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INTERNATIONAL 





' Agmtx hnHw 

- 1 RULE BRITTANIA — The UJC’s royal yacht sailing into Hong Kong harbor Monday. London and Beijing agreed that more Chinese Army 
(- soldiers could enter the colony before British rule ends at midnight June 30. China will deploy up to 10,000 troops after the handover. Page 10. 

On Sale! Lost the Lease! Everything Must Go! 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Post Service 


HONG KONG — Deng Xiaoping most be rolling 
v over in his grave. 

■ " “One country, two systems'* was the mantra of 
■. China’s late leader, referring to a formula that would 
allow Hoag Kong to keep its separate system intact 
-■■after it is absorbed into China. 

Now with barely a week left before Hong Kong's 
I: -historic change of sovereignty — an event known here 
I - -Simply as die Handover — Mr. Deng’s phrase has 


become the tningly familiar slogan of consumerism. 

“One Country, Two Pubs!” boasts a T-shirt out- 
side Delaney’s Irish Pub, sporting a picture of a 
contented Mao Zedong downing a pint of Guinness. 

Business corruption could be the wave of the 
future for Hong Kong. Page 17. 

“One Country ; — France. Two Systems — fixed 
price and a la carte,” says a French-style bistro, CafiS 
la Cite. 


It goes on. One price, two dresses. One store, two 
sales. One party, two hangovers. It’s the great Hand- 
over giveaway. 

And so it has crane down to this on the eve of one 
of the 20th century's momentous events: Hong 
Kong’s return to China has been reduced to a city- 
wide commercial frenzy — the end of empire as 
retail sales pitch. Hurry! Only a few shopping days 
left under British rule! 

There are Handover watches and Handover jew- 
See HANDOVER, Page 10 


WASHINGTON — TbeClinton ad- 
ministration suffered a major legal set-, 
back Monday as the Supreme Court 
rejected a White House cSort to with- 
hold notes from conversations between 
Hillary Rodham Clinton and lawyers 
that are being sought bv the grand jury id 
the Whitewater i 
. Without comment, the justices let 
stand* ruling by a federal appeals court 
that normal lawyer-client privilege does 
not apply to government lawyers’ notes 
that are sought by a grand jury. 

The White House, whose argument 
was joined by many lawyers and some 
framer U.S. attorneys general, had held 
that a loss of such privilege would make 
it difficult for the. president and other 
government officials to conduct busi- 
ness. 

Jhe papers being soughrmost now be 
turned ova- to the grand jury in Little 
Rock, Arkansas, that is looking into the 
business dealings of President Bill Clin- 
ton and Mrs. Canton. 

The White House counsel, Charles 
Ruff, criticized the high court's stance. 


“We continue to believe that govern- 
ment lawyers must be allowed to have 
confidential discussions with their cli- 
ents if they are to be able to. provide 
candid and effective legal advice,” be 
said, “and we regret that the court has 
decided hot to resolve this important 
issue.” 

The court's decision was a clear vic- 
tory for Keimeth Starr, the special pros- 
ecutor heading the Whitewater inves- 
tigation. Court papers filed by his team 
have referred to Mrs. Clinton as a “cen- 
tral figure" in the inquiry. IBs office 
had no immediate comment Monday . 

On Monday, with its term drawing to 
an end. the high court issued rulings in 
several other high-profile cases. Most 
notably, the court ruled that states could 
confine dangerous sex offenders to 
mental institutions even after their pris- 
on sentences had ended. (Page 3) 

The court's decision not to take up the 
case involving Mrs. Clinton’s' notes' 
cornea just weeks after another legal 
setback. The hi g h court cleared the way 
for a former Arkansas state employee, 
Paula Corbin Jones, to pursue a sexual 

See CLINTON, Page 6 



4 Suicides Follow Sweep by French Police 


Is There a Viable ‘Third Way’ for Global Capitalism? 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times Service 


By Sfeven Pearl stein 
and Paul Blustein 

Washington Post Service 


To hear it from President Bill Clinton 
at the economic summit meeting in 
Denver last weekend, America's entre- 
preneurial capitalism has proved itself 
to the world as the model for how an 
economy should be organized. 

But European leaders seemed as un- 
comfortable with Mr. Clinton ’s cowboy 
capitalism as they were with the cowboy 
boots he presented them. 

“I don't think you have to spend a 
long timein the inner cities of the United 
States to see that all is not a paradise,” 
said Leon Brittan, the European trade 
commissioner. 

For many, this standoff confirmed a 


widely held view that there is a stork, 
fundamental choice to be made between 
a hard-hearted capitalism in which 
workers are sacrificed at the altar of 
lower prices and higher profits, and a 
soft-hearted capitalism mat sacrifices 
jobs and growth for economic security. 

But among American economists, 
there now is a surprisingly broad con- 
sensus that it is not an either/or choice, 
that a viable alternative may exist that 
would combine the best of both sys- 
tems. 

“One can have an economic policy 
that preserves tremendously strong mar- 
ket incentives for innovation and ef- 
ficiency that remains pretty darn gen- 
erous to those who need help,” said 
Mancur Olson, a professor at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 


Robert Frank, an economist at Cor- 
nell University’s Johnson School of 
Management, said: “Wte~can hav&fee 
best of both worlds. On fee big questions 
— strong growth, more equality — there 
is virtually no need to compromise." 

The search for a “third way" got a 
boost in Denver on Sunday when Gor- 
don Brown, the new chancellor of the 
Exchequer, said it wonld be the central 
topic or next year’s summit meeting, in 
Birmingham, England. 

"Some countries have high levels of 
growth without fee social inclusion to 
fee extent they would like to see it,” he 
said. “Other countries have social pro- 
tection systems without high levels of 
growth. The challenge is to combine 

See MODEL, Page 6 


And Now aSwmhU 
About die Earth 

A United Nations conference on 
the environment, called Earth Sum- 
mit has opened in New York with a 
challenge by European nations 
aimed at fee United States. The 
Europeans want Washington to ac- 
cept firm targets for reducing car- 
don dioxide to combat global 
warming. So far, the Clinton ad- 
ministration. under pressure from 
U.S. industry and a skeptical Con- 
gress, has balked at committing to 
any specific timetable. Page 6. 


PARIS— Did French 
too far in a highly publicized sweep 
across the country last week that picked 
up 800 people suspected of pedophilia? 
Justice Minister Elisabeth Guigou 
wondered Monday whether they had, 
after four of 'fee suspects committed 
s umac 

“1 wonder whether we need these 
spectacular arrests and ail this publi- 
city," she said on Europe 1. radio, as 
human rights groups charged that in 
their zeal, the gendarmes had trampled 
the right of Che defendants to be pre- 
sumed innocent before trial. 

Relatives of the fourth suicide, a 39- 
year-old unmarried Bordeaux school- 
teacher whose car was found abandoned 
Saturday rooming on fee roadway of a 
suspension bridge across the Garonne 
River, retained a lawyer who said they 
would sue the authorities for ’‘violation 
of the presumption of innocence and 
putting others in danger.” 


The raids have resulted in 323 people 
being placed under investigation, the 
equivalent of being arraigned, and 24 
being arrested in the past week in an 
emotionally charged atmosphere recall- 
ing fee case of Mare Dutroux, a serial 
pedophile killer in .Belgium who 
through police incompetence was able 
to go on taking victims long after au- 
thorities were onto his traiL 

“We doe tiring in a witch-hunt at- 
mosphere that is due objectively to fee 
facts, but it also owes a lot to fee 
Duttons affair.", said Henri Leclerc, 
president of the League of Human 
Rights in Paris. “In a witch hunt, there 
are no small witches and big witches," 
he said. “No distinction is being made 
between Duttoux’s crimes, the disap- 
pearance of children, rapes, sex crimes 
and pedophile voyeurism.” 

The schoolteacher, Gilbert Pic, had 
been placed under investigation last 
week and temporarily forbidden from 
having contact wife minors, newspaper 

See FRANCE, Page 6 


Vietnam: Far From a Worker’s Paradise 

As Foreign Investment Grows , Its Abuses Bring Discontent and Strikes 


The Associated Press 

CU CHI, Vietnam — More than four 
decades after the Communists came to 
power in the north. Vietnam is facing 
unprecedented discontent in its labor 
farce. 

Fed up wife abusive foreign super- 
visors and sweatshop conditions, Vi- 
etnamese are walking off fee job in re- 
/ cord numbers in a country where strikes 
' were illegal until three years ago. 

Of the 24 legally recognized strikes 
during the first three months of the year, 
18 were in factories controlled by for- 
eign investors. 

.The dilemma for Hanoi: How do you 


balance fee country’s growing depend- 
ency on foreign investment while stand- 
ing up for labor rights? 

State news media have publicized 
some worker complaints to put pressure 
on foreign business operations, but the 
government has remained neutral on fee 
issue of specific strikes, which often end 
wife labor complaints unresolved. 

The authorities are working on setting 
up labor courts to deal with disputes, but 
so far, even wife a labor code on the 
books to define worker rights and em- 
ployer obligations, enforcement of the 
rules is proving to be an elusive goaL 
“Strikes are occurring for different 


reasons,” said Phan Due Binh, a lawyer 
in the Labor Ministry. “Primarily, we’re 
seeing that employers aren’t protecting 
the rights of workers. Now we’ve got 
foreign investors coming in who don’t 
know anything shout our rules." 

In sou than Vietnam, high-profile in- 
cidents of physical abuse against em- 
ployees at factories working under con- 
tract to Nike Inc., the American footwear 
giant, have fueled charges feat foreign 
companies exploit Vietnamese labor. 

“This is not only a cram tty that needs 
foreign investment, we need to build a 

See VIETNAM, Page 10 


Japan Firms Start to Balk at Payoffs 


By Sandra Sugawara 

Mto/ungftui Post Service 


TOKYO — The man who called at 
the headquarters of a small company 
called Mitsui High-Tec didn’t come 
right out and say h. bat his message was 
clear enough: Give me some money and 
I won’t make trouble for your busi- 
ness. 

The executives wbo received him 
knew very well who be was — a breed 
of extortionist, unique to Japan, who 
specializes in squeezing illegal pay- 
ments from public companies, what the 


Japanese call a sokaiya. The implicit 
threat: hostile questions at fee next 
shareholders' meeting, a sound-track 
barrage outside fee houses of execu- 
tives, maybe even violence. 

Mitsui High-Tec declined to hand 
over any money, executives said, so the 
visitor tried to negotiate, offering to help 
disguise fee payments so that govern- 
ment auditors could not detect them and 
take action against the company. The 
advice, recalled fee company's chair- 
man, Yoshiaki Mitsui, was: “Use your 


brain. You’re buying tea or toilet paper. 
Buy them from us.” Mr. Mitsui knew 
feat would mean vastly inflated prices. 

Sooner or later, most every publicly 
traded company in Japan gets a visit 
from sokaiya, who demand money to 
get lost or to provide “security" at the 
shareholders’ meeting. 

“It is said that Japan is a safe country, 
but underneath this facade there is ter- 
rorism against companies," said 

See JAPAN, Page 6 



BACKHAND SPLASH — Groundskeepers covering the newly opened 
No. I court on a rain-soaked opening day at Wimbledon. The defending 
champion, Richard Krajicek, won a straight-sets victory. Page 18. 

FBI Agent Who Spied for Russia Gets 27 Years 


AGENDA 

India and Pakistan 
To Meet on Kashmir 

India and Pakistan agreed Monday 
to explore possible solutions to their 
50-year dispute over the Himalayan 
territory of Kashmir. 

The specific commitment to seek a 
resolution to the Kashmir dispute was 
contained in a joint statement issued 
after a weekend of talks between top 
diplomats- of fee two countries in Is- 
lamabad, Pakistan. The diplomats are 
scheduled to meet again in New Delhi 
in September. 

Until Monday. India and Pakistan 
had not concluded an agreement about 
bow to approach their biggest dispute 
since they signed a 1972 pact to seek a 
. peaceful settlement Page 4. 


ALEXANDRIA, Virginia (Reuters) 
— A former FBI agent who pleaded 
guilty to two espionage charges for 
selling U.S. national security docu- 
ments to Russia was sentenced Mon- 
day to 27 years in prison. 

PAGE TWO 

US. Prison Is Tougher on Coronets 

EUROPE PagtS. 

A Russian Vote to Curb Churches 


Earl Pitts, a 13-year FBI veteran, 
was arrested Dec. 18' for passing vital 
secrets to Russian intelligence agen- 
cies .for $224,000 from 1987 to 1996, 
feus betraying some of fee FBI’s most . 
sensitive operations. 

' Books — Page 4, 

Crossword — : Page 10. 

Opinion — Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 18-19. 


TnelHT on-line http://v; i .v',v. iht.com 


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Still Reeling From Civil War, Liberians Hurtle Toward Elections 


By James Rupert 

HtoAifl guvi Post Soviet 




770294 



2 6 


MONROVIA, Liberia — In the jungle, war- 
chaired villages crumble into ruin. Mutes and 
rubber plantations yield rust and weals instead of 
profits and jobs. About half fee country’s people 
have fled for shelter to refugee camps or to Mon- 
rovia's slums. 

Liberia is an exhausted wreck. 

Wife help from West African peacekeeping 
troops funded by the United States, ithas pushed its 
seven-year civil war into fragile remission. And it 


is rushing toward an election next month that could 
further suppress that war — or reignite it. . 

Liberia is to choose a legislature and a presiderU 
on July 19 — too soon, according to almost every- 
oue here, for the vote to be well run. The election's 
early date — a result of West African politics aod. a 
misunderstanding involving West African leaders, 
according to election worms — increases the risk 
that it will destabilize, rather than pacify, the 
country. 

Liberia’s civil war began in 1989, when a former 
government bureaucrat, Charles Taylor, formed an 
army to overthrow fee brutal regime of Samuel . 


Doe. In a nation where the vast may 
' are mired in crushing poverty, Mr. Taylor and 
other leaders with access to money and grins had no : 
difficulty recruiting desperate young men to fighti 
and loot 

. Mr. Taylor and his rivals have led less a military 

struggle than a seven-year spasm of massacres, 
rape and looting directed at civilians. The country ■ 
is nominally ruled by a transitional Council of 
State: • 

' Of about 2J5 million Liberians, aid agencies 
estimate that 150,000 to 200,000 — or 6 to 8 
. percent of fee population — have been killed and 


as many as L5 million forced from their homes. 

In this shattered land, where people struggle to 
survive in fee rubble of what once was an econ- 
omy; almost no one is ready for an election. And 
abciuf 660,000 people,;* quarter.of feepopulaiion, 
are refugees- abroad, where they will be unable to 
vote; -. - ; r - • ■- 

. A‘ month before voting day, fee election com- 
missronsfifl is establishing branch offices in fee 
provinces. Many Liberians are. unaware who is 
nmning or how the vote will be conducted.. Be- 

• Set LIBERIA Page 6 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY JUNE 24, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Throwing Away the Key / 'Super-Maximum' Prisons 


Virginia Gets Even Tougher on Its Convicts 


By Peter Finn 

Washington Post Service 


B IG STONE GAP. Virginia— On a 3,000- 
foot elevation, surrounded by the lush, 
wooded Appalachian Mountains, a new 
deFmitioo of hard time in Virginia is rising 
in a series of bunker-like buildings. 

This is where Virginia is building one of two 
"super-maximum" prisons, harsh institutions that 
have become common in the United States. An 
identical 1 ,267-inmaie facility is being built 35 
miles northeast of here on Red Onion Mountain, 
near Pound. Both will open next year. 

The inmates in the new prisons will be divided 
into two groups: general population and segregated. 
Those in segregation — as many as 192 prisoners in 
eight units at each prison — will be in 23-hour 
lockdown. Their tiny cells have narrow slats to let in 
natural sunlight Through the slats, there is a spec- 
tacular view here of the valley below, but prison 
officials plan to smoke the windows before the 
prison opens so inmates can’t see out. 

For the segregated prisoners, there will be do 
group activities, no educational or vocational pro- 
grams, no television and no sports. Some of them 
also may be denied reading material. Exercise will be 
limited to an hour a day of pacing alone in a narrow 
concrete yard. When visitors are allowed, they will 
not be permitted to touch the prisoners; even the most 
secure of Virginia’s current prisons allow an em- 
brace at the beginning and end of a visit 
Such super-maximum prisons have drawn crit- 
icism from prison rights advocates and human 
rights groups. But prison officials say they are 
essential to manage the most violent and incor- 
rigible convicts. 

Ronald Angelone, director of the Virginia De- 
partment of Corrections, said the abolition of parole 
for all crimes committed in the state after Jan. 1, 
1995, means that the state will have many more 
prisoners to handle in coining years. So the state 
needs tougher prisons to house them, he said. 

Although the rate of violent crime in Virginia has 
remained steady or dropped every year since 1993, 
the number of stale prisoners has increased, from 
17,000 in 1993 to 24,000 today, and will reach 
40,000 in 2002, state officials said. 

Because of that projected growth, the slate is in the 
midst of a $420 million prison building boom. In 
addition to the two super-maximum facilities, of- 
ficials are buUding two maximum-security prisons, a 
women's prison and the state’s fust private prison. 

The two super-maximums will be needed to 
handle the larger number of violent inmates serving 
true life sentences. Mr. Angelone said. "Prisoners 
will be totally under the control of correctional 
officers," he said. When prisoners are taken out of 
their cells, whether for showers, exercise, or legal, 
medical or family visits, they will be shackled, 
handcuffed and accompanied by two guards. Above 
them, at all limes, more guards will watch from gun 
ports. The guards will be armed with guns and. for 
use in less serious situations, such nonlethal weapons 
as rifles that can fire up to 300 rubber balls. 

‘’The prison is designed so that there are always 
sight lines for the officers,” said Mr. 'Angelone, 
who noted that older prisons have comers where 
prisoners, they can escape scrutiny. 

The segregated units mostly will be used to house 
prisoners who have committed offenses inside pris- 



A view of the Wallens Ridge facility being cut into 
the „■ Appalachians . ‘ Segregated 9 inmates will be cuffed 
and escorted from their cells for an hour a day. 


on. Depending on the crime, some will be held in 
segregation for years. "We are dealing here with the 
worst of the worst” Mr. Angelone said. 

State correctional systems have beerr building 
super-maximum prisons, modeled after the federal 
prison at Marion. Illinois, since the 1980s. At least 
40 states have such facilities. 

T HE TREND concerns some human rights 
groups, who say the complete isolation of 
prisoners is degrading and has spawned 
violence and other abuses by guards. 

The American Civil Liberties Union. Human 
Rights Watch and the American Friends Service 
Committee have complained of beafirigs and hog 
tying of inmates and of guards forcing prisoners to 
lap food from plates because their hands are cuffed 
behind their backs. 

Some of the stun weapons that Virginia is in- 


troducing across its prison system, 
which every officer at the snper- 
maximums will carry, have been 
condemned by Amnesty Interna- 
tional as "cruel and inhumane.” 
Mr. Angelone said such weapons 
protect inmates and guards wiflioat 
the need to resort to lethal force. 

"There needs to be security, 
yes, but it always needs to be done 
in a humane fashion,” said Jenni 
Gainsborough, public policy co- 
ordinator for the ACLU’s National 
Prison Project. “There is tremen- 
dous potential for abuse in these 
places: the isolation, the weapons, 
the lack of any clear independent 
oversight. And the mental effect on 
people, particularly those who 
come in with mental problems, can 
be bonifying.” 

Indeed, one federal judge found 
that patting inmates with mental 
illness in such isolation was akin to 
"putting an asthmatic in a place 
with little air to breathe.” The 
judge, in a California case, foond 
that the mentally ill should not be 
so isolated, but he said such harsh 
conditions do not violate the Con- 
stitutional rights of the prison pop- 
ulation as a whole. 

Officials here plan mental test- 
ing before confining prisoners to 
segregation. And Mr. Angelone, 
without commenting directly on 
conditions in super-maximum 
prisons in other states, said Vir- 
ginia’s would be different from 
most of the others. 

Unlike most super-maximum 
prisons in the United States, Vir- 
ginia’s will have some general- 
population prisoners. Those in- 
mates — violent, long-term felons 
who nonetheless obey the rules — 
will have some privileges denied 
to those in segregation. They will 
be allowed to congregate in the 
yard, and will have limited edu- 
cational programs. 

But even compared with max- 
imum-security prisons in Virginia, those oppor- 
tunities will be scant. At nearby Keen Mountain 
Correctional Center, a maximum -security facility, 
prisoners can participate in a variety of woric pro- 
grams, including silk-screening and making T-shirts, 
soap and license plates. 

At Wallens Ridge and Red Onion, the only work 
will be janitorial, and educational programs will be 
limited to obtaining a General Educational De- 
velopment diploma. 

"What do we expect when these prisoners get out 
if there is no effort at rehabilitation and we just isolate 
them and encourage their antisocial tendencies?” 
Ms. Gainsborough of the ACLU asked. 

But in Virginia, society’s interest in rehabili- 
tation will be moot for many super-maximum pris- 
oners. Because of their sentences, and because the 
state has abolished parole, many will probably die in 
prison. 


Mortar Fire Bars Meeting of Brazzaville Parliament 


Crtnpii/Jtn Oar Suit, Fnmt Dnparhri 

BRAZZAVILLE. Congo Republic 
— Mortars were fired on the Parliament 
building during heavy fighting here 
Monday, preventing members from at- 
tending a meeting called by the pres- 
ident. a French diplomat said. 

The fighting was the most serious 
violation of the truce agreed to last week 
in the power struggle between President 
Pascal Lissouba and a former dictator. 
General Denis Sassou-Nguesso. Mr. 
Lissouba bad apparently called the ses- 
sion to review Lhe conflict. 


Laurent Viguier, First secretary at the 
French Embassy in Brazzaville, said the 
Parliament building came under artil- 
lery as well as mortar Fire. He had no 
details about whether anyone in the 
building had been killed or wounded, 
but said there had been reports of deaths 
in battles in other parts of Brazzaville on 
Monday. 

Details were sketchy because the 
fighting, which broke out at midmom- 
ing and lasted most of the day. made it 
difficult to gather information, Mr. 
Viguier said in a telephone interview. 


Brazzaville residents were pinned in- 
side their homes. 

Shells fired by one of the warring 
factions in Brazzaville also slammed 
into a military camp over the river di- 
viding the Congo Republic from the 
former Zaire, now renamed Congo, wit- 
nesses and officials said. 

‘ ‘Seven shells hit Camp Tsbatshi,” 
Foreign Minister Bizima Karaha said. 
"We could tell precisely where they 
were fired from.” Mr. Karaha called the 
incident unacceptable. Witnesses said 
there were no casualties. 


Germany’s Far Right * 
Just Can’t Find Votes 

Republicans Fail to Capitalize on Mood 


"There was supposed to have been a 
meeting this morning,” Mr. Viguier 
said of the Parliament, “but I think it 
was canceled because of the fighting.” 

The French ambassador, Raymond 
Cesaire, met Sunday with Mr. Lissouba 
and General Sassou-Nguesso as part of 
the attempts to end the fighting. Mr. 
Viguier said it was impossible to say 
Monday when such contacts would be 
resumed. 

“It’s very difficult to make plans 
when you are surrounded by men bat- 
tling each other,” he said (AP, Reuters) 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Past Service 

BERLIN — Everywhere he turns in 
Germany, Rolf Schlierer perceives the 
kind of gloomy social and economic 
conditions that he says should fuel a 
dramatic surge in the popularity of his 
far-right Republican Party. 

A majority of German voters say they 
are anxious about the course of Euro- 
pean unity, worried about surrendering 
their beloved Deutsche mark in favor of 
an untested Continental currency to be 
known as the euro, and frustrated by the 
bland message of their centrist political 
leaders. 

Many Germans no longer take pains 
to hide fears that a sharp rise in foreign 
residents will transform society and de- 
press living standards. With unemploy- 
ment now close to 5 million, a level not 
seen since Adolf Hitler came to power 
in 1 933, they say they are running out of 
patience with political bromides. 

But to his chagrin, Mr. Schlierer is 
struggling to make headway with voters 
at a time when other rightist politicians 
in Europe are achieving dramatic gains. 
In Germany’s last general election, the 
Republicans won barely 2 percent of the 
vote, and surveys show their support 
may be dwindling further. 

Mr. Schlierer, an articulate politician, 
acknowledges that he and his movement 
remain handicapped by the Nazi legacy 
and the repulsion of German voters by 
what be rails "defense of national in- 
terests.” 

"There’s no question our situation is 
different because of the German past,” 
he said in an interview. "We are not 
chauvinistic; we only promote what we 
think is best for Germany. We want 
tougher action on crime, we want to 
preserve the mark, and we want to expel 
foreigners who commit crimes. But the 
press does not give us a fair hearing, and 
we get stuck with the neo-Nazi labeL” 

Elsewhere in Western Europe, sim- 
ilar moods of disgust with mainstream 
politicians and dismay over their policy 
failures have propelled the rise of pop- 
ulist demagogues and extreme rightists. 
Amid grave uncertainty about the Con- 
tinent's future and their own liveli- 
hoods, growing numbers of voters are 
embracing the xenophobic message of 
crusaders who want to expel foreigners, 
reverse the drive toward European unity 
and break the mold of the existing polit- 
ical power structure. 

In France, the National Front is 
mounting a crusade to displace the 
GauHists as the most-powerful force on 
the right after winning 15 percent of the 
votejn recent elections. In Austria, Jo- 

X iider has vowed to become chan- 
within two years now that bis 
Freedom Party has secured the alle- 
giance of nearly a quarter of the 
voters. 

In Italy, the National Alliance under 
Gianfranco Fini also seems poised for a 
share of power after the next elections. 
In Denmark, Norway and the Neth- 
erlands, small rightist movements are 
luring voters who are disgruntled over 
high taxes, rising immigration and big 
government. 

But even though Western Europe’s 
biggest country is afflicted by record 
joblessness and is host to the largest 
number of alien workers, it has suc- 
cessfully thwarted the rise of far-right 
political movements that could resur- 
rect fears at home and abroad about a 
revival of extreme German national- 
ism. 

A key reason, sociologists say, may 


be Germany’s sustained effort to deal * 
squarely with the Nazi legacy. U nlike 
France. Austria and Switzerland, Ger- 
many. under the tutelage of Weston 
powers, was not allowed id mask the , - 
troth about the devastating con- S. 
sequences of Nazi rule. Other nations, 
shied away from the extent of their _!T 
fascist sympathies duriqg years of col- “* 
laboration with the Nazis and are now . 
paying a political price for their refusal . 
to confront history. „ r 

Another factor is tire ail-embracing ' u 
nature of the dominant German parties, 
especially Chancellor Helmut Kohl's - 
Christian Democratic Union, which has • 
smothered a lot of far-right tendencies 
within its broad populist tent. 

"One of Kohl’s greatest achieve- ’ 
meats has been to build a real people’s . 
party that absorbs a wide scope af opin- 
ion.” says Werner Pager, political ed- 
itor of Die Zeit, the prestigious weekly “ 
newspaper. "Kohl himself at times . 
seems to the left of Britain’s Labor Party- 
prime minister, Tony Blair, but there are 
people in his party who are every bit as 
right-wing as Jean-Marie Le Pen.” . ' 
leader of France’s National Front. _ „ 

Sociologists say there is ample ev- -J. 
idence of racial intolerance in Germany ... 

‘There’s no question 
our situation is 
different because of the , - 

German past.’ *..V 

and a large growth potential for ex- 
tremist views, most alarmingly among ,. , 
young people. 

In Eastern Germany, disaffected -; 
skinhead youths have been accused of . i , 
perpetrating a wave of firebombings 
against residences housing asylum - - 
seekers. Since Germany’s unification 
seven years ago, more than 30 foreign- _ > 
era have been killed and hundreds in- T« 
jured in these outbursts. 

German officials say much of this , 
hatred may result from the education - 
policies of the former East Germany's 
Communist rulers, who never instructed • 
the population about the full extent of ..- 
Hitler’s atrocities against Jews. Gypsies _ .! 
and the citizens of occupied lands. The ■ . 
Communist history lesson focused on . 
Hitler as a capitalist stooge who ex- 
terminated leftists. 

But studies show that young people 
from some of Germany's most pros- -\ 
perous western regions also show sym- •> 
pathies that could be construed as na- ■ -• 
tionalist or far-right. 

lira study of 1 384 students from five 
universities in the western state of 
Hesse, Alex Demirovic and Gerd Paul 
of the Social Research Institute in. 
Frankfurt reported that 15 percent of 
those questioned identified with pos- - „■ 
itions espoused by the far right, in- . - 
eluding the expulsion of aU foreigners • 
who commit crimes. 

"The lesson is that Germany with its 
Nazi past may indeed be different from , 
its neighbors, but the potential support •_ 
for right-wing populism is still there,” ' 
says Peter Loesche, a political scientist 
at Goettingen University who has writ- „ ■ . 
ten several studies about Germany’s far _> 
right 

"It’s only lying dormant within our .- 
society. All it requires is a moderate, ... 
youthful, charismatic figure like Aus- ■/> 
tria’s Haider and you could see it take ' 
off with a young generation that has no - 
direct link with Hitler and no prospects . 
for full employment. 


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TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


Strike Set for Paris Transit System 

PARIS ( AFPi — The Communist-led General Labor Con- 
federation union said Monday that its workers on the Paris 
Metro and buses would strike Friday. 

The one-day strike will protest a management plan to 
combine night bus services with a system for transporting bus 
and Metro night workers, leading to the loss of 27 jobs, the 
union said. 

Impasse Hurts Israeli Tourism 

JERUSALEM ( Reuters ) — The breakdown in Middle East 
peace talks is hurting Israel's tourism industry, the Israeli 
Hotels Association said Monday. 

An association spokesman. GiladNachum, said 2.1 million 
tourists were expected to visit Israel this year, down from 2.4 
million visitors in 1996. 

"It's due to a lack of secure feelings among foreign 
tourists,” Mr. Nachum said of the decline. 

A work protest by airline technicians Monday forced 
Greece's national carrier, Olympic Airways, to cancel 19 
domestic flights, stranding hundreds of travelers. The tech- 
nicians had refused to woric overtime. (APi 

Malta is planning to open two or three casinos in luxury 
hotels and let IS-year-oids frequent them in a bid to increase 
tourism. At the moment, the Mediterranean island has one 
casino, whose minimum age is 25. ( Reuters! 

The United States needs to do more to fight deadly, drug- 
resistant diseases that spread across borders because of the 
boom in international tourism, said the Board on International 
Health, a National Academy of Sciences unit (AP) 


Europe 


Today 

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Forecast for Wednesday through Friday, as provided by AcctiWMhor. Asia 



North America 
Hen and humid across die 
Northeast Wednesday and 
Thursday, but thunder- 
storms mU a from wffi pro- 
vide some rsM by Friday. 
Gusty thunderstorms will 
rumble Irom the central 
Plains Wednesday Irao the 
Midwest Thursday, than It 
win aim hm and dry. Com- 
fortably cool in the North- 


Europe 

Rainy, cool weather will 
move from England and 
France Wednesday to Ger- 
many and Scandinavia by 
Friday; there could be 
heavy rare over trss area. 
Thunderstorms In Greece 
Wednesday will be fol- 
lowed by sunny, warmer 
weather. Mostly sunny and 
ra^nwnn In Italy through 


Asia 

Sunny, very hot and dry 
across the northern hefl of 
China through Friday. 
South-central China and 
northern Myanmar will 
have soaking rare. Humid 
In Tokyo wttfi showers Ske- 
ly Wednesday, then some 
sunshkie through Friday. A 
developing tropical storm 
may threaten southern 
Japan. 


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Priun-.i it r .Vt-h-^u International. London. Registered as a newspaper a the past office. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1997 


PAGE 3 


mn > s Far ft; , - — 

Can’t Find \ 0 t Su P reme Court Upholds 
mlaii i„ ( A Sexual Predator Law 

Oft 1# 

^ Kansas Statute Kept Pedophile in Prison 
l‘ ■ . - i 'Q For Fear He Wo uld Commit New Crimes 


THE AMERICAS 


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"• - r <- T&r A*fewar«frf Pn*a 

. "••■•;:i ;r >f WASHINGTON — The Supreme 
■ . " 1 *\V it; Court ruled Monday (hat states can keep 
■ (r^ violent sexual prcdators locked up after 

■‘ •: they serve thedr prison sentences even if 

- iv “fe they are not mentally ilL 

: ■ Ruling 5 to 4 in the case of an ad- 
‘ % raided pedophile from Kansas, the 
: _ justices said such people can be held if 

‘ "V-n ^v they are considered mentally abnormal 
and are likely to commit new crimes. 

•-• "if Such, confinement, intended to pro- 
• Jit tect society, the court said, does not 

- • x.. violate the constitutional right to due 

process and is not double punishment 
■ ^ for the same crime. 

. . The court took these other actions: 

' " "S; fJ f£ •RfcBtig 5 to 4, it overturned its own 
1985 : ehinchf-state decision by ruling 
: - .„-.f \ that public school teachers can offer 
j 1 1 remedial help at church-run schools. 
The decision, is expected to save mii- 
-- '*? ^ lions of dollars a year in administrative 
v/-‘- “* 05 . costs for a federal program to help chil- 
Z ‘ Jc ^ jjren from lew-income families. 

i* ‘ • Ruling 5 to 4, it said guards at 

' f privately run' prisons did not enjoy the 
~ ' l ’ lf nq c . same legal protection as those at state- 
run facilities, a decision that could 
IUmlT" hamper efforts to privatize government 


ir. !CjRjj£.Mr** !'■ 
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The Kansas law does not amount to a 
criminal prosecution or punishment, he 
said. 

l *Th^ challenged act unambiguously 
requires a finding of dangerousness 
either to one's seif or to others as a 
prerequisite to involuntary confine- 
ment, he said. “Hendricks’s diagnosis 
as a pedophile, which qualifies as a 
‘mental abnormality' under the act, thus 
plainly, suffices for due process pur- 








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•It said railroad workers could not 
r t sue their employers for emotional dis- 
"f tbf tress over exposure to a cancer-causing 
substance if it has not made them ill The 
court ruled unanimously that a pipe- 
fitter exposed to large amounts of as- 
\ <. bestos while working for Metro-North 
Commuter Railroad in New York City 
could not soe for emotional distress. 

• avto «It agreed to use an Oregon case to 

• • clarify what evidence of danger must 

exist before police with search warrants 
•- -.:-i can break into a home without knocking 

• -anifis --•• 

...^ The sexual predator rulin g means 

• -^--..7 Kansas can continue to confine Leroy 

""*• Hendricks, who was convicted five times 
nf child-molesting and has said his d«nh 

- - ■ is the only way to guarantee he would not 

.. • V.'Jltr commit new crimes against children. 
-.-.TjT! “The court has recognized that an 
\yZl individual’s constitutionally protected 
- Yt; interest in avoiding physical restraint 
.' 7 r may be- overridden even in the civil 
' c context,” Justice Clarence Thomas 
"r ^ wrote for the court. 


Justice Thomas’s opinion was joined 
by Chief Justice William Rehnquist and 
Justices Sandra Day O’Connor, Ant- 
onin Scalia and Anthony Kennedy. 

Dissenting were Justices Stephen 
Breyer, John Paul Stevens, David 
Souter and Ruth Bader Ginsburg; 

Writing for the dissenters, Justice 
Breyer said the Kansas law amounted to 
additional punishment for Mr. Hen- 
dricks because the state did not provide 
treatment for him w hile he was in pris- 
on. The law cannot be applied retro- 
actively, he added. 

Justice Breyer also said Kansas could 
classify Mr. Hendricks as a mentally ill 
and dangerous person for civil com- 
mitment purposes. That section of his 
opinion was joined only by Justices 
Stevens and Souter. 

The Kansas law said violent sexual 
offenders who have completed their 
prison terms could be involuntarily 
committed if they suffered from a 
* ‘mental abnormality or personality dis- 
order” and were likely to commit new 
sex crimes in the future. 

Under the law, a judge or jury must 
decide beyond a reasonable doubt that 
somebody fits that definition. Anyone 
committed to a mental health facility 
under the law is entitled to a new eval- 
uation every year. Five other states have 
similar laws: Arizona, California, Min- 
nesota, Washington and Wisconsin. 

In 1994, Kansas prosecutors invoked 
the law to stop Mr. Hendricks's release 
after he had served 10 years in prison. 

A psychologist testified for the state 
that Mr. Hendricks was not mentally ill 
but that he was a pedophile, which qual- 
ified as a “mental abnormality.” Mr. 
Hendricks said the only way he could 
guarantee he would not molest children 
again was to die. 


Cats CthwcVnie Aoocucd Pra 

ACROSS THE FINISH LINE — Bicycle riders celebrating in Washington after hundreds of them 
completed a four-day procession from Raleigh, North Carolina, to raise ftinds for research against AIDS. 

NAACP Rethinks Schools Policy 


By Steven A. Holmes 

Nm- York Tunes Sen-ice 

WASHINGTON — Facing contin- 
ued white resistance to busing to 
achieve school desegregation, an in- 
creasingly conservative judiciary and 
now criticism from inside and outside 
its ranks, the National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored People is 
rethinking one of its fundamental prin- 
ciples: advocacy of public school in- 
regration. 

At its national convention next month 
in Pittsburgh die NAACP is expected to 
have a formal debate on its school- 
integration policy for the first time in 
mare than a decade. 

The NAACP has always supported 
school integration as a way to improve 
educational opportunities for black stu- 
dents, but opponents have begun 
voicing doubts about that goal. They say 
the organization should focus more 
heavily on seeking the improvement of 
majority-black schools. 

Officials of the civil-rights organi- 
zation have been in a quandary in recent 


years about members who oppose its 
traditional support for racially mixed 
schools, even ousting local chapter di- 
rectors who expressed different views. 
Opposition to the NAACP policy has 
been growing at the same time that 
segregation in public schools has been 
on the rise. 

Other dissenting voices have added 
pressure. More black parents are com- 
plaining that under school integration 
plans it is their children who are most 
likely to be the ones bused out of tbeir 
neighborhoods. 

And some black self-help advocates, 
like Justice Clarence Thomas of the 
Supreme Court and Louis Farrakhau, 
head of the Nation of Islam, have argued 
that it is demeaning to suggest that black 
students can achieve a quality education 
only in largely white schools. 

Myriie Evers- Williams, who heads 
the NAACP, said she not only expected 
the delegates to debate the merits of 
continuing to promote integration in 
public schools but also expected them to 
consider modifying the group's position 
in a resolution. But her personal position 


Sullen Tobacco Farmers: Somebody’s Blowing Smoke 

• i: j- -. ’ m r^riWvj - ■ v • 


Y’s 


HFH 


•}. JKy Adam Nossiter ■ 

.. ./'Hew York Turn Service 

LUCAMA, North Carolina — Tbe 
tobacco former lunged forward, his facte 
red with anger at the latest provocation 
from Washington. 

“Don't get me wrong,” said Billy ■ 
Bass, a gold tobacco leaf swinging from 
its chain around his neck. “Tobacco is 
bad. I wouldn’t tell it any other way. But 
as long as it’s legal, I'D grow it.” 

The tobacco farmers here have long 
lelt scorned by outsiders. Each devel- 
opment in the anti-smoking wars is an- 
other blow, and in the wake of the wide- 
ranging settlement announced in Wash- 
ington last week, the haze of freshly hurt 
pnde was- as palpable in eastern North 
Carolina as the new summer's heaL 

The deal left tobacco fanners here in 
Wilson County, the heart of eastern 
North Carolina's tobacco country, feel- 
ing like agriculture's pariahs. They do 
not know if the deal will mean fewer 
cigarette tuyere, less money for their 
crop or even eventual ruin for them- 
selves, but none of a half-dozen formers 
interviewed suggested quitting. 

“It hurts myfeelings, if you want to 
know the truth,” said Donnie Boyette, 


r ■. 1 i. , A*-* 

who farms' TJ3 acres (45 hefctares^ ne^ - 
here. 

The formers’ houses are surrounded 


m. • 


by the plants, already robust and dark 
green. Their ancestors grew tobacco — 
Mr. Bass said Ins family had grown 
tobacco on the same land since 1741. 
But they are ambivalent about this lu- 
crative crop. 

Most of the formers volunteered that 
they did not smoke, did not want their 
children to smoke and did not want any 
teenagers to smoke. 

They also insisted, vehemently, that 
they are good, hard-working citizens. In 
America’s tobacco wars, they said, they 
are at least blameless. In their view, the 
crop is legal, so if there are ill effects 
from it, they are not responsible. 

* ‘Tobacco farmers are good people,” 
said Thad Sharp 5r., who lives nearby up 
Highway 581 in die hamlet of Sims. 
“They’d give you the shirt off their 
back if you bad chill bumps.” 

“We're the people that's the salt of 
the earth, that’s paying the taxes," said 
Mr. Sharp, whose 200 acres of tobacco 
provide 70 percent of his net profit, 
though he grows soybeans, corn and 
tomatoes on 1,800 additional acres. 

He was sitting in an air-conditioned 


^offiefe, Siting he?A^feS !J gratefirf That to- 
■ banco had brought 'Mm all the way (here 
from a Depression-era boyhood. 

"I’m just as good a citizen as I was 
yesterday,” Mr. Sharp said. “I have no 
problem with my conscience.” 

The $360 billion deal notwithstand- 
ing, the short-term outlook for these 
formers is not all gloomy, said an ag- 
ricultural economist, Blake Brown. 

They are producing more tobacco 
than 10 years ago, and the huge export 
market is helping to make up for drastic 
declines in domestic consumption, said 
Mr. Brown, who works at North Car- 
olina State University. 

About 40 percent of flue-cured to- 
bacco, the kind produced here, is ex- 
ported. Still, Mr. Brown said the farm- 
ers are earning less than in the 1970s, as 
is North Carolina as a whole. Tobacco 
was 46 percent of the state’s farm in- 
come in 1964, but only 15 percent 30 
years later. 

To die tobacco fanners, who often 
refer to the crop’s historic pedigree, 
there is something unpatriotic about the 
tobacco deal 

Why, they ask, should the tobacco 
companies, and perhaps they, too, have 
to pay for something so fundamentally 


American as the exercise of free choice 

— the decision to buy a pack of cig- 
arettes? 

“I think it’s legalized extortion, but 
that’s neither here nor there," Mr. Boy- 
ette said. 

“You’ve got a U.S. company mar- 
keting a legal product to a public that 
can buy or not buy it. You, as a free 
American, choose the pack of cigarettes 

— that was your choice. Now, we've 
got to pay for your sickness?" 

Mr. Bass said: "If I was growing 
marijuana out here, I could understand 
this. Tobacco put this country on its feet, 
used to have a lot of support. Now 
everybody’s sold it ouL’ 


Away From Politics 


is still in support of integrated schools. 

"The NAACP has always believed in 
integration of the public schools,” Ms. 
Evers-Williams said. “But a debate has 
been raging as to whether that's still the 
position we should take." 

Whether the delegates decide to alter 
their backing of integration efforts, in- 
cluding busing, or simply vote to study 
the issue, Ms. Evers- williams said the 
NAACP board would also take up the 
issue either at the convention or at its 
next board meeting in October. 

Even the suggestion of a shift in po- 
sition could further erode support for a 
policy that seems to be increasingly 
falling out of favor among blacks. 

Michael Meyers, head of the New 
York Civil Rights Coalition, a centrist 
group that still supports integration, in- 
terpreted Ms. Evers-Williams’ state- 
ments as a tacit approval of some 
change in direction. 

“She is now sending a very clear and 
strong signal that she is ready to let their 
policy go by the wayside.” Mr. Meyers 
said. 

Efforts to reduce school busing are 
w innin g some black support. 

Earlier this year the Board of Edu- 
cation in Guilford County, North Car- 
olina, which includes Greensboro, 
voted to redraw its district lines to min- 
imize its large-scale basing program 
and preserve neighborhood schools. 

“Our biggest concent now is whether 
our schools will be equal,” said Amos 
Quick, a black member of the 60-mem- 
ber citizens committee that will redraw 
the school boundaries, wrote in The 
Greensboro News & Record last month. 
“Separate but truly equal would not be 
so bad.” 

With the increased costs of the law- 
suits and the NAACP’s continued fi- 
nancial woes, the group has virtually 
stopped involving itself at the national 
level in school desegregation cases. 

Still, the symbolism of an NAACP 
retreat from its unstinting support of 
school integration would have signif- 


Clinton Confirms 
It’s Foley for Tokyo 

WASHINGTON — President 
Bill Clinton has confirmed publicly 
that Thomas Foley, the former 
House speaker, is tus choice to be 
ambassador to Japan. Mr. Clinton 
blamed politics for a long delay on 
announcing the longtime Washing- 
ton Democrat as his choice. 

