.83 a share. 


• Chrysler Corp. said it planned to produce aboat 180,000 
minivans next year that can run on gasoline or an ethanol- 
gasoline mix. 


• International Business Machines Corp. unveiled a speech 
recognition product, c^ed ViaVoice. that it says would 
accept 140 words a minute of naturally spoken dictation, with 
up to 95 percent accuracy. ap. Biixmhcrii 


NEW YORK ^ For Mi- 
crosoft Cocp., money is not 
a problem, but finding a 
way (0 coQtiiiue its remark- 
able trajtttofy of growth 
certainly is. 

Buying a $ 1 billion stake 
in the cable operaux- Com- 

- cast Coip. Is part of 
ccosoft's solution to Aat 
problem— moving beyond 
personal computer soft- 
ware to become a metha 
company for die 2Ist cen- 
tury, combining program- 
miog, tectuology and dis- 
tribution. 

It is a reasoned, if risky, 
bet for Microsoft. The in- 
vestment in Comcast, an- 
nounced Monday, is only 
one of the many moves Mi- 
crosoft has made to expand 

— from the on-liM topical 
magazine Siate to MSNBC, 
a Web site and cable news 
network, to its recent $425 
million purchase of Web 
TV Networks ftlC., a maVr^r 
of set-top boxes that deliver 
the Internet to television 
sets. And with $9 billion in 
cash nestled in the corpo- 
rate treasury, Microsoft can 
afford its media strategy. 

'‘Microsoft is building a 
very large, powerful media 
cornpany," said Ridiard 
Shaner, a principal of 
Technologic Partners, a re- 
search firm. ‘'What has 
motivated this push into 
media is the search for fo- . 
ture growth. And what has 
attracted Microsoft is that 


foe media business is going 
through a transition toward 
the c^tal technology of 
co^uters.*' 

Tto stake in Comcast is 
an investment in foe dis- 
tributioa side of Mi- 
CEDSOft's ambitious media 
plans. Comcast says it will 
use the money it receives 
mainl y (o upgrade its net- 
work to prepare for foe in- 
tegradoQ, foroogh digital 
technology, of the worlds 
of foe perso^ crxiqMiter 
and of television. 

A high-speed digits 
transmission system is 
needed to bring Mi- 
crosoft's maltimedia offer- 
ings — news, en- 

tertainment and shopping 
— into homes with tele- 
vision-quality sound and 
vidM. The higher-speed 
network, known as broad- 
band. is essential to exceed 
the market for new media 
bqrond computer nerds to 
foe far larger audience of 
couch potatoes. 

“Tt^ is our attempt to 
accelerate the deployment 
of broadband networks,'* 
said Gre^ Muffei. hfi- 
crosoft’s vice president for 
corporate development 
“We hope our investment 
will galvanize others to in- 
vest more heavily in broad- 
band." 

Accelerating that invest- 
ment is important to Mi- 
crosoft. If Its sizable out- 
lays in new media for foe 
infonnatioa highway are to 
pay off, the hi^way has to 
be there. 


spread that second-ouarter sales and bond's pnceweaiceneawJ^roy/v/ae. ^^c!nL/uc^,aiTOiOT^jna^gr: * 

^fflings would top iSiniates. and foe yield rose to 6.84 percent from BtoketMemNew Yoik. TThetcoon^ ; ^*1 

• ‘Tlte strength in foe corporate sector 6.82 percent Monday. A private r^ *®,**^*3t ! ft / ) 

and phenomenal profitability of Amer- ally h^foy, and t he ou tlook is roB$|; ^ 

lean companies «ffltinue," saM Larry US. STOCKS XylM s annOTna^tpres^^ 

Babin, a lioneyiTuuiager at Society As- — : XWfM 3 toJ^ 


l y iyr ': 


lean companies i^tinue," said Larry US. STOCKS f 

Babin, a money manager at SocieQr As- . ' T ~ icch rotogy y ^w^^Xylan felj 3 to jg; 

set Management “This is ode of on retail sales raised concern that the Intel dropped 4 1/1610 1453/16,1^; 
greatest buU markets in history.’* economy was growing quickly enough ^Iincd 1^ » Applied Mattfo • . 

The Dow Jones industrial average fin- to prompt the Federal Reserve to raise dropped 3% to 60«. and Cascade C®., • 
!shed60.77pointshiBjieral7,539.27.Tbe borrowing rates to slow growth. muiucati^fell45/16to289/16._ i ; 

BO^tock average set is previous record UR Redbodc Research said retail sales Ascend CoBuniuucations, foe Btf !■ 
Monday, when it closed at 7,478.50 increased 2.3 percent in foe first week of active stock on U.S. markets, fell ' 






“There is Qo Indication that buyers June from foe same period in May. 41%onconcen)thatasoftwareprdl^1 : 
havehadfoeb-filfsaklAlanAckennan. “R came in a little higher ^ ex- in its Max networking products Of] ; 


a market strategist at Fahnestock. parted,” which hurt bonds, said Mike cause the company to miss revenue 
The Standard & Poor's 500-slock in- McClure of Zion's Capital Markets in gets for the second quarter. ; 


dex was up 2.36at 865.27, aftertouching Salt Lake City. Utah. Airlinesharesplammeiedinfoewaej- 

a record S70.06 during foe day. Cablevision Systems rallied 4% to 49 of proposed legislation that would bi- 

But foe technology-heavy Nasdaq as analyse forecast stronger growth be- crease airline taxes by as much as sj'- 
cofflDOsite index was a laseartL falline cause of foe company’s planned pur- billion. Shares of AMR, the parent C(tt>T' 


l-n 



shares dropped after foe computer net- York-area cable- 1 ^ nnits. caoievision Deitadeci>ned5»to»8andUAL.partc^ 
vrorkmg company Xylan became foe will strengthen hs position in foe icon's company of United Airlines fell 2 t| 
in the mdustry to warn that iu largest cable-TV market after it takes 7514. {Bttkmherg,AP\. 


EMU Fears Ease, and So Does the MarkI 


-r 




NEW YWUC — The dollar rose 
against foe Deutsche marie Tuesday as 
doubts ebbed that Europe's economic and 
monetary union would be delayed, but foe 
dollar fell against the yen armd concern 
over foe U.S. trade deficit with JapaiL 
Traders bought dollars on expectations 
foat France and Germany would iron out 
their (Uff^oces and k^ foe plaiued 
single cnneocy, the euro, on track for its 
1999 debuL 

“I^t^le wm so willing to believe 
that all <rf Europe would waUc away from 
EMU josi because France needed more 


time to thiiik about it," said John 
Hazelton, chief currency trader at Man- 
ufacturers & Traders Trust Co. “But 
they've worked too hard for it.” 

'The dollar was at 1 12.38 yen in 4 P.M. 
uadmg. down from 1 12.90 yen Monday, 


jFOREIGN EXCHANGE 


but at 1.7185 DM, up from 1.7063 DM. 
The dollar also rose to 1.4410 Swiss 
francs from 1 .4385 francs and to 5.8065 
French francs from S.76SS francs. The 
pound rose m SI. 6385 from $1.6373. 

Charlene Barshefsl^, foe U.S. trade 


representative, said Japan ttinst guard 
against significant growth in hs trade 
surplus by iixq>lementing market reJ 
forms to ^low faster growth in its do-i 
mestic economy. i 

“We don't expect lo see a significant 
increase in Jaj^’s current-account sur^ 
plus as it begins to implement d^-: 
ulation." Ms. Barshefsl^ said in testi-t 
mony before a House of Representadve^ 
committee. But she warned .i g ai n ^ foot-^ 
dragging in Japan's |HOgram of d^-' 
ukuing its financial markets and othe4 
parts ^ its economy. i 

(Bloomberg, Market News. AFPi 




Platiam 


AMEX 


Data Firms to Limit Details They Offer 


TuesdIay'sAPJI.Close 

The kp 300 most odtve ilttcs, 
up lo the dosing on WoU Street 
The AssoeUed Press. 


Mb 100 IM MM as* 


Lm UMri Ckv 


IM UM Ovt. 


By Rajiv ChandrasekaraD 
Aw Service 


WASHINGTON — Bowing lo pres- 
sure from a privacy-rights movement 
eight big consumer-^tabase companies 
in the United States have agreed (o limit 
the kinds of information (hey assemble 


about ordinary people and more closely 
monitor who uses me data. 


monitor who uses me data. 

The eight companies allow users to 
search for people’s phone numbers, ages 
and current and previous addresses. 


Some of the services also provide Social 
Security numbers, birth dates, vehicle- 
registration records and information on 
property deeds. 

Under the a^eemeot the companies 
will pledge not to augment their records 
with information from private markedog 
databases, some of which indicate an in- 
dividual's magazine subscriptions, shop- 
ping preferences and household income. 
Some people contend foat combmiog 
such data could lead to a proUfenitioa of 
dossiers on ordinary Americans. 


Privacy advocates had mixed prdse 
for foe accord. While they called it a 
much-needed concession, they said it 
would have a limited effect because 
smaller oompanies (hat did not sign the > 
agreement would continue to sell such 
iD^eting itifonnatioiL ; 

Lexis-Nexis, a unit of Reed Elsevier ' 
PLC, signed the agreement, along wifo 
Qioicelfoint, Database Technologies 
Inc., Experian, First Data InfoSouice, i 
Information America, IRSC Inc. and I 
Metromail Coip. I 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


June 10, 1997 


Hiqh Lm Law C)i«r Opini 


Mqri Lob MM CM OpM 


High Low LflM Qlpi OpN 


LoM Lfliei CM Opnl 


Grains 

CORN CCBOO 

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JUI9.' 


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Jun97 I24ja I7»4I -VOS ia7.SM 

Sod 97 127.92 I37AB I27B« —OM 111.934 
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ITAUAN GOVERNMEITT BOND (UFm 
I TL 200 nlBn . pb «f 1 « pd 
SepF7 iTYAI 129V7 IIOAB *041 BM 
Ok« 7 N.T N.T. 1«US *051 BOH 
Esl Mv TIBM. Pm. sam: 40332 
Pm.gpmkiU 80IM Up 1.32B 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 

cidCUiOi. Mnr Mrti 

MO: ;31» 391 2295 -028 

Au9*' 2318 7212 SIB -026 

Seel' 23 78 23 30 SSI -Or, 

CcTt: ass a 46 73 31 -024 

31.10 7145 arj -0J5 

>3n«9 34S SOS 23a -O.V 

£i' saiei NA. Mon & Min 74.053 
.Vdn .. oKn >nl I03.0N up 74* 


HI GRADE COPPER (HOIUI 

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> OGO Dll rii.piiTiLim. wuntb dm. duiIvi 

2)jl»7 j|4 810 313 -2 W.7I7 

Aug,; 770 iM’.i 749’-- -J'- 2i.}*0 

5wi7 Tiji.. 705 .T151. _i 40,1 

r«.4.' ,41 66S'i 6,7 -12 

>sn«4 ,83 M9'. 470 -if. 7.|9S 

E:4 mHi llA MoniMiei 3D5J3 

Mon'icoenini 164.779 oif 593) 


£3 rj A Mon', wim «.U7 

r.V)fi'i(P«nint S14II or 1174 


aiRooaiXARs (cmeri 
,1 nNAMn-p,, O' 100 ea 
Ma-O na «U) «U< 

June 913S 7319 73J) 

Seam 9121 9114 9117 

dkoo 91U nor mo 

MVOI 9114 9109 9110 

JWlOl 9110 9ie 9101 
SenOI 91V na 9103 
D«C0I 9100 9290 92.74 

Wor02 9100 9290 9191 

JiaiV 9197 9192 9192 

Scp 07 9193 92Ji t2jM 
Dkoo «2A4 9101 9101 

EM.Mln HA Mm'lmIcO 

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-on 2 USI 
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-401 12JSS 
-043 4J9I 
-403 4.7S 
-403 4454 


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4avoo voL OHO, on- art 
JH97 9J0 SI.40 SIAO *410 

MSI SLSe SI.7S SUO *U* 

SepV S14S SlIO SlIO -401 

Od97 sus Sin sea -on 

M,97 SITS 1100 SUS *49 

DK97 S4J0 519 5440 *434 

JBn9 740 S4SD SMO *414 

F«b9 7.10 5445 son *49 

Ma'9 Si3S S175 S19 *449 

eF.Sda HA ItaYVSBilS 4447 
MBn^OpoPM 139.29 w 35S1 


prHEAT (CBOT) 

f OODDij ■vnn.mvm* pnr nuihH 
All 9' J7; 367 343 -4': 

I'f: ji'l'; 374 -2'. 

C«fC9- J»|' 3SJ 3441, _3*., 

.MarfJ IH'; 389 JSf -2 

Ss: vsm N.A 7,i«n"x wm 7.199 
Mcm^csenini SJ;:’ oft US 


SILVER INCMX1 

SiHOVCi.p.. ..-Pnliprr llpvQL 

Ji»l«' 47110 -O* 

XI97 J’4J0 J7:» .C4j0 -OJO 
54P«7 «300 JTKi £9.10 -050 

0ec9: j;0H tjsfg -O.TO 

Jcn«4 MOO '0 70 

.Var*^ Pin 4919 491M -O.H 
AVr.98 :9 :m .19700 .P700 -OlTO 
AoeS 7IJ} -070 

EV '.dn Nj> Mon'iMIM 15.479 
ALjn c cp.>n in' il*** qrl l4l 


BRmSH POUND (OABU 
•2.500 SMM-j. 1 ec*A0uM 
Jun97 14404 14340 1439 
Scp9; 1477 14102 14350 
Dk 7 14313 1490 1014 
Ea.Min HA Mon'i.MMS 344C 
Men'jOPHiinl 51407 up 7440 


LIGHT SIVeET OIUDE QUm) 

1430 OH.' dMI VI PV pH. 

Join 149 14B 1413 *405 

Aiia97 99^7 1409 IU7 -4M 

Scb7 1945 19.10 19.17 -404 

oen 19.7 19.23 1940 *401 

NOYV 19.73 19J5 I9J5 *40 

08C97 1945 1944 741 *405 

J«9 190 1946 \9JB 

PchO 1943 19J0 19.28 *4N 

Mar9 If.n 19.85 1945 *414 

Afro 1944 1944 1944 *415 

e9.Wl0S NA Mon's.Mi 104446 
iMisPOnW 7njT3 on 0920 


PLATINUM (NMER) 

jOua.c,. . o,)io,m« irffr 

JUI97 :52IO 49li) 430 90 -I2» 11101 

474 1<] JOSU 41390 -O.TI 5.237 

Ji]il9l'. 416 ,0 400 00 436 90 — O-V IJ|9 

EU Mil.'. N A I'.lon'i Mill 

f;tan'',CPrtlin: 19.703 o?l 72 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100400 delHi. 5 MT CHi. M 
AmOT 77C ^305 A2I3 

5997 7246 7251 7251 

OK97 7310 7795 7218 

ES.Min NA MOn'iSOMi 71,713 
Motfsoponinl 467D3 oN 1436 


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4* no ID^- (■*«'. I*., ID 


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LONDON METALS (LME) 

Dolton pd m0ln« loi 
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Capper CotfeodH I H IgP Grade) 

^ 25001; 7S8«i* 255400 

Fmaid 2500': 2509'- U87 00 


GERMAN MARK (CMBt) 
i3SMarn«fc6 smnov 
Jun97 3870 .014 3021 

Sep97 3905 349 3140 

Pecf7 3921 3091 3n\ 

Edsem NA Mai'iMles 15.117 
Mon'« open oil 101.935 nfl 4746 


MATWALGASOWCR) 
lOiOOO mm tPv'i. 1 Per mm Peu 
A497 USD Ills 1122 
4 uo9? 2.17S 1145 IIS 

sops 110 1140 1145 

Odtr 1175 iia iiM 
NOW97 1305 12BS ISIS 
□0097 1450 ZAS SAB 

AMS isoo iMB xns 

FMlfO 1415 1395 U9S 

MV9I 10S ITS 1778 
Aprs IM 110 110 
es.9e4K 9LA 9M&5des SA29 
MoifiOPHiirf 194383 W 585 


