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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 




The World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE 
R . . Paris, Wednesday, June 25, 1997 


>N POST 




Croat ( and UN Tribunal) Go on Trial 










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General Tfliomir Blaskic at the start of his trial in The Hague on Tuesday. 


How Do You Say 6 I Do?’ 

Christian Right Scores a Legislative Coup 
In Crusade to Undermine No-Fault Divorce 


By Kevin Sack 

New York Tima Service 

BATON ROUGE, Louisiana — 
Louisiana’s le gislature has become 
the first in the United States to approve 
a law allowing a new and mare bind- 
ing form of marriage contract, one that 
would permit divorce only in narrow 
circumstances such as adultery, abuse, 
abandonment, a lengthy , marital sep- 
aration or imprisonment on a felony. 

On the final day of the legislative 
session Monday, the bill, which 
would take effect Aug. IS, passed the 
House by a vote of 98 to 0 and the 
Senate by a vote of 37 to i. 

Governor Mike Foster, a Repub- 
lican, is expected to sign the bill, said 
the governor’s press secretary, 
Marsanne Golsby . 

Known as covenant marriage, the 
new contract would be entered vol- 
untarily, and the law would not pre- 
clude couples from entering a mar- 
riage that allows a standard no-fault 
divorce. But it would require couples 
to choose the form of their marriage 
contract before they declared their 
vows, a choice that would almost 
certainly make for some awkward 
premarital conversations. 

That is pan of the point, the bill's 
sponsors say. By requiring couples to 
choose between a no-fault marriage 
and a covenant marriage, the new 
legislation would force them to more 
seriously consider- their compatibility 
before getting married ana starting 
families, said state Representative 


Tony Perkins, the Baton Rouge Re- 
publican who sponsored the bill. 

The bill is the first legislative suc- 
cess in a nationwide movement led by 
conservative Chris tians and pro-fam- 
ily activists to rewrite or repeal no- 
fault divorce laws, which they say have 
helped lead to escalating divorce rates 
ana the disintegration of families. . 

The divorce rate jumped by 34 per- 
cent between 1970 and 1990, the peri- 
od when no-fault divorce became the 
norm in every state. 

There were about 1.2 million di- 
vorces in the United States in 1990. 
Nearly half of all marriages now end 
in divorce, compared with about a 
third in 1970. But expats disagree 
about how much of that increase can 
be attributed to current divorce laws. 

Efforts to repeal no-fault divorce 
laws, which grant divorces without a 
specific showing of wrongdoing, 
have failed recently in several states, 
including Michigan and Iowa. But 
Louisiana's lawmakers apparently 
saw the covenant marriage bill as a 
comfortable middle ground because it 
would allow couples a choice, 

Ira Lurvey, a Los Angeles lawyer 
and tha chai rman nf the American Bar 

Association’s family law section, said 
he knew of no other state where such 
a bill had been introduced. 

“We’re trying Co slow down the 
hemonhagiDg afthe American family 
through the no-fault divorce system,” 
said Mir. Perkins, a 34-year-old father 

See VOWS, Page 6 


In the Footsteps of Carnegie 

Microsoft’s Gates Plans $200 Million Gift to Libraries 


By Elizabeth Corcoran 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Public libraries 
throughout the United States and 
Canada were preparing Tuesday to re- 
ceive their biggest single gift since die 
turn of the century, when Andrew 
Carnegie gave money to build 1,600 
libraries across the United States. 

Bill Gates, chairman of Microsoft 
Carp., and Ids wife, Melinda French 
Gates, are giving $200 million to es- 
tablish a foundation that will put com- 
puters into public libraries in low-in- 
come areas. 

Microsoft will, in addition, contrib- 
ute software worth $200 million. Fur- 
. tber, the foundation will provide tech- 
‘ nology support and training for library 
: employees. 

Grants provided from the foundation 
'will include cash for computer hard- 


Lack of Cooperation 
Hinders Prosecution 


By Charles Truebeart 

Washing ton Post Service 

THE HAGUE — A Croatian general 
charged with authorizing h undreds of 
civilian killings a nd other atrocities in 
wartime Bosnia in 1993 went on trial 
Tuesday in the first war-crimes pro- 
ceeding against a commander since 
World War a 

But as General Tihomir Blaskic, 36, 
appeared in foe dock of foe United Na- 
tions tribunal courtroom here to begin 
hearing charges of directing a “ethnic 
cleansing” campai gn against Muslim 
villages, foe infant judicial institution 






villages, foe i 
that is trying h 
ment of truth. 


m 


th at is trying him is approaching a mo- 


The Blaskic trial began, the slow grind i L^gfNpjjf ■ ■- iff 'i iff 

of its courtroom life with foe presiding | -jS^j 
judge, Claude Jorda of France, noting $p4 

that “justice which seems to be endless J J;* X jr ^ ^ 

will not meet the expectations of foe -•*? * 

international community.” • .yXjg 

General Blaskic, the Bosnian Croat §P§ 

commander of a strategic region in cen- .^1 

trai Bosnia, is charged in foe bombard- - ™ 

ment, plunder and pillage of four towns 
in foe Lasva Valley where more than a 

hundred Muslim civilians were >>' - 7 -X, J 

murdered, tortured or driven out of their Wb 

homes. In some cases, foe Muslims /, 

were forced to dig trenches on foe front ‘-‘X %> 

lines and were killed by Serbian fire. d' , .f ^ 

General Blaskic was allowed to say a 

few words about his occupation — “I h#**?™***, 

am a professional soldier of foe Croatian A workman in Tiananmen Square in Beijing installing a sign Tuesd 
Army” — his military training and his that reads "Celebrate the Return of Hong Kong/ due Monday nigl 

wife and two sons before the prose- • 

cation outlined its case and called its 
first witness in foe first day’s session. 

The likely duration of the trial was sug- %w 7" 11 Q, - T1 T| 1 

&^£jsa , 3 , jS2i Wall street Bounces Baci 

ratin gs stemming from foe prosecu- ' 

tion’s misspelling of foe first expert A 4V O ■ ,1 FT1 1 

Alter Scare Prom lokyo 

alike, foe tribunal itself is on triaL On foe w 

permanent international criminal justice Japan Clarifies ‘Misinterpreted’ Comments 

system to prosecute war crimes — a 

body whose use was indicated last week t> v Mitchell Martin which did not react as strongly to ) 

when Cambodian authorities requested tnietnaumai Herald Tnhme Hashimoto’s comments, also clirobe 


Katyn Sat/Aynu Fnm-Prra: 

A workman in Tiananmen Square in Beijing installing a sign Tuesday 
that reads "Celebrate the Return of Hong Kong/ due Monday night. 


Wall Street Bounces Back 
After Scare From Tokyo 


body whose use was indicated last week 
when Cambodian authorities requested 
a trial of its genocidal former dictator, 
Pol Pol 

But the International Criminal 
Tribunal, set up by the UN Security 
Council in 1993 to prosecute war crim- 
inals for the first time since the Nurem- 
berg and Tokyo trials after World War 
n, is beset by a public perception of 
ineffectuality: only eight arrests or sur- 
renders out of 75 indictments stemming 
from the Bosnian war, virtually all of 
them relatively insignificant offenders; 
one confession and one guilty verdict to 
date, and two more trials under way. 

Of the indicted, more than two-thirds 
are Serbs. The two most important 

See TRIAL, Page 6 


which did not react as strongly to Mr. 
Hashimoto's comments, also climbed. 

On Monday, foe Dow Jones indus- 
trial avenge fell by 19225 points, 
which was the secoatMagesf point drop 
on record, (railing rally the 508- point 
decline of Oct 19, 1987. 

But in those days, the Dow was trad- 
ing around 2200^ while it is now above 
7.600, and foe Monday decline of 23 
percent was not even in the top 100. 

The Dow closed Tuesday 153.80 
points higher, at 7,758.06. 

Michael Flament ofWright Investors' 
Service in Bridgeport, Connecticut, said 
stock investors likely woe using foe 
weakness on Monday as an excuse to 
rebalance their portfolios. 

“I don't think anyone believed there 
was an actual threat,” he said, “most 
people probably expected some sort of 
retreat from die official comments or 
figured that was hot what he meant to 
say, but still a lot of investors may have 
used it as an excuse to jnstget a litoc less 
invested, get their portfolios a little 
more cautions. ” • 

That caution, he said, xmgbtbe war- 
ranted by the surprising strength of the 
stock market TheDow industrials are up 
more than 18 percent so for this year, 
following i|aiiis of 26 percent in 1996 and 
35 percent in 1995. Long-term indicators 
remain bullish, however, Mr. Flament 
said, and the reaction to Mr. Hashimoto's 
comments may have been overdone. 

The U.S. economy, he said, is grow- 
ing without significant inflation largely 
thanks to rising productivity. 

Apparently, American consumers are 
complacent. The Conference Board, a 
research organization, reported on 
Tuesday that its index of consumer con- 
fidence rose to 129.6 inJune from 127.9 
in May. The June level is a 28-year high. 

See MARKET, Page 14 




NEW YORK — Worries that Jap- 
anese investors would dump U.S. Treas- 
ury bonds evaporated Tuesday after an 
official said comments by Prune Min- 
ister Ryutaro Hashimoto on Monday 
were misinterpreted. 

Although trade relations between Ja- 
pan and the United States have been 
edgy because of the recent weakness of 
foe dollar, the view on Wall Street was 
that Mr. Hashimoto probably had not 
meant to threaten American financial 
markets when he said Monday that Ja- 
pan could be tempted to sell its holdings 
of U.S. Treasury securities. 

Stock prices bounced back from a 
sharp fall on Monday and bond prices. 







c; \ a • r 


ware, and for support and training. The 
software will run on the co mpu t ers 
donated by Microsoft 

The vision behind the venture, Mr. 
Gates said in a telephone interview, is to 
renew foe idea that inspired Carnegie: 
Give people from all wants of life access 
to knowledge. 

“Oar goal is that people will take fra 
granted that you can walk into your 
local library, get foe latest book and sit 
down at a computer,” Mr. Gates said. 

Patty Stooesifer, a former Microsoft 
executive who will serve as president 
and chairman of the foundation, said she 
hoped to work with more than half of foe 

See LIBRARIES, Page 6 





MfeStsuAsowa 


A trader checking a monitor on the floor on the New York Stock 
Exchange on Tuesday, as the market bounced back from a sharp fall. 


1 . . • ••• • 1 

■ The Dollar ■ 

Nh Yoric 

TUndsy • 4 pji. 

prwtawdoM 

DM 

1.7238 • 

1.7185 

Poisid 

Y«1 

1.068 

114.70 

1.6717 

- 114.87 

FF 

5.8164 

5.7975. 

I „ 

Thr Dow 

■■1 

+153.8 

7758.06 

760426 

|| S&P 500 || 

CftWTQB 

Tuwitay O 4 PJd. 

prmfcMdoM 

+17.72 

896.34 

878.62 




No. 35,556 


U.S. Votes 


Trade Status 
For China 

Extension Approved, 
259 to 173, by Home 
Despite Strong Fight 

By Brian Knowltoo 

Intermaional HcmU Tribune 

WASHINGTON — The House of 
Representatives approved Tuesday a 
one-year extension of rnost-favored-na- 
tibn trade status for China, overcoming 
one of foe strongest and most broadly 
based challenges in years. 

The vote was 259 to 173, narrower 
than last year’s 286-141 vote for re- 
newal. 

Supporters needed only a simple ma- 
jority to continue most-favored-natioa 
status, which grants China the same 
terms enjoyed by nearly every other 
U.S. trading partner. 

While the outcome of the vote had 
been expected, the timing, coming less 
than a week before the reversion of 
Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty, 
gave it a dramatic edge. And the un- 
usually eclectic coalition of groups on 
each side of foe argument — with Re- 
publican free-traders supporting the 
Democratic administration while liber- 
als and labor groups made common 
cause with Christian conservatives in 
opposition — made any prediction of 
the vote difficult. 

Secretary of State Madeleine Al- 
bright had asked Congress to approve 
renewal of the most-favored-nanon 
status before she travels to Hong Kong 
to witness foe handover of power. She 
has called the U.S. policy one of ‘ ‘en- 
gagement, not endorsement.” 

Some opponents, however, defined 
that policy as one of appeasement 
“The engagement theorists don’t 
have die guts to truly engage China and 

LLS. Imports many grinds from 
companies owned by the Chinese 
military. Page 14. 

let them know their behavior is out of 
line,” Representative Gerald Solomon, 
Republican of New York, said during 
the House debate. He sponsored the 
motion to reject renewal. 

Both sides in the debate appeared to 
be grappling with the same question: 
how best to protect American strategic 
and economic interests without h ar m ing 
the Chinese people, setting back 
China's movement toward freer mar- 
kets and greater global economic in- 
tegration or condoning Chinese repres- 
sion. 

The dilemma was summed up by 
Representative Dick Armey of Texas, 
foe House majority leader, in a speech 
last week. 

“In my heart,” he said, “I would like 
to oppose most-favored-nation status 
for China as a way of expressing the 
deep repugnance I feel toward the 
tyranny of Beijing. But intellectually, 1 
believe that continued normal trade re- 
lations are best for foe people of 
China. ” 

The annual debate, always heated 
since Beijing's crackdown on foe pro- 
democracy movement in 1989, readied 
a particularly sharp pitch this year. 

A State Department human rights re- 
port concluded that China had crushed 
all dissent Charges surfaced about pos- 
sible Chinese involvemenr in illegal 
campaign contributions to American 


In addition, China has been castig- 


■ nology, sales of missiles and threats 
against Taiwan, for failure to protect 
intellectual property rights and fra its 
enforcement, sometimes by forced 
abortion, of a one-child policy. ■ 

The Clinton administration, waging a 
vigorous campaign, contended that a 
failure to renew would not only cost 
Americans’ jobs and raise consumer 
prices but also remove any U.S. in- 
fluence over China and possibly slow 
efforts there toward economic opening 
and, eventually, political reform. 

Just before foe vote the White House 
made public statements of support fra 
the trade status from three former pres- 
idents:— George Bush, Gerald Ford and 
Jimmy Carter. 


Newsstand Prices 


AGENDA 

Netanyahu Government Survives Vote 


Shanghai Sees One China, Two Cities 


Andorra. 10,00 FF Lebanon LL 3,000 

ArtfSes 11150 FF Morocco 18 Dh 

'Cameroon-. 1.600 CEA Qatar 10.00 Rials 

Egypt £E 550 Reunion 12JQFF 

^rancs 10.00 FF Sautfi Arabia... 10.00 ft. 

?abon 1100 CFA Senegal- 1.100 CFA 

taly. 2,800 Lira Spain 225 PTAS 

my Coast.1-250 CFA Tunisia 1.250 Din 

ondan 1250 JD UAE 10.00 Dfeti 

Cuwaft 700 F2s U.S. ML (Eur.).._$1.2Q 



JERUSALEM ( AP) — Despite the 
anger of influential members of his 
coalition. Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu's government survived a 
no-confidence vote in Pa rliament on 
Tuesday. 

The motion brought by opposition 
parties was rejected, 55 to 50, with 2 
abstentions and 13 Knesset members 
absenL 

Leading members of foe prime 
minister's coalition accused Mr. Net- 
anyahu of breaking promises and said 
they no longer trusted him after a 


string of broken promises. But they 
were apparently unwilling to risk 
their positions by voting to bring 
down the government, which would 
have also dissolved Parliament 


Books 

Page 12. 

Crossword 

Page 12. 

Opinion 


Snorts 



ThekiwmsrkBt 

Page 10. 

| The IHT on-line 

http://vv.vw.iht.com j 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Post Service . 

SHANGHAI — A museum rising up 
in People’s Square symbolizes the am- 
bitions of tins Chinese metropolis. 

With floor stone imported from Saudi 
Arabia, pillars from ttaly. balcony stone 
from India and the latest computer tech- 
nology n guide visitors, the new $70 
mil linn Shanghai Museum aspires to 
world-class status while housing irons-' 
ures from 5,000 years of Chinese hiv- 
tory; imperial porcelains, jade pendant*, 
coins, calligraphy and an unparalleled 
collection of ancient bronzes. 


V A museum reflects a nation’s civ- 
ilization or culture, so where it’s located 
and what it looks like are: very-im- 
portant,” said the museum’s architect, 
Xing Toagbe. "It’s a symbol of Shang- 
hai’s level of civilization.” 

The bustling British-run territory of 
Hong Kong, on foe approach of its return 
to Chinese sovereignty, is finding that it 
no longer has a monopoly on connec- 
tions, confidence and .construction 
Shanghai, more vibrant than ar anytime 
since the 1920s, when it was known as. 
(he “Paris of the East,” is trying: to '. 
■ regain centra stage in finanff culture and 
style — and to challenge Hong Kong for 


its pending tide pf China’s premier city. 

The MoriGroup of Japan is building a 
$1 billion, 95-story building that it says 
will be the world’s tallest City workers 
are racing m complete an 1 1-line subway 
system. An elevated highway network 
was erected in three years ^cutting travel 
time, in half. Two new bridges span the 
Huangpu River thar navigates the city 
before emptying into the Yangtze. 

; “Tte two cities are like two motors 
bfbne airplane^ two lead actors in foe 
same play, or two eyes of one gigantic 
dragon,” said Mayor Xu Kuangdiin a 

See SHANGHAI, Page 4 


&)) 






— - «T>- 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2 5, 1997 




PAGE TWO 


Lighting Up in Their Sleep /The MotIImm Mon in Poland TobflCCO FoCS ' ll ^ 

Cigarette Makers ’ Smoky Heaven: Eastern Europe Settlement 


\. Ma 


V IENNA — On the wall of Andre 
Calantzopoulos’s office in Warsaw 
hangs a glass cabinet displaying 
dozens of the more than 300 brands of 
foreign cigarettes, including seductively pack- 
aged “his" and “hers" brands, that the tobacco 
giants are churning out to entice Polish 
smokers. 

Mr. Calantzopoulos, an executive of Philip 
Morris Cos. for a dozen years, has worked in 
some of the world’s heaviest-smoking countries. 
Bat of Poland, where he is the company's man- 
aging director, he said; “I’ve never seen any- 
thing like it in my life. People go to the kiosk and 
say: 'Do you have any new cigarettes for me to 
try?' " 

If there is a heaven for beleaguered cigarette 
manufacturers from the West, it is the 
developing markets of Eastern Europe, 

Asia and the Middle East, half a world 
away from trial lawyers, assertive reg- 
ulators and a proposed biilion-dollar 
fond to compensate smokers who are 
ilL 

With cigarette sales in the United 
States stagnating, companies like Philip 
Morris and R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. 
view those regions as a frontier with 
bountiful opportunities for growth and 
profit Ana the tobacco compensation 
settlement reached Friday in the United 
States does nothing to limit manufac- 
turers' aggressive moves to profit from 
foreigners’ growing appetite for 
smoking and their general disregard for 
its effects on their health. 

Smoking foes fear that as the reg- 
ulatory grip tightens in the United 
States, foreign markets will increasingly 
feel the marketing muscle of the Marlboro Man 
and the allure of Joe CameL, and in some conn- 
tries they are pressing the health authorities to 
sue the industry to recover the cost of treating 
smoking-related illnesses. 

Already, Philip Morris, the world’s biggest 
tobacco company, has increased sales of cig- 
arettes abroad by nearly SO percent since 1990, to 
662.2 billion cigarettes last year. 


By Jane Perlez 

iVw York Times Soviet 


smoking on foe job and that is proposing a ban on 
smoking while driving. 

Last year, consumption dropped 7.3 percent, 
and experts predict a further decline this year. 

Still, foe Polish market and Eastern Europe 
would seem to hold a lot of promise. About half 
the adults smoke, compared with about 25 per- 
cent in the United States, and the running joke in 
Poland is that people enjoy tobacco so much that 
they smoke in their sleep. 

Western tobacco companies have spent more 
than $3 billion in foe last six years buymg dozens 
of often decrepit but potentially lucrative state- 
owned cigarette factories from Hungary to 
Kazaksta n and turning them into efficient cig- 
arette suppliers. 

With increased advertising and bigger sales 
forces, cigarette companies have relentlessly 
promoted their brands, and sales and profits have 
steadily risen. 


‘ ‘Research showed if we could bring a better- 
quality cigarette — more consistent in quality 
and at foe same price and with distribution 
muscle — it would work,” said Louis Hughes, 
the chairman of British-American Tobacco in 
Poland. 

In addition to making cigarettes better — 
Polish cigarette quality made under state man- 
agement was notoriously poor — British- Amer- 
ican Tobacco chose an extraordinarily success- 
ful brand name. It called its new cigarette 
Sobieski, tapping into Polish pride about a 17th 
century warrior-king. 

“Part of the success was the product.” Mr. 
Hughes said. “Part of the magic was the 
name." 

But, just as in the United States, the drive to 
increase cigarette sales in foe region faces a 
devoted anti-smoking lobby. Men in Eastern 
Europe and foe former Soviet Union have foe 


Under the proposed settlement in the United 
States, wanting labels cm cigarette pa ck a g es 
would grow to 25 percent of foe front of foe 

• i — J.L . IaLa! am nfnu 


"vuw — 

package, compared with a label on the side now. 

“Hie tobacco industry was shocked at how 
fast we were able to get these laws,’ ’ Dr. Zaton- 
ski said. The principal law on health warnings 
and foe smoking ban in foe workplace was 
signed last year by President Alexander Kwas- 
niewski, who overturned a veto by his pre- 
decessor, ‘Lech Walesa. 


By John M. Broder 

.V< t* York Times Ser.nr 



A LTHOUGH Asia is the largest market. 
Eastern Europe is a profitable, if dis- 
tant, No. 2. And Poland demonstrates 
how American tobacco companies 
have aggressively moved to capttme a devel- 
oping and potentially lucrative foreign market. 

But even in Poland, foe cigarette makers are 
confronted with tax increases, curbs on advert- 
ising and a fledgling anti-smoking movement 
that recently pushed through a law banning 


Four years ago, for example, when American 
companies started to have serious influence in 
foe former Soviet bloc, Philip Morris had a 51 
percent share of foe 59 billion American cig- 
arettes sold. By last year, that share had grown to 
70 percent of 1 77 billion cigarettes, Mr. Feldman 
said, and foe company had 1 2,000 employees in 
foe region. In 1991, it had only 135. 

The strategy in Poland for Philip Morris and 
its Western rivals is to improve foe quality of the 
cheaper Polish brands they have acquired, and as 
incomes grow, encourage customers to buy more 
expensive American brands. 

One Philip Morris rival. British-American 
Tobacco Co., has had particular success in win- 
ning Polish smokers over to its Sobieski cig- 
arettes made in northeast Poland. 

The goal was straightforward: attack foe lead- 
er in the market segment, a cigarette called Mars 
produced by a Polish government factory. 


highest death rates in the world from smoking, 
according to the Epidemiological Studies Unit at 
Oxford University in Britain. About 40 percent 
of all male deaths in middle age are related to 
tobacco. 

In Poland, an eloquent and highly visible 
cancer specialist who lectures frequently about 
foe dangers of smoking, Witold Zatonski, is 
prominent among those fighting foe cigarette 
makers. 

Dr. Zatonski. who infuriates the international 
tobacco companies with the way he saunters into 
the chamber of foe Polish Parliament to talk to 
his friends among the legislators, played a major 
role in getting legislation passed requiring that 
by December, health warnings cover 30 percent 
of foe space on cigarette packages, compared 
with 4 percent to 6 percent in Western Europe 
and 20 percent of foe space on billboards that 
advertise tobacco. 


D ESPITE these successes by smoking 
foes, foe tobacco companies still have 
huge potential markets. After years of 
negotiations, Philip Morris completed 
its deal for foe Polish government’s biggest to- 
bacco factory early last year. The company paid 
$227 million for a 32 percent interest in the 
factory and agreed to invest $145 million more 
for the acquisition of an additional 33 
percent over the next three years. 

Since taking over management of the 
factory in Nova Huta, just outside foe 
medieval city of Cracow. Philip Morris 
has had its work cut out for it. 

With 4,100 workers, the plant is 
vastly overstaffed, yet Philip Morris 
agreed to keep all the workers for three 
years. It also agreed to a 30percent wage 
increase for the workers and an ad- 
ditional bonus. 

Bertrand Butticaz, a Philip Morris 
manager who has revamped factories all 
over the world, immediately started to 
modernize machinery and management 
A new hall with German machines that 
make 8,000 cigarettes a minute boosts 
hig h ceilings, air-conditioning, smooth 
flooring and pleasant light 

For Mr. Butticaz, the main goal in the 

nyt first year was something basic: how to 
stop the slide in sales of the local brand, known 
as Klubowe. Cigarettes made from domestic 
tobacco still make up 50 percent of the Polish 
market with Klubowe foe most popular brand, 
but with slightly falling sales. 

Packaging the cigarettes in boxes instead of 
soft packages, and “upgrading” the taste of 
Klubowe, a process that included refusing to buy 
foe inferior fire-cured tobacco from Polish farm- 
ers, has helped stop foe slide. Mr. Butticaz said. 

Back at the headquarters in Warsaw, foe long- 
term goal for Mr. Calantzopoulos is getting more 
Polish smokers to switch to Marlboro or L&M. 

“Of coarse, we’re working in that direction." 
he said. “But it’s very difficult to tell a Klubowe 
smoker to smoke Marlboro. It doesn't taste like 
anything he knows. The conventional wisdom is 
that foe international companies are going to kill 
. foe domestic brands and introduce the inter- 
national brands. Easy to say. not to do." 


Congregants Seeking Quick Cures Produce Quick Profits in Congo 


By Howard W. French 

New York Times Service 


KINSHASA. Congo — With the fas- 
ter shouting and the choir chanting 
loudly, all eyes were fixed on the wom- 
an with foe heavy limp and pained grim- 
ace as she stood before foe altar in foe 
sweltering church. 

While the woman was instructed to 
lie on the floor, foe pastor of foe Miracle 
Center Church, his voice booming un- 
der foe high, ramshackle roof of metal 
and plastic sheeting, cried. “We ask foe 
Lion of Judah to remove her pain and 
make her whole!" 

Suddenly, while large plastic collec- 
tion bags were being passed around, foe 
woman bounded up from the floor 
beaming, “miraculously” cured. Hal- 
lelujahs rang out from the worshipers. 

Churches like these have become big 


businesses in Congo, until recently 
Zaire. And the 8-year-old Miracle Cen- 
ter has become one of this ragged city’s 
most prosperous operations. 

Every Sunday, by foe thousands, res- 
idents dawn by their bard luck flock 
here in their best clothing. The frenzied 
services of foe church seem planned to 
soothe people whose marriages are 
broken, who cannot find work, who 
suffer every kind of ill, particularly 
AIDS. Despite their modest means, foe 
worshipers accept foe church's un- 
abashed message on divine interven- 
tion: that generous gifts can help pro- 
duce it. They bring food, televisions and 
radios, clothing and whatever money 
they can gather. 

The genius of foe Miracle Center, and 
the scores of other churches like it that 
have sprung up around Kinshasa in re- 
cent years, has been in exploiting a 


marriage of deeply rooted Central Af- 
rican traditions and Western techniques. 
The former have to do with material 
sacrifice, spirit worship and magic, foe 
latter with the corporate organization 
and hucksrerism of the television evan- 
gelist 

“The missionaries who came here 
sought to stifle the African thirst for foe 
miracle,” said the Reverend Ndoudo- 
boni Essambela, a conventional Baptist 
pastor who. like many in foe more tra- 
ditional religious orders here, is critical 
of foe new evangelical churches. 

“Our churches have tended to focus 
on foe afterlife, which is fine," he said 
earlier this year. “But in Zaire, there are 
so many real problems right here on 
earth. And when people are miserable 
they want nothing so much as to dream 
and have miracles.” 

The first well-known Zairian evan- 


gelist, a Father Osborne, clandestinely 
preached that he could cure the sick and 
enrich the poor as long as 30 years ago. 
But religious experts in Congo say 
evangelical churches like the Miracle 
Center spread with the loosening dic- 
tatorship of Mobutu- Sese Seko, who 
was recently ousted. 

Until 1990, Zaire tolerated the pres- 
ence of only three Christian churches: 
the Roman Catholic Church, foe Prot- 
estant churches that followed, and a 
charismatic indigenous sect known as 
the Kimbanguist Chorch. 

Now, about a quarter of Congo's 45 
million people are Protestants, with as 
many as half of those belonging to evan- 
gelical churches. 

The new churches make no bones 
about not reinvesting in their commu- 
nities the money they collect each 
week. 


“Our concern is the word of God,” 
said an evangelical preacher who re- 
fused to be identified. “Once people 
have received foe word of God they can 
have anything.” 

Those who run the Miracle Center 
reject accusations that they are robbing 
foe vu Inerable. But at foe same time they 
are surprisingly open about foe cor- 
porate nature of their church. 

“We are not only a church, we are an 
enterprise, ’ ' said Bompere Egide, a lay 
preacher and manager of the Miracle 
Center. “At the end of the month, I 
receive a salary for what I do." 

“In our traditional culture you often 
have to make a sacrifice if you want to 
get results," he said. “It is foe same 
here. The Bible says that God will ma- 
terially aid those who give to Him. All 
we are teaching our flock is that if you 
want to reap you have to sow.” 


WASHINGTON — Critics have be- 
gun a concerted attack on the proposed 
tobacco settlement, citing provisions 
they consider too favorable to cigarette 
makers and demanding that major por- 
tions of the agreement be rewritten. 

Among foe provisions that have come 
. under hush scrutiny are the penalties 
that will be imposed on tobacco ccmpa. 
tries if they fail to meet targets for re- 
ductions in smoking by teenagers, the 
provision allowing companies to deduct 
from corporate taxes foe S368.5 billion 
cost of the proposal and foe lack of 
strong federal enforcement power. 

Senior administration officials began 
a comprehensive review Monday of foe 
settlement, which is expected to last at 
least a mouth. Officials suggested that 
they expected major changes before foe 
agreement is presented to Congress for 
ratification. 

Donna Shalala. the secretary of 
Health and Human Services, said in a 
telephone interview that officials io her 
department would “take apart*' the 68- 
page tobacco settlement proposal 
agreed on Friday to study each piece and 
see how they fit together as a package. 

“What we have here is a first draft," 
Ms. Shalala said. ‘ ‘This was obviously a 
balancing act and there were tradeoffs to 
get a final proposal. But they put a lot of 
work into it and it deserves careful 
study.” 

But others nor directly involved in foe 
administration review were harsher in 
their assessment. 

Dr. C. Everett Koop, the former sur- 
geon general and longtime anti-tobacco 
crusader, said thar foe deal was “deeply 
flawed.” He said he was particularly 
unhappy with the S2 billion annual limit 
on the penalties cigarette producers 
would pay if anti-smoking efforts did 
not produce specified reductions in un- 
derage tobacco use. The agreement calls 
for foe tobacco industry to take steps to 
ensure reductions in teenage smoking of 
30 percent in five years, 50 percent in 
seven years and 60 percent in 10 years. 

He criticized foe proposal ’s provision 
that allows tobacco companies to re- 
cover as much as 75 percent of those 
fines if they can demonstrate that youth 
smoking did not decline despite their 
“good faith" efforts. 

Dr. Koop said that even if the foil S2 
billion fine is levied, it would amount to 
only 8 cents per pack of cigarettes. 3 
cents of which would be deductible as a 
business expense. 

“So foe fine comes to a nickel a 
pack,” Dr. Koop said. “An unscru- 
pulous CEO of a tobacco company 
could say, ’Let's market to kids all we 
want and raise the price by 6 cents a 
pack and make a fortune.’ ” 

Dr. Koop’s opinion carries consid- 
erable weight because he is a co-chair- 
man of a panel of health experts who are 
advising Congress and the Clinton ad- 
ministration on the proposal. The While 
House is unlikely to embrace a deal that 


is not endorsed by that panel. 
A spokesman for the tobacci 


Sue Sumii, Japanese Novelist 
And Social Activist, Dies at 95 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


New York Times Service 

TOKYO — Sue Sumii, a 
fiery human-rights campaigner 
whose landmark novel sold 8.3 
million copies and helped 
change attitudes toward Ja- 
pan's “untouchables,” died 
June 16. She was 95 years old. 

Mrs. Sumii ’s greatest lit- 
erary and social accomplish- 
ment was "The River With 
No Bridge," a multivolume 
novel exploring foe humili- 
ations endured by outcasts 
known as burakumin. The 
first volume was published in 
1958, and she was working on 
the eighth volume at the lime 
of her death. Three movies 
were based on the books. 


Mrs. Sumii fought all her 
life for women’s rights, for 
social equality, and in par- 
ticular for equal opportunities 
for the burakumin. 


Olynfpic Airways Cancels 32 Flights 


Europe 


Forecast for Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AccuWeather. Asia 


The protagonist in “The 
liver With No Bridge" is a 


River With No Bridge" is a 
burakumin early in foe cen- 
tury in a rural slum in Japan. 

Mrs. Sumii described his 
traumas so vividly that she 
shamed many of her fellow 
Japanese into looking seri- 
ously at foe discrimination 
suffered by burakumin in 
modem Japan. 


ATHENS (AFP) — Olympic Airways canceled 32 do- 
mestic flights from Tuesday through Thursday because of a 
mechanics* strike, even though it was settled Monday. 

It canceled 12 flights on Tuesday, 10 Wednesday and 10 
Thursday, after which work will return to normal. Trans- 
portation Minister Haris Kastanidis said extensive reforms of 
the airline would be introduced after the summer. 


Copenhagen-South Africa Route 


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COPENHAGEN (AFP) — Scandinavian Airlines System 
and South African Airways will open a joint route between 
Copenhagen and South Africa on July 2, SAS said Tuesday. 

Two weekly flights between Copenhagen and Johannes- 
burg-Cape Town will use South African Boeing 747s. 


International 

Franchises 

Appears every Wednesday 
id The Intermarkct. 

To advertise contact Judith King 
in our New York office 
TeL: (1-212)752 3890 
Fax: (1-212) 755 8785 
or your nearest 1HT office 
or representative. 


Acharya Tula, 83. a monk 
who preached nonviolence to 
millions of people across India, 
died of a heart attack Moaday in 
Bikaner, news agencies report- 
ed. He was foe chief of the 
Terapanthi Jain Shwe tarn bar 
San gham . a sect of Jainism. 


Vietnam’s National Administration of Tourism reported 
that 700,000 foreigners had visited the country so far this year, 
7 percent fewer than in foe same period in 1996. (AFP) 


British Airways plans to offer flights between London 
and the Chinese cities of Shanghai, Guangzhou. Zhuhai and 
Shenzhen by 2000, Xinhua quoted Charles Phelps-Peory, 
chief of foe airl ine ’s China office, as saying. (Bloomberg ) 


Bobby Helms, 61, who 
gave Christmas a rock-and- 
roll sound with his 1957 hit, 
“Jingle Bell Rock," died 
Thursday at his home in Mar- 
tinsville, Indiana. 


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I U rn o nacnn M y 
Cold 


North America 

Hot and humid from 
Boston to Philadelphia 
Thursday with afternoon 
thunderstorms, then sunny 
end pleasant Friday end 
Saturday. I>y. hot weather 
will spdl Irom the South- 
west Into the central 
Plains, but the northern 
Rockies and northern 
plants will have gusty thun- 
derstorms. 


Europe 

Windy and cool across 
England and France 
Thursday Into Saturday 
with scattered showers. 
Some heavier rain is Mealy 
across Germany and 
Scandinavia. Southern 
Europe, from Spain to 
western Turkey, will be 
mostly sunny and very 
warm to hot with a Stray 
afternoon thunderstorm. 


Asia 

Sunny, vary hot and dry 
"earner will continue m 
northern China through 
Saturday. Northern Japan 
writ have showers, but 
Tokyo and the rest at 
Japan will be warm and 
humid with perhaps an 
afternoon thunderstorm. 
Typhoon Peter may ihreai- 
an southern Japan and 
Korea «s weekend. 


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Middle East 


Aui article on the Denver economic summit on Page i of 
Monday’s editions misstated the title of Jacques Chirac, 
France’s president. 


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A spokesman for foe tobacco industry 
complained that critics were not weigh- 
ing foe merits of the deal as a whole. 

“People can’t sit and focus on one 
little piece they don’t like,” said foe 
spokesman, Scott Williams. 

“They have to look at it as an entire 
package in which enormous compro- 
mises were made by industry that 
provides immediate and measurable 
health benefits, as opposed to years of 
confrontation.” 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNE SDAY, JUNE 25, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


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\t ^ Island Nations Plead for Action on Global Warming 


POLITICAL NOTES 






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united NATIONS, New York — 
The president of Maldives called on 
industrialized nations Tuesday to cap 
emissions of greenhouse gases in an 
effort to prevent small islands being 
engulfed by rising sea levels caused by 
global warming. 

Making a dramatic statement at the 
.second day of the UN Earth summit 
meeting. President Maumoon Abdul 
.Gayoom told delegates that time was 
running out for Maldives and the rest of 
the world's small islands. 

. The Earth summit meeting, whose 
first day was attended by 60 heads of 
stare and government, was called to 
review progress since the 1992 Rio de 
.Janeiro conference on environmental 

protection. 

, Mr. Gayoom, the president of a na- 
•■rion of 1,087 tiny coral Indian Ocean 
islands, none bigger than 5 square mile s 


(13 square kilometers), suggested that 
rang sea levels could wipe out small 
island nation unless tough action was 
taken. 

At Rio, I stated that I represented a 
people endangered by the threat of sea- 
Jevel rise. 4 ’ Mr. Gayoom said. “I left 
Rio confident that we had an agreed 
agenda that would save not only us but 
the whole world. 

“But today I leave here with the fear 
that unless we all act now, and with a 
renewed commitment, fliar m y country, 
and many countries like us would never 
have a voice nor a seat at a future ‘Rio 
phis.’ M 

Scientists have not confirmed any 
general rise in ocean levels, but Pacific 
islanders believe something is already 
happening, and blame global warming. 
Reports in recent months from the Mar- 
shalls, Kiribati and the Carteret atoll off 
Papua New Guinea tell of unusual tidal 


vity and rising waters washing away 
stal residences. 


activit 
coast 

Mr. Gayoom said that, according to 
an intergovernmental pane! on climate 
change, sea levels are expected to rise 
30 to 100 cenrimetos (12 to 40 inches) 
by 2100 as a result of global warming. 

* ‘Eighty percent of low-lying islands, 
such as those of the Maldives, would be 
totally submerged," he said. 

At Rio, industrialized states agreed to 
a convention on climate change provid- 
ing for voluntary caps on carbon dioxide 
emissions, blamed for global warming. 
Under the convention, industrialized 
states were to stabilize die emissions at 
1990 levels by the year 2000. A con- 
ference is scheduled for December in 
Kyoto, Japan, to decide on legally bind- 
ing commitments. 

“As we approach the Kyoto confer- 
ence, we must ensure that legally bind- 
ing targets for cutting down greenhouse 


gas emissions are set by all governments, 
especially those of the industrialized 
countries,” Mr. Gayoom said. 

No decision on global support for 
binding caps is expected to emerge from 
this Earth summit meeting. 

The island states are calling for a 
emissions cut of 20 percent below 1990 
levels by 2005. The European Union 
backs a 15 percent reduction by 2010, 
while Washington, under pressure from 
industry, has refused to announce sup- 
port for any limit. 

In another address Tuesday, Cuba 
said "capitalist greed" was the main 
cause of environmental damage. 

The speaker of Cuba’s Parliament, 
Ricardo Alarcon, said his country had a 
particularly hard time because of the 
“economic, political and even biolo- 
gical war unleashed" by the United 
States. 

This referred to a Cuban charge, first 


made in May and denied b> Wash- 
ington, that the United States had re- 
leased plant-destroying insects from a 
crop-dusting plane over western Cuba. 

“Capitalist greed is the principal 
cause of the unjust world and of the 
severe damage to nature which is threat- 
ening the survival of humankind today. 
It is absurd to try to cure those evils with 
blind worship of market, with more 
selfishness, with more capitalism," said 
Mr. Alarcon, a former foreign minister. 

Bui at a news conference near the 
United Nations, the estranged daughter 
of Cuba's leader. Fidel Castro, accused 
the Havana government of widespread 
environmental abuses and pollution that 
had damaged the health of the pop- 
ulation. 

"Erosion and pollution is not only 
affecting the ecosystems in our country 
but people os well.” said the daughter. 
Alina Fernandez Revuelta. \AFP. AP> 


Betty Shabazz, Malcolm X Widow, Dies 


By Dale Russakoff 
and Blaine Harden 

Washington Post Sen-ice 


. q ‘ i NEW YORK — Betty Shabazz, 61, 
the widow of Malcolm X who re- 


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illowing her husband’s dictums of 
.self-reliance, discipline and education, 
died Monday from bums inflicted dur- 
ing a fire allegedly set by her grandson 
r— her husband's namesake. 

Mrs. Shabazz, who had been taking 
.care of 12-year-old Malcolm Shabazz as 
his mother battled personal problems, 
died at Jacobi Medical Center in the 
Bronx surrounded by her daughters — a 
.haunting reminder of the Feb. 2 1 , 1965, 
scene when Mrs. Shabazz, pregnant 
with twins and accompanied by four 
-young daughters, witnessed the assas- 
< sination of her husband during a speech 
jr the Audubon Ballroom in New York 
City. 

. “My father lived strong, my mother 
did honorably, and her daughters are 
going to go through a lot in making this 
•adjustment to living this life without 
parents," Attallah Shabazz told report- 
ers. The oldest of six daughters, she was 
flanked by her youngest sisters, twins 
Malikah and Malaak, who never knew 
their father. 

‘ The Westchester County Attorney’s 
Office, which is responsible for cases in 
Yonkers, the New York suburb where 
Mrs. Shabazz lived, had pledged to pro- 
secute “to the fullest" surd could up- 
grade the charge against Malcolm 
Shabazz from juvenile delinquency to 
murder. If prosecutors request an 
autopsy -of Mrs. Shabazz,- said Mal- 
poim’s lawyer, Percy Sutton, the family 
will challenge iL 

_ They loved this lady and they do not 
wish to have her body subjected to ad- 
ditional cutting,' ’ said Mr. Sutton, who 
Also represented Malcolm X. "This is 
sad enough already." 


Mrs. Shabazz suffered third-degree 
bums over 80 percent of her body in the 
gasoline-fueled fire June 1. She sur : 
vived five skin-replacement surgeries, 
but was xinable to overcome the assault 
to her vital organs and immune system, 
doctors said. 

In the decades since Malcolm X’s 
death, Betty Shabazz emerged as a lead- 
er in her own right, but her three-week 
struggle for life inspired her largest fol- 
lowing of all. A blood drive held at a 
Harlem bank last Tuesday drew long 
lines of donors of many races and na- 
tionalities, stretching for many blocks. 
Among those who visited her in the 
hospital were Jesse Jackson; the poet 
Maya Angelou; the Reverend Dr. Mar- 
tin Luther King Jr.’s widow, Coretta; 
the NAACP president, Kweisi Mfume; 
and former Mayor David Dinkins of 
New York. 

President Bill Clinton called Mrs. 
Shabazz’s daughters to express his con- 
dolences and issued a statement saying 
Mrs. Shabazz “devoted a long career to 
education and to uplifting women and 
children." 

Mrs. Shabazz came to prominence in 
1958 when she married Malcolm X, the 
forceful leader and spokesman of the 
black separatist Nation of Islam. 

Mrs. Shabazz, a native of Detroit, had 
been raised a Protestant by her foster 
parents. She studied education at 
Tu&kegee Institute in Alabama before 
moving to New Yoik during the 1950s 
to study nursing in New York. 

It was in 1956, when she was 20, that 
she met Malcolm X. He was then the 
minister at the Nation of Islam's main 
mosque in- New York, where she was . 
teaching classes on hygiene and other 
health issues to Muslim women. 

Mrs. Shabazz followed her husband 
as he began to break away from the 
Nation oflslam and its policies of racial 
separation, converted to orthodox Islam 
and took the name El Hajj Malik El 


Shabazz after a trip to Mecca. 

Malcolm X’s break with the Nation 
of Islam had been bitterly denounced by 
many in the group, particularly by his 
successor at the mosque, Louis Far- 
rakhan. Although three Black Muslim 
zealots were eventually convicted in the 
slaying, Mrs. Shabazz and other fol- 
lowers of Malcolm X long contended 
that Mr. Farrakhan. now the Nation of 
Islam’s leader, was also involved. 

That feud took a bizarre twist in 1 995, 
when her daughter Qubifah — young 
Malcolm Shabazz 's mother — was 
charged by federal prosecutors with 
plotting to kill Mr. Farrakhan because 
she believed he had had a role in her 
father's death and was a threat to her 
mother. 

After the arrest, Mrs. Shabazz and 
Mr. Fairakhan had a public reconcili- 
ation. The indictment of Qubilah 
Shabazz was eventually dismissed. 

After Malcolm X’s death, Mrs. 
Shabazz earned a doctorate degree in 
education from the University of Mas- 
sachusetts and become an associate pro- 
fessor, then director of co mmunic ations 
and director of institutional advance- 
ment for Medgar Evers College in 
Brooklyn. 



Kilixt J '.xn.iM Thr W -.ji.il IV- 

Betty Shabazz giving a speech in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in January. 


‘Space Aliens ’? No, Just Dummies 


Tvn^iUiVVJlVil A JLH» U.J. 

Force offered Tuesday what it hopes i 
final .word on assertions "by UFO ze 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Air 

iisthe 
'zealots 

that bodies of roace aliens were recovered 
at a crash site m New Mexico in. 1947. 

The "bodies,’ ’ the air force said, were 
not aliens from unidentified flying ob- 
jects. They were dummies used in high- 
altitude parachute tests. 

The explanation — on the eve of the 


50th anniversary of the incident — was 
offered in enormous detail in a 231-page 
report titled “The Roswell Report — 
Case Closed.'' It is intended lo close the 
book on long-standing rumors that the 
air force recovered a flying saucer and 
extraterrestrial bodies near Roswell, 
New Mexico, in July 1947, and then 
covered the incident in secrecy. 

Skeptics immediately pointed out a 
discrepancy in the report Tuesday. 


The parachute tests, they said, oc- 
curred years after the Roswell incident. 
The air force theorized that those who 
saw the dummies were confused about 
the dates. 

In 1994. the air force issued a report 
on the Roswell incident that said the 
“spacecraft" that supposedly crashed 
was a balloon used in a secret program 
intended to monitor the atmosphere for 
evidence of Soviet nuclear tests. 


Capitol's Plague: 

A Leaky Dome 

WASHINGTON — The dome 
of the U.S. Capitol has sprung a 
leak. Make that more titan 200 
leaks. 

Many of the dome's ccntuiy-old 
cast-iron plates are cracked: the 
lead paint is peeling, and pigeon 
nests and bird droppings threaten to 
clog the Capitol gutters. 

“There's a lot of maintenance 
that needs to be done." said Alan 
Hamm an. who as the architect of 
the Capitol has to worry about such 
things. 

Mr. Haniman has requested an 
additional SI. 5 million in his 
budget for the fiscal year that be- 
gins Oct. I to work on the leaks. But 
he has run into a hitch. 

Eleven House Republicans are 
bucking their leaders and demand- 
ing that Congress freeze what it 
spends on itself at this year's levels, 
or about $2.2 billion. 

Any freeze in the legislative 
spending w ould probably doom the 
dome repairs, or at least defer them. 
And as any homeowner knows, a 
leaky roof has no mercy. 

So Representative James Walsh, 
Republican of New York, who 
heads the House appropriations 
subcommittee that pays for the up- 
keep of the Capitol, iias vowed to 
resolve the issue. 

"The dome is a pretty important 
symbol to the country and the 
world, and we want to make sure 
we take care of it.” said Mr. Walsh, 
whose subcommittee is to meet this 
week to approve the legislative 
spending levels. tiVlTi 


A Parking Space 
For Mother Teresa 


-KAtltEK 



^ir. - H, .*> 


First ‘Fat Gene 9 Humans 

2 Related Pakistani Children Make Medical History 


By Rick Weiss 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — The girl was just 7 
pounds 9 ounces at birth , but was constantly 
ravenous and gained weight quickly. With- 
in four months, she was off the weight 
charts for her age. And today, at 8 years old, 
she weighs 190 pounds — despite having 
had liposuction to remove excess fat, 

Now she and her younger cousin, a 2- 
y ear-old who literally tips the toddler scales 
at 64 pounds (29 kilograms), have made 
their mark in medical history by becoming 
the first people whose obesity has been 
shown to be caused by a mutation in the 
leptin gene — the “fat gene" that was 
discovered three years ago in mice. 

