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INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND T 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


London, Thursday, June 12, 1997 



TON POST 



Evidence Mounts of Mass Killings by Kabila’s Forces in Congo 



By John Pomfret 

Washington Post Service 


i \hdHh*kMgFocr Fimr*-!Vi»r 

In April;, a Red Cross worker in the Biaro refugee camp in eastern Zaire carried a sick child past rebel soldiers. 


-onsc 

hats in the heart of the vast Congo rain forest harbors a dark 
secret In mid-April, urged on by military officers loyal to the 
rebel leader Laurent Kabila, its villagers tom through a camp 
of refugees, most of them Rwandan Hutu, hacking and 
spearing men, women and children. 

The armed men among the Hum fought them off. But a 
day later, Mr. Kabila's rebel forces stepped in and. according 
to survivors and local residents, ravaged the some 55,000 
refugees for seven hours, firing wildly into the encampment 
in a grove of palm trees straddling a rutted jungle road. Again 
local villagers joined in the assault, wielding spears and 
machetes against the refugees. 

The local residents and refugee survivors say hundreds 
died. Many of them were buried in a mass grave 500 yards up 
a dirt path that now is guarded by Mr. Kabila’s troops. 

The story of Kasese is just one of numerous tales of mass 
killings of refugees carried out by soldiers loyal to Mr. 
Kabila, now president of Congo, auring his seven-month 
push to topple Mobutu Sese Seko, the longtime leader of 
what was called Zaire. 

Allegations that Mr. Kabila’s men killed Hutu women and 


children throughout Congo, and urged villagers to do the 
same, have complicated his attempts to gain international 
recognition of his victory over Marshal Mobutu and for the 
new government he installed May 29. 

The stories, along with mass graves and accounts of wit- 
nesses and victims in eastern, central and western Congo, paint 
a horrific picture of atrocities. The reported killings stretch 
from Gnma and Bukavu, where Mr. Kabila’s rebellion enipted 
in eastern Congo last fall, to Mbandaka. 750 miles (1,200 
kilometers) to the west on the oTher side of the country. 

Taken together, they suggest the massacres were not 
isolated instances of unruly troops, but rather part of Mr. 
Kabila’s war of liberation. Their goal appears to have been 
rwofold: vengeance and security. 

Interviews with international aid workers, refugees and 
local villagers indicate that Mr. Kabila's army is controlled 
by Rwandan officers who dominate its upper echelons. Mr. 
Kabila relied heavily on those well-trained officers, along 
with Rwandan, Angolan and Ugandan troops, to push Mar- 
shal Mobutu’s army aside. But in so doing he made a deal 
with people intent on bringing the 1994 ethnic war in 
Rwanda to Zaire. 

During that war, radical Hutu militiamen slaughtered 
See CONGO, Page 4 


Cease-Fire Ordered in Brazzaville 

But More Gunfire Greets Calls to End Weeklong Fighting 


OmpdratyOwSuff From Dapor hex 

• BRAZZAVILLE, Congo Republic 
— President Pascal Lissouba ordered 
his army Wednesday to start a unilateral 
cease-fire in Brazzaville to give a 
chance for peace talks to end the lethal 
standoff with militia supporting the 
former Marxist military leader. Denis 
Sassou-Nguesso. 

Mr. Lissouba said on state radio: 
“The mission to establish public order 
has turned into a civil war/’ 

He added: “I order an immediate 
cease-fire to give a chance for medi- 
ation. Peace must remain our first ob- 
jective.” 

His rival. General Sassou-Nguesso. 
went on his own radio station to an- 
nounce that he, too, had agreed to a 
cease-fire. 

There was no way of determining 


how widely observed the calls were, but 
French soldiers, journalists and hun- 
dreds of civilians seeking shelter had to 
dive for cover when a burst of automatic 
rifle fire enipted near their base at the 
international airport minutes after the 
announcements. 

In addition, General Sassou-Ngues- 
so *s radio continued broadcasting anti- 
government statements and calling for 
government soldiers to join his militia. 

An official in the office of the mayor 
of Brazzaville, Bernard Kolelas, who is 
leading mediation efforts, added: “Mr. 
Kolelas spoke with Sassou-Nguesso on 
the telephone and we expect him to 
announce his own cease-fire on the ra- 
dio at 5 P.M.” 

But a rebel militia spokesman said. 
“They are still firing on us despite the 
cease-fire having been declared.” 


Witnesses said shooting continued in 
several parts of the capital, racked by 
seven days of clashes. A few shots were 
beard from near the presidency and 
stray small arms fire hit a French base 
near the airport 

A Reuters correspondent saw the 
shots hit a wall at the Aviation Club, 20 
meters away from several hundred ci- 
vilians awaiting evacuation. 

Firing was continuing near the base, 
with the occasional sound of a heavy 
explosion, probably from mortars or 
rocket-propelled grenades, witnesses 
said. There was no immediate word of 
any casualties. 

Earlier in the day, witnesses reported 
scores of bloated bodies littering the 
streets in the city center and outlying 

See BRAZZAVILLE, Page 4 


Jiang, Blair 
And Doubters 
To Meet July 1 


C'trUfJfniOvSijffFwmPstarhn 

HONG KONG — The handover of 
Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty con- 
tinued to follow its bumpy but inex- 
orable course on Wednesday, as Beijing 
said that President Jiang Zemin would 
attend the handover ceremony and Bri- 
tain conntered with an announcement 
that Prime Minister Tony Blair would 
represent the departing colonial power. 

Local pro-autonomy activists, for 
their part, continued to demand a venue 
on July 1 to vocalize their opposition to 
limits on their freedom under the hand- 
over accord, lashing out at civic au- 
thorities for refusing permission for a 
rally in Victoria Park. Such an event 
would be the first major public gath- 
ering critical of Beijing in the early 
hours of Chinese rule. 

: Mr. Jiang’s visit to the territory, a 
British colony for- 156 years, will be Us 
first, and is due to last just a few hours. 
He is scheduled to return to the Chinese 
capital for Beijing's own celebration of 
its recovery of Hong Kong. But Mr. 
Jiang wiU remain long enough to attend 
on investiture ceremony for the post- 
colonial administration that has already 
created diplomatic disturbances. 

There had been suggestions that Mr. 
Blair might stay away after China^ an- 
nounced that it would use the festivities 
to swear in tbe nonelected provisional 
legislature slated to replace Hong. 
Kang’s Parliament, which was demo- 
cratically elected in 1995. Officials 
made dear that although Mr. Blair 
' would anenri the formal handover ce- 
remony, he would leave before the 
swearing-in started. 

The United States said Tuesday that 
Sedeiary. of State Madeleine Albright - 
would attend the sovereignty ceremony, 
hut w on Id boycott the investiture of the 
poaelccted legislature. It remained to be 
teen whether Britain’s other ixnritt- pan* 
i son$e of which have’ signed major 
deals with China, would follow 
&un_, ; 

. Officials said Britain would raise the 
mate at a summit meeting of European - 



Governor Chris Patten arriving at 
the site of Hong Kong's new airport 
at Cbek Lap Kok on Wednesday. 

Union nations in Amsterdam next week 
and at a meeting of die Group of Seven 
industrialized nations in Denver later 
this month. 

Mr. Blair, asked Wednesday if Bri- 
tain owed a moral duty to the people of 
Hong Kong that would not end with the 
handover, said, “J do agree” and “I 
think that is important,” adding, “I will 
be attending the ceremony myself.” 
Prince Charles is also planning to attend 
the handover ceremony. 


Key Senator 
Backs Plan 
To Pay UN Bill 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Senator Jesse 
Helms and other key senators have 
agreed on a far-reaching foreign-affairs 
bill that would pay most of the back 
debts that the United States owes the 
United Nations. 

■ Under the proposed deal, the United 
States would pay the world body $819 
million over three years in return for UN 
spending cuts and other concessions. 
That is less than what the United Na- 
tions says the country owes but the most 
that Mr. Helms, Republican of North 
Carolina, who is chairman of the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee and a crit- 
ic of the UN, said be would accept 

White House officials said they sup- 
ported the UN plan, reached after weeks 
of negotiations. B ut they still have some 
reservations about details in the bill 
regarding reorganization of U.S. foreign 
policy agencies. 

While the bill, which will be re- 
viewed Thursday by the Foreign Re- 
lations Committee, still faces obstacles 
to enactment, it represents a major 
breakthrough in the long stale m ate be- 

See DUES, Page 4 



T»Mttrn SiUjApcne FwK-Piruf 

Tbeo Waigel, the German finance minister, preparing for debate on the 
Maastricht treaty in the Bundestag on Wednesday. Germany withdrew its 
long-hekl opposition to a job-creation pledge in the Ell charter. Page 15. 

A Momentary EU Truce 

Jobs Pad Reflects Bonn-Paris Power Struggle 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 


BRUSSELS — France and Germany 
appeared Wednesday to be headed to- 
ward a resolution of their latest dispate 
over European monetary union, but the 
history of their differences suggests that 
any accord will be no more than a mo- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

mentary truce in their long struggle for 
control of Europe’s economic agenda. 

That fundamental gap was under- 
lined Wednesday by the starkly dif- 
ferent interpretations the two govern- 
ments put on a compromise plan that 
officials hoped could resolve the mon- 
etary dispute in time fora summit meet- 
ing of European Union leaders in Am- 


sterdam on Monday and Tuesday. 

The plan calls for Germany to en- 
dorse a resolution and new EU treaty 
commitments requiring governments to 
step up cooperation on growth and em- 
ployment policies in exchange for 
France’s dropping its opposition to a 
stability pact imposing stiff fines on 
single-currency countries that run ex- 
cessive budget deficits. 

For Prime Minister Lionel Jospin of 
France, the employment commitment 
represents a fulfillment of his promise to 
put jobs before austerity. 

But few officials or economists regard 
the jobs proposal as much more than a 
rhetorical gesture on behalf of Europe’s 
18 million unemployed. 

“There's nothing in it,” one senior 

See EUROPE, Page 4 



i put pressure 

on Beijing to respect human rights in 
Hong Kong. “Far the prime minister, 
the paramount thing is to make clear 
Britain’s commitment to Hong Kong 
now and in the future,” a British gov- 
ernment official said. 

As Beijing put the finishing touches 
to its plans for the celebration by de- 
claring July 1’ a national holiday for its 
1.2 billion people, Hong Kong’s demo- 
cratic lobby cast around for a venue for 
protest rafljes. The Hong Kong Alliance 
m Support of (heTamotic Democratic 

. See’ HONG KONG, Page 4 


AGENDA 


Juppe Won’t Make New Bid to Lead Party 


The Dollar 


Nbw Yak Wednesday * 4 P.M previous doss 


PARIS (Reuters) — Former Prime PACETWO 
Minister Alain Jnppe said Wednesday ™ ir , . „ , 

be would not seek re-election as leader Mending Broken Mmda m Angola 
of the Gaullist party. Rally for the Pase 10 

Republic. Mr. Juppe announced his - 1ft ‘ 

dechdoo during an emergency party Cn^word 

congress held in die wake of the con- Dpmwn — rages &-?- 

servatives’ defeat is legislative elec- Sports Pages 22-23 

lions June 1. It cleats the way for the 
former National Assembly speaker, 

Philippe Seguin, to take ova - as pres- 
ident of the party. 


DM 


1.7161 


1.7185 


Pound 


1.636 


1.6385 


Yen 


111.145 


112.38 


5.6048 


5.8065 



+37 JX) 


Pages 11-13. 


.iht.com 


757627 


S&P 500 


753927 


changs Wednesday A 4 P.M. previous dose 


+429 


869.57 


865-28 


Japan Posts 
Another Big 
Surplus in 
World Trade 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

International H trail Tnbwte 

TOKYO — Japan’s trade surplus 
soared by more than 90 percent in April, 
its second-largest rise since March 
1992, the government reported Wed- 
nesday, heightening fears of a fresh 
U.S. -Japan trade dispute and sending 
the dollar to its lowest level in nearly 
seven months against the yen. 

The dollar closed at 1 1 1.145 yen in 
New York, down from Tuesday’s close 
of 1 12.38 yen. 

The near doubling of Japan's current 
account surplus led to sharp comments 
from American officials, including 
Lawrence Summers, the U.S. deputy 
treasury secretary. He warned that Ja- 
pan “could burt global growth and fuel 

E rotectionism” if it relied on exports to 
rel its economic recovery. 

Washington has issued similar warn- 
ings since last year, when Japan’s trade 
surplus with the United States rose for the 
first time in more than two years. Since 
then. U.S. manufacturers have cam- 
paigned for the Clinton administration to 
shield them from booming Japanese ex- 
ports, saying U.S. jobs are at risk. 

Japan's surplus in its current account, 
the broadest measure of trade in goods 
and services, rose 92.7 percent in April, 
to 1.09 trillion yen ($9.7 billion), from a 
year earlier, the Finance Ministry said. 

After a 362 percent increase in the 
current account surplus in January, 
April’s rise was the biggest since March 
1992, when it rose 198.7 percent. The 
surplus in merchandise trade alone also 
surged in April, rising 90.9 percent, to 
1 .02 trillion yen. 

The Finance Ministry said temporary 
phenomena were responsible for the 
rises in both surpluses, which if said 
would not continue. It attributed the 
rises to tax increases in April, which 
s nrnted demand for imports, and to the 
weak yen and strong growth in the 
United States, which boosted the de- 
mand for Japanese exports. 

By contrast, private economists said 
the yen's continued weakness against 
the currencies of Japan’s major tra ding 
partners, which lifts the competitive- 
ness of its exports, meant its surplus was 
almost certain to continue climbing. 

“Japan’s current account surplus is 
clearly heading up,” said Richard J er- 
rant, chief economist at ING Barings 
Securities in Tokyo. “It’s just a ques- 
tion of whether it goes up at an ac- 
ceptably fast rate for the U.S. or not.” 

In a speech delivered after the current 
account statistics were made public. Mr. 
Summers told business executives in 
Denver, in advance of next week ’s sum- 
mit there of the Groiro of Seven in- 
dustrialized countries, that Japan should 
foster an economic recovery based on 
strong domestic demand. If Japan reties 
on exports to pull it through, Mr. Sum- 
mers said, Japan ’’could burt global 
growth and fuel protectionism.’ ’ 

The Finance Ministry said last month 
that Japan’s trade surplus with the 
United States soared 174.1 percent in 

See YEN, Page 16 


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‘ Jurassic Park ’ Come True? No, but a Fragment of Dinosaur Life 


By Nicholas Wade 

Nev York Tunes Serrke 



24 


NEW YORK — Scientists say they 
have recovered. elements of blood from 
the bones of a dinosaur that died 65 
million years ago. This is the first time 
that blood components have been re- 
covered from dinosaur bones, and the 
nearest that science has come to the 
sc ience fiction fantasy of r ec re a tin g the 
creatures from the genetic information 
in tbeirblood cells. 


.The dinosaur, a nearly complete Tyr- 
annosaurus rex, was buried in condi- 
tions that prevented its bones from be- 
ing converted to mineral, as is the case 
with most fossils. The in- 
terior of the bones was pro- . 
served largely in its original 
form. 

Mary Schweitzer, a pale- 
ontologist at Montana State 
University in Bozeman, recovered the 
specimen from the Hells Creek forma- 
tion of eastern Montana. Because of the 



bones’ state of preservation, she de- 
cided to look for signs of lift, cells, 
DNA and protein. 

The recovery of ancient molecules is 
fascinating but treacherous 
terrain on which many sci- 
entists have stumbled. The 
more sensitive the analyt- 
ical technique, the higher 
the risk of picking up mo- 
lecules that have coatamroatedthe orig- 
inal specimen. The DNA that a team of 
Utah scientists recently asserted mat 


they had recovered from 80-million- 
year-old dinosaur bones was later said 
by other researchers to be of human 
origin. 

Because of such setbacks, Ms. 
Schweitzer and her colleagues pro- 
ceeded with caution and took several 
years to publish their results. 

Earlier hopes of finding cells in the 
dinosaur bone have been dashed. Ms. 
Schweitzer said she could see no direct 
sign of cells, although a chemical suin 
that recognizes DNA picked up 


something in the boles where the bone 
cells would have rested She said she 
had been unable to retrieve DNA that 
could be identified as originating in a 
dinosaur. 

But she and her colleagues had better 

luck in looking for heme, the oxygen- 
carrying pan of the hemoglobin mo- 
lecule of tire blood. 

They reported finding evidence for 
the presence of heme by six chemical 

See DINOSAUR, Page 4 















PAGE TWO 


Mending Broken Minds / Papa Kitoko's Clinic 

Faith and Chains in Angola 


By Suzanne Daley 

New York Times Service 


L uanda, Angola — it is 

Sunday morning and the ser- 
vice — with its drum beating 
and rhythmic wailing — can 
be heard all along the rutted street on 
this city's outskirts, where garbage, 
die carcasses of abandoned cars and 
barefoot children vie for space. 

Through the windows of one of the 
mud brick houses here, a dozen wom- 
en in aqua robes can be seen swaying 
to the music, clapping and smiling. 

But behind these walls arc otters 
who are in no shape to take part. In 
many cases, they are chained to heavy 
auto transmissions or steel truck 
wheels and tucked Into the shadier 
comers of a half-built compound, 
where flies and the smells of h uman 
waste abound. They moan or repeat 
nonsensical phrases or stare into space. 
Some have open festering wounds. 

Welcome to Papa Kitoko’s Center 
for Traditional Medicine. Almost 
everyone in Luanda has beard of Mr. 
Kitoko, who is part traditional healer, 
part leader of a Christian-based re- 
ligious sect. 

The conditions in his center are 
appalling, but many L nan dans see 
Mr. Kitoko as a kind of hero. An- 
gola's 20 years of civil war have left 
barely a hospital standing and even 
less care for the mentally ill. What is 
available is far too expensive for 
those who live in the miles of slums 
that have sprung np around this city. 

Luanda was once the graceful cap- 
ital of this former Portuguese colony, 
built for about 400,000 people. But die 
refugees from the war kept coming, 
and now 3 million people live here. 
Basic services have all but collapsed. 

The streets are full of beggars — 
children reeking of the glue and 
homemade alcohol they use to get 
high — and mutikaos, the thousands 
of Angolans who lost limbs when 
they stepped on mines. Those with a 
tenuous hold on reality are in the mix, 
too. Many are former soldiers who 
have not recovered from the carnage 
they witnessed or took part in. 

Mr. Kitoko, who was provided 
with an ambulance by the govern- 
ment to pick up the mentally ill, says 
he takes in anyone who needs his 
help. In most cases the patient's fam- 
ily gives what it can to pay for care, 
and the family is responsible for feed- 
ing and clothing a patient 
But some have no family. 


family. He says 


patie 

able to tell nun their names. These hie 
supports from donations. He says his 
cure rate is about SO percent But 
some have been chained in his com- 
pound for as long as five years. 

After the Sunday service. Mr. Ki- 
toko received visitors in his office, a 
broken stethoscope around his neck. 

There are small glass jars on his 
desk that he says he uses to examine 
patients who he says are too sensitive 



to be touched by the stethoscope. He 
showed how they work, turning them 
upside down and pressing the rim of 
the jars on his desk. Then he pieced 
his stethoscope together so he could 
listen through the bottom of the jar. 

He also showed off a collection of 
business cards from visitors curious 
about his work and half a dozen cer- 
tificates from government officials li- 
censing his center. A woman, a former 
patient, took notes on all that he said. 

On a tour of his clinic, he stopped 
in front of a giggly young woman, 
introducing her as someone who had 
come to hun as a mute only a week 
before. “She speaks now/' he said. 

And, indeed, the woman briefly 
removed a rag from in front of her 
mouth to say she was doing well and 
again to give her age. 17. But when 
asked her name she balked, clutching 
the rag and giggling maniacally. 

Mr. Kitoko pulled the rag away and 
ordered her sharply to reply. But she 
looked terrified, and he moved on. 

In the next room, with its partial 
roof and dirt floor, he waved toward 
three chained men. Two had straw 
mats to sleep on, the other a towel 
Their filthy clothing was in rags. They 
did not seem to notice Mr. Kitoko. 

“We have no money for proper 
cells/' he said. * ‘So we must tie them 
up. They are very violent and ag- 


gressive. Sometimes they hurt them- 
selves anyway.” 

A room with a concrete floor and a 
roof is the pharmacy. Mr. Kitoko 
deflected questions about the ingredi- 
ents in a potion he gives to most of bis 
patients, hi one corner plastic con- 
tainers held a dark syrupy substance 
that was apparently fermenting. 
There were dried leaves on a metal 
shelf, and a woman was slicing small 
limes into a wash basin. 

The Angolan government and the 
rebels of the National Union for the 
Total Independence of Angola, or 
UNITA, signed a peace agreement in 
1994, but it has been more of a wary 
truce than an end to the war. Control 
of the countiy remains split, and there 
have been regular flare-ups, includ- 
ing attacks in the last few weeks by 
the government on UNITA territory 
in the diamond-mining areas. 

Little progress has been made in 
rebuilding the country. Only one pub- 
lic hospital functions in Luanda, with 
a small psychiatric floor. But the hos- 
pital lacks enough beds and medicine. 
Patients there also sleep on the floor 
among flies and dirty bandages. Only 
those who can afford to pay bribes get 
slightly better treatment 

M R. KITOKO says he 
learned his medicine 
from his mother, who 
was also a famous healer. 
But his religion, he says, is where he 
gets his power. By his account he has 
treated 43,329 patients in 2 1 years. He 
is now treating 1 02 patients, he said. 

Most have mental problems, which 
he tries to cure with herbs and re- 
ligious counseling. But others have 
come to him with a range of ailments 
from diarrhea to malari a. If he has 
made money on them, it is not ap- 
parent 

Many of the people who attend his 
Sunday services are former patients 
or those who are doing well enough to 
be released from their chains. One is 
Philipe Catarina Mukueno, a 20- 
year-old carpenter. He said his moth- 
er had brought him here about a 
month before because he had been 
behaving oddly. He had stopped 
bathing and was living in the street. 
For a week after he arrived, he said, 
he was tied up. But now he is helping 
out, controlling the more violent pa- 
tients. 

“I was doing things that I 
shouldn’t be doing/’ Mr. Mukueno 
said. "I am much better now.” 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Ttnnn tn Ran fj*ll Plinnp« nn Fliolite urcs of history and contemporary life, will tour Australia and 
Bonn to Ban rnones on r Ugnis Southeast As k starring in Melbourne in October. 

BONN (AFP) — Passengers using cellular phones or 
personal computers during commercial flights may face up to ^ _ . . 

two years in prison if the German government’s plans are LanterDUiy tO thaTffe A dmi ssion 
approved by Parliament J ~ 

A bill adopted Wednesday by the cabinet bans the use of all 
consumer electronics — including tape recorders and compact- 
disk players — because they may interfere with aircraft systems 
and cause security lapses, the Transportation Ministry said. 

Violations would be punishable with imprisonment or fines 
of up to 100,000 Deutsche marks ($59,000). 

If approved by Parliament, the bill could take effect before 
the end of the year. 


Madame Tussaud 9 s Goes to Asia 

MELBOURNE (Reuters) — Madame Tussaud’s wax mu- 
seum of Loudon will make a rare foray outside Europe when 
it brings many of its wax figures to Asia later this year. 

More than 100 wax statues, representing best-known fig- 


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Talks Halted as Tobacco Firms 
Split Over Nicotine Regulation 


Wiishinyipn Post Sen-ice 

WASHINGTON — Settle- 
mem talks between the to- 
bacco industry and its ad- 
versaries have recessed after 
the tobacco companies split 
over the scope of federal reg- 
ulation of nicotine in ciga- 
rettes. 

It is the first visible rift on 
the industry side since the ne- 
gotiations began April 3, ac- 
cording to sources on both 
sides of the talks. 

BAT Industries, parent 
company of Brown & Wil- 
liamson Tobacco Co., balked 
at a proposal that could allow 
the Food and Drug Admin- 


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Soldiers of the Revolutionary United Front riding in a pickup truck on their base on the outskirts of Freetown. 

j.p 

Poverty Fuels Sierra Leone Turmoil 


By James Rupert 

Waskut^ion Past Service 


LONDON (Reuters) — Canterbury Cathedral, the spiritual 
home of the worldw ide Anglican Church, will charge entrance 
fees to Sunday visitors. 

Cathedral authorities said their concerns were prompted by 
safety and not economics, because they are seeking to avoid 
“disruptive and dangerous crowding” in the cathedral, which 
attracts more than 1.7 million visitors a year. 


The Mexican government canceled a tropical storm 
warning as the storm turned away from Mexico's southern 
coast and headed off into the Pacific after strong winds forced 
several ports to close. There were no reports of damage. (API 

The Iranian airline Bon-Air has begun a weekly air 
service between the northwestern city of Tabriz and Dam- 
ascus, the official press agency ERNA reported. (AFP) 


FREETOWN, Sierra Leone — More 
than two weeks after soldiers here over- 
threw an elected civilian government. 
Sierra Leone's military is still struggling 
to stabilize its hold on power. 

By all available evidence, Sierra Leo- 
nians overwhelmingly reject the 
takeover. Out of protest and fear, they 
are refusing the ruling junta's orders to 
return to work. The economy is para- 
lyzed. Foreign governments have re- 
buffed the junta's appeals for under- 
standing. Nigerian troops, the spearhead 
of a regional West African intervention, 
are poised outside the city, sustaining 
fears of an assault aimed at restoring 
civilian rule. 

The standoff is the latest in a series of 
coups, upheavals and wars since the end 
of colonial rule — in such nations as 
Liberia, Gambia and Burkina Faso — 
that underscore and perpetuate die fra- 
gility of West African governments, ci- 
vilian or military, as they seek to rule 
over large, impoverished populations 
with little reason to be loyal to their 
leaders of the moment 

Here in Freetown, there may be an 
even bigger problem. Siena Leone faces 
the potential of another coup, more vi- 
olent and more radical than the current 
one. officers and political analysts say. 

The ruling Armed Forces Revolution- 
ary Council is dominated by colonels, 
generals and other officers. But real 
power is held by a coalition of younger, 
poorer, angrier men. They are enlisted 
army regulars and guerrillas of the Rev- 
olutionary United Front a rural-based 
rebel movement that has fought the gov- 
ernment from deep in the forest since 
1 990, demanding that the poor majority 
receive a greater share of the country's 
wealth. 

Impatient with the new leadership's 
inability to consolidate its rule and nor- 
malize life here, the enlisted soldiers and 
their guerrilla allies “accuse us officers, 
of not trying/' said a colonel on the 


ruling council. “They could turn their 
guns on us again.” 

In the coup’s first days, dashes were 
reported between the army and the Rev- 
olutionary United Front In the last 
week, the guerrillas have placed units in 
strategic locations in the city. Officers 
say they have persuaded the rebel front 
to pull back from some of them. 

“We need to encamp and disarm 
them,'' a senior officer said. 

Those who initiated this coup were 
not power-greedy military officers, said 
Babatunde Blyden. a scholar who heads 
a local organization promoting civic 
education. They were the men with guns 
among a desperate majority of citizens 
who cannot make enough money even to 
feed themselves, he said. 

“This is a war of people who have 
been deprived of everything/' he said. 

UN statistics show Sierra Leone as a 
perennial contender for the world's most 
impoverished country. Average life ex- 
pectancy is 40 to 45 years, and the av- 
erage annual income is $150. About 75 
percent of Sierra Leonians are subsist- 
ence farmers. Mr. Blyden estimates that 
more titan half of the population lives 
below an adequate subsistence level. 

Yet the country is rich in farmland, as 
well as diamonds and other minerals that 
yield profits for foreign investors and 
help sustain a wealthy elite of locals and 
foreigners in Freetown. 

The desperation of the poor helped 
create the Revolutionary United Front 
And, according to soldiers and civilians, 
that desperation also sparked the coup. 

Sierra Leone seemed to be inching 
toward democracy and stability last 
year, when a previous military govern- 
ment held an election and handed power 
to its winner. President Ahmad Tejan 
Kabbah. He quickly negotiated peace 
with the rebel front 

Mr. Kabbah “certainly is an honest 
and decent man,” said OIu Gordon, a 
leading Freetown journalist But with 
what he and other observers said was bad 
advice from his defense chief. Mr. Kab- 
bah cut benefits to soldiers and an- 


nounced that the army would be'- 
shrunk. 

Before the pay cut soldiers “could': * 
barely survive on our salaries/’ sakfr 
I I mam Jalloh, an army warrant officer, -‘ 
who was paid $1 8 and four bags of rice a 1 ' * 
month. The family ate two bags and sold-' 
one for other food. The last bag was sold' - 
to pay school fees for his six children. - 1 

When Mr. Kabbah halved the rice ra- 
don, Mr. Jallob knew that there would be” 
a coup and that he would join it he said. 

“If a soldier cannot feed his family, how- 
can he sit in his barracks? 1 ’ he asked- ■" 

A corporal Tamba Gborie, organized- 
the coup and recruited the man who now- 
is its public leader — the ruling council" 
chairman. Major Johnny Paul Koromah. - 
Major Koromah was in jail awaiting trial 
for an earlier coup plot and Corporal’ 
Gborie launched his takeover fay attack- 
ing tiie prison and springing Major;' 
Koromah — and the other inmates. j 

But Corporal Gborie’s troops began- 
arresting all other senior officers, lock-' 
ing them up in the Defense Ministry and* 
giving every sign of planning to kill 
them, officers said. 

“They kept us in there for two days/ ' 
a lieutenant colonel said. “They forced 
us to stay in our seats. We had to ask, 
permission to be taken to the toilet.” > 

In the streets, poor soldiers vented* 
their sense of injustice by looting and_ 
were joined within days by fighters from 
the rebel front in the countiy side. It is not 
clear whether the soldiers and rebels had~ 
planned in advance to work together, but 
in any case, now “these two groups are” 
joining,” Mr. Blyden said. “They un- 
derstand each othCT’s poverty.” 

That has left the senior officers iso- 
lated. Two high-ranking members of the- 
ruling council said they could control the 
lower ranks and rebels, whose continued 1 
looting bas terrorized the residents of- 
Freetown. Senior officers said they have 
had to argue with younger men to avoid* 
the arrests of politicians, labor leaders- 
and others who condemn the coup and', 
urge the population to paralyze it by* 
refusing to work. 


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WEATHER 


is tralion gradually to reduce 
nicotine to nonaddictive 
levels after 10 or 12 years, 
according to people close to 
the talks. However, Philip 
Morris Cos. and R.J. Reyn- 
olds Tobacco, the nation's 
two largest cigarette makers, 
have been willing to negotiate 
on the issue and have backed 
off their long-standing oppo- 
sition to any such regulation, 
say people involved in the 
talks. 

The tobacco companies' 
foes envision a two-tier sys- 
tem in which the FDA would 
be restricted in radically al- 
tering nicotine levels in to- 
bacco products far the first 10 
or 12 years after the agree- 
ment is reached. But once that 
time had passed, the agency 
would have greater leeway to 
alter nicotine levels. 

The internal disagreement 
raised yet another hurdle to 
reaching a settlement that 
would resolve scores of law- 
suits against the industry. 


Europe 


Today 

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Middle East 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by AccuWealher. 


Asia 


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North America 

A slow-moving front will 
■rigger thunderstorms, 
some with heavy down- 
pours. from Tennessee to 
New York Friday and Sat- 
urday. breezy and turning 
cooler in the wake of the 
front The Plains will be 
pteeeam wtm lots of sun- 
shine. but cooler In the 
west with showers end 
thunderstorms. 


Europe 

Cool across Turkey with 
scattered showers, while 
Greece will be pleasant 
with a good deal oi aun. 
Cloudy and damp with 
showers in England Friday 
and Saturday, then partly 
sunny and comlortabie. 
Scandinavia wil have pen- 
otfe of rain, but Italy wM be 
sunny and warm through 
Sunday. 


Sunny, hot and dry in Bel- 
ling and northern China 
Friday into Sunday. Tokyo 
will be partly sunny and 
humid whti the chance tor 
an afternoon thunderstorm 
each day. Humid In Hong 
Kong with showers Bkety. 
while Seoul will be sunny 


ana warm. Hot and dry in 
Inwa. 



northern and central In 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


Congressional Bliss: 
Taxless, Spend More 

Budget Agreement Frees Lawmakers 
To Pass Around Some of the Benefits 



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" By David E. Rosenbaum 

I* - flew >'ort Tunes Service 

^WASHINGTON — For all the an- 
gnish they say they went through to get 
ah agreement to balance the budget 
within S ve years. w hat members of 
Congress are really doing now is what 
day enjoy most: cutting taxes and in- 
epeasiag spending. 

■ Jhis is the first time in 15 years rhar 
t$ey have allowed themselves this lux- 
ury. Ever since economists and politi- 
cians discovered in 1982 that me tax. 
cats enacted the year before would lead 
t»«n explosion in the bndget deficit, the 
tHiin item of business in Congress has 
b?*o to decide who would pay higher 
taxes and who would be pinched by the 
(^.tightening needed to bring the def- 
icit under control. 

•3>ot next year, if the c 

n^nt is followed, the deficit 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

maUy rise — to $90 billion from $67 
billion this year, according to estimates 
made by the Congressional Budget Of- 
fice. 

.The deficit is not scheduled to fall 
below this year's level until 2001. 

This week, the Ways and Means 
Committee of the House of Represen- 
tatives is taking the first step toward 
parceling out tax reductions to families 
agd investors. Many of the new tax 
breaks under consideration, including a 
lower tax rate on capital gains, are being 
structured so that the revenue loss will 
be small in the next few years but will 
mushroom in the next century — when 
some future Congress can worry about 
the problem. 

Jn addition, a spending freeze that has 
been in effect since 1990. under Demo- 
cratic and Republican presidents and 
Democratic and Republican Con- 
gresses. has been lifted, and additional 
money will be approved this year for 
popular education and health programs. 

True, the lawmakers have begun writ- 
ing legislation that would pare $115 
billion from what would otherwise be 
spent on Medicare in the next five years. 
But except for an increase in premiums 
of less than $10 a month, the savings 
would not come from retirees, the main 
bgieficiaries of the health-care pro- 
gram, which is financed jointly by the 


states mid the federal government In 
fact, retirees would get new coverage for 
m a mm ograms. Pap smears and screen- 
ings far prostate and colon cancer. 

The savings in Medicare would be 
extracted from doctors, hospitals, nurs- 
ing homes and other providers of med- 
ical care. Their lobbyists will complain, 
of course, but they may get less of a 
hearing than they usually do. Studies 
show that in the main, the federal gov- 
ernment is paying more for the pro- 
viders’ services under Medicare than 
the providers are getting from patients 
who have private insurance coverage. 

Many specialists oi> budget policy 
defend this year's agreement as better 
than nothing. 

“This is not the deal we wanted," 
said Martha Phillips, executive director 
of (he Concord Coalition, a nonpartisan 
organization that lobbies for a balanced 
budget “But it is absolutely better than 
no deal at all. and there’s very little 
chance of replacing it with anything 
better." 

White House officials brag, with some 
justification, that under President Bill 
Clinton, the deficit has been cut by more 
than 75 percent from $290 billion in 
1992. There is no reason to believe, they 
say, that die final decisions will not be 
made to wipe out the deficit completely 
— in 2001 and 2002. when Mr. Clinton 
is no longer in the White House. 

But other budget specialists are skep- 
tical. Robert Reischauex, former director 
of the Congressional Budget Office, put 
it this way: “This was an agreement 
between the 105th Congress and Pres- 
ident Clinton to have the 107th Congress 
and — who? President Gore? — engage 
in fiscal restraint One has reason to doubt 
that the political system will deliver in 
2002 on a premise made in 1997." 

This is Mr. Reischaner’s point: The 
politicians can always renege on their 
promise to cut spending in 2001 and 
2002. They have carefully avoided say- 
ing which government programs should 
be trimmed, and they probably have not 
thought much about it 

Furthermore, if the effects of the 
Medicare savings turn out to be more 
severe than expected, and retirees begin 
experiencing reduced medical services, 
it is a safe bet that the lawmakers will 
leap in and fix the problem. But once a 
tax break is on the books, it is almost 
impossible to get it removed. 



AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


Wi)l> SkagfUc Awmirtl I ‘lev* 

FREE AT LAST — Elmer Pratt celebrating outside the Orange County Jail in Santa Ana, 
California, with his wife, Ashaki, after he was released on bail after 27 years in prison. A 
judge has ordered prosecutors to give Mr. Pratt a new murder trial or drop his case. 

Short Takes 

Speaking of manicures, the really together 
man of the ’90s has a new grooming option, says 
U.S. News & World Report: nail polish. After 
Urban Decay last year introduced a line of guy- 
oriented colors with names like Uzi (gunmetal 
gray) and Asphalt (silver-specked black). Hard 
Candy cosmetics has created a line with names 
even more unmistakably macho: Testosterone 
(slate silver). Libido (teal) and Dog (deep 
purple). Sales have been solid. 

It's a real-life dilemma in toyland: Barbie's 
disabled friend. Share a Smile Becky, cannot fit 
into the elevator of the $100, two-story Barbie 
Dream House. Kjersti Johnson, 17, a high school 
student in Tacoma, Washington, who has cereb- 
ral palsy, complained about the Dream House's 
lack of access. "How ironic and true," she 
wrote. “Housing forpeople with disabilities that 
is not accessible!" Mattel said all future doll 
accessories will be wheelchair-accessibile. 
Thousands of Becky dolls have been sold since 
they were introduced in May. 

Hordes of nutria, sharp-toothed rodents with 
webbed feet, have invaded at least 40 states, 
eating their way across rice fields in Texas and 
building burrows in Louisiana that threaten 
dikes. Popular Mechanics reports. Nutria pelts 
are used in fur coats, but a drop in demand led 
man y breeders to release the animals, which can 
eat three pounds of food a day. Experts in 
Maryland say it could take eight years and cost 
$3 million to be rid of the animals. 

Brian Knowlton 


Baby Boomers Hit the Spas 

Barbara Weaver treated herself for her 48th 
birthday, paying $105 to be bathed in sea mud. 
wrapped in plastic and put under sun lamps. 

“It made me feel like a million bucks," the 
Chicago real estate agent said. 

Baby boomers are spending millions for pre- 
cisely that feeling. 

They are turning to day spas, which offer the 
amenities of an Arizona resort but the con- 
venience of a long lunch. 

Boomers are “getting older and they don't 
want to get older," said Stephanie Matolyak of 
Spa-Finders magazine in New York. A decade 
ago, the country had about 30 day spas, doing 
$50 million in business a year, Ms. Matolyak 
said. Now there are 600, in an industry worth 
$250 million. 

Got $350 a day to bum? At The Grand salon in 
Chicago, that will buy you a hair styling, man- 
icure. pedicure, facial, massages. Champagne 
lunch, herbal body wrap, body polishing — and 
transportation by limousine. Men apparently 
constitute about one-third of the salon s clients, 
typical for the industry. 

. But women are the driving force. * ‘They have 
a family, they’re the mom, they do the career." 
said Richel D’Ambra, owner of a spa in Phil- 
adelphia. “Before, the term was ‘supermom.’ 
Well, supermom needs a rest." 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Congress Keeps Up Struggle 
Over a Disaster Relief Bill 

WASHINGTON — Unable to force an all-night Sen- 
ate session, Democrats staged an all-night media vigil to 
protest the failure of Congress to pass a disaster relief bill 
that President Bill Clinton will sign. Republicans made 
their own political point, accusing the Democrats of 
holding up a bill that would finance research into ways to 
curb birth defects. 

In the House, meanwhile. Republicans on Tuesday 
rejected a Democratic attempt to bring their version ot the 
$8.6 billion emergency spending bill to a vote. 

The partisan fighting frustrated lawmakers trom dis- 
aster states, particularly in the fiood-hir Northern Plains. 
People back home, said Representative John Thunc, 
Republican of South Dakota, know that “this institution. 
Washington. D.C., is playing politics with disaster as- 
sistance." 

Stymied by a party-line 55-to-37 vote to adjourn. 
Democrats w'ere unable to speak indefinitely on the 
Senate floor and retreated to the office of their leader, 
Tom Daschle of South Dakota, where a handful of them 
took three-hour shifts in an all-night session of radio, 
television and on-line interviews. (API 

Senate Panel Weighs Immunity 

WASHINGTON — In an attempt to revive its stalled 
investigation, (he Senate committee looking into ques- 
tionable and illegal fund-raising practices m the 1996 
election is preparing to gram immunity to at least a dozen 
people, a move that could cloud the possible prosecution 
of the witnesses, officials said Tuesday. 

Frustrated by the reluctance of numerous potential 
witnesses to testify at congressional hearings that start 
July 8, Senator Fred Thompson, the Tennessee Repub- 
lican who is heading the inquiry, will seek an immunity 
vole Thursday in a closed session of the Governmental 
Affairs Committee. 

The recipients of immunity would be behind-the- 
scenes players with knowledge of improper fund-raising 
practices, not key figures in the controversy, the officials 
said. 

"They’re lower-level players in the theater.” said a 
source on the committee. "They’re not the Charlie Tries 
or John Huangs." 

Mr. Huang, a former fund-raiser for the Democratic 
National Committee who is at the center of the inquiry, 
and Yah Lin iCharlie) Trie, a former restaurateur in Little 
Rock, Arkansas, whose donations to various Democratic 
causes have been questioned, are among some three 
dozen key people that investigators have sought in vain to 
interview. 

Mr. Huang, like most of these figures, has told hU 
attorney that' he does not intend to cooperate with the 
investigation. A handful of the others, including Mr. Trie, 
have left the country. The names of those being con- 
sidered for immunity were not released. iLXT) 


Quote / Unquote 


Michael McCurry. the White House spokesman, ac- 
cusing reporters of playing a game of "gotcha" every 
time President Clinton attends a fund-raising event: 
"We’re still going to have to have a competitive 1998 
campaign. We’re “not going to unilaterally concede the 
1998 election to the Republican Party. I’ll make that 
announcement right now.” (B'Pi 


U.S. Poll Gloomy on Race Relations 


By Steven A. Holmes 

*' ' f/n- York Times Service 

'WASHINGTON — As President 
BUI Clinton prepares this week to de- 
liver an address on race relations, a 
survey shows that a majority of Amer- 
icans are pessimistic that blacks and 
whites will ever learn to get along. 

-The most despairing among those 
polled by the Gallup organization were 
young, college-educated blacks. 

-According to the survey, 55 percent 
of both blacks and whites believe that 
relations between whites and blacks will 
“always be a problem” in the United 
States, while 42 percenr say that a solu- 
tion will eventually be found. 

As Mr. Clinton was preparing his 
speech on race relations which will be 
delivered Saturday in San Diego, die 
survey provided fresh evidence of how 


daunting a task he faces. In one sharp 
difference, whites generally opposed 
and blacks supported increased gov- 
ernmental efforts like affirmative action 
to boost black achievement. 

“When he does advocate those types 
of remedies for problems, he will cer- 
tainly have agreement from the black 
Ameri can community that that’s an ap- 
propriate action,” said Frank Newport, 
editor-in-chief of the Gallup poll, ‘ ‘but 
he'll be running up against a wall of 
attitudes of white Americans who are 
saying we don’t see that there are prob- 
lems currently and we don’t believe 
therefore it is necessary for the gov- 
ernment to intervene." 

Only 6 percent of whites and 10 per- 
cent of blacks rated themselves as pre- 
judiced toward other racial groups, sug- 
gesting most feel they do not need 
exhortations about tolerance. 


To produce its findings, Gallup in- 
terviewed 3,036 adults over the age of 
17 from Jan. 4 through Feb. 28. To make 
sure it accurately gauged black atti- 
tudes, the poll surveyed 1.269 African- 
Americans, a far larger proportion of the 
total number of people surveyed than is 
usually included in such a {toll. 

Among the more intriguing findings 
of the survey was the amount of pes- 
simism among African-Americans. The 
poll indicated that 76 percent of black 
college graduates said race relations 
would always be troublesome for the 
country, while 56 percent of blacks who 
have not earned a college degree felt 
that way. 

