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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 




enbune 


fhc World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Jacques Cousteau, 
Explorer, Is Dead 

■Popularizer of Oceanography 
ffhs Inventor and Film^ker 


By Gerald Jonas 

ffev Vurk Tones Service 


!nes-Yv»p>>KtMu, the Frendi oceanographer who 

i more of the Earth ’s surface to human e^^VOT than 
aay e»alorec m history , died Wednesday in Paris. He was 87 

year old. • 

Mr. ODosteu succumbed to a heart attack at home his 
wkkfw, Fiai^e, ^ She said that be had been sufTerine 
from a umg inlectioo and had developed complications. 

Mr. Cousteau, who held no scientific degree, a 

Iiousebold name duough the enormously popular hw irc 
films and television programs that documented more than 
- four decades of undersea explorations, 
i His first took, “The Silent World,” sold more than 5 
juiltioD copies m 22 langoages. A film of the same nam.. 
witti the yoi^ Louis Malle as one of the photographers’ 
woman Academy Award for best documentary in 1^7 die 
first of three Oscars diat his films received. ' 

Mr. Cousteau’s adventurous spirit and mastery of the 
media also drew the envy of more conventional ocean- 
Q^^ibers, some of whom questioned the scientific value of 
Ins leseardi, the authenticity of his film footage, and even 
his record as a pioneering environmentalisL 

See COUSTEAU, Page 10 




No. 35.55? 


es Mir Station 


'The Aw o i i' it h i hwrhe Cooscai Soriay 

Jacques-Yves Cousteau held no scientific degree, 
but he became a household name worldwide. 


Power Supply 
Is Cut in Half 

The AsstvbOeJ Pregit 

MOSCOW — An unmanned caigo 
ship crashed into the Russian space sta- 
tion Mir during a practice docking on 
Wednesday, causii^ a serious oxygen 
leak and damaging the station's power 
supply. The two Russians and one 
Am^can abcxird were not believed to 
be in immediate danger. 

Hie power su|^ly was cut b>' half, 
raising concerns about whether the 
aging station had enough power to re- 
main stable and hold to the right angle in 
space. The NASA astronaut Jerry Lin- 
enger, a physician who returned from 
Mir in May, called the accident “very 
serious.” 

A Soyuz spacecraft is always docked 
to the Mir, so the crew can quickly return 
to Earth if their lives are in danger. 

The station's crew heard a hissing 
sound and felt air pressure fall afier the 
collision, then rushed to shut the hatch 
to one of Mir’s six modules. That mod- 
ule contained gear for many scientific 
experiments that may now be lost. 

Ihe crash was die latest in a string of 
pFoblemsonthe ll-year-old Mir, which 
was designed to last five years. 



Dr V.-MUcdl^rn 

The Russian cosmonaut Vasili Tsibliyev, right, making the astronaut 
Michael Foale comfortable when the American was aboard Mir in Mas. 


Breakdowns have led to friction be- 
tween Russian and U.S. space officials, 
with tile Americans questioning the sui- 
tion's safely. The Russians iiuisi that 
Mir can operate safely through 1 999. 

"The bonom line is we've got the 
leak in the module sealed off, ^d the 
pressure is holding.’' Dr. Linenger said. 


“But there are big power problems anc 
attitude control problems.” 

The power shortage will force as- 
tronauts to do everything in slow motior 
to conserv’e oxygen, Dr. Linenger ad- 
ded. The lemperaluie m the dvkenec 

See SPACE, Page 10 


ffew Whitewater Twist: Prosecutor Looks Into Clinton^s Sex Life 


By Bob Woodward 
and Susan Schmidt 

Wathingtan hui Service 


" .WASHINGrON — Investigators for die in- 
daieadaA oonnset examining the Whitewater 
amdr have questioned state troopers in recrat 
OKHiths stout thdr knowl^e of any extramar- 
ital relationships Bill Clinton may have had 
while he was governor of Arkansas, say two of 
troops who were questioned and sources 
..se-tt) the investigation. 

The' FBl.agoats and prosecutors also have 
r j uestiooed a number of women whose names 
* are bton mcatiooed in connection wifo Mfr. 




Qinfon in the past the sources said. The sources 
said that the extensive interviews were part of an 
effort by Kennedi Starr’s office to fmd close 
Clinton associates in whom he may have con- 
fided and who might be able to provide in- 
framation about die veracity of sworn statements 
Mr. Clinton has made in the course of the White- 
water investigation. 

The troopers said investigators asked them 
about 12 to IS xvomen, inclu^g Paula Corbin 
Jones, a former Adcansas state enmioyee who 
has filed a civil lawsuit against Mr. Clinton 
alleging that he sexnaJly harassed her in 1991. 
Mr. Cfixuon has dmied die allegaiimi and has 
said he does not recall ever meting Ms. Jones. 


A ^fiiite House ^kesmao and a private at- 
torney for Mr. Clinton said Tuesday that they had 
no immediate comment, but Democratic Sen- 
ators and others said Wednesday that Mr. Starr 
bad gone too far in his investigation. Page 10. 

The nature of the questioning marks a sharp 
departure from previ^ avenues oi inquiry in 
the three-year-old investigation, whkh ^an as 
an examination of the Whitewater land devel- 
opment project Mr. Clinton and his wife, Hil- 
1^, first invested in the land deal in 1978 with 
James and Susan McDougaL 
Until now, however, what has become a wide- 
ranging investigation of many aspects of Mr. 
Clinton's governorship has largely steered clear 


of questions about his relationships with women 
in Arkansas that arose during the 1992 campaign 
and the first two years of his presidency. 

The tFOGpers, Roger Perry and Ronald An- 
derson, both of whom served on the gox’emor's 
security detail, said the questioning began this 
spring. They said that in fjrcvious interviews 
investigators had said explicitly that they had no 
interest in Mr. Clinton’s personal life. 

‘’in the past. I thought they were trying lo set 
to the bottom of Whitewater,” Mr. Pnry saiefin 
an interview. “This last Ume. 1 was left with the 
imjuession that they wanted to show he was a 
womanizer.” 

He added: “All they wanted to talk about was 


women." He said he was inierxieu'ed in April 
for more than one and a half hours by an 
agent and an attorney in Mr. Starr’s office. 

Mr. Perry, a 21 •year veteran of the Arkansas 
force, said he was ^ked about the most intimate 
details of Mr. Clinton's life. “Hiey asked me if 1 
had ever seen Bill Clinton perfonna sexual act,” 
Mr. Perry said. “The answer is no.” 

Mr. Perry said he was asked, ”We would like 
to know if BUI Clinton had any contact with these 
women und if he had any extramarital affairs 
with any of them.” He said he told the in- 
vestigatem that he and other troopers either took 

See CLINTON, Page 10 


ir Prods Sinn Fein 
Nonviolence Pledge 

for All-Party Ulster Talks Is Unveiled 


By Wairen Hoge 

fork Times Service 


LONDON. — Prime Minister Tray 
r Blatrunveiled anew plan Wednesday to 
'j^L-lioid itil-pariy fieace talks and simul- 
?£-laneou8 n^iotiatioiis on disarmament in 

Nortiiein Ireland and chadknged Sinn 

Fein, the ptdilkal wing of the Iririi 
Rmblican-Aimy, to make an “ab- 
soiiite'.’ commitment to nonviolence so 
it could particqiale. 

‘ -The joint proposal of the govon- 
i^ts of Brnaio and Ireland sets a 
timetaUe for tiie process, b anning in 
Septemberand eiuling in I^y, and re- 
' sto^ a mechanism for treating the sen- 
sitive matter of weqNms handover that 
fonner Prune Minister John Major had 
rejected and that Sinn Fein bad de- 
' mandedbeputinpUceasaconditionftt^ 
considering a cease-fire. 

Citing ^Tevulskm and outrage right 
- across the world” over the IRA kiUm^ 

' of two policemen in the town of Lingan 

00 June 16. Mr, Blair said that patience 
with the organization’s refusal to aban- 
dra violoice was running out 

- “Whatever Sinn Fein now say OT do. 

1 am detem&ied to move ra,” he told a 
p«*'*f*^ and sftifflmn Hftnsft i?f 

“Sion know what th^ have to do. 
•'nKxe is no shred of justification for 
can^g bn^s'tbey are now.” 

‘ .Jne princi^ new element in the 
paftirag^ jg agreement to set up si- 
nmltaneons ra riigaimament and 
pmce. Under so-called paralle] dect^- 
niis^Miing,tbe IRA andrival Protestant 
•pirainil iiaiy groups wtxild give up fh^ 
enns in closely monitraed stages wbfie 
main on a lasting political- 
setdanent crarinued. 

. : Whqt.this was proposed in Januaiy, 
1996 hy.Ceoige Mitchell, the fbirotf 
Boiled Stawy fiMiamr who is the diair- 
Juan the year-old peace Mlcs,-Mr. 
Major said rt was unaocep^le a^ 
Ptii^'instBad ra the IRA to gjve its 
anns as a.cpnditira for Sinn Fein en- 
ittiog the tails. Sinn Fein has contended 

that army sbould to given up only when 
^'&al settfaw^ » readied. 

- -Thep1*q wMi W set np an indqieadeot 


commission to make prc^osals for dis- 
arming titt gnecrilla forces and then 
monitor its iamlementation. A plenary 
meeting would be cravraed every two 
montiis to review pro g res s . Any overall 
' i^reement would be pat to a referendum 
in Northern Irelaiid and to a vote in 
ParliameoL 

Mr. Biair has moved vigorously in his 
first weeks in office to take up the search 
for an accord in Norfbero Ireland, where 
sectarian violence has claimed more 
than 3,200 lives dnra 1969. 

His government was deqily dis- 
mayed ^ the murders in Lmgan, since 
they came at a time when it had restored 
the first contact with Sinn Fein in tiie IS 
mnnths siDce the IRA ended its ceaso- 
fire and had held two meetings with a 
third schemed. 

In addirinn, Mr. Blair’s secretary for 
Northern Ireland, Mo Kfowlam, has pur- 

See BLAIR, Faee 10 



Mb Lehma/The 

Iliree Hong Koi^ residents protesting a justice official due to take office under Chinese 
rule, EHse Leung, whom they accuse of violating freedom of expressira and thoughL 


Hong Kong Press 
On Tenterhooks 

Censorship Feared After Handover 

By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New Kihl: Times Servu'c 

HONG KONG — For all his amiable veneer, Fong So 
spends his days in a small office here tormenting a group of 
old men. 

As a book publisher and nv^azine editor, Mr. Fong reg- 
ularly skewers China's Communist I^irty eldisrs. But at mid- 
night on June 30, when China regains control of Hong Kong, 
the party leaders will have the chance to strike back — and 
they may relish the chance to torment Mr. Fong for a 
change. 

Yet Mr. Fong is not fleeing, and neither are many other 
writers whom Beijing considers counterrevolutionaries or so- 
called reactionary elements. 

Contrary to the expectations of just a few years ago, 
China's critics in the local press are mostly sitting tight, 
preparing fora wrestling match with Communist Party cadres 
to determine the territor>'’s future. 

“We’re going to continue,” the silver-haired Mr. Fong 
said grimly as he sat amid a clutter of back issues of his 
Chinese-language magazine. The Nineties, denouncing the 

See HONG KONG, Page 10 


Anti-Netanyahu Rebek Smell Blood’ 


By Baitcm Gellman 

VfashmgUMPoaSaviee 


JERUSALEM — No one has yet 
evicted Dw Meridor from the spMioiu 
parliameotary office tiiat came with his 
<>abin ftt job, so be held court there 
Wednesday as leader of a growing re- 
bellira a^inst Prime Mimster Ben- 
jamin Netanyahu. 

Mr. Meridor, who r^igDed as finai^ 
minister fest week, fturly glowed with 
.tefiant hurnttf after a year of swallow- 
ing reseaiment against bis own Likud 


Party’s prime minister. When Army Ra- 
dio phoned to pht him on the air live, he 
translated Martin Luther Kh^ into 
Hebrew to eaqilain to Israeli listeners 
how he felL 

“I^ee at lastl Free at last!” he said, 
slipping his loafers on and off and fool- 
ing witti the telqihone cord behind his 
desk. 

'T feel a great relief, but also a sense 
(tf heavy reqxmsibili^,’' he said. “I’m 
no^ost going home." 

Where Mr. Meridor is going, m* so he 
hopes, is not ra any ^ Iasi’s old 


political maps. He wants to bring down 
Mr. Netanyahu, by one device or an- 
other, wi^ot returning the opposition 
Labor Party to power. 

A surprising cross-section of Mr. 
Netanyahu's governing coalitioii, from 
politick center to far right, from old 
friends of Mr. Netanyahu to allies of 
coavenieiice, would like the same thing. 
After a wi^ of serial blackmail 
coalition leaders, in which Mr. Net- 
anyahu bowed to successive demands 

See ISRAEL, Page 10 


North Korea Agrees to Plan Peace Talks 

It Drops Earlier Conditions That Stymied f/.5- Attempts to Meet 


We wss t e nd Prices 


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Said Actiita .10.00 R 
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UA-E. lOObDirh 

Ui.Ma.(EurJ..-$1.20 
Zh to bwa— aniSShtP 


By Brian KnoWlton 

fffffettflfavl f/evUTHbime 



WASHINGTON— Dropping earlier 

condifions. North Korea has agreed to 
meet South Korean and U.S. of- 
ficials next we^ in New Yoifc to plan 
four-way peace talks, flie State Depart- 
ment amxMiDced Wednesdtff. 

News of foe projected talks, ten^ 
tively set for eariy Augiwt and wdh 
riiina as foe foura participaDt, wm 
meted candoosly. It followed a series 
of Uniting attempts to arrange sudi a 
styn^ ipgulariy py North 

Korean reservations or olgectiODS. 

John Dinger, a State DepattmesU 


^kesman, said .Wednesday that foe 
meeting Monday in New Yoik would be 
at ito level of deputy foreign ministecs. 

Asked (b characterize those talks, 
which follow lower-level contacts last 
w^Mr. Dingeriqilied, "Clearly, we 
woold'noc be going to a more senior 
level if we difoi’t think that the talks 
. were headed in the right direction." 

He said the adminigtr arion lesoained 
htqiefol that foe four-party talks could 
\fnA uhitnatdy to peace on the Korean 
.peninsula, adding^ “But that’s obvi- 
rasly, rae woold^guess, quite a ways 
downfoetoad.” ' 

A Soufo Korean spokesman mWashr 
in gfnn aaid that Setw wouJd attach DO 


condiliras to foe August talks, assum- 
ing ih^ take place. 

‘ * We think the foor-party talks should 
be very flexible," said foe spdkesnjan, 
who asked not to be named. “We can 
diermag whatever North Korea wants to 
talk about’’ 

nesktent Bill Clinton and President 
Kim Young Sam of Soufo Korea first 
called in April 19^ for talks aimed at 
formally ending foe Korean War, 're- 
placuig 'tbe tensions of a contested 
aimi^ce with a full peace treaty. 

Wednesday was the 47fo anniversaiy 
oFthe ouforeak of the war. North Korea, 

See KOREA, Page 10 


AGENDA 


The Dollar 


NawYWt Wednesday e 4 pjy| pwvicusdoBe 
t>M 1.7233 1.7236 


Pound 


1^633 


1 . 


Van 


113.80 


114.70 


7 Fimdamentalists in Algeria Cabinet 

ALGIERS (AFP) — Seven fslsmir 
fundamentalists were given posts in the 
new government named Wednesday 
^ Prime Minister Ahmed Ouyahia, 
the president’s office disclosed. 

Four members of the mt^raie Is- 
lamic fundamentalist Movement of 
Society for Peace, which won 69 seats 
during the June 5 legislative elec- 
tions, were given four ministerial and 
three secretaiy of state posts. 

Seven posts were also given to the 
National Liberation Front, which woo 
64 seats in Pariiamenr and which is an 
ally to I^esident LJamine Zerouai’s 
National Democratic Rally, which 
won ISS of the tot^ 380 seats. 

National Democratic Rally mem- 
bers were given most of the posts in 
the new 30-member government, 
holding onto the key ministr ig ; of 
interior and foreign affairs. 



dungs Wednsafeqf C 4 PJ4. previous dose 


-7.35 


e8&99 


896.34 


MGETWO 

Bumon to ifbman in the HUig 

EUROPE Pages. 

(HdViBa in BerUn Starts Pku Ufa 


Boeing Tries to Cahn EU on McDotmell Deal 


Boeing Ca ma^ offer to change a 
sole-supiplier provisira in sales con- 
trads forra U.$, airiines in order 
to win European Union antitrust tq)- 
proval for its purchase of McDonnell 
Douglas Cozp., an attomey familiar 
with the transaction said Wednesday. 
The exclusivire provisions have 
tickxoe point 


been foe mainstic 


iODS 

ig point for Euro- 


loemg’s proposed $]S billion ptu-- 
chase of McDonnell Douglas. The 
clauses could cut off Europe's Airbus 
Industrie from doing business with. 


three of the largest U.S. airlinr»c for 
the next 20 years. 

In recent months, AMR Coip.’s 
Amoican Airlines, Delta Air t 
I nc, and Continental Airlines Inc. 
signed contracts with Boeing tiiat 
contained such elapses . Page 1 3. 

Books Page4. 

Croanrord Page 11. 

Opinion Pagseg^l. 

Sports Pages Ig-lp. 


The IHT on-line hUp;;'/v.n'.''.'.Mht. 








PAGE 4 


r 


im'ERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1997 





ASIAIPACmC 


British to Attend Hong Kong Rite 

Decision to Join U.S. at Swearing-In Ceremony Stirs Criticism 


GiiViMlvOifSi^FiBmPiaikadn 

HONG KONG — Britain, apparently 
in a c<»icessioD to the Qiincse-badced 
govemnent poised to take power here 
next week, joined the United States on 
Wednesday in announcing that their 
CMSula ic the colony would att^ the 
swearing'in of Hong Kong's unelected 
legislature. 

Hong Koi^ democrats expressed 
sharp disappointment, s^ing the moves 
would help legitimize Chile's plan to 
dismantle the deaed legislature when it 
recovers the British colony at midnight 
Monday. 

With the countdown to the handover 
in its final days, difficult questions 
about democracy and civil liberties 
mingled with often-sentimeatal signs of 


China Welcomes 
U.S. House Vote 
On Trade Status 


Asrnt’e Frjnce-Presse 

BEIJING — China on Wednes- 
day welcomed the '‘wise" vote in 
the U.S. House of Rqrre^ntatives 
to renew Chin^ trading priv- 
iJeges. Hong Kong representatives, 
anxious to avoid hwdover troubles, 
exmssed relief. 

China also was backed by senio' 
business representatives in calling 
for the United States to grant per- 
manent most-favored-nmion status. 

*‘We believe it was a wise move 
for the U.S. House of Represen- 
tatives to veto the bill on revoking 
China's MFN status," a Foreign 
Ministry spokesman said. 

Tues^y’s vote on Capitol Hill 
was 173 in favor of droning die 
status and 2S9 opposed. 

The Chinese spokesman reiter- 
ated a call for permanent most- 
favored status. "We hope that the 
U.S. government and Congress will 
reverse the outdated practice of an- 
nual review of China's status 

at an early date." 

Hong Kong officials and busi- 
ness leaders also want to end the 
annual agonizing. "The renewal of 
China's MFN status always maaers 
greatly to Hong Kong, but it has 
never mattered more thu this year, 
when Hong Kong will embark oh a 
new chapter in its history," said 
Hong Kong's secretary for trade 
and industry, Deixise Yvie. 


an era's sunset. 

The sun had just set on another 
steamy midsummer day. in fact, when a 
British military band piped and whistled 
its way through a farewell public per- 
fonxuince featuring tunes ineliiQing 
"Auld Lange Syne." 

Chinese and British listeners linked 
hands and sang. 

And s^bolism was u the bean of 
larger debates as weU with Hong 
Kong's democrats voicing dismay at 
news that the U.S. and British consuls 
would attend the ceremony that will 
swear in both the new government and 
the provisional legisl^re set up by 
China. 

The Hong Kong Democratic Party 
leader, Martin said the United 
States decision was "inconsistent" 
with established Washington policy. 

"How is it that support for a demo- 
cratic institution and the wishes of Hong 
Kong people is expressed by attending a 
ceremony marking the abolition of an 
elected legislature?'' Mr. Lee said. 
"This does seem to be inconsistent." 

The American consul, Richard 
Boucher, said Washington was tele- 
graphing itsdis^iproval by having Sec- 
retary of State M^eleine Albright sUp 
that ceremony. 

But Hong Kong is a pragmatic place, 
Mr. Boucher said, so it m^es sense to 
lay the groundworic for day-to-day deal- 
ings with the incoming govemmenL 

"The secretary is not going.' ’ he said. 
"That still conveys the main point, 
which is that we don't endorse the pro- 
visional legislature. In fact we look for- 
ward to its replacement as soon as pos- 
sible." 

In announcing the decision on Tues- 
day, the State Department spokesman, 
Nicholas Bums, said Tuesday of Mr. 


Boucher "He has to work with rite new 
legblature. For practical re^ons, be 
will attend." 

Tbe disclosure touched off an angry 
reroonse a ^kesman for Je;sse 
Helms, Republican of North Carolina, 
diainnan of the Sotate Foteiga Re-* 
lations Committee. 

“It undermines Albright’s message 
by coofening legitimacy on the puppet 
legislature," said Helms's spol^ 
man, Marc Thiessen. 

hfr. Boucher's presence will be 
"read in Beijirig as a wink and a nod," 

he added. 

Even more upsetting to Hong Kong 
democrats was word riom Britain that it 
would s^ its consul to the swearing- 
in, altiiough Prime Minister Tony BI^ 
will stay away. 

Britain says this does not in^cate 
suroort for the new legislature. 

But the Democratic Party, Hong 
Kong's largest, said such a move 
amounted to a "spectacular, unprece- 
«^ted retreat" since Britain's last gov- 
ernor helped engineer election re- 
fimms. fAP. AFP) 

■ Albright Leaves for Hetnam 

Secretary of State Altoight left San 
Franciso on Wednesday for Hanoi on a 
visit to strengthen ties with Vietnam. 
Reuters repoi^. 

"She's going to work on die rela- 
tionship, try to advance our relations 
with one of the mme important coun- 
tries in soutiieast Asia," the State De- 
partment spokesman said 

The Vietnam visit is the first leg of an 
Asian tour by Mrs. AUxight, who was 
scheduled to go on to Cambodia, al- 
though officials have indicated that this 
looked less likely than before because of 
security concerns. 



iJ<’ 


rlin. an 



pffU'iiipfjj'.a. , II 



; -i V 


I 7 


• (ffltlt 
irphaiit 






A Cambodian soldier guarding the entrance of an army base Wednesday outside Phnom Penh. 


If 

7? 


G-7 Envoys in Cambodia to Discuss Pol Pot 


Reuters 

PHNOM ^ENH — A special envoy Bom the Group of 
Seven leading industrial countries aiziv^ in Phnom rath 
on Wednesday, the Bist of two represeoiaiives expected to 
express the group's concern ^>out political chaos in Cam- 
bodia. 

Claude Martin, the d^uty secretary-general of the 
French Foreign Ministry, did not speak with reporters ai the 
aiqxirt. 

Yukio Imagawa, a former Japanese ambassador in 
Phnom Penh, was due to arrive in Cambodia later to join Mr. 


Martin on the mission, a Japanese embassy ofBciai said. 
Political tension is running high in Cambodia dne to a 


long-running feud between the countn^’s two prime min- 
isters and confusion over the fate of the Khmer Rouge 
guerrilla chief Pol Pot 

Cambodia's first p r ime minister, Hince Noodom Ranar- 
iddh, said Wediiesday that be would inform the G7 envoys 
about Mr. Pdi Pot, who he said was captured last week a 
breakaway rebel faction in northern Cambodia. The prince 
said talks with the rebels on handing over Mr. Pol Pot to the 
government wese continuing. 


Asian Fear After Hong Kong Takeover: A Resurgent China 


By Michael Richardson. 

lutenkiiioiul HerulJ Trihuw 


tiien, early this century, experienced the 


SINGAPORE — For Asian coun- 
tries, most of which were colonized by 
Western powers, Britain's return of 
Hong Kong to China marks a welcome 
end to an era of foreign subjugation. 
But, at the same time, they are con- 
cerned that China could b«ome the 
region's new imperial power. 

The handover "marte the final clos- 
ing of a difficult chapter of history for 
East Asians,'* said George Yeo, infor- 
mation minister of Singapore. The re- 
gion was first colonized by the West, and 


occupation of the Japanese militaiy. 

"*nie return of Hong Kong to China 
reflects the resurgence of Asia and its 
ability now to deal with Western powers 
on the basis of equality,'* Mr. Yeo ad- 
ded. 

But he also said that if China again 
tried to behave as an imperial overkxd 
in the region, as it did before Western 
powers arrived, "it will be resisted 
everywhere especially by Japan, Korea, 
Vietnam and other Southeast Asian 
countries." 

Chinese civilian and militaiy leaders 
have responded to these concerns by 


BOOKS 


BILUONS AND fiaUONS: 
Thoughts on Life and Death at 
the Brink of the Millennimi] 

By Carl Sagan 241 pages $24. Random 
House. 

Reviewed by T.H. Watkins 


among some of his fellow scientists. But 
what could not be gainsaid was his con- 
sistent defense of scleniific inquiry, his 
relentless campaign to increase the fund- 
ing for NASA research programs, and. 
above all. his crusades to end the pos- 


ozone layer, the greenhouse effect, de- 
forestation. species extinction, the dis- 
posal of rathoactive maceri^s: 'Rie whole 
crop of modem enrironmental calamities 
comes in for analysis. He does not l»iy 
the cuitent notion ttiat many of the tlueats 


r^ieacedly assorins Asian officials vis- 
iting Beijing that China will not seek a 
dominant position or spheres of iiffiu- 
eoce in the region. 

"Our national history and that of the 
worid has revealed a truth,' ' Chen Jian, 
China's assistant foreign minister, said 
at a regional security conference in 
Singapore earlier this month. "As a 
nation which has bad an unequal share 
of such suffoings under foreign sub- 
jugation and aggression. China will not 
do to othere what she would not have 
them do to herself." 

Analysts say. however, that almost 
every Asian country remains wary 
about China's ^wing political and 
economic shadow. 

While China has become one of the 
leading trading partners of most Asian 
nations, it is seen as "atiire^ as well as 


an opportnnity," said Robert Broad- 
foot. mapa^g director of Political & 
Economic Consultancy UtL in 
Hong Kong. 

China territorial disputes with 
nearly ail of hs net^ibois, including 
Taiwan, Japan and Kmea. 

The bi^en area of conflict is in 
Southeast Asia where lines on official 
Chinese maps suggest that Beijing 
claims sovereignty over much of the 
South Ct^ Sea as well as the disputed 


Spratly Islands in the sontfaem section 
of the sea close to the PhiliDoines. 


of the sea close to the Philippines, 
Malaysia, Brunei, Vietnam and fodone- 
sia. 

A defense policy paper issued recently 
by Indonesia cautioned that Beijing's 
claims in the South China Sea — which 
are contested by Vietnam, Taiwan, the 
Philippines, M^ysia and Bnmei — 


sibility of nuclear war and slave off are grossly exaggerated; they are quite 


C ARL SAGAN was an optimist to the 
end. hopins that science, to which he 


environmental collapse. More than just real, he insists, and his arguments are 


A^end, hoping that science, to which he 
had devoted his life, would be able to give 
him life for afew Rurre years. He hoped as 
well that the nations of the world would 
somehow transcend human cussedness 
and the iron wei^t of history to build a 
future in which would not blow one 
anotiier off the face of tiie Earth — or so 
corrupt the planet that there would be no 
real reason to hang aroand. He was wrong 
in the first hepe, dying of a vagrant strain 
of pneumonia after two years of exhaust- 
ive and exhausting ther:q>y for a rare 


about any other celebrity I think of, persuasive and frightening. He is equally 
Sagan used the spotlight of his fame to convincing when talldog about the ler- 


illuminaie the abyss into which stupid- 
ity. greed and tlie lust for power may yet 
dump us. 

All of those interests and causes are 
handsomely represented in "Billions 
and Billions' ' ( Sagan says he never used 


rityiog implications of a world gone po- 
litically chaotic even while much of it 
retains the power to destroy everything in 
a massive nuclear frenzy. 

Is life on this planet tten doomed even 
as we dream (some of us. anywayj of 


A U.S. Drug Stmg 
Strains Relations 
With Pakistan 


BRIEFLY 


I# 

Manila Tells Troops to Avoid 
Firing at China Near Spratlys 


the phrase; Johnny Carson did. as pan of finding it elsewhere? Maybe not, he spec- 


a "rough imitation" of him). Some of 
the material is original, some of it was 
previously publishw in Parade, aiKl one 
chapter consists of a speech he gave at 
the 12Sih anniversary of the Battle of 


By Walter Piucus 

Waahingtoa Post Service 


by the sting days after agents 
fiioni the Drus Enforcement 


blood disease called myelodysplaria. It Gettysburg in 1988. 


remains to be seen whether the second 
hope was better founded than the first — 
though it must be said dm he did his best 
to inwe it come true. 

Arguably, this astronomer and intel- 
lectual plaiietary explorer was the gr^test 
popularizer of science in modem times. 


As in most coUections. there is a certain 
eclectic character to "Billions and Bil- 
lions" as it wanders in subject rnatler 
from the mechanics of light waves r'The 
Gaze of God and the Drying Faucet") 
to the often paradoxical dicta of human 
social behavior ("The Rules of the 


He was neidier as skilled a writer as, say, Game' ' ). Still, what ties the book togetiier 


ulaies, though admitting that there are a 

lot of ifs involved. If developed nations WASHINGTON — A 
severely reduce their production of cblo- Drug Enforcement Adminis- 
rofluococartxms and their d^)eodeoce (ration sting operation run in 
upon fossil fuels; if developing nations Pakistandiisyearwithoutno- 
str^cuttuig down forests; if. as be srid at tiftcation of the Islamabad 
Gettysburg, nations learn to "reconcile, government has threaiBDed to 
not after the and the mass disrupt counter-narcotics co- 

muider, but instead of the r-ay iw gg and operaboo in tiiat country, ac- 
massmurder":ShouIdtbe8eaDdotberiiis cording to American and 
be met, he says, life may survive, but it is Pak ata ni sources. 
going to take more pure efibit than any The opefation has resulted 
other endeavor in human history. ki an emoarraMing standoff. 


The opefation has resulted 
in an ernWra^ing staodofi'. 


Lewis Thomas or E.O. Wilson nor as de^ 
a thinker as Stephen Jay Gould or Free- 
man Dyson. But if you stof^ied someone 
on the street and asked chat person to 
name a living scientist, Sagan almost cer- 


i$ a devotion to life so fierce that he found 
it almost impossible not to dream of its 
existence beyond this Icmely cinder called 
Earth. 

In the first part of the book he explores 


S AGAN was not a pessimist, but he 
was not a fool, either. He knew how 


American authorities m 
New York have arrested a 
Pakistani Air Foree major on 


stubbornly we human beings cling to the drug-stzuiggUng charges. 


tainly would have been the name thu what we know (little) and what we can 


came to mind. His famously successful 
"Cosmos" lelcvijiim series, his frequent 
appearance.*; on th;; Tonight' ' show and 


guess (a lot) of the piossibilitics of ex- 
traterrestrial life, a whole-souled enthu- 
siasm of his with which most of the 


other talk formais, Im 10 previous civilized world became familiar whether 
books, all written for the general reader it wanted to or not Life may be out there 


findeed, erne of them was a novel called 
"Contact." just made into a motion pic- 
ture) and lus regular articles in Parade and 
ocher gene^-interest magazines spread 
him across the cultural lanoscape. He was 
not just a scientist; he was a Personality, 
tliis tend^ to earn Sagan disdain 


in another form on another planet, an- 
other moon, he says here again; let's go 
find out. 

But while doing so, let’s not ignore 
what we are doing to life here on Earth, a 
warning that doininaies the lor^ middle 
section of the book. The depletion of the 


convictions and traditions that can mi while Pakistan has detained 
us. Still, he chose as his last testament a o**® 9^ citizens who was 
decluation of hope. working for the U.S. oper- 

He ran out of himself, but the one ation that stung the major, 

hope he would not entertain. Us widow. . The disjwte has come at a 
fellow scientist and writer Ann Dniyan, time when Pakista n has risked 
tells us in a touching CTilogue, was that of tnuj®' e m ba rra ssment to help 
an afterlife. Me, 1 thmk Carl Sagan has the United States in a separate 
one teirtfic surprise in stexe for him some- higb-profiJe case, utelh- 
whoe out whw the universe bends. gence service recenuy assis^ 


T.H. Waildns. the author of numerous 
books on American history, ettviranmen- 


higb-profUe case. Its utelli- 
gence serrice re^ntiy assisted 
the FBI and CIA in c^turing 
in Pakiirtaa a Pakistani citizen. 
Mir Ama! KarsL and flowed 


lal concerns and other judjec/j. wrote ^ flown to the Uni^ 


this for The Washington Post. 


BRIDGE 


States to face vial fix- killing 
two CIA employees in 1994. 
TTie U.S. drug ageucy’sop- 


fioiD the Drug Enlbrcement 
Administration on April 9 ar- 
rested a pilot, Major Faiooq 
Ahmed Khan, in New York 
and ch^ed him with selling 
ai^TTOximately two kilograms 
(4.4 pounds) of heroin to an 
undercover agent for the drug 
agency. 

Senior Pakistani military 
officers were angered wtea 
they learned that the U.S. 
drug agency had secretly cul- 
tivated potentially crxnipt of- 
ficers within the air force and 
trapped one of them attempt- 
ing to sell drugs, accord^ to 
sources close to the Paldstoni 
govemmenL 

U.S. officials did not ini- 
tially explain to the lUisiani 
Embas^ in Washington what 
had led to the drug agency's 
anest of Major Farooq in New 
York. That left tire Pakistan 
Intor Services Intelligence a^ 
Anti-Narcotic Force to initiate 
their own investigation. 

The PaJdstani investigation 
led to Islamabad police first 
arresting anotiter P akistani 
Air Force officer, Qasim 
Bhaoi. and then on Apifl 28, 
to the arrest of Ayaz Balucb, a 
longtime Pakistani empl^ee 


MANILA — The PhiJi[^uies, apparently in an attempt 
to east diplomatic tension with China, orderra its troops on 
Wednesday to avmd using guns while driving Chinese 
fishing boats away from areas around the Spratly Is- 
lands. 

The Philippine marines occupying ei^l isles in the 
disputed South China Sea should use band signals or t^os, 
the armed forces chief. General Amulfo Acedera. said. 

Last weekend, Philippine troops fired wanting shots at 
Chinese fishing boats near Kota Island in the Spratlys. 
which Beijing says belongs to China. The incident was 
the fourth between the two countries in recent weeks. 

The Spratlys, a cluster of isles in waters potentially rich 
in oil, are alK> claimed wholly or in part by Vietnam, 
Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia and Brunei. fRearerrl 


fbte in Papau New Guinea 
Deprives Ex-Leader of Seat 


PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea — Fortner 
Prime Minister Paias Wmgti became the first major 
casualty on Weds^day of the two-week national elec- 
tions in Papua New Guinea. 

Mr. Wingti, a iiO-year pariiamentaiy veteran, conceded 
be bad lott the Western Hi^ibnds regional seat. 

He trailed an anti-corruption campaigner, the Rev- 
erend Robert Lak by more than 5.000 votes with only 15 
baIkH boxes to be counted. 

Despite the resulL Mr. Wingti said be would still try to 
ensure tiiat winning members of his People’s Democratic 
Movement Party would play a role in the fomiation of tte 
new govemmenL Afr. Wingti had been considered one of 
the'ravorites for the top job. (Ju*) 


200 Killed in Sri Lanka Battle 


eration "has caused a lot of of the Drug Enforcement Ad- 
onbarrassmetu to our gov. miitistration. 


By Alan Truscoti 


A BIDDING idea that has 
grown steadily in pop- 
ularity in the last decade is the 
fit-showing jump. In certain 
competitive auctions, wluch 
need to be carefiiliy defined, a 
player simultaneously shows 
length in the suit he is bidding 
and some fit in his partner’s 
suit. The common situations 
arise when an overcall or a 
takeout double follows an 
opening suit!:''' 


quite righL He knew that 
jumping TO the two- or three- 
level. and perhaps the four- 
level, would indicate a fit. so 
he compromised with a pass. 

Subs^uently he bid hi.s 
suit to the five-level, and was 
lucky to find an ideal dummy: 
the heart acc and strength in 
both minor suits. West led a 
heart, feeling ihnt defensive 
tricks in that suit were more 
likely than in spades. 

South won in dummy with 
the acc and drew crumps end- 
ing ill his i<anu. He then led 


TTiis caused some diffi- the club ten. finessed, and 
culty to Andrew Rosenthal on held his breath. When this lost 


the diagramed deal from die 
final of the Flight B Reisinger 
Knockout Team Champion- 
ship. He wanred to bid some 
number of diamonds when 
his partner's one-club was 
doubled, but nothing seemed 


to the ace the contract was 
safe and he emerged with aa 
overtrick. Unable to read his 
partner's opening lead. East 
attempted to cash a heart trick 
with disastrous results. 

South was able to ruff and 


dispose of his spade loser on 
dummy's clubs to score 950. 
East should have saved the 
overtrick by considering that 
an attempt to cash the spade 
ace could hardly be wrong: If 
West had held K-J-x-x-x-x in 
spades, he would surely have 
bid more than one spade in 
response to the double. 

In the replay. East was per- 
mitted to play in four spades, 
which had to fail by one trick 
when the defense scored an 
immediate bean niff. So 
Rosenthal's team gained 13 
imps. He and his teanunates 
went on to win the match by 6 
imps, taking the title. 

The losers, a group led by 
Paul Bimbaum, might or 
might not have won if they 
had been as aggressive as 
Rosenthal and bid the North- 
South cards to five diamonds. 


The title would then have 


ernment," a I^kistani diplo- 
oiai said Tues^y. and 


Mr. Balucb. who allegedly 
provided the money that was 


hutged on whether or not Hat d^nonstrated that the Uoiied central to the sti 


contract was doubled. 


WEST 
e J875Z 

«8S 

♦ q? 


NORTH 
4 10 4 
C 41073 
OAQ 
4KJ84S 

EA5r 
4 AQ9«3 
CXQJ2 
0 J 

*AiS 


SOUTH 

* K 

C'S 

«K 10 976433 
*10 9 7 


Stat^ "was not cooperating 
fully with us." 

Because Pakistani intelU- 
gence and law eoforcement 
officials have worked for 
years vath the Central Intel- 
ligence Agency, FBI and 
C^g Enforcement Adminis- 
tration in vaiioos anti-terror- 
ist and anti-drag operations, 
the diplomat said, "we ex- 


central to the stiiffi that caught 
Mr. Bbatti and mjor Farooq, 
was charged with narcotics 
and anti-state activities. 

Pakistan has asked to have 
Major Farooq returned to Is- 
lamabad to stand trial with 
Mr. Bhatti, while the E^g 
Enforcement Administration 
is seeking to have Mr. Baluch 
released c» the ground that he 
was carrying out an under- 


COl^MBO ~ More tf>an 200 soldiers and rebels woe 
killed in the latest battle in oortheTn Sri Lanka, where 
troops are fighting T amil Tiger separatists in an attempt to 
open a key highway, the Defense Ministry said Wednes- 
day. 

' officers and 60 soldiers were killed in action and 

68 soldiers were wounded in the coofrontation," a De- 
fense Ministry statement said. 

"According to ground troops, over 150 terrorists were 
killed and a large number injur^,” it said. 

It add^ that more than 1 ,000 members of the Lib- 
eration Tigers ^Tamxl Eelam attack^ military artillery 
and mortar positions near Periyam^u, north of the gov- 
emment-held town of Vavuniya, late on Tuesday. 
Vavuniya is some 220 kilometers (135 miles) north of the 
capital, Colomba {Reuters) 


pected the Americans would cover operation. All tiiree are 
keep us infonned on what still in jail 


Taleban Captures Key District 

ISLAMABAD — The Taleban Islamic militia in Af- 


North and South vere 
The bidding' 


North 

East. 

South 

West 

14 

DbL 

Pass 

1 « 


2 A 

34 

30 

Pass 

4 A 


Pass 

Past 

Dbl. 

Pats 

Pass 


Wen ted the heart ei^t. 


they were doing." 

A UE. govenuneni source 
femiliar with the case call^ 
the uniiateraJ drag-enforce- 
ment investigation, conduc- 
ted out of the U.S. Embassy in 
Isiamabajl "a big mistake," 

The Pakistani government 
only found out its military 
personnel had been targeted 


The Drug Enforcement 
Admimstraiion’s spokesman, 
James McGivoey, said: 
"There was some misunder- 
standing between DEA and 
agencies in Pakistan, but U 
has been blown out of pro- 
portion. We are coofidrat we 
can retain good working re- 
lationships with them." 


ghaimtan cwtured a key district in die northwestern 
province of raiyab on Wednesday after heavy fighting 


province of Faiyab on Wednesday after heavy fighting 
with opposition forces, a Pakistan-based Af^aii news 
service said. 

The Afg^ blamic Press said Taleban fighters had 
talren die ^ysar district after s^ing Gfionriach in the 
neij^bofing Badghis province and were moving toward 
Maimuna, the capitaf of the Faiyab region, about 60 


iviaunana, me capital of the Faiyab region, about ou 
kilometers (40 miles) to the oortbeasL 
No independent confirmation was immediately avail- 
able. (Reatersi 


UP 


Urjrku, 

•Tv:: 

•* 

■k.i .cisSfiri-., 




could cause a military conflicL 

"China has very strong bargaining 




power in imemational relations, and it 
has even greater influence on deveU 


has even greater influence on deveU 
c^ing nations,' ' the paper said. 

Mi. Bioadfoot expressed a similar 
view: "As China is growing in eco- 
nomic and military' strength, it is show- 
ing a tendency to take a harder tine on 
many of these disputes. One thing ii 
shows no sign of doing is being more 
willing to reach compronuse solutitxis 
on any issues to which it attaches a 
‘sovereign right’ label." 

Neverfoeless, Asian officials say they 



hope that by simporting the return m 
Hong Kong to China and the eventual 


Hong Kong to China and the eventual 
reontfication of Taiwan with the main- 
land. they will encourage Beijing to be 
more flexible on its other territorial 
claims. 


r? 

& 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1997 






BAGErS 

- 'y>-^ 



THE AMERICAS 


oiirt Rejects Religion Law 


\ 

\ 


tv 


,1 

^ ■ 


•. C^MtfOnrSiqfFiamDivac^ 

■ WA SHINGTON — A divided Su- 
^®nie Court oa Wednesday struck 
jdowQ as uQccmstitatKnal a 19^ federal 
Daw flat gave the exercise of reUgious 
i^Skts greater protection from goverO' 
unent reg nlatj^ .- 

! Hu high court ruled that Congress 
|pvastei^>ed its le^ladve auth^ty in 
^adopting the ReUgious Freedom Res- 
toration Act l^esident Bill f!Iinr^ 
jsigned the act into law. 
t *‘We conclude the statute exceeds 
!Coogress's power,” Justice Aiv^ny 
Keunedy said for the court majoii^. 
!The vote in the case was 6 to 3. 

^ The court also made these major de- 
*msions; 

' •The government can farce bosi- 
Inesses to help pay for generic adven- 
•isir^ aimed at bolstering the h^th of 
^heir entire industry. By a 5-4 vote, the 
^urt said the fed^ government can 
•force growers and shippers of California 
Ipeadus, plums and nectarines to con- 
ftribute to such an ad campa^. 

: •It refiis^ to revive a ^.3 billion 
'settlement that would have resolved 
Aiiodreds of tiiousands of injury claims 
(against asb^tos manufsccurers. The 
(ruling is a setback as weU for efforts to 
ifind nationwide solutions for simil^y 
*^ast product-liabiUty litigation over 
•breast in^ilants, cigareties and otiier 
utems. 

I The decisUm on the ReUgioas Free- 
jdom Restoration Act, in a dispute be- 
•tween a Texas ciQr and a local Cadiolic 
•church, will prob^ly make it tougher to 
(challenge some goveramwt actions dial 
•:are seen as restricting religious liee- 
(dom. 

( The 1S>93 law “was designed to con- 
itroi cases and controversies, such as the 
(Oru before us." Justice Kennedy vnote. 
I But, be added, referring to the re- 
jUgious freedom act, “the provisions of 
jtbe federal statute here invoked are be- 
lyond congressional authority; it is this 
jcouit's precedent, not RFRA, which 
|must control.” 

i Congress was reacting to a 1990 Su- 
[preme Court ruling when it passed the 
{1993 law. The 1990 decision said laws 
ithal otherwise are neutral toward r elig ion 
jean be valid even if they may InJEtioge on 
isome people’s religioas beliefs. 

I The court had i^ed in that case that 
{Native Amoicans have no coostitution- 
lal right to take the hallucinogenic drug, 
jpeyote as a reli^o^ luactice. 

> Sl Peter Catholic Church in Boeme, 
■Texas, invoked the 1993 law after the 
{city thwarted its attempt to tear down 
|pan of a 70-year-old sanctuary and 
ibuild an addition. The city said that the 
{Spanish mission-style church * was 
■worthy of historic preservation. 

! The church argued tiiat Boeme's le- 
|fusal to issue a construction permit was 
■an example of governmental actioi 
{banned the law. 

; City o^ials, in turn, mounted a con- 
istitutional attack against the law. When 
{the justices agreed to study that cfaal- 
•lenge, what begun as a landmark- 
Ipieservation squabble quickly became 
'one of the most closely watched religion 
cases of the 1990s. 

- The Reverend Oliver Thomas of the 
National Council of Cburcbes caJJbd it 
“the most important religious-freedom 
-case the Supreme Court has ever had to 
decide.” 

- The ruUng also reflected die high 
.stakes of goveminental pow^. 

. “Our national e^rience teaches 
rtiat the constitution is preserved best 
when each part of the government re- 
spects both the constitutiaa and the 
proper actions and determinations of the 


otiier branches/* Justin Kennedy 
wn^ 

After the peyote decision, a coalition 
of reUgious and dvil-rights groups ex- 
tended that the hi^ court h^ turned Us 
back on vigotoo^ pFotecting reUgious 
rights. 

Congress agreed, and its 1993 law 
required that any federal, state or local 
law imposing a ‘'substantial burden*' 
X $omeoae*s religious beliefs must 
serve a “compelling’' government in- 
terest in the Ji^st intrusive way. 

That standard Im goveEmneoi protect 
public b^tfa and s^ety but also gives 
religious minoities far mme legal clout. 

Ui a dissent from tile Wednesday de- 
cision, Justices Sai^ra Day O’Connor 
and Stephen Breyer called for reex- 
siderine the court's 1990 ruling. Justice 
David Souter also dissent^, but did not 
join in tiiat calL In the majority opinit^ 
Justix Kennedy was joined by Chief 
Justice William Rebnqirist and Justices 
Roth Bader Ginsburg. Antoain Scalia. 
John Paul Stevens -and Clarence 
Thomas. 


Hie Religious Freedom Restoration 
Act mv<^Ded a sectiou of the 14(h 
Amendment tiiat authorizes Congress to 
“enfxce ap^tfopriate legUUtix" 
the ' amendmxt's equal-protsctix 
guarantees. 

A landsiaik 1966 Supreme Court de- 
dsix gave Cxgress extremely broad 
leeway in that re^id. In that luUag, the 
justices uiAeld a congressional ban on 
English iftetucy tests for voters in Pu- 
erto Rico. 

But the 14tfa Ameodmeut power of 
Congress itever has deeiw to te 
absolute. For example, die court in 1970 
struck down a federa law in which Gm- 
gress sought tt> give IS-year-olds the 
right to vote in stale elections. It took the 
2otb Amendment to acctsnpUsh that 

The xurt said Cxgress exceeded is 
14tii Amendment povrer when h passed 
the 1S)93 law. 

Sixteen states suppo rt e d Boerne's at- 
tack. They said die law allowed ‘ 'gan^ 
and like-minded groups to shroud Illicit 
activiQr under the cover of ‘reiigixs* 
belief ' in prisons. (Reuters. AF) 



tma Wil««V ttgoKf KKWf -Pic-w 

BACK IN SWING — PresidciitClmfrm practicing cm frie White House putting green before bis fast golf outing 

since knx surgery after a fall on March 14. He played some holes THiesday at the Army Navy Country Chib. 


Senate Backs Medicare Premium Rise 


By Robert Pear 

Net! VoHc Times SenriM 


WASHINGTON — Hie Senate 
has voted to increase Medicare 
premiums for afSnxi elderly 
p^Ie and to raise the age of eli- 
gibility by two years, to 67. 

Togttber, the pn^ios^ would 
malf«» profound f-hang gs in die na- 
tional health insurance program, 
forcing elderly people to take more 
respooaUli^ rar meir health care 
and their mescal insurance. 

Both ivoposals are politically 
explosive, so their fate is in doobL 

President Bill Clintx wants 
Congress to them xt of the 
bill 

The Hoose versix of the le- 
gislatix omits them. 

Some lobbyists have promised a 
eampaign (o block the Changes as 
the two chandlers try to work xt 
their differences this summer. 

The vote on Tu^alay surprised 
many lawmaltera, who recalted the 
way Democrats afraelferi Repub- 
lic^ X Medicare in the electix 
campaign last year. 

The vote to chuge higher preou- 
ums for higher-mcome elderly 


;>le was 70 to 30. Twenty-one 
and 49 Republicans 
voted yes. Six RqKiblicam and 24 
Democrats voted X. 

The vote to increase the age of 
eligibility was 62 to 38. Twelve 
Democrats joined 50 R^ubticans 
in voting for die increase. Five Re- 
publicans and 33 Democrats op- 
posed it 

The proposed increase in the eli- 
gibili^ a^ for Medicare would 
take ^fect gradually frxi 2003 to 
2027, in lo^ s^ vrith increases in 
tile age of eligibui^ for full Social 
Security benefits. 