The cousins, whose identities have not 
been made public.’&re members of a highly 
intermamea Pakistani family living in Eng- 
land. Their doctors hope that in the next few 
weeks they will start getting daily injections 
of genetically engineered leptin, provided 
by an American biotechnology company. 

If the engineered hormone works in the 

children asithas in mice, their appetites will 

shrink to normal and their fat will start to 
melt away. 

Bat the results of that experiment will 
have litrle relevance for the vast majority of 
overweight people, said L Sadaf Farooqi of 


Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge 
who, with Carl Montague and Stephen 
OHZahilly, discovered the cousins’ muta- 
tions. "This particular cause of obesity is 
likely to be very rare,” Ms. Farooqi said. 
And there is no convincing evidence yet 
that leptin injections can cause significant 
weight loss in people whose obesity is 
caused by something other than a leptin 
deficiency, she said. 

Leptin normally is secreted by fat cells 
and travels to the brain, where it suppresses 
appetite and helps regulate metabolism. 
Mice that lack leptin due to a mutation in the 
leptin gene have enormous appetites and 
various hormonal abnormalities that lead to 
obesity and other problems. 

But studies on about 2,000 obese people 
have failed to turn up even a single person 
with especially low levels of leptin, sug- 
gesting that leptin gene mutations are rare. 
Then the Pakistani cousins came to light. 

"It’s important because it definitively 
establishes a physiological role for leptin in 
the control of human weight," said Jeffrey 
Friedman of the Howard Hughes Medical 
Institute at Rockefeller University in New 
York. He led the team that discovered leptin 
in 1994. 

The new work was reported in the June 
26 issue of Nature, whicn was made avail- 
able Monday. 


NEW YORK — Even Mother 
Teresa has a parking problem in 
New York. 

In a private meeting with Mayor 
Rudolph Giuliani, Mother Teresa 
told him that she warned more 
street parking permits for her nuns, 
who w ere having a hard time find- 
ing a parking spot while visiting 
their various centers around town. 

The mavor, who has waged war 
with the United Nations over dip- 
lomatic parking scofflaws, adopted 
a more deferential approach with 
Mother Teresa. 

“I would give Mother Teresa 
anything she wanted,” he said. 
"She wants parking spaces, she 
gets parking spaces. * ’ (APi 

Quote/ Unquote 

President Bill Clinton on the 
lineal culture: "You know, you 
listen to some of these people talk 
in the nation's capital, you'd think 
that they spent the whole morning 
sucking lemons." tWPi 


& 


U.S. Agents Go on Prowl Again for Illegal Immigrants 


By Patrick J. McDonnell 

Los Angeles Times 

LOS ANGELES— Teams 
of federal immigration agents 
are knocking on doors, check- 
ing jails and prisons and 
searching work sites nation- 
wide as pan of a Clinton ad- 
ministration campaign to 
track down immigrants — il- 
legal and legal — who are 
subject to deportation. 

The Immigration and Nat- 
uralization Service expects to 
deport 93,000 people during 
this fiscal year — 35 percent 
more than last year. A third of 
the people deported so far this 
year were living in Southern 
California. 

Federal officials have long 
targeted illegal immigrants in 
the U.S. -Mexico border area. 

But the aggressive use of 
formal deportation proce- 
dures underscores a new pri- 
ority: tracking down noncit- 
izens and deporting them 
because they committed 
crimes in the United States or 
because they flouted depor- 
tation orders. 

Large numbers of illegal 
immigrants under orders to 
leave the United States have 


eluded detection and van- 
ished' into the population. 
They are now labeled as fu- 
gitives. 

Huge annual increases to 
the present $3.1 billion 
budget of the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service — 
its funding has more than 
doubled in the last four years 
— have led to a larger staff 
and an expansion of detention 
facilities. 

The new deportation cam- 
paign has caused anxiety in 
some ethnic neighborhoods 
of Southern California, where 


the nation’s largest concen- 
tration of illegal immigrants 
had begun to feel relatively 
secure. 

Some immigrants fear a re- 
turn to the days when federal 
agents roamed the streets, de- 
taining people who looted 
like foreigners. This practice 
was largely abandoned a de- 
cade ago after a public out- 
cry. 

"This kind of activity can 
destroy a whole community 
said the Reverend Dennis 
O’Neil, pastor of Sl Thomas 
the Apostle Roman Catholic 


Church in Los Angeles. 

Federal officials stress that 
the present campaign is fo- 
cused on criminals" and im- 
migrants who exhausted all 


appeals and went into hiding 
to evade deportation. 

Computers have allowed 
teams of agents to converge 
on fugitives in specific areas. 





Away From 
/Politics 


• Three pnmksters sen- 
_ . • fenced to 15 years for 
failing up .a stop sign, lead- 
■ ■ ,ing to an accident that killed 
/ three teenagers, were freed in 
Tampa, Florida, pending ap- 
' peals. Hie three, all in their 



top enlisted soldier, Sergeant 
Major Gene McKinney, will 
be aired in open hearings as 
he and news organizations 
wanted, the U.S. Court of Ap- 
peals for the Armed Forces in 
the District of Columbia has 
ruled- The hearings are. to 
determine whether he should 
be coart-martiaied- The arm; 
wanted them closed. . £T 






^ m r 4 AM* uu *** 

, early 20s, were, found guilty 
^ '.in die deaths of three 18-year- 


, ✓ 

y 




|,1 C ’I MM 


./•olds killed when a truck hit 
.Their car broadside. (AP) 

!*O.J. Simpson must turn 
^ a * (Over any profits from invest- 

- ?ments In two businesses, 
... .Orenthal Productions Inc. and 
"■ *® . kaked ham chain, to die 

“ ^ family of Ronald Goldman to 

. ' /satisfy a $33.5 million wrong- 
draft judgmMU a judge m 
_;-\C. • Be yerly Hffls, California, 
' - ^ . Lawyers for Mr. 
‘ .Simpson contended the ven- 
**■* v -farer wera worthless. ■ (AP) 


-*p. 


i»» / • Charges of sexual rais- 

- conduct a gain fit the army’s 



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PAGE ^ 


INTERNATIONAL HERA LD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1997 


Patten’s S umming Up: 
Democracy Is Secure 

Hong Kong Satisfies Its ‘Last Emperor’ 


By Keith Richburg 

Washington Pan Service 

HONG KONG — With six days left 
before his duty ends and Hong Kong is 
handed back to China, Governor Chris 
Patten said Tuesday he was satisfied 
that his sometimes tumultuous five-year 
tenure had left this territory freer and 
more self-confident than before and that 
the democratic space he opened could 
not be easily closed again. 

“I think the genie is out of the 
bottle,” Mr. Patten said in an interview 
at the governor's mansion. 

Asked if Hong Kong's nascent de- 
mocracy and more-open political cul- 
ture could be rolled back by a Chinese 
administration, he replied, ‘‘I think it 
would be unwise to try.” 

“One thing I very much hope is that 
I've contributed to a greater feeling of 
self-confidence in Hong Kong, standing 
up for the sort of values which are going 
to keep this place different and more or 
less free.’ ’ Mr. Patten said. 

The incoming Chinese administra- 
tion has already approved a package of 
laws, due to take effect in die early 
minutes Tuesday that will roll back 
some of Mr. Patten's electoral and civil 
liberties reforms. The legislature, the 
most democratically elected one in 
Hong Kong’s history, will be scrapped. 
New laws will tighten restrictions on 
political protests. And colonial-era laws 
requiring all organizations to register 
with the government will be reinstated. 

Mr. Patten — whom a critic recently 
dubbed “the last emperor of Hong 
Kong * * — said the irony of his position 
was that “I’m the last departing em- 
peror who will be able to say that there 
was more democracy when the com- 
munity was a colony than when it was 
not” 

But. he added, he was confident that 
political pluralism — not authoritarian 
government favored by proponents of 
what is called “Asian values” — was 
the wave of the future and that pros- 
perous Hong Kong, with its well-edu- 
cated and affluent population, was rid- 
ing that global trend. 

Mr. Patten's successor , Tung Chee- 
hwa, the shipping tycoon who will be- 
come chief executive on Tuesday, has 
often cited Singapore’s senior minister, 
Lee Kuan Yew, as a model. Mr. Tung 
has come down on the side of Asian 
values, with its emphasis on stability 
and order as preferable to Western so- 
cietal values, which place priority on 
individual rights and freedoms. 

In a speech last month, Mr. Tung 


firmly sided with the proponents of 
Asian values, idling nis audience, 
“Asians are different from Americans 
because of our upbringing, culture and 
history.” 

“These values have been with us for 
thousands of years and are as relevant 
today as they have ever been,’ ’ he con- 
tinued, citing “a belief in order and 
stability, an emphasis on obligations to 
the community rather than rights of the 
individual.” He said these values made 
Asian societies “more cohesive.” 

But Mr. Patton, without mentioning 
his successor by name, said Tuesday, 
“Why do we assume that Lee Kuan 
Yew is tiie embodiment of Asian values 
rather than Daw Aung San Suu Kyi,” 
the Burmese opposition leader? “Or 
Martin Lee,” the Hong Kong pro-de- 
mocracy politician. 

Mr. Lee, Mr. Patton said, is “an elo- 
quent advocate of authoritarian gov- 
ernment That's not necessarily Asian 
and it’s certainly not necessarily Con- 
fucian." 

“I’m sure Singapore has many vir- 
tues,” Mr. Patton said, “but people 
aren’t queuing up to reapply them to 
Hong Kong.” 

■ Lee Critical of Britain 

Mr. Lee fired a parting shot Tuesday 
.at Britain, wanting that Hong Kong’s 
people would pay the price of its rule, 
Agence France-Presse reported 

“I’ve always admired them for very 
far-sighted realistic diplomacy, but in 
this particular case, at the tail-end of 
. empire, they thought primarily of them- 
selves and not toe people of Hong 
Kong,” Singapore's senior minister 
said at a forum with Asia-Pacific busi- 
ness executives. 

“I think the British side did notlive up 
to tour highest tradition.” he added 

Mr. Lee also said that Mr. Patten 
would leave “bad blood ” with bis re- 
forms. “I think that Beijing's attitude 
will be one of grave suspicion and skep- 
ticism that you have tried to smuggle a 
Trojan horse into Shenzhen or Guang- 
dong,” Mr. Lee said referring to toe 
booming southern Chinese regions bor- 
dering Hong Kong. 

“Thar is goiog to make things much 
tighter, and I think that is the biggest 
penalty Hong Kong is paying for this 
belated and misconceived effort” 

Mr. Lee said that China “would stand 
for a separate city, a sense of cityhood, 
and having identified that give it suf- 
ficient institutional channels so that it 
can express itself and then loctic after its 
interests collectively.” 



MkcfMVIbeAMBcaiedPn 

A young Hong Kong woman waiting outside the U.S. Consulate on Tuesday to seek a visa. Many other 
applicants have turned up before the colony reverts from Britain to Chinese rule at midnight Monday, 

U.S. Official Freed, in Curious Timing 


By Seth Faison 

Nov York Tunes Service 

HONG KONG — With just days left 
before Hong Kong's legal system starts 
answering to a Chinese master, toe au- 
thorities quietly released a senior United 
Stares immigration official from cus- 
tody on Tuesday. 

The official, Jerry Stuchiner. was ar- 
rested on corruption charges nearly a 
year ago, and he argued in court that his 
life might be endangered if he remained 
in a Hong Kong prison after China tales 
control over the British colony July 1. 

That might have been overstating 
tilings. American and Hong Kong of- 
ficials say toe real reason Mr. Stuchiner 
won early release was that be agreed to 
cooperate with prosecutors in a coming 
case against another American immi- 
gration official in Hong Kong, who to- 
gether with his wife is under inves- 
tigation for helping smuggle Chinese 
immigrants to toe United States. 

Mr. Stuchiner’s case probably re- 
veals more about criminal activity with- 
in the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service than anything else. 

But the curious timing of his release 
highlights a touchy legal issue, one that 
remains unresolved as China regains 
control over Hong Kong; Beijing’s right 
to question people already in custody 
here. 

In Mr. Stuchiner’s case, it is unlikely 


that anyone in Washington liked the 
idea of a corrupt American official, who 
for years had access to a certain level of 
intelligence files, suddenly being vul- 
nerable to questioning by officers from 
Beijing. 

In other, more ordinary cases, if 
mainland officials request access to a 
prisoner, it seems unlikely that the Hong 
Kong government would refuse. 

“There is nothing in the law that 
would block access,” said Nihal Jay- 
awickrama, a law professor at Uni- 
versity of Hong Kong. 

”On any particular case, it would be 
up to the authorities in Hong Kong 
whether to grant access or not. Whether 
they do or not might depend at what 
level the request was made. ” 

At toe same time, while outsiders 
may fear toe worst about China’s future 
role in Hong Kong's legal system, law 
enforcement authorities here actually 
expect a minim um of meddling in legal 
cases by mainland officials. 

They say it is hard to imagine 
Beijing’s ever moving a prisoner from 
Hong Kong. 

“There is no way anything could 
happen to these people politically after 
toe handover,” said Jim Bell, a senior 
investigator at Hong Kong's Independ- 
ent Commission on Corruption, refer- 
ring to people in jail. “But it is a good 
ploy for anyone trying to stay out of jail 
in Hong Kong. They all want ro use it: 


‘You can’t send me back to a Com- 
munist regime.’ ” 

Mr. Stuchiner, 45, a flashy operator 
who often toasted about his friendships 
with tycoons when he was chief agent 
for the immigration service in Hong 
Kong from 1989-1994, was arrested at 
Hong Kong’s airport in July 1996 as he 
arrived from Honduras, where he was 
transferred in 1994. 

He carried five blank Honduran pass- 
ports with the intention, he lata: ad- 
mitted, of selling them for $30,000 to 
$40,000. He pleaded guilty to forgery 
and was sentenced to three and a half 
years in prison. 

In April, he was aided by a bizarre 
legal technicality, when a Hong Kong 
court ruled that he had been wrongly 
charged with forgery, since the Hon- 
duran passports were actually left blank. 
He was resentenced, on a lesser charge, 
to three months. 

But by that time Mr. Stuchiner had 
apparently negotiated a way out 
already, by cooperating an another case 
involving an immigration official, 
James DeBates, 45. An American of- 
ficial said Mr. Stuchiner had been angry 
at the way his colleague testified against 
him, and was determined to get at least a 
little revenge. 

Mr. DeBates was placed on admin- 
istrative leave without pay in March, but 
has gone to toe United States, claiming 
he needed special medical attention. 



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SHANGHAI: 

One China, Two Cities 

Continued from Page I 

1995 interview with the Shanghai Star. 

Not long ago, Shanghai's rise was seen as a 
potential threat to Hong Kong and part of a 
strategy to make China less vulnerable to polit- 
ical and economic blackmail in Hong Kong. 

Now, however, the fates of the two cities do 
seem to be intertwined. 

“The development of Shanghai shows that 
mainland China can and will develop more than 
one great economic city and that Hong Kong 
interests actually have the potential to benefit 
substantially from the process,” wrote a group 
of business professors and consultants in a book 
called “The Hong Kong Advantage.” 

“Shanghai will boom, there’s no doubt in my 
mind,” said Ronnie Chan, a Hong Kong-based 
real-estate 'tycoon. "I hope so. Tne reason? If 
China is doing fantastic, then Hong Kong will 
be doing fantastic too.' ’ 

No longer willing to depend solely on Hong 
Kong as its window to the world, China’s lead- 
ers are boosting Shanghai and encouraging oth- 
er cities to play more prominent international 
roles. Dalian is wooing Japanese investment, 
Xiamen courts Taiwanese investors looking 
forward to the opening up of direct shipping 
across the Taiwan Strait, and Shandong's 
coastal cities are luring Korean business. 

But no other city in China can match Shang- 
hai in its race to overtake Hong Kong and 
eventually match New York. The Shanghai 
stock exchange, initially housed in a pre-rev- 
olutionary hotel ballroom, is moving into a 
high-rise that is one of dozens of new towers. In 
just three years, Shanghai has built more than 
500 million square feet (45 million square me- 
ters) of new office space. 

The air is thick with construction dust, the 
streets echo with the rat-a-tat of jackhammers, 
and toe night skyline is lit by the floodlights of 
construction sites. 

These are Herculean fetus in a city of 16 
million, with streets that were built for bicycles 
and rickshaws. Quaint but crowded, much of the 
old housing has been leveled in toe name of 
progress. More people have been forced to 
move in Shanghai over the last five years than 
the 1 million who will be forced to make way for 
toe giant Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze. 
600 miles (960 kilometers) upriver to toe west. 

“I don’t know any place on Eanh that is 
changing as rapidly as this one,” said Christopher 
Shapland Tibbs, head of China corporate finance 
at Citibank, which moved its China operations to 
Shan ghai from Hong Kong three years ago. 

“Shanghai isn’t 100 years behind anymore,” 
Mr. Tibbs said. “It’s catching up real quick.” 

Shanghai's drive has been helped by its links 




Mm 



Y«o Dawo/A^scc Fnacc-Pimc 

Students performing before a portrait of Deng Xiaoping, China’s former senior leader. 
In a tribute to Mr. Deng’s participation in returning Hong Kong to Chinese rule. 

with Hoag Kong. One is personal. The leaders real-estate and broadcasting magnate whose 
of both cities are politically connected through a family owned textile mills in Shanghai and who 
network known as toe * ‘Shanghai gang. ' ’ Hong got his start in Shanghai 70 years ago producing 
Kong’s incoming chief executive, Tung Cbee- plays and movies. Many of toe museum l s ob- 
hwa, and its top civil servant, Anson Chan, are jeers have been donated by Hong Kong lu- 
from Shan ghai. minaries. 

Four former mayors or former party sec- Roy Ho, head of operations in Shanghai for the 
retanes of Shanghai are in toe Chinese Com- Hang Leng Group, one of Hong Kong’s biggest 
munist Party’s Politburo: Jiang Zemin, China's p ro P e ^-^ e l°P ment firms, said: “If you be- 
president and party chief; Zhu Rongji and Wu lieve that China is in the midst of irreversible 
Bangguo, the vice premiers, and the party sec- change, and I do, then what are you going to do? 
retary, Huang Ju. The population here has already tasted success. 

Also from Shanghai are China's vice pres- How are you going to change that?” 
idem, Rong Yiren, and Qiao Shi, chairman of He is overseeing work on a mammoth office 
the National People’s Congress and one of the and retail complex, one 'of three sites being 
seven members of the Politburo's standing developed by Hang Leng at a total cost of about 
committee. SI billion. 

Many of Hong Kong's billionaires also have The Hongkong Bank, which had a Shanghai 
roots in Shanghai. So, while some nervous branch from 1865 until the Communist rev- 
Hong Kong residents have been weighing olution in 1949, announced last week that it 
whether to flee to safer havens, many Hong would move more management to Shanghai and 
Kong tycoons have been donating and investing centralize mainlan d operations here. The bank's 
their money here: * chairman, John Strickland, told Hong Kong 

Over the doors of the galleries at the Shanghai newspapers that there was “a definite pos- 
Museum are the names of wealthy Hong Kong sibility that Shanghai might become a more 
donors, such as Run Run Shaw, a Hong Kong important financial center than Hong Kong.” 


Do you uve m Athens? 

For a hand-delivered subscription on the day 
of publication call 00 33 1 4143 9361. 




and Mnsfim retob m toe southern 
PS&dia *£ d uring the past week, 
toq rafery said Tuesday. 

"’rite operation will continue 
and T, bcaeve casualties will in- 
crease' as fighting goes on.” toe 
sde&etn commander, General 
Romeo PadBefabs, said as hundreds 
of soldiers, backed by helicopter 
gunships, chased about 200 guer- 
rillas in Magmridanao Province. 

Clashes began June 16 after the i 
rebels belonging to the Moro Is- 
lamic Liberation Front seized the 
project site of toe Philippine Na- 
tional Oil Co. Exploration Corp. m 
Sultan-sa-Barongis. 

The dead included 30 rebels and 
three soldiers. General Padiemos 
said. 

About 30,000 villagers have fled 
to government evacuation centers 
to avoid being caught in the cross- 
fire, the officials said. ( Reuters t 

Kashmiris Seek 
Role in Discussions 

SRINAGAR, India — Kashmiri 
separatists cautiously welcomed In- 
dia’s agreement to discuss the di- 
vided region in talks with Pakistan 
but urged the two nations to include 
Kashmiris in the negotiations. 

. “I am happy that India has fi- 
nally agreed to talk over the Kash- 
mir dispute,” toe separatist leader 
Shabir Ahmad Shah said Tuesday 
in Srinagar, the summer capital of 
Jammu and Kashmir state. 

“It is a healthy sign, but these 
two neighbors in future talks must 
include Kashmiris, main party to 
toe dispute, for better results,' * Mr. 
Shah, one of the most popular sep- 
aratist leaders in the state, said. 

India asserts that Kashmir — in- 
cluding a section controlled by 
Pakistan since 1947 — is an in- 
tegral part of the union, and insists 
that any discussions be limited to 
representatives of New Delhi and 
Islamabad. {Renters) 

3d Lawsuit Protests 
U.S. Extradition 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — A 
third lawsuit has been filed against 
toe Pakistani government in protest 
of the extradition of a man accused 
of killing two CIA employees. 

The Pakistan Institute of Human 
Rights went to court Monday, after 
lawsuits were filed by an opposition 
politician and toe former director of 
Pakistan’s spy agency. All allege 
that the government broke toe law 
when it extradited Mir Aimal Kansi 
to the United States last week. 

Mr. Kansi, 33, was picked up at a 
hotel, taken by helicopter to Is- 
lamabad and then flown to toe 
United States without receiving a 
hearing in Pakistan, as is required 
under toe U.S. -Pakistan extradition 
treaty. 

Information Minister Mushahid 
Hussein said in a statement last 
weekend that there was no question 
of any deal between the United 
States and Pakistan, and added that 
toe government did not protect any 
person charged with having been 
mvolved in terrorism. (Reuters} 

Troops Drive Off 
Chinese in Spratlys 

MANILA — Philippine troops 
fired warning shots to drive away 
Chinese fishing boats in the latest 
incident involving toe two coun- 
tries in toe disputed Spratly Islands, 
toe military said Tuesday. 

A report by the military said the 
shooting occurred Friday after a 
Chinese fishing vessel anchored 
near Kota Island, occupied by the 
Philippines, and sent five boats to 
fish in toe area. 

“This prompted Kota detach- 
ment to give warning shots, forcing 
them to stop their activities,” a 
statement issued to reporters said. 

The fishermen immediately 
went back to their mother ship, 
which withdrew two hours ialer, 
toe report added. (Reuters! 

Gunmen Kill 6 
In Pakistan Attacks 

LAHORE, Pakistan — Gunmen 
killed five men Tuesday id 
Pakistan’s central Punjab Province 
in an upsurge of sectarian violence, 
and one man was slain in the south- 
ern port city of Karachi in apparent 
ethnic violence, the police said. 

Three men, two of them mem- 
bers of toe minority Shiite sect of 
Islam, were fatally wounded at a 
store in the central Punjab town of 
Jhang, the police said, f Reuters I 







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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Prime Minister Voices Doubt That Rebels Will Yield Pol Pot 


BRIEFLY 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Tunes Service 


Some Guerrillas Still Support Him, Prince Ranariddh Says 


PHNOM PENH — First Prime Min- 
ister Norodom Ranariddh voiced public 
doubt for the first time Tuesday tha t 
Khmer Rouge guerrillas who are said to 
have arrested their leader, Pol Pot. would 
band him over to the government for 
trial 

If he is not turned over in the coming 
days. Prince Ranariddh said, “We can- 
not trust them. If we could not resolve 
the problem in a very short period of 
time, we cannot talk about trust, con- 
fidence." 

According to Prince Ranariddh, the 
Khmer Rouge leadership in the northern 
Cambodian jungle has ruptured, and Mr. 
Pol Pot is being held by guerrillas who 
have turned against him. 

But on Tuesday be painted a murkier 
picture than be has in die past, saying 


some guerrillas still support Mr. Pol Pot 
and that ‘ 'they need to cut themselves off 
from Pol Pot" before deciding to hand 
him over to die government 

Sounding less confident than he has in 
recent days, he said, “The political elim- 
ination of Pol Pot is not a very easy 
matter." 

If Mr. Pol Pot is not handed over, it 
would mean he would r emain at his 
remote stronghold — whether in cus- 
tody or not — together with his armed 
men, just as he has been for the last 18 
years. 

From 1975 to 1979, Mr. Pol Pot and 
the radical Maoist Khmer Rouge nearly 
destroyed their country, emptying its 
cities, crashing its culture and causing 
the deaths of more than a milli on people 
before being driven into the jungle by a 


French Envoy Is Trapped 
In Brazzaville Mission 


Fighting in Capital Ignores the Truce ’ 


Compiled by Our Sktf Frva DOptsdm 


BRAZZAVILLE, Congo Republic — 
France's ambassador here, the only for- 
eign emissary left in this capital, was 
trapped in his embassy Tuesday as new 
fighting erupted outside. 

Ambassador Raymond Cesaire, 
whose 30 gendarmes are tbe only for- 
eign force in the city, had earlier made 
his rounds of the battling opponents 
and other key Figures as he pressed on 
with efforts, so far fruitless, to restore 


peace. 

One mortar round landed about 100 
meters from the embassy, in the disputed 
heart of the capital beside the Congo 
River, before the fighting subsided and 
calm returned. 

For almost a week, a cease-fire has 
more or less held — though the truce 
seemed more like war. 

Shelling and smJl-arms fire have 
been part of the daily routine for 
nervous residents, with a 90-minute 
artillery duel Monday providing the 
worst, but not the last, breach of the 
cease-fire that both sides had agreed 


Peacekeepers Shell Rebels 
In Central African Republic 


Reuters 

BANGUI, Central African Republic 
— African peacekeepers shelled parts of 
the Central African Republic’s capital. 
Bangui, where mutinous soldiers were 
holed up Tuesday after four days of 
clashes, forcing thousands of people to 
flee, witnesses said. 

Residents said shelling by tanks and 
heavy mortars began at about 1 1 A.M. 
and was directed at Camp Kassai and at 
southern districts loyal to mutineers who 
have yet to rejoin their units under a 
peace deal reached in January. 

Medical workers say the clashes have 
killed at least 30 people and wounded at 
least 70. Bangui has been subject to three 
army mutinies in less than a year. 

France, the former colonial power, 
denied in a statement in Paris that it had 
provided direct help to the peacekeepers, 
but said a French helicopter had attacked 


TRIAL: Image Problems for UN Tribunal 


Continued from Page 1 


wanted men, the former Bosnian Serb 
president, Radovan Karadzic, and his 
military chieftain. Ratko Mladic, remain 
at large, visible to their neighbors every 
day but detained neither by local au- 
thorities, nor by U.S.-led Western forces 
in Bosnia, both of which are formally 
required to apprehend any of the 
tribunal’s indicted. General Blaskic 
gave himself up to the tribunal, saying he 
wanted to fight the charges. 

Judge Louise Arbour, the tribunal's 
chief prosecutor since last October, said 
she was concerned that, without major 
arrests, the tribunal could be dismissed 
as “a totally impotent institution." 

“It’s important we don’t die a slow 
death of neglect," she said in an in- 
terview on the eve of the Blaskic trial. 
"We’ve only made a dem in what we 
have to do." 

M. Sherif Bassiouni, an expert on 
international crime who works for the 
United Nations on war crimes matters, 
said, “The prosecution is caught be- 
tween the devil and the deep blue sea.” 

Citing the "costly arithmetic" of $1.3 
million spent per indictment, Mr. Bas- 
siouni said the tribunal's position is 
“very vulnerable to criticism: Four 
years and $100 million, and what has it 
produced?" 


Vietnamese invasion. On Sunday, the 
United States said it was working on a 
plan to extradite Mr. Pol Pot so that he 
could be tried under the auspices of the 
United Nations for crimes against hu- 
manity. 

But even if the Cambodian govern- 
ment does gain custody of the former 
dictator, new doubts were cast Tuesday 
on that plan when China announced that, 
as a member of the United Nations Se- 
curity Council, it would not support such 
a proceeding. 

And on Monday, tbe chief of Thai- 
land’s National Security Council Boon- 
$ak Kamhaengri thirong , said Mr. Pol 
Pot was extremely ill and might not live 
long enough to be put on trial. 

Thailand has maintained a close un- 
derground working relationship with 


the Khmer Rouge, and Thai intelligence 
about the guerrillas is believed to 
be at least as good as that of Cambo- 
dia. 

With China opposed to a tribunal and 
with the Khmer Rouge apparently slow 
to agree t to turn Mr. rol Pot over to the 
government, it appeared that a possible 
prearranged scenario bad run into trou- 
ble. 

Prince Ranariddh also announced 
Tuesday that general elections would 
be held next May, setting a deadline for 
the survival of the tenuous democracy 


increasingly tenuous coalition govern- 
ment of mice Ranariddh and his co- 
prime minister, Hun Sen. 

The growing rivalry between the two 
men, which has included threats and 
sporadic violence, has raised doubts 
over whether the election, which was 
scheduled to be held some rime next 


Mobutu Son Faces ~ 
Brussels Charges 


year, would in fact take place and, if so, 
whether the loser would accept the out- 
come. 

The split in the Cambodian leadership 
has paralyzed much of the government. 
From the top down, a parallel bureau- 
cracy includes often antagonistic co- 
ministers of every ministry, including 
defense. 

Because of these divisions, the Cam- 
bodian Parliament has not met in months 
and no election law has been adopted to 
set out the procedures under which 
a campaign and balloting would be 
held. 


that was put in place in Cambodia in 
1993 when the united Nations organ- 
ized tbe country’s first democratic elec- 
tion. 

That first election, the product of a $2 
billion international effort, produced the 


BRUSSELS — A son of Mob* 
Sese Seko, the ousted president tf 
Congo, the former Zaire, is befcgji 
held in Belgium on charges of at- 
tempted fraud, tbe Brussels public 
prosecutor’s office said Tuesday. 

A spokesman said Fangbi 
Mobutu Ndokuia was accused of 
trying to swindle a Belgian com- 
pany out more than 3 million Bel 
gian francs ($85,000) with a false 
check. He said a Brands conn had 
accepted boil of more than 3 million 
francs, but the prosecutor's office 
appealed, effectively, keeping Mr. 
Mobutu in custody. 

The bail had been deposited from 
Morocco, where Marshal Mobutu is 
staying. (Reuters) 


V 1,a,loW8 


Circumcision Ban 


to observe until the weekend. 

Estimates put the dead at 1,000 to 
3,000 after the 12 days of battles in 
early June that erupted when President 
Pascal Lissouba tried to disarm the 
militia of his adversary, the former 
one-party ruler. General Denis Sas- 
sou-Nguesso. 

Monday was the worst day of fi ghting 
since the truce was signed last week. A 
hotel next to the evacuated Italian Em- 
bassy was also heavily hit by mortar 
fire. 

Some residents have ventured into the 
streets of Brazzaville in recent days dur- 
ing lulls in the fighting to bury their 
dead. People transported corpses in 
wheelbarrows toward a vacant plot of 
land for hasty burial The city's cemeter- 
ies are mostly inaccessible because they 
are near the line of fire. 

Red Cross workers, who collected 
more than 100 bodies over the weekend, 
were suspended their duties Monday, 
fearing for their safety. They said that 
many more bodies were scattered 
through the capital (Reuters, AP) 



Rejected in Egypt 


CAIRO — A court on Tuesday 
overturned a government ban cm 
female circumcision performed by 
health-care workers, a procedure 
popular in Egypt despite deaths 
caused by botched surgeries. 

In his verdict on a petition by 
eight Muslim scholars and doctors. 
Judge Abdul Aziz Hamade said the 
ban was illegal because it over- 
stepped government authority’ and 
took away the medical profession's 
legal right. 

Home Minister Ismail Sail am an- 
nounced the ban last July after a 
campaign by rights groups, who say 
the procedure is dangerous, and not 
necessarily sanctioned by Islam as 
claimed by proponents. (API 


Iran Says It Holds 
American Citizen 


'■ * ' • "v 

-• • ■■ 


*;* r * 


TEHRAN — An American na- 
tional has been arrested in Iran for 
entering the country illegally. 
Ayatollah Mohammed Yazdl the 
chief of the judiciary, said Tuesday. 

Speaking at a .press conference, 
he did not reveal the identity of the 
arrested American or the date or 
place of apprehension. f AFPt 


Icm-Mat B*^o/Thc AwnHil Pie- 

RESCUE BY WATER — A barge carrying Rwandan Hutu children who had been lost in the jungle arriving 
Tuesday in Mbandaka in northwestern Congo. The refugees are being repatriated by tbe United Nations. 


150 Rioting Youths 
Arrested in Quebec 


Raiders Kill 18 


In Algeria Village 


mortar positions in “legitimate de- 
fense” after shells fell Monday on the 
French Embassy. French troops are in 
Bangui under a defense pact 

The peacekeepers intervened under 
the Jan. 25 peace deal to end political and 
ethnic clashes between supporters and 
opponents of President Ange-Felix Pa- 
tasse in the army. 

A spokesman for the mutineers said of 
the latest fighting that "this operation of 
elimination was prepared long ago" by 
elements of the presidential guard and 
tiie peacekeeping force. 

The shells that landed Monday on the 
French Embassy came after seven people, 
five of them French, were wounded there 
Saturday by mortar rounds. No one was 
hurt in Monday’s barrage. 

Die 800-member African force in- 
cludes soldiers from Burkina Faso, 
Chad. Gabon, Mali Senegal and Togo. 


But Judge Arbour, Mr. Bassiouni, and 
others monitoring the progress of the 
tribunal cite plenty of extenuating cir- 
cumstances: 

Establishing an international cri minal 
system without precedent. Running in- 
vestigations, prosecutions and trials in- 
volving witnesses from around the 
world. Conducting every significant 
conversation in two or more languages. 
Managing twin full-scale tribunals (the 
other one deals with war crimes in 
Rwanda) that share judges and chief 
prosecutor. Challenging adamant prin- 
ciples about state sovereignty and break- 


The Associated Press 

ALGIERS — An armed group 
slashed the throats of 18 villagers 
during a nighttime raid in a village 
near Algiers, officials said Tuesday, 
in tbe latest attack attributed to the 
five-year-old militant Muslim in- 
surgency. 

A 6-month-oId child, four youths 
and eight women were among those 
killed in a village 13 kilometers ('8 
miles) south of the capital, officials 
said 

The killings occurred last 
Wednesday and the victims, all 
members of tbe same family, were 
buried Thursday in their village 
near Mouzaia. 

No one took responsibility for the 
massacre, which bore the hallmarks 
of Muslim militants, trying since 
1992 to topple tbe miiitary-backed 
government. More than 60,000 
people have died in the bloodshed 
triggered when the army canceled a 
January 1992 legislative vote that a 
Muslim fundamentalist party was 
expected to win. 

Violence between security forces 
and insurgents had declined in the 
wake of the Algerian elections on 
June 5. President Liamine Zeroual ’s 
National Democratic Rally won the 
parliamentary vote on the promise 
to end (be random bombings and 
massacres in villages. 

Government officials would not 
confirm this latest massacre, but the 
independent newspaper El Watan 
reported Tuesday that the armed 
group burned the house of the vic- 
tims before leaving the village. 


Nigerian Opposition Leader 
Passes Sd Year in Detention 


Reuters 

LAGOS — Moshood Abiola, the ap- 
parent winner of Nigeria’s presidential 
election in 1993, marked three years in 
detention on Tuesday with no sign that 
be will be released soon. 

He was arrested in 1994 after pro- 
claiming himself president in defiance 
of the military ruler of Nigeria, General 
Sani Abacha. 

"Abiola was not discussed," a gov- 
ernment official said after a meeting of 
top military officers in the capital Abuja 
on Monday. The discussions focused on 
a fuel shortage that has gripped thecoun- 
tiy. 

The anniversary of Mr. Abiola’s de- 
tention, like that of the annulled pres- 
idential election on June 1 2, 1 993 that he 
is widely believed to have won, passed 
with only moderate media mention. 


next year when presidential elections are 
scheduled, at the end of General 
Abacha’ s three-year program for a tran- 
sition to democracy. 


QUEBEC — Policemen arrested 
150 rioting youths early Tuesday in 
Quebec province's two main cities. 
Quebec, the capital, and Montreal, 
the largest city. 

A policeman was hurt when the 
police clashed with youths who 
broke shop windows in Quebec city. 
’ The violence erupted on the day of 
Quebec’s patron saint, St. John the 
Baptist, which is celebrated as the 
national holiday. (Reuters) 


Nigeria, Exporter, to Import Oil 


But political commentators say they 
believe Mr. Abiola will become an issue 


Nigeria, the world’s sixth largest 
crude oil producer, will resort to emer- 
gency imports of petroleum to deal with a 
fuel shortage caused , by its decrepit re- 
fineries, The Associated Press reported. 

General Abacha announced the move 
in a statement Monday as public anger, 
over the month-old fuel crunch in- 
creased after the deaths of three people 
linked to the fuel shortage. 

The statement the national petroleum 
company had been ordered to begin im- 
mediate imports of refined petroleum 
products to meet the daily domestic de- 
mand for gasoline of 18 million liters (5 
million gallons). It said the imports should 
resolve the crisis within 48 hours. 


Extended Flooding 
Devastates Chile 


SANTIAGO — Chile declared a 
"state of catastrophe" on Monday 
in Santiago and seven central re- 
gions because of heavy rains and 
flooding that have forced about 
50,000 people to flee their homes. 

Interior Minister Carlos Figueroa 
announced tbe measure covering an 
area from the Atacama desert in the 
north to 500 miles (800 kilometers) 
south of Santiago. The declaration 
frees government funds for flood 
relief. (Reuters) 


LIBRARIES: Gates Giving Many Millions From His Fortune 


Continued from Page 1 


approximately 17,000 libraries in the 
United States and Canada. 

“We don’t anticipate turning libraries 
away if they fit the grant guidelines,’’ 
she said. 


Ms. Stones if er said she was planning 
to give out most of die foundation’s $200 


ing legal ground for the superseding 
authority of an international war-crimes 


to bring war criminals to justice has also 
raised the pressure on the Clinton ad- 


authority of an international war-crimes 
court. Dealing with the shrinking fi- 
nancing for the United Nations, which 
pays the bills for the tribunal. 

But no obstacle to this tribunal’s ef- 
fectiveness is so great as the failure of 
the former warring entities to turn ova 1 
to the tribunal documents* witnesses 
and, especially, the wanted criminals 
themselves. 

The arrival of Madeleine Albright at 
the U.S . State Department and ha recent 
visit to the Balkans have given new 
rhetorical impetus to the current U.S. 
policy of using both friendly and threat- 
ening suasion against die recalcitrant 
leaders of Bosnia and Croatia. But the 
secretary of state's voiced commitment 


raised the pressure on the Clinton ad- 
ministration to send its own forces to 
overpower local resistance and arrest 
Mr. Karadzic, General Mladic and other 
big fish and bring them to the detention 
center in The Hague. 

The Pentagon is reported to object to a 
“snatch" operation, which carries a 
high risk of casualties and an uncertain 
prospect of success. Mr. Bassiouni who 
shares that wariness, spoke of retaliatory 
hostage- taking, ambushes, terrorist 
bombings. 

"Are the United States and the West 
willing to accept that?" he asked. 

He also said an armed operation 
would focus public attention on “the 
kidnapped people rather than on what 
they did." 


million over the next five years. 

At that point, the couple may decide to 
make additional contributions to tbe pro- 
gram, she said. 

“We'll keep this thing going frill 


speed ahead as long as there are still 
needs out there," Mr. Gates said in the 


New York City and a pension fund for 
professors. 

In total he donated roughly $350 mil- 
lion, estimated to be the equivalent of 
about $3.5 billion in today's dollars. 

In a 1995 interview, Mr. Gates called 
the libraries project something for his 
"declining years" 

At41, he is getting an early start on his 
promise. 

“There are a lot of needs in the 
world,” he said in the interview. “It’s 
hard to find something where there's a 
clear path to making a difference." 


began by selecting needy library sys- 
tems and inviting them to aonly for 


Ex-UN Envoy Finds No Wide Abuses of Nike’s Asian Workers 


The Associated Press 

ATLANTA — Andrew Young, the 
former U.S. delegate to the United Na- 
tions who was hired by Nike kic. ro 
evaluate its labor practices, said in a 
report Tuesday that the company was 
not widely abusing its workers in 
Asia. 

Mr. Young, who spent 15 days tour- 
ing Nike factories in the Far East, said 
they were clean, well-lighted and were 
not “sweatshops." 

Nike, the world's No. 1 manufacturer 
of athletic shoes, has been accused by 


human rights groups of mistreating its 
workers in Asia and giving them mea- 
ger pay. One report said supervisors 
groped young women as they worked. 

"While not a single abuse is ac- 
ceptable — and there have been such 
abuses — there was no evidence of 
widespread and systematic abuse of 
workers at these factories," Mr. Young 
said. 

At the same time, he said, the 
concept of workers* rights is poorly 
understood in the factories and Nike’s 
code of conduct is not prominently 


displayed. He said factory workers 
needed a better system for filing com- 
plaints and gening them investigated. 

Human rights groups said the report 
failed to focus on the main problem: that 


workers were not paid enough to live. 
They say Nike workers earn $2.46 a day 
in Indonesia, $1.60 in Vietnam and 
$ 1 .75 in China — much lower than the 
standard wage in those countries. 

Mr. Young said he was not asked to 
review wages. Nike said it will enact 
his suggestions and even fine factories 
that violate its code of conduct 


needs out there," Mr. Gates said in tbe 
interview. "Certainly, over the next five 
years we’ll spend this money. But as 
long as Microsoft is doing well there’s 
more where that came from." 

With a fortune of about $35 billion, 
Mr. Gates is now the wealthiest Amer- 
ican and is listed among the very wealth- 
iest people around the world. 

Die $200 million he has committed to 
the library program will raise his gifts to 
philanthropic projects and another foun- 
dation to a total of $555 million, ac- 
cording to Microsoft 

The latest plan won praise from the 
American Library Association, whose 
executive director, Elizabeth Martinez, 
said: “Carnegie changed the physical 
Landscape. This will do the same for the 
21st century" 

Over the years, critics have chided 
Mr. Gates for not giving more of his 
bounty to charity. 

His usual response was that he would 
eventually donate most of his wealth, 
which consists primarily of Microsoft 
stock. 

Andrew Carnegie, an immigrant to 
the United States from Scotland who 
made a fortune in the steel industry, 
espoused a philosophy of charity that the 
rich should give away their fortunes 
while they are still alive to provide guid- 
ance. 

He opposed direct charity, instead 


VOWS: Louisiana Gives Couples a Choice 


Continued from Page I 


of two who has been married for 1 1 
years. “I think it will prevent potentially 
weak marriages in some cases. When a 
man says he wants a no-fault marriage 
and a woman says she wants a covenant 
marriage, that’s going to raise some red 
flags. She's going to say. 'What? You're 
not willing to have a lifelong commit- 
ment to me?’” 

Arne Owens, a spokesman for the 
Christian Coalition, said his group 
backed legislation like- the covenant 
marriage bill 

"We believe that the ease with which 
divorces can be acquired in this country 
now is one of the reasons that we have 
such problems with marital breakup," 
Mr. Owens said. “And that is to us a 
family issue, very much so, because of 
all the consequences that flow from di- 


vorce, especially for children." 

But Martha Kegel a staff attorney 
with me Louisiana chapter of the Amer- 
ican Civil Liberties Union, called the bill 
a Trojan horse" that would, in some 
cases, harm children by holding them 
hostage to bad marriages. 

“It has the laudable goal of keeping 
ramtiies together, but it makes divorce 
difficult or even impossible in many 
unfortunate situations where divorce 
would be in the best interests of the 


channeling money into education and 
the arts through such projects as the 




network of libraries, Carnegie Hall in 


,»> y - iiro P e 


Microsoft’s program is by no means 
the only one to get computers into public 
libraries, but it is the largest aimed at 
exclusively at Libraries. 

About 1 8 months ago, Microsoft start- 
ed a smaller project called Libraries On- 
line!, which was aimed at giving provid- 
ing computers and Internet access. 

Working with die American Library 
Association, the Microsoft venture 


terns and inviting them to apply for 
equipment and cash for computer-use 
training and other expenses. 


children,” she said. “People support 
this bill because divorce is generally a 
very difficult thing for children. While 
that’s true generally speaking, it’s not 
always true in each specific case. 

Under current Louisiana law. a di- 
vorce can be granted after a couple has 
lived apart for six months, or imme- 
diately if one spouse is guilty of adultery 
or has been sentenced to prion or death 
for a felony. 

But the covenant marriage would al- 
low a divorce only after the couple has 
separated for at least two years, or with 
proof that one spouse has committed 
adultery, been sentenced to prison for a 
felony, abandoned the matrimonial 
home for at least one year, or physically 
or sexually abused the other spouse or a 
child 

A divorce in a covenantmarriage could 
also be granted if the couple has been’ 
legally separated for at least one year, or 
for 18 months if the marriage has pro- 
duced a minor child Dk grounds for a 
legal separation would be the same as for 
a covenant divorce, with the additional 
grounds of “habitual intemperance’ or 
"cruel treatment" by one spouse. 

Die bill would also require coupl® 
who choose a covenant marriage to g* 1 
premarital counseling that would in* 
elude a discussion of die restrictions or 
the covenant. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY , JUNE 25. 1997 

EUROPE 


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!!" h “iu s^Under Hague, 
7< "" ,s f; V^Tory Shadows 

■ ALean Away 
•Prom Europe 

V ■ ;.sl By Wauen Hoge 

Vs. ' Ww ytrfc Timer 5f n-fcf 

• LONDON — William Hague, whose 
; • apolitical views have gone largely un- 

• • : \ staled during his short time in Britain’s 

‘'public life, has in his opening act as 
't-/ Conservative Party leader assembled an 
' -^opposition team leaning toward the 
v ._ Thatchaite and Euroskeptic right. 

' \ His first decision to try to turn his 
j • - u battered aggregation into what be said 

< irr Utii. * ■ ‘"‘Monday would be a “fresh, new party of 

| > . ,f l *hin P * e fr t0^e,, ^ w reinstall Cecil Par- 
J • '^Irinson to the post of party chairman 
' ” l/l f" which be occupied under Prime Minister 

'Vi'S Margaret Thatcher from 1981 to 1983. 
... t \ r ' The choice was a surprising one. Mr. 
-'..''•Hague. 36, in addition to promising a 
.‘J 7 i rejuvenated party, has made a particular 
-y -, commitment to eliminating “ sleaze” 
' \ — tbe kinds of sexual adventurism a nd 
i petty corruption that repeatedly snagged 
' ' ' T the Tories under former Prime Minister 
John Major. Lord Parkinson, 65, was 

forced to leave government, after ^ 

- i: parliamentary secretary revealed that 
' ' , she was pregnant with his child. 

Among Mr. Hague’s shadow cabinet 
■"•it ' appointments are Sir Norman Fowler, 
59, another former Tray Party chair- 
- man; David Heathcoat-Amory, 48, who 

- •• .. resigned from Mr. Major's gove rnme nt 
‘ ' . a year ago over his stance on Europe, 

• " ; and Michael Howard, 56, Peter Ulley, 

- ij 53, and John Redwood, 45. tbe three 

unsuccessful candidates for the party 
/ . leadership from the right wing. 

‘ * * ; l\\ If jj h Mr. Hague, who never expressed any 

| /f . ri opposition to further integration with 

- ■ * < 1 Tf/'fjfi ( ij: tne Continent during the two years he 
spent in Mr. Major’s cabinet as sec- 
: - c retary for Wales, moved rightward on 
: - IT die issue during bis campaign for party 

leadership and then to outright hostility 

- ( v People accepting posts in his shadow 
government must pledge they will not 
~'!y countenance British participation in 
monetary union in the next 10 years. 

He offered a senior position to Ken- 
‘ ' neth Clarke, the former chancellor off the 
‘ Exchequer, whom he defeated for the 
/ "ill V j pafly leadership in a runoff vote last 

tut ill [fir week. But Mr. Clarke, who could never 
i r-,.. , i ‘ ii | pass the prescribed litmus test on 
* - / f ' ? f i / J/i / 

During the weekend, Mr. Clarke told 
assodates that he would not be going to 
the back benches quietly. He prranised a 

■ "robust” performance in the style of 

- -:"z Edward Heath, a former Prime Mmister 

who took up die same parliamentary 

- foxtek?. after being forced from the 



David Trimble, left, leader of the Ulster Unionist Party, and the party's spokesman, K^ McoTnnLs 
leaving the meeting with Prime Minister Tony. Blair at No. 10 Downing Street on Tuesday. 