Blacks under 25 years old also felt 
that race relations would always be a 
problem while those over 65 were more 
likely to say things would be worked 
out 


Away From 
Politics 

* Lawyers for Timothy 
McVeigh wrapped up 
their attempt to save him 
from the death penalty 
with his tearful mother, 
Mildred Frazier, saying 
Iter son is a human being 
who deserves to live, 
“not the monster he’s 
been portrayed as.” 
Closing arguments were 
.set for Thursday. (API 

. • Seventeen members 
of the Outlaws motor- 
cycle gang were arrested 
in Milwaukee, after a two 
and a half year investi- 
gation/ on charges in- 
7 eluding ' murder, bomb- 
ing, arson and racke- 
teering in'a long, bloody 
tarf war with the rival 
Hells Angels. (AP) 

-* Charles Manson, the 
murderer, has been put 
in solitary confinement 
after being found guilty 
of drug-trafficking inside 
: Corcoran Stale Prison in 
CaSfenHa, prison offi- 
.c»h&al / Reuters ) 

*A jwy was seated in 
Ioubu Mkhigan, for Jack 
tfarokiaa’s fourth trial 
toh $&£ from his rote 
in an imated suicide . He 
has- heea charged with 
Jw; ftkwties — inctad- 
sig Violating the state's 
tm physkfan-as- 
shade — in con- 
with the death of 
LOBBa Peabody, ■ who 
saS Bed : from mitiople 
yfannrig . 1 (Raters} 


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PAGE 4 




: 


INTERNATIONAL 


Amnesty Official Grim 
A bout Rights in Kenya 

Fair Elections This Year Held Impossible 
Without Constitutional Reforms by Moi 


By James McKinley Jr. 

Mu 1 York Tunes Service 

NAIROBI — Amnesty International, 
the human rights organization, said Wed- 
nesday that Kenya's general elections 
later this year would not be fair unless 
constitutional reforms were made and 
repressive public-order laws repealed 

Ending a two- week fact-finding visit, 
Pierre Sane, secretary -general of the 
London-based group, painted a bleak 
picture of human rights in Kenya He 
criticized the government of President 
Daniel arap Moi for using colonial-era 
security laws to break up opposition 
rallies and called on Western countries 
to flood Kenya with election monitors. 

"Elections can't be free and fair if 
people are intimidated and harassed, if 
people are not allowed to talk directly to 
the electorate." he said. 

Mr. Sane said opposition leaders were 
often arrested without cause and in a few 
cases attempts had been made on their 
lives. Meetings and rallies have been 
dispersed by the police, sometimes vi- 
olently, he added. Journalists, charity 
leaders and human rights advocates also 
have been harrassed he said. 

in general Mr. Sane said, Kenya has 
made fittie progress on human rights in 
recent years. He said arbitrary arrests 
were still common and the police reg- 
ularly used torture and beatings to ex- 
tract confessions from suspects. 

Senior government officials deny 
most of Mr. Sane's charges. 

4 ‘The government is not kind to any of 
its officers who transgress the law," 
George Saitoti. the vice president, said in 


DUES: Helms Backs Plan to Pay UN Bill 


Continued From Page 1 

tween the administration and Mr. 
Helms, according to officials. 

The bill would authorize payment to 
the United Nations of $819 million in 
back dues and assessments and would 
forgive $106 million that Washington 
says it is owed by the UN. The United 
Stales calculates that as a total contri- 
bution of $925 million over three years. 

The United Nations says the United 
States owes more than $1 billion and 
disputes that it owes the United States 
$106 million. But the bill negotiated by 
Mr. Helms and the Foreign Relations 
Committee's ranking Democrat, Senat- 
or Joseph Biden Jr. of Delaware, would 
require the United Nations to accept the 
$925 million as payment in full. 

In addition, payment would be con- 
ditioned on a reduction in the percentage 
of the UN budget that the United Slates 
is required to pay each year. The United 
States cannot impose that change uni- 
laterally. but would cry to persuade the 
other UN members to accept it as the 
price to be paid for the back dues. 

*’We're concerned with some pro- 
visions of the legislation, but the bill is a 
major step in the right direction.” Bill 
Richardson, the chief U.S. delegate to 
the United Nations, said Tuesday. 

"1 think it’s a pretty good deal, the 
whole ball of wax," Mr. Biden said. 
"Helms has operated in good faith, 1 
consulted every inch of the way with the 
administration, and on balance the 
whole package is O.K.." 

A House counterpan to the legislation, 
likely to come to a vote this week, does 
not provide for the U.S. repayments. But 
the strategy of Mr. Helms and Mr. Biden, 
congressional sources said, is to produce 
a Senate bill that will have their names on 
it. and then use Mr. Helms's imprimatur 
to sell the package to the Republican- 
controlled House. As described by Mr. 
Biden and Mr. Richardson and outlined 
in a fact sheet distributed by Mr. Helms's 
staff, the Foreign Relations Committee 
measure contains something for just 


DINOSAUR: A Fragment of Ancient Life 


Continued from Page 1 

tests in an article published this week in 
The Proceedings of the National 
Academy of Sciences. 

In one of the tests, they injected 
ground-up dinosaur bone into rats to see 
if the animals would become immunized 
against dinosaur blood. Since no dino- 
saur was at hand to check if the vac- 
cination was successful, a turkey was 
chosen as stand-in. on the theory that if 
birds descended ftom dinosaurs the tur- 
key could be a close enough cousin to 
Tyrannosaurus rex. at least immunolo- 
gically speaking. 

The rats did react to turkey blood, 
evidence that they had made antibodies 
to some part of the hemoglobin mo- 
lecule. 

Ms. Schweitzer said the rats’ immune 
systems were probably reacting to a 
fragment of hemoglobin, not the whole 


French Socialists May Mute 
Army's Bid to Speak English 

HtWerf 

PARIS — The victory of the left in 
France's general election may spell the 
end of a military foray into the English 
language, the weekly Le Canard - En- 
chaine said Wednesday. 

Operation Shakespeare is aimed at 
finding 1,000 members of the military 
who speak proficient English for liaison 
units and multinational staffs if France 
returns fully to NATO's integrated com- 
mand. the satirical- investigative weekly 
wrote. But the Socialists may halt the 
movement toward integration. 


molecule. Another chemical test sug- 
gested that the heme was attached to a 
protein fragment. 

S. Blair Hedges, an evolutionary bio- 
logist at Pennsylvania Stale University, 
said he had found Ms. Schweitzer's ar- 
ticle convincing. since she had gathered 
"a pretty substantial body of evidence 
supporting the preservation of these bio- 
molecules in dinosaur bone." 

Norman Pace, the member of tile Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences who re- 
commended Ms. Schweitzer’s article for 
publication in the academy's journal, 
said, "1 think she did a real careful job, 
the best that can be done with present 
technology." 

The significance of Ms. Schweitzer’s 
work probably lies in its message to 
other paleontologists that biological mo- 
lecules are worth looking for in fossils, 
though carefully. 

The long-standing belief that proteins 
and DNA could not survive for millions 
of years has not been greatly changed by 
recent assertions to the- contrary, since 
many of these claims are widely 
doubled. 

Ms. Schweitzer said that the lightly 
mineralized state of the dinosaur was 
unusual but far from unique and that she 
believed that molecular evidence might 
be preserved in fossils more commonly 
than thought. 

Genuine DNA data from fossils 
would be greatly prized because its ge- 
netic information would help recon- 
struct the pathways of evolution. Protein 
data, Ms. Schweitzer suggested, could 
yield immunological information that 
would clarify the relationship between 
extinct species. 


a written response to Amnesty's cri- 
ticisms. ‘‘They are effectively discip- 
lined and often brought to justice." 

Mr. Sane’s remarks come as a debate 
is growing over reforming the consti- 
tution and repealing colonial-era laws. 

Opposition Leaders say the constitu- 
tion itself gives Mr. Moi's ruling party, 
the Kenya African National Union, an 
unfair advantage in elections. Though 
Mr. Moi got less than 40 percent of the 
popular vote in 1992, he still retains 
complete control of the government The 
rest of the vote was split among other 
candidates along tribal lines. 

Unable to agree among themselves on 
a single candidate to challenge Mr. Moi 
this time around, the splintered oppo- 
sition factions have been galvanized in 
recent months by the issue of consti- 
tutional reform. They have called for 
amendments thar would force a runoff if 
the president does not win a majority of 
the popular vote. They are also pushing 
for amendments that would allow a co- 
alition government to be formed. 

Not surpi singly, Mr. Moi has ruled out 
such changes and has promised to crack 
down on politicians agitating for re- 
forms. On May 3 1 , he did that, when the 
police used rubber bullets and tear gas to 
disperse a peaceful protest for reform in 
Nairobi, setting off street battles and 
looting for two days. More protests are 
planned later this month. 

‘‘We are going out on the street," said 
Maina Kiai, executive director of the 
Kenya Human Rights Commission. 
"Moi will understand when somebody 
dies in these breakups, but I think people 
are willing to die." 



Ed«c Stataflte AmM Pte» 


CLOSE QUARTERS — A Taiwan guard watching over Chinese illegal immigrants at a detention center 
in Hsinchu county, south of Taipei, on Wednesday. Over 250 are being held awaiting repatriation to China. 


Pan Am Plane 4 ! 
Is Sabotaged 
In New York 

The Associated Prut 

NEW YORK — Cnr wiring was 
found beneath the cockpit of a Pan Am 
plane at Kennedy Airport on Wednesday 
morning, officials said. 3 

A Pam Am spokesman, Jeff friend, 
ier, would not say which wires had been 
cut Bui he said passengers would aot 
have been in danger because pilots of 4c 
A-300 Airbus would never have let the 
plane leave the gate. "The systems 
would not have worked," be said. 

A law enforcement official, however 
said the tampering apparently took place 
earlier in the week, since a problem was 
noticed Sunday, and the plane m ade two 
round trips before the malfunctions— in 
a light and a windshield defroster — . 
were reported. Maintenance woken 
found the cut wires early Wednesday. 

The discovery meant that Pan Am 
Flight 21 was canceled three hours be- 
fore it was due to take off for Miami at 
8:30 A.M. The 102 passengers who had 
tickets on the flight were rebooked, said 
a transportation official who spoke on 
condition of anonymity. The FBI said h 
was investigating the incident 



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CONGO: Evidence Mounts of Mass Killings by Kabila’s Forces EUROPE: 


about everyone involved in the long 
struggle over U.S. relations with die 
United Nations and over the future of the 
State Department and other foreign 
policy agencies. 

The administration would get the 
money to pay a UN debt that Secretary of 
State Madeleine Albright and other se- 
nior officials say has eroded the coun- 
try’s credibility in the world body. 

The administration would also get a 
reorganization plan that generally fol- 
lows President Bill Clinton’s proposal, 
merging the Arms Control and Disarm- 
ament Agency and the United States 
Information Agency into the State De- 
partment, and giving the State Depart- 
ment increased control over the Agency 
for International Development, which 
runs foreign aid programs. 

Mr. Helms would get UN reforms and 
spending cuts that he has long sought, 
including a ban on major UN confer- 
ences in cities other than New York, 
Geneva, Rome and Vienna — that is, no 
more UN-funded extravaganzas in 
Cairo, Beijing, Istanbul or other capitals 
where the United Nations does not 
already have an established operation. 

Mr. Helms would also get a State 
Department reorganization plan that he 
proposed and fought for in Mr. Clinton's 
first term, while the White House was 
opposing it. The plan now supported by 
Mr. Clinton generally follows the lines 
of Mr. Helms’s proposal from the pre- 
vious Congress, a reflection of a de- 
cision by Mr. Clinton and Mrs. Albright 
to court Mr. Helms this time around. 

In addition. Mr. Helms and Mr. Biden 
would go far toward achieving their goal 
of re-establishing the importance of the 
Foreign Relations Committee. For years, 
the committee and its House counterpart 
have failed to produce a State Depart- 
ment budget authorization bill, leaving 
the Appropriations Committee to set for- 
eign policy spending levels. 

According to Mr. Biden, key appro- 
priators have agreed this year nor to 
move on a spending bill until the au- 
thorization bill has been approved. 


Continued from Page 1 

some 500,000 Rwandan Tutsi civilians. 
Rwandan Tutsi guerrillas then attacked, 
in part from bases in Uganda, and ousted 
the Hutu from power. The radical Hutu 
fled into what was then Zaire, bringing 
with them 1 milli on refugees. 

Their goal was very similar to that of 
the Tutsi who ousted them: to use an- 
other country, in this case Zaire, as a base 
from where they could train and one day 
return victorious to Rwanda. Last year, 
the Hutu began launching an increasing 
number of attacks into Rwanda, from 
bases in the refugee camps of Zaire. 

In October, soldiers and officers of the 
Tutsi-dominated Rwandan Array, after 
training for about a year with other pro- 
Kabila forces in the Rwandan jungle, 
entered Zaire along with the other 
forces, including Zairian Tutsi, to crush 
the Hutu security threat. 

With Mr. Kabila at its head, the move- 
ment declared it was out to unseat Mar- 
shal Mobutu. But United Nations of- 
ficials and Congolese officers in' Mr. 
Kabila's army say its highest priorities 
— which have remained prominent — 
were to remove the Hutu from the border 
with Rwanda and to crush the radical 
Hutu movement by killing as many 
refugees as possible. 

In interviews, soldiers fighting for 
Mr. Kabila indicated that the massacres 
were ordered by the Rwandan Army 
officers who dominated Mr. Kabila's 
officer corps. 

In Mbandaka, for example, soldiers 
said the order to slaughter unarmed 
refugees came from two brigade col- 
onels, both identified as Rwandans. A 
Congoloese officer. General Gaston 
Muyango, has the title of military com- 
mander in the area but has no real power, 
they said. 

in some places, like Kasese, the pop- 
ulation was involved in the killing. In 
others, like Mbandaka, on the banks of 
the Congo River far from the battlefields 
of the east, the local population said it 
was shocked by the mayhem. 

Mr. Kabila and his officials have 
denied that their troops carried out mas- 
sacres and summary executions of the 
Rwandan refugees. In interviews, sev- 
eral members of Mr. KabiJa's rebel al- 
liance blamed the bloodshed on bandits, 
armed units among the Rwandan 
refugees or fleeing soldiers who were 
loyal to Marshal Mobutu. 

"Look, if we had wanted to kill ail the 
refugees, why are we letting these 
people go home?" said Kalin da Kin- 
anuka. an official of the new Interior 
Ministry in Congo, as he watched a 
group of refugees board a UN plane to 
Kigali, Rwanda, from Mbandaka on Sat- 
urday. "We are professionals. If we had 
wanted to kill them, we would have 
killed them." 

On Saturday, after meeting with Bill 
Richardson, the chief U.S. delegate to 
the United Nations, Mr. Kabila agreed to 
cooperate with a UN investigation into 
reported massacres and other human 
rights abuses. 

But the first team is due in the Congo 
in two weeks and the investigation is 


HONGKONG: 

Leaders to Attend 

Continued from Page 1 

Movement in China, which grew out of 
protests against Beijing's crackdown on 
the 1989 student-led democracy move- 
ment, denounced the refusal of its re- 
quest to hold a rally in Victoria Park, The 
alliance's chairman, Szeto Wah, said he 
was disappointed but that his group had 
expected obstacles. “It’s a kind of polit- 
ical vetting," Mr. Szeto said. 

The Democratic Party has also been 
blocked in an attempt to stage a down- 
town rally in Statue Square on the hand- 
over night. A city council board ap- 
proved a celebration by a pro-China 
group there instead. 

Hong Kong is readying fora two-day 
extravaganza of fireworks, feasting and 
farewells to mark the handover, to be 
attended by over 4,000 foreign dignit- 
aries. 

Opinion polls have shown the mood 
among the wealthy and vibrant com- 
munity of 6.4 million people to be gen- 
erally positive toward the handover, but 
the installation of the provisional leg- 
islature and plans to roll back key civil 
liberties have hurt the popularity of Hong 
Kong's leader-in-waiting, Tung Chee- 
hwa. (Reuters. AP. AFP) 


scheduled to begin July 6. Already, Mr. 
Kabila's forces appear to be destroying 
evidence of their attack here. 

On Monday, this reporter saw more 
than 40 men moving through the Kasese 
camp, picking up spent cartridges and 
dropped machetes and spears. Two of 
the men said the team would later go to 
the mass grave site and begin burning 
cadavers. 

Piles of firewood had been collected 
on a dirt road that leads to the grave site. 
This reporter went to the site but was 
chased away by several soldiers and a 
small group of men clutching panga 
knives. A similar cleanup operation 
already has been reported at the Biaro 
refugee camp 10 miles away. 

The Kasese camp is sandwiched be- 
tween two villages on a road 17 miles 
south of Kisangani, a diamond and gold 
mining city in central Congo. Today the 
refugee camp looks like a huge, ravaged 
picnic ground. 

One witness to events there, Patricia 
Ndizeye, 20, is a Hutu who was a refugee 
in the camp since it was formed in 
March. 

A student who hopes one day to be- 
come a nun. Miss Ndizeye hid in a bush 
while the soldiers and the villagers 
worked their way through the camp. 
Thousands among the camp's popula- 
tion fled into the thick jungle. Hundreds 
could not move. 

She spent the night in the woods near 
the camp and the next morning awoke, 
she said, to the sound of a bulldozer 
pushing a mound of corpses into a piL 

Amid the corpses — but still alive — 
was her brother, Donatien Nkerabahizi, 
32, also a student. Marauding villagers 
had sliced open his head in five places, 
almost severed his right arm and cut 
holes in his left leg. He had been left for 
dead and collected with the other bodies. 
He is now at a UN infirmary. 

Mr. Nkerabahizi described the pile of 
corpses as approximately 5 feet high, 40 
feet long and 20 feet wide. He said he lay 


near the bottom of the pile, at the back 
toward the woods. 

Under intense international pressure, 
Mr. Kabila agreed on April 28 to allow 
UN aid officials to visit the area. UN 
officials and two soldiers from Mr. Kab- 
ila's army who said they were disgusted 
with the Rwandan leadership asserted 
that large-scale killing of refugees oc- 
curred also in the Biaro camp. 

A few weeks later another massacre, of 
a different sort, is said to have occurred in 
Mbandaka, a steamy town that straddles 
the Equator in Congo’s far west 

On May 13, about 280 refugees had 
assembled on a barge at the port and 
were waiting for a tugboat to move them 
down the Congo River so they could 
cross to safety. The ship’s captain, 
however, had gone into town. 

A wizened longshoreman described 
the scene he saw, looking out of a ware- 
house. 

“The array came onto the docks and 
started spraying the port with bullets," 
he said recently as he stood by die water 
and angled for catfish. "All of the sol- 
diers just loaded their guns and shot at 
the boat, killing everybody. Bodies fell 
into the river. Bodies fell onto the quay. 
Bodies fell into the barge. 

“I was in the warehouse and saw it 
alL" 

UN officials worry that thousands 
more refugees are alive in the Congo's 
dense jungles and risk extermination by 
Mr. Kabila's troops. 

A UN team found a group of 300 
people over the weekend in swamps two 
days by boat from Mbandaka. But the 
Congolese authorities denied the team 
permission to remove the refugees, UN 
officials said. 

The Congolese then told the UN team 
that the area would be closed because of 
military operations. 

"We are worried that we are being 
used by the military to identify where the 
refugees are," a UN official said. "The 
military will then go in and kill them." 


BRAZZAVILLE: Calls for Cease-Fire 


Continued from Page 1 

suburbs, and shops ransacked by looters. 
The death toll remained unclear. 

France, the former colonial power, 
said Wednesday its armed forces had 
evacuated 1,778 foreigners, two-thirds 
of them French nationals, to nearby Ga- 
bon by air since Monday. 

A government spokeswoman in Paris 
said France was sending 400 more 
troops to Brazzaville to help with a pos- 
sible evacuation of all its nationals. 

The government spokeswoman, 
Catherine Trautmann, said that Presi- 
dent Jacques Chirac wanted ‘‘the accent 
to be on security missions” and to “al- 
low the possible return of all the French 
who are there.” 

That, she said, "is why we have to 
increase the number of troops to 1,250' ’ 
from 850. 

A U.S. military plane flew out 30 
Americans and 1A other foreign res- 


idents Wednesday, although Washing- 
ton said it had not yet decided whether 
remaining Americans needed rescue. 

The Pentagon spokesman, Ken Ba- 
con, said Tuesday there were believed to 
be some 60 Americans in Brazzaville, 
including about 15 workers at the em- 
bassy, which remained open despite the 
fighting. 

Mr. Ussouba’s cease-fire announce- 
ment followed a meeting Tuesday with 
Mr. Kolelas, whose own militia were at 
the heart of similar fighting that killed at 
least 2,000 people in 1993 and early 
1994, but who has kept out of the latest 
fighting. 

Mr. Lissouba also apologized to the 
people of neighboring Congo for the 
sheLj fixed from Brazzaville that landed 
in Ki n s h asa on Monday, and pro mis ed 
compensation for any damage. 

He promised to restore good relations 
with his neighbor as soon as possible. 

(Reuters. AP) 


Struggle for Control 

Continued from Page 1 

European official said. “The big danger 
is, it creates a lot of fog over respon- 
sibility. Europe will be blamed for all the 
mess that is created by national politi- , 
cians.” 

Regardless of whether a compromise 
can be struck in time for the Amsterdam 
meeting, Paris and Bonn are likely to 
continue to struggle over care aspects of 
monetary union, particularly whetber'to 
interpret the Maastricht criteria flexibly 
when choosing single-currency partic- 
ipants next spring and whether to curtail 
the independence of the future European 
central bank. 

The French finance minister, Domi- 
nique Strauss- Kahn, indicated as much 
at an EU meeting this week, when he 
reiterated French demands for a political 
counterpart to the central bank and 
called for a "fair" level of the euro 
against the dollar. 

While the German finance minister, 
Theo Waigel, has acknowledged the , 
need for a ministerial council to discuss * 
die interplay of fiscal and monetary . 
policy, just as he does in meetings with 
the Bundesbank, Bonn regards the 
French call for a soft euro as evidence of 
a hidden agenda for political influence 
that would threaten the currency’s sta- 
bility. 

"The basic issues about policy are not 
resolved," a top European official said. 

While both countries are confronted 
with remarkably similar and daunting 
problems — sluggish growth, reconi 
double-digit unemployment and seem- 
ingly uncontainable deficits — they pro- 
pose significantly different remedies. 
This is a product of contrasting cultural 
traditions that have only been exacer- 
bated by the recent events. 

France’s traditional reliance on gov- 
ernment intervention to guide die country 
through economic change has been re- 
inforced by the election of a Socialist 
government led by Mr. Jospin, who prom- 
ised to put employment issues ahead of 
the austerity demanded by the Maastricht 
formula for a single currency. 

In Bonn, meanwhile, the government 
of Chancellor Helmut Kohl is deter- 
mined to stick to the Maastricht criteria, 
seeing them as vital both to reassuring 
German voters about the stability of the 
future euro and to pushing through the 
labor and tax reforms essential to the 
country's competitiveness. 

If anything, Mr. Kohl and Mr. Waigd 
find themselves even more bound to 
economic orthodoxy after their humi- 
liating retreat from a plan to revalue 
Germany's gold reserves, which dam- 
aged their reputations for economic re- 
sponsibility. 

The nations' cultural differences have 
clashed ever since the ink dried on the 
Maastricht treaty in 1992. Frustration at 
what France regards as its imbalance — 
with German-inspired rules codified for 
low deficits and inflation while plans for 
broader economic management were 
left vague — are at the heart of today's 
dispute. 


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GOOD LUCK PROM THE BOSS — Yasser Arafat d . 

Wednesday at a secondary school in Ram^Jah W«?lS!i? S SJ“ n « ^hing a student good luck 
' auan ’ west Bank. Some 35,000 students were firing final* 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 


PACE 5 


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ASIA/ PACIFIC 


Muscle Flexing in Pacific 

China and Taiwan Plan Military Maneuvers 



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EUROPE: 

Struggle j„ r 


BEIJING — China and Taiwan both may 
stage military exercises this month, moves that 
.-could raise tensions in the area on theeveof the 
-.handover of Hong Kong to Chinese control. 

' Taiwan has already announced major mil- 
•itary exercises for June 23-24, and an in- 
■i dependent Hong Kong newspaper has said 
...China is planning to respond with military 
--exercises sometime this month. 

if both governments go ahead with their 
_ plans, if would recall the March 1 996 Taiwan 
~ Snait crisis, when Beijing shook the region by 
i holding massive exercises and testing mis- 
viriles just off Taiwan's coast Those maneu- 
vers were seen as an attempt by China to 
» intimidate voters in Taiwan's presidential 
...election. At that time, the United States dis- 
-paiched 1 6 warships to the area as a gesture of 
i support for Taiwan. 

it remains unclear, however, what Beijmg 
-ns planning this time. Hong Kong’s Sing Tao 
■Daily said Tuesday that the exercises would 
is be beld on the southeastern Fujian coast but 
tgave few specifics. China’s Foreign Ministry 
./.did not provide details at its regular briefing. 

"As of now, we have not noticed signs of 
\ Communist troops planning to hold large- 
scale exercises,” Taiwan’s Defense Ministry 
spokesman, Kong Fan-ting, said in Taipei. 
-"Large-scale exercises usually require time to 
prepare. 


If China does stage exercises, said David 
Shambaugh, head of the East Asia studies 
center at George Washington University, ”1 
would guess it would be a very small version 
of last year, minus the ballistic missiles. It 
would be just big enough for the Chinese to 
make their point. ' ' 

Beijing’s point is that the self-governing 
island of Taiwan is a renegade province that 
should be reunified with China. Until then, 
Beijing wants Taiwan's leaders to stop inch- 
ing toward independence, lest they provoke 
China to attempt reunification by force. For 
now, however. Beijing probably just wants to 
warn Taiwan against any disruptions of the 
July 1 Hong Kong handover. 

Taiwan, by contrast, has military goals as 
well as political ones in scheduling its ex- 
ercises now. This round of exercises already 
has been postponed at least twice and will be 
Taiwan's first round of military drills since 
last year's missile crisis. Taiwan's exercises 
may showcase - new high-technology 
weapons, including F-16 and Mirage 2000-5 
fighters recently imported from die United 
States and France. Also slated for testing arc 
radar-evading Lafayette-class frigates bought 
from France and U.S.-made Patriot air de- 
fense systems, Taiwan media have said. 

If China's exercises proceed, they may also 
display new military equipment Russian- 
buut Sn-27 fighters have started arriving, and 
China expects to have 72 by the end of the 
year. 


* Olltllliji 


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J -i’ 1 


House Faults Jakarta on Rights 

-rights abuses.” 

Ir. Kennedy also sent a 


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m, WASHINGTON — The 
iRouse of Representatives has 
unanimously approved an 
.amendment condemning hu- 
■ i man-rights abuses committed 
, by Indonesia in the former 
•rFortuguese colony of East 
,,-Timor. 

* j. “Ihis will send a strong 
: . V ' 4 nd clear message to the In- 
donesian government that 

. 7 Congress will not tolerate the 
continued human-rights ab- 
- -irises of the people of East 
. * Jimor,” said Representative 
^Patrick Kennedy, Democrat 
df Rhode Island, who intro- 
duced the amendment to the 

• , t Foreign Policy Reform Act. 

Mr. Kennedy said Tues- 
, day’s unanimous vote would 
. serve as a launching point 
f - for further action against In- 

. d ones ' a -" 

K Mr. Kennedy also intro- 


duced a bill calling for the 
elimination of military assist- 
ance and training funds to In- 
donesia unless human-rights 
violations are halted, which 
may come to the House floor 
for a vote later this month. 

Indonesia hit out at the 
Kennedy legislation on Fri- 
day, dropping its participa- 
tion in an American military 
training program and the 
scheduled purchase of nine 
U.S.-made F-16 warplanes. 

The foreign minister of In- 
donesia, Ah Alatas, said at a 
news conference that Mr. 
Kennedy’s criticism was 
“wholly unjustified. * ’ 

“It was clear they were 
feeling defensive,” Mr. 
Kennedy told the House. 
“Tliey wanted to get the 
planes out of the way before 
this Congress expressed its 
strong opinion on their hu- 



L.f< IlllJIlN"!! 

The commander in chief of Taiwan's navy, Wu Shih-wen, inspecting troops in preparation for maneuvers. 


BRIEFLY 


man-i 

Mr. 

letter to President Suharto of 
Indonesia, requesting a meet- 
ing to “discuss my concerns 
regarding the situation in East 
Timor and in Indonesia. ' ' 

Jakarta has come underfire 
from some U.S. senators and 
congressmen, particularly 
over its human-rights record 
and East Timor, the former 
Portuguese colony that In- 
donesia occupied in 1975 and 
annexed the following year. 

Washington barred In- 
donesia from taking part in a 
military training program be- 
tween 1992 and 1995 after 
security forces fired into 
demonstrating mourners in 
the East Timor capital of Dili 
in 1991. Witnesses said up to 
200 people died. The program 
allows senior officers to be 
trained in the United States. 


Khmer Rouge Security Chief 
Accused by Group of Treason 

PHNOM PENH — The Khmer Rouge security chief who 
oversaw the torture and execution of thousands of Cam- 
bodians during the group’s four-year rule was accused of 
treason on Wednesday by other members of the group. 

The charge against Son Sen. who was defense minister in 
the Khmer Rouge government in 1 975-79. was made in a 
radio broadcast by Khieu Samphan, the spokesman for the 
Marxist guerrilla group. 

Mr. Son Sen was accused of working for the second prime 
minister, Hun Sen, in trying to eliminate the remaining hard- 
liners in the group. 

The accusations show a further split in the dwindling 
ranks of the Khmer Rouge. {AP) 

India Denies Deploying Missiles 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister I. FC Gujral denied 
Wednesday that India bad deployed ballistic missiles and 
condemned news reports of a deployment along the border 
with Pakistan as “a deliberate misrepresentation.” 

Citing U.S. intelligence officials, the Washington Post 
reported last week that India had moved fewer than a dozen 
medium-range missiles called Prithvis to a site in northwest 
India within about 60 miles (100 kilometers) of Pakistan’s 
border. 

An Indian daily, the Hindn, reported Monday that Prithvi 
missiles had been stored but not deployed near Jalandhar 
city in the Punjab Province, the same location identified in 
the Post. (WP) 


Taleban Loses More Ground 

KABUL — Opposition forces reported seizing a northern 
stronghold Wednesday from Taleban soldiers, who fled 
after being caught in a three-pronged assault. 

It was the latest defeat for the Taleban army, which only 
three weeks ago had taken control of 90 percent of Al- 
ghanistan. The Taleban was driven from Pul-e-Khumri. 145 
kilometers (90 miles) north of Che Afghan capital. Kabul, 
after a day of fierce fighting, an opposition >pokesman said. 
The anti-Taleban offensive included forces loyal to Ahmed 
Shah Massoud, the ousted military chief, as well as I^maili 
Muslim troops and Uzbek forces. fAPi 

Suharto Makes Cabinet Change 

JAKARTA — President Suharto made a rare change to 
his cabinet Wednesday, formally installing a former army 
chief-of-staff as the new information minister. 

General Hartono. who jusi retired from the military * 
replaces Harmoko, who was given a new post of minister for 
special affairs. Apparently impressed by Mr. Hamioko’s 
political skills. President Suharto has ordered him to help 
members of Parliament do their jobs bener. (API 

Sri Lanka Rebels Claim Vi ctory 

COLOMBO — Rebels claimed a victory Wednesday 
against government troops in the most serious fighting 
between the two sides in months. They said they snuck 
behind government lines and clashed with troops. More 
than 270 were said to have died in the fighting on Tues- 
day. (APi 


Philippine 
Opposition 
Merges for 
Next Vote 


/Vu 1 .liui iutrj Pres* 

MANILA — Three Phil- 
ippine opposition parties an- 
nounced Wednesday that 
they were merging to chal- 
lenge the governing party of 
President Fide! Ramos in the 
presidential elections next 
year. 

The parties said they 
planned to complete their 
merger in August and woujd 
hold a convention in six 
months to choose their can- 
didate for the election. 

“One thing is sure, if we 
did not unite we could not 
win,” said the president of 
the Senate, Ernesto Maceda. 
who brokered the merger 
talks. “By uniting, we can 
win. and we will win.” 

Mr. Ramos narrowly won 
the seven-wav presidential 
contest in 1992. On Tuesday, 
the Supreme Court stopped a 
move by supporters of Mr. 
Ramos to change the consti- 
tution to allow him to serve a 
second term. 

The new political group, 
called the Struggle of the Na- 
tionalist Filipino Masses, will 
include the country's largest 
opposition party and iw^ 
smaller groups. 

The leaders of two of the 
panics. Vice President Joseph 
Estrada and Senator Edgardo 
Angara, have said they plan to 
seek the presidential nomina- 
tion. Both promised to abide 
by the results of the group's 
convention. 

The merger “is an irrevoc- 
able and unconditional com- 
mitment to Philippine democ- 
racy,” the parties said in a 
statement. 

The parties that will merge 
are the Fight of Democratic 
Filipinos of Mr. Angara, the 
Party' of the Filipino Masses 
of Mr. Estrada and the Na- 
tionalist People's Coalition of 
Mr. Maceda. 

At least three members of 
the governing National Union 
of Christian Democrats Party 
are also expected to seek ihe 
presidency. 


; l— 

it; . 

- ‘.t . 





PACK 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Arab Ally Has Advice for U.S. 

Qatar Leader Says Policy on Iran and Iraq Fails 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

WashiHgum Post Service 


WASHINGTON — Coming from one of 
America’s best friends in the Arab world, the 
message that President Bill Clinton can ex- 
pect to hear from the ruler of Qatar might have 
special resonance: Your policies toward Iran 
and Iraq haven’t worked, and it's time to try 
something else. 

Sheikh Hamad ibn Khalifa al Thani. who 
deposed his father as Qatar’s chief two years 
ago, said in an interview that although he was 
committed to good relations with Washing- 
ton, he could not eadorse the U.S. strategy of 
“dual containment'' of Qatar’s two powerful 
Gulf neighbors. 

“With Iran, you have no more excuses,’ 'be 
said. “The new president. Mohammed 
Khatami, I think he is not from the extremists. 
I believe that communication with Iran is 
better for the United States and better for the 
area. Iran is a major country; you tried block- 
ing Iran economically, but you couldn't make 
it’’ 

Mr. Khatami, elected in a surprising land- 
slide May 23, is widely viewed as more liberal 
on social issues than other prominent Iranian 
Figures. But he has given no indication be is 
prepared to seek an accommodation with the 
United States. 

As for Iraq, Sheikh Hamad said, “I think 


the Iraqi people have suffered enough” from 
economic sanctions imposed by the UN Se- 
curity Council alter Iraq invaded Kuwait in 
1990. He stopped short of saying sanctions 
should be lifted, but he did say, “The regime 
of President Saddam Hussein is more strong 
than before, so America should find a way.” 

Many in the Middle East agree, but few get 
to express themselves directly to Mr. Clinton 
at the White House, as die Qatari ruler was 
doing Wednesday. His country is in high 
favor with U.S. policymakers for several rea- 
sons, including its support for peace with 
Israel. 

Sheikh Hamad, 48, said he did not come to 
the United States primarily to express his 
views on Gulf security matters, but he did plan 
to share those with the president. The main 
purpose of his trip, he said, was lo promote a 
November regional economic summit con- 
ference in his country's capital, Doha, the 
fourth such conference aimed at fostering 
Arab- Israeli economic ties. 

"There is a lot of pressure on us, but we 
committed ourselves a long time ago" to host 
this year’s conference, the Qatari leader said. 
“What is happening now is not encouraging,” 
he said, and it would be easy for his country to 
pull back on contacts with the Jewish state. 

“Nobody would blame us,” he said, “but 
we support the peace. We are a peaceful coun- 
try, and we want to see peace in the area.” 



Toaflra BtackwavJ/Apnx Fnn<P*t*< 

CAMPAIGN FINANCING — A Kiri pi a tribesman in Mount Hagen, Papua New 
Guinea, showing his donation Wednesday to a candidate in elections Saturday. 



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ERICSSON 


Intra-Kurdish Battle Reported 


ANKARA — Iraqi Kurds allied with Turkey are 
fi ghting separatist Turkish Kurds near the Iranian border 
in northern Iraq, an Iraqi opposition group said Wed- 
nesday. . 

“There was heavy fighting near HajKxnran. close to 


Baker in Western Sahara Talks 


LONDON — James Baker, the former U.S. secretary 
of state, began a round of talks Wednesday to try to 
resolve a 22-year-old dispute over the Western Sahara in 
North Africa. 

Morocco has controlled the arid, phosphate-rich West- 
ern Sahara since 1975, but a rebel group known as the 
Polisario Front wants independence for the indigenous 
people, the Sahrawis. 


Mr. Baker, who was appointed by Secretary -General 
>fi Annan of the Unired Nations in March as a special 


Kofi Annan of the Unired Nations in March as a special 
envoy, was scheduled to meet with all parties during two 
days of private meetings. (API 


Canada Finance Team Rehired 


OTTAWA — Prime Minister Jean Chretien, whose 
Liberal government was re-elected last week with a 
reduced majority, shuffled his cabinet Wednesday but 
maintain ed his highly regarded economic team. 

Mr. Chretien reappointed Paul Martin, who as finance 
minister won praise for slashing the budget deficit in the 
Liberals’ first term. His reappointment had been en- 
thusiastically sought by the financial markets. (Reuters) 


Election Violence in Mexico 


OAXACA, Mexico — Two trucks carrying leftists and 
their supporters were shot at in the southern state of Oaxaca 
in a sign of mounting tension as die July congressional 
elections draw near, a leftist opposition leader said. 

Saul Vicente, head of the Democratic Revolution Party 
in Oaxaca, said Tuesday that the attack, which took place 
Monday, had been carried out by agents of the governing 
Institutional Revolutionary Party in San Agustin 
Chayuco, 200 kilometers southeast of here. The attackers 
fired at the trucks, then beat up a party leader who was one . 
of the passengers, he said. ( Reuters ) 


An ISLAND (?) 
in the middle of 
Western Europe? 


Are you looking for twt already bugt-out, personal, family 
• and/or corporate “Home-Base* located m the heart 
of Western Europe? 

Wodd the kSerri (for you) be a country-estate property 
which combines the ultimate In OkS World Charm 
with the ultimate In New World functionality, 
cntenllles end infrastructure? 

What would describe The ideaT. for you? 

Would It be located within o one hour's drive from Bonn. 
Antwerp. Basses and Luxembourg?... 

Would It be located within a three hours's drive from 
Frankfurt. Amsterdam. Calais. Paris and Euro-Disney" 7 

Would the principal “Old World Feerivres" of I he property 
include a completely restored 37 room Chateau 
and an 18 room Pavilion de Chasse (both with 
indoor, heated, marble swimming pools); Guest 
apartments located In a separate building, a 200 
year old Manicured Pork, private deer habitat. 
worid-ctass Indoor and outdoor tennis courts, and 
your own 9 hole/ 1700 yard gott course, plus fully 
equipped gymnasium, formal outdoor 
entertainment poviKon. croquet court, and gardens; 
ponds, fountains, topiary hedges, hand-laid 
masonry drives and pathways etc Office facilities 
and access discreetly separated from residential 
spoces and facilities? 

Would the principal ‘New World Features’ include. Itte 
ultimate in functionality, amenities, and hl-fech 
Infrastructure such os: dual (llOv and 220v) 
electrical power supply systems. Fiber Optic cables 
and intro-property TV cable and digital telephone 
systems connecting (underground) the Chateau. 
Pav«on de Chasse. Office complex, and the guest 
apartments which grace the property; A "super- 
quiet*. superbly engineered. Chateau Air 
Purification system (down to I micron level). Air- 
Control. Conditioning and Humidification systems; 
Mufti-zone sound systems, saunas, steam showers, ta- 
the-floor hot water heating, high pressure water 
systems; Chateau and apartment building elevators. 
Helicopter pod and hangar (heated); A property 
perimeter that Is fenced, gated, and etectronicaty 
secured, etc.? 

Would there be an efficient, motivated, and rmitfflnguai 
(French. German. & Entfsh) staff already In place. 
who are already trained and experienced in all 
aspects of maintaining and operating the property? 


Although this property is not gn island with water around 
It. - It is a 65 acre island at security, privacy, charm. 
ft*id#onaBy. end kaury, - located In the very heart 
of Western Europe - with already developed and 
operational amenities, intrastructure, and 
sxporiencod staff - capable of supporting a quaity 
of life ond a standard of living, - rarely found 
anywhere. 

The owner is re-locating to Asia, and is anxious to sen. 
Seffing Price is substantially below bad i replacement 
cost and owners investment to date. Price, 
brochure, and video are available. Agents and 
prospective purchasers are Invited to contact 
owner via 


Fax at 1 -345-945-5369. 


(Requests tor connctentiafrty vriB be respected) 


vender’ I 


iff* 


1 !* ,4 ‘ 


r. fjtf‘ 


The reported fighting is between the Kurdistan Demo- 
cratic Party, an Iraqi Kurdish faction allied with Ankara, 
and the Kurdistan Workers Party, which has been waging 
a separatist war against Turkey. 

But a Kurdistan Democratic Party official in Ankara 


L/UV a DUIUIOSUU • wrnmmj V mmm ruUk(U4 

denied there was heavy fighting in the area. The pity, led 
by Massoud Barzani. has been cooperating with Ankara 


since Turkish troops poured into northern Iraq on May 14 
to wipe out Workers Party bases. (AFP) 


Jim 


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INTERNATIONAL HERAL D TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 

EUROPE 






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^ 6 Boy Wonder’ Emerges 
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H To Lewd Traumatized Conservatives 


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By Warren Hoge 

Nne York Tones Senice 

LONDON — William Hague, the 
yo ungest and least experienced iw mh ^ 
of former Prime Minister John Major’s 
cabinet, emerged Wednesday in an in- 
creasingly divisive selection process as 
the surprise favorite in the race for new 
leader of the Conservative Party. 

. Six weeks after their drubbing by . the 
Labour Party and an announcement 

from Mr. Major that he would step down 
as leader, the Tories were searching to 


Bat after a preliminary round of bal- 
lodng Tuesday and some backroom 
deal-making that evening, they found 
themselves even more divided than on 
the May 1 election day. 

; it is up to die 164 Conservative mem- 
bers of Parliament to choose die new 
leader, and in the first canvas Tuesday, 
involving five candidates, the actual 
winner was Kenneth Clarke, 56, the 
farmer chancellor of the Exchequer, 
with 49 votes. 

Mr. Hague, 36, showing unexpected 
strength, came in second with 41. Fol- 
lowing were John Redwood, an earlier 
member of Mr. Major’s cabinet who on- 
successfhlly challenged him for the lead- 
ership in 1995, with 27 votes; Peter Lil- 
ley, the former Social Security Secretary, 
who had 24 vexes, and Michael Howard, 
the former Home Secretary, with 23. 

. The final three are all identified with 
the right wing of the party that has made 
hostility to farther integration with 
Europe its battle cry and has sworn to 
block the bid of Mr. Clarke, whose 
insistence on keeping Britain in the ne- 
gotiations for monetary onion has been 
blamed by the dissidents for having 


damaged the party’s chances in the elec- 
tion. The three men had an understand- 
ing among them that the one of their 
number who finished best could count 
on the other two stepping aside and 
throwing their support to the fim 
No one expected that person to be Mr. 
Redwood, but it was be who stepped 
before the cameras with a fresh jaunti- 
ness in his stride and predicted with 
confidence that be would be tbe right's 
representative in next week’s second 
found against their nemesis, Mr. Clarke. 
By Mr. Redwood’8 reckoning, be bad 
fallen heir to 74 votes, wily 9 shy of the 
83 needed to win, and in tire week to 
come he expected to get the support of 
Baroness Thatcher, whom be b«H 
served as policy unit head in the mid 
1980s and who has said a new Con- 
servative leader should stand np force- 
fully to Europe . 

But in a move that shnefrftH and out- 
raged Mr. Redwood’s supporters, Mr. 
Lilley and Mr. Howard got together and 
decided to throw their hacking instead to 
Mr. Hague. While tbe camps of the two 
men acknowledged that Mr. Hague’s 
views on Europe were not as defined as 
they would like, they said they acted in 
the belief that Mr. Redwood was ul- 
timately unelectable. Fiercely intelligent, 
earnest and lacking in outward personal 
warmth, Mr. Redwood is often refared 
to in die British press as tiie interplanetary 
figure “Vulcan.” 

The move effectively made Mr. Hag- 
ue tbe odds-on favorite to win because 
of a feeling that support for Mr. Clarke, 
a man who arouses strong emotions in 
the party, had peaked and that ideo- 
logical opposition to him was wide- 
spread enough to deny him significant 
numbers of new supporters. 