Mr. Clinton, responding to a 
question from a Japanese television 
reporter, apologized for the pace in 
naming a successor to Waller 
Mondale. the former vice president 
who later went as envoy to Tokyo. 
Mr. Mondale came home in 
December. “Speaker Foley is one 
of the most distinguished men in 
America.” Mr. Clinton said. 

The president stressed his view 
that the ambassadorial nomination 
process could not be defended. 
“Political pressures have made il 
like ii is and we have to fix it,” he 
said. “And 1 have to ask you to 
forgive me for it. but we'll get him 
there as quickly as we can.” The 
nomination has not gone to the Sen- 
ate and a recess is approaching, so 
Mr. Foley may not get a hearing 
until fall. (H7»J 

Congress Nears 
Some Key Goals 

WASHINGTON — if all goes as 
intended, the House and Senate this 
week will pass their separate plans 
to balance the budget by 2002 , 
overhaul Medicare, cut nixes and 
restore welfare benefits for some 
legal immigrants. 

The two chambers will stitch to- 
gether the huge pieces of their ver- 
sions of the balanced budget agree- 
ment that the White House and 
congressional leaders struck last 
month. By the time Congress 
leaves for the July 4 recess, the 
House speaker. Newt Gingrich. Re- 
publican of Georgia, said last week, 
it will be able to proclaim. “This 
has been a remarkably successful 
session.” 

But the negotiations will start all 
over again later. House and Senate 
Republicans remain far apart on 
critical aspects of their competing 
thousand-page bills — and are far 
from winning the president's sig- 
nature. 

Once Congress completes work 
on the budget and tax plans this 
week, the focus will shift to a huge 
conference committee after the Au- 
gust recess. (WP) 

Quote/Unquote 

Dick Armey, the Texas Repub- 
lican who is House majority leader, 
rallying behind Mr. Gingrich, after 
reports of a plot: “The speaker and 
I are getting along great. He will be 
enthusiastically re-elected by the 
Republican Conference.” (AP) 

Jack Pitney, a professor of polit- 
ical science at Claremont McKenna 
College, commenting on Mr. Gin- 
grich’s battle to control and main- 
tain a small Republican majority in 
the House: “The infighting is a 
distraction. That gives every re- 
bellious group tremendous lever- 
age." (N> T) 


CROSSWORD 




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• Six people were being* held in an attack on three 

suburban teenagers who jumped off a freight train in a 
crime-ridden area of Flint, Michigan. All three victims 
were shot, one fatally. Four men and two teenage boys, 
aged 16 to 23, were arrested. (AP) 

• Two Marine Corps recruiters were arrested and 

charged in the rape of a woman and the beating of a man 
who had inadvertently pitched their tent in the middle of 
a Marine Corps bivouac near Portland, Oregon. The 
recruiters are both sergeants. (AP) 

• Two freight trains with four people aboard collided 

head-on, causing an explosion and diesel fuel fire near 
Devine, Texas, southwest of San Antonio. One man was 
killed and another was missing. (AP) 


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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Kashmir Talks 
To Resume as 
Pakistan-lndia 
Deal Is Geared 


By Kenneth J. Cooper 

Washington Post Service 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — For die 
first time in two decades. India and 
Pakistan agreed Monday to explore pos- 
sible solutions to their 50-year dispute 
ova 1 the Himalayan territory of Kash- 
mir, the main source of hostility and 
cause of two wars between the South 
Asian neighbors. 

The specific commitment to seek a 
resolution to the Kashmir dispute was 
contained in a joint statement issued 
after a weekend of bilateral talks be- 
tween top diplomats of India and 
Pakistan here in the Pakistani capital 
and at a nearby tourist resort 

The arch rivals also agreed to discuss 
seven other issues, including regional 
security and economic cooperation. Un- 
til the statement Monday, India and 
Pakistan had not concluded an agree- 
ment about bow to approach their 
biggest dispute since they signed a 1972 
pact to seek a peaceful settlement 

In September, the diplomats are 
scheduled to meet again in New Delhi. 

India's overriding policy in recent 
years has been to refuse to discuss Kash- 
mir, while Pakistan has often raised the 
issue in international forums and tried to 
enlist a third country as a mediator. 

Within two months of colonial Bri- 
tain's partition of the Indian subcon- 
tinent in 1947, India and Pakistan went 
to war for more than a year over Kash- 
mir, leaving two-thirds under India's 
control and the rest in Pakistan. A second 
war in 1965 Lasted about a month. 

For predominantly Hindu India, Jam- 
mu and Kashmir — its only mostly 
Muslim state — reaffirm the nation's 
constitutionally mandated secularism. 
For the Islamic Republic of P akistan, 
the incorporation or the rest of Kashmir 
would confirm a continuing need for a 
haven from Hindu subjugation for the 
subcontinent’s Muslims. 

India has largely put down die re- 
bellion with what Pakistan has estimat- 
ed to be more than 600,000 members of 
various security forces, a heavy deploy- 
ment dial Pakistan wants reduced. 

For die first time in the talks, the 
countries' delegates discussed missile 
technology, an issue P akistan was 
prompted to raise by a Washington Post 
report three weeks ago that India had 
moved some of its medium-range 
Prithvi missiles to near the border. 



Fears Mount 
That Pol Pot 
May Not Live 
To Be Tried 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Times Serna 


r/m.. 


Tium Hqfrifflwtu. 

Members of the Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front outside India's embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan, on 
Monday. It was the sixth anniversary of the detention of their faction leader, Roof Kashmiri, by Indian troops. 


In Hanoi, Former Foes Still in Discord 


Reuters 

HANOI — Vietnam War-era policy- 
makers from the United States and Vi- 
etnam ended a historic conference here 
Monday during which they reviewed 
the long and agonizing conflict 

But substantial differences remained 
between the interpretations and posi- 
tions of the two sides. 

Speaking at a news conference after 
the meeting, Robert McNamara, U.S. 
secretary of defense during the esca- 
lation of the war, said die four-day meet- 
ing here demonstrated that already in 
1961, both Hanoi and Washington bad 
been "seriously mistaken” about each 
other's motives and intentions. 

"These basic misperceptions, in my 
opinion, prevented each side from mov- 
ing to terminate the conflict at several 
different points between 1960 and 
1968.” he added. 


1960s in a conflict that was to escalate 
and drag on until April 30, 1975, when 
the U.S.-backed Sou A Vietnamese gov- 
ernment collapsed in Saigon. 

By then, 58,000 Americans, 3.6 mil- 
lion Vietnamese and thousands of oth- 
ers from third countries who took part 
were dead. 

Since the war ended, Hanoi’s victory 
has remained a central theme of state 
propaganda and is considered a main- 
stay of the Communist government’s 
claim to legitimacy. 

Analysts said that could explain Vi- 
etnam’s difficulty at the meeting, the 
first such gathering of scholars and de- 
cision-makers, in viewing the conflict 
differently despite the passing of more 
than two decades. 

Mr. McNamara said that, in his opin- 


ion, the United States had misjudged the 
degree to which Hanoi had beea willing 
to sacrifice lives to achieve its goal of an 
independent and unified Vie tnam. 

But he replied to the Vietnamese re- 
marks by saying that there had been 
opportunities for Hanoi as well as 
Washington to end the conflict sooner. 

"I submit to you that the Vietnamese 
mindset was just as firm and I think 
firmly wrong,” be said. 

"For God’s sake, apply this lesson to 
today and tomorrow," he added. 
"Think about it" 

Mr. McNamara, who left the 
Pentagon before the war ended, added: 

"There are misconceptions in the 
minds of political leaders that stand in 
the way or moving towards their com- 
mon interests." 


“Had we in the U.S. recognized that, j I V/* a J j I /II 1 • T7» j 

*■"- (Jut frith the Ula in Vietnam 

Vietnamese officials responded by _ _ _ . 

saying that, while there bad indeed been President and Prime Minister will Leave Their Posts 


saying that, while there bad indeed been 
mussed opportunities to end the war 
sooner, or even to have avoided it al- 
together, it was Washington that let the 
opportunities slip away, not Hanoi. 

"War was imposed on us,'* said Tran 
Quang Co, a senior member of the Vi- 
etnamese delegation. "This was not our 
decision. It did not take place in U.S. 
territory. Given that fact, who suffered 
more? It was our people.” 

The United States never did declare 
war against Vietnam. Its entanglement 
began during the late 1950s and early 


The Associated Press 

HANOI — Vietnam's ruling troika — 
the prime minister, president and Com- 
munist Party leader — will step down 
together from the National Assembly to 
make way for new leadership, a gov- 
ernment official said Moaday. 

Prime Minister Vo Van Kiet, Pres- 
ident Le Due Anh and the Communist 
Party general secretary. Do Muoi, will 
not ran for re-election when Vietnamese 
go to the polls in July, said a spokesman 


BOOKS 


FEEDING FRENZY: 

Across Europe in Search of the 
Perfect Meal 

By Stuart Stevens. 265 pages. $23. New 
York: The Atlantic Monthly Press 

Reviewed by Frank J. Prial 


S TUART STEVENS and Rat Kelly 
share two interests: exercise and eat- 


vJ share two interests: exercise and eat- 
ing. Weights and plates, so to speak. 
They work out regularly in a New York 
gym, then stoke up in one or another of 
the city's better restaurants. And that's 
all they do. 

As Stuart says, it’s "an appallingly 
shallow sort of New York ’90s-styled 
friendship." 

When Rat, a former model whose real 


name is Rachel, suggests a tour of Mich- 
elin three-star restaurants in Europe. 
Stuart eagerly agrees. Rat's boyfriend, 
Cari, a "white-shoe” lawyer with 
whom she seems to have a somewhat 
combative relationship, will underwrite 
tire trip — but only if they do the 29 
restaurants on then 1 list in 29 days. 

“He likes to challenge me," she ex- 
plains. "Particularly with things he 
thinks are sort of demeaning. " 

This is demeaning? Stuart asks. 

"On consecutive days,” Rat replies, 
"sure it is. Who could actually enjoy 
that?” 

Who indeed? 

And so they are off to England, for 
two Michelin three-stars, the Waterside 
Inn in Bray-on-Thames and La Tame 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 


I N the 12th running of the Aegon Hu- 
man-vs. -Computer Tournament, 50 of 


9 a3! If then. 9—£c3 10 Nc3 dc 1 1 Bc4 
Qc7 12 O-O, White would have had an 
enormous lead in development and a 


A man -vs. -Computer Tournament, 50 of 
the world's best computers competed 
against 50 human players.Tbe individual 
winner was the 26-year-old Israeli 
grandmaster Yona Kosashvili. who 
achieved a perfect 6-0 score. 

Kosashvili played conservatively and 
wore down machine after machine. But 
there was one exception: when Chessica 
boldly tried to win material. Kosashvili 
lashed out with a damaging gambiL 

A major point of 3 e4 in foe English 
Opening is that if the game continues 
with 3...g6 4 g3 Bg7 5 Bg2 0-0 6 Nge2, 
White will normally be first to operate 
cut the kingside with f4 because his king 
knight does not restrain his f pawn, as 
Black's does. 

After 4 d4. it is perfectly all right for 
Black to play 4...d6, but Chessica 
chooses the more aggressive 4..Bb4 5 
de Ne4 6 Qd4 Qa5. 

After 7..Nc5, Chessica ’s threat was 
8...Nb3. On 8 Qdl. it could have re- 
peated moves with 8-~Ne4. Would 
kosashvili have been content with a 
draw? Anyhow, Chessica at once 
spumed the chant# in flavor of the very 
aggressive 8...d5? 

The trouble began after Kosasbvili's 


Chessica had probably planned 9...d4? 
from at least as early as Move 8. But it 
had not realized that its sneaky human 


opponent would turn this into a power- 
ful sacrifice of rook for knight and pawn 
with 10ab!Qal IlNd4. 

After IL~Ne6 12 Nb3 Qa6 13 c5!, 
Chessica was forced to save its queen 
with 13...b5, which left its queenside a 
jumble of crowded pieces. And 
Kosashvili marched in with 14 Qd6l, 
preventing Black from castling. 

Kosashvili 's 16 f5! was a pawn sac- 
rifice that could not be accepted because 

16.. Bf5? 17 Bg5! f6 18 ef Qb7 19 Qd8! 
Kd8 20 fg wins an ocean of material. 

The mating attack with 19 Qg3 ! could 
not be warded off by 19...g6 because 20 
Qg5 Nd8 21 Ne4 Ne6 22 Qh6 Qa4 23 
Ng5 Qb4 24 Bd2 is annihilating. So 
Chessica tried to postpone its fate with 

19.. .Bg4 20 Qg4. 

After 20...g6, Kosashvili saw that 21 
Qg5 Nd7 22 Qh6?I Re5 23 Be2 Nf6 
would have given Black more than it 
deserved and chose 21 Bf4 instead. 
From here on, Kosashvili routinely 
crunched the machine. 

Cbessica’s 29—Rb6 was almost cer- 
tainly not a crude blunder but an attempt 
(o push Kosashvili's mating attack be- 
yond its horizon. Its handlers had seen 
enough and gave up on its behalf. 


CHESSKWBLACK 



Claire in London. Belgium is next Mr. Muoi, 

Comme Chez Soi in Brussels; Bruneau, leadership — i 
on the edge of the city; and then Romey- dependent oft 
er. The resigna 

On they go to Strasbourg and Au dividual dec is 
Crocodile; then across foe Rhine for foe eminent or G 
Sport Hotel in Baiersbronn, a German change foe a 
resort Paris is next with dates at Tail- Dung said, 
levent, Lucas Carton, L’Ambroisie and "The three I 
Tour d’ Argent. central govern 

Chewing steadily, they take in Michel to run again 

Guerard’s spa at Eugenie-les-Bains and sembly,” the 
Alain Ducasse's Louis XV in Monaco, all requested t 
Carl, the boyfriend, irked at missing the beginning. " 
fun (or maybe a bit jealous), joins them It was unci 
in Florence, where they do the Enoteca either Mr. Kiel 
Pinchiorri. The two m 

The next day, they are at foe Antica withdraw from 
Osteria del Pome, near Milan. Thai, in a seat in foe Pc 
1 2 days of calculated excess, they try to a member of ti 

eliminate more of the restaurants on 

their list, including Pic, Pierre Gagnaire, 

Paul Bocose, Georges Blanc, Lam- 
eloise, Troisgros. L’Esperance and La 
Cote d’Or. Personals 

And that’s pretty much it There’s no 

plot; no profound insights. A dish or two WT 
inspire lilting lines, but for the most part t» adored. gMfed. I 

the food commentary is Listless. Oc- forouflfiout the wrt 
casionally one wonders: Did they ac- 
tually eat in this place? The memorable samuato. help 
meals are — no surprise — in the simple pray tar us. Aron i 

places they visit to escape all the tree- 
star overkill. 

Stevens is a political consultant and promised Lit 
novelist who has written two previous 
travel books. “Night Train to Turid- 
stan" and "Malaria Dreams." This Announcements 
time out, his narrative vehicle is just 
that, a 1965 Ford Mustang, ordered sight 
unseen and shipped to England to 
provide exotic transportation. The car is suBSCRBsTcui 

practically a piece of junk, but stale fa gusto s or qua 
jokes about its daily breakdowns help 
fill the miles and the time between ex- c^aw 

pensive pigouts. Euno^MODLE e 


for the national assembly, Nguyen Sy 
Dung. 

Typically, the prime minister and 
president are replaced at foe same time 
in Vietnam, where the Communist Party 
aims to use the positions to strike a 
balance between conservative and re- 
formist interests in the government 

In the current leadership, Mr. Kiet. a 
southern reformer, countered General 
Anh’s Communist orthodoxy. 

Mr. Kiet, 74, and General Anh, 76, 
will both vacate their offices when they 
give up their legislature seats. Viet- 
nam?s president . and .prime, minister, 
must be members of the National As- 
sembly. 

Mr. Muoi, 80, will retain his party 


PHNOM PENH — The Khmer 
Rouge guerrillas who have reportedly 
turned against their leader, Pol Pot, may 
kill him rather than let him testily at a 
trial where he could implicate them. 
First Prime Minister Norodom Ranar- 
iddh said Monday. 

"It appears to me that some Cam- 
bodians and maybe some countries are 
not really willing to see Pol Pot alive and 
to be brought to justice," be said, in a 
suggestion that was endorsed by a num- 
ber of political analysts Monday. 

"You see, maybe Pol Pot would say 
something not very nice to them," he 
said. ‘ ‘Pol Pot would say. Those people 
were involved,’ or, ‘Those countries 
were supporting me for years.’ ” 

He aid not name any countries or 
people, but China was once the patron of 
foe Khmer Rouge government, and 
various Thai interests continue to have 
close economic connections to the guer- 
rillas, whose bases are along the Thai 
border. 

Prince Ranariddh’s comments fol- 
lowed the news Sunday that the United 
States and other nations bad aslcad 
Canada to seek the extradition of Mr. 
Pol Pot under its law against genocide, 
pending the creation of an international 
tribunal (hat would conduct a triaL 

On Saturday, both of Cambodia’s co- 
prime ministers, Hun Sen and Prince 
Ranariddh, signed a request to foe 
United Nations for help in setting up an 
such a tribunal 

The prince’s comments Monday 
echoed the suspicions of a number of 
foreign political analysts here, who said 
that even in captivity, foe man respon- 
sible for the deaths of more than 1 
million Cambodians from 1975 to 1979 
remained a threat to the political in- 
terests of a variety of people. 

A number of leading members of the 
current government, as well as King 
Norodom Sihanouk himself, are former 
members of the Khmer Rouge or have 
had close ties to them. 

A trial of Mr. Pol Pot with all its 
emotional power for Cambodia, might 
have unsettling effects on this already 
unstable country, where the two prime 
ministers are locked in an increasingly 
dangerous political rivalry. 

There was a widespread sense among 
foreign diplomats and political analysts 
that things are not what they seem in the 


reports about Mr. Pol Pot- • 
r . T he entire sc enari o that has boeu^Or 


leadership — an appointed position in- 
dependent of the National Assembly. 

The resignations were based on in- 
dividual decisions and not by a gov- 
ernment or Communist Party push to 
change foe country’s leadership, Mr. 
Dung said. 

"The three leaders were asked by the 
central government and many officials 
to run again for the National As- 
sembly," the spokesman said. “They 
all requested to stay out right from the 


ported over recent days of Mr. Pol Pot's 
split with his supporters, his flight into 
the jungle and his capture could be a 
drama orchestrated by the Cambodian 
government, the Khmer Rouge or both, 
they say. 

But if Mr. Pol Pot is now in some 
form of custody, a number of these 
analysts say they agree with the prince 
that the Khmer Rouge leader might not 
survive to face a tribunal. 

“You get a feeling around here that 
there is still a real fear of this guy," a 


Western diplomat said. “I’m still skep- 
tical that he is going to show up for 


It was unclear who might succeed 
either Mr. Kiet or General Anh. 

The two men will not completely 
withdraw from politics; each win retain 
a seat in foe Poutburo. Mr. Muoi is also 
a member of the Politburo. 


deal that tie is going to show up for 
trial." 

The prospect that Mr. Pol Pot, 69, 
could soon die is one that has been 
suggested privately and publicly by 
government officials, for whom his 
death would be more convenient than 
bis trial. 


Business Travel 


Key Indum Officio, 
’ Charged by Police 


fir - r% 



PATNA, India — Federal po- 
alicemen filed charges against the 
president of India’s governing c®-'v. 
aiirion Monday in a 5138 nnEjon 
theft case that could threaten foe ■ 
government 

The Central Bureau of Invests 
gatkm charged Laloo Prasad Yadav- 
and four other politicians with con- , 
spfracy and dereliction of duty in.,-, 
the case, which is known as the. 
"fodder scam." All five have* 
denied any wrongdoing. - 

Mr. Yadav and 55 others are' 
accused of siphoning off about 4.8:* 
billion rupees from the state gov-< 
exnment’s animal husbandly dc-. , 

partment in the 1980s and 1990s. .. 
The money was intended to buy^ 
fodder for cattle on state -run.- 
farms. 

President of the Janata Dal one'., 
of 13 parties that make up the gov- 
erjiing United Front coalition, Mr. 1 
Yadav also is chief minister of the-,; 
northern state of Bihar. (AP). r 


Al r. Ijrmpt 


- '"*f* 

• »♦«***. 


r-7* M § . 

■+*• to 

-tm 

iwnrtiL 


Titm* 

■- to- to. 


Pakistan Is Sued 
In CIA Extradition 



ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — An. ; 
opposition leader filed suit against! 
the government Monday, alleging , 
that it violated foe civil rights of a*.* 
Pakistani man who was extradited' , 
to the United States on charges of-v 
having killed two CIA employees', 
in Virginia. ’-j 

The leader of the Awami Na-rf 
tional Party charged that Mir AiznalLr 
Kansi’s rights were ignored when*-, 
he was whisked out of Pakistan last--: 
week without a hearing. . j 

Mr. Kansi was extradited in a 
clandestine operation that has out-' 
raged many in this Islamic nation. 

"The way in which Aimal Kansi 
was banded over to the U.S. agen- 
cies was against the constitution 
and self-respect of a country and 
amounted to depriving him of the 
country's legal protection and basic; 
rights," said Aurangzeb Kansi, a 
lawyer and politician who is not 
related to the suspecL (API 


■*» vmtmm 

1 1MK 


-I Tk 



■ yr- 





Sri Lankan Victory 





-ItorJMnsMi 


COLOMBO — Sri 1 ankan; 
troops captured a town Monday 
after resuming their offensive in the 
northern Wanni region, which is 
controlled by Tamil rebels, military 
officials sain. 

The town is PuliyankuJam, 22 
kilometers (14 miles) north of the 
government-held town of Vavu- 
jniya. Resistance was not heavy, the 
officials added. ( Reuters ) 


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Golkar: It’s Official 


JAKARTA — Indonesia's gov- 
erning Golkar party was declared 
Monday as the official winner of 
elections in May, gaining an over- 
whelming majority in Parliament 
and guaranteeing a seventh term for 
President Suharto. 

Golkar won 325 of the 425 elect- 
ed seats in Parliament, according to 
final results that were made public 
Monday. The military holds 75 oth- 
er seats. 

The opposition Muslim United 
Development Party took 89 seats, 
up from 62 in voting in 1992. The 
Indonesian Democratic Party won 
1 1 seats, down from 56. (AP) 


1 j* 

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AFFES keep popping up. The Alsa- 
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look alike.) And Jean -Claude Vrinai 
didn’t start TaiUevent; his father did. 

One can’t help wondering just when 
this madcap tour took place. Romey er, 
in Belgium, Has disappeared from foe 
Michelin guide; Pierre Gagnaire went 


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bankrupt a year ago and decamped for 
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last year. The Enoteca Pinchiorri and the 
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longer in the top category. Neither, for 
that matter, is Pic, in Valence. 

Admittedly, the Michelin inspectors 
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If this were a dish instead of a book. 
I'd say it needed a little more time in foe 
oven. Another hour, perhaps, at about 1 
350 degrees. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1997 

EUROPE 


PAGES 




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ussian Duma Votes 
: To Curb Some Religi ons 

S Lawmakers Exempt ‘Traditional 9 Faiths 


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By David Hoffman 

,. ! Wsfeington Poa Service 

’■ v 1 1 MOSCOW — Russia’s lower house 
■*-..., ^ ctf Parliament, the State Duma, gave 
., 1 * r f iftial approval Monday to legislation 

: i that would sbaiply restrict the activities 

' r . df foreign missionaries and many re- 
- . •■ • » ligious faiths except for the “tradition- 
; :-XaJ" religions of Russian Orthodoxy, 
. < .. Judaism, Islam and Buddhism. 

! The legislation is being closely 
“ \! S patched by human ri^its advocates as a 
.■’■ Ua mmeiex of Russia's commitment to 
-c-! freedom of conscience. Critics say the 
. l$w would be a giant step backward, 
. hi , toward state control of religion, and are 
'.‘5s. orging President Boris Yeltsin to veto 

. ' ; :t, i v the measure. 

• ‘ ' "rtf! I “The new legislation is oriented to- 

ffviard the revival of Soviet religious 
** l I 1 . ' Policy,” said Gleb Yak unin a de- 

/, j 1 'Upij hocked Russian Orthodox priest and 

*'' ' / */■ yf j, liberal member of Parliament. “Only 
*'0QlfL tbday, instead of the Communist one, it 
™ proposes to establish a dominant cler- 
1 ; i.-n ^ , real ideology, and to discriminate 
: against believers in other religions.'' 

^ £ ■ The legislation has its origins in fears 

• bjy some leaders of the Russian Or- 
- ’#'• -jpdox. Church that its growth and re- 

,!i -5 vjval is threatened by an onslaught of 
■ ■ foreign missionaries. 

1 > Persecuted and pressured daring the 
-.. c , Soviet era, the Russian Orthodox 
Church is struggling to reassert itself, 
and feels vulnerable to competition 
from proselytizing and religious sects, 
many of which have been active in 
-..- s _ Russia since the Soviet collapse, ac- 


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cording to specialists here. 

The church has especially bridled at 
foreign missionaries who have come to 
Russia bearing humanitarian aid. Ten- 
sions have also flared in the provinces 
between missionaries and local author- 
ities. 

According to Lawrence Uzzell, Mos- 
cow representative of the Keston In- 
stitute, which studies religious life in 
Russia and Eastern Europe, about one- 
fourth of Russian provinces have adopt- 
e *^? a y ,s quieting the rights of minority 

Mr, Uzzeil said a Roman rj»hniir 
priest in Belgorod was recently told he 
could not celebrate mass there because 
bis parish is a foreign religious orga- 
nization. 

The new legislation was overwhelm- 
mgly approved, 300 to 8 , and now goes 
to the upper chamber, the Federation 
Council, where it is also expected to be 
approved, Mr. Uzzeil said. 

President Yeltsin has come out 
against similar proposals in the past, Mr. 
Uzzeil recalled, but his decision this 
time is ‘ ‘up for grabs.” 

Mr. Yeltsin has not spoken oat pub- 
licly about the measure. 

The 1993 Russian Constitution guar- 
antees that religions “shall be equal 
before the law.” 

But according to critics, the new le- 
gislation would effectively create two 
classes 

of unequal religions. 

One would be the major traditional 
religions — Russian Orthodoxy, Juda- 
ism, Islam and Buddhism. But a second- 



BRIEFLY 


Ail ,'lh.- Av-kjauJ Pir«* 

TRYING TO SAY NO TO VIOLENCE — Young students in Warsaw marching in silence among a 
throng of 4,000 on Monday to protest the murder of a student. Their banner pleaded: Stop Cruelty. 


class status would be created, “reli- 
gious groups,” which would be allowed 
to meet pnvately if they registered with 
the local authorities. 

But to qualify, a religious group 
would have to have been operating in 
Russia for IS years, excluding all but 
those that were in existence when Le- 
onid Brezhnev, the Soviet leader, died, a 
time when the state was officially athe- 
ist and religious activists and dissidents 
were persecuted and imprisoned. 

Many of the non traditional religions 
that have come to Russia since the So- 
viet collapse, including Roman Cath- 
olics. Protestants. Baptists, Mormons, 
Jehovah's Witnesses, Peniecostalists, 


Seventh Day Adventists and others, 
would not meet the new criteria as re- 
ligious groups, and may have to wait 
years to be officially registered, critics 
said. 

“Asa religious group, you can gather 
at someone's house, and hold meetings, 
but it doesn't go much beyond that.” 
said Diederick Lohman, director of Hu- 
man Rights Watch/Helsinki. "You 
can’t have your own church, you can't 
own property, you can’t establish your 
own religious educational institutions." 
Mr. Uzzeil said under the legislation, 
these groups would not be allowed to 
carry out charitable activities. 

“If this bill becomes law it will en- 


shrine two new principles.” he said. 
“Fust, the Pontius Pilate rule that new 
religions are second class because they 
are new. Second, the Leonid Brezhnev 
rule, that any religious body that didn't 
gel along with Brezhnev is considered 
new.” 

The Russian Constitution, hastily 
written after the 1993 violent confron- 
tation between Mr. Yeltsin and Par- 
liament, has been battered with chal- 
lenges. 

For example, the constitution says 
that all of Russia's regions are equal but, 
in fact, the Kremlin lias made separate 
deals giving many regions unequal 
status. 


Arts & Antiques 

Appears every Saturday. 

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Kimberly Guenand-Betranoourt 
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or your nearest IHT office 
or representative. 


Italian Mob Expert to Oversee UN Crime Programs 


By Celestine Bohlen 

New York Times Service 


ROME — One of Italy's 
on the Mafia has been named the United 
Nations’ leading official mi internation- 
al crime. 

Pino Ariacchi, who is also a member 
of the Italian Senate, will become under 
secretary-general and director of the or- 
ganization’s Vienna offices, where the 
UN drug program and others are 
based. 

“The appointment of Senator Ariac- 
chi is an integral part of the secretary- 
general's effort to strengthen the ca- 
pacity of the United Nations to address 


in a coherent and systematic way threats 
to the stability of society arising from 
transnational crime in all its manifest- 
ations — from drug trafficking and 
money laundering to international ter- 
rorism,” said Fred Eckhard, the spokes- 
man for Secretary-General Kofi An- 
nan, 

A sociologist and the author of sev- 
eral books on Italy's powerful criminal 
organizations, Mr. Ariacchi, 46. has 
been closely involved with Italian law 
enforcement in its war against organ- 
ized crime, which has achieved remark- 
able success in recent years, particularly 
against the Sicilian Mafia. 

In an interview in his office at the 


Italian Senate, where he has represented 
Florence since 1995 as a member of 
Democratic Party of the Left after 
serving one term in the lower house, Mr. 
Ariacchi said his duties would include 
investigating financial empires suspec- 
ted of thriving on illegal profits. 

“We don’t have an international 
body to follow what is widely recog- 
nized as a weak point in the interna- 
tional system,” he said. “There is no 
international office that deals, system- 
atically or globally, with these subjects. 
We need to elaborate a system to deal 
with the big problem of tax havens, for 
instance." 

A striking example of the dangers of 


shady enterprises that go unregulated 
and unchecked is Albania, which de- 
scended into near anarchy this spring 
after the collapse of pyramid investment 
schemes. 

Mr. Ariacchi noted that the United 
Nations, with a 1988 agreement signed 
by more than 120 nations, already has 
one instrument available to pursue glob- 
al investigations of drug money. That 
convention requires signers to abolish 
bank secrecy laws that can help hide 
drug trafficking profits, and to contrib- 
ute a percentage of assets seized from 
drug-trading organizations to the UN 
office of Drug Control Prevention, 
which Mr. Ariacchi will now head. 


Albanians Promise 
A Free Election 

ROME — Albania's main polit- 
ical panics pledged Monday to en- 
sure free and fair elections in six 
days, but one key leader said he still 
feared fraud at die polls. 

The agreement signed here 
pledged that the panics would work 
for stable and democratic govern- 
ment, recognized the need for a 
coalition government after the vole 
Sunday and said the opposition 
would' be entitled to hold key po- 
sitions in Parliament. 

Fatos Nano, leader of the main 
opposition Socialist Party, said that 
"as a gentleman and a very serious 
politician” he would respect the 
results if his party did not win. 

But he quickly added in response 
to a question: ”t also confirm there 
is no possibility that my party will 
lose the election.” 

The agreement was also signed 
by Tritan Shehu, chairman of Pres- 
ident Saii Bens ha's Democratic 
Party-, and Skender Gjinushi of the 
Social Democrats. iRcuicrs) 

France to Uphold 
Homosexual Rights 

PARIS — The government will 
deliver on a campaign promise to 
give homosexual couples the same 
legal rights as heterosexual 
couples. Justice Minister Elisabeth 
Guigou said Monday. 

“This is a promise we have made, 
and we will keep it.” Miss Guigou 
said in an interview with Le Monde. 
“Homosexuals raised the question, 
but they are not the only ones con- 
cerned." One cannot describe the un- 
ion between two people solely in 
terms of marriage. ' ’ < Reuters 1 

EU Girds for Battle 
Over Subsidies 

LUXEMBOURG — EU agri- 
culture ministers began three days 
of negotiations Monday over plans 
to slash subsidies to the bloc’s 8 
million farmers. 

The EU agriculture commission- 
er, Franz Fischler. is pushing for 
cuts of I.4billionecus(Sl .6 billion) 
in aid to cereal and oil seed farmers, 
saying the reductions are needed to 
pay for the "mad cow" crisis. 

But Mr. Fischler faces an uphill 
battle. Of the 15 member nations, 
only Britain and Sweden are said to 
support subsidy cuts. { AP I 


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INTERNATIONAL 


Europeans Challenge U.S. at UN Environmental Summit 


Qmf/MbdlnOiirSBffitimDl/piklta 

UNITED NATIONS, New York — 
European leaders opened a UN Earth 
Summit here Monday with a challenge 
to a reluctant Washington to accept firm 
targets for reducing carbon dioxide to 
combat global warming, 

“We in Europe have put our cards on 
the table,' ‘ Prime Minister Tony Blair of 
Britain said. “It is time for the special 
pleading to stop and for others to follow 
suit," 

Mr. Blair, seconded by Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl of Germany and other 
European government chiefs, urged 
summit participants to endorse the Euro- 
pean Union’s proposal to cut carbon 
dioxide and other “greenhouse gases’* 
by 15 percent below 1990 levels, with a 
deadline of 2010. 

Governments are negotiating a new 
treaty to impose legally binding cut’ 
backs in greenhouse gases. But so 
far. the Clinton administration, under 
pressure from U.S. industry and a skep- 
tical Congress, has balked at committing 


to any specific timetable of targets. 

The world, Mr. Kohl said, has an 
“opportunity to take a major step for- 
ward" at the New York conference, 
where leaders and envoys from 170 na- 
tions have gathered to review progress 
on the environment and Third World 
development since the 1992 Earth Sum- 
mit in Rio de Janeiro. 

“We are all in this together,’’ Mr. 
Blair said. “No country can opt out of 
global wanning or fence in its own 
private climate." 

The Europeans pressed their case de- 
spite having failed this weekend, at the 
Denver summit of industrial nations, to 
win U.S. agreement on specific reduc- 
tion targets for greenhouse gases. 

Earlier, Vice President AJ Gore, wel- 
coming delegates to the New York sum- 
mit, declared that * * we must act' ’ to limit 
emissions of gases that trap the Earth’s 
heat. But he offered no specifics. 

President Bill Clinton will speak on 
Thursday. 

Many delegates hoped the United 


States, the world’s No. 1 polluter, would 
take the lead in setting environmental 
goals here. But it was Mr. Kohl who 
promised an action plan for * ‘Earth Sum- 
mit Plus 5.” 

The German chancellor was joining 
with Brazil, South Africa and Singapore 
to draft a plan for adoption by the UN 
session “to achieve concrete progress 
on key issues." The centerpiece was 
understood to be a proposal for a new 
World Environment Organization. 

“By making this personal commit- 
ment, we seek to lend the worldwide 
protection of the natural sources of life 
and the idea of sustainable development 
additional impetus and thus also to help 
make this special session of the General 
Assembly a success," Mr. Kohl said. 

Mr. Kohl was due to give more details 
of the four-nation partnership at a news 
conference later with President 
Fernando Henrique Cardoso of Brazil, 
Deputy President Thabo Mbeki of South 
Africa and Prime Minister Goh Chok 
Tong of Singapore. Brazilian officials 


said the initiative would focus on mea- 
sures aimed at protecting the climate and 
forests as well as problems of urban 
development 

Looking back over the five years since 
Rio, the conference chairman, Razali Is- 
mail, said bluntly that progress has been 
paltry. “We face a major recession — 
not economic, but a recession of spirit,** 
the Malaysian diplomat said. “We con- 
tinue to consume resources, pollute, 
spread and entrench poverty as though 
we are die last generation on Earth. '* 

In 1992, governments endorsed the 
goal of “sustainable development" — 
developing the global economy to benefit 
all while protecting the environment. 

But the steps that summit agreed upon 
were mostly voluntary, in reducing such 
greenhouse gases as carbon dioxide, for 
.example, to combat global warming, and 
in better preserving forests. 

The record since then is spurring calls 
for tougher, mandatory actions. Carbon 
emissions have actually increased — in 
the United States by more than 13 per- 


Clinton’s Class 
In Economics 
Annoys Some 


Reuters 

PARIS — Inspiring to some, humi- 
liating or infuriating to others. President 
Bill Clinton’s lessons in economics and 
job creation at a weekend Group of 
Seven summit meeting in Denver drew 
mixed reviews in Europe on Monday. 

There was no dispute that the main 
message was that Europe’s three biggest 
economies — Germany, France and 
Italy — need to deregulate and be more 
flexible to overcome mass unemploy- 
ment and stay competitive. 

But while German and Italian com- 
mentators sounded willing to accept the 
advice, the French were predictably ir- 
ritated by what many Paris editorialists 
saw as Wild West arrogance. 

The refusal of President Jacques Chir- 
ac of France and Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl of Germany to don cowboy boots 
and Stetson hats given to them as gifts by 
Mr. Clinton seemed to symbolize Euro- 
pean reluctance to adopt the American 
model wholesale. 

France's conservative Le Figaro said 
the incident summed up the summit 
“Faced with an America which loves to 
show off, faced with a sole superpower 
in the midst of an economic boom, 
which projects itself today as a universal 
model, the Europeans preferred to stand 
on their dignity." it said. 

Le Figaro bridled not only at Mr. 
Clinton's economics lesson but also at 
his attempt to dictate unilaterally which 
Eastern European countries may join the 
16-nation NATO alliance. 

France's LCI television station said in 
its main bulletin, "Denver, showcase of 
a triumphant America. At the summit, 
backed by the power of the American 
economy. Bill Clinton imposed his vi- 
sion of the world — from unemployment 
to Africa including NATO." 

And the leftist daily Liberation asked 
in an editorial: “Is there only a single 
valid model of capitalism on the entire 
face of the earth?” Liberation expressed 
admiration for the U.S. economy but said 
ihe Americans, “claiming that they are 
the new Rome of the democratic world, 
they get on the nerves of their friends.” 

But elsewhere, there was more sym- 
pathy for the master class in free-market 
economics administered by a U.S. pres- 
ident regarded as lcft-of-center in his 
own country. 

Economics Minister Guemer Rexrodt 
said Germany could learn a lot from 
America’s “job miracle.” Germans 
could increase employment if compa- 
nies were able to offer workers more 
flexible work contracts, he told Infora- 
dio in Berlin. 

The liberal Sueddeutsche Zeicung and 
the conservative Die Welt both com- 
mented that Germany, France and Italy 
had been warned unequivocally to shake 
up their heavily regulated economies to 
enable job creation. 

Italy’s daily La Stamps said the G-7 
summit showed there was no practical 
alternative to the growing globalization 
of the world economy. 

“Although there were a few 
grumbles, Europe had to recognize the 
truth of the American formula to create 
jobs and economic development without 
inflation," the newspaper said. 



Lcuehml Fr*gnJJlciuer' 

RECONCILIATION CONFERENCE — Cardinal Miroslav Vik of the Czech Republic, left, with Patriarch 
Alexei II of the Russian Orthodox Church on Monday as the Second European Ecumencial Assembly 
opened in Graz, Austria. Cardinal Vik is chairman of the conference, whose theme is reconciliation. 


FRANCE: 4 Suicides Follow a Roundup of Pedophilia Suspects 


Continued from Page 1 


reports said, after a search of his home 
turned up pictures of children, including 
some he had photographed at a local 
nudist beach — art photographs, but no 
pornography, according to his lawyer. 

Despite the public disgrace, the au- 
thorities said Mr. Pic had given no in- 
dication of being at risk of committing 
suicide. 

The Gendarmerie Nationalc. a police 
force under the command of the Defense 
Ministry, swooped down last week on a 
nationwide list identified by prosecutors 
of alleged customers of a pornographic 


publisher called Platypus, a company 
that duplicated and sold pornographic 
videotapes involving children. 

Its chief, named by police as Bernard 
Alapetite. was arrested two years ago but 
conditionally freed in January. After the 
arrests turned up videocassettes showing 
sexual abuse and rape of both male and 
female minor children, Mr. Alapetite 
was rearrested. 

Although judicial investigations are 
supposed to be secret in France until 
actual charges are brought, French me- 
dia quickly found out the identities of 
others picked up in the probe, including 
a 40-year-old postal inspector in Gren- 


CLINTON: Setback From Supreme Court 


Continued from Page 1 


harassment suit against Mr. Clinton. 

The Clintons have not been charged 
with any wrongdoing in the Whitewater 
affair. Bui the court's decision Monday 
holds Ihe potential for embarrassment. 

“I suspect whether or not Mrs. Clinton 
had something incriminating to teil. she 
didn't tell »r to White House cuunsel." 
said Paul Rothstein, a Georgetown Uni- 
versity law professor. Mrs. Clinton, her- 
self a lawyer, is “smart enough to know 
there was some risk in it” he said. 

But. Mr. Rothstein added, "When 
hostile eyes comb every statement you 
make, sometimes they can come up with 
stuff that looks bad politically." 

While House lawyers will have to 
provide two sets of notes to the jury. 

One set. from July 1995. details a 
meeting involving Mrs. Clinton, her per- 
sonal lawyer and two White House law- 
yers about Mrs. Clinton's activities after 
the suicide in 1993 of Vincent Foster, the 
White House deputy counsel. Some 


Clinton foes have asserted that papers 
incriminating to the Clintons were re- 
moved from Mr. Foster's office. 

A second set of notes dealt with Mrs. 
Clinton's testimony, on Jan. 26, 1996, 
before a federal grand jury in Washington 
regarding the mysterious disappearance 
and reappearance of billing records from 
the Little Rock law firm where Mrs. 
Clinton, and Mr. Foster, worked at the 
time Clintons were investing in the 
Whitewater real estate venture. 

Mrs. Clinton's lawyers had held that 
since her personal lawyer was present, 
the conversations were privileged. The 
8th Circuit Court rejected that argument 
and ordered the notes turned over to the 
grand jury. 

Susan Fain, a constitutional law spe- 
cialist at American University, said she 
was not surprised ar the high court's 
stance. "This court is fairly reluctant to 
handle the political hot potatoes." she 
said. But, other lawyers said, it was 
highly unusual for the Supreme Court to 
reject a White House request 


oble. who hanged himself, after being 
questioned, but not charged- “I can’t 
stand die way people are looking at me,” 
he told relatives, according to local 
newspapers. 

A 48-year-old white-collar worker in 
aGiat Industries defense factory in Tulle 
did the same thing after being arraigned, 
as did a 37-year-old handicapped man in 
the Rhone Valley region who had been 
briefly detained after police found his 
name on the Platypus company’s mail- 
ing list 

“Among the people picked up, some 
were accused of rape, others of sexual 
infractions or being in possession of cas- 
settes, and still others were not charged 
with anything," Mr. Led ere told the 
daily Liberation. "They were arrested in 
the sweep and let go, but they are ruined. 
You have to be strong to survive this. 
Their image is destroyed forever.’’ 

France-Soir, a mass circulation daily, 
put Mr. Leclerc’s picture on its front page 
Monday under a black headline, "Are 
Pedophiles Above the Law?" "Strange 
polemic,” the newspaper observed. 

Jean-Louis Coste, a senior prosecutor 
at the center of the operation, dubbed 
"Ado 71” by the authorities, said, 
"We're not talking about cassettes of 
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. 
There are 1 2-y ear-old girls being raped 
by potbellied old men of 70, 14-year-old 
boys violated and drugged before being 
mistreated by a wholes series of adults, 
images of enddren, both boys and girls, 
with mutilated genitalia.” 

Mrs. Guigou, the justice minister, said 
that pedophilia was an abominable 
crime that had claimed more than 5,000 
victims in France, and said that those 
found guilty of exploiting children crim- 
inally would be punished to the full 
extent of French law. But, she said, she 
did not believe that all the publicity did 
much to advance the investigation. 


MODEL: A Third Way' (Best of the U.S. and European Worlds) for Global Capitalism? 


Continued from Page I 


growth and social cohesion. 

The braid design of a third way has 
begun to emerge among economists. Ir 
would include a strong bent toward de- 
regulation and free trade, reducing gov- 
ernment interference in the workings of 
free market, regardless of the short-run 
consequences for individual workers, 
firms or investors. 

At the same time, those who advocate 
a third way say there is nothing wrong 
with redistributing the rewards of a mar- 
ket economy after it has done its job — 
as long as it is carried out in a way that 
does not significantly alter basic market 
dynamics. The favored vehicle is a pro- 
gressive consumption tax that encour- 
ages investment, assures a minimal stan- 
dard of living for all households and 
finances good schools and effective 
healthcare. 

If there is a model for this, it can be 
found in the Netherlands, where un- 
employment is about 6 percent — half of 
the jobless rate in neighboring France — 
while inflation is tame and incomes are 
growing about 2 percent a year. 

