Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

See other formats



!9M7 



Herald 




"1 




INTERNATIONAL 




PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 





■AipW j The World’s Daily New spapei 

ToOn e ^| President 
^ Re-elected 

0n 2 Amid Chaos 


Kvrrfij 

piidOil ^ ,%■ 
vr. r .s.: 


hV.- 


:-..W . 


In Albania 


Sun .. 
' L - ■ - 
fa use 

iftTti , vr ;„; 

*.>),. .. _ ■ 

Kcu-:. 
G !.■ 

r<4»- L . ■ 


' t, 


"<fc 


Foreigners Airlifted 
From South as Police 
Cordon Off Tirana 


r-e ;• 

•u leL.' ' r . v 
'*3'. :r ’>■! C 


" ‘ By Jane Perlez 

“■ f __ New York Times Service 

TIRANA, Alb ania — In a si gnal de- 
signed to show he is the undisputed ruler 
‘-'o of his rebellious country now unde r a 
state of emergency, the Albanian leader, 


Li <_;• 

sire 

OVC.*.; 


rinj. 

■■Jr 


1J ' 

"7C C. .>~ - . 


‘"-I \l 


..... . 


-TiJ. 


ft. 

: ■ 
ic • • 

Vr . v 

K 1 


H. -• 


•:v: 


Sah Berisha, went ahead Monday with a 
parliamentary vote for his election to a 
second five-year term as president. 

Amid fears of possible shooting be¬ 
tween secret police and civilians, an 
Italian government helicopter airlifted 
■- . journalists and other foreigners out of 
the • southern port of VIore. Tirana 
i ordered all foreigners out of the soutb- 
;• em pan of the country. Anri-govem- 
' meat protesters have homed pol ice sta¬ 

tions and other buildings in VIore and 
the towns of Sarande and Gjirokaster. 
•- [The state news agency AT A said that 

- tanks were deployed Monday evening 
on a highway near Gjirokaster. Agence 
France-Presse reported. It did not 
provide mare information.] 

. .. The French agency also reported that 
■ five peoplewere wounded by gunfire 
v Monday in VIore. Witnesses contacted 
By telephone said that armed men were 
firing automatic weapons at will. 

The state of emergency, imposed by 
Mr. Berisha after the collapse of fraud- 
ulenr investment plans that cost many 
Albanians their entire savings, appeared 
. to have blocked large-scale rallies by 
forbidding more than four people to 
’ ■ . gather in one place. But according to 

scattered reports from southern cities, 
which were cut off most of the day from 
Tirana by severed phone lines, looting 


7. ■ andpHlagingcontinued. 

'. r.;;. Avesi c m envoy s said they^ 
F f - :'!hat_Mr. Berisha. aiipered a 


were told 


u:r v 


5: • . v 


-A 


Iv - that^Mr. BerishaT angled at die dis- 
, ; apicted army and apparently wide- 

spitad'desertion of barracks in the 
' ”. ’ south, had fired the army chief of staff 
' and replaced him with his personal mil- 
•*f; itary adviser. General Adem Copani. 

; ~ ■ ■ - Mr. Berisha. who was asked by West- 
:* era envoys and opposition leaders to 
:■ “ • delay the re-election because it would 

• 'i . risk inflaming an already volatile situ¬ 

ation, was approved unopposed by fel¬ 
low party members in Parliament 
' \ The U.S. ambassador. Marisa lino, 
? - f in a show of displeasure at the state of 
• emergency that a Western diplomat 
V called Mr. Berisha’s “big stq> toward 
authoritarian rule." boycotted the ses¬ 
sion.' 

: 1 As the parliamentary chamber re¬ 

sounded with chants of “Bensfaa, Ber¬ 
isha"* tod a celebratory round of gunfire 
crackled outside the building, the grim 
effects of the state of emergency im- 
: r - posed Sunday night were becoming 
■- clear elsewhere. 

The head of the secret police, 
_B ashkirn Gaveideda, who is in charge of 
- ; the sta te of emergency, ordered road- 

• ■ blocks around the capital in an apparent 

effort to cordon Tirana off from the 
violence in the south- 
- The emergency laws passed by Par- 
; dameni warned that if civilians had not 

L -\ Y surrendered weapons or explosives by 2 
“■ PM Monday they would be shot 
“without warning.” 

. ‘'This is a rebellion of ordinary and 

> \ political criminals who are^ hying to 
topple die legitimate power,” a spokes¬ 
man for Mr. Berisha said . 

The emergency laws ordered all bust¬ 
s’- losses shut by 3 P.M. and imposed an 8 


See ALBANIA, Page 10 


§W f ^^ fl ^YUGOSlAVIA 
KOSOVO 


-rjf 





■*:&, 




. .--T? 


'■fp'i if- 



-ji 




r ::-i 



M 


Bahrain 1.000 Din M*—— 

Cyprus_C.£1-00 JgJ" 1 ?sSflE 

tonmk -14.00 D.Kr- Reis 

Gfcraftar...—.£0o5 JWP- in 00 B 

® 3 ^^ 1 2 + VAT 

- i_250JD UAE..—-10.00»J] 

_—— ■ 1 


.55 c. 


i# T 






Workers from Renault's Belgian plant taking to the streets Monday to demonstrate their unhappiness with 
the automaker's decision to close its assembly plant near Brussels and move production to France and Spain. 


Belgium to Sue Renault Over Closure 

Dehaene Calls for Laws to Prevent Companies From Moving Plants 


By Tom Buerkle 


/nrmtiirKiiu/ Herald Tribune 


BRUSSELS — The Belgian govern¬ 
ment said Monday that it would sue the 
French automaker Renault over its plan 
to shut an assembly plant outside Brus¬ 
sels. and Prime Minister Jean-Luc De¬ 
haene called for new European reg¬ 
ulations to stop multinational 
corporations from shifting plants and 
jobs across national borders. 

The moves came as some 3.500 
Reoanlt workers marched in the streets 
of Brussels to protest the closure, and as 
union representatives met in Paris to 
discuss reports of possible mass layoffs 
by Renault in France. 

At the core of the dispute. Belgian 
unions and government officials have 
accused; Renault of violating Belgian 


and European Union legislation requir¬ 
ing companies to consult worker rep¬ 
resentatives about possible plant clos¬ 
ures and large-scale layoffs. Renault 
gave no warning before announcing its 
decision Thursday to close the plant, 
which employs 3.100 workers directly 
and another 1.000at local suppliers, and 
transfer production to France and 
Spain. 

The dispute has taken on a larger sig¬ 
nificance because of growing concern 
across Europe about the impact of eco¬ 
nomic globalization and the ability of 
companies to move production and jobs 
to low-cost sites. Unemployment is run¬ 
ning near postwar highs of just under 11 
percent across the 15-nation Union, and 
many unions and government officials 
fear that the dismantling of trade barriers 
within the bloc and the prospect of a 


single currency are making it easier for 
large companies to shift production. 


lose concerns clearly motivated 
Mr. Dehaene, who noted that the closure 
“hit Belgium ai a particularly difficult 
time.” with unemployment at 13.6 per¬ 
cent and the January bankruptcy of the 
steelmaker Forges de Clabecq expected 
to cause a loss of about 1,700 jobs. 

He also had a strong personal mo¬ 
tivation because the Renault plant is 
located in his own town of Vilvoorde. a 
northern suburb of Brussels. 

Writing to Jacques San ter, the pres¬ 
ident of the European Commission. Mr. 
Dehaene demanded fresh proposals for 
employment regulations, saying “the 
credibility of Europe is at stake.” 

“It is essential that the liberalization 


See RENAULT, Page 10 


The Polish Question: Am I a Jew? 


By Christine Spolar 

Washington Post Service 


WARSAW—The phone in the one- 
room office in a building in central 
Warsaw begins to ring every Thursday 
just as die sun dips into the soft gray 
horizon. The anonymous callers have 
one secret to tell. 

They think they may be Jewish. 

Five decades after Nazi hatred tore 
Europe apart and eight years after 
democracy broke the bonds of com¬ 
munism. generations of Poles are en¬ 
tering a new age of discovery. Some 
face a puzzle of heritage as they piece 
together newly opened records with 
vague childhood memories. Others, 
listening to dying parents, are shocked 
by revelations of secret adoptions and 
well-meant lies. 


A few bewildered Roman Catholics 
who saw their faith as intrinsic to the 
struggle for a free Poland and to their 
Polish identity now are questioning who 
they are and whom they can trust They 
seek plain talk from someone who will 
not recognize them, expose them, judge 
them. 

They call the Jewish Confidence 
Line. 

“Whai Madeleine Allnight found out 
in America is happening every day 
here,” said Stanislaw Krajewslri, head 
of the Jewish Forum Foundation in Po¬ 
land. a local organization that started the 
help line four months ago. 

Mr. Krajewski estimates that more 
than 100 people have called with ques¬ 
tions about Jewish heritage in the 40 
hours that toe hot line has been taking 
calls. It is available only on Thursday. 


"You know, there are hot lines for 
alcoholics, drug users, people with all 
kinds of problems,” Mr. Krajewski 
said. “Of course, Jewishness is not a 
problem. We do not see it as a handicap. 
But it is an issue that some people here 
have difficulty dealing with.” 

That point was driven home last 
Wednesday when the single surviving 
synagogue in Warsaw was set ablaze by 
vandals in what Jewish leaders here 
called Poland's most flagrant act of re¬ 
ligious destruction in 30 years. 

President Aleksander Kwasniewski 
quickly condemned whai he called “an 
am of barbarity” inconsistent with 
“Polish culture, tradition of tolerance 
and respect toward" places of worship. 

zbudric' 


Rabbi Michael Scbudrich said later 


See POLAND, Page 10 



AGENDA 


Castro Would Grant Asylum 
To Peru Rebels, Fujimori Says 


HAVANA (Reuters) — Cuba would be willing to give 
asylum to leftist rebels who are holding 72 hostages in L ima 
if all parties, including the guerrillas, agreed. President 
Alberto Fujimori of Peru said after talks with President 
Rdel Castro on Monday. 

Mr. Fujimori, on a surprise visit to Havana, said at a news 
conference that be and Mr. Castro had discussed the 
possibility of Cuba’s granting asylum to toe Tupac Amaru 
Revolutionary Movement reoels who have been holding 
toe hostages in the Japanese ambassador's residence since 
Dec. 17. Mr. Castro, he said, had indicated that Cuba was 
willing to take them. 


PAGE TWO 

Chelsea Clintons Broadway Birthday Party 


EUROPE 

EV Agrees on Coals to Cut ‘Greenhouse Cases' 


Pages* 


Tta Amoc&M Cmsi 


President Fidel Castro of Cuba welcoming the Per¬ 
uvian leader Alberto Fujimori to Havana on 
Monday for discusaans on tbe hostage crisis in Lima. 


Books....Page 13. 

Crossword--— ^ *2. 

Opinion....-. Pages 8-9. 

Sports..-.... Pages 22-23. 


International Ctasstfiad 


Ps9*4, 


Clinton Steps Up 
Criticism of Plans 


For East Jerusalem 


Israeli Project ‘Builds Mistrust, 9 
He Says at Meeting With Arafat 


By Brian Knowlton 

Inwmanonjl Herald Tribune 


Knh.hr kao&sdict/Kcutcn 


WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton on Monday sharpened U.S. cri¬ 
ticism of an Israeli plan to construct a 
new neighborhood for Jews in Arab 
East Jerusalem, saying that “it builds 
mistrust ” 

Mr. Clinton was speaking at toe out¬ 
set of an Oval Office meeting with Yas¬ 
ser Arafat the Palestinian leader. It was 
the sixth meeting between the two men, 
but toe first in which other Arab leaders 
were not involved. 

The president’s comments came as 
Palestinians closed shops and schools 
throughout the West Bank, Gaza and 
East Jerusalem to protest the housing 
project. Some Palestinian leaders have 
angrily described the plan, which would 
be the biggest project of its kind since 
1980, as “a knife at the heart” of Je¬ 
rusalem. Spokesmen on both sides have 
warned of an explosive response. 

Mr. CUnton said Monday that toe 
Israeli announcement had created "a 
difficult moment,” but added, “I think 
we can work through it and go for¬ 
ward.” 

“The important thing is on both sides 


to be building confidence and working 
together.” be said. “And so I would 
have preferred toe decision not have 
been made because 1 don't think it 
builds confidence. It builds mistrust.” 

Mr. Clinton's reproach of Israel, a 
close ally, was more direct than the 
initial U.S. reaction after the govern¬ 
ment of Prime Minister Benjamin Net¬ 
anyahu announced its construction plan. 


Egypt's president once again 
refuses to visit Israel. Page 12. 


A White House spokesman said last 
week that tbe decision “further com¬ 
plicates an already complicated situ¬ 
ation." 

Mr. Arafat told reporters that tbe Is¬ 
raeli plan was intended “to squeeze and 
to isolate Jerusalem” but that he hoped 
Mr. Clinton would “push forward to 
prevent it.” 

Asked later how Mr. Clinton might 
pursue the matter, his spokesman, Mi¬ 
chael McCurry. said only, “The pres¬ 
ident indicated we would continue to be 
in contact with all parties, including the 


See CLINTON, Page 12 


U.S. Aide Admonishes 


Japan on Trade Surplus 


Tokyo Urged to Stimulate Domestic Demand 


By Paul Blustein 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON—Deputy Treas¬ 
ury Secretary Lawrence Summers has 
sternly admonished Japan to keep its 
trade surplus from burgeoning anew. 

“Too often in the past, we have 
seen cycles in which Japan’s trade 
surplus has declined, with consequent 
reductions in trade frictions, only to 
rise again,” Mr. Summers told the 
Japan-America Society of Washing¬ 
ton on Sunday as be prepared to leave 
for Asia. * ‘It is critically important to 
all of us that we avoid a repeat of this 
phenomenon.” 

The speech, though diplomatically 
worded, made it clear that Mr. Sum¬ 
mers intends to press the Japanese 
government to consider a more stim¬ 
ulative economic policy that would 
boost domestic spending, increase 
imports and prevent the trade surplus 
from widening. 

“To avoid a growing surplus, it is 
essential to restore domestic demand- 
led growth,” Mr. Summers said. 

The remarks reflected growing con¬ 
cern wi thin the. administration that Ja¬ 
pan’s economy, which has been 
mostly stagnant for four years, will 
remain so because of an overly con¬ 
servative approach to fiscal policy and 


reform of the troubled banking system. 
U.S. officials have often expressed a 
desire for Japan to stage a healthy 
recovery so that its economy will draw 
in more goods from overseas. 

Of particular worry to the admin¬ 
istration is a recent spate of economic 
developments, including a sharp drop 
in the Tokyo stock market, suggesting 
that toe Japanese economy may 
weaken later this year. Moreover, the 
fiscally orthodox Finance Ministry 
has refused to budge from plans to 
raise the nation's consumption tax in 
April, which would be expected to 
dampen consumer spending, arguing 
that despite toe soft economy, Japan 
must avoid deficit spending as much 
as possible so as to save for the cost of 
a rapidly aging population. 

Mr. Summers said, “Fundament¬ 
ally, Japan’s capacity to prepare for an 
aging society depends upon its ability 
to grow its economy by expanding its 
capacity to produce.” 

Mr. Summers bailed toe decline in 
toe broadest measure of Japan’s trade 
surplus from 3.1 percent of economic 
output in 1992to 1.4 percent of output 
last year, but added, “What is crucial 
is that Japan’s surplus, must not again 
be permitted to become the defining 
asymmetry in the industrialized 
world economy." 


Japan’s Public Works: 
Pork-Barrel Paradise? 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Tones Service 


SHINTOKU. Japan — When the 
national and local governments built a 
$4 million “agricultural airport" in 
this small town in northern Japan, 
they said it would allow local fanners 
to get higher prices for their veget¬ 
ables by flying toe products to market 
while still fresh instead of sending 
them by truck, a three-day trip. 

What the officials overlooked was 
that each flight would cost more than 
$4,000 but could cany no more than 
$3,000 in vegetables. 

Moreover, because the planes are 
too small to make it all the way to 
Tokyo or Osaka, trucks are some¬ 


times still needed for part of the jour¬ 
ney, meaning that shipping time is cut 
by only one day. Last year, only 10 
flights took off from toe airport, and 
taxpayers are wondering whether 
their money was well spent 

“It may be good for a children’s 
playground,” Kaypko Omiyo, toe 
wife of a farmer, said. The town gov¬ 
ernment is thinking of turning toe 
runway over for in-line skating, and 
for cross-country skiing in the winter, 
to try to make greater use of the site. 

With their nation facing a severe 
budget deficit, people in Japan are 
starting to object to spending for toe 
public-works projects that have 


See JAPAN, Page 10 


In Japan, a Thriving Business in Illegal Immigrants 


By Sonni Efron 

Los Angela Times 


TOKYO — Japan is awash with modem “boat 
people.” 

Law enforcement officials have been stunned by a 
sudden flood of illegal immigrants, mainly Chinese, 
Koreans and other Asians who arrive in fishing boats 
and sneak ashore in toe middle of the night on deserted 
coastlines in western Japan. 

The police contend that a new alliance between 
Chinese “snakeheads,” members of syndicates that 
specialize in smuggling illegal immigrants into luc¬ 


rative labor markets, and Japanese yakuza gangsters is 
responsible for the surge. 

Before, the snakeheads had been known to charge as 
much as $25,000, cash in advance, to sneak job seekers 
into Japan, where low unemployment rates and high 
salaries have created ideal conditions for low-wage 
undocumented workers. 

Their yakuza partners scout out quiet landing sites 
and use walkie-talkies to help guide the immigrants 
ashore, toe police said. Buses or trucks are waiting to 
whisk them off to the cities, where they quickly find 
jobs in toe underground economy. 

Now, the authorities say. the syndicates have come 


up with a hot new marketing technique: They charge as 
little as $2,000 cash down and collect the rest from the 
immigrant’s family once tbe worker has landed safely 
in Japan. Clients who get nabbed by immigration 
officials don’t have to pay — and many more cus¬ 
tomers can afford to take toe gamble. 

Business is booming. So far this year, officials have 
arrested at least 692 people who arrived on 28 boats, 
beating last year's record in less than two months. 

In the past week alone, ax least five boatloads of 
illegal migrants have landed, yielding 114 arrests and 


See IMMIGRANTS, Page 10 


The Dollar 


WBWYortc Monday 04 p.M. pfavfcw don 


DU 


1.697 


1.6903 


Pound 


1.6175 


1.6295 


Yen 


121.255 


120.225 



441.16 


6918.92 


6877.74 


S&P 500 


change 


Monday O « PJ<. prmjoia chtn 


+4.49 


795.31 


790.82 





BUNE 
11997 
USE 9 


ion,” 
III of 
Vran- 
y of 

Dung 
nnly 
es in 
m. A 
oud. 
>ody 
race 
ietic 

I his 
aim 

ap¬ 

ing 

his 

ape 

en- 

the 

3th 

DSt 

O. 

)lo 

an 

or 

re 

ir- 


y 

y 

e 

e 

e 

y 

i 

f 



























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 


PAGE TWO 


Chelseas Night / A Broadway Birthday 


The Clintons Do New York 




N EW YORK — Presidential historians 
lake note. On Saturday night in a sold- 
out Manhattan theater, six leggy wo¬ 
men wearing black-mesh body stock¬ 
ings, black high heels and little else, undulated 
their pel vises and purred “We want Billy, we 
want Billy.” 

The object of their attention was a character 
named Billy Flynn, a lawyer who specializes in 
courtroom razzmatazz as he gets women off the 
hook for killing their husbands. 

Members of the audience, however, began to 
giggle about a much more famous man named 
BUI. 

They stood and applauded when be and the 
first lady entered the Shubert Theater and took 
their seals for the hit musical “Chicago.” 

The audience seemed to be trying not to titter. 
They failed. The laughter on West 44th Street 
was uncomfortable but irrepressible, the naughty 
mirth of grade school children spying die teach¬ 
er's underwear. 

Such were the unpredictable results for the 
Clintons when they brought their daughter 
Chelsea to New York City to celebrate her 17th 
birthday. 

The Secret Service and the local police, of 
course, did their traffic-snarling best to tame the 
many discomforting distractions that lie outside 
a Broadway theater. Very Iaie Saturday night, 
the police were uns tacking barricades and re¬ 
moving Dumpsters from a scrofulous section of 
West 41 st Street, near the Nederlander Theater, 
where the Clinton family and three of Chelsea’s 
friends were to attend a Sunday afternoon mat¬ 
inee of “Rent,” 

Before the Clintons even arrived at La 
Guardia Airport — they flew in an eight-seat 
GulfctreamjeL while Chelsea and her girlfriends 
from Sidweli Friends School flew in the press 
plane—residents of Manhattan were advised by 
die local news media not to mess with the power 
of die presidency. 

“President CUnton is coining into town for the j 
weekend to celebrate Chelsea Clinton’s birth¬ 
day. We can anticipate frozen zones and closures 
all over the city, ’ * warned WINS radio in morn¬ 
ing bulletins. “Do yourself a favor. Please leave 
that car at home.” New Yorkers, of course, 
ignored the warnings. 

Great stretches of Park Avenue and other 
streets in the “frozen zones” around the Wal¬ 
dorf-Astoria. where the Clintons spent Saturday 


By Blaine Harden 

I Yashmgtan Past Service 


night, were transformed into parking lots where 
people honked tbeir horns and stewed. 

White House spokesmen said the Clintons 
bought S75 tickets for “Rent” because Chelsea 
wanted to see it. The spectacularly popular mu¬ 
sical. tickets for which are next to impossible to 
obtain, is a 1990s retelling of Puccini’s opera 
“La Boheme,” in which Mimi and Rodolfo are 
tragically separated by Mimi’s death from tuber¬ 
culosis. 

In “Rent,” the scourge is AIDS and each of 
the lovers discovers that the other has it when 
their beepers go off, telling them it’s time for 
AZT pills. 

While profoundly entertaining and moving, 
there was much in the Pulitzer prize-winning 
musical to make a 17-year-old student or a 50- 
year-old president wince, if she or he happens to 
be sitting with dad or daughter. This included 
same-sex kissing, simulated sex, banter about 
dildos and m ast urbation and marijuana, and dia¬ 
logue like, “There will always be women in 
rubber flirting with me. Give me a break!” 

With the Clintons sitting in the fifth row of the 
theater and the press pool confined to standing 
room, it was not possible to ascertain how these 
avant-garde moments resonated in the facial 
expressions of the first family. 

It is possible, however, to repeat with pre¬ 
cision that when the brazenly uninhibited char¬ 
acter called Maureen (played by Idina Menzel) 
mooned the audience, she did so at an angle to 
the president and his family that was as decorous 
as allowed by the act of pulling down one’s 
pants. 



Chelsea and President 
Clinton returning to the 
White House after the 
family visited New 
York City for a night 
of theater, restaurants 
and celebration. 


show that traces three centuries of 
hiank music and dance. Afterward, its 

cast treated Chelsea and her friends to 

a birthday and another profes¬ 
sionally modulated “Happy Birth¬ 
day.” 


M eanwhile, back with 

the folks. After the skilled 
hoofing and raffish plot 
of “Chicago” bad run 


W ITH her pants properly on, Ms. 

Menzel — in the middle of ashow- 
stopping song called “Over the 
Moot” — surprised the audience 
by singling out the president to join her in a song 
about a magical cow named Elsie. 

“Come on. sir, moo wife me!” the actress 
implored, gazing at Mr. Clinton. It appeared that 
the president mooed. 

At intermission. Mr. Clinton decamped from 
his seat and effusively praised the play. Twice, 
he called it “incredible,” adding that it was 
“powerful” and it had 1 ‘a real grip on 
people.” 

Hillary Clinton, meanwhile, remained in her 
seat and was immediately encircled by audience 
members who stood at a discreet distance, stared 
indiscreetly and whispered to each other. 

“I wonder if she gets tired of people staring at 
hex?” asked one. 


... . ' - • 1 -■* £.> r i\*:- -s 

• 'i - * . . _ •• • y ■■ .1* 

_;f Vr. * . r"L ; 


“It’s got to be depressing," said another. 

“You can’t even scratch your nose,” noted a 
third. 

At the end of the play, the Clintons rushed 
onstage, shook hands with the actors and listened 
as they sang “Happy Birthday” to Chelsea. 

White House spokesmen said that Chelsea — 
dressed fra New York in black slacks and black 
jacket, with a pale gray turtleneck — did not 
want to attend her second musical of the day with 
the folks. So. on Saturday night, she and her 
friends, joined by a couple of New York girl¬ 
friends, went to an evening performance of 
“Bring In ’da Noise, Bring m ’da Funk,” a hit 


I V I hoofing ana nunso pioi 
J. ▼ JLof “Chicago” had run 
their course, after audience members 
had slogged outside into a cold Man¬ 
hattan drizzle where a phalanx of po¬ 
lice officers shouted. ‘*Ya gotta keep 
moving.” it was that curious eruption 
of nervous, self-conscious laughter 
that lingered in the memory. 

ft seemed wholly unrehearsed- 
Most theatergoers had bought their 
tickets months before and had no idea 
they would be attending a show with 
the first couple. Many said they had 
voted for Mr. Clint on twice and con¬ 
tinued to admire him. 

In that moment, though, when the 
dancers were lubricioosly cooing a 
diminutive of Mr. Clinton’s name, a 
random assembly of Americans found 
that they could not help but laugh at 
their president’s alleged sexual ap¬ 
petites, even as he and his wife sat 
among them. 

It arguably could have been the 
f same laughter that one would have 

heard the president among them 
r': ■7'L.vlir been George Bush or Ronald Reagan 
itikcTbder/iw. or Jimmy Carter — but it sounded 
self-conscious, even pained. 

After their separate theatrical experiences, the 
Clintons met again around a large wooden table 
fra a late supper at the* *21" club. They were 
joined by Senators Edward Kennedy and Joseph 
Biden and tbeir wives, and by the actors Whoopi 
Goldberg and Bank Langella. Also invited was 
the actor James Naughton. who in “Chicago” 
played the silver-tongued Billy Flynn who ex¬ 
cited the dancers. 

Chelsea’s birthday celebration in Gotham las¬ 
ted until shortly after 2 AM. Sunday, when a 
motorcade hauled the Clintons four blocks 
through rain-soaked, barricaded but mostly 
empty streets to the Waldorf-Astoria. 


Cloning Suddenly Has Government’s Attention travel update 


By Rick Weiss 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — The issue of 
cloning research will soon be placed 
under the microscope as the National 
Bioethics Advisory Commission tries to 
help clarify the federal role in dealing 
with the rapidly changing field 

The 18-member commission of ex¬ 
perts in medicine, law and ethics will 
meet on March 13-14 to consider the 
extent to which humans are like other 
animals. Given the recent news that 
scientists have learned how to clone 
adult sheep, it will consider whether 
researchers would be going astray to 
apply some of those techniques to 
people. 

Last week. President Bill Clinton 
asked the commission to put aside its 
current work on genetic privacy and the 
protection of human research subjects to 
conduct an emergency analysis of the 
legal and ethical implications of the 
recent cloning work. 

The task is enormous and represents 
the first true test of the commission. 


which has suffered from a lack of funds 
and an uncertain future since Mr. Clin¬ 
ton created it in 1995. 

Because of tire commission's arcane 
funding apparatus, which relies on an 
atypical degree of coordination among 
several different federal agencies, 
money for its staff and research ex¬ 
penses was not made available until 
early this year — more than a year into 
the group’s two-year mandate from 
Congress. 

Now tire commission must quickly 
change gears and provide within 90 
days of list week's presidential request 
an intelligent assessment of one of the 
most difficult bioethical questions to 
arise in decades: In what ways should 
the federal government involve itself in 
the quickly evolving field of mammali¬ 
an cloning? 

History offers few insights into how 
successful the commission will be. 
Many members of the current commis¬ 
sion have a wealth of experience that 
could help the group succeed. 

Happily, some commission members 
said, the president has not asked for 


specific recommendations regarding 
what to do about cloning — a biological 
feat not yet proved possible in people. 

Instead the group will provide con¬ 
text and general advice, said a com¬ 
mission member, Alexander M. Cap- 
ron. co-director of the Pacific Center for 
Health Policy and Ethics at the Uni¬ 
versity of Southern California Law Cen¬ 
ter in Los Angeles. 

The panel’s agenda has not been fi¬ 
nalized, but a commission spokesman 
said time would probably be allotted fra 
public comment. 

“A big part of the value is that cla¬ 
rifying nmctioQ,” Mr. Capron said, 
“sorting out of what’s real about this 
and what is science fiction, and to what 
extent is this a problem we already have 
means of coping with and where might 
we need to have more regulation. le¬ 
gislation or guidance. 

"If we engage in it carefully and 
publicly, then we'll have heard from 
most of the key people on the subject 
and can be comprehensive in our re- 
port 

One unglamorous but important task 


New Quake Hits Iran as Death Toll Climbs to 965 


Reuters 

TEHRAN — The death toll from an 
earthquake in northwest Iran rose to 965 
on Monday as rescue workers searched 
the mountainous region to assess dam¬ 
age from another quake Sunday, the 
second to hit the area in three days. 

The Interior Ministry said 965 people 
bad died and more than 2.600 were 
injured in the initial quake, the official 
Iranian press agency, IRNA. reported 
from Ardabil, the capital of the stricken 
Ardabil Province. 

As many as 36,000 people in 82 vil¬ 
lages in the region had been made home¬ 
less by the quake Friday, which re¬ 
gistered 5.5 on the Richter scale, it said. 
The quake was followed by more than 


350 aftershocks over the weekend in 
heavy snow and snbfreezing conditions. 

The second major quake, measuring 
52 on the Richter scale, jolted the 
rugged region again, prompting rescue 
teams to search tne area for new damage 
and casualties. 

An Iranian Red Crescent official said 
some casualties were expected In tire 
latest quake. 

Tehran's state-run radio said earlier 
that the tremor Sunday and its after¬ 
shock s destroyed some buildings in 
areas damaged Friday, prompting res¬ 
idents to flee their homes. “Power has 
been cut in most towns and villages.” it 
said. 

Iranian media said units of the army 


and the Revolutionary Uuards had 
joined about 5,000 relief workers in 
rescue operations. 

SeifoUah Vahid Dastjerdi. the head of 
the Red Crescent, said Switzerland, Bri¬ 
tain, Japan and some international relief 
organizations had offered to send aid. 

Michael Schulenburg, the UN res¬ 
ident coordinator in Tehran, said the 
United Nations was trying to mobilize 
international assistance, which Iran had 
said it would welcome. 

“We have a UN team visiting the area 
today to draw up a complete list of wbai 
kind of aid is needed,” he said. “Con¬ 
ditions are bad and as until last night it 
was still snowing, access to villages is 
proving difficult" 


Guards had 
■ workers in 


the commission will try to accomplish is 
compiling a list of the various state and 
federal regulations that already apply to 
cloning and embryo research. The com¬ 
mission may also examine how well 
current restrictions on cloning research 
might withstand a legal challenge. 

Some scholars have recently have pro¬ 
posed that the First Amendment guar¬ 
antees a freedom to think and inquire, 
and that federal restrictions on scientific 
research could be interpreted as an 
abridgment of that right of inquiry. 

With some members of Congress 
talking about banning all cloning re¬ 
search regardless of the source of fund¬ 
ing, questions also arise regarding fed¬ 
eral jurisdiction. 

Usually, the government relies on 
interstate commerce laws to regulate 
private enterprise, but recent rulings 
have narrowed the applicability of those 
Jaws such that tbeir usefulness in ban¬ 
ning embryo research is uncertain. 

Legalities aside, experts said, [be 
prospect of human cloning gives rise to 
profound ethical questions for the com¬ 
mission to consider: 

What, for example, are the potential 
psychological impacts of being bom as 
a genetic duplicate of one’s parent? 

More generally, bow does cloning fit 
in with current regulations that require a 
risk-benefit analysis for all human re¬ 
search, when neither tile risks nor the 
benefits of cloning are well under¬ 
stood? 

Harold E. Varmus, director of the 
National Institutes of Health, said there 
might be hidden risks in making a per¬ 
son from a cell that is already many 
years old. If that cell has accumulated 
mutations during its years in another 
adult, the resulting clone might be bom 
with a predisposition to cancer or other 
diseases of aging. If so, be said, if may 
be unethical to create such a person. 


In Spain, Still No Toro! 

MADRID (AP) — The season’s first 
major bullfighting festival was forced to 
cancel its second day of fights Monday 
because of a strike by matadors and 
breeders.. . 

Hie strike had already led to can¬ 
cellation of the opening fight Sunday at 
the weeklong Magdalena Festival in the 
Mediterranean city of Castellon. 

The Federation of Bullfighting Pro¬ 
fessionals. representing matadors, 
breeders and agents, wants the Interior 
Ministry to change rules meant to detect 
illegal tampering with bulls’ horns. If 
there is no deal, the strike could cause 
fights to be canceled at the next im¬ 
portant fair. Las Fallas, in Valencia, 
which is due to begin Friday. 


Get Off Jet, Taipei Says 

TAIPEI (Reuters) — Taiwan's civil 
aviation chief vowed Monday to end a 
practice of some Taiwan passengers 
who, hoping to win financial compen¬ 
sation for flight delays, refuse to leave 
their seats. 

“In the near future, any passengers 
refusing to leave will be removed for¬ 
cibly from planes by law enforcers, ’ ’ Tsai 
Duoi told Parliament. 

Typically, a passenger angry over a 
delay simply refuses to get offthe plane at 
the destination and demands cash com¬ 
pensation. Such protests stalled six air¬ 
liners last Wednesday when fog closed 
Taiwan’s international airport. Airlines 
say most delays are unavoidable. 


Thai Airways International will in¬ 
crease its Bangkok-Los Angeles service 
to daily flights starting March 30, 
adding new flights Tuesday. Thursday 
and Sunday with a stopover in Osaka, 
Japan, tbe airline announced. (AP) 


WEATHER 



* 


U.S. Balking f «L • 
As Saudis Seek (■ r 

"i 

Plan for Iraq } 

After Saddams 


By Thomas W. lippman 

Wfotorgrwi Post Service 


WASHINGTON — A highdevej • 
defegarinn has gone home to Saudi Ate- Li 
bia without a promise drat some Saudis 
said they wanted: Fra the Clinton arif 
minis tration to begin systematic plaii-j 
ning for the turbulence and probable 
violence that would follow the death or 
ouster of President Saddam Hussein of 
Iraq. 

Instead, the Saudis had to settle fc^ 
unequivocal assurances that the United 
States would continue to keep Mr. Sad¬ 
dam bottled up so he could not threaten 
his neighbors again. j; 

Many analysts say they think - 

Saddam’s grip on power is, if anything , 1 

stronger than it was a year ago. But * 
Saudi official said some members of his 
government believed that tire Dec. 12 
assassination attempt that gravely, 
wounded Mi. Saddam’s son Uaay had 


ns®*’ 


prompted serious thinking about whs* , 
might happen if the Iraqi regime were: jp 


toppled. _L' 

U.S. officials said there was no Saudi 
request for specific action. They de£ 
| scribed the visit of Saudi Arabia’s min¬ 
isters of defense, commerce and peti 
roleum last week as largely informal," 
aimed ai cementing ties between the two 
countries and refocusing U.S. attention 
on a wide array of Saudi security and 
economic concerns rather than on 
reaching decisions. 

Nevertheless, according to a State 
Department official, “It is quite clear 
what they want on the subject of post-: 
Saddam Iraq, and that we understand 
tbe need for it.” 

In statements by Mr. Clinton and 
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, 
who met with the delegation, the ad¬ 
ministration reaffirmed that the United 
States would protect Saudi Arabia and 
other friendly Gulf states from Iraqi 
aggression. The assumption underlying 
their remarks was that Mr. Saddam is 
likely to remain in power indefinitely. 

The commitment to shield Saudi Ara¬ 
bia, Kuwait and other friendly states 
from Mr. Saddam’s ambition has been k 
cornerstone of American policy since a 
U.S.-led military coalition drove Iraqi 
troops out of Kuwait in the 1991 Guff 
War. 

ft represents half of the Clinton ad¬ 
ministration’s policy of “dual contain¬ 
ment,” an effort to keep Iraq and Iran 
bottled up through economic, political 
and,if necessary, military pressure.:- 
Some Saudi officials suggested that 
the visit here of a delegation led by the 
defense minister. Prince Sultan ibn Ab- 
dulaziz, might be an appropriate oc¬ 
casion to look beyond containment —.a 
policy that some analysts have begun to 
say has outlived its usefulness — to 
think about how to respond in the event 
of a sudden power vacuum in Baght 
dad. 

‘ ‘The strategic question is not wheth¬ 
er to keep UN sanctions or lift sane? 
dons” against Iraq, a Saadi official said. 
“The strategic question is this: Saddam 
is not going to last forever. What do we 
do. what arc we t hinking and planning 
for the post-Saddam era?” 

Some analysts of Gulf regional af¬ 
fairs began reporting last year that they 
detected signs of what they call “con-.’ 
tainment fatigue" — a sentiment iq 
some Arab and European countries thgf 
dual containment has failed to curb the 
behavior or change the intentions of Iran 
and Iraq and. therefore, it is time to fry 
something else. * 

One U.S. official said such friendly 
regional nations as Jordan, Kuwait and 
Saudi Arabia had been asking the 
United States fra some time “whether 
we have a vision for Iraq that goes 
beyond dual containment.” 

Aside from espousing the principle 
that Iraq should remain a unified state 
within its present borders and not break 
apart, the answer appears to be, “No.”’* 
Mr. Clinton, Mrs. Albright and other 
U.S. officials showed little inclination 
to get into this area of discussion. They 
stuck to the formulation that the United 
States is committed to protecting Saudi 
Arabia and limiting Mr. Saddam’s abil¬ 
ity to make trouble. 




■s'- ^ ‘ 


met ih 


vr 


t . „ ~ 


* - * 




* — ® +■ 


Europe 


Forecast tor Wednesday through Friday, as provided by AccuWaather. 


V. * 


DEATH NOTICE 


Wind Darkens Sweden 


Classified 

Marketplace 


Monday 

Internationa] Recruitment 

Tuesday 

Education Directory 
Wednesday 

Business Message Center 
Thursday 

International Conferences and Seminars 


EUane Chewier, Colette Drake 
and family regret to announce 
die death of 

LESLIE HENRI GBDEV81ER 
On February 23 at the age of 71. 
A service win be bdd 
Tuesday, March 4 at 11 am 
at Pcre-Lacbaise Chapel 
with the immediate family. 


Age nee France-Presse 

GOTHENBURG, Sweden, 
— About 50,000 people in 
southern Sweden were with¬ 
out electricity Monday after a 
wind storm that also disrupted 
rail traffic, the police said 
Winds of 120 kilometers 
(75 miles) per hour knocked 
down electricity poles, but no 
injuries were reported. 


Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace,'HoKday5 and Travel 


EUROPE 


Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 
For further information contact Fred Ronan In Pare: 

TeL: + 33 (0) 1 « 43 93 91 / ficc + 33 ( 0 ) 1 4-1 43 92 12 


! Exquisite style, witty pnovoca- 
i t * oa ’ right °n the inside track 

I of European government 

If you missed his reporting in the 
John vinocur IHT, look for it on our site on the 
Senior Correspondent World Wide Web: 


BcralbZ$ribu»e. 


TOE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 



reds* 

Tomomw 


HN* 

U»W 




OF 

OF 

OF 

OF 

ASarva 

22/71 

11*2 a 

21/70 

12*3 a 

Anwacajn 

11*2 

9/46 1 

12/53 

8/43 01 

Artuua 

1050 

■5/2* 1 

SMI -10/15 pc 

Atfiara 

17*2 

arat 

13153 

7M4pc 

Be/crfona 

IMS 

ara pc 

19*8 

11/52 pc 

£Wa* 

9*48 

■aw pc 

12*3 

307c 

Be*l 

10/50 

Grape 

1-V57 

fiMBa 

Bn&aW> 

I3S6 

11/52 r 

1353 

7/44 aft 

BuQaprw 

7144 


wra 

«»pe 

Cocannaspn 

6M3 

307 c 

11*2 

era oc 

Cos Del 

2 am 

1050 « 

22 m 

11(52 s 

04*1 

W*7 

era pc 

12*3 

3(3701 

EiMugh 

11*2 

era pc 

11/52 

0/32 aft 

Heronce 

18*4 

11/52 pc 

20*8 

tins pc 

Fm/«ft*1 

11/52 

4/38 B 

12/53 

6/43 pc 

Geneva 

18*1 

BMSc 

17/82 

7/44 pc 

HWW4C 

-IOI 

- 8 / 2 ?e 




W4S 

2*5 PC 

11/52 

7/44 » 

Laa Palmas 

26rt9 

18*4 1 

73/73 

17/62 aft 

LWPan 

I9*e 

12*3* 

1RS4 

12(53 pc 


14*7 

era to 


ara a 


S/71 

5(41 ■ 

20*8 

ara do 


18*4 

11*2 pc 

1 W 4 12/53 pc 


18*4 

8/48 c 

7i m 

ora pc 


1*4 

-022 Hi 

ana 

-5/24 an 


aue 

7/44 r 


6>*3 eft 


21/70 

13*5 ■ 

ZS/71 

1305 pc 

Otto 

Mt 

3/37 pc 

12/53 

-1/31 a 


14*7 

ara »b 

IMI 

8/48 a 


6/46 

4/39t 

13/55 

«43* 

ReyWv* 

5/41 

e /22 c 

aas 

-2/29 C 


18*4 

4/39 PC 


Sr Perwutuy 

1/34 

-3/27 c 

aw 

■4/26C 


era 

032 DC 

era 



13*5 

10*0 r 

18*1 

era aft 


■an 9 

« 2 C 

335 



14*7 

10 * 0 * 

1W 



1356 

era eft 

1081 

10/50 1 


era 

1/3 * fw 

11*5 


ZuBcti 

11*3 

era r 

TG/se 


Middle East 





aons 

18*4 PC 

auaa ■ 

16*4 a 




10*1 

1060 pc 

Cairo 

20*8 

toil 

IMS 

9/48 PC 

DariSKiB 

10/50 

2/35 pe 

11/52 



11*2 

3/37 pc 

1953 

307 C 


28*2 

7. 44 » 



RWfi 

29*4 

18(01 pc 

27(80 

13/56 I 




Fh 


Banpok 

Bontny 
Cateua 
Chang kw 

Colombo 


Ho Cm Minn 
Hong Kong 


I UnaumMy 
cou 


North America 

A frontal system ww br*nj 
unsettled weather to the 
East Wednesday, lottmed 
by s chilly shot In the 
Northeast and tnfd-Attantfc. 
MfW aw wU overspread the 
Plains and Orest Lakes 
Thursday and Friday. 
Stormy oomtao ns w* pre¬ 
vail over the Northwest and 
w e rtot n Canada. 


Europe 

A frontal boundary will 
swing acmes mo northern 
tier wth showera In Betfin 
Wednesday, then Warsaw 
and we stern Russia Thurs¬ 
day. Much of western 
Europe will be mainly dry 
and unseasonably mild 
through Thursday. Unset. 
Bed weather should return 
to London and Paris Fn- 
day. 


ggsno.' 

Asia 

Showers win dampen 8el- 
(kig Wednesday, followed 
by a coding trend. MUd to 
Seoul In to Thursday with 
sIkmwiiu arriving Thursday 
then a ctiUly shut Fnday. 
Un *»f*lBd weather may 
mech Tokyo Friday: other¬ 
wise, mainly dry and mBd. 
SOMoiwbly warm m Hong 
Kong wlih Hsa or no ram. 


Karachi 

K-LufTour 

K-ttwoWu 

Manik 

NWDMN 


TWW* 

HWl LrwrW 
Of OF 
»«s ssrrsch 

20K* 21/70 s 

iaw was 
33*1 19*6 ■ 
31*8 18*4 1 

30*8 raess 
SB** 21/701 
am iMB gc 
32*9 23173 pc 
20*8 IMS pc 
23/73 1050s 
28*2 22/7101 
27*0 11*a> 
31*8 21/70 pc 
27*0 22m pc 
28*2 22/71 r 
27*0 13S6S 
32*8 21/70 pc 

aan« 21/70 ■ 

23*4 21/70* 
1OS0 IS* pc 
13166 4139* 
28*2 22/71 pc 
18*4 12*3 pc 
BM 8 OTSa 
21/70 18*0 pc 


WOT loww""* 
OF OF 
3IIW 23/73 «r , 
32*0 8W7S pe¬ 
ls** 4oe r-j 

31*8 19*6 pc. 
30*8 17*2 pc- 
3301 23/73 pc 
28*4 23/73 pc 
23/73 1702 pc- ' 

33*1 same. 

21/70 17*2 be* 
22/7i 8/48 5 ; 
28*2 23i7a c ' 
28/79 13*5 pc 
32*9 23/73 pc 
28*2 23/73 pc • 

32*5 23 - 73 “ 

27*0 11*2 DC * 
30*8 22/71 c- 
32*9 24/78 pa 
32*8 34/7S pc • 
13*6 307 5 
16*8 9M8 pc 
28*2 24/7Spc 
2V70 17*2 pc 
12*3 M7 T 

»/73 ia *4 pc 


to* v 




r- nr 


t: 4 4T--~ 

?L ; ; 


North America 


T«ds» Turnon ww igw, C-— — 

H*9h L~rw >** Low W W*. liwW hSTTZZw 

OF OF OF OF CT OF S?" 

-307-12/11 PE -307-td/aspc Itne* 307 -11713 m, aco 

23/73 10*0> 30*8 6/43pc IfcjnWW - 3 /Z 7 S™ •J*®* 

307 002 in 9/48 -307 DC Npw aye? ij-f" £2! Jg »■ 

6H3 -405 C 307 -405pc NewYer* 7/44 iSS ^2®** 

Z3tn wane 18*4 9/48PC CMWMO 29*4 ,fl2i £ I2*g 

era -anfli 13*5 oospe Phcnh 24/75 £5“ 

7M4 -W8r 307 -0122 pc San Fran 14*4 tS; 1 SS‘ 

S/77 21/7D7 27*0 18*4» SM8W to* a/37 r 06 

tem 13/55 1 2303 11*2 a Toronto 1W .iXg!, ■*» «3* Ml 

am 10*0 s 74/75 9/46 pc Voncaww 6M3 -’V7 PC 

088 21/re «h 2M2AHBPC Wtottnaai 222 


20*8 sues 
Capa Town 17*2 sms pc 

g«»»«a 34/75 13*5 0 

31*6 B/46 a 
W*. 31*8 24/75 pc 

31/88 11*2 a 

Tu *» 19*4 8M8 a 


31*8 24/75 dc 




Latin America 


rruujHA' 1 -** "'d ■ w I igiWIB 104 .Am ,_T ' 

Loa Angato* gam 1060» 24775 BMepc Voncaww 6*3 'PI -’V7 PC 

Usm 30*8 Zt/raah 2M2 20*8pc | WaMngun ££ 


«W4*»*1« 2*175 lasepe 

Caracas 27*0 21/70 pc 
H" 1 * 38*4 22/71 pc 

««o«»CiW 26/79 Was* 

Woga Janaita 27*0 21/70. 
Senu^o 2964 11*2 a 


' ’ *4*1 2KB pc 


Oceania 


W/75 15*9 c - 

28*2 22/71 pc' 
asm 21/70 r- 
24/75 9/48 pc 
27*0 21/70 C 
26/78 11*2 ft 


; Snt; 


27*0 lanec zanaTia/BGoT 

21/80 22 m pc 26/78 18 / 8 * e ’ 


mm-'-:: 




\ . • 1 


Printed by Nemftu hnenuaionttl. London. Registered as a newspaper at the past office. 










8 SaudUe 8 ' 

_ a, U% 

Bv .. ^ 

* u * v —i«\V i\ 

—^ 4^. 

\SH!N C 7^. 11 

aSoa hi, -r,^ ; 7>v 

.‘!h0U! 2 D. ; .'. ;r V"" r ^IOSa®'W 

for in- -' r - 

wT kf; -- .1 f: - I 4 . . '■ JlW ' PV 

' or : ■•■!■■.■* 


fczd *.h- ^ 

*Vtx.--' .. ..'' 


„ 

Hu. 


'* ::.T • - , L ‘-=I LW * 

«BirJ j-. ■'.''.' ' c ■••* >.r»j, 

.r* *iri .t 

m \r? ■:.:. ihui 
<jI >c: ~ : i.-, ■' ate’5? 



J^ OT •?*■•:■." “J":r 
»«r.i ■.•.-. 

4 * ^ vr.:;- _- •,-.'Z L _V'-' 1E font 

*-*' :;i „■ :;.;-;/^.n- 

^ V > 

n - •=- - 

- • "jsi r. 

;; : :.'= ;• s s* 

-- .'"'“tit: 

.'. * "■• $ Dili 


I fc . . 


iai:r : 


a.'.' ». 


<• 

~-\e 

'* i;. 

^ * 'jb, 

ipi- 




c- 


, .’ T.irjX 
.: i. Aj 




.'.■Li 
.1 ■ J 


... -r. -jCt' 




- V 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 

THE AMERICAS 


RAGE 3 


S 


High Court 
Avoids Debate 
On Mandating 
Use of English 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Sidestepping a 
djto over roeasures requiring the use 
X jg^^ u ASup2«c5«iS 

that an Arizona dispute over 
efforts to make English the official state 
language never should have been 
brought before it. 

-••^ e justices unanimously ruled that 
. ir^° n ? ^sputc became moot, or 
legally irrelevant, years ago when the 
■ st^te employee who challenged an Eng- 
Uai-only amendment to toe state’s con¬ 
stitution left her government job. 
.'.-When the court agreed to hear the 
Arizona case last year, it had been ex¬ 
pected to decide the constitutionality 0 f 
Epgiish-only measures, enacted in 23 
sates. But by the time the justices con¬ 
ducted oral arguments in December, it 
was clear the potential for an explosive 
ruling had fizzled. 

'.During arguments, the justices, in 
questions and comments from the 
bench, had ignored the constitutional 
issues to focus exclusively on two ar¬ 
cane procedural issues—mootness and 
legal standing. 

The court’s ruling, delivered in a 37- 
page opinion by Justice Ruth Bader 
Ginsburg, wiped out lower court rulings 
In the case. 

*' The decision effectively reinstated a 
T988 measure that made English Ari¬ 
zona's official language and required 
-ovemment actions to be taken in Eng- 



POLITICAL/VOTES 


Kim LdmwiiiwThr Wni^rd hrM 


But Justice Ginsburg noted that the 
English-paly measure is the subject of 
another challenge now before the Ari¬ 
zona Supreme Court. The state court 
* ‘may now rule definitively on the prop¬ 
er construction*' of the 1988 measure. 
She said. 

‘ “Once that court has spoken, ad¬ 
judication of any remaining federal con- 
, stitutional question may indeed become 
) greatly simplified.*’ Justice Ginsburg 
said, 

. Arizona voters adopted tire English- 
only amendment to their state consti¬ 
tution, but lower courts struck it down. 
They ruled that the amendment ‘’ob¬ 
structs tire free flow of information and 
adversely affects the rights of many 
private persons.” 

. The amendment said En glish “is the 
language of the ballot, the public 
schools and all government functions 
and actions.” 

It. applied Joallgpvenunffatofficial^^ 
and employees on government business 
and said tire state “shaU act in English 
and jux other language.’!.:'uli.T:: 
-.'There.were exceptions — other lan¬ 
guages could be used to help people 
team English, teach foreign languages, 
comply with federal laws, protect public 
health and safety or protect tire rights of 
criminal defendants or crime victims. 

The amendment was challenged in 
1988 by Maria-KeDy Yniguez, then a 
state employee. In her job, she helped 
people who had medical malpractice 
\ Claims. Many of the people she dealt 
' with were far more comfortable speak¬ 
ing Spanish than English. 

When Ms. Yniguez sued in a bid to 
keep speaking Spanish on occasion in 
her job. she named Arizona as a de¬ 
fendant The stale’s attorney general 
had already interpreted the amendment 
however, to allow such use of another 


Vice President AI Gore addressing the National Association of Counties on Monday in Washington] 

New Frontiers in Fund-Raising? 

Some Political Veterans Assert That White House Went Too Far 


By Dan Balz 
and Lou Cannon 

Washington Post Semce 


WASHINGTON — The care and 
feeding of contributors is an essential, if 
unseemly, component of presidential 
politics, but the Clinton administra¬ 
tion’s systematic use of the White 
House to court and reward big donors 
goes beyond what others have done in 
the past, according to officials from 
administrations dating back 20 years. 

President Bill Clinton said last week, 
"The Lincoln Bedroom was not sold.” 
and his defenders assert no laws were 
broken in the use of the White House to 
help raise campaign funds. 

But veterans of past campaigns and 
administrations reject the “everybody 



Ms. Yniguez quit her government job 
in 1990 for reasons unrelated to the legal 

figta- 

‘'‘.'“At thar point, it became plain that 
she lacked a still-vital claim for pro¬ 
spective relief,” Justice Ginsburg 
yorote. 

