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Tffr I k INTERNATIONAL M * O ■ — ^ 

ilerala^i^kSnbtttte. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASH IN^TON : $bST 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


Paris, Wednesday, June 18, 1997 


U* i f.r 5 --’W 


No. 35,550 


Enlisting in NATO: 

A Challenging Battle 

Poland Adapting Its Strategy and Politics 




By Christine Spolar 

yyqsAoigton Post Service 

WARSAW — With a click and a 
cursor dragging across a computer 
screen, a military map-maker here 
moves Poland an inch closer to the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

■Street by street, city by city, every 
bump, bend and building in this coun- 
try is being numbered and marked as a 
military -coordinate. 

The quiet work by soldiers trans- 
ferring data from old paper maps to 
modem computer screens puts Po- 
land and its former Communist neigh- 
bors on NATO’s horizon. 

As the countries 
vie for membership 
in the world’s most Easl 

sophisticated mill- First , 

taiy alliance, their j 

fighter pilots, tank — 

commanders, paratroopers and map- 
makers are striving to overcome tre- 
mendous logistical and technological 
obstacles. 

Eight years after the fall of Com- 
munist rule in the region, three mem- 
bers of the former Soviet bloc are on 
the edge of a new era; NATO, con- 
ceived half a century ago as a Western 
bulwark against the Soviet Union and 
its allies, appears about to expand into 
Eastern Europe. 

Poland, Hungary and the Czech 
Republic, the region’s strongest de- 
mocracies, have emerged as die top 
candidates for admission. 


Hus series of articles will examine 
those three likely new Western allies 
and the massive practical and stra- 
a nd a tegjc adjustments they will have to 
njwter face to become full NATO mem- 
r here bers. 

to the For every military computer lab in 
ition. Poland, there are dozens of empty, 
every unneeded troops barracks. For every 
; cotin- soldier in Poland’s force of nearly a ' 
edasa quarter-million who has mastered 
E n glis h in die past couple of years, 
trans- there are thousands who nave no time 
aps to or money to learn it 
ts Po- Invitations to join the alliance, ex- 
neigh- peered to be issued in July at a NATO 
summit conference in Madrid, are 
seen as a first step 

EastuiarH u n i toward a historic 

eastward Ho! expansion that in 

First of three articles could stretch 
from Estonia to Ro- 

I map- A majority of NATO nations favor 
□e tre- the entry of two additional countries 
logical — Slovenia and Romania — but Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton made clear last 
Com- week dial the United States wants to 
mem- begin with just three, 
are on Poland, the largest and most eager 
I, con- aspirant to join NATO, represents the 
'estem principal argument for expansion of 
on and the defense allianrw 
id into Its history scorched by invasions 
from Germany and Russia, Poland 
Czech spells out its security fears, 
st de- But even Poland will go to the 
he top 

See NATO, Page 11 



rNirope’s Leaders Clash 
Over Reform Measures 

Defense Deal Set; Power-Sharing Is Eusive 



rX ii 



I'jul 

Prime Minister Jospin of France taking a spin on a bike in Amsterdam. 


Fighting Breaks Out Between Phnom Penh Rivals 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Service 

PHNOM PENH — Heavy gunfire 
erupted in the streets of Phnom Penh 
late T uesday between military units loy- 
al to the rival co-prime ministers, Hun 
Sen and Norodom Ranariddh. . 

The suddenly empty streets echoed 
with the rapid fire of small arms and die 
boon of rockets. Red tracers arced 
through the sky. 

The gunfire came at a time of es- 
calating tension between the rival mime 
ministers, as they sought to lobby for the 
allegiance of defecting leaders of 


the Khmer Rouge guerrilla movement 
Two military sources said the shoot- 
ing involved the security guard unit of 
Prince Norodom Ranariddh and sol- 
diers loyal to the top police official of 
Mr. Hun Sen’s political party. 

It was the most serious gunfire in the 
streets of the capital in many months. It 
was not clear late Tuesday whether the 
situation would escalate or calm. 

[At least one soldier loyal to Prince 
Ranariddh- was reported killed. The As- 
sociated Press said.] 

Earlier in the day, a senior UN human 
rights official said Cambodia’s leaders 
bad said they would make a formal 


request that the United Nations help set 
up an international tribunal to address 
the crimes of the Communist Khmer 
Rouge. 

Investigators who have spent more 
than two years amassing hundreds of 
thousands of documents said Tuesday 
that they were ready to proceed. They 
said their evidence directly implicated a 
number of leading Khmer Rouge fig- 
ures in the deaths of more than 1 million 
people from 1975 to 1979. 

The main hurdle to any trial or truth 
forum is political will. Cambodia is 
still terrified of its past and its leaders 
have more to lose than to gain 


by confronting die nation’s demons. 

There is no telling what those 20- 
year-old documents might contain 
about people who hold power now. or 
what turmoil any future defendants 
might be able to stir up once they are 
called to testify. 

Asked whether he really believed that 
a tribunal might one day be convened, 
the UN official. Thomas Hammarburg, 
paused and said, “I have to.” 

He said it was vital for the Cam- 
bodian people to deal in a systematic 
way with their past ”It is not only a 


past. ”It is not only a 


See CAMBODIA, Page 10 


By Tom Buerkle 

Iniermiuiuutl Htmlil Tribune 

AMSTERDAM —The leaders of the 
European Union clashed shaiply Tues- 
day over defense and power-sharing is- 
sues, casting doubt on their ability to 
conclude an ambitious constitutional re- 
form effort to prepare the bloc for East- 
ern expansion and other challenges of 
the 21st century. 

The divisions did not appear likely to 
derail the reform negotiations, which 
senior European officials hoped would 
conclude during the night with a new 
governing treaty for the 15-nation 
group. Indeed, the prospects of an 
agreement rose late in the evening when 
leaders reached a compromise on de- 
fense involving Britain, France and 
Germany. 

But the depth of the underlying dif- 
ferences indicated that the resulting 
treaty would fall short of the goal the 
leaders set at the start of the reform 
process two yean ago: namely, the son 
of political union that would equal 
Europe’s commitment to merge its cur- 
rencies in a monetary union. 

The treaty's modest stature in con- 
trast to monetary union was underscored 
by a brief tempest unleashed when the 
French minister for European affairs, 
Pierre Moscovici, was quoted as saying 
that the next six months would decide 
"whether or not the single currency is 
introduced." His comments, which 
came less than 24 hours after France 
endorsed a compromise designed to 
keep monetary union on track, were 
swiftly denied tty Prime Minister Lionel 
Jospin and President Jacques Chirac, 
who reaffirmed Paris’s determination to 
launch the euro on schedule in 1999. 

Hie open confrontation at the second 
day of the EU summit meeting here 
centered on two main issues. Britain 
strongly opposed a Franco-German 
plan to deepen European defense co- 
operation, while Belgium led the Un- 
ion's smaller member states in an 1 1th- 
hour attack ou plans to streamline de- 
cision-making by enhancing the voting 
powers of their larger partners. 

The leaders also appeared to be ready 
to trim back plans to enhance die free 
movement of citizens within the Union, 
a project that several states had touted as 
the treaty's most significant innovation. 
Indeed, it was a sign of the ebbing 
enthusiasm for deeper political integra- 
tion that Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 
Germany, long the chief proponent of 


the idea, signaled a last-minuie unwill- 
ingness to give up Germany's national 
veto over certain policies. He said it was 
a manerof "national duly and a piece of 
self-preservation" ’ that Bonn retain a 

veto over asylum policies. 

The leaders did agree to adopt a new 
treaty chapter on employment that 
would commit national governments to 
better coordinate their jobs policies. The 
chapter, which mirrored an employment 
and growth resolution adopted Monday 
as pan of their single-currency com- 
promise, was viewed by diplomats as 
crucial to winning public support. 

In other gestures aimed at wooing 
public opinion, the leaders agreed on 

Paris reopens the euro rift. Page 2. 

provisions for policies on the environ- 
ment. a modest extension of power for 
the European Parliament and more open- 
ness in decision-making procedures. 

On defense. France and Germany 
were pressing for a firm commitment to 
fold into the EU the Western European 
Union, a defense body that includes 1 1 
of the 15 members. The step would 
effectively transform the EU into a de- 
fense alliance. 

But Prime Minister Tony Blair of Bri- 
tain criticized die idea as "an ill-judged 
organ transplant” that would detract 
from European security by undermining 
defense links with the United States in 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

The final compromise called for fos- 
tering closer EU-WEU ties "with a 
view to the possibility of the integra- 
tion" of the two institutions. 

The leaders did agree on modest 
changes intended to enable the Union to 
speak with a single, effective voice in 
foreign affairs. The changes will assign 
a Brussels bureaucrat to coordinate joint 
foreign-policy initiatives and analysis, 
and provide greater scope for taking 
decisions by majority vote rather than 
with the unanimity rule that has long 
stymied the Union. 

As talks continued into die night, the 
toughest obstacle to agreement remained 
the delicate issue of power-sharing. 

Virtually all EU leaders agree that the 
basic rules established for the original 
six member countries, with wide scope 
for national vetoes and an overweight- 
ing of voting rights in favor of small 
countries, was under serious strain and 
would be unworkable in a future club of 
more than 20 members. 


March oftheRoadhogs: Detroit Vies to Turn Out the Biggest and Baddest 


By Keith Bradsher 

New York Tunes Service 

DETROIT — Big is getting bigger on the 
American road. 

American car makers, inspired by the recent 
popularity of big cars and trucks, are planning 
even larger models with equally gigantic sticker 
prices. Take the behemoth being rested by Ford 
Motor Co., which, at 19 feet, would dethrone the" 
Chevrolet and GMC Suburban by a foot as the 
longest mass-produced family vehicle ever budt- 

At more than three tons without cargo, or about 
twice the weight of a typical family car, this station 
wagon on steroids will also be one of tbe heaviest. 
It will have an optional 6.S-liter V-10 engine, 
twice the size of a typical minivan engine. It will 
seat eight adults in three rows and still have a 
sizable cargo area. 

There will be no question who is king of the hill, 
said one person with knowledge of Ford’s product 
p lans . -Its customers, this person added, will be 
people wanting to tow a boat or "have tbe biggest, 
baddest car cm the block. 

Tbe Ford vehicle is so large and heavy, in fact, 
that it exceeds tbe government’s weight limits for 
classification as a light vehicle. 


That provides two little-known benefits for 
Ford and its customers: The vehicle would be 
exempt from the federal luxury tax on high-priced 
cars and tracks that kicks in for vehicles costing 
more than $36,000 and from federal fuel economy 
regulations that were written to discourage just the 
kind of gas guzzler Ford has in mind. (Tbe vehicle 
is two years away from mass production, and Ford 
will not discuss it) 

fa the meantime, tbe march of the road bogs will 
only get bigger. 

Chrysler Cotp. is about to roll out a new Dodge 
Durango sport utility wagon that is roomier and 
more than a foot longer than tbe biggest Jeep. It is 
also planning an even bigger sport utility for the 
Mexican market, prompting whispers here that 
Chrysler may also sell it in the United States. But 
Chrysler says that is notplanned. 

Not to be outdone, General Motors Corp. is 
planning to redesign die Suburban over the next 
two years to make it more appealing to families 
who want to treat it as an oversized car rather than 
a truck for towing boats and Horse trailers. 

' Also, Bayerische Motoren Werke AG is ap- 
parently testing a design for a sport utility wagon it 
may offer in a few years derived from its BMW 5- 
series sedans. 


Ford has expanded on its successful Explorer 
sport-utility vehicle by building a larger Expedition 
model that went on sale last fell A big, phish sport 
utility version of its Lincoln luxury brand, called 
the Navigator, will go on sale in two weeks. 

Safety groups are already expressing concern 
about Ford’s plans to build die even bigger, heav- 
ier vehicle two years from now because it could 
inflict a loi of damage in collisions with smaller, 
lighter cars. 

"From apublic health vantage point, clearly it's 
better not to have such a weight mismatch.” said 
Adrian Lund, senior vice president for research of 
the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, a re- 
search group supported by insurance companies 
seeking to reduce the cost of accident claims. 

Ford has long made a point of designing 
vehicles that meet or exceed government safety 
standards, but those standards are being reviewed 
as more Americans are being killed in collisions 
between cars and heavier vehicles. 

Automakers say they are simply meeting de- 
mand with supply. What sells these days are the 
biggest things in the showroom. Since 1990, sales 
have climbed more than 60 percent for Suburbans, 

See GUZZLERS, Page 11 




" • — - - 


... - . 





Chrysler’s Dodge Durango is one of a new breed of roomier sport-utility vehicles. 


AGENDA 





AT®! 


UN Rejects Easing 

Ban on Ivory Trade THEAHEBKAS ^ 


HARARE, Zimbabwe ( AP) — A The Army'sTangi 

proposal to ease the worldwide ban on — 

trading fa ivory was killed Tuesday by Books „ — Page 4. 

the United Nations wildQifcconventian Crossword.:.: Page 4. 

hut wiUbe resurrected formore voting, Pages 8-9. 

Wednesday. The debate has pitted g T: Pages 20-21. 

Western countries, which oppose any * wrls "' 

easing of the ivory trade, agamst some The tm a mar iiBt PW& 


THE AMERICAS Page3. 

The Army’sTongled Notions of Race 


1-towVo rt 
DM 

Pound 

Yen 

FF 


The IHT on-line http://wwv.itH .con; 


Western countries, which oppose any ports . ....... 

easing ctf the ivory trade, agamst some The In ter ma rian 
developing nations, which seek sus- 
tainable use of their resources. 


The Dollar 


Tuaaday O 4 P.M, 
1.7303 
1.B393 
113.315 
- 5£367 

TuwdBydoaB 

7760.78 


Tuwday • 4 P.M. 
894.42 


Nowtand Prices : 

Andwa.^.iaoOFF Lebanon U-SJJOC 

AnMw„„„_.1Z50FF Morocco — — 16 Dh 
C®»OTl_1£00 CFA Qatar— — 1&Q0 RUs 

5j» FMunkan lafiOFF 

Fiance 10.00 FF Saufi Arabia -1Q.0QR 

eSm-.™;.t100CFA Senegal — VWQCEA 
IW. o ann um Spain. -^2SFTAS 

tayCoeeTSbCFA 

Jodgn - t wan JD UAE. — 10 . 00 Dfeh. 

fawaft- 700 Hfc US. ME (Euti.-Sl.20 


For Hong Kong , a Lot o 


6 A1I Money, 5 Mining Firms Say of Congo 


piwtiusdou By Raymond Bonner 

^ 732 ■ New York Times Service 

1-6375 . KINSHASA Congo — Eveiy day, 

113.45 Western businessmen in suits and ties 

5,5395 risk riding in creaking elevators at tbe 
Ministry of Mines, an imposing 20- 
mSmBIQm Story building on the main street of this 
prwkxjEdon capital, and wait on chairs with foam 
— 7772.Q9 pmtru dmg from the cushions for audi- 

ences with officials of the new gov- 
ernment to seek the right to go into 
piwtaiK cfcw malaria-infested jungles. 

893.93 A Western mining executive, stand- 


ing before a geological map hanging on 

the wall outside the minister's office, 
explained why. 

^"Ihis is ml money,” he said, his 
hand sweeping an arc over the eastern 
rim of this vast country, passing over 
symbols for cobalt, zinc, magnesium, 
iron, copper, diamonds and gold. 

The businessman would not give his 
name, nor that of his company. If be 
could have, he probably would have 
denied he was in the country. His part- 
ner at the map would not utter a word 
while a reporter was present. 


Tbe stealth and secrecy reflect a 
fiercely competitive atmosphere here as 
m i n ing companies vie for concessions 
in “potentially the wealthiest country in 
the world,” as foe man in front of the 
map called it 

An Australian mining executive 
there may be 250 tons of gold, with a 
value of $3 billion, to be mined fa 
Congo, the huge central African country 
formerly called Zaire. At the moment, 
the gold riches are virtually untouched. 

See MINES, Page 11 


By Philip Segal 

Special in ihe Heraki Tribune 

HONG KONG — The incoming government of 
Ttong Chee-hwa," which will take control of Hong 
Kong at the end of this month, has spent the Iasi jwx 
months battling critics of its eontrovereial pew Bui 
of Rights and electoral law’ Bat now ilfaces Rs first 
tough economic decision: what to do about tne 
territory’s runaway real-estate market. . . 

The real-estate issue is politically .explosive, 
pitting the interests of the ordinary home buyers 
Mr. Tang wants to win over against die short-term 


interests of the powerful property developers who 
are some of Mr. Tung's — -and China’s — most 
important backers. And, with property shares play- 
ing a key role on the Hong Kong stock market, too 

Clinton plans new China measures. Page 4 

much restraint of real-estate prices cojild send 
share prices plummeting- About 70 percent of 
Hong Kong companies derive at least some of their 
earnings from the property sector. 

The price of the average Hong Kong apartment 


is now stratospheric: Servicing the average mort- 
gage for a 7 00-square-foot (63 - square-meter) 
apartment takes up 93 percent of the median house- 
hold income, according to estimates tty the stock 
brokerage W.L Carr. Residential prices have risen 
20 percent fa toe last six months. A 700-square- 
foot apartment can easily cost $450,000. 

Because speculators have kept thousands of 
apartments off the market, the head of the in- 
coming government’s task farce on housing 
policy, C.Y. Leung, has promised action to help 
residents of Hong Kong get a better chance at 
baying their own dwellings. Mr. Tang is expected 


s in the Balance 

to receive his policy report this week. 

The stock market fears that Mr. Leung micht 

recommend a capital-gains tax on apartment salft? 

to drive speculators ont of the market. Singapore 
has such a tax, bid : capital-gains taxes haveSw^T 
been anathema to ^ng Kong, and Mr. Tung mi^ 

not want fas very few economic measure £ HE 
Kong to be a tax increase. *wng 

r '"J* a ^ °f change, with no bag- 
gage from die past, said Michael Leary moiyX, 
analyst at Lehman Brothers (Asia)Lfa.f^^ 

See LAND, Page U 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Watergate Tapes / Character Revealed 




Words That Weigh Heavily 
On Memories of Nixon 



‘ Deep Throat’ 
Is Alive, Says 
Woodward 


By George Lardner Jr. 

Washington Post Service 


W ASHINGTON — In ihe final years 
of his life, long after he was on the 
brink of impeachment and his pres- 
idency bad ended in disgrace, 
Richard Nixon amazed former allies and en- 
emies with his success ifl rehabilitating his repu- 
tation. 

A series of well-received memoirs, foreign 
policy pronouncements and carefully scripted 
appearances did much to confer on the former 
president the status of elder statesman, putting . 
the pall of the Watergate scandal ever further 
behind him. 

But as the 25th anniversary of the break-in at 
the headquarter* of the Democratic National 
Committee is remembered this week, Mr. Nixon 
remains bedeviled by his own words, captured 
on more than 200 hours of White House tapes 
made public recently after years of litigation. 

The newly available tapes deal exclusively, as 
the law requiring their preservation puts it. with 
“abuses of governmental power popularly iden- 
tified under the generic term, ‘Watergate.' ” 
Other, far more lengthy portions, to be made 
public in the next few years, will perhaps demon- 
strate Mr. Nixon's brilliance in foreign policy 
and his grasp of domestic issues. The “abuse of 
governmental power segments," as rhey are 
labeled at the National Archives, show the old 
Mr. Nixon, but at the same time a much fuller, 
understandable and compelling Mr. Nixon. 

Ir is this Mr. Nixon that history will remem- 
ber. 

“These 201 hours are a story, not isolated 
sound bites." said Stanley Kutler. a historian at 
University of Wisconsin whose lawsuit forced 
the public disclosure of the tapes. “A far richer 
and more interesting portrait of Nixon emerges 
from these tapes. It's not one that excuses or 
exonerates him in any way. But this is a real, live 
human being, not a cardboard figure." 

On the tapes. Mr. Nixon is profane, demand- 


Govemor George Wallace of Alabama, then the 
top vote-getter among Democratic presidential 
candidates, had been shot at a rally in Maryland 
by an addled, would-be assassin named Arthur 
Bremer. 

“Is he, Bremer, a left-winger or a right- 
winger?” Mr. Nixon asked. 

"Well, he's going to be a left-winger by the 
time we get through, I think,” Mr. Colson 
replied. 

“Good.” Mr. Nixon said, chuckling. “Keep 
at that. Keep at that.” 

E. Howard Hunt. Mr. Colson’s lieutenant and 
soon-to-be Watergate burglar, was told to get 
into Mr. Bremer's Milwaukee apartment simply 
to find out “what kind of a kook this guy is.” he 
told the Senate Watergate Committee in 1973, 
but the idea really was to salt the place with 
"McGovern for president” literature. With the 
FBI on the verge of obtaining a search warrant, 
Mr. Colson was worried only that it might be a 
bit too late. 

“1 just wish that. God, that I’d thought sooner 
about planting a little literature out there,” Mr. 
Colson said. 

Mr. Nixon broke into a hearty laugh. Tying the 
Wallace shooting to leftist anti-war liberalism 







The Attwwwcf Press 

WASHINGTON — 
The identity of the Wa- 
tergate source known 
as Deep Throat re- 
mains a mystery after 
25 years, but Bob 
Woodward, an assist - 


Underdog 
Battles Odds 
For Liberian 
Presidency 


By Howard W. French 

VfB I'tvi runts Srrur 


ant managing editor 
at The Washington 



clearly appealed to the president. 
In the end. Mr. Colson canceled 


ing. delighted, sad. insightful, angry, exultant, 
calculating and bitter. Some people, familiar 


calculating and bitter. Some people, familiar 
with the scattered recordings obtained by Wa- 
tergate prosecutors in the 1970s. have suggested 
that it is his paranoia that stands out, but (here is 
much more than that. Mr. Nixon had very real 
enemies and he knew it. They were out to get 
him, and he was out to get them. 

One old political opponent, former Senator 
George McGovern, Democrat of South Dakota, 
sought to make peace with Mr. Nixon, beginning 
with a visit in 1 984 to help celebrate Mr. Nixon 's 
71st birthday. But disclosures in' the Nixon tapes 
have since caused him to regret the effort. 

“I went to see him to heal the wounds." Mr. 
McGovern said in an interview. “But I wonder 
from these tapes why I ever bothered to reconcile 


In the end. Mr. Colson canceled the operation. 
The FBI had the apartment sealed. But the next 
morning, at a meeting with Mr. Colson and top 
aides, H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman, 
Mr. Nixon was still urging a White House- 
inspired media campaign about Mr. Bremer, 
with ridbits to be obtained from the FBI director. 
L. Patrick Gray. 

“You got Pat Gray, he will be an accom- 
plice.” Mr. Nixon said in confident tones. "Use 
him. And use Colson's outfit — you know, to 
sneak out things. 1 mean, you do anything. I 
mean, anything!” 

The tapes show how Mr. Nixon managed time 
and again to delude himself, to imagine that 
victory was within his grasp when it clearly was 
noL For example, he was convinced that. Pres- 
ident Lyndon Johnson had Mr. Nixon's cam- 
paign plane bugged in the closing days of the. 
1968 presidential race. He also was convinced 
That if he could get hard evidence of that, be 
could blunt and perhaps undermine the Senate 
Warergate bearings before they got started in the 
spring of 1973. 

“The plane was bugged. John, in (bar whole 
two-week period by J. Edgar Hoover, and John- 
son knew every conversation that took place.” 
Mr. Nixon told the former Texas governor. John 
Connally. then head of Democrats for Nixon, in 
the fall of 1972. "Johnson had it bugged.” Mr. 
Hoover was the FBI director at the rime. 





Tb-.WwM fV~ 


Richard Nixon waving good-bye to members of his 
staff outside the White House as he boarded a 
helicopter on Aug. 9, 1974, after resigning. 


at The Washington 
Post, said Tuesday 
that the man not only 
was still living but also 
had remained in con- 
tact with him . 

Deep Throat was the 
shadowy figure who 
Mr. Woodward said 
provided him, when he 
was a reporter, with the 
essential tips that con- 
nected a burglary at 
the Watergate hotel 
here to a scandal that 
toppled President 
Richard Nixon. 

Asked on NBC on 
Tuesday to reveal 
Deep Throat’s iden- 
tity, Mr. Woodward 
again said he would 
reveal the name only 
after the source had 
died — or had given 
him permission. 

Mr. Woodward was 
then asked whether 
viewers could assume 
Deep Throat was still 
living. “You may as- 
sume that, " he said. 


with him. It's hard to keep him on a pedestal with 
aJI these tapes speaking from the grave.” 

If there is one guiding principle about Mr. 
Nixon that stands out on the tapes, it is this: Do 
unto others what you think they have done unro 
you. 

One example is a phone conversation between 
Mr. Nixon and his top hatchet man. the White 
House special counsel, Charles Colson, on the 
night of May 15, 1972. A few hours earlier. 


W EEKS later. Mr. Nixon told Mr. 

Haldeman that it was Mr. Hoover 
who in 1968 told the president-elect 
and the attorney general-to-be, 
John Mitchell, about the bugging. 

Desperate to nail the story down, the Nixon 
White House called Mr. Johnson’s former press 
secretary. George Christian, and asked him to 
talk to Mr. Johnson about iL In an interview this 
month, Mr. Christian said he was informed that 
Mr. Hoover was the source of the story. 

“When I told Johnson about Hoover,” Mr. 


Christian remembered with a laugh, "the only 
word he said was, ‘Oh.' Maybe a pause and then 
an ‘Oh.’ ” 

Mr. Christian said that in 1968, "there was 
high suspicion that somebody in die Nixon camp 
was playing footsie with Anna Chennault, a 
close friend of President Nguyen Van Thieu of 
South Vietnam, to try to head off peace talks.” 
But he said that be doubted that Mr. Nixon's 
campaign airplane would have been bugged. 

‘ ‘Frankly, I think they had everybody in South 
Vietnam under surveillance,” Mr. Christian 
said, referring to U.S. intelligence. ‘ ‘They didn’t 
have to bug anybody else.” 

On the tapes, Mr. Nixon harked back, again 
and again, to the first big crisis of his political 
career: the case of Alger Hiss, the State De- 
partment official and accused communist spy. 
As a freshman congressman in 1948, Mr. Nix- 
on had investigated Mr. Hiss, who was even- 
tually convicted in 1950 on two counts of 
peijuiy. 

What Mr. Nixon seemed to forget in citing the 
lessons learned from the Hiss case was that the 
shoe was now on the other foot. Mr. Hiss had 


break-in, for instance, on July 19, 1972. Mr. 
Nixon was told by Mr. Ehrlichman that a cover 
story for a Nixon campaign official Jeb Stuart 
Magruder. was not going to work. 

“Did he know?" Mr. Nixon asked. 

"Oh Lord, yes,” Mr. Ehrlichman replied. 
“He was in it with both feet.” 

“He can’t contrive a story then,” Mr. Nixon 
said. 

* ‘The worst thing a guy can do — there are two 
things, each bad.” Mr. Nixon went on. “One is 
to lie and the other is to cover up.” He added. “If 
you cover up, you’re going to get caught.” 

“Yup,” Ehrlichman agreed. 


A ND if you lie, you’re going to be guilty 
of perjury,” Mr. Nixon continued. 
“Now basically that was the whole 
story of the Hiss case.” _ . 

Having said that, Mr. Nixon made'clear he did 
not want Mr. Magruder to say too much. 

"We ’II take care of Magruder immediately 
afterwards.” Mr. Nixon said. “In his case, it’d 
be easy as pie. But in the case of all of them, the 
Watergate break-in defendants. I mean, you 
could just give amnesty to all of them.” 

A former White House counsel John Dean, 
said Mr. Nixon's allusions to the Hiss case 
always baffled him. 

“We were in the position of Hiss, if you will” 
Mr. Dean said. “He’d raise iL I’d just sit there 
mum.” 


been found guilty of a cover-up. Now Mr. Nixon 
was accused of one. Mr. Hiss had been the target 


was accused of one. Mr. Hiss had been the target 
of a congressional investigation, as was Mr. 
Nixon. At times. Mr. Nixon spoke as though he 
were still a member of Congress doing the 
investigating. 

Little more than a month after the Watergate 


SUMMER PARIS SPECIAL 


TRAVEL UPDATE Church Official Calls for Burial of Lenin 


- ° Scribe 


BA Ends Spat With Paris Airport 


A & 1 S 


**** Deluxe Hotel 
Between Opera and .Madeleine 


Treat yourself to luxury from 
$1 99 pei' night 


PARIS (Bloomberg) — British Airways said Tuesday that it 
had resumed check-in services at Charles de Gaulle Airport after 
shutting its counter for seven weeks because of concerns there 
was not sufficient security at Air Algeria’s cbeck-in counter. 

The airline is now checking passengers in at three pro- 
visional check-in counters in different hails in terminal one. It 
said the Paris Airport Authority promised to set up a new 
permanent check-in counter this winter. Since Air Algeria 
began flying into Charles de Gaulle in late April, British 
Airways has been shutting its own check-in facilities when Air 
Algeria's are open. 

Algerian Islamic extremists have set off bombs in Paris 
several times in recent years, demanding that France stop 
giving aid to Algeria’s government and withdraw diplomatic 
recognition. 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Lenin’s embalmed 
body, which has been on display in Red * 
Square for more than 70 years, is a 
"symbol of evil” and should be buried, 
an official of the Russian Orthodox 
Church said Tuesday. 

"As long as Lenin's body remains 
unboned, as long as the Red Square 
remains a burial place, tensions will 


persist in Russia,” said Archpriest Gen- 
nadi Geroyev, a church spokesman. 

The statement came in the wake of 
President Boris Yeltsin’s proposal to 
hold a nationwide referendum on 
whether to bury Lenin. Mr. Yeltsin said 
that keeping the body on display goes 
against Christian tradition, and he sug- 
gested Lenin’s remains be buried in St 
Petersburg alongside his mother’s. 


WEATHER 


Europe 


Forecast tor TTuwsday through Saturday, as provided by AccuWeather. 


* Ef fective July ,iin| August l 1 ** 7 
•.ingle "r dnulile ruum with buffet breakfast 
all taxes and >en ice included. Limited availability 
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Hotel Scribe - I rue Seri lie - 75009 Paris 


Uffizi Displays Early Botticelli 

FLORENCE (AP) — The Uffizi Gallery has put the earliest 
known work of the Renaissance master Botticelli back on 
display after two years of restoration. 

“Fortitude,” an allegory portraying a woman embodying 
the virtue of inner strength, was painted in 1470 on a com- 
mission from the Florence merchants' guild. 

It is the earliest documented work by Botticelli, one of the 
leading painters of the Renaissance. His “Birth of Venus” 
and "Springtime” are among the Uffizi’s most popular 
attractions. 


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An article about the Paris 
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editions misidennfted the 
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MONROVIA, Liberia — Ii takes 
several minutes for Ellen Johnson-Sir- 
leaf, the candidate who has emerged as a 
leading contender for president, to fin- 
ish ticking off the obstacles that sand 
between her and her goal of becoming 
the fust woman to be elected Liberia’s 
head of state. 

While she has had to mortgage her 
UN pension to finance her candidacy, 
her principal opponent. Charles Taylor, 
the militia leader who started a mur- 
derous civil war here seven years ago. 
boasts a huge campaign chest that 
comes from having controlled most of 
the mineral-rich countryside. 

While Mrs. Johnson-Sirleaf s cam- 
paign relies on borrowed vehicles and 
local good will to get around. Mr. 
Taylor's organization has purchased a 
fleet of buses. And for his own trans- 
portation to the heavily forested interior 
of a country with few good roads. Mr. 
Taylor has reportedly hired a heli- 
copter. 

Mrs. Johnson-Sirleaf, 58. a former 
international banker and senior UN of- 
ficial has managed in the space of the 
short few weeks since she announced 
her candidacy to emerge from a large 
field as Mr. Taylor's most serious chal- 
lenger. and according to several opinion 
polls, the early leader in the race for the 
July 19 presidential election. 

His deep war chest makes Mr. Taylor 
the closest thing to a dominant figure in 
the race, which is being overseen by a 
council composed of representatives of 
the many militias from the war. which 
ended with a final spasm of violence in 
the capital last year. The vote will be 
Liberia's first since 1985 and is the 
culmination of an accord brokered by 
neighboring states that has since seen 
most of the combatants give up their 
guns. 

For many, from foreign diplomats 
and Liberian intellectuals to ordinary 
folk, Liberia's election is akin to a con- 
test between two Africas: one of ac- 
countability. institution-building and 
the ability* to attract foreign aid; the 
other the’ kind of highly personalized 
rule the country has known almost from 
the start. And the associations that each 
candidate inspires — Mrs. Johnson-Sir- 
leaf. comfortable with international fi- 
nancial institutions, and Mr. Taylor, 
with his Moburu-siyle cap and cane — 
are clear. 

‘ ‘Charles Taylor would run this coun- 
try like his personal property.” Mrs. 
Johnson-Sirleaf said at her campaign 
headquarters, which bustled with vol- 
unteers. “He would be the czar, getting 
richer and richer with a bunch of 
cronies, while the country' remains im- 
poverished.” 

To judge by the noise on the streets, 
as the campaign opened officially Mon- 
day, Mrs. Johnson-Sirleaf and the 10 
other candidates would seem to have 
little chance against Mr. Taylor, a 50- 
year-old descendant of the country’s 
founders. 

“I just like Charles Taylor,” said 
Evelyne Gbomeh, a 24-year-old woman 
watching a raucous Taylor campaign 
procession. "After all we have gone 
through. Liberia needs to be ruled with a 
firm hand. He is a man who is so de- 
termined to achieve what he wants to 
achieve that he never gives up. no matter 
what people say 3bout him. ” 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 1997 


PACE 3 


Race, Sex and the Military 

Black Soldiers Ponder Misconduct Allegations 


By Ian Fisher 

Mu' York Times. Swire 


black, the questions inevit- percent of the base's drill ser- 
ably become more complicat- geams are black? 


idons Why is it that in recent 
dis- high-profile cases, many 
when black soldiers have been 
.charged with rape and har- 
ssoci- assment — and portrayed 


_ — ed, raising old suspicions why is it that in recent 

t-LARkSVILLE. Tennes- about how justice is dis* high-profile cases, many 
Anny is far pensed, particularly when black soldiers have been 
Detter than society on issues race and sex intersect. . charged with rape and har- 
P |^ c e. Sergeant Darri us Both die National Associ- assment — and portrayed 

Rochester said on a drizzly ation for the Advancement of both by the military and die 
afternoon, and he did not have Colored People and the Con- media as predators — while 
to look far for proof: He was gressionai Black Caucus have accusations against many 
one man in a crowd more criticized the army’s handling whites, including General 
mixed racially than in most of the Aberdeen cases. They Joseph Ralston of the air 
places, watching as 30 or so maintain — and die Pentagon force, who withdrew as a can- 
soldiers stood at attention at a denies — that investigators didate to lead the Joint Chiefs 

n^tifAmant . - . l . . « j ^ i ji tu* La J 


THE AMERICAS 


AT A GLANCE 

Blacks in the Armed Forces 

The Army has the largest percentage of Mack officers 
and enlisted solders of any branch of the military. 

Blacks as a percentage of total 
Since the draft ended In 1073 


U.S. PoticeGirdfor ‘War 

Army Methods and Weapons Become the Goal 


OFFICERS 


35% 

- 

_ -$B% 

30 


- 30_ 

25 



20 




20 

15 


— 

— ^ 

10 

AflMY L. 

■» 10' 


ENLISTED 


ALL BRANCHES* 


By William Booth . 

"Washington Post Service ■■ _ { ‘ • - . 

FRESNO, California — Sergeant Wade 
Erigelson is preparing new recruits for war. 

Sporting fatigues and buzz hair cuts, die 
men are being trained In the use of sub- 
machine guns, explosives and chemical 
weapons. They have at their disposal a heli- 
copter and will soon have an armored- per- 
sonnel carrier. 


ployed’a few times a year, they are now used 
for all lcinHy of p olic e work — dozens of calls, 
hundreds of calls a year,” said Mr. Kraska, a 
professor erf police studies at Western Ken- 
tucky University. “In SWAT units formed 
since 1980, their use has increased by 53o 
percent.” 

The 30 members of Fresno’s Violent 
Crime Suppression Unit now patrol enme- 
ridden neighborhoods day and night, serving 
warrants at homes of suspected drug dealers 

I * - 1 _ • _ 


soldiers stood at attention at a denies — that investigators 
retirement ceremony here at pushed some female victims to 
foe Fort Campbell army base, say they were raped, making 
Half the retirees were black, the charges more serious than 
Sergeant Rochester, 25, if die accusations had involved 
who is also black, said that consensual sex. (Rape charges 


despite the army’s good rec- against several suspects have 
ord on race, he has felt stabs since been dropped.) 
of worry recently. It has not Sergeant McKinney him- 
escaped him or his friends self has said he was “slow to 
that all of those accused of believe it,” but now is con- 
sexual misconduct at the Ab- vinced chat race has played a 


denies — that investigators didate to lead the Joint Chiefs 
pushed some female victims to of Staff after admitting he had 
say they were raped, making an affair 13 years ago, only 
the charges more serious than reach the level of adulterous 
if the accusations had involved indiscretions? 
consensual sex. (Rape charges It is a measure of the mil- 
against several suspects have itary’s long record of inte- 
since been dropped.) gration that every soldier in- 

Sergeant McKinney him- terviewed dismissed the 
self has said he was “slow to notion of a wide conspiracy 


erdeen Proving Ground in 
Maryland are black. It is both- 
ersome to them, too, that the 
army’s top enlisted man. Ser- 
geant Major Gene McKinney, 
suspended over accusations 
by four women of sexual mis- 
conduct, also is black. 

“We’ve come so far, and 
the military is doing all these 
good things,” ~ Sergeant 
Rochester said. But, “we are 
getting ready to go into the 
year 2000, and it raises the 


major role in his 
He has suggeste 
ti gators have 


1.) gration that every soldier in- 

nney him- terviewed dismissed the 
is “slow to notion, of a wide conspiracy 
ow is con- against black soldiers. Most 
is played a said they had never experi- 
rosecution. enced racism in uniform, and 
that inves- perhaps a third said they saw 
sen more no racial overtones in the Ab- 


SS^ALL BRANCHES* . 0 

I I -» — rn ri 1 1 1 1 1 p -rf T I I ■ I'm 

7375 '80 ‘85 *90 '94 7375 '80 *1 

Data not available for 1 974. 1 978 and 1 978. 

■After 1 989, Indudes Coast Guard. 

Racial breakdown of the military 
As of September, 1996 
rft White M Black US AJ other 


■90 '94 1 


• But Sergeant EngeUon’s men are not U.S. and criminals, snipping vehicles, interrog- 
Navy Seals or army Rangers.- They are mem: siting gang members and showing a " pro- 
bers of the Fresno Police Department, whose . ence.” . ■ 

enemy will be found not in faraway lands but As they move through the civ o* 400,000 
in these very streets, where police units patrol . people, they wear subdued gray-and-black 
the neighborhoods fully armed and in urban urban camouflage and body armor . They have 


prone to believe his four ac- erdeen and McKinney cases. 


ENLISTED 
50 75 


cusers because they axe white, 
and that the investigators had 
suggested to witnesses a 
“scenario” for a motive — 


“In the military, you are 
only a person,” said Staff 
Sergeant Roberto Aron, 32. 
“It doesn't come down to a 


that he was “only interested black or white thing. If you 
in white women” (though the are wrong, you are going to 


V*. ji 


StfSSH 


mmtm 


lawyer for one accuser has 
said her client was not asked 
such questions). 


pay for what you’ve done.” 

But many black soldiers 
spoke about the military in 


Source: Department of Defense 


Nowhere is the issue of tones entwined with deep 


3 Rl\v: 


ThtNc* Yot Times 


question: Is there still racism race and justice in the military love and distrust. “I might haps 60-40 or 80-20. 


in the military ?” 

When soldiers who are 
white are accused of sexual 
offenses, the questions raised 


confronted with more ur- 
gency and earnestness than on 
military bases, as evidenced 
in interviews with black sol- 


seem to be about the military diers at Fort Campbell. 


itself; How far, politicians Is it only coincidence, last year an army colonel and 
and Pentagon brass are ask- many wondered, that the 12 a top Pentagon adviser on 
ing, will the armed forces go charged, at Aberdeen, all but race, used a distinctly military 
in pursuing sexual miscon- one of them drill sergeants, analogy: Fill a room with 
duct, as generals, an admiral, ore black, even though more birds, 70 percent ducks and 
a pilot, even the leading can- than 1,300 phone calls bn 30 percent swans. Toss in a 
dictate for chairman of the sexual harassment were hand grenade. He said a rea- 
Joint Chiefs of Staff have placed to a hot line set up sooable ratio of casualties 
fallen in recent weeks? during that investigation and would be 70 percent ducks 


a pilot, even the leading can- 
didate for chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff have 
fallen in recent weeks? 


not be the sharpest knife in the 
drawer,” one sergeant said, 
“but it doesn't take a rocket 
scientist to figure it out.” 

Ronald Joe, who was until 


haps 60-40 or 80-20. only black males are involved 

"What I don't think is stat- in these unwelcome sexual 
istically supportable on a nor- types of activities,” said Mr. 
mal day is that every casualty Joe, who is black, * ‘or it says 


in the room would be ducks 
and no swans,” said Mr. Joe, 


camouflage. - - • ■■■■■. 

In their expanding strength and mission, 
the SWAT team in Fresno mirrors a trend in 
United States law enforcer .- - 

mem — the rise in the number “ 
of police paramilitary units Disciplin 
across the county and a rapid 
expansion of their activities/a Iirepowei 

trend that police scholars RunnoHed 

refer to as *‘tfae militariza- 
tion" of civilian police. balance 1 

The explosive grow* and affS . 

expanding mission of SWAT “S™ W 

teams has, in turn, led to com- in major 
plaints that they are too ag- J _ 

gressive, too heavily armed, too scary and that 
they erode the public's perception of the 
police as public servants. 

“It's a very dangerous thing, when you’re 
telling cops they’re soldiers and there’s an 
enemy out there,” said Joseph McNamara, a 
former chief of police in San Jose and Kansas 
City who is now at the Hoover Institute at 
Stanford University. “1 don't like it at all.'' 

In a new study, a police researcher, Peter 
Kraska, and his colleagues documented ihe 


Discipline and new 
firepower are 
supposed to tip the 
balance in the 
fig ht flgahns t crime 
in major cities. 

;ary and that assault rifles 


that they have been treated growth of SWAT, which ■ means Special 


But. when the accused are even though no more than 60 


last year an army colonel and who for five years was the 
a top Pentagon adviser on commandant at the 
race, used a distinctly military Pentagon’s Defense Equal 
analogy: Fill a room with Opportunity Management In- 
birds, 70 percent ducks and sutute. He said that if those 12 
30 percent swans. Toss in a staff members are indeed the 
hand grenade. He said a rea- only ones charged at Aber- 
sonable ratio of casualties deen, the implications are 
would be 70 percent ducks “dastardly.” 
and 30 percent swans, or per- “Because it means either 


Clinton Sides With Pentagon on Mines 


By Tim Weiner 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The international 
campaign against land mines once 
seemed a lost cause. It is fast becoming a 
cause celebre. 

Elizabeth Dole, president of the 
American Red Cross, was the tost of a 
gala here Tuesday, featuring Princess 
Diana, to raise half a million dollars for 
victims of land mines. Mrs. Dole, a 
potential presidential candidate, has en- 
dorsed “a total ban” on the weapons. 

She is in good company. The com- 
mander of allied forces in the Gulf War, 
General Norman Schwaitzkopf, and the 
Vietnam Veterans of America are for 
banning mines. Fifty-seven senators 
back a swift ban, conservative Repub- 
licans and liberal Democrats alike. 

But the president and vice president of 
the 'United States are not on the land- 


wagon. The campaign's leaders say Bill 
Clinton and A1 Gore have told them 
personally that they cannot afford to 
cross the leaders' of the military 
branches, the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 

Bobby Muller, head of the Vietnam 
Veterans of America, said that President 
Clinton had told him, “I can’t afford a 
breach with the"Joint Chiefs” on the 
issue. Lieutenant General Robert Gard Jr., 
retired, a field commander in the Vietnam 


and Korean ware and a past president of tawa in December to sign a treaty banning 
the National Defense University, said that the production, export and use of anti- 


scheduled for signing in Ottawa in Today, 75 nations have agreed to sign the 
December. They prefer working with the accord, and the number is growing. 


UN disarmament conference in Geneva, 
a process that might take many years. 

A White House official said that Pres- 
ident Clinton “agreed with the chiefs on 


Among the members of the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization, only Greece, 
Turkey and the United States have not 
accepted the invitation. 


unfairly.” 

Charles Moskos, a profes- 
sor at Northwestern Uni- 
versity and co-author of a more, the researchers found that 90 percent 
book on race and the army, now have active SWAT teams,/ compared 
said he sees the issue as a with 60 percent irc the early 1980s. 
tangle of power, gender and Even in rural communities and smaller 
race. cities, the researchers have found that two of 

“Here is an exam ques- every three departments now have a SWAT 
tion,” proposed Mr. Moskos, team — a situation Mr. Kraska likens to 
who is white. “What best ex- . “militarizing Mayberry,” the fictional small 

S lains what is happening? A) town in the Andy Griffith television show. 

lack men are hitting on Yet more important than the raw numbers, 
white women. B) White Mr. Kraska said, the SWAT mission has 
women are flirting with black expanded. Once limited to highly specialized 
superiors. C) Black women actions, such against barricaded gunmen or 
know how to fend off har- hostage^ takers. the teams are now increas- 
assment better than white ingly engaged in more standard police work, 
women. D) Cross-race sexual There is a boom in * ‘high-risk warrant work,’ * 
harassment is more likely to including “no-knock entries,” he said, 
be reported than same-race The work is mostly related to the war on 
sexual harassment drugs, and by extension, “gang suppres- 

“ And the answer is E) All sion.” 

of the above,” he said. "‘Where the SWAT teams were once de- 


weapoi 
of 690 


ns and Tactics. In a nationwide survey 


at the ready ballistic shields and helmets, M- 
17 gas masks and rappelling gear. More 
equipment is carried in a mobile command 
bus that roves the city. Then 
"" there’s that armored person- 

and new nel carrier on order. 