IRGJABgGASOUieiNMBU 


JAPANESE YSI (CMBI) 
l7.5m4Mnvcfl,6par Un von 
Jun97 075 A4S3 3911 

Sea97 .9898 3944 3829 

Dec 97 .9100 310 .9I« 

Esi.Mies NA NlHi's.iipes 00373 
44an's«PeoM WAH up TOIS 


AI197 as SSm S44G »Q0 0343 

AU897 SIM 010 3431 -0.13 17.20 

SH97 S40 S47S S5J8 *0.14 S.44 

0097 SUS SUO S4J0 *8.14 ISM 

NOv97 Si0 S40 S40 -0.14 1.94« 

OecTT sen SU6 SiflS •IH 404 

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Mon'ioppnlrf 77344 up 00 


SpDl 60'; 629'* 42600 

Fonwild uIjN 44100 63930 

NiCM 

$nl ’'18000 TIMO] 7I3S00 
FwAdrd :mao 72000 

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Spot SiXlOO 544030 S54S00 
Foraom 54 ICOO 547500 $61000 


SMSSnlANCICMER) 

1 25 POO nraiu, 6 per ern 
A*l97 6976 017 49D 

Sep97 70S i«0 7017 

Dec97 7095 709S 7094 

ES.iolei HA AMrfLfidK «.70 
Men-sopenlM 51324 up 4413 


EM Mlfi NA Mon'hMle^ 3 444 
.'.vpi': open Ini I90i; m 541 


Sic iSpocM Hid Cm4e) 

Spol izien 1339 00 133200 

Fensnl 1)4200 I3i300 IJStM 


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jiii>7 aojd i9tr 045 -an 10.74; 

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0<t«' ■'105 0» 7892 -Oj: 4.777 

C>e':9.' 470) 4647 6702 -00 34*1 

ec! '.ulus N.A uwi 5am u.t05 
.'.Vn 5 Kvn iD' 3L4IS oH 1193 


PORKLa.LiES tCMER) 

A<noiD% •ceiv-.pi.elo 

AJ9r a3t> 4170 320 ^47 

iin*’ eiu 1105 07.0 -04$ 

FODIS 'S« 7425 5577 -US 

EM Mm NA iMwi'i urn 3.407 
MOnjcwTin: .'47) oD 314 


Financial 

us T. BILLS (CMER) 

51 rniiw- tv. 01 IWi-.i 

Jun).* 9)4^ v'lT? -0 04 3 460 

SfP'r *);i '■:u vn 5.47s 

D««7 ;4i? -153 9153 -OB? 73 

£9 M'l-:. N A iVn ^ mW) 

Mai'50Pi'ninl 


MEXICAN PESO UMER) 

snooopem iPCTpmo 
Jun4’ .12525 1240 .I3SV 

3ep97 .1071 .||«D .imO 
Dec9; .1159$ .1105 IISIO 
EU.Mln NA NUIRt.9de6 I9.9W 
Moffsoponinl VJIBS oR )M 


GASOIL (IPE) 

U A. doRon per mHHc ion • Ml H 1 V tom 
Jun 87 1410 107S 1410 *IJ0 lapM 
JUI97 IMW I41JS leia *i4N Iei4i4 
AU087 leATS lOJO 1M.7S *100 ^0 

S f7 WJB 1040 14740 *IJS A0< 
97 )W.7S 147.75 1«9XS *1JN I440 

No, 97 17IJ0 17000 17140 *0.7S 170 
DOC 97 17U5 17148 1717S *0JS ll^ 
E«l.iaks;17i(tt). nw.HlRJi234 
Pm. open hd.-. *6.10 oR l.M 


SYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

tm.QNliifin-Di' L uih* V lOOpT* 

Ain97 104-40 l(r$<$$ lOS-C -05 41.140 

Sep97 IS5-57 i;5-]3 lOi^ -05 IM.II7 

D«9; tOS-JJ -05 507 

EM uim NA iMon & jjliis 32.797 
.Mai'50P*nin; 72’.78? up 


3-MONTH STERUIK (UFFE) 
CSMOOD-pboUMpd 
3an47 9124 9237 910 Undl. ' 

:ep97 «10 «3M eioa -OjOI 

Ok 97 97.n 9208 02,81 -040 

More 9iti 47.n 41B2 -un 

4IIII0 9175 92.71 9174 —0411 

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Dee 90 93.45 9241 92AS -04)1 

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Pmopenkil 554545 up ITOS 


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S 97 IBTT 1774 17.0 -OLOS 17.110 

97 IIAS 18J4 IB34 •Gjn B737 

Nov97 1034 10A5 1049 ML04 Zm 

Dod? I8A3 1B0 110 *00 11.444 

JoM lOV loss US *00 703 

E*i.ialoKa3l4. Pm.si09:9Ul71 
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tinpOXUrv.n-pT-. A l-ndvol 100 
JunJ’ 100-13 132-01 lOJ^U -03 0402 

Sep97 lor-ro 107-1$ ia:-ifi -u 20.70 

Dk9.‘1o'-|7 io'-» w'-w -01 

Em '.airs n a 5 ssim 42,713 

M(in'5'X>min! snei} un 2441 


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.*.1094 1000 1417$ 1417$ -111$ 1210 

iViff.M noo 157 7$ 157:5 -16 :5 521 

Eu '.am ti A Mdn'5 MUm « C.*9 
Mw'swnini 21491 uo 12c 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBOTI 
lepTi-tw.vn-p'. & i.YiD'.o* luotii*! 

An9'iii-i: iia-7s iio-.f —02 hy.im 

$OP9Mia-3l 110-12 IIMi’ -02 343 i494 

i:«.:e:li0.IS llil-O) IIO-H -07 24. >94 

!Wqi0 UP-M —02 340 

E5> 501?'. ri A Men'*, 331 AO* 

Mon » uPi'x in' 441. 1*7 0(( I'd? 


3-MOMTH SUROMARK dJFFE) 

□Ml fflNHl • pisol 100 pd 
Jun 97 06.0 460 960 *<MI21fA311 

JI497 960 M0 940 Unch. L7Z7 

Aug97 HT NT 940 *402 201 

Sep97 94.02 W0 940 *002 230071 

Ok 97 96 72 9Ln M,73 *040 Oi-'m* 

Morn 9642 «4A0 94.61 *001 20049 

Juil98 960 96 43 940 *401 154302 

Sepa 9622 94J0 94J2 *001 120LSDB 

Ok 94 9597 9SM 0&9« *IL0) SIM9 

Em 5am: 144555 Pm.eoiesi 14173$ 
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SEP COMP.INDEk (CMER) 

SaPaindm 

M197 8712$ 84115 OtSitt -125 146.917 
SeP97 MI.I0 1710 874JQ $1933 

DeCf7 8190 1840 1890 *&0 1419 
ES.sam HA ManH.«4« B.SSR 
Morrsooenlid 205.452 u) 3382 


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Sep 9; 46 41 060 M0 

Dk9; 4*47 91,3/ 

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Jul97 24S90 24300 24440-220 iS9l 

Sofi97 26715 3050 2459J-2Z0 IlSii 

0«97 NT NT. 24794-220 457 

Moca tmo 22030 21030-210 «,T29 

Esi MUn: IA471 
Open M.'4AS65ani707. 


-004 5700 
■005 44181 
•OOS 0980 
■00 27,123 
■00 24804 
■003 1102 
■0<n 14761 


FTSB INCUPFB 
DsperliMnjMlid 

J«97 475M 44B40 47440 *370 43.292 
Sllp97 47880 47190 iTTBO *370 lUIO 
Dk97 mold 47880 4000 *310 9SI 
eULSMai: 2114L Pnf.CONL ILTO* 

Pm. open 81430 oE L3fl 


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lun9? 1110 113-17 11120 -121 60* 

Vip9> llll« 1130 II1I6 -OOl IS3JI* 

Dk97 NT NT IIMM -041 

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P/e« WMI- ISABm) M ?7.d74 


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m I mGini pifdllOOpd 
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Srp97 41Z7 9111 9135 UnA. 114044 

On 97 9150 9143 93.47 -OOl 41134 

«AW9| 9363 *154 9159 -402 3A733 

JunTC 93*9 9163 9144 -04)2 9A43I 

$ep«8 9171 93AS 9307 -00 laMi 

EM sam- S40S. Pim. Mitt. *7,10 
Fit.', open ml.- 13A492 on ioos 


Commodity Indexes 


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O® 















PAGE 17 


Fears of New Media Rules Hit French Stocks 


PARIS — Possible resbictions on 
ownership of Trench media compa- 
nies we^ed heavily on the share 
^ces Tuesday of Qenerale des 
Eaux SA, Lyonnaise des Eaux $A 
and Bouygues SA ova* fears tl^ 
such a move could tiiwart their plans 
to become media poweihouses. 

Od Sunday, France's new culture 
m i nis ter, Catherine lYautmann, gfi d 
she supported limiting ownership 
stakes in media companies to 25 
percent, instead of the current 49 
percent. Such a change in ownership 
limits would force ^ three of those 
constiuctiai and utility companies 
to revise their ambitious plans for 
the multimedia and broadcasting 


sectors, anal^ts said, and could 
c^Kn the possibility of broadcasters 
fwing iotoforei^ hands. 

“Tliis couhl be very, very neg- 
ative for Aese companies, ” said 
Veronimjc Gomez, a fund manager 
at Jean-Pierre {Ration. 

Generale des Eaux indirectly cem- 
tnoU ^nal Plus SA, Europe's biggest 
pay-televisioa comf^y, through a 
30 percent stake in its parent com- 
pany, Havas SA. Lyonnaise des Eaux 
owns 34 percent of M6-Metropo)e 
TeleviskxL Benyeues owns 39 per- 
cent of ITl i which operates Eun^'s 
biggestjprivaie channel. 

All three companies also seek to 
MMi^pete In France’s $28 billion 
teleconununications market when it 


is ope ned to competition next year. 

TP] , Lyonnaise des Eaux and M6 
are also shareboldeis in Television 
Par Satellite, a direct-io-home di- 
gital satellite broadcaster which 
rivals Canal Plus's Canalsatellite. 

“1111$ decIaratioD of principle 
prompts us to consider the real prob- 
ability of a major strucniral change 
in the s^or," analysts at ABN- 
AMRO Hoare Govett said in a note 
to investora tm Mrs. TIrautmann's 
remarks. 

Shares of Generale des Eaux lost 
the most, falling 2.75 percent at the 
close of trading, to 708 French 
francs ($122). Hivas fell 1.45 per- 
cent, to 400.10, while Canal Plus 
drop^ied 1.18 percent, to 1,007. Ly- 


onnaise des Eaux shares fell 0.93 
percent, to 534, and Bouygues fell 
0.58 percent, to 5 18. 

(Bloomberg. Reuiersl 

■ Eurotunnei Shares Gain 

Eurotunnel's stock rose on spec- 
ulation the company could soon win 
an extension of its lease to operate 
the Channel Tuiuiel, helping entice 
investors to back an £8.5 billion 
(SI3.9 billion) retxganization of its 
debt, Bloomberg News reported 
innn London. Many investors have 
said th^ would not support the plan 
unless Paris and London agrera to 
extend the lease beyond 2052. 

Eurotunnel shares traded in Paris 
ended at 6.80 francs, up 0.25. 


The Tk’ib Inctex PneesasotS-OOPM NamYakttt» 


Jan 1. >se9s roa 

Laual 

Change 

%ehangB 

yeartBdMe 

%Ghanga 

WQrtdlnUex 
Raglon*! IndneM 

169.34 

•0.22 

-0.13 

+13.54 

Asia/PaeSe 

126.69 

+0.53 

40.42 

42.64 

Qiropo 

177.02 ■ 

-0.25 

-0.14 

+921 

N.Ametica 

195.77 

-1.03 

-0.62 

+20.91 

S. Amaiica 

hduMrlM IndaxM 

156.91 

40.35 

40.22 

+38.87 

Capiu/ goods 

206.85 

■0.51 

-025 

421.02 

Consumer goods 

190.35 

■0.11 

-ao6 

+17.91 

Energy 

200.65 

■0.S2 

-026 

+17.54 

finance 

126.62 

40.31 

4025 

+8.72 

64isca(bnBOus 

167.78 

-1.16 

-0.69 

+3.71 

7teHrMa(sflalB 

184.92 

•0.10 

-0.05 

+544 

Service 

160.68 

-1.00 

-0.62 

+1721 

utmes 

144.62 

40.12 

40.08 

40.81 


VvmunmkwmfHtniaTrtuaeVlfijriaSioeklndpKOnacsiheUS dotarvaiieaet 
saoiaama tt m t yitMaabbaoe**lramS5a ju iti»f. Formois rt fua n st iaa. a tree 
(noUM » mMife Iff wrU^p ID n» TrO trdu. 181 Avamm diaries do Gaullo. 

BBSZI Heat/ Cedae, Prana. CanpriodlvBkxmbaigNaws. 


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Paris 

OAX.' •• 

FT^ 100 Index ' 

CACAO . 

3800 


3000 

3600 ^ 

4600 p 

2800 a 

3400 AlfJ 


2600 /V^llfl/V' 

3200 

4200 y ^ 

/ TV 

.m/ 

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J F M A M J 

F M A M J 

1997 

1997 

1997 


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pRfiMRiinai 
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Ut IJi \M 1J6 
la 3J& 3.46 as 
4flS 195 iS 197 
147 4.45 445 447 

VM 1.96 1S7 1.96 

3.a 3.3S U6 137 
174 10 172 U7 
7M 7.16 7.17 7.16 

ii39 ii 3> nao 1140 


711 II 6 JD 
131 12150 
rJO 209 
310 306 

464 4S 
216 277 

kSO 242 
m 692 
397 3S 
241 23150 
239 234 

278 249 

713 208 

2a 219JD 
IS ISO 
S 81JD 
271 26731 
UD 333 
IIS 177JD 
150 158 

>90 IRD 
UD 112JD 
229 ai5D 
BT in 


ofiered 1 16 biUion ($799.4 

miUion) Tuesday, or two and one- 
half times (be minimum bid, for the 
chance to control what is to h«com<» 
Spain’s second telnbone company. 

The offer by Spain’s bi gg est 
power company and Italy's top 
company was 38 percent 
higher than the only other offer for 


Telefomca de Espana SA. 

The sale is part of the govern- 
ment's effort to end Telefonica’s 
nioaopoly on basic telephone ser- 
vice and open the SfMnish market to 
ccxnpetition. Spain is committed m 
offering more tel^ooe licenses 1^ 
Deceinber 1998, when kfiilly opens 
its telecommunicalioas maikeL 


^.Ketevisionc 


billion pesetas. Ketevision executives 
said a final decision would be made 
within two months and savt the new 
service could be operating this year. 

A winning bid by foiinally 

known as Empesa Nacional de Elec- 
Dicidad SA. would enable it to honor 
a pledge to shareholders to enter tele- 
communicaiions. It also would allow 


STET and Hellenic Telecommu- 
nication Organization SA of Greece 
bid 1.56 biUion Deutsche marks 
($906.7 million) Monday for 49 per- 
c ent o f Sobia's (Aone company. 
STET also has investments in Aus- 
nia, Greece, tlie Czech Republic and 
Latin America. 

(Bloomberg, Retaers) 


Platinum Giant Reorganizes to Step Up Output 


Blooriibarg News 

JOHANNESBURG —-Anglo 
American Platinum Coip., the 
world's largest p latinum pro^cer, 
said Tuesday it would (Ustiibute its 
33 percent stike in Rostenburg I^- 
inuxn Holdings Ltd. to shardbolden 
and seU its diarnond-trading interests 
in atffoposed reorganization. 

company, known as Am- 


plats, will distribute its Rusplats 
shares in the ratio of 24.1 Rusplats 
shares for every 100 Aroplats 
shares. Rusplats, in mm, will be 
used as the vehicle to ^uire 
Amplats and its niining units. 