What distinguishes the Dutch econ- 
omy, according to the annual Global 


Competitiveness Report by the World 
Economic Forum, is not that the country 
has low tax rates or a small government. 
Government spending, in fact, accounts 
for more than half ofthe gross domestic 
product, while taxes and benefits arc 
among the highest in Europe. 

Bul unlike the French and other Euro- 
pean economies, the Dutch have vir- 
tually no barriers to the flow of goods 
and capital, even-handed labor laws and 
very modest regulation over hiring and 
investment — no interference, in other 
words, in the basic capitalistic ma- 
chinery. 

Contrast that with France, for example, 
where companies have trouble closing 
inefficient operations, where hiring pan- 
lime or temporary workers is difficult, 
where government-owned firms often 
enjoy protection from competition and 
foreign investment is restricted. 

"There is a fundamental choice an 
economy has to iruke beiw een trying to 
work with market forces and trying to 
resist the market and repeal the laws of 
supply and demand,” said Paul Romer 
of Stanford University. "And if you take 
the countries that have gone down the 
path of resisting the market, many are 
now finding that it no longer works." 


Mr. Romer offers an example of how 
the United Slates and France are respond- 
ing to the worldwide reduction in demand 
for relatively unskilled workers. 

In the United States, “working with 
the market" has meant trying to make 
the college degree as universal as the 
high school degree was a century ago, at 
the dawn of the industrial era. 

In France, the strategy seems to be to 
fight the market and shield low-skilled 
workers from the effects of falling de- 
mand by increasing their minimum 
wage. The new Socialist government, 
for example, said last week that it would 
increase the minimum wage by 4 per- 
cent to $7.65 an hour, for the lowest 
skilled workers. When payroll laxes of 
34 percent are taken into account, it 
means that a company must pay a min- 
imum of $10.25 an hour for even the 
least-skilled workers, 

"lb just wacky," said Robert 
Lawrence of Harvard University. "In a 
global economy, you can’t provide jobs 
for unskilled people at $ 1 0 an hour — we 
can’t, they can’t, nobody can.” 

But the French finance minister, 
Dominique Strauss-Kahn. defended the 
European approach in the name of 
“equality and social cohesion,” adding 


that economies with low minimum 
wages and weak labor laws also have the 
widest gaps between rich and poor. 

But Mr. Olson of the University of 
Maryland said that Europe's egalitari- 
anism is false and ultimately self-defeat- 
ing: "Economically speaking, the French 
are being picked io death by ducks. Every 
French worker benefits from one of the 
one-thousand-and-one labor market dis- 
tortions that the government has built into 
the system. But the result of all those 
distortions is that their overall standard of 
living is lower than ours." 

If the Europeans sometimes seem 
wrong-headed in their attachment to gov- 
ernment regulation of the economy, econ- 
omists are equally quick to point out the 
fallacy in die American belief that all 
government activity is a drain on eco- 
nomic performance, or that inequality is 
the inevitable price of a strong economy. 

“Empirically, it's just not true that 
having high taxes and generous benefits 
always results in less work, less risk 
taking, less economic growth,” said Mr. 
Frank of Cornell, “That may be the way 
it looks today in Europe. But in the 
Pacific Rim, economies are growing 
pretty fast and incomes are certainly 
more equal than ours." 



cent. Fresh water is increasingly scarce. 
Forests are being lost at a rate of 55,000 
square miles (142,450 square kilome- 
ters) per year. On the development side, 
die number of people living on less than 
$1 a day has edged above 1.1 billion. 

In closed-door, presummit talks, dip- 
lomats debated what conclusion to reach 
in the political statement that will end the 
summit: Is the environmental outlook 
“worse” than five years ago. or “not 
much better"? 

Such duels over language were the 
easy part The harder negotiations were 
expected to drag on through the week 
over global warming and other more 
concrete issues. 

Governments agreed two years ago to 
produce by late 1997 a new treaty on 
global wanning requiring industrial na- 
tions to cut back greenhouse gas emis- 
sions. 

A U.S. Senate majority says it will 
block any treaty that does not also man- 
date reductions by China and other de- 
veloping countries. (AP. Reuters) 


Dutch Power Loss' 
Strands Hundreds 


Renters 

AMSTERDAM — Many hun- \ 
dreds of train passengers were 
stranded and people were trapped in 4 
elevators for several hours Monday q 
when an electricity failure disrupted 
life and work in the central region of 
the Netherlands. 

The police said about a million 
people in the province of Utrecht : 
and nearby areas were affected in ‘ 
the mid-morning loss of power. 

The cause of the interruption was -| 
not known. 

A spokeswoman for the regional 
power authority, RE MU, said the 
problem started at power stations in ,| 
a neighboring province. 

“Some measures were taken to 
prevent the whole country going 
down,” she added. 

By early afternoon, electricity 
supplies had been restored to parts 
or Utrecht but full train sen-ice had 
not yet been resumed. 




LIBERIA: Hurtling Toward Elections 


Continued from Page 1 


ginning Tuesday, election officials are to 
register the entire country in a 10-day 
period — even though many Liberians 
lost all identity documents in the war. 

Some Liberian intellectuals and for- 
eign aid workers voice hope that even an 
imperfect election might yield a gov- 
ernment with enough credibility to de- 
militarize Liberian politics. “Hopefully, 
this could create the conditions for a real 
election” in a year or two, said a Liberi- 
an working for a Western agency. 

But many warn that the election risks 
reigniting the war. For several months, a 
truce has held partly because of the 
expanded presence of the peacekeeping 
troops — but also because it has post- 
poned the question over which this coun- 
try’s warlords have fought: Who will 
rule Liberia? 

The election, by answering that ques- 
tion, could give a losing faction cause to 
stan fighting again. 

“I don’t think we’ll be out of trouble 
by having had elections,” said Bill 
Frank Enoanyi, a prominent Liberian 
political analyst 

International peacemaking here has 
been run on the cheap and from a polit- 
ical back burner. The United States, 
which has older, closer ties with Liberia 
than with any other African state, re- 
fused to send troops. 

Instead, it pays for the West African 
peacekeeping force. Nigeria, whose 
troops form the bulk of the force, de- 
clined to send its best commanders to 
bead it until the Liberian militias hu- 
miliated the peacekeeping force last year 
by seizing and looting Monrovia for six 
weeks. The current commander has only 
10,000 of the 16,000 troops he has said 
are necessary to pacify Liberia 

Still, peacemaking has advanced. 
Since last fall, the West African troops 
have spread across much of the country 
and disarmed tens of thousands of mi- 
litiamen. But eveiyone concedes that the 
militias keep weapons hidden, and 
peacekeepers periodically uncover arms 
caches. 

Mr. Enoanyi and others say this is not 
enough progress to foster stable politics. 
There have been various offers of edu- 
cation and training to woo the disarmed 


militiamen away from what effectively 
have been lives of armed robbery. But 
“we really needed a longer period of 
reconciliation and rehabilitation. “ Mr. 
Enoanyi said. “Then we might have 
been able to hold elections in a reas- 
onably sane society.” 

The election's main political issue is 
whether Charles Taylor will rule the 
country. 

For years. Mr. Taylor has run his own 
administration in much of Liberia, in- 


cluding mining and limbering ope: 
tions that have financed a political n 


ra- 

ma- 


chine that dwarfs Liberia's official 
government. 

To mobilize his election campaign, 
Mr. Taylor has two helicopters and *52 
motorboats, Mr. Enoanyi said, “and a 
shipping, container full of motor- 
cycles." 

For campaigning in towns, “he 
bought a fleet of loudspeaker tracks’- 
from the runner-up in last December's 
presidential election in Ghana. Mr. 
Enoanyi said. This in a country whose 
police officers do not have cars. 

And it is Mr. Taylor who controls the 
formerly state-owned national radio neu 
work. Radio is by far Liberians' most 
important source of information, yet no 
other radio station reaches outside Mon- 
rovia Foreign aid agencies are working 
to set up more powerful stations in the 
capital that might, in the last weeks 
before the vote, offer information iiv- 
dependent of Mr. Taylor's. 

Liberia's civilian' political leaders 
have failed in efforts to choose a single 
candidate to oppose Mr. Taylor. But in 
the past two months. Ellen Johnson Sir- 
leal, a longtime UN official. has 
emerged as his leading rival. Mrs. John- 
son Sirleaf. who until recently headed 
the African section of the UN Devel- 
opment Program, won a Senate seat in 
the last election, in 1985. and has kept 
her political base here alive, many 
Liberians say. 

“She is a credible candidate" with 
money and international connections, 
conceded an opponent, Cletus Wotor- 
son. 

Many here suggest that neither Mrs. 
Johnson Sirleaf nor Mr. Taylor is likely 
to win a majority July 19 and thus will 
face each other in a runoff. 


JAPAN: Firms Balk at Payoffs to Mobsters 


Continued from Page 1 


Hideaki Kubori, a lawyer who special- 
izes in helping companies fight the ex- 
tortionists. 

The staikest illustration of that ter- 
rorism wifi occur Friday, when more 
than 2,300 companies will hold their 
shareholders ’ gatterings on the same day 
in an effort to minimize the number of 
meetings sokaiya can attend. Most of the 
companies have requested police pro- 
tection, and about 10,000 officers will be 
mobilized to guard the meetings. 

Sokaiya payments were outlawed in 
1982 — both company and sokaiya can 
be prosecuted — and in recent years real 
enforcement has begun. Prosecutors are 
going after big Japanese companies for 
doing business with the underworld. 

To date, the police have arrested 10 
executives of Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank 
Ltd. for alleged involvement in sokaiya 
payoffs. On May 30, the authorities ar- 
rested Hideo Sakamaki, former pres- 
ident of the huge Nomura Securities Co., 
accusing him of similar payments. 

Those accused of being extortionists 
deny they break the law. One large group 
of these people depicts itself as a share- 
holders' rights movement in a country 
where shareholders are notoriously dis- 
enfranchised and compliant. 

“I’m trying to fight to make meetings 
and companies more open, to force them 
to disclose more,' said Satoshi 
Yamamoto, who speaks for a group 
known as Rondan Doyukai. 

Wearing a suit and designer tie, Mr. 
Yamamoto was indistinguishable from 
an ordinary executive recently as he 
talked about his trade to a reporter. 

He denied his group has lies to the 
organized criminals known as vakuza, 
although he said some sokaiya do. In the 
past, his group has provided security for 
shareholders' meetings, he said, 

‘ ‘Right now companies don 't pay you 
as much as you think they would,” he 
said. 

_ He said his group had a delivery ser- 
vice, restaurant and newsletters. He 
denied that coroorations were pressured 
to use them. But one newsletter con- 
tained an example of how his group 
responds to opponents: photos of a welt- 
known sokaiya critic, who is married, in 
a compromising situation with a woman 
who is not his wife. 

companies, such as Mitsui 
High-Tec. succeed in fighting 


the 


sokaiya to a draw, but it is not easy. 


“You need to be guarded and pre- ; 
pared,” Mr. Mitsui said. He sought po- 
lice help, hired Mr. Kubori. the lawyer, • 
and employed guards to maintain order 
at shareholders' meetings. He put nets 
over die directors' seats to protect them 
from objects sokaiya might throw. 

What gives sokaiya their power is the 
belief in Japanese culture that order ; 
equals respectability- and must be pre : j 
served at all costs. Sokaiya threaten to • 
destroy order on the one day of the year 
that the companies invite their owners in ; 
and want everything to go smoothly. 

Sokaiya typically operate by buying a 
few shares in companies and then poring ; 
over the companies’ balance sheets. ■ 
They may also collect information from 
disgruntled employees and competitors: ; 
They sometimes send a list of * 'sample ' ‘ • 
questions before a shareholders’ meet- • 
ing to elicit bush payments. 

Other sokaiya offer their services to 
prevent disruptions by rival sokaiya If ‘ 
the boss of a region's dominant sokaiya * 
group is hired to keep peace and re- 
ceives, for example, a $10,000 cash pay 1 ; 
ment, he might distribute some of the • 
money to the other sokaiya, buying them ; 
off. ' ' 

Although sokaiya sometimes have in- . 
formation about illegal activities, such ' 
as tax evasion, "it's rarely the case thar ] 
sokaiya has that kind of damaging in- - 
formation," Mr. Kubori said. % • 

More often they pose the kind of j 
questions that might occur at an Amer- , 
ican shareholders’ meeting, queries j 
about failing profits or major expmses.; ; 
r When companies come to him, Mri : 
Kubori said: "They tend to be overly ; 
terrified. I usually say to them, this in*- \ 
formation is not that damaging. Let them • 
disclose it." • 

Until recently, many Japanese compa: j 
nies treated sokaiya payments as a cost ' 
of doing business! The fact is that many ; 
people here make use of gangsters as * 
well as suffer from their crimes. 

For years, finance and real estate. • 
companies have had yakuza evict re;. ■ 
calcitrant tenants or settle insurance: 1 
claims. In a country where there are on# j 
about 16.400 lawyers, and court cases 
can take years, hired hooligans are j 
sometimes used for settling such profrt < 
lems as disputes over auto accident pay-; , 
merits. Working for one party, the gang- i 
sters visit the other pany, who knows. j 
very well who they are, and "propose"’^ , 
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PAGE 8 


TUESDAY, JUNE 24 , 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PVBUSHH> VWHI tub NEW VO*K TIMES AND Tire WASHINGTON POST 


American Economic Strength Has Its Blemishes 


The Denver Scorecard 


Bill Clinton and the leaders of Rus- 
sia, Japan, Western Europe and Canada 
emerged from their marathon meetings 
in Denver over the weekend like tired 
college students who had endured a 
grading round of final exams. Their 
joint declarations covered such a be- 
wildering array of subjects, from Bos- 
nia to global warming to trade barriers, 
that it was hard to imagine that they did 
justice to any of them. The blurred 
foens obscured a couple of significant 
accomplishments, however. 

One was the further integration of 
the Russian president, Boris Yeltsin, 
into the West’s concerns, and the other 
was a new economic agenda for the 
world’s richest countries. 

As host of the Denver summit, Mr. 
Clinton rankled feelings among some 
colleagues, especially Japan, by in- 
sisting that Mr. Yeltsin become a 
nearly full-fledged member of the ex- 
clusive Group of Seven. In financial 


terms, Russia is clearly not in the same 
league as the other Group of Seven 


countries that have met annually since 
1975 to discuss economic problems. 
But since the collapse of communism, 
Russia has crept its way in. 

For the United States, inviting Russia 
this past weekend was a crucial payback 
for Russia's reluctant acceptance of 
NATO expansion, to be formalized in 
Madrid next month. In return, Mr. 
Yeltsin gave welcome new promises to 
speed ecooomic reform at home. Russia 
agreed just before the summit to write 
off most of the Soviet-era debt owed to 
it, and in Denver Mr. Yeltsin promised 
to push hard for improved tax collection, 
a step that economists consider crucial 
to restoring Russian solvency. U-S. of- 
ficials were impressed that Russia had 
floated its first 10-year bond issue since 
1913. But it was far from clear that 
Russia will make sufficient progress 
toward a legal System and open markets 
to meet die criteria for joining the World 
Trade Organization next year. 


A year ago, Mr. Yeltsin was a phys- 
ically ravaged man, struggling to sur- 
vive politically and unable to attend the 
economic summit meeting in Lyon. 
This time he seemed more fit than in 
years. He joined with his summit col- 
leagues to call for the reconstruction of 
Bosnia and went along with a renewed 
threat of sanctions against Iraq. 

But there were disquieting signs that 
Mi-. Yeltsin remains on the defensive al 
home because of the United States' ill- 
considered drive for NATO expansion. 
Russian officials offered little assur- 
ance, for example, that they would win 
parliamentary approval of the START- 
2 nuclear arms treaty in die Russian 
Parliament any time soon. 

Although Mr. Yeltsin's presence 
overshadowed the other work of the 
summit, the conferees nudged a few 
economic issues forward and papered 
over their differences in several areas. 
Europe continues to complain about 
lagging American aid for Africa, bat 
there was at least an agreement to 
accelerate trade and investment for 
countries with open markets. 

The summit gave a welcome if 
vague push toward closer collabora- 
tion on global wanning and the spread 
of infectious diseases. A pledge to 
make bribery by multinational compa- 
nies a crime mi ght eventually reduce 
corruption in the world economy. 

Conspicuous by its absence in foe 
final communique was much reference 
to Europe’s painful struggle to meet 
the austere requirements ofa new mon- 
etary union without ripepming unem- 
ployment, especially in France and 
Germany, while bragging about 
America’s recent economic success, 
Mr. Clinton wisely avoided lecturing 
his European colleagues about bow to 
solve their problems. He seemed more 
intent on creating a diversion from 
their crises at home in foe warm Rocky 
Mountain s unshine. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Tobacco Industry 


Now maybe the country will spend 
some time discussing, seriously and in 


public, what should become of foe 
American tobacco industry. That is the’ 


American tobacco industry. That is the* 
fundamental question raised by foe 
agreement between the tobacco compa- 
nies and the state attorneys general 
whose lawsuits helped to bring the 
companies to the table — whether and 
on what terms the industry should be 
allowed to continue peddling what even 
it now concedes is its deadly product 

The value of foe agreement is that it 
forces the discussion, but foe agree- 
ment itself is hard to read. 

Here is a demonstrably and notori- 
ously untrustworthy industry prom- 
ising, so it says, to pay a penalty if it 
fails to shrink its own long-term do- 
mestic market by reducing the number 
of U.S. children who smoke. It offers to 
underwrite campaigns to persuade 
people not to smoke and to help them 
quit, as well as to set up a fund to pay 
damages to its victims and to com- 
pensate states for health care costs at- 
tributable to smoking. 

It offers to make available docu- 
ments which could well turn out to 
show that it knew foe dangers of the 
product it was selling, suppressed the 
knowledge, lied about it and sought to 
make foe product addictive. It offers to 
submit tamely to future federal reg- 
ulation rather than fighting in Con- 
gress, foe courts and other available 
forums while awaiting an administra- 
tion less disposed than this one has 
been to enforce foe law . 

It sounds as if it is offering almost to 
put itself out of business, at least out of 
domestic business, and yet it plainly is 
not What foe companies think they get 
from this, somehow, is a steady plat- 
form from which to continue to do 
business, albeit perhaps on a reduced 
scale. That is whar everyone says they 
are after — a steady platform. That is 
what Wall Street is said to be after. The 
two tilings don't square. 

The deal needs to be vetted, care- 
fully and by a full range of public 
health experts — not spin doctors or 
those with a vested interest in its en- 
actment — to figure out what it likely 
means. We don't know foe answer to 
that at this point. 

We offer three suggestions while the 
vetting goes on. Hie first is that foe 
president and Congress should keep 
their distance from foe deal, take their 
time before they deride what to do 
about it, which parts (if any) to em- 
brace, which parts to reject, propose be 
revised, etc. The possible risks in this 


one are least as great as foe possible 
glory. They need to be careful above all 
to make foe decision on foe basis of the 
likely long-term merits, not foe short- 
term temptations. 

Two, foe basic goal has to be the 
maximum possible redaction within 
foe shortest possible time of the num- 
ber of people who smoke. The public 
health people who back the deal say 
it is on that basis that they have decid- 
ed to do so; they can think of no better, 
faster way to get the number down. Is 
that right? 

Above all, we would say in this 
regard, there can be no diminution of 
existing regulatory authority in return 
for foe other concessions in foe pact 


Some early readers of the pact sug- 
gested on Friday that there would be 


gested on Friday that there would be 
such diminution — in, for example, the 
standard of proof that foe Food and 
Drug Administration would have to 
meet to regulate nicotine. No way. 

Caution force is not to be blinded by 
the bucks. The regulatory aspects of foe 
deal are more important than foe money 
foe industry is offering, more important 
also than foe issues in either direction 
relating to liability. This is an industry 
that has pretended to accept constraint 
in the past, only to wriggle free. It kills 
people; it needs to be pat down. A deal 
that, on examination, seems likely to 
strengthen its ability to stay in business 
long-term will be a hard selL 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Intent to Cause Addiction 


In foe end, Friday's tobacco set- 
tlement happened because foe dispar- 
ate interests of youngsters and tobacco ‘ 
company stockholders were both 
served. But for members of Congress 
and President Clinton, both of whom 
must now approve the accord, the 
health of American youths must be foe 
primary concern. 

Under the historic deal, foe compa- 
nies would agree to major restrictions 
that every American can only under- 
stand as an admission that tobacco 
products are intended to cause addic- 
tion and result in illness and often 
death. No less historic are proposed 
tough limits on the advertising and 
sales practices through which man- 
ufacturers have so shamelessly tar- 
geted youngsters in the search for new 
smokers to replace those who died. 

— Los Angeles Times. 


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D ENVER — ■ Sure, America's 
Group of Seven allies were 


JL/ Group of Seven allies were 
- grumbling a bit in Denver over wbai 
they considered excessive bragging by 
President Bill Clinton about how 
“America's economy is foe healthiest 
in a generation and the strongest in foe 
world." Bnt I say let him brag a little. 

The fact is, he deserves credit for a 
five-year program of deficit reduction 
and trade expansion that has lowered 
inflation and interest rates — without a 
recession — and left enough steam in 
the -economy to finance America’s 
transformation into a much more ef- 
ficient global competitor. 

America’s economic strength today 
is reaL The United States now excels in 
making everything that is li ght. That is 
critical because foe more knowledge 
' and information technology are de- 
signed into a product, the less it tends to 
weigh, and the more it tends to sell for. 

As Alan Greenspan recently noted, 
there is less weight today in each dollar 
of US. GDP than ever before: vacuum 
tubes are replaced by tiny transistors, 
heavy fabrics by feather-light ones. 
And whether it is software (resign, In- 
I ternet marketing, banking, insurance, 
consulting, fast-food catering, higher 
education, package delivery, entertain- 
' meat, media, computer chips or potato 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


chips, the United Stales today is good at 
all foe light stuff. 

The bad news is that at such a mo- 
ment of unprecedented prosperity, we 
Americans ought to be addressing the 
very real problems still holding oar 
economy rack — and we're not 
For instance, I would feel better 
about America’s economy if I knew 


I would feel better 
about America's 
economy if l knew that 
we were prospering as 
one country, not as two . 


that we wereprospering as one country, 
not as two. One way I’ll know that is 
when my 11 -year-old daughter, who 
goes to public school in Maiy- 
lancLstops coming home sad because 
another one of her friends just quit the 
public school to go to private schooL 
If I have learned anything traveling 
the world it is this: Never trust a coun- 


try where the rich live behind high 
walls and tinted windows. That is a 
place that is not prospering as one 
country. That is a place where foe rich 
not only say “I don’t want you to see 
how I live" but “I don’t want to see 
how you live." 

Without foe Cold War, the spac e pro- 
gram, the civil rights movement or army 
service to unite us, it is easy for this 
widening rich-poor gap to become in- 
stitutionalized This is particularly tore 
when so many of foe wealthy are drop- 
ping out of foe last great homogenizing 
institution in America — the public 
schools, even the best public schools. 

In foe cabinet of the recently de- 
feated British Conservative prime min- 
ister. John Major, not a single minister 
had his children in the British public 
school system. The Clinton adminis- 
tration can’t be far behind that. Pres- 
ident Clinton did propose $5 billion in 
seed money to repair and upgrade de- 
crepit public schools, but Republicans 
cut it to zero. That is a travesty. 

I would feel better about America's 
economy if there were less tax cutting at 
this moment of prosperity and some 
serious reform of Medicare and Social 
Security. Without it, the deficit is sure to 
explode again when baby boomers start 
to retire. The longer you put off en- 


tidanem reform, the greater foe pm. 

I would fed better about America's 
economy if dm latest budget thd a Iiafe 
more for young people and a littte less 
for older ones. If we are going to take 
that lower slice of foe population that is 
not ready for the information cccoomy 
and give them skills to become ax- 


to invest more in foe ages of tanh to 5. 

If we can cut $85 billion in taxes over 
five years, we can spend a little more 
making sure every child has a min- 
imum of Head Stan and health care. 

I would feel bettor about America's 
economy if we weren’t doing so many 
of our improvements wnh other 
people's money. We are still borrow- 
ing tens of billions each year from (be 
rest of foe world to finance our deficit. 
China alone bolds SS2 billion in U.S. 
T-bills, and Japan holds 5291 billion. 

I would feet a lot better if I didn’t 
know that Japan had a savings rase of 
31 percent of GDP and an investment 
rate of 28 percent, while we have a 
savings rate of 17 percent and an in- 
vestment rate of 16 percent. 

In short. I would feel a lot better if 
(here were just a little less “Today, for 
Me*’ in the new budget and a little more 
“Tomorrow, far Us.’’ 

The New York Times . 


Hong Kong Will Need Stable and Improving U.S. -China Ties 


W ASHINGTON — Back 
in 1984, when Britain 


YY in 1984, when Britain 
agreed to return Hong Kong to 
China in 1997 and China agreed 
to keep has it was for “SO years 
at leak,” Deng Xiaoping re- 
marked that Hong Kong would 
not change much over that peri- 
od but China would Eventually, 
China would become so much 
like Hong Kong, he implied, that 
there would be no significant 
difference between the two. 

Hie Hone Kong Mr. Deng 
had in minawas economically 
libertarian but politically au- 
thoritarian. 

By 1984, Britons had gov- 
erned their little part of China 
for more than 140 years. To that 
point, they had shown no in- 
clination to temper their bene- 
volent autocracy by letting 
Hong Kong Chinese rave a rote 
in the politics of the place. 

The colony's governor ap- 


By Charles W. Freeman Jr. 


had a change of heart about foe 
merits of democracy in Hong 
Kong. British negotiators con- 
vinced Beijing that, although 
Britain had not done so, China 
should institute a significant de- 
gree of democracy there. 

In 1989, Beijing and London 
solemnly agreed that, within a 
year of the July I transfer. Hong 
Kong’s people wonld for the 


Chinese missteps 
would be 
self ^sanctioning. 


pointed the members of Hong 
Kong’s Legislative Council, in- 


Kong’s Legislative Council, in- 
sisted on his right to approve 
public gatherings, scrutinized 
foe local press for evidence of 
l£se~nwjest6, and sometimes 
threw editors in jail for object- 
ing to British rule. 

As 1997 approached, Britain 


first time elect foeir Legislative 
CounciL Bat Chris Patten, the 
last British governor, decided to 
jump foe gun by staging elec- 
tions in Hong Kong in 1995, 
two years before foe handover. 

However poorly the elections 
squared with Britain's agree- 
ment with China, they were un- 
derstandable, given the fears 
raised by China’s ruthless sup- 
pression of the peaceful upris- 
ing in Tiananmen in 1989. 

The Chinese insist that, not- 


withstanding what they regard 
as British perfidy, they will hon- 
or their word and sponsor new 
elections next year. Most people 
in Hong Kong clearly believe 
them. The stock and real estate 
markets there are booming. 

Still, Britain’s decision to al- 
ter the rales unilaieraUy could be 
used by Beijing to justify de- 
viations from the Chmese-Brit- 
ish accords after it reasserts its 
sovereignty over Hong Kong. 

Had Mr. Patten stuck to foe 
letter and spirit of foe accords, 
legislators appointed by him 
would have worked with his 
Hong Kong Chinese successor, 
Tung Chee-hwa, to set the rules 
for elections in Hong Kong. 

Instead, on July 1 China will 
cany through on its threat to 
dismiss die “illegally elected’’ 
legislature. A provisional leg- 
islature put together by Chink 
will replace it Legislators ap- 
pointed by China rather than 
Britain will determine how their 
successors are elected in 1998. 

The shape of democratic in- 
stitutions in Hcrag Kong matters 
in no small measure because, so 
far, Mr. Deng has proved right. 


Since 1984, China has become a 
great deal more like Hong 
Kong. (Hong Kong, too. has 
changed, but not to resemble 
other parts of China.) 

There is no inherent reason 
that Hong Kona's powerful in- 
fluence on China should not 
continue after July 1 , or that its 
influence should be limited 
forever to economic rather than 
political liberalization. 

Despite the unpromising be- 
ginning wrought by British ac- 
tions and Chinese reactions, 
there are grounds for optimism. 
Chinese missteps in Hong Kong 
would be self-sanctioning, and 
China knows it. 

If press freedoms are signif- 
icantly curtailed. Hong Kong’s 
role as a regional media center 
will wither. The Asian Wall 
Street Journal, the International 
Herald Tribune, CNN and oth- 
ers will find a more congenial 
base for foeir operations. 

If Chinese interference or 
corruption saps the Hong Kong 
economy of its legendary vigor, 
its business elite will have for 
Australia, Canada, the United 
States or other countries, where 
most have already established a 
right of residence. 


If foe 1998 elections are a 
sham, the reaction in Hong 
Kong and abroad will severely 
damage foe investment climate. 
The security of foe Hong Kong 
dollar will be in doubt Capital 
will go elsewhere. 

Beijing understands all this. 
That is why it is a good bet that 
China will live up to its pledge 


that “Hong Kong people will 
run Hone Kong with a high 


run Hong Kong with a high 
degree of autonomy." The 
greatest threats to Hong Kong, 
in fact, probably don’t come 
from China at all. 

On July 1, thousands of for- 
eign reporters and dozens of 
camera crews will be in Hong 
Kong to watch foe change of 
sovereignty. In politics, as in 
particle physics, observation of 
an event can change and define 
it. The reporters will be in Hong 
Kong looking for trouble. Their 
editors are not sending them 
there to report good news. 

That level of demand for 
trouble is likely to induce 


someone to supply it. Hong 
Kong could suffer irreparable 
damage from reporting that 
makes a photogenic but minor 
incident a misleading symbol of 
its future under Chinese rule. 

Then there are foe actions of 


NATO: Step on the Brake or We’re Off the Road 


B russels — T he dost has 

not settled afro: President 
Bill Clinton’s recent announce- 
ment of support for only Po- 
land, Hungary and foe Czech 
Republic for NATO member- 
ship. The dispute is symptomat- 
ic of the state of foe alliance. 

As NATO leaves further be- 
hind the common threat that 
bound it together for 40 years, 
differences between member 
countries have become more 
acute. But it is enlargement that 
is most harmful to cohesion. 

The decision to invite any 
candidate has to be made unan- 
imously by all member coun- 
tries, each of which can there- 
fore ball foe process. The 
United States is only one of 16, 
albeit, as Secretary-General 
Javier Solana has remarked 


By Frederick Bonnart 


wryly, an important one. 

The diplomatic dance is in 
full progress. One council meet- 
ing after another ends incon- 
clusively. Ambassadors refer to 
foeir capitals while Mr. Solana 
tries to tie foe knots together. 

Enlargement was discussed 


privately by NATO leaders 
present in Denver at foe Group 
of Seven meeting. But the 
lineup inside NATO of south- 
ern members versus the north is 
evidence of deep malaise. 

The American move was not 
a particularly tactful one, but 
foe exasperation expressed by 
some of the allies is equally 
unjustified. Many had, after all, 
previously voiced foeir own 
preferences, and their argu- 
ments in support of their vari- 
ous clients are spurious. 

Slovenia's membership is 
claimed as essential to ensure a 
land bridge to Hungary so that 
"the alliance can defend its 
frontiers. ' ' But these are not in 
danger, nor are they likely to be. 
And it is hard to see how sta- 
bility in the Balkans would be 
advanced by extending NATO 
membership to Romania. 

Yet the counterargument that 
other candidates are “not quite 
as ready” is equally weak. Ro- 
mania’s demoCTacy is indeed 


Why Expansion Looks Premature 


I QUESTION whether foe al- 
liance is ready for expansion. 


iliance is ready for expansion, 
and my skepticism has nn thing 
to do with particular concerns 
about any of the prospective 
new members. Rather, it seems 
that the alliance is avoiding the 


are long-standing and serious. 
To do so without modifying the 
treaty would be a disservice to 


die American people, who will 
pay foe price of expanding U.S. 


really tough walk of changing 
the NATO charter to account 


the NATO charter to account 
for broader membership. 

I am concerned that we have 
spent so much time figuring out 
now to avoid a clash with Russia 
over NATO expansion that we 
are ignoring the Likelihood of 
conflicts within foe alliance. 

We have foe experience of 
Greece and Turkey to caution 
us that members with historic 
border-related tensions can cre- 
ate a difficult problem of al- 
liance management Free of foe 
bonds of Gold War defease 
against a hostile enemy, allies 
might one day be adversaries as 
foe result of snch tensions. 

At the heart of the NATO 
relationship is Article S of the 
North Atlantic Treaty. It states 
that the members “agree that an 
armed attack against one or 
more of than in Europe orNorth 
America shall be considered an 
guaej r against them all.” 

On foe Clinton administra- 
tion’s present course, over the 
next few years, we will offer 
NATO membership to coun- 
tries with border disputes that 


pay the price of expanding U.S. 
security commitments. 

The alliance should agree to a 
process for resolving disputes 
between members. These con- 
flicts are inevitable as member- 
ship grows. Firing the problem 
now will keep the United States 
from being drawn into regional 
conflicts in Europe that would 
sap our own strength and weak- 
en the American security um- 
brella and foe alliance’s guar- 
antee of mutual self-defense. 

Another factor to consider is 
whether NATO membership is 
in the best interests of foe 
emerging East European de- 
mocracies. If their governments 
believe that strengthening foeir 
economies is a higher priority, 
then are the billions of dollars a 
year in defense spending re- 
quired to meet NATO force 
standards really appropriate? 
Wouldn’t such funds be better 
spent on infrastructure such as 
roads and water treatment sys- 
tems, or on investments in man- 
ufacturing and agriculture? 

— Kay Bailey Hutchison, a 
Texas Republican in the 
Senate NATO Observer 
Group, commenting in the 
Los Angeles Times. 


new, but not so far behind that 
of Poland and Hungary, while 
Slovenia is considerably closer 
to a Western-style state than 
most of the others. 

In addition, foe maturity of its 
people is evident in foeir ab- 
sence of enthusiasm, regardless 
of their politicians, for NATO 
membership. In this they are 
equaled by foe Czechs. 

That present indifference is 
likely to turn into active op- 
position when the real costs be- 
come known. 

The study by foe U.S. De- 
partment of Defense that is the 
basis on which foe administra- 
tion will present enlargement to 
Congress places the bulk of foe 
estimated $35 billion cost on foe 
Europeans, leaving a mere $2 
billion for foe United States. 

With all defense budgets de- 
clining radically, foe European 
members may find it difficult to 
come up with foeir $19 billion 
share, while questions should 
be asked about foe sources for 
foe new members’ $14 billion. 
In foeir fragile, inflation -prone 
economies, sucb expenditures 
will weigh heavily on social 
spending. 

They will therefore look to 
the old allies, in particular the 
United States, to back their sup- 
port with financial help, in foe 
form of extended credits or out- 
right aid. That is why foe Clin- 
ton administration is keen on 
making foe first step a so-called 
small enlargement 

Ii is not a small one. Only 
once in foe past has NATO ac- 
cepted more than one new 
member at a time, and that, for 
obvious reasons, was Greece 
and Turkey in 1952. 

Meanwhile, foe present dis- 
sension is mortgaging foe fu- 
ture. It is accelerating the en- 
largement process. 

To appease the other 
claimants, U.S officials em- 
phasize — and in this they are 
supported by all the allies — 
that the door will remain open. 
That oft-cited phrase could be 
foe death knell of NATO. 

Regardless of precautionary 
measures to try to slow down 
foe next step — by considerable 
enhancement of Partnership for 
Peace status to include partners 
in operational and force plan- 
ning — foe pressure from those 
not selected for the first wave 
will mount to boiling point. 

If Slovenia. Romania and 
Bulgaria are favored, foe Balt- 
ics will be outraged at being left 


behind. And the closer foe as- 
pirants get, the more they will 
feel that they, too, must sit at foe 
inner council table. 

But NATO is quite unable. to 
absorb this number of new 
members. It has not even been 
able to cope with foe French 
approach and establishment of 
the new command structure. 
Rapid expansion would inhibit 
foe decision process to a point at 
which the organizations cred- 
ibility would vanish. 

This unraveling can still be 
stopped. 

The process has reached a 
stage where, regardless of 
present dissensions, no member 
would dare to bait it At least 
Poland, Hungary and foe Czech 
Republic must be invited, to 
avoid foe critical reversal in foe 
democratic development of 
Central Europe that could result 
from present failure. 

So agreement will be ob- 
tained, even if only when 
NATO leaders meet at foeir 
Madrid summit on July 8 and 9. 
But if NATO is to retain its 
effectiveness and power, the al- 
lies will have to adapt foe pace 
of enlargement to the absorption 
capacity of foe organization. 


foe United Stales. The relation- 
ship between Hong Kong and 
Cmna is symbiotic. Hong 
Koog’s business elite is now 
muds more worried about a fatal 
ricochet from the current fusil- 
lade of American potshots at 
China than it is about what China 
might do to it after July I. 

Hong Kong would be the 
main victim of a decision by the 
United States to deny China nor-, 
mal trading status. American 
politicians, suffering from ap- 
parent “enemy deprivation” 
and calling for a new cold war 
with China, unnerve Hong Kong 
more than they do Beijing. 

To continue to prosper, to 
evolve toward a more demo- 
cratic society and to be a cata- 
lyst for accelerated change in 
China, foe Hong Kong Special 
Administrative Region of Chi- 
na will need three tilings from 
the United States. 

It will need policies that re- 
flect sustained American con- 
cern for its well-being and seek 
to hold Beijing to its word. It 
will need sympathetic support 
as its politicians bargain with 
Beijing over the electoral sys- 
tem to take effect in 1998. 

But most of all it will need foe 
security and confidence that 
only a stable and improving 
American relationship with 
China can provide. 


The writer, a specialist on 
NATO affairs, contributed this 
comment to the International 
Herald Tribune. 


The writer, U.S. assistant 
secretary of defense for inter- 
national security affairs in 1993 
and 1994, contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1897: X-Ray Success P^y. near Marion. The strike 

" kunbAM kZ-J 


PARK — The Journal des Di- 
bats says that successful use was 
made of foe special X-rays ap- 
paratus by wnicb the Customs 
authorities can discover the con- 
tents of travelers' luggage. Ci- 
gars in a closed box could easily 
be counted, the springs of an 
armchair could plainly be seen 
as well as the contents of a care- 
folly sealed package. Owing to 
the weight ofthe new instrument 
it cannot yet be used at small 
stations or by foe Octroi officers 
at the entrance to Paris. But it is 
very probable that smaller in- 
struments will shortly be made. 


pany, near Marion. The strike- 
breakers were tied together in 
groups of four to six and then 
told to run, being shot down as 
they obeyed foe command, oth- 
ers being tied together and 
thrown into the lake. Governor 
Small has ordered 1,000 Na- 
tional Guardsmen here pre- 
pared to move into foe coal dis- 
trict if needed. 


1947: Attacks in Sicily 


1922: Scabs Murdered 


CHICAGO — Probably forty 
men lost foeir lives by cold- 
blooded murder after they, 
as strike-breakers, had sur- 
rendered to foe mob of strikers 


which attacked foe strip mine of 
foe Southern Illinois Coal Com- 


ra nff . r ii wft L n ii ^ q 

*> 


PALERMO — Four men were 
killed and six wounded in si- 
multaneous attacks on Commu- 
nist headquarters here late last 
night [June 23]. The attacks were 
made at midnight by groups of 
Ifoaki-unifoimed masked men 
allegedly Jed by a notorious Si- 
cilian bandit, Salvatore Giuli- 
ano. Known as foe “Robin 
Hood" of Sicily, because of his 
habit of robbing from the rich 
and aiding the poor, Giulianohas 
reigned in the mountains fix' 
more than two years. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1997 


OPINION/LETTERS 


VMrE »* 



The Geitlemai Lawrence Walsh 
FinallvGets Mad and Gets Even 


W ASHINGTON ^ 
before him: Law 
Washington and got n 
tjnguished federal judj 
be independent coun* 
rpess, and he lost his en 
HnuckJed Reagan Whi 
as these things often a 
tfveen the law of toe 
fyfaiquess of Queensl 
which Mr. Walsh couli 
a Now Mr. Walsh, wl 
■pticent during his six- 
willful men of the Read 
ignored laws that did 1 
obsessions, has sirucH 
impeccable jurist has 


By Jary MeGrory 


Like other leftists 
nee W'a/sh cane to 
sged. He was! dis- 
who was chiien to 
in the Irancontra 
untcr with th/brass- 
House staffs t was. 
. an unfair fcht be- 
and claw and the 
rry rules. Tome of 
?asily havewritten. 
was" prettmaturaily 
ar attempuo nail the 
ladminisjfation who 
; accomnpdate their 
>ack. Thi diffident, 
tten his wn account 


.He teas no ma h forjthe 
; crafty despera oes uho , 

• would have d* e anything . 

! to save RonaL Reagan. T 

(Jf the lying and covei p of two Repuwican 
presidents. “Firewall is like Mr. Walsh's 
inquiry: overlong, p ding, remorselessly 
detailed and written v i scant regard for the 
consumer. But if yowant to know/ what 
really happened in t adventure id, law- 
lessness and uncon: jtionaJ goverrment. 
it's the source you ne 
. Mr. Walsh came Ik to town recently just 
the observance of : 25th anniveisary of 
Watergate was gettin inder way. The open- 
ing notes in that joyc paean, “The System 
forked," were bei, sounded. Bur in the 
Ipn-contra Loves lig in, nothing / worked. 
Mr. Walsh and his I d-working bond were 
rolled by Congress, t courts and, of course, 
Ijy the great bamboler Oliver North. TTie 
joint Select Comminiled by Senators Daniel 
Ipouye and Warren udman twty* were de- 
termined. going in.pt to impeich Ronald 
Reagan) committedle supreme .oily of im- 
munizing Mr. Non/ which meant that Mr. 
Walsh and compannad to turn themselves 
inside out to avoiding "tainted” by Mr. 
North's congress nil testimony. H was a 
folly resisted only Ithe Texas congressman 
Jack Brooks, who ftly suggested that if the 
Marine with the craed voice were to take the 
Fifth, a year in jai >r contempt of Congress 
rpight be a better i y to bring him around. 

Ten years later le decision to immunize 
Mr. North haunts le Senate Governmental 
Affairs Committee s it struggles with wheth- 
er to give immuni to witnesses in the cam- 
paign finance invi igation, the latest Wash- 
ipgton scandal, e committee . members 


recall that breaking voice, the flowers for 
Ollier piling up in the Senate a decade ago: 
they remember the overturning of his con- 
viction and they say, “l don’t think so.” 

Mr. Walsh never expected to write a book; 
he's not the cash-in type. But he found an 
unexpected interest and a willingness on the 
part of audiences to listen long to his version 
of events. He is 85, happily back home in 
Oklahoma City and in glowing health, which 
he attributes to swimming daily. 

He knows that in many ways he was mis- 
cast for his role. He was no match for the 
crafty desperadoes who would have done 
anything to save Ronald Reagan from the 
excesses of his policies in Central America 
and his efforts to recover U.S. hostages in 
Lebanon. The two foreign policy issues be- 
came joined in a grotesque marriage, in the 
sale of arms to Iran and the diversion of the 
profits to finance the last, ugly gasp of the 
Cold War in the hemisphere. 

For instance, Mr. Walsh made the laugh- 
able assumption that submitting written re- 
quests for documents from the White House 
would do. At the time. Fawn Hall was spir- 
iting them out in her underwear, and she and 
Mr. North broke a couple of shredders with 
their vigorous filing. Mr. Walsh now says he 
realizes subpoenas were called for. 

He admits ruefully that he might have been 
more gung ho in some situations. When the 
three-judge panel was named to consider Mr. 
North's appeal, Mr. North’s aggressive law- 
yer, Brendan Sullivan, successfully objected 
to the presence of Judge Abner Mikva. Mr. 
Sullivan argued that Judge Mikva should be 
disqualified because, as a congressman, he 
had voted for the Independent Counsel law. 
Mr. Walsh observes that he could have pro- 
tested another panel member, Lawrence Sil- 
benman, a vociferous critic of the statute. 

But Mr. Walsh was simply incapable of the 
pit-bull alertness of his targets. He did not 
understand the “arrogant disdain for the rule 
of law,” which he finally identified when 
George Bush “played the Iasi card in the 
cover-up” by pardoning Mr. Reagan's sec- 
retary of defense. Caspar Weinberger. 

Mr. Walsh gets mad and, in his book, he 
gets even. He makes mincemeat of Mr. 
Bush’s claim that he was ‘ ‘out of the loop’ ’ — 
assisted by large helpings from Mr. Wein- 
berger’s copious, handwritten notes, the ex- 
istence of which the secretary of defense 
vigorously denied. In the last days of the 1992 
campaign. Mr. Walsh reindicted Mr. Wein- 
berger and reignited the issue of Mr. Bush's 
characteron Iran-contra. Mr. Bush’s partisans 
“blamed me for their candidate's loss.” he 
writes with quiet pride. He's entitled. 

