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INTERNATIONAL 





une 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspapei 


London, Thursday, June 19, 1997 


U.S. Seizes Fugitive 
For Killings at CIA 

Afghan Tribal Leaders Aid in Capture 
Of Man Wanted for Virginia Shootings 


tir Foundation .tiamlt 


" By Tim Weiner 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — U.S. officiate 
working with Afghan tribal leaders 
and Pakistani intelligence officers 
have seized the lone suspect in the 
killing of two CIA officers that took 
place outside the agency’s headquar- 
ters in Virginia, according to gov- 
ernment officials. 

After a four-and-a-half-year man- 
hunt that reached from. Washington’s 

A Saadi dissident is charged with 
terrorism in the U.S. Page 8. 

suburbs to Afghanistan's deserts, the 
suspect, Mir Amal Kansu a 33-year- 
old Pakistani , was handed over by 
“Afghan individuals” after the 
United States had placed a $2 million 
reward on his head, the FBI said Tues- 
day. Government officials refused to 
say whether the money had been paid 
to the Afghans or how they bad cap- 
tured the suspect 

Mr. Kansi was flown to Wash- 
ington and taken to the jail in Fairfax 
County, Virginia, on Tuesday night 

[Mr. Kansi. wearing a dark green 
prison suit sneakers and a lead iden- 
tification wristband, appeared in a 
brief court session Wednesday morn- 
ing and told Judge J. Howe Brown that 
he understood the charges against him 


but could not afford an attorney. The 
Associated Press reported. Mr. Brown 
ordered that counsel be appointed and 
set a court date of June 21. 

[Mr. Brown said Mr. Kansi faced 
10 charges, five for the two murders 
and the wounding of three other 
people, and five more for illegal use of 
a weapon in those assaults. He granted 
a request by the prosecutor. Robot 
Horan, that Mr. Kansi be held without 
bond because of the seriousness of the 
charges and because be fled thecoun- 
try the day after the crime. Mr. Horan 
said after the hearing that be planned 
to seek the death penalty.} 

Mr. Kansi had been a fugitive since 
the morning of Jan. 25, 1993. That 
day, five commuters in a morning 
rush-hour jam outside the gates of the 
CIA headquarters in Langley, Vir- 
ginia, were shot by a gunman firing an 
AK-4-7 automatic rifle. All but one 
worked for the CIA. Two CIA em- 
ployees — Frank Darling, a com- 
munications engineer. and I .anting 
Bennett, a doctor — died. 

Mr. Kansi 's trail went cold by the 
time die FBI and the CIA tracked bis 
path from his Virginia apartment to 
nearby Dulles International Airport. 
The day after the shootings, he 
boarded a flight from New York to 
Islamabad, the capital of Pakistan, 
and a second flight to his family’s 

See ARREST, Page 8 



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MILE-HIGH SUMMIT — A horse-drawn carriage passing under an array of flags in Denver on Wednesday 
as the city prepared for a Group of Seven summit meeting. Russia will play a major role In the deliberations. 

Citing 6 . Patriotism , ’ Erbakan Quits 

Turkish Leader Pushes Ciller as Successor to Maintain Coalition 


Soaring Trade Surplus 
Puts Japan Under Fire 


, By Kattonlas 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Japan’s trade surplus 
«nh the rest of the work) tripled in May, 
the government anitoonced Wednesday, 
and Tokyo immediately found itself un- 
der fire from U.S. officiate over its trade 
practices. 

The surplus with the United States 
nearly doubled, rising for the eighth 
consecutive month and heightening 
concerns that Tokyo and Washington 
could clash over Japanese import bar- 
riers again.perfjaps as soon as this week- 
end at a summit meeting of the Group of 
Seven industrial nations in Denver. 

- . Further dramatizing the surge of ex- 
ports from Asia, China announced that 
its foreign trade surplus in die first five 
months of this year had surpassed the 
figure for all of 1996, Agence France- 
Prese reported from Beijing. 

• In May, Chinese exports jumped 24.9 
percent compared with the same month 
last year, to $15.2 billion, for a monthly 
trade surplus of $3.6 billion, the State 
Statistics Bureau reported. 

Exports from January through May 
stood at $65.5 billion, a leap of 26.4 
pereeatfrooi the same 1 996 period, fora 
trade surplus of $13.9 billion. China's 
trade surplus in 1996 stood at $12J3 
billion. 

AU.S. official in Tokyo said the new 
Japanese dam served to “reinforce our 
concern That the surplus appears to be 
climbing again” and that Japan could 
post a “significant increase” in its sur- 
plus this year. As a result, officiate in the 
United States are likely to have frank 


concern that the surplus appears to be 
climbing again and that this year there 
may be a significant increase' in Japan’s 
trade surplus,” he said. . 

Mamoru Yamasaki, an economist at 
Paribas Capital Markets in Tokyo, sad, 
“U.S. officials will want to know 
what’s going on.” 

“Japan has been insisting for months 
that its trade surplus is not rising, but the 
figures just keep going higher,” he said. 
“I wonder whether the U.S. believes 
what Japan says any more.” 

See SURPLUS, Page 8 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New Yori Tunes Service 

ISTANBUL — Yielding to military- 
led pressure that had become unbear- 
able. Prime Minister Necmetrin 
Erbakan, the first head of an Islamic 
party to lead Turkey, resigned Wednes- 
day after nearly a year in power. 

*T resigned because I am a true pa- 
triot,*' Mr. Erbakan said after a 45- 
minute meeting with President Suley- 
man Demirel. He asked the president to 
keep his coalition in power by naming 
his junior partner. Foreign Minister 
Tansu Ciller, as his successor. 

Mr. Demirel made no statement, 
however, and aides said he would begin 
consultations with party leaders on 
Thursday. 

Mr. Erbakan, who will remain in of- 
fice until his successor is sworn in, 
resigned after a sustained political as- 
sault by senior generate that some com- 
mentators have likened to a “soft 
coup.” 

It provided Turks with the specter of a 
powerful institution that considers itself 
to be so committed to defending de- 
mocracy that it is willing to use means 
that in many countries would be con- 
sidered undemocratic. 


*. . 1 ■ 

7J- > 



Tansu Ciller. Prime minister again? 


. likened this maneuver to “an airplane 
One secular leader, Denis Baykal of , being refueled while it is flying.” 
the Republican People’s Party, said foe It is not clear when elections might be 

military had played the role of a “demo- called, but aides to Mr. Erbakan said he 
cratic pressure group.” would like them to be held as early as 

“We cannot ignore the fact that the possible, perhaps in October, 
army has contributed to this develop- . ^federal prosecutor has filed a suit 
ment,” Mr. Baykal said. “The thorn asking that Mr. Erbakan's Welfare Party 
that dug itself into the foot of the demo- banned as subversive, and party lead- 

craric regime has been plucked out ' * erifeacthat if elections are not held soon, 

Whoever Mr. Demirel chooses as ' 
prime minister must put together a gov- 


See TURKEY, Page 8 


Czechs Have Little Inclination 
To Debate Benefits of NATO 


AGENDA 

UN Inspector Urges Crackdown on Iraq 


By Christine Spolar 

Washington Post Service 

PRAGUE — Ask Prime Minister 
Vaclav Klaus if the people of the Czech 
Republic need to know more about what 
it will mean for their country to join the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and 
he instantly wants to end the conver- 
sation. . . 

“Fm not interested,” be said just 

seconds into an inter- _ 

view as he reached to ■ _ 


Snnlar Surveys in Poland and Hungary, the 

two other former Warsaw Pact countries 

r T ,ux - expected to be invited to join the al- 

Prime Minister lianceat a NATO summit meeting early 
>p|e of the Czech next month, show stronger public sup- 
more about what port for membership. 

>untry to join the But the apparent apathy in the Czech 

)iganizatio*i,and Republic, and the prime minister’s re- 
eud the convex- sponse to it, illustrates what many dip- 
lomats and politicians in and outside 
U” be said just Eastern Europe see as a lingering weak- 

ness of the new de- 
mocracies — relat- 
Eastward Ho! ively little public 

vjy Second of threo articles discussion or debate. 
t 'senator Jo&eoh Bi- 


UNITED NATIONS, New York 
(Reuters) — The chief UN arms in- 
spector, Rolf Ekeus, called on 
Wednesday for a firm reaction by the 
Security Council to what he said was 
Iraq’s repeated blocking of UN 
weapons inspection teams. 

He said Iraq's actions were “a 
clear violation” of the council's res- 
olutions. 

“If Iraq is allowed now to decide 
what we should inspect, when we 
should inspect it, 1 think the value of 
the whole mechanism set up after tire 


Gulf War would be put into ques- 
tion,” he said, referring to the com- 
mission set up to scrap Baghdad's 
weapons of mass destruction and en- 
sure that they were not replaced. 

In Baghdad. Iraq said Wednesday 
that a UN inspection team had com- 
mitted a “flagrant aggression” by 
entering churches and monasteries on 
the outskirts of Baghdad. 

The United Nations acknowledged 
the transgression by the International 
Atomic Energy Agency inspectors 
and called it a “terrible mistake.'’ 


post a “significant increase” in its sur- halt a tape recorder, /fo tasxwara no. ,veiy ntue public 
plus this year. As a result, officiate in the “I don’t see the point. W Second of three articles discussion or debate. 

United States are likely to have frank I’m absolutely sure i SenaiorJosepb Bi- 

words far their Japanese counterparts • they are sufficiently , . Jr-. Democrat of 

when they meet ontoesidelines of the educated. To me, education of people is Delaware, pounced on the issue last 
G-7 sinnmiL analysts said. not a real issue.” mondi in a review of the top contenders 

“We’re watching this closely,”, said In fact, polls show that Czecte could for the Senate Foreign Refenons Gom- 

tbe U.S. offidalwbo asked not to be use some persuasion about the benefits mPtee. Onzranes areimclearabou 
named. JapanJtenoted, has “pledged to of NATO membership. A recent survey *e mutual nulitery obligations that 
in its ccrreat-ac- showed that if a referendum were held NATO entails, he wrote, addmg tirat 
count rarnlus” on the issue, less than 40 percent would governments need to “quickly embark 

“bK numbers do reinforce our vote for NATO membership. About a ^“cauon camf«Jgm so that 

third said they would vote against join- NATO duties and costs do not catch 

1 ing NATO, and the others said they did their populations off guard.” 

ipi . .ri* rn • f not know enough about the military 

l DEI J? mance LUlCI alliance to form an opinion. See CZECHS, Page 6 


Thai Finance Chief 
.iQoftsas Stocks Fall 

The Thau finance minister, Am- 
unayVn^van, facing criticism about 
his policies to shores a struggling 
economy; will resign Thursday, a 
spokesman said Wednesday. 

S peculation that the resignation 
wag imminent triggered a 3 percent 
decfin& of Thailand’s benchmark 
stock index to an eight-y ear low. 
TfebaM alw fen. Page 13. 


month in a review of the top contenders 
for the Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee. “Citizenries are unclear about 
the mutual military obligations that 
NATO entails,” be wrote, adding that 
governments need to “quickly embark 
on public education campaigns” so that 
NATO duties and costs do not “catch 
their populations off guard.” 

See CZECHS, Page 6 



The Dollar 


PAGE TWO 

N*w York 

Wednesday O 4 PAL 

previous doss 

The Good Old Days in America 


1.6383 

1.6393 

ASIA Pages. 

Yen 

iiaes 

113.315 

China's Army and Hong Kong Law 

FF 

5.8465 

5.8367 

EUROPE Page 6. 

* 

-42.07 

The Dow 


A Neo Nasi "Time Bomb 7 

7718.71 

7760.78 

Books Page 9. 

Crossword Page 18. 


S&P 500 


Opinion Pages 10-11. 

change 

-5.36 

Wednesday 6 * PM. 

889.06 

pevtousdOM 

894.42 

Sports Pages 18-19. 


% 


No. 35,551 


eminent that can win support from a 
majority of the 550 members of Par- 
liament. With major parties suffering 
defections and party leaders offering 
various inducements to wavering mem- 
bers, it is highly uncertain that either 
Mrs. Ciller or the main opposition lead- 
er, Mesut Yilmaz, could succeed. 

Mr. DemirePs alternative, either after 
failures by party leaders or instead of 
choosing them, is to name a caretaker 
government that would lead the country 
to elections within 90 days. 

Despite his resignation. Mr. Erbakan, 
a political veteran of three decades, re- 
mains popular and has no intention of 
leaving the political stage. Indeed, he 
said this week that he was stepping 
down only as a way of reinforcing his 
mandate through new elections. He 


Surrender 
Of Pol Pot 
Is Reported 
la Cambodia 

JPs a Ruse, Some Say, 
But Prospect of Trial 
Is Greeted by Cheer 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Sen-isr 


PHNOM PENH — One of the most 
reviled figures of the century, the fu- 
gitive Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pol. 
surrendered Wednesday to his former 
comrades, according (o a clandestine 
rebel broadcast. 

The broadcast was greeted with as- 
tonishment, joy and skepticism by Cam- 
bodian officials and by foreign analysts 
who have spent much of their lives trying 
to penetrate the workings of the brutal 
and often bizarre Maoist movement. 

It suddenly opened the prospect that 
Mr. Pol Pot. 69, could be put on trial for 
the killings of more than 1 million Cam- 
bodians during a reign pf terror from 
1975 to 1 979. a prospect that few people 
had believed could ever come to pass. 

“If it happens, it will be the first time 
in a Jong lime that we have had such a 
figure available for trial,” said Steven 
Heder. a lecturer at the University of 
London who is a leading expert on the 
Khmer Rouge. 

“It would be extraordinary if instead 
of being shot in the jungle or living out 
his days still fighting, he would be 
brought to justice,” he added. 

But the broadcast also suggested to 
experts on the Khmer Rouge that an 
elaborate scenario was being played out 
in which Mr. Pol Pot’s surrender, or the 
report of his surrender, was intended to 
dear the way for an amnesty for other 
culpable officiate. 

One possible scenario also involved 
the creation of a future coalition of 

See POL POT, Page 8 

British Join 
Lockheed 
On Fighter 

By Barry James ’ 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — British Aerospace PLC 
announced Wednesday that it would 
shun Boeing Co. and join with Lock- 
heed Martin Corp. as a partner in the 
competition to build a joint strike fighter 
for the United Stales armed forces. 

Lockheed Martin and BAe will co- 
operate on the $719 million conceptual 
phase of the. project to produce two 
demonstration aircraft. British Aero- 
space said it would also take part in 
development and production if Lock- 
heed Martin wins the $80 billion con- 
tract to build the fighter. 

The U.S. government will choose the 
winner between the Lockheed Martin 
team and its rival, Boeing, in 2001. 
Deliveries are to start in 2008. 

With its expertise in vertical take-off 
and landing technology, British Aero- 
space brings a valuable contribution to 
Lockheed Martin. 

A partnership with Boeing might 
have seemed more logical. British 
Aerospace is already a sub-contractor 
oq civilian airliner work for Boeing and 
a partner with McDonnell Douglas 
Crap., which Boeing is in the process of 
taking over. But Lockheed Martin made 
no secret during the Paris Air Show this 
week of its interest in trans-Atlantic 
partnerships and has been aggressively 

See FIGHTER, Page 8 


Meager Results in Amsterdam Point Up the ElPs Weariness 

" tiv Tnm Rn<»rlrlp support for integration. Instead of fill- eminent emphasized by its unu 

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Prime Mfa&ter Jospin, left and President Chirac of France stw 
the^lfeHs'ofa graefing round off EU talks that ended early Wednt 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

AMSTERDAM — To get a feel for 
the true state of European politics 
. today, one only bad to look at the 

• haggard, disgruntled expressions on 

• foe faces of Eorope’s leaders as they 
emerg ed from a final marathon session 

; of constitutional negotiations in the 
predawn hours Wednesday morning. 

.; Concluding two years of bargaining 
7bn areform package that was supposed 
to prepare the European Union to ex- 
>nand eastward while simultaneously 
ZfOTging deeper political integration 
/among its existing members, foe lead- 
os, by their own definition, fell woe- 
f- ^ fully short of the maik- 

fheir new treaty of Amsterdam re- 
flected a lack of will and consensus for 
bold political Initiatives at a time when 
high unemployment has sapped public 


support for integration. Instead of ful- 
filling foe 1992 Maastricht treaty’s 
promise of a European political union 
with common foreign, defense and in- 
terior policies, the leaders opted for 
watered-down compromises and a de- 
ferral of a decision on power-sharing 
issues. 

“No leadership, no appetite,” was 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

the blunt verdict of one European of- 
ficial here. 

Or, as Chancellor Helmut Kohl said 
upon his return to Bonn: “We could 
not expect everybody to impose his 
ideal Europe. There were too many 
conflicting interests.” 

The meager result underscored foe 
continuing role of monetary union as 
Europe's one, true vehicle for closer 
integration, something the Dutch gov- 


ernment emphasized by its unusual de- 
cision to hold foe meeting inside the 
country's central bank. 

But it also left foe single-currency 
project resting on shaky political foun- 
dations. 

The Amsterdam gathering revealed 
a resurgence of old national rivalries 
reinforced by the divisive forces of 
social and budget problems. Prime 
Minister Lionel Jospin of France 
struggled to reconcile his employment 
promises with Europe’s single cur- 
rency. Mr. Kohl showjed himself too 
preoccupied by Germany's worsening 
budget and unenmloyment problems to 
act as foe motor for deeper integration. 
And Prime Minister Tony Blair was 

See EUROPE, Page 6 

Hie sounds of discord. Page 6. 


I 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


From Prosperity to Gloom / And Back Again 


Are These America’s ‘Good Old Days’? Not So Fast 


By Louis UchiteUe 

New York Tbnn Service 


N EW YORK — In 1946. with World 
War II barely over, life magazine 
published a photo essay presenting 
what it called the “roseate and won- 
drous’’ American dream. 

A single-story, stoae-and-clapboard home ap- 
peared in die centerfold. Spread over the front 
lawn were the gadgets of envisioned prosperity: 
a convertible passenger car, a three-bomer elec- 
tric stove, a snail television screen embedded in 
a bulky wooden cabinet, a children’s slide, 
flimsy aluminum lawn chairs, a plastic garden 
hose and a gasoline lawn mower. 

In hindsight. Life's vision now seems sur- 
prisingly modest The next quarter-century 
turned out, in fact, to be a golden age, and as 
living standards rose, the “American dream*' 
became commonplace, even for relatively low- 
paid workers. 

Then came 1973. one of the tur ning points of 
the postwar years. That was the year the United 
States took the dollar off the gold standard. 
Western nations were hit by an Arab oil boycott 
and there was a worldwide shortage of grain. 

As a result, the rise in prosperity came to a 
hah. 

Inflation, stagnant wages, shrinking labor an- 
ions, growing income inequality, a spread of 
poverty and outdated factories all left scars. 

An economy that had been so plentiful for so 
many for so long suddenly followed a different 
path, leaving big portions of the population 
behind. 

Now the United States appears to be at another 
turning point Some of the hallmarks of the 
1946-73 era are reappearing. Perhaps 1997 will 
turn out to be as much a landmark in American 
economic history as 1973. 

But the new age, if it materializes, is not likely 
to recreate the postwar sense of bounty. 


II 


NSTEAD, people are carrying into the fu- 
ture the residue of the stagnant years and 
their compromised expectations. Rather 
.than counting on rising prosperity, Amer- 
icans are betting that by working ever harder, 
they may manage to cling to leadership in the 
world economy. 

“We are not in any sense back," said Robert 
Solow of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, a Nobel laureate in economics. 

* ‘There may be some economic measures that 
are equal to or even better than the pre-1973 
years. But not the level of well-being." 

Three statistics from the old days have re- 
appeared: a low inflation rate, an unemployment 
rate of less than 5 percent and a return of cor- 
porate profits close to the hefry levels of the I960 
as a share of the overall economy. 

Not since the pre-1973 era have such hall- 
marks of 3 vibrant economy co-existed so per- 
sistently. 

Naturally enough, these parallels with the 
“golden era” are generating considerable ,op- 


10% 

Average U.S. 

A 

\ 

8 annual rate 1 

of inflation 1 

XT 

6 

d 

UL 

4 A J 


TT 






’50 '55 '60 ’65 *70 75 *80 ’85 ’90 *95 


$50,000 



Median 
family 
household 
Income in U.S. 
1995 dollars 




*50 '55 *60 *65 *70 *75 *80 *85 '90 *95 
lire for 1953 two-income famines not available. 



timism. At McKinsey & Co., a consulting group, 
W illiam Lewis, director of its Global Institute, 
asserts that America's competitive laissez-faire 
economy should be the model for all natioos. 
Wired, the monthly bible of die “digerati,*’ 


proclaims that the global economy, led by the 
United 1 


Ini ted States, is altering a ‘ ‘long boom,” driven 
by powerful new technologies and the spread of 
capitalism to nearly every region of the world. 

And Fortune magazine states flatly in a long 
article this month: “These are the good old 
days.” 

But for most Americans, it is not like the good 
old days. Holding onto a job now takes pre- 
cedence over upward mobility or getting decent 
annual raises. Just prolonging an expansion has 
become more important than generating the ro- 
bust economic growth that made foe pre-1973 
period golden. 

Corporate success in global competition has 
become an overriding goal, even at the price of 
greater wage inequality or of leaving some 
groups behind. 

Longer hours on the job have displaced the 
pre-1973 goal of more leisure time to use the 
lawn furniture displayed in Life's “utopia.” 

And a sense of job insecurity — “cowed 
labor,” in the phrasing of foe economist Paul 
Samuelsoa — has become an accepted means of 
prolonging the .economic cycle,' mainly tty sup- 



BrOmann-MT 

Americans' optimism after World War 0 was reflected in new houses, however modest 


pressing wage increases and inflation. 

“Before 1973," said Richard Curtin, director 
of consumer confidence surveys at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, “there was this deep belief 
in personal financial progress. In foot sense, it is 
very different today. We don't expect a re- 
cession. But we no longer have much faith foal 
our incomes will rise.” 

While many Americans have clearly acquired 
more possessions, prosperity itself has a dif- 
ferent meaning. The pre-1973 economy often 
expanded in a given quarter at a 9 percent annual 
rate, or more. 

Since 1973, that has not happened. When 
growth reached 3.8 percent in the fourth quarter 
of 1996 and a rare 5.6 percent in foe first quarter 
of this year, foe news was hailed with -glee. 


LI 


OOKING back, 1973 has taken on the 
watershed status in American economic 
history of years like 1870, which 
ushered in tbe Gilded Age, and 1 929, the 
start of the Depression. 

Weak grain harvests around foe world and the 
oil embargo introduced shortages that fed in- 
flation. So did President Richard Nixon's de- 
cision to take foe dollar oft foe gold standard, 
allowing the currency to fall quickly in value. 
By 1973, inflation had become the No. 1 


economic issue: the rate doubled that year. Partly 

nth 


as a result, the nation's policy raakers.along wii 
many economists, did an about-face in their view 
of foe economy’s productive capacity. The na- 
tional output, once viewed as boundless, now 
seemed quite constrained. 

Until 1973. foe big economic issue had been 
how to generate enough demand to keep foe 
economy growing strongly. The standard mea- 
sures included tax cuts, public works projects, 

. jobs programs, a higher minimum wage. Supply . 


was taken for granted. The prevailing view was 
that companies could always step up production 
without much strain. 

“We overestimated how much capacity could 
grow,” said Herbert Stein, who in 1973 was 
President Nixon’s chief economic adviser. 

That complacency faded. Economists and 
policy makers came to attribute foe supply short- 
ages, and foe rapid price increases, to limited 
capacity. Supply could not rise to match demand 
after ail, foe new view declared, because the 
nation lacked foe necessary productive capacity. 
And soon attention focused on data mat in- 
creasingly suggested built-in ceilings on tbe 
output of goods and services. 

“When belief shifted, reality did, too,” said 
David Hollander, an economic historian at 
Middlebury College in Vermont 

Capacity is force things. It is enough workers 
to make or provide all that people want to buy. It 
is enough factories, offices, warehouses and 
stores, and enough machinery, computers and 
other equipment to produce all foe needed goods 
and services. 

Finally, there is productivity, or foe amount 
that workers using foe braidings and equipment 
can produce in a given time period. 

From 1946 to 1973, productivity rose nearly 3 
percent a year. But after 1973, foe annual ad- 
vances averaged only 1 percent 

So, starting in 1973, the nation's policy 
makers increasingly dealt with foe perceived 


ceiling on supply by restricting demand. Tbe 
restraint came from fo 


the Federal Reserve, using 

interest rates. 

By foe end of foe 1970s, with inflation and 
unemployment rising in tandem, the Fed chose 
to fight inflation with higher rates, paying less 
attention to unemployment. In this atmosphere, 
-labor’-s bargaining power.came unglued-, ..... 


Convention 



Ban on Izrail 

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CfWWfr Ow S*ffxmO*p*lm 

HARARE, Zimbabwe — Ao _ 
national convention on en da n ge red; 
cies rejected a proposal by South Al_ 
on Wednesday to rebut a baa 4D4& 
trade of rhino boras. 

South Africa foiled to get foe.t*£ - 
thirds voce it needed from the CoaJ . 
vention on International Trade m iff: 

daogered Specks to allow it to trades 

white rhino parts and explore pasanfc‘ 
ilities of trading in the animal's bora. , 
Some 60 countries voted in favor of 
ti» proposal, while 32 opposed iL 
Opponents of the proposal said re- ( 
taxing foe 1977 ban on rhino hem trade ' 
would endanger the rhino, which wa^ 
almost hunted into extinction by poach; 
ere. Rhino horns are prized for dagger 
handles in Yemen and for use m ' 
Chinese medicines. 

Trade in South Africa's while rhinos 
is currently restricted to live animafe 
and sport-hunted trophies. 

South Africa was seeking support 
from the convention to investigate the 
possibility of bilateral trade in rhino 
products to earn funds for conservation 
and to reduce illegal trade. 

“Although South Africa claims that 




tith'rn 
, Burro 




House Republicans Rebel Against Budget Pact With White House 


By John E. Yang and Eric Pianin 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — Long-simmer- 
ing tensions among top House Repub- 
lican leaders have bubbled to the surface 
as tbe House majority leader, Richard 
Armey, broke with the speaker. Newt 
Gingrich, over the budget agreement 
with President Bill Clinton, saying he 
was not bound by il 

“The basic rule around this town is 
that if you're not in foe room and you 
don’t make foe agreement, yon’re not 
bound by it,” said Mr. Armey, a Re- 
publican of Texas. 

Tbe negotiations were led on foe Re- 
publican side by the Senate majority 


leader. Trent Lott of Mississippi: Sen- 
ator Pete Domenici of New Mexico, and 
Representative John Kasich of Ohio. 
Mr. Kasich said Tuesday that he had 
regularly briefed Mr. Armey and other 
Republican leaders on foe bill's con- 
tents. Mr. Lott said of Mr. Armey: “He 
was around an awful lot He was in all 
foe critical meetings.” 

Mr. Armey, a leading spokesman for 


conservative lawmakers, also pointedly 
ring a 30- 


passed up an opportunity during 
minute news conference to defend Mr. 
Gingrich, a Georgia Republican, against 
criticism from conservatives foal he has 
failed to champion their agenda. 

While Mr. Armey later sought to min- 
imize his differences with his longtime 


ally. Republican leaders acknowledged 
that relations between Mr. Gingrich and 
his lieutenants are strained at a critical 
moment The House is working through 
crucial measures to implement the bal- 
anced-budget agreement by overhaul- 
ing Medicare, cutting taxes and financ- 
ing the federal government for the year 
beginning Oct 1. Open warfare among 
Republican leaders would complicate 
matters, already difficult enough as they 
try to run the House with only a slim 1 1- 
seat margin. 

In addition, the schism comes as the 
leadership is drawing foe fire of con- 
servative lawmakers. With the missteps 
and misjudgments that marked the han- 
dling of foe disaster-relief bill, many of 


the lawmakers said they doubted the 
leadership had thought out the coming 
battle with Mr. Clinton over the spe- 
cifics of the tax cuts and spending pri- 
orities. 

“We’re trying to work with the lead- 
ership, but we're having trouble getting 
their attention,” said Representative 
Sam Johnson of Texas, a leading con- 
servative voice. 

While Mr. Gingrich has largely re- 
moved himself from foe day-to-day op- 
erations of the House, leaving those 
details to Mr. Armey, he still steps in as 
a troubleshooter at key moments. 

Mr. Anney is known to have been 
irritated with Mr. Gingrich over the 
speaker's handling of foe disaster-aid 


bill, which allowed foe White House to 
cast the Republicans as obstructionists 
in passing legislation to help victims of 
foe Midwestern flooding and storms. 

Mr. Armey felt Mr. Gingrich did not 
keep him informed of negotiations with 
the Senate and White House, according 
to congressional officials familiar with 
his thinking. 

Mr. Gingrich's press secretary, 
Christina Martin, attributed those ten- 
sions to fatigue. ‘ This is still a team, but 
it’s a tired team at foe moment,” she 
said. 

Some House Republicans have also 


their proposal will maintain foe stan$ 
quo, it is clear that they anticipate le- 
galization of foe trade in just three 
years,” said tbe Care for the Wild De- 
fense Fund, a British-based animal 
rights organization. * 

“They want to investigate mechan- 
isms fen- the legal trade in rhino horn, 
This will inevitably lead to speculative 
poaching and increased pressures on the • 
remaining wild rhino populations,’’ c 
said ahead of Wednesday's vote. The . 
animal rights group said with a wild 
white rhino population of just 7,563, 
there could be no justification for re- 
laxing protection measures. 

During debate before foe ballot, a 
U.S. delegate said that although South 
Africa had fully complied with previous 
embargoes on rhino trade, his countiy 
was against trade in rhino parts because 
it would undermine current efforts 
around the world to reduce the appetite 
for foe animal ’s products. 

A Dutch delegate, speaking for the 
European Union, said there were no 
adequate measures in place to ensure 
trade would not endanger other white : 
and black rhinos. 

Peter Mokaba, South Africa's deputy 
environment minister, said that trade in 
white rhino parts would be tightly man- 
aged and that his country would be 
sensitive to complaints raised by mem- 
bers of foe Convention on International 
Trade in Endangered Species. He was 
supported by a Zambian delegate. 

But a report released last week by the 
convention — the Trade Records 
Analysis of Flora and Fauna in Com 1 « 
meice — said there were concerns ip 


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complained that Mr. Gingrich does little 
to develc 


lop a message politically be- 
neficial to them at home. 


South Africa itself that there were ire ly From Politic* 
adequate controls to monitor trade. ~L 

In another development, the convenr . 
tion set up a multinational working . 
group to re-examine proposals by Bot : 
swana, Namibia and Zimbabwe to ease _ 
a seven -and-a-half -year ban on ivory ’ 
trade to allow them to sell their stocks. .’ 

David Brackett, moderator of the 

meeting, said delegates conferred 

overnight with African states and op£ ” ' ‘ 
posing nations after a modified ivory 
proposal was rejected Tuesday. They ' 
agreed that a separate working group 
would represents “a pragmatic way to 
cany forward these complex issues,'.’ . 
he said. (Reuters. AP) ■ - ’ 


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TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


arattawr* mmm 

: VUS Hhrif UftattMten 
high ft tep hter 1 

- ; 'T’cng Jed by an. fated 
-jwrkrt 


EU Orders Detailed Ferry Records 


names, sex and age bracket cm voyages of more than 20 
nautical miles. 


LUXEMBOURG (Reuters) — To help rescue services in 
foe event of an accident. European Union transport ministers 
agreed Wednesday to require ferry operators to register details 
of all passengers and crew who travel on longer voyages. 

Under foe new rules, ferries sailing from EU ports will have 
to count passengers and crews on short trips and record their 


In this Friday’s 


The Car Column 



Chrysler Grand Voyager 


IBM to Help Hermitage Go Digital 

ST. PETERSBURG (AP) — The Hermitage Museum and 
IBM announced a plan Wednesday to create a computerized 
library of foe museum’s collection, enhancing public access 
to one of foe world's greatest an troves. 

Hie agreement, based on IBM’s $1.6 million grant to the 
Hermitage, envisages setting up a library of computerized 
images of foe museum’s pieces, foe development of a site on 
the World Wide Web and other services for museum visitors. 
The project is expected to be finished by the end of 1998. 


The authorities set up air-conditioned rooms for the 
elderly and people with respiratory problems Wednesday as 
heat and dangerous pollution levels gripped Athens. (AP) 


Air One, an Italian airline, is offering a one-way do- 
mestic ticket for 10,000 lire ($5.89) after the purchase of 
certain round-trip tickets. (AP) 


U.S. safety officials say the pilot of a Delta Airlines 
jetliner that crashed on landing at LaGuardia Airport last year 
was wearing unapproved contact lenses that distorted his 
depth perception. Three of the 58 passengers suffered minor 
injuries while evacuating foe plane. f AP) 


Declaring a train crew partly to blame for a fiery 
accident in Silver Spring, Maryland, foal lulled 1 1 people Iasi 
year, the National Transportation Safety Board has urged that 
voice recorders like those in jetliners be installed in every 
train in the country. (WP) 


Europe 



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Middle East 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by AccUWeather. 


nrr vme 




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Very *4nn along the East Mostly sonny and worm Sunny and nice tn BolUna 

Coast Friday and Setur- from Greece on north Mo Friday, but sunny and hS __ „ 

day. then hot and humid Poland and Satarus, but Into Sunday. Thunder- STST**’* 52 SE** 2!' 
wflh B thwidemcjm possV thunderstorms are Iftety storms in Seoul Friday. 52? I22SS 5 

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poms and possUe severe many. Shower* nhdy and 
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Waft* Into (he Mid- northern France; soaking day; the storm could brtio 
west, while tfx Northwest raft* are In store tor Scot* heavy rain to cenfr3 
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pass west of Tokyo. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 



RAGE 3 




"> LttS- May Juggle Warheads to Reduce Costs 

Ul I),, T 

Of Hi 


""•A 


By R- Jeffrey Smith 
and Bradley Graham 

HtoA/nrfon Post Service 










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WASHINGTON — Facing an im- 
mense tab for scheduled improve- 
ments to the U.S. nuclear arsenal over 
foe next five years, the Clinton ad- 
coimstration is considering altering 
the mix of nuclear warheads on sub- 
! ' 7 ~. itBrines, bombers and missiles so the 
msen si’s size can be maintained at 
' jower cost, senior officials say. 

One option under review by the 
. '•'*> Joint Chiefs of Staff would cut die 

- number of ballistic missile submar- 
foes. an invulnerable but highly ex- 

\ pensive strategic force, and increase 
Qk number of warheads based on 
‘ cheaper but more vulnerable land- 
- . based missiles and strategic bombers, 

- the officials said. 

Thai would help bring down die 
■■ estimated $10 billion cost, from 1998 
. to 2003, of maintaining a total stra- 
? . tcgic stockpile of more than 10,000 
i- nuclear warheads, of whicb 6,000 are 


now deployed, while helping fend off 
growing pressure to cut costs by un- 
dertaking new nuclear reductions, the 
officials said. 

The administration’s tentative 
planning runs counter to recent advice 
by two expert panels, oae established 
by Congress and the other by the 
National Academy of Sciences, that 
to trim costs and 


The pledge was meant to pressure while inc reas ing the numbers of war- 
the Russians by making clear that beads on missiles and bombs on 
Washington would not move toward . bombers," the official said, referring 
lower numbers until Russia did. But to Trident submarines. 


die R ussian Parliament, the State 
Duma, which has been angered by the 
proposed expansion of the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization, seems un- 
likely to take action on START-2 any- 
time soon, even though the country 
security by scrapping addi- • lacks the money to maintain its own 


ttoaal weapons soon. 

The administration has resisted 
such calls in part because defense 
officials are still reluctant to give up 
weapons dial have formed the back- 
bone of defense for SO years but have 
been the subject of growing contro- 
versy since the end of the Cold War. 

Also, the administration promised 
Congress and told Russian leaders 
last year that the United States would 
not redace the size of its nuclear ar- 
senal below the existing level until the 
Russian legislature ratifies the 1993 
START-2 treaty, which sets a ceiling 
of 3.500 nuclear warheads. 


arsenal at die higher START-1 levels. 

As a result, a White House official 
said, the Joint Chiefs of Staff have 
begun to “chafe at the restrictions of 
the original agreement with Con- 
gress," which barred any changes in 
mixture of weapons in the existing 
arsenal and were written into law 
when Congress approved the 
START-2 accord. 

“What the Pentagon now is saying 
is that we need to discuss some flex- 
ibility with Congress so that we s till 
can keep the pressure on the Duma but 
also save money — for example, by 
going to lower numbers of Tridents 


The National Defense Panel, which 
Congress created last year, con- 
cluded, to the contrary, that Wash- 
ing ion should drop ifs strategy of de- 
ferring further nuclear cuts to force 
Russian approval of START-2. 

In a report last month, the panel said 
“the move to START-2 force levels 
should proceed even if the Duma fails 
to act on START-2 this year." Philip 
Odeen, the panel’s chairman, said that 
"our actions to reduce our forces to 
START-2 levels are. in effect, being 
held hostage by the Duma." 

"Our view is, we should not con- 
tinue spending for these higher force 
levels beyond the point the costs would 
become insurmountable," he said. 

Some Pentagon officials said nu- 
clear force expenditures will not be 
sustainable beyond fiscal year 1998, 
when annual costs will rise to an es- 
timated $ I billion. 


Southern Baptists 
To Boycott Disney 

They Object to H^Friendly 5 Mdes 


. '• The Associated Press 

.. DALLAS — The Southern 
Baptist Convention on Wed- 
. nesday overwhelmingly ap- 
proved a boycott of Walt Dis- 
riey Co., including its theme 
• parks and its ABC -TV sub- 
sidiary, to protest what 
. . church leaders said were the 
company's “gay friendly" 
policies. 

■ The resolution by Amer- 
ica's largest Protestant de- 
nomination asked its IS rail- 
lion members to take action 
against Disney’s “anti -Chris- 
tian and anti-family direc- 
./ don." It urged “every South- 
: em Baptist to take the 
stewardship of their time, 
' money and resources so se- 
riously that they refrain from 
patronizing the Disney Co. 
and any of its related entit- 
ies." The resolution is not 
f Binding on churches. 

During debate before the 
; vote, Lisa Kinney, a delegate 
7 from Keene Terrace Baptist 
- Ghnrch in Largo, Florida, re- 
reived a standing ovation 
“S. after promising to avoid Dis- 
- - bey world. “Will a Southern 
- s: Baptist boycott change the 
Disney '.company?" she 
asked. “I don't know. But it 


will change us. It will affirm 
to us and the world that we 
love Jesus more than we love 
our entertainment." 

Ken Green, a spokesman 
for Disney in Burbank. Cali- 
fornia, declined to comment 
directly on the boycott mea- 
sure. “We’re proud of the 
Disney brand," he said. “We 
create more famil y entertain- 
ment of every kind than any- 
one else in the world." 

The Reverend Rick Mark- 
ham. pastor of Mount Zion 
Baptist Church in Sneliville, 
Georgia, objected to the res- 
olution. 

"In typical Baptist fashion, 
I’m afraid we have reacted to 
an extreme by positioning 
ourselves at another ex- 
treme,” he said. "And in do- 
ing so, messengers, we are 
throwing out the baby with 
the bath water." 

Many Southern Baptists 
object to Disney’s policy of 
giving health benefits to 
same-sex partners of employ- 
ees, so-called Gay Days -at 
theme paries and the release 
by Disney or its film sub- 
sidiaries of controversial 
movies, such as "Pulp Fic- 
tion" and “Kids." 


Away From Politics 

• Nearly a quarter of teenage girls who have had sex say 

fteir first experience was “voluntary but not wanted." ac- 
cording to a study conducted by the Department of Health and 
Homan Services. The National Survey of Family Growth also 
reported that an additional 7 percent of teenage girls said their 
first intercourse was not voluntary. (WP ) 

•The second Texas prisoner to be executed in two days, 
Eddie James Johnson, 44. was put to death by lethal injection 
& Huntsville for the murder of three people, including a 10- 
y ear-old girt. Mr. Johnson, a former oil-field yard worker, 
ihamtained his innocence to the end. (AP) 

• A natural gas well that exploded and killed at least three 
Workers in a Louisiana swamp near Butte La Rose continued 

! to spew flames 200 feet (60 meters) high a day later. The 
raging fire, which apparently was being fed by gas, blocked 
rescuers from searching for a fourth worker, who was pre- 
sumed dead, officials said. Two men were injured when the 
well exploded. (AP) 

•Seven contractors were fined $1.65 million in Omaha, 
Nebraska, for sending demolition workers into an asbestos- 
laden airport terminal without proper protection. The Oc- 
cupational Safety and Health Administration said the general 
contractor for the demolition of the 45-year-old terminal knew 
about the asbestos but failed to protect workers. (AP ) 


r 



Sam WaWiflV Anraxrd Prcn 

25 YEARS AFTER WATERGATE — G. Gordon Liddy broadcasting his 
radio talk show from outside the Watergate complex in Washington. Al- 
though today he makes his living with his mouth, Mr. Liddy, the Nixon aide 
who went to prison for his role in organizing the break-in into Democratic 
Party headquarters at the complex, loudly refused to testify about the scandal. 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 


They’re Cute, Say Tourists; 
They’re Bests, Say Fishermen 

Seals are returning to the waters off New 
England, where they are getting mixed 
reviews. 

“They’re so cute," one visitor said, 
"you want to pet them.” 

But local fishermen say the animals are 
pests. Not only gray seals, which can reach 
800 pounds (365 kilograms), but also harp 
and hooded seals — once not seen south of 
Arctic ice floes — are showing up in 
Massachusetts waters, reports The Boston 
Globe. Until 1972. not only was it legal to 
kill seals, but some towns also paid a $5 
bounty far each seal nose presented. (That 
spared hunters having to cart around whole 
carcasses.) 

But the federal government passed a law 
in 1972 to protect seals, and with natural 
predators tike sharks and killer whales 
uncommon in the cold waters off the 
Northeast, they have slowly rebounded. 
Seal populations are up an estimated 25 
percent over the past decade. 

Fishermen say that means more empty 
nets. Seals have learned to eat fish out of 
nets without getting themselves snagged. 