Ulster Arms Compromise Is Backed 


The Associated Press 

BELFAST — Northern Ireland's 
senior Protestant and Roman Catholic 
leaders accepted a British-lrish com- 
promise Tuesday designed to over- 
come the main obstacle in peace tatkc 
— agreeing when rival paramilitary 
groups must start to disarm. 

Since negotiations began in June 
1996, pro-British Protestants have 
vowed to move forward only if the Irish 
Republican Army agrees in advance to 
“decommission” its weaponry. 

Tbe ERA and its allied political 
party, Sinn Fein, say they will call a 
new cease-fire only if the British gov- 
ernment puts aside that demand. With- 
out the cease-fire, Sinn Fein cannot 
join die talks. 

Prime Minister Tony Blair of Bri- 
tain appeared to have won the backing 
of the two politicians who between 
them represent majority opinion in 


Northern Ireland: David Trimble of 
the Ulster Unionists, the main Prot- 
estant party, and John Hume, the mod- 
erate Catholic who leads the Social 
Democratic and Labor Party. 

The British-lrish plan was approved 
Monday in New York by Mr. Blair and 
Prime Minister John Bruton of Ireland 
and presented Tuesday to the parties in 
the Belfast talks. 

It would empower an international 
commission to establish when and 
how the IRA and its pro-British para- 
military enemies would disarm, and to 


Trimble and his deputies said they 
could accept a procedure under which 
the IRA called a “permanent” cease- 
fire. Sinn Fein committed itself to 
“exclusively peaceful means” and the 
IRA began handing in weapons as 
negotiations progressed. 

In a separate overture to Sinn Fein 
on Tuesday, Mr. Bruton delivered to 
Britain the findings of an Irish gov- 
ernment investigation of "Bloody 
Sunday" in 1972, when British para- 
troops killed 13 Catholic demonstra- 
tors. The paratroops were exonerated 


military enemies would disarm, and to tors. The paratroops were exonerated 
report progress on disarmament to the by a Britisn judge. The killings provide 
negotiators. Weapons would be dis- a rallying point for IRA supporters. 


mantled or discarded ”in parallel” 
with wider progress on establishing a 
compromise government for Northern 
Ireland. 

Emerging from Mr. Blair's office at 
10 Downing Street after talks that las- 
ted an hour and 15 minutes, Mr. 


Jospin Says U.S. Was Trying 
To Impose Its Ways in Denver 

baps.” Mr. Jospin added. The prime 
PARIS — Lionel Jospin, the Socialist minister did not directly criticize Pres- 
prime minister, accused the United ident Chirac's performance at the sum- 
S tales on Tuesday of seeking to impose mil talks. 

its economic and social model on He said he had not attended himself 
Europe at the weekend meeting of because he was not interested in “formal 


leadership in 1975 by Mrs. Thatcher and ’ Group of Seven leaders in Denver. representative roles," but stressed that 


■ used it to snipe at her policies. 

”i Prime Munster Tony Blair’s 179- seat 

• :: majority in Parliament, his adoption of 
. many traditional Conservative stances 
and his disciplined leaderships the first 
50 days ta office have left the Con- 
H.j.-Jr serrative opposition with scant room-to 
score points on policy or performance. 

• • * . t, ■ u ■% f llilfi ^ Ha 8 ue ^ focused, therefore, on 

■ : . mu ./iii- such gogig ^ reorganizing the party to 
. . ... double its membership — to 600.000 — 
' y,T. opening up its fund-raising practices to 
' . halt anonymous and foreign donations 
: 77 . and setting up disciplinary procedures 
7 ; to punish members of Parliament who 
; ;;;7 commit improprieties. 

7 -7 He fiist came to public attention as a 
• ' : 7 1 6-year-old Tory wunderkind invited to 

speak 'to the 1977 Conservative Paity 
• — conference^ where he brought die del- 


I am not satisfied with the results of two Socialist ministers had accompan- 


Denver,” Mr. Jospin said in Parliament. 
“We see a certain tendency toward he- 
gemony, winch is not necessarily 
identical with exercising the global re- 
sponsibilities of a great power, even if it 
is a friend-' ' 


ied the president “because we did not 
want him to be alone." 

He said that in tbe future, efforts 
should be made to see to it that the 
concerns of Europe generally, and of 
France specifically, “are taken into ac- 


Mr. Jospin did not attend the summit count more effectively" at such meet- 
meeting. at which President Jacques ings. 


Chirac represented France. 

The pnme minister said Europe did 
uot have the same model of society as the 


United States and bad always tried to the talks. 


Finance Minister Dominique Strauss- 
Kahn and Foreign Minister Hubert 
Vedrine were in Denver to take pan in 


preserve a balance between economics 
and social priorities. 


Mr. Jospin said the Socialists did not 
want to leave President Chirac “alone 


“Europe does not have the United under those circumstances, which were 
States's attributes of power and the rules not so convenient for our country and for 
that may apply in the wake of that con- Europe." 

siderable power in the United States ' Prime Minister Jospin also said in his 
cannot be as effective in Europe,” he speech to Parliament that be was not 


' ‘ u 7 egates to ibeir feet with his call to “roll . said. entirely satisfied with tbe results of the breila group. Mr. M* 

back the frontiers erf the state." “It will be up to Europe’s determi- European Union's recent' strained in- served three times as a a 

William Jefferson Hague — he nation, and to fiance’s own ability — teigovemmental conference in Amster- ister. He was dissmissed 

. . '* shares his first and middle names with and my government will work to that dam, adding, “We worked on the basis minister in 1995 for atta 

President Bill riintnn — was bom in the end — to ensure, that Europe's concerns of tbe instructions of the previous gov- servants* privileges. 

— — * South Yorkshire town of Wentworth. carry greater weight next time per- eminent.'’ (Reuters. AFP) 

His father, Nigel, ran a family soft- 

if jt'.rfirnt dnnfc business and was part owner of a 
TO HI pub. With three elder sisters, Mr. Hag- filial* YllnKI 7 

. . - ue’s motho, Stella, has said, “It was waller OCCS XUHGLfi, 

sometimes as if be had four mothers.” -rm . rail 9 ttt i 

-v * ** ere s iio Ueal Abortion Rights Backed in Germany 


and my government will work to that dam, adding, “We worked on the basis 
end — to ensure. that Europe's concerns of tbe instructions of the previous gov- 
carry greater weight next time per- eminent.'’ (Reuters. AFP) 


In a letter accompanying; the report, 
Mr. Bruton urged Mr. Blair to “look 
afresh” at the killings. He said a new 
inquiry could help to remove a source 
of ' ‘profound distress" not only to tbe 
relatives of the victims but to the Cath- 
olic nationalist community. 


French Party 
Gets New Chief 

Reuters 

PARIS — Former finance Min- 
ister Alain Madelin was elected 
leader of the opposition Republican 
Party on Tuesday, giving him a 
power base if he can widen the 
divided group. 

With his chances of a new gov- 
ernment role in tatters after the 
left’s upset election victory this 
month, Mr. Madelin hopes to turn 
the rightist group into a broad party 
to vie for power in the next general 
election, by 2002 . 

Mr. Madelin, 51, received 59.9 
percent of the vote at a party con- 
gress in the Paris suburb of Leval- 
lois. Gilles de Robien, a Parliament 
member, won 37.28 percent, and 
Philippe Mathot, a former law- 
maker, 2.82 percent. 

Former Defense Minister Fran- 
cois Leotard agreed to yield the 
presidency of the party, which Mr. 
Madelin plans to rename Liberal 
Democracy. But he retained the 
leadership of the Union for French 
Democracy, a center-right um- 
brella group. Mr. Madelin has 
served three times as a cabinet min- 
ister. He was dissmissed as finance 
minister in 1995 for attacking civil 
servants' privileges. 


Ciller Sees Yilimaz, 


BRIEFLY 


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of transcendental meditation and credits 
it with Ms ability to get by on little sleep. 
' _ Friends say he has long acted with the 
7 formality of a far older person; he is 
7 ' always called William, never Bill. 

He went to Magdalen College, Ox- 
; fad, where he was president of the 
. Oxford Union, tbe prestigious debating 
society, and the Conservative Associ- 
-• ation, . 

' v In 1989, he ran successfully for Par- 
liament from his present seat, Rich- 
y mood in Yorkshire. He became a junior 
social security minister in 1994 and the 
secretary fra Wales the next year. 

■ _ One of the requirements of that cab- 
inet post was to learn the Gaelic lyrics to 
■ ; the Welsh national anthem, and his 
teacher was a 29-year-old aide named 
' Ffyou Jerkins. Mr. Hague said many 
; years earlier that he would put off hav- 
-- ing a serious relationship with a woman 
until be became a government minister. 
Last March, he and Ms. Jenkins were 


Reuters 

ANKARA — Tansu Ciller, who is 
stepping down as deputy prime min- 
ister, said Tuesday that she had refused 
to discuss a political pact with the prime 
minister-designate, Mesut Yiimaz. 

She said after a 20-minute meeting 
with Mr. Yiimaz that she had not dis- 
cussed a future government with him 
“so as not to legitimise Yiimaz ’s po- 
sition. ” The two politicians are bitter 
rivals for leadership of the Turkish 
right. 

“We said to Yiimaz. ‘Go immedi- 
ately wnd return the mandate to tbe pres- 
ident,’ " Mrs. Ciller said. President Su- 
leyman Demirel on Friday asked Mr. 
Yiimaz to form a government 

Mr. Yiimaz is virtually assured of die 
support of two left-wing parties, a right- 
wing grou p and conservative independ- 
ents, but he stilllacks about a dozen votes 
he needs for a majority in Parliament 


Bri tain Threatens to Ban EU Beef Imports 




; CatsfOal b>. Our SetfFivm Dhpasc^r. 

- LUXEMBOURG — Britain warned 
Tuesday drat it would Mock imports of 
beefi& nw i the European Union by mid- 

sumnkr rftheEU fails totighten its meat- 
processsa& and insDection standards. 




- r * ' 

tee, ■*** ■»* Li »-3 

IpT . -- ILifJ ' — . 


ias -ijr 


rjt a 'i 

■ HM *-■ =• 


At a meeting of EU farm ministers, 
Britain's agriculture minister. Jack 
Ottiningfomi said that beginning July 
22 , -dte government would ^ppiy the 
same strict standards dial have been 
pkcedoo British beef producers!© meat 
anpoited from otiier EU countries. 

Specifically, Mr. Cunningham said 
he would like to see certain anim al 
entrails and membranes banned from 
hse as food or animal feed. 

. Britain has faced strict oversight of its 

production since last year, when 
dozens of B ritish cattle were struck by 
outbreak of bovine spongiform en- 


cephalopathy or “mad cow” disease. 

A possible link was established be- 
tween tbe disease and a fatal brain ail- 
ment in humans. 

- To ensure that the disease is not trans- 
mitted back to Britain, Mr. Cunningham 

urged his EU partners to ban the use of the 


goats that are more than 12 months old, 

and the spleen of all sheqp and goats. 

Mr. Cunningham's proposal mirrors 
one made last week by me EU’s Ex- 
ecutive Commission, which died weak 

controls across the Union. 

On Monday, a majority of EU ag- 
riculture ministers attacked a proposal 
to cut tty 1.4 billion Ecus ($1.6 billion) 
payments to cereals farmers to help fired 
aid for beef producers, disputing a claim 
tfmt the farmers had been over-com- 
pensated.. (Reuters, AP) 


KARLSRUHE, Germany — The Constitutional Court struck 
down a Bavarian law on Tuesday that sought to restrict abortions in 
that largely Roman Catholic state. 

The law, due to go into effect July 1, stipulated that doctors who 
performed abortions could not earn more than a quarter of their 
income from the practice. 

The Constitutional Court ruled in favor of two doctors who filed 
suit seeking to overturn the law. (AFP) 

Russians Urge Ouster in Nude Frolic 

MOSCOW — Members of tbe Russian cabinet want Valentin 
Kovalev to be dismissed as minister of justice after his implication in 
a sex scandal, the Kremlin spokesman, Sergei Yascrzhembsky, told 
tbe Itar-Tass news agency Tuesday. 

The cabinet asked President Boris Yeltsin to depose Mr. Kovalev 
A final decision will probably be made next week, once tbe details of 
tbe scandal have been clarified, Mr. Yastrzbembsky said. 

Mr. Kovalev, 53, stepped down temporarily, reportedly at his own 
request after the tabloid newspaper Soverahenno Sekrctno (Top 
Secret) published photographs showing a man identified as Mr. 
Kovalev surrounded by naked women in a sauna used by one of 
Moscow’s largest criminal groups. 

The justice minister, who received a law degree at the age of 33 and 
studied at Harvard University, was elected to Parliament in December 
1993 and became justice minister in January 1995. (AFP) 

$ Baltic StatesMake Plea to NATO 

PRAGUE — Leaders of the Baltic nations of Estonia, Latvia and 
Lithuania made (heir cases on Tuesday for admission to NATO, 

UT ^$e do expect to be anrtaf the next w^^enlareement,” 
Foreign Minister Valdis Bincavs of Latvia said on the fourth day of a 
NATO workshop -in Prague, 

“The summit in Madrid should recognize our aspirations and 
provide us with a clarity that invitations will follow," he said. 

. Poland, Hungary and die Czech Republic are considered the rally 
East European countries likely to .receive an invitation to join the 
Western military alliance at a Madrid summit next month. (AP) 

France Supports a Landmine Ban 

BRUSSELS-^- France signed a declaration of support ^ Tuesday for 
a campaign toward a worldwide ban on anti-personnel land mines, 
diplomatic sources said at a major international conference here on 
the issue. (AFP) 




\ 


PAGE 


Jews Aiming at Austria 
To Get Holocaust Assets 

Experts Debate Wider Search for Nasi Gold' 


By Alan Cowell 

A, n livi Tw;,.s Jrnvi ■ 

GENEVA — After months of scru- 
tiny of Switzerland’s wartime transac- 
tions with Nazi Germany, a prominent 
American Jewish organization sought 
Tuesday to broaden inquiries into 
Europe's relationships with the Third 
Reich to Austria, which has largely 
avoided close examination of its past for 
more titan 50 years. 

The call by Rabbi Marvin Hier, 
founder of the' Los Angeles-based Si- 
mon Wjesenthal Center, at an inter- 
national conference here could offer 
some respire to Swiss authorities. 

The Swiss have been complaining 
with increasing annoyance that they 
have been singled out for public crit- 
icism while other European nations with 
dark, wartime pasts escape the spotlight 
of opprobrium. 

Indeed at the same conference. 
Thomas Borer, a high Swiss diplomat 
charged with reversing the damage 
caused to Switzerland's image by the 
so-called *'Nuzi gold" affair, com- 
plained that Switzerland had been “de- 
monized" to the extent that it was 
threatened by "a new injustice" just as 
it sought to atone for its past. 

Other American Jewish officials, 
however, cautioned that, whatever in- 
quiries were made el&ewbere in Europe, 
they should not be seen as mitigating 
Switzerland's history as a land whose 
central bank purchased Nazi gold dur- 
ing World War II whose private banks 
obstructed the postwar quest of Holo- 
caust survivors for the assets of their lost 
relatives. 

"The notion that this would some- 
how reduce Swiss responsibility seems 
to me wrong," Elan Steinberg, exec- 
utive director of the World Jewish Con- 
gress, said in a telephone interview from 
New York. 

The World Jewish Congress has led a 
campaign starting last year to press 
Switzerland into confronting what Mr. 
Borer termed on Tuesday the ‘ 'shadowy 
areas” of its wartime history. 

“This is a confrontation with history' 
for all of Europe." Mr. Steinbeig said, 
but accused Switzerland specifically of 
resisting historical judgments such as 
those made by the Clinton adminis- 
tration in a major report this year. “If 
the question is: why is Switzerland 
singled out, the answer is that Switzer- 
land singles itself out,” he said. 

Swiss officials have been especially 
enraged by U.S. assertions that their 
country prolonged the war by dealing 
with the Third Reich, enabling Hitler to 
finance his military machine. 

Mr. Steinberg's however, reflected a 
growing tension between Switzerland 
among some American Jews over the 
declining pace of Swiss efforts, an- 
nounced with much fanfare earlier this 
year, to come up with financial com- 
pensation for aged Holocaust survivors, 
particularly in Eastern Europe. 

As Mr. Borer recalled Tuesday, 
Switzerland has offered to create a S 1 80 
million compensation fund for Holo- 
caust survivors, has offered to create a 
S4.7 billion foundation to assist all vic- 
tims of oppression and suffering and has 
set up a historians' inquiry into its re- 
lationship with die Third Reich. 

Additionally, a commission headed 
by Paul Volcker, former head of the 
U.S. Federal Reserve, is supposed to 
delve into the ownership of dormant 
accounts at Swiss private banks to see if 
they were opened by Holocaust vic- 
tims. 

Yet, the fund “has stagnated” after 
initial contributions by Swiss -private 
banks and industry, Mr. Steinberg said 


from New York, while the hisiraiam*' 
commission h.-iN become mired in .i 
fresh dispute over whether it > chairman. 
Jean-Francois Beruter. faces a conflict 
of interest because of his membership of 
a foundation supported bv a major 
Swiss bonk caught shredding poten- 
tial Iv damaging document* Iasi Janu- 
ary. 

As the conference opened, an un- 
resolved dispute over the value of 
Swiss dormant account.-, opened by 

Holocaust victims again erupted after 
Rabbi Hier put the total at “billions of 
dollars." 

“Those who participated in the 
greatest robbery in the history of man- 
kind cannot expect u\ to look aside 
while billions of dollars in today’s 
money robbed from the victims of 
Nazism Jie in the coffers of Swiss 
banks." he said. 

Rabbi Hier said that the amounts due 
to victims was only "half the story .” 

He took particular issue with U.S. and 
British insistence after World War 11 
that Austria be repaid for gold taken by 
the Nazis from its central bank after 
Germany annexed its smaller neighbor 
in 1938. 

"The world deserves m know who in 
the United States made such a decision 
— to reward those who Hew the 
swastika with gold stolen from the vic- 
tims of the ‘Final Solution.' " he said. 

Up until T uesduy. Austria has largely 
escaped the same examination ol its 
wartime past as has been forced on other 
lands — from Sweden to Argentina — 
by the World Jewish Congress's cam- 
paign. Indeed, some Austrians believe 
that their country has never really 
wished to examine its documented, 
widespread support for the Nazi an- 
nexation or the pan played by its people 
in the German military*. 

After the war. Rabbi Hier suggested, 
the Western Allies were far more in- 
terested in assuring Austria's Western 
orientation in the Cold Car. "If the 
Swiss are being forced by world opinion 
to reconsider, why should Austrians 
who fought for Hiller do no less?" 

U.S. Holds Up Loan 
To Press Croatians 

Modi invt. ut Pom Sen n «■ 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton ad- 
ministration has postponed action on a 
S30 million World Bank loan to Croatia 
in an attempt to press it to allow refugee 
ethic Serbs to return to their homes in 
Croatia and to hand over people accused 
of war crimes, according to officials 
here. 

The decision came after warnings by 
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright 
that financial assistance would "be 
denied to any Balkan government that 
failed to live up to commitments ac- 
cepted under the 1995 Dayton peace 
agreement. 

The move coincides with a signif- 
icant hardening in U .S. language toward 
Croatia. 

Throughout much of the three and a 
half years of war in neighboring Bosnia, 
the Croatian government was regarded 
by the Uniied States as a strategic ally 
because of its role in resisting Serbian 
military expansionism. 

The Clinton administration has come 
under heavy pressure from members of 
Congress and independent human rights 
groups to carry through on its words and 
to put an end to what is seen as favorable 
treatment for Croatia. 

Human-rights campai gners ha ve crit- 
icized the administration on Croatia. 



Bucharest October 29 8: 30 r 1997 

Romania is increasingly attracting the mention of ihc internal ions I invcMnvni 
community. To assess Future investment potential and u> highlight the progress 
Romania is making in hs bid lo,poshkn itself as one of the mure L>«eiiiqg 
investment opportunities in the world, the International Herald Tribune is convening 
a major Investment summit in Bucharest on October 20 & 30. 

President Emil Consuminescu will give ihc opening keynote address of ihc 
"Romania Investment Summit.*' Other speakers will indude key members of 
Romanian government and business os well as business and financial leaders 
from around Uw world. 


e Ttf.ewwe thstyoa do m miss this very special event 
■ pjease ppwact o«r e«tfigr«iee office today tor further detain., 
j . * *. ' Ursula, tievdfc 

iMMMtfettaT H«rald3Va»lHieGk>iifel^OCfiri^^ Long A«e, London WC2E9JH 
-■ ^iMnt>4toO909'ite<44I7i|S3»07l? E-mail: utewb^ite-com 


Tiie irnnLnn wih 


Bit-* T*“— 


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PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25* 1997 

EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribune 


PI IUSHUI wmi THE NKVI KIRK TIMRK \\D IHF «UHI\(lTOV POST 


Put Pol Pot on Trial 


A rare chance exists to hold Pol Pot. 
one of this century’s most notorious 
mass murderers, accountable for his 
crimes against humanity and the Cam- 
bodian people. Many hurdles must still 
be overcome before he can be brought 
before an international tribunal. But 
current realities of Cambodian politics 
and international diplomacy make this 
an opportune moment to try. 

From 1975 to 1979. Pol Pot ordered 
more than a million people killed as he 
tried to bend Cambodia to his radical 
Maoist vision. People were executed 
because they owned property, lived in 
cities or were professionals. Even lit- 
eracy became grounds for execution. 
Now. 18 years after Vietnamese forces 
chased him from power and four years 
after internationally supervised elec- 
tions left his Khmer Rouge a marginal 
political and military force, formerguer- 
rilJa comrades have reportedly turned 
against him and taken him captive. 

The United States hopes that Pol Pot 
can somehow be delivered to Canada, 
whose laws permit prosecution for acts 
of genocide. Substantial documentary 
evidence has been assembled, reliev- 
ing prosecutors of any need to grant 
amnesty to his close collaborators in 
exchange for their testimony. Some 
Cambodian leaders may be tempted to 
offer amnesties anyway, in the hope of 
luring his former associates into polit- 
ical alliances. But these men are them- 
selves guilty of mass murder. Wash- 
ington must make clear that any 
power-sharing deals with former 
Khmer Rouge leaders would lead ro 
sharply reduced American support. 

Getting Pol Pot to trial could be 
difficult. He could be murdered at the 


behest of senior political figures and 
others who fear that he could implicate 
them. Even if he is taken into gov- 
ernment custody, China, which has 
supported him for three decades, could 
use its Security Council veto to block 
formation of an international tribunal. 

But, encouragingly, both halves of 
Cambodia's feuding government are 
asking the United Nations to create an 
intemationaJ court with the authority to 
try Pol Pot The first prime minister. 
Prince Ranariddh, and die second, Hun 
Sen both want him out of the country, 
believing that his continued presence 
could provoke violent unrest. Both men 
were allied with him at different times 
in the past, a factor that should make it 
harder for either to try ro score political 
points over his present handling. 

China is not die only country to have 
supported Pol Pol From 1979 to 1991. 
Washington indirectly backed the 
Khmer Rouge, then a component of the 
guerrilla coalition fighting the Viet- 
namese-Installed government The fact 
that so many foreign powers were in- 
directly associated with the Khmer 
Rouge could, paradoxically, smooth 
the way to agreement on a UN tribunal. 
All Security Council members, for ex- 
ample. might spare themselves em- 
barrassment by restricting the scope of 
prosecution to those crimes committed 
inside Cambodia during tbe four hor- 
rific years of Khmer Rouge rule. 

Not since Nuremberg have the main 
architects of such wholesale killing been 
put before a court of law. Trying Pol Pot 
for the crimes he is accused of mas- 
terminding would be an extraordinary 
triumph for law and civilization. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Saddam Is Still at It 


Saddam Hussein continues to stone- 
wall the United Nations. For more than 
six years now he has orchestrated a 
policy of deceit and intimidation to 
prevent UN inspectors from doing 
their job — that is. from searching for 
illegal nuclear, biological and chem- 
ical weapons and the long-range mis- 
siles that could deliver them. As a 
result the Iraqi people continue to suf- 
fer from a UN trade embargo that could 
have been ended years ago. 

It is worth recalling that the cease- 
fire terms imposed after Iraq lost- the 
Gulf War were not all that punitive, 
given that Saddam started the war by 
seizing Kuwait. The United States and 
its allies did not insist on dismantling 
Iraq's army or even its elite units, and 
they did not propose to deprive Iraq of 
short-range missiles or other normal 
defensive weaponry. They did insist 
that Iraq comply with UN resolutions 
calling for the destruction of any Iraqi 
weapons of mass destruction. At the 
time. Rolf Ekeus. the Swedish dip- 
lomat in charge of the UN effort, es- 
timated that the entire process of in- 
spection, discovery and destruction 
could be completed in a few months — 
with Iraqi cooperation. 


Unfortunately, the Iraqi dictator 
chose a different route. He has re- 
peatedly concealed weapons and doc- 
uments relating to his secret arms pro- 
grams. His officials have interfered 
with UN inspectors trying to do their 
jobs. Just in the past few weeks Iraq 
again denied access to UN inspectors, 
concealed documents and weapons 
and. according to the Security Council, 
endangered inspectors' lives by inter- 
fering with their helicopter flights. 

The Security Council on Saturday 
voted unanimously to condemn Iraq’s 
latest behavior and threaten further 
sanctions if it does not cooperate by 
Oct. 1 1 . Russia went along after Pres- 


ident Bill Clinton personally appealed 

Denver, 


to President Boris Yeltsin in 
and France and China also endorsed 
the resolution despite reported doubts. 
Their vote is welcome, their hesitation 
difficult to understand. Many countries 
and companies would undoubtedly 
like to see Iraq’s oil start flowing again. 
Bur the United Nations will not pre- 
serve much credibility if it cannot stay 
the course on as clear a question as 
ridding Iraq's dictator of poison gas 
and germ warfare bombs. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Starr Gets the Notes 


Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr 
w'J I get the two sets of notes he wanted, 
taken by White House lawyers during 
conversations with Hillary Clinton in 
1995 and 1 996 about two aspects of the 
sprawling Whitewater investigation. 
The Supreme Court refused on Mon- 
day to disturb a lower court ruling that 
the documents be turned over. The 
White House says the notes are un- 
important but that the case represents a 
major defeat for the attorney-client 
privilege on which so much of the 
justice system depends. We doubt that 
the case is that weighty but wish that the 
Supreme Court had taken it nonethe- 
less, and nibbed off some of the rough 
edges of the lower court decision. 

The White House position has been 
that the notes are benign (we’ll seej and 


seemed to us right but in need of some 
qualifying: but there were not the re- 
quisite four votes on the Supreme 
Court to take it up. 

Normally, a dispute like this would 
nor get to court. If the Justice De- 
partment in the person of a federal 
prosecutor wanted a piece of evidence 
in regard to which another federal 
agency was claiming privilege, the at- 
torney general would settle the matter 
by applying a balancing test: Which of 
the two federal interests involved, in 
preserving the privilege but seeing to 
the prosecution, was paramount? But 


the idea of having an independent 

chi* 


the only issue was the privilege, without 
which officials could find it ii 


impossible 
to get the candid legal advice on which 
the good conduct of government de- 
pends. It claimed that the privilege was 
absolute and should not have to yield 
even to a grand jury subpoena in a 
possible criminal case, as here. 

Mr. Starr met absolutist argument 
with absolutist argument. To the White 
House "never" he said "always”: 
Subpoena trumps privilege. How else 
could the government's interest in 
achieving criminal justice be main- 
tained? A Circuit Court of Appeals 
panel agreed with him. The decision 


counsel is precisely to take such issues 
out of the hands of the attorney general. 
There was no place to go but court. 

We doubt that this ruling will have 
the effect the White House earlier pre- 
dicted for it. Our guess is that gov- 
ernment officials will be able to seek 
the advice of government attorneys 
with as much assurance of confiden- 
tiality as ever — and no more. 

This is a case involving the pres- 
ident's wife, who is not a public of- 
ficial and either is or is not in trouble in 
her individual capacity. She has her 
own lawyers, with whom her conver- 
sations would in fact be privileged. The 
best favor they could nave done the 
attorney-client privilege was to leave it 
out of this bad case. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


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Don’t Believe What Critics Say About the Euro 


H AMBURG — In the debate over 
the common European currency, 
three myths are bandied about that con- 
fuse citizens and endanger what can be 
a decisive step toward the political in- 
tegration of Europe. 

The criteria are rigid and the date of 
introduction is flexible. Only those who 
have not read die Maastricht treaty can 
think that However confusing the 
treaty language in other areas, it is quite 
clear as to the date and deficit criteria 
for the common currency. The third 
stage of monetary union "shall start" 
on Jan. 1, 1999. it says. And if a state 
does not meet the criteria, account will 
be taken of "all other relevant factors, 
including die medium-term economic 
and budgetary position" of states. 

The treaty thus says precisely the 


Bv Helmut Schmidt 


opposite of what the mythmakers 
:Iaira. TI 


claim. The date is rigid but the deficit 
criteria are flexible. 

The euro will lack stability. That 
would please some in the Union, but 
others, in particular quite a tew infla- 
tion-fixated Germans, are frightened by 
such predictions. But the myth reflects a 
lack of understanding or a deliberate 
distortion by those promulgating it. 

There are two aspects of currency 
stability: external, in relation to other 
currencies, and internal, in relation to 
inflation. It is important to look at both. 


The euro win be as stable as any 
currency managed by an independent, 
inflation-conscious central bank. The 
new European central bank w ill be no 
less independent of political interference 
than the Bundesbank or the Banque de 
France. It will thus be well equated to 
fight off inflationary pressures, if need 
be by raising interest rates. 

The bank is explicitly barred from 
providing credits to fund the budget 
deficits of member states. If one of 
them spends more than it earns, it will 
have to borrow from the capital mar- 
kets, and in case of excessive bor- 
rowing will have to pay higher interest 
rates, thus punishing itself. 

Because tbe new central bank will 
replace all the national centra] banks, 
including those which currently do nor 
have full independence, currency sta- 
bility on (be internal markets will in- 
crease, not decrease with tbe euro. 

The euro’s external stability, vis-a- 
vis other major currencies, will be 
greater than the Deutsche mark’s has 
hitherto been, due to the great volume 
of the new currency. 

In the past three decades currencies 
have fluctuated incessantly, with the 
mark's rate of exchange, thanks to 


Bundesbank rigidity, being pushed up 
to the point where German products 
became so expensive as to lose com- 
petitive edge. Germany’s high unem- 
ployment rate today is not least die 
result of thai misguided policy. Stability 
neither implies nor requires the euro to 
suffer the same deplorable fate. . 

It will be a hard cuirency all right, 
but not one whose external value can be 


terest rates up and investment down. 
Nor is ii likely 


manipulated easily by speculators in 
financi ' 


the financial markets or by political 

okyo. 


decisions in Washington or Tol 
Europe is not ripe for she euro, so 
let's postpone the date. This demand is 
based on the two preceding myths. It 
would require amendment of a treaty 
formally ratified by all the Union’s 
parliaments. No less important, it is a 
recipe for more currency chaos and for 
more European unemployment 
Postponing the entry date would re- 
move all control from governments and 
central banks and hand it over to in- 
ternational currency speculation. The 
result would be a hefty increase in the 
exchange rate of the Deutsche mark as 
well asheavy speculation, particularly 
against Southern European currencies. 

Unemployment would increase ev- 
erywhere in the Union, further under- 
mining Germany's export competitive- 
ness and. in the countries trying, to fight 
erosion of their currencies, pushing in- 


sely that countries which 
fail to reach rigidly (and wrongly j m. 
terpreted deficit criteria by early 1998 
will be more successful in two or three 
. years' time. The pressure to achieve 
convergence would be lost. What was 
hitherto a precise, disciplining objec- 
tive would turn into a vague.- non- 
committal vision. 

Postponement would amount to 
nothing less than abrogation of the 
common European currency. 

That would deal a possibly fatal 
blow to the great project of Europe's 
integration, the only concept in 
Europe's long history of conflict which 
offers the prospect of common security 
and prosperity to all its countries. 

The European Union is still a very 
young and fragile creature, it can be 
destroyed by national egotism as well 
as by international upheavals. The 
move toward the common currency is 
so important because it will make the 
Union more immune to such a fate. 


Myth-mongers, beware. By distort- 


ing 


*yt 

the facts you are endangering much 


more than just monetary union. 


The writer, chancellor from 1974 tv 
1982 and now publisher of the weekly 
Die Zeit, contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


Ekeus vs. Saddam: A Job Well Done, but There’s More to Do 



L ONDON — When the Gulf 
War ended in 199! and it 
appeared as if Saddam Hussein 
had been soundly defeated, a 
Swedish diplomat. Rolf Ekeus, 
was plucked from the comfort- 
able world of disarmament bar- 

f anting to corral and destroy die 
ictator’s terror arsenal as head 
of a newly formed UN Special 
Commission. 

He recalls thinking that he 
would finish the job within six 
months. In the diplomatic circles 
he traveled in. signatories to in- 
ternational agreements, however 
grudging, were assumed to-be 
good for their word. 

Six years later, UN inspectors 
are still playing cat and mouse 
with Saddam. Twice in the last 
two weeks alone Mr. Ekeus has 
gone before the Security Coun- 
cil to report serious violations of 
the inspection agreements, in- 
cluding four separate attempts 
to subvert the commission’s 
helicopter flights. 

Mr. Ekeus is stepping aside at 
the end of this month to become 
Sweden’s ambassador to the 
United States in September. 

By the unique terms of the 
cease-fire to which Iraq agreed, 
the United Nations claimed the 
right to destroy its nuclear. 


By Stephanie Cooke and James Tbackara 


chemical and biological wea- 
pons, and all but its very short- 
range missiles. Later, perma- 
nent monitoring arrangements 
were agreed upon. 

That put Mr. Ekeus at the 
center of a power struggle with 
a 20th century warlord who. it 
turned our, viewed the arrange- 
ments as another front on which 
to continue waning for dom- 
inance in the world's major oil- 
producing region. 

Mr. Ekeus quickly grasped 
both the real intentions of his 
adversary and the legal preced- 
ent that the special commis- 
sion’s methods would create for 
sustaining a peaceful world or- 
der in the decades ahead. 

There were startling discov- 
eries — of technical plans for 
missiles with a range to reach 
Moscow', Paris or London, and 
the high-tech accomplishment 
of Iraq’s illegal laboratories in 
stabilizing the virulent nerve 
gas known as VX- Virtually 
every route to nuclear arma- 
ment had been tried. 

The importance to Saddam 
Hussein of holding on to rem- 
nants of his engines of war (the 
special commission has yet to 


be satisfied that tbe missiles, the 
VX and a number of other items 
are accounted for) should not be 
underestimated. The arms gave 
him sway in the region. 

It is worth recording the 
courage required of Mr. Ekeus 
and his team. They have re- 
trieved files and computer pro- 
grams. destroyed factories, 
weapons and chemical agents, 
and shipped out nuclear fuel. 
Lately they have been sleuthing 
through missile engines to veri~ 
fv claimed Scud destructions. 

’ Security men have tried to 
intimidate them with gunfire, 
tried to wTest control of planes 
in flight, buzzed them w iih heli- 
copters. and in countless ways 
restricted their movements. A 
team was once held in a parking 
lot for four days. The aim has 
been, to exhaust their and the 
Security Council’s resolve. 

A net of monitoring equip- 
ment has been set in place, 
spanning Iraq and incorporating 
a range of intelligence techno- 
logy from airborne heat sensors 
to sniffers placed in sewers and 
surveillance cameras around in- 
stallations that render ongoing 
images across computer screens 


in New York. The special com- 
mission’s resolve has had the 
effect of putting spine into the 
International Atomic Energy 
Agency, whose inspectors con- 
sistently gave Iraq a clean bill of 
health during the 1980s. 

And it is influencing the de- 
velopment of enforcement tech- 
niques under new disarmament 
treaties like tbe Chemical 
Weapons Convention. 

"Our methods and tech- 
niques have shown it is possible 
ro carry out such work in spite 
of tough political and physical 
resistance," Mr. Ekeus says. 
"It is doable. That is a very 
important lesson." 

The struggle is not over. In 
March, U.S. Secretary of State 
Mdtieleine Albright said that 
Saddam’s destructive arsenal 
would not finally be removed 
until the dictator himself fell. 

Mr. Ekeus ’s function now 
passes to Australia’s ambassa- 
dor to the United Nations, 
Richard Butler, whose reputa- 
tion for combativeness will be 
put to the tesL 

In addition to facing down 
Saddam Hussein. Mr. Butler 
will have to stiffen support of 
the Security Council, where re- 
solve is weakening. In response 


to Iraq's latest violations, the 
Council voted unanimously last 
weekend to postpone a review 
of current sanctions until Oc- 
tober. But that was only after 
President Bill Clinton person- 
ally urged President Boris 
Yeltsin at the Denver summit to 
provide Russian support. 

Iraq’s oil minister. Amir 
Rashid. is lobbying oil de- 
velopers in Russia. China and 
France to gain support for the 
lifting of sanctions. 

In his last major report to the 
Security Council, on April 18, 
Mr. Ekeus called for a decision 
by Iraq’s leadership to give up. 
once and for all, all capabilities 
and ambition to retain or ac- 
quire the proscribed w eapons. 
He reiterated what by now 
should be obvious: th3t in the 
arena of weapons of mass de- 
struction, the will of a legit- 
imate world order must prevail 
over that of a criminal state. 


Stephanie Cooke is a former 


editor of Nucleonics Week, and 
Th 


James Thackara is a novelist 
who wrote "Americas Chil- 
dren . '* about the Manhattan 
Project. They contributed this 
comment to the International 
Herald Tribune. 


Hong Kong Has a Promising Future as the Asian Spy Hub 


H ONG KONG — ■ The hand- 
over of Hong Kong to 
China is most often seen as an 
economic and political issue, 
but there is also a security di- 
mension. It looks like turning 
Hong Kong into what Vienna 
was in the Cold War — an es- 
pionage battleground. 

Hong Kong’s military impor- 
tance has changed a great deal 
since the days when it was de- 
scribed as the best naval base in 
East Asia. The physical attrib- 
utes of the territory, with its 
magnificent deepwater harbor, 
should make it an ideal location 
for a navy wanting to play an 
influential role in disputed areas 
such as the Taiwan Straits, the 


By G«rald Segal 


South China Sea or even the 
waters around the Senkaku Is- 
lands in the East China Sea. 
Hong Kong's natural advant- 
ages should be of great interest 
to a China with ambitions to 
develop a blue water navy. 

But precisely because Hong 
Kong has such advantages, it 
has become East Asia’s premier 
civilian port. As a result, it is a 
poor choice for a naval base 
because its openness makes it 
vulnerable to foreign spying. 

The U.S. Navy makes some 
70 port visits annually to Hong 
Kong, but they are simply for 
rest, recreation and refueling. 


Singapore is the major regional 
port for repair of U.S. warships. 

China will base only a hand- 
ful of fast-attack craft in Hong 
Kong, mainly for operations 
against smugglers, illegal mi- 
grants, piracy and drug running. 
Visits will be made by the oc- 
casional destroyer to show the 
flag. But a China that shut its 
civil ports during the Taiwan 
Strait crisis last year will not 
want to operate its navy from a 
Hong Kong that is so open to the 
prying eyes of foreigners. 

Yet many forms of espionage 
will take place in Hong Kong 
after the British depart. In fact. 


Another Northern Irish Summer 


D UBLIN — Bloomsday, 
5: 15 P.M., June 16, 1997. 
A new edition of "Ulysses" 
was about to be launched. 

I was in a pub at the corner 
of North Great George's 
Street. The publisher was buy- 
ing drinks, the noise deafen- 
ing, the television set in the far 
comer vainly on at full 
volume. The editor, Danis 
Rose, was standing behind me 
at the bar. 

As we edged out. I heard 
fragments of TV news: IRA. 
Lurgan, two policemen dead. 
I thought it must be a program 
that was replaying old foot- 
age, although as I walked up 
the street it nagged at me that 
I could not remember any 
Royal Ulster Constabulary 
men being killed in Lurgan. 

It was only at dinner af- 
terward that I heard the details, 
and full realization dawned. 
The Irish Republican Army 
had killed two policemen right 
at the beginning of the Or- 
angemen's marching season, 
when Protestant groups tradi- 
tionally celebrate the Protest- 
ants’ 1690 victory over Cath- 
olics. Tbe IRA had done this 
after what seemed like prom- 
ising negotiations between the 
IRA's political wing. Sinn 
Fein, and officials of the new 
British government. 

Around the same time, loy- 
alist violence and sectarian- 
ism were taking the headlines. 
In the desolate town of Bal- 


By Seamus Deane 


lymena, a Protestant loyalist 
mob had kicked a policeman 
ro death because he had pre- 
vented yet another march 
from going through a Catholic 
area nearby. 

But still, in these circum- 
stances, when any intelligent 
person would have given short 
odds on a new cease-fire, 
maybe after the marching sea- 
son, maybe in the early fall, 
the IRA had killed two po- 
licemen, suddenly, with cruel 
efficiency. 

I have no time for the Royal 
Ulster Constabulary. It should 
be disbanded. Yet it says 
something that this IRA action 
aroused such pity for the two 
victims and such anger at what- 
their killing represents. 

How often, since 1969. has 
Northern Ireland faced a long, 
hot summer! The retarded 
rituals of the Orange marches, 
ever more stridently tri- 
umphal is t. are annually per- 
formed and defended as part of 
the Protestant "culture and tra- 
dition." Indeed they are. They 
are central to it Guiis are being 
unsheathed, bonfires prepared, 
city centers are emptying, fear 
is in the air tinging eveiything 
with a faint nausea. 

The IRA, or a faction of it, 
has made its lethaUy effective, 
strategically opaque contribu- 
tion. The corpses of those 


dead policemen lie across the 
threshold of the summer. 

By 10 P.M., the harmless- 
ness of Bloomsday seemed 
culpably infantile. Tbe discus- 


sions of virtual text, copy text, 
suhstant- 


isotext. hypertext, 
ives. accidentals, apostrophes, 
vaporized in the news beat. 

One reviewer accused Mr. 
Rose of "demagoguery" in 
promoting his "Readers' Edi- 
tion." Did this reviewer ever 
hear a demagogue, ever see 
what political catastrophes a 
demagogue can create? 

Northern Ireland, it was 
once said, could become an- 
other Lebanon: now, ihey say, 
another Bosnia. 

The image of ultimate 
breakdown hovers in exem- 
plary fashion over each killing, 
over each cliche of each long, 
hot summer. But some year, 
the image may come down to 
earth, like a twister, and then ... 
well, then people will be say- 
ing that some other trouble 


spot might end up looking like 
Northern Ireland. 


Maybe, by next Blooms- 
day, we will have a new edi- 
tion of the place, a new text, 
readable at last because it will 
be exemplary, the ultimate 
and definitive condition into 
which others fear to fall. 


The writer, a poet and au- 
thor of the novel "Reading in 
the Dark," contributed this to 
The New York Times. 



ft will become Asia's spy hub. 
The battles will be waged under 
numerous disguises. 

There will be a hunt by main- 
land Chinese authorities to root 
out the electronic and human 
intelligence planted in the 
colony by British, American 
and other Western spy agen- 
cies. China, which is obsessed 
about protecting its national se- 
curity. already has agents in 
Hong Kong’s civil service and 
business community. 

There is a danger that in the 
hunt for subversives, real and 
imagined. Beijing will damage 
confidence in the territory. 

And Hong Kong will become 
a battleground for Chinese spy- 
ing on each other. Different fac- 
tions in the Chinese leadership, 
the different interests of north- 
ern and southern Chinese, dif- 
ferent groups in the armed 
forces and different Chinese 
companies will vie for advan- 
tage. Tai-wanese agents will 
stay to keep track of these battles 
and seek their own advantage. 


Beijing will explain away 
ime of tin 


be a Hong Kong that is a mi- 
crocosm of the divisions of a 
modernizing China under de- 
centralized authority. 

Hong Kong will also become 
a key place for China to learn 
how to improve its strategic po- 
sition in its long-term rivalry 
with the United States. As 
Beijing intensifies its efforts to 
try to catch up with America in 
advanced military. operations, it 
will focus on Hong Kong as a 
base for improving its infor- 
mation warfare capabilities. 

China will also use Hong 
Kong as a cover for importing 
technology for military pur- 
poses. Much attention focuses 
on exports of finished weapons 
to China, sophisticated com- 
ponents of weapons systems are 
a far more serious risk. 

The recent sale of an airborne 
early warning system to China, 
which includes Russian. Israeli 
and British components, is an 
example of the high priority' that 
Beijing places on acquiring 
such material and technology. 


some or these internecine 
battles as part of the necessary 
struggle against Triad gangs 
and other kinds of criminal 
activity, perhaps even violators 
of Intellectual property rights. 
But tbe underlying reality will 


The writer is a senior fellow 
at the International Institute for 
Strategic Studies in London and 
director of Britain's Pacific 
Asia Program. He contributed 
this comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: London Tornado 


LONDON — In the metropolis 
itself and the neighboring coun- 
try the heat yesterday morning 
[June 24) was intense and the 
sky overcast About two 
o’clock a terrific tornado swept 
over various suburban districts. 
Curiously enough, the violence 
of the disturbance was not se- 
riously felt in London, between 
Regent’s Park and the river, 
though from districts south of 
the Thames a considerable 
amount of damage is reported. 


automatic pistol. Ten shots were 
fired, three of them fatal- Most 
Germans, irrespective of party, 
characterise this murder as a 
typical one of the long series of 
several hundred crimes which 
the monarchist militarists and 
Nationalists have perpetrated 
within the last three years. 


1947: Manchuria Aid 


NANKING — Eight Nationalist 
officials, admitting that the 
Chinese civil war was a Iife-and- 


1922: Minister Killed 


death struggle between the 
Communists and the National- 


BERLIN — Dr. Walther Ra- 
thenau, the German Foreign 
Minister, w r as murdered in cold 
blood near his villa, in the 
Grunewald, this morning [June 
24]. Three leather-coated, be- 
goggled conspirators in a mo- 
torcar followed Dr. Rathenau’s 
car and opened fire from the rear 
with an arm-long, parabeUum 


ists. charged today [June 24] that 
the Russians equipped over 
600.000 Communist troops^ in 
Manchuria. This was the first 
time that the government for- 
mally charged Russia with open 
intervention in China's civil 
war. General Chen Chen, the 
Nationalist Chief of Staff, con- 
ceded that the situation in Man- 
churia was grave, due to the sup- 
port given to the Communists. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1997 


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Tobacco Deal Is An Exercise in Political Hysteria 

IX.. Y_ TT ni » 


By James k« Cl assman 
-^yASHINGTON 


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■’. massive array of firepower 
since the Gulf War, tobacco 
v-J companies surrendered last 
■week and agreed to pay an 
;. v astounding 5368 billion as 
: p unishme nt for selling a per- 
... fectly legal, heavily .taxed 
product to millions of Amer- 
icans. 

Bat instead of lighting vic- 

toiy cigars, the beadles of the 
'j- ana-smoking religion — Ral- 
’’ ph Nader,. Joe Calif ano and 
former FDA commissioner 
David Kessler — are grous- 
ing that the bargain is too 
■- good for merchants of death. 

■ In truth, the deal — an ex- 
eicise in political hysteria — 

y. If 8 based on a 
view of people 
lacking free will 
and judgment 


is a disaster for anyone who 
believes in preserving the 
prime values in American so- 
ciety: personal responsibility 
and freedom. 

The agreement is also a 
frightening illustration of 
what can happen when the 
legal authority of fanatical 
federal regulators and politi- 
cians lusting for higher office 
becomes allied with a near- 
unanimous press and a pack 


of venal plaintiffs 1 lawyers, 
who include (incredibly) the 
brothers-in-law of both the 
president and the Senate ma- 
jority leader. 

The guiding theory of the 
deal is that helpless individu- 
als were duped into smoking 
by tobacco companies. So. 
it’s die companies, rather than 
the smokers themselves, who 
will pay the price. This denial 
of personal responsibility is 
part of a distressing trend (in 
the courts, it’s called the “ab- 
use excuse' ’J that is degrad- 
ing both human worth and 
civilized society. 

It’s based on a view of 
people lacking free will and 
good judgment, being hope- 
lessly manipulated by outside 
forces — in this case, greedy 
corporations armed with ad- 
vertising and chemicals. 

In a novel approach, die 
tobacco settlement extends 
die abuse excuse to govern- 
ments. States, for example, 
claimed in lawsuits that the 
tobacco industry should pay 
their Medicaid costs for mak- 
ing smokers sick. Bui were 
the states themselves so help- 
less all these years? If 
smoking is so terrible, ban it 
— or tax it heavily. 

