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INTERNATIONAL 




(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World's Daily Newspaper 


Paris, Friday, June 13, 1997 


Electrolux to Cut 11% 
Of Global Work Force 

Appliance Maker to Shut 25 Factories 






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Electrolux AB, the largest maker of 
household appliances in Europe, an- 
l oounced Thursday that it would lay off 
* 1 2,000 workers, ch- 1 1 percent of its work 
force, and close 2 5 of its 150 plants to 
' restore its competitive edge, signaling 
that the Continent's painful industrial 
restructuring has yet to rim its course. 

The heaviest job losses among the 
Swedish-based company’s worldwide 
;• work force of 105,000 are expected to 
occur in Europe and North America, 
over the next two years. 

The company, part of the Wallenberg 
family empire, said that its restructuring 
would cost U 2.5 billion krona ($320 
million) but that new efficiencies would 
allow it to recoup those charges in less 
than two years. Investors were quick to 
cheer Electrolux's actions, driving its 
share price up 14 percent in the biggest 
one-day spike in nearly a decade. 

In recent years Electrolux has 
suffered from intense competition and 
/ sluggish sales in its depressed home 
market of Europe, where it rang np 59 


Stocks Rise 
Amid Signs 
Of Slowdown 

Optimism on Inflation 
Keeps U.S. Market Hot 




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NEW YORK— U.S. stocks capped a 
, boisterous session Thursday as the Dow 
Jones industrial average jumped 1.8 
percent to post its fifth consecutive re- 

• cord close. 

The surge sent the Dow Jones in- 
dustrial average past 7,600 and then 
7,700points for the first time, as signs of 
nukfsflation signaled a possible slow- 
down, in the economy and fueled ex- 
pectations of low interest rates. 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
dosed 135.64 points higher, at 
•- 7,711.47. It was only two days earlier 
that the index passed 7,500 points for 
the first time. Less than a week ago, it 
first cleared 7,400. 

“The retail-sales figures were much 
weaker than expected,*’ said James Sol- 
laway, research director at Argus Re- 

* search. “These numbers certainly bol- 
ster the case that the Fed will keep rates 

— swady through their July meeting.” 

Stocks got a solid lift from bonds, 
which rallied on news that sales at U.S. 
retailers fell for the third month in a row 
^in May and first-time claims for un- 
employment benefits rose last week. 
Both developments implied the econ- 
omy had shined into a lower gear, and 

- bond investors tike the combination of 
low inflati on and restrained growth. 

.Investors are keeping a close watch 
on inflation and interest rates. The Fed- 
eral Reserve Board raised the rate on 
overnight bank loans to 5.50 percent 
horn 5.25 percent in March to keep 

- inflation at bay. but it bypassed a chance 
to changer rates again in May. 

U.S. stocks were joined by markets in 
Germany, Britain, Belgium, the Neth- 

: eriands and Sweden, all of which reached 
records. The Dow Jones average's surge, 
however, could be tempered if two in- 
flation reports scheduled for release soon 
contain any unpleasant surprises. 

A producer price report scheduled for 
release Friday will probably show an 
increase, analysts said, while next 

See MARKETS, Page 16 


percent of its sales last year. Its profits 
have been sliding for two years. 

Many analysts, though, trace the 
company’s problems back much further 
than that, to a 10-year string of ac- 
quisitions that transformed the Swedish 
appliance maker into a worldwide 
heavyweight, but left it struggling to tie 
all the diverse pieces together into an 
efficient and streamlined whole. 

Zanussi of Italy, White Consolidated 
Industries Inc. of the United States, with 
its long list of brands such as Frigidaire 
and Wes doghouse, and most recently 
AEG of Germany all were brought into 
the Electrolux fold, along with scores of 
smaller companies. In many cases they 
were in poor condition and their product 
lines dated and downscale. 

By all accounts die worst of the lot was 
White, an acquisition described by one 
Swedish analyst as “catastrophic.’' 

The Swedish appliance maker is 
more exposed to European demand than 
its American competitors, such as 
Whirlpool, which saw its first-quarter 
earnings rise 21 percent because Amer- 
ican consumers nave had more money 
to spend. 

trolux’s decision comes after 
ears of indecision, a delay some ana- 
ysts attributed in part to the difficulties 
in firing workers in much of Europe. 

“The trend in Europe has been to- 
ward re s tru ctu ring and cost cutting, and 
this will be taken as a positive sign,” 
Simon Robinson, an investment man- 
ager at Albeit Sharp in Britain, told 
Bloomberg News. “The European 
labor market is inflexible.' ' 

“This has not come as a bolt out of 
the blue," said Johan Sivander, an ana- 
lyst with Swedbank Markets. “These 
cuts have been coming for a very long 
time.” 

The fact that they have come at all is 
credited to Electrolux's new chief ex- 
ecutive, Michael Treschow, brought in 
from outside just six weeks ago to take 
the painful steps to whip the company 
into shape and place anew emphasis on 

See LAYOFFS, Page 11 




No. 35.546 


Europeans Protest 
Clinton’s Limit on 
Widening NATO 

Exclusion of Slovenia and Romania 
In First Wave Dismays Some Allies 


By William Drozdiak 

Washinyt/tt Past Scn-u c 




AMdhaL Scma/Agriw Fnikt-Npu 

BRAZZAVILLE TRUCE FAILS — French troops helping to evacuate U.S. residents 
Thursday as fighting in the Congo Republic capital nullified a cease-fire agreement. Page 1 1. 


Turk Military Turns Up Heat 

Generals Assert Erbakan Is Leading Nation to Disaster 


By Stephen Kinzer 

Nn- York Times Service 


ISTANBUL — Furious with the Muslim-led 
government for refusing to crack down on what 
they view as rising fundamentalism, Turkish gen- 
erals have publicly denounced the administration 
and charged that it is leading the country toward 
disaster. 

In an extraordinary series of briefings for pros- 
ecutors, university professors, journalists and lead- 
ers of civic groups this week, and continuing 
Thursday, the generals asserted that Prime Min- 
ister Necmettin Erbakan had broken a promise he 
made in February to close Islamic schools and 
brotherhoods. 

Although the generals did not explicitly demand 
Mr. Erbakan's resignation, their words were so 
strong that it seemed unlikely his government 
could survive for long. 

“The republic is facing an extremely serious 
threat,’’ General Fevzi Turkeri, chief of military 


intelligence, asserted at one of the briefings. 
“Political Islam is working closely with Iran and 
some other Islamic countries to pull Turkey into an 
endless darkness.” 

Another senior officer, General Kenan Deniz, 
described the confrontation between secular and 
religious forces as “a matter of life or death" for 
Turkey. 

Apparently responding to military pressure, the 
secular True Path Party, the junior partner in the 
governing coalition, announced Wednesday that it 
would quit the government if its leader. Deputy 
Prime Minister Tansu Ciller, “is not made prime 
minister unconditionally. ’ ’ 

Later Mrs. Ciller said: “A change of govern- 
ment is expected in the coming days." 

[Mrs. Ciller challenged the military's influence 
on politics Thursday, calling on the army “to mind 
its own business," Agence France-Presse report- 
ed.] 

See TURKEY, Page 11 


BRUSSELS — Tbe United States endorsed only Poland. 
Hungary and the Czech Republic on Thursday as NATO’s 
new members, provoking surprise and dismay among Euro- 
pean allies, who accused the Clinton administration of short- 
circuiting a debate about enlargement ahead of next month's 
Madrid summit meeting. 

The administration's decision to embrace the three new 
East European democracies was spelled out at a NATO 
defense mmisters meeting here Thursday by the U.S. defense 
secretary. William Cohen. But the strong reburials expressed 
by some of his European peers indicated that an alliance 
consensus was far from secure. 

Mr. Cohen told the ministers that one of President Bill 
Clinton's primary concerns was to ensure a two-thirds ma- 
jority in the Senate, which is required to ratify any en- 
largement of the alliance. He said Mr. Clinton reached his 
decision after consulting leading senators late Wednesday 
and determining what would be the most successful con- 
figuration. 

He said the American position was not negotiable, adding: 
‘ ‘The president is firm on that. 

Mr. Cohen also stressed the importance of keeping down 
the costs of NATO expansion and any disruptions to the 
military organization. A small enlargement in the first wave, 
he said, would facilitate future rounds at a much earlier date. 
"This decision shows that the door will remain open,” he 
said. 

Many southern European states have backed the can- 
didacies of Slovenia ana Romania in the first wave. They 
argue that since the alliance’s future threats appear rooted in 
instability along the southern rim, it should establish 1 ‘beach- 
heads” with Slovenia in the Balkans and Romania on the 
Black Sea to cope with security challenges in those volatile 
regions. 

The Italian defense minister, Beniamino Andreatta, de- 
scribed Mr. Clinton a s decision as a * ‘mistake" that was based 
on the false premise that it would reduce the costs of en- 
largement. 

"I don't agree with this solution," Mr. Andreatta said. "I 
believe the problems in Europe have a strategic and political 
aspect In particular, it is quite important to have a balanced 
distribution of new members.” 

Mr. Andreatta maintained that bringing in Slovenia would 

See EXPANSION, Page II 


Public Backlash Against Terrorist Killings Grows in Algeria 


By John Lancaster 

Washington Post Service 


HAOUCHE FANER, Algeria — 
Tbe first impressions are of southern 
France: A country road lined with olive 
trees. A farm house with long shuttered 
windows and a red-tile roof. Palm 
trees. Orange groves. Wheat fields and 
baled hay. 

Then die details swim into focus: the 
bullet-pocked stucco walls, the buracd- 
ont automobile in the courtyard of a 
ruined stone house. And the stricken, 
sad look that passes over the face of 
Ahmed Salehi, 15, when he talks, in a 
barely audible voice, about what 
happened here last month. 


Shortly after midnight on May 15, 
up to 50 armed men attacked this iso- 
lated hamlet 50 kilometers (30 miles) 
south of Algiers, slaughtering 34 men, 
women and children, including a 4- 
month-oid baby who died in his moth- 
er's arms, in an orgy of shooting and 
throat-slitting, according to survivors. 
Then die killers doused the bodies with 
gasoline and set them on fire. 

“We realized we were being at- 
tacked by terrorists because we could 
hear tbe people screaming when they 
were slaughtered,” said Ahmed, who 
hid in a food cellar with an elder broth- 
er while his father, 62-year-old Mo- 
hammed, held the attackers at bay with 
a double-barreled shotgun. 


The massacre was typical of die 
seemingly senseless terrorism drat has 
come to characterize five years of civil 
strife between government forces and 
Islamic militants seeking to turn Al- 
geria into the region's next fundamen- 
talist state. It also highlighted what 
could turn out to be a grave miscal- 
culation on the part of the militants, 
whose tactics of intimidation and mass 
murder are turning even once -fervent 
supporters against them. 

11101 public backlash, combined 
with iron-fisted security measures and 
a slight opening in Algeria’s rigid polit- 
ical system, has begun to raise hopes 
among Algerians of a possible turning 
point in the fratricidal conflict that so 


far has cost an estimated 60,000 lives. ■ 
Such a development would be good 
news for Western governments, par- 
ticularly in southern Europe, which 
rely on Algeria as a major source of 
natural gas and fear a tide of refugees if 
the violence continues. Europe and the 
United States have struggled without 
success to forge a common policy to- 
ward Algeria since die military-backed 
government canceled parliamentary 
elections in 1992 rather than permit a 
victory by the Islamic Salvation Front 
That decision sparked the civil war. 

"Personally, I believe things will 
improve,’ ’ said Ali Fodil, director-gen- 
eral of A1 Chourouk, an independent 
weekly that has been closed for the last 


three months because of editorials cri- 
ticizing the government. "The authors 
of such violence have arrived at an 
impasse, and besides, all the bodies of 
the government are becoming more 
legitimate, which means that the mar- 
gin of maneuver” for these armed 
groups “is very narrow." 

Algeria's crisis is far from over. Al- 
though the country last week held its 
first parliamentary elections since 
1991, the relatively peaceful contest 
was tainted by widespread charges of 
fraud. Nor will the involvement of op- 
position parties in Parliament, includ- 
ing two with Islamist leanings, change 

See BACKLASH, Page 11 


AGENDA 


President of Ireland 
Gets UN Rights Post 


UNITED NATIONS, New York 
(Reiners) — President Mary Robinson 
of Ireland was appointed in the top UN 
hu man rights post on Thursday by the 
UN secretary-general, Kofi Ann a n , in 
an attempt to invigorate a job created 
three years ago to promote respect for 
civil liberties worldwide. 

Mrs. Robinson, a lawyer and human 
rights expert, had been the favorite for 
the Geneva-based post of UN High 
Commissioner for Human Rights. Mr. 
Annan said he haH asked her to begin 
the job by September. 




Page 9. 


Page 6. 


.... Pages 8-9. 

Sports _ — ■„ — 

. Pages 24-25. 

Sponsored Section 

Pages 21-23. 

INVESTING PI POLAND 


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The IHT cn-!ir,e ht t p ://vvw’.v. iht.com 



FITTING THE BILL — The redesigned $50 bill unveiled Thursday 
is aimed at preventing counterfeiting and has a more legible number. 


Congolese Come Home 
To Clean Mobutu’s Mess 


By Raymond Bonner 

New York Times Service 


KINSHASA, Congo — The garbage 
has not been collected in most neigh- 
borhoods here in the capital in seven 
years. It has been drat long since school- 
teachers, police officers, firefighters, 
soldiers, nurses or any government 
workers have been paid on a regular 
basis. And when they are paid now, a 
month's salary is just about enough to 
buy a loaf of bread. 

The ill die because they cannot afford 
surgical gloves or medicine, which hos- 
pitals do not have. A journey from Lub- 
umbashi, the country’s second-largest 
city, to the copper mines, a major source 
of revenue, used to lake three days; it 
now takes nine, the bridges having 
crumbled and the roads having been 
consumed by jungle. 

"How can they possibly do it?" 
asked Frederick Racke, the Dutch am- 
bassador. ‘ 'The country is in total r uin. 
It is an unprecedented challenge." 

Bnt many people gave up comfort- 
able lives in the United States, Europe 
and South Africa to return to the country 
they had fled during Mobutu Sese 


Seko’s reign, and try to rebuild it. 

Tbe politics of die new president, 
Laurent Kabila, are still largely un- 
known, and there are disturbing signs 
that the he may create a one-party state. 
But the new ministers seem to be driven 
by a genuine desire to do so mething for 
their country, not to steal from it 

Tie looming question is whether 
their dedication and enthusiasm will be 
enough to compensate for their striking 
lack of experience. 

The foreign minister, Bizima Karaha, 
is a pediatrician educated in South 
Africa; asked if he was 30 yet, he said 
sheepishly, “I am 29." 

He will try to conduct foreign affairs 
without so much as a fax machine in his 
offices. 

■ The minister of mines, Mututolo 
Kambale, taught English at a teachers 
college and was a human-rights advo- 
cate in the lost Mobutu years. 

* 'I will absolutely vouch he’s as hon- 
est a man as you’re ever going to meet,' ’ 
said Anthony Gambino. who works for 
the,U.S. Agency for International De- 
velopment and has known Mr. Kambale 

See NEOPHYTES, Page 16 


Genetically Speaking, Father Knows Best About Women’s Intuition 


.By David Brown 

Washington Past Service 


WASHINGTON — Is female intuition inher- 
ited? 

Yes, says a team of behavioral geneticists from 
London. And they speculaie thai it’s inherited from 
the father. 

Pan ofariri’s genetic inheritance is the ability to 
interpret complex social cues and to be Dined 1 to 
approp ri ate behavior, die scientists the- 
orize. Boys ‘are. innately less endowed with such 


powers, although they are not devoid of them. 

These conclusions were drawn from a study 
published Thursday in die journal Nature that ex- 
plores two mysterious and controversial frontiers of 
genetics. One is die question of howrauch — if stall 
— genes determine complex human interactions. 
The second involves tfae'snrprig ing observation that 
a. gene may function differently depending on 
whether one gets it from the mother or die father. 

The new findings, in turn, . raise provocative 
questions about the possible evolutionary advant- 
ages of behaviors many people believe are learned 


rather than inborn. The researchers have not located 
a gene for good social skills. Instead, they believe 
thejrstudy indicates that such a gene — or genes — 
may exist, somewhere on die X chromosome, one 
of tbe two human sex chromosomes. 

Somehow the gene, or duster of genes, “fa- 
cilitates things like the ability to interpret body 
language, perhaps the nuances of tone in spoken 
conversation,’ 1 ’ said David Skuse, a research psy- 
chiatrist at the Institute of Child Development of 
University College in London. “It may help a 
person infer what another person is feeling or 


thinking — in short, female intuition." 

Social skills are almost certainly a producl 
both a perscra’s genes and a person’s experie 1 
and upbringing. The London researchers belli 
however, that a gene — or genes — on tin 
chromosome may be especially influential in 
teimimng a person' social abilities. 

Specifically, when the gene comes from or 
mother, it is apparently inactive, the researcl 
believe. When it is inherited from the fad 

See DAD, Page H 


3 

i 








1 


PAGE TWO 


A Battle for Privacy' / How Will the Courts Come Down? 

Coping With the Dark Side of the Information Age 


By Nina Bernstein 

AW Yori Times Service 


N EW YORK — It was past midnight 
when Beverly Dennis came home, 
weary from her second-shift factory 
job. and found a letter with a Texas 
postmark among the bills and circulars in the 
day's mail. As she read it in her small house in 
Massillon, Ohio, alone in the dark stare of the 
sliding glass doors, her curiosity turned to fear. 

The letter was from a stranger who seemed to 
know all about her. from her birthday to the 
names of her favorite magazines, from the fact 
that she was divorced to the kind of soap she used 
in the shower. And he had woven these derails of 
her private life into 12 handwritten pages of 
intimately threatening sexual fantasy. 

“It can only be in letters at the moment.” the 
man wrote after describing the sexual acts he 
planned. “Maybe later, I can get over to see 
you.” The explanation that eventually emerged 
deepened Ms. Dennis' sense of violation — and 
places her experience at the bean of a far- 
reaching national debate over legal protection 
for privacy in a world where personal infor- 
mation is ever easier to mine and market. 

The letter writer was a convicted rapist and 
burglar serving rime in a Texas state prison. He 
had teamed Ms. Dennis's name, address and 
other personal information from one of the 
product questionnaires that she and millions of 
other consumers had received in the mail, in- 
nocently completed and sent back to post office 
boxes in Nebraska and New York on the promise 
of coupons and free samples. 

Their answers were delivered by the truckload 
to the Texas prison system, which was under 
contract to handle the surveys for Metromail 
Corp., a leading seller of direct marketing in- 
formation. Hundreds of unpaid inmates, many of 
them sex offenders, entered the information on 
computer tapes for Metromail, which has a de- 
tailed data base on more than 90 percent of 
American households. 

To Ms. Dennis, a woman in her 50s who grew 
up in the coal country of southern Ohio, the letter 
represented the darkest side of information econ- 
omy. As the free-flowing exchange and ex- 
ploitation of information is being celebrated as 
the main engine of economic prosperity into the 
next century, individual privacy is looking more 
and more I Gee an endangered natural resource. 

Hunger for personal information is now grow- 
ing explosively in almost every sector of the 
economy and everyday life, from health care to 
enrertainment. from banking to supermarket 
sales. It is being spurred and sharpened by 
powerful market forces and evermore pervasive 
computer technology, including digital mapping 
tools and “data-mining” software that blast 


commercial value from newly linked data bases 
of unprecedented size. 

Yet, like the people whose private lives and 
public records passed through the fingers of 
Texas felons, most Americans have no idea what 
is happening to the stream of personal data that 
they shed just by living in the modem world. 

And most businesses that make money on the 
collection, recombination and sale of shards of 
personal information maintain that people need 
no legal right to know, and have no good reason to 
object. The electronic deposits keep growing with 
the pulse of daily life: telephone calls, checkout 
counters, automatic teller machines, electronic 
bridge tolls, the street gaze of security cameras, 
plastic insurance cards imprinted with the Social 
Security numbers that have become identity's 
common currency — and its easy counterfeit 

The Internet, where every keystroke can be 
archived, is now the most dr ama tic embodiment 
of what technology and commerce afford in the 
real world: the pooling of ever more vast stores 
of data, and the easy retrieval of individual 
specks with no one's say-so. 

This networked world of information is an 
economic powerhouse that creates new jobs, 
new services and astonishing efficiencies. It of- 
fers a wide range of consumer benefits, including 
easy credit, shopping convenience and custom- 
ized goods and services. It also turns common- 
place transactions into little revelations. 

When a clerk puts a supermarket discount card 
through the scanner, for example, a data base 
links the shopper’s identity with the bar code on 
every item bought. A love of rich chocolate 
cookies not only can be tracked over time, but 
matched with an individual’s address, age. 
weight and ethnicity, with marital status and 
credit standing and even with religious ties, to 
name just a few of the personal facts being 
bought and sold wholesale in today's booming 
information market. 


Ai 


CLASS-ACTION lawsuit that Ms. 
De nnis filed last year against Met- 
romail and its subcontractors is em- 
blematic of the growing conflict over 
privacy as people team how little they control the 
use of personal information that is an increas- 
ingly valuable corporate asset. 

'‘Privacy will be to the information economy 
what consumer protec non and product safety were 
to the industrial age. ’ ’ Marc Rotenbeig, dirertor of 
the Electronic Privacy Information Center, 
warned Federal Trade Commission hearings on 
electronic consumer privacy last year. This week, 
the commission is holding another round of hear- 
ings on the issue. But as Ms. Dennis has learned 
during a three-year struggle for redress, any battle 
for privacy today is an uphill fight, and individuals 
have an inherent disadvantage. 



Torn r>rpk-TV V* WL Tim— 

Beverly Dennis is going to court in an effort to safeguard individual privacy. 


Ms. Dennis spent sleepless nights trying to 
figure out the stranger's identity. She finally 
turned to local television news reporters for 
investigative help, and searched for more than a 
year before she found a lawyer willing to take on 
a novel and demanding case without pay. 

But when Metromail executives wanted to 
know more about the woman suing the company , 
their task was simple: They turned to the com- 
pany's own massive consumer data base, and 
retrieved more than 900 tidbits of Ms. Dennis's 
life going back to 1987. 

Laid out on 25 closely printed pages of spread- 
sheets were not only her income, marital status, 
hobbies and ailments, but whether she had den- 
tures, the brands of antacid tablets she had taken, 
how often she had used room deodorizers, sleep- 
ing aids and hemorrhoid remedies. 

“Attached is all we know concerning Beverly 
Dennis,” Dave Hansen, an information tech- 
nology systems analyst, wrote in a May 3. 1996, 
memo circulated to top executives and the chief 
lawyer for Metromail. which had S281 million in 
revenues last year and has budgeted SI.5 million - 
to fight the case. The memo was one of the intemai 
documents the company was recently required to 
turn over to the plaintiffs under discovery rulings 
by a state court in Travis County, Texas. 

The company dossier on Ms. Dennis illus- 
trates a central issue in the privacy debate: 


Information collected in one context can be 
reused in entirely unanticipated and even hostile 
ways without the knowledge or consent of the 
individuals involved. American law offers them 
little recourse. 

The U.S. Supreme Court has recognized an 
unwritten right tojptjvacy in the Constitution, but 
has essentially limited this right to the indi- 
vidual's “reasonable expectation” of privacy. 
That approach, privacy experts say, means the 
steep but silent erosion of privacy by tech- 
nological and economic change keeps narrowing 
the right to protection that ah individual can 
successfully claim in court as “reasonable” — 
especially since privacy is weighed against com- 
pering interests, like law enforcement or freedom 
of the press. And like the unwritten constitutional 
right to privacy, most of the nation’s patchwork 
of privacy legislation aims to protect individuals 
from government, not from the actions of private 
industry. Metromail maintains in court that it did 
nothing wrong and that Ms. Dennis has no rea- 
sonable claim to privacy because she disclosed 
the information herself in consumer surveys. 

Because of the case, Texas is considering a 
complete ban on data entiy by prisoners, but 
inmates in at least 27 other states handle such 
public records as motor vehicle registrations, 
and federal prisoners do such work for the IRS, 
among other public agencies. 


Commons 
Extends Ban 
To Cover All 
Handguns 





By Fred Barbash 

Viashinjtron Fast Semrr 


Little Excitement Over U.S. Offer on UN Debt 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


By John M. Goshko 

ilashiaxi^n Post Servhv 

UNITED NATIONS. New 
York — A U.S. Senate deal 
for repaying Washington’s 
debt to the United Nations has 
received a lukewarm wel- 
come here. UN officials and 
diplomats said the offer was 
encouraging, but they ex- 
pressed concern that it was 


lequat 
palatable conditions. 

Officially, no one was will- 
ing to make more than gen- 
eralized, pro forma state- 
ments about the agreement, 
under which the United States 
would pay the United Nations 
$819 million over three years 
in return for spending cuts 
and other concessions by the 
organization. The accord was 



Marki 


rkinq the historic handover of Hong Kong 
to Chinese rule, BBC World examines 
the broader issues and perspective 
in three special editions of 
Correspondent 


WATCH FRIDAY 13, 20 & 27 JUNE 
AT 21.30 CET 


WORLD" 


nit, Capa own 


Have you been to 


THE INTERMARKET 


today? 

Don't miss it. A lot ha p pens there. 


reached Tuesday by key sen- 
ators, including Jesse Helms 
of North Carolina, the Re- 
publican chairman of the For- 
eign Relations Committee. 

Typical was the reaction of 
Secretary-General Kofi An- 
nan, who said- through a 
spokesman that- he was “en- 
couraged” and continued to 
look forward to ‘-a positive 
outcome." 

The United Nations calcu- 
lates U.S. back dues and as- 
sessments at about $1.3 bil- 
lion. Many diplomats said 
they did not believe their gov- 
ernments would accept that 
$819 million was adequate. 

Many also said conditions 
in the proposed legislation 
were tantamount to a U.S. at- 
tempt to take over and mi- 
cromanage an organization 
with 184 other members. 

What struck many diplo- 
mats here as particularly om- 
inous was the impression that 
President Bill Clinton and 
Secretary of Slate Madeleine 
Albright would probably em- 
brace the broad outlines of the 
proposal as the best they 
could get and would try to 
force it on a reluctant UN 
membership. 

The fear here is that the 
United Nations is about to be 
handed a take-it-or-leave-it 
offer that would put the 
United States and the other 


members on a collision 
course. There is sharp divi- 
sion about how the member- 
ship would react. 

Some diplomats, noting 
that the United Nations would 
be unable to function credibly 
without the financial and 
political support of the llnired 
States, predicted that the 
likely result would be a 
grudging acceptance of the 
U.S. terms. That would leave 
most of the world community 
alienated from Washington. 

Others said their govern- 
ments were not disposed to 
accept what Congress did as 
the last word. Instead, they 
said, many countries would 
probably treat the details of 
any U.S. legislation as the 
starting point for further ne- 
gotiations. The other countries 
would insist thai the United 
States could not evade its 
treaty obligations by making 
only partial payment of its ar- 
rears or unilaterally reduce its 
assessed share of UN costs. 

This prickly attitude is 
evident not only among rep- 
resentatives of Third World 
countries, but also among 
some of Washington's oldest 
and strongest allies, such as 
those in the European Union. 
The Europeans are concerned 
that sharply reduced U.S. fi- 
nancial support will pressure 
them to pick up the slack. 


A False Bomb Alert 
Diverts Delta Jetliner 

NEW YORK (Reuters) — A Delta Air 
Lines jetliner bound for Madrid was di- 
verted to New York because of a bomb 
scare, an FBI spokesman said Thursday. 

After Delta Flight 108 took off from 
Atlanta late Wednesday, a passenger 
found a. warning scrawled across a lav- 
atory wall that led the crew “to believe 
that there was a threat being made to the 
plane.” said the spokesman. 

The passenger reported the warning to 
the crew and the airliner was diverted to 
Kennedy International Airport The plane 
was searched, but no bomb was found. 

Athens Airport Chaos 

ATHENS (AP) — Thousands of pas- 
sengers at Athens international airport 


have been plunged into confusion since 
the failure of electronic information 
boards. The failure, in its fifth day 
Thursday, has meant passengers cannot 
receive information on arrivals, departures 
or conveyors carrying their luggage. 

The head electronics engineer at the 
Civil Aviation Authority said he did not 
know when the “blackout" would be 
repaired. 

Air traffic was slowed around the 
eastern United States for nearly eight 
hours Wednesday because the main sys- 
tem for talking to airplanes in flight 
broke down at National Airport in 
Washington. [NYT) 

An average of 16 people die every 
day on Vietnamese roads, the Vietnam 
News Agency said Thursday. It reported 
that 2,463 people died in traffic ac- 
cidents between January and May this 
year. ( Reuters i 


LONDON — The House of Com- 
moos has approved a total ban on the 
possession or handguns, a measure that 
will give Britain one of the strictest gun- 
control laws in the world. . 

The legislation, passed late Wednes- 
day , fulfills a campaign promise by die 
Labour Party leader, Tony Blair. A baa 
on large-caliber handguns became law 
in February, and Mr. Blair had vowed to 
extend the ban to cover all handguns, 
eliminating an exemption for weapons 
of .22 caliber and smaller. The Con- 
servative government defeated in elec- 
tions last month had opposed a widens 
ing of the law. 

Both measures were prompted, 
largely by the killings in March 19% of 
16 children and a teacher at Dunblane. 
Primary School in Scotland by a man 
wielding four handguns, all of which he 
possessed legally under what had been! 
considered a strict licensing system. 

The new legislation requires a few 
more steps before becoming law. but 
nothing is expected to stand in its way 
after the strong support it received in the 
Commons. It approved the ban by a vote 
of 384 to 1 8 1 , with party leaders leaving 
members free to vote according to then- 
consciences. 

The main opposition came from Bri- 
tain's many target-shooting dubs, 
which criticized the existing law as well 
as the Labour measure in foil-page 
newspaper ads. They argued that the ban 
would prevent Britons from participat- 
ing in shooting competitions, including. 
the Olympics, and would do nothing to 
stop cri mina l use of guns. 

The bill includes a provision allowing 
shooting competitions ro take place in 
Bri tain, but the British team would have 
to practice in another country. 

The campaign in favor of the legis- 
lation was led by a grass-roots lobby, 
called Snowdrop, organized by Dunblane 
citizens after the shootings there, and by 
the broader Gun Control Network. 

Britain has no constitutional tradi- 
tions — written or unwritten — re-, 
garding ownership of firearms. But 
among industrialized nations, only Ja- 
pan, which bans civilians from pos- 
sessing handguns, has as tight a law. 
Britain still allows the possession of 
rifles and shotguns — though not auto- 
matics or semiautomatics — if ap- 
proved and licensed by the police. 

Roughly 200,000 handguns are li- 
censed in Britain, of which about 20 
percent are .22 caliber. Under the bill 
passed Wednesday, owners of hand- 
guns large and small would have until 
September to turn in their weapons, and 
they would be compensated by the gov- 
ernment at the guns' market value of 
October 1996. The estimated total cost 
to the government is $280 million. 
Among the big losers would be dealers- 
who specialize in handguns; they would, 
not be compensated for lost revenue. 

Estimates of the number of unli- 
censed, illegally held handguns vary 
widely from 1 million to 2 million. The 
frequency of their use in robberies and! 
other crimes is increasing — about 
3.500 handgun-related crimes a year are 
committed in the nation of 59 million- 
people, according to recent studies. 

Supporters of the legislation argued, 
that it would at least strike a blow 
against a growing "gun culture" in 
Britain. 


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North America 

Clearing In Washington, A shower In London Sarur- Mostly ssuiviy ana eaaaon- 
O C.. lor the U.S. Open day. then sunshine and ably warm in Osaka ana 
gafl tournament Satoiday. nice to end Ihe weekend. A Tokyo Saturday. Probably 
then sunny and ntee tor the lew showers Saturday in sunny again Sunday, 
tinai round Sunday. Sun- Brussels. Amsterdam and although Typhoon Nestor 
shine ime weekend In Hamburg; breezy and cool m«jht be luitong not mo far 
Chicago, then showers and Sunday, then sunny Mon- ro me south and east Hot 
thunderstorms Hkety Mon- day. Seasonably warm m with sunshine this week- 
day Atlanta will hare thun- Madrid this weekend whh end In Bei|lng. Hot and 
derstorms Saturday and partial surahne each day. humid in Hong Kong with 
some sunshine Sunday. awn* sunshiiw and maybe 

a ihunaerstorm. 


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i Conuiioii s 
! Extends B a „ * Senate Majority 
i To Cover ah Backs Mine Ban 

1 ’ Clinton Position Is Criticized 


INTERNATION AL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY , JUNE 13, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 




PAGE 3 


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3 1 — 


By Dana Priest 

Pom ^niif 

WASHINGTON — Fifiy- 
six members of the Senate, 
including a few conservative 
Republicans and its six vet- 
erans of combat in Vietnam, 
are prepared to pass a law to 
ban the use of anti-personnel 
land mines by U.S. forces. 

That would put a majority 

of the Republican-controlled 
Senate on record with a 
tougher position against these 
weapons than President Bill 
Clinton, who has opposed 
such a unilateral land mine 
ban because of the 
Pentagon's objections. 

[Members of Congress 
rook President Clinton to task 
Thursday for not join ing a Ca- 
nadian bid for a swift global 
ban, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Washington. 
Canada has invited officials 
from around the world to 
meet in Ottawa in December 
to sign a comprehensive in- 
ternational treat)' banning the 
production, export or use of 
anti-personnel land mines. 
The treat)' approach has the 
support of more than 70 coun- 
tries and was joined by Bri- 
tain last month.] 

The legislation is the most 
concrete example in the 
United States of a recent 
strengthening of international 
opposition to land mines on 
the ground that their cost to 
humanity outweighs their 
military value. 

Even some Republicans 
normally reluctant to push 
aims control initiatives have 
been swayed by the long- 
term. deadly consequences 
that the 100 million land 
mines laid in 68 countries 
have on people, livestock and 
potential farmland. 

Each month 800 people are 
killed and 1.200 are maimed 
by small mines. At least 204 
UN peacekeepers in Bosm'a- 
Herzegovina have been 
wounded, and 20 have been 
killed, by mines that litter the 
fields and abandoned villages 
of the former Yugoslavia. 


The moral high ground is 
' very .important here.” said 
Senator Chuck Hagel, Repub- 
lican of Nebraska, a former 
army sergeant wounded rwice 
by land mines in Vietnam and 
who is a staunch supporter of 
the military. 

Senator Hagel said he had 
spoken to many high-ranking 
military officers before de- 
ciding to back the legislation, 
which would exempt from the 
ban the estimated 1 million 
U.S. land mines now planted 
on the Korean Peninsula and 
any new ones to be- placed 
there. Top military chiefs 
“are not particularly both- 
ered by this,” he said. ‘‘Not 
one commander” he spoke 
with “vigorously opposes 
it,” he said. 

Prospects for similar legis- 
lation in the House are un- 
clear. but a one-year morator- 
ium on their use prevailed in a 
House-Senate conference in 
1995. White House officials 
said Wednesday that it was 
too early to know how Mr. 
Clinton would respond to 
such a measure. 

The legislation, co- 
sponsored by Senator Patrick 
Leahy, Democrat of Ver- 
mont, and Senator Hagel. 
comes at a critical moment in 
the international debate over 
land mines. 

Administration officials 
were to meet Thursday with 
counterparts in Canada to dis- 
cuss ways to narrow differ- 
ences over the Canadian ini- 
tiative. Its supporters say U.S. 
participation would be crucial 
in winning over such impor- 
tant. but reluctant, countries 
as Russia. 

In January, Mr. Clinton an- 
nounced a permanent ban on 
U.S. sales of mines to other 
countries and said this coun- 
try would destroy millions of 
stockpiled mines that do not 
self-destruct. At the same 
time, he said the United States 
would throw its diplomatic 
clout behind efforts to nego- 
tiate a global ban through the 
UN Conference on Disarm- 
ament. 



Plea to Put McVeigh to Death 

Prosecutor Urges Jurors to Give Ultimate Penalty 


IiuiLi r-nkum-»n^ ui. <| iV.- 


An international group of diplomats appealing in Tokyo for an anti-personnel land mine ban. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Til? AsfiAtiih'it hess 

DENVER — A lawyer for Timothy 
McVeigh made a last plea for mercy 
Thursday by portraying the convicted 
Oklahoma City bomber as a misguided 
patriot, but a prosecutor urged jurors to 
“look into the eyes of a coward” and 
give him the death penalty for killing 
168 men. women and children. 

•It s rime. It's time for justice." the 
prosecutor, Beth Wilkinson, said in 
closing arguments of the penalty phase. 
“This is ifie crime that the death penalty 
was designed for." 

The same jury that convicted Mr. 
McVeigh last week will decide whether 
he should die by injection or spend the 
rest of his life behind bars. A finding for 
the death penalty must be unanimous. 

Ms. Wilkinson said that the 29-year- 
old Gulf War veteran deluded himself 
into believing * ‘it was his right to murder 
innocent men. women and children.” 

‘ ‘Nineteen children under the age of 5 
were brutally murdered and ripped from 
the arms of their parents — ■ those are the 
facts,” Ms. Wilkinson said. 

“Look into the eyes of a coward and 
tell him you will have courage. ’ ’ she said 
to the jury. ‘.‘Tell him he is no patriot. He 
is a traitor and he deserves to die.” 


A death penalty expert began the de- 
fense argument by seeking to make jur- 
ors understand ’ why the bombing 
happened. Richard Burr, while saying he 
was not trying to minimize the enormity 
of rhe crime, asked: “Aren't we all in 
some way implicated in this crime?" He 
asserted ihat .Americans stood by during 
the siege at Waco and the “federal- 
ization" of law enforcement. 

In earlier testimony, the Oklahoma 
Citv bombing on April 19. 1995. was 
linked to Mr “McVeigh’s rage over the 
FBI siege of the Branch Davidian com- 
pound in Waco, Texas, where about SO 
people died in a fire. 

Mr. McVeigh stood up to that per- 
ceived tyranny. Mr. Burr suggested, 
even though the bombing was a “mis- 
guided” way to vent his anger. 

“Tim McVeigh's crime was not the 
product of evil motive." he said “His 
motive was based on qualities that in other 
contexts we applaud.” He added: "We all 
bear some responsibility for Oklahoma 
City. We should not feel a clear con- 
science if we kill Tim McVeigh." 

The lead defense attorney. Stephen 
Jones, later told jurors the bombing could 
not be likened to crimes of serial killers 
because it was a “political" crime. 


An Expensive Stand 
In Favor of Tax Cut 

WASHINGTON — The first ben- 
efits of the proposed 1997 tax cut 
began trickling down through the econ- 
omy early one morning when the $10- 
an-hour professional standees arrived 
to hold places for the $300-an-hour 
lobbyists who would not show up until 
hours later for their seats in the big tax- 
pie hearing room. 

“Welcome to Gucci Gulch,” said 
Gerald Brant, a 25-year-old entrepre- 
neur in a baseball cap who held a prime 
spot Wednesday for one of the power 
lobbyists stereotyped on Capirol Hill as 
the tasseled-loafer class of inside op- 
erators. 

“We line-standers at the Ways and 
Means Committee are very much at the 
bottom of the food chain,” said Mr. 
Brant, who was enriched by the minute 
as the committee's public session was 
delayed throughout the day and the 
buzz of anticipation over the spectacle 
of enacting a tax cut only grew. “The 
lobbyists pay us, and then the interest 
groups and corporations seeking tax 
breaks pay the lobbyists.” 

Mr. Brant omitted mention of the 


middleman, the private broker services 
which are paid $25 or more to hire the 
$10 standees for the $300 lobbyists. 

mn 

Democrats Solicit 
More Contributions 

WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton lavished praise on about 40 of 
the Democratic Party’s most faithful 
donors, telling them that their con- 
tributions bad helped promote ideas 
that are “changing the world." 

Left unspoken was the real reason 
Mr. Clinton had summoned the donors 
to the banquet Wednesday night: The 
party is facing financial disaster unless 
they write more big checks soon. 

While protesters on the sidewalks 
outside chanted about “dirty money." 
the Democratic National Committee 
spent the day inside hoping to persuade 
contributors to commit to giving 
$200,000 over the next two years and 
to raising an additional $50,000 from 
others. 

The party has pledged to return more 
than $3 million in illegal or improper 
contributions raised during 1996. and it 
is facing huge legal bills while de- 
fending itself from congressional and 


Justice Department inquiries into its 
fund-raising practices. fWPi 

Reshuffling at Top 
In Christian Coalition 

WASHINGTON — The Christian 
Coalition has reshuffled its leadership, 
recruiting a former Reagan cabinet 
member and a former member of Con- 
gress to take over the potent eight-year- 
old organization as its founder, Pat 
Robertson, eased into a less visible 
role. 

In its first major transition since it 
was bom out of Mr. Robertson's failed 
1988 presidential campaign, the co- 
alition installed Donald Hodel. who 
served as energy and later interior sec- 
retary, as its new president and Randy 
Tate, a one-term House Republican 
from Washington stale, as executive 
director. 

The selection of Mr. Tate to replace 
Ralph Reed bad been reported, but Mr. 
Hodel’s appointment came as a sur- 
prise. in large pan because it signals a 
shift in Mr. Robenson's position with- 
in the conservative political group. Mr. 
Robertson gave up his role as the co- 
alition’s president and took the title of 
chairman of the board. ( WP) 


Away From Politics 

• A man accused of spraying his “Ozie" moniker all over 
Los Angeles plunged 100 feet f 30 meters l to the ground after 
allegedly spraying graffiti on a freeway overpass. Daniel 
Supple. 19, broke “his spine, both ankles and his left arm. The 
police had been looking for Mr. Supple after a four-month 
investigation into 568,000 worth of graffiti vandalism. tAPl 

• A student driver lost control of a public bus as she pulled 

into a stop in Normandy, Missouri, plowing into a crowded 
train platform on the University of Missouri-St. Louis cam- 
pus. Four people were killed. tAPi 

• A man convicted of killing a couple at a lovers’ lane during 

a $15 robbery was executed in Huntsville. Texas, becoming 
the 21st person to be put to death in the state this year, 
surpassing the state's annual record set in 1935. Earl 
Behringer. 33, was condemned for the 1 986 shooting deaths of 
Daniel Meyer Jr.. 22. an army lieutenant, and Mr. Meyer's 
fiancee, Janet Hancock. 21, a high school and college class- 
mate of Mr. Behringer's. ( APt 

• A second defendant accused in a plot to blow up the 

FBI's fingerprint complex has agreed to plead guilty, his 
lawyer said. Jack Phillips was one of tw o men tapped by Floyd 
(Ray) Looker, leader of the Mountaineer Militia, to make 
bombs, said prosecutors in Morgantown. West Virginia. Mr. 
Phillips's lawyer said the guilty plea to a charge of conspiracy 
to make bombs carried a maximum penalty of five years in 
prison. " tAPi 

• Tobacco negotiators for the first time publicly disclosed 

many details of the big senlemeni they are trying to reach with 
tobacco companies, including tougher warning labels on 
cigarette packs and a cap on damages. Bui the negotiators said 
two major sticking points remain: the extent of immunity for 
tobacco companies and how much the government would 
regulate nicotine. tAPi 


Top Rights Post to Asian- American 



. By Steven A. Holmes 

.Vfii >i»nt 7i».Vi5t-niiV 

WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton will name Bill Lann Lee, an 
Asian-American lawyer from Los 
Angeles, to be assistant attorney general 
for civil rights, the first person other than 
a white or African-American to hold the 
government’s top. civil rights post, ad- 
tninistration officials said.“ 

The choice appears to be in keeping 
with a message Mr. Clinton is expected 
to impart this weekend in a speech on 
race relations in San Diego: that the 
country's changing demographics have, 
moved the issue of race relations beyond 
whites arid African-Americans, to where 
it now encompasses relations among an 
array of races and ethnic groups. 

Administration officials say Mr. Lee, 
48. a Chinese-Arnerican who is the son 
of immigrants, is symbolic of a recog- 


nition of the country’s changing racial 
dynamic. As the director of the Western 
regional office of the NAACP Legal 
Defense and Educational Fund Inc., a 
group that has mainly represented blacks 
in discrimination suits, Mr. Lee is. 
viewed by his supporters as a bridge- 
builder across racial and ethnic lines. 

"Bill is one of the most experienced 
civil rights lawyers in the country,” said 
Theodore Shaw, associate director- 
counsel of the legal defense fund. 

Asian-American groups were partic- 
ularly pleased by Mr. Lee’s appointment, 
seeing it as evidence that allegations of 
improper fund-raising on the part of 
some Asian- Americans in last year’s 
presidential election campaign had not 
led Mr. Clinton's administration to dis- 
tance itself from Asian- Americans. 

Karen Narasaki, executive director of 
the National Asian Pacific American 
Legal Consortium, said, "We believe 


it’s sending a message to the Asian- 
American community that's been feel- 
ing pretty battered over the whole cam- 
paign finance scandal that, in fact, the 
administration still is committed to the 
community.” 

If confirmed by the Senate. Mr. Lee 
would be filling the post of director of 
the Justice Department’s civil rights di- 
vision. a position that has been vacant 
since the resignation of Deval Patrick 
last November. The division litigates 
discrimination cases. 

• Mr. Lee's nomination is expected to 
be challenged by some conservative Re- 
publicans, who will probably question 
him shaiply about the role played by the 
legal defense fund in supporting court 
challenges to Proposition 209, a ballot 
issue approved by California voters in 
November that would ban state affirm- 
ative-action programs that grant any 
kind of preference based on race or sex. 


Airport Authority 


EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST 
Storage Racking System 

The Airport- Authority is responsible for constructing and operating Hong Kong’s new airport 
at Chek Lap Kok. When the new airport opens in April 1 998, it will cater for up .to 35 million 
passenger movements in its first year of operation. 

The Authority invites expressions- of interest from companies interested in tendering for the 
design, supply, delivery and installation of a storage racking system for the storehouses 
located rn.the Authority’s premises, and will consider only organisations who supply a system 
with a proven track record 

Interested parties are invited to express interest on or before Friday, 11 July 1997, in 
writing or by fax to 

Airport Authority 

25th Floor, Central Plaza 

18 Harbour Road, Wan Chai . 

•• V Hong Kong 


Attn. : Mr Peter Chui 


Tel No.: <852)2824 7677 
. Fax No.: (852) 2598 1332 

tender documents will be issued immediately upon receipt of the expression of interest. 
Tenders must be submitted in four (4) copies and placed 
. Tender Box on the 25th Floor at the above address 
hotter than 12:00 noon (Hong Kong time) on Tuesday, 

T2 August 1997. Late tenders will not £e accepted. The 
is notbound to accept the lowest or any tender 
. preserves the right to accept all or any-partof any tender. . 


? » e a e a » 



mmH fcrlHT 


Southern Africa 
Trade ft Investment 
Summit 


Botswana, November 18-19, 1997 

President Ketumile Masire and fellow heads of state from the region will lead 
discussions at the International Herald Tribune's third Southern Africa Trade ft 
Investment Summit to be held in Gaborone on November 18-19. The Presidents 
will be joined by business and finance leaders from the region, as well as renowned 
international figures and senior representatives from some of the world’s leading 
companies currently investing in Southern Africa. 


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PROTESTS ROCK CARACAS — Hooded student demonstrators throwing stones at the police near 
Venezuela's presidential palace to protest a rise in bus fares and the scrapping of a protective labor law. 


Pyramids Draw 6 New Age’ 


The Associated Press 

CAIRO — At night, long after most 
tourists have left the pyramids, die tombs 
of Egypt’s ancient pharaohs echo with 
the chanting, dancing and praying of 
travelers seeking a touch of the psychic. 

They are coming in increasing num- 
bers — often carrying oil to anoint 
themselves or crystals to measure fee 
spiritual power of fee great monuments. 
They want to feel .fee pyramids rather 
than to see them 

“It’s a spiritual journey to the source 
of all original wisdom,” said Jill Vander 
Veen, 45, a calligrapher from Johan- 
nesburg, after meditating in fee burial 
chamber of the Great Pyramid. 

The granite crypt is at fee end of a 
steep, wooden ramp deep inside fee pyr- 
amid. The air is dank ana still, and even a 
whisper resonates off fee stone walls and 
empty sarcophagus of the Pharaoh 
Cheops. The darkness is so complete that 
even people who are inches apart can't 
see each other. 

Yet in this apparent void, Ms. Vander 
Veen and others describe mystical ex- 
periences — brilliant flashes of light, 
strange voices from far away, a sense of 
supernatural forces moving around 
them. 

These spiritual visitors are fee heav- 
iest users of Egypt’s “rent-a-pyramid” 
program, which gives tour groups after- 
hours access to fee pharaonic tombs at a 
cost of S60G for three hours. 

Some 5,000 people bought time last 


year, and even more are expected to this 


year. 

The archaeologists 
fee Great Pyramids at 



responsible for 

the Giza Plaieau 

on Cairo's western edge have mixed 
feelings about fee trend. 

“People Ijfa* to dream, and they want 
to tie their dreams to fee most important 
symbols of the ancient world/’ says 
Vahi Hawass, fee supervisor at Giza. 
“We’re willing to accommodate 
feat.” 

But Mr. Hawass and other Egypto- 
logists are disturbed feat many ox fee 
spiritualists are being drawn by “New 
Age” theorists who seem bent on re- 
writing fee history of ancient Egypt. 

Archaeologists say feat the Giza pyr- 
amids were laboriously built wife prim- 
itive tools by Egyptian workers for fee 
Pharaohs Cheops, Chephren and My- 
cerinus about 4,500 years ago. Some 
New Agers contend they are far older. 

For example, two European writers, 
Robert Bauval and Graham Hancock, 
say fee three pyramids line up wife fee 
stars in the belt of fee constellation 
Orion as they appeared in the night sky 
10,500 years ago. 

.They' postulate feat the pyramids are 
fee work of a lost civilization — which 
perhaps left its wisdom concealed in fee 
great Giza structures. 

“They are trying to steal our his- 
tory,” Mr. Hawass responds when 
asked about these theories. “We have 
found no evidence of any lost civi- 


lization. Everything around fee pyram- 
ids dates it to fee 4th Dynasty in 2500 
B.C. — fee pottery, fee tombs of fee, 
workers, fee tools we’ve found/ 
Everything." ■ * 

But others are not convinced. Joy ' 
Anthony West, a New Age author fi&a - -* 
New York, insists fee Sphinx at Giza"' 
also is far older than has been generally 
believed. He says the weathering of fe^'; 
stones was not due to wind and sand bqft 
to heavy' rains and floods fee likes 
which have not hit fee Egyptian dcsen' : -‘ 
since about 9000 B.C 
An organizer of mcriharion sessions in’" 
the pyramids, Mr. West says his fbi- J 
lowers find in Egypt “fee source of 011 -/ 
paralleled an and architecture generated ‘ 
by a profound and sacred science we are . 


are',' 


only just beginning to understand," 

These modem-day spiritualists 
following in the footsteps of peopk/. 1 
drawn here for ceomries by the per- “ 
ceived powers of Egypt’s ancient res/* ( . 
tigion, wife its intriguing gods and " ■ 
promise of a rich afterlife. * T 

Astrologers have tried to depict fee 
Great Pyramids’ shafts and tunnek as ! 
guides to the stars. Mathematicians" 
have developed sophisticated “maps” * 
of fee world based on the monuments. 

Rainer Stadelraann, head of the Ger- 
man Archaeological Institute in Cairo, 
sees fee new theories as “just more. -i 
pseudo-science’ ’ echoing old ideas, “ft J if] (Tf J l 
comes like a flu." he said, “and after in? t*** 1 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1997 


PACE 5 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Britain Refu ses China’s Troops Request 


The Associated Press 

-HONG KONG — Britain on 
Thursday rebuffed a request from 
China ihat it be permitted to station 
Chinese troops in Hong Kong before 
the British colony's return to Chinese 
sovereignty on July I. 