An ISLAND 5?) 
in the middle of i 
Western Europe? : 

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Turkish Military Fears 
Islamic ‘Civil Uprising’ 



Ci’inpfM by Our Staff From Dapoxha 

ANKARA — The Turkish military 
said Wednesday that Is lami c radicalism 
was poised to break out in a civil up- 
rising, and the army said it would be 
legally obliged to resist such an uprising 
— by force if necessary. 

; “Radical Islamic activities have 
coined momentum toward civil upris- 
ing,” General Fevzi Turkeri said at a 
briefing at miliiaiy headquarters here. 

“Seme 30 radical Islamic groups are 
likely to engage in terrorist activities,” 
said General Turkeri, chief of tbe coun- 
terinteffigence department of the gen- 
eral staff 

Tbe Turkish military, which considers 
itself tiie guardian of the country's sec- 
ular and Western traditions, has begun a 
senes of discussions with judges, aca- 
demic and business figures, diplomats 
and journalists on what military leaders 
say is the threat of radical Islam. 


In Policy Shift, 
U.S. Supports 
Loan to Croatia 


By Steven Lee Myers 

. New York Times Service 

■WASHINGTON — The United 
States has announced its support for a 
SI 3 million loan for a redevelopment 
project in Croatia, barely a week after 
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright 
threatened to isolate Croatia econom- 
ically for its failure to comply with the 
Bosnian peace accords. 

' In announcing its support Tuesday 
for the loan, the State Department poin- 
ted to what a spokesman called “pos- 
itive tilings” that President Fran jo Tud- 
jman of Croatia announced after Mrs. 
Albright’s visit 

; They included the reopening of a 
bridge to the Serbian-held part of Bos- 
nia and the arrests of several Croats for 
attacking Serbian refugees trying to re- 
tain to foeir homes in Croatia. 

■ With tiie U.S. assent, the loan was 
Approved Tuesday by International Fi- 
uanceCorp., a World Bank affiliate that 

encourages private companies to invest 

ih the developing world 
) Tbe loan is part of a $64 million 

project to modernize a cement factory in 
wramamo, Croatia, a spokeswoman 
« the corporation, Amy Conran, said. 
I The deaskm to support the loan was 
ffificaed by those who argued that the 
rafted States needed to do marie id puh- 
$h Croatia for foiling to keep its prom- 
ises under tiie Dayton peace accords, 
pftrtkaiJ y ly nfwarriiqg cooperation with 
titewir-ertmes tribunal in The Hague. 

J “ft’s very disturbing and s h oc k i n g in 
W Of Secnaafy Albright’s com- 
TWBi,” said Nina Bang-Jensen, special 
for the Coalition for Intema- 
fipnafJmrice^agroapin Washiflgfonthat 
«Jvoqaes a stronger effort .to prosecute 
Wjgerinrina b in tiie form er Yugoslavia. 
Wky do we keep rewarding than for 
should have done already?” 
IL^ttxftaifoLautenbeig, Democrat 
y Ifew Jersey, said be believed the 
violated the sprit ofalawrc- 
JphbigtiB United States to oppose loans 
“^ TOSto tiofl S to nations that did doe 
c °opttate with tbe war-crimes tribunal. 



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ilklifl Wlim«nv \iMruinllNr«a 

William Hague reading a morning newspaper with obvious pleasure Wednesday. 

Political Battle Looms as Yeltsin 
Seeks to Oust Defiant Governor 


Meanwhile, Deputy Prime Minister 
Tansu Ciller said Wednesday there 
would be a change of government with- 
in days to end a dispute that had brought 
the current Islamist-led coalition to the 
breaking point. 

“A change of government is expec- 
ted in the coining days.” Mrs. Ciller 
told deputies from her True Path Party. 

On June 1, Mrs. Ciller and the Is- 
lamist prime minister, Necmettin 
Erbakan, said they would seek early 
elections to overcome a growing dispate 
with the secular establishment over de- 
mands for a crackdown on religious 
activism. 

The two did not set a dale for elec- 
tions. which have to be approved by 
Parliament, but a senior member of Mr. 
Erbakan’s Welfare Party said Wednes- 
day that voting was expected to take 
place in October. 

Mr. Erbakan has said he would hand 
power to Mrs. Oiler ahead of the elec- 
tions. But talks between the coalition 
partners have become bogged down 
over die details of the swap, and this 
week they lost support from a far-right 
party for a caretaker government. 

The army wait on alert 11 months 
ago after a Muslim-led coalition gov- 
ernment took power, becoming modem 
Turkey’s first religious- based govern- 
ment and upsetting the secular estab- 
lishment with its Islamist policies. 

At tbe briefing Wednesday, General 
Turkeri quoted from tiie constitution 
and from a law that says the Turkish 
armed forces must protect the country 
from, domestic and foreign threats and 
take up aims if necessary to do so. 

“The Turkish armed feces is in a 
position to define a mission for itself 
under these circumstances,” General 
Turkeri said. 

As he spoke, images of the governing 
Welfare Party’s radical deputies who 
have targeted tbe country's secular and 
Weston reforms in their speeches were 
projected onto a screen, as were pictures 
of Welfare-backed rallies at which Is- 
lamic flags flew and of Islamic sect lead- 
ers who had dined with Mr. Erbakan. 

General Turkeri accused the govern- 
ment of trying to lay tbe groundwork for 
an Islamic regime. 

As proof, tiie military cites govern- 
ment defiance of its directives to curb 
Islamic radicalism, efforts to place rad- 
ical Muslims in key state posts and what 
tiie militar y calls tiie tolerance of Iran’s 
attempts to export its regime to Turkey. 

Genera! Turkeri said Iran, Libya, 
Saudi Arabia and Sudan woe providing 
financial and logistical support to rad- 
ical Islamic Turkish groups. He said 
these groups also worked in close co- 
operation with Kurdish rebels who are 


By Michael Specter 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — Setting the stage for a sharp 
political and constitutional battle, a spokesman for 
President Baris Yeltsin has revealed that the pres- 
ident plans to remove tbe rebellious — but ex- 
tremely powerful and independently elected — 
governor of one of Russia's largest regions from 
office. 

Mr. Yeltsin has never removed an elected leader, 
an action for which he could invoke a vague 
provision of the Russian Constitution that requires 
the president to protect the people of the country. 

He has long been at odds with Yevgeni 
Nozdratenko, governor of the immense Primorsky 
region in the Russian Far East, on the edge of 
northeast China. Primorsky has enormous mineral 
riches, vast tracts of virgin forest and, most im- 
portant, the essential port of Vladivostok, which 
serves as the eastern anchor of the country. 

Still, Mr. Yeltsin has not taken decisive action so 
for against Mr. Nazdratenko, an openly autocratic 
critic of his administration. But he may never 
before have had more provocation. 

“Every day the situation there deteriorates,” 
Igor Shabdarasulov, a spokesman for tbe Kremlin, 
said Tuesday at a briefing. ‘ ‘There are a number of 
conditions under which tiie president has the right 
to remove the governor from office.” 

Crime and corruption have come to rule Primor- 
sky. Millions of dollars’ worth of federal money 
meant as wages for teachers and miners have 
disappeared. Energy shortages have become nor- 
mal, and more than one person has died on an 
operating table this year because power shortages 
during routine surgery made it impossible for 
doctors to do their jobs. 

Wage arrears, bad throughout Russia, are worst 
in Primorsky. 

While action against Mr. Nazdratenko is certain 
to send a message to the leaders of other rebellious 
regions, the constitutional and legal implications of 
removing him are not dear. 

The constitution, created largely by Mr. Yeltsin, 
grants unusually broad power to tbe president and 
permits him to interpret his need to “protect tbe 
Russian Federation’ almost any way be wants. If 
Mr. Nazdratenko is forced from office, his only 
real recourse would be Russia’s Constitutional 
Court, which is stacked heavily in Mr. Yeltsin’s 
favor. In any case, the legality of the ouster would 
take years to resolve. 

The bold action would be not simply a move 


against Mr. Nazdratenko, but a statement from the 
Kremlin that it will not accept the continuing 
erosion of federal power. 

Ever since Mr. Yeltsin became Russia’s first 
independently elected president in 1991, the coun- 
try's vast regions have demanded — or simply 
taken — power from the center. Many governors 
deny local leaders their constitutional authority. 
Others refuse to pay taxes to Moscow unless their 
wages are paid on time. 

To some degree the fights are simply reflections 
of the new economics. When the Soviet Union fell 
apart, so did the elaborate system of subsidies and 
supports that propped up so many parts of the 
country. The battles over such powers are often 
convoluted, and it is often unclear who is right. 

“Clearly, Mr. Yeltsin wants to prove that he is 
running Russia,” said Nikolai Petrov, an expert on 
regional policy ai the Moscow Carnegie Center. 
“But it has also become clear that something has to 
be done there. This is an important test case for the 
whole country.” 

Mr. Yeltsin has already taken the first major 
step, shifting much of M. Nazdratenko's power — 
to receive money from Moscow, to pay federal 
workers and to set quotas for mining, the timber 
harvest and fishing — to the president’s personal 
representative. Viktor Kondratov. 

Mr. Nazdratenko has reacted with the flam- 
boyance and fury that arc his trademarks. He has 
offered to hold new elections, which he would 
surely win. The Kremlin has said no. 

Last week, officials in the Yeltsin administration 
said, Mr. Nazdratenko was asked to leave his post 
quietly. He made it clear that that was not going to 


• 'We are sick and tired of all the complaints from 
the center.” Mr. Nazdratenko said Tuesday after 
hearing that Boris Nemtsov, the other first deputy 
prime minister, planned to visit him on his way 
back from a trade mission in Tokyo. After that. Mr. 
Nemtsov will report to the president 

"All these years, the obstacles this government 
has put in front of me,” Mr. Nazdratenko said. 
“I’m sick of feeling their breath on my neck.” 

Despite his problems and those of the region. 
many people there support Mr. Nazdratenko. He 
has convinced them that no matter how bad things 
are, it is not his fault, but that of the hated central 
government 

It is an argument that people living nearly 
10,000 kilometers (6,000 miles) from Moscow 
have little nrobJem accepting. And it is for that 
reason that Mr. Yeltsin has waited so long to act 


Swiss Discover Lost Accounts 

Banks Locate Hundreds Belonging to Holocaust Victims 


* The mili tary has taken over Tmiey 
three times since 1960, and its qppb- 
sitioa to the current government has led 
to speculation about another possible 
mili tary intervention. (AP, Reuters) 


Raris Hans to Close Reactor 

The Associated Prea 

PARIS — The new Greens envir- 
onment minister, Dominique Voynet, 
pilfflg to shut down foe troobled Su- 
papbenix nuclear reactor and is waiting 
for Prime Minister Lionel Jospin’s 
policy speech June 19 before setting fee 
date, a spokeswoman said Wednesday. 

The Socialist Party supports closing 
the 25 billion franc ($43 billion) plant, 
which is plagued by' potentially flam- 
mable leaks. 


By David E. Sanger 

Nfw 1 font Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Faced 
with the start of formal audits of 
their wartime accounts, Switzer- 
land's banks have quietly toki in- 
vestigators that they recently dis- 
covered hundreds of accounts that 
nay have belonged to Holocaust 
victims and thousands more that 
they cannot account for. 

The disclosures were made 
last week in Jerusalem and Bern 
to a commission headed by Paul 
Volcker, the former chairman of 
the Federal Reserve. 

Next week, after months of 
preparations and long delays, the 
commission will begin a series of 
“plot audits” of accounts 
opened between 1933 and 1945, 
to determine how many contain 
deposits placed in Switzerland 
by Jews and others to prevent 
their money from foiling into the 
hands of tbs Nazis. 

Two years ago, the Swiss 
banks said that they had found 
775 such accounts, containing 
roughly $32 million. That an- 
nouncement raised a number of 
questions, because Switzer- 
land’s bankers had previously 
insisted that they had turned over 
tbe last of their unclaimed war- 
time deposits in 1962. 

Now, the number of accounts 
appears much larger. According 
to people familiar with the meet- 
ings between- the bankers and 
Mr. Volcker’s commission, tbe 
batiks say they have found more 
than 1,000 accounts, totaling 
roughly $40 million, that were 
opened in the nam es of non- 
Swiss during foe wartime era. 
Tins means they have found at 


least 225 more accounts, worth 
roughly $8 milli on. The discov- 
ery, they told investigators, came 
from banks font had not com- 
pleted fill] surveys of accounts. 

In another surprise, tbe Swiss 
now say there are an additional 
15,000 to 20,000 dormant ac- 
counts that were opened by 
Swiss nationals during the war 
years. In a statement issued in 
response to questions, foe Swiss 
Bankers Association said Tues- 
day night that tbe amounts con- 
tained in those accounts were 
small, but it promised that “foe 
Volcker committee will fully ex- 
amine whether dormant ac- 
counts opened by Swiss citizens 
prior to 1 945 were opened for foe 

benefit of Holocaust victims.” 

“We know that a lot of people 
feared that they would be tor- 
tured to sign a power of attorney 
turning their assets over to foe 
Goman government,” one in- 
vestigator said. “But tracing ac- 
counts opened by third parties 
will not be easy.” 


Last month die Clinton admin- 
istration issued the first compre- \ 
hensive report to examine Swit- 
zerland’s dealings with Nazi 
Germany. 

That report, however, only 1 
touched on how foe Swiss banks 
handled foe assets of Jews and , 
other Holocaust victims. The 
Volcker commission is focusing 
exclusively on that issue. 

Tbe commission was set up 
last year as an independent in- 
vestigating body by the Swiss 
banks, in cooperation with the 
World Jewish Congress and the 
World Jewish Restitution Orga- 
nization. 

Representatives of foe Swiss 
banks insisted that the new dis- 
coveries showed that the banks 
were serious about opening their 
books and coming to terms with 
their history. 

But the disclosure is bound to 
raise new questions about wheth- 
er the banks sought to hide foe 
accounts to avoid paying back the 
heirs of tiie Holocaust victims. 


Despite Opposition, Greece Adopts 
EU Agreement on Open Borders 


Reuters 

ATHENS — The Greek Par- 


nesday , despite a rebellion by op- 
position deputies and an all-night 
vigil outside by protesters includ- 
ing many priests and nuns. 

Parliament voted 142 to 80 in 
favor of foe pact, which already 
has seven full members. 

The Schengen accord, as the 


pact is known, provides for foe 
removal of border controls be- 
tween EU member states and for 
increased cooperation in police 
matters. 

About 1,000 protesters, 
mostly members of religious 
groups, spent tbe night outside 
Parliament yelling religious slo- 
gans. They say open frontiers 
would threaten their country’s 
Christian Orthodox character. 


BRIEFLY 


Patriarch-Pope Talks Canceled 

VATICAN CITY — The head of foe Russian Or- 
thodox Church has canceled bis meeting with Pope John 
Paul n later this month, the Vatican said Wednesday. 

It would have been foe first meeting in history between 
the heads of the two churches. 

Patriarch Alexv B and the Pope were expected to meet 
at a Cistercian monastery outside Vienna two days before 
foe opening of the second European Ecumenical As- 

semblv. , , . . . , 

Patriarch Alexy has canceled once before, and the 
Vatican had described the June 21 meeting in Austria as 

tentative. . . 

On Wednesday, the Vatican spokesman, Joaquin Nav- 
arro- Vails, acknowledged there ‘were some difficulties 
in realizing this plan on June 21. ” The V atiean declined to 
speculate on the reasons for foe cancellation. fAP ) 

French Right Sees More Racism 

PARIS— Two leading Gaul lists predicted Wednesday 
foal a plan by the new Socialist prime minister. Lionel 
Jospin, to legalize thousands of illegal immigrants would 
attract more foreigners to France and bolster the extreme 
right 

“This absurd policy, applied in contempt of foe law and 
republican values, carries the seeds of racism and xeno- 
phobia,” said former Interior Minister Jean-Louis Debre, 
a leader of the RPR party of President Jacques Chirac. 

The policy shift was "a strong signal to all illegal 
immigrants that France is heading for a lax period,” 
inviting a new flood into the country, Pierre Lellouche. an 
RPR member of Parliament, said on Radio Monte Carlo. 

Keeping a campaign promise, Mr. Jospin on Tuesday 
ordered a case-by-case examination of tens of thousands 
of applications for legalization. { Reuters 1 

Italian Reforms Face Tie-Ups 

ROME — The head of an Italian commission looking 
into constitutional reforms said Wednesday that political 
parties had lodged so many amendments to key proposals 
that voting on tirem all would be impossible. 

Massimo d’Alema. commission president and leader 
of the main Democratic Party of the Left in the center-left 
government, said parties should cut the number of amend- 
ments and proposed a delay in voting on them. 

“We have before us 430 amendments on the nature of 
the state alone,” Mr. D’Alema said. “It will be tough to 
look at them one by one. But foe commission must vote by 
June 30 and, if it does not manage to examine and vote on 
every amendment, I will call in the end for the basic texts 
to be voted on directly.” (Reuters) 

Swedish Nuclear Closure Voted 

STOCKHOLM — The Parliament has approved the 
government’s proposal to shut down a nuclear power 
plant as a first step in phasing out the plants altogether. 

Tbe vote on Tuesday night called for one reactor at foe 
Barsebaeck plant in southwestern Sweden to be shut by 
July 1998 and for the other reactor to go out of service in 
2001 . 

When foe government announced its proposal in Feb- 
ruary, it said foe goal was the eventual shutdown of all 1 2 
of Sweden’s power-generating reactors, but gave no 
timetable for closing the rest. 

Nuclear reactors produce about half of Sweden's elec- 
tricity (AP) 


and jport— oil from on mtemalional 
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PAGE 8 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



eribunc 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NSW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON TOST 


Fairness for Congolese 


It mak es sense to help restore order 
and the possibility of a future in the 
new Congo (formerly Zaire), a large, 
regionally do minan t and potentially 
rich coon try at the heart of central 
Africa. The Clinton administration’s 
initiative logically follows on the earli- 
er American decision to embrace an- 
other large, regionally dominant and 
potentially rich country emerging from 
its own political trauma. Sooth Africa. 

Bat there is no denying that Wash- 
ington is taking a sizable chance in 
cozying up so quickly to President 
Laurent Kabila. He has yet to show the 
ihost important thing for a leader shift- 
ing from a war phase to a peace phase: 
a readiness to accept as fellow citizens 
deserving of humane treatment and 
civic respect the people who were on 
the other side in the old Zaire’s seven- 
month civil war. 

There is no proof that Mr. Kabila is 
personally directing the hideous killings 
and lootings of Hutu that — according 
to international observers, local wit- 
nesses and journalists — continue to 
take place in eastern Congo. But the 
strong Tutsi presence in the circle of Mr. 
Kabila's chief aides and foreign spon- 
sors, John Pomfiret of The Washington 


Post reports, has spumed persistent al- 
legations of a secret intent to clear that 
territory of Hum and other Tutsi rivals. 

Meanwhile. President Kabila is pho- 
tographed “chatting amiably' * with 
America’s UN Ambassador Bill Rich- 
ardson, who was sent to Congo with a 
large delegation to start building a new 
tie. Mr. Richardson, who has so far 
failed to persuade Mr. Kabila to bring 
into government the leading civilian 
politician, Etienne Tshisekedi, de- 
scribes the country as a likely “love 
interest for American business and in- 
vestment.” It is reported that as a con- 
cession to Washington, Mr. Kabila has 
agreed to let a United Nations team 
visit next month to check out reports of 
massacres by his forces. Caught be- 
tween a debt to Tutsi forces that 
brought him to power and a commit- 
ment to faring guilty soldiers to justice, 
Mr. Kabila denies it alL 

The post-Mobutu transition that Mr. 
Kabila is Dying to organize is bound to 
be uneven in foe best of circumstances. 
But he must generate a sense that he is 
mastering the disorder and ruling with 
nited St 


fairness. Otherwise the United 
has no business strengthening bis rale. 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Military Common Sense 


. General Joseph Ralston’s decision to 
withdraw from contention to become 
foe next chairman of die Joint Chiefs of 
Staff was the only sensible and respon- 
sible course of action, given public out- 
rage over die recent handling of adul- 
tery cases in the military. His candidacy 
was doomed once rt became known that 
he, too, had committed adultery earlier 
in his career. Neither Congress nor die 
American people could ignore a sexual 
infraction by one of its top generals, 
however innocuous that conduct might 
seem to his s upp o r t ers , when lesser 
officers have been drummed out of the 
service for similar offenses. 

But the anguish over the derailing of 
the Ralston candidacy will serve a use- 
ful purpose if it forces both the mili tary 

and Congress to reform a policy on 
sexual offenses that is veering dan- 
gerously ont of control. 

The madness in current policy can 
be measured by the recent loss or pun- 
ishment of three talented officers, all 
for reasons stemming from consensual 
but adulterous affairs with civilians. 

’ There was First Lieutenant Kelly 
Flinn, the first woman to pilot a B-52, 
whose affair with a married civilian 
was reported to authorities by a ser- 


: lied about the affair to investigators 
and disobeyed an order to break it off. 

. Then came Major General John 
Longhonser, a much decorated soldier 
who headed die Aberdeen Proving 
Ground. He was forced to retire after a 
tipster revealed his affair with a ci- 
vilian while he was separated from his 
wife five years ago. 

Now General Ralston has dropped 
out of the running for chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs because a war college 
classmate revealed his consensual af- 
fair with a civilian CIA analyst that 
started some 14 years ago when he, 
too, was separated from tus wife. 

One need not condone adultery to 
recognize that it occurs frequently in 
civilian and military life and is tacitly 
tolerated so long as it does no harm to 
ethers in the community. The con- 
sternation that many citizens feel about 
tbe military cases stems from a belief 
that tbe affairs are too slight to destroy 
careers or promotion prospects. 

Defense Secretary William Cohen 
should not have tried to push the can- 


didacy of General Ralston, a friend of 
his, when to do so raised the issue of a 
double standard for top-ranking of- 
ficers. But be was clearly right to call 
for (hawing brighter lines between 
what is acceptable and what is not 
With luck, the panels he has just ap- 
pointed to review sexual misconduct 
and gender issues will inject some san- 
ity into the process. 

The governing philosophy should 
surely be that the mili tary has no busi- 
ness investigating consensual sexual 
affairs unless they have a direct bear- 
ing on job performance or the main- 
tenance of military discipline. That 
would rale out almost any investiga- 
tion or punishment of private consen- 
sual affairs between military personnel 
and civilians who are not part of die 
same command. In theory, me mi li tary 
prosec ates adnlteiy now only when it 
is deemed to undermine good order 
and discipline or bring discredit upon 
the armed forces. Bat once a witch hunt 
is started, it seems increasingly hard to 
make rational distinctions. 

The military should without ques- 
tion crack down on superiors who use 
their power to coerce sex from sub- 
ordinates, as has happened with (hill 
sergeants demanding sex of trainees at 
Aberdeen. It should also set rales gov- 
erning sex that has potential to disrupt 
command structure and morale. Ex- 
amples would be affairs between of- 
ficers and enlisted personnel or be- 
tween senior and junior officers in the 
same chain of command. Sexual abuse 
of any kind cannot be tolerated. 

But what needs to stop is the in- 
cessant prying into sexual re 1 H on- 
ships that have no bearing on ; ary 
matters. Tbe bar needs to be jsed 
higher before a complaint, anonymous 
or otherwise, triggers an investigation. 
Commanders should rely mare on ad- 
ministrative penalties than on career- 
ending prosecutions. The “hot lines” 
designed to let women report sexual 
abuse and harassment anonymously 
may need to be revised to eliminate 
vindictive charges about consensual 
sex between adults. 

The goal should be to prevent sexual 
misconduct that harms individual sol- 
diers or military missions white ig- 
noring sexual affairs that are no busi- 
ness of the military. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Technology for Literacy 

The use of technology for education 
has been popular ever since the cre- 
ation of the reed pen and papyrus pa- 
per. Indeed, technology ana other tools 
mat can enhance humans' basic skills 
are increasingly included in the defin- 
ition of literacy itself. 

- As we approach the year 2000 the 
discussion or using technology — es- 
pecially advanced telecommunica- 
tions — for education and for literacy 
work has- become ever more intense. 

Much of this work is still in its 
infancy, such as efforts to utilize syn- 
thetic speech to teach reading, or the 
use of multimedia displays (interactive 
video, audio tapes and computer dis- 
plays) to provide much more sophis- 


ticated instruction than has been here- 
tofore available. 

And tbe multiple uses of the Internet 
are at the cutting edge of technology 
for literacy. Now accessible from most 
countries of die world, the Internet 
offers tremendous possibilities to im- 
prove the communications infrastruc- 
ture for literacy programs within and 
across countries. 

Similarly, distance education — us- 
ing radio, television and other means of 
communication — is likely to see dra- 
matic growth in the decade to come. 

The relative cost of computers con- 
tinues to drop at an astounding rate. 

— From Literary Innovations, 
newsletter of the International 
Literacy Institute (University of 
Pennsylvania. Philadelphia ). 



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Is the Bis Pendulum Taking a Leftward Swing? 

Cx „ ,_a. .c .«> nidi rhe French Socotitit nttf < 


W ASHINGTON — After the na- 
tional elections in Britain, France 
and Canada, it seams clear that Western 
conservatism has been shaken. 

As for capitalism, a fium> 
happened on the way to the 1 
enshrinement of the marketplace and 
the end of the business cycle. Major 
Western nations started electing So- 
cialists and Co mmunis ts. 

Nobody is suggesting that theghost 
of Karl Marx is moving into the Hys6e 
Palace or 10 Downing Street Still, it is 
possible to discern some new direc- 
tions in tax policy, disinclination to cut 
back social spending; skepticism of 
central bankers and financial bureau- 
crats; doubts about privatization. 

Maybe these are just blips. But the 
resounding French results, in partic- 
ular, suggest that we could be on tbe 
threshold of another big shift, like tbe 
conservative and free market trend that 
crested in tbe late 1980s. 

That conservative surge relied on 
markets to bring excessive government 


By the late 1980s, 
ideology had gone too 
far, and a correction 
started to build. 


under controL Any revitalization of the 
center-left would almost certainly use 
politics and government to curb the 
excesses of the capitalist ethos. 

In retrospect, the 1980s were clearly 
a conservative megacycle. Ten years 
ago, among the Group of Seven in- 
dustrialized nations, conservative 
parties and coalitions rated almost 
everywhere, stronger than at any time 
since the 1950s. In contrast to the aged, 
stodgy conservative leadership of 
those years, the new conservatism of 
the 1980s was an aggressive ideology, 
roaring ahead with tax cuts, dereg- 
ulation of financial markets and dis- 
mantling of welfare-state safety nets. 

The question now: Is the French 
election a bit of a revolution, and likely 
to spread? Or is new Prime Minister 
Lionel Jospin just another politician 
who will break his promises? 

Half of the controversial conserva- 
tive agenda, perhaps more, was nec- 
essary and constructive. But by the late 
1980s, ideology had gone too far, and a 
correction started to build. 


By Kevin Phillips 

Japan's conservative liberal Demo- 
cratic Party lost the upper house of 
Parliament in 1989 over regressive tax 
policy. Id America, the Republican 
presidential coalition cracked up in 
1992. Then Canada's governing Con- 
servative Party oumWed in the general 
election of 1993; a regressive general 
sales tax was its principal albatross. 

Italy is now run by die center-left 
Olive Tree Coalition. 

And on May 1 the British Conser- 
vatives, heirs of Margaret Thatcher, 
were thrown out in a landslide. Tbe 
Tory share of the vote shrank to 31 
percent, its lowest level since 1832. 

On May 25, in the first round of the 
French elections, the two governing 
conservative parties dropped to 29.9 
percent of the total vote. 

Germany’s ruling coalition is 
Europe's only major conservative sur- 
vivor, and it, too, could easily be de- 
feated in next year’s elections. 

Too little attention is being paid to 
bow these political upheavals have 
common spins, voter fatigue with re- 
gressive tax policy; actual or proposed 
cuts in education, health or pension 
programs; smug austerity demands 
from remote financ ial bureaucrats and 
central bankers; privatizations that led 
to huge CEO salaries and windfall 
profits for investors. 

Conservatism has come to look 
greedy, corrupt and dedicated to busi- 
ness and financial interests. Mean- 
while, socialism and communism are 
losing some of their 1980s taint, partly 
because of self-reform, partly because 
of the collapse of the Soviet Union, but 
more because of the excesses of con- 
servatism and capitalism. 

The hard-line Refonnded Commu- 
nist Party is playing a growing role in 
Italy, and Japan’s Communist Party 
has made some surprising mayoral and 
regional showings in the last few years 
after emerging as the strongest critic of 
the government's unpopular consump- 
tion taxes and bank bailouts. 

American pundits have enjoyed cat- 
egorizing the lead os of Britain's new 
Labour government, headed by Tony 
Blair, as more conservative than so- 
cialist, but this is probably a mistake. 

Mr. Blair, in Ins book “New Bri- 
tain,” describes himself as a demo- 
cratic socialist, saying that “the ul- 
timate political objective is a new 


ilitical consensus of Ieft-of-center, 
„sed around the key values of demo- 
cratic socialism and European social 
democracy.” . 

There are some obvious implica- 
tions for foe United States. Voters 

for consumption taxes m 
rfoiftda and Japan, and for the British 
Tories’ abandoned “poll tax” propos- 
al, suggest that the wo-coDSumpoon- 
tax views of Republican tax-writers 
such as Representative BID Archer and 
Senator W rTTiam y. Roth Jr. could be 
electoral poison. 

Meanwhile, Bin Clinton’s willing- 
ness to join the Republicans in slashing 
Medicare is probably costing the 
Democrats an issue that has been crit- 
ical for the center-left elsewhere. 

French voters’ “non” to a policy of 
safety net reductions paired with up- 
per-bracket tax cuts ts still echoing. 
And in Britain, where Mr. Blair has 
been reluctant to challenge Conserva- 
tive fiscal restraints, voters are anxious 
to do so. A late April poll for The 
Economist showed roughly 75 percent 
of voters in favor of more spending and 
programs — even if taxes had to rise. 

Privatization, too, should slow. The 
new French government, which is hos- 
tile to it, is expected to hold up some 
privatizations in the pipeline. Britain’s 
new Labour regime intends to impose a 
windfall profits tax on gains reaped 
from recent utility privatizations. 

Central bankers can expect far more 
scrutiny, with Labour having taken 
away the Bank of England’s super- 
visory relationship with British banks. 


and with tbe French Socialists out to 
weaken tbe role of foe planned Euro- 
pean central bank. 

Americans are usually skeptical that 
trends anywhere else mean much' for 
them, although conservatives were 
happy to proclaim the shared global 
ideology of the 1980s. Yet if there were 
obvious parallels in how conservative 
economics spreads, there canid also be 
parallels in now it retreats. - 

The British, French and Canadian 
elections confirm another trend: how 
right -wing populist conservatives arc 
sp litting away from elite conservatism 
?nd damaging its election prospects. 

In France, Jean Le Pen's National 
Front not only competed with foe con- 
servatives. but at least half its voters 
appear to have swung to the left in the 
runoffs. In Canada, the populist Re- 
form Party split the vote on foe right. 

Sir James Goldsmith 'spopuiist Ref- 
erendum Party drew off mare Th a n 
800,000 votes in Britain, mostly at foe 
Conservatives’ expense. Patrick J. 
Buchanan and Ross Perot have played 
similar roles in the United States.' 

Tbe crux of the matter If conser- 
vatism has overplayed its pro-market, 
anti- welfare-state and regressive- tax 
pr ef erences as dramatically as recent 
election returns suggest, we coold be 
looking at a 10- to 15-year countertide. 
Thai would be foe big political story of 
the early 21st century. 

The writer, publisher of American 
Political Report, contributed this com- 
ment to the Los Angeles Tunes. 


The Rout in France Serves Conservatism 

T 


‘HE electoral rout of the French 
right actually serves conservatism. 
It gives Socialists another opportunity 
to demonstrate the delusional nature of 
their policies, and to toss fistfuls of 
gravel into foe machinery driving 
Europe toward anti-democratic unity. 

In France, where statism is the civic 
religion, the welfare state is iocreas- 
ly incompatible with the welfare of 


the state, and of society. Government is 
big and weak, failing to propitiate pro- 
liferating client groups. Thus the wel- 
fare state, which was supposed to pro- 
duce social solidarity, produces 
pandemic irritability, as when angry 
truckers block the nation’s roads. 

The competitive astringency of foe 
global economy will intensify the pun- 


ishment of France for policies which 
presuppose, as socialism generally 
most, autarky. The French, already 
surly by stagnation and fay the 
mere mention of therapeutic policies, 
will want their Socialists to demand 
relaxation of the Maastricht criteria. 

Happily, Europe’s peoples are cast- 
ing a jaundiced eye on die real reason 
for monetary union — foe desire of 
Europe's political class to siphon sov- 
ereignty from national legislatures 
and pump it into die supranational 
bureaucracies. Dilution of national 
sovereignty, and with it of democracy, 
attenuates popular control of foe po- 
litical class. 

— George F. Will, commenting 
in The Washington Post. 







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Reinterpret Those Criteria, and Launch the Euro on Schedule 


b 


P ARIS — The political earth- 
quake in France, a month 
after the one that shook Britain, 
will have a major impact on 
European unification. The 
shock waves will be felt in the 
efforts to reform, strengthen 
and enlarge the institutional 
framework for a unified Europe 
as well as in the plans for a 
common currency. 

The victorious French So- 
cialists lack an absolute par- 
liamentary majority, and will 
have to count on the support of 
their Co mmunis t allies and the 
environmentalist Greens. Both 
are fiercely hostile to the goal of 
monetary onion undear the 
Maastricht treaty . And both will 
wield power in the new admin- 
istration, in which they together 
hold three cabinet ministries. 

The European Union’s mem- 
bers have taken a minimalis t ap- 
proach to institutional change: 
adjusting voting rights in the 
Union's Council of Ministers, 
reworking foe demographic rep- 


By Valery Glscard d’Estaing 


resentation of member states, 
and symbolically reducing die 
number of commissioners. 

France’s political shift will 
reinforce that minimalis t ap- 
proach, as deep splits within foe 
new majority will prevent the 
Socialists from agreeing to calls 
to build a strong federal Europe. 
No drama — just enough piece- 
meal reforms to allow nego- 
tiations to continue. “Greater 
Europe” is shrinking. 

The French election’s impact 
on monetary union is indeed 
more critical, creating diffi- 
culties on two fronts: meeting 
Maastricht's criteria to join tbe 
currency union, and the ''sta- 
bility pact,” which requires 
each European partner to lower 
its budget deficit 

France has not yet reached 
the requirement of reducing this 
year's deficit to less than 3 per- 
cent of GDP. The next audit is 
likely to show a huge budget 


gap. The 1998 budget is sup-’i 
posed td. have mandatary 
spending caps to attack .foe 
mounting debt 

The Socialists are proposing 
nothing but more spending 
(350,000 new jobs paidfor with 
public money, increases in pen- 
sions and foe minimum wage) 
without revenue increases to 
pay for it France’s public fi- 
nances are hyperextended, with 
no room to raise taxes further. 

The only possible way out is 
to cut spending, but font runs 
contrary to foe Socialists’ 
promises. Every decision to 
deepen the deficit reduces the 
chances of qualifying to join the 
single currency. 

The other difficulty has to do 
with the “stability pact” re- 
quired by Germany. France's 
new prime minister, Lionel 
Jospin, has demanded that its 

crackd to foe euro’s credibility. 


especially in persuading foe 
.Gem^n pjifrlic ttyeplace .the 
^Deqt^qhe markvrpcfc solid .for 
50 years, with the unknown and 
uhtestedeuro:.’*;’ ; : 

Fran here on in, the euro's 
main obstacle is going to be 
German public resistance. 

Mr. Jospin and Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl, frilly committed 
to the cause of European unity, 
have sought to reach an agree- 
ment acceptable to their coun- 
tries. A lasting agreement is not 
easy, because each leader will 
be under close scrutiny, one by 
his Communist and Green al- 
lies, the other by his public, kept 
in a state of high alert by foe 
German central bank. 

This is the crucial political 
question: Do the advantages of 

inaug urating foe CUTO OD foe 

planned date outweigh foe 
risks? If the answer is “yes,” 
the euro’s success will depend 
on a joint reinterpretation of tbe 
Maastricht treaty, replacing its 
strict budgetary criteria with a 


more flexible approach based 
on progress toward .reducing 
deficits, with .foe condition mat 
foe stability pact’s requirement^' 
be maintained. 

If Europe clings to foe strict 
criteria, not a single majoi' 
country will be able to meet 
them except by resorting to ad 
accounting trick, and the Euro 5 
pean project will faiL 
Or perhaps be delayed, bttf 
until when? Will the political 
conditions for a single currency 
ever be better than now? 

Putting the euro in place by 
foe scheduled date is an im- 
perative. We need it to taring 
about a stable unified market; 
encourage competition on an 
even playing field and attracts 
international investment 
We must save the euro, and" 
make it succeed. 


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The writer was president of 
France from 1974 to 1981. He 
contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


A Security ‘Identity 9 for Europe? Watch the Bosnia Theater 


L ISBON — Washington’s 
"New Atlantic Agenda” 
dominates foe trans- Atlantic dia- 
logue this spring, in the lead-up 
to next month’s NATO enlarge- 
ment conference in Madrid. 

The implications of the 
“agenda," and some of the ob- 
jections to it, were among foe 
topics of this year’s third Ar- 
rabida conversation, near Lis- 
bon, between Europeans and 
Americans, convoked by Por- 
tugal’s Orient Foundation, under 
the general chairmanship of 
Lord Carrington. The conversa- 
tion included the president and 
the foreign ministar of 
President Bill Clinton 
said that this generation has 
'“the chance to complete the 
great endeavor that Marshall’s 
generation began, to build a 
democratic, peaceful, undivided 
Europe for foe first tim e in his- 
tory. ' He sees NATO enlarge- 
ment providing an American- 
guaranteed unification of West- 
ern with Eastern Europe, com- 
parable in its implications to die 
Marshall Plan’s underwriting of 
Western Europe’s own unifica- 
tion after tbe world War n. 

This view implies that 
NATO expansion has become 
foe principal political game in 
Europe, rather than European 
Union enlargement An expan- 
ded trans-Atlantic NATO is 
presented as completing and in 
a measure superseding a purely 
European EU. 

This aspect of foe affair is 
why Baroness Thatcher sup- 
ports the parallel “New Atlantic 
Initiative,” launched in Prague 
a year ago. with Vaclav Havel 
ana Henry Kissinger in atten- 
dance. It is tire conservative ver- 
sion of the Clinton program. 


By W illiam Pfflff 


Meetings during the past year 
under joint sponsorship by U.S. 
embassies and European busi- 
ness groups have emphasized 
trade expansion and market- 
opening measures as part of foe 
new American approach. 

The Clinton administration 
has proposed a trans- Allan tic 
free trade agreement integrating 
NAFTA and foe European 
single market, although cooler 
beads on both sides of tbe At- 
lantic acknowledge that while 
access to the other side’s mar- 
kets is attractive, further market 
opening to foreign producers is 
less appealing to domestic in- 
dustry and fanners. 

The most enthusiastic sup- 
porters of the new American 
approach are found in some (not 
all) of foe former Communist 
Central and East European 
states. The reason is obvious: 
They want enhanced security, 
and NATO expansion seems to 
offer it Article 5 of foe NATO 
treaty states foar a threat to one 
member of the allianc e will 
meeta response from all. 

ence in Europe also suits iome 
of the smaller present members 
of NATO, who have always 
backed the role thar Washing- 
ton claims as a “European 
power” because the influence 
of the United States offsets foe 
influence of Ger man yj Bri tain 
and France. Tbe position of 
Dutch, Danes, Italians and Por- 
tuguese, among others, is 
strengthened vis-4- vis neigh- 
bors otherwise inclined to run 
Europe in their own interests. 

Others are annoyed or maA» 
uneasy by American efforts to 


expand its role, and particularly 
by tbe effort to substitute 
NATO for foe European Union 
as the body which sets Euro- 
pean policy. The French obvi- 
ously lead this camp — awk- 
wardly, since France still is not 
a felly integrated NATO mem- 
ber, precisely because of this 
dispute over who runs tbe al- 
liance. There are misgivings in 
Germany and Britain as well, 
and in some circles elsewhere. 

Thus a very important ques- 
tion is now posed for those 
Europeans who genuinely be- 
lieve that Europe should have 
its own foreign and security 
policy, as promised by foe Un- 
ion's present members at their 
Maastricht summit in 1991. 

Last year, in Berlin, NATO’s 
European members demanded 
and got Washington’s agree- 
ment in principle to a European 
“identity” within NATO, 
meaning a European right to use 
NATO resources in conducting 
operations of distinct European 
interest This still lacks practical 
definition and, what is worse, a 
common political will in 
Europe to come to a decision. 

There is, however, some- 
thing on which a decision is 
needed, within the next year, 
that coold have an immense in- 
fluence on how the trans-At- 
lantic relationship develops. 

There has to be a decision on 
what will happen in Bosnia if 
foe United States sticks to its 
announced policy of wifodraw- 
ingits forces by next June. 

_ The current European pos- 
ition is that when U.S. forces 
leave, European forces will 
leave with them. This policy 


was adopted solely to pressure 
foe United States not to leave. It 
ignores the consequences if tbe 
policy is actually carried out 
There have been reports that 
Paris and London are in touch 
about not leaving. This is po- 
tentially very important. If they 
should resolve not to leave Bos- 
nia with the Americans, and by 
next year develop a European 
replacement force, they would 
by that act have bestowed upon 
Europe a separate and inde- 
pendent foreign and security 
policy. No one would be more 


surprised, but also more im- 
pressed, than Washington. 

Failure to do so, after 
Europe's earlier failure to find a 
common policy at foe start of 
the Yugoslav war, would prob- 
ably lay foe tombstone of Euro- 
pean foreign policy autonomy, 
at least in this generation. 

The opportunity for foe Euro- 
peans is large, and foe implic- 
ations of failure are equally 
ge — for tbe United States, as 
European power, too. 
International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 



IN OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897: Murder A ttemp t not believed tbat tbe process is 

1 applicable to human beings, but 

it is important, as showing that_ 
the mechanism of heredity can 
be altered by external means. 


LEAVENWORTH, Kansas — 
A desperate attempt was marfe to 
assassinate Mr. Smith, Governor 
of the State. Mr. Smith paid an 
official visit to the National Sol- 
diers' Home at Leavenworth, 
accompanied by his wife and 
family. While going through tbe 
building a terrific explosion oc- 
curred and foe house was almost 
de mol i sh ed. By extraor dinar y 
good fortune Governor Smith 
and his children escaped prac- 
tically unhurt, but Mrs. Smith 
was badly injured. It is generally 
believed that the Governor was 
selected to be foe victim of an 
atrocious conspiracy. 

1922: Genetic Changes 

YORK - — Successful ex- 
periments for altering foe sex of 
butterflies by foe application of 
X-rays to die eggs are an- 
nounced by Professor James 
Mayor, of Union College. It is 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 


PAGE 91 


OPINION/LETTERS 



A Military Unmoored: 
Pettiness Will Prevail 

By Jim Hoagland 


W ASHINGTON — Sex, lies 
and careerism consume the 
Pentagon and Amcaica’s polit- 
ical leadership. Sure beats die 
Cold War as Topic A 
But look again. The hnnum 
frailty and bureaucratic obtuse- 
ness evident in the Ralston and 
plinn cases are not totally iso- 
lated from weighty matteis like 
NATO expansion and the shap- 
ing of national strategy. These 
issues are caught up in the polit- 
ical struggle over the values 
America expects from, and im- 
poses on, its warrior class. 

Suddenly die warriors are 
being judged not on their mili- 
tary skills, but on their truthful- 
ness to their spouses, command- 
ing officers and to inquiring tele- 
vision reporters abbot intimate 
behavior. 

The end of die Cold War 
permits the luxury of such a de- 
bate. But the unfinished peace 
of the 1990s also contributes 
to the national confusion that 
surfaces in this debate over the 
morally asymmetrical cases of 
General Joseph W. Ralston, 
First Lieutenant Kelly Flinn and 
die Aberdeen Proving Ground 
scandals. 

The troth is that as a nation 
Americans no longer know what 
to expect of their unreconstruc- 
ted, marlring -time military estab- 
lishment, which has reached 
gigantic proportions by contem- 
porary global standards and 
America's historic peacetime 
levels. 