The Washington Post 


, OTTERS TO THE EDITOR 


iMpdaswr ■ 

. Laim a ilftv grie’ at‘ an 
international schodl 1 Paris. 
This past March 1 1 < r part in 
the Harvard Model jngress 
Europe. The congr is a re- 
constitution of th< ifferent 
branches of the U. govern- 
ment and intemati al orga- 
nizations such as I TO and 
the Group of Sevc The or- 
ganizers' aim is provide 
students a better i erstand- 
rng of democracy i well as 
global and U.Sj sues. T 
chose to be a mewr of the 
National Securityfcjncil. 

We received/ rie rings 
written by Horvirdtudents 
explaining rhej isss we 
would debate. This ;ar. the 
NSC was studying t trans- 
fer of the Panama inaJ in 
1999 and examiningow the 
United States could ptect Us 
ihterests in the area. 

My main problem ith the 
briefings on Panama is that 
they gave a misleadinjersion 
of the facts and slatd the 
debate from the very ttset. 

■ For example. U.S. -mama 
relations were outlined such 
d way that it appeared at the 
United .States imerved in 
Panama in !9S9 simplyi pro 1 - 
tect democracy after ‘Cneraf 
Manuel Antonio Nona’s 
coup, and that Operatic Just 
Cause was successful! om- 
pleted within a week. 

Some reasons for !■ tuing 
U.S. troops in the regie vere 
not even mentioned -Tor 
example, making su jhat 
U.S.-friendly gover leftfs 
rilled Panama and ne ib<ir- 
ing countries. The F lama 
Canal was definitely U: ul in 
the U.S. effort to ovt trow 
the Sandinistas in Ni< agtia 
in the 1980s. 

_ On the opening d we 
heard a speech defini the 
goals of the congress the 
“three Cs": compnise. 
consensus, character The 
speaker insisted that il con- 
gress was an opportu y to 
add a moral and ethil di- 
mension to politics. W then 
took a pledge of honor 

However, what I card 
over the following da had 
nothing to do with mo iiy. 

’■ The only references i the 
Panamanian people were ] 
opinion polls that gave > in- j 
dication that much of il pop- ! 
ulation lives in povei 3nd 1 
that the overall ec< wnic 
situation worsened af the 
g.S. intervention. Nurruus 
conversations led me be- 
lieve that my coilcagut rus- 
ted the simplistic accr it of 
U.S.-Panama relation M\ 
efforts to introduce ct iter- 
argumcnls were met ii a 
determination to ienoi Any- 
thing that cast a shado over 
U.S. motives. 

I witnessed 17- a 18-1 


year-old kids behaving- like 
cynical ‘afitf : httirtTess adltlts. 
making statements such as 
"National security outweighs 
ethical considerations.” 

What I learned is that in 
foreign policy at least, de- 
mocracy exists in procedure 
but not in principle. The con- 
gress should have been an 
ideal occasion to use our com- 
bined resources and cal! into 
question the mechanisms of 
politics. By resources I mean 
our young age and our dif- 
ferent backgrounds. There 
were kids from Lebanon, Tur- 
key, Mauritius, India, Mo- 
rocco, Sweden, Germany, 
Luxembourg and Spain. Yet 
no one seemed willing to 
challenge the prevailing cyn- 
ical approach to the world, or 
to brandish ideals and human 
feelings in the face of war, 
money and power. Where 
was the hope or t he dream that 
these demons might one day 
stand in the desert like the 
crumbling statues of a de- 
funct dynasty? 

Ideals had been replaced 
by elegant suits and a dis- 
tinguished demeanor. 

ARUSHA TOPAZZtNl. 

Paris. 

France Unraveling 

If Diane Johnson 
( “France: Their High-Cho- 
lesterol Regimen Has Worked 
So Far." Opinion. June 11} 
really thinks the French have 
managed rather well up to 
now. then she should get an 
opinion from a chorneur — an 
unemployed worker — or 
perhaps make a rendezvous 
with a manager from one of 
the undercompetitive French 
enterprises inevitably due for 
cutbacks, or maybe even in- 
terview one of the many angry 
and anxious French business 
school students hopeful of 
finding a stoning position in 
an American or Asian multi- 
national company. 

Clean trains, nice museums 
and designer clothes tend to 
lose a bit of their charm when 
people have lost their jobs and 
benefit payments begin to run 
out. Either French businesses 
and the French state adapt to 


become more competitive 
both doritesticaHy andglob- : 
ally or the quality of - fife 41* 
France will continue to erode. 

On the other hand, the con- 
tinued unraveling of the 
French economic and social 
fabric might offer an excel- 
lent backdrop for a sequel to 
Ms. Johnson's latest novel, 
"Le Divorce." How about 
"Le Chomage"? 

CLAYTON DAY. 

Nice- 

Gates and Java 

Regarding “Don’t Worship 
Java. Gates Says " (Finance, 
June 4 J: 

It shouldn’t surprise any- 
one that Bill Gates is fighting 
the introduction of a standard 
programming language, call- 
ed Java. U is precisely the 
opportunity to escape the 
yoke of Microsoft dictator- j 
ship that is so meaningful to 
the computer community. Of 
course Mr. Gates shudders at 
the consequences that Java's 
adoption would hold for him. 

Those of us who have ben- 
efited so much from compe- 
tition in the computer hard- 
ware market, which has 
provided us with ever more 
powerful computers at in- 
creasingly reasonable prices, 
are overjoyed at the prospect 
of a similar development in 
the software market. 

JOE WILLIAMS. 

Diisseldorf. 

What Goes Around 

Regarding “A Jokey Scoop 
So Scummy It Isn’t Funny ” 

( Opinion . May 23) by Richard 
Cohen: . 

Mr. Cohen hit the nail on 
the head. Why has our society 
stooped to trying to trip 
people up rather than lift them 
up? Journalists are only partly 
at fault they give many of us 
what we want to see and hear. 
We should always remember 
that the tables could easily be 
turned and any one of us 
could end up being the focus 
of entrapment and unwanted 
attention. 

HOWARD M. L1EBMAN. 

Brussels. 


f \ j ECONOMICS 

t /'*' i Authoritative, 

j incisive, perceptive, 
f leading edge reporting. 

If you missed his exclusives in the 
Alan Friedman IHT, look for them on our site on the 
Global Ecotumics World Wide Web: 

C< a- respondent 


Eisenhower’s ‘Affair Was Nothing of the Sort 


By Susan Eisenhower 

W ASHINGTON — Adultery m 
the military has transfixed the 
press and public for weeks, bringing 
with it a spate of rumors and in- 
nuendo. There have been no sacred 
cows. Even those who are dead have 
been accused of committing adul- 
tery, even when the historic record 
actually supports their “inno- 
cence.” I am thinking about how 
reporters and pundits have rolled out 
the rumor about Dwight Eisen- 
hower’s alleged romance with his 


MEANWHILE 


wartime driver Kay Summersby, of- 
ten omitting “alleged” and simply 
repealing it as fact 

But contrary to what has been 
said, oral histones do not support the 
contention that they were romantic- 
ally involved. Furthermore, docu- 
ments show dial Eisenhower did nor 
secure Miss Summersby *s commis- 
sion in the army. Nor did he advocate 
that she become his military aide — 
all allegations that have been ad- 
vanced to “prove” their romantic 
relationship. 

The rumor has been durable, 
however. During the war. there was. 
some tattle about the supreme com- 
mander and the “pretty Irish girl who 
also drives for General Eisenhower” 
— in die 1943 words of Life 
magazine — but nothing much more. 
It wasn't until three decades later, 
and several years after Ike’s death, 
that the rumors were cemented in the 
public mind. It started when the re- 
porter Merle Miller published on in- 
terview with Harry Truman, in which 
die former president was quoted as 
saying that Eisenhower had written 
General George Marshall asking to 
divorce Mamie so he could marry 
Miss Summersby. Though Miss 
Summersby herself admitted that she 
was surprised by Truman's supposed 
statement, a few years later her 
second book of World War II mem- 
oirs, "Past Forgetting: My Love Af- 
fair with Dwight D. Eisenhower,” 
reinforced the idea of a romance — 
as did die 1979 television ministries 
based on the book. 

There was little or no coverage of 
the slow discoveries that soon cor- 
rected the distorted historical view, 
however. Merle Millar wrote another 
book, in which he recanted his earlier 
assertions. Scholars in search of the 
letter to Marshall found that on June 
4, 1945, Ike asked not for a divorce 
but for permission to bring Mamie to 












Europe, at a time when Miss Sum- 
mersby was very much on the scene. 
And before long, ir also came to light 
that Kay 1 Summersby had never writ- 
ten “Past Forgetting” at all. She had 
died within a month of signing the 
contract, so the book was penned by 
a ghostwriter. 1 

“In fact, this last dreadful book 
was only written after her death,” 
confirmed Miss Summersby 's con- 
fidante. Anihea Saxe, whose hus- 
band was the executor of Kay’s es- 
tate. "She never saw a word of it. ... 
The whole thing was made up.” • 

Miss Summersby had gone to 
work for Eisenhower in 1942, and 
after her fiance was killed by a land 
mine in 1943. her friends say she 
went into a deep depression. Eis- 
enhower, noticing her distress, tried 
to keep her busy so she wouldn't have 
time to brood.. “General Eisen- 
hower.” Miss Summersby recalled, 
“was like an older brother to me. 
kind, thoughtful and considerate.” 

Anthea Saxe says Kay helped Ike, 
too: “She was invaluable to the gen- 
eral, not as a lover, not as art object of 
romance, but because she was right 
there." 

Peg Chase Camajani. another 
WACat headquarters, wrote that she 
never had the feeling that Eisen- 
hower “loved” Miss Summersby. 
“She played a sharp game of bridge. 


rode a horse fearlessly and -was a 
gre^t help in providing the "oppor- 
tunity for rare moments -of recre- 
ation. Eisenhower was a truly lonely 
man, isolated in his commanding 
position.*’ . 

Bob Considine, a. journalist and 
Summersby . friend, recounted the 
evening his wife asked Kay directly if 
she had ever slept with Eisenhower. 

“ ‘You know,” Kay said, *you‘rc’ 
the first person J have ever met that 
had the courage to ask me that ques- • 
tion. ... The answer is ho. Never. 

If He had asked me, beckoned a fin- 
ger to me, 1 ‘would have done any- 
thing he asked me to do. But he never ■ 
asked me.’ " 

What a pity that the network rjvini- 
scries, based on a book the author 
didn't even see. made “fact" of the 
“affair.” For the true -story is far 
richer than ‘ any tale of. adulterous 
romance. It. is about how one man. 
without his wife for three, years, 
handled the weight of responsibility 
alone. “Everything 1 do, of see, or 
hear, or even think, is secret." he 
wrote Mamie. And throughout most 
of the war his security was, of ne- 
cessity. tight enough to warrant a 
guard at his bedroom doqr at night 

Despite [his, he developed a per- 
sonal philosophy and a moral and 
intellectual compass steady- enough 
to bear the terrible burden of life and 


death decision-making. On Feb 15. 
1943, Ike wrote one of hi-' .*• i° Idler ■< 
to Mamie, in which he said: "Sub- 
ordinates can advise, urge, help and 
pray, but only one man. sn !us own 
mind and heart, can decide “Do v. e or 
do we not.' The stakes are the highest 
and the penalties are expressed m 

terms of loss of life So the straggle 

is to do one’s best: to keep the brain 
and the conscience clear, never he 
swayed by- unworthy motive* or in- 
consequential reasons but to strive 
unearth the basic factors involved and 
then do one's duly.” 

Perpetuation of the Eh.cn how ei- 
Summersby rumor doesn’t hurt any- 
one except the American people. I: 
distorts the public debate by seitine 
up a false and misleading example of 
equivalency. 

As the "military and its civilian 
commanders grapple with the con- 
tinuing issues related to adultery in 
the military, it should not he too much 
to ask that wc be given the oppor- 
tunity to evaluate scriou* current is- 
sues with valid historical analogies 

The writer. granditn:t^h!i t <>; 
Dwight Eisenhower. :• Ign 

policy analyst and audio- <■,' ■ t/i •. 
Ike. Memories anil Rilict io-n- . 
the Life oj Mamie Eiscnui- 1-. : * " >/*-■ 
contributed this rninmeu: v />':» 
Washington Post. 


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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. JUNE 24, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


i* fttMtL 


More Chinese Troops to Enter Hong Kong Before Handover 


The Associated Press 

HONG KONG — Breaking a last- 
minute stalemate, China and Britain an- 
nounced a deal Monday to let 509 
Chinese soldiers enter Hong Kong three 
hours before British rule ends. 

The agreement announced in Beijing 
and Hong Kong said the troops and 
officers would enter Hong Kong in 39 
vehicles at 9 P.M. on June 30. 

Britain had flatly rejected an earlier 
Chinese demand to have at least some 
troops in Hong Kong barracks by the 
time sovereignty was handed over at 
midnight. 

The agreement, announced just eight 
days before the handover, will enable the 
Chinese force to “perform its defease 
duties in Hong Kong from zero hour of 
July 1 the statements said adding that 
it meant Britain will hand over defense 
responsibilities to China “smoothly." 

Beijing is to deploy up to 10,000 
People's Liberation Army troops in 
Hong Kong to symbolize its sovereignty 


over what will be a largely self-gov- 
erning region of China. 

Nearly 200 unarmed troops have 
moved in as an advance guard, and it was 
assumed the remainder would enter after 
the handover. 

But China unexpectedly insisted that 
the troops needed to be in their new 
barracks beforehand to take np their 
duties the moment the handover was 
completed. 

Britain refused, which led to spec- 
ulation in the media that the People's 
Liberation Army might move in without 
Britain's permission in the hours before 
the handover. 

Deploying the Chinese Army in Hong 
Kong, where it is widely disliked as the 
enforcer of the Chinese Communist sys- 
tem, was one of the most sensitive issues 
of the change of sovereignty. 

Even minor incidents. Like an alter- 
cation with a Chinese general at the 
border or the creation a public bus stop 
on what will be Chinese Army land. 


have occasioned headlines in the Hong 
Kong press. 

C hina has promised that its troops will 
be on their best behavior and refrain as 
much as possible from interacting with 
the public. Governor Chris Patten has 
said the advance party’s behavior has 
been impeccable. 

Monday’s agreement was reached by 
the Joint Liaison Group, the British- 
Chinese negotiating body that is over- 
seeing the handover. 

The announcements said the troops 
would be spread among barracks in four 
areas of Hong Kong. 

The 78 moving into Prince of Wales 
Barracks in central Hong Kong will take 
part in “a simple and dignified cere- 
mony around midnight," the statement 
issued in Hong Kong said. 

Meanwhile, another evocative sym- 
bol, the royal yacht that will cany the 
British empire's mantle from Hong 
Kong, docked Monday near the pavilion 
where colonial rule will end. 


The Britannia arrived escorted by 
ships and helicopters, and its crew im- 
mediately began getting it shipshape for 
the handover, and to serve as Prince 
Charles’s base when he arrives later. 

Both Charles and Mr. Patten, the ter- 
ritory's last British governor, will set sail 
from Hong Kong aboard the Britannia. 

Monday was a day that stood on ce- 
remony and nostalgia beyond the harbor 
as wed. Across town, members of the 
departing legislature buried a time cap- 
sule and expressed hopes about the fu- 
ture — some more tentative than oth- 
ers. 

The elected legislators lose their seats 
when the provisional legislature in- 
stalled by Beijing is sworn in minutes 
after the July I changeover. 

Emily Lau. a pro-democracy legis- 
lator. put her 1991 and 1995 election 
manifestos in the capsule, and said: “I 
hope that all those things would ma- 
terialize in 10 years — that we have full 
democracy.” 


Other time-capsule items ranged from 
a souvenir miniature bus to the voided 
American passport that a legislator gave 
up to demonstrate his faith in Hong 
Kong's future. 

China has promised the territory ex- 
tensive autonomy. Hong Kong's new 
leader, Tung Chee-hwa, reiterated that 
fact in a page-lone essay published Mon- 
day in the South China Morning Post. 

’**1 assure Hong Kong people that they 
will be able to continue with their free 
lifestyle and that lawful and peaceful 
demonstrations will definitely be al- 
lowed in the future,” Mr. Tung wrote. 

And the leader of the Democratic Party, 
Martin Lee, said that July 1 “should be a 
glorious day” for Chinese ev«ywhere. 
But “why must 1. in becoming Chinese, 
pay such a heavy price?” 

"Why mustT give up some of my 
freedoms on that glorious day? Why is it 
that Britain, our colonial masters, were 
prepared to trust Hong Kong more than 
our own Chinese masters?” 



Taiwan Opens Two Days of War Games 




/ .. 



> • ■! 




CC Yju/fc-iiM* 


President Lee Teng-hui Inspecting Taiwan's fleet Monday at Tsoying. 


The Associated Press 

TAINAN, Taiwan — Taiwan began 
large-scale air and sea war games Mon- 
day. showcasing its military might a 
week before China regains sovereignty 
over Hong Kong. 

The United States had asked Taiwan 
to postpone the exercises. Taiwanese 
military leaders said the annual war 
games had no connection to the hand- 
over of the British colony on July 1. 

The two-day exercises bring army, 
navy and air force units together to prac- 
tice defending the island from invasion 
and include a live-fire exercise. Navy 
ships also will practice maneuvers off 
the Hengchun Peninsula, Taiwan's 
southernmost point 

President Lee Teng-hui inspected Pa- 
triot missiles, U.S.-made F-16s and 
French Mirage fighters Monday along 
with domestically made fighter jets on 
display at Tainan Air Base in southern 
Taiwan. Then Mr. Lee took the salute 
from naval personnel at Tsoying Naval 
Base in the southern port of Kaohsiung. 
reviewing advanced Lafayette-class 
frigates purchased from France along 
with other ships made in Taiwan or 
leased from the United States. 

Taiwan is radically upgrading its mil- 
itary, spending billions of dollars to re- 
place World War II and 1960s -era 
American hardware. 

A Hong Kong newspaper reported 
this month that China planned to hold 
exercises at about the same time as 
Taiwan's games. Chinese officials have 
not commented on the report. 

The United States had urged both sides 
not to hold exercises during the cere- 
monies for the handover of Hong Kong. 


BRIEFLY 


German Court Jails 
4 Algerian Activists 

DUESSELDORF — A German 
court on Monday convicted two 
sons of a jailed Algerian funda- 
mentalist opposition leader of be- 
longing to an illegal support group 
for anti-government forces in Al- 
geria. 

Salim AbassL, 30, and his brother 
Dcbal. 26, sons of Abassi Madani. 
were found guilty of belonging to a 
criminal organization and forging 
official documents. They received 
two years and eight months and to 
two years and four months, respect- 
ively. 

Two other Algerians, Nasr-Ed- 
dine Layachi Hemaz, 31, and Mah- 
moud Logbi. 26, were convicted on 
similar charges and sentenced to 
lesser terms. 

“The aim of their criminal 
grouping was to provide persecuted 
Islamists with false passports and 
other forged documents,' ’ Judge 
Jurta Magiera-Steinacker told the 
court in Duesseldorf. (Reuters) 

54 Kurds Killed, 
Turkey Claims 

DIYARBAK1R, Turkey — Se- 
curity forces killed 54 Kurdish 
guerrillas in fighting over the week- 
end in southeastern Turkey, the 
governor's office said here in a 
statement Monday. 

The statement said troops, 
backed by air power, killed 33 
members of the Kurdistan Workers 
Party in the province of Van. near 
Turkey's border with Iran. 

In separate clashes, security 
forces killed another 1 2 guerrillas in 
the southeastern province of 
Hakkari and a further three in Simak 
Province, it said. Six guerrillas were 
killed late Sunday in the southeast- 
ern province of Bingol. (Reuters) 

Fujimori Slipping 
In Peruvian Poll 

LIMA — The popularity of Pres- 
ident Alberto Fujimori has fallen to 
the lowest level in his seven-year 
rule because of his perceived au- 
thoritarianism, according to a poll 
published Monday. 

Only 27 percent of Peruvians 
polled said they approved of Mr. 
Fujimori, while 67.8 percent dis- 
approved, the local pollster Ana- 
lysts & Consultants said. 

Mr. Fujimori has antagonized the 
public in recent weeks with his gov- 
ernment's moves against the na- 
tion's highest constitutional court 
and the opposition press. { Renters ) 


HANDOVER: It's a Which, an Umbrella 


Continued from Page l 

elry. There are Handover umbrellas. 
Handover top hats. Handover under- 
wear. Handover commemorative coins 
and stamps. Handover coffee mugs and 
baseball caps. Handover pocket diaries. 
Handover T-shirts and postcards. Hand- 
over lighters and even a limited-edition 
Handover Barbie, with a Chinese 
empress dress and long, black tresses 
replacing her familiar blond locks. 

Reebok is in on the act, with a pair of 
“commemorative' ' pump training shoes 
in red and yellow — the colors of the 
Chinese flag — with the Chinese char- 
acters for “97” embroidered on the 
tongue. Other souvenirs are less obvi- 
ous. owing to the boundless creativity of 
local entrepreneurs. For example, one 
can purchase a can of authentic Hong 
Kong “colonial air,” billed on the label 
as “the last gasp of an empire.” The 
ingredients? “100 percent pure pom- 
posity," the label explains. “Sealed be- 
fore 1 July 1997.“ 

There is a Handover beer, known as 
Red Dawn, bottled with a distinctive red 
label emblazoned with the year '97. And 
there are several varieties of Handover 
wine, including “Chateau Hong Kong, 
vintage 1997." which bills itself as “A 
Liberal Red.” 

No matter how tacky, at least some of 
the Handover memorabilia seem to be 
selling. Josceiin Halsey, who created 
Joss Enterprise Co. to peddle souvenirs, 
said she initially ordered 3.500 Hand- 


over mugs and has sold them alL Also 
selling well, she said, are Handover shot 
glasses. 

Natasha Edwards, who was bora in 
Thailand and grew up here, is marketing 
her own Handover memorabilia: top 
hats imported from Nepal and adorned 
with Britain's Union Jack on one side 
and China's red flag on the other. 

But not only merchandisers are cash- 
ing in on the turnover. Restaurants, bars, 
clubs and pubs have also all recognized 
that there is money to be made on the Big 
Event, and almost every watering hole in 
town seems to be offering some kind of 
Handover special for the night of June 
30, when Hong Kong returns to Chinese 
control at midnight. 

Off the party circuit, some of the se- 
miofficial events promise to give die word 
"kitsch" an entirely new meaning. 

For example, Hong Kongers on the 
first day of Chinese rule will awaken to a 
flotilla of giant pandas making their way 
down the harbor illuminated by lasers 
and fireworks. 

The flotilla will dock off the city’s 
central business district Then a local 
governing council plans to release 10,000 
Chinese homing pigeons that are sup- 
posed to find their way to China — to 
"symbolize Hong Kong's return to her 
motherland," the event’s organizers say. 

“Birds from all over China will be 
released in the territory,” dead panned 
Hong Kong's irreverent HK Magazine. 
“It will be interesting to see how many 
ask for asylum.” 


VIETNAM: For Workers , Not Yet Paradise 


Continued from Page 1 

system of law that protects the worker,” 
Mr. Binh said. 

It is the ultimate contradiction in Vi- 
etnam. a self-professed workers' haven. 
Ho Chi Minh and other Vietnamese 


that we aren’t machines, we're human 
beings," said Ho Thi Thanh, a union 
representative at Nike’s troubled shoe 
operation in Cu Chi, some 40 kilometers 
(25 miles) from Ho Chi Minh City. 

Down a dusty road from the Sam Y ang 
Co. factory, which is owned by South 


nationalists adopted communism in the Koreans and which works for Nike, Miss 


1940s in the fight against French co- 
lonial rule. When North Vietnam pro- 
claimed itself a communist republic in 
the 1950s. it was scarcely an indus- 
trialized society — a basic requisite for 
communism. 

Only now. as the economic doctrines 
of communist rule wane, is the country 
beginning to develop heayy industry and 
a manufacturing capability. A labor 
movement is emerging, bringing de- 


Tbanh balanced on a tiny plastic stool at 
a tea stall and explained the difficulties at 
her troubled workplace. 

Last month, a line supervisor smacked 
a worker across the hip with the sole of a 
Nike sneaker to make the employee 
work faster. 

It was a repeat performance of a highly 
publicized incident last year, when a 
South Korean floor manager used the 
rubber sole of a shoe to beat an employee 


mands for equality, respect and a bigger over the head. A tribunal gave that worn- 


share of the country's wealth. 

Foreign investment is creating more 


an a three-month suspended prison term. 
Nike says that it has intervened and 


and better-paying jobs and the standard of insists that labor relations are on the 


living in cities is on the rise — although 
modestly. Yet more workers feel reduced 
to cogs in a machine directed by foreign 
money and Vietnamese partners. 

Fewer than 3,000 people nationwide 
went on strike in 1994. Two years later, 
quadruple that number walked out in Ho 
Chi Minh City alone. The trend is still on 
the rise. 

"We often complain to our supervisors 


mend in its factories, all of which are 
closed to journalists except by guided 
tour with a Nike regional executive from 
Hong Kong. 

Miss Thanh said, however, that prob- 
lems still plague Sam Yang. The fac- 
tory's workers are still without a group 
contract, leaving them vulnerable to w. 
dom firings with little recourse asjH 
union, she said. g 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1997 ’ 

PAGE 11 








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Cruise Lin es: The Care and Feeding of Boutiques 


P 



By Suzy Menkes 

baenuitiongl Herafd Tribune 


ARIS — A new generation has 
stormed the citadel of couture. 
But will it have, the energy and 
the staying power of the estab- 
lished designers who keep turning out 
hew collections? 

The current cruise shows give some 
idea of the punishing schedule of fash- 
. fan life at the top. 

1 1 Take Emanuel Ungaro, who, like oth- 
er couturiers, is wonting f ranticall y on 
: haute couture, to be presented in early 
uly. On Friday, the house showed 100 
Inodjels in its cruise line- — fresh as paint 
L red. white and blue, neutral or bright 
- pastel colors. J 

On Saturday — the very day that 
Ungaro had dressed six society women 
in couture for the ball given by the Aga 


Khan at Chantilly for his daughter’s 
wedding — there was another complete 
collection: Weekend, with sophisticated 
separates selling at one quarter the price 
of the main line. 

Next week, Ungaro will put his 
meoswear on the Paris runway just 
three days before the haute routine 
show on July 7. Even with 25 people in 
the design studio, 350 outfits and four 
shows within one month is impressive. 

"I don’t know how he does it,” said 
Laura Ungaro at the cruise show, while 
her husband was closeted in die couture 
‘He gets up at 6 A.M., works out 
lor 40 minutes — and he has a lot of 
energy.” 

It is a similar story for Kart Lagerfeld, 
whose Chanel cruise line was presented 
in the spare space of a modern art gallery 

in homage to the Chanel No. 5 fragrance 
in Andy Warhol packaging. Lagerfeld 


has no men’s line for Chanel, but he is 
working both on couture and withe next 
ready-to-wear shows for Chanel, Fendi 
and Lagerfeld. 

The cruise lines are a good indication 
of how well a designer can distill the 
creative essence of the brand. In contrast 
to the brouhaha surrounding the sig- 
nature collection, these are clothes 
destined to “feed” the boutiques and 
give women an appetite for fashion be- 
tween seasons. They require a designer 
signature — but not a bold statement 

Ungaro’s show was a real client 
pleaser. Usually the phrase “something 
for everyone" is fashion’s kiss-off line, 
but Ungaro was smart enough to in- 
sinuate a new softness and ease forpanis 
and cardigan jackets, while still offering 
more structured suits for conventional 
customers. Both lorries were shown with 
cate tops in lacy, racy knit — an ex- 


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THE WORLD’S DAB# NEWSPAPER 



ample of how an individual item can 
refresh a wardrobe. 

A focus on color and texture was also 
significant, with devore or bumed-out 
effects creating a feathery tightness that 
made pants flow and jackets waft. Geor- 
gette and lace also made airy dresses , or, 
alternatively, stretch materials gave a 
sexy edge to skinny pants. 

The Weekend collection, a new pan 
of the U (for Ungaro) lower-priced line, 
looks like a hit. Here fabrics were in- 
triguing and often high-tech, with the 
logo as a camouflage pattern, burned out 
to give the effect of broderie angbisc. or 
used like a gift-ribbon banding a dress. 
Bright jeans and shiny cargo pants were 
casual, but shapely coats and jackets 
make the U collection more than just a 
designer jeans line. 

Chanel cruise was minimalist in 
mood: no globby signature buttons 
fastening the plain, soft tailoring: no 
logos on the sleek swimsuits: not one 
single necklace and only dull-metallic 
bracelets in the gilt- free zone. 

ET Lagerfeld has a wav of 
giving a fresh spin to Chanel, 
by making pastel -colored 
tweed suits paper-weight, so 
that the long skins seemed as light as a 
sarong. The pale knits that opened the 
show were ice-cream cool with their 
rainbow borders. 

Lagerfeld said that the sv. eel, soft pot- 
pourri colors were inspired by the paint- 
ings of Marie Laurencin, whose portrait 
of Coco Chanel hangs in the studio. Thev 
gave a slightly nostalgic fed to a col- 
lection that was still resolutely m«xJem in 
its use of new fabrics, its cookie-cuuer 
scalloped hemlines and its mix of suede 
and silk. For evening, chiffon cardigans 
knotted nonchalantly at the midriff over 
light dresses contrasted with more so- 
phisticated black dresses. 

Seeing Christian Lacroix’s cruise 
line in a small showroom was still not 
quite close enough to appreciate the 
design energy that had gone into ap- 
parently simple clothes. The imagin- 
ative fabrics needed to be touched to be 
understood. White foliage on an orange 
tsuit was flocked in rubber, stylized 
owers were printed on striped knits; 
subtle patterns on light fabrics were 
burned out and then appliqued. 

Lacroix, who designed Princess Zahra 
Khan’s wedding gown, is known for 
elaborate outfits. Bui the cruise line 
showed him a master of enriched sim- 
plicity. Knitwear wasstrong, with shapes 
long and slender for tunics over pants or 
for skinny dresses. Evening dresses were 
short and sweet, but also simple, like the 
pistachio green satin dress, suspended 
from shoe-string straps and flipping sau- 
cily at the near. A palette j qf .orange 'a[rid 
Aegean blue, with a touch of romance in 
the rose print, painted a strong and co- 
herent vision of Lacroix's sunny world. 

Sonia Rykiel was the only designer 
whose cruise line stuck close to die sea 
shore, with its sailor tops, stripey knits, 
bell-bottom pants and Breton berets. 

“Biarritz!” said Rykiel, citing the 
inspiration for the show and for the 
pants cut with a pleat at die back of the 
knee “like when you bend to play 
boules.” 

The brisk and easy collection showed 
the best of Rykiel: jersey cardigan jack- 
ets or sweaters slopping off one shoulder 
contrasted with shrunken knits. They 
were given graphic stripes, in contrast- 
ing colors and widths. A Japanese theme, 
bringing kimono wrap jackets and em- 
broidered flowers, took the image to 
more distant shores. Bui it remained as 
true to Rykiel’s spirit as the sweater- 
shaped bottle of her new fragrance. 


Kuniko 

Tsutsumi 

Tribute 


International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — “She was an ex- 
ceptional woman, discreet 
and full of grace,” Pierre 
Cardin said Monday at the 
memorial Mass for Kuniko Tsu- 
tsumi, who died of a cerebral hem- 
orrhage last week at age 69. 

Tsutsumi, part of the Japanese 
Seiba-Saison dynasty, was a fa- 
miliar figure in the French fashion 
scene. Her passion for Europe and 
its style was inspired by a visit to 
Paris in 1956. She never left, be- 
coming a writer, a fashion reporter 
and a talent scout for her brother 
Seiji Tsutsumi. She is credited with 
having pioneered the introduction 
of Hermes and Yves Saint Laurent 
to Japan in the 1960s. 

The sudden death of Tsutsumi 
was the more shocking because it 
came only hours after sbe had signed 
a contract for the sale of the couture 
house of Jean-Louis Schema - , which 
SeiburSaison hod bought in a joint 
venture with Hermes in 1990. This 
was followed two years later by the 
acrimonious departure of Schemer. 

The house’s new owner is 
Groupe EX. Finances, owner of the 
ready-to-wear house of Emanuelle 
Khanh, Harel shoes and Jacques 
Faih, acquired earlier this year. 

Those paying tribute included 
Jean-Louis Dumas, president of 
Hermes. Francois Lesage, the con- 
tore embroiderer, Jacques Mouclier, 
president of Paris couture’s govern- 
ing body, and Bernard Perris, current 
ftoeignar aL the house of Scherrer. 

Suzy Menkes 












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From top to bottom : Sonia Rykiel’s striped sweater set and knitted cotton 
pants ; Emanuel Ungaro's checked pantsuit and flowered top ; Christian 
Lacroix’s asymmetric satin slip dress, and ChaneFs sleek swimsuit 








































































Forge Pay-TY Accord 

Deal Opens Film Archives to Former Foe 


Compaq to Buy Tandem for $3 Billion in Stock 


Co*p*dlvO»s*ffj^Dim**a 

NEW YORK — - Compaq Computer 
Gap., the world’s biggest make r of 
personal computers, stud Monday it 
would buy Tandem Computers Inc. for 
about $3 billion in stock in an effort to 
add high-margin products to its Hn* 
Tandcm makes so-called “fault-tol- 
erant*' computers designed to withstand 
a malfunction by using backup systems. 

I Tandem computers run automated teller 
machines and stock exchanges, where 
around-the-clock performance is cru- 
cial. . . 

.. The purchase expands Compaq's 
reach by giving it a fuller line of 
products to offer corporations. 

ftalso givesCompaq, the No. 5 maker 
of computers of all sorts, another boost 
in its drive to become No. 3 behind 
International Business Machin es Corp. 
and Hewlett-Packard Co. by 2000. 

Brace Stephen, head of PC research 
at International Data Corp., said, “To 

- reach that they are going to have to grow 
into the enterprise area and have a 
product mix more like IBM and H-P.” 
To that end, Compaq, which had 

■ $4J5 billion in cash at the end of the first 
quarter, has been shopping for potential 

\ purchases for the past several months. 

■ Micron Technology Inc. confirmed 
that it held talks with Compaq to buy its 
direct personal computer subsidiary, 
Memo Electronics Inc. Digital Equip- 
ment Corp. and Gateway 2000 Inc. are 


among other reposted targets. 

Compaq has annual sales of $18.1 
bilhon and sells its products in more 
than 100 countries. 

Tandem, with about 7,000 employ- 
ees, had $1.99 billion in revenue last 
year, and Compaq said the acquisition 
would add to its ear nings immediate ly. 

The transaction is valued at about 
$22.42 for each Tandem share. Tandem 
stock jumped $5,875 to $20,875 in New 
York, ana Compaq shares slipped $2.75 
to $104.00. 

Personal computers have become less 


profitable as their makers slash prices to 
match lower costs and spur continued 
demand, a model that Compaq is largely 
responsible fix: since it instigated the 
first price war in 1992. The higher-end 
m ac h i ne s, such as servers and work- 
stations, are more expensive and cany 
much higher profit margins. 

The deal would give Compaq a vast 
new sales force to help sell its com- 
puters to companies around the world. 

Compaq, which had planned to add 
2,000 salespeople of its own, instead 
will hire far fewer and add Tandem's 


4,000 field staff, from salespeople to 
service managers, said John Rose, Com- 
paq’s head of enterprise computing. 

Compaq, which is based in Houston, 
is already me No. 1 seller of servers, the 
powerful computers that run small net- 
works of personal computers. But Tan- 
dem's technology is key to a Compaq 
drive to sell relatively inexpensive busi- 
ness computers for the most cumber- 
some tasks such as tracking inventory. 

The two companies said they expect- 
ed the deal to be concluded in the third 
quarter of this year. (AP, Bloomberg) 


By John Schmid 

Intermiticwul Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The media rivals 
Kirch Group and Bertelsmann AG 
ended their two-year battle over the 
future of digital pay-television in Ger- 
many in a settlement Monday that 
threatens to severely weaken Kirch's 
own once -dominant digital pay-televi- 
sion channel. 

Agreeing to wide-ranging coopera- 
tion terms with its one-time foe. the 
Munich-based Kirch Group also for- 
feited its most important strategic ad- 
vantage: Kirch will open its vast film 
archives to Premiere, a compering cable- 
television channel dial is lied directly to 
the Bertels mann media empire. 

The agreement reverses the picture 
from only a year ago, when Kirch’s gold 
mine of film holdings was seen as the 
key to exclusive control of the poten- 
tially huge digital television sector in 
Germany, Europe's biggest and most 
hotly contested media market. 

But the costs of acquiring such a 
coveted movie libraiy, including Ger- 
man pay-television rights to nearly all 
future Hollywood rides, have put Kirch 
deeply into debt 

Meanwhile, Kirch's struggling year- 
old DF- 1 digital TV channel has failed to 
attract the subscribers it needs. DF-1 
GmbH, which is not profitable, has at- 
tracted only 40,000 subscribers, well 


Laptop Makers to Meld Standards to Fight Big 2 


Carp&d by Om SugFnmDispmcba 

TOKYO — Some of the world’s 
biggest computer makers, led by In- 
ternational Business Machines Corp., 
said Monday that they would develop 
compatible standards for low-cost, 
portable electronics such as laptop 
computers in a move to challenge Mi- 
crosoft Corp. and Intel Corp. 

Eleven companies, including IBM, 
are backing the standards: Apple Com- 
puter Inc., Netscape Communications 
Coip., Oracle Corp. and Sun Microsys- 
tems Inc. of the United States; Nokia 


AB of Finland, and Toshiba Corp., 
Fujitsu Ltd., Hitachi Ltd. and Mit- 
subishi Electric Corp. of Japan. 

All are struggling for a share of a 
global computer mm-frett rtnminateH by 
Intel's central processor chips and Mi- 
crosoft's computer-operating soft- 
ware. 

Toshiba said die standards would 
determine how mobile computer 
screens should look, bow much power 
they need, die method of linking them 
with networks and the types of peri- 
pheral devices that they support 


The standards cover a new class of 
devices ranging from “smart* ’ cellular 
telephones to lightweight, handheld 
mobile devices with easy access to the 
Internet of corporate networks. 

The companies will work to provide 
“seamless connectivity” between mo- 
bile infor mati on terminals, and to de- 
velop security systems along with net- 
work connection speeds, Toshiba said. 

Analysts said the companies would 
face an uphill battle. 

“It’s chipping away at Microsoft 
and Intel, but I don't think it’s going to 


change anything in the next two 
years," said Reinier Dobbelmann, 
electronics analyst in the Tokyo office 
of SBC Warburg. 

Hiroo Okuhara, a Toshiba director, 
said his company would be the first to 
release mobile networking computers 
based on the new technological stan- 
dards. 

An IBM vice president. Phil Hester, 
said that his company planned to re- 
lease equipment based on the new stan- 
dard over the next one to two years. 

( Bloomberg , AFP) 


short of the 300,000 that Kirch had pro- 
jected in the maiden year, and well below 
the 13 million viewers at Premiere. 

The accord represents a coup for Ber- 
telsmann, which repeatedly had been 
outbid by Mr. Kirch in rights auctions 
for films and lagged in digital tech- 
nology. 

In a move that symbolizes the two 

competitors' close new relationship, 
both agreed to share a single set- top 
decoder box to unscramble the myriad 
digital transmissions. They will use Mr. 
Kirch's “d-box" decoder in deference 
to the massive outlays Mr. Kirch has 
made to develop digital technology. 

Kirch outlined its strategy in a joint 
statement with CLT-Ufa of Luxem- 
bourg. a European television operation 
owned 50 percent by Bertelsmann and 50 
percent by Compagnie Luxembour- 
geoise de Telediffusion SA. Bertelsmann 
has grouped its television, audiovisual 
and radio activities in CLT-Ufa. 

Kirch and CLT-Ufa each will raise 
their respective slakes in Premiere to a 
50 percent, aiming to achieve parity 
holdings through what amounts to a 
small reorganization of Europe's 
splintered pay-television markets. 

It is expected that Canal Plus SA of 
France will give up its 37.5 percent 
holding in Premiere, allowing Kirch to 
raise his stake from 25 percent and CLT- 
Ufa from its current 37.5 percent. In 
return. Canal Plus is expected to acquire 
Mr. Kirch's shareholding in the Italian 
pay-television station Telepiu SpA. 

■ BSkyB to Sell Digital Stoke 

British Sky Broadcasting Group 
PLC. will sell its stake in a British digital 
television venture, bowing to pressure 
from the industry regulator, Bloomberg 
News quoted media reports as saying. 

BSkyB will sell its 33 percent slake in 
British Digital Broadcasting, to the 
group’s two other partners. Carlton 
Communications PLC and Granada 
Group PLC, for £75 million (SI 24 mil- 
lion) if BDB is awarded three licenses 
from the Independent Television Com- 
mission. according to the media reports. 
The commission is responsible for en- 
suring that no single company wields 
too much power in the industry. 

Spokesmen for the companies in- 
volved would not comment. 



Thinking Ahead /Commentary 



Annual China Trade Fight Hurts U.S. 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — A sure sign of 
. thpstartof summer in Washington is the 
sound of America's political establish- 
ment shooting itself in the foot over 
trade with China. 

The painful annual ritual starts with a 
presidential decision to extend most- 
favorcd-nation treatment: to Chin a for 
another 12 months, provoking an angry 
debate in Congress. After heated and 
damaging exchanges, the president gets 
his way. 

Beijing’s adversaries end up proving 
> a point — that they do not have the 
political strength to torpedo China’s 
trade status — which is just about the 
opposite of the one they intended. The 
president is accused of caring rally 
about ctass commercial interests. 

This year passions have been running 
higher than ever, as an unusual coalition 
of conservatives, liberals, protectionists 
andhrnnait-r ighte and labor activists has 
sought to deny China normal access to 
the U.S.mariceL 

But this time there is also a glimmer 
of light at the end of die tunneL At last 
some people are beginning to ask the 
right question, which is not whether 
China’s current trade stains should be 
continued. It clearly should be. 

Withdrawal of most-favored nation 
trade status would be a declaration of 
economic war, in which the losers 
would include American bu si nesses, 
workers and consumers, the Chinese 
entrepreneurs wbo are weakening the 


bonds of the Communist system and the 
inhabitants of Hong Kong, whom 
America wants to help, not harm. 

Tire right question is this: Given that 
it is in the U.S. interest to continue most- 
fa vored-nation status, what mea n s other 
than trade sanctions are available to 
influence China’s policies and mark 
where the fanim of American tolerance 
lie? 

The lack of those other means has 
been the main cause of the annual trade- 
status fiasco. To many who dislik e 

The trick: Encourage 
China’s integration into 
the world economy while 
showing there are limits 
and costs to its behavior. 

Beijing’s policies — whether on human 
rights, Hong Kong, Taiwan, weapons 
and nuclear proliferation or the buildup 
of China’s armed forces — a vote 
against the trade status has looked like 
the rally leverage available. 

The problem is that most-favored- 
narinn status has been made to carry a 
load it was never designed to bear. The 
term simply denotes a pledge that a 
trading partner will receive tre atm e n t 
“no less favorable” than the most 
favored nation — a guarantee of nondis- 
enmination essential to the construction 
of the open postwar trading system. 

Beijing’s desire to enter that system 


— most notably by joining the World 
Trade Organization — should be wel- 
comed not rebuffed. The trick is for 
America to encourage China’s integra- 
tion into the world economy, while at 
the same time showing that there are 
limits and costs to Chinese behavior. 

Suggestions from a Republican task 
force last week are on the right lines. 
They include a voluntary code of con- 
duct for U.S. corporations in China, 
identification of companies linked to the 
Chinese military and increased funding 
for pro-democracy projects. 

Washington should also expand its 
policy of penalizing specific Chinese 
companies and individuals who violate 
U.S. trade regulations or laws, for in- 
stance, on weapons proliferation. 

At strategic level, Washington ur- 
gently needs to forge a common front 
with its allies to reduce Beijing’s ability 
to play off Europe and Japan against the 
United States — for example, by re- 
warding countries that keep quiet about 
human rights with lucrative contracts. 

It is also high time for the West to 
stem the flow of militarily applicable 
high technology to Beijing, ana to agree 
not to break ranks in negotiating 
Chinese entry into tbe WTO. 

Many of the same people who now 
oppose continuing most-fa vored-nation 
status will doubtless try to block 
China’s WTO membership or attach 
unacceptable political conditions. It will 
help to resist those de mands if A m erica 
and its allies have a wider array of other 
levers with which to apply pressure on 
Beijing. 