Instead, a passion for hy- 
pocrisy, pomposity and the 
main chance has won die 
limelight — and perhaps, ul- 
timately, higher office — for 
attorneys general such 


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Mike Moore of Mississippi 
and Richard Blumenthal of 
Connecticut 

The irony is that individual 
Americans understand per- 
fectly well that the decision to 
smoke is an informed person- 
al choice. For that reason, jur- 
ies for decades have denied 
claims by smokers and their 
families for compensation. 

In May, for example, a 
Jacksonville, Florida, jury 
found R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 
Co. not liable in the death of 
Jean Connor, a smoker. The 
forewoman in the case, Laura 
T. Barrow, wrote in The 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


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U.S.^Indonesia Ties 

■- 

Regarding “Indonesia Doesn't Need These 
K Blithe Lectures” (Opinion. June 18) by Philip 
Z Bowring: 

Mr. Bowring misses a point about concern 
... in the United States over the increasingly 
.. antidemocratic regime in Jakarta. Patrick 
Kennedy, who is making what Mr. Bowr ing 
considers inconvenient noises in Congress, is 
/. a representative from Rhode Island. Many 
T. Americans of Portuguese descent live in that 
state, and indeed, as Mr. Bowring reports, 
* Indonesia feels that Mr. Kennedy represents 
. . . the interests of Portugal. But Indonesia should 
1 instead see the hand of Americans who are 
upset about its actions in East Timor. This is 
} how Americans behave — they make noise 
.. over human rights issues. 

~ . .Jakarta should relax, though: No matter 
how much grumbling there is at home, the 
United States has a splendid record in dealing 
with unsavory regimes more or less the way 
> those regimes want to be dealt with. 

E.J. B AUMH1STER JR. 

Budapest. 

- Mr. Bowring blames Representative Patrick 

Kennedy for scoring points with his con- 
sthnems-by keeping alive the issue of human 
rights in East Timor. Presumably a significant 
number of the congressman’s constituents 
want the issue Taised. As there is no visible 
pro-Indonesia constituency in his state, the 
representative does whai he’s elected to do. 

What’s missing is a counterweight in the 
debate. The executive branch is not putting 
any ofthis in a larger context for Congress, the 
voters and Indonesia. Mr. Bowring can only 
comment sadly that Bill Clinton is beset by 
‘‘Asiagate,” as if the president were not at 
fault We should stop pointing fingers at Con- 
gress, and stop making excuses for Mr. Clin- 
ton and hold him responsible for letting re- 
lations with Jakarta slip. 

GEORGE FORD. 

— • Jakarta. 

As someone who has lived in China for 
three years,; currently lives in Hong Kong and 
has extensively traveled throughout the re- 
gion and to Indonesia, I think the article is spot 
on. America needs all the allies in the region it 
can muster. Most are ASEAN countries, 
though that could quickly change if America 
continues to let petty, short-term politics drive 
its actions. ' 

RAY BLANCHARD. 

_ . Hong Kong. 

Mr. Bowiing asserts that the history of 
rights abuses by Indonesia is well enough 
known but questions the necessity for a re- 
sponse. The gross human rights violations in 
East Timor and in Indonesia itself are de- 
scribed as ' ‘imperfections.'' 

The most worrying feature of Mr. 
Bowring’s thesis is this nse of “well known”: 
We know about rights abuses and about ju- 
dicial imperfections; we knov,' dial the situation 
is not asbad as in China. The really important 
foot seems to be that we know Indonesia is die 
world’s fourth-largest economy. 

TRAOLOCH COLLINS. 
----- Athlone,- Ireland. 


reasons why this budget item has not been 
shrunk appreciably. The American people do 
not want to cut off one of the important cash 
cows fueling the economic boom times. 

This is seen on the local, retail level — 
where one manifestation of the man in the 
street’s addiction to defense expenditures is 
opposition to any rumored base closure. Mil- 
itary funding pervades the entire U.S. economy 
— scientific, manufacturing and even aca- 
demic. Kill a military research project aimed at 
future production of 2 lst-centnry weapons or a 
continuing production line of contemporary 
weapons and immediately the media bombard 
the public with statistics de tailing the ever-, 
widening consequences that can be expected to 
cripple the nation’s economic well-being. 

Liberal or conservative, an economic stat- 
istician cannot anticipate any real reduction in 
U.S. aims expenditures — and the concurrent 
U.S. sale of aims abroad — without voicing 
grave doubts about the future of die nation’s 
* good times — not to mention the effect on 
local taverns. barbershops, grocery stores and 
other mom-and-pop enterprises dependent on 
local military bases and their personnel. 

We Americans don’t disarm because 
weapons are a vital part of our economy and 
our current prosperity. 

RICHARD P. WILSON. 

Mobile. Alabama. 

A More Tolerant Time 

Regarding “Where Discretion Rules, a Tol- 
erant Take on Sex: Adultery Uproar in US. 
Military Bemuses Allies ” (June JO): 

It would appear that 50 years ago, con- 
cerning the same issues, infinitely more tolerant 
attitudes prevailed in foe United States. At that 
time, Orville J. Taylor, a prominent Chicago 
attorney, was appointed by the army secretary 
to conduct an investigation of foe American 
military government in Germany concerning 
charges of misconduct, immorality, drunken- 
ness and so an. Concerning the large number of 
illicit affairs conducted by American personnel 
with German women, be stared in his report 

■ The Continental attitude toward extramar- 
ital relationships has always been somewhat 
different from our own and Germany is no 
exception. It would be disingenuous not to 
concede that such liaisons do exist and on a 
very broad scale. However, many of the per- 
sons, involved are entirely capable of per- 
forming their professional duties and that must 
be die basic criterion for their employment. 

“We have bad some cases of scandal, some 
serious indiscretions have been committed, but 
I do not believe that the public interest would 
be served by getting rid of a group of otherwise 
conscientious and capable public servants.” 

The above excerpt appeared in the Chicago 
Daily Tribune of May 6, 1948. 

From 1945 to 1947 I was a young coun- 
terintelligence agent in Garmisch, working 
hard, doing a goal job and behaving badly. 

GENE GUTOWSKL 
London. 

How Fatuous 


Washington Post about reach- 
ing her verdict. First, she said, 
it was clear smokers knew that 
cigarettes were dangerous: 
“As one juror put it, ’Even if 
there were no warnings at all 
on. packages, how can you 
take smoke into your body and 
not know it's bad for you?’ ” 

Next, the question of ad- 
diction. “I believe cigarettes 
are addictive,” Ms. Barrow 
wrote. “But exactly how ad- 
dictive are they? We were in- 
structed by the judge not to set 
aside oar common sense. 
Those of .us who' had smoked 
analyzed our own situations. I 
quit smoking the first time I 
tried. So did the other ex- 
smokers on the jury. The social 
smokers said they didn't find it 
too difficult not to smoke 
every day. And. most import- 
antly, Conner was able to quit 
smoking on her first try.” 

Anti -smoking hysterics try 
to present a model of children 
being lured into addiction by 
cartoon characters. Certainly, 
kids shouldn’t smoke; parents, 
taxes and laws should deter 
them. But children puffed be- 
hind bams long before Joe 
Camel's phallic snout nosed 
onto die scene. And smokers 
aren’t booked for life. A sur- 
vey at my 25th reunion found 
that fewer than 5 percent of my 
classmates smoked. But I'd 
estimate that, back in college, 
at least half did. That means 90 
percent kicked whatever habit 
they may have had. 

The vast majority of 


smokers make a free choice, a 
Faustian bargain: Knowing 
they may live a half-dozen 
years fewer, they opt for cig- 
arettes, which, in addition to 
pain, offer pleasure, solace 
and wisdom us Sartre and 
Mall arm i can attest). 

As long as smokers don’t 
hurt others, they should be al- 
lowed that choice. Cigarettes 
don’t make us crash our cars 
or rob convenience stores or 
beat our spouses. Yes. they 
can cause lung cancer and 
bean disease, and some of 
those medical costs are paid; 
thanks to collectivist Medi- 
care and Medicaid, by the 
public as a whole. If smokers 
paid for their own health care, 
they’d have a greater incentive 
to quit. Barring that, govern- 
ments are free to use cigarette 
taxes to recover the expenses. 

Instead, we have an insane 
tobacco deal that sends pre- 
cisely the wrong message to 
both adults and children: 
You’re not responsible for 
your own health. Or anything 
else for that matter. 

For the tobacco companies 
themselves, I have no sym- 
pathy. They believed that 
quantifying an open-ended li- 
ability would boost the price 
of their stock. I hope they're 
wrong; it would be a joy to see 
their shares plummet, in then- 
cowardice and disregard for 
principle, they're just as vil- 
lainous as the rest of die ac- 
tors in this sordid drama. 

The Washington Post 


The Summer of Love Plus 30: 
You Want to Smoke a Banana? 


Bv Paul Krassner 


L OS ANGELES — O.K.. get your ste- 
reotypes ready, because it’s here — the 
30th anniversary of the Summer of Love. 
Ancient history to some: a scapegoat for 
current problems to others, and. for those 
who were there, flashbacks to living an 
alternative to the blandness and repression 
of the Eisenhower-Nixon era. further fueled 
by the assassination of John F. Kennedy, 

MEANVIgLE 

which left a void that the Beatles would 
panly fill. Sgt. Pepper to the rescue. 

But the Summer of Love was about far 
more than sex. drugs and rock ’n* roll. The 
blossoming counterculture was, at its core, a 
spiritual revolution, with religions of repres- 
sion replaced by communities of liberation. 
Psychotropic drugs were their sacrament. 

Actually, the Summer of Love began on 
the afternoon of Ocl 6. 1966, the day LSD 
became illegal. In San Francisco, precisely 
at 2 P.M., I stood with thousands of young 
people who had gaihered for the purpose of 
simultaneously swallowing tabs of LSD in 
front of the police. Internal possession was 
not a crime. We were sending a message: 
We trusted our friends more than we trusted 
our government. 

The event had been publicized by a latter- 
day “declaration of independence," as- 
serting it was “necessary for the people to 
cease to recognize the obsolete social pat- 
terns which had isolated man from his con- 
sciousness and to create with the youthful 
energies of the world revolutionary com- 
munities to which the 2-billion-year-old life 

process entities them That the creation 

endows us with inalienable rights, that 
among these are: the freedom of the body, 
the pursuit of joy and the expansion of 
consciousness, and that to secure these 
rights, we the citizens of the Earth declare 
our love and compassion for all conflicting 
hate-carrying men and w>omen of the 
world.” 

When Time magazine prepared to pub- 
lish a cover story on the hippie phenom- 
enon. a cable to its San Francisco bureau 
instructed researchers to "go at the de- 
scription and delineation of the subculture 
as if you were studying the Samoans or the 
Trobriand Islands.” It was an appropriate 
approach. At the summer solstice celebra- 
tion in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, 
the same hippies who had ridiculed Pres- 
ides Lyndon Johnson's call for a national 
day of prayer were imploring the sun to 
come out at 5 A.M. They had given up 
trying to influence the administration but 
were still trying to influence the universe. 

However, as the Vietnam War escalated, 
the flower children began to grow thorns. 


They participated in peace demonstrations, 
from floating a yellow submarine in the 
Hudson River to exorcising the Pentagon. 

Although San Francisco had become the 
focus of a hippie pilgrimage, the Summer of 
Love was being celebrated across the na- 
tion. Shortly after the seminal Monterey 
Poo Festival presented Jirai Hendrix, Janis 
Joplin and Otis Redding. I performed stand- 
up at a concert in Pittsburgh, featuring the 
Grateful Dead, the Fugs and the Velvet 
Underground. Never before had so many 
local freaks been in the same place at one 
time. They were both astounded and re- 
assured. It was os though all the only- 

Manians-on -their- blocks ~ were attending 
their first Martian convention. 

The underground papers. « ith the aid of 
the Underground Press Syndicate, played a 
vital role in spreading die word about die 
Summer of Love. But the word wasn't 
always the truth. In New York, for example, 
editors of the East Village Other launched 
the Great Banana Hoax." 

The mainstream wire services picked up 
the story that bananas contained a substance 
like serotonin, released by LSD in the brain. 
It quickly became known nationwide that 
you could get high legally from smoking 
dried banana skins. In San Francisco, there 
was a banana smoke-in. and one entre- 
preneur started a successful mail-order ba- 
nana powder business. Federal agents 
headed for dieir own laboratories, cooking, 
scraping and grinding 30 pounds of bananas 
according to a recipe published in the un- 
derground papers. For three weeks, the 
Food and Drug Administration tried to 
“smoke” the dried banana peels. 

At a benefit in San Francisco, I men- 
tioned that the next big drug would be FDA. 
Sure enough. Time soon reported there 
would be "a “super-hallucinogen culled 
FDA." Silly me. 1 thought I'd made that 

up- 

Mean while. the quality* of co-option has 
not been strained. 

“Today is the first day of the rest of your 
life” was" used in a TV ad for a breakfast 
cereal. "Classic" rock songs are used to 
sell all kinds of products. .And the Summer 
of Love has become a commodity. Indeed, 
in San Francisco. Bill Graham Productions 
has been trying to trademark the phrase. 
And. in red spray paint, on a brick wall just 
off Haight Street, standing out among the 
graffiti 'like John Hancock’s signature on 
Die first Declaration of Independence, this 
message sums it up: "Love Is Revenue.” 

The author is a writer whose comedy CD. 
"Brain Damage Control." will appear in 
July. He contributed this comment to the 
Los Angeles Times. 






The Military and Money 


UkiUM PuJ r j * 


-■ -- V 



I was appalled by Madeleine Albright’s 
Harvard commencement speech (“Albright 
Revives Marshals Spirit.'’ June 7). 

She said: “We, too, must heed the lessons of 

. die past, accept responsibility and lead. ... No 
Regarding “4 Military Unmoored: Pet- nation m foe worldnfi^^^Ae^obal 
6 — - ■ - • - 1 — system we are constructings How pompous, 

patronizing- — indeed, how fatuous! 
^George Marshall must have been turning 
over in his grave. 

R. BRUCE STEDMAN. 
Westport, Maine. 


tiness MllPrevaiF (Opinion. June 12) by 

. - Mr.^Soagfcmd ponders the mastery sur- 
‘■j . rounding coatinued high U.S. military ex- 
_V pentikracs Kl'zbe eighth year of the Pax Amer - 
£ttu£.yet he dances around one of the prime 


i-ti 


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PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1997 


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The Museum Company is now accepting applications for the 
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The Museum Company operates 94 shops worldwide including 
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695 Route 46 West, Fairfield, NJ 07004, USA 
Fax: (201) 244-4280 





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Franchise- 



A GIVE-AWAY Export Surplus. Ladles 
tocto* tWrts short A tong sleeves. 
hanWaaded A embroil area hi USS250 
FOB Uarda. Soddot 8000 places. For 
deals ptoasa tax (63-2) B17-8693 

■“GENERIC CIGARETTES, American 
Mend tobacco, lowest prices, private 
aE^^avaiabte. FAX USA: 1 (954) 

WONDEMRA- Major saxes al qdy 
NgtvpnA feqerie & lestton untenrau 
tor hanattonai markets. Fax Mr. Jordan 
-JCJ.-Corp.'[N»i» YorttJ 212-541-5832 

. AUTHENTIC CUBAN CIGARS. 

Al biands and ton. Workttfe deirety 

^ t*. Tat *31.182 550230. 
*31.182396868. 

CUBAN CIGARS IN STOCK. LONDONS 
FflEST CIGAR MERCHANTS. TbI 44 
ttm 9292242 Fax 44 (0)171 WWP 


DO KMC AN CIGARS, 9 styles, hand 
rolte), volume purchases only. 
Tristar USA+9S4-474-3866 


ms 





*«^ -« **r —tt 

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nasrwi ' Bittiness Opportunities 

«Pfrtpteifiwr- ^ ■ 

;• ' level LADES ft GENTLEMEN 

■ i -* lyin,,/-?-.' wrtEd worldwide 
•** *•• - k *—■-*. Fraetaca Ageots/Representativos 
1 '• cw; FOB 224. 0+3056 Zuidi 
( jt'vf* ftK +41 f 371 71 08 

ij. frSHi 101613 Bcontouseivaxom 
'• i t? u&ii. • 


•rant Venture with our 
US Public Company 
Pot Development & Expansion 
Or Buy Out 
Contact the President 

Asia & Pacific 
Mining Ventures Inc. 

. (NASDAQ 0TC) 
FAX: (N. AMERICA) 
604 - 926-4416 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPARES 4 TRUSTS 
MNIGRAT10N/PASS PORTS 



OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

READY MADE GO'S, RJLL ADMN 
TRADE DOCUMENTS AND L/C 
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Contact SMb Ho lor hmecbte 
sanricas & company brochure 
NACS LTD, Room 1108, AUonPtaa 
23 Gramfla Road, TST, Kontoon, 
Hong ton. e-mat: necsOtesmei.ms 
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MASTER MARKERNGflXSTROUmw 
FtancKsa Licence oppotuiAy. Patented 
security product rramoui poiemlaL ex- 
reflect pofe Used by: Poke. Local Au- 
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TTS TIME TO BUY HOTELS IN 
FRANCE: In Parts + near Deauvlle + 
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avafcbte al 55% A you gel cash reun) 


2nd PASSPORTS f Driving Licences / 

Athena 16610, Greece. Fax 8962152, 
hopy/mM.^baHnoneyxorn 

2ND PASSPORT S1QK Also EU, 
Dtpkxnvtic. Driven Iterates. Emafl: 
cqualOunatJUtph Fac 83-2331 7552 


PRIVATE PLACEMENTS 


wtklflnd* growth aa a reprewitadw 
■ jour ana. Attractive tH Crohn. 

FBST DUTCH SECURmES 

2423223000 


TOUR OWN COMPANY M 

SWITZERLAND - 
ZURCH-2UG1UZBW 

CONRDESA 

Baareretrasse 36. CK3300 2UG 
TI+41 41 711 3286 Fx +41 41 7101CM9 


SWISS KNOW HOW COMPANY seeks 
Aflerts torkMde More iten 30 narta- 
hg opportunities (Heatt A Beauty I 
Household & Car Appliances) avatable 
fa rotation contact War Prana AG. 
FL-9490 IfcduL Tat 0041-75332 7172. 
Fax 0041-75-233 1667. writ inter-pro- 
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TH E SCHEFF a BIT! SCHOOL lor BO- 
hr admkfctrakn and patnnai esteems 
in USA and Ranee 8 leaking hs ska- 
te*: partner In Europa. Sand you bus- 
nass cad tet SLS.l fflJE DE LONDRE. 
23000 GUfflET, FRANCE Tat *33 (0)5 
55 41 40 09 


. OFFSHORE COMPANIES. For tree bro- 
chure or aiMce Ttt London 44 1B1 741 
1224 Fax. 44 181 748 6558/6338 
wwwapplettico.uk 


YOUR REPRESENTATIVE in Sauf Ara- 
bia. Looting tor agents, dfctrbutns. pai- 
ners? To marts your produasftervices 
In Saudi Arabs contact - Fax 
00986-2342-9616 


BANK FOR SALE FLORIDA USA 
Unique onommty buy 49% interest 
and bank in expansion. Deals Fax 
Seagle 305374-1013 USA. 


FHD YOUR FAVtWIE CIGAR 
on WWWdGARHULCH 


OFFSHORE BANKING FACUTES 
VARIOUS LOCATIONS 
Fax UK 44 (0)1624 661982 


, ruimuun, 

j Franchising 


NATIONAL FRANCHISE Conaulttnta 
seeks kfL afflatus tor expmtfon o( 


Telecommunications 


• GlobeAfe* 

GtobeNaL privately owned partnaraty) 
wlh one al he US’s Ingest cable T.V. 
pnvlderg, seeks to expand Is iitl 
Cato* wtatoafe program CMy exper- 
ienced cattack oparaiHS art mWmim 
morally trafle need apply. This Is tor the 
sartors catok resefer or master agn 

looting to Improve their market postton 

and margins. To receive an movtow of 
nr program, phase contact Karan Yart 
via hx at: 610-5253610 or E-mal: 
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Start tor investors tn ary enny. 

FAXWAY: 

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weprwae km+usy system, naidvrwa S 
software tree. Under a Raised partner- 
ship • Venr hWi raarnhs. Fax toqtrtes 
IP. BEST DATA lie TELECOM. 

FB Pirta 33 ( 0)1 40 2S 45 71 - 


9W Worldwide Cmenge Mebk 
Ptane/ftxtMa 
tor avairtte tor sale or me 
Tef: 44 171 628 4500 

Fedc 44 171 S28 1233 

E-mat rtQ9smarHetocan.com 
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Business Services 


BUSINESS CONNECTIONS 
NEW VOfK CTTY-UjSA 
LOOKKO FOR MERCHANDISE, 
rtkyres. Fhnresofeion. Qc7 Weget 
moa TBffaK 2i2.7i7.B8SS U3A 


A BRIDGE TO CWAr Consting- Bu» 
ness Devatoproen and Suaegfc inm- 
duatons. Please lax attention FD.G 
®2) 2545 0550 


YOUR OFFICE M DUBLIN Sereced Of- 
fices. Mai, Phone S Fax. Ofishore Co. 
Formates. Prestews Address Tel. 
+353 (U 475 1891 rax (1) 475 1888 


YOUR PERSONAL ASSIST ANT firsi 
class lady, excatot endure. 6 imag- 
es, also ta travel. Fax Geneva 4i- 
22/738 3074 


NYC - STH AV. ADDRESS 
Wl Forwarding - Fax-malflwv 210 
5th Av- Sufie 1102. Tet 212-242-3600 
NY Ual Service. 


MAKING LISTS by Berger & Company 
European business mid conauner data 
Tat 44 1312262996 Fax 44 1312267901 


SECOND PASSPORT, Fima info unA 
RASSPORTSOINFDfflEECOM 
FAX: t32i225D5S 


YOUR 0FFCE M LONDON 
Bond Street - Ual. Phone. Fax, Telex 
TN- 44 171 290 9000 Rn 171 499 7517 


Capital Wanted 


U. S. CORP SEEKS ime regional tonon* 
er I daHxrlor tor Southern Eatne aid 
one tor Northern Eunpe. » dmebp a- 
carts wlh major department ana al- 
ready coraactM by us. Capcal of nut 
mkn USS 50.000 fa needed, bit pmfhs 
very subaamtaL Fdr htarmadoa phase 
tax: -*31 70 355 4367 NL 


LOAN OF US SI 00 MflllON warned 
against prime bulk guaranty tor ONE 
YEAR to sot-ifi hydra power plant In 
INDIA. TeVFhr +33 ID) 4 50 51 23 27 or 
(0)6 60 718 754 


PUmJSHNQ COMPANY ratees work- 
ing capital tor an impntart^ nigh pnnOe 
venture wHh vere mgh returns muiy 
guaranteed. Cal Jane Sknmons on 44 
69171 8237859, tax: 44 (C|171 5812731 


Capital Available 


COMMERCIAL/BUSINESS FINANCE 
avatebte tor any vhbta projects wxtJ- 
wkta. Fax brief syropsls in English to 
CoqxxalB Advances, (4)44-1273321300. 

BLOCKED FUNDS AVAIABLE 
PHONE -H4 (0)171 373 0814 
FAX 444 (0)171 373 455B 

LOANS SOU 000 TO SID ULUOnT 
PRINCIPALS ONLY. TEl / FAX 44 (0) 
171 288 3329 


[\LLj CIIRISTON jt TO. 
btismdonBl Rinding Expats 

- CotteatGuarariM Programs 
- Real Estate PragEm 

- Leisure Projects 

- Ancah/ShiHjeig 

BROKERS COMPENSATED 
No fees until conirari signing 
Tel: 602-468-S71S 
Fsc 602-4664663 


CAPITAL CORP. 

M & A 

Cctpurm? Fmancrg 
Venire Capui 
rtednsi 

Tel: 0O1-407-24MK0 
Fax: 001-407-246-0037 USA 


GLOBAL PROJECT FUMHNG 
VENTURE CAPITAL-JO WT VENTURES 
-PROJECT FINANCING 


Tet 444 113 2727 5SD 
Fax: 444 113 2727 560 
Faes arena iea*s» pm re 
an Oder d twsing bemg made 


FUNDS AVAILABLE 
For investment Programs 
Proof of Raids Avalade 
Through Amaru houers a 
Seven U.5 & European Banks 
(212) 7524242 Fas (212) 756-1221 
Ammeys & Broken ironed 
375 Park Ave, NY. NY 10152 USA 


IRREVOCABLE BANK 


AGAINST SUITABLE GUARANTEE 


COMMERCIAL FUNDING AVAIABLE 
BiKmess finance 1 Venue Capital 
Wortteide ' Brokers wetoone 


ETMC MVESIIENTS LTD 
FAX 444 (0H15 942 7B46 


“HIMEOIATE A UNLIMITED ** 
- Cteal avaiatte tot 
ALL busmess npjeas 4 
MM US SI mum max. 

Ini Bteness CmsuBra 
(717) 397-7490 (US FAX) 
iqx/mw.Htxsconxorn (ktemef) 


COMMERCIAL INR BAMONG 

LOAN 

AGAffiST GUARANIS 
FAX *30 1 32 43 S27 


UNUUTED CAPITAL 

FOR 

M APPROVED COUNTRIES 
Furosns d Ear* GiarerMs era 
Dthe- Firuxal Inrrj^ns 
Lines of CreA va Uarteusle Securses 
Min. $10 Efiflon USD. to Mix. 

ALSO. ASK ABOUT THE 
SGNFfCANT CONTRACTED 
RETURNS AVAILABLE 
FOR PARTKPATION H SLC POOL 
Hhl. S6 Mite USD. No Mix. 

In tar na l i a ml Funfing Sendees, tac. 

1-504-304M rii 

Wet «w«sora 
El.laC furouijSds'Grg 


Akclo Auirican GIoup 

PIC 

PROJECT FINANCE 
V3TUAS CAPITAL 
GL03AL COVERAGE 
NO LUXliaJM 
BROKERS WELCOME 

For Caps r ag srodue arc 
iracmatin ps* 

Tel -rM -,Ki in o65 
Fax -y i?« 301 577 
rou ae aetwe a km ss 


PROJECT RNANCING 

Venue Capa - Jan venures - 
No Kmn ■ Srotets PitKKL 

BJ.I. INTERNATIONAL 
Tel: 001-242-363-1649 
Fax: 001-716-77M200 


UNLIMITED WTL FUNDING i LOANS 
itammeroal dqjki Tmance - sun-up 
devetopnenti mrough Prane irajrauna 
European FmanceT Sources To 0 enure 
pn project lames ivpe tc CROWN 
MST Inc via b. - 212572-9527 iUSA) 



Financial Services 


FINANCIAL GUARANTEES 

msuance ■ nemsuancs bacned 
guarariees tor quaHtad 
business prqeas 
Tef 561-998-3222 
Fac 561-995-3225 USA 
nonhanpSMtttiefaona 


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* Tradng ProgromsVanturp Captai 

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mnaanre Bmai KespaiCvstonfacom 



BANCOR 

OF ASIA 

EeTnarii jjararow* i: wur? -jci 
v -.ait ryxj 

VENTURE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 

lin; 1f4n ^ife;aral 
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Fax: (632) B1M2BJ 

Tet 1632) 68J-5558 

r^rzssai earo: cry c?jn c ify. 
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tetters d CreU 
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Tel: (212) 758-1242 
Fax: (212) 758-1221 

Erer j iVfr^Tr 

“£ Far* Avt- YT 'J- 1""5L iTi- 

Rrtra; l 3 Fetwi-- 
SCte.lie£ 


Serviced Offices 


COMMERCIAL COORDINATORS 
SWITZERLAND 

' ftlEro represerjaion 

• =ii acwtot»aa.e an: ureunai 
servees 

' ana soc-ar bvvn sra-'jmma 

• Trasacns ctp, vrang p Genran, 
Fre*wi Er^sh 

• Mmi an: yea icu c uj :^s 
Gsne.-a ex Zurich 

• Prcrerr.- searrt reircacr ass^artv 
' dices o German ana French 

speaking Sateriard 

CCS 

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Sauiceckersirasse ;5 

TekFax *(41) 1-362 34 07 
E-mail: C-c-sSncccs&cfl 


TAX FREE HAVEN 

in the heat cl rassau 
Besbgoia Otfce Space Avaflatte 
SeoEEral Sen-ces. Prea? Phone 
i Fa*. Corfsrence Room 
FuHPart-Tm? OtHw Retai 
Tel 1-M-35MU44 Far. 1-242-2^335 


YOUR OFFICE IN MUfflCH. Hambitacr 
i£5 other iocatians arridthe hc fit- 
ness centres Otter tdiv stilted 5 hit- 
nstied otlces c^mess a:- 

Oess muftbntei se^suna sicpcfl Tel 
-4940 2350 HC F,- 4» ^51' :h£ 


World-Wide 
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Uoh»'Ari 

NCmufK * : . , ■ 

START YOUR 
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5«:svss arresses tuna.-*: Sees 
nw -. 3 •«:-.-<« ir Austna, Belgian. 
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TeL + 41-1 214 62 62 
Fax 41-1 214 65 19 

iri BfcAtCT^in 


YOUR OFFICE IN PAHS 

a ready chan you otad tt. 

eiETi is a »'e :t rein 

C€S 


a.iL.’ai r> :--”u r -r" rase 
^rot* ra - j mu* 4i sr.-fj 

B B E — 

31. Fg St-Hcnate 75038 Pans 

v ..a .Vi::::-*, -n Kir.m: 


YOUR OFFICE IN PARS 



Rentals 


PARIS 7tti ::t £: £1 Zrrsr. rx 
iz ~r f: tt - -* srr. 

ZMr-v: -:I -M i; ;4 T-f 5= 


REAL ESTATE COMPANY 

FOR SALE M AUSTRIA 

r^oeP. n.m central i;ca-.;r r. Vicrea. 
mfrerarai ft-rnsti^ m epe-aort 
enc. Gte space 
■ Cortcist-e ar.nta lease incsne 

• Pceroai rer.ii sw 

• Ltec- aRetpasre caersai . 
iResasneLMBmaraai cflues) 

5o> 311 tHT 51=21 NEUILLY CIDEX 


PARIS 16th, INDOOR TENNIS COURT 

f- 4M Fir.jte cr ccmmercai Pciscie 
pannersn? Camaa 1 HT So« 32’. 
S321 NsUllIV CEE EX FRANCE 


PARIS MADELEINE I OPERA © 5dm 

txgh class dVf 3 roms - parfcng. Tei 
.on 4i2d 406? anssenn: machirv? 




GENERAL 










■ -« I-.i I- *7 1 iJTiWijH 


ouf mr special KADm 
REAL ESTATE 
IN & AROUND PARIS 

(Safes and Rentals) 

H appear on 
FRIDAY, JWE 27141 1987 

Par more dealt phase onto 

WTHWATTOMAL HERALD TOBUNE 
PARS Tat +33 (0)1 41 43 93 85 
orFte+33W14143B370 . 
EHirtb chraBedflltcom 


VIENNA, AUSTRIA. Tat 713 ■ 3374. 
Are you sad or worried? Lonely or de- 
prwsfld? Are you despaktag or sutoktal? 
ft twin to ta* about it. Ptmns; 
BEFWBflJERS in Mai conHance. Mon- 
Fri. 930 am ■ 1 pm and way day 630 
pn • 10pm. 


LHJAL CtfflJ) ADOPTION hum South 
America. CMck A efficient procudares. 
Backed by legal consulting Tel: 972 
50683T35 Fa^2 4 886T& . 


:Uk4«1,lM-1 




I *1=7771 rT 7 : re. iiMKi > •] 



Maas BBS NEW ♦ DEHOCARS 
*nwi6S'.+ SWtth Ltaoudnei. ftx 
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Personals 


MAY THE SACRH) HEART OF JESUS 
ba arkxed. gbrfied, loved and preserved 
throughout the world, now and forever. 
Sacred heart of Jesus, nay for us. Sake 
Jude, writer of rwaaes. prey tar us. 
SaH Jude, hetaer d the hohhss. pray 
far us. Amea % thh p^ier nhe tanBE 
a day, by the ninth day your prayer w9 
be answered, k has never been komm 
to falL Publcate must be promised. 
(PUL 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


French Riviera 




Friendships 


DOMINATE THE GULF 

OF SAINT TR0PEZ 
Dked oaxiK Houee in dupin. kxnished. 
decorated. 105 sqm. + tenace - Smal 
Provencal vfcge on lafckfe, 3 tons from 
toe sea / Pert Grtaeud. 5 ha. park, large 
sMsming pod, names, cafcn, caretaker. 
F1A50.oaa Txfc +33 ffia 80 14 01 95 
or hone +33 (t^4 93 37 10 95. 




Legal Sendees 


US MWGflATKM: Fax you quertone 
to oqjert WMtlMon D.C. Attorney bis 
F. Sataado. (M[f & Oaonjemn Law) 
wrt 15ya.+ opatece. (22)888 0568. 


DIVORCE 1-DAY CHTTFHJ 
Call Or F» (714) 98D86e5. Write 16787 
Beach BkxL n37, Huakigbn Beech, GA 
9264fl USA- HiBfl - MtamONnuom 


DIVORCE BM DAY. NO IrawL tfite 
Bat 377 . Sudtuy, MA 01776 USA Tet 
S 08 H 43 G 367 , RDC 506 M 43 D 183 . 


QAVD ROffiHTS RA-Unty* Cnleflton, 
over 200 hand cotored intugraphs- 
pecttB X 3401B) FK +9722 538 9921 


MEUDON-BELLEVUE for sale, apart- 
ment wtti exceptional raw of Paris. 105 
sqm, tooth floor of a residence shared 
In a large park, beside Meudon farest 
Careutotoiy private, free bedrooms, 2 
bolts, double Hvtng (36 sqm.], Italy 
equipped totchen. cedar, two rni^a 
sparaa. Bate* sate 5 nfc, (rose to 
rtamataei school to Sevrea. FF1550M. 
T* +33 Ml 45 34 94 38 (home) Of (0)1 
40 57 66 55 (office) 


IBth. AUTEUL 450 sqm TDWHOUSE 
4 Moreys. 13 mam rooms. Itigh taass 
BUngs, net* fi*r remvtaed, 100 sqm. 
QBAen ussi.7 M. Cal onger +93 m 
42 80 13 13 Far +33 (W 42 96 1333 


Gift, GUENEGAUD. Duple 
terrace, worn, very tan 
bam OWWTBl 433(0)1 



Real Estate Services 





Parfa Area Furnished 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 


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HERALD tribune, 

Sge^ 80 ^’ JlJNE 25, 1997 


STAGE/ENTER TAINMENT 


Making It Real: The Moscow Roots of Modern Acting 



By Michael Specter 

New York Times Sen-ice 


M OSCOW — It was one of 
those urgent, endless con- 
versations that have always 
been the province of the 
young and the idealistic. One hundred 
years ago, two Russian men, their eyes 
aflame with passion for a new idea, met 
at a Moscow restaurant called the Slavy- 
ansky Bazaar. 

Eighteen hours later, after one of the 
seminal philosophical dialogues of 
modem times, Konstantin Stanislavsky 
and Vladimir Nemirovich-Dancheoko 
had laid the foundation for the Moscow 
Art Theater, arguably the most influ- 
ential dramatic company of the 20th 
century. 

“The 'World Conference of Nations 
never considered issues of government 
with as much clarity and precision as we 
considered the fundamentals of our fu- 
ture venture," Stanislavsky, the creator 


of Method acting, wrote in his memoirs 
of the meeting. ‘ 'They were questions of 
pure art, our artistic ideals and stage 
ethics.” 


The Moscow Art Theater, relying on 
anislavskv's naturalistic use of acting 


Sunday, to assess the power of that 
ieting. and .to contemplate the trou- 


meeting. and .to contemplate the trou- 
bled future of what grew out of it, many 
of the world’s most notable actors and 
directors met onstage at the theater 
where Stanislavsky so long held sway. 
Everyone was allowed to ramble a bit, to 
address the empty chairs of the founders 
of the theater and to respond to ques- 
tions from an audience tilled with the 
intellectual descendants of the move* 
ment that began at the Bazaar in 1897. 

“There were splits, arguments, 
changes all the time,” said Sergei 
Yursky, one of Russia’s most renowned 
actors and perhaps its greatest inter- 
preter of Pushkin. "But still they did 
whar they did: They created a theater 
that raised the role of acting as never 
before. And the theater changed the 
world.” 


Stanislavsky's naturalistic use of acting 
and his insistence that actors explore 
their own psyches and emotions in pre- 
paring for a role, became Russia's prin- 
cipal vehicle for public art Performing 
works by Tolstoy, Chekhov and even 
scenes from Pu shkin, the theater 
quickly became the most exciting artist- 
ic site in a country on the verge of a 
revolution. By emphasizing the real 
struggles of man, not the distant myths 
of the pasr, the theater brought a new 
language of drama to Russia. 


T HE creation of the theater was a 
protest against the old way of 
acting, as Stanislavsky wrote, it 
was a strike “against false 
pathos and declamation, against actors' 
artificiality and bad conventional stag- 
ing.” 

The troupe’s early travels abroad, be- 
fore Soviet life made open expression 
and exchange impossible, helped spread 


BRITISH THEATER 


A Dressing Room With a View 


L ONDON — Like his long-lime 
director, Richard Eyre, the 
most prolific and faithful of Na- 
tional Theatre dramatists this 
last decade or so is leaving the South 
Bank on a considerable high: David 
Hare's new “Amy’s View" is not only 
another triumph of his national tem- 
perature-taking, but also that still less 
fashionable form of drama, the back- 


By Sheridan Morley 

liiieniationdl Herald Tribune 


stage play. 
Once urx 


Once upon a time, every self-respect- 
ing dramatist felt his portfolio incom- 
plete witbout at least one look through a 
dressing-room glass darkly. But re- 
cently has come the belief that plays 
written, however well, in greasepaint 
are unlikely to appeal to a non-Equity 
audience. So what Hare has cunningly 
done is to save the ritual dressing-room 
confrontation until the very end of a 
touching, chilling, hugely observant 
contemporary social drama, most of 
which takes place in an equally un- 
fashionable and long-lost setting, a 
country house in the Thames Valley. 

It is more than a little courageous of 
Hare to set his stirring defense of the live 
drama within the framework of what 
might at first sight seem a set vacated 40 
years ago by the likes of Enid Bagnold 
and Robert Bolt; braver still to open 


view," which is essentially that love 
will conquer all just so long as everyone 
is very nice to everyone else. 

Only of course they are not: Around 
Amy (a suitably wide-eyed if sometimes 
inaudible Samantha Bond) are gathered 
her mother ( Judi Dench, as the predatory 
old actress unable to believe in a world 
no longer run in her image), a drunken 
neighbor who turns out to be the Lloyd's 
villain (Ronald Pickup) and a pushy 
young TV director fEoin McCarthy), 
this last a somewhat thankless role, 
though not so much of an afterthought as 
that of the young actor (Christopher 
Staines) who has to come out of 
nowhere to sustain, with remarkably 
little help, the final scenes. There is also 
an old and later paralyzed grandmother, 
wonderfully played in a welcome return 
to the stage by Joyce Redman. 

In the end, this is not as powerful a 
Hare piece as "Skylight’Tnow back at 
the Vaudeville) or “Racing Demon” or • 
“Plenty.” largely because across the 15 
years of the play’s development the 
author seems to get a little confused 
about his priorities of national and per- 
sonal concern: The declining respect 
awarded to those actors who stay away 
from films and television? The fact that 
some very nice if somewhat careless 


can, a woman who finds more life in 
theater than in life, and "Amy’s View” 
is at the last reflected in a dressing-room 
mirror. For all that, hasten along: Eyre's 
staging of the last 60 seconds alone is 
one of the most breathtaking repres- 
entations of the trick of theater I have 


ever seen. 

On the main Chichester stage, 
"Blithe Spirit" got off to a somewhat 
shaky start on opening night, not least 
because Dora Biyan stepped in at short 
notice to replace an injured (but now 
happily recovered) Maureen Lipman 
and has as yet only a nodding acquaint- 
ance with the dialogue and indeed the 


plot. But as she (Madame Arcati, I 
hasten to add) has always been a mad 


people got inadvertently scorched by 
Lloyd's? The way that a trendy, Tarant- 


.loyd's? The way that a trendy, Tarant- 
ino-esque film director specializing in 


"Amy’s View” exactly as Noel Cow- 
ard opened his 1925 “Hay Fever,” with 


hasten to add) has always been a mad 
old bat, the play does not suffer unduly; 
and it gains considerably from the return 
to the stage after far too long away of 
Twiggy, an ethereal Elvira who makes 
one wish she were doing the musical 
version instead. Steven Pacey is won- 
derfully urbane as the unfortunate au- 
thor, ultimately henpecked from beyond 
the grave by not one but two ghostly and 
ghastly wives, while Belinda Lang does 
what she can with the ever-underwritten 
role of Ruth. Tim Luscombe’s thought- 
ful, underrated production will settle in 
on the road to London; all it needs is 
time, and perhaps some fractionally bet- 
ter timing. 


am opened ms 1925 Hay fever, with 
a celebrated if now outdated actress 
confronted with the arrival of an un- 
welcome weekend guest in the shape of 
her daughter's boyfriend. 

But having paid this ritual, and I trust 
conscious, obeisance to the old back- 
stage dramas, Hare moves his swiftly 
forward: his play is about the victims of 
the Lloyd’s insurance crash, the su- 
premacy of cinema over theater for the 
young and, above all else, "Amy's 


exploding skulls will always play to 
better bouses than the verv best dram- 


better bouses than the very best dram- 
atists? 

All of that is at the heart of "Amy’s 
View,” but her view too is clouded; so 
when the final confrontation comes be- 
tween her still self-absorbed mother and 
the young director who has married and 
then betrayed her, we know the stage 
lady will win out over the film guy 
precisely because that is what this play 
has been all about from the very be- 
ginning. Dench conveys, as only she 


A again to the Playhouse, under 
its fifth new management in 
20 years. This unlucky theater 
now has a brave new owner-producer, 
and the opening production, a rare West 
End sighting of Chekhov’s "Vanya" 
prototype “The Wood Demon," is cer- 
tainly hugely adequate if little more. We 
shall, I fear, need something more dra- 
matically sexy if that beautiful Thames- 
side theater is truly to come back to any 
kind of sustained life. 


ND finally, welcome back yet 
again to the Playhouse, under 


BOOKS 


THIN ICE 

Coming of Age in Canada 

By Brace McCall. Illustraied. 
249 pages. S24. Random 
House. 


Reviewed by Christopher 
Lehmann-Haupr 


F IFTEEN years ago. Bruce 
McCall published a won- 


JL McCall published a won- 
derfully funny collection of 
satirically captioned illustra- 
tions, “Zany Afternoons: 
And Other Glimpses of the 
Golden Age of Play." One 
ought to have guessed that be- 
neath this coolly elegant lam- 
poon of the excesses of Amer- 
ican commerce lay the usual 
dollop of undigested anger. 

Now, in a bitterly amusing 
memoir. "Thin Ice: Coming 
of Age in Canada," McCall 
anatomizes that anger, which 


he traces to a father who could 
nor be bothered to give his six 
children the rime of day, and a 
country that conspired to be 
inferior to the United Slates. 

Yes. "Thin Ice” is yet an- 
other memoir of growing up 
in a dysfunctional family. Its 
author writes that his father. 
Thomas Cameron McCall, 
was "in emotional turmoil 
every waking moment of his 
life and ran on four speeds: 
ebullience, anger, tantrum, 
and brooding rage." In re- 
sponse. the author's mother. 
Helen Margaret (Peg) Mc- 
Call, "more or less de mater- 
ialized." he writes. "She be- 
came a kind of hologram of a 
mother, a shimmering but 
aloof maternal figure, always 
just out of reach and out of 
touch. She read The New 
Yorker, chain-smoked and 


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increasingly dabbled in alco- 
holic spirits." 

As for being Canadian: It 
made McCall feel “himself to 
be about two-thirds Americ- 
an, with the other third com- 
posed of a grayish ball of 
chaff: hockey/plaid/buner 

tarts/earmuffs” and "God 
Save the King/Queen.” He 
adds that similar feelings ‘ 4 led 
the average Canadian to dis- 
count automatically his home 
and native land by about 33.3 
percent, especially in the 
presence of Americans.” 

Yet if McCall grouses at 
length about the losing hand 
he and his five siblings were 
dealt, he also steps far enough 
back to offer an objective pic- 
ture of what formed and un- 
dermined his parents. As 
'‘working-class kids” from 
the working-class town of 
Simcoe in Norfolk County. 
Ontario, T.C. and Peg McCall 
dreamed of escaping. 

They subscribed to The 
New Yorker and read sophis- 
ticated books. “NasceDt Jazz 
Babies they were,” McCall 
writes, "bright young things, 
flaming youth headed out of 
torpid Simcoe to find their 
destiny in the larger world, 
where they belonged." 

Bui "fate would choose 
otherwise.” McCall contin- 
ues. “Fate and one kid after 
another, born in the midst of 
the Great Depression to a 
small-town couple without 
worldly access or a spare dol- 


lar to jump-start their es- 
cape." In time they simply 
gave up. And then along came 
World War II to further 
deaden their spirits. 

But his parents' failure 
was the author's gain, he 
writes, thanks partly to his 
rebellion against them, 
partly to certain gifts they 
inadvertently provided him. 
Leafing through their old 
copies of The New Yorker, 
he was lured by the cartoons 
into the habit of reading, 
drawing and writing. 

In his epilogue, McCall 
gives thanks for having es- 
caped Canada, for having 
achieved success in New 
York City and for having 
been given his own office at 
The New Yorker, where he is 
now a regular contributor. He 
promises "to make the ob- 
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my long-time resident alien 
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He promises to do it “any day 
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He adds: "Next week is 
looking good, in fact Cer- 
tainly the end of the year. 
Absolute latest." 

But you feel that his re- 
luctance to give up his past is 
not as amusing as be means to ' 
be. And goes deep enough to 
flaw an otherwise entertain- 
ing book. 


Christopher Lehmam-Haupt 
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the technique across the world. Before 
Stanislavsky, acting (both performance 
and training) emphasized speech and 
the text. But the Method changed all 


that: psychology, not just diction, be- 
come the foundation of the actor's art. In 


the United States, die lineage is simple 
to trace. The Group Theatre, founded in 
193 1 by Harold Chuman, Lee Strasberg 
and Cheryl Crawford, and its direcT off- 
spring, the Actors Studio, sprang from 
the inspiration of Stanislavsky and the 
Moscow Art Theater. 

From James Dean and Marlon 
Brando to AJ Pacino and Robert De 
Niro, Method actors have learned to live 
their roles, probing deeply into the psy- 
chological roots of their characters to 
discover, and convey, a deeper truth. 
Lee Strasberg. as the director of the 
Actors Studio, became the Method’s 
foremost proponent in America, al- 
though one wno many say badly mis- 
interpreted the meaning of the craft. 

Anatoli Smeliansky, the literary di- 


rector of today’s Moscow Art Theater, 
reminded the assembled that Stan- 
islavsky used to watch rehearsals and 
issue his favorite phrase to acton who 
failed to meet his standards: “I don’t 
believe you,” be would bellow at any- 
one who he felt was just delivering lints. 
It was also a way of reminding his 
charges, that truth and authenticity are 
core values of the craft. 

“We have to remember how impor- 
tant it is to get to the roots to expose 


ourselves completely,” said Yuri Li- 
ubimov. one of Russia's leading di- 


ubimov, one of Russia's leading di- 
rectors, who for long was in exile during 
the Soviet years. ‘ ‘Otherwise it is just an 
actor looking for applause. And that is 
not an.” 


M UCH of the discussion Sun- 
day centered on the diffi- 
culty in the modem era of 
keeping the sense of rep- 
ertory and integrity that made such col- 
lectives as the Moscow An Theater and 


Manon’: 3d of the Triple Crown 


By David Stevens 

Initnuiriunal HerjIJ Tnmnc 


P ARIS — With ihe handsome and 
atmospheric new production of 
Massenet’s “Manon" the Paris 
Opera has wrapped up what 
might be called a season of major trans- 
plants. After "Carmen" and "Pslleas.” 
it is the third glory of the French repertory 
to be staged anew ai one of the company's 
two big houses, all three plucked from the 
smalle r garden of the Opera Comique. 

Well, the main business of an im- 
presario is to fill the theater, and in the 90 
years after its premiere in 1884. "Man- 
on” filled the house more than 2.000 



times at the Comique. second only to 
“Carmen" in popularity. 


“Carmen" in popularity. 