It would not affoa people now 
over the age of 59. 

Also X Tbesday, the Senate de- 
cided to establish a new charge of 
S5 a visit for home health care 
services under Medicare. 

Senate Republican leaders said 
the changes would help solve 
Medicare's financial problems, 
{Kesetving the program cuiieni 
beneficiaries and for baby 
boomers. 

But liberal Democrats said the 
proposals wxld break a bargain 
between the geaeralioiis, would in- 
crease the number of uninsured 


people and cause financial hard- 
ship fm* hundreds of thousands of 
beneficiaries. 

Rqmbiican supptm for these 
chan^wasxsuj^se. But it was 
xteworthy to see the yes votes 
from Demiocrats like John Breaux 
of Lxisiona, Kent Conrad of 
North Dakota, Bob Graham of 
Flmida and Daniel Patrick Moyni- 
han of New York. 

“Medicare is going insolvent in 
2001.” Senator Breaux said. “We 
have an obligailx to try and fix 
it*’ 

Seoruor Moynihan added that 
the votes disproved the thesis tiiat 
“xly oisis brings us forward to 
some sensible responses** to the 
fiscal problems facing the social 
insurance programs. 

The vote on Medicare premiiuns 
put the Senate x record in favor a 
so-called means test, which 

requires vreU-ofr elderly people to 
pay more for their hi^th insur- 
xce. 

Justifying the vote. Senator Judd 
Gregg. RqjubUcan of Neu' Hamp- 
shire, said it was absurd for low- 
income workers to be subsidmug 
health core for wealthy retirees. 


throng their payroll taxes. ■ 

But Sxator Barbara Mikolski, 
Democrat of Maryland, argued 
a gflini^ the “This bill 

breaks the bonds of ^th between 
the people and their government,’* 
she said. 

“It chaitges 30 yeaia of Medi- 
care in tiiree days/* she added. 
“This bill would end Medicare as 
we know it and mm it into a welfare 
program.** 

Under the Senate proposal, the 
monthly Mecficaife presnium, now 
$43.80, would quxiuple for be- 
neficiaries with aninnat incftiwa 
over $100,000 f(x'‘individDal5 or 
over $125,000 for couples. 

Individuals with tneyrntm under 
$50,000 a year or couples e»mh>g 
less than $75,000 a year would not 
be affected. 

For people in betwe^ premi- 
tims wt^drise with their mcomes, 
as the government reduced its sub- 
^y. 

Senator Bteaox said 1.6 millix 
of the 38 million Medicare bene- 
ficiaries would have to pay higher 
premiums xder the measure. The 
jsoposal wxld raise $3.9 tnlfix 
over the next five years, he said. 


Away From Politics 

• An Orthodox Jew was sentxced to 10 ye^ 

in prisx forplanting a pipe bomb at a Jewish 
center in an efibri to stop a speech by former 
Prime Minister Shiiran Peres of Israel Harry 
Shrqp^, 3 1 . plxted the pipe bomb at the Jack- 
sonville. Florida, Jewish Cxter in February and 
pleaded guilty a month later. The device was a 
dud. (AF; 

• A man in Arizxa was executed by injecUon 

17 years after be bludgexed, stabb^ and 
strangled a mentally ioqxured woman during a 
robb^ tiiat netted $107. William Woratzeck, 
5 1 , was xuvicted of beating Linda Leslie with 
a hammer, stabbing her three times and 
strangling her with his hxds during the 1980 
robb^. (AP) 


• Heroin xd methamphetamine are rapidly of a program that might one day provi 


supplanting crack cocaine as the drug of choice 
among many hard-core addicts, according to a 
nationwide study issued by the WUte House 
, Office of Naqc^ Drug Cxtroi Policy. Air 
tbx^ cocaine xntumes to be widriy abused.- 
tiie report found that the popularity of both 
crack and powdered cocaine had declined, and 
that yoxg users in particular have come to 
disd^ crack as a “ghette drug. ' ' (WPi 

« A window wa^er fril 33 stories to his death 
when scaffolcting came loose from one of its 
moorings at a building in Cievelaod. The wash- 
er and xotiKr man were working outside the 
BP America building when the scaffolding gave 
w^. The other worker was able to scramble to 
safety. (API 

• The U.S. military tested a sensor designed 
to detect and track art.npking nuclear missiles, 
the Defease Department said. The test was part 

itfc a 


natixal missile defense for the United States. 
In the lest, x optical sensx carried by a rocket 
that was fired from the Marshall tgfanHte in tiie 
Pacific Orean fpund.a,diuniqy wariiead ,t 
oa a Minutemah-2 missile launcl^ed from jC 
fomia. ■ (Reuters) 

• A body found in a remote part of Ni^eni 

Califomia might be that of a pilot accused of 
stockpiling cremated human remains, inves- 
ligaiors said. The pilot, A1 Vieua. 52, dis- 
appeazed two xd a half weeks ago after the 
authorities unlocked a storage shed packed with 
thousands of boxes of human ashes ne had been 
paid to scaner from his plane. A suicide note 
was found near (be body. (AP) 

• An explosix ripped through the Accra PUc 

aerosol packaging pixt in EUtiiaft, Indiana, xd 
released a toxic gss, kilUng one persx and 
injuriitg 34. The cause of the explosix was not 
known. (AP) 


Long^ Hot Summer of Rancor 

WASHINGTON — Six months ago, amid stirrup calls 
for cooperation. Congress sec out to investigate irapro- 
priti&s m tile 1996 political casxqsaign — but lawmakers 
nave barely spdten a civil word to each otiier since, and the 
investigation faces a loi^ hot summer of partisan rancor. 

“I’ve sat here and listened to discussix oa both sides 
oftiieaisle,”RepresentativePaalKanjofski, Democrat of 

PennsyWama, said at a hearing last week. “It's a lenible 
way to start what, quote, should be a bipartisan effort.” 

But tniiHites la^, Mr. Kanjorski was vowing to block 
Re^blicx eflbrts to tmfrmniw witnesses, prompting 
Reprbsxiative Robert Baer Jr., Republican of Georgia, to 
accuse the Democrats of “raw. biutal, partisan threats.” 

Mach of the attentix paid to the House investigatix 
and its coxterpait in the Senate has focused X the sparse 
informatix tiiey are receiving as they squeeze documents 
. out of a recalcitrant White House or chaise after witnesses 
who have either fled the cxutiy or refused to testify. 

But apw from extent, bom parties agree that the 
investigations have already gaii^ unusual notoriety for 
their abnost total lack of bipartisan experation and the 
imreleotiDg rudeness of the paitici{^ts hi thmr dealings 
with one another. (WP) 

Ihe Dogfight (her Clean Air 

WASHINCTTON — Industries fight^ toi^her clean- 
air rules are waiting to see whether their ^^earlxg, mulii- 
miUix-doUar lobbying campaign has oft. 

Utilities, antom^ers, ml companira. miners and man- 
u&cturera joined forces in a lobbying battle that par- 
ticipants X both sides said was xusii^ly intense for a 
r^ulatory question. 

Since last summer, the Ic^byists have been plotting 
strata xd dqil^ing their resources. Minutes of their 
meetings lefier^ blxt talk and txgh tactics. Notes 
fixi one niged participants to cxtact Democxauc Part)* 
comnunees, sayix: “Tell 'em ao more S unless they 
' pbeasiiredMed oeficiais X air issue.” 

The campaign also included expensive teieviskm and 
radio adveftising. and the financing of scientific studies to 
challxge die government’s reseat. 

President Bill Clintx must decide whether to endorse 
stricter air^allQf standards for smog and soot proposed 
by the Environmental Protection Agency, or to agree with 
industry that the changes would threaten ixxofnic 
growth and order the propxal scaled back. A decision 
xuld come as early as this week. (AP) 


Quote/Unquote 


Newt Gingrich, the speaker, as the House prepared to 
vote Thursday on the biggest tax cut in 16 years: ’ ‘Today 
and tomorrow we are at a historic moment. This is one of 
the most important votes in modem times.” (AP) 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


$7,000 Fun in the Backj'ard: 
Limiiy Baiheciie Grills 

Barbecue madness. POrf 2: Americans, 
as we were saying, love their barbecues. 
They are, it seems, willing to spare almost 
no expense to get the latest in incrertibly 
h^h-tedi models. . 

New luxury grills are loaded with fea- 
tures from state-of-the-art wood-smoke 
systems and flavor-enhancing lava rocks to 
umbrella stands, tile countertops, remote- 
cxtrol ignitions and even inlaid badtgnm- 
mx boa^. 

Ibices, reports the Los Angeles Times, 
can easily reach $7,000. 

If X earthquake in Shadow Hills, Cali- 
fornia. were to carry Frank De Sxtis’s 
bouse away, he could survive quite oicely 
with just hu barbecue complex. It includes 
a dishwasher, oven, garbage disposal, trash 
compactor and telephone. Cost: $30 JXK). 

top-end barbecue is a relatively re- 
cent phenomenon. High-end barb^ue 
makers are doing 10 times the business they 
were doing five or sbt years ago. 

But after all the bills are paid, do you 
reaUy get a better burger? 

You get the same flavor x a much 
cheaper ^ili, said Jules Lehr, a barbecue 
salesman in Santa Monica — but not the 
same fun. 

Sh(^ Takes 

A New Ymit state prison guard who 
*lew a Nazi x his front porch cannot 
te dismissed, even if hU briefs “represent 
i he most despicable tendencies of man- 
ind,” a state arbiter has ruled. 

Officer E^ard Kuhnel was ordered re- 
install with back pay dating to his sus- 

g ensix in Decento. Hie arbiter. Robot 
immeUejaer, held that corrections officials 
could not prove tiiat die flag could lead to 
prisx disturbances or persoxel.problems. 

Corrections Commissixer Glenn Go^ 
said Mr. Kuhnel would be locked xt of his 
job at Eastern Correctional Facility with 
pay while the state tqipeals the afoiter’s 
decision to the state Supreme Court 

A Hampshire boar, raised by the 
Barnhart foxly of Noble Comty, Indiana, 


was sold this month at the World Pork Expo 
for $48,000. Not bad, considering the av- 
erage hog fetches about $150, 

Tbe Eamharts' boar had the frame, 
muscle and genetic characteristics thatpmk 
producers love at a time whx consixecs 
increasingly insist x leaner pork. 

Tbe.fwm in New Carlisle, Ohio, diat 
purchased the boar has x feats about the 
return on its investmeat A mature boar can 
produce 20 to 30 doses of semen a weds; 
sold to farms in die United States or shipped 
abroad, these doses bring up to $150 each. 

The price paidlbr the Indiana boar was a 
record. But it didn’t last Later, a Yorkshire 
boar from Catifbniia was sold for $53,000. 

A parxhute instructor died during a 
tandem jump when be wrapped his arms 
around a British student to save his life, the 
instructor's family said. The police in Or- 
lando, Florida, could xt coozizm diat ac- 
xunt of the (kktfa of Michael Costello, 4^ 
killed near the Umatilla airport after his 
parachute failed to open. 

His student, Gareth Giiftiths, 21 , of Lx- 
don, survived the accident with a fractured 
lower spine. The parachute bacl^cfc was 
X Mr. Qistello, who was harnes^ to Mr. 
Griffiths's back. Mr. Costello landed x- 
demeaih his student; Mr. Griffiths is re- 
covering from surgery. 

His family believed Nfr. Costello landed 
X his back to break Mr. Griffiths’s fall, but 
the police were unsure. 

“When your parachute doesn’t woik, 
yx ’re at the mercy of gravity and Newton’s 
law,” the Umatilla police chief, Dxglas 
Foster, toU The Associated Press. “1 tmnk 
everyox would like to dunk die traino^ 
saved the student, but we have x way of 
knowing until we talk to the student.” 

Hospitals that xce routing per- 
formed autopsies have been xtdng bade 
to save money. But if anyti^, family 
members are quicker now than in the past to 
insist X answers about bow their relatives 
died. They may suqiect malpractice, or 
want to Ittim whether a genetic defect was 
involved. 

lithologists who operate laboratories 
had quietly done private autopsies for 
years, without advertisix thrar services. 
Now they are going puxe wiA sovioes 
like die toll-free numbtf of a Florida doctor, 
Brian McCarthy: 1-888-DR-AUTOPSY. 
“We can answer questions or relieve some- 
body’s anxiety or guilt,'* he said* 


Brian Knowltoo 


Murder Charge for Teenager 

Baby Bom at Prom Whs Suffoaxted, Prosecutor Sc^s 


By Blaine Harden 

Wfaitoigtoii PiWi SfTvwv 

NEW YORK — A New 
Jersey teenager who gave 
birth in a bathroom ^ her high 
scbxl prom, dien reoiraed to 
die dance floor and ate a 
salarl has been charged with 
murder after piosecutora as- 
set^ that an autopsy deter- 
mined the baby she discarded 
in a trash can was strangled or 
suffocated in a plastic l^. 

“The child was alive when 
be was born,” Jedm Kaye, the 
prosecutx for Moozxutb 
Coxty, said Tuesday. **It fits 
the d^ution of a 'loiowmg 
murder.’ 

Hie prosecutor saui at a 
news ct^erence th^ Melissa 
Drexler, 1 8. may have used tte 
sharp ed^ of a sanhaiy-aap- 
kin dispenser to cut the baby's 
umbili^ cord before dump- 
ing die newbora boy in a 
sbe fbund in a l^uoom stall. 

“Go tell the boys we'll be 
right xt,” Mr. Kaye said Ms. 
Chexler told a gir&ixd who 
had come into the bathroom to 
fetch her. The prosecutor said 
that Ms. Drexler, a vocational 
high school senior, put her 
dress back x, cleaned herself 
up and wera xt to meet her 
l^year-old date. He has since 
said be was the unknowing 
father of the child. 

The floor of the bathroom 
stall was left xveied with 
blood and the dead baby was 
sxn found tty a maintenance 
worker. Ms. Drexler, the 
prosecutor said, apparently 
nad kept her pre^ancy a 
cxiplete secret from faikly 
and friends, 

Sbe appeared in xurt for 
die first time Tuesday and 
uttered a bar^y audible “yes” 
to questions from Judge John 
Ricciardi of Superior Court, 


who set bail at $50,000. She 
pleaded not guilty. 

If cxvkted, Ms. Drexler 
faces life in prisx. Prosecu- 
tors said they probably would 
xt seek the death pe^ty. 

Details of (he baby boy’s 
death emerged the day after tile 
June 6 prom, but prosecutora 
had waited to file charges i rati l 
the medical examiner’s office 
xuld determine if be was bm 
airve and was capable of 
breathing X his own. 

Mr. Kaye said the autopsy 
fxud air in (he baby's in- 


testines, proving that he was 
able to breathe. Tbe cause of 
death, be said, was “asphyxia 
due to manu^ stranguJatix 
and obstnictix of tbe exteni- 
b 1 airway or orifices.” Tbe 
prosecutor later charged that 
the baby was stran^x or suf- 
focated after being put into a 
plastic bag. 

At his news conference, the 
prosecutx could xt expiate 
bow Ms. Drexler xparxtly 
managed to hide her {xeg- 
oancy fixi her scbxl friends, 
parents and boyfiiend. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. JUNE 26, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


A Growing Sport / 'Lips of Rouge. . .Fists of Fury' 

Wbman to Woman, They’re 
Duking It Out in the Ring 


By Julie Cart 

Ua Angela Times 


L OS ANGELES — His gold wire<runiTied glasses 
fogged, the Los Angeles-based fashion editor for 
Latin America's iea^g women's magazine was 
fanning himself with his glossy fbor-color 

product 

"They called me this afternoon, and told me to come out 
to this ... place," be said, swiping a hand throu^ the 
smoke at the dingy interior of the Country Club in Reseda, 
California, where, on this night, acutdng-edge hipness was 
happening: an all-women's boxing card. 

"I came here expeciiiig a fashion show, and it's all these 
badly dressed people and these, these . . . women S ghring . 
“Don’t you love it?" 

Who better than a fashion editor to what is in 
fashion? And by most measures, women’s boxing is in style 
— and demand — at the moment 
• In a USA Network poll of boxing fans last year, more 
than 80 percent responded that they wanted to see more 
women's boxing on television. 

• A female boxer, Christy Martin, cracked the bastion of 
mainstream sports joumaiism, the coveted cover of Sports 
Dlascrated. 

• Two months ago. a women's fight on die ABC ]»ogrm 
“Wide World of Sports’’ became the fust women’s boxing 
match to be broadcast over netwoik television. Women 
continue to be scheduled on the undercards of title fights. 



PmI Al^dcK Tana 

Luda R^ker, the former kick-booui^ champioii, wbo 
many feel is the best women's boxer in tiie world. 


and a women's bout is on the card of die Evander Holyfield- 
Mike Tyson heavywei^t title in Las Vegas m 
Satnrday. 

• Wmnen amateurs have been boxing in Golden Gloves 
compedtioa since 1994 and diis sumroer for tite first time 
will compete for a national amateur ch^pionsUp. 

Perhaps the truest test of the advancement and so- 
phistication of women’s boxing is that the flpHgling sport is 
plagued by the same problems prevalent in men's boxing; 
an alphabet soup of governing bodies, rival prorootets 
feuding and stealing fighters, boxers embellishing their 
backgrounds to make tbemseives more color^l, "star” 
fighters beginning to refer to themselves in the third per- 
son. 

With a dull predictability, women's boxing is following 
the c^cal-but-successfiil marketing strategy that pack- 
ages women athletes as possessing an iiresisdble com- 
bination of sex appeal and danger. It's an appeal that 
manages to dimiiush both the “product" and die con- 
sumer. 

During the sport's other small blip of attention in the 
mid- 1 980s, women boxers were billed as ' * Foxy Fighters, ’ ’ 
set Dp in evenings of “Leather and Lace." 'me '90s 
update to that was the title of the Reseda ail-women’s ftglu 
card: "Lij» of Rouge . . . Fists of Fu^.'* 

In fact, it is the amount of action in women’s fights that 
fans report they Jove. The women take the punches square 
on. Women don’t wear headgear and, just as men are 
required to wear cups to protect tiieir genitals, women wear 
padthng to protect tiieir breasts. 

Gina Guidi, a heavily tattooed welterwei^ titleholder 
wbo scored a first-round knockout that evening, later sat in 
the back of the club and surveyed the scene. 

"LoQkaFOUDdyou,'’shesajd. “To be quite honest with 
you, I know yvhat^s selling here tonighL I'll get in the ring 
with a prettier woman and get booed. Figure it out" 

The fashion editor did, witii one scan taking in the gaggle 
of bubbly youi^ women sausaged into spangly Won- 
deibras and sparitiing hot pants. They were assembled 
backstage, awaiting tire moment titey would cany peces of 
cardboard into the ring between rounds, indicating which 
round was coming up. 

T he juxtaposition of these women with the 
ni^t’s other performers occurs to few. Fresh in 
mind is the stoiy of a recent mixed boxing card in 
Salinas, California, in which tite {xomoters used 
female card modelers to the men's bouts and a man in tight 
swimming trunks to the women's bouts. Hie man lasted 
one rouno before be was driven from tbe ring, pelted with 
table-top projectiles. 

fit any end^vor. it pays to know your audience. Which 
raises the question, what is the appropriate demographic for 
women's boxing? 

“You’ve got the whole spectrum," said Fredia (The 
Cheetah) Gibbs, whose unhealed cut over an eye prevented 
her from fighting tiiai night. "You've got fi^t fans wbo are 
skeptical but also curious. You've got women’s boxing 
f^. And, of course, you've got the guys who like mud 
wrestling and wbo are tore hoping one of the women's tops 
will pop off during tbe fight. They're all here." 

Tenants of the strip mall in Hollywood are glancing 
nervously, again, ax their upstairs neighbor — Ae Wild 
Card gym — and wincing at tiie stream of horrifying sound 
leaking out the windows: 

“1 own you! You're mine! Anyone wants to rent this boy, 
see me!" 



Teresa Arnold swinging a right to the face of Bridgett (Baby Doll) Riley in a bout in Reseda, California. 


James Toney is bellowing at his rotund sparring partner 
while pawing like an irriti^ bear at the young man's 
head. 

This is the training home of Lucia Rijker, who, by tiie 
assessment of many, is the best female bmer in the world. 
Rjjicer, a Dutch tomer world kick-boxing champion, is 
sparring with a male fighter and listening intently to in- 
smictioos from her trainer, Freddie Roach. 

in their way. die pair exemplify two earily identified 
patterns in women’s boxing; women coining into boxing 
from the martial arts and kick-boxing and being trained by 
once-skeixical men who come to respect and admire dte 
women who prove their worth. 

‘ T've gotten some fiack from other ^ys.’ ’ said Roach, a 
former bmcer who has trained six wotIo champions. "They 
say: 'Roach, why are you training a girl? It's a man's sporL 
It’s a disgrace.' They are very shallow. Tliey should open 
up their eyes." 

Rijker is a self-assured, poised athlete and an excellent 
ambassador to women in boxing. She laughs at the com- 
mon question — should women be allowed to box? — 
understanding that asking permission is uzmecess^. 

“I'm here. 1 work harder than anyone else in this gym," 
Rijker said. “I've been a champion in another spore I take 
this seriously and respect everyone here. That’s ^ I can do. 
'That’s my part." 

If women’s boxing were more like men's, Rijker would 
be pitted gainst Christy (The Coal Miners* Daughter) 
Martin, boxing's most famous woman. Mrs. Martin’s story 
is well-documented: how she showed up at Jim Martin's 
gym in Bristol, Tennessee, with an entourage that included 
her mother and her Pomeranian: how Jim Martin surveyed 
his futtue wife and arranged with one of his filters to spar 
with the woman and bre^ her ribs, to teach ter a lesson. 

Ouisty Manio, of course, did not get her ribs broken — 
she married the traiso- and became a h^hly skilled boxer. 

"Offensively, she's wonderful." said Larry Merchant, 
boxing commentator for HBO Sports. "I watched her spar 
for several rounds with a young man. She almost never 
threw tire wrong punch.' ’ 

The Movie-of-tbe-Week plot line makes Martin's story 


irresistible, and her undeniable skill as a boxer helps, it was 
a match Involving Martin that gave women’s boxing its 
breakthrough. 

She and Diedrc GogarU' were paired March 1 6. 1996, on 
the undercard of the Tyson-Frank Bruno fight that featured 
a lemfied Bruno being knocked out in three rounds. 

Fans in Las Vegas and those watchii^ on pay television 
'were disgusted with the lack of action in the Tyson fight but 
were captivated by the blood and end-to-end acuon in 
Martin's figbL 

She won, stole the show and lent instant credibility to 
women's boxing. The fight was seen by 1.1 million view- 
ers — the second-mosi-w'atched boxing card in pay tele- 
vision history. 

A star, and a star's temperament, was bom. 

Tyson and Bruno were paid $.^6 million; Martin and 
Gogarty were paid .$18,000 in the Don King prtiduction. 
Martin began feuding with l^s, with whom she had a long- 
temi contract. Jim Martin reportedly sought $100,000 for 
her next fight and King refused. She has not fought since. 

M ARTIN'S feud with King led her to file a civil 
.suit in April charging him with breach of 
contract and damages for lost wages. Then, in a 
move that showed adults can come to rea- 
sonable i^reements where money is concerned. Martin 
signed up to box agaio under King's auspices. 

The blockbuster bout — a Manin-Rijker fight — that 
many believe would catapult women’s boxing into the 
really big rime, may be as much as a year away. 

Martin is represented by King and Rijker by his rival 
promoter, fob Ajum, and boxing's time-consuming dance of 
iM^otiation must take place before the fight is sciwuled. 

In the meanrirae. the women who fought in Reseda 
received S200 a round, a respectable payday for inex- 
perienced young fighters. 

*‘ 11161 %'$ got to be a reason promoters are paying these 
women, tiiey are not doing this to altruistic reasons." 
Merchant said. "I keep hearing there's a huge demand. J 
don’t know if titis will lastor not These women are explorers 
in space.'We don't know what they will find out there." 


House Votes to End 


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Bosnia Role in ’98 


By Bradley Crabam 

WaMngUM Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
House has voted to cut off 
funds for U.S. peacekeeping 
troops in Bosnia after June 
1 998, reflecting hardening re- 
sistarree in Congress to fur- 
teer extension of military 
presence there. 

President Bill Clinton has 
declared tiiat U.S. participa- 
tion in the NATO peace op- 
eration in Bosnia would end 
by ftea. But administration 
officials have insisted on re- 
taining some flexibili^, 
warning that tbe president 
would veto an attempt to 
write a pullout into the 
1998 defease authorization 
bUl. 

Nonetheless, an amend- 
ment requiring the withdraw- 
al passed the House, 278 to 
148, with nearly all Repub- 
licans and 57 Democrats vot- 
ing for iL 

The action may have little 
more than symbolic value, 
since tbe Seale’s version of 
the defense bill due for floor 
debate in July, contains no 
similar provision. 

Senators have appeared 
less inclined than House 
members to legislate a dead- 
line. 

Still proponents in the 
House, upset by Mr. Clin- 
ton’s decision late last year to 
depart from previous assur- 
ances and extend the deploy- 
ment by 1 8 months, said tiiey 
wanted to ensiue tbe presi- 
dent holds to his latest pullout 
plan. 


“It’s the president's date, 
it’s not my date," said Rep- 
resentative Steve Buyer. R^ 
publican of Indiana, the 
amendment's sponsor. 

Although the IS-month op- 
eration has gone more 
smoothly than expected, with 
no sold^ killed hostile 
fire. House members ex- 
pressed concern about the 
mowing cost of U.S. involve- 
ment, estimated to top $7 bil- 
liou by next year. 

They said the deadline pro- 
vision should serve uotice on 
European allies to be pre- 
pared to take over greater re- 
sponsibility in Bosnia afrer 
mid- 1998. 

An alternative amendment 
that would have required an 
earlier withdrawid — by 
December — failed by a vote 
of231tol96. 

Consideration of Bosnia 
came near the close of several 
days of often heated floor de- 
bate on the 1S)98 defense 
bill. 

The bill would add $331 
million to keep production 
lines open for i^e more B-2 
bombm, in addition to the 2 1 
dial Pentagon officials say are 
sufficient. 

It would block a Pentagon 
proposal to cat active-duty 
personnel by about 60,000 
below existing floors. 

And it woiud undo admin- 
istration plans to let private 
contrachxs bid to work at gi- 
ant air force maintenance cen- 
ters slated to closing in Cali- 
fornia and Texas — ^ans that 
were inirialiy conceived to 
protect defense jobs. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Strikes Loom at British Airways 

LONDON (AFP) — British Airways faces strikes during 
the peak summer period, after cabin crew voted overwhelm- 
ingly Wednesday to jxotest a salary issue. 

Members of die Transport and GCTeral Workers Unimi 
voted by a 3-to-i margin to protest an offer on pay and 
conditions that has already been imposed by the airline. 

Tbe union said it would decide next week rai the exact 
nature of die actions, which could be 24- or <^hour strikes 
and other forms of disruption. The union expects 9,0(X1 
ground staff to join the call for strikes, in a sep^te dispute 
over the selling off of the carrier's catering division. 


Rome Airport Police Gte Concerns 

ROME ( AFP) — The police at Rome's airport contend that 
the facility will be unable to with the open-border travel 

mandated by the European Ltnion's Schengen accords, unless 
the force is doubled. 

Tbe onion representing border policemen says "conditions 
for security checks are inadequate" at current manpower 
levels. 

Air New Zealand. Ansett international, Ansett Australia 
and Singapore Airlines have started a shared fares stnictuTB 
caUed &capade. f Reuters) 


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Forecast for Friday thnaugh SurKiay. as provided by AceuWealher. 



North America 
Sunny and peasant in the 
Nonheaa Friday and Sat- 
urday. then hatter ana 
more humid Sunday. 
Showers and guaty thun. 
darstoima, some wdh had, 
mB roam tram the northam 
fleckies into the northern 
Plaina Thundersioins wM 
also pop up near the Gutt. 
Hot and diy In the South- 
weal 


Europe 

Windy end cool across 
mch ol weetem and can- 
cal Europe Friday through 
Sunday. Scouaiw and lie- 
lartd will have some gun. 
Put southern England and 
Franca \o Poland ai\d 
goulhern Sweden will be 
cloudy with showers and 
gisadiar rams, warm and 
dry Iroffl Greece to Roma- 
nia and the Ukraine. 


Htfovy 

Snow 


Asia 

Sunny, very hoi and dry 
weaihW wtn continue hom 
Beijing on wait across ai] 
of ftorthem and western 
China through Sunday 
Typhoon Peter may spread 
heavy rains mto souiherri 
Japan and souinsin Korea 
over the weekend. Waim 
and humid in Tokyo with 
the chance (or a thunder, 
storm or two 


Asia 





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I 









INTEBNATIONAI. HERAl^D TRIBUNE, THURSIMY, JUNE 26, 1997 


EUROPE 



Ly> 


n^erlin^ an Old Villa Starts a New Life as a US. Cultural Institute 


By 'V^^Uiaxn Drozdiak 

MtfM«g<w»PwtStfrvfcf 

. BElOJDSr^Ever rioce the last Amer- 
sofcto left Bedia in 1994, Ger- 
jmifM Americans have been strng- 




adla to Di 


af • ^ 

;'_.L 

a» tima.% #ia,i 
^ . f«<rrSfcsi« i.%-r5 '' 

K , 

V U-: 'A . 

i» -SIMWC Mi !•; ; r . - 




■•and 5*5*^ w.T.'. 


I Resurgent Chit 


**0ii Hr .-'v: 

-it I’Uisw V. »- 

» I r» 

.a »M > K r< xrvi 

mm- !et 


czDcible the Cold War, tfie 

0eoae this city's western sector 

^^yvided a symbol of the Atlantic 

.apance’s cgnun it iTBut to fieedc^ 
•Now, as part of a boU initiative to 
assure fotuie Amenc^ influence in dbe 
gfcw ct^ial w a reunified Geonany, ibe 
veld by d^nited soldieis may soon 
ik filled 1 ^ a pai^ of distingDiriied 
gftists, scbolais, critics and writers inr 
vited to take iq> residence at a 40-room 
jjfkeside-villa tto will serve as the 
to pMT cm'Acadmy in Beriin. 

•Maiyor Ebeifaard Diepgea and.a 

Xroobled Aeroflot 
^ , Enlists the Elephant 

^ I The Associated Press 

^ ^MOSCOW — Seeing to brighten its 

P 1 fv linage, file Russian uriine Aeroflot has 
J 01 ritf esme iq> with a new mascot-type logo 
A ^ a winged.eleidiuL 

r Some cynics mi^t that an ele- 
pi^t is an ^)propriate symbol for an 
■ ■ ajfli'ne sthose ie|wtation has suftiered 
• ftom uncertain service, firequent delays 

" ; ski a troubluig safety record. 

|The airline's campaign began this 
, we^ with a series of print ud tele- 
vidflo ads widi an elephant in die sky. 
{Ihe ad’s slogan was “Light on its 
.T’^^vfeeL” 

•i.T ^'*(4 , ‘We wanted to use an antmal that 
' large, ftiendly, had a wann feeling 

aad repFesenCed power and individoality 

than bureaucracy,” Bruce Mac- 

^"^donald of (be the Russian advenisiog 
Agency Ptemier SV told The Moscow 
f 'I • 'nines. Ihe agency pranced die ad. 

[ nik Aentflothtfsturedintaestinitspio- 
vi/l m^on with an ofifer of roundtrio tickets 
^ to ai^ of its worldwide destinadons for 
$222. Ihe deal lasts ontil July 6. 


American ambassador, Richard 
C. HWbrooke, announced Wednesday 
vision of a grand American 
cutnral insbtution in Beriin would soon 
be translated into reality, thanw to a $3 
millipn founding grant donated by the 
foii%ofHansAtmiold,ODcealeaderm 
Berlin finucial circles and an important 

pBiroo of its 1920*s artisdc scene. 

^yor Diq^ said die academy 
which will accept its firat fellows next 

year and be known as the Hans Amhold 
Center, was destiiied to serve as a show- 

for Berlin’s vibrant intellectnal 

life. It will occupy the large fflansion on 

the Wannsee, where the Amhold family 
once lived before seeking refnge in the 
United Slates after the Nazis took power 
in 1933. 

’ V ^ historic moment in 
tbe history of Berlin and die United 


Stares,” said Mr. Holbrooke, the 
academy's first ehainnan, who served 
as afflb^sador to Germany in 1993-94 
and later negotiated tbe Bosnian peace 
accords 

“ft is the Jdnd of grand gesture 
will recoocile the past with the 
present,** he said 

Mr. Holbrooke said the academy had 
already xaised half of dte $10 minion 
required to fund the fim IS post-doc- 
tor^ sdiolars, who will be seleei fid in 
the months ahead from the aits, hu- 
manities, coltnre and public afiairs. 

He it was fitting that Mr. 
AmbOld's daughter and son-in-law, 
Aruia-Maria and Stqiben Kellen, a 
prominent couple in New York's cul- 
tural ai^ financial worlds, had supplied 
the critical financial boost to launw the 
insd&ite’s work. 


"Through this generous ^ft, the 
Amhold ramily, who were themselves 
forced m leave Germany in tbe 1930s, 
are helping establish in the very house 
they a living memorial to the arts, 
cukute and juiblic discourse for Amei- 
icans ccHning to Berlin,” Mr. Hol- 
brooke said. 

Tbe American Academy is seen as a 
vhal response to whu some influential 
Gennans and Americans see as the 
gro^g estrangement between their two 
nations as they pursue different strategic 
priorities in the poet Ckild War era. 

As die perinership nurtured by com- 
mon security threats has waned since 
the collapse of the Soviet Union, Ger- 
many hu become increasingly con- 
GBnM wife revitalizing the drive for 
European unity throughacloseri^»on 
wife France. In ihe United States, shift- 


ing ethnic and trade patterns have fo- 
amed greater anendon on Asia and Lat- 
in America. 

At the same dme, tbe U.S. cultural 
and diplomatic presence in many Euro- 
pean coonuies been greatly reduced 
by fee severe budget cuts inifxised by 
Congress. Within Gennany, the popul^ 
govemmem-sponsored cultural center 
known as Amerika Haus has been shut 
down in four rides. 

As the U.S. government has dimin- 
ished its profile abroad, cultural insu- 
tutions have b^ forced to turn toward 
the private sector in nder to survive. 
The American Academy will be ftinded 
entirely by {mvate sources, which its 
direaors hope will ensure its reflect 
and integrity as a independent American 
force in mitope’s cultural and intel- 
lectual CtMiununity. 


“We want this to be a lasting monu- 
ment ID U.S.-Gemian relalions,” said 
the honorary co-chairman, Henry Kis- 
singer. ‘ ‘ It will alter the U.S. presence in 
Berlin, replacing soldiers and govern-, 
ment adv isers wife scholars, artists, crit- 
ics and other pitfcssionals who will 
greatly enrich fee dialogue between our 
two nations." 

Hie villa itself resonates wife history. 
It was built a century ago for a jvom- 
inent banking family', the OppenMims, 
before passing into tbe possession of 
Hans Amhold. 

Confiscated by the Nazis, it was oc- 
cupied by Reichminisier Waller Funk 
undl fee Russians seized fee mansiem m 
1945 when the war ended. During the 
Four-Pbwer occupation of Berlin, it wa.s 
turned o\'er to the United States .Army, 
which used it as u recreation cenicr. 


BRIEFLY 


Swiss Agree to Panel 
On Holocaust Claims 

ZURICH — Swiss hank* have agreed to 
have Holocaust-era claims resolved by an 
indqieadent panel and not by tbe banks tfaem- 
selvea, fee Swiss Federal Banking Commis- 
sim said Wednesday. 

The sapervisoiy commission said bank s 
would publish a first list of fee names of 
dormant account holdera 00 July 23 in order to 
sp^ up claims from Holocuast survivors or 
their brirs. 

Ttie commission Tna4f» the 
in a joint statement with Paul Volcker, who 
heads a joint Swiss- Jewish commission is 

(robing Swiss bank records for traces of lost 
Holocaust fl^«Tn»g 

The new procedure would ai«rt rqilaee a 
Switt banking ombudsman, criticized by 
Jewish groups as in^e^ve, with tbe audit- 
ing compaiky ATAC Ernst & Young as fee 
central office for receivmg clainut and pre- 
paring them for the panel 

Tbe statement "indqieiKlent and 


(fejeedve intemadonal arIntraiioD paael" 
would have a majority of internarirmat mw n. 
bers and a Swiss presideoL (Reuters) 

Sih Suicide Reported 
In French Roundup 

Paris — a fifth suspect m France's mass 
crackdown 00 pedophilia has committed sui- 
cide, fee police said Wednesday. Ihe man, a 
schoolteariier whose identity was not dls- 
clMed, hanged himself in fee Atlantic coast 
town cd Royas after being released from 
custody and placed under investigatioD 
possesaoD of riiild aea videocassettes. 

The teacher one of more 800 
people rounded up in a hi^y publicized 
natioQwide police dragnet last week ordered 
Ity a public prosecutor in Macon. Human 
nghts groups and defease lawyers denounced 
dte opmtioo as onnecesrarily spectacular. 

Jnsciee Minister Elisabeth Guigon sugges- 
ted this week feat the police and fee me^ had 
gone overboard on the affair, and ^ gov- 
ernment spokeswoman, Oatheri iie Trant- 
mann, warned against making a spectacle out 


of the tra^. A total of 323 persons were 
placed under invesdgatiui, the first step to 
possible prosecution, and 24 were kept in 
custody in fee operation involving 2,500 po- 
lice officers. (Reuters) 

Papon Trial Faces Delay 

BORDEAUX — The trial of Maurice Pa- 
pon, facing charges of authorizing fee de- 
portation of Jews during World War D, could 
be delayed due a mcuiey shortage at the court- 
house, officials said Wednesday. 

The announceman was criticized by law- 
ym for tbe fiiinilies of dqtoned Jews, who 
said tbe Rr^h government could be viewed 
as itying to protect Mr. Papon, 86, who would 
be the highrat-ranldng Vichy official and the 
last living IRrenchman to face charges of crimes 
against humanity during World War D. 

The trial was due to begin in October, after 
conqiletion of renovations on tite nvun Bor- 
deaux courthouse. Officials said that a lack of 
funds could delay weak (» the building. 

Mr. Papon is charged with the arrest and 
dqiortation of 1 ,690 Jews, inclnding 223 chil- 
dr^ from fee Bordeaux regiuL (AP) 


I I OPTION^ 

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Annual Reports 


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Mil ^ 















PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBIINE, THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 199? 




INTERNATIONAL 


Iraq Still Lies About Arms, Outgoing UN Inspector Says 


By Barbara Crossette 

Nfw >bnl Tones Servke 


UNTIED NATIONS, New Yoifc 
Six years after the Security Coon- 
cil imposed its extraoidiDarily intrus- 
ive inspections on Iraq, that country's 
scientists are still under oiden to 
keep die nation r^y to mntrft ifriiat 
chemical weapons at notice, 
even if existing stocks are destroyed, 
according to a UN official 

' "We have documentary evidence 
about orders from ibe teadersh^ to 
preserve a stnUegic capability," 
said Rolf Ekens, the Swolish arms 
control expert who has directed the 
disarming of Iraq since 1991. ‘That 
means to keep the production equips 
meat ready to produce at any givoi 
moment" 

The commission headed by Mr. 
Ekens feels that it is closing in on 
Iraq’s misrile pro^ams, the In- 
ternational Atomic Energy Agency is 
optnnistic that it has shut dmvn po- 
tentially dangerous nuclear projects. 

But UN inspectors are focusing 
special c<»cem on the less visible 
bat very perilous chemical and bio- 
logical weapons and the delivery 
systems Bi^bdrul may be planning 
for them. 

Denied contracts in the West Iraq 


has turned to Eastern Europe and 
Asia in search of profited equip- 
ment Mr- Ekeus said in an interview 
a we^ before he st^ down at the 
end of the month to become 
Sweden's ambasador to the United 
States. 

hi six years, Mr. Ekeus said, the 
Iraqis have ces^utely refused to co- 
operate in good faith, mparentiy be- 
lieving th^ could fool ix^ectors 
who would then go away. com- 
m^its echoed reports be and his 
inspectors r^eatediy have made 
abrat Iraq in those years, and fms- 
tratiOD tfa^ nothing has seemed to 
change. 

"They come up with a new ex- 
planation every time," he said. 

‘They are voy, very innovative. 
This is frustrating ami irritating 
sometimes, bat also amusing, highly 
aronsiDg. Tb^ tell the most incied- 
iUe stories, fr is tike the ‘Thousand 
and One Nights,’ where every ni ght 
they tell a diiforeot story to save 
tiionselves." 

He said that die Iraqis fabricated 
declarations ^sout de^roying 
weapons, manipulated eWdence, in- 
terfered with inspections and 
routinely lied to monitors until con- 
fronted with documents, alter which 
tii^ simply changed their stories. 


‘ne ooncean about shadowy bio- 
logic and chentical pro j ects in- 
teudfres the iroaicy of stri^nng 
fraq of the abiu^ to hnllrl or .as- 
semble missiles, said Mr. &eus, 
who will be succeed as executive 
c ha i ma n of the UN Special C^- 
mission by Richard Butler, an Aus- 
tralian aims control e xp e rt who is 
now Australia’s rqrresentative at 
the United Nations. 

Mr. Ekeus says he is aware tiiat 
with his departure, the Iraqis may be 
tenq^C ^ change the ri&s in tiimr 
relations with the inflections 
m- that they will try to tost the of 

a new team diief. It is inqiortant, he 
said, that the Security Council, and 
the wc^ at large, km oessure cm 
Baghdad. A Dumb^othuddle East- 
ern and Eurcqiean countries have 
begun to urge a relaxation in sanc- 
tions. 

The Speraal Conusission, aimed 
witii the most advanced eqaqimeat, 
has the authority to inspect Ira^ 
sites, destroy weapons a^ confis- 
cate documents. By Security Coun- 
cil order, Iraq most comply if {Res- 
ident Saddam Hussein h^ any hope 
of easing or ending the sanctions 
inmosed on his goverament after its 
1990 invasion m Kuwait 

On Saturday, the Security Coon- 




















•vl-- 










cil tiireatoned to tighten the sanc- 
tions in tile fall if Iraq blocked or 
delayed investigations, as it has be- 
gun to do agam in lecm wedrs. 
Among other measures, tr^i of- 
ficials could be denied visas to 
travel abroad. 

"They blocked us at tisee loca- 
tions,*' Mr. Ek^ said, describmg 
his recent attempts to enter politically 
sensitive sites, vriiicfa legohed tiie 
piesaice of an Iraqi officiaL 'Tbey 
delay^ us mice seven hours, once 
five. When foe high Iracp official 
aoived, he waited until tiie site com- 
mander cleaned out the place and 
then said, ‘You can go in.^" 

On Monday, Dmuty Prime Min- 
ister Tariq Aziz m Iraq called foe 
charges m noncoopeiation "an 
American fabrication in which Rolf 
Ekeus took part" 

"Iraq has not yet been able to give 
ns an acceptaUe erolaxutiai of what 
foey are doing," W. Ekeus said. 
Cb^cal we^xms “are the most 
difficult because Ii^. with its food 
situation, necessarily must be al- 
lowed to produce pesticides for bogs 
and rats," he said. "But from there, 
the same type of equiixnent and cer- 
tun chemi^ confounds can also be 
manipulated into tnairing chemical 
poisons for humans, have to 


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iDOnitor these dual-capabili^ sites.** 
Among the cbenncal agents Iraq 
already has produced on a huge 
scale are musard gases and an ex- 


ceptionally d^y nerve gas known 
as VX wiuch Ira^ first denied they 
had, then arim toad they had exper- 
imented with in 1994-^. 

"Of course, we had found doc- 
uments and had investigated, so th^ 
couldn’t deny it,** Mr. Ekw said. 
"Then we mani^ to detea a huge 
amouni of imports of certain chem- 
icals, so-called precursms. which 
could not be us^ really, for any- 
thing but VX production.’* 

" ‘W^ did yon import tiiese?’ 
we asked. ‘Where are foey now?* 
They said, *We destroyed them 
secikly.* " 

"Then comes this matter of secret 
destruction, which is large-scale," 
Mr. fficeus said. "When did the 
secret destruction take place? Who 
decided? Who gave the order? Who 
carried out the order?" 

Mr. fficeus said his team inter- 
viewed people all the way down foe 
line onto tl^ found someone who 
had carried out foe destruction of 
material tiiat Iraq denied having. But 
was it ail destroyed? Mr. Ekeus said 
that lingering questions about chem- 
ical weapons stodts remain. 


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GUARDED — Ahmed Mousa Daqamseh, the Jor- 
danian seddier being tried for killing seven Israeli 
girls in March, waving to his fanuly Wednesday. 


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Centrist in Turkey 
Told to Press On 




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Rciuers 

I ANKARA — Mesui Yil- 
maz, the Turicish centrist, said 
after a round of talks with 
party leaders on Wednesday 
that President Sul^man De- 
mirel had asked him to con- 
tinue his efforts to form a new 
government 

‘‘TTie pn^ident asked me 
to continue in my duty," Mr. 
YUmazsaid. 

Earlier, the caretaker prime 
minister, Necmettin Erbakan, 
hit back at a bid by Mr. Yil- 
maz to frxge a secularist co- 
alition, presenting a petitixm 
signed by a majority of mem- 
bers of Parliament rejecting a 
plan to keep his islamisis 
from power. 

Deputy Prime Minister 
Tansu Ciller urged Mr. Yil- 
maz to surrender the mandate 
to form a government 

Designated by the presi- 
dent last week to form a cab- 
inet Mr. Yilraaz is just short 
of foe majority needed to win 


a vote of confidence in ifae 
550-5eat Paziiament. 

He has won the backing of 
secularist deputies from the 
lefr and right but uill rely on 
support from dissidents in tte 
rival conservative True P^ 
Party, whose leader. Mrs. 
Ciller is allied with Mr. 
Erbakan. 

Yilmaz has given him- 
self until early next week to 
present President Demirela 
proposed list of ministers to 
replace Mr. Erbakan's one- 
year-old govemmenL 

Efoakan resigned last 
week in an effon to resolve a 
growing dispute with armed 
forces leaders opposed to re- 
ligious activism. 

He has proposed a re- 
vamped coalition of his Is- 
lamists and the True Path un- 
der Mrs. Ciller. 

He criticized the president 
for picking Mr. Yilmaz with- 
out noting the pro-Islamlc al- 
liance had more deputies. 


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Winnie Mandela Faces irlii liftnk Set to 


Truth Panel Subpoena 


By Suzanne Daley 


New York Toney Sm-ice 


JOHANNESBURG — 
South Africa’s Tnifo and Re- 
conciliation Commission, es- 
tablished to investigate foe 
atrocities in the country's 


past, will subpoena Winnie 
Madikizela-Mandela, I^si- 
dent Nelson Mandela's 
former wife, to a closed ses- 
sion of the panel according to 
officials of foe cranmission. 

The commission has been 
investigating the activities of 
her notorious former bc^y- 
guaids, known as foe Man- 
dela United Football Club. 
Several of the club's mem- 
bers have asked for amnesty 
and in their applications ap- 
parently have revealed details 
of the club’s activities and the 
role foey say the president's 
former wife played in them. 

Dumisa Ntsebeza, head of 
the commission’s investigat- 
ive unit, said in a recent in- 
terview foat the information 
before the Truth Commission 
went far beyond what has 
been known about the club's 
activities. A commission of- 
ficial, who asked that he not 
be identified, said the new 
information involved perhaps 
as many as 1 1 slayings. 

Among those lo have asked 
for amnesty is fezry RiehaH- 
son, the club "coach." who is 
in jail for his part in foe po- 
litically motivated murder of a 
14-year-old boy in the late 
’80s. The youngster. Stompie 
j Seipel was kidnapp^ from a 
church home and taken to Mrs. 

, Madikizete-Mandela’s h^ne, 

I where he was fatally beaten. 


Mrs. Madikizela-Mandela. 
who maintained she took in 
the teenager to protect him 
from sexual abuse at the 
church home, was charged 
with murder in the case. But 
in 1991. she was convicted 
only of kidnapping and being 
an access<»y to ilte beating. 
She received a six-year Jml 
tenn. but her sentence was 
later reduced to fines. 

The Truth Commission, set 
up to spare the country from 
the expense and political di- 
visiveness of trials, is inves- 
tigating political crimes com- 
mitted by all sides under 
apartheid. It has b^n granted 
the power to give amnesty to 
people who confess all It ^so 
has the power to subpoena 
testimony for its own inves- 
tigations. Such testimony has 
always been given privately. 
officials said. 

The commission does not 


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have the power to prosecuie 
but it can turn its inrormation 


over to the justice system. 

The Mandelas divorced 
last year after two days of 
court testimony in which tbe 
president, who spent more 
than 27 years in jail. «ud that 
his former wife was not in- 
terested in him when he was 
released. During his years in 
prison, she had been a tireless 
campaigner on his behalf. Biit 
once he was free. Mr. Mafi- 
dela said, she had never once 
come into their bedroom 
while he was awake. 

Alter the divorce, which she 
opposed. Mrs. Madikizela- 
Mandela decided to begin us- 
ing her maiden name as well ^ 
her married name. 


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Yeltsin Sidelines Minister 


Shown in Gangland Sauna 


Ac'ilft'r.t 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin formally sus- 
pended the Russian minister of Justice. Valentin Kovalev 
pending an investigation into allegation 
that the minister was videotaped with naked womrti in a 
sauna frequented by criminals. 

Krwlin's press service said the susteiisioQ 
effect immediately. 

l-ast week, the monthly tabloid Soverriieuno Sekreino 
(1 op Secret) published grainv photograifos taken from a 
Videotape that, the paper said', showed Mr. Kovalev with 
naked women in September 1995. 