But Beijing won a victory on a 
different front when a Hong Kong 
judge threw out a lawsuit challenging 
to? legality of the legislature it has set 
up to replace the current elected one. 

The fuss over the military question 
emerged when a Chinese official said 
troops taking over from the British 
Army needed to be in place in time for 
the midnight change of sovereignty. 

;*'The Chinese People’s liberation 
Army should take up Hong Kong's 
defense responsibilities at midnight 
July l, 1997,” said Zhatig Junsheng, 
deputy director of China’s de facto 
embassy in Hong Kong. “Therefore, 
they should already be in their bar- 
racks.” 

But Hugh Davies, Britain's chief 
negotiator for the handover, said there 
was “absolutely do question of a gar- 
rison raking up its positions before 
July 1." 

Mr. Zhang did not indicate bow 


early China w anted its troops in place, 
and said Britain and China were still 
discussing the matter. 

Britain has allowed an unarmed 
advance party of the People’s Lib- 
eration Army to move in to * ’turn on 
the Ughts and prepare die arrange- 
ments" for the full garrison, Mir. Dav- 
ies said in a Hong Kong television 
interview. 

The deployment of several thou- 
sand Chinese soldiers in Hong Kong 
is one of the most delicate aspects of 
the change In sovereignty. Many 
Hong Kong citizens are suspicious of 
an army that they regard as the en- 
forcer of communism and the des- 
troyer of China’s democracy move- 
ment in 1989. 

The garrison “should be very sen- 
sitive to the local circumstances" and 
should “arrive discreetly, not in large- 
numbers, not with a display of force," 
Mr. Davies said: 

The issue could become the latest 
in a string of disagreements that have 
troubled the final years of British rule 
in Hong Kong, the most prominent of 
which involves the future of the leg- 
islature. China says the elected leg- 
islature must be disbanded because it 


was elected in 1995 ondtar rules 
' Beijing never agreed to. 

The 60-member provisional leg- 
islature is to be sworn in 90 minutes 
after the change of sovereignly, in the 
same building where thousands of 
foreign and local guestswill have just 
attended the handover ceremony. 

Britain and Hong Kong’s pro- 
autonomy camp have denounced the 
provisional legislature, and U.S. Sec- 
retary of State Madeleine Albright, 
who is to attend the handover ce- 
remony, has said she will boycott the 
swearing-in. 

On Tuesday, the Democrats, Hong 
Kong's largest party, filed suit in the 
' territory’s High Court to have laws 
passed by the shadow legislature de- 
clared void. 

But a High Court judge, Raymond 
Sears, ruled Thursday that the case 
was “doomed to failure” and would 
be a waste of time and money, ac- 
cording to a radio report. 

The report said Mr. Sears had 
found no evidence that the provision- 
al legislature had acted unlawfully, 
and . that he advised Hong Kong 
judges to stay out of disputes, between 
China and Britain. 


The office of Hong Kong’s leader- ■ 
in-waiting, Tung Chee-hwa, wel- 
comed the court’s quick decision. The 
Democrats, who are boycotting the 
provisional legislature, said they 
might appeal 

Governor Chris Patten appealed to 
China to consider the “embarrass- 
ment or potential embarrassment to 
Hong Kong and the international 
community” if the provisional law- 
makers took their oath of office in' foe 
midst of the handover celebrations. 

Meanwhile, legal experts' wel- 
comed the appointment Thursday of 
three senior and respected judges to 
the Court of Final Appeal, which will 
become Hong Kong s highest court' 
after July 1. “There could not have 
been any better appointments," said 
Nihal Jayawickrama, a University of 
Hong Kong law professor and an out- 
spoken defender of the territory's 
civil liberties. 

They will * ‘evoke confidence’ ’ and 
“be definitely welcomed," he said. 

Justices Charles Ching, Kemal 
Bokhary and Henry Litton “are not 
political appointees — they are pro- 
fessional men," Mr. Jayawickrama 
said. 


Gingrich Hunts for New Way to Pressure Beijing 


By Steven Erlanger 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — Newt 
Gingrich, the House speaker, 
has asked a group of prom- 
inent Republican legislators 
to come up with a new ap- 
proach to pushing the 
Chinese on human rights, on 
their legal system and on the 
general promotion of democ- 
racy, according to congres- 
sional aides. 

Headed by Representatives 
John Porter of Illin ois and 
David Dreier of California, 


the group is debating various 
policies that might have a 
stronger impact on China’s 
direction than the empty 
threat of revoking its trading 
status as a most-favored na- 
tion. Some among the group 
favor continuing normal trad- 
ing status for C hina and some 
opposed 

The trading status issue is 
the main instrument Congress 
has to show its displeasure 
with Beijing and Clinton ad- 
ministration policy toward it 
The threat of cutting off 
China's preferential status 


has been raised repeatedly 
through the Bush and Clinton 
administrations, but the 
United States has never ac- 
tually revoked foe status. 

The ideas being considered 
for new legislation range 
from providing more money 
to Radio free Asia, Voice of 
America and pro-democracy 
projects by nongovernmental 
organizations, to selling mis- 
siles to Taiwan and restricting 
visas for Chinese officials 
who implement a “forced 
abortion** policy. 

The annnal vote in the 


House on reversing President 
BUI Clinton's decision to 
continue China's trading 
status is expected June 25, a 
week before Hong Kong re- 
verts to Chinese rule. 

Many congressional aides 
now think the House will not 
vote to overturn Mr. Clinton, 
but even if it does, the action 
would not survive a presiden- 
tial veto. Mr. Porter said it 
was clear that, in foe end, nor- 
ma! trade status would not be 
revoked. “So that policy 
leads us nowhere,” he said. 

“We .need a policy that 


China Denies Misusing U.S. Supercomputers 


Reuters 

BEIJING — China on 
Thursday dismissed U.S. al- 
legations that it had diverted 
purchases of U.S. -made su- 
percomputers to its military, 
\ saying they were used for sci- 
entific research. 

“China, through normal 
trade channels, bought some 
supercomputers from the 
United Stales and their pur- 
pose is for weather forecast- 
ing, . earthquake prevention 
and other scientific re- 
search," said a Foreign Min- 
isny spokesman, Cui 
T[ankaL 

.“This is a totally normal 
commercial action," he said 
au a news briefing. The 
Chinese side “strictly abided 
by the toms of foe con- 
tract." 

^Washington said Tuesday 


that it was investigating the 
possibility that China had di- 
verted the supercomputers for 
military use and was review- 
ing foe sales. 

The New York Tunes re- 
ported this week that the - 
Commerce Department was 
investigating a 1996 sale by 
Silicon Graphics to a Chinese 
science academy of a super- 
computer that performs al- 
most six billion operations a 
second. - 

The newspaper quoted the 
company as saying that the 
buyer was a benign civilian 
institution, but nuclear ex- 
perts said the academy had 
other functions, such as help- 
ing China to develop long- 
range missiles. 

President Bill Clinton de- 
regulated the export of com- 
puters in 1995 on the grounds 


that increasingly powerful su- 
percomputers were becoming 
more available worldwide. 

The administration made 
special provision for licens- 
ing supercomputers to China 
to ensure against sales for 
military use, officials said. As 
a result, licenses were re- 
quired for all military-related 
sales of supercomputers to 
China in the range of two bil- 
lion to seven- billion opera- 
tions a second. 

Mr. Cui said U.S. curbs on 
high technology exports to 
China were to blame for the 
bulging U.S. trade deficit 
with China. 

"The U.S. side set up some 
obstacles to high technology 
exports to China," he said. 
"This is not conducive to the 
development of trade and 
economic relations between 


weaker 


the two countries." 

Asked to comment on 
American concerns that 
C hina was trading . weapons 
for oil in foe Middle East, Mr. 
Cui declined, but he did say 
that foe United States out- 
stripped Chin a in terms of 
>ns sales. 

J.S. arms export figures 
for exceed those of China," 
he said. 

"The United Stales is 
probably foe world's biggest 
arms exporter. China's arms 
exports are negligible com- 
pared with those of the United 
States." 

Mr. Cui continued: "We 
. have our own principles. We 
never harm the stability of 
concerned regions or coun- 
tries. We only help concerned 
countries cultivate their de- 
fense capabilities." 


really does impact China and 
promote the values we hope 
to see grow in China, like 
democracy, human rights and 
the rule of law." 

Mr. Gingrich has not de- 
cided if he will support al- 
ternative legislation. Mr. 
Porter said the group had 
asked its staff to draft legis- 
lation hoping for Mr. Gin- 
grich's support 

“And we'll proceed as 
soon as we have it" he said. 

While some lawmakers in 
Congress favor new, more 
targeted economic or trade* 
sanctions — against products 
produced by factories owned 
by China’s military, for in- 
stance — the Dreier-Porter 
group has decided not to pro- 
pose any trade sanctions. 

“That was the precondi- 
tion," a congressional aide 
said. 

The group includes a rough 
balance between legislators 
who do not want to revoke 
China’s trading starus.like Mr. 
Dreier. Douglas Bereuter of 
Nebraska and Matt Salmon of 
Arizona, and a range of op- 
ponents like Gerald Solomon 
and Benjamin Gilman of New 
York, Harold Rogers of Ken- 
tucky, Chris Smith of New Jer- 
sey. Mr. Porter and Christoph- 
er Cox of Cahfomia. 

An administration has said 
that if the cutoff of trade pref- 
erence for China is defeated, 
"members will flock to an 
alternative bill that might 
have some teeth, and a bill 
without sanctions is likely to 
And the most support. " 



Food Rolls Into North Korea 

Seoul Also Speeds Up Plans for Refugee Camps 


htoihwi llbi'/AtOkr Ftakc-ftow 

South Korean Red Cross workers leading a food 
shipment to North Korea over a bridge from China. 


Crwfjflrt/ Ik Ota Stiff f ran Duptarbn 

BEIJING — Trains carrying food donated 
by South Korea have begun crossing the bor- 
der from China to North Korea, officials said 
Thursday, and the Seoul government an- 
nounced it would build a refugee camp by late 
next year for North Koreans escaping famine 
in that country. 

A South Korean Embassy spokesman here 
said transport had begun of a first batch of 
donated com and flour organized by the South 
Korean Red Cross under an accord hammered 
out last month between Seoul and Pyongyang. 
It was the first time South Korean Red Cross 
officials had entered the North in 12 years. 

The Sou hi Korean Red Cross has promised 
to supply 50,000 tonnes of com, flour, 
powdered milk and instant noodles to the 
North by the end of July. 

Transportation difficulties meant it was un- 


clear how long it would take to transport the 
first batch, but Seoul was already planning a 
second batch of 16,000 tonnes to be shipped 
between June 20 and 27, Chang Moon Ik, the 
spokesman said. 

Separately. Deputy Prime Minister Kwon 
O Kie of South Korea said Seoul was ex- 
pediting its construction plan for a' refugee 
camp because of a “rapid rise in North 
Korean escapees.” 

A trickle of defectors has grown into a 
steady flow in recent years. An average of 50 
North Koreans arrived here annually between 
1994 and 1996, but 46 have already fled to foe 
South this year, and Mr. Kwon expects the 
number to reach 100 by year-end. 

Mr. Kown said the refugee camp — to be 
built near Seoul — would house 500 people 
and would try to help the refugees adjust to 
capitalist society. (Reuters, AP) 



Wrfl RoiBC-WItailcn 


WARMING UP — Chinese People's Liberation Army soldiers, dressed as. warrior- 
like fan dancers, inarching past a foam monument commemorating China’s Opium 
Wars in Beijing on Thursday. They were rehearsing for celebrations on July 1. 


BRIEFLY 


India’s Congress Party 
Re-elects Its President 

NEW DELHI — India’s Congress (I) 
Party re-elected a veteran politician, Sit- 
aram Kesri, as its president, party of- 
ficials said Thursday. 

The voting was held Monday. It was 
only the third election in the 112-year 
history of India's oldest political party, 
which has traditionally been dominated 
by charismatic leaders. 

Once the driving force behind foe 
movement against colonial rule, Con- 
gress has ruled India for all but five years 
since independence in 194.7, with the 
prime ministers Jawaharlal Nehru, Indira 
Gandhi and Rajiv Gandhi in power for a 
total of 37 years.- 

Mr. Kesri, 76, swept aside challenges 
from two younger party leaders who ran 
on a platform of rejuvenating foe ailing 
party that was ejected from power last 
year. (Reuters) 

South Korea Students 
Go on Hunger Strike 

SEOUL — Thirty-one militant South 
Korean students went on a hunger strike 
Thursday to protest a government crack- 
down on a pro-Pyongyang campus group, 
witnesses said. 

The students chained themselves to a 
steel rail along a ramp in foe Roman 
Catholic cathedral in Seoul’s Myong- 
dong area. The cathedral is a traditional 
sanctuary for anti-government protest- 
ers. 

“We have decided to stage ah indef- 
inite hunger strike because foe govern- 
ment is using foe death of two people as 
an excuse to' suppress foe student move- 
ment," their spokesman said. 

The protesters are members of foe Han- 
chongiyon, which admitted responsibil- 
ity for the torture and killing of a sus- 


pected police spy last week. Another 
policeman was killed while trying to end 
a violent street demonstration by the 
group. < Reuters ) 

India Soldiers Kill 
5 Rebels in Kashmir 

• .SRINAGAR, India — Indian paramil- 
itary forces shot to death .five separatist 
guerrillas in a gun battle on Thursday in 
Jammu and Kashmir state, a defense 
spokesman said. 

“Soldiers, on specific information, 
laid siege to a village in Sumbal and asked 
hiding militants to surrender. The mil- 
itants opened fire and five of them, in- 
cluding three foreign mercenaries, were 
. killed in the exchange." the spokesman 
said. 

, Sumbal is a small town 25 km (15 mile) 
north of Srinagar, foe summer capital of 
Jammu and Kashmir. (Reuters) 

Indonesia Arrests 3 
In Timor Market Fire 

JAKARTA — Indonesian police in 
East Timor have arrested three more 
people in connection with a fire last week 
that swept the largest market in the ter- 
ritory's capital. Dili, the official Antara 
news agency reported Thursday. 

“After further police investigation, the 
number of people accused of burning the 
Mercado Lama market increased from six 
to nine. They are being intensively in- 
vestigated,” foe East Timor police chief. 
Colonel Jnsuf Muharam, was quoted as 
saying. 

Antara said at least 30 kiosks were 
burned down in the market, but other 
media reports have said around half of 
the market's 320 stalls were burned in 
the fire, which started on Saturday 
night and lasted for more than two 
hours. . (Reuters) 


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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL 


Kohl’s Management Style Suddenly Loses Some of Its Luster 


By Alan Cowell 

Weu- York Times Si-nice 


BONN — For much of bis 14 years in 
office as Europe’s longest-serving lead- 
er and most enduring political colossus. 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl has behaved as 
if no crisis is so great that it cannot be 
postponed a day or two while tempers 
cool and backroom deals are brokered. 

Only in 1990. when Germany’s re- 
unification yielded a mother lode of 
political praise, did Mr. Kohl seem ready 
to put Bonn's full political and financial 
force behind a process rhat seemed 
tailored for the visionary's mantle. 

Now, though, in the space of a few 
short weeks, Mr. Kohl's more usual 
management style has come to seem 
increasingly frayed, confronted by a fi- 
nancial squeeze over the creation of a 
single European currency that has driven 
home a hard lesson: Backroom deals and 
deliberate delays have their limits. 


They do not necessarily cany weight 
with Goman — or other European — 
voters reluctant to accept the relative aus- 
terity associated with the new currency. 

Seven years ago, the former West 
Germany felt sure enough of its wealth 
to underwrite reunification. Now. it can- 
not meet the economic criteria for the 
new currency because the economy has 
not been restructured to meet the costly 
strains of merging the two Germanys 
and of global economic change. 

Then, Mr. Kohl was offering his con- 
stituents the fulfillment of a national 
dream. Now, he is offering uncertainty 
and likely sacrifice in the name of a vision 
that conjures far less emotive pull. 

Mr. Kohl embarks this week on a series 
of summit meetings, first on Friday in 
France with its equally misfortune-prone 
president. Jacques Chirac, (hen with other 
European leaders in Amsterdam neat 
week. and. finally, at a gathering of the 
Group of Seven industrialized nations in 


Denver on June 20. Rarely have his trou- 
bles been so obvious. 

To meet die European Union’s cri- 
teria for the new currency, largely de- 
vised by Germany itself, 'European na- 
tions are supposed to curb debt and 
inflation and rein in their budget deficits 
to 3 percent of their national output 
What’s more, eligibility for the new 
currency is to be judged on this year’s 
figures, just as Germany is confronting 
stubborn, record-level joblessness of 
around 4.2 million that consumes bil- 
lions in unemployment benefits and 
works to defeat government efforts to 
meet the budgetary criteria. 

Until last year, it seemed an econom- 
ically strong Germany would pull other 
European nations in its wake toward the 
single currency. But with the cost of 
reunification still consuming billions 
and with other economic burdens, few 
Germans believe that it is still the case. 
"The idea that the Germans were a 



Akvinlcr ZonllinJv.-nV VTV Pif, 

MOSCOW SCENE — An old women on her knees begging and a pensioner with a portrait of Moscow’s 
mayor, Yuri Luzhkov, haranguing passersby on Thursday as Russians celebrated Independence Day. 

The Last Word on Horrific U.K. Crime 


h Our StjJfFnm ffyunfei 

LONDON — Britain's 
highest court Thursday over- 
turned a ministerial decision 
to increase the sentences of 
two boys found guilty of one 
of the country ’s most horrific 
crimes — the savage murder 
of 2-vear-old James Bulger in 
1993. 

Jon Venables and Robert 
Thompson, both now 14. had 
been sentenced to a minimum 
of eight years in detention for 
the assault and brutal killing 
of the toddler. The youths 
lured the boy from a Liver- 
pool shopping mall on Feb. 
12, 1993. bludgeoned him to 
death and abandoned his 
body beside a railroad line. 

Michael Howard, the home 
secretary in the previous Con- 
servative government, decided 
that the sentence was inad- 
equate and increased the min- 
imum sentence to 15 years. 

A panel of five judges in 
the House of Lords, the last 
court of appeal in Britain, 
ruled that Mr. Howard had 
overstepped his powers. 

In a majority decision, they 
said Mr. Howard had been 
w rong in allowing himself to 
be s waved by a petition of 
250,000 signatures demand- 
ing a tougher sentence, 
presented to him by the vic- 
tim’s parents. 

"It is perfectly understand- 
able that the family of the 
murdered boy fell very 
strongly about the sentence to 
be served bv his killers." said 


Lord Steyn. one of five law 
lords who heard the case. 
"But is it quite another matter 
whether the home secretary 
was entitled to take into ac- 
count such protests, and other 
media-inspired protests, 
about the level of the tariff." 

Mr. Howard had also been 
misguided in equating the 
boys’ sentences with those of 
adults, the judges ruled. 

The youths, both 10 at the 
time of the killing, are being 
held in separate secure homes 


and undergoing rehabilitation 
and psychiatric care. Both 
come from poor homes in Liv- 
erpool. where they committed 
their crime. 

They were arrested after 
they were identified on se- 
curity camera film that 
showed them leading the tod- 
dler out of the shopping mall 
where he had become sep- 
arated from his parents. 

The murder caused shock 
and outrage across Britain 
and anguished soul-searching 


about increasing violence 
among the nation’s children. 

The ruling Thursday was 
the latest of several rebukes 
that Mr. Howard has received 
from the British courts over 
decisions he made as home 
secretary. 

On Wednesday, Mr. 
Howard stepped out of the 
contest for the leadership of 
the demoralized Conserva- 
tive Party after finishing last 
of five in the first round of 
voting. f Renters. AP ) 


100 Years on the Cutting Edge 


Ri Uh l f 

ZURICH — The Swiss Army knife, the 
all-purpose implement favored by presi- 
dents. polar explorers, astronauts and mil- 
lions of ordinary people reluctant to carry a 
tool box. turned 100 on Thursday. 

From humble beginnings as a pocket 
knife with six fold-out blades and tools, the 
implement has spawned dozens of ever 
more complex variations featuring gizmos 
designed to unclog car w indscreen washer 
jets or remove a fish’s scales. 

The manufacturer. Vic tori nox. laconic- 
ally calls the penknife, patented by the 
cutlery' maker Carl Elsener on June 12. 
IK97. a "useful pocket tool.’’ Nowadays. 
American astronauts on the space shuttle 
use the knives. 

During an expedition to the North Pole in 
1 ^ 70 - 77 . Charles Burton found his knife 
invaluable for more than just de-icing sled 
runners and opening cans. 

"When one of our team broke through 
the ice. we were able to cut off his clothes 


with the knife," he wrote in an account of 
the expedition. If his clothes, rapidly freez- 
ing at minus 37 degrees centigrade (minus 
35 Fahrenheit), had not been cut off. he 
would probably have died rapidly. 

About 34.000 Swiss Army knives leave 
the Victorinox factory in Ibach in central 
Switzerland daily. 

With a staff of 950. the factory is the 
biggest employer in the regional canton of 
Schwyz. 

The company, named after Mr. Elsener’s 
mother, Victoria, and “inox." a designation 
for stainless steel, is now run by the founder's 
grandson. Carl Elsener 3d. who is 75. 

Mr. Elsener’s classic six-tool red knife, 
emblazoned with the Swiss cross trade- 
mark. sports a large and a small blade, a can 
opener, a bottle opener, a corkscrew and an 
awl with a hole for sewing. 

Other models feature scissors, magni- 
fying glasses, saws, rulers, pliers and fish- 
scaling implements, right up to the "Swiss 
Champ." which has 33 blades and tools. 


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Fax Pans: +33(0)1 4553 37 09 


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bulwark of stability for the euro — for- 
get it,” said Rolf- Dieter Krause, a prom- 
inent television commentator. 

Beyond that, though, is the deepening 
sense that Mr. Kohl’s authority has been 
diminished and that his ability to trans- 
late grand vision into reality is faltering. 

The euro was, and remains, the very 
cornerstone of his notion of a unified 
Europe whose political and economic 
cohesion will, he often says, make the 
difference between "war and peace in 
the 21sl century.” 

"I have linked part of my political 
thinking for decades — and now my 
political existence — with the idea that 
this goal must be reached,” he said last 
Sundry, leading some critics to suggest 
that he is miscalculating Europe’s mood 
and Germany's own economic realities. 

As Mr. Krause, the television com- 
mentator, put it, "The chancellor will 
simply have to give up his earlier 


That much was apparent Wednesday, 
when Germany conditionally reversed 
its long-standing opposition to the idea 
of an EU jobs charter in a putative trade- 
off designed to persuade the new So- 
cialist government in France to abandon 
its reservations about strict accounting 
roles for the new currency. 

Mr. Kohl has long insisted that there 
can be no delay of the euro because that 
would spell the end of deeper European 
integration. 

But some German commentators be- 
lieve Mr. Kohl faces a peculiar political 
quandary. Germans respect Mr. Kohl for 
his European vision, even though the 
euro "has become a token, for various 
rea sons, of everything that is seen as 
politically, economically and socially 
unpleasant,” said Eckhaid Fuhr. a 
columnist in the newspaper Frankfurter 
AiJgemeine. 

For Mr. Kohl to soften, thus, would be 
tantamount to the emperor admitting he 


has no clothes. “The Kohl coaiirtcaj 
without the euro yields no attractive 
promises for the future.” Ml FoHr 
said. 

■ France and Germany have beat u* 
twin powerhouses of monetary u m^ 
but the rise of the Socialists raised a net 
challenge to one of Europe’s most en- 
during alliances, a threat that Mr. Koh] 
and Mr. Chirac will doubtless seek iq 
minimize at their summit meeting in - 
Poitiers, France, on Friday. 

In die meantime, the Bonn coalition 
that provides Mr. Kohl with a slender 
10- seat parliamentary majority, hai 
placed him in a bind. 

The Christian Social Union, the sist^ 
party to Mr. Kohl's Christian Demo- 
crats. has launched a powerful campaign 
against any softening of the euro, while 
tire Free Democratic junior coalition 
partner has insisted that no new taxes 
should be raised to help Bormqualift for i 
the unified current v. 


Unesco Strikes a Deal With China 

Beijing’s Objection to a Press Award Brings New Rules 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — The United Nations’ cul- 
tural body has approved a watered -down 
document on press freedom, while re- 
jecting restrictive proposals put forward 
by China, which was angry that a Un- 
esco press prize was awarded to an im- 
prisoned Chinese reporter. 

The compromise, put together Wed- 
nesday night by Unesco ’s executive 
board, gives the director-general more 
control over the prize jury, but it rejected 
the backbone of the Chinese position: 
Recipients of the press freedom prize 
should not have committed a crime in 
their own country. 

China reacted angrily after the di- 
rector-general, Federico Mayor, last 
month awarded the first Unesco/ 
Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom 
Prize to Gao Yu, a Chinese journalist 
serving a six-year sentence for what 
Chinese authorities say was the crime of 
revealing state secrets. 

China, which was not consulted on the 
award, called it "an action of gross in- 
terference in the internal affairs of a mem- 
ber state.” It demanded that in future the 
prize-winner should be named by a jury 


of seven members designated by the di- 
rector-general “on the basis of equitable 
geographical and cultural representa- 
tion." The Chinese proposal added. “The 
director-general will see to it that the 
nomination of the prize winner will not 
contravene the laws of the member state 
of which the nominee is a national.” 

Under the deal, the prize jury will be 
directly controlled by Linesco’s director- 
general, who will appoint two members 
from each of six regions, rather than the 
17 independent members as at present. 
There will continue to be two repre- 
sentatives from the Guillermo Cano 
Foundation, named after a murdered 
Colombian journalist. 

A senior official of the UN Educa- 
tional. Scientific and Cultural Organi- 
zation said Thursday that the compro- 
mise was "something we can live 
with." but that the concern was “what 
happens after Mr. Mayor.” 

Mr. Mayor said the' compromise text 
was ”a positive solution that preserves 
the principle of the Unesco’s commit- 
ment to press freedom and the univer- 
sality of this principle as well as the 
independence of the jury, which will be 
composed of media professionals from 
different regions." 


BRIEFLY 


Mr. Mayor had said earlier this week 
that he would not negotiate with China 
on the press freedom prize. He said that 
if the executive board went along with 
the Chinese position, he would have 
nothing to do with the prize in future. Mr. 
Mayor also said he would not accept i 
reversal on the decision to award this 
year’s prize to Miss Gao. 

Attempts by Unesco to impose a < 
"new world information order" under 1 
the previous director-general. Amadou 
Mahtar M’Bow. tore the organization 
apart and contributed to the withdrawal 
of the United States and Britain. 

Mr. Mayor has spent die decade since 
his appointment try ing to repair the dun- 
age. seeking to promote the indepen- 
dence and pluralism of the media in all 
pans of the w orld. 

Luis Gabriel Cano, brother of the slain 
Colombian journalist and president of 
the Inter-American Press Association, 
said he was concerned about efforts “to 
compromise the total independence of 
the prize jury composed of eminent press 
personalities from all regions, to enter 
governments into a selection process tlui 
has been free of official interference, and 
to deny the universality of the principles , 
of free speech and press freedom. ’ ’ 4 


Germany Backs Eurofighter 

FRANKFURT — The German finance minister. Theo 
Waigel. says that the four-nation Eurofighter is important 
for Germany and for Europe. 

"I want the Eurofighter and consider it necessary both in 
the national and European interest. Now it’s a question of 
agreeing on an acceptable financial model with the man- 
ufacturer DASA,” he was quoted as saying by the news- 
paper Die Weir in an advance summary of an article to 
appear Friday. The jet is being jointly developed by Ger- 
many’s Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG. British Aerospace. 
Spain's CASA and Italy's Alenia. (Reuters) 

Violence in Albania Campaign 

ELB AS AN, Albania — A campaign stop turned violent 
Thursday, degenerating into shootouts between the pres- 
ident’s bodyguards and townsfolk armed with submachine 
guns. The violence wounded 13 people and cast new doubt 
on elections thai are meant to end Albania’s chaos. 

Witnesses said the gunfights erupted after Elbasan res- 
idents, furious over the detention of a youthful heckler by 
bodyguards of President Sali Berisha, fired in the air and 
threw stones at a car full of guards. The guards then Fired 
into the crowd, several witnesses said. 

Hospital officials said seven people, including three 
policemen, were wounded, but none of the injuries were 
life-threatening. (AP) 


from Bulgaria. Romania, the Czech Republic, Slovakia. * 
Germany and Interpol in Austria discussed how to co- j 
ordinate their efforts in the fight against drug smuggling, car ! 
theft and trafficking in people. ' ] 

Bernhard Falk, vice president of the Federal and Criminal 
Office of Germany, said that in the last two years the number 
of stolen cars in Germany has decreased. 

“But car theft is still a big problem. About 1 10.000 cars 
a year are stolen in Germany and' some 60.000 of them 
disappear," Mr. Falk said. Trafficking in people from East 
European countries willing to emigrate and trafficking ’in 
women for sexual exploitation is an increasing type of 
organized crime, he said. 

" A lot of young women and girls from Poland, the Czech 
Republic and Slovakia go to Germany to work as prostitutes 
and that type of crime is closely connected to other types of 
crime, such’ as drug abuse and drug trafficking." he 
said. ~ (Reuters) 

Britain Warns on Parade Strife 


BELFAST — Britain on Thursday urged Northern Ire- 
land’s feuding Protestants and Roman Catholics to seek 
agreement to avert violence during the British-ruled 
province’s volatile annual parade season. 

Northern Ireland Secretary Marjorie Mowlam said the 
government would riot tolerate a rerun of violence that 
overshadowed parades last summer and did not rule out 
drafting in extra police from mainland Britain. 

“The rule of law must be upheld, " she said. 
a/V • T? a Y? , But she emphasized that she wanted to encourage me- 

Ujjensive on vast Europe L rune dialion and was not prepared to give up hope. 

° 1 Newspapers supporting both pro- British Unionists and 

nationalists who want Northern Ireland to be united with the 
Irish Republic joined in a plea for compromise, urging 
Protestant marchers and Catholic objectors to defuse tears 
about a heavily disputed parade scheduled in the townof 
Portadown on July 6. (Reuters) 


SOFIA — Police officers from East European countries 
and Germany said Thursday that they would widen co- 
operation in a bid to crack down on transborder organized 
crime. 

At a three-day meeting here, high- rankin g police officers 


U.S. Sergeant Found Guilty in Sex Cas^s 


£ nyfint *7 S*4T Ffim Pif/VKtrs 

DARMSTADT, Germany 
— A U.S. military court on 
Thursday found an army ser- 
geant guilty of raping a sub- 
ordinate, indecent assault and 
three counts of forcible sod- 
omy at an army base in Ger- 
many, in the second sex abuse 
. trial to hit U.S. forces abroad 
this year. 

Sergeant Paul Fuller, 25, of 
Columbus. Ohio, was cleared 
of three of the 14 charges 
against him. including at- 
tempted rape and obstruction 
of justice. A second rape 


charge was reduced to the in- 
decent assault charge on 
which he was convicted. He 
also was convicted of three 
counts of cruelty and mal- 
treatment, fraternization, kid- 
napping and a reduced charge 
of unlawful entry. 

He was sentenced to five 
years in prison and a dishon- 
orable discharge. 

Prosecutors had sought a 
life sentence for Sergeant 
Fuller after a jury convicted 
him of one count of rape and 
three of sodomy involving 
three female soldiers, as well 


■C’/Veir York Times/ Edited bv Will Shurtz. 


81 Hammer souno 

82 News letters 



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as three counts of cruelty and 
one of kidnapping. 

They called Sergeant 
Fuller a "sexual predator" 
who took advantage of his 
rank to get sexual gratific- 
ation. "This is a man who 
treated his barracks as his 
own kingdom and had a har- 
em at his disposal,” said the 
prosecutor. Captain Chris 
Hellmich. 

Defense lawyers argued 
that race had played a major 
role in bringing the charges 
against Sergeant Fuller, who 
is black, and said he was the 
victim of a prejudiced inves- 
tigation that turned into a 
witchhunt by oveizealous 
prosecutors. 

"Anybody who says that 
race is not an issue in this trial 
is wrong,” a defense lawyer. 
Major Peter Becker, told jur- 
ors during the three- day trial. 

Major Becker told the jur- 
ors in closing arguments Wed- 
nesday that Sergeant Fuller 
was "something of a playboy 
who enjoyed the company of 
women” but that female sol- 
diers had "cried fake tears” 
and were coached to appear as 
victims in court testimony. 

"The investigators told 
these women, who had en- 
gaged in consensual sex: ‘Are 
you going to be a victim or a 


slut?’ It is a horrible situ- 
ation." Major Becker said- 

Sergeant Fuller stoflp™ 
short of admitting the charge 
but apologized for his b^ha- 
vior toward his victims, 
were in the courtroom. 
asked the court for leniency 
and said he was sorry to ha'* 
dishonored his deceased ra- 
ther. an army veteran. 

Another soldier atthei# 5 * 1 - 
Sergeant First Class John 5 
Davis. 37. of Fayette* 
North Carolina, was cleared 
last week of rape 
but given two years’ in 
after being found guilty 01 
lesser charges, including 
decent assault. , . 

Sergeant Davis, who «s 2150 
black, was the firsi soldi® - ® 
be convicted outside 
United States in a 
series of sex abuse scanner 
that have tainted tbe-U-v. 
armed forces. Sergeant psv 
also said race had been 
issue in his case. t.;- 

The charges against;.^' 
geant Fuller related W-w 
dents that took place bew*® 
September and Depesjof 
1996 at the Darmstadt jaw- 
ing center, where soto£. 
spend two weeks, in an i 
entarion course before 
their permanent units in 

(Reuters. Art 








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PAGE 8 


FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Hcralb 


international 



Pl'StlSHEll WITH THE NKW YORK TIMT3 AND THE WViHlrtlTTUN KMT 


Dictating to the UN 


' Till. WAMIlNimjK iWT I Read All About It: India Is Deploying Missiles 


0* I' : ;' 
wM' 


If you measure the Jesse Helms UN 
reform package against what he orig- 
inally sought — a 50 percent cut in the 
bureaucracy, a 75 percent cut in the 
Secretariat’s budget, a virtual gutting 
of the organization's missions in the 
name of repelling its supposed prof- 
ligate invasions of its member states' 
sovereignty — then you will perhaps 
be relieved at the changes that he and 
the Senate Democrats and the Clinton 
administration have now agreed to. 

No doubt there will be widespread 
relief that the United Nations is sur- 
viving in a form that is painfully trun- 
cated but in some respects perhaps 
improved and more sustainable. Cer- 
tainly in the administration, there is a 
palpable sense of being delivered from 
an ordeal that has brought great em- 
barrassment to the United States. 

You do not have to cheer every 
United Nations office, program and 
emanation, however, to realize the 
heavy costs that went into the effort to 
save the world body from the full force 
of the campaign mobilized by the Re- 
publican chairman of the Senate For- 
eign Relations Committee. 

Nor only did Senator Helms prune 
the organization beyond the dimen- 
sions where change had been fairly 
indicated. He did it in a way — by 
unilateral imposition — that flouts the 
collective procedures which the United 
States had accepted in joining the 


United Nations by formal treaty in 
the first place. 

In the one, finally rather limited 
aspect of their foreign policy that 
Americans conduct through multilat- 
eral institutions, the United States now 
is showing that it will proceed in its 
own way without due regard for the 
considerations of other countries. 

For instance, it will pay delinquent 
financial obligations, but it will do so 
incompletely, only by annual incre- 
ments and according to specific 
“benchmarks" of UN performance in 
return. Similarly, it will impose a re- 
duced schedule of current and future 
American payments for its own dues 
and peacekeeping expenses. A more 
likely way to ensure continuing in- 
ternational resentment of the American 
imperial style, and to tempt its emu- 
lation, is bard to imagine. 

The LIN reform comes in a package 
that includes reorganization of Amer- 
ica's own foreign affairs organiza- 
tions. The information and arms con- 
trol agencies are to be folded into the 
State Department, and the aid agency is 
to come under tighter State policy con- 
trol. The point here is that these 
changes emerged from consultation, in 
this instance between the branches. 
That is a good deal more than can be 
said for the changes that the United 
States dictated to the United Nations. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Conditions for Kabila 


The course taken by the new gov- 
ernment of Congo under Laurent Kab- 
ila will have important consequences 
for much of Africa. Nine other coun- 
tries border on the vast, mineral-rich 
land formerly known as Zaire, and the 
political and military dynamics in sev- 
eral of them have already begun to 
shift. So have regional perceptions of 
France and the United States. Paris lost 
prestige for sticking too long with the 
dictator of Zaire, Mobutu Sese Seko. 
Washington, although also a longtime 
Mobutu" supporter, is now identified 
with the new Kabila government. 

The Clinton administration has 
moved deftly in this rapidly changing 
situation, opening a direct dialogue 
with Mr. Kabila through Bill Richard- 
son. America s UN representative, 
who also acts as President Bill Clin- 
ton’s personal emissary. 

Concerns have already emerged 
about the Kabila regime’s involvement 
in refugee killings and its commitment 
to democracy. Troops loyal to Mr. 
Kabila reportedly carried out delib- 
erate massacres of Hutu refugees from 
Rwanda. Also, the new government 
has restricted political rights, deferred 
elections for at least two years and 
failed to incorporate longtime political 
opponents of the Mobutu dictatorship 
in its administration. 

After decades of wi nking at Marshal 
Mobutu's authoritarianism, corruption 
and violations of his neighbors' sov- 


ereignty. Washington would seem 
awkward preaching civic virtue to Mr. 
Kabila. But that is what it must do. 
Condoning new abuses will not help 
Congo recover from Marshal 
Mobutu's disastrous misrule. 

Washington should also back up its 
advice with human rights conditions 
on American aid. Last weekend Mr. 
Richardson told Mr. Kabila that the 
United States was prepared to help 
with health and education needs, plan- 
ning a market economy, organizing 
elections and integrating former sol- 
diers into society. But he rightly con- 
ditioned this help on Mr. Kabila’s ad- 
dressing urgent humanitarian issues 
and longer-term political reforms. 

The first important test will be how 
Mr. Kabila responds to the massacre 
reports. These must be promptly and 
impartially investigated and any guilty 
parties prosecuted. The new govern- 
ment must also give the United Nations 
and the International Red Cross access 
to remaining refugees and cooperate in 
their eventual repatriation to Rwanda 
or safe havens elsewhere. 

Mr. Kabila only recently emerged 
from obscurity and should be given a 
chance to respond to Mr. Richardson’s 
advice. But America should provide 
aid only if he begins to move Congo 
away from the human rights abuses 
and dictatorship it suffered for so long 
under Marshal Mobutu. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Lock the Handguns 


In many more instances than most 

H ie realize, neighbors have guns 
:d and within easy reach in their 
homes. The proportion of household- 
ers who keep guns at home — safely- 
stored or not — has declined somewhat 
in recent years, yet one out of three 
households contains firearms. The Na- 
tional Institute of Justice finds that 55 
percent of handguns are kept Loaded. Is 
it any wonder that children are finding 
these weapons — and winding up dead 
as a result? 

According to the Centers for Dis- 
ease Control and Prevention, the rate 
of firearm deaths among children up 
to 14 years old is nearly 1 2 times higher 
in the United States than in 25 other 
industrialized countries combined. 
The center estimates that nearly 1.2 
million “latchkey" or unattended- 
after-school children have access to 
loaded and unlocked firearms. 

Leave aside the properly stored long 
guns of collectors and sponsmen who 
observe good gun -safety rules. Nation- 
al as well as local authorities have 
suggested some cautionary actions to 
curb accidental gun deaths of children. 
President Bill Clinton has urged le- 
gislation requiring that all handguns 
sold in the country come with a trigger 
lock or other device to prevent un- 
authorized use. In the Washington re- 
gion, county executives Wayne Curry 
of Prince George's and Doug Duncan 
of Montgomery' have teamed up to 


push safety-lock requirements for their 
jurisdictions. 

A dozen or so cities and some other 
jurisdictions have enacted such laws 
and report successes. The locks, which 
sell for SI l on up, work by fitting two 
flat sides around the trigger and 
passing a cylinder through the trigger; 
when pushed together, the device is 
opened by a key. Gun lobby oppo- 
nents. who oppose almost any effort to 
restrict the marketing of ready-to- 
sh oor handguns, have found absurd 
arguments tor rejecting this precau- 
tion. They note that the locks don’t 
always work: Some weapons can still 
discharge accidentally if the locks 
don’t secure the hammer that sets off 
the firing weapon and it is loaded and 
then dropped. They argue for safe stor- 
age, and safety education of children. 

Changes in gun designs are coming 
that will improve on trigger locks — 
* ‘personalized" handguns that will op- 
erate only with magnetic, electronic 
coded signals. But for now, the 
Duncan-Curry initiative is sensible. It 
is not intended to spark police searches 
of closets and dressers for lockless 
triggers, nor will it stop gun owners 
from leaving weapons unlocked and 
within reach. But, as the two county 
executives, law enforcement author- 
ities and parents' groups have been 
saying, if it saves just one young life it 
will be a success. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


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XTE5V DELHI - InwUigence leaks By Brahma Cbeilaney tepW 

1^1 tb newspapers, and reieaseof das- while pushing ahead with its 

sifted information in official testimony 

to congressional panels, can be a useful device 23 years ago, but it has not missile, the 

tool ofuS. nonproliferation diploma- conducted iy further tests. U.S. pres- ctssfiiUy fu s 
cy. Such methods have been panic- sure has been an important deterrent. i this to a con- 

ularlv effective against India. Twice in the last 18 months India official wfac dotted l this ;» a i«o 


N EW DELHI — Intelligence leaks 
to newspapers, and release of clas- 
sified information in official testimony 


ularly effective against India. 

They usually put the Indian gov- 
ernment on the defensive, and often 
help dissuade it from going ahead with 
moves that would openly challenge 
American efforts to halt the spread of 
nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles. 

The latest such intelligence Irak, 
published recently in The Washington 
Post, put the international' spotlight on 
India's tactical Prithvi missile, which 
seeks to counter short-range missiles 
supplied by China to Pakistan. 

The Post, citing U.S. officials, re- 
ported that India had moved “a hand- 
ful" of medium-range Prithvis ro a 
prospective launching site in the state 
of Punjab near the border with 
Pakistan. The disclosure was embar- 
rassing for India, which does not admit 
to deploying a single missile system, 
despite night-testing several different 
kinds in the past decade. 

India tested a nuclear explosive 


came close to carrying out another nu- 
clear test, only to retreat at the eleventh 
hour. The second such move had to be 
aborted because of the expected fall of 
the then Indian government, but the 
first was halted in late 1995 because of 
an American newspaper exposS relying 
on U.S. intelligence sources. 

The leak inflamed Indian nationalist 
passions, but U.S. diplomacy can take 
credit for averting an action that would 
have wrecked the nuclear test ban treaty 
then under negotiation in Geneva. 

Diplomacy by newspaper leak was 
also responsible for torpedoing Prime 
Minister Indira Gandhi s plan in the 
early 1 980s to detonate a nuclear device, 
an action that would have undermined 
U.S. -led nonproliferation efforts. 

American diplomacy has not sty- 
mied all of India ' s strategic moves. The 
Prithvi entered serial production two 
years ago, and two short-range mis- 


Agni, in hibernation. It was a U.b. 
official who disclosed this io a con- 
gressional panel in 1995. The testimony 
woke Indians up to the fact that the 
Agni had been shelved by the gov- 
ernment of P. V. Narasimha Rao, which 
was assiduously courting Washington. 

Indians leam more about their na- 
tional defense programs from U.S. of- 
ficials and newspapers than they do 
from their own government and media. 
It was news for lawmakers and citizens 
alike in India that there were Prithvis in 
Punjab, since the authorities had nor 
disclosed that the missile was even in 
commercial production. 

The fact is that the Prithvi is being 
readied for use by the Indian array as a 
weapon to counter the Chinese M- 1 1 
missiles in Pakistan’s armory- Yet 
when the Prithvis were reportedly 
sighted in the Punjab, the Indian gov- 
ernment claimed through media leaks 
that the missiles had merely been 
stored there, not deployed. 


The Prithvi, with a choice of fn*. 
different conventional ' waAeads. 
would be fueled and aimed while being 
readied for launch. But no Indian of. 
ficial has cared to explain bow the . 
storage of fully assembled nassites « 
different from deployment. Safely re» ■ 
quire men ts dictate that the warhead, 
the fuel and the delivery vehicle be 
stored separately within reasonably 
safe distances from each other. 

India, in the words of Robin Raphel, 
the most senior U.S. State Department 
official dealing with South Asia, is not 
.“openly" deploying the Prithvi, At 
least this gives Washington some de- 
gree of satisfaction. So the United Slates 
and India are partners in acharade. 
although for different political reasons. 

With the Prithvi controversy non 
over. Indian authorities can rest in 
peace, and the Indian public will be in 
die dark on their country's nuclear and 
missile moves until the next leak in an 
American newspaper. 

The writer is professor of securin' 
studies at the Center for Policy Re- 
search in New Delhi. He contributed 
this comment to the Herald Tribune. 


,»f Livii 


-r.i :: rr». 


?.*••• C -fr br 


Transportable Memory in Hong Kong, on the Way Elsewhere 


H onolulu — in the fid- 
dling little matter of body 
counts, China's postwar mar- 
tyrology, however colorful or 
cruel, is wildly unreliable. No 
one seems to know how many 
died or have been imprisoned 
through its injustices, only that 
they happened. 

“Approximately 4.000 polit- 
ical prisoners." it is reported. 
Approximately? 

And when Jasper Becker in 
"Hungry Ghosts" says that 
“perhaps 30 million" Chinese 
died in the great famine from 
1958 to 1962. it is a breath- 
taking “perhaps" to qualify 
that ungraspable number. 

Nevertheless, no one who 
suffered a famine could pos- 
sibly forget such a nightmare. 


By Paul Theroux 


nor would such a person look 
for clarification in Chinese of- 
ficial history, where a mention 
of starvation is regarded as an 
assault on patriotism or the 
party line. The facts are not in 
the archives, but the awful truth 
resides in the Chinese soul and 
the Chinese memory. 

I believe that it is memory that 
drives the Chinese, and the 


ing joint ventures with Beijing. 

Those who ignore or seek ro 
excuse such an abomination as 
Deng Xiaoping's massacre in 
Tiananmen Square cannot tell 
you how many students were 
killed. No one knows except 
the grave diggers, and they are 
not talking. 

Memory, especially memen- 
to mori. is of particular value 


seemingly divided loyalty of the .now in Hong Kong, which is 
Hong Kong Chinese is not as awaiting the June 30 rerroces- 


ambiguous as it seems, but rather 
an example of total recalL 
The Chinese have needed 
memory’s inner verification, 
for they have been badly served 
by a conspiracy of business- 
men and power brokers seek- 


sion to China. When people pre- 
vail over misfortune, the source 
of their strength is frequendy a 
memory of previous disasters: 
shortages, invasion, famine, the 
madness of crowds, the world 
turned upside down. 


Just Don’t Disturb Us Democrats 


By Robert J. Samuelson 


W ASHINGTON — We and revolutionary. It would 
are now witnessing — not do the bidding of the un- 
most recently in France but ions. It would not propose vast 
also in the United States and new spending, 
elsewhere — the triumph of Labour’s new respectabii- 
conservatism. This is not, of iry prevented John Major’s 
course, what you are hearing, government, tinged with scan- 
"Europe has turned left" dal, from overcoming its own 
says The Wall Street Journal, unpopularity, despite a solid 
noting that 13 of 15 countries 'overall record, 
in the European Union now Under the Conservatives, 
have leftish governments. Britain's economy ' became 
In France, the Socialists one of Europe's strongest. Its 
and Communists slaughtered unemployment is now about 7 
the center-right in parliamen- percent, compared with Ger- 
tary elections. In Britain, La- many’s nearly 10 percent and 
bour defeated the Conserva- France's 12.5 percent, accord- 
tives for the first time in a ing to the standardized rates of 
general election since 1979. the OECD. But voters don't 
The conventional wisdom has respond to political philo- 
got the facts right; what is sophy so much as ro their own 
wrong is the interpretation. yearning for security. 

The first definition of The failure to make this dis- 
" conservatism" (relying on tinction is one reason electoral 
Webster’s Unabridged Die- preferences often seem mys- 
tionary. third edition) is "the tifying and the swings seem 
disposition in politics to pre- erratic. Politicians — and 
serve what’s established.*' It many journalistic and aca- 
is this basic conservatism that demic commentators — im- 
has triumphed. bue elections with more philo- 

People in wealthy demo- sophical significance than 
cracies not everyone, but they deserve. As a result, ab- 
clear majorities in most coun- rupt shifts are routinely de- 
tries — ■ don't want radical clared when they often exist 
economic or social change, mainly in rhetoric. 

Whatever looks like radical Here is the conservative 
change (even if it is, in fact, writer David Frum agonizing 
fairly mild) stirs their wrath, recently in the Weekly Stan- 
Woe to the political leaders dard over his side's setbacks: 
who, somehow, unleash this “It’s baffling. It seems just 

powerful undercurrent of cau- yesterday — it was just yes- 
don and fear. The dominant terday — that the collapse of 
political philosophy is: Please ■ communism, the success of 
do not disturb. Reagan and Thatcher and 

Voters punish politicians for Kohl ... were widely thought 
suggesting unwanted upsets in to have settled (be big political 

the status quo. France’s center- 

right government fell for its 
efforts to trim the country’s A (rfilriOn A are 
lavish social benefits. Cuts, A g e 

deemed necessary to reduce "VTEW statistics remoi 


questions once and for all. 
Thattedious left-wing project, 
the search for a third way be- 
tween liberty and central plan- 
ning, appeared terminally dis- 
credited." 

In fact, electorates never 
veered to the far ideological 
right. What brought rightist 
leaders to power in the 1980s 
were the upsets of the 1970s, 
mainly rising inflation and 
taxes. In 1980, average infla- 
tion was 13 percent in Europe 
and 9 percent in America. 

But there never was a 
wholesale repudiation of the 
welfare state's protective co- 
coon. Even in Margaret 
Thatcher’s Britain, the state 
hasn't shrunk much. In 1980, 
government spending was 43 
percent of national income. In 
1996 it was 42 percent. 

People vote their interests 
— or what they view as their 
interests. In 1993, the French 
gave the right-center 460 seats 
in the National Assembly. Four 
years later the right-center got 
242 seats. Had the basic beliefs 
of the French really shifted so 
much? Certainly not. 

In the Lfaited States, voters 
trust neither party: so they rely 
on a Republican Congress and 
a Democratic president to 
check the most controversial 
schemes of the other. This 
conservatism is pragmatic 
and, to be fr ank, selfish 

It may also be delusional. 
All too often it frustrates so- 
cieties from adjusting to un- 
avoidable change. Europe's 
unemployment has been driv- 
en up Dy rigid wages and high 
social benefits. Companies 
fear hiring (because labor 


ngnt government leu tor its costs are too high), and the 

efforts to him the country's 4 trOluOTl An?€ jobless stay unemployed (be- 

lavish social benefits. Cuts, c? cause the benefits are so gen- 

deemed necessary to reduce "VTEW statistics remove all erous). Yet even timid efforts 
the budget deficit and qualify 1 1 doubt. Unemployment in by France’s government to 
for Europe’s single currency, America is just 4.8 percent, the modify these policies met 
aroused widespread anger. lowest in 23 years. GDP- is with rejection. 