You ’ve got the vision. 
We’ve got the know-how. 


You see things for what they 
are. And also for what they 
could be. 

It's the kind of vision that 
ignites and fuels the entrepre- 
neurial spirit 

We at Credit Lyonnais Private 
Banking share this vision. 
And, equally important we 
have the knowledge, special- 
ized products and services 
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CURRENCY A INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


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PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 




Investor’s America 





— I Hashimoto’s Remarks | 

Penuzoil Gets $6.4 Billion Bid Unsetde Wa u Street j 


fi publis 



FORT WORTH, Texas — Un- 
ion Pacific Resources Group Inc. 
made an unsolicited $6.4 billion 
bid for Peonzoil Co. on Monday, 
aiming to latch on to the best- 
selling U.S. brand of motor oil and 
to expand petroleum exploration, 
especially m the Gulf of Mexico. 

Union Pacific is offering $84 a 
share in cash for 50.1 percent of 
Pennzoil's outstanding shares. 

If the initial bid succeeds. Union 
Pacific will offer $84 in stock for 
the remaining shares of Pennzoil, a 
move that would be tax-free to 
investors. Union Pacific will use 
bank loans to finance die cash por- 
tion of the bid and will assume 
Pennzoif's debt if the bid suc- 
ceeds. 

Union Pacific said that the com- 
bined company would lead the in- 
dustry in a number of performance 
measures, including milling activ- 
ity, production and cash flow. 

Peonzoil, which is based in 


Houston, said it would review the 
offer and reply before July 7. 

Pennzoil rejected a bid of $80 a 
share Tnadf. June 10, Union Pacific 
said. The latest offer, which values 
the company’s stock at about $4.2 
billion, is a 41 percent premium to 
Pennzoil’s closing share price of 
$59,625 ou Friday. 

Pennzoil's stock price soared 
$18,875 to $77,625, and Union 
Pacific’s share mice slipped $1 to 
$25375. 

Shawn Brennan, an analyst with 
Merrill Lynch & Co. said die in- 
creased bid “would probably 
thwart anybody else from coming 
in and offering an even higher 
price.” 

As part of its bid. Union Pacific 
filed lawsuits to remove some of 
PennzoQ’s extensive barriers to a 
hostile takeover. 

A suit filed in a Delaware court 
asks that Pennzoil’s poison-pill 
shareholder-rights plan be over- 
turned; a federal suit filed in Baton 


Rouge, Louisiana, seeks to have 
any attempt to apply Louisiana’s 
anti-takeover laws to the Pennzoil 
offer declared unconstitutional, 
and a federal suit filed in Fort 
Wrath. Texas, asks that Union Pa- 
cific's tender-offer documents be 
declared legally acceptable. 

Union Pacific’s chairman. Jack 
Messman, nwfe public letters that 
he had sent to Pennzoil's chairman 
and chief executive, James Pate, 
that accused him of refusing to talk 
about an acquisition. 

In an interview, Mr. Messman 
said that Union Pacific would 
boost Pennzoil's oil production by 
9 percent a year for the “fore- 
seeable future” and would add 

about 9 percent a year to cash flow 

a share m the fust year. 

The transaction would be fin- 
anced with< $2.1 billion in bank 
borrowings and would involve $2. 1 
billion in common stock and $2.2 
billion in assumed debt, Mr. Mess- 
man said. ( Bloomberg , Reuters) 


fc e: Bloomberg. F ate 


Intcraamnl Hcnid Tnbcae 


Very briefly: 


• Paxson Communications Corp. said it would sell its radio 
stations, billboards and two minor-league spoils teams to 
Clear Channel Communications Corp. for $693 million. 
Paxson wants to focus on turning its 55 television stations into 
America's seventh broadcast network. 


Eli Lilly to Write Down $2.4 Billion 


• The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a group of Lloyd’s of 
London investors, or Names, must pursue securities fraud 
complaints against the insurer in Britain, not in the United 
States. 


OmyalaibjOarSMiffFrcmiDijparha 

INDIANAPOLIS — Eli Lilly & 
Co. said Monday it would take a 
$2.4 billion charge against second- 
quarter earnings to write down the 
value of its PCS Health Systems Inc. 
pharmacy -benefits unit. 

The write-down amounts to 58 


• CNET Inc. plans to start an on-line service that can be 
licensed by airlines, brokerages or any other companies that 
want to provide Internet access. License holders for the 
service. Snap! Online, would get exclusive advertising 
space. 

• Whitman Coq). said it would spin off its Hussxnann Corp. 
refrigeration unit and Midas International muffler unit to 
shareholders, allowing the company to focus on its soft-drink 
bottling operation, Pepsi-Cola General Bottlers Inc. 

• Dime Bancorp Inc of New York said it agreed to buy 

North American Mortgage Co. of Santa Rosa. California, 
for $374 million in stock. (Bloomberg, ap ; 


percent of the $4.1 billion Lilly paid 
for PCS in 1994. The charge, which 


for PCS in 1994. The charge, which 
amounts to $4-40 a share, would 
lead to losses for the quarter and for 
the frill year, but would bolster earn- 
ings by 1998. 

Lilly bought PCS from Mc- 
Kesson Corp. as an outlet for selling 


its drugs. At the time, Lilly feared 
that President Bill Clinton's health- 
care reform effort would concen- 
trate baying power in die hands of 
managed-care companies and en- 
courage doctors to prescribe die 
lowest-price treatment or generic 
drugs rather than brand-name 
products. That did not happen. 

“It seemed a bigger risk at the 
time not to get into pharmacy ben- 
efit management,” said Mario 
Corso, an analyst at Rodman & Ren- 
shaw Inc. in Boston. 

Lilly shares closed $335 lower 
on Monday to $107,125. 


Pharmacy-benefits managers like 
PCS negotiate low prices from drug 
companies, then sell the drugs in 
bulk to health-insurance plans. Lilly 
hag had a harrier rime than its rivals 
in making the arrangement work, in 
part because PCS 's biggest business 
has been processing pharmaceutical 
claims rather than discounting 
drugs. 

Securities analysts have increas- 
ingly criticized the purchase as an 
expensive blunder that has failed to 
bear fruit. But Golden said Lilly's 
strategy still calls for PCS to play a 
role. (AP, Bloomberg ) 


Ci<flf4M*rar F*m Dnpjbtn 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell 
sharply Monday as an increase in 
bond yields gave investor an ex- 
cuse to secure some profits after last 
week’s record-setting rally. 

Treasury bond yields rose after 
Prime Minister Ryu taro Hadumoto 
of Japan threatened to sell UjS. 
Treasury bonds and purchase gold. 
Rising interest rates make it more 
expensive for companies to finance 
their business. 

Tobacco and aerospace issues 
led the decline in stocks, but a spate 
of mergers and acquisitions pushed 
computer and U.S. oil shares high- 
er, tempering the loss. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age fell 19235 points, to 7,60436. 
Declining issues outnumbered ad- 
vancing ones on die New York 
Stock Exchange by a 2-to-i ratio. 

“The market is entitled to some 
rest and recuperation after the rally 
it has had,” said Alfred Kugei, chief 
investment strategist at Stein Roe ; & i 
Famham, a fund management firm. 
The Dow had risen 6 percent so far 
in June before Monday’s decline. 

The Nasdaq composite index 
slipped 12.77 points, to 1.434.33, 
ana the Standard & Poor’s 500- 
stock index fell 20.08 points to 
878.62. 

Philip Morris stock fell 2% to 
42% on concern that the $368.5 
billion U.S. settiement reached last 
week could spur similar actions 
overseas. Other tobacco issues also 
fell on the settiement. as did In- 
surance companies. 

Companies involved in the ci- 
vilian aircraft industry, such as 
Boeing, United Technologies, Mc- 
Donnell Douglas and AUiedSignal. 
dropped after a Chinese aviation 
official predicted that growth in the 
Chinese aviation industry would 


slow to an average of 8 percent to 
percent annually fresn the cuneqtX 
average of befeveen 10 percent aixtf 
12 percent. 

Meanwhile, James McDonnell 
HI, the son of a McDonnell Douglas 
founder, said he planned to oppose 
the company's acquisition by Boe^ 


in" 



will not bear his family name. . ; 

The price of the benchmark 30^ 
year Treasury bond dropped 11(33 j 
to 99 6/32 on Mr. Hashimoio’scon^' 
menis, bringing the yield up to 
percent from 6.65 percent Friday. .^ 

Speaking at Columbia Uni-^ 
versity in New York City. Mr. Ha^ 
shimotosaid the United States must, sc 
help Japan keep exchange raie^ 




US. STOCKS 


Pound Soars to 5-Year High Against Mark 


Weekend Box Office 


The Auodated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “Batman & Robin" dominated the U.S. 
box office over the weekend, with a gross of $43.6 minion. 
Following are the Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday's 
ticket sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


I .Batman & Robin 

2. My Best Friend's Wedding 

3. Can Air 

4. The Lost Ytorid: Jurassic Pak 

5. Speed 2: Crotoe Central 

6. Austin Powers 

7. Gone Ffchfci' 

ft. Addicted to Love 

8. The Frith Element 
!0. Buddy 


(WamerBms.) 

frnstarffdbmst 

(Tauduttne Pidurta) 

(UnhmaO 

mienMCMksyAad 

CNmLtmOnema) 

( HoByreood Pktvm) 
(Warner Bros.) 
(Cohanbia Pictures) 
(Jkn Hensaa PkAna) 


$416 motion 
*21 X mflton 
$102 mutton 
samOHon 
S/amflBon 
StrimOHon 
$1-2mBBon 
SLOmiBon 
*L9mBon 
S&82mHon 


Bloomberg News 

NEW YORK — The British 
pound rose to a five-year high 
against the Deutsche mark and 
surged against the dollar on Monday 
on speculation that British interest 
rates may soon rise. 

Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashimo- 
to of Japan, meanwhile, knocked the 
dollar from the day’s highs against 
the yen after he said Japan might sell 
U.S. Treasury bonds and bay gold if 
exchange rates remained volatile. 

Talk of high British rates gained 
momentum after The Sunday Times 


of London said the central bank was 
under pressure to raise its base lend- 
ing rate by half a percentage point 

“Speculation over the weekend 
that the Bank of England would 
increase interest rates is making 
sterling look good," said Chris Ig- 
go, currency strategist at Barclays 
Bank. “Whether they raise rates by 
a quarter or half a percentage point, 
they're almost definitely going to 
tighten again.” 

The pound climbed as high as 
2.8762 DM, its highest since reach- 
ing 38780 DM on July 10, 1993 In 


New York, the pound rose to 2.8741 
DM from 38642 DM Friday. 

Last week, a series of economic 
reports showed growing demand for 
British-made products, rising retail 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


sales and an increase in the money 
supply. The Bank of England raised 
its base rate half a percentage point 
on May 6 to 6.50 percent to rein in 
the economy and keep inflation at 
bay. 

A report due this month is ex- 


pected to show the British economy 
grew 0.9 percent in the first quarter, 
faster than the 0.8 percent rise fore- 
cast 

In 4 P.M. trading in New York, 
the pound rose to $1.6717 from 
$1.6565 on Friday. 

Thedollarfellto 1.7185 Deutsche 
marks from 1 .7276 DM the previous 
trading day. 

The U.S. currency fell to 1 14.870 
yen from 1 14.875. The dollar 
slipped to 5.7975 French francs 
from 5.8265, and to 1.4313 Swiss 
francs from 1.4385 francs. 


stable! He threatened to sell Treav^ 
ury bonds if the do liar -yen e*. j 
change rate remains volatile. < j 
“I hope the U.S. will engage in j 
effbrts and cooperation to maintain J 
exchange stability." Mr. Hashimo- I 
to said, ‘ ‘so that we would not sue- j 
ciimb to this temptation in sell off j 
Treasury bills and switch oar for-* 5 
eign reserves to gold. ' ’ t 

He added that Japan had been { 
templed to sell U.S. securities on ! 
several occasions in the past, most, 
recently during the 1995 auto talks; 
between Washington and Tokyo. ~ 

A spate of mergers and acquit 
sitions kept stocks from dropping- 
further, Compaq Computer agreed, 
to buy Tandem Computers for S3* 
billion, sending stock in computer 
makers higher. 

The offer by Union Pacific Re-* 
sources to buy Pennzoil for $84 a 
share helped oil stocks rally. 

Insurance stocks were among the; 
biggest dec liners. American Inter-, 
national Group. Chubb. Cigna and; 
General Re all fell. But Michael 
Smith, an analyst at Salomon 
Brothers, said speculation about big. 
insurance payouts to tobacco! 
companies was misguided. 

“The antagonists don't want; 
anyone to come along and help tiny 
tobacco companies out." he said, 
Shares in Cisco Systems rose, 
after Alcatel Alsthom S A of Francei 
said it signed an agreement with tfui| 
computer networking company 10; 
combine their expertise in Interne; 
access software and telecommuni-, 
cations networks. : 

American National Bancorp, i 
shares rose after Crestar Financial' j 
agreed to acquire the holding com- 
pany for American National Sail- 
ings Bank for' $20.25 a share. ofl? 
$72.9 million. (Bloomberg. AP,__ 


i Crlittniar 

Hanks 
...l tan i"fi 



: ***&_ 

I fSMAf-C! 

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AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FimjRE^^ 


nrUy J*ji 




-snrsrsf? 

ss- • Jt -.S 1 


Monday 3 p.m. 

TTw top 300 masFacOve shares, 
up to Vw doakig on WhI 5»«t 
The Assoaatad Press 


sdes man uwubi awe Indexes 


Most Actives 


June 23, 1997 


High Low Latest Qw OjjW 


High Low Latest Chge OpH 


High Low Latest Chge Com: 


High Low moral Chg» 


AMC 

AVICCpn 

AdvMaa 

Acnnon 

AiWd 

AJnmco 

SIS* 1 


W 71 h 
IM 4V, 
ms l»VS 
11J W, 
Hi r* 
136 IM 

in iru 

» 3H 


5*»* XWi 
4 ilh +VS 
1IVS 1W« -ft 
nvi tw — h 
3V, Wu —hi 


AJBhaln 

AHLnman 

AmM 

AESO* 

numniu 

AREInv 

Airfilmj 

ATechC 

Ampal 


I* 

4B» 71 ten 
6S4 Mi. 
350 14 

m wn 

1% 
io» nvi, 

Til 1M 
713 6V„ 


3Vh >Vh — te 
17* 17IS -W 

im in tH 

71V 21i —46 

rsw IM, —Vi. 
lSVi I5V6 —hi 

% a 

' 7?2 IvS 



Mi Mi 

no in* 


3335 11 

46M 1V6 

1SS 17fe 
373 1716 

1D77 Wu 


i l ia 

,K A 

17 +S 


Dow Jones 

<h»i W um Lot Ctek 

MH 7H9J7 ynso 740745 VMM -197J5 

TmB 7762-16 7771-57 273479 7737.97 -18-65 

Utl 775.37 226.04 22110 IBM -Ui 
Com 73B770 2371316 2347.71 ZBKM -OM 


16fe 1714 t* 


Standard & Poors 


Maaicwkn 

MoBHnwt 


m TOM, 

^2 KB 

711 MV. 


7114, 7lfe -VS 

Tfe rv. -Jfe 

13'4 14 4-1 

77 77 — fe 

146 Ife — V H 
Tfe fteii «V H 
1 1>M« thi 

life 141? *IM, 
Sfe 6 *VS 

5"4. — t H 
life life 


MawiHunt 

MdbuEm 


74 % 

6V6 6fe 


sfe y? 

MW. life. — »6 


hSJpnwl 


327 3fe 

bS £3 

175 ft. 
Ill Sfe 
3717 Ife 
74 WV. 
6(1 lSfe. 
41* T'Vi, 
606 life 
770 i»fe 
425 Tfe 
356 Kfe 
Sfe 

- 
«A 4fe 


Oxootcti 

CarwerBcp 

CcetlAM 

CetSci 


151 life 
13 3Vfe 
3010 22fe 
349 2Vi 
454 Ife 
73 life 
217 ZJfe 
4fe 
4V6 
D* life 
ao tvvu 
SB tZ 
*3 

118 life 
1780 16V. 

W0 Sfe 
3233 Ife. 
83 14 


QPOWE 

Bswtfi 

Emcrmn 

Eir&P 

EmpCor 

Gmaffl 

Equfeuren 

EteLvA 

FwinTiS, 

PtrmT wlA 

FonnT wtB 

PanHOTi 

RbrbO 

RAust 

FAusPr 

ftnv 

FMtedAn 

FntCA, 

HrJLH 

Forrijfl 

Fn*Sel 

Fre«CJ 

GST Tele 

GonoB 

GovCn 

C&wor* 

GnAun 

GnEmp 

GawOr 

GcKhCM 

Giatfll 

GW>fa* 

GaVdM 

GUStsm 

Cranms 

GrrvtwaL 

GrSimce 

HdtorMn 

HuigOr 

Hunwor 

Hdfcen 

Hastni 

Haw Air 

HKWVg 
H«r» „ 

HomaVttn 

Hondo 

Hovn&i 


117 

iw 

lft 

138 

ife 

Ife 

150 

35fe 

34 r. 

137 


9>Vu 

7*9 

ft 

ft 

445 

■Oft, 

*fe 

M 

Jl’ftj 

Dfe 

’V|. 

» 5* 

Sfe 

Mi 

954 

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7fe 8 -fe, 

l ft 3! 

3 fe Ife 
17fe IWh — fe 
27 30fe +U6 
2fe 3 f-fe 
2Sfe 25fe 
4Sfe «fe *3fe 

sS: A -8 
fiS a -Vi 

Ufe 1476 * 1’6. 
Ife Tfe -Vi, 

as Sn-a 

7fe Tfe —fe 
ISfe, 1816 * fe 

av,, iv H 

safe 53V,. *lfe 
27 27V. 

Sfe 3»fe — V. 
'fe fe +V% 
life life -J fe 
18fe . 38fe — fe 
life 22(6 tfe. 

ft a 3 

2116 2116 -fe 
3>fei Jfe 

ml iw — ‘i iu 
life 7116 —fe, 
3 % T* 

Tfe rvu — V» 
111* life ♦«, 

-fe 

^ ft 

Tfe 71 Vm ife 

SV, 5fe 
816 Sfe -V„ 
16fe I6fe — fe 
life I7fe tfe. 
141* 141* — fe 
Sfe Ife +fe 
4 

Sfe Sfe tfe 
Ife Ife — fe 
Ife 1V» 

34fe 3Sfe *fe 
9>Vu Tfe -fe 
fe fe -Vi. 


Msmmda 

MIUABC 

MIBanrM 

MunBn 

«n»d 

Mvemnd 

MTNCom 

Nation 

NlPrtnt 

NY Timas 




286 2fe 
7» TVm 
11* TV* 
73 17Vu 
1706 4fe 
86* Bfe 
643 Bfe 
11*4 50fe 
220 IBV, 
77 1716 


Bfe V 

? iS 

r p 

fe, fel 

ft ft 

H » 

1516 I5fe 
1266 1216 
14V6 3446 


ITfe tfe 

ft 7 SS 
15 


Industrials 

Tramp. 

Ulimu 

Finance 

SP 500 

SP100 


—1054.79 1(»U2 

— &9M (MM 

— 197J5 19S.75 

— 1814.14 101J6 

— 898L70 87&4S 

— 87476 85480 


141666 46U 
139027 21fe 
56177 ISM 
46473 I06M 
45471 TIM 
43470 83M 
<2387 56ft 
40460 am 

SS Sft 

34297 1216 
33678 Ife 
MW 32M 
V&l OT6 
JI AJ3 37V 


87*6 87ft 
77*6 77ft 
53ft 54M 
37 37V, 
65ft 65ft 
21M 22fe 
12 12 

lift 5 

34ft 36M 
38*6 36M 


High Law Latest awe OpM 
Grains 

cotw(caoT) 

SJJD4 bu nMmum- cents par duM 


JaiTB 8125 798» 00.10 -W5 1112 

Est.sotes NA PH's. sates SMS 
Fri’soowiau 3SJ80 oH <78 


Jul *7 

264ft 

257 

260ft 

—5 

67X55 

Sec 97 

?46ft 

Nft 

245 

— 2fe 

47X47 

Dec 97 

243ft 

241ft 

243 ft 

—ift 130X66 

Mcr9B 

250ft 

248ft 

250ft 

—ft 

18204 

May 98 2S5fe 

353ft 

255ft 


2X30 

Juts® 

238ft 

256 

258ft 

-ft 

32/1 

Scp *8 

254ft 

25) 

254ft 

+ lft 

145 


Est. sides HA. Frrs. sates 6L667 
FffsaDenlnt 274854 oH 2118 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBQrn 


Nasdaq 


46744 45M3 45047 -US 

W1J2 578J4 578.90 -12J2 

42140 41033 41051 -IJ7 

28662 mM M1J0 -*.11 

43173 42345 «16 S -7JB 


Tfe 3Vu 
7V6 

’S ’ft ;% 

22ft 23 —ft 

s52 ftz* 

17M II —ft 
Ufe ]«•* 
life 1016 

Jfe* £ -J* 

Tfe 3V. * ft* 
8ft Bfe — ft 

fe fe —Yu 
$ 

30 20 _ 

7*6 Tfe _ 
ITfe ITfe +Vt 
14ft 1 4ft —ft 
2fe, 2tew .ft, 

3fe 3V( +fe 
7ft Wu 
life life + ft 
6Yu 6ft» —ft 
3ft 3ft _ 
3 3fe -ft, 
Tfe 3 +ft 
14fe 14V* * ft 


Nasdaq 


77 17ft 
401 18ft 
178 4ft 
154 2*u 

1254 8ft 
176 ten 


gneor 
Onaormd 
Ottjanttes 
PC Quota 
PLC5YS 
PMC 
PacM&E 
PamHW 
PanAmCn 
PaxsnC 
PeoGW 
PeapteTd 
PtadW 
Phanctel 


IJ1 14ft 
281 fe 
415 7Wu 
798 15fe 
621 14ft 

n sft 

111 Wu 
ft 
ft 

114 2ft 
738 5<teu 
615 Steu 
1844 W* 
548 13ft 
113 ITfe 
10 45ft 


"a 

STOia 

14ft «fe 


life 14ft «fe 
fe, fe 
2ft 2*6 _ 

ISfe IWu Itfu 
14 14V4 — fe 

Sfe SM .» 
Tfe Jfe -Vu 
fe. fe. -Yu 


518 2fe 
18 6 
115 IT 1 Yu 
352 8fe, 
*6 #Vm 
530 Sfe 
147 13V. 

133 Ift 
163 life 
4*1 21 

714 37ft 
(33 lift 
26S 17ft 
304 3 Yu 
OT 1*6 
*1 *ft 
*5 17*6 


2ft 2ft tfe 
S4fe MU 

»Yu 8>fe. 

9ft Wu 
UW 13*6 *fe 
17ft 17*6 »V6 

45ft -fe* 

43 ft 43ft -fe 

Jfe, Jfe -fe. 
6 * — fe 

124* 13 — ‘fe, 

Wu I +fe 
4ft 4IVu 6ft, 

8 1 ^fe. 

17*6 Ufe *fe 
Ife Ife tfe, 
13 13 

»ft 20ft *fe 
37 37ft —fe 
33fe 33fe — 


17Yu 17teu *fe, 
3ft 3fe -ft, 
lft Ife -fe 
■ft Wu «fei 
17V6 17ft +fe 
4ft, 4ift, + Yu 
3«u Jfe *Yu 
J4fe JCVu *Vu 
■ft 1*6 
■ft. Mf, 

Pft, Sfe —ft 
38fe Me iVu 
4>ft. 4IVu +*u 
teu ,teu 
1*6 lift. 

(4*6 17 +fe 

Mt Wu 
SO*. Sft — fe 
i#fe nft. ‘ft. 
27 ft 27*6 —ft. 
SOU SOteu -fe 
|JU life 

4# 5^ 

Sft. Sfe —ft, 
im. 24M -ft. 


4023 2*M 
618 5 

I0S .-ft. 
2870 I teu 
78 17 
7ft. 
114 Sft 
05 life 
21* ITfe 
B0 51 
618 li 

HO »U 

IS s 

1441 Wu 
133 Hft, 
Ml Sfe 


IS Sfe 
SM 20ft 
774 2fe 
512 IB 
71 Ufe 
74 3 

70 3fe 

146 Oftt 
11655 14Y. 

ISM 6*6 
*06 3ft. 
3363 3te|* 
IU 3 
710 I4U 
998 BVu 
545 266 

77 Ufe 
U73 2*fe 
534 Ife 
267 6ft 
101 2*6 
4SB 71ft, 
M 21ft 
164 3ft 
878 4ft 

619 26 
(3 6*6 

349 life 
1090 Jfe 
366 Ufe 
555 life 
528 4fe 
207 Jfe 

126 ny 

71 6fe 

71 2V6 

425 ft, 

IM 5 
14483 BTay 
330 smL 
50* Jlift. 
in izft. 
816 IU 
74 Ife 

143 liny 
108 IM 
164 Ife 
IS Sft 
107 my 

*3 is*, 
S27 »ft 
M *6 
353 Sfe 
73 life 
511 MVu 

a is** 

144 27*u 

217 MTft. 
30 31 tei, 
172 17ft 
84 6 

11* / 

71 Tfe 
98 M 

72 Kfe 

127 24 

3651 2 

140 *fe 
3750 8*6 

119 10ft. 
77 1366 

111 17ft 
07 ITfe 
123 Wi. 

ns ift. 
§n 

ID* 1S66 

147 lift 
603 Vteu 
30* Kfe 
107 12fe 
127 13fe 

1233 3116 
4000 31ft 

E ’ft 

134 Ufe 
398 T7tft. 
ISO Sfe 
IE Sft 
1S5 ICft* 

4*? 

171 tPft. 
84 Ufe 
238 I7*u 
B 14 
79 1366 
127 Ufe 

1 ^ 


Mte* UW Lnt 
145X77 143172 143434 

^ m 

164037 144131 IfcgjS 
190900 189203 10M66 
95005 mil 94X46 


WU Ml*» 

114440 71ft 

71402 «*6 
4851* 1476* 
68516 42 
5*442 4 

S?? £ 

*7754 33ft 
45l! 7& 

32243 1416 


0fttN6 .te*. 

^ 14*6. -1«S 
4866 

l*5fel*Sft, -lift 
40U 401k .1 

4Y6 416 +lftt 

«« -1R 

31 31ft -ft 
ll»V*liWk -Vk 
fl*U TWk +7k 
138 T28fti -1ft 
58fe Sin -66 
13V» l»*k -*k 


AS 97 27000 24700 27370 + 2J0 27,412 

Aub97 251.50 24500 2S070 +U0 21,199 

Sup 97 23000 22500 22970 4-Lfl 13034 

Oct 97 71850 21530 21800 +050 0443 

Dec 77 21230 20970 211.90 tQj60 27334 

Jan 98 20930 20770 20730 +070 UHB 

Est. sales NA Ws-ratos 2X954 
FfTsapenM 111.902 off Z2S3 


SOYBEAN (XL (CB0T) 
tftOH tov cafe BW ft 

MV 2739 2270 22.75 -&10 30372 

Auo 97 2104 2238 2291 -0.12 19310 

Sep 77 ZL20 2335 ZUB -0.17 10370 

Oct 97 2370 23.05 2339 -039 12371 

Dec *7 2138 2341 2374 -0.17 21485 

JUl90 i 2145 2335 2135 -&» 2717 

Est.sates NA. RiY sates 25.948 
Fffsocenit* 102.730 in 466 


Hfek Iw UM 

42414 41732 *3*A2 


Dow Jones Bond 


20 Bonds 
HMJttBtfes 
10 Indushiab 


SPOR 34711 

PmttnC (BM9 

Audvoi 11033 

ISSWn £S 

$35? ^ 

CmOcd Q 4171 

VtocB 5715 

Haas 5531 


Sfan a 

§te* 7*6 7tek -66 
5*1 M Jft ih 
1M6 1866 llte» -*k 

r & a * 

Si sS 5K * 


Ite* I8k lft 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

MM Du mWmqm- cents aw bushwl 
AX 77 838 817 834 +10 41328 

Auo 97 770 756 768 +lft 2BJ23 

SW77 685 <70 483 -2*6 10369 

Now 77 455 448 6S2V6 -1 57,144 

Jon 98 455 U0 4SJVi -3*4 8J*4 

Est.Edw NA Fn'a.sda 50378 
FTrsopBlW 1ST 303 ell 8183 


Metals 

COLOOKMX) 

1DD tnjy ot- OoBorl Hr trav oi. 

Jtei 97 33* AO 334JD 33730 *1.70 327 

AX 77 m00 *1.70 6 

Aua77 34130 33850 341.10 +1.70 91*81 

0(397 34430 341.10 343A0 +1JD 7.999 

DKT7 3A6J0 34140 34420 +1JQ 27,276 

F«H>90 34870 347.90 348L70 -1.10 BA98 

351.10 +180 4J83 

Jun98 35140 IP Ol 19340 +]jg 8,158 

AU09B 35420 *1.80 757 

Ea.siXK NA FrTs. Idles 32247 
Frfsaoenlnl 181266 up 4949 

HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 

21000 tes.- amts par R>. 

Am 97 11830 U7JD 11840 + 0.10 1^26 

AX97 118J0 11170 11820 +0.10 21A91 

AUB97 11190 11570 11470 -0.M 2.944 

Sep 97 11440 11495 11420 *010 14J02 

00*7 114100 11140 11400 *0.10 IJ3S 

Now 97 11110 11240 11240 + 0J0 1727 

Dec 97 11170 11020 11U63 +025 4^84 

Jon 98 10940 109.10 10940 +050 444 

FWJ98 MOID +045 541 

Bf.soles NA Frfi. sates 17709 
Fri's oaen lnt 57396 on 1283 

SIL67B) (NCMX) 

UOOteov ol. cents Mf trow az. 

Jim 97 48070 471 JO 48070 +1O00 2 

-M*7 C2.« 447 JO 48L30 +1000 35340 

Sepw <7SflD 484.00 +10.10 29.132 

pec W 49100 48040 49270 +1020 8478 

47480 +1020 17 

Mar*® 499 JO 49400 499A0 +1030 8L7B3 

NIOV98 5041Q 50230 50410 +1150 2312 

508A0 +M.70 2A04 
Ea. sates NA Fn's.srtes 17J42 
Fr i*i open W 7Z32? off *78 


10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF5DOOOO - pis at 100 pd 
Sep 97 12Btn 12844 12844 + 004 1*5.145 
Dec 97 9732 97.14 9730-108 1,795 
Mar 98 94.72 96.92 96.70 -a 08 0 

EsI. sates: 91701 . 

Open Hit: 197.140 up 272. 


Industrials 


ITAUAN GOVERNMENT BOND (UFFE) 
rTLZOOmlBon - ptsof lOOpd 
Sop 97 133J8 132.97 13146 +0.15 92394 
Dec 97 N.T. N.T. 104.11 +4U0 270 

EslStPes; 51188. Prew. sates; 50300 
Plwr-ftwiWj 92AM up 2306 


COTTON 2 (NCTTD 

HLOOB mi- ccrWi PO, lb. 

JK 97 7270 7175 727* -0L41 

0097 7570 7490 7490 -039 

Dec 97 7580 7477 7573 -CO 

McrTI 7685 76 22 7663 —OK 

fA0Y*8 77.44 74.95 7770 -0 23 

ESI. sales NA FrTi sates i3.7*i 
Fn'SOPenW 44A24 alt 233* 


3iao-^ 


•rw# .. -it a •t 
'"S rjL * 


EURODOLLARS (CMER) 

SI mWon-ots at 100 pc*. 

All 97 9421 9420 7*21 


HEATING OR. 1 NMER) 

«una pal. twntsper oai 
AA77 SJJH SUB 5197 -0J 

Aub*7 5230 5130 5213 *082 

Sec 97 5300 5240 51*3 -037 


AUO 77 94 IB 9417 9417 9XD 

Sep *7 *414 9413 9413 — 0J»1 5S7345 

Dec 97 9194 9193 *1*3 -002 428383 

Marts 9188 9185 9185 -000770375 

Am 98 9177 9174 9175 -000 231331 

S0P 98 9147 9144 9145 -003 177.775 

Dec 90 7157 7153 915« -003134793 

Mw99 9154 9152 9153 -003 105328 

Am 99 9331 9148 914 -OID 813*0 

Sep 99 914 93X4 93X4 -0.04 74X01 

Dec*? 93X0 9137 9137 -OM 44X21 

EAuSes NA Frfs. sates 302X75 
(WioRenH 2X47377 off 1198 
BRIT 15 H POUND (CMBij 
raxoo Pounds, Spar pound 
SCP77 1X688 1X500 1X482 42.163 

Dec 97 1X44 1X554 1X034 342 

Mar9B 1X597 2 

Est.adas NA Frrs. sides 9.203 
FrTs open iit 43X27 up 2795 


0097 5400 5310 5J9J -057 


Nov 77 55X0 5450 KS3 


pec97 5585 55.70 5573 -157 


Jan« 5650 5185 5423 -157 

P«h98 54JS 5410 5*43 -0^ 

Mar*B 5190 S53J 55.63 - 0 42 

fesaes NA Fri's, totes 33.1* 
His open mt 153X17 up Jin 

UGHTSHST CRUDE (NMER) 


-icJ 

643 

-V|J 

iW4?r“G 

1A3142S 

6.39 




18X6 

19.02 

► 1119 100443--" 


19X0 

1920 

+aio 

48.717 >5 


1*16 

19 30 

+012 

27.128 eff 


1*20 

1M1 

-an 

18L*69 


1*23 

1950 

.an 

406a i«a 


lf.SO 

19X0 

+ U.B6 

P.9J! 


WXO 

19X4 

-act 

8.005 


19J9 

19X5 

-016 

4X78 *" 

fe 

19X3 

19X3 

+ 003 

5X99 P»J 

r. 


19.51 


4.S65 1 Jfe». 


Fri's. rates 

ID7.1B7 

"h. 



8 


Trading Activity 


Nasdaq 




2ft. 

Itfe life — fe 
24 14 +fe 

Tte,, 8 *Yu 

6V6 6H _ 
2 ft M 6 — 66 
7ft 7ft +V4 
91V. Jlft _ 
2ft- Wu —6* 


TaM terns 

IS GST 


BZS 1149 Ateyaw l 

1|J2 146 

738 777 v?n™imflBl 

J395 3412 Trtte_teuei 


IS TJ NnrLmr* 

Market Sales 


1579 2061 

77 4 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

MOB bumHrnum- conn par Builwi 
Ad 77 334 321 329ft -5 20,754 

Sep 97 341 336 337 -5 27398 

Dec 97 353 34 35DV, -366 ZLU9 

Mar 98 359 353 355*6 -3V. 1912 

Est.sdas NA FWistdes 33397 
Rfsopenw 11X15 alt 2773 


PLATINUM (NMER) 

* i+w at- auion per in, ot 
Ad 97 41850 41100 415.20 7,727 

00 77 404X0 377.00 40130 +1.00 7X24 

Aa> 98 37330 37250 37120 *09 PXJB 

Est. soles NA Fri**. sates 3317 
WsoaenW 1/370 off 205 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (OUST} 

100X00 doDn.t par Cta+Ok- 

Sep*7 J29 3227 3247 39XM 

Dec 77 J294 J282 3291 1539 

Mar 98 J377 3319 J329 517 

Esr. sates na Firs.sates 7X54 

Fri's open mt 47,709 aH 445 


Mttownfci 

• A+i ■ . MPi 

:zr * *4 

Vivfc r< 


^ _ 
an, ivy +ity 

25*6 14 +66 


S +<6 
+ *u 

i?S TJJ!; 


si St NYSE 

in lea Ames 

752 74 Nasdaq 

fi fi InmBk 


ipM 756.79 

24X0 3530 

51164 61236 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMS!) 

XMOD OK- eenfn pare. 

M-® 44J0 -050 1,573 

USS iS-E 4122 +(LB «.m 

0097 47.17 4632 47.10 +070 2107 

252 S-S +ox7 ixS 

K2 njl +JL45 6350 

«X2 72X2 +055 2.751 

ESLsdas NA FtTOsotes 9X7S 
FrTs open mt 91X85 off CM 


LONDON METALS (LMeT 
Dal krs pm metric km 


GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

1 15X00 marks, S per modi 
Sep 97 5859 All -5RQ 

Dec 97 58*0 5879 5890 

Mar 98 5729 

Es. sates NA Fri's. Mies HJ97 
Fri's Open lnt 4L16I ait 1001 


, i Ollgft Grade] 

^ 1563Vi 15J7V, 1558.00 

Farwort 1584* 158715 158000 1581X0 

Copper CteBMMo fffiaA Grade] 

Spot 2643X0 2645.00 Z708X0 2711.00 

ForwJ 2504X0 2506X0 2579X0 2580X0 


JAPANESE YEN (CMER] 
IlSmWonywi, I nr 100 wen 
Sep 97 X80S 5751 8801 

Dec 97 X917 8875 8917 

Ate-78 JOM 

Est sates na Fri's. sales B.77B 
Fri's opoiM 50X96 on 222 


Spot . 40® X0 40700 610X0 
FanranJ Mixo tjjxo 622x0 


3*6 3B6, +« 

Jfe 3K +fe 

2*6 2 ft _ 

6fe 6ft —Yu 

Tfe 2fe -fe 

fe ft -fe 
5 5 _ 

89fe 89ft, -ift. 


Dividends 

OKnpany 


Per Ant Roc Pay Corapaiy 


Per Amt Rec Pay 


I3t 

n a ^ -a 


ife iw +ft 
7ft 8 + Yu 

Sft Sft +iy 

3fe 3BA, +fe 
18fe 18ft +ft 
Xft 3Wi, — 4y 


mu um. — +u 

ft. fe — 
Sft .Sfe +Yu 


IRREGULAR 

ComranSenKGrA - JtG6 

CommnSansc Gr B _ X22 

Cross Turtom Ry _ .184 

Ewenjreen AniRS _ .12 

Eweftptai AmR B . Jf) 

EvarareenBalB m 

Ewa np aa n Bal V 
EvagrceiiFA 
EeetpceaF B 
EweiRreenFC 
Everatnen f Y 
Evworeen Inao B 


lift*, irft, — iy 
16 ISfe. -fe 


16 14Wii -fe 
15ft 15*6 —ft 
27 77ft +H 
10ft 10ft -ft 


EvemrwnlncaY 
KbofGIdl 


6-M 4-27 
6-26 6-27 
4-30 7-1S 
6-20 6-24 
6-20 624 
6S0 6-24 
6-20 6-24 
6*20 6-24 
6-20 6-24 
6-20 6-24 
6-20 6-24 

6-20 6-24 
620 624 
6-27 613 
6*30 7-15 


EnenyGipADSn *4479 627 7 -u 

NewsAiBamnp - .10 _7-2 7-25 
ZtonsBncpD 


- .12 7-14 }-n 


FCT3B? CATTLE (CMB2J 
5MHb.-cns»vk 

P- 10 TiM +117 
Sea 97 7830 74X0 7830 +1.18 

Oct 97 7850 7735 7850 +1X0 

NDW97 79.75 78X2 79X7 +H8S 

2-2 2 W nja +0- 77 

* aM 

Est sates NA FrTiafe 3US2 
Fri's open M 70,108 up 53 


H»ranl 621X0 622X0 622X0 

Ntetei 

2? 0 - 00 7105X0 

Farwtrt 7215X0 7220 00 7215X0 
TIB 

Spat 5550X0 5540X0 5500X0 
FtetanM 5400X0 5610.00 5410X0 


Ztac (Sped* Hlter Grade) ■ ■ 
Sp* 1388.00 1389.00 1380.00 
Forward 1+0700 1*0800 1399X0 


Hlgti Lem Close Chge 


Financial 


SWISS FRANC (CMBU 
nsjiao irom. S oer tronc 
Sep 97 7048 JD00 7053 
Dec 97 7138 7125 7130 

Mcr9B 7209 

6a. sates na Wl sides 9371 
Fri's open ini 34.132 oH 214 

ME3GCAHPES0 ICMER} 
aunMWklinretw 
Sen 97 .121411 -imo .12145 
Dec 97 .11720 .11430 .11720 
MOT98 .11315 .11250 .11315 
ES- sales NA Fri’s. sates 8X11 
Ftfsooenlru 33848 up 741 


AbtaoB Adams 
CNA Income Shn 


CerfarBsiGp 
DreftKsteJn&md 
Everareen Vatue 
Fst S«m Bk WA 

GBC itancorp 
HpraourtCan 

HomeButldteg 

OhtaAii 

Oshawa Group A 
n 

s. 


life 3iay +v» 
life 13ft +ft 
Sft 5% -fe 
7 7 -ft, 

7 7 —Yu 

raw, us. -ft 

16 14 -fe. 

TSfe JSfe -fe 
I'Vu 1*6 — fe 
Tfe 9ft +ft 


STOCK SPLIT 


Bristol Hotel 3 tar2sp«. _ 
Transaiattonlnc2ftirl spB-i 


Prime Bancorp 


REVERSE STOCK SPUT 
PotyitoPhaml ter 10 reverse spBL 


* 

Samndt TxExBri 
TCACabie^m 
Wrimer-Lflmbertl 
WMonFMHfl 


REGULAR 

0 .10 601 7-31 

IS Q M 6-30 7-14 

O 20 7-1 B 61 
i b .165 &-7T 8-13 

1 Q .123 6-20 624 

Q JJ7 630 7-10 
Q .12 6-30 7-1 S 
Q .18 7-14 7-31 
0 .075 7-7 7-21 
q X4 7-7 65 

L 0 .14 8-15 9-10 

» .086 638 7-1 S 
Q .17 7-5 8-1 

Q .13 7-7 61 

O .10 630 7-11 
i Q 71 630 615 

0 .16 7-14 

0 31 II 9-10 
0 .115 630 7-14 


HOGS-Lm (CMER) 

40X00 Us.- Cents per id. 

■UW BUS 030 B2X5 +1170 

USS 7,35 nM ♦ al ° 

0077 7110 71X5 7145 -0.11 

[tec 97 69X5 67X0 027 -037 

Feb 78 47.45 44X0 46X7 -037 

ENj.Hfcs NA Fri's. sales 5.161 
Friyoaenlnt 34X58 up 323 


UST. BBXS tCMBO 
SI mil an- pti ol 100 pet. 

Set) 77 9482 94X0 94X1 7J18 

Dec 97 MM -am 19 

Mar 98 74JB 3 

Est. sides NA Fri's. sates 120 
Fri's OMrtirt 7X97 up 51 


S-MONTB EUROMARK CLIFFEJ 


DM1 imfeon - pis o) loo pd 
JuCW N.T N.T. *0X4 Unch. 

Aug 07 N.T. N.T. 04X5 Uoeh. 

5 SES S 6 ^ unac 

Dec 77 94.73 ToJO 9870 —0X1 

»*» -Ml ; 

^“"2 W 0 **-42 -0X1 

Sep9B 9422 06.10 9620 -Ml 

’5-« 9S.9I 9S.9! -0X1 

*5.40 *5X4 *SX7 — <1X1 

J1X199 9548 *5X4 9SX5 -<101 

9173 9523 -ax2 

Dec 99 *5 W 95X7 95.02 -OX7 

^■ralBK 47,411. Prew sales: 77X04 

Pwv. opened J 1X16557 up lUle 


PORK BELLB (CNER1 
40XBO lor- cents per m. 

Mil 8240 BJO DU? —082 

OSS 55 *•» —MS 

Fed 98 7185 71 JO 71 JO -027 

^ sates NA FWisotes 1J9I 
Fri's opened 671? off 15B 


SYR. TREASURY {CBOT) 

siOOXOOprtn- pf» & oahi of loo net 

Sen 97 104-31 104-21 10623 —08 207,111 

£97 MMI -« U7I 

EV.sates HUSO FrVi rates 24X48 
Ft i s open Im 226X00 up 4587 


Food 

cocoa mesa 

10 metric tone- 1 perron 


Ife Ift -ft 

17ft lVA, +Vj, 

n 

17ft 17fe +-Vu 
4»u 4fe 1 fe 
ft ft —Yu 

<fe 4fe - 
6ft Wk +fe 
life ISfe —1 
life- life -fe 
Tfe 7ft 
28ft Sffe _ 

ITVu life — fe 

13ft JJfe +ft 
30ft 31 -fe. 
3P«fe. 31»y +J4 

rft. fe —ft, 
13 I3fe ^’^u 
17ft. 17ft 
5ft, M, -ft. 
Sft 5ft +16. 
10ft Mfe —ft. 