The tactical police officers 
ire here also cany an assortment 

n tm tlu> of weaponry denied the nor- 

° u " e mal beatofficer — battering 

tne rams, diversionary devices 

ict - ^ known as “flashbangs,” 

isc crime chemical agents such as pep- 

Xties. per spray and tear gas. and 

specialized guns, including 

assault rifles and, most famously, the Heckler 
and Koch. MP-5, tire short, highly accurate 
9mm. fully automatic submachine gun. 

While the enormous rise in SWAT work 
has drawn some criticism, police officials 
said it has been necessary. 

In Fresno, Chief Ed Winchester said that a 
highly armed and more violent criminal class 
requires an extreme response. Fresno formed 
its SWAT team in 197?, about a decade after 
the first such unit appeared in Los Angeles. 
Creation of the Fresno unit came after an 
officer was shot and killed by a robbery 


cities with populations of 50.000 people or 
more, Ihe researchers found that 90 percent 


the utility of landmines in protecting our 
troops and saving lives.” The president, 
he said, also agreed “we would give 
mines up in the context of a global 
treaty,” and that the United Nations was 
the best way to do that But tire UN 
disarmament conference has gone 
nowhere. The ban's supporters say the 
fastest path is through Ottawa. - • * 

Canada has invited the world’s gov- 
ernments to send representatives to Ot- 


the production, export and use of anti- 
Vice President Gere “said he could not personnel land mines. “In 1994, not a 
break with the Joint Chiefs, politically.” single country was willing to openly sup- 
The chiefs are not eager to endorse an port the idea of a ban,’ ’ Lloyd Axworthy, 
international treaty to ban the mines, Canada's foreign minister, said recently. 


know how to fend off har- 
assment better than white 
women. D) Cross-race sexual 
harassment is more likely to 
be reported than same-race 
sexual harassment. 


sexual harassment 

“And the answer is E) All 
of the above,” he said. 


which officers fired hundreds of rounds at the 
suspect, borrowed an armored car and used 
tear gas. 

"ft was what we would call a fiasco,” 
Chief Winchester said. He convinced every- 
one that a more highly trained, specialized 
and disciplined unit was required. 

From 1973 until 1994, Fresno’s team op- 
erated only in response to very specific call- 
outs, such as barricaded suspects. But by late 
1994, Fresno was enduring a crime wave. 
There were 55 shootings in five months, with 
13 people killed, including three children. 

And so Fresno's traditional SWAT unit 
transformed itself into the Violent Crime 
Suppression Unit and took to the streets in 
constant patrols. 

“The criminals aren’t stupid,” Chief 
Winchester said. “They see eight guys sur- 
rounding them, all carrying submachine guns 
and wearing black fatigues, they don't want to 
get killed.' 


DGZ again recorded a year of profit- 
able growth in 1996. An above-average 
increase in lending volume, a considerable 
expansion of the securities portfolio, and a 
notable gain in money market trading were 


by the specific needs of our clients, which 
include public-sector entities, large corpo- 
rations, banks, and institutional investors. 

The business volume of the DGZ 
Group advanced by 10.3 percent over the 





<■ • • v ■: V 




V:. 


• : gjjj 




Uk AsMfauol Pipo 

FLORIDA FOG — St. Augustine’s Bridge of Lions has been put on a list of endangered historical sites. 



He.alth Care Dispute 
Is About to Surface 

WASHINGTON — Even though 
President Bill Clinton and Congress 
have agreed to spend $16 billion on 
health care for uninsured children in 
the next five years, a major dispure has 
broken out over whether the states or 
the federal government should decide 
how to use die money. 

The disagreements will burst into 
public view this week, as the Senate 
Finance Committee votes on legisla- 
tion for the budget agreement. The 
basic question is whether to expand 
Medicaid, which covers 22 million 
children, or give each state a lump sum 
of federal money to use. 

Senator John Chafee, Republican of 
Rhode Island, and many Democrats, 
want to build on Medicaid. But many 


POLITICAL 


Republicans say the money should 
flow to the states so local officials can 
decide on its use. fNYTl 

Smoking Abstention 

WASHINGTON — The White 
House has refused to intervene in a 
vexing issue separating the tobacco 
industry and its adversaries as it ap- 
pears ro be nearing a final resolution, 
sources close to the talks say. 

Both sides asked the Clinton admin- 
istration to signal its position on pro- 
tecting tobacco companies from puni- 
tive damages in lawsuits by smokers. 
But, the sources said, the administration 
would not weigh in in on the issue until 
it could study a final package. (WP) 

Coming Vacancy 

WASHINGTON — - Erskine Bowles, 


President Clinton's current chief of 
staff, has been advertising his departure 
for months, and now. just six months 
into his tenure, the speculation about 
his successor is sweeping the city. It 
reached such a volume last month that 
the White House declared his departure 
was not imminent. Still, the expectation 
in the White House is that Bowles wifi 
be gone as soon as the year's final 
budget bills are passed, by New Year's, 
setting off more uncertainty and jock- 
eying inside the administration. (NYT) 

Quote/ Unquote 

Nicholas Bums, the State Depart- 
ment spokesman, on Pol Pot, whose 
Cambodian guerrilla movement is dis- 
integrating: “There are no tears being 
shed in the State Department about Pol 
Pot, believe me. He is a mass murderer. 
He does not deserve one ounce of sym- 
pathy from anybody. ’ ' (IHT) 


Away From 
Politics 

• Last year. 6,276 students 
in 29 slates and the District of 
Columbia were expelled for 
bringing guns and other 
weapons to school, the Edu- 
cation Department says. (AP) 

• Two Orthodox rabbis 
were charged with fonneling 
$1.75 million in Colombian 
drug profits through the bank 


accounts of a yeshiva and 
synagogue in Brooklyn, fed- 
eral prosecutors said. (AP) 

• In the 22d execution in 
Texas this year and the sixth 
this mouth. David Stoker, 38. 
was put to death for the 
murder of a score clerk. (API 

• O.J. Simpson must give 
up football trophies and golf 
clubs to begin paying $33.5 
million for the death of his ex- 
wife and a friend, a Beverly 
Hills judge ruled. (AFP) 


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:PAGE4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY JUNE 18, 1997 




Hong Kong Countdown 
Points Up Discontent 

Bold Midnight-Challenge Is Planned 


ASIA/PACIFIC 





By Keith Richburg 
and Steven Mufson 

Washington Past Service 


HONG KONG — A local Hong Kong 
■ council barred a protest march on the first 
day of Chinese rule-by a group China's 
leaders have labeled “subversive,” 
while members of the popular Hong 
Kong Democratic Party vowed Tuesday 
to hold a defiant midmghi rally from the 
balcony of the legislative building they 
will be forced to vacate. 

Also Tuesday, leaders of the Demo- 
cratic Party, which won a plurality of 
seats in the last legislative elections, 
denounced a move Monday by the 
Beijing-appointed chief executive to 
pack the lower-level local councils with 
appointed members from the pro-China 
' camp. The Democrats called the action 
“a step backward for democracy.” 

And in a further sign of dissent here, a 
group of Hong Kong human rights ac- 
tivists announced Tuesday drat they 
were forming a group called “Hong 
Kong Voice of Democracy" and 
launching an Internet site to spread news 
and views that mi gh t be censored in the 
mainstream local press after July 1. 

The latest posturing and polemics in- 
dicate that, with Houg Kong’s return to 
Chinese sovereignty now less than two 
weeks away, there is still widespread 
disagreement and discontent here over 
the basic rules of politics that will gov- 
ern the territory after the handover. 

A new opinion poll shows that nearly 
a third of Hong Kong residents would 
rather remain under British rule or be- 
come independent Moreover, the poll 
showed that even those residents who 
say they are generally optimistic harbor 
fears about an erosion of their political 
rights and a possible rise of corruption 
under the new administration. 

The poll, released Tuesday by the 
university-based Hong Kong transition 
Project that has been monitoring public 
attitudes toward the handover, shows 
that while 66 percent of respondents 
were optimistic about the future of 
Hong Kong's economic performance, 
only 39 percent were similarly opti- 
mistic about the political future. 

China has said that Hong Kong alter 
July will not be allowed to become a 
base of "subversion" against the 
Chinese mainland, and local officials, 
following the lead of the National 
People’s Congress, have now intro- 
duced a concept of “national security” 
as grounds for limiting public protest 
and banning political parties. One group 
that China has in the past singled out is 


the Alliance in Support of the Patriotic 
Democratic Movement in China, which 
was formed during the 1989 protests to 
assist the students. The Alliance has 
lately been the organizer of the annual 
candlelight vigils in Victoria Park to 
commemorate die June 1989 massacre 
of hundreds of students in China Al- 
liance leaders had asked for permission 
to use that same park on July 1 for a pro- 
democracy rally. But the bid was re- 
jected. Alliance leaders were told that 
the park was already reserved. 

Ihe Democrats meanwhile said they 
would stage a separate rally on the even- 
ing of Hong Kong's transition to China, 
to protest Beijing’s decision to scrap the 
60-member elected legislature and re- 
place it with an appointed one. 

The party vice chairman, Yeung 
Sum, said his party would bold a rally 
outside the colomal-style Legislative 
Council building starting at 10 P.M . 

After the clock strikes midnight, the 
party chairman, Martin Lee, and other 
Democratic Party members attending 
the ceremony at the convention center 
would return to the Legislative Council 
building and speak from the balcony ro 
assembled supporters. 

"We support Chinese resumption of 
sovereignty, but we will keep lighting 
for democracy for the people of Hong 
Kong," Mr. Yeung said Tuesday. 


Puiad MdHfVnir AiHudaol Pic* 

ELECTION DAY — A member of the Moge people of Papua New 
Guinea patiently awaits his turn at the ballot box in the Western 
Highlands. Voting opened Sunday and is expected to last two weeks. 


By Tyler M; 



meeting Wednesday with about 25 key 
members of .die House of Represen- 
tatives. One official described the gath- 
ering as a lobbying session to push for a 
one-year extension of most-favored-na- 
tion trading sums for China. 

The package, seen as a way to di- 
minish congressional opposition to re- 
newing the trade status for Beijing, is 
said to include: 

• A sharp increase in funding for Ra- 
dio Free Asia, the U.S.-governmenr- 
backed shortwave radio network that 
began broadcasting in Chinese last 

• An increase in funding for the Na- 
tional Endowment for Democracy Pro- 
gram, which works with the Chinese 

S vemment to promote the growth of 
al-level democracy -and the rule of 
law at the grass roots. 

• Creation of a new, privately funded 
but federally chartered institution that 


5 Years After Rio Summit, Old Ways Still Dominate 


By William K. Stevens 

Ww York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Five years ago, in 
the largest gathering of its kind in his- 
tory, world leaders meeting at the Earth 
Summit in Rio de Janeiro signed bind- 
ing treaties designed to prevent dan- 
gerous human interference with the 
Earth’s climate system and to protect 
living species. 

They also adopted a nonbinding blue- 
print to guide countries in protecting a 
deteriorating global environment while 
promoting economic well-being. 

On Monday, 70 heads of state or 
government will gather at the United 
Nations to take stock of progress since 
Rio and to discuss where to go from 
here. But UN reports prepared for the 
meeting have already rendered a judg- 
ment: With some important exceptions, 
environmental trends have changed 
little since the Rio gathering. 


The most notable exception, it turns 
out, is in an area not dealt with at Rio: 
population growth. Thanks to factors 
such as contraception, education and the 
enhanced status of women, fertility 
rates are declining more rapidly than 
had been expected in all regions of the 
world. The latest UN projections show 
that the populations of many countries, 
including some developing ones, will 
stabilize within a generation or two. But 
other countries still face high growth 
rates that will strain their resources, and 
the world population as a whole is ex- 
pected to reach 1 1 billion before' sta- 
bilizing sometime in the 2 1st century. It 
now totals about 6 billion. 

At the same time, according to the 
UN assessment, food production con- 
tinues to rise, and most people are living 
longer and healthier lives. These gains 
are threatened, however, by a growing 
scarcity of fresh water and a loss of 
topsoil and productive farmland. 


According to the UN, one-third of the 
world's population does not have an 
adequate supply of clean water, and 
two-thirds will be deprived of it by 2010 
unless action is taken. Some 3.7 billion 
acres of farmland — nearly 30 percent 
of the world's vegetated surface — are 
now degraded to some degree. 

Air and water quality is generally 
improving in rich countries. But despite 
substantial reforestation in those coun- 
tries and a recent slowing of defor- 
estation globally, forest loss continues 
worldwide. 

Each year, according to the United 
Nations, an area the size of Nepal is cut 
or burned. Ocean pollution threatens the 
health and livelihood of the two-thirds 
of humanity living near coastlines, and 
about 60 percent of commercial fish- 
eries are overfished or fully fished and 
in danger of depletion. Toxic chemicals 
still pose significant threats. 

Under the two binding treaties signed 


BOOKS 


at Rio, substantive progress has been 
scant. The Convention on Biodiversity 
has been ratified by 161 countries, al- 
though not by the United States. This 
> treaty obligates governments to protect 
plant and animal species, but species are 
being extinguished and their habitats are 
being destroyed at what the United Na- 
tions calls an “unprecedented" rate. - 

The climate treaty has been ratified 
by 166 countries, including the United 
States. But few developed countries are 
expected to meet the treaty’s initial goal 
of capping emissions of heat-trapping 
gases such as carbon dioxide at their 
1990 levels by 2000. 

Despite that, talks are under way on 
even stronger steps that would further 
reduce emissions of the gases. 

In the meantime, atmospheric con- 
centrations of carbon dioxide are grow- 
ing. Many scientists say that if they are 
not reduced the world can expecta warm- 
er climate and major climatic problems. 


BRIEFLY 


GLUED TO THE SET: 
The 60 Television Shows 
and Events That Made 
Us Who We Are Today 
By Steven D. Stark. 340 pages. 
$25. The Free Press. 
Reviewed by 
Michiko Kakutani 

T HE title of Steven D. 

Stark's new book, “Glued 
to the Sec The 60 Television 
Shows and Events That Made 
Us Who We Are Today.” 
might make you think this is 
some sort of coffee-table 
book, a bland, nostalgic caval- 
cade of television for the baby 
boom generation. 

It isn’t. 1 ‘Glued to the Set.’ ’ 
it turns out, is a tough, per- 
ceptive and highly entertain- 
ing cultural history that uses 
60 television shows to trace 
the evolution of the medium 
and its effects on society at 
large. It doesn't even have a 
single picture. 

Many of the points made in 
this book have been made be- 
fore by such critics as Daniel 
Boors tin. Tom Rosenstiel and 
Tom Shales, but Stark, a com- 
mentator for National Public 


Radio, has pulled them togeth- 
er in this volume to give the 
lay reader an appreciation of 
the myriad ways in which tele- 
vision reflects our changing 
world and in turn shapes our 
perceptions and expectations. 

Stark contends that the fail- 
ure of the Public Broadcasting 
System to provide an original 
alternative to commercial tele- 
vision stems from its heavy 
dependence on programming 
that “appealed either to cor- 
porations that could put up 
money, or to. the older, richer 
and generally more staid audi- 
ences willing to contribute 
during pledge drives." 

He observes that program- 
ming executives have always 
tended to shy away from con- 
troversy, preferring to present 
radical or threatening ideas in 
the form of comedy, be it “ All 
in the Family," "M*A*S*H” 
or “Bewitched.” And he 
traces our shortening attention 
spans back to “Rowan and 
Martin’s Laugh-in" (1968- 
73) with its fragmented, rapid- 
fire pace, a show thar would 
influence everything from 
“Sesame Street” to MTV. 

In fact. Stark discovers the 
roots of many current phe- 


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Hi grins Ctari. 2 8 

5 THE PRESIDENTS 

DAUGHTER, b) Jack 
Higgins — — 5 2 

* MASON & DIXON, by 

Thomas Pyndwn. 4 5 

7 THE NOTEBOOK, by 
Nicholas Sparks 

8 THE RANCH, by DsnfcJL- 

.... 6 

9 SNOW IN AUGUST, by 

PWe Hamill 8 

IB THE TENTH JUSTICE 
by Brad Mehrer 10 

11 OUT TO CANAAN, by 

Jan Karon li 

12 UP ISLAND, by Airoe 

Riven Siddons-. 

13 THE GOSPEL ACCORD- 

ING TO THE SON. by 
Norman Mailer 12 

14 END OF THE DRIVE, bj 

Louis L' Amour . 

15 LONDON, by Edward 

KuiherftmJ 14 

NONFICTION 

1 INTO THIN AIR. h> Jun 

Krakauer.. . I 

2 ANGELA'S ASHES, by 

Frank MeCoun . 


2 39 


3 JUST AS I AM. by Billy 

Graham 4 5 

4 WITHOUT A DOUBT, by 

Marcia Clark with Teresa 
Carpenter 3 4 

5 INTO THE STORM, by 

Tom Clancy with Fred 
Franks Jr. — 6 2 

6 UNDERBOSS, by Peter 

Maas..................-.—..... — 5 7 

7 THE DILBERT FUTU- 
RE by Scon Adorns. .... 7 3 

8 CONVERSATIONS 
WITH GOD; Book I. by 

Neale Donald Walsch 10 26 

9 MIDNIGHT IN THE 

GARDEN OF GOOD 
AND EVIL by John 
Bertsndl 8 132 

10 CONVERSATIONS 
WITH GO l* Book 2. by 

NeaJc Donald Walsdi .. .. ■> S 

11 BRAIN DROPPINGS, by 

George Carlin. 13 2 

12 THE MILLIONAIRE 
NDCT DOOR, by Thomas 
J Stanley and William D. 
Danko— ——————— H 21 

13 THE ONLY WAY I 
KNOW, by Cal Ripken Jr. 

and Mike Bryan J 

14 LOCKED IN THE 
CABINET, by Robert B 

Reich 12 7 

15 THE PERFECT STORM. 

by Sebastian lunger 1 

ADVICE. HOW-TO 
AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 KIDS ARE RUNNY. Tim 

■The O'Dcmndl 

Show"-... — - I 4 

2 SIMPLE ABUNDANCE. 

by Sarah Ban Bronhnack. 2 »' 

3 Eight weeks to 

OPTIMUM HEALTH, by 
Andrew Weil 1 13 

4 TRAINING A TIGER, by 

Earl Woods with Pete 
McDaniel — — 4 3 


□omen a in television shows 
created back in the 1950s and 
’60s. "The Dating Game" 
(1965-73) and other Chuck 
B arris confections like “The 
Gong Show" held the seeds 
of tabloid television and its 
exhibitionistic culture of con- 
fession. 

The emphasis that soap op- 
eras place on characters, mul- 
tiple story lines and open- 
ended narratives helped 
shape many successful 
prime-time dramas, from 
“Dallas" and “Masterpiece 
Theater" through “Hill 
Street Blues." “L.A. Law" 
and "ER.” 

The blend of journalism 
and entertainment pioneered 
by tire “Today’’ show (which 
had its debut in 1952) even- 
tually became the model for 
■ local news broadcasts as well 
as tabloid shows, “Entertain- 
ment Tonight" and prime- 
time magazines. 

And “The Beverly Hillbil- 
lies ” (1962-71) not only led 
to more c pm ball comedies, 
like “Petticoat Junction" and 
“Green Acres," but also to a 
host of fish-out-of- water 
series like “My Favorite 
Martian," “Mork and 
Mindy" and “The Fresh 
Prince of Bel Air.” 

Although the proliferation 
of cable stations has led to 
increased diversity. Stark 
notes that television tradition- 
ally appealed to the masses, 
seeking to ratify “a set of 
cultural values and assump- 
tions" that could be “shared 
as widely as possible." 

This is why actors like Bob 
Newhan — whom Stark de- 
scribes as the "somewhat bor- 
ing embodiment of conven- 
tionality" — have enjoyed 
lengthy tuns on television. 
And this is also why shows 
like “American Bandstand” 
and “TheMonkees" domest- 


icated the more threatening 
aspects of rock-and-roIL 

When looking at television. 
Stark observes, it is always 
important to remember two 
t h i ng s. First, that "most 
American TV shows conform 
to a changing yet powerful 
ethos to make the advertising 
look good" In other words, 
shows that * ’dampen the spirit 
of consumerism — say. tra- 
gedies — have less of a chance 
of making it to television." 

His second point is that 
“prime-time network enter- 
tainment still tends to be de- 
signed for a tired , s tressed-out 
audience watching at home 
without paying close atten- 
tion''; for the most part, it is 
“simple, repetitive and low- 
key programming that can be 
understood even if you leave 
the room now and again for a 
few minutes." 

There is a problem: Stark’s 
tendency to overestimate (and 
oversimplify) the impact that 
television has had on politics. 
He suggests, for instance, that 
spy dramas like “Mission: 
Impossible” and "The Man 
From U.N.C.L.E." “changed 
the way Americans thought 
about espionage, internation- 
al crime and toe role of gov- 
ernment in protecting secrets 
against the Evil Empire" and 
“thus helped create the Zeit- 
geist that made the Cold War 
possible." 

Fortunately, such over- 
statements are fairly rare in 
this otherwise perceptive 
volume. Despite its flaws, 
“Glued to the Set" could 
well prove to be one of the 
best television surveys 
around: an opinionated crash 
course in the medium that has 
infiltrated virtually every as- 
pect of American life. 


Japan Clears Organ Transplants 

TOKYO — After three decades of a bitter national 
debate. Parliament approved a bill Tuesday that would 
allow heart or lung transplants to take place in Japan under 
strict conditions. 

Hundreds of patients die every year in Japan because they 
have no access to transplants and cannot afford to travel 
overseas for an operation. 

Some doctors, however, said the bill's restrictions would 
make it difficult to overcome a long-standing taboo against 
such operations. 

In Japan, a person is not legally considered dead until the 
heart has stopped. But the bill says that a person whose brain 
has stopped functioning can be defined as dead in cases 
where the patient has given prior consent to donate organs 
for transplants. (NYT) 


a state oil firm. All were freed Monday, but the rebels struck 
back Tuesday, raiding a military camp in the area where the 
oil workers had taken refuge. The attack left eight guerrillas 
and one soldier dead, an army spokesman said. (AFP) 

Taleban Punishes 48 in Kabul 

KABUL — The Taleban religious police have started a 
crackdown in the Afghan capital, punishing 48 people for 
defying the militia’s strict Islamic codes, a police official 
said Tuesday. 

Police units beat 14 women who were out on the street 
and apparently not fully covered in line with the TaJeban’s 
Islamic dress code. A religious police official said his forces 
also beat four taxi drivers and seven shopkeepers who had 
served women unaccompanied by men, a crime according 
to the Taleban. fAP) 


Rebels Clash With Filipino Army Seoul to Clean Up Food Supplies 


COTABATO, Philippines — Nine people were killed 
and a Muslim guerrilla was captured Tuesday in the south- 
ern Philippines, as fighting overshadowed cease-fire talks 
between the government and Islamic rebels, officials said. 

The clashes were triggered by the separate abductions of 
a Japanese businessman, four Filipinos and 43 surveyors for 


SEOUL — The South Korean Red Cross said Tuesday 
that it would clean up food shipments to North Korea after 
co mp lai n ts that stones, wood chips and even dead mice had 
been found. 

“ ‘The North Korean Red Cross Society’s protest had been 
found to be well grounded," an official said. (AFP) 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 
i Needy 

s Cautious 
advice 

9 Rope fiber 
14 Michigan town 
or Its college 


15 — De in 

England’: 
Browning 
14 Going too lor 
17 Act of faith 
iB Ram 

is Like Dennis the 
Menace 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 
Rfrishod apaflnarts, 3 monte or 
mors or irfunfehed. residential areas. 


Michiko Kakutani is on the 
staff of The New York Times. 


Living in the U.S.? 

Now printed in New York 
for same day 
delivery in key cities. 

To subscribe, call 

1 - 800-882 2884 

licmlbSSribunc 


, THE WORLD'S imuy NEWSPAPER 


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a» Not having a 
surrounding 
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as Japanese 
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as Guy In the sky 
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44 Function asa 
medical device 

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si Eye In the sky 
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Grown 

Accustomed to 
Her Face* 

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major film 
«s inner tubes, 
geometrically 


a Muscat native 
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danger 
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• Hitting sound 

7 Glossy brawn 
fur 

a Some Sunday 
dinners 
9 Foreign film 
feature 

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12 Cartoonist Peter 

13 This Gun tor 
Hire’ star 

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§ 5 jpkt- support Cirinese-Amerjcn «- 
' ^programs in inch areas as ad- 


WASISNOTPN — Apeg£g£g^; admfrustmkffl oomsamttnt to 

key congressional vote on i<£{jKjbetter track of Ch i n a s human 

noitnal trade$dations wifeXThtB^Ps^;,. r§g|# reewd shrough suefe moves as 
idem Bill Ofuron is putting together gf increasing the staff at the U.S. Embassy 
package of policy and budgetary Beijing and compiling a register to 
changes aimed at nudging Beijing of human rigtovumns 

ward advances in humastrigbts and de- 
mocracy, according to U5- officials. 

Administration and - congressional 
sources say Mr. Clinton js expected to 
go over his proposals at a White House 


Tie administration also has pledged 
to pa& for wonting at this weekend’s 
meeting of the leading industrial nations 
in Denver that urges Beijing to guar- 
antee its commitments to protect demo- 
cratic institutions and human rights in 
Hong Kong. 

Administration officials believe that 
such proposals would at least partly 
address criticism that Mr. Clinton has 
abandoned efforts to press the human 
rights issue and encourage democratic 
reform in a rush to cash in on China's 
huge commercial markets. 

The ideas have found some support 
among House members on both sides of 
the trade issue. The House is expected ro 
vote next week on extension of trade 
benefits, and the outcome is far from 
certain. 

A coalition including human rights 
advocates, labor union groups and the 
Christian right, which wants to punish 
China for its restrictions on religious 
freedom, strenuously opposes extend- 
ing the most-favored-nation trading 
status to Beijing. 

The participation of religious groups 
in die debate for the first time, coupled 
with political fallout from accusations 
that Beijing illegally funneled money 
into the 1996 U.S. presidential cam- 
paign, has heightened the divisive 
nature of the debate. 

The administration's moves come as 
other forces favoring the extension 
began exertmgtheir own influence. At a 
news conference in Washington. Tracy 
Mullin, president of the National Retail 
Federation, claimed thar 2.4 million 
American jobs are directly related to 
retail sales of consumer goods imported 
from China. 

■ China Presses UJ5. Over Taiwan 

China on Tuesday protested the visit 
of the Taiwanese foreign minister to the 
United States, reminding Washington 
of its pledge to limit contacts with 
Taiwan, The Associated Press reported 
from Beijing. 

Foreign Minister John Chang of 
Taiwan is spending nine days in the 
United Stales to attend conferences. 

“We have persistently opposed the 
United States and Taiwan conducting 
any form of official contacts," said Cui 
TIankai, a Foreign Ministry spokesman. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 







aces New Test 
Of Its ‘Black’ Economy 

Off-the-Books Jobs Are Likely to Persist 


By Celestine Bolden 

Npm' y»i 7 t Toms Service 


PATERNO. Sicily — On paper, this 
town on the slopes of Mount Etna 
should be on the verge of a social revolt. 
Unemployment is officially 30 percent 
Bankruptcies are up, credit is tight and, 
as the not summer approaches, people 
like Antonio Di Stetano wonder how 
they are going to feed their families. 

At 32, Mr. Di Stefano, married with 
three children, has nor had steady work 
in years. His job picking die blood ted 
oranges for which this region was fa- 
mous disappeared when cheaper North 
African imports hit the maiket He drif- 
ted inro the building trades, but a na- 
tional corruption scandal wiped out the 
public works programs that were the 
construction industry’s lifeblood. 

Still, he is not in revolt, even though 
when he traveled to Livorno. Milan and 
Germany, he could find only temporary 
jobs. He is among the hundreds of thou- 
sands of Sicilians who subsist on off- 
the-books jobs — everything from day 
labor to small-scale factories. 

Here on Europe's southern rim, in a 
region that has always trailed the rest of 
Italy economically, where the dead 
hand of the Mafia has helped stifle local 
enterprise, people like Mr. Di Stefano 
survive and stay put, without much hope 
of improvement in the economy. 

And the way they do it offers some 
glimpses of what Europe confronts as it 
moves to cm welfare and raise taxes. 

As Italy, like the rest of Europe, goes 
abour the' difficult task of trimming its 
public largesse, more people are s inking 
below the radar of what Italians, using 
the English word, call their “welfare'’ 
state. They are buoyed instead by their 
churches, by their families and, increas- 
ingly. by employers whose only avail- 
able jobs are “black* ’ — involving 
neither taxes nor payments for social 
assistance programs. 

No one knows how the black econ- 
omy will respond os Italy loosens its 
labor laws ro make its business more 
competitive internationally. But if the 
past is any prologue to the furore, the 
likelihood in Sicily is that the black 
economy will persist, or expand, just as 
it has for generations. 

“1 find work here and there, enough 
to put food on the table, but 1 don't work 
every day,” Mr. Di Stefano said for- 
lornly as he and his wife, Giuseppina, 
stood outside the Church of the Holy 
Ghost, where the priest and volunteer 
workers regularly boil them out of such 
recurring dramas as the electricity bill. 

No one in Patemo believes that one- 
third of the local labor force is really out 
of work, not even Giacinto Corsaro, 
head of the local unemployment office, 
even though his latest report shows 
13,380 unemployed out of a labor force 
of 38,000. * ‘u those figures were true, it 
would be frightening, so you have to 
look at them with a pair of pincers, ’ ’ Mr. 
Corsaro said. “There is massive illegal 
work, and there always will be.” 

According to a recent study chat has 
shocked even the experts, one out of 
three jobs in southern Italy, the 
Mezzogiomo, is black. Nationally, the 
estimate is one of six. 

‘ ‘The difference is that in Sicily black 
work is usually a person's only job, 
whereas in the north, it is often a second 
job, or moonlighting.” said Giacomo 
Scarciofano. who heads the regional 
branch of the General Italian Confed- 
eration of Labor, Italy’s largest union. 

Pressed by global competition. 
Europe'selaborate systems of social pro- 
tection — from liberal maternity leaves 
to early pensions, long holidays, medical 
care and generous public payrolls — are 
now under attack as baggage govern- 
ments can no longer afford. 

For many here in eastern Sicily, these 
are financial lifelines that allow families 
to get by in rocky times. Yet for those 
w ho have never held a steady job, many 
of these benefits — with the major ex- 
ception of free medical care — simply 
do not exist. Unemployment benefits 
expire alter six months, and are used 
largely for seasonal workers who work 
between 100 and 150 days a year. 

“Those who suffer most are the 
young unemployed who have nothing, ' * 
said Mr. Corsaro. who bitterly laments 
that his office, like unemployment of- 


fices across Italy, is barred from as- 
sisting the jobless in finding work. 

Like many others, the Di Siefanos 
■have learned to make do.- When they 
could no longer afford the rent on their 
three-room apartment, they simply 
stopped paying it Because of strict ten- 
ant-protection laws, their landlord has 
not been able to evict them. And when 
she was unable to afford medicine for 
her children, Mrs. Di Stefano recently 
admitted them to a' public hospital for 
emergency treatment, which is free. 

According to the national statistics 
office, the percentage of younger people 
between 18 and 34 living with their 
parents in 1990 was S1.8; by 1990, the 
number was 58.5 percent The 1996 
statistics also showed, for the first time, 
that more young people than old were 
living in poverty. 

At the turn of the century and then 
again after World War II, S icilian emig- 
rants left their island by the thousands to 
find opportunity elsewhere, either in the 
New World or in northern Italy or Ger- 
many. Now there is no promised land. 

“It is the law of the markets that 
determines the phenomenon of black 
work," Mr. Scarciofano said. “Fifteen 
years ago, there was much less here 
because employment was almost full. 
But during an economic crisis, it is 
easier to blackmail workers into taking 
an illegal job.” 

Workers are not the only ones black- 
. mailed by black work. So is the state, 
which, even though it is losing tax rev- 
enues, turns a blind eye for fear of 
jus social balance. La 





Floods Kill 4 
In Normandy 

Residents of Saint- 
Martin deBoscherville 

■ in Normandy* cleaning 
iip Tuesday after 
violent storms and Rash 
flooding in the region. 

A mother and her two 
children were killed in 
a mud slide, while a 
man died in a car 
accident caused by 
"heavy rain. Three 
villages near Rouen, 

150 kilometers (90 
miles) northwest of 
Paris, were declared a 
disaster area. Major 
highways in the region 
remained cut off by the 
floods, and 20,000 
. residents were left. . 
without running water. 

_ Rnm <Hj Uwunht" Ihr - 


.1 

Waste Threatens French Arms’ Projects, Audit Says 


By Joseph' Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 



according to union figures. “Black 
work is tolerated because it is a social 
shock absorber,” Mr. Scarciofano said. 


BRIEFLY 


PARIS — France may have to cancel 
some major weapons programs because 
Defense Ministry management has been 
so poor In the 1990s, according to a 
government audit released Tuesday. 

The report accused officials of ac- 
cepting “unrealistic ' * cost estimates for 
new armaments and of failing to set up 
controls to track costs during devel- 
opment 

“Painful decisions” need to be made 
quickly, it concluded, or the French 
armed forces cannot expect to undergo a 
planned modernization. Key programs 
that are liable to be caught in a financial 


squeeze include the Rafale fighter jet,' a 
new combat helicopter, air-launched 
cruise missiles, the Helios 2 military 
satellite with infrared capability, the Le- 
clerc bottle tank and a multipurpose 
armored personnel carrier. Also vul- 
nerable is an array of defense electronic 
equipment designed to modernize the 
combat capabilities of French troops. 

The report — by the Cour des 
Comptes, an autonomous auditing 
agency — was withheld during the re- 
cent elections that brought a Socialist- 
led government to power. It was re- 
leased during the Paris Air Show. 

Coming our now, it will underline the 
Socialists' view that defense spending 
was mismanaged for the post five years 


under conservative governments. 

The hew defense minister, Alain 
Richard, was formerly a budget spe- 
cialist in Parliament, with only limited 
exposure to security issues. 

Presumably, he will be under pres- 
sure to invest in better accoui 
cedurcs to end the pattern in 
armaments programs have been can- 
. celed and foe initial investment lost be- 
cause of massive cost overruns. Even 
projects that survived have seen their 
cost soar because of (ate payments in- 
volving fines, the report said. 

. The French military budget has 
plunged by 25percem in two years in a 
precipitous effort to match the savings 
achieved by other countries. 


Beyond their interest in budget rigor, 
the Socialists have given few indica- 
tions of their likely moves in the defense 
sector, beyond saying that they would 
review the Rafale. 

The fust concrete details about (he 
policies of the new government are ex- 
pected this week in a series of scheduled 
speeches by Prime Minister Lionel 
Jospin. 


See our 

Business Opportunities 

every. Wednesday 
'in The Intcnnarket 


IRA Killings Condemned 

BELFAST — The Irish Republican Army 
came under fierce international pressure Tues- 
day to end its murderous campaign in Northern 
Ireland after two police officers were killed in an 
ambush that cast a pall over peace attempts. 

The province's police chier said there was no 
sign of the IRA ending hostilities and his of- 
ficers were on alert to prevent further attacks. 

PresidentBili Clinton castigated the IRA for 
“this brutal act of terrorism.” He also warned 
against retaliation by pro-British Loyalists. 

European Union leaders meeting in Am- 
sterdam reaffirmed their “abhorrence of ter- 
rorisfviolencS'id dll its forms.” (Reuters) T| 

French Pedophiles Held 

PARIS — French gendarmes detained 345 
people Tuesday in a nationwide crackdown on 
pedophile videos, a police spokesman said. 

The police searched the homes of 800 people 
whose names were found on foe mailing list of 
a company in foe central town of Macon selling 
pornographic films involving boys. (Reuters) 

Bucharest Blocks Miners 

BUCHAREST — Romanian authorities 
stopped trains and deployed riot policemen 
Tuesday to keep striking coal miners from 
advancing on foe capital, where they went on 
foe rampage twice in the early 1990s. 

“We have information that the miners 
wanted to use foe trains and come to Bucharest 
as they did in the past,” Virgil Leancu, the head 
of Romania's railway, said on state radio. 

The miners were on strike over demands for 
pay increases and improved job security, but a 
union representative gave no indication they 
planned to move on Bucharest from the mining 
area in the central Jiu Valley. ( Reuters ) 

Ciller Finds Key Support 

ANKARA — A tiny, ultra-nationalist party 
Tuesday gave its crucial support to a reshuffled 
government in which Prime Minister Necmet- 
tin Eibakan would stem down as foe head of 
modem Turkey’s first Islamic-led government 
in favor of his pro-Western partner, Tansu 
Ciller. 

Backing from the Great Unity Party is 
needed if the planned new government is to 
win the required vote of confidence in Par- 
liament. (AP) 


Georgia Frees 
Figure in U.S. 
Funding Case 

Tiir -b mn iiit'uj Pm j 

WASHINGTON — Roger 
Taniraz, a donor to the U.S. 
Democratic Party, was re- 
leased from custody in the 
former Soviet republic of 
Georgia three days after his 
arrest on an embezzlemem 
charge related to a failed bank 
he once headed in Lebanon. 

The State Department said 
Mr. Tamraz. a Lebanese- 
Amcrican businessman who 
is accused of having offered 
political donations to pres- 
sure President Bill Clinton’s 
administration to support his 
plans for an oil pipeline, was 
detained Friday on an embez- 
zlement charge lodged by the 
Lebanese government" in 

Bui Mr. Tamraz was re- 
leased from custody in Tbilisi 
on Monday and is free to leave 
Georgia because he has not 
been charged with violating 
any laws there, a Stale De- 
partment representative said. 


RECRUITMENT 


•* 


American Financial Service Company 

based in Pans searching for canctidatBS for (he position of 

Regional Operations Manager, MEA-210 kf+ 

The ednddats wM be both sales and operators onentaied. a self starter 
YBrth a watt dwotopad buanoaa acumen. TWs poaBion B responaMB tat 
enhafiora exiflbig iwhvotfc agarf serves quaflty. ansirtig nawohagante 
are in compraic* with operatina standards, installing, barring and 
launching «jr products and retoad swytaas. , _ . 

The suocewaful cantMato must be fluent in French and EngWh. AraWc 
would be a plus. Travel 60% o< the tsne, must nave e 4 year coAege 

‘iSarSHISSs SHa."’ 

eeacteen of '*a EEC. krow Windows 95. Word. Excel. PowerPoint, 
some knowiadgo of X2S 4 X28 telecommunications systems would be 
helpful, but not obrigataiy 
Phase respond by later or fax to. 1 
WESTERN UNION FSI: 33 Avenue Wagnm, 

75017 Paris or Fax: 33 (0) 1 45 72 77 21 


URGENT 


Colombia TriStar Films (France) 

Seeks an 

EXECUTIVE ASSISTAOT/SECRETAKY 
to work for the President. 

Must have at least 2 tears experience in a similar position. 
English mother tongue. 

Needs to be available to start in July (aid of July at the latest). 

Ptei.sc send a CL with photo & a handwritten motivation letter to: 

Jackie Page - Columbia TriStar Julms 
131 avenue decagram - 75017 Paris 


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PLUS: BAHRA/nR. CYPRUSM. EGYPT FROM W, FINLAND A, ISRAEL WOilQ KENYA (4), KUWAIT^. MALTA A, MOROCCO^. OUANFROM&, 
SAUDI ARABIA FtmuQ.UA.E. FROM S 

( 11 BF £-500 reduction on Sunday night, ( 3 ) FF 350 Wppl. at HoSdoy Inn Hasort , NbsJScti SL Laurent frem V7 \a 31 / 8 * 9 7 . (31 LfT 105.000 auppl at Ho&day Inn Crawne Plaza Rome^Anarva. 

i*lopo<wgBaiV^bnSloper*rigearty<Vi9u»L 

* Up ta twa aduto «mf too children aped 12 and under storing th*tr pvant*' room an totMad u Dm bnakftn. 

"* At parHopetliiD ImMta only; tflnn*r from the “SuHtmer SpedaT luanu (• ww more than 1 1tp«r p*mn; price 
IndudM a stole* of a main court*, ■ drink >nd Hflto; up to two KcampanytnB diltdren Bg*d 12 ami undte owi 
ehooM • ttmm «wi from the Rkts menu. AD MaMijr Inn Expma houb oHer ■'BsmpIlnMntMy coM bnMw* 

MUM. At MUM HuOday bin Express hotett the ■Sumuwr SpwfaT tllmwr nay to offered at ■ local restaurant. 

Rm ore nM « partWpMrvg tofeb ev«y day of the’ woeh fnw 1 ? Jvuta to 7 Sa^tarntw .1897 l*wna totals 
w*atonda only) and art payable In loeal currency. The S prieoa Indkata lha appreximata eqirivalam oTHta Head 
•oeol pita*. Booking* an aubject to avatuMlty of noma alloeaHd to tMa offer. For full Woetondar Pin name 
, and coadUoac, plena rafar to the broedam. 


TOLL-FREE RESERVATIONS from Belgium: 0800 1 99 11 , France: 0800 905 999, 

Germany: 0130 81 51 31, Italy: 1678 77 399, Netherlands: 0800 022 11 55. Spain: 900 99 31 19, 
Switzerland: 0800 55 11 75, U.K.: 0800 897 121, All other countries: 31-20 606 02 22 (not toll-free). 











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June Report £ 

Revolutionary Tubing System 1.5m 
Med & Bee Engiim Consult 750k 
Videographfc Prod Hardware 25 Ok 
Free Range Chicken Fanning 150k 
FeribanmgArtsIni^U^ 150k 
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IN THE 


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Protect Your Personal Assets 
• Incorporate m any state, ndixfing 
Dataware. Nevada S Wyoming 
1 UCs (Ufflitati Liability Convenes) 
' In as late as 4 S hours 

Corporate Agents, Inc. 

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CompuServe: GO inc 



BARONIAL TITLES 


Since cstiblshcd in 1 82b ‘Burkes 
Peerage" has published and dealt: 
with the Aristocracy of Gt Britain. 
To acquire an authentic and cm 
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contact us at Dept. 1 JIT. 

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LIECHTENSTEIN & WORLDWIDE 
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Management 
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Amertca i leaning product 
devoropmom company b fmensKd 

(international product design 

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REAL ESTATE 


SWITZERLAND 

ELEGANT 18th CENTURY MANOR HOUSE 
WITH A MAGNIFICENT VIEW OF LAKE 
GENEVA AND THE ALPS. 

A rare jewel completely renovated. Spacious grounds include Jarm 
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riding facilities- Building possibilities. Private mooring nearby. 
Available for rent or purchase. 

Reply in confidence to: 

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Oh. Claude Anet 4 ■ PO Box 247 - CH-t110Morges 
Tel. 41 21 802 61 30 Fax. 41 21 802 61 32 
E-mafrswissecGessQswissonline.ch. 


INT'L FRANCHISES # 


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franchisor. 176 pages. US$34.95 (includes shipping) 

Send to 1HT Guide. P.O. Box 12m. Oakland. CA 94004 Cash. Money Order, Visa 
or M/C (amd Am. #>. Expir. Date A Approval Smature).' 

Tel: (5101 839-5471 or Fax: (a fO) 547-3245 
E-Mail: source book (S' eartMnk.n« Website :www.frrachi(*ratLroiii 

HcralbSEnbuuc 


TwrumiwiHiii viTwn 


Import/Export 


BUYING OUTLET FOR THE LARGEST 
Tracing Companies Branded & Luxury 
goods Fragrances M 3 mats watches, 
pare, china Jare. oystaL nanebags. 
optical frames, sunglasses fine agars. 
Guca Tag Heuet. Cartier Wedgwood 
Saaravskl Herend. Ferragamo Prada 
Hermes etc Please caMan TRADING 
DESK Tel USA - 1-212-007-0973 Fax 
VISA -1-ZU-8Q7-M58. AH cate treated 
nth utmost confidence 


A GIVE-AWAY Export Surplus Lades 
axmi sluts short £ long sleeves. 
hantHwaded & enttrorJerefl at USS25G 
FOB Manta. Sxrtrot 8JQ0 pieces For 
del* please tax 16 W 1 8i7-w?3 


CUBAN CIGARS M STOCK LONDONS 
FINEST CIGAR MERCHANTS Tel 44 
l 0)171 9292242 Fax 44 (0jf71 9232232 


NOAMEX INC. 

LARGE GRADER OF USED CLOTHING 
For mmer ■ men ■ cMdrai 
PREJIUM & DOMESTIC QUALITY 
DENW JEANS & DENIM JACKETS 
Erewt tag bates, anal bates, boxes. 
AFRICA ASIA. EUROPE. MID-EAST. 

CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA- 
Ter 710-342-2278 Fax.7i 8-342-2258 US 


CASKETS 

American Caste! (or export 
Beam? a representative 
For rtnrmattan fax n me US 
(SO) 9264690 


GENERIC CIGARETTES, American 
blend lobacco. fowesl prices. private 
labeling available FAX USA i (954) 
474-38® 


AUTOMOBILES 


k s damNa 
isiMeean^ 

/ur red Eschar Street IP 

CH-8027 Zurich 
Pox. D1/2Q2 76 30 

Tot - 01/202 78 10 

now TAX-+REE usod 

ALL LEADING MAKES 
Same day rogtsvarton poastato. 
ronowabla up to 5 yesrs. 

we also regtaref care with 
tuwvdi lgre.qti ( -/real ptatw. 


- Automobiles 


SALE: MERCEDES a 600 
Cat* HV dnve) EJeoance 
BRAND NEW Color. Emerald Stack 
Mu UnregstHHl Fifty Xartpd 
Taxtree tu-Uercates neater: DR 256A 
I1U3S = ca DR. 1.90) 

Carted Mr 5 Op de Kamp. Mett«« 
Holland Tot +31-77-382 9999 
Fw: +31-77-387 2548 


UMOUSMES MERCEDES S -CLASS, 
Rofis-floyce. trow Towncars Swfched 
from 12 to 120 mete Call Tamur at 
Tr+staw Cusom Coach 201-512-9301 or 
Fax 201-512-9344 USA 


Swfasriands Porsche Bwstor Rental- 
Weekends - FR-Mo SF1650-T days 
SFSO 0 10 daw SF475Q-na 250 km'day 
Tel. -41794002606 Fax.-4 1S54427805 


Auto Shipping 


SAVE ON CAR SHIPPfflG. AMESCO, 
Krtjtestr 2. Antwerp Befgun. To/From 
US. Atn» Regular Ro-Ro sailing Free 
hotel Tet 3a3r231-4?39 Fax 232-6353 


Auto Rentals 


RENT AUTO DERGI FRANCE: Weekend 
FF500 7 days FFI5QQ. Tel Pare +33 
(OH 4388 5555 Fax (Oil 4353 9529. 