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«su wuiiicn in aepiember 1995. 

Nfr. Kovalev, a law school graduaie and former Com-j 
munist functionary, was named minUter of justice in. 
January 1995. He has denied doing anything wrong hur 
asked for time away from his job to clear his reputariou. • 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, ZHURSDAX JUNE 26, 1997 




PAGE 7 


eflS*'' 


INTERIUTIONAL 


Japanese Grow Weary 
Of Tokyo’s Heavy Hand 

< 

! Panel Charts Government DecentraUzation 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

l/UenteiuaalHarddTributie 


TOKYO — Tb his former colleagues. Reii- 
’ chi Kuwahara is a oimcoaL 

( For four decades, Mr. Kuwahara worked at 
I the ^borMxnistiy. He rose as high as deputy 
I miinster and belpM build the powerful central 
I boreancracy crated with tumixig war-tom 
I Japan inU) one of the world’s ridiest nations. 
I Nowadays, Mr. Kuwahara, 75, sits on die 
] Decentralizadon Promodon Committee, a 

* seven-member panel enqiowei^ to transfer 
I authority fix)m cenual-govemment bureau- 

ciats to their country cousins. 

J The inqietus for the decentralization of 
, I power in Jt^ian comes from the nation's 
I voters. They no longer see the need for an 
; afanighty central boTMociacy. 
i Tfuty want decentralization becanse of the 
! central bureaucracy's recent tniahanriinig of 
i the economy and a spate of scandals involving 
1 top officials. At the same time, the end of the 
I Cold War and the spread of globalization has 

• shifted their focus from naHnnfti security to 
I local ectmomic survivaL 

1- “For.50 years, Japan has been dominaled 
by Kasnmigaseki — poUtimUy , econoaucally 
and culturally,” Mr. Kuwahara said, referring 
to the TcdtyO neighborhood synonymous wi£ 
Japan’s central government bureaucracy. 

' *But since the end of the Cold War and the 
advent of globalization that arrangement has 
become irrelevant” said Mr. Kuwahara, now 
mayor of Fukut^ in soutbera Japan. 

Japw set up the Decentisdizatimi Promo- 
‘■'tion Committee three years i^o to draft bind- 
ing recommendations on decentralizing bu- 
•Oeauciatic power by 1 999. Since die panel was 
‘■‘'formed, H has spent most df its time drawing 
iip blueprints to ^evan:^) the taz system, the 
^/chief source of power for the cattral-gov- 
r>eniment bureaucracy. 

' " Under the existing system, the central gov- 
■'hmment collets two thir^ of the nation’s 
taxes but spends only a third. It allocates die 
-Remainder to local governments, largely at its 
'■^discretion. The ^tem has been widely ait- 
cjcized for wasting taxp^eis’ mmiey and 
^denying local officials the freedom to meet the 
*%eed$ die areas oversee. 

The system also gives central buieancrats 
^^discretionary powers to veto (RXiposed local 
f* projects In 1997, the central government is 
^expected to dispense up to 20 trillion yen in 
Yeveoue it collected in 19^ but '«ifinnf 
spend. 

,Asavis(ttoalmostaaypartofJapanoutside 
'Tdryo rdtests, tiiis centrauzed sys^ has re- 
in many towns boasting gleaiiung roads, 
libraries and town halls lariring basic 
’-sewage treatmeoL It has also left many major 
Japanese cities with tiaiispart Units too pocK* for 
'dim to compete effectively in ^obal trade. 


Under the new system being drawn Ity 
the DeceatraUzatimi Promotion Oormmttee, 
Mr. Kuwahara said local bureaucrats would 
have greater leeway to tax and qieod, al- 
though it is still urKiear how tar the reforms 
will go. 

To promote decentralization of bureaucrat- 
ic power, dw government has also floated die 
idrartfinovingimiastri^ onlsi^ Tokyo. Pre- 
sumably, the confusion following such a 
move would leave central -goye mm eni bi^ 
reancials in disarray and diminish their 
power, analysts say. 

In any case, few e iq iect the move to take 
place of the strain it would place on 

government finances, already deqiiy in the 
red. 

For diar part, central goverament burean- 
crats say they would wil&igly band some of 
feeirpowerfodieircoontiy cousins, excqxdiat 
th^ lade savvy and should not be trusted. 

Tlus was a powerful argument when Ja- 
pan’seconomy waspun^ akxig. But it lacks 
force whfa J^on struggling to recover from hs 
worst postwar recession. Partly as a resilt, 
some central govemmeat bnrraucrats have 
started to fveak ranks. 

‘‘Central goveznmeDi bureaucrats have 
long ridiculed lo^ officials lor being mept 
anrf parochial,” said Tosbinori Tanabe, an 
author and an econmnist at the Bank of Ja- 
pan.” But if local offidals bad agreater say in 
running Japan, I rtiink diey would do a better 
job at (xomotiog local developmeaL” 

Although central bureaucracy in Jqen 
dates from die 7th century, die system has its 
roots in the Meiji Period (1868-1912). 

Afraid that Westem imperialists ooight try 
to lyiirtnian! Japan, the goventment formed a 
arong central Dureaucracy to ooordinace na- 
tioQvnde industrialization and build up the 
aimed forces. 

The oential goveinment bnreaucraity per- 
severed aito Worid War II and went on to 
play a pivotal role in economic revitalization. 
It was widely revered Ity ordinary Japanese 
until as recently as the eariy 1990$. 

In the latest attend to curb didr powers, 
however, central govanment bureaucrats ap- 


eWorld Bank Set to Go Green 


Agence Frtutet-Prase 

, UNITED NATIONS, New York — The 
prraident of the World Bank unveiled a five- 
point en>tironmental plan Wednesday and 
■said he would recommend creation of an 
^independent panel to eosure that piojects fin- 
^ kneed by the bank are ecologically fiieodl^. 

“As an institution dedioued to reducing 
[ ‘poverty, we at the bank are more aware tiian 
‘^cver of the continuing link between the de- 
'-grading- environment and the poverty still 
-^Fllcting somany of the world’s people,” the 
'loank president, James Wolfensohn, said in 
''■reinaiks prepared fix' die Eardi SummiL 
'Ihe plan includes a strategy for ij^le- 
menting a climate-change treaty to be signed 
* 'in December in Kyoto, J^na 

Under the tre^, de^loping countries 
' would benefit from investments by indus- 
"Irialized countries to help them reduce green- 
house gases. 

' - Ou biodiversity, the bank has joined forces 
■‘\vith the World Wildlife Fund to protect 10 
' percent of each of the world’s forest types by 
' 2000 and target 100 million hectares of wood- 
*■ ‘lands for improved management. 

■ To stem ozone depletion, die bank seeks die 
''closure of cbloroiluoiocarbon productUm 
■ 'plants and of black markets that trade in the 
damaging substance in Russia. Mr. 
Wolfmsc^ estimated the cost at $27 millkxL 
The bank will assist the Desertificatirai 
. 'Convention to mobilize investment and co- 
. 'ordinate activities to stem desertificadoa, 
Vhich now affects one-quarter of the Eardi’s 
"land area. 

- ' It also expects to lend about $3S billion by 
'S020 to deal with the crisis feeing die wcxld's 
‘i'jresb water supplies. Twenty countries face 


serious shortages, and the number is expected 
to double in 25 years. 

EnvirraunentaUsts, meanwhile, were cri- 
tiemng the World Bank for investing in {xoj- 
ects that aggravate global climate change. 

A report by the Wasbingtoo-based Institnte 
for Policy Studies found that fossil-ftiel en- 
ergy projects financed by die bank in the last 
five years would emit more carbon dioxide 
over the life of the pojects than today's 
annual emissions by all dw worid's countries 
combined. 

Mr. Wolfensohn said he would reaxmnend 
that die Weald Bank board an in- 

depeodenc panel to monitor future pro j ects 
and ensure diey comply with emissions stan- 
dards. 

■ Concern Over Arctic FblhitioiL 

A ^bal effort must be made to fi^t 
poUntion accnniulating in die Arctic that us 
contanunated its people and wUdUfe with 
toxins, Norway's enviroaineat minister said 
at the Eardi Summit on Wednesday, Reutexs 
reported. 

“Ihe issues have became global issues,** 
the minister, Toibjoem Beratsen, said. 

“There is mounting pressure on the unique 
and vulnerable environment of die Arctic,” 
be said. 

Lars Erik Liljelund, of die Arctic Mon- 
itoring Assessment Program, said ” the Arctic 
is the nnai storage of many contaminants used 
on a global sc^e,” su^ as heavy metals, 
persistent organic chemicals and i^oactive 
wastes. 

The mooitxiag program was started in 
1991 to track effects of pollution diat is car- 
ried Ity water and winds to the Arctic. 


Get Out More, Get Fewer Colds 

Jiaiefy of Contacts Lowers SusceptihUityf Stiufy Finds 


By Susan Gilbert 

New K'rt Times Service 


NEW YORK — Correlating friendship 
with health, a new study has found that 
people with a broad array of social ties are 
sigoificantiy less likely to catch colds ihan 
those with sparse social networks. 

Tte incidence of infection among people 
who knew many different kinds of pet^le 
was nearly half that among those who were 
relatively isolated, the researchers reported 
T^ lack of diverse social contacts was the 
strongest of dw risk fectora for colds that 
were examined, including smoking, low 
V itamin c intake and stress. The study was 
published Wednesday in The Journal of die 
American Medical Association. 

“Every incronent in die size, of the di- 
versity of the network had an effect on die 
chance of getting a cold,” said the study’s 
lead au^r. Dr. Sheldon Cohen, a psy- 
chia^ professor at Carnegie Mellon Uni- 
versity in I^biiigli, who published pi- 
oneering research in 1991 showing a 
connection b^een stress and colds. 

One curious finding was that the total 
number of people in a person's social world 


had no bearing on his chance of devek^nng 
a cold. Hie key was the vaiie^ of people. 

Dr. Cohen says that having a diverse 
social network is beneficial because it tem- 
pers a person's lespMise to stress. 

Other researchers praised the sbuty. 

“If you didn't believe that lack of social 
suppe^ can cause you to get sick, here's an 
experimental study diat ought to ccnvince 
aitybody,” said Redfotd Williams of 
the Duke University Medical Center. 

The new study involved 276 healdiy 
adults from 18 to 55 years old. First, they 
were asked to name ue types of relation- 
ships in their social circle from a list of 12. 
The cathodes included spouse, childien. 
otiiCT relatives, neighbora, fiirads, col- 
lea^es and members of so^ or religioas 
groups. 

Next, the volunteers were given nose 
drops containing cold viznses. The people 
with the most categories of social relati^- 
sh^ had the lowest susceptibility to colds. 
The incideiice oi colds in me stn^ was 35 
percent among die petqile wife six or more 
types of relatioiisl^, 43 pexcent among 
feose with four to five t^ies and about 
percent among feose wife dsee or fewer. 



BRIEFLY 


J am il Stlw i t/ RBOICB 

IN THE STREAM — FcHreign Minister Kiana Kinkd of Germany takiiig a canoe 
break with journalists this week on the Lahn River, northwest of FTankfiiit. 

Ally Warns Kohl on Euro 

Bavarian Leader Backs Strict Budget Polici^ 


By John Schmid 

imemaSoHoi Henid Tniaae 


in a Afferent light 

Most dama^ngly , fe^ are held responsible 
for letting Jspan sli^ into its worst postwar 
recession afrv land and share prices crashed 
in fee early 19905. 

A series of indictments of hi^Hraaldng 
boreancrats frx cover-ups and payerff scandals 
has also sullied their lepotatioo. 

‘*I never feoogihtl would say feis, but Japan 
no longer needs a strong central bureaucra- 
cy,” hfr. Kuwahara said, “limes have 
changed, and regional towns and etties like 
Fukuoka now ne^ to talte charge of their own 
destinies.” 


FRANKFURT — A leader of one of 
Chancellor Hdnnit Kohl’s coalition parties 
issued his strongest threat ytA. on Wednesday 
to fight any attempt tty to deviate 

even mOdly from the qualification criteria for 
the new European cnnency. 

Saying tzis party stood s<piarely behind him, 
fee staunchly conservriive Bavaiiaa premier, 
BHmnnH Stofixi, pledged that be and his 
Christian Social Union colleagues would offer 
“bttter resistance” if fee Bonn government 
did not meet the strict interpretation oi the 
Europe Union’s deficit bmefamarks. The 
rhrigrian Socfel Uition is the Bavarian sister 
party of Mr. Kohl's Christian Democrats. 

Mr. Stoiber*s comments cocUd fiutberpoison 
fee pdilic mood in Gennany against the euro, 
fee propcoed ct&rency. 

And fee challenge escalated Bonn’s budget 
crisis, putting Hnance Minister Theo Waigel 
under rener^ pressure to take politicaUy 
painful ste{^ to meet fee deficit target for the 
euro's 1999 launck An economics expert in 
hfr. Kohl’s party, friedhelm Ost, accuse Mr. 
Waigel tills vreek of ‘ ‘gambling away mneh of 
the credibility” of the govenunent through a 




recent series of failed attempts to plug Bonn's 
deficits. 

“Potting together the 1998 budget is taldns 
laoe in an extremely difficult envbx)nmefit,'~ 

~ '. Waigel coneeded Wednesday, refeiiing 
to the Imest protests from Gern^ indus- 
trialists, who complain they will be hard hit 
under Mr. Wai^ a lax ola^ 

Few expect fee comition to break up, 
lai^y bemuse Mr. Stoiba’*s main interest 
appears to be next year's elections in Bavaria. 
But both Mr. Stoiber and his party have shown 
a strong independence streak in the rais- 
ing the prospect that M*. Stoiber will cam- 
paign openly against Boon's European 
policies next year, when Mr. Kohl runs in fee 
federal elections. 

Stoiber's antagonism also represents a 
public defiance of fee authority of Mr. 
Waigel, a Bavarian who is chaim^ of tiie 
Christian Social Unic». 

A rift within tiie govenuneoi immediately 
flared after the remarks. 

Wolfgang Geriiardt, leader of the Free 
Democratic P^, accused Mr. Stmber of 
cbngerous “anti-euro populism.” If such re- 
sistance led to a “delay or abandonment of the 
common Eurc^ean cuneDcy,” Mr. Geihardt 
said. Cfonnan industry and j(^ would suffer. 



Any iMpmfRMkn 

50 YEARS ON — Ex-inmates of a Japanese war camp protest- 
or Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto’s talks in Tte Hagtie. 

Brian Kdtfa, 75, a Gruff Character Actoi^ 
Is Found Dead at His California Home 


Bomb Wounds 50 in Algeria 

ALGIERS ^ A bomb lipped tiaoogh a tailrood^ 
atnmittatian Wednesday bt&idaAJgies,tearingfee^ 

in half and.woondn^ more dian SO people, emei geiuty 
woifcetssakL 

.Tbe goventment, which has tried fo tiom the 
’wtenoe af 'tfie country’s insurgency, did not sninc- 
' fha&^ onifiim die bla^ and stare radio and television 
uations wen am inunedfeiiriy reporting it. 

- . Bsc tire Banach tail station, east of tire camfel, re- 
mained filled wife smoke an hdor after the nufenemung 
expfoabaL Blood, cushioned seats, shaotered glass and 
trsm doOTs were strewn aoDSS tbe platform. 

Most of die Wetima wete'takea to nearby hospitals, 
emerg e ncy waters said. . . « 

There was no inunediate claim of re^onsibility for tire 
^ attack, but suspickm fell on Islamic muhants. (AP) 

Mobutu May Stay in Morocco 

TANGI&RS — The former Zairian diciator. Mobutu 
Sese S^, and his entourage will probably hike up 
peipranent leridence in Morocco as otirer countries mrn 
their backs on him. 

“No one wants him, "a close aide to Mr. Mobutu said, 
despite the numetous n^otiaiions to find a new hmne for 
him. Mr. Mobutu, 66, fled Kimhasa on May 17 ahead of 
fee advitoch^ reM forctt of Laurent Kabila. 

' He arrived in fee Moroccan coital, Rabat, on May 23 
after a rixut stay in Gabm. The Moroccan anthonties 
said fe^ were granting him residence for a few days on 
.-humiuiitarian Bounds . 

On June 19,te and members of his fam^ moved to the 
luxury Mirage Hold, near l^u^^ers, requisitioned by ttie 
Moroccan govenunent oa his behalf. 

Mefecal sources in Thngiets indicated diat die fonner 
dictator was suffisring from cancer of tbe colon as wen as 
prostate cancer. (AFP) 

Clule Rescues 250 From Snouj 

SANTIAGO — Oukan Air Force hdicopiers have 
been rmeued more dian 250 people who were mq^ied by 
Uioardsfor six days at a border CR^siiig high in the Andes 
on the frontier wife Aigentma, anlhaiy officials said. 

Most cti die people were stranded at the remote Los 
IJbenadores bender ^tion after heavy snow forced them 
to abandon die cars, buses and trucks in which tii^ woe 
traveling. 


although two suffeira health 
cue,” an air force spokesman, 
day. 


le were in quite good cmditioa, 
>iems during the res- 
Ciftientes, saidTues- 
(Reufers) 


Brazilian Police Biot Over Pay 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Thousands of police demanding 
higher wages have rioted, leaving one officer in a coma 
atobe was shot in die face, the police said. 

A demnistralioQ turned violent Tuesday after officers 
tried to break into tbe police headquarters in Belo Ho- 
rizonte, 330 kilometers west of Rio de Janeiro, a state 
police official said by telephone. 

'The injured policeman, Valerio dos Santos Oliveira, 
35. was shot as he defeat fee headquarters and was 
bter declared brain dead, the official said. The police said 
th^ did not know who fired the shot. 

*Ihe police officers, who earn the equivalent of $223 to 
$279 a month, are demandii^ a moi^y raise of $744. 
The government is leering ^S. (AP) 


Roi aania Trying Hard 
For a NATO Inyitation 

Popular Backing Put Above 85 Percent 


By Peter S. Green 

liaemaiional Herald Trilmne 



New YorkTimet Service 

Brian Keith, 75, die gruff, sturdy 
, character actor whose roles in filzns 
and on television tanged from West- 
ern gunslingen and sm&U-town po- 
lice chiefs to private eyes and the 
Manhattan bectelor uncte raising 
three children in “Fanuly Affair.” 
was found dead Ttesday at his botrc 
in Malibu, California. 

Icesman 
avecom- 

— had been 

suffering from cancer, said a spokes- 
wtKnan for his manager. Bob 
Schiller. 

Mr. Keith made his film debut at 
^ 3, but his adult career, spanning 
moretiian35yeaisbeginniflgin 1953, 
brought him his grea^ popularity as 
the star of a succession of television 
series. 

In addition to “Family Affair,” 
which ran from 1966 to 1971, 
included “Cnreadcr” (1955-56), 
“The Westerner” (1960), “The Bri- 
an Keith Show” (1972-74), “Lew 
Archer” (1^5). “HardcastJe & Mc- 
Cwmidc” (1983-S6), “Pursuit of 
Happiness” (1^-88) and “Heart- 
Uufe” (1989). 

“Series come and series go, but 


Mr. Keith posbteiitly lingers (^” 
John J. O'Connor wrote in ^ review 
in The New York Times of fee debut 
of “Archer,” in which Keith, gnm^y 
and stone-feced, played (he detective 
created by Ross Macdonald. 

Beginning with “Pied Fiper 
Malone” in 1924, Keith made more 
than 40 films. His adult career began 
in 1953 wife tbe western “Anow- 
bead.” Heplayed ahomicidal rancher 
in “'The Violenl Men” (1955). 

Among his many otbv filnu were 
“IHve Against fee House” (1955), 
“The Yoong PliiiiMli»ipMans ** 
(1959), "The Parent 'nap” (1961), 
“The Russians Are Craning, the Rus- 
siat^ Are (Zomiog” and “Nevada 
Smife” in 1966, “Reflections in a 
GoidenEye” (1967), “TheWindand 
the Lion”- (1975), in which Keitii 
played Theodore Roosevelt, and 
“Young Guns” (1988). 

Mr. Keith, whose fell name was 
Robert Brian Keith Jr., was bom in 
B^ronne, New Jersey. His fetiier, 
Robert, was a Broadway and silent 
screen actor ufeo also wrote plays and 
for early films beftne ap- 
pearing in a succession of HoUyvtoM 
productions from the eaiiy 1930s to 
1961. 


BUCHAREST — Eveiy evening 
for the last three weeks. Florin Calin- 
escu, one of Romania's most popular 
television personalities, has stood on 
a pile of postcards on a studio fioor 
aiM picked the winner of 10 milli on 
lei (about $1,400), a year's average 
salary in this impoverished country. 

The is part of a campaign launched 
by American-owned P^TV, Ro- 
mania's top-rated station, to mobilize 
popular support for Rranania's long- 
shot bid fra membersl^ in the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organiwition. 

It is backed by weekly debates tiiat 
have included IbieigD coneqx>adeiils 
and Piresideiit ifeml Coastantinesco, 
and blanket news coverage of events 
leadmg up to the NA’TO awnmit in 
Madrid on July 8-9. 

Romanians are desperate for out- 
side confirmation that de^te cro- 
turies of Thrkish and Rnssian dom- 
ination, tb^ are truly European. 
Buoyed by tiie publicity, th^ have, 
like DO ofera people in the framer 
Cornmuniabtoc, embraced tiieirgov- 
ernronit's bid to utin an invitation to 
NATO. While polls show that barely 
60 percent of Czechs suspoit tiieir 
country's roembersfajp bid, Romanian 
polls regularly show over ^ percent 
support for joining. 

^ the recent U.S. decision to favor 
the Czech Rqiublic, Poland and Hun- 
gary in the first expansion round, but 
not Romania, has proveted a finny of 
diplomatic and political activity, as 
tbe govenunent tries to prepare tiie 
population fra a rejection in Madrid, 
and win some reassoraiice that Rev 
mania is not out in tiie cold. 

A flat “No” could shate the co- 
alition regime and slow the growing 
flow of essential forragn investment 
Prime Minister Victra* Cirabea flew 
to Washington last week, meeting 
briefly with Secretary of State 
MadejbyAJjaigi^andRneigoMfe 

Brussels and London^uwe^^ 
“Our purpose until the final mo- 
ment is to jma NATO in the first 
wave,” Mr. Constantinescu said over 
tbe weekend. “If this is not possible 
we want Romania to be oominaied. 
and we want a clear date set fra Ro- 
mania to begin neg o ti ations, and this 
date ^lild wAbe later fean 1999.” 

Bucharest week is awash with 
rumors tiiat Piesideai 'Bill Clinton 
will visit after tte Madrid summit to 
announce that Romania is eoqiected to 
join NATO in a later round. 

Tak^ office only last December, 
after six years of misrule and half- 
baked reforms under Ion Diescu, his 


fonner Communist predecessor, Mr. 
Coastantinescu has doue most of 
what NATO would like new membeis 
to do. His government has settled 
long-standing disputes wife its neigh- 
bors Ukradne, Moldova and Hungaty. 
It has sent peaceke^wra to Bosnia, 
Albania and Angola. Its army is one of 
only two credible forces in Central 
Eurc^ — wife Poland's — and Ro- 
mania argues tiiat it occupies a key 
position on tiie alliance's soutiieastem 
flank while extending NATO's um- 
brella of stability to Balkans. 

Nationalists and fonner Commu- 
nists are maiginalized, and paiiiful 
economic measures have cut infia- 
tirai, stalMlized the currency and 
jump-started privatization, w inning 
applause from the Internationa] Mon- 
etary Fund. 

m^e DO longer vriuq}er about the 
Communist-era Securitate police 
puUii^ fee strings. Instead, Rooraai- 
ans are adapting to the market, buying 
stocks and tig htening fe^ belts as 
prices are freed and wages sink. 

But six months of reform was not 
enough to convince fee United 
Ststtes. 

“Romania will not enter NATO in 
this round,” fee U.S. ambassador in 
Bucharest, Alfred Moses, said last 
weekend. “Fra Romania the question 
was haateall y nnenf economic refomt 
Has it been consolidated or do^ ite 
country require a bit more time?” 

But there is little sig n thiu a re- 
jection at Madrid will harm the cur- 
rent course of reform. 

Alin Teodorescu directraof IMAS, 
a Bucharest-based polling organiza- 
tion, said: “Ifs not support for what 
the govenunent means, but their 
concenis about inflatiem, their stan- 
dard of living and freed^ to travel 
can be better addressed within tiie 
framework of NA'FO or the European 
Union or the OECD or whatever.” 


Polish Presidoit Sets 
Elecdons for Sept. 21 

Reuters 

WARSAW — President Aleksan- 
der Kwasniewski sign^ an official 
resolution Wednes&y firmfirniing 
feat Poland’s parliamentary elections 
will be held on Sept 21, ^ pr^. 
idential press office said. 

Parties have until Sept 1 to 
repstgfflnrtidatesfof the lower hivT.^ 
or Pariiameot and fee Senate. The 
main crattendera be fee gov emin p 

Doptocratic Left Alliance, vfeich is tte 

I^zty offrxiver Communists, and fee 
rigmigi Solidarity Elecfem Action. 


;i 'I 
1 




H 


l> 






PAGE a 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 




INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


WITH niE NfCW VOIUC TIMIB AND THE WAXUINCTON FQ^T 


Justice for a Change? 


Comiog from a small coontry, Pol 
Pot did not have the $c<^ for savagery 
that made Stalin, Hitler and his role 
model Mao Zedong the 20th ceotury's 
leading murderers. Each has tens of 
millions of victims. Still, althmi^ti he 
lacked their industrial and military 
sources, the Khmer Rouge leader did 
away with a million or so of his citizens. 
He did this, moreover, in an appalling, 
upKilose, often hands-on, bludgeoning 
s^Ie discrediting for all time the notiwi 
dmt certain countries are reservoirs of a 
distinctive cultural repose. This ha^ 
pei^ as Vietnam's dommunists con- 
solidated their victory at home after 
1975 and vied with C^bodia's Cc^- 
munists In a traditional regional con- 
firontation. f^I Pot later repaired to the 
jungle as the current fragile Cambodian 
system was established. 

This monster has now been seen 
(“very old and tired and sick") by an 
oulsiderfortbe fust time since 1^1. He 
may yet enjoy the distinction of be- 
coming die single one of die great mass 
murderers to face a judicial accounting. 
Intrigues among hu residue guerrilla 
supporters have evidentiy turned him 
hnm captain to prisoner, and the hard 
bargaining has b^un that could put him 
in the custody of the Cambodian gov- 
emmenL Its severely split royrdist and 


Communist factions seem able to : 
on little more than to remove him : 
Pamhnrfia lest his mere presence pro- 
voke the millioiis of Cambodians who 
have reason to exact retribution for ^ 
crimes against countrymen and kin. He 
would jxesumably go not into tranquil 
retirement but to an international court 
of justice. Nether his foreign support- 
ers, incliiHing r'liina aixl Thailand, nor 
his Cambod^ accomplices can be al- 
lowed to stall a reckoiimg. 

Nothing, of course, can bring back 
Pol Pot’s victims. And for him there 
cannot be the slightest pity. Whetbo' he 
will be able or willing to take part in a 
trial on charges of goiocide and crimes 
against humanity is uncertaiiL To those 
who suffered at* his bidding, nonethe- 
less, it could be deeply satisfying to see 
him brought into a fair judicial pro- 
ceeding, even though many who con- 
ducted the atrocities and deserved to be 
in Qie dock were not there with him. It 
would hardly be the usual crimi^ 
trial But there his deeds against the 
dead could be detailed and assessed, 
and his culpability before the survivors 
formally established. Not just the 
people of Cambodia but all others 
could proHt from the example of an 
evil leaders being brought to accounL 
— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Hashimoto’s Bomb 


The American economy is the envy 
of the world, right? That seemed to be 
the message Pr^ident Bill Clinton and 
his advisers took to Denver last week- 
end for a meeting of top world leaders, 
including Japan's prime minister, Ryu- 
taro Hashimolo. So how could it be that 
one patently offhand comment from 
Mr. Hashimoto on Monday, just after 
±e summit, could strike terror in the 
heart of Aiiierican investors and cause 
the American stock market to take its 
worst tumble (rf the year? Ai^wer. The 
cdmic book version of an ascendant 
United States and a Japan in decliiie is 
just a bit too simple. 

Mr. Hashimoto's comment came in 
response to a question after a luncheon 
spmb in New York. “We hope the 
U.S. will engage in efforts to maintain 
foreign exchange stability so we don't 
have to succumb to the teiiq}tation to 
sell off U.S. Treasury bills," he said 
As soon as this remark was reported on 
news wires, the U.S. bond marirei 
slumped, the value of the dollar fell and 
the stock market tumbled 

The usual sunny analysts were quick 
to supply a fair share of qualiiiers to 
this tale. Hie stock excnange was 
poised for a fall and looking for any 
excuse, they said While the Japanese 
leader’s remark sparked the second- 
worst point loss in histi^, in per- 
centage terms the Dow didn't fall all 
'that far — only 2.5 percent. It regained 
^und on Tuesday. And besides, Mr. 
Hashimoto didn't really mean what he 


said; he and his aides issued all kinds of 
explanations and r^hrasings. 

All true — yet irrelevant to the cen- 
tral poioL Why could Mr. Hashimoto 
spark such a sell-off? The answer is 
that the United States remains hugely 
indebted to the world, and to Japan in 
particular. That is de other side of 
Japan's perennial, and once again 
growing, trade surolus witii America. 

If, as Mr. Hashimoto hinted, Jaj^ 
anese investors were to withdraw their 
funds — to call their loans, as it were 
— U.S. interest rates mi^t rise to 
attract money from elsewhere. Higher 
interest rates in turn would slow U.S. 
economic growth, which is why the 
stock market dropped at the prospecL 

No one expects Japan to sell off its 
Treasury bonds, as Mr. Hashimoto 
himself subsequently explained; such a 
s^-off would hurt Japan, its bo^ and 
its exporters as weU as hurting the 
United States. But the remark may not 
have been ail that offhand; exasperated 
by Mr. Clinton's lecturing, Mr. Ha- 
shiznoto may have been “sending a 
shot across the bow," says Washington 
trade specialist Clyde I^stowitz, and 
suggesting that economic advice could 
stuT pioritabiy flow both ways across 
the racifk. Jap^ has a higher savings 
rate than America; its growth rate mt 
year was higher; its unemployment rate 
is tower. The U.S. economy is in re- 
markably good shape overall, but the 
trade dencit Imn't gone away. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


The Court Stumbles 


Everyone can agree that society hasa 
duty to protect children from violent sex 
offenders, but the U.S. Supreme Court 
has gone down a pc^tialiy dangerous 
road for civil liberties in upholding a 
1994 Kansas law titai waters down the 
(Mdinaiy criteria for involuntary civil 
commitment as a way to keep sex of- 
fenders confined in mental hospitals 
-after dieir prison sentences. 

The state's Sexually Violent Pred- 
ator Act is one of a number of recent 
.attempts by state legislatures to protect 
communities from sex offenders who 
are deemed likely to repeat theu crimes 
once released from pnson. It contains 
procedures for the civil commitment of 
p)eople whose criminal behavior was 
due to a “mental abnormality or pier- 
■sonality disorder" and who are 
“likely” to engage in future “pred- 
atory acts of sexud violence.” 

By a 5-to-4 vote, the court approved 
of detaining sex criminals hasten the 
standard of “mentally abnorrrtaJ" 
rather than the more demanding stan- 
dard of “mentally HI." It rejected ar- 
guments chat the statute's innovative 
civil commitment plan amounted to a 
double panishment, on the theory that 
the act requires a finding that the per- 
son being conunitted is dangerous to 
hin^If or others. Disappoin^^y, the 
dissenting justices, by Stephen 
Breyer, saw no fundamental consti- 
tutional problem of due process in con- 
fining offenders who have already 
completed their prison sentence by la- 
beling them “mentally abnormal" 


Justice Breyer objected on other 
grounds. He said Kansas had violated 
tiie constitutional prohibition against 
added-on sentences because it had 
failed to provide treatment for the men- 
tal orobte^ of the convict in the case. 

The court's instinct to want to keep 
this defendant incarcerated is under- 
standable. It would be hard to imagine 
a less sympathetic defendant than the 
person who brought the legal chal- 
lenge, Leroy Hendricks. He is a 62- 
year-old pedophile who has said that 
only deatii would guarantee a change 
in his beluivior. But of course the im- 
plicsUioQS of the ruling go weli beyond 
Mr. Headricks. 

By upholding the Kansas approach 
to civil commitment, the Supreme 
Court has raised the troubling prospect 
of states imposing indefinite confine- 
ment in a mental institution based on a 
loose definition of “abnormality" and 
an unreliable prediction tbata person U 
“likely" to commit dangerous acts in 
the future. The coun was clearly re- 
sponding to a toughening public at- 
titude toward child molesters, but it has 
done so in a destructive way. 

The American justice system is 
based on punishment for what pMple 
actually do, rather than on detaining 
them for what they might do. The 
Kansas decision undermines that prin- 
ciple and ignores the fact that every 
legislature has the option of length- 
ening the statutory prison terms for 
violent sex offenders. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


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A Bunrn NATO Road From Madrid Onward 


N ew YORK — The devil that al- 
ways lurks in the details of cosmic 
feats of diplomacy has suddenly 
emerged to jab President Bill Clinton’s 
plans for NATO eiqiaiisioa witii sev- 
eral sharp pitchforics. 

The pitchforks will not derail the 
administiation's rush for expansion of 
die Adantic alliance. But tpey could 
tarnish an event that Mr. Clinton con- 
fidently expect^ to be aoown jewel in 
his presidential legacy — the NATO 
summit in Madrid two weeks away. 

That meeting will now be ^ 
preached without great endiusiasm by 
many of Americans Eurc^ean allies, 
who are disturbed by what some see as 
an American attempt to “dictate" to 
them who will be flHmitrpd as new 
members of the alliance. 

France and a half-dozen other coua- 
tiies will continue to press at the Mad- 
rid summit to add Romania and Slov- 
enia to the list of approved candidates. 
Prudent Jacques Cnirac told Mr. Clin- 
ton in Denver last weekend, according 
to a senior French official aware of the 
contents of the conversation. 

The French do not expect to shake 
America's insistence trat only the 
Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland 
will be issued invitations ax Madrid. All 
16 members accept those three can- 
didates. Bui nine of the 16 favor ex- 


Bj Jim Hoagland 


panding expansion to five. Mr. Chir- 
ac’s remarlra rqjresent a rebuff for an 
American attempt to shut off debate on 
the numbers gai^. 

Deputy Secretaiy of State Strobe Tal- 
bott coDvedted die ambassadors from 
NATO states on Jhine 12 and deliver^ 
wlmd^kxB^ firom three of America’s 
closest allies described to me later as a 
“riiirtat” ^ stunned tbenL The nor- 
mally degantly manneFed Talbott’s 
demand for silence would have done 
justice to Ring Lardner’s great line: 
“Shut up, he explained." 

The tone between Mr. Clinton and 
Mr. Chirac in Denver was far more 
cordial, but didr ftdlure to agree was 
clear. “Each one spoke as if disap- 
pointed that he had not been able to 
convince the other of a very good ar- 
gument," a French official said. 

The Clintonites feel that they min- 
imize the initial problems of expansion 
by sticking to diree clearly qualified 
candidates. Mr. Chirac argues that re- 
jection of Romania is unfair, immoral 
and certain to farther destabilize 
NATO’s troubled southern flank. 

The bilateral Fiench-U.S. meeting at 
the economic summit in Denver dro 
failed, as expected, to resolve differ- 


ences between Paris and Washington 
on intenial NATO cemunand ainu^- 
ments. This means dat the original 
U.S. hope that France would formally 
rejoin NATO's military cmxmBnd at 
the Madrid gathering and n^e it an 
even more glittering ccI<^)ration has to 
beabandoi^. 

A third maximum U.S. goal gm 
hooked by gremlins at Denver when 
President Boris Yeltsin made clear that 
Russia would not treat the Madrid sun)” 
znit as a high-level celebration of unity 
and haimony. 


an event that combhies holding « 
beauty contest for potemiai members 
and a cfowmng of vht Americsi ntv 
ident as king N.ATO. 

The Czechs, Poles md Hungatuiis 
could haidly be blamed for u^ing ' 
rid and its inritation to N.ATO as a seal 


of approval by the worId*s_most to). 
italt! 


portant 


wers. They wiy; 

approved site 

ity to potential inve&ioes coosidetii^ . 


capitalist 
advertise (heir NA 


PQW 

.TO-j 



Mr. Yeltsin curtly reeled a sug- 


gestion that he die gadiering, 
saying pointedly that he would send bis 
amivig«»i4rw in Madrid instead. Later he 
was inveigled to upgrade Russia’s rq> 
resemaiion to a deputy ^me minister. 

Mr. Chirac, who woiked hard to con- 
vince Washington not to back Mr. 
Yeltsiii into a comer on NATO ex- 
pansion, finds Mr. Yeltsin much more at 
ease now tint NATO and Moscow have 
sign^ an agreement establishing a 
NATO-Russia Council. Russian pi^c- 
ipation in the Denver summit pr^ided 
Mr. Ydtsin vrith good argumems to use 
lo expl^ NATO expansion to the Rus- 
sian public, Mr. Otirac believes. 

Mr. Yeltsin. Mr. Chirac and other 
Europeans seem to fear that the Clin- 
tonites will attempt to turn Madrid into 


tieiwcen them and Ibv 
mania, Bulgana and the others. 

Tint situation draws at least a lem- 

poniry linedivkiing nation that suffered 

equally under Soviet rule. The Qintoo 
admiius&aiion is unwiiiii^ to discuss 
publicly and frankly the conseouences 
of that line-drawing. Nor does it 
squarely address the exisieniial ques- 
tions thtf its \^tte promises eS future 
NATO expansion raise for the Baltics. 
Ukraine ^ other former Soviet re. 
publics that want into the <x:eanizaiion. 

Those questions will be forced on tte 
adminisb^on in the U.S. Senate when 
it comes time to amend the Chance 
treaty and discuss U.S. responsibilities 
in Europe. Madrid, with all ib det'ilid 
but surmountable details, is the be- 
giiming of a grand debate, not the end. 

The Washotititm Post 


Backers of Romania and Slovenia Are a Correct Majority 


D enver — The CUnton 
adminis tration has re- 
placed its past opposition to 
NATO expimsion with a drive 
to limit that exp^ion. Ro- 
mania and Slovenia are about 
to feel the negative effects, de- 
spite a push by nine raembeis 
— including Canada, France, 
Italy, Turkey and Spain — to 
include them in the first wave 
of expansion. 

An enlarged NATO will en- 
courage the reforms under way 
in Central Europe. The leaders 
of Romania and Slovenia, who 
are strongly pro-democracy, 
have staked their prestige on 
entering NATO. Rejection 
would be a slap in the face to 
die most pro- Western leaders 
that these countries have had. 

Germany 1^ moved away 
from its earlier opposition to 
including them, isolating the 
Clinton adminisliatioD as the 
chief oi^nent. If successful, 
this opposition will sow the 
seeds of foture difficulties in 


By Hfanlc Brown arid Carter Pilcher 


NATO and in NATO's rela- 
tions with Russia. 

Russia’s primary concern 
during this round h^ been the 
inclusion of Poland, located 
astride the historical invasion 
routes to Russia, with its weU- 
trained aixl equipped military 
and its increasdi^y robust 
economy. Neither Romania, 
whose military historically op- 
erated at the edge of Moscow's 
sphere, nor Slovenia, as a part 
of the former Yugoslavia, has 
generated major interest or 
concern in Russia. 

Romania and Slovenia 
would perform important roles 
in extending NATO's stabil- 
izing influence deeper into 
Ukraine, into tiie Black Sea 
and into the Balkans. 

NATO membership has 
overwhelming support from 
the citizens of both Romania 
and Slovenia. Polls show even 
stronger support for assuming 


NATO obligations in Romania 
than is the case in many of 
NATO's current members. 

The two have jum^ 
through the hoops of settling 
border disputes, changing the 
command structures of their 
militaries and reorganizing 
their governments. These 
countries would have some 
reason to feel that they bad 
been misled if not included in 
NATO’s expansion. 

Poland and Romania are the 
strategic linchpins to an effec- 
tive NATO expansion. Taken 
together into NATO, they 
would form an iiimortant 
bridge between NATO’s 
northern and southern flanks, 
cementing the alliance territ- 
orially and strategically. 

NATXJ's defense of die 


Czech Republic and Hungary 
s le 


becomes less costly if these 
two countries are Romania and 
Slovenia are members. 


While Poland’s inclusion 
will extend NATO's influence 
deep into the Baltic regioii, Ro- 
mania sits astride the Danube 
and commands its mouth. In- 
ternational traffic along this vi- 
tal waterway to the Black Sea 
has increased by more than 600 
percent since 1994. 

Slovenia and Romania have 
reforms in place that will pro- 
duce robust, free market eco- 
nomies tiei closely to NATO 
members. 

Romania's transition to a 
free market has lagged behind 
that of otiier Central European 
countries, but its economy ex- 
panded by more than 4 percent 
in 1996 ^ the fourth straight 
year. The government’s plat- 
form of “work, sweat and aus- 
terity" will diamatiotlly ac- 
celerate privatization, decon- 
trol the foreign exchsuige mar- 
ket and slash subsidies to state- 
run businesses. £U countries 
now receive more than half of 
Romania's exports. 


Slovenia's economy is 
already making signiSFiewr 
progress. Its $10,606 GDP per 
capita is the highest in Central 
Europe. Its foreign currenc}' 
reserves exceed ils forei^ 
debt, industrial privatization 
was recently completed, infla- 
tion has bera under iOpercem 
since 1995, and projeciM GDP 
growth this year is 4 peicenL 
America has fought tiso 
world wars in this century be- 
cause it failed to underftand 
that stability in Central Europe 
is critical to U.S. and European 
securii}'. Including Romania 
and Slovifflia in the ftrst wave 
of countries asked to join 
NATO makes strategic and 
political sense. A majority irf 
NATO members has it rishL 


i\fr. Brown is a former VS. 
senator from Culorudo. Mr. 
Pilcher served us his foreign 
policy s^ialist. They contrib- 
ured this comment io ihc In- 
temaiional Herald Trihiine. 



lUhi lU 


I ; ilsMo 




Get Used to Blair — and Hope He Turns Out to Be a Leader 


L ondon — Tony Blair 
says he intends to get next 
year’sGroupof Seven meeting, 
which he will host, back to real- 
ity. The meetings were meant 
by their originator, France's 
ValiSry Gisca^ d'E^aing, as a 
quiet discussion among the in- 
dustrial nations' leaders. 

The meetings have since be- 
come bloated promotional jam- 
borees for the host nation. Next 
year Mr. Blair wants more se- 
rious talk on fewer issues. He 
reportedly would like the lead- 
ers to go off to a private retreat 
for “a real dialogue." 

The circus a^ Wild West 
show that took place in Denver 
this past weekend ended in 120 
pages of preprepaied commu- 
nique concerning more dian 40 
issues (including problems 0 [ 
the elderly, nuclear safety, io- 
teroational space srations and 
the inevitable AIDS). Much 
public money could have been 


By ^Uliam PfaflT 


saved had the leaders aU stayed 
borne and sent flunkies to [Den- 
ver to release the communique. 

The Clinton administration's 
triumphalism in Denver, pro- 
claiming its economic wizaniry 
as ifae answer to the world's 
griefs, went over poorly with 


Europeans and the Japanese. As 
one foreign visitor to Den^ 


toreign visitor to Denver 
said, you don't convince people 
that your system is wondeirul 
when, in the next breath, you 
tell them not to stray from \iveis 
hotels since they might be 
murdered for the sake of the 
change in their pockets. 

Prune Minister Blair wants 
next year’s meeting to focus on 
job creation and improving 


Europe’s struggle against the 
:Ioo 


development of that self-pex- 
petuating, unemployable un- 
derclass that provide America 
with its greatest challenge. 


These concerns bring him a 
great deal closer to the other 
Europeans than he seemed earli- 
er this month at the European 
summit in Amsterdam, whm he 
offered them a triumphaiist les- 
son of his own about the virtues 
of what could be called Blairite 
post-socis^m. 

Mr. Blair, in any case, looks 
as if be will be on the inter- 
national scene for a considerable 
time, while today's celebrities 
and heavyweights depart the 
scene. Helmut Kohl could be 
gone in little more than a year. 
Jacques Chirac is already a 
powerless presence, his legs cut 
from under him in the electiCHis 
his supporters just lost. Bill Clin- 
trai will be gone as the year 2(X)0 
beg^. Mr. Blair has a statutory 
parliamentary term of five years 
ahead of him and currently looks 
rather good for up to 10 years. 


When Japan Takes China’s Side 


T okyo — T he decision of 
the Jrmanese government 
to attend the swearing-in next 
Tuesday of Hong Kong’s new 
legislature, whose members 
were picked by China, is a 
disappointment to many of Ja- 
pan's friends. It is alro a re- 
minder that Tokyo has its own 
regional agend^ in which 
Chinese-Japanese relations are 
certain to ^w in importance. 

By ordering his foreign 
minister to represent Japan at 
the swearing-in ceremony 
(which Madeleine Albright is 
pointedly boycotting). Prime 
Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto 
is strengthening his countiy’s 
ties to Ae new government in 
the Special Administrative 
Region of Hong Kong while 
making a gesture that will be 
well received in Beijing, 

The fact that Australia and 
New Zealand have brokui 
ranks with Britain and Amer- 
ica over the swearing-in of the 
legislature is another cause for 
satisfaction in Beijing. 

Japan’s economic stake in 
Hong Kong is substantial. Its 
financial and trading interests 
there, and its eagerness to 
keep the territory as a gateway 
into southern China, have 
made Japanese corporations 
and their allies in Hashi- 
moto's Liberal Democratic 
Party wary of offending Hong 
Ktuig’s new rulers. 

The wish to safeguard ils 
investments in the territory and 
the rest of China makes Japan 


By Roger Buckley 


most unlikely to suf^^ pro- 
democracy elements in Hmig 
Kong in any future confron- 
tation with authorities there. 

Japan’s traditional low-pro- 
file diplomacy has been based 
on the security anchor pro- 
vided by its allian ce with the 
United States, and premised 
on continning Asian hostility 
to any signs of incipient mil- 


Hong Kong and Taiwan have 
tried to land on disputed Sen- 
kaku Islands in the East China 
Sea. The uninhabited islands 
are claimed by Japan, China 
and Taiwan. 

Activists from Japan’s 
r^htist fringe lave said they 
plan to erect buildings on the 
Senkakus. That could prompt 
Beijing to protest and lift its 
curbs on anti-Japanese 


de- 


monstrations. Much of East 


itarism vatfain Jap^ By sid 
linmisi 


log with China in mis instance, 
Tokyo has chosen to spurn die 
Anglo-American camp and 
show suppoft for an unelected 
group of legislators. 

Tus sends a signal to the 
rest of the world that, when 
faced with an uncomfortable 
decision, Japan may well 
prefer to put economic dq^lo- 
macy before considerations of 
democracy and human rights. 

It signal to the region and 
the West that currying favor 
with an emerging Asian su- 
perpower may be more im- 
portant than two generations 
of democratic experie^ in 
Jtum and a long period of 
solidarity with America. 

'pie next issue li^ly to test 
China-Japan relations may be 
harder to defuse, although it Is 
possible that the move to at- 
tend the swearing-*m cere- 
mony in Hong Koi^ is in- 
tended to help achieve this 
end. Twice recentiy, groups of 
Chinese nation^ists from 


Asia, including Hong Kong, 
ed under Japanese mn^- 


suffered , 

itaiy occupation before and 
during World War IL filing 
anti-Japan sentiment again 
would be a serious setback for 
Tokyo's hopes of improved 
relations wim its neighbors. 

Any such dispute would 
have wider repercussions. Ja- 
pan has long sought a per- 
manent seat on the UN Se- 
curity Council. China can veto 
the Japanese bid. 

^ What happens in Hong 
Kong in the montits following 
its handover to China will be a 
test of Beijing's pledge to re- 
spect the territory’s autonomy 
and rights. It may also be a test 
of how seriously Japan regards 
democratic fr^oms and the 
values of an open society. 


The writer, who teaches his- 
tory at the Inrenuxtionai 
Christian University in Tokyo, 
is author of "Hong Kong: The 
Road to 1997." He contrib- 
uted tins comment to the In- 
temaiional Herald Tribune. 


He seems unlikely to have 
competition from the Conserva- 
tive for some time. The 
iiewpriine niinister's program is 
intelugeot and his muisters are 
capable, but the big thing is that 
he is Uessed with a self-defeat- 
ing o{^»sition, just as the Con- 
servatives were when old Labour 
was at war with itself during the 
1980s and early i990s. 

The Tory party, struck down 
in May afta 18 ye^ in power, 
has now confirmed its ^>dicatioa 
of seriousness by giving itself a 
resotately anti-European new 
leadersh^ under an untested 36- 
year-old balding bachelor politi- 
cian of unknown qualities. 

The fortunate young man is 
named William Hague, and he 
won the Tory leadership cemtest 
because the Tory ri^t united to 
defeat former Chancellor of the 
Exchequer Kenneth Clarite, a 
heavyweight who was con- 
demn by the fact that he 
wants Britain to keep its options 
open with respect to Europe. 

The right ^en split over its 
own more serious candidates, 
eventually electing Mr. Hague 
because he, being unknown, 
had the fewest enemies and en- 
joyed the support of the de- 
posed and unforgiving Tory 
queen, Margaret 'Iliatcber. 

It was the parliamentary 
party that did this — those Con- 
servative MPs who managed to 
survive the Nfay 1 electoral de- 
bacle. Polls in the last two 
weeks riiowed the loc^ agents 
and activists of the party over- 
whelmingly in favor of Mr. 
Clarke. The general public in 


Britain aUo favored Mr. Clarke 
as Tory leader. 