Bill Clinton’s national growing at a lusty 4.1 percent. The Socialists’ policies, if 
health plan in 1993 baffled Inflation is a mere 2.5 percent adopted, might make matters 
people and seemed to threaten We are living in an economic worse. Their proposals in- 
the doctor-patient relation- Golden Age. and. yes, Bill Clin- elude raising the minimum 
ship. That helped Republicans ton is our Pericles. wage ( now $6.50 an hour) and 

win Congress in 1994. But Give him credit. He has un- reducing the standard work- 


tile doctor-patient relation- Golden Age. and. yes, Bill Clin- elude raising the minimum 
ship. That helped Republicans ton is our Pericles. wage ( now $6.50 an hour) and 

win Congress in 1994. But Give him credit. He has un- reducing the standard work- 
two years later they could not derstood from the start the im- week from 39 to 35 hours 
recapture the While House, ponance of low interest rates; without pay cuts. Both steps 
because their plan to overhaul he has narrowed the deficit; he would increase laborcosts and 
Medicare sowed suspicion has limited the spread of the sort make French products less 
that a Republican government of onerous regulations that have competitive, 
might savage many popular led to a jobless rare of 11.2 The United States does not 
middle-class programs. percent in Germany and to have this particular problem. 
What moves electorates, long-term stagnation in Japan, but it does share with Europe 
especially the swing voters He has had help from the and Japan a reluctance to an- 
who determine winners, is not monetary stewardship of Alan ticipate an aging society. No 
ideology but psychology. Of Greenspan and the free market one wants to alter ~ ' 

course, political traditions and enthusiasm of the Republican grams for the el- 
circumstances vary among Congress. Left to his own though everyone knows 'that 
countries. But the unifying devices, he would have spent these programs will someday 
theme in these and other con- more and taxed more, and have to be altered, 
tests is that voters reacted less Americans would be saddled The paralysis is emblematic 
to any particular political with nationalized health care, of the present electoral con- 
agenda * u — — 1 D * ■■ ■ - r - - - 


agenda than to personal But most of all. this Golden servatism, which is more 
threats, real or imagined, that Age is the result of policies ser scared than thoughtful. It il- 
govemments might represent, in motion by Ronald Reagan in luminates a central problem of 
In Britain, Tony Blair won the early 1980s. Mr. Clinton's advanced democracies- how 
precisely because he made the accomplishment is that he did to prepare for change when 
UbourPanyunthreatening.lt not stand in the way. the constituency asainsr 


would be middle-class and 
sympathetic, not proletarian 


— James K. Classman in 
Tltc Washington Post. 


toe constituency against 
change represents a majority. 

Newsweek 




up 





The history of Chinese in- 
stability and failure is the best 
guide to Hong Kong's future, 
because Hong Kong is a monu- 
ment to fleeing Chinese — to 
the ones who got away. 

Among the personal myths of 
most Chinese families are two 
emblematic ancestors — the 
one who was left behind and the 
one who made ft; the one who 
missed the boat and the one who 
caught it 

This mythology is evident to 
anyone who has been to China 
and witnessed buses or trains 
being boarded. All is calm until 
the bus or the ferry or the train 
arrives. Then there is a scramble 
— the stabbing of elbows and 
the trampling feet — and you 
understand the fear of abandon- 
ment and why the Chinese have 
had to become world-class prac- 
titioners of self-sufficiency. 

In 1966 1 met the only 
Chinese family in tribalistic, 
populous and quarreling Ugan- 
da. In a country of millions, 
where minority families were 
numbered in tens of thousands, 
here was a minority of one. 

The patriarch's name was 
large on the Kampala shop sign: 
Francis Yung Hok. He was not 
lost or marooned, but saved. He 
had come from Hong Kong. You 
can j ust imagine all the passages 
he had made. And it is salutary to 
take note of the effort. 

People t in Hong Kong are 
monotonously described as hav- 
ing a refugee mentality, bur they 
are not typical refugees. For this 
to be true, Hong Kong would 
have had to be true refuge, and it 
has not been. More ambiguous 
than refugees, people in Hong 
Kong are colonials without the 
nonrial colonial expectation of 
independence. 

Hong Kongers have existed 
in a perpetual condition of tem- 
porariness. They had no hope of 
changing their status as in-be- 
tween people — in between lan- 
guages, countries, cultures. 

Hong Kong, in spite of its 
lovely buildings and busy har- 
bor, has really been only an es- 
cape route — another way out of 
China, and especially a vantage 
point for these people in transit 
to find another place to live. 

Indeed, the Chinese were 
leaving Hong Kong long before 
the British denied tiiem citizen- 
ship with Margaret Thatcher's 
racially exclusive nationality 
bill in 1981; they have been 
fleeing the colony since it was 
established in 1841. And since 
1984, when the Joint Declara- 
tion was signed, many thou- 
sands have established resi- 
dence elsewhere. 

Who can blame them? They 
had few freedoms and even few- 
er guarantees for the future. The 
relatively small number who 
held British passports knew that 
such papers aid not qualify them 
to settle in Britain. 

Britain's racial exclusion was 


hardly a surprise; it was only in 
1973 that Australia lifted i is* 
whites-only immigration polk}-. 

But refugees, wherever they 
travel, bring the past with them. . 

If traditional Cantonese culture 
has flourished in Hong Kong, , 
and I think it has, it is because it 
was largely ignored by the Brit- ! 
ish. Most culture is portable; 
Chinese culture certainly is. 

Large-scale emigration does 
not contradict the greatness of* 
Chinese civilization. Painful, 
national history that burdens 
Europeans like a. dead weiglu' 
and makes them weary, cynical 
and complacent has no coun- 
terpart in China; indeed, such 
historical memory — especially, ■ 
the messiest defeats — seems to 
animate the Chinese. ' 

Without smirking. Hairy' : 
Wu, the dissident who endured ' • 
20 years in labor camps, speaks : 
passionately of China as "the . 
Motherland" and reflects with' r 
pleasure — as I beard him do i 
not long ago at the University of ' , 
Hawaii — on die return of Hong 
Kong to China's bosom, even; 
though he is well aware that 
China has been a destroyer. 

A woman originally from 
Shanghai, who suffered badly 
during the Cultural Revolution, - 
told me she thought the return of 
Hong Kong was a good thing, 
"because then China will be- - 
bigger." She is a recent im- 
migrant to the United States, 
who never intends to live again 
in China. 

Like Harry Wu, sentimental 
in speech, practical in action,' 
she knows the past. China far 
her, for so many, is both a harsh 
reality and a glorious ideal 

Chinese history is a record of 1 
cycles of convulsion and broken . 
promises, a seemingly penna-’ 
nent condition of uncertainty. So j 
people in Hong Kong have never 
thought “Look bow far we have 
come." They echo their exten-' 
ded families in China and think' 
“We could return to that." 1 

To the question “What will ' 
happen next?” the answer is: ' 
Anything, everything, some- 1 
thing. But expect the worst. The , 
best way to avoid humiliation is 
ro have a long memory. 

Most, however, keep their- 
memories to themselves. The t 
public utterance, the denanci-i 
ation and pronouncement, has i 
not been the Chinese way. But . 
when it comes time, action will 
be determined by memory. 

If there is a Chinese proverb, • 
as surely there must be, con- 
trasting the poverty of speech- 
with the eloquence of action, itis , 
a proverb that is constantly mur- ■ 
mured by people in Hong Kmig^ 
who are, because of their origins - 
and their peculiar history, air . 
ways mentally on the move. 

Mr. Theroux is author most . 
recently of " Kowloon Tong." o , 
novel. He contributed this com- ( 
mem to The New York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AG0_ J . 
1897;' Latin Trouble flag in Munich and a series of- 


BUENOS AIRES — The Ar- 
gentine Government asked for 
explanations from Uruguay on 
the landing of troops on its ter- 
ritory by the gunboat Juarez, 
which sank an Argentine vessel 
that contained arms for the Ur- 
uguayan rebels. The Argentine 


flag in Munich and a series of’ 
military ■demonstrations 
Potsdam and other German gar- 
rison cities. The revival of dft- ' 
cord is takin g the form of hatred 
towards France, hostility , to- 
wards Republican institutions 
and glorification of the old Get-- 
man army and flag. 


Government ordered a gunboat . ini 7 »*.«■• ■ 

to proceed to the point where tte&un m Oreecc 


iv pmteea to me point where 
the troops were landed and cap- 
ture the Juarez. The trouble be- 
tween Uruguay and Argentine 
commenced last year as a result 


ATHENS — In a fiercely in- ; 
transigent declaration of policy*; 
Greece’s Communis^ pod? 
served warning that ft would-' 

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Ifntgnay, where a tsv- worid general. Communist, 
olimon .s in progress. leadership 1 dSied ir would 

lft „. _ employ every means “so uwj.; 

Ger man Riots * e country would be extracwu 

RFBI TK rv ■ ^ from the present impasse." The, 

BfcKUN — Discontent in Ger- United States aid program was, 
many with Republican and Na- denounced as an attempt tt> # 

provoked convert Greece into an “Amef- / 1 

SriS? m ?! m ! Sber §;- Ihe icon protectorate" and as au : 
tearing down of the Republ ican anti-Soviet bridgehead. 


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9 -Mlssi/ej • What East Europe Seeks 
’i7«- Is a Model of Civilization 






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By Flora Lewis 






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S OFIA — Bulgaria and Ro- 
mania have new democratic 
governments that are at last mov- 
ing seriously on liberal reforms. 
One of the first benefits is that 
historic enmity is fading. Author- 
ities are gaming a new recognition 
that regional cooperation is es- 
sential for the Balkans, on all 
- kinds of issues — trade, trans- 
portation, the fight against inter- 
national crime. 

The Bulgarian parliamentarian 
As sen Agov told an international 
conference here on “stability in 
the Balkan Peninsula, * ’ convoked 
by the Free and Democratic Bul- 
garian Foundation: “All of us 
h who live in this godforsaken re- 
’ gion most live together.’' 

That is a new kind of talk in this 
part of the world, and even at a 
meeting dedicated to the idea it 
was clear that this is still far from 
dominating people’s emotions 
and opinions, as has come to be 
the case in Western Europe. Eth- 
nic and national grievances re- 
main threateningly acute. History 
['{• can still be a lethal disease. 

1 So it is important to recognize 
how central the aspirations to be- 
come an acknowledged, fully ac- 
cepted pan of the Western world 
are to their hopes for peace and a 
dawn of prosperity. The twin doors 
to admission are perceived as 
NATO and the European Union. 

Of course there is still fear of 
Russia. Russia is nearby and po- 
rendaUy overwhelmingly power- 
r fill. But that is not the first reason 
why everybody wants to belong to 
the West, including NATO, as 
people elsewhere suppose. 
Bulgaria’s president, Petar 
. 7 Stoyanov, a vigorous, determined 
-7 45 -year-old, put it su ccinctly in an 
interview: “We know it won't 
come soon, or easily, but our 
choice is a model of civilization.” 
The public is aware that the coun- 
try has lost several years since the 
collapse of the Soviet bloc, but it 
.. seeks reassurance that it is on the 
~ right track, he continued. 

I asked him what the reaction 
would be if Romania, which has • 
been campaigning hand and has 
support from several West Euro- 
pean countries, especially France, 
is invited to join NATO next 
month, leaving Bulgaria behind. 

- He gulped. It was a hand question. 
But he palled hims elf together, 
managed a smile and said: “We 
: are nor rivals with Romania. We 


INTERNATIONAL HER ALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JUNE 13, 1997 

OPINION /LETTERS 




\js£& 


PAGE 9 


must see that the success of one 
will help.us all.” 

Still, he hopes that there will be 
a chance to catch up, that the door 
won't be shut. “I am convinced 
that when we are in NATO, it will 
improve our relations with Rus- 
sia, make them clearer, less ideo- 
logical.” 

The next question stunned him. 
What if, after all the talks, the U.S. 
Senate does not ratify the expan- 
ded NATO, which gathering op- 
position shows cannot be ruled 
out? “I sincerely hope the U.S. 
doesn’t react this way.” he said. 
“All of Eastern Europe pins its 
hopes on this.” He added: “East 
Europeans couldn't understand the 
denial of their hopes to join another 
civilization, another world.” t 

It is not an idle question. The 
Western debate on NATO expan- 
sion and transformation has 
barely begun. The United States 
will be the critical focus, for con- 
stitutional reasons that make rat- 
ification more difficult than in 
parliamentary regimes, as well as 
for its central importance. 

So far American arguments 
have been essentially in negative 
terms, asserting and rebutting 
what might be disadvantages and 
excessive costs. This is not the 
place to go into diem, because 
what matters is the larger gain to 
be achieved by expanding the 
world's only credible, organized 
system of collective security. It is a 
matter of what kind of Europe the 
United Stales wants to live with. 

There will be a disastrous 
American, and Western, problem 
if Washington fails to start soon to 
explain to the public why die 
NATO decisions nave been made. 
The way things are going, and 
with the sour partisanship in the 
capital, the treaty could be Iosl 

It would be an international 
blow as serious as the failure to 
ratify the League of Nations after 
World War I. and it would be a 
demonstration that, the United 
States could no longer be relied 
upon as a power for peace and 
stability in the world. 

In their troubles, the East Euro- 
peans see what Americans have 
lost sight of as they try to cope with 
. lonely superpowerdora. The issue 
is no longer geopolitics but how the 
need for security is to be organized 
— a “model of civilization,” as 
President Stoyanov put it 

© Flora Lewis 


BOOKS 




Ik «\I\ 1 I |: ... , 1 - 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


About Burma 


Regarding " Partners Should 
Nudge Burma" (Opinion. June 5) 
by Jusuf Wanandi: 

Mr. Wanandi is to be warmly 
thanked for saying that it is now up 
to the Association of South East 
Asian Nations, or ASEAN, to lay 
aside, its policy of noninterference 
in the affairs of its members and 
chan a road map for the soci- 
opolitical development of Burma. 

He is right to point out that it is 
not only in the West that Burma's 
SLORC regime is abhorred for its 
total lack of decency and legit- 
imacy. Even by tbe authoritarian 
standards of sane governments in 
the region, this regime stands be- 
yond the pale for the utter contempt 
with which it treats its own people. 
To claim, as SLORC has done, that 
international concern for the situ- 
ation in Burma is merely die 
product of Western “neocoloni- 
alism” is to insult intelligent and 
principled Asians everywhere. 

Mr. Wanandi is. however, 
wrong in claiming that both sides 
in Burma's long struggle for de- 
mocracy have been unwilling to 


compromise. While it is true that 
SLORC has rejected serious ne- 
gotiations with the party that won 
overwhelming victory in the 1990 
elections. Daw Aung San Suu 
Kyi. who leads that party, has put 
dialogue and compromise at the 
very top of her agenda. 

In all her statements she has 
made it abundantly clear that if 
SLORC is prepared to negotiate in 
good faith, she and her party will 
meet it more than halfway in forg- 
ing a lasting political settlement. 

MALA VIKA KARLEKAR. 

New Delhi. 

Now that a decision has been 
reached by ASEAN to admir My- 
anmar. or Burma, as well as Cam- 
bodia and Laos as full members in 
July, it is time to make a sober 
assessment of the situation. 

It augurs well for the peace and 
stability of the region that for the 
first time, ail 10 Southeast Asian 
nations have agreed to join to- 
gether for the common weal. No 
one can deny that a peaceful and 
prosperous Southeast Asia will be 
a positive influence for regional 
and global security. 


In an 6 Abortion Culture , 9 
Babies Are Disposable 


Bv George F. Will 


At this important juncture, 
every effort should be devoted to 
nurturing the spirit of unity and 
cooperation that would ensure 
economic prosperity in the entire 
region. Any attempt to cast as- 
persions or to nudge the new 
members to follow certain paths 
would be counterproductive. 

In the case of our country, it 
should be appreciated that it was 
the current leadership that took 
the initiative to join ASEAN. That 
decision itself is a reflection of the 
aspiration of the entire nation to 
adopt policies that would propel it 
into the ranks of the fastest-grow- 
ing economies. The nation is fully 
aware of the responsibilities and 
duties that membership in 
ASEAN entails. 

ASEAN can best achieve its 
goals by encouraging members to 
work together as partners and re- 
fraining from interference in in- 
ternal affairs. 

THAUNG TUN. 

Washington. 

The writer is minister-counsel- 
lor at the Embassy of the Union of 
Myanmar in Washington. 


W ashington — Accord- 
ing ro a friend. 1 S-year-oId 
Melissa Drexler paused in front of 
the mirror in the bathroom ro 
touch up her makeup before re- 
joining her date on the dance floor 
at the prom. 

She had just tossed her 6- 
pound. 6-ounce baby boy into a 
trash bin next to the bloodstained 
stall in the rest room where she 
had given birth. “She seemed to 

MEANWHILE 

be enjoying herself.” said a 
classmate about Ms. Drexler *s 
postpartum dancing. 

Medical examiners have deter- 
mined that the baby was alive 
during the birthing process, which 
occurred early in the prom. He 
was soon discovered by a main- 
tenance worker who thought the 
trash bag was unusually heavy. 
Unsuccessful attempis were made 
to resuscitate the baby. 

Who taught Ms. Drexler to 
think, or not think, in a way that 
caused her to regard her new’bom 
baby as disposable trash? Many 
people and things, no doubt. 

She may have come from a less 
than attentive home environment. 
An assistant prosecutor says fam- 
ily members did not know she was 
pregnant. 

She has grown up in a society 
that does not stress deferral of 
gratification, and it's not her 
fault that the baby arrived dur- 
ing the prom, for Pete's sake. 
She has come of age in a soc- 
iety w'here condom-dispensing 
schools teach sex education in the 
modem manner, which has been 
well described as plumbing for 
hedonists. 

If she is like millions of other 
young American adults, she has 
spent thousands of hours watch- 
ing movies and television pro- 
grams not designed to encourage 
delicacy of feeling or to suggest 
that sexuality has morally com- 
plex dimensions and serious 
consequences. 

If she is like millions of other 
young adults, she also has 
pumped into her ears thousands of 
hours of the coarsening lyrics of 
popular music. And she certainly 
has grown up in a social atmo- 
sphere saturated with opinion 
leaders’ approbation of. and col- 
laboration with, the political pro- 
gram of reducing abortion — the 


killing of something — to a mere 
“choice,’ ‘ like choosing to smoke 
a cigarette, only not nearly that 
serious. 

However, foremost among the 
moral tutors who prepared" Ms. 
Drexler to act as she did is the 
Supreme Court. By pretending in 
Roe v. Wade not to know when 
life begins, the court encouraged 
looking away from the stark fact 
that abortion kills something. 

Ignoring elementary science, 
the court said, preposterously, that 
a fetus is “potential life.” But as 
Walker Percy, a physician as well 
as a no\ elist. wrote, it is a com- 
monplace of modem biology that 
a life begins "when the chromo- 
somes of the sperm fuse with the 
chromosomes of the ovum to form 
a new DNA complex that thence- 
forth directs the ontogenesis of the 
organism." 

*Mr. Percy continued; 

“The onset of individual life is 
not a dogma of the church but a 
fact of science. How- much more 
convenient if we lived in the 1 3th 
century’, when no one knew any- 
thing about microbiology and ar- 
guments about the onset of life 
were legitimate.” 

Biology does not allow the 
abortion argument to be about, or 
anyone to be agnostic about, when 
life begins. Conscientious people 
can disagree about the appropriate 
moral and legal status to be ac- 
corded the life that abortion ends. 
But science complicates — to say 
no more — the project of the 
“pro-choice” movement. 

Pregnancy is a continuum. 
What begins at conception will, if 
there is no natural misfortune or 
deliberate anack, become a child. 
If it becomes a child at a prom, it 
must be attacked quickly, lest the 
whole night be a bummer. 

The barbarism at the prom is 
being termed a "tragedy' 1 calling 
for "compassion" all around. 
No, an earthquake is a tragedy. 
This was an act of wickedness — 
a wicked choice — and a society 
incapable of anger about it is 
simply decadent. 

Perhaps the brevity of the life 
of Ms. Drexler's son will accel- 
erate the transformation of the na- 
tion's vague unrest into a vivid 
consciousness that today's abor- 
tion culture, with its casual cre- 
ation and destruction of life, is 
evil. 

WdSluHSltn P>ISI W'n/rrt Croup. 


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: : THE AGUERO SISTERS 

: j_ By Cristina Gaivia. 300 pages. $24. 

Alfred A. Knopf. 

” Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 

I N Cristina Garcia's haunting new 
novel, “The Aguero Sisters,” a 
strange scar is handed down generation 
' to generation. Blanca Aguero, the clan’s 
- ^ ill-fated matriarch, receives the mys- 
• -- tenons mark on her heel while swim- 
. ; . ming in Las Casas river during her hon- 

. eymoon. - 

• , : : Years later, while escaping from Cuba 

: to die United States, Blanca's daughter 
_ ; -■ Constancia leaves a similar mark on the 
. "7 foot of her daughter, Isabel, while tiying 

. _ to revive her from heatstroke. Isabel, in 
: i turn, eventually has a boy named Raku, 
who is bom with a red birthmark on his 
. . . • ' foot in the same place as his mother's 
wound. 

Like Achilles’ heel, the mark signifies 
. .. the vulnerability of the Aguero family to 

.. ' sorrow and disaster while at the same 
time marking them as the mark of Cain 
marked him, as accursed people, 
: doomed to exile, dislocation and loss. 
Although "The Aguero Sisters” 
' _ • lacks the compelling organic unity of 
: Garcia’s remarkable debut novel, 
"Dreaming in Cuban” (1992), it should 
ratify her reputation as a highly original, 
- highly gifted young writer. It also attests, 
like that earlier novel to her intuitive 
.. . • understanding of famili es and the fierce, 
:• enduring connections that bind one gen- 
' eraifon to another. 

More plot-driven than its predecessor 
(and hence more susceptible to lapses in 
stoiytelling), * ‘The Aguero Sisters" gets 
off to a fast, shocking start with the 
murder of Blanca Aguero by her adoring 
husband, Ignacio. Celebrated natural- 
ists; the couple - are on a field trip in 
. Cuba's Zapata Swamp to gather spe- 

cimens for anew museum when Ignacio 

\ | \ li 1111105 double-barreled shotgun on his 


beautiful wife and shoots her in the neck. 
He then carries her body 17 miles to the 
nearest village and begins to lie. 

The murder of Blanca and Ignacio’s 
subsequent suicide are events that their 
two daughters, Constancia and Reina, 
will spend half their lives tiying ro un- 
ravel, events that will irrevocably shape 
their own apprehension of the world. 
Separated as small children, they have 
grown up to be women with virtually 
nothing in common. 

Constancia left Cuba as a young wom- 
an to start a new life in the United States 
with her second husband, the stolid if 
somewhat hapless Hebeno. Like 
Lourdes, the pakry tycoon in "Dream- 
ing in Cuban,” Constancia becomes a 
successful entrepreneur; she starts a line 
of cosmetics and converts an old bowl- 
ing ball factory into a plant for her salves 
and lotions and potions. 

Although tbe advertising for her 
products plays upon a romanticized im- 
age of Cuba, Constancia does not like to 
dwell on the past; she does not like ro be 
tempted to remember. 

Reina has remained in Havana, in 
their father’s apartment, surrounded by 
his sniffed birds, books and memories. A 
statuesque beauty blessed with supreme 
self-confidence, Reina is as promiscu- 
ous as her sister is fastidious: she se- 
duces and abandons men with the 
aplomb of a woman who thinks of her- 
self as a goddess. 

She is equally self-confident about 
her work as an electrician — until she 
suffers a terrible accident. While trying 
to repair an electric water pump in a 
copper mine, she is struck by lightning 
and severely burned. 

Meanwhile, something strange has 
happened to Constancia as well: she 
wakes up one morning to find herself 
transformed into the spitting image of 
her mother, who abandoned her as a 
child. “What penance this is," she 
Thinks , “to wear Mama's mouth, her 


BRIDGE 


eyes, like a spiteful inheritance, to suffer 
die countenance that scorned her." 

As readers of “Dreaming in Cuban" 
well know, fantastic events are common 
in Garcia's fictional universe, a symp- 
tom both of the natural world's sur- 
passing strangeness and the bizarre pre- 
dicaments the human species likes to 
invent for itself. 

In “The Aguero Sisters." a man is 
saved from the murderous wrath of his 
workers by a flock of tree ducks: another 
man is killed by a “high velocity avo- 
cado" during a hurricane, and Reina and 
Constancy's grandmother dies in a pig 
stampede. Reina remembers “how their 
father's appearance conspicuously im- 
proved after Mami died, as if he'd stolen 
something of her life to replenish his 
own," while Constancia’ s son Silvestre 
imagines that he has willed the terrible 
fever that has left him deaf. 

B LENDING the hallucinatory .im- 
agery of Gabriel Garcia Marquez 
with a homespun American idiom, Gar- 
cia uses such events to illumine the 
unpredictability of ordinary life and also 
to underscore the unconscious choices 
and predilections that link mothers and 
daughters, fathers and sons. 

When it comes to familial betrayals, 
disappointments in love and rash acts of 
passion, the experiences of the Aguero 
women are so similar as to suggest a 
potent emotional genetics, if not an out- 
right family curse. 

What the author is less adept at, in this 
novel, is dramatizing the larger plot 
twists in her characters' lives. In the end, 
these abrupt narrative twists dilute the 
overall impact of “The Aguero Sisters," 
though they do not diminish the force of 
Garcia's powerfully imagined charac- 
ters or the magic of her prose. 

Michiko Kakutani is on the staff cf The 
New York Times. 




|£ JlkWi-A 


m MW##* **;•*- 

iff •- ^ 


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. ' • • By Alan Truscoa 

T WO- world-class teams 
continued their rivalry in 
’the final of the International 
Teams Trials, to- select tbe 
v-j-tiF American representatives in 
U . S“worid cramptonships in 
■ ■ ; Tnrisfai in October. 

Afer30of 120 deals, Nick 
fBtSeU 6f New York and his 
JpaS.rehiaBpion team led 
' S«3a^» : T)eutsch of Laredo, 
Jobs/ aid his learn by 28 
. . match points. 

_■ - ' hi... semifinal play both 

leanfe-won easily. 

^NkialL ; whose team in- 
■ Dick Freeman, Bob 

, WflUGMkb Hamman, Jeff 
"-.i ™ck^t^and&icRodweli 
against a Chicago 
“ \ ***» 'fr"-bjr Ralph Katz. 

*' -.Dsutsefc, with- Michael 


Rosenberg, Zia Mahmood. 
Chip Martel and Lew 
Stansby, defeated Jeff Wolf- 
son of Chicago and. his team 
by 76. 

In the contest between 
once-defeated groups, _ to 
determine , a second United 
States team to play in Tunisia, 
the semifinal scores by cap- 
tain after 30 or 60 deals were: 
Katz led George Rapee by 18; 
Malcolm Brachman led. 
Wdlfson by 26. 

George Rapee, 82, who 
won three world titles in the 
1 950s, was by far the oldest in 
the competition. 

On the diagramed deal 
from an earlier round Rapee 
sat Norm. He and his partner, 
John Sotadar, outbid t he qp - 
. position and gained substan- 
tially. > ‘ • 

The two-club rebid by 


South was an artificial check- 
back. but Rapee did not need 
to respond when West 
doubled to show clubs. The 
eventual contract of six 
spades served two purposes: 
it made South the declarer, 
preventing a damaging club 
lead, and it gave South the 
chance for a crucial .ruff in the 
dummy. 

He won the trump lead, 
cashed dummy's heart win- 
ners and led a diamond to the 
ace. He then ruffed the heart 
jack and returned to his hand 
with a diamond to draw 
trumps. 

Dummy’s diamonds pro- 
vided a club discard, giving 
South 12 nicks. The opposing 
North-South played six no- 
trump from the South pos- 
ition and failed, because of 
tbe location of tbe club ace, 


giving Rapee ’steam a 14-imp 
profit 


NORTH 

*Q8 

OAK 

4KJ84 

*86542 

EAST 

*92 

9Q8942 
0 10 9 S 3 
*Q8 


VEST 

* 6543 
0963 
« 72 

* A J 10 7 


SOUTH 
* A K J 10 7- 
O J167 
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North 

East 

South 

West 

IO 

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Was t led the Spade three. 



The Most Up-to-Date Reference 
for American Business Terms 


■■ ' _ — ;■ \ 




..... 


AMERICAN 


sasn- BUSINESS 

TERMS 
Dictionary 




The American Business Terms Dictionary includes 
over 4,000 terms from commerce, banking, invest- 
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This reference book is edited especially for people liv- 
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The clear and logical organization, as well as care- 
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and idiomatic usage, make this volume the ideal 
choice for business professionals, students or anyone 
who needs knowledge of the basic terminology of 
business and commerce. 

The Dictionary incorporates many useful 
1 features: 

\ ■ Each entry has at least one example or explana- 
tion in addition to a clear and concise definition. 

■ Current slang and colloquial words and phras- 
es are included, as well as buzz words and jargon. 
?|||^ ■ Abundant cross-referencing connects synony- 
j Bbfr mous terms and concepts 
jmm ■ Numerous abbreviations and acronyms are 
defined and explained, 

M||||iR along with common Latin terms and expres- 

The American Business Terms 
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RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE 


FRANCE 


REAL ESTATE BDCnOH SALE is the Patois de Justice da Hanlon 

On Thursday June 1$ th. I Wat 2pm. ONE LOT 

NEUILLY-SUR-SEINE (92) - TOWNHOUSE 

22-24. 2p. boulevard d'lnkermann, on about 2."O0 sq m. grounds. 
1 scorevs on basement plus attic appn.AimateI> I N$ sq m living space, 
automobile shed and chapel 

STARTING PRICE: FFI6,000,000 

Contact Maine A M JAUDON. Lawyer. Berreau des Hauts-de-Seine 
27 bu. rue de I'Abieuvoir. °2I00 BOULOGNE. Tel -J? it'll JA 21 7J 14 
Mai t re Olivier CP.ISONI. Lawyer. Baneau de Pans 
1 4 avenue du Ft-Wllson. 7’ I In Paris. Tet. -3 ? iui I J 7 23 48 4-5 
Record clTi+e oi Tribunal de Grande Instance of Nanterre 
Visit of rvrmse? with Maitre Frederic NAPJAR. bailiff at Neuillv-sur-Seine. 
la a-. Charles-de-Gaulle. Tel: t0> I J0 sb 4I ?| 
on Von.1i> lune lo. I'W - o wtill 1 1 TO am 


61 


AUCTION SALE organized by Maitres P. DURAND and 
J.F. JOUVION, associate notaries at the "Chambre 
Interdepartementale des Noiaires de Pans'. 12 avenue Victoria, 
75001 PARIS, on Tuesday. July 8th 1997 al 7:00 pm 

ENTIRE ESTATE of MARDIUY (Ome) 
so-called "HARAS PE MARPIUY” 

Ccmpnsmg: 

1st mt) PROPERTY located ai -Val Harangr - total content M r»29a23ca 
2nd] SEVERAL RURAL BUILDINGS • lotai contani 38 na 79 a 36 ca 
3rd) SEVERAL RURAL BUILDINGS - total content 15 ha 45 a 1 ca 
4th. 5th & 6th MEADOWS and PASTURES - total cantert 11 In 91 a 14 ca 

with reception bar and WC. 
i trainer house tocludni j 5 rooms - 
attached srutibs. Buimq lor brood mares, harnessing buBdrat. If 
paddock. agricultural shelter Technical takings. The stud farm 
i .000 m long x 12 m wide track.- 

STARTING PRICE: FF 1,500,000 

DEPOSIT: FF 375.000 

information: Me DURAND & JOUVION. associate nolanes in 
Pans (8tht 65. rue iTAniou - Tel. +33 10) 1 43 87 59 59 - SCP 
BROUARD-DAUDE. authorized aoenL 34 rue Sainte-Anne. 
75001 Paris. 

VISITS ON SITE: Wednesday. June 18th. Wednesday, June 
25lh. Wednes-lay July 2nd from 10 a.m. till 12 a.m. 


The enure estate ptesenUy induing: office taldlng » 

4-room manager's house Horse trainer house induing 5 rooms S 2 mdependam 

16 boxes. indMduai 
6 equpped with 


r PARIS 

SQUARE AVENUE FOCH 

(pnvale lane] 

IN HISTORICAL TOWNHOUSE 

luwriaus renovation. 3 apartments' 

120. 1 60 & 300 sq.m. 


Fax 


*.SB 


I 42 60 55 91 


r Near Geneva, > 

on the region ot Divonne (France/, 
high class residence of 350 
sq.m., modem architecture. 

Price: FF 7.000,000. 

Tel +33 (0)4 50 40 81 81 
, Fax (0) 4 50 40 80 98 > 


FOR SALE 


IN SPLENDID CONDITION 
IN THE HEART OF 
BEAUJOLAIS VINEYARDS 

*.iuoi» tixrnu: >hk -. 4«in ;« s:n« 
C*iUM A»h oyifenfeour. arMttlbre 
4-a- ; : m iietMOM SbrjKCmi 4 oans 
waw htocmj ..a.e irsem root 

. :: - j ■ -r * *;=.< 

Agence TIM - Francois Tessrer 

78, rut Vlclor-Huga ■ 71000 IUCON 
TeL: -33 |0p 85 40 99 W Fax 85 40 91 10 


BOTSWANA 


PRIVATE 
GAME RESERVE 

FREEHOLD 

One of the last true wilder- 
ness areas: 13,750 acres in 
Botswana, unfenced and set 
in a conservancy area of 
300,000 acres, contains 
largest numbers of elephant 
on privately owned lana any- 
where in (he world. Lion, 
leopard, cheetah and a wide 
variety of game. 

An internationally diverse 
group of 9 shareholders who 
own the land, seek a further 
5 partners to develop a pri- 
vate lodge for their exclusive 
use. The reserve is accessible 
and professionally managed 
for owners and their guests. 
Open game vehicles avail- 
able. 

Price £210,000 per share 
Contact Peter Fitt 
Tfel + 22 11 284 6956 Oo’buzg) 
Fax:+ 22 II 784 6957 ^ 


Rea! Estate 
for Sale 


Bahamas 


PRIVATE ISLAND IN 
TAX HAVEN-BAHANAS 
On tit aria S «a part n Eu- 
ma> one d Bra moil magnacflU elands 
KO r-itcem private is to sate 35 aces, 
a beaches i lagoon 3 iocag» S3 5W 
Tel 105-5J2-5B98 Fai 305-5354306 


Canada 


WHO WANTS TO OPT OUP Resort n 
SnCsh CchjttiDia iCaiib'X' 1 j.OuO le?l 
la**honi appret'xateir *5 acres 5 
t>m J caems i«Kfca« )J4uO sqP.i. 
■jjrj on tie Ut-i fa.'i'STV'ireftOuse ot 
II Jcrl lots d> 'mentor, land for 
callle r.-rses Ssiung C»5I.550 OM - 
s*Ct» w.rw Fftcre L50l IFT-lUIO. 
Fai ,:■»> 3?‘-::9J 


Caribbean 


SEA FRONT PROPERTY 

umM-ear. is'art o! t^mk 
l? A-et L'SS- ? MCion 
C-nta.: Mi.e m Canaan 
Te: i-«-.-i:4-7;:C- C4 U05-I7;.:7jt 
c 4> i ac jj 
S-U al nlsiy-babca 


SAINT MAARTEN, NeiiierUnds Annies 
vvaeieon: ho--- j.-. C’.smwa - tied. 
4 JjH a>U Boat a.Ji 2 m def J» 
MO- si in tr.i (S'ei.T ao«u a-.'+ss 
uss65u.uv Fa« t?cii :;:-5iii 


French Provinces 


BUY WITHOUT COMMISSION 
FreyRtt-i.e :-guid> ■> ai nom«.a 
wvor. ol teal -euw ctxrasfoatteg k 
,our oeTjr.i Le Paneniire cutapeen 
34297 Monlpellier cede* Bs. FtJrttf- 
Fai-33(P|457fi3S31^ww* mneLhlp# 


FRANCE - PROVENCE (Vaucluee) 
Lsid an: rt'Fws e vancu pk® ranges 
are aw a.aUUe m ire reaurJ lana ol 
Van G-jgr. stoh-rn ask krf MfS. 
Wagne'' Agen.e a-jg^er Sa2l3 Sami 
[iMi Fi li! ■ 33 (CM ?J « O' S 3 
Tix ■?? i-:i4 S3 X « 50 


MSNERSeS LUBERON 
tooiin. njercal siie. liD sqm 
mivj lar,i£05ec gatun Pod 
F\3 Mats fax cam: -3jiO’M2BJ£14 


BIARRITZ. Splendid villa 

6>? sg.m jfcs 1.5-35 sen garden 
feauaUiy le&rie UNIQUE" 1 WnSe 
Mr Feman®: Apana® 23: T Maond 
29302 Oi Fax 34 1 315 21 86 


DEAUVILLE. Beautiful. Normandy style 
terj.se near oww S tea* cafcn aiee 
3ar®r. an cor, ions, 5 Mdoors 2 
lo-eh- Replaces brw via®. «tage 
FF4 3U Tel Pans -33 i3U 4722 TSH 


PROVENCE. CAUARCUE. SAINTE5 
UARlE DE LA MEfl. »8 coflSBtiditle 
land TO 300 >qm *aie'. eletlnoty 
Price FFi 5C0 CM Tel Paris *33 
iCtl 42 S2 56 » or lull 42 54 W C 


SOUTH OF FRANCE - LANGUEDOC. 
Long ssUHtiiiM Franc* Pvflder wet? 
pariner r nvesl« fat an aS yeat i«aid 
image Vaunce Caiie n Cm AlARAC 
region T«L Vatena 6oudet a M*e KJa* 
*33 ,Tlfl 57M *23? rax (OH £744 13^ 


THOUVILLE SEAVIEW. m manw wan 
part, charming apartment Si sqm * 
mezzanine (anvencan kitchen. 2 l»l- 
roonc. bath. Met room, fen ace. partm 
SouJi-Vlesl. Yearty careiaMi FPE20.000 
*ea owner -13 i9|1 42 'J 71 07 


French Riviera 


HEART OF CAP FERRAT 
Magnlcoil sn view. FFt 6M 
Seafrotil private beach. FFiDM 
Charming 5 beJocm via. FF6.5M 
2fCsqm a/cfitects vd* FF5.eM 
NEAR MONACO 
Sumpfe'Xis piopeny with seav«w. 
^rden. lenaces ai baruam price 
HAUSSMANN Group 
TM: t33 (0) 4 82 00 49 49 
Fai *33 (0) 4 93 B9 40 88 
Mobile: +33 (0] 6 07 74 30 39 


ST JEAN CAP FERRAT 
Luxurious villa on : Roots (caiOO 54 m) 
whh elevator 5 tedrooms with baft, 
lame f.Tig-4ning 100m. wel kepi ^rten 
\2200 sq m 1. pool garage elc Contacl 
fax. SwiCetod — 4M-S26 7465 


ANTIBES MMoam tlal on hartxwr 
with IDG degree oews on sea and 
mountains, high tailings, renovated 
ociiDle living room FFi ESP.jM JJC 
INTERNATldMAL Tel -14 191 3329123 
or -33 4 S3 i4 54 53 


FACING OLD M DUGINS. >a uiew. w 
mi lecepnon 4 betfeooms & paths. 2 
fevers 2 5CC- sq m lanoscapad garden 
large jamming pool. FF3M Repr,- IMT. 
B01 291 92521 Men*,- cede*. France 


VILLEFRANCNEAner r'aroraric view on 
Cap Ferial lacing south Superb 3CiO 
sqm villa 2 SCO sq m garden 
FFiOrW.W Fax iCu 62 i] 29 fil 
■On Internet wwwoe lorges-oom 


LE CASTELLET Hmori^l medtesal vif- 
lage 1 2 km sea sunoipiJ*3 & '.myanls 
75 sg n h^nise 2 serbeons 2 bads 
:eil?:i OoMccn Tel .jj |3il4uTSSl9C 


COTE D'AZUR - Vllelranehe sur Mer. 
MagmSceni 3 i-jorj terrace, sunny 
view pay Jean Cap Feuai refined 
aw* awn Tel -13:0)4 '.] «0 iO I'J 


NEAR ST THOPEZ ■ Owner jells stne 
-ll'a i.ndapanoeni 2 rxems cn ground 
ne'er 1 2 moms on 1st poor 4 ;.;o 54m 
land, well snaaied Tel -33 , •JiaoiZoXXhj 


BEAULIEU SUR HER te seasonal rent 
cr tv sale :a< class Vila laeng lu.’bour 
& beach Tel awiw -23 iW 33316514 


ST JEAN CAP FERRAT. owner sells 
si s'lew '.ilia 6 ieCwms L-epan U5A 
irgefil ht 2SJ. 52521 sejay 'o 


Israel 


JERUSALEM 

Stunning Brand Nw 
Luxury Apartmenl 


Sacrifice Sale by Estate 

3 BeaeonB. 4 Eteganl Fans * Terrace 
overboiling Old City. Gouifhel Mlfher 
Marble Ftow ’male Geiage FJ pnvi- 
leoes v. new Htcon HotM comde* 2JM 
55 it Asking $1 6 MAonwrobte ferns 

Contact: E.M. Grant, Agent 
Tet (212) 688-4700 
Fax: (212) 688-5062 
277 Park Are, NY, NY 10172 

Brokets bmied - AI repies ccnMental 


92 


Sals h Ihe Pafals do Justee de NANTERRE, 

on Thursday Jine 26th, 1997 at 2 pm, ONE LOT 


TOWNHOUSE 

Ground floor plus 3 storeys 

Including: 1 independant bedroom, bay window on garden/light, 

1 double living with fireplace, 1 dinlng.1 sitting roonvbar under 
glass roof, 1 bedroom with bath, 1 very large room with 
fireplace, 1 " ,J * 

1 bathroom 
room, several 

f imes room, covered terrace with winter garden, garage. 

caretaker's flat 2 rooms with equipped kitchen, bath & WC. 
Technical rooms tor heating plant, machines. lift.T exterior 
parking, garden. 

LIVING SPACE OF ABOUT 550 SQ.M. 

at BOULOGNE-BILLANCOURT 

(Hauts-de-Sdne) 

3, rue Gambetta 

STARTING PRICE: FF10 million 

Mormadon: He Marie-Chrirtne BOUCHERY-OZANNE, Lem at Nantan* (92), 
215 av. Georgea-Cteotenceau. TH: + 33 (0) 1 46 GS 91 B7. 

Raconl office ot Ttfiwnal da Grande Instance de Nanterre: 930 tH 11:30 am. where 
appllcaUore requiremeiits file la avaBabie. 

Visit on site: Monday June 23rd, 1997 • 1MO dll 12:00 am. 


I 


USA 


Adirondack Paradise 
on the Bay 



North Fork , Southold, 

Long Island \ New York 

Secluded compound. Massive 1930’s 
Adirondack lodge. Extensively renovated. 
Beach and deep-water dock. Six private 
acres minutes from the Hamptons. 
Brochure and video available. Spectacular. 


Chace & Friends 


1 t ■ I ■ LIC 


Strategic Marketers Worixivvide 


203-861-5803 tel 
203-861-5804 fax 

Equal Housing Opportunity 


Italy 


FLORENCE - Prwtiglom comfortable 
PENTHOUSE n fcsfcric centre Fkxence 
overtook!*) me beuiful rooftops and fa- 
mous Duomo. 2 baffiooms. Jaain, let- 
race, fireplace and mote Cad. Anaflu 
TeX 39-55-5B1486 F « 39 55 


HOMES M fTALf. vfes and apartrwnts 
lor sale and te let « Rome and sur- 
roundings Argeniano. Cortona. Spotela. 
Capa CaUma. Veil some ol out propo- 
sihons on w-imiMiwsntaly com - E-mak 
rfesetaffhomesiniufy oom Tel: 0039 6 
32X5CO 


Monaco 


MONACO and FRENCH RIVERA 

We SELL and LET apartments, 
houses, villas, offire spaces 
VanoiB ran^i ol pnees Fire languages 
spo»en Fed bee to coniaci us 

PARK AGENCE 

INTERNATIONAL 

Le Park Palace 
25 avenue de (a Costa 
MC 98000 Monte Carlo 
Td P77) 93 25 IS 00 
Fix (377) 93 25 J5 33 
wvrwmorlecartoJTt'laader.lJaik agence 


MONTE CARLO, 

3S8 sq.m_ 3 bedroom. 3V2 bans 
maibte eiwance kbrary 3 rx)oor partavj 
spaces. 3 odbrs. large terraces 
tatuious new o» metharranean ana 
Monaco has not been Wed in snee 
USS12M renova tori For sale Dy wmer 
Tel: *33 (0)6 09 37 03 04. 


Paris and Suburbs 


BOUGIVAL 

GARDEN LsVa 
IN TOWNHOUSE. f£ART OF 
LANDSCAPED PARK «en POOL 

250 s^m APARTMENT 

Urge 60 sq rr. Wng - 
liDrarv wci SrcpU« 3 bedroom 
3 bails etpiCTeo loidien 
Ft 2 SOu.EC 

VISITS: 

June i4m 5 tjji 
HOC am sfi 4« pm 
31 rue du Cherrm de Fer 
SOTRAGM 


\ 


1 4071 71 31 

1)6 09 86 24 14 


16th. PASST. 4? sq m sluda balcony 
an garter., kr. Gooicantiion Fri iu 
Tel -33 10)1 47 i* 98 98. no avows 


PARIS XVI 

RUE CLAUDE TERRASSE 
New la^i class apannente 
Fist pnee sq m. FF23JDOO 

EXAMPLES OF PRICES 

3 rooms 73 sq. m. 3«d Door FFI 685000 
5 rooms 115 sgjr. bakony 13 sqm 
3rd fVwr. F2^CJM0 
Peiswafcad loot plans posstote 
TeL+33 (0) 1 49.10.09.11 


16th, POMPE 

BEAUTIFUL 2D SQ.U. FIAT 
completeky lehirtehed. 4 beffiooms. 

2 hmgs. 1 ffinng. to8y etpipped luldian 
3rd loor. trees tone bukfcng FF7 mffion 
TM (0)1 40 76 05 II ■ (0)6 09 81 05 02 


VALLEE DE CHEVREUSE (78) HOUSE 
Eoepbonal. r top condaon. historcaJ & 
UuwIk ate (Port Royal). 25 km Pans 
center. 10 km VetsadJes. 15 km Sami 
Genram infl school, rear goll : axporl 
250 vjn. 8 mam rooms, lag healed pod. 
pooi-house/BSQ. 2300 sqm landscaped 
l valed garter 3-cai garage * 90 ayn 
art-Ts swio.T«raau Heady id move-m 
5900.000 IS FF? 7T,| w 55.30aiiwilh 
raw Mi Georges Nod Telephone *33 
|0)1 3514 1260 Fax *33 <0U 3944 I2M 


YOUR APARTMENT 

IN THE EUBASSIE5 QUARTER 
PACHG RIVER SEME 
160 sqm Id Boor, in IS30 ksred 
FF3 8 M Tel 4j3i0l€ 80135105 
: ax *33 (Oil 40 31 80 36 




6TH. RUE DE TOURNON 
Exckrsw locaaon near From* 
Senate and Luxembourg gartens 
105 sqm. 2 bedrooms, sunny 
BeauiMvww USS700.000 
Td: +33 (0)1 43 29 45 07 
H +33 (0)6 60 45 40 91. 


SCEAUX - Sun south PARIS TRIPLEX 
Reatenial Dnecl ownet. n5 sqm - 6 
norre. double living. kiLben. fueplau. 
ban. shower rocn. ga: central baaing 
5 mms RER. center town scncois, 
univarsfiK. FF 1.750 000 Tal -33 (5u 
4660 0117 Fa VLM -33 |0|1 44777606 


5th. LATIN QUARTER near Panfteon 
and Sorboiwe, charming ‘pied a tens' 
large iwig room - maaanirw Baffvoom 
and kitchen Wy equpped FFi.ii>J006 
Tel .35 (0)1 4783 6306 ; (0)4 6723 7866 


Blh. FBG ST H0N0RE, n a ’mews’ 
c ha immg pied-a-lerie paneled 
50-^jm.sroall mdepenoetii loom Ter- 
race. silance. FFlM Tefrai 
-33,3:145010 or (0x144053532 


16th. MUETTE ■ Exceptional 2 level 
aparanenl (179 sqm; veranda opens 
onto pm ate garten i220 sqm: JusbAed 
rjg» pnee Teirai -33 (J»i 45 03 3c 5u 


6in, GUENEGAUD. Duple, > lOdsq m . 
terrace, sunny, very charming visible 
beams One- Tel -33(0)1 JM1142 


li cralb^&Sribunc 

TH F UiiHIjr*. |i\ ny 

PLANNING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? 

Place your Ad quickly and easily, contact your nearest IHT office 
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EUROPE ASlA/PACffIC 


FRANCE (HQh Psi-.. 

V (OH 4U3 <>385 

r 3 , [Oi]al 43^370 

r-rooJ Oaj'«t>cd©ilT' con 

GStWANY.AUSW 4 CENTRAL 
EUROPE Fronkfurt. 
w V.’iH y? 1 
Fx. K49,«7l^Ca 


HONGKCWG: 

Td liS2HV7Mi88 
Tate. Cl IT) t4IH» 
Fa* 19531 3922-11*3 
SNGAKXS: 

W 223 1470 
Fc. 325 OB4J 
Uw. 26749 IHT 3T4 


RARE. PLACE VENDOUE (NEAR). 
Pfesbjots bate far Meant nw room 
apartnani 58 sqm FFI ,480,0013. Owner 
Tel +33 <0ji 660 39S (answering ire 
dm) « +33 (0)6 0043 6180 (madh). 


PARIS 7th. HEART OF ST GERMAIN 
Elegant 6-room apartnent, 165 sqm. + 
30sq m bead bafeony TJveetore" budd- 
ng, chaim. perfect corrtfcn, |usU1ed 
price. EL 8efechas5e (0)1 40 62 97 97 


OLD PECO, WEST PARIS ISolU RER 
gorgeous property 300 son restored 
3.000 sqm. gantefl. 4 beamons. hogs 
Wing, wne cellar. Drect access shops 
Omr USSl M +33 (0) 1 34 53 67 00 


OFF BASTILLE, owner se8s 72 sqm 
apartment 2nd door, perted conffiten. 
rrarer courwart, wet and stm. Com* 
-manal teasa posafe FFI 380.003 Td 
(0)1 43 56 21 33 Fax (0|1 47 QQ 77 IQ 


LE IYS-CKANT1LLY. owner seOs big 
bouse mto iC.OOQsqm garden Recap- 
Ion. 6 t+dooms. 4 batorooms, 2 levefe. 
20 min. to Roissy Tel office 
-3310)142602720 


BEST PART OF I6tti 50 m bom Sene, 
gardens, Eiffel tower, quel 3-room Rat 
3rd floor, on garden, parting, cels 
FF24M. Td {0)1 4527 2317 after Bpn 


RUE BARBET DE JOUY. dose to Les 
Invabdes, ctianrvng Aal (73 styn). spa- 
cious rntng. bedroom & balftroon, htSy 
equipped kitten Tel *33 (0)1 46246761 


MONTMARTRE 18th near Place du 
Tertre. das charming studio in 
good condmon. Pnee Fr53i3,000 Td 
(OH 47 63 32 32 


7th. RUE DE BEAWE. 2 baly rannaF 
ed aparmwms n I7fl> can. btildng. 
84 sqm. ffXM. 54sqm FF22M Own- 
er by Fax *33(01147023927 


9th. 2 ROOKS. REDCBfE. 47 sqm. 5Si 
floor, lift cellar Historical buOrfeig. 
FFl.lM Tel +33 (0)1 46 37 08 75 


8UY OR R0fT LUXURY APARTMENTS 
n ra s iiaHa l dsincB. Pare and Nrety. 
Tel / Fax *33 (0)1 39 65 76 96 


LEFT BANK nr NOTRE. DAME chammg 
76 sq.m . beams. 4tti floot-Vl qufeL 
partonq FF23L TM (0)1 42 61 14 18 


PARIS 7th - RUE DE BEAUNE kfctf 
■pied a terra' BeausU 2- room, 49 sqm 
flat FFi j mfcn. (Oil 45 67 84 24 


Spain 


LUXURY VILLA UALLORCA 
USS4 5MO 

LUXURY VILLA MAHBELLA 
DM 4.9 MO 

Detafe upon Request <u Fax 
Gennany |+49) - 611 - 974 8429 


SPAIN-NEAR PUERTO BAMJS 4 bed 
nla wOi 2 bed guesbsafl tuuse Tennis 
con pool, n 10.000 sqm. landscaped 
gartens. private A secure. C775.000. Tel- 
London 44 10)171 937 3722 ot Spam 
0034 52 8832 03 


MADRID, SUPERB AND UNIOUE Beau- 
tifiM XVIII cenluy palace 6,000 sq m. 
but plre 70,000 sqjA ol lari Write. Mr 
Fernandez, Apanado 2311. Madid 28002 
cr Fax +34 1 319 21 86 


Swftzerfantf 


□ 


LAKE GENEVA & ALPS 

Sale to torniers authorized 
our speciality since 1975 


Amctire properties, owtloolmg views 
1 to 5 bedooms, Irom SFr 2003)00. 
REVAC SJL 

52. Montbrtteil CH-I2II GBfEVA 2 
TM 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 


V1LLARS-OLLON. Immedale sale 
2 bedroom. 2 bams, knehenene. 
fumisned apartmenl Indoor pool 
300.000 SF W 514-737-1456 Canada. 