Autos Tax Free 


TRANSCO BELGIUM 

20 TEARS WE DELIVER 
CARS TO THE WORLD 

An makes and models 
Expon Safe - Regraratori 
Snipping - rsurance 

Transco. 5i Vossesctejnstr. 
203J Arttwrp. Belgun 
Tet +32 3 54262.40 
Far. +32 3 5425897 


25YRS OCEANWIDE MOTORS 

soxriy and stmww tf AUd 
Mercedes. BMW Porsche CaU Germany 
+ 48-211434646 or fax 211-454 2120 


ATX WORLDWIDE TAX FREE CARS. 
Ejqwi * 5 tR*®B + registration of new 8 
used cbs. ATK NV, Temxefdei 40 2*30 
Brasschaai. Beteum. Phone: +32 3 
645*002 Fax +32 3 6457109 ATK. 
sh»i959 


TAX FRffi EtmpflUS REGISTRATION 
No Travel by owner & ear for ptees. Un- 

imed Fax +41 S 645 27 26. Tet 27 


INCORPORATE IN USA 
BY FAX OR PHONE 


• Corporations aod llcs 

• FrssmmBranrvatlas 

• Full registered agent services 

• Personal assets shielded 

• Confidential and cost effective 
> Attorney managed 

RUC 302-421-5753 

Registered Agents, Ltd. 



Dataware 

$199." ! 

I Wyoming 

late « ; 

Nevada 

*380 » , 

, Utah 

*270 “ ; 


TEL: 302-421-5750 
EMaU-.coniQilca.Bet 
www.lnoaa.com 


1220 N. Mar ket StreBt. Suite 606 


Wilmington, Delaware 19801 


EMFKE STATE BUBDtNG 

ADDRESS 

,i Getai instant cnedMHty. 

1 EntabMi a NY preaonca tn 
the workfs bast-known 
building. MaS recetwd. phone 
ww ewig. contarenca 
room, lumtatied rrrinl-omcaa. 

HIPWEgTCT OFFI C E IBBICB 

TEL- 204MSR • FUbUm-tlW 


BC SEEKS ACTIVE PARTNERS 

for creatran of highly 
profitable projects, 
opening IBC camera in 
USA, ASIA, AFRICA A EUROPE 
All new concepts & 
exceptional products. 

Tel: PARTS +33 
FSz: PARIS +33 


11011 41 05 07 OG 
1(0)1 47 56 5517 



com* 

Sceki sales distributors A fran- 
chisees (Asia&Europe) for ice 
rinks using the world’s finest 
s ynthe tic skating surface. _ 
SUPBVCC requires no refrige- 
ration equipment, is fight wei- 
ght & easy to install Investment 
is 40% less &. operating costs 
60% less when compared to wet 
-ice. ContactED KRAS INSKI Ph: 
16221 }42 11379/91 Jtax:6221- 
42 1 8061 .tputtputt@rad.neLid 


Putt- Putt 

Golf &Games 


Europe. 

investment US4O0K to US3JM 
with high ROLContactED KRA- 
S1NSKI PH: (622 1)42 11 379/91. 
Fax : (6221) 4216061. 

E:pu ttputt@rad.net id 


ITALIAN TRADING COMPANY exports 
8lf over the wild any text of products 
made ki Europe and rnports any kind of 
products from si tner the wrid tor tie 
Etmpean maitet. both for mdustiaf use 
and large consuwv. Could you please 
send your requests and/or offers wih 
catalogue ana price IW by tax or mal 
(and if p 088 Ue Mfrsampes) to BOOM 
ORGANIZERS - PIAZZA LE CAOORNA 
11 - 20123 MLANO • TEL/FAX +39 2 
8056143 


WONDER-BRA- Mdfor some of quaky 
Wgh-proft Sngerie & fashion undenrear 
tor ntemaBona markets Fax Ur. jodan 
J.CI Corp- (N« York) 212-541-5832 


USED LEVIS 501-505-517. All COF 
as/grades. DUM tom USA inter 
nmianefty recognized deafer Ptune: 
510-233-1500. Fare 5:0-233-1583 USA 


DOMINICAN CIGARS. 9 styles, hand 
rolled, volume purchases only. 
Telefex: liSA+854 -474-3806 


LEVI SOI'S. Used and New. QuaSty 
jeans dbset Irom the USA Honest and 
BeSabte. FiK 5035ZWJ749 USA 


SMALL ARMS AI«UNTTX)N/M1L(TAHY 
equpneik and supplies, towesl pnces. 
Vduna orty FAX ISA +954474-3866 


USED LEVI 501 JEANS • AI colors & 
For price H FAX. 801-561-3849 
RE 


SuG/ness Opportunities 


MINING Co:s JV's 

Operating mining Cas seeking 
Joint Vaiture with our 
US Public Company 
For Development & Expansion 
Or Buy Out 
Contact the President 

Asia & Pacific 
Mining Ventures Inc. 

(NASDAQ OTC) 
FAX: (N. AMERICA) 
604-9264416 


COMPANY SPECIALIZED in A atahols, 
brandy, wne, bulk and baffles, seeking 
conraeictaf partners ncti hstaied ki toe 
sector, in Oder to develop export sates 
[Asia. East etc > Ofico support hxhnisai 
8 raseadJ Effidert. you wfl coreirule 
yam knowledge of me maria energy & 
wA. Jacques Laurem Tef Fiance +33 
(013 8053 9060 Fax 10)3 8053 9069. 


UNSECURED VISA CARD avaiable to 
anyone. CredN Dint rrawnum S5QOO Fa 
free Wormalion please fax + 
322640.70 42- 


SUPPLIER OF WELL 
KNOWN BRANDS 


of SjpQte-ShoM (Mm, Adkte, RMxbK, Fte. 
SebeeQ, IMwtamO is looking lor nongbuyea 
(iiihninmp ■ j ii 1 1 1 iiii m>i) 


World Wide Supplies toe. 
ibc naooiiows 


INVEST ON 
INTERNET BUSINESS 


with Che PREAUER & OFFICIAL 

WORLDWIDE NETWORK 
FOR FASHION AND BEAUTY 

i very protirable opportunity 




FINANCIAL 

SERVICES 




The Mark qf Service 

ATEUE1A 

MANAGEMENT LTD 

(International 
Corporate & Trust) 
Contact 

Tony Gould / Alain Albert 
Td/Ruc 

+ 44 TO 1624 616007 /616006 
Etnaitoddai^enteEprisc net 


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Tel: 1^06^99.1991 • Fax: 1.206.599.1981 

417 Secmd AvenUs Wwt • 8eet0e,WA Mil USA 
wwnJcaflbackXooi • Erred: MoOkaKradccan 








bare up to 


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Brlirt 







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L i Ul ! 1 1 i (; : i ^ 


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OX. 


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GERMANY ^$0^4 EGYPT $L08 


AT THt • 

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BUSINESS IN 
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Contact Jacques at: 
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Square Ambiorix, 28 
B-1000 Brussels 
Tel: f32 2) 743 51 11 
Fax: (32 21743 51 12 

“...your home fbr 
business * 

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INT'L 

FRANCHISES 


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OFFSHORE BANKS . 

COMPANIES &■ TRUSTS 

IMItIGRATiON/P ASS PORTS 

lanfdr 
VS 


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Aston Corporate Trustees 

19 Ped Road, Doughs, fate of Man 
Tat +44 m 104 626591 
Fax: +44 (0) 1624 625126 

London 

Tat *44 ffl 171 233 1302 
Fare +44 v? 171 233 ISIS 

E Mail: aston6entefprise.net 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

READY MADE CD's. FULL ADMIN 
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Oonod Stab Ho lor nmetfeu 
semoeaS corrynny brodm 
MACS LTD, Room HOB. AUon Raza 
24 Gramfc Roafl. 1ST. fontar, 
Hong Korn, awnaft nacsOMuuier iM 
Tet 8SM7241223 Fax 27224373 


AN OPPORTUNTTY te Hkfll AdferiSS 
A cUwad benefactor a required 
to sponsor Ian ambUous, in 
and oorfioart boys Biwi]^ the ' 
mofl prefiXtgtoirs school and LMvotity. 
Sitopori and commamant Is raum for the 
satisfaction and parfdpefan in their 
education. Has visionary ml mingle 
win BRITISH ROYALTY and MenuHS 
of both Parfementary Houses. 
Telephone or tax 44 (0)171 702 7832 


YOUR OWN CO IB 5 ANY M 
SWITZERLAND 
ZUR1CH*ZUG "LUZERN 

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Bamrstassa 36. CH-6300 2UG 
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Hgh level LAMES A GENTLEMEN 
waned wridMfe 

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CO-C P06 224. CH8056 Zurich 
Fbx: +41 1 371 71 08 
B-maJ 101613 eoomixisavexom 


WTL SOCETY OF FMANCCRS 



ANONYMOUS BANK ACs, vtfVwtfxM 
credit cards. AAemailve Passports. 
REE SROCHURE Fa 44 (0)1245 
381992 or trU RSt PO Brit 2296 
Ctwfensted CM3 2RR Engterd 


2nd PASS’D RTS / Driving licences i 
DBgreas.’CEBJmaiapa Paaqxms/Sacrer 
Bank Accourts. GU, P 0 Box 70302. 
Athens 16610. Greece. Fa B962152. 
iW/wiwi.tfobtfflBrey.can 


A BRIDGE TO CHHA: CoraJrg. Busi- 
ness Development and Strategic intro- 
ductions. Please tax aientton FD.G 
(052) 545 0550 


CONFERENCES 


t 


Jtoty 35-aa, T 9 W 


fa-: * If 


INTERNATIONAL CRAFT EXPOSITION 

Rosemont Convention Center 
(five minttlca from p'HarelnrenuironalAinwni 
Searching iOf business opportunities? Attend die creative industry's most 
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Cantaef Offlnger Maatgasenl Co. Teh 614-452-1541 ■ Fas 614452-2552 
E-ftnO: keiub^ofllngerxom Webnvwwxreative-ijidretriAeoai/tce 






TO ADVERTISE IN CONFERENCES 8, EXHIBITIONS, 
PLEASE CONTACT PARIS ON FAX: +33 1 41 43 <?3 70 



OFFSHORE COMPANIES. For free ho- 
clue or advtoe Tet London 44 181 741 
1224 Fax: 44 181 748 6558/8338 
wwvapptetoflca.uk 


AGENTS WANTED! To Sel US OoTOO- 
rafions & LLCs from 5300 (afi induswe) 
Coiparme ConauUng Ud. Tetephrow: 
30^529-0500 or Fax: 302-529-9005 USA 

2ND PASSPORT S10K Also EU. 
Diplomatic, Drivers licences Emat 
ctpreffliratnetpli Fax: 63-2-831 7552 

FHD YOUR FAVORITE CIGAR 
on WWW.CfGARHU8.CH 

SEEK TO BUY BAHAMIAN BANK for 
one of our efiants. Wrfie hr. Box 304, 

IHT., 92321 Nauty Cede*. France. v 

Telecommunications 

FROM ANY COUNTRY - Fexmy - 
A new business opportinty for 
tetecomnunicatim cwiparuas or 
start te nvestors In any country. 

FAXWAY: 

The Now Way of Sending Fax to Fax. 

We provide turnkey system, hardware & 
software free. Under a ficereed partner- 
ship - Very Mgh margins. Fax Inquiries 

to BEST DATA LNE TELECOM/ 

Fax Parts: S3 fllj! 40 28 45 T1 

Business Services 

YOUR OFFICE M THE CARBBERN 

Fax, phone, donfcle ki the Caittean 
Personal and conUantiel sovfce 

Other tadttias. Fax Kr(809) 221-9060 

LAW RRM with lame Russian practics 
(28 offices in #w CIS) seeks offers from 
providers of immigration / passports ser- 
vices. First hand providers orw. Please 
fax +(7 095} 913 8442. 742 9708. frmtf 
zareeiyeOorttoeju 

YOUR OFFKX N DUBUN. Serviced (X- 
fees, Mai. Phone & Fax, Offshore Co. 
Formations. Prestigious Address. Tak 
+353 dl 475 1»1 Fax 11) 475 1889 

YOUR OFFICE IN MANHATTAN 

5th Are. mai naming, kidvfduaf 
teteptana bn + trantaeri^. tat. e-mta. 

Tet 1-212-84S4M99 Fax. 1-Z12-221-5S68 

NYC - 5TH AV. ADOTCSS 

tofl Forwardtofl • Fax-mafl-phone 210 

5th Av - SdU 1102 Tel: 212-242-3900 

NY Mal Service 

SECOND PASSPORT 

FTOe trio email: 

PASSPORTfllNFOFRBE.COM 

MAILING LISTS by Bager & Canaaiy 
European business end Gonamer date 

Tet 44 1312262996 Fax 44 1312267901 

NEED support in Ein+Bustees? For inf 
Far/Email our US/Asien pros in Berlin 

0049 30 8542286/tamjOcompuserveoom 

YOUR OFFICE W LONDON 

Bond Street - Mai. Rune, Fax. Telex 

Tet 44 171 290 WOO Fta 171 499 7517 

Business Travel 

Ist/Buelness Class taunt Travels 
WortOwide Up id 50t dl. No ratoons, 
no restrictions, imperial Canada Tel 
1-514-341-7227 Fax. 1-514-341-7998. 
e-mail address; Imperial e login.nel 
httpArm-bglnj^^ 

Banking 

COMMERCIAL MTL BARKING LTD 

• CREDIT 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBIiNE. 


INTERNATIONAL 


f Cohen Vows Firmness 
In Policy Toward Iran 


Citppilrdtn Our Stiff FniHDtipiKtm 

MANAMA. Bahrain — The United 
States said Tuesday that it was not 
headed toward a clash with Iran unless 
the Islamic republic started one. and it 
warned Tehran against any attempt to 
halt shipping in the Gulf. 

Defense Secretary William Cohen 
said during a tour of the Gulf states that 
Iran had successfully tested a new 
Chinese air-launched anti-ship cruise 
missile this month. That is in addition to 
cruise missiles Iran already has based on 
shore and aboard ships. 

Mr. Cohen's disclosure fit neatly 


South African 
Gets 6 Years 


CivqvtnlbiOurSMfFmmDUpHeba 

POTCHEFSTROOM,' South Africa 
— Eugene Terre ’Blanche, leader of the 
neo-Nazi Afrikaner Resistance Move- 
ment, was sentenced Tuesday to six 
years in prism for trying to murder a 
black man. 

Mr. Terre ‘Blanche, 53, a white ex- 
tremist well-known in South African 
politics for two decades, was convicted 
.of attempted murder last year for the 
savage beating of one of his black work- 
ers, for eating on the job. 

Prosecutors said the worker. Paul 
Motshabi, was beaten in March 1996 
with a pipe or a club and was left an 
invalid by the attack. 

Mr. Terre’Blanche was also con- 
victed of assault with intent to do griev- 
ous bodily harm for setting his dog on 
John Ndziraa. a gas station attendant, 
two weeks before the attack on Mr. 
Motshabi. 

Both convictions will be appealed 
and the court ruled Mr. Terre'Blanche 
could be released on a bail of 20,000 - 
rands (S4,440;.‘ 

The gray-bearded rightist sat impass- 
ively in the court in Potchefstroom. 
southwest of Johannesburg. His sup- 
porters were subdued as he stood to hear 
the magistrate pronounce sentence. 

“It's the greatest injustice," he said, 
while waiting for bail to be posted. “I 
regard it as laughable. I am convinced 
the appeal case will prove me correct If 
I should go to prison today, the truth 
would then be locked in with me." 

The magistrate became visibly an- 
noyed when members of Mr. Terre’ - 
B lanche ’s group handed in bags of coins 
as bail payment, and sent Mr. Terre’- 
B lanche down to the cells while the 
money was counted. (Reuters, A P) 


with the message he has delivered on 
each stop of his five-nation Gulf tour 
Iran poses a danger to its militarily 
weaker neighbors and does not deserve 
to be invired as a full member of die 
world community. 

Mr. Cohen also pressed the case for 
keeping sanctions on Iraq. "Iraq and 
Iran violate international norms of good 
behavior," he said. 

He said at a news conference that Iran 
"continues to support terrorism in ad- 
dition to developing weapons of mass- 
destruction, improving missiles that can 
strike neighboring nations and boosting 
the facility to close the Strait of Hor- 
muz.” 

- "The United States will not allow 
this to happen." he said in Bahrain; 
headquarters of the U.S. Fifth Fleet, 
which keeps more than two dozen war- 
ships in the Gulf. 

“The United States retains over- 
whelming naval strength in the Gulf, 
and we are fully capable of protecting 
our ships, our interests and our allies," 
he said, adding, “I am satisfied that the 
United States has the full capability to 
stop any operations that Iranians might 
seek to launch against us or our al- 
lies.” 

Mr. Cohen, who previously visited 
Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, flew Tuesday 
to the United Arab Emirates. 

In Abu Dhabi, whose rulers have a 
long-running dispute with Iran over 
control of the island Abu Musa in the 
strait, Mr. Cohen found an agreeable 
audience. In two hours of talks with 
President Zayed ibn Sultan an Nahayan. 



U*S. to Rfoefct 


'* .. .. ■ 


■ * AjnuFnuApc 

The Iranian" president-elect Mohammed Khatami, left welcoming 
Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif of Pakistan to Tehran 'on Tuesday. 


the Emirates’ leader agreed there should 
be no softening toward Iran. Mr. Co- 
hen's spokesman, Kenneth Bacon, 
said. 

•Mr. Cohen later flew on to Muscat 
Oman, the final stop on his Gulf tour 
before returning to Washington on 
Wednesday. 

“What we have tried to do is to 
indicate to all of our allies that we are 


Saudi Suspect Ready to Help 
U.S. on Dhahran Bombing 


By Pierre Thomas 

■ New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A Saudi man de- 
tained in Canada in connection with last 
summer's Khobar Towers bombing has 
reached a tentative deal with U.S. Justice 
Department officials that would send him 
to me United States as early as this week 
in exchange for cooperation in the probe, 
according to law enforcement sources. 

Hani Abdel Rahim Sayegh, alleged 
by Canadian and Saudi officials to have 
played a direct role in the attack on a 
U.S. military housing complex in 
Dhahran that killed 19 air force mem-, 
bers and wounded'500 others, agreed to 
cooperate largely because he feared de- 
portation to his native Saudi Arabia 


where he believed he faces possible 
torture and death, sources said. 

[The suspect's lawyer, Michael 
Wildes, said Tuesday that he expected 
his client to be on U.S. soil shortly, 
Reuters reported. "I believe that the 
arrangement serves both the interests of 
protecting my client’s safety and foe 
U.S. government’s interest in investi- 

r * ig the Khobar Towers bombing." 
Wildes said.] 

FBI officials are hopeful that Mr. 
Sayegh will be able to provide derails 
about foe participants in foe attack and 
its planning. 

They also hope he can provide in- 
formation about foe funding and support 
of the terrorist bombing, particularly 
whether Iran was involved. 


here to provide security agains t that 
kind of aggression chat might be dir- 
ected toward them,’' he said. 

U.S. defense officials said in Bahrain 
that Iran's Air Force on June 3 and 6 
successfully fired two C-80 1 K anti-ship 
missiles, one with a live warhead, from 
an aging U.S.-built F-4 Phantom jet and 
both test missiles struck barges used as 
targets. (Reuters, AP ) 


Burma Dissident 
Recovers at Home 

The Associated Press 

RANGOON — The opposition 
leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has 
reduced her daily workload while 
she recovers from a fan down foe 
stairs of her Rangoon home, ac- 
cording to a statement released 
Tuesday by her political party. 

“Aung San Suu Kyi slipped and 
fell from the stairs while descend- 
ing from foe first floor of her house 
on May 21 evening, hurting her 
back, neck and shoulder," foe 
statement said. 

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s health 
is critical to foe opposition move- 
ment in Burma, which has been 
ruled by military governments 
since 1962. She is the galvanizing 
figure of the movement. ' • 


Aid to Jordan 


By John F. Harris _ 

mistoigrtin Post Service - 

WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton plans to thank Jordan for its 
contributions to foe Middle East peace 
process by announcing that thekingdom 
will receive $100 million in U.S. aid — 
with foe money to be taken equally from 
assistance now sent to Israel and Egypt, 
administration officials say. ■ 

The aid would be a response to an 
urgent appeal that King Hussein made 
to Mr. Clinton in a White House meet- 
ing in April. Judging that Congress 
would not increase foe amount of rad to 
foe Middle East, Mr. Clinton told Prime 
Minis ter Benjamin . Netanyahu and 
President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt that 
he wanted . to squeeze their funds, an 
administration official said. 

The money is a tiny .fraction of foe aid 
foe United States sends to both nations: 
Israel gets about $3 billion a year in 
assistance, and Egypt gets $2.2 billion. 

Still, tiie announcement represents a 
departure from what had been a long- 
standing practice that treated aid to Is- 
rael and Egypt as sacrosanct. 

King Hussein’s brother. Crown Prince 
Has sail, is in Washington this week. He 
will meet with Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright and Mr. Clinton. 

The administration won the assent of 
Israel and Egypt to the new arrange- 
ment, but only after extensive consulta- 
tions with foe Israeli government on 
how to make the cut in aid cause the 
least discomfort there. 

Israel gets its U.S. aid in one lump 
sum and therefore will have, to write a 
$50 million check to foe United States. 
Egypt gets its aid in installments, which 
will be trimmed and foe money diverted 
to Jordan. Amman had its aid revoked 
by foe U.S. Congress as a punishment 
for leaning toward Iraq in the Gulf War. 
and the money that Mr. Clinton will 
•announce is by far foe most significant 
infusion of U.S. help since then. 

Jordan signed a peace treaty, with’ 
Israel in 1994, but in his meeting with 
Mr: Clinton, according to an admin- 
istration official, King Hussein said that 
his people were suffering from eco- 
nomic problems and that foe country 
remained vulnerable to manipulation by 
Iraq, which sells Jordan oil at below- 
market prices. 

Mr. Clinton is sympathetic, officials 
said. In addition to foe $100 million in 
aid this year, they said, he intends ro 
extend s imilar amounts for five years 
and to work with European nations and 
Japan to persuade them to give help of 
similar magnitude. 


BRIEFLY 


Israelis Wound 28 
In Hebron Clashes 

-HEBRON, ;West Bank— Israeli 
troops shot: and wounded 28 Pal- 
estinians on Tuesday inafounh day 
of clashes with Arabs who hurled 
rocks and gasoline bombs in The 
divided . West . Bank town of 
Hebron, witnesses said. 

Officials at the Ahli hospital said 
a 12-year-old Palestinian boy was 
in critical condition after a rubber- 
coated metal bullet, penerrated his 
bead. Witnesses said several dozen 
youths used slingshots to pelt Is- 
raeli soldiers with stones and threw 
at least a dozen gasoline bombs. 

Israeli troops initially withheld 
fire but when a boy burned an Is- 
raeli flag and danced in front of 
them they shoT him, wounding him 
in the leg. A 72-year -old Pales- 
tinian passerby was in serious con- 
dition after being hit in the forehead 
by a. rubber-coated bullet, hospital 
officials said. (Renters l 

Sierra Leone Chief 
fines Democracy 

FREETOWN. Sierra Leone — 
Major Johnny Paul Koromah. the 
military leader who seized power in 
a May 26 coup, had himself sworn 
in as head of state Tuesday. He 
pledged to work toward national 
reconciliation and the eventual res- 
toration of democracy. 

The ceremony at military' 
headquarters came a day after eight 
military officers and six civilians 
suspected of plotting a counter- 
coup against foe three-week-old 
ruling junta were detained. ■ 

Nigeria whose troops maintain a 
force in Sierra Leone has warned of 
military attacks unless foe ousted 
president. Ahmed Tejan Kabbah, is 
returned to. power. \APi 

For the Record 

■Hundreds of army troops and 
leftist rebels were locked in a battle 
in northern Colombia that so far has 
killed two soldiers and 18 guer- 
rillas. the army said Tuesday. The 
dashes broke out Sunday between 
two army battalions and 400 mem- 
bers of foe leftist Revolutionary 
Armed Forces of Colombia. (AFP) 

Peru has lifted a ban on family 
visits to jailed Tupac Amaru guer- 
rillas imposed during the group’s 
aimed seizure of the Japanese am- 
bassador's residence, according to 
prison officials. (Reuters ) 


-i- m 


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GENERAL 


Personals 


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United Slates Obtrict Court 
EASTERN C15TRICT C“ DSN VOnK 
SUUUCKa IN A CIV! ACTION 
CV 'x-£?2 STATEN sL»ND SAVINGS 
SANK •- KEYSTONE TRADING CQRP 
i<l KEYSTONE TRADING INC 
RslESiS KGSHEHLAND. INC 2%a 
KOSHEnUNE * 1 mC MCSnE 
a CSENF=iD ttGSME PSAGEfi 
C*sv; PRAGP5 and 5 AML'S. 
PpAGER TO f.fcsne RssnNl 144E 
82ft S"«et ErjAIvn. tea Ycrt 11219 
YOU ARE i-EAEEy SUMMONED and 
taqued n t* mBi the Cto* dtos Co«J 
jvj serve I con PlANTFFS ATTORNEY 
Th= LAW FIRM OF HALL & HALL 
5T EEACH STREET STATEN ISLAND 
NET. 1 vC-Rh 1030J.3T anssssr to me 
am piar* sJnch c fcswuh served upon 
var. nr>- Fv (tos after ser.«e ol lbs 
sunwau -xor. iij atium a! Uie day 
•;t serve* 4 you a: to co so (ud^nert 
' . deta uR erf M 2ien agasts you to 
•ne reset demanaM m me comotamt 
ROBERT C. KEWEtSANS CLERK 
(Signed BY DEPUTY CLERK 
ttay 20. 1996 Ths acton n cased an 
P'CO and Stale la;. alleging, near ai2. 
fraudulently Mmm to •ssua.nce of 
casters cherts d'Sica'SQOO 


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PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18 , 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Ileralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



ri'W.|SJIhD WITH TIUS Ntw YORK TIMFJ* Wll TIIE W vSHINT.TGV POST 


i Tin' &.iMrer.Tr.t nn I Indonesia Doesn’t Need These Blithe Lectures 


After Pol Pot 


Repons from Cambodia, although 
unconfirmed, suggest that the chief 
architect of that country's misery is in 
final Tetreat After more than 30 years 
of fighting and killing, the hated 
Khmer Rouge are reportedly in com- 
plete disarray and their supreme lead- 
er, Pol Pot, is said to be fleeing for his 
life. That is surely welcome news for a 
country where more than a million 
people died under Khmer Rouge rule 
two decades ago and where ordinary 
Cambodians have endured the group's 
guerrilla attacks ever since. 

But it is too soon to celebrate. Even 
if the reports turn out to be true, Cam- 
bodia has a long way to go before it 
even approaches democracy and a de- 
cern respect for human rights. Even 
now. the country's two rival co-prime 
ministers are eagerly courting the loy- 
alties of Pol Pot's former lieutenants. 
This is not a good sign. 

One overriding fact is clear. Starved 
for both weapons and diplomatic sup- 
port since the 1991 Cambodia peace 
agreement, the Khmer Rouge are riven 
by factional conflicts, revolving partly 
around political strategy. Should they 
abandon the military snuggle for con- 
ventional politics, and if so. with 
whom should they align? 

Cambodia’s two main parties are 
i he royalists, led by the first prime 
minister. Prince Ranariddh, and the 


former Communist Party, led by the 
second prime minister, Hun Sen. Apart 


has clean hands regarding the Khmer 
Rouge. Hun Sen was a Khmer Rouge 


leader before turning against his com- 
rades in the late 1970s. Prince Ranar- 
iddh was a close Khmer Rouge co- 
alition partner in the 1980s. 

The two men barely speak, do not 
cooperate and spend much of their time 
maneuvering against each other. Be- 
tween them they have created a climate 
' of corruption and intimidation. 

Less compromised politicians, like 
Sam Rainsy, have been physically at- 
tacked. The press is hemmed in by 
restrictive laws and threats. The in- 
tegrity of next year’s elections is now 
in doubt. 

These issues, along with the dis- 
maying prospect of former Khmer 
Rouge leaders entering the govern- 
ment, should be discussed frankly 
by Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright when she visits Phnom Penh 
later this month. 

Pol Pot’s rule killed off more than 
one in seven Cambodians. His po Utica I 
demise would be widely and enthu- 
siastically welcomed. But Cambodia's 
full recovery from that horrific era 
remains a long way off. 

— THE NEK YORK TIMES 


Ambivalent Cypriots 


By appointing a high-profile nego- 
tiator familiar with the divided island’s 
ways. Richard Holbrooke of Bosnian 
renown. President Bill Clinton has 
raised hopes of an easing in Cyprus. 
There, after an unsuccessful Greek- 
backed coup in 1974. the Turkish army 
overran the northern part of the island 
to protect its frightened Turkish Cyp- 
riot residents. Many special envoys 
larer. Cyprus remains rwo hostile and 
ethnically pure parts, the Greek Cyp- 
riot one widely recognized as 
"Cyprus" and the other called the 
Turkish Cypriot republic but recog- 
nized only by Turkey. The border 
between them has been quiet most 
of the time. 

Why would the United States want 
io increase its political investment in 
this unpromising and much worked- 
over Mediterranean issue? Historic- 
ally. the parties have often seemed less 
concerned with reconciliation titan are 
the anxious outsiders. The official an- 
swer is now, as it long has been, that an 
effort is justified by the danger of a 
spillover war between NATO mem- 
bers Greece and Turkey, countries 
■a iih a range of other difficult issues 
wing between them. Why. then, don't 


the Europeans or the United Nations 
jump in? They have tried and fallen 
short, and defer to the United States. 
The residual rationale for the Amer- 
ican diplomatic intervention is that in 
the post-Cold War circumstances, new 
combinations should be tried. 

The trouble in Cyprus has always 
been that, even as residents of both 
communities publicly solicit interna- 
tional mediation to bring them together 
in an uncertain bi-zonal federation, the 
two populations privately accept the 
available comforts and security of liv- 
ing apart — although, of course, there 
are costs, too. The resulting funda- 
mental ambivalence about the desirab- 
ility of compromise constitutes a per- 
manent drag on the prospects of a 
diplomatic settlement. In Greece and 
Turkey, deeply rooted tendencies to 
play politics with the Cyprus issue add 
to the difficulties of a negotiation. 

In July the Greek Cypriot and Turk- 
ish Cypriot leaders are to talk. Am- 
bassador Holbrooke says he is waiting 
for their word. The burden should be 
on them to show that there is good 
reason for the United States to get 
involved. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Talking About Race 


In proposing a yearlong national 
"conversation'’ about race. President 
Bill Clinton has put America's most 
important social problem where it be- 
longs — at the top of the national 
agenda. 

His speech on Saturday at com- 
mencement exercises of the University 
of California at San Diego was a ser- 
mon w ith little sanctimonious preach- 
ing. He went beyond the obvious need 
for racial justice to the practical and 
even economic reasons why the 
United Slates must nurture its increas- 
ingly diverse society . 

"For a president with a reputation of 


trying hard to please, it tookj'olitical 
audacity to stand up for affirmative 


audacity to stand up for aftirmauve 
.tenon in the very state and university 
system that had begun dismantling this 
essential remedy against injustice. 

Reaching out to those on the other 
tide of the issue. Mr. Clinton said 
Californians were doing this "without 
any ill motives" and from a sincere 
conviction that racial discrimination is 
no longer a significant barrier to suc- 
cess. But he rightly implored Amer- 
icans not to follow that path, which 
would only turn their public universit- 
ies and private workplaces into seg- 
regated islands of privilege. 

*A generation ago. as Mr. Clinton 
noted, the Kerner commission warned 
that the United States was in danger of 
becoming two nations, one black and 
one white. Today the country's ethnic 
difficulties are far more varied and 
subtle. In another generation, the pres- 
ident said, the United States will en- 
compass ethnic minorities from across 
the world. 

it will be of great social and practical 


RcralOi^nbunc 


ESTABLISHED isA' 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

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<0' 


J AKARTA — The United States is 
reaffirming its alliance with the 
leading nation of Northeast Asia, Ja- 
pan. but its relationship with the lead- 
ing nation of Southeast Asia, Indone- 
sia, is in an unnecessary mess. 

It is easy to dismiss U.S. congres- 
sional resolutions as .empty moralizing 
by congressmen more interested in 
their districts than in the place at issue. 
But the recent unanimous vote con- 
demning Indonesian action in East 
Timor is just the latest in a series of 
events that threaten to undermine U.S.- 
Indonesian relations just when there 
are major reasons to wish that Wash- 
ington would have more influence in 
the world's fourth largest country, an 
informal U.S. ally for 30 years. 

The amendment's sponsor. Patrick 
Kennedy of Rhode Island, promises 
that thisis just "the launching point for 
further action against Indonesia." 

Meanwhile. Indonesia is being 
tarred by the activities of the Chinese- 
Indonesian businessman James Riady. 
The Clinton administration, beset by 
"Asiagate." is unable to make key 
appointments and conduct a coherent 
policy toward Jakarta. 

Defense cooperation has been hurt. 


second prime minister, Hun Sen. Apart 
from their courtship of some of Pol 
Pot's closest associates, neither 


By Philip Bowriug 


with Indonesia's cancellation of orders 
for F-16 jet fighters after administra- 
tion foot-dragging, and the freezing of 
military training aid, which means 
nothing in money terms but has meant 
much to the bilateral relationship. 

Washington badly needs perspec- 
tive. The Riadys are loose cannon who 
have scam political clout in Jakarta. 
Indeed, Indonesians are less interested 
in their relations with Bill Clinton than 
in their Lippo group’s flaunting outside 
Indonesia of its Chinese identity, and in 
the shareholder links it has established 
with China Resources, one of Beijing 's 
most powerful state enterprises. 

The tragedy of Timor? The history 
of rights abuses is real enough. But 
there is no reason in particular to de- 


mand sanctions now. Rightly or not. 
Indonesians feel that Mr. Kennedy rep- 


Indonesians feel that Mr. Kennedy rep- 
resents the interests of PortugaL 
The U.S. Congress may have for- 
gotten that it was Portugal’s incom- 
petence as decolooizer in Timor, as in 
Angola and Mozambique, which set 
off two decades of bloodletting. The 
United States itself backed the 1975 


Indonesian takeover. Harping on 
Timor is undermining U.S. influence in 
other areas of human rights. 

The imperfections of Indonesia are 
well enough known: the aothariianan 
nature of the Suharto government, die 
repression of labor activists, high -leve l 
corruption, lack of judicial indepen- 
dence. restraints on the press, massive 
malpractice in the recent elections. All 
are proper subjects for comment by a 
United States for which such issues 
cannot be divorced from foreign 
policy. Many Indonesians welcome the 
attention they receive overseas thanks 
to links between local and foreign non- 
governmental organizations. 

However, if foreign opinion is to have 
an impact it must be grounded in fair- 
ness as well as fact. The level of political 
oppression in Indonesia is a fraction of 
that in China. Human rights groups can 
organize openly. The press reports facts 
and views that the government would 
prefer kept under wraps. 

Important people deliver open and 
biting criticisms of the government and 
the role of the first family. Labor ac- 
tivists have as much freedom to or- 


Mis Informed actions in Washington 
dilute U.S. influence at a time when 


X rations of change here arc high, 
leaders from most walks of so- 
ciety, including many in the miliary, 
arc searching for a path to orderly in- 
ternal change that will lead to a broad- 


er-based, mote open and lessperson- 
alized form of government. They are 


alized form of government. They are 
almost all friendly to the West, know its 
contribution to Indonesia's economic 
progress, know that they can leant 
much in other ways — but hate to be 
lectured by grandstanding foreigners 
who know little about their country. 

Damage to the military links comes 
at a time when both countries know 


thev need to prepare for the possibility 

-- /h. ; • : j .. ;« t . 


that China's regional ambitions w ill be 
nursued more forcefully than is usually 


ganize as in any ASEAN countries oth- 
er than Thailand and the Philippines. 


pursued more forcefully than is usual!)' 
assumed. The extension of L.S.-Jap- 
anese military cooperation is evidence 
of U.S. regional concerns. Indonesia 
needs no reminding of its longer-term 
anxieties about China's goals. 

Increased American awareness of 
Indonesia is to be welcomed. It would 
help if it were accompanied by re- 
cognition of the importance of the bi- 
lateral relationship. 

Inter mil i<*ul Heijid Tribute 


Europe Tries to Build a Central Bank on Technocrats’ Sand 


P ARIS — The European 
summit in Amsterdam has 


importance to harness such diversity 
to improve ihe quality of life fOT every- 
one and create an economy that can 
engage in an even more diverse global 
marketplace. 

The president spoke at a time when 
ethnic and religious conflict has erup- 
ted throughout the world. He foresees a 
historic role for the United States, lead- 
ing the way to a new definition of 
nationhood in which diversity is a 
strength, not a weakness. 

President Clinton’s speech evoked 
skepticism and criticism from parti- 
sans on both sides of the racial divide. 
Foes of affirmative action were dis- 
appointed that he did not reject what 
they consider to be the failed path of 
quotas and racial preferences. Advo- 
cates of more aggressive action on race 
and poverty were disappointed that he 
did not commit more resources for job 
training and education. They express 
lingering bitterness over the welfare 
law enacted last year that is likely to 
deepen poverty and racial despair. 

The president focused on the future, 
however, and encouraged his newly 
appointed advisory panel, with the his- 
torian John Hope "Franklin as its chair- 
man. to listen before making recom- 
mendations. 

The appreciative applause from the 
Californians at the graduation on Sat- 
urday was a welcome sign that the 
issues of race, affirmative action and 
diversity can be discussed candidly. If 
Mr. Clinton's speech starts such a pro- 
cess, and leads to concrete actions, it 
could be remembered as a turning 
point for him and the country. Let the 
conversation proceed. 

— THESE* YORK TIMES 


JL summit in Amsterdam has 
satisfied none of its participants 
but appeased them all. The af- 
fair ot Europe’s proposed single 
currency is not one in which 
satisfaction is on offer. 

Everyone is frustrated, all for 
good reasons. But no one will 
stop currency union now be- 
cause all believe that to check 
the momentum of European 
construction might destroy 
''Europe" itself. There now is 
what die French call fitirc en 
a\’am — a blind rush onward. 

At Amsterdam the French 
made a form of neo-Keynesian 
argument about growth through 
public investment, colliding 
with the wall of monetarist or- 
thodoxy behind which stood in 
serried ranks Helmut Kohl. 
German Finance Minister Theo 
Waigel. Britain's socialist Tony 
Blair, and all the right-thinking 
great and good. 

If Lionel Jospin and his new 
government are right in what 
they say, they have a funda- 
mentally healthy French nation- 
al economy in which to conduct 
a demonstration that real jobs 
can be created without infla- 
tion. If the demonstration is a 
success, rhe others will follow. 

The single currency is a sep- 
arate matter. The parallel Euro- 
pean currency unit was working 
well in 1992 and there was no 
urgent need to convert it into a 
single currency, least of all to do 
so with precipitous Jack of re- 
flection. However, there is a 
respectable tradition in EU af- 
fairs of setting outrageously 
ambitious goals in order to in- 
spire a bound forward. 

The single market was the 
last example of this. and. given 
an ambitious timetable and ex- 
tremely effective leadership, it 
was a great success. But tum- 
bling customs and regulatory 
barriers is easier than putting all 
of Europe's economies into 
identical budget parameters and 
economic cycles. 

The problems were never 
given the analysis they de- 
served. The stability criteria 


By William Pfaff 


make little sense. What good is 
a rigid rule on deficits when 
total national debt is ignored, as 
well as the social health of the 
various economies, above all 
the unemployment level? 

A single currency implies 
resolution of enormously im- 
portant political and social is- 
sues. One must ask if those 
Europeans who cite the ex- 
ample of America’s union have 
examined the American record 
of struggle over central banks 
and single currencies, which 
lasted from 1790 until 1913. 

It had two main axes. The first 
was political and constitutional. 
A Bank of the United States, 
first proposed in George Wash- 
ington’s presidency, was sup- 
ported by Alexander Hamilton, 
who believed it essential to a 
viable national economy and ar- 


gued that it was authorized by 
the powers "implied" in the 
constitution’s mandate to Con- 
gress to regulate trade. 

Thomas Jefferson insisted 
upon what has come to be 
known as "strict construction" 
of the constitution, which makes 
no mention of a central bank. 

The bank thus created was 
ended during the populist An- 
drew Jackson’s first adminis- 
tration. then re-established, 
then ended in 1 840 in favor of a 
system of regional federal de- 
positories that was itself dis- 
continued a year later in favor of 
state banks, and then re-estab- 
lished in 1846. lasting until the 
Federal Reserve System was es- 
tablished in 1913.’ 

There is no U.S. national 
bank today. There are 12 semi- 
autonomous regional central 


banks supervised by a Federal 
Reserve Board of Governors, 
named by the president 

Hamilton had said that '‘if 
the end be clearly comprehen- 
ded within any of the specified 
powers, and if the measure have 
an obvious relation to that end. 
and is not forbidden by any par- 
ticular provision of the consti- 
tution. it may safely be deemed 
to conie within the compass of 
the national authority'.*’ Thus 
have advocates of federal 
power argued ever since. 

Jefferson defended the prin- 
ciple that powers not specif- 
ically assigned by the consti- 
tution belonged to the states of 
the union. It was an argument 
eventually to be settled in a ter- 
rible war. when the Southern 
states declared their secession 
from the union. 

The second axis of the debate 
was between conservative 


bankers in the East, concerned, 
like Mr. Waigel. Mr. Kohl and 
the German electorate today, 
with sound money', and West- 
erners. believers in grow th and 
expansion — "crucified." as 
the most famous of them w as to 
say in 1896. "on a Cross of 
Gold." That was the praine 
populist. William Jennings 
Bryan of Nebraska, advocate of 
free and unlimited coinage of 
silver, three times rhe Demo- 
cratic presidential candidate. 

Those debates are fundamen- 
tally Europe's debates today, 
and they are essentially political 
and social. They cannot be re- 
solved by technicians, or by 
politicians playing to national 
political constituencies. Europe 
today needs to halt the fuite en 
avanL It may also now need a 
constitutional convention. 

hihTnariJitiil Herald T< ihnue 

? Lin Autries Tunes Sytdn .i.v 


Another French Chance to Make Idealism Work 


P ARIS — I have witnessed 
three exceptional moments 


1 three exceptional moments 
of contemporary life in France. 
In 1968. the May student move- 
ment. In 1981, the coming to 
power of the Socialist President 
Francois Mitterrand. And now, 
in 1997, the election victory of 
Lionel Jospin. 

. If May 1968 was the ideal- 
istic extreme of French social- 
ism. and the late Mr. Mitter- 
rand's presidency its pragmatic 
extreme, is Mr. Jospin's victory 
a desirable balance between the 
ideal and the practical? 

, The Parisian May of 1968 
shook the world. It was a pre- 
lude to a year of youthful re- 
bellions, from the ’ streets of 
Tokyo io the Berkeley campus 
and to the bloody Plaza of the 
Three Cultures (Tlatelolcoi in 
Mexico City. 

Politically, the May 196S 
movement failed when the 
French Communist Party pro- 
hibited the working class from 
participating in the student 


Bv Carlos Fuentes 


movement and when President 
Charles de Gaulle displayed his 
genius for political strategy and 
tactics. In any case, the "May 
Revolution’* claimed only one 
life, and that by accident. 

Tlarelolco has not yet ac- 
counted for its many dead — the 
difference between a de Gaulle 
and a Diaz Ordaz. the Mexican 
president at the time. 

But the legacy of the young 
Parisians was immense. It did 
not contain the wave of con- 
sumerism. technology and neo- 
liberalism that swept over most 
of the world, but it did offer a 
prophetic warning of the dangers 
of separating economics from 
the social objectives of politics. 

Later, President Mitterrand’s 
leftist spurt was soon held in 
check by political and econom- 
ic realities. France was forced to 
live with the reactionary and 
interventionist presidency of 
Ronald Reagan and with the 


Yes , Persecution in Saudi Arabia 


N EW YORK — A letter 
from the Embassy of 


IN from the Embassy of 
Saudi Arabia in Washington: 

"Regarding any informa- 
tion we might know of Chris- 
tian persecution in Saudi Ara- 
bia, the answer is — none. We 
have many foreign workers in 
the Kingdom and they are 
treated as guests, and every 
consideration is given for their 
needs, as long as they abide by 
the Sharia law." 

The letter was in answer to a 
New York Times reporter's in- 
quiry for a story on legislation 
before the City Council of New 
York chat would bar the city 
from doing business with 
companies operating in 15 
countries named as persecuting 
Christians. The list 'includes 
China and other Communist 
countries, and Saudi Arabia 
and other Muslim countries. 
Hie assurance about foreign 
guests was primed on June 15 
in an article about business op- 
position to the legislation. 

Now some facts about re- 
ligious worship in the king- 
dom. Such information is easy 
to find about any of the 15 
countries. About Saudi Arabia 
it is impossible to escape. 
Denial is a lie. 

The Sharia is the holy law 
of Islam, derived from the 


Bv A. M. Rosenthal 


“Freedom of religion does 
not exist. Islam is the official 
religion and all citizens must 
be Muslims. The government 
prohibits the practice of other 
religions.” 

For Christians caught wor- 
shiping, punishment can be 
arrest and lashing. Wearing 
religious symbols is prohib- 
ited. Christians wearing a 
cross or engaging in any o'lher 
religious practice can be ar- 
rested. flogged and deponed. 

Conversion by Muslims to 
another religion is considered 
apostasy. Apostasy is punish- 
able by execution. 

Paul Marshall, a specialist 
on persecution of Christians, 
writes that occasionally cit- 


Saudi Arabia during the Gulf 
War were not allowed to wear 
any symbol of their faith. 

Since the war, religious op- 
pression has increased. Saudi 
rulers are terrified that 
thoughts of religious freedom, 
or any other kind, linger from 
having had Americans around 
to protect them from Iraq. 