The pn^K)^ merg^ of Amplats 
mines is aimed at reducing prcmc- 
tion 00^ and enabling the company 
to increase producticxi. to meet ex- 


pired demand and shrinking sup- 
plies from Russia, the world’s 
second-largest platinum producer. 

Amplats will sell its diamond in- 
terests to De Beers/Cen tenary, 
Anglo American Investment Trust 
Ltd. and associated companies for a 
net 508 million rand ($113 million), 
or 1.175 billioo rand minus 667 mil- 
lion rand of debt in the diaroond- 


mding companies. The proposed 
reorganization has been app^ed 
fay the boards of the individual 
companies and of Anglo American 
Coip.. Amplats's biggest sharehold- 
er. It is expected to be completed in 
early S^tember and to te made 
retroactive to July 1. Shareholder 
meetings to vote on the reorgan- 
ization are set for early August 


Very briefly: 

• Unotype-Hell AG. a maker of print-production equi[MTimt 
controlled by Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, said its 
1996 net loss grew to IS2.7 million Deutsche marks ($88.7 
million) from 74.7 million DM a year earlier as it anempicd to 
reorganize. Sales feU 6 percent, to 814.3 million DM. 

• Pernod Ricard SA's shares rose 3 percent, to 300.80 French 
fr^cs ($51.90), after it said McDonald's Corp. would sell its 
Orangina soft drink at 600 restaurants in France, a move that 
analysts said could add $15 million a year in revenue. 

• Scottish Media Group PLC agreed to pay £105 million 
($171.6 milliob) for Grampian TelevisioD PLC, a Sconish 
broadcaster, in a move that frirther consolidates the British TV 
industry after last year’s loosening of media-ownership rules. 

• Commercial Union PLC frians a restructuring of its do- 
mestic general insurance operations to improve profitability 
and service. The British company said no jobs cuts were 
planned, provided it met its "overw strategic objectives.’’ 

• Italy's new-car registrations rose 4.1 percent in May, to 
232,600, driven by a government incentive program. 

BliHmiherg, Reuters 


TAG 


Heuer 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY- JUNE 11, 1997 


EUROPE 




iotech 


iMSi La££vc> t 


Supplier 
Is Bom 




-- 

••iiiii Mi-; 

=- 


I Gag^wffvOlrSivAniOqMrAa 

^STOCKHOLM — Amer- 
jam imemational PLC said 
Ibesday it would acquire con- 


M of Pharmacia & Upjohn 
Jc.’s Iffe-sciences operation, a 
^ove that would form the 
rforld’s largest biotechnology 
rurolier. 

4 llie combination, part of a 


ipn 

r j»?V4 -.z ijE-r, 


t- j^)vorldwide consolidation trend 
; J ^ the heahh-care industry, 

- * Iwoold benefit Amersluun by 
:* .building maiket share and 
' * ’product breadth in equinneni 
a iw genetic and moleci^ re- 
' : search, where it cmreotly ranks 
seventii in world sales. 

1 1 The new con^Tany, to be 
lH.|.called Amersham Phai^cia 
"irBio^h, is eimected «> have 
r annual sales 01 $700 millioD 
and 3,600 ^plc^ees. 

; Amersham is to own 55 per- 
cent of die company, and Phar- 
macia &' Upjohn win hold 45 
peiceoL 

The comjpany wiU supply 
and develop instnmieats, 

jCDOW-llOW and chemical s fer 

leseardi and production. 

Amersham shares surged 93 
peicent, closing 129 pence 
(^.11) higher in Loodra at 
£14.80 pence. In Sweden, Phar- 
macia & Upjohn shares rose 
8 JO kroncx- ($1.09) to close at 
277 JO. 

•x, . “The coaqiany has said it 
win be eaniings-aihanciiig, and 
there wiU be upgrad^,'* hfigel 
'' Bames, an analyst widi Merrill 
- Lynch International, said. 

(AFP, Reuters, Bloomberg) 


1 So Doe 


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international herald tribune, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 



RAGE 19 


What’s on China’s Hong Kong Shopping List? 


By Philip Segal 

special lo iht HeralitTnbwte 

HONG KONG — As the embers 
of British empire grow ever dim- 



of a local airline, electric utility and 
telqjbone company. The strategic 
investments appear far Irran over. 

.What else does China want to 
buy, the Territory's high-ro lling in- 
vestors ask, hoping for one more 
ladle from the gravy train. 

With less ihu ihme weeks to go 
until China takes over this British 
colony, and just days after it con- 
cluded a deal to buy as much as 30 
percent more of the territory's 
biggest phone company. Hong- 
kong Telecommunications Lrl, 
from Britain’s Cable & Wireless 
KX. invesfoi^ here are scrambling 
to pick the next investment target 
by a mainland-backed company. 

Shares in Hongkong Telecom 
fell 8.7 percent Tuesday, after 
rising more than 46 percent since 
April 29 in anticif^tion of a 
Chinese purchase. Some investors 
DOW fear that the acquisition may 
not guarantee much greater access 
to Qiinese telephone operatioos 
than Hongkong Telecom already 
has. The stock closed at 1730 Hong 


Kong doUars ($2.33), down 1.65. 

Investors in Hong Kong seem to 
aorec that property and banking are 
the new sectors to watch and do not 
discount rumors dial a major Brit- 
ish conglomerate here might be 
ready for the auction block. After 
it was nationalism that drove 
last week’s Hongkong Telecom 
purch^. as well as previous deals 
in which China acquired stakes in 
China Light & Power and Cathay 
Pacific Airways at discounts to 
their market v^ue. 

For China, it was unacceptable 
for such strategic industries to re- 
main in ooD-(^inese hands after 
Hong Kong reverts to rhtnft.«» con- 
trol July 1 . Now the market is ask- 
ing winch other Hong Kong 
companies or industries China 
might consider “strategic.'* 

“Maybe Swire," said ftiscilla 
Ng, head of sales at CEF Bro^rage 
Ltd., referring to one of the oldest 
British comparties in Hong Kong, 
Swire Pacific Ltd. Swire, which has 
interests in property, airlines and 
Coca-Cola bottling in Hong Kong 
and China, has denied rumors that 
China-backed CFIIC Pacific Ltd. 
might want to buy a substantial 
pcuiion of the company, but Ms. Ng 
said the market continued to see 
considerable logic to such a deal. 


“With all of these British 
companies, it makes sense they 
want to unwind their positions In 
Hong Kong. They don’t feel coii\. 
foriable widi all of this China au- 
thority.” ^ said. 

If Swire could sell part of the 
company to a Chinese-backed firm, 
the t hiniriag goes, it would be ac- 
quiring the same son of good con- 
nections and political insunmce 


Invefitors are trying to 
guess where Beijing 
will make its next big 
acquisition. 

that led it to sell pan of its airline ai 
such a steep discount In ^diiiop* 
Swire's stock price has lagged the 
market this year, despite a com- 
pany share-buyback pro^nm. 

llie next target ‘*is definitely die 
property sector,” said Lennon 
Chan, director Tai Fook Secu- 
rities. China has been busy in the 
past year acquiring portions of 
smaller real-estate or construction 
companies, whose shares have 
soajid as a result, in prnrajstioR to 
take a more active role in r^i- 
estate development here. 


But what about the possibility of 
buying into some of the major de- 
velopeis, such as Cheung Kong 
(Holdings) Ltd., owned by Li Ka- 
shing. or Henderson Land Devel- 
opment Co., owned by Lee Shau- 
kee? Like all the richest de- 
velopers, ih^ are Hong Kong 
Chinese with impeccable mainland 
political connections and extensive 
businesses inside China. 

“The tycoons don't really want 
to have the Chinese on rhetr own 
boards," said Mr. Chan, whose 
finn is controlled by New World 
Development, one of Hong Kong's 
biggest property developers and 
among the l^esi real-estate in- 
vestors in China. 

Presuming they have a choice in 
the matter, the developers ‘ ‘at most 
would sell a small pi^on of their 
holdings to a Chinese partner. " 
said Emilie Chau, an analyst at 
BZW Asia Ltd. 

“More likely is that the Chinese- 
backed companies will be more ag- 
gressive" in the Hong Kong pro^ 
erty market after July 1. she said. 

Perhaps, but property companies 
in Hong Kong are immensely prof- 
itable 8^ have a lot of what China's 
government lacks: money. 

Another area of feverish market 
speculation is in banking. Control 


of the territory's second-largest 
network of retail banks by the 
mainland's Bank of China group 
would seem to rule out the need to 
ac^ire an often-discussed target. 
H^C's 61 percent-owned Hang 
Seng Bank. 

Shares in a variety of Hong 
Kong's second-line banks, 
however, have rocketed in recent 
weeks on rumors of further main- 
land interest. CITIC already has a 
6 1 .7 percent stake in Ka Bank 

Ltd., but the bank's shares rose 25 
percent Friday on a report here that 
China wanted to double the bank’s 
assets in the next five years. The 
stock sUpped Tuesday to close ar 
7.05 dollars, down 10 cents. 

Union Bank of Hong Kong Ltd., 
which is already 60 percent-owned 
bv China Merchants Group, and Liu 
C^ong Mine Bank Ltd., where net 
profit rose 31 percent last year, also 
are viewed as potential targets. 

Tony Liu. an analyst at .ABN- 
AMRO Hoare Govett Asia, said he 
expected Liu Chong King's profit 
to rise by 18 percent or 20 percent 
over the next two years. 

The bank, with a profitable 
branch and good links to the 
Chinese city of Shantou, in Guang- 
dong Province, is more than 50 
percent held by the Liu family. 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
HangSe^ 

17000 — 

■.6000 

15000 


Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 



13000^^ W- - 
12000 j-p-iy' ^ J 


Singapore 
Straits Times 

-- 22000 

— 21000 
20000^ - 
(90D0' 

_ 1 Y-- 18000 


FMAMJ 



F'm A M'J 


Exetenge ■' • Index 

Hang Seng 


Tuesday 

Close' 


Prav. % 
Ckiss Chang^ 

14A39.71 14J655.1S -1.47 


^ngapore 

Straits Times 

2,014.78 

2,03021 

-0.76 

Sydney 

AH Ordinaries 

2328.90 

2,600.90 

+i;08 

Tdq^o 

NM(eI225 

20,532.55 20,223.82 *^S3 

Kuala Lumpur Comppaite 

1-, 110.38- 

1,117.20 

-0.61 

Btftgkok 

SET 

527.22 

58446 

■1.3S 

Seoul 

CoiT^osite Index 

769.63 

775.01 

-0.67 

Taipd 

Stock Market Index 8,392.98 

8.342.94 

+0.60 

Manila 

PSE 

2,775.11 

2,778.37 

• 0.12 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

689.77 

692.60 

-0.39 

Wellington 

N2SE'40 

246735 

2,371.02 

-0.15 

Sombey 

Sensitive todex 

3.86a97 

3.635.3S 

■ri).67 

Source: Telekurs 

lni.‘tiLiii.>nal H.ijdJ InhutK 

Very briefly: 


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■ Individual Credit Line 

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According to Swiss Law 

Inquiries: 

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Fax: +•*- 41 41 728 0809 


Bangkok Battles Arbitrage Artists 


(VSttf r/uH 

Bangkok — Tlie central bank 
unveiled tou^ measures Tuesday to 
halt speculative share tr adin g by in- 
vestors who take advantage of a loop- 
hole in official safeguard^ against at- 
tacks on the Thai cnnency. 

The Bank of Thailand told local 
financial institutions that bold shares 
in trust for foreign investors not to 
transfer proceeds of stock sales to non- 
resident^ai baht accounts here. 

The central bonk also said it had told 
the institutions not to lend securities to 
investors who im«id to sell them short 
on the Thai stock exchar^e to try to turn 
a quick profit from cuireocy arbitrage. 

Investors have been takuig advan- 
tage of a de facto two-tier exchange- 
rate mechanism set up by the author- 
ities to combat currency speculators. 

The difference between the onshore 
and offshore baht rates has allowed 
arbitragers to conven liquid Thai equit- 
ies into baht that are then traded for 
doUars at a profit on die offshore mar- 
ket, allowing players to make a profit 
and buy back their ori^nal shares. 

The dollar was quoted Tuesday at 


24.15 baht, up from 23.95 hahi 
Monday. 

Analysts said foreigners sold large 
parcels of shares fix' b^t before taking 
the proceeds offshore to buy dollars at 
a discount and then buyii^ shares 
back with cheap doUais at the baht's 
domestic exch^ge rate. 

Finance Minister Amnuay Virawan 
said diat the central tank’s latest mea- 


U«S. Backer for Du^ 

BloiiiAerg News 

BANGKOK — Goldman, Sachs & 
Co. said Ttiesday it would pay 750 
million baht ($31 J millitMi) for a 29 
percent stake in Dusit Than! Cotp., 
Thailand's largest hotel company. 

The tiansacdon would gjveGoldman 
a sb^e of ttKMe t^ 40 hotels in Thai- 
land and a pece of Kempinsld AG, the 
Berlin-based luxury hotelier that ^ SO 
percent-owned the Thai company. 

Goldman will buy 25 million new 
shares for 30 baht each. Dusit shares 
closed unchanged at 17,25 baht 


sures were needed 10 ensure fair play 
in the market. 

“We follow up the finance liber- 
alizations policy, but we don't want 
anyone to unfairly take advantage of 
us.” he said. 

The Stock Exchange of Thailand 
index fell 7.24 points Tuesday, or 1 .35 
percent, to close at 527.22. posting its 
sixth loss in the past seven sessions. 

■ Beregrine Trims Thai Unit 

Peregrine Investment Holdings Ltd., 
a Hong Kong-based brokerage, said it 
was closing its two retail dealing rooms 
in Thailar^ because of the Bangkok 
stock market's collapse. Bloomberg 
News rep^ed from Hong Kong. 

Peregrine will serve institutional cli- 
ents “completely’' and refocus its Thai 
retail operation on “high-net-worth in- 
dividuus,” Tom Grimmer, a spokes- 
man, said. “We’re shutting down our 
two retail dealing rooms because the 
ret^ business is so slow." 

Trading has slowed by nearly 30 
percent this year, from a daily average 
of 5.34 billion b^t (S222 million) to 
3.8 billioD baht. (AfP, Btoowhenii 


U.S. to Cut Rates 
It Pays Abroad 
To Phone Firms 

Axfihv Frijuie-PifSSf 

SINGAPORE — The United 
States said Tuesday it planned to 
slash payments to non-U.S. phone 
companies and urged Asia-Pacific 
economies to open up their telecom- 
munications markets to competition. 

Non-U.S. phone complies stand 
to lose billions of dollars in revenue 
because of the U.S. move to cut 
accounting rates, which determine 
the amount one phone company 
pays to another to complete the con- 
nection of an international call. 

Many .Asian and other regional 
phone utilities have criticiz^ the 
move to slash payments by as much 
as 70 percent. 

Susan Ness, a member of the U.S. 
Federal Conununications Commis- 
sion, said an announcement on a 
new form of accounting rates would 
be made “some time in the next 
couple of months, probably this 
summer." 


• PT Ifidustri PesawuJ Terbang Nusantara. an airplane 
maker owned by the Indonesian government, threatened to sue 
the Jakarta Post if the newspaper did not apologize and make 
financial restitution for what it said was an incorrect story 
about the crash of one of its planes. 

• Mifsubishi Motors Corp. plans ro h irhdraw from the ll.S. 
market for pickup trucks because of low profitability, severe 
competition and high import tariffs. 

• Japan called for a change in Indonesia's “national car" 
policy in talks between the two governments, an Indonesian 
official said. Indonesia also is holding talks with the United 
States and the European Union over its tax incentives to an 
auto company controlled by a son of President Suharto. 