Bnmdywtne ReaBy Q M 6-30 7-10 
Kenan Transport Q X7 630 7-15 


Mmmfc b^pmdBwtvaMont pv 
share/ ADR; g-porabfe in CaraSae fundv- 
BHUHritlT: a-qatettnic Mead-oanool 


1 3ft JWu +Vu 

IM 10ft, -Ay 
wu ra*u —Yu 
14ft. 14fe — VS. 
17ft. 17ft, *ft 


Wft, M _Yu 
13ft ISfe — fe 
lift. life, 

Ik! Ife -Hu 


Stock TaMes Explained 

Sates Agues are unafBdaL Yoariy Nghs and Bmh reBect lt» previous 52 weeks plus tt» anrerri 
eteeKhvrtnofBte It ip tft B ri teflgQy.W.'MreaipaaraDtAdhddHndMnourrtnglD 25 peregitormote 
Ikb been paid fw *wre MgMow range and dMdend ore shown ter the new stecta only. Unloss 
oBmumm noted rates of Mdenn ore annual dMimniMls based on ihe late! dedaraiion. 
a - dhridend aba adifl la), b - annual rata of dividend plus stock dhridend c - nquliMing 
dhrideruL ce - PE exceeds 99 Jld- Called, d - new yearly law. dd - lass In the last 12 marithi. 
i- dhridend declared or pdd In preceding 12 months, f . annual rafcv increased on k»l 
dedarafloa. j- dhridend h Canadton ftmdi satifeef to 1556 non-rasidenca lire. I ■ dMdend 
dedared aNer spW-up or stndi dMttemL j- dhridend paid IMS yeat, ondtied. tteterred. ar no 
□dton taken at latest dhridend meeting, k • dhridend declared or paid IMs year, an 
amimulatfvB issue wBti dhridend* in arrears, re - annual rata reduced on lost dedaraltan. 
B- new Issue in the past 52 weeks. The high-low range begins with the start of tradtag. 
dd - next day dtrihrery. p - Inflltn dhridend. annual rale unknown. P/E - price-earnings ratio, 
q - cksed-ewl rnvtwri tund-r - iMdefid dedaradar paid In preaetfing 12 rnonttB, plusstaek 
dividends -stock split DivriteiKl begins wRh dots of split, (is- sales, t- dhridend paid >D 
stockta preeming 12 mefrih* estimated cosh value on ex-tfivktend ore*-ifisMbtffion dale, 
■-new pea rtyhWi.v- trading hutted vt-inbankruptCT or reaeteershlpOT bring inargdiilied 
underthe Bankruptcy Ad, or secuririesossumed bysudi companies, led - when distributed, 
wf • when Issued/ ww - wHh umrunts. 1 - ex-dlvldand ar n-rigMs. nSs - 0-dbMbutton. 
xw« without warrants, y- ex-dividend and sales In fulLytd-yMd z- sales En fuS. 


Jljl 97 

1663 

1566 

1663 

+97 

473 

Sep 97 

1699 

1616 

1696 

+83 

37,7*4 

Dec *7 

1/3/ 

1658 

1735 

+80 

ram 

Man 

1760 

mi 

1760 

+73 

22X44 

May 98 

177* 

ma 

1779 


8X19 

Mn 

1/99 

1744 

1779 

*13 

627 


Fri's oaenint 98X19 up 20 


CWFSCPMSE} 

37XD0ISE.- cents porm. 

Jul97 204X0 19165 -430 

Sep 97 185X0 170X0 175X5 -405 

D8C97 141X0 M9JB 15415 -6JS 

Mar 98 15135 14475 14475 -6X0 

Mo? 98 14480 MUD 140X5 -5X0 

Est. rates f,M7 Ft, "6 sates 5X21 
Fri's opsnM 28X55 off 354 


HYR. TREASURY (CBOT) 
siaoxoo prtn- pn 6 xznas w 10a pa 

Sop 97 10622 10616 10617 —06 xu^vu 

J>«97 R)604 -04 3,548 

MtrM 107-34 — Oi 9 

Est.sates 40X04 Fri-iBBes 44X81 
Fri's coen irt 332.SK off 1712 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

(» PCt-tUW JJWJ-OM K .Dnds or TOO l 

Sep 97 112-16 112-04 112-05 —12 432,934 

D8C97 112-03 111-74 111-24 —13 25.291 

Mar 98 1 11-14 111-14 111-14 -13 2477 

Am 98 111-03 -13 801 

ES. rates 175JH0 Fri's. sates 251X45 
Fri's open tat 466117 off 1137 


NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

10,000 mm Bfu't, 1 per mm oni 

JUI97 1275 2Jte UU 25X85 

Aug 97 1770 2X40 273 27X23 

Sep 77 2X40 2235 2H7 19.1® 2 

Od97 12a 12« 223 »X44 

Now*7 2J7S 2J55 l3ii 9X11 ■£* 

Dec 77 2X10 2X90 2495 13X04 

Jbi*8 15SD 2X30 1535 I3X7D-J^ 

Fen 98 2X55 ZX« 14« 10246 -Vi 

Morn 2J2D 2JI5 JJ20 03'^' 

ST 9 !* 1 ?? 1145 I'M 3.538 Sr 

K. sates NA Fri'i. rales 39.804 ,?W 

Fri's own mt 201749 ,jp zs 

1M-EADEO GASOLINE (NMER) ,1 

«U«0 aoi. cents per tci 

“JO 54X5 5544 .(LI* 211S 

OSS US fiJ8 -0.(7 27X8Lrf:9 

S«97 55JS0 54 J5 St. *8 -025 B551..XI 

22.« W - 23 i-W-.TM 

fSS 5^ S3X8 t 0.49 2.U9, in 

Sf 9 -in 4574 jii 

*n« SUS SL30 53 80 +0X5 3J85^a» 

5420 +OB iMJ* 

gr.sates nil FnfesaiK 16061 iWi 

Frisopenun 78.965 off 425 

GASOILdPEl & 

U A doBara per metric Ian -Us 0(1 00 (on — 
Jul77 161.00 lsaxo 1(025 -1.15 19650, a 

Aog 77 162 75 162X0 le?X0 -130 U«S*- a 
Sep 9* 16500 16425 16425 +150 6D3S 

Od 97 167.7S 167 00 1*7 00 +150 6*58wife 

M»97 169.75 16*00 I6SX0 *1X0 4,011 ] 

D«97 17150 IKiJO 170X0 +125 ».1W ,p; 

Jan 98 172X0 171X0 171.50 -1X0 1249»T] 

Feb9B 17225 17175 171XC -IM 1^25^ 

EsI sates; 9390 Pmr. iota : I7.M eOQ 

Pnnr.opontnUoU.lIl awirjcup?7| -efl 


-4i^M ,*■ « 


. return#* 'K 
Jr 


Honpmmv feSSBl 


» owNrW 11 -■ R*- 


+0X5 iM JA 
961 list 

-IpT 


.-5 ILi 


n:-'w 


rsr «■ j 

»—■ k !»+ ■ - T** 


Stock Indexes 


MWNTH STERLING (UFFEJ 

raoaooo-ptsorioopd 

5® 97 *103 92. 92X6 -008 

OkW 92.83 92.76 92J6 -0X9 

«ar« flTO 92X3 92x3 -010 

Jmi«2 92X1 92X6 92X6 -4LI0 

92-56 92X3 92X3 -0X9 
Dee98 97X4 92X1 92X2 -0X9 

Mar 99 92X4 92X9 92X2 -OXB 

Jun99 *2X4 92X1 92X2 -0X7 

Sep>9 92X2 *2X0 *2X2 -0X5 

EsI rale*: 888*5. Pin rate; <7.771 
Pro*, open bit- <74+433 off 3.9*7 


S&P COMP. INDEX (CMER) j2*J 

500 / atm „ 

Sep 97 907.90 8m» 690J9 -M»l»l»^ 
Oee97 914.50 WOOD -I74S 

Mar *8 974® I.B*j 

Es. rates NA Fri's. rales S3.IE0 *1» 

Fri'soaeninr J40.170 off 2013 .» 

CACOO IMATin 

FF2O0 per mflo« point “11 

Jim 97 276’ 0 2725 a jTSftB +J.00 P M6 __ 
JW77 27590 27750 2757X - -LM 
4uq*7 2747.0 2747X 27650 -<00 l-TJJjO 
Sep *7 27715 27-15 X 2T720 +400 1M71 

EH. rate. 16.962. .af 

Open inf.; 72X30 uO 1.019. 7£i 

FTSE 100 (UFFEl 
E2S permoot pom! 

Sep 97 4605X 4S7L0 45810 -210 *4130 UH 
Doc 97 N.T N.T 46380 -23C 
EsI. rate 14673 Pta» sate- 74.IS7 'i-i 
Plow opon iM ■ 92-C7I up 6.788 


>-isr'«M9 JE 


Z~~ 45 I 


JMfti 


■* *8t» T. 1 

■ s+uwt m- re 


'■erwr- jtaNB 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSE) 

II24MI Ra.- cwito par h, 

All 97 11X23 11X2 11.13 +887 

0071 11J0 11JD0 11.11 +088 

Morn 11.13 10-98 1187 +0X7 

May 99 11X3 1155 1050 +004 

Estsdes 33434 Fritsttes 42JU 
Fits open tat 1712W ofi 7944 


ORANGE JUKE (NCTN1 

15X00 to*.- conti por ip. 

Jul 97 7125 71X0 72X5 -158 12X90 

SCP 77 77X| 74X5 75X0 —14) 1349* 

Now 97 80X0 7720 7840 —1X5 5X41 


LOOK 1-MOtfTH ICMHt] 

S3 mi non- pis of 1 00 net. 

”-2, *O0 71,2(1 

W28 «J7 9«7 11941 

Sep 97 9424 9423 9423 3J05 

Efl.sates Na Fri's. rate 1975 
FYfsapenhf 40X74 up *54 

BUND (UFFEl 
DMMUQW -phoMOOpet 

r£* 1 ?1- M 10128 -0. 04 239.930 

D«97 10030 10020 10024 -0X3 II S 

Es. sate 152.282 Prew. rates; UM33 
PNw.apon Wj 241069 up 634 

LONG GILT QJFFE) 

WUWJ - Irik A 32nds of loo pet 
J" 1 ” 11 JIB 113-14 113C19 -o-io 1,016 

®*P 112-14 11231 1134J4 —W0 140.626 

Dee 97 N.T. N.T. 112-24 — 0-10 


WMJNTH PIBGR (MATIF) 
FFSrtalten - pJsonoOod 
5«PW 86X6 9*X2 94X4 +d0l 

Dec 97 96X4 96X0 96X1 Unch. 

M«M 9446 9642 94.43 Unch 

J6J5 9630 *622 — 001 
SSSS 96,19 96.14 96)7—001 

OKW 9597 959J 95.95-001 

95J4 9510 95.7! —0.02 
§il MICK 19.280. 

Open ht. 24i73Q „p 2.996. 


Commodity Indexes 


Close piwiow^J 
Moody's 1.570.10 5X8880— 

PouiWi 1,99520 27)10.10 J 

DJ Futares 152X3 iSll#a“ 

CRB 2JI25 740X2 

Source- Vat*. Assoojtrt Fmxa LMXVa «*r 
Inn Fountain Fatim Brehan/e. in K Jg 
PcVoiwm Satmnge. ^ 

* ~-'s*5 


l op t n i r a O • 

:xsr m 


EsLrate 38.250, prev ton; 35.715 
Prew. open Ini, 161.642 up 1.700 


jy*ONTH EUROURA (UFFEl 
ITL 1 nifflicn - pH of 100 pa 

«« 52“ • lun ’’a^an 

J 550 +004 Taw 
7“ * 9418 94(77 94.13 +0X5 44.614 

‘0-os Sn? 

9427 9423 +0JJ5 21015 
9639 7420 7426 *0XS U06 
MW99 9437 9420 7423 +004 1*61 
SAIlt Prew. rate- 37.050 
Pn» open bfe: 310813 up 564 




N'l‘ i.»ur 

Arts and AntiqneN 

«fet*rv .Suliirdiiv 


,!■ . ^.+nirtS* 

emm, Mta*' 

• • -1 . wfeift ■ 

• r- **** 






: - X- «+*-« • 

ft - te u if n wwMp 
•:-tr s^+kiftrtW 









PAGE 15 



ta t/iWC H llr '-a? 


° * . 

-tr^^Peed Elsevier to Buy 
jU.S. Publis hing Unit 
From Walt Disney 




- QmrMI^OirSk^FremOapa^ 

AMSTERDAM — Reed Elsevier 
PLC said Monday that it would buy 
tfae three main divisions of Chilton 
Business Gronp from Walt Disney 
Ca for $447 million to expand its 
U.S. publishing business. 

Reed Elsevier, a Britisb-Dntch 
company, said it had agreed to pur- 
chase Chilton’s business-to- busi- 
ness publisher, research services 
.. company and its exhibitions man- 
agraoeot company from Disney’s 
ABC television network. 

Rood Elsevier said die deal, its 
\ third U.S. acquisition this year, 




JZz.: 


■» «t*. i 

Vft *♦*»-; 


h-t 

pr "rC‘. 


4 • 

**■’.:** 


ark 






r L--?A vrr .. 

r.; : . 

.v- 

,=:f? -?fsi 

v*-: : \y; v 


w.mTRr;< 

--T .T£.r. •_ 

* V Uwi A «*+ 4- r. *--+= s 

c. +-. ■; ir ■ 

* di* a 

•• -Ip 


t.-.TO -w 


.■} 

■-‘J* 


Merger Rumor 
About 2 Banks 
Stirs London 


Remen 

LONDON — A merger be- 
tween two British banking gi- 
ants, Barclays Bank PLC and 
National Westminster Bank 
PLC, as; rumored recently, 
would face insurmountable reg- 
ulatory hurdles, analysts said 
Monday. 

But one analyst conceded 
that a merger would maim 
“fantastic commercial sense." 

■ The merger, which at current 
market prices would create a 
bank with a market value of 
more than £30 billion ($49.6 
billion), could lead to great cost 
savings. 

But it would give the merged 
— about half of Britain’s 

. and medium corporate 

business — a share considered 
likely to ring alarm bells at the 
Monopolies and Mergers Com- 
mission. Neither bank would 
comment for the record, other 
than to say that they never com- 
ment on the record about mar - 
Icet speculation 

Sources close to NatWest 
said, however, that the bank had 
received no approaches from 
potential merger partners. 


would make an immediate contri- 
bution to its profits. 

^ Ea 5f5vJi lis y*** R** 1 Elsevier 
bought 40 U.S. law publications from 
l nomson Corp., and its science- pub- 
hshmg division bought MDL Infor- 
mation Systems Inc. for $320 mil- 
hon. The company said it would 
continue to look for acquisitions. 

Chilton, based in Radnor 
Pennsylvania, publishes 39 business 
m a gazi ne tides focusing on man- 

“factunog, entertainment and auto- 
motive topics. 

Reed Elsevier said it would 
perge Chilton’s core trade press 
business with its own U.S. business 
magazines unit, Cahners Publishing 
Co., which has more than 90 titles, 
including the show-business news- 

narvw Voriati. 


Loss of CEO Jolts W.II. Smith 


C^^^OsrSaffFftmDAfitlchn 

LONDON — WJL Smith 
Group PLC’s stock price dropped 
nearly 9 percent Monday after the 
company said its chief executive. 
Bill Cockbum, had resigned 18 
months into a four-year reorgan- 
ization that be had engineered. 

Mr. Cockbum, who will join 
British Telecommunications PLC 
as group managing director, will 
stay on with the book, stationery 
and music retailer until October. 

W JFL Smith’s stock price closed 
down 35 pence at 376.5 pence. 

The company, which has stores 
on nearly every main shopping 
street in Britain, has been snug- 
gling to compete as supermarkets 
move into its business by selling 
newspapers, books, com p act disks 
and videos. 

In November 1995, Mr. Cock- 
bum was brought in to find a way 
to secure the future of the chain, 
“He was the driving force behind 
strategic moves at W.H. Smith,” 
said one analyst, who asked not to 
be identified. 


Jeremy Hardie, the chair man 
said that Mr. Cockbum had been a 


catalyst for change within the 
group, presiding over the sale of 
several of Smith’s noncore busi- 
nesses, notably Do It All home 
improvement stores and Business 
Supplies. 

“Normally 1 would have 
wanted to see my plans through to 
fruition," Mr. Cockbum said. 
“My decision to join BT was not 
taken lightly, but it is the chance of 
a lifetime for me." 

Mr. Hardie said Mr. Cockbum 
had received an “irresistible" of- 
fer from BT and his decision to 
leave did not reflea any diffi- 
culties at WJ-LSmith. 

Mr. Cockbum said he would be 
running BT’a British operations 
after the company completes its 
merger with the U.S. telecom group 
MCI Co mmunic ations Corp. 

Last year, WJL Smith took a 
charge against earnings of £123 
million ($203 million) to cut jobs, 
write down losses on assets and 
cover losses on property sales. The 
charges wiped out profit for the year 
of £98.8 milli on, handing Smith the 
first loss in its 204-year history. 

Since Mr. Cockbum joined.the 


head of its flagship 400-store retail 
division and its commercial di- 
rector have both left. 

The reorganization focuses on 
improving sales at the retail di- 
vision. Sales at the division in the 
year ended June 1. 1996, were 
£927 million, making up 34 per- 
cent of total sales for the year. 

The lack of an easy solution for 
the problems at the division may 
have been one reason for Mr. 
Cockbum’s decision to leave, ana- 
lysts said. 

“He may have looked at the light 
at the end of the tunnel and seen 
there wasn't that much of it," said 
William Cullum. analyst at Paribas 
Capital Markets. “His 
leaves Smith in a bit of a hot 

Mr. Cullum said W.H. Smith’s 
new management team, including 
Beverley Hodson, the newly ap- 
pointed managing director of the 
core retail chain, were well placed 
to drive die business forward. 

Rowan Morgan, retail analyst at 
Nikko Europe, said: “It will take a 
little while to find someone. 
There’s no obvious successor." 

( Reuters . Bloomberg ) 


‘ van Hooff, Reed Elsevier’s 
strategy director, said that by com- 
bining Chilton and Cahners, Reed 
Elsevier could raise its U.S. busi- 
ness publishing operating profit 

margins to around 20 percent by 

1999, from about 15 percent to 17 

Tobacco Stocks Fall on U.S. News 

over 15 years, he said. 



■ 

Frankfort. . 
DAX 

London Parte ' 

FTSE 100 Index GAG 40 


3800 

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— 

3600 

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m — 


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3000 Jr 

4000“ 

2400 jf— - 

— 

j P M A M J ■ 3800 J F M 

A M j 2200 J F 'M' 

A M J ’ 

1997 

1997 

1997 


Exchange' 

tectes . 

Monday Prev. . % 
Oosa Dose Chaig* 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

86QJB& 6d220 

-0.16 

Brussels 

BEL-20 • 

2^3S1JS2 Z&\M 

-QA2 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

3J54J2 3J8a27 

-<3.89 

Copenhagen 

sack Market 

592.18 59139 

♦0.0$ 

HefsfeifcS 

HEXGfflieraJ 

3,157^8 ai2E3» 

*ij) 1 

Oslo 

OBX 

535.85 636.52 

4.11 

London 

FTSE 100 

4J57&8Q 4.5S390 

-OJ39 

Madrid 

Exchange 

S3U39 589.72 

+0.45 

Mflan 

MIBT6L 

13317 • 131K 

+1.00 

Parte 

CAC40 

2,7S2J» 2.757,10 

+0.18 

Socfctuten 

SX 16 

3.183JS7 3.156.79 

+084 

Vienna 

ATX 

1 >30.87 liC&47 

-0j8B 

Zorich 

SF1 

3^30.10 3.518.12 

+0.34 


Source. Tetekurs 


tmcmiiiiHul Herald Ttdiunc 


Very briefly: 


Chilton's magazines would ex- 
pand Reed Elsevier’s offerings in 
electronic media, be said. Reed El- 
sevier owns the Lexis-Nexis elec- 
tronic service. 

The company’s chief financial of- 
ficer, Mark Annour, said Reed El- 
sevier was looking for further 
takeovers. 

“b should be absolutely clear that 
acquisitions are a constant activity 
for Reed Elsevier," he said. “We 


portunities and shaking the trees.' 

Analysts welcomed the news of 
the purchase, saying it was a good fit 
with Cahners. “This is a dice build- 
on acquisition, it can be integrated 
nicely and has obvious tax advant- 
ages," said Jeff Meys of ARN- 
AMRO Hoare Govett. 

Reed International FTC and El- 
sevier NV each own 50 percent of 
Reed Elsevier. In -Amsterdam, 
shares in Elsevier fell 50 cents, to 
3220 guilders ($16.60), while in 
London, stock in Reed fell 2 pence, 
to 570 pence ($9.46) 

( Bloomberg , Reuters ) 


bvOvrS&FirmOapaiJin 

LONDON — Shares in BAT In- 
dustries PLC fell Monday, leading a 
decline in tobacco stocks across' 
Europe, as investors worried thar the 
landmark settlement of U. S- health 
claims could spur s imilar actions in 
other markets. 

The U.S. tobacco industry agreed 
Friday to pay $368.5 billion over the 
next 25 years and accept tight re- 
strictions oo advertising and reg- 
ulation to settle suits from states 
seeking to recover the costs of treat- 


ing ill smokers. Most analysts dis- 
missed the decline as temporary , 
and said the U.S. (xiyout, mostly 
covered by raising cigarette prices, 
would remove uncertainty from 
shares in the industry, which has 
been battered by litigation. 

Cigarette makers in Europe said 
they had little to fear from the pro- 

r sd settlement, adding that while 
agreement will incur large costs 
for American companies, this has 
been largely discounted by the mar- 
ket, and the prospects for similar 


settlements in Europe remain re- 
mote in the near term. 

BAT shares closed Monday at 568 
pence, down 21. BAT, the London- 
based parent of the No. 3 U.S. cig- 
arette maker Brown & Williamson, 
had seen its shares rise 20 percent 
since settlement talks gathered steam 
in March. 

Other European tobacco stocks 
also fell, but BAT is the only Euro- 
pean cigarette maker with a signif- 
icant share of the U.S. market, at 
about 17 perceatf Bloomberg, AFX) 


Bayer Reaches Pact With Workers 


Bloomberg News 

LEVERKUSEN, Germany — 
Bayer AG, Germany's second- 
largest dmgmaker, said Monday 
that it had reached an agreement to 
safeguard 46,000 jobs in Germany 
for three years and to invest 20 bit- 
lion Deutsche marks in the country 


by the end of 2002. 

Under terms of the pact with its 
workers' council, Bayer said it had 
agreed not to cut jobs in Germany 
fix- economic reasons before 2001 
and to make future staff reductions 
without causing “social hardship." 

In return, the company said it 


expected to save about 300 milli on 
DM ($176 million) annually as a 
result of more flexible work times 
and savings made “on personnel 
expenses and voluntary company 
benefits in the interests of main- 
taining and improving competitive- 
ness." 


■ The Paris Tribunal of Commerce hailed the sale to the 
state of a 25 percent stake in Artemis, the family holding 
company of Francois Pinault. at the request of the French retail 
magnate; Mr. Pinault indirectly controls PinauK-Printemps- 
Redoute through Artemis, which he heads. 

•Virgin Atlantic Airways of Britain has pulled out of bidding 
in the privatization of Sun Air of South Africa, leaving 
Malaysian Airlines and local consortia still in the running, 
according to reports in Johannesburg. 

• Battersea power station, a crumbling structure on die 
banks of the Thames River in London, is to be turned into what 
developers are calling the world's largest cinema complex. 

• Lonrho PLC’s first-half pretax profit fell 62 percent to £38 
million ($62.9 million), in line with analysts expectations. 

• ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. said it had obtained worldwide 
rights to seven F. Hoffman -La Roche Ltd. products and that 
La Roche would become a significant shareholder of ICN. 

• The European Commission plans to challenge copyright 
exemptions granted to certain U.S. food, retail and services 
outlets that the commission estimates are depriving EU mu- 
sicians of about 27 million ecus ($30.6 million) in royalties per 
year. 

• French shareholder associations fighting for better debt- 
restructuring terms at the Anglo-French Channel Tunnel 
operator Eurotunnel say they could have enough votes for a 
blocking minority at the firm's annual meeting on July 10. 

• Oppenheimer & Ca said it was setting up an investment 
banking unit in the Britain to expand its coverage of the 
technology and health care industries into Europe. 

• The Slovak Finance Ministry said it was considering a plan 

to give tax breaks to foreign investors 10 help lift direct 
investment Bloomberg, Bridge News, Return. AFX 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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AfldtofinB 

Puribttl A 

Pernod Rica nl 

PaugoatCt 

PkwitePiM 

Pranodet 


CtiJS- -8® m - va 
T7X58 16X90 17350 17150 
M5 926 Ml 936- 

687 665 685 673 

36X70 39990 36250 36X28 
708 688 706 698 

«» 953 MS 952 

22X80 220 22X79 222 

1054 ICO 1050 10*5 

4197 mm 4197 4200 

29X50 29050 29250 291 

24350 240J0 242J0 

699 681 <99 

m «» m 

566 559 561 

12601257.10 1260 1295 

974 956 969 964 


242 

681 

921 

560 


Investor! 
MoOo B 
'fknfluOen 
PtaoBdUMatai 
SandvteB 
ScradaB 
SCAB 

S-EBmitanA 

SkandbFcra 

StanskaB 

SKFB 

to a lwla i* 
Stodshypaiek A 
Stem A 
SvHandesA 
VUwB 


630 

896 


622 

861 


896 


430 

860 


9.15 9.10 9.15 9.15 
645 435 645 MS 


708 717 

412 41130 
777 764 

368 


Manila 


AyotoB 
Ayala Land 
BtPbtipW 
C&P Homes 
Mania Elec A 
Malm Bank 
Petren 
POBm* 

Pf : Lmg Dbt 
SanMigudB 
SMPiteMHda 


1915 

ZL75 

164 

1050 

9150 

550 

730 

25750 

845 

7450 

750 


PSEiw 
PrariaoK2M1J3 

1X25 1X50 19JS 
2X75 2X75 2350 
162 164 10 

9 JO 08 1SJ0 

8958 8950 91 

5* 550 550 

6.90 6.90 740 

25X50 255 25250 

010 810 850 

7X50 7133 75 

770 7 JO 7 JO 


Rh-PoatancA 

Songfl 

Sdmeider 

SEB 

5GS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
SadesJw 
StGobain 
Suez 

Sntiietabo 
Thomson CSF 
TaUB 
minor 
Vataa 


719 705 

41195 41X10 
785 765 

369 JO 363» 367 JO ... 
1090 1062 1090 1069 

2314 2233 2314 2263 
1532 1*1 1503 1531 

581 570 588 576 

341 JO 337 3* 34250 

38650 381.10 384 382J0 

307* 30110 306*40 30*10 
S92 575 5191 504 

29* 2855 2920 2944 

2286 2224 2255 2Z3 

149 JO 147 149 JO 14870 
1700 1676 1686 1686 

202 196 20150 20150 

537 514 517 538 

31870 31060 31870 31240 
1051 HOT 1035 1027 

44X90 444 446.10 45X50 

614 608 674 610 

3S* 2960 2961 2970 

844 835 837 B* 

30090 296.10 299 300 

7* 716 720 715 

15340 149.10 153 15040 

551 50 546 551 

9775 9550 96J0 9575 
37X50 M3 36640 377 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBttng 

BHP 

Band 

RiHmKIia but 
□IVUUINO 1HL 

CBA 

CC ArnaS 
CdaMyw 
Gomafco 
CSR 

Fasten Blew 
Goodsxn Hd 
1C1 Australia 
Lend Lease 
MlMKdm 
t Anri Bate 



WCripac BUng 
WaaiddePti 


571 

565 

570 

565 

79150 

285 

292 29950 

285 17X50 

-2B3--V7B50 

• £8- '•££. Vi 
397* -3B7 39550 

& 

259 

2* 

259 

247 

239 JB 

- 235- 

238 

2 39 

270 

265 26650 261 JO 

21 058 107 JD 20950 

209 

22650 

225 

226 22650 

170 

164 16550 

167 

B3J0 

B2 

8X50 

8X50 

285 

277 28250 

27B 

3S0 

342 

346 

345 

210 

205 20X50 201 JO 

167 JO 

164 167J0 167 JO 

190 

820 

190 

190 

132 

124 

126 12X50 

236 

22V 

229 23*50 

201 

19X50 

199 

199J0 

AI0nEnarieB2706J9 


PmtaVK 271X60 

870 

X62 

X63 

X65 

985 

971 

VJ3 

987 

1980 

IV* 

1950 

1VJ5 

*24 

*16 

*19 

*20 

26J5 

2580 

2595 

2634 

15J0 

1583 

15* 

1538 

16J0 

1675 

16* 

1658 

671 

*60 

691 

673 

7J5 

n s 

/JU 

7J5 

5.15 

MM 

588 

585 

152 

VJ0 

250 

2JI 

187 

184 

184 

184 

1X65 

IX* 

12*0 

12* 

2780 

2780 

2773 

7780 

X10 

785 

288 

286 

1X96 

1XM 

1X90 

1X95 

112 

286 

XII 

287 

6*4 

679 

641 

6M 

379 

387 

377 

372 

5-1 0 

*W 

582 

*95 

7 JO 

7* 

7J2 

7J4 

2X60 

22* 

22* 

2382 

X68 

X* 

X65 

X50 

880 

X6S 

874 

bjv 

X03 

7.90 

787 

B85 

1170 

I0J6 

1087 

11-16 

*39 

*25 

*29 

*30 


The Trlb Index pt^ a* otswp ****•*#< am* 

Jan 1. 1992*100. 

World Indea 
Regiarmi indexes 
Asiiftelllc 
Europe 
At America 
S. America 
Industrial Indoxae 
Capital goods 
Consumer goods 
Energy 
Finance 
MsceHaneous 
Raw Materials 
Sendee 
Utffibss 

The MamaSonet HaraU Tribune !0br» Suck tndmr Cuds the US. ChBar votes* of 
260 ammatwnalymeaabla stocks fccm 25 cowrote* For mom rto mat kn, a tna 
booUBt aavoUaUo oy writing to Trie Tnb tntiex.1B1 Avenue Ctwrias Oa GstiX 
92521 NeuSy Cadax. Franca CompSad Of Btoombarg News. 


Laws) 

Chengs 

%*wnss 

yssrndem 
% ctmngs 

175.18 

■^■75. . 

+0.43 

♦17.46 

130.36 

♦1A7 

♦1.14 

+5.61 

180.57 

■0.03 

-0.02 

♦1202 

205.86 

+056 

♦027 

+2721 

16723 

-1.27 

-0.75 

+46.14 

217J98 

+1.18 

+054 

+27.47 

197.53 

+058 

+0.19 

+22.36 

205.60 

+026 

+0.13 

+20/44 

130.68 

+0.73 

+0.56 

+1221 

173^4 

+159 

+022 

♦727 

186^1 

-028 

-0.15 

+625 

165.08 

-0.11 

-057 

+2022 

152.08 

■0.63 

-0.41 

+6.01 



Mgh 

Low 

aou 

Pre*. 


HW» 

Lew 

Ooe* 

PlWL 

Ntisul Fudasn 

1550 

1570 

15* 

1530 

Moan 

3X10 

29J95 

3X10 

3X10 

MOHiTruri 

851 

835 

846 

*48 

HcntridBcNet 

63 

4ffit 

6X90 

61 JO 


4500 

4470 

4500 

4530 

fterorcJu tnc 

3X65 

29 J5 

2985 

Xto 

HEC 

1670 

1650 

1670 

1650 

Korean Foeffly 

3X70 

3230 

37V. 


Nftoa 

1900 

1870 

1900 

I860 

MtiemTetecom 

12470 12280 

123 

I2*» 

tttkoSec 

696 

67B 

686 

6W 

Now 

lift 

11* 

11*5 

11-45 

Nirtisdo 

9600 

9470 

9550 

9400 


271* 

27* 

2785 

77tt 

S^pEapress 


910 

916 

*21 


2980 

79V. 

2Wi 

29V* 

MppoaOB 


625 

629 

637 

Petra Cdn 

2X90 

2X70 

22J0 

2X95 

IBpponSfe*! 


34V 

351 

350 


2385 

3X55 

2X10 

2170 

WtsanMakr 

TTj 

807 

807 

807 

PocnPefta 

14* 

1*10 

1*15 

1*10 

NKK 

237 

235 

237 

235 

POkKhSate 

ion* 

105.05 

10714 

10X20 


Mexico 


Alfa A 
BanacCfB 
Cemex CPO 
CHraC 

EmpModwaa 

GpoCOissAl 

GpoFBcoaer 

Gpo Fta totama 

KMlCktecMn 

TdnfsaCPO 

TefMcxL 


52J0 

2115 

3450 

1X60 

4155 

5X60 

116 

3X10 

12X80 

19J4 


Baba tadex: 4441 .19 
P ratiaw . *439.14 

5170 5X80 5X00 
22J5 2X90 2X90 
33J0 3*50 33J0 
13J8 1X54 1X16 
40J® «)-90 41 JO 
5070 5060 SOTO 
112 113 X16 

2945 2945 29.5S 
3140 31 JO 3X10 
111 JO 121 JO 12X30 
1970 19 JS 19J0 


Sao.Paulo 

BmtascoPfd 1070 
' ‘ 842JSS 

S5J® 
7580 
2180 
60980 
62180 
51180 
41281 


Milan 


M1B 


, c 133178* 

Previous: 171 8SJ0 



- .. 1189 

?SS? PH %3 

Tried 16*00 

SSSS 1 s 

SB 



1049 1X64 1850 
BfMQ 84150 84X00 
5470 5*70 5480 
7ZJ0 7255 7150 
2040 2050 2050 
58500 6058B 58780 
61X00 61580 62180 
50X00 51180509.980 
40X00 40X50 41140 
29X00 30X00 29280 
10080 1B7J0 18180 
3*550 35.10 3540 
11J0 1170 11J9 
15540 15770 15570 
18X00 19550 11850 
16150 16250 16480 
35X00362810 35X00 
*810 4X90 

1150 1158 1142 
2340 2X70 2370 


104500 99100 9 9100 
7890 7350 737# 

23400 22300 22500 
13300 13000 13*0 
mss 279®) a&Sffl 
690 6210 6380 

*0800 4340<B 
32300 33500 
50000 59100 
45600 45600 
67700 *500 

moo loaoc inn iion 


stmts n—K 20*479 
Pmlass:2NM4 



OBXi 
Pi itiea c! 6 1 6 52 

131 134 131 

169 169 169 

2150 2340 2380 
2750 2770 2X30 
137 JO 13X50 13850 
43.90 44 44 

428 4W.SI a 
391 39450 392 

25250 25X50 ZS4 
105 MSlSB 106 
SO 550 553 

J19 320 321 

13650 137 T37 

139 139 140 

510 510 510 

AS 45.10 4570 


SteeLati 
StegPmaF 

SmTediM 

UMtadutrid 
UMOSeattF 
WtagTaiHdBt 
r in US. dedal. 


Stockholm 

AGAB 107 JO 10550 10750 10150 

ABBA 18X30 10X» 10750 106 

Udjwign 227 225 226 228 

Ml 1» 139 JO W 

Ma cocco A 20030 301 203 20Ua 

JS3*r^ 29050 291 50 292 



14* 1420 1430 1430 

1000b 1060b 10G» 1070b 
Aism 4410b 4640k 4650k 
697 691 697 «94 

3U 310 314 309 

1510 1500 1500 1510 

11600 11400 1)600 JTS» 


874 

836 

842 

864 

3660 

3610 

3650 

3700 

1680 

1600 

16* 

1670 

570 

513 

515 

515 

8420 

8373 

8381 

B38S 

5930 

5900 

5900 

SMI 

1180 

1170 

1180 

1180 

1160 

11* 

1150 

1150 

8920 

8800 

B900 

8900 

1530 

1500 

1570 

1530 

1990 

1V70 

1970 

1990 

685 

670 

480 

688 

3090 

3050 

30B0 

3070 

1870 

1850 

1850 

1850 

1250 

1238 

1250 

1230 

7400 

7260 

7270 

7250 

9920 

9820 

9870 

9830 

1020 

1000 

1010 

we 

1780 

1730 

1750 

1780 

517 

513 

517 

510 

1860 

18* 

IB* 

1BS0 

314 

310 

314 

312 

1 ISO 

1160 

1170 

lira 

2970 

2950 

2970 

2960 

3230 

3170 

3170 

3230 

8430 

8300 

8360 

8410 

2070 

2050 

2060 

2060 

1100 

1060 

1100 

1090 

1410 

1390 

1410 

1410 

2420 

2390 

2390 

2420 

5730 

5620 

5600 

5750 

314 

309 

314 

212 

710 

702 

709 

708 

1480 

1460 

1470 

1470 

1760 

1730 

17* 

1750 

109 

801 

009 

801 

754 

747 

‘ 747 

749 

3170 

3150 

3160 

31* 

925 

909 

920 

905 

3310 

3330 

3350 

3350 

31* 

30* 

3070 

3120 



Vienna A B"S2SI2K 

ITMOK ijv4>v 

Bodder-UAM 957 944 952 957 

CietetanriPfd 499 48750 48940 499.90 

|A-Genenti 3160 3145 3145 3155 

165133 1603 1610 1650 

l 503 496 49785 498 

1560 1523 15*1547.90 

B67 857 JO 857 JO 866 

56135 556 55X50 560 

22302180*2180*219X9) 
WkntftowB Ban 2530 2506 2515 2549 


EVH 
Ftetintanm 
OMV 

OesiEleUrtz 
VA State 
VATodi 


*jrl0ftX-j(Ua0 


TSEIi 


Wellington HBMjj-jgj} 

AJrNZtMdB *32 *3? *32 432 

Briotflnri 1JB 1J7 U7 US 

Cuter HeB ml 3J7 354 357 2ifl 

FfctahOiBUg *36 *33 *33 *37 

FtaMlOlSr 444 *40 *43 *37 

FHdiaiFo« in no no 114 

FletthOi Paper 148 341 341 X* 

Don Nathan 373 173 U2 3J4 

Tctemn NZ 7J2 735 7 M 734 

Win Marian 1170 1170 1170 1175 


MmbbbM 

MOnkWilTL 

Mbui^H 


PrartMetsiui 

2545 2485 25.10 2515 

35 3X40 3450 3440 
MUSS AS 4X15 AS* 
1X20 1770 1770 1X20 
980 5120 5370 5X45 
5TO 57J0 38J5 57JS 
3180 3X20 3X90 31J5 
WM 3955 3940 40 

32 31 JO 31 JO 3180 
33M 336% 3340 3340 
31^ 3185 3145 31.15 
3470 3470 3430 3145 
» 9 5» 3H 

3X10 3440 3650 34S5 
5970 5870 99J5 5X40 
3645 3670 36J0 3*45 
30JO 30* 3045 3070 
39 JS 3945 3945 3945 
38.10 3U5 37 JO 38. H) 
2645 26.W 3U0 2X45 
1X35 1270 1230 1270 
29 2X70 2885 2X70 
32 31 Jltt 31 ft 

23K 23U 23U 23* 

42 40* 4111 41 

376 360 376 362 

2640 %m 2714 2X35 
24.1S m 24.15 24 

mi 68* (B 6X30 
1X55 12J0 121* 1240 

7170 7X55 7070 71.10 
4330 *?* 4X85 4345 
45 *«U 4*90 44J5 

20 1970 19.90 1985 
4680 46H 4645 4X80 
2040 2X30 20H 2040 
85K 8*W 8416 BSH 

13 1280 1285 13 


Zurich 

ABBB 


SPti 




m 

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MterR 

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541 


1309 

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■» 

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2067 

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1119 

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18X2S 

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U2S5 

sms 

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3805 

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2C® 

1592 

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1263 

556 


253X11 
251X12 

2160 2161 
579 502 

1527 1500 

2205 2190 

BS6 063 
222* 2222 
3400 3425 

US 1Tn 

137 135 

91* 934 

192 19X50 
541 541 

6440 6500 
4700 *00 
1305 1380 
515 50* 

IS 0 ,M7 

2276 2290 
167 JO 161 

1948 19*5 
142 833 

1924 1940 
284 27 1 

ran 1324S 
37150 39X50 
1870 1890 
3100 3015 
177 892 

1342 1330 
2049 3067 
]£» 104 
1716 1719 
1284 12M 
5*5 555 




r 


PACE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, JUNE 24. 1997 



NYSE 


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PAGE 17 : 



China’s Evil Model 

Corruption Is a Concern in Hong Kong 


Reuiers 

BEIJING — Corruption, a way of 
life for business in China could be 
fee wave of the future for Hong 
Kong. 

As the colony prepares for its re- 
tom to Chinese sovereignty on July 
1, opinion surveys show that erosion 
of the rule of law is one of the top 
worries for residents. 

“Hong Kongwill probably look a 
bit more like China does today,” a 
Western diplomat in Beijing said. 
“But the key is in Hong Kong's 
court system. We will want to see 
whether the courts remain independ- 
ent.” > 

Chinese and Western business- 
men cm this side of the border 
routinely com plain of the need for 
"grease” to turn the heavy ma- 
chinery of China's officialdom. 

. Permits, Licenses or just space for 
someone’s goods on a shop shelf are 
all fair game for a little bit of graft or 
fee need to “take care of one's 
friends.” 

China, did little to help its repu- 
tation or build confidence in Hong 
Kong with the notorious remark by a 
police official, Tao Siju, rhnr fee 
territory's criminals could be tol- 
erated as long as they were patri- 
otic. 

Even China's state-run television 
has been alarmed at the problem of 
officials’ toleration — if not par- 
ticipation — in illicit business. 

Television recently broadcast a 
program devoted to unmasking po- 
licemen who doubled as enforcers 
far brothels, discos and gambling 


dens. In a more recent display of the 
sometimes fine distinction between 
breakers and enforcers of the law, 
protesters staged a sit-in demonstra- 
tion outside Co mm unist Party 
headquarters in Beijing last week, 
alleging that they had been swindled 

by none other than the State Security 

Mimstiy — the government agency 
m charge of maintaining internal sta- 
bility. 

Protesters said that a real 
company belonging to the minis try 
which redeveloped their property, 
had reneged on its pledge to give 
mem new apartments, leaving them 
homeless. 

“China has consistently scored 
poorly in our surveys of expatriates 
jn^the^ corruption prob- 

ical & Economic Risk Consul t^xy 
in Hong Kong. "The worrisome 
point for fee future is cross-border 
corruption." 

China has made strides in 
strengthening its legal system but 
many of its commercial rales remain 
unpublished while statutes on the 
books are not always enforced. 

'These are already among the top 
concerns of U.S. companies in 
C hina , says the American Chamber 
of Commerce in Beijing. 

“It goes beyond fee pub lishing of 
rules,’ ’ said John Holden, chairman 
of the Chamber of Commerce. “It is 
also ^ an issue of enforcement We 
won’t have the legal protection we 
need until we have better enforce- 
ment” 

Hong Kong, however, has a legal 



Ent Drapo/Tl* Amcuted Pfc* 

A vendor sorting through some of the 50 competing papers pub- 
lished daily in Hong Kong. Their future under C hina is uncertain. 


system founded on more than ISO 
years of British colonial rale to hold 
the line on a seepage of corruption 

from the mainlan d 

It also has the powerful crime- 
busting agency, fee Independent 
Commission Against Corruption. 

“It will be interesting to see what 
happens when the first ‘princ eling * 
runs afoul of the law,” said a dip- 
lomat referring to the privileged off- 
spring of Beijing’s high officials 
who have sometimes proved able to 
flout Chinese law wife impunity. 

Among fee most well-known 



as a deputy chairman of a Hong 


Kong subsidiary of the giant Capital 
Iron and Steel. 

The chairman of the subsidiary — 
another princeling — has been jailed 
for life for corruption. 

Analysts in Beijing said that one 
fear is feat Chinese organizations 
might try to muscle their way into 
lucrative businesses in Hong Kong 
under the threat of blocking deals on 

the mainlan d 

But others contend feat China will 
learn to adapt to fee Hong Kong 
system, rather than disrupt it. 

Referring to Chinese companies, 
Huang Hai, an attorney who special- 
izes in commercial law, said, “There 
is no reason why they can’t learn to do 
things fee Hong Kong way." 


U.S. and Hong Kong Currencies to Stay Linked 

ally increase the currency's convert- 
ibility. 


Oar Ssi^ From Dkpaeiies 

- HONG KONG — The Hong Kong 
■ dollar will r emain pegged to fee U.S. 

dollar for the foreseeable future, and 
' huge foreign-exc hange reserves in 
Hong Kong and in China should pro- 
tect it from attack, monetary officials 
and business people said Monday. 