American businessmen 
never worried about such 
Saudi ways and morals, nor do 
they now. They do worcy 
about the increasing Americ- 
an public revulsion against us- 
ing government funds and 
contracts to enrich the per- 
secutors. Nineteen cities and 
states are considering legis- 
lation to use local economic 
pressure against repression. 

The opposition from busi- 


irrefii table success of the Ger- 
man economy, the locomotive 
of European integration. 

Within an unfavorable cli- 
mate. Mr. Mitterrand opposed 
Mr. Reagan by defending peace 
and diplomacy against the use 
of North American military' 
force in Central America. The 
joint declaration of the Mexican 
and French foreign ministers. 
Jorge Castaneda and Claude 
Cheysson, on El Salvador in 
1981. and Mr. Mitterrand's sup- 
port of the Contadora peace 
talks, offer proof of a will to 
exercise reason in the face of the 
inevitable social and political 
changes in Latin America. 

Mr. Mitterrand made ideo- 
logical concessions internally, 
but he demonstrated rwo things. 
First, that with social democracy 
in power, and without sacrifi- 
cing die market economy, it was 
possible to defend and extend 
the social conquests upon which 
European prosperity is based. 

Second, that a Socialist gov- 
ernment could create market re- 
forms that even the- right does 
not dare to carry out. 

Mr. Mitterrand brought an 
end to anachronistic economic 
laws that the right had doi dared 
to touch. He eliminated currency 
control, artificial price regula- 
tion and recurring inflation. He 
did this as a loyal agent of Euro- 
pean integration and as a tra- 
ditional French imperialist (his 
politics of selling arms to vari- 
ous petty tyrants in Africa and 
the Middle East), all the while 
countering Ronald Reagan. 

Today Prime Minister Jospin 
comes to power within a Europe 


largely situated left of center. 
The electoral victory of the So- 


Mr. Fuentes. the novelist, is a 
former Mexican ambassador io 
France. This comment was dis - 
irihuied by the Los Angeles 
Times Syndicate. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897: Spanish Gold gigantic industrial struggle ii 


writes that occasionally cit- ness and persecutors will be 
izens of important countries stepped up in organization and 
like Britain or the United funding. The focus will be on 
States are allowed worship New York City, and particuli 


within embassy grounds, if pressure on two men: Council 


they keep quiet about it. 

Amnesty Internationa] has 
documented about 350 cases of 
Christian foreign workers ar- 
rested when they triad to wor- 
ship tin private, since church 
services are banned.) But ar- 
rests of Christians from Asia, 
the Mideasr and Africa, which 
supply most foreign workers. 


Koran and Mohammed's .usually go unreported by rela- 
teachings. The Saudi section lives and employers. They fear 


in the State Department’s 
most recent worldwide report 
on human rights, based on dis- 
patches from U.S. embassies, 
is a good place to find out how 
the law is seen and enforced 
by the royal government: 


the reprisals: arrest and torture 
of the prisoners' families. 

And. for Americans who 
think that Saudi officials have 
any more respect for them 
than for laborers from the 
Third World: U.S. troops in 


Speaker Peter Vallone. who 
introduced the legislation, and 
Mayor Rudolph Gi uliani, 
sympathetic but uncommitted, 
who will find it on his desk. 

It is increasingly critical for 
opponents of religious perse- 
cution to insist that the ev- 
idence be spread out and deni- 
als examined instead of simply 
repeated and passed along. 

The businessmen and their 
lobbyists. Americans who at- 
tend Saudi Embassy parties or 
take those velvet trips to Saudi 
>yabia arranged by its offi- 
cials — they all know about 
rhe religious" persecution. 

The Sn, York Tmtes 


MADRID — The Spanish 
newspapers reveal that the Gov- 
ernment has resolved to charge 
in gold for all telegrams sent 
from Spain to foreign countries. 
Public opinion is considerably 
scared at this announcement. It 
is of course admitted that the 
Government must find money 
somewhere. Every month of the 
war in Cuba swells the already 
colossal Spanish deficit by sev- 
en millions of dollars. But tam- 
pering with fee currency of the 
nation is hardly a safe game for 
Ihe Ministry to play. 


gigantic industrial struggle in 
the history of the country. There 
is general unrest in labor circles, 
voiced at the meeting of the 
American Federation of Labor, 
at which Congress was bitterly 
condemned for alleged hostility 
to union labor and" assumption 
of unwarranted powers. 


1947: Wan Hollywood 


1922: Labor Unrest 


NEW YORK — Wife the na- 
tion-wide coal strike still in pro- 
gress after more than eleven 
weeks and wife a walk-out of a 
million and a quarter of railroad 


NEW YORK — ■ 1 ‘Is Hollywood 
Communist?" That question 
has been rocking fee nation wife 
laughter. It all started when a 
subcommittee of the House Un- 

American Activities Committee 

went to Hollywood with a green 
light and looked for red- Most of 
fee product turned out by Hol- 
lywood of late has been so 
devoid of any ideas, including 
fee Communist, that it doesn i 
look to impartial observers as it 




o® 




million and a quarter of railroad wan and weary Hollywood, an 
w orkers looming, labor and cap- infant industry with arrested de- 
ital are marshalling their forces velopment, had received any 
tor what threatens to be the most transfusion of red blood. 


Bart*? 


cialist Party and its allies in 
France represents three things: 

. • Lack of confidence in neo- 
liberal politics, and a decision to 
bring together economic oblig- 
ations with social obligations. 
The electorate has stated loudly 
and clearly that fee market is not 
an end in itself, but rather a 
means of satisfying the needs of 
fee majority. Without human 
capital there is no social capital, 
and without social capital there 
is no financial capital. 

• Confidence feat exercising 
fee vote and alternating teams 
brings not only credibility but 
also efficiency to the democrat- 
ic life of a nation. President 
Jacques Chirac, willingly ot 
not, has obtained this result. 

• For all fee talk of glob- 
alization, politics is above all a 
local matter. Globalization with- 
out localization is little more 
than a phantom, it is a danger 
feat places societies at the mercy 
of a minority of multinational 
corporations and of a fleeting 
abundance of investments feat, 
like fee swallows, are here today 
and gone tomorrow. Uncon- 
trolled, globalized markets can 
become a synonym for robbery- 

No government in fee world, 
however, deserves more support 
than that which its electorate is 
willing to lend it. This was 
learned too late by Mr. Chirac, 
fee great loser in this battle. If. 
however, he converts cohabit- 
ation with the left into an in- 
telligent political strategy of co- 
operation , his wfll be, speaking 
in paradox, a Pyrrhic defeat. 


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ec * lir e8 | Clinton’s Race Speech: 
Feel-Good but Empty 


By Richard Cohen 


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W ashington _ 

There is a rule in jour- 
nalism that if you get crit- 
icized by both sides in a dis- 
pute . you must be doing 
something right. By that mea- 
sure. Bill Clinton's speech on 
race relations in San Diego on 
Saturday was a roaring suc- 
cess. But before the president 
takes any satisfaction from 
iharnileof thumb, he ought to 
consider something: This 
lime the critics are right. 

First, of course, comes the 
mandatory praise of the pres- 
ident for just broaching the 
subject. It can’t hurt to talk 
about such matters but talk, as 
President Clinton himself 
noted, “won't be enough." 

Yes. What is needed are 
ideas, and in this area the 
president's speech was the 
rhetorical equivalent of an 
empty suiL 

Take, for instance, a seem- 
ingly minor point. Toward the 
end of his speech, the president 
noted that he was a Scotch- 
Irish Southern Baptist, "and 
I'm proud of it.** he said. But 
then he proceeded to say that 
his life had also been enriched 
by the "power of the Torah, 
the beauty of the Koran ..." 

His mention of the Torah is 
a redundancy. It is usually the 
Hebrew name for the 
Pentateuch, the first five books 
of the Bible. As a Southern 
Baptist, the president already 
knew them — unless, of 
course, he had read them in 
Hebrew on a sacred scroll. 

This is feel-good language, 
soothing to the ear. just plain 
puzzling to the eye — and 
meaningless. I am sure the 
president fell good saying it, 
just as he drew applause from 
a line asserting that "many” 
opponents of affirmative ac- 
tion — those who argue that 
only scores on standardized 
test’s should be the basis of 
college admissions — * 'would 
not apply the same standard to 
the children of alumni or those 
with athletic ability.” 

Cheap shot. Athletic abil- 
ity. like musical ability or a 
fine voice for the glee club, is 
still ability — unique to an 
individual* — and not fee 
same as race. As for the chil- 
dren of alumni, at more and 
more schools they stand no 
better chance of admission, 
than anyone else — although 
an aigument can be made that 
they should. (Parental dona- 
tions, for instance.) 

For people such as myself 
— reluctantly opposed to af- 
firmative action and looking 
tosee the errors of our ways — 
the president's speech was no 
help. When he decries the very 
dramatic decline in minority 
admissions at schools feat 
have abandoned affirmative 
action, he is identifying a real 


problem — maybe even & 
tragedy. But the president did 
not also concede that to restore 
those programs — to raise 
those numbers — means once 
again choosing (and rejecting) 
on the basis of nothing more 
than race. The cure may be 
worse than fee disease. 

The dilemma — seemingly 
unnoticed by Mr. Clinton * — is 
contained in one of his 
phrases. Referring to fee 
Kemer Commission’s warn- 
ing of 1968 that fee United 
States might become 1 two na- 
tions — one black, the other- 
while — the president updated 
it to account for America's 
growing national diversity: 
“Today we face a .different 
choice. Will we become not 
two, but many Americas? Sep- 
arate, unequal and isolated?" 

Not likely, I wouldisay. But 
is fee risk greater if certain 
minorities are underrepresen- 
ted at certain schooHs. or if 
people continue to be seen as 
representatives of -racial or 
ethnic groups? In 1 ‘ other 
words, does affirmative ac- 
tion exacerbate the problem, 
as I think, or ameliorate it, as 
the president seems to think? 
He presents no argument to 
make his case. 

Just once, though, he had 
an obligation to mention the 
pernicious costs of affirma- 
tive action — a heightened 
race consciousness, a tend- 
ency to see oneself as a group 
representative, the resent- 
ment of those who lose on 
account of race or ethnicity 
and, in some sense, its in- 
advertent concession to ra- 
cism itself: feat certain minor- 
ities jusr can't measure up. 
It's a once-good idea whose 
time has passed. What next? 

Next should be a massive 
effort to make affirmative ac- 
tions unnecessary — to im- 
prove primary and secondary 
schooling so that fee racial 
disparity in test scores simply 
evaporates. That will take 
money (the great unmention- 
able) and tougher education 
standards, which of course 
Mr. Clinton has mentioned. 

This was fee president’s 
maiden speech in what has 
been described as a sustained 
effort to talk about race aod 
bridge the American racial 
gap. Maybe later efforts .will 
be more thoughtful, more for- 
ward-looking and more will- 
ing to address fee concerns of 
affirmative action foes who 
hate racial discrimination — 
no matter what the reason. 
This speech did nothing of the 
sort, ft only showed, again, 
fear when it comes to fee im- 
mense and troubling issues of 
race. Bill Clinton’s hea^t is in 
the right place. It’s hisi head 
that's otherwise occupied. 

The Washington Post. , 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

South Africa’s Role American Tragedy 


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Regarding “ In Africa, a 
Mew Will to Confront Prob- 
lem" l June JO): 

it is.strange indeed that fee 
article passes over wife a 
single cursory mention fee ma- 
jor and crucial role played by 
President Nelson Mandela and 
his deputy president, Thabo 
Mbeki, in avoiding — by a 
diplomatic initiative unprece- 
dented in Africa — a bloody 
conflict in what was Zaire. 

It was South Africa that 
brought the parties of Mobutu 
Sese Seko and Laurent Kabila 
together for talks when 
Europe and the United States 
failed to do so. It was South 
Africa that got around the pre- 
posterous delaying tactics 
they employed in feeir refusal 
to agree on a territory where 
they would meet: South 
Africa provided a naval ves- 
sel, symbolically cast off from 
territorial connotations. Pres- 
ident Mandela himself flew 
lock and forth between fee 
ship and his commitments at 
home, bringing the weight of 
his personal moral authority to 
bear directly on Mr. Kabila to 
negotiate, -and on Marshal 
Mobutu to face reality and 
step down. Deputy President 
Mbeki devoted unstinting en- 
ergy, tact and patience to deal- 
ing wfeh Mr. Kabila. 

Without Mr. Mandela and 
Mr. MBeki there surely would 
have been a - civil war instead 
°f a mainly peaceful transfer 
ofpower. 

■ ^-SADH^EGORDIMER. 

Johannesburg. . 


Regarding “In an -Abor- 
tion Culture.' Babies Are Dis- 
posable" (Meanwhile, June 
13) by George F. Will: : 

I used to think feat Mr. Will 
was a little hard-edged but 
wife many valid views. I 
didn’t agr ee with him on 
many things, but I respected 
his opinion, as he always .put 
forth his position in a 
reasoned and logical manner. 

However, after reading this 
piece — " illogical, hateful 
claptrap — I can feel only a 
mixture of sadness, loathing 
and disappointment. 

His accusation feat fee hor- 
rible behavior of Melissa 
Drexler. who threw away her 
newborn baby, occurred be- 
cause she came of age in a 
society where ‘‘condom-dis- 
pensing schools teach sex 
education in fee modern man- 
ner" is. illogical. If she had 
listened to those condom-dis- 
pensing .schools she wouldn't 
have gotten pregnant in the 
first place. 

Sex education prevents tra- 
gedies like Ms. Drexler’s 
from happening. Women 
throw their babies away but of 
ignorance and fear, not choice 
and enlightenment. Bj' stig- 
matizing sex and reproduc- 
tion, we are only perpetuating 
the atmosphere that enables 
such tragedies to occurjj 

aldcpault^e , 
Berner — 


I think we canallagre^fe® 
tossing_away babies intq §cash 
bins is more tian just a came- 
his a tragedy. But bow easily 
. such tragedies could b£ r jpre- 


•M* 


,• ' ttri Avncry writes (“State- 

's hoo& tySB Mate Political Re- 


* 


. ;7«wJ?agafWr." Opinion. June 
‘v ^dw when the Palestinians 
: nationhood, then 
cin be democracy. But 
r «iusfory shows, the means 
Vjased ss Atfticve an end affect 
, end— consider the French 
Russian revolutions. 

' RALPH SLOVENKQ. - 
Detroit. 


' the laws and rules decide?! op 
by the courts in democratic 
countries. -. 7 ,. 

■ Abortion, is legal m*?he 
United States, yetthein^sage 
from a chosen few has mate it 
shameful and morally l^gaL 
What a <hflme that notom ya 
baby boy (Red fel t 
soul of bis teen a gM m cypr. 

SUSANNBLAJTTERBB^C. 

Lug ano , Swinerianjfc . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 1997 £ 3 © j | 

OPINION /LETTERS * * 11 

Slaughter « Then Silence - in Colombian Villages 


RAGE 9 


N EW YORK — Early last 
March, Clemenie Mosauera, a 
12-year-old Colombian child, found 
shelter in the Nelson Mandela bar- 
rio, near the dump sites of Cartagena 
de Indies, after a- long exodus. 

Clemenie was fleeing a mas- 
sacre in which he lost his entire 
family. 

He is fragile and dark, wife big, 
immobile eyes and birdlike bones, 

MEANWHILE 

and he has a scar feat crosses his 
right cheekbone and ends at his 
jaw. 

His nightmarish tale echoes all 
the others told among fee one mil- 
lion or so terrorized peasants in 
Colombia. 

On any given day, at dawn or 
dusk, a group of guerrilla fighters 
will appear in a village, take 1 0 or 12 
hostages and enter fee houses to loot 
and steal food. Then, some weeks 
later, in fee same village, paramil- 
itary squads will appear, summon 
all the inhabitants to the main square 
and summarily execute fee mem- 
bers of six or seven families as a 
punishment ' ‘for being accomplices 


By Tomas Eloy Martinez 


of fee guerrillas." They give the 
survivors 24 hours to evacuate their 
houses. 

At times the tragedy may play out 
in reverse: The paramilitary bonds 
will arrive first, and later the rebels 
follow up. Only on rare occasions 
do fee armed enemies fight each 
other. Their battlefields are the 
peasants' bodies. 

Among fee mournful evidence 
are fee hundreds of forsaken, un- 
inhabited hamlets feat now dot the 
north and center of Colombia, en- 
tire villages without a human soul. 

If someone from outside Colom- 
bia asks whar happened, nobody 
seems to know. In toe past decade, 
the events have become so frequent 
feat most villagers are too 
frightened to speak. Nobody 
speaks of it, nobody hears. 

"The world is deaf,” says Am- 
neris Santa cruz. the seamstress 
who has taken Clemente under her 
roof. "The world has always been 
deaf and blind to people like us. 
who do not have anything. Blind, 
deaf, unfair.” 

Throughout history, in nearly 


every country of the world, power- 
ful leaders have cracked a cruel 
whip to displace massive popula- 
tions in order to carry out tantal- 
izing, lucrative, glorious public- 
works projects — dams, great bar- 
rier walls, pyramids, transcontin- 
ental highways or canals. 

But in Colombia the executions 
seem a matter of gratuitous vio- 
lence. the unfortunate byproduct of 
Colombia’s long rebel war or per- 
haps even fee grave error of some 
inebriated commander's judgment. 
But is this indeed fee case? Is there 
truly no rationale to fee violence? 

"Between December 1995 and 
December 1996. more than 36.000 
households in Colombia were emp- 
tied by violence.” states the most 
recent report of Colombia’s Office 
for Human Rights and Displaced 
People, an official institution. "In 
that period of time. 1 S 1 .000 people 
were affected.” 

Some local news magazines, 
such as Cambio 16 and Altemativa. 
put fee number of displaced people 
much higher: at least 1.5 million. 

Clemente and his family had lived 


on a main street, a block from the 
town’s sports stadium. His father 
had built a two-story house, sur- 
rounded by a wooden veranda. They 
had 30 cow s on a farm a quarter of a 
mile south of the village. 

One day, a paramilitary squad 
armed with machine guns and elec- 
tric saws arrived and read a state- 
ment announcing that the villagers 
were sentenced to death "for help- 
ing the subversives." 

'Clemente recalls little of fee ac- 
tual attack — only feat he was left 
lying on his veranda, with a wound 
that crossed his right cheek — an 
injury caused by a machete. 

Near a pole, in the center of the 
village, his father and brothers 
were" savagely mutilated. 

He remembers also, although he 
still docs not know for certain 
whether it was reality or a dream, 
that he thought his mother was still 
alive and when he ran to embrace 
her. her body, which had been de- 
capitated. fell apart in his hands and 
he was drenched in her blood. 

Earlier. Clemente's father had 
heard rumors of government plans 
to build an inieroceanic canal over 
a vast expanse — traversing the 


Panama-Colombian border, the 
gulf of Uraba and the Atrato River 
and on to the port of Jurado on the 
Pacific. 

Indeed rumor became fact. In 
May 1996. President Emestn 
Samper officially announced the 
canal project — which includes 
railways, pipelines and new power 
plants '— and suddenly the value of 
the surrounding lands soared. The 
peasants thought prosperity might 
be in the palm of their hands, but 
they did not feel too confident. 

With >o much death surrounding 
him. every morning Clemente is 
amazed to be alive. Nevertheless, 
when he speaks of all this, his fa- 
talism and despondency turn him 
into what seems to be a 1 00-year- 
old man. instead of a 12-year-old 
child. "Everybody has to die." he 
says. “Sooner or later. To die soon- 
er "is better. One suffers a lot less.' ' 

The w riter is the author oj " The 
Peri in Sinvl" ami "Santa Evtla" 
and is i hair man of the Latin Amer- 
ican studies department at Rutger < 
University This art it le was dis- 
tributed by the Sew )ork Times 
Syndicate. 



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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, J UNE 18, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


2 Tory Chieftains Duel in Britain 

Clarke and Hague Face Off in Bid to Revive Fractured Party 


Reuters . 

LONDON — The contest to lead the 
battered Conservative Party beaded for a 
third and final ballot after a second vote 
Tuesday reduced the field to a straight 
left-right fight between Kenneth Clarke 
and William Hague. 

Mr. Clarke, a former finance minister 
and outspokenly pro-European, won the 
votes of 64 of the mam opposition 
party’s 164 members of Parliament 
against 62 for Mr. Hague, a former sec- 
retary for Wales who is on the party’s 
moderate right wing. 

John Redwood, a prominent Euro- 
skeptic and former cabinet minister, was 
eliminated from- the contest to succeed 
John Major, die former prime minister, as 
party leader after polling just 38 votes. 

The run-off ballot will take place 
Thursday. 


* Tm well satisfied with the results of 
the second ballot,” said Mr. Hague, who 
at 36 would be the youngest Conser- 
vative leader in more than 200 years. “I 
think I now have the momentum and the 
support to win the third ballot on Thurs- 
day." 

But Mr. Clarke’s backers were con- 
fident that their man would pick up 
enough votes from the Redwood camp to 
cany him to victory. 

After all, they noted, Mr. Clarke won 
15 votes Tuesday from two other right- 
wing challengers who dropped out after 
die first round of voting a week ago. 

“I think today is an extremely en- 
couraging result. I’m glad we’re now in 
the final furlong, but 1 think we're ob- 
viously going to win,” Mr. Clarke 
said. 

The problem facing the Conservatives 




>■ i 


is that the contest has only served to 
highlight the splits over Europe that con- 
tributed to their defeat in the May 1 
election, when they were crushed by 
Tony Blair’s Labour Party after 1 8 years 

in power. 

Before the ballot Thursday, Mr. 
Clarke bitterly attacked Mr. Hague for 
hardening his line against the European 
Union’s planned single currency in an 
opportunistic pitch for the votes of Con- 
servative Euroskeptics who are deeply 
hostile to further European integration. 

"Thai is not the campaign of a unity 
candidate. That is the campaign of a 
candidate who’s trying to settle an old 
issue,” Mr. Clarke said on BBC radio. 

He accused Mr. Hague of changing 
his position several limes before finally 
demanding that any Conservative law- 
makers who wanted to serve in his 




• W ii M l IV— 

William Hague waving to supporters Tuesday on his way to the Commons. 

"shadow" cabinet — which will mon- has said it would be folly for Britain to 
itor the work of the real cabinet — must close off die option of joining the single 
declare their opposition to scrapping the currency, thereby raising the specter of a 


pound. 


parliamentary Conservative party still 



— , • If, *fren Cm 

UN Asked to Extemi , ^ ' ■ »•«*• • 

Mission to Albania I '<■£’£ 


TtrAMrimfiPnaa 

UNITED NATIONS. New Ye*.- 
Countries that sent; troops to A*** 
asked die Security Council on Tuesday 
■tp authorize a 45-day extension ofgfcjr 
mandate to allow them to stay m fe 
BsaSom country throegb election tfo 
oioenfa. . 

The president of the edhocti, Sergei 
Lavrov of Raftfe, ufta Aafriesabtion, 
submitted by France on behalf of tie 
contributing nations, would be (focussed 
Wednesday. 

Mr. Lavrov said dm most of the 15 
members “expressed their support for 
its thrust." China abst aine d when die 
council approved die mission in Match. 
The mission's mandate expires June 28, 


This would rule out Mr. Clarke, who deeply divided along European lines. 


Albania requested that the troops re- 
main for three months, diplomatic 
sources said on condition of anonymity. 
The request followed an increase in vi- 
olence during the run-up to the vote. 


m«4«S 


W. # 
.. dwyr fr 

* *, ■‘■•afiv HMK 
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*»* 


France and Germany Reopen Euro Rift 

Differences Indicate More Conflicts Ahead Over Monetary Union 


BU*.mherg News 

AMSTERDAM — France reopened a 
rift with Germany on Tuesday on the 
terms for qualifying for the European 
Union’s single currency, raising new 
doubts about monetary union. 

Publicly, lawmakers from Europe’s 
two biggest economies said they had 
resolved their differences on key aspects 
of economic policy after the euro is 
introduced in January 1999. That agree- 
ment clears the way for EU leaders to 
sign resolutions on budgetary discipline 
and job creation at their summit meeting 


in Amsterdam. In talks to reporters, 
however, French and German officials 
gave diverging accounts about what was 
agreed on, particularly in terms of meet- 
ing the budgetary requirements for the 
single currency. 

Those differences will make it dif- 
ficult for the EU to agree on who should 
be allowed to adopt the euro and may 
lead to tension in monetary and fiscal 
policy after the currency is introduced, 
economists said. 

The differences also indicate that 
more conflicts are on the horizon be- 



Oran! CoieifA0cnx Freu-Hr«c 


Prime Minister Lionel Jospin of France chatting with his British 
counterpart, Tony Blair, at the EU meeting in Amsterdam on Tuesday. 


Congolese Enemies Hold Fire 
To Allow French to Pull Out 


’Ujfftnvi hr. 

BRAZZAVILLE. Congo Republic — 
The Congo Republic’s warring factions 
agreed Tuesday to hold their fire* long 
enough for French troops to pull out. but 
full-scale battles were expected as soon 
as die withdrawal was completed. 

Government and rebel forces have 
agreed on an "effective'' three-day 
cease-fire, beginning ai midnight Tues- 
day. and on demilitarization of the 
Brazzaville airport to allow French 
troops to pull out. mediators said Tues- 
day. 

A mice between troops loyal to Pres- 
ident Pascal Lissouba and the militia of 
former military strongman Denis Sas- 
sou-Nguesso was agreed to last Wednes- 
day. but has been largely ignored. 

The latest accord was signed at the 
French Embassy by the interim head of 
general staff of the Congolese Army, 
General Gaspard Loundou. and an en- 
voy from General Sassou-Nguesso. Col- 
onel Philippe Longonda. 

The U.S. Ambassador. Aubrey 


Hooks, said he and the 1 1 other Amer- 
ican diplomats in Brazzaville would 
leave Wednesday, fearing it will be too 
dangerous to stay in the capital without 
the French. 

French troops are withdrawing from 
Brazzaville after evacuating more than 
5,000 French and other foreign nationals 
trapped by almost two weeks of ethnic 
and political clashes. 

French troops sent to evacuate for- 
eigners have had a calming effect on tire 
country’s violent power struggle. When 
the soldiers complained Monday night 
that bullets were falling on the airport, 
delaying their withdrawal, the fighting 
promptly diminished. 

A fierce battle for the airport was 
expected once their pullout is completed 
later this week. 

Colonel Henri Pelissier, a French 
Army spokesman, said the Congolese 
factions were signaling their intentions 
with the recent fighting. “We think each 
is telling the other ‘Be careful, it’s not 
over.’ ” he said. (AP.AFPl 


tween the nations at the heart of mon- 
etary union. 

“The financial markets are concerned 
that France wants a different kind of 
monetary union from Germany.” said 
Michael Lewis, an economist at 
Deutsche Bank in London. "If Ger- 
many’s not happy with the terms of the 
euro, then a delay or abandonment of the 
plan is more likely.” 

The greatest divergence between 
France and Germany, the driving forces 
behind the plan for a single currency in 
the 15 -nation bloc, concerned how 
strictly to interpret one of the rules for 
joining the economic and monetary un- 
ion: keeping budget deficits at 3 percent 
or less a country's gross domestic 
product. 

Finance Minister Dominique Strauss- 
Kahn of France said in an interview on 
French radio Tuesday that nations must 
be allowed to adopt the euro "even if 
they haven't hit’ ' the 3.0 percent of GDP 
target, provided they “come close” to 
the target. 

A German official at the meeting, 
speaking on condition of anonymity, 
said his government's position remained 
that nations had to hit 3.0 percent of GDP 
to quabfy. 

Luxembourg was alone in meeting all 
the conditions for the euro last year. 
Other nations have until the end of this 
year. Germany and France are struggling 
to meet the deficit target, largely because 
of the cost of financing unemployment 
benefits for the 75 million jobseekers in 
the two nations. France’s jobless rate is 
at a record high 12.8 percent and Ger- 
many's has hit 11.3 percenL 

The Socialist-led coalition in France 
was elected this month after pledging to 
make budget deficit constraint second- 
ary to job creation. Paris forced EU 
leaders attending the two-day summit 
meeting to adopt resolutions on job cre- 
ation measures, such as lending more 
money to high-technology companies, 
as a condition of agreeing to the stability 
pact on deficits. 

Pierre Moscovici, the French minister 
for European Affairs, indicated that Par- 
is may even consider canceling its com- 
mitment to the EU currency after mon- 
itoring its budgetary situation in the next 
six months. 

"Whether or not it participates in the 
euro depends on the srate of our public 
finances,” Mr. Moscovici said in an 
interview on French radio. * ‘The next six 
months will be absolutely decisive.” 

The spokesman for Prime Minister 
Lionel Jospin moved to quell any spec- 
ulation that France was ready to re- 
consider its commitment to the euro, 
describing Mr. Moscovici’s remark as a 
“slip up” that did not reflect govern- 
ment policy. 

The debate on the deficit target is just 
one sign of a wider gap between France 
and Southern European countries on the 
one hand, and Germany and the Benelux 
nations on the other. 

German officials said that low budget 
deficits are essential to contain inflation 
and interest rates, generating the right 
conditions for job creation. 

French government policy since Na- 
poleon has been based on state control of 
companies and economic management, 
even if that means increasing spending 
in times of crisis to bail out companies 
such as Credit Lyonnais SA or Air 
France. 


CAMBODIA: Forces of Co-Prime Ministers Fight in the Capital 


Continued from Page 1 

question of passing verdicts, but also of 
establishing the historical record," he 
said. “This proceeding would make it 
possible for people to go back through 
their history and at heart fee! confident 
that the truth has been established. The 
question then is what to do with those 
who are found guilty.” 

He said both of Cambodia's rival lead- 
ers, First Prime Minister Prince Norodom 
Ranariddh and Second Prime Minister 
Hun Sen. had told him they would sign a 
letter to the United Nation’s. 

Mr. Hammarburg’s announcement 
came as some of the hard-line leaders of 


the Khmer Rouge appear to be preparing 
to give up their decades-old insurgency, 
with an apparent promise that they 
would receive amnesty. 

Their defection forms a central part of 
a power struggle now under way be- 
tween the tandem prime ministers, who 
have been lobbying over the past 10 
months for the allegiance of various 
defecting rebel units. 

In the past few days, according to 
Prince Ranariddh, the Khmer Rouge 
leadership appears to have collapsed 
in a violent division. The movement's 
founder. Pol Poti is said to have killed 
a chief Lieutenant. Son Sen. and fled 
into the jungle, pursued by guerrillas 


Radiation Leak at Russian Weapons Plant 


firmer. 

MOSCOW — A radiation leak at a 
Russian research center that makes 
nuclear weapons badly injured a 
worker on Tuesday, the Nuclear En- 
ergy Ministry said. 

The Communist Party said its lead- 
er. Gennadi Zyuganov, had been tour- 
ing the center at the time and had to cut 


short his visit The ministry said only 
that the victim had been evacuated and 
that radiation levels outside the room 
where he was working were normal. 

But another official said that the 
area nearby the center had been 
cleared. And the government called 
the incident a "serious violation of 
regulations.” 


who have turned against him. 

In a clandestine radio broadcast Tues- 
day. one faction of the leadership claimed 
that “the treachery of Pol Pot" had been 
resolved, though it gave no explanation. 

It claimed that the Khmer Rouge lead- 
ership was now unified behind Khieu 
Samphan, its nominal leader, with 
whom Prince Ranariddh had been ne- 
gotiating a defection. But it gave no 
indication of the status of Mr. Khieu 
Samphan. whom the prince says is a 
hostage of Mr. Pol Pot, 

With seeming relish, the broadcast 
thrust the Khmer Rouge into the lead- 
ership struggle in Phnom Penb, pledging 
allegiance to Prince Ranariddh's polit- 
ical jxuty while vilifying Mr. Hun Sen. 

While stoking the rivalry between the 
two co-prime ministers, the broadcast 
did little to clarify the situation among 
the Khmer Rouge at their remote base in 
Anlong Veng, 500 kilometers north of 
the capital. 

Prince Ranariddh also appeared less 
certain about the situation. He said Mon- 
day that he hoped Mr. Pol Pot would be 
captured within days. On Tuesday, he 
said, "I think we cannot say anything for 
sure, but 1 think the chances are very, 
very small of finding him alive.’’ 



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THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


I 








a 




PAGE 11 

INTERNATIONAL 1 


1 


MINES: 


Continued from Page 1 

he said Congo also is believed to have 
80 percent of the world’s cobalt re- 
serves, and its copper mines are said to 
be capable of yielding 500,000 tons a 
yean they now yield no more than 
50,000. 

The wealth has always been here, of 
course. But the avarice of the country’s 
longtime former ruler, Mobutu Sese 
Seko — bribes were required to get in, 
-and then a share of the action went to a 
Mobutu crony once business became 


foreign investment,” said W.S. Turner, 
general manager of Anvil Mining, an 
Australian company that has signed a 
copper-mining contract with the new 
government- “As long as that philo- 


The government has not yet decided 
what to do with the diamond- mining 
company, Societe Miniere de Bak- 
wanga, known as MIBA, or with the 
state mining company known as Ge- 


W 15 mere, we’re happy to be part of camines. But officials said in recent in- 

“■ A1 , terviews that the government was e.\- 

Already, die government has cut the ploring the possibility of selling large 
JSL a , diamond trading license to interests in both to one or more in- 
$50,000. from $ 150,000. teraational companies. 

We are trying not to be too greedy; “We want a market economy,” Mr 

f want Kv Uo •' e: . ,» .. J 


we want to be humble," Finance Min- 
ister Mwana Mawarapanga said Be- 
sides, the state was not really losing 


hr I t— u nv 


_ . . * . — ^ ■ vut duuc w a* iiuL reanv iosms 

JP^SSfar USE? away f0reign “3^ by c «tt“g the fee; the money, 
vestors for decades. he ^ used to go largely into the pock- 


pc*. 


Now % after the collapse of Marshal 
Mobutu's rule, it is seen as a new day 
here for business. Laurent Kabila, who 
was swam in as president last month 
after an eight-month insurgency, has a 

lot bis ministers talk like capitalists^and 
have vowed to end corruption. 

“Everything I’ve seen shows they 
want to govern honestly, that they want 


Mawampanga said * * But we want to ask 
those companies who come to invest in 
our country to be good corporate cit- 
izens.” 

^ , - K — o-«r — r — . The potential for outside investment 

ets ot Marshal Mobutu and his mends, extends beyond the nation's mineral 
“J” 10 treasury. : wealth, with staggering possibilities for 

One monopoly the government says it public-works contracts. In a country of 
intends to break is that of De Beers perhaps 50 million people in an area one- 
Coosohdated Mines, the South African third the size of the continental United 


ujw uwuuj nuiuui 

diamond concern controlled by Anglo 
American Corp. that was the only com- 
pany to buy the production of die Con- 
golese state diamond company during 
the Mobutu era. 


States, there are fewer than 2,400 ki- 
lometers of paved roads, and much of the 
country is not served by telephones. 

But for now, the focus of die action is 
ia the ground From Poland to South 




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TBEWDRU ^ DA ILY NEWSPAPER 


Africa, from Canada and the United 
States to Australia and Japan, the mining 
companies are coming, small, medium 
and large. 

A government mining official, 
Jean-Claude Muyambo. said many of 
the companies were trying to take ad- 
vantage of the lack of experience at the 
Ministry of Mines. Mr. Muyambo, 32, 
was a human-rights lawyer until the 
new minister of mines, Mututulo 
Kambale. a former professor of Eng- 
lish at a teachers' college, asked him to 
help out. 

“They think they are smarter than we 
are.” said Mr. Muyambo. whose dark 
suit, white shirt and tie would have blen- 
ded in at a Western law firm but who 
looked alien in his squalid office — the 
carpets are beyond threadbare, the walls 
are stained, and wires protrude from 
holes in the ceiling where there should 
be light fixtures. 

He said companies were proposing 
contracts that would give them rights 
to explore, mine and trade while pay- 





,m. V-u > .«*. Tap.- 


Jean-Claude Muyambo, a Congolese mining official, said some Western 
companies tried to take advantage of the new government's inexperience. 

ing only for the rights to explore. eminent officials so poor, how is it going 
"When we tell them something is to be possible to stop the corruption? 
wrong with the contract, they think we "It’s a very good^juestion, Bernard 


want bribes,” Mr. Muyambo said. 

With the stakes so high and gov- 


Mancno, a senior official in the Ministry 
of Mines, said with a heavy sigh. 



NATO: Poland and Other Candidates Find It's Difficult to Enlist 


Continued from Page 1 

Madrid summit this summer with a 
mixed portfolio. Here is a contender 
adept at political maneuvering and the 
art of persuasion. Here is a country with 
a proud military heritage that, even with 
some diligent training and reform, offers 
few military assets to the allian ce. 

“We don't have any easy periods in 
this country,” said General Henryk 
Szumski, chief of the general staff. 
“We've done a lot to prepare, but we are 
completely aware that all the burdens 
will be heavier after July.” 

The conditions stipulated by NATO 
fra* the admission of new nations are 
largely political. The candidates must 
foster a stable democracy, adhere to 
market reforms and create military com- 
mands that are under civilian control. 
They also must respect their neighbors 
abroad and their minority groups at 
home. 

Poland, the Czech Republic and Hun- 
gary were resolute in living up to those 
demands during the stormy years after 
the fall of their Communist govern- 
ments. Lobbying the United States, Po- 
land went further last winter It began 
taking its case to Washington and to 
capitals across Europe. 

ing to the miUfons^of Americans ^with 
Polish roots, persuaded a dozen stale 
legislatures to support NATO member- 
ship for Poland and its 38 million 
people. 

In Washington, no senator who will 
be crucial to securing American approv- 
al of NATO expansion went unnoticed. 
The Polish Embassy and Foreign Min- 
istry created computerized files on each 
one that tracked their every statement 
regarding NATO. Even the visit by Pope 
John Paul II to Poland this month was 
given a NATO twist — the Foreign 
Ministry handed reporters pamphlets 
promoting Poland’s case for NATO. 

But afterthe Madrid summit, the rhet- 
oric of persuasion will take a back seat to 
military- realities. The prospective new 
members will begin to find out how far 
they fall below Western standards of 
military capability and preparedness. 

According to preliminary Western 
studies, including one by Rand Corp. 
and the German research firm 1ABG, the 
gap is wide. Poland, with the biggest 
army in Eastern Europe, offers a “large 


force of low quality, in both readiness 
and modernness.” one analyst said. 

Top officers in all three potential new 
members are loath to discuss what 
equipment or readiness they would bring 
to NATO. In some cases, iheir taciturn 
demeanor is based on a luck of ap- 
propriate data or even on (he lingering 
effects of “disinformation” lingering 
from the Soviet period. 

“Bases? I can’t tell you how many 
bases we have.” said a colonel in the 
Defense Ministry. "Nobody knows. Po- 
land was the logistical base for Soviet 
forces. We have barracks every- 
where.” 

Military maps were another riddle. 
Western analysis found that during the 
Cold War, some Soviet-bloc countries 
had two maps for the same territory. 
One, for high-level officers, was ac- 
curate. The other, provided to soldiers. 


“We’ve reached the bonom," the letter 
said. "Twenty-year-old tanks and even 
older reconnaissance vehicles are (he 
norm. Radio communication practically 
doesn't exist.” 

Basic training, the letter added, "con- 
sists not of learning to shoot but of 
reading the instructions on how to 
shoot.” 

The same newspaper reported this 
month that soldiers in a training unit 
north of Warsaw were throwing rocks 
and cans as a substitute for practice 
grenades. Their commander bought 
some grenades with his own money. The 
commander's wife also pitched in. sew- 
ing uniforms out of old parachutes. 

The Czech Republic and Hungary 
fare no bener. Hungary’s jet-fighter fleet 
is down to 50 Soviet-made MiGs. The 
Czech Air Force lacks spare parts and 
lost some of its jets in crashes last year. 


Despite its proud military history, Poland finds that its 
crumbling armed forces hare little to offer the Western 
alliance as the time nears for membership. 


was deliberately misleading in case any 
were captured by an enemy. 

Today, in a nod toward NATO com- 
patibility', all the militaries are redrawing 
their maps under an American initiative. 
All will tell soldiers, in at least two 
NATO languages, what is on ihe 
ground. 

Other gaps are more costly to remedy. 
More than half of Poland's 1 .700 tanks 
are Soviet T-55 designs dating from 
1955 and are largely unusable in modem 
battle. About a third of its 300 to 350 jet 
fighters are deemed old enough to be 
scrapped or removed from service, or 
else they cannot be flown because of a 
lack of spare pails. At least six in the past 
year — including one last week — 
should not have tried. They crashed. 

Minesweepers, starved for upkeep, 
now cover only one-third of the Polish 
coast About half of the country’s naval 
vessels need to be overhauled. Artillery, 
however, is deemed to be largely in good 
shape. 

The shortcomings take their toll on 
morale. In January , warrant officers 
from the 17th Mechanized Brigade in 
southern Poland complained in a letter 
published in the daily Gazeta Wyborcza. 


This spring, the planes were grounded 
when microbes infested the gas tanks 
and mined the fuel. 

Fighter pilots in all three countries 
average only 40 to 60 hours of flight time 
a year. That compares with a standard of 
180 hours for NATO pilots. American 
pilots log as many as 220 hours in the air 
yearly. 

Such deficiencies in training and 
equipment are glossed over by military 
and political establishments here that 
say the benefits of joining such an elite 
Western institution as NATO for out- 
weigh the costs. 

The latest State Department estimate 
is that adding new members will cost, 
overall, between $27 billion and $35 
billion. Other studies suggest it will be 
two to three times as much. 

Today. Poland fights to maintain cur- 
rent levels of military readiness. 

"There is no expectation that tomor- 
row we will have new equipment, new 
planes, new radar,” a senior officer 
said. 

"It's not important now to have tanks. 
It’s the mentality that counts.” 


Tomorrow: Democracy is the focus. 


GUZZLERS: Detroit Orchestrates a March of the Roadhogs 


Continued from Page 1 

and there are waiting lists to buy than. 
Since Ford introduced the Expedition, 
its largest sport utility vehicle, it has 
doubled production and still cannot sat- 
isfy demand. 

People buy the big vehicles because 
they think they are safer, they want to 
ride above tbe traffic, intimidate others 
or simply want something bigger than 
what their friends baye. 

Automakers love to sell them because 
the vehicles generate huge profits. Each 
Suburban, for example, generates a 
profit of as much as $10,000, largely 
because development costs have long 
been recouped, analysts said. 

The gigantic new models scheduled to 
roll out over the next two years will 
probably have their devotees and de- 
tractors. 

The Transportation Department re- 
leased a study last week concluding that 
trig sport utility vehicles, pickup tracks 
and mini-vans posed a growing clanger 
to the occupants of smaller cars sharing 
the same roads. And with feel economy 
ratings of 14 miles a gallon or less and 
generally dirtier emissions, the new 
sport-utility vehicles will generate more 
pollution and raise reliance on imported 
oil, environmentalists warn. 

Ford’s eight-seatercrew wagon— so 
called because it can haul a construction 
crew — is based on its F-350 model truck 
that comes in a variety of models, in- 
cluding pickup trucks, cabs far city de- 
livery trucks and flat-bed trucks favored 
by landscape crews. The redesigned 
pickup will go on sale next year. . 

In Chicago in February, Ford pre- 
viewed the design of the truck by show- 
ing off its Powerfotce “concept” 
vehicle, a high and hefty pickup with 
power r unning boards that folded down 
to help riders step up. That idea is not in 
production. 

Tbe big Ford wagon would not be die 
first ‘ ‘overweight” vehicle to escape the 
luxury tax, which is imposed on vehicles 
costing more than $36,000 but has ex- 
emptions for fee very heaviest cars and 
tracks. The Toyota Land Cruiser, among 
others, is heavy enough when fully 
loaded to avoid fee tax. The Ford crew 
wagoo would also not be the fiist^ to 
escape fuel economy regulations, which 
exempt vehicles that weigh more than 
8,500 pounds when felly loaded. 

At least two vehicles now escape both 


the tax and tbe feel standards. Those are 
the heaviest Suburban models and the 
Hummer, a vehicle adapted from a mil- 
itary transport built by AM General. 

In Cheyenne, Wyoming, Nick Nickel, 
a Ford dealer, said feat the people buying 
big vehicles in his area were not fee 
farmers and ranchers pictured in some 
advertisements for Suburbans. The buy- 
ers are “primarily professionals: doc- 
tors, lawyers and accountants," he said. 
Ranchers mostly prefer tbe more down- 
to-earth and more practical pickup 
trucks, he said. 

With a gallon of gasoline now selling 
for considerably less than a gallon of 
bottled water, tbe cost of gas has largely 
disappeared as a worry for buyers of big 
vehicles. But even if gas prices rise, the 
Suburbans, Ford crew wagons and other 
rough, tough land yachts may not dis- 
appear. 

Tbe reason is simple: The people who 
can afford to pay $25,000 to $40,000 for 
a big sport utility vehicle can usually 
afford to fill their huge feel tanks even if 
prices rise. One of GM's envious rivals 


has done market research calculating 
that the average Suburban buyer earns 
$133,800 a year. The average car buyer 
earns just $67,100 a year. 

While the value of large sport utility 
vehicles in intimidating or impressing 
other drivers may be debatable, there is 
growing support for the view feat large 
sport utility vehicles provide excellent 
protection for their occupants and haz- 
ards to those in smaller vehicles. 

According to the Insurance Institute 
for Highway Safety, death rates in Chev- 
rolet Suburbans are among fee lowest for 
any vehicle on fee road But the institute 
will study whether the proliferation of 
such large vehicles is increasing death 
rates in other vehicles feat they hit, Mr. 
Lund said. 

Because large sport utility vehicles 
typically come wife four-wheel drive 
ana high bumpers, they also tend to 
override fee strongest sections of a car 
body and drive into fee passenger com- 
partment during collisions, the Trans- 
portation Department study warned last 
week. 


LAND: Hong Kong Ponders Regulation 


Continued from Page 1 

feat it was “realistic to assume we may 
see something like” a capital-gains tax. 
As for the stock market, he said, “We’ve 
got a bit of uncertainly over the next two 
months while Tung decides what he’s 
going to do.” 

Yet even if a new tax is imposed, Mr. 
Leary remains bullish on fee outlook for 
the biggest real-estate developers. Sun 
Hung Kai Properties Ltd and Henderson 
Land Development Co. Ltd, because of 
a recommendation he expects Mr. LeuDg 
to make to increase the amount of land 
for development in fee New Territories 
of Hong Kong, along the border wife 
China. The two companies own 34 mil- 
lion square feet of land in fee area. 