• Singapore will quadruple the price of water by 2000 to spur 
ronser\'aiion. Deputy Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said, 
adding that w'ater was a strategic resource in a country largely 
dependent on Malaysia for supplies. 

• Thai authorities approved a proposal by a private con- 
sortium led by JVK Holding Co. to form an airline to 
compete wirh state-owned Thai Airways International. 

• Hitachi Electronics Co., Sanyo Electric Co.. Matsushita 
Electric Industrial Co. and Victor Co. of Japan agreed to 
make radios for a digital satellite radio netw ork being set up by 
WorldSpace Inc., a private company based in Washington 
that aims to have a radio network by 3000 covering emerging 
markets in Asia, AMca and Latin America. 

• Television New Zealand, a state-owned company, will 
close five stations offering regional programming and start a 
youth-oriented channel next month in tlieir place. 

• Vietnam moved to end its telecommunications monopoly 
W issuing a license to a start-up provider, Saigon Post & 
Telecommunications Joint Stock Corp. 

• Mega PascaIBhd.. a supplier of concrete to the construction 

industry, saw its shares surge in their debut on the Kuala 
Lumpur Stock Exchange, dosing at 6.80 ringgit (S2.7 1 ) after 
opening at 3.50, Blwmibcr^, Reuters, AFP 


(1 (• For haute couture 
you go to Paris. And for 
asset management ? y / 


T o Geneva, of course. Its Private Bankers have developed 
made-to-measure asset management into an art. Unique 
investment expertise and a globd perspective have estab- 
lished their worldwide reputation for capital growth... 
a reputation they have ably defended for 200 years. 










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GENEVA'S Private Bankers 


liberty ■ INDEPENDENCE ■ RESPONSIBILITY 


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( 1796 ) 


In Geneva: 

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(1798) 


MIRABAUD&Cie 

(1819) 


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(1805) 


1 






Q /Jeffrey E. Garten 


Emerging Markets Reshape the World 


NYSE 


Tuesday** 4 PJi. dene 

(Cootmned) 

M » w K i&ee ^ 


HTlISr SMl l»>WK lgne U" 


^^^1 M g^k civ i!d ^ 


Jeffiey E. Garten, dean of 
the Yale School ef Manage- 
ment and former U,S. im&r- 
secreu^ of commerce for in- ' 
temadonal trade , is author of 
the newly published book 
“The Big Ten; The Big 
Emer^ng Markets and How 
T^ WU Change Our 
Uves.” He spoke with Brian 
Knowlton of the Intematiowl 
Herald Tribune about the 
risks and opportumdes of 
these markets, 

e 

Q. Yoar book jnediets 
sweeping, even cataclysmic 
chan^ as the 10 biggest 
emeiging marirats develop, 
gain confidence, become 
more assertive and change the 
rales we live by. You say diat 
the countries you include in 
this group — Aigeotina, 
Brazil and I^vco: China, In- 
dia, Indonesia and South 
Korea; Inland and Turkey, 
and S4rath Afiica — deserve 
at least as mnch foreign- 
policy attention as Japu and 
Europe. But first, why did you 
exclude Russia frtm your 
Ust? 

A. Russia is significant, 
above all dse, beca^ it has 
noclear weapons. For all the 
talk, the economic reforms are 
virtually nonexistent If Rus- 
sia went into recession tomor- 
row, I don't believe it would 
matter to die world economy. 
On die othn band, if the pro- 
gress in Poland b^an to un- 
wind, people would begin to 
worry about all of Eastern and 
Cen^ Europe. 

Q. So why are the big 10 


emeiging markets so inqxir- 
tant? 

A. A couj^ of sweeping 
inflnences are shapbu the 
post-Cold Wu wor^ One is 
mformatioo technology and 
the revolu- 

tion, Equally important is the 
rise of a number of countries 
1 ^ share certain characterist- 
ics — they're big physically, 
th^ have large pcpulatioas, 
they're econormcally dynam- 
ic, they're politically udhien- 
regionally and, incieas- 
ingly, on die glol^ scale. Th^ 
will be the engines cf world 
trade for the next decade. 

They will have a major in- 
fiuence on tbe kind of values 
the world oltimately em- 
braces. Ihese countries rep- 
resent at one time, a political 
challenge, an economic chal- 
lenge and a challenge of deal- 
ing with a clash of values in 
such areas as human rights, 
lalxv standards, cotraption 
and illegal trade in narcotics. 
• 

Q. How much weight will 
these 10 markets carry? 

A. Tbe United States 
already e^qiorts more to the 10 
Big Emerguig Markets than to 
Edtoto arc Japan combii^ 
and tbe trajectory is strai^t 
up. Take the example of in- 
f^tructure. In Laim Amer- 
ica. trending has reached $1 
billion a in infrastruc- 
ture, and all that's going to 
lead to great demand for more 
cental, capital equipment and 
technology. 

Q. What about the impact 
on the world labor market? 


GT US SNIAU CONinUilES FUND 

Seciel4 d'inveslisseinent a coital variable 
69, Route d'Esch 1-14^ Luxembourg 
ILC CaTfiaWaTg B IWbcr fr4S176 

Notice is hereby given In the shardioklen, that the 
Anmul G ener a l Meeiiiis 


of shareholders of GT US SMALL COMPANIES FUND 
will be held at the offtees of Banqne Internationale a 
Luxemboorg, Soei^t^ Anonjme, 69, route d'Eseh, L-1470 
Luxembourg, on Friday, June 20, at 3:15 p.m„ with the 
folIoHing agenda: 

I To hear and accept tbe reporte oil 

(a) Tbe Directors 

(b) Ibe Aadttors 

n To approve tbe Report of tbe Directors Ibr the 
year ended SI March 1997, Inclnding the 
Staicaaent of Net Asacta aa at SI March 19^ and 
the Statement of OperatSona for the year ended 
SI March 1997, 

III To discharge the Board of Mreetora and the 
Andilor la ■ ■ cap ect oftbelr perfomaace ofdatlca 
for the year ended March SI, 1997, 

IV To approve tbe Board oTDirretora and elect the 
Directors to aerve until the awat Ananal General 
Meeting oTShunreholdeni. 

V To reappoint Coopera 4 Lybraad SX> aa Aaditoni 
of the Fnnd to aerve aatil the next Annual 
Geaeral Meeting of aharefaoldera and to 
aidbo r lac the D hm ^ o ra to Cxt hch rconmeraflon. 

VI To approve the payamat of Directors liees. 

Vn Any other badness, 

VID Atyoaiiuncnt. 

The shareholders are advised (hat no quorum is required 
for the items im the aseofia of the Annitd General Meeting 
and that dedsions wilfbe taken on a simple majority of the 
shares present or reprewnted at the meeting- 

In order to take part at the Meeting of June 20, 1997, the 
owners of bearer shares will have to depotit their shues 
five clear days before the meeting with Banqne 
Internationale a Luxembourg, 69, Route d'Esch L-14'70 
Luxembourg. 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


GT INVESTMENT FUND 

Societe dTnvestisseinent a CapHal Variable 
69, Route d'Esch, Luxembouig 
R.C Laxendmoig 8-7443 

Notice b hereby given to the sharriiolders, that the 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

of sharrholders of GT INVESTMENT FUND »ill be held at 
the ofBees of Baiique Internationale i Luxembniug, Sodele 
Anonyme, 69, route d'Esch, L-1470 Luxembourg, on Friday, 
June 20, at 3:^ pjn., with the follo%ring agenda: 

I To hear and accept the reports of: 

(a) Hw IMrectors 

(b) The Auditors 

II To approve the Report of the Directors for the year 
ended 31 December 1996, including the Statement of Net 
Assets as at 31 December 1996 and the Statement of 
Operations for the year ended 31 December 1996. 

in To dischaim the Board of Directors and the Anditor in 

raped of Uieir performance of duties for the year ended 

December 31* 1996. 

IV To approve the Board of Directors and elect the 
Directors to serve until the next Annual General Meeting 
of shareholdera. 

V' To reappoint Coopers & Lybrand S.C. as Auditors of the 
Fund to serve until the next Annual General Meettus of 
sharaholders and to authorixe the Directors to fix their 
remuneration. 

\1 To approve the dividend, if auv, to be paid in respect of 
the year ended 31 December 1^96. 

\1I To afqirove tbe payment of Directors fees, 

VDI .\ny other basinciis. 

K Adjournment 

The shareholders are advbed that no quorum Ls required 
for the items on the uenda of the Annual General Meeti^ 


shares present or r e pr e s e nted at the Meeting, 
in order to take part at the Meeting of June 20. 1997, the 
owners of bearer shares will have to deposit their shares 
five Hear days before the Meeting with one of the followiDg 
banks who are authorised to receive the shares on deposit: 

• Baycrische Vereinsbank A.G., Kardinal-Faulhaber- 
Stiusse 1, 8000 Munrhen 2, 

• Credit Indusiriel ei Commercial. 66 rue de la Vietoire, 
F-75009 P^ris. 

• Banqne Internationale i Luxembourg. 69, Route d'Esch 
L-I4>i0 Ijjxeinbouig. 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 






A. Tliat's another dtmen- 
sioo, even more startliiig: 
From diese 10. countries wul 
come, over die next decade, 
about a billion and a half 
young workers not now in tbe 
woik force. They will be 
wtxjdog fex- $5 to $10 a day, 
compa^ to an average man- 
ufacturing wage in tbe United 
StatesGf$100aday. And they 
will have, for ttie first time, 
great access to Western man- 
agemrat and Western technol- 
ogy and all the coital they can 
ose, so they will be producing 
at very high levels of effi- 
ciency. 

I see this as a frei ght train 
coming down die rails. It's 
going to create job dtsioca- 
tions in tbe West on an order 
that few people are talking 
about It’s going to produce 
tremendous downward pres- 
sure on wages. 

Q. So thm's enormous op- 
portunity but also a feeling of 
danger ^ead. 

A. Exaedy. American 


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thinking about foreign policy 
and trade is 3o focusM on 
Europe and Japan — the big 
emerging maikets are still 
seen as pedpheraL I would 
switch tmt focus. Grante^ 
Europe and Japan will remain 
the center of economic grav- 
ity well into the next cen- 
tal. 

But the real dynamism will 
be in the emerging markets. 
It’s here where things could 
go very right oir very wrong. 

Q. China se^ns to embody 
a lot of what you say about the 
emerging markets in general 

— it's too big and too power- 
ful to ignore. Wesreni firms 
feel they can' t afford not to do 
business with it, but it resists 
all outside pressures on mat- 
ters like human rights. 

A. I agree. China repr^ 
sents an example of a Big 
Emergiog Maricet in very 
clear reli^. It has everything: 
the economic opportunities, 
tbe economic risira, the dif- 
ficulties of political engage- 
ment aixl the clash of values. 

1 think there's only one ap- 
pn^h to China, and that is a 
policy of engagement, recog- 
nizing all the inmerfections. 
The dternative, so-called 
contaiiunent theory, to me is 
an insane approach. 

I also think that when we 
talk about engagement, the 
way to relate to big emergi^ 
markets, the way to have in- 
fluence so that you can talk 
about human rights, is to have 
a veiy strong commercial 
link. The approach many in 
Congress would take — to 
use trade as a negative lever 

— is the exact opposite of 
what I am suggesting. 

Too many people see com- 
mercial engagement as deal- 
making almie. 1 see it as run- 
ning tile gamut from real 
hard-nosed trade negotiations 
to technical assistance in such 
areas as helping China and 
Brazil to develop stronger 
banking systems and bet&- 
regulated stock markets, to 
imp^e criminal justice ad- 
ministration. All diese are the 
underpinnings of modem 
capitalisTTL 

• 

Q. How far do you take 
engagement with the emerg- 
ing maikets? Suppose that 
after Hong Kong reverts to 
Chinese sovereignty there's a 
crackdown of Tianarunen 
proportions. Does America do 
nothing? Are concerns about 
prison labor and environuiea- 
tal depredation forgotten? 

A. Engagement doesn't 
mean subordinating 3U the 
other issues we care about It 
sinqjly means we are not go- 
ing to tie trade, legally, to oth- 
er issues and that we were to 
use trade as a [xessure point 
for anything other than recip- 
rocal trade — for human rights 
orchild labor — we have to do 
it roultilatnally. To do it uni- 
laterally is tott^ ineffective. 

If we can't get multilateral 
pressure, then we have to deal 
with human rights, child 
labor, environmental {xotec- 
lion as forcefully as we can. 
but short of withdrawing 
trade privileges. Without the 
commercial' relationslup, we 
have no leverage. 

Q. Looking ahead, say, 10 
years, do you see the outlines 
of a golden new age. with 
vibrant and agile new mar- 
kets, or a chaotic and more 
dangerous time? 

A. Ibe answer to that qoes- 
tion, I would say, is balanced 
ou a knife edge. 


Sociefe dnnvnstissniiient a Capital Variable 
69, Route d'Esch, Umembourg 
KG. Loxanboeig' B-81108 

Nnticr is hereby given to (he shareholders (hot (he ■ 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 


of sfaareholderv of GT EIJROFE FUND will be farid at the 
offices of Banque lalcrnationale i Laxemboorg, Societe 
Anonyme, 69, route d'Esch, L-1470 Luxembourg, on Friday, 
June 20, 1997 at 3d)0 p-m,, with the fdlowing agenda: 

I To heal* and accept the reports of: 

(a) Tbe Directors 
fl>) Tbe Auditors 

n To approve the Report of the Directors for the year 
ended 31 December 1996, including (he Statement of 
Net Assets as at 31 December 1996 and Statement of 
Operations for the year ended 31 December 1996. 

in To dlschai^ the Board of Directors and (he Auditor 
with mpcct of their performance of duties for the year 
ended DcGCmber 31 , 1996 . 

IV To approve the Board of Directors and elect the 
Directors to .^erve until the next Annual General 
Meeting of sbarehoMers. 

V To rcappoinl Gmperv A Lybrand S.C as Auditors of the 

Fund to serve until tlie next Annual Goieral Meeliim of 
flharcholdera and to authorize the Directora to fix tneir 
remuneration. 

\1 To approve the dividend if any paid in reapecl of the 
year ended 31 December 1996 . 

\ll Any other boAiness. 

Vin Adjournment. 

Hie shareludden are advised that no quorum is required 
for the items on the agenda of the Anniu General Meeting 
and that dwasions will be taken tm a simple majority of the 
shares present or represented at the meeting. 

In order tn lake part at the Meeting of June 20. 1997, the 
owners of bearer share? will have to deposit their sharea 
five clear days before the meeting with the registered t^ee 
of the company or with Banque Internationale 3 
Luxembourg, 69, route (TEsdb L-1470 Luxembouig 

HIE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 





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Communicator 








PAGE 22 


World Roundup 


Athletes Warned 

ATHLETICS Hie International 
Amateur Athletics- Federation, the 
stoh’s world governing body 
threatened Tuesday to suspend any 
athletes who run against Ma^ 
Slaney or Sandra Farmer-Patrick in 
the U.S. national champ ionships. 

Hie lAAF said Slaney and Faim- 
er-Patrick remain sus^nded 
cannot run in the championships, 
which start Wednesday in Indiana- 
polis. Indiana. It said that if the U.S. 
federation accept^ their entries 
then the “contamination*' rule 
would be applied to athletes who 
ran against them. 

The lAAF threatened similar ac- 
tion when Butch Reynolds, the 
world 400-meter reccxd-bolder, ran 
in the 1992 U.S. 01ynq)ic trials, but 
il did not suspend anyone. {AP) 

Three Coaches Hired 

ICE HOCKEY On the first work- 
ing day after the end of the Stanley 
Cup finals. National Hockey 
Le^ue made a flurry of manage- 
ment changes. 