These same anti-European, 
Conservative MPs. egged on by 
Baroness Thatcher, ruined John 
Major's government and made 
Labour’s" victory a virtual cer- 
tainty. despite the public's 
lingering memories of misgov- 
eniment in Labour's pasL Now 
they have taken control of the 
Conservative Party. 

The today provides no re- 
sponsible or el^table (^position 
to the new Blair govemmeoL 
Mr. Blair faces an opposition 
bench made up of pe^Ie who 
represent not a repudiated 
party but a wing of that part}' 
repudiated by the majority of the 
party's membership. 

Not all is positive for Labour, 
hi Denver, as when EYesident ) 
Clinton visited London in May. 
Mr. Blair demonstrated whk 
some would consider a pathedc 
effort to crowd into Bill Clin- 
ton's spotlight, in an appeal to 
equally paUietic British press 
prejudices. 

His campaign was notable 
for Clintonisnf. Yet as prime 
minister he is in a position to be 
his own man and do things that 
have not been polled and focus- 
grouped to the inch. 

If he fails to do thaL he will 
do a great favor to Mr. HagiK.r 
as to the more formidable fig- 
ures who could, in the midterm 
future, take Mr. Hague’s place. 
British voters pay attention Kb 
what their government doe&<. 
and they turn out to vote. 

Iniernatu/nal Herald Tribune 
■S' L.IS Angeh's Tinws Syn,lkv». 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 .\iND 50 YL\RS AGO? 


1S97: Fea^ Delayed 


BERLIN — According to a des- 
patch from Athens. Edhem 

Pariia has received orders to con- 
centrate his force at Larissa and 
there await the payment of the 
war indemnity from Greece. The 
delay in the conclusion of peace 
is due lo the refusal of Tt^ey i 


to 


accept certain proposals made by 
Greece and to the fact that the 


the last twenty years on the wVf 
matic synefoonization of Up 
movements on the screen and 
the audible word, has presented 
the results of his experiments^ 
a private show. The result aimetT 
at by the inventor was for all 
practical purposes folly at-, 

tained, complete synchronisiu 
being dericient by only a few 
thousandths of a second. 


Commission appointed to report 
fioaocial 


on Greece’s financial position 
has not yet completed its la^rs. 
The Grte Government is most 
anxious to conclude a provision- 
al arrangement with Turbev, so 
as to be able to disband a portion 
of its anny. 


1947: Tour Resumes 


1922: ‘Speaking Film’ 


P^lS — The “.speaking 
film, a combination of the 
screen picture and the phono- 
graph, seems at last to have been 
realis^. M. Louis Gaumont. 
who has been experunenting for 


P.4R1S — An even 100 of 
Europe's g^test cycling 
champions arrived in Lille fo^ 
Paris Iasi night lJune 25] on 
initial leg or one of the greal^ 
bicycle races in the world, tW 
Tour de France. The Tour, ab- 
sent from the French sp^ 
scene for the last niire ye^ 
always stirred the imagiuao<^ 
of the French fan. and if wy* 
thing can convince him ^ 
peace is really here, this ^ 
past-war version of the ra ^ 
ulous race should do it 




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INTERNAT IO NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THU RSDAy, JUNE 26, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 








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Give Bihi and Realism 
A Fighting Chance 

B j Wilfiam Safire 


J ERUSALEM — “A secret 
meedog?” roared Israel’s 
Ask Sharoa at his Jordanian 
counteipart as n^otiations about 
water li^ts reached (he critical 
poijrt. ‘‘Jam not a mistress!’* 
His prime minister, Beayamin 
Nctan^hn, undefstood that die 
King ^ Jonbn did not want pub- 
lic cootact with Israelis at that 
moment of Palestinian ibror. anH 
so ananged a * ’discrea meeting” 
at the highest leveL bringing Anir 
along. Result: Water started 

flowing even before the delighted 

jof^feiniang expected it 
“Bibi,” Ibesday survived 
a no^onfidence vote, is a nxse 
astute o^odator thm he gets 
cfi^ for. With a resolute ‘T am 
not g(^ to presi^ over a dis- 
astrous (fivisioD in the Jewish 
people,” he has been seeldne a 
co uip ro n iise to pieserve Oimo- 
- dwy ’arolemdiin die Jewish «iati» 
wjAoutdeoigrating Oxiserv^ve 
and Reform Judaism anywhere. 

Much of the flak Mr. Netan- 
yahu has been taldog lately has 
been about tbe pace of nego- 
tiations with Yasser Arafat’s re- 
gime on final brudexs. 

Junketing wofid leaders be- 
wail a “cr^'’ while U.S. Sec- 
retary of State Madeleine Al- 
laigfatseesa “low point” 

If Palestinian erroectations of 
gaining almost all tbc West Rank 
for a state with Jerusalem as its 
coital have been lowered, that’s 


consttuctive, even when accom- 
panied by organizedoutbreaks of 

i^e or the murder of real-estate 
otdlun. Realism about tbe final 
settlement is better introduced 
sooner than later. 

The bunion the road to real- 
istk bargamizig have been Pal- 
estinian nsactioDs to brad’s as- 
sertions of sovereignly within hs 
own capitaL Mr, Netanyahu’s 
critics cavil about the riming q[ 
the building houses on a barren 
hill widuo Jenisatem, but the mes- 
sage had to be sent that Israel’s 
^ital will remain ondmded. 
^ opposite message would in- 
vite disaster in the &al rtage. 

“Stages” were a great mis- 
take u die Oslo agreement Shi- 
mon Peres’s notion was to win 
Palestinian hearts by first fn*ir- 
ing concessions about West 
Bank land Bm then — with the 
salami sliced to its aobbin and no 
negotiating leverage left — Is- 
rael would have to bold to 
Jerusalem and call down on its 
bead the world’s opproMum. 

Mr. Netanyahu avoided tiiat 
tr^, as the Oslo accords per- 
mitted by slicing the West Rank 
salami tUnly, turning over less 
land now to the Palestinians than 

Mr. Arafat was riAmflnfiing 

Was the Likud goveroment 
wrong to redress that balance? I 
interviewed Mr. Pm’s suc- 
cessor as head of the Labor Party, 
Ehod Barak, who lus serious dif- 



ferences widi Mr. Netanyahu on 
negotuuiog technique. 

Mr. Barak, a former general, 
may wdl be prime minister of an 
Isr^ whose borders have 
negotiated by Benjamm Netan- 
yahu. He is not above 
Bibi about Likud’s internal 
battles: “We haven’t set up a 
shadow government because 
Likud already has one.” 

Mr. Barak has adopted 
Yitzhak Rabin’s !Bgnw» of urgency 
about risking a hasty Palestiman 
deal, with an eye toward greater 
danger from Ir^ and Iraq; Mr. 
Netanyahu thinks such a to 
agree treakens brael’s position. 

However, when as!^ abont 
die notion of ^vii^ great chunks 


of die West Bank to Mr. Arafat 
before final tall^ 1^. Barak 
noted pointedly that yeais ago, 
when this came up in tte eahim»j. 
he ahstained. He didn’t ot^t 
publicly then because h would 
have been “misintetpceted.” 

Mr. Netanyahu ’s ^iprooch is to 
apply patient pressure, moving to 
t^ endgame now. If Mr. Arafat 
sees that terror tactics do not panic 
the Israelis, and if he '•annm Iq- 

ve^ the United States and 

to impiDse a sohition — then real- 
ism be given a chance. 

Evefyone knows what the 
can be. Hie map of the “Alion 
Plan Pins’’ is no secret, with Is- 
rael’s secori^ zones in the West 
Bank administering fewer than 


SD,000 Arabs: a contiguous, vi- 
able Palestinian state stares map- 
makers in the face. 

But pronouncements of crisis 
in the absence of one-sided con- 
cessions only encourage Mr. 
Arafat to bold out for the “ritar- 
ing” of Jerusalem, which is the 
deal-breaker. 

I used to write Nixon speeches 
denouncing dovish proposals 
about Vietnam — at the time 
similar proposids were being 
made by the presidem’s agent in a 
back channel. It is inconceivable 
that such contact has not been 
going on, or won’t be soon. 

Outsidiers, lay off. Give pa- 
tient realism a chance. 

The \kM' YiitL Tuntt 


nvyCentEal 


'T^ * T'*' 
.Si.' 


'>,* f •• 




Gerald SogaTs article “Hong 
\ ICoug Has a Promising Future as 
. he Asian Spy Hub” (Opinion, 
■ tune 25) is about 40 years 
Mr. whose writit^ I 

- peatly admire has to be aware of 
Jong Kong’s use by many na- 
HMS, particularly toe People’s 
. JepnbUcofCliina,asa8pycenter 
lod window to toe Western wcu-ld 
lince tbe imd-1950s. In toe 19^ 
^ joke amoi^ Western inteUi- 
jence and counterinteUigence of- 
icers asrigned to Hong ^ng was 
that if one more electronic eaves- 
dron>teg device were installed, 

riw Out 1«» iJf a I.e8ilif!“<§^ 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


months is tbe disreantling of Htxig 
Kong’s own highly efiective 
counteiintelligeoce qperatioas. 
This should give all peitifs more 
fteedom to operate. 

DANIEL A GROVE 
Kong Kong. 

Outrageous Diatribe 

Regarding "In an 'Abortion 
Culture.’ B^es Are Disposable" 
(Meanwhile, June 13) bv George 
F. WiU: 

Melissa Drexler’s act of inhin- 
tidde is indeed outrageous. ^ also 
is Mr. Will’s use of tbe qnsode in 
his diatribe against abcution. Tbe 
article contains unfair ifaetoric that 


were one-^limensioDa], and M i w i 
crass language intended to riiock 
toe reader and distil him from 
responding ralumally. 

Consider Mr. Will’s condem- 
natkn of an educational initiative 
meant to ixomote individual le- 
sponsibiii^: Nfiss Dr^er 
grown up in a society to^ does not 
stress deferral of ^tification. and 
it’s not her fault that the baby 
arrived during toe prom, for 
Pete’s sake. She has come of age 
in a society where coodom-dis- 
pensing scftools teach sex «!u- 
catioD in tbe modem manner 
which has been well described as 
plumbing for faedcxiists.** 

Had Miss Drexler atwnripri to 


sode at her prom would never have 
occturedL It is the ban on dis- 
cussing contraception with young 
pet^Ie, not the programs to rem- 
edy a societal shoncoming, that 
accounts for tbe inordinate num- 
ber oS abcfftions — and unwanted 
babies — in America today. 

Purthermore, Will flattens 
the issue when be condemns abor- 
tion as sdmply “the killing of 
something.” Tbe morality of a 
particular abution depe^ on 
whetoer that “something” is an 
embryo or fetus; if it is healthy ra- 
genetically diseased, aiul if it is 
destined to be an admed baby or 
an unwanted one. 

The crowning misinfonnalion. 


How Consumers Can Help 
Save the World’s Forests 


By Francis Sullivan 


that modem science vindicates the 
anti-abortion platform. He quotes a 
jtoysician: ’‘How much more con- 
venient if we lived in the 13th 
century,” when arguments ai^l 
the onset of life were legitimate. 

This avoids toe true question 
underlying tbe abortion debate. 
The issue is not toe onset of life at 
toe cellular level, but the devel- 
opixmi of a conscious being pos- 
sessing what is termed “human 
d^iiy.” What this quality is in 
biological terms and when it is 
acquired by toe developing or- 
ganism is as unknown to scientists 
today as it was to people seven 
centuries ago. 

HTHAN SHTMONY. 


presets a CCTT^lex J^ y Budap^ 


G ODALMING, England — 
VVe all use wood in some 
form every day of our lives — in 
fact, w average we each consume 
more than 1 .5 kilograins daily. In 
the develc^ing world, firewood is 
the main i^uiremenU while pulp 
and paper products are toe main 
wood products consumed in de- 
veloped countries. 

These wood products come 
from forests that are being cut far 

MEAPTOlflLE 

faster than ihe>' are being replanted. 
This is bod news for crasumers. 

When firewood starts running 
out in Africa or South Asia, 
people must turn to burning dung 
and agricultural residues to co(A 
their lood. This means fewer nu- 
trients return to toe soil to guar- 
antee future agricultural produc- 
tion. When timber starts rtuuiiag 
ouL businesses have to find al- 
ternative sources of raw materials 
to satisfy consumer demand. 

With pt^lation rising and for- 
ested areas rapidly decreasing, it 
is clear that many counuies will 
soon cease to be self-sufficient in 
wood products. Already Japan 
and Bmain import more than SO 
percent of their wood r^uire- 
ments. A number of countries 
used to export have become major 
importers. Thailand, for example, 
is now toe world’s largest im- 
porter of m^ical sawn timber, 
while the Philq^ines, which was 
one of the largest timto exporters 
in toe 1970s. is a net importer. 

What can be done to pre^-em 
consumption of the world's re- 
maining forest resources? It is 
clear ^t although the timber 
trade is toe single gti^tesl threat to 
those resources, it is also a key 
force that can help repair the dam- 
age and set the world on the path 
to sustainable forest use. Far- 
sighted companies have begun to 
team up with environmentalists to 
work jointly toward a solution. 

Just over five years ago, tbe 
first forest product “buyers’ 
group” was established, li de- 
velop as a partnership between 
WWF, toe Woiid Wide Fund for 
Nature, and Briti^ companies 
that uo^nook to phase out uie use 
and sale of wood and wo(^ 
products that did not come fi^ 
well-managed forests. Initially, 
16 companies joined the group. It 
now has 73 merabcis. Pi^cipal- 
ing companies search for wood 


products that come from forests 
that have been audited and cer- 
tified as well -managed. 

The buyers' group cooc^t has 
spread to other countries, includ- 
ing Belgium, tbe Netherlands and 
Austria. In .April, buyers’ gnups 
were launched in Germany, the 
largest wood-consuming natioo in 
Europe, and in the United States, 
the lar^t wood consumer in toe 
world. Similar launches are 
planned later in toe year in Japan, 
Denmark. Ireland, .Australia and 
New Zealand. 

The program is not confined to 
develc^ed counuies. There are 
plans to establish a buyers’ group 
in Brazil. 

The key to the success of this 
program is the existence of an 
uiiernatianal body that controls 
toe way forest certification and 
timber labeling is carried ouL This 
body, toe Forest Slewai^bip 
Council, is based in Mexico but 
has a national presence in nearly 
30 countries. 

W'hat should consumers do? 
More than SO forests have been 
certified by the council in 17 
countries, so there is “managed” 
wood — although only a relat- 
ively smaU amount — on the mar- 
ket. In Britain alone more than 600 
product lines cany toe council’s 
logo. Consumera can make a dif- 
ference by looking out for toe logo 
and choosi^ to buy toe products 
toat cany iL Tl^’ can also put 
pressure on businesses and sup- 
pliers to join a buyers' group. Re- 
search shows that consumer con- 
cern about the perilous state of the 
world’s fwests remains high. 

If buyers’ groups can continue 
to inqvove control of the way 
timber is extracted from forests, 
they may provide a model for Iret- 
ler management of many other 
commercially exploited wild spe- 
cies, such as fish. 

Of course, SMne timber traders 
and Umber-producing countries 
see the development of forest cer- 
tification as a threat Their buri- 
ness has succeeded as a result of 
raind and unsustainable exploi- 
taiioa But if they are to have a 
future in the wom products In- 
dus^, they too must switch to 
certified, well-managed forestry. 

The Mriter is director of the 
WWF's Forests for Life Cam- 
paign. based in Britain. He con- 
tributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


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PAGE 10 


BSTERNATIONAL HER.4IJ) TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1997 


Search for a '^Missing’ Box 

White House Whs Threatened With Warrant 


The Associaed Press 

WASHINGTON — Whitewater pros- 
ecutors su gg ested las t year that they 
would seek a warrant to search President 
Bill Clinton's living quarters at the >^te 
House for a box they contended was 
relevant to their investigation, lawyers 
and others familiar with the matter say. 

Horrified at the prospect of inves- 
tigators r ummaging through the first 
family's rooms, the White House 
reachira a compromise with the inde- 
pendent counsel, Kenneth Starr three 
White House aides would search the 
FOoms instead. 

Two White House lawyers at the time, 
Jane Sherburne and Miriam Nemetz, and 
an usher, Gary Walters, scoured the 


building but found no box, said people 
familiar with the subject, speaking on 
condition of anonymity. *^Sberbume 
and Nemetz were ^ven a general de- 
scription of a box and they combed the 
pla^ high and low, topKlown, looking in 
the Clintons' closets, under the beds, in 
all the rooms,” one person said. 

Those who knew about the search said 
it was carried out in connection with Mr. 
Starr's inquiry into the White House’s 
handling of documents from the (riftceof 
Vincent Foster after bis death. 

"The specter of a search warrant was 
raised and the reaction at the \^te 
House was, *Look, come on. there has to 
be another way to do this,' *' anotiier 
person said. 


HONG KONG: Press Expects a Battle 


Continued from Page 1 

Communist Party. The willingness of 
China's critics to stay on is a tribute to 
the upbeat mood in Hong Kong, and it 
means that for the hrst time in Com- 
munist China's history, one part of the 
country will abound in broks and 
magazines openly hostile to the rulers. 

Yet the optimism in Hong Kong also 
sets the stage for a major confnxiiation 
in the next few years with Communist 
hard-liners who never met a publication 
that they did not like to censor. At stake 
is Hong Kong's role as an information 
hub for all of Asia. 

Hong Kong is a special headache for 
intemational news organizations. Time. 
Newsweek, the news agencies, CNN 
and The Wall Street Journal all have 
regional editions or ofHces based in 
Hong Kong, and the International Her- 
ald Tribune, owned by The New York 
Tunes Co. and The Washington Post 
Co., is pmted here. 

This is a regional center for news 
bureaus for publications all over the 
world, with more foreign correspon- 
dents than any other city in Asia. And for 
decades, Hong Kong has been a prime 
center for China watchers who publish 
books and m^azines that poke through 
the Communist Party's diity laundry. 

Can this siuiation endure? No one 
really knows, but 86 percent of Hong 
Kong business executives polled re- 
cently by the Far Eastern Economic Re- 
view pr^icted that the territory's press 
would no longer be free under Chinese 
rule. 

The Hong Kong press is already los- 
ing some of its vigor, although the re- 
sponsibility for that seems to lie more 
with Ho^ Kong capitalists than with 
Chinese Communists. 

Without Beijing's having even taken 
control of the territory, many publi- 
cations have already begun censoring 
themselves. Marlin C. M. tee. the lead- 
er of the democracy forces in Hoog 
Kong, describes it as "bending even 
before the wind s^rts to blow." 

Hiis year, the most distinguished of 
Hong Kong's newspapers, Ming Pao, 
has r^uced the space given to colum- 
nists critical of China and has toned 
down its previously aggressive report- 
ing of China and of Hong Kong politics. 
Even some foreign-edited English-lan- 
guage publications are making a pre- 
emptive retreat. 

La a sprawling Roman Catholic mis- 
sion on a hillside on the south side of 
Hong Kong Island, Sister Betty Ann 
Maheu edits Tripod, a newsletter about 
the Catholic Church in Chino. Her brow 
furrowed as she explained her new soft- 
hitting editorial policy. 

"Initially. I think our themes will 


change, to avoid being'political,” she 
said, "You've got to stand by your prin- 
ciples. but you've got to be careful. Be- 
cause if you’re shut down, that won't do 
any good either.” 

If foreigners shielded by the Catholic 
Church intimidated, the anxiety is 
even greater among Hong Kong Chinese 
who have no such protections. 

"The most insidious thing is that re- 
porters and editors have stopped going 
after negative aspects of the transition,” 
said one newspaper reporter, who is con- 
cerned enough to be considering a switch 
to a new field. 

This is, to be sure, not a universal view. 
Many business executives argue that the 
distinguishing feature of the news cov- 
ert^e about Hong Kong these days — 
particularly in the foreign press — is a 
lurid emphasis on worst-case scenarios 
that ignores the self-confidence that is 
much the most obvious side of Hong 
Kong. 

Anotiier basic question is simply 
whether press freedom matters very 
much for Hong Kong os a whole. Jour- 
nalists warn ttot Hong Kong’s currency 
is infomuLtion and that the territory will 
collapse as a business center if it loses the 
free flow of news. But others argue that a 
vigorous press is a luxury for Hong Kong 
rather th^ a necessi^. 

' ‘The fact is that Singapore, with press 
censorship, is a business center, and the 
Philippines, without censorship, is not,” 
said Robert Broadfoot. a business con- 
sultant in Hong Kong who has just pro- 
duced a report on the news media in the 
region. "If you're looking at where in- 
vestment is going, it's going to China, 
which has the heaviest censorship.” 

In the 198Qs, there was widespread 
speculation that some of these news or- 
anizations mi^t have to move to a new 
ome after 19^. But in fact. Western 
ubUcations are not only keeping their 
eadquarters in Hong Kong but expand- 
ing them. 

"For 50 ^ears our Asia edition had 
been edited in New York,” said Donald 
Morrison, the editor of Time magazine’s 
Asia edition, with a circulation of 
300,000. “Now this year we moved 
every vestige of it to Hong Kong. We 
think this is a great place to run a regional 
news operation.” 

So far only a few publications — prin- 
cipally China-watching publications ed- 
it^ by Christian groups — have moved 
from Hong Kong for fmliticaJ reasons. 

The hamlover to Chii^ marl^ the first 
time that most Western news organi- 
zations have had major assets and op- 
erations under Communist rule, and it 
raises the delicate question of whether 
China will gain leverage over the ed- 
itorial policies of Western news orga- 
nizations. 


KOREA: North Agrees to Attend Talks 


Continued from Page 1 

where early signs of famine have been 
reported, agreed in principle two 
months ago to join talks to set the terms 
of a four-pa^ negotiation, but .said that 
it fust required large amounts of food 
aid and an easing of U.S. sanctions. 

Pyongyang has now dropped those 
requirements, as well as a frequent de- 
mand that any peace treaty should be 
signed by Washington and Pyongyang 
but not Seoul, officials said. 

Food aid. in any case, is expected to 
be at the top of the agentki for the 
August talks. 

Asked whether the United States in- 
tended to send additional food aid to the 
North, Dinger said that there were 
no plans to do so. 

"However." he added, "should 
there be another request from the in- 
temationaJ community for food aid, 
we'll cenaioly consider it.” 

The U.S. decision earlier this year (o 
send food aid followed an appeal from 
the UN World Food Program. 

U.S. officials have been frustrated by 
the halting efforts to draw North Korea 
into productive talks. Some of those 
most leery of the Stalinist govcmmeni 
believe I^ongyang Is using the talks 
merely to obtain as much food aid as 
possible to prop up its government and 
military, said James Lilley, a former 
U.S. ambassador to South Korea and 
later China. 

Germany Denounces 
Neo-Nazi Music CD 

Agciux Fratwe-Pn-sse 

BERLIN — Neo-Nazis in Gennany 
are distributing a compact disc whose 
songs encourage listeners to kill for- 
eigners and far-left activists, the national 
intelligence agency said Wednesday. 

"I have never seen anything so 
crude." said Hans-Gcrl Lange, spokes- 
man for the Office for the Protection of 
the Constitution. 

The CD was recorded by a group 
called the Turk-Hunters ofZilleiial. 


"North Korea is inexorably txy^ to 
ingratiate itself into Western giving, 
without changing its system or policies, 
without instituting agricuIruraL industri- 
al or fmanclal reforms.” said Mr. Lilley, 
now dirtxtor of the Institute for Glob^ 
Chinese Affairs at the University of 
Maryland. 

He said he would be "pleasantly sur- 
prised' ' if the new contacts produced any 
substantial progress by year's end. 

In Seoul. Hak Soon, a research 
fellow at the Sejong Institate, a private 
think tank, said the North's lowering of 
its requirements for talks was "inev- 
itable,” given the county's severe eco- 
nomic distress and looming famuie. The 
nation's economy has been contracting 
by a dramatic S percent a year. 

But Mr. Paik predict*^ a long pro- 
cess. 

"The North,” he told Reuters, "will 
seek bilateral deals with the U.S. to over- 
come its economic woes and guarantee 
its surv'ival before considering cooper- 
ation with the South." 

The United States, fearful that food aid 
might be diverted to North Korea's large 
army, has refused to link such aid to the 
peace talks. 

But on the eve of the talks in April, it 
announced plans to ship 50,000 metric 
tons of com to the North throu^ the 
World Food Program, declaring this to be 
a humanitarian gesture unrela^ to pro- 
gress toward talks. 

South Korea suspended private rice 
donations to the North in the summer of 
1995. alter Nwth Koreans detairted a 
South Korean ship carrying food old and 
arrested crewmen on sp3ring charges. 

But earlier this year, Seoul said dona- 
tions could resume, and 50,000 tons of 
grain have since been delivered by 
rivate orgwizations, according to the 
outh Korean Embassy. 

The World Food Program has pre- 
dicted a North Korean shortfall of 1.8 
niillion to 2.3 million metric tons of food- 
stuffs this year. 

Mr. Lilley said that North Korea had 
received an estimated 1 million metric 
tons of grain so far this year, in aid and 
trade. China is providing more than all 
otiier counuies combined, he said, on 
terms believed to be "VC17 generous." 



INTERNATIONAL 



Democrats Assail Starr 
For New Tack in Inijuiry 


The Asseciaied Press 

WASHINGTON — Reacting to a re- 
pon that Whitewater prosecutors ques- 
tioned Arkansas state inx^ieis about 
po»ible extrasnarital afTaiis by Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton, Democratic senators 
assened that the indq^eodent counsel, 
Kouieth Starr, lad go^ too far. 

' ‘As a former jvQ^utor, I believe the 
independence Of this specif proseenten' 
is serionsly in question,” said Senatw 
John Ker^ of Massadinsetts. He added: 
"I think it is ioq)propriate to be asking 
questions of personal pa^ sexual history 
of any kind, but of a pointed nature that 
ttey have arisen to 1 think just crosses 
the line of decency.” 

Tom Daschle, the Senate minori^' 
leader, called the questioning "anse- 
cessary, and in our view it exceeds the 


bounds whbin which uc felt tins speri^j 
prosecutor was investigaung. 

James Chr\'ille. the presidcct's 
fotmer canqxugn aivhitcci and a entk tf 
Ml Starr, said'. "Thib ^&uud as sooe 
highbrow criminal investigation undcadEd 
op as some vswdty use of federal mooei. 
aM power to about sex 
But Josq)h DiGcnova, a ftvmcr U.S 


attorney aiu independent counsel, 


such a line was difficult but often nec- 
essary' for prosecutors. “It's very kn. 
ponant when you're doif^ what ihe\‘ are 
doing to talk to as many people as pos- 
sible,*' he said. "Whai they rc kK4:n)o 
for is drat maybe at 3 moment when the 
president had hks guard down he ntioh; 
have said something out of angcT'or 

ftustranon. Ifs somewhat unpleasant 
bur you have to do it" 


CLINTON: Stan- Probes Old Relationships 


Continued frtim Page 1 


.liiKk Hanfte>/nK AwdM Plot, 

GORE'S EXHIBIT — Vice President A1 Gore holding up a child's 
school chair Wednesday as he addressed the annual FaoiQy Reunion 
conference in NashvilIe,‘Tennessee. To illustrate a point, Mr. Gore used 
the example of an adult trying to fit into a child-sized chair. 


ISRAEL: Anti-Netanyahu Ripples Spread 


Continued from Page 1 


for money and jobs, the prime minister 
still managed to muster only two-tltirds 
of his own party for a vote of confidence 
in the govenunent late Tuesday night 
Wh^er the dissidents can topple 
him is far less clear, and many political 
oddsmakers still bee ;^ainsL 

But the ripple efiects of the attempt 
are already t^ing fell further afield, 
cause Mr. Netanyahu has even less run- 
ning room than before in the broken- 
down effort to negotiate an Israel i-Pal- 
estinian peace. 

With Mr. Meridor and some other 
centrist legislators now poised to vote Mr. 
Netanyahu out of office if they can. the 
prime minister is further beholden to die 
religious nationalists on his coalition's 
right 

One qjparent sign of that is his new- 
found enthusiasm for Ariel Sharoit who 
poised to inherit Mr. Meridor's 


IS 


powerful finance job and a seat on the 
three-person "inner cabinet” govern- 
ing talks with the Palestinian leader. 
Yasser Arafat 

Mr. Sharon, a prime patron of Jewish 
settlement on the West Bank and the 
father of Israel's 1982 invasion of Leb- 
anon, told the newspaper Ma'ariv that 
he has asked Mr. Netanyahu for the 


additional job of running Israel's ne- 
gotiations with the Arabs himself. 

“I am the only one who is capable of 
reaching a formula and successfully 
conducting the negotiations with the 
Palestinians,” he stud. 

An aide, Raanan Gissin, confirmed 
the Ma'ariv report but took strong ex- 
ception to a headline saying Mr. Sharon 
wanted to lead the talks “with ArafaL" 
"He will negotiate with the Pales- 
tinians, but not with Arafai,' ' Mr. Gissin 
said, alluding to Mr. Sharon's un- 
ch^ed belief that the Palestinian lead- 
er is a war criminal and terrorisL "This 
is completely off.” 

Mr. Sharon’s ascendance, though 
widely reported, is not yet a done d^, 
in part because Foreign Minister David 
Levy is dead set against it 
Beginning Tuesday, when he began 
refusing Mr. Netanyahu's phone calls. 
Mr. Levy became the latest of the prime 
minister’s coalition partners to let it be 
known he was ready to walk out the 
door. 

"Netanyahu's coalition partners 
smell blood and act like a pack of pred- 
atory animals, each trying to snatch his 
pound of fiesh, before the prime min- 
ister pulls himself together or col- 
lapses.” wrote the right-leaning 
Ma'ariv columnist Yosef L^id. 


Mr. Clinton to. or jnovided vehicles to 
transport him to, clandestine meetings 
with "seven or eight” of the women on 
the prosecutors' Usl This was at times 
when Clinton was out of town or 
asleep. 

Mr. Andeison.a 12-year veteran of the 
force, said be also was asked to review a 
list of names. He said last week that he 
reftis^ to answer the questions about 
relationships Mr. Clinton may have had 
witii women. "1 said, *lf he's done 
something UIcgaL I will tell you. But I'm 
not going to answer a question about 
womm (hat he knew because I just don’t 
feel lilre it's anybody's business.' ” 

The troopers said they also were 
asked about a half-dozen iraJe acquaint- 
ances of Mr. Clinton's. The sources who 
know about the investigation said eight 
troopers had been questioned. 

Asked Tuesday about the question- 
ing, John Bates, deputy Whitewater 
counsel, said: "We are coDtinuing to 
gather relevant facts from whatever wit- 
nesses, male or female, who may be 
available. Our obli^tioQ is to acquire 
information from mends, business as- 
sociates or other acquaintances or con- 
fidants." 

Mr. Bates said that it was "perfectly 
af^xopriate to establish the circum- 
stances of die contact" for a potential 
witness, including whether Mr. Clinton 
had an intimate relationship or arfair 
with the person. Mr. Starr's purpose, he 
said, was to ensure that the investigation 
was full and thorough. He added that 
senior lawyers in the independent coun- 
sel’s office had ajiqjroved the line of 
questioning. 

Mr. Starr's investigators are trying to 


BLAIR: Call for Sinn Fein Commitment to Nonviolence 


Continued from Page 1 


sued contacts with ail sides in 
the conflict more aggress- 
ively than her predecessors 
have, and a new govenunent 
bad been elected in Dublin 
and a new prime minister, 
Bertie Ahem, named with a 
perceived greater flexibility 
toward Sinn Fein. 

Mr. Blair said Wednesday 
that the killings had had re- 
percussions for Sinn Fein’s 
"credibility" in the United 
States, where the fxime min- 
ister just spent three days. 
President Bill Clinton, he 


noted, had condemned them 
"in exactly the same terms as 
I did” 

While in the United States, 
Mr. Biair appealed to Amer- 
icans to stop giving aid to the 
IRA, echoing a longtime com- 
plaint by British governments 
that Americans were unknow- 
ingly funding violence. 

He told the House of Com- 
mons on Wednesday that 
three days before the killings 
of the two constables in Lur- 
gan he had sent a written aide 
memoire to Sinn Fein, setting 
out the terms of what was 
need^ to gain re-entiy to the 


talks and Uve period of time, 
six weeks, that the govern- 
ment would need to conclude 
that the cease-fire declaration 
was "sincere" one. 

"1 have dealt straight with 
them," the prime minister 
said Wednesday of Sinn Fein. 
"I expect straight dealing in 
return. We and the other 
parties will not be waiting 
around for them." 

He repeated an earlier 
warning that “the settiement 
train is leaving, with or with- 
out them." 

Mr. Blair is also trying to 
take the heat out of the season 


of Protestant marches, that 
ended m violence last year. 
The choice of Lurgw, a 
County Armagh town in the 
very area where the marches 
are due to begin early next 
month was seen as an effort 
by the IRA to provoke re- 
t^ation by Loyalist paramil- 
itaries. plunging Northern 
beland rack into the tit-for- 
tat violence that has been 
largely abated in recent 
years. 

"There is no time to 
waste,” Mr. Blair said. "The 
situation on the ground in 
Northern Ireland is fragile." 


COUSTEAU: Famed Undersea Explorer Dies at 87 


Continued from Page 1 


His later years were clouded by fam- 
ily quarrels over the direction of the far- 
flung Cousteau enterprises, which rang- 
ed from the not-for-^fit Cousteau So- 
ciety and related organizations, with 
more than 300,000 members in Europe 
and the United States, to the Cousteau 
Oceanic Park, a theme park near Paris 
that filed for bankruptcy in 1991. 

But Mr. Cousteau's reputation rests 
on an achievement of unassailable im- 
portance: he was the co-inventor and 
principal developer of the Aqua-Lung, 
better known by the acronym "scut» ' 
for self-contained underwater breathing 
apparatus. Hie only previous options for 


undersea exploration were the diving 
ralmt 


bell and the helmeted diving suit. Scuba 
gear set divers free to explore to depths 
of a hundred feet and beyond. 

Mr. Cousteau’s other accomplish- 
ments resist pigeon-holing. To every 
task, he brought relentless energy, un- 
quenchable curiosity, unshakable faith 
in hims elf, an irresistible charm and the 
ability to share his enthusiasms. 

He was boro in Saini-Andre-de-Cub- 
zac, near Boitieaux. His father, a legal 
adviser and traveling emnpaaion to a peri - 
ratetic American millionaire, kept his 
family on the go. Young Cousteau's in- 
troductiOD to the sea came at the Nor- 
mandy resort of Drauvilie. Although a 
sickly child, he learned to swim at age 4. 

After World War I his father's new 
employer, another American million- 
aire. took the family to the United States 
for two years. Jacques and his older 
brother, Pierre, play^ stickball in Man- 
hattan and went 10 summer camp in 
Vermont, where Jacques learned to hold 
his breath and dive to the lake bottom. 

Back in France, he saved ius allow- 
ance to buy an early Pathe movie cam- 
era. Before shooting his first film, at the 
age of 13, he took the camera apart and 
pul it back together to find out how it 
worked. The homemade melodramas he 
filmed always credited ‘ ‘J. Cousteau ' ' as 
producer, director and cameraman. 

In 1930. be gained entrance to the 
French naval academy at Brest. He took 
a movie camera on a world training 
cruise and filmed rolls of exotic scenes 


— including an encounter with Soutii 
Seas pearl divers who wore peculiar- 
looking goggles to search for oysters. 

Mr. Cousteau enrolled in the navy's 
aviation school, but before he took his 
pilot's exam in 1933, he drove his fa- 
ther's sports car off a mountain road and 
awoke in a hospital bed with two broken 
arms. It probably saved his life; all but 
one of his classmates at the aviation 
school were killed in World War U. 

At Ate Toulon naval base. Mr. Cous- 
teau began swimming daily in the Medi- 
teiranean to strengthen his arms, on tiie 
advice of Ptulippe Tailliez, a fellow of- 
ficer. They teamed up with a civilian 
named Fr^ic Dumas to experiment 
with water-tight goggles. The submarine 
vistas he beheld when he first put on the 
goggles in 1936 were a revelation. 

Cousteau and his friends began 
tinkering with homemade snorkel hoses, 
insulated body-suits and portable 
breathing devices based oo the recent 
invention of the compressed air cylinder. 
Mr. Cousteau also fashioned a water- 
proof housing for a movie camera. 

World War II and France’s quick de- 
feat did not halt his underwater explor- 
ations. While remaining in the navy — 
and later spying on Italian occupation 
forces for the ^ench resistance — he 
found time to continue his search for a 
self-contained breathing apparatus that 
would transform a diver into a 
swimming "manfish." 

The search led him to the Paris office 
of an engineer, Emile Gagnon, who bad 
devised an ingenious valve that allowed 
wartime automobiles to run on bottled 
cooking gas. Together, Mr. Cousteau 
and Mr. Gagoao adapted the valve to the 
task of feeding compressed air to a diver 
on demand and at the pressure of the 
sunounding water. They patented their 
deviceasthe "Aqua-Lung." 

By June 1943, Mr. Cousteau was 
ready to test the bulky 50-pound ap- 
paratus. On his first dive, he went down 
60 feeL He recorded what happened in 
his journal: "1 experimenter with all 
possible maneuvers — loops, somer- 
saults. and barrel rolls. 1 stood upside 
down on one finger and burst out laugh- 
ing. a shrill distorted laugh. Nothing T 
did altered the automatic rhvthm of the 


find people Mr. Clinton wa.s close to in 
the 19S0s and early 1990s. said a source 
iainiiiar with the investiganmi. to ask 
them wliat Mr. Clinton might have told 
them about the Whitcwaicf mvcstmeni. 
the McDougals or Madison Guaranty — 
the bsuik owned by Mr. McDousol. ' 

Investigators maintained that they did 
not set out to ask about Mr. Clinton's 
personal life, but that such quesuons 
became essential in determining who 
might have participated in intimate con- 
versations with the then-governor about 
his financial dealings. 

liie special prosecutor's ins’cstigaiion 
has been the subject of much political 
controversy . as Democrats have accused 
Mr. Starr of engaging in a partisan ven- 
detta against the Clintons that has token 
him far afield of the original inquirv-. 
Rqniblicans. meanwhile. h.ivc ch^^ 
the White Hou.se w ith stonewalling and 
trying to cover up misdeed^. 



viiv 



SPACE; 

Crash Damages Mir 


Continued from Page I 


station has remained constant. 

Frank Culbertson, the N.ASA official 
in charge of the Mir training program, 
said the accident knocked the spacecraft 
away from the ideal angle for its solar 
panels to gather energy from rhe sun. 

One of Mir's six nuxlulcs was 
quickly closed off because oxygen le^- 
ing throu^ a gash in the station's shell 
was reducing die pressure to dangerous 
levels, NASA and Russian official 
said. 

The damaged capsule contained sci- 
entific equipment and perronul gcMr N.*- 
lon^ng to the Americun astronaut Mi- 
chael Foale. Mr. Culbertson said, 
adding that he did not know how much 
of that could be recovered. 

He estimated the gash at three square 
centimeters — about the size of >1 post- 
age stamp — and said lhai a space walk 
would be required to repair the damage, 
if it could be repaired at all. 

Representative Janies Sensenbrenner. 
Republican of Wisconsin, who is chair- 
man of the House &iencc Committee, 
said a second module was al.so ^hut, bui 
NASA officials said he was mistaken. 

"Since February, there h.ive been 10 
major crises involving the Mir space 
station," Mr. Sensenbrenner said. "We 
have to make a determination if the 
science we are doing up there is wiorth 
the American lives we ore risking." 

But Mr. Culbertson said the accident 


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air. Delivered from gravity and buoy- 
ancy 1 flew around in space." 

Cousteau convinced his navy su- 
periors to establish an Under^ Re- 
search Group. Its mission was to perfect 
the techniques of scuba diving and un- 
derwater photography and to teach them 
to naval officers and seamen. In addition 
to clearing mines from French ports, the 
group salvaged marble columns frirni a 
2,000-year old Roman wreck off the 
coast of Tunisia. Mr. Cousteau's first 
underwater films won prizes at the 
newly established Cannes Film Festi- 
val. 

In the 1950s, Mr. Cousteau came into 
his owm as an innovator and entrepre- 
neur of undersea exploration. On per- 
manent leave from the navy, he formed 
the first of a series of corporations and 
nonprofit organizations through which 
he financed eiqieditions, advanced en- 
vironmeutal causes dear to him, and 
projected his own image as the leading 
explorer of the day. 

Aboard a converted 66-foot mine- 
sweroer that he rechristened Calypso. 
Mr. Cousteau began searching for new 
arenas to demonstrate the latest under- 
water technology. The Calypso was ex- 
pensive to operate, and he soon saw that 
the only way to realize his dream of 
keeping it in virtually constant operation 
was to turn the ship into a self-susuiinins 
media attraction — a kind of modern- 
day showbOaL 

Mr. Cousteau’s later years were 
marked by professional disappoint- 
ments and personal losses. His younger 
son, Philipp, his chosen successor, was 
killed in a seaplane crash in 1979. 

Jean-Michel, the older son, became 
heir-amxuent to the Cousteau empire, 
but father and son fought constantly over 
management and policy, and Jean- 
Michel resigned from the Cousteau So- 
ciety in 1992. 

'^ee years later Mr, Cousteau went 
to court to prevent his son from using the 
family name to promote an "environ- 
raentaUy aware" resort in Fiji in which 
Jean-Michel Cousteau had a financial 
interest. 

In 1990 his first wife, Simone, who 
had accompanied him on hundreds of 
explorations aboard the Calypso, died. 


Wednesday was not related to the Mir's 


age. "This decompression could have 

• ^ a g- ^ 

occurredonDay 1 of the Mir'&life," he | 


said at a news conference. 


Officials have not yet determined 


whether the accident was caused b> 
faulty equipment or human error, said 

.. 

Viktor Blagov, a deputy director of the 


Russian Mission Control Center near 

•• 

- • • vfc'- 

Moscow. 

-.•-•rriSr 

"We have managed to stabilize the 


situation.” Mr. Blagov said. "TTiereis 

" 

no talk about evacuating the crew or 

• ■ 

jettisoning the module." 

*. * ■ * r . 


I-U. sulU (lie 

pressure aboard Mir dropped slightly 
after the accident hut was brought bock 
to normal. Space stations, like uu'crafi. 
are pressurized to maintain proper oxy- 
gra levels for the crew. 

The crash occurred at 1:15 P.M. 
Moscow time, while the crew was using 
manual controls to practice docking the 
Progress cargo ship. 

Mission control in Ru.<sia did not 
aimounce the problem until at least two 
hours later, and only after NASA made 
public information in the United 
States. 

The cargo ship missed its docking at 
one end of the station, bounced off solar 
energy panels and a side of the station’s 
Spektr modu le and then tumbled sIowK 
away. A videotape taken by the as- 
tronauts showed ragged gashes in the 
solar panels and denis in the module's 
white skin. 

•No one was aboard the cargo .ship —■ 
a bus-sized spacecraft that brings m 
suf^lies and tstices out gaibage. It is now 
orbiting the Euiih near the space sioliun- 
Cargo .ships ore routinely discarded to 
burn in the atmosphere. 

In addition to Mr. Foale, Mir 
staffed by the cosmonauts Vasili Tsib- 
liyev and Alexander Lazutkin. Njr. 
Tsibliyev was at the controls when the 
accident occurred, but both hh- 
Lazutkin and Mr. Foale were assisting 
him. Mr. Blagov said. . ■ 

The Progr^s had been docked wim 
Mir since April. Another cargo ship had 
been expected 10 dock this weekend, 
but that has been put off for at least R* 
days, .Mr. Culbertron said. 

Mr. Foale has been living on 
since mid-May. when he replaced Dr. 
Linengcr. who experienced a .series ot 
problems during his four-month visit, 
including a near-miss with a Progress 
and a fire. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERAU) TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 2^ 1997 


HEALTH/SCIENCE 


h 


/ 


! ^ 


A Potent Hormone 
Gains Respect 

2d Estrogen Receptor Discovered 


By Natalie ADgier 

Nnf York Times Service 



\s. 




EW YORK — If 
Shakespeare had been a 
chemist, he wcAld have 
loved estrogen, a honnooe 
' fit for comedy, tragedy and a sonnet or 
' two. 

Estrogen can be heroic, governing 
human fertility and nurturing tbe heart, 
.-bones, blood vessels a^ brain so per- 
: suasively that soon estrogen may be 
' -piescribM for middle-aged men as it is 
today fw women. It can play Latty 
Macbedi, with blood on her bands: es- 
trogm has been implicated in cancers of 
the brnfit, ovary and uterus, autoim- 
mune diseases, asthma, fibred, mood 
. disordffi and migraines. 

And just when scientists think 
: they've got estzogoi figu^ out, die 
' honnooe turns Puckish, wiftpiring then* 
•assumptions and rewriting the script 

Among the most radical of revisions 
to the estrogen stmy, scientists have 

• recently discovered a second estrogen 
recqitor, a protein that allows die mUs 
■ of the body to heed estrogen's call For 

f decades, lesearchers had assumed diere 
was only one type of estrogen recqitor, 
one peerless, vmsatile molecular dock- 
^ site widi which estrogen must unite 
. if the tissues of the utraus, breast or 
.•elsewhexe are to reqiond to hormonal 
.stimulation. Now it turns out that there 
- -is another Kceptov, cail^ estrogen re- 
; ceptor beta, through which die potent 
.henmone can convey its message. 

And thoo^ whw researchers ini- 

• •dally detected the beta receptor last 
year, diey dionght it was merely a 

_baclmp protein for die “true** estrogen 
~Feceptor, a rash of new studies suggests 
that beta has a porpose and intricacy of 
its own. Scientists have found evidcoce 
of the beta receptor in organs th^ dis- 
play liole or no evidence of ali^ and 
that nobody had dionglu of as bung 
under estrogen’s dominion, including 
die lui^s, Udneys, intestines, bladder 
and colon. 

. It also exists in certain cells of die 
. 'bone and blood vessels where the orig- 
, .inal receptOT — now called alpha — is 
.scarce, while being neariy absent in 


those cells where alpha, abramds. 

This new work could help resolve 
some iMigstanding puzzles about es- 
trogen’s activity, including why the hor- 
rri Q^ yt offers iDiiltipait braefits to the 
cardiovascular system and skeleton, 
why some women lose control of thdr 
bladders as di^ age, why intestinal 
upsets are a predictable aSlictimi of 
pregnancy and why a drag like tamox- 
ifen, used to treat or inevent Ixeast 
cancer, has the paradoxical effect of 
inhihirifig (fae gTOWth of bxeast cells 
while overs timniating (he cells of the 
uterine linittg 

Ihe finHings could influmce die 
treatment of breast cancer. By cuixent 
zHorocol, oncologists screen biopsied 
tow mmor cells for the presence or 
absence of estrogen recqitors, to deter- 
mine if the cancer is sensitive to es- 
trogen and dins likely to be inhibited by 
drugs that block estrogen. Today’s as- 
says rely on antibodies that cKily rec- 
ognire estrogen receptor alpha, but it is 
possible dial some seemingly lecmttK'- 
negative tnmors in fact are rich in beta 


Heeding Estrogen’s Signals 


Estrogen, a powerful and only partly understood hormone, has been found 
to have two Wnds of receptor piote^—> alpha and — tltetaBowceRs 

to heed Hs caK. Further study of these receptors may solve some of the 
puzzles about estrogen, such as why the hormone offers benefits to both 
the cardiovascular system and skeleton, why some women lose control of 
their ladders as age and why intestinal i^isets are a preddatoe 

affliction of pregnancy. Below: which tissues and organs seeni to have 
more of one receptor than the other. 

OmM nervoiB system: 

beta and alpha •' 




Another Bad Habit 

It May Also Carry the Ulcer Bacterium 


By Jane £. Brody 

NetellbrkTSmes Service 


Alfhoii; 

prompted experts lo 



Blood Vessels: bsta 


Bone: beta 


nerable to die prefoi^ theiaity of anti- 
estrogen drags. Studies are uo^ way to 
explore whether receptor tests should be 
modified to take beta into account 




THER recent wodc also un- 
derscores estrogen's readi, 
its omacity to influence die 
body far byroad what classic 
models of sex hormone acd^dty had 
suggested. Scieiitists have gadiered ev- 
idence that some like bone, 

breast and vasculature not only react to 
es tro gen droulating in the tooodstream. 
but generate extra supplies oi the 
hormone locally, using an enzyme 
called aromatase to convert bonnone 
(zecorsors into full-bore estrogen. 

Asked if thoe was any part of the 
body left diat estR^en did not tom out to 
affect. Dr. Benita S. Katzenellenbogen, 
a prtoessor of pifayriolQgy, ceil and 
structoral biology at the Univexsity of 
Illinois in Urbana who has studied the 
honnooe since the 1970$, said: ’T used 
to tinnk sa Now I have my doubts. 
Well, maybe the spLeen.** 

And Imt anybody think that die new 



work has rde^rance only to women, it is 
time to put to rest — and cremate — the 
shibboltoh of estrogen as a “female 
honnone.’* Most of the new wodc that 
has been done cm estrogen recratois of 
eidier Greek suffix, ^ on ^ aro- 
matase enzyme, applies to male and 
female bodies alike. Indeed, the beta 
receptor was first detected serend^it- 
ons^, during a search for more “mas- 
e nii^ * ’ quarry. Or. Jan-Ake Gustafsson 
and his colleagues at die Karoliosira 
Institute in Huddinge, Swed^ were 
screening icxieat prostate tissue in 
search of a novel androgen receptor, a 


protein imponsive to the so-called male 
bonomie, testosterone. Th^ did not 
find a new androgen recqitor, but diey 
did detect something widi the ftarmarks 
of an estrogen receptor. 

“At first we thought we*d made a 
mistake, diat this was a cloning arti- 
fact’* said Dr. Gnstafs^. Bnt on fin- 

“vrerealized^^i^^^^^^g new.” 

Scientists do not yet know whether 
the beta receptor animates difierent 
genes than does die alpha lecqrtor, but 
they have begun mapping out omer pro- 
vocative disoepancies. 