The government may also increase 
the allowable height of buildings in the 
New Territories, which would provide 
an instant boost to the net asset values of 
fee land, Lehman Brothers said 

Dresdner Kteinwort Benson, a 
brokerage, was less enthusiastic about 
fee outlook for property and finance, 
noting feat bank lending for residential 
mortgages was up by an annual rate of 29 


percent over the last three months. With 
more than 40 percent of bank lending 
going to real estate in Hong Kong, 5 
warned that a sudden jolt to property 
prices could affect the earnings of either 
weaker banks or of property companies 
that have borrowed heavily on feeex- 
pectation of continuing high prices. 

In figuring out what to do, Mr. Tung 
faces pressure from outside Hong Kong. 
Mainland real-estate companies have 
scarcely a presence in fee Hong Kong 
property market, and cannot hope to 
compete wife the established developers 
as long as prices remain so high. 
However he resolves fee issue, provtd 
ing affordable housing is more com- 
plicated than just releasing vast swathes 
of land for developers. 

“When people say there’s a shortage 
of land in Hong Kong that’s rubbish. If s 
finding developable land that’s fee pnfc- 
lem,” said Alan Dalgleish, a real estate 
analyst at Socgen-Crosby Securities. He 
contends that the government has been 

slow to provide road and rail links to fee 

underdeveloped New Tenitories. Until 
this happens, tbe housing shortage k 
likely to continue, he said. ■ . ■ 



d 


G 


I 



INTERNATIONAL herald tribune, 
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 1997 
PAGE 12 


The ‘Eurojazz’ 
Of Louis Sclavis 

A French Interpretation 


I M 


By Mike Zwerin 

hiinikiriimg] HcruM Tribune 

P ARIS — Lump together all the 
styles of this particular kind of 
music on this particular contin- 
ent and you come up with the 
term “Eurojazz." 

It's like packing the entire product of 
another continent under the heading 
' ‘African Music. ’ ' It won't hold, though 
everybody uses the terminology. There 
are too many continental divides. 

A superstar on one side of the border 
can be a backup singer on the other. A 
prizewinner can be a sideman. In fact, 
most cross-border stars are American. 
Which poses other problems, cultural 
imperialism for example. 

There are of course exceptions. The 
French multi-reedman Louis Sclavis has 
a round-the-elobe reputation. He records 
for a Germain record company and he 
places in Down Beat magazine polls. 

Not only that. Sclavis comes from 
and continues to live in Lyon. As re- 
cently as a decade ago. it would have 
been impossible to maintain an inter- 
national artistic career based in what is 
considered a provincial backwater. But 
decentralization is a political fact in 
France and anyway Sclavis does not 
look at it that w'ay. 

“Foreigners tend to judge France by 
Paris." he says. “This is no longer true. 
Provincial artistic production is now 
enormous." He sounds like a member of 
the chamber of commerce in. say. Kansas 
City. 

In the past, looking for profitable mu- 
sical programming, a French producer 
would automatically have hooked up 
with Americans. It was well known the 
French public would only come out to 
listen to American jazz musicians. Now. 
for better or worse, it’s different. Unless 
we’re talking about big names or prom- 
ising young lions, an American jazzman 
is basically just one more foreigner 
today. And' his papers better be in order. 

It is becoming obvious that the 
French are beginning to prefer their 
own. And that their own are obviously 
much belter than they once were. Be- 
ware these are generalizations, but still, 
Sclavis. for example, has a high level of 
respect and visibility difficult to ima- 
gine only a short time ago. 

It follows, then, that French inter- 
preters will look into their own culture 
for music to interpret. Sclavis found the 


18th-century composer Jean Philippe 
Rameau. His ECM album that resulted 
last year was called "Les Violences de 
Rameau." Not that Rameau was ne- 
cessarily all that violent “Each mu- 
sician sees, hears and interprets his own 
source materiaL" says Sclavis. “For me 
the starting point was to say that tins 
image of nobles dancing in the court, all 
the fine ladies and gentlemen dressed in 
feathers and lace being polite before they 
go to war and kill, is violent. At least in 
pan, this was our vision of Rameau." 

As a boy, Sclavis studied classical 
clarinet in Lyon. At the age of 14, be 
discovered Sidney Bechet In 1970, he 
was 17, year zero for him. He beard Sun 
Ra. Mingus, Monk and the An En- 
semble of Chicago. They changed his 
concept of the nature of the business. He 
had not known their music, be had no 
idea of its antecedents or where these 
players were coming from. 

But he knew — he just knew right 
away — that he could do it He had 
absolutely no idea of how mainstream 
jazz, swing, bebop — whatever you call 
it — worked. He aid not understand the 
jazz vocabulary, the altered chords, the 
Broadway song form, the bebop melod- 
ic lines. “I was never a ■real’ jazz mu- 
sician," he says. There was nobody 
around Lyon who was able and willing 
to explain Gerry Mulligan to him.. 


F REE — abstract — jazz had 
elements of musique contenipo- 
raine. the avant-garde classical 
music being investigated by 
Pierre Boulez ar Ircam in Paris. He 
could plug into that The Living Theatre 
was in France. Albert Ayler and Archie 
Shepp were playing free jazz in mu- 
seums and prestigious halls. While free 
jazz was starving on the Bowery in New 
York, in France it was considered an- 
other important expression of African 
American culture rejected at home. The 
door to free improvisation was wide 
open. 

“Free" jazz did not mean, a joke of 
the day notwithstanding, that the mu- 
sicians were not paid when they played it. 
And there were rules all right, inventing 
rules was part of inventing the music. 

He was lucky to come on the scene in 
his early 20s in die early ’70s and he 
knew it. The wizards who had matured 
in the ’60s had families now, they were 
obliged to take commercial work. He 
was young and fresh with a low over- 



‘Each musician sees, hears and interprets his awn source material / 


head, ready to take economic and mu- 
sical risks. He jumped in the deep waters 
of abstraction even though he wasn't at 
all sure he could swim. 

By going the European way, as it 
were, by following Boulez and Luciano 
Berio rather than John Coltrane, he es- 
caped the tyranny of die African Amer- 
ican experience. 

Because it is impossible to play be- 
bop in French. Straight-ahead blues- 
based 4/4 time quarter-note jazz can 
only come out of the urban American 
experience. Europeans who try it as a 
means of expression without a deep 
physical feel for American streets and 
street talk are in for trouble. 


If you want to leam how to play ragas 
on a sitar, you go to India. If you want to 
learn to play the music of the Pygmies, 
you go where the pygmies live. And the 
Austrian jazz pianist Joe Zawinul said: 
“All of us cats who know how to play 
this music, sooner or later we come to 
Brooklyn." 

Sclavis had no experience with 
Brooklyn. He did not even have much 
curiosity about it. He was very faraway 
from it. far from even wan ring to get 
close. So he looked closer to home! No, 
he looked at home. 

If “Eurojazz" is steak tartare, you can 
call bebop a cheeseburger. Either way,, 
they are different dishes. Bon appetit. 


lONPONTHEATER 

As Musicals Go, 
Little to Sing About 


BySheridan Motley 

Iprenutimal Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — Npt perhaps the 
greatest of weeks for stage mu- 
sicals. - what with Andrew 
Lloyd Webber declaring losses 
of around £10 million ($16 million) for 
his Really Useful Company on this side 
of the Atlantic alone and the new ab- 
dication musical at the Victoria Palace 
already unkindly known backstage as 
" Walks and Vomit.” 

What is it, I have long wondered, about 
musicals that brings out the absolute 
worst in London drama critics? No, this is 
not going to be a defense- of ' ‘Always." 
essentially because there is no. real de- 
fense' of it; the show is indeed veiy nearly 
as terrible as most reviews have been 
reUingyou. 

.But imagine we had been dealing 
with a- truly terrible “Hamlet" or 
"Seagull.’* Would the Guardian have 
"solemnly published a box detailing the - 
last half-dozen classical West End dis- 
asters? Or would the Daily Telegraph 
have noted that “it wasn't quite as bad 
as we had been hoping"? Just who are 
"“we 7 arid why do we sit around hoping 
for musicals to fail? If you were starting 
out to write or produce a new London 
musical now, my immediate advice 
would be to stop, The critical message is 
that no musical is a good musical. 

Even so, there is precious little to be 
said in dirfense of “Always"; it isaweird 
lithe Windsor wonderland, one that 
neatly sidesteps the few intriguing as- 
pects of Edward VIU and Wallis 
Simpson; notably his latent fascism and 
her reputed sexual athleticism. 

Clive Carter and Jan Hartley are thus 
left with a couple of cardboard cutouts, 
and a supporting cast led by Shani Wal- 
lis as her aunt with even less. There was 
something more interesting about them 
than is ever suggested here in a show 
.that goes for shallow stage cartoons 
when it is not dealing in waxworks. A 
scene in France? Right then, we’ll have 
ajbloke in a beret with a concertina; I 
suppose we were just locky they didn’t 
put him on a bicycle selling onions 
while doing his tacky Chevalier im- 
pression. “This kind of stress I don’t 
need," sings the once-and-never king, 
and one knows exactly how he feels as 
yet one more lavish production number 
dies on its dancing feet all around him. 


Another question is where the cho- 
rrographef-mrector Thoramie Walsh 
has been since 1950. ft is one thing to 
organize period pieces, quite another to 
stage them as if they were still current. . 
His co-director, the infinitely more das- ■ 
sical Frank Hauser, does what he can . 
with, a few ail-too-brief political scenes, 
but jest as any of them threaten ro come ; 
to lire we are hurled back into yet another : 
fashion show, cocktail party or, worst of 
all, choirs of lovable Welsh miners 
singing of their devotion to treacherous 
Eddie. But worse than the choreography 
or the dialogue or the lyrics or the music 
or the acting is the realization that 
nobody involved in this whole calamity 
seems to have had the faintest idea of the 
trae period details of this perennial ly : 
fascinating class warfare. 

At the Jeimyn Street, Noel Harrison 
makes a welcome return to Britain after . 
30 years in Canada and Los Angeles , 
with ‘.'Adieu Jacques," a thoughtful ! 
arid very touching account of the life ■ 
and songs of Jacques Brel, sung in 
French but with a wistful, wondrous ; 
English commentary. ' 


A 


ND the best is last: On the : 
Cottesloe stage of the Nation- ; 
al, Patrick Marber's second 1 
play, “Closer," not only lives , 


up to the. promise of his “Dealer's 
Choice ” but is an even sharper and more 
tense account of relationships in total 
moral and sexual breakdown. This is a & 
story of four people who can live neither f 

together nor apart but whose electric 
attraction to eac h other finally bu ms al I of 
them out in a shock ending that has been 
very carefully prepared if only we could 
have seen it coming. Marber has a re- 
markable talent for making us fall in love 
with appalling people, and here their fatal . 
attraction is what drives the play across 
the borders of comedy and tragedy. 

Not since David Hare’s “Skylight," 
about to reappear at the Vaudeville, has ' 
there been a British play about sexual 
politics with such raw energy and 
throat-catching reality, and in Marber's | 
own production, the mismatched lovers | 
are equally breathtakingly. played by ? 
Sally Dexter. Ciaran Hinds, Liza Walk- j| 
er and Clive Owen. Like “Skylight." y 
“Closer" will also have a long West 3 
End and Broadway life when it leaves AR 
the South Bank, but catch it there while li 
it is still fresh off the typewriter. | 






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‘Cats’: A New Champion 


MIDDLE EAST 

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' By Peter Marks 

New Yart Times Service . 

Tk "J* EW YORK — This 
l\ I week, a new champ 
;l/^y breaks the endur- 
J: ■ ^ . ance refcord and be- 
comes the longest-running 
show: in Broadway . history. 
It’s a concept' musical that 
features I ) acnorus of dancers 
who tell then characters’ sto- 
ries in song and movement: 2) 
an over-the-hill female char- 
acter attempting a sentimental 
comeback, .and 3) a compe- 
tition among the performers 
to be selected for a coveted, 
life-altering assignment. 

Hmm. Dancers, personal 
stories, competition. Didn't 
“A Chorus Line” retire as the 
Street's king of the long run 
five years ago, after 6,137 
performances? Well, yeah. 
But Michael Bennett's fabled 
ensemble show is not the one 
in question. 

The musical that will, at 
Thursday evening's curtain, 
surpass “A Chorus Line" as 
Broadway’s reigning Methu- 
selah is “Cats;” Andrew 
Uoyd Webber’s wildly suc- 
cessful adaptation of T.S. Eli- 
ot’s “Old Possum's Book of 
Practical Cats.” 

The eerie narrative paral- 
lels between the two shows — 


L- I F 


WORTH 


each has an episodic story line 
built around a lengthy audi- 
tion process, in the one case 
for a dance job and the other 
for a ticket to cat heaven — 
suggest that there may be 
some winning formula for 
producers seeking to enter the 
longevity sweepstakes. But 
the truth is that contests are a 
staple of the contemporary 
musical, in shows as diverse 
as “Starlight Express" and 
“Steel Pier.” 

No, the . fact that the two 
musicals use similar plot 
devices only goes to show 
how conservative much of the 
modem musical theater truly 
is. and bow much the crowd- 
pleasing shows — - no matter 
how innovative they at first 
appear — fall back on the 
conventional. 

And yet, the passing of the 
mantle from "A Chorus 
Line” to “Cats." as it com- 
pletes its 6,I38ih perfor- 
mance on Thursday, could not 
be a richer symbol of the 
artistic and financial shifts 
that have occurred on Broad- 
way. "Cats" was the produc- 
tion, after all, that ushered in 
the era of the megaspectacle, 
the heavily merchandised and 
immensely profitable model 
fora succession of lavish Brit- 
ish musicals that in the 1980s 


A G C A R A T 



IALANDE CLOCK 


MUSEUM AND STORE : 30Bis. RUE DE RABADtS - 10* 

CALL; 01 47 70 64 30 


and early 1990s not only came ; 
to dominate Broadway, but > 
also shifted the balance of cre- 
ative power in the musical 
theater from Times Square to i 
Leicester Square. 

That “Cats’" would be the 
show to dethrone “A Chorus 
Line" won’t be applauded by 
theatrical patriots, or even by 
critics, many of whom had 
unkind words when the show 
opened at the Winter Garden 
onOcL 7, 1982. 

So the question arises: i 
Why has “Cats" — its 1983 : 
Tonys for best musical, book, 
score, direction, costumes, 
lighting and featured actress 
tBetiy Buckley) norwith- 
standing — endured? What is' J 
it about this whimsical mu-- 
sical, with its trash heap of a' 
set by John Napier and cast of 
22 felines who prowl tile 
aisles of the Winter Garden, 
that has allowed it to live and 
breathe on Broadway longer 
than any other show? 


A VISIT to “Cals" 
and a perusal of the- 
audience was en-'. 
lightening. As the 
first real tourist musical — 
those trademark cat’s eyes are 
as familiar as the strains of the 
show's hit song “Memory" 
— it has the advantages of a' 
high profile and no language 
barrier. You don’t have to be 
even marginally acquainted 
with English to follow the ac- 
robatic antics of Macavity and 
Munkustrap and all those other 
singing and dancing felines. 

The experience, though, 
was a bit like a trip through 
the rime tunnel, back to 1982. 
when Gillian Lynne's claws- 
out, arched-back choreo- 
graphy. and Napier’s cos-" 
tumes for tabbies and toms, 
did communicate a theatrical 
freshness. But “Cats" is now 
an artifacr, not a living work. ■ 
Peter Brook, in his famous 
1968 study of the theater. 
“The. Empty Space." con-; 
eluded that a particular staging 
of a play has a shelf life of 
about five years. “It is not only 
the hairstyles, costumes and 
makeups that look dated,” he 
wrote. “AH the different ele- 
ments of staging — the short- 
hands of behavior that stand 
for certain emotions: gestures, 
gesticulations and tones of 
voice — are all fluctuating on 
an invisible stock exchange all 
the time. In the theater, every 
form once- bom is mortal.” 

. Don’t tell that to the pro- : 
ducers of “Cats.” It's a ter- 
rifying thought, but could , 
they have really meant “now 
and forever” literally*! 





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BUSINESS/FINANCE 






WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1*, 1997 



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^i RP V^ B ^ CNJESS T *5' e bi Sg est order SO far at the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget, above, American Eagle will bay 42 Embraer 
50-seat EM B- 145 jets and 25 Canadair 70-seat CRJ700 jets, demonstrating the strength of the market for smaller, regional craft. 

Motorola Plans $12,9 Billion Satellite Net 


Newt* Ik 


& Cuapirdbv Oar Staff Fnm Dbpunim 

1 WASHINGTON —-In a 
ibid to dominate the satellite- 
systems business. Motorola 
Inc. said Tuesday it was plan- 
ning to build a $12.9 billion 
. global network to provide 
voice, data and video com- 
munications to phone compa- 
nies, businesses and telecom- 
muters. 

The venture, called Ce- 
lestri, would be marketed to 
businesses and residential 
:onsumers and would be the 
bird major satellite venture 
for Motorola, a leading maker 
rf cellular phones, pagers and 
|smicondnctors. 

The system, which is ex- 
« peeled to stan service in 
. 2002, dwarfs . - those . of 

> } |ll\\ fTdedeac Corp., and a joint 
I ‘ i venture of France’s Alcatel 


Als thorn and Loral Space & 
Communications Ltd. of the 
United States. 

The system would use a 
necklace of 63 satellites in 
space to move telephone, 
television and data at high 
speeds to small receivers on 
the ground, according to a 
document Motorola filed 
with the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission on Fri- 
day. 

“We have filed what will 
be a planned global broad- 
band network,'’ said Rusty 
Brashear, a Motorola spokes- 
man: 

The network will “rely on 
advanced communications 
satellites and ground commu- 
nications-’ to provide phone 
and video services to phone 
companies, large multination- 


al corporations and telecom- 
muters. The network could be 
used,, for instance, by resid- 
ential consumers to send and 
receive computer files while 
working at home, as well as 
for entertainment and educa- 
tion, the document said. 

Motorola would not offer 
services directly to con- 
sumers but would lease ca- 
pacity to companies that 
would provide voice, video 
and data services to homes or 
businesses. 

“Motorola does not anti- 
cipate selling services direct- 
ly to end users,’* the company 
said. “It intends to offer 
wholesale space segment ca- 
pacity to carriers and service 
providers, who .will in turn 
market a variety of services to 
their customers.” 


Motorola's first system. 
Iridium, is a $5 billion voice 
and paging system that is to 
launch its sixth satellite on 
Wednesday. The second sys- 
tem, M-Star, is a $6. 1 billion 
system designed to provide 
data to corporations. 

The latest venture would 
pit Motorola against Teledes- 
ic Corp., which has proposed 
a $9 billion high-speed satel- 
lite system. 

Motorola has asked for 
permission to use the same 
portion of the radio frequency 
spectrum as its competitor. 

“It’s difficult to measure 
the demand” for such ser- 
vices, said Jean-Denis Muys- 
Vasovic, European technol- 
ogy analyst at Banque Pari- 
bas. ' ‘There may be a problem 
there, but hopefully Motorola 


PAGE 13 


A Philips-Lucent Accord 

Companies Agree to Join Phone Businesses, 
Creating a Giant With $2.5 Billion in Sales 


has done its homework.” 

Motorola plans to launch 
its first satellites for the sys- 
tem in 2001. The venture will 
be funded with a combination 
of third-party investors, bank 
loans, and a public offering, 
according to a published re- 
port. The company has not 
secured customers or operat- 
ing partners for the venture. 

“It’s very ambitious, and 
it's going to require a lot of 
up-front investment,” said 
Mr. Muys-Vasovic. ’’And 
it's not clear that it's going to 
be successful.” 

Motorola shares rose $1 .25 
to close at $71. 

(AP, Bloomberg,) 


J fn iJfir Sitl f n*w Piytrt. »i 

EINDHOVEN. Netherlands — Philips 
Electronics NV and Lucent Technologies Inc. 
of the United Slates said Tuesday that (hey 
had agreed to combine their telephone busi- 
nesses and create the world’s biggest tele- 
phone-equipment company, a move that is 
expected to generate more than $2.5 billion in 
annual sales. 

The new company, to be called Philips 
Consumer Communications, will develop 
and produce digital and analog phones, an- 
swering machines and pagers for a global 
market of more than S36 billion, which is 
expected to rise to about $47 billion by 
2000 . 

No financial derails were disclosed. Philips 
will own 60 percent of the venture, and Lu- 
cent 40 percent. 

Shares in Philips, the world's third-largest 
consumer electronics maker, rose 6.5 percent 
in Amsterdam after the announcement to 
close at 128.90 guilders (S66.10). Philips's 
American depositary receipts rose $3 to close 
at $66.25 in New York trading. Lucent's 
shares rose $2.25 to end at $69,875. 

Since takin g over in October Iasi year. 
Philips's president. Cor Boonstra. with the 
motto "fix, sell or dose." has repeatedly 
pledged to turn around, sell or close un- 
profitable divisions. One way of doing that 
has been to strike up alliances with com- 
petitors. 

“It looks like things are improving even 
faster than anticipated,” said Erie de Graaf. 
an ING Borings analyst, who raised his earn- 
ings estimates for Philips. "It seems like the 
sensible thing for diem to do: spreading their 
risks with another company.” 

In the past. Philips has often proved unable 
to cash in on its innovations, with the most 
telling example of its lack of marketing ability 
being iir the 1980s when VHS. the standard 
introduced by the Asian electronics compa- 
nies, usurped Philips' technologically super- 
ior Video 2000 system. 

Philips telephone equipment business, 
which generates $1.5 billion in sales, is not 
profitable yet, a spokesman said, adding that 
he expected the new company “to become 
operationally profitable during the fourth 
quarter of this year.” 

He said Lucent's division had $1.1 billion 
in sales. 

“For Philips, it's essential to have an entry 
into tile U.S. market,” the spokesman said. 

The definitive agreement on the merger 
should be completed by Oct. 1 when the two 
companies will transfer their net assets into 
the joint venture. The company will have its 


headquarters in New Jersey, with regional 
offices worldwide. ( Bit •nmherg. AFX i 

■ Intel and Hewlett-Packard Set Deal 

Intel Corp. and Hew len-Packard Co. said 
Tuesday that they had teamed up to establish 
standards for capturing and sending photo- 
graphs and other images on a personal com- 
puter. Bloomberg News reported from Santa 
Clara. California. 

The two companies will work together lo 
create specifications for digital cameras so 
they work more easily with personal com- 
puters. They also will set standards for send- 
ing pictures in various software applications 
and for rran&mining them between PCs and 
such peripheral devices as printers or scan- 
ners. 

Intel, the world's largest chipmaker. is 
involved in several initiatives to broaden the 
uses of the personal computer to create in- 
creased demand for the machines. Intel's 
chips are found in 85 percent of the world's 
PCs. 

Hewlett-Packard, the world's second- 
largest computer maker, is the leading maker 
of printers. It also makes scanners and cam- 
eras. 


Reports Fail 
To Lift Stocks 


<',wyiln//K<tar lu}lhm H l\q malm 

NEW YORK — Stock and bond 
prices fell Tuesday after a strong in- 
dustrial production report offset a tame 
consumer prices report, reigniting fears 
of inflation and high interest rates. 

A higher- thon-ex pec led 0.4 percent 
rise in May industrial output at factories, 
mines, and utilities was paced by strong 
demand for computers, a rebound in auto 
production and gains in output of com- 
mercial aircraft and coal mined for elec- 
tric utilities. Federal Reserve figures 
showed. That followed a 0.3 percent 
increase a month earlier and was the 1 0th 
consecutive monthly rise in production. 

Meanwhile, the consumer price index 
rose just 0.1 percent last month, identical 
to April's increase. Labor Department 
figures showed. 

See ECONOMY, Page 14 


. t , j-.Ji - t - V - / 


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t\ 


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te! 




{How to Pitch Business in Silicon Alley 


By David W. Chen 

Near fort Times Sen-icc 

W -y EW YORK — Robot Gal- 
|V I insky and Janice Erlbaum of 
I XI Pseudo Programs Inc. chose to 
L ^ dress . up as auctioneer, 
smiling through the audience in a man- 
pier reminiscent of the Broadway play 
'“Cats” as they pitched their idea of 
| establishing an on-line auction house, 
puis Bryant of T3 Media Inc. was more 
sedate but got more attention from the six 
panelists and the standing-room-only 
crowd in a loft in lower Manhattan as he 
described his company’s plans to provide 
a live Webcast of the Mars Pathfinder 
landing cm the Fourth of July. 

And Eric Bryan Slavin and Elaine 
3ood of Televerse Inc. decided to ex- 
change jhe kind of canned, - choreo- 
graphed banter usually reserved for 
msts of a Miss America pageant as they 
Promoted their Internet game, which 
ncourages girls to be runway models 
>y chooring their own bodies and ward- 
obes (Want to be 5 feet 8 inches? Wear 
ighr skirts?). “This," Mr. Slavin said, 
‘is what young girls aspire to be.” 

For a moment, all were silent. Then, 
onathan Thuriper, head of digital me- 
lia at the William Morris Agency, said, 
‘Is this for real?" 

He was referring to the game Model 
I. but he might as well have been 
uestioning the entire proceedings in 


which nine New Yoik-area Internet 
companies got a chance to make a busi- 
ness pitch, seeking financing and val- 
idation in just six minutes each. 

The forum,, called “Ready, Set, 
Pitch!” and held in 'lower Manhattan 
last week, had the sheen of nonreality, 
of virtual-reality reality, because it 
yanked what is normally -an intensely 
private and proprietary affair out from 
behind closed doors and put it on a stage 
for a curious. note-taking public. 

It was part of a daylong conference 
called Meet the Alley sponsored by the 
. International Radio and Television So- 
ciety Foundation, a nonprofit organi- 
zation focusing on educational pro- 
grams about electronic media, ana the 
Sil icon Alley Reporter, a magazine cov- 
ering New York’s new-media industry. 
Silicon Alley refers to the hundreds of 
multimedia companies staffed by cre- 
ative people in lows' Manhattan. 

Such conferences are contrapuntal 
moments in the rhythm of life among 
Silicon Alley companies, times when a 
more sober reality is overlaid on the 
quest for electronic coolness that pre- 
occupies this predominantly young and 
hip culture. In these settings, the ex- 
uberance over a deft bit of Javascripting 
must coexist with a focused discussion 
of profit margins and business plans. 

But the conferences are also public 
affairs, while business plans are usually 
a very proprietary matter. So last week's 


gathering, advertised as being about en- j 
trepreneurship, left the presenters both 
excited "and confused as to who the real 
audience was and what land of impact 
they could realistically make. 

4 "This is a great opportunity. but you 
don’t want to tip your hand too much to , 
the competition,” said Andy Howarih. 
president of Snickelways Interactive; 
who proposed an Internet site that 
would be an opinionated catalogue of 
international world Wide Web sites. 
“I’m holding back some key ingredi- 
ents, for sure.” 

Venture capitalists, of course, are used 
to evaluating talent Last month, the New 
York New Media Association sponsored 
a conference in which start-up companies 
had the opportunity to make their pitches _ 
to venture capitalists. And next month, " 
city officials are organizing a similar 
endeavor, on an even bigger scale. 

Those events, however, are much 
more formal and thorough in nature than 
last week’s. The “Ready. Set. Pitch!” 
forum, by contrast, had the feel of an 
abbreviated Broadway production. 

. Those taking part included Mr. 
Tnunper as well as Lara Stein, manager 
of creative development at Microsoft 
Multimedia Productions; Jerry 
Colonna. managing partner of Flatiron 
Partners; Paul DeBenedittis. director of 
program acquisitions at USA Networks, 
and Man Rothman, senior vice pres- 
ident at Sony Online Ventures. 


CURRENCY & I 




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c RcpiUii- Notima] Hanbo? iqyh 







PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18. 1997 


THE AMERICAS 




30-Year T-Bond Yfefd 


\^/ jiu/H ; 


Pensioners Scold 
Corporate Boards 


Ship Line Deal: Dominance at Sea? 




Nnv York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — The 
California Public Employ- 
ees Retirement System has 


released a blueprint de- 
scribing what it thinks are 
basic requirements for die 
structure of corporate 
boards. 

Caipers, the nation’s 
largest public pension fund, 
suggested, among other 
things, that independent di- 
rectors make up a majority 
of a board, that boards ap- 
point a director to balance 
the power of a chief ex- 
ecutive who is also chair- 
man and that directors re- 
ceive only cash or stock as 
compensation, but no extra 
benefits like retirement 
plans. 

It also suggested more 
stringent guidelines that it 
called “ideals.” For ex- 
ample. retiring chief exec- 
utives would not be al- 
lowed to serve as directors, 
the chief executive would 


J f m A M J 
1997 


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1997 






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Very brief ys 

Clinton Unveils Initiative for Africa 


be the only company em- 
ployee who is a director and 
the chairman would be an 
independent director. 

Although Caipers re- 
leased the list Monday 
morning, its own board 
stopped short of approving 
it, apparently because of 
disagreement over two sug- 
gestions — that directors 
no longer be considered in- 
dependent after 10 years on 
a board, and that ho more 
than lOpercent of a board's 
directors be older than 70. 

A Caipers spokesman 
said the guidelines were 
likely to be adopted later 
this summer once differ- 
ences over those two issues 
were resolved. 

With $113 billion in as- 
sets. the organization is the 
nation's largest and most 
prominent player in the 
shareholder-rights move- 
ment And it knows how to 
apply public pressure to 
support its causes. • 


C.iupdnltn Ob iufFr.w Dor 

MIAMI — Royal Caribbean Inter- 
national said Tuesday that it had agreed 
to buy Celebrity Cruise Lines Inc. in a 
SI. 3 billion deal designed to help the 
combined company attract more cus- 
tomers while cutting costs. 

The result will be a fleet of 20 cruise 
ships, totaling over 38,000 benhs by 
2000. The company will challenge Car- 
nival Cruise lines for leadership of the 
vacation cruise business. 

Royal Caribbean said it would pay 
$230 million in cash and issue 7.4 mil- 
lion shares of its stock in exchange for all 
of the stock of Celebrity. Royal Carib- 
bean will also assume about 5800 mil- 
lion of Celebrity debt. 

Royal Caribbean said it intended to 
maintain Celebrity as a separate brand. 

“Together, the two brands will enable 
us to deploy vessels and attract cus- 
tomers on an increasingly global basis, 
as well as provide opportunities to 


achieve greater economies of scale.” 
said Richard Fain. Royal Caribbean's 
chairman and chief executive. 

Mr. Fain said that John Chondris 
would stay on as chairman of Celebrity 
“for the time being.” 

Celebrity sails to Alaska, Bermuda, 
the Caribbean and the Panama Canal. 
Rovai Caribbean offers destinations in 
Alaska, the Bahamas. Bermuda, the 
Caribbean, Europe, the Far East, 
Hawaii. Mexico, the Panama Canal. 
Russia and Scandinavia. 

About 5 million vacationers are ex- 
pected to book cruises this year, up from 
4.b5 million last year and 4.3S million in 
1995. according' to the industry' group 
Cruise Lines International Association. 

Jim Winchester, an analyst at Lazard 
Freres &. Co., said Royal Caribbean was 
buying a “fixer-upper” that had built 
brand recognition but did not have 
enough ships to cover its operating costs. 
But he did say that Royal Caribbean had 


paid a fair price for Celebrity. 

Celebrity is a joint venting w 
Chandris Group and Overseas Sfa. 
buildina Inc. The cruise ship bus^g 
didn't Tit into their industrial shiprog 
business. Mr. Winchester said. ^ 
. Peter McMvUm. an analyst at Sonfc. 
east Research Partners, said the purchase 
would give Royal Caribbean "an op. 
ponunity to develop different routes *£i 
a different bnujd.” 

Mr. McMullm said Celebrity's rev. 


Ur«P*«y. 

La o«n 




•t'SWr.jiWW 


by Royal Caribbean in 1996. 

The acquisition is expected to dfcfe 
Royal Caribbean’s earnings in 1998 bn 
add to earnings in the following yean 
the company said. Zt may also issue more 
stock to keep the value of the nandrtx 
portion of the transaction at $500 mil- 
lion. Royal Caribbean's shares ruse 
S2.25 to close ar $39,125. 

(Reuters. AP. Bloomberg 


ECONOMY: Stocks Decline as Reports Fail to Lift the Market 


Continued from Page 13 


WASHINGTON ( AP) — President Bill Clinton presented a 
package of proposals Friday aimed at promoting growth in 
sub-Saharan Africa through trade and investment incentives. 

The trade initiative would allow the poorest countries in 
Africa to receive duty-free access to U.S. markets for 1,800 
products and would be applied to "African countries that are 
undertaking concerted reforms to open and liberalize their 
economies.” according to a White House summary. 


Dollar Drifts Lower 


New York Retailer to Close 4 Stores 


NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Barney’s Inc. said it would 
shut four of its 13 stores as pan of a plan to save $10 million. 

The New York-based retailer said it would shut its flagship 
1 7th Street store in Manhattan, as well as ones in Houston, 
Dallas and Troy, Michigan. 

Barney's sought Chapter 1 1 protection from creditors in 
January 1996 after failing to agree with Isetan Co. on how to 
repay its $600 million debt to the Japanese company. 


FedEx Fined Over Maintenance 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — Federal Express Corp. 
must pay $187,500 in fines for failing to keep complete 
maintenance records for 21 aircraft, the Federal Aviation 
Administration said Tuesday. 

The agency said FedEx was required to use a computerized 
system to keep track of flight times, takeoffs and landings and 
the dates of scheduled maintenance of its aircraft engines. 

• General Motors Corp. and the United Auto Workers 
reached tentative agreement on a new contract at a key parts 
plant near Milwaukee, averting a threatened strike. 

• Eastman Kodak Co. has dismissed J. Walter Thompson 

Co. in New York and consolidated all consumer photography 
advertising accounts, with annual spending estimated at $300 
million, ai Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide. ap. SYT 


Bioomhera News 

NEW Y ORK — The dollar 
was slightly lower against the 
yen and Deutsche mark Tues- 
day ahead of trade reports 
from Japan and the United 
States and the summit meeting 
of the Group of Seven leading 
industrial nations this week. 

“The dollar is on hold be- 
fore the trade reports and the 
G-7 meeting,” said Richard 
Gilhooly, global market 
strategist for Paribas Capital 
Markets. 

The dollar was quoted at 
1.7303 DM in 4 P.M. trading, 
down from 1.7315 DM on 
Monday, and at 1 13.315 yen, 
down from 1 13.400 yen. 

The dollar eased against 
the yen on speculation the 
United States would make 
trade a major issue at the eco- 
nomic summit talks. Japan's 
trade report .will be released 


Secretary Robert Rubin and 
President Bill Clinton, re- 
peatedly warned that Japan 
should rely on domestic de- 
mand rather than exports to 
pull its economy out of a five- 
year slowdown. 

Dan Tarullo, Mr. Clinton’s 
special assistant for intema- 


“This is just spectacular informa- 
tion.” said Nick Pema, chief economist 
at Fleer Financial Group in Hartford. 
Connecticut. “Even the 12 -month 
change in consumer prices is getting 
smaller and smaller.” 

But bonds took their cue from the 
industrial production report, which 
sparked concerns that interest rates 
could head higher. 

The benchmark 30-year U.S. Treasury 
bond fell 8/32 to 98 26^2, taking the yield 
up to 6.72 percent from 6.69 percent 

“The market tends to go in these 
surges where you have very powerful 
progressions in stock prices and then you 
get a little period of consolidation,” said 


Ben Hock, director of research at John 
Hancock Funds. The bond market's 
slump is ‘ ‘putting a little pressure on die 
equity maiket.” 

The Dow Jones industrial average 
was 11.31 points lower at 7.760.78. The 


US. STOCKS 


Standard & Poor's 500-stock index 
rose 0.52 points to 894.42, and the Nas- 
daq Composite Index gained 11.16 to 
1.443.11. 

Strength in technology issues helped 
stem the decline. Computer issues were 
particularly strong amid expectations 
that second-quarter earnings will exceed 
estimates. 

Database software maker Oracle rose 


15/16 to 5314 in anticipation of the com- 
pany’s fourth -quarter earnings, which 
were announced after the market closed. 
Oracle said net income rose 35 percent, 
to 5360 million as sales rose 33 percent. 

Intel gained 2 7/16 to 149 1 1/16. Stai 
Microsystems rose 1 5/16 to 36 1 1/16. in 
reaction to a strong third -quarter earn- 
ings report from Micron Technology. 
The results were the latest evidence that 
U.S. companies have reaped greater 
profits in an environment of benign in- 
flation and low interest rates. 

Oil shares fell on concern that prices 
are higher than justified by prospects for 
future profits. 

Royal Dutch Petroleum fell 3% to 205 
7 /b. Chevron fell Y s to 76V5 and Texaco 
declined Vk to 1 W/i. (Bhmmberq. AP\ 


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FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


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Wednesday, followed by U.S. 
statistics Thursday. 


statistics Thursday. 

Many analysts expect the 
Japanese and U.S. reports will 
show that the trade imbalance 
continues to grow. Top U.S. 
officials, including Treasury 


tional economics, said he did 
not expect G-7 leaders to 
spend much time talking 
about currencies. 

The dollar was also at 
1.4445 Swiss francs, up from 
1 .4425 francs, and at 5-8367 
French francs, up from 5 .8340 
francs. But the pound rose to 
$1.6393 from $1.6366. 

The dollar rose against 
some European currencies 
after comments from French 
officials about EU criteria for 
monetary union led to con- 
cerns the euro would be weak. 
Finance Minister Dominique 
Strauss- Kahn said countries 
joining the euro did not have to 
meet the strictest interpreta- 
tion of the economic criteria. 


Tuesday's 4 P.M. dose 

The top 300 most active shares 
up to the dosing on Wall Street. 

The Associated Press 


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,1“ ri r * 

IT-, .■* 

•J?* ■** 


1IU lit* 

I-* ». 


. ft 1 : 


1-. IV* 

»4 TV. 


7I7J OH 

IS* 17. 

M ,r- 

114 171. 

§ 

m c. 


V-i It 

ir* in 


4 1 jN. J, 

5 

J7 1 ! 3T ■ 


1 h* »" 

Si 4‘t 

I! a 

ir* !?:» 


•’-=* 

-A' rJfr'SSTt % 1 

‘ WvT»:.v - . 

?' Vrr. 

I?- *.«A 

- 4 . 

AV-.; T-- w;/ ip9ii 
'jAn' 

K -rxrfrir. ***-7 '.Sr 

:> «&»•'■ 

V ■? -. lyr-^ 

•->. kz 

■Y=ytt *■-_£ .I,.. 

t-R.iui# :*U K-.-'. 


ip f. 

It 


- TV' 

- ’ Wrr*i 

■ . '■aW . .1 


IP* 1*?. i, 

J* 

Y, l-» 
iS: Wt -U 


X MARKET* 


4,4* 


ft IS 

2 Jit -V. 


June 17, 1997 


High turn LatKl Ch^e OpM 


coun icflon 

'000 bu mrtmum- com, pn tMnhvi 


tel 97 

270 1 : 

758V, 

270'/. 

+ 1U 

18.701 

Sep 97 

53 

250'/+ 

257 V, 


41 577 

Pec 97 

749 

2461* 

MV 

r<6 

120.038 

Mar *8 

JSSVi 

753k 

2SVV 


14*57 

MWN 

2MM.+ 

258k 

260 


2533 

tel ?8 

363V. 

Ulk 

263'/. 

♦ V. 

3573 

5ep« 



254 

♦ 1 

I0J 



High 

Low 

Latest Chge 

0 

1 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTN) 



15*90 Oft. - cents per ■>. 




tel 97 

Tins 

7S3> 

75.90 

-895 

15.971 

5ep97 

SOLID 

78*0 

78AS 

—0.75 

18820 

NOU97 

82.10 

*1-25 

81-25 

—1-00 

4*85 

Jan 98 

8*25 

8175 

0.75 

-0*5 

1439 

Est. sores NA 

Man’s, sates 

2.232 


Man's acen int 

3*972 

up S75 




High Low Latest Oige OpLnl 


High Low Latest Clige OpW 


GERMAN GOV. BUND (UFFE1 
DM2SaOOO - pis oMOOgd 
S*pV7 1014* 101 JJ 1*132 -0.24 ».1W» 
Dec 97 100.95 10042 10037 -039 1.901 

Ed.sdev 214.205 Prev sales; 144401 
Pict. open lot - 2S&090 all &20* 


Sep 9* 94.13 940* 94,2 .007 19.188 

94.13 9409 9413 -007 4830 

EM iotev SL805 Pre*. sales: S7J77 
Pie*, open nl ■ 3447*4 up 17.773 


i, £ 

•t •» •>* 

fi »v, 

7 7 J* 

n. i». 

u D». *J, 

2*‘t 1H -it 

IV* 2V» -i, 

ir>t iiu 

i o* 

2SU Jl* -U 


Bh sl 

a ?: 

V, 4>* 

H 14 
Hi i it 
T, 
5^» 9t 
F. S 
’ P, 
31 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


S; * 

14a -b 


Indexes 


Dow Jones 

Op** Nip L*w uat a*. 

ran 77S2.il rrasa 77037 * 7740 . 7 * -iiji 

Tbbis 271849 273441 2711S4 2727S4 .538 

L7BJ E4JB 225J* 22316 22110 .047 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


• - -j,**".- 


CMP 2372.13 238459 234144 2370.91 .024 


Esi sofa NA Moo’s sdes 4EJ554 
Moo-sooefirt 7.773440 up 2000009 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

100 im,- ttilm m ion 
JUI97 com 274.20 27170 -U0 

Aug 97 2S470 »L70 25450 *2.60 

5eo97 235.90 232.00 HS.90 *2S0 

0097 724 00 271 JD 22400 - 2.10 

Dec 97 21751 71450 3470 *290 

Jon« 21450 211 50 21400 *250 

E'J Wi NA Man’s, sola 20J38 
Mon-sopwian I125HI up JQ 


GOLD CNCMX] 
IDO Ira* at.- doll 
Jin 97 34L10 
JlH»7 

Aug 97 34480 
OCJ97 347. HI 
Dec 97 38950 
F907B 15200 
Aer98 

Jun « 35800 
Ain 98 

Ea. sales NA 
Mon's openin' 


anpcmtH. 

341 JO 34150 —1.10 
34250 -1.10 
34130 343JQ -1.10 
34410 34420 — 1.10 
34850 34050 -1.10 
LSI 40 35150 -150 
35350 -150 
15440 35440 — 0.90 
3»J0 —0.90 
/Man’s «*es 9.344 
145474 up SR 


10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1F) 
FF900000 pfSollOOpd 
Sap 97 12*48 13*7* 12894—02* 704814 

Dec 97 98.1* 9B1« 9754-03* 1575 
Mar 98 9016 9016 9754*9756 0 

EsLsdes: 134101. 

Open mu 230759 up 3571. 


Industrials 


Standard & Poors 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND CUFF El 
7TL 200 milian - ptsal 100 xl 
S«P 97 13267 13214 ,3258 .040 84213 

Dec 97 NT. N.T 10443 *055 300 

EsLsntes *3.433. Pre*.»ta»: 517*0 
Pm.opwimL: 84513 up 0601 


EURODOLLARS (OMBI) 
s, mtNmmsi IQOccr 
Ma-CO 9351 9135 9139 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 
M.OIXI lbs- enws per lb 


JulW 

2131 

TIM 

7124 

+8D 

37439 

Aug 97 

23 50 

73 J7 

2144 

+809 

30.117 

Sen 97 

216* 

ZLSS 

2163 

-OJB 

7.765 

00 97 

23 JD 

23*8 

23 77 

*8W 

11.938 

Dec 77 

24 05 

2179 

ZL99 

-OJW 

71*30 

Jon 98 

24JO 

7*08 

2*13 

+818 

1.637 


Esi sales NA MoiTv soles 9,949 
Man's open uH I CO. 5(0 up 65 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

S7M0 au nmnum- am par buslwl 

A497 854 815V: 853 *14«i 54449 

Aug 97 755 771 714 -10S, MA99 

Sep?.' 708 4* 706 W •« 10026 

No* 97 676 664’h 67311 -711 54J33 

Jan ?8 677 670 675'/: -8 7JM 

Es! sales NA Mon's, sales 45 . 6 I 6 
Man's open int 191.977 up I6S7 


HI GRADE COPPER (NOMA) 

24000 lbs.- cents nor m. 

Jun 97 171.10 119.90 121.10 -090 

Jul 97 12110 119.90 I21J0 —1.00 

Aug 97 119.90 11850 119.90 -050 

Sec 97 119.90 11750 11950 -030 

Od97 ,1490 11600 11490 -060 

No*97 1ISJD -450 

Dec 97 114.10 11250 114.10 -040 

Jan 98 11150 -0.40 

Feb 98 UOlO -445 

Esi. sates NA Mon'isc fes 4.216 
Man's open*!, 5*493 as 149 


JundO 93J7 93JI 9135 
Sep 00 9133 9127 9131 


Dec 00 9126 9X21 9174 
Mar()l 9126 9330 9134 


Jun 01 9123 9116 9130 
Sap 01 9116 9113 9116 


Dec 01 9X10 9106 9109 

MorQ7 9112 *L06 9109 


Am 02 9308 9102 9105 
5ep(B 9102 ?101 9102 


Ora02 9195 9193 9195 

ESI. soles NA Man's, sales 
Mon's open W 75*1421 up 


-0.01 S9J03 
—481. 43.743 
-041 38.721 
-041 31,148 
-401 79,55* 
— 001 74450 
-407 16.931 
-402 13582 
-4.02 12,713 
-402 7.155 
-402 6.114 

-402 6.919 

407581 . 

15526 


COTTON J(NCTN) 

SD.OOD tov- owns per b. 