In understanding how and why 
this has happened, Americans do 


not get modi help from their 
leaders, who swing between in- 
ertia and the face of emotioo- 
alism in setting fo reig n and na- 
tional security policy beyond the 
Cold War. 

The United Stales continues to 
fund its military at Cold War 
levels despite die Soviet col- 
lapse. In aseminal article on U.S. 
military -civilian relations that 
coincides with die Pentagon’s 
bonfire of sexuality. Professor 
A. J. Bacevich of Johns Hopkins 
University points out that U.S. 
military expenditures “come in 
at jnst a shade less than the com- 
bined budgets of Russia, China, 
Japan, France, Germany” and 
Britain. 

* ‘The fact that the United 
States has ffayam to retain a large 
and powerful standing militar y 
force in the absence of any prox- 
imate threat to its own security 
violates principles long held to 
be integral to the Americ an ex- 
periment The Founding Fathers 
would have looked arirantte at 
such a development,” Professor 
Bacevich writes in the summer 
issue of the National Interest 
magazine. 

Those of us who believe 
America must continue to play an 
active leadership role in the world 
can only support a large, well- 
trained U.S. military. But we 
must also acknowledge that trim- 
ming the uniformed military to 
1.4 million persons from 2.1 mil- 
lion in 1989 has occurred without 
any sgrinns natio nal nr 

comprehension of die goals as- 
signed to a face of that size. 



Colin Powell sized this face 
and the spending it requires in the 
early 1990s, in large part as a 
then-prudent insurance policy 
against a revival of Russian im- 
perialism. He justified the only 
large standing army in American 
peacetime as necessary to fight 
two regional aggressors, such 
as Iraq and North Korea, nearly 
simultaneously. 

General Powell also deliber- 
ately provided the troops with a 
medium-term sense of mission 
and cohesion in the absence of 
the Soviet threat. 

The two-conflict strategy was 
his way of explaining to the 
forces why they had to live the 
peculiar life military discipline 
demands, even in peacetime, anti 
be content with it 
North Korea and Iraq are no 


longer credible reasons for main- 
taining a huge American force. 
The troops know that al some 
level, as does the nation. As the 
sense of mission unravels, so 
does morale. Yet the Pentagon 
and the White House have been 
unable to move in new direc- 
tions. 

Fear of giving the Republicans 
an issue seems to bar President 
Bill Clinton from rethinking the 
defense budget. Conservatives 
who cry wolf over phony “Clin- 
ton defense cuts" in hope of 
political gain do the nation a huge 
disservice. 

The administration’s pretense 
that NATO expansion is not 
aimed at the Russians also adds 
to the strategic incoherence con- 
fronting the U.S. military, which 
has been coerced and cajoled 


By WN/J CRM* *n*r»r.-n*«S™dH.ir-. 

by the White House into endors- 
ing a flawed expansion plan 
based on politics and emotion. 

A clearer sense of mission and 
strategy almost certainly would 
not have kept General Ralston or 
Lieutenant Flinn on the path of 
righteousness. They made per- 
sonal choices unrelated to nation- 
al strategy. But a military estab- 
lishment of the current size and 
influence does not have tradition- 
al anchors in American society. 
Those anchors must be developed 
by the nation's political leaders. 

Without solid moorings, the 
U.S. military establishment will 
continue to be blown off course 
and exposed to ridicule by mat- 
ters as petty as the separate sexual 
dalliances of Lieutenant Flinn 
and General Ralston. 

The Washington Post 


All This Talk About Sex 
Is a Gigantic Turnoff 

By Maureen Dowd 


XX WASHINGTON — I never 
W thought I’d say this, but I'm 
tired of sex. 

! have eros-fatigue. 

We Americans have been so 
awash in lurid details about sexual 
misadventures between men and 
women in New York, Hollywood. 
Washington, Aberdeen. Minot 

MEANWHILE 

and Little Rock that it's made me 
long fa some old-fashioned, 
deadly earnest policy stories. 

What ever happened to Goals 
2000? Have we reinvented any 
more government lately? Give me 
a GAO report -- quick! 

Is there a sequel to that book 
Michael Dukakis used to read — 
“Swedish Land Use Planning”? 

Seen in the crimson glow of 
today's tawdry obsessions, maybe 
that book was dirty, after all. 
Heaven only knows what those 
Swedes were using that land for 
anyway. 

I don't want to hear another 
word about any unexpected fea- 
tures in unexplored places on the 
president's body. 1 don’t want to 
hear Gennifer Flowers testifying 
fa the defense that there was “no 
mark." 

The only news stories I can bear 
to read anymore are the ones 
where the French laugh at us and 
call us zee beeg ee-diots. The 
American love of puritanism is 
even more stupid than the French 
hatred of capitalism. 

They were wrong about Jerry 
Lewis and Mickey Rourke, but 
they're right about this. We are 
foolishly doomed to be both in- 
dulgent and flagellant, to be 
naughty and guilty, to pretend we 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


The French Election 

J Reading the International Her- 
ald Tribune in the wake of the 
French election has been real fun. 
• Two main features emerge 
from the comments of most chron- 
iclers: the belief that there are so 
intermediate solutions between 
state-run economies and un- 
fettered capitalism, and a surpris- 
ing misunderstanding of French 
^ttitudes and motives. 

, How can journalists who have 
Been .hying.. in France for so long 
(enjoying the French way of life 
still harbor traditional preju- 
dices that the French are unreal- 
istic, unmanageable, stubborn, ro- 
gtantic, vengeful, unpredictable, 
ignorant of the rest of the world 
and so on? 

This thinly veiled irritation at 
results of a democratic vote is 
indeed disturbing. 

. MICHEL MARCHETEAU 
Paris. 

. The results of the French ejec- 
tion ate difficult to understand if 


politic 

hard-1 


one sticks to the old concepts of 
left and righL The new majority 
combined the votes of a wide 
>litical spectrum ranging from 
-line Stalinists to moderate 
Social Democrats, with many 
votes coming from the xeno- 
phobic far right in the second 
round. 

The common facta in this pe- 
culiar coalition is die fear of the 
modem wold and the rejection of 
the adjustments it requires. A ma- 
jority of the French believe the new 
government can postpone such 
■ changes indefinitely without neg- 
ative impact on theji well-being. 

This “Fiend) malaise'’’ has its 
roots in the French educational 
system, whose historic role has 
been to supply civil servants. It 
concentrates on France, the 
French culture and the French lan- 
guage; overall it does a poor job of 
preparing youngsters fa the 
modem world 

The present split in French so- 
ciety is not related to social 
classes and economic stains. It 
corresponds to different visions of 


the modem world. The French 
“social fracture” is only a side 
effect of a much wider “cultural 
fracture.” 

JEAN-CLAUDB BERTHUUER. 

Fourqueux. France. 

The Herald Tribune is not 
amused. A majority of French 
voters chose social democracy on 
June 1 . Whai does this shift mean? 
“Forward to the past,’ ’ according 
to one headlin e. Such also is the 
interpretation offered not only in 
news analyses but in news stories. 
Journalists write as editorialists, 
whether describing a ‘1970s- 
styie”' policies or denouncing die 
Socialists’ imitation of “Sweden 
25 years ago.” 

What these articles indicate is 
that tiie Herald Tribune voted with 
the stock market. This ideology is 
often presented as “realism,'’ and 
any dissent as a “romantic” re- 
jection of the iron rules of glob- 
alization. 

That France remains stuck in 
the past is a classic cultural clichl 
among Americans: the French 


should modernize, i.e., Ameri- 
canize. But French voters still be- 
lieve, a generation after de Gaulle, 
that politics should not be dictated 
by the stock market. This reflects 
a political option, not cultural 
backwardness. 

The fact that so many in France, 
even on the right, refuse to have 
financial analysts decide elections 
reveals something deeper — a 
continuing cultural faith in the im- 
portance of politics. Politics can- 
not ignore economics, but they are 
too serious a business to be left to 
business. '• 

-• It is true Ihat recent American 
presidents, from Ronald Reagan 
to Bill Clinton, have worked 
hard to destroy the old-fashioned 
belief in politics. As a result 
many in the United States have 
given up on politics, or al least 
voting. But this land of Amer- 
icanization may not be inevitable 
in Europe after all. Politics still 
matter. This is good news fa de- 
mocracy. 

ERIC FASSIN. 

Paris. 


As an American living and 
working in Europe for many 
years, I have always been not only 
a regular reader but also rather 
proud of your usually balanced 
and thoughtful coverage of inter- 
national events. This, I patiently 
explained to my European friends 
— who expect that a newspaper 
wifi be an unfailing mouthpiece 
for a given political perspective 
— is what American journalism at 
its best is all about. 

Over the last several years, 
however, you have strayed from 
this fine tradition, increasingly 
taking instead an attitude that can 
only be described as rather nar- 
row, unquestioningly “pro-mar- 
ket,” a bit nasty and decidedly 
small-town in its approach to the 
complex events that are unfolding 
around us all and that require a 
wise, calm and thoughtful voice to 
be properly presented and com- 
mented upon. 

Your coverage of the latest 
political events in France has been 
biased, and dull as well. “No Pink 
Wave for Europe” has the un- 


pleasant drumroU of the Mc- 
Carthy era. 

This is not the old IHT at its 
best. We are living in a transi- 
tional age in which many of our 
traditional beliefs and attitudes 
are being challenged. It is not by 
driving ourselves back into some 
old, musty burrow of economic 
nostalgia (hat we will be able to 
participate wisely and usefully in 
die process. 

Your voice — your voice at its 
best — is much needed. 

FRANCIS E. K. BRITTON. 

. . , Paris. 

In view of all the negative re- 
action to the French elections and 
the philosophy that government 
should let business do business, 
wouldn't it be better to let busi- 
ness do government as well and 
return to a time when only the 
propertied classes held the fran- 
chise? Obviously the masses 
don’t know what's in their best 
interest. 

EDWARD R1CE-MAXIMIN. 

Grenoble, France. 


have seen the light and then act in 
the same old ways. 

The more men and womens 
blend, the more we clash. Then 
more we talk to each other, the< 
less we understand each other. 1 
Our erotomania has deadened^ 
us to eroticism. We talk about sexi 
constantly, but nothing is sexy.* 
Our society is all kinky expli-5 
citness. But pleasure demands} 
discretion, silence, privacy, the 1 
absence of reporters. 

Consider the risible state of 1 
feminism. Older feminists spendj 

The only news stories 
I can bear to read l 

are the ones where '•* 

the French laugh at n 
us Americans for our 
idiotic puritanism. 

all their time hiding, so they can 1 
avoid commenting on Paula^ 
Jones. 

Younger ones present the' 1 
blindingly obvious as brand new 
ideas. 

like the Bill Murray comedy 
“Groundhog Day,” where he had 
to relive the same day over and 
over, these feminists cannot make^ 
any progress because they suffer- 
from gender amnesia, a condition* 
that forces them to keep redis-' 
covering the same things over and : 
over again. 1 

In her hilarious new book,', 
“Promiscuities," Naomi Wolf re^ 
veals to us that women like men’ 
and that they like to be touched. 1 
Well. duh. i 

(For good measure, she add^‘ 
that kids should be taught to neck? 
to avoid teenage pregnancy. A*’ 
national petting policy. 1 ) * 

After Betty Friedan, after Ger- 
maine Greer, after Gloria! 
Steinem, we’re just getting 1 
around to the ancient Tao instruct 
tions to men: “He must know hoW’ 
to feel his woman’s nine erotic^ 
zones.” 

At a crowded reading irR 
Washington Monday night, Ms:‘ 
Wolf read from what she called: 
her most popular page, 185,° 
which describes the ancient 
Chinese “milestones of female 1 
desire.” * 

“She lifts her body, pressing 7 
him. It indicates that she is en-'J 
joying it extremely . She relaxes) 
her body. It indicates that the body 1 
and limbs are pacified. ’ ’ ■*' 

Her Yin tide having crested, her. 
Yin essence is in balance. These 
are the discoveries that 13-year-! 
old boys have been sneaking our 
of their parents' libraries for years' 
with the National Geographic and 
the Kama Smra. 

My fellow Americans, we 
must be candid. There is sex^ 
Now, can we please change the 
subject? i 

The New York Times. 



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Doctors Mull Ethics 



The New Yorit Times 


Just Say 6 Cheese 
How to Be Toothsome 


By Jane E. Brody 

New York Times Service 



EW YORK — A bright, 
fresh-looking Vanna White 
smile can often compensate 
for less attractive features 
and take years off a person's face. With 
dental decay now less troublesome, 
more people are turning their attention 
to improving die appearance of their 
teeth. For some, orthodontics to change 
the positioning of the teeth is the prime 
concern. 

But for increasing numbers of patients, 
die issue is whitening of discolored teeth. 
At an international symposium last fall, 
experts in aesthetic dentistry reviewed 
the safety and effectiveness of various 
treatments to remove unsightly stains 
from teeth. Their findings were pub- 
lished as a supplement to The Journal of 
the American Dental Association. 

The experts agreed that aside from 
toothpastes that may gradually whiten 
teeth, self-treatment with over-the- 
counter bleaching agents is risky and 
unwise and warned patients to consult 
with their dentists before deciding to try 
tooth-whitening on their own. 

Some people naturally have yellow- 
ish teeth, having inherited the trait horn 
one or both parents. For others, aging is 
the main cause; teeth yellow over time 
like an old newspaper. 

Smokers and users of smokeless to- 
bacco can blame years of exposure to 
tobacco tars for the brown stains on their 
teeth. Frequent consumption of certain 
foods and drinks, especially coffee, tea 
and red wine, all of which contain tooth- 
staining tannins, is an even more com- 
mon cause of tooth discoloration. 

Some people are exposed to metals 
that can stain teeth. Among them are 
workers in (he copper and nickel in- 
dustries, who may develop green dental 
stains, and iron workers, who may get 
black stains. People who take iron sup- 
plements may also experience some 
blackening of the teeth. 

One or more teeth may become no- 
ticeably discolored after an injury, and in 
children high fevers or severe jaundice, 
the use of certain medications, especially 
the antibiotics tetracycline and mino- 
cycline, or even overexposure to flu- 
orides can discolor most or all the teeth. 


The various mildly abrasive tooth- 
pastes on the market can lighten certain 
stains without damaging the enameL 
But more serious tooth discoloration 
requires a more aggressive approach. 
Just which procedure is best to use de- 
pends upon the cause of the discol- 
oration and how deeply it penetrates 
into the teeth, which is one reason dent- 
ists caution against self-prescribed' use 
of over-the-counter tooth bleaching 


By Sheryl Gay Stolberg 

New York Tunes Savior 

EW YORK — Now and 
then, in his job as medical 
director of a San' Francisco 
■ hospice agency, Robert 
Brody discovers that a patient has killed 
hims elf with help from a doctor. 

The news rarely surprises him. After 
all, San Francisco is a city scarred 
deeply by the AIDS epidemic. “It's in 
die air,” said Dr. Brody, who also is 
chairman of the ethics committee at San 
Francisco General Hospital. “It is 
something that our patients know about, 
and that they do.” 

But it is also a crime. And so, while 
doctor-assisted suicide is widely ac- 
knowledged, there are no professional 
guidelines for it Now, however, as the 
U.S. Supreme Court considers the con- 
troversial question whether Americans 
have a fundamental right to die, medical 
practitioners have quietly begun grap- 
pling with the delicate mailer of wheth- 
er, or how, they might create standards 
for helping people end their own lives. 

It is a quixotic effort at best and, like 
the debate over assisted suicide itself, 
fraught with controversy. But from New 
York to Oregon, small groups of health 


Ives questions that were once 
unthinkable: Who is an appropriate can- 


didate for assisted suicide? Should pa- 
tients put their requests in writing? 
Should a second opinion be obtained? 
Should there be witnesses? A waiting 
period? Repeats to the coroner? 

In San Fraadsco, where one survey 
of doctors who treat AIDS found that 
more than --half had already helped a 
patient to die, a network of medical 
ethics committees has issued a formal 
protocol for the practice of “hastened 
death.” It is to be published in The 
Western Journal of Medicine, and while 
it is not the first set of guidelines to be 
published, it marks the first time any 
community has reached a consensus. 

“Most doctors don't want to deal 
with this at all, and that includes me," 
said Dr. Brody, who took part in the 
effort ‘ ‘I wish i* weren’t part of life. But 
it is. And because it is, and because we 
are doctors, we can’t put our heads in foe 
sand.” 

Among the requirements are a 48- 
hour waiting period and a patient con- 
sent form, signed in the presence of a 
witness. The group also drew up several 
sample forms, including a “physician 
checklist” that asks doctors to confirm, 
among other things, that the patient is 

mentall y com p etent; that he is terminally 

ill and expected to die wi thin six months; 
that he nas been offered high-quality 
care to relieve pain, and that his choice to 
die has been ''needy made, independent 


of financial, family, health insurance or 
other sources of coercion.” 

To opponents of assisted suicide, 
such recommendations are sttirdy un- 
realistic; no policy s t atement, they say, 
could adequately envision the compli- 
cated array of questions that crop up at 
the end of life. 

“We are setting up guidelines in an 
ivory-tower hypothetical situation;” 
said Diane Meier, a geriatrics expert at 
Mount Sinai Medical Center in New 
York. Dr. Meier, an early proponent of 

the right to tfie, was an author of the first 

known set of guidelines for doctors on 
assisted suicide, but has since changed 
her mind. “They may bear very little 
relationship to the real world. And if we 
set up guidelines that are essentially 

useless, we are inviting abase.” 

Even if assisted suicide remains il- 
legal, practice guidelines would be use- 
ful, said Dr. Timothy Quin of 
Rochester, New Yoik, who caused a 
furor over the issue in 1991 when he 
published an account of how he had 
helped a terminally in leukemia patient 
loll herself. Quill is Dr. Meier's co- 
author and the lead plaintiff in a New 
York case currently before the Supreme 
Court that challenges a state law pro- 
hibiting doctor-assisted suicide. 

“They tell a person who is consid- 
ering doing this for a patient, ‘What 
should I be on the lookout for? What 


should I really attend 
said. “In every other n age r _ 
and-death decision we ge|oar 
minds together to tafle over aad 
sore that we are doing the tight 
best we can.”- - 
Thai was precisely fee 
the San Francisco ea» 

Steve Heilig, its executive tfesctetEI 
“Our idea », whe&er v " 
Court legalizes this or ^ 
happen, and there shoold besomet 
ance, some protocols out theafe” 

• _ j . i i j 





ligsaid. 


tors have actually helped i 
dents die. A survey of doiP 
tors m the stale 
Washington, published last year hi rtet 
Journal of the American Medical A£ 
sociatioo, found that 25 percent had 
received a request for suicide assist, 
ance, and that a fourth of the psA W 
who asked for help were gtah-pn? 
serrations for lethal drugs. 

The betting among legal experts "" 
that some issues in the debate wjU , 
have to be resolved immediately. ; 
believe that the Supreme Court, winch Q 
expected to rule by the end of the month? 
will not find a fundamental right to dfe 
but will instead leave decisions cm arf 
sisted suicide to the states. id 


Another reason is the potential for 
overuse and misuse, which can result in 
injury to the gums and possibly to the 
teeth as well if they have cracks, cavities 
or worn fillings. 

Before any tooth bleaching is tried, a 
complete oral examination should be 
done by a dentist, who may first have to 
do some repairs! The dentist should also 
ask about exposures that might account 
for the s taining , since different stains 
may require different techniques. Then 
X-rays are needed to identify potential 
problems, like the health of the tooth 
pulp, which affects the sensitivity of the 
teeth. 

Once a decision is made to proceed, 
photographs should be taken to allow a 
before-and-after evaluation. For most 
stains, the preferred method involves 
home application of a bleaching paste 
supplied by the dentist. 

The paste, a combination of hydrogen 
peroxide and urea called carbamide per- 
oxide, is placed in an individually 
formed mold, or tray, and that fits over 
the teeth and reduces exposure of the 
gam tissue to the irritating paste. The 
home treatment can be used for several 
hours during the day or applied nightly 
for several weeks, if necessary. 

Sometimes the dentist will first use a 
more potent peroxide solution in the 
office to give the bleaching process a 
head start and shorten the time needed 
for home treatment 

Another popular method, which may 
also be followed by the use at home of a 
bleaching paste, involves microabra- 
sum of the tooth enamel, using a dental 
burr and an acidic compound to lightly 
abrade the tooth surfaces. This leaves 
the enamel with a lightened, smooth, 
glazed surface that is better able to resist 
future staining as well as attacks by 
decay-causing bacteria. 


U.S. Debut of Abortion Pill Hits a New Snag 


By Caryle Morphy 

Washington Post Service 


W ASHINGTON — The 
European company that 
had agreed to manufacture 
the French abortionpill for 
sale in die United States is backing out 
of die project, according to a source 
knowledgeable about the situation. The 
decision may delay the drug's intro- 
duction in the United States. 

The U.S. sponsor of the pill, the non- 
profit Population Council, now must try 
to find a replacement manufacturer. 

Sandra Waldman, a spokeswoman 
for the New York-based council, de- 
clined to confirm that the European 
company is backing out, but said: 
“Wnat we want to say is that there’s a 
dispute [with die manufacturer] and 


we’re continuing to talk to them, and our 
commercial partners are very actively 
looking for other manufacturers.” 

Asked whether this latest setback 
would delay the pill’s availability, she 
replied: “We don t know whether it will 
or how much it will, if at alL” 

The abortion pill, also known as RU- 
486, has been available for several years 
in Europe. But it has been debated in the 
United States, where it is opposed by 
anti-abortion groups. Fearful of eco- 
nomic boycotts or violent protests, no 
major U.S. pharmaceutical company has 
been willing to market the drug here. 

The European manufacturer has nev- 
er been identified publicly by the coun- 
cil because of concerns about a backlash 
against it by abortion foes in the United 
States. 

An attorney for the Population Coun- 


cil, James Boynton, did not deny that the 
manufacturer was backing out of its 
agreement with the council. “Let’s just 
say we have a dispute,'’ he said. The 
council and the foreign drug company 
have been in negotiations fra several 
weeks, Mr. Boynton said, and the ne- 
gotiations continue. 

The council, which promotes family 
planning and contraception, decided to 
posh ahead with plans to market RU- 
486, whose technical name is mifepris- 
tone, after the French developer of the 
drug gave its U.S. patent rignts to the 
council in 1994. Because the council is 
primarily a research organization and not 
a business, it reached licensing agree- 
ments with businesses to set up networks 
fra marketing and distributing the pilL 

Mifepristone is a synthetic steroid 
that makes it difficult for a fertilized egg 


to adhere to the lining of the 
When taken with misoprostol, a 
that triggers uterine contractions, tiki 
result is an abortion. ^ 

Mifepristone offers women an aherns 
ative to surgical abortion. Unlike smij 
gical abortions, it is effective in pnfr 
during abortions in the early weeks 9$ 
pregnancy. The side effects, most 
which are caused by the second drug} 
misoprostol, include bleeding, cramps 
nausea and vomiting. 

Last fall, the U!S. Food and Dnis( 
Administration conditionally approved 
the pill’s use, declaring it “sue an# 
effective.” But a court battle between 
foe council and one of its business parP 
ners delayed the project, which by then 
had cost the council more than $13 
million, until the litigation was settled 
out of court in January. ;y 



i 


A Body Chemical Fights TB Microbes j 


By Philip J. Hills 

New Tort Times Service 



EW YORK — Scientists 
have found a body chemical 
that naturally fights the 
tuberculosis bacterium. 
They believe that it may help them 
devise a treatment that does not depend 
on antibiotics. 

Dr. Richard A. Young of the White- 
head Institute for Biomedical Research 
in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Dr. Ger- 
ard J. Nau of Massachusetts General 
Hospital in Boston and their colleagues 
reported in The Proceedings of the Na- 


tional Academy of Sciences that a sub- 
stance called osteopontinis produced by 
the body when the lungs are infected 
with tuberculosis. 

The body's defense cells, the mac- 
rophages, usually engulf and destroy in- 
vading bacteria. But the tuberculosis bac- 
terium can resist being devoured. When 
the macrophage fails to destroy foe bac- 
terium, it then makes osteopontin, which 
acts as a signal for other defense cells to 
wrap around the invader and to form a 
mass of tissue around it If it cannot kill 
(he bacterium, at least it can imprison it. 

These globs of tissue surrounding foe 
tuberculosis bacterium, called granulomas. 


are about half an inch to an ineb across, and 
are characteristic of tuberculosis. Most im- 
portantly, they are also found in many 
healthy people whose tuberculosis infec- 
tion has not become virulent. 

The discovery that osteopontin sets 
off the formation of granuloma suggests 
a solution to one of Hie world’s medical 
mysteries. One-fond to one-half of foe 
world’s population is infected with 
tuberculosis, foe World Health Orga- 
nization reports, but only a fraction of 
those who are infected get life-threat- 
ening disease. It may be osteopontin 
luction and the formation of granu- 
foat prevent worse infections. 


Dr. Young said osteopontin mi| 
therefore be a candidate for the 
against tuberculosis, which is the lead- 
ing infectious killer in many developug 
nations. J 

The method the researchers used C 
discover foe role of osteopontin in tubefc 
culosis is also notable. They compand 
foe thousands of genes operating in cdl^ 
infected with tuberculosis with those op-, 
erating in uninfected cells. It tamed out 
that the only noticeable difference wa| 
that the infected cells were producira 
osteopontin. Scientists now plan to use 
the technique to study cells infected with 
HIV, foe virus that causes AIDS. ,J 


5#* k*r 

T-W TtllT 

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land ( ; \s Will 


BOOKS 


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NOAM CHOMSKY: 

A Life of Dissent 

By Robert F. Barsky. 237 pages. $27 JO. 
MIT Press. 

Reviewed by Carlin Romano 

O F all modern thinkers, foe MIT 
linguist and political theorist 
Noam Chomsky best illustrates what 
might be called the mind-brain problem 
in contemporary philosophy. 

As a brain, he's the patriarchal 
founder of foe Chomskyean Revolution 
in linguistics, foe man whose “Syn- 
tactic Structures’* (1957) stampeded foe 
behaviorism that ruled the field before 
him with a vision of “transformational 
grammar,” his comprehensive theory 
of bow innate language abilities are cot 
so much learned as biologically 
“grown.” Chomsky foe brain is also 
known for producing complex tomes of 
radical political analysis foal ambi- 
tiously dissect global problems, always ' 
in solidarity with the downtrodden. 

As a mind, however, the 68-year-old 
Chomsky can be famously captious, 
self-righteous and splenetic, prime to 
belittle the integrity and mental ability 
of those who disagree with him, to ex- 
aggerate points and impute foul motives 
to others. For instance, in his just-re- 
issued 199 1 pamphlet, ' ‘Media Control: 
The Spectacular Achievements of Pro- 


paganda,” Chomsky writes that "the 
last legal victory for labor was really 
1935,” that the media's depiction of 
international politics “has only the re- 
motest relation to reality,” that every- 
body " gooses tepped on command” 
during foe Gulf War, and that Manuel 
Noriega “is a minor thug” by com- 
parison “with George Bush himself.” 
Regarding foe Gulf War, he adds, “No 
reason was given for going to war that 
could not be refuted by a literate teen- 
ager in about two minutes. That again is 
foe hallmark of a totalitarian culture." 

Long absent from mass-media outlets 
— because of ideological censorship 
according to him, because of terrible 
judgment according to others — Chom- 
sky combines an extraordinary gener- 
osity toward humble folk who seek his 
counsel with a take-no-prisoners venom 
toward professionals who clash with 
him in print. Considering the dimen- 
sions of his fame and influence — foe 
Arts and Humanities Citation Index lists 
him as the only living figure among the 
10 most-quoted humanist thinkers of all 
time in a recent survey, ahead of Hegel 
and Cicero and gaining rat Freud — it is 
odd that no one before Robert Barsky, 
an assistant professor of English at the 
University of Western Ontario, has pub- 
lished a straightforward biography. 
Studies of Chomsky’s thought are com- 
monplace — from John Lyons's early 


monograph in the Modern Masters 
series to foe eight- volume Routledge 
collection of articles in its Critical As- 
sessments series — but not nuts-and- 
bolts accounts of his life. 

Barksy's effort might be called a ha- 
giography in the days when people be- 
lieved in living saints. The term “apo- 
logiagraphy” makes more sense, 
because Barsky has invented a new 
genre. Not only does he take Chomsky’s 
side on every issue, but his routine way 
of repelling any challenge to his hero is to 
yank Chomsky in — courtesy of snippets 
from interview transcripts with the all- 
knowing one — to answer foe charge. 

T HUS when Barsky introduces 
Chomsky’s debate with B.F. Skin- 
ner, Chomsky is immediately brought in 
to describe Skinner's weak as a 
“fraud.” When Barsky contrasts 
Chomsky’s activism unfavorably with 
Irving Howe's, Chomsky beams down 
and nastily attributes Howe’s move to- 
ward moderate socialism to his “bitter 
resentment of the student movement 
and the New Left for failing to pay 
enough attention to him.” Baraky's de- 
fenses of Chomsky’s long-standing af- 
filiation with MIT despite its Defense 
Department contracts and Chomsky's 
concern with the free-speech rights of 
French Holocanst-denier Robot Fauris- 
son are even more embarrassing. 


Anyone inclined to view Chomsky’s 
irascibility in the face of criticism as 
peculiar only to his politics need only 
turn to Randy Allen Harris's superb 
“The Linguistics Wars,” which re- 
cords foe blood baths in that discipline. 
Barsky echoes Chomsky’s belittling of 
Harris’s book, dabbing it “gossipy.” 
The reality is that Harris drew on scares 
of sources and interviews, while 
Baraky’s book is a clip-job, strung to- 


gether with Chomsky’s phoneme bites. 

Reading about Chomsky’s intense 
teenage reaction to foe fall of Barcelona 
during the Spanish Civil War, and his 
enduring love affair with anarchism, 
one absorbs a crucial truth way before 
Barsky states it “Unlike the many 
members of foe left who captivated him 
as a young man — such as Dwight 
Macdonald, George Orwell and Ber- 
trand Russell — Chomsky himself did 


in 

not come to left-libertarian or anarchic 
thinking as a result of his disillusion^ 
ment with liberal thought. He quite lilj 
eraily began there.” 

He also, alas, seems to have ended 
there. 


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hr.vjr$ x-'-vmt 


Carlin Romano, literary critic af the 
Philadelphia Inquirer and a teacher of 
philosophy at Bennington College, 
wrote tius for The Washington Post. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Draft org. 

♦ ■Immediately^ 
j The back of the 
choir? 

13 American falcon 

ii Queen's home 
«■ Emotes 


it Beans or com. 

a -0 

ia Harvestman 

sn Astronaut 
Shepard 

xi Postal creed 
word 


AGENCE CHAMPS aYSSS 

Ftmshed ap art ments, 3 months or 
more or unfurnished. raaldential arose. 


By Alan Tniscott 

EFORE reaching for an 
1 indignant pen, the reader 
is urged to read on. All is not 
quite what it seems. 

The diagramed deal, more 
or less, was played recently in 
the 34th UJA-Federatiou 
Charity Game at the Har- 
monie Club in Manhattan. 
The proceeds, more than 
$80,000 set a record said the 
chairwomen, Marci Miron 
and Tubby S layman. 

The winning score, also 
thought to be arecord, was 75 
percent by Mark Molson of 
Montreal and Neil Scott of 
Manhattan. 


There afe days when noth- 
ing can go wrong, and it was 
so for me winners. On the 
diagramed deal, they had a 
small accident and showed a 
profit. With the North hand, 
Scott bid clubs followed by 
spades. He then supported 
diam onds, and charged on to 
slam. The five-spade re- 
sponse showed two of the five 
keys cards plus the queen of 
diamonds. 

In choosing his opening 
lead. West thought his best 
chance was to take at least one 
trick in dummy's second suit. 
He therefore led the spade 
jack, and when the dummy 
appeared everyone stared 
harl Conscious that they 


were looking at him, Scott did 
a double-take. 'He then re- 
moved the ace of spades from 
his club suit and put it where it 
belonged. 

Molson won in dummy, led 
to the heart ace and ruffed a 
heart He then announced that 
he would draw trumps and 
discard his losers on 
dummy’s spades. He hod 
made on overtrick that was 
worth a lot of match points. 

Bnt if Scott hod bid his 
hand normally, spades first 
and then clubs, foe opening 
lead would probably have 
been a club, scoring a trick for 
the defense. He had achieved 
a rare maneuver: the lead-in- 
hibiting accident 


NORTH 

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Tel Paris: +33(0)142 253225 
Fas Peris: +33 (0)14563 37 09 



22 *Thy word is 

■ unto . . 

Psalms 
28 Air quality 
tester. Abbr. 

28 Joe and others? 
ao Writer Wtesei 
3i 1970 George 
Segal movie 
38 Kind 
>7 Undergoes 
38 — Group 
(Latin American 
association) 

38 Chum 

40 It might result In 
6 change of We 

41 Env. extra 

42 1964 Cary Grant 
comedy- 
romance 

49 Daughter of 
Laban 

47 Glasgow refusal 
4a — de 
Cologne 
«9 Combust bte 
woodpiles 
n Sign of 
success? 

S3 Prong 
571966 A. E. 

Hotchner 

memoir 
ei Mol basic 

«s Really soak 
84 First name in 
women's tennis 
88 Poe poem 
■a Young swan 
«r Crew need 
■a Cal. units 


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forces 

2 Singer Payne 

3 *My Roomy* 
atarywrtter 

4 Frequent 
accompanier 

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■ Didn't function 
property 

7 Ancient Semitic 
idol 

8 Sleep disturber 

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10 Town near We 
Golden Gats 
Bridge 

11 Laundry room 
brand 

12 Word part 
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ia Musical tail 
14 Low Island 
19 Old name for 
the flu 

23 Draws out as 
humor 

24 Orange 

ae S way showing 
27 Hyphenate with 

American 

2 BTwo-)or-one? 

31 Young lion 

32 Dancer Carol ol 
The Pajama 
Game' 

38 Landscaper's 
Job 

84 White, granular 
powder 

35 Chlorophyta bit 

43 Start of a toast 

44 Lost interest in, 
in a way 

48 Occasional 
parking 
requirement 
so Enliven 
52 City on the 

.Missouri 
34 Johnny Cash's 

’ thelme' 

aa Btg-iime 
competition: 
Abbr. 

se Scrutinizes 
58 Noi enough 
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Puoto by GRwrt H. IwMg 


©Afeir York Times/ Edited by Will Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of June 1 1 

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SPONSORED SECTION 


EGYPT 


ENTERNAHONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 


PAGE 11 


SPONSORED SECTION 



£■•-:• - 


Economic Shakeup Extends to All Sectors 

r 

Qgypt’s economic reform program has begun to reap results. 


he- Egyptian economy 
T| is receiving a long 
rJL overdue shakeup that 
is forcing change in all sec- 
tors, from tourism and tex- 
tiles to pharmaceuticals and 
Agriculture. The three key 
c&nponents of the economic 
reform program are the pri- 
vatization of state-owned 
companies, die liberalization 
of trade and deregulation, 
which is creating competi- 
tion because of an overlap in 
the activities of banks and 
financial service companies. 
t-'The goal of the reform 
program is not only to in- 
<£ease investment, but also to 
create employment, improve 
Serial services and establish 
new communities in the New 
VaJJey to relieve congestion, 
fhe overhauling of ports and 
customs as well as the pri- 
vatization -of the country’s 
four large public-sector 
banks will begin this year. 

_ For the reform program to 
stay on course, much invest- 
ment is needed to achieve 
sustainable gross domestic 
product growth of around 8 
percent annually. The re- 
quirement is around 27 per- 
cent of GDP, and the country 
has 17 percent Foreign di- 
i&ct investment — much of it 
earmarked for tourism, oil 
and gas — totaled $800 mil- 
lion in 1996-97. Portfolio in- 
vestment, which amounted 
fa $13 billion, saw “an in- 
fant of $200 million within 
the month of the Standard & 
Poor’s rating early in die 
flac,” says Youssef Boutros 
minister of state for 
Economic affairs. S&P’s rat- 
upg of BBB- reflects the suc- 
cess of the reform program. 
r-.The automobile industry 
Kas been a magnet for foreign 
investment over the past 
years. Major international 
®r companies — including 
Citroen, Peugeot, Fiat, 


- ; |S, 


Renault, Suzuki, Toyota, Hy- 
undai and Daewoo — have 
set up shop in Egypt In 
November, Daimler-Benz 
AG will start assembling 
Mercedes-Benz E-2Q0s at a 
new $443 mi lli oilplant, and 
BMW's first domestically 
produced sedan will be un- 
veiled on June 18. Mean- 
while, leading Egyptian 
manufacturer Abdel 

Moneim Saudi of the Mod- 
em Motors group has gov- 
ernment agreement for a joint 
venture to develop a substan- 
tial car-mamifecturing proj- 
ect in Libya. Modem Motors 
already produces Suzuki 
Swifts, and plans are under 
way for the production of 
Nissan commercial vehicles 
and 2500 cc BMW 523 mod- 
el passenger cars. 

Exports and savings 
To make up for the shortfall 
in investment and to trans- 
form Egypt into an emerging 
market, the government 
plans to increase exports and 
to raise domestic direct sav- 
ings by improving the per- 
formance of insurance, pen- 
sion funds and social 
security. “Our strategy is to 
go to savings institutions, the 
contractual ones — insur- 
ance, pensions funds and so- 
cial security. All three need a 
major overhaul” says Mr. 
Boutros Ghali. 

Life insurance premiums, 
for example, could do a lot 
better They “don’t exceed 
ouetirird of 1 percent of 
GDP in Egypt.” he says, 
adding that this figure should 
be “around 3 percent to 4 
percent of GDP.” The insur- 
ance institutions “do not 
have the proper access to 
markets, the proper technol- 
ogy, die proper know-how to 
generate these kinds of 
premiums from the local 
economy,” he says. The gov- 


ernment plans to tackle, flu's 
by bringing in private sector 
insurance companies to sup- 
ply technical expertise. Mr. 
Boutros Ghali says two for- 
eign insurance companies 
will be opening shop shortly. 
Plans are also under way to 
privatize joint-venture insur- 
ance companies. 

To stimulate noncontrac- 
tual savings, the government 
accepts that the capital mar- 


Reforming the tax struc- 
ture to attract savings might 
prove easier than reorganiz- 
ing customs and ports, which 
are a main stumbling block to 
doing business in Egypt This 
is another area where pri- 
vatization may provide a 
remedy — this time, for the 
bottlenecks caused by poor 
administration, red tape and 
corruption. Alexandria and 
Dikhelia have the largest 


tunes of the Suez Canal Au- 
thority have dwindled on 
several fronts. Earnings from 
northbound oil tankers have 
declined by more than 30 
percent In 1994, well over 
16,000 vessels used the 
canal compared with less 
than 15,000 in 1996. These 
factors have contributed to a 
decline in canal revenues — 
from $2 billion in 1993 to 
$1.88 billion in 1996. 


Remtty for businostK 
Rr omidon t Hoani Mtitoarafc tew reafflini etf Egypt's 
t M n unitm tM tl to economfc i w Um mm amd offtctoncy. 


iwWcfi §9 expected to 
In both 


itm participation 
gMhafmarlr«ts. 


ket will have to be made 
“safer, better organized, 
more transparent,” says Mn 
Boutros Ghali. 

A sustainable domestic 
market is linked inextricably 
to the growth of a middle 
class, which is still small in 
Egypt. The population of 
around 62 million has an av- 
erage annual income of less 
than $1,000 — not enough to 
stimulate growth based on 
domestic savings. Mr. 
Boutros Ghali feels confident 
that the middle class will 
“kick in by the end of the 
year and will have greater 
spending power and more 
confidence.” 

A factor in the growth ofa 
domestic market is how 
quickly the vast underground 
economy can be brought into 
the mainstream. Mr. Boutros 
Ghali says that as the “tax 
structure becomes simpler, 
more transparent and more 
obvious, this underground 
economy is going to slowly 
come above ground.” 


volume of trade, followed by 
Suez, Damietta and Port 
Said Sorting out ports and 
customs “was not a high pri- 
ority up to now because we 
had serious financial imbal- 
ances,” says Mr. Boutros 
Ghali, who believes the prob- 
lem can be solved in 12-18 
months. “The physical con- 
straints are few. I don’t need a 
new port 1 just need to man- 
age it better — to get the 
private sector to do it." 

Suez Canal and SUMED 
In a country with a vigorous 
privatization policy, where 
competition is the name of 
the game, one impediment to 
file privatization of foe Suez 
Cartel — which is losing 
ground to competitors — is 
its status as part of the na- 
tional heritage. 

For over 40 years (al- 
though not always continu- 
ously), the Suez Canal has 
been a vital conduit for East- 
West maritime Hade. In re- 
cent years, however, the for- 


Oil and Gas Will Boost Economy 

Sgjjtf is poised to become' atop supplier of natvraigas. 1 T 


D iscoveries of vast amounts of 
natural gas will aid the gov- 
ernment's energy policies in re- 
ducing domestic oil consumption in fe- 
tfprofgas. Besides being cleaner for the 
environment, increased gas consump- 
tion will mean that more oil will be 
available for export With so many im- 
portant new finds, gas exports could 
fjon increase dramatically. 

& The export of 73 million tons a year 
of liquefied natural gas from Egypt to 
Turkey— proposed in a memorandum 
Of understanding between Egypt, 
Amoco and foe Turkish company Botas 
Petroleum Pipeline Corporation — will 
not happen overnight This is because 
deports are dependent on infrastructure 
developments; to turn natural gas into 
iNG, for instance, an export terminal 


has to be built — possibly somewhere 
between Port Said and Damietta. The 
product has to be marketed, and it will 
take time to develop new gas fields to 
cope with demand 

Egypt already produces 1,600 mil- 
lion cubic feet a day of natural gas, and 
reserves are said to be about 30 trillion 
to 35 trillion cubic feet, according to 
official statistics. Egypt is thus poised to 
become a leading supplier of natural gas 
once new finds come on stream. 

The Nile Delta is known to have 
world-class reserves of natural gas. 
Amoco Egypt Oil Company recently 
announced its 18lh discovery of gas in 
the Nile Delta area within a period of 
five years. Amoco and the Egyptian 
General Petroleum Corporation have 
formed a joint venture, Gulf of Suez 


Petroleum Company (GUPCO), which 
is Egypt’s leading producer of oil with 
an output of 360,000 barrels a day; it 
also produces 90m c/ffd gas. 

Amoco’s partner in the region is 
Agjp, through the latter’s local com- 
pany, International Egyptian Ofl Com- 
pany, which is developing gas fields at 
El-Temsah, East Delta Drap Marine, 
Ras el-Barr and Baltim. These devel- 
opments are expected to cost about $1 
billion and to produce l billion c/ffd by 
the year 2000. 

Agjp/IEOC’s main gas interest is the 
EI-Qar’s field in the Nue Delta. EEOC is 
also active in Gulf of Suez and the 
Western Desert “Several discoveries in 
the Gulf of Suez will consolidate the 


Continued on page 12 


SCA’s competitors are the 
large container ships and big- 
ger tankers that for economic 
reasons sail round the Cape of 
Good Hope to transport 
Middle East oil to the United 
States and Europe. The Arab 
Petroleum Pipeline Company 
(SUMED), which is 50 per- 
cent owned by the Egyptian 
government and 50 parent 
by Gulf interests, is cooper- 
ating with the SCA. “SCA 
and SUMED have a com- 
plementary strategy and are 
coordinating their policies to 
jointly attract the maximum 
amount of oil moving around 
the Cape,” say sources from 
SUMED. The maximum 
navigable size of a vessel in 
the Suez Canal is 150.000 
deadweight tons. Anything 
larger unloads at Ain Sukhna, 
continues on its way up the 
Suez Canal and reloads the | 
oil at Sidi Kerin Under the § 
agreement, or “complement- 
ary strategy,” smaller tankers g| 

should pass through the Suez 
Canal without unloading and 

larger ones should go half rigated areas south of tire 
empty. Kharga oasis. Investment in- 

centive legislation is in place 
The New Valley project to attract investors to Upper 

The reform p rogram includes Egypt; in add-on, the gpv T 
. tiie recent^ promulgation , of ,emment plans to buildroads, 
investment legislation for foe ‘ fund agricultural and indus- 
development of Upper trial development, and create 
Egypt Aquifers of tire 
Kharga oasis m the Western 
Desert have provided inhab- 
itants of the region with wa- 
ter for thousands of years. 