Still, it seemed reasonable to wonder 
how Massenet's perfumed and caressing 
lyricism would thrive in the vast space of 
the Opera Bastille. The answer is just fine, 
for several reasons, one being that under 
its elegant surface, the musculature of 
Massenet's music is very strong. 

Another is that Renee Fleming is as 
radiant a Manon as one could wish for. 
with a soprano equal to the role’s for- 
midable demands and a portrayal that 
encompasses Manon's fatal mixture of 
fragile sincerity and easy frivolity. 
Richard Leech as the Chevalier des 
Grieux. deployed his resonant tenor in a 
solid performance that could neverthe- 
less have used a touch more elegance. 


T HE staging, directed by Gilbert 
Deflo with William Qrlandi as 
set and costume designer, in- 
geniously coped with the op- 
era's scenic demands, from modest bou- 
doir to the outdoor spectacle of the 
Cours-la-Reine. A triple ring of con- 
centric, revolving walls made it possible 
to close or open up the stage as needed 
and without delay — using the Bastille's 
technical resources to artistic purpose. 
Orlandi’s costumes took care of the 
18th-century atmosphere, and the light- 
ing of Joel Hourbeigt enhanced the fluid- 
ity’ of the scenic changes. 

The unobtrusive bur very solid mu- 
sical floor was provided by the orchestra 
under Gary Bertini. sensitive to the re- 
finement and luscious subtlety of the 
score as well as to its more" frenetic 
outbursts of emotion. 

Laurent Naouri was impressive as the 
Comte des Grieux, dispensing well- 
meant but futile advice to his feckless 
son with austere sympathy. Jean-Luc 
Chaignaud made more than usual of 
Lescaut. Manon's unscrupulous brother; 
the veteran Michel Senechal turned in 
another of his cameo numbers as rhe 
fatuous Guillot de Morfomaine. and 
Franck Ferrari was reliable as the eph- 
emeral Bretigny. 

Performances continue through July 
12 at the Opera Bastille. 


Renee Fleming in the title role of Massenet’s 'Manon.'' 


MoUi-Mah<uk*i 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

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ingredienls 


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Town" 


14 Trig (unciron 


15 Man of ihe 
House’’ 

18 Oil 0< — 

17 Gin inv 9 nior 

19 Aflet -school 
dnnk 

20 'Cheers slar 

21 Fib 


23 Cravings 
29 giorno!" 

28 Balhing facility 

29 Spot 

ai Flashed one’s 
pearly whiles 
35Unagi.aia 
sushi bar 
38 Lymphatic pan 
38 'Penny Lane.' 
not Strawberry 
Fields Forever' 


39 Frank Fontaine 
TV character 


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Merchants Group 


43 Thomas Manns 

■ Kroger' 

«4 Presidential run 

45 One below a 
second taut 
os Pursues 
48 Government 
worry 
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51 Sir Pater 

painter ol Bntish 
royally 

53 Kind of toad 
55 Leftover 
99 Emphatic 
affirmative 

83 Violist's ctef 
B4 'Valley of the 
Doits’ co-star 
68 Sweet dessen 
67*Oh. very 
tunny 1 ’ 

68 Line of type 
89 Blackens 

70 Yesteryear 

71 Brewer s need 


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Bahamas. Tel: (242i 394-7080 
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at a restaurant 

2 Theme song of 
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colony 

7 Fender bender 
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9 Victrola part 
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11 Midaast earner 

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segment 
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character 

34 Full-bodied ale 
MSphl-oH groups 
27 Candidate ol 
1992 and '9S 
2 B George stalk 
showco-hosi 
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32 Properly 
securities 

33 Order 

34 Floor models 
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41 On ihe team? 

42 Lite in the early 
days 

47 Like many a 
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vehicle 

56 Miss Gnaws ol 
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57 Piay the lead 
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the Group Theatre 
Lyubimov complained loudly 
that Russia today has given itself 
ro weak, popular culnue from other 
lands. “This is not even the country," 
he said, "‘where Dostoyevsky is takes 
most seriously." 

Others — Galina Volchek of die 
Sovremennik Theater of Moscow, for 
example — noted with satisfaction the 
enormous diversity' and complexity of 
modem theater in Russia today. 

The Russians were not the only ones 
to worry about the fate of their craft. 
Robert Brostein, artistic director of the 
American Repertory Theatre in Cam- 
bridge. Massachusetts, gave a long talk 
about the lack of cultural sophistication 
in the United States. 

"The theater depends on a group of 
actors working together in concert," 
Brustein said. He said that the mis- 
direction of Stanislavsky’s method in 
the United States had turned out many 
stars, bur few true actors. 


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tribune. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1997 



RAGE 13 


Paris Signals Trouble 
With Budget Targets 

Bank of France Urges Cuts and Reform 



I ■. 



J riiii, 


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^Lockheed Maim Corp. has sold about 3, 600 
J*- Jo fighters to afrfiirces around the world over 
the past 22 company is looking to 

Eastern Eth&pe to keep the plane in 
production into ihe next century. 


Aging but Agile F- 16 Still Dancing for Orders 

By Bany James the fighter to other North Atlantic Tmarv r>o™ ivatinn cnn /m .. . 

ImemanonaJ Herald Tribmt 


F 0t °type crashed with a 
stack landing gear while it was practicing for the 
Pans Air Show in 1975. v ^ Ior ““ 

®9® sions - engine cut out in flight, 
fbrc^g pflots to glide to an emergency landing 
But the teething problems were solved by die time 
Ae^ow opened, and the F-I6 fighter’s 3m puMto 
demonsuation went off without a hitch, dazzlin g 
assembled air force generals from around the world 
wiito a program of daring aerial pirouettes 

s£33sSs33F« p 

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SLl 00 ,? POttnrial “ •***<»> to a 


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Cmp^which inherited the F-16 when it absorbed 

ST Pt^ced and imEFSi EmSES * 1 
fall of the g Beriin Wall SP * M ^ ^ afier * e Because the aircraft has become a standard NATO 

asaaffi*i— ■Kn^. 


sell for about $23 million each.” 

In all, 3,600 F-16s have been delivered to a score of 
an - forces, and the aircraft is extensively co-produced 
abroad. A consortium created by the United States 
Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark and Norwav 
produced ^ ’ 


their Soviet-built jets. 

Lobbying has been intensive in Hungary in recent 
months, with Sweden promising a series of offset 

See FIGHTER, Page 17 


Cisco Systems Expands Its Network and Buys 2 Firms 

Cotvtety Oar Saff Flam Dijpm+a . _ •/ 

thev seek tn nffW * -r 


&T 


CompMtyOar5KeFmmDapm*a 
SAN JOSE, California — Cisco Sys- 
tems Inc., the world’s largest maker of 
equipment to link computers, saidTues- 
day it would buy two networking 
companies. 

Cisco said it would buy the rest of 
Ardent Communications Corp., in 
which it already holds a minority stake, 
for about $156 million in stock, 
will also buy Global Internet Software 
Inc. for$40.3 million in cash and take an 
undisclosed stake in the parent com- 
pany, Global Internet com. 

Networking companies have been on 
a buying 1 binge during die past year as 


they seek to offer a broader anay of 
products to help companies share in- 
formation and link computers in far- 
flung offices. 

Cisco has also been looking for other 
ways to expand. On Monday, the com- 
pany announced an alliance with Alc- 
atel Alsthom SA of France to develop 
c omm u n ications gear that would inte- 
grate telephone, data and video net- 
works into a seamless pipeline of in- 
formation. ■ 

Neither company intends to make an 

investment in the other and neither com- 
pany plans to transfer employees to the 
other's factories or laboratories. 


The two companies said the deal 
would allow each of them to generate an 
additional $500 million of annnai rev- 
enue by 2000. 

"The major concept is building 
voice, data and video networks as one, 
using Alcatel's experience with voice 
networks and our abilities with data," 
said John Chambers, Cisco’s chief ex- 
ecutive. "If we can do that, and do it 
quickly, we don’t have any compet- 
itors.’' 

Cisco now wants to link its network- 
ing technology with the standard tele- 
phone systems that most people use to 
dial into the Internet. 


Ardent designs products that inte- 
grate voice, data and video on public 
and private networks. The company was 
founded in 1996 and collaborated with 
Cisco to create its products. 

In late New York trading, Cisco was 
down 18.75 cents, at $70.00. 

(NYT, Bloomberg) 


CnmpJnl fa Our Suff Fnn OcptO. bn 

PARIS — Finance Minister Domi- 
nique Strauss-Kahn warned Tuesday 
thar the Socialist government would 
probably be forced to cot "a certain 
number of spending commitments" be- 
cause it was likely to have inherited a 
higher deficit than expected. 

Earlier Tuesday, the governor of the 
Bank of France, Jean-Claude Trichet, 
called on the government to cut spend- 
ing and implement structural reform. 

Mr. Strauss- Kahn said an audit of 
public finances planned by the new gov- 
ernment was likely to show that the 
previous center-right government had 
worsened the deficit this year. 

"During the election campaign we 
promised not to worsen the deficit, but, 
unfortunately it has, because of your 
own decisions in the first half of the 
year," he told opposition lawmakers. 
"And the audit, 1 fear will reveal it" 
The results of the audit are expected to 
be released July 21. 

"As a result, the spending that we 
want to undertake will be weighted 
against a certain number of spending 
commitments that we will not make." 
the finance minister said. 

At the presentation of the Bank of 
France’s annual report. Mr. Trichet said 
it was "essential to control spending 
and reduce public deficits, both in 1997 
and the medium term.” 

That was the first time Mr. Trichet 
had commented on the economic 
policies of Prime Minister Lionel 
Jospin's government. Mr. Jospin be- 
came prime minister after a general 
election June 1 during which he pledged 
to make job creation his top priority, 
ahead of reducing the deficit. 

"What Trichet is basically saying is 
that France needs to cut spending in a 
lasting manner," said Ernest Ramiro 
economist at Bankers Trust in London. 

Mr. Jospin promised to raise the min- 
imum wage by 4 percent and spend 
more money on housing. Those mea- 
sures could call into question whether 
France will be able to reduce its budget 
deficit to the level required to q ualif y for 
the euro — 3 percent of gross domestic 
product — raising doubts whether the 
single currency will be introduced on 
Jan. 1, 1999. 

Mr. Strauss-Kahn told lawmakers 


that any increase in spending would be 
offset by a cut in spending. Over the 
weekend, he said that any sign of a 
“’significant" deficit overshoot would 
lead to a "readjustment" of policy 
pledges, including a possible postpone- 
ment of plans to cut value-added tax. 

The government has committed 
France to joining the single currency on 
time but has coiled for. a flexible reading 
of the Maastricht treaty criteria. 

Without specifically referring to gov- 
ernment policies, Mr. Trichet appeared 
to challenge Mr. Jospin's view that 
higher government spending was 
needed to increase growth and job cre- 
ation. He warned that a widening in the 
deficit caused by higher spending would 
raise interest rates. That, in turn, would 
hinder job creation by raising borrowing 
costs, he said. 

The Bank of France “would like to 
stress the importance of a gradual and 
subsumtial reduction in the share of 
public spending in the economy," Mr. 
Trichet said. 

Mr . Trichet also cri ticized the re venue 
side of the budget as an impediment to 
economic growth and job creation, ar- 
guing that (axes and social security 
charges were "clearly too high.” 

Mr. Trichet called for "in-depth 
structural reforms" of public institu- 
tions as a means of cutting spending. 
Failure to examine the role and size of 
public institutions would mean that 
spending could be contained "at best, 
but not significantly reduced." 

Mr. Trichet said France's 12.8 per- 
cent jobless rate could only be reduced it 
there were "structural" reforms to the 
labor market — implying fewer 
obstacle to hiring and firing workers. 

Specifically, he called for reforms in 
education and training and said the labor 
market must be rendered more flexible. 
He indicated that the cost of unskilled 
labor must be allowed to vary in line 
with market conditions. 

Mr. Trichet repeated the bank's com- 
mitment to the single currency and said 
it would continue to pursue low in- 
flation rates and a stable franc — con- 
ditions for qualifying for the euro. He 
said the planned single currency was not 
being undermined by a “crisis in con- 
fidence” and that it would be launched 
on time. ( Rearers, Bloomberg) 


Michael Jackson’s Waning U.S. Star 


Global Private Banking 





By Andrew Ross Sorkin 

Nrw York Times Service ■ 

NEW YORK — Once promoted as 
the icon of a generation, Michael Jack- 
son now finds himself in the precarious 
position of seeming to stand on stage 
alone — at least in the United States. 

Unlike tire usual hubbub that sur- 
rounds anew Jackson album, the release 
more than a month ago of tire singer’s 
sixth recording, “Blood on tire Dance 
Floor History in The Mix,” was ac- 
companied by hardly a sound. The ab- 
sence of a nml timfluti n-dollar market- 
ing campaign was perplexing to many in 
the industry. 

“They just sort of snuck it out there 
without any hoopla," said Russ So- 
lomon, president of Tower Records, a 
xnnsic retail chain. The result: "It’s not 
exactly selling particularly well." 

4 In the four weeks since its release. 
‘Blood on tire Dance Floor" — which 
includes five original songs and eight 
remixed songs — has sold a paltry 
92.000 copies in the United States, ac- 
cording to-Soundscan, a company that 
.tracks music sales. 

Even Jackson’s last recording — 
"History: Past, Present and Future" — 
which was generally considered a flop, 
did better, selling 104,000 units in Jts 
fourth week alone. 


‘ ‘Blood on tire Dance Floor," which 
was released by Epic Records, a sub- ' 
sidiaxy of Sony Music Entertainment 
Inc. made its debut at No. 24 on the 
charts. This week the recording has 
fallen to No. 92. 

While Epic does not release infor- 
mation about its promotional budget, it 
denies that it is spending any less on Mr. 
Jackson’s newest release than on his 

MEDIA MARKETS 

previous efforts. “Absolutely not. We 
are completely behind the album," said 
Melani Rogers, spokeswoman for Epic. 
“Michael is certainly (me of our su- 
perstars and is treated as such." 

In fact, he may be getting such treat- 
ment, but its focus has simply shifted 
overseas, where Mr. Jackson has be- 
come much more popular (ban in the 
United States. 

Industry experts said Epic might be 
back-pedaling in the United States after 
tiie disappointing performance of “His- 
tory," a doable album, "ft didn’t sell 
close to what was expected,” Mir. So- 
lomon of Tower Records said. * ‘I suspect . 
they probably said, ’Let’s not get burned 
this time around.’ v Analysts estimate 
that Epic spent more than $30 million 
promoting A History, ’ ’ which only sold 3 
milli on copies in the United States, 


though it sold 25 million overseas. 

"We just went into this one with onr 
global hats on," Ms. Rogers said. "And 
globally, it is performing well” 

Despite the album’s poor U.S. show- 
ing, “Blood on the Dance Floor" is 
doing well overseas. It hit No.l in the 
United Kingdom, France and Sp ain 

In Europe, appears to be putting 
its promotional muscle behind the re- 
lease. The record company has put to- 
gether a major radio campaign mar in- 
cludes of number of different promotions 
with retail chains. Moreover, Mr. Jack- 
son is in the middle of a concert tour that 
has him playing to sell-out crowds all 
over Europe. There are no plans for Mr. 
Jackson to tour in the United States. 

As for his airplay on American radio, 
the album’s first single, also titled 
"Blood on the Dance Floor," did not 
even make the Top 40. Some blame 
Epic’s low-key promotion. 

The lack of promotion could perhaps 
be a euphemism fora lack of confidence 
in the artist, ft is no secret that tabloid 
headlines have created a public relations 
problem for Mr. Jackson. Hie settle- 
ment he reached over accusations of 
child molestation, together with his 
foiled marriage to Lisa Marie Presley, 
and Ins surprising new marriage have all 
contributed to his fall from grace, in- 
dustry analysts say. 


Truly exceptional service 

STARTS WITH CAREFUL LISTENING. 



U aa Jt p a n i... ... 

National Bonk of Not* York 
(Stoma) S-A. m G 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


June 34 LibicHJbor Rates 


IMS 


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PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JUNE 25, 1991 


THE AMERICAS 


30-Year T-Banci Yietd 


7410 W- 7.10 



Dollar in Deutsche marks 


,7S ' - - - ss: : 130 


U.S. Buys From China’s Army 

AFL-CIO Report Says Retailers Making ‘Vast’ Imports 


Dollar Holds Course 
As Mart Loses Ground 


us a 


— ‘ 120 


By Lena R Sun 

Washingion Post Soviet 


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WASHINGTON — Companies 
owned by the Chinese military are 
exporting vast quantities of goods 
to tbe United States, including 
toys, exercise weights, camping 
tents and fish for fast-food res- 
taurants, according to a report by 
die AFL-CIO, the largest U.S. 
labor organization. 

The U.S. companies that are 
buying products from wholesalers 
or distributors who get the goods 
from firms owned by tbe Chinese 
military and paramilitary police 
include some of the biggest names 
in retailing: Nordstrom Inc., 


The United Food and Commer- 
cial Workers International Union 
has pushed Congress to ban 
Chinese military and paramilitary 
companies from doing business in 
the United States. It also has 
launched a campaign to get 
pledges from American retailers 


not to buy any products from the 
Chinese People's Liberation Army 


Macy’s. Kmart Cora., Wal-Mart 
Stores, Inc. and Montgomery 
Ward & Co. Inc. 

The report, released Monday, is 
the first of its kind to detail the 
extent of business that the Chinese 
military is doing in the United 
States. It came on the eve of a vote 
in the House of Representatives on 
renewing normal trade relations 
with China. 

The annual renewal of China's 
most-favored-nation trading status 
has been heatedly debated in Con- 
gress since the brutal 1989 crack- 
down by the Chinese army on pro- 
democracy ’ demonstrators near 
Tiananmen Square. 


Source.- Bloomberg, Reuters 


Inicnulhea] Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


Lucent Sues Newbridge Over Patent 


MURRAY HELL, New Jersey (Bloomberg) — Lucent 
Technologies Inc. sued Newbridge Networks Inc. on Tuesday, 
claiming the communications-equipment maker infringed on 
four of Lucent's data- networking patents. 

Lucent said the patents covered technology used to unclog 
congested data networks and control the flow of information. 
Dan Coulter, a Lucent spokesman, would not elaborate on 
how the company.uses the technology. 


Chinese People's Liberation Army 
or the People’s Armed Police. 

Over the past decade, the army 
has extended its reach into nearly 
every sector of the Chinese econ- 
omy, virtually becoming a corpo- 
ration in its own right. Experts on 
the Chinese military estimate that 
it has 20,000 companies involved 
in a wide range of businesses, from 
pig farms to telecommunications. 

Chinese military-owned 
companies, for example, are the 
largest exporters of fish to U.S. 
fast-food restaurants, according to 
Jeffrey Fiedler, president of the 
Food and Allied Service Trades 
Department, which prepared the 
report. 

Poly Technologies, which is 
owned by the army’s general lo- 
gistics department, was the third 
largest Chinese exporter of pollack 
fillets into the United Slates in 
1996, he said Representatives of 
the company were charged last year 
with smuggling arms into the 
United States. Poly Technologies is 


a subsidiary of Poly Group, which 
is beaded by Wang Jun. the Chinese 
business executive who met with 
President Bill Clinton at a meeting 
for Democratic donors at the White 
House in February 1996. 

The report identified about 25 
army-owned trading companies in 
China that shipped products to the 
United States last year. Chinese 
companies owned by the state or 
the military enjoy privileges that 
give them a commercial advantage, 
and private companies often try to 
set up relationships with them. 

A spokeswoman for Federated 
Department Stores, Inc., which 
owns Macy’s, said retailers may 
not know who they are buying 
from because of the complex 
nature of Chinese company own- 
ership. Federated bought glass- 
ware last year from a private com- 
pany in Beijing, but the name that 
appeared on the bill of lading was 
Huadong Enterprises Corp., which 
is owned by the Chinese military. 

“Huadong Enterprises is not 
and never mis been a Federated 
vendor,” said Carol Sanger, vice 
president for corporate communi- 
cations at Federated. She said the 
orders for the glassware were 
rerouted through the Hong Kong 
office of the Beijing company, 
which “has a relationship with 
Huadong Enterprises.'' 


Jthumbrty; St wi 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
little changed against the yen Tues- 
day and rose against most other ma- 
jor currencies as concern eased that 
Japan would sell U.S. Treasury so- 
curities. 

In Europe, die British pound rose 
again st the Deutsche mark for the 
third straight day amid speculation 
that British interest rates are set to 
rise. Tbe mark’s weakness against 
tbe pound, combined with talk that 
Europe's single currency may be 
weak, dragged the mark down 
against the dollar. 

Finance Minister Hiroshi Mirsu- 
zuka of Japan said his country was 
not considering selling U.S. bonds, 
countering comments made in New 
York on Monday by Prime Minister 
Ryutaro Hashimoto. Japan is 
among the Largest foreign holders of 
U.S. Treasury bonds, so sales of 
those assets for other investments 
could weaken the U.S. currency. 

“Mitsuzuka was trying to retrace 
or reconfigure the interpretation of 
the comments,” said Ricardo 


Washington cooperates in fighting 
exchange-rate swings. 

Mr. Gomes said the message Mr. 
Hashimoto was trying to convey 
was that Japan was “trying to be 
flexible on exchange rates. ' ’ 

The dollar is likely to rise versus 
the yen in coming days, if, as ex- 
pected. Wednesday's closely 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


Gomes, head of foreign exchange at 
Republic National Bank of New 


Republic National Bank of New 
York. “There was a rebound in the 
dollar on the back of that.” 

In 4 P.M. trading, the dollar 
slipped to 114.700 yen from 
1 14.870. It rose to 1 .7236 DM from 
1 .7185. The pound traded at 2.8758 
DM. compared with 2.868? DM 
Monday. 

Mr. Hashimoto sparked a sell-off 


watched tankan survey of Japanese 
business sentiment shows the econ- 
omy is slowing and will not soon 
recover, traders said. 

Against other currencies, the dol- 
lar rose to 5.8164 French francs 
from 5.7975. and to 1 .4355 Swiss 
francs from 1.4315. The pound fell 
to S l ,6690 from S 1.67 1 7. 

The pound continued its rally as 
expectation lingered that the British 
economy is growing quickly 
enough to warrant an increase in 
lending rates, which would make 
pound -denominated deposits and 
securities attractive. 

Reports last week showing rising 
retail sales, money supply and de- 
mand for manufactured goods 
fanned talk of a rate rise. The Sun- 
day Times of London reported that 
the Bank of England — which has 
raised the base rate twice since May 
6 , to 6.50 percent — is under pres- 
sure to raise the rate again. 


U.S. Clears Some Netscape Exports 

MOUNTAIN VIEW, California (Bloomberg) — Netscape 
Communications Corp. said Tuesday it had received approval 
from the Commerce Department to export software equipped 
with stronger security features. 

The maker of Internet software said its Netscape Com- 
municator offers 1 28-bit encryption, or scrambling, of private 
information, more than twice the size of the current 40-bit 
version and several times harder to decode. 

Encryption is often used by financial institutions and others 
who send confidential information via the Internet though the 
U.S. government has been blocking export of strong encryption, 
fearing it could be misused by terrorists or criminals. 

• Nike Inc. recalled more than 38,000 pairs of athletic shoes 
with a logo that outraged the Muslim community because its 
logo was similar to the Arabic word for Allah. 

■ Berkshire Hathaway Inc, the investment vehicle of the 
billionaire Warren Buffett, said it had agreed to acquire Star 
Furniture Co. for an undisclosed sum. 

* Kendall-Jackson plans a $54 million expansion in the next 
three years that will include new wineries in the Monterey, 
Napa and Sonoma counties of California. 

•Tbe New York Stock Exchange began quoting stocks in 
sixteenths of a dollar, as expected. Return, ap 


MARKET: Dow Recovers After Japanese Clarification 


Continued from Page 1 


The survey found that about 25 per- 
cent of consumers expected their 
incomes to rise in the coming six 
months. Yet that optimism is not 
expected to lead to an inflationary 
spending binge, according to Cheryl 
Katz, senior economist at Merrill 
Lynch & Co. Ms. Katz said that high 
consumer confidence “does not ne- 
cessarily point to a pickup in con- 
sumer spending.” 

Treasury bonds yields, which re- 
flect investor’s expectations about 
inflation, showed tittle change 
Tuesday. The benchmark 30-year 
bond rose to 6.69 percent in late 
trading from 6.68 on Monday. The 


sell its holdings of U.S. Treasury 
securities and raise its gold reserves, 
but bad not done so. Reuters quoted 
him as saying, “I hope the U.S. will 
engage in efforts and incooperation 
to maintain exchange stability so we 
will not succumb to the temptation 


US. STOCKS 


yield rose only slightly on Monday 
from the Friday close of 6.66 per- 


from the Friday close of 6.66 per- 
cent 

Mr. Hashimoto, who was speak- 
ing in Japanese at Columbia Uni- 
versity, was quoted as saying that 
Japan had in the past been tempted to 


to sell off Treasury bills and switch 
our funds to gold.” 

On Tuesday, however, Takatoshi 
Kato. the Japanese deputy finance 
minister, said Mr. Hashimoto was 
responding to a question of whether 
it would be profitable for the gov- 
ernment and private investors to 
continue to hold U.S. Treasury se- 
curities. 

Tbe dollar has recently weakened 
to about 1 14 yen from a late April 
high of more than 127, reducing the 
value of Japan’s vast holdings of 
American securities while aiding 
U.S. exporters. 


At the end of February. Japanese 
investors held $291 billion of U.S. 
Treasury securities, nearly a quarter 
of the estimated $1.18 trillion held 
by foreigners, according to Smith 
Barney. There is about $3 .5 trillion 
of Treasury debt outstanding. 

Writing in English, Mr. Kato re- 
leased an announcement that said 
Mr. Hasbimoto's response to the 
question was that “even though 
some mentions were made of these 


Wachovia to Buy Central Fidelity 
In $ 2.3 Billion Stock Transaction 


temptations in the past. Japan never 
sold Treasury bends for nrofits be- 


sold Treasury bends for profits be- 
cause of the overriding importance 
we attach to Japan-U.S. relationship 
and to the stability of the currency 
market” 

Mr. Hashimoto “regrets that his 
intention was not accurately con- 
veyed,” Mr. Karo said, and the 
prime minister plans to “maintain 
the consistent policy of the govern- 
ment of Japan, which has been im- 
plemented. bearing in mind the good 
relations between Japan and U.S." 


Bloomberg News 

WINSTON-SALEM, North 
Carolina — Wachovia Corp. said 
Tuesday it would buy Central Fi- 
delity Banks Inc. of Richmond, 
Virginia, for $23 billion in stock. 

Wachovia will pay 0.63 share 
for each Central Fidelity share, 
valued at $39.45 a share based on 
Wachovia's closing price Mon- 
day. The combination would give 
Wachovia, based in Winston- 
Salem, 335 branches and $9.9 bil- 
lion of deposits in Virginia. 

* ‘This is a financially attractive 
and low-risk transaction,” said 
Wachovia's chief executive, 
Leslie (Bud) Baker Jr. 

The addition of Central Fidel- 
ity, the third-Iargest Virginia bank 
with $ 10.6 billion in assets and 
244 branches, would make 


Wachovia the 17th-Iargesi U.S. 
bank with $60. 2 billion in assets 
and 8 17 branches in theCarotinas, 
Georgia and Virginia. 

Wachovia's share price fell 
68.75 cents Tuesday to $61 .9375. 
Central Fidelity stock rose S 6 a 
share to S37.875. 

* 'It certainly looks expensive.” 
said Nancy Bush, an analyst with 
Brown Brothers. Harriman & Co. 
“The numbers are big.” 

Wachovia said it expected the 
transaction to be completed in the 
fourth quarter. 

It is the second time in two 
weeks that Wachovia has gone 
shopping in Virginia. On June 10. 
it agreed to acquire Jefferson 
Bankshares. a CharlofiesviHe- 
based bank with S2.1 billion in 
assets and 96 branches. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday 4 pa. Close 

Tha top 300 mast-active stares, 
up to The ctasmu on Wb 3 S&oev 
The Associated Ptbss 


Sates HMh low Lama Owe Indexes 


Most Actives 


June 24, 1997 


High Low Latest Chgo OpM 


Law Latest Qipe OpM 


High Low Latest Char OpM 


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UO 22377 22570 221*4 224.15 *177 
Coma 23 UM 2382.04 234188 7EBA4 ‘ 29.98 

Standard & Poors 


Meteor wt 
Metrikon 
Mebomda 
MJOotRty 
MSTBR 
MSNXVTwl 
MunUn 
Mmrst 

MTMCchti 

NVR 
Nabors 
WPomt 
NY Times 

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IIS (Ito, Bto 
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*73 1ft Bft 

577 ft Vh 
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117 1 ft Ift 

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1825 12*4 12ft 

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159 73ft 73 

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312 ISto 1S>* 
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1187 Bft 7’toi 
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363 3*4 2ft 

386 Bft TO* 
4354 13V, 13ft 

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385 4>'i 4 

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41* 15 14ft 

IE ft ft 
STB ITto, lift 
316 3ft 3V„ 
283 3 7i» u 

14} lift lift 
5W 1*4 I 

777 9>Ve M, 
135 Uto 14ft 
1B6 ft ft 
134 S 5 

47*15 Bft M 
2320 Wto SP*> 


lift * ft 
4*4 -ft 
tto, -ft 
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Industrials 

Transp. 

Ufltitles 

Finance 

5P500 

SPI00 


Law 7PM 
704, 70t» 
43V. 43ft 
77ft RH 
65ft 6 Sft 
34ft 35ft 
89ft Wft. 

S«ft 55 
to** ton 
13ft 14 
37ft 33ft 
30ft 30ft 
3»ft 34ft 
in ton* 


High Lon* Latest Qipe OpW 
Grains 


CORN (CBOT) 

UNU bu mbilmuni- cents, ner amber 


MV 

261 ft 

258ft 

140ft 

-ft 

mm 

Sep 97 

«7ft 

245ft 

247 

+2 

OAO 

Dec 97 

246 ft 

243ft 

245ft 

+ 7ft 13L992 

Mora 

253 

25D 

252ft 

+2 

19.140 

Mnv98 

257T4 

255ft 

257ft 

+2 

2.139 

Jul« 

241 

259 

260ft 

+ ?ft 

SAU 

5epW 

Si 

2SS 

254 

+ lft 

226 


ORANGE JUICE mCIN) 

15.000 Bx.- cents per D. 

Jul97 75A0 72J0 74L3D ♦!.« IWlt 

Sea 97 78.00 7150 77 JO *120 I4JB48 

New 97 80.95 7160 79.90 *IJ0 MSS 

Jm*8 8170 81 JO 82-50 *140 Z.1H 

Est. soles NA Men’s. scBes 9,*30 
Mon's epen ml J6J91 up 1411 


GERMAN GOV. BUND LUFfEl 
DM2SOOOO - pb atlOO pa 
Sep 97 101 AS 101.10 101 64 *034 243,223 
Dec 77 100J7 10030 1Q0J1 *037 MSt 
Est. sales: 199357. Piwr.saNa: 15M77 
Prev.openHU 25L882 op Mtt 


Industrials 


Ed. sides NA Man's, softs 83,730 
Mar's open mt 271445 ofl 319 


Nasdaq 


34to. +*4 

1 -5* 

ift, +to. 


15V* 

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■14 *ft 


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IRSWOKS 

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Transp 


144223 14J7JB 14021 ‘*2.91 
11BBJ3 116424 Il«J3 *5J9 


1596.91 I5BA33 I596JI +14JW 
14SL4I M39A8 145189 *9A4 
1907.90 18*4 JO 1*07.90 * 1324 
947 J3 (59.11 94SJJ1 .121 


tM. We* 
I17WS V*t, 
79181 70ft 
64605 29ft 
56259 45 U 
47514 69ft 
47400 41ft 


Nasdaq 


H«4 (aw 3PM. On. 
144543 1417 JO 144IJM +6J4 
1169-44 I164JI 116625 *2JI 
159112 15*4.13 159474 +1141 
1646.55 1639.48 164165 *140 

I9W.M 1B9+J0 1503.72 +VA 6 
94777 939.11 *4134 *004 


0055 146ft 
3 POT 31ft 
36437 17ft 
36137 10ft 
Pro 7ft 
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33080 49ft 


Law 1PM 
5ft 6 ft 
,69 70*6 
76ft 77ft 
41 4**e 
66 66 
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70tV 30ft 
164ft 17ft 
W I0»ft 
3ft 41ft 
70 70*ft 
6 7ft, 
48ft 48ft 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

100 ion v- dotes ner Ion 
JulVJ 2J5l*0 22 US 22150 -QJO 23J31 
AU897 25180 2SBLSD 251.10 +0J0 71/54 
Sep 97 232-00 230.00 331J0 +1JD 13J11 

Oct *7 221.00 TIB-50 22080 +200 0532 

Dec 97 2I6J0 21 1 JO 71U0 *190 Z7.939 

Jan 98 71100 HUB 71100 *150 2.984 

Est. sales NA Man's, staes 2M6* 

Men's open irv 10372 off 1530 


COLD (NCMX) 
WUlWBL-M 
Jon 92 3J8J0 
Jut 97 

Auo97 J43J0 
Oct 97 344.60 
Dec 97 347 JO 
R*9B 34820 
AWW 
JUn9B 
AW 98 

E9.i4ries NA 
Man's opviM 


Bftpertraroz. 

33720 -U0 
33640 -JJ0 
32540 339 JO -140 
34100 342-00 — U0 
34440 36440 -140 
367.10 147.10 -140 
31940 —1-70 
351 JO -1J0 
35*50 -1J0 
NtafS.SOteS 27,648 
15*822 UP 1556 


AMEX 

np lw vm an 

621.16 6IBJ5 61* J1 — IJ1 

Dow Jones Bond 

f in l ni Twto) 


soybean on. iraan 

tiuno (»- ce«a per ft 
Ju«*7 2245 2171 

Aw 92 MP3 21* 
Sep 97 2120 2100 

Oc* 97 2122 2100 

Dec 97 2139 2113 

Jan 98 23J5 23-2* 
Est. softs NA Mon's. 
Mom open rtf 10340 


2173 —402 
21*0 —041 

2103 -a 05 

2104 -&as 
2119 -a 07 
2343 -042 
sales 21485 
is 730 


SPUR 
OftOcde 
-ITS Corp 


20 Bands 
lOUtlffies 
10 Industrials 


I03J9 10340 

10047 100.71 

106-11 106J29 


vet Mali 
47*15 89*1, 
15073 71ft 
HSBI >to, 
7420 S>to, 
6671 12 1 to. 
6786 31 V* 
5672 B 
4644 111* 
4594 9ft 
4354 ISto 


Low Lost am. 
BE B9Wi* .JKft, 
71 Vi 21ft — *|, 
ft to —ft 
5ft Sto 
12ft 7?ft —ft 
JJtoi —ft 
7ft 7ft —Vi, 
IOWm 11 .V„ 

Bft *ft * Ift 
lift 12ft —ft 


SOYBEANS fCBOTJ 
5400 bu mtoienum- com par busfiM 
A497 840 826 831 -5 

Aw, 97 724 765ft 767ft -ft 

Sep *7 697 68] 691V* +8*4 

l*w 97 665ft 654ft 660ft +0 

Jan *8 666ft 656 662 +lft 

Est. sales NA Man's, soles 56.960 
Mon's menial 750.796 off 897 


HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX) 

25400 fcfc- mds par Bl 
J un 97 I1SJ0 112.58 11270 — 5J*J 

A* 77 11840 11140 112.15 -6.05 

AUB97 11450 1 1050 111.15 —SJ5 

SeP 97 11440 11030 11075 SAS 

Oct 97 11270 WOW 108.95 -555 

N<N 97 107.75 —485 

Dec 97 11140 1 04 70 10755 -4J5 

Jan 9* 105J5 — 425 

Feb 98 MOO -190 

Erf.sate NA Man's. sales 1W47 

Man *s open M 54195 up 699 


1B-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1F1 
FFSOOOOO -pis oMOO pc* 

Sep *7 129.12 12852 12856 + 020 202480 

Dec 97 97J4 97.1* 9750 +020 2D95 

Mar 98 9A5B 96JB 9490 +DJ20 0 

Esf. sate: 154139. 

Open HL 204579 Up 7435. 

ITALIAN 60VERHIAENT BOND tUFFE) 
ITL200 mHan - pts e* 100 pd 
Sep 97 13413 133.17 13450 +054 91,751 
DecW N.T. N.T. 10657 +04* 270 

Ed. sales 82587. Piw-Hrias 51565 
Pan- open Ini- 92521 off 843 
EUtOOOU-ARS fCMER) 

SI mMon-ptsof 100 pd. 

XI 71 9421 9430 9421 3t,9» 

Aug 97 8418 9417 9417 10509 

Sap 97 94.14 84.13 *414 55402 

Doc 9? 9355 9192 91*4 4313)22 

Mar 98 SUM 9184 *106 2914*3 

•tat *8 9176 9173 9174 235429 

58P9B 9346 9343 9166 -051 194912 
Dbc* 0 9335 912 9353 -051 137.227 
Mar 99 91B 9350 9351 -051 104200 

An 99 9349 93Ai 9148 814ft 

S'® 99 9246 9343 *345 74581 

Dec 97 9139 9136 7237 -051 67J039 

Est sales NA Man's, sdes 167458 
Mart's men M 2461400 up 1103 


COTTON 2 1NCTN] 

50.000 itrv - am pc* *i 

XI 97 7340 7250 7139 -U0 1323 

Oct 77 7635 7495 76J6 -1J6 11171 

Dec 97 7750 75.40 7690 -142 37443 

MarW 7770 7645 77.70 -1 17 5.9K 

May ft 7835 7740 tus -IBS UII 

Esr.pNes NA Man’s. sales 26547 
Man's open it* 64105 off 719 


HEATING OK. (NMERJ 
42400 ml, cam per boi 
A t 97 52J0 5135 5150 -0.15 

Aug 97 52.75 5155 52.05 -013 

Sep 97 534J S2-7D 5200 —0.13 

Oct 97 5430 53.45 5345 -A® 

NOV »7 55l25 5640 5480 -OOB 

Dec 97 56.18 5540 55.65 -108 

Jan 99 56JD 5600 5025 -003 

Feb 98 5480 5650 5630 -013 

MarW 5650 5540 5540 -01] 

Bt.Uto NA MOT'S. Hies 27523 
Man's open ini 152431 off 996 


Trading ActMfy 


Nasdaq 


7ft —ft 
5ft 

lift vft 
to 

I JH . ~ 


8 33 M TaM issues 

TW Nan Hlgns 
6 15 New UNIS 


1811 IB5« 

15G STS 

2l7t Ml 

Mm 5733 

138 2» 

94 II 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

9500 au min inum- cenptfr bushel 
Jul97 335ft 328ft XBft +2ft 25474 

Sbp 97 3d 336ft 339 + 2 27.994 

Dec 97 355 349 3B *lft 25,175 

Mtr98 360ft 355 357ft +114 1377 

Est. sales NA Man's, sales 34107 
Man’s OWBimt 84492 up 2477 


5B.VS1 (NCMX) 

4000 srey at- cants par hw «. 

Jun *7 47460 -4.T0 

Jul 97 48100 47350 47550 -420 
Sep 97 487.00 477 JO 479.90 -6.10 
Dec 97 49350 «5JM «*» -6.10 
Jen 98 488.70 -4W 

Mar 98 49650 49340 49340 -Aft 
MOV 98 497 50 -430 

JU9S pwm —640 

Ed. safes NA Mon’s, sales Z7497 
Mod's open M 94.137 w> 1010 


BRITISH POUND (C3V5ERJ 
62J0P PMA. f par pound 

Sep 97 1-4692 14580 146X1 
Dec 97 14430 14550 1.6550 
MarW 14992 

Esl. sales NA Mon’s.Pies W.190 
Man's man W 51484 up 9157 


LKHT SHEET CRUDE IfttaER) 

Moo dbl- dDhm perm. 

Aue97 1945 18.92 1958 -0.06 101453 

Sec 97 WJ0 19J0 1*35 41354 

Oct 97 19.54 19.17 1939 —007 28452 

NOV 97 1941 1935 19J7 -059 18,986 

Dec *7 1947 1937 19J3 -052 ®J0l 

Jpn98 19.7D 19 JO J9J5 -056 W.79* 

Feb 98 1941 1956 1940 -505 0312 

Mar 98 1*75 19J6 I1J6 -409 44H 

Apr 90 1940 1948 1968 *053 5.14 

MavW 1946 6355 

Est. Kites NA Monr^ safes 53.911 
Man's open M 390.HS up 1751 


Martel Sales 


I7ft *1® 
26H ‘ft 
5ft * ft 
lift ‘ft 
Mu _ 
I Tto —to 
14to +ft 
'A +■/(, 


as to 

S* S if YSE 

la JS Ames 


^ 'S & 


)o InutSTonf. 


Today Pm. 

44* coal. 

54651 605.36 

2549 31.36 

58454 553.91 


ijSi IJVil +VTi 


45ft 47 *lft 
42ft 42IY„ — Vp 


iss^ 

novidec- 

(CldStaft 

SwttnoL 

irtaisev 


MNterMn 

(HonoOr 

HorrvDir 

ttakwW 
BtaLon 
HretPTH 
YloaAlr 
HlttPre 
ihearx 
WgtaHnc 
HameVHn 


2ft» W, *ft* 
Sto 6ft + ft 
12ft 13ft, lift: 
Bft 9ft *lft 
4ft 4ft 
7Uft, SVu 
13 13 1 .* t ft 

ato 20ft *1* 
37 17 -ft 

jjft 33JV|, ' Via 

17ft 17»Vi* *V„ 

13ft 13ft ‘to 
Ift 1Y« 

Bto Bft 
4to 4V U — »„ 
4to PVu * to 
54V, , Mft —ft 
8ft Bft -to 
to to - 


Ttumwd 
Tflhjit, 
TOCfirre 
TWA 

TretMedn 

TubMw 
USFGP 

sac 

UnAta 
Unknw 


664 Oft 8ft Bto -to 

187 to to to 

at 

7420 JVu 5ft Sto 

3WS »to SBto »»■, -‘'a 

532 4>Vu 407 u 4i*u —to 

1452 ft <Vw to 

2540 Hft, 1ft lfti “to 

130 l?Vi» 12h I2*V|. 

1 S 17ft 16ft 17 


pnta 

hmnCMto 

brnpOllg 

hfltmTcn 

irtogTcwt 


160 

Tto 

7ft 

71 ft, 

• to 

232 

23ft 

Bft 

Bto 


175 

9ft 

Bto 

*ft 

+to 

138 

Bto 

an 

Ito 

*ft 

131 

ift 

6ft 

4ft 

„ 

105* 

lift. 

11 

lift 



tBO 

3tt lift 16*1, 
« 21ft 2D<V« 
16N ift 1 Vi> 

ill rift me 
145 llto llto 
IB BV. J'Vu 

194 5Vu sto 
246 9to 8h 
Ml 2ft Ito 

466 I9to lift 
12* 18ft IBft 
2949 39ft 38'i 
1109 5ft, VVh 
1ST lfrto 16ft 
Ml 27ft 27ft 
143 ISft 15ft. 
295 II 10ft 
387 31to JO ft 
127 1? llto 
324 7 7 

370 7to 7 

202 13ft Bto 
167 75ft 25to 
110 TUt, lift, 
116 1ft I 

700 Ito Ito 

3210 Oft, VVu 
194 Tito 13ft 
1087 IT ft, 17ft 
305 17ift, 1 7ft 
385 6to 4ft 

143 t'A 6ft 

JOBS ft. "to 

73? 5 4ft 

1169 7ft 7 

179 ISto I5Vi 
145 Ift 7 

1017 109a *to 
860 26ft, Wft 
967 JOto »to 
one ji ft, soft 

■ gw 

323 Ito 

3S77 1 xv » 

SB to '*!• 
372 ir*u ITto 
(JO 10"to lIFf* 
Tel 13ft IJto 
691 IffVi, 10to 
145 ;7to 15ft. 


3to -ft 
Jto 

lift 4-ft 
Ift, -ft 
9'Vi, *V, t 
14ft *ft 
jto —-to 

swu+nS 

SaBr u *a. u 
16to + ft, 
JOto — 'ft, 
ift, - 
lift -ft 

Mb „ 

Bto *to 
Sto —to 
9’S ♦ to 

ito —to 
i*ft *to 
llto 

-■Vu 
57, . —17, 
JMto 

-ft, 

ISto _ 
I Oto *to 
30to —Ift, 
17 +V„ 


Dividends 

Company 


Livestock 
CATTLE (CNEER) 

40 OOB W.- cants par ii 

AUP97 6X30 £L» S3J7 -6LS7 42A44 

Oct 77 67J5 6657 66J7 -0J2 23J7, 

Dec 97 (0.95 4930 69J0 -0J7 1X440 

Feb 98 7097 70.45 7062 -0.15 6J76 

ATT 1 * 7X07 7X60 7272 —610 2.79? 

Jun*t 69J5 OSS 60.92 -007 1JB4 

Es*. sales 1 1.727 Man's, sates 11972 
Mon's open inf 90002 off M3 


PLATINUM (NMER) 
soirevaz.' dHlon prr irar ai. 

JU *7 41150 40600 4Q9A0 —LB) 7,404 

Oct 97 40300 39800 4OOA0 -480 7,947 

Jana 39490 39200 39490 *1.70 1071 

Est, Stas I Mon's, setos 1.932 
Mars seen M 17.155 off 215 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

1 0ftOdOdotors. Spot CdiL ifr 
Sep 97 -7352 .7226 .7228 

Dec 97 7298 jm TW 

Mar« J3W J3W 73W 

Est. soles NA Mot's. Stan 19*4 

MnnrsopenW 42,988 up IT* 


Ova 

LONDON METALS (UUE) 
DoBor per metric Ion 


GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

1 26000 martu. s Par mot 
Sep 97 -5864 sen SOD 
Dec 9/ sent sm sea 

Mr« J929 

ESI. safes NA Men's. ; Se* 21J7I 
ABuTslMWin 60J39 off 1522 


NATURAL CAS 
to.floo mm bWs. 
Auo97 23K 
Sep 97 177Q 

Oct 97 12 a 

Nov 97 1380 
Dec 97 isio 
Jana 1550 
Feb W 14«o 
Mara 1330 
Apra 2.I7S 

mov a tic 
Est. Stas NA 
Man's open .nf 


(NMER) 

■ Spar mm B*u 
2-235 2263 

1230 1250 

1240 1250 

1310 1365 

2405 1490 

1525 2J35 

MSS 1445 
1310 1120 

1170 1170 

1115 XUS 
Man’s, sales 36430 
702.526 off 223 


Aknotoea ftffqfa Grade) 

Spat 1562ft 1563ft 1542ft 1563ft 

Fanmnl 1586ft IS87V4 1586ft 15B7W 


Cattadas (KM Orada) 

2425ft 2827ft 264300 264500 

d 249600 249700 250400 250600 


JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 

I U inUon vaa 1 per loo mi 
5®97 0875 0802 JUS 

Dec 97 0939 0920 0920 

Mara XBS 

Est.sotes NA Mon’s. sales mo 
Man's open M 49J62 off 534 


WAEADED GASOLINE (NMS2) 

47Jntapl, cants oer oat 
MVT 5620 55.10 SS» +XI4 2LZB 

Aug 97 5600 5500 5135 «0O7 31B28 

Sep 97 5575 54.90 55.10 -0.12 9.« 

Oct 97 5U0 S4J8 5630 -087 5777 

NOV 97 54.25 54.10 54.10 -072 lltt 

Dec 77 5430 5170 5390 -072 5.113 

Jonw saai 3.w 

Feon 54jo tja 

Esl. safes na Man’s, sties 26.786 
won's opw rt (XL«6 ua 1531 


Per Amt Rec Par Cammy 


irregular 

Monti AWnram b Mli 6-27 — 

BiBlJUsar US Ovis _ .19 6-24 d-30 

MesaOffehaeTr _ JXM o-M 7 31 

MesaPoyattrTi _ 74/71 6-30 7-31 


INCREASED 

Americas IncnTr M .555 7-3 7-23 

Hingham Instttu Q ,12 7-11 7-21 

Manaaen Inca Eq M 317 6-24 6-26 

fttoStSrigtal Fodl . 23 7-9 7-25 


INITIAL 

anchimti Befl it . .10 7-2 8-1 

Perpetual Bank „ JS 7-24 8-7 

Trim Dfaarefd g _ 223 6-30 7-15 


ArocrSol Prtfl 
Amor Shall itCDPtfl 
A mar Shat incolL 
AmerStraf InctrilL 
CeibcolK 
EatonVanDep 

Eaton Von DriroM 
EatonVan Cero E» 
EatonVm Classic 
EatonVan Ex Bos 
EatanVan FHlEx 
EatonVan MuntBd 
EatonVan 2nd Rd 
EatonVan TreOSlh 
Heritage Propane 
Highlander Inoo 
Hunt pftrey Hasp 
LnSaBeReHold 
Monotjers Bd Fd 


Insthtform East _ .06 $-30 7-15 


Rowleln* 

SM Product* 
Suburban Rn 
Untied DomfUty 
Vance Soiuto 


13ft -ft 
2 Sto ‘ft 
7 

1ft, _ 
I'ft, s ft 
BV|» 
lift 
[7|I7 U 

171ft, -ft, 
Aft _ 
6ft _ 


SPECIAL 

GutfCdoRaadip .81 6 30 7-14 




7 3 7-23 
7-3 7-23 
7-3 723 
7-3 7-23 

6-30 7-15 

6-23 630 

6- 23 630 

634 630 

7- 1 S 7-29 

623 630 

6- 23 630 
7-1 715 

623 630 

7- 15 7-30 

7-1 7-15 
7-3 7-33 
7-6 8-4 

7-4 MB 

624 626 
7-1 7-15 

630 7-14 

7*H 7-35 
7-1 7-15 

7-11 7.31 
7-1 7-15 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 
50000 lbs.- Cento Per Rs 
A«9J 78J5 Jm 7LX 

See ft 78.40 77.77 7122 

Oct 97 7865 7100 7837 

Nta97 79JD 7*.35 79JS 

Jon a 7JJB 79 jd na 

Marts 79J5 79.10 79.10 

Esl. safe* 2,910 MaTs. safes 
Man's ooenint 20,197 up 89 


605ft 40600 608-00 60400 

62000 421 JM 421 JM 422JM 


-0.17 10J23 
-0JJ7 2.763 
-0.12 3.648 
—012 2+C2 

—027 775 

*0.10 187 

SM 


705500 706500 710000 711000 
717000 718000 721500 722000 


555000 555500 05000 5560 00 
561000 561500 560000 561000 


SWISS FRANC (CMER] 
itsmtm,)pcrimc 
Sep 97 JD75 JttD JD11 
Doc 97 JW JOB jvn 

mw« nn 

Est. safes NA Man's, sates LLS2B 
MstYsamW 33.538 aH SH 


HOGWjai (CMER) 

41000 Ka, - canto Per fe. 

JU97 0300 8205 82 JO 

Aug 77 ms W OO 79.45 

Od97 7148 J0.« 7107 

Dec 97 6140 6740 4702 

FeftW 67J1S 6150 *657 

Est. safes 7.931 Man's, safes 

Men's cpenW 36838 oK 420 


5 Pd 138400 13B7J30 138600 138900 

FanMRl 140300 140A0D 140700 140800 


+ai5 s.no 
+002 11079 
— 0-17 7,130 

-4L4S 4JQB 
-&« 1,853 
7J74 


Hfeh Low Que Oige Opwt 


MEXICAN PBO (CMER) 

5004U0 POM. 1 Bto PBa 
5® 97 .12170 .17125 .17160 
Dec 77 .11740 .11705 .11740 

Mara ,in% .nan .urn 

Est. Stan NA Man's, soles MJ62 
Men's open inl 34SM uc m 


Financial 


PORK BOXES (CMER) 
400astbv- cents Mt to. 