JUI97 7195 71H 7166 *042 

OQ9I 7545 7440 7450 *050 

Dec 97 7550 7535 7554 *041 

Mot ft 7657 7454 7630 *053 

Mov98 77.18 7745 77.1* *051 

Esl soles NA Man’s, sales 2B.941 
Man's open rt 71532 off 2272 

HEATING OR. (NMER) 

47.000 gd. canH era ool 
All 97 S110 51.95 5145 *151 

AW 97 5L4S 52AJ 5X89 *053 

Sen 97 54.10 S150 5174 * 0.48 

DC 97 HA5 54.45 54.64 *048 

NO* 97 5555 5535 SS49 *a43 

Dec 97 5640 56.15 5129 *aj| 

Esl. sales NA Mon's, saes 72 . 1/4 
Mon's aoen Inf 144J9* up 510 




l teNwW ms 
Trortsp. 
umotes 
R nance 
5P500 

SP too 


Wgb law do** 4 PAL 

1D53.12104&53105130 10S139 
633J71 62645 62B45 630A0 
197J2S 196.13 19641 197.11 
10270 102.05 10270 10257 
895.17 89IJ71 893.90 89442 
87257 867.96 87237 87288 


VM. Ml** 
1B7354 15»» 
79394 7&»i 
7155* J6*r 
7153) 22te 
71458 . 42 'j 
68999 
59133 2H 
5470J 109*1 
50563 33*g 
49097 3#V> 

33 U5 

77 


134. 15*4 
.Me. ifc't 
33'1 341 
20*4 Ste 
SOU 41 Y 

45*1 46*7 

7*! 2M 
105*1 109*1 
311* 33*. 


'K 

I V !»W. ( 6, 4. 
A * - .4UK 


.i» r.. 

St Nl *T 


. r_S* sm. 

• .h j r 


33 33>. 
anti 71 
•9 90*1 


•> .!»»••. b 

> r-e W- i;.i . 


Nasdaq 


UGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMBI) 
lAOObU - 00 tort par btt. 

All 97 1947 19JI 19.17 +116 46J76 

Aup97 1?A2 1921 19J0 *11J 85222 

Sep 97 19A7 I9J0 - 1943 *aiS 36.797 

OdW 1923 WAS 1922 +115 2SJB7 

NO* 97 19.78 1926 1940 +1M I7J*1 

Dec ?7 19.79 19.51 1942 *110 38200 

Ed. sates NA MorTvsitts 73,101 
Man’s epen int TO. 985 oft 1312 


^ ^^pircmi i s i jrig 

| * rf rifa j|«ai ' •••. •’ *v " V •* t\- 4 V .«* * ■ 'V. 'S 

|OUrsubsidiary SKW:)s 


46*29 46126 46*09 
59148 58393 58149 
41*44 41143 41*20 
38527 2*3.06 284A5 
42842 4Z4JD 43726 


Nasdaq 


MM Low Lot 
144448 143*57 V443.ll 
11*49 1,4920 115174 


•frig to shape 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

5.000 mornun. cent* per Due*) 

Jul 97 3u 343 34316 *1 34229 

Sep 97 3549; 34854 352’.. -U6 24.926 

Dec 97 366 J67 v , 364 - ft 71439 

Mar 98 170 347 368 -1 2.613 

Es, sates NA Mars. soles 33216 
Man's OMIlnl 8i’69 off 1319 


SILVER (NCMX) 

SbO trow *L- tan per how nt. 

Jim 87 47540 *750 2 

Jul 97 48150 46100 47630 , 7.50 44JW 

Sep 97 48500 47100 TO9U *7.50 18235 
Dec 97 «L50 Stm 48740 +7.60 8451 
Am?8 48920 *740 17 

Mar 91 49520 49100 49440 + 740 8298 

MOV *8 49100 *7.70 221? 

A498 50X00 * 720 2.916 

Est.&n NA Man's, sotes 9,896 
Alan's open nr 90241 up 1199 


BRITISH POUND (CMBU 
pauMS. S per pound 
Sep 97 14370 14296 14356 
Dec 77 14318 

Mar 98 16287 

Esi. sales NA Man's. sAes *579 
Man’s open tel 54.19* oB 516 


NATURAL GAS (NMER) 
lajKBmmbftj'S'lDernvnbtu 


Livestock 


PLATINUM (NMER) 

SO tnrr oi.- doaan par wow 01 
JUI97 422J30 40840 411.10 -1Z30 18445 

0097 «S20 M20 39910 -*80 6.964 

An 96 19520 39110 39110 -600 1.569 

Esi.scOes NA Men’s, sdes 5238 
Men's open M 19,103 cm rts 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

IIRUM0 dailm. S per Con. dir 
Am 97 J117 7202 .7206 

Sep 97 7269 7247 7260 

Dec 97 7307 3292 7304 

Ed. soles NA Man's, scies 13206 
Man's open W 6*365 up 1649 


2.175 

2.13S 

2.IS 

29,193 

2.180 

1145 

2.145 

38*0? 

1175 

114S 

2140 

18372 

2.175 

2.155 

2t70 

HU 35 

1305 

2295 

2K0 

9,157 

1450 

2*35 

2*45 

12AM 

2490 

2*75 

2*85 

1X742 


VI AG. Creating enduring value. 


1617.16 1601-33 161*41 
1879 40 18693 187979 
94928 941.93 94721 


viol High 
113*48fa 
113329 31 
110648 60*1 

isss 1 ia?* 

J0939 68<S* 
14674 4|lb 
81378 170 It 
73415 53te 
noas Z3 
65840 ,340* 
65782 3M 
59991 M 
39121 431* 
58575 691* 
46865 73 


•u "t 
29* 31 

5tet SBtk 
146*71498* 
66*4 

46k 47k 
115k ,78*1 
51N SYt 


130<tl34«k 
391 
51 569* 
41 4T«k 
64k 68 

I9H 211* 


■ -w' 

■'w *1 -fa. 

“rhL ’ 




■»* 

•••tv ~r- 


9 — 

- - r. 

-t: 

■ • “ 7J5T 

r 

*:-r* 

. • - .e_ 

-ire.- : .rc K 



.-.a: »te 


- 

•+ (' "TT-C. 



:~r 

jy 

• - 

sir- s+>.- 

-.'I 

• t 

v - ii n:‘4 

r« 

-■ 

•». V. ■ » 

rt « 

• . 

----- - v 


- 

-;-l St: 



HrKT.k. 


61825 *1*78 63546 .131 


Dow Jones Bond 


Voc Hk* Urm Lap O* 

33246 6V- 5ft 5*k -k" 

Wk. B8*» 89k _ 

7783 5 4°k 411 +W 


7783 5 4°k 411 +W 

7687 U» •>» I -« 

75+* m iv* 1*1 


20 Bonds 
lOUlWtes 
lOindusMols 


1MJ17 +031 

loaia +0.07 

105.96 +025 


5937 9k ... _ 

55 is « me n*» +9* 

5551 7*1. 2k 17* *1 

5379 35+, I2k 3J*k -»» 

4WJ 35V. is** JS** +W 


— »■ 

■ rt-w* ’ 9 : 
-i.rrr 


* c.« *T4 


Man's ram H 199774 up mi' 


VNLEADS)6A50LME (NMER) 
42A0QOC* ceres praaol 


CATTLE (CMER) 

40.000 tbs.- cans per 1b 

Jun 97 6£«> 6SJ2 6522 -027 5.999 

Aug 97 6523 6452 6*10 -0.07 43.373 

Od?7 67.72 67.15 67J5 -1107 23219 
D«97 70:67 70.12 7135 -410 12J49 
Fen 98 7120 71.05 71.07 -0.05 6,22 

Apr 98 7130 72.95 TJ 10 -0 15 2288 

Eg. sales 17271 Man's scPes 17283 
Mafsapenint 9*476 OH 1973 


Oose 

LONDON METALS (LME3 
Dalian per me Me ton 
Ateateen fflU Grade) 


GB1MAN MARX (CMER} 

1 1*000 marks, s per Irak 

Sep 97 2821 2791 2809 

Dec 97 2847 2836 2847 
M»90 2886 

Esi. soles NA Mon’s, setas 31.765 
Man’s Open W 91,957 OH 14487 


SBJK 

SMB 

♦ 0*5 

30*231 

5* 

S7*4 

♦0.49 

25-367 

56JM 

57JJ9 


6*34 

55*5 

S579 

+0*4 

*151 

55.19 

S5.I9 

+ 0J9 

2124 

44JV 

5*79 

+831 

*821 


5*77 

+832 

2*42 

5582 

5502 

+832 



Fax +49 -89 -12 54-44 91 


MMKMM Grade) 

SpOl 15000 1553.00 ISSclOO 
Fanxed 1579k 158000 158300 
Copper Catbortes [High Grade) 

Soul -64*00 2671X0 267700 
Fbnmrt 3501.00 2582 00 2587.00 


JAPAIBE YEN (CMER) 

122 mu Ion van. I per 100 van 
Sep 97 J967 J91I 2937 

Dec 97 9055 -9032 3055 

MCT98 9173 

Esi.idas NA Mari’* sates 3X040 
Man's (**n lit 1X353 oH 648 


Ete.soies NA won'* soles ifj93 
Mon's open mt 79246 on 627 


/I AC 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMBU 
SO .000 itn - 4*«s per fc. 

Aw 97 79.15 7BJ2 7141 -0.12 10.197 


60900 6I0J» *1(100 
622 M 42320 62300. 


Sen 9? 

7870 

7810 

7822 

-812 

2*H 

Oa?7 

7870 

73.30 

7835 

-807 

3*04 

Nav47 

79 70 

79 JO 

19.40 

+835 

2J84 

Jan M 

79"5 

7940 

79 75 

-0.1S 

444 

Mot 98 

79.05 

7885 

7895 

+8IS 

172 


Esi. tales 2284 Man's, sotes 3.157 
Man's am <ni 1921 J up B2 


Spa) TOJWJO THUMB 7)60* 
Fanwrd 718000 7140 * 7270* 

n* 

Spa 5510* 5520* 5510* 
Fonotnd 5560* 5565* 5550* 
Zmc (Spedni MNIi Grade) 

Spot 1346W5 1347* 1347V; 

ForwdRl 1368* 1369* 1370* 


SWISS FRANC (CMBI) 

11S.0QS tm*. S p*r Irene 
Sep 97 7020 *963 *991 

Dec 97 J070 JOB J067 
Mor?S 7U5 

Est. sates NA Man’s, sates 11.514 
Man’s apei int 48*0 ail 1082 


GASOIL (IPO 

UA ddlas per meMc fern Ms a 1 * fan 

Ji697 164 50 16220 16175 »5JX) 19,939 

Aug 97 166* 164* 16520 +1.75 11*1 

Sep 97 168.* 16620 16720 +120 &83I 

00*7 170-25 165.75 170* +1.25 *533 

Nw97 172* 170JS 171 75 +125 1319 

Ora 97 17320 17220 I73L2S *1J5 9.1* 

Jon 98 17*75 17320 17*25 +1.25 Vm 

Feb 98 174* 173* 17175 +1.50 410 

Est soles: 11834 Prev. solas: 11321 
Ptev. apm InL- 61332 up 617 


HOGS -Lean iCMEHl 
40 0 * lbs ■ calls oer ii 

Jul47 82 00 11.20 81.92 +1.K 9.721 

Aug 97 79 os 7835 7900 +1* 10*51 

Od 97 71.70 7392 71*5 + 0.70 6*77 

ora 1 97 «.ia 47J77 «BJK +HO 2-8J2 

Fee 98 6670 6600 6625 *067 1.711 

Esi. sain 7.512 Mm’s, sotes 7*28 
Man's ooen ini 37*40 off 243 


High Law Close Chge Oplnl 


MEXICAN PESO (CMER1 
500*00 oesov S per peso 
SeoW .12150 17085 .12115 

Ora 97 .11712 11660 .11712 

Mar 98 .113* 11790 . 113 * 

Es. soles NA Man’s. sOes *757 
Man's open M 40.IJ9 up 1151 


PORK BB. LIES (CMERI 

40 000W, -<*nrs 0 Wlb 

Jul97 81.70 792S 1122 -2J2 174J 

A.J997 81.90 OB* 81.72 -1.** 2r55J 

Peb98 74 70 7205 7150 -420 f* 

6y sates J* 99 Mon's sates 1116 
Mon's open ini *230 off 769 


COCOA (NCSEI 

10 mt+TpC rant- 1 jwr Iwi 


Jul?7 

■620 

1553 

>584 

-3 

1.795 

Sep 97 

1455 

1598 

1625 

—i 

37187 

D«W 

l«4 

IM) 

1641 

-1 

19.984 

Mar 96 

1710 

146? 

1692 

-4 

22*90 

MOV 96 



1712 

s 

I.7S7 

JU98 

1735 

1732 

1732 

-8 

S75 


Man's Open ml 9643* «« S70 


COFFEE C(NGSE) 

- ci-wtiw-iD 

JU97 211 5D 19500 306.70 - Ii20 

5ep«7 19*00 18160 19070 -9.10 

Dec 97 168.70 161 « 168.79 -150 

Mar 98 157 70 152* 157.70 - 720 
Mav 98 153 70 1*8.50 1S170 *7.30 
Es? sates N.A Mon's sates 8JW 
Mon s men int 21.614 oH 302 

SUGAR-WORLD II (NCSE) 

1 1 7.000 tos - sort! per Itx 
JiH97 11*0 11.34 UJ4 -402 

0097 I1J0 H.IB 1126 -007 

Wtar 98 1120 11j0* 11 20 -004 

MO» 98 ll.W 11* H.0" -Off) 

EG s«es na. Man's sates 71.253 
Man's aoen int 187.395 off 684 


US T. ULLS (CMER) 

Si mHtan- ptiat 100 pa. 

Jun 97 "ill 95JH 95 W —401 1 418 
S«3 97 9481 94 7B «*80 *847 

Dec 9? «*<7 - 0 X 0 2 fl 

Est. ydes NA Man's sates 97? 

Man's opan irt 9.91 i oH 362 

SYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 
Simx*BpAl-f*S&64Rts<)t 100 PCI 
Sep 97 106-32 106-10 106-20 -OS 20U04 
Dec 97 106-02 -os 1J40 

Est.s«*es NA Mon's sties 36.995 
Mon's open m 228213 fl« 2S16 

»YH. TREASURY (CBOT) 

11004* prn- prs & Buis <* '* Pd 
S»97 108-22 IG 8 -O 6 lOO’J* — M 315. 7W 

Dec 97 108-04 IP-27 108-03 -B 2.971 

Mar99 107-21 -05 9 

Eft sates N A Man's, sales 46 JB4 
Man's <®en lm 312.262 7963» 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 
•gKi-i,aojm«n&m'»atH»pai 

Jun97 112-20 111-M 112-07 -07 32.170 

Sep 97 m-W 111-R HI ® ~V> 4U.TRA 

Dra 9 / 1 1 1—75 IH-« 111-14 -07 26.138 

Mar* "»-* — SS, :JS * 

E st. sates NA Man's sates liUP 
Mot's own ml 472,184 ort 14132 

LIBOR 1 -MONTH (CMER) 

U miBon- ptsu* lOBfat. _ 

Ju|47 9*33 9*30 9132 — 0JR I8J80 

Aug 97 9*79 M76 «.» HAW 

Sep 97 9*23 9*2 J NJ3 —401 1*9 

Esl. Kies NA Man's v*?. KMU 
Man’s open err 41369 op 4962 


3-MONTH STERLING (LiFFE) 

CSOOMO -ptsu( 100 pd 
Am 97 91311 912" 91* UneK "»3* 

Sep 97 93.19 9115 9116 -402 124474 

Dec 97 93 03 "198 92.99 -403 112*1 

Mar 99 92.93 9289 9289 -403 67.384 

-ten "8 9285 9281 "282 -0© 4*757 

Sop W 9279 9277 9277 -4<B 32J93 

Dee 98 9277 9274 9274 -40 36*9 

Mar 99 93.75 9274 9274 -4* 24191 

Esi. sates: 49,698 Prev. idea. 4*757 
Prw open int.' 5*1493 up 153 

3-MDNTH EUROMARK (UFFE) 

DM1 rafflai -pltol 100 pd 

Jim 16160 

JUI97 46 85 9685 9685 -0.01 2727 

Aug 97 NT NT 9*85 Uncb. 441 

Sap 97 9683 9*81 9*83 Until 271420 

Dec "7 9474 96 71 9671 -0 02 16*543 

Mar 98 96*4 9640 9661 -O 82 233,951 

Junes 9648 9642 9*43-004 154243 
Sen 98 9615 9620 96 22 -4MB I J1 766 

Dec 98 9599 95.94 95 95 -OW 89^94 

Eu. sales 127.067 Pro*, sates- 10131 
Piev.ogen InL. 1846.389 up *448 


BRENT OIL (IPE1 

U8 dadurs per Parol -fats at 1,000 barren 
Aug 97 1132 1102 1108 +1123 78607 

Sop 97 1843 1819 1871 +618 7 1 .699 

on 97 >8-51 1833 1834 +0,15 11.484 

Hari) 1858 1840 1144 +010 8359 

Dec97 1868 1846 1850 -a 08 11376 

Jan98 1163 1152 1150 +008 6976 

Fab98 1860 1855 1848 +068 *511 

Mra98 NT NT. 1845 +068 1.783 

Elt. sates: 38341 . Pit*, sates :717« 

Pre*. open hL:1 4.734 aH 1,460 


Stock indexes 


S8PCOMP. INDEX (OMER) 

SOD s ted*, 

Jun 97 899.00 80*40 0<480 -005 19,577 
Sen 97 90830 89125 90*00 -0.15 QI491 
Dr 97 91U0 90100 91150 *300 1832 
Estates NA AtaYsscies 10IU27 
MaTsopenim 236.765 up 3«2 


CACGI WAT IF) 

FF200 per inda» paint 

Jim 97 28016 27310 27BS10 Unch 34719 

Jul"7 27915 2731 J 270.0 Undi 7+aoi 

A«g97 2rtlfi 37841 17910 Unch. 164 

Sep 97 781*5 2758,0 27985 Unch. 16299 

Dec 97 060 0.® 281 85 Unch. 722 

EsL Solas. 70.229 
Dp*n In,.: 6*871 off 1 15 


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FF5 mlfllon-pB at 100 pel 
Sep 97 9663 "655 9656 

Dec 97 9662 9*54 9*55 

Mores "654 "646 "647 
Jun9B 96 45 "637 9658 
Sep 98 9650 9623 «6& 

Dra98 9608 9601 9*01 - 
Mar 99 9S34 91 77 95.78 

jun 99 95 61 9557 9157 

Esl Met: 61914. 

Open Ini - 241^71 cfl 37561 


-003 6*779 
0.04 31648 
aai 30538 
0 04 2*746 
004 1L&34 

0-06 11782 
0.OJ 13318 
80* 7589 


FTSE 188 (UFFE) 

□SpertadnpaM 

Jun "7 47670 47380 46815 -6 " JO 4**18 
5«p97 4803.0 47910 47185 —655 38631 
Doc 97 48400 48405 4772.0 -660 1228 
Es>. rotes: 4*048 Piet, rates: 38835 
Prev. open teL 90477 up *410 


LONG GILT CL1FFE1 

CM. 000 - pH 8 32mfs <4 100 pd 

Jun 97 114 26 114-12 ,14-15 -O-ll 1.766 

5*p97 114-18 113-28 11*01 -0-11 16*77? 

Esi. sales. 48171 Prev sates: 34544 

Prev. open int 165.993 up 2,736 


3-MONTH EURO URA (UFFE! 

ITL 1 milian - pis of 100 pet 

Jun 61.725 

5ep"7 9143 9136 9338 +001 11*177 

D«97 9176 9169 9171 *801 66863 

Mar 98 93 97 919, 9193 ,002 -HOB 

JU198 94 09 9*03 9*06 +005 38895 


Commodity Indexes 

Gam Pmfera 
Meodr’3 158*10 T58S.70 


Reuters 1.99120 2,00230 

DJ. Future* 15*86 1S350 

CRB 24*90 34353 

Sources.' AWft Associated Press. London 
Inti finanaai Fotmes ExcStanga Inn . 
Petmbum Exchange. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 1997 


PAGE IS 


I 


ats 


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n»*fi uti.r-.-if 


iMoscow Threatens 


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on 


Against Oil Producer 


X-. CaBsArdlrfOwSkffFnmDtspartKs 

MOSCOW — The cash-strapped 
- *■■■. central government, determined to 
, j 1 ? squeeze overdue taxes out of cor- 
porate debtors, threatened Tuesday 
10 drive one of its biggest oil pro- 
0. ducers, Nizhnevartovskneftegaz, 

into bankruptcy. 

But the government accepted 
_ H plans by another big oil producer, 
.0. Noyabrekneftegaz, to issue millions 
of dollars of new shares to pay off its 
•„ debt, a spokesman for Finance Min- 
ister Anatoly Chubais said. 

> The two moves underscored the 
n. govemment’s determination to m ake 

^ companies pay their tax bills as Mos- 
pi cow prepared for. a second wave of 
' privatization in the oil sector. 

The government will begin bank- 

. 

* ■ ■ 

Israel Moves 
To Make Shekel 
•/> Convertible 

- . y. ' GxyiM ty Our Stjff Fma [Hsfurkn 

‘jj. CAESAREA, Israel — 
Prime Minister Benjamin Net- 
■ anyahu set a one-year goal 

> . Tuesday for liberalizing Is- 

rael’s foreign-currency market 
and struggled to end a feud over 
‘ k the issue between the Treasury 
1 and the central bank. 

Joseph Frenkel, the central 
bank's governor, has urged a 
rapid liberalization as well as a 
widening of the shekel’s trading 
bands against the dollar. Finance 
^ Minister Dan Meridor opposes a 
widening of die bands and has 
sought to slow liberalization. * 
The dollar fell to 3.4061 
shekels Tuesday from 3.4149 
shekels Monday. 

The next stage, Mr. Netan- 
yahu said, was “in fixing a 
timetable for the shekel to be- 
come fully convertible in world 
markets.” 

But Mr. Meridor said, “If we 
let die exchange rate drop and 
the currency strengthens, busi- 
I nesses will go broke.” 

( Reuters . Bloomberg ) 


niptey proceedings against Nizh- 
neyartovskneftegaz after turning 
down a bid by the major west Siberi- 
an oil producer to reschedule its tax 
debt, Mr. Chubais, who is also first 
deputy prime minister in charge of 
economic policy, said. 

But the decision by Mr. Chubais 
does not mean that Nizh- 
nevartovskneftegaz will be declared 
bankrupt, as Moscow has been re- 
luctant to liquidate companies. 

Earlier this year, Russian tax au- 
thorities targeted 90 companies for 
bankruptcy proceedings in a new 
drive to curtail the power of indus- 
trial lobbies and tackle a nationwide 
debt crisis. TTie 90 companies haH 
combined tax debts of more than 35 
trillion rubles ($6.08 billion). 

In its search for fresh revenue, 
Moscow will offer investors stakes 
in six large state-owned oil compa- 
nies beginning Thursday, an official 
said. 

The government, unable to pay 
millions of workers because of 
budgetary problems, hopes to raise 5 
trillion rubles through the sales. The 
government will sell stakes ranging 
from 45 percent to 51 percent in the 
six oil companies, Viktoria Vergel- 
skaya, spokeswoman for the State 
Property Committee, said. 

Russia is one of the world’s 
largest oil producers, but its output 
has fallen sharply in recent years, 
and the oil companies need private 
investment to modernize their op- 
erations. 

The government plans to offer the 
shares in AO Vostsibneftegaz, AO 
Vostochnaya Neftyanaya Kompan- 
iya (Eastern Oil Co.), AO SIB UR, 
AO Tyumenskaya Neftyanaya 
Kompaniya (Tyumen Oil Co.), AO 
Komitek and AO Norsi-Oil. 

Separately, the government has 
again postponed by one week bid- 
ding for a 25 percent stake in the 
telecommunications monopoly AO 
Svyazinvest, officials said. 

Terms for the sale were supposed 
to be announced by die government 
on June 10 but have been postponed 
twice. 

The government has set a min- 
imum bid of $1.18 billion for the 
stake, which is primarily earmarked 
for foreign investors. 

(AP. Reuters, AFP) 


EUROPE 




BSkyB Chief to Step Down 


CtMtpOrttvOrSkgFnxiDuftKrttri 

LONDON — British Sky 
Broadcasting Group PLC an- 
nounced Tuesday that Sam 
Chisholm would resign as chief 
executive of the satellite-televi- 
sion company at the end of the year 
for medical reasons. 

Mr. Chisholm, 57, who has held 
the post since September 1990, 
will be succeeded by Mark Booth, 
currently chief operating officer of 
Japan Sky Broadcasting Co., an- 
other venture formed by Rupert 
Murdoch's News Corp. Mr. 
Chisholm will remain a BSkyB 
director. 

“It is no secret that I am an 
asthma sufferer, and my doctors 
have advised me that 1 should not 
take ou the next stage of BSkyB’s 
development," Mr. Chisholm 
said. That next stage is to center on 
a move to 200-channel digital 
satellite broadcasting, which 
BSkyB plans to introduce early 
next year. 

Shares in BSkyB. Europe’s 
second-biggest satellite broad- 
caster after Canal Hus of France, 


closed 16 pence lower at 574 
($9.40). 

Mr. Chisholm's plan to step 
down should not weaken the bo 3rd 
or signal a change in strategic di- 
rection for the company, analysis 
said. 

BSkyB also said its deputy man- 
aging director, David Chance, 
would leave next year and would 
take up a role as a consu Itant to the 
company. Mr. Chance had been 
seen by analysts as a potential suc- 
cessor to Mr. Chisholm. 

Mr. Booth. 40, an American 
from Kansas, joined JSkyB in 
January, becoming the company's 
top-ranking non-Japanese execu- 
tive. 

Originally, JSkyB was a venture 
between the Japanese media com- 
pany Softbank Coro, and News 
Corp., bnt Mr. Boom oversaw the 
introduction in May of two new 
shareholders. The addition of 
those two, Sony Corp. and of the 
Japanese broadcaster Fuji Televi- 
sion Network Inc., gave JSkyB 
some of the programming it 
needed to fill the 150-channel ser- 


vice it is due to begin next April. 

“In operational terms, 
Chisholm is the architect of 
BSkyB 's success," said Roben 
Jolliffe, an analyst at ABN- 
AMRO Hoare Govett. “He rene- 
gotiated all the movie and sports 
contracts, pul the senior manage- 
ment in place, organized the com- 
pany and managed it through flot- 
ation. He’s the guy’s who’s turned 
Murdoch’s theories into reality." 

(Bloomberg. AFX. Renters) 

■ Mirror Group Holds Talks 

Midland Independent Newspa- 
pers PLC said it was holding talks 
with Mirror Group PLC that could 
lead to Midland becoming pan of 
Mirror Group, Bloomberg News 
reported. Midland Independent 
publishes 32 newspapers, most of 
them in central England. 

The announcement came four 
months after Mirror Group, which 
owns British newspapers includ- 
ing the Daily Mirror and the Daily 
Record and a 46 percent stake in 
The Independent, denied it 
planned to bid for Midland. 


Opel Is Urged to Clarify Job Outlook 


CpB^tb-d by Ota Stiff From Wjfujrkn 

FRANKFURT — The workers’ 
council at Adam Opel AG deman- 
ded Tuesday that the carmaker make 
clear its position on possible job 
cuts, and another top Opel executive 
quit over plans by the parent com- 
pany, General Motors Corp., for 
global expansion. 

Opel’s works council said recent 
news reports that the company 
might eliminate 1 0,000 jobs had cre- 
ated a “storm of controversy” that 


heightened simmering tensions 
among the company’s 45,000 work- 
ers in Germany. 

Opel’s troubles were compoun- 
ded Tuesday when GM's European 
headquarters in Zurich said a senior 
marketing executive, Jonathan 
Browning, had resigned to join the 
European operations of Ford Motor 
Co. in England. He was the third 
senior manager to leave the Amer- 
ican-owned automaker in recent 
weeks. 


His resignation came amid grow- 
ing concern that GM, in trying to 
expand into South America, Asia 
and Eastern Europe, may affect its 
already struggling operations in 
Western Europe, which are losing 
sales and market share. 

The leader of Opel’s works coun- 
cil, Rudolf Mueller, said no new 
labor contract would be approved 
until job-security issues had been 
clarified by Opel management. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Russian Official Snubs Brittan 


MOSCOW — The first deputy prime minister v3oris 
Nemtsov, refused to meet the European Union’s top 
trade official Tuesday in a protest against the EU’s anti- 
dumping measures against Russian pipe and tube man- 
ufacturers. officials said. 

Mr. Nemtsov’s snub came as Sir Leon Brittan. the 
EU trade commissioner, ended a two-day visit aimed at 
promoting Russian membership in the World Trade 
Organization, the body that supervises trade accords 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


London 
FTSE 100 

4300 


Paris 

Index CAC 40 


M J F M A 
1W7 

Exchange 

Amsterdam 

Brussels 

Frankfurt 

Copenhagen 

Helsinki 

Oslo ~~ 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Paris 

Stockholm 

Vienn a^ 

Ziaich 

Source: Talehurs 


A M J 2200 J F M A M J 


AEX _ 

B EL-20 

PAX 

S tock MaiKet 
"HEX General _ 
~OBX 
FTSE 100 
Stock Exchange 
MIBTEL 
CAC 40 
SX 16 

ATX "" 

SPI 


Tuesday Prev. % 

Close Close Change 

847.15 849.SKJ -053 

2560.03 2,387.40 -1.15 
3,741.48 3765.11 -0.63 
569.34 589.39 -0.01' 

3,11143 3,137.48 -0.83 

53674 637J9 -0.16 

4,68270 4,745.10 - 1.33 
571.84 _ 578.38 -1.13 

12717 '1 275 4 ' -0.S9 

2,762.60 2795.87 -1.19 
3,135.10 3.165.4 0 -0.9 6 

i j303 39 ^307.97 -035 

3,400^6 3,406.80 ^6.13 

Illk'IlUllVLll IL-tjJll Tllhuik' 


and provides a negotiating forum for new agreements. 

“It’s a shame that Mr. Nemtsov has not had the 
opportunity of putting his concerns to me in an honest, 
manful way, face-to-face, rather than engage in this 
kind of boycott,” Sir Leon said. 

An aide to Mr. Nemtsov, who is a leading economic 
liberal, said the meeting had been scrapped in reaction 
to the EU’s imposition of duties on nonalloy steel and 
iron pipes to stop the alleged dumping by Russia of such 
goods at below-market prices in Europe. 


Very briefly; 

• Royal PTT Nederland NV will split into two companies, a 
telecommunications business and a mail and freight operation, 
so the separate parts can take their own routes to growth. 

• EMI Group PLC, Britain's largest record company, con- 
fumed that it would return to shareholders as much as £499. 1 
million (S3 17.7 million), or about 10 percent of its market 
capitalization, by giving them one bonus shore redeemable for 
1 14.5 pence, for every ordinary share held. It also proposed lo 
split its ordinary slock 2-for-l, then consolidate every ten 
resulting shares into nine new ordinary shares. 

•Thames Water PLC’s 1997 pretax profit rose 63 percent, to 
£371.8 million, driven by increased prices and profit at its 
international operations. Sales rose 8 percent, to £ 1 .29 billion. 

• Norway’s banking commission advised Sparebankgrup- 
pen AS, a group of four savings banks, to rccons ider its hostile 
takeover bid for Fokus Bank ASA. Den norske Bank ASA. 
Norway's largest bank, has already promised not to sell its 
8.49 percent stake in Fokus, which will make it difficult for 
Sparebankgruppen to obtain the 90 percent control it needs 

• Finland is preparing to sell some of its shares in Neste Oy, 
a chemical and oil company, and Imatrao Voima, the state 
power company. 

• Henri EmmanuellL a former treasurer of the French So- 
cialist Party who was twice given suspended jail terms after 
taking responsibility for illegal fund-raising, was named 
chairman of the National Assembly's Finance Committee. 

• Italian police seized more than 40.000 pirated computer 
disks in a crackdown on black market sales of software; 
reports said 21 people faced charges following the operation in 
the western port of Livorno. 

• Rheinmetall AG paid about 900 million Deutsche marks 
(5519 million) to raise its stake in the auto parts maker 
Kolbenschmidt AG to a controlling 53.5 percent. 

BlamherK. Reuters. AFX 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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8825 8675 87 8825 




Lta U65 TWO 1850 1360 SHKProja^ »J75 n/ ong 

II JUO 7430 76* 76W snn £* . 


W i* r 


XSB S* 35* 35^ anoLarxl^ 

7WJ TWO 7100. SlSRK?* , 

3335 33H 3320 3ffi 5wj«PKA 

SM 5H3U- 5960 6000 WlBfHriB* 

r 14573 14425 14«- J425 WloeMt 

15325 14573 14750 15475 

12975 WtS MBS — — — — 

.~ms - 4960 4965 sw Jakarta 

9920 9746 9760 9900 JUIUIIUI 


845 8J0 840 845 

7JS 725 7JS 7J5 
66 6325 6425 6525 
33.10 31.98- 3295 32.70 
17JS 17J0 17JS 1725 




fv l ; 

I*--- ? & 


. M W MO WJ fmmm 
. wS .wm 22550 MnM 7200 7M 7M 7050 
' "Si* 6 - : ‘* m - S5 Mtal0n ua jot 

■ =i.&==2= 'B- ’I ’I’i 

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SaiL’- 7 - 3 ''* ssaSa* i ss ® .s 

^ s.g. | | .SSSL 3S »» 

l£l£ Johannesburg 

<mM l is ua 

' 2425 U* . 


3900 39ZS 




1 !■£*' ' j 


_ 191 

16 I5LB0 15 

am nsn 4755 jox 

M 2 21TS .3415 




■M M 34 3118 J4.10 

3925 392S.%S 


p .4 * *-' 



P n g ' " 1 *** 




4060 39^ 392£ %S 

«S:;ar ggr ■ iS«l f 
l.H ffc.fyg *£ *£ 

- M 


AMMBHdgs 

Genfing 

Md Banking 

Md tnflSBpF 

MranasGai 

Praton 

PubBcBk 

Renong 

RemrtsWbrid 

Rothmans PM 

Shne Darter 

TeMm Mol 

Tanaga 

indBigtoeen 


London ' 

Abbey Nidi 8J0 
AltedDasecq . 425 
Ao^ianWtoter 6J0 

53k- S 

Assoc Bf Foods 5.78 
BAA 5.92 

Bmdays 12^ 
Bass ZOO 

BAT lad 588 

BankSoothn) 193 
Wue arete 144 
BOCGawp 1027 
Booh 7M 

BPS lad J44 

Brit Asroip 1386 

Brit AlfMCT* 726 

BG 2-TB 

Brit Lml 577 

Brit Pefm 7M 

BSkyB £87 

BrflSted UO 

BffiTetaaw 443 
BTR J 

BunnahCMM 1052 
Barton Gp 1J2 

GddeWMen £45 
CadbmySdiw £38 
Drtoa Comm 112 
Comial Unloa 7.12 

Enssf 3 

DtHons 523 

Bacboamponenfa 4J2 
EM! Group 1220 

Fan CotanW 149 
GeirlAocMert 9.42 
GEC 349 

GKN 10-62 

GfiDoWeflatma 1176 
GnrakiGp 825 
Grand Md SM 

GRE 2M 

GraanoliGp 4g 
Gtrnm £90 

GUS 1* 

NsSzHIdgs law 

linpl ToOocrD 4-U 

» § 
uaw“ 248 
LBflBl GadGip -ia 
LklfrisTSB Gp 134 
UraVortty 

Mote Spencer 136 
MEPC £JE 

MefcuiyAssai llio 
NoUondGM 

MP*** 

nST^ 7^ 

p 

RSoS'tnflW iS 

a 

RMCGRWP . 1034 

bB. -a 

RtTko 1226 

*3$*"* & 

^324 

SKSr* ® 

Shall TrarepR ll» 

iSS®* iiS 
SSSSc • S| 


mmriwlM 943 

E- ;: t 


Prurtoas; 107748 

1590 1120 1620 
1280 13.10 1290 
25J0 25J0 25J0 
6.10 110 620 

9.10 9.10 9 JO 

1270 1340 1280 
388 388 388 
211 324 118 

885 8.15 810 

2425 2625 27 

835 845 BAD 

11J0 1140 11-80 
11J0 11J0 11.40 
1820 18J0 1880 

885 8.15 880 

FT-fiE 180s 468228 
PrevfcwK 4745.10 

. 174 

113 113 420 

423 153 

583 580 588 

122 124 124 
523 5JB £74 
£74 529 585 

1180 11.97 12.13 
743 721 743 

'* 588 

383 

127 . 423 AM 
10^1 1024 1025 
7J2 727 785 

n) 3J9 384 

1327 1383 -1382 
7.14 7.15 729 

2.11 2.15 2.IB 

W 520 525 

783 7J7 7J9 

£65 £74 £90 

1J6 129 129 

488 156 448 

186 1.97 189 
1025 nm 1081 

125 125 122 

541 
526 

584 

686 490 JM 
783 7.07 709 

345 386 152 

— — 521 

— — 138 
1120 1144 1121 

637 682 682 

641 463 625 

147 14? 14V 

9J7 

348 

1088 KUO 1040 
1285 1281 1248 

887 842 174 

544 £82 546 

249 224 229 

481 481 IB 

528 £90 SMi 

642 643 688 

527 £80 585 

1720 T7.77 18.19 
BJ0 824 US 
4.1® 

. 726 
284 285 289 

886 886 847 

240 240 248 

174 43d 136 

587 685 630 

283 286 - 2.09 

— "■ £35 

■«» 5J8 

1288 1229 13.13 
2.16 . 2.16 224 

581 115 £12 

7J3 78! 7J5 

7-2B 7JB 783 
315 118 125 

283 287 113 

621 £24 625 

198 198 7.11 
127 128 129 

680 482 624 

155 1» 441 

£15 £20 £20 

&3S £25 £26 

176 174 388 

888 £94 U4 

341 157 389 

588 £90 682 

127 229 233 

628 192 783 

223 IN 227 

18 TOfe 1183 
zJ3 2J3 2J9 

HO 62J 625 

1182 1189 1185 
172 4JS S£lt 
341 344 345 

345 348 320 
1685 16J5 1643 
. 658 643 646 

383 385 » 

288 190 286 
7J2 7JJ 741 
1245 124? 1248 
949 986 948 
1J4 125 181 

1066 1048 1088 
8.13 8.14 8.19 
XII IIS 4J8 
625 682- 626 

983 929 

159 441 443 

182 386 386 

445 645 421 

U4 £16 £20 
£53 SS3 5J5 
- 248 258 243 

1788 17.« 1U5 
161 ifl 
728 781 785 


Madrid 

Acafhm 

ACESA 

ApuosBareaicfr 


Boka Mae 57184 
PlMMWJIUI 


BBV 
Banreto 
Baiddnter 
Bar Cento HNp 
Boa Popular 
Bco Santander 
CEPSA 
Ctottaenta 

gS5T rc 

FECSA 

GasrWund 

ftentota 

Pryoa 

Repaol 

SevUanaBK 

Thbaontara 

TeWortca 
UntoaFemna 
VOIenc Cement 


Manila 


AyntaLand 

BkPMtaW 

CtPHoan 

MotetaEkcA 

Mato Bank 

Peton 

Pa Bra* 

PM Long DU 
SaaWgudB 
SM Prime Hdg 


27800 27400 
1890 1845 
5940 5800 

8210 8000 
11430 11060 
1505 145® 
25290 24510 
5060 4915 
32100 31600 
4505 4250 
5140 50TO 
2890 2820 
7830 7550 
11200 10930 
13® 1300 
30800 30110 
1795 1755 
2865 2760 
6430 6330 
143S 1* 

7510 
4355 42* 
1310 1280 
2125 1065 


77440 27900 
1850 1875 
5850 59) D 
8020 8200 
11090 11340 
1495 1480 
24750 25300 
4970 5010 
317* 31910 
4345 44* 
5078 5120 

28* 2900 
7570 7700 
10970 11130 
1305 1310 
3J620 312* 
1760 1770 

2625 2855 
6350 6390 
1400 1415 
74® 7530 

*55 4330 
1285 1300 
2100 2095 


Accor 

AGF 

AirUauWe 

AkanAUb 

AxMJAP 

BaiKoto 

BtC 

BNP 

Canal Rin 

Candour 

Casino 

CCF 

CeMem 

Christian Uar 

CLF- Dads Fran 

CmB Agitato 

Danone 

Etf-AquBainc 

ErittantaB5 

Eunxtsney 

Eurotumet 

Goa Earn 

Hans 

Imctai 

Lafarge 


PSEtadeK 279825 
Pinkos: 27908* 


18J5 1BJ5 19 
21 JO 21 JO 21 JO 


LVMH 

KSI 1 

Paribas A 
Ptmod Rtasd 
Peogeol at 
PtnwBfr tnl 
Promades 
Renault 

pT^ f | 

Rh- Poulenc A 

Sanafl 

Schneider 


1068 1042 
2315 2232 
1559 1518 
562 

... 337 

398 391.10 
308 296.10 
611 S96 

2E!7 2735 
2167 7110 

1501* 14620 
1720 1696 
200L* 19460 
558 5* 

32335 318J0 


10 

167 

10 

167 

SEB 

10*5 

1002 

10 

9X0 

9 90 

970 

5GS Thomson 

4600 45*20 

93 

92 

92 

93 

StaGenenrie 

642 

630 

50 

545 

550 

50 


2925 

280 

7J0 

770 

/JO 

7J0 

SlGdbata 

863 

|Q5 


S2-50 9K7AD van 252J0 

855 835 B55 830 

75 72 75 72 

760 . 7 JO 7 JO 760 


Suez 

KTcsf 

Total B 
Ustaor 
Valeo 


CAC-*! 27*26* 
PratfaMi 2795J7 

899 

JO 17760 18080 
715 929 952 

M9 657 669 

150 36760 369 JO 

704 704 714 

750 950 952 

L10 235 238 

MS IB® ms 
110 4125 4224 

283 280 

JO 243 24420 
660 478 

941 938 

581 580 

151 1275 1280 

“ 972 981 

635 638 

M0 875 887 

-10 9-10 9JO 

J5 <60 £75 

733 ' 756 
L10 41 £70 420JO 


377 
1046 UBS 
2254 2307 
1533 1536 

568 530 

339.10 338 

39X10 39150 
29860 304 

602 toe 
2744 2821 
2137 2151 
149 14880 
1709 1701 

197.70 19890 
544 557 

32080 320 

1042 10* 

459 452 

628 640 

2850 2912 

840 857 

29630 297.* 
690 701 

15130 156 

558 561 

99.15 99 JO 

378 373 


EledntasB 
Ericsson B 
Heanes B 
Incentive A 
Investor B 
MoDoB 
Nordbanken 

sssr- 

Santa B 
SCAB 

S-EBankenA 
SSandla Pars 
StatnctasB 
StCFB 

SpotnnkenA 
SoddinnMA 
Stour A 
Sv Handles A 
Vote! B 


Sydney 

Amcor 

Bocal 

Bramble) bd 
CBA 

CCAmatt 
Cotas Myer 

Crannlm 

CSR 

Fosters Brew 
Goodncn Fid 
El Australia 
Lend Lease 
NUM Was 
NatAunBank 
Nat Mutual Hdg 
New Corp 
PadflcDantop 
PtoaeerHI 
Pub Braadciist 
RiaTMa 
StGeorgaBank 
W7AC 

VVtotpocBHng 
WooitUe Pet 


High 

Law 

ciom 

Prev. 

579 

556 

557 

582 

301 

291 

296 

302 

m 

276J0 

282 285X0 

725 

70 

725 

724 

396 

387 

388 392-50 

20 2*7 JD 247 JO 

248 

236 

232 23450 

237 

267 

263 

265 

261 

213 

218 211.50 

212 

232 225J0 225J0 

233 

161 JO 

159-50 

I61J0 

10 

83 

81 

81 JO 

82J0 

271 

26*0 

270 

271 

369 352.50 

353 

356 

196 

192X0 

195 

I92J0 

10 

1&SJ0 

169 JO 

165-50 

190 

1W 

190 

190 

125J0 

121 

124 1205® 

232 

228 

20 227 JO 

202 

197 

I98J0 

203 


A8 Mantas: 2481 Jl 
PrWtoHE2469JB 
863 834 862 8* 

10.03 9 JO 9-70 985 

1960 1882 19 JO 18J0 
432 415 425 422 

26 25J8 25J» 26JB 
1566 1X95 1519 15 

15.90 1.170 1570 1590 
665 654 662 662 

7J5 7.15 7.15 7J5 

£20 499 5.13 £17 

254 250 2J2 251 

182 ' 1J7 l^t 180 
12-35 1119 1232 12.11 
27.05 2£50 2691 2£55 
ZJH 1.92 2.01 1.92 

1896 1874 1885 1878 


2 

1.96 

1.94 

2 

£14 

*07 


£12 

373 

3X2 

370 

3X9 

*0 

4X0 

*63 

*0 

7X5 

772 

77S 

774 

23JS 

22X6 

rt vn 

22X1 

8J8 

875 

BJ6 

828 

870 

879 

8J5 

877 

7X1 

7X7 

70 

7.70 


Mexico 

AtoA 

Baiaalfi 

CoommCPO 

OtoC 

EmpMaderno 
GpoQmo A1 
GpaF Banner 
Gao Ro taburso 
KmbOortcMex 
TetevtaoCPO 
TdMexL 


Attacm Assic 

Bat Cobb rid 

BasHdauran 

Bead Rdtoo 

BoMtton 

CimSoitaDano 

Edison 

EN1 

Fiat 

GenendAssfc 
I Ml 

1NA - 


SPaotaTatn 

m 

Tetocnm teda 

TIM ' 


Balsa bake 42*69 
Pnvtaas: 42064 

5020 5120 5030 
2080 20.95 21 JM 
3160 31.70 31J5 
11 J6 11.90 1180 
3980 41.10 39.10 
*80 4875 47.95 
102 2J» 2JH 

2035 2860 2835 
31J0 3135 3130 
11£*0 116BQ 118XO 
1860 1862 1890 


MIB TelaaaAcae 127n6> 
Pterion: 12754X0 

1130 11850 11985 12100 
1645 35* 3580 3615 
1530 4460 4530 4495 

1235 1193 1 209 1210 

BOO 25100 ism 25100 
(915 2B50 2875 2895 

□tO 8165 8260 81* 

Q20 9105 9230 9205 

U95 6030 61 QD 61* 
1000 39200 3X50 357S1 
340 851* 15400 157* 
640 ®5« 2590 MO 
1495 5350 ,5410 5120 
3® 7100 7185 7270 

1250 9900 9900 lfflUO 
088 1064 1«SS 1081 

479 461 467 475 

•505 2470 2480 2400 

OSS 3980 4030 6030 

B2S 13360 13510 13650 
1845 18505 18655 18725 
\m 11055 11215 11255 

090 9170 9225 9300 

3JSO 5000 5870 5DES 

1490 SOS 5390 £410 


SSoPaul ° -T!ISE!5S2 Talpei 


BradescoPfd 

BratanaPM 


CE 
Copd 
EHiabrai 
Oaubanco rm 
ught Senridas 


Sauza Ciuz 
TetabrasPH 
Teton tg 

t55T 

TdespPM 

UflBnnoa 
Usiminas PM 
CVRD PM 




965 960 960 939 

837X0 815X0 83500 B1A01 
57^6 5633 5630 5660 
7850 7SJ0 71M ISM 
17J1 1765 1771 1761 
400JHS 570® 597X0 5*4X1 
mes 587X0 SBTJffi 57560 
54060 535X0 535X0 500X0 
441X0 435X0 439J1 439 JO 
316X0 307X0 313XS 3t*X0 
1B1.00 179X0 181X0 179 JO 
35.90 3520 3530 35JB 
11.13 11X0 11.10 11.10 
15530 151* 15X70 149 JO 
101X0 177X0 179X0 17800 
170X0 165JD 165J0171.9TO 
352X0 344X0 35000 347J® 
40J0 39X0 3S« *J0 
11.10 10950 11X0 1.10 

2£* 25X0 25.10 25X0 


Pievtaas: Tlf JS 

Daoom 100000 ^0 9U00 95500 

DamnoKem BBi Bg® B3S0 8310 

ttranddEtlft 27*0 26000 26800 247W 

HaMalnra 15900 14700 1^0 ism 

KorefflaPwr 29600 28U0 2J800 29SM 

Korea SlCb Bk 7100 6700 6860 7000 

Korea Mob Td 435000 » iWOO 4M000 

LGSemknn 41900 38000 41 00 0 39900 

PahangtonSt *4000 60600 62900 *0600 

— Ekc fgSfflSSKSS 


Singapore »“i£jSS 


Montreal 


Bee Mob Com 
CdnUreA 
CdnUDA 
CTftrtSvc 
GmMdm 
GHVestUMoo 

Investors Grp 
LobtawCoa 

KM* 

Pneermn 
OuebacorB 
Bdb«sCoo«b B 
RordBkGda 


Aker A- 

s 


m 


<2 It 42M 
26.60 26.95 
3SJ0 3SS9 
35 V 1 m 
1765 171* 
32M 32K 

3960 39H 

•m » 
22.10 22.10 
17.10 17J0 
3360 3X15 
3M 34 
26 2£U 
965 960 
065 600 


OBXtadB 63674 
Pmtaae 61779 

133 133 135, 

166 167 lflF f 

m nn iste. 