The New Valley project, in- 
augurated on Jan. 9, 1997 by 
President Hosni Mubarak, is 
a new manifestation of a very 
old dream to extend habitable 
areas by building aqueducts 
and various irrigation 
schemes. 

What is different about die 
New Vhlley project is its size 
and feasibility. Over a 20 
year period, the government 
plans to move 3 million 
people from the congested 
Nile Valley into newly ir- 



health and education infra- 
structure. 

Water is to be diverted 
from the Lake Nasser sea- 
sonal overflow reservoir at 
Toshka and pumped through 
the proposed Shaikh Zayed 
canal to irrigate 520,000 
acres south of the Kharga 
oasis. A pumping station and 
siphon system, 50 kilometers 
north of Abu Simble, have 
been proposed to lift: water 
above the lake’s water level. 
Besides the expense — and 
the price tag keeps changing 
— any scheme to harness the 
waters of the Nile has to be 
put into a regional political 
context Many countries 


share the Nile basin, since 85 
percent of the water begins in 
themoist Ethiopian high- 
lands. 

. Politics told s&iety 
On the political and social 
fronts, the Muslim Brother- 
hood is immobilized by in- 
ternal disputes, and the 
Gamma’a Islamiya militants, 
who were behind most of the 
recent insurgency, no longer 
hold the country to ransom. 
Moreover, the social malaise 
that caused the violence — 
particularly the extremely 
high levels of youth unem- 
ployment and general 
poverty — is being alleviated 


to a certain extent by the So- 
cial Fund for Development 

The fund was set up “to 
handle the adverse effects of 
' tire economic reform . pren; 
gram throughput the transi-, 
tion,” says Manager Ezzeld- 
in Shawkat 

The unemployed and poor 
remain a large offstage pres- 
ence as the government fo- 
cuses on the nuts and bolts of 
the economy. As Egypt’s 
leaders drag the country out 
of the 19th century, intro- 
ducing many significant eco- 
nomic changes, it faces the’ 
challenge of extending tire 
benefits of these changes to ', 
all social classes. • 



A, 


igip was one of the very first 
companies to take a serious interest 
in Egypt's energy resources by 
investing in technologies and 
personnel. The history of our 
40 years activity in this country 
is one of ongoing success: from 
the early discoveries of oil, and 
then gas, in the Gulf of Suez, up 
to recent finds in the Nile Delta 
and Western Desert. 

Achievement of these goals has 
been the outcome of a total 
commitment that entails belief in 
real cooperation and respect for the 
idea that everyone has the right to 
make their own contribution to the 
integrated economic and energy 
development of the countries 
around the Mediterranean. 


• 


/S^pRESeNCE »J ESYPT EoC’tf™ - 



ASP, iMH AN OVERALL CRUDE OIL 

PRODUCTION OF smodo miSWESECOND 
LARGEST 0& COMPANY IN EGYPT, 

AND ms t&fmstfor gas, 

WIMAPRQDUCnONOF53BILUON 
' CWKMETBRS/YEAB.BX1ALTO ABOUT 

4o % of Mncm. production. 


BAg*> 

ITALIAN ENERGY 


Agip is a member oflWFnl 













PAGE 12 


INIEBNAilONAI HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 


SPONSORED SECTION 


SPONSORED SEX "HO « 


EGYPT 


Pharmaceuticals: 

Ready for Major Change? 

New developments are likely to transform the industry. 





kists 


T he pharmaceutical in- 
dustry is in transition 
as the government's 
program of liberal economic 
reform and privatization un- 
folds to encourage foreign in- 
vestment, which will enable 
the fuller integration of 
Egypt into the global econ- 
omy. 

Egypt recently became a 
member of the World Trade 
Organization, and this, to- 
gether with its trade accord 
with the European Union, is 
throwing into relief the mod- 
us operandi of the industry. 

Egypt's pharmaceuticals 
market, the largest in the 
Middle East, is worth 32 bil- 
lion Egyptian pounds ($944 
million) and in 1 996 grew by 
6 percent 

“Around 85 percent of the 
product is dispensed in the 
private market, and the re- 
maining 15 percent is dis- 
tributed through government 
hospitals, health insurance 
and large institutions, such as 
the armed forces and police 
outlets," says Samir Sabet, 
vice chairman and managing 
director of Novartis (Swiss- 
pharma), formed by the mer- 
ger of Ciba and Sandoz. 

Around 94 percent of 
Egypt's pharmaceutical 
needs are manufactured at 32 
sites in the country. Mr. Sabet 
adds, however, that “the re- 
maining 6 percent, represent- 
ing the high-tceh end of the 
market requiring heavy in- 
vestment, is likely to con- 
tinue being imported." 

Among the market leaders 
are Novartis, Bristol Myers 
Squibb, Hoechst Roussel, 
Eipico and Pharco, Glaxo 
'Wellcome, Amoun, Amriya 
and Mist. 


Topping the top 10 

Novartis increased its market 
share from 7.6 percent in 
1995 to 8.2 percent in 1996, 


and in the first quarter of 
1997 assumed first place in 
the top-10 league or leading 
Egyptian manufacturers. 

The company's sales in 
1996 grew by 19.6 percent, 
compared with market 
growth of 6 percent Accord- 
ing to company statistics, the 
increase was due mainly to 
the performance of core re- 
gistered products, die high 
performance of three new 
products, large increases in 
the sales of generic products 
and increased exports to the 
Gulf. 

“In those segments of the 
market where our products 
compete specifically, we still 
maintain the position of be- 
ing number one or two in all 
areas,” says Mr. Sabet. Com- 
pany profits were also 
pushed up by the value of the 
U.S. dollar against the Swiss 
franc and by the increased 
value of the Egyptian pound 
against the Swiss franc. 

Complying with the WTO 
Egypt's membership in the 
WTO means that local pro- 
ducers will no longer be pro- 
tected by government sub- 
sidies, tariffs will be lowered 
and the pharmaceutical in- 
dustry will have to comply 
with stringent WTO rules re- 
garding tariffs and trade-re- 
lated intellectual property 
rights. 

Copies of drugs, which re- 
sulted in a flourishing local 
market, largely replaced 
costly imports but will be- 
come a thing of the past as 
local manufacturers must 
now produce patented drugs 
under a license. 

Consumers and many 
manufacturers fear the new 
rules will push up prices and 
forpe the closure of many 
local companies, which do 
not have the resources for 
development to compete 


with multinationals. “Many 
will not survive unless they 
merge,” says Mr. Sabet The 
pharmaceutical industry will 
be subject to what Atef 
Obeid, the minister for pri- 
vatization, refers to as a 
“core feature of the liber- 
alization of trade” — 
namely, competition in the 

marketplace. 

The WTO argues that 
membership will actually 
lower prices by encouraging 
competition among export- 
ers and improving the quality 
ofTocai products. In any case, 
more than 1,000 drugs are 
already exempt from tariffs. 

Importance of exports 
With deregulation and lib- 
eralization, exports are likely 
to become an even more im- 
portant focus of the industry. 
The country already exports 
to the Middle East, partic-, 
ularly to the United Arab! 
Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar and * 
Saudi Arabia — the largest | 
market, worth around $750 ® 
million. • 



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A 5944 mffibn Musty: Egypt’s pharmaceuticals market 's the largest in tiie Mtktie East 


Privatization Is a Key Element of Structural Reforms 


AnM , 


.... -■■■jrk.rei fr* LppfB-ift' 


Industry I 


The next wave of privatizations in Egypt will include sugar, aluminum and textile companies, as well as public utilities. 


E 


gypt's economic re- 
form program rests on 
three central, interre- 
lated elements: privatization, 
liberalization and deregula- 
tion. 

The offering of 3 14 public 
sector enterprises on the 
stock market has come to 
represent the motor force of 
privatization's contribution 
to a successful reform pro- 
gram, to which the govern- 
ment is committed under an 
IMF agreement 
“The core to structural re- 
forms is the privatization 


program because you give a 
signal that the government 
will not be a competitor to tiie 
private investor,” says Atef 
Obeid, the minister in charge 
of privatization. 

From sugar to ntitities 
Privatization generated about 
5 billion Egyptian pounds 
($1 .48 billion), raised mostly 
through public offerings, in 
tiie fust phase of the pro- 
gram, which ended in May. 

The next phase will in- 
clude some of tiie largest tex- 
tile, aluminum and sugar 


companies. Public utilities 
are on the agenda for private 
investment, and some 
companies will have more of 
their shares sold on tiie stock 
market 

The government began its 
program by selling off prof- 
itable companies. With the 
proceeds from the first round 
of successful sales in a cen- 
tral bank fond, tiie govern- 
ment is now approaching an- 
chor investors, or those who 


come from within the same 
industry as the company in 
question and who have the 
expertise to turn round a fail- 
ing company. 

When a company even- 
tually goes to the stodt mar- 
ket, the anchor investors’ 
“interest will, of course, be 
tiie capital gains that they 
make in the interim period 
and, they hope, profits as 
they go along,” says Sherine 
Faring, investment manager 


at tiie Gulf Arab Investment 
Company. 

Part of the funds from the 
first round of sales will be 
used to settle major debts and 
redundancy payments to die 
employees of unprofitable 
state enterprises. 

Employees who have 
worked in these companies 
for longer than 20 years are 
being offered early retire- 
ment, along with a sum of 
12,000 to 35,000 Egyptian 


■ : — v-*-f * w 




['Hi 




_ SK 






In Egypt since 1984, our 
portfolio of direct and in- 
direct investments now 
exceeds $ 70 million. Our 
extensive experience and 
widespread network in 
Egypt and the Gulf States 
position us to actively 
support you in a broad 
range of investments. 


Acquisitions 
New Ventures 
Mutual Funds 
Financial Portfolios 
Direct Investment Funds 


For FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT: 

Ahmed Farid, GeneralManager - 
Mohamed El Sabbahi, Manager, Projects 
Shireen Farrag, Manager, Investments 


56 Gameat El Dowal El Arab ia, Mohatides 6iri^ Gi 2 a L . VfA r 
- P:0: Box ll2, Gezira 11568, Cairo, JSgypt. ;• . ‘2; > j -V I/.- 1 >: ' ' A 

Telephone: (202). 336 3717/13/30 Facsixriilc: (^2^ 348 9809 { 


i 

d'L'rJL 


ARAB INTERNATIONAL BANK 
A LEADING BANK IN EGYPT & ARAB REGION 


AIB 30 / 6 / 1996 RESULTS 

ASSETS / LIABILITIES US $ 2264 MILLION 

CAPITAL US$ 210 MILLION 

RESERVES US$ 100.7 MILLION 

DEPOSITS US$ 1914 MILLION 


LOCAL BRANCHES 

ALEXANDRIA: Tel : 4836775 Telex :55683 AIBLX UN 
PORT SAID : Tel : 223739 Telex :63273 AIBPS UN 
TAHRIR: Tel : 5743448 Telex :201 13 AIBIR UN 
HELIOPOLIS: Tel : 2902069 Telex :21718 AIBHL UN 

OFFSHORE BRANCH : BAHRAIN Tel : 53161 1 Telex: 9489 - 9538 AIBBH BN 
REPRESENTATIVE OFFICE : TRIPOLI, LIBYA Tel : 3600040 Telex :20919 AIBLY 

CALL US AT HEAD OFFICE 

35 Abdel khalek Sarwat Street, Cairo, Egypt. Tel: 3918794 - 3916492 - 3916391 
Telex: 92079 AIB UN - 92098 AIBEX UN SWIFT: ARIBEGCX001 



Privatization Program: July-December 1997 

The following is a partial list of companies scheduled to be privatized this year. 


Companies Offered on the Stock Market: 

Minority shares (40%) 

Egyptian Pharmaceutical Tracfing 
Misr Pharmaceutical Industries 
0 Gombouria Pharmaceuticals and Medical 

Appliances 

Chemical Industries Development (CID) 
□ Nile Pharmaceutical and 
Chemical Industries 
Majority shares 
Alexandria for Container Handling 
General Egyptian for Railway Wagons (SEMAF) 


Com p ani e s Offered to' Anchor Investors: 

Minority shares 

The Delta Industries (IDEAL) 

PHILUPS 

0 Nasr Wool and Selected Textiles (ST1A) 
Paper Converting (VERTA) 

BATA 

Societe Industrielle Moharram Press 
Commercial for Woods 
Grand Hotels of Egypt 
Egyptian Hotels 


Fbr more Information. please contact 
Dr. Mokhtar Khattab, Public Sector Ministry. Fax: (202) 355 9233. 


pounds. The package is being 
offered before privatization 

The privatization program 
is attracting investors from 
Europe and many Arab 
countries. 

Saudi Arabia and Kuwait 
are the largest investors M 
Egypt, with interests estimat- 
ed to be worth around $2 
billion each, followed 
Libya and the United 
Emirates. 

Saudi Arabia, considered 
Egypt’s most important trade 
partner, invests in a range of 
sectors, including tourism, 
real estate, agriculture and itV- 
dustry. 

“With the privatization 

pro g ram going on in Egypt. 
Saudi Arabia will un- 
doubtedly invest heavily fj 
Egypt,” say Saudi Arabian 
embassy sources. 

Substantial income 

Egypt’s privatization 
gram is well under way, 
numerous public of’ 
through tiie stock 
generating substantial 
come fbr the government!. 
Some bankers estimate thaf 
$4 billion will be raised by 
tiie end of tiie year, after tw 
sale oflarge sugar, aluminum 
and textile companies. • -J 




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NATIONAL BANK OF EGYPT 
The Top Bank in the Land 


A 


f'-.'.V, --S': 


Tte firstBank to introdueeinataai | 

■ X - - 


The first Bank to establish a leasing 
’ con|any m Egypt in cooperation 
expertise.. 


The first Bank to issue GDRsin 
the international market . . 

The first Bank on the Internet. 

Equity participation in 162 projects 
with a total capital of 


LE.16.5bn. 




H- 

Head Olfict^: National Bank Of Egypt Tower ^ 
Corniehe FI Nile. Cairo j* 

P.O. Ro\ i Hill Tel. : 5749101 Fax : 7626"^ ft 
t lx : 20009 Mil; I N f 


- sum 


Oil and Gas Finds -i 


Continued from page 11 

role of IEOC as Egypt’s 
□umber one gas producer and 
□umber two oil producer,” 
says Oldarico Masoni, man- 
aging director of Agip/ 
IOEC 

Agip/IEOC recently dis- 
covered 17 natural gas wells 
in the Nile Delta, six new oil 
wells in the Western Desert 
and five oil wells in the Red 
Sea. In 1996, the company 
produced about 3 1 percent of 
Egypt's oil, or 290,000 h/d, in 
tandem with joint-venture 
partner EG PC, through their 
company PetrobeJ. Their 
principal oil-producing area 
is at Belayim in the Gulf of 
Suez, discovered in 1961. 

SIX billion in oil exports 
Egypt’s oil exports for fiscal 
1996 were worth S 1 .6 billion. 
Volume could rise to 1 mil- 
lion h/d within two to three 
years; the current rate of pro- 
duction is 880,000 barrels of 
oil a day, according to official 
sources. 

More than 16 other 
companies are active in the 
field; these include Apache 
Corporation at Qarun as well 
as at the two adjoining areas 
of Khalda and Khalda Offset, 
where seismic studies and 
drilling are progressing. 
Apache has a 40 percent in- 
terest in Khalda and Khalda 
Offset; the operator, the 
Spanish company RepsoL 
has a 50 percent interest; a 


third partner, Samsung, has-i 
10 percent stake. “Khald^ 
Petroleum, the joint v* 
company between EG1 
and the partners, operates i 
production in all of the ~ 
operations,” says Kevin ' 
vice president and 
manager of Apache, 

On the transport side, a new 
gas pipeline across the WeaJ- 
era Desert from Khalda 2$ 
Alexandria is being cofe- 
structed and wifi cany. 2^0 
million c/f7d of gas fronji 
Khalda in 1999. A -secoriiji 
pipeline is being planned to 
carry gas out of Khalda. 
destined fbr south Cairo. :> 

“Qarun is our flagship 

eration and is probably the 
largest single find in fop 
Western Desert,” continues 
Mr. Heel. “We have a 75 pw 
cent working interest in parlf 
nership with Seagull. Apache 
has six drilling rigs at 
along with several prospects, 
including an inventory, and 
we intend being active oiit 
there fbr years to come. 
There is a lot to do.” ! 

The substantial new dip- 
coven es of oil and gas wit! 
prove beneficial in the future 
as demographic factors and 
economic growth increase 
energy consumption in 
Egypt. The switch from oil fo 
gas as a source of energy is 
unlikely to take place in th e 
short term because invest- 
ment in the infrastructure 

needed to process gas must 
come first • 







FJyiriAlEcMi; 

vi r 


“Egypt” 

hjk produced in Us entirety by the Advertising Department 
°f the International Herald Tribune. 

Writer: Jane Borges is based in London. 
Program Director: Bill Mahder. 




figsfflasit 


■ v-fi'* l wrfi*: 




SFONSORKD SECTION 


JC'TTEKIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 


PACE 13 


SPONSORED SECTION 



tural Reforms 


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*Meo?1997 


EGYPT 


f or Tourists Seeking Sunshine in Winter 

addition to its cultural attractions , Egypt offers fine beaches and spectacular coral reefs. 


<v$4> t jSa 


g-n gypt has 15,000 kik>- 
jH. metos (9300 miles) 
|L— > of largely unspoiled 
pindy beaches and beautiful 
boral reefs that are practically 
|on Europe’s doorstep, and 
Jthe country could become a 
[sought-after destination for 
Europeans seeking the sun in 

> Tourism is the country’s 
feccajd-laigfist earner of for- 
eign exchange, after remit- 
tees from Egyptians living 
raerseas, and the industry 

pen tributes more to the an- 
nual gross domestic product 

itfran revenues from oil and 

foe Suez Canal. Tourism is a 
wbor-intensive industry, and 
Basis great potential for job 


E on under way 

ehind the sectoral 
g of the economy 
vemment’s 1993 
reforms, which 
folio and foreign 
straent, much of 
1 to die tourism 

is privatization 
under way, with 
hundreds ofhotels being sold 
all over the country — 36 in 


the first few months of this 
year. 

. Coastal areas in Sinai and 
along fee Red Sea have been 
earmarked for private sector 
development, and they have 
bees a focus of direct foreign 
investment from Europe and 
fee Gulf. 

Incentives for investors 
The government is offering 
very favorable incentives to 
private investors, including 
tax holidays ami fee sale of 
land that has been set aside 
fen tourism purposes for as 
little as $1 per square meter in 

new tourism areas. 

Tourism is one of fee most 
rapidly growing sectors of 
fee economy. Growth can be 
seen in three statistical in- 
dicators: The number of tour- 
ist nights increased by 128 
percent between 1983 and 
1995; the number of hotels 
mushroomed from 300 in 
1984 to 761 in 1996; and fee 
number of tourists more than 
doubled, from 13 million in 
1983 to 3.9 million in 1996. 

Rapid growth in tourism 
The top markets for Egypt in 
1995 woe Germany, Saudi 


Arabia, Britain, Israel and 
Italy. By fee end of the year, 
however, Scandinavia is 
likely tobe added to fee list as 
an important European mar- 
ket. 

Egypt’s oldest travel 
agency, state-owned Misr 
Travel has signed a cooper- 
ation agreement wife 
Sweden’s Fritidsresor 
Group, which has branches 
all over Scandinavia, to be- 
gin charter frights in October 
from Scandinavia to Egypt 

The agreement is expected 

to “raise the number ofScan- 
dinavian tourists to Egypt by 
30 percent above last year’s 
figures,” says Mohamed 
Ahmed Hussein, chairman of 
Misr Travel 

In f r a st ru c tu ral targets 
To reach fee target of 6 mil- 
lion visitors by 2000, the 
country will not only have to 
build quality hotels and re- 
sorts, but it will also have to 
meet other infrastructural tar- 
gets, says Mamdouh el- 
Behagui, Egypt’s minister of 
tourism. Roads, railways, 
airports and telecommunica- 
tions infrastructure need to 
be built and upgraded, and 


the tourism industry staffed 
by professional personnel. 

The muhibillion-dollar 
tourism industry will likely 
make an even greater con- 
tribution to the economy 
through diversification. Cul- 
tural tourism will no longer 
dominate fee tourism sector 
since new projects on the 
west coast of the Red Sea and 
on the Sinai Peninsula are 
being developed to add 
beach and recreational hol- 
idays wife a difference. 

The two main areas for 
private sector development 
are along the coast from Ras 
Zert to Meisa Alam on the 
Red Sea, and South of Sinai 
in fee Gulf of Suez, St Cath- 
erine Plateau and fee Gulf of 
Aqaba. 

New developments 
The Sahl Hashish Bay proj- 
ect, south ofHutghada on fee 
Red Sea coast, is being de- 
veloped by the Egyptian 
Company for Tourist Re- 
sorts, whose backers are the 
local Misr Insurance, Al- 
Charq Insurance, Al-Ahliya 
Insurance and fee National 
Bank of Egypt, which owns 
more than a fifth of the land. 


In the next lOto 1 5 years, fee 
company plans to build 500 
villas aid six hotels. 

The El-Gouna project on 
fee Red Sea is in an area of 
beautiful coral reefs, 21 ki- 
lometers north of Hmghada. 
Several developments are 
envisaged. These include an 
airport, a golf course, fee 
Abu Hg marina, a resort of 
120 villas, several hotels and 
apartments. Early in the year, 

the World Bank agreed on a 
$5 million equity investment 
and a $20 million loan for 
infrastructural development 
at El-Gounal. 

Super-luxury resorts 
Ras Abu Soma, north of Saf- 
aga, is due to open within a 
year; it is being developed by 
The Egyptian Finance 
Group, wife contributions 
from tiie International Fi- 
nance Corporation, the 
private sector arm of the 
World Bank, and Saudi Ara- 
bian and Egyptian investors. 
Robinson Hotels of Germany 
and Sheraton Corporation 
will manage two of the hotels 
in this super-luxury resort 
wife golf course, marina, 
shops and casino. Facilities 


Banking Industry Has Come a Long Way 


such as water and wastewater 
treatment and electricity will 
come out of a $1 30 million 
World Bank tourism devel- 
opment loan. 

Conrad International Ho- 
tels will be opening a new 
351 -room hotel in Ras N os- 
rani Bay at Sharm El-Sheikh 
in the simmer. Conrad In- 
ternational Hotel’s initial 
project was assuming man- 
agement of the Conrad In- 
ternational Hurghada Resort, 
located 10 minutes from fee 
airport. Conrad International 
Cairo is due to open in fee 
winter of 1998. Besides 670 
deluxe rooms and suites, fee 
hotel will offer “extensive 
meeting and banqueting fa- 
cilities and the biggest casino 
in Cairo,” says a company 
spokesperson. 

The Red Sea Riviera has a 
string of Egyptian- Israeli 
jointly owned developments 
and a large project at the 
Egyptian resort at Taba, fee. 
port of Aqaba in Jordan and 
the Israeli resort of Eilat. The 
Egyptian development will 
involve tourist villages and 
hotels, golf courses and mar- 
inas between Taba and Ras 
Mohammed. • 



Mystery and splendor Egypt has long been a favorite destination 
for international borders. 


Deregulation and greater competition are transforming the industry. 


rri his year, as part of its privat- 
inl ization program, the government 
: ,4- will begin selling four public- 
sector banks. 

it is not yet clear which bank will be 
fae fust candidate. Of fee country’s 8 1 
banks, 28 are commercial, including the 
four dominant public-sector banks. 
3hese are fee Batik of Alexandria, 
Banque Misr, Banque du Cairo and fee 
Rational Bank of Egypt, which together 
hold more than half of all deposits and 
assets. 

3 f. The other 24 co mm er c ial banks are 
'joint venture concerns or in private sec- 
tor hands. The five laigest are Com- 
mercial International Bank, MIBank, 
Egyptian American Bank, Suez Canal 


Batik and Misr Exterior Bank. 

Some of these are majority owned by 
giant public sector parent companies; 
MIBank, for instance, is mqority 
owned by Banque Misr, and these 
shares are soon to be sold on fee stock 
exchange. The government will gradu- 
ally whittle down public sector interest 
in domestic banks. 

Before 1991, fee banking sector in 
Egypt was regulated through the central 
bank, which set interest rates and de- 
cided what charges should be imposed 
on transactions and commission fees. 
Fierce competition after deregulation 
led to slashing of interest rates, and 
competition was further increased when 
foreign banks became entitled to deal in 


Egyptian currency. Confidence is now 
increasing, and some banks have begun 
showing good profits. The National 
Bank of Egypt, which celebrates its 
1 00th anniversary next year, has been 
one of fee most innovative players in 
this field. 

Deregulation opened up many in- 
vestment possibilities in fee banking 
sector. Banks are becoming far more 
business-oriented and are now com- 
peting wife financial service providers. 

The Commercial International In- 
vestment Company was formed in 1994 
as fee investment wing of fee Egyptian 
American Bank. C1IC and EFG-Her- 
mes are out front in investment banking, 
but fee Egyptian financial market is 


seeing growth in all types of investment 
activity. 

In addition to fund-management 
companies, investment banks and cor- 
porate finance houses, there are several 
offshore investment funds, more than 
15 mutual funds and around 85 
brokers. 

One analyst expresses unease with 
fee proliferation of small brokerage 
companies, as mistakes are likely to be 
costly m terms of investors’ trust “In 
the United Stales, there are just a few 
companies wife branches all over fee 
country,” she says. 

The Egyptian Stock Exchange has 
attracted more than a million investors, 
most of them in the past year, nearly a 


third of whom are foreign. The market 
which is capitalized at more than $20 
billion, is possibly fee largest in the 
region and fee second laigest in Africa, 
after South Africa. 

lire country's bourse has come a 
very long way. “When Egypt began to 
attract direct foreign investment, not 
only were there price controls, ex- 
change controls, no investment laws, no 
business laws, but also there was no 
mechanism for raising funds,” explains 
Sherine Farrag, investment manager at 
Gulf Arab Investment Company. 

“As a result of the legal and foreign 
exchange environment and because of 
poor funding, many companies went 
belly up. Raising equity is more chal- 
lenging, but it is cheaper than debt” 
Traditionally involved in greenfield 
projects, GAIC is employing its finan- 
cial resources expertise in fee Egyptian 
stock market and recently launched a 
mutual fund. 


There may still be huge bureaucratic 
hurdles, including a lack of information 
technology and skilled personnel, with- 
in this transitional phase of the capital 
market, but there is growing flexibility. 
According to Ahmed Farid, general 
manager of GAJC, people used to 
“think 10 times before committing 
funds to Egypt because they couldn't 
get out when they wanted, and they 
couldn’t unload unless a buyer was 
found for the company.” ft is now pos- 
sible to sell a company piecemeal on the 
stock market, bringing investors a great 
deal more flexibility and therefore se- 
curity. 

The country's investment climate is 
becoming increasingly attractive for di- 
rect investors. “If I make an investment 
today,” says Mr. Farrag, “and 1 only 
want to commit for three years, I can 
look at capital gains that will be at- 
tractive to my shareholders. That's a 
nice change from the past” % 


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HA Vmm W/nffcfcjwrtt 

to 


World-Class service 
in a striking 
seaside setting. 


Oil and Gas Fins 





BIOCHEMDE / 

Head V 

Dr. Hussein El-Sheshtawy 


CEB A GENERICS 
Head 

Dr. Adel Yunnan 


Ciba Vision 

Head 

Dr. Salwa Eid - 




Conrad International Sharm El Sheikh Resort 
' welcomes you to Sinai, 

a panorama of sea, 
mountains, desert and history. 





^lubuiLiI 


We're the largest independent oil and 
gas company operating in Egypt and, 
with contractor interests in 1 1 1 ,000 
square kilometers, the largest leaseholder 
in the country. We participated in the 
biggest oil discovery in the Western 
Desert, Qarun's 1 1,957-barrel-per-day 
0 Sagha #3. 

We increased our stake in Egypt by 
merging with The Phoenix Resource 
Companies last year and acquiring 
three blocks from Mobil Corporation in 
January 1997. 

Between 1 996 and 1999, we plan to 
invest $1 billion in Egypt-in fast-track 
exploration and development, 2-D 
and 3-D seismic, production facilities, 
pipelines and other infrastructure 
designed to help the economy 
grow and prosper. 

We're Apache Corporation, 
proud partners with the Egyptian 
General Petroleum Corporation. 


MISR TRAVEL 

YOUR GUIDE IN EGYPT 

Since 1934 


Novartis Agro Egypt &ax 




; a-: 

p name, 

!* f Syc^. to worry any 

" longer "about your trip to Egypt. 
NV We; ( provide all your travelling 
n|;.C ’ needs for •• 

fc>u 3 fness or leisure.. . 

. • 'conferences...; . 
romqnqp and relaxing 

• NHe cojis^s- (floating hotels) 

. • Pqckqges^to ekplbre Upper 

. ’ .'Egypt 

• Rooting restaurants (Onyx. 
Topaz, Opal & Turquoise) 

' • Professional multilingual guides 
Y;A: 0 ’" 3 N;Connfoitd 6 le - 
accommodations 
• Complete travel reservations 

• 500 pJush touring vehicles 

I individuals 

P'N :.; • SiSht-s^eing in Cairo 

• Diving trips at Magawish , a 
A. v resort on the Red Sea 

r - • Furnished ffats in Cairo and 
Alexandria 

£0 sayiiiore? 

























































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SrO N SO RED SEC i IO \ 


IVTERIVAIlOi'iAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 


PAGE 13 


SPONSORED SECTION 


EGYPT 


For Tourists Seeking Sunshine in Winter 



pi addition to its cultural attractions, Egypt offers fine beaches and spectacular coral reefs. 


E gypt has 15,000 kilo- 
meters <9,300 miles) 
of largely unspoiled 
sandy beaches and beautiful 
coral reefs that are practically 
|on Europe's doorstep, and 
She country could become a 
sought-after destination for 
[Europeans seeking the sun in 
winter. 

> Tourism is the coi 
Second-largest earner of i 
<5gn exchange, after remit- 
tances from Egyptians living 
Overseas, and the indushy 
Contributes more to the an- 
nual gross domestic product 
than revenues from oil and 
^be Suez Canal. Tourism is a 
labor-intensive industry, and 
j&ereis great potential for job 
^eation. 

rl^ 

itization under way 
: force behind die sectoral 
ig of the economy 
the government’s 1993 
ag reforms, which 
|ed to portfolio and foreign 
investment, much of 
lich went to the tourism 


die first few months of this 
yean 

Coastal areas in Sinai and 
along th e Red Sea have been 
eannaiked for private sector 
development, and they have 
been a focus of direct foreign 
investment from Europe and 
the Gulf 


* Ambitious privatization 
plans are under way, with 
hundreds ofhotels being sold 
all over the country — 36 in 


Incentives for Investors 
The government is offering 
very favorable incentives to 
private investors, including 
tax holidays and die sale of 
land that has been set 
for tourism purposes for as 
little as Si pea: square meter in 
new tourism areas. 

Tourism is one of die most 
rapidly growing sectors of 
the economy. Growth can be 
seen in three statistical in- 
dicators: Die number of tour- 
ist nights increased by 128 
percent between 1983 and 
1995; the number of hotels 
mushroomed from 300 in 
1 984 to 761 in 1996; and die 
number of tourists more than 
doubled, from I_5 million in 
1983 to 3.9 million in 1996. 


Arabia, Britain, Israel and 
Italy. By the end of die year; 
however, Scandinavia is 
likely to be added to the list as 
an important European mar- 
ket 

Egypt’s oldest travel 
agency, state-owned Misr 
Travel, has signed a cooper- 
ation agreement with 
Sweden's Fritidsresor 
Group, which has brandies 
all over Scandinavia, to be- 
an charter flights in October 
from Scandinavia to Egypt 

The agreement is expected 
to “raise the number of Scan- 
dinavian tourists to Egypt by 
30 percent above last year’s 
figures," says Mohamed 
Ahmed Hussein, chairman of 
Misr Travel 


Rapid growth in tourism 
The top markets for Egypt in 
1995 were Germany, Saudi 


I nf r ast ructural targets 
To reach the target of 6 mil- 
lion visitors by 2000, the 
country will not only have to 
build quality hotels and re- 
sorts, but it will also have to 
meet other infrastructural tar- 
gets, says Mamdouh el- 
Behagui, Egypt’s minister of 
tourism. Roads, railways, 
airports and telecommunica- 
tions infrastructure need to 
be built and upgraded, and 


the tourism industry staffed 
by professional personnel. 

The multibillion-dollar 
tourism industry will likely 
make an even greater con- 
tribution to the economy 
through diversification. Cul- 
tural tourism will no longer 
dominate the tourism sector 
since new projects on the 
west coast of the Red Sea and 
on the Sinai Peninsula are 
being developed to add 
beach and recreational hol- 
idays with a difference. 

The two main areas for 
private sector development 
are along the coast from Ras 
Zeit to Mersa Aiam on die 
Red Sea, and South of Sinai 
in the Gulf of Suez, St Cath- 
erine Plateau and the Gulf of 
Aqaba. 


In the next 10 to 15 years, the 
company plans to build 500 
villas and six hotels. 

The El-Gouna project on 
the Red Sea is in an area of 
beautiful coral reefs, 21 ki- 
lometers north of Hurgjrada. 
Several developments are 
envisaged. These include an 
airport, a golf course, die 
Abu Tig marina, a resort of 
120 villas, several hotels and 
apartments. Early in the year, 
the World Bank agreed on a 
$5 million equity investment 
and a $20 million Joan for 
infrastructural development 
at El-GoimaL 


New developments 
The SahJ Hashish Bay proj- 
ect, south of Hmghada on the 
Red Sea coast, is being de- 
veloped by foe Egyptian 
Company for Tourist Re- 
sorts, whose backers are foe 
local Misr Insurance, AT 
Charq Insurance, AJ-Ahlrya 
Insurance and foe National 
Bank of Egypt, which owns 
more than a fifth of die land. 


Super-luxury resorts 
Ras Abu Smna, north of Saf- 
aga, is due to open within a 
year; it is being developed by 
The Egyptian Finance 
Group, with contributions 
from foe International Fi- 
nance Corporation, the 
private sector arm of foe 
World Bank, and Saudi Ara- 
bian and Egyptian investors. 
Robinson Hotels of Germany 
and Sheraton Corporation 
will manage two of foe hotels 
in this super-luxury resort 
with golf course, marina, 
shops and casino. Facilities 


such as water and wastewater 
treatment and electricity will 
come out of a $130 million 
World Bank tourism devel- 
opment loan. 

Conrad International Ho- 
tels will be opening a new 
351-room hotel in Ras Nos- 
rani Bay at Sharm El-Sbeikh 
in foe summer. Conra d I n- 
ternational Hotel’s initial 
project was assuming man- 
agement of the Conrad In- 
ternational Hmghada Resort, 
located 10 minutes from foe 
airport Conrad International 
Cairo is due to open in the 
winter of 1998. Besides 670 
deluxe rooms and suites, the 
hotel will offer “extensive 
meeting and banqueting fa- 
cilities and the biggest casino 
in Cairo," says a company 
spokesperson. 

The Red Sea Riviera has a 
string of Egyptian- Israeli 
jointly owned developments 
and a large project at foe 
Egyptian resort at Taba, foe. 
port of Aqaba in Jordan and , 
the Israeli resort of Eilat The | 


Corporation Egyptian development will: 
of foe hotels involve tourist villages and ! 


hotels, golf courses and mar- 
inas between Taba and Ras 
Mohammed. • 



Mystery and spfendar. Egypt has long been a favorite destination 
for international travelers. 


Banking Industry Has Come a Long Way 


Deregulation and greater competition are transforming the industry. 


5y 


I his year, as part of its privat- 
ization program, tire government 


,T . _ . t 

r, JL will begin selling four public- 
sector banks. 

it is not yet clear which bank will be 
foe first candidate. Of the country's 81 
banks. 28 are commercial, including the 
four dominant public-sector banks. 
These are the Bank of Alexandria, 
Banque Misr, Banque du Cairo and foe 
Rational Bank of Egypt, which together 
bold more than half of all deposits and 
assets. 

■j\ The other 24 co mm er ci al b anks are 
joint venture concerns or is private sec- 
tor hands. The five largest are Com- 
mercial International Bank, MIBank, 
Egyptian American Bank, Suez Canal 


Bank and Misr Exterior Bank. 

Some of these are majority owned by 
giant public sector parent companies; 
MIBank, for instance, is majority 
owned by Banque Misr, and these 
shares are soon to be sold on foe stock 
exchange. The government will gradu- 
ally whittle down public sector interest 
in domestic banks. 

Before 1991, the banking sector in 
Egypt was regulated through the central 
bank, which set interest rates and de- 
cided what charges should be imposed 
on transactions and commission foes. 
Fierce competition after deregulation 
led to slashing of interest rates, and 
competition was further increased when 
foreign banks became entitled to deal in 


Egyptian currency. Confidence is now 
increasing, and some banks have begun 
showing good profits. The National 
Bank of Egypt; which celebrates its 
100th anniversary next year, has been 
one of the most innovative players in 
this field. 

Deregulation opened up many in- 
vestment possibilities is the banking 
sector. Banks are becoming far more 
business-oriented and are now com- 
peting with financial service providers. 

The Commercial International In- 
vestment Company was formed in 1 994 
as foe investment wing of foe Egyptian 
American Bank. CDC and EFG-Her- 
mes are out front in in vestment banking, 
but foe Egyptian financial market is 


seeing growth in all types of investment 
activity. 

In addition to fund-management 
companies, investment banks and cor- 
porate finance bouses, there are several 
offshore investment funds, more than 
15 mutual finds and around 85 
brokers. 

One analyst expresses unease with 
the proliferation of small brokerage 
companies, as mistakes are likely to be 
costly in terms of investors’ trust “In 
foe United States, there are just a few 
companies with branches all over foe 
country," she says. 

The Egyptian Stock Exchange has 
attracted more than a million investors, 
most of them in the past year, nearly a 


third of whom are foreign. The market, 
which is capitalized at more than $20 
billion, is possibly the largest in foe 
region and foe second largest in Africa, 
after South Africa. 

The country’s bourse has come a 
very long way. "When Egypt began to 
attract direct foreign investment, not 
only were there price controls, ex- 
change controls, no investment laws, no 
business laws, but also there was no 
mechanism for raising funds,’’ explains 
Sherine Farrag, investment manager at 
Gulf Arab Investment Company. 

“As a result of foe legal and foreign 
exchange environment and because of 
poor funding, many companies went 
belly up. Raising equity is more chal- 
lenging, but it is cheaper than debt" 

Traditionally involved in greenfield 
projects, GA1C is employing its finan- 
cial resources expertise in the Egyptian 
stock market and recently launched a 
mutual fund. 


There may still be huge bureaucratic 
hurdles, including a lack of information 
technology and skilled personnel, with- 
in this transitional phase of the capita! 
market, but there is growing flexibility. 
According to Ahmed Farid, general 


manager of GA1C, people used to 
before co 


’think 10 times before committing 
funds to Egypt because they couldn't 
get out when they wanted and they 
couldn’t unload unless a buyer was 
found for the company." It is now pos- 
sible to sell a company piecemeal on the 
stock market, bringing investors a great 
deal more flexibility and therefore se- 
curity. 

The country's investment climate is 
becoming increasingly attractive for di- 
rect investors. "If 1 make an investment 
today,’’ says Mr. Farrag, “and I only 
want to commit for three years, 1 can 
look at capital gains font will be at- 
tractive to my shareholders. That's a 
nice change from foe past." • 


or 



i Conrad International Sharm 0 Sheikh Resort 

■ “ ■ ■ • , 

. : «r 


welcomes you to Sinai, 

a panorama of sea, 


^ Anoufrtmns, desert and history. 

- T. Ml. - ■ . 


i'.v tw- 



IBS*?-. 

y aemrxrtaSALsnaoi ■ 

-mm**. 




’ Ni T E ^ N A l i O N A L 


& Straikh; South Sinai, Egypt. 

fgypt. 

Wife 3483jCjl. 


NOVARTIS 


new skills in the science of life 

NOVARTIS group is now formed 
from the merger of 

^ SANDOZ d3°X§] 
Novartis aims to become 
a global leader in life sciences: 

Health care, Agribusiness 
v\v> and HutHtion : a 

Novartis Egypt - presided ttyDr. Samir Sabet 
• - provides for the weltere of the E 
. Community -wtth tts high qua&ty. - 


Novartis Pharma sae 

Director 

Dr. S.”Saf 





We're the largest independent oil and 
gas company operating in Egypt and, 
with contractor interests in 1 1 1,000 
square kilometers, the largest leaseholder 
in the country. We participated in the 
biggest oil discovery in the Western 
Desert, Qarun's 1 1,957-barrel-per-day 
0 Sagha #3. 


We increased our stake in Egypt by 
merging with The Phoenix Resource 
Companies last year and acquiring 
three blocks from Mobil Corporation in 
January 1997. 


Between 1996 and 1999, we plan to 
invest $1 billion in Egypt-in fast-track 
exploration and development; 2-D 
and 3-D seismic, production facilities, 
pipelines and other infrastructure 
designed to help the economy 
grow and prosper. 


We're Apache Corporation, 
proud partners with the Egyptian 
General Petroleum Corporation. 


Apache Egypt Companies 
Kevin Ikd, Ge neral Manager 
IX, Street 281 
P.O. Box 672 Maadi 
New Maadi, Cairo, Egypt 


Tels # 3520504 / 3520905 
Fax #3528117 



CORPORATION 



M^rrfo^^Xir name, 
worry any 

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provide all your travelling 
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fel * 3*30010/0077 Fax: 3924440 
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J 





PAGE 16 


THE AMERICAS 





J F 'M ' A _r M"' J 1 ? 110r_ J ' F M ’ A 'M ’ j % 
1997 3 1S97 



French Bank Wins on MGM 


By Geraldine Fabrikant 

NewYart Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — Giancarlo Par- 
retti, the Italian- financier who 
bought the MGM movie studio and 
then was accused of nearly driving 
it into financial ruin, has been 
ordered to pay $1.48 billion to 
Credit Lyonnais, the French bank 
that helped finance the araoisition. 

California Superior Court in 
Los Angeles entered a final judg- 
ment Tuesday in favor of a Credit 
Lyonnais holding company that 
bad effectively controlled the trou- 
bled movie studio, which since 
then has been bought by an group 
that includes Kirk Kericorian. 

But for Credit Lyonnais it may 
well be a pyrrhic victory, because 
Mr. Parretti fled the United States 
for Italy last January before he 
could hs sentenced after a con- 


viction on charges of perjury and 
Tamp erin g with evidence in a re- 
lated case in a Delaware court 
In November 1990, Mr. Parretti 
bought MGM for $13 billion, 
some of it raised by Credit Ly- 
onnais. Within months, trade cred- 
itors had gone to court complaining 

that they woe not getting paid. 

Credit Lyonnais stepped in and 
worked out a plan to avoid a bank- 
ruptcy if Mr. Parretti agreed to step 
aside from management 
Later, the bank removed Mr. 
Parretti from the board, and in 
1991 it went to Chancery Court in 
Delaware, suing to validate its ac- 
tion in removing him. The court 
ruled in favor of Credit Lyonnais. 

Last October, Mr. Parretti was 
convicted in a Delaware court of 
perjury and tampering with evi- 
dence in the 1991 Chancery Court 
trial. But before he could be sen- 


tenced, he fled the country. In a 
separate case in a federal court m 
Los Angeles, Mr. Parretti was try- 
ing to avoid extradition to France to 
face charges in that country that Ik 
had looted MGhTs French assets. 

Trying to avoid extradition, Mr. 
Parretti had posted bail in Cali- 
fornia. One condition stipulated 
that if he jumped bail, he could be 
ruled in defarnt in yet a third legal 
action, a civil case in California. 

. In a third case, all Mr. Parretti's 
claims agains t Tty* hanV in the civil 
case were dismissed because he 
was not in the country. 

On Tuesday, the judge in the 
bank’s civil case entered a judg- 
ment, in favor of Credit Lyonnais 
because of the stipulation for bail 
and the fact that Mr. Parretti was 
now a fugitive. The judge said that 
he had to pay $1.1 billion along 
with interest of $376 million. 