AS 97 8UK 79 JR 8055 

AW 97 81.10 79 J! 80.70 

F*n 7200 71 JO 71J7 

Es.sdes 7430 Man's, sales 
Man^aoenlni L87* off <3 


—0.17 JJ75 
+070 3.985 

— 050 491 

low 


US V.BBA5 (CMER) 
tl melon- pn ot mo pa. 

Sen 97 HJQ 94J1 9401 

Dec 93 B44J 7L63 
Mali WJ3 

Est.saies NA Men's. safes 399 
Mat's open W TOM ip 147 


J= o« rSi reG 7' iig g is 

AmerGflncoPM M 035 7-3 7-23 aHnantoly; q^aarlMlr; s-swil-amMl 


4’V,, 

7ft* —ft* 
IS* +to 
2ft *W 
10 <ft 
Wft. 

30ft. -ft, 
3tau -ft 


=27 13ft 
Ito 16ft lift 


411 77*. 

44B Sift* 
IM» Ito 
IW ’ft 
146 5ft 
23S7 W.i 


Sift, 30ft »ft —ft* 
Ito Ift. 1ft. - 
V. ft, '<« —ft, 
5ft S' ft. 5 
Wi Sft S*u —ft. 


1H 16ft lift 
145 17ft 17ft 

S in* iy»u 

loft w« 

1 n lift lift* 
3431 ft* 

UU 1ft 
14* 1 7ft 17ft, 


ito 

i«h -Wp 

in* -fti 

iavi. —ft 
I3ft -ft 
Wft* *V|. 
1 7Vi» tlrt. 
I3»t|* -V11 
16ft +V„ 
|7V„ * ft 

14 *ft 
IJto ~ 
nu *u* 


stock Tables Exploited 

Safes figures are unofficiaL Yeailr hlgtB and kws luffed the previous £2 weda plus fhe ament 
week, bol rirtlhetote^badfegdoy. Where a sj*orstnd(iJM(lefi<Jariiatiriling to 25 percent or more 
has been pan itie higWow range aid dMdend ore shown ior Sx new slocta only. Unless 

athewfce noted, rate of (Mdewtsore annual 4sbumnents bated tin life tafest riedamflorv. 
a - dMdead aba extra (s). b - annual rate of dividend pltra slack dividend, c • Bquidoflng 
dividend, cc^ - PE exceeds W.dd - cuSed. d - new reorfr la*, dd • loss In lt» lastl 2 months. 
■ - dividend dedared ar paid In preceding 12 months, f - annual rate, increased on last 
deck rattan, 5- dhridend in Canadian funds, subject to 15% nan-residence fax. I -dividend 
dedared after spill-up or shukdWMrod,}- dividend paMlhfc year, ontfted. deterred, orno 
action kkan at (otest dividend meeting, k • dividend declared ar paid this year, an 
accumularive Ksue wtth tfivWerms (n atreare. m - annual rate, reduced on test dedaialtan. 
n - new issue in the past 52 weeks. The MglHow range Begins with me start of trading, 
od - nextdar detiwrr- p- lalflaliflvidewt annual rate unknown. P/B- price-eamlngs ralio. 

- dased-end mutual fund, r-dhridend dedared or paid In precetflng 1 2 months, plus slock 
dividend. > - stock split. Dhrtdand begiiis with dote of spfl sh * sales. 1 - dvtricnd paid in 
sftKkin precedtnQ 12 monflts. estimated cash value an ra-tfluktend w taHftshtoutan daft, 
u - new veartv high, v- trading ftatail M • in bankvplcy or receivership ar being reorgonired 
underfhe Banfcruplcy Act or securities assumed bv such companies, mi- when distributed. 
Wi - when issued' WW - with warranls, X - tarfividetirf or ex-rights, BUS - ex-disMbufton, 
xw - wtitwut warrants, f- a-dhrMend and oaks hi fuff, yld - yield, z - sales in fuff, 


Food 

COCOA (NCSE) 
lDmetrtc vns- s per ton 
W97 1/00 1447 1400 +17 278 

SW«7 1737 1685 - 1712 + 16 40J33 

Dec97 1775 1730 1755 ♦» ftL496 

Marto IBID 17U 1705 +25 J2.W2 

MOV 9* 1817 1777 1803 + 24 9JM 

Jm* 1835 1791 1114 +17 682 

Ea.wfes 15.0(5 M. safes ISAM 
Man'saawiim UDJOO up 3911 

COFFEE C(NCS0 

3r>aa lbs.- tento per to. 

JU197 lWn 19100 19BJR7 +135 MQ 

SwW 179JS 17135 175.10 — 4L3S W.917 

Ok W 157JM 151 M 15435 *0J0 MB 

Morn 144JXI 14000 >4150 -1.2$ TM 

W»*a 14100 136 X 0 139.SD -1.1S 774 

5*5 4,130 Mat's sates 8499 
Man's oton bp 20J73 Off 87 

SU&AJ?- WORLD n (NC5EJ 

KJW #»•- <=»ito Per to. 

JW»7 J1.I5 1105 11» -«B 30.951 

0097 11J0 1107 11.15 + 004 85415 

MW* 11.17 10LH M.I2 +005 36470 

Mava 1109 10.97 1104 +006 7,967 

74.to» Man's odes SWIS 
Mon's open W I44J09 oft 4980 


JYJL TREASURY (CSOTJ 

Iiauioo prei- pto 4. 64ttto of 100 act 

Sea 97 106-77 106-14 104-22 -01 210.145 

D«97 '“MS U71 

MarW -01 

Est- sales NA Man's, sates I7.7«9 

Man'sapmfet 727054 up 1054 

HYIL TREASURY (CBOT) 

pH, B. Unas rf too W3 

S»97 108-19 108-12 100-16 -01 323JI7 

Dec 97 100415 108-05 100-06 —01 3.598 
MarW IflJ-M 9 

Ettsmes NA Mon's. mtes 15487 
Mon's open irt 329J89 off 3737 

US TREASURY BONDS KaOT) 

(BPO-SIOWlOd-pto 4.32mtiM ISO pell 
Sep 97 112-09 111-79 112-05 423.111 

0ec97 111-27 111-18 111-25 + 01 25.228 

Mara 111-16 2*6 

Juna II MB m 

Br- K8K NA Men's, sdes ra.ai 
MursooenM 459438 off an 


STERLING QJFFEJ 

uKuroa-pisonoopd 

S-S S'? 6 Undi 131.867 

2^2 Q 1 * 2-r <nJi Unch. 104802 

S 44 9134 97A4 +0 .01 74360 

JunM 92St 93M 92L58 +007 51,68* 

2P 7 92/B 9156 * a03 HSD4 

l * WB vOJM J7447 

MarW 9154 92J8 92-57 +0.05 20,072 

». sates: 131,615. Prev. tales: 91,286 
Prev.opfinkUj «1|9T up &7S8 


GASOIL (IPEJ 

U5. dotac par (Mine ton - kill ol 100 tans 
Jl897 14100 14000 16075 UnO. 19X97 

Aug 97 163.75 16200142258 .025 I&ZS4 
Set! 97 145.7$ 144JB 144JQ +025 4569 

Oft 97 I6JL2S 167 JO 147J5 +0J5 6JM 

Nairn 170 00 149.00 14945 +045 

Dec 97 1TV75 1TOJ0 TOTS +M5 93S7 

Jena 172.75 171.75 172 00 MLSO 3J07 

Feb« 172.75 172IM 17100 +050 WSJ 

Ed. sates: &7S3. Prev sales : 10.7*3 
Pm. open ini.- 71771 up 1.440 
BteHTOlLDPEl 

U.S. daflara per band - Us of 1.000 bantal 

Auon 18.14 17J3 1757 -d.ll 77 JM 

Sep 97 1L39 17.93 18.05 -OJO 3a«9 

00 97 1838 18.14 1819-051 14,145 

NOV97 10.53 18J5 1831 -0JD 1IUB1 

D«9? IBit 1837 1839 -004 1&B2 

Jart98 UJ9 1837 1839 -OJB 7.W 

FeMS 1855 1837 1839 -OOS 4SO 

Mora N.T. NT. 1835 -804 L749 

Est. sates: 29,498 . Pwr safes : 23L9S3 
Ptw. open mt0 17iSS7 tip X21S 


Stock Indexos 


tSPOTN EUROMARK OJFFE1 
DMlmMon - pte aiiOO pd 
JUI97 NX N.T 9to86 Unch. 

K-i H- T - 9485 uneti. 
5fein 94.87 96JS1 9483 +001 : 

DecW W.77 96J0 9W2 +0113 ; 

9442 96J5B Jfc42 +0JJ2 : 
JwtW 94.65 96A1 96.45 *103 

JfP 1 * a.23 96.18 9633 +0.03 

DecW 95.96 95.91 95.95 .003 

B*. sates. 72*91. Prev sink: *8956 
Ptw. open lift; U17A9S up ZS38 


SAP COMP. INDEX (CMERJ 
Mo » hide* ... 

Sep 97 $0450 68045 «1S> *277517i3g 

Doc 97 90800 097.50 90800 +1480 i.V» 

«ar« W1.W tfiS 

Es. safes NA Mat's, sates 10BJW 
Mon’s acen mi 178231 Off 6188* 


LIBOR 1 -MONTH (CMER) 
S3mar«n.ptsar 100 pa. 

Jill 97 9431 9430 0631 

Aup97 9428 9426 9438 
50197 9424 14J4 *434 

ES.MO NA Mars sales 2473 
Man's bow Ini 48201 alt 166 

LONG GILT fUFFE) 


W*OffTHP1BO»lMATlF) 

FF5mam.ptsof109pa 

£-2 ** 

2£2 S-S 34717 

94" +W» 31.462 
JunW 9637 9431 P62* +003 27,55s 

^■2 SIS 9k-,t 9t.W +802 3)^» 

Dec a 95a 95.94 W W +003 |7,sjp 

Est. sates. 71,131 

Opm biL247^» up 1,739. 


CAC 40 (MATIF) 

FFOTporindtoipoinl 

Jun 97 77870 37430 27740 +17-0 323» 
Jill *7 27B3J 27420 27740 +17.0 18gJ 

Alia 97 77775 77530 27823 +173 
Sep97 2000 27S9S 7JW.0 +110 16.W 
Mara J831.S 28285 28385 *17Jt «7* 


E9.Hfe6.5U9S. 

. Opan lift.- 72033 up 8 


FTSE 190 OJFFEJ 

CBpermuaptaO _ .... 

5«p 97 46320 45450 46280 +480 
Dec 97 46740 4674.0 44840 +480 VtP 


Est, Mies- 11447. Pre*. rates: 1A987 
Prev. Open inL: 650S3 dfl 516 


OOOOO-ph 6.32nd, <4100 pd 
JunW 113-25 113-10 11*30 ,4.11 lam 
saw 113-19 112-25 113-17 Sm 1 |»3l7 
74548 Pita, sates: 38924 
Piw. open *ili 1*8419 oil 1,223 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1997 


PAGE J 5 


EUROPE 


Persistent, 

LVMH Still 

Wants End 
To Merger 




FTSElDOlwSwc GAG 40 


PARIS — LVMH hns spent 
an additional $2.5 million on 
shares in Grand Metropolitan 
PLC as part of its ongoing battle 
to block the British company’s 
merger with Guinness PLC. 

LVMH Meet Hennessy 
Louis Vuitton SA last week 
bought 6.29 percent of Grand- 
Met for $1.8 billion and bought 
an additional 250,000 shares 
Monday, bringing its total to 
6.30 percent. 

If LVMH raised its Grand 
Met stake to 10 percent, it could 

meeting of C^and'^et^share- 
holders. And if it lined up 
enough allies in the widely held 
company to form a 25 percent 
block, it could stop the merger. 

LVMH opposes the merger 
because it sees no coherence in 
combining the food operations 
of GrandMet with the drinks 
business of Guinness, in which 
it owns 14.2 percent. 

Bernard Arnault, the chief ex- 
ecutive of LVMH, wants instead 
to combine the drinks busi- 
nesses of the three companies. 

Shares of LVMH fell 20 
francs ($3.44), to 1483 after 
falling 1.8 permit Monday. 

Analysts say that Mr. Amanlt- 
wants to create a d rinks group 
combining LVMH’s Moet & 
Cbandon and Hennessy brands 
with Guinness ’s Johnny Walker, 
Dewar’s and Gordon’s Gin la- 
bels and possibly Grand Met’s 
Smirnoff, J&B and Baileys 
brands. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


CyHp&d by Om-SttfFrvm Dupxrka 

PARIS — The head of Eurotun- 
nel warned Tuesday that the Chan- 
nel Tunnel operator must restructure 
its £8.7 billion ($14.5 billion) debt 
or face bankruptcy proceedings. 

• The Eurotunnel president, Patrick 
PonsoUe, called on shareholders to 
approve the new debt plan at a gen- 
eral meeting next month. If not, be 
said, the board will have to refer foe 
matter back to the France’s Com- 
mercial Court. 

Mr. PonsoUe’s warning, which 
followed a general meeting con- 
vened to consider the debt plan, re- 
sponded to increased pressure from. 
minority shareholder groups. 

He warned against attempts to 
renegotiate the package on better 


terms for shareholders. Some of 
them want banks to write off at least 
some debt before they support a 
restructuring that would see the 
banks take a 45.5 percent equity 
stake in the company, a move that 
would dilute foe power of current 
shares. 

“It is now or never,” Mr. Pon- 
solle said. “If it failed, there would 
be no second chance.” ■ 

Eurotunnel posted a loss £685 
million last year as interest pay- 
ments on its debt, mostly accumu- 
lated in building foe tunnel foal 
opened in 1994, overwhelmed a 71 
percent increase in revenue. 

Mr. PonsoUe said the company 
was still waking to get the French 
and British governments to extend 


its lease to operate the Channel Tun- 
nel beyond 2052 and hoped to have 
ai least an agreement in principle 
before foe shareholders meeting. 

Eurotunnel units, equal to one 
share in Eurotunnel PLC and one in 
its French sister company, Eurotun- 
nel SA, fell 10 centimes to 635 
francs ($1.09) in trading on foe 
Bourse in Paris. The stock traded as 
high as 1 10 francs in 198 9. 

The meeting Tuesday did not at- 
tract enough shareholders to con- 
stitute a quotum and Eurotunnel will 
hold a second meeting on July 10. 
Only 29 of foe 721,000 mostly 
French shareholders attended the 
meeting, while 22379 others were 
represented by proxy. 

Among those who attended were 


foe leaders of force shareholder- 
rights groups. 

Last year the dissident groups had 
‘a third of foe votes cast at foe annual 
meeting — enough to block a debt 
agreement, which requires two- 
fomfe approval. The groups say they 
have collected enough votes to be 
decisive again this year. 

On the business front, Mr.. Pon- 
solle said foe Eurotunnel freight 
shuttle service; restarted earlier mis 
month after a tire in November gut- 
ted a s t re t ch of foe tnwngl, was now 
attracting 1,000 trucks a day. 

He also said that EurotnnneTs 
results for die first five months of the 
group’s fiscal year showed that in- 
terim results would be “ahead of 
budget” (AP. Bloomberg ) 




■ ■ 1 ■ •mm-: . 

i ft ■ 

> ’WSA' 



Britain Chooses Carlton- Granada for Digital TV 


Bloomberg News 

LONDON — British Digital 
Broadcasting PLC, a j oint venture of 
Carlton Communications PLC and 
Granada Group PLC, won permis- 
sion Tuesday to start a new era of 
digital ground-based television in 
Britain. 

The so-called digital terrestrial 
TV license allows the venture to 
broadcast from 15 to 20 new digital 
pay-TV channels to British homes, 


using existing antennas. The broad- 
casts are due to start by mid-1998. 

As a condition of.foe license, Brit- 
ish Sky Broadcasting PLC, in which 
Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. owns 
a 40 percent stake, was required to 
sell its 33 percent stake in the venture. 
Granada and Carlton each are to ac- 
quire half of BSkyB 's stake. BSkyB 
has separate plans to introduce up to 
200 channels of satellite-delivered di- 
gital television next year. 


In the medium to long-term, said 
Matthew Horseman, media analyst 
at Henderson Crosth waite Institu- 
tional Brokers, “the license will 
make BDB the first real rival to 
British Sky Broadcasting Group 
PLC in the UJC pay-TV market” 
Carlton’s share prices closed at 
525 pence ($8.74), up 8 pence, and 
shares in Granada rose 17 to 852. 

BSkyB shares fell 19 peace to 
468 pence. They have fallen more 


than 25 percent in the past 12 days. 
A report that BSkyB may lose a 
contract to broadcast British soccer 
contributed to the decline. 

The Premier League, which rep- 
resents top British soccer clubs, was 
advised by Oliver & Ohlbaum. a 
British media consultancy, to start 
its own television service in 2001 
rather than renew its £670 million 
(SI.2 billion) four-year contract 
with BSkyB, foe repot said. 


■ acanarn 

Volvo Targets U.S. for Sports-Utility Vehicle Si 

C7 «/ i •/ • Vendnn 


CvpOftj by Our SaffFtzm Dispatches 

STOCKHOLM — Volvo AB said Tuesday it 
would begin producing in the autumn a new four- 
wheel drive vehicle with features similar to a 
Jeep. 

Volvo expects the greatest demand to the 
vehicle to come from foe United States, where 
sports-utility cars are popular. The car also will be 
sold worldwide. 


The car will be built using the same frame as its 
predecessor, foe V70 , but will be higher to make 
it more versatile for off-road driving, it said. 

It said the new car, the V70 XC, will be 
manufactured in Ghent, Belgium and will cost 
around 291,900 kronor ($ 37 , 909 ). 

“We plan to produce 5,000 cars this year,” said 
Ingmar Hesslerors, Volvo spokesman. “Then the 
pace will increase to 20,000 cars a year.” 


The first version of foe new car will have foe 
old 23-liter turbo engine generating 193 
horsepower and will be available with a manual 
or automatic gearbox, the spokesman said. 

The Swedish news agency Direkt said the car 
will be shown at the Frankfurt car show in 
September and will be launched in the United 
States, Canada and Japan between September 
and October. (Bloomberg, AFP) 


' J F M A M J f J F M : A M J~ J F M 

1997 . ; 1907. . 1997 

. r; ' : Tuesday Prm. ■ 

' ■ ■ ■ ■ * " ■** jCfase CtasB. 

i ijigyaec- . :. "3- ; *om 

i : ■;/.-■ aass-i* 2 , 351.62 

- •/ • ;• 3^SSL82 3,754.72 

:S9t33 . *682.16 

63585 . 

ASflflJO .AWSJM 

BTfiLlV-V JSW6 13317 ■ 


'13 83 163 • I jMW.jjjS 
“ V Tfrgfcw sjsa&io -o.t3 

Source: Telekurs Iraeiwra+al Hr«w Tntauv 

Very briefly: ■ 

Daimler-Benz AG’s car sales rose 1 1 percent in the first five 
months of this year, to 20.4 billion Deutsche marks ($1 1.82 
billion). Unit sales rose 4.7 percent, to 275,100 cars, between 
January and May. - 

• The euro, Europe’s planned single currency, will be used in 
stores and shops in the French town of Millau during a 10-day 
public awareness exercise that begins Wednesday. 

• Scandinavian Airline Systems is not facing up to de- 
regulation, increasing competition and lower prices and could 
disappear as an independent airline in the next five to 1 0 years 
according to the consulting firm Cap Gemini Group. 

• Vendome Luxury Group PLC, a British-Swiss maker of 
luxury goods such as Cartier watches, said pretax, profit rose 
8.1 percent in the year ended in March, to 509.9 million Swiss 
' francs ($355.9 million), as increases in all of its markets offset 
weak tourist spending in foe Far East 

• Alexander Krupnov, head of Russia’s state telecommu- 

nications committee, said as many as 18 Russian and foreign 
companies have already shown interest in bidding for a 25 
percent stake in the Svyazmvest telecommunications com- 
pany at an auction next month. Re wers. Bloomberg. AFX 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Mgb Low doH pm 


Mgh Law dose Prev. 


Tuesday, dune 24 

Prices In local currencies. 
Telekurs 

. High Low dose Pnw. 

Amsterdam abcukkijk 

PmfaueMLM 

37 36.10 3X80 3490 

139 137 138-® 13?.®} 

AtnM 16X20 161J0 16430 1MJ0 

AKzdNoM 239.10 3S3-WJ 257 257 JO 

Boon Go. 13450 12450 133 12950 

3860 38.90 39 Ju 

9950 97.10 99.10 99 

DorttadiePw 41450 m 4mjq 4ism 

194 189 19350 191 

3260 3150 3263 32J0 

82 7950 S15D 1050 

<480 63.?® UM 6450 

*450 -win iu 

ioi 10*50 mes 

Hcmekrn 36050 35170 35880 35750 

Hoogownscra 1095® WM wjo 10950 

145 143 14450 14490 

9050 B&aa 8950 0950 

<150 5850 4050 9950 

4550 4480 4550 4550 

81 79.70 8QJ0 805 0 

55 54.10 
309 309 

OooGrtnkn M8J0 245.10 2-ffiJO 249 

133 135J0 125.10 

Potaraa 11050 10650 mm 109 

RmW Hdg 20350 197 20350 198.90 

Robaco 184.10 18250 184.10 184 

Radamco 6480 <440 4450 4450 

RnSnco 185JO 18550 18550 18750 

Rurerto 11350 H35D 11350 113 

Royd Dutch mm m mso 40450 

U newer CW 410.® 40520 41050 410 

Vondalca 10780 10550 107 106J0 

VNU 4550 4450 4480 4550 

WaRanKlara 250 242 249 244 


RWE 

SAP pH 

Sdwfciq 

SGLCortxm 

Statins 

Springer ttaeO 

5uedoJt*ef 


ABN-AMRO 
Aegon 
AtnW 
Afco Nobel 

Boon Go. 

Btes Wesscw 
CSMara 
DonflxhePw 
DSM 

E3mmXv 

CE8-IIU 

Farits Amav 

Getrorics 

G-Braccvu 

Huoeroeyw 

Heraeken 

Hooqawemcra 

Hera Douglas 

ING Group 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

nSSEi* 

OcoGrtnten 

BrUfsBec 


LOW ChM 

7550 7550 
343LSB 3® 
1B9.10 19050 
23550 THJM 
105.05 10555 
1550 1550 
939 M 
418 42050 
97 M 9780 
ss m 
795 79855 
1222 1233 


Helsinki 

PrillOK: 2157J8 


Bangkok 

A0* Into Sic 
BamkokBkF 

siom Cement F 
Stem Cora BkF 
laIKDfHita 
TW/Umqp 
Thai Row &F 
Old Com 


Bombay 


WoAiotLmr 

HtatatPeam 

IndDnrBk 

rrc 

mJSSSi™ 

SWoBklnda 
Steel AuttoBy 
ToN Eng Loco 


Brussels 


CBR 

Caknyt 

DeBntzoUni 

BedrofaW 

Etedni&n 

Forth AG 

Cauoen 

GBL 

g fflfiWjS 

wiwowni 

Ptrtoftw 

Poemfti 

sa 

SoA«7 

TrrMnI 

DCS 


SET Mac 493.13 
PnotaKSMJS 

142 IQ 157 

160 144 172 

U 27 2855 

304 -304 320 

466 468 470 

94 95 102 

2750 2755 2735 

34 35 34 

109 118 122 

98 100 9750 


92655 91055 
1283130955129755 
449 451 45155 

93 94 9450 

49355 50255 49755 
29155 29555 293J5 
36450 37450 367 

337.7S 34155 33935 
« 1755 1755 
44025 46425 


BEL-20 Mac 2358.19 
PrwteOK22SV42 

14300 14300 14450 

6640 6870 6890 

9150 9210 9340 

3400 3465 3460 

14275 16825 14425 

I860 1880 1860 

7650 7650 7m 

3480 3560 3510 

7010 7140 7000 

3280 3385 3340 

5870 9990 9970 


EnsoA 

HuhtamaU I 

Kmnta 

Kesha 

MerffloA 

AMraB 

AAdu-SntaB 

Nede 

NoidaA 

Orion- YMymae 

OsJtaimpu A 

UPMKommem 

Vrinet 


Hong Kong 

rvtoj Props 850 

Bk East Asia 3180 

CanayPacUc 1480 

CheutoKang 78 

CKMRatnid 2430 

OAnUgM 44^1 

□BcPocfle Am 

DooHcnaBk 42J0 

MP«ic 980 

Hang Lung Dev 1450 

Ho ng Seng Bit 10150 

Henderson tar 190 

HendenonLd 71^0 

HK China Gas 1155 

HKBkMc 3110 

HK.T«taamn 1855 

HapeweBHdgs 450 

HSbCHrte 230 

HukWsanWh 6425 

HywinDw 2130 

Jt&SanSHdg TAM 

KmyPtem 1880 

Nn* World Dev <7^a 

Oriantal Press 123 

OftanM 188 

SHK Props 9435 

ShunTokHdgs 485 

SfatoLondCO. 845 

5m Oi.il Post 7.95 

SwirePacA 49 35 

WhattHdgi 3440 

Wtaeiodk 19 


47 4150 

224 224 

48 48 
7440 73 
17.10 16.90 

149.10 149.10 
42 41-50 

134.10 138 

380 377 

202 197 

10120 1(030 
m msi 
88 8440 


Haeg Soog: M89(LM 
PrMteus: 1502153 

8 8.10 8.10 
31 3150 31JS® 
14 1435 1440 
74 76^S 7780 
2190 2425 2440 
4180 4180 4450 
47 JO 48 48-ie 
4180 4240 4240 
9 JO 940 980 

1195 1485 14® 
101 MBJ0 104 
830 835 tm 

69 7080 7050 
1585 1585 1540 
3240 3240 33 

17BS 1785 1850 
405 4 M 413 

227 228 231 

42 63 6175 

2280 2115 21B 
2145 2190 24 

1830 1880 1830 
4630 46.70 4740 
288 113 198 

134 139 143 

91J0 93 94 

480 483 185 

830 840 880 

745 7JS 745 
48 <935 70 

34 3410 3490 
18.10 1830 1845 


BrftPeflm 7.11 

BSkrB 487 

feiSted 148 

BrltTriecoas 451 

BTR 1-99 

Bonati Castad 1038 

Barton Gp 1.19 

GototoWMtess 587 

CadbuySdiw 5J3 

CaritonCoonn 543 

Carnal Unk* 640 

SUSP 52 

Dbeora 499 

Etectroa»ponorrts460 
EMI Group 1 1151 

IS£SS 3 

FamuttonW 183 

GcirlAcddeol 982 

GEC 255 

GKN 1022 

GtawUUkano 12-66 
GnmodaGp 887 

GrandMet 5.90 

GRE 235 

GreendsGp 447 

Gatoness 588 

GUS 445 

HsScHMgs 17M 

ia us 

InpITobaoca 


Jakarta 

AsiraM 
Bk liltl tndna 
Bk Negara 
GudtNB Garni 
Inducement 

Indatood 

Indawt 

SaqnetmHM 

S ornenGre sBt 

Tudmuftittl 


Coaepodokda; 71*39 
MOW 71M4 

7925 7800 7800 7950 
ms ms jaw 2075 

1575 1550 1550 1575 

IsSO 9575 9575 9675 

3775 3650 3675 3750 

5900 5800 5B50 5000 

7550 7475 7590 7550 

9225 ttSffll B92S 9725 
5300 5175 5225 5J75 
3975 3V50 3975 4000 


14275 13900 
133KS 12875 
4990 4955 
10075 9960 
3400 TW » 
21325 21050 
15025 14900 
11795 11450 


1«S0 142OT 
13225 12975 
4905 4985 

wm mo 

Xm 3*05 
21175 21175 
14900 14950 
11400 11410 


Copenhagen 



PmtoOBT 592.14 
18 347 348 355 
’5 367 370 373 


Johannesburg A Maag^ wng 

PIMM 11. 728442 

AmoMnnld Bks 
AngtoAnCU 
AngioAiiKdrp 

AngloAm Gold 202JO 280 28280 27880 

AiwtoAmlnd 
AVMJN 
Bartow 

CG-SmBh 

Da Beers 1<780 165.75 14780 14435 
DrietonMn 
FstNatIBk 
Gencor 

GRA ... — ... 

Imperial Hdffl 5880 5735 SUD 57.75 

tnaweCod 
bar 

Johnnies Indl 
LfterffHdgs 


ffcaltanSAB 

SaphusBerB 

TetoDanntB 

uSSdWnaifcA 

Frankfurt 


AMBB 1545 

Adktos 201 

ARkaizHdg 3^» 

AHHM 1870 

BkBertki 3780 

BASF 43L20 

BSSSBELkSS 

%s> 

Bows 4180 

BMW 1408 

CXAGCatonto 16380 
Commerzbank 4830 
DaOntorBenz 13580 
Degussa 9380 

Deutsche Bank WAS 
DevtTetokam 4380 
OmtoerBaek flUO 
FRKtdtB 341 

FreseritosMed 152.10 
Filed. Knipp je 
Gone 11980 

ew a 

Set ^ 

Hoedaf 4980 

Karstadf 64080 

IMM/V 80 

LMa 1335 

mnma a 

MAH 53380 

M uwi eantt W 244 

ManchRmdcR 4970 
Piwundg 512 


1)S m 63083 M 
BOO 347000 340000 34706® 

720 7W 709 714 
725 717J8 723 m 
981 970 978 97B 
352 345 345 354 
356 34985 3SS09 37.40 
374 . 365 370 37187 


istti 

Mtoons 


i 33 33.10 
l 270 77280 
268 26685 
ao*a Z7880 
I 195 19380 
I 1580 15J5 
48 48 

25 24J0 
14780 164J5 
3180 3185 
1 4075 

109 10SJ0 
58J0 57.75 
30.15 3025 
118 117 

5125 5780 
325 332 

1Z3J5 120 

17JS 1785 
10350 103 

1880 16JJ5 
9980 1ESJ 
47.75 4780 
6125 60J5 
7175 75 

13680 1 37.75 
47 

a/ 57 
21680 210 
8280 BJ 80 


Land Sec 

Lojmo 284 

Legal Gent Gtp A33 

LtoydsT5BGp 432 

Lucas VojBv to? 

Modes Spenow S10 

MEPC 497 

Mercury A*sd 1180 

National Grid 213 

NottPWrer 5.17 

NotWest 8J0 

Nat 7.05 

NarwtofaUnlon 158 

Orange 799 

P&O 415 

789 
1J7 

POHcfGWV 498 

Pnndw Franco 433 

PiiHtonU 5.90 

Rattan* Gg 419 

Rank Group 3.W 

RaddHCabn 895- 

ftwiwd 380 

Reed Ini 591 

RentoMkiM 220 

ReutsnHdgi 460 

Raton 284 

RMCGtWip 9.92 

RofcRayot 141 

RnrriBkSat 403 

KTZna 1605 

3 

Satashwy 155 

Sdwxtcra 1425 

ScotNewanfle 435 

Seal Power 173 

Secwfcor . 183 

Sewn Trent 7 JO 

Shed Tramp R 1134 

State KL22 

Smith Nephew 1.77 

SrrtWaie 10.72 

SnAatad &13 

SttwnBec - 425 

StogeamOi 480 

Si-td Charter 9.15 

Tato& Lyta 453 

Teeoo 149 

Thames Wider 475 

31 Group 594 

71 Group 139 

Tomkins 158 

Uidlenr 1797 

Utd Assuanoe 440 

UM News 712 

UtdlMMes 430 

UendamLxuti 444 

Vodoftne 
WMltnad 
WBkmHdgi 

Mfi lie ■ f i ■ ■ 
nuD moj 

WPGmup 
Zeneca 1498 


497 798 794 

452 448 487 

185 1.47 18B 

481 445 487 

192 197 198 

1012 HL25 KLM 

1.17 1.17 1.18 
153 5BS 585 

5.18 529 522 

5.12 525 5.17 

152 15 UD 
477 477 792 

139 380 380 

492 495 498 

457 440 460 

1195 1198 11.19 
433 434 434 
443 457 450 

159 182 182 

890 893 997 

387 388 354 

IMS 10.18 KU5 
1230 1251 1284 
H 7? 452 435 

5X2 593 599 

280 271 284 

480 447 484 

591 591 590 

441 680 687 

574 478 580 

1780 1793 177B 
793 8.14 897 

2jf 195 394 
484 495 494 

234 239 280 

630 832 135 

281 162 284 

405 413 414 

493 428 410 

1M 297 296 

592 596 596 

489 494 495 
1280 1274 1281 
299 211 213 

498 5.12 595 

7J6 825 794 

692 M2 488 
122 126 128 

193 1.99- 194 

M3 &OT 415 
4W 795 795 

1- 20 1.23 195 

us &n 

447 451 

5J2 583 579 

41® 413 417 

398 388 384 

‘894 491 898 

339 135 U6 

580 579 5J1 
115 116 119 
443 443 681 

2- 50 158 283 

9JJ 9JB 1096 
134 239 141 

550 596 595 

1058 KUO 1087 
437 481 445 

338 139 381 

147 381 151 

1595 1696 1 
430 432 

139 388 173 

278 293 290 

7.20 7JS 727 

1134 1134 1333. 
10.11 10.18 1022 
173 175 171 

HUB 1080 1088 
893 412 407 

418 417 417 

430 440 438 

470 9.13 473 

442 452 4S3 

382 384 384 

465 467 471 

497 104 502 
525 533 
254 296 

1697 1697 17. 
437 438 4 
720 722 7 

422 427 427 

450 458 

297 

745 794 752 

111 118 115 

471 471 484 

ISO 391 254 

1895 1892 1856 


AltaatUdAssic 

BaCeamDol 

Bar htfisswn 

Ben 5 Romp 

Benetton 

Crcdlta HnSano 

Edban 

ENI 

Hat 

General Assic 

IMI 

INA 

ttalqm 

Mediaset 

MerEobcnca 

Montedison 

Ofivefl 

Pannakit 

Pireil 

RAS 

Rota Banco 
State Torino 
Stef 

T elea m Hofa 
UM 


MIBTetaORdkO: 1331450 
PMlion; 1B1798 

1600 12900 13180 13150 
1820 3700 37B0 3765 

ilOO 5000 5050 5070 

267 1211 1250 1224 
VSO 25950 27200 27700 
060 3115 3155 3235 
1750 8430 6600 8700 
K7D 9315 9510 9400 

1325 6175 6190 6305 
1700 30100 30400 3W50 
890 15915 159140 14305 
770 2720 2740 2771 
1780 5610 5415 5720 
395 7220 7345 7345 
1320 10470 10400 10600 
170 1145 1144 1149 

498 482 49130 479 

ESSO 3440 2S2S 2575 
1415 4280 4315 4380 
*75 13560 13715 13620 
1500 19760 20150 20000 
050 11860 12210 12150 
O10 9850 9935 9940 
iTW 5455 5510 5480 
715 5590 5685 5635 


Peugeot CD 
PtncnSt-Pilnt 
Pmmodm 
RfHsesB 

n i 

nQta 


High Law Ctaae Pie*. 

5515 580 580 591 ABB A 

2934 2875 2894 2920 AsstDtWK 

2338 2251 230S 2255 Astra A 


Mfh Urn (tax Pie*. 

108 104 108 107 JO 

227 217 225 226 

141 JO 138J0 141 139 JO 


15080 147.10 'SMM 1«J0 ABasCOpeoA 2D4J0 m VIM 203 


Rexel 1700 1690 1499 1686 *Mr _ 

Bh-PoalencA 202JD 198 201.90 381.90 BMlI . 

Sanofi 53S 521 524 517 EricawiB 

SdntWft 327 3U 327 318.70 HewmB 

SEB 1040 Ida IW 1835 toomlMA 

SGSTtxxason 44350 447 45180 446.10 tewtarB 

SteGenerate 442 422 638 424 MaOoB. 

Sodexho 2988 2920 2937 2941 HontorzAen 

StGobato B2 833 838 837 PharmtUpiahn 

Suez 307 JO 296J0 303Jt> 299 Sate* ft 

SynltKzWx) 739 720 739 720 SamteB 

TnonsonCSF 154 151.10 132J0 153 SCAB , 

Total B 572 547 557 544 S-EBaakenA 

Ustnor 97.95 96 9785 94J0 -ftTridta Fors 

>Mao VOR 360.10 363 344J9 SsssskaB 

■ .. . .. SKFB 


Sodexho 

StGobato 

Suez 

SyntticWw 
MmuonCSF 
Total B 
Ustnor 
iMao 


2» 250 292J0 291 JO 

580 567 5® 530 

S 3! 3 3 

719 709 712 717 

400J0 393 396J0 395L50 

262 252 262 259 

241 235 241 238 

271 264 270 246 JO 

314 » 214 209 J0 

230J0 225 230 226 

149 144 148 165 JO 

83 El JO 83 82JD 

283 280 281 JO 282JD 

349 344 34850 346 

20* 205 205L50 28BJ0 


Sao Paulo wo to iw 147 iw 

Piwunin. liZJSJV um,* iv ik in 


Market Gosed 

TheMontreal stock market 
was closed Tuesday fora hol- 
iday. 


Cerate Ptd 54.90 5420 5440 5400 
CESPPM 7451 7100 7450 73 JO 
CopH 20-70 20* 20165 2M 

Etahnbfls 431X0 <0500 629.00 60500 
tawhancoPfd <19.00 41100 41800 £19.99 
UgMSentdas 52000 51500 52000 511O0 
UgMpar 419590 41450414990 41000 

PetatomsPto 31100 30000 30900 29700 
PodMdLR 19450 19000 19450 18900 
StdNadonaf 35.10 3502 3505 3540 
SannOuz 1152 11J1 11J1 11J2 
TdebrasPU 14050 15700 14050 15601 
Tetonig 19750 796.00 19750 19800 
Tetar) 16200 15899 16001 14159 

TetaspPM 37400.34500 37200 36200 

Un&ancn 40.W 40.50 4QJ0 « jn 
UstatoasPM 1100 1140 1700 iui 
CVRD PM 2410 2380 2355 2350 


OBXtodttc 63950 
PlWtoUK 63505 

135 132 135 134 


SvHandtetA 

238 


229 

VetaoB 

m wi jo to jo 

TO 

Sydney 

AlOnteortaK 241840 
PihImkZTMJO 

Amcor 

U7 

452 

844 

843 

ANZBUna 

9J8 

9 JO 

944 

9.73 

BHP 

1945 

19.17 

1040 

19 JO 

Bate 

419 

4T2 

416 

419 

Bran tote bid. 

2X91 

2X60 

2X76 

2X9S 

CBA 

15J0 

1X22 

7541 

1X48 

CCAnaB 

1430 

16 

1410 

7640 

CohsMicr 

ft 

644 

45» 

491 


7.M 

7.14 

7JU 

CSR 

sss 

493 

5 

XM 

Fosters Bow 

151 

IA 


7.50 

Gootenan Bd 

193 

1JH 

1.90 

IJ6 

ia AuteroSa 

13 

1X50 

13 

1240 

Lend Luca 

27J0 

27 J3 

t/JO 

2773 

MIM Hdffl 

MtfAlSW 

2J6 

1892 

X03 

1848 

10s 

w 

XM 

18* 

Not Muted Hdg 

XII 

xos 

111 


The Trib Index 

PHca* an ot 2M» PM New York am. 

ten. f. 7932 > taa 

Lmt 

Ctang* 

%drangt 

-year 10 (tela 
% cneng* 

+17.39 

World Max 

175.08 

+0.40 

+083 

Raglan* Mama 
AsbJPatS Be 

129.95 

+0.16 

+0.12 

+528 

Europe 

181.47 

-0-32 

-0.18 

+1257 

N. America 

203/15 

■2.14 

-1 04 

+25 66 

S. America 

IndnataUiadaxu 

17227 

+3.05 

+1.B0 

♦50 55 

Capital goods 

216.82 

+081 

+0.28 

+2655 

Consumer goods 

19657 

+0.74 

+0.38 

+2202 

Energy 

204.78 

-1.17 

-057 

+1996 

Finance 

13090 

+087 

+021 

+12.40 

Mscebaneaus 

17289 

-056 

-0.33 

+6.87 

rUw Mttorttte 

18583 

+095 

+0.51 

+6.C2 

Service 

765.54 

+050 

+C30 

+20.55 

umes 

15587 

♦1.69 

♦1.10 

♦8.51 

TTmtntimmaonttHaraHfTtibtfm WotlffStfA fndiBrO tracks 9 ib US OoSai valves of 

2X xtornaaawty tavasmaa stock* from S5 eaunom. For more -nfcrmaaan. j tree 
baoUst tanvasttM by mtSnp 10 77» Tno index 18 1 Arnnn CrwHm da Gauss 
XSZINmSSyCedSK France. Comtes tp Steens*? Afews 


Mgh Law cion Pm. 

899 885 890 903 CdnHaORal 

SUM 8250a 8340a 8390a OtaltatRu 


Mgb Utw Oort Pm 

59 JO SB>i 59 'J 589. 
3610 34 3».|0 36.10 


27S1 2640 mo 3633 CdDOeddPto 3040 29.90 30.18 3040 


3955 3845 38te 39.20 

SS8 2S 52 £P? hC0 3495 25->s 3450 3540 

S?2 f52 f 3 ® ^ akaco “J° tS.60 2555 2180 

l«M 1440 Drantar 12t« 12te 1 *4 T7i 

em tm Mm mo BonotweA ito » iw 79 os 

1400 1580 1590 1590 DutatCddA 30.90 3016 3IU5 30V. 

UP 215 21S 214 EdperGmp 23% 23J0 2135 23te 

1^ 22S !“5«n*Meg U AX 4W 41 

3380 3H0 3330 327D FoWnxHnl 395 375** 390 37B 

1690 1420 1490 1620 F tf cnnbtfc te e 27M 27 JO 2740 27J5 

« « <« « FtaMwOnlA U\k 73b 2405 2435 

™ 403 FrancuNewda 7U5 49.15 70.90 69 ki 


- •’ , ' v - % : 3‘‘ V 


Madrid 

117 

Acettoajf 

17® ^S5Z CEtal 

3 ^r 


DAXiSTSSJX 
Pratten: 375452 

7515 1545 1510 

198J0 19150 7W 

375 375 378 

1830 I860 1863 

37 JO 37 JO 38 

62J0 42J5 63J8 

51.95 SZJK 52JZ3 
71 JO 71 JO 71J5 

4090 4140 41.10 
1397 140 1402 
160 160 162 
4105 4185 48.15 

13490 13545 13440 
.9240 9140 93 

97.10 99 JO 9748 
42J0 4115 4115 
59 JO 4140 6055 
360 360J0 3S8 

151 152.10 152JSD 
34280 . 343 342 

117 119 11180 

1«7 148 14830 

9840 99.10 99.80 
44540 44548 44540 
78 80 79 

68.95 *945 6945 

428 431 

7TJB JO _ 
1315 1320 1320 
3440 3440 3540 
529 JO 532 538 

740 741 

34 34.15 
186JD 18810 193-50 
4950 4970 4960 
507 508J8 510 


Kuala Lumpur 

AMMBKdgs 1440 
Gcnftlp 1130 

Md Banking 2425 
StSMiaipF 6J0 
PatamnGas ^ 

ft 

RateMItaPM 2875 ! 
StaKDabv 
TetakomMal 
Tcnaga . 1110 i 

UM Engineets 1840 i 


Co uw ot te. 1T7J2 
PrXVtOUs; 798898 

1820 1640 1440 
law 1130 13» 
26 2425 26-50 
Ui MB US 
9 9JS 9.15 
1240 I860 1240 
378 3J8 3J4 

340 150 348 

8 8JS 8.05 
2525 2150 2575 
850 8J0 840 

1140 7170 1220 
1790 12 1810 

1810 1830 1850 
7JS 841 848 


London 

Abbey ftetl 
AflJea Domecn 


FT-SE MB: 459421 
PmtoBV«T520 


849 

708 

8 

427 

415 

425 

tSO 

4* 

449 

X73 

540 

X 70 

120 

1.17 

120 

X14 

SJ9 

XI3 

547 

578 

X64 


BAT tad 

BoikSatltand 

Blue Onto 

BOCCwup 

Boats 

BPBInd 

MAansp 

BritAinwr* 

BG 

Bit Land 


1177 I1J5 1171 1141 
720 720 723 7J1 

570 854 S40 548 

187 173 IK 378 

ATS A13 A16 All 

IQJi 1028 1045 1048 
478 6J5 4.97 472 
3JB 324 320 1» 

13J0 1135 1139 1349 
725 AM 499 7J3 

222 2.16 222 2.19 

156 547 547 5J2 


BT 

Gas Rotund 
teerdmia 
Piycn 
Repsol 

SavtaanaBec 

Tabacptara 

Tdefonica 

Untentaasa 
VMxncO— e a t 


Manila 


npMpW 

CAP Hones 
Mania EtocA 
Meta) Bar* 
Ptoran 
PO Bank 
P tat Lana DM 
Son Wgurifl 
SM Prana Hdg 


Mexico 

Alfa A 
BanaadB 
C«»jCPO 
CrlnC 

Emp Modena 

GmCanoAl 

GpoFBaaier 


Botaa WK592JI 
Pnwtow: 59129 

27410 27700 27450 
7935 TWO 1985 
58M 6020 5900 

8200 8300 8238 

11510 11710 11680 
7455 1475 1470 

25200 25600 25600 
5780 5400 5319 

32300 33100 32950 
4475 4650 4600 

4950 9B00 50?8 

2955 3(05 3010 

7530 7590 7S90 

11430 11560 11540 
1375 1400 1410 

32140 32320 32800 
1BZ5 1875 1865 

2805 2665 2875 

4220 6270 <34® 
1435 1485 1455 

7740 7050 7900 

jxk 4J4S 4355 
1305 1335 1HS 

22S5 2270 2250 


PSEtadac 281IJ7 
PmMS. 280865 
19 1825 19 1850 

23 22JS 23 22_75 
144 142 144 144 

10 940 M0 9.70 

89 JO 8850 89-50 89 J8 
S50 535 340 SO 

7.10 A70 7 6M 

255 25Z50 25223 2S5 

835 SIS 830 BIO 
72 70 71JD 72J0 

VO 7 JO 7M 7 JO 


Be l Mi edmWUlB 
PmMeu 441875 

5130 5150 53J0 
21 JS 21J5 Z2J0 
3820 3A35 3A40 
1240 1170 1SLSB 
4090 40.90 41 JO 
50 JO 51.10 5DL70 
110 111 113 

29 JO 2MB 29 JO 
3890 31 JO 31 JS 
121 JO 122.10 1ZIJ0 
T8L96 19.04 19.14 



‘• 4 ^ :*■ . 

r -> > 


tauunlSk 1150 U40 

HBoSS", __ 13© 1320 
Haodo Mater 3300 3250 

IBJ 1690 IfflS 

IHI 445 440 

todia 603 594 

ito-vwndo ms mm 

JAL 500 491 

Japan Tobacco 8980a BSTDa 
Jasa> 4M9 3900 

Kg|toa 443 635 

KamalBK 2290 226® 

Kac 1600 1580 

KowawUHry 52c 5P 

Kdna5taei 357 3S4 

KMdMppRir 781 695 

KktoMwBr 1180 11® 

Kobe Steal 213 211 

Kunatm 911 902 

Kubota 360 SSI 


44 4220 43M 42 

395 375*6 390 37B 

27H 77 JO 27.60 27J5 


*00 

M3 

3900 

635 

* 

3990 

649 

2290 

22® 

2290 

2280 

Ml» 

75» 

1S70 

1590 

52C 

357 

5P 

354 

3 

522 

357 

701 

495 

499 

WJ 

IS® 

1160 

1190 

1180 

213 

211 

212 

211 

911 

902 

911 

906 

360 

557 

,556 

£3 

90* 

8930 

9030 

90IH 


7000 GuU Cda P.es 

» N*M« 

sieoa inco 





^ % 

. .y 


RfWtaBec WW 1990 20K; K® One. 