Turkey 


FOR SALE DUE TO ILLNESS. 4 story 
an0e lamOy horn?, sen-detached Wh 
rod balcony, in Kusadag Trntey. House 
is hal complete (tame, roof and eifenor 
vats) ma^nfcenl harbor *ww Arduteo 
am plans batroom and lotten fames 
available Cor lad Monty Chertil Tel. 
212-764-5637. Fax: 2f2-944-t7lB USA 


— 

USA Residential 

60sEastUw S«fc 

PERFECT PIED-A-TERRE 

Groat condo brfttng. Best kxaMa. 
SkyiiiB view, nigD cswp. mart* baft 
new fatten, bnghi sunny. Also great 
Investrefli if rerted. 

Juia Camacfto 212881-7023 

DOUGLAS ELLIMAN 

YOU CAN HAVE IT ALL Uapfewood. 

NJ. Live n lira o*«ry A fetrt n NYC. 

Dnecl ffam into NY 12 bout Opposde 

Soulh Mountaai reserratm. center hal 
cfikonial. naster bedroom suite with p- 
ai c, aid steam-sauna shower 5 afldi- 
ttonal beotwre. 7 balls, ehors 
and large deck, ftrashed basemenl «rt» 
aparrreni tor l«Mn Walk to schools 

14 sera maneured grounds. etcelenBy 
nantamd home pn»d to seB low 400K 
by owner. Rn Susan C212) 262-5536 or 
(201) 763-2610 

PURCHASE PASTORALE 

ESTATE 

PifChase. NY. 

68 acres Ctympc see heated pod. 

Jacuaa. Ul terais court. Pond. EaNn 
Gazebo Kaftan. 4 Refteces. 

4 Bettoom sums. S Bams 

USS375M 

By owner: 21M88-3044 

HOUSE FOR SALE. CONNECTICUT 
tl you warn to enjoy wfldlrfe on your 
doorstep it beautM mm sunoundogs 
ths home 6 lor you. i B acres continu- 
ous >cCh stale tores! and watting trals; 
spacious, private yet dose to shopping 
sea on tetox: GuJtort Grew. exceSenl 
schools, and die sea of Long island 
Sound: luge skyfl feng. drung & fairty 
rooms plus 6 baffioorrastodfes and 3 tie 
bathrooms Sale by owner $459 000 

Tet (203) 4534372 USA tor (totals 

NAPLES. FLOW) A. 

LUXURY HIGHRISE ON BEACK 

3800 sq A. 3 bedooms Ji badft. tneda 
room pm-ate dibs: GoCVadil/tenras. 

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EOfli Floor large i beOmm. 1 1/2 baft 
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ireneda toy S995JC Fix sale by Owner 

Cal 201-52^0410 USA. 

U.S. S5 00,000 REDUCTION Matbon. 
Wisconsin, ranked »1 residential city ri 

U.S. by Money Magazine; 2 home 
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40,000 student uwersity. symphony, 6 
major artnes, seduted festi pond, gift 

154 acres (62 Hectares) U.S. S4 7U. 
rwpttbte terms. FAX 1-608445-7794 

Real Estate 
for Rent 


French Provinces 

Be a Chatetotn In be Loire Vadey 

Ran ndependert arie ol a LXVI Casfc 

4 rooms. 4 bafts, large receplon. 
equpped fatten Pawd famitore 

80 ires from Pare by TGV. 

FFiO.OOO ! monh / long stays. 

Tel +33 (0)549211502 Fax (0J549853SS 

French Riviera 

CAP D'AJL - 2 km Uonra Carlo. Bete 
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looking seduded bey. pool. 4 double 
rooms. 4 balhs, Engtsh-speakng staff. 
Unexpectedy avattia 4ft August to 1st 
September Cal via drect ■ 33 (0)4 93 

78 27 61 or proprietor In London - 44 
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■••jx 


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I? of Rnanoal Dab cL Kl wftCahte 
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TUSCANY. 

Apartment totally bxntted ei a medcval 
vffage in Bra Tuscan countrysde. tour 
bedrooms, lour bathrooms, large living 
room, modem kitten laundry, vacuum 
cleaner system, entrance, large court- 
yard, lags terrace, garden, gym. gauge 
Avaflabfe lot rent as second residence 
cal office. -33-55-3360210 Ref FerrajO 


Poland 


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Paris Area Furnished 


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kteal aaxnmofteon stodo-5 bedooms 
QuaBy and service assured 
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YOUR REAL ESTATE 
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ROYAL APARTMENT opposite Maxn5 
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ter of Pars Imre coutyart. quiet, veiy 
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Fuffy famished to dgh standard. Pnvale 
patting in couityart. Sll JOO/mo, up to 
12 mortis. Tel Paris +33(0)144608669 


MARAIS - Rare, scejtfy dacgtSH 
large fiirny 3 Mom digfex tr 
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-, fv. 


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an sget scat. FFEOKbct© Tat 

-33 ill 4538 23tt cr (5<1 4350 1555 


7th, UWVBSnEfAUU. 3 monKT bed 
room*, faity spsffeO Liber,, parse 

CFliban rr3JD5 per Btcji » esarak 
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-i-C- 


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Supert 4 rocros. i=c sqm.a2«mtore. 
Free - FF15 5K- metodng tiaRes 5 
1*2Bg Ter -33 Art 4: 34 72 3 


16th. &MANDEL, moder. 4» her. tq. 
cesan. rg sqm. 2 oedwns, psiim 
FF15KC - ffat^S -33 Sjl 4524 4SI3 


Spain 


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Tel. -34-3-33 1 3682 


Scotland 

TWO LUXURY FIVE 1 service to 
Gecrjan townficnses c enW Edntagfi 
Conserve, vale; partir.g. el tntematne- 
al tesva! i£-2) Acqosi 1st sleeps 4: 
£ 4 .63!lwaex 2nd steeps 2=£l SfiGmdL 
Te» *44 (5: 131 £57 5906 


Switzerland 


GENEVA, hjrury fumithed. pesb^ws 
VILA. 5 Eedroorrs 4 iwicgs. sa nra; 
poo:, iscuo. garter 5 garages, ajert 
lake new Prsfae tor summer merhs 
or lu 1 ! vear. also unfumohed Tel 
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Fai -4122-715 K1G 


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baDaoctn & kitten Tel 41 3 731 GTX 


GENEVA. LUXURY FURNISHED apsi 
merits From slrflos to 4 beCsoms Tar 
-41 22 73 6325 Fa* -41 22 736 2TI 


USA 


NEW YORK CITY. Upper West Side 
Baaotfully modernized. furr.:sMd 1 
bedroom apartmenl ci feircfs lanmara 
braking Sale. Converrenl Ail amatees 
USSJ.OOilmonD TelFar 212-530-^w 


NYC FURNISHED APARTMENTS. I 
week to 1 year Great Locairocs Cat 
PaLCfMjM. 212-448-5223. Fa* 212- 
448-9226 c-UaL afNimehraSaolcaro 


SUMMER IN LOS ANGELES. El agas 
house near toe beach Judy and too. 
S1700 pet rrarft 310-3H>-243i 


CAP7TALE * PARTNERS 
Handpdted qiafey apartmenB, 
M sizes Paris and sububs. 
Teh +33 (0)1 4G 14 82 II 
Fm; +33 (0)1 46 14 82 15 
We http you tastf 


8TH-LUXURY DUPLEX. oN Avenue 
Mogfaigne. New. beaubfafly furnished 
Bvmg room, doing area. 1 bedroom 
1 1(2 marble barns, modem custom 
fatten. Inensfffishes, guartben. 3 
mortis to 1 yt Tal 01-42.8944JJ9 


EXCEPTIONAL RUE DU BAC. 140 
sqm. n bee-hied private coutyart Du- 
el 2 beOooms, (tying room, large tang, 
al comtons. Ftee Aig iSth-end Dec 
FF4 jOOArak. Ca! +33 10)1 45 44 76 74 


CLOSE LOUVRE, futy eqwpped shrto. 
bnghi and spotless FF150 daty Hitt 
r long term tans. Tal. owner *33 
42 96 3 


( 0)1 


i 39 67. Fax: (0)1 42 61 47 24 


15th. near 7ft superb 2 room (to. newly 
decorated. «m garden, sun. <qiieL futy 
equqiped. F7.400 Tel -33 (0)145670458 


THE INTERMARKET | 
Starts 
on Page 4 


;■ Hi i- 

j -•■'•is- 


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IV & VROIAD PARIS 

tSjlf* .mil Ri'iii.il-i 
n ill .if>|H .ir on 

KKIDAY. Jl^iE 27tb 1997 

hv /n».ri- , /*■/<!,/* yiA+»**- miitnri. 

KTEBA VTIOWL HERALD TBBCVE 
PARIS. Tel: >33 (if)! 41 13 1385 
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The concept, design and the decoration in 1930 Arc Deco style 
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The quality fittings on board, remind one of the golden years 
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200 passengers and 36 crew members will find an agreeable 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1997 gp* 1 \ ' m ^ "" 

PAGE 11 


INTERNATIONAL 



In Central Europe, Enthusiasm Battles Nervousness Over NATO 


By Jane Perlez 

Nn- Kiri Timex Service 




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WARSAW — As Krzysztof Bertram 
balances studies in business with work at 
an insurance company, he has little doubt 
where his country should be headed. 

“For sure. Poland has to join NATO,’ ’ 
said Mr. Bertram, 27, as he checked out 
courses at the Warsaw Polytechnic. 
• ‘The balance of power has changed. The 
Soviet Union is not around anymore, and 
I think NATO will be the or ganiza ti on to 
provide security for the world. " 

Mr. Bertram is enjoying the increased 
material well-being that has come to 
Poland as it progresses toward a market 
economy. Poles want to secure that new 
prosperity, but their overwhelming sup- 
port for admission to NATO also sug- 
gests their almost reflexive fear of Rus- 
sia. and a desire to-be enveloped in a 
Western security blanket. 

Three Central European countries are 
lined up for admission in July: Poland, 
the Czech Republic and Hungary. Po- 
. land is the most enthusiastic, but for all 
three, joining NATO is seen as a long- 
term economic advantage because it 
brings them closer to Western Europe. 

StilL there is nervousness over how 
the costs of military upgrading will be 
met, particularly in the governments of 
Hungary and the Czech Republic. 

The alliance is also considering mem- 

LAYOFFS: 

12,000 to Be Idled 

Continued from Page 1 

shareholder value. In the first quarter 
Electrolux recorded a 14 perceor fall in 
profit, to 777 million krona. 

Meanwhile, after nearly 10 years, 
Electrolux's American acquisition is 
only now beginning to edge into prof- 
itability. “Being the No. 3 player in the 
U.S. market is difficult,*’ said Anders 
Trapp, an analyst at Enskilda Securi- 
ties. 

Squeezed between General Electric, 
which dominates the market in the 
United States for refrigerators, and 
Whirlpool, which dominates the Amer- 
ican market for washers and dryers. 
Electrolux has struggled just to find 
space to sell its appliances in such big 
stores as Wal-Mart and Sears. 

Where the company made little pro- 
gress was in cutting costs and achieving 
die economies that are the supposed 
Dear-automatic dividends of global op- 
erations. Thursday's cuts, for instance, 
are designed to bolster Electrolux's op- 
, dating margin to a range of 6.7 to 7 
■ percent. Last year its margin was a mere 

• 1.7 percent compared with Whirlpool’s 
five-year average of 5.9 percent and 

• GE's of more than twice that 


bership for Romania and Slov enia. 
where popular sentiment for joining is 
overwhelming. The United States has 
shown little interest in expanding the list 
of newcomers to five, but with nine of 
the 16 NATO members in favor of ad- 
mitting Romania and Slovenia, the pos- 
sibility is being discussed in Washing- 
ton. 

The leaders of the three likeliest new 
members — from the Czech president, 
Vaclav Havel, and the former Polish 
president. Lech Walesa, who initially 
pressed the NATO case with President 
Bill Clinton, to Prime Minister Gyula 
Horn of Hungary and the current Polish 
president, Alexander Kwasniewski — 
nave campaigned in the halls of Wash- 
ington and Brussels to join NATO. 

On the home front, too, they have 
pushed die idea of joining NATO, 
though with little explanation of costs or 
responsibilities, as a panacea to all kinds 
of problems, a golden bridge to the 
West. 

One of the most enduring, almost in- 
terchangeable, television images in 
these three nations, the most econom- 
ically advanced in Central Europe, has 
been of presidents and prime ministers 
boarding planes to Western capitals with 
a wave, and returning days later with the 
solemn pledge that entry into NATO 
headquarters is ail but certain. 

But their nations, often lumped to- 


gether in the American psyche as former 
Warsaw Pact allies, have their own his- 
tories, military traditions and world out- 
looks. 

In Poland, where there is an almost 
visceral fear of Russia based on more 
than a century of Russian rule and about 
75 years of Soviet communism, support 
of the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation has been consistently strong; it 


armies in the rest of Central Europe. 
Today, the Polish military is impov- 
erished and poorly equipped compared 
with its standing in the Communist era, 
but the army continues to rank as the 
■ most esteemed institution in the country, 
above state and church. 

Most Poles reckon that whatever is 
good for the army is good for the coun- 
try. Being in NATO has to be good for 


‘The balance of power has changed. The Soviet Union 
is not around anymore, and I think NATO will be the 
organization to provide security for the world. 9 


was at 79 percent five years ago and 
climbed to 88 percent in March, ac- 
cording to OBOP. a polling firm. 

Those against joining NATO have not 
exceeded more than 14 percent and now 
number 3 percent, OBOP surveys 
show. 

This popular support stems largely 
from the geographic difficulty of being 
sandwiched between Germany and Rus- 
sia, and from serving as a stamping 
ground for both. 

Despite its many setbacks, which in- 
clude tire German capture of the port city 
of Danzig in 1939, the Polish military 
has always been held in high regard 
among its citizens, in contrast to the 


the army, goes the argument. Another 
ingredient in the Polish zest for NATO, 
say analysts, is the strong link with the 
United States. Many Polish families 
have a relative in the United States, and a 
pro-American sentiment reinforces the 
acclaim for NATO. 

In contrast to Poland, support in the 
Czech Republic for NATO ranges from 
28 percent to 42 percent, depending on 
how the question is phrased, according 
to Zdenek Borkovec. director for the 
department for NATO cooperation in 
the Defense Ministry. Mr. Borkovec 
said he discounted a recent poll com- 
missioned by the Foreign Affairs Min- 
istry that showed a level of support ex- 



AJcl Hma/Thc AH^Ued Picv> 


RIFLE- WHIPPED — An Israeli soldier striking a Palestinian youth with his rifle on Thursday during a 
violent confrontation over land rights that took place near the Jewish settlement of Morag in the Gaza Strip. 




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Brazzaville Fighting Flares After a Day’s Lull 


rat 




V; - < v-* -v*- — - 


WlISJITOVflS 

XVAnfJ&U LS* 


GiHpdnttn l. In Suit From Dopunhn 

BRAZZAVILLE, Congo Republic — 
Fighting continued to worsen and spread 
throughout Brazzaville on Thursday, 
ending a day-old cease-fire negotiated 
after a week of fierce clashes between 
forces loyal to the president and those of 
a former Marxist military ruler. 

The city center echoed to gunfire, 
punctuated by explosions of mortars and 
.rocket-propelled grenades, as fighting 
grew steadily worse between President 
Pascal Lissouba's troops and the Cobra 
militia of Denis Sassou-Nguesso. 

. Near the French and U.S. embassies, 
government troops could be seen taking 
cover in drainage channels, firing to- 
ward Cobra positions. 

■ France, the former colonial power 


here, warned that the conflict could in- 
flame the entire region but reiterated thai 
the French military’s aim was to protect 
foreign nationals, not to intervene. 

General Sassou-Nguesso. the oppo- 
sition strongman, called on French 
troops to prevent Mr. Lissouba from 
using the airport for reinforcements. 

“If necessary, we will ban all land- 
ings,” he warned, in a reference to 
French military aircraft being used to 
evacuate foreign nationals. 

At the French Army base near the 
airport, hundreds of foreign civilians, 
most of them West Africans, awaited 
evacuation as shells landed nearby. The 
French Army said it planned to send six 
light tanks to reinforce its 1,250 troops 
evacuating foreigners from Brazzaville. 


Across the road from the U.S. Em- 
bassy, a soldier struggled under the 
weight of electronic goods he had looted 
from a nearby store. Almost no shop in 
the center of town was untouched by 
bullets or grenades. Branches have been 
torn from the avenues of mango trees by 
rocket and grenade blasts. 

The clashes erupted last week after 
government troops surrounded the home 
of General Sassou-Nguesso in a crack- 
down on militias ahead of a July 27 
presidential election. 

A French military spokesman said 
neither side was well-organized or knew 
bow to hold positions. In addition, be 
said there was fighting within factions, 
particularly Mr. Lissouba’s, composed 
of soldiers from General Sassou- 


Nguesso 's old regime and new ones 
recruited by Mr. Lissouba. 

“From the beginning there were sol- 
diers on the government side settling old 
scores with each other,” he said. 

On Wednesday, Mr. Lissouba ordered 
a unilateral cease-fire to allow for me- 
diation efforts. Hours later. General Sas- 
sou-Nguesso ordered his forces to stop 
firing. 

Mr. Lissouba won a 1992 presidential 
election after General Sassou-Nguesso. 
who had been president since 1979, 
bowed to calls for multiparty politics. 
Mr. Lissouba defeated Bernard Kolelas, 
the mayor of Brazzaville, in the second 
round of the election after General Sas- 
sou-Nguesso was knocked out in the first 
round. f Reuters. AFP, AP) 




BACKLASH: Public Resistance to Orgy of Terrorist Killings Is Building Up in Algeria 


t www 11 1 - 




Continued from Page 1 

the balance of power, which remains is 
the grip of die military-backed elite. 

Known to Algerians simply as “the 

- Power, “ the, regime stands accused of 
numerous human rights abuses, includ* 

- ing the torture, minder and imprison- 
ment without trial of political oppo- 

' newts; the. Islamic Salvation From has 
called for an independent inquiry into 
widespread-charges that security forces 
have earned out some civilian massacres 

. to discredit the Islamists. 


The social and economic forces that 
fueled the violence, moreover, remain 
largely unresolved. The country has an 
unemployment rate of 30 percent and a 
severe housing crisis. For those and oth- 
er reasons, few expect last week’s elec- 
tions to have any measurable effect on 
the violence, at least in the short term. 

“The election was based on the logic 
of exclusion,” said Said Boukhalfa, a 
prominent Algiers lawyer who repre- 
sents the jailed Islamic Front leader Ab- 
delqatier Hishani, an American -trained 
petroleum engineer who is considered a 


relative moderate. “Tbe best solution 
for the Algerian trauma should be dia- 
logue between all political parties with 
military leaders and the Power.” 

But the government of President 
Liamine Zeroual has thus far shown little 
inclination to bargain. Its decision to 
cancel tbe 1992 elections, ban the Is- 
lamic Front and arrest its leaders led to 
the emergence of. among others, the 
Armed Islamic Group, which has been 
blamed for some of the worst acts of 
tenor. Islamic Font leaders abroad have 
distanced themselves from the group 


EXPANSION: Europeans Protest Limits 


j * 





- -- Continued from Page I -■ 

this make it eashsrfor NATO^orces to 

* maintain: a collective defense. When 
Hungary becomes an “island” on tbe 

• NATO map, trwftt be harder to protect 

its Jwnfarsfhe said 

The new -French defense minister, 
Alain Richard, advocated the. cause of . 
Romania, winch has made rapid strides 
'^^free-markei democracy in recent 
. ®ooxhs. Public opinion there in favor of 
. NATO '^afaigemeat inns -close- -to 90 
peseBMveli above the approval ratings 
j'ja Hungary :.and the Czech Republic, 





' tiacsltiahoeV 

/Ifc Cdheh said he had expressed corn 
ceca abom these lukewarm sentiments to 
Czecfr tad Hungarian representatives, 
-voiced confidence their com- 
P*foa wbald rally to the NATO cause 

- he necessary to hold refor- 

membership. ’ 

- -Hepmscd ihe efforts by Slovenia and 
n Llo qualify fra NATO . mem- 
bra said the reform process un- 

_ fry tfc yy r gww m nfliBt had OOt . 

MMSSni-time to become firmly 
fogfeL He -said tte' administration was 


confident that if those countries con- 
tinued along the path of reform, they 
would be prime candidates in the second 
wave of new members. 

• ■ US. Decision Carries Weight 

All NATO members must approve 
’ any enlargement agreed to by Western 
leaders at a summit meeting in Madrid 
on July 8-9. Reuters reported But Wash- 
ington’s derision was certain to cariy 
large influence despite a push by several 
others to admit five new members. 

The NATO secretary-general, Javier 
Solana Madariaga, agreed with Mr. Co- 
hen that “the first wave will not be the 
last,” but he declmed to publicly com- 
mit support for any current plan. 

Mr. Solana said he hoped the 16 
NATO nations, which have quarreled 
over issues, huge and small since the 
alliance was formed nearly 50 years ago, 
could reach a consensus before the sum- 
mit meeting on new members. 

“The announcement by Secretafy 
Cohen was pretty, significant and will 
have a big effecTou those who are here, 
y p d the British defense minister, George 
Robertson. . , , 

. . Tbe United States is acknowledged as 
the most powerful member of NA1 


s. 


NEOPHYTES: 

Congolese Go Home 

Continued from Page 1 

since the American was in the Peace 

Corps here 20 years ago. 

‘Tie’s smart But will he be able to do 
it? Who knows." 1 

At the Interior Ministry, the new oc- 
cupant of the crumbling headquarters, 
Mwenze Kongolo, studied to be a Bible 
translator and was working as - an in- 
vestigator with the Philadelphia district 
attorney's office when he signed on with 
Mr. Kabila. 

Now, Mr. Kongolo is in charge of a 
police force for a country as large as tbe 
United States east of the Mississippi. 

■ But first he has to build one. What are 
the most pressing needs at die police 
academy? Electricity, clean water and 
shoes for the cadets, he said. 

“This is the time in the history of this 
county when there should be great 
faith,” Mr. Kongolo said. 

He will need. ft. His responsibilities 
include immigration. The Interior Min- 
istry has no computers. 

“It’s going to be better,” he said. 
“It’s going to get worse before it gets 
better- But it’s going to get better." 


and condemned attacks on civilians. 

During the first three years of the 
conflict, with militants staging frequent 
attacks on military and police targets, 
some Western analysts predicted that a 
fundamentalist takeover in Algeria was 
only a matter of time. But tbe gov- 
ernment's aggressive security measures 
appear to have removed that threat. 

“In 1994, you saw bands of 100-plus 
in the countryside attacking small-size 
towns, pinning down police garrisons,” 
said a Western envoy in Algiers. 
“That’s completely gone. Large am- 
bushes of soldiers? That isn’t happen- 
ing.” He added, “The question of, ‘Will 
this government be overthrown?’ has 
been reversed.” 

On the political front, the government 
benefited from Mr. Zeroual’s relatively 
persuasive victory over three rivals in 
1995 presidential elections. But the Is- 
lamic Front has continued to challenge 
the government’s legitimacy and the 
militants have continued their attacks. 

In recent months, the militants shifted 
their campaign from attacks on the gov- 
ernment and its perceived allies to ter- 
rorism against civilians. Tbe campaign 
has included car bombings in Algiers 
and a wave of rural massacres, including 
decapitations and disembowelments. 

One way or another, almost everyone 
seems to have been touched by the vi- 
olence. Wassila, for example, is a 17- 
year-old who likes Michael Jackson and 
wants to be a dentist. Until recently, sbe 
lived with her mother and father, a 
mechanical engineer, in a suburb south 
of Algiers. But one night last November, 
sbe said, a young, “nice-looking” man 
Dimed up on her doorstep to warn ber 
father against allowing his daughter out 
of the house without a veil, flashing a 
gun to emphasize the point. Terrified, 
the family fled for safer territory in the 
capital at 5 AM. the next morning. 

“We just care for our lives,” said 
Wassila. “The other thing is not our 
concern.” 


ceeding 50 percent. 

“Czechs feel secure,” Mr. Borkovec 
said, as a way of explaining the thinness 
of support. "They are occupied by 
private problems. And Czechs are not 
informed about NATO; they need more 
information.” 

Historically. Czechs have held a low 
opinion of their army, he said, adding 
that "people say our army never fought 
for our country." 

Indeed, a favorite aphorism of the 
Czechs is that their army has not fought 
since the Battle of White Mountain in 
1620 when the Bohemian army lost 
badly. In modem times — in 1 938. when 
the Germans marched in: in 1948. when 
the Communists took over, and in 196S, 
when the Warsaw Pact invaded — the 
army stood by. 

The prestige of the Czech Army was 
not helped in March when the govern- 
ment determined that not one brigade 
was ready for combat. The ability' of the 
army to “fulfill its tasks continues to 
decline,' * ihe government said. 

in Hungary^ eagerness to join NATO 
is also subdued. Ferenc Petroczki, may- 
or of Nyirbator. on the eastern flank of 
Hungary near where the Russians 
marched in more than 50 years ago, said 
his constituents were more interested in 
jobs than in NATO. 

"Even with the military base nearby, 
people don’t bother with it.” said Mr. 


Petroczki. "The least of their bothers is 
which military organization they should 
belong to.” When the Hungarian de- 
fense minister. Gyorgy Keleti, came to 
the area recently for a meeting with 
citizens, NATO was mentioned just 
once, in passing. 

In Hungary, a small country of 10 
million people that once was part of the 
Austro-Hungarian Empire, there is some 
readiness for a kind of Austrian neut- 
rality. There is also concern about the 
costs of updating the armed forces, and 
resistance, particularly among older 
people, to the possibility of another set 
of foreign troops being stationed on 
Hungarian soil after 50 years of enduring 
Soviet bases. 

The most recent of many Gallup polls 
commissioned by the Hungarian De- 
fense Ministry showed the strongest 
support for NATO so far. In March. 47 
percent of the respondents were in favor 
of joining. 27 percent were against, and 
26 percent indifferent. Most respondents 
said they felt no particular external threat 
to their security, said Gyorgy Fischer, 
the project director for Gallup. 

"Those who are in favor of NATO 
often say that as a small country we can't 
manage our business alone." Mr. Fisc- 
her said. They look to NATO, he added, 
in the way a "child does when it cuddies 
a mother, for no particular reason but to 
generally feel safer." 


BRIEFLY 


Egyptian Meets Netanyahu and Arafat 

TEL AVIV — An Egyptian envoy met Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu 
of Israel and the Palestinian leader. Yasser Arafat, on Thursday in a bid to 
revive the Middle East peace process against the backdrop of violence in 
Gaza. 

Osama El Baz, an adviser to President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt, entered a 
meeting with Mr. Netanyahu a few hours after Israeli soldiers shot and 
wounded two Palestinians in a confrontation near a Jewish settlement in the 
Gaza Strip. In a later incident in another part of Gaza, a Jewish settler wounded 
two more Arabs in clashes at a ceremony dedicating a memorial to an Israeli 
soldier killed in violence in September, a Palestine Liberation Organization 
police officer said. (Reuiersl 

UNITA Troops Resist Angolan Government 

LUANDA. Angola — Heavily armed troops of the UNITA rebel movement 
are putting up strong resistance against Angolan Army forces trying to oust 
them from the country’s northeastern region, threatening the country’s fragile 
peace process, military and diplomatic sources said Thursday. 

A senior military source said UNITA may have sent up to "six and seven 
battalions” into the battle and that the government side was Fighting with 
tanks, artillery and anti-aircraft cannons. Western diplomats said the fighting 
could restart the civil war that plagued Angola for 20 years. (Renters l 

Ethiopian Forces Take Somalia Stronghold 

MOGADISHU. Somalia — Ethiopian troops backed by tanks captured an 
Islamic stronghold in Somalia on Thursday, a fundamentalist group said in the 
capital. 

An aid worker in neighboring Kenya said the offensive against the town of 
Luq began Wednesday night. A spokesman for AI Itrihad A1 Islam in 
Mogadishu reprated the fall of Luq, the rebel group's main center about 100 
kilometers (60 miles) from the Ethiopian border. Ethiopia sent troops into the 
same area twice last year, calling Al Ittihad a “multinational terrorist group.” 
but it had never previously taken Luq. (Reuters) 

Japan Minister Apologizes for Peru Crisis 

TOKYO — The Japanese foreign minister. Yukihiko Ikeda, said he tried to 
resign Thursday to take responsibility for Japan's hostage crisis in Peru, but 
was persuaded by Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto to stay on. “The prime 
minister told me in reply that resigning would be taking the easy way out and 
would not fulfill my duties,” Mr. Ikeda said. “1 will continue to deal with 
diplomatic issues to restore mist” in the Foreign Ministry. (AP) 


TURKEY: Military Warns the Government 


Continued from Page 1 

[‘ ‘We have openly put forward a solu- 
tion,” she said after a meeting with Mr. 
Erbakan. “The solution is democracy, 
the supremacy of the people's will."] 

Government officials and Islamist 
figures have responded angrily to the 
army's new tactic of direct confron- 
tation, creating one of the most serious 
crises in the political history of modem 
Turkey. 

“I have been in politics since 1955, 
through three military coups and many 
governments.” said Yilmaz Karakoy- 
unlu, a leading legislator from the op- 
position Motherland Party. “In all that 
time I never saw this much political 
instability." 

The generals have taken such an un- 
compromising tone that some Turks fear 
they might try to intervene directly if Mr. 
Erbakan does not resign or alter his 
policies. 

These fears have been fueled by pub- 
lished reports, confirmed by several for- 
eign diplomats, that the military has 
ordered all its top officers to remain in 
Turkey al least until August. The gen- 
erals said It was their job to defend the 
political system. 

“A military coup is the worst dead 
end for human rights and democracy," 
Turkey’s Human Rights Association 
warned in a statement in Ankara on 
Thursday. “No other power can take 
precedence over the consensus of the 
people." 

The army’s deputy chief of staff. Gen- 
eral Cevik Bir, said in an interview that 
be and his colleagues had derided to 


confront the government because “anti- 
secular activities in Turkey are increas- 
ing every day.” 

"We are acting strictly in accordance 
with the Turkish constitution," General 
Bir said. "Article Two of the consti- 
tution declares that we are a secular 
country, and Article Four says that mis 
provision can never be changed. Par- 
liament has given us the responsibility to 
protect the Turkish mainland and also 
the Turkish Republic. In the United 
States or Britain, it is not the job of the 
military to defend the political system, 
but in Turkey this is a mission given to us 
by law. We are not dealing with political 
issues, only carrying out our constitu- 
tional responsibility.” 

General Bir sharply criticized Min- 
ister of Justice Sevket Kazan, the most 
visible Islamist in the government, as an 
official who “does not share the values 
of democracy.” Mr. Kazan bad sought 
to prevent prosecutors from attending 
this week’s military briefings and 
threatened to investigate any who at- 
tended. Nearly all the prosecutors who 
were invited, however, ignored the his 
warnings. 

The current crisis began to unfold at a 
tense 10-hour meeting in February, 
when senior officers presented Mr. 
Erbakan with a list of demands aimed at 
curbing the growth of fundamentalism. 
They include enforcing secular dress 
codes and imposing restrictions on 
Muslim brotherhoods. 

Some of Mr. Erbakan’s supporters 
urged him to resist the demands. Al- 
though he pledged to implement them he 
has proved highly reluctant to do so. 


DAD: He Knows About Women’s Intuition 


Continued from Page 1 

however, it is active, and somehow fa- 
cilitates social interaction. 

Human beings have a pair of sex 
chromosomes, one donated by each par- 
ent. Girls have two X chromosomes. 
Boys have one X and one Y. But in arare 
genetic condition called Turner’s syn- 
drome, the developing embryo foils to 
get a lull pair of sex chromosomes. In- 
stead, tbe developing cells have only a 
single X chromosome, which could have 
been received from either the mother or 
the father. The majority of those em- 
bryos miscarry. The few that survive 
develop into girls. Dr. Skuse and his 
colleagues asked the question: Are girls 


whose X comes from their mother dif- 
ferent from girls whose X comes from 
their father? 

The researchers asked the parents of 
88 girls with Tomer’s syndrome to rate 
their daughter on various behaviors they 
termed, as a group, skills of “social 
cognition.” Among the numerous ques- 
tions they asked were whether the gfri 
was lacking in awareness of other 
P*»ples feelings, or was unknowmoiv 
offers people with her behavior!^ 

They found that girls who had X chro- 
mosome from their mothers had scores 
on the questionnaire that demonstratS 
more “social cognition” problems than 

chromosonK «■* 








The Port Wine Capital 

A Face-Lift and a Lively Arts Scene 


By Daphne Angles 

Nn 1 York Times Service 

PORTO, Portugal — The 
1 second largest city in Portugal 
f and the capital of its port wine- 
industry is in the middle of a 


city. This year’s program is devoted to 
Bach, and includes an organ recital by the 
Austrian organist Bernhard Gfrerer at the 
Cathedral on July 21 and a performance of 
the "Magnificat" by the Portuguese En- 
semble Barroco Europeu at the Igreja da 
Lapa. a large 19th-century church on Largo 


major restoration of its historic heart. The da Lapa north of the historic center, on July 
1755 earthquake that heavily damaged Lis- 27. Free. Call or fax (35 1-2) 308-019. 
bon spared Oporto (known as Pono by the The Ritmos-Festas do Mundo. a World 
Portuguese). With many streets unchanged Music festival, will fill the docks of Cais da 
since the Middle Ages and an endless van- Alfandega. between Miragaia and the river, 
ety of tiles (azulejos) and wrought-iron with infectious rhy thms at 8 P.M. on June 
balconies decorating its buildings, this city 27 to 29. Bands from Brazil. Angola, 
along the Douro River has a remarkably Uzbekistan and Congo are expected. (351- 
unspoiled assortment of architecture. 52) 646-800. 

In the historic center. Barredo, much- A day’s tour could start at a cafe on the 
needed restoration is being carried out un- Praca da Ribeira, surrounded by buildings 
der Fernando Namora, an architect who is beautifully adorned with azulejos. with a 
an Oporto native: Barredo was view of the port wine lodges 

added to Unesco’s World Her- a across the Douro and the open- 

itage Site list this year. Work is ■’ • air market nearby. Finish with 

also under way in die districts of Oporto y ■ tea and pastry at the aptly named 

Ribeira and Miragaia. v/j Cafe Majestic, a mirrored 1920s 

A lively arts scene is nurtured tearoom awash with stucco an- 

by the Serral ves Foundation, one G A L- . gels at 1 1 2 Rua de Santa Catar- 

of Portugal's most dynamic cul- ina. 

rural centers. Art galleries are >Usbon From Praca ^ it’s a 

flourishing in the hilly, riverside short walk to the Church of Sao 

Miragaia district, and farther up- r: ' V Francisco on Rua Infants D. 

river in Ribeira, several bars offer |||| \ . Sw®* Henrique, with its stunning 
art exhibits, live jazz and rock. - ’ Baroque interior whose gilded 

and poetry readings. • carvings conceal the 14fo-cen- 

Even after restoration, much of Gothic structure. The 

Oporto's charm will be hidden 1 c " 1 church no longer holds regular 

away in its labyrinth of steep streets. But services. It is principally used for concerts 
now that the sun has finally won over the and theater productions. 

Behind the church, the Stock Exchange 
(Palacio da Bolsa), circa 1840, bears wit- 
ness to the city's rich trading history. Its 
monumental granite stairway is typical of 
the local stone-carving tradition; the Ara- 




ocean mists of spring, signaling the ap- 
proach of the hot, dry summer weather, the 
colorful tiled and painted building facades 
have come into their own. 

The Feast of St. John, the city's patron 


P v • ■« 


TUGAL ' 


• Lisbon 


Tht New Ywk Thor. 


saint, on June 24, occasions several days of bian Hall was inspired by the Alhambra, in 
celebration. On the 23d, streets fill with Granada. 


people tapping one another on the head with 
plastic hammers, a curious rirual that traces 
its roots to the 19th century, when the long- 
stemmed garlic flower was used in similar 
fashion in midsummer games that, in turn, 
came down from pagan celebrations. That 
evening, there will be fireworks over the 
Douro. and all-night dancing on the city’s 
squares. 

On June 24, borcos rabelos. the boats 
traditionally used to transport casks of port, 
will race on the river. Each port wine lodge, 
where the harvest from the Upper Douro is 
transferred to begin the aging process, still 
owns a boat (although they were long ago 

S d out of use), and the sight of the 
a on the shimmering Douro is im- 
pressive. 

T HE Serralves Foundation, in a large 
An Deco house within an extensive 
park with fountains and a rose garden, 
is exhibiting works by the German artist 
Robert Schad, who creates steel sculptures, 
through June 22, followed by a retro- 
spective of the Portuguese art scene in ihe 
late 1970s from July 3 to Sept. 7. The 
foundation will also present the Jazz in the 
Park festival in the adjacent park on July 19 
and 26 and Aug. 2. when the Dave Holland 
Quartet will perform. Tickets are S6.50 to 
SI 3, based on a rate of 154 escudos to the 
dollar. The foundation, 977 Rua de Ser- 
ralves. (351-2) 617-2038. is open 2 to S 
P.M. weekdays; 10 A.M. to S P.M. week- 
ends: closed Mondays. 

The Soares dos Reis Museum is named 
after the 19th-century sculptor whose work 
is displayed there, along with Portuguese 
and international art. The museum is being 
restored: only the 19th-century galleries are 
open, as well as temporary exhibits. 

During Baroque Music Week- July 20 to 
27. concerts will take place throughout the 


STAIN! P> GLASS WINDOWS At 144 Rua 

das Carmelitas across from the church 
tower (Tone dos Clerigos) is the 1906 Lello 
& Irmao bookstore, with an extravagant 
neo-Gothic wooden stairway and stained - 
glass windows. Some of Portugal's greatest 
19th-century writers, including the ro- 
mantic poet Camilo de Castelo Branco and 
the novelist Eca de Queiros, were published 
by Lello & Irmao. (35 1-2) 200-2037. 

Nearby on Praca Almeida Garrett, the 
waiting room of the 1896 Sao Bento train 
station is decorated with realistic azulejos, 
painted in 1930, depicting events in the 
city's history as welt as rural life in northern 
Portugal. 

The Cathedral, known as the Se, which 
started as a 12th-century fortress church, 
dominates the cityscape from atop the Pena 
Ventosa hill. The granite church has a grace- 
ful medieval cloister and twin buttressed 
towers, and the architectural elements range 
from Romanesque to Gothic to Baroque." 

Beneath die Se is the Dom Luis l Bridge, 
built in 1886 by a Belgian firm that was 
inspired by the ironwork on Gustave Eiffel 's 
railway bridge farther upriver. On the other 
side of the Dom Luis I Bridge, sprawling 
along the riverfront Vila Nova de uaia dis- 
trict, are 80 port wine lodges, creating a 
closely knit patchwork of orange-tile roofs. 
Most are open to visitors free, with a tasting 
culminating the tour, and two are noteworthy 
for more than the standard presentation. 

At Sandeman, 3 Largo Miguel Bom- 
barda, ('351-2) 370-2293, there is a small 
museum with an exhibit on the barco ra- 
belo. A neighboring lodge, Ramos Pinto, 
has an extraordinary collection of advert- 
ising posters from the 1920s and- '30s.: 
reproductions can be purchased. The lodge 
is at 380 Avenida Ramos Pinto. (351-2) 
300-716. 


There are two sides to this old river town, hut whichever New Orleans you choose there is music and food galore: It sjust livin . 

The Endless Weekend of New Orleans 


n v o : -u 00 unless they went with someone who lives here. You 

V VI ■ 7 can do it in a weekend, at least a New Orleans one. 

Where you go on your first weekend mghr in 

EW ORLEANS — The weekend could New Orleans depends on the music you want to 
begin at dusk on Thursdays at The hear, and whether or not your stomach can stand a 
Columns Hotel on St. Charles Avenue, little grease. The French Quarter will draw you to it, 
where the wide front porch hums with that first night. Even if you do not mean to go there, 
the air smells faintly sweet, like mar as- sooner or later your car is circling the narrow 


begin at dusk on Thursdays at The 
Columns Hotel on St. Charles Avenue, 
where the wide front porch hums with 
gossip and the air smells faintly sweet, like maras- 


real bacon, fluffy grits and scrambled eggs with 
green onions diced up in them. Some people swear 
by the blueberry muffins. 

Remind yourself, as you butter a biscuit, that it is 
still just Friday morning. While it is still the cool of 
the morning, pay the S 1 fare, get on the old streetcar 
and just ride. It is one of the most beautiful avenues 
id the country, St. Charles. There is an elegance to 



chino cherries. Ice tinkles in sweating glasses of blocks, searching for parking places that are just a it missing from most of the rest of the world. It is a 


bourbon as the ancient streetcar clanks past under rumor. 


the live oaks, taking the working fc 
foe tourists no place in particular. 


folks home, taking 


Or maybe it starts later that night at about 10:30 


If you don't want to get dressed up for a classy 
French Quarter joint like Nola, head for Felix’s 
Restaurant and Oyster Bar at the comer of Bourbon 


over at Vaughan's Lounge in Bywater, at the comer and Iberville. Eat light: a dozen oysters with an 





grand place to sit and dream. Ride it to foe end. 
Then ride it back. There is only one route. 

Skip lunch. Take a long nap. Then ride the street- 
car down to The Columns, to just sit and breathe. If 
you can, sneak up to foe balcony and sip your drink 
in foe branches of foe oak trees. 

Friday night is a good night to dress up. to go to 
the best restaurant in the city. Commander's Palace, 
in the Garden District. Reservations should 
be made days in advance , but sometimes you 
can get lucky. Eat anything with crawfish, 
anything with shrimp. Snobs say it is too 
touristy now, but that is bald pretension. Eat 
a bread pudding souffle. 



of Dauphine and Lesseps. Kermit Ruffins and the Abita beer or a Barq's root beer. Watch foe in foe branches of the oak trees. 

Barbecue Swingers are making brass band music, horseradish; it will kill you. Friday night is a good night to dress up. to go to 

funky New Orleans style, and there are free beans Most tourists will automatically gravitate toward the best restaurant in the city. Commander's Palace. 

— white sometimes, red sometimes — in the Garden District. Reservations should 

dished up between sets. 

But most likely it starts an hour or so later, 
a few miles away, at the Mid City Lanes, a 
combination music hall and bowling alley 
that serves a decent turkey gumbo. Natives 
just call it the Rock a n’ Bowl. 

Thursday is zydeco night, and if you can't 
dance, at least don't get in the way. On any 
given night there might be Nathan and the 
Zydeco Cha-Chas, or Boozoo Chavis, or. if 
God smiles on you, foe sizzling Rosie Ledet, 
whose fingers fly over her accordion’s keys 
like two birds chasing each other along a 
white picket fence. People dance and sweat 
and drink and swear and go home to Buck- 
town or Metairie or Kenner feeling as if, by 

GocL they did something. p 

"I can’t claim that weekend starts here," There is an elegance that sets New Orleans apart. into a riverfront mall and hotel not roo long 

said John Blancher, who owns the Rock V ago. 

Bowl. “But it's not far off the truth.'' One thing is foe Acme Oyster House, across foe street, for the If you're feeling brave, go to any one of a half- 
for certain. The weekend does not waitfor Friday in savory red beans and rice served In a nifty hoi- dozen vendors and get a Lucky Dog. about the size 
New Orleans. Some people even say there really is lowed-out boat of French bread, but Felix’s, plain- of the business end of a Louisville Slugger, topped 
no weekend here, or. perhaps more accurately, no er, will make you feel more genuine. If you’re still with chili, mustard and raw onion. Or you can drive 
week between perpetual weekends. It’s just livin’, hungry, order foe shrimp or oyster po' boy, on a or take a cab to Guy’s on Magazine Street, get a 
dahlin', one long kiss on the Ups of excess. French roll ‘’dressed" in tartar sauce, lettuce and sack of po’boys — shrimp and fish are good, but 

— tomato. Douse it in foe hot sauce, or you are a sissy, some people prefer foe pork chop po'boy for its 

A CHOICE OF 2 Cities lit should be noted here that Felix ’s po’ boys are not sheer decadence — and have a picnic at Audubon 

anywhere close to foe best in foe city, and that the Park. Feed foe geese or squirrels the crumbs. Think 
First, you need to decide which New Orleans you really good ones are protected by locals who keep about how nice it would be to live here, 
are coming to see. There are two distinctly different them secret, for fear of being overrun by people in 






LSutfoVEifliJM 

There is an elegance that sets New Orleans apart. 


PANCAKES AND PAINTINGS The next day. 
remind yourself it is only Saturday morning. 
Wake up fairly early and take a cab to Betsy's 
Pancake House, on Canal Street downtown, 
for another real breakfast served by women 
in big hair who call you * ’dahlia ’. ' ’ StroU foe 
Quarter. Look at the paintings. 

But sooner or later, you have to ease on up 
to the river. Sit on one of foe benches, sip < 
some coffee, watch foe giant ships glide by 
15 and try to forget that one of them smashed 
into a riverfront mall and hotel not roo long 
ago. 

If you're feeling brave, go to any one of a half- 




dahlin’, one long kiss on the Ups of excess. 

A Choice of 2 Cities 


First, you need to decide which New Orleans you really good ones are pr< 
are coming to see. There are two distinctly different them secret, for fear of 
sides to this old river town, like the black and white plaid Bermuda shorts.) 


sack of po’boys — shrimp ana fish ore good, but 
some people prefer foe pork chop po'boy for Us 
sheer decadence — and have a picnic at Audubon 
Park. Feed foe geese or squirrels the crumbs. Think 


halves of foe ceramic Mardi Gras masks for sale in 
T-shirt shops in the French Quarter. One is the 
guidebook New Orleans, foe one that encourages 


Of course, you can have your food and music at 
Vaughan’s. Sometimes Kermit Ruffins will even 
barbecue out back. It is a genuine New Orleans 


O N a Saturday, any place good on foe beaten 
path in New Orleans wiU be packed. A 
savory alternative is Frankie's Cafe on 
Hampson Street, in foe Riverbend neighborhood 
near Uptown. The crab claws are good. The fish is 
fresh. The cream sauces are Fattening. Get the pork 
chop swimming on a plate of lima beans, or 
something caUed the doorstop pork chop, which is 
big enough to, well, stop a door. Two people can eat 
well here for about $50. 

There is music still to be heard. There is always 
music to be heard somewhere in New Orleans. For 
an adventure, try the Mermaid Lounge in foe Ware- 
house District It may have jazz, rockabilly, any- 
thing. Go to sleep with your ears ringing a little, on 
foe soft pillow, in the dark room that can keep the 
sun out for a long, long time. 


visitors to ride foe elegant old riverboats, to sip foe joint. The cover is $5 for the music. The beans are 
rich coffee at foe Cafe du Monde and maybe even free. 


gamble a little bit at the floating casinos. 

That New Orleans welcomes visitors into several 
somewhat generic music halls and bars on Bourbon 
Street, and makes certain that no one goes home 
without an alligator- toenail key ring from Marie 
Laveau's House of Voodoo on Bourbon Street, a 


Take a cab to Vaughan’s, on Lesseps Street, a 
mix of businesses and houses a couple of miles 
from foe Quarter. In this city, take a cab every- 
where. Tourists are seldom the targets of its high 
level of violent crime, but even Chamber of Com- 
merce types will warn you to be careful outside foe 


dozen pralines from Aunt Sally’s shop on Decatur most heavily traveled areas. 


Street, and a Justin Wilson cookbook from foe 
Riverwaik mall. 


For breakfast the next day. you can ride the 
streetcar Uptown and stand in line with foe yuppies 


And all of that is fun. But there is a whole other and tourists at foe Camellia Grill for waffles, or you 
New Orleans that many tourists might never get to, can go to the Pontchartrain 's cafe, for hot biscuits. 




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flv most often were linked to other major airlines that could flv 
you anywhere you wanted to go. Smoothly. Effortlessh. Eitkicndv 
Wouldn’t it be great if you had access to more airport lounges. 
And when flying on any of these major airlines, von could earn 


mileage points that count towards higher status in am of their 
tiecjuenr d. her puagi amines. Would nr it be great if you could enjo' : 
the same high standards of service whenever and wherever von 
ily I hats the idea behind Star Alliance;'-' a network of S -\S, 

Air Canada, Lufthansa. THAI, and (.Aired Airlines. A fundaments 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1997 


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LEISURE 



An Australian Island’s Take on Camembert and Brie 


By Kate Singleton 



ING ISLAND, Australia — 
According to legend, a ship 
sailing for the penal colony of 

.Australia in the early 1800s 

was wrecked along one of the reefs that 
surround King Island, a tiny dot in die 
ocean between the northwest tip of Tas- 
mania and the coast of Victoria. Pas- 
sengers and cargo sank, but the straw 
that filled the mattresses contained grass 
seeds 'that eventually reached the shore, 
where they sowed a small patch of for- 
eign soil with pastures as rich as those of 
distant Britain. 

King Island does indeed provide free- 
ranging cattle with pasture lands so lux-' 
ariant that there is no need for processed 
grain supplements, let alone anything 
worse. Such conditions have given rise 


K> a dairy industry that has become the 
flagship for gourmet cheese production 
in Australia. The island climate is mild 
throughout die yean Balmy in the sum- 
mer but newer dauntingly hot, and cool 
but frost-free in the winter. 

The pace of ‘life is slow; no traffic- 
lights, no pedestrian crossings, no park-- 
ing meters, no mobile phones, no auto- 
mated teller machines. There are less 
than 2,000 King Islanders, and those not 
involved in daiiying earn a quiet living 
from fishing, kelp harvesting, and beef 
and wool production. 

King Island Dairies is in keeping with 
the general ’50s atmosphere. Clad in 
white boots, rubber gloves, overalls and 
hairnets, the workers splash across whey- 
drenched floors to aid and abet recal- 
citrant machinery that appears to belong 
to a bygone age. Next year’s Cheddars are 
extruded from stainless steel jaws in 


thick, unruly swathes that need to be 
heaved and flopped onto the scales be- 
fore they can be bedded in steel basins to 
solidify. This is hands-on cheese-making 
that encourages the flavor and savor that 
never fail to delight and surprise fine 
palates. The white and blue mold cheeses 
require even more individual attention 
than the sturdier cheddars. 

perfect pungency The award-win- 
ning Cape Wickham Double Brie ripens 
from the outside in and continues to do so 
in its wrapping, so a vigilant eye is kept on 
all stages of maturation so that it arrives on 
die table in perfect condition. For gooey 
balance and perfect pungency, there is 
□othing to beat the Stormy washed rind 
cheese that is carefully bathed on both 
sides once a day for a week and takes SO 
days to develop from milk to maturity. 
The dairy is also proud of its Phoques 


ARTS GUIDE 


AUSTRIA 


Vienna 

Kuiwtforum, tel: (1)711-91-5737. 
open daily. To Aug. 24: ‘The Froe- 
iich Collection." The private col- 
lection of German and American 
art brings together 150 works by 
Warhol. Beuys. Baselitz end An- 
selm Kiefer. 