Ron Wilson took over the Wash- 
ington Capitals on Monday, Jim 
Schoenfeld joined the Phoenix 
Coyotes, and Danyl Sutter relumed 
to the NHL as coach of the San Jose 
Sharks. The Capitals also hired 
George McPhee as general man- 
ager, and St. Louis turned its GM 
duties over to Larry Pleau. 

Wilson. 42. signed a three-year 
contract worth a reported $2. 1 mil- 
lion. He spent the four years as 
Anaheim'scoach.compLlinga 120- 
145-31 record and guiding the ex- 
pansion team to its first playoff 
berth. McPhee 38, becomes the 
league's youngest general man- 
ager. 

Schoenfeld, 44, got a three-year, 
SI. 5 million contracL The fonmer 
All-Star defenseman, who was dis- 
missed by the Capitals last month, 
is the franchise's fourth coach in as 
many years. 

Suiter. 38. had a 1 10-80-26 re- 
cord as Chicago's coach from 1992 
to 1995, making the playoffs each 
time. He resign^ in June 1995 to 
spend more time with his family. 
His 4'year'Old son has Down's syn- 
drome. {AP\ 

Dewulf Falls in First 

TENNIS Filip Dewulf of Belgi- 
um. a semifinalist at the French 
Open last week, lost 6-7 (6-8). 6-4, 
6-2 Tuesday to Daniel Nestor of 
Canada in the first round of the 
Queen's Club grass-court tourna- 
ment in London. 

In second-round matches at the 
traditional Wimbledon warm-up, 
Martin Lee, a British teenager 
ranked No. 500 in the world, out- 
lasted I3th-seeded Alex O'Brien 3- 
6. 7-6 (7-3 ). 6-4 and Jean-Philippe 
Fleurian upset a fellow Frenchman, 
Cedric Pioline, the No. 12 seed, 7-S. 
b.3. {AP) 



*'■ • 





Jean-Philippe Fleurian return- 
ing Tuesday to Cedric Pioline. 


^ IicnitbS:Sribuite 

Sports 


WEDNESDAY. JinVEl 


Tiger Woods 
And Golf’s 
Gourmet 

U.S. Open Prondses 
Eclectic Players’ List 


By Bill Plaschke 

Lus Angeles Tima 

BETHESDA, Mary land — Two days 
until the start of Tiger Woods's 
and Dennis Trixler is ready for his ^t 
challenge. 

Bacon. 

“I'll get to Recourse in the morning, 
that great smeil of crispy bacon will te 
in the air, and 1 won't be able to think 
about anything else," he said. 

Two days before Woods tees off at 
the Congressional Country Club here on 
Thursday, trying to n^ down the 
second piece of a golf Grand Slam and a 
bigger westion is this: 

Will Dennis Trixler be able to play 18 
holes without once leaving the course to 
eat off somebody's barbecue? 

“I just can't help myself," he said. 
“If I'm walking to my IhlU and I see a 
nice piece of chickra on a grill, I just 
have to go over and taste it." 

Or toss the fan's salad. Or suggest a 
wine to accompwy ±e Iamb. 

Before excusing himself to continue 
his game, Trixler sometimes asks if he 
can return afterward and cook dinner. 
While his playing partners will be dunk- 
ing about shooting birdies, he will be 
thinking about marinating them. 

Two days before the U.S. Open, and 
before writing about 10.000 words on 
how Woods can win his second con- 
secutive major, it might be worth a few 
paragraphs on why he might not 

The course will be incredibly tough. 

And because il is an Open rield, the 
competition will be incrembly weird. 

Meet Dennis Trixler, the golfing 
gourmet. He is a 39-year-old amateur 
chef and professional golfer. 

In that order. 

“1 enjoy cooking more," he said. 
“Golf is not. like, fim. You have to 
concentrate too hard. Fun, for me, is a 
tailgate party, with leg of lamb and 
twice-baked potatoes and " 

He is producing a golf and cooking 
video that he hopes to turn into a tele- 
vision series. He has cooked for many 
tour players in exchange for beds in 
their homes during tournaments. He 
once even threw a pregwe meal for 
some of the Green Bay Packers. 

Golf? Well, he has never won on the 
PGA tour, hasn't even qualified to play 
the tour since 1993. 

His country club in San Francisco 
still charges him monthly dues. 

He has no clothing or equipment 
sponsors, and one motto: “If it's fi^. 
it's for me, I'U take three," be said. 

So what will be be doing here this 
week, teeing offThuraday only one hour 
after the great Woods in pursuit of this 
country's greatest golf championship? 

He's playing because he won a qual- 
ifying tournament open to just about 
anyone who has a bag. 

More than 7,000 golfers across the 
United States tried it. Only 63 made it, 
rounding out the field of 156- 

That'is what separates the U.S. Open 
from the two other majors in the United 
States. That is its beauty, and its beasL 

It is truly Everyman's Tournament. 
In 1913. a caddie won. 

There is also a chance that a guy-like 
Trixler could gel hot, get on national TV 
on Saturday, and while his partner is 
taking a second shot, cameras could 
capture him in the gallery, chowing 
down on a dnimstick, advis'tng a fan, 
“Why don't you put a little lemon pep- 
per on tius?” 

“I've always been an unusual guy," 
he said. 

Not that he is a bad golfer. He has won 
more than $500,000 in a variety of tour- 
naments since turning pro 18 years ago. 

He's just a golfer who treats golf like, 
well, golf. Something to do when you're 
not tiddng care of the really important 
things in life. 

Like eating. 



SMWdriVThei 


Bare Leg Ban Ends for Open Caddies 


WushingMi Post Serxwe 

WASHINCjTON — With steamy 
ternperatures expected next weekend 
at Congressionm Country Club, the 
caddies at the 97th U.S. Open will 
have die chance to make a bold state- 
ment, if not for fashion, at least for 
comfort on the golf course. 

For the first time in Open histo^, 
the men carrying the bags for the 156 
players in the field will be allowed to 
wear shorts, although women caddies 
have been allowed to wear shorts dur- 
ing competition. 

Only one player, Forrest Fezler in 
the 1983 Open at Oakmont, Penn- 
sylvania, has worn shorts during play. 
After wearing them during practice 


rounds, Fezler was asked by Open 
officials to put on trousers during the 
championship. But before playing the 
I8th hole of the final round, he 
changed into a pair of blue shorts. He 
bogeyed the bole but got a bonus from 
his clothing manufacturer.. 

Carrying a 40-pDund bag nearly 
four miles for more tban four hours in 
the heat would seem to constitute a 
health risk, but the rules have strictly 
prohibited bare legs on the course. At 
last year's PGA Championship at 
Valhalla in Louisville, the caddies for 
Tom Lehman and Steve Jones started 
in shorts, but were told by PGA of- 
ficials to change into pants or the 
players would disqualified. 


Although he carries only 160 pounds 
on his S-foot-lO frame, he can never 
stop pondering the wonders of food. 

Perhaps the key to his qualifying vic- 
tory last week at El Cab^ero Country 
Club in Tarzana, California, was that he ' 
bad three exquisitely prepared mes- 
quite-smoked turkey breast sandwiches 
on sourdough in his bag. 

But then, while other pros may spend 
their toumament evenings wotting on 
putting, Trixler is out buying hibachis to 
use for hotel balcony barbecues. 

* ‘ I must have bought 30 Utde grills all 
overibecountry," hesaid. “Sometimes 
I do wonder what my game would be 
like if 1 thought only about golf." 

He's been thinking about other things 
since, as a child, he sld^med school to 
watch “The Galloping Gourmet" on 
television. 

By the time he was a teen-ager, he 
was cooking breakfast for his buddies, 
dinner for his parents. “Plates heated, 
passes chilled, bacon dried between 
two towels," he said: “Tlie works.” 

He has eight holes in one. He has 
qualified for the U.S. O^n four other 
times and finished 50th in 1988. 


“But nothing gives me the satisfac- 
tion of preparing a big meal for 
friends," be said. “You can't get that 
feeling with golf. Too many hi^, too 
many lows, too much frustration.’' 

Those friends once includ^ the 
Green Bay Packer quarterback, Brett 
Favre. who knew Trixler from some 
small Mississippi tournaments. 

Favre brought some to 

Trixler *5 apartment for dinn er the n^t 
before the Packers defeated ' Ihe^^ 
Francisco 49ers in the playoffs afrer the 
1995 season. 

“Cracked crab," Trixler said. 

His lifetime highlight? A practice 
round with Jack Nicklaus and Greg Nor- 
man in 1989,one day after Nicklaus had 
stiffed him before another scheduled 
practice round. 

His projttted highlight this week? He 
says he is playing well, says he thinks he 
has a chance to make the cut, surprise 
some people. But he is certain of only 
one thing. 

“Free lunches.” he said. “I've 
already seen where they are giving us 
free lunches, and I can’t wait to see what 
ih^'U be. 


The Promised Land 
Just North of Paris 

Afnca Leads Race to Wbrld Cup 


By Rob Hughes 

latemarioiu! Herakl Trihme 


GETTING READY — Tiger Woods teeing off in a practice round at the 
Congressional Country Club, where the U.S. Open opens Thursday 


L ondon — The Stade de France 
is raVing elegant shape in Saint 

Denis, a limthem suburb of Paris. 
Looking at the flat, saucer-like roof, 
and bearing the distant drums of the fust 
qualifiers to foe 1998 World Cup, one 
can see foe fiitnie. A year hence, on June 
1 0, this arena will throb to foe chorus of 
80,000 fans aind the games will be on. 

Braal and Erance, the holder and the 
host, have not had to sweat for a place 
among foe' final 32. All foe rest are 

WoNfcPSOCCEK 

running hard to reach this promised 
land. >&ca, the cradle of civilization, is 
foe tot to give birfo to qualifiers. 

It produced triplets last weekend, 
with Morocco, Nigeria and Tunisia each 
winning foe right to play in foe finals. 
South Africa and Cameroon are each 
just a point away from taking one of the 
two omei places to African nations. 

hfeanwhile, celdTration competes 
against recrimination. In Casablanca, 
foe stadium overflowed wifo joy when 
80,000 people discovered a new hero, 
KhaUd Ragmb. For an hour he sat idly 
by. a mere substitute watching a stale- 
mate against Ghana. 

Tea minutes after Raghib came on, he 
scored. The only goal, foe precious goal, 
foe goal that s^ed Morocco's driven 
desire to return to a World Cup. Pan- 
demonium followed in die streets, in 
towns and cities as millions of Mo- 
roccans danced the night away. Soccer 
contagion is far from exclusive to Mo- 
rocco, bat its intensity and its vitality is 
so very obvious there. 

Down toward the equator, Nigerians 
have grown almost blas6 about foe might 
of their soccer stars. Tb^ play foe game 
fast and strong, and foey domonstiated at 
foe lastWorldCiq) and wifo foe Olympic 
gold medal that their time is coming with 
die force of an expre^ train. 

Last week, Nigeria swatted Kenya 
aside, wifo goals from Sunday Oliseb, 
Emmanuel Amunike and Wilson Or- 
uma. But soon aiaim was raised in Brus- 
sels, where foe European Union sap- 
posedly still has an embargo against 
Nigerian sports after foe Novonber 
1 995 execution of Ken Saro^'Wiwa and 
eight Ogoni dissi^nts. 

Glenys Kinnock, a member of foe 
European Parliament, swiftly penned a 
letter to foe Times of London, warning: 
“European commitment to democratic 
reform in Nigeria is already, jastifi.ably. 
seen as weak and ineffectual. ’ * How can 
it be acceptable, Kinnock asks, to give a 
sigz^ to foose who will use Nigeria's 
participation in foe World Cup “as 
proof of our willingness to deal^ wifo 
to r^ime of Genial Sani Abacha. 

Sport, once more, is asked to makea 
stand and -a .sacrifice where politicians 
and tradesmen fail. • 

I N A VERY different atmosphere, 
and in a place where mm and pol- 
itics were once indivisible, to 
Olympic Stadium in'Berlin stages Ger- 
many’s Cup final this Saturday. 

It is an intriguing affair, a symbol of 
foe struggle to make reunification woiic 
down at society's roots. The final pits 
VfB Stuttgart, one of foe elite of foe 
west, against Energie Cottbus, a team 
fitxn die former E^t Germany whose 
players are part-timers and wbe^e pl^ 
is in r^onkl soccer two divisions b^ 
low to Bundesliga. 

Cotfous won 57 straight matches up to 
last month — and in that run beat MSV 
Duisborg, St. PhuU, Stut^art Kickers, 
VfL Wolsburg and finally Karlsruhe to 
reach foe German Cnp fi^. 

Should Cottbus triumph on Saturday, 
it would qualify for next season's Euro- 
pean Cop Winners* Cup. Tlie tale has 
to aura of Guy Roux, who took foe club 
in foe provincial French town of Aux- 
erre into Eorope’s Champions League. 
Eduard Ge^, foe Eneigie Cotfous 


coach, is leraiedly using toRoEXfoedk- 
od (k bailding a team fitxn to locd" 
population and binding k whh dis^it- 
linL He inherited a club whose playtti 

bad mostly defected to Bundesl^ leaiBi 

once the Wall came down in 1991. 

He found players to fill dx^ va. 
caocies with to time-honored lore of 
semi-professionalism: Find day jote for 
to players in a depressed ^ustii^ . 
time, and train them under the half 
of stadium lamps by night 

The chances of success in dieciip may 
come down to who wants it most. For 
Cottbus, the onus is on strikers Toralf 
Kontzke and Detlef Irtgang, young men 
who have never strayed fnm foeir home 
city near foe Polish border. Each hit the 
target against Karlsruhe. 

For Stungart. the strikers are bigger 
names. Th^ is Giovane Elber, a 
Brazilian of quick, mercurial move- 
ment and Fiedy Bobic. to tall center 
forward sometimes chosen to lead the 
attack of to unified Cennan side. 

Elber is on his way out of Smttgan: 
bound for Bayern Munich in a S5 mil- 
Uon deal to replace Juergen Klinsmann; 

Bobic was bom in Slovenia, trained as a 
salesman, and has performed to Ger- 
many on and off for three years. 

Berlin seems foe right venue for this 
meeting of East and West For here, in i 
country which lords it as European na- 
tions’ champion and has rediscovered 
after 14 years foe winnbg touch in the 
European club champion's cnp, there is 
anotor rebirth — Herfoa Beiun. 

This club, once synonymous with 
soccer power, has drawn crowds of 
75.000 while striving this season to 
climb out of to second division. Old 
club, new money: Herfoa Berlin is being 
bacl^ by Rolf Schmidt-Holz of the ' 
giant Bertelsmann media ctxnpany. 

Cottbus is not in that financial l^ue. 

It draws its strength, its energie, from 
foe hardship and the longing of local 
people whose unemployment rate has 
grown since rcunlficuon. Win or lose 
on Saturday, foe payoff to each club is 
about 2 million Deutsche marks ($12 __ 
million) which to Cottbus clears foe 
entire year’s outlay, to Stuttgan it is an ])[I> I.' , 
arm or a of one of its star players. - J m I . • 

It would be sL^Ustic to read this as 
David versus Goliath. Just as it overstates 
foe case to suggest that one plucky un- 
derdog can redress imbalances. CoUbic 
represents foe human spirit strivings and 
sj^ can lift public morale; but foe polit- 
ic masters and foe financiers wil) still 
have to reshape to future. 

Bob Hughes is on the staff of The 
limes of London. 



?■ 
a 

f-' W \k9 

-iaNiw 

V.- at:' SI •Vi'* 


Teams for Copa 
Less Than Stellar 

Reuters 

SANTA CRUZ, BoUvia — The 
Copa America, South America’s 
premier soccer tournament, opens 
Wednesday wifo second-string 
squads representing many of the 
continent's most powei^l teams. 

The South American Football 
Confederation is paying foe price 
for increasing both foe fiequency of 
foe Copa Aimrica and foe number 
of matches countries must play to 
quality for foe World Cup. Since 
foe Copa is squeezed between two 
rounds of World Cup qualitying 
games, many nations are not using 
full-strengfo squads. 