Tour operators are happy; they now take 
visitors to watch big brown seals romping 
gaily in coastal waters. Cute they may be, 
but tourists are warned to keep their dis- 
tance. Seals carry parasites. And they 
bite. 


Short Takes 

The National Trust for Historic Pre- 
servation this week designated Ellis Is- 
land one of America's 11 Most En- 
dangered Places. Half of the island, just 
southwest of Manhattan, is a restored mu- 
seum. The other half, the sad side, has 24 
buildings in extreme disrepair. “It would 
be a disgrace and a real slap on all our 
forebears to let it crumble," said Peg Breen 
of the New York Landmarks Conservancy. 
Twelve million immigrants passed 
through the reception (and later detention) 
center on Ellis Island from 1 892 to 1954. A 
private foundation set up in 1 982 collected 
donations to renew the Statue of Liberty, 
on nearby Liberty Island, and to open Ellis 
Island Immigration Museum. But the 24 
buildings on die soath side of the island 
missed oul They once housed those who 
made it to America’s doorstep only to be 
separated from fellow travelers because of 
illness — to recover or die. 

America has 1.6 million miles (2-5 
million kilometers) of dusty roads in 
need of paving. It also generates 20 billion 
pounds of used asphalt roofing shingles a 
year. So officials in rural Benton County, 
Iowa, are testing a technique to turn waste 
shingles into chips and mix them with 
asphalt to form pavement. But there are 
bugs. Similar use of recycled tires has made 
some road workers Ul after they breathed 
the hot, smelly mixture. And Benton 
County has encountered another problem: 
nails mixed in with shingles. It plans to 
remove them magnetically because, as one 
official put it, “ Building a road with nails is 
just kina of frowned upon." 

Brian Know] ton 


Some Surprises in Pensacola’s Welfare Cutoff 




ar 


‘ ' ^ A ' 
7 " " ts-t - 




By Jason DeParle 

New York limes Service 

PENSACOLA, Florida — 
As welfare programs across 
t^e country enter a new era of 
timelimits, this sunbaked city 
t of sailors and tourists has be- 
come the first place where 
limits , have already expired 
tod poor families are being 
dropped from the rolls. 

After years of ideological 
x debate, real- world experience 
bag brought several surprises. 
So far, the two-year limits 
here, imposed by in© stale un- 
der an experimental program 
that p re da tes the new federal 
welfare law, have failed to 
- Serve ' as die motivator that 
V‘ Ihcir- supporters envisioned. 
Jhe ticking clock has not 
pished .poor families to find 
jobs faster or leave the rolls 
earlier.. 

; ■ At the same time, however, 
" die loss of benefits has not 
typically, led to the depriva- 
tiontfaar critics feared, at least 
tot in the early stages. Most 
• families hywaHy fend on their 
feet; and some former iecip- 
gys area prais e the cancel- 
^ttontif their benefits, saying 
« poshed them to find a job. 
^Consider the journey of 
,.s A Denise Rifey. a 39-year-dld 
^ i motto who spent two yeais 


insisting that she had a can- 
cerous colon that prevented 
her from working. Her case- 
workers asked for a doctor’s 
letter. Ms. Riley failed to 
provide one. The two sides 
waned, until last September, 
when her monthly $241 
checks ran out 

And then what happened? 

“I went to work a week 
later, "she said cheerfully. “I 
had to.” 

Ms. Riley told the story ata 


The loss of 

benefits has not 
typically led to the 
deprivation that 
critics feared. 


naval-base pizzeria where 
even her part-time job stock- 
ing the buffet at $5.75 an hour 
pays better than her weifere 
check did. Though she still 

says she has cancer — it is in 
remissipn, she says — she 
calls the loss of her welfare 
fhftric an unexpected bless- 
ing. V j 

“It made me wake up ana 
my priorities back m or- 
she said. ‘Til be hon- 
est: I "•ri ght have l e an e d on 


that check a little longer. 

Even the Pensacola pro- 
gram's most ardent support- 
ers say it is too early to predict 

success for it Only about 130 
of the 2,700 families in the 
pr o gr am have hit the time 
limit, and they come from that 
part of the caseload con- 
sidered most ready to work. 
Eke those with a high school 
education and a history of 
past employment whose chil- 
dren are already of school 
age. Those with greater prob- 
lems face a three-year limit, 
which, for the earliest en- 
rollees, has just begun to ex- 
pire. . 

Still, however preliminary 
die experience, it has taken 
some local advocates by sur- 
mise. 

“We were really expecting 

an increase in homelessness, 
but there hasn’t been the in- 
flux we were waiting for, at 
least not yet,” said .Anne 
O’Leary of First Call for 
Help, a referral agency for 
Pensacola families needing 
emergency aid. “1 think it’s 
kind of a sink-or-swim thing 
here, and people are paddling 
away. What we don’t know is 
how long they’ll stay 
afloat.” 

The biggest questions cen- 
ter on the families’ long-term 


prospects. Finding work is 
easier than keeping it, since 
children often get sick, child 
care arrangements collapse, 
cars break down and layoffs 
arise. 

Ms. Riley is prone to bouts 
of depression that have cost 
her previous jobs, and even 
now she tries to steady herself 
by toting a Norman Vincent 
Peale paperback to work. 

When setbacks do occur, 
how well will families man- 


age without the weifere safety 
net? No one knows. 

Ms. Riley recently warned 
her mother, ‘ ‘Whatever I have 
to do to keep a roof over my 
head and keep my baby fed, 
ITldoiL" 

Wien her mother said 
surely this would not include 
bank robbery or prostitution, 
Ms. Riley offered no assur- 
ances. 

“I said, ‘Mama, whatever 
it takes.’ ” 


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THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Labor Uses Attack Ads 
To Aid Minimum Wage 

WASHINGTON — The /UFL-CIO is 
launching a new round of political attack 
ads in the home districts of key members of 
Congress who are seeking to exclude work- 
ers coming off welfare from the federal 
minimum wage. 

Armed with new poll results showing 
that 69 percent of the public favors paying 
welfare recipients the federal minimum 
wage, the labor federation has targeted the 
-districts of nine House members and three 
Senators in the hope of pressuring them into 
changing their position on the wage issue. 

Labor will bolster its ad campaign with 
leafleting and telephone calls to voters in 
the targeted districts as well as some others 
where it has a political operation in place. 

The House Ways and Means Committee, 
as part of the new budget bill, voted 22 to 16 
last week to exclude persons forced to work 
under the new welfare reform law after the 
White House ruled that these workers 
would be paid the $4.75 an hour minimum. 
The minimum increases to $5. 15 on Sept. 1 . 
The Republican effort has infuriated labor, 
which sees the move as a new way to 
undermine the minimum wage increases 
approved last year by Congress. 

The $550,000, weeklong ad blitz is the 
start of a broader campaign by labor against 
the tax measures in the Republican budget 
bill. Starting sometime next week, the AFL- 
CIO said it planned to begin a series of ads 
in up (o 30 districts questioning provisions 
of the Republican bill including the estate 
tax, capital gains cuts and a change in the 
tax code that would make it easier for 
companies to reclassify millions of em- 
ployees as independent contractors and 
strip them of workplace benefits. fWP) 

Long Hearings Slated 
On (Campaign Funding 

WASHINGTON — Representative Dan 
Burton, the House’s top campaign- finance 
investigator, says he hopes to open public 
hearings by the end of July, and may con- 
tinue his investigation into next year. 

The Indiana Republican, chairman of the 
House Committee on Government Reform 


and Oversight, said he was seeking au- 
thority to lake depositions from 1 50 to 200 
witnesses in the United States and overseas, 
which could continue for months, even as 
the hearings unfold. 

Committee Democrats protested Mr. 
Burton's latest move as a new power grab in 
his efforts to freeze the minority out of the 
investigation: “He’s taking on powers no 
other chairman has ever had." the ranking 
committee Democrat. Henry Wax man of 
California, said. “The only check are the 
limits he places on himself." 

Mr. Burton has taken constant criticism 
from Democrats for conducting his inves- 
tigation in a "highly partisan" manner. 
Democrats say he has focused the probe on 
the transgressions of the Clinton admin- 
istration and the Democratic Party during 
the 1996 elections while ignoring possible 

abuses by Republ icans. f H7* ) 

Clinton Is Rebuffed 
On Medicaid Measure 

WASHINGTON — Con*?rvutive Re- 
publicans scored a big victory as the Senate 
Finance Committee rejected a bipartisan 
proposal to expand Medicaid to cover mil- 
lions of uninsured children. 

The iK'ion Tuesday, by a vote of 1 1 to 9. 
was a rei uff to President Bill Clinton. The 
commit!-.'? decided instead to give states a 
choice between Medicaid and a new pro- 
gram that would offer each state u lump sum 
of federal money, with broad discretion to 
provide health coverage to children. Many 
states say they will take the block grants 
because they know best how to meet the 
needs of children in their states. (NYTl 

Quote/Unquote 

Representative Joe Knollenberg. Repub- 
lican of Michigan, who has introduced le- 
gislation to assure that Timothy McVeigh, 
tiie Gulf War veteran convicted of the Okla- 
homa City bombing, does not receive mil- 
itary honors al a veterans cemetery after his 
execution: “TTiis man was convicted of the 
worst domestic terrorist attack m the history 
of the United Slates. I don't think it's right 
to bury him in sacred ground with fallen 
heroes who gave their lives for our free- 
dom." " (WPI 


Global Side to Tobacco Talks 

Anti-Smoking Activists Fear a Cigarette Invasion 


am 


By Myron Levin 
a Kasper! 


Kasper Zeuthen 

Los Angeles Times 


WASHINGTON — For- 
eign anti-smoking advocates 
have assailed efforts to forge 
a “global" settlement of U.S. 
tobacco litigation, arguing 
that the deal could accelerate 
the invasion of the Third 
World and Eastern Europe by 
U.S. tobacco companies. 

Tobacco control advocates 
from 19 nations said in a 
statement that a U.S. settle- 
ment could “exacerbate pub- 
lic health threats in the de- 
veloping world," where 
cigarette makers will be 
coanting on increased sales to 
offset expected declines in 
U.S. smoking and to finance a 
settlement of up to $400 bil- 
lion. 

The statement was co- 
ordinated and released Tues- 
day by Essential Information, 
a group in Washington that is 
concerned with issues of cor- 
porate responsibility. 

Anti-tobacco negotiators 
involved in the talks should 
insist on safeguards to ensure 
that an agreement does not 
worsen the toll of disease and 
death overseas, the statement 
said. 


Signers of the statement in- 
cluded Judith Mackay of the 
Asian Consultancy on To- 
bacco Control, and Hatai 
Chitanondh of Thailand's 
Health Promotion Institute, 
prominent figures, in the in- 
ternational anti-smoking 
movement. 

With domestic sales flat, 
U.S. cigarette makers are set- 
ting new records for exports 
on an almost annual basis. 

Sales and profits from for- 
eign cigarette plants operated 
by U.S. companies are grow- 
ing even faster. 

Philip Morris and R.J. 
Reynolds, leadens in the U.S. 
market, sell far more ciga- 
rettes abroad than at home. 

The statement said: “It is 
ironic that die settlement dis- 
cussions have been labeled 
talks aimed at achieving ‘a 
global settlement,’ since the 
talks have reportedly ex- 
cluded consideration of the 
public health consequences 
of U.S. tobacco exports and 
the U.S. tobacco companies’ 
overseas operations.” 

The group said that any set- 
tlement should require to- 
bacco companies to accept 
the same controls on market- 
ing overseas as they agree to 
at home, among other things. 


They should also agree not to 
fight anti-smoking initiatives 
in other countries, it said. 

■ Barriers to a Deal 

The attorneys general su- 
ing the tobacco industry have 
expressed deep frustration 
with what they described as a 
two-part “roadblock” that 
has all but stalled the nego- 
tiations to settle scores of 
state and private lawsuits 
against the industry. The 
Washington Post reported. 

“It’s come down to two 
little things." Attorney Gen- 
eral Robert Butterworth of 
Florida said Tuesday. "They 
don't want to be punished, 
and they don’t want to be reg- 
ulated.” 

The state officials threat- 
ened to walk out of (he ne- 
gotiations if the industry did 
not agree to accept full reg- 
ulation of tobacco by the 
Food and Drug Administra- 
tion and to drop its demands 
for protection from punitive 
damages in lawsuits. 

The negotiators have 
cleared away many of the 
thorniest issues in more than 
two months of negotiations, 
including a series of measures 
to reduce underage smoking 
and help smokers quit. 



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161 THORNTON INVESTMENT MGMT LTD 
33 Queen SL London EC 4 R I AX 44171 2*4 jooa 


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Hong Kong Protesters 
Focus on Chinese Army 

* Troops Said to Receive Special Favors 


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1 : «on?^ng . doubt about the validity of laws ap- 

. : : HONGKONG — Hong Kong s pro- proved by the provisional legislature 
: autonomy movement tned Wednesday Since it was set up in December the 

• to maintain pressure on the Chinese an- provisional legislature has been meet- 
jborines, staging a protest against lng weekly in southern China because 

: ^ Chinese troops and again vowing to tar- Britain regards it as illegal. 

1 nish ceremonies marking the colony’s Governor Chris Patten said in an in- 
i . handover to China on June 30. terriew broadcast Wednesday that it was 

■ - t A dozen protesters, angered by what “ejtcqjtionally sad” that China planned 
' '*+: • they said were signs of Chinese troops to replace the colony’s first elected leg- 
' • *cting, *ovc the law, marched on die islatnre with its own body next month. 
,v - ; • central Hon gkong base where advance “This will. I think, be pretty well the 

• puts of me People s Liberation Army only example in recorded history of 

■ ; .rsri; Sue billeted. decolonization being accompanied by 

■; The protesters said that the garrison less democracy rather Th an more,” he 
' ja Hong Kong had been given special said in the interview, on Japan Broad- 
. Customs privileges at the border and that casting Corp. 

• this boded ill for their behavior and The reunification bill, which is ex- 

. iighte in thefuture. pected to be approved on July 1, is clearly 

: : China tned to play down the incident, aimed at preventing any legal challenges 
; . saying it stemmed from a misnnder- to laws passed by the provisional leg- 
: ■ standing Mused by language problems islatnre before the Bridsh cokray reverts 

gt amain border crossing. to Chinese sovereignty. The provisional 

. ? B nt members of Hong Kong ’s elected body is to be sworn in July I as Hong 

• • colonial legislature, which will be dis- Kong’s official legislature, 

missed during the handover ceremon- The draft bill also includes provisions 

’■ Jes. will have talks with government to endorse Che appointment of a new 
* officials this week to highlight the dis- chief justice and judges of the Court of 
pate ova: the troops. Final Appeal, which will replace Lon- 

.’f Hong Kong residents have vivid don’s Privy Council, and enshrines the 
' memories of the People's Liberation new court setup. 

-• Army crushing the student movement in The bill adopts dmuw. as an official 

■ .Bd/ing in June 1 989. language, alongside En glish, and strikes 

' • Perhaps no aspect oftbe handover has out all references in law to “Royal" 
. > raised more concern in Hong Kong than “Hex Majesty" and "The Crown.” 

the arrival of Chinese troops. An ad- These bills and other planned legis- 
•• vance group of about 200 soldiers has lation have to undergo a “verification" 
already moved in and an undisclosed process to give them the force of Law. 

• \ number will cross the border in the early That will be done when the legis- 

hours of July 1. la tore, after its swearing-in following the 

: The Democratic Party, the largest in . B ritish departure at midnight, meets at 


• • colonial legislature, which will be dis- 
. ’ missed during the handover ceremon- 

jes, will have talks with government 
1 officials this week to highlight the dis- 
• pate ova: the troths. 

. * f Hong Kong residents have vivid 
' memories of the People's Liberation 
i Army crushing the student movement in 
' : jSeijimg in June 1989. 
i:; Perhaps no aspect oftbe handover has 
! ! f raised more concern in Hong Kong than 
the arrival of Chinese troops. An ad- 
■ yance group of about 200 soldiers has 
‘already moved in and an undisclosed 

• ’ number will cross the border in tbe early 

hours of July 1. 

: The Democratic Party, the largest in 
i 1 the soon to be dissolved assembly, re- 

-■ • " J ..4 U u _ “ 


; tuiklmgs and read out statements while 
• China’s new, hand-picked legislature is 
: j being sworn in at a convention Centex. 

' * In another development Wednesday, 
; Bong Kong’s incoming government 
; published a proposed reunification bin 
' to ratify all laws passed by the Beijing- 
. : tacked provisional legislature after the 
: territory reverts to Chinese rule. 

* The office of Hong Kong’s fixture 
_ leader, Tung Chee-hwa, said the bill 
- jwas necessary so that there would be no 


2:45 A-M- on July 1 to pass the bin. 
which wiU then be signed by Mr. Tung. 

‘ “There is no doubt about the validity 
of the laws,” said a spokesman for the 
office of Mr. Tung, which published the 
bUl. “But the confirmation process on 
July 1 would serve as an added as- 
surance." 

The transition bin “puts beyond 
doubt that the working of the govern- 
ment and the courts will continue de- 
spite the change of sovereignty," Mr 
Tang’s office said in a press statement. 

(Reuters. AP, AFP) 


V • . Reuters 

u ■ BBUING — President Jiang Zemin of 

> Chi na said Wednesday that die mo- 
7 jnewnm for improved ties with the 
i United States was being maintained and 
1 repeatedJBegmg'scommitineiittoapros- 

p«atws Hong Kong under Chinese rule. 

\ • “Important mutual benefits exist in 
1 X3rinese-U.S. ties,” the Xinhua press 
: ?gracy quoted Mr. Jiang as saying in a 

> meeting with Henry Kissinger, former 
' .TJJS.'secretary of state. 

; *. = “Last year, when I held talks with 
President Bill Clinton in Manila, the two 
Jsides expressed their willingness to seek 
common ground while reserving dif- 
! Iferences and to weak together to ensure 
; [stable and healthy Chinese-U.S. ties in- 
■ Jo the 21st century,” Mr. Jiang said. 

; !‘"SiDcethOT, Chine»e-U.S. ties have ba- 
- . Really maintained the momentum far 
. 'improvement that appeared in the 
’second half of last year. ’ 

■ Sc bang tit is opportunity to push ties 
. !to a new hl^b not only required the 


20 Years Later, Vietnam War’s Rivals 
Will Debate Missed Chances for Peace 


Reuters 

HANOI — The American defense 
secretary during the Vietnam War, 
Robert McNamara, arrived in Hanoi 
on Wednesday to attend a conference 
on missed opportunities for peace 
during a conflict whose scars are still 
carried by both countries. 

Mr. McNamara is the most senior 
member of as American delegation of 
researchers and historians who will 
debate the events of more than two 
decades ago with Vietnamese gov- 
ernment ministers and academics 
from Friday to Monday. 

General Vo Nguyen Giap, Viet- 


nam’s revered military strategist and 
the mas termind of victories over the 
French and Americans, will meet his 
old foe at the oul of the seminar. 

The visit is Mr. McNamara's 
second to Vietnam. He first visited in 
November 1995. 

The conference cranes at a time of 
wanning relations between Washing- 
ton and Hanoi, which exchanged am- 
bassadors for .the first time last month. 
Both countries are now seeking to 

speed progress toward a trade agree- 
ment, and Secretary of Stale Made- 
leine Albright will visit Vietnam late 
next week. 







fefc 



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;.'v v - 




Hong Kong protesters holding up pictures of Major General Zhou Borong of the Chinese Army on Wednesday. 


BRIEFLY 


Jiang Lauds * Momentum 9 
l Of Improving U.S. Ties 


India and Pakistan Set to Talk 

ISLAMABAD — India and Pakistan are set to resume 
peace talks Thursday despite tensions over a reported 
movement of Indian missiles toward the Pakistani border. 

Both sides seem determined not to let their fragile 
dialogue be sabotaged by the dispute over the new Prithvi 
missiles India is said to have moved within 100 kilometers 
(60 miles) of the border. 

“We don’t think it will be afactor at all in the talks," said 
an Indian diplomat in New Delhi. “It has added one more 
point which they will raise and we will reply." 

“We have our own concerns, namely the proxy war in 
Kashmir,” the diplomat added. “That remains our main 
concent. We want to see evidence that Pakistan is reducing 
aid to such people." 

Pakistan has denied Indian charges that it arms, trains 
and finances separatist guerrillas who have been fighting 
since 1990 to end Indian rule over the two- thirds of 
Kashmir stale under Delhi 's control. {Reuters) 

Congress Party Targets Minister 

NEW DELHI — The main ally of the coalition led by 
Prime Minister Inder Kumar Gujral of India joined left- 
wing parties Wednesday in demanding the resignation of an 
alliance leader accused of corruption. 

The Congress (T) Party lined up with members of the 15- 
party United Front coalition to call for the resignation of the 
Janata Dal party chief, Laloo Prasad Yadav, who is also 
chief minis ter of the northern state of Bihar. ‘ ‘We think that 
it is advisable for the chief minister to voluntarily resign to 
cany on the best democratic traditions and give a good 
message to die country,” a Congress spokesman said. . 


On Tuesday, Bihar’s governor authorized India's central 
investigation bureau to pursue legal proceedings against 
Mr. Yadav in a $280 million corruption scandal involving 
animal-welfare funds. Mr. Yadav has said he is innocent 
and has repeatedly rejected demands that he resign from 
either post. Mr. Gujral's Janata Dal party is the largest party 
in the fractious United Front coalition. "t Renters t 

Hosokawa Breaks With Party 

TOKYO — Former Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa, 
who shook up Japanese politics with promises of reform, 
said Wednesday he was leaving the opposition New Frontier 
Party. Mr. Hosokawa offered no reason for his action, but 
some reports said he was leaving because of policy dis- 
agreements with the party leader, Ichiro Ozawa, and because 
of an investing scandal that tarnished the party's image. Mr. 
Hosokawa said he had no plans to join another party. (AP) 

Violence Mars New Guinea Vote 

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea — Two people 
have been killed and several others injured in violence 
during early polling in Papua New Guinea's two-week- 
long national elections, officials said Wednesday. 

The police said one man died when he was hit by a 
vehicle as be fled a stone-throwing mob at Mount Hagen in 
Western Highlands Province. On Bougainville island, 
northeast of Port Moresby, a man was shot and killed and 
rwo others were wounded when they were ambushed by 
separatist rebels trying to disrupt polling. 

The vote is seen as crucial to the future stability of the 
South Pacific nation, which experienced a crisis in April 
after an army mutiny. (Reuters) 


Clinton Vows 
To Hold Firm 
On East Timor 


t'*' Sag Pafitto.yHtr&rt 

WASHINGTON — Meeting with a 
rights activist from East Timor. Pres- 
ident Sill Clinton has said he will not 
back down in pressuring Indonesia to 
improve its human rights record. 

Mr. Clinton briefly dropped by a 
meeting at the While House on Tuesday 
between his national security adviser. 
Sandy Berger, and Bishop Carlos Filipe 
Ximenes Belo of Easi Timor, who re- 
ceived the 1996 Nobel Peace Prize. 

“The president expressed his interest 
in peace and reconciliation for the 
people of East Timor, and our will- 
ingness to continue to raise issues with 
respect to human rights in our discus- 
sions with people in the region, spe- 
cifically with the government of In- 
donesia.” the White House spokesman, 
Michael McCrary, said later. 

Indonesia this ’month canceled a deal 
to buy F- 16 fighter jets from the United 
States and backed out of a U.S. military 
training program because of Washing- 
ton's repeated criticism of its human 
rights record. Activists accuse the In- 
donesian military of killing, torturing 
and illegally imprisoning separatists in 
the former Portuguese colony of East 
Timor, which was annexed by Indone- 
sia in 1976. 

Meanwhile, Portugal and Indonesia 
clashed Tuesday in a UN committee 
over the question of East Timor, two 
days before their foreign ministers were 
scheduled to hold talks in a series of 
UN-sponsored meetings on the issue. 

The foreign ministers of the two 
countries a re i o meet at the United Na- 
tions on June 19 and 20 for a ninth round 
of talks — the first since Secretary- 
Genera] Kofi Annan took office in Janu- 
ary and appointed a former LIN rep- 
resentative from Pakistan, Jams heed 
Marker, as his personal representative 
for East Timor. 

Speaking to the UN decolonization 
comminee. Ambassador Fernando 
Neves of Portugal said: “East Timor’s 
decolonization process was brutally in- 
terrupted by Indonesia’s military inva- 
sion in 1975. and since then it has been 
prevented by Indonesia’s illegal occu- 
pation of the territory.” 

He accused Indonesia of retaining an 
excessive military presence in East 
Timor and cited various sources as re- 
porting a “persistent pattern of arbitrary 
arrests, interrogation and torture.” 

The Indonesian representative, Marty 
Natalegawa. called die allegations “an 
outrage,” adding, “Indonesia is a law- 
abiding society, committed to upholding 
its laws as well as according due process 
of law to all its citizens." (AP, Reuters)- 


common efforts of the two governments 
but also needed active promotion by 

S le of various walks of life, Mr. 

j said, adding (hat he hoped Mr. 
Kissinger would use his influence to 
ensure further improvements. 

But Mr. Jiang did refer to one thorn in 
the relationship: U.S. concerns over 
whether China will make changes in 
Hong Kong after the territory reverts to 
Chinese sovereignty on July 1. “In 13 
days, China will resume the exercise of 
sovereignty over Hong Kong and we are 
fell of confidence for the peaceful tran- 
sition and smooth handover," Mir. Jiang 
told Mr. Kissingpr, regarded as a friend of 
China since his so-called ping-pong di- 
plomacy of the 1970s resulted m the birth 
of Chinese-U.S. diplomatic ties in 1979. 

“Ensuring the long-term stability 
and prosperity ofHong Kong is not only 
in accordance with China’s own in- 
terests but is in the interests of all coun- 
tries, including the United States," Mr. 
Jiang said. 


North Korea Says 
Seoul Is Secretly 
Planning for War 


The Associated Press 

SEOUL — The North Korean De- 
fense Ministry accused the United 
Stales and South Korea on Wednesday 
of secretly planning for war while out- 
wardly seeking peace. 

The ministry expressed doubts about 
the Korean peace talks that are being 
pushed by Washington and Seoul. 

“The enemies are outwardly calling 
for four-way talks for a lasting peace 
and security on the Korean Peninsula 
and, behind the scenes, making war 
preparations in earnest," it said in a 
statement carried by the official press 
agency, KCNA. 

North Korea “will not hesitate to 
fight the final battle with die United 
States and fee South Korean authorities 
if they so earnestly wish to make a 
military showdown," it added. 

The statement came amid reports of 
famin e in the isolated communist coun- 
try. Western military experts warn that 
the North may use war to divert do- 
mestic attention from its worsening eco- 
nomic problems. 

President Kim Young Sam of South 
Korea said Wednesday that the North 
was bent on military adventurism despite 
its deteriorating economic problems. 

'‘Despite its internal crisis. North 
Korea continues military exercises and 
has forward deployed its warplanes,” 
Mb. Kim said. 

The North’s statement charged that 
South Korea recently conducted a series 
of military landing operations to prepare 
for war, calling it “an attack exercise 
that goes beyond self-defense. ’ ’ 







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PAGE 6 


EUROPE 


French- German Discord on a Eurobank Is Sure to Be Heard Again 


By John Vinocur 

huemarionul Herald Tribune 


AMSTERDAM — Europe’s soft 
voice of compromise, muting the dis- 
sonance for a day or two from the 
French-German confrontation over the 
Continent's economic future, is going to 
fade behind the c latter of reality. 

The hareh noise to come involves 
French determination to create some 
kind of politically controlled body or 
agency to oversee the monetary policy 
making prerogatives of the future Euro- 
pean central b ank. The new Socialist 
government in Paris is insisting on read- 
ing the compromise resolutions, accep- 
ted at the summit meeting here to ac- 
company the stability pact for European 
Monetary Union, as a signal to attempt 
to bring the independence of the future 
Eurobank under control. 

Considering that Germany conceived 
the central bank and the stability pact to 
guarantee that a unified European econ- 
omy and currency would mirror its own 
institutions for the foreseeable future, 
the French position pointed at the heart 


of the German concept for foe monetary 
union, and meant that foe truce produced 
by the summit meeting's participants 
was likely to have the longevity of a 
Bosnian cease-fire. 

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the French 
finance minister, insisted that the res- 
olutions constituted a "decisive step to- 
ward rebalancing" monetary union by 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

giving it an "an economic pole" — a 
phrase he said he was using because 
Germany did not like France's previous 
references to the creation of an "eco- 
nomic government" that would watch 
overgrowth and jobs after creation of the 
common currency. 

What the real sense of foe summit 
meeting, which ended here in the early 
hours of Wednesday morning, came 
down to, Mr. Strauss-Kahn said, "was 
that foe day after Jan. I, 1999. the mo- 
ment when foe stability pact will come 
into force, something should exist along- 
side as a counterweight to the European 
Central Bank." 


This characterization could have been 
from another city or planet, so for was it 
from foe meaning of foe resolutions 
drawn by Theo Waigel, the German fi- 
nance minister, who waved them off by 
saying they "change nothing, touch 
nothing, undermine nothing." 

The two views were described by a 
German as having as much in common 
as carp and rabbits. Pointing to Mr. 
Strauss-Kahn’s remarks, foe financial 
newspaper Handelsblatt said the French 
finance minister was pushing things in 
an attempt to cast himself as a winner, 
and taking aim well beyond the range of 
reality. 

But the French perception of tilings 
was different Prime Minister Lionel 
Jospin, it was explained, after making an 
election-campaign description of the 
stability pact as an absurd concession to 
German-led monetarism and its job- 
killing budget performance targets, felt 
duty-bound not to challenge its provi- 
sions at the meeting because France had 
accepted its principles at the EU's Dub- 
lin summit meeting six months ago. 

The "economic government" idea 


was another matter, however, and press- 
ing for it represented no going back on 
France’s word. The former Gaullist 
prime minister, Alain Juppe, had pushed 
for apolitical counterweight to foe Euro- 
pean central bank, and the idea bad 
found support in Paris, where wide 
bands of both sides of the political spec- 
trum considered it senseless to turn over 
virtually all responsibility for Europe’s 
money to independent bankers they may 
not be able to reach on the phone. 

Holding to this line would be a gesture 
by Mr. Jospin to those in France, in- 
cluding the Communists and left-wing 
nationalists in bis government who re- 
gard the stability pact as a surrender of 
French sovereignty. To emphasize that 
Paris would be pressing the issue in the 
future. Mr. Strauss-Kahn stressed that 
the EU's finance ministers would be 
making an interim report at the next 
summit meeting in Luxembourg in view 
of proposing a resolution concerning the 
“economic pole" in early 1998. 

To the German government, any step 
that would make foe future European 
central bank appear less the replicant of 


foe Bundesbank would undermine its 
credibility and that of the unified cur- 
rency, creating a political liability for 
Chance llor Helmut KohL who faces 
elections in October 1998. A German 
official said it would seem reasonable 
for a mechanism to exist that would 
allow member governments to exchange 
ideas and advice with foe new central 
bank, although on the condition there 
was no attempt to dictate policy. 

In addition to the "economic gov- 
ernment" area, the French regarded with 
satisfaction, and the Germans with some 
displeasure, that the resolutions adopted 
here included encouragement for dis- 
cussions between EU functionaries and 
the future central bank on exchange rate 
policy for the common currency. This 
would tend to give an rastitutional frame- 
work to the French Socialists* pledge not 
to ler foe U.S. dollar sink too far against 
foe euro — a potential precedent relating 
to the possibility for political influence 
over foe centra] bank. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn also appeared to be 
somewhat at odds with Mr. Waigel's 
insistence that there be no variance al- 


lowed for members seek™, 

monetary union’s criteria from foe def- 
icit to gross national product ratio of 3 
percent. Mr. Strauss-Kahn placed mq* 
emphasis on the assessment of a coug. 
try *5 trend line — ; eweidiaJIy wbefteraa 
euro candidate is moving toward tfe 
target. 

Since neither France nor Germany 
appears ready to achieve the. target ® 
1997, according to most independent 
projections, Mr. Waigel may wd! move 
sooner or later from his present position. 
This makes the difference in tone on foe 
deficit issue between foe French and foe 
Germans less contentious. Mr. Strauss- 
Kahn has said France cannot state its 
final position on the subject until n las 
completed a national audit during the 
summer. 

The audit would disclose the state of 
Bench accounts and determine hens 
much leeway, if any, Mr. Jospin would 
have to finance such campaign promises 
as assisting in foe creation of 700,000 
jobs, raising the minimum wage, revising 
the value-added tax and offering employ- 
ees 39 hours' pay for 35 hours' wore. 


- \ 


A Neo-Nazi ‘Time Bomb 9 

German Rightist Cells Pose Hidden Threat 


By Alan Cowell 

New York. Times Service 


BERLIN — In 1990, just before the re- 
unification of Germany, a slender, unassum- 
ing teenager named Kay Diesner made his 
way from West Berlin to a house occupied by 
neo-Nazis in Weitlingstrasse in foe East. 

His political views were nebulous, but he 
somehow felt drawn to the comradeship 
offered by the National Alternative, a far-right 
fringe group. Those who met him recall him as 
deferential, certainly no fanatic. 

Seven years later, the police encountered a 
different Kay Diesner. 

Well muscled from working out, his head 
shaven and with a pit bull and a pump-action 
shotgun as his companions. Mr. Diesner now 
stands charged with murder after what the 
police call a rampage of politically inspired 
violence in February. He is to stand trial in 
August. 

The case has broader implications, reflect- 
ing a suspicion among investigators that after 
government crackdowns in foe early 1990s. 
Germany's far-rightists went underground, 
either as loners tike Mr. Diesner or in small, 
anonymous cells. 

"He became a time bomb waiting to ex- 

E lode," said lngo Hasselbach. a former neo* 
lazi who took Mr. Diesner under his wing at 
Weitlingstrasse and tutored him in the ways of 
the far right "And I'm afraid he's not the only 
one." ” 

in foe former East Germany in particular. 
‘ ‘the right wing is deliberately dissolving into 
a kind of cell structure,’ ' Uwe Kranz, a lead- 
ing investigator, told foe newsmagazine Der 
Spiegel after Mr. Diesner's arrest. 

Even by the violent standards of foe far 
right Mr. Diesner's actions were unusual 
because they showed an unaccustomed read- 
iness for confrontation with the authorities. 

Gunter Moller, foe prosecutor leading foe 
investigation, said Mr. Diesner had admitted 


the murder charges against him but sought to 
justify them by saying he found himself ‘ ‘in a 
state of emergency against the state." 

The rampage began Feb. 19, when, the 
police say, Mr. Diesner shot and wounded a 
leftist book dealer in Berlin to retaliate for the 
disruption of a rightist rally a few days earlier 
by leftists. 

Then, on Feb. 23, two police officers asked 
Mr. Diesner for identification at a rest slop on 
the A24 highway between Hamburg and Ber- 
lin after they became suspicious of his license 
plates. 

Apparently believing that they wanted him 
for questioning about foe earlier' shooting, the 
police say , Mr. Diesner shot to death one police 
officer and wounded the other. He fled, leading 
other officers on a chase that ended when he 
crashed his car and was slightly injured. 

The extent of sympathy for such actions is 
hard to gauge. 

Linked by electronic mailboxes and 
bolstered by rock bands that play on a concert 
circuit known as "Blood and Honor." vi- 
olence-prone German rightist skinheads 
numbered some 6.400 in 1 996. 200 more than 
in foe previous year, according to the latest 
figures issued by Germany's Office for foe 
Protection of foe Constitution. 

The question remains: What turned a seem- 
ingly innocuous teenager into an accused 

- Tbrntex comrades'antittVesligjUtjrs say that 
over a period of sev en - y eaiy;the ; youngtnan,~ 
now 24, underwent political indoctrination 
and paramilitary training in Germany’s shad- 
owy rightist underground. In the process, he 
may have experienced what other rightists 
have described as a sense of comradeship 
sharpened by the perception of an under- 
ground war against a hostile state and leftist 
adversaries. 

When the various groups he had belonged 
to were outlawed, he began to act alooe. the 
authorities say. 


EUROPE: Meager Results Show EU Weariness 


Continued from Page 1 

intent mainly on preserving 
British vetoes over common 
border controls and defense 
policy. 

It is "less automatic to find 
convergence" between Euro- 
pean governments, said 
Hubert Vedrine, the French 
foreign minister who should 
know, having played a role in 
the Maastricht negotiations as 
a senior aide to the president at 
foe time. Francois Mitterrand. 

“France is evolving; it has 
its problems and its social de- 
mands, its new political situ- 
ation," Mr. Vedrine said. 
"Germany is having prob- 
lems it did not have before. 
Chancellor Kohl perhaps 
does not have the same mar- 
gin for maneuver that he had 
for years." 

Mr. Kohl's domestic con- 
straints were manifest in the 


way he torpedoed negotiations 
on reforming EU decision- 
making procedures, a step 
deemed vital to enabling the 
bloc to take in new members. 

Reacting to stem warnings 
last week from leaders of Ger- 
man states opposed to any 
new shift of powers to EU 
institutions, Mr. Kohl on 
Tuesday blocked proposals 
for EU countries to give up 
their veto rights and accept 
majority voting in areas rang- 
ing from culture and indus- 
trial policy to social security 
and immigration. Even Mr. 
Blair was wilting to endorse 
many of foe proposals. 

A clearly irritated Jean- 
Luc Dehaene, the Belgian 
prime minister, said thar 
“Kohl practically made ex- 
cuses for himself" by blam- 
ing the German slate premiers 
for his stance. 

German officials said Mr. 


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Kohl was simply saving all 
his political capital for the 
single currency, which many 
Germans distrust 'but which 
foe chancellor regards as vital 
to guaranteeing European 
unity into the 21st centuty. 

"He decided foe priority is 
absolutely with monetary un- 
ion,” a German diplomat 
said. "The rest can come 
later." 

The 18 hours of negoti- 
ations also exposed funda- 
mental rifts between large 
and small countries and be- 
tween net contributors to the 
EU budget and net takers. 

Mr. Dehaene rejected a 
Dutch proposal to enhance 
the voting power of large 
countries because it would 
have given the Netherlands 
one more vote than Belgium. 
Prime Minister Jose Maria 
Aznar of Spain, meanwhile, 
demanded special compensa- 
tion if his countiy is forced to 
give up its second seal in the 
European Commission to a 
future eastern member. 

The leaders' decision to 
defer most power-sharing is- 
sues until new members ac- 
tually arrive in the next de- 
cade is likely to delay and 
complicate enlargement, 
many European officials say. 
Indeed, the decision was 
“living proof that you can’t 
have the present system with 
20 member states," a senior 
European official said. 

Most officials now say foe 
Union will accept no more 
than three or four Eastern 
countries by the middle of the 
next decade. 



Continued from Page 1 

The secretary-general of 
NATO, Javier Solana 
Madariaga, noted at a briefing 
for Czech journalists at 
NATO headquarters that he 
was disappointed by the de- 
bate in "the very countries 
concerned in foe process." 

In choosing new members 
from the nations of the former 
Soviet bloc, NATO has relied 
heavily on broad measures of 
political and economic re- 
form. 

Poland, foe Czech Repub- 
lic and Hungary tout the 
strength and goals of their 
democratic reforms of foe last 
eight years as their strongest 
selling point. 

Ah three have freely elect- 
ed their governments at least 
twice since throwing off 
Communist rule in 1989. All 
have fledgling but solid free 
markets. All have struggled to 
reduce their militaries while 
maintaining economic equi- 
librium. 

But foe debate on NATO 
membership in all three coun- 
tries has been muted, despite 
its tremendous implications 
for the future of each. And foe 
Czech Republic — the coun- 
try heralded for its "velvet 
revolution" to a free society 
and one that often describes 
itself as Eastern Europe’s 
leader in stability — has ail but 
smothered public discussion. 

In fact, ambivalence in the 
republic about NATO is sur- 
prisingly widespread. In ad- 
dition to showing that less 
than half the eligible popu- 
lation would vote to join 
NATO, a recent poll by the 
Factum agency found that 
more than half of all Czechs 
surveyed could not think of a 
reason why their countiy 
should join the alliance. 

A nearly equal number 
could not think of a reason 


why it should not. The NATO 
debate in Eastern Europe 
tends to be distilled in stark 
terms across a region eager to 
make up time lost to Marxist 
theory and Soviet domina- 
tion. None of foe contending 
countries’ political elites 
want to fumble what one dip- 
lomatic analyst called a 
"once-in-a-mdlennium 
chance” to join the Western 
club. 

As such, NATO expansion 
has been embraced by nearly 
all political parties in foe re- 
gion. Rarely is it debated in 
citizens' forums. 

People who support NATO 
expansion see the Czech Re- 
public as entering foe West 
and laying claims to all its 
values. 

Those who are against 
joining the alliance question 
foe price and the need, par- 
ticularly for countries still re- 
covering from the burdens of 
membership in the Soviet-led 
Warsaw Pact. 

When such questions are 
raised, NATO becomes a sen- 
sitive barometer. People who 
wholeheartedly favor entry 
are generally deemed demo- 
crats who are eager to display 
their Western values. Those 
who doubt foe need are often 
accused of nostalgia for com- 
munist days. 

In this charged atmo- 
sphere, legitimate questions 
about costs and benefits can 
be lost or steamrollered by the 
political elite. 

President Vaclav Havel 
has grumbled to associates 
about Czech antipathy. In 
public, he attributes low sup- 
port to "short sighted'’ pa- 
rochialism rather than anim- 
us. 

The Czechs’ shortcomings 
are especially glaring when 
seen next to the country’s 
neighbors and former Eastern 
bloc brethren. In the words of 


Schiphol 



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a Western diplomat, the 
Czech government has "done 
a terrible job." 

Poland’s enthusiasm for 
the Western alliance is un- 
paralleled in foe region. 
About 80 percent of foe pub- 
lic favors membership and 
foe information services me- 
dia have mirrored that in- 
terest. 

Newspapers and television 
in the country of 38 million 
people have zeroed in on 
NATO preparation with in- 
tense coverage. 

In Hungary, public support 
for NATO is somewhat high- 
er than in the Czech Republic. 
Gallup polls conducted this 
spring in Budapest show that 
about 47 percent of all Hun- 
garians would vote for mem- 
bership, about a quarter 
would oppose it, and that foe 
remaining 25 percent or so 
have no opinion. 