Is the RosweU UFO Case Closed? Maybe 


By William J. Broad 

New Yoit Times Service 



EW YORK — No bodies. 
No bulbous heads. No secret 
autopsies. No spaceship. No 
crash. No cxtratecrestri^ or 
.alien artifacts of any sort And most 
emphatically of all, no government cov- 
er-up. 

Ihe wfocce has issued its latest repcfft 
-on the 1947 incident in the New Meuco 
• desert near the town of Roswell that is at 
.the heart of claims by flying-saucer fans 
that extraterrestrials have visited the 
•Earth and which has become a celebrated 
part of American pr^lar culoiie. 

The report, in vohmiffloas deteil, says 
the SDppreed mountain of alien evi- 
-dence is a mirage. The air ftirce says the 
shadowy doings of brave fliers, high- 
altitude balloons, lifelike crash dim- 
mies and saucerlike craft in the south- 
eastern New Mexico desert at the dawn 
.(rf the ^ce age were glimpsed and 
embellished over the decades into folse 
' evidence of aliens. 

For ttigfnnrft, one serviceman who 
crashed in a test balloon 10 miles north- 
west of Roswell sufiered an injury that 
caused his bead to swell and lesonble the 
bulbous cranium of the classic scteoce- 
.fiction alien, the repext says. This 1959 
m^iap. it adds, a^iarendy led decades 
later to tales of a cratiied extraienestiial 
that walked under its own power into a 
military hospitaL 

So, too, dummies were routinely 

aiu/’vwe sometimes lost in^tie^isert 
and disputed in suggestive ways, toeir 
hwds often missing a finger* A dis- 
tinguishing characteiistic of the aliens 
supposedly sighted near Roswell, the 
report notes, is four fingers. 

Not surixisii^ly, true beUevers in 
.Roswell are nnshaken, seeing the new 
report as evidence of the most egregious 
government cover-iq> of all time, one 
whose SOth aiuuversaiy is to be cel- 
ebrated early next month witii a basb in 
the New Mexico desert 


Qitidi' of (he fqiari'toidlelif Its mauT 
diesis: that civilians are confusing mil- 
itary activities tiiat to(A fdace over rmse 
than a decade and falsely recalling them 
as a sin^e iucideiU. Sudi memory fail- 
ures. critics say, are highly unlikdty. But 
(he air force in its report says the wit- 
nesses are often recalling events more 
than four decades old and could have 
eas% mixed up the dates that badly. 

much-debated incident took 
place in a desolate stretch of desert that 
was surrounded Ity a number of secret 
military bases. Increasingly, the site or 
sites (the faithful disagree on its exact 
location) are today ringed by tourist 
^tractions that play on the extrater- 
restrial theme. More ttom 100,000 dey 
watchers and conrairaqr theorists are 
eniected to visit RosweU. for the in- 
cidmt’s golden anniversary ceMiration 
during the first week of July. 

The hullabaloo got started in July 
1947 when a ranch foremao, W.W. 
BrazeU found strange, shiny material 
littering tiie ground. He turned it over to 
(be shmff, ^o gave it to the military 
authorities at the nearby airbase. 

On Jnly 8, tile RosweU Anity Air Reid 
issued a news release about tile crash of a 
flying disk, prompting a local news- 
paper, The Ri^eU DaUy Record, to run 
an article under the headline: “RAAF 
Ca^Kures Ryir^ Saocer.*’ Militaiy of- 
fice retreated tiie next day, calling the 
curious driiris merely a downed weather 
balloon. The matter was largely for- 
gotten until the late 1970s with the birth 
of wl^ eventoaUy hmrameL a smaU in- 
dustry of eaqierts. books, articles and 
tdevisioa shows recount^ alieo vis- 
itations and conspiracy tiiereies. 

Under growing pressure firom true 
believers and curious coQgiessmen, the 
air force in February 1S>94 began to 
investigate just what took place many 
decades ago, its review including mU- 
itaiy riflta that had been classified secret 
during the cold war. 

A 23-page report made public in 
Sepiembre 1994 said the silvery wreck- 
age in tiie desot had been part of a top- 


'secretS 3 «t^dfafoaJc ^roaa^‘.t!^7' 'log^her'ffom miGtary“ work ^{Tobk 
ried high into the atmosphere hy bal- place over many years. ; 

^ re- The desert wo^ focused on the de- 
velc^onent of spy gear and hi^altitude 
escape systems. Starting in 1950, for 
instance. baUotms rising as Idg^ as 19 
miles dropped dozens of lifeUke dum- 
mies to perfect parachutes for pion- 
eering pilots, inciuding those in the X- 
IS roi^et plmie and the U-2 spy plane. 
The dummies landed aU over die New 
Mexico desert with several lost 
The Tcport also tells of other activity 
in New Mexico that conceivably was 
mistaken for extraterrestrial crafo A V- 
shaped baUoon flown in 1965, for in- 
stance. bears a striking resemblaitee to 
the stetch of an alien spacecraft drawn 
by an anonymous witness. And the re- 
port notes that (teert baUoons between 
1966 and 1972 lifted and dn^iped mock 
inte^lanetaiy |xobes. The {xogram was 
designed to aid NASA research, but to 
the untrained eye tiie probes looked Uke 
flying saucers. 

“The incomptete and inaccurate in- 
tenningling'* Ot actual events, the re- 
port concludes, over the decades has 
resulted in a “sensational story’’ about 
aliens fiom another world crashing in 
the desert at RoswelL But the.tale “can- 
not withstand close scrutiny when com- 
pared to official records.” 


loon, the spy sensors listened for re- 
verberations fiom Soviet nuclear blasts. 
But the 1994 reptm said nothing about 
extrateirestriaJ beings, who in various 
accounts of the Roswell crash number 
between two and eight, dead and some- 
tunes alive. The silence arose because 
the air force found ootiung in tiie bal- 
loon saga to accotmt for the reports of 
aliens, so it ignored toe topic at the 
time. 

The new Roswell rqiorc, titled “Case 
Qosed,’* was written by Ctptain James 
McAndrew, an intelligence officer. Its 
23 1 pages are designed to go beyond die 
1994 report ^ levealing mtxe about 
federal woik in the desert and examin- 
iim what apparently inspired 
or not only alien- artifacts but of 
extraterresuials themselves. 


EW YORK —Could a per- 
stm catch ulem fiom a 
housefly? "As' preposterous 
as that may seem, it ooiild 
at least indirectly. 

.t 90 pecceot of ulcers are now 
known to be caused by asIeoder,spiral- 
shiped ba^erium- cml^ Hdicobacter 
pyloiis, or H. OTloris. This lesU^ or- 
ganism, found in the stomachs of a 
quarter of Ameticau adults, is believed 
to spread fiom person to per- 
son Ity way of rood cr water 
contaminated by fecal natter. 

Microbiology at Sl Eliza- 
beth’s Medicu Center in Bos- 
ton recendy demonstrated 
tiie common housefly can be- 
come a reservoir of H. pyloift, 
canying tiie organism on its 
skin and in Its intestinal tract and passing 
the bacterium on in its excretions. 

One does not have to be a scientist to 
envision a likely mode of transmissioa. 
^(^le infected with H. pyioris excrete 
viable bacteria in tiieir fec^ Houseflies 
lay Qgs, develop and feed on excrement 
— human or otiierwise — and often 
land on unprotyed food, where th^ 
may d^iosit the troublescxne organism 
and pass it along to an unsuspecting 
consumer. 

if this mode of transmissioa is cor- 
rect, it may p^y explain why H. ftylor- 
is infection is most common in poor 
countries. lodocx' plumltung, rdftigera- 
tion and modern sanitation are often 
lacking, and H. pyioris inf^on is 
neariy universaL 

How H. pyioris is transmitted is only 
oneof sevK^ unsolved inysteries about 
a bacterium tiiat should become as fa- 
miliar to people as E. coli, Saimoarila 
and Pneumococcus. For (»e thing, sci- 
entists are still ttOi sure exactly Irow H. 
pyioris causes an ulcer, althcm^ they 
know bow h is tfole to sur^we and 
flourish in tiie ho^e acid uivironment 
of tiie'stontech. 

H. pyioris produces an enzyme, ur- 
ease, which converts urea to ammonia 
and bicarbtnate tiut neutralize the 
sKunach acid and allow the organism to 
gain a foothold. This it does with the aid 
of a tril, or flagellum, and re- 
ceptors that enable it to wriggle through 
the stomach’s protective mucus coating 
and attach itsen to die cells tluit line the 
stnnach. Ooce secure, the l»cteria pro- 
duce toxins tiiat uritate and inflame 
sanoundiiig tissue. 

But the mo^ pressing question is 
why, when so many people hai^r this 
dganism, often for their entire lives, do 
only a few develop ulcers and even 
fewer develc^ eitiier of the two foizns of 
stomach cancer that are also attributed 
to H. pyioris infection. One strain of tiie 
otganism has a gene that renders it more 
virulent than other strains. But is this the 
whole answer? Are human factors also 
involved? 



has 

.. Jscount stress as a 
cause of ulcers, might stress-induced 
changes in body ebemistty explain why 
some peoftie are susceptible and othen 
are resistant to ulcers caused by this 
bacterium? 

Tben titeie is the treatment dilemma: 
tiieinabiUty so fir to finda simple way to 
ranuan H. pyioris infection. Three or four 
drugs simultaneously are best able 
to knodc out tiie organism, but the more 
complicated, costly and unpleasant the 
treatmeot regimoi. the less likely people 
are to foDow it and be cured. 

Thanks to the discovery of 
H. pyioris just IS years ago b>‘ 
two Austrmian scientists. Dr. 
Bairy Marshall and Dr. J. 
Rol^ Wairen. most people 
who develop the symptoms of 
an ulcer can be spared the con- 
. . stant threat of recuirence once 
they are treated with ajqiropriate an- 
tibiotics. They no longer have to forever 
gobble antacids or live on a bland diet, 
avoiding all ^ices, alcohol and coffee to 
squelch the pain that arises in toe upper 
abdomen wneoever their stomachs are 
empty or tiiey consume irritating foods. 

A^ while reducing stress is always a 
good ulcer or no ulcer, relaxation 
thmapy is not essaitial to keeping this 
di^T^ing aihnent at bay. 


T 


HERE are several ways to dia- 
gnose an H. pyioris iufeciion. 
The siraqilest' and least ex- 
pensive is a blood test that can 
detect anubotfies to H. pyioris. But this 
test cannot distinguish towcen a cur- 
rem active infection and a prior one that 
has recently been cured. 

A secrauL more expensive blood test 
may be needed to certain of the 
di^posis. Mtxe costly but also more 
(xecise is tiie recently approved urea 
breath tesL The patient consumes a small 
amount of urea, tiiat has been labeled 
wtitii a spedal fbnii of carbon. If there are 
H. pyioris bacteria in the stomach, a 
short while later the patient will exh^ 
caibon dioxide with the labeled carbon. 

Throng tiiese tests doctors can usu- 
ally avoid having to insert a fiber-optic 
tabt tiuough the mouth and into the 
stomach to examine the stomach lining 
and to remove a tissue sample to test fOT 
tiie presence of H. pyioris. .Aliliough this 
is the most accurate test, it is also toe 
most expensive and discomforting and 
must be administered by a specialist in 
gastroenterology. 

Who should be tested for H. pyioris? 
Experts recommend testing anyone w ho 
has a new or recurrent stomach or duo* 
denal ulcer, including those who rog- 
ubriy take nmisteroidm anti-inflamma- 
tony* drugs like ibuprofen and aspirin, 
which are known to produce ulcers in 
some pc^le. But pec^Ic with chronic 
acid indigestion not be tested be* 
cause treatment to eradicate an H. pyior- 
is infection. If found, has not been 
shown to relieve tiieir symptoms. 




N places it is grim. For instance, it 
d^cribes the crash of a KC-97G 
militaiy plane near RosweU that 
kiUed 11 fliers, leaving their bod- 
ies badly burned and reeldng of fiieL T^ 
stench was so foul that ideDtificatioo 
wodc at the Roswell air base was moved 
flom tiie small hospitri to toe oom- 
missaiy, which had a laige refrigerator. 
The air force rqiort suggests tiiat this 
ccasli, recalled decades Utec by a dvilLu 
who visited the air base aod talked to 
wofters there, prooqited his account of 
small, black, mangl^ dead aliens who 
smeUed so b^ that tii^ aut^sies were 
moved fiom the base ho^tri to a fa- 
cility better suited to the dusections. 

TTiis civilian, W. Glenn Dennis, 
bun called the “star witness” of the 
RosweU incidenL Mr. Dennis is pres- 
ident of the Intemational UFO Museum 
and Research Center, which was foun- 
ded in 1991 and is rai Main Street in 
RosweU. 

The new air force recxirt focuses on 
militaiy work and accidents frenn 1947 
to 1976 and says many of the claims 
about extraterre stri als are based on mis- 
taken monories and, in fact, are pieced 


Natural Antibiotic Is Found in the Skin 


RetOers 

L ondon — H uman sldn pro- 
dnees a natural antibiotic that 
helps protect the bcxiy from 
bodena, German Teseaicbers 
said Wednesday. Seos Schroeder and 
colleagues at toe Univecsity of Kiel, 
who called the antibiotic human beta- 
defeasui-2 (hBD-2). said It could ftxm 
tiie basis for oew drags. 

“Our observations show thathuman 
skin contains a diemical shield,” they 
wrote in a letter to the science joinnal 
Nature. “Disruption of this sh^d as 
in cystic fibrosis, mi^ be a reason for 
recuneat infections of skin.” 


They found tiie antibiotic while in- 
ve^gating why people wito psoriasis, 
which causes itching and fktoin^did 
not have nxMO skin infections. Tests 
showed the antibiotic was veiy ef- 
fective against common bacteria like E 
coli — CMie strain (rf^whicto causes food 
poisoning — and the infectious yeist 
Candida albicans. It was less effective 
against staplQdococcus bacteria, which 
natuiaUy live on the skin and which 
can sometimes cause fatal infections. 

One other “oatural” antibiotic has 
been found in toe body, f^own as 
hBD-l, it is found in the bladder, 
genitals aod lungs. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 Historic 
introduction? 

4 Clamorous 

a Gothic 
ardwectural 
feature 


14 Grp. overseeing 
eariy reactors 
is Slowly 
isAuriculaie 
17 Sian oi an Erma 
Bombedc quip 

If Honey 

Are You?' (Fats 
Wader hit) 


More on Fertility Drugs 
And Ovarisui Csuicer 

WASHINGTON (WP) — As the use 
■of fertility drugs increases, researchers 
have been eager to detenniae whether 
these that spur women to 

produce eggs are also linl^ to eascerof 
the oyaiy. Some recent studies have 
concluded that the dru^ do increase the 
risk of die cancer, while other studies 
have found that they don’L 
' Danish researchers sought to clarity 
the matter in a study of all women to 
Denmark under the age of 60 who de- 
•veloped ovarian cancer from 1989 to 
J994. The study, in the journal Fertility 
W Sterility, pubtished by the Amer- 
ican Society w Reproductive Medi- 
cine. included ^ women wito ovarian 
cancer and a control group of 1,721 
women without cancer. 

•■ The stucty found tiiat women who had 
hevo- delivoed babies were 1.5 to 2 
i -times as lilrely as those who had become 
fnotiiers to develop ovarian cancer. 


Those who were infertile and did not use 
dn^ to mdnee bad an even 

greater risk. 

At the same time, the researchers 
found no increase in ovarian cancer risk 
m women who used fertility drugs, no 
matter whether toe medications pro- 
duced pregnancy or not 


Risk of Osteoporosis 

WASHINGTON (WP) — Whatever 
cuises osteoporosis in womeai after 
menopaiisei.it is not high caffeine in- 
take, a study by researchera at Penn 
State Univosity suggests. 

The study included 138 healthy wom- 
en, ages 55 to 70, with no hirtory of 
tobacco use and little or no bonnone 
replacement tiierepy. Researchers 
measured bone mineral de^ty in tiie 
and other braies of tiie women and 
gauged the results against their daily 
consunqition of low (zero to 2 cups), 
moderate (3-4 cups) ami lu;^ (5 or more 


cups) -amounts of coffee or its equi- 
valeoL 

Caffdne intake — mostly fiom cof- 
fee tea — did not affect tte womea’s 
bone density, the study concluded, even 
among women of conqiarable age, 
weight and exercise habits. 

The findings were reported in tiie 
American Journal of Clinical Nutriticxi 
by a team fiom Peon State's GoU^e of 
Medicine. Previous studies had linked 
osteoporosis to caffeine Intake. 

Loss of bone den^ in postmeoo- 
pansal women leads to osteoporosis ^ or 
porous and brittle bones — -and increases 
the risk of fiactures. Inactivity, smoking 
and low calcium intake are known 
factors in ooeoporosis, according to ti» 
National Osteoporosis Foundation. 

Previous studies suggesting a link 
between caffeine intalto aod risk of os- 
teoporosis, they said may have fail^ to 
fiilly oxisider the influence of otiiff 
factors, such as smoking, body weighL 
exercise, calcium consumption and hor- 
oxxie rejdaceinent flierapy. 


TheRnance 
Meidianfs Group 


OHiore CoimeriU Baata 
Bahamie. Tel: (242) 394-7080 
Fax: (2421 394-70S2 


2»0ey TV series 
ai Kindofwneeia 
s He's a real doll 
MRappei? 
HTerrorOe 
aaOuip,part 2 
aa Dfslar's no-no 

aa operas - 

(GiltMitand 
Sullivan works) 
at- Jtma 
37 Gulp, parts 
40 First mate? 
siRtb-UcMers 
44 Set Straight 
47 Ouip. pert 4 
aoActrass 
Donohoe 
SI Sticking point? 

SSAX 

S7 Crack or jack 
toltower 
sa Twited iabric 
saStemach- - 
SI End ol the quip 
asThepierry 
widow in Ttte 
Merry Widow' 
SI 'Aha!' 

87 London Zoo 
iqature? 
to ‘MM 
as Trades 
TO GO staff,' e.g. 

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iBam items 
0 Summation 
aDangerotis 
bacteria 
4 Female 
member of the 

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aChurehlirs'so 
tew”: Abbr. 
a Famous Brum 
7 Gone by 
STheDe^Pox 
9 Baubles 
loWordtoa 
doctor 


11 Covered costs 
ia— — n«|este 
ia Paradise lost 
laCorday'svictlm, 
1793 

aa* —luck?' 
as Astronauts' ade 

as Arrestee's 
rights, 
familiarly' 

87 Hslfa dance 
asDebussy 
aut^eci 

ao Gad about 
aiQotaloador 
aa Suva Is its 
capital 

aa Takes one's 
breath away 

MLongSmeNBC 
Symphony 
conductor 
ae night formation 
as Long spar 
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saRsbukes - 
sharply 

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Solution to Puzzle of June 25 

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BUSINESS/FINANCE 



THURSDAY, JVm 26, 1997 



PAGE 1? 


Luxiuy Amid Lions: 
New Wildlife Safm-i 

Ajjican Chain of Game Lodges Thrives 


By Donald G. McNeil Jr. 

JOHANNESBURG — n* most 
^iQjans CDD^yce of the Conservadoa 

C^. of AAica is not Dave Varty or 
Also BcEDStein, its fbnaders. 

Ncff is it a mbnber of the Getty 
fa^y, a inaj'or investor. ^ 

It is Znnoe Mazibulro, a p^a^hfr 
cangbt with a dead antelc^ on die 
coiw)ao 7 *s Phinda Game Reserve. 

Ife has been featured in envnoo< 
meiBal magazmes as an escample of 
Cooscoip’s enpghteaed attitude to- 
ward- me African cootmaniiies in 
which it operates game lodges. 

Instead of tormns Mr. Maziboko 
over to the police, C<msc<Hp hai y j ^ 
him over to his vill^e’s hea^an f^r 

INTERNATIONAL MANAfiEB 

triaL Nonnally, be woold have been 

fined a cow or two. But Mb. Maztbnko 

was too poor to own a cow so a dra l 
was allied — be would work free at 
dte Phinda Game Reserve for three 
months, making bricks hy hawvt 
Alter his sentence, Mazibi^ 
asked ID stay on, but for pay. With a 
Consccm lo^ he boo^ brick-mak- 
ing madiine^ and now has 10 em- 
pl^ees making bricks for costomers 
in oeaiby towns. 

Recently , Consomp gave him a con- 
tract to Mcks for a new i^gf 
CoiQSCOip is an nnu-omi company, b 
is at die forefront of eco-toorism. 
Africa's hottest growth it of. 

fees an old colonial experience — c o m e 
to Africa, see hs wildlife, be waited on 
hand and foot — bnt its atrimH^ is 
disdnetfy die new Sondi Africa. 

ConSOMp builds schools and dinirae 
nw its lodges, and it eo^iloys as many 
local people as possible, not just as 
cooks and chambermaids but as bidld- 
cis. inmwmkoa and game trackers. 

It buys seed for local fanners and 
tearhes them to plant vegetables, 
nhiefa it then buys for its tables. It buys 
materials for loc^ artists and sells their 
wpek in its enrio shops. 

Jt hires people to clear trees, then 
bojn the caarooal tfa^ pro^ce from 
the wood they cany hoi^ 

It is ntoted in Africa, but incor- 
porated on the Isle of Man. and most of 
ks financing and costomers are Euro- 
peans or Americans. 


I^*8nt. said Natalie Abratt, a company 
5***®®woinaiL “We bm kids in, give 
them loach, take them on a two-hoor 

^06 drive with one of our tracers and 

ih^talk to diem about eco-tourism.** 
The latioaalc is partly naghberii- 

tKss and partly a gamble that the bigger 

w stake local people have in the lod g e , 
the less likefy they will be to poach, 
the cooqiany to court or even 
TOject when die occa«oiial elohant 
hod nins amok in their cmnfielu! 

Cttisca^ grew out of ow lodffi in 
Soim Africa — LondoloEi, or Place of 
the Leopard that had been the family 
game farm and hunting mh^#^ 
1^ Mr. Varty and his brother, John. 

Mr. Bemitein, 38, a real de- 
velops widi a backgroond in finafw*^ 
and civQ eagineeiiDg, who had stayed at 
Loodotozi as a sold Mr. Varty 

on (he idea of a chain of luxury inHg^ 
Seven years later, Conscoip is nin- 
uing 22 lodges in A^ca, inchiding 
Ke nya a nd Za^bar. It is negotiating 
for Roperties in Brazil, Tn/tonaaia and 
Malaysia. Africa is nearly 20 percent 
<u the world's land but it gets 
only 4 percent'of its tourist dollara. 

Ibe company is privately held now, 
but it esqiects to make apublic offering 
within a year, said Mr. Bemstean, its 


deraty chaiTrnan 

Cooscoep't 


qicresaves 


ne people 
wno’vej] 


nevRseenanele- 


j's secret is to keep lodges 
small, beautiful and etqiens- 

ive. Prices range from $260 to $650 a 
person per m^t, with a $300 average. 

No lodge accommodaiies more than 
40 people, and bedrooms are nataily 
diaJets or tents on a hillside. 

The hill may be unfenced and 
people airiviag or leaving after da^ 
now most wait for armed escorts. 

That policy was instituted after a 
wranan guest left dinner at the lodge to 
fetch a sweater from her accommo- 
dations and was eaten by a linn«s ^. 

A foU day involves rising at 5 aIm. 
for a three-hour game drive, brea^asl 
pool time, then lunch, an afreraoon 
bush walk witii a rifle-toting ranger, a 
four-hour drive, fc^owed 1^ game- 
spotting by searchlight and dumer. 

The fonmila is lucrative. Revenue 
totaled $30 . million last year and is 
esmeetpd to be.$SS milGon tiusjyear. 

The largest stockboldera ate, mem- 
bers of the Get^ family, Hambros 
PLC, a British banking unit of Sakora 
Bank Ltd. of Jr^iaii; the pension fund 
of a South African cheirucal workers’ 
union. Soutiiena Sun Hobtis and the 
Welcome Tkusl a British charity. 



U.S. Court Upholds 
Insider-Trading Rule 

^Misappropriators^ Can Be Liable 


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Ctufiki In Oat HiiTFnaii Ln 

Washington — investors can be 
prosecuied for using inside infonnation 
10 buy or sell a company’s stock even if 
they do not work for the coinpany or 
owe it any legal duty, die U.S. St^ueinc 
Court ruled Wednesday. 

The highest U.S. court niAeld, 6 lo 3. 
one of the federal go\'emmenl’s most 
powerful enforcement weapons in fight- 
ing insider-trading abuses. 

The court ruled tiuu the government 
was correct in its interpreiation of an 
important section of the securities law 
that makes it a crime for a person to use 
confidential information in securities 
trading. 

Under the government's theory, if an 
individual “misappropriaies*' secret in- 
formation and ir^es on it. it is illegal 
because the pe^n has Ineached a trust 
or duQ', even if the individual is not a 
traditional insider at the company 
whose stock is at issue. 

The chainnan of the Securities and 
Exchange Commission, which handles 
insider-trading cases, hailed the ruling. 

“This decision reaffirms the SEC'^s 
efforts to make the stock market fair to 
all people, whether you ’re a Wall Street 
veteran or Main Street newcomer.’ ' said 
the chairman. Arthur Levitt “lliis de- 
cision is a reminder to all investors that 
insider trading is cheating and will be 
vtg|mu5ly prosecuted." 

The high court reinstated the con- 
viction of a Minneapolis lawyer, James 
Herman O’Ha^, who was accused of 
making $4.3 million by trading on con- 
fidential information about a planned 
takeover bid for Pillsbury Co. 

Mr. O’Hagan was convicted on 57 
counts and sentenced to 18 mmiths in 
prison. 

An appeals court had thrown out the 
charges, saying Mr. O’Hagan could not 
I because he learned about 


be prosecuted 

over pi; 

for the buyer. Grand Metropolitan PLC. 
Because Mr. O’Hagan had no formal 


the secret takeover plans from a lawyer 


connection or obligation to Pillsbury, 
the appeals court said, he could not 
accused as an insider for trading that 
cc^any’s slock and options. 

Trw Supreme Court, in an opinion 1^* 
Justice Ruth Bader Qinsbtug, said it did 
not matter that Mr. O’Hagan had no 
fonnal connection to misbury. Mr. 
O’Hagan viobied the law when he de- 
ceived his law firm, which represented 
Grand Met. by using information about 
the takeover to a profit. 

"Misappropriators decei\’e by pre- 
tending foyalt>' to a (xincipal. while 
secretly using the principal’s informa- 
tion for personal gaia." she said from 
the bench in summarizing the ruling. 

Insider tracing ordinarily applies to 
transactions by prople who have con- 
fidential infonnation because they work 
for the company whose stock they are 
trading. In addition, people who are 
tii^ied off by an insider can be pros- 
ecuted for insider trading. 

But during the 1980s the Securities 
and Exchange Commission broadened 
Its definition of insider trading to bar 
trading in a company's stock by 
someone who has co^idential infor- 
tnation but does not work for the com- 
pany or owe it any legal duty. 

"It is a fair assumption that trading 
on the basis of material, nonpublic in- 
formation will often involve a breach of 
duty of confidentiality to the bidder or 
target compwy or tiieir representa- 
tives,’’ Justice Ginsbuig wrote. 

Chief Justice William Rehnquist and 
Justices Clarence Thomas and .^lonin 
Scalia were the dissenters in the case. 

In addition, the high court voted, 9 to 
0. to uphold null fraud cmtvictions 
against Mr. O’Hagan. 

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals 
coun had thrown out tbore chafes, 
saying that if the lawyer's insider trad- 
ing was not illegal to begin with, then it 
was not against the law to use the mail lo 
further the alleged scheme. 

(Bloomberfi, AP, Reuters} 


Hmhimoto Wants Europeans 
To Have a Major Currency’ 


OPEC Miiiisters 
Agree to Freeze 
Oil-Output Ceilnig 

VIQINA — OPEC miiiiEten 
have agreed to freeze their ouqxit 
cetfing, OPEC's secretary-genml, 
Rilw^Lokman, Wednesday 
at meetings in YieoDa. 

Hie Otgaiiization of Petroleum 
EjqxMrting Coontries also secured a 
pmige by its 11 meiiibers to cut 
back ppodoefron that exceeded the 
00 ^ quota of 25.033 inUlioo bar- 
' rels aday., Mr. Lntman said. Mon- 
itors said roatine violations of tiie 
quota added altout 2 million barrels 
a day to'fiie figm. 

hfr. said the new OPEC 

frsMft would last until the cod of 
the yeaCr ndth fbb 11 meoibeTs 
keqiing their gvi'tfing oil ontput 
quotas nnehang ed- 
Tbe ^reement was eiqiected. 
^Everybody agreed to adhere to 
^teir quotas," said Abdalla Salem 
El-Ba^ Libya’s oO mmisteraiid 
OPEC’s ptesidenL 
Hie jnee of Brent oil for August 
deliyeiy rose to $18.22 a barrel in 
London from $17.87 on Tuesday. 


Boeing Is Seeking to Ease EU Concerns 


BteomberfNews 

SEATTLE — Bodng Co. ma^ offer 
to change a sole-supplier provision in 
- sales contracts with duee U.S. airlines 
in Older to win European Union antitrust 
approval for its purchase of McDonnell 
Douglas Goep., an attomey fomiliar 
with the transaction said Wednesday. 

Hie exclnaivity provisions have b^ 
the main sticks^ point for European 
Commission officials reviewing Boe- 
ing's proposed $15 bilUonpoi^ase of 
McDnuiell Douglas. Hie clauses could 
cut off Enrope’s Airbus Industrie from 
doing business with tinee of the largest 
U.S. arrlines for the next 20 years. 

Id recent months, AMR Coip.’s 
American Agtipes,Ddta Air tines Inc, 
and Continental Airiines Inc. ' signed 
contracts witii Boeh^ that contained 
SDchclaoses. 

An EU official said Wednesday that 
Boeing bwt not notified antitrust au- 
thorities any {dan to scrap the pro- 
visions. The officiat who sprace on the 
condition of anonymity, said the agree- 
ments were a key obstacle to EU ap- 
proval, and Aitbos had made a 
str ong case in recent bearings that the 
|jve Boeing an xmfur compet- 
itive advantage. 

A spokeatnan feu Boeing, Jeny 
Hendin, would not confirm that the air- 
craft maiw was conaidering abandon- 
ing the excinsive provisions. "We’re 


going to continue to talk to the Com- 
mission and not settle this in the press," 
be said. 

Boeing executives have said the issue 
of wfaetiiv tile contracts were fair bad 
nothing to do wHh the purchase of Mc- 
DooD^ Douglas. Both companies' 
shareholders are expected lo vote on the 
transactioo at meetings on July 25. 

Shares of McDonnell Douglas were 
up $2,125 to $70,125 in late trading as 
investors bet that the ac^isition would 
be completed. Shares of Boeing were op 
18.75 cents to $55.25. 

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission 
is expected to aDow the acquisition to 
w!& few concessions, if any, 
said two attorneys familiar with the 
transaction. That approval is likely to 
occur bef<ne Jnly 17 when the U.S. 
antitrust baud’s review period expires, 
the attorneys said. 

During io six-naonth review, the 
conumssion subpoenaed major Amer- 
ican commercial airlines to explore the 
degree to which competition from Mc- 
Donnell Douglas had constrained prices 
for Boeing lunrafr, attomeys familiar 
with the review said. Even those that 
said McDonnell Douglas had kept Boe- 
ing prices in check admitted tiiat the 
coo^iany's ability to do that was flag- 
ging alOTg with its market share, the 
lawyers saki. 

While Boeing bolds about two-thirds 


of the global commercial-jeUmer mar- 
ket. Sl Louis-based McDonnell 
Douglas has just 5 percent 

The combination was not eiqiected to 
raise U.S. antitrust concerns on the mil- 
itary-aircraft side eitiier, said sources 
faniiJiar with tbe review process. 

The Pentagon is exp^ted to clear tbe 
transaction but is waiting for Dqiuty 
Defense Secretary John White to return 
from a European trip to sign off for- 
maliy, said a person fomiliar with tbe 
situation. Tbe commission, tbe source 
said, should receive that endorsement 
by next Tuesday. 


CimfatittfOmSafFKmDoimtn 

THE HAGUE — Prime Minister 
Ryutaro Hashimoto of Japan said 
Wednesday that he was in favor of a 
strong sin^e currency for tte European 
Union and that Japan's widening trade 
surplus with tbe EU was a "temporary 
phenomenon." 

Speaking at a news conference after 
the annual European Union-Japan sum- 
mit in Tbe Hague, Mr. Hashimoto said 
that Japan was very interested in moves 
toward Enropean monecuy union and 
that Japan was trying to ^ucaie bnsi- 
ness executives and officials on tbe im- 
plications of a single cnirency. 

’ 'We would like to see it have a status 
as a major currency,'’ be said. "We 
have adopted a forward-looking ap- 
proach to tbe issne." 

Tbe Japanese leader said tbe com- 
pletion a lefbim of financial services 
will help save the ym from being re- 
legated to a second-tier currency. 

Mr. Hashimoto also said too much 
enyhasis was being pland on Japan's 


trade figures, adding that the current sur- 
plus would not increase significantly in 
tbe medium term. In May, Japan's trade 
surplus with the EU sooi^ 231 perceui, 
to 207 billion yen ($1.81 billion). 

He added dial the recent expansion in 
Japan’s trade surplus with the EU was 
likely to recede. 

"On the riion term, both iinports and 
exports have increased and mat is the 
trend," be said. "People tend to be 
preoccupied by the surplus." 

Over the few years, Mr. Ha- 
shimoto said, tbe "trade imbalance 
been improving gradi^Iy." To help 
further i^uce it "various discussions 
will start on distribution and de^u- 
lation." he added. 

Hie EU's chief trade official. Sir Le*^ 
on Brittan. said the EU hnrf "concerns'* 
atmt the tra^ deficit with Japan. He 
said Mr. Hashimoto’s confidence that 
the deficit was only tonporary would 
give the EU "something to return to" if 
it does not haf^n. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg} 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 
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June 25 


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Japan’s Big Business 
Sees Brighter Future 

C3sv4M Or WFRmh nMuoNsr 

TOKYO — Leading Japaoew manufacturers are in- 
. creasingly optimistic about tbeir bnsiDess fxoqiects, but 
the economy has not improved enough to benefit non- 
mBaufocturers, a business survey indicated Wedn^day, 
"The underlying strength of this economy is actnaily 
much stronger thu people are reaefy to admit," said 
Kenneth Courtis, chia economist at D»tsche Ba^ Asia 
Pacific. "WeareooweDieriiigathree-to-four-yearcycle 
which will bring very strong perfonnances." 

The news from Japan’s taigest conqiaaies, many of 
which are exporters, was much better tbw most analysts 
expected, and it helped Japanere stocks and bonds rise. 
Hu doUv, meanwhile, feu against the yen. (Page 14) 
The Bank of Japan's qoait^y azniban sni^ showed 
that smaller companies and DoninaDufacturers, such as 
coDtiactors, retailers and service wovideTs, who are more 
dependent on the domestic maiKet, were less optimistic 
about tbeir prospects. 

"The tankan showed a bipolarization of the Japanese 
economy," said TSisoke Tmaka, a foreign exchange 
strategist at Credit Soisse First Boston in T^okyo. "Big 
firms, mainly ei^rters, are reaping positive results fr^ 
their re structuri ng efforts. Other firms, however, are 
falling bdiiiid.'* 

'"We cannot count 00 expraters to be the locoototive for 
Jbe J^ianese economy, as they are stUi in a restructuring 
process,V Mr. Tanaka said. "Moreover, an ejqiortled 
recovery would create a political problem for die United 
'States a^ JapatL" 

Tensions overJapan’s big trade su^os with the United - 
States have been on die rise. While encouraged that 
manufacturers are more confident, the Bank of J^ian said 
die recovery TcmaiDS graduaL - 

"The hasn't suggested any sign that the eco- 
nomic recovery will pidc im meed," said Masayuld' 
'^‘'Idatsushiiiia. director-generaT or the Bank of Japan’s 
lesearch and statistics dspartmraL Tbe bank expects the 
economy to slow in the AjRil-Jnne quarter after the 
govenunent rrised the coDSoiiqiiion tax to 5 percent from 
3 percent in cutting consumer spending. 

Shares in Itoding expraters rose Wednesday, pushing 
die Nikkei 225 stock average up 33734 points, ra 1.7 
peccent, to 20,67937. (Bloomberg, Reuters, AFPJ 


A CLASSIC 
OFTEN IMITATED 








Romulus. The master craftsmen at 
Comm have signed the original of 
this model whose unique design and 
purity of line often imitated. The 
Roman numerals are band-engraved. 
Solid gold, platinum or steel/gold. 


CORUM 

SUISSE 

For jnlbmadon write to C0Mn,g01 IaQiaii3Mte4too(lc,Swltsedad. 


rj- 







PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBljNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 



Fallout From Tobacco Accord 

Philip Morris to Pay Lion’s Share at Start 


Acting Schizophremc,’^^* ^ 
Wall Street Tumbles 


.('hip fever i 

,1 j iiiN i»» Bufl Rat 


'.fsa,'?*.'' r 


Bv Barrv Meier payment and maybe more, people 

S inside and outside the company 

— said Tuesday. 

C — Philip Morris The subsequent aruiuol payments 
of the c^uette in- under the settlement, which would 
novide the majority start at S8.5 billion and grow to Sl5 
10 billion payment billitxi, woold be divid^ based on 


NEW YORK — Philip Morris 
Cos., the giant of the c^uette in^ 
dnstiy, would provide the majority 
of an initial »10 billion navment 


under 6)eS3685 billion totacGo set- each company's share of the cig- 
tlemeiu pn^xrsal nsached last week, arette maivet in the United States. 


:m iPiOi *i ii jrrrfcm*:. „ . 


*i^im 




Under a formula agreed to by 
the five mbacco companies tal cing 
part in the propel the first $10 
billion payment would be divided 
based on stock market value. Un- 
do' the plan, which was a heated 
t(^ic of discussion axnoi^ compa- 
nies during the talks. Philip Morris 
would pay $6.5 billion of me initial 




At the beginning of this year, 
Philip Morris had about 30 percent, 
and its closest ctxnpetitor, RJR 
Nabisco Holdings Coip., the parent 
company of R J. Reyndds Tobacco 
Ca, had about 2S percent. 

RJR Nabisco's pan of the initial 
payment will be about $600 mil- 
lion, the company said Tuesday in 


a filing with the Securities and 
Exchange Commission. 

That payment is significantly 
less than the initial $1.7 billion 
payment of the third-leading cig- 
arette m^eter in the Unit^ 
States, BAT Industries PLC, and 
reflects RJR Nabisco's weakn fi- 
nancial position, said Martin Feld- 
man. an industiy analyst with 
Smith BamQr, 

Along with BAT Industries, the 
parent company ^ Brown & Wil- 
liamson Tobacco Corp.. other to- 
bacco producers in the settlement 
include Lxiews Corp., parent com- 
pany of Lorillard Inc., and UST 
Inc., parent of U.S. l^obacco Co. 




Payouts Will Kill Liggett, Chief Protests 


By John Schwartz 

V^uhingioii Post Service 


Very briefly: 


Merger Costs Hit Morgan Stanley 

NEW YORK (Reuters) — Moi^ui Stanley Dean Witta 
Discover & Co. said Wednesday its second-quarter net in- 
come fell to $509 millicN] from ^51 million on a pro forma 
basb in the compa^le period a year earlier. 

The company said earnings were damped tw a charge of $63 
million from expenses linked to the merger ot Morgan S tanle y 
Group Inc. with Dean Witter Discover & Co. 

company's revenue rose to $3.51 billimi from $3-13 
billion in the ccmqjarable period a year earlier as gains in asset 
man^ement and die firm's own investments offset a decline 
in undCTwriting securities. 


Hughes Sues Lockheed AfGliate 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Hughes Space & Communi- 
cations Inc . h^ filed a $300 million lawsuit against an affiliate 
of Lockheed Martin Corp., saying it reneged on a coutract to 
launch satellites at a fixed price. 

the world’s largest satellite manufacturer, charged 
in its suit filed Tuesday that it had a written contract with 
Lockheed’s Russian affiliate, Lockbeed-Khninicfaev-&ier- 
gia. to lannch four satellites between 1^7 and 2000. 

The lawsuit claims that the price of those launches was set, 
but diat Lockheed added millions of dollars to the price to pay 
for upgrades at its Russian iaunching facili^. 

• Digital EquipRieiit Corp. said it did not plan to sell to the 
public a stake in its MteVista Intmiet Software unit, just a 
week after the unit's chief suggested the sale would occur. 

• U.S. banks are pcKtiog tbeir strongest earnings in two decades 
by diversifying their businesses to offset continuing losses from 
credit-card operations, Moody’s Investtffs Service rqxrrtecL 

• The National Science Foundation said a nonprofit or- 

ganization would begin assigning numbers for Internet ad- 
dresses as part of an effort to help speed prtvatization of the 
Internet. Bioomberg. AP 


WASHINGTON — The land- 
mark tobacco setdement proposal 
announced last week “would kill’’ 
Liggett Group Inc., according to a 
strcMigly worded letter that die head 
of the company has sent to more 
than 20 state attorneys general. 

Bennett LeBow, the Liggett ex- 
ecutive said he was “outraged" by 
the settlement because the plans 
for tobacco companies to pay bil- 
lions of dollars could force Lig- 
gett, the smallest and financially 
weakest of the major tobacco 
companies, into bankruptcy. 

'"The shameful and outr^eous 
result of your actions is that the 
very companies that you claim 
have misled the American public 


— that only now have come kick- 
ing and screaming to the settle- 
ment table — would see their stock 
prices skyrocket and their exec- 


the larger roster of states suing the 
industry, agreeing to cooperate 
with their legal attack and to turn 
over sensitive documents about 


utives enriched, while Liggett, the joint induspy discussions. Mr. Le- 
compony that got them to the table. Bow admitted publicly that his 
would be ruined. You may not company's products were addict- 


would be ruined. lou may not 
care, but we do not believe that 
Congress, the White House or the 
American public will countenance 
this result.^' Mr. LeBow wrote. 

Liggett, which has $400 million 
in annual sales, first broke ranks 
with the tobacco industry in March 
1996. when Mr. LeBow an- 
nounced that his company was set- 
tling with the five states and private 
attorneys that at that point had sued 
the tobacco indusUy to recover the 
costs of treating sick smokers. 

A year later, the company 
reach^ a second settlement with 


company's products were addict- 
i\*e and caused disease. 

Richard Scruggs, a Mississippi 
lawyer who represents more than 
20 states and helped negotiate both 
the Liggett deal and the overall 
settlement, said that Mr. LeBow 
was getting “far more than he bar- 
gained for" and noted that the 
company had been exempted from 
paying its share of the multibil- 
iion-dollar industry paymenL 

Allowing Liggett to escape the 
annual payout, Mr. Scruggs said, 
would have let the company charge 
much less for a pack of cigarettes. 


Stuumherji Xrws 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell 
Wednesday after having been high- 
er for most of the day, as toba^ 
and bank shares retreated. 

G^ns in MoRvola and other 
computer-related issues prevented 
steeper losses. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
se slid 68X18 poiots to 7,689.98, as 
the num^ of declining issues was 
sUghily higher than the number of 
advancing mes on the New Yevk 
Stock Exchange. 

“The market's acting schizo- 
phrenic," said David Rolfe, chief 
investment officer at Wedgewood 
Partners Inc. “With the stocks at 
records, a lot of people are trying to 
come to grips with whether the mar- 
ket is ovepi'alued or undervalued," 

Some investors said stocks could 
resume their climb. The U.S. mar- 
ket has gained about 20 percent this 
year, setting records against a back- 
drop of low inflation, stable interest 
rates and robust corporate profit 
growth. Investor appetite for mu- 
tual funds — SI8.5 billion was 
placed into stock funds last month 
alone — has fueled the gains. 

"The character of this market is. 
the money checks in. and ii doesn't 
check out," said William Dodge, 
managing director at Marvin & 
Pal^r /Gsociates Inc., a fund man- 
agement firm. “We're ail at risk of 
underestimating the market's up- 
side potential and overestimating 
downside risk." 

The Standaiti & Poor's 500-slock 
index fell 7.35 points, to 888.99, 
while the Nasdaq composite index 
was down 6.20 points, at 1,446.23. 

Treasury bond prices fell, hurt by 
the dollar’s slump against the v'en 
and a privsue report showing a sur- 


prise surge in home resales in VTav, 
A report from the Commerce De' 
partment that showed a 0.6 percent 
decline in orders for durable 
In Nlay failed to lift bond prices. 

A falling dollar makes Treason 
sccorilies Jess anroctive to Japan^ 
investors, because it erodes their 
lemms once the proceeds are con- 
verted into ven. 

Ilic price of the benchmark 30- 
>‘ear 'Treasury bond fell 19/32. to9!i 
18/32, pushing its yield up to 6.74 
percent from 6.60 percent 
Bonds began sliding after the .Na- 
tional .As.sociation of Realtors .viid 


•• - is 

• i f..-- iv- 


■•T T i JL •tAC. ' 

■ -Aif 

■•V • ’fV. ar» 

- - A TB •■•..irHari 




U,S. STOCKS 


sales of previously owned honars 
jumped 4.4 percent last month, tom 
annual rate of 4.24 million units. 


• ' • ■■■''■■(I -•-i: 

- -.-jl *• sr' 




Yen Gets a Lift From Japanese Business Report 


CenfMbyOirSafFmDi^melHi 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against the yen Wednesday after the 
Bank of Japan’s tankan survey of 
business sentiment suggested the 
economy may soon pick up. 

Against European currencies, the 
dollv was barely changed. 

The unexpectedly optimistic sur- 
vey rekindled speculation that Jap- 
anese interest rates might rise soon, 
increasing returns on deposits in Ja- 
pan. 

“As the global recoveiy fxxiceeds 
and other ecomMnies catch up to 
ours, that will limit inflows' ' of cash 


to the United States from Japanese 
and other foreign investors, said 
Richard Berner, economist at Mel- 
lon Bank in Pittsburgh. 

At 4 P.M., the doUar was trading 
at 113.80 yen, down from 114.70 
yen at the end of the day on Tues- 
day. 

Still, some analysts said they 
doubted that the Bankof Japan would 
raise interest rales in the near term. 

“Japanese interest rates are not 
about to rise since, aside from ex- 
ports, the Japariese economy remains 
depressed," said Steve Hannah, ana- 
lyst at Industrial Bank of Japan. 


Among Europe^ currencies, the 
pound slipped against the marie after 
reaching a five-year high Tuesday. 
“The nurfcet worried about sterling 
being overvalued, and British trade 


On Tuesday, the pound reached 
its highest level aga^t the mark 
since July 1992 amid speculation 
the Bank of England w'ould raise 
interest rates to cool the British 


FOREIGN EXCHA.NGE 


economy and keep inflation at bay. 
But in late New York trading 


figures Wednesday morning 
strengthened those worries some- 
what." Mr. Hannah said. 

The British government said the 
country's trade deficit with countries 
outside the European Union widened 
to £563 million ($937.9 million) in 
May from £365 million in April. 


But in late New York trading 
Wednesday, the pound fell to 2.8636 
DM from 2.8790 DM, and to S 1 .66.33 
from SI. 6690. 

The dollar, meanwhile, edged 
down to 1.7233 DM from 1.72.36 
DM. But it edged up to 5.8170 
French francs from 5.8164. It slid to 
1.4380 Swiss francs from 1.4385. 

{Bloomberg. AFP \ 


By pointidc to strength in U;,; * 
economy, the rupOTt “toibes the 
prospects' ' that (he Federal Reserve 
Boora might raise interest niie«. 
^d Anthony Karydakis,ccunomi%i 
at First Chicago Capital Markets. 

Philip .Morris sharc-^ slid I to 43 
3/16 after an influential health ad. 
visory panel called fa^t week's in> 
bacco settlement flawed because it 
would not give the govemmeni 
enough authority to rceukite nicot- 
ine. Other tobacco shares also fell. 

Many computer-related stocks 
rose amid ii^iimism that a push b\ 
companies around the gtote to be- 
come more efficient will drive de- 
mand for computers and software. 

“TTie drive to be more eff icient is 
very much a continuing trend," and 
computer-related companies arc 
supplying the means to that end. 
said Richard Pender, a money man- *■ 
ager at Nutional Life Inx’esinieni 
Management Co. 

Paper stocks fell on concern that 
prices for pulp will slide this sum- 
mer and hurt profits, analysts said. 
Georgia-Pacific fell 2 T/16 to 87;.. 
and International Paper drof^ied 
to 50»/<. 

Shares in limtion fell I 5/16 in 
24'/» after the maker of computer- 
storage and imaging products said 
its second-quarter c.imingN utiiJ 
sales would less than Wall Sueet 
estimates due to weakcr-ihan-e:t' 
peeled demand for data-storage 
products. 

Spyglass inc. fell 1 I'l6to715/l6 
after the Internet sofiuarc developer 
said it e.xpected its ihini-quancr Iks 
to exceed analysts esiimntcs stag- , 
nani demand for its products. 

Stock in the oil-products com- 
pony WD-40 rose 1 lo 57v; after it 
saicl it would raise its dividend and 
split its stock 2 for I. 


■ ..--J y.'-r ■- - r: r 

‘i U W-7 ' ”“4 ■-r-.y-.f 


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■ .?! •••.: .*iu: 

. : A --m'l . ■ 

■■■ V. ■ 

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AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Weskiesday’s 4 P JL Close 

The lop 300 most odfve sinrei; 
up to the dosing on Wol Street. 

The Assooaled Press. 


iM uM ct«e Indexes 


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47M ttH 
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M \y% 
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E>ow Jones 


Most Actives 
NYSE 


June 25,1997 

Lm LDiesi Oiqe Opnl 


nm ink 
a im. 