Tbe new Congress will consider a law 

making* English tire federal govern¬ 
ment's official language. Such legls- 
. lotion was passed by tire House but not 
the Senate last year. 


Whfie' House coffees arranged by the 
Democratic National Committee^ and. 
the 938 people who were overnight 
guests at tire White House — including 
hundreds of contributors—represent an 
escalation of past practices. 

And George Stephanopoulos, a 
former senior adviser at the White 
House, said Sunday that the Democratic 
National Committee had installed sep¬ 
arate telephones, fax lines and com¬ 
puters in government buildings to allow 
people there, including Vice President 
A3 Gore, to work on political projects. 

“It's like the difference between 
someone who likes to have a cocktail 
before dinner now and then and a guy 
who downs a fifth every night,” said 
Stuart Spencer, who was a political 
strategist for Presidents Ronald Reagan 
and Gerald FordL 

Evan Dobelle, President Jimmy 
Carter’s finance chairman in 1980 and 
now president of Trinity College in Con¬ 
necticut. said: “The world has changed 
in tire sense that people on both sides of 
the aisle have been caught up in a situ¬ 
ation that I'm unaccustomed to and not 
used to. I can’t suggest whether it's eth¬ 
ical, moral or legal. All I’m saying is that 
we didn't do it and we could have.” 

When tire office of former President 
George Bush released a list of 284 
people who spent the night at the White 
House during his four years — which 


included only a few major contributors 
— his spokesman. Jim McGrath, said: 
“President Bush asked me to reiterate 
that there was never any solicitation, 
either direct or indirect, made of the 
Bushes' guests to make political con¬ 
tributions." 

A spokeswoman for Mr. Reagan's 
office in Los Angeles said contributors 
were not invited to stay overnight at the 
White House during his presidency. 
“Family members stayed at the White 
House and a handful of longtime per¬ 
sonal friends,” said Joanne Drake, chief 
of staff for Mr. Reagan's office who once 
worked in the Reagan White House. 
“Use of die Lincoln Bedroom was never 
made available to anyone on tire basis of 
past or future contributions." 

Veterans of past administrations said 
they found nothing wrong with a pres¬ 
ident inviting a wealthy contributor who 
also happens to be a good friend to 
spend the night at the White House or to 
invite occasional contributors to a state 
dinner or to have occasional receptions 
for major contributors, with the pres¬ 
ident posing for photographs. 

“That’s fund-raising. That’s been 
done forever.” said Robert Teeter, who 
was Mr. Bush’s campaign manager in 
1992. Bui be said the notion that others 
have done what the Clinton campaign is 
reported to have done is “absolutely, 
totally wrong.” 

These political veterans also said ten¬ 
sion between those who raise money and 
those who run campaigns is common. 
Fund-raisers routinely had to deal with 
unhappy contributors who felt they were 
not given enough access to snch things 
as state dinners or White House recep¬ 
tions. White House officials often had to 
ward away the ideas of fund-raisers that 
might have crossed a line between ac- 


industries, and congressional leaders told 
corporations not to expect favors if they 
continued to give money tq Democrats. 

Jody Powell, Mr. Carter’s press sec¬ 
retary, said that while Mr. Clinton’s use 
of the White House may differ in de¬ 
gree. it was not a significant departure 
from past practices. **It*s my obser¬ 
vation that almost everybody who gets 
invited to the White House, other than 
members of the family, whether to 
spend the night or go to a coffee or a 
reception, are there either because 
they ve done something to help the ad¬ 
ministration or the administration hopes 
they will do something.” 

Mr. Powell added that he found the 
media frenzy over Mr. Clinton’s fund¬ 
raising excessive. “Has the press just 
discovered that people raise money in 
politics?” he asked in exasperation. 


Washington Mayor 
Seen as Ceremonial 

WASHINGTON — The rhetorical 
mortar shots come by way of intro¬ 
duction to the junior senator from 
North Carolina. 

“The District of Columbia does not 
belong to the people who happen to 
live between its boundaries,” the Re¬ 
publican said. “The city belongs to 
the people of the United States. 

“How many scandals would you 
say we've had in the District these past 
20 years? 500? 600? It’s ludicrous.” 

“I’m thinking the control board 
would become a permanent feature of 
city’ government. And they would ap¬ 
point a city manager,” he said, 
adding. “The mayor would be ce¬ 
remonial, and we could keep a city 
council in an advisory capacity.” 

This product of rural North Carolina 
just got his hands on the District's 
fiscal pulse — Duncan McLauchlin 
Faircloth is the freshly minted chair¬ 
man of the Senate Appropriations sub¬ 
committee on the District — and sees 
no percentage in minding his tongue 
about its sickly condition. 

“It’s time to cut out the euphem¬ 
isms. It's time to stop worrying about 
stepping on toes,*’ he said. “There are 
many privileges of living in the capital 
of the U.S. Voting for mayor simply 
won't be one of them. If that bothers 
you. then you need to move." (WP) 

An Offer to Amend 
Budget Amendment 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
majority leader, Trent Loti, has 
offered to make a small alteration in 
the Republican-crafted balanced 
budget amendment in a last-ditch ef¬ 
fort to capture the additional Demo¬ 
cratic vote needed for passage. 


“If we could make a change or two 
in a minor way that would get us 
another vore or two. we would con¬ 
sider doing that,” the Mississippi Re¬ 
publican told a television interviewer. 

A Senate vote is scheduledTuesday, 
and Mr. Lott confirmed that he was one 
vote short of tbe 67 needed for ap¬ 
proval of a constitutional amendment 

Republican leaders in Congress un¬ 
til now have stood adamantly against 
changing their balanced budget 
amendment. It stipulates that three- 
fifths of members in both houses 
would have to approve allowing a 
deficit in any year and permits 
waivers for national security only 
when the nation is at war. 

Mr. Lott acknowledged that Re¬ 
publican votes might be lost if tbe 
amendment were watered down to 
pick up a Democratic vote. (AP) 

Trade Mission Rules 

WASHINGTON — Commerce 
Secretary William Daley unveiled 
guidelines Monday that he said would 
eliminate partisan politics in picking 
executives for trade missions. He 
pledged to reform a process that critics 
said was riddled with political favor¬ 
itism under the late Ronald Brown. 

Selection of people for the most 
popular trade trips would be made by 
a panel with a majority of career em¬ 
ployees rather than political ap¬ 
pointees, he said in introducing the 
17-page guidelines. (AP) 

Quote/Unquote 

Mark Me liman, a Democratic poll¬ 
ster, on President Bill Clinton's high 
public standing despite the barrage of 
reports on fund-raising: “It’s a fas¬ 
cinating fact If it proves anything, it 
{Moves how out of it the political com¬ 
munity and the pundits are, as far as the 
public is concerned. ’ ’ (LAT) 


Away From 
Politics 

• President Bill Clinton has de¬ 

clared parts of Arkansas a major 
disaster area and ordered federal aid 
for areas struck by severe storms and 
tornadoes that killed 23 people Sat¬ 
urday. He said he would travel to his 
home state Tuesday to view the dam¬ 
age. (AP) 

• A man shot in the head by a gun¬ 
man on the observation deck of the 
Empire State Building has 
awakened from a coma and is likely to 


survive, doctors said. Matthew Gross, 
27, awoke Saturday night, six days 
after the gunman. Ali Abu Kamal. 
killed a member of Mr. Gross’s rock 
band and wounded five other people 
before killing himself. (API 

• Harold Nicholson, the highest- 
ranking CIA officer ever charged 
with spying, pleaded guilty Monday 
in U.S. District Court in Washington 
to selling secrets to Russia for more 
than $180,000. Mr. Nicholson, 46. 
was a 16-year veteran of the agency’s 
clandestine operations directorate, 
where he had access to the names of 
spies working for the CIA and other 
secrets. (Reuters) 


ay Democrats now find Repub¬ 
lican criticism of Mr. Clinton’s cam¬ 
paign practices self-serving, noting that 
the Republican Party regularly has out- 
raised and out-spent the Democrats with 
inventive enticements designed to at¬ 
tract big contributions from wealthy in¬ 
dividuals or corporations. 

During the Republican-controlled 
104th Congress, corporate lobbyists 
helped write legislation affecting their 


Abortion Bill Returns for Another Try 

Clinton Under Pressure to Sign ‘Partial-Birth 9 Measure if Passed 


By Katharine Q. Seelye 

New York Times Service 


WASHINGTON—After two years of 

ac rimoni ous debate in which both sides 
were intransigent, pressure « “ornitog 

for Congress again to pass and Presided 

Bill Clinton to sign a ban on what aides 

mil “nartial-bixth abortion. 

With a bill banning the procedure to 
be reintroduced in the House ttas week, 
and with the Senate to start hearings 
■ b' w ithin two weeks, abortion opponents 
’ saythar recent recantations by an abor¬ 
tion-rights advocate about the fre 

ffigi'SssssrsGSs 

Congress passed the ban . but the Senate 
Medwoverride a 

Tire White House ays 
position is unchanged that 
sig!uten only ^ hmakes^an exref^ 
for women who need to hav JP?5£ 
cedure for health reasons, a provision 
^n^entswihn^t 

re- 

SL^his posing 

ZSfffiri&ns fevered burning 

gSaiss*®* 


! sign the 

“There’s no hiding behind numbers 
at this point, and I think this bill will 
pass ana will be signed,” he said. 

Representative Charles Canady, Re¬ 
publican of Florida, who is to reintroduce 
the House bill this week, said in an in¬ 
terview, “The president is getting in 
more and more of a box on this, de¬ 
fending something which fewer and few¬ 
er people are going to be willing to 
defend.” 

The renewed hope for abortion op¬ 
ponents came last week in the unlikely 
form of Ron Fitzsimmons, executive 
director of the National Coalition of 
Abortion Providers, a lobbying group 
based in Alexandria, Virginia, that rep¬ 
resents 200 abortion clinics. 

He tokl American Medical News that 
he had “lied through my teeth " when he 
said earlier, in an effort to bolster tbe 
aborticsMights movement, that the ‘ ‘par- 
tial-birth” procedure was performed 
rarely, no more than 450 times a year. 

Now he says it is perforated more 
frequently, perhaps as often as 5,000 
times, aim in the late second trimester, 
not only in the third, as he and other 
abortion-rights advocates had led the 
public to believe. He also says it is 
performed on healthy women carrying 
healthy fetuses, not just on those in 
mfriirert emergencies, as Mr. Clinton has 
contended. Neither side is disputing die 
facts that Mr. Fitzsimmons presented. 

Mr. Fitzsimmons’s statements man¬ 
aged to reopen a seemingly intractable 


debate, heartening those who oppose 
abortion and sending abortion-rights 
advocates scrambling to try to salvage 
their credibility on Capitol Hill. 

Both tbe Hoase and Senate voted Iasi 
year to ban the procedure at any time 
except to save the life of the woman. Mr. 
Clinton vetoed the measure, saying he 
also wanted an exception for a woman’s 
health. He called the procedure “a po¬ 
tentially life-saving, certainly health-sav¬ 
ing’ ’ measure for ‘ ‘a small but extremely 
vulnerable group of women,” which he 
put at “a few hundred a year.” The 
House overrode tbe veto with four votes 
to spare; the Seriate fell nine votes short. 

Abortion opponents adamantly op¬ 
pose Mr. Clinton’s health exception, 
saying it is so elastic as to be mean¬ 
ingless. A spokesman for the Right to 
Life Committee. Douglas Johnson, calls 
the president’s insistence on such an 
exception a public-relations ploy to tug 
ai people's heartstrings while diverting 
attention from another of the president's 
conditions — that the ban be in place 
only for the third trimester. 

As Mr. Fitzsimmons asserted, and 
abortion-rights advocates have not 
denied, most "partial-binh” proce¬ 
dures occur in the second trimester, not 
the third. All abortion procedures, in¬ 
cluding this one, known medically as 
dilation and extraction, are legal until 
the third trimester, although several 
states allow exceptions in the third tri¬ 
mester to protect a woman's life and 
health. 


. .i • .* . \ "• •' 

. * ’ . .. . • I*' 

■ . I . . ■••••”■ ,;■*.> .. v • “ 

• • . < ■ ... v • • 

• • •' t . ■ ■*: iv; 

’' " V . f ” i ‘ ’ ' . 

\> l ; 

■ tr* 





If it's good, enough, for a submarine, 

it’s good enough for a Rolex. 

The Twinlock winding crown of a Rolex screws down on 
to the Oyster case to close as securely as the hatch of a 
submarine. Useful whether you're in the deep end 
of the pool or the deep end of the ocean. 




BUNE 

-1997 

UZE9 


ion.” 

ni of 

Vran- 

y of 

oung 

imly 

esin 

m. A 

oud. 

>ody 

race 

letic 

I his 
aint 
ap¬ 
ing 
his 
ape 
en- 
the 
'Sth 
ost 
o. 

>lo 

an 

or 

re 

ir- 

iy 

Df 


y 

y 

e 

e 

e 

y 

I 

f 
















PAGE 4 


international herald tribune, Tuesday; march 4 ,1997 


ASIAIPACIFIC 


Chinese Port City Opens Its Arms Again to the Japanese 


By Rone Tempest 

Lea Angeles Times 


DALIAN, China — At the Beautiful 
Club, a dimly lit basement karaoke bar 
here, silk-gowned Chinese hostesses 
wait mi Japanese businessmen who are 
looking for company. 

In the penthouse restaurant of the 
Senmao Building, an imposing new 
marble-and-glass skyscraper construc¬ 
ted by the Mori Building Co. of Tokyo, 
Japanese diners linger over yellowtail 
sushi and sea urchins. 

At the new Golden Pebble Beach 
Golf Club north of town, Japanese 
golfers—who pay a membership fee of 
$70,000 for the privilege — tee up on a 
rocky shoreline course designed to look 
and play like the challenging California 


links for which the club is named. 

The Japanese are back. 

From 1905 until the end of World War 
H, Dalian was the overseas pearl of im- 


Russia in the Russo-Japanese War. 

At die peak of Dalian's colonial era, 
300,000Japanese lived here, many in the 
European-style villas on the hills above 
the city center. The Dalian train station is 
an exact copy ofUeno Station in Tokyo. 
The courthouse was a copy of Yasudo 
Kodo Auditorium at Tokyo University. 

Arriving air passengers could see “Big 
Japan" spelled out in giant characters on 
the rooftops of this picturesque city on the 
tip of the Liaodong Peninsula. 

Today, Dalian, which is famed for its 
ice-free deep-water port has re-emerged 
as Japan’s cultural and economic beach¬ 


head on the Chinese mainland, even 
though it is separated from Japan by 
1300 kilometers (800 miles), as well as 
die Sea of Ja pan and North Korea. 

A city of 1.7 million that is also home 
to about 4,000 Japanese expatriates, 
Dalian is the key to Japan's campaign to 
win part of the giant China market —a 
nampaign that it seems to be winning on 
many fronts. 

According to the Chinese govern¬ 
ment’s estimates for 1996. Japan is 
China 's biggest foreign trading partner, 
followed by the United States, Hong 
Kong and the European Union. 

Despite vestiges of bitterness over 
Japan's World War II aggression. 
China’s growing consumer class rates 
Japanese products above all others. Ac¬ 
cording to a 1995 Gallup Organization 


survey of consumer attitudes, 6 of die 
top 10 foreign brands identified bv con- 


top 10 foreign brands identified by con¬ 
sumers are Japanese. 

Only three American brand names — 
Coca-Cola, Mickey Mouse and Marlboro 
— made the list. Meanwhile, the four 
best-known Japanese brands — Hitachi, 
Toshiba, Toyota and Panasonic — also 
had the highest product-quality ratings. 

While winning a substantial chunk of 
the emerging market, Japan has largely 
avoided providing China with the tech¬ 
nology transfers that have characterized 
U.S. and European investments in 
China. 

“In general," said Anne Stevenson- 
Yang, director of the Beijing office for 
the U.S.-China Business Council, “the 
Japanese have been very reluctant to 
transfer technology. They view China 


as potential competitor, which most 
U3. businesses do not." 


Train Crash in Pakistan 


Kills 125 and Injures 450 


Cx*fMtyOvS^FrcmDiipim&es 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — A run¬ 
away passenger train jumped the tracks 
in Pakistan's eastern Punjab Province 
on Monday, killing at least 125 pas¬ 
sengers and crew members. 

Another450 passengers were injured 
when the brakes failed on the express 
train outside Khaniwal, about 400 ki¬ 
lometers southeast of Islamabad, rescue 
workers said. 

Hours after the accident, many riders 
remained trapped inside the overturned 
railroad cars, said Shamsbed Iqbal, an¬ 
other ambulance worker. Some of die 
cars had rolled on top of others, making 
rescue more difficult. 

“You can hear the people screaming 
for help, but we can’t reach them.' ’ Mr. 
Iqbal said. “We are having trouble get¬ 
ting to them.” 

The government called in die army to 
help. Rescue workers used torches to cut 
their way into the cars. 

Carrying 1,500 people, the 17-car 
train was en route from Peshawar in 
Pakistan’s Northwest Frontier Province 
to southern Karachi on the Arabian Sea 


See our 

International Reendtuat 

every Monday 


when the accident occurred Monday 
mailing. 

Railroad officials said the train left 
Khaniwal for Karachi but failed to halt 
at a junction, apparently because of 
brake failure, at about 4 A.M. Con¬ 
trollers switched it to a dead-end line to 
stop it from smashing into the Karachi- 
Lahore express train on the single-track 
line and causing even greater carnage. 

The diverted train hit the buffers at 
the end of the spur line near the village 
of Mirshah, about five kilometers from 
Khaniwal, derailing the engine and five 
cars. The engine plowed through the 
buffers into a sand barrier. Two of the 
cars were completely crushed, wit¬ 
nesses said. 

Most of the dead and injured woe 
sleeping in the first five cars when the 
accident occurred, Mr. Iqbal said. 

Prime Minister Mian Nawaz Sharif 
took a helicopter to the scene of die 
accident. He also went to the hospital in 
Khaniwal. where hundreds of people 
had gathered to donate blood. 

P akistan 's train system is antiquated, 
and there are frequent accidents. 

The country’s deadliest train accident 
occurred in 1989, when two passenger 
trains slammed into each other in south¬ 
ern Sind Province, killing 850 peo¬ 
ple. (AP. Reuters) 



hGmjrns (Xb/Ketocn 

LINK UP! — Yasuko Ytinoki exhorting protesters forming a 
human chain Monday around the Labor Ministry in Tokyo to call 
for stronger enforcement of equal-opportunity employment laws. 


Meanwhile, Japan's low-key ap¬ 
proach on human rights issues wins 
points with the Beijing leadership, 
which has been angered ui the past by 
U.S. efforts to link trade with the issue. 

Chasing the market, some of the new 
Japanese investment in the last two 
years has shifted from the Dalian area to 
the richer, more densely populated re¬ 
gion of the Yangtze River delta sur¬ 
rounding Shanghai. Investors estimate 
that in a few years the river basin will 
have developed a consumer pop ulati on 
of more than 200 million people pros¬ 
perous enough to buy basic consumer 
goods. 

But it is herein Dalian — once one of 
Japan’s greatest ovezseas military bases 
arid home of the Manchurian Railro ad 
— that legions of Japanese business 
people and tourists find the most Japan- 
friendly environment in C hina Among 
the tourists are the 16,000 aged mem¬ 
bers of the Tokyo-based Dalian As¬ 
sociation, who frequently return to the 
city they call Dairen to visit their child¬ 
hood homes and schools. 

More than perhaps any other place in 
China, Dalian tends to be forgiving of 
Japanese military excesses during the 
long occupation and World War u. 

- “Historically," said Li Wengfang, a 
young city trade official, “D alian and 
the Japanese people have things to re¬ 
gret But if we kept thinkin g about his¬ 
tory we would have no cooperation, no 
progress. In the end, we can’t blame the 
grandson for the sins of the grandfath¬ 
er." 

Sun Meili, a 20-year-old hostess in 
the Beautiful Club, seemed to agree. "I 
am too young to remember die bad 
things the Japanese did,'' she said. “My 
parents are too young to remember. 
Maybe my grandparents remember." 

The city boasts dozens of Japanese 
restaurants — including at least four 
that rival top restaurants in Japan — 
karaoke clubs and bathhouses. Many of 
the Japanese-era buildings in tire city 
have been restored, including the stately 
Japanese bank buildings that surround 
present-day Zhongshan Plaza. 

Last year in Dalian, die expatriate 
Japanese opened a school for Japanese 
resident children. There are 15 flights a 
week from the Dalian airport to Jap¬ 
anese cities. 

The Japanese Cons ulate , opened 
three years ago, is housed in a villa once 
occupied by a colonel in the Japanese 
Imperial Army. 






5 minutes from museum, shopping area 
and restaurant-. 10 minuses from business 
bean. 271 rooms, executive floor and 
meeting roams up to 1000 persons 
Readers oner free upgrade to executive 
doorfplwMarina Annual WTwta n ei r mxi 
Apollolaan 138-140 
1077 BG Amsterdam 
Tel: (31-201571 1229 
Fax: (31-20) M2 6688 




22 Meeting roams up to 1500 persons 
New lobby & restaurant 
Close to cultural and business centre 
Fairground and airport only 10 miss away 


Horn 
gpi > a c tten 

fcnumn u 


STE1GENB ERG ER 


d&> 

H OTEL DU RHON E 
«*!!»*•* 


Bomb in Sri Lanka Explodes 
Near Lodging for President 


The Best Hotel in Edinburgh 


The Most Famous Hold in Frankfurt 


Best downtown location - Business centre - 
• State or the an * meeting and banqueting 
facilities - Private fas in c\ay room - 
Twu highly rated restaurants 


Geore-Glock-Strasse 20 
40474 DOsseldorf 


40474 DOsseldmf 
Tel: (49-211143770 
Fax: (49-211)4377650 


I Festival Square 
Edinburgh EH3 9SR Scotland 


Td: (44| 131 2299131 
Fax: (44) 131 2296254 


Kaisoplau 
D-60311 Frankfurt. Germany 
Tel: (49-69) 215 02 
Fa*: (49-691215900 


Td: (4 [-221731W 31 - Fas; 141 -22l 732 45 58 


klStONDON 




LUGANO 




wms 


BARIS 




PICCADILLY 


HOTEL 

BEcaag 

* ft ft ft 


LB BIONTOCUX P4LACC 




One aTLoodon's most elegant and traditional 
hauls with style, charm and enginahty. 
Enviably situated in the bean 
of the West End and ovnknldcg Green talk. 
Now an ITT Sheraton Iwel. 


Piccadilly, London. W1Y 8BX 
Td: (44) 1714996321 
Fas : (44) 171 499 1965 


PANORAMA •COMFORT* BUSINESS 
where Swiss Quality meets Italian Hospitality 
131 rooms, fully aircoadjtkiucil, 2 restaurants, 
I American bar. outside swimmragpooL 
paridng. Meeting Fadlmes up to 500 persons 
number efCOUJBW TULIP WORLWIDE 
Via Cation 18. CH - 6902 Lugano 
Tel: (41-91)994 23 32 
Fax:(4I-9ll994 95 18 


... The ultimate luxury in town 


An ITT Shoaton Luxury Collection 



French specialty restaurant. 
Harry s New-York Bar 
For your Meeting & Conferences: 

• Lc rail Palais » Convention Center 


Recently renovated to it's oriental 
splendour, me hotel is located in the heart 
of the city. 168 guest rooms, gourmet 
restaurant, bar, patio.'banquet facilities, 
fitness centre. 

33, avenue Grange V - 75008 Paris. Ranee 
Tel: (33)01 53 23 77 77 
Fax: (3310153 2378 78 


100. Grand Rae Montreux. Switzerland 
Td : i4]-21] 962 12 12 
Fax : (41-21) 962 17 17 


Saint James Paris 


The Only Hotel in Paris 
That Looks Like a Chateau 


Rooms Itura 1600 F 
Tel: 133101 4405SI 81 
Fax : (33)01 44 05 81 82 


The Associated Press 

COLOMBO — A bomb exploded Monday near 
a home where the president of Sri T.mka was 
staying on a campaign trip, killing the man carrying 
it and injuring a bystander. 

President Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumara- 
tunga was not injured by the bomb, which the 
police said exploded about 300 meters (1000 feet) 
from the house in Nuwara Eliya. a resort town 100 
kilometers (60 miles) east of the capital. 

The police arrested a 16-year-old Tamil they said 
was accompanying the bomber. The youth said that 
he and the man killed had found the bomb in a drain 
and that it had exploded when they picked it up, 
state radio said. 

It was not immediately clear if the bomb was the 
work of Tamil Tigers, guerrillas who are fighting 
for an independent homeland in northeastern Sri 
Lanka. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Personals 


THANK YOU JESUS and Saint Judo tor 
answered prayers and hopes renewed. 
SEZ 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S! 


BAREUE AS 24 

AU 4 KARS 1997 
Prtt ho® TVA en devise locals 
(kaduedan tiqxribb but demands) 
Ftamptece les butanes ereariews 


Auto Rentals 


RENT AUTO OERGI FRANCE 
WEEKEND. FF500. 7 DAYS: FF1500. 
TEL PARIS 433 (0)1 43 6B 55 55. 




FRANCE (zone C) en Rtf - TVA 206% 
GO: 3,71 F00*: 2J20 

SCS7: 5,44 SCSP: £25 


OffSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
ASSET PROTECTION 
HflK^tATKJN/PASSPORTS 
TRADE-FINANCE 


Business Services 


Business Travel 


Real Estate 
for Rent 


Lowest Inf I 


Legal Services 


If you enjoy reading the IHT 
whan you travel, why not 
also get it a! home? 


UK an A-TVA 17.9% Paul 8%) 

GO 05324 FDD*: 0,3476 


Telephone Rates! 


isVButineaa dan Frequent Trodere 
WdritWde. lb lo 50% oil. No coupons, 
no rearcUons. impend Canada Tel: 
1-514-341-7227 Fas 1-514-341-7998. 
e-mail address: imperial@togfn.ne< 
hhpAniwJoginjnd^MiW 


Paris Area Furmshed 


ASTON CORPORATE 


ALLEHAGHE (zone 1) DIU - TVA 15% 
ZUEI-G: 


DIVORCE M 1 DAY. No travel Wide: 
Bn 377, Sudbuy, UA 01776 USA Tat 
50BM436387. Fax 5D8M43-01B3. 


in key UK dies 


Announcements 


New York rail 2T2752 »90) 


GO: 1,09 

ZOHEB-I: 

GD 1,06 
2DHH-F: 

GO: 1315 

Z0NEIV-F: 

SCSP: 1.40 
Z0HE/V-G: 
GO: 1JJ7 


TRUSTEES LTD 

19 Peal Rood, Douglas, We ol Mm 
MHilsjes 


SCSP: 1,42 


Tet 01624 626591 


SCSP: 1,40 


Fax: 01624 625126 

E kU No. arionSenlBprtaLflet 


Cal The USA Fima 

Germany _50.33 

UK . J025 

France --SL32 

Swtmtand -HL36 

Sweden -S0-2S 

Saudi Arabia_5089 

Cel far Al Rates 
25% Comntsston 
- Agents Welcome! 


B R I E F L Y 


Taiwan Aide Wont 
See Dalai Larna 


Mercenaries Active 
On Bougainville? 


SYDNEY — Mercenaries are 
participating in helicopter air 
strikes on Papua New Guinea's se¬ 
cessionist island of Bougainville, 
the rebels said Monday. 

* ‘There have been reconnaissance 
patrols in central and south Bou¬ 
gainville, starting from Friday, 
Francis Ona, the rebel leader, said ui 
a statement read out in Sydney by his 
spokesman, Moses Havini. 

One of the two Iroquois heli¬ 
copters fired grenade- launchers on 
suspected military targets on the 
ground on Saturday, be said. The 
rebels said three of the eight heli¬ 
copter crewmen were mercenaries 
hired by Papua New Guinea to help 
crush the rebellion. {AP) 


4,000 Demonstrate 
For Megawati 


JAKARTA — About 4,000 op¬ 
position activists, watched by anti¬ 
riot police, demonstrated Monday 
outside a police station where In¬ 
donesia’s top opposition leader was 
interrogated for a second time. 


Blocked by policemen, hundreds 
more jammed nearby streets to 


Sukarnoputri for holding what the 
government says was an illegal rally 
at her home on Jan. 10. 

“Mega will definitely win" and 
“Mega, the next president," 
chanted the group outside the po¬ 
lice station. One of the dozens of 
banners they held aloft read: 
“Don't sacrifice Megawati." 


For the Record 


A Philippine power company 
cut electricity Monday to the re¬ 
frigerated crypt of former President 
Ferdinand Marcos, saying his wid¬ 
ow had not paid $215,000 in bills. 
The Docos Norte Electric Cooper¬ 
ative says it has tried for a year to 
collect the money from Imelda 
Marcos. (AP) 


Wildlife authorities in South 
Australia on Monday began ster¬ 
ilizing koalas to prevent their over¬ 
crowding on a sanctuary island after 
a public outcry stopped plans to 
have thousands culled. (Reuters) 


AGOCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 


FumtstadI apartments, 3 months or more 
or urfutriBhed, residential areas 


Tet +33 

fa* +33 


M2 25 32 25 

}1 45 63 37 09 


AT HOE N PARS 


Capital AvaOable 


PARIS PROMO 

Apartments to rani lurched or not 
Sales & Property Management Services. 
25 Av Hod* 75006 Pans Fx 014561 1020 


PASSY, we* furnished smafl apartment 
newly redone, 50 sq.m., lufly equroed, 
sumy. calm on courtyard. Wnmum 1 
war nan. No agent R),0G0 per monBi 
Tah owner +33 fl)1 42 30 71 40. 


C01IHERC1AL/BUSMESS FINANCE 
avaSable for any viable projects world¬ 
wide. Fax brief synopsis In Engfsh to 
Corporate Advances, {+H4-1Z73821300. 


M+33 (0)1 45 63 25 60 


Employment 


FDD: 0,61 


KallMart 


FEELHG low? - luring prctlaiB? SOS 
HELP ertsis-frw in fagfsh. 3 p.m - 
Upon. Tet Paris (01) 47 23 80 6» 


TOE WOIDS Puny HCT-BXfBX 


BELGIQUE en FBI-TVA 21% 

Gtt 22JJ7 POD: 10S 
SCS7: 3349 SCSP; 31.48 


EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


H0LLAME fzsneZ)MJSn - TVA 17.5% 
GO: 1244 H» 0.7B8 

SCS7: 1547 ' SCSP: 1.787 


PROJECT FINANCE 08TAMABLE 
Ten tear bans at 5J% 

USD $5 to 5150 MBon 
Botha htmaSon al Bank Hut 
Queensland. Fax 817 55 943 BM 


Tet 1-407-777-4222 Fate 1-407-777-6411 
WpJjypnjomtagmart 


Financial Services 


4ft, PUCE OES VOSGES (NEAR) Hi 
historically-classed butkfing. beaidtfid 
studio on cobbled stoned and treed 
courtyard, equipped tertian, bathroom. 
F5£70 no. Tel: +33 |0)1 45 B9 92 52. 


Educational Positions AvaHabb 


CLOSE LOUVJff, My equeped studo 

r asa- Start or long term Tet owner 
[0)142963967. Fate (0)148614724. 


FRANCK 


UaaBOUHG en LUFfl ■ TVA 15% 
GO: 1957 


PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR Surveflsnce 
& Personal Security. Extremely discreet 
& confidential Tat -*44 (0)BQ2 409305 
(TSgiaSy Secure) 


EXPERIENCED 8 quaOed ER readier 
"Orking pepera tor professoral fen- 

0243, HT, 92S2) NaAy Cedar, Fra*? 


FUNDING PR0BLSIS? 


Atteiyitoiv 
EFL Tmciums 


Telecommunications 


ESPAGNE tone A) en PTASMVA16% 
GO: 84,83 

SC97: 102,41 SCSP: 103L28 


YOUR 0FHCE K LONDON 

Band Street - Man. Phone, Fax, Tetox 

Tet 44 171 499 91S2 Fax 171 499 7517 


VENTURE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 


prmruiv'Mu. i 


tbe monurs ana 


uue 


ItaterMfrB ana 

I FRENCH COURSES I 


PtwAthUSm 

GfOtp MW LM&on, 


FRENCH RIVIERA 
Cannes. 

mwtttut Francaiw RMra 


For information 
regarding our 1996-97 
“Newspaper in the Classroom” 
materials please contact: 


Business Opportunities 


F-UCMOO CANNES 
rat- 3M/eaeeaso) 
Fax 394 f as n 28 37 


Emuje Leveau 
Educahoiyal 
Services 
Department 


GUARANIES) PROFIT SHARING 
Assat bached a6er hough 
Safes Tradhg Corp. 

For farther mla pteese tax 
*41-31-819-8831 (Tel: -883Q 


Telephone 

Conferencing 

hUti-ratioral 
Conference 
al US Rales 
*AT&TQuaHy 
* No Minimums 


Serviced Offices 


Long term cobtetal 
Supported fllHU Wt UBS 
rrts ac n earned orty itpon Fintteig) 
fcabto guarartees to secure hrndhg 
tw write prefects oranged by: 


PLANNING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED aiw 

Pkx» your Ad quiddy and easily, contact your neareS 
representative with your text You will KTTJt5 a,Bi j r i* *■ 
ond on^ay^tt if S •* *• cos) 

m 48 hours. All major Credit Cords AccejSS ™ ^ a P pear 


BANCOR 


WorhHWtte 
Business Centres 
HeMwk® 



OF ASIA 


GREAT BRITAIN 







START YOUR 
BUSINESS TODAY! 


Brokets Comnfeeton Asaied 


nmwiaBiiomwnM 


A UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

Bac^ietof’s/Masler's/Doctorates 
andfor Profiassorial status 


FB0C 44181 3361697 
or Phone: 44 in 9478924 


181 Avenue Charles-de-Caalle 
92521 NeuiDj Cedes - France 
TeL 33 1 4-143 94 39 
Fax.-33 1 4-143 92 26 j 


LENDNGIIJQAIG FUNDING BANK 
Taring, dosing, dtebusing, defat tree, 
sal IqufdaSng ban (LOJ + FureBa es- 
febfciTOent bond + tank leas requestsA. 
Fee (490) 21Z281.44J5. 


Where Sfendante an Set. not Met! 

Tel: L206£89.1991 


Business addresses, toirched efflees. 
meeting tetiEdes ire Awtria, Brigkaa, 
France, Genaen, Great Britain, My, 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Pteese txnaa: Sales Ofloe In Zurt* 1 Parfc and Suburbs 


Fax: 120L599.1981 

Ere* hfafitafibadLCOta 

wmeMbacfexon 


OFFSHORE COWAHB. far tree tro- 
rtw or sMca 1st London 441B1741 
1224 Fax 44 161 748 655816336 
WMpptaUMJ* 


Came see us at CefflT 57 
Hafi II, Sand C40. Booth be 
H wwrer, Getmony March 13-19 


Tel. -<41-1 214 62 62 
Fax +41-1 214 65 19 


E-Uti 101527jaiiecompwwvJMTi 


EZCEPTKMAL, MARLY LE R0I 
nUfVERSAUES 
Wi cart tauffi, 400 sqm hng 
bbcc. Proteafcnal use poseUe, 
QHCO n 1 39 16 37 37 


bjrohe 

«ANCE9IC):Rto, 

Td.: »1] 41 43 93 8S, 

Fme {01)4143 93 70. 

tmoS: OmdiectOh can 

GBMANY. AUSTRIA & CENTRAL 
UWOre. FrerUwi, 

TdL (OS9|97I2SOO 
fac (069| 97125030. 

Td.: (02) 341*3509, (02) 344-0117 
fax(02)34WUS3. 

GREECE A CYRHIS: A hn 
Td.: 301/68 SI S25 ' 

Fnc 301/68 S3 357 

Copanhogai 

Id:31 42 9335; 
"NWOfHdik*. 

Td-358 9 60S338. 
fnK 358 9 646 508. 

MLttMbto. 

Td :5831573a 
fwc 583 20938. 

Td- 31 20 6841080. 
fan. 31 20 6881374. 

NORWAY &SWB»t 

fa* (47) 55 913072. 


POBOtGAL-lib^ 

I*- ^51-1 -457-7293. 
Fac 351-1 457-7352. 

SWUhtModnj^ 

Td: 4572858. 
fa* 4 58607a 
SWnZBttAND: Pkdy 
Td. (021)728 30 21. 
tK’l 728 3091. 
U ^W4GOOI*l ax J Q _ 

Jd-t0171)836^m 
fa« (0171)4200338 

The 2620QO. 


NORTH AM^aCA 


wwYomt 

Td: (212) 752-3890. 
^■^■^1572-7212 
fa* R12175S87H5 


., s 4 ■ 


r. • x4 


TAIPEI—Foreign Minister John 
Chang, in another to avo^ 

mgeiSig China, said Monday he 
would IK* meet with the 
diSig the exiled Tibetan Buddhist 

leader’s trip toTaiwan. 

The presidential office aJ«> 
denied a newspaper report that 
President Lee TLmg-hu, ‘would 

meet with the Tibetan 
during his six-day visit, scheduled 
for March 22. 

Mr. Chang, who spoke to re¬ 
porters after he left an unrelated 
meeting, said Taiwan should not 
overpoliticize the Dalai 
visit or it could jeopardize already 
icy relations between Taipei- and 
BeijSr - -(Outers) 


^«A/PACffic 

HONCKQNG; 

1* (M2) 2922-1(88. 
I****! 170 H1HX. 
fa* (85212922-1190. 


SMGAKXE: 

Td.: 223 td78, 
*f(W) 224|5«L 
t “bk 28749. HI sw 


<*> 


' s ■ * . 


isniay 5 4 P.M. Z> 

















LLuULiNk 




[IJDC11J 


IT 

BUNE 

,1997 

1GE9 


The International Herald Tribune 
is owned by The New York Times and 
The Washington Post, America’s two 
most prestigious newspapers. 

In addition to having instant 
access to their coverage, we have 
assembled a staff of selected journalists 
all over the world to bring you a view 
that is distinctly multinational. 

And with the availability of every 
newswire service, it all adds up to the 
world’s most extensive news-gathering 
network. 

No other publication can match 
our resources. 


So if you’re interested in 
commerce, in finance, in industry, in 
politics, or if you need to know what 
the world’s strongest economy thi nks 
about events in the rest of the world, 
make sure you get your copy of the 
International Herald Tribune. Every day. 

To subscribe, call us at: 

Europe/ 

Middle East/Africa : +33 1 41 43 93 6 1 
Asia : +852 29 22 11 88 
The Americas : +800 882 2884 


Hera lb 


INTERNATIONAL 


tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 

















PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 


EUROPE 


EU Agrees on 15% Cut 
In ‘Greenhouse Gases’ 

But Goal for 2010 Skips Earlier Target 





ConpUrd tj Pur SufFnm Ddp**rs 

BRUSSELS — European Union en¬ 
vironment ministers set long-range 
goals Monday for reducing emissions of 
“greenhouse gases,” but were unable 
to settle on reductions for the near fu¬ 
ture. 

The 15 EU countries agreed to part of 
a Dutch proposal, which called for a 15 
percent cut in output of the gases from 
1990 levels by 2010. 

Greenhouse gases are believed to be 
responsible for a gradual warming of the 
Earth's atmosphere. 

But the ministers deferred untQ June a 
decision on whether to require EU coun- 


2 German Guards 
Regret ’62 Killing 
At the Berlin Wall 


Reuters 

BERLIN — Two former East Ger¬ 
man border guards said at their trial 
Monday that they were sorry for the 
1962 killing of Peter Fechter, who was 
shot and bled to death at the Berlin Wall 
as his cries for help went unheeded. 

Mr. Fechter, 17, an East German ma¬ 
son. was shot in the pelvis while trying 
to climb over the Berlin Wall near an 
Allied checkpoint. He called in vain for 
help for about 50 minutes as he slowly 
bled lo death. 

“I was assigned to do my duty at the 
border and the only thing I can say is that 
I am sorry about it all,” said Rolf 
Friedrich, 61, one of two guards facing 
■manslaughter and attempted man¬ 
slaughter charges for the killing of Mr. 
Fechter and for shooting at a friend who 
escaped over the Berlin Wall. 

. Erich Schreiber, 55, told the court 
filled with journalists and a gallery of 
spectators that included Mr. Fechter’s 
-sister. Ruth, that he. too. regretted the 
■shooting, which became the most fa¬ 
mous and widely condemned slaying at 
the Berlin Wall. 

' Mr. Fechter's anguished screams 
rwere ignored by the East German border 
■guards, although West Berlin police and 
Western Allies tried vainly to help him 
fy tossing first aid kits over the Wall. 
Because Mr. Fechter was in Soviet- 
controlled East Berlin, West Berlin po¬ 
lice said they could not intervene. 


tries to have achieved most of those 
reductions by 2005 — just eight years 
from now. 

The Netherlands, which bolds the 
EU’s rotating presidency, had urged 
members to commit to a 10 percent cut 
in output of greenhouse gases from 
1990 levels by 2005. 

Much of the talks, which began 
Sunday night, focused on proposed re¬ 
ductions of carbon dioxide, by far the 
biggest offender among the greenhouse 
gases. 

But the ministers also held off setting 
specific levels for carbon dioxide emis¬ 
sions, which result when coal or other 
fossil fuels are burned. 

The negotiations in Brussels coin¬ 
cided with talks on global wanning by 
about 160 countries in Bonn, in prep¬ 
aration for international negotiations on 
climate change that are to be held in 
Kyoto. Japan in June, and again in 
December. 

The EU ministers agreed on how to 
parcel out cuts among member coun¬ 
tries for only 10 percentage points of die 
15 percent pledged, an indication of the 
difficulties that the Union still faces 
with its announced target 

Under the plan agreed to Monday. 
Germany, Austria and Denmark would 
face the largest cuts — 25 percent by 
2010. 

By contrast Portugal would be al¬ 
lowed to increase emissions 40 percent 
and Greece would be allowed to in¬ 
crease emissions 30 percent over the 
same period. 

Britain, which had been concerned 
that overly ambitious targets would 
damage its industry, would be required 
to reduce emissions 10 percent 

A recent European Parliament res¬ 
olution called for a 30 percent reduction 
in greenhouse emissions by 2010 — a 
figure much higher than that agreed to 
by the environment ministers. 

In agreeing to the 15 percent cut the 
European Union laid down a marker for 
the international talks. 

“We are very happy with the agree¬ 
ment” said an Austrian source, speak¬ 
ing on condition of anonymity. 

The Dutch environment minister, 
Margreet de Boe. said late Sunday that 
the 15 percent figure was a firm com¬ 
mitment 

"We go to Kyoto with 15 percent 
and if that's agreed then we will ne¬ 
gotiate about how to share out the re¬ 
maining 5 percent within the EU,” she 
sad. (AP, Reuters) 


Fatih SaftuflteoBi 

Turkish women singing inarching songs and chanting slogans against the Isl amis t-led 
ruling coalition in a demonstration in Istanbul's central Taksim Square on Monday. 

Secularist Turks Take to Streets 

Anti-Islamist Protests Put More Pressure on Erbakan 


ANKARA — Turkey’s secularist majority 
joined ranks on Monday with the pro-Western 
army in an assault on Prime Minister Necmettin 
Erbakan’s Islamist ambitions. 

Several thousand anti-Islamist demonstrators 
took to die streets of Istanbul and a former prime 
minister and leftist leader. Buleni Ecevit, warned 
Mr. Erbakan to respect democracy and toe the 
official secularist line. 

"I told him that if he can't do that, then he should 
leave the government” Mr. Ecevit said at a news 
conference following a meeting with Mr. 
Erbakan. 

A recent increase in army criticism of the co¬ 
alition has stirred memories of three military coups 
in the last 37 years. 

But Mr. Erbakan brushed off the generals’ latest 
efforts to influence the running of the country. 

"in Turkey governments are formed in Par¬ 
liament not in the National Security Council. Laws 
are made in Parliament” he said. 

The military-dominated council warned Mr. 
Erbakan on Saturday to end a recent surge in 
religious activism they fear could pave the way to 
turning Turkey, a member of the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization, into an Islamist state. 

The army action plan, published by newspapers, 
includes a ban on propaganda on pro-Islamic tele¬ 


vision and radio, tighter restrictions on religious 
dress and measures to prevent Islamist radicals 
from entering the stare administration. 

The military is also demanding strict surveil¬ 
lance of financial organizations controlled by re¬ 
ligious fraternities and firm controls on the pur¬ 
chase of pump-action shotguns, the sales of which 
have surged in recent months, allegedly to pro- 
Islamic radicals. 

Turkish stocks dived 5-58 percent on Monday on 
the political uncertainty. 

"An easing in political tension is needed." said 
Mustafa Yilmaz, a broker. "Newspapers full of 
pictures of army generals negatively affect the 
market.” A prominent member of Mr. Erbakan’s 
Welfare Party called for the government to heed the 
army warning. 

"Welfare should take steps to smooth this out,” 
the newspaper Yeni Yuzyil quoted Avdin Mend- 
eres, a member of Parliament, as saying. Mr. 
Menderes’s father. Adnan. was executed after a 
1960 coup that deposed him as prime minister. 

Mr. Erbakan, 70. became modem Turkey’s first 
Islamist leader last year in alliance with con¬ 
servatives after narrowly winning general elec¬ 
tions with 21 percent of the vote. 

Many secularists say he has no mandate to raise 
the profile of Islam in public life, one of Turkey's 
most sensitive issues. f Reuters. AFP > 


brief ly 


Bonn-Paris Vision of EU Future 

The Germanand French foreign mum ^ they 

and Herve de Charette. said aft tn&amtm ^ ^ 
would present the £Utreaty, 

tergovemmental Corferenceon l ^L ed ^ the Western 

Mr. Kmkel said it bad fS^STarm^houId be in- 
European Umoo. bioc s defense _ ^ 


She Western European Union, tne 

They also saidtbey had agreed on ^ “~nd ^ 
secretary-general to coordinate foreign po ^ 
curity policy. 

EUSees 1996Pact With Russia 

MOSCOW — President Boris Yeltsin and a rop-k^el 
European Union delegation reported progress Monday 

toward increasing economic cooperation. t . 

The president of the European Commission, Jacques 
S outer, and the Dutch prime minister. With Kok. held 
talks Monday with Mr. Yeltsin and Prime Minister Viktor 

^Tbe twosides discussed efforts to finalize a broad 1994 
agreement on trade and other economic relations, 
agreement should be in place by the end of the year. hw. 
San ter said. 

U.S. Doubts Russian Aid Theft 

MOSCOW — The U.S. Embassy expressed doubts 
Monday that $25 million in cash reported stolen in London 
was American aid bound for Russia. ,, 

"This story, as reported, is not credible to us. said a 
statement released by Richard Hoagland, press spokes¬ 
man for the embassy. U.S. Aid for International De¬ 
velopment, which runs assistance programs in Russia, 
"has no direct govemment-to-gqvemment cash pay¬ 
ments in Russia.” the statement said. 

Scotland Yard said Sunday that the cash disappeared 
Feb. 25 from a Heathrow airport cargo compound just 
before it was to be loaded onto a flight to Moscow. (AP) 

Court Hears Danube Dam Case 

THE HAGUE — The World Court began bearing a 
dispute Monday between Hungary and Slovakia over a 
hydroelectric-dam project started in the Communist era. 

The project was commissioned in a 1977 treaty between 
Hungary and Czechoslovakia. Budapest abrogated the pact 
in 1990, but Slovakia, went ahead, diverting a part of the 
Danube ai DunakHiti, 160 kilometers west of Budapest. 

Hungary contends that the move violated international 
law and caused environmental damage. (API 

Priebke’s Extradition Is Barred 

ROME — Italy's constitutional court has ruled that 
Erich Priebke. the former Nazi officer accused in the 1994 
massacre of 335 men and boys near Rome, could not be 
extradited to Germany because be would face the same 
charges when he is retried in Rome. 

The court cited a 1957 European convention on ex¬ 
tradition for its decision, which was mode Feb. 14 but 
released Monday. (Reuters) 



CLT3JRJENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 


Call today for your complimentary copy of my latest research reports, 
market opinions and performance records. Learn how you can put 
my 19 years of professional trading experience to work directly for you. 


OUTSTANDING Analysis for All Major Markets 
EXCEPTIONAL Execution Forex or Futures 
COMMISSION SpotFX 2-5 Pip Price Spreads 


SUPERIOR Selection of Managed Accounts 
FREE Trading Software A Data 

COMMISSION Futures Si 2-S36 Per RtT 


Prepare for Tomorrow's Major Market Moves by Calling Toll-Free Today 


Peter G.Catranis 

Fores ft Futures Specialist 


.liuirdla 1800125944 0800158B0 Bermuda 18008784178 Brazil 0008119215513 < olambia 980120837 

Crprut 08090805 Urnmatk 80016132 Finland 08001110064 Frame 080090 2246 Urrrrf 00800119213013 

Grrmaity 0130829668 Hoax Kang 8007209 8 00569294 /varM771000102 /M/r 167875928 

Japan 0031128BOB Karra 0038110243 I turmhaart 08004552 JI/«r«w»5B0Q87841T8 AVi*rr/<w^060220657 

y^alilln 18009945787 .VZMWOS0O441S8O!^rtj w i/O5O112632 Singapore 8001202501 .V.. t/rka 0800996337 

Spain 900931007 Satire 020793158 AiOiM0800897233 Thodamd Q01IHJ0119230666 7 urkry 00800139219013 

l-auedKinvdom 0800966632 InitedStatn 18009945757 I'S- Toll I oicr +714-3 76-8020 VS- Tall Fax*714-376-8025 


24 HOUR FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


International Foreign Exchange Corporation 

YOUR GOAL IS OUR GOAL 
Margin 3 - 5% - 24 hour trading desk 
MARKET UPDATES ON NBC TEXT PAGES 355 & 356 
and INTERNET:WWW.IFEXCO.CH 
Call for information package & free daily newsletter 

88 bis route de Fromenex ■ 1208 Geneva ■ Switzerland 
^Tel(41)228497411-24hr{41)228497440-Fax(41)22 7Q01913 


ITUfV nt7 IT # * 08ni Spreads; no commission __ 

EyLg • Minimum transaction S1 00,000 KB 

-- • Competitive margin rotes 

K3 hutes pk. t Warwick Raw. London SWt E 5ER. Great Bmoin ■‘SKF 


Tel: -44-171-896-0022 


Fax: -44-171-896-0010 


Forfurther details 
on bow to place your listing contact 
Christopher SETH in London 
TeL: (44) 171 836 48 02 
Fax: (44) 171 2402254 

HrnUfc^gjgfeSribimr. 


•Escorts & Guides 


l BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

LONDON - PARIS 

' THE FINEST ft THE HOST SMCERE 
18 - 38+ WTSBtATKWU. 
8EAUTFUI 8 ELEGANT STtfflEMTS 
SECRET ARES, AIR HOSTESSES & 
MODELS + 

* AVAILABLE AS VOW COHPAMON 


; Escort Agency Cmffl Cents Vtk c ae 

TEL LONDON ++ 44 (□) 

: 0171 589 5237 


ROYAL PLATINUM SERVICE 

ATLANTIC 

NEW YORK 

(1) 212 7BS 1819 

LONDON PARIS 

WOftJWSJE ESCORT SERVICE 

+ 44 fOl 7000 77 04 1022133 


AMSTERDAM BERNADETTE 
Escort Sense & Drew Date. 
Tet 631 63 36 or 631 OB 43 



imsmATKML ESCORTS 

Notts Ftal & Most Ex*«w Savtes 
MoMb, Beauty Quern, Actresses 
UUfagual Travel Carnations 


I Cnparions 


Hdqtrs. 212-765-7896 NY, USA 

officeftintascartLcm 
Service writonds. Cradit cants, checks 
accepted. View videos & photos h office. 