"The Cr^ederation decided at the 
start of the iS)90s to hold the Copa 
America every two years ingtead of 
every four years. In 1995, it in- 
creased to number of Wcvld Cup 
qualifying matches each of the nine 
nations must play to 16. 

Brazil, which as world champion 
automatically ^alifies for foe 1998 
World Cup in France, is one of foe 
few nations fielding a strong team. 



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Scoreboard 







BASEBALL 


Major Leaoue Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 



EAEIDnnBION 




w 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Ballimoic 

4D 

17 

.782 

— 

Ni^wVui' 

34 

27 

JS7 

0 

TornnlD 

28 

30 

.483 

17'i 

Dolmil 

27 

33 

4» 

14 

Boston 

24 

35 

.407 

17 


CENTUM. DIVISION 



Cleveland 

30 

27 

.526 

— 

WflMOukce 

28 

30 

483 

2'- 

Kansas C;lv 

28 

31 

.475 

3 

Chicoge 

28 

32 

M7 

3'-. 

Minimohi 

27 

34 

.443 

5 


WEST DIVISION 



ynnte 

33 

28 

.541 

— 

Anaheim 

33 

28 

.533 


Teuls 

31 

38 

J25 

1 

OoKiend 

36 

37 

.413 

8 

HjmGNAlUAOUl 



EASIOnWOH 




w 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Aitonu 

41 

31 

661 



Flonda 

35 

26 

J74 

S’. 

New York 

14 

37 

J57 

6'-. 

Montmal 

33 

38 

641 

T". 

Philadelphia 

21 

19 

350 

19 


CEHTRAL DIVeiON 



Pittsouigb 

31 

30 

.508 

— 

Houston 

31 

32 

493 

1 

Sr. Louis 

29 

33 

475 

7 

Onclmoh 

24 

37 

J93 

7 

Chicago 

24 

‘ 38 

J87 

r.) 


WESTDIVISlOH 



Son Francisre 35 

3b 

574 

— 

CGtorado 

34 

3U 

.548 

1’'. 

LosAneeles 

30 

31 

492 

5 

Son Dkgo 

27 

14 

443 

8 


MttNBAV'S UNiSeeMS 

AIERICAN LEAOUE 

Anoheln ' ITT IT3 OOS-13 IS fl 
KaimaCHv IN «4 NS-5 S 0 
VArtua DcLucM (dl. HoHz (91 ond LevriiE 
Ruwh. J&annoQO lo). WiuWitaim (B). 
Coslon («} ana Mncforlane. w-watsoa 5-3. 
L— RuKh J.J. HRs— AnolMliiL Enlod >6>. 
^.oiKOS Cnv. i Ben (91. CDoett (9). 


BMbnon ON 140 041—10 13 0 

CMcogv ON ON 200-3 9 I 

Minsinoand Hoiles; Boldoiin. Simos (8). C 
CosIWo (9) ond Fobreoas. w— Mussina. 8.1. 
L— BakMiL J.8. HR^Bonimu ns 
Hammonds (0). Cllkaga Bdlo (141. L 
Moulon 13). 

tUnONAL LEAOUE 

NwYerk 030 ON 011—4 9 i 

Clndnotl ON ON 200-S 7 0 

BJJone% JaFronco (9) and HumBew 
Mrickn. Bdinda (8), ttofliBnonr (9), Show 
(9) ond ToubensoG. ). Olver (9). 
W-BJJones 11-3. L-BeOndo D-Z 
Sv— Jo.Fionco f)6]. HR— Oncbinolb 

Branson (1). 

cmeogo ON (W2 021-9 10 0 

MontKOl 4H ON OOl-O 0 0 

F.Castllla Totis (31. Wendell (7) end 
&Grm Judcrtf Dool (7). D,Vem (8), Teftord 
18). UiMra (9] end WidaGr. W— iudeiw 0*3. 
L-F. CosOBa 3-8. S«— UrbhW (9,i. 

Herida ON ON 103-4 7 2 

SonFrandsco IN 23(7 Oil— 7 11 I 

Ropis Hunon (6). Cook (8) and C Joiinsore 
FnllWk ToeOKi 17). DJieniv (9) and 
RWBkins. W— FouIa |.1. L— Rope, 4.3, 
HR-Sai FraiKisca Bonds (in. 

St.Ls«|S 3N 030 303-0 14 0 

SooMeSO Nl ON NO-1 5 0 

An Benes. Fossas (91 and DifeliCB 
Cunnane. P. Smith (S). Bumms 17). 
TLWemll in. Bochfler (9) and Ftoherl/. 
W-AiLBenes. S-l L-Cuimone. 4-1 
HRs— SI. Louis, Lankford (IS). DMHKe (3), 
D. Young (31. 

Hellktm 003 ON 000-3 II 2 

LosAngeles 2N 3H Ns-8 8 2 

Hott. Umo (7), R. Gordo (8) and AusmuA 
RJVtortlneb Culhne (B> ond Plnsa W-R. 
MvHnei, d.Z L-HolL 6-S. HRs-Los 
Angdn. Zelle2(12). 

Anonhi 020 Nl 000-3 13 0 

Cdorodo ON OSI 3lb-4 13 0 

Clovlii^ Boramkl (6). ClonQ IB) end J. 
Lopes R.Bailen M. Mvnez M. S. Reed (0), 
Lesfconic (9) and Momianng. W— R. BNey. 
d-S. L-Ofo«lne 6>4. HRs-AtlaniD. Ktesko 
(in. Cotonida Burks <14L Codmo lid). 


AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Aug. 
FThomosChW 57 202 50 79 J9I 

SAtonvOe 45 I6I 38 S9 Odd 

JustteOe 55 )93 43 70 JdS 

WOoikTe 47 IN 36 dl M\ 

CoraSeo Sd 309 40 7S JS9 

SGrhoHBol 49 ISO 30 63 JSO 

IRodrigiwTek Sd 233 39 8l J48 

GAndcnen Ana $0 339 33 01 J39 

EMortlnuSea 61 22S 41 74 J29 

ROberlsKC 54 1B7 2) dl S3d 

RVNS-Crtffsv Jb SeotllG Sb A 

Rodiigues Seattle 50; 6. eWIIRDiTi& New 
York, M F. Ttamos, OikBga SIk KnoblDudi 
lY.limesota 46; ToClotk, Delmit 44; Thorns 
Clevetand, 43; M. Vougha Bosloa 43; 
HoUlnb Anonolin. 43. 

RBT-GriHeu Jb SeotHa 64 T. MarWiGL 
New Yorlw Sft F. TbomoA Chlcogib Bdle, 
ChfcoqG 55; ToCkirlb DetroA 51: McGwire 
Oakland, so; Justice Cleuetaml 46. 

HITS— A. RodrigvGL SeotUA 83; G. 
Andcrwa AnoAdiib 8lt I. RoRIgiieL Texas. 
81; F.TittnMs,CI)icaeG7%BeWBin&New 
n Cmb SeoMb 75) Corrienb Boston. 
74; T. Martinez, New Ybrk. 74: E. Martinez. 
SeaHla,7A 

DOUBLES-^. RodnoiKL Seottla 31; 0. 
NellL New Yort, 3); Sprogub TorarUb 20; I. 
Rodriguez. Texas. 1ft Caia SarNle. 1ft 
EnfeKb Anoheim. 17; dombs OiAlend 17; 
GilllA MOwdukeb 17; B. ewniams. New 
Y»K17. 

TRIPLES— Carduponib Boston 5; Jeter. 
New York. 4; OHenma Kmsoi Oly, 4: 
VIzquel CleuelaiKL ft Alicsa Anahabn ft 10 
ore tied with 3. 

NOME RUNS-GrIfler Jb Sentlle 25; 
McGutlie, OaUand. 3ft T. Maninez, New 
York. 21; ToClorK, Delraft Ift JuitICb 
Cleveland. 17; Thome, Oovefand 1ft M. 
Vougln Bedoa 1ft F. Thonns. OncoBn, Id. 

Sm£N BASES-KnoUanch Mbine- 
soto. 28: B. Utunteb Oetmit 27: NbwL 
Tomnie; 37: T. Goodwin Kansas aty. 3ft 
Ourhinn.CMoiBnl7:VIzquolClavelonit Is: 
BumOL MHwaukee. 14. 

PITCHING {0 Dedslons)— ChnnerB. 
Tonnta. 1 14 I OOa I Aft Kcr. BoDImore 10. 
I. .909, 366 RoJolinsoa SoaMn ^1. ML 
3.45, Mussxia BaHmem 0.i. 489. 3J9s 
Enckson BoOlmonb ftZ JOB 15ft oidQon 


Anaheim, 7-2. .77ft 343; WHL Texas. 7-3, 
.77ft 3J9. 

STRiKEOUTS-RuJohnson SeottN 12ft 
Conn Now York. 1 1 1; Ander. Kansas Gly, 9ft 
Clemare. Torantn Oft- Mussina BolHniara 
7ft ANniez, Chicoga 7ft Hentgen Tomnia 
70; B. McDonald. MikMUkea 70. 

SAVES-M. Rluora. Now York, 19; 

RoMyers, BoWmaia ift DoJonos. 

Mmnuliea ift Agnilenb Mbmesota, ift R. 
Hcmamkft CMcega ift VVettetaml Tecos, 
iftTerlDr,OoMaiid.ii. 

NARONAL LEAGUE LEADERS 

6 AB R H Avg. 
LWofterCol dO 223 dl 94 .423 

GwymSD 60 337 41 96 JOS 

LoBimAII 63 M4 48 03 J53 

BlouscrAll 61 19S 37 46 J49 

PiozzoLA 57 197 33 AB 345 

Gokirragocol S8 225 si 75 333 

ScgulMon 46 168 35 SS 317 

BonUoFlo SB 214 24 70 327 

OteiuONYM 59 219 48 71 334 

BooweNHou 63 232 46 7S 333 

RUNS— L Wafter. Colorada 61: Gaki- 
noga Cohmxla 51: Loflon Attonta 4ft 
Biggin Havsian 47) Bogweft Homtun 4ft 
Butkn CukHodn 46. EdYoung, Colamda 41 
RBI-Golonrpga CokmiOo. dft Bagwell 
Houdun 59: L Walken Cotorodn 5ft- Kent 
San Frondsen 51; Ahw. norfda 51; BldieHn 
Cotoindn 48; LonUbrd. 5L Louln 47. 

HITS— Gwynn. Son Diegn 9ft L Wdker. 
Cotanuki. 9ft Lonm, Altonm 93: EcYomg, 
Coknadn 7ft Bogweft Houskia 75; D. 
Sanders, GndnnSft 75; Biggin Houstna 7S; 
GaloiTagaCaloredn75. 

DOUBLES-GfudMoneh, MoMiem. 23; 
Qeyton SL Louis. 31; BonAn FloiMa 21; L 
Wolker. Colorada 30; H. RodiigiieZ, 
Menhoak 19) Bogweft Houstan Ift 
Morandliil PhlhideipMa 19. 

TRIPLES— W. (Niemira Los Angden ft 
WOmodb Pittsbuiglv 6; 0. Sanders. 
Clndmoft ft Rmda PMsbuign. S; (3e. 
SMeidn St. Louis. S; Tudwr, Aitoirta ft 
SeYtoung, Colomria ft MelMa CMoga 4. 

HOME RUNS— Bog^ Housloa 19; L 
Wbder. ColoiBda iB: CrnlRIa Coloffida Id; 
Cotorroga Coloroda ift Lanblorft St. LouN, 
IS; Sosa CMeoga Ift Butka Colarada I4j 
STOLEN BASES— 0. Samters^ ChldnnalL 
30; Wemoek. PMsbingn 2ft Luttoa AfloMn 


19; De. SMekN. St. Louin 1ft EcYouno, 
Celemda 15; Cloyloa 51. Loidar 15; 
McCmdum, Colorada 1ft L. Wofter, 
Coknoda 14, 

PITCHING (8 DedstOBS)— Neogla AL 
lantn8-l.389.3j0ftB.JJaneaNewVMLll. 
Z .846, 12ft Esten Son Frandsen 0-ftJOft 
177) P. JMarffne. Montreal ftz iOft 1.78; 
Kiln HousIwl 7.2. .77ft 2J97i G. MflUdux, 
AJhmln 7-Z JTft 2J)1i Judeib Montreal 6-2. 
.7sa ATS; Gordrar. s«i Franebo d.2. .750, 
338. 

STRIKEOUTS-SchDIIng, PMMelpMa 
11); t*. JMorhnez Monheoi 9ft Nomn Us 
Angeles 95; AIBenea. SI. Louis, 9ft K. 
JBrawn Ftartda 8ft R. Mamneb Los 
Angeles. 82; Smollz Alianla 77. 

SAVES— Bock. Son Fmicfeca 19; Nsn 
Ftondn 1ft JoFronen New York, |ft 
Towerreft Lm Angeleft 1ft BoHoSa 
PrAadBWHa 1ft WoMerz ADonta lft 
Eckersley. St. Louis. 11 

Japanese Leaqubs 

aHiRuiiaain 


ICE HOCKEY 


NHL Playoff Lejiders 

PliBl plNoHseotlnBleudarK 



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26 


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M7 

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110 


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19 

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Lainieuk.Col 

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KameiskiL Col 

17 

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BrlrnfAmoiu PM 

19 

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21 

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LeCWbPM 

19 

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10 

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Fedorov; Dot 

20 

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12 

20 

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ShonohoaDet 

20 

9 

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17 

43 

Foisbeig.Col 

14 

5 

12 

17 

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OnEnsaCol 

17 

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13 

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Koztov.Oet 

20 

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KortyaAnn 

11 

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YzenranDot 

20 

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7. Lee Vfcstwona England 295,024 
a TlMinB Bjein Dontnoifc 289.165 
9. CoslDnflno Rooca Holy 284.735 
ia Pad Breodhurst Engtand 223;5S2 

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1Z Jese Marta Okizabal Spain 199487 
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RAGE 23 

SPORTS i 



1 


, ;„„j T ' Less Than Invincible, 

Bulls Start to Brood 


>rUi of Pai 


By Mike Wise 

>/vX Tiwfi Si'n-NV 


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salt lake C1T\’. Urah — Michael 
Jonj^ admits that his body aod mind ore 
spent Scouie Pippen, his agitated All- 
Star teammate, wants a piece of Greg 
Ostertag. And Dennis Rodman, the most 
invisible role player in the series, dis- 
appeared again, this time to La& V^as. 

, Jackson gave the Chicago Bulls 
the day off Monday, and did they ever 
it. Joidan is tired. Pippen is inriiable. 
And Rodman, fed up with the serenity of 
Utah, is trying to win at something. 

. 'nieyarcnofcomcrcd. but playing the 
iazz* in the raucous Delta Center has 
become a steep canyon for these Bulls. 
The day after John Stockton and Karl 
fi 4 aloDe combined to steal Game 4 and 
10 even the National BaskerbaU As- 
sociation finals at two games apiece, 
Chicago's basketball team appeared 
much less than invincible. 

, “It's an artinide that has to elevate, 
and a lot of the guys don't understand 
that." Jordan said Monday. ‘^Corning 
into this situation, a lot of players never 
experienced repeating or defending 
something. It ‘s harder than the first time 
in some respects.” 

Pippen said: "We're being challenged 
right now. We have to look back and say, 
it's not going to be easy. This reminds us 
of playing with the Knicks.'* 

The Bulls are not on the ledge yet, but 
one more poor performance and they 
ftill be. Came 5 is in the Delta Center on 
Wednesday night. 

Game 6 and. if necessary, Game 7 are 
scheduled for Fnday and Saturday in 
Chicago's United Center. 