In both Hungary and foe 
Czech Republic — countries 
with about 10 million people 
each — U.S.-financed polls 
conducted this spring re- 
vealed slightly greater sup- 
port, but allow room for close 
comparisons. 

About 55 percent of people 
in both countries would vote 
for entry, according to sur- 
veys by the U.S. Information 
Agency. But those majorities 
balked at costs and respon- 
sibilities. 

Vast majorities in both 
countries opposed increasing 
spending on the military 
rather than, for example, on 
education or health care. And 
about 80 percent of the people 
in both countries believe 
NATO actually will increase 
military costs. 

In all three countries, sup- 
port is low for sending troops 
to defend alliance allies or 
allowing routine alliance 
training exercises on their ter- 
ritories. 

Such figures set off alarms 
in Hungary, but have been 
ignored in foe Czech Repub- 
lic for foe most part. 

No public information cam- 
paign was planned by the 
Czech Ministry of Defense or 
Foreign Ministry until late in 
the game. The first public lec- 
ture, sponsored by foe Defense 
Department, was held May 2 1 . 
The first NATO manuals — to 
be delivered initially to sol- 
diers — were printed in foe 
last week of April. 

The Czech government 
only recently pulled together 
a national defense strategy. 


Tory Foes Forge 
Unlikely Alliance 


■ Lfcrv- On-kin HV Amain! I W 

Kenneth Clarke, a contender for the Tory leadership, making a point Wednesday. 

CZECHS: Not All Approve of Joining NATO 


Reuters 

LONDON — The race to 
succeed John Major as leader 
of Britain’s defeated Conser- 
vatives was too close to call 
Wednesday, after a bout of in- 
ternal infighting extraordinary 
even by foe main opposition 
party’s own recent standards. 

In a day of dramatic twists, 
Kenneth Clarice, the former 
finance minister and the 
party’s leading pro-Euro- 
pean, dramatically bolstered 
his chances by forging an al- 
liance with Ins erstwhile ideo- 
logical foe on Europe, the 
right-winger John Redwood. 

Mr. Clarke and Mr. Red- 
wood portrayed their pact as a 
bold stroke to draw a line un- 
der the divisions over Europe 
that cost the party the May 1 
election, when it was routed 
by Toiw Blair's Labour Party 
after 1 8 years in power. 

But it triggered a furious 
reaction from the right, led by 
former Prime Minister Mar- 
garet Thatcher, alarmed that 
Mr. Clarke might claim the 
mantle for the Conservative 
left wing. . 

"The Conservative -Party 
must rally round a position of 
principle — not fey to seek 
refuge in an incredible alli- 
ance of opposites, which can 
only lead to further grief," 
ly Thatcher said. 

Lady Thatcher does not 
have a vote in Thursday's 
third and final ballot, which is 
restricted to the Conserva- 
tives’ 164 members of Par- 
liament 

But she remains influential 
and used her prestige to make 
a very public endorsement of 
Mr. Clarke's rival, the youth- 
ful former Welsh secretary, 
William Hague. Speaking 


outside Parliament she said: 
"I come out firmly for Wi|. 
liam because foe principles 
that he is founding his vision 
upon are very much the prin- 
ciples I founded my govern- 
ment on for quite a long 
time. 

"Principles don't change. 
Circumstances do. But you 
still apply the same principles 
to changing circumstances." 
she said. 

The right's fury stemmed 
from the decision by Mr. Red- 
wood. the Conservatives' 
most outspoken opponent of 
European economic and 
monetary union, to throw in 
his lot with Mr. Clarke, a pas- 
sionate advocate of the need 
to keep open foe option of 
joining EMU. 

Mr. Redwood said his al- 
liance with Mr. Clarke, who 
has promised him foe job of 
finance spokesman if he wins, 
did not mean he was abandon- 
ing his views. 

The two men said they had 
joined forces in an effort toend 
foe party’s divisions, and pro- 
• duced a joint statemeiit stress- 
ing that they saw eye to eye on 
all main domestic issues. 

"We both belie ve-that it is 
our duty to work together to 
unite foe Conservative 
party," foe statement said. 

Mr. Redwood was thrust 
into the role of kingmaker 
after he was eliminated in foe 
second leadership ballot on 
Tuesday, when he trailed 
third behind Mr. Clarice and 
Mr. Hague. 

Mr. Clarke, with 64 votes, 
beat Mr. Hague by just two 
votes, leaving foe outcome of [ 
Thursday’s run-off in foe ’ 
hands of the 38 MPs who ; 
voted for Mr. Redwood. 


BRIEFLY 


Yeltsin May Shun NATO Talks 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin will stay away 
from NATO's summit meeting in Madrid, Itar-Tass re- 
ported, although the Kremlin played down the report. 

Itar-Tass quoted a source dose to the presidency 
Tuesday as saying that Mr. Yeltsin would not attend the 
July 8-9 meeting, at which the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization will announce which former Soviet-bloc 
countries it is inviting to join. 

But the chief Kremlin spokesman, Sergei Yastrzhemb- 
sky, said that he could not confirm foe report and that Mr. 
Yeltsin himself would announce whether he would attend 
the meeting. (AFPi 

EU Urges Tighter Food Rules 

BRUSSELS — The European Commission made a 
new bid Wednesday to better protect consumers from 
“mad cow' ' disease by urging foe removal of risky cattle 
tissue from food and formally banning exports of British 
gelatin. 

EU inspectors have criticized most European Union 
countries for not enforcing rules to eradicate foe fatal 
cattle brain-wasting disease, bovine spongiform enceph- 
alopathy. 

Acting on advice from the World Health Organization, 
the EU resubmitted a proposal to ban the brains, eyes and 
spinal cord of cattle, sheep and goats more than 1 2 months 
old from human and animal food. (Reuters) 

Missile Downed Italian Plane? 

ROME — A 17-year-old mystery over the crash of an 
Italian plane that killed 8 1 people made headlines again 
Wednesday when national media said recently released 
radar records showed it was downed by a missile. 

But the Italian Ah* Force's top officer at the time of the 
June 1980 crash off Sicily contested the newspaper ver- 
sions, saying the crash was probably caused by a bomb. 

All major newspapers said Wednesday that foe DC-9 of 
foe now-defunct ltavia airlines was shot down in an air 
battle involving Libyan, U.S., French and Italian fighters. 
They said radar monitoring recently released by NATO 
showed that seven fighters were in foe vicinity when foe jei 
plunged into foe sea off the island of Ustica. (Reuters) 

Bloody 9 Campaign in Albania 

TIRANA. Albania — Prime Minister Bashkim Fino 
called on candidates Wednesday to stop taking their 
campaigns on foe road, since violence was increasing in 
advance of Albania's June 29 elections. 

It would be better if foe electoral tours of foe political 
parties from town to town might be stopped," Mr. Fino 
said in a briefing. "It’s becoming a bloody electoral 
campaign." . . - tAP) 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1997 


PAGE 7 




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PAGE 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY JTOflE 19, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Lev Kopelev, Dissident Writer, Dies *i 


» Or SmfPam Dsp*rhn 

COLOGNE — Lev Kopelev, the 
former Soviet dissident and human- 
rights campaigner, died here Wednes- 
day. He was 85 and suffered from se- 
rious heart disease. 


signing a petition protesting the arrest of 
two dissident writes. 


Mr. Kopelev was expelled from the 
Communist Party in 1968 after express- 
ing fears of a return to Stalinism. Pe- 
titions fra the freedom of Mr. Solzhen- 
itsyn and the physicist Andrei Sakharov 
resulted only in harassment. In 1977, he 
was expelled from die writes' union. 

In Jannazy 1980, 10 months before be 
left Moscow, be supported Mr. Sakhar- 
ov. The Soviet media caricatured Mr. 
Kopelev as “Judas taking over the role of 
Don Quixote,” after he and other dis- 
sident figures signed a petition in favor of 
Mr. Sakharov. 

The same year, after the publication of 
his memoizs, tee Soviet press criticized 
his support for Polish bids to shed Soviet 
domination, and for the independence 
from Moscow of tee Baltic republics. 

His apartment was then seen as a 
“hideout for ideological subversion” 
where Westerners -were allegedly 
briefed with anti-Soviet propaganda. 

When Moscow unexpectedly granted 
him an exit visa in October 1980, he and 


Known for his long gray beard, be 
became known in tee West in 1976 with 


his work about his prison years, “To Be 
Preserved Forever.” The title refereed to 
the stamp printed on the file of every 
Soviet political prisoner. 

Bora into a Jewish family in Kiev, Mr. 
Kopelev admitted in his memoirs to his 
admiration as a young man for Stalin and 
his belief in Communist ideals. 

But in 1945, when he was an army 
major, he was charged with “sympa- 
thizing with the enemy” and imprisoned 

for 10 years after denouncing Red Army 

excesses in occupied Germany. 

Among Ms fellow prisoners was AI- 

■ ■ exandcr Solzhenitsyn, who paid tribute 

“ to Mr. Kopelev by creating the character 

~ of Rubin in “The Fust Circle." He was 

NnHmkyik'AaKiMrdPta. freed and rehabilitated in 1956, but a 
Israeli policemen chasing Palestinians in Hebron. Three people were wounded by Israeli gunfire, witnesses said, decade later was in trouble again for 


his wife, Raisa, emigrated to West {W 
many, in vjfated by friends, iociudtng & 
late German author Hdarich BoeiL 


In January 1981 a decree signed t» 
Leonid Bicznnevdeprived him of Sovw 

r itiTm thirt far “mtHMtinllatMJ • 


of die Soviet fezkujS 
activities,” He later acquired 
Gennan citizenship. 

Mr. Kopelev, who had studied Go- 
man language and Uftmure before ti* 
war and late wrote a biography of tfe 
writer Bertok Brecht and a history ^ 
German teeate, settled in Cologne. 

He was active in tee West Gcnn^ 
anti-war movement in the early 1980s 
and became a high-profile commentate 
on East-West relations. 

In 1982, Mr. Kopelev founded Orient. 
Okzident, a company teal helped trans- 
late and publish dissident Eastern Euro- 
pean writers. 


Until recently. Mr. Kopelev had been 
oririns on a University of Wtmoemt 


working cm a University of Wuppertal 
project on the reciprocal literary views 
of Germany and Russia since the Middle 
Ages. ■ (AP.AFP) 


Israeli Finance Minister Resigns 

A Popular Official Says He ‘Cannot Support Netanyahu’ 


FIGHTER: British Aerospace and Lockheed to Cooperate on Jet 


Continued from Page 1 


The Associated Press 


The opposition Labor Party planned 


JERUSALEM — Israel ’s popular fi- to submit a no-confidence motion in tee 
nance minister angrily resigned Wed- government next week, and the Labor 
nesday. saying be had lost faith in Ben- leader, Ehnd Barak, said its prospects 


vote, with three minis ters abstaining and 
five absent in a hastily called cabinet 


wooing European companies, 
including Aorbus Industrie, 
Boeing’s only rival for civil- 


comc from tee military side, involve it in all phases of the 
Boeing would be able to even project, including devel op- 


out the peaks and troughs in meat and production. British 
the highly cyclical civil man- Aerospace s chief executive. 


jamin Netanyahu and accusing tee prime 
minister of creating an artificial dispute 
over exchange rales to force him out of 
the cabinet 


government next week, and the Labor session that lasted most of Tuesday 
leader, Ehnd Barak, said its prospects night. 


were now “much more than wishful 


Mr. Netanyahu’s coalition controls 66 
seats out of 120 in Parliament. But in 


Mr. Meridor suggested teat Mr. Net- 
anyahu held a grudge against him for not 


supporting him during a political scan- from 
dal this year. “Isn’t it strange that in tee view. 


ran airliners. 

Bnt because it is one of the 
four Airbus partners, British 
Aerospace’s partnership with 
Lockheed Martin rather than 
Boeing makes more sense 


ufacturing business and tens Richard Evans, said it could 
gain an important advantage be “tee most significant 
over Airbus. trans-Atlantic military pro- 


American competition re- 
mains problematic. 

Norbert Lammen. co- 
ordinator of aerospace activ- 
ities for the Gennan govern- 


Lockheed Martin needs the gram of die 21st century.” 
contract to assure its future Some experts say the joint 


be “the most significant ment, put it succinctly when 
trans-Atlantic military pro- he said that the industry 


once it has completed deliv- 
eries of tee F-16 and F-22 


The resignation of Dan Meridor addition to Mr. Meridor, at least three middle of tee week, they call an urgent. 


from a European point of fighters. 

view. The agile F-16 is still tee 


strike fighter will probably be 
the last manned jet warplane 


“must become truly Euro- 
pean or become irrelevant.' * 
Manfred Bischoff, chairman 
of Daimler-Benz Aerospace, 


deepened concerns about Mr. Netan- lawmakers from the Likud party and sev- unscheduled cabinet meeting to disenss 


yahu’s governing style after a tumul- en from Natan Sharansky’s Russian iro- 


However, the partnership star of the air show after more 
also underlined the need for than two decades, but its con- 


— after it, wars will be fought said mere cooperation among 
with computers and on- companies was not enough. 


tuous first year in which he has wrangled 
with the Palestinians, battled Israel's 
elites and key members of his Likud 
party and barely escaped prosecution. 

Some analysts said that currency re- 
forms Mr. Meridor had objected to. 


migrants party are said to be wavering. 

Mr. Sharansky said Wednesday that 
be did not feel beholden to support Mr. 
Netanyahu, noting “a crisis of confi- 
dence in the prime minister." 

Many saw Mr. Meridor’s presence in 


what?” Mr. Meridor asked. “Not war, tee fragmented European 
heaven forbid, or a peace agreement,” aerospace industry to consol- 
but the trading band- idate, or risk ceding complete 

Mr. Meridor had said he feared that supremacy to tee United 
widening the band would strengthen tee States. Just tee other day, Jean 
shekel against the dollar in the short Pierson, president of Airbus 
term, making Israeli exports more ex- Industrie, accused the U.S. 


turning survival into tee next 
century depends to a large ex- 


manned weapons platforms. 

Norman Augustine, Lock- 
heed Martin’s chairman and 
chief executive, said die 


tent on how many foreign or- agreement “supports our ob- 


ders it can win. 


jective of forming mutually 


Lockheed Martin is build- beneficial, long-term interna- 
ing the F-22 stealth fighter, tional partnerships.” And 


aimed at loosening the Israeli shekel’s tee cabinet as an essential balance to pensive and causing greater unemploy - 


ties to other currencies, could deepen tee 
countiy’s recession and even cause a 
currency collapse. 

The reforms, approved early Wednes- 
day morning, prompted the Bank of 1s- 


na ri n nalist and r eligi ons extr emis ts, and 
his departure coaid harm Mr. Netan- 
yahu's popularity. 

Mr. Meridor is tee second Likud min- 
ister to resign since Mr. Netanyahu 


The shekel’s strength derives from tee European consortium. 


central bank’s high interest rates aimed 
at reining in inflation, which is now 


Industrie, accused tee U.S. for first delivery around 2010, Mickey Blackwell, president 
government and Boeing of with Boeing as the subcon- of tee company’s aeronautics 
colluding to eliminate tee tractor. division, said: “Ultimately 

European consortium. British Aerospace has been we will see mergers across 


rael to lower its key lending rate by 1.2 formed his government a year ago. The 


percentage points, tee first reduction 
since February. Israeli shares then 
closed higher in tee heaviest trading in 
three years in response to tee rate cut 
Mr. Netanyahu said that be regretted 


first was tee science minister, Benjamin 


Begin, who quit when tee government percent 


at reining in inflation, which is now 
running at around 9 percent a year. Mr. 
Frenkel lowered me discount rale 
Wednesday from 13.9 percent to 12.7 


Although it is America's teamed with McDonnell 
biggest defense contractor. Douglas to build the Harrier, 


approved a partial troop pullback from 
Hebron. 


The new economic plan will also al- 
low Israeli companies and banks to in- 


Mr. Meridor and Mr. Begin, descen- vest more freely in foreign stock markets 


Lockheed Martin also is en- 
gaged in a deadly struggle for 
survival with Boeing, whose 
proposed takeover of the Mc- 
Donnell Douglas Corp. 
would give it greater access to 
Pentagon and NASA research 


British Aerospace has been we will see mergers across 
teamed with McDonnell borders and across tee At- 
Dougias to build the Harrier, lantic. Thru day may not come 
the only production a i rcraft for a while but it is just over 
capable of taking off vertic- tire horizon.” 


Mr. Meridor’s resignation and that he dants of established right-wing families, and permit citizens to keep assets abroad funds and contracts 


Mr. Meridor s resignation ana that he dants oi established right-wing lamifc 
had given the official “all the backing were known as “princes” in Likud. 


possible,” even when the prime minister A leading candidate to replace Mr. 

L. . £.ICIi: Ll. —I- 1AA l M : J tl ■ ■ . 


and to buy mote foreign currency. 


With a steady source of in- 


capable of taking off vertic- the horizon.” shared, 

ally, a requirement fen- one But while bote Lockheed Yves Michot, head of the 
version of the joint strike Martin and Boeing are af- Bench Airbus partner. Aero- 

firming their international spatiale, has proposed that tee 
British company's credentials, tee struggle to assets remain with the part- 
‘ Lockheed Martin as forge tee European civilian ners who would then give op- 
ppeared to have been and military aerospace sector erational control to the Airbus-* 
1 by the promise to into a unit big enough to resist management. 


version of tne joint strike 
fighter. 

The British company's 
choice of Lockheed Martin as 
partner appeared to have been 
prompted by the promise to 


atfonns. “What we need are true Euro- 
ne. Lock- pean joint ventures.” 
mian and The key to consolidation is 

said tiie tee formation of the four-na- 
ts our ob- don Airbus consortium into a 
mutually single corporate entity. As its 
n interna- activities expand into a global 
And battle with Boeing, the con- 
president sortium badly needs tee flex- 
fonautics Utility and access to capital 
Utimately teat corporate status would 
rs across provide. 

; tire At- Bnt the partners have a 
not come long way to go before agree- 
just over ing on how assets should be 
shared. 

Lockheed Yves Michot. head of the 
> are af- Bench Airbus partner, Aero- 
miational spatiale. has proposed that the 
nggle to assets remain with the part- 


felt he was not fulfilling his role 100 Meridor was tee infrastructure minister. 


percent.” 

Mr. Meridor responded with an un- 
usually harsh attack. “1 cannot support 
Netanyahu,” he said in a television in- 
terview. 


Ariel Sharon, a former general who en- DitT DAT. m n T 1 I O • J a O J 

gmaed the 1982 invasion of Lebanon, i ill. iU 1 1 Khmer Rouge Leader Is Said to surrender 

The economic dispute was over Mr. 0 

Netanyahu's decision to support the Continued from Page 1 dictatorial regime that has covered itics. Last Biday, Prince Ranar 


Netanyahu's decision to support the 
Bank of Israel’s governor, Jacob Fren- 


dktamrial regime that has covered itics. Last Biday, Prince Ranar- 


Asked whether he would try to bring keL in widening the trading band for the Cambodian factions that might 


Mr. Netanyahu down, Mr. Meridor did 
not respond directly, but said: “If I 


our Cambodian history since 1975 
has been dissipated and com- 


Israeii shekel — the upper and lower include the Khmer Rouge but ex- pletely removed by the Cam bod 


limit on its value againstomer currencies 


thought Netanyahu was fit to be prime — from a 14 percent range to a 30 
minister, 1 would have stayed in the percent range. 


cabinet.’ 


The plan was approved by an 8-to-3 


Saudi Indicted for Terror 
Will Aid in Bomb Inquiry 


elude one of tee country’s co- 
prime ministers. Hun Sen. 

Among public figures who re- 
acted to tee broadcast Wednes- 
day, Mr. Hun Sen was the most 
skeptical. 

“We should be extremely 


ian people," said the brief state- 
ment, which was read repeatedly 
by a male voice. “A new era is 
beginning.” 

The broadcast also stated a 
new credo that amounted to a 
rejection of much of the prim- 


careful with these Khmer Rouge itivist and isolationist policy of 
games.” he said. “This is a game tee Khmer Rouge: peaceful co- 


cemrurdbiOmSt^F^mDopMctei with a terrorist organization that actively 

WASHINGTON — A Saudi dissi- promoted the use of violence” against 
deni who agreed to cooperate with tee U.S. citizens and property abroad. 

FBI investigation into a deadly truck “The object or the conspiracy was 


that has been organized by Pol 
Pol No one in tee organization is 
above him. He has organized this 
hims elf.” 

The broadcast came from a 
Khmer Rouge grouping calling 
itself the Provisional Govern- 
ment of Unity and Salvation and 


existence, contacts with all other 
nations and adherence to inter- 


iddh announced that Mr. Pol Pot 
had turned on one of his oldest 
associates, the former Khmer 
Rouge Defense Minister Son 
San, executing him and 10 of his 
relatives. He said Mr. Pol Pot had 
then fled into the jungle, pursued 
by 1,000 guerrillas who had been 
under his command. 

■ Phnom Fenh Is Calm 

Phnom Penh was quiet 
Wednesday following street 
fighting overnight between se- 


U.S. Envoy Leaves Brazzaville 


national law and tee United Na- cirri ty men loyal to the two prime 


tions charter. 

Hie radio broadcast came after 
a tumultuous week that involved 
violent confrontations both with- 
in the Khmer Rouge in their 


bombing in Saudi Arabia was charged 


me object or tne conspiracy was 
that the defendant and other conspirators 


claming allegiance to Khieu jungle headquarters m northern 
Sampban, who has been engaged Cambodia and within the nation- 


Wednesday with conspiracy to commit known and unknown to the grand jury 

miiivlrw on/i * * Iw f ii wm tiAnal ■ pm ** nrmllH trill fiafiAnolc of fha ITmfprl Qfofatc 


in discussions with Cambodia’s al government in Phnom Penh. 


murder and “international terrorism,” 
the Justice Department said. 

The indictment alleged that Haiti. Ab- 
del Rahim Sayegh, who had been de- 
ported from Canada, “was associated 


would kill nationals of the United States 
residing and working in the kingdom of 
Saudi Arabia,” according to tee indict- 
ment. U.S. officials have said the 


other co-prime minister. Prince 
Norodom Ranariddh. 

“The dark cloud of Pol Pot’s 


The separate but intertwined 
crises were a reminder of the 
complexity of Cambodian pol- 


ministers, Reuters reported. 

Two bodyguards from Prince 
Ranariddh's Fundnpec party 
were killed in a 90-minute ex- 
change of automatic-weapons fire 
and rocket-propelled grenades on 
Tuesday night The two prime 
ministers’ political parties issued 
a joint statement condemning the 
clash and calling on the aimed 
forces to remain calm. 


BRAZZAVILLE, Republic of Congo — The U.S. 
ambassador flew out of Republic of Congo’s “fragile and 
tense" capital Wednesday, among the last foreigners to 
flee tee civil war that broke ont two weeks ago. 

A cease-fire was holding Wednesday morning after 
heavy firing from bote sides in the hours before it came 
into effect midnight Tuesday. But battles were expected 
to erupt as soon as tee three-day truce expires. 

“The cease-fire remains fragile,” Ambassador Au- 
brey Hooks said before boarding a chartered plane. “We 
are talking now about an accord so that both parties 
control the airport We hope that they are successful, but 
the situation remains fragile and tense.’ * 

Mr. Hooks and 1 1 other members of the U.S. Embassy 
staff headed to Kinshasa in neighboring Congo, formerly 
known as Zaire. 

The presence of French troops has so far kept President 
Pascal Li&souba’s army from all-out battles with the 
private militia of General Denis Sassou-Nguesso, a 
former dictator. But France began pulling out its 1 ,200 
soldiers Monday, saying their job of evacuating for- 
eigners was nearly done, and combatants here say the 
shooting will resume once the French leave at the end of 
the week. (AP) 


ARREST: 

Fugitive Is Seized 


planned attack was never carried out ^1 t Dlfl?Va T"a± . 6Tb a • a 1 i n • AM’ • > 

Under a previously negotiated plea JL U JVIY-Ci !• Lilting xCuTlOtlSttL I tittle JjllTtiSteT ( JuitS 
deal, Mr. Sayegh will admit his guilt to ° *■ 


Cohen Targets Iraq and Iran 


Continued from Page 1 


home in Quetta, a town on Pakistan's 
western border with Afg hanistan. 


the one-count conspiracy charge and 
will cooperate in the FBI investigation 
into the bombing last summer of a U.S. 
military complex in Saudi Arabia, U.S. 
officials said. 

The attack on June 25, 1996. in which 
terrorists detonated an explosives- laden 
truck in front of the Khobar Towers hous- 
ing complex, killed 19 U.S. Air Force 


Continued from Page 1 


overstepping its mandate and act- 
ing as a partisan political force. 


curb religions schools, ban private 
Koran courses and crack down an 


vent them from running at alL 
In an election, Mr. Erbakan 
would probably be helped by the 
lack of unity among secular 
parties. The Welfare Party might 


Mr. Erbakan forged an unlikely Islamic foundations and clubs. He 
coalition last summer with Mrs. promised to comply with tee mil- 

D.A D.^.1 I. I ■ I 1_L . J 


Ciller’s secular True Path Party. 
Mrs. Ciller became deputy prime 
minister and foreign minis ter. 
Military commanders ’ were 


He was believed to have fled into the members and wounded 500 others. 


lawless border land of Afghanistan. The 


FBI and the CIA, working with directly participated in the attack, ar- 
Pakistan ’s spy agency, Inter-services In- rived Tuesday in Washington. Author- 


telligeace, had been trying to lure the 
suspect back into Palos tan for years. 
They also sent word to Afghan tribal and 
guerrilla leaders that Mr. Kansi had a $2 
million price on his head. 

Although investigators have said teat 


Mr. Sayegh, who is alleged to have trigues by military officers, press 
directly participated in the attack, ar- barons and other anti-Islamist 
rived Tuesday in Washington. Author- figures who Mr. Erbakan has de- 
ities are hopeful that he can provide nounced as “secular fascists.” 
details about the participants in the ter- In tee absence of a strong left- 
rorist assault and specifics about those ist political party here. Welfare Israel without consulting him 
who funded and ordered it has also become tee political 

Canadian court documents and Saudi home of many villagers, migrants 


be able to win votes by posi- suspicious of the government 
tiooing itself as tee victim of in- from the moment it was sworn in. 


They were unhappy with Mr. 
Erbakan's decision to pay early 
-visits to Libya and Iran, which 
they consider hostile powers. 


itaxy s wishes, but did not do so. 

Military leaders were infuriated 
by his reluctance, and their anger 
intensified when several Welfare 
leaders attended amass protest in 
Istanbul where they vowed to de- 
fend religious schools. 

Last week, the military 
summoned prosecutors, academ- 
ics and community leaders to an 


MUSCAT, Oman — The U.S. defense secretary, Wil- 
liam Cohen, winding up a tour of Gulf Arab monarchies, 
renewed warnings over threats from Iran and Iraq on 
Wednesday. 

Mr. Cohen met Sultan Qaboos ibn Said of Oman before 
flying home, tee official Oman News Agency reported. 

He criticized “Iraq’s continuing disregard for its ob- 
ligations under UN Security Council resolutions” and 
“Iran’s intentions toward its neighbors and larger global 
community.” 

At each stop on his tour, which started in Saudi Arabia 
on Saturday and included Kuwait, Bahrain and the United 
Arab Emirates. Mr. Cohen underlined the U.S. com- 
mitment to keep its forces in the region to protect the flow 
of oil and contain Iraq and Iran. (AFP) 


In tee absence of a strong left- Later, they reached accords with extraordinary series of briefings 

nnliHrol ivrf+ir Kata Wolfora lirlthAiit kim — * — l j . j 1 « 


has also become the political Most recently, they began a 
home ofmany villagers, migrants major offensive against Kurdish 
people who feel left guerrilla sanctuaries in Iraq with- 
y the social injustices out notifying Mr. Erbakan. Of- 
accompanied Turkey’s fleers said they were afraid that 
boom. members of his government 

ing to various public would leak their plane to the 
rveys, the military is the guerrillas, 
ected institution in Tur- The military’s displeasure 
actions against Mr. broke vividly into public view in 
ave sharpened its profile February, when h demanded that 
antra- of secular rule, but Mr. Erbakan retreat from his pro- 
led to criticism teat it is Islamic policies. It insisted that be 


sources have said teat tee bombing was and poor people who feel left 


Mr. Kansi bore some grudge against the carried out by Shiite Muslim members of behind by the social mjustices 


United States, they have also said they a group known as Saudi Hezbollah, that have accompanied 


think be acted alone and was not part of Hezbollah has long been funded and economic boom. 


injustice 

Turkey’ 


a terrorist organization. 

Having been charged under Virginia 


law. Mr. Kansi is in greater jeopardy of provide their first independent confinn- 
being put to death than if he had been ation of Saudi suspicions of Iranian in- 

° . . . , j r j » i • -■ . i — « • - _ _ A .i-a 


trained by Iran, the sources added. Accor ding to various public 

U.S. officials said Mr. Sayegh may opinion surveys, the militar y is the 
provide their first independent confirm- most respected institution ui Tar- 


accusal of a terrorist act under federal volvement in tee b 
law. That is because the current federal could result in pi 
death-penalty law did not take effect House to retaliate, 
until 1994, the year after the CIA ^ 

killings. 

[President Bill Clinton said the case CT TDpT 1 
underscored the nation’s determination OUlU. JU< 
to pursue terrorists * ‘no matter how long 

it takes, no matter where they hide,” The Continued from Page 1 

Associated Press reported.] 

Mr. Kansi 's friends and relatives told In Washington, 

U.S. officials teat he had been mentally adviser discussing tee G-7 meeting 
unstable since the death in 1989 of his . said President Bill Clinton would 
father, a wealthy tribal chief. Federal not seek specific deregulation 
investigators learned that the suspect’s promises from Japan. (Page 14.) 
father was widely believed to have The Finance Ministry said Ja- 
worited with tee U.S. and Pakistani in- pan’s overall trade surplus jumped 
teliigence services daring the Afghan 222 percent from j 
guerrillas ' fight against a Soviet occupy- 738.27 bi I lion yen 
ing force. That was its third 

At about the time of his father’s death, months after thre 
the investigators learned, Mr. Kansi par- Clines, 
ticipated in demonstrations against tee The surplus u 
United States. States, a source 


volvement in tee bombing, a charge that 
could result in pressure on the White 
House to retaliate. ( Reuters, WP) 


at which military leaders outlined 
what they described as the 
dangers of creeping fundament- 


End to Cuba Food Ban Sought 


key. Its actions against Mr. 
Erbakan have sharpened its profile 
as tire guaramra erf secular rule, but 
have also led to criticism teat it is 


re against Kurdish dangers of creeping fimdament- 
uaries in Iraq with- alism. Officers desaibed the rise 
Mr. Erbakan. Of- of political Islam as tee greatest 
y were afraid that threat facing Turkey. 

his government But at a news conference Mon- 

heir plans to the day, Mr. Erbakan issued a veiled 
warning to party leaders and oth- 
suy ’s displeasure ers who seemed to be urging mil- 
in to public view in itary intervention, 
n ft demanded that “We are all in the same boat,” 

street from his pro- he said. “Do notdrill holes in that 
s. It insisted that he boat.” 


SURPLUS: Japanese Trade Figures Raise Tensions With Trading Partners 


Continued from Page 1 among U.S. manufacturers who 

contend that Japanese exports 
In Washington, a White House threaten American jobs, singed 93 
viser discussing tec G-7 meeting percent from a year earlier, to 
id President BUI Clinton would 322.87 billion yen. 
it seek specific deregulation Japan’s surplus also grew with 


change its stance, indicating that it tee long term. Many private econ- 
f°° now fear tee surplus is omists expect the surplus to con- 
fesher. tinue to rise for tee rest of the vear 


WASHINGTON — Twelve members of Congress 
called Wednesday for an end to tee embargo on food sales 
to Cuba and an easing of curbs oo sales of medicine, 
saying that the measures were punishing innocent Cu- 
bans. 

‘In m ai ntaini n g appropriate pressure on Cuba’s Com- 
munist regime, it is imperative that compassion for the 
suffering people of Cuba not be lost and humanitarian 
exceptions to tee U.S. embargo be allowed to go for- 
ward,” said Representative James Leach, Republican of 
Iowa. ' 

The group introduced legislation aimed at remedying 
what it said was the unintended negative impact of current 
U-S. policy toward Cuba. The group said current le- 
gislation makes the licensing process for tee sale of 
medicine to Cuba so arduous that it creates a de facto 
ban. (AP) 


teeEuroj 
Asia in 


“We need to continue to keep 
careful watch to see whether there 
has been a change in the declining 


inopean union and the rest of trend of tee trade surplus, 
in May. The surplus soared ministry official said 


tinue to rise for tee nest of the year. 
But few fear it will maintain its 
recent pace of growth. They say that 
as consumers become accusto med 
to tax increases that took effect in 


Blast Kills Colombian Officers 


nTo S?=to^.6^oo- Yasrmiteegoveroor tt&tS 
IJ^tfroma y^r atiher.to wrtfa the EU and widened^ per- of tee Bank of Ja^n, JL ££ SX ^ 


738.27 billion yen ($6.52 billion), cent to 578 billion yen with Asia, forthright about hnsfears for the 
That was its third increase in four Despite recent rises in its sur- widening trade surplus saying it 
months after three years of de- plus, Japan bad steadfastly main- would continue to grow at least 

Clines. rained teat it was still on a down- “for tee time being " 

The surplus with tee United ward pate. But tee latest figures He said it was “difficult to tell” 

States, a source of frustration prompted tee Finance Ministry to how the surplus would move over 


Japan, was more overall trade surplus. 

his fears for the The Finance Ministry attributed 


months after three years of de- 
clines. 

The surplus with tee United 
States, a source of frustration 


wuuiu wunonue io grow at least 
“for tee time being. " 

He said it was "difficult to tell” 
how the surplus would move over 


The Finance Ministry attributed 
tee expansion of the surplus in May 
to the 7 trillion yen in tax increases 
in April and to tee weakness of the 
yen against tee currencies of other 
main trading partners. 


BOGOTA — A bomb apparently triggered by remote 
control exploded in a track at a police station mi ti* 
outskirts of Bogota, killing eight officers and wounding 
10. 

The blast Tuesday occurred while officers were search- 
ing the back of a track that had been seized earlier outside 
Bogota. 

The truck’s driver was d etain ed, said a police official. 
General Teodoro Ocampo. 

There was no immeaiate claim of responsibility and 
police officials did not say whether they suspected any 
particular group. ' 






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PAGE 9 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, J UNE 19, 1997 

HEALTH/SCIENCE 


Not Doctors, but Assistants: Filling a Medical Gap 


By DeNeen L. Brown 

Washington Post Service 


W ASHINGTON — Tom 
Harward has diagnosed 
heart disease, aneurysms, 
diabetes and depression. 
As he races through the small West 
Virginia town of BeJiogton making 
house calls with his little black bag, he 


treats throat and ear infections and in- 
jects painkillers into cancer patients. 
Some people in this remote town call 
Harward “Dr. Tom." 

But he's not a doctor. 

At Prince George’s Hospital Center, 
Bonnie DeMare's beeper goes off ax 630 
P.M., alerting her that a patient is in 
respiratory failure in the critical care unit 
She rushes to the unit, makes an incision 
in the patient's chest and guides a tube 
into his lung to drain the fluid. She sutures 
the opening with neat stitches; the crisis 
has passed. She’s not a doctor either. 

Mr. Harward and Ms. DeMare are 
physician assistants, members of a 
booming profession that increasingly is 
filling a void in health-care needs in the 
United Stales. Physician assistants are 
providing primary health care in rural 
areas where people have little access to 
doctors, in inner-city clinics where 
people have little money for health care, 


and in hospitals and private doctors’ 
offices where doctors caught up in the 
cost-cutting revolution of managed care 
have to see more patients in less time. 

In the last two years alone, the number 
of schools offering physician assistant 
programs leaped 33 percent, from 64 to 
85. In the last 10 years, die annual num- 
ber of graduates from physician assistant 
programs has nearly doubled, to 2300. 
Although the medical profession is grap- 
pling with an overabundance of spe- 
cialists, the demand for PAs continues to 
exceed the supply. About 85 percent 
were employed in their field within a year 
of graduation, according to the American 
Academy of Physician Assistants, and 
the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics has 
predicted a growth rate of 50 percent 
above the norm through 2005. 

One reason for die popularity of phy- 
sician assistants — there are about 
29,000 practicing now — undoubtedly is 
cost: The median annual income in gen- 
eral practice is about half that of a doctor 
($60,000 compared with $1 10,000). And 
the average tuition to earn a degree (about 
$2 1 ,000) is significantly less mark that for 
a doctor's degree (about $80,000). 

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, 
wben the physician assistant profession 
was in its infancy, questions were raised 
in medical circles about whether they 



DnaSBdVThcW^n^iaM 

Bonnie DeMare, center, in the emergency room at Prince George's. 


would lower the quality of health care, origins of the profession. “Others wor- 
“Some critics thought the job of PA was ried about the legality of PAs performing 
not attractive because it was interposed tasks traditionally carried out by phy- 
be tween medicine and nursing,’' Re- sicians; and still others worried about 
ginald Carter, chief of the division of PAs impersonating doctors and not 
Physician Assistant Education at Duke knowing their own role limitations.’' 
University, wrote in an article on the Those concerns have lessened over the 


years, particularly after a National 
Academy of Sciences commission con- 
cluded last year that there was do dif- 
ference between the quality of care given 
by a physician and an assistant. “The 
demand to hire physician assistants is at 
an all-time high," said Richard Scheffier, 
a professor of health economics at the 
University of California at Berkeley. 

Although the nearest full-time doctor 
practices 16 miles (25 kilometers) from 
Belington, two doctors visit Mr. Har- 
ward’s clinic two half-days a wed, and 
he tries to schedule his most complex 
cases for those days, 

“We're the eyes and ears for the sur- 
geon," said Ms. DeMare, the physician 
assistant in surgery and trauma at Prince 
George’s. That, she stressed, is quite 
different from being the surgeon. 

Aside from the financial advantage, 
some in the medical profession see an 
added beaefit in physician assistants: If 
managed care is forcing the humanity out 
of the medical profession, they say, phy- 
sician assistants may be bringing it back. 

Programs for physician assistants 
began in the mid-1960s, when military 
corpsmen were returning en masse from 
the Vietnam War, loaded with medical 
experience but with no arena in which to 
exercise their skills. About the same time. 
Congress passed legislation creating the 



Medicaid 

grams, vastly expanding heal th case 
rams for the elderly and the . 
f, millions of people who^* 
viously had seen a doctor only in a% 
gentries were eligible for federally foiled 
health care. The medical profession oo^J 

not keep pace. 

The surgeon general concluded far 
medical schools would have to increase 
their enrollments by SO percent to dad 
with the growth is patients. “AlsoafW 
the Second World War, we saw more 
physicians go into specialties rather than 
general practice," said Dr. Carter, chief 
of Duke’s PA program. “There was a 
real crisis in the general care arena.'' - 


T O answer that demand and 
train medical professionals 
faster, Eugene Stead Jr„ then 1 
chairman of the Department of i 
Medicine at Duke, created a two-year * 
program modeled after the first two 
years of medical school to educate 
corpsmen as physician assistants win 
would work under the supervision of -a 
doctor. Stale laws had to be rewritten to 
allow the first graduates of Duke’s pro- 
gram to go to work. But as the concept 
was picked up by other schools, a na- 
tional certification process for physician 
assistants was established. 


Dr. Schechter’s Ouchless Place: New Ways to Relieve a Child’s Pain 


By Susan Gilbert 

New York Times Service 



EW YORK — A lot has 
changed since the 1980s, 
when many children bad to 
endure postoperative pain 
and excruciating procedures like lumbar 
punctures without anything stronger 
than acetaminophen. 

Widespread myths in the medical pro- 
fession then held that children did not 
feel pain as intensely as adults and that 
narcotics should be withheld from chil- 
dren because they could cause addiction. 
Today, every major children’s hospital 
has a pain management service with 
anesthesiologists, psychologists and 
others who keep children comfortable 
most of the time. 

But this approach is too costly for 
most community hospitals, doctors say. 
This means that they have no systematic 
approach for relieving children's pain 
and that the methods used are often 
inadequate or outdated, said Dr. Neil 
Schechter, director of behavioral and 
developmental pediatrics at St. Francis 
Hospital and Medical Center, a com- 
munity teaching hospital in Hartford, 
Connecticut. 


To counteract the financial pressures, 
a handful of doctors and nurses have 
devised ways to relieve children's pain 
without spending much if any extra 
money. In the current issue of the journal 
Pediatrics, Dr. Schechter and several 
colleagues describe a program they de- 
signed at St Francis, which they say 
other hospitals can duplicate. “Almost 
□o additional expense is necessary,” Dr. 
Schechter said. “It’s a change in philo- 
sophy.” 

The group of pediatricians, surgeons, 
nurses, anesthesiologists and phar- 
macists began meeting in 1 995 to identi- 
fy the obstacles to easing children's pain 
at St Francis. They found no uniform 
method for determining how much dis- 
comfort children felt no place in their 
records to put this information and no 
agreement on which medications to 
give. Some doctors used methods of pain 
relief that were inappropriate for chil- 
dren, like injecting Demerol into the 
muscle. Dr. Schechter said. 

Demerol, once the treatment of choice 
for children, is now considered a poor 
choice because it can cause seizures. 
And intramuscular injections should not 
be given to children, he said, because 
they are so painful that children have 


been known to play down their pain from 
disease and surgery to avoid them. The 
group also found that children in the 
hospital often suffered pain because of 
poor planning. Blood would be drawn 
for a laboratory test and then, an hour 
later, a doctor would order a second test, 
subjecting the child to yet another needle 
stick. 

T O correct these problems. Dr. 
Schechter and his colleagues 
developed standardized proce- 
dures for assessing children's 
pain and relieving it For example, they 
call for nurses to ask children 8 years old 
and older to rate their pain on a scale of 1 
to 10, with 10 being the worst pain. 
Children from 3 to 7 use visual analogs, 
tike a scale of five faces ranging from 
happy to sad. Severe postoperative pain 
is treated with a continuous infusion of 
morphine or other opioids, rather than 
weaker chugs or intramuscular injec- 
tions. 