S A 


IndlM VJJM 7II2.iI 749.M 76«9.«t 4aM 

Trant Z7441S 274446 Z73U4 273L31 .|0?1 

UK 22&24 22S7* 2ni« 22443 •IU7 

Qmp 237&a£ 23*421 235IJ» 234SiS -lUO 


VkL HM 

105442 4l*t 
43314 2iH 
81445 4»k 
77m 35 


Standard & Poors 


7DBM 71 
SHSS; Uka 
S7I5Q 74kk 

isns isn. 

54557 SkM 
47951 93ki 
444U 37M 
45251 l4kM 
45011 Ukk 
447)D iTM 
42537 47lk 


indishtois ios3.li lanotiosiTg 


9k 4* 
2h 

I4M -H 
14M -M 
4M -n 
SMk 4M 
liM «lk 
17M 
SM 

IM -«k 
Ml *«k 

m 


639J8 iSaoSS A39.70 
197.17 19SaO 196M 
10306 101.36 103.56 
8M.IS 870.SZ 09634 
fMIM 056J0 07538 


U« UM Oig. 

42m 434a .1 

^ 

S'*. 2>k 4k 

74'k 74'a *1, 

71 75 »3Vl 

5i S4iVa -M 

91>l«1ka 

37 f.lr* 

n 44 

Bka .41 

59VkUV» .19k 

4S't 45»k -M 


JUI97 

2S9ft 

2$M 

2S6Ui 


57,479 

Sm97 

3117 

743 

342' ;■ 

^>(1 

50778 

OK 77 

344 

240'm 

74Dft 

-5 

I34J73 

Morra 

25lft 

2471: 

7il7M 

-4M 

19,504 

AAa*98 

25$ 

252ft 

»24< 

-ift 

l.teS 

JulkS 

239 

256 

2S6V> 

—4 ft 

5747 

Sen 98 

254ft 

253ft 

254 

-3 

230 


Hlgb 

Lett 

Latest Oige 

OpInI 

ORANGE JUKE (NCINI 



1 5400 Uk - am ner b. 




JMV? 74.40 

7360 

7115 

-045 

IOJ20 

Sep97 7775 

7675 

7650 

-OlTO 

ISAM 

Nav97 SOTO 

7975 

PI3S 

-U5 

S£16 

Jan98 83410 

824B 

BZ.I$ 

-0J5 

2J1S 

Es.si8es NA 

Tub's, sdes . 

5.SI4 


Tue'sepenM 

35.851 

Off 940 




Lolni Oigk Opint 


High Lmt LohKt n»N 0p<nl 


L0N6Cll.TaJPFE> 

csluao - pu 6 sinds too pa 

J«m97 I1A-11 11440 114-11 44.13 IJIDI 
Scp«7 11444 113.14 113.30 44-13 IS9.923 
Esl.sal»5: 7UH Pm B2.Z2d 
Pnm.onnicii.' i6a934 up sos 


Industrials 
COTTON I (MCTM) 
fll4)00 IML* ttMt OW la 


EsuwiM HA. Tu«*5.5ae5 nxs 
Tue'smnnt ilijos oA ll« 


4^ 4SVJ4 46L9V -117 


«IJS 416.17 41740 -144 

^>5 3KL79 »I43 -3.13 

4054 425.19 43641 -OM 


Nosdoq 

ypiBn 

3ani 


iVk Ikk 
DM IK 
H Ik 
7M 7M 
UM UM 
BM 13 

aw a 
I3M in 
TIM ?iM 
«M 4H 
Mik 91k 
4M 4M 
ZJM a 
» DM 

I 79k 

DM 4M 


W -M 
SM *fk 
4h »fk 
Wk Jft 
2 

% *JS 
dS 

m 4* 
2Slh tin 
I3M «M 
m *IN 
M *kk 
•M 4k 
4M 


Nasdaq 


IW7.I* 143624 144633 
inSJI 116407 1167.74 451 

UIIM I60I.W I60M2 4-661 

1664.99 164431 164946 <57 

191653 190678 191673 454 

94847 93698 94159 -341 


Vli MMl 

374141 14 
I2I4J9 49M 
77824 I4|i4 

733kl Si 
70091 71M 
4S8U I5»k 
61929 17<k 
S44U UM 
S5SU ia'4 
S3IM 

499BS 74M 
44175 ilVi 
47044 ra 
38673 ISM 
38650 Ml 


law aiis 
7M 96 
47M 41Vk 
I4SM I46M 
<4kl soft 
4tM kSS 
IlM ISM 
3019k SIM 
3Fl 47M 
l»M TJM 
8*» M 
TOM 73M 
40M 40M 
6kk 4 
ll9MI3l»k 
'9 4k 


SOYBEAN MEAL (C80D 

100 ton- dalim oor m 

Jul97 Z72.9D 76l.a 16690 .cM a7l4 

Am 97 25600 347j00 31740 -in 21483 

Seo97 33050 32850 32940 -2.10 13484 

00 97 a030 21650 21940 -140 13527 

Oec97 71600 21350 31440 —140 28534 

Jni98 31150 31120 31120 -IJO 7.981 

Est.Mies NA Tin's Mies 22.92$ 
Tue'sapenlm 108.958 off 1414 


GOLO(NCMX) 

UKIVWOL. W tray ut, 

Jun97 33900 3Z7JD 31720 -450 
Jul97 337.90 -050 

AII0 97 34120 31670 32900 -050 
Oct97 343J0 34150 34I5D -050 
OK9; 34610 31310 j4«.q0 -OiQ 
Fe09a 34450 -640 

Apr9| yj ip ^60 

Jun9l 3534 35I2D 35120 -670 
AII0 98 353.80 -670 

era ules 36000 TuVk.M4t6 17587 
Tut'sePOiint 186^1 up 489 


lO-YEAR FRENCH COV. BONOS (IIUTIF1 

FFsaaoQa-DhadaoKi 

5^97 12924 12694 129.14 « 028 016870 

Ok 97 9722 9742 97.78 « 028 1095 

Atv98 97JI2 97713 97.18 -028 0 

EtLkolK- 13&861 

Open fen. : 306915 up 2Jm 


Jul9.' 

74 a 

7376 

r4.'o 

■081 

l«7' 

oa«7 

77 25 

7599 

74 70 

■044 

17.54 

OkP 

7761 

76 M 

’.’a 

• on 


NlerYS 

mm 

nJG 

ni$ 

•C56 

619 

rJovU 

1903 

7811 

*»05 

•352 



\ttack Drams 


Ed sain HA Tue s u«s 3l.sto 
TuesopenM 63J67 rk rs 


ITAUAN COVERNMENT BOND (UPFEl 
ITL 200 maMi - ph ol 100 pd 
$ep97 laieO 13185 13458 *058 96480 
Dk97 N.T. N.T. 10723 *046 270 

EsI. sales: 66772 saitt; 84208 
pRV.oponlnlj 96730 up 6729 


SOYBEAN OIL (CSOD 
40 m Ms- ckiM per ■) 

JUI97 2278 2243 2346 -057 

Aue97 319S 2241 2243 -028 

Sep97 2105 2276 2250 -023 

00 97 2310 2275 2279 -62$ 

Dec97 ZU2 2258 2292 -027 

Jai98 2330 aoa 23a -025 

ES.mOk NA Tup's, sites 28481 
Tue'sapMitt MS227 l«i 1BS4 


61151 41610 61924 -OaI 


kk <«i 
Ikk M 
I9« IWk 


IlM IlM 
IfW IlM 
2M 27N 
3H IP 


9 «M 

I 

Sn -Vk 
IM 

4lk -Vk 
M .M 

JL 

Mk -Vk 
IfM J* 
3 4k 

IM -M 


Dow Jones Bond 


VM. Hisk lew UW 
45923 9014 STk-a 09 
15*04 aka 5M 64a 


20 Bands 

lOUMIHes 

lOInduslitols 


6583 n IPf* 18» 

SI97 10 944 9M 

5701 SM SYb Ska 

5424 na 0 1 

4032 llkk I3M 13 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

5400 bu nHnknum- OMM per Ik^kH 
Jul97 831 8I4M BICM — 14U 

Aug 97 748 753 7S4Y| —13 

Sep97 692h 484 68S'A -4 

Nowf7 464 6S1 457 


W GRADE COPP ER {NQWX) 

2S4H ibk-cenliaKIP 

JurYT 11240 U)t50 UnjQ —348 

JU97 11350 10631 10920 -29$ 

AII097 11000 laa 100.95 -220 

Sep97 1I2M 10600 10680 —19$ 

00 97 10950 10720 10720 -1.8$ 

fto»9T 107.99 10648 10640 -12$ 

Ok 97 10720 I067D IQSJO — I2S 

JOI98 IDin 10350 10630 -125 

Faba 10450 10350 10158 -670 

E9. soles 25200 TyVkSOei 27.920 
Tue’swenM 0576 tM aSW 


EUROOOLtAKS (CMBU 
fl rniiien.fmiii00pa. 
marm 9139 913S 9336 -603 

JunW 933S nJ1 4132 -64? 

SepN 9121 9134 9328 -600 

DkOO 9324 <319 9321 -041 

AllB-01 9134 9119 9121 -043 

JwiOl 9121 9115 9317 -603 

S6P0I 9117 9112 9113 -604 

JecDI 9110 9146 93U -lUK 

».,sales NA TiA ygJ* .HT-ftB* 
T«-5«nlrt 2S7l5fe”« 


HEATING 00. (NMER) 

CJNPpP. ameer ga 

JuI97 512$ $150 

Aug97 SIM $1.7$ 
Sep77 $615 5250 

0097 SS40 $150 
Mw97 $130 $455 

Dk97 $4 73 55.48 

Jv9| 57.48 $600 

r9b«8 57.90 561$ 

M8r9a HJO $54$ 
Esi.sdes NA Tue", 
Tue'SGPeniR l$l,709 


5197 

-143 

>9.2S: 


53 1? 

-IJI 

r4.’i 


51» 

-131 

16.711 

^ t.m. 

54.47 

-III 

15.91 

• ■ 

5537 

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i3ia 

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VT 

-IDl 

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56 87 

-0.91 

i;.£3; 


54-87 

-031 



5607 

-074 

STri 

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. . 'I .. v.k'.T * ? i'.: ■■.irrl 


I • 1 :. 


USIK :$.7I5 
eti 712 


LIGHT SWST anJOE INMER) 

i2D8ent .penmMrBCi 

Aug97 19.7$ UBS 1956 .i647 lOOOr; 


..- " ■.V-k'f '-i " 


I"***** •■••e l^ewV •WMtm 

Sepo; 1980 I9(D |1$3 -0« 472T: 

0091 19.90 1913 1968 -027 lUG 


...a ivoo "Ujr 4a.a.9 

Ncw77 i9«o 19.25 19.7$ .834 H2F . 

D«97 19.95 19.34 1982 .027 4607:- U'.:- 

J»i93 19.90 1945 1981 *62$ lUH ■ 


Nowf7 464 651 657 ^3%a 
Jan9t 663K 657 69^ -3W 
Ep. soles NA TlK's.Mles $9,930 
Tue-scpenlnt 146606 ott 2100 


M Trading AetTvny 


im I2M 
4U 4M 
Sk 3H 
3M 3Vk 


2M IWk 
UM 2»k 
tkk IM 
Ml kk 
TM Tkk 
4M Ikk 
ta 
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14 llkk 

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II* IlM 
m 2* 
IMk IM 
17 IlM 
4 IM 
Skk SM 
nk a« 
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TIM *n 
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Ik tM 
13 tM 

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31k 

nk rM 

Ikk .kk 
27>k Mk 
IM 4k 


Nasdaq 


UndiapgK 

TMkiiHues 


1788 1780 AOwkbO 
1540 978 DMM 

^3 »s:tl5!? 


1763 S74 

1586 im 

3157 isn 

5574 5731 


WHEAT tCBOT) 

S200 bu mhUnkirri- cem p«r buMel 
JU97 335 319W 33IM -M a.792 

Sep97 3I3V> 327ft 361 “t 39.738 

OC97 356ft 3SDft 3S2ft *ft 36271 

Mcr9B 3U 357 3S7U ->6 3215 

EsI soles NA Tw'5.siAK 26.740 
Tue'sepenen 85,025 up 733 


SKVERtNCMX) 

SLOn bDv ru.- ctmis per kpv oz. 

Jun97 47520 «-Q20 

JuIkT 47820 47650 47520 '■020 
Sep97 «U0 47920 48020 -640 

DK97 49620 «420 48720 *078 
JVI98 40920 40X1 

Mar9e 49560 49640 49640 *600 
rMKkO 49020 -0J8 

Jul98 $0600 $8210 50280 rOID 
E9.ides 24,000 Tue'&sde a.i26 
Tub's men in 88.958 off $187 


eemw POUND (cusu 

47. SOO pounds. S per peune 
Sep97 12472 I2SSB 12594 
Dk 97 I2SB0 12510 12558 
MQr9l 12506 

ESI. soles NA TuVs.odes n2« 
Tin's open eit $S24l up 38$7 


PlATMUMtNNIERI 
SO troy 01.- OMIors per Per M. 

JUI97 41620 40650 4II2D *210 5.403 

Oa97 409.00 39920 405.00 *420 6774 

JmIO RDM 39720 39920 -640 1.734 

Esi.seiH NA Ti)e‘s.saies 6319 
Tup's MMnen ttS3i oH 919 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (OUER) 

MOim cMlork. S per Cdn Ar 

Sita97 7234 7201 7210 

DK97 J342 J3m 7253 
AUr98 7300 7290 7290 

ESI.SOIK NA TupLOOMs 5i249 
Tue'sepenM 4957 oft 31 


Market Sates 


IlM 4k 

Sk 

Uft 4k 
llkk 4k 
M tM 


TMilscuas 

HeaHlpB 

HewU&S 


jS ^ NYSE 

IS4 N4 Amen 

™ ig N«i(iq 

5 9 lamitiona. 


TkOer Prev. 

44W ms. 

609JS 65648 

2SJ3 33X17 

637^7 630Xn 


I4M UM 
Ak SIk 
Ikk n 
IK IM 
90K I7W 
SINIi SK 
HM 9M 

Its S* 

ITM 27 
IK IM 
IMS IM 
IlM IlM 


I4M »M 

I -*k 


Dividends 

c— D Wiy 


CATTLE (CJHERI 
40200 bk . ante per lb. 

Aijg97 6120 6310 6377 -640 

Oa97 47.15 4427 67.10 *632 

Ok 97 49.70 69JO 49.82 *622 

Feb?! 7615 7045 70J2 *630 

Apr 90 7302 7255 72.97 *625 

Jijn90 49J0 4685 49JIS *617 

Est. soles I68n Tue'&soles 9.780 
Tue'sepenM 91.450 up 14« 


GeRMAN«6ARIC (OMER) 
l254IIDmerfc6 sper nwh 
Sep97 2854 A25 2836 
Oec97 2874 2V6 2875 
«ar98 29U 

Esi.sdes NA Tup'LScOes 11.928 
Tue'sepenM 40214 eft 52$ 


NATURAL GAS 

10.000 mm b4u*. 

6U997 1780 
SPP97 2710 
OCI 97 1770 

Now 97 2270 
Dk 97 2300 
Jai9a 2540 
Pee 98 2250 
Mar48 2320 
Acrke 2li0 


l9.jD 

19 40 

$« 

19.52 

1968 >007 

4.01 

19 53 

IBTD -Oil 

5 0 

IB $5 

T4B -017 

4.IM 

. TM‘s.salej raj6; 


JB8.35I 

oP 1.’e7 


tfMMEPl 


«p $ Mr n*Th o*u 


2JI0 

IT 19 

3UR 

IT 13 

7JID 

NOT 

3325 

7. 15 

S.DU 

:mj 

TJJO 

1342 

L465 

2445 

lua 

L505 

2505 

1352 

7.425 

7.4:5 

HIE 

L305 

7J10 

6a» 

7.140 

.M«0 

3a\ 


r^r<i lu (kjmpulerize 


• 7.- la-..-c 2v.c;rr.i'* ' 

-‘rft 


UNLEADED GASOUNE (NMB7I 

47100*01. i-m.. p,.rooi 


CIOSP 

LONDON METALS ILMB) 
DoHpn pet meMc Ml 
Ahiieipui {High CtpOtl 


Spot 1525.00 IS344I0 iSbift 1962ft 

FkMid 1SS0A0 154020 190520 ISHOO 


Anaid 159020 154020 19052Q ISHOO 

Ceppor Cplfeodps (HMb GnOp) 

Sen 249120 zAiJoa nasft 2i27ft 

Forwurri 2381.00 230200 249*20 249720 


JAPANESE YEN (CMER1 
l2Jmllanv*n,sper MO yen 
Sep97 2929 2804 2801 
Dk97 .9007 2990 2997 

MOr98 9IU 

ES. sates NA TiW^ soles 16030 
Tup'sflPSiM S22S9 UP 3297 


Jul97 

UM 

55 15 

sria 

As 97 

5! ti 

£S«. 

$1.8$ 

S«pB.’ 

567$ 

S509 

5o53 

Oct 97 

55 25 

$4 .$3 

5;:$ 

Nov 9? 

ii'/l 


55 10 

Dec 9: 

54 70 

>400 

5170 

lonkj 

56 4$ 

$609 

>4Tb 

Pro 98 

55 DO 

5415 

$5 00 


'V ’.k;..” TTio.1 

■» ;nj;' 

. . y\ ii:;! 


CBwpWiy P« Amt Rec Pay 

IRREGULAR 

DodgeCokBalFd _ 23 6-25 MO 


19 -M 
ISM 44l 


CoKlna _ .19 6-2S MO 

CnSlfcFd . 36 «.35 MO 


MM tk 
g .*k 

IK ‘ft 
IM 4k 


STOCK SPLIT 
FonKN DdSur 3 for 3 spill. 

Hougnlnii Mtmi 2 tor I soDt. 


WI>4aCo3forl SI 


m IM 

39M ink 


UM ISM 
27M 27M 

15lh IM 
UM IM 
3P*k 30M 
I2h 12 


M -Ik 
* 


27h -Ik 

IS? ^ 

3Pt *M 
OU -K 


IMCREASD 

FN8 Rodiealer S .07 7-IS 7-31 

impeffalCroAt 0 20 7-7 7-17 

NeithemSIPwr O .TQS 7-9 7-20 

PABBkshn , 085 7-1 7.15 

TteummoPsi Q .14 7-tl 7-25 


REDUCED 

1838BdDBbTiDd Q 7-1 » 


INITIAL 

Hou^BonMRIn , .125 0-13 B-37 

River VhltorBiib - M 7-7 7-31 

WD-40Con . 31 7-11 7-31 


k k 
m. I 
UK im 
IM u 
SM 4M 
17M 17M 

18 ITkk 
Mk K 
9 4N 
7M M 

25* J!* 

9H 9 ' 
ink IlM 
IlM lift 
an 30M 
ank 30M 


I9k 

ste 

17M *Vb 


REGULAR 

ACM Muni Secs M Jlt5 7-7 7-10 

ASBRnd Q .10 7-15 7-31 

AHMiceWloOlh M .1275 7-7 7-18 


AlOanceWMa 
Am Bncp OH. 
BCBFind 
EEAtneomeFd 
BEASmUGIb 
Ctaror Inc 
CDmmd MelDis 
Commun BAsIvs 
Doyphin Deposit 
EeeteMEmirA. 
Eutoun Bnoi 
FFVAFeid 
JeffBonksIne 
Uquld-B« 

MSB Bancorp 
MoscoCon 
Miss'ssipoi Vini 
MonloiM^ 
One Valley Bncp 
Phelps Oixtoe 
Pioneer SM 
Parlpc Inc 
MvenfevtSegs 
Refabtoo Myeis 
United Woter 
VbnMta 
Vyestcoumwp 


Per And (tec Pay 

M .1106 7-7 7-18 

0 05 7.7 7-11 


7-7 7-21 
7-8 7-15 


7-0 7-15 

7-11 7-25 


Ml 7-25 
6-30 7-15 

?-7 10-3 
7-9 7-18 

d-M MS 
7-7 .T.ja 
7 -18 8-20 
7-1 7-15 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMER) 

SD20e Mk - cents per ita. 

Aue97 7890 7602 7110 *638 

SCP97 7650 77.90 7637 *615 

OdT7 7600 7610 7677 *040 

No»97 8625 79.40 RUB *645 

Jonei 802$ 79JD 8617 *657 

Marie 7990 7925 79.85 -679 

Esi sotes 2245 Tue's.ades 2253 
Tue'sepenM 36347 up 150 


Spel 404.00 40520 

Foraaro 41820 619.00 


iOS'i 40420 
62020 63120 


Spot 692600 693520 
PerannI 704600 705600 
TIP 

Spot 5S3020 $5X00 


705620 706520 
71X00 710600 


SWS5 FRANC (OMERl 
135204 fmo, 1 ner frooe 
SeP97 7024 Xli 7022 
Dec97 7125 

Nkarn TIM 

B2. soles NA. Toe's, sates 16236 
Tue'stveninl X368 all 22 


Tue'sdppnru 41,057 up $73 
BREMT OIL (IPS) 


U.S OotlCR per bomJ • Ms of 1200 buiiiD ' . 

A*ja->7 1549 i7.70 I97J *635 


ForaoM SSRUn SS86Q0 


Bdc (SppcM MM GroSe) 
Spot 135920 134020 
FOOMnl 137600 I379QD 


SSS020 5S5SM 
S6W20 541520 


1306.00 130720 
l-unjio 140600 


4-X 7-IS 


a-i 615 
7-11 61 


H06&-l2ai(ailER1 

40204 Ms - cant, per U. 

JU|97 8240 81.40 82a -640 6286 

A|J0 97 79J0 7685 79.15 ^LIO 12061 

0097 n.lD 7670 71.05 ^ 22 7J$I 

Oec97 67Jt ff.« Oja -617 4.S6i 

Fcb98 4465 462$ 4452 -00$ 1284 

Eg. sates 6J3I TuVssiKes 6t9l6 
Tue'soponM as-n; oft 3li 


tkMt Lsw Oese Oipe OplM 


MEXICAN PESO (CMERI 
SHhOtO pesos. S par e«w 
Sep97 .12165 .17135 1 7147 

Ope97 .11732 .11717 II7I7 
Mor98 .11330 .11310 .liJJS 
Eg.soies N.A Tue'&soips 5474 
Tue^SQpenM MTC off IS6 


1549 17.70 1977 »63S 

64P 97 10 59 K89 1633 *033 

OC197 1658 18.10 IS54 *03$ IfW 

Noy9? 1853 1833 18 63 *632 

Dc-^r >8.60 1631 >8 48 -Oae IW 

Joir>3 16, -0 >639 1828 -Oil *~i 

F(«9g 1847 1824 I6M *079 6^ 

'‘•1ar45 I24T 163$ I6«3 *0a 1-^ 


a Room? Try' Ho 

■' Kvrn Hsuttki 


E'J '.ACS. .0.399 Pipv. soles 1 29.514 
Frev c^en Ml iriiel up 7M 


7-7 MS 
8-» 9.10 
7-9 8-1 


8-12 91 

7-7 7-18 


7- 11 7.31 

8- 1$ 9.1 


PORK BBJJES (CMER) 

4 jm iiK. - eents per b. 

Jui97 8200 79.95 81.M *655 J.2B4 

Auo97 8200 RUB 81X *-680 J.D2B 

FebfS 7120 7605 7022 -|J5 $09 

Eg.wtes I.9S6 TutTkadM Lite 
Tlv'SOpeRM 6.840 Off 34 


Financial 

UST.BUIS (CMERI 
SI mUoi-prsceinpa. 

See97 «U4 94 87 9487 *801 7J8I 

D8C97 9164 384 

Morea 9693 7 

GS.S 1 K 6 NA Tu6's.M8e5 Ma 

Tue'sooeriM 7,774 eff 88 


MIONTH EVROMARKiUFPE) 
DMiPffion-pIsaflOOpd 


6-X 7-31 
6-X 7-14 


O-OBmah h-opproi huu le onount pir 
slNitf ADih pGByBbte in toodton toids; 
DHKoathly; ffGuortortp t-sarnMniHial 


Food 

COCOA (NCSE) 

10 inufek tons- s prr ion 


Z,. ■’v 

9Mi 4k 
MM *lk 
I3K *N 


n>k Ik 
3M -tk 


•M iwerSl 

-ft iULUl 


S 24H 
kk Ik 
kk ffk 
1711 I7M 
M 4ft 
UM UM 
IM 13ft 
M tOh 
IM nh 
Mk INK 
SM IH 
4ft MM 
7ft ITM 
MM 14ft 

Ift IM 


a4R 

A 

N 

ITM ift 
M aft 
Wft *ft 
UM 

lOM *lk 

lift 

IlH **14 
ISM *lk 

611 

7K th 
UK 

QVk -ft 
M 

Wik Mk 


Stock ToMesExplaiiied 

Soles figures ore unoffi^ Yeoflv highs and lows reflect the pieviaiB S3 encks plus the cureqr 
kreeto toff neribelolesllnidbig day. Whmospa or stock dvtdndannjiiiingtoSpefcem or more 
iNBbaen pail Bk yean IflglHOw range and dvKtentf are shawl tor the new snos only- Unless 
oBienvise noted rates of iMdencb ore annwd dUuneRuits hosed on the tetosl deetorstiDrL 
a - (flvideiid otso edra (s). b • annual rate of cividend plus stock dnndenA c - liqiHdotlng 
dwMeniL ce - PE exceeds 99.CM - callod. d - new yeorty lew. dd - loss in the Iasi 17 rmnlhs. 
B - dividend dedored or paid in preesding 12 monthL i - annual rafe increased an ksi 
itoctonilkHL g * dMdend in csnaiBan fundA siibjed to 15% non-residence hn. I ■ dividend 
decXred aRui spBMip or stadc divideiKL i - (flvidend poid this yar, omitted deferred, orno 
oedon token at uteto dividend im^n^ k - dividend dedarrd or paid this ycor. on 
occurnukittve Issue wMi dMdenOS in orrears. m - annual ralA reduced on krai de^rainn. 
a • new tosue In ihe post 52 weeks. The htoh-km ronoe begins wilh the start of trading, 
nd - nexi itoy dellvefV- P ■ iniliol dlvideiid annual rate unknown. P/E - prfcs-Mmhigs ratio, 
q - etoosd-eiHl muhral fund r - dvidend declared ur paid hi preceding 13 imnlhs plus snek 
dhAdend s * dpde spDL DhMcnd begins wflti dote id sdil. Os - sales, t - dividend paid In 
otodcin pmeetEng 12 nianth& estimated cosh value on ex-dWidend orss-distitovtton dale, 
d-now yearly high, v-tredlng boiled vl-ln bonkruptey or receivofsMp or behiBrearganlied 
under flic Bonkniplcy Ad. or securtltas assumed by sudicoinpanles.wd-whmdistributni. 
ul - when tasuedi m - wNh Hnmnis. 1 - a-dMdend or ea-dgbts. sAs - ex-dlstilbuttoa 
m - KdHioul wununtL |h ai-dMdend and utos in tad yld - ytold s - soles In full. 


JUI97 

l«70 

1637 

1651 

-29 

341 

Sep 97 

1690 

1675 

1683 

-29 

41.460 

DK97 

1742 

171$ 

1729 

-26 

21.100 

Mar 90 

I77D 

1747 

1759 

-26 

22.511 

Mevto 

1785 

1772 

177* 

— U 

9.U9 

Jun 

1801 

1787 

1796 

-to 

834 


ES.SOleS 11,903 Tue'kStoeS 14,749 
Tue'sotennl 30AI0 off 81180 


COFFEE CiNCSEI 
37.sniin.-i:mspKt). 

Aliy; 9WM 19820 20600 * 200 998 

Siw97 laioo 17458 1801$ -&0S 11,105 

Dk97 15600 15305 IS740 -IDS 4.748 

foorte I4US 14130 ISSiSO *200 3,2» 

MoyOa 14650 13050 14050 *IAI 811 

Esrsdes $.743 Tue's.sales S563 
Tue'souenM I04/4X i» 53053 


SUGAftNIORUlll (NCSG) 

I iTAto IBS - CMS per to. 

Jul97 11.14 Il3n ll.iS *007 5677$ 

Od97 1132 11.00 1134 *611 84.934 

Mar98 1174 i|3R I1J4 -6l7 37582 

iUlav9B 11.15 n98 11.15 *611 6QS8 

Est.ietes 39.418 TuCLSCOeS 7k .im 
Tue'sepenM 146.313 eff 96 


5YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 
s m Jna prav pis & 44rtis or I n per 

Sm9? IQk-U 106-13 106-17 —06 IHAM 

DK97ia6<03 KMO 106-00 -OS 1J7l 

Mer98 mi 

Esr.solH NA IWlioies 12334 
Tue'sgpenM 22570 off 1711 

10 YtL TREASURY (CBOT} 

tl0D4U prl>^ PIS 6 Mnos of TOD PO 

$40 97 in-z 108-00 100-11 -« 324 684 

^tolOB-OS I004P lOHM -He 4582 

Ma-to 107-21 -03 9 

^.soies Na Toe's sates 40J3D 

Tue’sepenM 331740 tc 1851 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBOTI 
(Bbei-iioD.oge-pikaiTiiaso' 100 pai 
SeD97 1177a 1IM8 111-23 -U 417 432 

0«97 111-24 111-06 in-l| -14 isir 

Morte 111-02 -13 

i?’* -13 «| 

&.salef NA Tue'xsoln ntja * 
TuesopenM 453.703 eff 533$ 

LIBOR l-MONTH (CMER) 

Slntfloan-eKet used 

Arl97 9437 «JD 901 *601 20440 

AW97 M.n 9474 ^ 

«7S 9421 94.34 2M 

I^SOles NA TuB'fcSdtes 3J86 
Tub's mwi lie 40.999 up 391 


i*ll97 H.3. K.T 9«3k »JniA 

3^ N.T. 96.8$ Unen 
SepW 9684 9653 9653 Unch : 

D«97 06 75 9477 94.74 -04)7: 

Mlar9S 9455 9057 96 04 . 0(.2 3 

lunft 04.40 9644 9448 *607 1 

Sep «8 9677 9623 ft27 1 

D«98 9600 45 9$ 9$.99 *004 

7Aor99 957$ 9670 9i.74 *oeu 

Esi saiR' 136620. Pnrr.Mln UAH 
Frvi open ini: 1.47443s up IjeO 


SASOILtlPGI 

■Jt OoKoisptn^rntliKtMT'UFsollODtC^'M- 
JVI97 'oi.rs IS925 iac.a ust-- 
4i.T>’ Koeo 10'. 2S IkiSO -C2S 16^ 
top 91 lo$bD l«7 7$ 164 50 Undi 
'Jc;97 !67JC :ao:5 :n760 -075 A'U 

WtkV la- 2: ujjci l«rt00 -OTS *JI: 
3'<7' l.’IW l»j» 17050 -025 
Ton*? n.'S 17175 Ifl^S -025 $*! 
PrE VS 171 ra 17150 it: 7$ -025 
F'.< seUT Pftt.'.ates-.690i 

p-r. '. 10m Inf 7 1,428 off $5 


"Sake Sir*.' 

■ : if' 

. . .. ■ Y?>r - i 


Stock Indexes 


UP COMP. INDEX (C86ERI 

. .nr** 


3.MONTH STERUNG (UFFEI 
$96000 -BftQt 100 pd 
JooOT 92.99 92.9$ 9797 *001 130.103 

DkW 9180 9174 02.78 -OOSIIIW 

Mur 98 9670 93.4? 9768 -004 81^ 

Jun« 92.46 97J8 92.64 -Oift SlSk 

92.4S 9259 9163 .00’ 5^ 
Decte 92.65 9756 9163 *007 

Atar99 9254 9258 92*3 -u0<- 36419 

Esi sole',: (6643 ftm.sgin i3a»io 
P iw 6DenM.' »12kS8 up lain: 


>09: ';il27 39930 89000 

?«7: rajii ixji — iiss Jl? 

'.'zrV, 9J4T0 


S-J .7.'. roe-i«f« 133532 
Tw", -seen. re njr? tra Ifo 


V./wi * ■ 

•• .. . , J-. • , . '■’tY,'’.* '‘.'l 

7,*^. k.- -j.Lr n 

• -i;.-,-:-. ;l'.M r.-.'T.'ji.'f ■: C.’. 

■ - ' . ' T'T-. ?*-4 ; 

• • *5 A' • * ” 


M1DNTH PIBOR (MATIFJ 
FFSmilllMk.phol 100 Pd 

96« %i6 9*59 .0 02 

D«9T «ftS6 9653 fti , OOT 

^rto 96.48 9* 4$ 9647 , 057 

JunW 96J7 9nii . o« 

S«« 9622 99 19 967: -003 

Decft 9600 9!$98 9600 * 00^ 
EsI sates 36663 

Open int- 254373 up v-ci 


CAC40IMAT1F) 

FFTOCpKiMevHeir 

Ji, nB- 786^5 ,*3080 ?a«0 *870 

JW"' auJ 7K53 78610 -8^2 ni 

Avo’: 263:0 7837 3 78695 **$4 1^* 

irffs- :s:n 0 ;?:30 7S764; -sjj 

fc'.I 'Jlr- T'.iW 

C'pnnM r£-a77urf09 


.... ........ .TJar= LJSTJtr 




PT6E INtUFFE) 

r.'S per pdnl a*”’ 

6CD97 46660 464i0 J6$« 

n—n. jMT.'i Jjsae J771S •1*" *’ 


stDV.- 4606 u ilBaaai MW t--. 

Ski; -Twa 4.'»o -wo 
Ev '.cici U505. 

Pur. . apfSi M 4497E W 875 


GERMAN GOV. BUND (UPPEi 
DMasaooD - on M 100 pd 

Sep 97 101 Je 10154 10171 *OA7 SS4-i7S 
DK97 10680 100.40 100.77 -0114^19 
Es). cotes: I7A336 Piet, solas' 2IS.777 
Pret.ooMM.- 2bA694 up Iasi* 


EUROURA iuffbi 
IjL 1 mqlion • KFl$ o! too dcI 
SK« 9354 9347 *S54 -Q 04 11« .JV-. 

93 77 9357 9Jk7 •0 06 

Uorya 9474 44 >4 «». .f^J. 

ijnW 94.40 9478 «3 *C10 mItsO 

SCB98 944S 9437 UJ7 ,0^5 

|M softs. 82.651. Prrv io6s. IXf] 

Pret ooen M • 3U32I up 7$ 


Commodity imtexBS 

V* i rMlwfk-- i.l'l, 3tl‘-’ 

WB , .1^ 


•r 

• u'Jl'i 'tl-Vlni 

.r.l.- 4V i 

I,..- a-: ThC.iilTllt..* 

-r*: •*<■*.* Aha 


ITL ■ i- 


CTB rfl? . 

Soi-t.‘n v.M 
inf innonoai ^ 

V *tr £ rtfWV 


.Vv ' ’T-y’r 

V- r .- •iL. " RjwWi. 


ai': ‘* ‘•■ff 


O® 








I 






.it.---. 


I , 5« 

*550 j)|j . 

^^*nl)l Chip Fever on a Rise 

^ Handover Faib to Cool Bull Run in Hong Kong 


INTERNATIONAL HER ALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAV, JUNE 26. 1997 

ASIA/PACmC 


PACE 15 



{•*■'■•■ L’Oi' 

r sj . jt .. . 


By Seth Faison 

New YortTlmts service 


peeled it to get this higb,” 

fact, the mailtei got even hotter ihan 
oeiju^ wanted, partly b^use of a rush to sell 


1^.*- :,L5.v- 


. ^o/ inieiest rates, ana i 
■ '■ jaw record vmuiiie. 


On (Friday, to cool the fevenah in- 

tensSl ID rDd nUDS. Bciiuie AnnAiin<v»H n«ui 





Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

17000 

16000 ■■■ 

15000 
140C0 - 
13000^‘^'\- 

12000 ... .X 


Sngapore 
Straits Times 


Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 


J F M A M J 
1997 


F M A M J 


'j F M A M J 
1997 


Exchange 


Wednesday Piev. 
Close Close 


Hong Kong Hang Seng 


1S.065.02 14.890.06 +M7j 


.unhanded fiom omam to ra July 1, the had ajoyed signifi^dy i«s ^ 

-,;.HoDg Koag g^^|«cwrf(^^ even the ^esecomp^listedontheShan^^ A trader shouting an order across the Hoorofthe Hong Kong Futures Exchange, 


■/: SSom^^w this almosiraucously bnllish The a G^^U. chief Mecutive Credit Ly- need mont^, Mr. CouU predicted, 300 or so 

^ 0 .. .J I. . 1 HC nevr luCdSUieS CSine as a stmrise no onnaix .^Rninrt«fi Acia >h>ir Mr.no unll nmkaKIv •.HMMnr Mikli.. 


, ^^“sendment on the eve of such a precarious onee^teSlSHS^SSJ^*****^ Securities Asia, predict^ that Hong will 

'Ifu^ hisiaicd Kong would grow steadily as a financial cen- year for the next 20 years, and many of those 

nS^ - go* Ho"gKong-s stocks will undoubtedly be in Hong Kc^. 


probably attempt public 
for the next 20 years, and 


offerings each 


and MtwoS^fflaikMr were” e 3 CDected*to*te trJt^ coigemri act more as a place for Chinese companies to In contrast, an economTst, Faber. 

"•r^taStodly in 1997, on SSSunotion Sodf ^ than as an imcraaiional center, foresees the demise of Hong Kong’s singular 

:i«-, SSlchi^e woulSa™ ■.-.■•n^.H^.g Kong comn-ny P«mon,».r (he dccalle. be- 




|H)rl 


Tl fff 


snnenng ^ j»iuapuon stock makel, and apparently 

that aia&laad Gh^e wonld devastate their new rules woold rein t 


‘ political life here. Instead, both SuLSSLJ^h grow to supplant other centers in cause with high real estate and other prices, it 

^ Mr. CouU saii “Tie idea of Hong conid lose itaWduve edge. 


^Aeta are near flieirhifihs Mr. uouu said, “nie idea of Hong could lose its competiuve edge. 

■ -' v®^Srismalx)UtC2uiJ¥surgmfi economy Kong as an international financial center “It was the only bridge to China for a long 

'"*^and^Sope*»“**aveb^ suffix, but its lok for China wm more time,"_said Mr. Faber who is known in Hong 


Kong for his contrarian gloominess, which 
enterprises in China that has earned him the name “Dr. Doom.” 


Singapore 

Sti^timQS 

ib»A5 

2.041.38 

-0.86 

Syfeiey 

AlOrcBnaries 

2,705.10 

2.688.40 

+0.6£i 

Tokyo 

Nikkei 235 

20,679.27 20.341.93 -i-l 66 

KumeLuinpi 

ur Composite 

i,ut».ue 

1.U//.VX 


Seng^cek 

SET 

496.03 

493.13 

i-0.55 

Seoul 

Composite Index 

744A9 

753.70 

-1.15 

Tulpef 

Stock Msuket Index 8,95&41 

8.916.17 

40.43 

tBanHa 

PS£ 

2,82929 

2JD8.65 

+0.7S 

Jaktuta 

Conteosite index 

712.50 

71339 

-012 


NZSE-40 

2AQ2.S3 

2.39B.97 

+0.1E, 

Bombay 

Sensitive index 

4,093.62 

4.119.39 

-0.63 


Souree: FefeSu/s 


ll.'iuUI Tn-'.R. 


• y **®? P^" ** «»*« subtly, the gWf^ ex- 

'1 ou^y«uireacbi^la^rfl5J)00 Friday. uberance in Hong Kong’s market still seems 
"IheHongKt^mariEAjnrecentyearstm da^erauslyhi^ some economists say. if not 
. beea trading at a discount because of Che com- quite irrational. 

. • v'Jng efaang^’ ^dOtristc^rfiCT ^^i^ood, Asian “Overexcitement can lead to underexcite- 


Very briefly; 


.s andEineigmgMari^slraiBgistatPe^^ ment" said Miron Mushkat, chief economist India. 

. ..1^ .Hong Kong-basrt mvestment bank. “What’s at Lehman Biothera in Hong Kone “If «■ 

. • r'been happenmg this yw evoything collapses six mooS laterf'fliese ! •* .t. o- .... 

. jVtasnairowed aspeoptebeccnneiw^ gainswUlbeviewedasha^dngbecnanartificial buf^Jf^.P^i^cost^B.J^SbilbonSmga^ 

■ ?. fident that the handover will go smooihly.” bubble. That will be very dirappointing.” (SLQ5 bilhon) m the island s eastern Changi area. 

One fectw. other analysts say, is a wide- Even so, Mr. Mushkat said he rau^itive *500 


^rai^yh^h,someecoQoixu5tssay.ifiu)t eToycAa Motor Corp, and Kirloskar Group, an aLai Sun Development Co. is considering rc- 

. Inditm con^omerate, are finalizing talks aimed at developing Hong Kong's Furoma Hotel and Riiz- 
Uveraentaneot can lead to underexcito- forming a joint venture to make autonuibiles in Carlton hotel into a commercial complex. 


temion of acquiring a new hanking license. Sep- 
arately, the stock exchange of Thailand urged cau- 
tion in the market over speculation of possible 


Japanese prosecutors arrested the president of merger deals involving debt-ridden finance firms. 

vak,i lti>SI.I.,.n r'n J.. nn^ .h.* finnmii.'M n..u mi>-i,.i.ri,k t,i 


Singapore will build a 66 hectare (163 acre) Azabu Building Com Kitaro Watanabe. once de- one day after the cabinet approved new measuresto 


; ^r•:' One fedor. other analysts say, is a wide- 
qvBad expectatKK) that Chinese autbMities 

• ’Tc^.^ill takede^ to msure tiiu Hong Kong’s the rest of the year, a sentiment lhat*was rights, in what ahalysis said was another indication ocr. Central Group, plan lo open 15 TOPS su- Chemist retail chain inieraaiionalb. 

•' i '•'jnatket rems^ teoy^t during and after me widely echoed by other economists and ana- that South Korean investors were exercising their permorkets in Bangkok on June 28. . Ka»ak<ran'« nrL-ddeni Nur<.ui(an Na/arbav ev 

. o«,mhipri^«. Mitoizuk,.. Japan-. n„,„« «r. 

f'’* “Fvavane fiemls’^na will miller «irv j long-term future seems • Share prices of Beijing Yanhua Petrochemical announced a $700 million loan to fund a series of emmeni-run pension svstem bv requinne workers 

' W Cow, China’s biggest pities maker, fell 6.8 per- major infirasmicture projects in China. tocontribuie Srica.si lOperceniof meir sidaries and 

''■^^^S.-’^1^SMiorexautiveatM«T- cily's ta^ISS' k’ • ^stni Than^it PLC, a lca.^g Thai rinanca employers 15 perrem.o ana., sysl.mll.al will 
• us rffl Lynch in Hone Kone. “Bat no one ex- seems to have an oninion first day oft^u^m Hong Kong amid doubt about and sccunttes finn. said it was planning a mercer some retirement money invested through mutual 

oimuu . profit growth in Chirm s chemicals industry. with other finance-sector compmiics with the in- funds. i/V’.M.-i.i.M .tF\ 


scribed as one of the ivorld's ricbesi men, for avoid a collapM* in the troubled sector. 


Samsung Electronics Co. has been sued by a 


signs mat me market would remain strong for nusoiity shareholder for ignoring small investors' 


the test of the year, a sentiment that was 
widely echoed by other economists and ana- 
lysts and brcAers. 


allegedly preventing creditors from seizing the 
company's assets, according to news reports. 

• Royal Ahidd NV and its Thai joint-venture part- 
ner, Central Group, plan lo open 15 TOPS su- 


• Bouts Co„ Britain's biggest retail phannacisi. 
plans to open its first stare in Thailand on Thursday 
as pan of plan to expand iLs successful Boots the 
Chemist retail chain interaaiionalls . 


• Kazakstan's president. Nursultan Nazarbayev, 
has signed legislation to replace the counin. 's gov- 


China Oears 18 New Share Tiisrings 


AjMcf Fnnee-Prtaae 

SHANGHAI — China has approved a total 
-cu of 18 new listings on its two sto^ exchanges, 
YSbffighu and Shenzhen, the largrat numb^of 
;^.''tcmpaaie8 ever to be adr^tted in one week, 
^'’’jourees sdd Wednesday. 

Three companies were listed Wednesday. 

• .10 more were to be listed '^ursday and five 
■ . '* are slated to make their trading debut Friday, 
‘ ."just before Hong Kong’s return to Chinese 
Tuesday, the sources said. 

.'7'^ “It is the biggest-ever listing exercise in the 
.. ~. ^history of me stock maricet,’ ’ said Cai JEnwei, 
r.'. an analyst at Soutfatfn Securities Co. 


l' An official at the Shenzhen Stock Ex- 


' cbai^e said the rush was aimed at listing tiie 
companies befiue me close of me fina^al 
■year next Monday. Butsrao&aiialyst&sudme^ 
government was coocemed that strong in-- 


torest in stocks and a huge influx of pnwaic 
investment might raise risk and cause in- 
stability in the market optimism triggered by 
the handover of Hong Itong. The increase in 
the supply of available shares wonld choke off 
any excess demand, they said. 

“The market expansion is much b^tor than 
administrative measures to keep tite stock 
market from overtteating,'' said a local ana- 
lyst who deciin«vi to be identified. “Trading 
ii^ cautious since (he listings will have some 
effect on the sentiment of investors, but the 
influence will dis^ipear shortly. Maybe lo- 
motrow, share prices will go upward ^ain.*' 

An analyst at China Guotai Securities Co. 
said that investors would try to select new 
shares mat showed good earnings potential, 
iather.thaaj»pwii1aring.hlinrily- aa.Juy.Jiew. 
Chinese stocks, as. often occurred in fee past. 


The euro 


Baht Attack Drains Reserves 


Cwpiii^Owai^FnmDafmim 

BANGKOK — Thailand 
spera about $5 biHion sbming 
op its conency last inxith, 
i-draioing foreign-exchange 
'reserves to their lowest le^ 
^ in more than two years, econ- 
'omists said Wednesday. 

; The country’s central bank 
will disclose die exact cost 
Thursday, when it repms for- 
eign reserves for May. A 


hefty bill may heighten con- 
oezn about bow long Thailand 
can fend off a dev^uation of 
feebahL 

“The baht cannot hold up,” 
said Chia Woon Kbian, 
of Asian economic research at 
Skandinaviska EnakQda 
Baoken Ltd. *’lhe govern- 
ment eventually has to engi- 
oeer stxne soft devaluation.” 

According to an official at 


Vietnam Urged to Computerize 


Ageece Fnuce^rene 

HANOI — Vietnam has 
the potential to develop a poor 
man's oo mpu ter cosing as 
. little as 5200, fee chief ex- 
ecutive of die Acer Group 
said Wednesday. 

Stan Shih, chairman and 
founder oi the Taiwanese 
■ coo^rater pant Acer,' said he 
had told Vietnamese leaders 
that fee countiy should build a 
-domestic computer indostiy, 
. malting ineegreusive machines 


using older technology. 

“Tliere is no value added 
in hardware assembly,” he 
said. “Anyone can make it; 
you just buy fee parts.” 

Nfr. Shih said feat wife w 
mirial investment of $S oul- 
lion, Vietnam could make 
loc^y afRxdable computers 
costing $2(X), the i^ice of a 
color TV set But wife animal 
per capita income of about 
$280, & Vietnamese market 
is still in its infancy, he said. 


fee Bank of Thailand, fee fin- 
ancier George Sotcm led an 
attack on fee baht last month 
feat forced Thailand to raise 
interest rales and place con- 
trols on fee flow of money in 
and out of fee countiy. 

Foteiga-excluDge reserves 
pobably fell to ab^ $32 bil- 
uon — fee lowest level smee 
December 19^ — firan $373 
bifeon in ApriL analysts said. 

On Wednesday, fee dollar 
fdl to 2S.10 baht fiom 25.75 
'Diesday. 

Sqxirately, tiie govem- 
ment releas^ its budg^ ffx 
die year to September 1998, 
wU^ calls for sharp spend- 
ing cuts and an increase in 
revenue. Officials have re- 
peatedly warned of a looming 
bu^et deficit Prime hfinis- 
ter Chaovalit Yoogchaiyut 
b^an a three-day parliamCT- 
tary debate on the 982 billion 
baht (38. 14 billion) budget, as 
the opposition attacked what 
it caJlra fee government’s 
ladt of fisem discipline. 

(Btoamberg. AFP. Reuters) 


We will be 


rea(iy for it . 


Need a Room? Try Hong Kong 

Bm Il?s E^ensivB, E^ean ThoD^ the HajidoTCr Boom Flowed 


Bieamberg News 

hong KONG — Keiichi Shioza.wa has 
sdvice for touxists who rbinlc feat Hong Kong 
is the place to be for its return to China at 
mifeugbt Monday: Tty Bali instead. . _ 

“Too etmensive,” said Mir. Shiowaza, 
-whose iravu agen^, JTB lnc.» caters to fee 
Japanese, who^eount for 20 percent of tire 
'.teiritoiy 's visitors. He is sending many of his 
clieius els^here. 

He isn't alone. The flood of tourists that 
"Hong Kong hofelieis were counting on fix' ^ 
handover tnroed out to be more of a liidcle. 

Think you can't get a room for tiie Jnty 1 
.cennuHiy? Think again Hotels are scrain- 
to fifl tixiQsands of tiieai. 

The industiy*s fretunes probably p ea k ed 

last vear. urhM manv tmiTHtfS 08106 tO SeC 


Thke Sino Hotels Holdings Ltd.*s Gty 
Garden Hotel, which is cutting deals to get 
people tiiroo^ the door. ^ • 

The hotel, in tiie lemtoy s North JPorat 
district of anoaymous apartment towers sM 
drab office buildings, is offering rooms for 
$244 a night, a 10 percent discount It has W 
dnppcd its three-n^t minimum, said Joe- 
landLo, the front office manager. The prob- 
lem, be raid, is that Beij^ has restrict^ the 
number of Chinese visitors to Hong Kong 
between June 15 and July 15. 