_ ; — ; — r ■toO* 1 ' 1 

Industry Leaders Lift 1/ rV ( * 



Shares Across Board I 


.fr- 


roups 




Source: Bloomberg, Routers bKnEUKnsiHnmUTVUw 


Sallie Mae Chief Offers to Resign 


Very briefly: 


Inco Sells Subsidiary to Blackstone 

TORONTO (Bloomberg ! — Inco Ltd., a mining company, 
said Wednesday it had agreed to sell its Alloys International 
unit to Blackstone Group LP for about $410 milli on. 

Inco Alloys International makes nickel and other alloys that 
are used in the aerospace, chemical-processing, power-gen- 
eration, pollution-control and oil and gas industries. 

Blackstone Group, a New York-based investment firm, said 
it planned to combine the operations of the Inco unit with those 
of Haynes International Inc., an Indiana-based producer of 
nickel and other alloys, in which it has an SO percent stake. 


Bloomberg News 

WASHINGTON — The Student 
Loan Marketing Association, or 
Sallie Mae, said Wedn esday that its 
chief executive, Lawrence Hough, 
would resign in a bid to stop a group 
of dissident board members from 
taking control of the education-fi- 
nance company. 

Mr. Hough's resignation will take 
effect after shareholders vote in July 
or August on competing plans — 
one put forward by the management 
and the other by the dissidents — to 


cast off Sallie Mae’s government 
charter and turn the company into a 
fully private corporation. 

Tlie announcement comes after 
two years of battle between the 
board majority and dissident direc- 
tors. Neither group won the needed 
majority of shareholder votes in re- 
cent ballots to decide who would 
control the 25-year-old govern- 
ment-sponsored enterprise after re- 
organization. 

If management wins, M. Hough, 
53, will continue as interim chief 


executive until the board finds a 
replacement 

Sallie Mae also plans to nominate 
10 directors to the 15-member board 
of the reorganized company, leaving 
five seats for dissident members. 

Shares in Sallie Mae rose 56.125 
to close at $126375 amid optimism 
that both groups will go on running 
Sallie Mae — a combination that 
has helped triple the company’s 
share price in the past two years, 
said Thomas O’Donnell, an analyst 
with Smith Barney Inc. 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK. — Stocks rose for 
the fifth day in a row Wednesday as 
investors decided that demand for 
shares of market-leading compa- 
nies would grow as prospects for 
corporate earnings brightened. 

Shares of blue chips in various 
industries rose amid a favorable 
backdrop of meager inflation and 
stable interest rates. Mock rose 1 % 
to 953k and Johnsoa & Johnson 
climbed 2 to 63%. 

’If corporate profits continue to 
nd at above average-rates and 

tion stays low, all systems are 
go,” said Charles Henderson, chief 
investment officer at C h ica g o Trust 
Co. “There’s no reason the market 
won’t continue going up unless 
there’s a recession, and there’s no 
sign of one.’’ 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed 3636 points higher at a 
record 7,575.83 as advancing issues 
outnumbered declining ones cm the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index 
rose 4.30 points, to 86937. 

Among Dow components, Cater- 
pillar shares rose l A to 103% after 
the farm- and' construction-equip- 
ment company said it would raise 
its dividend by 10 cents, to 50 cents 
a share, and split its stock 2-fbr-l. 

But Eastman Kodak stock fell 
4 % to 7936 amid concern that losses 
from its Advanced Photo Systems 
cameras could hurt profit 

Shares in Boeing fell % to 56% 
after executives from the company 
and its rival. Airbus Industrie, were 
summoned to Brussels by the Euro- 
pean Commission for interviews to 


help determine whether Boehg'g 
acqtrisitionof McDonnell Douglas 
violates EU antitrust regulations..,. 
Financial issues rose as boil 
yields hovering near three-mpS? 
lows improved the outlook for 35 
companies’ second-quarter .profit 
Merrill Lynch climbed 2% to 5m! 

The price of the benchmark jfL 
year Treasury bond rose 5/32 toll 
15/32, pulling the yield down a? 
6.82 percent from 6.84 percent. 
Computer-related shares, mea^J 


US. STOCKS 


■"«! 



Numar Soars on Takeover Offer YEN : U.S. Officials Issue Warnings as Japan Posts Another Big Trade Surplus 


DALLAS (Combined Dispatches) — Shares in Numar 
Coip. soared Wednesday after Halliburton Co. offered late 
T uesday to buy the company, which makes a sophisticated test 
to evaluate oil wells,' for about $355 million in stock. 

Halliburton is an oil-field services and construction com- 
pany that has been investing in technology to bolster its ofl 
drilling and well -evaluation business. Numar makes a mag- 
netic-resonance imaging device to evaluate rock formations 
below the surface in newly drilled oil and gas wells. N umar 
stock rose $ 16. 1 875 to close at $36.9375. Halliburton’s shares 
slipped $1.75 to end at $79,125. (/fearers. Bloomberg) 

• Procter & Gamble Co-, Kraft Foods Inc-, Quaker Oats 
Co. and Schreiber Foods Inc. are suing to recover money 
they allegedly lost when Archer Daniels Midland Co. and 
other citric-acid makers conspired to fix prices. ADM ad- 
mitted in October to fixing prices for citric acid and lysine and 
agreed to pay a record $100 million criminal fine. 

• Lennar Corp. will buy a rival home-builder. Pacific Grey- 

stone Corp., for about $450 million, or $30 a share, expanding 
its presence in the California market ap. Bloomberg 

AMEX 

Urn UM aw 


Continued from Page 1 

April, its seventh rise in a row. 

Charlene Barshefsky, the U.S. 
trade representative, also expressed 
concern about what she called “dis- 
turbing” trends in Japan’s trade bal- 
ance.” 

Talking to U.S. lawmakers in 
Washington on Tuesday, she said, 
“We have communicated to Japan 
we do not expect to see any sig- 
nificant increase in the current ac- 
count surplus as Japan begins to 
deregulate its economy.” 

Currency traders took Mr. Sum- 
mers’s remarks to mean Tokyo and 
Washington could soon be headed 
for a new trade dispute. In response, 
they sold dollars aggressively and 
bought yen, sending the dollar as 


low as 110.65 yen in Tokyo, its 
lowest level in nearly seven 
months. 

The dollar recovered most of the 
day’s losses against the yen after 
Japan's “Mr. Yen,” the influential 
Finance Ministry official Eisuke 
Sakalribara. greeted the yen’s latest 
rise by restating Tokyo’s dislike of 
sharp currency swings. 

“Both an excessively weak yen 
and an excessively strong yen are 
undesirable,” Jiji news agency 
quoted M. Sakakibara as saying. 

Nevertheless, traders were left 
wondering whether the United 
States planned to tackle Japan’s per- 
ennial trade surplus by devaluing 
the dollar against the yen. 

In the past, Washington has done 
precisely that to rein in Japan's trade 


surplus because it mak es Japanese 
exports more expensive in the 
United States and undermines their 
competitiveness. 

In recent months, Robert Rubin, 
the U.S. Treasury secretary, has re- 
peatedly said that a strong dollar is 
in die United States' interest be- 
cause it helps keep inflation at bay. 
Bnt amid few signs of inflation in 
the United States, some economists 
in Tokyo fear Washington could 
abandon that policy. 

The dollar, which reached a 
nearly five-year high of 127 yen on 
May 1, has fallen by more than 10 
percent in the last six weeks. 

Some economists in Tokyo say 
they fear that Washington could try 
to push the dollar lower still against 
the yen when the leaders of the 


Group of Seven gather for a summit 
in Denver. 

■ Dollar Steady in Europe 

The dollar was little changed in 
European trading with traders re- 
luctant to establish positions be- 
cause of uncertainty over European 
monetary union even though France 
and Germany appeared to make pro- 
gress toward burying their differ- 
ences, Bloombeig News reported 
from New York. 

At 4 PJVL, die dollar stood at 
1.7161 Deutsche marks, off slightly 
from 1.7185 DM the day before, and 
1.4385 Swiss francs, off from 1.4410 
francs. The currency also was quoted 
at 5.8049 French francs, off from 
5.8065 francs. The pound closed at 
$1.6380, down from $1.6385. 


U. S. STOCK MABKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


while, dropped partly on 
that orders for computers, ! 
ductors and software would 
during the summer months, 
paq fell 336 to 99%, and Cisco I 
terns lost 1 5/16 to 63 11/16. 

The Nasdaq composite index, 1 
which contains many computer-ie-j 
lated shares, rose 6.16 points, tot 
1,407.85. 1 

“This is the time of the yean 
where you tend to see some weak] 
ness in technology stocks,” sakt 
James Solioway, co-president ol 
Argus Research Corp. “What’s qx4 
acerbating the situation this tim*| 
around are the signs that there 
some slowdown in demand 
Europe continues to be a 
problem.” 

Stocks in chipmakers and 
ufacturers of semico ado ctar-mak 
mg equipment are still 
from Intel’s announcement on 
30 that second-quarter 
would fall below expectations, 
has dropped 15 percent in the 
two weeks. 

“Intel’s warning is lodged in tbej 
back of everyone’s mind, ” satq 
George Jamison, managing dir&j 
tor of Nasdaq stock trading d 
Wheat First Butcher Singer. ,r Tha 
weakness in tech stocks probably! 
worries me more than anything.” j 
Still, the Dow has risen mote 
than 1,000 points since the middle 
of April, foeled by a deluge of new 
money that flowed into mutual 
funds. f 

In the first quarter, net inflowsrio 
stock funds totaled $57.75 billion. 
To get the money invested as 
quickly as possible, stock-fond 
managers are sinking the cash iifo6 
companies with a plentiful supply 
of shares outstanding. 

“Managers want to own stocks 
they can buy without the pn£$( 
shooting up or that would be easy ^ 
sell if the market started going the 
other way,” said Robert Brod£ 
manager of the American Growj§ j 
Fund. -■’ort j 

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134 


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lore 

10ft 


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196 

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m 

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194 

274 

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174 

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74 

1244 

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m» 

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7 retail 
UJFW 
UTlEng 
Uoa* 

(MOD 

13 

412 

in 

7354 

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lta 

mi 

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lire 

14 

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17 

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1714 

40 

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174 

174 

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98 

9 

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- 


Indexes 
Dow Jones 

Omm h« Lon c+t- 

IndH 7S37.51 ISU.IV 79U3 7S7SJH + J6J4 

Inm 2*77.16 269163 2S71.12 2*7649 +137 

UN ZULU 22 UH 71941 2H3* +047 
Comp 2317.75 232843 331547 232AM +8JJ5 

Standard & Poors 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


June 11, 1997 

HU< Lon Latest Chge Optat 


Hi* Lae On* 4PJUL 
Industrials 1024.02 101193101 7 J3 102241 
Transp. 617.77 61031 61121 614.17 

UBBlei 191XO 192-1 S 19224 19157 

Finance 9926 9001 99 JU 9923 

SP 500 87005 862. IB B6527 86957 

SP100 8*928 B4O03 84350 847.46 


NYSE 

Compose 

MusMab 

Tnnsp. 

UtflUr 

BMW* 

Nasdaq 

CsnpesM 

imunktti 

Benia 

■piwoncfl 

Rn onoc 

Trump. 

AMEX 



Grains 

CORN (Own 

UD0 bu rrtfnfcmum- oma oer bustw 


4&UM 451-75 45150 +1J4 

57497 571.69 57411 +110 

40651 «30 40(23 +4B* 

27661 277.30 378.03 +OJ* 

41635 41370 41422 *231 


Nasdaq 

Aland 

ss, 

ApfeUM 

IF 


nwnoi 

Adopted 


140724 139640 140724 


+615 

+0JM 

+VJ 7 


152665 151 
19223 156 
1(4602 183109 1MLSI + i03i 
94363 93654 939 JB 41 2 


ft’ 

Peepodn 

Mom 


low .nt am. AMEX 


*2273 421-07 *2247 

Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
lOUHBies 
ID Industrials 


10260 —004 
9953 - OU 
10565 +056 


Dlfhd 

TWA 


65TTM 

mvmsn 

Echo Bay 


3833 3 

35W SSH +1* 


.»* 41T» ++k 

stVj * 11 * +nj 

^ m 

27 21 49k 

3S^t 

A 

izm. 127 +246 
ion* ion* 4* 

16 M 

on 45U -1«VW 


14437 (Mb 87V* +64. 

1409 » M M 

im 5v» ji m 

,w. +*5 

11VU +41 

3» +* 

7V, 

4(1 +W 

4H +-Vk 


jm 97 

Z 74 

270 Vi 

272 V, 

+ 14 

99.322 

Sapto 

W* 

257 V 4 

25014 

+14 

36772 

Dec 97 

257 

25 * 

2 S 5 V, 


111592 

MorW 

atsa 

asere 

2*2 

+ % 

I 3 J &2 

Mar 98 

2(7 

2*5 

2*6 


1 J 3 ? 


2m, 

2*814 

269 V 4 

+ 14 

MU 

Sep 98 

25 / Vi 

25715 

257 % 


92 



754 

SS M2 

*553 m 
5920 in 
49*6 HI 


fit 

4m 

*vy 


Trading Activity 

NYSE 

Mnnced 

□KSned 

UNnanoad 

Tan* Inin 
(WHOM 
NcwLdB) 

AMEX 


Nasdaq 


1525 

iau 

(II 


U1] 

1174 

AAunced 

Docami 


15«o 

I960 

3396 

307 

10 

if 


21*0 

5585 

115 

a 

1*30 

5779 

M 


Market Sales 


Pewm. 


ltotoy 





tei 




NYSE 

30176 



Amac 

20.15 




Nasdaq 

55758 


558JM 

7 

In mlBkmi. 





Dividends 


CmpaRy 

Per Ant Roc 

Pny 

IRRECULAR 



Anglo Araer Co SA 
CmnlncADR 

. 1.188 
_ 3902 

6-90 

6-27 

s-n 

Kbkl Bnmsiy 

_ J 1 

M7 



ADR 

LVMHMod 

_ .4999 

6-13 

7-7 

Did Kingdom Fd 

- Ml 

6-27 

7-11 


STOCK SPLIT 

FabfteM ComimmnsiorZspnt. 

REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
En do ret Corp l tar ISrewpso. 

INCREASED 

UmmwBlstNofl Q .14 6-16 7-1 

INITIAL 

KinpRcnd . .70 6-20 6-37 

REGULAR 

AiturPmpTr q .175 MO 8-15 


Coapanr 

Auburn Nad Bncp 
Ballard Med Prap 
BUcRc* stmtTnn 
General Re 
Handsdifeoerlnd 
ISbjwjCoip 
IBnoit PwrotflpfA. 

Lnsrd Ala til tnoo 
Natl HJIMnvest 
OunssoCorp 
Rama^Gen 
South St Fnd 
State FndSves 
StawaitiStewin 
xrn larva Tm 
THan Whed Inti 
Tyco Inti 

I HOMS 


Par Ant Roc Pay 


S JOS 
M -0395 
Q 55 
0 .10 
Q 21 
Q JS 

M J 164 
Q 74 

a j» 
a 62 
Q .10 
Q .12 
a joss 
M 5718 

q ms 
a as 
a 27 


6-10 6-25 
6-16 7-3 
6-16 6-30 
6-33 6J0 

6- 25 7-8 
MO B-l 

7- 10 8-1 
6-19 6-30 
4-27 7-10 

7-7 7-24 
6-30 7-1S 
6-20 7-7 

6- 24 7-7 

7- 31 8-13 
6-19 630 
6-30 7-15 

M 8-1 
7-7 7-1 S 


mmhIi iHBppradMia mmiti pw 
ibarWADRj p^xrynM* in Canadkia fundu 

w-wnlMs ^quatwty; 9 will irwiwat 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sales figures am unoffldaL Yearty highs and lows reded the previous 52 weeks phis Hie 
caneiH week bulnalltre West trading day. WhenaspmwsttckdMdendaino(itiHngtD2S 
percent or more has bean paht Hie years hlgb-lcw range anddMdend are shown forlhe new 
stocks only. Unless othemfae nofed rates ol dhiidands are annual disbursements based en 
the tartest declaration. 

a - dividend dl» extra Is), b • annual rate of dividend plus stock dMdend. c- BquMatlng 
dkridend. a - PE exceed) 9943d • coBed. d • new yaarty low. dd - tan in Ihe tost 12 menltis. 
o ■ dividend declared or polo In precwBng 12 months. I - annual rata increased on las) 
dectoratton. g - dividend in Canadtan hinds, subled tol5* non-residence tax. I - dMdend 
declared after spilt- up or stock dMdend. j- dividend poid this year, omltled, deferred or no 
action token at latest dMdend meeting, k - dmdend declared or paid thb yean an 
accumulative Issue with (Mdendi In arrears. - annual rate, reduced on tost dedoraflon. 
n - new Issue kt Hie past 52 weeks. The Mgh>tow rung* begins with Ihe start of tiwflng. 
nd - next day delwty. p - IrtBtal Addemt mnual rats unknown. IVE^ - priee-eamings rofio. 
q-daHd-end mutuoltund.r-4v?denddednredorpotalnprec«fingl2nwnfliv, plus slock 
dividend. 5 • stock sslil. Dtotdend begins wflti date of spin, sis - sales, t • (Mdend paid In 
stock to preceding 1 2 mon He- estimated cash value on eK-dMdend or «x-^*Mbu(ton data, 
a ■ newyearty high v- tradtag hailed vl - in bankruptcy or reariveistdporbdnfl reorganized 
under ItwBanluuptcy Act or securities aKuimed by such companies, wd- when msMtxded. 
wl - when Issuedf ww - wWi warrants, x - a-dMdend or ec-rifptis. xds ■ MMScWnitom 
m - without warrants, y- K-dtvklerKl and sofas In fulLyld- yield *- soles In fuB. 


EsLHdes NA Toe’s ides sway 
rue’s open int 273,9*4 oil 41* 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

IDO tone- Mare Mr inn 

JW97 274.10 26480 274.10 +7X1 37,132 

AUB97 2SJJ0 24880 254.90 +SJ0 11578 

SOP 97 23750 23240 23670 + 420 12J89 

Od97 22550 ' 22170 22550 +U0 I2J48 

Dec 97 21750 21SJB 717.28 +270 25.795 

Junto 21450 21250 7149 +270 25*9 

Ed.sdes NA Tua’i.sdes 285*7 
TiWsaoenM 112503 u> 4485 

SOYBEAN (XL (CBOT] 

4d4(XII»- cents per !□ 

AX 97 2125 ZL0D 23.77 +022 41,1*0 

Aim 97 2345 2119 213* +DLU 18525 

Sep 07 2170 23.45 2154 + 0.1* 9562 

Od 77 2175 2151 23.70 +019 11^*6 

Dec 97 23.97 2175 2189 +ai* 2UI3 

Junto xm sun 2401 +0.13 193 

Eg. sate na Tub's seres 1U40 
Tue'scpgilnt 105J77 up 15*6 

SOYBEANS (CBOT] 

5JXM bu mmbnun>- tm Ptr SuM 
M97 833 811 830K> +I7H 

Aim 97 7839V 7*B 782 +l» 25804 

Sep 97 nw 705 mu +616 9^76 

NOV77 srm 467 673 +« SUM 

Jmto 675Yi 638 *741* +41* 7JS7 

Eg rate NA Tub’s sate 59854 
TuCseponM 1*145* oH 3123 

WHEAT (CBOT) 

MOB bu mWm«i+ am oer busM 
JU97 367 361 3*4K +Tft 40.997 

Sep 97 375 3*016 374 2IJ95 

Dec 97 3649, 31195 38SH +116 18.158 

Morto 389 385 380 2,293 

Eg. sate na Tim's ute 24858 
TueNopenin 83.0*6 up 389 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMSKJ 
40JB0 tos- art* per b. 

Jun07 &U 0 *385 *457 

AIM 97 6480 63.45 £382 

0097 6750 6782 *7J7 

Dec 07 4985 <080 080 

Fed to 7880 7052 3057 

Awto 72-50 7127 7237 

Ed. sales 14 3H Toe's sate 
Tub's wen Inf 98,5*6 up 63 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMBQ 
50800 tos- cents ear 8 ». 

Aub 07 77.45 7475 7727 +057 

Sw 77 7492 7491 7685 *117 

Oct 97 77.25 74.fi! WJD +ai7 

N 0 V 97 7850 ms SMS -ai7 

Jmto 7490 7847 7858 -425 

Mix 98 7850 78.15 7822 —082 

esi.sctas 2252 Toe’s sties 3812 
Tue'sooenH 19.184 up I8£ 

HOGS-Lbxi (CMBU 

JUT 97 81.67 80J8 8159 +1.12 4801 

9497 8182 W5 8082 +U7 IS,57« 

Aub 07 7982 7885 747? +ft!5 9,794 

00 97 71 AS 71.15 7152 +1180 M62 

Dec 97 6745 0.15 6332 +020 3563 

Eststte 10599 tub’s tote 9jp7 
Tub’s wen M 38539 up 215 

POKBBJJSICMER} 

40800 Im, - cents ow to 

Ufl 8175 WiO »1W -&S 8 4714 

Aua97 8285 8 IJD 8117 —072 1472 

R*9S 7495 7400 7442 —0.15 450 

Est.sdes id TUB’S soles 2.917 
Tub’s open tot 7.911 up M5 


Food 

COCOA (K5E) 
w metric ion*- s per ton 
8H97 1472 1426 1471 

Sea 97 1514 140 1514 

Dec 97 1549 1518 1549 

1577 IS* 1578 
May 98 1595 1537 1505 

£«» 1(15 +30 

Est.sdes 12,798 Tub's sate 7897 
Tuo’scpenW 89.90 off 04 

COH=EEC(NCS0 
u>t ^ i" to. 

M97 22400 28*08 20785 — HL38 
199 JO 187 50 190.10 -645 
OecW 17 m 14425 17145 -300 
Mwto 1*150 1075 157 JO —425 

Mov9b uaao 15120 -lsum -475 
Efl.»tos 9JTS Tin's soles 13 020 
Tin's wm int 22,941 off 750 

SUOAR-WOBLDll (NCSE} 

iiuaan«s.-eMHi>«-iu. 

1187 1182 118* -dll 

Oa» 1182 I UN 11.15 — O.H 

Mcxto 11.10 1182 118* HU* 

«ay« 1180 KUS 1097 -dOi 
».sate MJI7 Tim's sate 34622 
Tue’sop+nif* IB 42 S 1 up 30* 


High Lew Lnhol C8ga OpM 

0RAN6EJUKE (NCTNJ 
15800 ll».-cmls per is 
84 97 79 JB 7M 7988 +120 14362 

Sep 97 BISS 7985 8150 +285 9J13 

Nav97 1385 8180 8175 +190 414* 

Jt»l98 86.15 1460 86.15 +180 1839 

Ext. sows NA Toe's sate 2838 
Tue'saPenW 33,137 up M4B 

Metals 

SOLD 0*04X1 
1 DO voy chl - Manernra. 

8X197 34410 34380 34180 — 0.M 450 

8497 344 ©} _ dW 1 

Aub 97 34650 345J0 34fi.flO —a 18 72.168 
0097 34980 3480 3*H» -dW 7277 
Dec 97 35120 35020 351, M! 2*245 

Rbto 351*0 9M3 

Apr to 35600 4885 

Junto 35LW 35SJ0 mss 0,002 

Aub 98 3*1.40 73S 

Est.Mdee 4200 Toe's sate 9899 
Tub's open Int MD275 up 362*4 

HI 6RADE COPPBt (NCMXJ 
2 S 8 OQ ms- ceitts pv kl 

8xi97 121.40 IHJO 12125 +185 1265 

8497 12190 11920 12180 +120 332*5 
Aub 97 11920 11880 11920 +182 32M 

Sep 97 HIM 11*80 118.18 +188 7892 

Od97 11520 1IUH 11520 +120 1,10 

Nov 97 11325 +I2B 1834 

Dec 97 11198 11180 HUM +120 6854 

Janto 11085 +180 45* 

Febto JIW25 +L55 541 

Est. sales 7200 Tub’s sales 12879 
Tub's open W 59200 up *089 

SILVER (NOW 

SHOO nn> oz.-canre par •rovar. 

Junto 47320 +dl0 23 

8497 47780 47280 0450 49.710 

Sep 97 48120 06® 09.10 11204 

Dec 97 48820 48480 48590 8837 

Jan to 48880 17 

Mar 90 49190 49280 49290 +0.M 0284 

Mwto «7.I0 +0.10 2212 

8498 501 JB 50080 58 UO +0W 2.795 

Bt.sales 4800 rue's setos 10281 

Tup's open inf 88845 up 4114 

PLATMUM (NMSU 
SO HOT ol- <*)Uar» par Uw or. 

8497 446J0 63190 4000 +410 12299 

0097 0130 40650 41980 +i.» 5234 

Jan to 41120 40400 40500 —1.90 1214 

Es sate na Tue'sstoH 4.300 
Tub’s open M 20269 up 3*1 


loo pa. 



Est.srtes NA 

Tiff's, sties 

30^9 




37X392 


138.178 



94.T1 

M.Q 







»irti . 

HSU 

MJ8 

4.543 

LiGirr SWST CRUDE (man 

?*■ . 

9102 

km 

51X935 

1400 UA^ dellan pv bW. 



9X80 

9181 

411,932 

Julto 

19.20 

HU1 

«J0 

-0.11 

16331 

9178 

9171 

80619 

AW 97 

19A* 

1*75 

IBM 

-OM 


9CLS9 

9X40 

257,931 

Sep 97 

1948 

19.02 

1945 

—015 

£3) - 

9149 

9X50 

191 J0 

Odto 

19-7D 

19.15 

I9JS 

-an 


93 38 

9139 

13044* 

Not 97 

19.78 

1946 

1943 

-aw 


9X38 

9138 

39X0*0 

Dec 97 

19.85 

190 

1945 

—045 

374*7 

9131 

SIM 


Jon 98 

1944 

1940 

1948 

— aw 

ISAM 

9X30 

9X30 

—001 7W81 

Feb «8 

19.90 

19. a 

19.*D 

—047 

■ 

Tufs-sOes 

374428 

Mar 98 

19.90 

1940 

W45 

—OSS 


2J3X703 


Aar 98 

19.90 

1942 

19.90 

+022 

4J0 


O0M 

LONDON METALS OJME] 
Datore per metric inn 


Previous 



KKMSMe) 

spot 1606V* 140716 1507V5 15»M 

Foneaid I62S.00 162*80 160880 1*0980 
ndadflilCndil 
267280 267580 25UM 258916 
25*420 256780 250BV+ 250916 

*3280 63380 62816 629M 

64M 641 V* 64180 64280 

719080 730080 718080 719080 
730080 731080 729080 730080 

55*580 559580 563080 5*4080 
5*1080 563080 567080 5*7580 

(M HU CMOa} 

130W 1343 15 133880 133980 

137TK 137280 13*280 13*380 

Hfth Lo» Omb atge OpM 

Financial 

UST.8RX5 (CMBU 

>1 mHlon- PTC Of HO PCI. 

ixi 97 9589 9584 7500 +08* 178* 

See 97 9471 9427 9468 +101 6225 

DacW 9453 

Esi.sote NA TUP'S sete 2243 

Tub's open Ini 9297 

5 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

1100800 i*in- PK A Mtcs of 100 pel 
Jur 97 105-62 105-57 KJ5-59 * id 522*3 

5ep77 105-48 105-39 105-4] +01 180267 

Dec 97 105-25 +01 m 

Esi . sales *1200 Tub's sate 70259 
Tub's open W 234231 up *344 

UYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

SlOtUnOprtft-Ptl liSmasatlOOpa 
Jun97 108-07 108-01 HA-04 +01 S3 290 

5M97 W-55 10-1* 107-18 jj 

DGC97 10-10 10*08 10-08 Jfflj 

Est. sales 86753 Toe's wtes 137 , 93 * 

Tub's uuen bx 32264 on 10553 

U5 TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

U pc+- 111020 bpt »6 tondsol 100 pai 
2X197111-04 110-a HI-00 +03 imju 

Sep 97 iw-n iio-i] no-19 +« 

QK971W-0* 110-w UM* *n aiS 

TUMI T J,®"® * ® 9,81 p 

ESI. sate 338800 Tile'S Sate 3BJ4S 
Tue’s open Int 40U34 aH *855 

LIBOR 1-MONTH (CMER) 

nmiiHit- preaMoo pa. 

Junti 9431 9630 9438 u » 

JUI97 9425 9424 H3S 

AU097 9419 9419 94.19 tS 

Est.saks J^- Tue's.irtas 5217 ' " 

Tue'ICWrilm 39J59 

LOW 4HLT (UFFE] 

C508M - pte 4 Bndi Ot 100 pa 

Jon 97 114425 113-25 I144 q 44 m- - 

taff HM» iijy nil? lialS 

N£j IMi Sm 


+3* 14297 
♦37 21255 
+34 20211 
+5 22.391 
+30 8297 

+30 575 


*202 

8208 

4J0B 

1225 

531 


75212 

082* 

30213 

*20 


HWh Law Latast Chge Optra 

GERMAN 60V. BUND {UFFE} 

DM25(«)0l>-ptsan00pd 

Sep 97 101.05 10029 100.76 -0.12 231,986 

Dec97 9923 99JD 9923 - 0 . 1 * 250 

Est. stooo: 155,714. Prev.itoes; 13420 

Piw. open tato 23Z23* up 5218 

1MTEM . FREIKH COV. BONDS U6ATIF) 
FRoaooo-jis at 10 a pa 
JU«P7 1795* 1»24 12922 +0.14 9111(1 

Wp97 IZa2* 12780 1278* +0.12 124940 

Dec 97 97.10 97.KJ 9688 + 088 575 

Est sales: 75S46A. 

Opsn Int- 217AM off 2259. 

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND OJFFB 
ITL 200 nUlton - pts to 100 pd 
Sep 97 13023 13080 1 30.811 +082 02.18* 

Dec 97 10385 10385 10400 +077 300 

Est. sales: 7644 X nev.iatow 76622 
Prw. open ini- 82284 off 1,702 

EURODOLLARS (CMER) 


Jim 97 9420 
Jto97 9412 
Aw 97 9401 
SBP 97 M.M 
Dec 97 9382 
Mar to 93-73 
Junto 9381 
SSPto 9X51 
Dec 98 9321 
Mar 99 9X39 
J0HW 9135 
S6P 99 9132 


BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

SUM pounds, seer pound 
Junto 14426 12350 12376 
SCP to 12398 1271* 12342 
DK to 12320 12300 12X1* 

Est. soles NA Tiff's sales 122*4 
Tub's, open iit 5184* up 159 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER} 

MOWN daSarSa 1 par Con. dV 
Am 97 J221 7205 7213 

SCP 97 720 7252 7258 

Oecto 7202 7298 7298 

ESLwta* NJL Tiff's sate 17899 
Tiff's open Int 67J93 up 11*5 

GERMAN MARK (CIAEH) 

T 2 SO 0 D marks, (opr merit 
Am to 2857 2815 2832 

S*P to 2895 2855 2870 

DBCto 011 2904 2911 

Efl.stoes NA Tim's sores 358*4 
Tiff's open int HM.9U oft 1023 

JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

115 mlMen yen. I par HO yon 
Junto 8050 8900 8009 

5* to 8174 J0T2 8129 
Oecto .9253 8239 8251 

Ed. sales I4A. Tub's stoes 0,157 
Tiff's open lift 100,971 up 4145 

SWISS FRANC (CMSO 
TU80D uteics. I per Vone 
Junto 2990 893! 29*3 

SB»« 7WB 7016 J041 

Dec to TIM 7105 7120 

EAsata NA Tuft's. sole* 21993 
Tuo^ opai Int 512*2 up 34 

MSOCANPE50 (CMSO 
500808 pesos, t par p+w 
Junto .12515 .1720 . 1 JS 30 
SO* ?7 .1*70 .12010 .12053 
OtCti .11445 .11580 .11*70 

T ■*’ a sales 11-07 
niB'sapenrt 29890 up as 

lygONTH STERLING (UFFE) 
£SDO00Q . nhnf i«i _ 

Junto 
Septo 
Dec to 
Mff 98 
Jan 9ft 
Sap 90 
Dec 98 


High Low LoteJ Chg» 0^ 

Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTN) 

91800 Are.- cam par I). 

All to 7615 7Z80 7X44 +1.12 

OOto 7570 7480 7525 +1.W 

Dec to 7630 7525 7615 +1.19 

Miff 98 7730 7650 7720 +1.W , 

May 98 7775 77.10 7775 *1.0 1.1 

Est sate ha Tim's sate mxw 
Tim's open Ire 75,123 up 641X1 


HEATMeOR. (NMHR) 

41800 ae4 cum per are 
JUI97 5285 5170 5122 


'All 

... L13 3OT 

Aim to 5X30 5180 5XU -029 OW 

Sep to 5480 5220 5100 -027 IMS 

oaw 55.00 5190 5190 -079 

n orto 5580 S4LBS 5480 -079 

Dec to 56*0 5565 51*5 -029 J*H 

Jan9B 5770 5*75 5*75 -079 10M 

Feb 98 57J0 5*JS 5635 -029 4W 


, ■ P+ 4 

.« v jx 

• r - 

«' -•=• f - J ; 

* +:•■'.*+*+* > 
-■:» .• ir.- .-> 

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1 — - s'. . ; 

+: 'W 


e amm .2 -wr 


, *1 i* ' 

. ->-■ '• 

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— — ••»-■+ s 

. r ss- cr 






28,988 

22.143 

115 


34973 

3JU73 

1280 


53482 


54915 

4S.138 

9H 


24940 

25.970 

*2* 


11849 

MJ51 

9^0* 


Ed.sote NA Tup's sates 744*4 - 

Tux's open M 396408 u> 435 ^ 

NATURAL. CAS (NMER) ,V 

lOLWOmm Hu's. Sear nun Hu _ +! 

AH to U55 2JU5 28*5 

AUB to 1175 1105 110$ 

tan xi*5 Lioa 1100 

Oct to 1175 1110 im 

Nov 77 2J05 }jj5 2270 780 

Dec to 1445 1400 1400 JJMI 

J«m 98 1490 1440 140 

Feb 98 240 2J6S 1330 ”5 

MarW 2380 27 « 23SI 

Apr« 1IX 1130 1120 „ ■M'S 

Est. sate NA Toe's s*h 3040 Jtal 

TuCsapenirt 1963V off 241 Ai 

IRLEA0ED6AS0LME(NMBQ 
42400001. cam per aal ... 

Julto 5770 5*80 5*24 +&M 38£ 

Aire to 5775 5585 5624 +0JB 

Sep to 5480 5570 5580 ME 

oaw 5580 5470 S57S MB 

Nov 97 SS2S 54 JO 5430 VS, 

D«C97 SSJS 5485 5405 _ *C 

EsLsales NA Tub's sues 27.10 ^ 

Tar's open Lift 79,177 up 161] ^ 

SASOILOPEJ ?y; 

UA doOos per neMc tan ■ tali of lOBtons 
Junto T612S 1*075 14275 +075 Mg 

Julto 16480 14475 16X75 +180 ‘25 

Aug to 16520 1*425 1&57S ^ - 

S«to 16720 1*675 16720 +050 -a... 

Odto 149,75 14675 1»75 +d» ^ 

Nov 97 171.75 17180 17129 +OSD 
Dec 97 17325 17225 17380 +«3S 
EU.sote7Q.752. Prev. sotai :178M ,«T 

Riot, open lnt-4S«4ofl 3*3 a 


: — r n~ 




1 '. 1 -j "ir ■ 

. - -• ; f.. 

- + v+-. 


H ■ . 


r.r atptac ** 

-reJiep ro 


.-■-=* -V 
■“ r. 


laaoio 

124879 

107,197 

69290 

46873 

331411 

25.253 


6 ® 


9327 9328 Unch. 

9111 910* 9389 +081 
to-M 9109 9192 +d01 
9282 u ndL 
US 2 77 9174 Unch. 

S -2 *** Unch - 

Est. sate; 81371. Prev. solos 77,748 
Pm. open bit: 560810 up 4^45 

^“THEURCMARK (UFFE) 

DMIaftOtan -ptianoOpU 

ljIot +081 194234 

Jul97 9685 9485 9605 +081 1.7S2 

**-®4 9*84 +881 201 

nS-V, SH 3 9681 9682 UnaL 340277 

2*2 9 S 74 96.71 9673 UndL 25610* 

%££ •AdO 9681 UndL 239.653 

PlW. Open (nL 1209.208 up 11,217 

WWIfTN PI BOS tMATIF) 

H'®S5*on - Pis ai wood 

Jun97 9*25 9621 9*22 +004 

5*446 96.41 9647 , 085 

J64S 96.40 9*41 +084 

9f* 9*3* 9*34 +083 

»20 9625 96J4 + 087 

JJ-lS 96.11 96.12 +083 

Opan Oft.: 271996 up 1 ^ 7 . 

^“SSEUMURA (UFFE) 

IP -1 * • P*> PMOO pd 

J«i?7 9111 9106 93.11 +&M 

*° m 

”-56 9321 9154 ^ao? 

«A7 9163 9324 +887 

S'JS +«80 

—IT 9172 «J 0 + 0.11 

jg; 1 ** WAT*- Fiw-eote: Sim 

PHW. optwt Ww 3X1.974 on 451B 


Slock indexae 
SaP COMP. INDEX (CMER) 
snomnou 

Junto 0180 8*600 B70JB +>•» 

Sep 97 880.70 0100 87920 tlif 
Dec to 88600 046.00 18600 
Esr. soles NA Toe’s sate IllflS 
Tue'sopenbft 208859 up 1738 

tWMCMATIFl ~Z 

iim«7 Pe Wo M78 2*888 +0R 
Julto 2*848 2*640 2*852 +0£ ,?£ 
Jfpto J7040 26762 27012 +0® 

Esi. soles: 20811. 

Open W: 41952 off *11 

FTSE 108 (UFFE) 

E25 per Index poM 

Junto 0648 0*28 0408 -W 
S«P 97 47928 47928 47715 
Dec 97 4835J) 48258 48258 ^ 


JLijrnpi-r 


-a 


ExLaolafc 21796. Pic*. Hies 22884 
Piw opcnn*.- 81165 up 735 


— t# 


SOP 97 
Dec to 
Mdr9t 
JW19B 
Sep 98 
Due 98 


Sep to 
Due 97 
Mar 98 
Jun9a 


mu 

6SL309 

34344 

27270 

21872 

18,711 

14768 


70487 

111471 

61,77V 

34988 

24448 

11775 


CommocBty Indexes 
dm 

Woody'. NA 

Rowers 1,98150 

DJ.Fuhjres 15S.9T SS 

CRB 24 10 *~Z 1 

, SmmeKMotiiAsmaantPfmitf^, 
inriFitKBKtaiFutvmEjxfxm* lnn ;+i 
flefrotemi Exchange. -w 


»' « '8V* r 


Sec our 

Business Message Ce0**5 

eveiy Wednesday 


’■ ~ j. 

• j v:. 


PAGE 17 



s Lift 

es Across B 0ar j f 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12,199^^^^ 


EUROPE 


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;’l O^fUedbyOar Sufi Fun DappKba 

^HXJNDON — Energy Group 
PLC’s shares rose more than 10 per- 
febt Wednesday after the electric 
®ity and coal-mining company 
jgld PacifiCorp may agree to Miy it 
about $8.2 billion. 
f Energy Group, which was spun 
a# from Hanson PLC in February, 
Sod after the London market closed 
Tuesday that talks could lead to a 
cash bid of about £3.6 billion ($5.9 
fnfljoo). PacifiCorp, which is based 
hr Portland, Oregon, also would 
have to take on about £1.4 billion in 


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^Klaus’s Victory 
"Provides No Lift 
v*Po Czech, Markets 


CompSrdbyOm-SiqfrFmMDJspatcMn 

PRAGUE — Vaclav Klaus’s 
“•narrowly won vote of confi- 
'fdence provided little impetus to 
^the Czsech Republic's financial 
'■^markets Wednesday, as ana- 
-r-k^ts said the victory for the 
me minister’s coalition had 

E 1 already been factored into 
^prices. 

The koruna weakened 
slightly at the opening of trad- 
ing, then steadied at its late- 
3 *Tuesday levels of about 18.7 to 
fSftJie Deutsche mark and 32.2 to 
<%e U.S. dollar. The Prague 
PS tock Exchange's benchmark 
[ s PX-50 Index rose 0.1 percent, 
*fo close at 506.9 points. 

^ Since the beginning of the 
or, the koruna has fallen 17.9 
rant against the dollar, the 
-50 Index has fallen 6.2 per- 
pcent, and bond prices have 
Rumbled by about 7.5 percent 
tC* c (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


i-n 


T 

a**- 


debt, according to analysts* esti- 
mates. 

An agreement would help Paci- 
fiCoip’s ambitioo of booming a 
global player in the energy markets 
tujd give it control of Peabody Hold- 
ing Inc., the biggest U.S. coal miner. 
It would be the eighth purchase of a 
British power company by a U.S. 
utility, and the largest one so far. 

Energy’s shares rose 60 pence, to 
close at 640. The company said any 
offer would be at a premium of 
“about 20 percent” to its Tuesday 
closing price of 580 pence a share. 
PacifiCorp declined to comment 

Energy Group would be a large 
acquisition for PacifiCotp, which 
has a market capitalization of $6.2 
billion. Some analysts questioned 
whether it had the resources to com- 
plete such a 'takeover. 

U.S. power companies have 
bought seven of Britain's regional 
electricity companies since the gov- 
ernment sold 12 of them to private 
investors in 1990. The companies 
have been attracted by higher re- 
turns and the chance to learn about a 
less regulated market in advance of 
regulatory changes that are still 
pending in the United States. 

This would be the first such bid in 
the British power industry since the 
Labour Party’s landslide election 
victory here May 1. 

Analysts said there would be little 
reason for the Labour government to 
block a takeover on competitive or 
regulatory grounds, although the 
Labour Party was critical of the 
former Conservative government’s 
willingness to approve bids for 
power companies and thereby 
hamper the ability of regulators to 
operate in the sector. 

Shares in Southern Electric PLC, 
meanwhile, Britain’s only remain- 
ing independent regional electricity 
company, rose 14 pence, to 432. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Debtors Squeeze Gazprom 


Ccmp&dtH 0*r StdTFmm OopuDrtKi 

COPENHAGEN — RAO 
Gazprom said Wednesday that state 
and municipally owned companies 
in Russia owed it $2.5 billion and 
that its lade of these funds was 
preventing it from paying the es- 
timated $1 billion in taxes it owed to 
the Russian government. 

The company’s chairman, Rem 
Vyakhirev, speaking at an industry 
conference here, denied that 
Gazprom’s tax arrears, which 
should have been paid off by Tues- 
day, were as high as the $1 .2 billion 
often quoted by Russian officials. 
He said the natural-gas supplier was 
borrowing and repaying sums on a 
daily basis. Gazprom, which has 
sold shares equal to about 1 percent 
of its capitalization to foreign in- 
vestors, is negotiating loans with 
Western banks to ease its tax prob- 
lems. Mr. Vyakhirev declined to 


name the Western banks with which 
the company was negotiating. 

“Lots of people owe us money, 
including state companies which 
owe us $900 million,'' Mr. 
Vyakhirev said, "Together with 
Russian municipal companies, that 
makes $2.5 billion which we are 
owed. It will taken loi of time to gel 
a clear shot at this nest of vipers.” 

Mr. Vyakhirev said Gazprom 
would have no financial diffi- 
culties if it could call in its debts. 

In Moscow, a Gazprom spokes- 
man, Sergei Smirnov, said the 
company had recently paid $228 
million to the state in the form of 
pension contributions, honoring a 
promise to pay debts to the pension 
fund by this week. 

* 'Russian institutions cannot re- 
pay us,” Mr. Vyakhirev said. “It 
is a problem which musr be settled 
at national level.” Mr. Vyakhirev 


also said the company planned to 
ship gas to Asia, expand exports to 
Western Europe and even sell to 
customers in North America. 

The Russian company expects 
growth in gas demand from Asia to 
offer the biggest potential for ex- 
ports. While big buyers such as 
Japan are a long way from some 
Gazprom fields in Siberia, much of 
Asia is not too far away, Mr. 
Vyakhirev said. 

Gazprom also sees more growth 
in Europe, where it already sup- 
plies 20 percent of the Continent’s 
gas and governments are starting to 
open markets controlled by nation- 
al monopolies, he said, and added, 
"When the Russian Arctic off- 
shore fields are in operation, that 
creates the ground for liquefied 
natural gas to the North American 
and South American markets. 

too." (Bloomberg. AFP. AFX) 


Investor’s Europe 


FffflTlrfrnt 

London 

Pang 

DAX . 