9X0 Ul 3&» 
138 139J0 1* 

4J0 4X50 , 65 

£ & 

256 20 yS&T 

*50 105 teSO. 


AddRKBnw| 

CerebosPoci 

ayDnNsH 


Rm 

lawn 
DBS Law 
Fnser&Neaw 
HKLand* 
JantMathesn 
jtazdam?ig£ B 

K^ptaBo* 
•-Keppcl 


PtxtanrHdoS 
Sembowonn 
Stag Abb 

Stag Tech bid 
StanTdeanai 
-TauiBaak 
UHtaduftM 
UMOSeaBkF 
WtagTafHdgs 
^InUSdoMn 


411V £10 
7 6XS 
llffi 1360 
1460 1481 
two 86S 
1830 18 

X72 458 
1050 10.10 
262 £57 

765 *3S 

3XB 3X2 
NX NT. 

180 ^ 
4X4 482 

iS 

S Si 

665 660 
1260 1220 
655 665 

2960 33 M 
194 3X0 

S 35 

15X0 lj5 
424 422 


£25 615 
7 485 
1170 1360 
1X20 1X30 
069 068 

1820 18 
m x72 
1020 1020 
2J9 10 

760 765 

3J8 3X6 

N.T. 420 
3X0 176 
4X4 4X2 
3X6 3X6 
14X0 15 

8X0 Mi 
LX 460 
460 <60 
1230 1220 
450 445 
2860 2760 
3X0 3X6 
2JS 267 
132 328 
1X8 1X7 
1511 1530 
422 420 


Ca8utrUtalns| 
OnnHMBkl 
avoo Tung Bk 
China DaWpmt 


Mi 

Sfcsni&i— 


numiH 

Han Yo Ptaalca 
ShtaKonaUtai 
TUmiMB 


Tokyo 

Asdd&sik 

mSSpJS 

East Japan By 
Ft* Book 


Hands Motor 

CBJ 

HI 

9odw 

■a-VUmta 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 

Jurat 

Kalina 

KansalEtec 

Kao 

KawasaU Hvy 
Kawaaed 
KtaUNIppRr 
KmnBreUW 

Kobe Steel 

Kaasdsu 

Kubota 

Kpxxar 

KwHuBfiC 

LTCB- 


315; m 
UPvr 

urn JL 
515 5U 
4£50 4S80 


Stockholm =ftSES£|j 

■Jg; !£3 W & HMD 

*Sv««, 220 217 2225D 221 

1» lg 1® 

JUffif*"* St 


The Trib Index 

Prices as of 3.00 PM. NowYoriiume. 

Jan. t, 199B s too. 

Level 

Change 

%changa 

ywrtodtta 

World Index 

173.99 

-0.20 

-0.11 

+16.66 

Rational Indma 

Asia/Pacific 

129Z4 

-0.48 

-057 

+4.71 

Europe 

178.08 

-1-37 

-0.76 

+10.47 

N. America 

205.72 

+1.15 

+0.56 

+2756 

S. America 

bKkiMrial Indexes 

16854 

+1.70 

+152 

+4729 

Capita/ goods 

216.70 

+2.68 

+155 

+26.7 8 

Consumer goods 

195 J5 

-0.45 

-053 

+2151 

Energy 

20856 

-055 

-0.41 

+22.16 

Finance 

128.78 

-0.98 

-0.76 

+10.58 

i&sceBaneous 

16952 

+0.14 

+058 

+4.78 

Raw Materials 

186X14 

-352 

-1.75 

+608 

Service 

163.74 

+052 

+020 

+1924 

Utilities 

162.70 

+151 

+1.00 

+6-44 

TtwfrmrwonBlHarMTnbunBWoiV Stock trOexO trades me U.Sdotarvtdues of 

000 mumtooneay mwtatto jraeta torn 25 oountae* For more ntormaeion, a free 
Cnoktef fc avatotw Oy among » 77w Trib Max. 101 Avow Ctmrtn da Gre#* 

SB521 NBiay Cede*, France. Compteri Oy Btoombug News. 


11.14 10X8 11 11X5 
433 X13 430 X18 


Stock Market tattoc 8679 J4 
Pterion: 86*45 
10 153 10 156 

118 115 115 116 

69J9 *8 68 *9.50 

126 123 123J0 123 

28X0 2410 2820 2860 
117 113 113 115 

7*50 74 74 75-SI 

11550 11230 11239 11150 
0 67 67 * 

8* 84 84 8150 

98 95 9550 97 

109 1-84 10850 102 

St 5* 56 5*50 

93 905® 88 

69 6650 6*50 6850 


Ntkei225r 2*59166 
PRftaas: 20481X7 

1190 1170 1 1 B0 110 

732 725 728 728 

*2* 4248 42* am 

S73 858 B70 8*5 

m m m m 

11* 1120 1120 1130 
2180 2120 21* 2170 

07 591 05 595 

2680 2610 2** 2*0} 


210 7130 

2070 3050 
2*0 24* 

790 781 

1420 1390 
533 520 

1360 1320 

914 906 

8380a 82*08 
2690 2620 

5980B 5940a 
2260 22* 
4350 4270 
1710 WTO 
4570 4520 

1510 1490 

11* 110 
1310 1290 
34* 3400 
1610 1580 
450 445 

625 615 

6960 6870 
517 511 

9370a 9320a 
3900 3738 
680 648 

2270 2 23 
”590 15* 

530 525 

361 357 

703 m 
1200 1170 
224 220 

908 896 

578 571 

8870 1780 
2060 2020 
423 417 

519 sa 
2370 2300 
3550 39* 
220 2230 
1310 1280 
USD 1420 
370 366 

<82 671 

1670 160 
80. 831 


High Law Chaa Pro*. 


MBsalFudasn 100 1570 1570 1580 

Mitsui Trmi B83 B67 874 883 

Murpta ttfg 4*50 4*00 4*30 4*80 

NEC 1470 1*0 1*60 W*Q 

Nton 1930 1890 1900 . 194S 

NkkoSec 710 73! 73S 707 

Nintendo 9580 9500 9580 9510 

s«r 

Nuon Steel 
Nissan Motor 
NKIC 

Nomura Sec iotu i«/u lerv teau 

NTT 111® 1090b 1090b lllflb 

NTT Data 4580& 44» 4500b 4520b 

00 Paper 725 Jiff 707 722 

Osaka Gas 312 308 311 312 

Ricoh 15* 1520 1520 1530 

Rolan 11*0 11200 11400 11100 

SdunBk 853 837 849 835 


High Low Ctose Prev. 


MePm e s 

Moore 

Newbridge Net 
Noromta Inc 
Narcai Energy 
Nthem Telecom 
Nova 


U10 13.15 
0.95 “ 

66 

31J5 31V 

37.65 32X0 
124 lb 123J5 
111a 111* 


947 

937 

9* 

945 


28G 

27Vi 

28U 

27V. 

*49 

630 

630 

649 


0 

24 

0X0 

0 

29*4 

355 

348 

348 

355 


73* 

23.90 

73* 

MS 

786 

m 

K00 

Placer Donre 

25L 

24X5 

24X0 

35,15 

242 

70 

7* 

239 

PocoPettm 

14X0 

14* 

14* 

14X5 

14911 

14* 

1470 

1480 

Potash Sasi. 

107W 

106 

10*95 

10716 


21* 21* 
2070 2070 
loo iao 
781 792 

1410 1400 
533 523 

1330 1370 
906 910 

835C« 8400a 
2£t0 Z700 
5960a 5960a 
2250 220 

m 43® 

160 1700 

11 * 


3870 0* 

il 

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EVTER3VATI0NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18. 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 




PAGE 17 


inquiry on Sumitomo Motors Shaken by Attacks 


Investor’ 


Hong Kong Singapore Tokyo 

Hang Seng Straits Times NBttei 225- 


U.S. Unit Faces Allegations of Fraud 

Ce#eMb?OurSKtfFnmDBfuj(tirf 

TOKYO The Federal Deposit Insurance Coro said 
Tuesday it was investigating allegations that Sumitomo 
Bank of California violated banking laws by hiding risky 
loans between 1993 and 1996. s ^ 

-Many of the allegations arose from a lawsuit filed by 
two loan examiners at the bank, said Bob Garsson, a 
spokesman for the FDIC. The suit alleges that Sumitomo 
Bank of California regularly underwrites risky loans and 
illegally destroys evidence. 

“The ^ allegations are groundless,” said Sumitomo 
Bank Ltd., which owns 85 percent of the U S. bank. 

Shares in Sumitomo Bank fell 4 3 percent, or 80 yen to 
1,770 yen (SI 5.42) after reports of the investigation. 

(Bloomberg, AFX) 

■ A Gall to Fight the Racketeers 

The chief of Japan’s police uiged business leaders to take 
a tough stand against racketeers, now at the center of pay- 
off scandals involving such firms as Nomura Securities Co. 
and Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank lid., Reuters reported. 

"I want corporations to adopt a confrontational stance 
toward sokaiya, the chief of the National Police Agency 
Yuko Sekiguchi, told the Keidanren business lobby. 


LEAF 

Soc&te d’ I nvestissem ent k Capital Variable 
Sfege Social : 2 , Boulevard Royal 
L-2953 LUXEMBOURG 


To our shareholders 

Wc have the honour to invito you to attend the 

ANNUAL GEVE8AL MEKITOf. 

of the- Company to be held at the offices of Buuquc 
Internationale a Luxembourg^ Socictc Anonymc, 69. route 
d’Esch, L - 1470 Luxembourg, on June 25th. 1997, at 
3.-00 pjn n with the following agenda: 

AGENDA 

1. Report of the Board of Directors and of the 
Statutory Auditor; 

2. Approval of the statement of net assets and of 
the statement of operation* as at 29 February 
1997; 

3. Allocation of the results; 

4. Dheliargt to the Directors; 

5. Statutory appointments; 

6. Mbcdlaneoas. 

The shareholders arc advised that non quorum is required 
for the hems of the agenda of the Annual General Meeting 
and that derisions will be taken on a simple majority of 
the shares present or represented at die Meeting with no 
restrictions. 

In order to attend the Meeting, the owners of bearer 
shares will have to deposit then- shares five clear days 
before the Meeting with Banquc Internationale a 
Luxembourg, 69, Route d’Eech, Luxembourg (to the 
attention of Mrs. Nicole Dupont). 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


CMtpUtf in Oar Skfl Frew BW*n 

SEOUL — Kia Motors Corp. is run- 
ning on empty. 

With a debt of about $ 6.2 billion. 
South Korea's second-biggest aulo man- 
ufacturer has been attacked by a rival and 

C entred by a subsidiary. In a nation 
linated by a handful of wealthy fam- 
ily-run conglomerates known as chae- 
bol. Kia is paying a price for putting all its 
eggs in one basket. 

All six listed Kia Group shares fell 
sharoly after Asia Motors was late pay- 
ing back 130 billion won (5145 million) 
in promissory notes due Monday. 

A spokesman strongly denied that Kia 
had financial problems. An Asia Motors 
spokesman said it encountered diffi- 
culties Monday because its debt demands 
were higher ton usual 

“We ran into trouble only tempor- 
arily," the Asia Motors spokesman said. 
"We settled all the problems.” 

Kia Motors, the flagship firm of the 
group, helped Asia Motors to redeem 
about 30 bulion won in debt obligations, 
officials at financ ial institutions said. 

As news of the missed payment came 
out, Asia Motors' stock fell its 8 percent 
limit to close at 4,740 won Tuesday. 
Both Asia Motors and its biggest cred- 
itor, Korea First Bank, said the default 
was a temporary problem rather than a 
serious financial concern. 

Last week, Kia’s management style 
and profitability were called into ques- 
tion by a researcher at Samsung Group. 


the latest Korean conglomerate to tiy its 
hand at making cars. While rivals rallied 


acute as the government encourages 
mergers and acquisitions to enhance in- 


around Kia and accused Samsung of dustrial competitiveness, paving the way 
bullying tactics, the report underscored for the biggest chaebol to gobble up 


toT rhe company was losing market weaker rivals against their will, 
share and lacked' the financial support In recent months, Kia Motors’ sales 
for a quick fix. Kia’s predicament casts have been battered by new passenger cars 
doubt on whether independent compa- introduced with great fanfare by Daewoo, 
nies can survive, ler alone grow, in South With the backing of its parent, Daewoo 
Korea, where the combined sales of five Motor Co. poured in an estimated SI 
leading industrial groups are equivalent billion to develop and market three new 
to half the national economy. models. Kia’s domestic market share 


17000— 

16000 - 

15000 jx 

14000-. /* 

isooo^^V-f— 

12000 T F'M Thj 


22000 

21000 

20000 1 


J F M A M J 
1897 


17000 j-p M A M j 


Exchange 


nair tne national economy. 

“Pan of Kia’s problem stems from dropped to 19.2 percent in the first five 

months of the year from 25.8 percent a 
year earlier. Daewoo profited the most. Sytfn 
Kia’s predicament raises rising to 35.4 percent from 24.6 percent, 

r . .1 Meanwhile, the overall market is _i 

questions about the shrinking. Domestic sales dropped 1 1 Kuaii 

outlook for independent percent in May from a year earlier, yet 

• ■ r, r i T i- Samsung is to start selling cars by next - — 

companies m South Korea. March and the unprofitable Ssangyong SeQIJ 

Motor Co. also plans to start making Ta&H 

the fact it does not have the massive passenger cars. 

chaebol support its competitors have,” This provided the ammunition for the 

said Kang Hoon Suk, an auto analyst at Samsung research report that said Kia Jakat 

ING Barings. “Kia does not have would face “growth restrictions’* be- 

enough employees who would buy Kia cause of its large debts, “distrust of lop 

cars or rich sister companies to lend it managers ' 1 and “conflicts within man- 80011 


Kia’s predicament raises 
questions about the 
outlook for independent 
companies in South Korea. 


Hong Kong Hang Seng 

Singapore Straits Times 

Sydney Afl Ordinaries 

Tokyo Nikkei 225 

Kuala Uunpur Composite 
Bangkok SET 

Seoul Composite 

Taipei Stock Mark 

Mani la PSE 

Jakarta Composite 

Wellington NZSE-40 

Bombay Sensitive ii 

Source: Telekurs 


Nikkei £25 


money at favorable terms.” 


agement.” Kia sued Samsung for libel. 


Composite Index 79BL29 

Stock Market Index 3^79.24 

PSE 2,798.25 

Composite Index 705X18 

NZSE-40 2,368X33 

Sensitive India 4,087.64 


Tuesday Prev. % 
Close dose Change 

14,307.15 14,364.50 -0.61 

2.004J2B 1,991X18 +0.66 

2,681.70 2X369.30 +0.46 

20,593.66 20,581.07 -0.42 

1,076.93 1,077.40 -0.04 

437JZ 51L55 ^70 

792 29 789.05 +0.41 

8.679.24 6,640 AS +0.45 

2.798.25 2,790.86 +026 

705X38 705^9 -003 

2,368X33 2,37052 -0.12 
4,087.64 4.025.41 +1.55 


IsIckliIi.iiuI HeraU Tnbonc 


With annual sales of S20 billion and linking the report to a hostile takeover 
50,000 employees, Kia Group is the bid. Kia sued Samsung for libel, alleging __ , . 

country's eighth-lareest chaebol. the report was smoke screen designed to Very Pl‘l6f lyS 


country's eighth-largest chaebol. the report was smoke screen designed to 

This pales, however, alongside Hy- facilitate a hostile takeover bid. Rival 
undai Corp. and Daewoo Corp.. which carmakers sided with Kia, threatening to 
also make cars and have four times rhe take unspecified actions against Sam- 
revenue and staff to call upon. sung uoless it issued an apology. 

Kia's problems are becoming more iBImonherg. ' Renters i 


( l RRIiNCY & CAPITAL 
MARKET SERMd’S 


SOVEREIGN 
(FOREX) LTD. 

SWISS BROKERHOUSE 

ll 8 , Rue du Rh&ne, 

1204 Cenfeve 

24 HOURS FOREX DESK 

- Interbank Conditions 

• No Commission 

• Capital Return Guarantee 

■ Higher Return on Investment 
> Dally Market Comment 

■ Individual Credit Line 

■ 20 Years Experience 

■ Confidentiality Guaranteed 
According to Swiss Law 

■ Inquiries: 

Phone: ++ 41 12 14 6322 
Fax: ++ 41 41 72 S 0809 


Economic Fears Sink Thai Stocks 


c^iijrjhi oarSi^FnmurH.^kjbhn Thailand’s economic slowdown was being 

BANGKOK — Thailand’s benchmark driven by the same factors that triggered the 


stock index closed below 500 points Tuesday 
for the first time in eight years as concerns 
over the Thai economy and the impending 
disclosure of bad debt levels by banks and 
finance houses undermined sentiment on the 
stock market. 

Concern over falling company profits and 
rising interest rates added to the market 


bursting of Japan's so-called bubble economy 
in the early 1990s. The rumors reflected pes- 
simism about the government's ability to 
come to grips with the end of a decadelong 
boom that ran out of steam Iasi year. 

“Banks led the market losses today on 
worries about their loan problems,’’ said a 
broker at Ekkanat Finance & Securities. “The 


rising interest rates added to the market broker at tkkapat Finance & securities, me 
slump. The Stock Exchange of Thailand index fall of the SET index below key technical 
fell 13.83 points, or 2.7 percent, to close at support of 500 points also encouraged other 


support of 500 points also encouraged other 
497.72. its lowest close since April 27, 1989. investors to offload shares.” thority of Thailand will jointly invest about SI. 2 billion 

The index is down 40 percent since the be- f.4P. AFP, Reuters) petrochemical project. Bt-.rmht^.Rtunrs.AF, 

ginning of the year. __ 

Dealers attributed the decline to a frenzy of 

BHP Says Agua Rica Holds 1.7 Billion Tons of Copper 

lem loans at some of the country's strongest 

hanks. The rumors caused the stocks of those oyrsuttFn. HPeyu**n North Ltd. and MIM Holdings Ltd. "The result 

banks to drop by nearly the 10 percent limir MELBOURNE — Broken Hill Pry., Australia’s date are promising,” a BHP spokesman said, 

the exchange allows on any one day. largest resources company, said Tuesday that it had Separately. China’s announcement that it plar 

Meanwhile, the Japan Bond Research In- found as much as 1.7 billion metric tons of copper at to deliver 10.000 tons of copper to London M 


• The Philippines’ trade deficit narrowed by nearly 35 per- 
cent in April from a year earlier, to SS60 million, as de- 
regulation and economic growth spurred exports. 

■ Hong Kong’s American Chamber of Commerce said 
more U.S. business people in the territory were optimistic 
about their future than they were two years ago. despite the 
handover to China on July 1. A survey of members showed 
that 95 percent of respondents thought the business climate in 
Hong Kong would remain favorable over the next five 
years. 

• New World Development Co., Hong Kong's fourth- largest 
real estate company, will acquire a 1 .5 percent stake in Beijing 
Yanhua Petrochemical Co., China's largest plastics firm. 

• China produced 144,100 cars, trucks and buses in May. 
down 9.49 percent from April, while auto sales fell 13.66 
percent, to 133,600 units, according to press reports citing the 
Ministry of Machine Building Industry. 

■ Hong Kong's unemployment rate for the three months 
ending in May eased to 23 percent, off slightly from a rate of 
2.6 percent for die three months to April, with the construction 
sector accounting for much of the shift. 

• Chevron Corp.'s chemicals unit and the Petroleum Au- 

thority of Thailand will jointly invest about SI. 2 billion in a 
petrochemical project. Bloamhem. Renters. afp. ap 


banks. The rumors caused the stocks of those 
banks to drop by nearly the 10 percent limir 
the exchange allows on any one day. 

Meanwhile, the Japan Bond Research In- 
stitute downgraded the long-term foreign cur- 
rency rating of Thailand, affecting 90 billion 
yen ($790 million) worth of samurai bond 
issues. In lowering its rating from double- A- 
minus to single-A-plus, the institute said 


its Agua Rica deposit in a new, mineral-rich province 
in the foothills of the Argentine Andes. 

Agua Rica is near the Alumbrera copper and gold 
project — the world’s second -largest gold dig. in north 
western Argentina — that is owned by Australia’s 


North Ltd. and MIM Holdings Ltd. “The results to 
date are promising,” a BHP spokesman said. 

Separately, China's announcement that it planned 
to deliver 10.000 tons of copper to London Metal 
Exchange warehouses was greeted with skepticism 
from traders, who saw it as a means of driving down 
prices. 

"They are playing games.” a Chinese trading 
source said. ( Bloomberg . Reuters) 



More risk? 

Then you may bank on us. 


Less risk? 

Then you may bank on us. 




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Sports 


PAGE 20 



Dsn CaoUlvmc AnocnM Pnv 

Venus Williams playing 
Chanda Rubin on Tuesday. 


Williams Advances 


tennis Venus Williams marked 
her 1 7th birthday Tuesday with a 6- 
4, 6-4 demolition of world No. 26 
Chanda Rubin in the Eastbourne 
grass-court tournament 
Williams, who is a Jehovah's 
Witness and does not celebrate 
birthdays, took just 80 minutes to 
dismiss her fellow American. 

"I’ve never served and volleyed 
as much as I am doing on grass and 
it is really helping me be more 
aggressive,' ' Williams said. 

• The top two seeds. Maicelo Ri- 
os and Carlos Moya, were both elim- 
inated Tuesday in the first round of 
die Nottingham Open. ( Reuters ) 


Peter Graf Heads for Jail 


TENNIS Peter Graf, the father of 
Steffi Graf, will go to jail within the 
next two months. Prosecutors and 
defense lawyers both said Tuesday 
that they had withdrawn their ap- 
peals against the verdict handed 
down in January. Graf was sen- 
tenced to three years and nine 
months in prison for evading, taxes 
on Steffi’s earnings but had been 
freed pending the appeals. (Reuters) 


Cricket Goes Dutch 


cricket Amstelveen in the Neth- 
erlands and Edinburgh. Scotland, 
will both host a match in the 1999 
cricket World Cup. At the launch of 
the seventh World Cup in London on 
Tuesday. Terry Blake, the tourna- 
ment director, said 42 matches 
would be staged at 21 venues with 
each of the 1 8 English county team’s 
hosting at least one nasch.( Reuters) 


NHL Picks 4 Cities 


ICE HOCKEY The National 
Hockey League on Tuesday ten- 
tatively approved expanding to 
Nashville. Tennessee; Atlanta, 
Columbus, Ohio; and Minneapolis - 
St. Paul in the next four years. 

If the plan is ratified by the 
NHL’s Board of Governors on June 
25, Nashville will join the league in 
1998. Atlanta in 1999, and Colum- 
bus and the Twin Cities in 2000. 
The committee bypassed the cities 
of Houston and Oklahoma City. 

Each expansion group is expec- 
ted to pay an estimated $80 million 
entrv fee. (AP) 


Caddie Medlen Dies 


golf Jeff (Squeeky) Medlen, the 
caddie who carried for Nick Price in 
his two PGA Championship and 
one British Open victories, died 
Monday night at his home in Ohio. 
Medlen. who was 43, had been suf- 
fering from luekemia. 

Players and caddies had shown 
their support for Medlen during his 
illness by wearing green ribbons 
bearing the word “Squeeky." (AP) 


• -//iviaRjS 


WEDNESDAY. JUNE IB, ] 


Golf and Self-Esteem: Perils of Getting Jinxed on 


Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — How well can 
you take a punch? 

That’s what major tournament golf 
asks of its contenders. From one shot to 
the next, one hole to the next one day to 
the next and even from one year to the 
next, how much disappointment and 
embarrassment can you endure? 

Maybe it’s not entirely coincidence 
that the new U.S. Open champ, Ernie 
Els, came on tour with the nickname 
"Joe Pfclooka.” Partly it’s because of 
the 6-foot-3, 200-pound physique of the 
South African, as well as his resemb- 
lance to the old cartoon strip boxer. But 
it’s also Eis’s dogged, implacable man- 
ner on die course. 

When be has bis gorgeous swing and 
self-confidence intact, be gets up off (he 
canvas as well as anybody in the game. 
. Who knows the source of an athlete’s 
desire to keep fighting even when he 
feels humiliated or furious with him- 
self? Nothing is easier than betraying 
your own ability. Els saw that demon- 
straied firsthand at this Open. 

Els was playing Friday at Congres- 
sional with his old friend John Daly. 


Vantage Point / Thomas Boswell 


"I’ve known John since he came to 
South Africa, before he ever had a tour 
card,” Els said. They recognized that 
they were two of the most gifted players 
of their generation. 

"John's got so much talent,” said Els 
after Daly, a recovering alcoholic, 
walked off the course after nine holes 
Friday. 

It is easy to understand why golfs 
blows have often overwhelmed Daly, 
carrying the burden of bis disease. To 
many other players, however, their own 
performance is often a mystery. 

"I had confidence in my seif and my 
game today,” said Els after be had shot 
69 — the second-lowest score of the 
final day — to win by one shot over 
Colin Montgomerie. "At other times, I 
might feel different Maybe that's why 
I've lost a couple of majors in the last 


tortion — than Tiger Woods. Some say 
this was a disappointing yet humanizing 
week for Woods, one that showed his 
limits and lowered our expectations. My 
feeling is just die opposite. 

Any superstar can win with his "A” 


game. At the Open, Woods battled to 
19th place with his “Z” game. He left 


19th place with his "Z” game. He left 
his driver in his bag most of the week. 
He missed at least 10 putts inside six 
feet, almost all of them pilled to the left 


Tharpattem can be fixed. 
"The suffering is over. 


couple of years. Today, I felt I had the 
will I was going to push it through.” 


will. I was going to push it through.” 

Of all the prominent players in this 
Open, perhaps none saw himself more 
sharply — with less rearview-mirror dis- 


"The suffering is over. This course 
humbled me big time,” said Woods 
after shooting 74-67-73-72-286. "Be- 
cause I wasn't quite there physically, 
my mind was tested, and my patience 
and my grit and every kind of emotion 
you can conjure up was tested. I think I 
held up pretty good.” 

That sounds right Like the young 
Jack Nicklaus, Woods analyzes himself 
just as unblinkingly as he analyzes his 
swing. He has studied the careers of the 
greats and already grasps the game’s 
most consoling truth: Even when you try 


your hardest, you usually lose. A golfer 
who can’t forgive himself is a goffer 

who will have to find so m et h i n g outside 

himself to blame whenever he fails. 

The crowd favorite. Tom Lehman, is, 
many hope, an example of a player who 
is at peace with his ddfeat and not in need 
of excuses. “I really believe I’xn men- 
tally rough enough, I’m confident 
enough, rmpatient enough andl’mgood 
enough. I haven't backed down. I haven’t 
wimped out I haven’t choked my guts 
out." said Lehman, who has led the past 
three US. Opens after three rounds but 
not woo yet “It just hasn’t happened.” 

Carve that on the wall, please. 

In his prime, Nicklaus once lost 12 
straight majors, finishing ninner-up three 
rimes and third once. Was be a choking 
dog? In another two-year span, Nicklaus 
squandered six straight chances id win 
majors. He was runner-up three times. 
thir d twice and fourth once. Had he lost 
confidence? Was be jinxed? None of the 
above. He played well. Somebody else 
won. It just didn’t happen. 

That’s die lesson Montgomerie needs 
to learn before his tendency to alibi 
becomes terminal to his golf. The big 


Scot has large, generous emotions 
nice, self-deprecating humor. Bstfe; 

six-season run rtf’ bad luck in the majr^ 
is doing a number on him. - 

At Congressional, Montgomerie 
blamed his 76 in the second n»ad on j 
rain delay (before he ever teed off), & 
well as on fans who cheered when he 


i AIM 

#>/ Ini 





missed a putt at the ninth green. Those” 
maybe valid excuses, bat Montgomerie 


may be valid excuses, bat Montgomerie 
behaved like a man who was lootmg&r 
something to put him off Ids game. 

He put on a great show of being 
distracted by two players putting out on 
the I8th green 70 yards away. 

All Montgomerie's wounds frora 

those years of disappointment in Abe' 

majors rode possession of him. It 
wrenching to watch. The longer Monty 
waited, the more obvious it became dm 
only one thing in the world was more 
important to him than making that put 
having an excuse in case he trussed. And 

that means you always miss. 

He needs to learn the lesson tha 
Woods may have grasped already: 
Golf’s majors will punch you often, 
enough all by themselves. Don’t beat 
yourself up to boot. 


•-=* A*#- 

*j«t Hi* 

?- - a* 




■M 


Milan’s Quiet U-Turn 
Brings Capello Home 

Berlusconi Offers Little Comment 


By Rob Hughes 

International Herald Tribune 


LONDON — AC Milan, from its 
unaccustomed position as a down-table 
Italian league team, made a statement 
Tuesday. It was brief and to the point: 
“From July 1, 1997, the team's tech- 
nical direction will be entrusted to Mr. 
F. Capello." 

That was all. No regal balcony ap- 
pearance from n Pres i den te Silvio Ber- 
lusconi. No profusion of promises. No 
apology to journalists branded liars and 
fabricators for writing in April that Fa- 
bio Capello would return. 

"The situation is not as dramatic as 
they say," Berlusconi had scoffed, 
standing by his coach, Airigo SacchL 
* ‘All we need are the results and a bit of 
luck. Perhaps a trip to Lourdes would 
sort everything out.” 

The solution is more pragmatic, more 
costly. Sacchi was Milan's first U-turn; 
Capello was waiting to be the second. 
Through contempt, or because even 
Berlusconi was embarrassed, the club 
tried to bluff « out 

Berlusconi has a hide as tough as his 
image is sleek, but he has a heart for 
soccer. He brushes off political humi- 
liation like a hair from his collar. He 
mocks those seeking to prosecute him 
for alleged fraud. 

But Milano is his base, the focus of 
his popularity. Whatever Berlusconi's 
reasons for buying the club and picking 
it up when it was bankrupt, soccer in- 
sistently gets beneath the skin. 

I don't doubt his Milan will rise 
again. I don't suppose the cost of losing 
Capello last summer and hiring, then 
firing, Oscar Washington Tabarez and 
Sacchi in turn will inhibit spending. 

Three coaches in one year is unlikely 
to work out at less than $5 million in 
salaries and payoffs. Three changes of 
mind, as the club slumped from cham- 
pion of Italy, Europe and the world, 
brought a loss of face and income. We 
never really know the cost, but finishing 
1 1th in Serie A, losing more games than 
it wins, scoring fewer goals than it con- 
cedes is a pretty humiliating downfall. 

Last summer, Adriano GaJliani, the 
chief executive at AC Milan, presum- 
ably thinking coaches were as inter- 
changeable as light bulbs, insulted 
Capello by effectively putting him on 


probation for his next contract Galliani 
must have bad presidential approval, but 
he as good as showed Capello the door. 

Milan offered him a one-year con- 
tract extension and said that would only 
be renewed if the team won Serie A or 
the UEFA Champions’ League this sea- 
son. This to a coach whose record was 
four league triumphs and the Cham- 
pions’ Cup in five seasons. 

Capello is not universally loved. His 
strategy is to stifle the opposition and 
then strike. His handling of players can 
be brusque, demanding, disciplinarian. 

But he gets results. This season, ruff- 
ling the feathers of Real Madrid in the 
boardroom and on die t raining field, 
CapeUo has had a normal season — he 
coached a previously ailing Madrid to 
the Spanish championship. 

While Milan lost 13 games — four 
times the average number of defeats in a 
season under CapeUo — Real Madrid 
succumbed in only three. Milan 
mustered just 43 goals in 34 matches. 
Real Madrid scored 85 in 41 games. The 
defensive solidity of Milan was trans- 
ported to Madrid. 

So, about the time the press reported 
that Berlusconi was courting Capello, 
his old flame, CapeUo was making it 
known that working in Spain was 10 
times as difficult as in Italy. 

CapeUo broadcast that it was "im- 
possible to find a harmony of dialogue 
with Lorenzo Sanz and his collabor- 
ators.'' The Real Madrid president re- 
turned gratuitous insults in kind and 
lined up Jupp Heynckes, the coach to 
Tenerife, to succeed CapeUo. 

But Capello and Sanz stayed together 
until the title was won. Of course, Capello 
said it was lies, damned press lies, mat he 
had a Milan borne to go back to. 

We, the liars and fabricators, have our 
day. CapeUo is back where he belongs, 
in the city where his sons are at uni- 
versity. The contract resumes July 1, 
while the buying and selling, the re- 
appraisal of those CapeUo left behind 
began some time ago. 

The stalwarts, Paolo Maldini, Aless- 
andro Costacurta and Demetrio Alb- 
ertini will be looked in the eye and asked 
whether they have the will to start again 
under CapeUo's demanding regimen. 
The old leader Franco Baresi, 37, hav- 
ing denied the aging process thus far, 
will be ruthlessly put to the test. 


***** 

" . ... 





!y* . 



nA-;.'- 

n! • 



I T (* < 





: ■ r/rin 
-.'■■bixf 




Leonardo of Brazil, right, competing for the ball with Dullio Da vino and 


IW w~'»c*nrr Irinrr- 

Villa, left, of Mexico. 




Brazil Fights Back to Down Mexico , 3-2 


Reuters 

SANTA CRUZ, Bolivia — Brazil 
fought back from two goals down to 
beat understrength Mexico. 3-2, in an 
enthralling Copa America match. 

A stunning left-foot strike by Le- 
onardo 10 minutes from the end of the 
game Monday gave Brazil the victory in 
whai has been a lackluster tournament 

Two Fust-half goals by the striker 


Luis Hernandez put Mexico on top. 
But Brazil replied through Aldair and 
a Romano shot that was deflected in 
by the Mexico defender Caroilo 
Romero before Leonardo scored the 
winner from a narrow angle. 

"The second half was a magnificent 
• victory for art over strength. We pro- 
duced great technique, everything the 
fan likes to see,” said Mario Zagallo, 


the Brazil coach. "But we must never 
be as apathetic as we were in the first 
half.” 

In die other Group C game, Neider 
Morrantes scored twice as Colombia 
beat Costa Rica, 4-1. 

world cup Australia advanced to 
the next stage of the World Cup soccer 


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qualifying round Tuesday by beating 
the Solomon Islands. 6-2, in Sydney. 




! \ W > 


WAMfti 


The rejuvenated Roberto Baggio, gif- 
ted beyond words, will be retained only 
if CapeUo believes be is ready For more 
consistency than in the past four years. 
George Weah would need ro be the 
player of 1995. not the egotist of 1996. 

And there will be new blood, perhaps 
repatriated blood. Capello took right 
back Christian Panucri from Milan to 


Madrid. He brought Roberto Carlos, a 
match winner from defense, to Spain 
and turned Argentina’s Redondo into a 
tremendous force. 

It is, of course, media “lies” dr at 
suggest CapeUo will remove the pillars 
of Madrid to shore up Milan. But soccer 
moves in predictable ways. 

One player CapeUo did not get along 


with was Gianluigi Lentini. He was rhe 
winger Berlusconi bought six years ago 
for an aUeged $16 million. 

But with CapeUo’s second coming, 
Lentini has been offloaded on a free 
transfer back to Torino. The harsh de- 
cisions have begun. 

Rob Hughes is on ihe staff of The 
Times of London. 



Scoreboard 




BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 


3S 29 SA7 — 
M 30 S38 2 


EASTOMStOM 

W L Pd. GB 

Baltimore 45 20 .492 - 

Newport, 17 30 -S52 9 

Toronto 31 33 .4 U 1314 

Detroit V 36 Mi 16 

Boston W 3S .433 17 

CENTRAL UVBON 

Cleveland 34 30 S31 - 

Karoos City 33 33 .492 

IVUttrouKee 31 34 ATI 3'i 

Chkmja 30 3fi 455 5 

Minnesota 30 37 448 S 1 * 

WEST DMS40H 

Seattle 38 29 S47 - 

Tew 35 30 538 2 

Anaheim 34 32 JI5 3'y 

Oakland 38 41 tot 11 

NAnOMALlEAOItS 

EAST DIVISION 

W L M. 6i 

Atlanta JJ 35 AT! - 

Florida 40 37 S97 2W 

Montreal 39 28 S82 3H 

New YMtc 37 30 SSI 5W 

Philadelphia 32 44 433 20 

CENTRAL DIVISION 

Piltshurgii 33 34 493 - 

Houston 33 36 .478 I 

SI. Lows 31 34 -463 2 

Ondnnoti 26 39 ^18 5 

Chicago 28 40 J12 57, 

WEST DIVISION 


34 32 its 3‘S 

38 41 .404 11 


26 39 .418 5 

28 40 412 57, 


San Franctsae 

38 

29 

S67 

— 

Colorado 

36 

32 

-529 

2'A 

Los Angelos 

33 

35 

.478 

6 

San Dtego 

n 

38 

433 

9 


MONDAY'S IINKOMS 
Chiagacuta 23i on oit—8 m g 

Cftfcdgo WIHN So* 082 MI 090-3 9 0 

Faster, R.Tata (7], Roias l9i and Senate 
Navarra. Karchner (8). MeEfruy N) and 
Fobroqas. 8V— Foster, W. L— Navarra. W. 
HR— Chicago White 5a*. LMouton Ui. 
Atlanta no 000-3 8 0 

Toronto 000 000 000-0 5 0 

Hwstoond J. two CtemcnsandOTitefi. 
W — Ncoglis 10-1. L— Clemens. 11-2. 
HR— Atlanta. ChJones M 
Florida 301 DOB 011—7 13 0 

Dalrnil 010 020 000—3 A I 

KJ. Brown, Powell 191 and C. Johnson. 
Biar. Soger W. M. Myero roi. Broeaii TO and 


Casanova. W—K. J Brown, 7-4 L — Btah.d-3. 
HR— DehoiL O. «ni«(l). 

N.Y.Meto 300 BOO 201-4 9 2 

N.Y. Yankees 000 000 OOM 9 I 

AUrcU and Hundtey: PeWHe, Lloyd (8} and 
OrardL W-MIMM. 3-5. L — PettSta. 9-4. 

SL Locks 000 000 000-4 5 0 

MihmakM 000 000 001-1 . 4 I 

ALBeneS and Difeficer BAAcOanald 
Wkhmon (71 and Maftwny, Levte TO. 
W— Wlckmarv 4-2. L— ALBenes, 4-4. 
HP— Mffuraukee. Bwnttz (8). 

Pifftturgh 022 200 110-8 15 0 

Minnesota 000 ON 051—4 ? I 

Schmidt Plncon (8). LoiseUe TO and 
Kendall: Alflrod. FrJtadrtguez IS), Ritahie 
(8), Aguilera TO and StainbaCh. W— Schnridl 
2-4. L-AWred 2-?a Sv— LoiseOe (7). 
HRs— Plttstwigh, NLSrnmi 11). PatankJi 
(I). Mlimesata, SWnbodi (4). 

PtiBadataUa 010 100 020 0-4 11 1 
Bastes on 010 0M 1-5 15 2 

10 tailings 

Beech Spradlin (7), Battalia) (91 and 
Ueberttafc Cordon, Brantenhutg TO. 
Hammond <B). Wasdin (101 and Hatrebeig, 
Stanley (1W. w-Wasdia 1-3. L-Bortalka 
1 J. HR— Boston. Mack m. 

Houston NO 101 000-2 4 1 

Kansas Cty 000 OlO «*-5 11 1 

Hampton. R. Springer C71. Martin (71 and 
Au&nu'u Rosado and AAocFariwie. 
W— Rosado. 7-3. L— Hampton. 7-6. 
HR-Haustaa L GdraolM O). 

MOfllRd IK 200 014-6 12 I 

Baffimare WO 010 2H>-1 9 0 

Hermansoa Tetford (7). Dool TO. D. Veres 
(7). Utairta (8) and FleWten BasUa 
MUohnson (6). MMs TO. Orosco TO and 
Hoflos. w— Hermansoa 3-4. L— Bosnia 3-3. 
Sv— Urtlna (12). HBs— Montreal Lansnp 
f10t. McGdiro (3). Baltimons Surhoff (9). 
Holies (8). 

cJndnaTi Olo on iM-e 7 o 

CtonHmd 000 0W 001-1 7 1 

Tomka Belinda (8). Stem TO and Fardyce 
Henhiscr. Assenmachw TO, Shuey (9). 
Mormon (9) and S. Atomur. W- Tomka 3-1. 
L— Heishtew. 6-1 HR— Qew. Painmu TO. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 

G AB R H Avg, 

F Thomas ChW 57 202 » 79 391 

b Alomar Cle 51 185 33 68 J68 

WCIark Ta> S3 189 30 68 360 

Justice Cle 60 306 43 72 350 


Cara Sea 
E Martina Sea 
MVauptro Bm 
Greer Tex 
IRodripooz Tex 
Offerman KC 
SurhattBai 


62 231 46 79 342 

67 246 47 83 337 

65 239 A 60 .335 


62 M8 42 B6 333 

48 198 28 U 233 

57 207 34 49 JJ33 


RUNS— Griffey Jr. Seattle, 57; BeWHltams, 
New York, 54; Knoblauch, Minnesota, 54; A. 
Radrisuez. Seattle. 51: F. Thomas. CMcapa. 
M; M. Voujhn, Boston 4ft Jeter, New Yort, 
47; HolDirs, Anaheim. 47; E. Martinet 
Seattla47. 

RBI — Griffey Jc Seattle. 7Z T. Mariha. 
New York. 41; Belle, Chicago. 61; F. Thomoi 
Oncogai SSi ToOariL Detroit Si Thome. 
OwetortL Stt BeWaftamt, New York, 5b 
Buhner, Seattle, SO: McGwbto Oakland 50. 

HITS— G. Anderson. Anahelaw 87; A. 
Rodriguez. Seattle 8& I. Rodriguez, Trans, 
8#f BeWUlams. New Yort. 8% E- MorttrKt 
Seattle. 8X- Gwdaporm Boston. 82; 
Edmonds. Anaheim. 8ft- NL Vaughn Boston 
BD. 

DOUBLES — Sprague, Toronto. 2% a 
■Nefli New York, Zfc A. Rodriguez. Seatlte 31; 
Greer, Terns, 2ft artOo. MAmuLm. 20; l. 
Rodriguez. Teas, 2ft Cato. Seattle, 20. 

TRIPLES— CaffikgMtttl' Boston 5 ; Jeter, 
New Yarfc 5; Vizauei Onatond % Oaimr. 
Kansas Cty, * B LHimter, Detroit A 

Knoblauch. Minnesotn 4; OffemMik Kansas 
CBy, 4 Alicea Anahebn 4 
HOME RUNS— GTffley Jr, Seattle. 2); 
McGwire, OaUatift 24 T. Maittnez. New 
Yon, 31; M. Vttugfm, Boston 2ft ToCIa*, 
Detroit 18. Thame, Ctevetomt Ift Justtae, 
Ctovdand. 17. 

STOLEN BASES— T. Goodwin Katws 
City, 38; KnabtaadL Maxtesata. 2 ft Nixon 
Toronto. 28. B. LHuntw, Detroit 27; Vbquet 
Cleveland, lft Durham, Chrcaga, 17; Bvmltz, 
MHwaufcea 14 

PITCHING « Denteal— Key. 
BaNimora 11-1, .917, 247; R. aJchman 
Seattle, 10-1, 30 9, 2-3* Mussina Batflmoru 
8-1, J89, 3Sd Clemens, Toronto. 11-3. Mb, 
2JOi Erickson Betti more, 9-2. BIB. 3i4 
Fasseia Seattle 4-2, ,75ft 183; Mayer. 
5eofllafl-l .7511438. 

STRIKEOUTS — RoJchttton Seatte, 132; 
Conn New York. 12ft Clemens. Tororria 10ft 
Appiec Kansas Oty, 9ft B. McDonald. 
NUiwaalme. 85; Hentgen Taranto. BL 
Mussina Battnnoie. 82. 