LTCB 498 468 493 467 ProataPattn 

Mnrubert 517 511 517 514 PetoCdo 

Moral 2300 2ZSB 2270 2290 Placer Oome 

MatauOomn 40BO 3990 4070 403® FteMta 

MahuEtoctad 2290 Bffi 2280 2270 Potash Sask 

MSf* IS US So S MSS- 

S3&9- S S S S SSS.'S -6 * » * » 

ssss ls S S 'S S 

MunUMTy 1750 1730 1730 1750 Ted B 

1090 1000 1090 1090 Teteqtete 


12*6 11-85 T] 73*5 
71.15 7035 7DJ5 7870 
42^ 42 4820 42.10 

4815 44J0 4$ 45 

19.90 19* »J5 T9jS5 

ifiJS 44 4480 4A10 
20*4 20.10 2820 2815 
8195 ..S 83Vr 83.70 
12.95 12£8 12J5 1285 
3105 29 JO 3005 29.90 


|0?B Nava 71 W 1140 IMS IMS 

[920 Onex B 274 2714 27*4 

461 Pancdn Peffm 29J8 29*4 2940 WM 

£4 Petra Cdo 7290 2285 22J5 22J0 

™ gtoMCDurae 2280 2840 22*4 22.85 

s® 74*4 1X90 14 1A70 

£5 ftriashsm 107J5 707 707*5 18S35 

430 taateanoa . 39 38*4 3845 3880 

4» RtoAlgan _ 3460 3190 3350 MMS 


647 456 645 660 SanranGo 

1620 1600 1610 7610 SMCdoA 

K8 . 852 856 858 Suncar 


836 .B28 836 


5585 55* 5580 S5*4 

6135 60*4 61*4 <lte 

37ta 37 37 37*4 


7750 1720 1730 1750 TadB 
1090 1080 1090 1090 Tefagtabe 


TMteraonEny 4X80 S&i tuo 4X60 


Miad Fudqsn 1520 1500 1510 1540 Tetui 


Mtetl Trust 

NBdwSec 


M 855 B46 Thomson 


281* g*6 27*5 281* 

52*4 52*4 52*5 5235 

2530 25.05 2530 2X10 
32 VS 32.05 3245 3X45 


4SD 45UJ 4510 4500 T«D«bBct* 4X10 4X15 4105 Cv< 


1670 1450 167D 1670 TianeaKo 16ta 1435 1&40 1 *** 

’S2 ’SS ”2 TramtOtotat V90 PU M 27ra 

oSS TrttwnfcRnl 6895 SOW 60 39*4 

5 o?S ? 5S 31 10 30 - 50 30510 

915 W3 W5 916 TVXGoJd 714 71ft 7 aq tu, 

« 2? S ’ Wg * TOn>E ^ 2X40 2S3B 

^ 25 ^7 % *“*” « W 90 91 

236 233 234 237 

1450 1420 1450 1430 — — — — — — . .. 

SSSS Vienna 

697 491 <92 697 Pl-J— sW90J7 

315 311 315 3U BuoMeMIddetl 94X50 92840 940 952 

1520 1490 1520 l3o0 ClWfltanstPtd 487.10 475-70 477 JM^O 

11600 17«0 T16OT 11400 EA-Genend 3155 3TS253 3741 3145 

,0 W 151 842 EVN 1607 JO I m 1594 1616 

3S30 3650 3670 3650 FhnhOtalWtan 501 JO 492 500 497.95 



TAGHeuer 


Itippon Steel 
Wnrai Motor 
WOC 

Monona Sac 
ffTT 

HTT Date 


Soma Bank 

SaraoEIec 

Secon 

SdbuRwv 

SeUniOtam 


ATXtMnelSXn 
PmtoBi: 1290J7 


Hr n 

K i 

SagaPettoiA I39J0 
5®U| 161 

sSSranTfSa 4X20 


148 170 

23JB 23J8 
2740 7820 

137 US 

44 44 

391 427 

391 398 

251 254 

105 106 

543 553' 

.318 322 

134 139JD 

138 140 

580 510 

45 45 


pomaoHeny 7700 7140 7 
Hyundai Eng- 22900 22200 22 
KtoMakrx 13600 13300 13 


MfeoiCfem. 
Sakfauf House 
Seven-Elem 
sharp 


315 .311 315 3U BuoMeMIddetl 94X50 92040 940 9S7 

1510 1490 1520 l30O ClWfltanstPJd 487.10 .‘7S-70 477 JB9M 

11600 11600 71600 11600 EAferMni 3155 3131 3741 3145 

B70 JM8 851 842 EVN 1607J0 im 1596 1616 

3630 3650 3670 3650 FTuahafen Men 501-90 492 SCO J97.9S 

1620 iwa 1610 . 1440 oKS 1560 1533 1545 1548 

SIS W 512 515 OestBettfe 858.75 HSU 856 857J« 

Sffii 1060 BJ0G B380 VAStuM • 555 549.10 JOT 558J9 

5910 Sm 5770 J900 VATndl 2189 2155 21B2m« 

™ 1J2 1180 1180 WtenatwgBaU 2S1Q 24R 249QAS K*5 

1150 1130 1140 115D 

EfS® JffiO 8890 8900 

1520 14M 1320 1520 


Korea BPwr 28800 2B«ffl 2®$ _ 

Korea Emli Bk 6«® 6040 6100 6380 MaTWo - 2X62 2X20 TIS5 2245 5SP3S 1 *-" 

KOeaMabTet 443000 43W00 44HKW 434000 SGeargeBaeK 171 W 171 86S 

LGSwnkMl 33880 X29C0 33000 33500 WMC L70 8J6 A57 8J4 

taangimsr mm ssm mm ssw Wk Bun 7J6 7.71 jm 7.92 

Saoauog Dtetoy 46100 45000 46000 45600 WooHdePte 10J2 1045 7047 53*7 SL. 

SamsungEICC 69800 <8000 69400 68500 NbatHDlths 430 A20 A29 429 wlSSru, 

StaWunBaftk 11100 10800 110110 11100 ^Solem 

' 1 ... E(st 

w sMmwu Taipei UStS? 


737B NewsQn 6J3 AB 435 641 nuu stwu ma 

mm KScdSudo S M W W 2S5. 15M im >520 1520 

V BEt* ,A JS J| WsLT Ilia Werangton •mgjgggg 


A30 AB A29 429 


ato-uap 

Bfflwdra 

BSC 

BMP 

CmtfPtos 

Conetour 

Cetotmi 

OrattanDtor 
CLH pBdo Rwi 
Credit Agrtcote 
Danone 

ifflSf 

IS2[ 

Cen-Eaw 
Haws 
I metal 

LVMH 


CAGAOS 278474 
Ptwrtoev 274X20 
882 B97 894 

171.10 17138 17190 
930 956 941 

682 712 685 

341-20 36460 362.50 
«8 6tt 706 
9*8 949 965 

22X40 235 JO 22A70 
1030 1044 1050 

« JlH 

474 490 

911 911 

540 579 

1260 1260 
*5 971 949 

422 


Singapore re-jin-gM. 

Ada Poc Brew N.T. N.T. N.T. A2S 

Cpebasta 6J8 AW. A90 A90 

1X60 1X60 1X40 1X60 
15.10 . 1AS0 1X10 15 

0-72 0J9 077 OJO 

Oeftenin 1840 18 18 18J0 

DBS Land A64 4J0 A62 A64 

Fraser A Neoue 1840 .itLSJ 1030 1X30 


Taipei 

ChtoorLHe 


7870 

1850 

1850 

1850 

MrNZMdB 

430 

427 



1280 

1310 

1750 


7J7 

1J6 


742U 

/m 

/SRI 

7270 


IW 



98+U 

9770 

98* 

9870 

FMchQBidg 

433 

428 



1000 

IMI 

TOl® 

gaits ChEoy 

445 

437 


XJ2A 


1/70 

urn 

FfitehChFORl 

X10 

247 

7 HI 

515 


570 

S17 


X* 

143 



ia® 

1850 

IV* 

UonNoAon 

J77 

170 


316 

312 

315 

314 

TetoomiHZ 

720 

7D9 


1210 

1160 

12M 

lira 

WRsoa Horton 

71 JO 

11J0 

11.70 

3000 

3140 

2970 

3100 

2980 

3150 

2970 

3170 


Tfctll aifllil hnlrai. MT»n Jib Jl* Jib JM TsHGDb NZ 

“““isaEKs ? ass, as jjs as ss — 

. 163 IS ia 160 3160 31 $0 317B 

11&50 114 114 115 TDK B340 8370 8253 " B360 

a 3 79 79 jo si jo JoJsfjjEiPwr auo io« 2070 2060 Zunch 

M2 138 138 1A5D 2S5** 1110 1® 1100 HAD 

2X90 . 28 28 28 TokbMaitoe . 1410 1390 1410 7410 ABBB 

114J0 11X50 11X50 114JQ ToteogPwr 2420 23S0 2470 23» Adeem 8 

70 69 49 7450 Tglyi Etedran S6T0 5610 5650 5680 MsubecR 






Paribas A 
PwnodRksd 


90S 0.10 
435 435 
706 729 

S5*^ 

365.10 368J0 
1073 7093 
2280 2360 
1*3 143 

gSjjj 34X30 
W7J0 3B7.10 
303 30440 


UK 1 <wj * X81 176 X8S 2J1 

7AS 7J5 7 JO 770 

XBfi XD 384 XJ4 

6J0 AID A15 Alt) „ 

»• X6B 168 370 UtdMfenBeC 

A8i 4M AB2 A86 UWWMdChta 

4 3J8 158 3J6 

ocHCtaretm IS 1440 U90 .75 = — 

(7S Untan BK F 9 830 - 0 8J0 

PDrinmrHdSi 4JS A40 445 &J0 TOKVO 

Seratawang 7.70 ATS 7 ATS 

Sing Air foreign 7X70 1X20 \Z>'i 1140 

Stag Land 4J0 445 450 4J0 

“ ' - 292B 28J0 29JD ».10 __ 

XH 3JB 384 X90 

244 2J8 X64 241 juaNam 

3J6 134 .1X6 336 

-L10 -154 1,10 1J7 SfSSSft... 


115 11X50 11X50 .114 Tokyo Gas 

W 47 67 66 - TokyuCoip. 

8450 84 84J0 84 • ' 

112 7«8 mass 107 jo TopponPrinl 

122 11431 122 11SJ0 

56 55JD 55J0 Si Tariite - 

114 110 111 J0 113 To*t« 

49 4450 .4450 6S TopTruri 


WO 2043 2070 2040 ZUHCh SPItariac 3525-48 

1110 1080 TIM UM Pretoowi 853110 

2188 21M 2162 2160 

.51 SB3 S79 

Hi if? to Are*-SeranoB 220S 2150 2T68 2205 

,22 707 109 AWR 854 056 856 854 

IS JS JS 22» 2208 221S 2B6 

*5? 29 ’2* BahMflHdgR 3430 3300 3430 3400 

®» BKVWnn 1200 1190 1M 17B 

QteStecCheni 1M75 135 1^ 137 

^□SS Qert*tR_ 924 899 920 916 

JS! J89 JS JS OtfSufstwGpR 19X50 18X75 !9xS 192 

.HI. 5* 561 541 


iHs 


MU 225: 20341 SI erxmkKiUO 

hwtoBE2H3AM 

1230 1210 1230 1220 

J?7 TOO 703 707 TOfWltO 

3W0 xmo 391® 2f2S 

S ® 5! AMU con. 


£60 M50 Stodrawdt 
9M 3070 EinCtawd 
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EVTKRNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25,1997 


EAGE17 


M' 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Thailand 
To Force 
Mergers 

Moves Aim to Bolster 
Finance Industry 

Gm&nt by Ctr Suff Frmt Duputcbn 

BANGKOK — Three days after 
his appointment as Thailand's fi- 
nance minister, Thanong Bidaya 
was given emergency powers Tues- 
day to order ailing finance compa- 
nies to merge as parr of a plan to 
shore up the industry. 

The government will also allow 
firms to repackage property loans in- 
to securities to bolster their finances, 
and plans to raise the limit on foreign 
holdings in commercial banks. 

"This is what the doctor 
ordered," said Nimir Wongjariyak- 
ul, senior vice present at Thaunex 
Finance & Securities Ltd., whose 
company is planning a merger with 
units of Thai Military Bank. 

The cabinet approved an exec- 
utive decree to allow securitization 
of real-estate loans and the creation 
of the Secondary Mortgage Corp., 
an agency to buy and sell loans, said 
Prasam Trairatvorakui. deputy sec- 
retary-general of the Securities and 
Exchange Commission. 

Hie government wants to con- 
solidate the financial-services in- 
dustry by having strong companies 
take over weak ones. 

The cabinet meeting was die first 
with Mr. Thanong as finance min- 



Attack on Baht 
Led by Soros, 
Official Says 

Bloomberg News 

BANGKOK — The finan- 
cier George Soros led an attack 
on the Thai baht that drove the 
currency to an 1 1-year low last 
month and prompted Thailand 
to impose currency controls and 
raise interest rates, a Thai cen- 
tral bank official said Tuesday. 

The Thai measures were in- 
tended to "punish" traders such 
as Mr. Soros by making spec- 
ulation on the baht prohibitively 
expensive, said the official in 
the Bank of Thailand’s money- 
market operations division. 

Traders betting the baht 
would fall borrowed the cur- 
rency and planned to buy it later 
at a cheaper rate. 

“Soros was the main guy, but 
that’s his business," me offi- 
cial, who was not named, said. 

The Nation newspaper re- 
ported that Mr. Soros, president 
of Soros Fund Management and 
chief investment officer of 
Quantum Fund NV, earmarked 
$6 billion for his run on the baht, 
which fell last month. Soros 
employees in Hong Kong de- 
clined to comment on the cen- 
tral bank official’s comments. 


WccjuHUflJRrwel* 

Thanong Bidaya, the new fi- 
nance minister of Thailand. 

ister. The merger and securitization 
measures were written by his pre- 
decessor, Amnuay Viravan, who 
resigned last week because of what be 
said was meddling by politicians in 
the six-party government coalition. 

Mr. Thanong. in an effort to ac- 
celerate the rescue of the finance and 
property industries, asked the cabinet 
to approve an executive decree on the 
measures. As a decree, the act need 
only be signed by King Bhumibol 
Adulyadej to become law, rather than 
face full parliamentary scrutiny. 

“The reason some cabinet min- 
isters didn’t want an executive de- 
cree this week is because the new 
finance minister has been in office 
only one day," said Chavarar 
Chamvirakul, one of Mr. Thanong’s 
three deputies. "This now gives an 
opportunity for opposition parties to 
attack the government, even though 
we took things forward today." 

The new legislation is expected to 
give tax breaks to companies that 
merge. It is also expected to allow 
the merged companies to become 
commercial banks. Entities arising 
from the mergers or transfers with 
assets of greater than ISO billion 
baht ($5.54 billion) will be allowed 
to apply for banking licenses. 

When Mr. Thanong faces ques- 
tions from Parliament on the 1998 
budget Wednesday, analysts said he 
would encounter heavy pressure to 
explain Thailand's budget deficit 
this year, the first shortfall in nine 
yean. The Budget Bureau last 
month estimated the Thai govern- 
ment’s budget deficit for this year at 
63.2 billion baht. 

( Bloomberg . AFP. Reuters) 


Singapore Banks on Its Port 


By Michael Richardson 

l/wnuntoral Herald Tribune 


SINGAPORE — Virtually every visitor to the 
headquarters of the Pan of Singapore Authority is 
given a glimpse of the future in a large display cabinet 
— a model of a giant new container shipping terminal 
being developed at a cost of 7 billion Singapore 
dollars (S4.9 billion). 

to return to China. Singa- 
territory as the world’s 
tbly in 1997. 
been able to proceed 


As Hong Kong 
pore is set to ovi 
busiest container port. 

While Singapore 
smoothly with its port expansion program, Hong 
Kong ’s plan to enlarge its container terminal facilities 
was delayed for more than three years by wrangling 
between Britain and C hina. 

Even more important is the increasing diversion of 
maritime trade that once reached the Chinese main- 
land through Hong Kong. With C hina 's rapid mod- 
ernization, more of its exports and imports are being 
handled by Chinese pons. 

Hong Kong is now planning on the basis that “the 
of cargo from northern and central 


, which presently flows through Hong Kong, 
will no longer do so," said Benjamin Wong, a member 
of the territory’s Port Development Board. “We also 
expect that a gradually increasing proportion of south- 
ern China cargo will go through its own ports." 

Since 1986, Singapore has been the busiest port in 
the world. Shipping tonnage to the island-state in- 
creased 8 percent to nearly 76 9 million tons in 1996, 
while the number of vessels calling at the port rose by 


13 percent to 117,723 terns, 
m con tail 


container traffic, however, Singapore ranked 
second to Hong Kong last year. Singapore handled 
just over 12.9 million 20-foot equivalent units, or 


TEUs as the huge steel cargo boxes are called in the 
trade, compared with die territory's 13.2 million. 

Although Singapore says it is not in competition 
with Hong Kong, the increase of over 9 percent in its 
container traffic in 1996 narrowed the gap with Hoag 
Kong to about 250,000 TEUs, compared with 
650,000 in 1995. 

Even as it is poised to overtake Hong Kong as the 
premier regional container hub, Singapore is con- 
cerned that it may lose business, like Hong Kong, 
through the rise of rival nearby ports. . 

Shippers estimate that 70 percem of the cargo 
passing through Singapore is for transshipment to 
three countries: Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand,. . . 

All three have ambitious port development pro- 
grams designed not just to attract big shipping lines to 
make direct calls but also to grab a share of the 
regional transshipment business. 

“Competition in the port business is getting 
fiercer," Mah Bow Tan, Singapore's communica- 
tions minister, said recently. “Major shipping lines 
are forming large consortia to bargain for favorable 
terms from port operators. A few hub pons will cover 
the whole world, each fed by many feeder pons." 

While analysts foresee a declining market share for 
both Hong Kong and Singapore, they expect both to 
continue to prosper on the back of surging maritime 
trade within Asia and between Asia and the rest of the 
world. 

Andrew Penfold, director of Ocean Shipping Con- 
sultants, which is based in Britain, said that. Singa- 
pore’s share of the Southeast Asian regional port 
market would decline to 49 percent in 2000, from 53 
percent in 1996. But be said that container traffic 
through Singapore would increase strongly to 19.8 
million TEUs in 2000, while the volume for Hong 
Kang would reach 17 million TEUs in the same year. 



Investor’s Asia 


r J F M A 
1997 


M J 


J F.M A M J 
1997 


J F M A M J 
1997 




' Tuesday ' 
<3088 

Prhtf. ' 

Close 



Hdn^Seng....... 

H&S0.96 15,42123 *0-87 


Straits "rimes •- 

2,041.38 

2.034.79 

+0.32 


MOrtfewtes - 

- zjmM 

2.706.30 

-0.66 



2&341.93 20.43&t4 -0.46 j 

KtttfeLumptu- Composite 

1J077J& 

.1,08098 

-1.02 


SET • - 

493.13 

504 53 

-2,28 


Composite Index 

753.70 

753.05 

+0.09 

Taiprf ■ 

Stock Maftattadex 8,918.17 

0925.12 

-0.08 


PS& 

dosed 

2.80065 

• 

Jakarta 

Composite Index- 

. 71339 

719.6*: 

-0.87 

WWfeflton ,- 

N25E-40 : ! - 

-£388*97 

2.414.87 

-0.86 

Bombay-- - 

Senfilth® Index 

4.119.39 

4,08020 

+074 

Source: Tabkurs 


Inhnv 


Very briefly: 


South Korea Delays Bank Refer 


CaoptMtri Our Sujf From DUfMrbn 

SEOUL — South Korea decided 
Tuesday to maintain the ceiling on 
individual stakes in b anks at 4 per- 
cent, defying a presidential reform 
panel and blocking conglomerates 
from exerting too much control over 

h anks . 

The finance and economy min- 
ister, Kang Kyong Shik, said the 4 
percent ceiling should be main- 
tained to prevent the concentration 
of economic power in the bands of 
the country’s conglomerates, or 
chaebols. 

Chaebols are barred from owning 
banks or participating in bank man- 
agement 

“We have yet to solve many 
problems before raising the limit” 
Mr. Kang said. 

But he pledged to push ahead 
with financial reforms focusing on 
the creation of a powerful financial 
regulatory body, buoyed by support 
from bank chiefs. 


His decision to shelve the lib- 
eralization of bank ownership ran 
counter to recommendations by the 
Presidential Commission for Finan- 
cial Reform, which called for a rise 
in the current limit on a single share- 
holder’s stake in a commercial 
bank. 

Bank stocks tumbled on the news. 
Korea Exchange Bank fell 4.4 per- 
cent to 6,100 won. 

Earlier this year, a presidential 
commission proposed raising the 
ownership limit to 10 percent in 
order to overhaul the obsolete bank- 
ing industry. 

The lack of management controls 
were partly responsible for a kick- 
backs -for- loans scandal involving 
the failed Hanbo Group early this 
year. Eleven people, including three 
bankers, are serving jail terms in 
connection with the scandal. 

Critics said a higher limit would 
allow the already powerful chaebol 
to dominate the economy by con- 


trolling their finances. The com- 
bined sales of the top five chaebol, 
including Samsung and Hyundai, 
are equalto half of the nation 's gross 
domestic product. 

Meanwhile, Moody's Investors 
Service Inc. said South Korea's 
ability to repay debt has “deteri- 
orated,’* reflecting slower econom- 
ic growth and mounting bank- 
ruptcies at high-profile companies. 

while the New York-based rat- 
ings company does not plan to lower 
South Korea’s current “A-l" rat- 
ing, it said a surge in external debt 
— to twice the size of its inter- 
national reserves — and North 
Korea's shaky economy were 
causes for concern. 

Moody's, which rated South 
Korea's credit outlook as “stable" 
three months ago, said its opinion 
now was based on “vulnerability 
posed by the weakening financial 
health of the corporate and banking 
sectors.” (AFP, Bloomberg) 


• Nissan Motor Co. is considering cutting the number of 
platforms on which it builds cars and scrapping one of its three 
development divisions to try to reduce development and 
materials costs. A platform consists of vehicles that share 
engines, transmissions and suspensions. By grouping dif- 
ferent vehicles under a platform, Nissan would be able to 
develop cars that use the same parts 

• Hong Kong hotels are unlikely to have a full house for 
celebrations of the handover to Chinese role on July 1. a 
property consultancy said in Singapore. Occupancy up to 
April was better than last year, but since then it has been 
erratic, with some days being sellouts and others recording os 
low as 40 percent occupancy. JLW TransAct said. 

• Ayala Corp., a Philippine holding company, said it would 
stop maintaining separate classes of shares for foreigners and 
Filipinos. If declassification is approved by its stockholders 
and regulators, it would ensure foreign investors would be 
able to buy Ayala’s shares at the same price as Filipinos. 

• Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co. expects half of 

its customers to have higher phone bills after it begins 
metering local calls. Bloomberg, afp 

Kia Plans Asset Sales to Ease Debt 

Bloomberg News 

SEOUL — Kia Group, the cash-strapped owner of South 
Korea's third-largest automaker, said Tuesday it would sell 
assets worth 795 billion won ($895.2 million) to alleviate its 
financial problems. 

The move came as Kia Steel Co., a steel manufacturing unit 
of the group, sought a 30 billion-won emergency loan from the 
state-run Korea Development Bank, after one of its units, Asia 
Motors Co., missed a debt payment last week, a bank ex- 
ecutive said. Kia said it was trying to resolve a “temporary” 
crisis as merchant banks attempted to collect loans. 

The company has debts totaling $62 billion. 


Opel Set to Replace Peugeot in China Venture 


Bloomberg News 

BEUING — Adam Ope! AG, die Ger- 
man subsidiary of General Motors Corp., 
will sign a joint venture to make cars in 
southern China, replacing PSA Peugeot 
Citroen of France, the official Xinhua 
news agency reported Tuesday. 

The agency, citing unnamed executives, 
said Opel would join Denway Investment 
Ltd. in the Guangzhou Peugeot Co. 
Peugeot, which has a 22 percent stake in 
the company, said in March it would pull 


out of the joint venture, which is also 
owned by the Guangzhou city government 
and Denway, which is controlled by the 
municipality. 

The plant only made 3,000 vehicles last 
year, losing about 500 million yuan ($60 
million). The news agency said the new 
firm would make a car specially designed 
for the Chinese market. 

Peugeot executives were unavailable for 
comment. Guangzhou city officials said no 
final decision had been made. 


FIGHTER: Lockheed Martin Seeks New Markets for Aging F-16 


Continued from Page 13 

deals to persuade the Hun- 
garians to buy the rival JAS- 
39 Gripen fighter, jointly 
marketed by Saab and British 
Aerospace PLC. The offset 
arrangements include foe 
building of a white goods fac- 
tory by foe ELectrolox group, 
which has announced it was 
laying off 12.000 workers and 
closing 25 plants elsewhere 
because of overcapacity. 

Lockheed Martin's biggest 
push, however, is in Latin 
America, where the Clinton 
administration last month al- 
lowed the company to bid for 
a Chilean contract, breaking a 
20-year policy effectively 
barring foe export of advanced 
weaponry to the region. 

Critics say foe proposed $1 
billion order for an initial 18 
jets would help remove some 
of foe causes of social tension 
in the region, such as foe lack 
of schools, hospitals and ef- 
fective police forces. Because 
a principal function of fight- 
ers is to engage other fighters, 
it is likely to be only a matter 
of time before Argentina acts 
to replace its elderly A-4s. 

Arms control advocates 
have accused the Clinton ad- 
ministration of jeopardizing 
democracy by rewarding re- 
gimes with abysmal human 
rights records, while export- 
ing weapons to regions with 
unresolved border disputes. 
The critics say that the sales 
are being pushed for strictly 
short-term economic reasons. 

Bur Lockheed Martin ex- 


ecutives at the air show, who 
spoke on condition they not 
be identified, justified selling 
foe F-16 to Latin America and 
ocher tense regions, on the 
ground that if the United 
Stares does not do it. someone 
else wilL Lockheed Martin, 
the biggest U.S. defense con- 
tractor, has been a key force in 
persuading the U.S. govern- 
ment to soften Its policy. Its 
chairman, Norman Au- 
gustine, is chairman of the 
Defense Policy Advisory 
Committee, which counsels 
the secretary of defense and 
foe U.S. trade representative 
on military export policy. 

Sweden, France and Russia 
are all frying to sell their jet 
fighters in Latin America. The 
head of Ecuador's armed 
forces. General Paco Mon- 
cayo, is on record as saying 
that foe money spent on mil- 
itary hardware is useless and 


damaging to the economy. But 
be added that countries would 
always buy more weapons 
than they need as long as old 
border disputes fester. 

So Ecuador, one of foe 
poorest countries in the re- 
gion, went out and bought 
fighters from Israel after a 
brief but bloody border war 
with Peru. This required U.S. 
approval since the engines are 
made in America. 

Peru circumvented the re- 
quirement by buying a squad- 
ron of MiG-29s from Belarus 
for $350 million. The MiG-29 
is one of the most powerful 
fighters to have come out of 
the Soviet Union. Unfortu- 


nately for foe Peruvians, Be- 
larus did not provide after- 
sales parts and services, 
which means the planes are 
grounded most of me time. 

The Lockheed Martin ex- 
ecutives said the sale of F- 16s 
to Latin America would ac- 
tually improve security be- 
cause it would lead to foe pro- 
fessionalization of foe air 
forces around a set of com- 
mon standards, as in Europe. 

And as a final sales pitch, 
they said foe supersonic F-16 
could be adapted to fly mis- 
sions for which it was never 
originally intended, such as 
counterinsurgency operations 
and interdicting drug traffic. 


Win with ns. 

founa dynamic company active to 
the booming sector k seeking? tor 
9 serious and financial ffl 
partner tor the further di 
and expansion in Switzerland 
through the EC countries, 
i Is ready to support ana 
place 0.5 Mto SFr. at our disposal, 
repayment within the next Bw years. 
Good Interests on your Capital and 
possfcfflyot partnership. 

Plaerantad: 

Cypher 25- AA 467 Publioto. EC. Bo* 
OMWBLunsro. 


which 


CURRENCY & CAPITAL 
MARKET SERVICES 


SOVEREIGN 
(FOREX) LTD. 

SWISS BROKERHOUSE 

ilS, Rue du Rhone, 

1204 Gen&re 

24 HOUR 5 FOREX DESK 

• Interbank Conditions 

• No Commission 

• Capital Return Guarantee 

• Higher Return on Investment 

• Daily Market Comment 

• Individual Credit Line 

• 20 Years Experience 

• Confidentiality Guaranteed 
According to Swiss Law 

Inquiries: 

Phone; ++ 41 iz 14 6322 
Fax: ++ 41 41 728 0809 


DREYFUS AMERICA FUND 

SfCAV 

Registered Office: 

2, boulevard Royal, L-2953 Luxembourg 
R-C LUXEMBOURG 


Shareholders are hereby convened to the 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

of shareholders of our company, which will take place 
at the offices of Banquc Internationale a Luxembourg 
69. route d’Esch, L - 1470 Luxembourg, on July 4, 1997 
at 2 tun. for the purpose of considering and voting upon 
the following agenda: 

1. Submission of the Reports of the Board of 
Directors and of the Auditor; 

2. Approval of the Statement of Net Assets and of 
the Statement * ~ 
as at February 


thV Statement of Operations for the year ended 
28,1997; 


3. Allocation of the net results; 

4. Discharge to the Directors; 

5. Statutory appointments; 

6. Miscellaneous. 


.tired for 


Shareholders are advised that no quorum is retrain 
the items on the agenda of the Annual General Meeting 
and that decisions will be taken at the majority of the 
votes expressed by the shareholders present or repre- 
sented at the Meeting. 

In order to attend the a Mccting of July 4, 1997, the own- 
ers of bearer shares will have to deposit their shares five 
clear days before foe Meeting at the offices of Banque 
Internationale A Luxembourg, 69, route d’Esch, L - 1470 
Luxembourg. 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


CONTRACT FOOD AND MANAGEMENT SERVICES • REMOTE SIT!; MANAGEMENT 
SERVICE VOUCHERS • LEISURE SERVICES 


HIGHER INTERIM RESULTS 


As the world leader in food and management services, Sodexho Alliance 
makes a world of difference every day, with 142,000 people in 62 countries providing 
food and management services to companies , government agencies , 
schools, healthcare institutions, retirement homes, and remote sites, as well as 
issuing service vouchers and offering river cruises. 


Sodexho Alliance has reported the following 
financial results for six months ended Februazy 
28,1997: 

- Net sales of FRF 14,148,344,000, up 14.1 % 

- Operating income of FRF 683,604,0001, up 
21.8 % due to an improvement in operating 
margin to 4.8 % from 4.5 % in the year-earlier 
period. 

- Net income less minority interests of FRF 
269,391,000, up 26.3 %. 

At current exchange rates, net sales for the 
full 1996/97 fiscal year should reach FRF 28 
billion* with net income less minority interests 
of FRF 535 million. 

^ ’ Sodexho Alliance recorded a number of 
important new contracts during the first half: 

- Aldershot Garrison in the UK, with foe mana- 
gement of all non-military operations on 
foe British Army’s home base. The contract 
represents revenue of GBP 200 million over 
seven years. 

- Shell UK Exploration and Production at TbBos- 
Aberdeen in foe North Sea. The contract repre- 
sents revenue of GBP 30 million over three years. 

- The RAI television company in Turin, -Italy. 


- Municipal schools in foe 1st and 20th arron- 
dissements of Paris and foe Beaugency 
Hospital, in France. 

• The DSM chemicals company in Geleen, the 
Netherlands. 

-The Austrian Police, with 35,000 service voucher 
users per day. 

-The Califormia Museum of Science in Los 
Angeles, USA and the Lido music hall in Paris, 
France. 

In March 1997, Sodexho Alliance acquired a 
49 % interest in Universal Services, foe leading 
US provider of remote site management services, 
with annual sales of around FRF 700 million. 

★ The BELLON S.A and FINANCIERS 
SODEXHO holding companies will soon ask 
shareholders to approve the merger of their 
two companies before foe end of 1997. 

The transaction will help to streamline 
SODEXHO ALLIANCE'S ownership structure. 
Pierre Bellon and his children own 64 % of 
BELLON S.A., which controls 67 % of 
FINANCIERE SODEXHO, which in turn holds 
44 % of SODEXHO ALLIANCE. 


* * * 


Sodexho 

ALLIANCE — 

For further information, please contact: Raphael Dubrule- Corporate Secretary 
TeL:+33 (ll 30 85 74 74 - Fax: +33 (1) 30 85 50 05 - Web site: http://www.SQdexliQ.com 



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~rrr*73ra 























































































































PAGE 20 


World Roundup 


FIFA Examines 
Ronaldo’s Move 


socccr Soccer’s world govern- 
ing body. FIFA, said Tuesday that 
Ronaldo, ihe Brazilian striker, 
might have contravened its inter- 
national transfer regulations in his 
proposed shift from Barcelona of 
Spain to Inter Milan of Italy. 

Ronaldo’s lawyers say the world 
player of the year is a free agent, 
having obtained his release from 
Barcelona last Friday when he 
bought out his contract for four 
billion pesetas ($27.6 million). 

But FIFA rules say that a player 
cannot buy out his contract for the 
purposes of obtaining an interna- 
tional transfer and that "buyouts’* 
or withdrawal clauses in Spanish 
contracts are valid for domestic 
transfers only. Moves abroad musr 
be negotiated by the two teams. 

Ronaldo is contracted to Bar- 
celona until 2004. FIFA said it had 
received a complaint from the 
Spanish federation on behalf of 
Barcelona. [Reuters \ 

• Howard Kendall could become 
manager of Everton for the third 
time. Sheffield United. Kendall’s 
current club, said Tuesday that 
talks would take place berween 
Mike McDonald, the United chair- 
man and Peter Johnson, the Everton 
chairman, over Kendall's possible 
return to Goodison Park. [Reuters l 


Interleagne Play Is TV Hit 


baseball In ter league play, 
which lifted attendance in the major 
leagues by 35 percent, was a hit on 
television. The U.S. Nielsen TV 
ratings issued Tuesday showed an 
increase of more than 19 percent 
over the week June 12-18, when 
interleague play began, compared 
with the same week last year. (APj 


Johnson Returns 


athletics Michael Johnson is 
to return to the track Wednesday for 
the first time since he injured a 
thigh muscle in a 150-meter race 
with the Canadian sprinter 
Donovan Bailey on June 1 . Johnson 
will compete in the 400 meters at 
the Paris grand prix. ( Reuters I 


I/" 



. ■ 

.Jt* ■* 1 ’ 


v* 

W; 


Michael Johnson talking with 
the press on Tuesday in Paris. 


rTft Ik ivnRWTVivti.M • \ 

Sports 


d> Ijakfc 


WEDNESDAY, Jir.NE 23, 1997 



The Death of Tennis 

Starless Game Killed by Tiger Woods 


By TonyKomheiser 

ftni Srn-u r 


tpyii« Ifc-fU-i/lImn- Ipn" I liinwIV 

Guillaume Raoux leaping to play a shot against a fellow Frenchman, Arnaud Boetsch. Raoux won, 6-3, 6-4, 6-1 


W IMBLEDON began Monday 
amid ail the traditional pomp 
and ceremony — the long 
lines of people waiting hours to buy 
tickets for the deep green, wooden seals 
of Centre Court, the enticing possibility 
of spotting royals in the Royal Box, the 
overpriced strawberries and cream. 

Wimbledon has always been the most 
special tennis tournament of all. 

It’s too bad tennis is dead now. 

Dead. Mort. Finis. Fuhgeddaboutit. 
Tiger Woods pushed it over a cliff. 
Remember how 20 years ago they 
were building indoor tennis courts all 
over the place, and you’d see the bubbles 


Vantage Point 


Clay Men Learn the Class System 


By Ian Thomsen 

Intcrnuiionul Herald Tribune 


WIMBLEDON, England — The sky 
shifted from shades of blue to gray, like 
one of those mood rings from the 1 970s. 
and as you walked outside the barb-wired 
walls of the Wimbledon grounds people 
were lined up by the hundreds, waiting 
patiently for their bags to be searched. 

The sense of vigilance and the huny 
in which the matches were played Tues- 
day — the hurry because more rain is 
forecast for Wednesday — might have 
seemed obvious to someone Like No. 8 


Wimbledon 


Boris Becker, the three-time champion 
who won his opening match in straight 
sets against Marcos Aurelio Gorriz of 


Spain. Becker has been coming to 
Wimbledon for 14 vears. 


Wimbledon for 14 years. 

Playing on the court next door to him 
was Gustavo Kuerten. 20, the Br azilian 
who was seeded 1 1th because of his 
shocking victoiy in the French Open just 
16 days earlier. Kuerten had never been 
to Wimbledon before. He wore his whites 
as if they’d been laid out on his bed by his 
mother. No one told him, unfortunately, 
nor to put on blue underwear. 

‘ ‘Yesterday 1 put on this cap, because 
I didn't know I could use a bandanna 
with colors,” Kuerten said. By the time 
pby resumed Tuesday in the second set 
of his eventual 6-3, 6-4, 4-6, 1 -6, 6-4 loss 
to Justin Gimelstob of the United States, 
Kuerten had realized his bandanna 
would be allowed. It transformed him 
slightly. After losing the second set, he 
claimed the third and fourth. 

His opponent was practically the same 
age, but they had nothing else in com- 
mon. Gimelstob ’s father owns an in- 
surance and pension consulting group in 
New jCTsey. By the fifth set. Gimelstob 
was sitting in his chair with his eyes shut, 
like someone realizing that the pUot can 't 
get the landing gear down. Kuerten bad 
his chair turned to face the Centre Court 
stadium, a small ivy mountain overlook- 
ing his own tiny Court No. 3. When the 
applause spilled over from Centre Court, 
it sounded like gentle rain. 

Kuerten lost his match with a volley, 
which he wristed in the same way that 


lifelong soccer players try to throw a 
baseball. He missed that volley, double- 
faulted, and the match was over just like 
thaL That is the problem for outsiders. 
The grass is just too quick for them. As 
the match wore on Kuerten seemed to 
learn how to shorten his strokes, jabbing 
instead of throwing full roundhouses 
and hooks, and relying on his serve more 
than any sane clay-court player should. 

“Yeah. I think it was good,” said 
Kuerten of what was supposedly the 10th 
match of his life on grass. “I know there 
are many things to learn. I think I will 
play better, but worse is impossible.” 

in the small court next to Kuerten's 
— separated only by a narrow, crowded 
sidewalk — was Marcelo Rios, the 
No. 9 seed from Chile who won a match 
at Wimbledon for the first tune, beating 
the Indian qualifier Mahesh Bbupathi in 
straight sets. At other tournaments Rios 
has worn black shorts, socks and shoes. 
Now forced to come out in all white, he 
looked as dangerous as Darth Vader in 
flannel pajamas. Staying near the 
baseline he won anyway. 

The result is that some of the world’s 
finest players begin to realize how it 
feels to be British. Wimbledon for them 
becomes a lesson in class structure and 
hopelessness. From where Kuerten sat 
the Centre Court looked like a castle. 
How does someone like him make it 
inside a palace like that? 

The easiest way to make it up the 
social tennis ladder into Centre Court is 
to be British. This is why there is so 
much resentment toward Greg Rused- 
ski, the Canadian-bom-and-ratsed serv- 
er who became eligible to represent 
Britain two years ago and immediately, 
brazenly claimed the support of the 
audience at Centre Court. Some people 
who love and respect the traditions of 
Wimbledon — Pete Sampras, for ex- 
ample — have looked at Rusedski as 
something a self-invited host of the 
world’s finest tournament. 

After finishing off his overnight 7-6 
(8-6), 7-6 (8-6), 6-3 victoiy over No. 7 
Mark Philippoussis of Australia, Rused- 
ski is a threat to play well into next week. 
He is the hardest-serving player left, and 
the crowds are willing to repay his move 
to London with their support After all, 
they just want to enjoy themselves. 


No.l Seeds 
Both Win as 


Others Fall 


The Asstvuied Press 

WIMBLEDON, England— Pete 
Sampras powered smoothly into the 
second round of Wimbledon with a 
straight-set victory Tuesday, while 
the women's top seed, Martina Hin- 
gis. struggled to defeat a qualifier 
with a world ranking of 218. 

Sampras, who has won Wimble- 
don three times, coasted to a 6-4, 6- 
4, 6-2 victoiy over Mikael Tillstrom 
of Sweden. Sampras was broken 
only once and was always in com- 
mand. He served out the match at 
love, finishing with his ninth ace. 

Hingis, repeatedly bouncing her 
racket on the turf in frustration, 
needed six match points before fi- 
nally completing a 6-4, 6-4 victoiy 
over Anne Kremer of Luxembourg, 
an amateur who plays for Stanford 
University. 


spring up like giant mushrooms? You 
don't see those bubbles any more, do 
you? Remember how hard it was lo 
schedule court time? You can get court 
time any time you want now. 

What you can’t get is a tee time. 

Tennis is no longer chic — and chic is 
what propelled iL 

The men with their pastel cable- 
stitched sweaters tied loosely around 
their necks: the women with their Euro- 
mode Ellesse outfits and their diamond 
tennis bracelets: the care they took in 
dressing for the tennis matches. That’s 
done. They’ve moved on. They’re 
hanging around the 16lh green now, 
puffing on cigars. 

Twenty years ago was a high-water 
mark for tennis. Chris Even had em- 


phatically taken over from Billie Jean 
King, and Martina Navratilova was es- 
tablishing herself as Even’s top chal- 
lenger. The men’s draw had entered a 
golden age of star power with Bjorn 
Borg and Jimmy Connors dominating 
die sport — and 1977 was the year 
unseeded teenager John McEnroe went 
all the way to the Wimbledon semi- 
finals. All that lay ahead of tennis was 
blue skies and flat road. 

But we’ve come to the end of that 
road. Tennis is a two-week-a-year sport 
in the United States now: The second 
week of Wimbledon, and the second 
week of the U.S. Open. There’s no 
compelling reason to watch it any other 
time. For what, the Gstaad Open? The 
Rock Creek Park Where The Names 
Advertised On The Bus Disappear In 
The Second Round Classic? 

The winners of the French Open — a 
major no less — were Gustavo Kuerten 
and Iva Majoli. Exactly who are they? 
Principal dancers in the Bolshoi Ballet? 

Here's the problem with tennis: 
There aren't enough stars. 

Do you know who won Wimbledon 
last year? 

Richard Krajicek. 

I rest ray case. 

Let's take the men. Pete Sampras is a 
fine fellow and an excellent player. He’ll 
leave his blood and guts on the court — 
and as we saw in last year's U.S. Open, 
sometimes he’ll leave his lunch out there, 
too. But who is there to rival Sampras 
and ennoble him the way Borg did Con- 
nors and McEnroe did Borg? Boris 
Becker will turn 30 this fall; injuries and 
burnout have reduced Becker after a 
decade of prominence. Andre Agassi, 
who should have been Sundance to 


Hingis hadn’t played a match 
nee losing in the final of the 


since losing in the final of the 
French Open just over two weeks 
ago and lost her serve four times. 

“it’s much harder to play a qual- 
ifier because they are used to play- 
ing matches on grass,” Hingis said. 
“And she’s a hard opponent. I re- 
member i played her in a junior 
tournament and lost from two 
match points.” 

Jonas Bjorkman, who became 
the No. 17 seed after the late with- 
drawal of Thomas Muster, was ous- 
ted by Chris Wilkinson of Britain. 
7-6 (7-5), 0-6, 7-5. 3-6. 6-4. 

The first women ’s seed to fall was 
Kimberley Po, 25. an American 
seeded 13. She lost, 3-6, 7-5. 6-2, to 
Kerry- Anne Guse of Australia. 

Michael Stich. the 1991 cham- 
pion, making his last Wimbledon 
appearance, beat Jim Courier, 7-6 
(7-0). 7-5, 7-6 (7-2). 


A ND DON’T get me started about 
the senior tennis tour. Senior 
golf is bad enough — and those 

f uys aren’t running after golf balls. 

pare me the sight of Bjom Borg in 
middle age. his ponytail graying, la- 
boring crosscourt. 

Perhaps there is a rocket out there 
waiting to be launched, a Tiger Woods, 
a Ken Griffey Jr., a Bren Favre who 
compels you to watch. It would be nice 
if he or she were an American, because 
as tennis drifts globally it runs the risk of 
becoming like track — a sport more 
honored outside the United States than 
in it. An American star, a new Connors, 
a new Even, might regenerate the sport 
in the United States, and prompt it to 
anchor here like the golf tour. 

There doesn't seem to be anything, 
you can do to amplify the game, to jazz 


it up for the X-generation. 
Statistics don’t help e: 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 


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amihcah worn 

EAST DIVISION 

W L PCI. 

BoKtmore 48 23 .676 

New Yort 41 32 -562 

Toronto 33 37 .471 

Boston 33 40 .452 

Detroit 32 39 451 

GB 

8 

14V. 

16 

16 




Cleveland 

37 

33 

J29 

— 

MSmukee 

35 

35 

300 

2 

Qllcago 

35 

37 

-486 

3 

KmraasCIty 

34 

36 

-484 

3 

Minnesota 

34 

39 

M6 

4K 

WEST DIVISION 



Seattle 

43 

31 

381 

— 

Anaheim 

39 

34 

334 

3V1 

TeMS 

36 

36 

300 

6 

Oakland 

30 

46 

J95 

14 

llAnOHM LUOM 


EAST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pci. 