FFSE 100 Index 

CAC40 

3800 

4800 

3000 

3600 • -JE 

4600 p 

2800 

m ■ 

m yV' 

2600 /vA 

3200 A-™ — 

. 4200 X V 

• / 

.3000// 

4000 

2400 f - ■ 

2®®'j F M'A M _ J 

m j F~M AMJ 


1997 

1997 

1997 


Exchange 


Index 


Amsterdam AEX 


■Brussels ■ BEL-2) 


AM J 

Wednesday Prey. ... % , 
Close Close Change) 

827.1 S 830-77 -C-44 

^36270 2.352.15 +0.45 


Spain Gets Time to Free Up Telecom 


Frankfurt 

CiAX 

3,677,43 

3,665.01 

+0.34 

Copenhagen 

Stock Market 

58&CT 

586-71 

*0.02 

Helsinki 

HEX General. 

3,14232 

3,10934 

+1.07 

Oslo 

06X 

. 638,42 ... 

.644,42 

' >0.93 

London 

FTSE f.00 

4,724,80 

4,739.60 

■0,31 

Madrid 

Stock Exchwge 

571,66 

566-81 

*■0.66 

.Milan 

mibtel . 

12213 

12.134.00 +0.65J 

Paris 

CAC-W 

2,896.19 

2,664.18 

+1^0 

Stockholm 

sxie 

.3,11161 

3.11058 

+0-10 

Vienna 

ATX 

1J3CKL56 

1^97.73 

+oi2 

Zurich 

SFl 

3,371.86 ' 

3,391 .34 

•0^7 

Source- TeiBkurs 

InirfnalHiiai K'»U Tnbunc 

Very briefly: 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Commission agreed Wednesday to 
give Spain more time to liberalize its 
telecommunications industry as part 
of a plan for total EU liberalization 
of the sector. 

A statement by Karel van Miert, 
the European commissioner respon- 
sible for competition policy, said 
Spain would be given until Nov. 30 
next year to open up its public tele- 
communications networks. 

Previously, Spain would have 
been required to complete the move 
by the beginning of next year. 

The commission said that exten- 
sion granted Spain was compatible 
with the World Trade Organization 
agreement on telecommunications 
reached in February, which the 
European Union signed. 


Under the extension, Spain will 
be required to advise the commis- 
sion before the end of the year on 
how it intends to grant telephone 
licenses. The licenses will have to be 
given by Dec. 1 next year. 

Beginning next month, Spain will 
also have to ensure that all restric- 
tions on the supply of already lib- 
eralized services are lifted. 

In addition, Spain will be required 
this year to allow cable operators to 
provide telephone services. 

The Commission has already 
granted extensions to liberalization 
timetables for Ireland, Portugal and 
Luxembourg. A decision on Greece 
is still pendmg. 

■ Boeing Deal Worries EU 

The exclusive deal between Boe- 
ing Co. and Continental Airlines, 


announced Tuesday, wilt add a fur- 
ther dimension to EU concerns over 
Boeing's merger with McDonnell 
Douglas Corp., a spokesman for the 
European Commission said, news 
agencies reported from Brussels. 

Boeing's existing exclusive deals 
wilh AMR Corp.'s American Air- 
lines and Delia Air Lilies Inc. are a 
key element in the commission's 
objections to the proposed merger. 

Separately, an official of the 
European Commission said that it 
would rule on the planned truns- 
Atlantic alliance between British 
Airways PLC and American Air- 
lines well before November. 

The official was responding to the 
British carrier’s threat to abandon 
the alliance if it does not receive 
regulatory approval by November. 

(AFX. Bloomberg) 


•The European Union filed an appeal with the World Trade 
Organization against the finding that its banana- import policies 
violated WTO open-trading rules. The appeal was made one day 
before the EU has to explain how it will deal with the finding. 

• Daimler-Benz AG expects the acquisition of Ford Motor 
Co.'s heavy-truck business to add more than $1 billion to its 
annual U.S. truck sales. 

• Volkswagen AG is suffering a sales slump in its home 
marker and the rest of Europe as potential buyers appear to be 
waiting for the new Golf model due out later this year. 

• Automobiles Peugeot of Peugeot SA has presented a 
voluntary redundancy package to its workers' council under 
which 2,816 jobs will be shed. 

• Poland unveiled a plan for selling its remaining state-owned 
assets through 2000, saying it wants to sell everything, except 
its transportation infrastructure and natural resources, to fi- 
nance pension reform and other budgetary needs. 

• Granada G roup PLC said first half profit jumped by a third 
as the benefits of its takeover of Forte PLC last year came 

through. Reuters . Blttunberfi . AFX 


370RLD STOCK MARKETS 


Hlgii lam date Pra*. 


Bril Pehn 


JMfodnesday, June 11 

„ Prices hi local currendss. 

■ Ci 








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1 10410 10440 
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9 5950 89-90 
l 5S30 5550 
I 41.90 4240 
) 7250 7110 
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I 30550 30450 
i 2SZ 25250 
I 113 11350 

> 95 95J0 

> 19450 194J0 
1 17190 178.90 
1 4110 4330 
I 18190 18310 

> 112 112 
i 381 JO 383 
1 388-33 39073 
J 10J.70 10330 
) 44.10 44.10 
) 23750 23850 


37.10 

14450 

155 

24150 

115-60 

38 
10090 
39150 
19370 
3250 
82 
4SJ0 
6S30 
9450 , 
335 
10450 
16450 ' 
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5550 
4230 
7350 
4950 
306 
25470 
117 
95J0 
19850 
178.90 
43 

18110 

11150 

382-30 

38750 

10550 

4450 

238J0 


SGL 

SSDW 

Springer (Aid) 
Somhocfev 
Tbyssen 
Vefaa 
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HU* Law Cfase 
73.10 7230 7250 
32050 31750 319 

19450 192-10 1W.10 
235.70 23330 23330 
9950 9070 99.10 
1530 1520 1530 

5-59 987 990 

41090 406 407 

9755 9755 9754 
535 532 534 

80S 794 8008 

1195118750119350 


Pm 

7350 

319 

187.9S 

23250 

9830 

1510 

995 

60950 

9750 

532 

79050 

1193 


7,45 
AOS 

BrnSfed 153 

Bril Telecom 484 

8TR 1.90 

'BnninhCadml 10.18 

Burton Gp U1 

QiMeife&ffl 547 

MVSdM 532 


CDdbuvSdw 

Ctralton Comm 

Camai Union 7-22 
7JD4 


599 


Helsinki HEXBemrWMmlMjJl 

Pruhus: 310954 


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226 220 22150 

52 51 ST-58 

76 53 75 7550 

1730 1430 1450 
147 145 14550 

42 4150 4150 
136 131 134 

.. J3U. ,.350135350. 

209 23-5 2Q5 

K7J0 70450 10730 
124 121 124 

■950 09 89 


4450 
225 
5150 
7750 
1730 
14750 
4130 
13750 
. . 352.. 

205 

10480 

122 

90 


Dtans 5-10 

BedmcanpanenttAJO 
EMIGnnq) 1155 

Energy Group 6.75 

EltaprittOfi 6.93 

EbaiCataU 1-47 

GenlAaSdenl 9-42 

G6C 170 

GKN 1032 

GtowWMoonw 1195 
GmnodaGp 9.12 

Grand Met 
GRE 

GromWiGp 
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GUS 


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Hong Lung Dev 

Hang S«w BA 

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SHMK 8Ue 2927 J1 
Pim4msc 386857 





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878 

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844 875 86075 

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438 45135 .436 
9175 96 9473 

48025 4J035 48550 
285-50 28935 2B550 
315 316 31525 

315 319JD 314,25 
1825 19 18 

39050 401-75 39025 


Poari 
SHK Praps 
ShuoIrtTHrigs 
Stau Land Cn. 
Stti CWno Pod 
SwteRtcA 
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2945 

1320 

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2350 

44.10 

47.10 
4150 

9.95 

1440 

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045 

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420 

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1935 

4440 

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2875 29.15 
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73 74 

2285 2350 
4250 4190 
4550 44.10 
4080 4090 
9.15 930 
1445 1445 
89 9050 
845 850 

4450 4875 
14 1455 
2885 30.10 
1430 1470 
485. 4.13 
230 233 

6025 6135 
2295 23.15 
1950 1975 
1930 1930 
4470 45 

2-68 2.70 

159 172 

88 8950 
435 485 

040 045 

730 730 

4525 66J0 
3130 3320 
1O10 1835 


835 

2935 

12 

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4150 

995 

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8935 

820 

4935 

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1730 

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4075 

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21.10 
1940 
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248 

233 

9050 

495 

895 

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3230 

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Legal Gent Grp 
UaydsTSBGp 
LaonsVMy 
MmbSpenonr 
ME PC 

Mncury Asset 
NaHandGiU 
Nail Power 
No4We« 

NeM 

5X5®* 

POD 

Peartoo 


Pleader Famed 
PiudeWU 
{Wrack Gp 
Rode Graup 
BectiHCotoi 
RndlnwJ 
Reed Ird 
ReidoMlniU 
Ret*® Hdgs 
R mem 
RMC Group 
feliRwco 
Royal BtScal 
Klin 


545 

289 

440 

5JO' 

454 

Ml 

104) 

047 

494 

7.40 

252 

on 

276 

472 

442 

2.11 

532 

iZJ 

1370 

218 

535 

014 

751 

216 

637 

799 

132 

094 
445 
047 
440 
435 
047 
377 
598 
234 

095 
272 
947 

253 
647 
IMS 


Brussels 





BEL3I Mob 234270 
PnMeas: 23S2.1S 

17000 74450 14800 M8SD 
4620 6570 66M ASS) 
9750 9600 9400 9670 

3470 3400 3470 3AM 

15400 14700 15025 14675 
1845 1820 1835 1820 

7700 7480 7700 74« 

*75 3540 3560 3540 
7100 7W0 71» 

3390 3340 3390 3340 

5870 5770 5850 5830 

J43SB 14225 14250 U225 
16100 15025 15925 16075 
12850 12708 327/S 12675 
5050 5000 SM0 SMQ 
10175 9920 9960 19225 

3450 3400 .3*95 3395 

23375 22500 23125 7305 
15250 14800 15100 15675 

m i40oana9ooo3i ii asmooaoo 


Jakarta 

AIM HI 

BklrffUndoo 

BkNegoro 

GudongGonn 

(jxfaXHBefd 

todofaod 

Moaot 

SanneroaHM 

SenwiGw att . 

reMneranamf 


CMveAWroMM 

PlWtoos: 61937 

A9SO 6875 6950 6^0 

1900 1*50 1875 1900 

1600 1550 1600 1«® 

10200 10150 10200 10000 
3850 3025 3050 J05D 
5450 5425 5425 5475 

7425 73)0 7450 
10000 9750 9075 1MB 

5550 5500 5550 53® 

4000 3875 4000 3900 


Johannesburg *■«■**«■*» 


^ - •«** - 


AnffiaArihCap 

AngtoAroGold 

AiHuAa) lnd 

AVAUN 

Bnttow 

LG. Satttl 

Da Bees 

DtMantota 

FriNdlBk 

Gamr 

GF5A 




IflP 




DMDoeiheBk 

VSVntofgB 

era 

UlMm 

SP.Brott b 

"" EBcrB 

mat B 
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Stock H 
Pmrieee S84J1 


328 31&» 322 

3*1 375 381 

B9S 890 895 

404 400 404 4)0 

640 429 632 M0 

345800 345000 345000 351000 
745000 339500 24MHJ 244000 

WOl 989 992 990 

7u m m Jtt 

726 721 m TU 

185 975 975 97110 

356 351 355 349 

360 354 340 360 

345 356 345 340 


HP? 


_Bk* . 2930 2935 29J0 2930 
OH 295 294.75 295 296 

s® ns m 275 

307 30535 307 305LB 

19175 192 19125 193 

16JD5 1540 J6JK 1555 
48 4730 4730 48 

2535 2455 25 _25 

141J5 159-50 161.25 13935 
3635 3630 3630 36B5 
^3540 37 3560 

JOuAS 2005 2845 XUS 

m no no 1U30 

^ 

31 3850 31 3050 

114 3.14 3.16 

57 53. 57JS 

350 wn'Dl 35150 
12875 12835 12050 129 

1730 17 1730 17.1S 

10135 102 


111 

S8J 

35135 


Stand? Sun Afl 4.95 
Safeway 161 

Sairafaur 
Sdiraden 
SadNewaisfle 
Sad Power 
Sccarkw 
St v e in Trad 
SbedTrompB 
Skhe , 

SoA Nephew 
SmBhKSne 
SnfitaM 
SfeeroBec 
StogecoaOh 
Stand ChartEr 
Tate 8. Lyle 
Tefon 

Itames Wrier 
31 Group 
TlGroup 
TaroMu 
Ihdkmr 
UMAwmmoe 
WdNews 
UtdUUes 
VtaKtoow Lxuls 447 

VOdidQM 390 

mutrntd 7M 

WBtams Hdge 317 

Wrinfey 484 

WPP Group 256 

Zeneca 1957 


348 

1485 

670 

182 

253 

755 

1231 

959 

1.73 

1056 

737 

440 

895 

980 

455 

184 

682 

532 

5-58 

25§ 

14.98 

459 

778 

650 


s 

"iM 

476 

156 


1031 

1259 

882 

553 

282 

453 

565 

647 

5JS0 

18.18 

853 

388 

734 

243 

8J8 

270 

457 

6.19 
282 
510 
517 

1340 
313 
.512 
Z M 
737 
313 
516 
598 

1.19 
476 
457 
647 
653 
432 
558 
123 
5.90 
231 
451 
345 
938 
350 
432 
1048 

485 
358 
357 
1657 
658 
372 
280 
750 
12-1 i 
9 j60 
171 
1083 
783 
4JD6 
685 
958 
449 
ITS 
470 
513 
549 
255 
1481 
442 
753 
635 
440 
384 
7JB 
313 
473 
zs» 
1935 


556 543 

284 289 

455 440 

548. 

451 


Pro*. 


High 1 

Low 

a«m 

744 

Boo Coked llrd 

3435 

3375 

3410 

4 

Ben rktowuiu 

43D0 

4200 

4205 

1-49 

Bca dj Romo 

1144 

1135 

1145 

483 

Benetaa 

23700 

23200 

23450 

I8S 

Credki ttolano 

2650 

2600 

2445 

T01D 

Edison 

7825 

7600 

7730 

S3fl 

ENI 

8990 

8885 

BTO0 

589 

Fkri 

5845 

5745 

57W 

533 

Gonmrii AesJc 

29200 

2B350 

29150 

537 

IM 

14500 

14230 

14250 

786 

INA 

2450 

2415 

2458 

7.01 

3-41 

Itataa 

Aledtoset 

5170 

7305 

5075 

7205 

5140 

7295 

588 

MiMfiohonto 

939S 

9210 

9395 

426 

Itotttfisrai 

1027 

1012 

1019 

1144 

OBnffi 

475 

464 447-50 

580 

Ponnalal 

2385 

23® 

2370 

484 

PMH 

3988 

3870 

3895 

187 

RA5 

128® 

12640 

12745 

980 

ftao Banco 

18200 

18035 

1B0B0 

3J3 

Sltaeto Torino 

10725 

10450 

10700 

ML31 

SM 

8640 

8470 

8400 

1273 

Triecnm naSa 

4700 

4595 

4690 

9X0 

TIM 

5190 

5100 

5145 


Peugeot a 

Phmdt-PiM 

Promades 

RenauU 

tod 

Rh- Poulenc A 
Sanall 
SduwUer 
5EB 

SG5ThDmun 

SteGenaide 

Sodexho 

SIGohata 

Sue? 

Synthetabo 
TnooKoaCSP 
Total B 
Usnor 
Vdten 


High Law Close 

Prev. 


High 

Law 

Close 

Prev. 

563 

554 

554 

546 

ABBA 

ll&JO 

113J0 114J0 

114 

248) 

2630 

2645 

2439 

2100 

AssJ Demon 

719J0 

214 

319 

2I7J0 

2110 

2081 

2100 

Astra A 

130 JO 

126 

17650 

IX 

135 

120 

133 

12780 

Alkn Copco A 

211 

205 JO 

206 

211 JO 

1717 

1684 

1717 

16*6 

AuMlv 

311 

305 306J0 

310 

198.80 

195 

197 

19330 

EtodrahixB 

470 

443 

465 

464 

550 

535 

550 

538 

Ericsson B 

29SJ0 

283 

291 JO 

286 

3T9 3Q9-SO 315.90 

305 

HennesB 

248JO 744J0 

748 

245 

10W 

I0SS 

1085 

1085 

Incentive A 

715 

496 

no 

698 


453-JO 44530 445.90 453 

628 611 618 m 

2800 27SB 2784 2824 

■25 815 825 816 

28430 279 JD 28050 78231 
710 694 708 705 

156.90 15440 15530 15640 
564 549 553 559 

97.75 94 97 9580 

360 342 357 34480 


S3o Paulo 


Montreal 


laKhstrtabiadBc 3317 J7 
Pmtawc 330676 


680 

Bee Mob Can 

42m 

4180 

SUB 

42-45 

589 

CdnTiteA 

26 

2590 

26 

2610 

1834 

Ciln UfO A 

3140 

3505 

35-40 

35.70 

861 

CTFunSvc 

3625 

35N 

36V* 

3614 

387 


1785 

17-45 

17V> 

18 

73B 

Gt-West LUeco 

31 

3020 

30U 

2935 

751 


4085 

3980 

40 

3965 

U87 

Investors Grp 

28.45 

2865 


2860 

273 


1985 

1980 

1980 

1080 

873 

Nad Bk Condo 

17 

1670 

1670 

1695 

6-44 


3314 

32.90 

3781) 

33 

283 


32W 

32 

T/85 

32 

5.14 


26.10 

25.90 

26 

26US 

531 


9!A 

91* 

980 

Vi* 

1332 


JVHO 

9X 

WJfr 

W.7D 

2.15 







BrndeseaPH 
BndnnPfd 
: Comb PM 
SSPPId 
Copel -- ■ 
EMrofans 
ftaubamoPM 
UgldSenldas 

^raSrosPfd 

Paufcla Un 
5MNuctanal 
SaumCniz 
TriebrosPM 

Tetemlg 

Tetad 

TehapPfd 

UrrixHico 

UsknbaaPM 

CVRD PM 


asa 

83300 

5540 

7350 

.-1740 

505.00 
53480 
56180 

430.00 
27398 
18300 

3350 

N.T. 

14740 

18000 

16480 

33880 

3930 

1.14 

2570 


855 

82280 

5450 

4850 

1780 

50000 

50580 

54580 

41080 

24580 

17880 

3580 

N.T. 

145.70 

17880 

19982 

33480 

3095 

1.12 

2440 


todne 11397.90 
114284* 

880 848 

82280 83280 
5470 5480 
69.95 6930 
1730 -1480 
501.00 50280 
53300 51780 
54580 55780 
42850 41080 
27380 24680 
178.10 178.90 
3549 3649 
N.T. 1180 
14640 14750 
178.10 1B08D 
16310 16050 
31480 33900 
3930 3940 
1.12 1.13 

2490 24.70 


InwdorB 
MoDoB 
Nordbontai 

ssrr n 

Samta B 
SCAB 

S-E Sunken A 
SkandtaFon 
StncBi . i 0 
SKFB 

lA 


IS 


398 39250 39550 
249 JO 740 24950 
23850 23450 23850 23850 

277 270 272 77750 

214 20950 211 213 

223 221 222.50 223 

16050 158 JO 159 ltO 
83 82 8250 83 

278 270 774 26850 


stora A 

Sh Hnndtes A 
Vahn B 


351 341 

187 183 

146 142 50 
1W 590 
121 11450 
22950 22550 
20850 206 50 


344 

184 

166 

190 

120 


341 

184 

164 

190 

115 


22850 22550 
207J0 208 


5.14 521 OslO 

883 885 

743 7J6 ... 
Z14 214 

6.19 633 
781 783 

131 1.17 

494 480 

459 444 

642 640 

65B 654 

433 433 

&45 US 
334 335 

596 598 

234 235 

688 489 
271 2-76 

952 932 

251 251 

638 636 

1034 1Bl«J 

492 487 

359 357 

348 343 

1683 1681 
651 675 

3.75 339 

283 283 

755 744 

12.17 12.17 
946 944 

132 131 
1086 1092 

785 784 

432 4.18 

493 492 

944 942 

451 455 

384 377 
630 689 

530 5.17 

555 541 

256 258 

1686 1693 
449 447 

730 735 

643 452 

440 443 

289 289 

780 792 

3.16 3.16 

476 433 

252 252 
1942 1945 


OBX ludau 43843 
Provtam: 44442 

134 13750 


CMpostfetadee 74679 
ProttaOK 76983 

96000 95000 95000 95100 


Sydney 

AH Orttaories; 241178 
Previous: 262*80 

Amcor 

658 

646 

B-46 

838 

ANZBMng 

9-40 

9-77 

932 

934 

BHP 

19 

1665 

1*66 

1692 

Baal 

4.16 

407 

407 

412 

Brombles l«L 

24.05 

2380 

24 

23.79 

CBA 

I486 

1436 

I4J0 

1430 

CC Amato 

15.70 

15.15 

1530 

1530 

Cafes Myer 

6 JO 

642 

6-47 

647 

Coma lea 

7.16 

788 

7.15 

785 

C5R 

4.94 

468 

490 

486 

Fosters Brow 

240 

236 

237 

237 

Good man Fid 

180 

1.76 

179 

1.76 

KJAustraRa 

12 

11.95 

12 

12 

Lend Lease 

26-46 

2539 

2659 

2635 

MJMHdqi 

Nat Ausl Bank 

1.90 

187 

189 

188 

1985 

18.75 

1677 

1698 

Nat Mutual Hdg 

1.92 

188 

1.91 

188 


The Trib Index 

Prices as at 3VO PM New Yortt tone 

Jan. f. 1992- 100 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to date 

World Index 

170.33 

40.99 

+0.58 

+14321 

Regional Indexes 





AsWPacif/c 

127.46 

*0.77 

+0.61 

+3.27 

Europe 

177.00 

-0.02 

-O.OI 

+9.80 

N. America 

198.13 

+2.36 

+1.21 

+22.37 

S. America 

160.39 

+1.48 

+0.93 

+40.16 

Industrial indexes 





Capital goods 

209.28 

+2.43 

♦1.17 

+22.44 

Consumer goods 

191.53 

+1.18 

+0.62 

+18.65 

Energy 

201.66 

+1.01 

+0.50 

+18.13 

Finance 

127.20 

+0.58 

+0.46 

+9.22 

Miscellaneous 

169^0 

+1.42 

+0.85 

+4.59 

Raw Materials 

185.95 

*1.03 

+0-56 

+8.03 

Service 

160.92 

+0-24 

+0.15 

+17.19 

Utilities 

145.36 

+0.14 . 

. .*0.51 _ 

. +1 32 

77w bmmattonal Homtu 

Tribune WOrtd Stock tnfMxOmKks [fie U.S. 0aBar valves of 

\ 280 tritematfotialfy hvestabb stocks tram 25 countries. For more mtomnttan, a (roe 

booklet is avaitabie bv wmtno to The Tnb tndox. ist Avenue Ctmnes do Guu«e. 

92521 Neudty Codex. Fiance. 


Campdea by Bloomberg News. 



Madrid 


Botrotadwe 57144 
PrariMB 56681 


HD 103 

18 18.10 18.10 

92 TO 92 ms 
4610 45£3 46 .46 

6135 403S 4035 6035 



■«* ' 


2*14 •* ■ ,T „ S 


roy*-' - * 

mt •>■ * t - 


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DAX: 367743 

PlWhHs 3«M1 

1408 mo-un 
198 19830 197.10 
36450 36540 3SW 
1780 1785 1700 

3740 3740 38 

<380 606 4185 

Milo raa 6980 

“w 90 S wf 

as 4® 

1370 1374 nn 

ms 1 CJ 0 U94D 

4235 4940 49 

mi 135J5 195911 
BJ0 8740 MX 
99.90 »0 mio 

4US 41 JO. 41 
43 4125 41 W 
345 370 365 

g 

12650 125 0490 

-V 


Kuala Lumpur 

17 1680 
13 1330 


sSgf 


17 1670 
1330 13 
2735 J67S 
*85 

. 940 930 





17730 17130 

177 

113 

7450 

24 

74 

2440 

2930 

29 

29 

29.10 

140 

137 

138 

m 

44 

45 

4530 

45 


417 

4)650 

424 

386 3*130 

385 

385 

255 

253 

255 

255 

105 

°\§ 

104 

SIS 

105 

548 

319 31750 

31730 

319 

14230 

137 

13730 14230 

143 

142 

M2 

142 

H.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

527 


Daewoo Heavy 

MS* 

Korea El Pw 
Korea EKfaBk 

SSSS,™ 

PDhanoInma 
Samsung Dhloy 
SowaunaBec 
SrohhmBonk 


8400 8020 

21100 20600 
16000 15900 
29500 29000 
6990 gO0 
3TO0I»36«B:® 
34500 3K®« 
57400 56ffi® 
45900 45W0 
46400 65200 
11300 11100 


8140 8240 
20900 Jlllffl 
15TO0 14000 
29500 29500 
» 6850 
3650ifl5 3B9SOO 
35600 36000 
56500 57400 
45300 45900 
65600 66100 
11200 11300 


News Crip 
Potfe Dunlop 
Pioneer inti 
PubBnadcaxt 
Rio TWO 
St George Bank 
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553 







PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 


Wednesday’s 4 P.M. 

TteijOMmost-lrodedNofiofflilMartetsecwKBa 

)nternisrf(k)tovQJue,up(lDlPdtwtccayEW. 

ThaAuocUedPnss. 


h JV an c* yk re id 





35 £ f :S 

ft i i i 

I || 1 























































































It is more than the world's preeminent financial services firm. 

It is a vision of the future. 

A future where all your financial needs will be met. 

Where you will have the best minds in the business working for you. 
And the most resources to draw upon. 

It is a vision of a future where change will be embraced. 
Where knowledge-will be revered. Where uncertainty will become 
the very basis of opportunity. 

Introducing a financial services firm with the global strength 
to make that vision a reality. Not a few years from now. Today. 
Today, vision has a name. 


MORGAN STANLEY, DEAN WITTER, DISCOVER & CO. 


r 


C1W7 StflfJfiy, D*an Witte; Dkow & ^ 



i 





ASIA/PACIFIC 


Selling Creativity in Asia 

London’s BBH Tries to Transplant Its Technique 


By Daniel Tilles 

Spti ini io the Herald Tribune 

Bartle Bogle Hegarty’s new Singapore of- 
fice inside a renovated shophouse, or family 
store, is a long way from the advertising 
agency's London headquarters in funky Soho 
— both geographically and culturally. 

But that doesn't matter to John Bartle. 
Nigel Bogle or John Hegariy. 

As different as the Asian and European 
advertising environments may be. as small as 
BBH is compared with multibill ion-dollar ad 
agencies operating in the region such as J. 
Walter Thompson or McCann-Erickson, the 
three founders could not resist the ‘'enormous 
growth potential in Asia-Pacific for the sort of 
brand.; we're associated with," Nigel Bogle, 
the agency's co-chief executive, said from 
London. 

BBH. a medium-sized agency with about 
$366 million in annual billings, has built its 
European reputation on a simple yet unusual 
premise: that a single office can create 
ground-breaking advertising for multination- 
al marketers across an entire region. 

The 15-year-old BBH office in London has 
produced award-winning ads for clients that 
include Levi Strauss & Co.. Polaroid Corp.. 
Whitbread PLC and Grand Metropolitan 
PLC’s Haagen-Dazs ice cream brand. 

The key question for BBH — and for the 
hundreds of Western businesses trying to 
make it in the region — is whether a European 
formula can win in Asia. 

BBH Asia-Pacific began operations in Oc- 
tober. Since then, the company has generated 
$26 million in billinss. and it" is shooting for 


$35 million by the end of its first year. Most 
other agencies with blue-chip client rosters 
prefer market- by-market local service, with 
offices spread out over a region to tailor ads to 
tastes of consumers in individual countries. 
But with its history of lengthy agency-brand 
relationships, BBH has found a way to make 
its modus operandi work. 

“We talk almost exclusively with corpo- 
rations who want a consistent image every- 
where. even if it’s on a marketrby-market 
basis," Mr. Bogle said. ‘ ‘Certain products are 
desired for being the same thing everywhere- 
— brands which don't have a different image 
because people don't want the image to be 
different." 

BBH decided the same technique would 
work in Asia, even though few marketers in 
the regioa know the company’s stellar cur- 
riculum vitae back in the West 

“Despite our reputation in Europe and in 
the advertising market, BBH has no aware- 
ness within the Asian client community," 
said Simon Sherwood, chief executive of 
BBH Asia-Pacific. 

■ BBH Asia-Pacific has started work in the 
region for Levi Strauss and Polaroid and is 
seeking other clients. 

Mr. Sherwood acknowledged that selling 
quality creative work in the region was not 
easy. 

"From a consumer point of view, there's 
no obstacle to running great work," he said. 
“The bigger challenge comes from getting 
clients to take chances, as this is a very ‘safe* 
society." 

Leslie Burt publisher of Asian Advertising 
and Marketing, a trade publication, said that 







.composite • • ' t.iiass . 




One of Bartle Bogle Hegarty’s creative efforts fora Levi Strauss campaign in Japan. 

with work such as a new campaign for Levi’s “Some of the great creative work they’ve 
introduced in Japan, ‘ ‘they are already creating done is not suitable for the Indonesian mar- 
waves." She added: “I think they are moving ket,” she said. “It's done in English, and 
quite aggressively in establishing themselves. Indonesia does not have the same English 
People at other agencies are noticing them." fluency. Japan is more sophisticated, so it’s 
Clients agreed. “They don't remind me of a easier to run work there than here. They need 
start-up," one said. “It’s like they’ve been to do a lot more learning.” 
here for years. They’re very professional.” Criticism notwithstanding. Mr. Sherwood 
Still. BBH executives admit to being less said BBH’s fundamental strategy of produ- 
fluent in the differences among countries and ring regionwide advertising for brands would 
cultures in Asia. Kiki Rizki, marketing ex- remain the basis for the agency’s develop- 
ecutive for Levi's Indonesia, said it would take meot- “We care very much about our creative 
time for BBH's European advertising sens- reputation in Asia,” he said, 
i bill ties to catch on in some parts of Asia. ‘ * We can’t have two different standards and 

“I think the creative premium is different in keep our reputation.. We are determined to 
Asia than in Europe." she said “Different maintain our positioning and not change to 
markets are at very different points of de- snit the market Great brands change the mar- 
velopmenl." ket to suit them." 



Source: Telekues 


Inienauonri HcraU Trftiiv 




-• *- ■*•*? 
•*r»* m A*t r 

J3.. 


Hong Kong Ibws 
Freedom for Film 

.1 jlvji. v /■>.«».- 1 ■frr«; 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong 
opened its first international film 
fa‘‘ aimed at consolidating its po- 
sit on in Southeast Asia as a gov- 
ernment official pledged Wednes- 
day that the authorities would not 
meddle u ';h moviemakers aller the 
July handover. 

“We are determined to keep gnv- 
emmen intervention to the minim- 
um while providing the maximum 
level ul support." said Chau Tak- 
hay. secretary for broadcasting, cul- 
ture and spun. 

He added that the government 
was •■fully : ware of the dangers of 
bureaucratic interference, which 
can frustrate initiatives by the 
private sector and hinder business 
decisions." 

The three-day fair. Filmart. has 
drawn 300 prospective buyers. 


Tightened Currency Controls Hit Thai Stocks 


C. -'win/ hi PuruK-hn 

BANGKOK — Slock prices fell 
Wednesday for the seventh time in 
eight sessions, after the Bank of 
Thailand tightened currency restric- 
tions by tarring foreign investors 
from taking proceeds out of the coun- 
try m the local currency, the baht 
’ The move, aimed at defending die 
baht, raised concern that big bor- 
rowers such as banks will face rising 
loan costs because foreign capital 
will he less likely to flow into Tliai- 
land. That could prompt greater de- 
mand for domestic capital and keep 
interest rates high, analysts and 
traders said. 

The Slock Exchange of Thailand 
index fell 5.82 points, or 1 percent, 
to 52 1 .40, its lowest close since May 
12. 1989. The index has fallen 37 
percent so far this year. 

Nevertheless. J. Mark Mobius, 
president of the Templeton Emerg- 


ing Markets Fund, said be planned to 
invest his own money in a new Tem- 
pleton fund targeted at Thailand, the 
world's worst-performing market 
tilts year. With the stock index at ah 
eight-year low, “some excellent 
bargains are beginning to emerge," 


he said Thai stocks now trade at an 
average price/eamings ratio of 8 J, 
down from 13 a year ago. 

Finance Minister Amnuay 
Viravan said the currency restric- 
tions were only temporary and that 
speculation on the baht was expec- 


Japan Updates Economic Practices 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Parliament modernized two major Japanese economic 
practices Wednesday, giving the central bank more independence and 
removing a ban on holding companies. 

The Bank of Japan will gain more independence on monetary policy 
starting next April in the first revision of the law governing the central bank 
since 1942. Japan’s 50-year-old bon on holding companies came to an end 
with passage of an amended Anti-Monopoly Law that will allow the 
creation of companies that exist merely to hold shares in other companies. 

The measures are part of a plan under which Prime Minister Ryu taro 
Hashimoto's government series a wholesale restructuring of Japan’s 
administrative apparatus and financial system by 2001. 


ted to ease within a month after 
temporary defensive moves by the 
central bank. But foreign analysts 
expressed skepticism. “In addition 
to economic and corporate risks.’' 
one analyst said, “we now have this 
currency uncertainty, which will 
further make it not worth the risk to 
invest here.” 

The new controls are part of the 
central bank’s effort to safeguard the 
currency by making it expensive for 
investors to bet against the baht. The 
government said foreigners now 
must bring foreign currency into 
Thailand to buy local assets and con- 
vert the proceeds into foreign cur- 
rencies inside Thailand when they 
selL Many analysts said they doubted 
Thai stocks would recover soon, as 
second-tier b anks continue to suffer 
from the effects of loans made to 
failing property companies. . 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFP) 


Very briefly; [ 

• Australia’s share of Japan’s investment abroad has fallen 

by nearly half since 1 989 amid concern over low profits, high • 
production costs and rising concern about aboriginal lafui 
rights, tiie Australian Foreign Affairs Department said. -A : 
report by the department said Australia’s share of Japan's . 
direct foreign investment was 3.3 percent in the first half Jof 
1996, compared, with 6 percent in 1989. ■ 

• Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank was raided again by prosecutors; a 
day after four executives were arrested for their alleged role-in ; 
a widening. loan scandal. 

• South Korea’s government denied any involvement in an ' 

alleged plot by Samsung Group to force mergers and ic- .in- 
quisitions in the auto industry. j f : 

■ Singapore Telecommunications Ltd., faced with incresis- * 
ing competition at borne, is looking to buy stakes in tele- 
communications companies in Thailand and Indonesia. Hoi : 
the company said it would not confirm or deny a report in 
Struts Times newspaper that named PT Telekom unikasi 
Indonesia and four Thai companies as likely candidates. : 

• Seoul Bank's bead, Chang Man Hwa, resigned over loan&io . 

the failed Hanbo Group. AFP. Bloomer 

GM Sets Up Asian Hub in Australia ;. 

Agente Francc-Presse ‘ 

MELBOURNE — The Australian arm of General Motors - 
Corp. launched an export drive Wednesday that would make - 
Australia its engineering center for the Asia-Pacific region! 

The unit. General Motors-Holden's Automotive, com- . - 
pleted an engineering and design sourcing arrangement that it ■ 
said it- expected to generate an extra 100 million Australian - 
dollars ($76 million) in annual exports to Asia. : * 

Under the arrangement, the company will employ 30fr 
additional automotive engineers in a new product engineerihg . 
center for the Asia-Pacific region, redesigning and modifying 
cars for the ’world’s fastest-growing market. ’ j 



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Care for a Shot of So ju? 

Domestic Sales Make South Korean Liquor No. 1 


Bloomberg News 

SEOUL — Move over, Ba- 
cardi: The world's best-selling 
liquor is soju, a sweet potato 
grog made famous by a nearly 
bankrupt company in Seoul. 

Jinro Ltd sold more than 
500 million bottles of the stuff 
last year, beating out all other 
brands thanks to its huge do- 
mestic sales, according to 
SpiritScan International, an 
American beverage-industry 
magazine. 

Aside from the obvious — 
.South Koreans can evidently 
bold their liquor — . the rank- 
ing also shows how hard it can 
be for foreign drinks to 
quench local thirsts because of 
a combination of high import 
taxes and traditional tastes. 

Now, the South Koreans 
want to export their success. 

Jinro has an added incent- 
ive to succeed In April its 
parent group was bailed out 
by creditors from $3 billion of 
debt run up by some of its 
other businesses, in construc- 
tion and foods. 

Soju drinkers such as 


Hwang Chang Sok, a man- 
aging director at a venture 
capital company, are willing 
to raise a glass or three to help 
out an old friend. 

“When my colleagues get 
together, we are more likely 
now to drink Jinro because we 
feel sympathetic to the ailing 
company," Mr. Hwang said 
between sips of his favorite 
drink. "Jinro is a legend the 
soul of Korea.” 

It is also an acquired taste. 
Distilled from sweet potatoes, 
tapioca or rice, soju is 24 per- 
cent alcohol, just over half the 
strength of Bacardi rum, 
which Jinro knocked off the 
top spot in terms of bottle 
sales last year. Jinro has been 
making soju for 73 years. 

Soju ’5 success here is the 
flip side of a stuttering econ- 
omy. With the economy grow- 
ing at its slowest pace in four 
years, consumers are seeking 
refuge in the cheapest glasses. 

A bottle of Jinro. which 
holds about eight shots, costs 
just 600 won f70 cents), half 
the price of a beer. But the 


price is ready to rise. The sta|t- - 
owned Yonhap news agerifcy 1 
reported Wednesday that die •' 
government planned to almost ^ 
double taxes on soju, to 62J t 
percent, in response to com- : 
plaints from the United Stales 
and tiie European Union. Im- ■. 
ported whiskey carries a 100 '“ 
percent tax. Rather than lovjer : • 
the whiskey tax. Seoul will ; ‘ 
raise the soju tax in an effortjio "■ 
discourage heavy drinking., - 

South Koreans can drink <, 
with the best of them. The 30 y, 
Korean soju makers, inclqd- * 
ing Jinro, Doosan Kyung- 1 
weoul, Bohae and Kumbokju. ■; 
sold 12.1 milli on cases in the 
first two months of this year. ;• 
up 3 percent from a year ea^i- 
er. Thai represents almost 
eight bottles for each South- 
Korean. 

In the same period Korea's • 
three big brewers — 0B 
Brewery Co., Chosun Brejv-' 
ery Co. and Jinro Coots Brew- : ' 
ing Co. — sold 23.5 million 
cases of beer, down 3-3 percent • . 
from a year earlier, and whis- 
key sales dropped 10 percent. 




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CONSOLIDATED 
ANNUAL REPORT 




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ft -eWw- • 


Statement of 
Income’ 


Uorttw pertcdJtpta 1. ibbb 
» March 3HB97) 
m Maura ot Yen 


Net sales 5,453,397 

Cost of sales 3.900.022 

Income before income taxes and minority 

interests 125.456 

Income ta<es ' 71,593 

Net income 67.077 

Net income per share 20 06 (in Yen) 


Consottdated Net Sales 
(Yeai ended March 3U 





Assets 

Cash and cash equivalents 
Notes and accounts receivable, 

trade 

Inventories 

Other current assets 
Property, plant and equipment 
Other assets 


580.420 


1.410,065 

.. ..1,068.154 

404,011 

... 1.425,299 
.... 921.336 


Liabilities and Shareholders 1 Equity ; 

Shorl-lerm borrowings and current portion of , 

long-term debt 1,235.761; 

Notes and accounts payable. trade .. 1 ,029.9 

Other current liabilities 1 , 069.21 9| 

Long-term liabilities 

Minority interests • ■ 

Shareholders equity 1.264. 77-* 











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^5ritcral b.a^l Sribimc 

Sports 


PAGE 22 



believing 


THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 


World Roundup 


U«S, Officials Suspend Slaney 


athletics Mary Slaney, the U.S. distance runner, was 
suspended by USA Track & Field for alleged drag use, 
making her ineligible for the national championships that 
began Wednesday, a track and field source said. The move 
followed demands by the International Amateur Athletics 
Federation that Slaney be barred from the U.5. trials. 

The U5ATF source said the action was taken Tuesday 
night by association's five-member drug custodial 
board. (API 


Bad Day for Island Nations in World Cup 


soccer The goalkeeper Mark Bosnich relieved his 
boredom by scoring a late penalty as Australia opened its 


World Cup qualifying campaign with a 13-0 rout of 
lesday. 


Solomon Islands on Wednesday 
Bosnich, who barely touched the ball in goal during the 
match, scored with the last kick of an embarrassingly one- 
sided Oceania group game. The strikers Damian Mori and 
John Aloisi had, by then, each scored five goals. 

In Tehran, Iran routed the Maldives, 9-0, on Wed- 
nesday to win Asian World Cup qualifying Group Two 
and still left the 50,000 home fans disappointed. Last 
week, Iran set a World Cup record by beating Maldives, 
17-0. ( Reuters ) 

Iran entered the game needing only a draw to move to 


the second round after Kyrgyzstan scored in injury time 
iy to beat Syri: 


earlier Wednesday to beat Syria, 2-1. 

• Lokomotiv Moscow retained the Russian Cup Wed- 
nesday, beating Dynamo. 2-0, in the final. Alexander 
Smirnov and Yevgeny Khariachev scored to give Loko- 
motiv a spot in the Cup Winners' Cup. ( Reuters! 


Referee Cleared of Bribery Allegations 


soccer A Spanish referee. Manuel Diaz Vega, was 
cleared Wednesday of bribery over a World Cup qual- 
ifying match between Norway and Switzerland. 

After UEFA, the governing body of European soccer, 
banned a former referee, Kurt Rothlisberger. after in- 
cidents at another match, allegations over Diaz Vega 
appeared in the Swiss press. FIFA, the governing body of 
world soccer, said its inquiry had cleared Diaz Vega. 

( AP ) 

• Slephane Paille. a former French international was 
jailed for four months on drugs charges Wednesday. The 
conn in the French town of Bourg-en-Bresse found Paille. 
32. guilty of buying and using cocaine and being an 
accomplice in drag- trafficking. {Reuters) 


Derby Bookie Takes the Money and Runs 


HORSE racing A bogus bookmaker swindled £40,000 
($65,000! from punters at the Epsom Derby last Saturday 
after setting up with a fake permit and disappearing straight 
after the race. The racecourse has received 79 complaints 
about die bookmaker, who called himself John Batten. 

Claims for winning bets total more than over £10,500. 
but the amount stolen is expected to top £40.000 as most 
of the bets were on the beaten favorite. Entrepreneur. A 
British newspaper said Wednesday that punters lined np 
to take Batten’s 6-4 against Entrepreneur. Most bookies 
offered 6-4 on Entrepreneur. (Reuters) 


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Knee Injury Casts 
Shadow Over Graf 


a 1 

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Tennis Star to Miss Wimbledon 
And VS. Qpen; Prognosis Hague 


The Associated Press 

VIENNA, Austria — The 
surgeon who operated on 
Steffi Graf's left knee said 
Wednesday that there was no 
guarantee she would ever be 
able to resume competitive 
tennis. 

Graf underwent a two-hour 
operation on Tuesday to re- 
pair cartilage and tendon 
damage. She said she expec- 
ted to be sidelined for four to 
six months, missing Wimble- 
don and the U.S. Open. She is 
the defending champion in 
both Grand Slam events. 

Graf was being transferred 
Wednesday from a private 
clinic in Vienna to a reha- 
bilitation center at Gars am 
Kamp in lower Austria. The 
center, where Graf will un- 



jreign 

politicians, actors and other 
celebrities. It is ran by Willi 
Dungl, a well-known health 
counselor in Austria. 

Graf. 27. issued a state- 
ment after the operation say- 
ing she was “confident'’ she 
would return “to the sport 
which I love so mnch — and 
in good health.” 