= “The government of Hong Kong 
: will continue its commitment to 
’■ maintain the link after June 30, 
: 1997,” said Norman Clan, deputy 
: chief executive of fee Hong Kong 
) Monetary Authority, at a business for- 
• tun.. The authority acts as Hong 
j Kong’s centra] bank. 

The Hong Kong dollar is currently 

- fixed at .a rate of 7.80 to fee U.S. 
7. dollar. 


/‘It’s easy to put a political spin on 
this but, overall, Hoag Kong's im- 
portance to China is economic," said 
T. C. Chan, head of commercial bank- 
ing for Citibank in Hong Koqg. 
"China clearly sees that, ana there Is 
absolutely no economic reason far 
them to tamper with the current sys- 
tem.” 

Mr. Chan dismissed as "ground- 
less" any fears feat Qiina would dip 
into fee territory's foreign-exchange 
reserves, which stood at $67 billion at 
the end of May. 

He also described as "unfounded** 
the view that fee Hong Kong dollar 
would be supplanted by fee Chinese 
.yuan as fee territory’s currency, de- 
spite die mainlan d’s efforts to gradu-- 


Hong Kong’s agreements wife 10 
other Asian central banks, which al- 
low it to borrow f unds quickly using 
U.S. Treasury bonds ana bills as col- 
lateral to fight speculation, was an- 
other positive factor, he said. 

Agreements and commitments 
from Chinese leaders, central bankers 
and Hong Kong’s leader-in-waiting, 
Tung Chee-hwa, have guaranteed that 
the existing system will continue un- 
changed for many years, Mr. Chan of 
fee monetary authority said. 

Richard Maxgolis, a political analyst 
with Merrill Lynch & Co., said re- 
cently that “the commitments to a 
separate and autonomous fiscal and 


monetary system for Hong Kong after 
the transition are clear and unequivocal 
and are enshrined in fee Basic Law, 
Hong Kong’s post-1997 constitution. 

"The evidence of fee manner in 
which these issues were handled dur- 
ing the negotiations on Hong Kong’s 
future is that Chinn regards fee peg as 
an integral part of a winning recipe 
feat operates to China's advantage as 
well as Hong Kong’s.” 

Mr. Chan of Citibank said feat 
while the peg was “susceptible to a 
number of pressures,” including spec- 
ulative attack, Hong Kong had suf- 
ficient funds and China has vowed to 
tap into its own reserves if necessary to 
support fee Hong Kong currency. 

f Reuters . AFP ) 


Rule Hits 
Red-Chip 
Stocks 

HongKongReels 
On China Law 


CimtpMbfOmSuSFnwDapdtrbrs 

HONG KONG — The 
stocks of Chinese investment 
companies listed in Hong 
Kong fell shaiply Monday as 
investors reacted to new rules 
that make it harder for fee so- 
called red chips to buy assets 
from their mainland parents. 

An index of 41 red-chip 
stocks compiled by Bloom- 
berg News fell nearly 2 per- 
cent, lo 30530. Oriental 
Metals Ltd. and Denway In- 
vestment Co. each fell more 
than 7 percent. 

The benchmark Hang Seng 
Index fell 133.13 points to 
13021.23. 

Analysts said the slump 
might be short-lived. Compa- 
nies backed by city govern- 
ments or national government 
agencies will probably keep 
rising, the^ 1 said. 

Under fee rales released 
Friday, red-chip companies 
must gain approval from fee 
relevant authorities to buy as- 
sets from their parent compa- 
nies. New listings will be 
more strictly regulated. 

A report on fee rules by the 
Xinhua news agency said as- 
set transfers to foreign listed 
or unlisted companies would 
require local regulators to no- 
tify provincial governments 
or relevant departments of the 
Chinese cabinet. The move 
signals regulators' unease 
wife fee way companies raise 
money in Hong Kong and buy 
mainlan d assets. 

The chief of fee Hong 
Kong exchange, meanwhile, 
sought to quell concerns that 
enthusiasm for red-chip 
stocks, and Hong Kong shares 
in general, is overblown. 

Edgar Cheng said, "De- 
spite the rise in our market 
this year, the price -to-eam- 
ings ratios of fee great ma- 
jority of Hong Kong stocks, 
including most of our ‘blue 
chips,' are still far from high 
compared to other regional 
markets with comparable 
economic prospects.” 

f Bloomberg, AFP) 




Hong Kong 

Singapore 

Tokyo 


Hang Seng 

Straits Times . Nikkei 225 


17000 

250 dr 

22000 


16090 - 

2200 n 

21000 


15000 

. 2150 \ 

A( 2100 

M - - 

f 

14000 -■ - 

„I\Aa 

2050 


r 


r- 2000 

V v ISOM fluty 


1Z0W J FMA 1950 J F M 

A M J 17D03 J F M 

a m y 

1997 

1997 

1997 


Exchange 

Index 

Monday Prev. 

% 



Close Close 

Change 

Hong Kong 

Hang Seng 

15,021.23 15,154.36 -0.BB 

Singapore 

Straus Times 

2434.79 2.0C&44 

+1.31 

Sydney 

AH Ordinaries 

2,70630 2,712.60 

•053 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 225 

20,436.14 20.385.54 *0.25| 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

1.08&98 1,097.54 

-0.78 

Bangkok 

SET 

504.53 480.25 

+5.06 

Seoul 

Composite Index 

75335 770.22 

-2.23 

Taipei." 

Stock Market Index 6325.12 8.882.13 

.+0.46 

tfanQa 

pse 

2,808.65 2381.73 

-2.54 

Jakarta 

Composite Index 

71934 712.22 

+1.04 

Wellington 

NZSE-40 

2.41437 2.423.60 

-036 

Bombay 

Sensiliva Index 

4389.20 4,083.04 

+0.15 


Source: Te/ekurs 


lm.-nuli.iiul hfcrJJ Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• Daewoo Group of South Korea will soon be assembling 
cars in China, the group’s chairman said. Kim Woo Choong 
said he was confident of being able to build a car assembly 
plant with an annual capacitv'of 200,000 units in China by 
1999. 

•The first Chinese companies to issue corporate convertible 
bonds could go lo fee market as early as October, wife several 
issues expected by fee end of 1997. underwriters said. 

■ Honeywell Inc~, a U.S. maker of automation equipment, 
said it expects annual sales in China to double from last year to 
SI billion by 2000 because of rising spending on power plants 
and other infrastructure. 

• Singapore Power. United Engineers Ltd. and Govern- 
ment of Singapore Investment Corp. said they would join a 
Chinese consortium to build a 5560 million power plant in 
China's Anhui Province. The Singapore partners will hold a 
49 percent slake in fee project. 

• Imperial Chemical Industries PLC put about 52 percent of 
its Australian subsidiary on the auction block in a global 
offering it hopes will raise around 2 billion Australian dollars 

(SI 3 billion). Reuters. AFX. Bloomberg 


Taiwan Chipmaker Is Upbeat 

Bloomberg Ken 

TAIPEI — Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. said 
Monday feat it would raise its forecast for 1997 profit by as 
much os 20 percent, triggering fee biggest one-day rally in 
Taiwan technology stocks in two years. 

The announcement by TSMC. fee world’s largest computer 
microchip foundry, bodies well for fee island's other computer 
and technology companies, analysts said. 

Confidence is growing that these companies will deliver 
profits that keep them among among fee top performers in one 
of this year's best-performing markets. 4 ‘Nobody wants to be 
caught without chip shares." said Jonathan Ross, Taiwan 
country manager for AMB-Amro Hoarc Goven Asia Ltd. 




NYSE 


- -• * ■ - 


Monday 4 p.m. Close 

{Continued) 


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Shareholders Plan 
To Seek Answers 
In Sumitomo Case 

Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — A group of Sumitomo 
Corp. shareholders will demand Friday 
that fee company explain why it will not 
file a civil lawsuit against its former star 
copper trader who racked up $2.6 billion 
in losses over 10 yeais. 

In an unusual move, the shareholders 
have sent the company a list of questions 
they want answered at the company's 
general shareholders meeting in Osaka. 

“If we wait until fee day of fee share- 
holders meeting, Sumitomo may not an- 
swer our questions, saying only feat 
they'll study the questions," said a 
shareholder, Kazuyoshi Yuoka. 

Yasuo Hamanaka. Sumitomo’s for- 
mer chief copper trader, went on trial in 
February ana pleaded guilty to charges 
of fraud and forgery in connection with 
losses from unauthorized trades. 

Last month, Sumitomo said it was 
unlikely that it would make public fee 
results of its internal investigation be- 
cause of pending legal action against it in 
fee United States. 

The group’s questions will focus on 
Sami tomo’s internal investigation into 
the illegal copper deals; its decision not 
to sue Mr. Hamanaka; whether Sum- 
itomo's auditors were aware of fee il- 
legal copper trades, and discrepancies in 
fee amounts in losses reported. 


Thai Finance Plan Delayed 

New Minister Wants More Time to Study Proposals 


Caa&nlbyOw Sr^fFmtaDaparbn 

BANGKOK — Thailand on Mon- 
day delayed a plan to shore up its 
ailing fuiance and property sectors, 
saying fee new finance minister 
needed more time to study fee steps. 

Before fee government said it 
would delay fee measures, Thai 
stocks posted their biggest gains in 
four months. The Stock Exchange of 
Thailand index rose 24.28 points, or 5 
percent, to 50433. 

Deputy Finance Minister Thawai- 
wong na Chiang Mai said the new 
finance minister, Thanong Bidaya, 
who was sworn in Monday, would not 
have time to review fee measures 
before a cabinet meeting Tuesday. 

“The ministry should give him 
time to study the major issues,” be 
said, adding that he could not say 
when the package of executive de- 
crees would be proposed to fee Thai 
cabinet 

The package includes measures to 
speed fee merger of cash-strapped 
finance companies, to create a legal 
basis for fee securitization of assets, 
and to set up a secondary mortgage 
cooperation scheme. 

The securitization and mortgage 
decrees would allow finance compa- 
nies to sell, rather than write off, bad 
loans and other assets. For fee mo- 


ment, such assets cannot be traded on 
Thailand's underdeveloped capital 
markets, analysis said. 

With fee delay in the measures, 
some analysts worried feat finance 
companies would go into a planned 
program of mergers wife a negative 
net value because they could not sell 
undesirable assets. Banks and finance 
companies are estimated to hold 800 
billion baht {$32 billion) in bad loans, 
mainly involving real estate. 

Other analysts, however, said fee 
measures, although essential, were in- 
sufficient. 

”1 don’t think these decrees would 
have much impact whether they are 
adopted this week or next,” said 
Thanawat Pachimkul of Seatnico Se- 
curities PLC. "They are ar relatively 
lower priority than renewed specu- 
lation about fee baht 

“The decrees would help the fi- 
nance sector, but any mergers would 
take time anyway,” he added. 

Thailand's 91 finance firms have 
faced a severe liquidity crunch from 
bad loans, shaky confidence in their 
stability and prolonged high financ- 
ing costs in fee Thai money market. 
They have also been hit by the slump 
in the stock market, which has fallen 
nearly 40 percent this year. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg, AFP ) 


ill 


U.S. Urges Hands-Off Internet Trade 


ires. 


3 G. 


AM & 


nifPfl 


si 


j 


£ Si. 

.s a a 





Agence France-Presse 

SINGAPORE — Wash- 
ington wants a universal code 
to govern Internet transac- 
tions and a ‘ ‘hands-off” reg- 
ulatory approach by govern- 
ments to raise electronic 
commerce, a senior U.S. of- 
ficial said here Monday. 

President Bill Clinton 
plans to issue an Internet 
strategy report on July 1 set- 
ting a Jan. 1, 2000, deadline 
for a gre ement on the code to 
take effect, said ha Magazin- 
es an adviser to Mr. Canton. 

The report would call for a 
uniform approach to elec- 
tronic commerce on issues 
such as taxes and duties, con- 
tent restrictions and stan- 
dards, die adviser said. 

Mr. Magaziner said the re- 
port would cone wife a 
“road map” of dates for 
countries to negotiate key is- 
sues involved in electronic 
commerce, such as taxes, tar- 
iffs, privacy, security and 
non-tariff barriers. 

“We believe feat if fee 
right environment can be set, 
electronic commerce can be- 


come our laigest category of 
trade within fee next de- 
cade,” Mr. Magaziner told 
reporters before ending a 
two-day visit to Singapore. 

Some 15-to-20 percent of 
retafling in fee United States 
would be done on Internet in 
10 years, Mr. Magaziner 

said, and a large portion of 
financial services would be 
done in cyberspace. 

Electronic commerce in- 
cludes fee sale and delivery 
of products and services on 
the internet such as software, 
movies, consultant and edu- 
cational services, health dia- 
gnostics, data bases and 
news. 

The lack of a predictable 
global legal environment has 
impeded the growth of elec- 
tronic commerce, Mr. Mag- 
aziner said, adding that U.S. 
businesses wanted an agree- 
ment among governments 
and private sectors to create 
such a framework. 

Mr. Magaziner heads a 
task force charged wife set- 
ting principles for develop- 
ment of Internet commerce. 


The group has met wife 
experts, business representa- 
tives and consumer groups to 
prepare recommendations 
for fee development of a 
“free and open global elec- 
tronic marketplace.'’ 

"First of ail we think it is 
very important that the global 

electronic commerce should 
be a market-based industry, 
not a regulated industry,” 
Mr. Magaziner said. 

"In principle, govern- 
ments should take a hands- 
off approach to electronic 
commerce, should not treat it 
as a regulated industry but 


rather should treat it as an 
industry where contracts 
form the basis for business, 
not regulation.’' 

In other areas, nations de- 
veloped domestic industries 
and legal structures and came 
together to negotiate on a 
global basis, but the Internet 
was different because it was 
“born global,” he said. 

The report was expected to 
suggest establishing cyber- 
space as a duty-free zone, 
advocate no new taxes, op- 
pose compulsory licensing 
and call for measures to pro- 
tect intellectual property. 


JAPAN PACIFIC FUND 

SICAV 

1 1, njs AJdringen, L-1 1 18 Luxembourg 
R.C. LUXEMBOURG N B&340 

DIVIDEND HODGE 

Atthe Annual General Meeting heU on June 18th. 1997, the shareholders 

resolved to declare a (Mdenci of Yen 50 per share, payable on July isth, 

1987 to sharahokJara on record on July 13h, 1997 and to halites of 
bearer shares upon presentation d coupon n 27. Die shares w« be 
quoted ox-efividend as from July 15th, 1897. 

Paying Agent Kredtetbark SA. Luxambourgeolse, 43, boutevaid 
Royat, L-2955 Luxembourg 


-- 1 
l +*' 




t 



SPONSORED SECTION 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1997 


SPONSORED SECTION 


BUILT FOR BUSINESS: JAPAN 



A country on the move: 
The different sectors 
of Japan's economy 
arc back on course. 
Right Consumers 
keep fast-food outlets 
busy ah daylong, 
attracted by teriyaki 
burgers and other 
products adapted to 
local tastes. 
Far right Housing 
remains expensive in 
metropoBtan areas, 
but there is demand 
for developments Bke 
. the high-rise 
condomuuum complex 
“fhverdty ZL," 
located along the 
wa terfront of 
Tokyo Bay. 



Japan Inc. Takes 
Show on the Road 

High-tech companies are expanding overseas. 


There’s Good News and Bad News for the Economy 

Economic growth was robust in the first quarter of 1997, and companies are optimistic even as they' tighten their belts. 


L ike its landscape and people, Japan's economy is full 
of contrasts in 1997. According to a recent survey, 
most companies surveyed expect sales to improve this 
year, but growth of the gross domestic product is expected to 
decline. Exports of cars, electronics and other products are 
rising, while a hike in the domestic sales tax has hampered 
results at home. 

The stock market is bouncing back, though investment 
banks and securities firms are tightening their belts and 
payrolls to prepare for deregulation. The government sees a 
need to support certain sectors of the economy more than last 


“Built pur Business: Japan” 
urn produced in its entirety by the Advertising Department of' 
the International Herald Tribune. 

Writer: Janet Ijvaux is based in Los Angeles. 
Program Director: Bill Muhder. 


year, however, it will move ahead with plans to cm fiscal 
spending in order to reform the budget 

Despite the contrasting scenarios, Japan's economic fun- 
damentals are improving, analysts say. The more the country 
deregulates and initiates reforms in the short term, the better 
off it should be in the long run. In the meantime, conditions 
in Japan will continue to challenge both the private and 
public sector, employers and workers, and producers and 
consumers. 

Fairly optimistic 

The current statistical picture is fairly optimistic following 
the tumult of spending that preceded the hike in Japan's 
consumption tax to 5 percent from 3 percent on Apri 1 1 . The 
gross domestic product grew 6.6 percent on an annualized 
basis in the first quarter, although higher taxes should limit 
growth for die rest of the year. 

Retail sales jumped 14 percent in March from a year 
before, while housing starts rose 2.4 percent from February, 
according to the Bank of Montreal. 





The Choice 
of Japan 

• National Daily Circulation of Over 10 Million* 

• 99-7% of Circulation is Home Delivered 
• 2.9 Readers Per Copy 

Reaches -t0° o of Households in Major Regions. 23°o Nationwide 
• i0° o of Readers Have Household Income Over ¥7 Million 
• Over 120 Years in Business 


Survey > show die Japanese place a high level of trust in newspapers.. J 
The country's largest and most respected newspaper, \;v' i 


Hie Yomiuri Sltiiubun is also Japan's most .effective- -advertising nwdtUflCi 

‘I0.iJ0,A'W: Soonv: UR. In. June • / *' - " .-.g :% 



THE YOMIURI SHIMBUN 

Japan's Most Influential Newspaper 

1-7-1 Oicmachi. Chiymla-Lu. Tokyo 100-55. Japan Tel: 0-3216-8744 Fax: 03-32 16-8749 
To retell* our media hit proriding details on the Japanese market and competitive media statistics, contact your nearest representative. 


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The jobless rate cased to 3.2 percent m March, from 3.3 
percent in February. 

The robustness of the economy in the first quarter led 
manufacturing companies surveyed by the Bank of Japan in 
March to express their first positive sentiment in five years. 
The so-called Tankan index rose to +2 in March, from -3 in 
November of last year. Growth in the country's export 
performance was cited as a major reason for the turnaround 
in the index. 

Opportunities for graduates 

Exports have also led some companies to begin recruiting 
students upon college graduation — a practice many had 
abandoned during the past few yeans. 

Nonetheless, the June Tankan survey could decline to -1 
as consumption slows. The country’s GDP growth is ex- 
pected to fall to 1 .9 percent this year, from 3.2 percent last 
year, though it could rebound to 2.5 percent in 1 998. some 
analysts say. Interest rates should continue to stay low until 
the expansion becomes more durable. • 


Exports Up, But 
Will This Last? 


Cars and electronics benefited from a weaker yen. 

T he mam bright spots in Japan’s economy over the past 
1 2 months or so have come from some of the country's 
large carmakers and electronics companies, which 
have boosted their exports — thanks in part to the lower value 
of the yen — and are showing stronger profits. 

This puts them in a stronger position globally, after the 
turmoil and cost-cutting of the past few years, and then- 
success is also having an effect on other parts of Japan's 
economy. The recent strengthening of the yen, however, 
means there will be more pressure on exporters to come up 
with new products that can sell at higher prices overseas. 

Toyota Motor Corp.’s sales rose close to 15 percent, to 
$ 1 00 billion, in the fiscal year ending in March. TTic number 
of exported vehicles rose more than 12 percent to 1.3 
million, and the company expects exports to grow about 7 
percent this year, to 1.4 million. 

In the electronics sector, Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. 
increased its overseas sales 1 8 percent to $29 billion, in die 
fiscal year ending in March. Exports in all major product 
categories were up more than 8 percent 

Many companies — both large and small — are focusing 
their efforts on establishing more extensive sales networks in 
overseas markets. Yokugawa Electric Corp., for instance, 
plans to set up a unit in Singapore on July 1 to sell its control 
systems and measuring instruments. Working with the trad- 
ing company Itochu Corp.. DaifukuCo. plans to penetrate the 
Chinese market for bowling machines. 


J apanese High-tech 

companies arc teaming 
up with partners from 
die United States and other 
countries and investing 
abroad in order to expand 
their international business. 
These links are proving vital 
for Japanese companies that 
want to enter new markets in 
China, for instance, and in- 
crease their market share in 
developed countries like die 
United States. 

Deals are being an- 
nounced on a daily basis. 
NEC Corp. struck one of the 
biggest a few weeks ago with 
Shanghai Hua Hong Micro- 
electronics. The two compa- 
nies, in cooperation with die 
Chinese government, will 
develop a $1 billion chip- 
making factory in Shanghai, 
according to recent reports. 

$7 billion market 
Demand for semiconductors 
is booming in China. That 
market is now worth $7 bil- 
lion and could more than 
double over the next few 
years, according to sources 
cited by The Economist 
magazine. 

In return for access to this 
growing business, NEC — 
the world’s second-largest 
chip maker — will be sharing 
its latest chip-making meth- 
ods with China. The elec- 
tronics company can now 
squeeze 700 or more 
memoiy chips on a single 
eight-inch silicon wafer, 
which tops die 450-chip 
wafers now made by some 
rivals. 

Many of Japan’s other 
chip makers have been de- 
veloping chip plants in the 
United States. When prices 
on some chips fell dramat- 
ically last year, however, 
Hitachi Ltd., now ranked 
sixth among chip makers in 


terms of sales, put construe*, 
tiou work on its r mc ro p rch* 
cessor plant in Texas on hold, 
until recently. The company. - 
has announced that it w9>. 
begin work again due to aj. 
pickup in demand fra 1 mi, 
croprocessors. Production a* 
the $3 50-mi II ion plant is set 
to begin in the second half of 
1998. 

Silicon Valley 
When it comes to electronic 
products using chips. Japa- 
nese companies are equally 
busy on joint ventures antji 
work overseas. Many arc 
concentrating on ties with . 
Silicon Vfeilcy in Northern. 
California. 

In early April, for instance, . 
Japan's phone giant NTT, 
Corp. set up a research cent®, 
in Palo Aho to improve tiw' 
development of its business 
products. The main focus,, 
will be on multimedia... 
products, including internet 
and Intranet technology. ... 

NEC and Sumitomo Bank 1 , 
established a S60 million,, 
fund in April to invest in.- 
multimedia ventures in Silv 
icon Valley and elsewhere, > 
NEC believes this work will 
help it maintain its edge in 
computers, communications, 
and electronic devices. . 

Mutual benefits 

Japanese companies arc tak- 
ing steps to assist their global- 
partners in expanding sales to -. 
Japan and other parts of Asia.;. 
NEC, for example, organized - 
a program in early June to. 
support the sales of its global •• 
software vendors. “The NEC, , 
Asian Alliance Program 
helps independent software, 
vendors achieve success withy. 
NEC in these reports,” says- ^ 
Angela S ten berg, manager of. 
the NEC Systems Laboratory: • 
in San Jose, California. • 



Toyota expects to export 1.4 mXon vehicles this year, a 7 percent • 
nse over 1996. 

The booming trade between Japan and other parts of Asia ! 
land the world) is also boosting one of Japan's oldest 1 
industries: shipbuilding. 1 

Shipbuilder Sumitomo Corp., for example, won an order ! 
in early June from Hong Kong-based Top Glory Shipping ; 
Co. for 10 double-hull bulk cargo ships. The country’s other ; 
shipbuilders say it looks like smooth sailing ahead for their : 
exports as well. • i 


YOU'LL KNOCK TM OUT 
IN TOKYO... 
UNLESS JH LAG 
KNOCKS YOU OUT. 


V 

t/o u pi 



ou plan to come out swinging, close the deal, and go 
home a winner. Then jer lag hits you — hard. 

What can you do? Head for the Hotel Okura and enroll in 
our unique let Lag Plan. Specially designed to get jet laggers up 
on their feet and raring to go, it includes a Light Box to help put . 
your body's dock bade on schedule, a Health Club workout and 
let Bath, Relaxation Videos, a Body Sonic Massage, your choice 
of pillows to help you sleep better (we'll even remember your 
favorite for your next visit), and special breakfast and dinner 
suggestions for extra energy. 

The Jet Lag Plan is only V 10,000 extra per day, or free for 
members of the Okura Club International, our special program 
for frequent guests. To receive a free brochure simply send your 
name and address (o our Public Relations Office. 

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sponsored section 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1997 



BUILT FOR BUSINESS: JAPAN 


on ' rn t 


assssw-r 



Perks for First-Timers and Frequent Travelers 

J apan s hotel industry is more competitive than ever, and the customer should benefit. 



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A new batch of top-class lodg- 
ing and meeting facilities — ■ 
sponsored by both foreign 
and local investors — has cropped up 
in Japan recently, and that’s good 
news for visitors and local residents 
alike. 

-Many hotels offer frequent-travel 
programs for those who come often 
ta Japanese cities like Tokyo, but 
they also have special programs — 
including services such as meeting 
guests at the airport — for those who 
afe new to Japan. 

’ There are alsogood bargains to be 
had as hotels adjust rates and dis- 
count plans to accommodate the 
yen’s changing value. 

Special offers 

Hotel chains offering special pro- 
grams for frequent guests include the'- 
Prince Hotels and Four Seasons 
Hotel Tokyo. Prince Hotels’ Prince 
CTub International gives members 1 0 
percent discounts on rooms at its 30 
hotels worldwide. Special discounts 
aithe Akasaka Prince Hotel in Tokyo 
lower the price of some rooms by 40 
percent At a sister facility, the Tpkyo 
Prince Hotel, guests staying five 
nights get a 10,000 yen ($90) cer- 
tificate for use at any Prince Hotel in 



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Jr.'- , 


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rfi. .. -dz-z IV.- 


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•Other Prince Club perks include 
an extended check-out time (until 6 
pit.), and free breakfast and news- 
papers every day. Airport assistance 
is-' provided to guests traveling 
through New Tokyo International 
Akport “ 

• Such help can be essential to busy 
visitors arriving at Narita Airport, at 
least 60 minutes away from central 
Tokyo by car. 

Personalized service 


Speaal, meals, exercise, r&txa&nandandaskep 
'is designed to getthem back in shape fasia-th m ever before. 


make sure that incorrect calls aren't 
connected to a room between mid- 
night and 5:00 A.M. 

E-mail and Internet access 
For guests who need to be in touch 
with the home office around the 
clock, die nearby Imperial Hotel in 
Tokyo and its sister hotel in Osaka 


Responding to this need, the Four started offering visitors special e- 
Seasons Hotel Tokyo introduced its mail and Internet services in April. 


personalized arrival service last July. 
If requested in advance, a hotel staff 
member will greet guests outside 
customs and assist them with lug- 
gage, transportation and other ar- 
rangements. 

‘The Four Seasons also offers ac- 
cess to the scenic Chinzan -so Garden 
~ near Tokyo’s imperial Palace. Mod- 
_ : * em comforts include multiple telc- 

pfione lines, facsimile machines, a 
• — 3 Binary service and call screening to 


Vs 


■.¥ 




The new sendee lets guests send 
and receive electronic mail at a 
private address that is set up for 10 
days at a time. 

Internet access is included in the 
service’s low flat rate, which allows 
guests to avoid paying international 
phone charges. 

Help for jet lag 

Another special program available to 
visitors coming to Japan is the Hotel 


Okura’s Jet Lag Plan, which is part of 
the hotel chain's Okura Club Inter- 
national. The plan is designed to help 
world travelers switch time zones 
through proper diet, exercise pro- 
gram, relaxation and a sleep regi- 
men. 

For those who have already gotten 
over jet lag, the Hotel Okura in 
Tokyo, which recently celebrated its 
35th birthday, has computers that can 
be used 24 hours a day in the business 
center. Guests staying at the hotel 
from Aug. 1 1 to Aug. 28 can visit a 
charity art exhibition for Red Cross 
Japan, featuring 60 works of art from 
Japan’s five grand masters. 

Japan's hotels are also hooking up 
with airlines to offer guests special 
benefits. The Hotel New Otani now 
awards 500 miles per stay to mem- 
bers of frequent-flier programs 
sponsored by American Airlines, 


Jet Lag 

a survival manual 
from the Hotel Okura 



Ctfi&uL 


British Airways, Japan Airlines. 
Northwest Airlines and United Air- 
lines. 

Such programs should keep vis- 
itors to Tokyo and other pals of 
Japan coming through the door. • 


Information Technology: 
High Quality, Innovation 
And Competitive Prices 

From cameras to video games. Japan is still the world leader. 


Japan continues to lead the world in 
display panels, video games. . .intents and 
other consumer products. The country's 
computer and computer-related equip- 
ment makers are strengthening their po- 
sition in the market for computers thanks 
to the high quality of their display panels 
and related high-tech equipment. 

Their aim is to do what they have done 
worldwide with television sets, video- 
cassette records and stereos — to chalk 
up sales through innovative technology, 
top-quality manufacturing techniques 
and competitive pricing. 

Big share of U5. market 
In 1996. four of the top 10 sellers of 
laptop computers in the United States 
were Japanese. Toshiba Cotp. captured a 
24 percent market share, up from 21 
percent in 1995. Worldwide. Japanese 
laptop makers have about 37 percent of 
the market, and they are unveiling a host 
of new products this year to raise that 
figure. 

A U.S.-based unit of Sony Corp. un- 
veiled a new line of multimedia notebook 
computers in early June that promises to 
be a "no-compromise” computing solu- 
tion for businesspeople and other com- 
puter users, the company says. 

The notebook computers weigh about 
5.3 pounds (2.2 kilos), including bat- 
teries: they are 1.5 inches (3.S centi- 
meters) thick and come with 12-inch 
screens. For fans of audiovisual tech- 
nology. there are built-in stereo speakers 
and a microphone, as well as remote- 
control headphones. 

In desktops. Sony is set to sell models 
in the United Stales in July that also 
include integrated video and audio tech- 
nology. 

In addition, these desktop models have 
video memory to support the use of di- 
gital-imaging software. 

Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. in- 
troduced its line oflightweight slim note- 
book PCs in May under its Panasonic PC 
brand name, and Hitachi Ltd. is hoping to 
shake up the market with handheld 


n 


SPONSORED SECTION 


devices this year. Hitachi's latest Win- 
dows-based computers weigh less than 
14 ounces: they offer a larger LCD screen 
than previous models, plus a modem. 

DVD-ROMs 

For computer users looking for the latest 
m audio-video technology, Hitachi has 
started shipping the world's first DVD- 
ROM drives. The new drives allow data 
to be recorded and played back on a PC, 
the company says. The revv ri table DVD 
format also allows users to store 5.2 
gigabytes of data — about the same 
amount of data that is normally stored on 
3.6011 floppy disks. 

To support - - and at the same time take 
advantage of - -• these developments. Ja- 
pan's electronics companies are focusing 
on semiconductors that will make the 
next generation of computers and other 
products work faster and better. 

Toshiba Corp.. for instance, has been 
developing a new type of chip called LSI 
(large-scale integration), which enables 
the placement of various specialized cir- 
cuits on a single chip. Thanks to LSI. 
Toshiba has been able to produce a 200- 
gram. palm-sized phone computer that 
can be used to browse the World Wide 
Web or talk on the phone for up to 270 
minutes before a battery must be re- 
charged. • 



Japanese laptop makers have 37 percent of 
the world market 





lotion and reform could increase growth in Japan s gross domestic product. 


hough bitter pills to 
swallow today, dereg- 
ulation and reform are 
rasing the expectation that 
Jean's economy can make a 
mjafor turnaround over the 
next few years. 

• hi early June, tite country’s 
Economic Planning Agency 
sajd the government ’s dereg- 
ulation measures could push 
economic growth up almost 
1 jjercenta year and — at the 
s$ne tirae - . — limit the 
growth ofeonsumer prices. 

►That 'vjpwdd mean the 
country's ~ gross domestic 


product could be 5.8 . percent 
higher in 2003 than it would 
be otherwise. 

The reason? By giving 
new freedom to Japanese in- 
dustry, new products and ser- 
vices can be developed, the 
EPA says, and that should 
transfoie into new demand. 

The big bang 
The financial sector has been 
an important focus of dereg- 
ulation through an effort re- 
ferred to as Japan's “big 
bang.” Perhaps the loudest 
pop will sound next spring 


for banks and other financial 
groups. They will be allowed 
to form holding companies to 
strengthen operations and 
absorb weaker institutions. 
This June, banks were al- 
lowed to begin selling loan- 
backed securities to individu- 
al investors and corpora- 
tions. 

Still in the works are steps 
to fully liberalize brokerage 
commissions for securities 
firms and even get rid of 
stock transaction and ex- 
change taxes by late 1999. 
These moves are being 







rj-± m 








hi " 





pushed by financial groups 
that believe the liberalization 
of global transactions next 
April will put pressure on 
their domestic trading work. 

In insurance, government 
panels have not yet agreed 
upon a date for a proposed 
change in rules that now ban 
banks from selling coverage. 
They may allow banks to sell 
life and fire insurance to 
mortgage borrowers. Further 
change, however, is strongly 
opposed by the insurance in- 
dustry. 

Changes in retail 
Other interesting develop- 
ments are taking place in the 
retail sector. Large retailers 
— like supermarket chains 
— are pressing for charges in 
the controversial Large- 
Scale Retail Store Law, 
which mandates that stores 
be no larger than 1,000 
square meters (10,760 square 
feet). This size is expected to 
increase in tire near future, 
and store hours should be 
extended beyond their 
present 8:00 P.M. limit, de- 
spite opposition from small 
shop owners. 

Consumers should also 
benefit from the reform of 
rules governing gas stations. 
Some Japanese officials are 
recommanding that gas sta- 
tions be allowed to obtain oil 
products from more than one 
wholesale supplier. 

A futures market for pet- 
roleum and the liberalization 
of exports will also be pro- 
posed. 

Name of the game 
At foe federal level, stream- 
lining and restructuring are 
the name of the game. Prime 
Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto 
and a group of lawmakers 

have proposed that the Prime 

Minister’s Office be merged 
with the Home Affaire Min- 
istry and Management and 
Coordination Agency. The 
aim is to improve the au- 
thority of foe Cabinet and 
elected officials. 

In early June, foe Cabinet 
agreed to integrate and re- 
structure II special govern- 
ment-approved corporations 
over foe next few years. One 
of these corporations, the 
Power Reactor & Nuclear 
Fuel Development Corp., 
will .be privatized. • 



Tokyo Hadquanen: 5-J.Kha-Aoj l ama 2-cborae, Miaan*laj.Tofcyo 207-77, Japan 




) 


s 

t 





PAGE 18 


World Roundup 


Els Ousts Woods 


golf Emie Els became the first 
South African to head the world 
rankings following his U.S. Open 
and Buick Classic victories. 

Els took over as No. 1 in the 
rankings Monday from Tiger 
Woods, who held the position for 
just one week. 

On Sunday in Westchester, New 
York, Els won his second succes- 
sive Brack Open. And, like last year, 
he led at the end of every round. He 
shot a two- under-par 69 in the final 
round to bold off Jeff Maggert, who 
also finished second last year. Els 
finished on 16-under-par 268, two 
strokes ahead of Maggert. (7teK/*rr; 


England Hangs On 


cricket Michael Atherton and 
Mark Butcher shared an opening 
partnership of 162 Monday to en- 
sure a draw for England in the rain- 
shortened second Ashes test 
against Anstralia at Lord’s. 

Shane Wame, the Australian spin 
bowler, created some tremors in the 
England dressing room when he dis- 
missed Butcher for 87 and Nasser 
-■Hassam for 0 in successive overs. 
But Graham llKHpe (30 not out) and 
John Crawley (29 not out) survived 
When play was finally called off on 
the fifth and final day, England was 
266 runs for 4 wickets, an improve- 
ment on its first innings of 77. Aus- 
tralia had declared its first innings 
closed at the overnight total of 213 
for 7. (Reuters) 


Franco Baresi Retires 


soccer Franco Baresi. the vet- 
eran Italy and AC Milan defender, 
announced his retirement from pro- 
fessional soccer Monday. 

Baresi, 37, played for Milan for 20 
years. He said he would stay at die 
dub as a vice president and would 
also work with the youth team. 

Baresi made his Serie A debut 
with Milan in April 1978, and 
played 716 official games for the 
club, winning six Italian league titles 
and three European Cups. He played 
81 times for Italy. (Reuters) 


WNBA Claims Success 


BASKETBALL Larger crowds and 
better television ratings than ex- 
pected made the opening weekend 
of the Women’s National Basket- 
ball Association a success, league 
officials said Monday. 

Phoenix drew a record U.S. 
women’s professional basketball 
crowd of 16,102 to a 76-59 tout of 
Charlotte on Sunday, one day after 
14,284 watched New York beat host 
Los Angeles 67-57 in the WNBA 
inaugural game. About 4.5 million 
U.S. households watched. (AFP) 



*. . . .2* ' •* . -i' 


Mark Butcher watching the 
ball go by against Australia. 


Escorts & Guides 


IXTEHKATXmL 


Sports 


if 

i L i 


Th 



T«lSSDU!,JljTWM,li^|I lj(i ( 

^ ' 

Ronaldo Scores Twice f 


To Give Brazil Victory ? 




Ration 

SANTA CRUZ, Bolivia, — Mexico 
finally won a penalty shoot-out as it 
reached the Copa America semi-finals 
Sunday, while Ronaldo scored both 

goals for Brazil as it overcame Paraguay 
in a disappointing game. 

Jose Luis Cn&avert, the Paraguay 
goalkeeper, also made his mark Sunday, 


World teccit 


fVA.. * 


AdanBodo/AiEcnce Haw near 

Tim Henman of Britain keeping his eye on the ball during his match Monday against Daniel Nestor of Canada. 


Under Gray Skies, Britons Shine 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 


W IMBLEDON — The English 
gave themselves this day. 
They opened a new beautiful 
Wimbledon stadium with 10 of the 
greatest champions parading around, 
and then chased them all ont to make 
room for Tim Henman. It was left to him 
to hit the first ball He hit it and it began 
to rain. 

“Warm-up is suspended,” the um- 
pire announced. 

It was as if the English planned the 
opening Monday of Wimbledon know- 
ing that die weather wouldn’t let them 


Wimbledon 


dump too mnch pressure on No. 14 
Henman, their first homegrown seed in 
15 years. Whenever die English begin 
having too much fun, it rains and every- 
one runs for cover. It rained twice on 
Henman’s straight-sets victory. 

Later in the day, when a nationalistic 
roar shot up through the hole in the 
Centre Court roof for Greg Rusedski — 
who isn’t even a real Briton — well, that 
was just too rich. The rain came fast and 
hard. Play was suspended immediately 
after Rusedski had taken the first set, 7- 
6 (8-6). over the No. 7 seeded Mark 
Phillipoussis of Australia, and after a 
delay Rusedski won the second set by 
the same score. 

In the last few days, Rusedski has 
been complaining that Henman has 
been getting all of the British attention. 
It seems that if Rusedski had known it 
was going to be like that, he never 
would have ditched his native Canada a 
few years ago to become a British star. It 
seems he feels cheated. 

For Henman, the issue of support is 
reversed. Many worry that he is being 
overwhelmed, although for the moment 
he does not seem worried at all. “It's 
nice that they've given me the oppor- 
tunity to have that opportunity,” Hen- 
man said of the chance to open Court 
No. I with his 7-6 (13-11), 6-1, 6-4, 
victory over Daniel Nestor of Canada. 
“No added pressure. At the end of the 
day, with the attention, with playing on 
Court 1, still you have to put all that 
aside and get on with the job in hand.” 

The new 1 1 ,000-seat court is meant to 
be a brighter, modernized but subser- 
vient version of Centre Court. It has a 


shopping mall underneath and a picnic 
area outside. The problem with bright- 
ness in England is that it lets the rain in. 
Most of those sitting around die new 
court Monday probably would have 
been willing to accept a little more pub- 
lic- bouse darkness in exchange for a 
little more roof. Currently, only the top 
few rows of seats are protected. 

The first applause in the new stadium 
was put forth, aptly, for the crew that 
came out to remove the tarp. A couple of 
red carpets were laid on the grassy sta- 
dium floor and a table was covered with 
a green cloth while the signs on the 
electronic scoreboards helped build on 
the sense of anticipation with slogans 
like, “Picnic hampers and other bulky 
packages may not be taken into the 
stands," and “Please do not use flash- 
light photography during play.” 

A man in a tie came out and began to 
set the table with 10 plates. For a mo- 
ment we thought we had been brought 
outside to watch the club members eat 


denying Ronaldo a hat-trick when he 
saved a second-half penalty. 

Mexico’s last two World Cup cam- 
paigns have ended with penalty shoot 
defeats against Germany in 1986 and 
Bulgaria in 1994. 

On both occasions, Mexico missed 
two penalties. But it won the shoot-out 
Sunday against Ecuador in 
Cochabamba, 4-3, after the match had 
finished 1-1. Mexico again missed two 
attempts, but goalkeeper Adolfo Rios 
saved three Ecuadoran efforts. 

Mexico travels to high-altitude La 
Paz to face Bolivia on Wednesday in the 
first semi-final. 

Ecuador made an early breakthrough 
when Lois Capuno, who later missed 
his attempt in the shoot-out, scored from 
the penalty spot. Cuauhtemoc Blanco 
equalized for Mexico 12 minutes later. 

Ronaldo’s killer instinct was the dif- 


lianfiy saved Ronaldo’s shot. fj 

Chilavert had two attempts to sco®# 
from free kicks but fired one effort in*, 
the defensive wall ami blasted his second ? 
in the direction of the Andean foothilBr*? 

Brazil will face Pern on Thursday iq** 
the other semi-final. “*** 

WORLD YOUTH CHAMWNSMH^ 

Kostas Salapasidis scored four goals?”* 
including a last-minute penalty 
day, as Australia beat foe champion^* 
Argentina, 4-3, in Kangar, Malaysia, hr' 1 
the Under-20 championships. The upsqt,.* 
lifted Australia to the top of Group E and 
left second-placed Argentina in the" 1 '; 
sanra half of the draw as Brazil. * * 
England won Group F by beating^ 
Mexico, 1-0. Mexico faces a tough pre^ 
quarter-final against France. Michaef,'* 


total 


in the 65th minute. 

England plays Argentina on Thors-.;* 
day, with the winner almost certain to * 
face favorite Brazil in the quarter-finals.'''* 
Brazil plays Belgium in its next match ’ 3 
Japan fought out a 3-3 draw vntBy* 
Paraguay to finish second, after Spain. ijt.'r 
Group D. Spain routed lowly Costa Rica^ 
4-0, to win all three group matches. . u f 
Australia suffered an early setback .“ 
when Bernardo Romeo put Argentina 
ahead, Salapasidis scored twice just bd-'* ' 
fore half-time and hit his third in the 5Wrv 
minute. Diego Placente narrowed theH 




: A 


Reigning Champ 
Beats Rain to Win 


ference between the teams. Paraguay set margin, and Roman Riquelme made it 3 - * 1 
up several chances but could not scare. 3 with a penalty two minutes from the^ 

T— 1*7*1. fkn **t/1 A umn in th#» sHitnci '**■ 


V 


B UT THE plates were silver, and 
there was one for each of the 
three-time (or more) champions 
who were introduced one by one. In- 
cluding Louise Brough, Rod Laver. 
Margaret Court (now The Reverend 
Margaret Smith), Billie Jean King, John 
Newcombe, Chris Evert, Martina Nav- 
ratilova, John McEnroe. Boris Becker 
and Pete Sampras. 

The loudest applause might have 
been for Sampras. He was also the least 
affected, marching his lap behind the 
others with his head down, more con- 
cerned about his immediate future than 
about the past 

Three British ladies champions were 
also introduced from their seats in the 
audience. Then, after all this, came the 
22 year old from Oxford, Henman, 
holder of one career tour title and re- 
cipient, more recently, of painful elbow 
surgery. Mainly because he is the hope 
— at this early stage in his career, a slim 
hope at that — of becoming the first 
British singles champion at Wimbledon 
in 61 years, he has been trying to shut his 
eyes to tire sight of his mirroring image 
on die covers of newspapers and 
magazines everywhere in Britain. Dur- 
ing the opening ceremony he was in a 
waiting room playing backgammon. 

“1 think it would give me a chance to 
be a tittle bit distracted,” Henman said 
of the praise. 


Reuters 

LONDON — Richard Krajicek 
dodged the showers to begin the 
defense of his Wimbledon title wife 
a straight-sets victory over German 
Marcello Craca on Monday. 

The rain meant that only a dozen 
matches were completed. Krajicek 
had just set foot on Centre Court 
when rain sent him back to the lock- 
er room. Another downpour inter- 
rupted die third set fra 75 minutes, 
but the Dutchman won 7-6 6-2 6-4 
after one hour 41 minutes of play. 

Second seed Goran Ivanisevic 
sped through his match on Court 
Two in 64 minutes, where play 
began earlier than on Centre Court, 
before the rain started. He beat a 
Romanian, Dinu Fescariu, ranked 
I06th in the world, 6-1 6-3 6-3. 