The protocols also call for pain from 
needle-stick procedures to be blocked 
with a topical anesthetic cream. And a 
child is to get ail such procedures at 
once, before the anesthetic wears off. 
Doctors cannot order additional tests 


Depression and the Wish to Die 


By Jane E. Brody 

New York Tunes Service 



EW YORK — When a ter- 
minally ill person expresses 
the wish to die, nearly two- 
thirds of Americans, includ- 
ing doctors, believe that this wish should 
be granted and that doctors should be 
allowed to assist in such a death without 
risking prosecution. (The Supreme 
Court is expected to rule on whether 
there is a constitutional right to assist- 
ance in dying by the end of June.) 

But some researchers and medical 
personnel who specialize in the care of 
dying patients say that before accepting 
at face value the requests of patients for 
help in dying, the reasons behind their 
thoughts warrant a closer look. Recent 
studies have revealed that most termin- 
ally ill patients who contemplate suicide 
are seriously depressed. 

Although it may sound at first like a 
bad joke, experts agree that dying does 
not have to be depressing. The end of life 
is always sad, but when pain and other 
problems are controlled, it does not have 
to be a period of grim despair. That is 
usually depression, and even as death 
nears it can be recognized and treated. 
When it is. thoughts of suicide can evap- 
orate. 

In one study, for example. Dr. Harvey 
Max Chochinov. a psychiatrist at the 
University of Manitoba and the Man- 
itoba Cancer Treatment and Research 
Foundation in Winnipeg, found that 
among suicidal cancer patients who ex- 
pressed a consistent, unequivocal desire 
for death, more than half were clinically 
depressed. 

In a New York study of 378 AIDS 
patients, the strongest predictor of a per- 


sonal interest in doctor-assisted suicide 
was the presence of depression. In an- 
other study among elderly patients, treat- 
ment of depression prompted many to 
decide to accept life-sustaining therapy 
and to be more realistic and optimistic in 
assessing its risks and benefits. 

Two other conditions, also reversible, 
can foster a desire for death in the ter- 
minally ill: severe, uncontrolled pain or 
the fear of it and inadequate support 
from family and friends, although in Dr. 
Chochinov 's study, these were less in- 
fluential than depression. 

But the three factors are often in- 
tertwined. In some cases, untreated pain 
is the main cause of depression; in oth- 
ers, the patient’s depression is the main 
reason others fail to provide adequate 
support. 

Based on their own studies and those 
of others, researchers at Memorial 
Sloan-Ketteting Cancer Center in New 
York maintain that focusing on suicide 
“is inappropriate when so tittle has yet 
been done to ease suffering without hav- 
ing to kill patients or to assist in their 
killing of themselves.” 

F urthermore, Dr. Kath- 
leen M. Foley, co-chief of the 
pain and palliative care service 
at the cancer center, cautions 
that wishes to die often fluctuate and a 
patient requesting doctor-assisted sui- 
cide one week may reject this option two 
weeks later. 

Many families and doctors may as- 
sume that being seriously depressed is a 
natural state for people with an incur- 
able disease or terminal illness who are 
nearing death. It is not. Various studies 
have shown that even among patients 
with advanced cancer who know they 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

LEVEN of the 12 players 
who will represent the 
United States in the Bermuda 
Bowl World Team Champi- 
onship in Tunisia in October 
are now known, and all of 
them have had successes at 
world level. 

The No. 2 team, which 
clinched its place with a 34- 
imps victory in New Orleans 
consists of Nick Nickell of 
Manhattan. Dick Freeman of 
Atlanta. Jeff Meckstroth of 
Tampa. Florida. Eric Rodwell 
of Naperville, Illinois, and 
Bob Wolff and Bob Hamman 
of Dallas. 

Their strongest opposition 
is likely to come from France, 
which won the World 
Olympiad title on the Greek 


island of Rhodes last year, 
Italy, which has dominated in 
international events in the last 
year, and the No. 1 American 
team. This group consists of 
Seymon Deutsch of Laredo. 
Texas, Zia Mnhmood of Man- 
hattan. Michael Rosenberg of 
Tuckahoe, New York. Chip 
Martel of Davis. California, 
and Lew Stansby of Castro 
Valley, California. 

Zia, a charismatic charac- 
ter, is the only one of these 
players who has never won a 
world title. That is because he 
has never before represented 
the United States, the result of 
loyalty to his native Pakistan, 
which he has twice helped to 
win silver medals in world 
championships. 

On the diagramed deal 
from the Deutsch-Nickell 
playoff in New Orleans, both 


North-South pairs reached 
three no-trump without dif- 
ficulty. Zia as West lulled his 
opponent to sleep with a small 
deception. Instead of leading 
the spade four, the orthodox 
fourth-best called for by his 
partnership methods, he led 
the two. This did not deceive 
his partner, for the declarer 
could hardly have a con- 
cealed Five-card spade suit. 
South now assumed, na- 
ively against Zia, that there 
was a four-card suit on his left 
So when Deutsch, East, won 
with the ace and returned the 
nine, South covered with the 
ten. Zia promptly ducked, and 
the game was now unmake- 
able. When Deutsch gained 
the lead with the diamond ace, 
he played his remaining spade 
ana Zia took three spade tricks 
for down one. 


NORTH 

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North 

East 

South 

Pass 

Id 

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lb 

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16 

Pass 

3N.T. 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 



Vest led the spade two. 


later in the day without a good reason, 
like a change in a child's condition. 

Perhaps the most important compon- 
ent of the pain-relief program is parental 
involvement. Dr. Schechter said. Parents 
are allowed to be with their children 
during all procedures. And parents are 
taught ways to help take the edge off 
then- children's pain and anxiety, like 
blowing bubbles, telling stories and 
looking at books. 

The pain-control system is now a per- 
manent fixture at Sl Francis. As a sym- 
bol of the hospital's commitment to it, 
the pediatric unit has been renamed the 
Ouchless Place. 

Dr. Schechter admits that “ouchless” 


is a bit of an exaggeration. "When a 
child has surgery, it’s impossible to keep 
him pain-free,’ ' he said. ’ ‘And, tike any- 
thing, the program has its ups and 
downs," like failure of technicians to 
use anesthetic cream before drawing 
blood. Bat over all the response has been 
positive, be said. “The approach does 
not rely on expensive pain services or 
highly technical methods of providing 
care and is therefore applicable to any 
setting in which ill children are cared 
for," Dr. Schechter and his colleagues 
wrote in the joumaL 
Dr. Zeev Kain, chief of pediatric an- 
esthesiology at the Yale University 
School of Medicine, expressed concern 


that even relatively inexpensive pro- 
grams like these may be too costly for 
community hospitals to sustain. But said 
he applauded any effort to ease chil- 1 
chen s discomfort in the hospital, es- 
pecially in light of his own research 
showing that children who experience a 
lot of anxiety before surgery are likely to 
have nightmares and behavior problems 
for weeks and months. 

‘ ‘Neil Schechter is on the cutting edge 
in advocating for pain management in 
the pediatric population," Dr. Kain said. 
“If somewhere some pediatrician will 
read about his program and change his 
mind and do something better, that’s 
great.” 


are dying, only about 25 percent are 
clinically depressed. Of course, people 
who are terminally ill are likely to be 
sad. 

But sadness, which is perfectly nor- 
mal, is not the same as depression, which 
is not. Sadness does not rule out hope, 
whether it is the hope of seeing a new 
grandchild or enjoyuig a movie. 

Millions of terminally ill Americans 
currently suffer from serious depression, 
a treatable yet usually untreated con- 
dition that turns the end of life into a time 
of desperation, blocking the dy ing per- 
son's ability to enjoy anything during the 
last weeks or months of life and in- 
hibiting meaningful interactions with 
family and friends. 

Not only are the patient's last days 
nightmarish, family and friends suffer 
too, because they are unable to offer 
comfort and love to a person who re- 
peatedly pushes them away. And, as Dr. 
William Breitbart, chief of the psychi- 
atric service at Memorial Sloan- Ketter- 
ing, points oat, “If death occurs in a 
context of uncontrolled pain and de- 
pression, that unpleasant legacy lingers 
with the survivors for generations.” 

Diagnosing depression in a very sick 
person can be tricky. Dr. Breitbart said, 
because many of the usual physical signs 
of depression, like fatigue, sleep dis- 
ruption, loss of energy and poor appetite, 
may be caused by the patient’s medical 
illness or its treatment 

But Dr. Chochinov and colleagues in 
Manitoba found that it was not necessary 
to rely on such criteria to determine 
whether a sick person was seriously de- 
pressed. They showed that simply ask- 
ing the patient whether he or she is 
depressed could produce a reliable dia- 
gnosis. 


Estrogen May Fight Alzheimer’s 



New York Times Service 
EW YORK — Researchers 
at the National Institnte on 
Aging and Johns Hopkins 
Bayview Medical Center 
have found that women who take es- 
trogen after menopause are much less 
likely to develop Alzheimer's disease 
than those who do not use die hormone 
replacement. The risk of developing 
the disease was reduced by more than 
50 percent among the hormone users, 
according to a report in the June issue 
of the journal Neurology. 

The finding adds to a growing body 
of evidence that estrogen can Benefit 
the aging brain. Previous studies have 
indicated, for example, that estrogen 


acts as an antioxidant and anti-inflam- 
matory agent that can inhibit age-re- 
lated deterioration of critical brain 
cells. The hormone also stimulates the 
growth of neurons that release acet- 
ylcholine, an important transmitter of 
nerve messages in the brain. 

Other agents that have been linked to 
a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease 
include vitamin E, which is also an 
antioxidant, and nonsteroidal anti-in- 
flammatory drags tike aspirin, ibupro- 
fen and naprosyn. 

The current report came from the 
Baltimore Longitudinal Study on 
Aging, a project of the National In- 
stitute on Aging now in its 40th year of 
observing various aspects of aging in 


more than 2,000 people. The estrogen- 
Alzheimer’s arm of the study involved 
472 women who were observed for 
more than 16 years. 

The participants were examined 
every two years over the course of 2*4 
days, during which the researchers as- 
sessed their use of estrogen replace- 
ment and administered physical and 
cognitive tests. 

The director of the Alzheimer's 
study. Dr. Claudia Kawas of Johns 
Hopkins, said, “This finding gives us 
additional evidence that estrogen may 
play a role in warding off the onset of 
this devastating disease.” 

Jane E. Brody 


Another Danger Is Linked 
To High Blood Pressure 

ARLINGTON, Virginia (AP) — In a 
finding that offers another reason to con- 
trol high blood pressure, a new federal 
study suggests a link between hyper- 
tension and loss of brain tissue. 

The study, reported in USA Today, 
shows that ignoring high systolic blood 
pressure — the higher of the two num- 
bers in a blood-pressure reading — in 
middle age could lead to brain damage 
and loss of cognitive ability by the early 
70s. The research on male twins shows 
that the longer a man lives with above- 
normal systolic pressure — a normal 
reading typically is 120 — the more 


mental declines he exhibits and the more 
healthy brain tissue is lost 
“There’s been a misperception in die 
medical community that since systolic 
pressure goes up with age, it’s O.K. to 
accept a level above 140,” said Ten 
Manotio of the National Heart, Lung and 
Blood Institute. 


On Teenage Cholesterol 

DALLAS t AP) — A teenage girl with 
high cholesterol may not solve the prob- 
lem by losing weight, because girls’ 
cholesterol levels appear to be unrelated 
to their percentage of body fat, a new 
study suggests. 


The findings contradict the conven- 
tional wisdom about obesity and cho- 
lesterol. said Dr. Darwin Labarthe, the 
lead author of the report published in the 
American Heart Association journal 
Circulation. \ 

“In girls, the proportion of body 
weight that is fat is unrelated to cho- 
lesterol level, whereas for boys the two 
are closely parallel," Dr. Labarthe said 
He studied 678 children, ages 8 to 18, 
for four years. The children, from a 
Houston suburb, were tested every four 
months. Cholesterol for both boys and 
girls fell as they got older and gained 
weight. In boys, the drop paralleled a 
decrease in percentage of body fat But 
girls’ fat levels stayed about the same. 


BOOKS 


SOUTH 
4 Q IB 6 5 
9AK72 
4 J9 
4KJ4 

Both sides were vulnerable. The bid- 
ding: 


VIRGIL THOMSON: 

Composer on the Aisle 

By Aruhony Tommasini. 605 pages. $30. 
Norton. 

Reviewed by Jack Sullivan 

O NE of the few undisputed truths of 
our musical culture is the centrality 
of Virgil Thomson as critic and taste- 
maker. From the 1920s through the ’80s, 
whether writing from Paris, from his 
post as music critic for the New York 
Herald Tribune, or in free-lance venues 
such as the New York Review of Books, 
Thomson produced the most bri llian t, 
audacious, and influential music crit- 
icism since Bernard Shaw. 

Thomson had no conflict about “con- 
flict of interest.” This moral dilemma, 
hugely an American construct, did not 
exist in 1920s Paris, where expatriate 
Thomson did his apprenticeship. The last 
and most politically shrewd of the great 
composer-critics, Thomson used his in- 
fluential reviews not only to bash the 
conservative, star-obsessed classical 
music establishment, but to advance 
himself and other American composers 
when they were still locked out of Euro- 
centric musical circles. Wben Peggy 
Granville-Hicks, searching for a job ar 
the Herald Tribune, jokingly suggested 
to Thomson near the end of his tenure 
that a reviewing post wouldn’t hurt her 
career as a composer, he said, “Baby! 
I've sucked that lemon dry.” 

Ironically, Thomson’s virtuosity as a 
writer overshadowed his achievement as 
a composer, even though works such as 
his 1928 opera with Gertrude Stein, 



“Four Saints in Three Acts,” forged a 
distinctive American idiom before Aaron 
Copland’s ballets or George Gershwin’s 
“Porgy and Bess.’’ Thomson wrote mu- 
sic of radical simplicity and “Amer- 
ican” spareness when “the complexity 
boys." as he called them, dominated the 
scene. He predicted the collapse of aca- 
demic seriatism and paved the way for 
Leonard Bernstein. Philip Glass, and oth- 
er tonal composers, but his own music 
remains largely unperformed. Appar- 
ently he could manipulate public opinion 
toward any music but his own. 

Anthony Tommasini has written an 
ambitious, utterly absorbing biography 
of this formidable figure and the culture 
be shaped. Readers of the New York 
Times, where Tommasini appears as a 
stringer, know him as a thoughtful, lit- 
erate music critic. With Thomson as his 
subject, he’d better be. 

This book sails straight into the most 
complex crosscurrents of Thomson’s 
life: his Kansas City upbringing as an 
“unreconstructed Southerner" who en- 
joyed using his Southern Baptist slave- 
owner lineage to shock his New York 
friends; his Paris years in the Satie- 
Boulanger-Siein circles; his opera, ballet, 
film and Broadway collaborations with 
Stein, Orson Welles, Lincoln Kiretein, 
and John Houseman; his closeted life as a 
homosexual who deplored the openness 
of gay liberation; his complicated feuds 
with the very people he championed, 
including Stein, John Cage, and “the bad 
boy of music” George Antheil, who in 
Thomson's withering appraisal “merely 
grew up to be a good boy." 

An admirer of Wilde’s epigrams, 


Thomson lived a life of Wildean para- 
doxes. A “genius at social manipula- 
tion,” in Lincoln Kirstein’s words, he 
was famous for homespun honesty; an 
endlessly charming communicator, be 
was secretive and insular. Dealing his 
friends, as Gertrude Stein said, to “leave 
him inside himself completely to him- 
self." He was a formidable intellectual 
who despised “professor’s musks” a 
rarefied aesthete who deplored art that 
was not connected to a broader culture, as 
in his famous characterization of To- 
scanini's “wow technique,” a style 
“very little dependent on literary culture 
or historical knowledge ... a temporary, 
but intense condition of purely auditory 
excitement.” 

A biographer is expected to te Holland 
Tommasini does not hesitate to record 
Thomson’s lonely affairs and crushes, b» 
desperate attempts to remain in the closei 
by having a beautiful woman on his arnj 
at concerts, his shocking meanness and 
pettiness, his relentless insistence 
hogging the limelight. But he does so to* 
spirit of compassion and sadness rather 
than the catty “gotcha” manner that ra- 
ins so many psychobiographies. 

Tommas ini's writing has a rather non- 

Virgilian modesty and restraint that allow 

him to stand outside his snbject ewo 
when he is close to iL This is a thoroughly 
original biography.detachedyet intto^j 
learned yet entertaining, one that does ran 
justice to its feisty, iconoclastic subjeto- 

Jack Sullivan, editor of “ Words «« 











PAGE 10 


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Meralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



fvm.imikp »mi Tim new n irk Times nnu rut wa-munctcm* row 


A Warming World Needs Human Remedy Now 

• - ■" -a... nnli- rlniK Maftm ■ 


Unfinished Business 


The most remarkable aspect of Bill 
Clinton's San Diego speech on race 
was the extent to which it was pro- 
moted in advance as a statement of 
exceptional weight The president in- 
deed did deliver an important speech 
on prejudice, discrimination and the 
need to close America's various pain- 
ful racial divides for the 21st century. 
But it was not a landmark statement in 
the sense of representing a turning 
point in the nation's history. 

The important point — the funda- 
mental point — is that a conversation 
on race is not something new or needed 
or that Mr. Clinton could launch this 
year even if he wanted to. The con- 
versation on race has been under way 
in the country one way or another since 
the 17th century. 

Starting as early as the Colonial 
period, through the Civil War, the Re- 
construction era and the judicial and 
civil rights struggles of the 1950s, '60s 
and '70s, people in America have been 
engaged in interchanges on the mean- 
ing of race and the implications of 
people of different racial backgrounds’ 
living and working together. At times, 
as Mr. Clinton said, citizens have 
“talked at each other and about each 
other.*' But there have been occasions 
when Americans have relaxed their 
guards, reached across the dividing 
lines and talked and worked with each 
other as well. TTiose exchanges — of- 
ten tense, painful or rancorous, and 
perhaps too infrequent — help explain 
the country's tom-down racial barri- 


Marching Season 


The Irish Republican Army's con- 
temptible murders of two Protestant 
policemen are not only a tremendous 
setback for the cause of peace in North- 
ern Ireland they pose an immediate 
danger to Northern Ireland's people. 
Every summer, Protestant groups hold 
marches commemorating a 1690 Prot- 
estant victory over Catholics. The 
marches, which peak in early July, are 
often routed through Catholic neigh- 
borhoods, setting on a spiral of injury, 
looting, property damage and some- 
times deaths. The IRA murders this 
week took place veiy near the site of 
last summer's worst riots, and seem 
designed to provoke retaliatory vio- 
lence from the largely Protestant 
groups loyal to London. All sides must 
scramble to prevent violence this year. 

Even before the murders, the British 
government had taken some construct- 
ive steps to defuse the, tension. The 
secretary for Northern Ireland, Mo 
Mowlam, has repeatedly met with res- 
idents, both Catholic and Protestant, 
urging them to speak to each other and 
reach a compromise on parade routes. 
The largest parade group, the Orange 
Onjer. wrote a letter to residents of a 
Catholic neighborhood where violence 
was particularly bad last year, explain- 
ing its desire to march. Catholics wrote 
back, but the two groups still will not 
talk face to face. Catholic leaders, for 
their pan, should cancel a confron- 
tational outdoor festival planned to co- 
incide with the Orange Order march. 


and persuade residents to protest 
peacefully and avoid baiting police. 

Last year's violence, among the 
worst in decades, was exacerbated by 
the behavior of Northern Ireland's 
largely Protestant police force. When 
police banned a march through a Cath- 
olic neighborhood, Protestants rioted 
for four days. Police then gave in and 
allowed the march. Catholic riots fol- 
lowed. This year the British government 
needs to lake responsibility for parade 
routes and crowd control strategies 
rather than leaving such decisions to 
Northern Ireland's police. It must also 
act upon an internal British police in- 
vestigation that concluded that Northern 
Ireland 's police were poorly trained and 
equipped durii g the marches. 


Tony Blair should ban plastic bul- 
lets. which police have not used else- 


lets. which police have not used else- 
where in Britain. Police fired nearly 
6,000 of these potentially deadly bul- 
lets during last year's marches, nearly 
90 percent of them at Catholics. 

Mr. Blair is right to repudiate the 
IRA’s murders by cutting off all formal 
contacts with Sinn Fein, the IRA's polit- 
ical wing. The ERA will have to embrace 
the peace process and begin a real cease- 
fire before Sinn Fein can take a seat at 
peace talks. But London should com- 
bine firmness on this Issue with a mature 
policy to preveni parade violence. This 
is the best answer to the ERA 's apparent 
efforts to provoke destruction and death 
in the marches of the weeks ahead. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Death Isn’t the Answer 


. The Denver jury that sentenced 
Timothy McVeigh to death had ample 
justification in the law. The defendant 
.is a mass murderer who has shown no 
contrition. The jury weighed the pro- 
secutor’s list of aggravating circum- 
stances and found un Friday ihat all 
were present in this crime. The mit- 
igating factors, which by law must be 
considered and balanced, were insig- 
nificant If anyone deserves to pay the 
ultimate penalty allowed by law for 
these murders, it is McVeigh. Although 
it is difficult to see a crowd cheering the 
announcement of a death to come, the 
scale of this crime and the emotion it 
s generated, not just in Oklahoma City 
but across the country, make even that 
stark reaction understandable. 

The more basic question, however, 
is not whether Timothy McVeigh de- 
serves the most severe penalty avail- 
able in a civilized society. He surely 
does. It is what thai penalty should be. 
We continue to believe that it should 
not be execution by the stale. Although 
sorely tested by this case, this position 
is grounded in a firm belief that state- 
sanctioned killing is immoral. 

Some of those who argued against 
execution suggested that it would 
make McVeigh a sympathetic martyr 
in the eyes of some Americans. That is 


not persuasive or even realistic. Others 
said that his life should be spared so 
that he would be available to implicate 
other conspirators — a long shot. And 
the defendant's attorney even warned 
the jurors that a death sentence would 
provoke violent retaliation, a spectac- 
ularly misguided threat that probably 
backfired. The jurors would have been 
wrong to buy any of those arguments. 

The only solid case to be made 
against ihe death penally — and we 
find it persuasive — is the moral one. 
And ii applies even to Timothy Mc- 
Veigh. The taking of life, even by the 
state, even when ihe person executed is 
a monster, is simply wrong. 

And il is always irrevocable. This 
week's news that Elmer “Geronimo" 
Pratt, a former Black Panther, was re- 
leased after serving 25 years for a 
murder he says he did not commit is a 
reminder of the occasional fallibility of 
the law. So is the exoneration of a 
number of other long-term prisoners 
and death row inmates after DNA test- 
ing. which was unavailable at the time 
of their convictions. The state has the 
right and the obligation to punish mur- 
derers severely. It should not have the 
authority to act as a killer has acted and 
to take a life for a life taken. 

— I HE HASHING! ON ROST 


* tk. ivruiiwiiftii m* * * 

ilcralo^a^&dtnbunc 


ESTARUSHtD /.W 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
G '■ClMtnncH 

KATHARINE P. DARRQW. \ i.v Chainmin 


RICHARD McCLEAN. Pithlidu-r «£ ChitfFxe, hi nv 
MICHAEL GETLER, Ewmin- Editor 


• WALTER WELLS. M,«wwnc Editor • PAUL ttORVITZ, Deputy Miinusms Ediun 
KATHERINE KNORR mi CHARLES MITCHELMORE. Deputy bliues * SAMUEL ABT and 
~ARL GEW1RTZ. Assxvuie Edit.™ * ROBERT J. DONAHUE, biitur of the Mium.it Paga 
• JONATHAN GAGE. Otistiu-xs .<«/ Fuiotur Editor 
• RENE BONDY. Deputy Publisher 

• JAMES McLEOD. AAmteiig Director • DIDIER BRUN.Cirr»bnr«i Du\\i,ir 
Direeteur de la PuNiortiw Richard McClain 


WionaJ Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charta-ik-Gaulte. 9252 1 Niruilly-Mir-Scuv. Fiana-. 
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N EW YORK — Yes. the world is 
getting wanner. This warming is 


By James Hansen 


ers, and why America today is less 
segregated across the board than it was 
a few decades ago. 

But it still faces a huge burden of 
unfinished business on the racial and 
ethnic fronts. The threat of a country 
separated by race and ethnicity is real. 

Mr. Clinton asked the signal ques- 
tion: “Can we define what it means to 
be an American, not just in terms of the 
hyphens showing our ethnic origins, 
but in terms of our primary allegiance to 
the values America, stands for and val- 
ues we live by ?' ' He proposes to answer 
that question through an advisory panel 
that will travel the country for the next 
year promoting a dialogue and explor- 
ing issues related to race, all in “the 
cause of building one America." 

It gets fuzzy about here. Just as, we 
might add, issuing a national apology 
for slavery — beyond its symbolism — 
does not expand economic and edu- 
cational opportunity, remove barriers 
to achievement, promote effective cit- 
izens or build one America based on 
mutual respect and shared values. 

No single symbolic act or landmark 
speech can bring abouL those results. 
Some symbolic acts and speeches 
meant to make things better can ac- 
tually make them worse by reinforcing 
the idea that all people today may be 
defined as to both their moral and 
political status strictly on the basis of 
the color of their skin. There is no 
substitute for courageous, real lead- 
ership and concrete actions. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


not blatantly obvious, because it is 
smaller than short-term chaotic climate 
variations — the random atmospheric 
fluctuations that moke weather patterns 
unpredictable for periods longer than 
several days. But it is apparent in sys- 
tems, such as mountain glaciers, that 
respond sluggishly to climate change. 

Mountain glaciers are melting tick 
almost everywhere. The European Alps 
have lost half their glacier volume since 
1 850. The largest glaciers respond very 
slowly, but Lonnie Tbomp-son, a pro- 


Sincc then. Earth has been cooling 
slowly and irregularly, with the coldest 
time being the Little Ice Age of 1 600 to 
1850. At times the river 'Humes froze 
hard enough to host London ice fairs, 
and American revolutionary soldiers 
could drag cannon across the ice from 
Manhattan to Staten Island. 

Since the Industrial Revolution 
began, the long-term cooling trend has 
reversed. Earth, on average, has 


warmest year in the 125-year period of in his grave. Nol ^- v ^esNan«e pfcy 

instrumental data. drcc. now lh % 

When the largest volcano eruption of consequence of human-made changes 
the century, by Mount Pinatubo in the of atmospheric comp«|tion. 


Philippines, blasted millions of tons of 
aerosols (fine particles) into the stra- 
tosphere in 1991, one of the same cli- 
mate models that had been used to pre- 
dict greenhouse warming was used to 
simulate the expected effect of the aer- 
osols. The model predicted a three-year 
global cooling, peaking at about half a 
centigrade degree a year after the erup- 
tion. Subsequent observations agreed 


siowiy. out Lonnie lbomp-son, a pro- warmed by about half a centigrade de- closely with these computer-aided pro- 
fessor of geology at Ohio Stale and an gnee since 1850, with the most rapid dictions, increasing confidence in our 
intrepid explorer of glaciers world- wanning occurring since the middle understanding of climate change, 
wide, reports that all the glaciers he has 1 960s. What is causing this reversal? Global satellite observations con- 
measured are retreating. In 1988, 1 testified to the U.S. Senate firm that greenhouse gases are causing 


measured are retreating. 

This universal retreat does not seem 
to be natural. 

An example of unexpected melt- 
back was the unceremonious exposure 
in 1991 of a mummified Bronze Age 
hunter in the Tyrolean Alps, replete in 
his gear of a bow, 14 arrows, flint 
dagger, leather shoes and fur robe. This 
hunter, trapped in the ice 5 J00 years 
ago, had every right to expect to remain 
undisturbed for 100,000 years. 

Natural long-term oscillations of cli- 
mate related to changes in Earth's orbit 
are dominated by 100,000-year swings 
between relatively warm interglacial 
periods and ice ages. The warmth of 
our present interglacial period peaked 
6,000 years ago. 


that I was 99 percent certain that Earth 
had entered a period of wanning and 
that I had a high degree of confidence 
that this was a consequence of human- 
made gases. Greenhouse gases, prin- 
cipally carbon dioxide from the burn- 
ing or fossil fuels, warm Earth's surface 
by absorbing heat radiation from the 
ground, as a blanket warms a person. 

My confidence was built in part on 
the agreement between computer mod- 
el simulations of climate and observed 
climate, but mainly on empirical ev- 
idence for how greenhouse gases had 
altered climate in previous epochs. 

Evidence since 1988 strengthens 
these conclusions. The global temper- 
ature record was broken in 1990. the 


Deferring Action Will Only Raise the Cost 


T HE science is compelling. Carbon 
dioxide warms the planet. The 


wanning will affect different places in 
different ways, but the net effect is 


unlikely to be good. Abating carbon 
dioxide and other greenhouse eases 


dioxide and other greenhouse gases 
will entail economic costs, but these are 
small and transitional. 

Broad price signals — perhaps the 
product of emissions permits that pol- 
luters could trade — send everybody 
the right message. They are not a whole 
policy, but a requisite basis for one. 

Climate change is not some sci-fi 
terror that requires immediate mobil- 
ization and massive sacrifice. But de- 
ferring action will raise the cost of 
stabilizing the world's atmospheric 
concentrations of greenhouse gases, 
our ultimate goal. That is because emis- 
sions are growing faster than any im- 
minent technology can abate them. 

The longer we wait the further we 
have to catch up. On the other hand, the 
sooner we give ourselves some lead 
time, the easier all of this will be. 


Capital incentives are important 
he faster we invest, the faster we turn 


The faster we invest, the faster we turn 
over our capital stock and achieve 
emissions reductions. That is because 
new investment embodies the latest 
technologies for reducing emissions.* 


Experience across a wide range of 
industries shows that well-designed pro- 
cesses reduce both emissions and total 
business costs. Investment incentives 
must be considered as part of climate 
change strategy, because pro- invest- 
ment policy is pro-environment policy. 

It is all one atmosphere, whether pol- 
luted by U.S. utilities, German steel 
plants or Korean traffic jams. If we let 
polluters in one country search for 
cheaper pollution offsets in others, then 
we lower the cost of the entire process. 

The former Soviet bloc, China. India 
and others will offer such opportuni- 
ties, at least for the next few decades. 

Technology is the key. We must 
have a far-sighted technology program 
that aims our most formidable eco- 
nomic weapon — new ideas — at this 
pressing problem. 

Let’s sidestep the yammering about 
' ‘corporate welfare,' ’ sit down with the 
business leaders who have expressed 
their concern and work out a shared 
program to innovate our way through 
this problem. 

The whole world must be involved. 

— Everett M. Ehrlich, U.S. 
undersecretary of commerce for 
economic affairs until i/iis month. 


Global satellite observations con- 
firm that greenhouse gases are causing 
climate change. Satellite data spanning 
1 8 years reveal precise changes of stra- 
tospheric aerosols (a natural effect of 
volcanoes) and changes of ozone (a 
human-caused pollution effect). 

These changes have distinct spatial 
and temporal patterns, and the models 
predict distinct patterns of temperature 
change, which have been observed. Ir 
follows that the climate system will heat 
up in response to the uniform carbon 
dioxide increase around the planet. 

Nine years ago I said that greenhouse 
warming was smaller than local climate 
variability, but that ii altered probab- 
ilities — it loaded the climate dice. 1 
argued that the chance of an unusually 
warm season. 30 percent in the period 
from 1951 to 1980. would be double 
that in the 1990s. So far the data show' 
that, despite Pinatubo-caused cooling, 
the frequency of unusually warm sea- 
sons has reached about 50 percent. 

Our model predicts that the rest of 
the 1990s will be even warmer, with a 
new record global temperature being 
set during the next three years. 

The most threatening potential effect 
of global warming is an increase in 
extremes of the hydrologic cycle. 
Greenhouse heating causes more evap- 
oration, and thus more heavy rainfall 
and floods. But it also increases the 
intensity of dry periods, thus causing 
more extreme droughts and forest fires. 

Long-term data are limited, but 
changes observed in the United States 
are consistent with these expectations. 
For example, the amount of precip- 
itation falling in extreme events (rainfall 
of more than 5 centimeters a day) has 
increased by 20 percent in this century. 

Nevertheless, no specific regional 
climate fluctuations can be blamed on 
the greenhouse effect. This frustrating 
situation arises from the inherently 
chaotic nature of climate variability, 
and ultimately from the uncertainty 
principle of modem physics. 

The lack of determinism was a con- 
sternation to Albert Einstein, who pre- 
ferred to believe that “God docs not 


Impacts of global warming, ai least 
so far, are a mixed bag. For example, it 
is estimated that climate trends in Aus- 
tralia have been responsible fora 15 to 
20 percent increase in wheat yield* 
And high-latitude regions, such as 
Canada and Siberia, may benefit from 
some warming and increased precip- 
itation. But people, wildlife and forests 
are adjusted to the climate that has 
existed for thousands of years, so rapid 
climate changes undoubtedly would 
have a negative net effect, 

Although some human-causcd cli- 
mate change is inevitable and already 
occurring, it is desirable that the 
changes be limited. 

In the past 1 8 years of accurate satel- 
lite measurements, the climate forcing 
due to anthropogenic greenhouse gases 
has increased by only about a hall wall 
per square meter. The total healing by 
human-made greenhouse gases that 
have accumulated in the atmosphere 
since the Industrial Revolution began is 
now 15 wans per square meter; that’s 
the equivalent of a 1 percent increase in 
the brightness of the sun. 

This total anthropogenic climate for- 
cing is substantial, but its recent rate of 
growth is only about half of the most 
Sire model simulations of the 1 9S0s. 

Part of the slowdown is a credit to 
humans — use of ch loro fluorocarbons 
has been baited in its tracks by en- 
vironmental concerns about ozone de- 
pletion. And part is a puzzle — meth- 
ane growth has slowed mysteriously to 
half of earlier rates, and carbon dioxide 
has been taken up at an increased rate 
by unknown “sinks” on land, prob- 
ably forests or soil. 

In my opinion, a sensible policy is to 
slow greenhouse gas grow th rates fur- 
ther, as we develop a better under- 
standing of climate change. 

So far we have only felt half of the 
warming due to gases already added to 
the atmosphere, because the ocean’s 
large heat capacity delays the response 
to changes of atmospheric composition. 
Thus climate will continue to warm in 
coming decades, glaciers will melt back 
further, and sea level will rise. 

As the loading of the climate dice 
becomes more obvious to people, we 
had better be prepared. It will be far 
easier to slow climate change if we have 
already made energy systems more ef- 
ficient, decreased dependence on fossil 
fuels and taken other steps to reduce the 
growth of greenhouse gases. 


The writer is director of the NASA 
Goddard Institute for Space Studies 
and adjunct professor of geological 
sciences at Columbia University. This 


commenting in The Washmpidn Post. r - ; mate change could mrJtefynstein turn-. Angeles Times Syndicate. 


Clinton’s Foreign Policy Requires Teamwork as Well as Stars 


W ASHINGTON — Five 
months into Bill Clin- 
ion’s second term, stardom out- 
ranks unity as the guiding prin- 
ciple for his foreign policy 
team. That team has not yet 
jelled into the tightly knit group 
that the president expected ana 
promised after his re-election. 

Secretary of State Madeleine 
Albright has emerged as the 
brightest star on the cabinet ho- 
rizon, and her aides seem de- 


By Jim Hoagland 


termined to keep it that way. 
When another official routinely 


When another official routinely 
asked the State Department to 
look over a speech that dealt 
with a foreign country, the re- 
view produced precisely one 
question: Why wasn't the sec- 
retary’s name mentioned? 

Defense Secretary William 
Cohen, portrayed in several re- 
cent newspaper articles as hav- 
ing lost to Mrs. Albright in an 


intramural tiff' over Bosnia, still 
seems to administration in- 
siders to think and act more like 
the Republican senator from 
Maine that he was than like the 
dominant force'in the executive 
branch that he could be. 

“I will feel more comfort- 
able when he starts saying ‘we’ 
and means the cabinet rather 
than Congress," one well- 
placed Clinton ite told a friend 
five weeks ago. Mr. Clinton's 
national security adviser, Sandy 
Berger, expressed a similar sen- 
timent directly to Mr. Cohen 
during a meeting of Mr. Clin- 
ton’s principal foreign affairs 
advisers on Bosnia last month, 
according to two sources. 

Mr. Berger recalls that he 
kidded Mr. Cohen in that meet- 
ing about his congressional 


background, but he denies that 
it reflected any tension between 
them. As Mr. Clinton's point 
man on unity, Mr. Berger tells 
me that reports of internal dis- 
putes over foreign policy are 
greatly exaggerated. 

There is something to that 
view. There are not great dif- 
ferences over the substance of 
foreign policy within this cab- 
inet. as there were in the Nixon, 
Carter and Reagan administra- 
tions. Expect no KissingerRo- 
gers, Brzezinski- Vance shoot- 
outs in Clinton IL 

More likely is a running 
series of lower-volume scuffles 
having to do with ego and spot- 
light rather than the bricks and 
mortar of policy-making. Al- 
most all of the attention devoted 
to Mrs. Albright's fast, spirited 


Missile Mischief in South Asia 


start as secretary of stale, for 
example, has had to do with her. 
not with foreign policy. 

The exception has been Bos- 
nia, where her long-known 
hawkish views conflict with 
Mr. Cohen’s skittishness. He 
would bolt for the door even 
before the June 1998 cutoff of 
U.S. participation in peace- 
keeping there. He has sought to 
persuade Mr. Clinton to take the 
same view. 

A New York Times front- 
page report last week said Mrs. 
Albright had turned back Mr. 
Cohen's effort to commit the 
administration formally to a fi- 
nal. total U.S. pullout by next 
June. The report of tension be- 
tween the two had a self-ful- 
filling quality. It did not go un- 
noticed at the Pentagon that the 
detailed reconstruction of the 
argument was written by the 
Times’ State Department cor- 
respondent. 

But the president did not 
need to be dragged to staying in 
Bosnia. He has at several points 
in the last six months fought off 


son took up issue most strongly 
with Mr. Cohen, pointing out to 


S INGAPORE — Amid re- 
ports that India has placed 


Bv Neil Joeck 


short-range ballistic missiles 
near its western border with 
Pakistan, the two countries re- 
sume talks this Thursday on 
normalizing their relations. 

Nothing could do more to 
poison the positive atmo- 
sphere that had developed in 
recent months than the reports 
that India has deployed its 
Prithvi missile, which brings 
all of Pakistan within range. 
Beyond undermining the bud- 
ding diplomatic rapproche- 
ment. the reports threaten to 
drive Pakistan into deploying 
its own missiles to show that it 
cannor be pushed around. 

But Pakistan’s leaders are 
cautious and unlikely to be 
goaded. They know that a pub- 
Gc display of pique would play 
into the hands of hawks in In- 
dia, worsen relations with the 
United States and accomplish 
little in strategic terms. Yet 
Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif 
will need to expend significant 
political capital to resist de- 
mands from his opponents thai 
he not lei India get away with 
intimidation tactics. 

At their meeting in Is- 
lamabad, India's foreign sec- 
retary, Salman Haider, must 
convince his Pakistani coun- 
terpart. Shamshad Ahmed, 
that the missile reports do not 
signal a reversal of India's 


new conciliatory policy to- 
ward its neighbor. 

Inder Kumar Gujral. the In- 
dian prime minister, appeared 
to open the door for a face- 
saving way out for both sides 
when he was quoted by the 
Press Trust of India news 
agency as saying on Tuesday 
that the Prithvi missiles would 
be deployed along the nation ‘s 
border only when there was a 
threat, but that there was no 
such danger at presenL 

Mr. Gujral is in a difficult 
position. He came to power in 
April as the compromise 
choice of the United Front, an 
amalgamation of more than a 
dozen Indian parties held to- 
gether by little more than dis- 
taste for the corruption- 
plagued Congress Party and 
the Hindu nationalist Bhar- 
atiya Janata Party. The front 
does not hold a majority in 
India’s Parliament, and Mr. 
Gujral does not have the back- 
ing of all parties in the front. 

He has little room to ma- 
neuver, but must now resolve- a 
volatile issue. Few who know 
him believe that he authorized 
the transfer of the Prithvis for 
“storage” at a military base ar 
Jullundur not far from the bor- 
der. He may be caught berween 
a shaky government coalition 


and an entrenched bureaucracy 
that acted without his autho- 
rization or had the decision ap- 
proved before he took office. 

Just as South Africa’s polit- 
ical leaders put tight con- 
straints on their scientists to 
ensure that technical progress 
did not dic tate the pace of stra- 
tegic policy, so must Mr. 
Gujral ensure that he guides the 
nation and is not a captive of 

vested bureaucratic interests. 

Set against the background 
of the continuing Kashmir dis- 
pute and concerns that both In- 
dia and Pakistan could quickly 
develop nuclear weapons if 
they do not already have them, 
the missile issue must be 
headed off quickly- Imroduc- 
tion of missiles that could cany 
nuclear warheads would seri- 
ously undermine relations be- 
tween the two countries and 
could overwhelm their ability 
to manage future crises. 

A sober and measured dis- 
cussion of how to avoid an- 
other dangerous round of arms 
competition, while ar The same 
Lime avoiding finger-pointing 
and the laying of blame, 
should be high on the agenda 
of the Islamabad meeting. 


B ressure to say publicly that no 
( .S. troops would participate in 


U.S. troops would participate in 
peacekeeping in Bosnia beyond 
next June. 

He correctly understands the 
damaging effect that such state- 
ments would have on the 
ground in Bosnia and in Europe. 
His policy on Bosnia, while 
opaque and constrained, con- 


unremitting grayness of the 
Warren Christopher era at State. 


Warren Christopher era at State. 
What remains to be proved is 
that it can fit over the long run 
with the top item on the foreign 
policy agenda for Clinton II: tne 
quest for a presidential legacy 
that establishes Bill Clin ton as a 
significant figure in world af- 
fairs and in history. 