MAK - Austrian Museum df Ap- 
plied Arts, tel: (1) 711-38-233. 
dosed Mondays. To Sept. 7; “Ja- 
pan Yesterday." Art from ancient 
Japan: cut? objects from Buddhist 
temples, silk screens and pen- 
and-ink drawings. 


BRITAIN 


London 

Tate Gallery, tel: (171) 887-8000, 
open dally. To Sept 7: "Ellsworth 
Kelly." A retrospective of 50 paint- 
ings and sculptures created from 
1948 to data. Kelly's large-scale 
abstract paintings usually derive 
from the play of shadow, shape of a 
doorway or pattern of bars on a 
window. The exhibition will travel to 
Munich. 

Victoria & Albert Museum, tel: 
(171) 938-8349, operv dally. To 
Jan. 11: "Zuioaga: Spanish Treas- 
ures from the Khalill Collection." 
Urns, caskets, mirror frames made 
in the Spanish workshops of Pta- 
ddo Zuioaga (1834-1910), a mas- 
ter of the art of damascening, the 
process of inlaying metal objects 
with designs of gold and sliver. 
Whitechapel Art Gallery, tel: 
(0171) 522-7788, dosed Mon- 
days. To July 27: “Krishna The Di- 
vine lover." The exhibition brings 
together 120 miniatures, dating 
from the I6tfr to the T9tf? centuries, 
and featuring different stages of 
-the Hindu God Krishna, an incarn- 
ation of Vishnu Wrrics by contem- 
porary Indan artists are Included In 
tiie show. 



DENMARK 






Copen had en 

Arbejdermuseet, tel; 33-83-25-75, 
cftsed Mondays. Continuing/ 7b 
Sept. 1: “Red and While: Posters 
from the Russian Civil War 1917." 
Propaganda during the civil war 
that foUowed the 1 91 7 Revolution. 




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Pams 

tnsdtut rfu Monde Arabe, tei: )1- 
40-51-38-38, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/ To Aug. 31 : "Soudan: 
Royaurtws sur Is Nil." An exhib- 
ition of archaeological finds from 
Sudan. 

Jeu de Paume, tel: 01-47-03-12- 
50, ckteed Mondays. To Oct 19: 
“Cesan Retrospective." An over- 
view of the French sculptor’s work, 
tram the welded animate of the 
1950s. to the compressions and 
expansions of the 1960s and 70s 
that made Cesar one of the pre- 


Berlin : Hans F ewer photo . 

cursors of Minimal Art, and to the 
more recent sculpted self -portraits, 

■ oekmant 

Berlin 

Camera Work Galarie. 7b July 30: 
“Hans Feurer Photographlen." 
Works by the German artist 

Bonn 

Kunst- und AuestellungshaUe 
der Bundesrapubltk Deutsch- 
land, tel: (228) 91-71-200, dosed 
Mondays. To Oct 19: “Sigmar 
Polka: Die Drel Lugen der Waters! 
(The Three Lies of Painting)." Ap- 
proximately 180 works represent- 
ing afl the phases and genres of the 
German artist (bom 1941) from 
1 962 to the present The show will 
travel to Berlin in November. 
Kunstmuseum, tel: (228) 77-62- 
60, closed Mondays. To Sept 7: 
“Multiple Identity: Amerikanischq 
Kunst 1975-1995 aus Dam Whit- 
ney Museum of American Art" 
More than 80 paintings, video in- 
stallations, photographs and draw- 
ings created during the last 20 
years chart the artists’ engage- 
ment with social issues, such as 
feminism, Vietnam, and AIDS. In- 
dudes works by Sherrie Levine, 
Jean-Michel Basqulat and Mfts 
Kelley. 

Frankfurt 

Schlm Kunsthalle, tel: (69) 299, 
8820, dosed Mondays. Continu- 
ing/ To June 29: “Zoran Music 
Retrospective." More than 100 
paintings and drawings by the Itali- 


an painter who was Imprisoned at 
Dachau. 

^ ITALY 

Milano 

Fandazlone Antonio Mazzotta, 
tel: (2) 878-197, closed Mondays. 
Continulng/To June 29: “Otto 
Dix." Works by the German painter 
(1891-1969) that testify to life in 
Germany between the two World 
Wars. 

Venice 

Palazzo Grass!, tat: (41) 522- 
1375, open daily. Continuing/ To 
-July 13: “Arte del ‘900: La Plttura 
Ramminga e Otandess." 20th-cen- 
tury Belgian and Dutch painters. 

■ JAPAN 

Kyoto 

National Museum of Modem Art, 
tel: (075) 761-411, dosed 

Mondays. To June 29: ‘Tetsugora 
Yorozu." Paintings by the Japa- 
nese artist (1885-1927) who de- 
veloped a style Influenced by the 
Cubist and Fauve movements 
from Europe but later Introduced 
Into his works elements of Jap- 
anese shamanism and of Nanga 
paintings from southern China. 

Osaka 

Museum of Art, Kintetsu, tel: (6) 
625-2222, open daily. To June 18: 
“Modigliani and His Time: Paris, 
1910-1920." Mors than 70 paint- 
ings by the French artist (1884- 
1920) and some of his contem- 
poraries: Utrillo, Soutine and 
ktefing. 

Amsterdam 

StedeiQk Museum, tel: (20) 5732- 
911. open dally: To Aug. 24: 
."Around Europe." A selection of 
works by 20th-century artists from 
the 15 states of the European Un- 
ion. While artists feel rooted In the 
culture of their own country and Its 
history, they also seek the strange 
and surprising abroad. The exhib- 
ition features paintings, sculp- 
tures, applied art and posters by 
Baselitz, Jom, Kounellls. Sigmar 
Polke, Maria Elena Vlelrada Silva, 
Lupertz, and many others. 

■ SWITZERLAND 


Cove Camembert, a cheese so rich in 
taste and smell that those whose palates 
have been deadened by aseptic industrial 
produce may find the farmyard tones 
almost overpowering. 

These and the full range of blue 
veined cheeses can be found in specially 
cheese stores throughout Australia as 
well as in delicatessens in Singapore. 
Hong Kong, Japan and the West Coast of 
the United States. When milk yield is up, 
some may also find its way to Britain and 
Scandinavia. However, the best place to 
tiy them out is on King Island itself, llus 
little haven of forgotten quietude offers 
just the right facilities for those attuned 
to the most elusive luxury of the con- 
temporary world: Slowness. 

Following a 50-minute flight in a 
small plane from Melbourne, visitors to 
King Island can choose from host farms, 
two pleasant motels, a hotel or rented 


holiday accommodation. Apart from 
catching up on sleep, daytime activities 
include some of the world's best and 
least crowded surfing, swimming, 
snorkeling and fishing. There is also a 
golf course, tennis and squash courts, 
and of course plenty of opportunity for 
bush-walking and horseback trail-rid- 
ing. As for the nightlife, it's delightfully 
wild: Watching fairy penguins and 
shearwaters returning from the sea to 
their breeding grounds, spotting pos- 
sums and wallabies with a light, strolling 
along the beech in the moonlight or 
joining the locals for a drink. 

AIRY products aside, the island 
1 is also proud of its beef and its 

game meats. Above all. 

however, in the right season it can offer 
some superb seafood, including crab, 
ovsters. abalone and crayfish. From 


January to August visitors can dive for 
rock lobsters. 

And this brings us back to the ship- 
wrecks. The rugged coastline has netted 
more than 60 ships since 1801, the year 
of the first reported wreck. More than 
800 lives were lost, and hundreds of rons 
of cargo plunged to the depths. 

King Island Dive Charters, phone: 
(61) 03-6461-1133; fax: (61) 03-6461- 
1293), can arrange exploration of 20 of 
these sites. The King Island Tourist De- 
velopment Association, toll-free phone: 
1-800-645-014 or (61 ) 004-62 1 809, will 
provide all necessary information re- 
Bardina accommodaiion. bike or car 
rental and other facilities. Cheeses can 
be ordered from the King Island Dairy 
by fax on (61)004-621-591. 

Kmc Singleton is a writer based in 
hair. 


MOVIE GUIDE 


ranean." 70 works created by Mon- 
et during hte trips to the French and 
Italian rivieres between 1883 and 
1908. The exhibition will travel to 
New York. 

New York 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, tel: 
(212) 570-3791, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/ To July 6: The Glory 
of Byzantium." The influence of 
Byzanti(ie culture on Islamic states 
and Christian kingdoms from the 
9th to the i3th century. 

Museum of Modem Art, tel: (21 2) 
708-9400. dosed Wednesdays. To 
Sept 2: “Stenberg Brothers: Con- 
structing a Revolution in Soviet 
Design.” A retrospective of the 
work of Vladmlr and Georgii Sten- 
berg, prominent designers of the 
Russian avant-garde In the 1920s. 
Working in various media in a Con- 
structivist style, the Stenbergs de- 
signed projects as different as 
ridges, automobile plants and 
women's shoes. 

Washington 

National Gallery of Art, tel: (202) 
737-4215. open dally. To Sept 1: 
The Artist Prints: Thirty-Five Years 
at Crown Point Press.” Works pro- 
duced at Crown Point Press, a pre- 
eminent place for painters and 
sculptors interested I n etching in the 
1960s and 1970s. Features works 
created during the last 30 years by 
John Cage, Richard Diabenkom. 
Soi LeWitt, Tony Cragg and Chuck 
Close. The exhibition will travel to 
San Francisco. 

CLOSING SOON 

June 14: "Bellmer Graveur." Mu- 
see-Galerie de la Seita, Paris. 
June 15: “Vecsi'Age d'AireJn: Rod- 
in en Belgique." Musee Rodin, 
Paris. 

June 15: "Vienna 1900: Portrait 
and Interior." Van Gogh Museum, 
Amsterdam. 

June 15: “Pompel: Picta Frag- 
menta.’* Yokohama Museum of 
Ait Yokohama.' 

June 15: “Lua'eno Fabro." Tate 
Gallery, London. 

June 15: “Le Douanler Rousseau 
et Las Pelntres NaJfs Francals." Le 
Petit Palais, Geneva. 

June 18: “Le Surrealisms et 
L'Amour." Pavilion des Arts, Paris. 


Breakdown 

Directed by Jonathan 
Mostow. U.S. 

In “Breakdown,” consider 
poor Jeff (Kurt Russell): His 
Jeep has broken down on a 
cross-country journey and his 
wife, Amy (Kathleen Quin- 
lan), has gone missing in the 
same wide-open Southwest' 
where C. Thomas Howell en- 
countered "The Hitcher" and 
where those poor college stu- 
dents made the cut in “The 
Texas Chainsaw Massacre.” 
Problem is, no one believes 
Jeff — not the indifferent 
sheriff, not the extremely odd 
customers at Belle’s Diner and 
especially not die trucker who 
offered Amy a ride to Belle's 
in his 18-wheeler and now 
denies ever having seen her. 
Before be knows it, Jeffs 
adrift among predators who 
commit highway robbery and 
operate a traveler processing 
plant under the very nose of 
trusting wives. Jonathan 
Mostow, who wrote the script 
and directed, travels mostly 
fa miliar back roads and 
crosses bridges when be 
comes to them, managing a 
pretty good cliff-hanging de- 
nouement on die latter. 

(Richard Harrington. WP) 

La Vie deJesus 

Directed by Bruno Dumont. 
France. 

Freddy (David Douche) and 
lils gang live in a muddy brick 
town in the north of France, a 
place with small beer joints 
and no jobs. They talk in 
blurred communiques, as if 
they had a mouthful of pota- 
toes. In the town band, they 
pound out dirge- like music; 
for fun, they mount their bikes 
and putt-putt off into the 
empty countryside or hassle 
Kader, an Arab boy (Rader 
Chaatouf). Freddy, the gang 



(UruiJ P-imun 

Kurt Russell in Jonathan Mostow's “Breakdown." 


leader, is epileptic, mute as a 
pained animal. At the most 
dire moments, he wears a 
quizzical expression: “Freddy 
is always thinking.” one of his 
buddies says. Between hos- 
pital scanners and meals with 
his ineffectual bartender 
mother (Genevieve Cottreel). 
he has rushed moments of ob- 
livion with his girlfriend 
CMaijorie Cottreel ), but he has 
never learned that a meal or a 
mating was anything to be 
savored. Dumont’s first film is 
without cynicism, but not 
without edge. What's remark- 
able about "La Vie de Jesus.' ’ 
aside from the actors, locals 
from the village where the 
film was shot, is the density of 
the characters; even when they 
look befogged by frustration, 
they are vivid as sores, and 
more intriguing than so many 
current "Assassins" and anti- 
heroes. (Joan Dupont. IHT) 

Ret rato 

deMujercon 

HombrealFondo 

Directed by Manane Rodri- 
guez. Spain. 

About two-thirds of die way 
through this plodding film, the 
French actress Myriam Mez- 
ieres, portraying a hard-drink- 


ing painter in Spain who is 
depressed about her marriage, 
says that she realizes what a 
big mistake she has made in 
life. But the astute moviegoer 
need not wait so long to rec- 
ognize the real-life mistake it 
would be to sit through the 
movie. It’s the first for di- 
rector Manane Rodriguez, a 
native of Uruguay who has 
lived in Spain for 20 years. 
She also wrote the disjointed 
and shallow script. The story 
is a portrait (retrato)of a wom- 
an and the men in her life. The 
protagonist is a big city di- 
vorce lawyer, 35. who lives 
the high life. The actress 
Paulina Galvez, as the lawyer, 
shows potential, bur the film 
does not make her on-screen 
character engaging, nor the 
people in her life, Uke the un- 
happy painter, who is more 
comic man tragic. The movie 
is a vehicle for dull dialogue, 
ridiculous sequences and 
characters who are unbeliev- 
able. (Al Goodman . IHT ) 

Timothy Leary's 
Dead 

Directed bv Paul Davids. 
U.S. 

When the Moody Blues sang 
“Timothy Leary's dead 1 * on 
an early album, they intended 


a '60s-sryle compliment: that 
(he acid gum had anained a 
better vantage point and was 
“outside looking in.” But al- 
most three decades later, dead 
really means dead. Or at least 
it might for someone without 
Leary's love of self-promo- 
tion and gift for gamesman- 
ship from" beyond the grave. 
So in an authorized documen- 
tary intent on securing for 
"this visionary genius'* his 
place in history 1 , the piece de 
resistance is an act of cryo- 
genic defiance. When last seen 
in Paul Davids's hippie-filled, 
hagiographic film. Leary is a 
severed head in a freezer and 
wears a solemn, meditative 
expression that might have 
suited him in life equally well. 
The film's biggest accom- 
plishment is to make this im- 
age seem a logical extension 
of Leary's escapades and cre- 
ate one last nippy frisson: 
He's not gone. He’s waiting. 
That’s the right final vision of 
Leary and his times, which are 
nostalgically evoked by Dav- 
ids. f Janet Maslin. NYTl 


Best Bet for 

GAMBLERS 

This Summer at the 
VA RKERT CASINO 
Budapest 
European Flight Tickets 
5 Star Hotel Rooms and 
Dinner in our 
Award-Winning 
Valentine Restanrant 
FREE 

For all Qualifying Players. 
For further information: 
Tel.: 36-1-202 4244 
Fax: 36-1-202 6764 


Martmky 

Fondation Pierre Gianadda, tel: 
(28) 22-39-78, open dally. To Nov. 
11: “Joan MJro." A retrospective of 
paintings, gouaches and watercol- 
ors, sculptures and ceramics by 
the Spanish painter (1 893-1983). 


UNITED STATES 


Fort Worth 

Khnbefl Art Museum, tel: (B17) 
332-8451, dosed Mondays. To 
Sept 7: “Monet and the MedHer- 


Do yoi ijvi: i\ Ami jvs? 

For a hand-delivered subscription on the day 
of publication call 00 33 1 4143 9361. 



THE WORLD’S TUI LI NEWSPAPKR 






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Marketing’s Muse: 
History Sells Big 

Major Museums Inspire Boom 
In Product and Design Licensing 


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said Eliza- 


pro motions 
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ByEriklpsen inap{ropriaie,” said Eli 2 a- 

fntenu/Tional Herald Tribune beth LamOnt, promotions 

-LONMN - Clutching a c^SSS 

can of his company s for- hired last year to shepherd the 
niture polish, ken Mannering BritishMuseam into the brave 

.nlwnnlv nrrv'lnimc it »an> -r i* _• 


solemnly proclaims it “a 
quantum leap for V&A En- 
terprises.” The head of mar- 
veling and licensing ^lsn 
boasts that he has the top four 


new world of licensing. 

On the other hand , where 
does a cash-strapped narinnai 
icon draw the line? 

The British Museum, for 


selling designs of bedroom instance, offers under its 
textiles and says Marks & name a range of items from 


Spencer will open a special Rosetta Stone tea towels to 
V&A ciotmng section at a bright blue Egyptian hippo 
dozen of its stores in August, pencil tins to plaster casts of 

In a pioneering effort, David’s nose as 

V&A Enterprises Ltd., the originally rendered by 

for-profit marketing arm of Michelangelo — and now 
the victoria & Albert Mu- ’‘suitable for wall hanging.” 
seam in London, has cata- Even Mr. Mannering, who 
polled its range of goods far lauds toe “stretchability” of 
beyond cramped museum his own brand, admits to lim- 
shops and into the mass mar- its. “We will not be in con- 
ket through large-scale ti- doms,” he said. On the other 
censing agreements. hand furniture polish, silver 

As museums step into mar- polish and care products 
keting, V&A Enterprises, drawn cot from the museum's 
which began in 1987, has collections but from its 


shops and into the mass mar- its. “We will not be in con- 
ket through large-scale ti- doms,” he said. On the other 
censing agreements. hand furniture polish, silver 

As museums step into mar- polish and care products 
keting, V&A Enterprises, drawn cot from the museum's 
which began in 1987, has collections but from its 
gone further than any other closets and its experiences of 
museum in cashing in on its its curators are in the works. 



U.S. Treasury Cautions 
Against a Volatile Yen 

Warnings Give Dollar a Major Boost 


o«r»WM- 0 HrSi<sjr»wDi#«i** J 9 % and April 1997. Bui he said it would take 

WASHINGTON — The United Stales more than a month’s or even a quarter's worth 
should not “use currency as an instrument for of data io see whether that surplus was be- 


trade policy” and will discuss recent swings coming a “sustained” problem. 


in the dollar's value against the yen with other The surplus means that Japanese exporters 

members of the Group of Seven leading in- will have far more dollars, which they will 
dustrial nations at their meeting next week in eventually have to convert to yen, than U.S. 
Denver, Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin exporters will have yen to convert to dollars, 
said Thursday. As that gap widens, the yen tends to grow 

Mr. Rubin told reporters that the govern- stronger, 
meat's position that a strong dollar was in the Although Mr. Rubin said Monday that the 
U.S. interest was “uncharged." United States still wanted a "strong” dollar. 

The volatility seen in currency markets is “as we always have.” traders have focused 
“undesirable.” he added. instead on a series of comments by U.S. 

The dollar, meanwhile, posted its biggest officials on Japanese economic policies, 
e-day gain against the yen since Aug. 19, On Tuesday, Lawrence Summers, the 
93, after a top Japanese Finance Ministry deputy Treasury secretary, said that Japan 


one-day gain against the yen since Aug. 19, 
1993, after a top Japanese Finance Ministry 
official indicat«l he was determined not to 
allow the yen to strengthen further. 

Eisuke SakaJribara. director general of the 
ministry's International Finance Bureau, said 
Japan would take "strong” measures to stop 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

should not prop up its economy through ex- 
cessive exports and trade barriers and that 


excessive swings in the dollar-yen rate. He Tokyo's postwar economic model was out- 
made the comment as he emerged from a dated. 


collections. It is one of the Asa former licensing man- 
world’s premier design mu- ago- for spin-off products for 
seums. where seven miles shows and movies such as tbe 
(11.2 kilometers! of corridors A-Team and Rambo, Mr. 
house 3 million artifacts. Mannering figured rhar the 
Its licensees from Malaysia V&A would be more conser- 
to Austria turn out 2,000 vative than Paramount Pic- 


Ken Mannering, head of licensing at V&A Enterprises, finding a market for history. 


items, ranging from wall Cures. name of “the nation’s attic.” 

paint to pewter mugs. All What has surprised him is It also earned it the status of a 
share a label saying “Inspired what he says is his new em- haunt not only for scholars 
by the collections of the Vic- ployer’s uniquely easy accept- but for dress designers, sil- 
toria & "Albert Museum in ance of licensing, even to the versmiths, glass blowers and 
London” and an agreement point of lending items from its jewelry makers shopping for 
that requires their manufac- collection to display in depart- ideas. 


commercial design. The mu- 
seum’s wildly eclectic and 
even quirky collection long 
ago earned the house the nick- 
name of “the nation’s attic.” 
It also earned it the status of a 
haunt not only for scholars 


But why go all the way to 
Britain and tbe V&A for his- 
tory? “What the V&A has 
available for us far exceeds 
anything the local museums 
could provide," Mr. Gordon 


includes lamp shades and 
duvet covers. 

“You won’t find anything 
in our collections that looks 
like Donna’s duvet cover,” 
Jane Lock, a V&A licensing 


closed-door meeting sponsored by the Japan 
Center for International Finance, a private 
organization headed by a former deputy fi- 
nance minister for international affairs," To- 
momitsu Oba. 

Mr. Oba said he would not mind seeing the 
dollar rise to 1 30 yen. 

The dollar on Thursday traded as high as 
1 15.80 yen. After the dollar lopped 1 15 yen 
for the first time since last week, Japanese 


The same day. the U.S. nude represen- 
tative, Charlene Barshefsky, told members of 
a House of Representatives committee on 
international relations that Japan should guard 
against significant growth in its trade surplus 
by carrying out market reforms. 

"We don’t expect to see a significant in- 
crease in Japan's current account surplus,” 
Ms. Barshefsky said. 

Speaking Thursday, Mr. Sakakibara said he 


exporters sold dollars for yen to bring profits did not think the trade surplus would be a 


but for dress designers, sil- material and from all differ- 
versmiths, glass blowers and ent cultures.” 


said. “Jt gave us centuries of manager, said- 

material and from all differ- Then, too. the problem with 


that requires their manufac- 
turers to pass 3 percent to 12 
percent of the wholesale price 
back to the V&A. ■ 

With 90 manufacturers in 
17 countries, revenue at the 
retail level last year was £85 
million (SI 39.2 million). 

But as the business builds, 
so does the concern. “You 
don’t want to cheapen the 
name of your museum by ap- 
plying its name to something 


:rcent to 12 mem stores next to new 
lesale price products they have inspired. 

For the V&A such actions 
[acturers in are actually consistent with 
snue at the what Henry Coles, had in 
ar was £85 mind when be set up the mu- 
illion). seam in 1852 with assistance 
[less builds, from Queen Victoria’s be- 
:em. “You loved Prince Albert as the 


ideas. 

In November, Syratech 
Corp.’s subsidiary, interna- 
tional Silver, launched its mi- 


ning for While customers may 
think they like historical ob- 
Syratech jects, they are only too happy 
Interna- to have them rejiggered to 
»1 its ini- current tastes. Thus, some 


tial collection as a licensee of drawings by tbe English de- 
the V&A. Today its 40 items signer William Moms be- 


aitists is that all too often they 
have contented themselves 
with creating one object, or a 
series of unrelated objects. 
Modem commerce, on the 
other hand, finds product 


home, traders said. 

The dollar was quoted at 4 P.M. in New 
York at 114.265 yen, up from 111.145 yen 
Wednesday, and at 1.7296 Deutsche marks, 
compared with 1.7161 DM. 

“I suspect we will discuss the recent volat- 
ility” at the G-7 meeting, Mr. Rubin said. 


major point of contention at the G-7 summit 
meeting that starts next Friday because the 
surplus would not increase significantly. 

Meanwhile, the dollar has seesawed against 
the mark in recent days as traders have tried to 
balance the risk of European monetary union 
being delayed against the risk that it will go 


The Treasury secretary again expressed the ahead on time with a wide membership and 
White House’s concern over Japan's growing weaker single currency, or euro. 


trade surplus, saying a * 'sustainable increase' ' 
in die trade gap could hurt global growth and 
risked creating a “protectionist backlash.” 
Mr. Rubin's comments came a day after 


mind when be set up the mu- range from fireplace screens come a line of jewelry, and a 
seam in 1852 with assistance to teapots, with more design taken from tbe inside 
from Queen Victoria’s be- products planned. Barry Gor- of a Mogul coat cuff becomes 
loved Prince Alberr as the don, the vice president for tbe inspiration for the borders 
Museum of Manufactures. A product development, attrib- of Britain's best-selling bed 
major part of its raison d’etre uted its success to the fact that sheet — the Kalmakan col- 
was always to inspire good history sells. lection by Dorma, which also 


lines far more efficient to plug Japan reported that its trade surplus with the 
than one-off items. United States almost doubled between April 


Against other major currencies Thursday, 
the dollar was quoted at 1.4435 Swiss francs, 
up from 1.4385 francs, and at 5.8350 French 
francs, up from 5.8049 francs. The pound fell 
to $1.6320 from $1.6380. 

( Bloomberg . Reuters) 


was always to inspire good 


lection by Dorma, which also 


3 Nations Won’t Make Euro, OECD Says 


flunking Ahead /Commentary 

Globalization Needs Better Advocates 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


W ASHINGTON — It has 
quickly become a clichtS 
to suggest that angry 
French voters did more 
titan dump their center-right govern- 
ment in this month’s election: They 


also recorded a protest vote against enter the labor force in a world without 


is not the fault of globalization but of manufacturing because productivity 
France's failure to adapt to h. has risen so much that fewer workers 

The difficulty is that while many are needed, 
economists know this, it is not ne- The consequent shift of jobs in in- 
cessarily obvious to everyone else. On dustrial countries from manufacturing 
die contrary, to many people in in- to services is as natnral and as desirable 
dustrial countries, it seems to stand to as the move from agriculture to in- 
reason that if vast numbers of low- dustiy over the past century. Compa- 
wage workers in developing countries tries investing abroad are not, in most 


globalization. The French left's vic- 
tory, it is said, was a heartfelt cry for an 


economic barriers, jobs and incomes in 
the richer countries must be under 


alternative to the remorseless spread of threat 


economic liberalization and its dam- 
aging social consequences for ad- 
vanced industrial countries. 

As an explanation of voting beha- 
vior, the theory is clearly ddfective. 
President Jacques Chirac and the out- 
going government were deeply unpop- 
ular for many reasons — including 
arrogance, incompetence, appalling 
politicaT judgment and broken prom- 
ises — that had nothing to do with the 
global economy. 


Numerous economic studies now al progress, as computers do more jobs 
show that this is a false picture of how that people once did. One day, rc- 
the world works. Counterintuitive latively unskilled workers will be able 
though it may be, much recent research to operate the new technology, but not 
suggests that low-wage imports are not for some years yet. 
generally the main threat to jobs in Hie problem with these points, of 
Europe, nor axe they tbe principal cause course, is that they are economic, not 

_ • • i 1 «s«_. i:»: l i 


has risen so much that fewer workers 
are needed. 

The consequent shift of jobs in in- 
dustrial countries from manufacturing 
to services is as natural and as desirable 
as the move from agriculture to in- 
dustry over the past century. Compa- 
nies investing abroad are not, in most 
cases, stripping tbeir home economies 
of jobs. 

The main threat to jobs and wages in 
the industrial countries is technologic- 
al progress, as computers do more jobs 
that people once did. One day, re- 
latively unskilled workers will be able 
to operate the new technology, but not 


OwfdVtit Oh, Sniff From Dhfbarin 

PARIS — France. Germany and Italy 
will exceed this year the public deficit 
target qualifying countries for partic- 
ipation in the European single currency 
in 1999, the OECD said Thursday. 

The Organization for Economic Co- 
operation and Development said in its 
mid-year Economic Outlook the three 
countries were all facing deficits of 3.2 
percent of gross domestic product this 
year. The limit set by the European 
Union’s Maastricht agreements is 3 per- 
cent. 

Britain, with a projected 2.8 percent, 
and Spain, at 3 percent, are the only 
major EU members likely to meet this 
requirement, the OECD said. 

The OECD also warned there was a 
danger of a correction in world stock 
markets that would depress economic 
demand. 

“The recent buoyancy of equity mar- 
kets in North America and Europe may 
be read in two ways.” the OECD said. 
“It may reflect an underlying improve- 


ment inprospects for growth and profits 
which is not fully reflected” in the 
OECD’s economic projections. “But 
there is also the danger of a correction 
that could depress demand.” 

Regarding single-currency 


GDP last year to 62 percent in 1998. 

Italy will miss the target by a far 
wider margin, the OECD estimated, 
saying that Italy’s debt ratio, which 
topped 124 percent of GDP last year, 
was likely to come down only mar- 


thresholds, the OECD predicted that ■ ginally to 123.3 percent this year and to 


both Germany and France would clear 
the hurdle next year, with budget def- 
icits projected at 3 percent and 2.7 per- 
cent, respectively. 

The projections highlighted the de- 
bate over methods used by EU gov- 
ernments to cut their deficits and over the 
role of the EU Stability Pact, promoted 
by Germany to ensure that countries 
qualifying this yedr for the launching of 
tbe euro keep public finances under con- 
trol on a lasting basis, analysts said. 

Germany will nevertheless not only 
fall short of that target this year, but will 
also miss, both this year and in 1998, the 
Maastricht target of bringing gross pub- 
lic debt below 60 permit of GDP, the 
OECD report showed. Its public debt is 
projected to rise from 60.7 percent of 


1 22.2 percent in 1998 — twice the level 
agreed at Maastricht 

On the basis of stated French policies, 
France is expected to perform better, 
although the policies might be modified 
by the new Socialist-led government Its 
debt is likely to rise on a scale similar to 
Germany's, from 56 3 percent last year 
to 58.5 percent in 1998, according to 
OECD estimates. 

Both the Netherlands and Belgium, 
whose budget deficits will be well be- 
low the 3 percent limit, will miss the 
debt target Dutch debt will remain 
above 70 percent of GDP while Bel- 
gium will still have a ratio of 124.5 
percent next year after cutting it from 
more than 130 percent in 1996. 

(AFP. Reuters) 


of growing wage inequality in the 
United States. 

Cheap imports of labor-intensive 


political. They are coldly rational, 
when hostility to globalization is often 
emotional, moral or psychological. 


Next: How to Pay for EU Compromise 


products are not depressing prices of They are not good enough answers to 
competing goods made in industrial many people's concerns. 


Many voters in the world’s fourth- nations — and they represent only a 
largest trading power, including the small proportion of the rich countries’ 


largest trading power, including tne smau propmuon oi me n 
skilled, the well-educated and the overall economic output, 
growing numbers involved in inter- Few economists wou 
national commerce, stand to gain from cheap imports can can: 
globalization. As in other industrial some industrial sectors. B 
countries, it is the unskilled and the less overwhelmingly shows t 
educated who are more likely to suffer and companies benefit from increased 
and most inclined to attribute their ills competition. 

to the global economy. . Despite a decline in manufacturing 

But that does not mean that glob- employment, most industrial countries 
alization itself is their enemy. France’s are still net exporters of manufactured 

goods to developing countries. Rel- 


it is no good telling a fired Renault 
worker in Belgium that deindustrial- 
ization is on the whole a good thing. 


Few economists would deny that The political reaction to globalization 
cheap imports can cause shocks in is dictated by what people think and 
some industrial sectors. But experience feel, not by what economists say — 
overwhelmingly shows that countries even if the economists are right. 


horrifying unemployment — a main 


reason for the center-right’s demise — atively fewer people are employed in 


The challenges of globalization 
need political as well as economic re- 
sponses. That means better leadership, 
especially in Europe. If people are 
really voting against globalization, the 
politicians must be doing something 
wrong. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates. 

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Mil aps*v prion 
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Stuoettafen. 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Prime Minister 
Lionel Jospin accepted a com- 
promise Thursday that will 
enable European monetary 
anion to move ahead on 
schedule, but there was no im- 
mediate word on how Europe 
would pay for the job program 
France wants in return. 

Both Mr. Jospin and the 
president of the European 
Commission, Jacques San- 
ter, said . after meeting 
Thursday that they were op- 
timistic the 15 EU nations 
would in turn back the com- 
promise at a summit meeting 
in Amsterdam next week. 

Neither commented on 
how this might be achieved 
ahead of an emergency meet- 
ing of finance ministers on 
Sunday that will flesh out the 
agreement Mr. Santee’s 
spokesman said that the 
Netherlands, as EU presi- 
dent, was preparing a com- 
promise document 

Mr. Jospin said tear 
Ranee’s concerns about the 
tide of 18 milli on unem- 
ployed across Europe “have 
been understood. We are 
making progress.” The Paris 
stock market reacted to the 
possibility of an agreement 
by moving sharply upwards. 
The CAC-40 blue-chip index 
closed up 2.38 percent, at 
2 , 76027 . 

Mr. Jospin told reporters 
after meeting Mr. San ter, 
“The preoccupations we are 
expressing do not simply 
concern France. They con- 
cern the whole of Europe.” 
Mr. San ter said, “all the ele- 
ments are on the table to pro- 
gress toward signing a pact 


next week,” but when asked 
to elaborate on what those 
elements were, he replied 
only, “jobs and growth.” • 

In Brussels, EC officials 
said the details on accom- 
modating French demands 
for greater emphasis on jobs 
promotion would not be 
worked out until the second 
half of the year. 

French objections to the 
stability pact, emphasizing 


financial targets and provid- 
ing stiff penalties for coun- 
tries that fall short of the 
mark, led to fears that cur- 
rency union might be blown 
off course. But Germany has 
said it is willing to attach an 
job clause to die stability pact 
providing it does not lead to 
higher spending. 

The next piece in the jig- 
saw could drop into place on 
Friday when Chancellor 


Helmut Kohl travels to Poit- 
iers for a meeting with Pres- 
ident Jacques Chirac. 

Mr. Chirac signed the sta- 
bility pact in Dublin in 
December, and under the 
constitution would be re- 
sponsible for signing any re- 
vision. His spokeswoman 
said Mr. Chirac would meet 
Mr. Jospin before the summit 
to resolve differences over 
the single currency. 


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PAGE 16 


THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 





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Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 

lnktiub.«al Hmkl Tritranu 

Very briefly: 


Murdoch-Robertson: Match Made Where? 


By Geraldine Fabrikant 

Sew York Tuna Service 

NEW Y ORK — At first glance it 
would appear to be a merger of the 
sacred and profane. 

Rupert Murdoch — the man 
whose Fox Network brought to tele- 
vision the risqud. “Married With 
Children.' 7 the nihilistic series 
“The Simpsons' 7 and the violent 
children's program “Mighty 
Morphin Power Rangers’ 7 — 
agreed Wednesday to pay $1.9 bil- 
lion to acquire the cable channel 
controlled by Pat Robertson, the 
religious Christian talk show “The 
700 Club.” family-oriented movies 
and reruns of such wholes oraepro- 
gramming as “The Mary Tyler 
Moore Show." 

But in fact. Mr. Murdoch and Mr. 
Robertson are similar in key ways: 
They are politically conservative 
but pragmatic executives con- 
cerned with creating the largest 
audiences possible for their tele- 


vision fare. That is why. whatever 
Mr. Murdoch’s plans for spicing up 
Mr. Robertson's Family Channel, 
analysts say he must take care not to 
totally alienate the audience that has 
turned the operation into die United 
States' ninth-Iargest cable network, 
reaching 67 million homes. 

Mr. Murdoch has always been 
“completely unconcerned with the 
very social agenda that Mr. 
Robertson seems to cherish, such as 
sexual abstinence, heterosexuality 
and the patriarchal family structure 
— in short everything that ‘The 
Simpsons’ makes fun Of.” said 
Mark Crispin Miller, professor of 
media studies at Johns Hopkins 
University. 

And yet, Mr. Miller said, the two 
media executives' differences 
“may be more apparent than 
reaL" 

Shareholders apparently ap- 
proved of the deal, sending shares 
of NewsCorp. up sharply in Sydney 
on Thursday. The stock closed at 


6.27 Australian dollars ($4.76), up 
0.40, or 6.8 percent. News Corp. s 
American depositary receipts 
closed at $18 JO in New York trad- 
ing, np 50 cents. „ . 

Mr. Murdoch, whose Fox Kids 
Worldwide Inc. unit of News Corp. 
is acquiring the Robertson-con- 
trolled holding company. Interna- 
tional Family Entertainment Inc., is 
intent on expanding into cable pro- 
gramming and vying with such fam- 
ily fare as the Disney Channel and 
Viacom’s Nickelodeon network. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Robertson, a 
businessman who spun out Inter- 
national Family several years ago 
from the Christian Broadcasting 
Network to create a publicly traded 
company, had come to realize that 
in an era of media mergers, he had 
little choice but to sell. 

* ‘ We felt it was time for the Fam- 
ily Channel to join the consolid- 
ation that was going on in the in- 
dustry,” said Mr. Robertson, who 
started the Christian Broadcasting 


Network in 1960 and turned it into a 
culturally and politically powerful 
force that enabled him eventually to 
create the Christian Coalition and to 
run for president during the Repub- 
lican primary campaign of 1988. 

One of his political supporters in 
that race was Mr. Murdoch. 

Fox executives said that Mr. 
Robertson would continue to serve 
as host of “The 700 Club,'* which 
runs on the Family Channel each 
weeknight. combining spiritual up- 
lift of a conservative Christian fla- 
vor with on-air healing sessions. 

Over the years, Mr. Robertson has 
used the program to preach about 
various societal sins, including the 
evils of modem television. He has 
said that God had “little obligation 
at the present time to spare America, 
because we are polluting it with our 
television programming." 

And yet, to expand the audience, 
he has moved the cable channel’s 
programming toward a mainstream 
secularism. 


Peace Feelers in Soft Drink War? 

NEW YORK (AP) — A heated price war in the soft-drink 
industry could cool off after the Fourth of July. 

Coca-Cola Enterprises, the biggest bottler of products made 
by Coca-Cola Co., recently told its field managers that it 
would "attempt to increase prices" after the U.S. midsummer 
holiday. That was seen by some industry -watchers as a peace 
offering to the company's chief rival. PepsiCo Inc., whose 
executives recently complained to analysts that Coca-Cola 
bottlers’ retail pricing had fallen to an “irrational" level. 

“Soft-drink pricing has gotten ferocious.” said John Sich- 
er. editor and publisher of Beverage Digest. “It has not only 
been ferociously low for Coke and Pepsi but for everyone else 
in the soft-drink business." 


Chubb Sells Property Unit to Investing Firms 


Bloomberg A .'m 

NEW YORK — PaineWebber 
Group Inc. and Morgan Stanley 
Dean Witter. Discover & Co. said 
Thursday that they would buy most 
of Chubb Corp.’s real-estate sub- 
sidiary for $758 million in cash and 
assumed debt. 

The sale of the property, which 
includes stakes in 44 office build- 
ings with 7 million square feet 
(650,000 square meters) of space, is 
another step in Chubb's plan to fo- 
cus on its property and casualty in- 
surance business. 

For the investment banks, the pur- 


chase through a joint venture called 
PW/MS Acquisition I LLC, gives 
them office properties in New Jersey, 
Michigan. Illinois and Maryland as 
rents rise in a strong U.S. economy. 

“We are receiving excellent 
value for these commercial prop- 
erties, and strengthening our balance 
sheet with their divestiture." said 
Dean O'Hare. Chubb's chairman. 

The sale includes the Fountain 
Place building in Dallas, designed 
by I.M. Pei. and the Franklin Court 
building in the Franklin Square area 
of Washington. 

Chubb, of Warren, New Jersey, 


put its Bellemead Development 
Corp. real-estate unit, which devel- 
ops offices and industrial properties, 
up for sale late last year. It sold its 
life insurance business last month 
for $875 million. 

The agreement calls for the joint 
venture to pay $649 million in cash 
and assume $109 million of debt. 
Chubb said the proceeds will be 
used to reduce debt. The sale is 
expected to be completed this fall. 
Chubb’s shares rose $1.50 ro close 
at $67,125. 

Morgan Stanley, through real es- 
tate funds it runs for institutional 


investors, has a stake in more than 
$6 billion of real estate worldwide. 
Analysts said now was a good time 
for Chubb to sell the properties. 
After lagging the real-estate recov- 
ery, offices became hot properties in 
1996. with prices rising 20 percent 
or more in many areas. 

That is because a steadily grow- 
ing economy and a dearth of new 
construction pushed vacancy rates 
down to their lowest point since 
1986. according to commercial 
broker CB Commercial Real Estate 
Inc. Meanwhile, rents are rising at 
tbeir fastest pace since 1981. 


PacifiCorp 
Will Buy 
U.K. Utility 


L-tlbi Ov 

PORTLAND. Oregon — Pa- 
cifiCorp has agreed to buy En- 
ergy Group PLC for $9.8 billion 
in cash, assumed defat and lease 
obligations, people familiar with 
the agreement said Thursday, in 
a move that would make it one 
of the largest U.S. utilities. 

PacifiCorp. a utility and tele- 
communications holding com- 
pany based in Portland, Oregon, 
will pay around S6 billion in 
cash for London-based Energy 
Group and assume $3.8 billion 
in debt and lease obligations, 
the sources said. Energy Group, 
which was spun off from Han- 
son PLC in February, owns a 
large British electric utility and 
Peabody Holding Inc., the 
biggest U.S. coal company. 

An acquisition would be the 
latest in a string of moves by 
U.S. companies into the British 
electricity market — even 
though Britain's new Labour 
government says it will hit 
those companies with a “wind- 
fall" tax to raise money for a 
youth-jobs program. 

The boards of PacifiCorp and 
Energy Group have voted on 
the preliminary terms of the 
agreement, but final details still 
must be hammered out. 

PacifiCorp shares gained 50 
cents ro close at $22.25 in New 
York trading, while Energy 
Group rose 6 pence in London 
to close at 646 ($10.53). 

(Bloomberg. AP) 






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MARKETS: Amid Signs of Slowdown in U.S. Economy, Stocks Rise to Post a Fifth Record Close 


BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union and Mexico said 
Thursday they had laid the foundation for what they hoped 
would be a wide-ranging agreement on trade in goods and 
services. 

Jaime Zabludovsky, Mexico's deputy minister for trade, 
said that the interim deal, concluded after two days of ne- 
gotiations. would help Mexico close a growing trade gap with 
the EU. Officials said the initial agreement covered political 
aspects of EU-Mexican relations, including both sides’ ob- 
ligations to respect human rights. 


Continued from Page I 

week ’s consumer price index is also 
expected to show arise as well. That 
could partially reverse the optimism 
the markets showed on Thursday. 

Tumbling bond yields helped 
stocks both in the United States and 
, , .. _ abroad. The yield on the benchmark 

• US West Media Group Inc. said it sold slightly more than 30-year Treasury bond dropped to 
4.4 million shares of Time Warner Inc. for $220 million. 6.76 percent on Thursday from 6.84 

percent on Wednesday. Low yields 
mean companies will not have to 
spend more money to finance then- 
businesses. 

Retail sales fell 0.1 percent last 
month as purchases of autos and 
other durable goods slid. That fol- 


• International Business Machines Corp. said its chief 
financial officer, G. Richard Thoman. was leaving to become 
president and chief operating officer at Xerox Corp. 

• Boeing Co. is talking with customers about two proposed 
new versions of its 747-100 jumbo jet. including a stretch 
model that would cany nearly 500 people. Biuon7hcm. Reuters 


lowed revised declines of 0.9 per- 
cent in April sales and 0.3 percent in 
March sales — both worse than pre- 
viously reported. The last time retail 
sales declined for three straight 
months was September through 
November 1981. a Commerce De- 
partment spokesman said — just as 
the worst recession in the last two 
decades was starting. 

The sales slump may be a con- 
sequence of consumers owing too 
much money. “There is a tendency 
to buy a lot, build up your credit card 
bills and take a rest for a while and 
pay those bills,” said Ira Silver, 
chief economist at J.C. Penney. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index 


r: 

L. 

• — - >. 


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” x -~ :• .rrT? 

...... . 


closed with a rise of 13.88 points 
883.45. 

But the technology-rich Nasdaq 
composite index showed much 

US. STOCKS 

more subdued movement. 

With the technology sector 
clouded in recent sessions by weak- 
er-than-expected profits at key 
companies, the index rose only 3.48 
points higher at 1.4 1 1 .33. 

Banks benefited from the pros- 
pect that low interest rates will make 
lending more profitable. 

NationsBank. First Union Corp. 
and Bank One Corp. showed solid 


g ains J.P. Morgan & Co. rebounded 
after an early loss after Goldman, 
Sachs & Co. cut 1997 earnings es- 
timates on concern that revenue 
generated from trading stocks and 
bonds may lag estimates. 

Polo Ralph Lauren Corp. surged as 
the upscale clothes maker sold shares 
to the public for the first time. 

Utilities also posted strong gains 
as those companies' large dividends 
looked more attractive amid pros- 
pects of low interest rates. 

Columbia Gas System, Texas 
Utilities and Duke Power were 
among the leaders in the sector. 

Among the biggest laggards for 
the session was Intel, which dropped 


on concern that scheduled price cuts 
in August will be as high as 52 
percent, steeper than some analysts 
had expected. 

Goldman Sachs lowered its es- 
timate for fourth-quarter and fiscal 
1997 earnings. 

Texas Instruments. Advanced 
Micro Devices and LSI Logic were 
lower in late trading. 

■Xerox's shares rallied, mean- 
while. after International Business 
Machines said its chief financial of- 
ficer, G. Richard Thoman. was leav- 
ing the company to join Xerox as 
president and chief operating of- 
ficer. ( Bloomberg . AP) 


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Indexes 

Dow Jones 


IlHlB 

Tmns 

un 

c«n> 


7el0.lt 771170 7S7162 7711.47 + 11541 
J*»S TtmJt 7*7113 7*9854 +14.45 


7357 A. 2374.13 235474 +13.06 


Standard & Roars 

Pmloai Today 

HI* Uv am 4 PM. 

Industrials 1023.96101777)102151 1038X8 


Tramp. 
UlflHks 
Finance 
SP 500 
SP100 


NYSE 

Cemprtle 
IJWoilnoK 
Trans n. 
utni» 
Hrmnct 

Nasdaq 

Caniposno 

Industmts 

Banli 

Insurance 

Finance 

Tiwis*. 


618.70 61155 61432 610.54 

193.78 192.24 79138 105.91 
99.74 99.01 99.68 101.40 

870.66 865.15 869.57 883.01 

848.78 843.29 847.90 85969 


Most Actives 

NYSE 


PakRLit 
PMNIars 
cue hi 5 

ss? 

Mi, 

CenEkc* 

EUPNAt 

nr* 

PepsiCo 

AMD 


UK* LOW Lost 

44*70 45150 +e064 
54123 57410 SBIZ) 
407.14 40423 M4J0 
18290 77X03 7K.O0 
4212* 41422 47164 


I4U57 1401.42 1411.33 
1142-48 1137.00 1 7427X7 
1541.93 1 53*37 1 Si 1.93 
1^6.95 1582 42 159281 
1847.65 185044 1867*5 
944JH 9393)7 94*375 


+7.14 

+9.13 

-2.17 

+4*7 


•TUI 
4424 
+ 1529 
+ 11.59 
+ 1934 
+431 


AMEX 

Dow Jones Bond 


20 Banda 
■0 U Mines 
10 indiretnals 


Hlq* Lew urd 04 

*76.12 622*7 676.17 +3*5 


Pimm Tony 

Ckao Nm 

10260 102.79 

99 JQ 99.94 

105.45 105A3 


*D 

Eaons 
IBM 6 


Nasdaq 

Intel 

3Com 

Ascend 

OXD 

cm lew 

werwems 

IntqCv, 

Peohd 

SuiMIcs 

AeMMal 

Deucci* 

ande 

Mem** 

RaanOin 

TotoGsnA 


AMEX 

STOP 

Har»w 

hocCp 

nostros 

VMCB 

TWA 

Di ind 

FAuiPr 

JTS Can 

EctoBay 


VoL Hifk 
199545 33 
13SJ44 45*. • 

48539 25U 
55538 98M 

sms 40* 
Slot 3414 
50079 59 
448S4 &SU 
45090 J4V> 
443*9 Zlky 
43473 |7W 
406*3 JB% 
40109 38» 
37S77 44 
37S47 88V, 


VeL HU* 
183197 14515 
MI769 4ttt 
993*1 43W 
15*32 14<e 
7948S 2I<* 
711*3 29->. 
*909 1016 
46905 711* 
***37 15 
*4365 el It 
*1»4 117V. 
S6473 50 
55443 lilt* 
52053 1*1* 
SI 516 I7"» 


5*5 3118 
4318 44 VI 
?5Vi 2SM 
96*5 97 

38»t 39 *5 
331t 23*5 
54*4 51 

*3'« 45*8 
B*4 34 

19*5 71 

3*2! 1714 
3* 3*+5 
J7*8 37:4 
•3W *4 

85*5 t*U 


♦ 1*8 
♦ *» 
•lO 

41 

•1 

♦ 1*5 

♦ l*» 
♦ 1 

+u 

•Ilf 

♦2 

♦ IK 


I47143T8J 
46*5 4* 

41<6 4318 

tiwinx 
I9W 70*%* 
26*1 7»**8j 
**» T". , 
20 298* 
33*8 341V. 
St*a *0*8 

106*8117*9 
49*7, 4W*S 
125*8 12t*4 

15*8 15*4 
169* 17 


*¥b 

+1**4 

-*» 

•M 

♦*9 
-1*4 
♦ 7*8, 


V9t Nig* LM Lad Of. 

47014 m 87*8 «9W +I98I 

15959 fr*9 5+1 4V, • U 

11(06 11*5 II 11*8 +«9 

MM 70*4 2»*» 301* i« 

*45? 34*8 33»» 34*8 +lt 

9** 9V. 

VV. 1*4 


*381 9»» 

*313 V-m 
«05 9*8 

4779 1*9 

*254 


4*8 


-VU 

♦ W 

■V8 

-*8 


Trading Activity 

NYSE 


AOixsiced 

□Ottawa 

UntTcnB+a 

Tcaal tunes 

wowHuns 

NewLlM*. 


AMEX 

Aon need 

D*rjnW 

Unenaigea 
TtWlssu^, 
New Highs 
NiWLOte 


305 

251 

185 

7*1 

1 


1519 

1058 

814 

3191 

784 

14 


300 

241 

304 

747 

50 

II 


Nasdaq 

Aovaneoo 
DetSned 
unownged 
Total laaite 
NewHqlB 
How Late 

Market Sales 


NYSE 

Amex 

Nasdaq 

tnmiBions. 


1*2 7007 

1*43 7019 

2ZJ7 1707 

5S7 5735 

1,0 

70 a 


T*M Pier. 

*■0 cm. 

59853 635.85 

2167 2438 

5B2J6 42X70 


Dividends 

Conpanv Per Ant Rec Pay 

STOCK SPLIT 
Doncaal Group 4 lor3 split. 