•‘We've allowed them to stop all of our 
runs that we made at them.*' Pippen said. 
“It has been very difficult to bi^ the 
game open against them. But I feel very 
|ood. W^.'re still in control of this series. 
We still have two games in our building, 
ifneeded" 

. For all the respect and admiration be- 
tween the two teams. Pippen has a per- 
sonal feud with Ostertag thar may lead to 
more contentious behavior in the series. 
The 7-fooi-2-incb 1 2.1 -meter), 280- 
pound ( 1 27-kilogxam 1 center, convinced 
that Pippen was trying to undmut his 
knees on a previous possession, tossed 
Pi{q)cn to the floor after a hard foul 
Sunday n^i. The tw’o had 10 be sep- 
arated and received technical fouls. 


"Ihope he's got some more hard fouls 
for me because I got some more iid- 
dercuis for him," Pippen said Monday. 

Rodman, who has been in a funksince 
the series began, played only 23 minutes 
in Game 4. With the permission of Jack- 
son and the genei^ manager, Jeny 
I^use. he chartered a plane Sunday 
night to Las Vegas with eight fnends. 
Anything to get away from his tortured 
existence here. 

■ "I went Out and had a good time 
there," Rodman said, "just relaxed and 
got rid of this bad taste in my mouth: 
S^t Lake. Can you stand Salt TjiVe 
City? I didn't do it to win or lose, 1 just 
wanted to hang with my ^ends and get 
myselftogether.'* 

Rodman, who did not let Malone gnin 
inside position on him for much of the 
game, is also perturbed by his lack of 
playing time. 

"T can play Karl," he said. "If I had 
lime to play him,. I can play him. He's 
not going to try to outmaneuver me to 
the He’s going to use his jumper. 
But I can't play 22 or 23 mtnaies and be 
effective. I have to play 35 or 40, and I'm 
not doing that That’s Phil's decision: 1 
can't go over the coach’s head." 

Jordan and Pippen do not hawe a prob* 
lem with Rodm^'s getaway, as lo^ as 
he comes to play Wednesday. Ibere are 
more frossing problems, such as why 
Pippen is nor exploidng a mismatch with 
Jeff Homacek in the post, and why the 
triangle offense has beco^ two-sided, 
with everyone relying on Pippen and 
Jordan. Toni Kukoc's sprained right foot, 
an injury diat has hampered him severely 
since February, and Rodman's ineffect- 
iveness also are hurting the Bulls. 

"It's been very difficult for us two. 
especially, because we've really exerted 
a fot of energy crying 10 get our ball club 
going and hoping, mm game to game, 
that we're going to step up and have an 
aE-around team game,'' Pippen said. 
‘‘Bur irhasn'thappened. Whoknows?lt 
may never hajtpen.'* 

Jordan said Monday that another 
play'off run had left him "mentally and 
physically exhausted," but he is less 
pessimistic than Pippen. 

"It’s fun." be said ‘ ‘It's a great chal- 
lenge. I don’t know if you could have 
gotten the same gratification if it was 
handed to you. If you go out and get it, 
you *11 appreciate it that much more. This 
ream is making us work hard for it. " 



On Deck in Baseball: 
It’s Interleague Play 


By Murray Chass 

.\c‘' y’rkTil>li\Si‘'>h'r 


The Mets' Btdtby Jones, pitching against the Reds, got his 11th victory. 


Baseball's interleague experiment 
begins Thursday and besides some of 
the nafuraJ aeo^aphical rivalries, the 
inierieague games that seem to be cre- 
ating the most interest are the ones that 
wiirfeaiure Ken Griffey. 

‘ 'There has been a lot of interest in the 
Seattle series," said Fred Claire, the Los 
.Angeles Dodgers' general manager. 

Woody Woodward of the Mariners 
said clubs had all reported that tickets 
for the games with the Mariners were the 
fust to 'sell and were attracting the most 
.ttrenrion. Jl all goes back to Griffey. 

‘'Seattle is the ream that druus best 
here." said Herk Robinson of the Roy- 
als. "They 're all coming to see one guy, 
the guy." 

Bas^ on ad\','uice sales, baseball of- 
ficials projected that attendance for the 
fust round of inierleague games, which 
will run through June 18. will be 32 
percent above normal attendance. With 
ihe majur-league average entering last 
W'eekcnd ul Z^.775, that increase would 
mean an average attendance of aN^ut 
34.lK)0 for the initial inierleague games. 


Benes Stings Padres as Cards Win, 9-1 


The AssutiJ^ First 

Since leaving San Diego m 1993, 
Andy Benes has added a pitch to his 
arsenal. 

On Monday night, he showed Jiis im- 
proved change-up to the Padres and 
dominated his former team for eight in- 
nings, white John Mabiy extended the 

Bascball Roumdiif 

Nationai League's Itmgesthimng streak 
to 20 games as the St. Louis Cardinals 
beat the Padres, 9-1. 

Benes, making his first start in San 
Diego since the Padres traded him to 
Seattle on July 31, 1993, allowed four 
hits, struck out seven and walked two. 

‘T had a good change-up toniehi, and 
that 's something they haven't reuy seen 
in die past, so it's to advantage,' ‘ he 
said. 

San Diego lost for the fourth time in 


five games and for the eighth rime in 
nine home games. Tony Gwynn singled 
in the sixth and eighth innings and now 
has the second-longest hitting streak in 
his career. 19 games. He hit in 25 
straight games in 1983. 

Doduftrs a, Actras a In Los Angeles. 
Todd Zeile hit a pair of two- run homers, 
and Los Angeles capitalized on Craig 
Biggio's error at second base in the 
fourth to score the ty'ing and go-ahead 
runs. 

eianu 7, iiarlin* 4 In San Francisco. 
Barry Bon^ homered and drove in four 
runs to help Keith Foulke get his first 
major-league victory. 

Expos 6, Cubs 5 Jeff Juden (6-2) 
pitched into the seventh, and Henry 
Rodriguez hit a three-nin triple as 
Montreal completed a four-game sweep 
at home. 

RoddM B. Bravos 3 In Denver. Vinny 
Costilla hit a three-run honte run — the 


I (X)th of his career — and Ellis Burks htid 
u bases-empty shot in a same delayed 
nearly 2''2 hours by rain. Colorado's 
Larry Walker ueni 3-for-4 to raise his 
major league-leading average to .422. 

Mots 4, Reds 2 In Cincinn.’iti, Bobby 
Jones became the NL's first 11-game 
winner. 

Orioles 1 D, White Box 2 Mike Mussina 
dominated the White Sox in Chicago, 
winning his eighth consecutive decision 
to give Baltimore its ninth victory in 1 1 
games. Mussina (8-1 ) allowed five hits 
and sinick out six.The right-hander lost 
his .shutout in the seventh on solo homers 
by .Albert Belle and Lyle Mouion. 

Anaols 1 2, Royals s Darin Erslad drove 

in n career-high four runs and scored 
three runs as visiting Anaheim roughed 
upGIendon Rusch. a Kansas City rookie, 
for the third time this season. Ersiad's 
three-run homer capped a five-run ninth 
inning for California, which had 18 hits. 


UMPIRE: Insolence and Fisticuffs on Rough Diamonds in Japan End BasebalVs Brief CuJturahExchange Effort 






nrl: 

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Li d* 'v .V . • 


A/.T.’S 






Continued from P^e 1 

"There's a ^at difference in the 
siyle of baseball here-and in America, 
tu^diere's nothing wrong vdth that. But 
I would hope that when you’re talking 
about a'physical assault, there would be 
no acct^nce of that, no matter where 
you are." 

Officials in Japan's Central Le^ue 
bad asked Oi Muro. an umpire in C^s 
AAA minor-league baseball in the 
United States, just one level below the 
major leagues, to work in Japan this 


hir^dijid 

/ I L ... season to try' TO improve sagging fan and 

.#'.'..1 l/iail Vm pliyerrespKi for umpires . 


ir-' '-■j.-.j'--'' 

V-»> L'-*7 


Tlie iocideni that caused Di Muro's 
departure took place Thursday night in 
Cdu. a city* west of Tokyo. Di Muro 
culled a strike on Yasuaki Taiho. a slug- 
ger for the Chunichi Dragons. Taiho 
argued the call and refused at first to step 
back into the batter's box to take the 
next luich. 

' A tape shows that after Taiho stepped 


back in. Di Muro called another strike 
and Taiho ar^ed again. This time, he 
aroroached Di Muro and repeated, 
“why?" and "No strike." Di .Muro 
told him to get back into die baner's 
box. Taiho refused. 

Coaches at first and third bases, as 
well os the manager and a coach from 
the dugoui. ran to home plate. Di Muro 
dien ejected Taiho from the game. 

As soon as he did, the first-base coach 
pul his hands on Di Muro's chest and 
argued with him. Then Taiho punched 
Di Muro in the chest. More players ran 
toward the scene, and the group shoved 
Oi Muro away from home plate. Taiho 
swung at Di Muio again but missed. 

Di Muro eventually was grabbed by 
Leo Gomez, the Dragons* third baseman 
and a former player for the Baltimore 
Orioles. Di Muro said Gomez told him, 
"You've got to get out of diere. They do 
this all the time over hero." 

As is common pr^ce in Japanese 
games, the head umpire got on the pub- 


lic address system and explained the 
incident to the crowd. 

Di Muro said the announcemeni so 
enraged the crowd that two young men 
climbed the screen behind home plate to 
scream at him. and other people threw 
plastic noisemakers and garbage toward 
the field. 

"it was not a ct^ortabJe feeling," 
he said. 

Baseball has become increasingly an 
area of ctxnmon ground for Japan and 
the United Suites as more Japanese 
players join the U.S. major leagues. 
Having an American umpire spend this 
season in Japan seemed a oatuik idea to 
some, even though die two countries 
play entirely diffuent brands of base- 
ball. 

la Che United States, umpires are 
strong authority figures whose calls may 
be questioned, argued and booed from 
the stands but are almost never reversed. 
In Japan, umpires have evolved as weak 
figures whose decisions are often sub- 


ject to reversal if questioned. In. the 
United States, hitting an umpire can end 
a player's season. In Japan, it's just port 
of the game. 

Japanese players and coaches berate 
umpires and occasionally hit or shove 
them to make their point. At times in the 
19S0s, Japanese umpires were beaten 
bloody by coaches. 

. The incident involving Di Muro 
seemed relatively minor to many here, 
who said the Americans had overre- 
acted by calling Di Muro home. 

One sports newspaper ran a mocking 
headline that said "Bye-Bye" in Eng" 
lish. Id smaller type, it said. "Umpire Di 
Muro; '] was scai^ of Taiho. I'm going 
to quit.' " 

But many more here said they un- 
derstood why Di Muro was leaving and 
called his departure a setback for Japan. 
‘ Di Muro had become, something of a 
celebrity. He had been f»njred in most 
major newspapers and television stations 
and was recognized wherever he went 


Japanese baseball fans seemed to Like 
him. and many asked for his autograph. 

The announcement at a news con- 
ference Monday, therefore, was colored 
not by anger but by disappoiormeni that 
a well-intentioned idea had been 
crushed beneath tJte weight of cultural 
difierences. 

"This is an embarrassing day for 
Japanese baseball." sud Tomoaki 
Takayuma. a columnist for the Sports 
Nippon newspaper. 

tn Muro said he was disappointed to 
be leaving. "The Japanese umpires are 
good people and good umpires.'^ he said. 
"I would hale to see things set back even 
further over here because of this. ’ ' 

"This is a big loss for Japanese base- 
ball." said Hiromori K^washima. pres- 
ident of the Central League. "The rime 
has come for us to fundamentally dis- 
cuss why these things happen and' what 
we can do about it This must be a 
trigger for Japanese professional base- 
ball to change course." 


Advance sales, officials said, .irc run- 
ning from 33 percent u> 40 percent 
above normal. 

The New York ^‘ankees are involved 
in TWO of the :«harpesi increases. Tlie 
Florida Marlins sold oui their ihrce- 
eame series with the Yankees ne.xt 
weekend more than a month ago. ami 
the Yankees are vinu.ill> sold out for 
their ensuing series at Yankee Stadium 
with the Mets. 

Sales for the all-Cin'caao matchup at 
Comiskey Park nest week smned 
slowly because the White Sox tried m 
make fans buy p.ukage> that Included 
other games. Bui they dropped ihai rc- 
quiremem and non rep>n brisk saleN. 
about 1.000 tickets j day and a loial of 
30.000 to 35.(X)0 for each game. 

On the north side, the Cubs aniicipaie 
standing room only for each of their three 
games with the Milwaukee Brewers. 

In Canada, ihe Royal MuiintiON may 
have to look into developments in 
'Toronto because the Blue Jays don't 
expect sellouts for their scries with 
Montreal laier this monih. 

The Dodger' don't ex^x-ci to come 
close to selling all 56.00CI se.it> for e.Khof 
their two games .'igainst their iieighN.^rs. 
the .■^aheim Angels, Bui iIk- .Angels, 
with a reconfigure cnpac-ity of .^5.000. 
say they will sell all of ilieiis for ihe 
games with the Dodgers next m<>inh. 

Some leams are relueiani to disclo'e 
advance-sales figures. Tlie Red .Sox. for 
example, would say only thai >e.us w ere 
available for the Philadelphia serie-i next 
week and that tickets tor the .Ailanui 
series in .August had sold better than 
they do for a series with the 'I'ankees. 

Other teams, however, are specific to 
the ticket. 'The St. Louis Cardinals re- 
ported that for their series wiih Cle\- 
eland next weekend ihev had sold 
.34.161. 37.245 and 34.0ti6'iickeis. 

Tlie Mets have strong advances for 
their first two games with ilie Red 
next weekend, but they aren't doing so 
well for the Sunday night game. 

While NL fans may get to see Griffey, 
they could be deprived of a glimpse of 
Seattle's other marquee name, ihe pitch- 
er Randy Johnson. 

Johnson has had back problems and 
may not sian against theGiants ina iw i> 
game series in San Francisco on June 1 7 
and 18, even though his turn would 
come up. His dilemma, as J'ur many 
other American League pitchers, is that 
he is rarely called upon to hit. 

"Randy has to be involved in this 
decision because nobody knows his back 
better than he. but Lou is looking at iliui 
seriously now." said WoodwanJ. refer- 
ring to ihe Mariner manager. Lou Pini- 
ella. "We don't w.xni to put the stress of 
swinging a bat on his back. We know 
fans would like to see him pitch, hut we 
have ID look out for Randy first." 

Because baseball officials can't settle 
on one rule, the Americ;vi League's 
designated hitters will nor be pan of 
their lineups when they play in National 
League parks. AL piicher.s. some of 
whom have not batted since high school 
or their youth-league days, will bar in- 
stead. 

Some managers fear injuries to their 
pitchers when they run the bases, if they 
should get on. Some are concerned that 
pitchers, unaccustomed to being at the 
other end of those tib-mile-an-hour fast- 
balls. will not react quickly enough to a 
close pilch, get hit and be hurT. It is 
almost a given that at least one pitcher, 
trying to sacrifice, will gel his hand too 
fai along on the bat. get hit and maybe 
break a finger. 
























PAGE 24 


LMERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, ^S'EDNESDAY, JUNE 11- 1997 


OBSERVER 


Sex and General Caesar 


By Russell Baker 


N ew YORK — Stale your name, 
rank and serial number. Replv: 
Caesar, Julius. General. MMMD- 
CCCLXVni. 

Question: I won't beat around the 
bush, general. We have to know 
evei^thing there is to know about you 
before clearing you for this big-time 
command. 

Answer; Everything? Well, as you 
may have heard if you caught me dis- 
cussing my book w'iih Ted KoppcI the 
other night. I was .ible to conquer all 
Caul despite the fact that it is divided 
into three pans. There 1 e.xhibited such 
skill at commanding legions and cav- 
alry, assembling frumentum and trans- 
porting impedimenta that — 

Q. Don't beat around the bush with 
me, Caesar. You know what [ want to 
hear. 

X A. So the jig's up. is it? You want 
me CO confes.s my plot to seize control of 
the government, have myself crowned 
king and — 

Q. Don't waste my time with 
twaddle. Julius. Ma> I call you Ju- 
lius? 

.A. .As secretary of pure warfare, sir. 
you're the boss. Call me Julie, if you 
like. 