The Washington Post 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897j Storm Hits Paris 


PARIS — The cyclone which at 
five o'clock yesterday after- 
noon visited Asnieres and Bois- 
Colombes caused three deaths 
and injured more than fifty 
people, fifteen of them serious- 
ly. It was fortunately preceded, 
says the Figaro this morning 
[June I9J, by a heavy fail of 
rain, which drove the people 
indoors, otherwise the proba- 
bility is the victims of yester- 
day's storms would have been 
counted by rhe hundreds. 


women smoking cigarettes ai 
they strolled along the beach, 
and when he threatened to arrest 
them, they offered him a cig- 
arette for himself. He then de- 
cidcd to consult his superiors 
before taking further action, 
wirh the result that young wom- 
en can now smoke on the public 
beaches unmolested. 


1947: Misty Ambitions 


1922: Free to Smoke 


The writer, a research as- 
sn, iate at ihe Imcrnatii >nal In- 
stitute fm Strategic Studies in 
London, contributed this com- 
ment to the Herald Tribune. 


BOSTON — ■ After diligent 
searching of the law books. Po- 
lice Commissioner Bailey has 
notified the patrolmen of the 
Metropolitan District that he 
knows of no law to prevent 
women smoking in public on 
the beaches under control of the 
State. A day or two ago a po- 
liceman noticed three young 


LONDON — Albert E. Lange, 
thirty-six-year-old engineer of 
North Arlington, New Jersey* 
stepped from a. Pan-American 
Airways Clipper ar London air- 
port today [June 18] and stated 
firmly to reporters: ”1 am here 
to many Princess Elizabeth-’ 
Immigration officials doubted 
this greatly, and ordered him 
back to the States. Lange told 
reporters: “I have wanted to 
marry Princess Elizabeth evc ^ 
since she was five years old. I 
have been seeing her in a mist ot 
my dreams." 



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tinues to show his own sound 
instincts ar work. 

And it was not Mrs. Al- 
bright's argument that domina- 
ted' the decisive Bosnia meeting. 
UN Ambassador Bill Richard- 



wirh Mr. Cohen, pointing out to 
the president that the Clinton 
legacy in Bosnia would be 
erased by a hurried American 
departure and an immediate re- 
sumption of fighting. The per- 
formance stamped Mr. Richard- 
son, credited with a deft 
performance on the Zaire/Congo 
crisis, as another rising luminary 
in the Clinton firmamenL 

Mrs. Albright has assembled 
a strong management team at 
State, putting talented and in- 
dependently minded policy 
maven5 like Tom Pickering, Stu 
Eizenstat and Marc Grossman 
in high-visibility jobs. Having 
chosen well, her task now is to 
mold them into a cohesive sup- 
porting cast for her star turn. 

A touch of personality cull is 
a refreshing change from the 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1997 


PAGE 11 


rtirk a> Wcl: a- Slari 


OPINION/LETTERS 


All Those in Favor of Aid 


TVTi , jpt j j * /r i rrr All inose m ravor oi jw 

loda y s Media Were Covering Watergate ... To Elephants Say Aye 

WASHINGTON — On the 25th an- By Maureen Dowd — - - - - - - * J J 


W ASHINGTON - On the 25th an- 
niversary of the Watergate break-in, 
let’s imagine how today’s very different 
media might cover the scandal 


could be devoting to China. They say Mr. 
Nixon is fighting a battle over the di- 
rection of the country, that we are driving 


focus groups that readers are not that in- 
terested in national or world news, ignores 
the story, fearing it will turn off those 
looking for a pleasant reading experience. 

.U-S- News & World Report decides to 
put “Best Mutual Funds’* on the cover 
instead of Richard Nixon. Exp lainin g this 
decision, the editor, James Fallows, says* 
“The Watergate story is just another case 
of the' mainstream press putting tactics 
ahead of substance. Instead of worr ying 
about the raaoeuverings of the White 
House staff, die news should treat the 
presidency the way it does the scientific 
establishment, judging it by public pro- 
nouncements and not looking too far be- 
hind the veil.’’ 

ABC’s “World News Tonight” plays 
the Watergate story third, after an in-depth 
look at how yon can be fit even if you’re 
fat and an expose about the American 


ue-m Winnie scandal on “Soluoons, no decision made solely on the basis of > 
reporting how the residents of a small money. They warn that Richard Nixon is t 
Midwestern town are coping with bills being Richard Jewelled. t 

nxwnpiumbas. On "Crossfire,” Pal Buchanan dispar- 

The New Orleans Times-Picayune does ages Woodward and Bernstein as "fern < 
not want to focus on something as “neg- bar trash.” $ 

ative” as Mr. Nixon’s Jewish slurs on the On CBS’s Saturday morning show, 1 
tapes, so it assigns 20 reporters to examine Susan Molinari interviews Spiro Agnew! * 
tte historic, economic and political roots who rants against nattering nabobs of neg- a 
m America. ativism and says there is no controlling 1 

On MSNBC, Brian Williams goes in- legal authority. She nods sympathetically, t 
tractive in a chat room consumed with chirping. * ‘Watergate doesn’t speak to the 
Mo Deans sex life. On “The Site,” problems of working mothers.” i 

Soledad O’Brien scolds President Nixon Publicizing his $2.4 million book deal s 
as a technophobe who can’t even use his with Random House, G. Gordon Liddy 
owntaping jjystein. looks for closure with Oprah, Baba and I 

On ABC’s “This Week Without Johnnie Cochran, confiding that his ali- t 
Brinkley, * George Will and Bill Kristol enation began when he was born pre- 1 
treat the subject with withering scorn, maturely and had to be kept in an in- i 
arguing that Watergate nitpicking is tak- cubator. Charlie Rose presses him: l 
rag away valuable time that the president * ‘Didn’t it ever bother you, holding your 


hand oyer the candle flame like that? 
Does it impress women?” 

On the final day of the Watergate 
hearings, NBC's “Nightly News” is in 
a panic. It goes with a split screen: 
Watergate on one side and the lack of 
progress in the JonBenet Ramsey case 
on the other. 

On CNN, the Gen-X pundit Farai 
Chideya calls the story overblown, ar- 
guing, “What does it tell ns about the real 
lives of people of color?” Her conser- 
vative counterpart, Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, 
shrugs: “The country is way prosperous. 
Why are we in a shame spiral over petty 
theft?” 

Joe Klein meets Deep Throat in a paric- 


By Guy Gugliotta 


■ wv> lt mu nmn/ui 

Brinkley,” George Will and Bill Kristol 
treat the subject with withe ring scorn, 
arguing that Watergate nitpicking is tak- 
ing away valuable time that the president 


JT g* A All IMLfc All U yiilA 

problems of working mothers.” ing garage. Anonymous warns to discuss 

Publicizing his $2.4 million book deal ghostwriting Mr. Throat's memoirs, 
with Random House, G. Gordon Liddy In a darkened room in the White House, 
looks for closure with Oprah, Baba and Richard Nixon nurses a Scotch and listens 
Johnnie Cochran, confiding that his ali- to “Victory at Sea.” He is contemplating 
enation began when he was born pre- his future, considering bids for three-pic- 


pacs from Oliver Stone, Jerry Bruck- 
heimer and the Coen brothers. 

The New York. Tunes. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Turkey and the EU 

Regarding “ Turkey and the Di- 
lemma of Its Western Allies" 
( Opinion . June 14) by Philip H. 
Gordon: 

Mr. Gordon’s piece on Turkey 
and its relationship to the West, 
particularly the European Union, 
seema curious to me. 

As he correctly notes, Turkey is 
de facto under the control of its 
military. So just exactly how 


does one go about integrating a 
military government into a demo- 
cratic union? 

There is also Turkey’s long- 
running fend with Greece over 
Cyprus to consider. 

Greece is already a member of 
the European Union, and unless 
Greece drops its objection to 
Turkish membership, Turkey 
will never be admitted to the 
Union. I would not expect that 
to happen until Turkey and 


Greece resolve the Cyprus dis- 
pute. 

JOSEPH P. ZINGHER. 
Saarbriicken, Germany. 

On Reparations 

Regarding “Should American 
Whites Pay Damages to Blacks ?” 
(Opinion, June 3) by William 
Raspberry: 

Richard America is an advocate 
of selective social conscience. 



to 4T 4 


By KAL bribe Sun {IWliaiaK*.CftV Syodkolr. 


which has the current advantage 
of being politically correct. In 
proposing that white Americans 
pay reparations to blacks, he ig- 
nores history and the wonder of 
what America has been able to 
achieve as a nation. 

A high percentage of the 
people who arrived in the orig- 
inal colonies were in fact in- 
dentured servants. It took decades 
for most of them to become free in 
the economic or political sense. 

Later immigrants also went 
through decades of servitude and 
were excluded from the main- 
stream because of their ethnicity 
or religion. 

It is time to stop exploiting the 
slavery era and focus on equal 
opportunity. 

WARREN E KRAEMER. 

Benitachell, Spain. 

Mr. America seems not to con- 
sider the case of white mmigrants 
like my great-grandparents and 
grandparents who were them- 
selves exploited as cheap labor. 
They sought nothing except ac- 
ceptance as Americans and per- 
mission to receive die fruits of 
their labor. 

By his oversimplification and 
stereotyping of a complex social 
problem, Mr. America himself 
participates in the kind of dis- 
crimination that will do nothing to 
heal the racial divide that 
threatens to tear America apart 

Let us forgive and forget and 
look forward to a more racially 
tolerant future by burying the 
past 

MICHAEL PRAVICA. 

Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

A Joint Job 

Regarding “Tinkering With 
Europe" (Editorial, May 29): 

Tbe editorial states that the U.S. 


Senate “has the final say” over 
the expansion of the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization. 

Not so: The Senate shares that 
final say with the parliaments of 
all the other member nations of 
NATO. 

ELIZABETH YOUNG. 

London. 

Adultery Is No Grime 

Regarding “ Where Discretion 
Rules, a Tolerant Take on Sex: 
Adultery Uproar in U.S. Military 
Bemuses Allies" (June 10): 

Looking in from the outside, it 
does indeed seem paradoxical that 
the land that prides itself on being 
the champion of freedom and per- 
sonal liberty should accept and 
even support court decisions that 
punish people for private affairs 
like adultery. Legal institutions 
should rule only on public is- 
sues. 

Surely how people choose to 
lead their private lives is strictly a 
personal matter. Adultery is not a 
crime. 

Those who would like to see 
laws introduced to govern 
people’s personal lives should 
look at those countries where die 
concept of personal freedom does 
not exist; where a human being 
can be reprimanded for the way he 
dresses or punished severely for 
the way he thinks. 

SONIA SCAILLET. 

Chaurnont-Gistoux, Belgium. 

If the U.S. military continues to 
harass and terminate the careers of 
its members who are having, or 
have had, extramarital affairs or 
sex without benefit of clergy, 
there won’t be enough troops left 
to police die front lawn of the 
White House. 

PAUL J. DuPREE. 

Kdnigstein, Germany. 


W ASHINGTON — Politi- 
cians love to dump on for- 
eign aid: It’s patriotic (We’ve got 
plenty of problems of our own! 1; 
it's responsible (We can’t afford 
to cure all the world's ills!), and 
best of all, nobody cares (Bolivi- 
ans don’t vote!). 

At the same lime, as most of the 
world knows, America loves to 
meddle in other countries' affairs. 

MEANWHILE 

There are good meddles (feeding 
the hungry in Somalia): baa 
meddles (trying to pacify 
Somalia); controversial meddles 
(international family planning), 
and eiemal meddles (trying to get 
China to behave). 

Then there are great meddles, 
and two weeks ago Representa- 
tives Jim Saxton, Republican of 
New Jersey, and Neil Abercrom- 
bie, Democrat of Hawaii, hit the 
jackpot: guarantee d-io-pass legis- 
lation setting up a S25 million 
Asian Elephant Conservation 
Fond. 

That’s right Fbreign aid for ele- 
phants, and, boy, do they need iL 
Asian elephants, efephas max- 
intus, are the ones with the little 
ears (Dumbo’s tormentors) that 
have beat hauling logs, spiffing up 
sultans' weddings and giving true 
meaning to the phrase * ‘ heavy cav- 
alry” for the last three millennia. 

Luckily for the elephants, the 
fund wasn’t part of the $2 1 billion 
foreign aid bill that failed to pass 
the House last week for the 12ih 
consecutive year. As usual, there 
will be a spending bill this sum- 
mer that at least surreptitiously 
continues most existing pro- 
grams, but there won’t be any- 
thing exotic, new or expensive. 

Elephants, of course, are dif- 
ferent. Elephants are popular 
enough to come up in legislation 
of their own. and no problems are 
anticipated in the House, accord- 
ing to Mr. Saxton. Probably not in 
the Senate, either. 

Mr. Saxton said he modeled the 
Asian elephant fund on a similar 
act for African elephants (they 
also have one for tigers and rhi- 
nos), in which the United States 
gives grants to people with neat 
ideas on how to help save the 
animals. 

The best idea for African ele- 
phants (the big-eared ones) turned 
out to be a world ban on the ivory 
trade. This may be good news for 
parents trying vainly to explain 
about the “wicked hunter” who 
murders Babar's mother on Page 
7. Today, the evil hunter quotient 
is down, and the African elephant 
population has stabilized at about 
half a million animals. 

By contrast, the World Wild- 
life Fund says there are be- 
tween 35,000 and 50,000 Asian 
elephants living in the wild, 
which is few enough to make 
them an endangered species both 


in the United States and abroad. 

This act will be more difficult 
than the one for African elephants 
because this involves “human- 
wildlife conflict,” Mr. Saxton 
said. 

“Obviously, as populations 
grow, habitat is affected.” he ex- 
plained. 

In other words. Asian elephants 
don’t have enough room. 

And unlike the orphaned 
Babar, who wanders into Paris on 
Page 9 and immediately encoun- 
ters a suitable haberdasher, wild 
Asian elephants have abominable 
manners and need up to 160 
pounds of forage per day. 

“Bephants love rice.” said 
Bruce Bunting, the veterinarian 
who runs the World Wildlife 
Fund's Asia and Pacific pro- 

In Asia . , the rice- 
paddy- ruining 
beasts are about as 
popular as the 
plague . 

grams, and if they find a paddy 
during iheir regular migratory 
trips they usually stop for lunch. 

Each elephant also needs a min- 
imum of three-quarters of a square 
mile of land to run around in. and 
they are trying to run around some 
of the most populous countries in 
the world — among them India, 
Thailand. Vietnam, China. 
Pakistan, Indonesia. Sri Lanka 
and Malaysia. That’s why they are 
generally about as welcome as the 
plague. 

“The key is habitat conserva- 
tion,” Mr. Bunting said, and the 
Wildlife Fund suggests that the 
proposed aid should seek ways to 
create preserves and protect hab- 
itat “corridors” so populations 
could connect with one another. 

There are those who might 
think the fond rather extravagant, 
but consider the $I9.6-million- 
per-year International Fund for 
Ireland, which dispenses foreign 
aid to two members of the Euro- 
pean Union — Britain and Ireland 
— or the $10 million TV Marti, 
which broadcasts a signal that 
Cuba has successfully jammed 
since 1989. 

Unlike Irish-Araericans and 
Cuban-Americans, Asian ele- 
phants don’t vote. 

But elephant lovers do. 

The Washington Post. 


Letters intended for publica- 
tion should be addressed “ Letters 
to the Editor" and contain the 
writer's signature, name and full 
address. Letters should he brief 
and are subject to editing. We can- 
not be rcsponsiblefor the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 




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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1997 


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PAGE 13 


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RETTs have become big players 
In commercial real estate... 

Share of 1087 office building 
sates over $10 million. 


...paying high prices and driving 
up the cost of office space... 


...but Investors worry that 
the REITs are overpaying. 


$14.1 bffion 

individual 

investors 


Building 
occupants 
2.7% — 




fa 







Institutional 

investors 


r Foreign 
investors 
& 4 % 


$120 a square toot Northeast 

100 Iiir 


80 

Nationally 

60 • 

_ Average price paid 

40 

for office space 

20 



15% Monthly change in 

the stock prices of 

10 five publicly traded 

office REfTs. 


SoweoK Granite Partner*; Property information Exchange; Pane Webber 


1996 


1997 



The New Ymfc Tunc* 


Have REITs Pushed Property Past the Peak? 


By Charles V. Bagli 

New fori Times Service 


N EW YORK — Steven Roth, 
chairman of a high-flying 
real-estate trust called Vor- 
nado, had lost twice th is 
spring in bidding for properties in the 
suddenly hot marketed Manhattan. He 
was determined not to strike out a third 
time. So, on Friday, April 25, when it 
. appeared that a rival had emerged as 
the leading bidder at 90 Park Avenue, 
where Sumitomo Trust & Banking Co. 
was selling the mortgage, Mr. Roth 
; plunged into a weekend of negoti- 
1 ations, landing the 41-story property 
} for $185 million — $20 milli on more 
] than Sumitomo originally anticipated 
getting. 

Vomado Realty Trust’s decision to 
shove its way into the winner’s circle is 
but me example of the intense com- 
petition for prime office b uildings in 
Manhattan and elsewhere around the 
United States, a battle that is rapidly 
propelling prices skyward. 

At the heart of the battle are real- 
estate investment trusts such as Vor- 
nado. 

RETTs, as they are known, are es- 
sentially investment pools. They have 
been around since the 1960s, mostly as 
mortgage holders, and have had an up- 
and-down history on Wall Street But 
lately, they have began to own prop- 
erty outright, particularly office build- 



ings, and they have become hot prop- 
erties themselves with various types of 
investors. 

With office space becoming tighter, 
these so-called equity REITs have an 
edge, because they can move faster and 
raise money more cheaply than old- 

WALL STREET WATCH 

line real-estate moguls, hedge funds 
and invest ment banks. And with the 
number of REITs specializing in office 
buildings soaring — there was just one 
in 1994, compared with 15 now — they 
often posh prices beyond the seller's 
giddiest expectations, even when they 
do not win. 

That has longtime real-estate ex- 
ecutives and some analysts nervous. 
After a t reme ndous run-up in prices of 
office REIT stocks last year, in fact, 
their values are down an average of 5.8 
percent this year. John Lift, an analyst 
at PaineWebber Inc., said that was 
because investors were worried that 
office REITs were “paying too 
much.” 

The most aggressive trusts are buy- 
ing properties less for their current 
return than on the hope of a spike in 
rents later — an echo of the bad old 
days, in the 1970s and a gain in die late 
1980s and early 1990s, when many 
trusts and traditional real-estate part- 
nerships got into terrible trouble. 
Those deals also were based on high 
rent projections that never came 
to pass. 

In 1985. for example, the pro- 
spectus for the real-estate trust 
that held the mortgage on Rock- 
efeller Center predicted that rents 
wonld double by 1995, to $75 a 
square foot. - Instead, rents 
plummeted to about $34 after a 
d evas tating recession, and the 
RETT teetered at the edge of 
bankruptcy. Goldman, Sachs & 
Co. and a developer, Jerry Spey- 
er, ultimately paid $8 a share to 
buy out shareholders who bad 
once seen the stock trade at $21. 

No one seems to think a col- 
lapse is near now; the real-estate 
markets are too healthy for that, 
and rents still are generally mov- 
ing upward. 

But with prices pushed to the 
limi t by the trusts’ buying sprees, 
the days of easy money in com- 
mercial real estate are over. 

Demand is up and vacancy 
rates are down, said John Lyons, 


a founder of Granite Partners, a 
real-estate investment bank. 

“But as the competition for qual- 
ity properties has increased due 
to the vast amounts of capital in 
the market,” he said, “pricing 
has increased and therefore the 
returns have decreased.” 

For real-estate operators, the 
REIT structure provides tremen- 
dous access to capital, through 
either the stock market or private 
lenders. 

As long as the trust distributes 
95 percent of its income to share- 
holders, it pays no corporate in- 
come tax. And while the private 
real-estate partnerships popular 
in the 1980s often involved a 
single risky asset, today’s trusts 
provide individual and institu- 
tional investors with a diverse 
portfolio of properties, as well as 
stock that can be bought and sold 
at any time. The market capit- 
alization for all RETTs has 
jumped from $56 billion in 1992 to 
more than $142 billion last year. 

“We’ve raised over a billion dol- 
lars,” said Thomas Rizk, president of 
Cali Realty Carp., a well-regarded of- 
fice RETT based in Cranford, New 
Jersey. “We can enter transactions 
without financing contingencies and 
close transactions very quickly.” 

Until recently, investors also made 
oat handsomely. In 1996, office REITs 
delivered a total return of nearly 50 
percent, more than double that of the 
Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index, 
according to the National Association 


With prices pushed to 
the limi t by the real- 
estate trusts’ buying 
sprees, the days of easy 
money in commercial 
real estate are over. 


of Real Estate Investment Trusts, a 
trade group. If the trusts are overpaying 
for properties now, though, investors 
who have roared in billions of dollars 
in the last 24 months could see the once 
haid-charging stocks falter or retreat 
further than they already have. 

Equity trusts emerged in the early 
1990s as REITs focused on apartment 
buildings and condominiums, the first 



properties to show signs of life after the 
recession. As the recovery spread, 
trusts appeared for retail, health-care 
and hotel properties. 

In 1994, office REITs appeared in 
suburban markets on New York’s 
Long Island and in California, Mas- 
sachusetts. New Jersey and Texas. 
Spurring their rise was a decline in 
office vacancy rates in the United 
States, which dropped to 12.1 percent 
at the end of 1996 from 16.2 percent in 
1994, according to Oncor Internation- 
al, a real estate data service. 

Despite their relative youth, office 
RETTs have a voracious appetite, gob- 
bling 47.5 percent, or $6.7 billion, of 
the $14 biUion in major office deals 
nationally so far this year, up from $5.2 
billion in all of 1996. according to 
Granite Partners. The race to become a 
roultibillion-doUar company is fueled 
by a sense that investors will reward 
size and diversity. A bigger company, 
in tnm. can command lower borrowing 
rates, funnel more money into acqui- 
sitions and reduce administrative 
costs; and a bigger company must 
make bigger acquisitions to sustain a 
pattern of growth. 

Yet real estate is a notoriously cyc- 
lical industry, and real-estate trusts still 
control only a fraction of America’s 
commercial real estate, which under- 
cuts thfcir ability to impose hefty rent 
increases when tenants can easily go 
elsewhere for less. 


How Central Banks Took the Glitter Out of Gold 


By Jonathan Fuerbringer 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The world economy 
is set to grow at its fastest pace in almost 
a decade, and currency markets are jit- 
tery over whether European fiscal dis- 
cipline is-about -to be relaxed in the 
straggle to introduce the euro, die Jong 
awaited single currency. So gold, that 
age-old hedge against inflation and un- 
certainty, must be rising, right? 

Not a chance. Gold for June delivery 
on the New York Commodity Exchange 
has fallen 8 percent this year, trading 
late Wednesday at $340.50 an ounce, 
down $130 on the day and down from 
$371.10 on Jan. 2. 

There are lots of reasons that gold has 
been so weak recently, but the newest 
twist emanates from the secretive do- 
main of tiie world’s central banks and 
the hurly-burly trading rooms where 


financial engineers design derivative 
packages that help gold producers get 
better prices and provide a way tar 
speculators to bet on gold. 

Central banks, which bald nearly 25 
percent of foe above-ground gold sup- 
ply, are selling at an accelerating pace. 
The move to a single European currency, 
analysts say, could inspire individual 
central banks to dump even more gold. 

At the same time, central banks are 
also lending oat their gold aggres sively , 


More importantly, that lending 3 
tbe trading of options on gold and makes 
the selling of gold by producers in ad- 
vance of delivery, or * forward,” mare 
attractive. All tins is putting extra down- 
ward pressure on the price of gold. 

“A new generation of managers 
without tbe reverence for gold shown by 
their predecessors” is running central 
banks now. Gold Helds Mineral Ser- 


vices said in its 1997 gold report, foe 
bible for tbe industry. 

Meanwhile, some of the other forces 
that have conspired against gold since 
the end of foe 1980s are stronger today. 

Gold’s ability to sparkle at the sign of 
a crisis seems to be limited these days to 
little more than a brief flash. Inflation is 
tame, and central banks have developed 
more respect among investors as a re- 
liable bulwark against a revival of price 
pressures. Moreover, foe stock market 
has been such an attractive place to 
invest since foe early 1990s that gold 
looks like a losing proposition. 

To this generation of investors, it 
seems almost another era when gold 
soared to $800 an ounce in 1980. 

“People believe in central banks, and 
they believe is foe Standard & Poor's 
500.” says James Grant, who edits 
Grain’s Interest Rate Observer. * ‘When 
they lose faith in those institutions, gold 


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Thai Finance Chief 
Quits, Market Skids 

Baht Falls , Stocks Hit 8-Year Low 


Cimritni to Oar Sntf Firm Oportos 

BANGKOK — The benchmark 
stock index fell 3 percent Wednesday to 
an right-year low amid reports, winch 
were confirmed late in foe day, that 
Finance Minister Amnuay Viravan 
planned to resign. 

Mr. Amnuay, faring criticism about 
his policies to shore up a struggling 
economy, will resign Thursday, Sorn- 
chai Montriwat, his spokesman, said. 

The SET stock index fell 14.78 points 
to close Wednesday at 482.94. The Thai 
currency, the baht, also slipped on the 
news, with tbe dollar quoted at 23.90 
baht late in the day, compared with 
22.40 baht earlier. 

Earlier in foe day, Mr. Amnuay said 
he would not ‘ ‘confirm or deny reports” 
that he would resign. “I want to talk to 
the prime minister first,” he said. 

Mr. Amnuay had made those com- 
ments in a brief, impromptu press con- 
ference. Immediately before that meet- 
ing, Mr. Amnuay, 64, former executive 
chairman of Bangkok Bank PCL, 
played golf with Prime Minister 
Chavalit Yongchaiyudh and Prime Min- 
ister Goh Chok Tong of Singapore. 

The career banker indicated he wants 
to quit because of disagreements within 
the six-party coalition government, said 
an official in the prime minis ter’s of- 
fice. 

“The prime minister has two choices: 
to refuse or find a new candidate im- 
mediately,” said Poo saua Premanoch, 
deputy chief of staff 10 the prime min- 
ister. The premier has already pared his 
replacement choices to three people, 
Mr. Poosana saidL 

Mr. Amnuay is one of the few cabinet 
members who isn’t a member of any 
political party. He was appointed by the 
prime minister in December over the 
objections of other parties in the co- 
alition, who wanted an elected official 


to captain foe country’s economic 
poUcies. After the golf game, the prime 
minister would only say that he hadn t 
received any “letter of resignation” 
from Mr. Amnuay. 

Mr. Amnuay has become a lightning 
rod for discontent over the govern- 
ment’s inability to bolster on economy 

g owing at its slowest pace in a decade. 

ut much of foe criticism has come 
from elected officials, rather than the 
investment community. 

Tbe benchmark stock index tumbled 
60 percenr in the past year, and many 
companies are struggling to sell shares 
or debt. The government is now trying 
to fend off a devaluation of the baht, a 
move that may become more likely if it 
were to leave office, fond managers 
said. 

What brought Mr. Amnuay to the 
brink was foe cabinet’s decision on 
Tuesday to overturn an excise tax in- 
crease made just three weeks ago on 
motorcycles, batteries and granite. 

The Finance Ministry raised taxes in 
an effort to narrow foe expected 1997 
budget deficit, the first in a decade. But 
Industry Minister Korn Dabaransi, who 
has often been at odds with the finance 
minister, successfully lobbied for foe 
consumption rax to be scrapped, after 
protests by manufacturers. Mr. Korn is 
deputy head of foe second-largest co- 
alition party. 

Mr. Poosana said foe three top can- 
didates to replace Mr. Amnuay were 
Siam Commercial Bank PCL's pres- 
ident, Olam Chaipravat; Advanced 
Agio PCX’s chief executive officer and 
a former finance minister, Virabongsa 
Ramangkura; and Pridiya thorn Devak- 
ula, president of Export-Import Bank of 
Thailand. Each of foe contenders has an 
advanced degree from the University of 
Pennsylvania's Wharton School of 
Business. (Bloomberg. Reuters, AFP) 


Harley-Davidson Signs 
Engine Pact With Porsche 

Venture Would Make Parts for Future ‘Hogs' 


will stand a chance, but probably not 
until then.” 

For all foe traditional factors under- 
mining gold, it is foe new collaboration 
between central bankers and options 
traders that infuriates many investors. 
To some, tbe central bank selling, op- 
tions trading and financial engineers are 
tbe only thing between them and a new 
gold rally. 

“The dealers going out to get the 
business and the central banks’ will- 
ingness to accommodate this is potting 
pressure on the price of gold.” said 
Richard Pomboy, president of Pomboy 
Capital Coro. He was so angry that he 
ran an ad in The Wall Street Journal and 
The Financial Times in which he tried to 
persuade central banks to stop selling. 

lb 1996, according to foe Gold Fields 
report, central banks had net sales of 239 
tons of gold. That was almost 7 percent 
of foe total supply of gold last year. 

The impact of gold lending and op- 
tions is a nttle less direct, but in today’s 
ire climate it tends to augment the 


Conpfcd to Om Saag PnmDbpMctvx 

STUTTGART — Two of the mo- 
toring world’s legendary names, 
Porsche AG and Harley-Davidson Inc., 
are teaming U p to make motorcycle en- 
gine parts, Porsche said Wednesday. 

Porsche said each company would 
contribute $10 million to foe venture, in 
which foe American motorcycle maker 
would hold a 51 percent stake and 
Porsche 49 percent. Production of foe 
parts, to be used in future Harley-Dav- 
idson motorcycles, is to take place in foe 
United States and should begin within 
several years, Porsche said. 

. A spokesman for foe German com- 
pany said it had wanted to team up with 
a motorcycle maker for some time, and 
foe deal with Harley presented “a very 
interesting opportunity.” 

According to a report in foe German 
publication Manager Magazin, the pro- 
duction plant would be built in Kansas 
City, Missouri, in 1999, but a Porsche 
spokesman would not confirm that. 

Porsche will be responsible for or- 
ganization of foe joint venture and mo- 
tor development, foe magazine said. 

Porsche said foe venture was another 
“piece in foe puzzle” of its strategy to 
expand through alliances and ventures. 

“One is always going to get 
something out of working more in the 
U.S., such as better contacts with sup- 
pliers,” said Manfred Ayasse, a Porsche 
spokesman. The company aims to shift 
some of its production abroad in an effort 


to reduce labor costs. This year, Porsche 
contracted Finland’s Valmet Oy to begin 
producing its fast-selling Boxsrer sports 
cars this fall, and Chief Executive 
Wendelin Wideking said in a recent in- 
terview foal he saw "great chances” to 
move additional production to other 
parts of Europe ana the United States. 

Opening a factory in the United 
States could reduce production costs, 
delivery times and exposure to currency 
fluctuations, and give foe carmaker 
more exposure in its hugest single mar- 
ket, analysts said. 

“Porsche is not just a car producer," 
said Christian Breitsprecher, an analyst 
as Trinkaus Capital Management. “It is 
also active in the engineering sector,” 
but foe venture with Harley-Davidson 
“is not going to make a significant 
difference to profits.” 

Porsche often cooperates with other 
carmakers around the world on devel- 
opment and design projects. It also has a 
joint venture with Mercedes-Benz AG 
in Germany to produce roofs for con- 
vertible cars. 

Stock in Porsche rose 20 Deutsche 
marks ($11.54), to 2,120, in Frankfurt. 
Harley-Davidson shares rose 75 cents to 
close at $47.50 in New York trading. 

H ariey -Davidson, bared in Milwau- 
kee, earned $166 million on sales of 
$1 .53 billion last year. In foe year ended 
July 31, 1996, Porsche earned $283 
million on sales of $1.6 billion. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg. AP) 


Life After Chrysler: Iacocca 
Focuses on Electric Bicycles 


Whether foe current hammcrlock on 
gold can be broken is hard to teU- 

Randall Oliphant, foe chief financial 
officer at Bamck Gold Corp-, one of the 
world’s largest gold producers, says the 
crucial question in the gold market is 
who fills the gap between foe annual 
output from mines and foe demand for 
gold in foe market- The price is going to 
be lower, he says, if central banks see an 
advantage in bridging that gap. 

But tf foe move to a single European 
currency is delayed, or ended, some 
analysts think there will be less pressure 
on central banks to sell gold. If political 
pressure to cut unemployment raises 
doubts about whether European central 
hanlrc will continue to have the upper 
hand in foe fight against inflation, gold 
could rally. 

Michael Metz, the chief investment 
strategist at Oppenheimer & Company, 
suggests that the Socialist victory in 
France and foe threat of delay or weak- 
ening of tbe new European currency are 
indicativ e of a move to reject the fiscal 
discipline and tough, anti-inflation 


So, he added, “If gold does not re- 
nnd to this, I don’t ki 


know what it 


Reuters 

TAIPEI — Like foe U.S. carraarker 
that he twice brought back from the 
dead, foe former Chiysler Corp. chief 
Lee Iacocca has found new life in 
wheeled transport 

But his new passion has wily half as 
many wheels as a Chrysler, weighs far 
less and doesn’t bum gasoline at all: Mr. 
Iacocca, 72, now wants to build electric 
bicycles in Taiwan. 

During several days in Taiwan, the 
retired car executive signed letters of 
intent with Taiwan’s Giant Co., one of 
the world’s top bicycle makers, and 
UQM Electric Co. to make electric 
vehicles, executives said Wednesday. 

Before leaving Taiwan on Tuesday, 
Mr. Iacocca told reporters he was con- 
fident his electric bicycle, manufactured 
by Giant, would hit foe market in June 
1998. 

Taiwan’s United Daily News said 
Giant would pour $1 million into die 
venture under a letter of intent signed by 
Mr. Iacocca and the chairman of Giant, 
Liu Cinn-piao. 

A spokesman for Giant declined to 
confirm foe figure, saying that invest- 
ment amounts had not been discussed. 

Separately. UQM Electric ami Mr. 
Iacocca' s EV Global Motors agre ed to 
forge a strategic alliance to develop and 


market electric vehicles, said Wang 
Shuang-ching, president of Kw&ng 
Yang Motor, a major investor in UQM 
Electric. 

The maverick American executive, 
who won feme for twice bringing 
Chrysler back from foe brink of bank- 
ruptcy, retired from foe carmaker in 
1992 and formed EV Global in 1996. 

He said environmentally friendly 
electric vehicles eventually would re- 
place conventional gas-powered ones, 
out * ‘not in my lifetime’ ’ because cheap, 
long-running batteries had yet to be 
developed. 

But if foe marketing of two-wheelers 
proves successful, he could move on to 
electric automobiles, Mr. Iacocca said. 

Executives of Giant said the bicyde- 
maker was eager to cooperate because 
die environmentally friendly electric 
vehicles would become a leading trend 
in the next century. 

Mr. Wang said developing cost-ef- 
fective car batteries was foe key to the 
success of electric cars. 

“Until now, we have yet to develop 
one that is both efficient and cheap, 
Mr. Wang said. 

“But we still want to go forward 
because electric vehicles definitely will 
have a large market in foe future,” 
said. 






THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 1 


- ir.-m. x:* : 'Q 







'SastfiafiQ'' 




Source Bloomberg. Reuters 


I mrtwl HmM T ri*nc 


Very briefly: 


Microsoft Looks to Europe 

Company Plans Lab in England to Lure ‘Smart People 9 


By Steve Lobr 

New York Times Service 


Microsoft Carp, has realized 
that rain, Starbucks coffee and 

pect of its shares have-not *beeri 
sufficient to lore leading computer 
scientists away from Europe to its 
headquarters in Redmond, Wash- 
ington. 

The company will spend $80 
million to set up a research lab- 
oratory in Cambridge, En gland, in 
collaboration with Cambridge 
University — its first overseas re- 
search lab. 

“There are tons of smart people 
who, for whatever reason, aren't 
going to come to Seattle,” said 
Nathan Myhrvold, the company’s 
chief technology officer. “Going 
to Europe gives us a way to hire 
people who bring new talents and 
new perspectives to our work that 
we couldn’t get any other way.' ’ 

The lab will be run by Roger 


Needham, a Cambridge professor 
and a research pioneer in computer 
systems, and will eventually em- 
ploy 40 full-time research fdlows, 
mostly from Europe. Microsoft 
will also invest $16 million in a 
venture fund to back technology 
start-ups in the area. 

The Cambridge lab is part of an 
ambitious campaig n by Microsoft 
— which is no longer content to 
rule its industry by skillfully re- 
fining die computing inventions of 
two decades ago — to build one of 
die world’s great research oper- 
ations. Over the past few years, the 
company has recruited about 200 
leading computer scientists, a 
number it intends to triple over the 
next three years or so. 

The Microsoft research group’s 
mission is not to fashion nifty fea- 
tures for next year's spreadsheet 
software or Internet browser, but 
to think about such issues as how 
people interact with computers 
and how software is written. 


The resulting produce might be 
computers thatlistea to people and 
talk ha rk, a programming Esper- 
anto or virtual helpers. Some of 
those products may not appear for 
five or 10 years, «■ not at all — that 
is the risk inherent in the basic 
research Microsoft is pursuing- 

The research community views 
Microsoft’s venture as another 
sign that the software giant is ex- 
ceptional in an era of deficit re- 
duction and corporate belt-tight- 
ening — a time when the federal 
government and most companies 
are curbing their spending on basic 
research. 

“Under the guise of re-engi- 
neering and downsizing, corporate 
America is pulling back from basic 
research — and it’s shortsighted,” 
said Michael Dertonzos, director 
of the MTT Laboratory for Com- 
puter Science. 

“But Microsoft is conspicu- 
ously running counter to die 
trend.’’ 


Computer Blues Put 
A Drag on Wall Street t 


No Japan Deal Expected in Denver Stocks’ Spr ing Sl llTTin HitS Goldmail 

WASHINGTON (Bloomberg) — President Bill Clinton will JL t5 MT 

not seek specific deregulation promises from Japan or discuss 
the dollar-yen exchange rate when he meets with the leaders of 
the seven richest industrialized nations in Denver this week, a 
key adviser to Mr. Clinton said Wednesday. 

Mr. Clinton’s top international economist, Dan Tarullo, 
said that while both subjects could come op when Mr. Clinton 

w: “ : — fo of Japan — - 

Thursday, 


and Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto of Japan met for a 
short bilateral discussion in Denver on Thursday, he did not 
expect any announcements on deregulation or the dollar. 

Helmsley Plans to Sell Properties 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) — Leona HeJmsley, who controls 
one of the biggest U.S. real-estate empires, said Wednesday she 
planned to sell her interests in properties valued at $5 billion. 

She said she had hired Eastdil Realty to sell her interests in 
properties that include the master lease on the Empire State 
Building, die New York Helmsley hotel, office buildings and 
a string of motels in the Midwest. 

Ms. Helmsley, who served 1 8 months in federal prison for 
tax evasion several years ago. inherited the properties from her 
husband, Harry Helmsley, who died in January at age 87. 

• Gtecb Holdings Corp. agreed Wednesday to acquire NTN 
Communications Inc-, an unprofitable maker of interactive 
games, for about $ 140 million. 

• Automatic Data Processing Inc. agreed to sell Autolnfo 
Inc.’s assets to settle charges that it had acquired the company 
to create a monopoly, the Federal Trade Commission said. 

° AltaVista Internet Software Inc_ a unit of Digital Equip- 
ment Corp„ expects to become profitable by the end of the 
year and may eventually go public, the Internet-search com- 
pany’s president. Hene Lang, said. Bloomberg 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — Goldman, Sachs 
& Co. said Wednesday its second- 
quarter pretax profit fell 14 percent, 
to $610 million, as rising interest 
rates and a fall in stock prices in 
March and April, the quarter's first 
two months, slowed trading and un- 
derwriting. 

One of the securities firm's most 
lucrative businesses, underwriting 
initial stock sales, fell significantly 
from the previous year. 


Revenue at Goldman edged up to 
$1,674 billion from $1,670 billion a 
year earlier, while expenses in- 
creased 1 1 percent, to $1.06 billion. 
Partners' capital rose to $5.6 billion 
from $5.4 billion in March. 

Goldman is the first big securities 
firm to disclose earnings for its 
second quarter. Its results could sig- 
nal reduced earnings for major rivals 
such as Morgan Stanley & Co., Dean 
Witter. Discover & Co. and Lehman 
Brothers. Those companies are ex- 


pected to report second-quarter 
profits within the next month. 

“We can probably project this to 
the rest of die brokerage world,’’ 
John Keefe, an independent secu- 
rities analyst, said. 

The firm’s quarterly profit was 
well below the $905 million it made 
in the quarter that ended in February. 
For its first half, Goldman’s pretax 
profit rose 20 percent, to a record 
$1.52 billion from $1.27 billion a 
year earlier. 


Cn&attnOaf St&Fnm A?uff*rr 

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks fell, 
led by computer shares, after Gate- 
way 2000Inc. and Seagate Tech- 
nology Inc. warned that profits had 
not lived up to expectations in re- 
cent months. 

Technology shares paced the re- 
treat as investors showed concern 
that sluggish demand may linger in 
the coming months. 

‘‘The psychology and reality of a 
summertime slowdown is hitting 
the market,*’ said Scott Pape, a 
money manager for Loomis. Say ’Ies 
& Co. “Some investors dunk it's 
better to step aside from the stocks 
fora while. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed 42.07 points lower at 
7,718.71. 

About seven stocks fell for every 
five that rose on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 

The Nasdaq Composite Index, 
laden with computer companies, 
fell 10.63 to 1,432.48, while the 
Standard & Poor’s 500 index lost 
537 to 889.06. 

U.S. bonds rose, however, after 
the Labor Department issued fig- 
ures showing that U.S. worker pro- 
ductivity rose in the first quarter at 
the fastest pace in more man three 
years, offsetting higher labor costs 
in many industries. 

Economic growth, meanwhile, is 
slowing as “pockets of weakness” 
and competition help contain in- 
flation, me Federal Reserve Board 
said in its so-called tan book, a re- 
port tm regional economic activity. 

Analysts said the market was 
already convinced that the Federal 
Reserve would not raise interest 
rates when it meets July 1 and 2 to 
discuss policy. 

The benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond rose 14/32 in price, to 99 7/32, 


Dollar Rises Above U.S.- Japan Trade Concerns 


GrteriM h> Our Stuff From Dbpatrha 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
higher against other major curren- 
cies in late trading Wednesday as 
the market shrugged off fears of 
another U.S .-Japan trade war. 