But her surgeon. Reinhard 
Weinstabl, was less certain 
about whether she would be 
able to resume her career. 
“That is certainly our aim,” 
he said. “Whether that aim 
can be reached, one cannot 
say now.” 

Weinstabl said the situation 
was difficult because of Graf s 
long history of problems with 


her left knee. She was out of 
action for three months earlier 
this year after arthroscopic 
surgery was performed on the 
knee. Weinstabl added that 
Graf would return often to the 
Wiener Privaddinik. the 
private hospital where be per- 
formed die surgery, 
throughout her rehabilitation 
phase at Dungl ’s center. 

The surgery came less than 
a week after Grafs quarterfi- 
nal loss in the French Open to 
Amanda Coetzer. 

The doctor for die German 
Olympic team, Joseph Keul, 
said Graf should make a full 
recovery. “It is a sign of wear 
and tear that, however, by no 
means has to mean the end of 
a career,” he said. “I think 
that Steffi Graf will be 100 
percent again by the end of 
the year.” 

Even if she does return, 
Graf will have a steep hill to 
climb to return to the top. 
Graf, who has won 21 Grand 
Slam titles, dropped to No. 3 
in the WTA Tour rankings 
after her quarterfinal loss in 
Paris, her lowest ranking 
since 1986. 

Missing Wimbledon, the 
U.S. Open and the season- 
ending Chase Championships 
in New York would mean drat 
Graf would probably (hop to 
between 15 and 20 in the 

r anking s. 

The last time Graf went a 
year without w innin g a Grand 
Slam title was in 1986. Her 
lowest world ranking was No. 
22 at the end of 1984, just as 
she was beginning her career. 



'■cm Ifewy Ipwftann-lfeat* 

Australia's Patrick Rafter going after a shot by Canada's Sebastien Lareau at the Queen's Club. He won, 6-3,7-5T- 


Chang Falls at Queen’s 


I would like to receive- — copies of the 1997 PGG. 

D Payment enclosed by cheque made payable to 
■Editions D & G Motte" 

□ Please bill me at above address. 


C.mpdetUn Out Staff Fntn PupauSa 

LONDON — Michael 
Chang, ranked No. 2 in the 
world, was knocked out of the - 
Queen's grasscourt tourna- 
ment Wednesday by Scott’ 
Draper of Australia. 6-3, 2-6, 
7-6. 

Pete Sampras, the world 
No.l, seemed happy to be 
back on grass and strode con- 
fidently into the third round, 
beating Javier Frana of Ar- 
gentina, 6-3. 6-2. 

“It was like I never left,” 
said Sampras, who won the 
London tournament in 1995. 

Pairick RafteT of Australia. 
No. 9 and a French Open 
semi finalist, beat Sebastien 
Lareau of Canada. 6-3, 7-5. 


■ Kuerten Wins Again 

Gustavo Kuerten, the 
French Open champ, made a 
successful debut at the 
Cans bo clay court todrnameht • 
Wednesday, The Associated 
Press reported from Bologna. 

He breezed past Marcelo 
Charpentier of Argentina. 6- 
1, 6-3, in a first-round match. 

Kuerten, the No. 8 seed, 
needed just an hour to win his 
13th consecutive match and 
beat Charpentier for the 
second time in less than 24 
hours: He and a fellow- 
Brazilian, Fernando Meli- 
geni, beat the Argentine and 
his Mexican partner, David 
Roditi, in doubles Tuesday. 


Norman Just Can’t Take the Cheers 


Los Angeles Times 

BETHESDA, Maryland — It was 
another tough day for Greg Norman in 
the tough world of professional golf. 

For several hours Tuesday during a 
practice round for the U.S. Open at 
deep, green Congressional Country 
Club, Norman was surrounded by all 
these . . . fans. 

He swung, they cheered. He walked 
to his ball, they cheered. 

He stopped and wiped the sweat 


Vantage Point / Bill Plaschke 


from that perfect face under that per- 
' nat, they cheered. 


feet straw 

A tough, tough day. 

“Unless you are in my situation, you 
don't understand it.” Norman said. ”1 
would like to see how you would react 
if you beard some of the things I hear 
out there.” 

Horrible things. Things like, 
“You’re the man.” And, “Get ’em 
Shark.” . 

“It’s not a lot of fun,” Norman said. 
* 4 People whittle and whittle at you. It’s 
like the slow water-torture test.” 

The world's greatest golfer twice 
’succumbed to the torture last week, and 
who could blame him? 

At the Kemper Open on Saturday, 
the announcer at the first tee heralded 
Norman’s arrival by saying, “If he 
invites you over to hjs house to see all 
his trophies. I’d advise you to respect- 
fully decline.” 

It was a joke about the recent fall and 
ensuing knee injury suffered by Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton at Norman’s house. 

Norman thought it was so funny, he 
took the announcer into a small tent 
and scolded him like a child, then 
threatened never to play the tourna- 
ment again. 


A day later, a fan had the audacity to 
shout, “Chum in the water, Greg!” It 
was a reference to his ‘‘Shark” nick- 
name, and was meant to be inspir- 
ational. 

Norman heard something different, 
thought the man was urging him to 
“Chunk it into the water,” even 
though there was no water on that 
particular hole. 

So, witnesses say. Norman flipped 
the man the one-finger salute. Twice. 

A tough, tough day. 

Norman showed up at Congression- 
al in preparation for what some feel 
could be his first major tournament 
victory in this country. He’s hot, and he 
has won two tournaments on this 
course. 

But all anybody wanted to talk about 
was. is he losing it? 

How dare they. 

‘1 did not create those situations — 
they were created by others,’ ’ Norman 
said of his weekend troubles. 

Since finishing second eight times in 
major tournaments, losing playoffs in 
four, Norman has become one of the 
most pitied sports figures. Apparently, 
he is starting to buy it. 

He publicly embarrasses a man for 
an innocent joke, is openly nasty to a 
fad who is cheering him and directly 
apologizes for none of iL 

He has not won a PGA tournament 
in more than a year, his popularity is 
being eroded by Tiger Woods and sud- 
denly his problems are everybody 
else's fault 

Why? Is somebody throwing coins 


at his head, as happens in baseball? Ice 
balls, as in football? Is anybody stand- 
ing behind each tee. screaming about 
his manhood, as in baseball? 

The truth is. the average gentle golf 
fan would sooner be locked in a port- 
able toilet than heckle a player who is 
standing close enough to hear. 

So there may be an occasional joke 
or jeer. The rough is getting higher. 
The stars are getting younger. Every- 
one is waiting for hum to choke. 

It’s enough to make me give the guy 
an encouraging shake of ray fist, if I 
didn’t think he would tell me where to 
stick iL 


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Norman shooting out of a sand 
trap during practice Wednesday. 


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It Goes in Cycles: U.S. Pros in Slump While Grassroots Thrive 

on Sunday in Phil- 


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By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 


LANCASTER, Pennsyl- 
vania — By consensus arming 
the sport’s professionals, bi- 
cycle road racing is in a trough 
in the United Stales after hav- 
ing ridden the crest of the wave 
for more than a decade. 

Americans* performance 
at the Olympic Games in At- 
lanta was disappointing; the 
country’s major race — the 
Tour DuPont — was abruptly 
canceled, the major team — 
Motorola — lost its sponsor 
and has disbanded, as have a 
couple of smaller teams, and 
the one recognizable star — 
Lance Armstrong — is sick 
and probably not racing this 
season. Road-racing licenses 


35.000, where they have been 
for years, while mountain 
biking licenses have soared to 
the same number from barely 
any a decade ago. 

“The sport's in a state of 
flux because cycling isn’t a 
mainstream sport in America, 
it's kind of cyclical,” said 
Robin Morton, technical di 


CYCLING 


issued by the U.S. Cycling 
tie at 


Federation are stab! 


rector of the Tour of America. 
“I think we need another year 
to get back on line and get 
some more team sponsor- 
ships going.” 

Sean Petty, managing di- 
rector of the USPRO arm of 
the U.S. Cycling Federation, 
agreed. 

“After the Olympics, a lot 
of sponsorships ran their 
course.” he said. “Unfortu- 


nately they all hit at the same 
time. We’re a bit in the re- 
covery mode now.” 

Among others, Mike Her- 
mesky, Allan McElheny, Dan 
Pavelko and Jon Kahler dis- 
sent. All four, who range in 
age from 15 to 41, belong to 
bicycle raring clubs in Lan- 
caster, and all four testify that 
at least at the grassroots am- 
ateur level, the sport remains 
strong. Their sponsors, rang- 
ing from a hospital to a night 
club, continue to meet the 
small budgets that keep their 
clubs going. 

The four were among a 
crowd of thousands that lined 
the streets of Lancaster on 
Tuesday night to watch the 
CoceS tales Invitational race, 
the second of three races this 


□ship oi 
iefphia. 
The ra 


week leading nj> to the 


CoreStates USPRO Champi- 


ons 
adelt 

race will cover 156 
miles (251 kilometers) and 
has attracted more than 15 
American and foreign teams, 
including such big interna- 
tional competitors as the U.S. 
Postal Service, Mapei and 
Saeco. They will ride for 
Si 17,810 in prizes; including 
$25,000 for die victor, which 
makes the championship the 
richest one-day race in the 
world. A women’s race, the 
Liberty Classic, over 58 miles 
and worth $43,860, will open 
the festivities. 

It’s not rally money or 
computer victory points that 
lure the Europeans, Morton 
said. 

“They like the atmosphere 
too. It’s the biggest outdoor 
event in Philadelphia, a few 


hundred thousand spectators. 
The Europeans are always 
surprised and liken it to the 
Tourde France.” 

Only a few thousand fans, 
of course, watched the pro- 
ceedings in Lancaster, a city 
of 75,000 in the rich farmland 
of central Pennsylvania. The 
90-mile race for $15,000 in 
prizes followed one in Pitts- 
burgh last Sunday and pre- 
ceded one in Trenton, New 
Jersey, on Thursday as stage 




setters for the championship. 

>, the 


At the first two rides, 

crowds were enthusiastic and 
savvy. Lancaster has four am- 
ateur clubs comprising 150 
people, Hermesky said, with 
probably an equal number in 
nearby Reading and York. 

“They ail care about the 
sport and train and race of- 
ten,” he said. A 41-year-old 


research and development of-/ 
ficial with a building products-: 
company, he rides for the ! 
Chameleon Club, about 25/ 
people sponsored by a night ^ 
club of the same name. ] 

McElheny, 33, a printer,. ■« 
Pavelko, 15, and Kahler, also J 
1 5, ride for the Redroses Rock- i 
ets, sponsored by Lancaster ■ 
General Hospital. The club has ) 

75 members, many of whooPi 
missed the start of the CoreSt- J 
ales Invitational because Tties- , 
day and Thursday evenings are ! . 
dedicated to training rides far, j j 
from the race’s course through ^ * 
the city. 

Nevertheless, McElheny [ . 
was on hand near the startingf- ’ 
line and excited. 

“A great chance to watch 
some of the finest riders in 
sport,” he said. “Wrath missr;’ > 
ing training for once a year." ^ ? 



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1 





Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major league Standings 



EAST DtYt3*OH 




w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

BoBimare 

42 

17 

.712 



New York 

3S 

27 

-S6S 

8>* 

Toronto 

29 

30 

-492 

13 

Detroit 

28 

32 

•447 

14'.y 

Boston 

24 

37 

J93 

19 


CENTRAL HVntOM 



Ctovatand 

31 

27 

-£U 

— 

Mlkiaukcc 

28 

31 

-475 

TA 

Kansas dry 

28 

32 

-467 

4 

Chicago 

28 

• 33 

-499 

4'A 

Minnesota 

28 

34 

-452 

5 


WEST DTVJ5TON 



Anaheim 

33 

28 

541 



Seattle 

33 

29 

532 

'A 

Terns 

31 

29 

517 

H» 

OaKlaird 

26 

38 

406 

BS 

NATIONAL IUMHII 



East division 




W 

L 

Pel. 

GB 

Atlanta 

42 

21 

567 

_ 

Florida 

36 

» 

5B1 

5'A 

New York 

35 

27 

565 

6V.- 

Montreal 

34 

36 

548 

r.. 

PMrodetphk 

1 21 

SO 

344 

30 


CENTRAL DNI5KM 



Houston 

37 

32 

500 


Pittsburgh 

31 

31 

500 



51. Laos 

29 

33 

-468 

2 

Cirr:innati 

25 

37 

403 

6 

Chrrcgo 

24 

39 

-3S1 

7 1 ', 


WEST OtVIStON 



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W— Erickson, 9-2. L-Euwimoiv o-i. 
HRs — Baltimore R. PafcKitti {121. Besfcn 
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Second Cane 

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Boston 002 000 000-2 12 a 

Boshte Rhodes IS, A. Benito? (8), 
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(6), Hudson (9) and Hasotmat W— Rhodes, 
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(71. Boston. M. Vaughn (181. 

Mdemakee 001 003 00B-4 II 1 

CJevaktod 030 000 30*— 5 B 0 

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Navarra, C CasfiJki (5). Kantmer (8) and 
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Be.WWai» 00), Soto (1). 

OMhetm 010 002 021-4 10 1 

Kansas City 000 010 100-2 7 0 



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W— Ofcfcmv 8-2. L— Appier, 4 4. 

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Minnesota 383 300 01s— 10 13 8 

Wrtt AJberro (3). SaUana 15), Vaeberg (6), 
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Florida 0M 010 701—9 8 0 

Sob Frandsca OM 000 000-0 0 3 

KJ. Brown end C- Johnson; 
VanLandingrtara, Cartoon W and BenyMI. 
w-x. J. Brawn 6-4. 1— Van Landing ham 34 
HR— Florida CJahnson (5). 

Pittsburgh 050 MO MO-5 9 1 
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W— ReraRnyer, )-3. L— Rincpa 2-3. 

5v— Show (1IJ. 

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BofWw MX Ptarrienbeto (8) and Lidwthat 
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Veras (8), LSm'rfh (9) and FleWror. w-O. 
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NewYert 031 130 011—10 13 0 

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McMJdiad rex jaFranca (9j and Hundley; 
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TUESDAY, M ST JOWTS. ANTIGUA 
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match. 

AUCIWAUATOU* 

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Rain washed out opening day. 


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NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAWE _ V 

ABZONA-SIgned CB Ty Howard » >1*®— 
c ontract. v. 

BUFFAtO-Signed DB Sean Woo*«" ond^:\ 
TE Put FrtzoeniW. "• 

Jacksom vi lle— signed FBTyHatoekanfl , 
STravbDavb. 

KANSAS Gry-signad S Kevin Ra» 

Bien Penknan and OL Ralph Taimnta2-y» 
contracts. Released 5 Brian Wa9«B9kin. 

Miami— S igned C Jerome Dw*tc " 
Nicholas Lopez and LB Mike CTOWtart. Re- 
teasod WR Daryl Frazier. __ 

NSW ORLEANS— Sic ned OB JokF 2*- ■ 
Itomme and CB WBBam Strong to l-yeffat”- 
tracto. Signed WR KMlh Poole to «"■ 

trad. 

Philadelphia— S igned DE Jon Hantoto 
S-year cantrad. 

p ittsb urch— S igned QB Korddl Ste*Ht 
ta 2 -year contract extension. _ 

*am PMHcisco— Signed K Gary Andesan 
TAMPA bay— R eleased WR AMn HWP»- 
Washinot on —Signed DE Chris Mtoi«» '• 
yearcantrad. 

st. Louis— Rehmad OG Dwayne Whi»- 



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ST. louis— N amed Lorry Piemi 4#®” 
manager. 

Sah jose -N amed Darryl 5 utter ax*^- 
■asH MGTON— Named George Mtf w 

genend monaoarand Ron WRsoncaadL 










ftmHRNmONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 

SPORTS 


PAGE 23 


O® 


Till | S ., Tl 



•‘Disbelieving’ Brown 

Throws a No-Hitter 

^ ■ " • 

Florida Marlin Is Nearly Perfect 
As He Shuts Down San Francisco 


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(irassroot* Thrfa 


r The Associated Press 

~ SAN FRANCISCO — Kevin Brown 
w&ehed his pitch fly past die Giants 
' outfielder Darryl Hamilton and, for just 
: a flnonient, he was confused. 

jjhe Florida Marlins right-hander had 
thrown a nearly perfect game ag ains t the 
Sqh Francisco Giants, the first no-hitter 
in She major leagues this season. 

£‘I was trying to figure oat how to 
act” be said about his instant of un- 
. certainty after striking out Hamilton for 
\ thefinal out of the game. 

/ pis second thought? 

*?It was disbelief. I guess I still don’t 
l realize what h's all about,” he said, 
“ ffn t of me wanted to run.” 
instead, Brown raised his arms to the 
” ! sfc$ and leapt into the arms of Ms teara- 

NL RoDNBur 

miles. The Marlins came away with a 9- 
. 0 victory- Tuesday, bnt the actual score 
a; hardly seemed to matter. 

.r ,t*lf there was ever a no- hi tier where a 

~ — gw had practically 100 percent unhit- 

:• ( - table stuff, that was today.” said Jim 

' Ley land, the Marlins manager. 

' • Brown (6-4) was so good he almost 

became the 15th pitcher in major league 
< £ ' history to throw a perfect game. With 

fs ; twpouts in the eighth, his 1-2 fastball hit 

a' “ f £* § V ; M|uvin Benand, who became San Fran- 
u cisco’s only baserunner. 

- f Brown’s counterpart with the Giants, 

x E ' ^ ■ Wjlliam VanLandingbam, also had a 

* no-hitter going, until me seventh inning, 
wBen Charles Johnson's two-run homer 
sparked a seven-run rally. 

r‘It wasn’t that bad of a pitch,” the 
■' . ■ dejected Giants pitcher said. 

1 On VanLandingham’s first pitch to 
: him, Johnson hit a foul pop to shallow 

- right that the first baseman, J.T. Snow. 
• 1 dropped for an error. After two tells and 

three pickoff attempts, the catcher hit 
. hiS firth homer of the season, giving 
■ Florida a 3-0 lead. 

Johnson also was on the receiving 
end of Ai Letter's no-hitter on May 11, 
.. 19^6, Florida's first 

“It’s already my second one and I’ve 

- only been in the league for three years,” 

• Jewison said. “A lot of guys don’t get a 

e e to do that It’s awesome, a good 
g to catch a no-hitter.” 

Brown, who led die major leagues 
" • ' * wijha 1. 89 ERA last season, had not won 

. - : -li’ v i'l sidce foowing a complete game May 25 
- - • ••?*.*• at San Diego. In his last start on Jane 5, 
T - be&flowed 12hits in seven innings in a 6- 
' ',*1 OlosStofoe New York Mets. 

‘ Tl Re^fiiEew 99 pitches, 68 for strikes, 

■ ' r ■ ■*> : ‘ and stride out seven Giants on his way 
•_ ■ . - / J into the lwaory books. Even the San 
FnfociacoSaanager, Dusty Baker, was in 
t., awe. “Tfcis the first no-hitter I’ve seen 

-fgjj in a tong-time,” he said. “I was on a 
. copple of clubs thai got no-hit against 
' <3™ Nolan Ryah and John Candelaria.” 

Madras 6, Canfmats 5 Tony Gwynn 
_ . • a traded the longest hitting streak in the 

National League to 20 games with three 
- • ~7 : T doubles. Gwynn’s third double drove in 

. iho tying runs in the ninth, and Chris 

Gornlez singled in the winning run in the 

, 1201 inning as San Diego beat Sl 

• "• Louis. 

... :•••*■“. I,j, m not g 0 | n g t0 ggj gH caught up iu 

_ . chr hoopla,” said Gwynn, who was 

bothered by a migraine. “There 
„ shouldn't have even been a ninth. Still, 


to come back and win, it wa: a good win. 
But if you get a team down 3-1 in the 
ninth inning, you’ve got to close the 
game. Not only did they tie it, but they 
took the lead and we had to scratch just 
to get even. It ain't that big a deal to 
me.” 

With one out in the 12th inning, Rigo 
Beltran walked Wally Joyner. Quilvio 
Veras followed with a single to center 
that was hobbled by Ray Lankford, al- 
lowing both runners to advance. 
Gomez, who was 3-for-6, followed with 
a single to center to score Joyner. 

Brains 8, Roc i«* 3 Denny Neagle 
raised his record to 9-1, and Chipper 
Jones drove in four runs for Atlanta. 
Neagle, taming the top hitting team in 
the majors with a baffling variety of off- 
speed pitches, went seven innings, al- 
lowing five hits and three runs with one 
walk and four strikeouts. 

Mats io, Cobs e John Olerud, Manny 
Alexander, Edgardo Alfonzo and Car- 
los Baerga homered in New York’s first 
fonr-bomer game this season. 

Redo a, pirates s An error by the 
reliever Rich Loiselle, Pittsburgh’s first 
in 47 innings, let in the two go-ahead 
runs in the bottom of the eighth. 

The Pirates led 5-0 after sending 10 
batters to the plate in the second inning , 
but their struggling starter, Jason 
Schmidt, and the bullpen failed to bold 
on. 

Trailing 5-4, the Reds sent np nine 
batters for four runs in the eighth. With 
the bases loaded, Barry I^rkin hit a 
grounder to the right side. First baseman 
Mark Johnson got to the ball, bnt his 
throw got by Loiselle covering first base 
for a two-run error. Hal Morris and 
Willie Greene followed with run- scor- 
ing singles. 

Expo* b, Phflfiss 5 In Montreal, Mike 
Lansing’s two-run single capped a four- 
run eighth as the Expos won their fifth 
straight 

Astras 6, Dodgers 3 Craig Biggio’S 

two-out, three-run double in the top of 
the eighth triggered a four-run rally for 
the Astros. Biggio drove in Ricky Gu- 
tierrez, Ray Montgomery and Bin Spi- 
ers, snapping a 2-2 tie. 



* v , j, 

.7 77'nvif 


Knr \mnu.iI IV 

Kevin Brown of the Marlins on the way to his no-hitter against the Grants, the first in the majors this season. 

A Heavenly Catch Lifts the Angels 

Edmonds’ Diving Grab Saves 2 Runs as Anaheim Tops K. C. 


The Associated Press 

When the crowd starts cheering for 
the other guys, surely something special 
has just occurred. 

It did Tuesday night in Kansas City, 
courtesy of Anaheim's Jim Edmonds. 
The center fielder marif. a sensational, 
lunging, belly-flopping catch in the fifth 
inning that saved two runs and helped 
die Angels to a 6-2 victory over the 
Royals. 

“It’s one of the greatest catches I've 
ever seen, and 95 percent of the guys in 
here will tell you that,” said David 
Howard, who hit the ball Edmonds 
tracked down on die warning track. 
“People don’t just dive on their face 
with their back to the infield as they’re 
heading into the walL” 

When Edmonds got to his feet, the 
Kauffman Stadium crowd of 14,774 ex- 
haled and then applauded his brilliant 


effort “I looked up and saw it come 
over the bill of my cap and thought I 
might as well lay out for this one, the 
game’s on the line here,” said Ed- 
monds. 

In the next inning , Edmonds broke a 
1-all tie with a run-scoring double, and 

AL Roundup 

the Angels were on their way Co moving 
into first place in the AL West by a half- 
game over Seattle. 

When Howard hit the ball, Edmonds 
took off at full speed with his back to the 
infield When be hit the ground, the ball 
almost popped out, but Edmonds 
cradled it with his bare hand as team- 
mates threw their gloves into the air in 
celebration. 

After his double, Edmonds moved to 
third on a wild pitch and scored on Tim 


Yankees 9 $12.8 Million Bet Looks Good 


The Associated Press 

TAMPA, Florida — So far, George 
Stein brenner’s $12.8 million invest- 
ment looks pretty good 

Hideki Irabu, the Japanese right- 
hander the New York Yankees are 
expecting to bolster their starting ro- 
tation. delivered a promising perfor- 
mance Tuesday night. 

He was dominating in his American 
pro debut, finishing a four-inning oot- 
uig for Class A Tampa with a 99-mile- 
an-hour fastball that the Yankees be- 
lieve was a glimpse of the future. 

“It certainly was encouraging to- 
night,” said Steinbreoner, who had 
not seen Irabu pitch when the Yankees 
signed him to the richest rookie deal in 
major league history last month. 

“This kid is the real deal,” said the 
Tampa manager, Lee Mazzilli. “I think 
the boss did a great job. I think what 


yon saw was just tile tip of the iceberg. 
This kid has a lot going for him.” 

Irabu, who is expected to join the 
Yankees within a month, had com- 
mand of each of the four pitches in his 
expanding repertoire. He struck out six 
of 13 battes while allowing one bit and 
no walks against foe St Lncie Mels. 

“Out oflOO percent,** he said, rat- 
ing his performance through an in- 
terpreter, “it was 100.” 

Irabu threw 44 pitches, 32 for 
strikes, before leaving a scoreless 
game that Tampa went on to win, 5- 1. 
His debut drew a crowd of 4,784 — 
more than double foe usual attendance 
for a Tampa home game — and about 
75 reporters and photographers. 

Perhaps the most impressive thing 
about Irabu was his control in his first 
real game since Ocl 10, the end of last 
season in Japan's Pacific League. 


He threw eight pitches in the first 
inning, all strikes, and had good com- 
mand of his fastball, curve and sharp- 
breaking split-finger, as well as the 
change-up he has developed with the 
help of the Yankee pitching coordin- 
ator, Billy Connors. 

“The way he threw tonight, and has 
thrown, will get major leaguers out,” 
Connors said. “He throws strikes. 
And once he gets ahead of you in the 
count, he’ll wipe you out with that 
split-finger.” 

Said foe catcher Scott Emmons: “I 
haven’t canght a million major 
leaguers, but He’s got foe best stuff of 
anybody I’ve seen.” 

“I was very impressed,” said Sl 
L ucie’s manager, John Gibbons. 
“About the only thing 1 didn't like 
about him is he’s a Yankee and not a 
Met” 


Salmon’s sacrifice fly. Salmon had a 
two-run homer in the eighth and Chad 
Kreuter a solo shot in the ninth as Kevin 
Appier, foe Royals pitcher, failed for the 
seventh time at career victory No. 100. 

Orioles 7 Red Sox 2; Orioles 4, Rad Sox 
2 Cal Ripken went 4-for-4 and B.J. 
Surhoff had a two-run homer in the 
second game as Baltimore swept a 
doubleheader in Boston. 

Tigers 6, Athletics 4 In Detroit. Willie 
Blair allowed two runs in 5^ innings 
and won for foe first time since his jaw 
was broken May 4 by a line drive on the 
bat of Cleveland's Julio Franco. 

The game also saw the usually mild- 
mannered Mark McGwire ejected for 
arguing a called third strike in the sixth 
inning. After be was kicked out by the 
plate umpire, Jim Joyce, McGwire 
threw six bats, two helmets and one ball 
out of foe dugout. 

Indians 5, Browers 4 David Justice 
drove in the go-ahead run with a sac- 
rifice fly in the seventh, and Charles 
Nagy (7-3) won again after a Cleveland 
loss. Marquis Grissom was 2-for-4 and 
sparked two Indians' rallies at Jacobs 
Field. 

Jose Valentin hit a three-run homer in 
the sixth off Nagy, giving foe Brewers a 
4-3 lead that Cal Eidred (6-6) couldn’t 
hold. 

Wank mm 12 , White Sox 1 In New 

York, Andy Pettitte (8-3) came within 
two outs of his first major league 
shutout. Derek Jeter went 3-for-3, and 
Bemie Williams and Luis Sojo hit 
homers. 

Bluo Jays 8, Mariners 3 A pinch hitter, 

Juan Samuel, hit a bases-loaded triple 
off Norm Charlton to key a five-run 
seventh and lead the Blue Jays to victory 
over visiting Seattle. Pat Hentgen got 
foe victory although he allowed three 
homers, including Ken Griffey Jr. ’s ma- 
jor league-leading 26fo. 

Twin* 10 , Rangers i Paul Molitor 
went4-for-4 with a two-run triple to help 
Bob Tewksbury (3-6) to his first victory 
of the season in the Metrodome. 


Agitator 

Rodman 

Provokes 

Mormons 


By J.A. Adande 

Ui/jfting/tJH PuU Seniie 

SALT LAKE CITY. Utah — Chica- 
go Bulls forward Dennis Rodman's 
words and actions continue to make him 
a focal point of the National Basketball 
Association finals, despite his minimal 
impact in the games. 

Tuesday, after returning from his 
second trip to Las Vegas since Game 4 
on Sunday, Rodman did not apologize 
for a statement he made about Mormons 
on Saturday. An NBA spokesman said 
the league would look into Rodman’s 
statement and consider punishmenL 

The Anti-Defamation League criti- 
cized Rodman for his complaint Sat- 
urday that "it’s difficult to get in sync 
because of all the [expletive] Mormons 
our here.” 

When told there would be an outrage 
if he had said the same about Jewish 
people, Rodman replied: “I wouldn’t 
say that about Jewish people. Just Mor- 
mon, just any people. I'd say that if I was 
in another 'state; some of the Texas 
people are kind of [expletives]. They 
give you the Finger, and that’s iL That’s 
it. Maybe I don't know some of the 
Mormon people. Mormon people don't 
like me, either, right? That's a given, 
right? So what the hell.” 

The NBA spokesman, Brian 
McIntyre, said: “If that's what he said, 
it’s indefensible. We will be dealing 
with Dennis after the finals are con- 
cluded.” 

In the two games played so far in Salt 
Lake City, both of them won by the Utah 
Jazz, Rodman grabbed only nine re- 
bounds and missed all five of his shots. 
Rodman has complained about playing 
only 25 minutes per game. The Bulls 
and Jazz were to play Game 5 on Wed- 
nesday night. 

After Game 4. Rodman flew to Las 
Vegas, where he spent the night and 
returned in time for a media session 
Monday. The Bulls did not practice 
Monday. Rodman went back to Las 
Vegas and returned to Utah at around 
2:30 A.M. on Tuesday. He described his 
trips as therapeutic. 

“I feel pretty good," Rodman said. 
“I feel like a lot of weight’s off my 
shoulder. I went out there and just got 
free of a lot of stuff." 



The Amciaicd 

Unapologetic Dennis Rodman talk- 
ing to the press in Salt Lake City. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


r ANW!0LAFI WHAT ARE 
sVOUGOYS D0IN6 HERE? 


/WERE 1 
LOOKING 
FORA 
NEW 
.HOME.. 


/UJE THOUGHT YD «M 
MIGHT BE ABLE ID 
HELL U5 WHERE 
\ OURKHDLJOUUy 
V RT IN... y 


SOMETIMES I THINK ABOUT 
M^ BROTHERS, ANDY ANP 
0LAF...I WONDER WHAT 
THEY'RE DOING NOW.. 


NBi., '(OUR HM3. DCESHT 
StiCSL UP THE WM WUSB> 
TO. BUT W _ . > 
IEASV lOJR / 

HENfeHaiew 

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THANKS, HQ8BE5. 
'KXTQE.MJaL 
LIFE SAVER. TM 
S0BWT GOT 
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PAGE 24 


ART BUCHWALD 


The Adultery Closet 


W ASHINGTON — This 
column is not about 
adultery. The reason it isn’t is 
that 1 believe adultery is 
nobody’s business, unless it is 
ttefween that person and that 
person’s priest or lawyer. 

I have hung around the mil- 
itary for decades, and I have 
yet to meet any- 
one in the ser- 
vice who has 
had an adul- 
terous affair. I 
know many 
high-ranking of- 
ficers who have 
admitted to a 
lousy golf game 
and a Tew who 
ate Chicago Bulls fans, but not 
one of them has ever mentioned 
sneaking off to a motel to violate 
the Ten Commandments. 

□ 

I hate writing about adul- 
tery because so few people do 
it and so many people get 
accused of of iL 1 am not for it. 
My position is pro-choice. 
Each person has to decide for 
himself or herself whether 
doing it would help the Gross 
National Product. 

The worst pan of adultery, 
as we have just seen in the 
Pentagon revelations, is that 
there is no statute of limit- 
ations. A general committed 
it 13 years ago when es- 
tranged from hrk wife. It did 
not hurt our bombing of 
Iraq. 

□ 

Frankly, the subject didn’t 
come up until the military set 
up a hot line and callers were 
blowing the whistle on people 
who had their cars parked il- 
legally outside of motels. 

For the moment it is a mil- 
itary problem, but like most 
things involved with sex. 
it can spread to the civil- 
ian population. This would 
be very unfair because peo- 



ple who fool around and 
do not have their finger on 
the nuclear button should not 
be put in the same class as 
those who throw the first 
stone. 


□ 

A recent survey revealed 
only four Americans cheat on 
any given afternoon in the 
United States. These people 
resort to sin because they had 
an unhappy childhood or owe 
more than $100 on their VISA 
cards. The rest of the pop- 
ulation wouldn't think of do- 
ing anything to mess up their 
marriages or their chances of 
becoming the head of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff. 

If it weren’t for the military 
scandals, the four couples 
who have committed adultery 
would not be known. 

But now the chances of 
them winding up on the front 
page of The Globe tabloid are 
big. 

The reason 1 refuse to write 
about adultery is that you 
have to make judgment calls. 
Some of the most wonderful, 
honorable people I know 
have committixl it, and 
some of the most miserable 
humans 1 have ever sat next to 
at a dinner party say they 
don’t do it. 


□ 

What we have to be careful 
of is that we don't get en- 
gaged in witch hunts. To get 
even, people will accuse oth- 
ers of adultery and our streets 
will be filled with innocent 
souls in the stock with holier- 
than-thou citizens throwing 
mashed potatoes at them. 

What I resent more than 
anything is columnists who 
use their space to write about 
adultery as if they are above 
iL This subject is much too 
important to be left to the pun- 
dits. We must put it back in 
the closet where it belongs. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1997 


6 I Was Wearing a Camel’s Hair Blazer 


• • 


By John Kifner 

New York Times Service 


B OSTON — The magnolias were in bloom along 
Marlborough Street when I walked over to the bar at 
the Rjtz-Cazfton to meet Robert B. Parker. In the Public 
Garden. George Washington and his horse stared down at 
the Back Bay where Eddie Bauer, the Gap, Starbucks and 
the rest of Mall America are shouldering out the little 
galleries and boudques. and where Spenser (“With an s. 
like the English poet"). Parker’s tough hut sensitive 
fictional detective, keeps his office. 

I was wearing a camel’s hair blazer the color of a 
camel, a blue tattersall check shirt, nicely shined 
cordovan loafers and gray flannel slacks. The slacks 
were for the Ritz bar, because they have an iron rule 
against blue jeans, lest some dowager pitch into her 
martini in cardiac arrest. 

Parker was holding down the near comer of the bar 
wearing a Size 52-regular sport jacket in a mud pie 
tone, a Scotch and soda concealed in his left paw. He 
had a go-to-heli Irish face decorated with a mustache 
meant to be dashing, and cute dimples when he 
smiled, which was a Iol He had a weight lifter's big 
shoulders tapering outward to the tummy of a man 
who makes his living sitting down writing. Quite 
successfully, too. The current, 24th, Spenser novel, 
“Small Vices'* (Putnam), has been a best seller, as 
has every one since 1983. 

The deal was, we would go to his place and Porker 
would slip into the guise of his alter ego, Spenser, 
cooking in his kitchen. We made writer talk for a 
while. Parker pointed out that he owns a 9-millimeter 
Browning pistol, the same kind as one Anthony 
(Cleo) Clemente, on trial for using his to blow away 
five other reputed unsavory characters at lunch in a res- 
taurant in the Charlestown neighborhood. “The weapon the 
pros use." Parker said proudly. 

The characters and dialogue in the case could have come 
from a Spenser novel. Here's Clemente's deadpan testimony 
about encountering the five, including Roman Luisi, who 
weighed 275 pounds and whose reputation was enhanced by 
his having beaten two murder raps in Los Angeles: “His 
eyes changed. If this guy's reaching, I know he’s not 
reaching for no Bible. I shot him dead. Killed everybody. 1 
shot the booth on both sides. When I finished working the 
booth, I hear movement to my left. I spin around. I shot him 
in the back. Then I lake a better aimed shoL I shot him again 
in the head." In his defense, he says this. 

This is Boston. Spenser’s Boston. The city — the met- 
ropolitan area, really, for Boston, unlike most other cities, 
maintains a kind of identity in its sprawl through Waspy 
suburbs and gritty old industrial towns where Irish and Italian 
hoods jostle with the new Hispanic and Asian immigrants — 
is as much a fixture of the novels as Parker's ensemble of 
recurring characters. 

In Japan, where the books are wildly popular, the “Il- 
lustrated Encyclopedia of Spenser Novels" includes maps 



Mi. Il.-IViijii'TV V* laL'JitiH- 


Writer Robert Parker whips up meals between detective novels. 

of the Boston are3, and long biographies with drawings 
t Spenser's shoes: brown penny loafers, black tassel loafers) 
of the regulars: Susan Silverman, Hawk, the phlegmatic 
homicide^idetectives Quirk and Belson, the mobster Vinnie 
Morris and the resL The Japanese have also published a 
Spenser cookbook, because the detective’s regularly dis- 
played skills, along with insolence and a penchant for 
walloping people, include whipping up a good meal. 

*Tt's got to be very concrete,” Parker said of his use of 
specific detail. “It’s the way Raymond Chandler made Los 
Angeles real." We were cutting across the comer of the 
Public Garden, where the swan boats were tethered in their 
pond and neat lines of ducklings waddling toward the water 
were chased by ragged clumps of tourists waving cameras. 

His car, a big, black four-wheel drive like the one Spenser 
drove in “Stardust” (1990) was at the Four Seasons Hotel. 

When we made the turn onto Storrow Drive there was a 
golden glow acre«ss the Charles River like you see nowhere 
else . a single white sail and some college crews in Long, slim 
shells bending in unison over their oars. On a small street off 
Harvard Square in nearby Cambridge, the novels have paid 
for a rambling Victorian house where Parker lives with his 
wife, Joan. “The best thing 1 ever did was marry Joan and 


have those two boys.** Parker said. All the books are 
dedicated to Joan, the sons (David. 38, a cho- 
reographer, and Daniel, 34. an actor; or all three. 

Roth 64 now, they met at a birthday party when 
they were 3 and she hit him with a big gob of | Ce 
cream. They ran into each other again a i the Colbv 
College freshman dance, where Parker had grown 
into a wise-mouth with a lit cigarette tucked behind 
his ear, very cool in those days. He was “so loath, 
some," she recoiled, she would circle the campus to 
avoid him. They have been married 40 yean. 

Parker was in advertising for a white, but couldn't 
stand bosses. With Joan’s support, the Korean GJ 
Bill and a loan from his father, he went back to 
school, got a doctorate and a job teaching English at 
Northeastern University. He began work on the fust 
Spenser, “The Godwulf Manuscript," in November 
1 971 and finished it. writing about a page, a page ami 
a half a day. in March 1973. 

Practice has brought his writing speedup to about 
five pages a day, and four months pier novel. In the 
fall he is to come out with "Night Passage, 1 ’ a novel 
he hopes will develop into a different series featuring 
Jesse Stone, a former Los Angeles cop with a drink- 
ing problem seeking redemption as the police chief 
in a seacoasl town north of Boston. 

The kitchen had a fireplace, and couch facing the 
work alcove and a glassed-in eating area whh trees 
outside. Parker chopped up some scallions with an 
eight-inch chefs knife. Then some peppers. He 
shaved com off a cob, threw some thin asparagus tips 
into a pot of boiling water briefly and then cut those 
up, too. 

Joan was explaining that their marriage had gone 
through a series of strains in the late 1970s. They 
loved each other, but couldn’t live together. Couldn't live 
apart either, it turned out. They found “salvation," she said, 
in the big house with a separate staircase entrance and a third- 
floor apartment where she lives in her own independent 
fashion. They date regularly and spend weekends together in 
a 1697 farmhouse they restored in Concord. Massachusetts- 
When Parker introduced the monogamous, mature if 
sometimes messy, relationship between Spenser and Susan 
Silverman — in “God Save the Child” (1974), his second 
novel — it was at the time rare in the genre of hard-boiled, 
traditionally lone-wolf detective fiction. “With the first 
book, I was kind of imitating Chandler, who I think is one of 
the greatest American writers of the century.” he said. “In 
the second, I had a little more confidence. When Spenser met 
Susan, she was just going to be his new bed male. Then I 
realized it was my opportunity to write about the fundamental 
fact of my life. I can use hen I can write about love.” 

"Everybody always says, ‘So you’re Susan Silverman,' “ 
Joan was saying. “I’m both flattered and horrified to be 
Susan Silverman. Sometimes I like her a Iol Sometimes I 
think she's so pretentious I want to slap her. She's loyaL 
she's intelligenL I like thaL But vain, when she puts on lip 
gloss before seeing a patient. I hate that'’ 



Kafc A— vulij Pit -" 

YUK — A model of a house fly, one of many extremely large insects in the 
"Gargantuan" exhibition being installed at the Australian Museum in Sydney. 


PEOPLE 


T WENTY-SEVEN years after splitting up, the 
Beatles are still earning more money than any 
other British group. The group last year grossed 
£48 million (about $80 million), well ahead of 
Oasis, with £25 million, and Queen, £20 million, 
statistics from the International Federation of 
Phonographic Industry showed. While other 
groups rake in profits from concerts, the Beatles’ 
earnings came exclusively from copyrights, pub- 
lishing and merchandising. 

□ 

Princess Caroline of Monaco was caught by the 
cameras vacationing with Prince Ernst of Han- 
nover, off Majorca. A score of photos published by 
the sensational weekly Oggi magazine showed the 
two in each other's arms aboard a yacht off the 
Balearic islands. Oggi said Wednesday that he is 
separated from his wife, Chantal Hochuli. 

□ 

Two photographers whose stakeout of Arnold 
Schwarzenegger led to a car crash that briefly 
trapped him and his pregnant wife face misde- 
meanor charges. The action-movie star and his 
wife, Maria Shriver, told police that camera- 
wielding motorists in two cars harassed them as 
they drove their son to schooL The vehicles wedged 


their car in, they said. One of the vehicles collided 
with the Schwarzeneggers', causing minor damage, 
the police said. No one was injured. The incident 
occurred less than two weeks after Schwarzenegger 
was released from a hospital after heart-valve re- 
placement surgery'. Giles Harrison and Andrew 
O’Brien both were charged in Santa Monica, Cali- 
fornia. with false imprisonmenL Harrison also was 
charged with reckless driving, and O’Brien with 
two counts of battery, for allegedly shoving two 
people who tried to help the couple. 

□ 

Talk about gross excess. The latest $85 designer 
Barbie doll has been outfitted by Ralph Lauren. 
But the collectible clotheshorse, which goes on sale 
in July at Bloomingdale's, is not your usual blonde. 
Barbie sports a navy blazer, gray pants and camel 
overcoat. Lauren is such a perfectionist, Bloomie’s 
boasts, that he ordered the blazer lapel angles 
altered and stitching added to the coaL But he 
apparently had no problem with the out-of-scale 
coat buttons, which in real life would probably be 
the size of bagels. 

□ 

Bryant Gumbel. who’s getting a new CBS 
newsmagazine, has signed on to anchor the Emmy 


awards show in September. Just don’t look for him 
to yule it -ip too much as host of the 49th Annual 
Primetime Emmy Awards. Gumbel said. He in- 
dicated that his wouldn't be a side-splitting per- 
formance in the mold of another awards show* host. | 
Billy Crystal, who at the Academy Awards in’ 
March did a musical number about nominees. 
“Although I can’t sing and don’t dance, I welcome 
this challenge and look forward to an entertaining 
evening,’’ Gumbel said. Bryant joined the net- 
work after his long tenure as co-host of NBC’s 
"Today” show. 

□ 

Vice President AI Gore and the House Demo- 
cratic leader, Richard Gephardt, share more than 
a yearning for the Democratic presidential nom- 
ination. Each is about to.become the fattier of the 
bride. Gore will go first, July 12, when his oldest 
daughter, Karenna Gore, 23, a Harvard graduate 
and editorial assistant at an on-line magazine who 
will enter law school in September, marries Dr.. 
Andrew Newman Schiff, 3 1 , a physician in New 
York. It will be Gephardt’s turn on Sept. 20. His 
daughter Christine Leigh Gephardt. 24, a North- 
western University graduate, will marry Marc 
Alan Lei bole, 25. a medical student at Washington 
University in St. Louis, Missouri. 







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