SAVES— RnM yen. Btaflraaia 23; M. 
Rhraa New Yak. 21: WMtekmL Texas, 1ft 
DoJones. Milwaukee, Ti Aguttem 
Mtonesato, 14 Taylor. Oaktana H R. 
Hernandez. Chkoga 13. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS 

LWoftetCd te JC tf 161 in 

GwjmnSO 66 246 44 105 J96 

Plana LA 63 222 40 81 J65 

Lanfetord SIL 48 174 39 61 JSI 

Lofton AH 66 281 49 96 J42 

Gataroga Col 64 251 57 85 335 

BtoueerAlt 66 213 39 71 J33 


SAVES — Beck. San Francisco. 21; Nen. 
Florida 17; JoFroncn New York. 17; 
ToWotreft Los Angem. IS; Buttofica 
PWodrtpWa 14 Wohlers, Atlanta. 1ft 
EcketsJey, 5t. Louis. Ift 


Japanese Leagues 


Bagwell Hau 69 257 47 84 SO 

Bonilla Flo 64 237 27 76 J2l 


w 

L 

7 

PdL 

GB 

DSonderedn 63 263 30 84 J19 

Yakut! 

37 

21 

— 

J438 

— 

RUNS — L Walker, CoJantaa, 6ft- 

Hiroshima 

29 

27 

— 

.518 

72) 

Gakvraga Cbtoroda 57; Blggta Houston, 5ft 

H Olsten 

29 

29 

— 

.500 

82) 

Lofton. Atlanta 49; Burks. Cotorodo. a* 

Chunichi 

27 

30 

— 

.474 

9J 

ECYoung, CoWrodo. 47; BagureO, Houston 

Yokohama 

24 

29 

— 

•453 

105 

47. 

Yomtort 

U 

34 

— 

AU 

m 


4 Bernhard Langeo Gartnany 33&499M 
5. Miguel Angel Martin Spoln 31 7.05485 
A Per-lltrik Johansson Sweden 314.48472 

7. Lee Westwood, Engtand 31U15J0 

8. Thonxrs Bfom, Denmark 292466AS 

9. Costonhno Roccn Italy 2S473SA7 

10. Paul Broadhwst England 227,90468 

11. Sam Torrance, Seotkmd 22X47142 

12. Jose Maria (Mz&bal. Spain XUSHto 
II Peter Mttoheft England 197,82847 
14 David Ghforit England 181.12095 

15. Jean Van da Vahte France 175.92422 


SOCCER 


RUGBY UNION 


RBI — G u l uim ga Gotaroda 71; Bagwell 
Houston 65. Aknt Florida, Aft L WfAer, 
Cotorodo. 5ft Kent San Francisco, 54 
CasttOa Coioradn 5 ft sosn Chicoga si. 

HITS— Gerypn San Dlega IQS; L Waricer. 
Cotorada lOi. Lotion Altanta 9ft Blggia 
Houston 8ft Gatomga Coierefe Bi 
EeYoimft Catorada 84 Bagwell Houston 
84 D. Saidem Clndmtto 84 

DOUBLES— Grudzielanek. Montreal 27; 
BonNa Florida 2ft dflytorv SI. Louis, 21; 
Boftereft Houston 21; Morandvi 
Philadelphia 21; L Walkes Cotoradn 21; 
Blggtft Houston 2Q. 

TRIPLES— W. Gaetma Las Angeles, ft 
Randa. Ptoshurgh ft WOtnadt Pittsburgh, ft 
tte. SlueME. SI Louis, ft D. Sandws, 
Cincinnati ft Tudces Atlanta St KendoL 
Pittsburgh, 4- E< Young. Cotorada ft Mdtae, 
Chkagg.4. 

HOME RUNS— Bogwefl, Houston 2ft L. 
Wo dear, Cotorodo, 2ft Gataraga Cotaroda 
18) Casttda Cotoradn lft Lankfant 5t LouS, 
15; Hundtey. New YoriUS; Sosa CMcaga, |S; 
BorXs. Cotoradn IS. 

STOLEN BASES— D. Sandaa Cincinnati 
SftWmttfc Pittsburgh, 24 D. eShMdn SI. 
Laute 2ft Lofton Atlanta 19: EcYouno. 
Catorada 17; GrvdzManefL MontreaL Ift 
Cloyton St. Louis, lft 
PITCHING (8 oedston)— Neagta 
Altanta 10-1. .909, 2.87; P. JMartmeA 
MordreoL 9-2. -8lft 14ft Esles. San 
Fnnosca 8-2. BOft 2.99: B. J Jones, Now 
YoriL H-1 786, 24ft Juden Mon (real 7-2, 
J7ft 4 4ft Gardner, Son Frandm 7-ft .77ft 
3.1ft KSn Houston 7-3. JOft 2.1ft G. 
Maddux. Atlanta 7 3. .70ft TJX 
STRJKEOim-Sdiaibta. PNfadetohto. 
lift AIBenas, SL Loota, lift P. JMorttnez. 
Montreal lift Nemo, Los Angeles. 103; K_ 
J Brown, Ftorida 9ft R. Martinez, Ln 
Angeles. 87; SteMemyra St. Loots, 86. 


TUBMAY'B RESULTS 

Yomiuri 2, Yakut? 1 (14 innfcgs) 
Hiroshbtra 6, Hanshtai S (12 Innings) 
rokohamo & Chunichi 0 

MOKUAIHIl 


■UIHH kJONSTOM 

TUESDAY. M WB1MSTOH, SOUTH ARRtCA 

Emerging SpttepboLs 22, Brttbh Ltons 51 


CROUP C 

Cotombto 4 Coeto Rica 1 ■ 

Brazil X Mexico 2 

STANDMQSc Brazil 6 potato; Colombia ft 
Mexico 1 Costa Rico a 

WORLD COP OBJUTOS 

OGCANUZDNE 
CROUP 1 

Australia ft S trio men Islands 2 
STXIIDBMli Australa 9 points; Sotornon 
Uond*ftTahBia 

Aestarita oualMed tor Oceania tMe ptay«ff 

wttti group 7 wbinor. 

CMNWi RRsr DfinuON 

Athletic Bilbao 1 Deporflvo Coruna 0 

Port Mtekid92 polnte Bor- 
cetona 87J Deporihro Corona 74 Real Bafts 
74 Aliettco Madrid 71; AthtoOc Blftoo 64_ 


dlsrritled &st. RecDBed C Mike Hobfaata fn* 
lownAA. 

PLDtUM— Read ted OF BOy Mc«*f 
from CTiarioitB. IL. Put INF Alex Arisen 15- 
doy diseMed Bst. Optioned RHP Lhwi Her 
nand« to Choriotte, CL. Recntad RHP An- 
tonio Alfonseca from Charlotte. 

new yorx— Activated OF UroceJobM® 
from 15-day disabled Bst Bough* twritad 
INF Jason Hordlke (ram Norfolk, ft- 3** 
RHP-Bony Manuel outright to NortoA PJ 
INF Shawn Gilbert on 15-doy dtaiWnf « 
Transferred OF Andy Twnheritete35d«ki 
60-day disatried KsL 

SAN dieoo— A ctnmled P Andy AsWnr f®", 
lSday disabled tat Optioned P Todd Ei*». 
te Mobile SL and OF Trey BeOTwa to US 
Vegas. PCL. . 

PHILADELPHIA — Pvt RHP 

Stephenson. 2B-OF R» Hwfier and 
Ken Ryan on iS-day rBsitotod Bst. Porchta" 
contract o* RHP Sam RirffcomhamSats** 


UARME) 






U7S, 


M £ nt \ 


Otter 31 2D — 408 — 

Seibu 32 23 1 .58? 1J) 

Dtnd 29 29 - J00 SJ 

Nippon Horn 27 31 — M6 JS 

Lotte 23 29 2 442 &5 

KmJefsu 23 33 1 41] 105 

iwnriinii» 

Orix 4 Kintetsu S 

Oatei & Nippon Ham 40? Imdngs) 

Setter 1. Lottel (12lroWigsJ 


T 

1 

Pd. GB 

-603 - 
.58? ID 

Ducenskutd 24 Francs 34 

1 TRANSITIONS ( 

WtUuK-Barte. IL Recofcd RHP N . 

Gomm ond IF Kevin Sefdk from Staffii*"' X* 
WBtes-Barm, IL . v — 

3C M 

2 

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MTTSBUBen- Traded RHP 5coflTayl0f“ 

Caigwy. pa to Ihe 5TO Diego, Acflw*l ,^S 

Mari Snritti bum Iftrii* dimteed fSL ^ - L 

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jorniNK mum mm cop 

S te nrin gs lor 1887 Ryder Cup to to 
Ptoyed SepL 28-28 et ltolderranu in So- 
tegrnde, Spain. itaplOOntohmstHD qualify 
tor l2<oen teams. LLS. captain ihm Kite end 
European captain Swa BaBeateros «Bi an- 
lea two pleyera sr targe to eomptem bkti 
H am: 

UMTED STATES 

l. Toro Lehman 1014290 points. 2. Tlga 
Woods lOISJOft 1 Mark OMearo 8C1 asft 4. 
Brad Faxon 727 JOQ; 5. Scott Hoch 711 .947; &. 
Tommy Toft* 689J8ft 7. PnH Michelsan 
65929ft ft Davis Low III 63830ft 9. Stew 
Jones 57928ft 10. Jim FlKVk 57230ft 11. 
Mart. Brooks 54975ft 1ft Pari StankowsW 
SU34ft 1 1 Jeff Moggeri 476425; 14. Justin 
Leonora 470jnft 15. Davtd Duval 415JI0D 

eurdpc 

I. Coin Montgomerie, Scotland 675. 73 193 
ft Ion Wouanota Woles 44737532 
3. Dairen Clarke. N.lretond 38I34K64 


wnunams 

1. Morton Hlngb Swttzeitantk ft 189 potato 

2. Monica Seles. US* ft 497 

3. Steffi GroL Germany: ft4$1 

4 Jana Nowtna, Crech RepuUta 3,143 

5. Ivo Map*, Croatia, 1141 

6. Ltodsar Davenport U5*ft556' 

7. Amanda Coetzeo South Africa, 2539 

8. AiAe Huber, Germany. 2360 

9. Arantxa Sanchez Vienna Spain, 2354 
lft Mary Pterca Franca ft310 
U.CmcMta Maiiinn, Sp*v 1223 

12. Mary Jee Famandez, Uft* 2088 

13. Irma Spblea Romenta 1 ,812 
lLKMberiyPaUa. 1481 

IS. Brando SchuKz-McCorthy. Nettu l, 4BI 


1 . Pete Sampras. U.S « 4743 points 

2. MlchortO«no.US,ft727 

3. Coran hmnhevfc Croatia 2861 
4 Thomas Muster, Austria 2724 

5. Yevgeitf Katotolkov. Russta 2^82 

6. RkfKrt Krailcek. Nethartanda 2431 

7. Alex Corretja Spain 2208 
B. Serai Bnrguera, Spate. 2,176 

9. Thom® Engnst Sweden, 2148 

10. Marteto Rtoa Ch8e. 2092 

11. Cartel Moya Spain 2405 

Ift GustoM Kuerten Brazil 1.878 

13. Mari PMppaussta Australia l J45 

14. After! Costa Spain, 1230 

15. Alberto Benwrtegui. Spate. 1303 


tatm 15-day disabled feL Sen! RHP Bitan 
Wffionts to Rochester, IL- 

Chicago— P ot IB FranK Thomason 15-doy 
dhabled tel remotfn hi June 7. Recalled 
IB Mario Valdez ham NashW8e.AA. 

CUV EUhd— A ssigned C Adam Toylor, 
LHP Mark Taylor. RHP Segn DePauki and 
WP RMnraNevOtato Wotertown, NY-Pt. 
“-tastanedC Pat Evans to Catomtes. SAU 
Starred RHP Robert Voet OF Dutton Mohr 
«t«2B Joseph KRrerg. 

DETSOrT_PutOF Bobby Hlggteson an 15- 
fay disabled Bst retroactive to June 11. Re- 
Odled INF- OF Joe Had from Toledo, tu 
pto rred C C hristopher Parker, 78 Daniel 
“Wfartottw. mid LHP Richard Roberto. 

*EW YOftn— Activated RHP Dw^M Gaod- 
wjnen 15-doy dhabled list Optioned OF 
«ott P«« to Columbus IL Assigned RHP 
Hideki Intou to Norwich, EL RHP Tony Ar- 
roasandOF OrnkShumpertto Tampa FSL 
and RHP Daniel Mote ond C Rene Pinto to 
OnwnlaNY-PL 

taMPA bay— S igned SS Jason Goerere. 

TWAS-Acthmted RHP Dormy Pattnan 

ttbrn 1 5-day dtoariedlht Optioned RHP Jose 
Atorero to OUotrema Gty, AA. 

TOjWYo-Rei*^ OF Ruben Sretra. Re- 
caned INF Tamos Perw hum Syracuiei IL 
HXnONAL IXAOUC 

CHieA O O — P ut C Tyfcr Houston on 15-doy 


•toned OF Freddy Garda to Corofina, SL . 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCWWh 
Detroit— S igned Doug Coffins, eewft * 
rei w goitoted 5 - yet n u n Uud . 


NATKMAL FOOTBALL LEAOUS 

AKtnita-SIgnedG Anthony Rednw » '' 
year contract. Released LB Seth Jonwr. , 
ATLANTA —Released LB So* 

WR Pete Alien. 

ATLAHTA-Slgned G Sa* Daws » ftF* 

confrucL RB Harold Graen to Mwrttjjj 0 
and 5 Moreus WlmbertT to 3-yeorm*2_ 
buffalo -Re-signed TE Rote" Gw? 
OL Corbin Locmo. TE Lonnie 
Carey LoacMey, LB Mario Pe"7- 
Rogers. LB Oawd WWta OL J«y 
and RB Tim Tindata Slgired «- H* 0 * 

CAROLINA .-S-KSlKSr'J 
Mam Mtetor. Waived LB Emdt H»rta^ 
Reggie Garnett DT Tim CoisSKi ana " 

CedrlcZodrety. 

onanNATi-Ri- signed WR Ch«w ^ 
to l-yeorax ilro cL _ ^ 

KANSAS -Waned OB Stew Bono, smn* 0 
CB Mari McMffltai to 
miami— S igned OB Dro Marin e to 

Contract extension teroegh 

YoM Green, to ft year cantrod ^ 

Madison to *-ytw controd. 



I t* ™ 


HMiSUft 


fjl Mi . , ~~~ — * 

1 S I\II 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18. 1997 


u i ;,v 


* 'I si 


SPORTS 





PAGE 21 


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Uj ^Mla an All-Ohio Match 

Tomko Outpitches Hershiser, 4-1 , 
On a Night of Interleague Play 


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It wasn’t a Subway Series or a North 
Side vs. South Side battle. It wasn't 
even a memorable game — unless you 
were Brett Tomko. 

The 24-year-old rookie returned to 
his hometown and pitched the Cincin- 
nati Reds to a 4-1 victory over the 
Cleveland Indians on Monday night in 
the first interleague meeting between 
Ohio's two major-league clubs. 

Tomko. bom in Cleveland, outdueled 
former Cy Young Award winner Orel 
Hershiser in the first regular-season 

Bauball Rou nd or 

meeting between the teams after 96 
years of both of them being in the majors 
— plus a two-hour rain delay. 

"It’s just an incredible night," said 
Tomko, who gave up five hits, struck 
out four and walked three in 7'A shutout 
innings. "To go against him, especially 
when it's 1-0 deep into the game, I was 
thinking, ‘This is kind of cool. We’re 
battling.’” 

Cleveland's 161st consecutive sellout 
crowd arrived early for the first inter- 
league contest at Jacobs Field, and most 
stayed, through the rain delay. After 96 
years, what’s a couple of boors? 

Except for Tomko, it was a bigger 
deal to the fans than to the players. 

"I don't think for us it means too 
much," said Omar Vizquel, the Indians* 
shortstop. 

“I don't think it's a rivalry just because 
we haven't played them, " die Cleveland 
first baseman Jim Thome agreed. 

Deion Sanders, the leadoff hitter for 
the Reds, swung and missed a pitch 
from Hershiser to start the game as flash 
bulbs popped throughout die park. The 
flamboyant hitter, who beard a smat- 
tering of boos, struck out swinging and 
jogged back to the dugout 

"I felt like 1 knew how to pitch them, 
and they knew me," said Hershiser, a 
longtime National Leaguer who gave up 
two runs and five hits in eight innings in 
his 29th career start against the Reds. “I 
felt like I was back in the National 
League again." 

The Reds got a run on a Cleveland 
error in the second innin g and scored on 
three singles against Hershiser in the 
seventh. Mike Hargrove, the Cleveland 
manager, was ejected by the third-base 
umpire, Ed Hickox, for arguing too vig- 
, orously over a call. 

1 "For what I said, I -would have 
thrown me out, too," Hargrove said 

BanyLarkin, the Cincinnati shortstop, 
strained his left calf in the second inning 
and left -the game. He has missed 10 
games ids season with injuries. 

Expose, Orioles 4 Mike Lansing and 
Ryan McGuire homered as Montreal 
won before a sellout crowd of 47 ,557 in 
Baltimore. 

The Expos, who have won all four of 
the team's interleague games, gained 
their 10th straight victory after taking a 
5-0 lead in four innings. 

The Orioles, coming off a three-game 
sweep in Atlanta that gave them the best 
record in the majors, got home runs 
from Chris Hoiles and B J. Surboff. 

Brant 3, Blue Jays 0 Denny Neagle 
stopped Atlanta's longest losing streak 
of the season at four, outpitching Roger 
Clemens at Toronto’s SkyDorae. 


Chipper Jones homered as the Braves 
beat the team they lost to in the 1992 
World Series. The Braves visited 
Toronto for a pair of sprina training 
games in 1993. 

Neagle (1 0-1) pitched a five-hitter 
and did not allow a runner past second 
base in his second shutout of the season. 
Clemens { 11-2) lost his second straight 
stan despite striking out 12. 

A crowd of 34,409 — 4,000 more 
than Toronto has averaged — saw the 
Blue Jays’ first nonexhibition game at 
home against a National League team 
since Joe Carter's three-run homer 
against Philadelphia ended the 1993 
World Series. 

RodSox5,PfuBiea4 Philadelphia's left 
fielder Gregg Jefferies took extra field- 
ing practice before the game at Fenway 
Park, trying to become familiar with the 
famed Green Monster. 

It helped, as he twice held Boston 
players to singles on balls hit off the 
wall. But in the ninth inning. Jefferies 
misplayed a fly near the crammed 
corner into a double, setting up a pinch- 
hit, two-run double by Troy O’Leary 
that tied it at 4-4. 

The Red Sox won in the 10th when 
O’Leary was hit by a pitch from Ricky 
Bottalico with two out and the bases 
loaded. 

The game drew a crowd of 26.926, 
only 800 more than the Red Sax have 
averaged this season. 

Brawm 1 , Cantnalt O On a night 
dominated by pitching, there were only 
two mistakes on the mound in Mil- 
waukee — by acting commissioner Bad 
Selig to stan the evening and by Sl 
L ouis staner Alan Benes to end it. 

Jeromy Bumitz homered off Benes 
with one oat in the bottom of the ninth 
inning, finishing the game between die 
f I982 World Series rivals. 

Selig threw out the ceremonial first 
ball. But the Milwaukee owner's toss 
bounced and was 20 feet wide of the 
plate. 

The crowd of 23,503 was 9.152 high- 
er than the Brewers’ average. 

Marlins 7, T fears 3 Pitching 59 years 
and a day after Johnny Vander Meer 
became the only major leaguer to throw 
consecutive no-hitters, Kevin Brown 
lost his chance to match that feat in the 
second inning at Tiger Stadium. 

But Brown, who held San Francisco 
hitless last Wednesday, still pitched 
well enough to win as Florida dropped 
Detroit to 0-4 in interleague play. . 

Marlins designated hitter Jim Eis- 
enreich drove in two runs. The game 
drew 23,874, about 10,000 more than 
the Tigers have averaged. 

Royals 5, Astro* 2 Jeff King had three 
hits and drove in three runs as Kansas 
City won the first interleague game at 
Kauffman Stadium. 

The game drew 22,528 fans, about 
4,000 more than Royals’ average. 

Pirates 8, Twins 6 Mark Smith 
homered in the first at-bat by a Pitts- 
burgh designated hitter as the Pirates 
became the first National League team 
to win at die Metrodome. 

Minnesota swept eight home games 
in two World Series against St. Louis 
(1987) and Atlanta (1991). The Twins 
lost this contest before a crowd of just 
16.007, nearly 2,000 below their av- 
erage for the season so far. 



A Face-Off 
Old Casey 
WouldVe 
Relished 


By George Veesey 

,Yrn Hint Haw* Srrrar 




I'iip • ■■■ L.I 1 VI. ‘Ii I1-- 

The Cubs’ Brian McRae hustling back to first base as Mario Valdez of the White Sox awaits the throw. 

Avenging 1906: Cubs Beat White Sox 


• t.'nmptnlfc Our iruff Fiddi Dhpuuitn 

CHICAGO — The highlights of the 
historic interleague game at Comiskey 
Park were greeted with dissonant 
rounds of cheers and boos, never just 
one or the other. Chicago Cubs fans 
from the city’s North Side were 
scattered among White Sox fans from 
the city's South Side, the effect being 
thar each tried to outshout the other, and 
neither team seemed quite at home. 

In this simultaneously friendly and 
hostile environment, the Cubs defeated 
the White Sox, 8-3, in the first regular 
. season game ever between these 
crosstown rivals. 

An old standby, Ryne Sandberg, got 
three hits for the’Cubs. The Cubs start- 
ing pitcher Kevin Foster, who grew up a 
Cute fan in the northern suburb of 
Evanston, gave up three earned runs in 
six innings. White Sox starter Jaime 
Navarro, a former Cub, helped his 
former teammates considerably, allow- 
ing 11 hits and seven earned runs in 7 X A 
innings. After the Cubs’ early scoring 
splurge, tite White Sox came back with 
three runs in the next four innings but 
never made a game of it. 

The Iasi rime anyone took a Cubs- 
White Sox game seriously — at least in 
relation to die record book — was when 
Frank (Wildfire) Schulte of the Tinker- 
to-Evers-to-Chance Cubs grounded out 
against Doc White of the Hitless Won- . 
der White Sox — they hit seven homers 
all year — to give the White Sox an 8-3 
victory that wrapped up the 1906 World 
Series. Time fries. Monday, 91 years 
later, the Cubs and the White Sox did it 
again. And again the score was 8-3, 


although this time the Cubs came out on 
top. 

Of course, the World Series of 1 906 is 
a faded memory — as are most World 
Series appearances by Chicago teams, 
considering that the White Sox have not 
played in one in 38 years and the Cute in 
52 years. 

So Cub and Sox fans were able to vent 
their hostilities and root their hearts out 
for a game between them that finally 
counted: Each team wore commemor- 
ative uniforms: the Sox in the white caps 
and white home baseball suit of 191/. 
the Cubs in the navy blue and gray of 
their 1911-12 teams. 

‘‘They’re going to be a little bit 
warm,’ * Cubs pitcher Terry Mulholland 
said before the game. "But let’s put il 
this way: I’m happy to play in my 
undies." 

And how did the players feel about 
this interleague business? "If the fans 
like it," said the White Sox shortstop. 
Ozzie Guillen, "then I like it." 

And the Cubs' manager. Jim Riggle- 
man, said: "I was reluctant at first — I 
mean. I thought it was successful the 
other way. But when I saw that at- 
tendance over the past weekend of in- 
terleague play was up 40 percent. I 
changed my mind.- This is what the fans 
obviously want." 

Eddie Einhora, the White Sox vice, 
president, placed the interleague situ- 
ation ui a certain perspective. Referring 
to the return of regular league rivals, he 
said, "I'm more concerned about when 
Minnesota comes to town this weekend, 
and how we’U draw." 

Jerry Reinsdorf, the White Sox own- 


er. was concerned that too many Cubs 
fans would attend Monday's game, thus 
sapping his employees of the home- 
field advantage. So he tried a few 
dodges of selling tickets so that only 
White Sox fans might have an incentive 
to buy them, but that idea failed miser- 
ably. 

And indeed, there appeared to be as 
many Cubs caps in the stands Monday 
as Sox chapeaux. 

One Cubs capper was John Graham, a 
North Side plumber. "Some friends of 
mine worried that I was taking a risk in 
wearing the Cubs hat here," he said. 
"But to be a Cub fan you have to be 
brave — or crazy." He smiled. "And so 
here lam." 

"No question this is a big game to a 
lot of people in this city." Cubs first 
baseman Mark Grace said. "There have 
been a lot of drunk fights over the years 
in bar rooms, in front of television sets. 
After years and years and years of ar- 
guing, we will finally find out after these 
three games. 

"It's not like the old times of playing 
in exhibitions, all fun and games. These 
games are important, and not only in the 
standings. I'm not going to insult any- 
body's intelligence and say there's not 
pride .on the line. There is.” 

Even Mayor Richard Daley, who 
wore a white souvenir cap in his seat 
behind the batter's box. couldn’t as- 
sume a neutral stance. 

Daly grew up blocks from Comiskey 
Park. "I'm a Sox fan," Daley said. 
"Cubs fans understand. When the Cubs 
play ‘ anv other team. I’m a Cubs 
fan." ‘ (NIT. WP) 


NEW YORK — “Break up the Mets- 
ies." Casey Stengel would have cackled 
— unless, of course, he happened to be 
manaaing the Yankees. 

The Old Man. who done splendid 
with both of these ball clubs, used to say 
that "in baseball, every day you see 
something you never saw before." 

It was certainly true Monday night. 
Neither Casey nor anybody else had 
ever seen an "official league game be- 
tween a New York American League 

Vantage Point 

team and a New York National League 
team, until his old Manhattan/Queens 
team stunned his old Bronx team by a 6- 
0 score behind Dave Miicki. who is 
closer to Jav Hook than Whuey Ford. 

In Casey's .Amazin' Mets days, that 
would have been worth a sprightly ga- 
votte around the clubhouse, dressed or 
otherwise. And Monday night a very- 
vocal one-third of the attendance roared 
its approval. 

When the visitors erupted for three 
runs in the first inning, the blase Mets. 
who had been maintaining this was just 
another l/162d of their season, gave 
each other high-fives on the top step of 
the dugout. On a lovely cool night, 
many players wore light blue and bright 
orange jackets, giving the night an Oc- 
tober flair. And when Cecil Fielder 
struck out to end the first inning, that 
some noisy minority bounced a cheer 
off the walls of the Bronx County' Court- 
house. 

Casey would have loved it. I pictured 
him. a cantankerous old Father Knick- 
erbocker or Peter Stuyvesam, looking 
down at his two clubs, the once-solemn 
Yankees and the formerly horrendous 
Metsies, and not knowing which way to 
root. 

Casey collected the spontaneous ec- 
centricities of baseball — Marv Throne- 
berry, who played for both these ball 
clubs, missing both first and second 
bases while legging out what would 
have been a triple. 

Never saw that before, the Old Man 
mused. 

The novelty Monday night was 
neither spontaneous nor eccentric, but 
rather the blatant ploy of the owners, 
who have given us Yanks-Mets, Cubs- 
White Sox and eventually Blue Jays- 
Expos and a few other interleague 
games that might actually touch the 
hearts and souls of a city or a region ora 
nation. The rest of this two-week frolic 
consists of quickie series between 
mostly unnatural opponents. 

The night itself was peacefuL Gary’ 
Peterson of Levinown, New York, even 
took his daughter. Jennifer, a student at 
Wisdom Lane Middle School, both 
wearing Mets’ colors. 

"Oh, I worried about it a little," 
Peterson said. "I got tickets in the upper 
deck, and I envisioned myself being 
harassed by all kinds of people, but we 
had to come here." 

His daughter unzipped her Mets’ 
jacket and revealed a T-shirt that said: 
"I Root for 2 Teams — The Mets and 
Whoever’s Playing the Yankees.” She 
zipped it up again, wisely. 


; " DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 

















r 


PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 1997 


OBSERVER 


Reading Sans Pain 


The Outsider Who Became a Blockbuster 





By Russell Baker 


hem with outrageous 
floats heretical ideas he'd nev- 


By Phoebe Hoban 

New York Times Seniee . 


VTEW YORK — Reader, it 
-L i is widely said that you no 
longer read. Saddened by 
news that you no longer read, I 
have sacrificed hours of tele- 
vision viewing toreadforyou. 
From these exhausting bouts 
with the printed word, 1 have 
extracted, especially for you, 
a few passages that would do 
everybody a world of good to 
read and, then, ponder. 


THE TRANSIENCE OF 
CLAMOUR — In the 1930s 
Stanley Walker, one of the 
great New York Herald 
Tribune city editors, wrote 
about the glories of his trade: 

“A newsman knows ev- 
erything. He is aware not only 
of what goes on in the world 
today, but his brain is a re- 
pository of the wisdom of the 
ages. He is not only hand- 
some, but he has the physical 
strength which enables him to 
perform great feats of energy. 
. . . Men admire him. women 
adore him, tycoons and states- 
men are willing ro share their 
secrets with him. He hates lies 
and meanness and sham, but 
he keeps his temper. He is 
loyal to his paper, and when he 
dies a lot of people are sorry, 
and some of them remember 
him for several days." 


cr admit in public, and so 
forth. . . . (T]hat we act dif- 
ferent in private than in public 
is everyone's most conspicu- 
ous experience, it is the very 
ground of die life of die in- 
dividual; curiously, this ob- 
vious fact remains uncon- 
scious, unacknowledged. . . . 
[Tjt is rarely understood to be 
die value one must defend be- 
yond all others ... the in- 
dispensable condition, the 
sine qua non, for a man to live 
free. 


DEMOCRACY'S GRAN - 
DEUR — In the following 
passage from a Freedom For- 
um publication, Jim Squires, 
former editor of The Chicago 
Tribune, characterized the 
portrait of President Clinton 
drawn by Martin Walker in 
“The President We De- 
serve." a book about the 1996 


. .walker profiled Clin- 
ton as the quintessential pro- 
duct of the modem American 
political system: a perfect can- 


didate blessed with soap-op- 
era good looks and a preach- 


ers good looks and a preach- 
er’s sincerity. A creature of 
timing and courage with the 
energy of an atom, the quick- 
ness of a computer, the lives of 
a cat and the soul of a cat 


burglar. A candidate who em- 
bodied the American dream. 


MEMO FOR PROSECU- 
TORS — * ‘Crazy Rhythm,’ ’ a 
memoir by Leonard Garment, 
who worked for Richard Nix- 
on, is an elegant book about an 
inelegant time. In it Garment 


quotes the following from the 
Czech author Milan Kundera: 


Czech author Milan Kundera: 

“P]n private, a person says 
all sorts of things, slurs 
friends, uses coarse language, 
acts silly, tells dirty jokes, re- 
peats himself, makes a com- 
panion laugh by shocking 


bodied the American dream, 
invariably promising more 
than he delivered and talking a 
better game than he played. A 
man who came from nothing 
but through resourcefulness 
became everything to every- 
one, however and whenever 
necessary, to be thechoiceof a 
here-today-gone-tomorrow 
American voter with the at- 
tention span of a flashbulb and 
a remote control in hand. A 
president for his time. Exactly 
what we deserve.” 

New York Times Sen iee 


N EW YORK — On the opening 
night of the exhibition “The 
Lost World" at the Museum of 
Natural History in May, Jeff Gold- 
blum, the hero of Steven Spiel- 
berg’s latest blockbuster, “The 
Lost World," seemed to be every- 
where, as if he, like his dinosaur co- 
stars, had been cloned. 

There he was on a series of video 
monitors, talking about making the 
“Jurassic Park” sequel. There he 
was in the "Extinction Theatre,” 
narrating a short film about the the- 
ory that dinosaurs were done in by a 
meteor from outer space. And there 
he was backed into a comer, all 6 feet 
4 inches ofhim. neatly obliterated by 
a stampede of autograph-seeking 
children who were at least as ag- 
gressive as the mischievous mini- 
ature dinosaurs in the opening scenes 
of "The Lost World. "They were 
so sweet!" he said the next day. “I 
was melted." And he doesn't mean 
the kind of oozing condition he ex- 
perienced in David Cronenberg's 
1986 film, "The Fly." 

Dressed from head to toe in sleek 
black, Goldblum does not live up to 
his advance press; he is nothing Like 
the nutty -professor type he often 
plays. His friends, from the “Lost 
World" screenwriter David Koepp 
to the actor Vince Vaughn, do a 
dead-on impression of Goldblum's 
trademark conversational style — a 
kind of Thelonious Monk approach 
to small talk, with quicksilver stop- 
start sentences, glissando intona- 
tion and the repetition of certain 
key words. But in person, despite 
his verbal tics, Goldblum is pos- 
itively Zen-like. 

“I'm enjoying this time period 
right now, but who knows what 
will happen?" Goldblum said of 
his current ubiquity. 

Five years ago, Goldblum had a 
cameo in Robert Altman's film 
"The Player," - playing Jeff Gold- 
blum. But given the success of * The 
Lost World." which has already 
grossed $190 million in the United 
States, it’s safe to say that Gold- 


blum, 44, has now entered that stra- 
tosphere where he himself is a play- 
er, courageously holding his own 
against the world’s most spectacular 
special effects. “He is to sci-fi what 
Arnold Schwarzenegger is to action 
films," said Dean Devlin, who 
wrote the script for “Independence 
Day” with its director, Roland Em- 
merich. "He has this ability to make 
wild concepts understandable, and 
he is one of the few people who can 
really pull off that technobabble.” 

“The Lost World" is Gold- 
blum's third film — including * ‘In- 
dependence Day" and “Jurassic 
Park" — to break box-office re- 
cords in the past several years. But 
the actor has arrived at mega- 
bankability after one of the. more 
meandering careers in Hollywood 
— two decades after he first sur- 
faced in movies by auteurs like 
Robert Altman. Paul Mazursky and 
Philip Kaufman. 

• It's a long way from the flam- 
boy am biker Goldblum portrayed in 
"Nashville" to the role of Dr. Ian 
Malcolm, “chaotician" extraordi- 
naire in the * ‘Jurassic Park” movies, 
a thinking woman’s action hero. 

Over the course of 46 films. 
Goldblum has carved out a niche 
for himself as a charmingly oddball 
outsider the opportunistic People 
magazine reporter in Lawrence 
Kasdan’s baby-boomer classic, 
"The Big Chill"; the heanbreak- 
ingly brilliant scientist in “7116 
Fly," Cronenberg’s creepy ro- 
mantic tragedy; the narcissistic 
artist in Christopher Columbus's 
“Nine Months," and the nerdy he- 
ro of “Independence Day." 

The only common denominator 
is Goldblum's ability to commu- 
nicate an uncommon level of in- 



covered by a talent scour in. high 
school, but she never pursued ir. 

Jeff was the third of four chil- 
dren; his older brother Rick died of 

a sudden illness at the age of 23: ius 
sister, Pamela, a painter, lives in 
Los Angeles, and his oldest broth- 
er, Lee. works in real estate in. 
Pittsburgh. From the rime he was a 




young child, Goldblum played pi- 
ano and was the family mimic. The 


li'Aui IWI,mll.wTh- V-* Y»ii Tim-* 

Jeff Goldblum: “I used to pray, ‘Please, God, let me be an actor.’ ” 


teliigence. “You’ll have to excuse 
Dr. Malcolm," said Richard At- 


tenborough as John Hammond in 
“Jurassic Park." “He suffers from 
a deplorable excess of personal- 
ity." One could say the same for 
the actor, it's an excess that Gold- 
blum has honed into a talent for 
creating characters who are simul- 
taneously cerebral and sexy. 

“Jeff is an actor who can make 


the line ‘No, I won’t' sound in- 
teresting and inspired." said 
Koepp. "He exudes intelligence. 
The thing I like about him is that he 
thinks of himself as his character's 
lawyer. If he feels that you are 
doing something that belittles or is 
beneath his character, he's on it 
immediately. And he's got such a 
particular sensibility and particular 
rhythm and attitude that you are 
crazy if you don't sit down with him 
and work together on dialogue." 

For a man who has managed to 
make chaos theory commercial. 


Goldblum is disarmingly modest. 


“I was dying to be an actor, and 
that's about the extent of my master 


plan," he said. “And I guess I have 
been surfing the wave of whatever 


been surfing the wave of whatever 
has appealed to me. But I do feel at 
home in a variety of things, and I 
think it’s partly because it all feels 
like acting to me.'* 

Goldblum grew up in West 
Homestead, Pennyslvania. the son 
of parents who had show-business 
aspirations. His father, Harold, be- 
came a successful physician. His 
mother. Shirley, had been dis- 


acring bug bit when he was sent to 
music camp the summer after be 
was in fifth grade and was cast as 
die lead m a Gilbert and Sullivan 
takeoff. By the tune he was IS, he 
was taking drama classes at Carne- 
gie Mellon University. 

“I had the umc of my life 
there," he said. “I became ob- 
sessed. I used to pray. ‘Please. God, 
let me be an actor.’ " 

At 17, he moved to New York 
City and studied with Sanford 
Meisner at the Neighborhood Play- 
house. When fhe Public Theatre 
called and asked for "someone 
talL” he was cast in the New York 
Shakespeare Festival's "Two Gen- 
tleman of Verona.'’ which later 
moved to Broadway. He got his first 
film role in 1974. as a thug in the 
vigilante bloodfest "Death Wish." 

Soon afterward, Robert Altman, 
snick in New York during a bliz- 
zard, saw Goldblum in the musical 
“El Grande de Coca-Cola" and 
decided to cast him in "California 
Split” as a frustrated actor. Gold- 
blum was anything but: one role 
flowed seamlessly into another, 
and his film credits soon included 
"Nashville.” “Next Stop Green- 
wich Village,” “Between the 
Lines” and “The Right Stuff.** 

Spielberg didn't think twice 
about casting him in “Jurassic 
Park” (1993), calling it a “no- 
brainer choice." When it came to 
the sequel, Spielberg said: “There 


i seizes ri 

'Killing 1 *# 


• tm 

-*n-**NH 




*■‘■**4 K 





is no Ian. Malcolm except as played 
bv Jeff. In the first film, the Ian 


by Jeff. In the first film, the Ian 
Malcolm character was along for 
the ride, criticizing everybody, 
telling them they were wrong. In 
this one, Jeff as Ian is the 'con- 
structive force leading the joume> 
into the adventure.” 




4rtoM|F#jMg| 

iJ CTI M J 


PEOPLE 


S ITTING at the edge of the stage 
singing, "I’m So Lonesome I Could 


O singing "I’m So Lonesome I Could 
Cry” to a hushed audience, LeAnn 
Rimes seemed way ahead of her des- 
ignation by fan voters as a “star of 
tomorrow. ’’ The 14-year-old newcomer 
was also co-host of the 3 1st TNN Music 
City News Awards at the Grand Ole 
Opry House in Nashville, Tennessee, 
with old pros George Jones and Randy 
T ravis. Alan Jackson received his fifth 
straight honor for best entertainer and 
sixth for best male vocalise Brooks & 
Dunn won best vocal duo for the fourth 
straight year, and Lorrie Morgan won 
her second best female vocalist award. 
The Statler Brothers won the best vo- 
cal group award for the 24th time in the 
last 25 years. Alabama interrupted the 
streak in 1983. 


Paltrow. 24, met in 1995 on die set of the 
drama “Seven." In March, Pitt told 
Rolling Stone magazine that it was love 
at first sight. He said he got * 1 goofy’ * the 
minute he got “within 10 feet of her.” 



23 Receive MacArthur Foundation Awards 


By William H. Honan 

New York Tunes Sen-ice 


The Irish singer Sinead O'Connor 
has canceled a Jerusalem concert on 
Saturday night that was to have pro- 
moted the city as a capital for Israelis and 
Palestinians, saying that she had re- 
ceived death threats. 


China is planning to preserve the 
mily home of the late Bruce Lee in 


Brad Pitt and Gwyneth Paltrow 
have broken off their engagement and 
are splitting up. No reason for the break- 
up of the two-and-a-half-year relation- 
ship was given in the brief statement 
released by Pitt's publicist. Pitt. 32, and 


family home of the late Bruce Lee in 
southern Guangdong province as a me- 
morial to the martial arts film star. Lee’s 
home in Shunde will become a kind of 
memorial hall to celebrate the kung-fu 
star’s contribution to spreading know- 
ledge about martial ans. 



N EW YORK — Elouise Cobell had 
just landed at an airport in northern 


fossae at biology and anthropology at the Univeniiy at 
Utah whose multidisciplinary work combines evol- 
utionary biology, ecology and animal behavior. 
S300.000. 

Peier Calison. 42. of Cambridge. Massachusetts, a 






1 1 just landed at an airport in northern 
Montana last Friday when she was giv- 
en two messages: her luggage was lost, 
and a philanthropy based in Chicago 
wanted to give her $3 10,000. 

“I cried for three, hours,” said 
Cobell, the leading founder of the 
Blackfeet National Bank, the first bank 
organized by American Indians to be 
given a federal charter. 

CobelL 51, who lives on the Black- 
feet Reservation in northern Montana, 
was one of 23 winners of MacArthur 
Fellowships announced Monday by the 
John and Catherine MacArthur Foun- 
dation of Chicago. 

These are this year’s other fellows: 

Luis Alfaro. 35. of Los Angeles, a performance 
artist. playwright and poet. S230.000. 


professor of the history of science and of physics at 
Harvard University who focuses on the importance of 


The actress Geena Davis and director 
Renny Harlin are ending their marriage 
after four years. 


Lee Burner. 60. of New York, a writer and play- 
wright with the Mabou Mines Theatre, which he 
.co founded in 1970. S355.000. 

Vija Celmins. 58. of New York, an independent 
painter and prim-maker. S 345.00) 

Eric Charoov, 49. of Summit Park. Utah, a pro- 


(t'A-'i 'Tlw* 11^ 

Alan Jackson accepting an award. 


Harvard University who focuses on the importance of 
scientific instruments. S265 j000. 

Mark Harrington. 37. or New York, policy director 
of the Treatment Actioa Group who has advanced the 
know ledge of AIDS treatment. S246.000. 

Eva Harris. 31. of San Francisco, on adjunct pro- 
fessor of biology at the University of California at San 
Francisco whose work has facilitated the diagnosis and 
treatment of disease in Central America and South 
America. S21QJQ00. 

Michael Kreruer. 32. of Cambridge. Massachusetts, 
a professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology whore models give answers to bask 
economic questions in original ways. S2 1 5.000. 

Russell Lande. 45. of Eugene. Oregon, a professor 
of biology at the University of Oregon whose work in 
quantitative, genetics has influenced many areas of 
evolutionary biology. 5280.000. 

- Kerry James Marshall. 41. of Chicago, a painter 
who portrays the lives of lower middle-class and 
middle -class African-Americans. S 260.000. 

Nancy Moran. 42. of Tucson. Arizona, a professor 
or ecology and evolunofury biology whose work has 
led to a new understanding of the evolutionary forces 
controlling sexual reproduction and the role of al- 
truistic behav for. S265.0Q0. 

Han Ong. 29. of New York, a playwright and 
performer mho depicts life in urban, multicultural 
America. S 200.000. 

Kathleen Ross. 56. of Toppenish. Wash., president 


and an-founder of Heritage College m Toppeiu-h 

which serves the Yakama Indian Nation. S3-? * Q . 

Pamela Somuelson. 48. of Berkeley. California a if PI I 3 J )’ M 9*M 

prtrfessor of information mamsemeiu and of law jtihc'i/ f #f ^ * l q 

Utuvcniry of California at Berkeley studying how 
modem methods of communication are aitcctiru in- 
tellectual property rights. $295,000. . I 

Susan Stewart. 45.of Philadelphia, a professor ot. I li fig $ i d t f M 
Englishotthe University of ifennsyhanu wlu>,a -.voik {,* I f f / * f £ M f- 
includes a study of how iheran practices mf!uer.ve2 " I 


English at the University of ftmnvyhanu who 
includes a study of how Iherary practices mf! 
social perception and activity . 5280.0W. 


social perception and activity . 5280.00a 

Elizabeth Streb. 47. of New York City, a dancer and- ■ 
choreographer who has experimented wnh what Ha- 
been called ' gravity-defying movement." S290 .i.kxi 
T rimpin. 45. of Seattle, a musician and sculpt".* 
who creates installations of sound- and mustc-nukmc 
machines. 5280.000. 


Loic J. D. Waoquam. 36.of Berkeley . a professor or 
Etiology al the Univeniiy of Calrfamu at Berkeley - 


sociology al the Univeniiy of Calrfamu at Berkeley - 
who Iras w-nnen extensively about urban poverty. 

5235.000. 

Kan Elizabeth Walker. 2’. of Providence. Rhode 
Island, an artist who explores racial, physical jnd 
sexual expkriurion. SI 90^KM. 

David Foster Wallace. 35. ofBloomtngti *n. Him- 'is. 
a professor of English at Illinois State Univer-ity ar.d j 
novelist noted for his inventive wordplay, intellectual 
rigor and w hat has been called postmodern absurdwn. 

5230.000. 

Andrew Wiles. 44. of Princeton. Sew Jersey, a 
professor of mathematics at Prince too University w ho 
has provided insights wuh his exploration of the my ?- 
renes of number theory . $275,000. 

Bracketre William*. 46. of Tucson. Arizona, an 
anthropologist who focuses on cultural ideniitv and . 
social relationships. S285DOO. 


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Please check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers, 


AT&T Access Numbers 




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938 OOO 8798 lilt; 
raomi 


Alijiriawo 

flelginm* 

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Franca . ... 

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Sraace* . . 

Ireland 

Italy* . .. 

Mathartands*. 

Russia •A(Mo»n}> 

Spain 


o-sao-ina-ia 
M-42-fl B0-101 
0-800-9WW11 
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00-800-1311 

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172-1 BIT 

0000-022-9111 

755-5042 

900-99-00-11 


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Swttzwland' 


...020-796-611 

9800-03-0911 


OWHH&OOn 


EBypi»{Cairo)f 
Israel . .. 
Saudi Arabia ^ . 


MIDDLE EAST 


510-0200 
177-100-2727 
1-000-10 


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Kenya* 

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