News that Japan’s trade surplus 
bad soared in May sent the dollar 
lower initially on fears that the United 
States and Japan could squabble 
about trade issues at tire upcoming 
summit of tbe Group of Seven lead- 
ing industrial nations in Denver. 

But the dollar rebounded and was 


trading at .113.650 yen at 4 P.M., 
compared with 113315 yen at the 
end of the day Tuesday. 

President Bill Clinton and Prime 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE 

Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto of Ja- 
pan are to meet Thursday in Denver 
before the G-7 s ummi t meeting this 
weekend. The G-7 also includes 
Germany, France, Britain, Italy and 
Canada. Washington at times has 
pushed for a weaker dollar to reduce 


its trade deficit with Japan. A weak- 
er dollar makes foreign goods 
cheaper in Japan while raising 
prices of Japanese products abroad 

Agains t other currencies, fee dollar 
rose to 1.7333 Deutsche marks from 
1.7303 DM, to 5.8465 French francs 
from 5.8367 francs and to 1.4470 
Swiss francs from 1.4445 francs. The 
pound slipped to $1.6383 from 
$1.6393. 

“The mark is suffering because 
of big uncertainty about European 
monetary union,” Peter Cornelius, 


an economist with Deutsche Bank, 
said. Although Germany and 
France, the core of the single-cur- 
rency project, agreed Tuesday to 
limit debts and deficits once the 
single currency, or euro, was 
launched, some doubts linger about 
the planned 1999 starting date. 

Mr. Cornelius said there was a 
one-third chance that the single cur- 
rency would be delayed. “If that 
happens, then there is a danger that 
the whole thing will fall apart,” he 
said. (AP. Bloomberg . Reuters) 


as the yield fell four basis point*, 
6.68. Bonds also got a boost 
the Fed bought $1.64 bUbon „ 
Treasury securities to addtes&ase^ 
sonal shortage of reserves. 

Among dK ma jor losses iufe 
technology sector, Seagate was s* 
lower at 36VS. Cisco Systems ftfl 
1W to 67, and Microsoft slumped 4 
10 1303/16. 


[1 

ill 


i 


from all-time highs set this weeks 
erode prices declined. Oil is dowg 
about 14 percent in tbe last five 
weeks, undermining the prospects' 
for rising profits for die industry, 
Texaco eased % to 1 13, and Exxon • 
slipped l A to 63%. 

After the close of trading Toes. ■ 
day. Gateway and Seagate warned ' 
that profits would not meg 

US. STOCKS 

analysts’ expectations. Last month, ' 
Intel said that sluggish European ’ 
sales would hurt second- quarter ; ; 
results. 

Oracle slumped 3 to 50W even “ 
after fiscal fourth-quarter earnings 
of 54 cents a share met expecta- 
tions. Analysts said they were dis- ) 
appointed with the 22 percent sales 
growth of Oracle's core database t 
products. ! . 

“Oracle’s results were in hue, ' 
but in-line earnings these days tend 
to get hit, "said Greg Riley, a senior ) 
trader at Credit Suisse First Bos- ■ 
ton. \ 

Not all investors are convinced , 
the high-profile warnings are a bad 
omen for stocks. 

Computer makers profits are fall- . 
ing because they could not get 
enough of Intel’s new chips to ! 
power their products, not because 1 
of slowing demand, said Ray : 
Hirsch. head of technology invest- 
ing at American Express Financial - 
Advisors. 

“It's not that demand for per- . 
sonal computers is saturated, it’s 
more that people want the latest and 
greatest technology and they're . 
willing to wait to get it.” he said. 1 
“Just a couple of companies saying 
something negative doesn’t neces- 
sarily mean dial the whole industry 
or the whole economy has gone 
sour.” 

Intel’s stock, which fell 3 1/16 to 
14616, also came under pressure 
when analysts said Wednesday that - 
the company was likely to cut prices 
more than initially planned in the 
second half to try to boost flawing 
personal computer demand and 
stave off increased competition. " j 
/ Bloomberg , AP) - 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 



indexes 

Dow Jones 

incus 

Torn zmx 2739.W 2715.13 

U«1 2I6S4 ffiJ JWM 22*45 

Comp 23W.VJ 277732 5371 JS 

Standard & Poors 

Mm Tutor 

HI* LM CUM 49.M. 

Industrials 1055.70104230105X04 1042-54 
Tramp. 63X38 42589 63060 631.86 

UIBHies 197-24 1WJ23 197.11 196.76 

Finance 10008 101 35 1(057 10X14 

SPS0Q 89760 886.19 89442 888.06 

SP 100 87686 86496 87X88 84699 


NYSE 

Cmak 
MdusatK 
Tramp. 
u*n 


Most Actives 

NYSE 


PHMars 

232S! 

CnTcnRS 


Nasdaq 


VU. HM 
144142 U 

bs»i s 
79123 2*91 
76514 52 
63844 4614 
51777 16A 
arm *2ft 
46454 * 

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sm list* 
37743 1344 
360IJ 32Vl 
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33913 «6M 


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~y> 2244 


13544 1064* 

jm a* 
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June 18, 1997 

Hlgti Low Liitasl CUgo OpM 


Grains 

comtcaoT) 

6M0 tel nMnan- orts per buftirt 
*697 fflU 144ft 246* -3ft 
Sep 97 2S4 249 3016 >116 

Dec 97 349V, 26 2406 -3% 

Mor» 255V) 252 221* -31* 

Move 240 JS64S 25544 -11* 
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8m* 237ft — 7ft 

Estsdes na Tuftv srtes 7056* 
Wswih 37246* OH 2801174 


44X89 461.91 46141 1*8 

k'A 4S 
42SJ7 9KB .« 


Nasdaq 

HM U* 


insurance 

Rronco 

Tram* 


j* AMEX 


143839 MI8J4 14J1M -1*62 

113*3! 115Z10 1157-90 -OJA 
154414 155146 156013 1-125 

1631.12 448452 1631.12 +1671 
18W-67 18713d 189073 + 10M 
94650 94083 943-53 -394 


UJanrits 

3Com 

SSP 

w: 

Amgrai 



* j* xm +m 
5a 5BVW J84, 
4) Ml +V» 

i«v*u6»v -at 

2^ 32 

TJMft -4 

66** -V» 

MV> -4V) 
41H -Mi 
_ XT* -m 
SP* 51 -3»i 

584* 59VW -4-4* 


8630 

<0822 

20790 

16207 

1497 

1679 

W 


3X5* 

19/04 

1X992 

am 

24.120 

X729 


62*05 42077 62597 

Dow Jones Bond 


t*. v-ra is*. AMEX 

ZZ V-.MtabLd.Uwl 


20 Bond* 

10 unties 
10 Industrials 


10X0* 

10023 

10546 


— 003 
+005 
-> 0.10 


&i R 

kst" 

TobSks 

□nSd 

SSs, 


mvr 

is r 

35 i<»b 

7914 l*t 
7616 4 
<10 I* 
410 llta 
560 124* 


SOYBEANS (CB0T7 


& 


IV* I4ta 

% ^ 
I I 
1114 12*b 


♦f 

to* 97 

BS9 

■n 

83291 

“^OOft 

54.130 

Aim 97 

786 

770ft 

777ft 

-lift 2X21 

-u 

Staff 

701 

6ta 

698ft 

—8 

10886 

+S 

Ntraff 

ffiO 

66615 

668ft 

-Sft 

4WJ72 

tore 98 

675 

*MV> 

M9ft 

-6ft 

X.W 

+4* 

Eft. rafts na 

, Tufts srtes 

*9.733 

Tufts open W 

110477 

ta 500 



Trading Activity 

NYSE 

Mtinced 

Deoima 

MS 

NMH49I& 

NaUoK 

AMEX 

Adnnced 

DBdnotl 

Unownaa) 

loWrtSJm 

SSGIS? 


uaa 

If 


Nasdaq 


1272 

nn D«snM 

JS 

^ SSSSES? 


1344 

1*04 

2217 

5305 


1982 


Market Sales 


WHEAT (ONTO 

&oao bu mMmtata. cm pra- bubnl 
JW97 344V* 33816 JtPA -8 3X539 

Sep 97 353 3*5 361* -3 25£97 

Dec 97 36416 358 3SVi SVt 20384 

MOTH 348% 363 364 -i IOS 

ES. softs NX Tue-LSOes TAOS* 
TXa'scanM 1V7* all ms 


Livestock 
CATTUS (CMER) 


tew 

Ptwv. 


TMm 

Piaa. 

MUM Bn— certs parte. 
Jun97 6540 6582 

m 

% 

NYSE 

49637 

«^*T 

Augff 6665 6605 


309 

A roe* 


2741 




ttedaq 

61X75 

Ftata 71.10 7X45 

7 

u 

InmBBofU- 



Aprta 7105 7247 

Eft. rales 11751 Tuft 
TlM'SMWnirt 9287* 1 


Dividends 

Company Par Ant Rec pay 

IRREGULAR 


CrtskuaWe 
MoroGrent Smll 
UAL Ofl & Gas g 
Tel Offshore Tt 


b .1078 6-25 - 

- JJ7 6-26 7-1* 

- J7 6-30 7-15 
-.3934 MO MO 


Coiwaay Per An* Rec Pay 

INITIAL 

Am Stores n - -OP 6-2 7 7-10 


STOCK Spur 

Am Store* 2 fori spm. 

Cascade Bna 3 tori spiff. 

Cdmsaf Corp *4 shore of Ascenl Entefain 
Group wrench stare beta. 

•htoflarart 3 fori spiil. 

5TOOC 

Greater Cnramun _ T0% 710 7-3i 
REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
SI Andrew Gld I tarS stare conwfidottoa. 
INCREASED 


Rut* Corp 
ThomtaiqMlo 


.1/5 7-25 
JH 6-30 


Mark Centers 


REDUCED 

Q M 6-30 


8-15 

7-10 


7-31 


AmwHech 
Butter Mtp 
CFSBBariawi 
□MHI YldSeair 
CPB Inc 

ComnmVti 8ncp 

Dow Jones 
Empres 1CA Sac 
Excel Radiy 
FttaityMihn 
Hist Bancorp 
PM Ball 
Rnd LMsporr 
ron Thomos Rn 
KoydonCrap 
Orange & Rock 

Ptwiss Property 

SCoratComBnc 
Tin raCria Pipe g 


REGULAR 

a 565 6-30 
Q -12 6-27 
Q .15 6-30 
M .06 6-27 
0 2i 6-30 
9 fl? 627 
S 24 H 
b M7S 627 
Q SO 7-1 
0 317 7-11 

0 .13 6-30 

0 .10 6-30 


8-1 

7-15 

7-n 

7-18 

7- 11 

8- 29 
7-10 
7-15 
7-22 
MS 
7-18 


0 .13 7-1 7-15 
0 .0625 7-2 7-lfi 
0 .14 9-15 9-29 

a -MS 7-21 8-1 

x .2884 7-2 8-25 
0 J2S 6-30 8-15 
Q jCt 6-30 
S JO 627 
Q J2S 5-30 


7-17 

7-11 

7-31 


PSDSI CATTLE (CMBR) 

Span bs.- carts par fa. 

Aon 97 7855 78.10 7X2 -047 

Sen 97 78.W 77^2 77.97 -SL2S 

Otf 97 7X2 77J0 78J3J -027 

NW97 79^ 79.12 7935 — <U» 
Jan 98 79J0 7UZ 79J3 
Mom 79 JB 79JJ5 79 JO +005 

Eft. soles 1406 rue's, softs X094 
Tub's wen tor 19414 off 98 

H0G&4M tCMESU 
40490 too.- cents per b. 

JU97 6250 n.U 82J5 +032 

AU997 7945 7X2 7745 +045 
0097 71 JO KU7 71 >12 -02 
OC 97 6040 Ojft 4X27 *L22 

Fton 6675 6630 6642 +007 

Est softs 9.115 TUe'l softs liua 
Tup's open tol 35.20S air 208 

PORK N3JJES (CMS!) 

40400 tot.- CHS PV ft. 

M91 SIX 7142 IT *5 +0.13 

Aub?7 SI4> 75J2 238 —US 

Rtoffl 7345 7U0 72Jfl -060 

Est sales 1443 Toe's, sates 2490 
Toe's open tor 4403 off 717 


KW55 

242* 

X544 

2401 

434 

T48 


924 

11,135 

4.792 

4.191 

1.722 


X378 

2JW 

504 


uyruuV8-4 ipiiu«iwit4 oft e ng t per 
storeTADft ^poytato la CbuAb fmto; 
re-OMKlMy; 4-quortorlK s-aapfttaMl 


Stock Tables Explained 

SdKfipres ore uitoftduL Verely Mysore] tows teffealta preffae 37 weeks ptustte omt 
ftento tat iwUtatoteslfcwasi day. Wtareo s p8t oi sto ck dMrie ndo nxjunfltigto2Sperotfiir mote 
twstawi pokl the yeas M9M0M range and Aridendareftnwn to toe row stocks ontf. Unlea 
offrarnte nrM lutes ai OMftnta a» aomid rUwrseinenls tamed oi itie Wat dedandsa 

a - (fiwWend a(w extra CsJ-6-onniwl rate at dMttand plus siocK dnWaui. C - OquldQdng 
dlvktond. ec - PE aoMds ».«*!- cnlforL d - new yerely tow. Od ■ toss in Hie last 12 months. 
• - dividend declared or paid to preceding 12 months, f - annual rate. Increased on last 
dedaralkm. 3 - ertidmid to Canacfian funds, subject to 15% non-residence Me. i - dMdeiid 
declared offer spIB-up restock dividend. J - dividend paid (tils year, airtfled. defcmd. orito 
adkm to hen at larast divfdand meefirtg. k - cffvhiend declared re paid this fHr, an 
flccvrmitoftve Jssue wttti dividends in arrears, in- annual rate reduced on lost declaration, 
n - new Issue in Itie past 52 weeks. The hfgtr-tow range begin* with tha start of trading, 
nd - next day deOwry. p - irnffai dividend annual rate unknown. P/E - price-eamkiijs ratio, 
q-dased-end murual fond r- dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 monlfis, plus stock 
dividend, i - stock split Dividend begins with dote of split, sts- sales. 1 - dvWend pdW In 
stock in preceding 12 mantes, eslknatad costi value an ex-dMdand oreji-ifislifcuiion date 
u - rww teariy high, v- Trarflng (totted, vl - In MnkiuptcyrerecBlveisMp retains rewganbad 
unrterthe Bankruptcy Art.orsecuittlasusunwdby 5«d5corTflMnle5.«d- when disWbutod 
Wf - when issuectr raw - wflfi warranTS. X - ex-dWdcmd orax-rtotits. xtfs ■ Hwflsirtbutan. 
h - wfflratit warrants, f- n-dMdend end udes In ted fid • ytoM. 1 - sates In ML 


1550 

1551 

—33 

811 

1599 

l«l 


3X00 

1417 

109 

-a 

19823 

1467 

IMS 

— M 

21407 

ICS 

MB 

—34 

ITS 

171* 

TTtt 

-34 

*11 


Pood 

cocoa mese 
M metric im-t 

XX 97 1577 

See 97 1423 

.Dec 97 ura 

*r« M90 

Mav9B 1694 

mv rm 

&t.50lK MA .»»*»«> 1*1*1 

Tlta tapenM 96*72 UP 593 

CDfflSctNCSE) 

V-9 BOtosr-CBSspre to. 

4*97 21X50 189X0 WftSS -1X65 1851 

Staff 19358 17580 17X55 -1X15 9.991 

Cfocff TTOOO 1J6S 15655 —1115 4465 

159.00 147.55 147J5 — 10.15 2^13 

15U0 W85 I46S5 -845 607 

Ed ire* HA. TvCv softs 8.15B 
Tiff's mn m 71,923 up 309 

SUOAS- WORLD 11 (NCSE3 
'JMOO ftoL- carts nr to. 

1141 1(2 n.3* >002 53.174 

OttW 11J5 112 IL3T t(UH 82AQS 

i&Si \IH «-« +40Z 3X793 

gw* 11.12 ms n.11 *ojb ion 

EscicAs NA Trie’s softs 16*** 

Tub’s mmw m&i off 499 


HWI Lora Lflftft a** Optnt 

ORANGE JU4CE (NCTN) 

154M Os-Mrark 

JUT? TL90 7SJ0 25J0 -8.V0 15341 

Staff Tt.to 7XN 7841 -4U5 114*4 

N#vff IT 75 8X75 IT JO *005 *JTt 

Jon* 1650 81* 8X10 +905 1J82 

Eterafts NLA. Tub's. softs 199 
Tire's men irt 35.735 up 741 


Metals 


OOLDOCMXl 


SOYBEAN MEAL loan 
Xiororm- oaten pvian 
JUI97 mst> 2713) 27X70 -740 

AUB97 254JW 2*9.10 MfJO -4J8 

Staff 23X09 23148 231.90 —441 

0097 22X50 22000 2B2J0 -441 

Oecff B6J8 21X50 1UM -441 

Jcn9B 31600 2T140 711 JO -3J0 

Est softs HA Tiff's sales 71J78 
Tiff's open W 11X505 off 15 

SOYBEAN OR. (CBOTJ 


Jftff 2X32 22.95 2107 -417 36,186 

Aitoff ZXS4 2177 ZX2* -441 2DJ78 

Sta 97 2161 Z3JS 2162 -471 9JB5 

OO 97 2370 1137 2363 —030 0012 

OkW 2605 2X9 3X6* -435 31.115 

Jan 90 2X95 2348 2X80 -033 1413 

Eft. saies NA Tiff's, soies 14237 
Tus'staenVt hum an 423 


3*0 

1 

76467 

7.973 

46303 

M19 

US 

8,134 

757 


Jtaff 3030 338JD 339.10 -3Jt 

Jftff 30940 -X70 

AU097 34640 34U0 34IJ0 -478 

Oct 97 346J0 3050 3058 -470 

Decff 34940 34X70 34610 -2J8 

Feb 91 3(941 34U0 34640 SJ0 

Are 91 35140 — 3JD 

Junto 3SX50 —2.91 

Atato JS4J0 -4RI 

Est-srtes NA Tufts, sftet 11.117 
Tiff's open tot Muff off 9*7 

M GRADE COmt (NCMX) 


JlX»T7 222J0 121J1 12155 +045 

JUlff mil 12835 17145 +075 

AM97 12490 12410 12425 +435 

Staff 12850 11850 11955 +425 

0097 11750 11745 117.05 +a» 

Nw97 11545 +045 

Oecff 11440 11340 11405 -045 

Jonto 11155 -4)5 

Ftato 10940 -430 

Eft.srtss NA TUfts. sates 16707 
Tiff's open tot 56688 off 5 

SR.VEROKMX} 
ranmvA-CHipiriwoL 
Jre>97 67X00 46670 41478 -630 3 

4497 .47600 VIS) «95D -670 4X10 

Staff 48X00 <7X00 47620 -670 2B493 

Drew 4040 «U0 481.10 -679 6390 

Junto «lt(l -670 17 

Wft 98 49140 4758 4750 -670 8464 

AtoTto 49150 -690 2JT7 

54 to 4550 —7.10 2416 

EM.scto NA Tuftx softs 260* 

Tub's open tor 94*S m <14 

FLATMDM (NMER) 

Bnros-dffenpvftm 

JlHff 41140 «KV 4650 — 64 9415 

0097 39850 39000 39190 -420 7.061 

ton 98 39000 38940 3B95S -020 1423 

Eft.SrtSS NA Tufts-sates 2J19 

Tufts awn hr >8^3* off <77 


148 

274<5 

X860 

0437 

1JU 

6387 

ft 


LONDON METALS (LME) 
DoUan per metric ton 


Prsftore 


^4 


140 197000 15040 155X00 
15*440 13*540 1579V5 138049 
katas CH tab erode) 

270240 ffcaoo 2*6840 367140 
2S9740 2S9K40 258140 338440 




*0*19 607N 

63040 (41X0 


60940 

£3240 


*1040 

62X00 


Spat 71 1040 

Pwrtd 723040 
71a 

Spat 351040 

ftnwrt S5S0M 

136340 


712040 707040 788940 
723040 718QXO 719000 


553940 551940 553040 
559040 556040 556540 




13*« 134649 134740 
136940 134840 136940 


Iflffi Lora Oan Orn OpH 

Financial 

UST.fULLSCOAES) 

(InVIRavpftrtMODa. 

Atoff WOt 9545 9545 -803 1451 

Staff *63* 9679 *U2 +042 7XE 

Dec 97 8667 337 

EN.sdes NA Tufts. skes 13X 
Tuft socon tot 9,141 up 223 

sYiLWEASUirraacro 

Jtolwrepftt- PM 8,6*4 Of IK PQ 
Staff 106-S lot'll HU-26 + 06 201310 

DOCff >06-08 f 06 MC 

£9. softs 36400 Tiff'S, softs 3BJ16 
Tufts gpmM 28436 op 135 

VVR. TREASURY tCBOn 
Y10B40D prto - pm & 33nds «t 1 ao act 
Staff l*-2B 108-07 108-18 + 06 319,667 

Dec 97 TD8-D7 187-29 W6-C7 +04 x«6 

MretO U7-25 + 06 9 

EO40l« W4ff Tuft 6 rafts 863» 

Tufts opw ii* 331478 eft 7M 

US TREASURY B0ND5 C30T1 
a PtaMMOtofs a saasre no poj 
Jtaff 113.19 111-30 112-17 +10 24J11 

Staff itj-as ut-i7 m-os +« atjb 

Oecff m-b in-os 111-M +10 

War 98 111-1* + lo 240 

gdsdM 395400 Tufts, sates 30*62 
Tufts open tot <71419 tfl 11*5 

LtBOS VMONTM (CMER) 

kUnragn-Msarmopei 

J*ff «J2 *630 9631 H.m 

AUOff 9631 9626 9628 l|jS 

Staff 8634 *U2 9624 |M 

Ed softs NA Tuftxsatas 8413 

Tufts open tor up 983 

LONG CILT (UFFB 
CSOOOO ■ pta & BA rtioflpct 
Jtaff 116-15 11JO HUB -0-19 XON 
Staff 11*05 113-12 113-15 —0-19 16X394 
U.U80K 8X959. Pee*, rates: «L355 
Piev.pptaML: 166362 oB MSI 


Mgh Lora Luted Chga OpM 

GERMAN COY. BUND OJFFQ 

DM350000-|dErtinpa 

Staff 10140 101-11 10144 +042 246904 

Dec 97 10040 10045 100J9 +002 1-939 

EsLsrtraK 166410 Prev. rates: 226693 

Prtr.opentaL 24X863 off 9,227 

W-YEA R FRENCH GOV. BONOS QWATIR 

FFSBMOO-pIsOflOOpCI 

Sapff »2X96 12840 12k* -006 20IJ1I 

Dacff 1706 WJ* 97 -008 7-575 

Marfa UM 97J* 97.78—041 0 

EH rates; 116*43. 

apw lot: 2024*6 ell 2747X 

ITAUAM GOVERNMENT BOND (UFTO 
TT1.200 nj*on-pt» TOO pa 
Sspff 13X15 1S2J1 1*08 +050 84198 
Dacff 10540 105.90 10543 +041 300 

EsL rater 55.125. Pirn, rates: 65799 
P(W.opantoLit64N OR 2415 
EUROO Q 6JA R5 (OABQ 
tl mWtan rtsrt IN pet. 

JUlff 9621 9620 #621 3X539 

Aapff 9618 *616 MM 9JQ5 

Staff 9LU 9611 9615 556691 

Dec 97 9196 9191 9X96 +081 432-0W 

Mo r98 9349 9383 9349 +0.01 288,900 

Jta98 9X79 «72 9X78 +082 251.956 
Est sales NA Tufts, srtes 626051 
TufttopanM 246945* oH 322QO 
BRmSH POUND (CUS2) 
B.»taute.spnrrb»te 
Staff 1.63X1 1433* 143SD 
Decff 14300 14300 143W 
MretE 1^66 

fstsaies NA Tuftssrtas 4458 
Tufts open inf 0,922 oft 276 

CANADIAN DOLLAR CCMERJ 
MUB4i|ntrea*iM 
Sepff J 2 tt rm j2» 

Drew J30O 7220 7774 

«or« 2111 

fi*** rates xao 

Tufts oprarw OSB eft 832 

GERMAN MARX (CMER) 

•*6080 morfca, iprr mar* 

Staff « 4B » 

Drew 4170 4K2 5842 
Merit 4B8T 

&.S48S NA Tufts, srtes 16493 
Tufts Cpen tot 96544 up 4587 

JAPANESE TEN (CMER) 
lUmlSgnnn.iora-Taavwi 
Staff M8U 89W 8917 

□taff 4085 4030 4IQS 
Mre98 4153 

M.Kte na .T ufts. Srtes Iijio 
Tim's open tot 86576 off 877 

SWISS FRANC (CMBl) 
travel, snwtronc 
Staff -TBIi 4973 4981 

Dreff 2076 JMS Jfai 
Morn 7T33 

EsL sates NA Tufts. Kites 10480 
Tus’sepanM <64ff *jli 

MEXICAN PESO (CMBQ 
toxato aram, S ear para 
Staff . 2PM .12145 .17187 
-TO .11750 .11735 
MO’S.IIJS .11117 .11342 
Bisote NA Tufts. rafts 7,106 
TliftStatatof 40JB8 up 649 
MWNTN STERUNG flJpFEJ 
£5auX»-0SoflOOpd 

Jtaff 9X30 9X24 9X23 —005 89.1 SB 

^yff 2-18 933B 93416 —0.10 13US9 
Dtaff nm 9186 91*8 -0 II luS 

S5 SHi S 77 «t» 

JonW 9X84 9248 9X70 -012 46495 
SjP** 9143 V2M ~ an 7X268 

i6t8i 

Mre99 9175 9X41 9145 -009 20390 
EsL rates: 176*8. Prev. sales: 50136 
Prer.openlrtj 54X273 off 220 
^MONTHS IIHOMARK (UFFE1 

Oyiu^-PtsotlDOpn 

JJff 96.84 96*5 9484 +001 1807 

94JM 96^5 UndL *41 
Staff ««3 9682 9682 UndL 27*848 
u « S5 -77 96.71 UndL 2*6101 

^“5 S' 6 * 9fti0 9441 Urn*. ^417 

Sh 5 ™ 8 * E083X Pnte.srta: 1302*8 
9rw °pw ret- 1 J9X115 up 17 XU 
MMIRTH P1BOR UAAT1F1 
FFsrmBpfl-ptertioopd 
Sta^Z teS5 9642 94-55 — 001 71447 
2® 2 S 4 - 5 ^ ffJ® 94-54—001 36612 
torew 9646 9642 9646 _aoi Jistl 
9f*3J —OOI 27.248 
S*P9B 96J3 9620 9622 — 001 3X750 

2*5 5® S 98 9600 — 60) 1J.910 

l t ar 2 5^* 9575 95.77 — O0J 13^09 

Jwiff 9X46 95JS 9i55-0(B XSff 

Staff 9534 9533 9531—001 5.283 

Ed. rate 4X131 
OptatoL; 245330 up X65X 
WNrasuReuimuFFB 
rrLlmifcn.pl.rtlOOpct 
o£ff ^ "«25 

ss ss as as ss as 

gs sss «s stu Si? as§ 

S3S£ifSi i af-?£g* 

industrials 

cottorsdktn) 

wtete^- ram parte. 

»" 7X75 72-48 tea _ fli-1 njn 

g £ % "2 

i*V7 7564 7525 7540 —014 34,109 


32-525 

129 

2 


30978 

7301 

*96 


4X877 

881 

IQ 


49447 

1X09 

IDS 


31437 

777 


19^99 

nwni 

2.655 


Mgh Low Lite Otpa Opbn 

Morn MU 769 7655 -G15 SJD2 *7! 

May 98 77J0 77.10 77.12 -a* 1.W 

Ea. srtes KA Tim's, rates I Mil 
Tufts wen W 70819 Oft 513 

HEATBIG OIL (NMER) 

40M art, conte par art 

to* 77 5225 51.15 51 JO -1.15 39.141 

AubW 5285 5140 5145 -144 29J9* ' 

Sep 97 5175 5X9 5250 — IJ* 16749 

Octw 5« a» M -1.16 12.918 

Novff BJ5 5*ta 5450 -0.99 11J54 

DecW 5600 S3) 55J0 —0.99 14JN ; 

Junta 56*0 15.W 54. 0Q —079 114J4 - • 

Feb98 5695 5610 5630 -054 537 « 

Mreta 5600 5Sta SSJO —42-39 5.199 ^ 

E*L srtes NA Tufts sores 21475 
TbftsoPenW U4.0K oft 303 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMBt) 
l.MDtaL-drtttnebrDU. 

Jrtff V9.I7 1846 1X73 -4148 4),t*» _ 

AlloW 19 JO 1885 1X92 — (LO KIN 

Staff 19.40 1982 n.10 — OJi 3X381 - 

P?ff J9JS 19.13 19J1 -DJ3 ZM« .' 

NW97 1952 1974 WJO — 0JS 17323 

DBC9T 1956 WJ1 19 J* -0J6 3XJ75 . 

JWIta W58 19J6 19.44 _a« I7J19 ’ 

feb98 1959 H-48 1989 -at7 7.9N f . 

Mreta W41 1988 19-48 — 0.19 4jli " 

Alftta 1*51 1954 1954 -XU **B - ' 

EN. srtes NA Tufts rate 87 J® 

Tufts open tot 40X271 up 1286 

NATURAL GAS WMER) I 

W-ODOrTbn tofts. S pra nrn Mu .. 

to* 99 21*0 1151 2171 Z78B 

*M»ff X305 2170 1177 ktf . 

Staff 11*0 1105 1172 HJK . 

Orfff 2^ Xlti 1175 20.15* 

Novff 2325 2JOO JJIO 9J* . 

Dacff 2468 2-M 2450 r29fl J ^ 

Jta ta 2500 1402 J-WQ US* J v 

Ftata 2420 2400 1415 95*4 

Mreta 2795 2775 1285 647] . 

Aprta 1133 1130 2135 IN* 

Eresrtes na Toe's. aras 1*54 J 

Tta'saoenlrt 198827 od 947 > 

UtdEADED GASOLINE (NMER) - 

ojmsoumtttt, gw 

to^ff »80 56J5 5678 -1.70 2X» 

WtoO 5610 5637 -147 HJ* ’• 

Staff 5640 5545 5587 — 122 60 9 ’■ 

^ -aw m - 

teW 5580 SUO SU7 -082 V$ ■ ^ 

OiCff 5440 SXW 5485 -C74 48M ’ , 

Junta 5440 5480 5486 —TL7? 2JS 

S4J* 54X6 ^886 7S c 

Era. rates NA Tuftx »fts 19475 
Tue’s onen a* 7X531 off 509 

GASOIL (IPE) 

“to. jdrttars per metric tai -tots rt 100 Iran . 

JW97 16285 15880 1587S -580 20*« ; 
Augff 16625 16028 16080 -580 8UgJ. - 
Sep 97 165J5 16X25 14X2S —625 iS2t ' 

2E.ff ]“to0 16680 16680 -480 6«2 , 

Ntaff 170 JO 16880 16880 -US ia» 

Oecff 17X00 17080 169.75 ISO . 

teff 17X50 17075 17100 -125 lfl:\ 
Febff 171.00 17180 170.75 -380 Ll» - 
softs: 19845. Pn*. rates 11388 
Pita, open tot.: 46197 up 1865 

BRENT OIL(IPE) 

’'ff I?** 17.77 -0J1 77J£ 

Jtaff If M 1786 17.95 -0J6 ’ 

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&t rate 4X3*2. Pre«: rates: 38449 
Piw. opsn tot.: 151853 up XI 18 1 


Qd 97 
Nob97 
Dreff 
to»W 
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Malta 


Stock Indexes 

SIP COMP. INDEX ICMER) 

XBiMn 

Junff 89240 18640 89020 -020 B* 4 " . ■ 
Staff 90X38 99X80 899,70 -3*6 - \ 

gfff 9HL70 90170 909 JO _X*0 H" 
es-soies NA Tur i. sates tn,lff ' : : 

Tufts open irt 235.177 up 8*12 

CACtatMATIR 
FrSOo pertodrapebd 

Junff 27500 271 78 27*88.-100 ■ 

i a,9 L ff4&0 2717.5 27468-100 MJ* 

Augff 27528 273X0 77568—380 "• 

Staff 27610 2737.5 27618 -Iff li£ 

DOcff 000 am 27828 —100 'S ■ ■ 
080 ODD 28068—100 M** . 

ES. softs: 19899. 

Open lr*_6&869 mi x , 

pJseiooojFra 

46528 -298 N 

Staff 67318 *7108 M*68 . •* 

D«ff 474X0 47278 47*18 -3)8 H* ' 

gx softs: 54401. Pre». rate «4B 
Pr+v. open an. 89.255 oft 1.222 


CommotSty Indexes 


{JtaOftS 
Renters 
DJ-Fulures 
CRB 

fours;. 

Futures Exhanf/e. 
Petmfrum Exctumga. 


1,59440 1®^- 

101X70 IffiS 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1997 



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all s t f 1 Bonn’s Aim to Halve 
^ Joblessness by 2000 

hi * 

Isn’t Viable, Ifo Says 


EUROPE 



PAGE 15 


,r\ 


Reuters 



MUNICH — The German ggv- 
:: v • eroment’s aim to ent unemployment 
^ ja half by 2000 is unrealistic, the Ifo 
. : ~V.v Institute for Economic Research 
- “tu.r^s said Wednesday. 

‘ • 'n, ^ In a special report, Ifo said bring- 
* ing joblessness down by that much 
■ Vc- in the next three years would require 
r Vj* annual economic growth of 5.75 per- 
cent — a level of expansion that the 
^ institute said was far out of reach. 

‘ Germany's unemployment rate, 
currently 11.2 percent, will not start 
to fall until annual growth reaches 
V about 23 percent, the institute said. 


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Vereimbank 
BuysNoris, 
German Rival 


CctvUatbyOarSmffFumDitpaKka 

MUNICH — Bayerische 
Vereinsbank AG, Gdmany’s 
largest mortgage bank, said 
Wednesday it bad bought Noris 
Verbraucberbank GmbH from 
the Schickedanz Group. 

The sale price will be less 
than. 200 million Deutsche 
marks ($1 15 million), estimat- 
ed Markus Strigl, a banking 
analyst with TVmkaus Capital 

Management 

Noris will be merged into 
Verwnsbank’s Franken WKV 
Bank GmbH. That will produce 
a bank with 100 branches 
throughout Germany, about 
370,000 customers and a credit 
volume of 3.6 billion DM. 

Separately, Vereinsbank and 
Commerzbank AG said they 
were bolding talks on the future 
of their joint ownership of Ger- 
many’s fourth- largest mutual- 
fund group. Allgemeine 
Deutsche Investxnent-Gesell- 
schaft. Commerzbank and Ver- 
einsbank both have 42.7 stakes 
in die fund concern. The rest is 
held by eight banks and three 
insurance companies. 

( Bloomberg . AFX ) 


Gennany’s economy grew at an an- 
nual rate of just 1.4 percent in the 
first quarter of 1997. 

In the report, Ifo said the rela- 
tionship between growth and em- 
ployment was now tighter than ever, 
adding that conditions for reduc- 
tions in unemployment through 
growth had never been as favorable 
as in the 1990s. 

It said the growth level at which 
joblessness would begin to decline, at 
2.3 percent, was as low as h bad ever 
been. For every percentage point of 
growth above 23 percent the in- 
stitute said, unemployment would 
fall by half a percentage point 
Ifo said that when compared with 
the United States and Britain, Ger- 
man labor markets showed no meas- 
urable disadvantages in terms of flex- 
ibility. “Therefore, the problem of 
unemployment can, in principle, be 
solved in terms of growth, although 
the effective growth nrmsr rise above 
normal rates," the report said. 

An animal growth rate of 2.75 
percent, which the Ifo institute ex- 
pects for 1998. would ooly have a 
relatively small impact on the un- 
employment rate by 2000. 

The institute suggested that (me 
starting point would be to stimulate 
investment through raising the rate 
of savings, which it said would spur 
growth and employment 
According to a model analysis, a 
10 percent rise in savings rates, 
coupled with annual growth of 4 


Gazprom Delays U.S. Stock Sale 


Gapfaffe ftrStfftoa Dnpnrtn 

MOSCOW — RAO Gazprom 
said Wednesday it would delay a 
second placement of American de- 
positary receipts until next year in 
the hope that a planned reorgan- 
ization would lift the stock’s price. 

“We consider it expedient to 
place this tranche in 1998,” said 
Eduard Ivanov, the company’s 
chief of investor relations. He said 
the exact timing had not yet been 
detemrined. 

Gazprotn’s shares were trading 
Wednesday at 3,307 rubles (57 
cents), up 63. One American de- 
positary receipt represents 10 of 
these ordinary shares. 

The company is p lanning a re- 
organization to improve profitab- 
ility and buoy the stock price, said 
Pyotr Rodionov, director-general 
of ’ Gazprom's Lentransgaz 
pipeline subsidiary and a former 
reel and energy minister . 

Gazprom, producer of a quarter 
of the world’s natural-gas output, is 
already beginning to reorganize its 
subsidiaries into operational divi- 
sions. Thai move will be followed 
by a reorganization of supporting 
structures, such as the profitable 


gas-export business, Mr. Rodionov 
said. Gazprom also wants to get out 
of “social spheres” in central Rus- 
sia, where it runs farms, hospitals 
and schools. 

Such a move would allow 
Gazprom to cut its work force of 
400,000 by a quarter, he said. 

Mr. Rodionov also said 
Gazprom would pay its tax debt of 
3.5 trillion rubles to the govern- 
ment by the end of June as prom- 
ised. The company accounted for 
26 percent of Russia’s 1996 tax 
revenue. 

“We are taking the responsi- 
bility to pay our debts,” said Mr. 
Rodionov, who complained that 
government agencies, including 
die army, owned Gazprom more 
than 4 trillion rubles. ‘ ‘But we also 
demand the government take steps 
to meet us halfway.” 

He added, “It’s time for the 
state to conduct itself correctly 
with regard to payments from en- 
ergy companies,” referring to 
what he described as unrealistic 
state revenue targets. 

In a note to shareholders, 
Gazprom's chairman, Rem 
Vyakhirev, said that the restruc- 


turing was intended to “promote 
competition in regional gas mar- 
kets, expedite payment for sup- 
plied gas, reduce overheads and 
increase the company's profits.” 

Gazprom is also interested in 
pay its debts so that it can more 
easily raise capital abroad for its 
$45 billion Y amal-Europe gas pro- 
duction and pipeline project 

Reaching its goals will put 
Gazprom in abetter position to sell 
new securities to foreign investors, 
Mr. Rodionov said. 

“We will sell 9 percent of our 
shares to foreign investors as 
planned,” he said, adding that it 
could take “one year, three years 
or five years.” 

Gazprom has already sold 1.15 
percent of its shares in the foim of 
depositary receipts to foreign in- 
vestors. The first tranche was is- 
sued in 1996. 

“Weare already thinking of do- 
ing a convertible-bond issue in- 
stead of an ADR issue,” Mr. Ro- 
dionov said, noting the possibility 
of selling shares backed by Amer- 
ican depositary receipts. * ‘We 
aren't rushing with this.” 

(Reuters, Bloomberg I 


Investor’s Europe 


London 
FTSE 100 


Paris 

Index CAG 40 

3000 



FM'A MJ 


Exchange 


index 


AM J 2200 J * M A M J 
19S7 

Wednesday Prev. 

Close Close 


Changd 


Amsterdam 

AgX ■. 

849.13 

347.15 . 

+0^ 

Brussels 

BEL-20 


2,360.03 

^)-63 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

3.730.27 

3.741.48 


Copenhagen 

Stock Market 

588.60 

589.34 

•0.13 

Helsinki 

HEX General 

3,11327 

3,111.43 

•ro.06 

Oslo 

OBX 

632.52 

636.74' 

-0.66 

London . 

FTSE 100 

4,657.00 

4.682.20 

-0-54 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

577 JO 

571.84 

+1.04 

Ulan 

MftTEL 

12930 

12717 

+1.67 

Parts 

CAC40 

2,751.74 

2.76^60 

*6.39 

Stockholm. 

SX 16 

3,123.63 

3.135.10 

-0.37 

Vienna 

ATX 

1,297.47 

1,30a39 

-0.45 

Zurich 

SPI 

3,430 JS 

3,400.56 

+0.87 

Source Tetekurs 


lnL.-injii.4i^ IL'ijU Intaov 

Very briefly: 


Olivetti to Stay in the Red for 1997 


2003, toe institute said. 
Separately, the Bundesbank said 
Wednesday in its monthly report for 
June that toe deficit of toe German 
federal government and of toe state 
governments rose to 34.5 billion 
Deutsche marks ($19.94 billion) in 
the first quarter, 8.5 billion DM more 
than in the year-earlier quarter. 

The central bank said the sharp 
deterioration called not only “for 
the continuation but also for the 
medium-term strengthening” of 
measures aimed at cutting spending. 
It forecast that the deficit this year 
“will exceed toe forecasts.” 

The wider deficit in toe first 
quarter was also due to lower tax 
receipts. Receipts in toe quarter were 
down more than 4 percent from a 
year earlier, toe central bank said. 


Qmghlal by Our Staff Firm 0t**tt*3 

IVREA, Italy — Olivetti SpA 
will remain unprofitable this year, 
toe company said Wednesday, as 
improvements in its information 
technology companies fail to offset 
losses in telecom operations. 

Roberto Colaninno, chief exec- 
utive, told shareholders at the annual 
meeting that 2997 would see a re- 
covery in profitability at its infor- 
mation technology interests. 

But Olivetti’s Telemedia and its 


5 percet 

mobile phone consortium would 
stay in the red for 1997. 

Shareholders approved a plan to 
write down its capital to reflect the 
losses. The company will cut toe 
no minal value of the shares to 640 
lire from 1,000 lire each. Share- 
holders will then change 25 old 
shares for 16 new ones. 

The writedown will enable the 
company to move money from its 
reserves to shareholder's equity. 


i posted 

lion lire ($540 million) last year, its 
sixth loss in a row, compared with a 
loss of 1.6 trillion lire in 1995. 