INCREASED 

AnqetesMtg O .27 7 14 8-S 

Fst5honBncp a .IS 6-30 7 15 

Oswego Cjty5«B Q JJ7 6-30 7-15 

INITIAL 

BBC Coo Tr .. JB9 6-15 6-30 

*K1 Dgaf Grp 1* - -10 -10 B-15 

NatienwMo Fin A - .06 M 7-15 

REGULAR 

Alfa title Energy Q J«S 6-23 7-15 


Baker. J. 
Beedcatbom 
F&M Natl 
FstCamnumM) 


.01S 7-23 
37S 7-31 
.18 6-25 7-22 
.20 6-30 7-15 


8-1 

8-14 


Company 
Fulton Bancorp 
Haitor Fed 1 1 nr 
HWi Inai Oppott 
High Inai Op pad 
High Inca Opport 
JaOiyjrnrffle bvg 
Logansgotl Fm 
Magna mil A a 
Mills Carp 
Masl nee Paper 
HoanoyHHy Tr 
Old Second Bn 
Poc Enterprise 
Piedmont Bncp 
Premier hdBncp 
Shared Medical 


fl -anm«ai SawnMe Bmoant per 
shara/AOR; tpaftMe so Canaflan fond* 
muiortWv; q-q u arterty ; » ae ml — M 


Per And 

l Rec 

Pay 

_ 

J» 

6-20 

6-30 

O 

.10 

7-1 

7-10 

M 

.093 

7-23 

725 

M 

.093 

8-26 

fF29 

M 

5393 

9ZJ 

9.24 

0 

.10 

6-25 

7-10 

Q 

.10 

6-24 

7-10 

Q 

30 

6-30 

7-1S 

O 


7-1 

7-22 

a 

sn 

8-1 

8-15 

0 

2X 

fr-20 

(+30 

0 

X 

6-23 

7-1 

a 

33 

7-21 

8-15 

a 

.10 

ft-30 

7-15 

0 

.12s 

6-33 

6-30 

0 

21 

6-30 

7-15 


Stock Tatties Explained 

wwffiQal. Yearly higte and tows reflect ton previous 52 weeks plus the 
Surreal week not the totesl trading day. Where o split or stock dividend anWiflting to 25 

pernnldr marc his been pant the years high -low range and dividend are shown torihc new 
s*«*s only. Unless others on noted roles of dhriacntb are annual disbursement based on 
the la lest dedaraliofi. 
a - dividend a Bo evtre (s). 
b • annual rare of dividend plus stock di- 
vidend. 


June 12, 1997 

Wgh Low Latest Ogr Op Ini 


Grains 

CQRNlCBarn 

5. C4I0 tw mnlmum- ce+te P*f Busf»i 

JJ 97 773 Vi Z7IP* 271V, — 1>* 97J73 

Sep 77 J*0h 7571- 201* -I 37,22 

Pec 97 257 25318 7S4V, _|% 1114*0 

Morn 763 Vi 2«v, 7*0 Vi -1*8 11.503 

MOV « 2*7 264% 7«Mi —11* 1.582 

Jul98 270V, 26788 261’* —l 1 * 1*31 

Sen* 25**8 256*8 25* ’8 —I 92 

ES-SOtes NJ*. wed’s. Sates 4S.732 
WeO SBpenW 27 S. 578 UP '5*3 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CflOT) 

100 lm- dollars par ran 

JUI97 277 JO 77110 27L70 +2J0 J7J51 

Aug 97 257 M 251.00 33130 +030 19,001 

See 97 239 JO 23600 23690 -120 12.771 

Od 97 22800 22400 22L70 -0J0 12.722 

Dec 97 219J0 215J0 21610 — l.M 25J7B 

JaiVB 2I4J0 71280 213.00 -1J0 ISC 

Ed. saws HA WWs.sdtes 2*.1*S 
Wed’s open nt 111915 u*> 1612 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 

«ojoo Uc- cerm per te 

JUJ97 2145 210* ZL24 +607 40.103 

Aup 97 2165 2127 2143 - 007 19008 

Sep 97 2100 2140 2161 +007 9.124 

Od97 219S ZUO tt74 +03N HOC 

Dee 97 7425 aoi 21M +007 210C 

Jor98 3435 74.10 26\0 +0.09 1.S2S 

Ep. sates HA. weds.sdes IS .M2 
WedsopenM 104007 off 970 

SOYBEANS CCaOTl 
S4HP tei nwtarun- cos per Bushel 
M ft 047 829*8 04Th +11 *0.675 

AU?97 <90 778V, 784V. +2Vi 2501 1 

S» 97 720 710*8 Tllte -18 9.923 

NoV 97 *81*8 609 671 —2 51287 

3(«*98 682*8 «71 67?te -2 7611 

E3. sales UA. Weds, sates 54,217 
Wad's open lib 166497 ufl 1159 

WHEAT (CBOT) 

WXC Du rrWiWram- errte par bushel 
Jui97 3*7 352 353 —11V, 39,775 

Sep 97 77*80 3*1 K 3*7*4 — II U 21328 

Dec 97 388 374 J7AA* -II 10.310 

MOT 90 *7*8 379 J80 -9 2J2I 

Esl. sates NA Wed’s, sotes UJ73 
Wed’s open «n 84^9t> up 5* 


Livestock 

CATTLE [OMEN) 

40 JOO IDS - conis per «x 

API 97 6445 64J0 6L47 —0 K) 9.276 

Amj 9 7 6195 6160 *177 -a 10 453778 

Od 97 67A7 47 JH 6720 -0.17 22423 

OK 97 49J7 ajc *947 -a 12 11.495 

Feb 98 Tift 7D4D MC -415 6.T0I 

Apr 98 7250 712S 7L30 -0.02 2^92 

Est. sales 10.140 Wad’s, sates ll«3 
Wed’S Caen M *7,950 alt 61* 

FESTER CATTLE ICMER) 

WJ30O fcv- cent par 10. 

Aug 97 77.60 7L95 77^2 -405 10,022 

58097 77.05 7LM 7480 -005 3^IJi 

Od 97 77 45 74.92 77 JO 1423 

Nw97 78.50 78.10 7&20 *105 2J23 

Jmfl 78AS 78.50 7156 *54 

Mar 98 7120 —a ra 197 

ESI. sates 2.?B Weds, sates 2.7*4 
wed’s oeen mi 19^11 un 231 

HOGS-Lmb (CMER) 

40000 tr. - cents per ti 

Jun«7 81 40 8000 84.97 — Q.«J 4.54 

Jul97 8050 7900 79 35 —1^7 IIJVS 

Auo97 7602 77 J? -117 HUM 

C*d97 71 J3 69.70 7125 -1,07 1579 

Dec 97 67 JO 4505 6A2S -197 1 748 

Es sales 13A8B wed’s, sates 9.371 
Wed’s opwi irt -31M3 un 1053 

PORK BBJJES (CMER) 

AM lbs - cads per ■> 

3i*97 KAO TUB 78.90 -1B0 4*7 

Aug 77 8135 79. [7 79.17 -100 7^57 

Feb 91 7452 71 42 71X3 —1* 447 

Est sales 2JJ21 Wed's. «6es 2A24 
Werfsapenlm 7.933 up 15 



High 

Low 

Latest 

a*g» 

Qptat 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) 







Sul 97 

79.90 

7e+® 

77 AO 

-LOO 

14.286 

Sep 97 

B24S 

7««. 

79X5 

-7,85 

■9.771 

Nov 07 

8480 

82.10 

HLS0 


4. 259 

Jw* 98 

87 JO 

8$ IS 

85.15 

-1D0 

1.795 

Ed soles NA 

Wed'S, s ales 

2X44 


Wnfsooenrre 

1X639 

up SB 



Food 


C - Bojidaflng dividend. 
cc-PEaxceedsW. 
dd-odted. 
d- new yearly loir, 
dd -loss In the igsn 2 months. sE-snlts. 

a- dividend rteOared or paid In precctfnq 15 t - dividend paid m stock In precBtSng 12 


P - initial dividend annual rate unicnown. 
P/E - pnce-eornhigs iaHo. 
q - dased-end mutual fund, 
r - dividend declared or paid In preceding 1 2 
months, plus stud* dividend, 
s - stodtspM. Dividend begins with dots of 


COCO ft INCSS 
tonwVKtem- Suer ion 
■W97. 1537 I4M 
5eo« 1577 
97 l*o* 

Ma 98 iu5 
Mav 98 IJSl 
JUT8 


IS* 

1577 

IH3 

1623 


1523 

1571 

1404 

1631 

1651 

167» 


months. 

I -_ annual rale, increased on last dec la 
ration 


months, estimated cash value on e*-di- 
ridend or ex-dislrtbutlon dale, 
u- new yearly high. 


g - dhridend in Canocfian hinds, subject to v - trading halted. 

J ^ | w | n e saepcte toe vi - m bankruptcy nr recehretthlp or being 

1 1 ■ owdond declared after split-up or stock rwrganlrea under the Bonhuptcy Aa, or 


dividend. 

| -dMdonil paid IKsvedtorndted deferred or wd - whan distributed, 
no oefian taken al Ig tetr flu t d wid meettoq. wj . when asued,' 

k - dMdend dcaorea or paid this yew an ww - with warrants, 
accumulathebsua with Addenda fei arrears, 
re - annual rate rnducod an last decloni 

lion. 

n- new issue In the prat 57 weeks. The high- y- ex-dhidend and sales In fulL 
law range begins wttti the start ot hading. yM-yMcL 
nd - next dav delivery. 2 - sales in fulL 


securities assumed by such com pontes. 


i - ci-dimdcflu or sx -rights, 
nhs - ez-dtotitouiton. 
n* - without mrranis. 


16/i +5* 

Esi soles 10.127 Wed’S, sites 13.500 
*ed's«nmr up 1339 

aWEEcmcsE) 

® • ** *»•- com ie+ d 
A4« 71750 29450 207* +915 

Stt 9? 19400 I9Q.10 t17M *2.30 

E J763B 16450 17025 —1.20 
1*3X4 159 DO IS DO +150 

Mov«8 1 57 JO 15125 15525 +425 

EilsoIcs v in wee's sotes vj76 
W*d's*p«iW 22,(65 ofl 776 

SUGAR -WORLD 11 fHCSE) 

1 1 TJX® Bi. .>nl> omr fa 

Mil JIJ0 1123 1149 +023 

OdW .35 11.11 ||J4 +0.17 

IS H-89 HJ8 *8.14 

Mu* »B 11.10 10.93 ll.M +D1J 

31.01* wed's, saes n.m 
wwsopenvil 1*5.773 gfl »7| 


*S 17-SM 
+S7 24J07 
♦S5 39J05 
-M 22.558 
*5* 8.771 

*» 575 


5.992 

0477 

AW 

2.348 

SO 


77.955 

DJ83 

7X71 



Metals 

GOLD (NCMX) 

100 Ira* bl- arm en tre+f m. 

Jun97 3(300 34 1 JO 341 A0 -2J0 379 

MSI 34150 -130 . 1 

Aug 97 34*00 3040 34360 -440 7X084 

Oct 97 347 A0 346.10 Mi- ID —2.40 7J74 

OecYt 351J0 34850 3*70 —ZAO 26578 
Feb 91 351.90 351 JO 351 JO -140 9513 

Apr 98 35360 -2A0 4,265 

•ton to 35*20 — 2«J 8Jm 

Auavs J58J0 -150 772 

Ed sales NA Wetfs. sides «A21 
Wed’s open M >61X83 up 1008 

HI GRADE COfteHt (NCMX) 

2S xm fav - cotes p# lb. 

Am 97 121 JO 120 JO 172.10 -OA5 1.799 

3*677 121*0 I2IX0 12135 -0AS SX22 

Aug 97 121.60 I IU0 119 J5 —6.15 2X14 

Sec 97 119J0 117X0 11825 +115 7.487 

0<JV7 115.95 + 825 1.164 

Nov 97 11430 11175 11X75 TJ29 

Dec 97 114X0 11270 11X95 +0AS 6J97 

tor 98 11070 +OA5 651 

Febto 109X0 +0AS S4I 

Est sales 1X110 Wed’s, safes WAI1 
Wed’soaenktt *0.156 u> 65* 

SILVER (NCMX) 

S.000 WOVOL- rents per troy OL 
Ato 97 471* 46970 46970 -ISO 2 

Jul97 47100 47X56 470J0 -170 MJ59 

Sep 97 47850 475X0 47140 -170 11X79 

0X97 48100 48X00 4B2J0 -170 8.112 

ton«8 0430 -370 17 

Mwto 49000 48920 49920 -170 S654 

Md,98 493A0 — 170 TAT 3 

All 9* 49760 — 370 7.79* 

Ea. safes NA. weds sales 6.134 
Wed-sapenW 87799 all 246 

PLATINUM (NMER) 

50 iiov to. - doPars M+ irav os. 

36 97 46150 4»j0 41110 —10.70 IX9M 

Da 97 41150 40400 41110 -471 6.2M 

Jan 98 OljQ 40X08 4*10 -9.70 1716 

ES. sates (LA Wetfs sates 1473 
Wed’spaenini 2X544 up 477 

Ctoe Pmvtovs 

LONDON METALS (LME) 

DcUars per metric ton 
Ateatoun (High Grade) 

5pol 159SW 1596W 1606V? 1*07+6 

Fawoni 1*1100 IMtflQ 142100 162L00 

Capper CsTbades (HUB Grate) 

Spif ’ J666X0 MWM 2672X0 2675X0 

Forwred 2579X0 2580X0 2S66X0 2567X0 

Lead 

Sped 629 00 630X0 632.00 63100 

Forward *34X0 637X0 440V? *4)55 

Ntctad 

Spot 7095X0 710500 7190X0 7200X0 

Forward 7205X0 7218X0 7300X0 7310X0 

Ute 

'Pa* 5580.00 55X100 5585X0 5595X0 

Forward 5*1000 5*7000 5*10X0 5620X0 

Zinc (Spedd High Grate) 

'*» 1333 W 1334*5 1347W 1348V? 

Forward 1358.00 1359X0 13719? 1372X0 

Htgh Law Od* Chge opfcfl 

Financial 

UST.BBXS(CMER) 

51 rniVran- pisol 109 per 

Api 97 95.13 95.07 9111 -0X3 2.741 

3eo93 9478 9475 W.77 +0,99 

Dec 97 5465 94X5 94*5 +011 192 

Esi.stfes NA Wed t sates 499 
VVWsBjenW 9X74 up 177 

5 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

nocooo cr<+-iHs A Mttisar ios p a 

ton 97 104-23 l56-9» 184-21 + 29 49JB5 

Sep 97 104-12 105-34 Kte-07 + 28 182X67 

Dec 97 105-53 + 28 $D2 

csr sates NA We<rs.s<4es 3L9R 

WWs open ill 232.769 ofl 1282 

10 YfL TREASURY (OOT) 

S'WAM prht- P*i 4 JWdS ot l»sa 
tend 108-23 108-00 108-19 + gM 

3SD97 108-08 107-13 108-03 + 17 

Oec97U7-24 107-24 107-24 - ]* 

Est.s<te NA Wed’s, sales 60J34 
Wed’s eoenW 326X37 oH 5637 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

K ocr-sicaan-pis * biws *r i» M | 
ton 97 111-29 110-to 111-24 - J4 105.273 

So.97 111-16 110-14 111-12 + 25 Ml 78 

Dec 97 111-9* HMD 118-31 - jj ax44 

A 6 ar«fl 110-21 + 25 jj™ 

Esr sales na wetfL sates 182,95? 

Wed’s open W 479.993 ofl 4DI 

UB0R r -MONTH (CMS?) 

C mllian- P?5 or IDO oc? 

ton 97 913J 94JB MJJ Uja| 

to< 77 9431 9424 «J| 

Aw 97 H7* 9418 94 -0X7 7J*> 
Ea sofas MA Weds. senes 4X10 
Weds men BV OS.TV in »3B 

LONG GILT OJFFEJ 

£50000 - (Ns i Unde or 100 pd 

Jan 97 114-18 114-01 114-14 +0-1* sees 

Ea. srters: *2979. Pie*. Soles; M.7S4 
Prev. ooentdj 157,254 on 7,4ga 


KMi Low Latest Chgn Optel 

GERMAN GOV. BUND (UFfS) 

DM12511000 -pb at 100 pd 

Sap 97 101-44 10QL71 10136 +040 234072 

&L sates: 192771. Prev.sdee: 161X89 

Prev.qpanM-- 234372 19 2136 

lVVEAR FRENCH OOtf. BOND5 UAAT1F) 

FFwaooo - pts or loopet 

Jun97 13006 129X1 130X4 +0A2 64706 

Sep 97 12840 122.92 12236 + 040 149X46 

DacV7 97 JO 97X0 9730 *032 STS 

Esi.sdas 227X03. 

Opm blU ZI&1Z7 off 2577. 

[TALI AN GOVERNMENT BOND OJFFE) 

ITL 200 mam - pN al 100 pd 

Sm97 13148 130J5 131*2 +0X3 05XZ7 
Dae 97 10430 10430 10461 +061 300 

EM-wdes: 71X65. Piwcsatec 78X52 
nev.opmblt.: 85427 up 2841 
EUBCfflOLIARS tCMBl] 

*1 mm ptvoMiN per. 
ton 97 *421 9419 9422 

A* 97 9420 9412 9t» 

Aw 97 9416 94X7 9415 

Sm97 94W *400 9413 

Dec 97 93JS 9338 9193 

Mar 98 9186 91M 9LB3 

tonM 9334 9X55 9132 

Sep » 9164 9147 9161 

Ore 98 9153 9138 93J0 

M«f99 9151 9138 9149 

ton 99 9147 9134 9145 

S*P 99 V14J 9135 9141 T ... 

Est. sates NA Wed’s, sdes 271J64 
Wed’s aoenW 2X38,132 w 4429 
BIOTtSH POiM) (CMBD 

62X00 pounds s per pound 
ton 97 1X3M 1 *250 1X314 
Sen 97 1X342 1X226 1*380 
. Dec 77 1.6294 1X794 1X244 
Esl.sdes NA Wed's. sates WJ41 
Wed’s open W 513*8 uo 507 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 
lofaoao doitars. t oor con. a* 

JW97 3M4 3703 3229 

Scp 77 3271 3748 327* 

Dec 97 3337 3290 3318 

Ess.sdes NA weds sales 10X80 
Wed's open ter 65X59 on 173* 


High Low Lutes! Oboe Optet 

Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NON) 


.’^T" "- V ‘ jal 


- ; 1 r? 


Jul 77 

7190 

7X30 

7X3* 

-038 

2654* 

•re 

•-r 

CX3 97 

7575 

75J0 

75X5 

-a 10 

7JW 


A .' +V ■ 

Dec 97 

7650 

7595 

761* 

+0JM 

31,587 

_ ■ 

+. -* 

Mar 18 

7750 

77 JO 

77 J4 

+804 

5X53 

• . f 


MOV 98 

7770 

77 J9 

77 J1 

-au 

I.W 


-•'-IT " 


Weds oral tel 75X85 up 7*3 


+0X3 365.932 
+0X7 21349 
+0X7 SJK 
+ 0X9S149I4 
+21) 04507 
+112 282X74 
+ 112 257,419 
+111 194610 
+111 1XX80 
+211 101,775 
+111 82302 
till 70X34 


27326 

34401 

121 


HEATING OIL (NMER) 
rexaa pre. cenrt w sal 
Jul 97 51 90 5U5 

51.67 

*aio 

34783 

-i. 

Auu97 52XS 

5195 

52J0 

+aa 

34X22 

■ - •. i 1 

5ep*7 5X35 

52.95 

suo 

+tta 

1X298 


CW97 SOS 

5X90 

54 1(1 

♦OJO 

1Z024 


Nov97 5X30 

54.75 

5500 

+030 

10738 

— 

Dec 97 5620 

B70 

5185 

*870 

mxh 


Jm98 5670 

5630 

56« 

-US 

10,174 


Feb 98 5690 

5650 

5650 

-ais 

5782 


Mor98 5620 

5150 

55X0 

+aio 

5J» 


Bi. sates na 

Weds, sates 

30X20 

... . 




^*.+ 


2# 


+113 
*0X1 
-0X1 
.. .. -409 
1935 -0X9 
I9J9 -110 


31X65 

32391 

1X36 


OSIMANMARK (CMER) 

I £4090 marks. S Per ms* 

AtoW X829 5780 J7« 

Ste>97 X87D X819 X822 

Decto je» 5863 J862 

Estjides NA Wedssrtss 29,536 
Weds open m 94J74 uff (538 

JAPAIE5E YEN (CMER) 

’•■52+lon yen, S per IDO yen 

ton 77 .9001 J64 X760 

toDto .7125 X730 £*75 

Dec *7 3025 X98S J992 
EstSdn NA Weds. Sftos 48324 
Weds reran it* 92333 on *745 

SWISS FRANC (CMER) 
niaa>*nk.i. s Per franc 
A**” 6953 X902 X929 

toP 77 7BJ9 X970 7007 

Oec97 JWB 7BB0 7006 
Est. sales na Weds, sates 114*8 
wed’s reran ire 50,106 

MEXICAN PBO (CMER) 

501X00 pesos, s par pm* 
toll? .12555 .12530 .17550 
topW 12W0 .13050 .13070 
Dec 97 .11(35 .11615 .11630 
g*-«*s NA w«rs sales 7.770 
Wad's «ran tor 39345 Ofl (45 
STERLING CUFFE) 

Boaooo-pharioopd 

fins 3EH 9 7i29 +S1J01 gum 

Dre97 «« 2^ 2- 14 +«I51*4S34 

wu£ab S’” 9t9B +«■»* 112+34 

Jimra m2? S* *°- w 69 '* x 

Sntt S’ 81 

njS »!** 

7174 9165 9173 +107 TSjKl 

soles? *4108 Pm. sates: 84026 
Prev open Wj 5*1*1 1 up 

Wjpjmi EUROMARK (UFFO 

SI & iK ss w 

TABS 96X2 96X5 + nm ioicp c 

to- 76 74.71 96.76 +ao* 251244 

Morto 96X7 HX0 96X6 +aS S7J77 

9649 +gx* 157,091 
toq>7B KOI 9*30 9127 +OQ* 129_5** 

Dec** 7*02 95.94 96X1 +4UH 818OO 

Estvatei WlM. hn.Mra 122X74 


Weds open ter 139.795 up 1617 

UGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

) xm tfaL- donors per dm. 

All 97 18X1 1653 18X6 

Aw 97 19X1 1181 Ilw 

Sep 97 19J8 1199 19X8 

0097 19.44 19.13 1918 

Nov 97 19X7 19.29 

Dec 97 19X5 19J7 . _ 

A»1to 19X9 19X2 19X6 -0.07 

Feb 90 19X7 1950 1950 -006 

NO 98 19.72 19.52 WJ7 +030 

Apr to 19.70 1»52 19X2 —005 

Ea.sdes NX. Weds- sates 129JS9 
Wed's open ui» 402.759 up 4351 

NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

10X00 mm fall's, s per rm> Mu 
JW97 1109 

AUB97 1130 

top 97 2.125 

0097 1140 

Nw97 2X70 

Ore 97 1410 

Jon 98 14(0 

Feoto 13 m 

Marto 1255 


43X34 

73X11 

17X49 

2196* 

17X86 

37X43 

17.301 

7X11 

4X19 

4X38 


- V -fd 
+:■ - : 
V •> >.» 

— .C -=-X: 

'fj. 

-Ti n . 

v. te. r* Tr* 

--- -..r.- 

v * • 

' ■ c ■ 


2055 

2075 

31,990 

re - 

2080 

2100 

BA2t 


2090 

LIB 

was 


2705 

2115 

TOOK 


2245 

2250 

9.IM 


2J90 

2395 

1UN 


2X35 

2440 

LU67 


2355 

2370 

non 


2740 

274) 

6442 


2105 

21M 

MM 

U- 


: 4- 


47X07 

44.745 

500 


41504 

47X98 

917 


22X78 

26X64 

636 


10X95 

16X12 

9X29 


rrev.faPHE: 123X 

Pror *Pen tat: 1X19X4 up lain 


Sspto 
Dec 97 
Marto 
Junto 
Sapto 
Dec 98 


66 . 12 * 

61418 

3AI30 

21531 

2A199 

21703 

1A293 


PI BOR [MATT FI 

FFSmUfan-phsuMOOpd 
ton97 9LS 9L53 9fa57 +0X5 
96« 96X9 +M7 
96X7 96/3 9bXJ +0X6 
MX M3S 96X2 + 0X6 
9632 9625 9632 +0X6 
9611 96.18 +0X6 
9i9B 9502 95.97 + 0X3 
En. sraas: ua.no. 

Open biL; 27M1 7 off 779. 

WWNTHEUROURA CUFFE) 

I TL 1 rultean p« ol roo pa 

sSw 2-U *4391 

S 5 S 3 as tB'JSS 

ss ss m 

+4111 1W41 

^ ill B 


Wedsopenrn 197.995 us> 1655 

UNLEADED 8ASDUNE (NMER) 

4?X00 aoL Cam per goi 
AM 97 SIS 5655 SB8 *054 35,146 

Aug 97 5690 5*35 56X3 +BJ9 21 511 

S*P 97 56J0 ss» 56X1 +OZ1 4XW 

0097 55 JO 54 BS 5685 +0.15 3X01 

Nov 97 5475 5640 54X0 +B.M l.«l 

Dec 97 5470 S6N 56)0 -0X5 4X66 

Est. sates NA Weds sates 33X88 
Weds open ter 74X96 o« ®l 

GA50JUIPEJ 

UX. dolors per metric tan - tats of 100 fan* 
JM97 16600 16175 1*250 1-25 1&2Z1 

Aug 97 1(550 16350 16375 -450 9,954 
Sap 97 16775 14573 165.75 —175 SJ7i , 
0<3 97 1»X0 1*175 16&2S -150 62£ 

No* 97 1717S 170X0 17025 — ITS 2*7 
Dec 97 17100 1715Q 17150 —150 1973’ 
Jan to 17175 17250 17250 —150 2718 
Est. sales-- 15561. Prev. sate 
Pr*». open Nil.- 63x06 atf 2X88 
BRENT OIL (IPEJ 

U5. dollan per banal - tots aMXOO taprte 
July 97 17X0 1 1JB 17X4 +41X9 

Aug 97 1758 17X5 1771 +4107 J«94 

top 97 1BX7 1757 17.91 +4UB JJ® 

0d 97 1857 1BX6 18X9-0X4 10OT 

NWM 1243 1B35 1&34 —0X7 7-g 

Dec97 1853 1BJ0 1BJ4 IBM 

Junto 1&54 1855 1BJ8 -007 6992 

Fobto 1850 1859 1878 -M7 *« 

EsL sate: 49587. Prov. sate : *1.923 
Prev. open tat. 166710 up 602* 

Stock Indexes 

toLPCDMP.nOEX (CMER) 

5D0>Mev 

JW197 *87.70 8U(a +1195 UUM 

top 97 *9(*0 RRUD 89258 *1610 74X56 
D« 97 903.00 891/0 90200 +1658 1™ 
ES-sale* NA Weds. sates BUM 
Weds ooen rt 309X24 up 1172 

CAC40(MAT9F) 

FFttoparlndapOH 

Jtm97 Z747X 571-60 2746.0 +»* 

Tula? 2739.0 27115 27415 **2 

Aug 97 2736X 27360 27S20 +5BX W 
SepW 7749 0 27275 27«L0 *5B| 

Mar 90 27920 27920 78020 *90 A4H 
Eel. sates. 225B2 
Open hL 64.932 Ml 1X20. 

FT5E 16t IUFFE) 

JW97 <T !raS*C25X J771X +JJ0 
top 97 4*100 47595 48HS +31X 
Dec 97 NT #LT 4857X +3 M 
EsLidn- 18X72 Pm. sotes.-»9Sl 
Prev. aped InL 8£3» up 2233 


- 1 - kr+*5 u*s 


'4+r*5 


ye 


" I f ASM* 
to +1^*, 


x 

If : ■ — 


Commodity bidexes 




Moody’s 
Rewters 
D+J. Futures 
CRB 

Sources t _ 

)nn mandat! . 
Pefiofnm Eadienge. 


Oese 
NA 
1,98820 

15557 !«» 

344X9 


1+5885’ 

VtM 


PAGE 17 



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ABM’s European Base 
Is Raided in Inquiry 
Over Price-Fixing 


Si 


Cm&dbrOvStHFRm PcpBSrUa 

BRUSSELS — European Union 
regulators raided the European 
headquarters of Archer-Daniels- 
MidJand Co. and two other compa- 
nies Thursday Id investigate afie- 
garioos of price-fixing La the market 
for amino adds. 

An announcement of the raids by 
the office of the EU’s competition 
commissioner, Karel van Miert, was 
the Latest sign that ADM’s struggle 
with a prolonged price-fixing scan- 
dal was still not over. 

An EU spokesman confirmed that 
ADM was being investigated, as the 
company said Wednesday, but he 
declined to identify the other 
companies involved. Another EU 
source said later that three compa- 
nies were being investigated, in- 



•’ o: 


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Profit Up 27% 
For Daily Mail 
Group in U.K. 

Reuters 

LONDON — Strong sales 
from its national titles helped 
the British newspaper publisher 
Daily Mail & General Trust 
PLC to increase profit in the 
first half of its financial year by 
27 percent, the company said 
Thursday. 

The group, which publishes 
the Daily Mail and Mail on 
Sunday, both national newspa- 
pers, reported pretax profit ex- 
cluding exceptional items of 
£46.9 million ($76.7 million) in 
die six months to March 30, up 
from £36.9 million. 

“Trading conditions in die 
UJL, still the predominant 
market for the group, re main 
positive/' the company said in 
a statement “In these circum- 
stances, the group expects to. 
produce a satisfactory result at 
die fuD year.” 

The first half figures were 
toward the bottom end of share 
analysts’ forecasts. 


eluding ADM, and that they all were 
based outside the 15-nation Union 
but had operations in Europe. 

The EU Commission can raid any 
company that trades within the bloc. 
If price-fixing allegations are 
proven, the commission can fine the 
offender as much as lOpercentof its 
annual global sales. 

Ammo acids are used primarily in 
animal feed. 

The raids came three days after 
four U.S. companies filed a lawsuit 
in San Francisco accusing ADM of 
conspiring with others to fix prices 
far citric acid, an additive used in 
detergents and beverages. 

ADM, which pleaded guilty to 
pice-fixing charges in the United 
States last year, said Wednesday 
that it and several of its European 
subsidiaries were among the targets 
of an investigation by the European 
Commission of allegedly anti-com- 
petitive practices. 

The American agricultural- 
products processor said in a state- 
ment that the commission was in- 
vestigating the possible participa- 
tion of major manufacturers in 
agreements in certain EU markets 
for amino acids, including the feed 
additive lysine. 

EU sources confirmed that lysine 
was one of die products concerned 
and was probably the main one. They 
said the European market for the 
product, used in pig and poultry feed, 
was worth 250 million European cur- 
rency units ($282 million) a year. 

They said competitors had com- 
plained about alleged price-fixing 
but declined to give names. They 
added that some companies had 
been cooperating with the EU’s 
competition officials. 

The European investigation rep- 
resents a setback to ADM’s recent 
efforts to close the books on a wide- 
ranging U.S. Justice Department in- 
vestigation into price-fixing in ag- 
ricultural commodities. 

In October 1996. ADM admitted 
fixing prices for citric acid and ly- 
sine and agreed to pay a record $ 1 00 
million fine. Three months ago, the 
company reached a $30 million set- 
tlement with shareholders unhappy 
over the drop in value of ADM’s 
stock after the scandal. 

(Reuters, AP ) 


Copper Gets Over Its Scandal 


Reuters 

LONDON — The world copper 
market has shown remarkable re- 
silience since the Sumitomo de- 
bacle a year ago, recovering most 
of the ground lost in a crash amid 
revelations feat the Japanese' com- 
pany lost$2.6 billion in rogue trad- 
ing. 

“It’s been a phenomenal per- 
formance,” said analyst Robin 
Bhar of tbe Brandeis brokerage 
firm. “All credit to the copper 
price that it's clawed back to where 
it started. No one would have ex- 
pected the tightness to have per- 
sisted.’’ 

Analysts credit unexpected sup- 
ply tightness for helping copper 
rebound by nearly $1,000 from the 
lows of the past year. 

On Thursday, copper closed at 
$2,672 a metric ton — actually 
firmer than on June 1 3, 1 996, when 
Sumitomo Corp. of Japan con- 
firmed rumors of huge losses from 
what it called unauthorized 
trades. 

Although analysts generally ex- 
pect prices to ease later in tbe year 


as delayed production comes on 
stream, some caution that the mar- 
ket may not have felt the last of 
Sumitomo’s legacy. 

Copper started a dizzying 
downward spiral in mid-May 1 996 
from a high at $2,715 on rumors 
that Sumitomo’s star copper 
trader, Yasuo Hamanaka — 
widely suspected of squeezing the 
market by hoarding metal — had 
changed jobs. 

Sumitomo's announcement on 
June 13, 1996, that Mr. Hamanaka 
had lost hundreds of millions of 
dollars through unauthorized trad- 
ing escalated the panic selling. 

Within a month and a half, the 
price of copper had fallen by one- 
third, bottoming out in late June at 
$1,745. 

Since then, however, unexpec- 
tedly strong world economic 
growth, supply hiccups in South 
and North America and other 
factors have kept prices climbing 
back up at a steady pace. 

The London Metal Exchange 
also is well into the process of 
instituting reforms. 


“To date, we are about halfway 
through this implementation pro- 
cess,” said David King, the chief 
executive of the exchange. He ad- 
ded that the Sumitomo affair had 
been caused by the “failure of a 
firm to properly control the activ- 
ities of an employee." 

He said the investigation of the 
copper market by the London Met- 
al Exchange, which started in tbe 
autumn of 1995, along with sep- 
arate inquiries by British and U.S. 
regulatory authorities, had been 
instrumental in Sumitomo uncov- 
ering Mr. Hamanaka’s activities. 

The investigation was earned 
out by the top regulator of the 
markets in Britain, the Securities 
and Investments Board. The board 
called for a package of wide-rang- 
ing changes. 

Since January, the London Met- 
al Exchange has increased its 
board from 16 to 18 directors. 

Mr. King said this move would 
help tackle the contentious issue of 
“conflicts of interest” when the 
board was called upon to intervene 
in the market. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt • 

London 

Paris 

DAX - 

FTSE 100 index 

CAC40. 

3800 

4800 ■ ru/ 

3000 

3600 1 ^ 

4600 n 

2600 

m jJ 


2600 fA 

3200 ft 1 

4200 J* v 

1 

30K)V 

4000 

2400 / 

2800 J FM AMJ 

' ,38M J FM AMJ 

FM 

1997 

1997 

1997 


Exchange 

Index 

’Ibursday 

Close 

Ptbv. 

Close 

% 

Change 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

639.36 

827.15 

+ 1 >W 

Brussels 

BEL- 20 - 

2 . 391.23 

2.36270 

+iii 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

3 . 707.99 

3 , 677.43 

+ 0.83 

Copenhagen 

Stoc* Market * 

587.71 

586^7 

+ 0.19 

Helsinki 

HEX General 

3 , 133.03 

3 , 142.92 

- 0.13 

Ottio 

OBX 

640.03 

638.42 

+ 0.25 

London 

FTSE 100 

4 , 757.20 

4 . 724 J 0 

+ 0.69 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

575.04 

671.66 

+ 0.59 

Milan 

MJBTEL 

12459 

12213 

+ 2.10 

Paris 

CAC 40 

2 , 760.27 

2 , 696.19 

+ 2.38 

Stockholm 

SX 16 

3 , 137^0 

3 , 113.61 

+ 0.77 

Vienna 

ATX 

1 ^ 96 lQB 

1 , 300.96 

-034 

Zurich 

SPt 

3 ^ 406.00 

3 , 371.88 

+ 1.01 

Source: Telekurs 

, 

lrtk.'nuiii<nl H.*f JJ I'nhuu,’ 

Very briefly: 


Thyssen to Buy Giddings & Lewis 


Gvfftird bjrOwSsiffFimi Dofatcln 

DUESSELDORF — Thyssen 
AG said Thursday it would buy Gid- 
dings & Lewis Inc., the largest 
maker of assembly-line equipment 
in North America, for about $675 
million to expand its U.S. presence 
and bolster its machinery business. 

The $21-a-share cash deal ex- 
ceeds a $19-a-share, or $610 mil- 
lion, hostile takeover attempt made 
by tbe U.S.-based Harnischfeger In- 
dustries Inc. 


The agreement with Thyssen 
calls for Giddings & Lewis to con- 
tinue to operate under its current 
name and maintain its headquarters 
and management team in Fond du 
Lac, Wisconsin. 

“Our board of directors unan- 
imously concluded that this trans- 
action with Thyssen is in the best 
interests of all Giddings & Lewis 
constituencies.” Marvin Isles. Gid- 
dings chairman and chief executive 
officer, said. 


“We are like-minded about bow 
to achieve our goals and Giddings & 
Lewis's management is enthusiastic 
about the value Thyssen adds to our 
business.”, he added. 

G&L. with $700 million in sales, 
makes automated machinery, 
primarily for automakers such as 
General Motors Inc. and Chrysler 
Corp. The company, which had a 
1 996 loss of $ 1 2.5 million, has been 
laying off workers and discontinu- 
ing product lines. (Bloomberg. AP) 


Profits Evaporate at European Airlines 


AFX News 

BRUSSELS — The Association of European Air- 
lines said Thursday that its members suffered an es- 
timated operating loss of $90 million in 1996, as 
opposed to a $870 million profit in 1995. 

Officials from tbe organization said the figures, 
based on those provided by members, do not always 
tally with their published results, and exclude catering, 
hotels and aircraft sales. 

The association said the drop in revenue was the 
result of rising costs, especially higher fuel prices. 


On the traffic and capacity side, most indicators were 
favorable, it said, adding that current interest rates had 
in fact helped die airlines. 

The secretary-general of the Association of European 
Airlines, Karl-Heinz Neumeister. said that an increase 
in the number of passengers had adversely affected 
operating results and that airlines have filled additional 
seats by cutting prices. 

He said the outlook for 1997 was much better, with 
fuel prices stabilizing. He said one airline has reported 
having better financial results, so far this year. 


• Western Europe's car sales fell 1.9 percent in May com- 
pared with the same month a year earlier, partly reflecting 
economic conditions that were weaker than expected, the 
European Automobile Manufacturers' Association said. The 
number of new car registrations fell to 1.151.900 from 
1,174,500. 

• LucasVarity PLC, a British- American engineering giant, 
posted a 16 percent rise in first-quarter pretax profit, to £72 
million {$] 18 million) from £62 million in the like quarter of 
last year. 

• Seagate Technology Inc. will invest more than 148 million 
Irish punts ($224 million) to establish a factory in Ringskiddy . 
in southwestern Ireland, that it expects will create more than 
1,000 jobs in the next three years. 

• Italy's third cellular-phone operator, whose license will be 
auctioned this month, wi II be able to offer pan-European GSM 
service as well as its basic DCS 1800 service, an Italian 
parliamentary committee decided. DCS is similar to GSM 
service but is unavailable in most European countries. 

• Inspirations PLC, a British package-tour company, is 
holding talks with a company that seeks to acquire it, but it said 
the discussions “may or may not result in an offer.” 

• Britain's chancellor of the Exchequer, Gordon Brown, set 
an inflation target of 2.5 percent and said the Bank of England 
would be asked for a public explanation if inflation misses the 
target by one percentage point or more. 

• Switzerland's economy expanded 0.2 percent in the first 
quarter, its first quarterly gain in two years, in a sign that 
Europe's slowest-growing economy was emerging from its 
longest recession since World War D. 

• Astra AB. a Swedish drugmaker, will appeal a ruling in 
German patent court that did not recognize a patent-protection 
document for a substance in Astra's ulcer drug. Losec. 

Reuters. Bhhmbcni. AFP 


• WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


MUi Law dm Piw. 


High Law Close Pro*. 


Kish Low Close Piw. 


WgD Law dose Pnw. 


rl-TI-RES 


nr .JU -.Je= — • 

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liK rs " *r 

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■im'mjaAo* ***£ 5 -.^*- « 

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+■• + * #•' 

* . - ^ 
i» •*«« **-- — a- 
w : 

M 


Thursday, June 12 

Prices In local currencies. 

Telekurs 

High Law das* Pm. 


— Amsterdam 


AEXHaeOMI 
Proofed*: 127. IS 


JUIMMU 

fcgon 

And . 

AtaDNrtrf 

Bum Co. 

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37 JO 
14&40 

159.90 

2W 

116J0 

31 

WHO 

39BJ90 

19480 

3X40 

BUD 

6530 

6750 

10430 

mso 

105 

168 

ALSO 

56-JO 

M 

7579 

49 JO 

307.90 
257 

9SJ0 
19X50 
181 
- 66 

- 70.10 

m>n 

- 391 
391 J0 
1CBJ0 

47 

240 


36J0 37 JO 
142J0 14450 
15430 159 JO 
262 

11150 115J0 
37 JO 38 
10140 103 

373.10 398.90 
19240 19480 

3270 3340 
81 JO 8130 
64 6440 
6540 6730 
W0L50 10QJO 
331 JO 33840 
10260 10480 
166 168 
8970 9050 
55J0 5640 
42J0 44 

73 75.10 
4930 49 JO 
3Q5J0 307.20 
25Z 25670 
112J0 11540 
94 95JC 
19530 197 

179JO 180 

at qi ci u 
18240 18110 

112.10 11240 
3B5 39030 
3B9 39050 

101 JO 108 
46J0 4680 
23740 240 


36.7D 

142.90 
15670 
26040 
113J0 

2770 

10170 

391.10 
19150 

32.90 
82 

6490 

AC ID 

9950 

331 

10440 

146 

89.90 
5S80 
4240 
7110 
4970 

306JO 

25X50 

11X80 

9120 

19170 

17090 

S3J0 

183.10 
112 
383 

39070 

10370 

46.10 

23850 


■ High 

Deutsche Bank 10040 
Deut Tefekim 42 JJ5 
Drtulner Balk 62J0 
FrwenhB 382 
Fnaentus Med 161 JO 
Fried Kiupp 351 
Gate - 126J0 

Hefcfe&gZrat 146 
hWdpfd 9730 
HEW 480 

HocWief 75J0 

Hceetst 69.10 

Kontafl 660 

LMa . 1345 

LBflhansa 3175 
MAN 50650 

Maanamotm 747 

KT— ^",$3 

MndiRwdkR 4775 
Preu*«a|- S 20 

RWE 73J0 

SAPpH 325 

i^an ^ 

Skmem _ 100.10 

aswBiWM i m 

TTwBen 406 

Vsoc 9940 

VEW 537 

821 JO 
1201 


TO 

144 


650 

77 

1320 




Law doaa Pm. 

100J5 10075 100 ' 

4140 41 .95 41 JO 
6270 6275 6275 
379 380 370 

16070 161 161.10 

350 350 352 

123J0 12570 
16570 lAjO 

97 9740 9770 
478 478 480 

7540 7570 7570 
68X15 68.15 4870 
653 654 

76J0 7870 
1315 13HJ a 
3075 31.10 3045 
502 503 50450 

739.70 74670 73S 

3745 3778 3745 
19470 197 JO 19X50 
4720 4765 4735 

512 530 513 

7240 7X25 7240 

322 321 -£ Jt* 

19240 193 1M.10 

231 23VJO 23 3. X 
9940 9972 99.10 
1520 670 OHO 

990 990 990 

40270 4B30 407 

97J5 9M5 97J6 
530 537 534 

816 81770 80470 
1197 1197119370 


SABrewories 

132® 

131® 

IX 

132 


496 

4® 

493 

SflnwxDT ' 

48® 

47® 

X 

49 

ttxfcfem 

2.® 

7® 

2® 

Soad 

57 JD 

57 

57® 

57® 

WhUjreod 

7 SB 

7J5 

7.77 

SBC 

715 nus 

214 

214 


323 

114 

117 

Tiger Oob 

78J0 


78 

78 

WotsMoy 

4.9S 

4J3 

4.91 






WPP Group 

2® 

1L55 

2® 


Kuala Lumpur <*■££•: "S41 

PfMttfK ilNJS 

AMMBHdgt 
Goirihg 
MolBflricfeg 
AMbdtSI# F 
-PetronasGaa 
Proton 
PubOcBk 
Rrnong 
Reunis WWW 
RnriwamPM 

-fist 


Zanem 


476 

2J2 

1937 1930 1949 1942 


linqga 

UWEnc 


uw 

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16.90 1670 
13 1270 
27 2675 

6 575 
935 9.15 
13 12J0 
370 378 
336 336 
830 8.10 

25.75 2570 
SJD 830 
1120 1140 
12 11 JO 

19.90 1970 
BJS 890 


1670 

1270 

2670 

6 

9.15 


17 

13 

27 

6 

935 


Madrid 


13 1270 
190 3.90 


334 

8.15 


334 

8.15 


2570 25J5 
870 835 

1230 1230 
11.90 12.10 
1970 19.70 
8.95 875 


London 

Abbey NaH 
Affled Ddoecq 
Ar^ka Wirier 

A^Graup 
Assoc Brnods 
BAA 


FT-SE Wfc <75740 
Pnwtsas: 4724J0 


ACE5A 

A gunsBot nlon 

Araentario 

BBV 

BOMStO 

BonUrtw 

Bo Cento Hhp 

BoPoputor 

Bm5antondw 

C£PSA 

CartbwitB 

FECSA 
1 Noland 



Bangkok 

A* m 5*c 

ta^fcnkBkF 

W 1 

SnCneriF. 

Smontkf. 




■* ‘ Thai 

j UUCaaai 


158 

214 

2850 

334 

» 

2670 

3335 

IS 

92 


SET UK 51936 
Piwriaat: 52148 

' 153 156 151 

208 712 JSS 

27 J5 27 J5 2770 

326 321 328 

460 470 494 

102 100 103 

2435 2435 25^ 

3225 33 33 

114 114 112 

88 89 90 


Helsinki 

EraoA 

HUomridl 

tenlra 

Kesto 

MaffioA 

MafraB 

Matsa-Saria B 

Nate 

N 0 U 0 A 

Orian-YMyreae 

OskrimqwA 

UPMKwnaane 

VafeMt 


HEX CwHRd Use 31 JB42 
: 314272 


22S 

51 

7570 

1670 

147 

42 

136 

364 

205 

10770 

125 

8940 


47 

222 

51 

75 

1670 
146 
41 JO 
134 
35970 
201 
10630 
12260 


47 4770 
TO 22170 
51 5170 
7370 75J0 
1670 16J0 
147 34570 
4170 4160 

202 205 

107 10730 
12330 124 

8930 89 


Bombay 

SSSJL, 

■i K®- 

rial 


892771 


State BilncSo 

sass 


897 JO - 870 
1293 1250 

- *J 454 

9675 96 

- 519 . 4M 
'■ 294 21875 
32375 3H7D 
32035 31735 

W75 19 

4Q73S 401 


891 875 

1287 1246 

465 45135 
9635 96 

51850 4962* 
289 JD 28935 
31150 

31835 3I9J0 
!9J0 _ 19 
40535 40135 


n- - , je + 



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-> 


■**■■■■?*■ *■ 


BELJritedKZSna 

PrWriNH; 234230 

'17000 16725 16825 16800 
6740: 4680 67X «10 

’35W £» 3495 ICO 

'B * 1 

. 7720.7680 7710 7700 

. 3OT 35® 3570 35® 
...7001 7050- 7120 7040 
33BS 3360 2385 3390 

5900 58® 5900 _5BSD 
14475 14250 14400 1C® 
MWS 15700 15775 19925 
0525 12775 12875 H775 
am 4995 ®M ®40 

KODI 1030 9070 9960 

3490 3*00 34X 3405 
23366 33450 ZWg 23125 
fflwow 15175 15000 15100 IPOO 
— wsMnnsDcinwaooniTOo 


Hong Kong 

SlSS, s 

CothoyPocfflc 1370 

SSISS g| 

OrinaLlga . 4370 
CBicPSSc 46 

■mat i|. 

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HendeooaLd 6B 
HKCNnaGas USS 
HK Electric. 3Q4B 
HKTeteaxnm 16^ 

2M 

RutdriemWb 6170 

SSS^HriO 1935 

HawlSS pe v 4530 
Oriental Prs*s . 230 
PaatlOrienM W 

msstm 

"SwtaPncA • 66J0 

£ ibS 


"ttft 

7 * 29.15 
.1275 '1260 13 

7135 72 74 

2265 22JO 23J0 
4160 4170 4190 
4270 43 46.10 

3930 3930 SOM 
895 195 930 

lt» 1430 1445 
8850 8850 9070 
8.15 820 870 

6435 6475 68J5 
1435 1470 1475 
2975 2975 30.10 
1560 1 530 16J0 
U5 M 4» 
TtJ 2D • 233 

5970 6135 

2270 2275 23.15 
1965 19J0 19^ 
1865 1865 1930 
4110 43 JO # 
260 265 2J0 

1.12 1J2 
86 8970 
473 485 

835 865 

7 JO 7J0 

i-IT i <850 

31.90 31W 3330 
17 1775 1825 


Boss 
BAT tad 

Bank Scotland 
Blue Onto 

BOC Group 

Bocis 

BPBInd 

BrttAaasp 

BritAnroys 

BG 

BrOLand 

BfOPelta 

Met 

BittTeiaaM 

BTR 

BannapCdstrol 
Burton Gp 
CobteWWe* 
CoriMnySdiw 
Carton Ccmm 
Coerunl Untao 



EMI Group 

|& 

GKN 

GtaoWefleome 
Granada Gp 
Grand AW 
GR£. ■ 
GraenaBtGp 
Guimesj 
GUS . 

ICJ 

Imp) Tobacco 
Klnrftther 
LoSoto 
Land Sec 
Lasmo 

Legal Cart G»p 
Usuis TSBGp 
LuasslWtr. 
Marita Spencer 
MEPC 


9 

472 

662 

572 

.137 

S6B 

5J0 

1234 

775 

5.98 

256 

442 

1067 

737 

149 

1331 

778 

121 

578 

769 

6JJ7 

178 

4J5 

173 

1031 

176 

566 

537 

5.19 

7.17 

7.10 

374 

813 

472 

11.95 

22 

169 

1074 

1190 

877 

664 
2J8 
455 
.575 

665 
576 

1830 

862 

4.13 

735 

269 


8J1 a.90 
4.13 470 
675 676 
532 SJ7 
133 17* 

561 565 

570 565 

12.11 1270 
765 7 75 
561 5.96 
374 150 
430 478 

1030 1065 
733 774 

132 360 

1155 U® 
735 733 

218 218 
5J> 571 

760 7 M 

536 674 

173 176 

469 469 
1J4 151 

1012 1071 
130 172 

576 565 

570 570 

5.12 5.17 
634 7.10 

772 776 

140 154 

537 570 

475 477 
1178 1136 
670 666 

6J6 661 
167 169 

962 966 

340 340 

1033 1072 

^ w 

577 

33 

566 


833 

337 

7.17 

263 

871 


870 

4.19 

678 

577 

176 

561 
571 

1273 

765 

573 

336 

473 

1071 

770 

135 

1157 

738 

219 

5J4 

761 
539 
173 
478 

177 
10.12 
177 

562 
525 
118 
7.11 

762 
138 
510 
470 

11 

660 

673 

167 

973 

340 

1038 

1277 

896 


a 


Pryto 
Rtpsd 

SewSJwHoe 
Toboaflera 
TWaforicn 
Untar Fenosa 
VUencCrtnart 



BrtwMtoCSWJT 


Rvrtooo: 571-4* 

29770 

29300 

29500 

29230 

1855 

1815 

1850 

1810 

6030 

5830 

5970 

58® 

8310 

Bin 

8310 

8140 

11410 

11260 

11410 

11240 

1550 

1515 

1535 

1525 

25910 

25500 

25640 

25300 

5020 

4865 

5020 

48® 

asm 

32250 

32500 

32300 

4395 

4345 

4385 

4345 

5150 

5110 

5110 

51® 

2950 

2870 

2905 

2990 

77® 

7650 

77® 

75® 

11400 

112® 

11310 

112® 

1350 

1315 

1350 

13® 

29900 

29528 

29710 

296® 

1805 

17® 

1805 

17*5 

2875 

-2770 

2875 

2800 

6420 

6270 

6410 

6300 

1460 

1460 

1445 

1410 

7610 

7310 

7610 

7300 

<325 

4265 

4325 

42® 

1325 

1305 

1315 

1310 

3078 

2040 

20® 

2055 


Market Closed 

The Manila stock market 
was dosed Thursday for a 
holiday. 