VENUS IN FURS 

MHH WORLDWIDE ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON 0171 362 7000 

AI cants. Mane taottags wtcoae 


"SWITZERLAND + GERMANY* 

TeL ++3V20427 26 27 

ZURfttHSEYA-BASEL-BEnE 
NEW: LONDON - BRUSS8J3 - VIDUA 
COSMOS Esccn Apncy. CmH Canto 


HilJUi'flttE'irALY'LQNDON'PAflIS' 

owwiTumTflviERA'viamAm- 
SINKI’GLASGCWSK) AREAS Eanm 
Service. TeL 39 {01338 852 37SB^H 


HHJTS MGH SOCETnfENNA'PAM 
COTE D'AZUR & ZURICH * G8iF 
IrcemaDonal Escort & Travel Service 
Vieira +443-1-5354104 al aarfi cards 


eotocontact wn *•"•**• 

Top focal S travel serree woridwxte 




CtaSEA ESCORT SERVICE 
51 Beaudmp Place, London SWT 
Tet 0171-564 6513 


SWITZERLAND A MR E sc ort Service 
Zuncrr Geneva ■Bern •BaserTfano • 
ParfeTOmraWanTfafttarLondon' 
Only Int'l Top Models & Gems’ 
-VOGUE- Tet +41 ffl 79 407 0931 


MLwi*mu.rE«Bore 

Jdb Escort Sendee 3St B3U2SS77S7 


ISABELLA AQUINAS 

Escort Sennce Lotion - 0171 498 5789 


’ PARS S LOWOH • 

EXCLUSIVE BEGART ft EDUCATED 

Escort Senice 

Union (171) 394 51 45 


AMSTERDAM ■ DREAMS ■ ESCORTS 
and (toner Date Semes tar Km sr Her. 
+31 (0) 20-64 02 J1W64 Q2 6S6 


ASIAN PERSIAN ORIENTAL 
C0NTMENTAL Escort Service London 
Tet 0956 23317 24 m Canto 


* BUTTBtFLY E5C0RT SERVICE 
'GENEVA’PaRIS' 
TeL OZZ I 731 90 81 


“CONCEPT 2000“ 
EXCLUSIVE ESCORT ft Travel Agenc* 
FRANKFURT 068 - 955 20 774 


CHL0E BEAUTIFUL MODEL 
Prtvala Escort Service 
Tet 0171 835 0971 AH Canto 


DIANA'S ESCORT SERVICE TAIL 
BLOW SUM AVIATION STUDENT 
TEL 0975 531503 2pm - 2am 


FRANKHJRT-COLOGN&OUSSaDORF 


Gars Escort Service +48(01171-5311805 


GENEVA PRETTY WOMAN 
BASEL LAUSANNE. M0NTRBJX 
Cal 022/346 00 89 Escort Agency 


flwato ftwr ft Escort Sew? Lurtftn 
Tet 0467 251664 


jASwffs escort service 
LONDON 017| 935 0564 
CREDTT CARDS ACCEPTED 


LONDON HEATHROW PARS 
JAPANESE ESCORT SERVICE 
0956 572543 (AI Canto) 


LOMtON SENSATIONS FRIENDLY 
SOPHISTICATED. BEAUTIFUL LADIES 
Tet 0171 419 2985 Escort Sense 


UORFSSON CLUB • VENNA ESCORT 
Service. 5.. Rechte Wenzel 2a 
0222/506 86 84 


TANYA BLACK. Began ft Educated 
London/ Hwtfmjw Private Escort Sente. 
0181 906 2261 Cndt Canto Welcome 


VALENTWES WTEHNATXMAL 
VIP Escort Semis phdn 9 lo new cenual 
London efee 0171 835 0005 ad cant 


V10WA'PRAGUE KENNEDY'S Escort 
Service. Friaufiy, eJegsrt. affiaaire. 
cads. Day & night {++431] 5335044 



Tl iK ivniMmiMAL®* • i 

itcralo^^^eribunc 


the worn-ire qua newspvpeh 

If you would like to receive further information on the advertisers who appeared in our 
International Education Special Report 
on February 11,1997, please complete this coupon & send it to: 

The International Herald Tribune c/o carrier direct 

1 Upcott Avenue - Pottington Industrial Estate, Barnstaple, Devon-EX31IHN, England 



France Tick box 

1. INSEAD □ 

2. ISG-EMBA □ 

3. THESEUS □ 

International 

4. EG-BBA/MBA C 

5. MBA Un iv ersi t y C 

Netherlands 

6. MMBAS C 

7. Rotterdam School 

Management □ 

8. Strategic Management □ 

UK 

9. Richmond College □ 

USA 

10. De Paul University □ 

11. JFK School of Management 

Harvard University □ 

12. Touro Law Center □ 

13. UnivezsityofCA/Rivemde □ 

14. University of Illinois 



at Chicago 

□ 

lofleges & Universities 


Begium 


15. 

EFAP International 

□ 

16. 

European University 

□ 


France 


17. 

American University 



of Paris 

□ 

18. 

FAM 

□ 


International 


19. 

ABS 

□ 

20. 

ISG-BBA/MBA 

□ 

21. 

Schiller Omessty 

□ 


UK 


22. 

American College London □ 

23. 

Florida State University 

□ 


USA 


24. 

George Washington 



University 

□ 

25. 

Harvard University 



Summer School 

a 

26. 

New York University 



Summer Institute 

□ 

27. 

Pace University 

□ 

28. 

Stanford University 

□ 

29. 

University of California/' 



Berkeley 

□ 

30. 

Yale University 

□ 


Name:_ 

Home Address:. 


Job Title:. 


AGE: 

□ Under25 

□ 25-34 

□ 35-44 

□ 35-64 


France 

31. Albert Camus 

32. CUEF 

32. Institut France Riera 

34. LaCardere 

35. LangueOitze 

36. LaSarborme 

37. Paris American Academy 

38. University Aix- Marseille 

Switzerland 

39. EcoleLemania 

USA 

40. American University 

41. Tufts U niv e rs i t y ESL 


Oaf 8 Soaring Schools 


France 

42. Eurecok 

43. Ecole Active Bihngue 

44. Lennen Bilingual School 

International 

45. TASIS 

Nethe r lands 

46. International School 
Amsterdam 

Switzerland 

47. Aigkm College 

48. International School 
Geneva 

49. John F. Kennedy School 

50. Leysin American School 

51. Monte Rosa 

USA 

52. Jodson School 

53. Tabor Academy 

54. Taft Summer School 


flrtG 




France 

55. Paris American Academy 

UK 

56. Christies Education 

USA 

57. Harvard Graduate 
_ School of Design 

HwfkdSdwoh _ 

Hungary 

58. Semmelweiss University 

USA 

59. Ross University 


□ 65 or over 


— e-mail: 

SEX: 

□ Male 

lam request 
O Myself 


Netherlands 

60. ChxisteljkeHbg □ 

Switzerland 

61. HIM-Hotel Institute MonlreaxQ 

62. Hosta Hotel & Tourism 

School □ 

63. HOTELCONSUUT □ 

64. Hotel School Laozarme □ 

65. HU'll - Inter national Hotel 

& Tourism Training 


Institutes Ltd. 


Switzerland 

66. Village Camps 

USA 

67. Camps Mondamm 
& Green Cove 

68. Med-O-Ierk 

69. National Camp 
Association 

70. Pok-O-MacCready 


Switzerland 

71. FSEP 

USA 

72. Academic Quest 
International 

73. Jean P. Hague 

74. Vmce nl/CnitiB 

Education C on fe r a ma 

USA “ ~ 

75. NAFSA 

Special Edacation " 

USA 

76. New England Villages 

Edreatton PabBcoUoni 

International 

77. UNESCO 

Mpcdhanaous _ 

UK 

78. KAPLAN 


□ Female 
a information for^ 

□ A friend 


□ Afamily member DAnen^^ 


4-3-97 









































































































\£A 


PAGET; 










































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































PAGE 8 


TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 


Meralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


nmUSHED WITH THE NEW TORE TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Aid to Democracies 


The U.S. government maintains that 
its post-CoId War foreign policy and its 
use of foreign aid are now aimed in 
large part at promoting democracy 
overseas. Given a chance to back that 
rhetoric with action in one obvious 
case, the administration has flubbed it 

The country in question is Armenia, 
ft regained its long-lost independence 
in 1991. Enjoying widespread support 
in die U.S. Congress, it has been re¬ 
ceiving more U.S. aid per capita than 
any nation except Israel. For a time, this 
generosity seemed well placed, and not 
just because of the emotional ties be¬ 
tween Armenia and America. While a 
succession of coups and civil wars at¬ 
tended the births of neighboring former 
Soviet republics Azerbaijan and Geor¬ 
gia, Armenia got off to an auspicious 
political start, electing a president and 
Parliament democratically. Land¬ 
locked and energy-poor, it needed all 
the humanitarian aid it could get, and it 
seemed likely to use that aid well. 

Things went wrong during the past 
two years, with President Levon Ter- 
Petrossian banning political parties, 
shutting newspapers and otherwise be¬ 
coming more autocratic. This trend 
culminated in a Sept. 22 presidential 
election, which only the re-elected Mr. 
Ter-Petrossian and his entourage de¬ 
fended as fair. An Armenian election- 
monitoring team, composed of neutral 


nongovernmental organizations, re¬ 
ported “violations and irregularities in 
tire voting process [and] serious abuses 
and breaches of the law during the vote 
count” which “raise a serious ques¬ 
tion as to the validity of die entire 
electoral process and foe outcome of 
the presidential elections.” 

Yet in tbe administration's 1988 
budget proposal Armenia takes only a 
small hit ana emerges as once again die 
biggest per capita recipient in the 
former Soviet Union. Georgia, which 
has been making great progress on 
political and economic reform under 
President Eduard Shevardnadze, 
would get a lot more than last year but 
still only about one-fourth of Ar¬ 
menia's total on a per capita basis. 

It is hard to see the logic in this. No 
one argues that Armenia should be 
totally cut off (as has been Belarus, 
another Soviet republic gone autocrat¬ 
ic — but one without a domestic U.S. 
constituency). By all means provide 
some humanitarian aid; work with 
civic groups to foster a return to demo¬ 
cracy; stay involved. But to continue 
giving so generously is to say that all 
the U.S. lip service about democracy is 
only that If one country can derail its 
democracy but stay on track for U.S. 
aid, why should any other country be¬ 
lieve U.S. rhetoric? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Telephone Revolution 


The competitive revolution in tele¬ 
communication took two encouraging 
steps forward last week. News Corp. 
announced a merger that promises to 
provide its customers with a broadcast 
satellite service folly equal, if not su¬ 
perior, to their local cable service. 
AT&T, foe long-distance carrier, then 
announced that it had secretly de¬ 
veloped a technology that would allow 
it to bring local phone service to 
people's homes without using the 
.equipment of the regional Bell compa¬ 
nies. The key in both cases is wireless 
communication. News Corp., which is 
owned by Rupert Murdoch, and AT&T 
are threatening to break the monopoly 
choke hold of their competitors by 
sending their services over the air, 
rather than laying fabulously expens¬ 
ive wires into everyone's home. 

News Corp. will invest SI billion in a 
service with EchoStar Communications, 
-a small satellite broadcaster. The com¬ 
bined facilities will offer homes across 
most of America a video service with 
hundreds of channels of high-resolution 
television. CD-quaiity sound and some¬ 
thing that no other satellite service has 
so far been able to provide: signals from 
at least sane local television stations. 
Because satellite services have lacked 
local channels, they have lured too few 
cable customers to keep cable rates 
down. By offering satellite customers 
local charnels. News Corp. will give 
households foe option of saying good¬ 
bye to their local cable monopolies. 

AT&T also plans to bring its service 


into the home over foe air rather than 
through a wire. The wireless techno¬ 
logy will broadcast calls from towers 
directly to a radio box. attached to the 
home. From there foe call will travel 
through phone lines and equipment 
that already exist in everyone’s home. 

Currently, AT&T cannot provide 
customers with local phone service un¬ 
less it rents from the local Bell com¬ 
pany switches that route phone calls 
and the wires that connect switches to 
individual homes. But with wireless 
technology, AT&T would operate 
largely independently of tbe Bells, giv¬ 
ing it more ways to woo customers by 
cutting costs and improving services. 

So far, foe promises of both compa¬ 
nies are just that—promises. AT&T's 
new wireless service is an unproven 
technology; even if it works as ad¬ 
vertised, it may not be ready for wide¬ 
spread distribution for years. Mr. Mur¬ 
doch faces a thicket of regulatory and 
copyright challenges. Cable operators 
are required, within limits, to cany all 
local broadcast channels. His system 
cannot possibly accommodate 2,000 
local stations across America. Reg¬ 
ulators will need to give him leeway to 
provide at least some local stations. 

Americans are used to squabbling 
with their local cable and telephone 
companies over installation, service re¬ 
pairs and rates. But if the new ventures 
succeed, foe next time the local mono¬ 
polist misbehaves die customers can 
do more than fight They can switch. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Mexico and Colombia 


President Bill Clinton drew a fine 
■ line, but a sensible one, between cer¬ 
tifying Mexico and decertifying 
'Colombia as a reliable partner in fight¬ 
ing drug trafficking. The record of both 
Latin countries in stemming foe dread 
track is sad, but at least the Mexican 
government is demonstrably trying — 
it had the political courage to arrest its 
corrupted drug policy chief on tbe eve 
of the certification proceedings — 
while the president of Colombia is 
established as tbe creature of a drug 
cartel. Mr. Clinton decided that Pres¬ 
ident Ernesto Zedillo's capacity to do 
better would be strengthened by cer¬ 
tification and that President Ernesto 
Samper was beyond redemption. It is 
an arguable decision, but it fits the 
exigencies of foe American certific¬ 
ation law, and it also fits foe facts. 

By now it is accepted in the White 
House and elsewhere in the admin¬ 
istration that the American certifica¬ 
tion law is a blunt instrument poorly 
designed for the delicate political work 
of drug enforcement. In a hemisphere 
where the premise of effective diplo¬ 
macy is to respect the sovereign equal¬ 
ity of member states, this law brings 
American power to bear on supply and 
transit states without either consulting 
<them or providing them a reciprocal 
opportunity to pass judgment on Amer¬ 
ican policy. A nationalistic reaction is 
the inevitable result. Still, it is the law. 


and the president is bound to enforce it. 
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, 
in announcing tbe administration’s de¬ 
cision oi Friday, acknowledged the 
obligation of tbe Untied States to press 
ahead with its own strategy to reduce 
demand—a strategy ithaamtraduced, 
to something less than foil public at¬ 
tention, earlier in the week. The de¬ 
mand equation remains foe true front 
line of foe war on drugs. 

Mexico was unconditionally certi¬ 
fied as an American drug-fighting part¬ 
ner. So it is not exposed either to foe 
political rebuke or to foe economic pen¬ 
alties that follow from being decer¬ 
tified. But Mexico is far from being in 
the clear. Mrs. Albright publicly listed 
tbe particular policy areas (capture and 
extradition of kingpins, money laun¬ 
dering and so on) in which foe United 
States expects to see Mexican progress, 
and which she, the attorney general and 
the anti-drug chief will monitor. 

A considerable number of legislators 
have indicated that they will attempt to 
reverse the administration’s certifica¬ 
tion of Mexico. They should ask them¬ 
selves how such a gesture, satisfying as 
it might be for the moment, actually 
would serve their cause, and what effect 
it might have in other areas of policy — 
trade, immigration, environment — 
where good relations with Mexico are 
vital to American interests. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 



ESTABLISHED 1887 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 

KATHARINE P. DARROW, Vice Chairman 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher A Chief Executive 
MICHAEL GETLER, Executive Editor 

• WALTER WELLS, Managing Editor • PAUL HORVTTZ. Deputy Managing Editor 
• KATHHUNE KNORR and CHARLES MITCHELMORE. Deputy EeBrars • SAMUEL ABT and 
CARL GEWIRTZ, Associate Editors • ROBERT J. DONAHUE, Editor of the Editorial Pages 
• JONATHAN GAGE, flusinui and Finance Editor 
• REN£ BONDY, Deputy Publisher 

• JAMES McLEOD, Advertising Director • DIDIER OR UN. Circulation Director. 
Dtrecteurde bt Publication: Richard McClem 


btenntiooal Herald Tribane, 181 A venae Owfcs-de-Gaulle, 92521 NemOy-sar-Setae. France. 
Tel: (1141.43.93.00. Roc Ore.. ([) 41 A3.92.10; Adtv., ([)41 AJ.92.12. 

Internet address: lmptfwwwjhtxoai E-Mail- air ffiln mm 

Editor for Asia: Michad Ridnudum. 5 Canterbury Rd..Singapore 0511.Trl. (65)472-7768. Fax: \b51274-2334 
Mug. Dir. Asia. RatfD. KranepM. 50 Ghmeesur Hang Kang. Tei.852-2922-1188. Fas: 852-2922-1190 
Gm.%.CffOTorr T. SeftEar, Friedridstr. 15.60323FraifiriM.TtL +49(019712500.Far +49W97I250-Z) 
rrts. VS.: Michael Qmroj. fflfl Tbml Aw, New foft NT. 10022. Tel (212) 7S2J890. Fax: {2121755-8785 
OJC. Advertising Office: 63 Long Acre, London WC2. 7W. (171)836-4802. Fax: (171 ) 240-2254 
8AS. au capital Ac /200000 F. RCS Nasaerre B 732021/26. Commission Paris, 

61997. Statrmtwmtl HeraU Tribune. All rights reserved. ISSN; 02M-WJ2. 



EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Help Keep China Moving in the Right Direction 

JL JL O _ V human riahts in China w 


W ASHINGTON — The death of 
Deng Xiaoping has triggered a 
new round of debate on U.S.-Ouna 
policy, but it is a debate that remains 
highly unsatisfying. The moralists 
make a passionate case for ratcheting 
up pressure on China, but they have no 
strategy. And foe strategists make a 
sobering case for-why continued en¬ 
gagement with China is a U.S. interest, 
but they have no morality. It is time to 
extract ourselves from this choice. 

How did we get here? It started in 
Jane 1989. Shocked by the televised 
murder of pro-democracy demonstrat¬ 
ors in Beijing, the human rights com¬ 
munity and Congress looked for a club 
to punish China's leaders. They opted 
for threatening to withdraw China's 
most-favored-nation trade benefits if it 
did not release jailed dissidents or give 
the Red Cross more access to them. 

MFN was foe wrong club. Threat¬ 
ening to withdraw it hurt U.S. business 
as much as China. So China found it 
easy to go to U.S. corporations and ask. 
“Are you ready to sacrifice your in¬ 
terests so a few troublemakers are re¬ 
leased from jail?” Since the answer was 
“no." Beijing easily divided and para¬ 
lyzed America into two rival camps. 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

Worse, the human rights debate got 
reduced to MFN or no MEN. This also 
suited China, because once it got foe 
administration to set aside foe MFN 
club, C hina had clear sailing. H uman 
ri ghts activists had no other mhans to 
influence China and became irrelevant. 

But while human rights and business 
groups were screaming at each other, 
they both lost sight of developments in 
China. Many Chinese re form e r s started 
reacting negatively to the U.S. human 
rights debate because it was so focused 
on a few dissidents that it ignored those 
Chinese who were working within the 
system — bureaucrats, lawyers, fac¬ 
tory managers— to advance the rule of 
law, something that the Chinese gov¬ 
ernment, for its own reasons, also had 
an interest in doing. 

For example, says Jonathan Hecht. a 
research fellow at Harvard Law School 
and a Chinese-speaking consultant to 
the Lawyers Committee for Human 
Rights: “The real guts of the Chinese 
government’s arbitrary powers reside 
in administrative law. Since Tianan¬ 
men, China has actually enacted new 


administrative laws that allow Chinese 
to sue their government, to seek com¬ 
pensatory damages and to establish 
limits on tbe range of penalties that 
bureaucrats can impose on people. 

“They are now working on anao- 
ministxative procedure law that codi¬ 
fies how government agencies make 
and publish rules, and what sort of 
appeals agains t administrative de¬ 
cisions people would have.” 

How many people know that China 
just revamped its criminal procedure 
law in ways (hat provide sane greater 
safeguards for defendants and create 
more separation between courts, pro¬ 
secutors and police? 

“These new laws are far from per¬ 
fect," adds Mr. Hecht, “and senqus 
human rights abuses continue despite 
them.” But they are a real step toward 
rale of law in China — as opposed to 
arbitrary Co mmunis t Party rule — and 
they are being put in place because 
people inside China have an interest in 
that happenin g. You would never know 
that from the debate here.” 

No question — freeing dissidents is 
a necessary condition for human rights 
progress in China, but it is not suf¬ 
ficient. The only sustainable improve- 


See Md most promising way 
foMhe United States to promote such 
efomS is by building oo Cfona s own 
seLfiunterest to have more rale of law. 
ir is not easy. There is a senqus 
thSs China’s 

never let foe rule of law apply to them. 
But clearly China's leaders feel some 
SLi^Vo move in this direction, or it 

would not be happening. ' 

That pressure is due to one Th 

onlv legitimacy China s leaders have 

derives from their abihI y, 
proving the economy, and they cannot 
build a fully modem economy, or keep 
attracting Passive global myestment, 
without instilling into the Chinese sys¬ 
tem more predictability. 3X1(1 

transparency based on a rale of law. 

The task is to keep China moving m 
this direction, building more rale of 
law, brick by brick, in hopes that one 
day these bricks will connect. It is a 
strategy that has some allies and mo¬ 
mentum inside China^ and one foal 
serves the interests and values of U.b. 
human rights advocates, big business 
and geostrategists alike. 

The New York runes. 


After Deng, Different Problems Invite Novel Solutions 


H ong kong — The 

Deng response to the Mao 
era was an extraordinary suc¬ 
cess, but that does not mean the 
correct response in tbe post- 
Deng era is more of foe same. 

For Deng Xiaoping, policies 
should be a product of circum¬ 
stance; success was measured 
by household incomes and na¬ 
tional strength. The problems 
that his successors face are dif¬ 
ferent and perhaps more intract¬ 
able than those ne faced. 

Worst of alL for those now 
in charge, is the revolution in 
expectations. In 1977 expec¬ 
tations were appropriately 
modest. Now perhaps they are 
inordinately high. 

Tbe old Deng formula needs 
adjusting. But how? 

As foe current National 
People's Congress session 
suggests, priority to stability 
makes sense after a decade and 
a half of roller-coaster growth. 
The stabilization program be¬ 
gun in 1994 remains intact. 
Stockbrokers* wishful think¬ 
ing notwithstanding, monetary 
policy remains tight, inflation 


By Philip Bo wring 


low and the currency strong. 
There is renewed policy em¬ 
phasis on agriculture and on 
foe need for state planning to 
prevent recurrence of massive 
overinvestment in real estate 
and consumer durables. 

The tough but conservative 
formula of Zhu Ronji, deputy 
prime minister and economic 
czar, has been a success in 
achieving a soft landing. 
Sound macro-management 
may be welcome after Mr. 
Deng's last drive for growth 
and liberalization, set off by his 
southern tour in 1992, nearly 
ended in disaster. 

But where do they go next? 

Mr. Deng's success owed 
much to risk-taking. It may all 
look very obvious now, but 
each step in the reform process 
has had high risks, even for 
someone as dominant as Mr. 
Deng became. Tiananmen was 
one, the asset bubble another, 
endemic corruption a third. 

A continuous revolution, a 
market-oriented version of 


Mao's doctrine is needed: to 
create real ent repren eurs rather 
than provide a route to cadre 
enrichment at state expense; to 
overturn the bastions of priv¬ 
ilege. the state-owned enter¬ 
prises; to reduce reliance on 
foreign investors. 

Mr. Deng’s reforms had 
fores main components: 

• Land to foe tiller, and a 
large measure of freedom to 
peasants to produce whatever 
they deemed preferable. 

• Outward orientation of the 
economy through foreign 
trade, investment etc. The 
Deng and Thatcher eras of 
power coincided. 

• Belief that centralized 
political power was not neces¬ 
sarily in conflict with econom¬ 
ic decentralization and region¬ 
al income disparities. 

The first objective was 
reached long ago. but further 
advance is very tough; phys¬ 
ical capita], not just men and 
markets, is needed. Tbe second 
is an ongoing success; how¬ 


ever, the shift in emphasis 
from outward processing of 
labor-intensive goods toward 
skill and capital-intensive pro¬ 
jects has barely begun. The 
third is being reined in. 

It is possible that China can 
continue rapid growth based on 
a shift of labor out of agri¬ 
culture into light industry and 
construction. But without better 
resource allocation and more 
efficient use of scarce capital, 
growth will inevitably slow. 

That means reform of the 
labor market as well as of the 
state-owned enterprises. But 
the privileged urban labor 
force has been the biggest win¬ 
ner from recent growth, and 
foe enterprises remain inex¬ 
tricably linked with the party 
machine and cadre privileges. 

What would Mr. Deng's 
solution be if he were now re¬ 
incarnated as a 70-year-old 
paramount leader? He would 
certainly continue to believe 
that China needs an authorit¬ 
arian government to hold it to¬ 
gether while allowing market 
forces to drive foe economy. 


and regions to go their own way 
in development without endan¬ 
gering foe centralist political 
structure. But foe party is the 
cause of corruption and inef¬ 
ficiency and main obstacle to a 
genuine market economy. 

One solution: Abolish the 
party just as he in practice ab¬ 
olished socialism. Give the 
army, Indonesian style, a dual 
military-political function. 

That could free business 
from party shackles and allow 
economic technocrats to guide 
the development process. Re¬ 
latively, the army is a cleaner, 
more coherent structure than 
the party. It has a clearer but 
more limited concept of its role 
than foe party, narrower vested 
interests and a greater capacity 
for self-renewal. 

Fascism? Perhaps, but likely 
to be a more effective author¬ 
itarianism than that delivered 
by the party’s collective lead¬ 
ership, and less prone to per¬ 
sonality cults or pretense at 
ideology. Fanciful? China is 
full of surprises. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Beware of Good Intentions That End in Destructive Results 


By William Pfaff 


P ARIS — Nothing is more 
powerful as a face for evil, 
as well as for good, than good 
intentions. A fund of unfocused 
idealism in society is not hard to 
tap but sends people in destruct¬ 
ive directions as well as con¬ 
structive ones, and can launch 
them on crusades of virtue that 
do not always turn out welL 
A biography of Whittaker 
Chambers (by Sam Taoenhaus) 
has recently come out in New 
York. Mr. Chambers was one of 
tbe significant figures of the 
American 1950s, a prewar 
Comintern agent who eventu¬ 
ally abandoned communism be¬ 
cause of foe Stalinist purges and 
later accused the eminent foun¬ 
dation executive and former 
government official Alger Hiss 
of having been a Soviet spy. 

Of the two men, Mr. Cham¬ 
bers is by far the more inter¬ 


esting, an anguished and com¬ 
plex man who had certainly 
been what he said he was, an 
idealistic recruit to American 
communism, later taken into die 
Comintern underground (con¬ 
trolled by foe Soviet intelli¬ 
gence service) to serve as a 
courier. One of his assignments, 
he said, bad been to collect foe 
information stolen by Mr. Hiss. 

Such operations by foe Com¬ 
intern underground are well 
known from both foe testimony 
of others who were its agents and 
from foe Communist Interna¬ 
tional's own archives, which 
since 1992 have been open in 
Moscow to Western scholars. 

On foe basis of those records, 
another recently published 
book (this time in Paris) de¬ 
scribes tbe career of Eugen 


Fried, born in 1900 in eastern 
Slovakia. He studied in Bud- 
joined the Hungarian 
uni st Party and took part 
in Bela Kun's short-lived re¬ 
volutionary government in 
1919, ana then joined die 
Comintern organization. 

In 1930, on Soviet orders, he 
went to Paris to become the 
secret bead of the French Com¬ 
munist Party. He controlled it 
for the next 13 years. 

He blocked the party's early 
social democratic tendencies, 
and dictated its course through 
the Stalinist years. He caused it 
to support foie Popular From of 
1935, and later to endorse foe 
HilJer-Stalin pact of 1939 — to 
tbe dismay of many party mil¬ 
itants. He was lolled in Brussels 
by foe Gestapo in 1943. 



Japanese Will Do It Their Way 


W ASHINGTON-—In the 
late 1980s, foe fear was 
that Japan represented a su¬ 
perior form of capitalism, 
with industrial policy and life¬ 
time employment, foot might 
end up dominating global 
business. Now the fed is to see 
Japan as a failure which will 
necessarily have to adapt to 
the global economic free-for- 
all. But many Japanese are ter¬ 
rified of tbe deregulation that 
will make them more effi¬ 
cient, and unconvinced that 
their system is fatally flawed. 

Certainly, Japan has been 
suffering from self-generated 
problems in the 1990s. Any 
system in which a small bu¬ 
reaucratic elite has extensive 
power to influence the eco¬ 
nomy through an opaque de¬ 
cision-making process is prone 
to blunders ana corruption. 

Responsibility for the spec¬ 
ulative bubble in foe real estate 
and stock markets in the late 
1980s rests squarely with the 
Ministry of Finance, which 
provided excessive monetary 
stimulus and encouraged 
banks to lend to investors 
without regard to risk. 

Even without the sordid 
tales of greed, manipulation 
and official malfeasance in 
these markets, the heavy hand 
of regulation, influence and 
favoritism is bolding Japan 
back in several sectors, from 
agriculture to telecommunica¬ 
tions, where productivity is 
low and prices sky high by 
international comparison. 


By Edward J. Lincoln 

These problems might 
seem to be enough to persuade 
foe Japanese to rethink their 
brand of industrial policy, but 
many people do not share the 
American zeal for deregula¬ 
tion and open markets. In foe 
liamentary elections last 
, voters largely spumed tbe 
parties most eager to reform. 

Many Japanese fear the 
supposed consequences of 
American-style capitalism. 
Unpredictable markets with 
real winners and losers are 
frightening concepts to a na¬ 
tion where the government 
has managed markets and re¬ 
duced foe risk of failure. 

Neither voters nor bureau¬ 
crats are convinced that Jap- 
anese-style industrial policy 
has totally failed or should be 
swept a way. They are proud of 
the country's low unemploy¬ 
ment (only 33 percent, de¬ 
spite four years of a virtually 
flat economy), innovative 
manufacturing techniques that 
lowered costs while increas¬ 
ing quality, and corporate pa¬ 
ternalism, features which they 
believe are integral to what 
makes Japan different. 

So Prime Minister Ryutaro 
Hashimoto’s bold statements 
on the need to deregulate 
should be taken with a grain of 
salt. Furthermore, the actual 
process of deregulating re¬ 
mains firmly in foe hands of 
the bureaucrats themselves. 


who have obvious reasons to 
obstruct wholesale change. 

Clearly, some change will 
take place in Japan. Scandals 
have been unusually numer¬ 
ous, and concern about felling 
behind America economically 
is palpable. But Japan will 
find its own way, no matter 
how much pressure it is under 
to loosen economic controls. 

Five years from now, foe 
government will likely have 
lessened control over some in¬ 
dustries. But it will not aban¬ 
don its fundamental belief in 
providing a guiding hand. Con¬ 
vergence with an American 
economic model is unlikely. 

The present system is foe 
same one that created an eco¬ 
nomic miracle. The scandals 
and problems spawned by 
mistakes of the past are dra¬ 
matic but have not resulted in 
a widespread sense of crisis 
among foe public. 

For roost people, life is quite 
comfortable. A falling real es¬ 
tate market is a boon to renters 
and home buyers. People may 
be uneasy about the long term 
but they are in no mood for 
fundamental change. 

Tinkering with the system 
could well produce modest 
changes that will work in tbe 
Japanese context. 

The writer, a senior fellow 
at the Brookings Institution 
and a former special economic 
adviser to the US. Embassy in 
Tokyo, contributed this com¬ 
ment to The New York Tunes. 


This book (written by the late 
Annie Kriegel and Stdphane 
Courtois) has provided a big 
shock even now to many 
present or past Communists, 
who had believed that the party 
made its own decisions, and 
never dreamed that a Comintern 
agent controlled it from the 
shadows, and that it lived on 
Soviet subsidies. 

Another newly published 
book, actually written in 1941, 
is- die autobiography of Jan 
Valtin. originally Richard Ju¬ 
lius Herman Krebs, known by a 
half-dozen other aliases as well. 
He served as a Comintern agent 
after World War I in Hamburg, 
tbe Pacific, Latin America and 
even Galveston, Texas, Los 
Angeles and Honolulu, work¬ 
ing mainly among sailors and 
port workers. He spent three 
years in a California prison for 
attempted murder, committed 
on Comintern orders. 

Although he eventually re¬ 
cognized foe cynicism and be¬ 
trayals of the Comintern lead¬ 
ership, he became a Communist 
spy inside the prewar Gestapo. 
He finally bolted, fleeing to 
America, leaving a wife to die 
in the Nazi camps and a son to 
become, he acknowledged, a 
pupil of the Third Reich. 

These were careers launched 
by idealism as well as ideology 
and political ambition. Those 
who survived in the Comintern 
did so by becoming comiptors 
and betrayers themselves. But 
in their time these secret agents 
of communism were widely 


seen as romantic figures, es¬ 
pecially by Western writers, in¬ 
tellectuals and students — un¬ 
focused idealists themselves. 

In France, Andrd Malraux 
passed himself off as having 
been a Communist revolution¬ 
ary in China. The Hungarian- 
born novelist Arthur Koestler 
was actually a Comintern agent 
in France and Spain. In foe & 
United States, the young John w 
Dos Passos, Clifford Odets and 
Edmund Wilson were among 
foe more prominent who 
wrestled with the question of 
party commitment. 

Even foe highly successful 
thriller writer Eric Ambler 
made the heroes of his earliest 
novels Comintern agenLs. 

From today’s perspective we 
see only foe squandering of 
goodwill. We see what actually 
happened. People started out by 
thinking of themselves as lib¬ 
erators. and ended in political 
and moral squalor. 

The Italian novelist Ignazio 
Silone. a Communist revolution¬ 
ary before remaking himself as a 
Christian one, made a famous & 
claim that foe “final battle" 
would be fought between Com¬ 
munists and ex-Communists 1 . 

° n 'y they grasped foe issues, he 
said. It really did seem then to bfc 
a gigantic moral drama, a 
struggle for the future. 

Now that seems scarcely 
imaginable. We are left with foe 
individuals’ sad stories, for our 
edification, our caution. 

Inter rational Herald Tribune. 

& Los Angeles Times Syndicate. ' 


IN OUR PAGES: 100,75 AND 50 YEARS AGO : 
1897: Advice to Greece 

ST. PETERSBURG — Pa¬ 
tience here is quite exhausted 
with Greece, whose big words 
and speeches are taken in foe 
coldest manner. If Greece 
wishes to be wise, she will cul¬ 
tivate Russia's friendship. The 
Mirovye O/goloski publishes a 
strong article, the substance of 
which is that the only alliance 
which could smooth away all 
difficulties would be England’s 
joining France and Russia. 

1922: Immigration RiU 

WASHINGTON _ Senator 
William J. Hams has intro¬ 
duced a Bill in foe Upper House 
providing for foe stoppage of all 
immigration to America for the 
next five years. The measure 
also provides that when immi¬ 
gration is resumed, all immi¬ 
grants must arrive at American 
ports in American ships. The 
immigration problem has been 


^ing up a great deal of 
tenbon in Congress during i 
past year. The large amount 
unemployment was one reas 
for the passage of the Bill 1 L 
ttJflS immigration to 3 per ct 
of U.S. nationals in 1910. 

1947: Sudan Dispute 

Egyptian Prem 
iNOKrashy Pasha accused B 
of inciting the Sudan 

from E gypL and d 
clared that the Sudanese cou 
express their views free 
only when British troops ha 

eva cuaied ^ Sudan „ P £ 

Egyptian people unai 
mously agreed on the evac 

c-sypt. foe maintenance of n 

Jp-SEWSB 

Sudanese for self-govemmen 












ec s 

••'■HI- ntiiT\dr. V 

*ben !'rj V"". :r - 

6?-. «r4 !hc 7 " - r 
te’Co^i Sty-* . : ' r ; 

ptSbv .••• » a 

BSer&it^■*; 

' rj 

«HSts ; - 'i 
p testisV'*-’ --7-;•••.- 

3e*ri\ •'. J 

15; 

4iwibt‘h Jr ^-'; ■ •■'7..^ 

«fses^r*k'*V *? *• 

ttffSfr-ij-i r-r.V '• . 

<fetf csr-v. ' '• : - 

:atru"‘- tt-,:- - ■•- :* 


J&k'bux. 


sui tft-4'iibr..-1- 
miX? 

JSMaJv ' 
w«sfc^:. 
dirri.^. o. • _ 
blt.i- r-\ % ; 

rhc*? 

:#.y this ‘-.a, 
‘HtUJ "J - : - ." - I ' 
the : 

US 


Soli 


itions 


1 r T'>.-, 

r- '. _ 


-:r,. 


- . ' '■ 


*7 




J . !l_' - 


stive Hevi? 


i?T- 


I*' - - 

r^- 





f 


'■ \ 



OPINION/LETTERS 


Switzerland Wasn’t Alone in Dealing With the Devil 

PW VnDV r~. C/ 


N tbe end of with/ w By Tina Rosenberg uncles of Raoul Wallenberg. He ure to save Jews. The French are 

Europe is awash in inform Jfcr.iT 1 ✓- was the diplomat who saved thou- only now challenging popular 

nations which conskWri °l mat “* Germans and later secretly sold as it earned out bombings five miles sands of Jews in Budapest with myths that celebrated the French 

selves neutral or even c!H' *i® g . old in A®®- According to de- away. It took as refugees only a Swedish safe-conduct passes. He resistance while minimizing French 

Nazis actuflllv *5?°*?® documents, Spain ac- small proportion of the Jews that it was arrested by tbe Soviets and — : --**• **-- ‘ , :F - 

HolocausL "P™ ,, e $138 million in Nazi gold had promised to take. It did not drop dial in prison, 

strategic mi ^i“ aiT1Cice 5 ,n B°‘d, and kepi almost all of it after tbe leaflets or send radio broadcasts to The rather banal lesson of tbe new 

tate. Newly oDeneds^v ^ CS » war -. Po,and 311(1 the Netherlands are die ghettos warning Jews of what lay revelations is that institutions such 
that others lmrwnf CD J Ve V ev ‘“J, also investigating what happened to at die other end of the train tracks, as banks and governments will often 

Jews and staved Si » Sf^Sbierof the wealth of their own victims. President Franklin Roosevelt do the wrong thing unless closely 

these countries ~*v nt '. e test (0r while France and Austria are learn- was likely reluctant to divert sol- watched. News of the past should 
thev did nJn k-Tu' y not 21 11131 m treasures in national diers and weapons from the effort not, however, be a reason for con- 

now to uncover rK^ Wi muse V ms were looted or bought at to defeat the Nazis. Nor, appar- demnations of Sweden or Switzer- 

compensate the • r IrUl “ ^ 10 P^ces from Jews. ently. did he want to risk identi- land today. What is a proper basis 

Swhzeriand w CtlmS »k i L More shocking, perhaps, than tying the war as a “Jewish" cause for judgment is how the govern- 


ciirmmuuii-. , the on fy the looting is the evidence that Bri- 

ai^ediy neutral nanon that tain knew in 1941 that the Nazis 
Voti ^ 31,(1 supplier to the were systematically exterminating 

bm ^ eTS 3150 mk Jew s in the Soviet Union. Yet Lon- 
S ?° ld fr° m don said and did nothing. 

None of this should be very sur¬ 
prising. h is useful to recall that the 


Nazis without inquiring about its 
origins, and the government al¬ 
lowed German soldiers to pass 
through Swedish territory. Por¬ 
tuguese officials recently disclosed 
that neutral Portugal acquired 
stolen gold by selling tungsten to 


government, while waging all- 
out war, took few steps to deal di¬ 
rectly with the extermination of 
European Jews. It failed to bomb the 
death chambers at Auschwitz even 


during a time when America was a 
good deal more anti-Semitic and 
anti-immigrant than it is today. 

America’s role in the war en¬ 
compassed both shameful neglect 
of the Jews and a heroic war effort. 
The same complexities apply to 
other nations now discovering their 
complicity. Two Swedish bankers 
accused of taking looted gold and 
making large loans to a German 
company without collateral are the 


merits and citizens of these countries 
are reactin| to the news now. Are 
they covering up the accusations 
and continuing to profit from their 
— in ene 


collaboration with the Naas. 

The nation that treated its past 
guilt most seriously after the war 
was probably West Germany. It 
paid 85 billion marks in compen¬ 
sation and reparations and begin¬ 
ning in the late 1950s tried thou¬ 
sands of its citizens for killing 
Jews. Germany’s efforts remain 
imperfect. Most of those tried re¬ 
ceived absurdly light sentences and 


behavior — in effect, still colla¬ 
borating? Or are they assuming their 
responsibility by embracing full in¬ 
vestigations and recompense? 

Few countries deal honestly with 
their past American textbooks 
about world War II long neglected 
to publicize the government’s fail- 


large numbers of victims never got 
payments. Few Germans spoke of 
the Nazi era until a generation 
passed, but now they speak of it 
constantly. Given the scope of the 
crimes, this is as it should be. But 
such introspection is a rare thing, 
and worth tbe attention of other 
nations suddenly discovering that 
their own records are less than 
pure. 

The Aten- York Tunes. 


My Parents Owed Their Lives to the Swiss Haven, and So Do I 


W EST LAFAYETTE, 
Indiana — I was bom 
in Zurich in 1945, the son of 
Austrian Jewish refugees. 
During the frightful years of 
World War LL, ray parents 
found safety and friendship 
in Switzerland. 

There is no question that 
during World War EL 
Swiss financial institutions 
plundered Jewish bank ac¬ 
counts and that they dealt 
comfortably with tbe Nazis. 

It is also beyond doubt that 
the Swiss government itself 
collaborated with the German 
authorities cm restricting Jew¬ 
ish immigration, which led to 
the notorious proposal by 
Heinrich Rothmund, the chief 
Swiss police official, that the 
Nazis affix a special stamp on 
the passports mall “non-Ary¬ 
ans” and “Aryans” whom 
German leaders wished to ex¬ 
pel permanently. 

But it is also true that thou¬ 
sands of ordinary Swiss — 
Christians as well as Jews— 
did a great deal to assist Jew¬ 
ish immigration and to ease 
Jewish suffering, sometimes 
in direct opposition to their 
government. 

My parents, Sigismund 


By Louis Rene Beres 


and Margarete Beres, were 
married in Vienna on July 
31. 1938. Thar night they 
fled their country, taking the 
train to Italy. They told the 
Italian border control offi¬ 
cials they were headed for 
a honeymoon in Venice. 
When they were informed 
that they would not be al¬ 
lowed into the country, my 
mother, not yet 18. sat down 
on the tracks and wepL 
Where could they go? 

The answer appeared out 
of nowhere. As if be had 
stepped from a Hollywood 
movie, a man. wearing a 
trench coar, approached and 
presented them with two 
tickets to Zurich. “Take the 
next train to Switzerland.” 
he said. “When you arrive, 
there will be refuge.” 

And so there was. To be 
sure, tbe Swiss authorities 
did not give my parents any 
special opportunities; they 
were confined for about a 
year in a special refugee 
work camp near Lugano. But 
after a time, they were per¬ 
mitted to move to Zurich and 
to seek normal employment 


Weeks before their wed¬ 
ding. my father had waited 
for days and nights at tbe 
American Embassy in Vi¬ 
enna, seeking escape as the 
Nazis tightened their noose 
on Austria. American offi¬ 
cials did not even let him 
through tbe embassy doors, 
let alone grant him a visa. 

So it is unfair to Switzer¬ 
land to suggest that it was in 
some way uniquely delin¬ 


quent After the war, because 
of its growing anti-Commu¬ 
nist obsession, tbe United 
States set up top-secret op¬ 
erations that offered refuge 
and considerable affluence 

to major Nazi war cri minal s. 
At the same time, it kept out 
Holocaust survivors. 

The United States is cer¬ 
tainly not now in a position to 
claim absolute purity in these 
matters. 

No European country has 
a longer tradition of receiv¬ 


ing persecuted refugees than 
Switzerland. More than 15 
percent of the country’s in¬ 
habitants were aliens in 
1914, giving it the highest 
proportion of outsiders of all 
European countries except 
Luxembourg at that time. 

Moreover, tbe Swiss Con¬ 
federation admitted large 
numbers of refugees freon 
Germany in 1933. For about 
five years, this was the Swiss 
policy. 

Shortly after my parents’ 


safe arrival in Switzerland, 
the authorities effectively 
announced, “Das Boot ist 
voll” — the boat is full — 
and denied sanctuary to any 
more Jewish refugees. 

Yet my parents owed their 
lives to the Swiss safe haven, 
and so do I. 


The writer, a professor of 
international law at Purdue 
University, contributed this 
comment to The New York 
Times. 


Cool Statesmanship Kept the Nation Intact 


V ICO MORCOTE, Switzerland — 
The relationship between Switzer¬ 
land and Nazi Germany during World 
War II demands re-examination. 

In August 1940. Hitler dominated 
Europe. As a Royal Navy officer, I was 
frequently in the Operations Room at 
the Admiralty. Brave words were 
everywhere. But no one looking at the 
military facts then could in his heart fail 
to know that defear was a possibility, 
even a likelihood. 

Now consider the position of 
Switzerland. Italy had joined the Nazi 
war effort, France was a Nazi puppet 
state. Belgium, Holland, Denmark. 
Norway, Poland and Austria had all 


By Peter Smi there 


been conquered. The survival of Britain 
was in doubt Switzerland was entirely 
surrounded by German and Italian 
arms. 

It was obvious in London and cer¬ 
tainly in Bern that Hitler could an¬ 
nihilate Switzerland whenever it suited 
him. But would he? On one hand, 
Switzerland could be of considerable 
use to him. On the other, if be destroyed 
Switzerland, be would capture massive 
gold reserves and be able to exterminate 
the Jews who lived there. Which al¬ 
ternative would he choose? It was up to 


the Swiss government to strike a bal¬ 
ance that would make it slightly more 
advantageous for Hitler to keep 
Switzerland whole. 

In a remarkable display of cool 
statesmanship under conditions that 
those who experienced them recall as 
truly terrifying, posterity should be 
grateful that the Swiss government 
achieved this balance. 


Sir Peter my is a member of Parliament, 
an undersecretary of state in Britain’s 
Foreign Office, a delegate to the UN 
General Assembly and secretary-general 
of the Council ofEurope. He contributed 
this comment to the Herald Tribune. 


Free to Rewind Time 
On a Set of Wheels 


By Michael Richardson 


S INGAPORE — An old 
guy asked me the other 
day why I went roller-blad¬ 
ing. 1 was sweating heavily, 
putting my gear into a back¬ 
pack after finishing what I 
thought was another gazelle¬ 
like session on wheels along 
the concrete and asphalt paths 
of a park near my home. 

Roller-blading is not a pop¬ 
ular sport in Singapore and I 


MEANWHILE 


must have looked an odd sight 
to ih?s Singaporean as I put 
wheeled 


away my high-tech w] 
boots, ungainly pads for 
knees and elbows, plastic 
wrist guards, gloves zo protect 
ray fingers incase of a fall and 
— the sartorial crown — a 
navy blue cap like those worn 
by members of the French 
Foreign Legion with a flap at 
the back to protect my neck 
from the sun. 

I pondered his question for 
a few moments, partly because 
I was breathless. Perhaps that 
was why he asked, out of hu¬ 
morous sympathy. Come to 
think of it. he looked about my 
age: fifty-something. 

I thought of telling him 
how good it feels to relax and 
move rhy thmicall y along the 
pathways, whizzing past jog¬ 
gers ana walkers as they grind 
along in low gear. It makes 
me feel young again. 

Better still in tropical 
Singapore is to roller-blade as 
dusk falls. It’s cooler then and 
die sensation of speed and 
freedom is greater as darkness 
gathers. 

Recently, in tbe park at 
nightfall during die Hungry 
Ghost festival, 1 was die 
speeding watcher of Chinese 
families lighting candles and 
burning imitation paper 
money and joss sticks in the 
belief that such offerings will 
release the souls of their an¬ 
cestors from purgatory. But 
what I remember most clearly 
were the peals of laughter 
from the children around the 
tiny pools of light 

I didn't tell that to the man 
who asked me why I went 
roller-blading. Instead, I said 
it was good exercise and 
helped me to keep in training 


for skiing when I wasn't on 
the slopes. 

Indeed, that's why I got 
started on wheels. My young¬ 
er daughter, who is 23, was 
keen to learn. I thought I’d 
better give it a try lest she 
dismiss me entirely as an old 
fossil. 

She is usually my roller- 
blading companion. Perhaps I 
thinkIlookgraceful because 
she does — and I’m usually 
behind her, so I can see. 

We learned together last 
June on the bicycle paths of 
Nantucket Island, the old 
whaling center turned holiday 
hideaway off the coast of 
Massachusetts. 

On about our third day out, 
she fell heavily on an asphalt 
path, landing on the base of 
her spine. As usual, I was 
behind, and I fell on my hip— 
it must have been in sympathy 

— causing a nasty graze. 

Both our falls were painful 

and none of the orthodox 
knee, elbow and wrist pro¬ 
tectors helped to cushion tbe 
crunch. We debated whether 
to continue such a risky 
sport. 

Then we discovered hope 

— padded pants. Some had 
just arrived in a Nantucket 
sports shop and we snapped 
up a pair each. The label said 
that they were “Engineered 
in the USA.” The pants were 
mid-thigh length in white 
stretch Lycra and nylon. The 
pads, which cover the hip¬ 
bone area and tbe base of the 
spine, were hardly noticeable 
when covered by shorts. 

But they were remarkably 
effective. We fell a few more 
times with no injury or sig¬ 
nificant pain. Soon — like 
those who leant to ride a bi¬ 
cycle without falling — we 
became free and confident 
spirits on wheels. 

Free spirits, of course, are 
not universally appreciated. 
My mother-in-law recently 
called from Australia. “I just 
wanted to let you know that I 
was nearly run over by a 
roller-blader when I was 
walking the dog yesterday,” 
she said. “I can't believe that 
yon do anything so juven¬ 
ile.” 

Imemational Herald Tribune. 


•j ’ V- * ■ 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


France and Immigration 


Regarding “French Face Off Over 
Immigration' (Feb. 18): 

The current dispute between tbe 
French government and opponents of 
its immigration proposals highlights 
France’s unwillingness to view illegal 
immig ration as an international issue 
and not just its private business. 

What is needed, along with more 
flexible restrictions at home, is a pree¬ 
mptive foreign policy dealing with the 
pr imar y causes of immigration -— 
economic stagnation and political in¬ 
stability in the countries with significant 
outflows of people toward France. The 
government ought to focus on enhanc¬ 
ing the support of democracy in those 
countries. 

Sadly, France's friendly ties with re¬ 
gimes as undemocratic as Zaire’s sug¬ 
gests France still doesn’t have inter- 
patinnal views consistent with its 
domestic policies. 

JUUEN Sl/AUDEAU. 

,r Paris. 


On China’s Army 


J Regarding “China Has Ambitious 
Military Plans, but It Will Take 
7 ime" (Opinion. Jan. 29) by Richard 
Halloran: 

■' j would like to comment on two 
points. First, the statement that China s 
military power extends “only so far as 
the People’s Liberation Army «>uld 
walk” is meant to be derogatory, but it 
should chill military analysts old enough 
to remember Korea in November 1950’ 
when 300,000 Cfainrae 
walked across the frozen Yalu River 
and within two months bad pushed 


the UN forces back to the 38th ParaUeL 

Armies do not need modern trans¬ 
portation to be effective. The Vietcong 
got by quite well with bicycles. Amer¬ 
icans, wife oceans on each side,, nat¬ 
urally think in terms of motorized trans¬ 
portation; the Chinese Army, on the 
other hand, can walk to just about any¬ 
where in Asia. 

Second, I worry that the Pentagon is 
misleading itself when it thinks in terms 
of intervention. What if China invaded 
Vietnam tomorrow, for example? China 
could veto any UN resolutions in the 
Security Council, and what U.S. pres¬ 
ident would dare recommit troops to 
Vietnam? 

What about tbe nuclear deterrent? 
Can we be sure the policy of Mutual 
Assured Destruction would work with 
C hina ? Of all countries. China can af¬ 
ford to throw away population. It has not 
worried much about population loss in 
the past. Also, could die United States 
accept the risk that Chinese nuclear 
weapons could be delivered not by mis¬ 
sile but in die holds of ships that dock in 
major port cities? 

ha the end. how strong would the 
U.S. co mmitm ent to Asia be if China 
did not actually attack America itself? 
An Asia under a Greater China might 
be treated simply as a that much larger 
market 

Asian nations need to ask themselves 


American public. Perhaps the safest 
way for Asian nations to contain 
China is to engage it in so many com¬ 
mercial enterprises that war becomes 
both uninteresting and unprofitable. 

FRANK L. GROSSMANN. 

Amman, Jordan. 


Wrong Bad Guy 


Regarding "The Party That 
Brought the Great Famine Is Alive and 
WelT" (Opinion. Feb. 22) by A.M. 
Rosenthal: 

Iran did not fire the missiles that killed 
37 U.S. servicemen aboard die frigate 
Stark in 1987. Iraq did. 

AMERMATAR. 

London. 


Mind-Oogging Data 


if China poses a menace now, not a 
deca de from now. I feel the answer is 


yes 


China has seen America’s retreat 
from Vietnam, its half-victory in the 
Gulf and its pullout from Somalia. 
China mi ght just risk invading its 
neighbors, knowing how unpopular 
low-technology foreign wars are to the 


Regarding “Selenium: Cinderella 
Nutrient?" (Health. Feb. 20) by Jane 
Brody: 

When die slimier fit perfectly, Cinder¬ 
ella won her Prince Charming. Will Jane 
Brody ever get a right fit? Or will we 
always have to settle for the Best Nu¬ 
trient of the Year award? 