Under Italian law. if a company 
cannot cut its losses to less than one- 
third of its capital, it must reduce its 
capital. 

Mr. Colannino said the company 
would not ask shareholders for a 
capital increase. It has already asked 
shareholders for cash three times in 
six years. (Reuters. Bloomberg 1 


Iberia Leans Toward BA as Partner 


Agence France- Press? 

BARCELONA — The state-owned airline Iberia 
will have a foreign partner by August, and British 
Airways is one of the main contenders, Industry Min- 
ister Josep Pique said Wednesday. 

He said Air France had been a top contender but that 
toe election early this month of a Socialist government 
in France, which cast doubt on plans for the airline's 


privatization, made a partnership less likely. 

In April, Iberia’s president, Xabier de Iraia, said he 
hoped a European partner would acquire 1 0 percent to 
20 percent of the company’s capital. 

Last week, Iberia posted a profit for the first five 
months of the year, for toe first time in many years, of 
1.2 billion pesetas ($8.2 million), in contrast to a loss of 
5 billion pesetas in the like period last year. 


• LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton SA's shares fell 1.7 - 
percent, to i.507 francs (S258). after the French luxury goods ' 
company announced late Tuesday that it had bought 0.23 
percent of Grand Metropolitan Pl.C for £27.4 million - 
($44.9 million). Investors apparently feared that the purchase 
could hurt LVMH ’& retuni on equity: the newly acquired stake 
is linked to LVMH's opposition to a proposed merger of. 
GrandMet and Guinness PLC, whose biggest shareholder is 
LVMH. 

•British Sky Broadcasting Group PLCTs shares fell 8 
percent, to 5*22 pence, after a published report *aid British 
regulators had told Europe’s second-largest satellite broad- 
caster to abandon its interest in a digital-television venture. 

•VNU NV, the Dutch publisher of The Hollywood Reporter, . 
said it had bought Equifax Inc.'s National Decision Systems 
unit, for a price it did not disclose, and had a 1 0-year marketing 
agreement with toe U.S. -based parent. ’ 

• SAP AG, a German software maker hit last month by an 
insider-trading investigation, said it would take steps to pre- ... 
vent illicit share dealing by employees and management. 

•De Beers/Centenary AG. the world's largest diamond 
producer, said first-half diamond sales from its marketing unit 
rose 4.8 percent to a record $2.88 billion, reflecting buoyant \ 
retail sales in toe United States. 

• British consumers will begetting cheaper gas supplies, after., 

regulators ruled that gas transport levies charged by Transco. ( 
the pipeline and gas-transportation subsidiary' of BG PLC, 
should be cut by 2 1 percent Annual gas bills should fall by an t 
average of £29. \ 

• Turkey and Ukraine plan to build a pipeline from the 

Mediterranean to Ae Black Sea through Turkey to partly meet : 
Ukraine's crude-oil needs: the line would bypass Turkey’s ; 
congested Straits. Btvomberg. AFP. kvuttn .. 


= WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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822 832 
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643 645 

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11-57 UJ1 

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816 825 

1068 1074 

770 723 

138 142 

1X55 1153 
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117 522 

1-52 169 

461 454 

l. 92 2 

TOa 1228 
125 127 

540 SM 
132 524 

813 824 

874 877 

763 766 

361 145 

811 818 
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1140 1149 

637 840 

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565 566 

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1043 1849 
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349 8S2 

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1268 1188 

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ACESA 

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Aroentorta 

BBV 

Banestn 

Bofltonter 

BeoCenfroWsp 

BcnPoputa- 

BcnSortatoer 

CEPSA 

Cetotoatfe 

FEC5A 

GasKaSurrt 

Uterota 

Pryai 

RepvJ 

SevitanaElec 

Tfftoariero 

UntonFawo 

Uarinc Cement 


oho tadet 57780 
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27390 
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8100 
11200 
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31409 
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2830 
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26900 

1835 

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11060 

USD 

24510 

4915 

313S0 

427S 

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2780 

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10970 

128S 

29900 

1750 

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7680 

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26900 27440 
1870 1850 

5870 5SX 
8100 8020 
11160 11090 
1500 1495 
24830 24750 
5010 4970 

31580 31740 
4420 4345 
5070 5070 

2900 2S£) 

7600 7570 

11180 10970 
1330 1305 

31400 32520 
1790 1760 
2825 2825 
6440 6350 

1430 1400 

7680 7680 
4295 4255 
1305 1285 

2115 2100 


B1C 

BNP 

CanolPta 

Oiretour 

Catfno 

CCF 

Cetolem 

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CLF-DetoaFran 

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Elf-Aqultelne 

EridnntaBS 

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Eurotureia 

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UtoW 

Lewreiit 

LCracd 

LVMH 

Lwn-Eaux 

Wc bctoB 

Pnrita A 

Pernod FUami 

PBd^olOt 

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21X5 2250 2150 
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9X0 990 9X0 

91 JO 9150 92 

545 555 550 

7.10 7X0 7X0 

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74 75 75 

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36650 367X0 
704 704 

960 950 

229 235 

1052 1049 

4116 4125 

291 283 

244.90 243 

675 660 

927 941 

571 581 

1263 1275 
975 972 

621 635 

870 875 

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645 6X0 

724 733 

416JD 416X0 
776 802 

37860 377 

1049 1046 
2261 2254 

1507 1533 
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349 339.10 
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29830 29860 
599 tea 
2783 2744 

2168 2137 

148.90 10 
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201 197X0 
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314X0 320 JO 
1087 1042 

454 459 

626 628 
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298.10 296X0 
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151.90 15330 

546 558 

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297 



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393 38250 

383 

388 

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24 

241 

243 

24750 

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237 

732 

236 

23450 

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SandyfcB 

262 

252 

25850 

265 

212 

207 

2QR50 

211 JO 

Santa B 

228 

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226 

22550 

SCAB 

163 

161 

163 

16150 

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82 

81 

KJ 

8150 

SkandaFors 

27150 

267 

269 

270 

Smnska B 

3S5 

347 

34750 

353 

SKFB 

19750 

196 

19650 

195 

teateankeaA 

10 

190 

166 

190 

14450 

190 

14950 

190 

StoroA 

126 

123 

126 

124 

SvHareflesA 

231 

228 

230 

229 

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702 

197 

199 

19850 


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Amcor 
AHZBBmj 
BHP 
B art 

BranUestad. 
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cc/_._ 

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Comalco 
CSR 

Fosters Brew 
GoodemRd 
KJ Audndo 
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Not Aust Saak 
NtaMutuW Hdg 
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PreSfic Dontop 
PtoneerlnH 
PebBroodenst 
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WMC 


ABOnBntes: 2673X1 
Piwrisw26nJ0 

861 8X0 8X5 £43 

9.72 9X8 9J5 9.70 

19X1 19.15 19X7 19X0 
4X2 <12 <15 <25 

25X0 25X6 25X9 25X0 
15X1 14X6 15X5 15.19 
15.90 15X1 15X5 1570 
<72 6X0 6X7 <62 

7.16 7.W MO 7.15 

5.10 5J2 5JB £13 


The Trib Index 

Pm s as of 300 PM Met Vor-c rims 

Jsn 1. 1992-100 

Laval 

Chongs 

% change 

year to date 
% Change 

+1509 

World Index 

■ V7259- 

. .. _ -3j00 • 

-0.57 - 

Regional Indexes 

Asia/Paatic 

12B.56 

-0.68 

-0.53 

+4.16 

Europe 

17856 

+0.18 

+010 

+10.58 

N. America 

202.98 

-2.74 

-1 33 

+25.37 

S. America 

Industrial indexes 

167.56 

-0.98 

-0.58 

+46.43 

Capital goods 

214.95 

-1.75 

-O.01 

+25.76 

Consumer goods 

194.08 

-127 

-0.65 

+20.23 

Energy 

206.73 

■1.85 

-0.89 

+21.10 

Finance 

128 40 

-0.38 

-0.30 

+10.25 

Miscellaneous 

160.96 

-0.56 

-0.33 

+4.44 

Ban Materials 

184.89 

-1.15 

-0.62 

+5.42 

Service 

163.50 

-0.24 

-0.15 

+19.06 

Ufflies 

151.63 

-107 

-0.70 

+5.69 

77m bteingfana/ Herak! Tntxjv World Swot" Index iC trades the U S dollar values ot 
2B0 tnternaxmeBy invearable stocks front 2£ countries For mere information, a Irse 
booklet is restores by wnbrtg to The 70 Index, tat A venue Clones ds GfluSe, 

32521 NeuBv Codex. France. 


Compted by Bloomberg Netvs. 

High 

Low One 

Pm. 

High Low 

Oms p rev. 


253 

2X8 

2X9 

252 

MBsul Fudosn 

1560 

1530 

1540 

1X1 

1.78 

1X1 

1X0 

Mitsui Trua 

866 

845 

846 

12AS 

2710 

1238 

1258 

1232 

MunrtBMfg 

4830 

4780 

+mn 

2615 

27.12 

26X1 

NEC 

1660 

160 

1630 

2X5 

1.97 

2X4 

201 

NtaHi 

1950 

1890 

1940 

1SX2 

18X5 

78X5 

MX5 

NMoSec 

685 

667 

m 

1.97 

1.94 

1X6 

1.96 

Nintendo 

9600 

9380 

9470 

<17 

3X4 

<06 

155 

<14 

3X1 

<09 

170 


937 

636 

923 

630 

926 

631 

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4X0 

4X5 

4X3 

Nippon Steel 

30 

344 

344 

735 

7.10 

7.15 

735 

Nissan Motor 

B04 

782 

796 

2335 

22-99 

2333 

2310 

NKK 

240 

235 

237 

axo 

831 

837 

836 

NomwuSec 

1480 

1460 

1470 


BJ9 8X5 

7.79 7.71 7X5 

11.08 1898 11X5 

4X8 <18 <25 


8JS 

7.79 

11 

<30 


Mexico 

Alfa A 

IWryrl B 
Cemex CFO 

CIraC 

EmpModemo 
GpoCresoAl 
GpoFBa»er 
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51X0 
2880 
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11X2 
41 J5 
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2-16 
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31.75 
110X0 
18X4 


B0Mlodae42<rj4 
PrevtWK 427643 

50J0 51 JO 51X0 
2QXS 2ftS 2080 
31X5 32X0 37X0 
11X8 1180 1180 
4870 41X0 4890 
0.10 48JC 4840 
2ja 2.13 no 
2850 2870 2980 
31J0 31X5 31 iS 
116X0 11850 117X0 
18X4 18X3 18X0 


ssof ® 1 " 0 -XSS!S!tS Ta!pei 


Stedi Mortal tedan 8712X9 
Previous: 8679.24 


PM 

PM 


?X5 


Sts- 


Milan 


MIB 


Bco Comm U 
Bca Hdeoram 
Bcntaftoroa 
Benetton 
Credte ttaOrew 


ENI 

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IMI 
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mearooorm 

Mreiteteon 

O&rort 

PannaU 

PtreS 

RAS 

Roto Banco 
S Paolo Torino 
Sltf 

TtaKOTtUta 

TIM 


12300 

3585 

4630 

1215 

26700 

3000 

B430 

9385 

6140 

29850 

15680 

2688 

5475 

7250 

10250 

1078 

485 

2545 

4160 

13780 

wooo 

11525 

9605 

5245 

5580 


11780 

3500 


2340 

8190 

9156 

SB8S 

29150 

15250 

2580 

5330 

7150 

9815 

WS7 

440 

3990 

13365 

18510 

11115 

7190 

5015 

5350 


i: 

1271780 

12230 1HR5 
3565 3580 

4615 4530 
1213 1109 

56700 25600 
3000 2875 
8430 8260 

9300 9230 
6140 6106 

29650 29658 
15600 15400 
2680 2590 

5475 5410 

7345 7U5 

10150 9980 
1077 1068 

460 467 

254S 
4150 
13775 1 
19000 T 
11525 1 
9600 
5245 5070 
5580 5390 


lCruz 
TetabraPM 
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77 JO 
18X0 
59100 
SB4J0 
532X1 
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31800 
185.99 
3520 
11.10 
157 JO 
187.00 
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39X5 
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2£00 


9X0 9.790 
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5450 5100 
75.90 76X0 
18X0 18J0 
574X0 582X0 
575X0 56000 
529X0 531X0 
427X0 427X0 
301X0 305X0 
TBOX01B2J10 
3480 35X0 
11.10 11.10 
153X0 155JQ 
179X0 185X0 
16490 168X3 
348X0 355X0 
39X0 3935 
1052 10X3 
2455 24J5 


9X0 

838X0 

7780 

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595X0 

571X0 

531X0 

437X0 

310X0 

181X0 

35290 

11.10 

15SX0 

180X0 

16560 

348X0 

39X0 

10X4 

25.10 


Grthof Life tat 
OwieHwoBlc 
CMooTtngBk 

ajnogweOw’t 

Chinn Seel 
FW Barrie 
Formosa Ptasflc 
HwNonBk 
MOmwiBk 
NmYnPlosrics 

ToTung 

ITttMxroEtec 

UMWbridChin 


154 10 

ii6J0 m 

48J0 66 

129 12150 
2810 27X0 


150 153 

114 115 

67 68 

129 123J0 
27X0 2810 


115 113 113J0 113 

7X50 7150 75 74 

11450 11150 111 50 11250 
68 66 66 67 

89 84 2750 84 

9650 93 9350 9550 

113 10850 111 10850 

5656 55 55 56 


Seoul 

Doran 

Doem Heavy 

KreeaBPvrr 
KoM&diBk 
Korea Mob Tet 
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BC 77311 

PreVtaOR 79219 

104500 90000100000 98000 
B430 7990 7690 
27000 24700 24700 26000 
15300 14100 14200 15300 
29200 20100 29000 29000 
6940 6330 Mg 

455000 425000 425000 43SJOO 
43700 38S00 38500 41800 
63900 61500 61900 62900 
51000 <7000 ew 5BCD0 
75000 7WO0 72»0 73300 
12400 11500 11700 12400 


Singapore simfc'nwifcWis.M 


Proving; 280426 


Montreal 


Bat Mob Com 
CdnTlreA 
QteOSA 
CTFWSvc 
Gaz MeJm 
GFWert Utaco 32X0 
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Matt Bk Cano* 


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2714 

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31.15 
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41M 41X5 4L10 
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35X0 35XS 35X5 
3SM 3515 XVr 
1710 17M 1755 

39^ 39X5 39X0 
31.15 31.15 3W 
21X0 21X0 22.10 
17.10 1710 ITU 
3335 33X0 3190 
33 33X5 36 

26 2<!J 

9X0 9X0 9X0 

60 60X5 6030 


Oslo 

AJtaf A 

■BateHHWA 

OifisteK 


OBXbdBC 63252 
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StagAbtandMi 
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IA 

KnanrerMa 

HonblMo 

ImORKQ « 

OrttiAteA 
Petal CeoSvc 

TrensoceffliQ B 
Starehrato A h 


132 131 JO 
168 166 
2180 2X0 
29.10 23X0 
139 13650 
4450 44 

422 415 

*3 37950 
258 256 

105 103 

552 5C 
316 3K50 
10 136J0 

520 520 

4<70 4530 


132 133 

1U 167 . 
2170 23X0 
2810 2916 
138 139 JO 
44 MM 
415 420 

382 381 

256. SO 
TO 105 

■» IS 

UlM 


Utd todtatrkrt 
UtdOfwBkF 
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103 M20 
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178 122 
4X6 <84 
196 178 
15 14J0 
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192 

£56 £54 
134 338 
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<25 <25 

<80 7 

1110 1130 
1<2D K20 
0X9 0X9 

IB 1810 
4X2 <70 
1030 1010 
2X7 £59 
7X0 7X0 

3X4 188 

<10 <15 

177 2X0 

<86 4X4 
182 3X6 
14X0 14X0 
8X0 8X0 
640 <25 

<45 <50 

1110 1130 
<35 <50 
» 28X0 
192 190 

£ £ 
108 1X6 
15 1520 
<18 <22 


Tokyo 

Atewmoto 
Al Nippon Air 
Arrowy 
Aeobi ELrek 
AstfCbem 
A*rt*Gte 

DK TOKDnflfnQ 

Bridpestoe 

Caoon 

QwbuDec 

awodarEkc 

Dnif^pPiW 

DOW 

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BZc 

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nonaa 
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Stockholm 


AfiAB 

ABBA 

ssssr 

&s~ A 


gHtateimfl 

Pierian: 3135.18 

10150 181 102 101 JD 

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1 INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1997 

* 1 t fyi | 

PAGE 17 

ASIA/PACIFIC 

UP i si/X j 



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China Seeks to Join 
Hong Kong’s Hongs 

State Firm Adds a Bank to the Mix 


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Coep&tywS&rnBtDbfetrtos 

} HONG KONG — China Re- 
sources Enterprises Lid., the invest- 
: meot arm of China's Foreign Trade 
I, Ministry, said Wednesday it would 
1; buy a stake in a Hong Kong bank for 
■: 2 billion Hong Kong dollars ($258 
million). 

By adding Hong Kong Chinese 

• Book Ltd. to a stable of businesses 
; [bat Includes property development 

* and food and beverages, China Re- 
sources is shaping up as a powerful 
conglomerate to rival Hong Kong's 

'■ biggest companies, or hongs, such' 
as Tandine Matheson Holdings Ltd. 

; “We want to become a ccnglom- 
2 erate and take part in the financial- 
services industry/' the chairman of 
- k China Resources, Zhu Youlan, said, 

■} '*Tbe only way we can do it is to 
*■' gain control of HKCB.” 

The move underscores China's 
- determination to establish its own 
\ conglomerates in Hong Kong, 
which returns to Chinese sover- 
eignty July 1. With holdings in 
: Hoag Kong banks, China can in- 
. troduce expertise to its own banking 
system, which has been slow to de- 
; velop commercial practices after 
■ years of state planning. 

\ “Beijing has an intrinsic agenda 
> to develop hongs like Jardme's,” 
; said C.Y. Ho, head of Hong Kong 
. and China equities at UBS Secu- 
; rities (Bast Asia) Ltd. It wants these 
big t rading companies to play a role 
■{ in banking reform, he said. 

■ China Resources will buy 50 per- 
’ cent of Hong Kong Chinee Bank 
F and rename it China Resources 


Bank, Miss Zhu said. Chinn Re- 
sources is buying the stake from its 
own parent company, China Re- 
sources Holdings Ltd. 

It is not clear how the restructuring 
will affect the other owner of the 
bank, HKCB Bank Holding Co. 
Lippo Group Ltd. of Indonesia owns 
59 percent of HKCB Bank Holding. 

China Resources will increase its 
stake further in a share transaction 
with Lippo Group, Miss Zhu said, 
bat details of that transaction have 
notyet been agreed upon . 

China Resources has steadily 
bought assets from its parent, rap- 
idly increasing its profit and lifting 
its market value. 

The market capitalization of the 
company has surged to 41.5- billion 
dollars, reflecting a 20-fold jump in 
its stock since Januaiy 1995. 

“All major Chinese corporations 
want a bank under them; it’s a cor- 
porate imperative,” said Andrew 
Kuet, analyst at Deutsche Morgan 
Grenfell Asia Securities (HK) ird- 

It is not clear whether the* trans- 
action was fairly valued, be said. 
HKCB is now trading at 27 times its 
1996 earnings per share. Hang Seng 
Bank Ltd., one of the territory’s 
biggest banks, trades at 21 times 
earnings. 

Miss Zhu said the parent bad 
agreed to sell the stake at just 105 
times earnings. 

She did not say, however, wheth- 
er she was referring to forecast earn- 
ings for this year or to actual earn- 
ings for last year. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 



Aputpnl Waa"fK*J*atcn 

PEDDLING HIS WARES — A cydo driver taking a break 
Wednesday in a slum area in Ho Chi Minh City. Vietnam’s 
reforms, introduced in 1986, have made many people wealthy 
but have widened the gap between the rich and poor. 

Nike Supplier Lays Off 447 Workers 

Agence France- Presse 

HANOI — A South Korean supplier making shoes exclusively for 
Nike Inc. in Vietnam has fired 447 workers at its Ho Chi Minh City 
factory, a report said Wednesday. 

According to the official labor union newspaper, Lao Dong, the 
workers are to be laid off this month after the end of their ap- 
prenticeships and to be paid roughly $12 in compensation. 

The supplier, Sam Yang Co., has nearly 6.COO employees in its 
factory in tbeCu Chi district of Ho Chi Minh City. The firings there are 
only the latest of several labor problems involving Nike and its 
suppliers in Vietnam. 

In April, workers at Sam Yang staged a two-day strike over work 
conditions, which were then under negotiation. Reports at the time said 
3,000 workers had walked off the job, but Sam Yang put the figure at 
800. Nike appointed a labor-practices manager in Vie tnam last year to 
help oversee conditions for 35,000 workers in five factories. 


World Bank 
Is Bullish on 
Indonesian 
Economy 


Reuters 

JAKARTA — Indonesia can be- 
come one of the world's 20 largest 
economies if it maintains current 
growth rates through 2005, the 
World Bank said Wednesday. 

“The Indonesian economy is cur- 
rently performing very well,’’ the 
World Bank report said in its annual 
report. “Real growth continues 
strong, overall reflation is down, 
external confidence is high, foreign 
direct investment is robust- “ 

It added that if Indonesia's econ- 
omy continued to grow by 75 per- 
cent a year on average through 2005, 
animal per capita income would 
more than double in current prices to 
$2300. 

But the report warned that slower 
economic growth was possible. It 
said that a decline in the growth rate 
to 5 percent could easily come from 
a drop in productivity. 

■ Complaints About Taxes 

The European Union, Japan and 
the United States have asked In- 
donesia to lower import duties for 
car components and luxury taxes on 
imported cars, die Indonesian min- 
ister of trade and industry, Tunky 
Ariwibowo said, Bloomberg News 
reported. Indonesia is studying the 
proposals, he said. 

The three parties have lodged 
complaints at the World Trade Or- 
ganization, saying Indonesia's 
policies breach open-market com- 
mitments. 


Investor’s Asia 



'j FU AMJ 
1997 


1 J F M A M j‘ F 'mTM'J 

1997 1997 


Exetangh '• 

index 

Wednesday Prw. % 

Oobb dose '".Change 

HbngKoog 

Hang Seng 

■ 1<U03^9/ -A 7 ? 

Stagapw® 

Straits Times. 

: 1,985.14 2JQM28 -0JB5 

Sydney . . 

^Ordinaries 

2JBT2M iSBI.70 -Q* 1 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 ' 

■ 20/497.85 20,593.68 -&47 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1JJ88.12 iJXXX +1-04 

Baugfceic 

SET- 

462.94 " 497X2. •Z®! 

Seoul 

Composite Index 

■7734ff 78829... *241 

Talpd . • 

Slock Mffikst index »,7t3yw . lysra* ■ ■«««] 

Manna 

FS£ 

2^23-25 2.798^5 +0.80 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

710L79 t-RjaOB; 

Woffington - 

NZSE-40 

2AOOL21 2^68J» 

Bombay 

Sensitive Index 

AJ382JS0 AfiSTM *0,13 

Source : Teletairs 


(mpniahnul ffadJ Tnfttmc 

Very briefly; 


Hong Kong Exchange Sees Itself as China’s International Bourse 


I 




? f, t \ : : 

c ft i ~ c ~ 

T . . 

c {; r - 

r„ I? e* .== i.; 

F 5 r 7 7" 


Reuters 

HONG KONG — The 
stock exchange said Wednes- 
day that it would be China’s 
international bourse after the 
territory was returned to 
Chinese rule July I, with 
mainland exchanges playing a 
domestic role. 

“Hong Kong would still be 
die international financial cen- 
ter for China, and we will keep 
on performing our role to as- 
sist die Chinese companies to 
raise capital/' said Alec Tsui, 
chief executive of the stock 


exchange. “Shanghai will ul- 
timately be the national ex- 
change, and Hong Kong will 
ultimately be the intpmnrirvnfll 
exchange for China,” he said. 
“We should be complement- 
ing each other rather than 


rtiile, the deputy gov- 
ernor of China ’s central tank. 
Choi Yuan, said in an article 
published in the Beijing-based 
Financial News that Shanghai 
would not soon be Hong 
Kong’s equal in status. 

“From a short-term point of 


view, or at least until the ren- 
minbi becomes a fully freely 
convertible currency, it will 
not be possible fra Shanghai to 
become an international fi- 
nance center,” Mr. Chen said. 
Tbe renminbi is the official 
Chinese term for the yuan. 

Mr. Tsui predicted that the 
next five years would be the 
most interesting in the ex- 
change’s history as Hong 
Kong and China become 
more closely integrated- 
investors appear equally ex- 
cited about the market’s firene. 


bi ddin g tbe blue-chip H ang 
Seng Index up to record highs 
this year while anticipating 
greater growth opportunities 
on the mainland after Hong 
Kong's reversion to China. 

According to a poll conduc- 
ted by Reuters, the Hang Seng 
is expected to be the best per- 
former of all major world in- 
dexes in 1 997 and 1998, with a 
30 percent rise forecast in tbe 
next 18 months. 

“Hong Kong currently is 
at the right place at the right 
tune,” Mr. Tsui said. 


“The territory plays a key 
role in the movement of li- 
quidity flows to die mainland 
and other regional centers and 
is sitting on the doorstep of 
China's burgeoning econo- 
my. 

“We are easily accessible 
into China. We have all the 
expertise basically from the 
legal background, the ac- 
counting background and also 


die technology background, 
and also financial services in- 
dustries are concentrated in 
Hong Kong.” Hong Kong's 
closer ties to China have led 
to a flurry of listings of main- 
land-linked enterprises in the 
territory, and investors have 
been snapping up stocks of 
China-related companies this 
year, expanding their market 
capitalization. 


• Japan's Finance Ministry banned Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank 
Ltd. from bidding for or underwriting 10-year government 
bo nds as a p unish ment for making loans to a corporate 
extortionist who then allegedly used the funds to blackmail 
Nomura Securities Co. 

• Honda Motor Co. may make fewer vehicles than it orig- 
inally planned next month, saying the increase in Japan's 
consumption lax in April had hurt sales more than expected. 

• Seibu Department Stores Ltd. of Japan sold the fashion 
house Jean-Louis Scherrer to EK Finance, a French com- 
pany grouping designer clothing and shoe manufacturers. 

• Okamoto Industries Inc. of Japan will ask the U.S. Food 
and Drug Administration to retract a warning about leaks in its 
Careplus condoms, saying its own tests on condoms shipped 
to America had not found any such problems. 

• QNI Ltd. of Australia is to merge with the nickel-producing 

arm of Gencor Ltd., giving the South African mining group 
control of the company. AFP. Reuters Bloomberg 

Bakun Dam Rights Issue Canceled 

Agence Fnince-Presse 

KUALA LUMPUR — The chairman of Malaysia's Bakun 
dam project said Wednesday the directors of the project had 
decided not to issue rights for extra shares after its taring on 
the stock exchange. 

“We wifi use other instruments to raise funds,” said Ting 
Pek Khiing, executive chairman of Ekran Bhd., owner of a 32 
percent stake in Bakun Hydro-Electric Corp. He did not say 
why tbe rights issue had been canceled. “The Bakun project 
will go on with or without the initial public offer/' he said. 
“We already have the shareholders' funds. 




.i . 


t- 


i 


Congratulations 

TO THE WINNER 

of the International 
Herald Tribune’s 1997 

SURVEY PRIZE DRAW 

. ‘/,y 

> Mr J. Paoli, 

ZL. Alicante, 

Spain s7 

S'/fl i\'V X 

A case of Taittinger Champagne 
is on its way to you. 

And a big thank you 
to all 4,036 readers 
who took the time 
to complete our 
questionnaire. 



CHAMPAGNE 

TAITTINGER 

_n i_i iff — 1 i "* mL 



TPir gompg DAILY NEWSPAPER 


. . This announcement appears asjunatter of meant, only . . 


March 1997 



api IU 1 MHA 


api ENERGIA S.pjV. 





api 


Lit 1,003 billion 
Project Credit Facilities 


Arranged by 

ABN AMRO Bank N.V. Banca Nazionale del Lavoro SpA 
Chase Investment Bank Limited Istituto Bancario San Paolo di Torino SpA 
Mediocredito Centrale SpA NatWest Markets Union Bank of Switzerland 

Domestic funding supported by 

European Investment Bank 

Lead Managers 

ABN AMRO Bank N.V. Banca Nazionale del Lavoro SpA The Chase Manhattan Bank 
Istituto Bancario San Paolo di Torino SpA Mediocredito Centrale SpA National Westminster Bank Pic 
Union de Banques Suisses (Luxembourg) S.A. Banca Antoni ana Popolare Veneta 

Banca Commentiale 1 tab ana SpA Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA Fiiiak di Roma CARIPLO SpA 
Mediocredito Lombardo SpA Rabobank International Banco Ambrosiano Veneto SpA 
Banca di Roma Gmppo Cun di Riipxrmio di Roma Bank of Scotland 
Bayerische Hypotheken- und Wechsel-Bank Aktiengesellschaft Bayeriscbe Landesbank Girozentrale Filial c di Milano 

Bayeriscbe Vereinsbank AG BZW - Barclays Bank PLC Creditanstalt-Bankverein Credit Local de France 
Credit Ly onnais S A. Credit© Italian s SpA DG BANK Deutsche Genossenschaftsbank 

Diesdner KJeinwort Benson Generate Bank Mnao Branch HELABA Landesbank Hcssen-ThOringen Girozentrale 

ING Barings Krediettank Project Finance MeesPierson NV NationsBank Europe Ltd Rolo Banca 1473 SpA 
Socidrl G&teraJe - m am SQdwestdeutscfae Landesbank Girozentrale Tbe Bank ofTokyo-Mitsubishi. Ltd. 

The Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank, Ltd The Royal Bank of Scotland pic The Sakura Bank, Limited 

Managers 

ABB Export Bank INTERBANCA Banca per Hnanziamenti a Medio e Lungo Pennine SpA 
The Samitomo B ank, limited AIB Capital Markets pic Special Finance Unit Banca Popolare di Novara SCaRL 
Bank Austria Banque Nationale de Paris Centrebanca SpA Korea Fust Bank 
i «n«Wrank Rhrinland-Pfalz Girozentrale Nomura Bank International pic Scotiabank (U JL) Limited 
The Industrial Bank of Japan, Limited The Mitsubishi Trust & Banking Corporation (Europe) SA 
The Nikko Bank (UK) pic Union Europfienne de CIC Wesnteutsche Landesbank Girozentrale 

Co-Managers 

Banca CIS SpA Banca Popolare di Sondrio Banco Central Hispanoamericano SA. - Milan Branch 
Banqne Cantooale Vandoise Berliner Bank Aktiengesellschaft CAB Society per Azioni 
Cassi di Rispannio di Parma ft Piacenza Christiania Bank og Kreditkasse ASA O&lit Agricole indosuez - MUm Brandi 
DSL Bank GiroCredit Bank AG The Fuji Bank, Ltd. Milan Brandi The Tokai Bank. Limited 

Facility Agent 
NatWest Markets 


— - -V 









PAGE 18 



Monica Seles hitting a back- 
hand to Naoku Sawamatsu. 


Muster Withdraws 


tennis Thomas Muster and Jen- 
nifer Capriati are both out of next 
week's Wimbledon Champion- 
ships because of injury, a Wimble- 
don official said on Wednesday. 

Sixth-seed Muster has with- 
drawn because of an injury to his 
left hip. Swede Jonas Bjorkman 
will come in seeded 17. 

Capriati pulled out with a leg 


injury. Her place will be filled by an 
additional player bom the auali- 


additional player bom the quali- 
fying tournament. 

• Iva Majoli, the French Open 
champion, slumped out of the East- 
bourne grasscourt championships 
on Wednesday and complained 
about what she saw as a snub. 

Majoli. the third seed, lost 6-2 7- 
5 to Belarussian Natasha Zvereva 
on Court T wo. 1 0 days after beating 
Martina Hingis in Paris to win her 
fust Grand Slam title. 

After her defeat Majoli said: ”1 
was so disappointed. I expected to 
get a chance to play on Centre 
Court not an outside court Even if 
my dog won the French Open he 
would deserve to play on Centre 
Court. I just think it's not fail.” 

Top seed Monica Seles was on 
Centre Court and began her defense 
of the title with a straightforward 6- 
2 7-5 victory over Japan’s Naoko 
Sawamatsu. Venus Williams lost in 
three sets to Frenchwoman Nath- 
alie Tauziat 6-3 5-7 6-4. 

• Pat Cash, the 1 987 Wimbledon 
champion, fought back to beat 
American Steve Campbell at Roe- 
hampton in the second round of the 
qualifying tournament for this 
year's Championships. Cash won 
4-6. 6-2. 1 1-9. (AFP. Reuters. AP) 


A Very Rich Teenager 


basketball Tracy McGrady, 
an 1 8-year old high school student 
who has entered the NBA draft, has 
signed a S12 million endorsement 
deal with Adidas, a spokesman for 
the shoe company said. 

The 6-foot-8 forward is expected 
to be among ihe first 15 players 
selected in the NBA draft. 

Sonny Vicaro. a director of 
sports marketing with Adidas, said 
the deal was worth a maximum of 
S2 million per year. 

"After we signed the contract, 1 
told my coach I can’t believe what 1 
just did." said McGrady. “Man, 
this is happening too fast.” (AP) 


Sports 


[World Roundup 


At Cricket’s Cathedral 


Talk of Noisy Chants 

English Play Old Foe by Old Rules 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — Cricket is unfathom- 
able to much of the world. This is 
because the sport is impossible to 
explain. It can, however, be analyzed to 
death, as it was Wednesday in the pres- 
ence of the England captain, Michael 
Atherton. 

If Atherton leads England to victory 
in the five-day Test match against Aus- 
tralia. the home team will take a com- 
manding 2-0 lead in the six-match sum- 
mu' series. To do so will require some- 


Vantage Point 


thing like a miracle, because the second 
Test begins Thursday ar Lord’s, the 
home of English cricket, where, para- 
doxically, the English have managed to 
beat the visiting Aussies once this cen- 
tury. They meet every four years at 
Lord’s and yet England hasn’t won there 
since 1934. Therefore Atherton needs 
every little advantage be can find. 

In the first Test, less than two weeks 
ago, he found great help from the crowd 
in Birmingham, which cheered, sang 
and chanted England to a startling vic- 
tory. At last the English had hit upon a 
winning formula — or so the captain 
hoped against hope when he told re- 
porters during Wednesday’s training, 
“Obviously. I would like to see support 
behind the home team for sure.” 

What do you mean by that? he was 
asked. 

“Certainly.” Atherton said, “if the 
Australians play good cricket, the fans 
should appreciate it. But good folk will 
show their support for the home 
team.” 

It became the issue of the day. How 
would he feel about the English fans 
booing the Australians? 

“I don’t want to see that.’’ Atherton 
said. So, what did he want then? 
Singing? Soccer chants? How sporting 
was it to subject the Australians to noise 
while they were trying to bat? 

“I'm all for getting behind Devon 
Malcolm as he’s running up to bowl,” 
Atherton said of his teammate. “It up- 
lifts ihe guy.” 

The lonesome American reporter 
standing al the back of this lighthearted 
grilling found it all a little difficult to 
understand- The American remembered 
the story of Jose Canseco, the American 
baseball star on a visiting game at Yan- 
kee Stadium, who got into an argument 
when a fan asked in belligerent, shouting 
detail about his recent date with 
Madonna. The American thought about 
the two World Series in Minnesota which 
required ear plugs, because the fans had 
combined to make the indoor stadium 
sound like the inside of a jet engine. 

In America, itself a former colony 


U.K. Boxer in Critical Condition 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — The British Medical 
Association renewed its call for a ban on 
boxing Wednesday after a British fight- 
er was left in critical condition with 
brain injuries suffered in the ring. 

Chris Henry, 28, was listed as “crit- 
ical but stable’’ at London’s Qldchurch 
Hospital after surgery to remove a blood 
clot from his brain. 

Henry was rushed to the hospital 
Tuesday night following a punishing 
loss to fellow Briton Dominic Negus in 
the defense of his southern England 
cruLserweight title. 

Henry was bleeding from the mouth 


after taking a sustained attack from 
Negus in the 10th round. He crashed 
into the ropes and almost went down as 
referee Tony Walker stopped the fight 

“We continue to be very concerned 
about the type of injuries boxers such as 
Mr. Henry receive in the ring.” BMA 
spokesman Dr. Bill O’Neill said. “And 
it is why we repeat ourcall for a total ban 
on the sport” 

The last British boxer to die from a 
fight-related injury was James Murray in 
October 1995. He was taken off life 
support two days after being knocked 
out in the final round by Drew Docherty 
in their British bantamweight title fight. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

l Deep-six 
8 ‘I Ain't 
Marching 
Anymore" 
singer 

IB Exult (over) 
14 Puppeteer 
Lewis 


19 Versifier 
16 Hearty 

companion 
*7 Golden Horde 
member 

18 n begins "In the 
first year of 
Cyrus King of 
Persia 


AGENCE CHAMPS &YSEE5 
Ftrsshed apartments, 3 months or 


more or urtumtaheri. residental areas. 


IB 'O parna nua" 
singer 
20 General 

description of a 
26-. 46- or 
63- Across 

23' ! Come 

back'" (1953 
movie fine) 

33 Diner 

26 See 20- Across 

30 Come apart 

31 Promo pro 
32 ‘Have a good 

timer 

as Like good 
burgundy 
38 Trig ratios 

40 Gilbert of 
"Roseanne" 

41 Catalogue 
lustration 

43 Carries 
as Sidekick 
46 See 2Q- Across 
48 Pitch tents 

32 Le Quai des 
Tulleries 
adjoins it 

53 See 20 -Across 

57 Dark forces 

58 Promise, e g. 

58 Extreme 

as It may be due 
on a duplex 
84 Pan of CPU 

86 Some athletic 
shoes 

•br precedes 
qustro. In Rio 

87 Raspberry — 

' 68 Certain 

retirement plan 


Tet Paris: +33(0)1 42 2532 25 
Fax Paris: +33 (0)1 4S 63 37 OS 


1 747 alternative 

2 Pan ota 
repealed dance 
movement 

3 Deserter 

4 1994 Peace 
Nobeiiat 


5 h might bite the 
hand that feeds 
it 

s Tiade grp since 
9/14/60 
7 Homey 
a What a drover 
drives 
S Rude one 
ie Jumps on 
it More chips for 
the pot 

12 Bom earlier 
l than) 
is Pooped 

21 Base 
negotiating 
amounts 

22 Slip (into) 

23 Irish county 

24 Crossed one's 
fingers 

» Stuff 

27 Farrier, e.g. 

28 Tonkin delta 
city 

22 "You're — 
talk!" 

3340's foe 

34 Spier 

35 Brown 
alternative 

37 Bankers' 
woes 
3» ’Got" 

42 Naive one 
44 Explore caves 

47 Little one 

48 Actress Langtry 

49 First president 

of the German 
republic. 1919 
ao'Vfhenp>gs ft V' 
si Queeg's 
minesweeper 

54 Skeletal unit 

55 Former Israeli 
PM. 

Be Street in New 
York's Chinatown 
80 W B.A. decision 



• byPltrtc* Jenfan 

QNew York Timea/EdUed by Will Short*. 


Solution to Puzzle of June 18 


a* CoKee order. 
Abbr. 


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Cy> 



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which deviated from the myth of cricket 
long ago, winning is everything. In Eng- 
land winning is not the only thing. The 
public ambition to beat the Aussies 
seems to have released in the officials at 
Lord’s a sense of impending doom. 
They have announced that any undue 
outbursts of emotion directed at Aus- 
tralia — hissing, booing and chanting — 
will result in ejection. 

Every second year the Australians 
and the English meet, alternating be- 
tween hosts, over the trophy of the 
Ashes, which is a small urn kept in the 
museum at Lord's. Within the urn, sup- 
posedly. are the Ashes of a cricket ball 
or bail cremated more than a century 
ago following Australia's first victory 
on English soil over a full-strength Eng- 
land team. It was inspired by a young 
London jour nalis t who wrote at the 
time: “In affectionate remembrance of 
English cricket which died at The Oval, 
29th August, 1882. Deeply lamented by 
a large circle of sorrowing friends and 
acquaintances, R.LP. 

“The body will be cremated and the 
Ashes taken to Australia.” 

If the rivalry suggests the opportunity 
for the Australians to build their own 
identity as a nation, then for the English 
it harks back to their days as an imperial 
power. To this day. each side is trying to 
win something at the expense of the 
other. It is a gentlemanly conflict and 
the cathedral palace of Lord's presides 
over iL 

In the last century the former colonists 
have wanted to over-run the palace more 
eagerly than the English have been vail- 
ing to defend iL A key player for Aus- 
tralia is Shane Wame. who spins the ball 
more accurately and creatively — turn- 
ing cm a sharp angle, occasionally be- 
hind die batsman’s legs — than any 
other bowler in the world. He has not 
been al his best lately: the spinning is 
murder on his ring finger and shoulder. 

On Thursday Atherton will be making 
his England-record 42d appearance as 
team captain, a record set in four years 
which indicates to some extent how dif- 
ficult it is to maintain command in Eng- 
lish cricket. As captain he is in charge of 
strategy, deciding who will play, when 
they will bat and bowl and where they 
will field. How many other sports put as 
much responsibility in one player? His 
overall salary is estimated at no more 
than £150.000, which makes him the 
highest-paid cricketer in England. 

“Often cm match days I get to the 
ground a bit early to work on my own 
game,” he said. He then revealed, in a 
way, die differing pressures of modem 
American baseball and timeless English 
crickeL “Often it can be an advantage to 
be worrying about other players. It 
means you aren’t worrying about your- 
self. Sometimes you can worry too much 
about your own game. ’ ’ 


• v •• - 

rt -* + ■ 

T - •*• •• 
i *.V ■. ■■ 



Shane Wame working out Wednesday with an Australian Rules football. 


Sunday at the Bike Race: 
Eat, Drink and Be Philly 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 


PHILADELPHIA — A big tree, a 
sycamore by the dessicated look of it, 
uprooted itself and tumbled onto the 
course during the bicycle race in Phil- 
adelphia on Sunday. With about a third 
of the 156-mile race still to be run. there 
the tree lay on the road below the Art 
Museum in Fairmount Park. 