The botel is now three-quarters lulL 

The trouble, according to travel agents like 
Mr. Shiozawa, is that tourists took to 



At ABN' A^5RO Bank, v.'S ivould :nuch 
rather anticipare c-oang-e than merely 
riispcnd S .0 it. Which is v;hy you v.-ili 
fir j us ;n cur fin^! stages cf prepara- 
t’cn fc- the -.nircjcucticr, cf ihe fjro. 
W'v.h Significant investments 
comrmttv-L: jnu an c-Mcriitve Europeati 
r.eiv.crk c.ls.cc, 'I'.c -.-.fi'. i',elp-our 
clients .'cAlise the ocportur'lfies -cj' the 
currenc. Granted, there ;s st:ii 
uncoria-nf'. rcScircing the euro. 

v.u .'irr:-:'. r.refe'- to be re0d\' lor it 


— ^ MOMUOUjr a AMteiiiiauiWT x--* 

year, wbra many tounsts came to se® 
, Hoag Kong in the days of British rule, 
analysis said 


MT. OlUOZawn, a luoi 

iCTorts thal hotels wonld be booked solid. 
They came en masse last summer to ex- 
perience that last bit of British sovereignty, 

be said. ' » . . 

Hotel executives ssy tounsts got fee 
“wroM message” that it 
posSbS to book hotels m or ^ 

toritoty around the handover, sad Bob Wan, 
eeneial manager of the YWCA Garden View 


njynssaid 
Thai ia a slap in the face to hotehers, who 

™s*d prices and banded together to sell five- 

day nuniiiiiim-stay packages. It’s also a slap 
to Hoog K(X]fi's econony. About 1 1 .7 mifliou 
-visitois cam*, iQ the lenitoiiy last year and 

■ spefe a recorf $10.7 billion, making toiin^ 


the-euro 


----eQ-ah . 

GiBotedL such cplontai 'lamhnatks as the 

Peninsola ^ xriiose grand Icfeby and views cu 
^ Vicioria Baibor have lured travelem si^ 

- ^ are booked for tiie handover fiiBwoiks. 

! More down-market establishments, 
' though, are looking for guests. 


general manager or me iwi-Auarocu 

mtematioual House. . . 

The Hong Kong Tourist Assoa^on ^ 
fee misconoMption stemmed from the end ot 
i«gt year, vriiffli hotels first started a^epbng 

wMlots of block bo^^^.” said 
Peter Ran^ spokesman for tite tour^ a^ 
sociation. “Butas time nearedandpetjte^^ 

to for tiiose bookingis, tiiey canceled. 


ABN*AMR 0 ^TheNetwoikBanic 


i 



PAGE 16 


BNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAX; JUNE 26, 1997 


m 






EUROPE 


VW Pact Shows Flexibility 

Unions Accept Vhge and Schedule Concessions 


CaifAtf Oftr Sitf'Fnw Oqudka 

HANNOVER — Volks- 
wagen AG has agreed to in- 
crease pay f<n'its Gentian work- 
ers by 4 percent ova- two years 
in exchan^ for concessions on 
woik practices, a move analysts 
said signaled a shift in Geraian 
labor ^doas. 

Underthepact, agreed on late 
Tuesday, Saturday shi^ will be 
added as required and eitmloy- 
ees aged between SS and 60 will 
see their woik week cul 

“This trend to greater flex- 
ibility is only the beginning,'’ 
said Jueigen Graf, bead of re- 
search at SGZ-Bank in Frank- 
furt. ‘‘There is good news for 
both sides in this agreement and 
the comity and workers can 
live with it*’ 

The pact comes after a similar 
agreement JV-vn he chemical 
company Ba> er AG. nnd as Ger- 
man unions, faa-! A.th record 
postwar unempl- •ynient, come 
under pressure . a.' ef 


wage rises, more flexible work- 
ing conditions and pay stnic- 
tares in return for job securi^. 

According to tbe company 
and its muon, some 10,000 
older workers would have to 
move to pait-tinie schedules 
over the next five years in order 
to create 1,000 full-time jobs for 
apprentices annually. 

Under tbe plan for older 
workers, which will cost an es- 
tunared 1S0,000 E^tsche 
marits ($S6.99n for each par- 
ticipant, wooers aged 55 may 
opt to take 8S percent of thmr 
net income for the next five 
years and, in renira, can retire at 
57V6 years instead of 60. 

VW will also make special 
pension payments to make sure 
that woikeis do not see any sig- 
nificant cut in the level of dieir 
pension upon retiimnenL 

Vol^w^en agreed to in- 
crease the pay of its 90,000 Ger- 
man workers by 1.5 peicait 
from Aug. 1, compare witii 


Oermany's annual inflatioa rate 
of i.6 percent in May. VW 
agreed on a further raise of 2,5 
pereenEfiom Aug. 1, 199$, The 
pact, which ends three months 
of negotiations, will secure jobs 
at VW until 19^. 

(BUumberg, AP, Reuters) 

■ Audi Sees Saks Growth 

Audi AG, tbe luxury unit of 
Volkswagen, said it expected 
1 997 sales to rise to more than 20 
billion Deutsche maiks (511.8 
billion) because new models are 
selling faster than they can be 
made, Bloombeig News rqx)Tt- 
ed ficm Ingolsta^ Germany. 

Audi reported sales of 18.8 
billion Dm in 1996. Audi said it 
expected unit sales to rise to 
more than 500,000 cars for the 
full year from 492,046 in 1996. 
- Audi’s two most recent sig- 
nificant product launches were 
the compact A3 late last year 
and the more-expensive A6 lux- 
ury sedan earlier this month. 


Debis Ends Cap Gemini Pact 


CMf«M ROT ZNqunte 

BERLIN — Daimler-Benz 
AC’s software suhsidia^ said 
Wednesday it would end its part- 
nership with the French com- 
puter-services company Cap 
Gemini Stseti SA because of 
“d^ering mture strategies. ’’ 

Daimler-Benz InterServices 
AG, or D^is, plans to place its 
24.4 percrat st^ in Gem- 
ini with international investois 
in a convertible bond issue 
worth more than 1 billion 
Deutsche maiks ($579.9 mil- 
lion). The bond will be convert- 


ible into Cap Gemini shares. 

Cap Gen^ will sell to Debis 
its 1 9.6 percent stake in the sofi- 
ware-development company 
Debis Systemhaus. 

Jueigen Schrempp, chief ex- 
ecutive of Dai^r, said, 
“Daimler-Benz will invest the 
proceeds fiom the sale” of the 
Cap Gemini stake ‘ ‘to strengthen 
Dais’s international informa- 
tion-technology activities.” 

Earlier this year, tradeis on die 
Paris Bouise speculated tiiat 
wmtid sedc to increase its 
stake in Gemini, and in May, 


the chairman of D^b, Klaus 
Mangold, said the oompa^ 
would decide whetfaa to raise its 
stake before the summer. 

On Wednesday, Mr. Man- 
gold said: “Tbe separation Irom 
Cap Gemini is not easy for 
Debb, as both companies have 
been able to record a number of 
joint successes in the market In 
the six-year partnership." 

Daimler said the U.S. Bank 
Holding Company Act had 
hampered expansion in the U.S. 
infonnatioo-technoJogy mar- 
keL(i4FX, Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Denmark Plans to Sell 
Stake in Telephone Fir: 


Blopmherji News 

COPENHAGEN — The government 
said Wedneday it plan^ to sell all or 
part of its 51.7 percent stake in the 
teb^Aone company Tele Danmark A/S 
as part of its goal to open the country’s 
teleconununications inuket to increa^ 
compedtiou. 

Denmark's Social Democratic minor- 
ity government said it would bc^ dis- 
cussing a plan for a sale with other 
politi^ parties thb autunm. A sale of all 
or part of the stake would need majority 
approval in Parliament. 

The move follows l^islation in May 
to open up Denmark's taq^bone marled 
to free competition before the European 
Union deadline in 1998. Until the le- 
gislation was passed, the govemment 
was not allowed to propose reducii^ its 
Tele Danmark stake below a majority. 

Analysts said the govemment had tlsee 
options; It a>uld sell shares to domestic 
international investors; it could sell a 
stake to a strategic partner or it could sell 
shares b^ to Tde Danmark. 

A sale of some shares to Tele Dan- 
mark would be the most beneficial to 
cunent sh^holders. analysis said. It 
would allow the telephone company to 
use itsspare cash, while raisingihe share 
price and earnings per share. 


“What the market b looking for is a 
riiate buyback from Tele Danmatk,” 
said Steven Brooker, an analyst at 
Nykredit Bank. “Otherwise, it will be a 
disimpomtmettt, because di^ are over- 
capitaiTTwi at tire mcHseoL” 

If the government does sell shares to 
Tele Daiunarfc, it b likely to sell only a 
20 to 25 percent stake. It may even 
combine a buyback widi one of the other 
two options, analysts saicL 

But tile government could abo fiod it 
difficult to seU shares to new investors in 
the next few years, when several other 
large European teleconununications 
comnmies, such as France Telecom S A, 
Stei SpA of Italy and Deutsche Telekom 
AG, are als o p lanning to sell shares. 

In addition, there has been ^recu- 
lation that tire Scandinavian operattm 
Telia AB in Sweden and Telenor AS in 
Norway could also be wholly or partiy 
sold to the public. 

in recent weeks there has been spec- 
ulation that British Telecommunications 
PLC, which already cooperates with 
Tele D anm ark in several mtemational 
ventures, may buy a stake in tbe com- 
pany as a strategic partner. BT would not 
comment. 

Tele Danmark shares closed 2 krona 
lower at M3 krmer ($32.24). 


France Lifts Minimum Wage 4 % 




C, Mfpda/ oar Skiff ffUH AirMft An 

PARIS' — The French cabinet on 
Wednesday approved a 4 percent increase 
in the national minimum wage. Finance 
Minister Dominique Strauss-Ka^ said. 

The rise ‘*repiesentsa3 percent increase 
in purchasing power because inflation has 
be^ less than 1 percent," Mr. Strauss- 
' Kalm said after the weekly cabinet talks. 

The minimum wage is now 6,406.79 
francs t$l. 101.07 ) a month. 

Economists say die increase is suipris- 
ingly low and sends a political message 


that despite- demands from Communists, 
rapid wage raises might have to wait until 
job creamm becomes more robust 

Separately, Italy's unemployment rate 
rose to 12.S percent in April, die state 
statistical unit Isiat This was tbe hmbest rate 
since Is^ created a jobless defmtion in 
19^ in line with the ^’s definition. 

Tbe uoeDiplo 3 nnent rate woisened in tbe 
south and center, and declined in the richer 
north of the country. Analysts had forecast 
the unemployment rate to drop to about 
12.1 pCFcenL (Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Investor’s Europe 



C^WBhagan 

Hel^ 



FTSEIOO 


Hffiiin 

mSTB. 

•mm 

13318 

P»te 

CAC40 

2iKrM 


StoeMicAn' 

SX1& 


SiZOOisa^^^MM 

Vienna 

AIX 

ijzssLn 

1 , 283 , 68 ^ 

zwich 

SPl 

3 ,sn,ss 

^JSZSM 4>Lat| 

Sourse: Tatataiis 


IrerimOTital HmU TrtanK 

Very briefly: 


• Geneva's oldest new^per. the Frendi-langua^e Joumalde 
Geneve, said it would merge with a rival daily, Lc Nouveau 
C^otidien, to overcome its financial difficulties. 

• Cnmpagnie Bancaire SA, a specialized baitiung unit of 
Compagnie Finandere de Paribas, said it would ^lend 3 
billimi francs (^15.5 millitxi) to buy the 39 pererat of die life 
insurer C^rdif SA and tbe 27.S percent of the leasing ccxnpany 
UFB Locabail SA that it did not already own. 

• France Telecom is offering to buy the cable-idevision 
t^retations of Compagnie Generate des Eam that are af- 
filiated with networks ovmol by the telecommunicati^ 
concern, according to the French daily Le Monde. 

• Granada Group PLC. tbe British television concern, made 
a £7 1 1 million (S 1 . 1 8 billion) agreed bid fw Yorkshire-Tyne 
Tees Television Htridiogs PLC. although some shaieholdeis 
were opposed to the size of tbe offer. 

• Ciga SpA, tbe Italian luxury -hote l group controlled 1^ ITT 

Corp., is not for as part cn nT*s defense against a hostile 
takeover bid Hilton Hotels Corp., Ciga’s cbainnan, 
Daniel Weadock, said. Btikanhem- ttmm 


■■■ -r 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Wednesflay, Jtme 25 

PrtcBS in tool currencies. 

TaMws 

mah Lam Oase nw: 

Amsterdam AEX^in.« 

pRViaHiMIse 


abimwro 

Ausot 

Ahold 

AknNoM 

BoanCo. 

Bobwaten 

CSMcw 

DonSuhePel 

DSM 

EBtw 

Fate Aim 

Coinrta 

C-BiOCCM 

Ho M Wior 

HoinokcR 

HsMoomcM 

HmsDou^ 

INGGmv 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPM 

IMOTdGv 

NuMot 

OceGMOT 

v^dwivn 

Ruuihii) HSg 

Robecs 

Rodonco 

RAks 

RoMto 

IteMlOirtdi 

tinicwcOT 

VoidBlnfl 

VNU 

WeNcnKlon 


37.40 3s7D 
131.10 mjD 
1UJ0 14140 
usm 2SB30 
137 13ZJ0 
37.30 3ejQ 
100 77J> 
41X50 USlBO 
177SD IMJO 
S 3Z5I 
8UD 83 
4150 44.70 
64JD 

104 I0Z5) 
343 3S7 

110.90 10940 
171 I47JD 

91.70 9070 
4040 S7JD 
4140 4110 
fIJD 10 
S&JO 55.10 

313 31050 
3S45P 74730 
1JL3D I34J0 

110.90 10»A 
210 3045(1 

1BLS0 104.90 
4470 44JD 

187.70 107JD 
11170 11130 

407.90 404.10 

41950 417 

10030 107.10 

4450 45 

3SZ50 247.10 


37.10 3480 
137.70 13040 
14^ 14430 
3050 357 

13U0 133 

3870 3090 
100 99.10 
417.10 41450 
197 I915D 
3L70 31il 
C 8150 
4S 4470 
413 4430 
IQUD 10450 


34150 
110.TC 10950 
14950 14450 
9170 87.90 
40 <030 
4550 
8050 8050 
54 55 

512 309 

752 2«X 
141.10 13170 
10740 IO7J0 
20450 30150 
18490 10410 

18750 18550 
11130 11130 

407.90 4U5D 

417.90 41030 

108 107 

4180 4480 
248 349 


Bangkok 

AffvMoSK 

SimCemenlF 

SteaConBkF 

TeboHMsia 

TInlAinMm 

Thai Fmn 84 F 

UldCOma 


ia 

140 

in 

142 

104 

149 

181 

144 

2750 

212$ 

2755 

27 

3M 

304 

304 

304 

464 

4D4 

404 

468 

102 

93 

lU 

95 

a 

27 

27.75 

27.75 

IS 

a 

34 

35 

114 

104 

>]4 

110 

104 

9950 

lU 

100 


Bombay 

BcridADlo 

HmUlLMr 

HbidiistPdlm 

IMDwBk 

ITC 

MdimnaiTei 
ftnOanceml 
SMeBklndo 
SteH Autiioiilr 
Tola Eng Luos 


Brussels 

Ahnonll 

Bmtad 

BBL 

CBR 

Cafniyl 

DemriBUon 

EbdnM 

Ebdnriina 

Fate AG 

Gew^ 

GSL 

GoiBnnqiw 

Kie dMIicn k 


nonBran 

RoyoleBel 

Sac Gen Bi 

Sohny 

TractebH 

lO 


I447S 
4940 
9300 
3490 
I74SD 
1915 
7800 
3630 
7340 
3385 
S9W 
14250 
1442S 
13775 
4775 
10D7S 
3420 
213SO 
ISDN 
1 1710 


14300 
4910 
91M 
34AI 
[7QS0 
1890 
7490 
3S40 
7040 
3320 
58S0 
141 SO 
14250 
13400 
4730 
9990 

sen 

21225 
14875 
1 1400 


Copenhagen 


BCBonk 

bitsbooB 

Codon Fan 

Donisoo 

OenOonskoBk 

CVSSvolArgB 

MI91ZB 

FLSIndB 

KobLufanme 

NvoNonSkS 

Soph usBeiB 

ToeDonink B 

TngBalliCQ 

URHDiinnrkA 


351 346 

374 366 

890 880 

435 414 

439 43088 
348500 345547 
243000 339000 
230 224 

715 710 

730 723 

m 77454 
347^5 342 

358 349 

374 349 


Frankfurt 

AMBB 
AdIdflS 
AllanzHdg 
AUbb 
MB oilni 
BASF 


1SSD 
20050 
37450 
1858 
38L1Q 
4440 
Bk 5170 
7170 


40«l 

9025 

41 

1409 

165 

5045 

137 

7450 


Boy.' 

ISSUff 

Bewoo 
B»W _ 
CKAGCdanhi 
Coninwixlwitt 
Dataller Bair 

SiSSwBn* 10450 
DhiI Tetalumi 42.90 
DiesawBank flJQ 
fteeeniiB 372 

FreseausMed 1S4J0 
McOKRipp 347 

GtaK 

HeMoBigBiit 
HoMpM 


HEW 
HoeMM 
HoedEl 
Kmlodt 
Lahmeycr 
Linda 
LirilMHn 
M AH 

Ml l BWWIOI W 
M d n jlg ean to dw n ig^ 
MWa ittjO 

Muidi Ruedi R 4970 

FreuBBO 534 


12150 

17D 

9750 

44540 

8250 

7045 

453 

82.10 

1335 

35.90 

541 

7U 


1540 

197 

374 

1838 

37.90 

4140 

5355 

7J 

47J2 

72.^ 

40 

1401 

142 

50 

134J0 

9130 

1017S 

4255 

414) 

365 

153 

34250 

iioao 

14850 

9050 

46540 

8050 

7015 

44950 

BO 

1326 

35 

532 

75750 

3655 

18750 

4910 

51025 


llOtt 

170 


65050 

82 

1335 


RWE 

SAPpM 

Sehaing 

SGLCortai 

SiHiMm 

Sfrfngcr (AteO 

g yedaicfc w 

VEW 


ragb lm 
7450 TSM 
354 346.10 
19150 19050 
340 337 

10750 104.70 
1547 1549 
938 937 

424 42350 
7750 7030 
SM 540 
W 79750 
1250 1237 


dm PK9. 

74 75.90 
35950 344 

19050 19020 
237 23550 
10750 10455 
050 050 
938 940 

426 42050 
9055 9750 

546 540 

804 7902S 
1250 1233 


SET todoi 47453 
nevtaCK 47113 


Savai 30 litaac 411959 

PmkaemtJt 

N.r. N.T. N.T. 924JS 
1374 13081353.75130955 

4S4 444 44755 451 

9150 92 93 74 

499 «O50 49450 502J5 
39650 290 39Q2S 29075 

380 345 34650 37450 

343 337 33725 34I.2S 

17.75 17 1750 1755 

440 44150 450.75 46055 


BEL2D Mo: 237157 
Pravtous 235119 


14350 14300 
4930 4870 
9150 9210 
*300 3445 
rW 14825 
1895 1880 

7800 7450 
3620 3560 
7150 7140 

3370 3385 
5870 5990 
1400 14175 
14325 14150 
13700 13225 
4780 4785 
lOOOO 9770 
3400 3380 
21250 71175 
15000 14900 
11475 1)400 


348 34 

370 370 

085 BBS 
414 429 

in 6Xaa 
344344 348000 
239000 240000 
225 m 

no m 

725 723 

900 978 

343 345 

353 35559 
375 370 


DAX: 379051 
PmSeuK 3705.83 


1542 IS4S 
199 19050 
374 375 

1050 1840 
3005 37J0 
Aanq 4255 
S355 S2QS 
72J0 7150 

47.90 6010 
97 9250 
40 414) 

1409 1403 

142 140 

SD.45 4005 
137 I3S45 
9450 9340 
1D4J0 9950 

42.90 43.1$ 
4155 60.40 

368 36A5D 
15450 15110 
J4Z50 343 


Helsinki 

HBXCepwdiidtt. 3226.17 


Piciians:3iaa 


4740 

47 

47 

47 

HuMmnsWI 

224 22350 

774 

224 

KoM 

« 

47 a 

a 

a 

Kn6o 

75 

7ia 

a 

74 a 

MmItaA 

)7a 

1190 

1710 

17.10 

ia .10 

NtehaB 

159 

149 a 

150 

WmnSrteB 

4290 

47 

47 a 

a 

Neste 

139 

13150 

IW 

13110 

NektaA 

395 

woa 

iS 

300 

Oten-Yidyrme 

2Q 

199 

207 

OutokunpuA 

1050 

in 

103 


UPMKymnwne 

injD 

123 

t2ia 

Vbbnd 

89 

87.a 

■ 

■ 

Hong Kong 

Ham Seng: 1306182 
Pim!kM:]48fXM 

AmrrProiK 

850 

XIS 

X30 

0.10 

BkEediteta 

31.90 

31 a 

31 a 

31 a 

rnPnwPcvdr 

14.90 

14 a 

UBS 

1159 

OteUCtaKM 

CXInfraiteild 

79 

2i05 

Tin 

Tia 

7625 

na 

71W 

2129 

China UM 
aOePDOk 

4420 

4U0 

44 

4180 

4X80 

47 a 

aa 

a 

DooHeng^Bk 

HntPoA 

4340 

47 a 

43 a 

aa 

9JB 

9a 

9a 

9a 

Hong Luna On 

14a 

1405 

1115 

1105 


107 

885 

102 a 

xa 

103 lOUO 

xa 0.75 

Henderson Id 

73 

aa 

7ia 

na 

HKOrinaGas 

1175 

isa 

11 a 

1X59 

HKEkdric 

3SM 

3i.a 

31.90 

32a 


IXB 

1805 

1X16 

i7.a 

Hmewdl Hdos 

las 

4n 

4a 

la 

HSBCHdgs 

234 

732 

733 

2»l 

Hulditaon Wh 

4125 

43a 

4375 

13 

HysrniOev 

2150 

TJIK 

73.05 

7119 

21 a 

aw 

24 

7190 

Keny Props 

New WM Dew 

1X40 

1X45 

1X55 

IXW 

4X30 

47 50 

a 

4620 


SJO 

.315 

335 

113 


IJS 

IJ7 

IJ7 

1.39 

SHKPren 

95 

9550 

93.a 

93 

105 

483 

103 

183 


OSS 

8a 

045 

Na 

SRiCMimPosI 

X10 

7X5 

785 

7.a 

SwheRicA 

ajg 

aa 

a 

a .79 

Wharf Hdgs 

3400 

14 a 

3150 

3110 

Wheelock 

19a 

ixa 

loa 

1X70 

Jakarta 

Ceomesde tadac 7)150 


Pravlees: 71339 

Astra Ini 

7900 

7700 

7850 

TWO 

Bklntllndan 

2)50 

7000 

7175 

TOM 

flfcMenmu 

1525 

I5DD 

1575 

)S50 

GudonqGatm 

9575 

93a 

95 a 

9575 

IndocenwM 

3650 

3550 

3400 

3475 


5800 

5775 

.5800 

SOSO 

hidoeot 

7425 

7300 

7350 

71910 

SumpoenmHM 

9050 

MW 

8700 

8975 


5300 

5075 

5ia 

5225 

TdekanutAnsi 

4000 

3925 

39 a 

3975 

Johannesbuf^ 

AffidmmidBIcs 

AndoMBCed 

33 

3a 

3100 

iM.a 

33 
■ 770 

33 

770 

AitgtoAtaOHp 

AndoAnGon 

26X25 

200 

247 a 

27Xa 

2M 

2Hia 

2M 

281SD 

AndoAfflhid 

A^N 

)96 

iia 

i9ia 

isa 

195 

11 a 

19S 

isa 


4a.a 

4X10 

a 

a 

C&Smni 

25 

2125 

a 

75 

OeBeoR 

id/a 

147 

147 a 

T47a 


31 a 

3ia 

'n80 

3180 

FsllinflBk 

4ia 

4025 

4X75 

4X75 


2) 

aw 

71 

21 

GFSA 

109 

108 

109 

109 

ftmeifdHdos 

40 

mso 

.98a 

MSO 


3X15 

29 a 

3X15 

3015 

l«nir 

1)9 

3.17 

3.18 

118 

Jotemies bidl 

5X25 

. 57 a 


5X25 


332 

329 

3IS 

175 

Uberfylde 

LtaUfeStmt 

13175 

i9aa 

191» 

12175 

17 a 

1175 

17 a 

1775 


lOlSO 

10175 

mso 

iQi.e 

Nmnpak 

19 

1830 

185(1 

1R9D 



a 

aa 

9950 


mati 

47» 

47.75 

47.7S 


di.a 

41 

6) .a 

6106 


7S.7S 

7,9,75 

7175 

/l/S 

SA Breweries 

l» 

13X2S 

138a 

ISXSD 


47 a 

44 

47 

47 

Sdsel 

BJB 

.5A79 

S7 

57 

SBtC 

219 

217 

214 a 

216a 

Tiger OMs 

lOJO 

03 

82J0 

82 a 

Kuala Lumpur 

AMMBHdgs 


14 

16 

t6a 


1130 

liUlO 

13 

1130 


212$ 

2125 

2025 

SiCSS 

MdMIShipF 

6a 

6J0 

4J5 

6a 


. 9.20 

90$ 

9a 

915 


17 a 

17.10 

)7a 

12 a 

PubDcBk 

380 

178 

3.a 

178 


148 

134 

3J6 

150 


XIO 

749 

7SS 

0 


2 $a 

2160 

3ia 

25a 

SbiK Dolby 
Tdekem Altai 

xa 

12 

xa 

11 a 

aa 

11 a 

X50 

11.70 

Tenggo 

1110 

laa 

DffO 

loa 

12 

ixa 

12 

ixa 

YTL 

X4D 

7.90 

X30 



London 


119 

140 


9750 99.10 
aOO 050 
8080 80 
nas 49.45 


431 

00 

1320 


3550 3^ 
$39 532 

762 741 

3445 36.15 
18000 18010 
4947 4970 
522 SDOaO 


AWoIDanecq 

Ap^onWota 

AiA 

Asm Crawl 

AsucBrninfs 

BAA 

Bordoys 

Boss 

BATUld 

BoiaSadlaHl 

BluaCrde 

BOCGnup 

Boots 

BFBInd 

BrilAaw 

BfllA)nM|n 

BG 

BrttLOMl 


033 US 

450 452 

42 044 

5.77 550 

153 1.19 

5.IB &I2 
550 140 

Ills 11.70 

754 7.15 

SJO &5I 

451 35$ 

450 4)7 

1057 1047 

7.10 655 
359 133 

1147 1136 
754 455 

252 252 

&4S 548 


BriUteOm 

BSM 

BittSnd 

BiltTeiecoin 

BTR 

BunartiQtaM 
BurtaRGp 
Coble Whelm 
C adbun ^StTna 
Cdfflon unnni 
Cornml Union 
CanpoaiGp 
CaainuMk 
QtaaB 

Bachoaompam 

EMI Group 

EnergrGitwp 

EntonriseOi 

FomCokmIel 

GanAoddent 

GEC 

GKN 

GioBlWIcBni 

GranedoGp 

ftBgdWlot 

GRenoOsOp 

gjr- 

HsScHMgs 

la 

Impl Tobacco 
Kbig' ' 


UindSK 
iJOTno 

LagdCenlGrp 

LhRdsTSBGp 

LuotaVpitlip 

Mlokslpancv 

MEPC 

MeioirrAsMt 

NotamlGrid 

NottF^Hcr 

NtaMtet 

Nod 

MndchUioon 

OiMoe 

PSiO 

Peonon 

PWetagtan 

i^iwaiGM 

nemlsFamel 

Piudarital 

RoMndcCp 

tadcGrecp 

Raddncobn 

Redond 

ReadlnU 

Rariokfl Inffiol 

RevtacsHdff 

Rmni 

RWICCinip 

RoliRiwca 

RnoIBkScoi 

RTZim 

RoMdOSonAB 

sAmv 

Sdnsbury 

Sdirarien 

SeotNoKaslle 

ScolRiHer 

SecurlcDr 

SmmTnfd 

ShtalTiniBpR 

Stabe 

SRdliNephaw 
SmithKIbK 
SniiteM 
sown Elec 
SiPtaicDOdi 
Stand Oiorler 
TdeOLpta 
Teso 

ThaitasWbtai 

SIGnup 

TIGioup 

Tankbis 

Uidiner 

UMAasurance 

UMNeirs 

Ufd unties 

vendmneLxvIi 

Vodptone 

WMbi^ 

WWomHdgs 

Wotataer 

WPPGraup 

ZeiKce 


High Low dose 

Prev. 

7.15 

707 

7,13 

708 

AM 

AS} 

477 

4AS 

ia 

7S7 

ia 

la 

150 

la 

451 

145 

199 

1.9? 

194 

197 

1X28 

10.1? 

1017 

1X25 

7.20 

I.I7 

i,m 

) 17 

X92 

$75 

506 

5X5 

$35 

sa 

504 

.579 

$37 

5.10 

575 

575 

172 

6.55 

AM 

A 55 

AS/ 

620 

474 

A 77 

la 

3a 

144 

ia 

195 

187 

493 

49$ 

Its 199 

la 

441 

4M 

11.17 

II 

11.08 

1108 

AM 

4.17 

40 

42a 

422 

4S5 

471 

46/ 

144 

U3 

143 

1A7 

X9B 

Hin 

808 

8,91 

3a 

3J4 

146 

ia 

1X34 

ran 

1X08 

iai8 

1194 

1741 

1779 

17 51 

X5) 

xa 

xa 

857 

$90 


$84 

581 

228 

£21 

773 

‘171 

19/ 

143 

4,97 

44/ 

190 

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$07 

581 

482 

456 

471 

. 4M 

5JI 

577 

$81 

5/8 

ixa 

17.93 

18.17 

17 93 

XB 

UO 

X27 

8U 

197 

197 

196 

195 

7.12 

495 

70S 

495 

iB 

2a 

7a 

7-19 

157 

X3? 

XSV 

xa 

220 

?Ji 

166 

2tf 

la 

115 

474 

413 

442 

6.7/ 

a:« 

A78 

208 

205 

108 

70/ 

50* 

$03 

$09 

506 

50/ 

196 

5M 

404 

1192 

17.WI 

12a 

17./4 

117 

213 

715 

711 

SJO 

$07 

512 

512 

494 

on 

XI8 

835 

730 

7 

7.W 

707 

138 

3?3 

377 

.174 

1.99 

197 

I.9B 

1.99 

413 

6a 

406 

403 

7.12 

497 

7a 

705 

727 

174 

7M 

7.73 

705 

497 

7 

4M 

155 

4a 

455 

X51 

$94 

505 

$91 

.503 

428 

603 

407 

413 

3S0 

344 

178 

3S9 

9Ja 

891 

X94 

891 

3J4 

3.13 

la 

115 

XM 

583 

585 

579 

118 

7.15 

7)4 

714 

45) 

4.18 

4a 

4a 

242 

?a 

741 

7.58 

9a 

973 

979 

9.70 

2J5 

7a 

7.a 

7.19 

X95 

574 

507 

594 

7092 

1078 

1085 

MW 

157 

AM 

154 

140 

la 

318 

sa 

1.19 

la 

353 

X58 

35) 

1425 

1405 

1411 

1404 

4a 

4a 

A.14 

427 

173 


171 

1M 

205 

187 

w 

283 

7a 

717 

7.17 

7.7.5 

11a 

1177 

17a 

1774 

1X25 

)X)7 

1073 

1010 

1.H 

175 

174 

175 

1X77 

10.51 

1X77 

10.50 

X15 

803 

X03 

817 

4.27 

417 

427 

417 

4a 

430 

U7 


934 

9a 

MO 

911 

ISS 

X5D 

451 

dS3 

173 

347 

.170 

144 

477 

AaR 

673 

4A7 

507 

501 

.505 

504 

sa 

578 

$34 

533 

241 

7a 

7.57 

706 

17a 

14.95 

1704 

1497 

137 

137 

437 

431 

730 

7a 

7.79 

779 

415 

622 

425 

*n 

441 

4a 

454 

458 

in 

207 

190 

7a 

7a 

7.53 

7a 

754 

119 

316 

119 

310 

174 

445 

449 

471 

253 

7a 

la 

7.51 

19a 

18.94 

i9a 

10.92 


Higb Low CIoh Prev. 


High Lnnr dole Prev. 


Higb Lew Oosb Pn*. 


Madrid 

Aeeriim 

ACESA 

AouasBaalo) 


BI 

BooeslD 
BiMJnler 
Bat Centra Hlsp 
BaiPaputar 
BaStaMnder 
CEPSA 

OMMnenle 

CopMei^ 

Enden 

FECSA 

GosNolurri 

Ibenkota 

Repeal 

SevPknElec 
TdbdCOlaD 
Tdefadco 
Union Fenose 
VMeiK Cement 


28180 

2020 

4050 

8370 

12020 

1510 

24140 

5490 

341110 

4775 

SOSO 

3300 

7730 

11800 

1440 

3i69D 

1710 

3010 

4330 

1510 

7960 

4390 

1350 

2300 


27800 27810 
1980 1980 
5760 5900 
8340 0360 
11820 11990 
14S 1510 
25000 26010 
5410 5450 

33500 34100 
4700 4770 
5000 SOSO 
3010 3240 

7630 76S0 
11630 II800 

1405 1410 

3ZS00 32580 
188D 19)0 

2845 3045 

4270 6390 
I4«0 1505 
70)0 rtio 
4350 4390 
1330 1340 
2205 2300 


n4E 100: 4840.00 
Pietaw6:4S 9 450 


8LI5 8 
454 455 

4.48 6.49 

5.77 5.70 

122 150 

5.16 5.13 

544 144 
1115 11.71 

759 723 

151 160 

191 355 

450 4.14 

1055 1045 
7.00 4.97 

354 350 

1147 1359 
6.90 6.99 

250 252 

545 147 


Manila 


AygloB 

C8P Hones 
MenibEiecA 
Metro Bank 
Ptam 
PQBonk 
PMLongDhl 
SaiAUgiKlB 
SM Prime Hdg 


Mexico 

AlfaA 

BmxxIB 

CeniaCPO 

CRnC 

EmpModam 

GpoCasoAl 

GMFBcoBer 

GpoRn lidHirn 

tambOntaMg 

TetovinCPO 

TeUtoL 


Ben Coital Ital 

Scofidevram 

Bead) Rem 

Beneflen 

CneMItalmn 

Edwoi 

EM 

Flat 

CenoOiAssIC 

■Ml 

INA 

DbIms 

MedioMi 

MeOtabaiKo 

Montadtaon 

OMh 


3815 3730 

5340 SOSO 
1274 1250 

27900 27350 
3250 3100 
8670 8325 
7K5 7570 
6290 417$ 


3750 3780 
5)15 5050 
1251 1250 
2745D 27200 
3205 3155 
8410 0600 
9470 95)0 
4100 4190 


PoeB 
RAS 

RotoBmea 
3 Itaolo Torino 
Slel 

Tetoemn ItaliQ 
TIM 


30800 30450 3QS0D 30400 
I6IS0 15700 IS9XI 15940 
2800 2740 2740 2740 

5745 5550 5565 54)5 
7445 7305 7360 734S 

>0750 I047D )0700 10600 
1144 1148 1IM 1144 

SIS 498 SDOjO 49150 
2540 U65 2445 2^ 
44)0 4325 4335 43)5 
13975 13720 13910 13715 
20600 200S0 20550 20)50 
12600 12350 12525 12210 
10740 10035 107)5 9935 


PhMuO-Pnn) 

nsneda 

Reimd) 

Real 

Rh'PoulencA 

SoneB 

Setmetder 

SEB 

SGSTlMmson 

SteGouRHe 

Sadedn 

SfCobem 

Sue2 


OF 


Total B 
Usinor 
Valeo 


3015 

3S408 

151 

1725 

213 

553 

33180 

1050 

4665D 

465 

2905 

876 

309.90 
740 

191.90 
570 

HIQJO 

374 


2897 

2332 

144 

1490 

20110 

S30 

324 

1032 

458 

445 

2941 

•44 

30150 

730 

155 

557 

97J0 

348 


2907 3894 
240 2305 
147 14040 
1702 1499 

211.90 20)50 
547 526 

33>.90 m 
1041 1040 
464 4S150 
645 638 

2962 2937 
845 838 

308 30140 
750 739 

IS9i0 lajO 
570 5S7 

mJO 97.95 
373 343 


ABBA 


Sao Paulo 


Montr^j 

8a MM Con 
QtaTbtA 
CdnUHA 
CTFhHSic 
Gqz Metro 
Gt-Wesl Utaco 
imoBco 
limstorsChp 

NotIBKCmdo 

rVPO rm 

QuebecorB 
RoowsConwi B 
Royal BkCdo 


5485 

5025 

S5BS 

5715 

5670 

5785 

5510 

S4BS 

l■entbtatetelte9B3M1a 


PreiioaS: 3288a 

0.90 

0.90 

490 

rann 

27.10 

27 

a.10 

2/a 

3$6S 

3$a 

asrt 

3505 

3t*i 

3AM 

36i» 

34 

17.95 

17*4 

17.90 

U05 

34 

33Vi 

2190 

33 

3X55 

3X45 

3X45 

39-/5 

32 

32 

39 

31 a 

to 

20 

20 

aijs 

1705 

17.15 

I/a 

1690 

2AU 

3300 

34 

3155 

Ote 

3L9S 

33te 

3155 

24 

2$/0 

2185 

2$M 

945 

9a 

7a 

9a 

4140 

63te 

63a 

6105 


iMfeK 1292040 
mrieuK 12587.40 


AstloA 
AfttaCopcoA 
AuMta 
EledrahuB 
EnosenB 
HenoesB 
bionllwA 
MvcsPdtB 
MoDoB 
NontbaOim 
PtuiiWpitain 
SoidAB 
SenniaB 
SCAB 

S^BaUmnA 

SluniflaFws 

SkQR^B 

SICFB 

lA 


BradesaPM 
Brahma PU 
CcnMPfd 

cesFpw 
Cepta 
EMrabm 
■MubairaePM 
LJaMSeivfefa& 
Ligitaiar 
Petrabm Pfd 
-PoulstaLin 
adNacMnol 
SoinaCiur 
TelebrasPId 
Tetemlg 
Teieil 
TekspPfd 
Uikfatnoa 
UotatamsPfd 
CVHOPM 


1075 

84UO 

5650 

7850 

2150 

4S100 

42Dita 

ssaoo 

44000 

32200 

30000 

3160 

1170 

14650 

70400 

I7DO0 

385010 

4070 

11.90 

24.10 


1040 1070 
83000 <3400 
5440 5600 
7550 7750 
2050 2)020 
42700 4000' 
4)500 41100 
S30OQ 550.00 
42DOQ 43000 
31400 32000 
19100 19600 
3400 3400 
114B 1148 
I6IOD 144.01 
20000 20400 
16200 16199 
3BDOQ 382.00 
4070 40.70 
1155 1100 
23.70 2199 


1075 

84)00 

5400 

7501 

2070 

43400 

41090 

52600 

4U0I 

31000 

19400 

3160 

I1J5 

14100 

30000 

161.95 

37100 

4070 

1105 

3190 


ShnA 
SeHandesA 
WlwB . 


109 

230 
145 

20150 

39750 

585 

30050 

384 

715 

40400 

364 

245 

274J0 

21450 

23150 

170 

83 

283 

350 

307 

14450 

)90 

133 

231 

. 202 


107 1QOS0 
234 226 

1A50 143 

20250 20350 
9150 29250 
573 572 

711 711 

aaa east 
25950 26D50 
M) 242 
270 271 

213 21450 
229 232 


16150 

8? 

281 

347 

202 


146 

83 

282 

348 

203 


165 14150 
190 190 

12950 131 

229 23050 
.10050.50050. 


100 

225 

141 

yam 

39250 

SOD 

392 

203 

713 

39450 

242 

241 

770 

214 

230 

148 

S3 

28150 

3450 

20150 

166 

190 

129 

22950 

1^50 


SvdlieV 'AUOidhiariB:2nS.1t 

^ ' Pimbas: 248840 


Oslo 

AhwA 


OBXiad<ta442JI2 
Pravioa; 43950 


Seoul 


130 136 137 135 OOCORI 


CempesaotadBe 74459 
ftaiileeKTSlTO 

101000 90000 90000 990D0 


Amcor 
ANZ Ulog 
BHP 
Borai 

Brandrieslml 

CBA 

CCAnioin 

CobnMyer 

ComMoo 

C5R 

FortwBlBiV 

Goodman FM 

iCIAiatioBo 

LeodLeose 

MIMHito 

NotAvVlB* 

Not Mutual Hdg 


9ii 

1955 

425 

24 

1143 

1455 

495 

755 

5iH 

252 

2 

13 

27.95 

107 

19.02 

111 


844 
9.71 
1955 
419 
2545 
15.4) 
IIW 
445 
7.16 
499 
249 
1.93 
1183 
27 JO 
1.99 
1858 
107 


144 844 

9X1 944 

1955 I9JD 
419 4)4 

2148 2174 
1151 I5JI 
1199 1410 
485 480 

750 7.14 

SL04 5 

IS) 2J9 
1.97 150 

1198 13 

27.75 2750 
3 205 

IA97 I&B3 

2.11 110 


B al wt ndte . 6WJ3 
Picvtoes: 59258 


27700 

1960 

4020 

8300 

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444000 440000 
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9100 8990 9090 
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PAGE 18 


Jordan? Click Here 

BASKETBALL Michael Jordan 
Signed an agreement Wednesday 
thatwill put 1^00 the Worldwide 
Web for the nejrt 10 years. 

Jordan could repoi^y earn $ 10 
million in addition to an undis- 
closed advance cash bonus from 
CBS SportsLine. He will answer e- 
mail, conduct interviews on a 
monthly basis, appear in radio and 
TV commercials and provide ex- 
clusive content for CBS SportsLine 
and his on-line fan club. iAPi 

• Kevin Johnson, the Phoenix 
'Suds guard, has changed his mind 
and will not retire diis summer. He 
said Tuesday that he will play at 
least one more season. John^n. ^ 1 . 
has signed a one-year contract 
worth a repioried $8.4 million with 
the Suns. (AP) 

Phillies’ Draft Dodger 

BASEBALL The agent for J.D. 
Drew, the No. 2 pick in this 
month's baseball draft, has filed a 
petition with the commissioner's 
office seeking to make Drew a firae 
agenL 

Agent Scott Boras said the Phil- 
adelphia Phillies. who made Drew 
their top choice, failed to send the 
outfielder a contract within the re- 
quired 15 days. 

Boras is try'ing to use the loophole 
he used last year to free Matt ^ite 
from his obligation to San Francisco, 
the team th^ drafted him. White, 
declared a free agent, signed with the 
expansion Tampa Bay Devil Rays 
for far more money than he would 
have received from the Giants. 

The Phillies say they sent both 
Boras and Drew a registered letter 
offering a standard minor-league 
contract (AP) 

Nike Withdraws Shoes 

Nike will recall 38.000 pair of 
shoes carrying a logo that offended 
Muslims because it resembled the 
word "Allah” in Arabic. Under a 
written agreement Nike also apo- 
logized to Muslims for any unin- 
tentional offense. In exchange, the 
Council on American-Islamic Re- 
lations will urge Muslims world- 
wide not to boycott Nike. (AP) 

Greece Stops Turkey 

BASKETBALL Greece beat Tur- 
kev 74-52 in Gerona. near Bar- 
celona, on Wednesday on the open- 
ing day of the European 
championships. In the other Group 
A game Russia beat Bosnia-Herzo- 
govina. In Group C in Badalona. a 
suburb of Barcelona. Italy beat 
Latvia 85-75 and Yugoslavia beat 
unfancied Poland 104-76. (AFP) 



Greece's Efthimis Rentzias 
shooting over Turkey's Mirsad 
Turkan (6) and Huseyin Besok. 


Iteralo^s^^t&nounc. 

Sports 


THlltSn.AT, JT>*E 26. 1997 


World Roundup 


Brazil Hits 10 Again 
To Rout Belgium 

Irish Advance With Golden Goal 





CempiMbjiOurSl^FiemDi^/aKin 

Brazil scored 1 0 goals for the second 
match in a row Wednes^y to reach the 
quarterfinals of the World Youth Cup in 
Malaysia. Brazil overwhelmed Belgi- 
um, 10-0, in Ku ching . On Sunday, it 
beat South Korea, 10-3. 

In other games in the second round, 
France beat Mexico, 1-0, at Kuching 
and Uruguay beat the United States in 
Shah Alam, 3-0, 

But the greatest drama of the evening 
came in the final game at Shah Alam as 
Ireland beat Morocco, 2- 1 , with a golden 
goal in the fifth minute of extra time tom 
Damien Duff. 

In the quarterfinals Brazil feces the 
winner of Thorsday's game b^een 
England and Argentina, the defending 

World Soccid 

champion. Uroguay will face France and 
Ireland will meet the winner of Thurs- 
day's game between Spain and Canada. 

In Kuchi^, the hrat and humidity 
seemed to wilt the demoralized Beloans, 
whose goalkeeper — Jean Francois GUlet 
— had said be wasn't afraid of Bra^ but 
was hoping Ke wouldn 't have to si^er the 
same fate as his Korean counterpart 

Alex de Souza scored three goals, 
Alquino Alvaro and Roni Santos hit two 
each and Adailton Martins, who scored 
six against the Koreans, hit one to take 
his total for the tournament to 10 goals 
in four matches. 

"It was a game that was never a 
game,' ' said Balkan coach Ariel Jacobs. 
"Even from the first minute, we could 
never reach the height of the Brazilians. 
We were running behind them.” 

"We just had too much respect for 
the Brazilians and we gave them too 
much space,” he added. 

Brazil went ahead in the fourth 
minute with a goal tom Alvaro and was 
4-0 up by halftime. 

"lliey were all over the place. 1 can 
imagine now how the South Korean 
goalkeeper must have felt,” Gillet said. 

Peter Luccin scored for France in the 
final minute, tallying from just outside 
the penalty area with a power^ blast. 

Mexico had the better of the play, and 
France, the reigning European cham- 
pion. seemed content to go for long- 
range shots, which until the 9()tii 
minute, were saved with ease by Mex- 
ican goalkeeper .Alejandro Alvarez. . 

In Shah Alam, Uruguay over- 


whelmed an inexperienced American 
side with speed and superior technical 
and tactical ability from the opening 
IdckolT. 

The two teams sp^ almost the entire 
first half in the American end of die field, 
keying the United States from getting a 
chance on goal until the 28th minute. 

Damian Duff scored a golden goal six 
minutes into extra time after Ireland had 
staved off a sD^ of attacks tom Mo- 
rocco. The African under-20 champion 
controlled the play for most of the game 
but found it difficult to penetrate fee 
Irish defense. 

Ireland took fee lead in the 34th minute 
when Neale Fenn, who for fee most part 
was left alone up ftonu received the baU 
close to fee penalty spot and drove it past 
keeper Thrik El Jarmouni. 

Morocco grabbed an equalizer two 
minutes before halftime when Irish de- 
fender David Worrall kicked fee ball 
into his own net as he tried to clear a shot 
tom Mohamed Jabrane. 

WORLD CUP Bailing an unlikely 10- 
goal defeat in its last ^t-round match, 
Japan clinched a place in the final round 
of fee Asian quaking competition for 
next year's World Cup finals when it 
beat Nepal, 3-0, on Wednesday. 

TWo goals tom striker K^yoshi 
Miura and one tom Akinori Nishmwa 
gave Japan its fifth successive ^oup 
four victory to take it to a maximum 15 
points and a goal tally of 30-0. 

Japan plays second-place Oman in its 
final group match on Saturday. The 
Omani's must win by at least 10-0 to 
overtake the Japanese. Oman beat Ma- 
cau, 2-0, Wednesday. AP. AFP 

■ Baggio Says He'll Leave Milan 

Roberto Baggio said Wednesday he 
was leaving AC Milan, Reuters reported 
tom Milan. 

Interviewed by Italy's RAI television 
at fee Venice airport on his return tom a 
holiday in Argentina, fee World Cup 
star said he had spoken to Fabio 
Capello, who has returned to Milan as 
coach. 

"Capello rang me on fee telephone.” 
he said. "He confinned a bit what was 
to fee air. I'm disappointed a bit, break- 
ing wife fee fans.” 

Baggio, 30, said that no other Milan 
official had contacted him. "When they 
need you, they call you even At home. 
When you are no longer any use, fee 
telephone ceases to exist" 




S'., 
#>.• 


Fans at Wimbledon's No. 1 Court waiting for the rain to stop. After a four-hour delay they saw Monica Seles. 

After 3 Days of Delay ^ Seles Wins 


By Ian Thomsen 

liucnutu^aal HeraU Trihunr 


W IMBLEDON. England — 
After waiting for hours of rain 
to end. No. 2 Monica Seles 
was about to finish off a fiisl-round 
match feat had talren her three days to 
play. 

The suspense wasn't much to brag 
about but still, it was better than watch- 
ing 17-year-oid reruns of games by John 
McEnroe and Bjorn Borg, which the 
BBC had been forced to televise in 
between liveptcturexof people standing 
under umlxeOas. 

So, anyway, she's about to do fee 
Charlie Chan feing. to solve the crime 
and end the case in a stadium full of 
witnesses, and wlut does Seles do? She 
walks across the lawn the umpire and 
. . . asks her to stop fee match. 

It was raining ytt again. The net was 
dismantled, the iatps dragged across 
Centre Court with Seles leading, 6-0, 5- 
2 and deuce m the serve of Rachel 
McQuUIan of-Australiii. 

Shortly before darkness. Seles re? 
turned, played four points, won three of 


them, and returned indoors wife a 6-0. 
6-2 victory. 