As a long-time reader of her columns, 
I remember when the other miracu¬ 
lous antioxidants — vitamins C, E 
and beta carotene — were hailed as die 
stars in the anti-cancer, anti-aging 
dramas, only to fade into obscurity 
tbe next year or.to be debunked by 
another study. 

I wish Ms. Brody would stop giving 
us this confusing poll data and start 
analyzing some of iL Please stop clog¬ 
ging our minds with this nondata. 

MADELYN BRENNAN. 

Lucca, Italy. 


THESE GEHTUEMEN ARE 
MAJOR CONTRIBUTORS 
TO'RUTULESS DOT3RSH1PS 
FDR CLIhnON/GORE. 




Who are the stars of V.I.P.? 



j[ nt er e sting 

I ntellecfual 

I ndividual 


4 ma 


_ n ci save 


4 njluential 

f m *> 

# nsRhing 





V.I.P. 


Where the most important people talk 


JC”; -‘ti 


presented by 

Catrina Skepper & Tanya Beckett 

weeknights 

at 

1930CET 
1830UK 




WHERETOE 



GOME 
OUT AT 


EUROPE 

NBC available on satellite and cable 




BUNE 

,1997 

IGE9 


ion, 
HI of 
\ian- 
■y of 
oung 
rmiy 
es in 
m. A 

oud. 

>ody 

race 

jetic 


I his 
aint 
ap- 
dng 
his 
ape 
en¬ 
tile 
5 th 
ost 
o. 
>Io 
an 
or 
re 
ir- 


fy 

)f 

>- 

y 

y 

e 

e 

e 

y 


1 








PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Wall of Silence Falls as Guilt of Hitler’s Army Is Displayed in Munich 


By Alan Cowell 

_ New York Times Service _ 

MUNICH— The old man with memories and 
the young woman with questions HaH not met 
before this day, but seemed drawn to one another 
— she to inquire, he to warn — about the 
unwanted legacy that both binds and divides 
Germany's generations: the Nazi past. 

Briefly, their paths entwined at an exhibit in 
the Gothic City Hall that has stirred unaccus¬ 
tomed passions in this southern city, confronting 
Bavarians with evidence directly contradicting 
the fondly held belief that Hitler's army remained 
aloof from the Holocaust. 

Here, in grainy black-and-white photographs, 
some taken as grisly souvenirs, ordinary German 
soldiers — not SS madmen — are shown hu¬ 
miliating Jews and conducting summary exe¬ 
cutions by firing squad and hanging. Here is a 
letter written home by a young soldier boasting 
that his unit had killed 1,000 Jews — '‘and that 
was not enough.” 

The exhibit has already toured IS cities in 
Germany and Austria, but only in traditionally 
conservative Munich, where Nazism took root in 
the 1920s, has it become an object of ferocious 


political division, to the extent that both the far 
right and leftist groups called rival protests. 

Yet, most remarkable of all, the exhibit has 
broken a wall of silence between young Ger mans , 
who learned principally about the Holocaust dur¬ 
ing high school, and a much older generation 
that took part in World War II and then, by 
and large, took refuge in self-imposed silence. 

“Up until today, this bad not 
been discussed across the gen- ““ 

erations,’ ’ said Lucy Wilbers, a ‘There WC 

22 -year-old student, whose en- „ , i„ 

counter Sunday with Hubert unul uHia 

Endl, 79, a military veteran, - 

touched off one of many spontaneous debates. 

Hie exhibit, sponsored by a private foundation 
run by the tobacco heir Jan Phillip Reemtsma. is 
called ‘ ‘War of Destruction—The Crimes of the 
German Army, 1941-1944.” 

Its theme is that, as the catalog puts it “in 
1945, barely after the defeat of Nazi Germany, 
the generals of that period began the fabrication 
of a legend — the legend of the ‘clean army,’ " 
according to which “the soldiers kept their dis¬ 
tance from the Nazi regime and Hitler, fulfilled 
their military duties with decency and dignity." 

The exhibit's organizers, however, said that 


“from 194! to 1944, the Germany Army in the 
Balkans and the Soviet Union conducted not a 
‘normal war' but a war of destruction against 
Jews, prisoners of war and civilians that claimed 
milli ons of victims.' ’ 

That conclusion, supported by photographs 
and documents, has inspired Bavaria's conser¬ 
vative rulers in the Christian Social Union—the 


bangings and mass graves. “And thank God I 
wasn't. Because if I had been. I'd have done the 
same. The choice was to shoot or be shot for 
disobeying orders.” 

All the same, though, he said, he bad served in 
a place in the Ukraine that he suspected was 
among the many sites where Jews were known to 
have been killed. “I said to my comrades: If the 


, ,, _ , . _ are happening, then we will all 

‘There were books and videos and we studied them. Hot, have to repent them.” 

until today, they were not so real . 9 pe$ehi fodr'jSS!aSdteX? 

—7 -;-- jackets who had clustered 

sister-party of Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s dom- around him, waving his walking-stick as he de¬ 
inant Christian Democrats—to urge a boycott of claimed: “It must never, ever happen again.” 
the exhibit on the ground that it besmirches a For Miss Wilbers, the student who spoke with 
proud military record, inspiring clashes with Mr. Hndl about his time with tbe German Army in 


leftist parties that support a more open debate 
about the past. 

But. despite the boycott call, many Bavarians, 
young and old, have stood in line for hours to 
view the exhibit, fascinated and introspective. 


“I was drafted in 1942,” said a 73-year-old so real.” 


the Ukraine and Yugoslavia during the war, the 
old man’s stories illuminated what she had been 
toldatschooL 

“There were books and videos and we studied 
them.” she said. “But, until today, they were not 


veteran, who declined to give his name. 

“I wasn't in the places where these things 


Miss Wilbers belongs to a generation of Ger¬ 
mans that has been taught never to suppress the 


happened,” he said, gesturing to photographs of memory of the Holocaust and to accept, not guilt 


for it, but a national generation much 

Mr.B^.bycon^^ a ^S a ?. IbeIiCTe 

closer toquesoons of guUtand'is«=^ 

thal after 50 jsm. <™ yo o sec 

thing? np<5^soldiers woe 

some Gennans to a generaoona^ sluf^ U has 

£&XS5 n “^eyoung generation egrehve * 
debate though, is more tangled than mat. 

i S Z of rnisw gr 

GenoaIs seek to absorb the ntjoptot torfore^ 

Se happeoedin the past, they 

should not be the only onesto shoukter gmlL 
“Other countries pushed out their Jews and 
sent them to us — isn’t that true? said a middle- 
aged woman, bursting into a debate between two 
war veterans and a group of students. 


Chirac Ignores Comments 
By Le Pen on Jewish Link 

Rightist Said Groups ‘Control’President 


By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — A claim by Jean-Marie Le 
Pen, the far-right French politician, that 
Jews have “control” over President 
Jacques Chirac met studied disdain in 
most of the French political establish¬ 
ment on Monday. 

Mr. Le Pen’s remarks surfaced in 
weekend news accounts of comments he 
made to tbe authors of a forthcoming 
book about Mr. Chirac. In the com¬ 
ments, Mr. Le Pen, the leader of the 
National Front, said that Mr. Chirac's 
hostility to him was so strong that it 
could be explained only by the grip of 
international Jewish organizations that 
had provided the French president with 
"enormous sums and exceptional polit¬ 
ical support.” 

Mr. Le Pen was quoted as saying that 
Jewish groups had “control” over Mr. 
-Chirac, a Gaullist, and were forcing him 
to shun any alliance with the National 
Front, even if it meant depriving the 
Gaullists and other conservative parties 
of the margin they needed to defeat the 
Socialists. 

Mr. Chirac did not respond directly to 
the claim in a previously scheduled 
meeting Sunday with leaders of France’s 
Jewish organizations. But he did 


strongly defend his government’s con¬ 
troversial new laws to control illegal 
immigration, implying that they were 
designed to cut the ground from beneath 
Mr. Le Pen's feet. 

Tbe new laws, he said, will combat the 
rise of a perception among voters that the 
government is lax on illegal immigrants 
and therefore dam pen racist tension of 
tbe sort played on by extremists. 

On Monday, Socialist leaders called 
on Mr. Chirac to sue Mr. Le Pen, but 
conservative leaders, including Simone 
VeiL the former health minister, de¬ 
fended Mr. Chirac's policy of keeping 
the presidency aloof from unsubstan¬ 
tiated allegations. Newspaper editorials 
and Jewish leaders supported that ap¬ 
proach. 

The Le Pen remarks are similar to 
allegations about Jewish plots rbai appear 
in National Front publications, which fre¬ 
quently allude to a newspaper stray in 
1986 in which officials of B^nai B’rith. a 
prominent Jewish fraternal organization, 
said that French political leaders had giv¬ 
en assurances that they would not make 
political alliances with Mr. Le Pen. 

Mr. Chirac's hostility to Mr. Le Pen 
has been consistent As a result Mr. Le 
Pen said to the authors of the Chirac 
book. France could never have a gov¬ 
ernment reflecting the country’s con- 





4 






Cbvfca Pluaa/Tbc Auocand Preu 

President Jacques Chirac applauding after receiving a gold medal from Jean Kahn, left, the head of tbe French 
Jewish community, during a weekend ceremony in Paris. Mr. Chirac extolled Jewish assimilation in France. 


servative character. Instead, he said, a 
Jewish conspiracy had prevented parties 
like his own from sharing power. 

The timing of Mr. Le rat's remarks 
was accidental, but they coincided with 
the political batde in France over im¬ 
migration, an issue that Mr. Le Pen has 
made a centerpiece of bis campaigns 
against Arabs and Muslims in France. 

Tacitly acknowledging the inroads 
Mr. Le Pen has made with this theme. 


Mr. Chirac on Sunday warned critics 
that it was dangerous to ignore a national 
mood in which resentment against il¬ 
legal immigrants, if ignored, would fuel 
racism and threaten France's ability to 
assimilate legal immigrants. Mr. Chirac 
accused his Socialist opponents of na¬ 
ivete on the race issue. 

"Let us not play into the hands of 
those who exploit uncertainties about 
the future, urge us to turn inwards, fuel 


our fears of each other and incite 
hatred,” Mr. Chirac said. 

Mr. Chirac was speaking Sunday at a 
commemoration of Napoleon’s decision 
in 1806 to recognize French Jews as full 
citizens. He extolled Jewish assimilation 
as an example of France's human wealth 
and cited his own action in recognizing 
the nation's responsibility in wartime 
persecution of the Jews as proof of bis 
commitment to fighting racism. 


RENAULT: Belgium to Sue Automaker Over Plant Closure and Will Call for Law to Limit Firms’Movement 


Continued from Page 1 

of the European market be accompanied 
by real social regulation, by clear mea¬ 
sures on tax harmonization and by 
checks against disinvestment." Mr. De¬ 
li aene wrote. “In the same spirit, the 
European Union should impose a system 
of collective bargaining on die European 
subsidiaries of multinational compa¬ 
nies." 

Mr. Dehaene said tighter regulations 
should be adopted as pan of tbe in¬ 
tergovernmental conference on EU re¬ 
form, which is supposed to revise the 


Union's governing treaties by June. He 
was expected to press bis demands at a 
meeting in Brussels on Tuesday of 
Europe’s Christian Democratic leaders, 
including Chancellor Helmut KohL who 
is struggling to contain tbe political pres¬ 
sures stemming from a surge in German 
unemployment to levels last seen in 

1933. 

Belgium's federal government and 
the government of the northern region of 
Flanders decided Monday to sue Renault 
for allegedly violating the information 
and consultation provisions of a 1972 
law on employer-union relations. A fed¬ 


eral labor inspector delivered the com¬ 
plaint to Renault managers at Vilvoorde 
on Monday and were expected to file a 
formal court complaint on Tuesday. Vi¬ 
olations can be punished by a fine of up 
to 20 million Belgian francs 
($573,000). 

A spokesman for Eric von Rornpuy. 
tbe economics minister of Flanders, ac¬ 
knowledged that the fine would be of 
little consequence to a company that is 
expected to announce a loss of as much 
as 4 billion French francs ($700,000 
million), but be said tbe authorities were 
hoping to embarrass tbe company. 


"It’s the principle that matters," he 
said. “Renault is losing face." In Par¬ 
is, a Renault spokeswoman merely 
said that the company * 'intends to fully 
respect all tbe requirements of Belgian 
law." 

Louis Schweitzer, the company chair¬ 
man who confirmed plans to close die 
plant at a meeting with Flemish officials 
on Saturday, would meet with Belgian 
unions in the near future to discuss ways 
to minimize the closure’s impact, she 
said. 

The spokeswoman declined to com¬ 
ment on French newspaper reports that 


the company was considering laying off 
3,000 workers in France. French union 
officials met in Paris on Monday to 
discuss the reports, however, while the 
European Federation of Metalworkers 
planned a meeting of union represen¬ 
tatives from Renault plants in Belgium, 
France and Spain to seek a common 
strategy toward the company's cutback 
plans. 

Workers were blockading some 5,000 
finished cars, valued at 3 billion Belgian 
francs, from the Vilvoorde plant. The 
plant also contains equipment valued at 
10 billion francs. 


POLAND: 

Asking‘ 9 Am I a Jew? 

Continued from Page 1 

that the fire — which came a week after 
Parliament voted to restore Jewish prop¬ 
erty taken during World War H — could 
cause alarm among “all those people 
who are discovering their roots." 

“Part of their concern is. Is it safe to 
be Jewish in Poland?” he said. “This is 
not the kind of answer we want.” 

Sentiment about Poland’s once-vibrant 
Jewish minority reflects ambiguity. Anti- 
Semitism remains a problem in Poland 
and a disquieting challenge throughout 
Eastern Europe’s democracies. 

Few Jews now live in this country of 
38 million. Most of a pre-1939 Jewish 
population of 3.5 million, the largest in 
Europe, was murdered by the Nazis. 
Thousands of survivors later abandoned 
Poland or fled in 1968 when the ruling 
Communists instigated . a campaign 
against Jews. 

Since the fail of communism in 1989, 
Poland’s democratic governments have 
sought to improve ties with the remaining 
Jews (estimated to number 3,000 to 
30,000 in all of Poland) and with Israel. 

Still, a government poll issued in 
January found nearly one-quarter of 
Poles surveyed to be strongly anti- 
Semitic, 56 percent to be against anti- 
Semitism and the remaining 20 percent 
somewhere in between. 

“Anti-Se mitism in Poland is as wide¬ 
spread as it is superficial,” said Kon- 
stanty Gebert, a Jewish Forum Foun¬ 
dation member and well-known 
journalist who will inaugurate a Jewish 
cultural magazine here next month. 
“Living as a Jew in Poland isn't such a 
big deal, particularly if you live in the 
city. Tbe point is: You have to put up 
with stuff. You can bear some veiy nice 
people say hideous things.’’ 

It is that kind of understanding, and 
realism, that callers seek when they dial 
652-2144 in Warsaw. Because the hot 
line is anonymous and confidential, out¬ 
siders are not allowed to listen in. But 
counselors, middle-aged Poles who have 
known of their Jewish roots for years, 
have been trained to listen and advise. 

"Talking is the first step," said a 
volunteer, Ryszarda Zachariasz. “After 
that, they think about what they want to 
do nexL Maybe nothing. Maybe they 
want to find out more. Different people 
have different needs.” 


JAPAN: Public Jfbrks Wkigh on Economy 


ALBANIA: President Re-elected Amid Crackdown 


Continued from Page 1 

played an outsized role in Japan's econ¬ 
omy and political system. 

The questioning is part of a broader 
reassessment of public spending policy 
and of Japan's once-admired bureau¬ 
cracy, both of which are now seen as 
riddled with waste and corruption. 

Japan spends more on public con¬ 
struction, about $300 billion, than the 
U.S. Defense Department's total mil¬ 
itary budget. Critics call Japan doken 
kolcka, the “construction state.” a ref¬ 
erence not only to the magnitude of the 
activity but also to tbe cozy relationships 
between contractors and government of¬ 
ficials that keep pork-barrel projects 
coming. 

Public works also have long been a 
sore point in trade with the United 
Stales, as U.S. companies seeking a 
share of the huge projects have com¬ 
plained of a bidding system that locks 
them out of contracts. 

“The construction state is in some 
respects akin to the military-industrial 
complex in Cold War America (or the 
Soviet Union), sucking in the country's 
wealth, consuming it inefficiently, 
growing like a cancer and bequeathing 
both fiscal crisis and environmental dev¬ 
astation,” Gavan McCormack, a pro¬ 
fessor of Japanese history at Australia 
National University, wrote in “The 
Emptiness of Japanese Affluence." a 
recent book. 

In the past few years, public-works 
spending has been stepped up even more 
to stimulate a languid economy. Every¬ 
where you look, roads are being paved or 
dug up, rivers dammed, bays filled to 
make new land and arenas erected. 

Projects range from the $7.6 billion 
Akashi Straits Bridge, which is being 
built near Kobe and would be the longest 
bridge in the world, to the art museum 
for the small town of Ono, completed in 
1993, that displays only reproductions 
because there was no money to buy art. 

The statistics alone are staggering. 
Japan uses as much cement each year as 
the United States, despite having only 
half the population and only 4 percent of 
the land area. Japan's construction in¬ 
dustry, with 500,000 companies and 6-6 


million workers, accounts for 10 percent 
of the country's employment, compared 
with 5 percent to 7 percent in other 
advanced nations. 

Public-works spending in Japan 
amounts to about 6.6 percent of gross 
domestic product, compared with 1.6 
percent in the United States and 2 per¬ 
cent to 3 percent for West European 
nations. 

But now the cabinet has formed a task 
force to cut public-construction ex¬ 
penses. Citizens have begun to question 
government extravagance in public 
buildings, and environmentalists have 
started fighting the construction binge 
that has left only three of Japan's 113 
major rivers flowing freely and only 45 
percent of the coastline of the four main 
islands in a natural state. 

The press is having a field day digging 
up white elephants such as the pier at 
Fukui, a port to which ships rarely come, 
that is called a “10 billion yen fishing 
hole” by local residents. The pier, sitting 
empty except for fishermen, actually 
cost 30 billion yen ($250 million). 

A fiscal crisis is driving Japan's re¬ 
assessment After years of lecturing the 
United States to reduce its federal budget 
deficit Japan has developed a deficit of 
its own that is far worse proportionately 
than Washington's. 

In 1996. Japan's central and local 
budget deficits amounted to 7 percent of 
gross domestic product the highest 
among the Group of Seven major in¬ 
dustrial countries. The figure for the 
United States is less than 2 percent Some 
22 percent of the budget for next year will 
be spent on interest on the accumulated 
debt — more than on education, science 
and tbe military combined. 

The deficit results from several years 
of a weak economy, which forced the 
government to cut taxes and increase 
spending to prime the pump. Since 1992. 
the government bas announced stimulus 
packages valued at $560 billion, much of 
it to be spent on public works. 

Despite such infusions, the economy 
still has not fully recovered. Some econ¬ 
omists say the public-works stimulus is 
losing its effectiveness, although others 
say it kept the economy from a deeper 
recession. 


... •• :jisf ... 


Continued from Page 1 

PM. to 7 A.M. nationwide curfew. Anyone with¬ 
out identification caught outside those hours 
would be arrested and any resistance met with a 
warning shot and then a shot to “kiiL” the 
regulations said. 

Western envoys said they were concerned that 
Mr. Berisha would use the stare of emergency to 
tighten his grip on power in the long term and 
smother the opposition. An indication of this, 
they said, was the arrest of two opposition leaders 
Sunday night on their way to a meeting with 
Western ambassadors. The politicians were re¬ 
leased only after the intervention of the mayor of 
Tirana. Albert Brqjka. who was at the meeting, an 
envoy said 

Opposition politicians who have called for Mr. 
Berisha’s resignation and new parliamentary 
elections were in hiding Monday. 

The headquarters of the main opposition news¬ 
paper, Koha Jone, were destroyed by fire early 
Sunday by a group of about 20 plainclothes men 
believed to be members of tire secret police. 

A night guard and American missionaries who 
live adjacent to the building said the men visited 
three times, shooting into the first story, taking the 
guard hostage and men torching the offices. 

The silencing of Koha Jone, whose circulation 
trebled in tbe last two months as unrest over the 
HdEvPDKbarneAsMcivdftaa collapse of the financial schemes grew, was seen 
Two boys scavenging for ammunition in Vlore, where as particularly grave. Two employees of the 
five people were reported wounded in fighting Monday, newspaper— Zamir Dule, a journalist who cov- 


— ' ■••• ; 

. . r .. -■ '; 

-- -V - V. v/. 


e 


4K . 

*V** * - 

V, * 


> I 

. •» 


ers the secret police, and Anesti Nikolla, a driver 
— were seen picked up by plainclothes men 
Sunday night and remained missing Monday, the 
paper’s director, Nikolle Lesi said. 

Ben Blushi. the editor, who has received death 
threats in the past month, said as he stood outside 
the burned building: “I expected something. I 

expected to be arrested. But I didn't expea this.” 

The U.S.-based Soros Foundation, which sup- fr 
ports many media enterprises in the former Eastern 
bloc, lent $130,000 to the newspaper last year. 

Some Western envoys said they believed that 
Mr. Bensha was fixed on a barah crackdown but 
would ease control once he understood that for¬ 
eign aid was at stake. About one-third of the $960 
million budget last year came from European 
assistance, diplomats said. 

Washington increased aid to Albania this year to 
527 million from $20 million last year, with a major 
anphasis on “democracy budding.” Hie United 
States also pledged about $30 million in nonlethal 
military assistance that includes used army tracks, 
communications equipment and uniforms. 

■ Italy and Greece Halt Ferry Links 

Fearing a exodus of Albanians fleeing growing 
anarchy, Greece on Monday stopped its sole fercy 
service to Albania and stepped up patrols alone its 
romhern^n, Associated Press repJted 

r 1150 h , a, ? d fe V? to Albania and joined 

^ or * European Union plan to help # 
defuse the worse violence in Albania since 1990. * 


IMMIGRANTS: Smugglers Profit as Undocumented Workers Surge Ashore in Japan 


Continued from Page 1 

triggering a nationwide manhunt for 
about 140 Chinese the police said are 
still at large. The police have also cap¬ 
tured seven suspected snakeheads 

“There are so many of these cases 
every day, I can’t even keep straight 
what prefecture they’re from." said Yui- 
chi Motoyama. spokesman for the Japan 
Maritime Safety Agency. “It’s chaos.” 

The authorities said these people 
posed no national security threat, but did 
serve as an unpleasant reminder of one 
of Tokyo's worst nightmares: that polit¬ 
ical or economic turmoil in Pyongyang 
might one day launch thousands of 
hungry North Koreans toward Japan. 


Tbe number of foreigners living il¬ 
legally in Japan bas soared in recent 
years from an estimated 160,000 in 1991 
to 285,000 today, according to Japanese 
immigration authorities. 

Since 1990. it has been a crime in 
Japan to hire an illegal immigrant. 
Smugglers of undocumented workers 
face a year in jail. Immigration agents 
have started raiding construction sites, 
pig and chicken farms, and restaurants 
where many of tire foreign workers find 
jobs. While the authorities have doubled 
the pace of deportations, they still man¬ 
aged to oust only 4,650 illegal immi¬ 
grants in 1995. 

The vast majority of illegal job 
seekers arrive on airplanes — and more 


are getting caught at Nan la International 
Airport nearTokyo with stolen or forged 
travel documents, said Nobumko 
Futamura, bead of security for the Im¬ 
migration Bureau. 

But the invasion tty fishing boat has 
sparked a major immigration scare. Law 
enforcement officials have begun to 
openly encourage Japanese diplomats to 
pressure China and South Korea to crack 
down on smugglers. To stem the tide, 
police patrolling depopulated areas of 
Japan have enlisted fishermen to report 
all foreign-looking ships. Signs on remote 
beaches urge citizens to call the police if 
they spot suspicious boats or people. 

The police learned of one landing 
thanks tn a vegetable vendor. Shu 


outside a train station in Yamaguchi 
prefecture when two men approached 
herto ask for help in getting to Shinjuku 
Tokyo s entertainment district. 

“She understxxxi they were saying 
Shinjuku. Shinjuku,’ but couldn't un- 
derstand another word they said.” 
Takaioshi Shigeto of the police depart¬ 
ment in Eizaki said. “She thought thev 
e I5P dd ' ^ so she called the police^ 
men were captured and told 

Chinf . , ? lha L? ey ^ COrae from 
Gfiina s Fujian Province in a fishing boat 

80 olher People. “When they 

t V Vl one “*<> a to goto 
two apparently mused 
the truck.” Mr. Shigeto said. Their so 

“"tirades have not SE± 80 















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MARCH 1997 


I 


P-s 5 :--.- ■ - 



55s ?ca.!h:. 

..... '•'-uM- 


N 


tintira **-*%;> ^«- 

a^-iscteiock?' 36 !^ 

Wm^ ibL *ugy 

Ea^^SS 

&SS53hSP5*-» 

fr«Ofettrirs Vm £. ^ h1 ^.Vv 1 

bkMB - 

**», huTvnrV:^; 'f*v" *£■ 

!iw« «Kl a grWcfS?^ 


* sfc,,, S i -im l 0]tj 

:V S ; Coming 

T^riMunOT! i .'-.L'i 

gfr-WteRCur.^ 
©Mwexliirr". urn - - ■" -‘K- 
«%*> are di‘. u - ”.■.•71’: r ‘Vv 
"*•' "Pan ut :hs - V*“ "Jl* 

*e Jc^. ir. :-• . y e ‘£ 

artthe kis;d : •: 
; Seerirvr • 'j> - ? 7: 

trurr:'-/ . ~.V.^: 

Ste mm ^r , 'XV-~ i 
M a :u 


fefc-n? F:vf :-rc • .> -.TT > 
k--i-v. •. 

3* V: .• . • *>: 

MjpuhlSr.'-t: ’ i •. V .'." 1 

3SsSm. •*: -.-. ■: 
Mart* - .-, 


: *u 

-i-1• 

«****-■ ■*;'■• 

fc»» S f*4-. 

s... 

r '-$fc2 ...... 


•—”• -i-UU 


wr- r ■:. 
c. V- -»- 


r^l^ 

•toi-!w...s ! 

Ml:** :i 


1 



Micr 


I n a remarkalpweep, 
two different ^sutrishi 
Motors vehp cap¬ 
tured the top at places 
in the 19th DalrAgades- 
Dakar Rally jspite of 
L . blazing hot sunJd punish- 
_ ing road condtts- 
i. A grueling J>tor sport 
* event, the I5ay Dakar 
Rally ended oM-19 with 
t triumphant suits for 
* Mitsubishi, vse Pajero 
finis he d in fufsecond and 
i third pJ ac esJoIIowed in 
■jfburth phi by a 
- Mitsubishi /Challenger/ 
1 jMontero S pL This victo¬ 
ry was evepore signifi- 
1 leant for Mibishi in top, 
fertile firsthe,only v4hi- 
' teles basetpn mass-pro- 
«_ duced mods were allowed 
• Ito enter thjally. j 
; The lea/car, die Isam 
MItsubisn Oil Raliait 
f Pajero, ffi driven by 
f Kenjiro plunozuka a 
;W&tmbis‘ dnployeewho 
■ has pajcipated if the 
i Dakar My 12 tnris. He 


and his navigator. 
Frenchman Henri Magne, 
beat out the tough competi¬ 
tion in a field of 1S3 cars 
and trucks that started the 
rally, which began in 
Senegal and proceeded 
through Mali, Niger and 
Mauritania to end back in 
Senegal, passing through 
the desert wastelands of the 
northern Sahel on the bor¬ 
der of the Sahara, where 
temperatures hovered 
around 40 degrees Celsius. 
The Dakar is run through 
unpredictable territory,'’ 
commented Mr. Shinozuica. 
“It’s really a nightmare for 
the engineers.” 

In second place was the 
Team Off Road Express 
Mitsubishi Ralliart Pajero 
driven by Jean-Pierre 
Fontenay with Bruno 
Musmarra, followed by 
Bruno Saby and 
Dominique Serieys in their 
Team PIAA Mitsubishi 
RalHait Pajero, and Hiroshi 
Masuoka and Andreas 


I f “Mitsubishi” 

wasttnoduced in its entirety 
by MAdvertising Department 
of the Itemational Herald Tribune. ■ 
Warren; Hm Ellison, who is based in Paris. 
PaoGBM Director: Bill Mahder. 


Schulz in the Team Car 
Plaza Mitsubishi Oil 
Ralliart Challenger. 

In addition to taking the 
top four places in the rally. 
Mitsubishi also won almost 
all the major classes and 
categories, including Group 
Ti (mass-produced cross¬ 
country vehicles). Group 
T2 (improved petrol-driven 
cross-country vehicles) and 
Group T3/I (petrol-driven 
cross-country prototype). 

The opening leg of the 
rally consisted of narrow, 
twisting roads passing 
through heavily vegetated 
countryside. The strength 
of the competition from 
Nissan, Toyota, SsangYong 
and others is illustrated by 
the fact that there were 
eight different leg winners 
during the rally. 
Nevertheless, by the half¬ 
way point of the rally, in 
Agades, Niger, the three 
Mitsubishi leaders were 
separated only by a matter 
of minutes. The competi¬ 
tion bad clearly been left in 
the dust, and the three 
Mitsubishi Pajeros were 
fighting it out among them¬ 
selves. In Nema, 
Mauritania, the Pajero team 
manager decided that the 
lead car would remain 
unchallenged to the finish. 


From that point on. the 
Mitsubishi drivers were 
able to take it easy, driving 
carefully and avoiding 
risks. The three Pajeros and 
the Challenger/Montero 
Sport arrived at the seaside 
resort of Saint Louis with¬ 
out a scratch. The final leg, 
to Pink Lake, allowed the 
teams to show off their dri¬ 
ving stalls to thousands of 
spectators near Dakar. 

Mr. Shinozuka. thrilled 
with his victory, said, “It's a 
great feeling to win the 
Dakar at last. I have partic¬ 
ipated 12 times_Now it 

is a dream come true. The 
Dakar is the most popular 
motor sport event for Japan, 
and this result is good for 
me and good for 
Mitsubishi. I really enjoyed 
driving the Pajero T2.” Mr. 
Shinozuka was the first 
Japanese driver to win the 
Dakar evenL 

Of the 153 cars and 
(nicks that started, only 83 
made it back to Dakar, 
making this one of the most 
hotly contested and difficult 
Dakar rallies ever. The 
8,518 kilometer (5,293 
mile) event included 6^513 
kilometers of competitive 
legs through the rough ter¬ 
rain of the Sahel and along 
the fimges of the Sahara. 


I 


Jfr To the victor go the spods: 

Mitsubishi took aB of the top prires. 
The Pajero finished in first, second, and 


■tj third places. The fourth p&ce wirewr was a 
r ChallengerfMontero Sport A total of 153 cars and 
trucks began the race. 


M r . 

Fontenay, 

the driver of 

the second- 
placed Mitsu- 
bishi Pajero, 
noted that his car 
was “superb," with ^ 
the brakes, suspension, ’ 
engine and the rest work¬ 
ing together in perfect har¬ 
mony. 

The Mitsubishi Chalieog- 
er/Montero Sport that came 
in fourth was lauded for its 
performance by its driver, 
Mr. Masuoka: “We only 
had four months to test the 
Challenge r/Montero 
Sport," he pointed out. “but 
the car was perfect, and we 
had no problems at all apart 
from four punctures during 
the event The Challenger's 
performance was better 
than I expected. I am very 
happy to get fourth place, 
and my target next year is 
to be the overall winner.” 

Careful driving was the 
Mitsubishi strategy. Carlos 
Souza, who took first place 
in the Tl (near-standard 
vehicles) category in a 
Pajero, said, “We drove 
very carefully, and we were 
kind to the car from the 
beginning. We let all the 
others go fast and break 
their cars .. . The car per- 


formed 
* perfectly, 
and we 
never had any 
Sjflr serious prob- 
lems." 

The winner of the 
W Marathon class was 
~ once again a Mitsubishi 
Pajero, driven by Miguel 
Prieto and Carlos Mas. In 
this class, the crew is not 
allowed to change any 
major parts on the car, 
which are sealed by the 
organizers. 

Jean-Pierre Strugo and 
Bruno Cattarelli unexpect¬ 
edly pulled their Pajero into 
seventh place and won the 
T3/1 category. Said Mr. 
Strugo, “I secretly hoped to 
get eighth place ... but to 
get here in seventh place 
and win T3/1 was even bet¬ 
ter than my secret ambi¬ 
tion.” 

The director of Sonauto 
Ralliart, Karl Die, summed 
up: “We won all the classes 
we entered with 
Mitsubishi; it cannot get 
better than that. It has been 
a brilliant rally.” 

The two Mitsubishi 
FR415 4WD-RS trucks that 
provided parts and service 
also made a fine showing, 
experiencing no mechani¬ 
cal problems. • . 


Mitsubishi Pajero T2 


Length: 4,030 mm 
Width: 1,885 mm 
Whehbase: 2,420 mm 
Weight. 1,700 kg 
Engine: Type 6G74. V6 
DOHC 24-vatve 
DtSPLACEMBtn 3,486 cc 
Bore/Stroke: 93.0 x 85.8 
mm 

Maxnuu torque: 34 m/kg 
at3000ipm 

Maximum power: 270 bhp 


Transmission: manual 5- 
speedgearbox 
Suspension: front double 
wishbone with coil springs; 
rear 4-fink, rigid axle with 
coil springs 

Brakes: ventilated discs + 
4-pot caliper 
Tires: Michefin 16/78-16 
Fuel capacity: 400 liters 
Maximum speed: 195 km/h 
(121 mfies/h) 


Mitsubishi Chalienger/Montero 
Sport T2* 


Length: 4,530 mm 
Wdth: 1,875 mm 
Whfh.basf: 2,725 mm 
Weight: 1.900 kg 
Engine: Type 6G74. V6 
DOHC24-vah/e 
Dispiacemqci: 3,496 cc 
Bore/Stroke: 

93.0 x 85.8 mm 
Maximum torque: 33 m/kg 
at3000 rpm 

Maximum power: 250 bhp 
Transmission: manual 5- 
speed gearbox 


Suspension: front double 1 
wishbone with torsion bar 
springs; rear 3-fink, rigid ( 
axle with coil springs 
Brakes: ventilated (fiscs + 
4-pot caliper 
Tires: Itichefin 16/78-16 
Fub. capacity: 350 fiters 
Maxhum speed: 

180 km/h (112 miles/h) 

*72: improved cross-coun¬ 
try car category 


to 

RUNE 

,1997 

1GE9 


rtW> tv- ■ 

jUBMti 
P 1 J . 

- It » V. -ii 


m-? i- -•' 




Ip W v. 


\edAnii<i Oa^_ 

nhrt -* _ 7 — 

jMW*» i: ' : ‘ 

tftdse-/ r . 

-- L - 

rrI&- ^ ^ 

4;^ .■ l \ 

*&**■'. *■*--*; 5 


mBnm. *-■ ■ 




. ..-if- - 

- * l * , 


; v- : - 


CMH 


.J.dturi 




ifcX*'** “'.'J. 

• V* - 


wmm 



* : • 
A f'i ■. *-V 

V -v 

r- 

•>»>»>< -y- 






>i l : 


mm 








:t. t > > 












Some of tbc cqnipiwau strawn nay vary axxonfing la narira. 


Mifeubishi’s production Pajeros 
ssdzep gruelling Dakar Rally. 


^W97^Jt 



2nd&3rd 

QveraliS^ 


The Dakar rally is the world's toughest 
test for cars. This year, drivers struggled for 
16 days through 8,518 km of steamy 
jungle and burning desert in the heart of 
north Africa. 

More than a third of the cars entered 
gave up by the halfway point. Practically 
anything that can go wrong with a car 
happened to somebody. 

Mitsubishi did not create a special car for 


this rally. The three cars Mitsubishi sent 
across Africa are very similar to any three 
Pajeros you might see on the highway. 

But at the end, not only did those three 
ordinary Mitsubishi Pajeros finish 1-2-3 
overall, they were all more than four hours 
ahead of every other automaker 

That's why the win is so special—because 
the cars weren’t. 

Depending on how you look at it. 


Mitsubishi 


MITSUBISHI 


f#*r :\V 

.fat 


v ■- 


A 

MITSUBISHI 

MOTORS 


..«i*i- • ' , • ' 







PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Netanyahu Due to Take 
One-Way Road to Egypt 
For Talks With Mubarak 


By Douglas Jehl 

Nr*i hwt Times Service 


CAIRO — In whai has become a 
ritual for Israeli prime ministers since 
the signing of the Camp David accords 
in 1979. Benjamin Netanyahu is to visit 
Egypt this week to discuss the quest for 
a wider peace in the Middle East. 

Following a path trodden in turn by 
Menachem Begin. Yitzhak Shamir. Shi¬ 
mon Peres andYilzhak Rabin, Mr. Net¬ 
anyahu has already traveled to Egypt 
once since taking office in June. 

But the leader who has welcomed all 
of them to his country said Sunday that 
the rime was still not right for him to 
make a return visit to Israel. 

“Now. with the present situation, it is 
difficult.” President Hosni Mubarak 
said in an interview, reflecting a stance 
that he has made a hallmark of nearly 16 
years in power. “The public opinion 


Graft Trial Begins 
For 2 Ex-Treasurers 
Of French Socialists 

Reuters 

LYON—Two former treasurers 
of the Socialist Party in France 
went on trial here Monday over 
allegations they received illegal 
contributions through a covert 
campaign financing scheme that 
dated to the late 1980s. 

Henri Emmanuel/i. who served 
as the Socialist Party chief after 
being its treasurer from 1988 to 
1991. and Andre Laignel are among 
50 defendants in a trial expected to 
last about a month. 

The others include elected local 
Socialist officials and business ex¬ 
ecutives. 

Mr. Emmanuelli and Mr. Laign¬ 
el are accused of receiving illegal 
campaign contributions from a 
front company known as Urba, 
which prosecutors say demanded 
consulting fees from businesses in 
return for public works contracts. 
Both men deny the allegations. 

The prosecutors say the Socialists 
illegally raked off 9.4 million francs 
($1.65 million) from public works 
contracts in Marseille in 1988 and 
1989. Mr. Emmanuelli was con¬ 
victed of similar charges in 1995. 


should accept my trip there.” 

In the world of diplomacy, which is 
based on reciprocity, Mr. Mubarak's 
refusal — with one exception — to 
travel to a country with which Egypt has 
been at peace for 18 years has long 
raised eyebrows. 

But Mr. Mubarak said Sunday that 
under current circumstances, the Egyp¬ 
tian public would not even approve a 
visit to a second-tier Israeli town, and he 
said he had little faith that such a gesture 
would have any effect on the quest for 
peace. 

The Egyptian leader did visit Jeru¬ 
salem briefly to attend the funeral of 
Yitzhak Rabin in November 1995. As 
vice president in 1977. he traveled with 
President Anwar Sadat to the Israeli 
town of Beersheba. 

He said that in the days before Mr. 
Rabin’s assassination, at a time when 
relations between Egypt and Israel had 
grown particularly warm, he was on die 
verge of announcing that he was pre¬ 
pared ar last to make a return journey to 
Beersheba as president. 

Israel has long said that it would 
welcome an official visit by the Egyp¬ 
tian leader, and in recent years it has said 
so with increasing impatience. 

The United States has quietly sought 
to persuade Mr. Mubarak to make such a 
trip, and it may do so again at the end of 
this week, when he is to travel to Wash¬ 
ington before a meeting with President 
Clinton next Monday. 

But Mr. Mubarak said the policies of 
Mr. Netanyahu’s conservative govern¬ 
ment had so angered ordinary Egyptians 
that it would be a mistake for him to 
make the journey unless those policies 
changed. 

‘ ‘The main problem is the Palestinian 
problem, which is affecting the public 
opinion in our country," Mr. Mubarak 
said. 

Mr. Mubarak presented a staunch de¬ 
fense of what he described as Egypt's 
independent role in the quest for a 
broader peace. “Our mission is to help 
in narrowing the gap. not in adopting 
everything the Israelis want to do.” he 
said. 

Saying it could pose “a very big 
problem.” he repeated his sharp cri¬ 
ticism of the Israeli government’s ap¬ 
proval last week of a plan to build a new 
neighborhood for Jews in Arab East 
Jerusalem, a decision also criticized by 
the United States. But he gave no in¬ 
dication that he had considered protest¬ 
ing by canceling Mr. Netanyahu’s visit, 
which is to take place Wednesday. 



Advancing, 
labels Assert 
Mdmtu Must 


io. 

iet 


GHi Up 


Power 


W/icr France? 
AlVatrw - • 


I Wid 6S<ennuVR«ulen 

Mr. Netanyahu surrounded by bodyguards Monday during tour of an Arab neighborhood in Jerusalem. 

CLINTON: He Criticizes Israeli Plans to Build in East Jerusalem 

Continued from Page 1 

Israeli side, continue to help the parties 
work through issues on which they are 
clearly divided or see differences.” 

Mr. McCurry said the president and 
Mr. Arafat had met for 80 minutes. He 
called the encounter “a veiy good, very 
textured meeting.” 

Less than two years ago, the Israeli 
prime minister at the time, Yitzhak Ra¬ 
bin had to abandon plans for a more 
limited Jewish building project in East 
Jerusalem in the face of pressure at 
home and abroad. 

On Sunday. Mr. Arafat told a Pal¬ 
estinian-American group that the Israeli 
construction plan violated the self-rule 
agreements signed with the Rabin gov¬ 
ernment, under which Israel was to halt 
construction of housing units in the 
West Bank and Gaza Strip. 

Mr. Arafat, who says he wants the 
UN Security Council to denounce the 
plan, said that “not one single house” 
should be added in East Jerusalem. 

Israel claims the entire city as its 
capital, including the eastern portion, 
which it seized in the 1967 Middle East 
war. The Palestinians say the eastern 
portion should be the capital of a future 
Palestinian state. 

Under the 1993 self-rule agreement, 
the future of Jerusalem is to be the 
subject of the next stage of peace ne¬ 
gotiations. Both sides have sought to 
cement their claims before those talks. 

The latest Israeli proposal is to build 
6,500 apartments, to house about 



VitRiliiln/DwAMoiudftni 

Mr. Clinton and Mr. Arafat meeting Monday at the White House. 


30.000 Jews, on a pine-covered hill that 
stands between Bethlehem to the south 
and two Palestinian neighborhoods to 
the north. The neighborhood is called 
Har Homa in Hebrew and Jebel Abu 
Ghenaim in Arabic. 

The Netanyahu government has 
pledged that in a first phase, when 2.500 
of the apartments would be built, it 
would also gram 3.000 private Arab 
building permits for other parts of the 
city, more than four times the total num¬ 


ber issued since 1990. Constraints on 
Arab construction even as thousands of 
apartments were built for Jews has 
turned East Jerusalem from an all-Arab 
city to one in which Jews have a slight 
advantage in numbers. 

Mr. Netanyahu, trying to ease Arab 
anger, visited A! Thouri. a neighbor¬ 
hood of East Jerusalem, on Monday and 
promised improvements in the Arab 
part of the city, Reuters reported. 


Half of 
our network. 



German Civilian Workers Go on Strike 
At U.S. Army Bases Over Severance Pay 


The Associated Press 

FRANKFURT — About 2.000 Ger¬ 
mans walked off their jobs at U.S. mil¬ 
itary bases Monday in a dispute over job 
security and severance pay. union of¬ 
ficials said. 

The strike, approved last week by 80 
percent of union members, was expec¬ 
ted to spread to other bases throughout 
the week. 

The U.S. military has 15.000 locally 
hired civilian workers in Germany. 
Combined with those working for other 
NATO allies — Britain. France and 
Belgium — 35,000 civilians could be 
affected by the strikes. 

The strike follows the reduction of 
U.S. and NATO troops in Germany and 
resulting cutbacks in the local work 
force. 

Lieutenant Colonel J.D. von 
Merveldt said he had no reports of ci¬ 
vilian employees striking at British 
bases Monday butadded, “We’ve heard 
we may have strikes on Wednesday.” 

The U.S. Army says it has offered an 


improved indemnity package — a max¬ 
imum of 12 months’ severance pay 
compared with the current limit of no 
more than five months. 

But talks deadlocked last month, it 
said, because the unions wanted to 
speed up the schedule by which em¬ 
ployees would become eligible for the 
maximum payment 

A public services union representa¬ 
tive in Stuttgart said 1,400 of the 6.000 
civilian employees at U.S. Army bases 
in Bavaria went on strike Monday. 

About 500 civilians working for the 
U.S. Army in Hanau also went on strike, 
said Beatrix Mueller, a spokeswoman 
for a union of white-collar workers in 
Frankfurt 

D J. Loza da. a spokeswoman for the 
414th Base Support Battalion in Hanau. 
confirmed that the union report "is 
about right.” 

Ms. Mueller said the strikes were 
expected to be broadened in coming 
days to include bases near Frankfurt 
Wiesbaden and Giessen. 


f-Presse 

GOMs"Zaire — Zairian rebels 
poised Size Kisangani, the last gov- 
emroentSonghoId w 
MondaySit President 
Seko mi give up power before they 

S *®?5ti , niand direct negotiations 
with Mobi to organize his departure 
in older tc a ve the management of the 
country tcien of integrity, a rebel 
spokesmarGilles Ingala Gwamona. 
said Mondiin Goma. 

Marshal lburu is in Nice, following 
medical tes One of his aides said he 
was not expt&i to return to his country 

before next vfc, , . . , 

Mr. Gwania, a member of the del¬ 
egation fironhe Rebel Alliance of 
Democratic F>es for the Liberation of 
the Congo (Ze) f which took pan in 
initial peace tis in South Africa last 
month, said "y suspension of hos¬ 
tilities can onho/ne” once Marshal 
Mobutu had relished power, which 
he has held sinc>965. ^ 

“Those who \u a cease-fire before ▼ 
talks have the soljm of weakening the 
allian ce.” he saiThe alliance began 
its insurrection 1 October and has 
seized control of ast swathe of east¬ 
ern Zaire. 

Over the week*, the rebel leader. 
Laurent Kabila, si his men were on 
the verge of takin£jsangani. having 
already overrun tw^ore key towns — 
Lubutu and Kindu -and the last main 
camp for Rwandan tu refugees. 

Rebel advances h* prompted tficu- 
sands of refugees to I?. Mr. Kabila had 
warned of an assaulbainst the carrp. 
Tingi-Tingi. where, Charged, fbnrer 
Rwandan goyemmeitroops and ex¬ 
tremist Hun. militias 're being anted 
by the Zairim Army id intimidariig 
and torturing refugees. 

A rebel ftreign affa official. Bie- 
itna Karaha. ruled outhe idea of a 
national uniy governor and sail: . 
**We are figiting for liberation «f i 
our country, rot to obtriijobs as sorre 
malicious pectle suggest: 

He also appeared to exode dny par 
tition of ZaiK but also tid hat re¬ 
taining the tentorial integty of the 
country was ‘not a probLn for the 
alliance unlessbe Kinshasa ;sime re¬ 
mains in powei” \ 

The latest rfcel gains, M Karaha 
said, were “stxesses for a popular 
army that is figiting mercenary* ’ He 
added that “Mo'utu is counting two 
armies that canid out genocide iVheir 
own countries, Rwandan HuitAand 
Bosnian Serbs.’ 1 

pie govemrent claims thatyhe 
rebels are back© by Tutsi-led regies 

which had beeni home in^extie^r 
many of the Rwadan Tutsi rebel SJ- 
diers who seized pwer in Kigali af*- 
the 1994 genocideof more than halli 
million Tutsi mid noderate Hutu. 

All three neigh being countries den 
this. \ 

The rebels’ “justi emioister.” Kon- 
golo M weoze. denouittd Monday whar 
he called "raaneuvendon the questionf 
of Hutu refugees b; ome countries 
such as France and feltium to put the 
Mobutu regime back nlhe saddle.” 

He appeared to bei jfening to re¬ 
newed international cife for a foreign 
buffer force to go ti Zaire to help 
refugees, which was ast month pro¬ 
posed again by the Orgnizafion of Af¬ 
rican Unity, France an senior UN of¬ 
ficials. 

"Everybody knew tat Tingi-Tingi 
was a military camp as Veil as a refugee 
camp,” Mr. Mwenze erphasized. 

But in NairobL a spokeswoman for 
the UN World Food Pbgram, Brenda 
Barton, said that the cenps at Tingi- 
Tingi “appeared empr” when aid 
workers flew over on Suii 


L.,,. 




unday. 


CROSSWORD 




ACROSS 

i “Let's go'” 
s Miss Cinders of 
old comics 
a Stravinsky's “Le 

-du 

printemps" 


i« It's pulled on a 
pulley 

IB Music for two 
1 C Farm units 
17 Once more 
is Schooner part 
ia Signified 


5tti&:,air admits io being a regional airline. It s just that our region covers roughly 130 destinations worldwide, with new 
ones added continuously. It's not bad. but there's room for improvement, considering that the globe boasts aboul 400 major 
airports. You might ask, quite legitimately, what we propose io do should you plan a trip to one of the destinations we're 
not Hying to. The answer is pleasant. 


swissewv£? worlds most refreshing cirfsne. 


s 



***** 


HOTEL METROPOLE 
GENEVE 

A PRIVILEGED PLACE! 

34. quai GbwralOHSan 1211 Genera 3 
^ Tel: (41-221 31B 32 00 
Fax: {41-22} 318 33 00 
£-mail:www meftopole.ch_ 


20 Hit NBC 
comedy 

23 Passing grade 

24 Director 
Howard 

23 X's In bowling 
27 It's behind 
home plate 

32 Sugar source 

33 ‘-American 

Cousin’ (1S59 
comedy) 

34 Results of big 
hits? 

36 "Gandhi" 
setting 
39 Shiite, e.g 
411997 has two 

43 Brothers and 
sisters 

44 Rattens 

46 Plains home 
48 Tam-o'-shanter 
46 Yin's 

counterpart 
Si Not the subs 
S3 Libera ce wore 
them 

56 A.F L.'s partner 
ST Temps sell. 

S8 Novelty 
timepiece 
64 Cinnamon unit 

86-Seltzer 

er First name In 
super- 
modeidom 
68 Actress Berry 
M Alice doesn't 
work here 
anymore 

70 Campus 
authority 

71 Buzzing 

72 Organic luel 

73 Kluiz's 
utterance 

DOWN 

1 Pack in 

2"-Lisa' 

3 Uke a William 
5a fire piece 


4 Alternative to 
J.F.K. and La 
Guardis 
s Oilers’homa 

6 Molokai meal 

7 For fear that 
aEsqs. 

9 Belustv 
character on 
“S.N.L“ 

10 Expert 

11 Bartender's 
supply 

12 “Walk Away 
-’ (1986 hit) 

13 -Park. Colo. 

*i Pear type 

22 Like some 
stocks, lor short 

26 Lodges 

27 Part ot an old 
English 

Christmas feast 

28 Atmosphere 
20 Hodgepodge 

30 Cross out 

31 Glazier's items 
» Back-to-school 

time' Abbr. 

37 Building 
support 
36 Egyptian 
threats 
40 Romeo 
42 Maine’s is rocky 
*s Tee-hee 
47 Psychiatrist 






n - 




17 " 




Z" 


-J 



T~ 

m 

r 

TT- 

TT- 

13” 






r 






1 

2T 




28 

1— 






PwoW by Etoman c. OonU 

'G'lSetp York 


Times/Edited by Fill Shorts. 


Solution to PuzJle of March 3 


Berne 

7 a 

■■ 

■ 


so Bearded 
creature 

92 “Holy-’’ 

n 

a 

□ 

0 

m 

0 

a 

0 

0 

0 1 

M Russian-bom 

0 

□ 

a 

D 0 I 


violin isl 
Schneider. 
Informally 
94 These, in Madna 
33 Rascal 
58 “Twittering 
Machine' artist 

60 Neighbor of 
Kan 

61 Nondairy 
spread 


Bit ol thunder 
63 Dolls since 
1961 

escarp's 151 


□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

0 

□ 

□ 

□ 

0 

0 

a 

a 

1 

a 

□ 

a 

10 

a 

a 

□ 




















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 


PAGE 13 


INTERNATIONAL 


kbels aL 

rlv tip Po 


Protesters Await 
Nuclear Load 


■ ^ _ - .... — : 



... . 


BRIEFLY 


- 



• v- .. -»*. . - • »-.■» . 

w: - • 


GG\J* y 

™ ^ Vr’ v 

Tpe^i 

“VkV . v,h H. 

Ih Mc^.., 1,- Vl| .._ 

wstiuf kiL-/. .._*■■ •■•■ ■■. ' 
urur. ik -'i.- -J^P-Wu 

Niar 1 ^^: r 

-di,.,-.; !i.‘l : .- 

; 

4r.*. , ’ 

V. 

f-'. 