“About 800 people attacked that tree 
and moved it right off the road,” said a 
race official. “They were like ants, 
pulling the branches and manhandling 
the trunk back onto the grass.” 

When whai was left of the 150-man 
pack swept through minutes later, com- 
ing down Lemon Hill off the Schuylkill 
River, the road was clear. 

“Those people came to see this bi- 
cycle race and they weren’t about to let 
a tree get in the way,” the official said. 

That sums up the spirit of the Core- 
States USPRO Championship, which 


“There’s a bicycle race, grab a beer 
and watch for six hours,” somebody 
said. “There isn’t a bicycle race, grab a 
beer and don’t watch for six hours. ” 

A lot of beers were grabbed Sunday. 
A lot of food, too. Despite the 80 degree 
heat, people worked over grills to make 
and sell cheeses teaks, a Philadelphia 
staple that takes some gening used to. 


sausage- and-pepper-and-optional- 
onion sandwiches, barbecue and 


onion sandwiches, barbecue and bar- 
becued ribs, soft pretzels, Italian ices, 
hot dogs, crab cakes and bougie sand- 
wiches, whose name seems to be as 
obscure as the luncheon meat within. 

People also throw private parties, as a 
first-time visitor learned when he fol- 
lowed his nose down an alley between 
houses and found a man making omelets 
on an outdoor stove. “It’s my own 


party,” he said, “for my neighbors and 
friends.” He looked the visitor over. 


has been staged in Philadelphia once a 
year since 1985 and which has spon- 
sorship from the CoreStates Bank until 
2005. In a time of dwindling financial 
support for bicycle road racing, the race 
appears to be a model of how a sponsor 
and a municipality — American, Euro- 
pean or Asian — can work together to 
produce what the '60s called a people’s 
festival 

In the suburb of Manayunk, for ex- 
ample. Along Main Street, which the 


race traversed 10 times, the yuppy 
crowds were as thick as the cream in their 


crowds were as thick as the cream in their 
cappucinos at outdoor tables near Le Bus 
cafe, Ma Jolie Atelier and such second- 
hand clothes stores as Wear It Again Sam 
and Wom Yesterday. At least one of the 
$4,000 bicycles leaning against a store- 
front had a crooked and therefore in- 
efficient saddle but hey, whatever. 

Take a right off Main Street into 
another world, that of the Manayunk 
Wall, the town 's 2 1 st Ward, a kilometer- 
long uphill past blue-collar houses. 


friends.” He looked the visitor over. 
“Always nice to make new friends.” he 
said. “You from around here?” 

Manayunk knows bow to make the 
day a festival. At O’Brien's Watering 
Hole, a small series of pierced pipes 
extended over the road ana sprayed wa- 
ter onto any rider who didn’t — or didn’t 
want to — get out of the way. 

“Been doing it since the race start- 
ed," O'Brien said. “The riders appre- 
ciate it on a hot day.” 

The championship always has been 
run on a hot day, officials said. Never a 
drop of rain yet That helps draw the 
crowds, which are estimated between 
200,000 and 750,000; the higher-rank- 
ing die official, the higher the estimate. 

It also helps that the race is shown in 
its six-hour entirety on local television 
and broadcast on an otherwise rock V 
roll radio station. 

“People see or hear the race and 
decide to come on down for the last few 
hours,” a Philadelphian said. “The 
crowds are always biggest at the finish. 

“Of course,” he admitted, “it’s free. 
And there isn't all that much else to do in 
Philadelphia on a Sunday.” 


Scoreboard 


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, (xi 

— iir 

Goalkeeper 



Scores But 
Argentines 
Laugh Last 


X r 




Reuters 


SANTA CRUZ, Bolivia — The goal-, 
keeper Jose Luis Chi la vert scored on a. 
penalty as Paraguay drew. 1-1, against 
his favorite enemy, Argentina in the' 
Cora America. 

Chilavert took two free kicks in Toes-, 
day’s match, appeared to psyche oaf. 
Argentina’s Marcelo Gallardo, who 


***«* mMmm 

tilkeM 


Cofa America Soccer 


missed the first of the game’s three' 
penalties, and was involved in the in- 
cident that led to Pablo Rotchen being 
sent off. 

But Gallardo bad the last laugh when' 
he converted a last-minute penalty to- 
send his team into the quarterfinals and 
force Paraguay to wait and see if they 
can get through as one of the two best' 
third-placed teams. t 

Chilavert, who regularly scores from' 
penalties and free kicks, plays his club 
soccer in Argentina with Velez Sars- 
field and says his hosts cannot stomach 
the fact that a Paraguayan is superior lb 
the homegrown stars. 

When Gallardo stepped up in the 55tfa 
minute for his first penalty, the menacing 
figure of Chilavert seemed too much.. 
Gallardo fired high and wide and Chil- 
avert celebrated aggressively. He then 
showed Gallardo how to take a penalty, 
sending his opposite number Carlos Roa. 
the wrong way in the 73d minute. 

But in the dying seconds. Gallardo' 
got it right, blasting his shot into the roof 
of the net after Argentina had been 
awarded a second penalty. ‘ 

Earlier. Ecuador, which ended 
Paraguay's 15-month unbeaten run in 
an earlier group A match, beat Chile, 2- 
1 , to top the group. Argentina finished 
second and Paraguay third. 

Daniel Passarella, the Argentine 
coach, threatened to pull his team out of 
the tournament because of a possible; 
venue change for his team's quarter- 
final match. Passarella was outraged at 
an alteration that could force his team to; 
play their quarter-final in La Paz. at 
5.600 meters above sea level. 

“I’m not going. I’m not going,” he 
said. ‘ ‘This is a complete disgrace. ’ ’ 
Originally, the second-placed team in 
the group had been due to meet the 
second-placed team in group B in foe. 
colonial city of Sucre. 2.700 meters; 


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BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 


EAsrumaoN 



W 

L 

Pd. 

GB 

Baltimore 

46 

20 

jfn 

— 

New York 

38 

30 

559 

9 

Toronto 

31 

34 

xrt 

1414 

Boston 

30 

38 

M\ 

17 

Derma 

29 37 

CENTRAL DfnSION 

A3 9 

17 

Cleveland 

35 

30 

538 



Kansas City 

32 

34 

-485 

3V, 

Milwaukee 

32 

34 

.485 

3 H 

Chicago 

31 

36 

543 

5 

Minnesota 

31 

37 

ASA. 

5\* 


WEsrpvBfON 


Seethe 

38 

30 

5S9 



Texas 

36 

30 

545 

I 

Anaheim 

34 

33 

507 

3V, 

Oakland 

29 

41 

A 14 

W 


mnowAi UW B 

EAST DIVISION 

W L Pet GB 
Atlanta 44 25 438 _ 

Florida 41 27 4B I 1 * 

Montreal 39 39 574 A'/. 

NmYoffc 37 31 M 6'n 

PtiltadBtptliO 22 45 .326 i\ 

CCHTHAL RVBK1N 

Houston 34 36 Mb — 

PtHsOurDh 33 35 MS - 

St. Louis 31 37 456 2 

CJndfmeti 28 40 ,412 5 

Chtaigp 2fi 41. MB 5*6 

WEST DiVt&tON 

Son Fiandsco 39 29 574 — 

Colorado ■ 36 33 522 316 

Los Angela 33 35 .4® 6 

San Diego 29 39 J36 10 

ramuri loascota 
QntiMti no in on— j s 1 

Contend 000 203 08 11 0 

5m Bey, Sullivan <69. Carrasco {7}, 
FcJ?odrtguez 17) ond JOUvw BrAndef»n 
A. Lotrez (8). M. Jackson (7) and S. Alomar. 
W—Br Anderson. 1-1. L-Smfey, S-6. 

Hfit— cindwwfi, E. porw (3). Cleveland, 
VbqutH CD. 

Honda IN 000 Dll— 3 6 a 

DoTrelt 000 010 108—2 4 0 

Hdnt F Heredia (71. AHoruct C8L N« 
(W and C Johnson: Lira M. Myers (fj), 
To Jones <81 and Casanova, w— Alfonseca 
1-0- U-ToJones, 1-1 Sv-Nen o®. 
HF— Florida BanBa tfi. 

Atlanta 300 in 400—0 12 1 

Toronto 0T2 OOO 138-7 12 l 

GJiAoddox. BMeckJ 17). Wohkas (9) ond E. 


Peres Arxhnor, Spoijaric IS). Jaruen {», 
rimDn (9) and B. Santiago. W— G. Maddus. 
83. L— AnduKR 03. Sv-Woritere (14). 
HRs — AJtcrrta, Klesko 0®. Toronta C 
Delgado (13X 5. Green 2 (4). 

Pittsburgh 000 on 108-1 4 1 

Minnesota 084 030 51s— 13 17 2 

Lacan. WatthMse IS). Peters t® ond 
Mndrdfc Hawkins. Trembler fB) rerd O. 
Mym. W— Hawkins, uj. t— Loaba SJ 
HR — Minnesota GMyers (3). 

PWodeWio 031 008 200-4 10 1 

Boston 132 010 Sto— ' 12 1« 1 

Rulfcom R. Hwrfs (3), eiaticr M), Comes 
(7). Ptantenberg (7). Nye (8) oid Uetoermok 
hem. Brandenburg (7), Lacy (7) and 
Halle berg. W— Sete. 8-i L-Ruffeonv 0-1. 
5v— Locy (3). HRs— PtrflmMptaa Rolen f7). 
Boston. Cordopann 08). 

Now York (NL) m on no-3 7 2 

NOW VerktAU 040 000 7Sx— 4 11 1 

Rernoaa Lldto (7). R. Jordon 17). 
McMktiaal (7). Kashhooda (8) ond Hundley; 
D.Wefa, M, Rtwra (91 and GkorttL W— O. 
Walls, B-3. L— Reynoso, 5-1. Sw~M. Rivero 
02). HR-Hew Yarit fN). Gllkey C7). 
Houston 000 041 128-10 15 0 

Ksnsnaty ooo on 100-2 4 5 

R-Garda Umo (6), B. Wagner (9) and 
Ausmug Haney. Mfc.WBttms (51. J. 
Sdnfiogo (8) and Modariane, Faso no (7). 
W— R. Gada. 3-4. L— Haney, 82. 
HR— Kansas Clfy, J. BeB (IQ). 


(22). HRs— Seattle. 6. Martmer (|0). San 
Firsrchca Javier (2). 

Tens 330 011 000 02—10 17 1 

Colorado Itt 000 023 00—8 17 0 

01 innings) 

Burkett X. Hernandez (8), Wedekind (9j. 
Patterson 00) and UJodxvjuec Triwreon. 
Hotmcs O). M. Munoz (4). Dipato (7). B. 
Ruffin (W. Leskonrc (10). S. Reed (11) and 
Manwarinq. W— Pattefsoa 53. L-S. Reed 
r-3. HRs— Te«s, Ju.Gonzalez (14). 
CotaRMh Butts ()<). CastlUo (ifl). 

Anatietm DOT 003 000-3 4 0 

Los Angelos 000 010 012—4 10 1 

CRnley. James (8). p. Hants (8), Hariri®, 
Pcrcivtf £8) and Kreuwn Park. Gumrie (ffl. 
Hall (91 ond Pinza. W— HaB. 22. 
L— PerdwL 23. HRs— Las Angeles. Zeite 2 

(74), W. Guerrero Q). 

Oi*l»d 012 ON 430—10 12 2 

SenDtego ooo 003 000—3 s 3 

OguteL Gn»m (6), D. Johnson (6), A. Small 
(7) Ond G. WBDams.- J.HomStoa P. Smith (6), 
TL Worrell (7). H. Murray (8). Batrfirior (8). 
Bochner (9) aid Flaherty. W-D. Johnson l - 
0. I.-P. Smitti M. Sv — A. SmoB (3). 
HR— Oakland. McGwire 05). 

Japanese Leagues 


fi«U) 


Ecuador 2, Chlktl 

STJUHNMas: Ecuador? poirfc; Aigwfr 
no 5; Paraguay X Chile 0. 

world cop autumn 
OCEAMAZONE 
GROUP 2. SHD ROUND 
Nee Zealand 5. FniO 
STAMOIMOSI New Zealand 9 noMs HP 
a Popua New Guinea 1 
New Zealond wok fed for Oceanic 2-fc9 
Htie ptay-oR wltti Australia 

MresMAnoMursiKifore 
United Slates 2. Israel I 

urvuHcwnitti 
Skonto 2, Dinoborg 1 


me!** 1 \ 




TRAN SITIONS 


i m 


OMTRALUAOUI 


AA6 

— 

CMcogo (NL) 080 200 881-3 7 0 


W 

L 

T 

Pet 

.GB 

Mb 

— 

Odesgo(AU 2TB IN ICS-5 7 0 

Yokutt 

37 

31 

Q 

,638 


M6 

2 

JtGOnrata Patterson (7), Wendoll (8) 

Hiroshima 

29 

28 

0 

509 

r/, 

A)2 

5 

and Servo br Drobek. Kaittmer (71. R. 

Harrshm 

30 

29 

0 

508 

7L, 

MB 


Hernandez (9) and FttngiK. W—Dnbek, 4- 

Qwmehl 

27 

30 

0 

.474 

VA 



4. L— JeGoraciez. 2-1 Sv— R. Hemands 

Yokohama 

24 

29 

0 

.453 

TO'/v 

SH 

— 

nil. HRs-Qiteaga DoAtertin« (7), 

Yamwri 

24 

34 

0 

4)4 

13 


ARE ratwi LEAGUE 

Minnesota— W arred RHP Kerin J«* 
Recalled RHP LoTiay Howrons hum » 
LokeCiiy. PCL 

NCWvokK— PiriOF Bernio WWoM» on 2^ 
day ebsabted ret ittroaatre to June Id >“• 
called OF Scott Pose ham Cotntnbw 1L. 
NATKMAL LEAGUE 

cmanRATi-Piit SS Bony Wt«B " "J; 

day tfisabted list. Adtrotcd LHP JoW5D«» 

from 1 5-day dsabied list. 

COLORADO-Acflvated LHP Brea 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR IBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1997 

SPORTS 






PAGE 19 






£ r t*f\ 
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'Dodgers’ Rally in 9th 
Sinks Crosstown Rival 


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The Associated Press 

Todd Zeile of the Los Angeles 
Dodgers was paying close attention, and 
it paid off. 

Zeile was in the on-deck circle when 
the Anaheim Angels’ Troy Percival 
threwacurveball into the dirt for a wild 
pitch, allowing Wilton Guerrero to 
score from second base with the tying 
run in the bottom of the ninth. 

“I'm thinking he ’s not going to come 
back with the breaking ball,” Zeile said. 
“Besides, he’s a power pitcher and he 

BAI1EAU ROUU PUP 

throws it in the mid-90s. So J was sittin g 
on a fastball.” 

That’s exactly was Percival threw. 

Zeile hit his second solo homer in as 
many innings, giving the Dodgers a 4-3 
victory over the Angels on Tuesday 
night in their first interleague matchup. 

“I threw a curve, gripped it too tight 
and tried to bury the pitch,” Percival 
said of the wild pitch. ‘ ‘J needed to keep 
it at least in the area code and I threw it 
six feet outside. 

In the eighth inning, Zeile greeted 
reliever Mike James witta a leadoff 
homer to bring Los Angeles to within 3- 
2. The Dodgers tied it in the ninth when 
Wilton Guerrero led off with a single, 
moved up on pinch-hitter Brett Butler's 
sacrifice, then scored Bom second on a 
Percival's two-out wild pitch. 

The game, the first in the so-called 
Freeway Series, drew a crowd of 
41,428, above the Dodgers' average of 
37,129 this season, but considerably 
less than their last home game. “Beach 
Towel Night,” attracted 52,873. 

AWetHSBio l Padni3 Mark McGwire 
hit his first borne run in interleague play, 
leading off the second innin g with his 
25th homer of the year as Oakland won 
in San Diego. 

Giant* 4, Mariners 3 In San FrancisCO, 
Stan Javier's two-run, pinch-hit home 
ran was the key blow as the Giants 
handed Seattle its first loss in live in- 
ter! eague games. Ken Griffey Jr. and 
Barry Bonds played to a draw in then- 
much ballyhooed matchup, each 
singling and scoring a run in the first 
regular-season game between the Gi- 
ants and Mariners. 

i»iihm» io, Rockies ft In Denver, 
Juan Gonzalez had five runs batted in, 
including a two-run homer in the 11th 
inning, to lift Texas to victory. Colorado 
had rallied from an 8-3 deficit with two 
runs in the eighth on Vinny Castilla's 
two-run homer, and three more in the 
ninth, including Ellis Burks’s two-mo 
dint off John Wetteland. 

Bicwcn 4, CMdnais 3 In Milwaukee, 
Jeff Cirillo led off the sixth with his 
sixth homer and the Cardinals defense 
fell apart despite sterling play on both 


offense and defense by the St. Lonis 
catcher, Tom Lampfcm. 

Larnpkin doubled and homered and 
threw out two runners. Fernando Valen- 
cia (2-9), acquired from San Diego on 
Friday, had a throwing error on a bunt 
that contributed to a four-run rally. 

Astros io. Royals 3 In Kansas City, 
Ramon Garcia allowed one hit in five 
innings and Luis Gonzalez’s bases- 
loaded single keyed a six-run fifth in- 
ning for Houston. Gonzalez stretched 
his hitting streak to 21 games, die 
longest of the season in the NL. 

Whito sox 5^ cubs 3 The largest reg- 
ular-season crowd ever at the new Com- 
iskey Park, 44,249, watched Dave Mar- 
tinez. a former Cub, hit a two-run first- 
inning homer. 

Oriotea 5, Expos 4 Baltimore ended 
Montreal’s 10-game winning streak as 
Roberto Alomar had two runs batted in 
and Tony Tarasco homered. The game 
was played before 47,793, the fiflh- 
largest regular-season crowd in the six- 
year history of Camden Yards. 

indnm 5, Rods 1 1n Cleveland. Omar 
Vizquel hit a three-run homer and drove 
in 'fiverons to lead the Indians to victory. 
Vizquel's sixth-inning shot was only the 
13th homer this month by Cleveland. 

Rod Sox 12, Phillies s In Boston, Dar- 
ren Bragg had three hits to give the Red 
Sox four wins over an NL club for the 
first time since 1918. The Red Sox took 
two of three from the New York Mets 
over the weekend, then beat Phil- 
adelphia in two straight to improve to 4- 
1 in mterleague play and move out of the 
AL East cellar. The Phillies have lost 
four of five against the AL. 

Marlins 3, Tigers 2 Bobby Bonilla's 
leadoff home run in the ninth inning, a 
459-foot shot, cleared the right field 
roof in Detroit. Bonilla's homo 1 , his 
fifth of the season, was just the 33d to 
clear the roof at Tiger Stadium, and the 
third this season. The loss left the Tigers 
as the only winless major-league team 
in interleague play. 

Yankees 6, Mots 3 David Wells, ejec- 
ted from his last start pitched eight 
strong innings and the Yankees tied 
their Subway Series with the Mets be- 
fore 56,253 at Yankee Stadium. 

Braves a, Blue Jays 7 In Toronto, Ry- 
an Klesko’s three-run homer helped At- 
lanta weather Shawn Green's two 
hornets. Greg Maddux (8-3>, pitching 
on three days' rest, gave- up three runs 
and seven hits in six innings to get the 
victory. 

Twins 13, pnatoa i In Minneapolis, 
LaTroy Hawkins, making his first ma- 
jor-league appearance in more than a 
year, allowed three hits in seven in- 
nings. Called up from the minor leagues 
on Monday, Hawkins allowed a leadoff 
single to Tony Womack, then retired 17 
of the next 20 hitters. 



The Expos* catcher, Darren Fletcher, reeling after tagging out Mike Bordick of the Orioles at home plate. 

Women 9 s Pro Basketball: 2-Front War 


Orioles’ Davis Has Cancer Operation 






a STA-- .*> 



Washington Post Service 

BALTIMORE — Eric Davis , the 
Baltimore Orioles’ right fielder, may 
taiss the rest of the season after doc- 
tors renwyed a fist-sized cancerous 
r mass from his colon. 

•. The surgery' took place Friday, but 
doctors did not reveal that they had 
found a malignancy until Tuesday. 

Dr. Keith Lillemoe, the surgeon 
who led the team that removed the 
right one-third of Davis's colon during 
the operation at Johns Hopkins Hos- 


pital, said there were no indications 
that the cancer had spread. He said he 
believed it was unlikely that Davis 
would suffer a recurrence, and he in- 
dicated that Davis's long-term med- 
ical outlook was relatively promising. 

Both Dr. Lillemoe and the Orioles' 
physician. Dr. William Goldiner, said 
they thought it was likely that Davis 
would play again, but they made no 
predictions about this season. That, 
they said, would depend on how Dav- 
is, 35, responded to chemotherapy. 


By Earl Gustkey 

Los Angeles Times 

L OS ANGELES — On Saturday, the 
war in women's basketball will be of- 
ficially engaged on all fronts. 

In the 25th anniversary year of the 
passage of Title IX, establishing equal- 
ity for women in college sports, Amer- 
ica’s premier female basketball players 
have gone from no pro leagues in the 
United States to two: the Women's 
NBA, which begins play Saturday, and 
the American Basketball League, which 
begins its second season in October. 

The eight-team WNBA opens its of- 
fensive Saturday in three cities, with the 
league opener, on NBC the national 
television network, Saturday afternoon 
at the Forum. There, the Los Angeles 
Sparks, led by Lisa Leslie, meet the 
New York Liberty and Rebecca Lobo. 

On Saturday night, Houston opens at 
Cleveland and Sacramento plays at 
Utah. Charlotte is at Phoenix on Sunday 
afternoon. 

There will be no monthlong playoff 
schedule at the end of the WNBA sea- 
son. Its 28-game schedule will finish 
with one championship game, on Aug. 
30. after two single-game conference 
title games. 

So, after roughly 10 months of hype, 
the WNBA is going to start play in 
scaled-back NBA arenas. At the Forum, 
for example, all seals above the con- 
course wdl be curtained off, leaving 
7.500, which the Sparks say are sold out 
for Saturday. 

Houston and Cleveland also say their 
home openers are sellouts. 

A sports-marketing veteran in New 
York, however, advises caution on all 
this. Says Marty Blackman, in the busi- 
ness 30 years: 

“Don’t get too excited over opening- 
game crowd counts. Look at attendance 
a month from now, and then let's talk. 
I'm not saying they won’t make it. Just 


keep in mind the NBA has a lot of 
marirering and advertising muscle and 
they’ve done a great job of stirring up 
early curiosity. 

“Let’s see if they can sustain this. 
You can only do so mnch with hype. 
Hype can ’t sustain you. 1 ' 

The PR blitz would have you believe 
that the NBA commissioner, David 
Stem, is the father of women's pro 
basketball, as the league’s ESPN info- 
mercial indicated Monday night. 

In truth, the ABL was first and it 
remains the bener league. Of 1 3 premier 
college seniors from last season, for 
example, the ABL signed 10. losing 
only USC's Tina Thompson, Stanford's 
Jamilla Widemon and Kansas's 
Tamecka Dixon lo die WNBA. 

Blackman said that the WNBA's 
weak point was that it doesn't match up 
in lalem with the other league and they 
had glossed over that very well. “They 
buried it, in-fact,” he said. 

Bui the WNBA certainly didn't bury 
its three Olympians, Leslie. Lobo and 
the pregnant Sheryl Swoopes — the 
baby is due Saturday. 

They have been the point players, in 
the buildup. Never mind that seven of 
their Atlanta teammates are in the ABL. 

The one area in which the WNBA has 
flattened the ABL is television. The 
WNBA will be shown on NBC and 
ESPN, the spott network. ABL, by com- 
parison, was adrift in the confusing 
jumble of cable networks. Even with a 
satellite dish, it was hard to find ABL 
games last season. 

Another major difference is pay. 
ABL salaries for top players are about 
triple what the WNBA- pays, from 
$I50,T)00 to $200,000 to top players, 
down to a $40,000 minimum. 

The WNBA range is $10,000 to 
$50,000, but there are three major ex- 
ceptions: Leslie, Lobo and Swoopes. 

Those three are under WNBA per- 
sonal-services contracts that could 


boost tlieir 1^97 incomes to seven di- 
gits. Leslie, including endorsement 
deals, is expected to cam $ l million to 
52 million this year. 

In corporate >pon>ur<liips. the 
WNBA is far ahead. Ten corporations 
have signed on as WNBA "marketing 
partners.” at what is believed to be as 
much as 53 million each. The total fig- 
ure could be tens of millions of dollars. 
So why the low player salaries? 

It's assumed by some that the WNBA 
is warehousing cash with which lo buy- 
out the ABL, creating a 17-team 
WNBA. But the WNBA commissioner. 
Val Ackerman, denied that. * ' I don’t see 
things moving in that direction for us.” 
she said. 

Added a WNBA insider. “If we can 
go out and raise that kind of money 
through sponsorships, why do we need 
to buy out the ABL?” 

That same insider added that lawyers 
are already trying to put together a 
WNBA players' union. 

“That has to happen, onee all the 
players become fully aware — espe- 
cially those making $20,000 — that ihe 
league has been so successful with 
sponsorships. The salary scale will have 
to go up next year. 

“And remember. Stem stuck his 
neck out on this. There was some arm- 
twisting with some owners in getting 
this thing started. Now that we’ve 
shown it's working, some owners are 
going to want to see some checks." 

Three of the most visible players in 
the league will be at the Forum on 
Saturday — Leslie. Lobo and the6-foot- 
8 four-time Chinese Olympian Zheng 
Haixia. When the Sparks scrimmaged 
the Phoenix Mercury last Saturday, 
Haixia made six of seven shots and had 
four rebounds in 15 minutes. She isn’t 
pretty running ihe court, doesn't jump 
very much and appears to have bad 
knees. But she takes up lots of space, 
and passes well. 


Expansion 
Will Divide 
NHL Into 
6 Divisions 


By Rachel Alexander 

Hinft uitfinM Pimi Sen n e 

The National Hockey League's pro- 
visional plan to expand from 26 to 30 
teams over the next four seasons will 
bring a radical realignment of divisions. 

The recommendations will be voted 
on by the NHL’s Board of Governors 
June *25. A three-fourths majority is re- 
quired for approval, but the slate is ex- 
pected io pass eosilv. The new franchises 
— Na>hville. which will join the league 
for the 1998-99 season; Atlanta (1999- 
2000 1: Columbus. Ohio (2000-2001). 
and Si. Paul. Minnesota (2000-2001 ) — 
each will pay an 580 million fee to the 
NHL. which has expanded three times in 
the past five years. 

“The bottom line is expanded tele- 
vision markets.” said Phil Esposito, the 
Tampa Bay general manager. “More 
people watching is good for the growth 
of the league." 

Under the proposal. the league will 
change from four divisions to six. Teams 
will play opponents in their division six 
times and opponents in tlieir confer- 
ence’s other divisions four times. 

Teams also will play opponents from 
the opposite conference just once a year, 
alternating home dates. The remaining 
three games in the 82-game schedule 
will consist of “rivalry games." to be 
determined by the commissioner. 

The NHL and NHL Players Asso- 
ciation also agreed, pending ratification, 
to extend rhe collective bargaining 
agreement from 2000 to Sept. 15. 2004. 
Bill the idea that the league — hit with a 
lockout in J 994 — could be free of work 
stoppages for the next seven years was 
lost in Ihe flutter over expansion. 

The NHL propose* to admit NastwUe in lWtL Atlanta In 
1999 and CfllnmtHHood Twin OtHSlnHOa. To do tub it mans 
to reafign its dhrtsioit* tour tunes: 

1 998-1 999 MASON 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 

ATLANTIC— New Jersey. NT isnndet*. N.Y. Rangers. 
PhMdelpha Pittsburgh. 
northeast— B eslan, Buffalo, Montreal Ottawa. 
southeast— C arolina, Florida# Tampa Bay. WmhmgtoiL: 
WESTERN CONFERENCE 

central- C hicago. Del roil NssftviHe. St. LoarS. Toronto. 
northwest— C algary. Colorado. Edmonton, Vancouver. 
pacific— A naheim. Dados. Los Angeles. Phoenix, San Jose. 

1999-3000 SIMON 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 

ATLA/tTiC-Men Jersey. N.Y. Islanders. N.Y. Pan gen. ' 
Philadelphia Pittsburgh. 

NORTHEAST— Boston. Buffalo. Montreal Ottawa 
southeast— Atlanta, Carolina. Florida Tampa Bay. Waslt- 
rogtwt 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 

central— C hicago. Detroit NoshvHte. St Louts. Toronto. 
Northwest— C algary, Catorada- Edmonton. Vancouver. 
pacific— Anaheim Dallas, Los Angeles, Phoenix San Jco*. 

3000-3001 SEASON 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 

atuwTic-Ncw Jersey. N.Y. Isfandom N.Y. Rmtgen. 
Philadelphia Plffshuroh. 

northeast— B oston. Buffalo. Columbus*. Montreal Ottawa. 
southeast— A tlanta Carolina, Florida Tampa Bay. Wash- 
ington. 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 

central— C hicogo Detroit, Nashville, St. Louis, Toronto. 
northwest— C algary. Colo redo Edmonton. Twin CMes. 
Vancouver. 

pacific— A naheim. Dallas, Las Angeles. Phoenix, San Jose. 

FINAL MAUCNMUr. 3003-3004 SEASON 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 

Atlantic— N ew Jersey. N.Y. Islander. N.Y, Rangers, 
Philadelphia. Pittsburgh. 

north east- B oston, Buffalo. Montreal Ottawa. Toronto. 
southeast— A tlanta, Carolina, Florida. Tampa Bay, Wash- 
ington. 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 

central— C hicago, Columbus’, Detroit, NoshvSe, SL Loots. 
northwest— C al gory, Colorado. Edmonton. Twin OSes, 
Vancouver. 

paci fic — A naheim, Dallas. Las Angeles. Phoenix. San Jose. 

* Columbus wM play m Northeast Division and Toronto will 
play in Central DhrtsJon through the 2002-03 season or urrtfl 
Cjlirmbus mates playoffs, wfdchever comes find. 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 






















r 



PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1991 


ART BUCHWALD 


Couch Potato Miles 



Buchwald 


W ASHINGTON — Just 
when you thought there 
was no more the airline 
couJd do for you, they have 
added an in- 
centive to get 
you to stay at 
home. Americ- 
an Airlines will 
now give yoo 
extra fhsqoenl- 
flier miles for 
watching ABC- 
TV programs. 

Don't look at 
roe that way, I haven't been 
drinking. 

It seems ABC. which is 
running third in the ratings 
war, has made a deal with the 
airline that if you watch its 
network shows and fill out a 
survey sheet attesting that you 
didn't cheat, you can build up 
enough points to go on a trip 
to any place, including Birm- 
ingham. Alabama. 

□ 

This is how it works. 

The living room of the 
Micky and Jim Clippard 
household: 

“What’s on?" 

'‘Barbara Walters and 
Hugh Downs." 


Circle in the Square 
Suspends Operations 

New Yvrk Times Service 

NEW YORK — The fi- 
nancially troubled Circle in 
the Square theater, which de- 
clared bankruptcy last Au- 
gust, has suspended opera- 
tions and laid off its staff, 
raising doubts that the 46- 
year-old institution will be 
able to survive. 

Gregory Mosher, the pro- 
ducing director, said be and the 
executive producer intended to 
set up a new organization to 
raise money fora reconstituted 
Circle in the Square. 


“I thought you were going 
to watch file basketball play- 
offs." 

"They don’t give you any 
free mileage for watching 
basketball. If I can guess 
Hugh Downs's last name 
American Airlines will fly me 
to Bangladesh." 

“That sounds like a good 
deal Will they do the same if 
you watch 'All My Children' 
in the daytime?" 

“Of course, and you get a 
5.000-mile bonus if you tune 
in ‘General Hospital' on the 
someday." 

While there has been a 
great deal of competition for 
airline business, this is the 
first lime that a network is 
offering its TV viewers 
flights for sitting on their 
couches eating TV dinners. 

□ 

Everyone is taking ir seri- 
ously. Mark Weinberger, who 
had a tennis game scheduled 
with me. canceled at the last 
moment. His explanation was, 
"I have to watch ‘PrimeTime’ 
if 1 want to be upgraded to first 
class to Albany next week." 

I asked an American Air- 
lines executive if the cam- 
paign wasn't counterproduct- 
ive. "If people stay at home to 
watch ABC shows, how do 
you get them to line up at the 
ticket counter at the airport?" 

“We give them auto- 
graphed photos of Diane 
Sawyer and Sam Donaldson 
with their lunch." 

One of file gimmicks ABC 
is using is free trips to Disney 
World, which ties in with the 
TV show “Wonderful World 
of Disney." The ABC mar- 


keting people hope that view- 
ers will watch “Wondet 


‘Wonderful 
World" on their sets and 
then, with their bonus miles, 
take an American Airlines 
plane to Disney World, where 
Roseanne will show them 
around. 


Hogarth’s Progress: The Bad Boy o 






By Warren Hoge 

New York Times Service 


L ONDON — William Hogarth was bom 
300 years ago, and a host of commem- 
orative showings and events are reminding 
Britons that the so-called Father of British 
An may have also been the original Euro- 


skeptic. 

Self- 


taught and contemptuous of clas- 
sical training. Hogarth gloried in his coarse 
Engtishness and took every chance he could 
to sully the Continent and the affectations in 
his own society that he took to be European 
pollution of London life. He adopted the 


nom de plume Britphil for a diatribe sent to 
37 atl 


newspapers in 1737 attacking foreign art as 
full of “dead Christs, holy families. Madon- 
nas and other dismal dark objects." 

Hogarth’s subjects, by contrast, were an- 
imated. mortal, common and alight with 
malice. While powdered young English 
lords on the Grand Tour gazed adoringly on 
classical antiquities in Italy. Hogarth stayed 
at home and memorialized politicians, mer- 
chants, thieves, prostitutes and men on the 
make. Let European artists and their fol- 
lowers in England rework classical history. 

Hogarth's tense was the present. Let them 
place their subjects in idealized postures 
with ennobling expressions. Hogarth cap- 
tured them in the unbecoming awkwardness 
of their daily lives. 

The shows and lectures and conceits 
scheduled through next March will not 
settle arguments over whether Hogarth's work amounts to 
great painting, great illustration, great satire or great visual 
literature, but they do constitute a robust, perceptive and 
opinionated chronicle of his time and confirm him as the 
inventor of English narrative art. 

The England of his time saw the aristocracy being chal- 
lenged for control by a rapacious new prospering class 

for the hon 



sketching brought him under suspicion <* 
being a spy. He responded by pamting tk* 
jingoistic “Oh. the Roast Beef of ; 

land," which mocks the French as . 
besotted, starring wretches opflfing jj^- 
soup all over themselves as a grand pieced 
meat is earned ashore destined for descry®., 
English visitors. - ^ 

The showing of “The Rake’s Progress*- 
is the first at which the paintings and a* 
engravings have been together since (key 
left Hogarth's studio. The conjunction. « 
useful because the engravings are far esd* r 
to read in detail than are the paintings, and 
Hogarth was fond of a kind of rowdy visa* 
journalism of sight gags and suf 


can get lost in 03. Study a Hogarth, aad 

in the co 


Sr J-lwr Sunr', XJinrtw/f'dimnio 

“The Rake's Progress"; Britain Is celebrating 300th anniversary of Hogarth’s birth. 


pursuing riches and pleasure with disdain 


homeless 


drunks who filled London's alleys and gutters. It was a place 

officials 


of preening financiers and swinish government 
taking money under the table, of debauched wastrels ca- 
rousing in brothels and dandies betting their inheritances at 
the gaming tables. There was a new social fluidity, but 
extremes of wealth and poverty still prevailed. 

A satirical series of paintings and engravings on show at Sir 
John Soane's Museum with the eight-part “Rake's Progress" 
is called “An Election” and lampoons political campaigning 
in a vote being held on keeping Britain free of European 
domination. “The Mrerriage Contract," a painting Hogarth 
was working on at his death in 1764, portrays a high-bom 
young couple being forcibly married by an elder while the 
bridegroom looks away to read a billet-doux that has been 
placed in his hand by a servant 


The idea of telling a story in several images arranged in a 
series, like scenes "in a play, earned Hogarth renown as 
England’s first narrative painter. 

Tricentenary commemorations are going on or are sched- 
uled at the Tate Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the 
British Museum, the National Gallery, the Gunncrsbury Park 
Museum, the Museum of the Order of St. John, the National 
Portrait Gallery and Sl Bartholomew’s Hospital, all in 
London; the Gardner Arts Center at Sussex University and 
the Whitworth An Gallery in Manchester. 

The satirical works at Sir John Soane’s Museum have come 
to be called Hogarth's Moral Matters, but they are more akin 
to soap operas than parables. And while Hogarth himself was 
part of the belligerent new middle class, he made sure he grew 
rich in his traditionally underpaid profession by publishing 
his paintings as engravings and tightly controlling their 
distribution. 

The pursuit of affluence even overcame his hatred of the 
Continent. Much as he found anything French odious, he 
didn't hesitate to ship his work to Paris for engraving because 
he knew the French were more skillful at it than the English. 
The only other time he ever crossed the English Channel, he 
was arrested and deponed by the police at Calais when his 


inevitably you'll find a cat in me corner 
greedily eyeing a pci bird, a pickpocket 
lightening a neighbor’s wallet, a pig upend, 
ing a wench, men with staves and poles 
muling about in the distance, a ptieup of 
carts and dray horses and carriages in on 
18th-century traffic jam, 

Hogarth's vision is not happy and life- 
affirming. There are always threats to order 
lurking, a sense of distant menace that in- 
fuses the vigorous front and center activity 
with a numbing, dark spirit. There is more 
cruelty than compassion in his attitude. 

Hogarth was bom on Nov. JO, 1697, in a 
house near a meat market It was a great 
arena of butchery that informed Hogarth's 
visual imagination for scenes of unruly com- 
merce. Hogarth's father, a schoolmaster, 
started a doomed enterprise, a coffee shop where people 
were encouraged to visit to brush up their Latin. He went 
bankrupt and was in debtors' prison for five years. Hogarth's 
mother hawked patent medicines, and the family was con- 
fined to the filthy streets outside the jail walls. 

More than any other, this experience shaped the young 
Hogarth, and his paintings were to be filled with scenes of 
men suffering in prisons and madhouses like Bedlam. 

The market was often transformed into a fairground, and 


it was there that Hogarth saw the hack theatrical present- 
ed him; 


ations that enchanted him and influenced the composition of 
his paintings. Above all, his anecdote-packed pictures are 
stagy, fussy production numbers for his lowlife parodies, 
with personal encounters occurring from wing to wing and 
backstage to foreground. 

In his self-portrait, Hogarth gave a modest rendition of 
himself, dressed informally and leaning on bodes by 
Shakespeare, Milton and Swift, confirming his commitment 
to narrative an. By his side is his pug, a runty cur with 
absolutely no ennobling characteristics. 

Hogarth would undoubtedly love the satirical footnote he 
unknowingly left for the 20th century. The dog's name is 
Trump. 


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PEOPLE 


T HE Liverpool house where Paul 
McCartney wrote his first songs 
and where the Beatles practiced is to be 
restored to 1960s style and opened to the 
public. The National Trust, which in 
1995 bought the terraced house where 
McCartney lived from the age of 1 3 until 
the Beatles became famous, said Wed- 
nesday that it had received a £47,500 
($78,000) grant from Britain’s national 
lottery fund to turn the house into a mini- 
museum. The National Trust will use 
photographs taken by McCartney’s fam- 
ily at the time to re-create the decor of the 
1955-1964 period. 


the sole purpose of "achieving her aims, 
including the construction of the new 
Acropolis museum," the foundation 
said. 


□ 


Michael Jackson got hisses of dis- 
approval when he walked out before the 
curtain went down on a concert in Milan 
by the Three Tenors — Jose Carreras, 
Placido Domingo and Luciano Pav- 
arotti. Jackson, who was in Milan for 
their show a night before his own con- 
cert, and the tenors are considering the 
possibility of cutting a record together. 


film in Vietnam based on an American’s 
motorbike ride down (he Ho Chi Minh 
Trail. Zoetrope Studios has been given 
the green light by Vietnam's Culture and 
Information Ministry to produce a film 
based on the book "Sparring with 
Charlie" by Christopher Hunt. Only a 
handful of foreign film companies have 
received permission to film in Vietnam, 
producing mainly French titles, includ- 
ing “Indochine" and “Cyclo." When 
Coppola was making "Apocalypse 
Now" in the late 1970s. he filmed all the 
Vietnamese scenes in the Philippines. 


□ 


□ 


□ 


MalafA|MA hTOB-PlW* 

PIECE OF CAKE — Wim Wenders, the German 
filmmaker, noshes on a piece of the Eiffel Tower at a 
Hollywood celebration honoring the 50th Cannes film 
festival and French and American directors. Behind 
him are Steven Soderbergh and Delbert Mann. 


The foundation named for Melina 
Mercouri is seeking film on the life and 
times of the late actress and Greek cul- 
ture minister, who died in 1 994. In a plea 
issued in the Greek press Wednesday, 
the foundation headed by Mercouri's 
husband, the film director Jules Dassin, 
asked people who have professional or 
amateur film on Mercouri or her work to 
come forward to help found a Mercouri 
archive. All documents will be used for 


The comedian Tim Allen, star of 
‘ ‘Home Improvement,’ ’ >vas placed on a 
year’s probation and fined $500 for driv - 
ing while impaired. Allen, who pleaded 
guilty to the charge, was stopped for 
speeding in suburban Detroit in May and 
arrested after failing sobriety tests. 


□ 


Francis Ford Coppola’s film com- 
pany has received permission to shoot a 


The Spanish opera star Montserrat 
Caballe and the Greek singer Nana 
Mouskouri joined forces Wednesday in 
urging a European Union policy for pop 
music. In an appearance ai an EU music- 
sector bearing organized by Mouskouri 
at the European Parliament, Caballe said 
a pop policy was important to the Un- 
ion’s economic plans because of the 
industry’s impact on young people. 
Mouskouri is a member of the European 
Parliament 



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