Mexico 

aboa _ 

Bmocd B 
CeaexCPO 
CHraC . 

Emp Moderns 
GpoCotioAl 
GpoFBcoraer 
- Tnlnburoa 
.CkvkMn 
BO CPO 
TaiMexL 


• aw wwwi w 

□0 GpoFtn 

68 KimbQ 


50.10 

1970 

31,95 

%£ 

ASS 

1JV 

2860 

3075 

11660 

19.14 


Ratal Use 422431 
Piarioas: 419464 

4960 4930 4960 
1882 1960 1876 
3165 3135 3135 
1208 1210 1218 
39315 3975 39.10 
47.90 4850 4770 
1J4 1J5 1J4 

2810 2875 2800 
30.10 3075 2930 
11510 11530 114.10 
IBM 19JJ4 1832 


Paris 

A aw 
AGF 

AkLfeuUe 

AlarWAteth 

Axo-llAP 

Bcncflre 

BtC 

BNP 

Canal Ptas 

Qarefour 

Cadno 

CCF 

CeMam 

Christian Dior 

CLF-DwdaFran 

OetlHAarict* 

Derate 

Etf-Aouridre 

EridartaBS 

EuQdtawr 

Ewotumd 

GeaEaiw 

Haras 

touriat 

BSd 

lSteo( 

LVMH 

Lyon. &»* 
AtldiritaB 
Paribas A 
Pefnod Stand 
PBugeotat 

Phmdt-Prirt 

Praraodes 

Renouri 

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Sanofl 

Sdmertef 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Sle Generate . 
Sodexho 
SiGobaln 
Sun 

Svntheia&o 
TharesanCSF 
Total B 
Ustnor 
Valeo 


CAC40; 276977 
MnMUf 


908 879 

13130 17830 
950 936 

655 629 

360 34730 
704 693 

932 907 

22970 226 

1037 1024 

4710 4060 
28760 276.10 
24430 23970 
668 640 

944 924 

572 564 

1275 1264.10 
911 952 

640 622 

890 870 

970 9.10 
■635 675 

73S 722 

42290 41670 
US 8)6 
392 38070 
1073 1056 

2344 2282 
1525 1496 

5S2 S43 

338 3284) 
30 372 

310 308.10 
5B2 564 

2768 2715 
2130 2095 
uo 131 JO 
1728 1711 
204 198 

565 546 

3Z3 317 

1085 1044 

44770 43370 
632 610 

2865 2800 

840 831 

267 JO 284J0 
720 702 

153 153 

562 SO 
9775 97J5 
37270 359.10 


904 »0 

18160 176J0 
950 93S 

6S2 629 

3S9J0 345 

700 688 

930 901 

229 JO 22370 
1035 1016 
4177 4034 
285 Z74J0 
240 241 JO 
651 662 

944 915 

571 561 

1275 1252 

977 960 

629 628 

8BB B70 

9.15 970 

660 6J5 

735 711 

422J0 414 

825 820 

38870 376 

1072 1 052 
2344 2260 
1574 1485 

549 539 

338 325 

377 36570 

309.90 307 JO 
580 554 

2768 2665 
2130 Z1Q0 
139 JO ID 

1720 1717 

20 270 197 

550 550 
' 321 31570 

1060 1085 
440 445.90 
620 618 
2850 2784 

839 825 

TfiAnn Hwqi 
719 708 

156.10 155J0 
554 S3 
97J5 97 

372 357 


Electrotux -B 
Ericsson a 
Henna B 
IncwrihwA 
iDvatof B 
MorioB 
Kndbanken 

ZZFF'* 

SamlaAB-B- 
SvensfcaB 
S-E-Bcrtton-A- 
SkantEa Fob 
S buiskn-B- 
SKF-B- 


StaroA 
SVriamfluA 
VWWB 


94 

299 

250 

742 

397 

253 

240 

268 

210 

2Z7 

160 

8370 

28070 

34970 

184 

164 

190 

m 

228 

21070 


458 
29170 
247 
725 
39170 
2*670 
236 
25570 
207 
222 
15870 
82 
272 
340 
179 JO 
161 
190 
117 
22470 
207 


S29 465 

29B70 29770 
747 JO 248 

728 710 

392 395 JO 
218 24970 
240 23870 
26470 277 

207 211 

227 22270 
160 159 


8270 

279 

348 

180 

162 

190 

11850 


8270 
274 
344 
184 
‘ 166 
190 
120 


22570 22870 
209 20770 


Sydney 

Amcor. 

Bart 

Bnmhteslnl 
CBA _ 
CCAmatn 
Crt esMy* 
Caaalcn 

Fasten Blew 
Goodman FM 
KJAutirafia 
Land Lea** 

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Nat Mutual Hdg 
Mows Cap 
PocBfcOurtop 
Pfawlrt 
PubBroaknit 
RfeTlrria 
S! Gaonjo Bemk 
WMC 


AlOnBamfas: 2618.11 
Prorious: 261X70 


894 

893 

894 

B96 

10 

921 

9.X 

922 

1895 

1820 

18J0 

1896 

4.14 

406 

412 

497 

2492 

23.W 

2492 

24 

1495 

TA30 

1495 

14® 

1595 

1521 

IS® 

1520 

655 

695 

691 

697 

7J7 

7.16 

723 

7.15 

A® 

4® 

425 

4® 

2® 

3-52 

293 

297 

1J9 

126 

1 n 

1.79 

1293 

11JS 

1291 

12 

2595 

2590 

2546 

25® 

1® 

1.® 

1® 

1® 

1994 

1895 

1825 

1827 

1® 

122 

1.94 

121 

a 

5.94 

3® 

627 

398 

597 

395 

4 ® 

465 

425 

465 

t sa- 

6.M 

7 

8® 

ri 

Z1J6 

21.® 

2192 

8.14 

7® 

811 

7.® 

822 

aio 

822 

B.10 

797 

728 

7® 

729 

1091 

1070 

10.78 

ID® 

496 

4 

405 

404 


The Trlb Index 


Prices as of 3:0? P.44 Nw York Owe. 


Jan. t. 1992 - 100 . 

Level 

Change 

%change 

year to date 
% change 
+ 15.17 

World Index 

171.78 

+ 1.43 

+O.B 4 

Regional indexes 
Asta/Patific 

126.06 

• 1.40 

- 1.10 

+ 2.13 

Europe 

178.18 

+ 1.18 

+ 0.87 

+ 10.53 

N. America 

201.61 

+ 3.48 

+ 1.76 

+ 24.52 

S. America 

165.22 

+ 4.83 

♦ 3.01 

+ 44.39 

Industrial Indexes 
Capital goods 

211.14 

♦ 1.86 

+ 0.89 

+ 23.53 

Consumer goods 

193.91 

+ 2.38 

+ 1.24 

+ 20.12 

Energy 

204.59 

+ 2.93 

+ 1.45 

+ 19.85 

Finance 

127.64 

+ 0.44 

+ 0.35 

+B .60 

Miscetianeous 

168.06 

- 1.14 

-O.S 7 

+ 3.88 

Raw Materials 

187.47 

+ 1.52 

+ 0.82 

+ 6.89 

Service 

161.52 

+ 0.80 

+ 0.37 

+ 17.62 

UBrtiss 

147.24 

+ 1-88 

+ 1-29 

+ 2.63 


The International Hewkt Tribtmo Worm Stock (nriax O rwcfcs ttv U S. OoSar values ot 
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PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1997 


























































































































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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 13,1997 


RAGE 19 


ASIA/PACIFIC 






Regulation 
Seen Hurting 
Telecoms 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Gov- 
ernment regulation threat- 
ens to strangle rapid growth 
of the satellite telecommu- 
nications industry and 
should be left to the market, 
industry officials and ex- 
perts asserted Thursday. 

“Regulators should per- 
mit access to satellite pro- 
viders and let the maixet- 

6 lace decide,” said Steven 
lorfman, chief executive of 
Hughes Telecommunica- 
tions and Space Co. “One 
competitor is worth a thou- 
sand regulators,” he said to 
delegates at the Asia Tele- 
com 97 trade fair here. 

Larry Irving, assistant 
secretary for communica- 
tions and information ar the 
U.S. Department of Com- 
merce, said: “Governments 
cannot keep up with the 
pace of technology, nor can 
regulators. Governments 
need to set competition 
rales, not telecommunica- 
tion rules." 



R»Man fbrinonMfcax FaBCfrAmc 

TINY PHONE — Gavin Trevitt of Inmarsat show- 
ing his company’s battery-operated miniphone 
system at the Asia Telecom 97 fair in Singapore. 


China’s Securities Purge 

In Industrywide Crackdown, Heads Are Roffing 


EMERGE CAPITAL 

Societe d'lnvestissement a Capital Variable 
69, route d'Esch, Luxembourg 

R.C Luxembourg B-4S530 


To our shareholders. 

We have the honour to invite you lo attend the 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

of shareholders of our company, which will take place at the 
offices of Banoue Intenationalr a Luxembourg. 69 route 
d’Esch. L-1470 Luxembourg, on June 25. 1997 at -LOO p.m. for 
the purpose of considering and voting upon the following 
agenda: 

1. Report of the Board of Directors and or Lhc Independent 
Auditor: 

2. Approval of the Statement of Net Assets and of the Statement 
of Operations as at February 28. 1997; allocation of the results; 

3. Discharge lo the Directors; 

4. Statutory appointments; 

5. Miscellaneous. 

Resolutions on the agenda of the annual general meeting will 
require no quorum and will be taken at the majority of the 
\nli* expressed by the shareholders present or represented at 
the meeting. 

In order to attend tlte meeting, the owners of hearer shares will 
have to deposit their shares five clear days before the meeting 
with Ban quo Internationale a Luxembourg. 69. route d’Esch, 
L- 1470 Luxembourg. 

The Board of Directors 


Unilever Ends 
Price Dispute 
On Indian Unit 

• Bloomberg News 

BOMBAY — Unilever has 
agreed to pay 1.06 billion ru- 
pees ($29.6 million) to raise 
its stake in Hindustan Lever 
Ltd. to 51 percent from 49.9 
percent, ending a four-year 
court battle. 

The company originally 
planned to pay 310 million 
rupees for the 2.98 million 
Hindustan Lever preferential 
shares. The sale was held up 
after two Unilever units — 
Hindustan Lever and Pond’s 
India Ltd. — challenged a 
central bank directive order- 
ing Unilever to pay about 2.1 
billion rupees instead. 

Pond’s rose 148 rupees, or 
10 percent, to close at 1,627 
on the Bombay Stock Ex- 
change. Hindustan Lever, 
which has an 8 percent 
wei ghting in the benchmark 
30-stock Bombay Sensitive 
Index, rose 33 percent, or 41 
rupees, to 1,287. 


Bloomberg News 

SHANGHAI — For the second time in two 
years, China is purging executives from its 
securities indusuy to absorb blame for market 
manipulation. 

The presidents of two securities firms and 
an executive at the country’s largest com- 
mercial bank were replaced in the past week. 
More changes are likely. 

“The whole industry is now under a 
cloud,” said Bruce Richardson, chief rep- 
resentative at ABN-AMRO Hoare Govern 
Asia. “The government will push the industry 
into a new way of doing business.” 

The crackdown — the biggest since 1995 
— shows how China is struggling to develop 
its financial markets. 

Almost seven years after die country 
opened its two stock exchanges. C hina ’s mar- 
kets are rife with shoddy disclosure, insider 
trading and speculation that regularly sways 
prices as much as 10 percent a day. 

As part of the purge, Haitong Securities 
fired its president, Li Huizhen, according to 
people at the firm. Industrial & Commercial 
Bank of China, the nation’s largest com- 
mercial bank, replaced its Shanghai branch 
chief, Shen Riiolei, people at the bank said. 

And Shenyin & wanguo Securities Co., 
China’s biggest securities company, replaced 
its president, Kan Zhidong. after the gov- 
ernment uncovered illegal stock manipulation 
by the company, executives said Tuesday. 

None of the changes were announced. 
Some executives said heads were also likely 
to roll at the country’s two stock exchanges 
and the C hina Securities Regulatory Com- 
mission, or CSRC. die stock watchdog. 

Tbe changes are aimed at putting con- 
servative executives in charge of China’s se- 
curities industry and regulatory posts. It also 


is a means of amfla ti ng. Mame iftfr ivarke t 
manipulation that the gove rnment , has had 
little success so far in erasing. - -.7 " 

The last crackdown was in 1995, when a 
bond-trading scandal led to the replacement 
of the CSRC chief at the time, Liu Hongra, by 
its current boss, Zhou Daojiong. ‘ ' 

The government started cradSag down on 
stock speculation last month aftercares rose as 
much as 60 percent in the first four months of 
the year. Authorities were concerned that die 
milli ons of individual investors who had fueled 
that rally would be burned if stocks collapsed. 

Investors have been chasing stocks higher 
because of a shortage of other investment 
channels in China ’s underdeveloped financial 
markets. 

In a move to cut demand for shares, die 
government said May 22 that it would for the 
first time ban state-run and publicly traded 
companies from trading stocks for short-term 

■ Multinationals Expect Lower Profits 

Multinational firms are scaling down their 
profitability estimates for business; in China, 
but there is no sign of any reduction of, in- 
vestment in the Chinese market, ah industry 
consultant said Thursday, Reuters reported 
from Shanghai. 

W illiam Best, ti>e Asian vice president for 
the A T. Kearney consultancy, said his com- 
pany's latest annual survey of 67 mn^nafinnak 
operating in China showed a dramatic down- 
turn in expectations. While previously mul- 
tinationals would say they expected to break 
even within two to three years, Mr. Best said. 
“This time, it is more like five to six years." 

He added, “Geariy, reality is setting in 
with regard to the difficulties of operating in 
China.” 





J F M A M J> 
1987 


J. F M A M J 
1097 


: :i;1oa2S ■ -JET? 

j.;, - ■ ■ ~ 

- , va-is 

[ s&fri t ■ Vl-41 

I : k :... a •. / x a /. • v .- ■ ■ ■ ' <■' ■■ ■ — 

Source: Tolekuts ■ InienuuiBuJ HcraJJ Trmuif 

Very briefly: 

• Tokuma Shoten Publishing Co.. a Japanese entertainment 
and publishing company, plans to buy 10 percent of DirecTV 
Japan, a move that- wffl give the digital satellite-television 
broadcaster access to Tokuma’s library of animated films. 

• WoridCom Inc. of the United States said its focus on data- 
phooe services rather than voice transmission gave it an ad- 
vantage in obtaining a Singapore telecommunications license. 



Share Prices Slump in Hong Kong 


Cotnpded tn OnrSktfFnmi POjvectm 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong share prices 
plunged 3.4 percent Thursday after major foreign 
brokerages recommended a reduction in weight- 
ing for the domestic market, dealers said. 

Downgrades by foreign brokerages, in- 
cluding Merrill Lynch & Co. and Credit Ly- 
onnais, were the major reasons for the sharp 
downturn, analysts said. 

Merrill Lynch said Hong Kong’s stock index 
may fall 10 percent in the coming months. The 
brokerage recommended investors sell Hong 
Kong shares and increase their holdings of 
South Korean and Philippine stocks. 

The stock exchange’s key Hang Seng Index 
shed 497.18 points to close at 13,92434, its 
fifth, consecutive losing session. The index 
peaked at 14,990.90 on June 2. 

The Hang Seng Index has dropped 5 per- 
cent tiie past four days. 

In addition, shares of the so-called red 
chips, or Chinese investment companies listed 
in Kong Kong, fell Thursday in their biggest 


one-day decline in more than a year amid 
concern that Chinese regulators would make 
it harder for them to buy assets from their 
powerful parents. 

Executives from Shougang Concord In- 
ternational Enterprises Co. and other red chips 
had met with Chinese regulators over the 
weekend to discuss new rules governing their 
business. Local newspapers reported the cri- 
teria may be released within a week. 

The move signals regulators’ unease with 
the way these companies raise money in Hong 
Kong. Some of. mem -evade disclosure re- 
quirements for new listings by buying into 
already listed shell companies. They then use 
these companies to finance the purchase of 
assets that dwarf the size of the listed -com- 
pany. often at below-market prices. 

Property companies were bearing the brunt 
of the sell-off of Hong Kong shares on the 
assumption that the incoming government 
would move to control property specula- 
tion. (AFP. Bloomberg) 


state enterprises and offices to buy cars from PT Timor Putra 
Nasi on al, which is partly owned by President Suharto's 
youngest son. 

• Tianjin Zhong Xin Pharmaceutical Corp., a maker of 
medicines, plaits to raise $68 million in a Singapore initial 
public offering; making it the first Chinese company to have a 
primary listing in Singapore. 

• Thailand’s biggest state phone utility agreed to take a 25 
percent stake and become the biggest shareholder in Thai 
Telephone. & Telecommunications Co. in exchange for 
dropping a revenue-sharing requirement. Bloomberg. Reuters 


Takeover Rumors lift ANZ’s Stock 


Bloomberg News 

MELBOURNE — Shares in Australia & New Zealand 
Banking Group Ltd. rose to a record high Thursday ou signs 
that the bank, the nation's second-largest, was the target of a 
foreign takeover move. 

ANZ’s stock closed at 9.78 Australian dollars, up 036, 
amid speculation the government may disclose that a foreign 
bank has applied to buy ANZ. 

“There are rumors erf takeover everywhere,” said Ron 
Porter, a director at J.B. Were & Son. Australia's largest 
independent stockbroker. 

ANZ told die Australian Stock Exchange it could not 
account for the rise in its share price. 



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COUNTIW/ajRISNCY 

2MONTH5 

f'SWSSTAND 

PRO 

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AUSTRIA 

ATS 

1456 

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Igotfeseopyofiw Wat □ Idasfc □ bod □ arfine □ otfier J3-6-97 
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Atoif or to. fokmteimf Herald Triune 
18 1, ovenue Charts de Gowfe. 92521 NeuSy Ciekx, f ranc a . 

Foe +33 1 41 43 92 10 
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In Ada; + 85229321 18 *. jggo»foB*Ji 1 - 800 - 832 - 2884 . 
Offer vedid for nawaABo^enoriy. Ha2w 


For a quarter of a century. DGZ International 
5.A. has been successfully operating on the 
Euromarket serving public-sector borrowers, 
internationally-operating companies, and insti- 
tutional investors. The Bank's financial state- 


low-cost and risk-conscious funding, we made 
use of a broad spectrum of derivative instru- 
ments. Against this background and taking net 
income from financial transactions into account, 
we achieved an ordinary operating result sub- 


Business Year 1996 


25 YEARS OF EUROMARKET 
EXPERIENCE AND 
ANOTHER SATISFACTORY RESULT 


ments for this anniversary year illustrate the 
basic approach which we have pursued over the 
years. 

The moderate increase in business volume 
was achieved primarily through the expansion of 
the securities portfolio. Reflecting our risk con- 
trolling lending policy, the volume of loans out- 
standing remained practically unchanged. For 


From the Annual Accounts 
DM million 

Tota 1 Assets 
Due from Banks 
Due from Non-bank Clients 
Securities Portfolio 
Deposits by Banks 

Deposits by Non-bank Clients 

Own funds ^ A - 

Net interest and Commission income. Trading Results 
Administrative Expenses 

Taxes [[n| -' 

Net income . 


stantially above the previous year's level The net 
income for the year rose to DM 65 million. 

The confidence of our clients and the dedi- 
cation of our staff have significantly shaped our 
development over the past 25 years. We wish to 
express our gratitude to all those who have con- 
tributed to our success. 


1996 

9.634 

3783 

4*279 

1378 

4386 

4353 

239 

192 

’ 16 _ 

85 

65 


1995 

9.432 

4.03° 

4.025 

1,149 

3.667 

5.005 

209 

,.. 138 

18 

41 

15 


A copy of our annual report is available upon request. 


Deutsche Girozentrale 
International S. A. 


16, Boulevard Royal, L-2449 Luxembourg, Tel: (352} 46 24 71-1. Fax: (352) 46 24 77 



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Adverti sement INTERNATIONAL FUNDS June 1 2, 1 997 

available on Internet: http://www.iht.com/JHT/FUN/funds.html 


Quotations supplied by fund groups U>M)Cf(apalParia(ta]: 33-1 4D2BD90S) SefViCG SpOHSOTed by 

For Information on how to Hst your fund, fax Katy htouri at (33-1) 41 43 62 12 or Ewnail : <unds®iht«WYi lUrii/l A 
Quotations for your funds wiaE-mafl : e-functs©imcom 


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INVESTING IN POLAND 






PAGE 21 


SPONSORED SEC TION 




Poland today is reaping 
the benefits of sevon 
years of uninterrupted 
economic growth. 
Political stability t rising 
(Esposabfe Incomes and 
the Increasing avahrtgffiy 
of consumer products are 
just a low of the 
advantages enjoyed by 
the Po&sh population. 
Potent has the leading 
economy bi the CEE 
region and one of the 
fastest-growing m 
Europe at large. 
A member of the OECD 
since June 199% Poland 
iswelHfiacodtofacettus 
year’s challenges to hold 
the course md become a 
fuB European partner. 



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CZECH REPUBLIC 


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Investment, Demand and Entrepreneurial Elan 

Observers see several contributing factors behind Polands sewn -year record of economic growth. 


P oland's economy con- 
tinues to show its fun- 
damental strength. 
After growing at a 7 percent 
clip in I9^5„ the economy 
grew at a 6 percent rate in 
1996. As has been the case for 
the last seven years, the result 
was die best among the 19 
CEE (Central and Eastern 
European) countries, and very 
close to the lead for all of 
Europe. The ongoing rise has 
been accompanied by steady 
drops in inflation and unem- 
ployment. Over the last two 
years, the inflation rate has 
been halved It is currently just 
above 1 5 percent, and Finance 
Minister Marek Belka is pre- 
dicting a rate below lOpercent 
by the end of the'year. As of 
early June, Poland’s unem- 
ployment rate stood at 12 per- 
cent, a six-year low. While 
external indebtedness re- 
gistered a further 7 percent 
decline, to 34 percent of GDP 
in 1996, the year's FDI (for- 
eign direct investment total) of 
$52 billion smashed 1995’s 
record and consolidated die 
country’s grip on first place in 
die CEE region in this area. 


This influx of investment 
and the resulting moderniz- 
ation of production facilities 
continued to up the country's 
industrial productivity per 
employee, which rose a fur- 
ther 10 percent in 1996, 
bringing the three year in- 
crease to 37 percent 

Engines of growth 
Observers in and outside the 
country have made attempts 
to analyze the engines of Po- 
land’s continued economic 
growth. One view cites the 
influx since 1990 of more than 
$21 billion in FDI and related 
corporate commitments 
linked to the initial investment 
as the principal catalyst ' 
Backets r 'of r this widely 
held viewpoint argue that 
post-Communist Poland 
started out in 1991 with great 
entrepreneurial elan, a well- 
educated workforce and raw 
materials, but desperately 
short of capital. By providing 
the key missing ingredient, 
this FDI influx energized first 
the manufacturing sector, 
and then, via a spillover ef- 
fect, the entire economy. 


Since 1991 and the bottom 
of the post-revolution slump, 
industrial output has in- 
creased by a strong 57 per- 
cent Personal and corporate 
incomes have also increased 
by about the same rate over 
the same period. 

Other observers view the 
“entrepreneurial elan" itself 
as the driving force. 

“ Even, and especially dur- 
ing. the Communist era. our 
country's people were al- 
ways avid wheeler-and-deal- 
er providers of services." 
says Jacek Moscicki, CEO of 
Creditanstalt’s operations in 
Poland. 

"After 1939. these bud- 
ding entrepreneurs scraped 
together a bit of capital, ex- 
ploited all their connections 
and founded more than a mil- 
lion companies. Most of 
them were in the service sec- 
ton an area totally neglected 
by the previous regimes." 

“The growth we’re seeing 
is predominantly issuing 
from the maturing of the 
companies surviving the 
founding phase," Mr. Mos- 
cicki adds. “These compa- 


nies constitute the vanguard 
of Poland’s emerging SME 
[small and medium-sized en- 
terprise] sector." 

The country’s service sec- 
tor now accounts for 60 per- 
cent of Poland’s GDP, twice 
as much as in I9S9. 

According to a third view- 
point. the growth in the ser- 
vice sector and much of the 
rise in manufacturing output 
derive from the surge in con- 
sumer demand, always a po- 
tentially important factor in a 
country so large. 

Total annual expenditures 
by Polish consumers are 33 
percent higher than they were 
seven years ago. Consumers 
have three times as many 
telephones and twice as 
many automobiles as they 
did in 1991 . Retail sales rose 
at a 22 percent clip in 1995 
and 1996. All these individu- 
al rises add up into an im- 
pressively large market. Po- 
land's population of 38.5 
million is 38 percent larger 
than those of the other four 
Visegrad countries (Hun- 
gary, the Czech Republic, 
Slovakia and Slovenia) com- 
bined. 


modernized production facil- 
ities. It also stemmed from 
our budding service sector's 
satisfying of pent-up needs,*' 
Ms. Wasilewska-Trenkner 
says. 

"In the mid-1990s., with 
Western Europe entering into 
a low-growth. low-import 
phase, it’s been the surge in 
consumer and corporate de- 
mand for both products and 
services which has been 
largely carrying our econo- 
my.” she adds. What is Ms. 
Wasilewska-Trenkner’s pre- 
diction for the second half of 
1997 and beyond? 

"New sectors of demand 
are materializing, both with- 
in Poland and outside it We 


still have a tremendous pent- 
up need for good housing 
We have construction and fi- 
nancial sectors well capable 
of meeting it. Our neighbors 
m the CEE region are be- 
coming important purchasers 
of Poland's durable goods. 
The vast inflow of invest- 
ment into the country is just 
now starting to make its pres- 
ence felt in our mix of ex- 
ports going to the rest of 
Europe. 

"With tilts broad base of 
support, 1 see no reason why 
our string of 5 percent-plus 
annua] increases in GDP 
shouldn't continue." Ms. 
Wasilewska-Trenkner con- 
cludes. Terry Swartzberg 


European Partner 

Poland is on the fust track to NATO and EU 
membership. 

I ntegration into the European Union and NATO is a long, 
hard road, especially after decades of Communist rule, 
but Poland isn't looking back. With future membership in 
both organizations fairly secure, the country is working to 
adjust its various structures to EU and NATO standards. 

Poland has already made great strides in this area as a 
member of the North Atlantic Cooperation Council since 
1991, the Partnership for Peace since 1994 and the OECD 
| since 1996. The adoption in May of the country's new 
* constitution has further accelerated the process. 

Joining NATO 

The NATO-Russia Founding Act. signed on May 27. has 
defined the relationship between NATO and Russia and put 
the top candidates — Poland. Hungary - and the Czech 
Republic — on the rode to admission. These countries are 
expected to be inviied to join the alliance at the upcoming 
NATO summit in Madrid on July 8 and 9. 

“Poland is very satisfied with this document" says An- 
drzej Karkoszka. deputy minister of the Ministry of National 
Defense. “It responds to all of our anxieties and wishes, and 
has a positive impact on our main agenda item, which is 
enlargement" 

Before NATO accession, which is expected to take place in 
1999. Mr. Karkoszka is focused upon ensuring the basic 
interoperability of Poland's armed forces with those of EU 
member states, which means the standardization of com- 
munications and command systems, as well as training 
Polish officers in English. 

This stage does not encompass the sweeping changes and 
sky-high budgets often associated with NATO enlarge- 
ment. 

“Our budget does not permit rapid modernization at this 
time, but we must make sure we have interoperability.” say's 
Mr. Karkoszka, who estimates that complete modernization 
of Poland s armed forces will take 15 years. 

At present. Poland’s government is Ending 1 0 percent of 
its annual defense budget on NATO-accession efforts, or 
about $300 million each year. Future modernization ex- 
penses, including the purchase of 100 fighter jets, are ex- 

Can tinued on page 22 


The New Europe 

is our business 





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Since 1991, ftragn investment and modernization have increased bdustrta output by 57 


Looking ahead 

Which of tite viewpoints out- 
lined above is correct? 

“All of them.” says 
Halina Wasilewska- 

Trenkner, Poland's vice min- 
ister of finances and a highly- 
regarded expert on the coun- 
try’s economy. “Each of 
these engines, at various 
phases of our upswing, has 
been the main impeller of 
growth." 

"In the early days of the 
post-revolutionary period, as 
shock therapy caused domes- 
tic demand to slump, our 
m growth stemmed almost ex- 
| clusively from export sales of 
“the manufactured goods is- 
suing from our newly built or 



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PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1997 



SPONSORED SECTION 




Corporate Advisory 
Capital Rising 
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Swede Center Building 
Al. Jerozolrmskie 56c. PL-00003 Warszawa 
Tel.: (+48/22)630 6022. Fax: (+48/22)630 6003 



INVESTING IN POLAND 

Foreign Investors Are Here to Stay 

Poland continues to draw record levels of international investment. 

F oreign direct investment continues to pour into Poland. Poland, in addition to attracting its share of this 1 
In 1996. the $5.2 billion invested by non-Polish investment tram the 26.000 tomMmtdamm 
companies in the country was more than double 1 995 s present in the country (according to Poland s Central 


X companies in the country was more than double 1 995 's 
S2.5 billion, itself an all-time record for the country. And 
1997 is promising to be nearly as good a year as 1996. 

WaldemarDabrowski. president of PAIZ, Poland's agency 
for foreign investment, is responsible for attracting FD1 to the 
country. He is pleased with these results, but not only because 
of their scale: “Timing has been especially important” he 
says. 

“ In Poland, we first underwent a top-to-bottom economic 
transformation, then received an inflow' of international 
capital. This sequence is tbe reverse of those of many other 
CEE countries, and it helps explain why Poland's FDI total 
has been progressively rising." he says. 

“When the foreign companies arrived in Poland to set up 
their production and distribution facilities, they found local 
corporate partners that had already completed their in- 
dividual restructuring processes. They also found a frame- 
work of regulatory and approval procedures reworked to 
accord with those of Western Europe," he adds. 

Leading the region 

The size of the foreign companies’ latest. investments also 
makes Poland unique in the CEE region. With die exception 
of such spectacular, one-off items as the privatizing of the 
national telecoms or utilities, die international investments 
being made in the CEE region today are generally follow-up 
or secondary in nature. Companies already present in the 
countries are expanding existing facilities, and Western 
suppliers are coming to provide on-the-spot services to their 
main customers. 


Blue-Chip Companies on the Block 

With sell -offs of key state-owned films. Poland is entering the final phase of its privatization program. 


P rivatization is going 
strong in Poland. Over 
the next 12 months, 
many of the country's state- 
owned blue-chip companies 
will be privatized. A prime 
beneficiary will be the 
Warsaw Stock Exchange. 

June 12 marked a high 
point in Poland's history of 
privatization, when shares in 
the 15 National Investment 
Funds w ere launched on the 
WSE. Tli is move increased 
the WSE 's market capital- 
ization by 30 percent 
Each of these closed-end 
funds was created in Decem- 
ber 1994 with strategic hold- 
ings in 33 to 35 companies. 
Tbe goal was for the NIF 
managers to provide the ex- 


pertise necessary to restruc- 
ture the companies included 
in “their" fond. 

The verdict is still out on 
the NIFs. According to in- 
ternational financial analysts, 
roughly onc-third have 
proven themselves to be 
“change agents” capable of 
restructuring their corporate 
charges. Others have distin- 
guished themselves through 
quick sales of attractive as- 
sets. The Polish population 
has shown indisputable en- 
thusiasm for the NIFs. Each 
of Poland's 27 million adults 
was entitled to purchase, at a 
nominal price, a “universal 
share certificate" exchange- 
able for one share in each of 
die NIFs. This conversion 


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was to take place when the 
NIFs were listed on the WSE. 
As of May 25. 1 997, 95 per- 
cent of eligible Poles had 
purchased the certificate, and 
just under half had already 
sold them on die country's 
NIF OTC (over-the-counter) 
market. 

All-time highs 
This enthusiasm for shares 
recently propelled the WSE 
to a set of all-time highs, a 
good omen for another 
blockbuster privatization. On 
June 25. the shares of Bank 
Handlowy w Warsavvic SA. 
Poland's largest bank, w ill be 
listed on the WSE as part of 
the privatization of 95 per- 
cent of the bank's 1 .85 billion 
zlotys ($578 million) in share 
capital. Fifteen percent of 
Bank Handlowy’s share cap- 
ital will be offered to Polish 
private investors. Some 
300.000 people are expected 
to purchase these 9.7 5 mil- 
lion shares. Most of the re- 
maining share capita] will go 
to foreign and domestic in- 
stitutional investors. All told, 
the privatization will reap 
$300 million for the ultimate 
recipients — the state pen- 
sion fond and other public 
sector entities. Its market 
value of$l billion will make 
Bank Handlowy die largest 
company listed on the WSE. 

In the pipeline for privat- 
ization by the end of 1 997 are 
K.GHM Polska Miedz SA. 
Poland’s largest copper pro- 
cessor. Powszechny Bank 


Kredytovvy SA. the country > 
sixth largest bank: Pol lb 
Krakow SA. a pharmaceut- 
icals concent:, and eleven 
other major corporation.'. 

Part or all of these compa- 
nies' equity will be sold via 
open international tender 
through die offices of inter- 
national merchanr bank*, 
andor through IPOs (initial 
public offerings). 

The biggest fish of all. 
Telckomniunikacja Polska 
SA ITP SA). Polands rclc- 
coms company, is now set for 
partial privatization in the 
second half of 199.S through 
an IPO. The offering w ill be 
for one-quarter of TP SA> 
share capital and is expected 
to raise up to $5 billion. 

“This IPO is our way uf 
testing the water for later, 
even larger offerings of TP 
SA shares. In addition, iw 
don't want to overload ihe 
WSE.” says Anita Ryng. 
head of international rela- 
tions at the Ministry of the 
Treasury, the successor to the 
former Ministry of Privatiza- 
tion. “We don't have a single 
formula for priv atization." 
Ms. Ryng adds. "Rather, we 
let the companies' needs 
determine our method of pri- 
vatization. Many of our 
companies arc led by highly 
capable managers but have a 
strong need for new capital. 
They are thus suited for pri- 
vatization via IPOs. Others 
require the services of com- 
pany doctors, hence die 
NIFs." T.S. 


European Partner 


Continued from page 21 

pec ted to be offset by foreign defense industry investments in 
Poland. Interested investors are being encouraged to produce 
and assemble their defense products in Poland, using local 
labor. 

Preparing for the EU 

Preparing for membership in the EU is a complex process 
involving all segments of the Polish government, the private 
sector and society at large. The Polish government is taking 
care that all the players involved work closely with each other 
and with their EU counterparts to expedite the process. 

Coordinating this effort — which unites over 300 people in 
40 different governmental bodies — is the inter-ministerial 
Committee for European Integration. 

Jaroslaw Pietros, the undersecretary of state and the com- 
mittee s second-in-command, emphasizes the coordination 
necessary to prepare the country's various sectors for EU 
membership. 

"We don t want a situation where we address the Euro- 
pean Commission. Brussels and member states w ith con- 
flicting voices." says Mr. Pietras. "You have to ensure a 
uniform position." 

Poland is expected to be invited to begin EU accession 
negotiations next year, but it is unclear whether it will begin 
such talks with one or mote of its regional neighbors — 
Hungary and the Czech Republic, for example — or if it will 
proceed alone. 

The Polish government has structured it> preparations for 
accession to the EU into "Package 2000." the country ? 
economic program adopted in 19%. It presents die gov- 
ernment s policies on revising rates of taxation, eliminating 
taxes on imports and cutting customs tariffs. It is com- 
plemented by “Euro 2006." which establishes ihc fiscal 
measures to be taken in preparation for Poland's accession to 
European Economic and Monetary Union. 

Dawn Smith 


“Investing in Poland" 

i *aspre/>ared in its entirely by the Mhvrrisine Ptyumneul 
of the fiiteniaiinnal Herald Tribune 
Writers: Tern- Smirtrhei'g in Munich 
and A iii-ri Smith in lljtrtiiir, 

Program Director: HUlMuhder . 




Poland, in addition to attracting its share of this kind of 
investment from the 26.000 foreign-owned companies now 
present in the country (according to Poland’s Central Office 
of Statistics), continues to draw a laige spate of initial big- 
ticket investment. 

“Many of our first-wave international investor arc cm to 
their first or even second facility expansion programs. Over 
the last few years, scores of suppliers hav e settled near the 
facilities set up by ABB. Fiat. Daewoo and other major 
international industrial corporations." says Roman Kor- 
nacki, director of PAiZ's investment servicing department. 

"But in Poland, in contrast to other countries, the era of 
initial, large-scale investments is by no means over." he adds. 
A dance at the roster of recent foreign investments buttresses 
Mr. Komacki's statement These include several hundred- 
million-dollar-plus investments in the cement manufactur- 
ing, oil refining, automobile production and other sectors. 

Reinvesting profits 

“Large though it has been, the total amount invested bv 
foreign companies comes to only 3.4 percent of our GDP." 
notes Mr. Dabrowski. “On a per capita basis, our FDI total i> 
still much lower than that of other Visegrad countries. Unlike 
these countries, we still have a tremendous supply of at- 
tractive business areas and prime opportunities." 

Perhaps the most important factor impelling the rise in FDI 
has been the track record of the first-wave foreign investors, 
which have kept 8U percent of profits in Poland, using them 
to expand their existing operations. 

“Rather than taking the money and running, our foreign 
companies are staying on for further growth." says Jacek 
Janicki, PAIZ’s director general. IS. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. JUNE 13, 1997 




o® 


PAGE 23 


INVESTING IN POLAND 


Employee Base and 
Investment Incentives 

Special economic zones attract a variety of global 
heavyhitters. 

The recent arrival of International automobile firms Gen- 
eral Motors and Isuzu at one of Poland's special economic 
zones is proof that these investor-ready regions are at- 
tractive to global heavyhrtters. 

The country boasts three such zones — In Katowice, 
Mielec and Suwalki. The government recently decreed the 
creation of three more zones In Lodz. Legnica and Wal- 
braych, and plans exist for another four by the end of 
1997. 

Poland’s special economic zones are designed to uplift 
previously industrylntensrve areas that were nit hard by 
unemployment afterthe collapse of Communism. General 
Motors and Isuzu. for example; selected sites in the 
Katowice region, where the coal mining industry feces 
debt and decline. 

In addition to an eager employee pool, most of these 
zones feature factories that are ready for restructuring or 
modernization. With the significant tax reductions offered, 
special economic zones can prove to be an investor- 
friendly equation for domestic or intemational'firms. 

In 1995, Poland established its first special economic 
zone in the southern city of Mielec. based on a similar 
project in the Shannon region of Ireland. Previously a 
bastion of aviation-oriented industry, the airport-equipped 
Mielec zone now hosts a wide array of small- and medium- 
sized companies. 

Companies that invest 2 million ECUs ($1.4 million) In 
the Mielec zone or employ 100 people are eligible for a 10 
year tax exemption, followed by a 50 percent reduction in 
taxes for the next 10 years. The requirements vary, 
however, depending on the region. For example, in the 
Suwalki zone, located in a northeastern region known for 
its agriculture and tourism, investors need only 350,000 
ECUs or 40 employees to earn the tax benefits. 

The zones also vary greatly in size: The Katowice zone 
encompasses more than 800 hectares, while the up- 
coming zone in Lodz, formerly a textile stronghold, .covers 
only 250 hectares. 

Although the Polish government approves foe creation 
of these zones, It is up to local authorities to initiate the 
project and generate funds. Launching a zone can cost 
anywhere from 50 million to 150 million zlotys ($15.6 
billion to $46.8 billion), says Marek Kalupa. government 
specialist on economic zones at the Ministry of Econ- 
omy. 

The only state contribution is a stake in each of the 
management firms that develop, operate and promote the 
zones. Communities, banks or investors themselves can 
also be a source of fundin s . and more serious investors 
often purchase the land they plan to develop. 

Investors interested in doing business in these zones 
must contact the individual management firms and enter 
negotiations or bid for a site. 

Mr. Kalupa believes it is too early to predict the success 
of these economic hothouses, noting that the first zone in 
Mielec probably won’t show results for another two or 
three years. “If investors come to a zone, they need time 
to build and educate.” he says, 

D.S. 


The Paman International Fat feted its 75th anniversary in 1996. 


Going to the Fair 

Trade fair draws high numbers of exhibitors. 


I n tiie current age of spe- 
cialization. a multi-in- 
dustry trade fair is a rar- 
ity. The Poznan International 
Fair, which debuted in 1921 
as the Universal General 
Fair, still aims to cover the 
gamut of industrial invest- 
ment goods, from machinery 
to electronics. 

This year.'s event will 
bring ‘ together 1 .733 in- 
dustry-minded exhibitors on 
June 15-20 in the -western 
Polish city of Poznan. 

Of the exhibiting compa- 
nies. 1,137. will originate 
from Poland and 5% from 
abroad. A total 54.700 square 
meters of exhibition space 
will accommodate their 
stands. 

In the 1980s, the Poznan 
International Fair Ltd. began 
to organize more specialized 


Versatility and International Reach 


Foreign banks are major players in Polands financial sector. 


events. says Grzegoiz 
Turiciewicz, PIF's vice pres- 
ident of the board. This has 
allowed the PIF to sharpen 
the focus of the main fair and 
at the same time develop sep- 
arate venues for growing in- 
dustries, including medical 
equipment, consumer goods 
and packaging 

Overall, Poland will host 
300 to 350 trade fairs this 
year, including 28 organized 
by the Plr. But Mr. 
Tmiuewicz warns against 
holding such events in halls 
that are not specially de- 
signed for the purpose. 

PIF is continuing to con- 
struct new halls on its fair- 
grounds, including one 
building that was completed 
in 1 996 and another that will 
be ready later this year. 

DS. 


A s Poland's financial community becomes increas- 
ingly international, the distinction between foreign 
and domestic banks is rapidly losing its validity. 
Mixed local-foreign ownership of banks is becoming 
widespread, and. should several major privatizations and 
flotations go ahead as planned, foreign financial houses will 
have major equity stakes in most of the country’s large 
commercial banks by the end of the year. 

Polish banks, in turn, are going increasingly international. 
Currently Poland's fastest-growing bank, with a 47 percent 
rate of equity growth in 1996, the Pekao S,A, group has 
established offices in New York, Paris, and other major 
international financial centers. 

Meanwhile, led by Austria's Creditanstalt-Bankverein. 
several non-Polish banks are rapidly extending their net- 
works throughout the country and acquiring new segments of 
the corporate and retailing banking market 

Creditanstalt has become a significant source of financing 
for Poland's SMEs (small and medium-sized enterprises). To 
date, the bank has 4.500 such customers, making it one of the 
largest players in this field in Poland. Is this embrace of the 
SME sector a calculated gamble on Poland's future? 

“Not at all. The services we provide — trade-related 
financing, injections of working capital — are inherently 
low-risk. Further, the companies we're dealing with, though 
young, already have proven track records of success and 
corporate accounts meeting strict international standards.” 
sa>s Jacek Moscicki. Bank Creditanstalt S.A.'s CEO. 

“Nor is this outreach to the SME sector the exclusive 
province of Creditanstalt. Quite the opposite. The large 
number of foreign bunks entering Poland's financial market 
and the even larger number of domestic banks having 
successfully carried out restructuring measures have created 
intense competitive pressures.” Mr. Moscicki says. “These 
have forced the banks to look beyond their regular segments 
of customers — the local subsidiaries of international cor- 
porations and Poland's emerging blue chips — into the SME 


sector.” As Mr. Moscicki points out. this development has 
greatly benefited local corporations, as the competition to 
secure their custom has lowered lending margins and_ 
sweetened operarinc conditions. In expanding its base of 
corporate customers in Poland. Creditanstalt can rely on its 
knowledge of Polish companies and their familiarity with 
Creditanstalt — thanks to the activities of iis investment 
banking subsidiary. Creditanstalt Investment- Bank (CAIB). 

In 1996. in the largest deal of its kind. CAIB lead-managed 
the IPO (initial public offering) of Forte S.A.. a major Polish 
manufacturer of furniture, as well as those of two con- 
struction companies. And 1997 looks even better CAIB has 
already lead-managed four share issues in Poland. The 
transactions have a total value of S100 million, equivalent to 
one third of all such issues undertaken in the country during 
the same period. 

In the field of privatization. Creditanstalt takes lull ad- 
vantage of its versatility and range of activities in Poland. 
CAIB advises foreign companies on the acquisition of Polish 
firms and advises Poland's Ministry of the Treasury on rhe 
privatization of state companies. 

CAIB recently helped two NIFs (national investment 
funds) sell various holdings. The bank serves as asset 
manager for one of these funds and is also stewarding the 
listing of two other NIFs onto the Warsaw Stock Exchange. 
No other NIF manager has charge of more than one of the 
closed-end funds. In addition. CAIB has become Poland's 
fourth latgest brokerage house. It is the leading discretionary 
portfolio manager in die country, and it operates Poland's 
second lamest mutual fund. 

Would it be fair to say that Creditanstalt is going local in 
Poland? 

“Yes. It was always our goal in Poland to be a domestic 
financial house relying on strong international backing to 
offer its services, rather than being an international house 
with a small-sized range of operations in Poland." sajs 
Wolfgang Bauer, head of CAlB's operations in Poland. T.S. 


Useful Addresses 


PAIZ 

Polish Agency for Foreign Investment 

Ai. R6z 2, PL-00559 Warsaw 
Tel.: (48-22) 621 62 61/621 8904 
Fax: (48-22) 6218427 

Ministry of Finance - Republic of Poland 

ul. Swietokrzyska 12 
PL-00-916 Warsaw 
Tel: (48-22) 26 23 11 
Fax: (48-22) 694 39 66 


Ministry of the Treasury - Republic of Poland 
36. Krucza/6 
PL-00-522 Warsaw 
Tel: (48-22) 695 87 85 
Fax: (48-22) 628 11 90 

Warsaw Tourist Information Center 

1/13 PI. Zamkowy 
Warsaw 

Tel.: (48-22) 635 18 81 
Fax: (48-22) 831 04 64 


Web Sites 

Fora complete briefing on every aspect of life in Poland, http://www.explore-poland.pl has it all, plus train schedules, 
sightseeing guides, hotel booking services and an excellent range of hyperlinks. 

Tourists should check out the site's On-line Guide to Poland. 

For businesspeople. http://www.paiZ:gov.pl is the "must’ Web site. It contains the latest information 
on the country's economy and its various sectors. The site provides detailed information on PAlZ's services 

and on how to start a business in Poland. 


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PAGE 24 


Khiivert Is Accused 
Of Raping a Woman 

SOC CE R The Dutch police said 
Thursday that they were investi- 
gating a 20-year-old woman's al- 
legation that she was raped by the 
Dutch star Patrick KJiiivert and 
three other men. 

"A 20-year-old woman made a 
report to us of rape by four young 
men and one of those men was the 
well-known soccer player," said 
Klaas Wiltin. a police spokesman. 
Klmvert has not been charged. 

Kiuivert, 20, is moving from 
Ajax to AC Milan this summer. The 
alleged victim, whose name was 
not released, also told her story to a 
Dutch supermarket tabloid, detail- 
ing what she described as a gang 
rape in Kluivert’s apartment in Am- 
sterdam on May 1 1. (AP) 

Cordero Charged 

baseball Wil Cordero, the Bos- 
ton Red Sox outfielder, threatened 
to kill his wife as police arrested 
him after an early morning alter- 
cation that left her nose bloodied, 
according to conit testimony. 

A not guilty plea was entered for 
Cordero at his arraignment Wed- 
nesday, when he was charged with 
assault and battery, assault and bat- 
tery with a dangerous weapon and 
threatening to commit a crime. (AP) 

U.S. Runner Reinstated 

athletics An arbitrator on 
Thursday ordered the American 
track and field governing body to 
reinstate the hurdler Stephon Flen- 
oy in its national trials. 

Flenoy's case is similar to those 
of Mary Slaney and Sandra Farmer- 
Patrick who also have been sus- 
pended pending drug hearings. 

Gilman criticized USATrack and 
Field for handling the original hear- 
ings by conference call, for the time 
it took to stan proceedings and for 
not keeping Flenoy informed. (AP) 



lieralbS^-Sribunc 

Sports 


FRIDAY, JUNE 13,1997 



Montgomerie Starts 
With an Accurate 65 

Other Stars Struggle Early On 


^,111 Jordan 

pai*t the 


ljbt/lV \-orul«i IW 


Colin Montgomerie hitting from the first fairway at the U.S. Open Thursday. He shot 65 to take an early lead. 

A Special 18th Awaits at U. S. Open 


Jens Knippschild returning to 
Tim Henman on Thursday. 

Sampras Walks Through 

tennis Pete Sampras advanced 
to the quarterfinals of the Queen's 
Club grasscourt tournament Thurs- 
day without hitting a ball. New 
Zealand's Brett Steven defaulted 
because of an upset stomach. 

No. 3 seed Goran Ivanisevic 
served 1 7 aces, including three in a 
row to finish the match, to beat 
Martin Lee. a British teenager 
ranked No. 500. 6-1. 7-5. 

No. 4 Tim Henman of Britain, a 
Wimbledon quarterfinalist last 
year, lost to Jens Knippschild, 7-6 
1 7-5 1 . 6-3. Before this week, 
Knippschild. a German, had not 
played on grass in six years and had 
never won a grass-court match. 

• Venus Williams, the 16-year- 
old American, has refused a' wild 
card entry to next week's East- 
bourne event, preferring to qualify. 
Williams wanted extra grass-court 
practice ahead of her Wimbledon 
debut the following week, organ- 
izers of the Eastbourne tournament 
said Thursday. f AP) 

Panthers Fine Wrestler 

football Kevin Greene was a 
no-show Wednesday at the Car- 
olina Panthers three-day min- 
icamp. and the team said it would 
fine the 1996 NFL sack leader for 
his absence. Greene has been con- 
centrating on his second job as a 
professional wrestler. (AP) 


Scoreboard 


Los Angeles Times 

BETHESDA. Maryland — It will 
finish as most of us started. 

Before we learned to hit a wood. 
Before we could afford to play any- 
where but the pitch-and-putL Some- 
where between Goofy Golf and the 
country club. 

To 71 holes of high opera, the ll.S. 
Open golf championship will add a dis- 
tinctly American ending Sunday, and it 
should be a humdinger. It's the 18th 
hole. It features a slope-filled green 
surrounded on three sides by waier. and 
one side by sand. Only 190 yards from 
the tee box. A par three. 

This is the first finishing par three at a 
U.S. Open in 88 years, the first at any of 
the four major tournaments in 57 years. 
Not to mention, golf blasphemy. 

Traditionalists feel that great tour- 
naments should end on holes that nor- 
mally require the use of each of the three 
types of clubs — a wood, an iron and a 
putter. ■ ‘This hole takes the driver out of 
your hand,” complained Tom Lehman, 
last year's leading money winner. 

Traditionalists want to end this Open 
on Congressional Country Club's 17th. 
where tournaments usually end here, 
where Ken Venturi made his weary walk 
at the close of his 1964 Open victory. 

Even members of Congressional were 
disappointed, sending the USGA up to 


Vantage Point / Bill Plaschke 


1,000 letters of complainL To which I 
say, don't get your knickers in a twist 

Watching par fours and par fives on 
television, it is difficult to tell the good 
shots from the bad. There is nothing 
more boring than watching a ball soar 
through the air from a nondescript patch 
of fairway ... and land in the middle of 
another nondescript patch of fairway. 