. $iste Uposal Convoy on Its Last Stage 


Byfcn Cowell 

Ne^fjifnes Sen-ice 


rec« 


B 

many 
and w\uld- 
I to 

, railroad tra 
But, 


ilia.’ pt.Vw» 


h«- 


— ■ •■ -" \ 


■k> iu. j 

.. - . V , .. _ 

• ■ ‘O v /ii 

r. 

0<r >.* 
.im K.. 

Ja-.jv . - .. 


!«.?• 

,r-. 


• i f.. 

'"toll* 

• rv 

n.l.,, 

;■&* 

; -/"x. 

... ' 4 Dw; 

, Vt, 

■ ,7 

•"■ ■■■ iljj. 

/■■'runa 
" i\' ■ 

•’• 'fi , 

|l| J»2 

V'- : -Jih.i 

; is 
■•■•«! 


-Jllf 

Bi 

• O' 

■ 'id 
v .\ 




^ rolled through Ger- 
toys drawing protests 
aboteurs, even people 
lemselves down on the 
store its advance 
by 30.000 police of¬ 
ficers arose land in postwar Ger- 
-jnany'slbi^ security operation, a 
, train csW nuclear waste to tem- 
-.porary Irfe in central Germany 
L..neated iftfl Monday. 

Still, jfeast 10.000 protesters 
awaited tfassive nuclear waste con- 
.. lainers fq final, snail 's-pace stage of 
; tbeir joi/ by road Tuesday to the 
storage Sties at Gorleben, conclud¬ 
ing an dal nuclear pilgrimage that 
. has bed part magnet for anarchic 
r defiance die authorities and part 
token Germans’ deep concern over 
F atomic power. 

[ is carrying six containers of 
ar fuel from the southwest- 
F Waiheim to Dannenberg in 
where the waste will be 

8 trucks for the 19-kilometer 
il stage to the Gorleben 
e depot east of Hannov- 

ials and some politicians 
it, alongside peaceful 
. the protest, which has 
me every year since the 
jclear waste to Gorleben 
/ears ago. has drawn in 
r otttrirtio see the occasion as a pretext 
foi 'rent confrontation. 

(fttheless. the train and road con- 
^vo trying nuclear waste from sev- 
. er Orman power stations and from a 
■ re tossing plant at La Hague in 
-Fip is also depicted by environ- 
m tasts as a reflection of broad op- 
pc jn in Germany to nuclear power. 

ibonstrators on Monday dug holes 
in Highway to be used by the convoy 
ar bxrked highways with (rectors. To 
ct itr protests, the police deployed 
w :rcannon and helicopters. Seven 
-p< cofficers were injured; one of them 


every Wednesday. 

> advertise contact Fred Rorum 
TeL + 33 i 4143 93 91 
Fax:+ 33 14143 93 70 
or vour nearest DfT office 
or representative. 






seriously, when water cannon in a pro¬ 
cession of police vehicles on its way to 
Gorleben collided with a patrol car. 

The police deployment is estimated 
as costing taxpayers more than $40 mil¬ 
lion. 

“The problem is that too many 
people have gonen involved in this and 
want to pursue their own agenda with 
violence to draw attention to them¬ 
selves.” said Gerhard Glogowski. the 
interior minister of Lower Saxony 
state. 

Against that argument, the Greens 
Party maintains that the issue is not so 
much the transport of nuclear waste as 
the use of nuclear power in general. 

“There is only one alternative, to 
abolish nuclear power in the face of 
popular protest,” said Gunda Roestel. a 
leader of the Greens. 

The authorities have banned all 
demonstrations along the entire route 
taken by the nuclear-waste train and 
road convoy but that has had no effect 
on the readiness of some protesters to 
try to block its progress. 

Near Goettingen on Monday, the 17- 
car, 1,900-ton train was held up 20 
minutes when protesters slipped 
through a line of police in riot gear and 
clambered onto tne tracks in front of it. 

As the train began its journey 
Monday, 172 protesters were briefly 
detained then released, the police said. 

In one protest, demonstrators de¬ 
scribed by police as militants set off a 
pipe bomb near tracks at Hanau. No 
injuries were reported 
The nuclear waste is being transpor¬ 
ted in specially constructed containers 
known as Castors, the acronym for the 
English-language words Cask for Stor¬ 
age and Transport of Radioactive Ma¬ 
terial, whose outer shell is made of 
seamless cast iron. The containers, 
which are monitored for radioactive 
seepage, are said by German authorities 
to be capable of storing radio-active 
materials safely for tens of thousands of 
yean. 

Protests against the transport have 
been gathering since last week, when 
protesters sabotaged railroad tracks and 
even schoolchildren occupied school 
halls to prevent the police from using 
them as temporary barracks. 

Joschka Fischer, the national leader 
of the Greens Party, said the “gov¬ 
ernment is pushing through its nuclear 
energy policy like a police state.” 

“ R is irresponsible to carry on with 
nuclear energy when we don’t know 
what to do with the damned waste.” 


v. •• 



.X. . .!<■ r -SS?.. : 

b j*«. ■vs?-’, ■“ »-*' v “ 

. “ . ... ~ v» « aaB' 

4^ r &>§*W&' 




v- 

. 

r :;. .. 

; j::. ■ - ■ *>: ' 


raa >Mb *whi 

Masked anti-nuclear activists walking in front of a road blockade Monday near the German 
nuclear-waste storage facilities in Gorleben, where a convoy of trucks will carry tbe waste. 

Stanislav Shatalin, Economist, Dies 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Stanislav Shatalin, 62. an econ¬ 
omist who co-wrote a radical plan in 1990 to reform 
Russia’s centralized economy, died Monday. 

The Russian Academy of Sciences announced 
Mr. Shatalin's death but did not disclose the cause. 

Working in 1990 under the last Soviet leader, 
Mikhail Gorbachev. Mr. Shatalin and Grigori 
Yavlinsky, a liberal politician, created a 500-day 
plan to transform the state-controlled economy 
into a market-oriented system. 

But Mr. Gorbachev scrapped the blueprint, and 
Mr. Shaialin accused him of caving in to pressure 
from Communist hard-liners and of abandoning 
his reformist approach. 

“The country is in a state of deep crisis, decay 
and panic.” Mr. Shatalin wrote in 1991 after Mr. 
Gorbachev had abandoned the plan. “Economic 
catastrophe is approaching and nothing is done to 
avoid it.” 

Mr. S hatal in said he was compelled to ‘ ‘take to 
heart the misfortunes and hopes of the Russian 
people.” He advocated social protection, includ¬ 
ing unemployment benefits, and social justice. 

Raymond Lambert 82, Paved Way to Everest 

NwYMTenesSerice 

Raymond Lamben, 82. a Swiss mountaineer 
who came within 800 vertical feet of immortality in 
1952 but had to console himself ever after with the 
knowledge that he had paved the way for Sir 
Edmond Hillary’s conquest of Mount Everest a 
year later, died in Geneva on Feb. 24 of a lung 
disorder. 

Scaling Mount Everest has become so common¬ 
place that it is easy to forget how formidable the 


challenge seemed in 1952, when Mr. Lambert and his 
Sherpa companion, Tenzing Norgay, came as close 
as anyone before them who lived to tell the tale. 

For a century the Himalayan mountain on the 
Nepal-Tibet border had been recognized as the 
world's highest, but beginning in 1921 repeated 
efforts to scale it had failed in the thin air and 
vicious storms around the peak. 

In the end, their rudimentary oxygen equipment, 
which could be used only at rest and not on the 
move, proved insufficient for tbe task. 

Mr. Tenzing joined Sir Edmund's expedition a 
year later, in which they conquered the mountain. 
Although Mr. Lambert continued to climb in the 
Himalayas and elsewhere, he never tried Everest 
again. 

Vicente Parra, 66, Leading Man in Spain 

MADRID (AP) — Vicente Parra, 66. one of 
Spain’s most famous leading men in films of the 
1950s, died of cancer here Sunday. 

Mr. Parra was most identified with his starring 
role as a 19th century Spanish king in two films. 
“Donde vas Alfonso XII7” (Where Are You Go¬ 
ing. Alfonso XII?) in 1956 and the sequel “Donde 
vas, triste de ti?” (Where Are You Going. Poor 
Thing?). 

After those films became big hits. Mr. Parra 
starred mainly in comedies in the 1960s. working 
with the most important directors active during the 
Franco dictatoiship. - 

Lenore Hershey, 78. a former editor of Mc¬ 
Call's magazine and The Ladies' Home Journal, 
died of complications from Parkinson’s disease in 
New York on Feb. 27. 


Iraq Cites Only 9 UN Deals 

BAGHDAD—Iraq has submitted 222 food and med¬ 
ical contracts for United Nations approval since Decem¬ 
ber under the oil-for-food deal, but only nine have been 
accepted, an Iraqi minister said Monday. 

“The only ones that have been approved were three 
contracts to buy wheat from Australia and France, three to 
purchase milk from Tunisia and France, one to buy tea 
from Szi Lanka, one to buy rice from Thailand, and one 
contract to purchase medicine from Britain,” Commerce 
Minister Mohammed Mahdi Saleh said. 

Mr. Saleh said the first shipment of French wheat was 
due to arrive at the end of Miurh. 

The United Nations said Saturday that it had so far 
approved 11 contracts worth $150 million. (AFP) 

Mandela’s Second Stop: Brunei 

BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN, Brunei — President 
Nelson Mandela of South Africa arrived here Monday on 
his second visit to Brunei since his release from apartheid 
jails in 1990. 

Mr. Mandela, who is on a 10-day, four-nation Asian 
tour, arrived from the Philippines. He is being accom¬ 
panied — for the first time on a state visit — by his 
companion, Graca Machel. 51, the widow of Mozam¬ 
bique’s founding president, Samora Machel. 

The Islamic government of Brunei has not commented 
on their traveling together as an unwed couple. 

Mr. Mandela will leave for Singapore on Wednesday 
and visit Malaysia the next day. (AP) 

Mexico City Mayoral Race Set 

MEXICO CITY — Mexico's two main opposition 
parties have picked well-known candidates to run in the 
first election for mayor of Mexico City, setting the stage 
for an arduous electoral struggle. 

Late on Sunday, the center-left Party of the Democratic 
Revolution overwhelmingly voted in favor of its two- 
time presidential candidate, Cuauhtemoc Cardenas. 

Though not all the votes were counted, he said his 
opponent, Porfirio Munoz Ledo, had recognized his vic- 
lory and congratulated him. 

In a separate selection process Sunday, the center-right 
National Action Party selected a former leader, Carlos 
Castillo Peraza, to run as its candidate. 

For tbe first time, on July 6, residents of the capital will 
elect their own mayor, ending a custom in which the 
president hand-picked a “regent” from his governing 
Institutional Revolutionary Party. (Reuters) 

3 Soldiers Die in Colombia 

BOGOTA — Battles in the east and northeast of 
Colombia over the weekend left at least three soldiers and 
more than 20 leftist rebels dead, army sources said. 

The latest fighting broke out Sunday near the town of 
Restrepo in a mountainous area on the edge of the eastern 
plains, about 60 kilometers (40 miles) from Bogota. Two 
soldiers died and six others were wounded, an army 
officer said. 

He said that about 15 rebels of the 53d Front of the 
Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia were also 
killed. 

In separate clashes near the town of Tam, in northeast 
Arauca Province, nine rebels and one soldier died in 
heavy fighting, according to the regional army com¬ 
mander, General Rafael Hernandez. (Reuters) 


BOOKS 


■n ? 


•: rs. • ► • ■ 

:r x - 


V;. 

tile-. 


: A UFRF MATTHEW ARNOLD 

By Niche Murray. 400 pages. $27.95. 

. Sl Marti 

■Review by Richard D. Altick 

rpHESre prosperous times for high- 
X quali biographies of Victorian 
- writers. lie past year or so we have had 
-Juliet Bar — exhaustively — on the 
-Brontes, xta MacCarthy — scarcely 
r bssso—. William Morris, and Morton 
-Cohen onewis Carroll. Now another 
well-nesebed and Eminently readable 
?, study is aid to the shelf: Nicholas Mur- 
:rmy on fchew Arnold. It is unusually 
7 timely, ioat it follows by only a few 
'months 2 appearance of tbe first 
1 volumes Cecil Y. Lang’s long-awaited 
'-■six-volur edition of Arnold's letters. 
Murray H access to the manuscript col¬ 


lection at the University of Virginia in 
Charlottesville on which the Lang edition 
is based as well as to Arnold's weekly 
letters to his mother, kept at Balliol. his 
old Oxford college. The persuasiveness of 
his engagingly portrait owes much to tbe 
wealth of domestic detail and family feel¬ 
ing contained in these sources. 

As a poet of great lyrical gifts, Arnold's 
place in tbe canon seems secure, despite 
tbe fact that all the poems he wrote of 
more than passing interest, the product of 
a few youthful years, can handily be 
contained in a small volume. He was not 
a failed poet, but an uncompleted one. For 
a century and more, his biographers have 
tried to explain why, ai so ewly an age, his 
poetic resources dried up and his ima¬ 
ginative energies were transformed into 
intellectual Mies. Tbe young Alfred Ten¬ 
nyson's weltschmerz similarly gave way 


CHESS 


By 


Robert Byme 



OBl Benjamin beat Johan Hellsten in 
“^Rrfmd 6 infhe Rilton Cup in Stock- 

W 

\, l hrief Sielian Defense, became a 

— och Defense with 5 d4. and after 
■sr Vc6 6 Bb3Bd6 7 dc Bc5 8 0-0Nge7 
_j. bd2, a hivily used Tarrasch Van- 

* t arose. T .. 

— 'ack hasNtarted a reasonable roo- 
_J ition of tis pieces, but it is nec- 

V to maittain constant vigilance to 

— to his opponent from arranging me 

tnge of several minor pieces that 
S. cresult in the isolated d5 pawns s 
^ biing an exploitable weakness. 

10 Nb3, a retreat with 10.~Bb6 

~ is considered faulty because of 11 

— Rid J£ Be3. either obtaining a 

sereotat of the black king bishop or 

‘ chaining its exchange. 

noint of 11 Bd3 was to prevent 
lit? in view of 12 BhT? Kh 7 J? 

-' Bufsten’s reply. 11 -Kh£j 

bibre should have coptedaNtgei 
““ Shts Jbmgcbuan game pom^me 

— Oljd in Yerevan, Annerna, which 


hblstshblack 


went 1 l_h6 12 h3 Nf5 13 Rel Qf6 14 
Bc2Rd8 15Qd3g6 16Bd2Nh4,witha 
complex battle. 

Hellsten’s I8..ilac8 misplaced a 
rook. He had no play on the c file and 
could have used this rook as an indirect 
pro tea or of his d pawn with 18...Rad8. 

On Benjamin’s 19 Bg5!?, Hellsten 
should have tried 19-.ro because he 
would have been cramped but alive after 
20 Bel Rfe8. Instead, trying to avoid any 
weak squares, he erred with 19..JRfe8 
and Benjamin pounced with 20 Be7! 
Re7 21 Re7 Qe7 22 N£5 and wot a pawn 
after 22...Qf8 23 Ne3 Bc6 24 Nd5. 

After 25...Bb8, however, Benjamin 
started a nice little combination with 26 
Ng5! If 26- JBd5 27 Rd5 Rd5 28 Qd5, the 
double attack on b7 and f7 wins more 
material. If 26..JBe8. then 27 Rel f6 28 
Ne6 Bd7 29 Qg6 hg 30 Nf8 Rf8 31 Bg6 
wins another pawn with an iron grip on 
the position. 

Againt Hellsten's 26„.Kg8. Benjamin 
bored in with the decisive 27 Ne7! Qe7 
28 Rd8 Qd8 29 Qf7 Kh8 30 Qg6! hg 31 
Nf7 KgS 32 Nd8, winning a second 
pawn. 

Immediately after the time control 
bad been reached, Hellsten gave up. 


FRENCH DEFENSE 


Black 

HaOsteu 



to a Carlylean conviction that in modem 
society a poet was obliged to assume the 
mantle of a prophet, but after he did so, he 
remained a poet and nothing else. In 
Arnold's case the inward-looking Ro¬ 
mantic was replaced by a full-fledged 
Victorian sage, the exponent of a mor¬ 
alized. classics-based poetics and the 
scourge of the smug, neo-Puritan middle 
class, to whom he was the first to apply 
the permanent label of "Philistine.” He 
became, as T.S. Eliot once remarked, not 
so much a critic as a propagandist for 
criticism. 

Murray rightly says that “there is no 
simple, comprehensive explanation for 
Arnold’s desertion by the Muse, nor 
could there be.” But be finds it more 
profitable to look at his seemingly di¬ 
vided life from another angle. A French 
critic, one of Arnold's correspondents, 
once told him that be was baffled by “the 
secret unity of your life” — a quondam 
poet, a prose essayist, a full-time civil 
servant, even a self-taught theologian 
(“Literature and Dogma.” 1873). How 
could the blank dejection induced by 
“the melancholy, long, withdrawing 
roar” of the Sera of Faith ("Dover 
Beach”) be reconciled with the implicit 
hopefulness of tbe mature Arnold’s de¬ 
termined attempt to save contemporary 
society from itself by proposing new 
forms of education and new cultural stan¬ 
dards? How was it possible for a com¬ 
paratively rudderless youth struggling to 
emerge from tbe shadow of his late il¬ 
lustrious father, "Dr. Arnold of Rugby,” 
to whose memory his son’s mediocre 
record at Oxford did little honor, to be 
metamorphosed into a hard-working but 
inexplicably unpromoted inspector of 
schools, committed for 35 years to a 
vocation laden with dreary routine? 

A divided life it may have been, but 
Arnold, as busy as a Victorian man of 
affairs could conveniently be, accom¬ 
modated tbe seeming paradox. From 
hearing lessons in a London slum school 
in the morning he went to dine at night 
with Rothschilds, with whom he and his 
wife were on friendly terms. 

He thought he was living in an "un- 
poetic age’ ’ and he was out of sympathy 
with its intellectual and aesthetic climate, 
hut to a man of his temperament thar was 
all the more reason to devote his con¬ 
tentious powers to redeeming it. Com¬ 
fortable in his conventionality, he was, 
Murray insists, a happy man, not least 
because he was a family man, with strong 
ties to his siblings and, in due course, 
with wife and children of his own. 

Arnold's high spirits were as much a 
part of him as his far better known ded¬ 
ication to the literary ideal of high se¬ 
riousness. Like Browning and Dickens at 
the same age, be affected dandiacal airs 
and dress, and when he came to be cel¬ 
ebrated as a skillful controversialist 
wielding a rapier rather than a bludgeon, a 
London paper gave him the sobriquet of 
‘'the elegant Jeremiah.” 


The other 
half. 



A C ** . 

pBlUAMWIWHITE 


flop after 26 . 


Richard D. Altick’s. whose latest 
book. "Punch: The Lively Youth of a 
British Institution. 1841-1851" will be 
published in May, wrote this for The 
Washington Post. 



We have formed quality partnerships with some excellent airlines: Austrian Airlines. Delta Air Lines. Sabena and Singapore 
Airlines. Partner means more than just friendly relations: coordinated timetables, so connections are connections and not 
delays; through-check-in; frequent flyer program partnership; over 400 destinations. So in effecl Swissair has more than 
doubled its network. And halved your booking work, http://www.swissair.com 


swisstA^ world's most refreshing on-line. 



BUNE 

,1997 

IGE9 


ion,” 

Dlof 

Vran- 

y Of 

oung 

rmly 

esin 

m. A 

oud. 

>ody 

race 

>etic 

I his 
aint 

a P~ 

iing 

his 

ape 

en¬ 

tile 

Sib 

ost 

o. 

llo 

an 

‘or 

re 

ir- 

iy 

rf 

y- 

■y 

y 

e 

e 

e 

y 

1 

f 


















MAURIZIO GALANTE 

PARIS MARCH 1997 

PRESENTATION OF THE PR ET A PORTER COLLECTION AUTUMN/WINTER 1997/1 gg 

PRESS OFFICE 4 SHOWROOM: MAURIZIO GALANTE S.A. 22 RUE DE PAlESTRO 75002 PARIS TEL. 01 55 3i 34 55 FAX _ 5 5s 


P4G 

iLm INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 

M TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 
' PAGE 14 


Enough of Nostalgia — London Switches to Neo-Pu 


From left, Chalayan's metallic geometry on slim dress; Keogh's mohair knits; MacDonald's mermaid dress; Clements Ribeiro's Union Jack sweater; Rocha's cobweb knit; McQueen's cowhide-front cardigan and goatskin st. 


By Suzy Menkes 

lnternattonal Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — This is England's 
fashion moment. Make that 
“Britfash" — to go with the 
exuberant music scene of the 
Britpop gereraiion. 

London Fashion Week, which opened 
the international faJJ/winter season, 
wore the flag with pride, literally, in the 
case of Naomi Campbell, striding out at 
Clements Ribeiro’s show in a Union 
Jack sweater. Or one of the Spice Girls 
group singing on stage in a flag-pat¬ 
terned dress hoisted high on the thighs. 
Or the hip American actress Chloe Sev- 
igny, in ragged-edged dress with fishnet 


hose, bunsting through a flag curtain at 
the People Corporation show. 

A raw, angry, aggressive energy — a 
1990s version of punk — was a strong 
undercurrent of the London season, with 
Alexander McQueen sending out 
scissored animal skins as though raging 
at the pity and the folly of “mad-cow” 
disease. And Antonio Berardi's models 
in skin-tight pierced leather gyrating 
through smoke as though in some in¬ 
ferno. 

Yet at the opposite end of the spec¬ 
trum from the spectacular shows, joy in 
detail and craftsmanship was found in 
the small showrooms of young design¬ 
ers. from the delicate embroideries 
of Matthew Williamson to the flow¬ 


er-braid trims of Stella McCartney. 

The warp and the weft of the season 
was knit. Jalien MacDonald, a Welsh 
wizard of the knitting machine, made 
extraordinary mermaid dresses, strung 
like intricate fishing nets in an art gal¬ 
lery's 3triura. Or there were furrowed 
coats, long and lean, in mist gray, sham¬ 
rock green and peat brown — shades of 
Ireland — at Lainey Keogh’s show, 
where actor John Hurt read poetry as the 
supermodels cuddled into the woollies. 

Sweaters as fine as cobwebs, with 
medieval sleeves dangling over the 
hands, came out at John Rocha's strong, 
Celtic-flavored show. Shirin Guild 
showed comfort-blankets of cashmere 
sweaters on models with arms out¬ 


stretched. Knits came graphically 
striped from Clements Ribeiro. who re¬ 
invented that genre; and from Jean Muir, 
where mixes of horizontal and diagonal 
stripes gave the collection a youthful 
spin. 

In his body-conscious striped sweat¬ 
ers. Martin Kidman admitted a design 
debt to Sonia Rykiel. The ubiquitous 
lace and crochet knits were made com-, 
mercial by Nicole Fartii and Katharine 
Hamnett. Jasper Conran, making a 
classy if conventional return to the run¬ 
way. had playful knits with curtain-edge 
bobble effects among sophisticated tail¬ 
oring. 

London fashion's other strengths 
were in concise cutting and imaginative 
decoration, both of which enlivened the 
simple, long-line silhouette of dresses 
and pantsuits. What now seems outdated 
is a costume party collection, like Bella 
Freud's on a pirate, theme, although her 
cropped pants were a general trend. 

The most polished and effective show 
of the season came from Hussein 
Chalayan, a modem-minded designer 
whose compass-twirls and sharp-angle 
seaming in soft fabrics gave his clothes a 
liquid geometry. That meant cape 
shoulders on a jersey dress, three precise 
pockets al the rib cage on a jacket or pin- 
wheel embroideries on slender evening 
dresses. Chalayan's skill was to make 
such intricate cutting and complex dec¬ 
oration seem effortless, as when star- 
shaped seaming was used on pants or 
metallic chains traced geometric pat¬ 
terns. 

Cut was the key to Berardi's col¬ 
lection, which, although repetitive and 
often derivative of his former employer, 
John Galliano, had a strong sexual 
charge and fine attention to detail. That 
meant complex zigzag cutting, ribbons 
edging chiffon and tiny buttons climbing 
the legs of skinny pants. In the neo-punk 
spirit, Berardi added distressing effects', 
scars to the models’ makeup and mud 
stains like bruises. 

There was a similar disturbing story 
line at McQueen's show, where the apo¬ 
calyptical urban-tribal scenario included 
derelict cars bursting into flames (an 
accident; and rams' horns or a cro¬ 
codile's head piercing the shoulder- 
blades of leather jackets. But Mc¬ 
Queen’s angst and rage — not to men¬ 
tion the wild hair. Cleopatra eyeliner and 
surgical accessories — could not divert 
attention from his imaginative crafts¬ 


manship. That included undulating cow¬ 
hide worked as the yoke of an Aran knit 
or as the hip-band of a slim skirt; lace- 
work in leather; and rose appliques on 
Prince of Wales check tailoring; and 
bleached denim cut hard to the body. 

Asymmetric cuts are a continuing 
trend.' from the fishtail hemlines on Mac¬ 
Donald 's mermaid dresses to the angular 
tailoring at Justin Oh. Careful cutting on 
a slim-line silhouette was the story from 
the designer duo Pearce Fionda, while 
Sonja Nunall took a fashion stride for¬ 
ward with her check-and-stripe tailoring 
and gauzy dresses. 

Soft to handle or soft to touch was the 
fabric story. Muir's team sculpted suede 


Philip Treacy’s sculpted hat. 

and silky jersey; Mulberry made country 
clothes in shearling and everyone's fa¬ 
vorite velvet. Mark Whittaker's witty 
show, punctuated by shearling-covered 
bar stools, had touchy-feely fleece 
clothes in sugared almond colors. He 
described them as “about roundness of 
foTm and softness of line.” 

Embroidery and appliqu6 were Lon¬ 
don embellishments. There were tone- 
on-tone embroideries at Workers for 
Freedom's modem romantic show; and 
whorls of roses on velvet in Helen Dav¬ 
id's Russian-inspired collection for Eng¬ 
lish Eccentrics. She also had the feather 


embroideries that were found on B je 
Lisi’s slinky, glamorous dresses aas 
prints at John Rocha, while Clents 
Ribeiro’s strong show had naivelti 
embroideries. I 

Real feathers also made news, as Br¬ 
er duster headgear at Berardi. in £u- 
nett’s feather boas over brief ^vt 
dresses and in the sculpted hats of /ib 
Treacy. His road millinery show—pict 
included a giant snail hat and corkret- 
shapes — featured Jerry Hall 
stage platform in front of her h 
Mick Jaggec, Boy George and the 
Helena Bonham Carter. Treac'aJso 
showed his intriguing new accedes 
from a banana-shaped bag, to haiwnbs 
and scarves decorated with featfw 

Lace was another deco rati vlrend 
with McQueen creating cutout effts on 
cowhide and Berardi edging shajeath- 
er pantsuit with a lacy trim. Le ap¬ 
pliques went on cote plaid min|lts at 
Clements Ribeiro. who also 1 lace 
patterns traced on bare legs. Fji had 
openwork faggoting and WiUiaibn cut 
out leaf shapes on simple wooljbsses. 
Fringe was another favored effi used 
cowboy-style down trouser leg Cop- 
perwheat Blundell and at the n iff of 
Chalayan's long, slender dress* 

So the shows lived up tothe J nging • 
London hype? 

They were as uneven as thos sin ail 
hemlines, and as Joan Kaner of iman- 
Marcus put it, while praising (lay an 
and a wealth of small design, the 
week’s showings were long-di m-out 
and could have been com pres) into 
three days. 

“You can’t put Loadon int i cat¬ 
egory, but it is about diversity, c ii vity 
and energy,’’ said Nicole Fisclis of 
Saks Fifth Avenue, praisir.g the piver of 
McQueen and the new lefineitnt of 
young designers. 

The week closed with a showif stu¬ 
dent work from St Martin’s Cojige of 
Art — the crucible of design bents, 
including Galliano and McQuem. With 
pin-spiked leather and voodoo cftllsiom 
apart on the runway, the stujendwe.e in 
a combative, punky mote, dthojgh 
their strongest fashion sntemini was 
with knit and textiles. 

London designers seen final! \ 
have left nostalgia behind for an 
gressive, sexually predatoh style th 
suggests a willingness to [embrace 
harsh future rather than clng to a 
m antic past. 


Ducasse Gains a Michelin Star and Loses Another 


C<wnp8rdfr Olr SuffFntn iMspjwhri 

P ARIS — Alain Ducasse fell one star short of be¬ 
coming the first chef in France to be awarded the 
Michelin guide's top ranking for two restaurants 
simultaneously. 

The latest edition of France's best known restaurant 
guide, released Monday, awarded Ducusse's new Paris 
restaurant three stars but removed the third star from his 
Louis XV restaurant in Monte Carlo's Hotel de Paris. 

Ducasse took over the Paris restaurant in the 16th ar- 
rondissement from Joel Robuchon only last August, com¬ 
moting from the Riviera. “I think it was unfair for my team 
in Monaco which didn't deserve to lose it and which 1 
continue to manage.*’ Ducasse said on French television. 
“I’m very disappointed.” 

Critics speculated that the demotion was the Michelin 


director-general Bernard Naegellen’s way of saying that a chel 
must work full-time in the kitchen to earn the guide’s supre 
honor. Naegellen did not deny this. “The two restaurants 
not exactly next door to one another,” he said. 

The number of three-star restaurants in France stood at l: 
in the new guide, five of them in Paris, with the li< 
unchanged from the previous year’s guide apart frori 
Robuchon's retirement and Ducasse’s simultaneous rid 
and fall. Five restaurants were promoted to two-star stan 
Pierre Gagnaire in the Hotel Balzac in Paris; Les Feuillar 
at Ceret; La Bastide at Grasse; Auberge des Cimes at Sail 
Bonnet-Ie-Froid, and Jacques Maximin at Vence. 

A number of two-star restaurants — including Jaccn 
Cagna and Pre Caielan in Paris, as well as Moulin 
Mougtns near Grasse—dropped to a single star in the 1' 
gu,de - (AFP. Reuu 


to 























ftr'r + J} r \Ti't 

g*w* *.;-v 




|V‘t 


• r'rv-’ZT 




!•»»%• ,'xVv ■»• •; 


AS.. : ..'^ 

■M&xz 

*V •>' • ^'. -V 


I 




; •» ▼■•.*; 


frys* - ,n« ni 

'tt'.Vi^ii*'^- ** : 


r~s*%. 






?£*’& *-*1 
; •'<.’• % ;*a: 


*V "7^.,: 

••'. ' 'y-s ." 'H 
• *«***..; 




■» '-*• >: v 

: • -,u -V' 


ir>" 




r.*S 


” ^V-'s...: 


-v- 


! 4 T”* U, **•- 


•: .i 

. •» ■ ,» W- » ■: 


» j*y • ' 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 4 1997 


PAGE 15 


respoijiibijjr, 

as^isiToma 

^■Sfsss 




*■ inore Uin 


. ones IC. sh 


n 1 ihm tnj 


ijrous or sj 


= 'un -Thu 


.•!.'•• ! i.*S 


ion. ' 
ID of 
Vran- 

y of 

oung 

rmly 

es in 
m. A 
oud. 
>ody 






















PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 


Monday’s 4 PJH. Close 

Nationwide prices nc* rctedfng kite trades efcevifwre. 


12 Matt SB 

Hlg# Lot SM W W PE TOBlMgb 


I QMI SB 

Or K%k UM Ha* Dh YU PE MOinn 


■ I HIM! _ SB 

awl Hft* UW snl Ob YU PE MB 


I I2M«* _ 
awl W \pm Stack 


Wtf Uv LaU* 


m vh pe m l»l*< OP 




»WPE nSw Ln Lavs Op. 


jh» jfb e f 

!&§§ II = f£ f c .? 

g» jj^ ajjfflg »■* ^ Jjj li* ft &* * rt 

ft &• Us™* ~ 3 7i !3 ]$» A* 5 it* 

{I ft ,j 3 8 iI ^ S a 
ilsiS ill * ji i | a 

p§ ft Saw - ■- * **** *** *■ * |S 

sc ss?? 

Mb to 


* Jj 1 
ias lO " 

»II 

- I S 

js a 


Lufi S 8 S 1 

55 il 
B 9 §8-4 

mi . ji I fl ri 


5" *ssn* — : 
fn1 Ifi ««g ^ _ 

F Ik sa. r 

IS & jfi> * J 
ss Ik jee\ a 

iw-i 

as js sk- * 




ja Is il g 

1 7k 63 r ™ 


bs *-a 

frU 4W •** 

ft. as *4 

2 > 7?b * 


(be 


&E» 

fl « ttmi 


ti JJ g dM M 

h i 

- ;? K I 

'ff "S ” nB S* 5% fl 
£ U £ '“3 ft ft i 

MO U £ q fti B » 

'J5 B I ^"S Ps I 
in WS ^ ^ OS IT ir 
Ui a * TE SS ft § 
: 'IS Sf S 


~ 3 

■* * ,? 
L» 83 _ 

ill 


Ifl tt = ”1 fib 

*8 * ■*( I 

a s b •$ » 

1 .H 35 is 


as & as 5 * u a S & sa 
a F ass,, SB-sr s 

fi aw mht . __ a a m ni% 


«£Sr 

£b fn* Akoinb 

ss b. sw 


,l» 73 “ 4». 

fffi So la 771 ‘ 

suss; 

_ 5* «J 


&««SsTVs §§ a 

1 C i!s & i£ $ - J£ L iR i, 


i & 5 
i 85 ? 


as »** as? 

SS *SV 
St %3 

3B W W7 

a* I* UfeM 

kta Wl WARM 


W Sn ?s?* 


3^14 
1 4 8 I 

p ?*? 

.11 U S H 
i n ie 2 


il 4 I? 

||| 


JK •■» 
“Sn - 

17V iR 

m -K 


mT : 3 ^ US U» it -3 

as 0 . * 'i 2 9 SS SS « :S 


IS 555~ 

i»W MHO, 


«P*7 MSVt V 

]7¥ ACvKovn 
M AfM 
9P» ftSw 1 
m AMITpr 

(B 


us fel " » uK 

•ih: 

* 3 .1 ^o!S 

Ul 11 _ » 7S»> 

a & \\ 4 & 

U, it |1 Tffi INI 


*18 * S is .1 

r f§13£I £ .I 

; ^ J S "“i 1 ^ U IS :B 

i = «B is e :: 

: -? * 1 # jb is s 
“ iiiu : . H 11 - 

*■ >• « ; 4 fia m w I 

L- M g £ _§ 5 h SS S& .iS 

ik = 


iff 


13S 


..II. 


II = H S t if 

we'HF is f -1 

-^4 n 4 H B 71V. a .n 


AO 3 S d 

dsa • 3 

as;; 


S-HMH 


Urn 15 la 
& t| 3? 
* » » 


ss£ 'S i 

issft iR,Si 


127 10 “14 Wb in 
- IB ll» si* JM* 
.nun. at* 
l3 j* W sib aiv. 

| » S IS* In 
i S JIES SSS SS» 

_ a 4s» a» ziv, 

?;SS f 

a. 

J i *s s“ at 

^ 8 »s s» js 


fr ■IB.y - 3 

,4b f! 7 

&? !fi t! A 17 


}ta & 


4 s i 


fSg ? ^ifSois K *1 

§ » « is -a sa « a -3 

iSS. ap ii » » ^ 1 

pas' 4 iS « ^ib £H sa ^ 

IT jSfSu I!? ^ ® fSH fiS 41 5US ” 

R ^r” as a i % is w h -is 


iib mi iib 

i»' ; jsS ?T m? t 

|41 lit £1 

I is#:i s ; lin 


Sh 25b JSb -It 

174b US 

2b 72b 27b -b 


RRIi! If SB I 

2.. W i!?fe *S J _ S? !4y 141* l*b 


(a SljjP 

iff-,3^111 p 

PIBr „I?«S8 


Hfiis 

. : fS ® ii? 


ST 'M 141* 1*b 4l* 

s/a 4]v, 43b 43b *3 

«ns Tab 74b Tab 

^3? St St tfi 


!« S! is - a ,2 >$ |«> U? *5 

« la sajg" r “ J »s la ® is s 

bWai=3tRCi 

as jr w,< ' ,i5 s 4 % ^ jS 3 
£ £islpir s 

AS S5 g9‘2*04« I lia ii 5 e* ay py _ 

'£* “ g>* aka iu »w in ji n 

znt in* hoe ■ u« u t in >» u n> .b 


s s»' 

SB t& liS?a« 

if? !i2 S*4YtO 


w u j m» mi s* 
- k k Jb ut ob 

„ j, ■ n h tb tb 

un til _ JOO 27b d 2Sb 2Sb 


in* ii** -fi 

,a .« : 

U* W> y 

N Ml 


Ifl IJ* BcSaffOl 

A. .ffi tsss 


*4 73 1* 4S? 

JB la V V? 

zjir u.4 _ rn 
a u 2 a nn& 
A u 12 «7 

,S 3 if J 

liH C 14 \\744 

... * M 51 


? a B : IS |r S P 
* a s y ® st « 

; ii 5 ss 1 ® S s 

? as a = £ £b s j& 

MU- 51 I* 17b lb* 
W IJ # ]•«*«■ 50b 

' «M 11 - 1 1 Tb 17b in* 

I M* LO - 444 Ob Ob M 

' dB 0 |» SSu S“ SS 

,JB " : a 4 ]; a* a a. 


■j§i? 


hi 


98 I I 
■" 0 i dl 
iB 8 ? ,si j 
,® s E i 


98 J 

ii! 

uo S3 O 

a a 


“ ■*•* jnodEc „ ]4 aij kb »* u* 

S & 53 g 1J S! SH SS 

M JSS 1 ”A*» JSS JL 

"Ty 24y ituBMa V3 0.7 _ ID in* 17M 1Tb 


St, a* KK us M : 
^ s' sis TjI h z 
s; £ wsa 0 ss 3 i 

5 ? IS w la re 

f|«R|s 

a* & aaS f* s = 


U 4 71J a f 

M - n 7m 77k in* 

U - _z> in* I7Vt 27M 

ZJ 20 71M Wl #4 Ah 


riSfl BM blfe SV« 4k 

’its si s: 3 

5 41 Vf «lk 41M -4* 

jB IM* I A** UK 4* 

m w ssn iw« ■«* 
i®^ a »u -h 
II 25*» _2M1 SS 

T,’32 ’jT 'if' *» 
.S Si ft ft 


ft ft P : w « ^ S -i 
s& ^ KH,“ S“ ^ 

fe-SBI !S8 E J& Is i: 1 


iff 3 = 'fl ft 

4 s s J S 

“fi If 8 

.14 3 4* *J Ob 

NS. 33 1* 3" 

iS d z *S sE! 
B S ^ ft 

In 04 « jea j$* 


» ’is *; 

ft ft .5 

I E ; 3 

s? sr -S 


i r fi 

i fl ^ 
»8 

^ 25 S 


y a a ft 2 
fg p “g ft I 

as a r g ft I 

_ _ 1 ttf) )• 

2JD 72 ^ 71 |A 2 


a a * 


J 8 « 
.3 13 ft 


as i 
* !5: 


II 

Ii; j 

iiL 


30 l 2 S £ 
a * I? a B 

'U if ii ^ ft 
a is e ass 


SSA Iti) IM 14M •> 

71 Ill* Ji 77 -It 

477 4141 41k 4TM *1* 

Tlf7 4TA 4ft* 49* *V> 

fi IB •? 
Jfi I §r £ 


ul io 14 ici m w m *4% 

S « : ft ft ft -a 

. L m a & ^ 

41 .3 tt B ft ft i* -S 





For investment 

INFORMATION 

Read 

| THE MONEY 

j every Saturday 

1 in the IHT. 


INTERNATIONAL 


mnvra vnnu mat tow mm omothh voto u t w wr 

THE WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


| //hW“ 




1 1^5!^ 


































































































































































































INTERNATIONAL 


swissair 


'■i 


worlds most refreshing airline. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■0 


world's most 


TUESDAY MARCH 4,1997 


PAGE 17 




iS ST. 

•rtS* 

tr:-. 

t * 


'■ * ' 

* - t? , 

• v- 5 * 
^ ■ i* , 


$*g. 
5‘ :*-■ 

IS*. 


bi 

if? ::> T - 
i 3 

IT. Jmo.” 


fr.H ■>».• 

c Sr?, 


V- v=. . . 

L- 

*E *.£•/ 


•-i •« 

-? r ' ~. 
'' r-/ • 


C'Ki’ 

i? ■;•«.. 


i 1 -«■' : 

.•• V— 




~ , 



After two years of stock gains, “people are not spending as much as the wealth effect would imply,” said the economist Joel Prakken. 

Americans Are Getting It but Not Spending It 


rm- ,V» WiTa. 


By Jonathan Fuerbringer 

AW- York Times Service 


NEW YORK •— You jumped into 
the market well before the Dow hit the 
once-imthinkable level of 4,000. You 
kept making monthly contributions to 
your retirement account You even 
placed some side bets with nonretire- 
ment money, as you watched — first 
with glee, then in shock, now in awe— 
as the Dow kept soaring, clicking off 
1,000-point gains almost as fast as a car 
zipping past highway markers. Oh, yes. 
those stock options you snickered at a 
few years ago are now worth a small 
bundle, too. 

You may not be rich, but you are 
certainly starting to feel wealthier. So 


surely you’re now driving a flashy new 
car to your new drop-dead second 
home, aren’t you? 

Not if you are Scott Meyer, 36, a 
sales representative for Cadence 
Design Systems in Phoenix, Arizona. 
He has six figures’ worth of stock just 
in his “money to acquire things” ac¬ 
count It is jammed full of high flying 
technology stocks. Is he feeling a lot 
richer? “Absolutely,” he says. 

But he doesn't have the new car or 
vacation home to show for it 

“I used the money to get our family 
out of debt — mortgage and 
everything.” he said of the gains he 
harvested from the account over the last 
couple of years. 

Mr. Meyer is one of the millions of 


affluent Americans who are confound¬ 
ing economists and economic policy 
makers alike: Instead of spending a 
modest chunk of their newfound wealth 
from the stock market, they appear to 
be holding back, and that is sending the 
experts back to their models of con* 
sumer behavior to rewrite the equations 
for the so-called wealth effect, the the¬ 
ory that consumers will spend simply 
because the value of their financial 
assets has risen. 

“In our forecast for 1997 we are 
marking down the wealth effect in our 
model,’ ’ said Joel Prakken. a proponent 
of the wealth effect and chairman of 
Macroeconomic Advisers in Sl Louis, 
Missouri. “Our confidence in it has 
been modestly undermined.” 


Federal Reserve policymakers are 
also worried. While die increased 
spending from the stock market rally 
has been less than forecast, that pattern 
could change, as the Federal Reserve 
Board's chairman, Alan Greenspan, 
noted when he testified before Con¬ 
gress last week. “The unusual uncer¬ 
tainties in the overall outlook," Mr. 
Greenspan said, “are especially fo¬ 
cused on the behavior of consumers,” 
whose spending equals two-thirds of 
U.S. output. Thai seemed to add to Mr. 
Greenspan's concern that stock-market 
gains of recent years were making it 
more difficult for the Fed to maintain a 
balanced economic environment 

See WEALTH, Page 20 


German Joblessness 
Seen Rising Slightly 

Bonn Discounts a Dire Forecast 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 


, Thailand Suspends Trading in Shares of Finance Firms 


% 


k f 

|ft- 


Cn^vtattvOirSuffFnmDapadia 

7 BANGKOK —The Stock Exchange 
bf Thailand suspended trading in bank¬ 
ing and finance shares Monday after die 
'government ordered the industry to shore 
itself up against mounting bad loans. 

* The suspension of trading in compa¬ 
nies that account for one-third of the 
stock market's capitalization shocked 
investors and underscored die fragility 
of art industry squeezed by high interest 
tares, had debts and skittish depositors. 
Trading is expected to resume Tdesday, 


the stock exchange said. The action 
marks the first time that any Asian coun¬ 
try has stopped trading in a group of 
stocks and could shake confidence in die 
region's economies after years of rapid 
economic growth. 

The government ordered banks and 
finance companies to increase loan re¬ 
serves by as much as 50 billion baht 
($1.93 billion) over the next two years, 
which analysts said could wipe out earn¬ 
ings growth in that period. The gov¬ 
ernment said 10 companies would have 


to increase their capital to meet the new 
provisions. 

“That's what you call a hard land¬ 
ing,” said Ash win Vasan at Oppen- 
heimer Funds Inc. “Bad loans will 
probably double. A lot of financial 
companies will go bankrupt” 

Thailand’s benchmark stock index fell 
Z79 percent to close ax 707.24. 

The suspension is the latest in a string 
of mishaps for Thailand’s finan ce in¬ 
dustry. A three-year slump in the real- 
estate market, the slowest economic 


growth in a decade and one of the 
world’s widest current-account deficits 
are eroding the creditworthiness of 
banks and other companies. The cur¬ 
rent-account deficit narrowed to 19 bil¬ 
lion baht in December 1996, down 
about 40 percent from December 1995. 

The suspension of banks came days 
after the central bank brokered a rfcscue 
of Finance One PLC, the nation's 
largest finance company, which agreed 
to merge with Thai Danu Bank PLC on 
Monday. (AP; Bloomberg) 


FRANKFURT — Finance Minister 
Thee Waigel said Monday that he ex¬ 
pected only a “slight increase" in the 
number of unemployed in Germany 
when the government reported fresh 
statistics this week. 

His comments came as government 
and union leaders attempted to calm 
fears that Bonn was preparing to dis¬ 
close another big increase in the number 
of jobless Thursday. Some officials 
conceded, however, that February’s fig¬ 
ures would register a new record. 

January's figures rose to the highest 
level since 1933, setting a postwar re¬ 
cord that alarmed the nation and put the 
government under heavy pressure to 
deliver a solution. The Federal Labor 
Office is to publish February's figures 
Thursday. 

While implying the new figure for 
February would probably push further 
into record territory, Mr. Waigel denied 
a weekend report in the Bild am Son- 
ntag, which in an unattributed article 
said that the number of people unem¬ 
ployed would rise by 140,000, to 12.5 
percent, or 4.8 million unemployed, up 
from January's record 12.2 percent, or 
4.66 million. 

”1 believe the number will rise only 
slightly in February, not the figure that 
was reported.” Mr. Waigel said in Ber¬ 
gen. Norway. “It will be roughly the 
same as January, perhaps a bit more.” 

January’s unexpectedly large jobless 
number already exceeded by 150,000 
the maximum number of unemployed 
that the government had budgeted for in 
1997. 

Analysts said any new record would 
sustain speculation in financial markets 
and political capitals that the German 
budget deficit would widen to the point 
that Europe’s biggest economy no 
longer could qualify for the start of 
European monetary union in 1999. 
Higher-than-budgeted unemployment, 
they note, means dial fewer people pay 
taxes while government spending bal¬ 
loons to pay for Germany’s generous 
jobless benefits. 

“Bonn's hopes for achieving EMU 
could hardly survive another number 


like we had in January,” said Holger 
Schmieding. senior economist in Frank¬ 
furt for Merrill Lynch. 

Because of Germany's budget mis¬ 
haps, surveys that track the probability 
of a 1999 single-currency inauguration, 
which have been rising steadily for 
months, have begun to fall. 

The monthly “EMU Barometer" 
compiled by the Handelsblatt business 
newspaper showed its first decline last 
week. 

Germany got more bleak budget 
news over the weekend when Bavaria’s 
finance minister said tax revenue for his 
state and for the federal government was 
significantly lower than planned for 
January and February. 

The president of the German central 
bank, Hans Tietmeyer, denied Monday 
that there would be a delay in the 
launching of the euro. 

“Fears and rumors on markets of a 
delay in economic and monetary union 
are so ridiculous Thai I cannot under¬ 
stand them,” Mr. Tietmeyer said at a 
banking conference in Frankfurt 

Wim Duisenberg, who is designated 
to succeed Alexandre Lamfalussy as 
president of the European Monetary In¬ 
stitute, echoed Mr. Tietmeyer’s view. 

“The rumors on the markets of a 
delay of EMU are unfounded,” he said. 
“I am convinced it will start on Jan. I, 
1999.” The European Monetary Insti¬ 
tute is the forerunner of the European 
central bank. Mr. Duisenberg is a can¬ 
didate to head the bank. 

Based on January’s data, Horst 
Siebert, a member of the government's 
Independent Council of Ecorxnfiic Ad¬ 
visors and president of the Kiel Eco¬ 
nomics Research Institute, said he ex¬ 
pected a 1997 budget deficit of 3J5 
percent — above the 3 percent single- 
currency benchmark. 

If that forecast proves accurate, Mr. 
Siebert said, be will call for a delay of 
Europe's most ambitious integration 
project 

Because the stakes are so high, Ger¬ 
man officials took pains to stress that die 
newspaper’s prediction for February 
was an unrealistic overestimate. 

Bernhard Jagoda, president of the 

See EMU, Page 18 


* 


■: 4 


flunking Ahead /Commentary 


EU Shouldn’t Count on a U.K. U-Turn 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 



ASHINGTON — Britain's partners in the 
European Union have made little secret of 
their hopes that the election due this spring 
will spell the end of John Major’s Conser¬ 
vative government, one of the most obstructionist in the 
Eli’s 40-year history. 

The conventional wisdom on the Continent has long been 
that a Labour government under Tony Blair would be much 
more cooperative than Mr. Major's 
increasingly ragged aad Euroskqp- _ 

tical Conservatives on most issues 
feeing the Union — from the 
planned single currency to_ institu¬ 
tional reform. With Mr. Blair riding 
high in opinion polls and an election 
due by May. the Continentals could 


Even under Labour, the 
British are not going to rush 
into new European ventures. 


uwc uy nwj. uiw —--—- . , 

get their way. But they are probably setting tbetr hopes too 
high if they expect a dramatic change in British policy. 

The advent of a relatively pro-European Labour gov¬ 
ernment is not going to alter the funtfamental historic. 
: political and cultural forces that make Britain such a reluctant 
■ member of the European club. Mr. Blair’s first big test would 

- come at the Amsterdam summit meeting m June, wtach is 

- supposed to finalize important reforms m EU decuaon- 
■.* roakhigand prepare for the Union’s eastward! etdaigeraent. 

There can be little doubt that his tone would be more pro- 
European than Mr. Major’s, but the Labour leader would 
stfflnotfiiid it easy to sign up for 
Amsterdam. His hands would not be CTtmely 
election campaign will probably rajuim 
Major’s tough stand on a number of perceived Bnfrsn 
national interests, such as keeping a veto over EU de- 
5££rtdS5*»> on Europe would soon start emerging 
in ih<> T jahour Party once it took otrice. _ 

Labour’s divisions are not as spectacular as 

but they still tun deep. They have been con¬ 


cealed by the party's long absence from government and by 
its determination not to allow any splits to show in the run¬ 
up to the election. 

Even so, 50 Labour members of Parliament published a 
pamphlet last year warning against any further European 
integration, and party leaders are far from unanimously 
enthusiastic about the EU. 

Mr. Blair's personal pro-European leanings could be ex¬ 
pected to take second place to domestic political require¬ 
ments — especially if, as many predict, the Conservatives 
were to become even more fiercely anfi-EU if they were 
voted oat of power and became part 
of the opposition. Most ominous for 
Britain's partners is Mr. Blair's re¬ 
cent public rejection of the idea of 
“flexibility.” under which some 
countries could integrate more 
quickly than others. 

“If Blair says no to flexibility, 
we're in real trouble,” says Gijs De Vries, president of the 
Liberal Group in the European Parliament. If London does 
not relent on flexibility, ns partners might be reluctantly 
obliged to plan new forms of cooperation outside the existing 
European institutions to escape a British veto—di gg ing an 
even deeper ditch between Britain and the Continent. 

Even under Labour, the British are not going to rush into 
new European ventures, including economic and monetary 
union. Most Britons favor closer trading links with die 
Continent but not a so-called European superstate with 
common defense and foreign policies. 

The idea that Britain can go it alone has become more 
attractive as the country has prospered in comparison with 
the rest of Europe—in contrast to the first three decades of 
European integration, when it kept felling farther behind. At 
least under Mr. Blair the chances would probably be higher 
rhat Britain would ultimately join the single currency. But 
Britain will never be in the forefront of European unification. 
It would certainly be a mis take fa- the others to keep waiting 
for Britain, whichever party wins the election. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 

^ .W . 


OIL 


Ju uu ine 

M l MW . H9i 5LK3 JM ® 

. MH9 Vti — 
1 J»S ■— “g 

taut yam tom 
a me -- - ust* usi-S 
««YhrkOa - “J 

Sa A • roue 4.M2 Utod 


Turn 
Joratia 
;ZMdr 
3ECtt 
4 SO*. 