At the same time No. 3 Jana Novotna 
of the Czech Republic was winning fee 
first set of her opening-round match 
against Wiltnid Probst of Germany. 

WlMRLlDON 

Probst, however, broke ahead early in 
the second set. raising doubts feat they 
would have time to fmish Wednesday 
night 

It is supposed to rain again Thursday, 
and potentially Friday, arid the weekend 
isn't looking very bright and cheery 
either. If fee weather continues to mis- 
behave, Wimbledon will consider open- 
ing its gates this coming middle Sunday 
for only the second time ever, with the 
show courts to be filled by thousands of 
enthusiastic supporters who probably 
wouldn’t be able to obtain such tickets 
otherwise. 

The firsl match Wednesday on Centre 
Court didn't begin until just after 6 
P.M..; araouoting to a delay of four 
hours; spectators hoping to attend the 
smaller outer courts, which operate on 


The Grudge Match of Mike Tyson’s Life 

An Introspective, “Much Matured' Fighter Prepares for Holyfield 


By Tom Friend 

Nfti' Vark 7im« Smke 


L as VEGAS — The post-penit- 
entiary years; Settled resolutely 
into p^nfeood, our former 
heavyweight champion Mike Tyson is 
commanding up to $30 million a fight 
and spending a generous portion of it on 
dolls. Either he buys fee dolls, he says, 
or his children have fee idle time to ask. 
"Daddy, where’s your daddy?” 

Tyson's father, according to Tyson, 
was a pimp, but feat is for him to know 
and fee children hopefully not to find 
out. In the meantime, his three kids will 
soon be asking about a certain villain 
named Evandcr Holyfield. the man who 
made them cry seven months ago, and U 
would be a help if he could say, "Well, 
I got him the second time.” 

Ofeerwise, it is difficult to tell where 
Tyson's mind is, or if it is on boxing at 
all. All he had in prison was stationery, a 
pen and a reading lamp, and that is no 
way to train. Or is it? The Mike Tyson 
who will stand before Holyfield on Sat- 
urday night at the MGM Grand is either 
at peace or about to be sliced to pieces, 
or both, or neither. 

From the looks of things, he is in 
shape, muscles on top of muscles, but 
from fee sounds of things, be is no 
longer in the demolition business. 

He is still bitter to fee core, of course, 
that he and his camp have been lam- 
pooned, and he does not trust anyone as 


far as he can squint. And there is still a 
bully in there, too. But a layer of his ice 
has melted, and the obvious question is 
whether he has fee rancor to win the 
World Boxing Association belt back for 
a third time. 

"Listen!” Richie Giachetti. his train- 
er, said Tuesday. "Yes, Mike is a much 
matured person. He has a different out- 
]ook on life, a better outlook. But it has 
nothing to do wife fighting! Nothing! 
Somebody listen to me. Why do you want 
to coodemn a man for growing up?” 

Growing up is one thing, but growing 
tired is anofeer. The Indiana prison is 
where Tyson, between meals, realized 
he is and always will be a solitary man. 
His entourage was unavailable, as were 
his groupies, but fee book on Trotsky 
was on his cot, so he devoured it 

”I read a lot of Conununist liter- 
ature,” Tyson said in an interview, 
"and one thing I realized that's so true; 
fee leader is always by himself at a time 
of doom.” 

So, he served three years for rape, 
emerging richer of mind and poorer of 
wallet, but feat was where boxing would 
serve its purpose — financial gain. He 
learned that his promoter, Don King, 
and his then trainer. Giachetti, had had a 
falling out, so he settled on Jay Bright, a 
neophyte, to run his comer. "Maybe I 
wasn't taking it feat serious when I first 
got out,” he said. 

His entourage was under reconstruc- 
tion, too. although those at fee top were 


spared. King and Tyson's co-managers. 
John Home and Holloway, re- 
mained, but tMher loiterers were told to 
hit the road. ”I have no friends, man.” 
Tyson said. "When I come out of pris- 
on, all my old friends, they've got to go. 
If you don't have a purpose in my life, 
you've got to go, num." 

King. Home and Holloway had a 
purpose — stock Tyson's bank account 
— so they stayed. Besides. Tyson has a 
soft spot for them. "Listen." be said. 
"When we first started this together, I 
was going through a divtMce, ( was 
going through a lawsuit with Bill 
Cayton, I was partying and drinking 
every day and I was 260 pounds. This 
was 1988." 

B ut, NOW in 1997, they are not 
as close to him as they once 
thought, (x* as he once thoiighL In 
those first few months after prison. 
Tyson returned to Brooklyn for a dose 
of reality, and gm it. all right. He ran into 
an old neighbor in Brownsville, a man 
his age. wtK>se mother used to say. 
' 'Stay away tom Tyson.’ ' But the man, 
it turned out. had stayed away from 
Tyson, but not from drugs. 

"I come up and this guy is hustling.” 
Tyson said, "and I ask him, 'How's 
your mother and your bnMhcr?* He says 
his brother’s doing good, and I figure his 
brother must be rich, must have made a 
score. But no. he's married, he's got a 
job and two kids. That's doing goed! 





Evander Holyfield, the World Boxing Association's heavyweight chain- 
pkM^ during a training session in Las Vegas. Holyfield will defend his fille 
against Mike Tyson, whom be defeated in November, on Saturday n^ht. 

That was just a wake up call to me. I 
said. 'Life is not about having it all. 

That's just extra.' Man. fee only thing 
that's important in life is your health.” 

Well, feat may or may not have been 
fee reason, but Tyson was married less 
than two years later. Her name is Mon- 
ica, sbe is a doctor, and fee only ihing 
they appear to argue about is whether 
they will hit their three kids (ages 7. 6 
and 15 months and one more due in 
August) when they discipline them in 
the future. Tyson says yes; she says no. 

•'The right age to hit them? I don't 
know. 10 years old?” Tyson said. 

"There's no particular age. I've been 


beaten all of my life. My children, 
they’ve got a mother thai's'a doctor, a 
bright loving woman, a father who'^ 
rich and takes care of them. I had an 
alcoholic and a pimp for parents. 
They're going to have a great life." 

This is fee new Team Tyson, if it i!>a 
team ai all. and so he enters the grudge 
match of his life as an altered and in- 
trospective fighter. It is a new way for 
him to train — check back Sunday 
morning to sec if it is the right way — 
but at least those prison beroks taught 
him one thing. 

Yes. he will be by himself at fee tinK 
of doom. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


MajcB League Standings 

AMfHOUIlUaUi 



EASTOIVISUN 




W 

L 

Pci. 

G8 

Btftimm 

49 

33 

.68) 


New York 

43 

33 

048 

8 

Tomnto 

33 

38 

065 

iS'/i 

Bostnn 

34 

40 

ASf> 

16 

Detmi 

32 

40 

Mi 

17 

CENTRAL DIVISION 



CtevuMnd 

38 

33 

.535 

— 

ChicDge 

34 

37 

093 

3 

Milwaukee 

35 

34 

493 

3 

KonsokCily 

34 

37 

.479 

4 

MliinesolD 

34 

40 

459 

S'-v 


WESTOmSION 



SeoHte 

43 

72 

573 

— 

Anoheim 

40 

34 

341 

2'5 

Tcmis 

34 

37 

493 

4 

Oakland 

31 

46 


13 

lUnoNBLUMUl 



EASTOnnSKM 




w 

L 

Pet. 

GB 

Atipnto 

47 

28 

427 

— 

Ftorido 

44 

30 

J95 

2U. 

New Yak 

43 

32 

J73 

4 

Monlical 

43 

32 

J48 

4'.) 

Phdadclphto 

33 

SO 

JI5 

23 

CENTRAL DIVISION 



Houslon 

37 

39 

487 

— 

Plthfauigh 

35 

40 

.407 

T-» 

St Lous 

34 

40 

059 

2 

CiiKinnoN 

31 

43 

ai9 

5 

CMoipa 

29 

46 

M7 

7’.-, 


'WC01 uiviMun 



Son Frandsco 

1 43 

32 

573 

— 

Cohuodo 

4D 

36 

524 

3'.^ 

L« Angeles 

37 

38 

493 

4 

Son Diego 

33 

43 

.427 

II 


fUESMys umscoais 

AMEMCAM LEAeUE 

Mkmesaln IDO 2IB 000-5 9 0 

OndOlMf 024 004 OOk-IO 13 0 

SiMinilell (4>. FrJMnguez (6), 

Ritchie (7) ondGJWyoRr Jar.WrtqM, Jaceme 
14]. Maaa |4>. M. Joctoon (O) and SXIomai. 
W-Jar.Wrighl lA Stevens O-l. 
HR&— NUimsoia Coomer i«). M. Cankm 
(5>, StDhoviBk (4). Oevekinil Thome (21). 
MaWXIIainsll5),Cn«(6). 

KonsosQlv 000 000 000-0 5 0 

□licago . 022 000 OOx-4 8 0 

PitMey, J. Walker (01 and Fasanw Ahrniez, 
KaiChiW (9). R.Hemandcz R] and 
Pabiegos. W— Ahrarez. 64. L— PitlsICK 2-5. 
Stf— R. Hernandez (18). 

NewYort 001 222 003-12 13 1 

Detroit no oi 2 400-9 14 3 

Mendoa, Mccir (6). Stanton PL NoHon 
(7). Lloyd (8). M. RIvem I?) and Pomke 
□livaies Bautista (S), Mkdl (7). Ml Myen 
(91. Biocail (91, Jarvis (91 and Casanova, 
W— Uoyd. 1-1. L-M. Mycn. IM. Sv— M. 
RwM (24|. HRn-New Ydik. T. Martinez 2 
(35t. Curia (S). DetmiL COHnoW) (2>. NIewK 
19). Easley (10). 

Boston 250 010 100-9 IS I 

Toranta 202 110 000-6 13 2 

Suppan. Hudson 01. Wisifin <6J. Sloaimb 
19] ond Hotteberg; Andu|v, Janzen m. 
SponoM (5). nmHn (71 and B. Saitugo. 
W-Vfcsdm. 23. L-Andu|ar. 0-4. 
Sv-Slocumb {9).Ht L n o j ton Caraopaira 
n 1). Bragq (7], Toranla Coxier (9). 
Bofflmore 051 OM 000-4 I 0 

Mbwoukee 200 000 000-2 4 0 

Bosfcie. Rhodes 14] and Loten Kstnarie 
(7), Felleis (9) and LeviL Sflnpett (S). 
W-RmHr 4.3. L-Koil 2-9. &v-Rhodes 
(1 1. HR-SaHinwre. Inomqlia iS). 

Anoboln 120 000 301-7 II 0 

■hm 300 100 110-4 14 2 


DSOntgOr. Giw (71 James ( 8 ), DetiKio 
( 8 ). PcrM 19) and LeyrilB tCHill WhMe^dc 
(4). Vosoeto 171. X Hennndez (7). 
wetteland (9) and l. RndrigiKZ. 
W— DeLed^ 4-2. L— X. Hernandez. 0-1. 
Sv— PercMI 19). 

Ooklonri 002 0)0 001—4 II 0 

Saotfle 000 000 001—1 S 0 

Konoy. MoMer (7), Taylor (9) and 
(;)a.waiianu,- RoJahman aid Da,W 8 saa 
W— Karsoy. 2-7. L— RoJohnsoiv 11-2. 
HRs— Oaiu MeCwire (27), Ga.Wlltoins (H. 
NJCnONAL L£AGUE 

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SaeRoKBa 02 l ooo (Nk — 4 0 o 

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W-EslOL )0-2. L-OnJocksoa 1-5. 
Sv-Beek (2S). HR-S.F. Bonds (17). 
QlNiAaK 000 003 012 1-7 12 0 

Moirtnfll 010 300 101 0-4 13 0 

Moigon Suirmn (4), RemRnoar (7). 
Beindo ifll. Shan 19) and Pordyce. J. Olver 
(7); CPereL Tenant (4). L Smith (9). D. 
VMS 19), M. Valdes (10) and WMger. 
W-Shaw, 2-0. L— D. Veres, 3-2. 
HR4-GmnMtb EdoJ^erez (41. Momma 
Larsing (11), H. Rodrigiis (14). 
nerido 002 ON 011-4 10 1 

Phladtlptoa no ON ooo-) 4 O 

A.Ldter. Powel Ui. Nan 19) and C. 
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Marlin (7i. Hudefc IB) and Ausinus. 
W— Llebet 44. L-WoB 3-S. HRs— Pitts, A. 
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Attonto 2N IN 200-5 12 0 

NoMYerb IN let 021—4 II 1 


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McMichad (9) and Hundley. W-McMichoel 
4< L-WtohieiL 2-2. HRs-^Ittinlii Tucker 
(4l.NMYoifc,Baeman). 

Odeooi ON ON 110-2 $ 1 

St.uals no 310 IN— 7 IS 2 

MulhoHaid. BeWameW (0. R- Tabs (e). 
Rota (7), T. Adams (0 and Senmbi 
An.BeneL TJJWotheurs (8). Bettion (9) and 
DHeaco. W— AaBenes. 6-1 L— MulhoL 5-8. 
Cetomde 3N IN IDO-4 7 1 

LosAngeles 101 ON 100-2 4 o 

Hobnes. Leskanic (oj and Mamraring; 
Astode. Haifcev (4). Ro(Rnsi 7 (8). Q»»n (9) 
and Piazza. W— Holm^ 3-1. L Astoao. ]• 
7. HR— Colonda L VAAer (22). 

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Moppert 544A24 12. Mart; Breaks 549.750: 


U Pout Stonkewski 509J34, 14 Jvstin 
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I I. Jose Moifci OhBobol Spoto. 2Z1470 
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14 Peter Mitchell, EnghiiM, 191.828 

15 David GIlfDiU Englona IBI.S2D 


NORU COPQUAIimPta 

ASIAN ZONE. GROUP POUR 
OmenZMocooO 
Jopen 1 Nepol 0 

STANDINGS: JoDon 15; Oman IZ NeHl I. 
MaoG I. 

WOUDTOWIHCDP 

2D ROUND 
Brosi iQBeipIvmO 
Uruguay 3, United Stots 0 
France I. McwcdO 
Iretond Z MerocED I 


weoNDYifr 

WEST OOES vs. SRI LANKA 
TUEODAV. W KMGSTOWN. ST. VINCENT 
West Indies lit Innings: 147 
Sri Lanka liilnninos:223 
Wesl Indies 2d mninge; 343 


£> 


Sri Lonko 3d hiring: 231-8 

Teel drawiv ploy slopped due to bod nght 
West Indiee won Ihe serin I -D. 


WlMDLEOOW 

FIRST ROUND 
WOUEHS SINGLES 

Monica Sotos (2). US. del. RaUictMcQuluaa 
Ausinli&64).6-2. 

WfJiHui.rrD 

•AsnAu 

AMCmeAN LEAGUE 

■OSTOH -Stoned OF Mark Pachvi. iNF 
Aonn Capisto. RHP Jell TogHonh, LHP An- 
dren Haztett, RHP Marty .‘i/lcCiMry. LHP 
Thomos Milter. CChed AleviaL LHP Picherd 
OOehe. INF JergeOHwn, RHPOwme Rp, 
bom. OF Dortny Hops. INF David Ectetor. 
LHP Brian Poitenheimer and RHP Joseph 
Thomos. 

CL£VEUUID-Pul OF Dovte one 

RHPCtMdOgoaon)S.dayGlsaDlBdl,5t Rn. 

colled OF Tremdod Hubbard Irom BuKois. 
AA. Bought eentraet el RHP Jorm Wngni 
tmmBirtftLAA. 

KANSAS OTY -Pul RHP Randy Vem ei; 
15-day disabled hsL Recalled LHP Jomw 
Wolkn from Wichito. TenL 
MiLWAUKBE-Fired Ten Inland, mamqn 
rt Tucson of. PCL Named hhlina cooeh Bab 
Monona monoqcr of Tucson lor reimmocr of 
season, 

SEATTLE— Reteosea unconditnnaiiv OF 
Croip GnHcy. 

TEXAS-Adnoted DH WKkey Temclon 

froin is^ioydiscibled MSI. Optioned INF Hon 
iryFnasioOMatMina Cdy. AA. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
ATLANTA— Put OF KCIVl* Lcflsn SR 1 
disobled IBI Boogiri centrect v OF 
Baunsto (rom PictHnorwL il 
CHICAGO -ActotetoO SS SibiiwDr: 
optroned OF .*610001 Cera to towa. AA. 

CINCINNATI-Pul 3B Terry PendtetoF or 
IS'dov deobted fisl Acli^clcd RHP .V'K 
iVlorqon from 15. day disobled bsL Art 
nounced they ore moving spring w onna 
*rern Plord City Fte to SmMlG Fto. Psk 
moico INF Fete Rase Jr to todrontata 
AA. 

MousTON -Rceaibd OF Chuckle CoR f>vA 
Np.y Crtecns. AA. PWO? Rav MontoomtfT 
on 15-dovdnsbh:dKst. 

LOSANCELEV-Put RHP ROfflPn MOrfb*- 
on I s. n^v ffi ii'r* i. 'ti^act a. -e to June 1^ 

PecoUcc RHP V.iw f'arMv (mnj Ata 
ovciauG PCL CcMptiptod C HockoM 
asstonqienr 

FNILAOELFHIA -Pit RnP Motk L«r*f 0* 
iS-dot disobted iisl Recalled RHP 
.V'Odutr frsn ScrjnUR '/.'flfccs Bsnt IL 

SANDlECO-PulLrtPHcelli •AonwJni^ 

flovdiooblcdiisl Bo 4 »ph;eon.*f!ieiofRHPjw 
STiSFI' irrp Los '-.'CpT- PCl- 
SAN FIAIKlfCO -PKOllcd RHP 
Foulkc iTRi Prac-nit PCL. AswnN ™ 
A'ervm Senara u Phoemi. 

BAnunaiA 

NATIONAL BASKETBALL AB90C1AT1N 
BOSTON— Named John Corrtll asswDP 

CLCVELMO -Fired J'n BcytorL ossn®"' 
c wch ond vid'.'O cenidinctc:. 

tmCKBY 

HAIKWAL HOCKEY ^ 

BETtgrr -Signed Ntork Ho w- 3” ^ 
and enmo' ■eapi'C detcisarron C8fl« ■ ■ 
ycarcorlnsct. _ ^ 

NEK VOIK BIANOEOS-Apreed *8 te™ 
‘With o rowpunv NaiMsniuv 


different schedules, were in.ide to wait 
more than six hours, .^nd yet most ut ihe 
seats were filled w'hen Seius and Mc- 
Quillan finally showed up for a first- 
round match feai had oncinally been 
planned for Monday. 

The early evening light w .is as gray as 
itwasforSeles'sappearance inthe 1992 
final, a quick loss to Steffi Graf feat was 
extended to several excruciating hours 
by steady bouts of rain. Wife that 
memory gathered all around her, Seles 
went to work quickly, taking the first set 
in 1 8 minutes. 

iK^en Seleik took (he court, hers was 
one of 30 women's first round matches 
still to be resolved. Seles, \ovotna and 
threeofeersecds were still in limbo. (By 
comparison all but six of ihc men's first- 
round matches had been finished. 'i .Asa 
result all 17 courts were assigned to ■' 
women. 

There was no inimvdiaie rkiom; 
however, for the l6-year*(i!d American. 
Venus Williams, whc«e Wimbledon de- 
but against. Magdalena Gnrybow.ska of 
Poland was scheduled for .Monday. There* 
was no telling when sbe and. many 
others — come outside to play. 


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imERNAIlONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1997 


SPORTS 


RACE 19 


Hawkers 
Of Apparel 
'Smell Gold 
In Irabu 


‘ By Richaid SaDdomir 

* New yprt Tbna Savice 

: NEW YORK — For $12.8 minion 
H i de b Irabu will be eroected to deliver 
nore than laser fastbaus, savage ^lit- 
Jeis and vicEories for tbe Yaidcees. 

* The portly Japanese right'-bander will 

also be relied upoo to sell T-shirts after 
ills expected arrival in the maj nr l^q^pia^ 
after the All-Star Gamte break, fbllow- 
11 ^ two starts at Class AAA rninmhug 
Joe Yankees <^)en a six-ganie home- 
stand July 10, a boon for merchandise 
sellers to capitalize on Irabu's 

^but at Yankee Staa iim. 

- “If he comes oat hot and wins, we 
foel he can get to Nomo Dunibeis,*’ said 
Doug EeOy, president of ^ Player, foe 
appuelmate. 

Z Kelly said tbe burst of success hv 
^deo Nomo in his 1995 rookie year 
produced $6 millioa in retail T-shirt 
Sales by Pro Player. “Li Los Angeles, a 
^ of tourists from Japan were buying 
up a dozen shirts at a mne.** 

Z Starter and M^estic Afoletic also did 
wen wifo Nomo. Reooaiizing Nomo’s 
mpeal, foe oonqmnies ^ve their Irabu 
designs R»dy iw prodnction. But foeir 
metdiandise cannot be sold until Irabu 
has agoed his major league amtract and 
is a naonber of tlte players’ association. 

Kelly added that sakes could not start 
until Irabu had pitched two iniungs. But 
he is n^otiaiing to have T-shirts ready 
for immediate sale as soon as hubn’s 
second inning is coQ^eted. 

“We feel Irabu is a great c^^r- 
tnni^,’’ said Steve Raab, Statter’s>di- 
recttv of special maikets. “I asked foe 
guy in ct^e of puttii^ our Nomo 
pro g ram together h^ big this can be 
hod he said, ’Huge.' “ 

■ FanstCapohianco, director of licens- 
ing for Mqestic, which will pro^ce 
Ir^ T-shro and batting practice jack- 
ets, “Irabu ha* great potential. 
He’s going to be a Yankee. But tiie 
novels of a foreign player was taken off 
a Ut because of Nomo. Everydiing de- 
pends on how he performs.’' 

He added: “Our customers want stuff 
1 ^. Th^ want to sign orders. Demand 
is focosed mainly in tiie New Yodc 
matfe^ but there is interest all ovct." 

. Tn licwnseri tne ndhandiiOft twirw , Trahn 

is a *'hot maricet,” a player <x team 
prodnct that suddenly soars, vfoethear 
It’s NGchacl Jctfdan's temporary switdi 
to No. 45 or “Squeeze the Cheese'' 
shirts for New England Patriots pv- 
riaanx before th^ foced theCreen 
Packers in tire Super BowL 

A hot maritet can last fw a few days, 
wedcs or months, d^rending on the sub- 
ject’s sppeaL success or staying power. 
Often the hot market is earthed in a 
certain city or and cetetnates a 

chanqiionsiip. 

1 In Komo’s case, sales of dofoiagbear- 
ihg his name and im^ lasted throu^ 
foe 1S19S season, during vtiiicb be com- 
piled a 13-6 record and was voted die 
National League's todde cf foe year, 
r Nomo was certauily not the equivalent 
pf a market, sum as the Chict^ 

R nllg ^ d m nnpinnrfiip KnrlheP&elners* Su- 

X Bowl victoiy. And even a snooessfol 

mgirfianriiamg eanyaign will nOt 










if;™";. . *. 






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.. 


HmajBij Mii llll■f^^^ nn R 

The Metsfaortstop, Edgnrdo Alfonzo, rdayin^ throw to to' complete doifole play after fuci^ Mark Lemke. 

Baerga Takes Revenge on Braves 

Game- Winning Hit Eases Memory ofJfbrtd Series Failures 


The Assodaud Pmt 

Caiios Baerga remembered, which 
made it especially sweet 

In three of the four games tiie Gev- 
eland Indians lost to foe Atlanta Braves 
in the 1995 World Series, Baerga made 
the ftoal out — twice wifo Marie 
Wohlers on foe mound. 

Now, Baaga is playing for foe hottest 
team in foe Natick L^igue, the sur- 
prising New York Mets. Toes^y night, 
It was payb^k time. 

*T think it's one of foe best feelings 
I've ever had in my career," he said. 

In foe d^fo inning, Baerga’s two- 
nm homer ti^ foe game. In foe ninth, he 
sla[^>ed a liner to l^-center off Wohlers 
to ^ve the Mets a 6-5 victoiy over 
Atlanta. 

“It was a nice night for me. " he sakL 
“Tli^ had n^r number in the World . 
Series/* 

Baerga’s h^ics gave the Mets their 


sixth consecutive win, including two 
straight over Atlanta, and put them 11 
games over .500 for foe first time since 
July 30, 1991. It also moved New Yodc 
to four games behind foe first-place 
Braves in the EasL 

With Wohlers on foe mound in foe 
ninth, Todd Hinufley walked wifo one 

NL Roundup 

put and Carl Everett singed, Hundley 
going to third. That brought Bae^a, 
who was 0-for-S in his career against 
Wohlos, to the plate. 

“Car-los, Car-los," chanted tiie Shea 
Stadium crowd, lowing Baerga has 
raised his average from .161 to .289 
since Apiti 28. 

His liner over the sbmtstop’s bead 
sccned Hundley with the garzie-ending. 
run, and as he crossed first base, Baciga 
pumped his fists high In the air. 


76ers Cancel Trade for Boston’s Radja 


* ’But $6 miliinn is not a oriall mar- 

ket," Raab said. 


The Anodated Press 

PHILADELPHIA ^ Tbe PhU- 
adelphia 76ers called off a proposed 
trade wifo foe Boston Celtics after 
Dino Radja failed a physical 

Radja, who had knw surgery last 
seasrax, had initially been reluctant to 
take the physical because he was un- 
htqtpy about the trade. He finally took 
the test Tuesday. 

The 76ers had traded forward Clar- 
ence Weafoeispoon and ceater-fex'- 


ward Mjchael Cage to foe Celtics for 
Radja, a 6-foot- 10 center-frxward, in 
foe first deal between tbe teams' new 
coaches. Larry Brown of the 76ers 
and Boston’s Rick Pitino. 

Weafoeispoon and Cage pas^ 
their physicals in Bostrai, Celtics 
spokesman Jeff Twiss said Tuesday. 

Celtics general manager Chns 
Wallace said Tuesday night foe team 
would not have any comment on 
Radja failing the physicaL 


19 Johnson Strikeouts 

Add Up to a 4-1 Loss 

Mariner Is One Short of Record 


RocUas 6, Dodgan 2 In Los Angeles, 
Dairen Hoin^ (3- 1 ), Starting in ptece of 
ailing Rockies ace Roger Bailey, 
pit^^ eight strong inmngs, and Lar^ 
walker hit his 22d hraner in Colorado’s 
victexy. Holooes, noimaily a reliever, 
gave up five hits while vraUdng two and 
strildog out a career-high seven. He re- 
tired 16of die last ISbatteishefrtced. 

llllariiii»4,PhiKasi In Philade4foia, A1 
Leiter allowed only one run in six innings 
and Em l^srareich and Gary Sheffield 
eadi drove in a run as Fkxida handed the 
Phillies th^ nintii loss in 10 games. 

Piraita* 8, Aatras 3 In Houston, Jon 
Lieber pitched seven strong innings and 
A1 Martin and Kevin Young hit back-to- 
back home runs as Pittsburgh moved 
within 116 games of the Central Di- 
visiOD-leadl^ Astros. 

Canfin^7,«idM»2 inSt. Louis, Aody 
BenesaUowed four hits in seven innings 
for his 100th career victoiy and Ron 
Gant broke outof a slump with tiiree hits 
as foe Cardinals won for tite tiuid time in 
four games. It took Benes three tries to 
get milestone win. 

Bmls 7, Expos « In Mtxitreal, Lenny 
Harris singled hrane the wixuilng run in 
foe lOtii mning to sn^ Cincinnati’s 
three-game losing screaLEduaido Perez 
bomei^ drove In three runs and had a 
career-high four hits ftx foe Reds. 

GsMOm 4, PaAos 1 In San Francisco, 
Barry Bonds hit his 17fo homer and 
Shawn Estes won his fifth strai|^t start, 
allowing one run in eight innings in the 
Giants’ victoiy over San Disgo. 

Bonds led ^ foe tiiird wifo his fifth 
homer in six games. Rod Beck pitched 
the ninfo for his NL-leading 2Sfo save. 


.ThrAiucuaedPress " 

Randy Johnson set a record for foe 
rncnA strikeouts ^ an American Le^ue 
left-hander with 19 — and lost. 

“I was more wmied about vtenthra 
to win the g^ than the strUceonta,” 
Jifonson after finiriiing cme 

strikeout shy of the muor league record 
in Seattle's 4- 1 losstoOaklaiidonTties- 
day ni^L 

Mark McGwire hit a 53S-foot home 
run, the hnigest of his career, and a run- 
scoring double to beat Johnson (11-2). 

“V^eu you have a great pitdier in 
Randy Jemoson out foere, you 
pumped uptoface him," McGwire said 

of his fonner UniversiQr of Southern 
Califonua reanirp^ite. “Vice versa, be is 
pumped up to face me.’ ' 

“Strikmt suo^ and low-hit games 
are land of just icing oa tiie cake," 
Johnson said. * “The bluest thing was to 
go out tiiere and win tiie ballgiune." 

Johnson, who leads foe majors tiiis 
season 157 strikeouts, nearly 
matched the mne-inoing recrad of 20 set 
twice Ro^ Gemens, in 1^6 and 
1986 for Boston. 

Johnson became tbe fiffo pitdier to 
fan 19, joining Nolan Ry^ Tom. 
Seaver, Steve CSriton and ^vid Cone. 
Like Johnson, Carlton lost wba he 
struck out 19. - 

Tbe Atiiletics ended a five-game los- 
ing streak and brbke the Mariners' five- 
game winning streak. Seattle lost for the 
first time at ncxne in nine games this' 
nyonth- 

. Johnson struck out 15 in die first six 
innings. .Hie left-hander fanned no one 
in the seventh, but added three victims 
infoeeigt^ 

In the ninth, he had an 0-2 aiunt on 
ieadoff man Scott Brosius, uiio filed 
ouL George W illiams followed wifo a 
home run, thm Johnson struck out Mark 
BellhomfbrNo. i9.Wifoacbancetotie 
Clemens, Jdmson got his last out on a 
fly ball by Jason McDonald. 

“I stni^ out 19 guys," Johnson said, 
“but I still got an *L’ next to my 
name." 

McGwire hit foe Irmgr^ recorded 
home run in die 21-year history of the 
Kingdrane. He connected on a 97 
fast^ into tbe second dedc in left fi^ 
in foe fifth inning. 

It was only the lOfo ball hit into the 
Kingdome's second deck in left field. 
McGwire did it twice in a single inning 
on Sept. 22, 1996. 

tmiIomm 12,.TkpMr»9 Tino Martinez 
hit ins secraidhoine xun.of.the gante, 
matching his career hi gh wifo five hits 
and breaking a ninfo-inning tie at Tiger 
Stadium. 

New YoriE led, 9-3, in foe sixth, but 
Detroit made it 9-9 on pinch-hitter 
Melvin Nieves's three-run homer in tbe 
seventh against the Yankees weak buU- 
pen. 

Martinez opened foe ninfo with his 
2Sth homer and Giad Cnrtis added a 
two-run homer. One out later, Detroit's 
pitcher, Doug BrocaiL hit Derek Jeter in 
foe hand with a pitch, causing the 
benches to clear. No punches were 
thrown, but Broc^ was ejected. 

intfam iWois 5 Jaret Wright won 
his major league debut, Jim TlKnie hit 
two home runs and Sandy Alomar ex- 
tended his hitting streak to 23 games as 
Qeveland beat ^siting Minn^ota. 


Wright, sffli of Gyde Wricht, a 
.fbmm majw league pitcher, was^ 
Infoans’' f^-nwnd pick in the 19^ 
draft Gyde.Wr^t uso made hb big 
^jutssQaiasxtbi Twins, pitching 
a four-hitter for the CalifcKiiia Angels 
on June IS, 1966. 

Wright allowed five runs and seven 
hits in 5% innings. He gave up home 
r uns to Ron Coomer, Marty Cordova 
and Scott Stahoviak.' 

White Sox 4, Royal* O Working 

quickly, Wil^ Alvarez stretched his 
sccxeless smeak to 17 innings as host 
Chi^o beat Kansas City for its fourth 
straight victory. 

Ahrarez, who allowed four hits in 
eight innings, has permitted just one run 
in his last 324^ innings. The left-hander 
has p^ed up his pace on the mound 
ever since an interleague game at Cin- 
c tnnari, when a National L^ue umpire 
told him be would get better calls if he 
wast^ less time. - 

Oriolo* 6, P rowo f * 2 Shawn Bnskie 
won for the first time as a starter this 
season, pitching Baltimore past Mil- 
waukee at CounQ' Stadium. PCtc In- 
caviglia homered for die Orioles, who 
continue to make a runaway of their 
division’s race. 

Rod Sox 9, Bkw Jays 6 Nomar Gar- 
ctapoira' had four hits and scored four 
runs as visiting Boston beat Totoiko for 
its fourth straight victor*- Gaiciapaira 
homered, doubled and singled twice. 

Joe Carter homered as foe Blue Jays 
lost th^ foimh in a row. 

aingoi* 7, Rongof* 6 A pair of pet 
Uamas did nothing to change the luck of 
the Rangers, who lost their seventh in a 
row. It was also Texas's 16fo defeat in 
21 one-run games. Anaheim won its 
sixth straight game as Craig Grebeck 
singled home foe. tiebreaking run in foe 
ninth irmiog off John Wetteland. 

The Rangers' president, Tom Schief- 
fer, had two llamas — the animals arc 
good lock in Peru, he said — Ixought in 
to stand around the batting cage at The 
Ballpark in Arlington during practice. 



i'liin'‘ni*i(ip«n'T1i- lavnalrJ IVrv 

Randy Johnson thanking the fans. 


^DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


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I OCH^TTHIKKHDORBBBNe ONE VOU TELL HIM 
FAIR TO CHARLE 9 , SIR.. WE^RENOTTHlNKINe OF 
— J HIM ..THE NEXT OAT '(OU 
TELL HIM U/E MISS HIM. 




GARFIELD 



^ VOufeE 7 LOVERS AREN^ 
• PLAH 1 N 6 f REAL PEOPLE, i 
8 L 0 \/ERS' V MARGE.. J 
I 6 AME 5 . 5 IR ^ ^ 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 

\(7mS IS AJOBPOR.. 






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BLONDDE 



AMP I'M NOT 00IK6 TO 
TAKE IT LVIHO POWN/ ^ 


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Enteriainiiient 

Appeals every Wednesday 
m The IntcrmarfccL 
lb advenlse contact 
Sandy O'Hara 
in our New York onice 
TeL: (1-212) 752 3890 
Fax: (1-212) 755 8785 
or your nearest IHT office 
or representative. 


USrviEEK&to I ALMOST 
BOUGHT A EXPENSIVE ) 
— < 1 NEW oeess 

fRSALLV? 


BUT A LITTLE VOICE F WsT- 
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PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL mrjtAT.n TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


An Unkind Cut 



W ASHINGTON — You 
have piob^ly watched 
thousands of tours of 
magazioe stows. Have you 
ever wonder^ how they get 
so many people to appear on 
Aem? 1 can tell 
yon tow from 
personal ex- 
perience. Re- 
cently I xe- 
ceiv^ a call 
from *‘One 
Hour With 
You” — one of 
themanynews- „ . 
magazine jho- Bucbwald 
gra^ on the airwaves. 

“We're doing a documen- 
tary on AlHix, the great 1946 
use broad jumper, and we 
understand that you were 
good friends at college. Do 
you mind if we send over a 
television crew to intersriew 
you about him?” 

Hix was my long-lost 
buddy, so I agreed. 

Thirty minutes later three 
men and a woman showed up 
at my apartmenL Without a 
word of conversation, one 
man rolled up my carpet and 
ran cables along the floor. 
Another started to move frir- 
nitaire out of the living room 
and pile it in the kitchen, lire 
third put white sheets across 
the pictures on Ae wall, and 
die woman, who turned out to 
be the producer, kept moving 
my chw around. 

□ 

She said reassuringly, 
“We’ll put everything b^k 
as we found it.” 

“That's good. Do you also 
pay for the broken la^?' ' 
“What broken lamp?" 
“Tbe one that your cam- 
eraman just knocked over 
with his tripod. How long will 
you be here?" 

“We should be out in a 
jiffy — two hours max." 

Eveiyone fiddled some 
more until the producer 


seemed satisfied. 

llie producer spoke, “I’D 
ask die questions. Amie 
Swope, the aoebonnan, will 
be cut in to look as if he is 
interviewiag you.” 

‘Tm ready.” 

“You knw AI Hix at 

use.” 

“That’s correcL He had a 
convertible, so 1 made sure 
that I was a close friend.” 

□ 

For an hour we igticwt 
about what a great athlete Hix 
bad been and what a fine stu- 
dent and what a straight ar- 
row. Whenever I ran out of 
material the producer said, 
“Try to think of more inci- 
dents. This interview is the 
to the stow.” 

Having exhausted the truth 
1 started to tell lies. 

Seventy minutes later we 
had finished, except for the 
reverse shots with my back to 
the camera. The crew attempt- 
ed to put everything back in 
place, but it just didn't lo(A 
like the same apartment. 

The producer thanked me 
profu^y and told me that I 
had given her great material 
and that I would be a smash 
on the show. 

A couple of days later she 
called to tell me when the 
show was due to air, and I 
called all my friends to re- 
mind them to watch. The fol- 
lowing week 1 tuned in to the 
program — and I wasn't even 
mentioned. 

Hopping mad, I called up 
the {ffoducer and asked, 
“What happened?” 

She said, “The people at 
.the network dumped you on 
the floor two days ago. If we 
used everybody we inter- 
viewed we'd have run into 
‘Nightline.’ “ 

Well, you all know toout 
prapie who appear on tele- 
vision. Now you know about 
people who don 'L 


The Two Sides of a Troubled Comedian 


By Sharoo Waxman 

VbslmgioHPostSrreice 


T ^ 


OS ANGELES — There are two 


Lawrentte. One is a wiiy, raunch^ninded, 
fun-talking, off-kilter smartass, a little gi^ 
with a big mouth and a keen eye for a weak 
niOL A guy who ncmetheless wcxildn’t hurt a 
fly, say those who Imow him. The otiier is a 
ranting, incoherent menace. A gun-wielding 
madman. A basket 

The two are locked in battle inside a man 
who a few years ago was ctnimMitiy refected 
. to in the national press as “the next EdtUe 
Murphy” or “the next Richard ftyor.” 

It s still unclear which Martin Lawrence 
will prevaiL One has a bright Hollywood 
career widi a movie coming out next month. 
The otiier aj^ieais to need professional help, 
is unable to control his rage among friends or 
strangers. 

It wouldn’t be the first time that ov ernight 
success, easy fame and untold riches des- 
troyed a peitectly tolerable Hollywood tal- 
enL The Rise and Fall of — take your pick: 
James Dean, Roman Pohnsld, Richard Piy- 
or. River Phoenix — is by now a wrell-wom 
morality tale whose lesson seems never to be 
learned by those who need it most. Money. 
Drugs. Women. Too much too soon. 

In May 1996 Lawrence was detained by 
police afrer being found wandering in the 
middle of a busy L.A. intersection, raving, 
according to a witness, “Fight the power!” 
witii a loaded handgun in his pock^ Three 
months later he was arrested at Burbank 
Airport for^ng to board a plane to Phoenix 
while canying a loaded 9inm Beretta. He 
told police he thought guns were allowed on 
interstate flights. No charges were filed in 
either case. Then last Oettoer, a month after 
he filed for divorce from Patricia Lawrence, 
his wife of 20 months, she won a restraining 
order against him after, among other things, 
she told a judge that he threatened to loll her 
and her fa^y. 

Matters have gone downhill from there. In 
January Lawrence’s TV co-star, Tisha 
Campbell, fried a suit alleging a patteiD of 
sexu^ harassment and battery, which he 
denied. In March Lawrence was anested and 
charged with misdemeanor batteiy for hav- 
ing allegedly punched a Los Angeles man in 
the face twice after they bump^ each other 
at a dance club. A pretrial hearing is set for 
June Lawrence's lawyers entned a plea 
of not guilty at his arraignmeaL His divorce 


recently finalized, Lawrence still 
faces a battle wltii his ex-wife over 
custody of tiieir infant, Jasmin, 
child supp<»t. a prenuptial agree- 
ment tiiat she now contests and her 
Atwiand for living expenses. 

Bat, in the meantime, tiiere is 
this other life. Ilie 32-year-old act- 
or has mtoe a nM>vle, shot the final 
season of “Martin,” his sitcom, 
and appeared in comedy clubs. 

Thie, colleagues and acquaint- 
ances say that he looks pmnfhliy 
thin Qod sleep-deprived. But tirey 
also vouch for Lawrence as a kind, 
haid-wt^dog, setuitive soul who's 
going through something they 
don’t really cndeistaod. 

Th^ say that the Martin 
Lawrence know is notiung 
like the Martin Lawrence sugges- 
ted by the headlines. **He’s one of 
Ihe sweetest guys you ever want to 
meet.** says T<»per Carew, a 
former managerof Lawrence’s. “I 
basically and iinukuDentaliy be- 
lieve he's a good peison.” 

“He stows up to meetings on 
time. He seems noe. Nonnal Pro- 
fessional,” says Barry Josephson, 
a producer who signed LawFMce to 
a $20 m^oo, tiiree-movie tovel- 
opment deal at Columbia Pictures. 

“We have a script that we'll be 
showing Martin soon.” 

But then there are days like the 
one in May of last year, when 
Lawrence was busy shooting 
“Nothing to Lose,” a Disney com- 
edy co-starring Tim Robbins that — studio 
officials report — is “testing through the 
roof.” Robbins plays an upti^t advertising 
executive who cracks when be learns that his 
wife is slewing witii his boss; Lawrence 
plays a small-tinte crook who tries to caijack 
' him. But that day on the set Lawrence was 
having trouble remembering his lines. An 
assistant called his tiien-wife to say the actor 
“was tflnghing hysterically over nothing and 
was unable to stop,” according to a dec- 
laration she filed to the divorce court. 

Erector Steve Oed^erk says he sent 
Lawrence home, but tto actor did not show 
up there until S a!m., according to the dec- 
l^tion. He was up again at 8 or 9 A.M.. 
rambling on about wanting to wash the car. 
He went to the carwash, a gun in his pocket, 
and wandered out into a Sherman Oaks in- 



IM, PUfA^/llr .iMciilni IV>n ' 

Martin Lawrence with Patricia, then his wife, at 
a movie premiere in Los Angeles in April 1996. 

tersectira, screaming and yelling at no one in 
particular. 

Police subdued the comedian and sent him 
to Ctoars-Sinai hospital where a doctor 
announced that Lawrence was “suflering 
from exhaustion and dehydration." A hos- 
pital spokesman later said, “Mr. Lawrence 
was sufrering from a seizure as a result of his 
failure to take prescribed medication.” The 
spokesman dia not specify what medication. 
The next day Lawrence's doctor, William 
Young, who did a toxicology report, said 
drugs were not the cause of the incident, the 
actor was not on prescribed medication and 
he had not had a seizure. 

After two days of rest, Lawrence went 
back to the set as if nothing had happened. 
“The day he came back, he did ascene when 
he’s out on a balcony — it's his most brilliant 


work in fbe movie.” uyi Oedekerk, who 
to being n^stifkd. “When 1 hear 
dieie thi^ it jott jobs oe.” he says. '*li 
really doean’t mesb whb what 1 know «r 
14 hwi Lawrence. 1*ve seen the as 
pnibe , ea^ lo commonical ^vig lt ^ Tm 

tea, bnl I'm OM piivy any of thaL** 

ranee was boni in New York, and fail 

^ moved to Maryland wfaa be was L 

LfisfUber was an Atf Poreeseraeani who 
the family when Martin was 8; his moifa#. 
raised six diildrea working as A cashier. The' 
napoveiisfaed Csmily remuned dose-kait. 

A cfaobby kkl, Martin nicknamed 
*T(»fcer” — ^ used to practice comedy 
lOBtinei on street coineni.aQd, after gradiH 
ath^ frtttn Ugh school, scaned to perform OB 
dieWasUhigtODclubcireiBt. He was noticed 
by a scoot for TV talent show “$qr 
SeaKh” in 1987« prapeUfaig him to Hoi-^ 

1 - - - ^ A mawW ’W 

mapaitmr 
tg N^!” i 

M episodes, 

Re worked the chb^ rmalEy bitting bs 
stride in 1^2 with his in-your-face hastily' 
of HBO's “Def Come^ Janu” a showcase 
of yonxig comic talent- He built Iris nanv on 
a routine filled with unrestrained and — to 
many — ^ offensive scatological and sexual 
jcAes and was criticized Bill Cosby, 
among others, fcff projecting a gutter itna^ 
(rfbiau men. 

If tbe pressures of fame were getting to 
Lawrence, it didn’t show in public, at least 
not until last year. He hired his family mem- 
bers and frioids, buying them houses and 
cars as he grew wealthy. He met fwmer Miss 
Virginia Patricia Southall in 1992 and mar- 
ried her in January 1995. 

It may be that Martin Lawrence doesn't 
think he has a problem. He may believe that 
die negative publicity will pass if he just 
ignores it He has not shown np at any of ^ 
comt bearings related to his allied behavior 
and failed to attend the proceedings of his 
own divorce. A successful mosic right about 
now mi^t be one way to refocus uitention 
from all this nasty stufl*. But >i will do 
nothing to erase any problems. His sitcom is 
finished and there are no films in the worics, 
despite producer Josephsrai’s promise of an 
upcoming script. But for the momeni, at 
least, he still has friends in Hollywood. “I'd 
work with him in a second,” says Oeddterk. 
“He comes from a place where he may not 
go through life behaving as everyone else, 
but he genuinely is a nice guy.” 



PEOPLE 


A SPANISH government crxnmis- 
sion on Wednesday called for Pi- 
casso’s great work “Guernica” to be 
moved to the new Bilbao Guggetoeim 
museum in northern Spain. Officials at 
the Reina Sofia Ait Center in Madrid 
said in May that die delicate state of the 
60-year-old painting precluded its being 
transferred. Bui tbe parliament's edu- 
cation and culture corrunission, awareof 
the importance of “Guernica” to the 
Basque re^on, asked Prime Minister 
Jose Maria Aznar's govenunent to 
move the painting “wheii it is tech- 
nically possible to guarantee its safety.” 
The mural poignantly depicts die 1937 
Nazi bombing of Guernica in die Basque 
country, not far from die industrial ci^ 
of Biitoo. 'The Bilbao Guggeoheim. 
built at a cost of $171 million, requested 
in February that “Guernica" be lent or 
permaDenily moved to the museum for 
Its OcL 3 opening. 

□ 

Marlon Brando gave a 90-minute 
discourse to a polite, if sometimes 
baffied. audience at an enviroiunental 


forum in Greece. Tbe actor, who arrived 
in Athens last week at the behest of the 
shippii^ nu^nate Yannis Latsis, spoke 
at Latsis’ mansion to 800 guests about 
“environmental threats of our time.” 
“I thank you for not snoring,’' Brando 
said repeatedly to the audience, which 
sometimes missed self-deprecating 
jokes in his speech. “You can gossip 
among each omer while I drink t^ and 
recharge,” he said before gulping down 
an cnctre glass of water. He left im- 
mediately after the lecture, while the 
guests stayed for cocktails. 

□ 

Jean-Paul Belmondo will be on band 
for tbe opening Friday of an exhibition at 
the Toulouse-Lautrec Museum in Albi, 
France, in honor of his sculpts father, 
Paul Belmondo, who died in 1982atage 
83, The exhibition, which includes M 
bronzes, 29 works in plaster, sculptures 
in stone and marble as well as sketches, 
is to tour France for the next two years. 

□ 

The Swiss watchmaker Rolex gave 


out watches worth $ 17,000 each to world 
leaders attending tbe Summit of the Eight 
in Denver. Prime Minister Tony Blair 
of Britain turned down die gift because 
he is barred from accepting presents 
worth more than $150, and on Wednes- 
day, bodi President Jacques Chirac of 
Prance and Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 
Germany said they were not keeping 
them. Oiirac will donate his to a mu- 
seum, and Krill plans to return the watch 
to Rolex. The watches, in 18-karat white 
gold, are engraved with the initials of 
each leader along with tbe words, “Den- 
ver Summit of tbe &gbt” Presidmit Bill 
Clinton, President Boris Ydtsin and 
IMine Minister Jean Chretien of 
Canada accqpted diem, although it is 
uodear what they will do wi£ diem. 
Time in Denver to present die watches 
ran short, so Prime Minister Romano 
Prodi of Italy and Prime Minister Ryu- 
taro Hashimoto of Japan uiU get their 
gifts back home. 

□ 

A wateicolor landsc^ie by Vincent 
van Gogh sold for £8.8 milUon ($14.7 


million), mak^ it die most expensive 
modem painting sold in Europe since 
1990, Sotheby's said. '’Harvest in 
Provence” (La Moisson en Provence) 
had not been seen in {Xiblic for almost 50 
years when It was unveiled befrie the 
sale in London, Sotheby’s said. 

□ 

Yves Saint Laurent, who celebrates 
40 years in fashi on next year, has entered 
into a deal te design clothing for the 
2.600 officials at the 1998 Worm Cup of 
soccer in France. Tbe fashion house will 
also hold a parade featuring the cou- 
turier's 40 ye^ of design on tbe day of 
tbe soccer final. Saint Laurent's first 
coUectioa, for the house of Dior, ap- 
peared on the catwalks in 1958. 

□ 

The choreographer and teacher Anna 
Halprin received the 1997 Samuel H. 
Scripps/American Dance Festival 
Award. The $25,000 cash award, es- 
tablished to 1981, is tbe largest dance 
award presented annually. It honors 
lifetime achievemenL 




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AN ELLA FOR LENA — Lena Horae, flanked by Ginny Mancini, left, 
and Liza Minnelli, after receiving the EDa Award, named for EDa 
Fitzgerald, from the Society of Singers at an 80th birtiitby gala for Home. 



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