On the 1 8th hole here, there will be no 
such ambiguity. From tee to pin, thou- 
sands of fans on surrounding hillsides 
will be able to tell exactly what is hap- 
pening. They will know the exact mo- 
ment the winner has won and the loser 
has lost, and exactly how. 

The green is huge, 6,400 square feeL 
But when the hole is at the from, as it 
should be most of the weekend, only the 
most timid will use all that green. The 
courageous will glare at the water, shrug 
at the sand, go for the hole, bet thou- 
sands that their shot will not slip down 
the close-cropped grass along the front 
slope and back into the water. 

It will be a championship potentially 
decided with an iron, a putter and heart 
It will be great theater. And doesn’t the 
USGA know it 

The organization gave several rea- 
sons for the using the hole, including the 


theory that a U.S. Open should be played 
on an exact course used by eveiyday 
golfers. But mostly, it was because they 
saw the amphitheater created by the 
hills, and the potential for the game's 
most exciting finish ever. Even if some 
pros aren't sure exactly how exciting. 

“If you have a lead it's not that hard to 
put an iron on the green,” Tiger Woods 
said. “You can play a safety shot to the 
right if you want, and you have a big 
green to hit to.” 

Jack Nicklaus acted as though the 
opportunity is one he wishes he had at 
his other 40 U.S. Opens. “If you have a 
shot to die green on the last hole, 
wouldn’t you rather it be from a tee than 
from the fairway?" he asked. “That’s 
what we're talking about here.” 

Perhaps Ian Woosnam summed it up: 
“Everybody who says it's easy, well, 
when they are standing there in front of 
the water and have to put it on the green, 
that’s a different story.” 

So the leader’s grand Sunday after- 
noon fairway march toward the club- 
house will be a short trek across a rickety 
bridge. So the champion may get a little 
mud on his slacks. So somebody will 
finish the tournament with a tost ball. 

It’s nothing we won't understand. 


The Associated Press 

BETHESDA, Maryland — Colin 
Montgomerie, who had said that Con- 
gressional Country Club's treacherous 
golf course suited his game, proved it on 
Thursday by shooting a five- under-par 65 
to lead the first round of the U.S. Open. 

Montgomerie, who says he loves 
tough courses birdied five of seven 
holes in the middle of his round to take 
die lead over the rest of the 156-man 
field. Tiger Woods made Augusta look 
easy by hitting the ball long. Colin 
Montgomerie made Congressional, at 
7,21 3 -yard the longest ever Open 
course, look the same way by simply 
hitting it straighL 

“I love this form of golf, where hit- 
ting fairways means something and par 
means something,” he said 

The Scot missed only one fairway and 
two green. One stroke back was former 
PGA champion Hal Sutton, who also 
missed just one fairway. 

Mark McNulty birdied four of the last 
five holes to shoot a 67. 

“If you miss the fairway, it's brutal,” 
said Greg Norman, who missed it four 
times on the front nine and wound up 
with a 75. He wasn't alone. Fred 
Couples looked like his club struck a 
bowling ball when he tried to play out of 
the thick bluegrass on the third hole, 
where he took a double bogey. 

“It makes a big difference when 
you're in the fairway, which I usually 
am.” said Montgomerie. 

Woods struggled on the greens. He hit 
mostly a 2-iron from the tee and - was 2 
under through 10 holes. But he missed a 
4-foot birdie putt on No. 1, a 4-foot par 


putt on No. 3 and also lipped oula par pan - 
in taking another bogey at No. 5. 

Showers threatened throughout the 
day but only a few sprinkles fell. Thar 
made the greens relatively easy to hold, ! 
but the rough makes the U.S. Open 
difficult under any conditions. 

“The golf course was playing pretty 
easy ' said Jack Nicklaus. who finished 
with a 73. “It was pretty much there for 
the raking." 

That's assuming the second shot is a 
mid- iron into the green instead of a sand 
wedge that has to be hacked through the 
rough and back out to the fairway. 

Monrgomerie ran into that problem 1 
just once on No. 6 and it turned a con- 
servative, Open-type round into 
something that looked like Woods at the 
Masters. 

Montgomerie, who missed three 
birdie putts inside 1 2 feet on the first 
three boles, hooked his drive left into the 
dense rough and punched a sand wedge 
out to the fairway. 157 yards from a pin 
on the top tier of the green. His 8-iron 
stuck 1 foot from the hole for a par. and 
he birdied four of the next five holes. . 

“It was the most important par I’ve 
made in a long time,” he said 

Sunon’s only venture into the rough 
came on No. 5 but he saved par. 

“I drove it in the fairway moil oi the 
day,” Sunon said. “And I showed a lot 
of patience. Whoever the champion is 
over the course of 72 holes will have had 
a lot of patience.” 

Norman had company in the rough, 
and on the scoreboard. Couples, Steve 
Elkington, Phil Mickelson and Davis 
Love in ail shot 75. 


Argentina Struggles to a Draw 


Ciwqdrd h\ ' tar SutfFntnI\>tu*'l>r> 

COCHABAMBA, Bolivia — 
Paraguay beat Chile, 1-0, and Ec- 
uador and Argentina drew. 0-0, on the 
first night of the Copa America. 

Ecuador created several clear 
chances Wednesday in a game fea- 
turing two teams that brought some 
regular internationals but rested their 
starplayers- Argentina also recalled its 
goalie. Ignacio Gonzalez, who is 
serving a three-match World Cup ban 
for butting a Bolivian player in April. 

In the opening game, played in the 
same stadium, Robert Acuna scored 
after 28 minutes with a shot that could 
have been stopped by Chile’s goalie 
Nelson Cossio. 

• El Salvador’s coach was suspen- 
ded for two games Wednesday because 
of fan violence at a World Cup qual- 
ifying loss to Mexico on Sunday. 

FIFA, the sport’s governing body, 
also fined the El Salvador federation 
$35,000. MUovan D’Joric will miss 


two World Cup qualifying games — 
against the United States and Costa 
Rica. “We have to accept it, but 1 
don't know why they punished me/' 
the coach said. 

In die final minutes of Mexico’s 1 - 
0 victory, the referee suspended play 
for several minutes after the crowd 
grew angry when El Salvador was not 
awarded a penalty kick. 

■ Real Talks With Ronaldo 

Lorenzo Sanz. the president of 
Real Madrid, met with an agent for 
the Brazilian striker Ronaldo on 
Thursday and said Real hoped to hire 
FC Barcelona’s star if Inter Milan 
fails to sign him. 

Ronaldo's contract, like all Spanish 
contracts, includes a stipulated transfer 
fee. If another Spanish club is prepared 
to pay that fee and the player wishes to 
go, his dub must sell him. Inter, which 
is Italian, cannot exploit this rale, but 
Real Madrid can. (.AP. Reuters) 


Grandpa at the Wheel? It Must Be Le Mans 


By Brad Spurgeon 

International Herald Tribune 

When the 65th annual 24 
Hours of Le Mans starts Sat- 
urday, 37 of the drivers will be 
former Formula One racers. 

In one way. this confirms the 
status of the most prestigious en- 
durance test in the world. But 
some may wonder how a race 
with cars going more than 300 
kilometers an hour < 1 85 mph ) can 
be run with so many old drivers, 
some of whom are grandfathers 
coming out of retirement. 

Mario Andretti, 57, will drive 
his Courage prototype for the 
third straight year as he tries 
again to become only the second 
driver in history to win the In- 
dianapolis 500. the Formula One 
Drivers’ Championship and Le 
Mans. Only Graham Hill has won 
the events that make up motor 
sport's grand slam. 

Andretti said he’d keep own- 
ing back as long as the other two 
drivers of the team could say, “1 
know he can carry his own 
weight; I know he's a guy I want 
on the team.” 


This year one of the two other 
drivers on Andretti's team is his 
son Michael, the CART cham- 
pion. who presumably is disposed 
to want his* father on his team. 

Still, can a man twice the av- 
erage age of most Formula One 
drivers, hold his own in a 24-hour 
race at those speeds? 

“I think it's not so much the age 
in itself rather lhan the length of 
time that you are in the business.” 
said Jan Lammers, 41. a Dutch 
former Formula One driver who 
will be driving a Lotus GT1. 

“Easily until 40 to 45 you 
should be capable of doing a top- 
class job. But that all goes with 
your motivation to really get the 
most out of yourself. And to be 
very sharp and alert on technical 
issues to try to improve your 
equipment. I've been in the busi- 
ness now for 25 years and I'm as 
hungry as anything." 

Henri Pescarolo, 54, four- 
times a Le Mans winner, has driv- 
en in the race a record 30 times. 
He also drove in Formula One. 

“There's the ascending peri- 
od,” he said, “during which we 
are under a maximum amount of 


pressure in order to get into For- 
mula One. then to stay there. It’s 
a period that is psychologically 
very’ difficult, because it’s a con- 
tinual pressure. After 10, 15 and 
sometimes 20 years at the top you 
start to get a tittle worn out psy- 
chologically.” 

That’s when a driver starts 
looking for other forms of racing. 
In endurance races the speed and 
level of competition are high, but 
the pressure is less intense, be- 
cause the drivers do not need to 
reach the absolute limits all the 
time. Pescarolo says age may be 
an advantage in endurance races. 

“It’s in the experience in 
knowing how to analyze the wear 
of the car during a race,” he said, 
“and analyzing the wear of the 
tires in function with the evolving 
meteorological conditions, and 
adapting a different kind of driv- 
ing. Here it’s no longer the pure 
speed or chepossibi lity to turn the 
fastest lap that's most important 
It’s the need to be very fast all the 
time in ail the different condi- 
tions. And that’s where experi- 
ence can compensate for absence 
of ‘youth/ or ’age.’ ” 


Many believe age is relative. 
When Damon Hill switched from 
racing motorcycles to tar racing 
at 23. he shaved a couple years 
off his official age at the time 
because he feared be would be 
considered too old. He did not 
race in Formula One until his 
early 30s, but nevertheless be- 
came world champion last year at 
36. 

“It depends on the context,” 
said Eric Van de Poele. also 36 
and a former Formula One driver, 
who is racing in a Nissan. “In 
endurance racing it’s very im- 
portant to prove that you're fast, 
and that you don't make stupid 
mistakes on the track. It’s true 
that experience counts. But a lot 
of the 25-year-olds of today have 
more experience than I do, be- 
cause they started a lot younger. I 
started at 22, wheal I went to 
driver’s sctaooL” 

Formula One remains the most 
physically demanding form of 
car racing, however, with its sud- 
den and violent speed changes 
during braking, and with the G- 
forces a driver’s neck undergoes 
in cornering. 



Uurml flrbinr/Thr 

Mario Andretti chatting with his son (and teammate) MichacL 

At Le Mans, among the 1 50 or seconds slower thnn teammates 
so drivers this year, there will be a in identical care, 
disparity of talents, with some That’s where the old guys like 
drivers turning laps several Mario exploit their experience. . 


Major League Standings 

AMEBKAN LUCU 1 

EAST DIVISION 



W 

L 

PCI. 

Boltinwre 

42 

18 

-TOO 

New Vo it 

36 

27 

.571 

Toronto 

71 

31 

JB3 

Defrail 

29 

32 

.475 

Boston 

2£ 

37 

.403 


CENTRAL DIVtSKM 


Cleveland 

32 

27 

M2 

Kansas City 

29 

32 

.475 

Milwaukee 

2 b 

3? 

.467 

Chicago 

28 

34 

.453 

Mlnnnala 

78 

35 

444 


west onnsiDN 


Seattle 

34 

29 

540 

Anaheim 

33 

39 

532 

Tesas 

32 

29 

525 

GoMand 

26 

19 

.400 


NfflOMUUWI 

EAST DIVISION 



W 

L 

Pa. 

GB 

Alta mo 

42 

23 

.65* 

— 

Florida 

37 

26 

587 

4’i 

Montreal 

35 

2B 

550 

6‘A 

New York 

35 

28 

556 

6‘ « 

Philadelphia 

21 

41 

539 

20 

CENTRAL HlftHOH 



Houston 

32 

31 

m 

— 

PttR uurgh 

31 

33 

493 

— 

St Louis 

30 

33 

476 

1 

Clnomtafl 

26 

37 

.413 

5 

Chicago 

25 

39 

391 

6'i 


we srr division 



San Front tern 

35 

IB 

556 

— 


Colorado 25 29 547 

Los Angeles 31 32 .492 4 

San Diego 58 IS MS 7 

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Scuffle 100 010 It 0—5 9 0 

Toronto ooo ooo 100-1 5 I 

Fassera Ayala (9) and Maim no: Demon. 
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Sant. W— Fasstmi, 6-2. L— Clemons, 11-1. 
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Qqutst, A. SmoB 17), Matter IB}, Taylor (8) 
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W— Canton. 4-& L— MUofmson 0»l 
Chicago 101 in 000-5 8 1 

New Tort BOO 004 (On— 7 9 1 

DRUeL T. CasMo (6). Karcteter 171. 
McElroy 17). R. Hernandez (8) and 
Kaitavtce: KoVogeis. MenSazs IS). Stanton 

(8) . M. Rivera (9) and GimKL W — Stanton. 1- 
0. L— McElrey. 0-1. Su— M. Rivera (20). 
HRs— Chicago. SnopeK (4). New Yoifc. 
Retdor 161 

MdwuutM 000 012 000 00—3 5 2 

amM OOO 200 100 01— C II 0 


(ll limlngs):BJMcOonalil Worn (8), 
Widunon (8), Adamson (10). Fetters (10). 
Do Jones (11) and Matheny, Levb iBl; 
Henhfeer, M. Jackson (9). Mormon (vi. 
Shury (0), Assenirurefier (1 1 1 and 5. Alomar. 
W— AssenmaclKf. 2-0. L— Oj J ones. 3-3. 
HRs— Milwaukee* cwBu (5). Js.Valcnttn (51. 
Onetand. Thome (171. 

Texas 000 351 000-9 18 1 

Mmnesahi 901 120 200-6 13 0 

Burkett Gunderson (7). X. Hernandez (7). 
Wcttetand (9) andl.PodriguettAldrcd. Jarvis 
(5). FrJtodrtgircz 16), Guardado (8), Aguilera 
(9) and Stemboch W— Burkett. 5-5. 
L— Aldiwt 2-9. Sv— Welle land H3) 

HRs— Texas, I. Rodriguez 191. Greer (71. 
Ju.Geruahu 2 (12). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Alta ota 711 000 003-6 11 1 

Colorado 301 003 3li-9 16 0 

Brack. Cfcmtz (5). Embree (*), Btetecki <71 
Byrd (8) and EMPeree Thomsen. M. 
Munoz (7). S. Rccd (8L Leskanic (9) and 
Je.P.Md. W— Thomson 2-6. L-C kudz, 2-1. 
HRs— Altanlo. DU ones f7). McGnff (9). 
Edd. Perez [II. Coton da Galarraga (171. 
it Peed (*) 

New Y<.rk 000 1BO 030-4 7 0 

Oncaga 100 101 Til— 5 13 0 

Reynoso, Trfleek (6), Kashlwada (7). Lidh 
(7J. MeMidKHl iB) and Hundley; 
Jc.Garuafez. Patterson 18), T. Adame (8) and 
Senate. W-T. Adams, 1-3 L— McMtchooL 
35. HRs— New York, M HunStfj 

(14). Oiteoga. One (ll- 
Ftarida 401 010 000-4 13 0 

SaiRmctece 200 00# 901 -0 9 I 

Hefluig. F. Heredia (41, Powell WJ. Non (91 
and C Johnson; Ruder, Tnwni (5), Pude 
id). P« (71. D. Horny (91 and » Wilkins, 


W — Hettng. 2-4. L— fioefec 2-2. Sv— Nun 
M7j. HR— Florida BonMa (4). 

Pittsburgh 000 010 000-1 6 I 

Ondaetl 000 000 20x-2 « 0 

Loatza Pefcn (7), Sodowsky (B) and 
Kfinddb Tomka Rom linger IB). Show (B) ana 
J. Oliver. W-Tomka 2-1. L-Loatza 5-3. 
S«— Shaw (111. 

Philadelphia 200 000 010—3 7 0 

Montreal 000 021 OI1-4 t 0 

Beech. Spradlin (81 and UobaTthit 
Bti linger, Urbina (9} and Widgcr. 
W — Ballinger, 4-5. L— Spradlin 1-3. 
Sv— Urbina (10). HRs— Montreal Lansing 
(9). McGuire (2). 

SI. Louts 200 100 580-8 11 1 

Son Diego 018 011 *00—3 6 1 

ALBenes. Peflmsek 17) and Dtfeflce. 
J -Hamilton. Burrows (7). Erdos (7). P. Smith 
io) and Flaherty. W-Al-Benes. 6-5. 
L— Burrows. 0-2. Sv— PettovSok (1 1. 
Hurston 101 110 081—6 10 1 

Les Angeles 300 110 33 *- 10 ll ] 

Hampton R. Garcia rSL Mognarrte (B1 ond 
Eusebius Path. Radinsky (B). Hall (8). 
TaWbtrel (9) ond Piazza. W— Park. 5-3. 
L— Hampton. 2-1 HRs— Houston. Blggio 
(ll). Los Anqetes, Piazza ml. Mondesi 2 
(13). Kanos (91. 

Japanese Leagues 


Yomfuri 22 32 — .401 

immmtnin 

YtAuB «. Han&hbtl 
Yokohama 8. Yom'rori 5 
Churichl &, Hiroshima! 

MaHCLUon 


Oris 

W 

2& 

L 

19 

T 

Pet 

596 

GO 

Scibu 

31 

22 

— 

585 



Onto 

27 

28 

— 

491 

5j0 

Nippon Ham 

26 

29 

— 

673 

6.0 

Latte 

22 

27 

1 

549 

720 

Kauebu 

22 

31 

1 

.415 

M 



W 

L 

T 

pa. 

W 

Yakult 

35 

1? 

_ 

448 

_ 

Hanshln 

27 

27 

— 

500 

BJ) 

Hiroshima 

26 

26 

— 

500 

80 

QiunkM 

26 

27 

— 

^91 

85 

Yctohwna 

22 

& 


<449 

105 


THUUSMT 1 * USUITS 

Nippon Ham 9. 0*3 
Soibui Kintetsu 4 


woBut cup auAUFTMe 

EUROKANZONE 
GROUP ■. OUAUFYMQ ROlfHa 
Iceland (^ Lithuania 0 

lUSHOtMfUUKE 
France 2, Kdy 2 

fOPA AMfKfl 
Paraguay l.CIfleO 
Ecuador a Argentina 0 

KHMOABULNCOPFIMAL 

SECOND LEG 

MTK2.BVSC0 

(MTK wan 8-0 an aggregate) 

amnBTMWMii 
n*At STAHDOtSSr Sparta Prague 65: 
Slavta PraquBil; PK JabtaWr: Mr Body Bmo 
Stouon Uboiee S* Ct*k* a udcfwfcn 
44. Perm Draevfe* 41 Stoma Okumuc 40. 

Koucut Opouo 4tt Bdltfr Oefcova 27t VBJerta 
Plzen Hi Viktona Zizkov 70; FR Tejjlkc 2B. 5k 


Hiadec Kudom 2& FC Kanrtna 25, Bohemi- 
ans Prague 19. 


TOVEMAHM 

WEDtCSOAY. Bl JOHANNESBURG 
British Lions 20. Gauteng Lions U 


TUBO DAY MATCH 

KQTTWGHAteSWRe VS, WJSTWUJA 
THURSDAY. M NOTTINGHAM. ENOLAAD 
NamngnattsNni 1st Innings: 239 aR out 


amemcahlbacue 

CHKAeo-PutC Tuny Parra an 15-day dis- 
abled list, retroactive Id Juno 3. Recalled OF 
Jett Abbott from Nashville, AA. Signed OF 
Brett Caradonna LHP Jim Pgraue, RHP 
Rodcy Biddle and RHP Jake Meyer. 

CLEVELAND -RoattJM LHP Brfon Ander- 
oon tram Buffalo, AA. Optioned PUP Dairy 
Graves to Buffalo. 

DETROIT— Adivoted SS Orlando Miller 
Frem 60-day disabled 1st. Oadgnoted LHP 
John Cummings foi'osslgmnenL 

NEW TONE —Optioned IF Andy Fan la 
COftjmbu& IL. 

OAlCLAND-PDt INF Scott Sptezio an lately 
disabled tel relioocttve to June 6. Catted uo 


L _ ,3 


INF Mark Beflhom from Edmonton PCL. 

Seattle— T raded RHP Paul Menhait to 

Son Dwgo Padres for RHP Andres Bwrnien. 

Assigned Barmen to Toeomn PCL 

TAMPA BAY-Signed LHP Jam 
JimorretSigned OF Kenny Kelly. LHP Robert 
Dows CToby Hal C Cartas Vazquez and C 
Bart Carter. 

Texas -Signed RHP Todd Van Poppet to 
minor. league contract. 

national league 

Arizona -Signed LHP Jeff Wilson and 
LHP Jeff Santa. 

anaNNATl-Signed 1 B Toby Sanchez. OF 
David Tidwell, and SS Kevfn Baderdeen. 

MOirrwsAu-S.fcnbfl RHP Thomas Tucker, 
2B Clarence Myore, SS Joshua Reding. LHP 
Pyan Becks, 1 8 Talmadge Norman, 2B Scott 
4edk RHP Ryan Saylor. LHP Raymond 
Plummer. OF Michoel Edga and RHP Tobin 
Lanzato. 

new Tome —Signed SS Jason Brett and 3B 
Jason Bow mg and assigned them to 
Kingsport AppLStgitedRHP EricCammacL 
PHP Dovrid Lohmurn, RHP Joseph Maberry, 
OF J«o Rljo- Berger and 3B Jason Bnaefi and 
owigned Ihon to Pltisfieid. NY-PetmL 
Signed SS Bobby H*. C Brtoi Jorvkns.COofk 
Lambert. OF Nick Rains and 2B Anthony 
Valentine and resigned them to GCL 

PHI loe LPH 1 A — Signed RHP EW A dab: 
SS Brian Horns. SS Kevin Kurina, RHP Gooff 
totwtsu. c Johwy Eshutefc RHP James 
Fresh, ss Jeff Terrell 38 James Mcttamata 
OF Gary Burnham. RHP Brett Block. 1 B An- 
grew Do minique. RHP Kevin Shipp. C Ed 
i-ttzpalrtck. ss UnriCasBns. RHP Roger Eo- 
mtl RHP Paler MondeHa and 3B James 
and assigned Ittem to Botov kL NY- 
PennL. Signed OF Duane Johnson LHP Par 


DrtscolL C Jerry Vaktez, LHP Adorn Wt*M 
RHP Chad Albovgh, RHP Marti 
RHPChre Humphries INF U Mart* C"®* 
RHP Tam Key. LHP Jeff Hoateete C 8)0" 
Cody, and 18 Jo na t han Bushman and a* - 
signed them to Mortrtsvifle, Appl- 
Ian DiEdO— Put INF Craig SWpfcT » 
day disabled Ost retnMBJhre to Sunday, 

ttwted OF Chris Janes from 15 kW dboW« 

Bst. Acquired RHP PwriMenhcrthura*®; 
tie in etdange tor RHP Ambes Beromen m 
assigned Mertwtl to Las Vbgos, PCL. 


NATKMAL BASKE1BAU. AS80CUTKW 

Indianapolis— N amed Rk* CofWe o» 
Die* Hotter assistant coaches. 

FOOTBALL 

HATWIIAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

ARizoiiA-agned DL Jerry Drtretoa-*® 
con trod. Released K Arte Larsen. 

Atlanta —Signed S Chris Boyne. 

Carolina— A greed to terms wfftDc 
Mifar. . . 

KANSAS -Signed WR Lake Oawson 10 1- 
yearcortroCL . .. _ 

HEW ORLEANS -Signed LB Brian Jones » 
J-jw contract. .. _ 

SAN die 00— Signed LB Michae l Httm jWj 

In 3-year contract and DB Mark Morfreu* ra 
l-ynor contract. _ — 

SEATTLE -Signed TE IRHd MI< 10 3_T " 
c on t ra ct. 

n ash mcion -signed WR AMn Horow- 

HUES IT 

NATIOHAI, HOeKET LEAGUE 

NHL— Announced D«i Craig w« K* 
leagues hoekoy u p cra Bcm dawtmem 
kefivu Sepftunbff I. ^ 

BUFFALO -Named P«y Ratf*’ 0 
manager. 


ij/Sfr a / r 6 ! ‘J 
This i * * 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 1997 

SPORTS 


i> lj&' 


PAGE 25 




i 


mene 


An 111 Jordan Drags 
Bulls Past the Jazz 


/accurate fjj 

ttruggh' I'jiriy f) 


Struggles ! 


By J.A. Adande 

WililllllfU'll /W St'ITM «■ 

SALT LAKE CITY — Thirty-four 
times Michael Jordan ha s scored’ more 
than 40 points in a playoff game. Per- 
haps none of those performances was as 
impressive as the 38-point effort he 
somehow found the energy to put forth 
the other night. 

Despite a stomach infection that left 
him weak and wobbly. Jordan managed 
Wednesday to play 44 minutes and lead 
. the Chicago Bulls back from an early 
16-poim deficit to bear the Utah Jazz, 
90-88, in Game 5 of the National Bas- 
ketball Association finals. The victory 

• cave them a 3-2 lead in the best-of-seven 
' series. His three- pointer with 25 seconds 

left put the Bulls ahead for good. 

When it was over, after the Bulls had 
. stopped Utah ‘s 23-game winning streak 
at home and handed the Jazz their first 
. home defeat in the playoffs. Scottie 
. Pippen ran to embrace his teammate. It 
was as much an ourpouring of emotion 
as it was a necessary crutch: Jordan 
looked as if he needed the support just to 
remain standing. 

“I almost played myself into passing 
our.*' Jordan said. ‘ 'I came in and I was 
almost dehydrated and it was all jusr to 
win a basketball game. " He drank fluids 
. for about 15 minutes after the game. 

“I’ve played many seasons with Mi- 
chael." Pippen said. “I've never seen 
him as sick, to the point where I didn’t 
even think he was going to put his 
uniform on. The effort he came out and 

• gave us today, it was just incredible. He 
made big shots after big shots. He kept 
wanting the ball. He showed how pro- 
fessional he is.” 

The Bulls lost Games 3 and 4 here and 
were on the verge of bei ng pushed to the 
brink of elimination for the first time in 

• their five trips to the NBA finals. Game 
6 and Gome 7 tif necessary) will be at 
the Bulls home arena, where they are 9- 
i in the postseason, though the Jazz 

• played well there in a two-point loss in 
Game 1. 

“I wanted it real bad,’ * Jordan said of 


Chicago 90, Utah 88 





Ottawa 






Min 

re 

FT 

O-T 

A 

PF Pb 1 

Pippen 

45 

5-17 

7-9 

2-10 

S 

4 

17 

Rodman 

23 

1-t 

0-3 

1-7 

1 

6 

2 

Longley 

26 

0-7 

0-1 

1-4 

2 

1 

12 

Jordan 

44 

13-27 

10-12 

2-7 

5 

3 

38 

Harper 

Si 

2-4 

0-0 

1-4 




WIIDoms 

23 

3-8 

34 

1-4 

0 

2 


Ken 

24 

0-3 

0-0 

0-2 



0 

Kukoc 

24 

3-5 

0-0 

2-4 

2 

2 

9 

Buechler 

A 

0-0 

0-0 

0-0 

0 

1 

0 

Coffey 

3 

0-0 

041 

0-0 

0 

2 

0 

Totab 

240 

32-72 

20-30 

10-43 

17 25 

90 



UUH 






Min 

FG 

FT 

0-T 

A 

PFPb 1 

Russell 

40 

4-10 

04 

2-7 


2 


Malone 

34 

7-17 

5-9 

1-7 


5 

19 

Ostertag 

34 

5-a 

3-4 

7-15 

0 

3 

13 

Homacek 

29 

2-M 

2-3 

15 

2 

A 

7 

Stockton 

36 

5-10 

2-3 

2-3 

5 

3 

13 

Anderson 

13 

1-2 

0-0 

0-0 

0 


2 

Efetey 

12 

1-3 

CHI 

0-0 

4 

0 

2 

Monte 

14 

4-7 

04) 

0-2 

0 

0 

11 

Foster 

Io 

0-3 

fr6 

0-6 

1 

3 

6 

Carr 

11 

2-4 

<W> 

0-0 

2 

3 

4 

Keefe 

1 

04J 

04] ■ 

0-0 

0 

0 

0 

Totab 

240 

31-75 

18-25 

13-45 

21 

25 

88 

Chicago 

14 


33 

IB 


23—90 | 

Utah 

2? 


24 



16-88 

3-Point Goat* B-19, 421 {Russell 3-5, Monte 3-5, 

Homacek 1 4, Stockton 1 -4. Makme 0 - 11 . Tectwtfenb: 1 

| Stockton 743 fourth. 





_l 


the pivotal Game 5. “I tried to do my 
best-” 

Phil Jackson, the Bulls’ coach, said 
Jordan woke up in the middle of the 
night and felt ill. He was diagnosed with 
viral gastroenteritis, and missed the 
team's morning shoo taro und. 

“There was no doubt about the fact 
we were worried about him even being 
able to play,” Jackson said. 

“He hadn't gotten out of bed all 
day,” Jackson added. “So we were 
worried about the amount of minutes, 
and he said, “Let me play and regulate 
my minutes and I'll let you know bow 
I’m doing out there’ — and he played 44 
minutes. That’s an amazing effort in 
itself.’’ 

The 6-foor-7 Pippen did a better job 
of exploiting his matchup against the 6- 
foot-3 Jeff Homacek, and finished- with 
17 points, 10 rebounds and 5 assists. 
Bulls center Luc Longley had his best 
game of the series, making 6 of 7 shots 
to finish with 12 points, and forward 
Toni Kukoc made three three-pointers. 



Chicago's Michael Jordan keeping the bail away from Utah's Jeff Homacek as the Bulls squeaked by in Game 5. 


Mostly, this was Jordan's game. He 
made 13 of 27 shots. 10 of 12 free 
throws, had seven rebounds, five assists 


the Bulls' bench. 25 to 16. the Jazz 
couldn't get quite enough from its top 
players. Malone played only 34 


and one blocked shot. He scored 1 5 of minutes. John Stockton, scoring 13 


his points in the fourth quarter. 
Although Utah’s reserves outscored 


points, had a paltry assist- to -turnover 
ratio of 5:3. 


“Their defense was good,' ’ Stockton 
said. “When we don't do what we’re 
supposed to do as a group, we end up 
taking a lot of outside’shots. fadeaways, 
desperation shots. That’s basically what 
it came down to for us.“ 


-v -=? 4 




, ■. 


i-rir?.'- -•r-Tr'-- — 


Clemens Runs Into His Nemesis as Griffey Powers Mariners 



The tesucitiirtl Press 

Roger Clemens escaped with a no-decision the 
last time Ken Griffey Jr. came to Toronto. He 
wasn't so lucky this time. 

Griffey doubled home two runs in the seventh 
inning Wednesday and the Seattle Mariners beat 

Baseball Roundup 

the Blue Jays, 5-1 . handing Clemens his first loss 
after he started the season with 1 1 victories. 

“You know Roger’s going to give everything 
he has on the mound,” said Griffey, who hit two 
homers earlier this season against Clemens. 
“You know you can’t get behind because he’s 
going to put you out of your misery if you do.” 

Qemens has made everyone but Griffey miser- 
able this season. In his only no-decision, on April 
. 26, Griffey hit two of his homers off Clemens in a 
13-8 victory over the Blue Jays. 

”1 thought every play that could be made was 
made." Clemens .said. “I throw 95 mph and the 
ball is coming back at you at 125 — a blink of an 
eye." 

" Griffey is 22-for-53 (.415), with five homers 
against Clemens, a three-time Cy Young Award 
winner. 

Gemens lost for the first time since a 4-2 defeat 


to the New York Yankees on Sept. 28 while with 
Boston. Jeff Fassero (6-2) allowed one run and 
five hits over 8W innings, and the top four Blue 
Jays in the lineup were a combined 0-for-16 with 
five strikeouts. 

“Maybe I concentrated a bit more because of the 
pitcher "I was throwing against." Fassero said 
Clemens gave up four earned runs in seven-plus 
innings, struck out five and left with a 1 .94 ERA. 
still tops in the league. The Blue Jays averaged 5.75 
runs a game in Clemens’s 12 previous starts. 

Tigers 4, Athletics 2 In Detroit. Curtis Pride’s 
two-run single capped a three-run eighth as the 
Tigers completed a two-game sweep of Oakland. 
Oakland's Geronimo Berroa homered for the 
third straight game, hitting his J5th home run in 
the fourth. 

Royals B, Angola 1 Chili Davis hit his fourth 
homer in five games and had three runs batted in 
to lead Kansas City to victory. In the last seven 
games, the 37-year-old Davis is 12-for-23. 

Rad sox io. Orioles 1 1n Boston, Tom Gordon 
came wi thin one our of his second shutout and 
settled for a four-hitter as Boston won for only the 
third time in 12 games. 

Indians 4, Brewers 3 Omar Vizquel’s one-OUt 
squeeze bunt scored a pinch-runner. Pat Borders, 
with the winning run in the bottom of the 1 1th. 


Yankees 7, White So* 5 Trailing. 5-0, New York 
scored four runs in the sixth — two on a homer by 
Cecil Fielder — and three in the eighth to beat 
Chicago. 

Rangers 9, Twins 6 Juan Gonzalez broke out of 
a slump with two homers, a double and three runs 
batted in as Texas ended a four-game losing 
streak. 

The Rangers were warming up for a date with 
history Thursday, when their game against the 
San Francisco Giants was due to inaugurate reg- 
ular season interleague play. 

In National League games: 

Mariins 6, Giants 3 San Francisco prepared for 
its big night Thursday by losing to Florida, 

The San Francisci>Texas game at The Ballpark 
in Arlington on Thursday was scheduled to start at 
8:35 P.M. eastern daylight time. The night's three 
other interleague games were all on the West 
Coast starting at 10:05. 

“It is pretty historic,” the Giants manager. 
Dusty Baker, said Wednesday. Speaking of his 
starting pitcher, he added: "I told Mark Gardner 
he's going to go to the Hall of Fame tomorrow 
after that ballgame." 

The Giants second baseman. Jeff Kent, said, 
“It’s changing the tradition of the game. It’s 
taking a lot away from the game.” 


San Francisco’s loss to Florida, combined with 
Colorado’s victory over Atlanta, reduced the Gi- 
ants' lead over the Rockies to a half game. 

One day after suffering a no-hitter by Florida’s 
Kevin Brown, the Giants stranded 15 batters 
against the Marlins. 

cubs s, Nets 4 In Chicago, Scott Servais scored 
the go-ahead run on a wild pitch by Greg McMi- 
chael with two outs in the eighth inning as the 
Cubs stopped a six-game losing streak. 

Rockies 9, Staves 6 In Denver, Andres Galar- 
raga and Jeff Reed each hit two-nin homers as 
Colorado won consecutive home gajnes for the 
first time since late May. 

Rads 2, Pirates 1 In Cincinnati, Terry 
Pendleton’s pinch double broke a seventh-inning 
tie as the Reds rallied to win for the second 
straight game. 

Bxpoi 4, Phillies 3 In Montreal, Mark 
Grudzielanek's run-scoring double with two outs 
in the eighth gave the Expos their sixth straight 
victory.. 

cardinals 8, Padres 3 Royce Clayton’s bases- 
ioaded triple in the seventh broke the game open 
as St. Louis won in San Diego. 

Dodgers io, Astros 5 Raul Mondesi hit two 
homers and drove in five runs as ihe Dodgers beat 
visiting Houston. 


Foul Line 
Comes Back 
To Haunt 
‘Mailman’ 


By Tom Friend 

i\Vh Yi-rk Srr. i, , 

SALT LAKE CITY — Karl Malone 
and the foul line have to stop meeting 
like this. In Game 1 . the foul line won. In 
Game 4. Malone won. And in Game 5. 
the foul line struck back. 

With a boiled-over Delta Center 
crowd screaming. ''MVP! MVP!** on 
Wednesday night, the Jazz power for- 
ward misdirected a fourth-quarter free 
throw with 2 minutes 25 seconds re- 
maining, and then made the worst as- 
sumption of his life. He assumed Mi- 
chael Jordan would moke a foul shot. 

With 46.5 seconds remaining and the 
Bulls trailing by 85-84. Jordan made the 
first of two free throws. Malone ex- 
pected Jordan to swish the second shot, 
but instead it ricocheted off the nm. 

“I didn’t get a good body on Toni 
Kukoc.” Malone said, "and tie was able 
to tip the ball out to Michael." 

Jordan knew what to do with it. Stom- 
ach flu and all. he drilled the 3-point 
bomb to ruin Malone's next Harley- 
Davidson ride. Malone scored one lousy 
point in Wednesday night's fourth 
quarter, but he will take the motorcycle 
nde anyway, up a remote mountain, 
perhaps’ around midnight. 

“It’s just one of those things 1 kind of 
like to do — just get away to"one of my 
favorite spots, just alone, just away.” 
Malone said. “No. I'm not suicidal." 

Someone had to lose the duel on 
Wednesday night between the Mailman 
and Con Aar. (“Jordan’s sick?" Utah’s 
Bryon Russell said. “Sick of being in 
Utah, maybe.”) Malone scored" 19 
points, to Jordan’s 3S. and he wasn’t the 
one with the stomach virus. The Jazz 
lost. 90-SS. 

Apparently, two days off were rwo 
too many. The Jazz had been in a state of 
euphoria after Sunday's Game 4. par- 
ticularly after Coach Jerry Sloan's slob- 
bering " post-game speech. Unfortu- 
nately, the Bulls were not available for a 
doubleheader Sunday night. 

Forty-eight hours' passed, and then 
Jordan hit the Jazz for 17 points in the 
second quarter. 

Sloan thought his team was prepared. 
Immediately after Malone's rwo free 
throws had clinched Sunday's victory, 
the coach slammed the locker-room 
door and called a team meeting. He 
wanted absolute silence. “Finally." he 
said. "Finally you believe you can bear 
these guys." 

On Monday and Tuesday, they be- 
lieved it. And 14 minutes into Game 5, 
they still believed it. But by halftime, 
fear had re-entered the building. 

Malone was in foul trouble, having 
committing the silliest reach foul of his 
career In the second quarter, and he had 
to sit (hand on chin) while Chicago 
overcame a 16-point Utah lead. 

Malone had entered the game a re- 
vitalized power forward. Only 10 days 
ago, he had botched two free throws to 
cost the Jazz Game 1. and he was so 
sullen, his wife thought he might never 
recover. “He couldn't even telf me what 
was wrong with him,’ * Kay Malone said. 
“I made his favorite meal, spaghetti . . . 
then, he just woke up one day and felt 
it.” The bad feeling “was over. ” 

She might be back cooking spaghetti 
before Friday night’s game. 


















PAGE 26 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. JUNE 13. 1997 


OBSERVER 

Killing Fields 


By Russell Baker 

W ASHINGTON — The 
military exists to kill 
people in large numbers. Its 
press agents prefer to say, 
“No. it exists to prevent such 
mass killings.” It does so, they 
say. by being ready and will- 
ing to kill in large numbers. 

And so, this being the land 
of the free and the home of the 
press agent, we prettily real- 
ity by calling it the Defense 
Department, while referring 
to death as “body count.” 

Historically, our military's 
killing work has been inflic- 
ted exclusively on men. Men 
who hated it were forced to do 
it anyhow. 


Such men must always con- 
stitute a great majority, since 

(1) most men instinctively 
shrink from killing people, and 

(2) most men fear the prospect 
of being killed or maimed, 
which "are high-probability 
risks of the job. Commanders 
sensibly pack their armies with 
males young enough to be- 
lieve themselves immortal. 

Until recently few women 
have shown much zest for this 
ghastly toil. Now however, 
they clamor for official li- 
cense to kill and be killed, just 
like all those wretched men, 
most of whom, if given their 
druthers, would rather do 
neither. 

What we have here is a 
cockamamie perversion of 
the otherwise sensible prin- 
ciples of the feminist move- 
ment. What was to be hoped 
for from feminism was a 
manning influence on the es- 
sentially boyish, game-play- 
ing nature of American life! 

A great deal of the sexual 
hysteria now racking the mil- 
itary comes from deep and 
sullen male resistance to 
women claiming a “right" to 


kill and be killed for the coun 
try. The Kelly Flinn case, no 
matter how the Air Force ra- 
tionalizes it, was about a boy- 
ish, game -playing system de- 
termined to keep women 
from flying a glamorous 
killing machine. 

This led with fine, ironic 
and inexorable justice to the 
case of Air Force General 
Joseph Ralsron. a sexual sin- 
ner like Kelly Flinn and prob- 
ably millions of other Amer- 
icans. if truth be told. 

Hie general had an adul- 
terous relationship 13 years 
ago while separated from his 
wife. “Fair’s fair" is the cry 
in Washington, so General 
Ralston, who was about to 
become chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff, withdrew. 

Tales of sexual abuses of 
military women are common- 
place. So are reports of con- 
sensual sex among military 
women and men. And what 
else was to be expected? The 
military is not a Boy Scout 
Camporee. It is teaching 
young people to kill other 
young people, a work that does 
not prosper when men are ex- 
pected to behave like gentle- 
men and women like ladies. 

Needing youth's muscle 
and gullibility, the military 
must deal with a huge number 
of men and women at the age 
of raging hormones. Li- 
centious and even abusive be- 
havior is easily predictable. 
All this is complicated by the 
American culture's childish 
view of sex, which requires us 
to be shocked by it even as we 
rejoice in the prurience of TV 
soap operas, supermarket 
tabloids and gossip about 
love children of the stars. 

Maybe full sexual integra- 
tion of the military is a noble 
idea whose time has not 
come. If we were in a shoot- 
ing war now, we could be in 
real trouble. 

New YlvI Times Service 


Shakespeare’s ‘Cockpit’ Is a Rousing Success 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Sen ice 

L ONDON — So finally, almost four cen- 
turies later, the prologue to “Henry V” 
seemed to make sense as Mark Rylance, the 
actor playing King Harry of England, stood 
at the from of the stage in the replica of 
Shakespeare's Globe Theatre and asked: 
“Can this cockpit hold the vasty fields of 
France? Or may we cram within this wooden 
O the very casques that did affright the air at 
Agmcourt?” 

Still, if in Shakespeare's Lime the answer 
was no doubt affirmative, today Ryiance. 
who is director of the new Globe, might well 
have added a few questions. Can this cockpit 
become more than an Elizabethan theme 
park? Will this new wooden O offer a genu- 
ine theater experience or merely a fresh 
stopover on the Shakespearean tourist cir- 
cuit? 

The dream of building a replica of 
Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre near its original 
site beside the Thames was bom of the Amer- 
ican actor Sam Wanamaker os far back as 
1970. Bui in the long years of fund-raising 
and construction that followed, there was 
ample time for Londoners to sound skeptical. 
Now. with the Globe finally completed and 
its first full season under way. the verdict is in. 
Both public and critics have been won over. 

Wanamaker died in 1993, but his daugh- 
ter, the actress Zoe Wanamaker, was to recite 
the prologue to “Henry V“ at the start of a 
special performance called “Triumphes and 
Mirth” which was to be attended by Queen 
Elizabeth on Thursday. The evening, in- 
cluding Act IV of “Henry V" and Act V of 
“The Winter’s Tale,” was rhe official open- 
ing of the theater. 

Preview performances open to the public 
began late last month, offering an occasion to 
judge both the quality of the productions and 
the experience of reliving something of the 
ambience of popular English theater at the 
turn of the 17th century. 

In August, two non-Shakespearean plays 
of the era will take over: Thomas 
Middleton’s comedy “A Chaste Maid in 
Cheapside" and “The Maid's Tragedy" by 
Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher. " 

Of the first two plays to be performed in 
repertory twice daily (except Mondays) 
through Aug. 3, “Henry V" seems to fare 
best. This production, directed by Richard 
Olivier, seeks as far as possible to show the 
play as it might have been performed at the 



J,ifcr. 

A scene from “Henry V,” as performed at the new Shakespeare's Globe. 


Ji.hr. Tuluf—f 


original Globe, using ornate period costumes 
and an all-male cast ( even for the key roles of 
Mistress Quickly and Princess Katherine). 

In contrast to its depiction in epic movie 
versions of the play or even some theater 
productions on large stages, the Battle of 
Agincourt takes place largely out of view. 
But flag-waving, battle sounds and military 
drums echoing ffom the musicians’ gallery’ 
behind the stage suffice to create die mood. 
By doubling up roles, the 13 actors handle 
theplay's 36 characters. 

Tne production connects well with the 
audience — the 500 “groundlings' ' in the 
“bear pit*' and the 900 others sitting on 
wooden benches in three galleries — by 
presenting the play with the patriotic fervor 
that Shakespeare intended. Thus, if the new 
Globe's hope is to provoke interaction be- 
tween stage and public as in times of yore, it 
proved easy to incite pantomimic boos and 
hisses whenever the enemy French appeared. 
This did not detract from the high drama and 
earthy humor of the play itself. 

Rylance’s Henry was well received. “He 


is a superb Shakespearean, with an enga- 
gingly hesitant manner that invites us into his 
mind,'’ Robert Butler wrote in The Inde- 
pendent on Sunday. “He suggests again and 
again that he has reached a crossroads and 
that his next thought could go either way. In 
this lovely intimate theater, he finds a still- 
ness and poise." 

“The Winter's Tale" proved more of a 
challenge simply because, by passing suc- 
cessively through tragedy, magic, humor and 
romance, it lacks the" clear narrative drive of 
"Henry V." In this case, with the stage 
covered in earth, the director David Freeman 
has opted for a more modem rendering of the 
play, with the Sicilians and Bohemians 
dressed respectively in brown and blue pea- 
sant tunic s. rubber tires serving as prop chairs 
and Autolycus the rogue appearing boozily 
in raincoat and trilby, with bottle in hand. 

With Mark Lewis Jones playing Leontes, 
King of Sicily, the production does succeed 
in achieving high poignancy at its climactic 
end when Leonres’s much-offended Queen 
Hermione appears as a statue and comes 


back to life. “She’s warm," the king cries 
out. In this case, women play women's roies, 
with Anna -Livia Ryan warmly applauded 
for her strong performance as Perdira, Le-‘ 
ontes’s daughter. 

Yet in these early days, almost as im- 
portant as the productions is the novelty of 
attending a play in this theater, modeled on. 
the first Globe, which was built in 1599 and 
destroyed by fire in 1613. Its replacement 
was closed by the Puritans in 1642. 

Like its predecessors, the new Globe is 
made of wood, with Norfolk reeds providing 
the thatched roof and lime plaster covering 
the walls. The stage and galleries are 
covered, but the “bear pit" is open to the 
skies. 

So, yes, the weather is an important vari- 
able. above all for the groundlings, who are 
not allowed to block the view of others by 
sheltering under umbrellas. And yes. it has 
rained during some recent performances, 
prompting some groundlings to try tn find 
shelter and others to ignore the elements in 
fairly heroic manner. 

The acoustics, which were tested in a 
series of workshops in 1995 and in a “pro- 
logue season" in 1996 that included a pro- 
duction of “The Two Gentlemen of Ver- 
ona." are better than expected, considering 
that, with public galleries covering three- 
quarters of the wooden O. actors must in- 
evitably turn their backs to some of the 
audience. Forgetting stormy skies and aching 
legs, the groundlings, who can stand within 
feet oF the performers, are best positioned. 

Extraneous noises like the occasional 
passing aircraft pose no serious problem. 
Perhaps more disturbing for audiences used 
to sitting in the dark of a theater looking at a 
lighted stage is that, even at night under 
subtly located floodlights, the entire wooden 
0 is visible, including actors, audience and 
theater staff members wandering among the 
groundlings offering wine or sandwiches 
during the performance. 

It could be argued that in Shakespeare's 
day the Globe was anything but solemn. In 
fact, this and other touches of commercialism 
reflect the fact that the new Globe is meant to 
be financially self-sufficient and that it must 
still raise S25 million in order to complete the 
$60 million complex planned for this site. 

The hope is thar a new indoor Inigo Jones 
Theatre, an education center and an exhib- 
ition area will be ready for inauguration on 
Sept. 21, 1999. the 400th anniversary of the 
opening of the first Globe. 


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Two Vienna Operas 
Linked to Mozart 

Sew York Times Service 

N EW YORK — An Iowa mu- 
sicologist has amassed evi- 
dence that portions of two tittle- 
known Viennese operas were writ- 
ten by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. 

David Buch. a professor of music 
history at the University of Nonhem 
Iowa, came upon a copy of a 1790 
opera called “Der Stein der Weis- 
en" (The Philosopher's Stone), in 
Hamburg, which includes the names 
of composers who contributed vari- 
ous sections of the opera. Mozart's 
name appears above a duet and also 
is inscribed above substantial por- 
tions of the second-act finale. 

The other opera. “Der 
Wohltarige Derwiseh" (The Bene- 
ficent Dervish), had been attributed 
to the impresario Emanuel Schik- 
aneder. who commissioned "The 
Magic Flute." Buch concluded that 
Mozart also had contributed to 
“Derwiseh.” 


I N the “Star Wars" and “Indiana 
Jones" movies! he played brave ad- 
venturers, but in real life Harrison Ford 
avoided fighting in the Vietnam War by 
claiming conscientious objector status, 
the actor said. In an interview with 
Movieline magazine. Ford acknowl- 
edged that he dodged the draft during the 
late 1960s when he was a straggling actor 
just out of college. “ T confused them [die 
draft board] so badly that they never took 
action on my petition," he said. "My 
conscientious objection wasn't based on 
a history of religious affiliation. I went 
back to my philosophy training at col- 
lege.’ ' He said he had written a long thesis 
arguing about the concept of God as not a 
being but rather the most meaningful 
thing in his life. “I combined it all and 
typed for days and sent it off and never 
heard a word," Ford told “Movietine.” 
He said that more than two years later his 
first wife became pregnant and he was 
granted an exemption from the service. 


John F. Kennedy Jr. and his wife, 
Carolyn Bessette Kennedy, are expect- 


PEOPLE 

ing their first child. The Daily News and 
The New York Post reported, quoting 
unnamed sources close to the couple. 
Bessette and Kennedy were married last 
September. 

□ 

Camilla Parker Bowles was slightly 
injured in a car accident near Prince 
Charles's home in southwest England. 
Parker Bowles suffered a head injury 
and a sprained wrist when her car hit 
another head on. The other driver, a 
woman, was treated in hospital and dis- 
charged. Press Association, the British 
news agency, said Parker Bowles passed 
a breath test given by the police at the 
scene. She was taken to the prince's 
estate and returned to her nearby home 
on Thursday morning. 


Jackie Robinson and Colin Poweii 
have been chosen for the National Civil 
Rights Museum's 1997 Freedom Awards. 
The prizes honor people who have 
worked for racial equality. Robinson, who 
broke baseball's color barrier 50 years 


ago. died in 1972 at age 53. His widow, 
Rachel, will represent him at the Septem- 
ber awards banquet in Memphis. Powell, 
the former chaiiinan of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, will probably attend, the museum 
board president, Benjamin Hooks, said. 


Saul Bellow has been a literary idol 
for years. He went to Washington this 
week to celebrate his transformation 
into an icon — the type that hangs on a 
wall. The acquisition of Bellow’s por- 
trait by the National Portrait Gallery- is, 
admittedly, a little premature. To have 
your image become part of the per- 
manent collection, it’s necessary to 
have been a president, a presidential 
spouse or dead for at least a decade. 
“Technically, he’ll have to be thought 
about again someday, but we’re betting 
on him making it," said the gallery 
director. Alan Fern. Late this year, the 
portrait, by Sarah Yuster, will be hung 
in a temporary exhibition, but the Nobel 
Prize winner, his friends and colleagues 
got a preview of the portrait at a special 
dinner at the gallery. 


John and Carolyn Kennedy are reportedly expecting a baby. 


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