S3* VOU 

12BJB H&jM 706 

iiTSl Z3B91 

usa UUS vm 
uni ass wo 


FJr. Lfc* fcfl 

nm- — 
£H>5 UGH* 1USH 
USO .118* UK 

a MM 174U7 1IW 

SU1 *5 

flttf — S'® 
iTJl UNM *2" 
_ nrPt* UBQ 

ns* u® sua 

|MJMMfc 

ua uruw 

iflO IS5UB 
7J07S W*a a* 


Marcfl 3 

rm a mm 

1JH8* I* 1J5" 
<um an u» 
urn* uss ITUS* 
huh uia mu 

HUB* 10UM — 
UfiM Uttti ItW 

uIBS vm mss 
47321* ttw UflS* 

— IMS ua 


EF. «. 

S45U* UM 

— 2171 

4WI* U* 

S&JKJ 1387? 

4.1HJ fim 
rtfilt UA6 

3SJS UTS 

IMS W® 

iHj.* — ib* i am ine* 
S IJHS UW UH5* 

«31M 2JW17 MUS? IKS HUfl 

in after centers! New Yu* and 


UbM-Llbor Rates Man* 3 

swfcn Rem* 

PcNr D-Mort Fmc SMk* Fnmc Yes ECU 

l-OWSti SU-SWi 3VW-3VW m-in 6-m 3V»-3W 7w-vw 4MI-4U 

3-nwnttl 5Vk-SVi 3V»-3 ¥m 1W-1W 3Vh-3U 4%-flfc 

&4MMU! 5W-5H W*-W* 3W.1W Vu-V* 4H-IU 

1 -yenr SU-SWta 3M-3fe 1V4-H* Mi-4V» 3V»-3fc. tt-U 44-4W 

Sources: Otvtm Lloyds Bank. 

Rales apptenbie to Mahant deposits of SI nrittn aWnum (erequMenO. 


/JT. 


*** ^monatk HA: nol ^ ^ ava * a *- 


■■ e * 


* .* '< «*' 


mother Dollar Values 




_NTS 

jhgmLpeu 0,9908 £2?^* 

^MeritaaS 1-2752 JiSSsSSt 

hoar* lJisw fe-gSr 

XMaestyMB &32S4 
*Ull IMW 29D6 M*** 

OMsfekm* 6X5*5 
.-ItatlMNHl 13943 


Pert 

25000 

7.7437 

17577 

3503 

239&00 

04354 

03038 

2X787 


CWIWO 

ILZHUdS 

mns-tn* 

PWLP«“ 

Porte*** 

RbssisW* 

SawBitrsI 


PcrS 

7JM 

14472 

64215 

253t 
3M 
77043 
558340 
27498 
7X241 


Conesq 

S.Afr.mnd 

S.KM.WM 

SwnLkraH 

TtatwmS 

TWtaB 

TaftWlBPe 

UAEAtM 

maulk 


pms 
4X71 
852 JO 
7552 
27J3 
25.90 
122125- 
25705 
48140 


JM0 1 **** **•* 

jaai7 11943 1W.1S 
I™5 14671 1-4633 



Key Money Rates 


Unto! States 

Oust 

Pit* 

OtsoRMtrat* 

£00 

540 

Pitas rate 

8U 

8U 

FMMtfltaB 

515 

Sto 

MMkrCDiMK 

£47 

5X2 

UMWCPMfcfS 

£35 

544 

3 mMib TnwHy M 

£22 

£21 

l-yeor Trvnsorr bn 

5L58 

£63 

fcyedrTreasMYba 

549 

£08 

SfearTraasnyints 

5X1 

648 

7-fcv Tima? note 

5X8 

5X5 

nyecrTiMWiTli 

£57 

554 

3>YtwTma»TiMwwl 

£43 

64ft 

Maitn Lyndi3#-d*T RA 

£88 

448 

■taw" 



MieNRtraki 

050 

aso 

CflBMqr 

0X1 

0X7 


055 

055 

mitftllBHIt 

056 

055 

IHWimlllitMlIMII 

ft* 

059 

18f#v6wtbMd 

2X7 

2X7 

G mourn 



Uaturt rate 

450 

450 

CtaSHMY 

3.15 

3.15 

vwn Mwb«* 

£25 

3l2S 

3HM«th iaWMsk 

345 

125 

Marttlnliital 

125 

3l25 

lt^en-Biad 

£55 

£52 


Bittofn 

Book w» rate 

UUtBMT 

T-amrthfartnteBfc 

3-Bontb loteftxmk 
hMliUiitnit 
lOnrOK 


440 440 
540 640 

6Mi 6V» 

6ft «V» 
On «Vk 
745 7.14 


iDfarmnoo rate 
CoB moony 
1 malt MrtMl 
3 -bmh 8 lswtaak 
5 — M i I rtm tasi i 
tOtwOAT 
Sources; Semen, Blombem. MWffi 
Lrncti, Bank of Tokro-MIfsublsM, 
Cemtnaibank, CrcaS Lyonools. 


110 210 
m 3 Vb 
314 W 

3Va 3(4 
£45 £39 


Gold 


am 


UK. PJA. tjfgu 


34300 34240 +275 

35140 352.15 +255 
M«ur York 365.10 35340 -U0 
, UJ. doBan per ounce. Lotion official 

tApmj 

Source; Revtat. 


PRIVATE BANKING 


\buVe got the vision. 
We’ve got the know-how. 


You see things for what they 
are. And also for what they 
could be. 

It's the kind of vision that 
ignites and fuels the entrepre¬ 
neurial spirit. 

We at Credit Lyonnais Private 
Banking share this vision. 
And, equally important, we 
have the knowledge, special¬ 
ized products and services 
to help you get where you 
want to go. 



Our Geneva subsidiary, specialized 
in Private Banking since 1876. 


We've gained unrivaled, in- 
depth experience from our 
group's worldwide presence. 
Even in the most out-of-the - 
way countries. 

But there is yet another 
key dimension to Credit 
Lyonnais Private 
Banking strength. 

From the time 
we opened our 
first office in 
Switzerland, 

120 years __ _ 

ago, our 1 ~ rr 

history has revolved around 
durable, personal relation¬ 
ships, based on dialogue and 
attention to detail. 

We listen first... and then 
respond with speed, efficiency 
and a total commitment to 
providing the precise solution 
for your demands. From trade 
financing and international 
logistical support to portfolio 


management, financial instru¬ 
ments and precious metals. 
Whether you are a private, 
corporate or institutional client, 
you'll find Credit Lyonnais 



Private Banking can anticipate 
and serve your needs through 
close partnerships built on 
trust and vast resources. 
Together, these two dimen¬ 
sions create something 
unique in Credit Lyonnais 
Private Banking. 

Let’s talk 



CREDIT LYONNAIS 


Private Banking Network: 

Switzerland: Geneva tel 41 22/705 66 66 - Headquarters for Credit Lyonnais International Private Banking 
Basle tel. 41 61/284 22 22 -Zurich tel. 41 1/217 86 86* Lugano tel 41 91/923 51 65 
Paris tel 33 1 /42 95 03 05 - Luxembourg tel 352/476 831 442. London tel 44 171/499 9146 
Monaco tel 377/93 15 73 34 • Vienna tel. 431/531 50 120. Monitvideo iel 598 2/95 08 67 • Miami tel 1 305/375 78 14 
Hong Kong tel 852/28 02 28 88 * Singapore tel 65/535 94 77 



BUNE 

,1997 
LGE 9 


ion. 
in of 

Vran- 

y of 

oung 

rmly 

es in 

m. A 

oud. 

>ody 

race 

ietic 

I his 
aim 
ap- 
ung 
his 
ape 
en- 

the 
5 th 
ost 
o. 

>lo 

an 

or 

re 

ir- 

iy 

rf 

j- 

y 

y 

e 

e 

e 

Y 

i 

f 































PAGE 18 



PA 


THE AMERICAS 


JV 



Record IPO Is Little Noticed 


By John Markoff 

Ne*r York Times Service 


It happened so quietly that few 
besides me shareholders and awe¬ 
struck analysts seem to have no¬ 
ticed yet. But a small. Maryland- 
based Internet technology com¬ 
pany recently went public and 
achieved a $3.44 billion market 
valuation overnight — making it 
the largest stock offering by a start¬ 
up company in history. 

On its first day of trading, Feb. 7, 
Ciena Corp.’s stock opened at $23 
and closed at $37, to reach that 
$3.44 billion market capitalization. 

The stock closed Monday at 
$38.75, down 50 cents. 


Certainly, as initial public of¬ 
ferings ana Internet companies go. 
Ciena’s blistering start generated 
none of the ’hoopla created 18 
months ago when Netscape Com¬ 
munications Corp. achieved a $2.2 
billion stock-market valuation on 
fee first day its shares traded. 

“I was puzzled when they cause 
out with a huge valuation and 
nobody took notice," said Jack 
Wilson, managing editor of Tech¬ 
nologic Computerietter. “Perhaps 
me Internet frenzy has shifted, and 
now we’re waiting for the compa¬ 
nies to justify the enthusiasm.’’ 

As with many other companies 
going public. Ciena so far has gen¬ 
erated little revenue. But unlike 


other Internet stocks that have 
achieved high valuations on no 
earnings, it is profitable, with 
profit of $14.7 million on sales of 
$54.8 million in the year ended 
Oct. 31. It has forecast sales of 
$200 million for financial 1997. 

Ciena is the first company to 
market with a technology called 
wave-division multiplexing. The 
technique is roughly equivalent to 
using a bundle of flashlights — 
eap-H with different colored light 
— in place of a single flashlight to 
transmit data through fiber-optic 
networks. Each color can carry a 
stream of information (hat does not 
interfere with the streams of other 
colors- 


Rally in Chipmakers 
Offsets AT&T’s Slide 


Dow Jones Scion Calls for New CEO 


Sauce: Bloomberg. Reuters 


law natio nal Hendd Trite* 


Very briefly: 


• HFS Inc., owner of the rental-car company Avis, agreed to 
buy Mitsubishi Motors Corp.’s Value Rent-A-Car Inc. for 
$175 million. Value Rent-A-Car operates 45 car-rental out¬ 
lets, mostly in Florida, with a fleet of 22,000 cars, 

• Tenneco Inc.’s board authorized its management to buy 
back as much as 5 percent of its stock, or 8.5 million shares, in 
a repurchase program valued at about $340 million. 

• General Motors Corp. and Chrysler Corp. posted lower 
U.S. vehicle sales in February, with both car and truck sales 
faltering. Chrysler said its U.S. sales fell 2.8 percent from a 
year earlier, while GM's sales fell 7.1 percent 

• Smith Corona Corp. emerged from bankruptcy-court pro¬ 
tection after a 20-month reorganization. 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — William Cox 3dL 
an outspoken member of the family 
that controls Dow Jones & Co^ said 
Monday that be wanted a new chief 
executive to run the media company. 

Mr. Cox told the cable business 
news network CNBC that he would 
like Thomas Murphy, the former 
brad of Capital Citie^ABC Inc., to 
take over as CEO of Dow Jones. An 
ABC spokeswoman, however, said 
Mr. Murphy, 71, had no plans to 
come out of retirement. 

In November, Mr. Cox, who no 
longer works at Dow Jones, and his 
cousin, Elis abeth Goth, dined with 
Mr. Murphy and discussed the CEO 


job, CNBC reported. “We had a 
wonderful conversation," Mr. Cox 
said, according to a transcript of the 
broadcast. “We asked him if he 
would be interested in coming to 
work at Dow Jones and he. said, 
‘Absolutely.’ ” 

Mr. Murphy retired last year from 
ABC after Walt Disney Co. ac¬ 
quired it He serves on the Disney 
board of directors. 

During the CNBC interview, Mr. 
Cox did not say he was shopping 
around for a new CEO. He spoke 
only about the possibility of having 
Mr. Murphy fill the post 

Shares in Dow Jones rose 
Monday, trading late at $41.23, up 


other pi< 
also may have helped the price. 

An article in The New Yorker 
cited a General Electric Co. executive 


interested in taking a 20 percent to 25 
percent stake in Dow Jones. 

General Electric declined to com¬ 
ment, as did Dow Jones. 

Dow Jones has received a swiri of 
attention following a recent Fortune 
magazine story in winch the dis¬ 
pleasure of Mr. Cox and Ms. Goth 
were documented. The article said 
the two had sought advice from 
powerful investors like Warren Buf¬ 
fett on how to lift the company's 
sagging stock. 


tecnon aner a zv-iuonui reorganization. -r\-m /bttt rT _ __ _____ _ _ 

• Fiserv Jnc.. a provider of financial data and services, agreed X^JtI U Z Unemployment Rise Will Be Slight. GeTTTUUlY SttYS 
to acquire BHC Financial Inc., a processor of securities 1 ■' ° J J 

Continued from Page 17 


acquire financial Inc., a processor 
trades, for about $212 million in stock. 

• ABN-AMRO Bank NV agreed to buy Citicorp Futures 
Corp., as the Dutch bank continues to expand its U.S. trading 
business. Bloomberg, ap 


Weekend Box Office 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — * ‘The Empire Strikes Back’' dominated 
die U.S. box office over the weekend with a gross of $12.6 
million. Following are foe Top 10 moneymakers, based on 
Friday's ticket sales and estimated sales for Saturday and 
Sunday. 


1. The Empire Strikes Bock 


OmCetuyFaO 

S116ma>an 

2. Donnfa Srmco 


(TriSM 

SlUmUan 

IStorWpra 


mmosrturFaa 

S7mfl8on 

*. Body Co* 


(Columbia Pictures) 

SOXmDBan 

5. Ahsokite Power 


(Cohanbki Plduiss) 

J£7ntffltan 

b. Dante’s PeA 


(Universal) 

summon 

7. VegQsVaaribn 


(WamerBrosJ 

3*5 mm«t 

B. Foots Rush in 


(Columbia Pictures) 

S3.7mfiBon 

9. Marvin's Roam 


(Miramax! 

saSmBHan 

10 Rosewood 


(WamerBrosJ 

SZ8 mUon 

. AMEX 

Monday’s 4 P.M. Close 

I tort Srtfa HJpi 

Ufa U*3» 09 


Federal Labor Office, which tab¬ 
ulates the monthly jobs data, said he 
considered the report “improb¬ 
able." 

Even more convincing was a 
denial from Ursula Engelen-Kefer, 
deputy chairman of foe German 
Labor Union Federation. 

Ms. Engelen-Kefer. who also is 
chairwoman of the Federal Labor 
Office, has a reputation for pub¬ 
licizing the monthly labor-market 
data days in advance of the official 
release. 

This time, she said she expected 
only minor changes compared to 
January. She said she saw'no in¬ 
dications that foe number of 4.8 
million was accurate. 

But at current levels, she added. 


German unemployment is cause for 
deep worry. The respected Ifo eco¬ 
nomics institute expects February 
unemployment re rise to 4.7 million, 
said an Ifo researcher, Wolfgang 
Meister. The number also will rise 
when adjusted for seasonal distor¬ 
tions caused by weather, he said. 

■ Dollar Gains on U.S. Data 


The dollar rose against most other 
major currencies after stronger-- 
than-expected U.S. economic data 
reinforced expectations for higher 
interest rates, Bloomberg News re¬ 
ported from New York. 

The government said personal in¬ 
come and spending rose in January, 
as did spending on construction pro¬ 
jects. That could provide enough 
evidence that foe economy is grow¬ 
ing fast enough to kindle inflation 


for foe Federal Reserve Board to 
raise interest rates on March 25, 
when it next meets. 

Interest rates in Germany, mean¬ 
while, are expected to remain 
stable. 

At 4 PM. in New York, foe dollar 
was at 1.6970 Deutsche marks, up 
from 1.6903 on Friday, at 5.7310 
French francs, up from 5.7100 
francs, and at 121.255 yen, up from 
120-225 yen. The dollar fell to 
1.4775 Swiss francs from 1.4783 
francs. The British pound fell to 
$1.6175 from $1.6295. 

Comments from Ernst Welreke, a 
Bundesbank council member, also 
helped foe dollar against foe Ger¬ 
man amrency. Mr. Welteke said the 
drop in value of the mark against foe 
dollar was a “welcome” develop¬ 
ment 


Compiled by Or Sag From DapatAa 

NEW YORK — Stocks rose 
Monday as gains in semiconductor 
shares offset a slide in AT&T Corp., 
which warned that a push into new 
markets and the defense of its fran¬ 
chise long-distance business would 
hurt 1997 profit. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver¬ 
age closed up 41.18 points at 
6,918-92. white the Standard & 
Poor’s 500-stock index rose 4.49 
points to 79531. Gaining issues 
were about even with losing ones on 
the New York Stock Exchange. 

Semiconductor stocks gained on 
signs that prices for computer chips 
may have hit bottom. If a rebound 
occurs, profits for companies such 
as Texas- Instruments, Novellus 
Systems and Lattice Semiconductor 
may exceed expectations this year. 

“Demand for chips has been 
there — it’s been a supply prob¬ 
lem,” said Graham Tanaka, chief 
executive of Tanaka Capital Man¬ 
agement ' ‘A lot of companies have 
verified that much of foe inventory 
situation has been cleared up.” 

Major Japanese chzpmalrezs. in¬ 
cluding Toshiba, raised prices on 
some types of computer chips, foe 
Nihon Keizai newspaper reported 
That sent shares ofU.S. chipmakers 
up strongly. Intel rose 2% to 1449k 
and National Semiconductor 
gained 1 to 2716. 

The technology-heavy Nasdaq 
composite index rose 2.19 points, to 
1311.19. 

But blue-chips were held back 
from stronger gams by AT&T, 
which fell 2% to 37. The company’s 
president, John Walter, warned that 
first-quarter earnings would lag 
forecasts, and analysts were skep¬ 
tical about plans to lift profit down 
the road 

Mr. Walter said AT&T's earn¬ 
ings would suffer as it spent to enter 
the lucrative local phone market 
and tried to keep pace with rivals in 
its long-distance business. But he 
said cost cuts and other measures 
would lift profit in the long run. 

Mr. Walter, who was tapped four 
months ago to succeed Robert Alien 
as chairman and chief executive in 
1998. said AT&T would focus 
more on customers. 

“We are changing our organi¬ 
zation to strengthen our bond with 
customers," Mr. Walter said 
“Without our customers we are in 
trouble." 

AT&T’s warning was foe latest 
in a string of bad news from foe 
nation’s No. I long-distance pro¬ 
vider, whose stock has fallen 13 
percent in foe past year. In Septem¬ 


ber, AT&T said it would revamp its 
pricing strategy to stem declining 
market share. 

“You want to chase stocks that 
have been beaten up but have an 
improving fundamental outlook,” 
said Steve Gortch. an analyst at Na- 



said Steve Gortch. an analyst at Na¬ 
tional City Bank of Cleveland 
“I’m not convinced the outlook is 


improving for AT&T.” _ 

CSX rose 314 to49 l A andNorfotk 
Southern rose 2% to 93% after re¬ 
ports foe two companies would split 
up Co mail and remain competitive 


U^. STOCKS 


rivals along the East Coast under an 
agreement being worked out to 
break a six-week stalemate. 

Conrad's board was to meet 
Monday to consider the deal, but 
foe company made no immediate 
announcement 

Stocks were held back early by a 
report showing that U.S. incomes 
were growing faster than many 
economists had expected Coupled 
with signs of robust U.S. manufac¬ 
turing, investors are concerned that 
Alan Greenspan, the ch ^nnan of the 
Federal Reserve Board, wifi make 
good on last week’s hint that the 
central bank, would act to head off 
inflation by raising interest rates. 

Higher rates raise foe cost of bor¬ 
rowing money and tend to make 
stocks less attractive than fixed-in¬ 
come investments. 

“All you have to do is look at 
what Greensgan said," said Todd 
Clark, managing director for insti¬ 
tutional trading at HSBC James 
CapeL “The minute he sees in¬ 
flation pressure, he's going to try to 
do something to halt that.” 

Some saw signs of inflation in a 
report from the National Associ¬ 
ation of Purchasing Management, 
which said U.S. manufacturing 
activity improved in February from 
a month earlier as orders and pro¬ 
duction accelerated The report's 
index of prices paid for goods rose 
to 55.1 from 51.4 in January. 

The data helped send foe price of 
the benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond down 12/32 point, to 9712/32, 
taking foe yield up to 6.83 percent 
from 6.80 percent Friday.. 

CB Bancorp rose 4% to 3314 after 
Pinnacle Financial Services said it 
agreed to buy the bank holding 
company for $98 million in stock, 
offering $35 in Pinnacle stock for 
each CB Bancorp share. Pinnacle 
fell % to 2714. Du. Pont rose 4 to 
11114 after the chemical and 
plastics maker's board approved a 
2-for-I stock split/Bloomberg, AP.) 


4. 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


The top 300 most mflve draw, 
up to the dosing on Wall Street. 
The Associated Press. 


Soto Hip Law tided Or* 


IK* 



*fa 


I £ ® * 

a s * 


MS 

zrw 


£ £ £ 45 

S -T r 2 

» ,3V* 3Vk -Vk 

| % X *5 

4 g a ^ £ 

' X X * 


m \\h v 

.131 Eft 


I pe 6 4 

a ™ .L .a ;5 

a ivi ni j 
1 ' 


MCe 


BOVTchn 


£ B 

» M 
™ Ilk Ift 
« levy ish 
www 
in Pi 8W 

W JH 

SJ» Iff! KM 

516 SH 20* 

w a 

« 9> M 

126 5V, TV, 

HU 3324 33 

I* 22 225* 

s sn 
te is* in 
V 3» W: 

,3! ■£ “}* 

Iffl jw Ki 
ss 24* Zft 
aow 

sn fat to 

IflJ 27V, »v 

n m in 
in m m 

27fc 275* 

8V, t 

n 

un i» 
n m 

7n 7 
4*i m 
.24* 1*k 

lia Hit 
Wit *9i 
iw um 
£k 4*, 

Sft 5ft 

74% » 

a in* 
n in 
in m 
it, m 
Bft 27V 
lh 2 
2W 14 
lift 

nit m* 

261* 14k 

UK IN 

*t 


n 


Ht 

I*. 

int 

n 

Eft 

Mi 

2D*t 

2ft 

a. 


**» 

*1% 

+fa 


23 

S 

ISft 

m 

MM 

3V. 

& 


5 


110 


SV» +ft 
1A *46 
Wk *lft 


7H 

*2 

A 


kMfa 


iKpOBfl 

HnTcrt 

MW 

tatafitg 


KM 

24*1 

43ft 

K 

fly 

SVk 


MLnr 

SsS* 

JanM 


KetM 

imi 

KTFBS 

USE? 

W- 

53 h. 

LaSag 


744 

Hi 
652 

2J8 

ion 

s _ 

its In 
<05 7ft 
1157 1211 

tm 2*u 

£ £ 

m n 


mt 

2M 

an 

Vi 

A 


IN 

24ft 

*W 

*k 


Indexes 

DawJogtes 


rink* Lim 

091 ESI 6828.10 *918.93 *41.18 
2J73.II Z31131 2373.11 +54.10 


Most Actives 

NYSE 


*8 


219 

121 

» 

593 

in 


S&c 


157 

W 


IMcR 

MH 


MaSOLog 


MUtetsM 

MLHMl 


SB 
239 
1» 3 

177 7ft 

*2 17ft 

i« 

75 


ft 

int 

7 

121 * 
7ft 
.Wi 
IS* 
At 

31 22*1 

lift lift 
12 lift 
17ft 17ft 

9V 

5 5 

2ft 2ft 
Mfc 69k 
21ft m 
10ft IN 
Ik ft 
I 7ft 
4ft Aft 
64* » 

14ft Uh 
11 19ft 
Mt N 
20ft 20ft 
WI 38ft 


SSSin 


MMlMIOR 

SHonT 

MnsM 

NTNCnt 

NV> 


717 

140 

*3 

4H 

491 

126 

133 

669 

2! 

231 


int 

r 

mt 

i> 

3ft 

3ft 


M 

7*. 

12ft 

4ft 

M 

W 

11 

13ft 

7. 

1 

lift 


t 

10H 

7ft 

17ft 

TO. 

£ 

7ft 

s 

lift 

m 

Nft 

2V. 

6ft 

lift 

l 

16ft 

WI 

.5* 

30ft 

4 

in 

in 

ii 

131* 

I* 

m 

j* 


22771 27624 277JS 

Cam 2TILB7 2UL66 2106316 TUBAS 


J* 

+H 


Standard & Poors 


+ifc 

1 


HU 


♦ft* 

-n 

*v» 

+M 

-ft 

ill 


Industrials 

Transp. 

unites 

Finance 

SPSoa 

5PT00 



March 3 ( 1997 

High lam Close Q>oe OpM 


17ft 17* 

% 15 

261* '27 

37H 38*t +* 


Grain* 


.l+5Vk 


i 


32ft 33H 
SMi 31 
39ft 41Vt +lft 
90H (4 lift 


CORN (CHOP 

MOD I»in4nlmum- Con per butM 
Wor»7 ffl M HQ *ili 38.890 

MOVV7 ill ft 226Vi 300ft + 5ft 155.184 

jMW 3Wft 2M 300 *6 110339 

5*0 97 W as 21) +5ft 13405 

Dec97 288ft 284ft 287ft 66ft 61,606 

ESt sates NA. FTfs. sates 79,999 
RTsopbiW 381,815 ofl 1970 


High 

Low 

QOS0 

Oige 

Opinl 

ORANGE JUICE WON) 



IMQn.-Ciartsp«rb. 




Mar ft 79X0 

7150 

78X0 

+ 2.10 

2X08 

Mnv97 82X0 

7830 

8160 

+2-50 

1*335 

AHY7 8520 

81X0 

8*50 


*871 

5ep97 87J5 

8*2$ 

H7JK 

+2.15 

3X33 

Eat fades ALA. 

Fit's, sates £500 


FrfsopenW 2L72B Ofl 9 




HW Loti Clom Chon Opinl 


Motels 


TIFYEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS tMATtFJ 
FFSXkOOO ■ pn afl 00 pd 
BVMAJ? 97 

Mar 9713Z30 131JJ8 131 SB -(T44123J03 
Jun 97 13130 ISOM 13072-1U4 2&236 
Sep 97 129JZB 129Z8 129316-044 1,782 
Dec 97 N.T. N.T. 9028—044 0 

Est. totume: 132Z85.0pen ht; 15X321 off 
9-C5. 


High Lae Ooce Ofl* Optot 


Industrials 


NYSE 


Uft 3HM Qb 


NASDAQ. 


ft 

ft 

** 

ft 

ft 

to 


OmpasOe 

mdmfrWs 

Transa. 

UfB» 

Rnoncs 

Nasdaq 


41447 41123 415.97 *046 
521JB 51724 52043 +0J» 
367.76 3597S 367J6 +585 
270.10 3*a3* 248 71 —036 
3*727 383163 38741 *143 


tft 

ft 

-It 

*11 

tit 


HU U VM Ot 


GamposOe 

Inaustrlab 

Bom 

insurance 

Rnmee 

Transo. 


131141 1300311 130049 -091 
109516 109070 109290 —ISO 
1417-50 141481 141527 —449 
14663ft 140188 1401JB -680 
174749 I73B.74 174749 —187 
84748 B4I8I 04780 *043 


3Qm 

Intel 

US Rows 

Asoaid 

Curbs 

Novell 

Mkrosns 

Syosnt 

Orodei 

tMKMs 

TctedmA 

WterMOris 

ApWMa 

Centoctr 


VoL M|h 
92915 55ft 




6570* _ 

57713 SO 
SUM 55ft 
35704 UR* 
385*9 10ft 
36S12 99 
36222 30ft 
35139 30% 
32751 73ft 
31338 12ft 
29077 26ft 
27528 51ft 
25176 «ft 


LOW JPM 
53ft 54ft 
32ft 33 
MOM 142ft 
55ft S5®/« 
50ft 53ft 
12ft 15>ft. 
Oft Tft 

96ft nv. 

Phi JMi 
3Bft 38ft. 
70ft 72ft 
lift lift 
25ft 29Vu 
49ft 50ft 
30 36b 


—IM 
t M 

tit 


SOYBEAN MEAL (OSOD 

1 (Signs- ODdars per ton 

Mir97 26500 26293 26500 *440 0478 

May 97 26200 25450 259.70 *500 46.900 

-M97 mOO 25450 25560 *5W 28,177 

AW97 25100 249JO 251JJO *460 4434 

SOP 97 WM 23880 26530 *346 3409 

0017 234JB 22250 22150 +178 2455 

Est softs NA Fifs. sates 22.927 
FfTsopenW Ofl 898 


p 3fc 


Tiv? 


*ft 


_ AMEX 


SOYBEAN an. (OIOT) 

60400 to-certs nr ft 

Mir 97 3WB 243S 2447 HUS 7427 

Mar 97 2563 2471 2496 +0J5 47499 

All97 2585 25.W 25J5 +0L29 21471 

AU097 2660 2535 2566 +829 4429 

Sep 97 2540 2545 2SJ0 +0L26 2JU0 

Od 97 2545 2540 2542 *026 U89 

Ed.stees NA Rfs.srta 2848) 
FrfsopanM 93J43 up 1126 


12ft 

wt 

lift 


17ft 

fft 

16ft 


Law VM Oft. 


AMEX 


NT Thai 
NAftct 


13ft 

IS 

7ft 


17ft 

ft* 

Mft 

m 

13 

14ft 

Wft 


56489 59149 SUM +04S 


SPDfl 


OHfflW 

Otar 

Onarml 

SBEh 

PUf 

Refer 

PWSPMU 

MCi 

PhGU 

*wph1d 

PtaK 


27ft 
4ft 
1<6 
3 ft* 
A 
22*1 
TVk 


13 
141* 
in 
7ft 
4lft 

22 23ft 

4b at 


Wt +»ft 

-ft 


Dow Jones Bond 

pmtaas Today 

Oase Non 

20 Bonds 10362 10116 

lOUtOHes 99.96 100.04 

10 IndusMofe 10668 10527 



LnsJ 


VoL Hloh Law 

79ft TWv 

KV. 3SV. . _ 

4ft 5ft 5!) 

19* Uti 14ft 

5ft 5ft 

% ” 
SI 

47* 


O*. 

* 

+ ft 


£ i 


SOYBEANS (CBOTl 

5000 tei mWmum- certs per Bushel 

floor 97 SUM 883 807% +16% 14.237 

MOV97 SIS 805 810 +1M 75,900 

JUI97 813 79516 80910 *mt 51,147 

Aug 97 ram 787 79915 +16U 7JG2 

Sop 97 734 751 754 +13 3A6 

Est sates NA Frfs.sc6BS 57,116 

PrfsanonW 179636 off ISM 


GOLD (NCMX) 

100 par nt- dollars per tnw ca. 
flfla-97 36470 5 

Aw 97 38660 36340 36560 -4HJ 79,130 
May97 36660 

Jon97 368.10 36570 3020 -0.10 3M5A 
Allfl 97 37020 36850 37030 *050 1IM3D 

0097 37260 37160 37260 -030 6JS7 

DocW 37120 37350 37530 *030 2W24 

F«b 98 377.10 37U0 377.10 -4U0 4JM 

Ert.sates NA FiTs-sites 60637 
Rfs Open ini 173,117 ofl 2630 
W GRADE COPPER CNCMX) 

25000 to.- certs pgr n. 
flflorW 11660 11180 11560 +165 9,193 

Aw 97 11460 11420 11450 +170 3653 

MOV 97 11370 11160 1127S +165 25670 

Jun97 1106D 11068 11050 +150 974 

-tel 97 10960 10750 I0M *160 6637 

A*J097 10555 633 

Sk97 10620 105.10 10560 +120 2681 

Od 97 103J0 603 

N(V97 1(7350 SB 

Est. soles NA FrTs. sates 9689 
RTsoaenM 60231 
5U.VSKNCMX} 

5600 frer dl- cents pgr Iror oz. 
flflar 97 53960 528JS 53750 +650 2607 

Aw77 anno 'mm 53360 —850 1 

MOV97 54350 53250 S40LQO *400 39650 

JU 97 54850 53750 54660 *5.10 11698 


ITAUAN GOVERNMENT BOND OJFFB} 
[0200 Minn - pis al 100 pa 
1SS jaw 1M6S TmoQ +050 60584 

AJ97 mja 12S70 J2760 +055 44790 

SgOT NT NT. 12755 +055 

ESsgks: 118691. Pier.totes 139423 
Pn*. naan tat: 126.982 off 4787 
EURODOLLARS (CMER) 
SlmOten-PMoMBOpcL 


COTTON 1 (NCIN) 
5M00to.-CBnfsperl*.' 
flflar97 7425 7410 7410 +023 

May 97 7405 7545 7565 +B22 

-tel 97 77.15 7410 7495 *020 

Od»7 7725 77.10 77.W -068 

Dec97 TJS 77.14 7725 +067 

Mor98 7860 ms® 7400 

Est. soles NA Frfs.K*es 4248 
Bfsopenw 61.109 ofl 356 


253 

31613 

12.113 

1266 

14447 

1679 


MW 00 93.19 
JunOS 93.14 
Sep 00 93.10 
Dec80 9362 
Mw 01 9362 
XnOI 9223 
Sep 01 92.94 
DecOI 9266 
Mar 02 9266 
Junta 9261 
Sep02 9278 
Dec 02 9270 


ELI7 9117 
9L1J 93.12 
9368 9368 
9360 9360 
9160 9362 
91.97 9258 

9263 9264 

9264 9246 
9266 9246 
9141 9241 
9278 9278 
9270 9270 


Est. sates NA FrT».sdes S 64 .I 11 
PrYtapenM 2680.100 oft 6072 
BRmSH POUND (CMBtJ 
CUOO PNtefe, 1 par pound 
flflar 97 14302 14152 14194 
An 97 14232 14110 14146 
Sep 97 14140 14T30 16140 
Dec 97 14090 14090 16090 
Estsote* NA Fri**.sales 96C9 
PrfsnpenM 38561 rtf 283 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (CM50 


—045 42253 
-065 36672 
-065 32655 
—045 25571 
-066 23707 
—06* 10,751 
—064 14,159 
-064 10694 
-045 
-WK 
-06S 
-045 


5782 

5612 

5,186 

S7N) 


SOM 

2,976 

1633 


4ft 


f ft* 

SI 

7BH 


WHEAT (CBOTJ 
SJUteunMnnim-arts opr buM 


1077 HI* 
m Wk 
88 18ft 
164 ISh 

no 2 ft 

U7 BV. 
*64 t 
1U4 Slk 
186 J>* 

iu a* 


ft t** 
:<ft 25 
W* 2M* 
.7* Jte 

15ft IS** 

x F 

8ft tft 


Trading Activity 

NYSE 


IB 

J if# 

IBB 3P* 
m 11 
at 1 

M Oft 
145 27ft 271* 


lift 

W* 

in 


lift 

6V, 

5ft 

a 

111 * 

12ft 

12 ft 

ift 

2311 

» 

ft 

18k 

■K 

'a 

if!! 

2» 

It 

1. 


IK tlk 

Vi 1M 

J? ii? 

nu a 

23! 8ft 
IM 8k 
224 7ft, 
IU tft 
366 1ft 

21 ** mt 

446 H* 


£ £ 
•ft 9ft 


» 

n k 
m 
ft 
6ft 


fft 

Mt 

1ft 

7ft 


* 1 ! 

«h 


tft tit 


tft 


8ft 


}*i 


Ift 


m ft 
IM 
»• 

2*« ft 
ft 




1ft 

f 

ss <ft Ift 

in IM ISK 

aa » 3ft 

! a at a 

ib m » 

t Ok «N in 

to It 18ft IM 

an t Eft* oh 

3*44 9 sn fft 

127 2ft 2*t » 

6 U I4A 14H IM 

2918 Jt VVt 37ft 

18S 29* Tft Ift ft 

1U 5ft 5ft JW +» 

4W lift Iff* lift 

£ Iff >3S un 

59* IBft Wk H ft 

b m s*ft m tit 

*»«*«* 68k ttk 

m rv» jv, 2 »u ,H 

OS 12 lift S tft 

M 51ft 4tft 

to n 32ft 

TK l» 16ft 

11 m in ran 

in ift n* m 

n*i M* uft 14 

KB Ift Ift |«k 

971 4ft «8k 4ft 

_]« mt 12 ft Bit 


41ft -2ft 


St 


ftk 


ft m» 


*11 


1H _ 

136 » m SM 

| “55. K ft “ft 

46M 4ft 4tk 4ft 

SC Oft 429! 4SS* 

mi m w A 

to I 1 1 

in? n, in jv, 

i&> sa m 

115 17»» mt nt 

n m m lott 


75 tft 616 
1HD 14 T» 

a nt » 


pubcm 

asr. 


» % 


464 IM 
.92 Sft 
Ml 1ft 
_ 16H 


Advtnced 

DacSned 

llnchiiwd 

TolrtKsuet 

NmWg 

New Lews 


IN 7 

740 11* 

59 2Ht 
200 JIM 


issif 


SpOWT* 


117 

S2W 

497 

25S 

OS 

235 

257 

440 

149 

153 

219 

■6 

10739 

IM 

3 


iw 

M 

int 

IM 

in 

'IS 

7ft 

19ft 

37k 

25 




smor 

T<iSa 

Ted» 

Teds 

Totelsn 

Tofilrt 

TeM« 

TftmOn 


s 


7W 

9277 

M12 


1ft* 

J 

9H 


a 


M 
Oft 

at 

13ft tli 

5ft 

16ft -ft 

5 r * 

IU* Ift* 

Zn> 22ft tft. 

a son -ft 

Ilk 1ft 4k. 

M M -Vki 

ftaft r*ft 

i»» n* -M, 

Mt Utt tft, 

lift lift 

3ft 21* 

19 19 Oft 

Sft 38k tiki 

W Ai _i 

3ft Iftft -Vki 

n 4 *ii, 

TWk Mt 

SW )1 51ft 

.8, 1 ? 

r r 

.w* nt 

u 


C AMEX 


AdkonaaS 
□ectnad 
UnenanoM 
Total issues 
NewhtetB 
New Lam 







flflar w 379 

370 

374Vj 

+1«i 

2244 






Mar 97 3D 

37310 

379 

+3fa 

25284 



Nasdaq 



JUI97 371 

366 

370 

+5Wli 

31955 





Sep 97 372 

367 

37) ft 

+6 

IM 






EStMtes NA Frys-fades 17,181 


999 

1063 


Horn 

amt 

Frr» Open Int 

70,791 Off 767 



Advanced 

1553 

1895 







Dedfeied 

1907 









iXidmaed 


1678 






m 

12 

SP 

New Hfato 




Livestock 




New Loan 

Market Soles 

60 

m 

CATTLE (OflBt) 





Pier. 




Apr 97 69JH 

69.17 

6922 

-4L40 

«LI5B 



T< 5S 

432X3 

Prev. 

Jun 97 65X0 

65L20 

6525 

-aii 

21,180 




Aug97 6*70 

6*22 

6*3# 

—097 

18279 



NYSE 


Qd97 67J5 

6760 

67 JO 

+AI7 

12,998 

m 

199 


Dec 97 69.95 

69X5 

61X0 

+020 

5275 

624 

735 

Amex 


28-lfl 

Fab 90 71JD 

70X5 

71197 

*0.12 

2693 


18 

Nasdaq 

49964 

68*88 

Est sales NA FrTs-sales 1*766 




mntiOans. 



FrYsapenM 

PSDBICAT 

10*717 

TLE1CJV 

UP 797 

IERJ 




JW19B 556.10. 

flflar 98 S6170 

Est. sales NA FiTs. sates 23466 
Firscpenkn 9IW89 cfl 2506 
PLATMUM (NMERJ 
50 Irtwm.-donors certrovoz. 

Aw!? ®4JD BUD 39360 —360 18J0T 

JUI97 377JO 39Z50 3J5J0 -2J0 3621 

Od97 39S5Q 3MJD 39150 -ISO L9M 

_ «&I0 1.III 

Ettsoflts NA PrTs.sales <765 
FfTsaptnint 34.995 oft 79 


£305 

MOT97 

2333 

7312 

7323 

4*642 

14 

Jun 97 

7369 

7356 

7366 

15JS8 

*666 

Sep 97 

7410 

7400 

7407 

1759 


Dec 97 

7448 

7440 

7446 

765 


HEATING (NLUtfflER) 

43600 art. cants per art 
Aw 97 51W SLO 52-95 -049 

Mar 97 SIX 52.10 SU0 -039 

Am 97 53L3B SL38 52JSI -049 

All 97 53JO 5265 S3.M -039 

AW 97 5438. 53LSB S3J0 -0® 

SOP 97 K60 5448 5450 -019 

Od97 55 l/0 5560 5&3D -086 

Nov 97 S6A5 S14S 5190 -064 

Dec 97 5095 5630 SteSO *061 

J?n 98 5730 5455 5*30 +0.11 

a.sttosNA Rl's.sales 3*662 
FrfsoponW 110456 afl 6861 

UGHTSUfSTOMAE (NMER) 
i60DbU..aDMneerbte. 

AW 97 2068 MM 30.18 -0.12 

Nottl tUl WX 1937 -067 

JW1J7 sail 1962 1962 —064 

JUl» 1935 19-53 I960 -M5 

A0B W 1962 19.45 I9J6 -4J? 

S»07 W36 WAS TOSD -067 

Od97 1964 1942 19_54 +062 

Nov 97 I960 194S 1948 

DKW 1965 1935 1945 

SIS K-S 1*4* -061 

FetiW T96S 1945 I960 *063 

19^ 19M 1945 -063 

Af *» 1938 19JB +009 

Ed. soles NA FiTs. sates TKLZJ* 
RTsooenirt 408417 up 1UM 


35679 

11,257 

10,323 

10684 

4338 

5370 

33ffl 

3451 

7.155 


4315 


86673 

4B31V 

42607 

23341 

18683 

13617 

12,970 

11395 

24.959 

14.173 

8489 

2383 

3474 


LONDON METALS (LMEJ 
Donors par mettle ion 
—wm CWtah Grade) 

146060 146160 142214 1423% 

148754 148860 1451160 765160 


w 


waft 


r 24^“ 2431.00 

241060 241160 237260 237460 


want 

Lead 




Dividends 

Co mpan y 


Per Amt Roc Pay Company 


IRREGULAR 

Nn Wesfmta Bfc 0 2371 3-7 5-16 


t*to 

•h 

♦*k 


STOCK SPUT 
DuPont A Ca 2 for Isom 
[atercheteoe F4* 3 fer 2 spat 

Nth Country Bnep 2 for 1 spffl. 


Blount ifiriB, 

CaVHCA HJllKora 
EiecftonfcTete 
BednmlcTeia 
EfeniraSvga 

UngMHFM 


STOCK 


Emerging Ml 
FWeonriwJ 
Frt Ubeny Rn 
rlneo 


% 


"new* 

TraEaii 

WS 

W 1 

Tkmrw 

Mil 


in 2 m 
IK IM 
251 IP* 

M S* 

12ft 


Ml 


s 

Toftrt ■ 


«a tti 

S lift 

_« 15ft 


U £ 

£ £ 

xnt a 

lift I9W 
ftt 9ft 

» 3ft 

lift T2H 
MW Wi 
,9ft 9* 

int HK 

U IM 
15ft ISft 
to* K 26ft 

Iff* 1ft 

■». ft ftk 

Tft TV, 7H 

WM M left 

.Sft Sft Ift 

TS_ IM IM 

mt 


til, 

tiki 

th, 

-ft. 

tlkl 


■^*1 

tlk. 

+N. 


flflACC Pltvote 

- 10% 

3-14 

3-31 

flflACC Private 

, 10% 

3-14 

3-31 

New Bruns Sd 

- 10% 

4-15 

5-15 


INCREASED 



MMl Cos 

Q sa 

3-31 

4-15 

Mass HPtiEcmcEx flfl M2 

415 

4-30 

Raymond Cam 

Q 0625 

3-U 

3-n 


YEAREND 



Perry County Rn _ A0 

3-11 

3-25 


REGULAR 



BCE Inca 
Blount Ins A, 

Q 68 
Q .1265 

Ml 

M7 

4-15 

4-1 


, iPatSrt 
MerrlmocIrKl 
NSD Bancorp 
NiftCeffhlBiKShr 
PflgtenArnPrRt 
PfcyMerGaiup 
Satonan Bids2008 
SakmwnHUnoa 
Satemon Wldwlde 
SehawfclncA 


SMneCara 

USF&GPaa 


PdcetMr 


Q .1182 3-17 
Q 62 5-1 

S .06 3-14 
S 66 W 
O .14 3-17 
Afl .1325 3-18 
O 635 4-3 

Q .10 3-14 
M .1187 3-18 
Q 3b Ml 
M .1031 3-10 
Q .10 3-7 
Q 35 3-17 
O 6625 3-14 
M 643 3-10 
Q .10 3-10 
M 673 3-10 
M .125 3-1B 
M .1187 3-18 
0 645 3-17 
O .15 317 
Q 425 3-13 


4-1 

M 

Ml 

9-3D 

3-28 

3- 31 

4- 17 
4-1 

3-31 

MB 

Ml 

3-21 

Ml 

4-7 

3-30 

3-17 

3-31 

3-31 

3-31 

3- 31 

4- 1 
Ml 


sum to.- ante oer b 
Mw97 tut 4B2S 6U2 -06} 4682 

Aw97 49.15 6830 6032 —1.15 3.MB 

flflar 97 7160 7065 mij -167 £264 

Aub97 73.70 7115 7122 —0-92 4458 

Sep 9) 7*67 71*5 7U5 -0JB 1455 

OU97 7465 7445 7455 —047 2670 

Est. sates NA RfS. sofas 2.707 

8178* 


ward 

NkM 


«S60 72460 72100 72560 
taSVj 70660 49560 49460 


ft; 


£15u00 822560 79B560 799100 
B31GL00 832060 807560 808060 


TK 


nrsapenM 104217 up 


Spot 579560 580560 575060 574060 
For- 585560 SB40.00 580560 5B1O0D 


no e »Lww<CMBu 
40000 to.- arts aw ip. 

Aw 97 7440 TIES 7412 -635 

Jun97 7760 7930 7965 -025 

.M 97 7100 7733 77J0 +062 

Auo 97 THW 7415 7450 -0.10 

Od97 674) 4465 47.10 -0)0 

Dec97 4530 4480 SIX *007 

Ed. sates NA Rl's. sates £604 
Rfs open int 33475 up 45 


15416 

10480 

2422 

2612 

1491 

7B4 


Ubc tSpedrt Hlgb Grade) 

Sprt 123760 ]22860 12D5W, 1204M 


124000 124160 122560 122460 
Hlgti Low One Oige OpM 


FfTsopwW 44312 w 479 
6aUMNIAAa((CIUBI) 

125600 manes, s par mar* 
fl*w97 J934 J89I JB97 
•Ml 97 J960 J926 JB30 

SU97 39» 3944 3947 

Dec 77 job 

Est sales NA FWs.srtes 28.942 
Previous Ftt'sopfflM 103.287 up 344 
JAPANESE YEN (CMERj 
I2J mOton von, t pw HO ran 
Mw 97 8350 6261 6271 

Jun97 6451 6347 6380 

S6P97 fSK san 6507 
Est. soles NA ErTS. ides 29634 
Erf's open inr 79668 off 2240 
SWWS FRANC fCMBR) 

135600 ftoitte. 1 per tvnc 
RAW97 4001 £756 6782 

Jun 97 Mm 6025 MS* 
j»B»97 6910 6915 6915 

ea-sdes NA RfftMteS 13609 
Frfs open int 54915 Ofl 804 

SECT'S"™ 

atom *9173 9i?n 

JlBOT 9147 9343 

Sep97 9136 nS 

0M97 HU 9X06 

9361 93.95 

M % ^ 

3 a? ss 


90459 

1(U5* 

IM 

25 


72.184 

4251 

673 


44748 

4364 

IJ7S 


NATURAL GAS (IMER) 
lOAOanvm Mu’S, Suer mmuu 
16® 1J90 ms 

May 97 1685 1843 ]655 
Jrt»97 1600 1870 1.185 
8697 1600 1605 1695 

1-SH 1JK 1J ® 

S2£ I-SJ >■« ij» 

Od97 1670 1640 1655 

Nov 97 1895 2fflK 1690 

Dec 97 2645 27W5 IM 

Jan 98 2280 2X0 2.765 

Fean 2205 2800 2800 

BLSalei NA ftYisales 31,751 
FfT5 open Int 160.180 up 2003 

UM£ADB9 GA90UNE (NMSO 

ajm aoi, am per aoi 

AprV7 6Z65 4180 6185 -471 

¥ W a» 7 4115 —478 178H 

■jjiy 61-75 6060 4l.ua —043 12 , Isa 

**** WZO flC-70 —OJS 5,503 


33,188 

18,780 

11859 

10.3*5 

4442 

7830 

9-388 

£545 

£952 

9,189 

£422 


9172 +061 98844 
9147 + tUO 121470 
9384 + 062 88676 
9369 1061 60039 

10807 


Financial 


frooasafctM 


rtpar 


teanlADteHQtUihCgMldliatfii 
fa-pwnmp w la te wend aa aa d 


PORN IB-L1ES (CMBII 
«m to.- cert* oar *». 

Mw97 8285 «US 81.95 +082 

flflar97 8410 1225 BUD -065 

M9f 8115 8160 836D +0.12 

AuaVT K6Q 2980 80J» +085 

Est. sates NA Wi sates 1171 
RTsoPtn W 7666 up 321 


1813 

4655 

1899 

*99 


•hi 


left 
17ft 
4*» 
ft “ft 

Sf M 

Mt ITm 


k & 


4lk Mk tlkj 


1 us a* 
WW I 


36ft 

B* 


14 


}U 


ft. 

ir 


VftftCB 


% 


lift 

Jft 


J 

rll»: 


% 


SUSS 


WHHK* 
nsm 1 


a 


if E £ S 

iw 121k Bft 

111 ft 

18 ink aw isoft 

m w «* w 


+fi* 

55*' 

+15! 


-h 1 


jft* 

■*«! 

.Sftl 

-Ift* 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sates Ogata are rtwOdaLYeaty highs and torn refiedOie pnttoas 52 weefts (du the cuncnl 
ageli. but notffiebfast1id8ng day. Whewa spa orstod(dMtl B4li* T Kw ding to25peaanta iu ore 
in bm paid fie ynoBM^cwnnge and atldBiO era shown for flw new sloda only. LMess 
aOtawtse noted roles of dMdemts am wwwrtajtwnwikwts based on #w Uest dedaraion. 
a - dhrtetend aha e*tm Cs}. b - annuoi rate of dMdnnd plus stack tfMdend e - HqUdallnB 
«8*W«id oc-PE enaecb WjM - caned, d-now yearly law. dd-lass In Km last 12 months, 
a - tflvftfand dedcraf or paid br preceding 12 mounts. * - annual rate inaeased on last 
dedarnflan. f - dividend In Canadian funds, subfact to 15% non-nsMance fm. I - dMdond 
dedtaed after spflt-up or stock dtektendl-dMaendpahl fils yaai,aminad deferred or no 
adlan taken at latest dividend meeting, k - dMdend dedand w paid this year, an 
wxtmNjlanK Issue wtth dWUJends in a rrears. at - annual ndd reduced on last declaration, 
s - now issue In die past 52 weeks. The Mgh-faw rwga begins with Bn stwt of tending, 
nd - next day deOvery. p - Irttlal dMdOKt annual rale unknown. P/E - prtce-camJngs ratto. 

g-ctesed«d muhialfmjtl. r • dMdand dedond wpoMln pre«iBngl2niontha. pha stock 
dlvfateiid. f - stodc spot Dividend bagfns with date of spot, sis - sales, t - dividend paid In 
stock in preceding 12 raondta estimated anti value on ea-dNMend ores-dtstrtbatton date. 

undorttwBanluijptcy Act wsaculltesassumed by sudi«Drnpanies.i>ii-when dbMbutad. 
ml - when butfln - will wonwits. x - owflrfclend aroMlgMs. sSc * BMSsMhuMn. 
nd * wfltnat warrants, y. ek-dMdendand sofas In ML rid -yield. - soles hi did. 


Food 


COCOA WOE} 
to tnantc tana- s ptr ton 


1262 

1241 

1362 

+16 

1317 

1287 

1315 

+29 

13*2 

13H 

Ufa 

+» 

13 n 

Ufa 

1370 

+36 

1398 

1380 

urn 

+M 


Est safes NA RT*. rales £959 
RTropentet 91723 up 1581 


429 

3L4D2 

18.955 

1BL745 

42» 


COFTCE C (NCSD 

37-900 IbS^OBnliPW fa. 

Mw 97 19968 19060 19860 * 760 
May97 WSJB U86B 18160 +465 
Jrt97 17460 16860 17160 +440 
Sep97 16125 15960 16191 +*35 
EsLlrteS NA nrdsilBS MU2B 
FfTsopenW 42681 up 160 


2607 

2*292 

7850 


UST.BBJLMCMHO 
*1 mifaan- ptiaf UN oct. 