Iva Majoli, the French Open 
champion but a novice on grass, got 
her first victory ar Wimbledon. She 
beat Argentine Mariana Diaz Oliva, 
2-66-06-3. 


In the 17th minute, Ronaldo took the 
ball off an opponent, used his explosive 
acceleration to burst away and then fired 
a shot beyond the helpless Chilav ert. He 
scored from a similar position in the 
34th minute after Denilson slipped a 
clever pass between the Paraguayan de- 
fenders. Paraguay claimed Ronaldo was 
offside. 

In the second half, Brazil was award- 
ed a penalty when Chilavert fouled Ron- 
aldo. But the Paraguayan captain bril- 


end. Australia won a penalty in the dying 
seconds when Juan Serrizuela brought ^ 
down Salapasidis, who then scored. -Jl'-J 
The United Arab Emirates, whicnT^ 
had lost its first two games, 5-0. bear'*;; 
Ivory Coast, 2-0, to finish third in Group'" 
E and qualify as one of the four besf^f 
third-place teams. Canada beat Hun- 
gary, 2-1, to finish third in Group E and^’ 
advance. The results Monday meadrr 
that the United States, third in Group 
will face Uruguay. 2‘ 


Y*f * 





■r 


‘-'*■*-$-''41 


UMBd IL-rnUflrn-r Frjon- IV— s” ‘ 

Brazil’s Romano, left, Ronaldo, center, and Leonardo celebrating. 



;■***-• 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 


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SOCCER 


Hampton B. Wagner (91 and Aosmra. 16. Bernhard Langn Germany, 537 
W— Hampton. 3*. L-Fwtet *5. Sv-B. 17. tan Woasnara. Britain. 544 
Waaier n3). HR— Houston, Bapwefl (23). 18. Davis Low III 5.27 

Altouto 819 020 806-12 17 0 19. Vflny Singh FIX 5JJ3 

PtaMMpNa 120 030 tM-3 10 I 20. Tam Watson. US. 4.97 

GJAaddux. Byrd (61, Ctonlz OT aid 
Edd.Perr£ Stephenson. Nyv GDI Staler (43, 

RL Hards M), Games (63, Sprortftn (93 and 

ftuent W— G. Maddux 9-3. L— Stephenson - _ 

2-3. HRs— Atlanta Bin user (9). Tudw (53, 

Uton,lkM(n.nMfth 

JET 002 OH M0— 2 4 I Ai^Deivl^WmwnP. 

MM.'a'ftSiA H. Dragavoifac, Croaffa. ft Busfla. Fr 
Summn (5). Rem fcqa- (73. Gna. Austria 2. SBurbwp. Denmw*. 
Belinda (8) and Fordycs ALBenes, a whips 

Edmretey (93 and Dlfeftoe. tempWn (W. Arts, N. Iratond, a Royal Antwerp B 
W-A lBenes. 7-6. L-SuHvaa 1-2. ■ Lwsam» 4. Nea Satamtaa C 
S»— Eckersfey (14). anoupe 

PUtstmgk OOP 439 1« 8-9 13 9 MaocaN PdDlt TftWb tor. T, Cologne 

NawYmK 013 1IU 888 3—12 18 2 Standard Uega Betg.Q'Awau.SwH] 

nohMtags) anoups 

LoaUa. SBva te, Sodomhy (63. Baatdagld. Pane bland& a Genk, E 
Christtamen (6). LotenBe (®. Pe*5fs 001 and PanaehaH. Greece. l.Stabaek, Non 
Kendal; Udte. Acevedo (53. R. Jordan (7). groups 


anoupi 

Dh«mMv93 Minsk, BsLl. Heeremeen. NefluO 
AaEbon+ DeruZ Paienia Wanaw PoL 0 
onoupa 

H. Diagawoifoc, Craada. d Busfla. France. 1 
Gras, Austria 2, SSkebarg. DanunsS, 0 
anoups 

Arts. N. Ireland, a Royal Antwerp, Belff. 1 
Lausanna Srtta, 4, Nea Satamha Cyprus, 1 

GROUP 4 

MaccoW Petah Tttva fsr. r. Cologne. Ger.3 
Standard Llega Belg. a Aorau.Swto.0 


wn TOOK KAN KINOS ' < 

T. Martina Hingis. Swltzeriand. 5.169 paints^ „ • 
Z Stuff! Grot Germany. 3451 ,7 

Z Jana Novotna Czech RepahlicZlBI 

4. Maiden Seles. US. 1160 

5. No Matt* Craatta 1963 ■ 

6. AimdxaSoncha. SpainZ568 . p 

7. Amanda Coetzeo Soirth Africa 2L539 -iW. 

8. Undsoy Davenport U.5. 2437 -r 

9. Mary Pierce, France 2JS3 , 

10. Antes Huber, Germany Z25? ’ " u 

11. ConcMta Martinet Spain 1,999 ._ ^ 

1Z Irina Spirtoa Romania 1,806 ’ 

IZMmy Joe Fernandez. U^. 1.799 

14. Klaiburty Pa UA. 1^03 riu - 

15. Brenda Schultz, Nemertands, 1.554 

Wimbledon 


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S*— RaJAyws 05). HR— Baltimore, 

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2. L— A. Small 54 Sv— Perehml (8). CJarenatR 

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Sv — Beck CM). HRs— (.os Anode*. Gagne 
(53. San Frondsco, Bands (163. 


CRICKET 


GROUP T 

Un l w sflu tot Lot, 1, lstonbvtspar; Turkey, 5 
OitwVajdaSwedea 1, Vases, Hungary, 4 
GROUPS 

Konpsvinger, Nor v 1, Lommet, Bdglonv 1 
Ha|rtsk RotSc, Ydg* 0, Haimstod, Sweden. 1 
GROUPS 

ZBnrj, Skwakla, X Austria Vienna Austria 1 
Odm Wodzbtow, PoL, Z Rapid B, Rom. 4 
GR0UP19 

Ftafta Btelrtta Rom. 1, MontpelHer, Fr.2 
Gronfaigea Nettu 1, Cukortckt, Yug. 0 
GROUP « 

Prrt>«snv Stovenkv 1, Antotympo* Tsrir. 1 
Pretalec Yug. 4, MoccnU HaHO, Israel, 0 
group rz 

MemnL Georg- 0, Torpedo Moscow, Rus. 2 
RJett, Austria, 1 Hemtas SatanOra Gr- 1 


Sptrtea (l23.Rom.def. Nagyiiva,SML6-t.6jlr.T 
NUAatoevtv Balg- def. Pull in, Brit. 6-1. 6-3. ■ . 1* * ■ 
Torrens- Voter*, sp. net. PtzrkWnJ. It. 14, 6-3. 

Garda. Sp. det Enda, Japan, 6-1 6-3. , 

CWadkova Czech, def. KKSnova, Czedi 74 ! 

(7-53,64. . '.-5 

Ma|oa (4J, CIO. def. atom. Arg. 24» 641 (W. -J*! 
Davenport (5). U5. det Jones, U.S. 5-7, 6-1 j* 
6-Z 4 

MUM'S SHMUS »'1n •! 

tonetevfeca. Cm. daf. Pesoariu, ROm.6-1.6^'4 

3.6- 3. 4C*' 

RWiartson, BtU. def. Damn. Sp. 74 (7-5), i 

3.6- 3, N 

Steven, N 2. del. Roux, Fr. 6-1 6-Z 74 (7-01: I 
Pmta. Rom. tW.DewuK.Be9g.6-l.44k 74,6- 3 

Z6-3. 

Maya DO), Sp. def. Biyarv U J. 74 17-H. 6-1 ,i| 
44, 6Z 

Henmon 043, Brit, det Nestor. Con. 74 CIX? ^ 
m 6-1. 64. .»-S< 

Krajicek (4), Nelh. det. Craca Ger. 74 (7-5^ 

6-Z 64. ,.g 




} -f*' 



TRANSITIONS 



21® TEST, STH DAT 
BIGLAND V8. AUSTRALIA 
MONDAY. M LONDON 
England: 77 and 266 tor tour 
Aestrafix 213-7 declared. 

Test ends In draw. 

England toads (-0 fei the 64esl series. 
SM LANKA TOm 
2WD TEST, (TH DAY AT LUNCH 

wear mo ws. sre lanka 

MONDAY. H KMGSTOWN. 8T. VWCOfT 

West Indies: 147and226G 
Sri LankzeZEL 


Afltmlas Q, Panays 3 
Zalglris-Vbliiieto 1, Kareda 1 
Interns ZZalgkfel 

TAM DS t ot; Kareda 64 paintu ZaigMs 
S6i Interns 5S FBC Kaunas 41; Etaonas 34; 
Ponerys26: Altarrtos IBjZolplris-Votmeta 16 


New England 3 Date Z SO, 2-1, 
stam obiqs. Eestore Owtonwce: D C 
29 points New England 22 Tampa Bay 19; 
Ctriumbus T7; NY-NJ Western Coator- 
e«e: Kansas Oty 23 points Cdarado 22; 
DaSasIftSanJose 11s Las Angeles la 

Com America 


FOOTBALL 


World League 


8UNOAY, M BARCELOMA 
Barcelona 3& Rhein 24 


Buick Classic 


aiMRmmALs 

SIMMY H COCHABUBA, BOLMA 
Mmdcal. Ecuador I 
Mabcn won 44 on penalties 
, Extra Am to not played to Capa America. 

auwuar, MSAHTA CRUZ BOLIVIA 
BmdlZ Paraguay 0 

SBBFMALS 

Wednesday in La Phe Boftria vsMexks 
Thtnsday In Sonia Crut: Braza vs Pen 

African Nationscijp 


Flnsi ecaea Swstoy In ¥1-5 aflHon PQA 
Buick Classic, ptajwt an 6,722 d yard (6,144- 
mrear). par-73 W e s t cl r wiat Country Chta in 
Hamoon. N.Y. (U& iMess srarad}; 


CksenceRase 
SwwartOnk 
BmdFabel 
Pata Jerri hi 


64484749-268 
67494648-270 
674849-70-274 
71464849-274 
69-70-7146-275 
7147*7148—277 
6949-7049-277 
734866-70-277 
6947-7468— 278 
696869-72— 278 


GROUP 2 

Mafi 1 Benin 1 
I ray Coast Z Algeria 1 
STAmmas! Mall 9 points; hnry Coast 9? 
Algeria -V Benin 1 . 

GROUP 3 

Senegal lEthtoptoO 

■ iiimHoac Morocco 8 points Senegal 
8; Egypt 3r Ethtopta l. 

GROUPS 

Cameroon Z Gabon 2 
vrAMBMra* Homtbta 7 points 
Cameroon & Kenya A- Gabon 3. 


TENNIS 


gl-pnd.-WL. Hubbont ISu, 


I.EmtoEb, Smith AftfcnPJSpdnb 
Z Tiger Woods U2. 948 
Z Colin Martganerfe, Brttnm, 941 
A Greg Namun, Austmaa, 9J1 

5. Kick Price, Zimbabwe, 9M 

6. Tam Lehman UA 896 

7. Sieve EBdngton, AustraEte Z74 
X Mlasahto QmU- Japan, &11 

9. NlartrO'Mem,U^.7^3 

10. Nlelt Ftdda Britain, 7,07 
n.PMMk3ceton,Ui7J6 
1Z Brad Fnnv UJ5, 6A£ 

Scott Hodr.UX.64i 
14. Fred Couples, Ui. 6J9 


amavlta Sweden 547 




JOT RANK] HO* 

«■ Pete Sara pro*. US. 4,742 points 
ZMichrte Chang, UA, 1768 
1 Goran Ivanisevic. Croatia Z861 
4 Thomas Master, Austria Z724 

5. Rkfiart Krepoata Netheriondta 2448 

6. Yevgeny Kofetaikwr, Russia Z34S 

7. Aker Correfla Spain. Z206 
rt, Seigl Bruguera, Spabv 1176 

9. Thomas EnqvttL Sweden, Z148 

10. Maraelo RtoaOdla Z092 

11. COrin Moya Spam. Z085 
1Z Gustavo Kuerten, Brazil 1.851 

1Z Mark PMHppous3iA Antrate, 1^45 

14. Albert Casta Spain, L820 

15. Feta Martflla Sputa 1,724 


AM6RICAN LEAGUE „ 

Chicago— A ctwoterl IB Frank Thwno^a. • 
ftom 15-day rBsabled ftst. Optioned OF J 

Abbottto NashvMa AA. N _ 

CLEVEuuiU— Recofled LHP Jason Jo- -T"" 
come bom BuflrtaiLOpitonedOFTrenMigrKS ' 

Kabbant to Buffalo 

Dcnrarr-Destarated OF Joe HeB tor o^Yj ft, 
slgnmenl Announced LHP John Cummk) 9 *~^*T , 
has doored wahrere and has been assigned . '* 

Totoda IL. > 

KANSAS CtTY-Put LHP Qendon Rate an-T*' - - 
154ay rtaaHBd Dst rohoaefive to June ijfeKi \ 
Recoiled OF Jon Nunnofty Irom Omatia AAr-, — 

M tLKA 11 kee— S igned OF Frank Candela ? v 
OF Lnrry Jacobsen RHP Andrew Cg-^- ^ 

vanasglL RHP Qtamcey Jones and CJartd-— • _ 
Maffds and assigned Mm to Ogdon PL. ,*fyi \ 
oaklahd— R eleased RHP Rlddo Lewto.- ■*“ * 

TEXAS— Signed RHP David Elder. J 

MTIONAL LEAGUE ^ 

emCAGO-Recfl8cdlNFMlguelCnirafiwa.lt 
town, aa, Irt-.' ' I 

cwaRNATl-Reafted INF Aaron Boone • | 

from Indtonapeb AA. _JL.< v. 

FLORIDA— Pul OF CWf Floyd ori 15-day ^ 

attedltoLReoaeilOf BlflyMcMiBonondOPJoi . 

Tadd Dumwody from Charfotto. ft- - — 

HWBTOrt-Put RHP Rura Springer w 15- ' 
day rthabtodSst Recoded RHP John Hndtit-'—V^ * 
from New Orleans, AA. .- 

i« AMOELGt-Sisned C WH1 McCmtty onrT 
arolgned him to Yakima NL *>.. 

MOrTREAL— AcftvofrdlBDoYidSegiilcita 
OF Vlwflralr Guerrero from I54ay rasrfrted 
8W. Prt 38 D«ro stronger 15-rtoyftatlte 

list, refroadive to June 17. . 

Philadelphia— M amed Dave AAontgo- 
m«y managing partiw. presWert and chid 
Otec u rive o ffi cer and Bid Gtecholrmcin. Ac-* 
ffvutird RHP Garrett Stephenson from lSdoyJ 
rffsatfled BstOpBoned LHP Erik Ptedentwf^i 
to Scranton! 1— « > *i ^ 

PrnssuRCB— Recalled OF Jermaine AH * 

ienswntfa from Calgay. PCL Opftoned OP \ 

Adrian Brown to Catgary. 1 

POOTBAU. 

IUOWHAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE i 

atlakta — S igned DE Anthony PleasonP 
and C Colvin Colflns, Chrimed DE JotonSim-^ 
rnons of) wolven. 1 


.i I J 








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MAnONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE * 

hew j BUSBY— Traded tarn 1997 3rt-rowio 
draff ptata to Ottawa Ittr 1997 2nrHound draft 
Pk*. 






















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY JUNE 24, 1997 


SPORTS 


PAGE 19 


Olympic Thrills 
And Wild Parties: 
Ifs the X Games 


By Samantha Stevenson 

New York Times Service 

S AN DIEGO — Bine 
skies, sparkling water 
and 30,000 wild and 
crazy fans formed the 
oacxnrop of a production 
here that Is on the verge of 
becoming this generation’s 
Olyiqpics. It is called the X 
Games, a three-year-old in- 
vention of ESPN, the U.S. 
cable t TV sports network, for 
those twentysorae things 
known as Generation X. 

“We are already bigger 
than' 'most athletes in the 
Olympics,” said Tony 
Hawk, a 29-year-old skate- 
boards- and owner of Bird- 
house, a skateboard company 
in Huntington Beach, Cali- 
fornia, “We already have the 
integrity.” 

The only difference is the 
regimen, said Andy Macdon- 
ald, Hawk's partner in a 
doubles skateboarding com- 


‘ ‘Olympic athletes have 
six dhys on and one day off,” 
said Macdonald, 23. “They 
swim and run and lift weights 
or whatever. We ride with oar 
frienjis and have a good time, 
ft has! never been a sport to 
have a coach and a trainer.” 
/• A], small percentage of 
tnese , alternative athletes 
make more money than most 
Olympians — as eatrepre- 
neurs. Hawk’s company is 
leading the industry- that 
caters to the 9 million Amer- 
icana’ who buy skateboards 
and idie clothing that goes 
with the sport, such as baggy 
shorts, jeans, T-shirts and 
hats. ’ 

For others, such as Mac- 
donald, the life is a simple 
onerjjving close to the beach, 
bat with enough money from 
spocySbrs to get by. Many of - 
the 450 athletes competing in 
27 dfspiplines in 1 1 sport cat- 
egories at die X Games are 
carpenters, teachers, writers, 
i odels, bartenders and doc- 
tors.’.' 

For many, their sports are 
as serious as they want them 
to bet 

“If it became an Olympic 
sport, I wouldn’t compete,’’ 
said Ghris Edwards, 23,an in- 
line Skater who finished third 
in die men’s aggressive vat, 
a competition in which 
skaters perform their best 
routines inside a large half- 
pipe. 

“I’d just ride, even if there 
was a mess load of money,” 
he added. 

“My generation used tn 
love team sports,” said Ed- 
wards, who owns a skating 
clothing and equipment com- 
pany in Minneapolis. “But 
now it's about bikes and in- 
line s kating and rolling and 
going fast Team sports are a 
thing of the past Baseball is 
at an all-time low, and people 
don’t .care. We’re growing, 


and they are de clining. ” 

The animated ana enthu- 
siastic crowds that have come 
to this beach area called Mar- 
iner’s Point for free seem to 
back up Edwards's claim. 

The organizers of the X 
Games say the games attract 
more men from 1 2 to 34 years 
old than any other sporting 
event on television. 

Indeed, on a Saturday, it 
was mostly hip and shirtless 
men who took in the live ac- 
tion on £iant television 
screens while the mus ic of 
Sublime and Ska blasted 
through loudspeakers and 
sponsor booths did swift 
business — even the Maxine 
Corps showed up. 

Teenage girls in braces 
giggled and asked skaters for 
autographs. 

Young women with tattoos 
and bikini tops maneuvered 
past security guards to be up 
close and personal with the 
new stars. 

“It’s a male-dominated 
sport,” said Mary Nelson, a 
26-year-old college graduate 
who has been competing in 
the women's street skating 
event for two years. “We 
have an older female com- 
petitor who wears a G-string 
under her baggy shorts so that 
when she does her fires the 
judges see the string. It’s fe- 
male sexual objectifica- 
tion.” 

S EVENTY-NINE of 
the X Games athletes 
are women. One of 
those is 14-year-old 
Katie Brown, from Jackson- 
ville, Florida, the only Amer- 
ican who competed in the 
women’s in-line vert compe- 
tition. She came in last. 

Brown, who has already 
had surgery for a torn anterior 
cruciate ligament and ripped 
cartilage, is closely guarded 
by her brother and manager, 
22-y ear-old Bean Brown. 
She will skate in her stronger 
division, street skate, on 
Wednesday. 

“It’s getting better for the 
women,’ 1 Beau Brown said. 
“The level of competition 
has stepped up. The women 
are gaining. respect from the 
men. Not equals yet, but get- 
ting respect from the guys. 
The gins- stick" together. It’s 
pretty healthy out here. And, 
sure, there are some wild 
parties.” 

Wild seems to be the op- 
erative ward for these South- 
ern California X Games, 
which continue through Sat- 
urday. 

Whether the extreme edge 
of these athletes, with names 
such as Beauty, Rat, Pistol 
Pipe, the Glide and Jedi 
Knight, will ever make it past 
the opening ceremony of the 
Olympics is anyone’s guess. 

' ‘Like, it’s so big, it should 
be Olympian,” Katie Brown 
said. 




I • • — .v. .. ' V : ^ -> • - *• 


I.M. UhWIto tMMUnl Item 

Mariners’ catcher Dan Wilson and Texas Rangers’ Will Clark colliding at home as Clark scored. Seattle won. 

Braves’ Victory Soured by Injury 

Chipper Jones Limps Off' During Rout of Phillies 


The Associated Press 

What looked like an easy afternoon in 
Philadelphia was almost wrecked for the 
Atlanta Braves when Chipper Jones col- 
lided with first baseman Mike Mordecai 
on a routine popup by Rico Brogna in the 
eighth inning. 

Jones fell writhing to the ground and 
had to be helped off the field with a sore 
left knee, the same one that was injured 
and cost him the entire 1994 season. This 
time, die prognosis was a lot better for 
the All-Star third baseman. 

“I think it’s just a strain,” said Jones, 
who ran into Mordecai 's right knee. 
“The pain has subsided a lot since I 
came off the field. We’ll just have to re- 
evaluate in the morning. We ’ll ice it and 
I’ll stay off of it" 

Earlier Sunday, Jones had hit one of 
Atlanta’s four homers in anine-run third 
inning. He had four hits as the Braves 
sent the Phillies to their eighth straight 
loss, 12-5. 

The Braves tied a franchise record by 
hitting four home runs in an inning. Jeff 
Blauser led off with a homer, Jones and 
Fred McGriff hit consecutive shots, and 
Michael Tucker connected later. 

Greg Maddux (9-3) helped himself 
with a two-run double. 

j-ttiaphaiwfl In New Ypric, John 
Franco blew a save chance in the ninth 
inning for the second time in four days 
against Pittsburgh. He responded by 
tossing his glove, hat and a water cooler, 
but Carl Everett hit a three-tun homer in 
the bottom of the 10th to win the game 
for the Mets. 

“Plain and simple. 1 stunk,” Franco 
said. “I’m frustrated at myself. I didn’t 
get the out when I needed to." 

Pittsburgh tied die game at 9 on Joe 
Randa’s two-out, two-run double in the 
ninth off Franco. 

On Thursday night. Franco allowed a 

r " g, three-run homer to Dale Sveum of 
Pirates with two outs in the ninth, a 
game die Mets wound up winning, 7-6. 
On Wednesday, Franco gave up Tino 
Martinez’s game-winning single in the 
10th at Yankee Stadium. 

Giants 4, Dodgers 2 In San Francisco, 


Barry Bonds hit his 16th homer and Kirk 
Rneter pitched seven strong innings as 
the Giants beat Los Angeles. 

The Giants scored two in the seventh to 
break a 2-2 tie. With runners at first and 
third with one out, first baseman Eric 
Kanos bobbled a grounder by pinch-hit- 
ter Mark Lewis to allow a ran to score. It 
was Karros’s second error of the game. 

Padm4, RodriM 2 Tony Gwynn hit a 
three-run double in the eighth inning, 
rallying San Diego past the visiting 
Rockies. 

Colorado rookie John Thomson 
blanked the Padres on three hits for 
seven innings . But be left after a single 
and a walk in the eighth, and reliever 
Bruce Ruffin walked Chris Gomez to 
load die bases with one out 

Gwynn followed with a one-hopper 
off the fence in left-center for a 3-2 lea <L 
He went 2-for-4, raising his average to 
393. 

Cardinal* 5, R*«fs 2 Dennis Eckersley 
tied Jeff Reardon for second place on the 
career saves list with 367, preserving the 
Cardinals’ victory over Cincinnati m St 
Louis. 

Eckersley pitched the ninth for his 
14th save of the season. He trails only 
Montreal’s Lee Smith, who has 475 
overall. _ , 

Astros 3, Cub* 1 Mike Hampton, 0-3 
with a 6.S2 earned run average in his 
previous seven starts, shut out Chicago 
on four singles for eight innings at foe 
Astrodome. Hampton (3-6) left after a 
leadoff double in the ninth by Ryne 
Sandbag, and Billy Wagner dosed for 
his 13th save. 

Marini* 2, Expos o Ed g ar Renteria 
broke a scoreless tie with a two-out 
single in foe ninth inning, and Florida 
won at Olympic Stadium. 

Rookie Toad Dunwoody doubled to 
start foe ninth and the Marlins loaded foe 
bases with one out Bobby Bonilla 
popped out, but Renteria singled. An- 
other run scored when a throw by right 
fielder Vladimir Guerrero sailed to foe 
backstop. 

Whfta Sox 2, iwm* i In Chicago, 
Jaime Navarro (5-6) held down Mm- 


Quarterback Stars 
As Barcelona 
Wins World Bowl 


nesota for eight innings, and Ray 
Durham drove in both runs for the White 
Sox with a pair of sacrifice fries. 

Bank Thomas, sidelined since June 7 
because of a strained stomach muscle, 
was activated before foe game. He went 
0-for-4 for foe game and is batting 3S3. 

Royals B, Bwwars 5 Chili Davis hit a 
foree-mn homer in foe eighth inning as 
Kansas City won in Milwaukee. 

Milwaukee had taken a 4-3 lead in foe 
seventh with three runs on five con- 
secutive singles. 

Angels 7, Athletics 8 In Anaheim, 
Troy Percival retired Jose Canseco on a 
fly to deep left with the bases loaded in 
foe ninth as the Angels completed a four- 
game sweep. 

H aiiiBi'i 8. Rangor* 4 Seattle scored 
three runs in foe second after a critical 
error by Benji Gil, and Jay Buhner and 
Ken Griffey Jr. hit homers as the Mariners 
completed a four-game sweep in Texas. 

In games reported in the late edition 
Monday: 

R*d Sox 2, Tigor* i In a frustrating 
season filled with acrimony, injury and 
losses. Boston finally enjoyed a mem- 
orable moment in its victory ova vis- 
iting Detroit. 

With two oats jp foe ninth innings . 
Boston left fielder Witfrcdo Cordero, 
shortstop Nomar Garciaparra and catch- 
er Scott Hatteberg executed a perfect 
relay play to get Brian Johnson at foe 
plate for foe final out. 

Johnson was running on a 3-2 pilch 
when Jody Reed doubled into the left- 
field comer. Cordero played a hard 
carom off the wall perfectly and threw to 
Garciaparra in short left Garciaparra’s 
throw was in plenty of time for Hat- 
teberg to tag out Johnson. 

Indiana 5, Yankees 2 In Cleveland, 
Sandy Alomar hit a three-run home run, 
and Brian Anderson pitched seven ef- 
fective innings for the Indians, who won 
foe final two games of the series. 

Oriohre 5. Blue Jay* 2 In TOTOQtO, Cal 
Ripken hit foe 500th and 501st doubles 
of his career and drove in two runs for 
Baltimore. 


By Mike Carlson 

InurniaionalHtraldTnt^mt 

If uncovering star quarter- 
backs is foe key to the World 
League, of American Foot- 
ball’s success, then Jon Kitna 
has given .the league another 
reason to carry on. 

In front of 31,000 fans at 
Barcelona’s Montjuic Stadi- 
um, Kitna threw for 401yards 
and two touchdowns Sunday 
to pace foe Barcelona Dragons 
to a 38-24 victory over the 
Rhein Fire in World Bowl V. 

- Detroit’s Scott Mitchell 
(who played for the World 
League's Orlando Thunder ) 
and Minnesota’s Brad John- 
son (ex-London Monarchs) 
are the most visible stare pro- 
duced by the NFL’s devel- 
opment league, which is run as 
a joint venture with Fox TV. 

Kitna, allocated to foe 
league by foe Seattle Sea- 
hawks, threw fra 1 scores of 66 
yards to Mexican receiver 
Marco Marios and 40 yards to 
Alfonso Browning and was 
voted foe game’s most valu- 
able player. Marcos, who 
entered foe end zone back- 
wards in a taunting move 
worthy of Deion Sanders, be- 
came the first non-American 
to score a touchdown in a 
World Bowl. 

Tbs Dragons had many 


ficial WLAF all-star team, in- 
cluding safety Carlos Brooks, 
who intercepted Rhein’s TJ 


Rubley and returned it 18 
yards for a first-quarter score. 

Four of Rbein's offensive 
line were all-stars, haring al- 
lowed only one sack all sea- 
son, but Barcelona's line gave 
Kitna timeto pick Rhein apart. 


Although Barcelona sacked 
Rnbtev only once, it pressured 
him throughout, forcing him 
into subpar 1 1 for 30 throw- 
ing, with two interceptions. 

If offensive linemen like 
Barcelona's Everett Lindsay 
(who is signed to foe Min- 
nesota Vikings) or Rhein’s 
FThan Brooks (Falcons) also 
have success in foe NFL, it 
will help the league improve 
the quality of players alloc- 
ated by NFL teams. 

“Some teams use this 
league to prove to themselves 
that guys can’t play,” said 
one coach. 

Jason Simmons, foe defen- 
sive end allocated to Scotland 
by the St Louis Rams is a 
case in point He was voted to 
the all-league team, and se- 
lected by foe coaches as foe 
league’s defensive MVP. Yet 
the Rams waived him last 
week, although he was then 
picked up by the Falcons. 

The league had debated tak- 
ing the game away from Bar- 
celona. It was wearied about 
rfgctining attendances and a 
clash with the final day of the 
Spanish soccer league. But 
after Real Madrid clinched the 
title a week earlier, leaving 
second-place Barcelona with a 
meaningless final game, those 
worries were unfounded. But 
the question remains whether 
tiie 20,000 or so extra sup- 
porters who turned out for foe 
final will return to see the 
Dragons next season. 

“We will take things one 
step at a time,” said one team 
omciaL “This is the greatest 
day in oar history, and for 
now, we want to enjoy it.” 

Mike Carlson is the studio 
analyst on World League 
Football for SkyTV. 


Cable Firms Team Up 
For Sports Network 

The Associated Press 

Rupert Murdoch, Tele-Communications Inc. and 
Cablevision Systems are teaming up to form a new U.S. 
sports network. 

The three companies announced Monday that Fox/ 
Liberty Networks, a joint venture of TCI aim Mr; Mur- 
doch's News Corp., would boy 40 percent of Cable- 
vision’s sports assets for $850 million. 

These assets include foe New York Knicks and 
Rangers and Madison Square Gardens as well as eight 
regional sports channels. 

Those will be combined with nine Fox/Liberty regional 
sports channels and regional spots systems affiliated 
with Fox. Together, they will be used to assemble a 
national network. 

The partners will compete with ESPN, which currently 
dominates sports on foe cable. 

Fox Sports Net, as the network will be called, will reach 
55 million North American homes. 

ft will allow both partners to negotiate for national 
sports programming and national advertising dollars. 

The network initially will have 24 major-league base- 
ball teams, 22 National Basketball Association teams, 16 
National Hockey League teams and college and local 
teams. i 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 






UlE SHOULD CALL CUUC&AND 
m HIM WE WERE SITTING 
| BY THE CAMPFIRE, AND WE 
WERE THINKING OF HIM.. 


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THINK1N6 OF I WERENT?, 
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HEY, CHUCK. .MARGE AND I 
WERE SrmNS BY THE . 
CAMPFIRE, BUT WE WERENT 
THINK1N6 OF YOU.. 




CALVIN AND HOBBES 

WAKE A XiSf MKT VmJ 30 WE. CM* 
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Setting the Date 


The Real ‘Ulysses’? Yes, He Said It Was, Yes 


W ASHINGTON 
Single mothc, 


Single mothers have 
problems eettinp mar- 


more problems getting mar- 
ried than other people. I dis- 
covered this when I was wit- 
ness to a pro- 
posal of a friend 
of mine named 
Jim, who said 
on bended knee 
to a friend of 
mine named 
Bonnie, ‘‘Will 
you many 
me?” 

Bonnie was 
taken by surprise. “When?" 

Jim said, “It doesn’t matter 
— it could even be at your 
convenience.” 


Such wa Id 


you happy and convince you 
that all men are not rotten.” 

“It sounds like bliss, but it 
will have to wait until Kathy 
is fitted with all her braces. 
She hates dentists.” 

Jim said, “I love children. 
I’ll take good care of them. 1 ’ 

“Nick does not like men 
touching me.” 

“Even after we’re mar- 
ried?” 

Bonnie said, “We could do 
it when the kids go to the 
movies. That way it won’t 
cause trauma." 


By Sarah Lyall 

Nrw York Times Serrice 


L ONDON — Even James Joyce 
didn’t always know the nrerise 


Bonnie, a single mother 
who has two children, said, 
“Well, I can't do it this week 
because I promised Nick's 
class I would drive them in a 
van to New Jersey.” 

Jim said, “But I love you 
very much. And want to live 
with you the rest of my life.” 
“And,” said Bonnie, “I want 
to live with you the rest of my 
life except for next weekend 
when I am taking all the kids 
to see ‘The King and I.' ” 
Jim was desperate. “Let 
me take care of you and make 


“Are you sure you want to 
many me, Bonnie?” 

“Of course. I’m sure, but 
let's not make any plans in 
July- when 1 have to go visit 
my mother in Nantucket." 

Jim got off his knees. 
“Maybe we should think it 
over.” 

“There is nothing to think 
over. You love me and I love 
you, and we could get married 
in September before school 
starts and I don't have to car 
pool.” 

“Will we bave time for a 
honeymoon?” 

“We'd have a week if I can 
get my sister to take care of 
our cat.” 


Lagerfeld Faces $3 Million Tax Bill 


N ICE — An administrative court here has slapped a huge 
tax bill on fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld, concluding he 


1 y tax bill on fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld, concluding he 
evaded taxes during 1982-84, justice sources said on Mon- 
day. 

They said the court, in a nonpublic judgment, ordered 
Lagerfeld to pay 18 million francs (about $3. 1 million) in back 
taxes after rejecting his argument that he was a resident of 
Monaco, whose residents are exempt from income tax. La- 
gerfeld said he would appeal. 

Lagerfeld, chief designer for French fashion house ChaneL, 
Italian firm Fendi and his own signature line, is one of the 
world's best-known fashion names. 

The ruling covers taxes due plus penalties for late payment, 
but does not include penalties for ted faith, the sources said. 


J-f didn’t always know the precise 
words he intended to use in 
“Ulysses,” his masterpiece and a 
book that was as chall enging in the 
writing as it is in the reading. 

The first edition of “Ulysses," 
published in 1922, was cobbled to- 
gether from original drafts, ad- 
dendums, piecemeal revisions and 
semi-legible scribbled notes. It was 
printed by a French company in 
Dijon whose employees did not 
speak English. 

“I am extremely irritated by all 
those printer’s errors,” Joyce 
wrote to his patron, Harriet 
Weaver. "Working as I do amid 
piles of notes at a table in an hotel I 
cannot possibly do this mechanical 
part with my wretched eye and a 
half." 

Joyce, who was suffering from 
glaucoma, never did do the ’ 'mech- 
anical part,” having to move on 
quickly to bis next project and his 
next meager paycheck. The result 
was that “Ulysses,” the story of a 
day in the lives of those two Dublin 
residents, Leopold Bloom and 
Stephen Dedal us, written in rad- 
ically different styles and designed 
to echo Homer's epic, was never 
thoroughly edited to conform to its 
author's intentions — whatever 
those may have been. 

The lack of a definitive version 
has consumed Joyce scholars and 
fanatics for the last seven and a half 
decades. And now, coinciding with 
the 73th anniversary of the book’s 
publication, comes a new edition, 
edited and substantially tinkered 
with by Danis Rose, a Joyce schol- 
ar in Dublin. The new “Ulysses” is 
intended. Rose says, to do nothing 
less than change the way people 
approach Joyce’s formidable nov- 
el. 

Rose's edition was published on 
Bloomsday. June 16, the day in 
1904 when the book takes place. 
But the sharks — in the form of 
Joyce scholars, critics and the James 
Joyce estate itself — were already 


circling. The author’s estate, led by 
his grandson, Stephen James Joyce, 
tried to stem the book's publication 
on copyright grounds. 

“Danis Rose decrees, by fiat, the 
reign of an editorial theory which 
violates every principle and pro- 
cedure of critical editing, replacing 
it with nothing more than ’making 
sense’ as construed, tautologically, 
by Danis Rose,” wrote Lawrence 
Rainey, an associate professor of 
English at Yale University, in The 
London Review of Books. "His 
edition, if it can be called that, is a 
chastening example of how an ex- 
cess of piety can imperceptibly nun 
into seu-aggrandizmg fantasy.” 

And John Kidd, director of the 
James Joyce Research Center at 
Boston University, said that Rose 
was “way out of the bounds of 
serious editing.” 

“No responsible editor has ever 
undertaken the scale of mutilation 
that Danis Rose has perpetrated on 
this text,” said Kidd, who has made 
something of a career out of at- 
tacking new versions of "Ulys- 
ses.” (He is at work era his own 
version.) 

What has Rose done to deserve 
those remarks? For one thing he has 
made, he reckons, between 8,000 
and 10,000 changes in the book’s 
230,000 words. These include al- 
tering spellings so they are accurate 
and consistent; changing punctu- 
ation by, for example, adding apo- 





James Joyce in 1928: He never corrected original printing. 


strophes to Molly Bloom's previ- 
ous I v unD uncreated soliloquy; 


ously un punctuated soliloquy; 
breaking up compound words so 
that, for instance, “lookingglass” 
becomes “looking glass" and al- 
tering the order of words for better 
logical sense. 

In a work characterized by idio- 
syncratic punctuation (or none at 
all), creative spelling and sentences 
that often do not conform to normal 
standards of sentence structure, 
Rose says, such changes are nec- 
essary for an ordinary reader to 
understand the text “I wanted 
people to be able to re-examine the 
text and to experience the delight 
that Joyce experienced, which has 
been donded by errors and by the 


heavy-handed manner in which the 
text was presented to us,” said 
Rose, who is 46 and has been work- 
ing on Joyce texts for 20 years. “I 
have produced a text that," from an 
academic point of view, is c loser to 


Joyce's meaning than anything else 
that has come before. If you think 


that has come before. If you think 
of ‘Ulysses 1 as Joyce’s mansion 
and each of the rooms as each of the 
episodes, I went in and opened the 
windows, let in the light and air, 
cleaned out the cobwebs so we 
could view with awe and admir- 
ation the beauty of the architecture 
and the exquisite craftsmanship of 
the furniture.” 

Rose said he had identified a 
□umber of errors that had crept into 


the text when Joyce sloppily mis- 
transcribed his own work. "In the 
process,” Rose said, “he darkened 
the meaning which existed in the 
text at the time he wrote it and 
which can be fixed by careful 
scholarly analysis of documents.” 

If Rose knew that his work was 
opening a huge can of worms, so 
did Jon Riley, the publisher of Pic- 
ador in London, which has just 
brought out the new edition. “Mr. 
Rose is highly respected in the 
Joyce world, but it’s the most frac- 
tions and controversy-laden group 
of practically any area of literary 
study,” Riley said. (Indeed, it is a 
world whose inhabitants are con- 
sumed with things like the issue of 


whether Joyce ever used a semi- 
colon after 1919.) 

Rose's edition is the first to come 
out since 1984, when a team of 
Goman scholars led by Professor 
Haas Walter Gabler of the Uai. 
varsity of Munich brought out a 
hefty critical edition. For several 
years, the new edition — which 
Gabler claimed corrected some 
5.000 omissions, transpositions 
and other errors — became the 
definitive “Ulysses.” 

But in 1988, in large pun due to 
the efforts of Kidd, who published 
an 8,000-word condemnation in The 
New York Review of Books, the 
Gabler edition was itself found to 
contain a large number of mistakes, 
severely discrediting both Gabler 
and his research methods. Fritz 
Senn, director of the Zurich James 
Joyce Foundation, said tear in trying 
to make the text dearer, Rose may 
have subverted the very elements 
that brought genius to “Ulysses.” 

"This is not my ‘Ulysses.* " he 
said. “I've always enjoyed the pas- 
sages where you couldn’t tell what 
the author meant and there were 
ambiguities and you had to back- 
track in your reading. I think this 
son of tentative reading is not char- 
acteristic of just ‘Ulysses.’ but also 
of an in the 20th century. 

“Also, Joyce did take tremen- 
dous care with some details, but if 
he didn’t take care enough with 
others, is it someone else's task to 
change him into a different kind of 
writer than he is? Why should you 
change an author when he’s not 
infallible? ‘Ulysses' is about a de- 
ficient, fallible world." 

But, said Rose. Joyce wanted 
precision, not obfuscation. 

“Nowhere in ‘Ulysses’ did; 
Joyce seek anything but clarity,” 
he said. “Joyce wanted a person, 
on the closest possible reading of 
‘Ulysses,’ not to be tripped up. He 
wanted them to be able to take a 
microscope to his text and see 
definition.” 

What is next for Rose? “I’m 
going to proceed with my new edi- 
tion of ‘Finnegans Wake,*" he 
said 


PEOPLE 


A FTER a scolding in the tabloid press. Princess 
Diana apologized Monday for taking her sons 


Diana apologized Monday for taking her sons 
to * ‘The Devil’s Own,” a movie about the IRA. The 
princess, who reportedly persuaded the theater staff 
to let the underage Prince Harry, 1 2, see the movie, 
said she had been unaware the film was about the 
Irish Republican Array. Harry and his brother. 
William, who turned 15 on Saturday, went to see 
the movie Sunday with their mother at a theater near 
their Kensington Palace home. The film, starring 
Harrison Ford and Brad Pitt, is licensed for 
audiences 15 and over. A statement from Diana’s 
office said, "She apologizes for any distress which 
may have been caused by her taking her sons to see 
this film." The Odeon movie theaters said there 
would be an internal investigation into the matter. 
Mary Weale, head of the local licensing committee 
said, “We are going to investigate this incident. I 
take a dim view of anyone using their influence, or 
being influenced, to allow a child to see an un- 
suitable film in this borough." 


pressed hopes that the writer persecuted under com- 
munism would be buried in nis native city. But his 
remains were transferred from the United States to 
Italy last weekend and he is to be buried in the wind- 
swept San Michele in Isola cemetery in Venice, a city 
of which he once wrote: "I will never possess this 
city but I don’t mind because it possesses me." 


getting ready to take a piece of the action on the 
Janis Joplin story. (Paramount favors Melissa Eth- 
eridge; Tristar is looking at a lip-synching Lili 
Taylor.) Why all the flashbacks? “Hollywood is 
absolutely ravenous for stories from real life,” the 
producer Michael Cieply said “When you talk 
about music stars of the ’60s, you’re talking about 
some amazing stories.” 


Lena Horne says she has no problem turning SO. 
“I’m taking it with a grain of salt,” the singer said 
of her June 30 birthday milestone. "I think you just 
have to look in the mirror and say, ’Look, this 
morning i got a few more wrinkles and there ain't 
too much I can do about that’ ” She is to be 
honored at a Lincoln Center birthday gala, where 
she’ll receive the Society of Singers’ Ella Award, 
named for Ella Fitzgerald. 


A Beijing factory worker turned soprano has 


won the Cardiff Singer of the World competition. 
Guang Yang, 26, won £10,000 ($16,500) in the 
Welsh contest, as well as appearances at a London 
recital and concert engagements. Until 1991, the 
singer worked in a factory. She then began formal 
voice training and went on to win honors in Paris 
and Japan. Her first solo concert was last August. 


Josef Brodsky, the Russian-bom Nobel Prize- 
winning poet who died in New York at age 55 in 
January 1996, is finally to be buried in Venice. 
Brodsky was bora in Saint Petersburg, formerly 
Leningrad and President Boris Yeltsin had ex- 


A rash of biopics of musical giants from the days 
of Flower Power are in the works. Cuba Gooding 
Jr., who won the best supporting actor Oscar for 
“Jeny Maguire,” is negotiating to star in “Blaze of 
Glory,” about the soul singer Otis Redding, En- 
tertainment Weekly reported. The magazine said 
that the story of Jimi Hendrix was now being 
developed and that Paramount and TriStar were 


Steven Spielberg has bought film rights to "The 
Diving Bell and the Butterfly," the best-seller by 
Jean-Dominique Bauby recounting his mental life 
after a stroke. The movie is to be directed by Scott 
Hicks, who made “Shine,” sources told Age nee 
France- Presse. Bauby, who died in March, nad a 
stroke in 1995 that left him almost entirely paralyzed 
He dictated the book by blinking his left eyelid. 



Out, Uro/Tbc AmviaKd Pnw 

IN MEMORY — Anne Waldman reading a poem in tribute to feDow poet Allen 
Ginsberg at a Los Angeles show in his honor. The Beat poet died in April at age 70. 



Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 




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AT&T Access Numbers 




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.172-1011 AFRICA ' ~ - 

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755-5942 Kenya* .0-800-10 

909-99-00-11 Smith Africa 0-800-99-0123 


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