Q. It makes it easier to talk man-to- 
man w hen everybody's on a first-name 
basis. Know' what I ‘mean, Julius? 

A. My firsi name happens to be 
Gaius. so if you'd prefer you could call 
me Guy. That's what my wife calls me. 
”You*'re some guy. Guy." she often 
says to me after P ve conquered another 
province. .And 1 always say. "No. my 
dear. I am some Gaius." She always 
laughs at that. 

Q. That *s whai I want to talk about, 
general. 

.A. My wife's sophomoric sense of 
humor? 

Q. .About relations between you 
and Mrs. Caesar. 

A. Well, things are not bad between 
us e.xcept when I forget her binhdav' or 
come home from a conque.si a little 
smashed. 

Q. What about those good old mar- 
riage vows, .lulie? 

.A. I assure you that Calpumia is the 


last word in monogamous rectitude. In 
fact, the highest praise I can give a 
politician is to say he is "as pure as 
Caesar's wife," 

Q. .Ah yes. general. But how pure is 
Caesar? 

A. Oho! You want to know has 
Caesar ever been naught}*, eh? 

Q. You know the principle that 
guide.s us. Julius. Better to lose the 
war than win it with naughty war- 
riors. The fact that the work is bestial 
cannot excuse a breakdown of dean 
living among the troops. You have a 
problem with that, general? 

A. Permission to speak franklv. sir'? 

Q. Granted. 

A. Clean living is what makes us a 
great res pubiica. bur 1 think it's a bad 
idea to give dishonorable discharges to 
all soldiers caught cu.ssing while in uni- 
form. 

Q. Yuuapproveofcu.ssjng,generai? 
You w ant our res pubiica *s survival to 
depend on men who cuss? Men who 
use the vile four-letter Germanic word 
referring to conjugal activity? Start 
down that road, .luiius, and you'll end 
up saying it's all right for the men to 
tell Carthaginian jokes. Then it will be 
Parthian jukes. Then Cappadocian 
jokes. Have you, yourself. Galas Ju- 
lius Caesar, ever cussed? 

A. Only when alone and out of uni- 
form. sir. 

Q. Surry to have to ask you these 
things, old fellow, but — 

A. Policy, sir. 1 understand. 

Q. Now, about your service in Egy pt: 
While there you knew one Queen Cieo- 
patra. a person notorious for arousing 
concupiscence. .Aaswer truthfiiliy. 
Wasn't there some naughty stuff going 
on with you two? \’es or no. 

.A. What makes you think I'd do 
something like that? 

Q. Please don't force me to give the 
press the name of a certain Eunuch 
First Class who o|^rated the fan in 
Cleopatra's boudoir, or they'll chop 
you up for Caesar salad. Tell me all. 

.A. Loyal to the ideals of our great res 
pubiica. I cannot tell a fib — 

.At this nioment the army of cussing, 
fibbing, naughty barbarians who had just 
captui^ the res pubiica blew up the in- 
lenogation room. 

,\en )Kirt TimfS SiTviiv 


R. B. Kitaj’s Revenge on British Art Critics 


By Alan Ridii^ 

Sn' Kiri Tiinrs SenicK' 


L ondon — An artist is meant to create, a 
critic is meant to criticize and no one 
expects them to be happy bedfellows. But 
occasionally conflicts Ktween artists and 
critics come to dominate the art and the crit- 
icism. .And that is more or less where things 
now stand in the war between the Aroerican 
painter R. B. IGtaj and British art critics. The 
war has become the event. 

Kitaj, who has Lived in Britain since 19S9, 
said t^t in hindsight he bkieved he had 
always been hated by British critics. But in 
truth, the 64-year-oId Ohio-bom painter made 
his name here. He even coined the term School 
of London to describe an influential group of 
London-based artists comprising Francis Ba- 
con. Lucian Freud. Frank Auerbach, Leon 
Kossoff, Michael Andrews and hims elf. In- 
deed. had he not been respected here, he 
would not have been given a major retro- 
spective at the Tate Gallery in June 1994. 

But then, no question, ihinzs turned sour. 

The reviews of the show were ferocious. They 
questioned Kitaj's work as an artist, they 
described him as a fake, they displayed par- 
ticular animosity toward ibe explanatory and 
allegorical texts that Kitaj placed beside his 
paintings and one critic even referred to him 
as the Wandering Jew. Then, three months- later. 
Kitaj's wife, the painter Sandra Fisher, died of an 
aneurysm at age 47. And Kitaj concluded that his 
critics, motivated by anti-Semitism, had killed her. 

All this would be history were it not that many people 
visiting the Summer Exhibition of die Royal Academy 
this w’eek headed straight for Gallery II to look at 
"Sandra Three." a wall of texts and paintings by Kitaj 
that he describes as "revenge tragicomedy." 

Accompfuiying him in his "goodbye room" are 
works by some of his friends, including Freud, 
Auerbach. Kossoff, David Hockney and Peter Blake. 

Kitaj had in fact planned to abandon Britain after 
what he calls the Tate war and Fisher's death, but his 
young son. Max, wanted to remain here. So the artist 
turned his anger elsewhere. In last year’s Royal 
Academy show, he presented ' ‘Sandra One,' ' a paint- 
ing called "The Critic Kills." Last fall he published a 
booklet called "Sandra ’Two" in which he is in- 
terviewed about Fisher by the American artist Susan 
Shaw. Now he and Max, 12, have decided to move to 
Los Angeles. But before leaving, Kitaj wanted the last 
word. *nie room and above all "Sandra Three" are 
intended as his fmal blast at critics. 

"Although the School'of London is now closed," 
he wrote in one text in the show, "I have invited a few 
of the Over-the-Hill Gang to join me in this room 



Kitaj and his wife, Sandra Fisher, in his London studio in 1992. 


because I believe in a Geriatric .Avant-Garde, 1 wish 
there had been room for more artists. I am about to 
become a re-tired advance-guard in the sun. to be 
near Sandra again. If not. not. 

The central painting in "Sandra Three" is a large 
oil in bright red. green and brown reminiscent of 
much of Kitaj's etulier work, except in this case it 
carries the inscription: "The killer-critic assassin- 
ated by his widower, even." Inspired by Manet's 
"Execution of Maximilian." it shows a headless 
person — representing Kitaj — standing beside a 
bearded Manet, both fuing at a multi-eyed ogre 
representing the critic. 

.All across the canvas are quotations — ‘ 'Do not go 
gentle" (Dylan Thomas) and "Blood will have 
Wood" ("Macbeth") — supporting the premise of 
revenge. And i^m the mouth of the ogre, a yellow 
tongue of bile carries the wor^. "yeUowpressyel- 
lowpress kilikillkillkill the heretic always kill 
heresy.” 

Apart from a placid portrait of his son playing the 
violin "with the spirit n his mother," the other texts 
and objects pursue the same angry theme. Several 
identify' Kitaj with other artist-victims, among them 
Cezanne ("The artist most attacked and mistreated 
by the press") and Manet C"lt seems you have the 
honor of inspiring hatred." Baudelaire wrote to 


Manet). One quotation equates cntics wft 
Hiller: another from Nietzsche justifies ih^ 
exercise: "A little revenge is more fminaa 
than no revenge." 

Certainly, if Kitaj's purpose was to be 
noticed, be has succeedra.. The Royal 
Academy show has some 1,200 works tju 
year, but press attention has focused on hh 
raging w’all. On the oih^ hand, if his pntpose 
was to make British critics feel guilty, weU, 
alm ost by definition critics are peO(de who 
shwld not ne^ to be lo\’ed. 

As it happens. William Packer of The Fi. 
nancial Times of London, one-of the critici 
who originally attacked the retrospective a 
the Tate, tried hard to be fair, noting that 
Kitaj's two paintings in this show display 
"something of his old force," but be wameo; 
"While Kitaj continues with this absurd po- 
lemic, he makes the w ork itself invisible.^ 
To me extern that the panic's reactHm can. 
be measured, it app^^ mixed. One recent 
afternoon, several visitors to the show who 
were u^amiliar w ith the polemic remaiked 
on how much hatred exuded from "Sandra 
'Tliree.'.* On the other hand Marotilla Parka,, 
who was accompanied by her two ^Idrea. 
said that critics can be loo poweifril: "If the 
critics are cruel, people w ill go anyw^, just R> 
see for themselves. They very ofrea .ger^- 
wrong." She was disturbed, though,'^' 
deep sorrow and bitterness" of the woilc. 

Kitaj, in cootrasi. seems happy* with wfaacbe has 
done. "I was a dead man for one and a half yearsafter . 
Sandra died." he said in an interview in his terrac^' 
house in Chelsea, surrounded by padirng boxes 
waiting to be shipped to Los .Angeles. "*fhen the 
juices (:ame back and I felt like ^hiing badL" 

More than ever, he say s. he thiidcs critics declared 
war on him and brought bn Fisher's death because he 
was always an outsider in Britain's tightly knit 
society, an outsider because he was "the only Jewish 
painter wbo showed his Jewishness." because he 
was the only American painter to succeed in London, 
because he was the only painter to wTite cqiiously. 

"I think I have been anacked for xenophobic 
reasons,' ' he went on. "It also happened to Wilde, to 
Whistler, to Pound because they were outsiders. It 
didn 't happen to Heno' Janies andT. S. Eliot because- 
they became British." 

So this month. Kitaj and Max will head for a 
rambling mansion in Westwood, taking with diem 
the prizes, honors and awards earned by the an'ist 
during his almost four decades in Europe. "I have 
been homesick for 25 years," he said. He then 
paused, as if wondering whether he would ever return 
to London. "Maybe I'll be unhappy over there," he 
added softly. "I think not." 



i 











:i.r, i,:.; 







UK • 



PEOPLE 


«lf ' Sju.-i PffUITI'- 

SWISS EMOTION — Steven Tyler, lead vocalist of the rock band 
.Aerosmith, performing in Zurich on the group's "Nine Lives Tour." 


'~pHE former film star Brigitte Bardot 
1 haslostajudicialpleafortheseizure 
of her second husband’s lell-aU mem- 
oirs. in which he laments being "trapped 
by a small Don Juan in a skirtT" A judge 
in Paris ruled T uesday that the seizure of 
Jacques Charrier's "My Reply to 
6B" would violate freedom of expres- 
sion. Turning to Bardot’s claim that the 
book was a violation of privacy, he said 
he would consider damages in a new 
mling set for next October. Bardot and 
Chairier have been locked in a battle 
over revelations about their 1959-1963 
marriage since the release last year of 
her autobiography "Iniriales BB. " 

□ 

Campbell Soup Co. and the Andy 
Warhol Foundauon have reached an 
agreement lo license images the 
celebrated Pop artist's collection of 
Campbell Soup art. Andy Warhol's 
Campbell Soup images — first paLnte(i 
in 1962 — will appear on department 
store products, including tapestries, car- 
pets, stationery and beach towels. There 
are plans to add home textiles, watches. 


clocks, jewelry, leather goods and ap- 
parel. 

□ 

Carl Perkins, who wrote the coun- 
try-rock classic "Blue Suede Shoes." 
was reported in satisfactory condition in 
a Memphis hospital afre'r surgery to 
clear a carotid arteiy. The 65-year-old 
entertainer entered the hospital for tests 
a week ago. 

□ 

Wynton Marsalis and his lonsttime 
girlfriend. Victoria Rowell, are calling it 
quits. The Pulitzer Prize and eight-time 
Grammy winner, who lives in New Yoik. 
and RoweiJ. an actress who lives in L^ 
Angeles, were d long-distance couple for 
nine years and have a year-old son. 

□ 

There is something slightly sadistic 
about the awards ceremony at the Van 
Cliburn piano competition in Fort 
Worth. Texas, something beyond die 
wailing and teasing inherent in all such 
events. Before the three medalists were 


announced, the finalists and about .3,000 
listeners patiently endured an hour of 
speeches brimming with acknowledg- 
ments and platitudes, relieved onlv by a 
16-niijiute film retrospective of Clibum 
competitions past Then, after the prizes 
were awarded, the six finalists — one of 
them elated, the rest feeling varying 
degrees of relief and disappointment — 
were gi\’en a few momenis to compose 
themselves before performing one more 
work as a kind of encore. This time, the 
gold medal went to Jon Nakamatsu. a 
28-year-old pianist who for the last six 
vears has been teaching German at St. 
Francis High School in Mountain View. 
California. His prize — estimated to be 
wonh $200,000. including S20.000 In 
cash, S 10.000 in concert «fress. a travel 
subsidy, recitals in New York and Lon- 
don and two years of management ser- 
vices — will allow him to give up the 
day job. Asked what he would tell his 
students, he said, "Auf Wiedersehen." 

□ 

The actor Karl Malden will teach a 
senior drama course for two weeks this 


fall as pan of a distinguished faculty 
series at San Angelo State in Texas. 

Malden, who made the "Don't leave 
home without it ' ' line famous for .Amer- 
ican Express in dozens of commercials, 
won an Oscar for the 195! film "A 
Streetcar Named Desire." 

D 

When the Norwegian military put 
Gyda Kaland on iu reserve list, she uas 
ready to serve her coumiy' — even at age 
98. "1*11 be there if they need me." she '| i;- j . 

said in (he Bergens Tidende newspaper. >« * i / ' 

Kaland ended up on the roster bwause , - , 
she bought a new tractor last year. The .| / * . . ’ . 

military maintains a list of potentially | l_/i : ; ; ' 
useful civilian vehicles, such as trucks 
and tractors, and advises owners that ■! 

they and their vehicles may be sum-j Hpgjf : > ' 
moned to active service in waiTimfc ' ■ ’ • 

KaJand's orders said she and her tractor 
should report to Lime, near the west coast 
city of Bergen, in any mobilization. "If 
they can use my tractor to defend the 
coun^. they caii have it." Kaland said 
"I might no’t be quite as useful. J'm not 
quite as frisky as I used to be. " 


•t.- P-. m:' ' 

.-ft 


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do as the 172-101Ts do. 


Every country has its own AT&T .Access Number which 


makes calling hemte and to ether countries reallv easv. 


Just dial the AT&T .Access .Number for die countrv vou're 


calling from and you’ll get the fastest clearest connec- 


tions home. And be sure to charge your calls on your 
AT&T Calling Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous 
phone charges on your hotel bill and save you up to 
60?at So when in Rome (or anwhere else for that 


matter), do as many business travelers do. Use AT&T. 


Please check the list below for .AT&T Access Numbeii 



rrwr Clirti f*iiD 

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AT&T Access Numbers 


EUROPE 


Slep» 1» folio* for cjsi calling Koridnidc 

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83B non 67911 1771 

TIMU 


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Austrlaoo 

BelgluRi* 

Cueti RepHbHBA 
Francs 
Garmany 
Gn«a* 

Inland 

Italy* 

Neflierianda* 

Ru$5la*A|MWB0W)> 

Spain 


.022-8B8-ini 

0-8D0-in-10 

BO-42-DOO-1II1 

D-6eo-99inii 

0130-0010 

.QD-m-1311 

1-BI»-950-000 

172:1011 

0000-022-9111 

755-5042 

ooe-oMO-ii 


Smden 
Swlizarland* 
Uniled Kingdanii 


r rL'A 

1- • 

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• ; ■jcnBCuiffTTiii 

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Israel 

Saadi Aralila-> 


MIDOLE EAST 


02D-7g!^1 

(wn-8^1 

0500-flMail 

nsoB-aMflii 


AFRICA 


S1D-D2Q0 

in-100-2727 

1-800-10 



Ghana 
Knnj'a* 

South Alrica 


. .0191 
0-800-10 
0*809-99-0128 

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