Mar 77 M.90 9*88 1469 -663 3.(01 

Am 97 9174 9482 9482 —065 4611 

See 97 9*5] K53 9463 -063 1,754 

Dec 97 9448 867 

ESi.iales NA Rl's.sates 
fWsopanirt T off 10031 
5 YR. TREASURY (CBOTl 
HOMinnft-r(i»«iiHi*iMpa 
MOT 97106-90 105-53 105-58 —09 9*928 

Jun 97 185-47 105-32 105-40 —09 130.943 

Sep97 105-33 3 

Ess.soles NA ftfs-ietes to* 851 
Fn sopenlnt 225674 oft 364* 

10 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

SUKUMn prfn- p*t & touts of too oct 
MarWIDMB lw-29 10862 -09 159JS2 

JUA97 107-22 107-06 107-14 —00 150667 

S8P 97 107-00 106-00 107-00 — 0* £202 

Est sofas NA Erf*, sales 130,120 
PrTsepenlnt 311250 eft 7431 
US TREASURY BONOS (CBOTl 
(«pct-tuMeo-pf,ft3a«faaruDpcti 
Mar 97110-28 110-09 110-0 -16 226675 

Jun 97 110-13 109-34 109-30 —16 311827 

5CP97 109-22 109-10 109-12 —20 11,140 

Dec97 109-19 4805 

EH. ides NA RTs-scees *526*8 
FfTsopenW 552.912 afl 15281 


9266 — 061 10679 

8S=8S s 

Prai.opfaliaL 518675 rtf 3623 


7852 

*827 


5S2? 9687 *1 


Decw 


m 

jfi S H :ss.s 

® 

«s %% :8£'1£3S 

k« S2 SS *g« 72.972 

SU7 SS SS f. ani 2-775 

Bd 9535 UnOi 856*7 

Sm Sia S 1? * 061 21099 

946» 9488 9488 +061 2*160 


GASOIL UPE) 

OS. dooan per metric ton - ftds of 100 tons 

fl*f97 16375 159JO 162J0 —275 21J}10 
16175 1*1.75 -275 1*407 
*BYW ^-00 1634)0 16375 -285 *W1 

JunW 167410 16480 16*50 —2_5n 7 «Xn 
•W97 1687S 16475 76dS -TJX ifS 

f .V. 16780 167.75 —280 1832 

197 171 JO 169410 16975 -2J0 1,2W 
97 17075 17075 17075 —950 L452 
IW97 174_50 17*50 1717 S —2JO 6B1 

Dec97 17575 17100 17275 -2J0 ssSl 
EsL sales; 1*854. Op«l Intj6£649aff616 
BRENT OIL UPE] 

UAdadars per barrel-tOBeM ,000 barrels 
fiC.97 19.13 1866 1872 +04)7 si,160 

6*0997 1864 18X2 1865 *0413 SlmS 

■Junes? 18.70 1878 18X9 -fl.15 ®|3S 

1|*3 1874 18X1 -0.17 12^41 

A 1597 I860 1871 1878 -ai7 sSl 

SgW 18J4 1871 1876 —0.17 2S, 

0097 18^ 1874 1875 -0.16 4752 

Noe97 18X7 18.18 1873 —0.1* * 1 ® 

^Estsates: 4 * 375 . OpenW-l72608up 



; n % !. ■; r, ^,1 

■-1 ■ i • • . 




Hoff] mis 113-00 1(5.16 +| 


MflWOHPIBORtfflATin 

SS 33 

StoS 2S5 %79 §679 = 

Jun 98 9679 9477 9677- 

U-V W5= 

Mar 99 9574 9572 9573 — 

gi § § 

Oee 99 954)9 95.07 954)7— 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSBJ 

HUM eift- cants oer b. _ 

May 97 1171 HUB 107* -ftU 

7797 1U6 (tS 1M4 ~m 

Octrr 1073 1835 1061 —0.12 

MW9B 1872 HL56 1040 -AM 

Est. sofas NA Frfs. sates. JMW 
Pits open H 1CXB Oh 1953 


Z3J26 

31.186 

2£5V 

9678 


mmn ,,*-<• i,w *■*•» +0-05 107X05 
J8B97 112 HP 111-16 11240 * 045 16*521 

user nt. nt. ni-17 f ms 
EStfldas; I12JS2. PftN.SrtteB 130X62 
Pm*, open int: 271,926 up 1XN 


W * W * ^iiWi. Open Inf. 


072 47675 
04)3 5163* 
04)3 38628 
004 30X91 
04)5 18175 
004 1*630 
004 12796 
04)3 9,781 
04X3 1Z928 
0-03 *476 
WI <540 
004 *265 


Stock Indexes 
S8PC0MP. INDEX (CMaa 
seOKinckBi 

HSi gs » 

gw 00760 «B45 «*» +,« « 

wi* 


f- 253131? up 


TOWttJmo 

gf 1 “SJPV*;*, 42914, + M m 

s?- ■«!.«» *au +S4 zirof 

§= *** JMWL ,P«»-srtes: TV.T76 
™openl«^ 60.964 up TJDT 




flSFSaSJSP™’ 

H gf gs gg :8|,ts 

^ si S as :ss S3 


CACgKNMTIP) 


ddllll mHW IWfl-ir W *.M ▼ IfllY 

ESt sofas 247X81 Pnv.Mes: 330165 
Pier, open HO: 3*0585 up MW 


Mam 0X-!" YU6 + OJD 34039 


in SSr •»«-« —i7j« Atm 

2Sn & 25815—104)0 m 

StSt* Wiume: ,2 -979. Open int; 58.782 Off 




I 







! L . 






Future 

co*,u^ r ^^yu, ailt 

‘JS^niiniMtfps vi.^^ne. 

“« MC.-. 4 ,, "^ihtv 

'"’svnion of!},,,p..'■t in" 

lenrnse anr . A ew 

W*ii cn rh-” “! 

2:?- foreign ^' ii ' , ; c ? for a 
1 £nd,. 


■?* *. 
***** 


4 IT*. , **i 

w,lr "Him i, 

JnsVe;;^ , 

repor-c ? ron r : J /^ | ev c || 

:ij*^perci::-r. " “ * M <widiv j 
*«P C*«nir.i,. Kir ■ • 
nisnisirfr. \v ; -,/.; Vut* 


*Ja lS I -I * ;"■! ’ 

t eco!v:^: 

bj ifji* en.j 


•■-■- - TTi 


ilnijr 
’^d 

,r - The 
«r. Mr 
: -Vi 


Aid Th e f ( 

r.r.'.Kj'.,', ,,,,, iS / 




dfUjljB 

London 


•aid; 


-; t -j : "*. J. " ’ 'PW«.; 

lanes' 

?-. '■•■ ' *• “ i:!l pn\. I 




■ ^'“Ppeared I 

. jus j 

' •■■-<••* i.v-J 

lube Dam Case \ 




- j 

■ i 

■-.’ —■‘wo ' 

an •' 

• ■'■rjk ) 


■il/t;#’ /V Barred 


::u* 
r.NV+ . 

k ; 

: ' 


- nrf 

i.' ’r<: 


PAGE 19 


NatWest Stock Slides 
As It Seeks Inquiry 
Into Trading Loss 


Om^U by Our St^TFrmDapadin 
LONDON —National Westmin¬ 
ster Bank PLC’s shares fell 3.5 per¬ 
cent Monday as the bank brought in 
accountants to investigate how one 
M gf its former tinders bad lost as much 
f as £50 million ($81 million) in op¬ 
tions trades and concealed the loss. 

The bank disclosed the loss, and 
said it wouldtake a provision against 
earnings of the some amount, after 
the London Stock Exchange closed 
firiday. 1116 shares closed Monday at 
. 732'pence, down 26.5. 

NatWest said it hoped the inves- 

HSBC Profit Soars 
On Strong Growth 

CoaptUbjQurSiejfFianDupdSi&n 

LONDON — HSBC Holdings 
PLC said Monday that its pretax 
profit rose. 23 percent last year be- 
a- cause of strong growth in all its 
' markets, but the company predicted 

a “challenging” year ahead with 
increasing competition. 

Britain’s largest bank posted 
profit of £4.52 billion ($7.37 bil¬ 
lion}, op from £3.67 billion in 1995. 
Net interest income rose to £5.82 
billion from £5.12 billion. Nonin¬ 
terest income rose 10 percent, to 
£3.77 billion. 

But HSBC’s shares fell after John 
Bond, the chief executive, said: 
“We see 1997 as a challen gin g year 
wherever we look, whether it be 
Asia or the UJC. The competition 
continues to increase.” The shares 
fell 29 pence, to 1,506 pence. 

HSBC's banks in Hong Kong and 
Britain, its two bases, have expe¬ 
rienced strong lending volume and 
margins, with growing income in 
investment banking income. 
Hongkong & Shanghai Banking 
pi, ^s Asian banking operation. 
_attributable profit rose 16 per¬ 
cent^ to 19.25 billion Hong Kong 
dollars ($2.49 billion), as rising 
lending income offset higher costs 
and ligber provisions. 

Midland Bank, the British bank¬ 
ing subsidiary, reported an attrib¬ 
utable profit of £849 million, an 
increase of 39 percent over the pre¬ 
vious year.. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


tigan On would be completed as soon 
as possible. The bank declined to 
identify the accounting firm it had 
appointed. Britain's Securities and 
Futures Authority, the industry reg¬ 
ulator, has been informed of the er¬ 
rors, and the Bank of England, which 
regulates banks generally, said 
Sunday it would be looking at what 
had happened. 

NatWest said a trader had "mis¬ 
priced” options, which are contracts 
giving buyers the right, but not the 
obligation, to buy or sell an under¬ 
lying security at a set price on a set 
date. The trader’s mistakes were not 
discovered until two months after he 
had left the company. 

NatWest said it had suspended a 
senior trader for failure to exercise 
proper supervision, and it reported 
the former trader to the Securities 
and Futures Authority. 

Banking sources said mispricing 
was a general term for errors that did 
not necessarily imply fraudulent in¬ 
tention and could have resulted from 
mistakes. But they said that if such 
errors occurred on a continuing basis, 
it would suggest that the trader in¬ 
volved had been aware of a discrep¬ 
ancy between the actual and the book 
prices of the derivatives in which he 
was dealing. 

The disclosure that the trader had 
“mispriced" the options, and that 
his mistakes were not discovered 
until two months after be had left the 
company , is the latest in a series of 
scandals involving UJC futures and 
options trading. 

In 1995, unauthorized trading by 
Nick Leeson at Barings PLC in 
Singapore brought down Britain's 
oldest merchant bank with £860 mil¬ 
lion in losses. 

Last year, a copper trader with 
Sumitomo Corp. admitted losing 
$2.6 billion in copper futures trading 
over the past decade. 

The incident hurts Nat West’s 
reputation just a week after the bank 
said its investment-banking unit, 
NatWest Markets, had a 52 percent 
gain in pretax profit last year, to 
£462 million. 

“Their credibility has been den¬ 
ted, and it’s quite a big chunk of 
money,’* said Mike Butler, a trader 
at Panmure Gordon & Co. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


EUROPE 


BBC Making Changes in U.S. 

Americas Chief Quits, and PBS Wonders What’s Next 


By Lawrie Mifflin 

Noe York. Tima Serrwe 


To people in the television in¬ 
dustry. British Broadcasting Corp. 
in the United States had one face: 
Sarah Frank’s. 

By the end of this, month, 
[hough, she will be gone, a cas¬ 
ualty of the BBC’s new expan¬ 
sionist strategy. 

Ms. Frank, as chief executive of 
BBC Worldwide Americas, built it 
from a sales office with $9 million 
in revenue in 1990 to a diversified 
division that took in more than $50 
million last year. 

But she could not instantly 
provide an investment 10 times 
that size, which is the what the 
BBC is being offered for its ex¬ 
pected combination with Discov¬ 
ery Communications Inc. Nor can 
she magically create a BBC cable 
network in the United States 
either, as the Discovery Channel 
promises to do. 

If the BBC and Discovery com¬ 
plete their extensive joint-venture 
agreement, which was announced 
in September but has yet ro be 
signed, there could be other prom¬ 
inent casualties of the BBC’s new 
strategy. 

Both the Public Broadcasting 
Service and the A&E cable net¬ 
work could lose a stream of pro¬ 
grams from their co-production 
deals with the BBC — from dra¬ 
mas like “Pride and Prejudice.” 
the most-watched program ever on 
A&E, to science programs on the 
PBS series “Nova.” 

Neither side will say when the 


complicated negotiations are 
likely to finish. In preparation for 
the big event, though. BBC World¬ 
wide in London dismissed 16 of 
the 60 employees ar BBC World¬ 
wide Americas in New York on 
Feb. 19, citing a need to “reor¬ 
ganize” its U.S. operations. 

Ms. Frank, an American who 
was The highest-ranking woman in 
the BBC. saw her department 
chiefs ousted and her own role 
about to shrink. So she resigned. 

“The ideal partner for 
the BBC in terms of 
philosophy would have 
been PBS, but PBS 
doesn't have the 
money. Discovery does/ 

“It's another symbol of the big 
wedding that's about to take 
place,” Michael Dann. a former 
NBC and CBS programming ex¬ 
ecutive who is now a consultant to 
international television ventures, 
said of Ms. Frank's departure. 
“The Discovery folks won’t want 
another American CEO in place— 
that’s one of the things they will 
bring to the table.” 

Discovery will also bring an or¬ 
ganization that does many of the 
same things Ms. Frank's staff did 
— co-production deals, merchan¬ 
dising. marketing and promotion. 
And it does them well: the com¬ 
pany last week reported cash flow 


of $70 million on revenue of nearly 
S662 million for 1996. 

Under the proposed joint ven¬ 
ture. Discovery — whose three 
cable outlets are the Discover}' 
Channel, the Learning Channel 
and a new cable channel culled 
Animal Planet — and the BBC 
would produce programs together, 
and would start cable channels in 
the United States. Britain and else¬ 
where. Discovery would supply 
the investment capital, and the 
BBC would provide its formidable 
television and film library. 

"The ideal partner for’the BBC 
in terms of philosophy would have 
been PBS.” said an adviser to the 
BBC who spoke on condition of 
anonymity. “Bui PBS doesn't have 
the money. Discovery does.” 

Last week a BBC board mem¬ 
ber. Colin Browne, visited PBS 
executives to reassure them that the 
relationship between the two pub¬ 
lic television entities would con¬ 
tinue, despite the Discovery deal. 

After all, what PBS offers that 
Discovery doesn't is exposure. Its 
average audience is at least four or 
five times larger than that for the 
average program on Discovery. 
And BBC producers want their 
programs to be seen. 

“What we've been told, wheth¬ 
er it's by BBC Worldwide Amer¬ 
icas or BBC Worldwide in Lon¬ 
don. is that they still see PBS as a 
key partner.” said Kathy Quat- 
trone, head of programming for 
PBS. “Our relationship will con¬ 
tinue. What we don’t know yet is 
exactly how.” 


South Africa Picks Telkom Buyers 


Cceyeltd by QurSutffrrm Dbyarlm 

JOHANNESBURG — South 
Africa named SBC Communica¬ 
tions Inc. of the United Stales and 
Telekom Malaysia Bhd. on Monday 
as joint winners of a 30 percent stake 
in Telkom South Africa Ltd. 

The deal, the largest privatization 
in sub-Saharan Africa and the first 
major asset sale under President 
Nelson Mandela, was valued by ana¬ 
lysts ai about 6 billion rand ($1.34 
billion). Jay Naidoo, minister of 


posts, telecommunications and 
broadcasting, did not disclose details 
of die bid. saying the government 
would begin final negotiations with 
SBC and Telekom Malaysia. 

SBC and Telekom Malaysia faced 
competition from Deutsche Telekom 
AG, which ultimately withdrew, and 
from France Telecom, which was 
stranded after the German phone 
company failed to submit a bid. 
South Africa had wanted bids to be 
submitted as a group. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frankfurt 

DAX 


London...’.. 

FTSEWIndex 


Parte = 

CAC40 



^"O N D J 
1996 

F M ®* , 0'N'D' 
1997 1996 

j F M 1950 O' N D J-fJX" 
19S7 1996 1997; 

Exchange 

Index 

Monday -Prev. ■' %: Z 
Ctose ■. Close Oiaigfi 

Amsterdam 

AEX 

738J» 737.46" ' 

Brussels 

BEL-20 

.2,14243 . Marts. 

Frankfurt 

DAX \ 

64 " +e.t&' 

Copenhagen 

Stock Market 

533^1 632.01 

Helsinki ■ 

hex General .... 

M 

Oslo 

OBX 

58SL1S.. 58WJ7 : 

London 

FTSE100. •• 

wier .to 4.3<^3o" 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange . 

4^.67 . 4&B38 . -0.69 

ifitan “ •• 

MiSTEL 

iiBOdjQb u.745.aa +i*o. 

Paris 

CAC40 

2,60025 2.60755 

Stocktiofm 

SX16 

Z827M 2,804.08 *tK8 4: 

Wanna 

ATX 

1.237,01 1JJ22.65 t-1.17 

Zurich ‘ 

SP1 

2.837^9 2.851^6 -O A8 

Source: Tetakurs 


Imemauonal Herald Trflxme 

Very briefly: 


The proceeds from the sale of 
Telkom and other assets, under a 
program that could raise tens of bil¬ 
lions of rand, will be used to reduce 
government debt Stakes in South 
African Airways and in Airports Co., 
which manages the country’s major 
airports, are likely to be sold soon. 

The government said that some of 
the proceeds from the Telkom sale 
could be used to build infrastructure 
to extend telephone service to poor 
areas. (Reuters, Bloomberg J 


• Interim Services Inc. bid £346 million ($564.5 million) for 
Michael Page Group PLC of Britain, in a move aimed at 
giving the U.S. executive-recruitment firm a global reach. 

• Bulgari SpA and FerragamoSpA, two Italian luxury-goods 
companies, signed an accord to make and sell perfumes and 
cosmetics under the Ferragamo and Ungaro brand names. 

• British Airways PLC will consolidate its accounting staff 
in a new office, cutting 290jobs, and will hire more temporary 
staff at London's Gatwick Airport to try to save a combined 
£12.6 million a year. 

• Banco Santander SA, Spain’s largest bank, will propose a 
3-for-l stock split to try to attract small investors. 

• Sasol Oil joined with black civic and community groups to 
create the fust South African black-owned petroleum com¬ 
pany, Naledi Petroleum. 

• Banco Espanol de Credito SA’s former chairman. Mario 
Ccmde, went on trial on charges of embezzlement and forgery. 

• The Athens stock exchange dropped fora third consecutive 
day. with its general index losing a record 7.45 percent to close 
at 1,206.54. 

• DePuy Inc. agreed to buy Landanger-Camus SA of France 
for $144.6 million to try to expand its line of orthopedic 
products. 

• Newtelco AG. bidding to win a share of the $8 billion Swiss 
telecommunications market, will invest 500 million Swiss 
francs ($ 339.4 million) as it prepares ro compete with Swiss 
Telecom PTT for customers. 

• Granada Group PLC sold the Plaza Athenee Hotel in Paris 
to PA Holdings France SA for £45 million. 

• Hicks, Muse, Tate & Furst Inc, a U.S. leveraged-buyout 

specialist, bid £129 million to buy Forward Group PLC of 
Britain to try to build its electronics manufacturing busi¬ 
nesses. Bloomberg. AFP AFX. AP 



BUNE 

,1997 

iGE9 


ion, 
IH of 
\ran- 

y of 

oung 
rmly 
esin 
m. A 
oud. 

Jody 

race 

tetic 

I his 
aint 

■P- 

ung 

his 

ape 

en¬ 

tire 

8th 

ost 

o. 

>Io 

an 

or 

ire 

ir- 

iy 

3f 

> 

y 

y 

e 

e 

e 

y 

i 

F 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Lem Oow Prar. 


High Low Close Prw. 


High Low OOM Prev. 


Hlgti Low Oose Prev. 


J3iri 


Wrt lar.es 


2 . 4 .V-' • - - 


. V* - ---- 




_ 1 


3J COST2^ : V3- 



Cs*» 




SA Breweries 13425 133 13425 134 VendoraUjuts-X» 525 529 


Monday, March 3 

Prices In local currencies. 

* :=■ Telekun 

Ugh' low Uw I 


Amsterdam 


: - ABM-AMKO 
* Acgoa 
AJtcU 

. AIzo Hubei 
Boon Co. 
sals Who chi' 
CSMod 
Donfed»W 
DS» 

m £tester . 
w Forth Anev 


Ofincaw 


HMBMOBCre 
HvrfUmgtai 
IMGGfBOp . 

&PBT 

KPW- 

DcoGfMon 
Pugg S ec 

ftnSSnfHdg 

Rneem 
RoAkboo . 
Rofnco 


. RmniDHEti 
UaMKtcva 
VUrtoiM 
VNU r 
WotesKfcvo 


136.90 

120 ) 

12530 

275 

8550 

-tiwn 

roan 

3*9.90 
190 
3060 
7220 
OM 
65 JO 
16550 
341 
09JO 
147 
7X80 
59.70 
4X80 
6870 
56J0 
28850 
23850 
86.40 
8950 
14750 
161.4 
6050 
16540 

non 

32950 
36150 
■ 87.90 
39.60 
246 


133J0 
124 
1 " 


84 
3320 
107 
34650 
188 
30.10 
7150 
61 JO 
£350 
16340 
336J0 
M40 
14X80 
7X80 
5850 
4250 
6720 
5550 
206.10 
236.10 
8520 
86 
14570 
16020 
6020 
16450 
11040 
327 
35170 
SATO 
3W0 
243 


Bangkok 

AiumsK 
Bangkok Bk F 
“ iTluiBk 


AfStaRCMKrtF 
7 SanCMBkF 




244 

swp. 

Susa. 

310 

680 

4075 


SET tociac 79724 
P rem wr 7X754 

226 226 250 

SUSp. Stop. 228 

** s f& 

660 672 

3925 3975 


Bombay 


. I Lever 
HMagPeSu 

&°“ 8k 

-SMvBkMa 

SMAuBMrft* 

TSbEnguS 


109950 

1090 

J1S 

10750 

448 

20375 

31175 

33575 

2350 

40375 


msa 30 Swtac 387155 
Pievtow: 347479 

10231(0625 89650 
9B> 1022 90450 

398 40250 381 

98 1(050 B05O 
0250 434 «7 

265 26675 ^238 
30450 30550 27225 
322 324 284 

2150 23 2025 

J75 389 34675 


Brussels 


SBL 
CBft 
■CokwO.' 
■WWULlM 
EltdmM > 


raft AC 
"Geitoert , v 
WL 

G«Booqpe 

xmmS 

fetaftw 

fcPWWftl 

SocGen Beal 
to!®? 

TncMwl- . 

■«3 ' 


BE L-20 Mae 2M2£ 
PievlwK 214242 

13800 13600 13650 13250 
5960 9730 5)40 5WJ 

7460 SS 3295 

3300 K50 3280 3295 

'ss ’Si ’i H 

SS S8 si 1 
6110 6010 6110 
2530 10 S 2495 
4860 4780 4360 4790 

12950 12W 
12750 1257 s 12725 
125D0 12400 12500 12jg5 

£200 SOBO sm OM 

1 s §s as 

*350 21100 21375 

WHS 15050 15100 15100 
.$£§ WOO 93600 94300 


AEX Mac 73426 
Pievtooe 73746 

135JO 13630 
12570 125.90 
12SJ0 12270 
275 37X50 
84.10 B6J0 
rt «jn Tnn 
10050 108.90 
348 349 

188 190 

3020 3X40 
72.90 73 

6170 62 

6470 6430 

164.90 16570 
33X80 33660 

8X40 8560 
146 14360 
7130.7150 
5* 5X20 
4360 4360 
67 JO 68 

5630 55L80 
28650 208 

23760 237.10 
BS70 8570 
8960 87 

14650 14X90 
16070 16160 
6070 60.40 
16480 16560 
11060 11030 
32760 32X60 
35360 36160 

86.90 8770 
3960 39JO 

245 24360 


Dntsdie Bonk ' 8860 
Dent Teiaknoi~ “ 3363 
DresOnerBmk 56.18 

Fteva'ha, . 358 

FKsotfgMM! 16260 

Frtert. iCropp 275 

Gehe 116 

HeUefeflZnt 14360 

HenkdpW 9470 

HEW 488 

HocNtef 7530 

Honcfcs} 77 

KnreJotO 552 

Unde 1184 

Lufthansa 2275 

MAN - 435 

ManneamafM 668 

Melaflgejefisdisft367£ 
Metro 14875 

Munch RueCKR 4210 
Pibosmu 443 

RhatoeMdra 1243 

RWE 7670 

SAPpW 2 a 

Severing 157 

5GL Carbon 22960 

Scrams 86 

Springer (A*»0 1230 

Suedzuduer 748 

TTiyssen 358 

Veto 9770 

VEW 515 

744 
81760 


Lew One Prev. 


88J0 8X38 
3118 3160 
56 56.10 
345 358 

16170 16260 
27760 275 

115 115J0 
138 142J0 
9060 9470 
488 aoo 
74 7560 
7178 71-85 
550 551 

1088 1095 
2275 2278 
43260 434 

66560 66660 
3X65 9675 
147.15 14860 
4185 4195 

440 441 

1224 1243 

7575 7575 
25X60 257 

15L9Q 15260 
227 227 

84.15 8C40 
1230 tua 
755 767 

355.40 35X40 
9X70 9X95 
502 515 

739 741 

8T4 81475 


8760 
.3260 
56 
348 
140 
269JO 
114 
139 
90 
0030 
7350 
7160 
552 
1100 
2260 
43150 
66X50 
3X99 
148 
4230 
43350 
1220 
7X70 
23960 
15110 
ZD 

esjs 

nm 

764 

35110 

9X60 

501 

74550 

818 



SSJS 

5X50 

SSJS 

5X75 

Votfntone 

255 

2.90 

193 

5oaol 

50 

4X20 

50 

4850 

Whitbread 

8 

704 

7.9W 

SB 1C 

183 

180 

183 

18250 

WBDras Hdgs 

122 

118 

11" 

Tiger Onto 

7550 

75 

7550 

7X25 

Wofedey 

475 

X7U 

X73 






WPP Group 

Zt* 

200 

204 


576 

2.91 

766 

122 

471 

24.1 


Kuala Lumpur esgfcjjjij; 

PltvlMs: 127067 


AMMSHdBS 
Gwfflno 
MdBffiUng 
MNMSWpF 
PefnmtM Got 


PubBcBk 
Renong 
Resorts Wofld 
RoftunorePM 
Sbne Darby 
ToMunMel 
Tnoga 
UM Engineers 
YTL 


2360 

17 

2960 

660 

9.10 

1X50 

560 

456 

1170 

2X25 

965 

2X30 

1250 

23 

1450 


London 


765 

439 


3850 

318 

692 

147 

47 

4050 

153 

160 


Helsinki 

HEX General lodec2B4Xll 
Pimteos 289149 


42J0 

4200 

4200 

4300 

Huhtemokll 

236 

236 

236 

236 


57 

56 

56 

57 


74 

73 

73 

7100 

MerOuA 

1X30 

1700 

1/50 

1X10 

Metro B 

302 

m 

300 

300 

Metto-SertoB 

4150 

3950 

3900 

42 


138 

131 

131 

140 


299 29550 

297 

30350 

Orton-Yhryraoe 

18150 

IN 




8X30 

87 

88 

88 

UPMKynanene 

106 




Votow 

9150 

9030 




Abbey Mart 
Anted Doroecq 
Anglian Water X55 

Ai£s 7-03 

AsrtoGrtW 1.13 

Assac BrRxxts 489 

BAA 540 

BcjdeyS 1164 

Boss X54 

BATInd 567 

BankSarttanO 362 

BtneCWe 403 

BOCGrtW 


10 

682 

261 

1277 


Hong Kong h»i 


Cathay PocfflC 
OwngKonfl 
OCWrostrud 

UNC ruailt 

EfesJ 

Hang Lung Dev 


Hendersanlrw 
vtenrtessMiLO 
HK China Gas 
HK Etedrlc 

HK Tetecsnnn 
Hopewefl Hdos 
HSBCHrtgs 
HuftWKjn Wh 

SESfSw 

OitaM P«* 

Pent Oriental 

IftnlOkHdes 

SJnoLondCX 

SthCWnoPirf 

SwfrePacA 

WtnrfHdgs 

wneeladc 


960 9.15 

2X40 9AM 

12 jd nn 

7725 7375 
22 2160 
3X80 3560 
3960 3920 
4X60 40 

1X95 1X70 
1X80 1565 
90 8X50 
X0O 865 
7125 6X73 
1465 1465 
2X80 2X60 
1300 1325 
468 45B 

19150 l»a 
5975 5X50 
27.15 2X40 
21 JO 2XB0 
2QJ0 1960 
4960 47JO 
358 320 

4J0 625 

9150 ,» 

550 X4S 
8.90 875 

7 X85 

a 6X75 
35 3V0 
2080 2050 


_ 1358728 

PlWrtMR 1339X72 

920 92S 

2820 2825 
12.15 1265 
7475 7375 
2 21.90 
3570 3520 
3960 3950 
4050 3950 
1070 1085 
1X75 1X60 
89 8950 
820 870 

71 6925 

1475 1465 
2620 2620 
1355 1630 
460 463 

189 189 

5975 59 

27 27.15 
21 2160 
1960 20 

4X70 48 

350 323 

&40 X35 

9075 8975 
565 550 

8J0 870 

XB5 675 
4450 6450 
3490 3440 
2070 2085 


5.07 

X14 

ft 

725 


Jakarta 


Copenhagen 


BGBonk . . 293 

cSB&S” ho 

Data 394 

.DwftrafcBk 58S66 

a 

MttMnttB 631-50 
SWwBerB - 865 
IttDaunkB 3d 


ASholirtl^ 

Bkluflfftricn 

BH Negara 

Cttdong Garni 

i mtocente tf 

Iwtafoort 

twtosat 

SaswoernoHM 

SemfrtGrrfk 

Tektoiwnltas 1 


“"lasss 

sill 

1725 1675 1700 1725 

11575 11400 11400 TW75 
3»5 3475 25W 

5JHI 5175 5225 5350 
ami 6800 6835 6775 
1WS 11» 11900 

7075 7000 70W 

4200 4100 4125 4175 


SBS. 

Frankfurt 


JiJS | 

854 8SJ0 OT 

S S44 ® 

g S i 

„„ lino 1050 

llll 

Mill 

4uo,^.tS 


Stock 

PnttOBB 532*1 

ro 2BB 290 

yy 399 396 

S a g 

57 . 5 76 -- ~ . tote tads 

Johannesburg 

* ft ofcsS 714X1B RTiLrea 


% *8 ” 


BPBm6 
BrlAermp 

BrtT Always ___ 

BG 172 

Bril Land 526 

Brtf Peflai 7 

BSfarB XU 

Brit Steel 159 

BrtTTeteeom 420 

BTR 265 

Burmab Caflral 1038 

Burton Op 1J9 

CabtoWtretess 
CadbuySdWf 
Carikm Coram 
Coa»rt Union 
Compass Gp 
Courtadds Mr 

Dtxara X34 

Pripftn| n tf np nHP n ti tefH 

EMI Greop 1174 

iss sa is 

FamCotenU 158 

GwitAoddM X4B 

GEC 379 

GKN %9 

GtateWflcm 1067 

Granada Gp 928 

Grand MB! 461 

GRE . 284 

GfeenaNsGp 5iB 

8S- ffi 

H^CKIdgs 1X19 

Id 760 

Irani Tobacco 426 

Mr £2 

Land Sec 772 

1 iisiun 261 

Legal Gen! Grp 194 

uS*TSBGp X05 

UKosvwfly UU 

MoAsSpanar 5 

MEPC *6B 

Merasjr Asset 1367 

NdtondGrid 288 

NodPorree 

NotWest 787 

^we 212 

£L % 

Plkbiglon 165 

PwwGw _ X» 

PrwiferFanirt 697 

PTvdertU 572 

RoabOdtPP 
Sank Group 
RKUnCBM 
Redan) 

Reed lid 

Rerdofcl Inflfcrf 

Reuters Hdgs 
Reran 
RMC Greop . 

ROBS', 

RnalBfScni 
RTZ11 


»” ,nd 

sss& 

FslNaflBfc 

Getar 

&Br 

lASNUte 
LfcUlo Shot 
MW*® 

wtijarsurt 

nZ* otnilnucn 


283 281 282 2S2» 

JSS 354 355 ® 

» isi! lS ^ 

un K*; 4435 4725 

1*2 iSS ifl 
SS Sw 2W5 

IP 1M 1WJ 

i 128 ! 4 

S 2775 23 » 

•S& HIM 

% tjfs Jg ittJS 
’f? U70 is 1 SB 

10750 108 'K 

h 7 *s "* 
s H 

7550 7X50 


m 

ASS 
754 
357 
1168 
450 
XS7 
133 
963 
136 
5LB6 

Re n ton Nk 428 

Sotebery 
Sdndn 
ScotNewoBSe 
Scot Power 
Securtcor 
Snm Trent 


76 

46 

a 


SMBTraepR 1 
Stebe 

Snflti Nepftew 
SmfthKirte 
SdffltBlhd 
SOi BitElec 
Smgscooch 
Stood Charter 
Tale & Lyle 
Tosco 

Thanes inter 
31 Greop 
Tl Group 
Tontine 
Ufiitewr 
Utd Assurance 
UMNteH 
UUUtflMa 


360 

1X95 

677 

158 

214 

1.17 


973 

154 

9.19 

777 

755 

768 
869 
428 
142 
650 
5.12 
524 
207 

1X78 

562 

769 
670 


2110 

1658 

2955 

600 

9 

1XW 
500 
448 
1150 
2X75 
9JO 
1970 

mo 

2250 

U0O 

2140 

1650 

2950 

645 

9J5 

16 

X4D 

440 

1150 

26 

930 

19.90 

1100 

2250 

1410 

2300 

1690 

2950 

655 

9.05 

1600 

500 

452 

1100 

2X75 

9.40 

20.10 

11-90 

2290 

1440 

FTSE 100:4X7.10 

PrwtooB 438130 

707 

709 

706 

4J0 

433 

437 

605 

650 

640 

680 

690 

606 

1.11 

1.12 

U2 

406 

407 

409 

X30 

533 

551 

1030 

1095 

11.14 

802 

80S 

80S 

535 

504 

X37 

133 

302 

339 

196 

403 

196 

906 

9.98 

909 

473 

679 

677 

X27 

335 

302 

1277 

1207 

1175 

630 

641 

631 

QJ2 

0J2 

1J1 

5J0 

X35 

533 

6JS 

676 

680 

X90 

60S 

506 

109 

151 

101 

425 

438 

AM 

207 

203 

239 

1CL25 

10JS 

1034 

156 

158 

107 

498 

5J2 

499 

499 

5J5 

xoe 

506 

538 

5J6 

602 

7JB 

605 

7JO 

733 

735 

301 

163 

364 

X26 

530 

532 

398 

402 

4 

1105 

1158 

1104 

X20 

X26 

533 

6.12 

615 

632 

157 

158 

108 

X3S 

837 

B56 

37? 

3J6 

3.73 

9J7 

905 

957 

1035 

1002 

1000 

9.06 

9J3 

934 

445 

451 

454 

275 

202 

237 

553 

X57 

X5B 

453 

456 

459 

60S 

658 

653 

532 

537 

5JD 

1X01 

1X06 

1535 

730 

736 

708 

432 

424 

425 

475 

688 

600 

238 

22B 

232 

7-79 

750 

7.90 

237 

U9 

203 

ISO 

193 

192 

490 

X02 

509 

201 

203 

205 

494 

497 

496 

402 

464 

462 

1300 

1306 

1308 

105 

107 

208 

401 

492 

491 

650 

732 

709 

5.93 

597 

X« 

108 

2J9 

2.11 

656 

659 

607 

705 

7J9 

X7C 

100 

101 

105 

4.12 

623 

61B 

480 

483 

493 

555 

X49 

5J0 

451 

464 

454 

417 

421 

421 

705 

709 

7.97 

308 

153 

148 

1133 

1159 

1108 

444 

409 

451 

433 

654 

657 

3>2S 

130 

125 

905 

955 

903 

133 

254 

233 

5J1 

X79 

X78 

930 

900 

958 

492 

495 

45* 

351 

164 

303 

307 

108 

308 

1475 

1685 

1693 

6J3 

675 

678 

309 

156 

300 

X10 

112 

113 

703 

7.11 

7.18 

1030 

1037 

1003 

955 

908 

90S 

150 

151 

153 

903 

905 

9.19 

758 

797 

7J1 

700 

752 

7.97 

702 

702 

708 

SJB 

X65 

80] 

430 

437 

437 

337 

301 

359 

400 

683 

687 

507 

X10 

X10 

X26 

530 

538 

203 

204 

204 

1505 

1X50 

1X77 

XX 

X37 

550 

701 

707 

703 

655 

657 

683 


Madrid 


Beteo bdec 46307 


Preitoos: 44X18 

Attrtnosc 

19950 

19450 

19470 

19920 

ACESA 

1620 

1585 

l»0 

law 

Aguas Boraton 

5510 

5350 

5450 

5500 

Arawtorfo 

BBV 

5800 

•420 

5730 

rwi 

5800 

8360 

5740 

8450 

Banesto 

1095 

1085 

1094 

1085 

BonWnter 

19200 

18810 

18850 

19150 

BcnCtertroHSp 

3800 

3740 

3775 

3000 

BarExrerior 

2810 

2790 

2810 

2810 

Bcd Popular 

26Y» 

25610 

25860 

26050 

Bco Sortnnoer 

9830 

95/0 

9700 

9700 

CEPSA 

0230 

4)10 

4)50 

4115 


KM 

2460 

2465 

2530 


7550 

B790 

7260 

8650 

7260 

8720 

7530 

8750 

FECSA 

1170 

1130 

1170 

1145 

Gas Notural 

31100 

30270 

30350 

31000 

Iberdrota 

1570 

1535 

1560 

1565 


24N 

2600 

2610 

2645 

Rrosol 

5510 

5410 

5450 

5450 

T 

If 

13B0 

12/4 

1290 

1300 


6700 

6450 

6510 

6490 

Tefctontai 

3300 

3250 

3270 

3300 


1135 

1085 

1115 

1135 

vatenc Cement 

1575 

1510 

1550 

1530 

Manila 


PSE bdec 332001 


Prevtoes 331X28 


3000 

30 

X0O 

30 

AyoB Land 
BkPhUpH 

3100 

3000 

31 

3100 

190 

189 

!» 

190 

CAP Homes 

1175 

1300 

1300 

1300 

I 

fn 

if 

> 

122 

170 

ITO 

124 

Metro Bank 

730 

no 

775 

730 


1035 

1025 

1005 

11150 

PQBank 

385 

3/S 

380 38200 

Pffll Long Dtst 

1565 

1545 

1565 

1545 


98 

9500 

96 

M 

SM Prime Hrtg 

I 

7.W 

7.9Q 

7.90 

Mexico 


Beba bdec 379208 


Pnvtoos 384600 

AlfoA 

4X20 

44.70 

4X20 

4X20 


1666 

1140 

164B 

1X66 

Cemex CPO 

3100 

3000 

3100 

32J0 

CHraC 

12.14 

1106 

111" 

1200 

EaraModerao 

4100 

41 JO 

4100 

4100 


4490 

4170 

4405 

4X10 


1.95 

1.93 

103 

1.97 

Gao Fto Inbursa 
timbOnriiMac 

2730 2730 2730 
171.10 164N 16600 

2700 
17100 

TetovtsoCPO 

9X70 

9400 

»3uW 

9610 

TetMOL 

1508 

1X32 

1506 

1500 

Milan 

MIBTabaralico: 1190900 


Pirates 1T74S0O 

NtaranAsstc 

raw 

UNO 

11990 

12170 


3555 

3425 

3545 

3470 


4385 

4130 

4335 

4260 


1255 

1220 

1234 

1241 


19800 

m/o 

19514 

19390 


2350 

7300 

7375 

2310 

Eiflson 

9475 

9100 

9295 

9290 


8645 


8615 

8345 


5425 

5250 

5425 

5270 

General) Assk: 

30800 

30400 

30650 

30700 

IMl 

14710 

144TB 

14615 

14760 

1NA 

2250 

ms 

rob 

2210 

ftnfcm* 

Metfwf 

6750 

7230 

6014 

7005 

6145 

71* 

6025 

7125 

Mwfcbanca 

m« 


11055 

11035 


1248 

1217 

1347 

1220 


07 

622 

631 

620 


2430 

mo 

7430 

2325 

Pirea 

3400 

3330 

3400 

3345 

RA5 

1M50 

15750 

15450 

15240 

Roto Banco 

IbOOO 

17600 

178K 

17810 


12100 

11650 

11700 

11990 

Stet 

7475 

7150 

7435 

7250 


4130 

3965 

4130 

39/0 

TIM 

4470 

4305 

4350 

4425 

Montreal 

tortniilute 

bdK 308659 


Prevtoes: 299709 


4140 

4314 

4300 

4315 

CdnTMA 

2405 

2445 

74 95 

2400 

Cdnl/NA 

3100 

31 Vt 

3100 

3100 

CTRrtSue 

31b 

till* 

31 V-. 

sm 

Gen Metre 

17 

1690 

1695 

16V5 

Gt-WeslUfeco 

2314 

73 

73 

zm> 

Imcsco 

3730 

3605 

3695 

3/0b 


» 

2X60 

25 

14.90 

LobtowCos 

1614 


lMt 

1665 

NtilBkConodo 

T5M 

iff! 

1X70 

15* 

Power Core 

2800 

28JQ 

KA5 

29 


36te 

2660 

76V 

2690 

QuebecorB 

2X20 

34 94 

2X10 

7X15 

RoBereComniB 

900 

9J5 

900 

9J4 

Royal Bk Cda 

SX10 

54Vi 

5X10 

5X11 


Oslo 


AkerA 


O gXtadB C 58215 
Prelore! 


DernoisfceBk 
Stem 
HatttendA 
KwenwAso 
NQtAMdD 
NookeStogA 
MyconedA 
OrWoAsaA 
Petfen GeaSK 
' 1 PetknA 


TneoaeanOff 

StorabrendAta 


172 

142 

2520 

2950 

IDS 

50 

331 

339 

211 

10750 

543 

287 

113 

130 

375 

4550 


170 171 

141 142 

uso 2450 
2950 2960 
107 10750 
49 50 

328 32950 
335 33650 
207 208 

105 10550 
536 53650 
285 287 

111 11250 
125 12550 
370 375 

4X20 4&10 


: 58X07 
175 
140 
2570 
30 
in 
4950 
331 
33750 
207 
105 
540 
281 
11350 
132 
37350 
4X10 


Paris 


Accor 

AGF 

AlrUqulde 

Alcoler AWti 

AnMIAP 

Bonartre 

BIC 

BNP 

Canal Plus 

Cnn^fcur 

Casino 

CCF 

Cetetem 

QuMtofi Dior 

CLF-DedaFran 

Credit Agrtcato 

Danone 

EH-Aqattatoe 

Ertdmlo BS 

EutwUsney 

Euratunnei 

GM-Eoib 

Hams 

I metal 

LaTUyr 

Legruod 

L-Oraol 

LVMH 

V-ran-Ema 

WkjieflnB 

PortbraA 

Peraod Rtcard 

Peugeot Clt 

Plrojt^PiW 

Praraodes 

Renault 

Rexel 

FJn-PourencA 

Sonofl 

SchneTder 

SEB 

5G5 Ttarnson 
Ste Generate 
Sodexho 
SIGoboln 
Suez 

SVnOwtabo 
Thomson C5F 
TOtolB 
Ushxr 
Valeo 


791 
209JO 
910 
589 
38150 
707 
937 
25X90 
1000 
3527 
261 
270 
715 
838 
573 
1285 
883 
553 
935 
1060 
770 
801 
45450 
620 
361-90 
1011 
1949 
1350 
596 
3S650 
393 
31900 
632 
2437 
1711 
145 
1768 
200.10 
576 
305 
1027 
380 
665 
3159 
850 
279 
630 
78550 
46X40 
8950 
38X00 


CAC40! 360076 
PremtH: 366755 

761 767 784 

199.90 20X10 20050 
883 095 9W 

583 587 585 

379.10 38050 379JO 

695 690 691 

911 913 924 

25650 258 

1047 1055 1060 
3470 3492 3511 
25X30 25X50 260 

265 265 267 

492 699 706 

817 830 828 

565 568 569 

1250 1285 1266 

B45 880 864 

541 544 S45 

918 932 921 

1040 1050 1045 
7 7JO 7J15 

771 793 793 

447 449.70 450 

7W BI2 620 
352 35X50 357 

Ml 1000 1000 

1907 1910 1 931 

1314 1328 1333 

583 595 582 

34850 35170 35X60 
383 38450 387 

312J20 31X80 311 

620 623 630 

2384 2394 2411 

1682 1683 1685 
139 141 14650 

1746 1748 1769 
19X10 1 99 200 

5S6 558 564 

331.40 305 30010 

982 1004 1070 

37250 380 37450 

653 655 660 

3051 3066 3170 

838 838 840 

27370 27460 27X40 
601 629 618 

181.10 18350 18050 
450 45150 45450 

8X10 BX90 88 
383 364.70 384 


Sao Paulo 


_. iPfd 
Bra tone Pfd 
Cento PM 
CHSPPtd 
Copel 
Etefrubros 
iwubanco Ptd 
ugrrtSewfcJos 
ughtpar 
PtrtroerosPfd 
PauSstaLin 
Hit Nodoaol 
SevzoCrvz 
TetebrnsPM 
Tetemto 
Teiwt 
TefespPM 
unfbanco 
(Mm toes Pfd 
CVRD PM 


XS0 X65D 
70CUXJ 69C.00 
4370 42.10 

57 JO 5670 
1400 1440 

46X00 4553)0 
530JO 519.69 
<37 JO 42BJC 
31050 309.99 
211 JO 20650 
14X00 145.00 
3301 3850 
806 877 

10190 101 JO 
16CJ0 154J0 
15X00 15150 
289 JO 284JD 
42-00 -JOJO 
173 1.19 

2779 27.40 


875 X80 

692.00 701 JO 
4370 42J5D 
5670 5750 
1X45 1405 
464.00 462.00 
519.99 53X00 
437JO «W0 
31DJ0 311.10 
21000 21X00 
14X00 146J0 
3850 3870 
806 870 

10300 10250 
15450 154J0 
154J0 15?JO 

28900 28900 
4000 4200 
172 171 

2750 27.90 


Seoul 


Carapoteto Mac <7954 
-: 67X53 


Oocora 

DWteSoHeovf 
Hyundai Enp. 
Kla Wastes 
Korea B Pw 
Korea Etch Bk 
coren wobTei 
LG Sera Icon 
Pohoitg Iran 51 
Samsung Wsloy 
samwngSec 

ShMnnBank 


110500 106000 108000 109S00 
44» CM 44M iW 
19500 19000 19300 18900 
15400 14600 15400 15400 
2S50O 24500 2S200 2000 
6150 5800 6100 5790 

495000 487000 490000 4M000 

77700 26700 27400 26600 
43000 42700 42200 43000 
44900 44100 44300 44300 
5B600 57500 57600 58000 
10600 10500 IO500 10500 


Singapore 

Ado Poe Brw 
CerebotPac 

Otf Derfts 
Cyoe Contone 
Dol/yFonaW* 
DfiSfcreton 
DBS Land 
KeppefFefc 
Fnser&Nnw 
HKlard* 

Jard Mnlhesn * 
Jord Strategic* 
Keppei 
KeopeiBank 
OCBCtortogn 
OSUtdonBkF 
Partner Hdps 
Sembavreng 
Sing Air foreton 
Sing Land 
Sing Press P 
Sing Tech Ind 
Sing Ttimran 
Slrafft Steam 
Tat LJe Bank 
UW lodiEau 
UtoffSeoBkF 
WIogTalHdgs 

‘ItoUXebtoK 


5>re Its TbnatZl 9X34 
Previous; 219570 


15 

078 

1X90 

555 

X8S 

1200 

185 

605 

128 

1000 

400 


6 

700 

1160 

805 

2700 

182 

300 

406 

150 

173 

1670 

468 


N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1030 

1010 

1030 

1400 

14 

1430 

1X30 

1480 

1400 

on 

076 

076 

IB.90 

1800 

1040 

X7D 

500 

505 

60S 

X90 

X95 

13 

1200 

1190 

2.90 

206 

207 

615 

60S 

615 

108 

306 

128 

1040 

1030 

1040 

408 

404 

406 

1900 

1800 

I860 

1100 

1030 

1000 

610 

£W 

X95 

8 

700 

700 

IUQ 

12J0 

1200 

flsn 

e 

8.10 

2700 

7700 

77JO 

198 

184 

356 

130 

302 

124 

AM 

400 

400 

156 

302 

152 

10B 

101 

101 

1630 

1X40 

1X50 

400 

466 

468 


Stockholm 


AGAB 

ABBA 

AsJDomon 

AmA 

ASK Copco A 

Auto* 


SX16 MR 282754 
PieVtoUB 280X88 

109 107 10750 108 

BSJ 845 849 845 

19150 191 1*2 19450 

36450 35950 364 360 

174 17150 17250 17150 

342 340 341 341 


Electrolux B 

479 

465 

474 

469 

Eric&son B 

24100 7J70O 

241 

23800 

Hemes B 

1075 

1060 

1060 

1066 

inearth* A 

527 

523 

527 

522 

imrestorB 

336 

332 

33X50 

332 

MoDoB 

239 

23150 23450 

238 

NontborAan 

274 

268 

272 

272 

Phonrdllpiohn 

280 

27700 27900 

27700 

SondvtkB 

184 

18150 

18300 

18300 

ScontoB 

18X50 

184 18450 

184 

SCAB 

168 

166 16650 

16650 

$-€Bor*enA 

8100 

79 

81 

79 


230 

225 22650 

228 

SJanstaB 

335 

327 

327 

331 


SKFB 
Spratianken A 
StofchypetekA 
StoraA 
Sv Handles A 
Volvo B 


1B2 17750 17850 179 

145 142 143 148 

190 190 190 190 

103 10150 10250 10250 

210 30X50 210 210 

19150 18X50 191 IBS 


Sydney 

Araenr 

ANZBUng 

BHP 

EkxuJ 

Brambles tod. 
CBA 

CC Araatt 
Coles Myer 
Coma Icn 
CRA 
CSR 

Pasrers Brevi 
Goodman Fk> 
IQ Austro Bo 
Lend Lease 
MWHdgs 
Hal Arts Bank 
Mol Mutual Hdg 
News Carp 
PadRcDuntop 
Pioneer inti 
Pub Broadcast 
St George Bank 
WMC 

westpocBUng 

wocosIdePar 


ABOnJtowtes; 242170 
Prevtoes;244900 


847 

805 

1705 

2102 

1177 

11.77 

573 

604 

1970 

456 

UJ 

158 

1X15 

2300 

178 

1672 

104 

607 

ill 

302 

X42 

7-65 

X15 

77* 

X74 

357 


80S 

773 

1676 

145 

2150 

1247 

1157 

SM 

X60 

1870 

446 

142 

154 

12 

2340 

174 
1X90 

108 

X66 

107 

175 
605 
751 
805 
708 
804 

155 


840 848 

7.79 004 

1678 1705 

147 150 

2155 2170 
1258 1202 
1170 1100 
57? £67 

X63 604 

1800 1979 
455 455 

L64 349 

155 156 

1206 1270 
2345 2356 
176 179 

1X07 1X22 

1-94 101 

670 606 

110 XI0 
XJ1 303 
X35 645 

755 770 

806 X12 

no 7jp 
870 8.71 

355 359 


Taipei 

COthoy Ufc Ins 
Chong Hun Bk 
Chine Tung Bk 
CWno Devetprrt 
OitooSIwt 
FWBonk 
ForrwsoPtasfc 
Hue Nan Bk 
Intt Consn Bk 
HonYaPtosta 
Shto Kang Uie 
TahnnSefnl 
Tatung 

UHAUapSec 
Utd World Chin 


Stack MarM todac 788X45 
Prevtous: 798371 

190 1B0 IN 179 

190 179 186 17B 

95 91 91 9050 

11150 10X50 10X50 10750 
2640 2X60 2X60 2X10 
194 183 187 182 

77 7450 7450 74 

156 145 145 146 

88 8450 8450 85 

68 66 67 66 

116 11Q50 11050 111 

64 63 6350 6250 

5550 54 55 54 

4X30 <340 4440 4470 
7050 69 69 70 


Tokyo 

Altoamota 
AB Nippon Air 
Ainww 
AsoH Bonk 
Asowctwn 

ASOhlGka* 

Bk Tokyo fAvJso 
Bk Yokohama 
Bridgestone 
Conan 
Oxi bu Elec 
Owaohi Etec 
DalNIpp Pliltf 
Date) 

DaHcMKang 

Dahw Bank 

□atoraHwHe 

OatonSec 

DDI 

Denso 

East Japan tey 

EXto 
Patrac 
FuS Bank 
Full Photo 



NOdtei 22X10429.13 


PrevtoOK 18557JO 

MOO 

1070 

10N 

1090 

855 

836 

H41 

873 

3450 


3450 

3350 

854 

839 

aso 

884 

69 

642 

647 

653 

10B0 

1060 

1060 

1070 

1970 

1950 

1950 

\9W 

575 

567 

564 

578 

2180 

2150 

2170 

2160 

7530 

7500 

7510 

«0 

2130 

2100 

2110 

2130 

2100 

2070 

2080 

2090 

2020 

2000 

2010 

7010 

ROD 

785 

787 

798 

13111 

1290 

1310 

1320 

493 

482 

492 

485 

1350 

1330 

1340 

1340 

950 

919 

va 

948 

723b 

/I.'too 


7270a 

2320 

2270 


SHOT 

51400 

5080a 

5140a 

6140a 

2260 

7710 

2230 

7760 

3880 

3750 

3850 

3750 

1420 

1370 

1380 

1410 


HKNlwlBk 
KtRKM 
Honda Motor 
IBJ 
IHI 

Itochu 

Ito-Yotedo 

JAL 

Japan Tubucui 

Jusao 

Kojreo 

KonsalElK 

Kn 

KawasaUHvr 
Kawa Steel 
lOnWNlpoRf 
Kirin Brewery 
Kobe Steel 
Komatsu 

Kyocera 
Knehu Elec 
LTCB 
Marubeni 
Moral 

Matsu Cram 
MatuEtecInd 

Matsu Elec Wk 
MBsubtshl 
MteubfeWCii 
MRSUbisidEI 
Mitsubishi E5t 
Mitsubishi hhry 
MttsuMsh) Mat 
MfcubtsMTr 
Mitsui 


4050 

4000 

4030 

4040 

1190 

1180 

1190 

1190 

1070 

1040 

MHO 

1M0 

1050 

1030 

1050 

1040 

3730 

3660 

3/M 

T/TO 

1470 

1390 

IJVU 

1440 

441 

43? 