GB 

Atlanta 

47 

27 

-635 

— 

Florida 

43 

30 

389 

3 ft 

Montreal 

42 

31 

375 

4'6 

New York' 

42 

32 

360 

5 

PtlitadeJphta 

23 

49 

319 

23 

CENTRAL OVISION 



Houston 

37 

38 

.493 

— 

Pfltrtuigti 

34 

40 

.459 

J'4 

SI. Louis 

33 

40 

.452 

3 

Gndnnott 

» 

43 

All 

6 

Chicago 

29 

45 

J92 

7% 

WEST DIVISION 



San Frandsto 

a 

32 

36a 

— 

Cotoroda 

39 

36 

320 

3V, 

Los Angofes 

37 

37 

300 

5 

5an Diego 

32 

42 

.432 

10 

f^ORDAVSUHCSCOns 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 



210 1 

OQ 822-7 

16 0 

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000 101 000-2 

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I dn ’jjp/J rivi IfT f, I J teft J J I I I loivv 
I 1 1 it* «h to ,>■»»• S«" <™ JJfiwwwd Wfara 

Mri.vh.fc itartffJHwUHi-, 

la/.mrawOMkndiO** WIN** Cato hunt* 

Ift, .nut 4307 10 

OKC Ail ‘S3 1 41 W03 6I 

fa Mata: *092 29 23 H SS. fa IboUS lYntHntok 1-4004 83-2444. 

OIL. Jnr.4™, .rr HAIM 


Radix, T rant** (?) asdStehtaadt Ogea 
A. Lope/ (71 Plunk (9J, Assemudwr (91 and 
S. Alomar. W— Rodke. 8-5. L-Ggeo. ML 
HRs— M»i_ Moves tal-Cfc*. Thame! (70) 
New Yort 013 mo ooe— 5 7 0 

Detroit Oil on l»-2 4 0 

Cone. M. Rivero (?) and GtnmfcUra Jams 
<6i.TBJi>nK(9)aitaaBBna*a.W— CaK,B- 
3. L— Lira, 4-4. 5v— M. Rhrera (23i. 
HRs— New York. F letter CM. T. Martinez 
1331- Detroit Homofai (61. Easley (9). 

Boston 000 020 500-7 13 9 

Toronto OH 100 300-4 13 I 

sete. Hammond (7), Lccy (7), 0. Henry ffli, 
Uoeumts (0) and Hattafaag; W.WHnnn. 
Quqntnll (71 and a Sutawga. W— Seta 9-5. 
L-W. WUBonte 2-7. 5v-Sbcurob CM. HPs 
-B, Cordero tl 11. Stanley ta. NoetMng (91. 
Bateman 000 000 000-0 4 2 

MUwaufen 400 000 10*— 5 11 0 

Key, Mflls (71 and Webster. DAnvco mid 
Mrtheny. W-O-Amtok L— Kcv. Il l 

HRs— MHwoukca Bumttr (11). 

Kansas City 102 300 000-4 >4 1 

Owafo 012 003 ID* — 7 10 I 

Rosado, R. V*»es tfti. Costal tt* Pttfiartto 
( 0 ). Haney (B) and ModarMncc Drobc*. 
McE troy C4j, t'arrhncr (7h R. Hernando* (91 
and Kmtuivle& Fabreqo* (7). W— Kardina. 
I -0 L— Pichardo, 2 3 . Sv— R. Hernandez (1 71. 
HRs—Aonsns Ov, J. 0dt (121, Kino (141 
OitaMte Cameron tt), Bcfletm. Bowes m 
BfloMvn m 010 OH— I 7 O 

tubs OH OH KHHJ 7 1 

Wdtscm, HweaawD (71, Holtz tW. DeLuda 
(flj and KiMifar. D.OUver- Patterson tfflondl. 
PodnqucjL W— Watson. ^4. L — D OUvcr.3-9. 
Vf-DcLuda (7l. HR— AiMfKtm. Lcyrttz lW. 


oattand 002 020 010-5 8 2 

Senate 230 100 OCX— 4 11 0 

Te*jbedor. C Reyes (61 and Maync* 
Go.WBams 16); Lowe. McCarthy (61. S. 
Sanders (81, Charlton (91 and DaWDswc 
W— Low. 2-2. L-Tetgheder, 24. 

5v— Chartton UU. HRs-OaMand. Gttmbt 
(81- Canseco (171. Stain (11), Beflhom (1). 
NATIONAL LEAOUE 

Qndnatl 000 ooe 000-0 4 I 

MMtiwd no in n * — j b 1 

Smiley, Carrasco (71 and J. Other. 
Tmitonsee (71; BulDnger and Wldger. 
W — Bufinger. 5-6. L— Smiley, 5-9. 

HR— Montreal, Santanoeta (41- 
Atteata 101 0» 000-2 4 I 

New Yort 000 012 SOx-3 10 0 
Smoltz and J. Loptc R.Reedand Hundley. 
W-fi. Reed. 54. L— Smote. 6-7. HR — New 
York. Everett (9). 

Florida 060 010 200-3 I 0 

PMtadetpMa 203 2 W 02*-9 9 1 

HeBfag. Hutton (51, Stentter (7) and C. 
Johnson; Schflllng, Spradlin (fll. BoftoDco (91 
and UeberttioL W— SchflSnq, 94. L -Hotting. 
2-5. HRs— Florida Aloa (91. Ptiflodrtphla, 
DtHJBon (9}. Rolen < 8 J. Amaru ft). 

Olieogo 200 001 000-3 8 0 

St. Leals HO 000 ore— e 4 2 

Jp.Gaurff; and Senate Valenzuela 
Frosartore (7). Pdkovsek (9J and Lamphin. 
W— Je.Ganzttezi 3 - 2 . L— Vttennreta 2 - 10 . 

HR— Chteoga. NlaGroee (61. 

PHIttartfi MO OlO 8 SO -6 3 0 

H Misted OH OH 600-0 2 0 

F. Comma and RendalL- R.Garba uma 
(8), Martin (B>. HudeH (V) and Ausmus. 
W— f. Cordova L— ft. Gorao (1-51. 
HR— Pfltsbur^v J Gotten (61. 

Coteruto 030 000 000-3 7 I 

Las Ang e lo s 500 000 «ht-5 s 0 

ML Dipolo (71 and MimwiHino; Noma HaB 
191 end Piazza. W— Noma 74. L— Rite 5-7. 
Sv-HH O). HRs-Cotandi* CasttHa (19). 
Las Angola Kanos (lSL Mondesi (15). 

Sap Dkgo 410 111 102—11 20 0 

SaaFrandseo 420 080 000-6 12 1 

Cunnane. Brvsfce ( 21 , TlWoirefl (7). 
Bactitter (81, Hoffman (91 and Flaherty; 
Gardner, Poole (61. R. Rodrigue/ (7). D 
Henry (0), Ron W and BcnyhUL W— Brasta. 
1-0. L-Gardner, 8-1 Sv— Hoffman ( 13 ), 
HRs— San Diego, S. Finley 3 (It), Joyner 2 
( 8 ). San Froochco, Javier (S). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS 

G A 8 R H Avg. 
FTHomasQiW 5 9 2ll 51 81 J04 

SManarCte 56 505 36 7t J7I 

WCtoik Ten 40 216 34 74 J52 

I Rodrigue/ Tm 60 390 46 IDO J4S 

Greer Tor 7! 266 49 90 338 

Coro Sea 69 260 5t 88 338 

EMartmetSen 74 271 52 91 334 

M Vaughn Bos 6$ 239 49 80 J35 

JwJfceCle 63 7IB « 73 J3S 

RandmrQe 62 223 35 74 333 

RUNS— Griffey Jr, Seattle, &A Knoblauch. 
Minnesow, 57; B, eWlNoms. New York, 54 ; 
Hattm, Anaheim, S3,- EMarttncr, Seattle. 52. 
A. Rodriavex# Seattte, 51. F. I homos. 
CWcoga 51; Coro. Seattle. 51. 

RBI— Grtttey it, Seottte, Jts T. Mafflnei, 
New Yort. 64; Bette, CTKOgft 6i ToCkirt. 
Detroit 62 Bufinar. ’Seattle. 4ft FThomos. 
Ctiicagat Si McGwire, Oakland, 55. 

HITS— I. Rortnauet Texas, too: G. 
Andcnav And fwim. 92: E. MarBnaz, Seattle. 
*»l; Greer, Tews. 90: Cam. Seattte 88. Griffey 
Jr. semtte 87: By Anderson, Baifanwie, 87. 

DOUBLES — Cora Seattle, 2Sr Sonique 
Toronto. 74, 0. -Neift New York, 24. I. 
Rodriguez, Took. 22 A. Rodrigucc Seane. 
21; R. Daves. Saattfc, 21; Greer. Texas. 31; 
Cirilte MUwoiAea 71 . 


TRIPLES— Jeter, New York. fe 
GartJajiarro, Barton & Vtzquei. Cleveland, fe 
Dmnon, Kansas CHy. 4 B. LHunter, Detroit, 
4 BiOTiltz,M&waiikee. 4 T. Goodwin. Kansas 
City. 4 KnoWouch, Minnesota 4 Oflerman. 
Kansas City. 4 Alicea Anaheim, 4 . 

HOME RUNS— Griffey Jr, Seattle, » 
McGwire, Oakland. 26. T. Martinez. New 
Ywfc. 22 Thome. Oevetand, 3ft MVaughn 
Boston 2ft Buhner. Seattle, 2ft ToCiark, 
Detroit 19. 

STOLEN BASES— fl. LHunter. Detroit 32 
Nixon Taranto. 31; T. Goodwin Kansas CHy. 
29: Knoblauch, Minnesota, 29; VizqueL 
Clevelontt 1ft Durham Chicago. 17; BumHz, 
Mihvaakeev 14. 

PITCHING (9 Deristoas] — RaJolvsoa 
Seattte. 1 1 -I, .91 7, 2.19: Clemens. Toronto. 1 1 ■ 
Z -B4& l.9ft Erickson Baltimore. 10-2. .823. 
354 Mussina BoUimore, 8-2 JOft 3 SO: Key. 
Baltemre. 11-2 784 2S>: Dickson, 
Anaheim. 8-1 727.327; Hentgen Toronto- 8- 
1 727. 161; Cane, New York. 8-2 .727, 221. 

STRIKEOUTS— Conn New York, 147; 
HaJohnsoa Seattte 13ft Demers, Toronto. 
112 Appier. Kansas City, 102 B McDonald. 
Mivvaukee. 92 Mussina Baltimore. 87.- 
Henlgen Toronto, 86. 

SAVES — RaMyers, BattSmare. 25: M. 
Rivera New York, 22 R. Hernandez, 
Oilcnga 171 DeJanes, MNwauhee, 17; 
Wettekmd, Texas. IS, Aguilera Minnesota, 
iSi Toytor, Oohtonl, 13. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS 


Hairston, B-2 .727, 271; Gardner, San 
Francisco, fl-i .727. 350. 

STRIKEOUTS— Sc hWng. PhBodeiphin. 
139. P. JMorttnez. Montreal, 124 AfBenea 
St. Louis, lift Noma Los Angeles, lift K. 
J Brown, Florida 107, Smoltz. Atlanta 9ai 
Sroltlemyre. Sr. Louts, 87; R. Martinez, Las 
Angeles. 87. 

SAVES — Bede S.F. 24 Nea Fla. 1ft Jo- 
Fronav N.Y. 1ft ToWoneH, |_A- 1ft Wa Mm 
Atl.15; BotfalloaPtL 14 Eckersley, S. L, 14 


RUGBY UNION 


RAMCITOUR 

ruesow. m Newcastle. Australia 
A ustrafam BarhariaiK 24 Fmnce 25 

AMtUTMATOOl 

TUESDAY. M NEW PLYMOUTH 
NEW ZEALAND 
ToranaM26> Argentina 10 


SOCCER 



S 

AB 

R 

H 

Avg. 

L Walter Cal 

72 

260 

71 

I1D 

AID 

GwyttaSD 

71 

286 

46 

M3 

-395 

Piazza LA 

70 

247 

42 

87 

J52 

Bia user All 

72 

233 

47 

.81 

■348 

Lofton A« 

67 

2B5 

50 

98 

344 

LonklartStL 

54 

195 

41 

67 

344 

GalomigaCof 

71 

283 

62 

97 

343 

Joyner SD 

58 

201 

29 

66 

328 

BagweilHou 

75 

274 

52 

89 

325 

OferadNYM 

73 

266 

49 

85 

330 


RUNS— L Waften Cotoroda 71; Biggla 
Houston, 62 Gatanaga. Ctfdrodo. 4i Burts, 
CoMrada $4 Ec Young, Colorado, 52; 
Bagwell Houston Sft Lofton, Atlanta, 50. 

RBI— Gatorroga Cotoroda, 79. Bagwek. 
Houston 71; L Walker, Cotoroda 62 Alou. 
Florida 61; CasMa Cotoroda 5ft Kent, Son 
FrancfcOL 54 ClUanes. Atlanta 54 Bichette. 
GateRda. Sd. Gvrpev San Dtega 34. 

HITS— GwYiuii San Oteoa 1 12 L Waftcr. 

Cotoroda 1 1 ft Lotloa Attanta. 9ft GatartDgn 

Cotoroda 97; Blggia Houston, 9ft EcYaunq, 
Cotoroda 9ft Bagwefl, Houston, B9: D. 
Sanders. Cincinnati. 89. 

DOUBLES— Gfudrteta nek. MnnlreaL 77 : 
Bagweft Houston. 2« Mmndnv, 
Phitadelphla 24 L. MWker. Cotoroda 24. 
Bonflta. Ftorida 74 Ctayton. St Loute 22; 
BJgau. Houston, 22. 

TRIPLES— W. Guerrero, Las Angetas. J: 
De. Shclite SL Loute ft Randa PUtsbuigiy 4 
Womack, POtsbwgh. 6 D Sanders. CmorwMt 
4 TucLcr, Anaida, ft ECYoung. Cotoroda s. 

HOME RUNS— BaqwelL Hoviton, 21 L 
Walter, Colorado. 21 - Gflttrroqa, Cotoroda 
71; Ca&Ha Cotoroda, 1ft Hundley. New 
Yortt 17, Butte, Cotoroda 17. Bonds, San 
Frortctota 16 , 

STOLEN BASES— D. Sanders, Cmctoieitr. 
31: Womack. Pittsburgh. 97; O. eShiekb. Si. 
Louis. 27; Ec Young, Cotoroda Ift Lofton. 
Atlanta Jft Ctayton, 5f. LouK »7; LWoflun. 
Colorado. 17. 

PITCHING (9 Oeauaas) — Nwnte 
Altanta ID-1, .909. 374 Estes. San 
Frendsca 9-2 Jit zs« B jjonm, New 
York 12-1 JOft 2.2ft Judea MaalrcoL 8-2, 
AOft 4J4 P, JMarltncL MantreoL 9-1 750, 
1 Mi G. Madmn. Anama 9-i 75a 267 Kite 


•MNUH FWfT DfVZSION 

Atterico Madrid a v Tenerife 3 
FINAL STANDMBO: Real Madrid 92 
points; Barcelona 9ft Departure Coruna 77: 
Real Befis 77. Atterico Madrid 71- Athletic 
Bilbao 67; VoftttfoW 64 Real Soaedad 61 
Tenerife 54 Vafenoo 54 Compesteto S3.- E»- 
ponyol 51; Racing Santander 5ft Zaragoza SO: 
Sporting GJjan 5ft C «Bn Vigo 4ft Ovrttto 4ft- 
Rdvo ValleCflna AS: Extremadura 44 Sevilla 
XX Hercules 41; Lagranes 33. 

UnuUNIAN FIRST DtVIHOM 
Dynamo Kiev z CSKA Kiev 2 
KryvbasKr. RinaDntpro DmpropetrovskO 
Torpedo Zapartzhva a Mciaiurg Zaporuhra 4 
Nyw Ternopii i Ziriur-Nibas Kiravotuad l 
Shakhtar Donetsk 4 Tavno Simferopol 0 
Kremm Kremenaiuk 0. Itarpaty Lviv 1 
FINAL STAND Ma& Dynamo 7ft 
StMkhlar 62; Verakla 58. Dnlpro 5ft karpaty 
52. Tavrra 44- Chormnnrets 42; Mciaium Jl. 
Nyvtt Tetnopil 3ft Zhfca-Ntoas 16; CSX A 2X 
h'ryvbas 31 Piyterpottya 31. Torpedo 29: 
Kremm 24 . Nyva Vamytsya 18 

WORLD YOUTH «KAMMOHMtU> 

IN UALAY3IA. IMD ROUND MIIMtCS 
ON WEDNESDAY 
Uniquay vs United States 
Morocco vs Ireland 
Brazil vs Betqlum 
Franco vs Mexta? 

ON THURSDAY 

Ghana nUiuted Arab Emirates 
Spam vs Canada 
Australia vs Jcpan 
England vs Argentina 


tennis 


Wimbledon 


FIRST ROUND 
WONDI'ISMIU 

Aiendr. Ui. del Lorvjrovn, Czech. 6-Z 6-0 
Huber (7). Cvr. dd I now. Jao 6-1A-3. 
Marimoz not, Spj del Habsudma, Slovak. 
6 - 1 , 6 - 2 . 

Raymond, U.S del Moffluawa.a.64.4-2. 
Baiabansaiifcova Bet det. Beqcicw. Ce*. 6- 
3.6-3. 

Mar«*a Aus.del. Cemi Cz. 7 6 (Ml. 6-7. 
SdUfflz. McCarthy tut, Heth. ad. Farina It. 

J-6.61A-2. 

Kiuqer S JUr dri Dc- Villc.Brta 7-6 17 31. 6 3 


Rlttner, Get. def. Sid at Fr. 7-6 (fl6L o-J 
Coefzer (61. S. Ate, def. Fusm. Fr. 7-6 (17-101. 
4-1. 

Makarova Ruwief. Panova. Rus£4. 4 - 4 . 6-3 
Gusa A list L. del. Po (13), U.S. 34. 7-5. 6-2 
Sanchez Vtoario (8i. Sp. def Wood. Brtt,6-a 
6 - 0 . 

Hingis it). Swliz. def. Kremer, Lux. 6-4 6 a 
B asulu. Inda. del. Suglyama Jap. 6-3. 6-0. 
Dechy, Fr. def. CourTob. Betg 6-7 ( 6 - 81 . 6-1- 
6-Z 

Frorler, U.S. def. Cacic U.S. 7-ft 6-4 
Kourritevo. Russia def. Rubia Ui. 6-1.6-I 
Gaiaisa. IL def. Decriaume-Bafleret Fr.vL 
3-4 6-3. 

Suteva Cz. det. SMdalL Bnt. 7-6(7-41.6-1. 
Sanchez LoreataSp. def. PcrtettLitA-J. o-4 
Cross. Brit. det. Wfld. U.S. 6-4 6-2. 
Appetawns.Betadet.Simpson.Ca6-2J4 60 
Fernandez. U.S. def. O remans. Neth. 7-6 i7- 

51.6- 1 

Gfcm. Ger.defjJnro orate 1 5). R. 5-7. 6-2 >04 

MIM'I UUUli 

Raoux. Fr. def. Boetsch. Fr.. 6-3. 6-4, 6-1. 
Vitaca sp, def. Gaelner. Ger. 7.S.46, 7-6 (7- 
51.74(7-5). 

F rana A 1 g.defDamm.Ci 6 - 7(5- 7)^6Jrf-Z. 
Ftacn. UJ>. def. EDwood. AusiL. 6- 1. 7-6 17- 
41.3-6.6-4. 

Statte. AurtL a et Woodruff. U5. 6-2 6-2 6-4 
Haartiuis. Noth, def . Laieau. Can. 6-1. fr 1 ? - 
6(7-5). 

WoodfertteAusiL def. Paes-lnd-frlT-ii--*- 
FerrelTo (IS), S. Atr. def. Draper. Aart- 6- 7 
(5-7). 3-6, 6-4 ML 7-5. 

Van Scheppuigeri. Neth. def Frombeta 
Auric, 5-7.64 3ft 6-1. 6-4. 

Norman. Swe. del. Herrera. Max. 7re(8re'.e- 

1. 6- 4. 

Praflnc. Fr, del. Chorpenter, Aroentan. S-7. 
W. 75. 6-1 

ClaveL Sp. def. Laoentti Ecu 6-1. 6-* 
Fetteriem. Den. det. Novak. Czech. J -6. 

4 7-6 (7-3), 6- J. 

Goimard. Fr- det. Detoado, Bnl- 6-4, o-t 6-7 
(4-71.6-:. 

Larwiam. AuslL rfet, Doscaot Czech. 6-7‘> 

71.6- 3.6-417 5. 

RikL Czech, dot. Vaceto Czech. 6-1. 6-3. 6-3. 
Aharez. Sg.def.Carisea Den. 6- 7 <A-7i. 3ft 
6-4. 6-1. 6-2. 

Gilbert. Fr det. Taranoo. US. 3-6. 7-ft .’-el’ 

01.6- 4. 

Rusedski Bnt- def. PhtappouWis (H. AiBlL 

7 6 (ftol. 7.6 (B-6) 6-3 

Gfliwfstab. UJ. det. Kuerten (ID. Brant. 4 ' 1 

Becker (8), Ger, def. Gorriz. Sp. 6-1 o-Z, 
CfemcnL Fr. def .Mlfcgaft Bnl. J -ft 7-6 1 ? ' 
74 e-2. 

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7 


Sampras’s Hindi, (reals Tennis like a 
summer job in bis posl- Brooke uni, 
maybe Andre should become a lifeguard. 


Michael Chang? Chang’s game iufi 
large enough. Jim Courier or Michael 


tansiacs don't help explain tennis 
they do baseball: you'll never make 


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large enough. Jim Courier or Michael 
Stich? They’re toast. Goran Ivaniwnc? 
What’s he won? Mark Philippoussis? He 
has Nolan Ryan heal on bis serve, but is 
he more than a one-trick pony? 

It’s Sampras by default. He’s a gen- 
tleman, a champion, a role model. 

But a star 1 ? 

The women's side of the draw i* )n 
worse shape. In the last few- years h has 
been devastated. Navratilova retired 
Monica Seles, who was so carefree and 
blithe, was stabbed. She has returned, but 
she hasn't returned to championship form 
— and she certainly hasn't returned with 
that exuberant Valley Girl personality 
that made her so popular. Jennifer Capri- 
ati, who was supposed to be the next 
Chnssie, had quote teenage problems 
unquote, and barely leaves a footprint in 
tournaments anymore. And now Steffi 
Graf, who was a warrior champion for so 
long even under the burden of her father’s 
sordid life, has a bad knee, and she’ll be 
out for the rest of this year at least. 

That leaves the immediate fate of 
women's tennis resting on 16-year-old 
Martina Hingis — who’s so yoiaig that 
she's named for Martina Navratilova — 
and hoping for the emergence of 16-year- 
old Venus Williams, who so far is better 
known for her beaded hairstyle than her 
game.Thefirsuiinea 16-year-old caused 
a big stir was 1971. when Evert reached 
the semifinals of the U.S. Open as an 
amateur. The American public isn't 
clamoring for Hingis (or williams) the 
way it clamored for Chnssie, with hex 
pigtails and ribbons. Bom Tracy Austin 
through Andrea Jaeger. Graf. Capriati. 
Seles and now Hingis, 16-year-old phe- 
noms have become commonplace. " 


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like they do baseball; you'll never make 
"unforced errors" into earned run av- 
erage. Ir doesn't have the collision of 
football or the speed of hockey or the 
choreography of basketball. And right 
now it doesn't have the cachet of golf. 

Tennis is in a bind. It’s almost prim- 
itive compared to other spons.lt can't 
add a three-point shot, or a penalty box. 
It has to wait for some charismatic star 
to transport ir. That could be tomorrow, 
or after the millennium. In the mean- 
time, get that slow group ahead of me 
off the green. I'm ready to hit. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 199 





SPORTS 


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Brazil Strikes Gold: 
The Next Romario 


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By Rob Hughes 

tmermnumil Heivld Tribun e 

L ONDON — Talent, that most 
precious resource in sport, as in 
most walks of life, is nothing 
without the knowledge, the effort, or 
the instinct, to convert it into achieve- 
ment. 

In soccer, that ultimately means 
goalscoring. And at the World Youth 
Championship being played in Malay- 

World Soccer 

sia, a precocious new predator is 
showing a talent that looks ready for 
the full international stage. 

His name is Martins Adailton. He 
hails from Brazil, and if they keep on 
finding talents like these we may have 
to consider handicapping Brazil to let 
others drink from the World Cup. 

On Sunday in Kuching, Brazil 
hammered South Korea by 10 goals to 
3. Adailton accumulated six of those 
goals, proving himself as elusive as a 
lizard, as deadly as a sniper. 

I don’t think he has any thin g spe- 
cific against Koreans. It is just that he 
has a terrible, delightful, greed. Small 
and slight, exquisitely balanced and 
quick where it counts, he appears 
almost to command time and space. 

Brazilians know where he is coming 
from because they dubbed Adailton 
the new Romario before the tourna- 
ment. He had scored four times in a 
match against Venezuela in another 
10-goal victory in a qualifying match. 

The left foot is ids dominant fin- 
ishing weapon. He uses it like a seal pel. 
with sharp, fine cutting edge. I ike Ro- 
mario. he is cunning at peeling away 
from players trying to mark him, seem- 
ing to possess a sixth sense of the 
precise time to dart right or left, seem- 
ing also to sense hesitation in goal- 
keeper and defenders around him . 

From his low center of gravity, he 
can pivot and nun in graceful seconds. 
Opponents know the No 11 shirt on 
his back is the one to watch, but they 
lose it in a blur and, from all angles, at 
all times, he can strike with efforts 
that seem at once cold and joyous. 

A contradiction in terms? The 
greats scorers often are. Gerd Muller 
was disparaged as a cart horse, a small 
player with chunky, oversized thighs 
and calves. 

Muller struck 628 goals for Bayern 
Munich, and 68 in 62 matches for 
Germany. He never could explain it. 
“I have this instinct for knowing 
when a defense is going to relax, or 
when a defender will make a mis- 
take," he said. * * Something inside me 
said Gerd go this way, Gerd go that. I 
don't know what it is." 

. Watching the new boy from Brazil. 

1 suspect Adailton obeys the inner self 
die way Muller did. the way Romario 
does. 

For sure, the South Koreans are still 
trying to fathom where he went, and 
these are Ihe youths being built to co- 
host die 2002 World Cup with honor. 
They'D ieam only that Adailton is 

S our everyday opponent They’D 
j the video, bur if they or anyone 
else woxks out a way to counteract 
that left foot. I’ll be surprised 
Two of Sunday’s goals were pen- 
alties, struck with seamless, nerveless, 
accuracy low to the goalkeeper’s left 
Another came from a devastating run. 


a rolled shot from an acute angle. 

Then there was a sweeping mm, an 
instant shot, and. saving the best for 
last, he treated the few fans in the 
Sarwak Stadium to two pieces dc re- 
sistance. For goal number five. 
Adailton was positioned in a crowded 
goamouth, his back to the neL He was 
men, yet aware. The ball broke to him 
and, with the cheek of a street urchin 
picking a pocket, he flicked that hall 
with his left heel through his own less 
and across the line. D 

It got better. After having a headed 
goal ruled offside, the little man 
lingered once more with his back to 
the Korean goal. He was 13 yards 1 1 1 
meters) out when the ball came; he 
controlled it high on his chest, used 
one delicate touch of hjs superb left 
Foot to lob the ball gently over his 
righLshoulder, and swiveled to volley 
it into the far corner of the net 

The consummate strike: Control, 
turn, shoot and no mercy. 

Adailton is on his way. He has to 
negotiate the stride from youth to 
manhood, to mature without getting 
swollen headed, to make the right 
choices when the army of agents, 
inevitably heading his way like a ants, 
makes its offers. 


M ILES AWAY, in Bolivia, 
Ronaldo and Romario will 
hear the drum beating for 
their young countryman. Ronaldo is 
safe barring injury or prolonged loss 
of form if and when his transfer from 
Barcelona to Intemazioaale of Milan 
is concluded. 

Romario. thought to be incompar- 
able for his physique and the variety of 
his inventive opportunism at the last 
World Cup, is making a comeback 
after allowing the lure of the beach 
and nightlife to take away his gift. 

Right now, coach Mario Zagalio 
would not swap Romario for the boy 
Adailton. He needs die older man to 
coax and coach Ronaldo; he trusts the 
dram temperament of Romario be- 
cause be has been to the final and 
won. 

But what a reserve. What a prospect 
if Romario’s vulnerable concentration 
on the Beautiful Game wanders anew. 
Brazil could turn up for the World Cup 
in Fiance a year from now with Ron- 
aldo. 21 , and Adailton. 20, as a duo the 
world would fear and envy. 

Adailton ’s timely rise has two ben- 
efits for the coach. He can use it to put 
pressure on Romario to keep justi- 
fying his place or be can bring on the 
latest kid from the goalscoring block. 
From here, it looks a thrilling choice. 

For wherever man, and increas- 
ingly woman, plays soccer, the hunt 



< 1|.- ■ -ni'-i: I, ... >■, . •• 

The Yankees' David Cone delivering a pitch in Detroit. He allowed the Tigers only four hits and struck out 16. 

From High School to NBA High Life 


ference between the sexes when it 
comes to the sport, and Germany’s 
Martina Voss celebrated her 100th 
cap by scoring her 21st international 
goal, against Denmark on May 27. 

She will seek more in the fourth 
Women’s European Championship in 
Norway and Sweden from this week- 
end. Voss is a competitor, but two 
Italians, Carolina Morace, with 101 
goals in 145 games, and Elizabeth 
Vignotto, 106 goals in HO games, are 
the queen of goal scoring. 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London 


By Eric Pugh 

UJiftiwjgwn Post Sen u «• 

DURHAM, North Carolina — Tracy 
McGrady drives a new $47,000 Lexus 
sport-utility vehicle, he has hired an 
agent to represent him and he recently 
signed a $12 million sneaker endorse- 
ment contract. Wednesday night, as the 
only high school player entering this 
year's NBA draft, ne probably will be 
introduced by the league's commission- 
er. David Stem, to a worldwide tele- 
vision audience as one of the first 15 
players selected. 

The soft-spoken 6- foot-8 -inch (2.03- 
meter) 1 8-year-old forward from Mount 
Zion Christian Academy enjoys his 
newfound celebrity status. 

He accommodates almost all inter- 
view requests and, after his first formal 
autograph signing session last month, 
he admitted to being as excited as the 
high school students who jammed a 
small auditorium for the event. 

But McGrady understands the rea- 
sons his world is changing with dizzy- 
ing speed: He is blessed with outstand- 
ing skills on the basketball court. During 
a one-week camp last summer, he dom- 
inated players with bigger reputations 
and catapulted from a virtual unknown 
to being ranked among the nation's elite 
players. And he went to Mount Zion. • 

“If I didn’t come to Mount Zion, I 
might still be getting into trouble some- 
where back in Florida," McGrady 
said. 

Aubumdale, Florida, a rural town 
near Tampa, is McGrady’s home. He 
achieved basketball success there, av- 


eraging more than 20 points a game 
during his junior year for Aubumdale 
High, but he also found trouble as easily 
as he now finds his way to the hoop. 

“I was doing the wrong things a lot of 
times, and with the wrong people." 
McGrady said. 

Acting on a tip from a friend who 
coaches high school basketball in Flor- 
ida. Mount Zion’s coach, Joel Hopkins, 
visited Aubumdale last summer and 
brought McGrady north to a boarding 
school with 200 students and a strict 
disciplinary and Christian code. Mc- 
Grady joined a team that, according to 
most college recruiting analysts, in- 
cluded at least 10 players with major 
potential. 

McGrady and his teammates bene- 
fited not only from the intrasquad com- 
petition but also from the school’s daily- 
regimen, which included organized 
study halls, housekeeping chores, a 
school dress code and tight limits on 
phone use and socializing. 

* ‘I became a Christian once I got here, 
and I’m not saying I’m perfect, but 1 
started changing in positive ways. ’ ' Mc- 
Grady said. 

Last season he posted sterling per- 
game averages — 27 5 points, 8.7 re- 
bounds and 7.7 assists — and was 
named national high school player of 
the year by USA Today. 

McGrady has showcased his skills 
the last few weeks while zigzagging 
across the country, accompanied by 
Hopkins, to interview and work out for 
10 NBA teams. 

McGrady said it had been “great” 
meeting such NBA legends as Larry 


Bird, the Indiana Pacers’ new coach, 
and Jem- West, the Los Angeles Lakers’ 
president, both of them former stars on 
the court. 

.And many NBA officials have been 
equally impressed with McGrady. The 
Toronto Raptors' owner. Isiah Thomas; 
said he hoped to select McGrady with 
the ninth overall pick and, according to 
Mount Zion coaches. Bird and the 
Pacers* organization were “very 
pleased" with McGrady’s workouts. 

Despite the recent success of Kevin 
Garnett, a Minnesota Timberwolves* 
forward, and Kobe Bryant, a Laker 
guard, both of wham skipped college to 
enter the league, other NBA team of- 
ficials remain cautious about whether 
McGrady can jump to the NBA and 
contribute immediately. 

The Denver Nuggets’ general man- 
ager. Allan Bristow, who saw McGrady 
play in March and interviewed him this 
month, told the Rocky Mountain New s: 
“You have to be impressed with his 
athletic ability, it’s just incredible. But 
he’s not quite fundamentally sound. De- 
fensively. I think he's son’ of clueless, 
and he’s expected to be clueless, be- 
cause he just hasn't been taught.” 

McGrady had the chance to Ieam in 
college. He was recruited by hundreds 
of colleges, with Kentucky and Florida 
State leading the pack. 

But “I did what I fell was best for my 
family and me at the time." McGrady 
said. 

“Some players go four years of col- 
lege and are not in the position I’m in 
now to be drafted, so I thought it was 
best to go now." 


Cone Rings Up 
16 Strikeouts 
As Yankees 
Down Tigers 


Tui .-tJTii liiteJPrm 

One after another, the Detroit Tigers 
walked back to the ducoui after empty 
at-bats against the Yankees’ pitcher 
David Cone. 

"I saw those guys shaking their 
heads." said the Yankees’ catcher, Joe 
Girardi. 

The Tigers were clueless against 
Cone, who struck out 16 in eight innings 


Baser all Roundup 


Monday night to lead the New York 
Yankees to a 5-2 victory in Detroit. 

“1 don’t know how’ you can pitch 
much better." Girardi said. 

Cone (S-3) allowed just four hits, 
including homers by Bob Hamelin and 
Damion Easley, and walked two. 

“Over the last three games, this is the 
best l*ve e\ er felt in my career as far as 
real good command and know mg what 
I*m doing out there." Cone said. 

Cecil Fielder, making his second trip 
to Tiger Stadium since Detroit traded 
him to the Yankees last July 31. hit a 
three -ran homer to back Cone. 

White Sox 7, Royals 6 In Chicago. 
Albert Belle homered and robbed Chili 
Davis of a possible go-ahead homer in 
the ninth. Jeff King and Jay Bell each hit 
two-run homers for Kansas City. 

Twins 7, Indians 2 Man Lawton had 
four hits and Brad Radke iS-5 1 won his 
fourth straight start as Minnesota beat 
the Indians In Cleveland. 

Rad Sox 7, Blue Jays 6 Mike Stanley 
and Tim Naehrine hit consecutive 
homers in a five-nin seventh inning for 
Boston at Toronto. 

Brewers 5, Orioles 0 Jeff D’Amico 
pitched a four-hitter for his fust career 
complete game a> Milwaukee sent 
Jimmy Key to his second straight loss. 

Antals 1 , Hangars O In Arlington. 
Texas. A I len VV at son pitched six shutout 
innings and Jim Leyriiz homered as 
Anaheim won its fifth straight. 

Mariners 6, Athletics 5 Jay Buhner 
and Edgar Martinez drove in two runs 
apiece as Seattle won its eighth straight 
home game. 

In the National League: 

Mats 3, Braves 2 Rick Reed beat the 
1996 Cy Young Award winner. John 
Smoltz.’ and Carl Everett hit a two-run 
homer as New York beat Atlanta. 

padres 11, Giants 6 Sieve Finley 
homered three times and Wally Joyner 
hit two homers as San Diego won in San 
Francisco. 

Dodgers 5 , Rockies 3 Eric Karros and 
Raul Mondesi homered on consecutive 
pitches at Dodger Stadium, and Hideo 
Nomo allowed five hits in eight innings. 

Pirates 6, Astros o Francisco Cordova 
pitched a two-hitter in Houston for his 
second career shutout, and Jermaine Ai- 
lenswonh hit a bases-loaded triple in the 
eighth as Pittsburgh won. 

Expos s, Reds o Jim Bui linger pitched 
a four- hitter in Montreal for” his fourth 
career shutout and the Expos won for 
the 13ih time in 16 games. 

Phil Bern 9, Marlins 3 ScotT Rolen, 3 
rookie, homered and drove in five runs, 
and Curt Schilling (9-6) struck out a 
career-high 13 as Philadelphia stopped 
an eight-game losing streak. 

Cubs 3, Cardinals o Jererai Gonzalez 
pitched a four-hitter for his first com- 
plete game in the major leagues as vis- 
iting Chicago stopped a five-game los- 
ing streak. 


















PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. JUNE 25. 1997 



OBSERVER 


When Money Died 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK - There 
came a time when all the 
money had been made. Many 
committed suicide. The notes 
they left were all much alike. 

They had lived to make 
money, they said. Now that 
all the money bad been made, 
there was nothing left to live 
for. 

Others tried to change their 
lives. Alvin O. Otis, who had 
made 5700 billion and was 
the second-richest man in 
Moline, Illinois, took a world 
cruise aboard his personal 
ocean liner. 

He came back a total wreck, 
having gone berserk and 
rammed his vessel into Tahiti. 
This had caused considerable 
damage to the island and sev- 
eral hundred of the guests he 
had invited to cruise. 

Voyagers who made it 
home with their wits intact 
described a floating night- 
mare. Otis's passengers were 
people who had passed their 
lives talking about killings in 
Manhattan real estate and 
mergers of multinational cor- 
porations. 

Now, with all the real-es- 
tate killings complete and all 
the multinationals merged in- 
to the one supermuliinational, 
called “the omninationai." 
they found themselves at sea 
with nothing to talk about. 

Deterioration set in quick- 
ly. Otis had ordered his ocean 
liner built twice the size of the 
Titanic. Some of the passen- 
gers, desperate for something 
interesting to do. pied to get 
up a mutiny. They planned to 
seize the ship and sail it to the 
iceberg belt in the North At- 
lantic to see whether its size 
would make it sink twice as 
fast as the Titanic, or only half 
asfasL 

This scheme was aban- 
doned. Nobody on board 


knew how to steer an ocean 
liner or how to find the North 
Atlantic. All they knew was 
how to make money, and now 
the money was all made. 

Meanwhile, back at die land 
all the juice began to seep out 
of life. It became impossible to 
assemble a Congress in Wash- 
ington. The people who made 
money did not need Con- 
gresses anymore now that all 
the money was made. 

People of limited means 
who had sustained an interest 
in life by dreaming of some 
day making money became 
listless. Many became surly 
toward employers they had 
served for years despite being 
denied pension rights, health 
insurance and overtime pay. 

With ail the money made, 
they had lost the incentive to 
put up with corporate malar- 
key and stoned listening to 
Verdi operas on the job and 
reading the novels of Thomas 
Mann. 

□ 

Gradually an overpower- 
ing sense of pointlessness 
began to affect American life. 
Esau McGraw. the third- 
richest man in Sylacauga, 
Alabama, bought Staten In- 
land. This he covered with his 
great Tombdome. Under the 
dome he placed the Great Pyr- 
amid of Cheops; the Sphinx 
and Napoleon's and Grant's 
tombs he put along the In- 
terstate highway leading to 
his own mausoleum. 

McGraw had wanted the 
Parthenon among his mortu- 
ary trophies, but Michael Eis- 
ner. who owned the city of 
Athens, planned to convert 
the Parthenon into a summer 
cottage where he could while 
away the hours wondering 
how Socrates would have ad- 
justed to the trials of living in 
an age when all the money 
was made. 

New York Times 5rn /iv 



Boz Scaggss The Train Is Picking Up Speed 


By Mike Zwerin 

tiucrniuivnal Herald Trilxinr 


P ARIS — Hoping for a more receptive 
audience, William Royce (Boz) Scaggs 
took his band The Wigs from Dallas to 
London, which was “Swinging” back then, 
in the '60s. 

Not for white Texans playing black 
rhythm and blues music, however. The 20- 
year-old singer/songwriter/guitarist went in- 
to Continental orbit on his own. He busked 
and performed what he calls “folksy-bluesy 
stuff' in romantic European basements. He 
spent a friendly winter in Stockholm. 

When spring came, he set off on the hippie 
trail to Afghanistan. When he got back ro 
Stockholm he found he liked it even more. 

He might still be there if he had not received 
a phone call from his old Dallas high school 
and University of Wisconsin buddy Steve 
Miller, who needed a hand forming a band 
plainly named The Steve Miller Band. 

Considering the collective far-out stare of 
mind at the lime, it took a lot of originality 
and some courage to give such a straight 
eponymous name to a collection of freaks. It 
turned out to be a very good band indeed. 

The 1968 album “Sailor" was, along with 
the Beatles' “Sgti Pepper." one of the first 
recordings to use the recording studio as an 
instrument. It was also one of the first to 
structure a string of rock songs as a suite. 

"Sailor" never sold ail > that well but it 
influenced a lot of influential people, and the 
numbers were good enough to support a 
two-year tour. As Miller said: “We played 
every psychedelic dungeon in the world." It 
would not be the last very good influential 
band Boz Scaggs had a band in forming. 

He went out into the studios as a solo act in 
the '70s and recorded his albums “My 
Time" and "Slow Dancer" at the famed 
Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. 

He learned the metier of songwriting, although he never got 
over the blank-page syndrome. To this day he'enjoys having 
wrinen more than he enjoys writing. 

He called the drummer Jim Kellner to lay down some 
grooves in 1976. Kellner had played with the Beatles, he was 
always busy. But he told Scaggs about three mainline studio 
players who, if he could get the three of them together as a 
rhythm section, would be “really special" — David Paich, 
David Hungate and Jeff Porcaro, slick young session players 
in Los Angeles, later they became superstars together as the 
heart of a band called Toto. 

Helping Scaggs record his first hit album, "Silk De- 
grees." they taught him how to avoid rehearsals (Scaggs 
absolutely detests rehearsals). They were “fantastic tooTs" 


Scaggs on his new album: “People don’t mind saying, ‘My wife enjoys it.’ 

— pan of a large pool of young musicians in Los .Angeles 
who took pride in lending themselves to whatever kind of 
music you wrote. If he had a song that required Latin or funk 
feel, he could call these guys in and they'd complete it for 
him. 

Or rather with him. They were boss collaborators: “They 
were all ears. You gave them a tape and a lead sheet and they 
took them home and by the time they come into the studio on 
Monday morning they had it completely down." 

They did not like leaving their comfy, cozy and 
remunerative air-conditioned scene open for the compe- 
tition. But they were young, all of them under 21. and they 
enjoyed going out for two weeks every so often to get a taste 
of the freedom of the road. Scaggs allowed them sovereign 


power as a rhythm section for rhe first 
rime. 

“Silk Degrees" kept spinning off hil 
singles one after another — vongs like 
“Lowdown" and "What Can I Say.**’ 
Paich- Hungate and Porcaro phyeii with 
Scaggs “long enough to get their adult per- 
sonality together. From the beginning they 
had a very clear idea of what they wanted to 
be and do. They began to write their own 
songs. They- became Toto. It was pre- . 
destined." Scaggs adds. 

Scaggs became a seasoned slur under his 
own name. (You have to admit it's a name 
that's hard to forget. > He hired good mu- 
sicians and an efficient organization includ- 
ing managers, publicists and roadies. You 
heard his nits and interviews w ith him on the 
radio. But he felt an increasing laid of 
responsibility. Success was "like ar. osu-of- 

control train.” 

By this time he had twosons. age 1 and 2. 
He thinks that "nobody has any idea of what 
an effect having children has on your life 
until it happens to them. With me it « as very 
profound.'' 

He and the sons’ mother divorced. He 
wanted to stay even closer to the boys 
Fortunately, w T ith all of the bus spinning 
off. he did not really need to work. Bui 
his confidence got shaky. W as he not mak- 
ing music because there was no more in 
him to make? He might very well need 
his career again one day and he had 
seen other guys lose their wealth and 
their cool through drugs, lack of motivation, 
laziness or bad luck and then find them- 
selves unable to make more when they 
needed it. 

After laying back for most of the ’ 80s. he 
"smarted to get in touch with myself again. 
Music came back into me. I started to enjoy 
it like when 1 was a kid. Basically, that's 
where I am now. The train is picking up 

speed again."’ 

The title of his new album. “Come On Home." released 
in April on Virgin, is apt. He has come home to rhythm und 
blues: “The response to this album is different from any- 
thing I’ve ever done. Pecrole don’t mind saying 'my wife 
enjoys it.* Rhythm and blues seems to be kind of a great 
equalizer. It's back to basics, just the song and the singer. 
People feel comfortable with it" 

In his 50s now, he has come to realize that picking up 
music again is actually not all that big a deal: "I had enough 
of a career going for 10-15 years that I could come back in 
without too much difficulty. The way it works in the music 
world is ‘He did it once, he can do it again. We can put a little 
money on that horse.' ’* 



PEOPLE 


T HE couturier Paco Rabanne says 
1 that Claudia Schiffer may be 
beautiful but she’s hopeless as a mod- 
el. "She is beautiful but she doesn’t 
know how to walk down a catwalk," 
the designer told the newspaper Le 
Temps in Tunis. According to the 
avant-garde designer, “a beautiful 
model isn’t necessarily a beautiful 
woman but a woman who knows how 
to move down a catwalk, who knows 
how to walk, who has style." Ra- 
banne was in Tunis as a member of the 
of the 1997 Mediterranean Top 
els. A total of 35 aspiring models 
from 1 1 countries took part. The cou- 
turier jeaa-Charles de Castelbajac 
chaired the jury. 

□ 

Robert De Niro has married 
Grace Hightower, a former flight 
attendant, in a private ceremony in 
New York. It was De Niro’s second 
marriage and Hightower's first. 

□ 

Sting accidentally left his favorite 


guitar behind on a luggage cart at the 
Frankfurt airport, and an airport work- 
er. Ulrich Mueller, saved the day by 
delivering the guitar 30 minutes before 
Sting was to go on stage at a concert in 
Korbach. north of Frankfurt. 

□ 

Luke Perry, the former "Beverly 
Hills 90210" star, and his wife. Min- 
nie, are the parents of a baby boy. Jack 
weighed in at 8 pounds, 8 ounces (3.9 
kilograms). 

□ 

James Bond’s 1963 Aston Martin 
has been stolen from a Florida airport 
hangar. Even in well-to-do Boca 
Raton, where luxury imported cars 
dor the roads, the flashy silver road- 
srer with right-hand drive, machine 
guns, bullet-proof windows and ejec- 
tion seat would likely be easily spot- 
ted. "We suspect that it could be for a 
private collection of some son," a 
police spokeswoman, Lori Croy, 
said. "It wouldn’t be a vehicle you 
could drive on the road without being 


noticed." The Aston Martin DB5, 
was used by 007 in early Bond 
movies, including "Gold Finger." 

□ 

Almost a decade after the release of 
the ground-breaking “Who Framed 
Roger Rabbit,' ’ where toons and real- 
life actors cavort together on screen, 
Disney is mulling a sequel to the film. 
According to sources quoted by Daily 
Variety, me new movie will actually 
be a prequel, the rabbit’s journey to 
fame and stardom on the sil ver screen. 
The original film, directed by Robert 
Zemeckis and produced by Steven 
Spiel berg, cost S55 million and 
brought in S4Q0 million. 

□ 

Michael Jackson braces for a 
series of four French concerts starting 
this week, part of his bid to stay on top 
of the charts by tapping markets out- 
side the United States. His first show 
in France is set for Wednesday in 
Lyon, where the venue was switched 
to a 30,000-seat football stadium be- 


cause of insufficient ticket sales in the 
50,000-capacity park where it was 
initially scheduled. Two further con- 
certs are planned in Paris for this 
weekend, one already sold out, and a 
last is to be held in the southern city of 
Nice in late July. 

□ 

Prime Minister Antonio Gu- 
terres of Portugal, who was in New 
York to address the United Nations, 
took time out to pay tribute to a queen 
from his country — or at least half a 
queen. Accompanied by Secret Ser- 
vice agents, Guterres traveled by heli- 
copter to the Taliix foundry in 
Beacon, New York, for the unveiling 
of the top half of a sculpture of Cath- 
erine of Braganza. She was the Por- 
tuguese princess who married King 
Charles II of England and for whom 
the New York City borough of 
Queens is named. The statue by 
Audrey Flack, which is now in clay, 
will be recast'in bronze and will sit on 
the waterfront ar Hunters Point in 
Queens. 




MULTIPLICITY — Yoko Ono, artist and the widow of John Lennon, in the Lonja 
Art Hall in Alicante, Spain, where she is showing her exhibition, “In trance." 


I * % 

nr I " 






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