435 

437 

590 

5M 

990 

S96 

5550 

5450 

5490 

5480 

50/ 

494 

494 

501 

8100a 

soooa 

8B5M 

8100a 

3400 

3710 

3230 

3470 

662 

651 

651 

660 

2180 

2150 

7170 

7190 

130 

1320 

1330 

13?0 

500 

493 

4H 

500 

324 

318 

■XU 

373 

775 

771 

m 

775 

1030 

1010 

1010 

1030 

225 

771 

225 

773 

905 

091 

900 

900 

SO 

525 

528 

549 

71V) 

1070 

7120 

nn 

3100 

2070 

7090 

2090 

440 

420 

429 

435 

474 

469 

m 

47? 

1750 

1710 

1720 

1730 

3150 

3100 

.71JU 

3170 

1850 

IK*? 

1B5U 

I860 

1120 

1060 

11M 

1060 

mo 

1030 

1100 

1170 

335 

379 

331 

335 

676 

669 

6/3 

678 

1410 

1400 

1400 

1470 

870 

863 

864 

869 

on 

880 

884 

885 

1330 

I2UI 

1300 

1339 

896 

892 

895 

m 


The Trib Index 

Prices a» of 3.00 PM New Yor* tens. 

Jan. J. 1382= IPO. 

Lewd 

Change 

% change 

year to dale 
% change 
+14.32 

World Index 

150.76 

-0.70 

-0.46 

Regional (nOexes 
Asfa/Padfic 

112.12 

-1-24 

-1.09 

-16.49 

Europe 

157.36 

-1.01 

-0.64 

+13.06 

N. America 

176.06 

-0.25 

-0.14 

+37.28 

S- America 

138.43 

+0.90 

+0.65 

+55.47 

biduatria! Indues 
Capital goods 

174.62 

+41.47 

+0.27 

+31.41 

Consumer goods 

171.28 

-0.35 

-020 

+24.05 

Energy 

172.80 

-0.45 

-0.28 

+27.41 

Finance 

112.39 

-1.51 

-1.33 

-11.66 

MtscaUansous 

157.05 

-1.B3 

-1.03 

+15.64 

Raw Materials 

183.11 

•0.58 

-0.32 

+29.13 

Service 

140.90 

-0.56 

-0.40 

+17.42 

Utilities 

133.14 

+0.11 

+0.08 

+4.72 


TTMMerrMttonW/fenrttf Stock totfa* C&sckstfwU.S doSar vatuos at 

290miamaaonaty mvessobts stocks iitm 25 countrioe. For mora k d oi mmo n. a tree 
booklet is avaHable by wrnting to 77 » Trti toox.181 Avenue Chstlos de Gavlb. 

82S21 Nouity Cede*. Fanes. Complied by dkxxnborg Atoms. 


Mitsui Pud BSD 

MBs* Trust 

MimrtoMtg 

NEC 

Nhcoa 

NSdwSec 


ssssr 

Nippon sreal 
Nissan Motor 
NICK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 

NTT Date 

op Paper 

OsotoiGas 

Btah 

Rohm 

Sokurp Bk 

Sonkyo 

SarmoBonk 

SmyqEteC 

5eenm 

SeftraRwy 

SeUsul Cnera 

5etisU House 

Seven- Be«n 

Sharp 

ShtoWHPw 

Shimizu 

Shbi-etwai 

Stoseldo 

Shizuoka BK 

Softbank 

lurStomo 
Sumitomo Bk 
SornO Cten 
Sumitomo Elec 
Sum* Meter 
SirmbTiuS 
Tabha Phorra 
TokedaChen 
TDK 

Torioku El Pwr 
Toko I Bank 
TokJo Marine 
Tokyo El Pwr 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Gos 
TokyuCorp. 

Tana; 

Too pan Print 

Toniylnd 

Toshiba 

Toosil 

Toyo Trust 

Toyota Motor 

YaanrewcM 

ax lot to* MC 0 


Hlgb 

UW 

Clasa 

Prev. 

1290 

1M 

1280 

1310 

739 

m 

734 

746 

<230 

4210 

4230 

4170 

1400 

I3H) 

1380 

1400 

1790 

1740 

1770 

17/0 

499 

684 

692 

700 

850Q 

8430 

8500 

8500 

777 

74/ 

755 

777 

514 

M2 

50V 

509 

322 

316 

322 

321 

719 

70/ 

719 

m 

260 

756 

260 

759 

1600 

1,560 

1590 

16)0 

8730a 

8550o 

8730a 

BS90a 

3100630700003090000 

3100b 

682 

659 

665 

672 

296 

292 

296 

297 

1430 

1410 

ICO 

1*20 

0620 

8610 

8620 

8730 

750 

73S 

743 

771 

3380 

3330 

4350 

3360 

1370 

*s 

1340 

1390 

492 

490 

510 

67B0 

6630 

6740 

6800 

5240 

4900 

5740 

5160 

1250 

1240 

1240 

1250 

1140 

1110 

1130 

1170 

7250 

7110 

7160 

7260 

1530 

1510 

1530 

1510 

2090 

2070 

2070 

2090 

725 

715 

720 

728 

2350 

2330 

2350 

2330 

1410 

1400 

1400 

1410 

1020 

1000 

ion 

1030 

10600 

10AM 

10600 

1090(1 

8740 

8600 

8700 

0710 

899 

090 

897 

907 

1490 

1450 

1470 

1530 

<59 

452 

452 

460 

1670 

1660 

1660 

1670 

287 

21)1 

286 

288 

1020 

967 

10N 

985 

2800 

2690 

2710 

■7780 

2450 

2420 

‘7430 

2430 

8170 

883D 

B17D 

8080 

2070 

205 0 

2050 

2070 

966 

949 

962 

976 

1230 

1150 

1730 

H50 

2230 

7190 

7210 

2240 

4280 

4200 

<760 

4330 

307 

304 

305 

30/ 

561 

W3 

540 

565 

1730 

1710 

1230 

1220 

1400 

1380 

1400 

1390 

698 

682 

682 

690 

6H6 

670 

681 

680 

2760 

7700 

27M 

2800 

876 

166 

8/5 

HA7 

31X 

3080 

3170 

3090 

2530 

2520 

2520 

2520 


Toronto 


AbKHPna 
Atreria Energy 
Aiatn Alum 
Anacreon Exm 
Bk Montreal 
BkNavaScafla 
Banc* Gold 
BCE 

BCTeteamm 

Btocheni Pham 

BomoardlerB 

BrasanA 

BiMMUerate 

Cornea) 

CISC 

CdnNaltteoS 

CdnNatRes 

CdnOaMPd 

Cdnpotfte 

Comtoeo 

D otosco 

Domtar 

DanatiueA 

DaPontCdoA 

ENerGnaa 

EuroNev Mug 

FoIrhHFW 

FatoKtortooe 

FWOwrChoHA 

Franco Newda 

Guff Cda Res 

Imperial 0B 

Inca 

IPL Energy 
LnMncvB 
Laewen Group 
MocmUBM 
Magna Ind A 


TSE ladtfstriah: 6U00B 


PrevtoOK 615704 

2235 

99 Wl 

2135 

7205 

29 

2850 

2X90 

2*4 

4905 

*70 

49.70 

49 

1600 

1X00 

I6J* 

IAW 

4800 

*40 

4H >.9 

*IK 

51.90 

5105 

5100 

57.10 

3805 

3B.I0 

3X35 

38.70 

6608 

65.00 

6605 

6600 

30-10 

79J5 

30.10 

29.90 

B2W 

n 

72 

Wi 

7X35 

36JS 

9*m 

26k. 

3205 

3200 

32.90 

SPA 

1900 

1X90 

19 

1900 

51 

5A.K 

iAW 

50.95 

66 

6X70 

65.nn 

6600 

49.70 

49to 

4965 

m 

33-10 

ram 

33 

3700 

mo 

99 nn 

27« 

73.10 

3305 

3X40 

339» 

■nen 

39 

38.70 

38.90 

39 

74JB5 

2465 

24J5 

2414 

17 JO 

17.16 


1245 

MU 

JX« 

m 

3630 

3135 

3115 

3115 

3105 

230U 

73.10 

7344 

3140 

4400 

4L40 

4405 

4450 

29 J 

290 

290 

786 

32 

311ft 

3IJK 

31.90 

2205 

llJfi 

77'4 

2200 

64to 

63.15 


6440 

916 

0JO 

900 

900 

60.14 

5960 

MK 

M 

*65 

(IK 

*55 

*15 

40.05 

3W4 

40 

3995 

19.10 

1X85 

19.10 

1R95 

<405 

44 

44W 

44U 

19 

iNjn 

19 

1X90 

TU5 


/» 

7205 


Methanek 

Moore 

Newbridge Net 
Nora nda lnc 
Moran Energy 

Nthem Telecom 

NON 

Onsx 

PonalnPBrtm 

Petra Cda 

PtocerDame 

PearPmlra 

PotoxftSask 

Renobaonce 

RWAJgom 

Rogers ConWB 

SeoaramCO 

ShUCdo A 

Stone Comold 

Suncor 

TollsnwnEjty 

TeckB 

Tetentobe 

Telus 

Thorason 

TorDomBank 

Trensatta 

TransCdoPtpe 

TrtmorVFlnl 

TriacKidui 

TVXGdd 

WestooastEny 

Weston 


High 

1300 

30** 

4370 

33 

2970 

9X65 

1200 

2405 

5X10 

1900 


Low Owe 


13V) 

X 

4200 

3200 

9R« 

97to 

1216 

24VS 

56 

1945 


1355 

Mta 

4250 

32.95 

2805 

9805 

1200 

2405 

56 

1900 


Prer. 
13401 
3000. 
4345- 
3205. 
2911, 
9X35, 
1255^ 
2X90. 
56fe' 
1900. 


3 m 

7714 

28to 

2935" 

1205 

1205 

1206 

12M' 

108 10X35 106.10 10705- 

39 

3&30 

38.90 

38M-’ 

yspy 

3400 

35 

34M* 

23Vi 

22Y9 

2330 

23 

63 

5210 

5245 

5X35- 

5SJO 

55 

M 1 * 

56 s 

2230 

2210 

72.15 

2214' 

62 

UFA 

0130 

6030- 

4406 

42.95 

4405 

4445' 

3345 

3X20 

3340 

3340- 

3900 

3930 

3940 

3930- 

2*4 

*56 

20to 

2030. 

2X80 

58 

2800 

28.153 

3830 

3730 

38 

38W; 

1600 

1615 

1605 

184; 

2535 

25 

2530 

2535s 

<1.90 

4) 

4130 

421. 

32.15 

3141 

3215 

32. 

1205 

iwt 

11 JO 

12.15; 

24.9S 

74*4 

74.95 

2435. 

74.95 

73V. 

74V4 

7430 , 


Vienna 

BoehfcMJddeh 
CredOonst Pfd 
EA-GeneraD 
EVN 

Fluahaten Wten 

OMV 

Oest Eiektib 

VASffihl 

VATncti 

WtonefbeegBau 


ATX bdec 123701 ^ 
Pravtos;122X97* 
82X80 81900 82X50 82050* 
45700 45140 45750 454.90 ^ 
3420 33X 3400 3300' 


175300 1725 

59950 592.10 
1418 1381 

86750 859 

47X90 46X10 


1746 1749 
595 595: 

1412 1400: 

860 863" 

473 47105 ; 


1835179X10 18331792.10 J 
2189 2140 2189 2157" 


Wellington nzsb-niw__ 

PieitaoK 227903. 


JJrNZeort B 

.184 

335 

334 

177 

Briefly Invi 

t39 

U8 

139 

119 

QifWHononJ 

177 

334 

336 

397 

Retch Oi Blag 

436 

433 

436 

434 

FkSdiOiEny 

333 

xn 

330 

171 

Fletdi Ch Para 

7JI 

1.99 

1.99 

2J6 

FteJchCb Paper 

235 

233 

7J15 

2(H 

UonNaftian 

303 

305 

303 

356 

Telecom NZ 

600 

X* 

607 

649 

Wibon Horton 

1131 

11 JO 

11 JO 

11J0 


Zurich 

ABBB 

Adeem B 

AtasdbseR 

Ares-SeranoB 

AMR 

BoerHdgB 

BaWseHdgR 

BKVHon 

OariontR 

CidSufcaeGpR 

EteX&owattB 

Ems-Chemie 

ESECNdg 

HoldertiankB 

UaddenstLBB 

NesttfR 

Nowatiste 

OeriBin Buefi R 

PargesoHidB 

PhormVtoiB 

RkfiwnentA 

PWBPC 

Roche Hdfl PC 

5 BCR 

Schindler PC 
SGSB 
SMH8 
SutzerR 
Swiss RtobEte 
SwtssolrR 
UBSB 
Winterthur R 
Zurich Ajar R 


5P1 Mac283709' 
Pravtous 205156 ■ 


1676, 
478". 
1185- 
1520' 
B60 
1614 
2900' 
»-■ 
70S' 
lS7^5i 
531 4 
5755= 
4015- 
10981 

4SBJ 
1606' 
1686-" 
I42r 
1500. 
7351 
SOTO"* 
. >98 : 
12415a 
260. 
1650. 
33501 
Ml; 
920j 
1509.1 
1257, 
1324: 
897 1 
439 


1692 

1672 

1681 

480 

472 

475 

1187 

1172 

1176 

1530 

ISOS 

1510 

N.T. 

NT. 

nr. 

1640 

1611 

1636 

2915 

2990 

2915 

BSD 

835 

M5 

709 

699 

709 

158 15X75 15735 

531 

578 

531 

5773 

5670 

5770 

4820 

4780 

*20 

1102 

iaee 

1093 

460 

456 

456 

1608 

1593 

INI 

1688 

1666 

1671 

143 

141 

14200 

1510 

1495 

1510 

736 

712 

725 

2107 

2075 

2075 

200 

195 

199 

12445 

12140 

12190 

284 27900 

281 

1650 

1610 

1610 

3400 

3355 

3380 

859 

847 

654 

935 

905 

920 

1517 

1497 

1501 

1277 

1250 

1275 

1335 

13)9 

1322 

901 

886 

900 

439 

435 43700 










I 


PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Asahi Stake 
To Be Sold 
To Paper 

Softbank and News 
To Focus on JSkyB 

Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — News Corp. and the 
Japanese publisher Softbank Corp. 
said Monday they were selling their 
stake in Asahi National Broadcasting 
Co. to the Asahi Shimbun for 41.75 
billion yen ($348 million), nine 
months after having bought iL 

At a news conference with News 
Corp.'s chairman, Rupert Murdoch. 
Softbank's president, Masayoshi 
Son. said the companies were turn¬ 
ing their focus to Japan Sky Broad¬ 
casting Co., a new satellite-broad¬ 
casting venture. 

The companies paid the same 
amount in June 1996 for the 21.4 
percent stake in Asahi TV as a way to 
secure Japanese-lan^uage program¬ 
ming for the satellite broadcaster. 
JSkyB. not yet in operation, is to 
compete with two new satellite 
broadcasters, PerfecTV and Dir¬ 
ecTV. For Softbank, the cash from 
the sale will be nearly enough to pay 
the first three years of investment in 
JSkyB, Makoto Soda, an analyst at 
Dresdner Klein won Benson (Asia) 
Ltd., said. 

“This is a good move for Soft- 
bank; they will have no cash prob¬ 
lems,'* he said. 

Asahi Shimbun initiated the 
transaction, the newspaper’s pres¬ 
ident, Muneyuki Matsushita, said. 
We' ‘wanted to buy back the stake,’ ’ 
he said. Mr. Son said the companies 
had agreed that Asahi would co¬ 
operate in the JSkyB venture by 
providing programming even after 
the sale. 

"There’s little reason for Soft- 
bank to hold shares in TV Asahi, 
because JSkyB’s business is already 
looking successful." said Takehiro 
Kanazawa, analyst at Yamaichi Re¬ 
search Institute. 

Another reason Softbank and 
News Corp. may feel they do not 
need such a strong tie with Asahi TV 
is the likelihood that they will reach 
an agreement with Sony Corp. to 
make them an equal partner in 
.JSkyB. Negotiations with Sony are 
continuing. Mr. Murdoch said. 

If Sony joins the venture, JSkyB 
will have another source of cash as 
well as Sony’s programming and 
experience in manufacturing broad¬ 
casting hardware. 


Australia Sees a Boon From Uranium 



Bloomberg News 

DARWIN, Australia—Over the 
next five years, as Australia lifts a 
ban on new uranium mines, compa¬ 
nies plan to double production of 
the raw fuel for nuclear reactors. 

Australia is sitting on one-third 
of the world's supply of low-cost 
u ranium, and demand is expected 
to be plentiful as reactors around 
the world deplete their stockpiles. 
The 240 million Australian dollars 
($186.1 million) that uranium ex¬ 
ports earn for Australia is expected 
to more than double, too. 

Yet the potential revenue from 
uranium exports is relatively small 
compared with the close to 8 billion 
dollars that coal brings in for Aus¬ 
tralia, and the widespread resump¬ 
tion of uranium mining will bring 
political headaches for the Aus¬ 
tralian government over health haz¬ 
ards and environmental damage. 

One of the new mines, for in¬ 
stance, is just within the boundaries 
of Kakadu National Park, one of 
Australia’s most famous wilder¬ 
ness areas. Enemy Resources Aus¬ 
tralia Ltd. is seeking permission to 
mine its lease on the deposit but it 
will have to file stringent environ¬ 
mental-impact assessments. It also 


will have to get approval from ab¬ 
original groups under Australia's 
native-land-rights legisLation. 

The ban goes back to 1983. when 
a Labour Party government limited 
mining to the three mines in pro¬ 
duction then. Voters had returned 
Labour to power amid concern over 
be hazard of radiation from foe 
mines and die proliferation of nu¬ 
clear reactors 

and weapons , 

around the Australia IS 

one-dlird of 

dear reactors low-COSt urs 

and no plans for _ 

any.) Last year. 

Labour lost to the conservative Lib- 
era!-National Party coalition. One 
of foe first things the coalition did 
was to abolish foe limits on uranium 
mining. For foe mining companies. 


Australia is sitting on 
one-tiurd of the world’s 
low-cost uranium supply. 


said Michael Krockenberger, cam¬ 
paign director for foe Australian 
Conservation Foundation. 

-At least five new mines are 
planned, in addition to the two 
already in production. A third mine 
clotted in 1988. The scramble for 
uranium comes amid a supply 
shortage. After radiation leaked out 
of the Three Mile Island nuclear 
reactor in 

. Pennsylvania 

Kitting on and Cher- 

the world’s in the 

n hnw supply. 1970s and foe 

_ J 1980s, foe 

world grew 
wary of auclear power. Utilities 
scrapped plans for new plants, and 
by 1992, the price of uranium had 
fallen to $7.75 a pound from $43.25 
before foe Three Mile Island ac- 


the change in policy is “the kiss of cident At those low prices, it was 
life," said Grant Watt, manager of hardly worth mining uranium, but 
gov e rnment and aboriginal affairs by foe mid-1980s, nuclear plants 
for Koongarra Mines Pty., a unit of were consuming more uranium 
a French state-owned uranium min- than the miners were producing, 
ing company, Cogema Resources Now foe world's 440 comraer- 


a French state-owned uranium min¬ 
ing company, Cogema Resources 
Ltd. For foe en v ir on mentalists, 
“despite industry assurances, nu¬ 
clear waste from reactors remains a 
very real and very potent danger," 


Now foe world’s 440 commer¬ 
cial nuclear plants, which supply 
17 percent of foe world’s supply of 
electricity, are depleting their 
stockpiles. The price is rising 


again, to S 14.50 a pound recently. 

While Australia contains about 
one-third of the world's low-cost 
uranium, it produces only about 
one-tenth of foe supply. Canada, by 
contrast — the world's largest pro¬ 
ducer— has only about one-tenth of 
the world's reserves but supplies 40 
percent of foe uranium. 

Australia's production is not 
about to overtake Canada's soon, yet 
it is in a position to grab much more 
of the market. The world will need 
almost 80,000 metric tons of urani¬ 
um in 2002, up from 73,000 now. 

In addition to the problem of old 

g iants, new demand has emerged, 
i Asia, with its booming econ¬ 
omies. demand for power is grow¬ 
ing rapidly. Japan and South Korea 
between them are building eight 
new nuclear-power plants. 

Australia has about 8 percent of 
the world market for uranium now; 
if it doubles production as planned 
to almost 12,000 tons, it will have 15 
percent five years from now. The 
end of the ban is bringing foreign 
miners flocking in. including the 
world’s biggest uranium producer, 
Cameco Corp. of Canada, whose 
mines in Saskatchewan Province are 
getting more difficult to work. 


Hong Kong 
-.Hang Seng-.y •. 
15000- 

. 12000 /^-- 

. 11000 --, 

10000 , q'h-q- j F 

1996 1997 


2250—- 

.2200 —/V 

2150 V I ~ 

2100 f4- - 

2050-V-- 

aw-enro 

1996 


ftnep-.r v 

- 20000 —i———■ 

.- 19000- \TtT 

- "laooo- 

■D-rinr* 

1997 ' 1996 1997 


_ _ . m i ll-1 1 1 1 A r 1 1 r mm m—— .< f —ni n 




l&m I. 






Source: Tetekurs 


K..E448J8D. sl.V 
i-t8557JJp'-0.69 


;; /• tO.** 

+G-15 

ImcnuDarol Herald Tribune 


Great Eagle 
Cancels Issue 


Ccmpded try Ow Staff From Dispadta 

HONG KONG — Great Eagle Hold¬ 
ings Ltd., one of Hong Kong's biggest 
developers, canceled a $333 million 
share sale Monday, 11 days before the 
stock was due to start trading, citing 
poor demand. 

Great Eagle's stock, which had fallen 
as it planned the spin-off of Tai Shan 
Properties Ltd.—its office-property unit 
— rose 4 percent to 30.20 Hong Kong 
dollars ($3.90) after the cancellation. 

“It’s buried; we don’t intend to try 
again," said Adrian Lee, assistant di¬ 
rector for finance. “This is not the first 
time we've tried, but it seems investors 
just aren’t biting.” 

The company, one of 33 in Hong 
Kong's benchmark Hang Seng Index, 
already postponed foe move once, in 
mid-1994. 

Property stocks lifted Hong Kong’s 
benchmark Hang Seng stock index, 
which closed at 13.507.28. up 108.56 
points. (AFX, Bloomberg) 


Games Firms Zap Console Prices 

Nintendo-Sony War Benefits Buyers in Japan and Abroad 


Agence France-Presse 

TOKYO — The price war between Nintendo 
Co. and Sony Corp. is going global. 

“Hand-to-hand fighting is expected between 
the two companies as Nintendo gives chase to 
Sony after finally launching a price battle," said 
Kazuhara Miura of Daiwa Research Institute Ltd. 

Nintendo announced late last month that it 
would cut die Japanese retail price of its mainstay 
64-bit console by 33 percent, to 16.800 yen 
($139.02), as of March 14 to counter Sony Com¬ 
puter Entertainment Corp. 

Sony said Friday that it was cutting the retail 
prices of its Playstation game console in Australia 
and Europe. The price for foe 32-bit machine in 
Germany dropped to 299 Deutsche marks 
($177.02) from 399 DM as Nintendo launched the 
64-bit console at 399 DM. 

Sony’s price cuts duplicate its June strategy in 
Japan, where initial shipments of foe Nintendo 64 
crashed when Sony cut the price of.its Playstation 
by 25 percent, to 19,800 yen. the day before the 
Nintendo debut 

Nintendo had been dominant in foe video-game 
market since the 1990 debut of its 16-bit console, 
but 32-bit machines introduced by Sony and Sega 
Enterprises Co. steadily eroded its position. 


Japanese sales of Sony's Playstation are forecast 
to reach 3-5 million units in the year ending this 
month, with Nintendo expected to sell 23 million of 
its 64-bit consoles and Sega estimated to sell 2.2 
million of its Segasatum console. Daiwa Research 
reported. 

Analysts said foe Nintendo-Sony war would 
continue for some time. 

“Despite the price cur." Mr. Miura said, “it is 
still uncertain whether Nintendo can regain its 
comfortable domination in the market, as Sony has 
outdistanced other video-game makers in terms of 
the number of software titles." 

Nintendo has released 10 titles for its new ma¬ 
chine. compared with 683 for the Sony Playstation. 
But other analysts predicted that foe domestic price 
cut would bolster Nintendo 64’s sales. 

“Nintendo is still capable of catching up with 
Sony later this year, as foe new price is low enough 
to attract a considerable number of new con¬ 
sumers," said Takanobu Murakami of Yamaichi 
Research Institute Ltd. 

Nintendo, forecasting increased sales, said it 
would increase output of Nintendo 64s by May by 
43 percent, to 1 million units. The battle is expected 
to spread to the United States, but Nintendo officials 
said they had no plans yet to cut prices there. 


Very briefly: __ 

• The International Herald Tribune added Kuala Lumpur c 
to its 12 other printing sites. Its local partner, Utusan Melayu 1 
(Malaysia) Bhd., mil print and distribute the newspaper 
throughout Malaysia. Richard McClean, publisher and chief 
executive, called foe move "an important part of our overall 
expansion plan," which he said would “fiirther unfold in 
coming months." 

• Sapporo Breweries Ltd.'s 1996 group pretax profit rose 9 
percent, to a record 14.04 billion yen ($116.2 million), while 
net profit surged 59 percent, to 3.81 billion yen. 

• Japan agreed to forgive 4 billion yen of Burma’s debt of 
more than 400 billion yen to Tokyo. 

• Vietnam attracted more than $28 billion in foreign investment 
from 1988 to foe end of February, The People newspaper 
reported, with 1,696 projects licensed by the government. 

• China may buy 100 passenger planes from Airbus In¬ 
dustrie, the French trade minister was quoted os saying. 
Beijing also plans an extensive restructuring for its iron and 
steel industry, including consolidation of smaller companies. 

• Indonesia’s trade surplus rose 45 percent in 1996 from a 

year earlier, to $6.9 billion, according to a Ministry of Trade 
and Industry report, as foe December surplus increased 10.2 
percent, to $916.1 million. ap.afp • 


Vietnam’s Currency Drops 1.8% 

Bloomberg News 

HANOI — Vietnam's currency, the don®, fell 1.8 percent 
against the U.S. dollar Monday, foe first day Foreign-exchange 
markets were open after the central bank widened the band 
permitted for daily trading. 

The fall, after the State Bank of Vietnam's decision Sat¬ 
urday, was the biggest one-day movement in four years. 

On foe interbank market, foe U.S. dollar closed Monday at 
11.400 dong, up 200 dong from Friday. 


W EALTH: Americans Are Getting It but Just Not Spending It 




By maintaining a far-flung network of news-gathering resources, the World's Da! 
Newspaper brings you unrivalled coverage of wond politics, business and economics, 
as well as science, technology, travel, fashion, the arts and sport — all from an 
1 international perspective. 

" Take advantage of this limited opportunity to try the International Herald Tribune 
with a low cost, 2-month trial subscription and enjoy delivery to your home or office 
every morning. 


COUNDtY/CURRENCY 


2 MONTHS 2 MONTHS DtSCOUNT 


NEWSSTAND 

P18CE 


GREAT BRITAN 


LUXEMBOURG 

NETHERLANDS 


SWITZERLAND 


Ft* infermciion concerning ha 

Cmttmy tf OI30-M 83 85 or 


OFFER OFF 

FMCE COVER PRICE 

650 SS* 

1.350 ~ 60S 

360 54* 

310 SOX 

210 60* 

77 60* 

22 S3* 

9,100 50* 

26 SO* 

SSjOOO 60* 

1.350 60* 

n 60* 

390 S3* 

5,000 58* 

3J00 57% 

330 sen, 

66 60* 


aSSn 0 '* 1 ™ rt ""* *** 111 


Yes, twodd tike to start meowing dw toern&xxxJ Hcndd Tribune. 4-3-97 

□ My d>od< is andened (payable to the If-fT) 

Q PWsm charge nqr- 

O Axncx □ Diners Club □ VISA □ Access □ MasterCard □ Eurocard 
Gucfcf card charges wrfl bo mode in French Francs cd curronf rote, 

Cord Nor — —., — . Fax Dale:_____ 


Signature 

For business orders, indicate your VAT No:. 
Mr/Mn/Ms Family None:_ 


(WT VfiS FR7-1732021 1261 


MeSng Address:___ . 

Cty/Cada. ____ 

_ 

Hama Id No: — ■ XmI Nn: 

F-MnilMWf 

I got ifn oopjr of fa HT erf: £□ Icknlc □ Fidel OoirfineDafar 
□ I do not wish to receive informefion from o6w oanduly so w en a d compani m 
Mo3 or fax tor International Herald Tribune 
18l.CMOueOnriesdc Gaulle, 92521 ISkxjMy Codex, France. 

Fax: *33 HI 4392 10 
OR CALL +30 1 41 43 9® 67 

la Atlas *8322922 11 88. In the USpoB-Baefs J-800-882-2884. 
B4Aa8 Nac subemhfMm 

__Offer vafid tor new subscribers ortf. HA2M 


Continued from Page 17 

The stock market surge of 
foe past two years added 
nearly $3 trillion to foe total 
of household financial assets 
in America, and foe number is 
continuing to rise. 

The current total is equal to 
more than a third of foe na¬ 
tion’s output of goods and 
services last year. According 
to most studies, Americans 
would be expected to spend 3 
percent to 5 percent of that 
new wealth, or as much as 
$150 billion over several 
I years, on longer vacations, 
bigger cars, second houses, 
yachts — or just more fre¬ 
quent visits to restaurants or 
the theater. 

But economists who be¬ 
lieve in foe wealth effect are 
concluding that there has 
been a lot less bang for foe 
buck than they had expected. 

“People are not spending 
as much as foe wealth effect 
would imply," Mr. Prakken 
concedes. 

Other economists see new 


ammunition for arguing that 
there never has been much of 
a wealth effect. 

Income is the biggest 
driver of consumer spending. 
People who take home more 
pay tend to spend most of iL 
But an increase in a person’s 
wealth from a rise in foe value 
of a home, a surge in foe stock 
market or an increase in foe 
value of a small business 
should, many economists say, 
spark them to spend some 
more, too, even if the gains 
are still on paper. 

The spending of such 
gains, however, is not imme¬ 
diate. because it takes time for 
foe investor to decide how 
permanent the gains might be. 
There can be a lag of several 
years, especially if the gain in 
wealth is from foe stock mar¬ 
ket. Often foe extra spending 
comes from reducing contri¬ 
butions to savings rather than 
cashing in on the new 
wealth. 

The portion eventually 
spent — the wealth effect — 
is not large, because people 


ns-- 

&SS1 


IE 

i m 



1996 result steady 
Growth expected in 1997 

The Board of Directors met under the chairmanship of 
Francois Groppofte to close the consolidated financial 
statements for 1 996. 


Consolidated financial data (audited) 

IFF, in millions) 

1996 

1995 

Net sales 

11,502 

11,028 

of which outside France 

60% 

58% 

Operating income 

L619 

1,610 

Net income 

927 

923 


At constant structure and comparable exchange rates, net 
sales rase 2.7% 

Steady 1996 results are in line with group projections reflecting 
marked slowdowns on Leg rand's main European markets ana 
normal fine-tuning of production lines as major new ranges were 
launched. In 1997, the group expects earnings la head up 
again, driven by the improvement in operating margin that 
emerged in the second half of T996 and the positive impact of 
new product lines. 

At the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders to be held in 
Limoges on May 27, 1997, the Board of Directors will submit 
resolutions setting the dividend at FF 8.15 on ordinary shares 
and FF 13.04 on preferred shares, up 6.5%. After deduction of 
the advance payment made on February 3, the balance of FF 
4.30 per ordinary share and FF 6.88 per preferred share will 
became payable as of June 13, 1997. 

Financial information : Tel. {33 I) 49 72 53 03 


generally view their new 
wealth as something to be 
used over a lifetime. But a lot 
of economists have argued 
that the impact should not be 
dismissed. It could be the dif¬ 
ference between an economic 
slump and just slow growth. 
Or it could provide just 
enough kick to the economy 
to cause the Federal Reserve 
to push up shon-term interest 
rates to ward off inflation. 

Some economists point to 
foe wealth effect to explain 
foe surprising spurt in spend¬ 
ing in foe second quarter last 
year (which lasted only 
briefly) and put Wall Street 
on an alert for a Fed tight¬ 
ening of interest rates (which 
did not occur). Others tie foe 
wealth effect to the surge in 
the purchase of luxury goods 
throughout 1996, a year after 
the Dow Jones industrial av¬ 
erage jumped 33.5 percent 
while foe broader Standard & 
Poor’s index of 500 stocks 
rose 34.1 percent. 

So why is the wealth effect 
turning our to be such a poor 
predictor of behavior? 

A principal factor is foe 
same force that has powered 
the stupendous rise in the 
stock market: foe desire of 
millions of baby boomers to 
prepare for retirement, a drive 
that seems heightened by 
their growing fear that Social 
Security benefits will be 
much stingier for them. 

Debt burdens may also be 
getting in the way of spend¬ 
ing. For many middle-class 
Americans, a rise in debt may 
have offset the wealth effect 
from gains in their portfolios. 
At foe same time, wealthier 
Americans may have re¬ 
strained their spending while 
paying off their debt. 

Baby boomers — and other 
investors — are also worry¬ 
ing about losing jobs, and 
many would rather spend less 
than risk being out of foe mar¬ 
ket for a split second and 
missing another market rally. 
All this means conserving 


rather than spending. 

As Mr. Greenspan said lasr 
week, many middle-income 
Americans have built up such 
substantia] debts that they 
cannot borrow more and 
sometimes even have to rein 
in spending to meet interest 
payments. 

The median debt burden 
rose 5.6 percent from 1992 to 
1995 for families with in¬ 
comes of $25,000 to $49,999. 
according to foe Federal Re¬ 
serve. although households 
with incomes over $100,000 
reduced their median debt by 
21.6 percent. 

Economists also say many 
Americans may not be feeling 
so wealthy because a growing 
portion of their stocks are 
held in 4010c) accounts and 
other retirement plans. Many 
consumers see this money as 
a nest egg that may still be too 
small. 

Of the nearly $3 trillion in¬ 
crease in the value of stocks 
held by households from foe _■ 
end of 1994 through foe third 7 
quarter of last year, about 40 
percent was in retirement or 
other indirectly held ac¬ 
counts. The number of house¬ 
holds with retirement ac¬ 
counts jumped to 43 percent 
'.ol? 95, from 37 9 Percent in 
1992. while foe percentage of 
households owning stocks di¬ 
rectly or in mutual funds re¬ 
mained ai 27.3 percent. 

Even some economists 
who trumpet the wealth effect 
~ and have seen their owit 
fortunes rise — have trouble 
pointing to significantly in¬ 
creased spending on their 
own part. 

N. Gregory Mankiw. a pro¬ 
fessor of economics at Har¬ 
vard University, said foe rally 
in foe stock market “in, 
creases my sense of Financial* 
security and increases foe 
chances that I would go to foe 
M5 restaurant. 

"But to be honest," he ad¬ 
ded "1 am finishing up this 
book now. and l am n ot 
spending anything." 


A\ART 

| A Flaming Case of Kitsch 
■ .CdRP l Rembrandt’s Altered States 
l The Great Auction War 
Sleuths Among the Stalls 

If y™ "rased it in the HT. look for it 
A Cduor on our site on t he World Wide Web: 


Vl V 

■'-? 5 -i ?.U. c ,v 


’Ao*\ds> 












■? IE fLV 


iner he | e fr 


the n 


lii- ins Ttf K- 


i. Most* i-i 


eguiiaii 






































































































































































































































fflTCBNATUttAL 


PAGE 22 


Sports 


TUESDAY. MARCH 4,1997 


World Roundup 



. ■ \,y 


&. V.: 


Wikcr DUaHWAFT* 


Australia’s Greg BJewett driv¬ 
ing a ball Monday. He hit 214. 


South Africa Totters 


cricket Australia took control 
of the first test against South Africa 
on Monday. Steve Waugh and Greg 
Blewett stretched their record- 
breaking partnership to 385 runs. 
Then Shane Wame took two wick¬ 
ets as South Africa finished the 
fourth day on 99 runs for four wick¬ 
ets in its second innings, 227 runs 
behind. 

Blewett hit 214 and Waugh 160. 
Australia declared its first innings 
closed at 628 runs fix' eight wickets, 
a first innings lead of 326 .(Reuters) 


Sampras Wins Title 


tennis Pete Sampras struggled 


stniggi 

to beat Patrick Rafter of South 
Africa, 5-7, 7-6 (7-4) 6-3. Sunday 
in the final of the $7 24,250 Advanta 
Championships in Phil¬ 
adelphia. (AP) 


Victory in Doubt 


nascar Rusty Wallace edged 
Geoff Bodine in the Pontiac Ex¬ 
citement 400 on Sunday in Rich¬ 
mond Virginia, but might not have 
won the race. 

NASCAR officials said they had 
taken the engine from Wallace's 
Ford Thunderbiid for “failing to 
meet compression ratio specifica¬ 
tions." NASCAR said it would 
make further tests. (AP) 


Victory Scrubbed Out 


marathon Nadezhda Ilyina 
crossed the line first in a 26-mile, 
355-or-so-yard race in Los Angeles 
on Sunday, but Loraah Kiplagat 
won the 12th running of the Los 
Angeles Marathon. 

Ilyina of Russia bad cut a comer 
in the 22d mile, saved about 30 
yards and was disqualified. Ki¬ 
plagat, a Kenyan running her first 
marathon, finished two seconds be¬ 
hind Ilyina and then found she had 
won $15,000 and a car worth about 
$26,000 for beating her friend. 

Crying. Uyina said she had been 
looking for a bathroom from the 
third mile and thought she had 
found it at a gas stati on/conveni¬ 
ence store. She said she had cut 
about 10 yards off the course, but 
that she had also spent 15 seconds 
in the store parking lot. looking for 
a bathroom. (LAT) 


U.S. Tie in Jamaica 
Represents a Victory 


6 Onus’ Was on Host in First Game 


CaofAdbf Orr StaffFnmDaptacha 

In World Cup qualifying, a draw can 
be a victory. So a drab, scoreless draw in 
Kingston, Jamaica, represented a setback 
for the host and a small triumph for the 
United States, even though both teams 
earned just a point in-the standings. 

“The onus was on Jamaica to play for 
the win," said the U.S. coach, Steve 
Sampson. “In qualifying, you try to get 
as many points at home as you possibly 
can and try to tie as many away games as 
you can.” 

The manner in which the Americans 
accomplished die draw was nothing to 


Despite its lackluster performance, 
e U.S. tea 


Wo alp Cup Soccii 


boast about. The lifeless U.S. squad 
failed to generate any serious scoring 
threats. It buzzed around Jamaica's pen¬ 
alty area a few times, and striker Eric 
Wynalda had two tightly angled shots 
stopped by goalkeeper Warren Barrett. 

At the other end. Andrew Williams, a 
19-year-old speedster who studies at the 
Uni versity of Rhode Island, caused sev- 
eialproblems for the U.S. defense. 

The Sunday draw was the first of 10 
games for both teams in a league of the 
six countries still in the running for the 
three competitors from the Central and 
North American and Caribbean region 
for the 1998 World Cup in France. 

John Harkes, the ILS. captain who 
comes from New Jersey, said: “I 
haven’t played on a field like that since 
I was 12 and in Kearny. It was hard, 
dried out and very bumpy. I can’t wait to 
get them back in the United States. It 
will be a totally different game.” 

Rene Simoes. Jamaica's Brazilian 
coach, said: “This is the best field we 
have in the country. What can I do?” 


die U.3. team had a few bright spots: 
Goalkeeper Kasey Keller and 35-year- 
old sweeper Thomas Dooley were su¬ 
perb, and reserve forward Roy Lassiter 
provided a spark in the closing 
minutes. 

Keller made a sparkling save on Wal¬ 
ter Boyd’s low shot in the 30th minute. 

But the most important stop was by 
defender Mike Bums in the final minute 
of the first half. Theodore Whitmore beat 
Keller but Bums stopped the ball on the 
goal line and cleared it out of danger. 

“I just wanted to make sure I con¬ 
trolled it,’ ’ he said. ‘ ‘The ball was boun¬ 
cing all over the place. Someone has to 
be there, and this time it was me.” 

Maa ric o 4» Canada 0 Mexico routed 
Canada in Mexico City with four goals 
in the second half Sunday as the two 
countries played their first game in the 
Central and North American and Carib¬ 
bean region qualifying group. 

Before a near-capacity crowd in 
1 12,000-seat Azteca Stadium, the Mex¬ 
icans played with authority in the 
second half. 

Mexico opened the scoring in the 
50th minute when Carlos Hermosillo 
headed in a pass from Luis Hernandez. 
Benjamin Galindo scored with a penalty 
shot eight minutes later. 

Hermosillo made it 3-0 at the 80th 
minute wife a quick shot, and Luis 
Roberto Alves completed fee scoring. 

Mexico moves to fee top of fee group, 
wife three points. Canada has none. The 
other two teams in fee group, El Sal¬ 
vador and Costa Rica, have yet to play. 

The next games in fee regional qual¬ 
ifying group are March 16, when Mex¬ 
ico plays at Costa Rica and fee United 
States is host to Canada. (WP. AP) 



Olympic Panel 
Weighs Use of' 
Blood Test for 
Deadly Drug 4 


, r W 


f - 


Biaudo F<guero»/Tbr Ajvodalrd Pra» 

Gregory Messam of Jamaica restraining Cobi Jones of the United States. 


Busy Argentine Teams 
Play Twice in One Day 


Reuters 

Velez Sarsfield and Racing Club of 

two 


Faldo Cruises to Nissan Victory 


Washington Post Service 

LOS ANGELES — Nick Faldo of 
Britain was the true tiger in the Nissan 
Open field at Riviera Country Club 
here. He showed the stripes of a cham¬ 
pion wife a meticulous final round of 3- 
under-par 68 to secure a three-shot vic¬ 
tory over fee defending champion, 
Craig Stadler. 

It was Faldo’s first title since he won 
the Masters 11 months ago. 

Tiger Woods closed with a final 
round 69. his first score in the 60s of a 
frustrating week not far from his home 
in Cypress, California. He finished at 3- 
under 281, good fora tie for 20th place. 


his worst finish in four events on the 
U.S- Tour this season. 

The play Sunday drew a crowd of 
more than 42,000. The four-day total of 
129,000 was a tournament record. 

Faldo’s four-day total of272 left him 
at 12-under 272, earning him a winner’s 
check of $252,000. Over fee four rounds 
at the Nissan, the man who won fee 
1987 British Open wife 18 straight pars 
fee last day had only four bogeys and 
one double bogey. 

“When I did that at fee British Open, 
they used to write feat I was mechanical 
and boring,” he said. *Tm delighted to 
report Tra getting close to that again." 


Argentina each played two games in i 
different countries on the same day. 

The two clubs played each other in an 
Argentine championship match in 
Buenos Aires on Sunday and also took- 
part in Ltbertadores Cup matches away 
wife different Ecuadorean opponents. 

So, both teams faced two games with¬ 
in a few hours of each other but thou¬ 
sands of miles apart. 

Oswaldo Piazza, fee Velez coach, 
opted to send his first team to Guay¬ 
aquil, Ecuador, to face Emelec. 

Alfio Basile, the Racing Club coach, 
put the Argentine championship first He 
fielded a strong team against Velez in 
Buenos Aires and used reserve and youth 
team players against National in Quito. 

Racing, which has not won the Ar¬ 
gentine title for 31 years, came out on top 
in fee domestic game as it bear Velez's 
reserves, 2-1, to claim its first victory of 
fee current clausura championship. 

Racing lost, 2-0, to National in Quito, 
and is bottom of Libertadores Cup Group 
Two and in danger of not making the 
second round. Velez beat Emelec, 3-2. to 
go second in the same group. 


Such a pile up of games has become a 
hallmark of Latin American soccer. 
There is a multitude of competitions 
organized by different bodies at con¬ 
tinental, nariq nal and — in Brazil — 
even regional level. 

Coaches are often forced to field re 


South Amiri can Soccii 


serve teams against opponents when 
they think they can get away wife it 

Mexico played a World Cup qual¬ 
ifying match on Sunday against Canada 
— while the country’s national cham¬ 
pionship continued unabated wife six 
games taking place almost immediately 
afterward. 

Last month, the problem again 
reached absurd proportions as Cruzeiro 
of Brazil played two matches in one 
night at their stadium in Belo Hori¬ 
zonte. 

brazil The revival of Brazilian striker 
Romano continued over fee weekend as 
he scored twice for Flamengo in its 5-0 
away victory over Baireira in fee Rio de 
Janeiro championship. Romario made his 
international comeback against Poland 
on Wednesday after a two-year absence. 


Reuters 

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — After 
an experiment at the Nordic wontr 
championships in Norway, more skiers 
may have to get used to the sight of a 
doctor with a needle demanding blood_ 
before a race. _ 

Blood was taken from some cross¬ 
country skiers before races and tested.^ 
Skiers wife hemoglobin levels higher 
than normal were not allowed to race. _ 

High hemoglobin levels bolster en r ; 
(jn r»nr*» by enabling the blood to trans- 
port more oxygen to working muscles. 1 
Levels can be increased by blood dojv 
ing, a technique in which Wood is taken 
from an athlete’s body and pumped, 
back just before competition._ £; 

Injecting erythropoietin, or EPO, one 
of the most dangerous banned drugs iff', 
athletics, has a similar effect because it 
stimulates the production of red blood 
cells. It can lead to a thickening of blood 
and heart attacks. 

Patrick Schamasch, medical director 
for the International Olympic Commit¬ 
tee, said Monday that it was possible - 
that skiing officials could ask for similar.* 
tests to be used next year at the Winter 
Olympics in Nagano. Japan. 

And Marc Hodler, chief of the In-, 
temational Ski Federation, said: “We 
introduced the tests because 85 percent 
of our competitors wanted them. Maybe 1 
the athletes will now go to die IOC and 
ask for them.” 

Sources at fee Olympic committee 
said its doping experts were against 
introducing the test because they were 
not sure it was completely reliable. 

The Olympic committee would have ■ 
to test hemoglobin levels because it* 
does not have a reliable test to detect 
EPO and it is unlikely that it will have 
one before fee games in Nagano. Cyc¬ 
ling, in which EPO is popular, has de¬ 
cided to introduce a test for the drug this 
year. 

Cycling officials have decided they 
most introduce an EPO test because the 
abuse of the drug is believed to be 
widespread. Eighteen riders in Europe 
have died of suspected EPO side-effects 
since the drug was introduced in fee 
mid-1980s to treat kidney disease. 

The Olympic committee wants its 
tests to be 100 percent reliable because 
of fee increasing number of lawsuits in 
sport. Mr. Schamasch said: "The im¬ 
portant thing is that the test is reliable 
since it could lead to sanctions." 

The committee is also unlikely to be 
ready to test for human growth hor 1 
mones — which are rapidly replacing. 
muscle-building steroids—by fee 2000 
Summer Games in Sydney. 








• tar*' 


net the 


Flyers 9 Top Line Scuttles Whalers , 5-2 


The Associated Press 

The Philadelphia Flyers blew out the 
Hartford Whalers, 5-2. 

The Flyers* top line led the way — in 
particular John LeClair, who had a goal and 
two assists. In a 2-2 tie against Hartford on 
Feb. 19, LeClair was frustrated by backup 
goalie Jason Muzzatti. 

“It was kind of my fault,” LeClair said of 
his previous performance against the 
Whalers. "He’s got a good glove, and I kept 
going back there.” Eric Lindros, Joel Otto. 
Janne Niinimaa and Shjon Podein also 
scored for fee Flyers. Goal tender Garth 
Snow extended his unbeaten streak to 16 
with 26 saves. 

Islanders 2, Capitals o Tommy Salo con¬ 
tinued his mastery of Washington, making 
39 saves to earn his third straight shutout 
against them. 

Salo has four career shutouts, all this 
season. He has won only nine of his 34 
games against the other NHL te ams . 

Marty Mclnnis and Claude Lapointe 
scored for visiting New York, which is 4-0 


against the Capitals this season. 

“This has got to end sooner or later,” said 
Washington coach Jim Schoenfeld. whose 
team has scored an NHL-Iow 158 goals. 

Migtity Ducks i, Red Wing si Anaheim and 
Detroit both kept unbeaten streaks alive. 

Kirk Maltby scored for Detroit, unbeaten 
in its last eight games. Chris Drury scored 




for visiting Anaheim, which has not lost in 
its last five. 

Anaheim goal tender Guy Hebert stopped 
34 shots while Detroit’s Mike Vernon made 
24 saves. 

Bteckhawks 4, Coyotes o Brent Sutter 
scored twice. Tony Araonte and Alexei 
Zhamnov both had shorthanded goals and 
Jeff Hacked made 38 saves for his sixth career 
shutout as visiting Chicago beat Phoenix. 

The Blackhawks were playing without 
All-Star defenseman Chris Chelios, who 
injured his left knee in Saturday's loss at 
Colorado and watched from the stands. 


The victoiy was fee ninth in 14 games for 
Chicago but first in three games against fee 
Coyotes this season. It moved the Black- 
hawks into fourth place in the Central Di¬ 
vision, one point ahead of Phoenix. 

■ Penguins Fire Coach Johnston 

The Pittsburgh Penguins, losers of eight 
of their last nine games, fired head coach 
Eddie Johnston on Monday and said Craig 
Patrick, the general manager, would take 
over as coach for the rest of the season. The 
Associated Press reported from Canons- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

Johnston, 60, began his second stint as 
Penguins coach in 1993. He previously 
coached fee club from 1980-83. He will be 
reassigned to another position in the or¬ 
ganization, the club said 

The Penguins are nine points behind first- 
place Buffalo in the Northeast Division. 

“We’ve got a ship that’s off course and 
listing, and we’ve got to get it back on 
course,” Patrick said. “It’s definitely very 
painful.” 




John Kunam/Thr Anuria k-d PmA 

Marty Mclnnis of fee New York Islanders losing his footing as he ’ 
battles for fee puck wife Sylvan Cote of fee Washington Capitals.’ 




Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Mcmcomaatt 


Exhibition Baseball 


IW MBflBMUl 

Pittsburgh ZTesas 1,1st game. 7 Innings 
TensZ Pittsburgh 1,2nd gome.7Innings 
Florida & Atlanta S 

Hen York Mas 9 , Los Angolas 5 

51. Louts 5, Qndnnall 3 

Houston ft KmtsosCtty 7 

PMbdelphloX Toronto 0 

Baltimore la. Montreal 2 

Cleveland 14 Oetrofl 5 

Boston 12. Mlnnesfla 3 

Chlai^ White Scs 8. New Varic Yankees 4 

Cotarado 7, San Fneidsco a 

San Diego la Seattle 9,11 Innings 

Chicago Cubs 7, Anattefm 4 

Milwaukee ft Oakland 411 tarings 


Seattle 

41 

16 

.719 


UA. Lakers 

39 

19 

672 

2% 

POritond 

31 

28 

-525 

11 

(_A.aiggen 

25 

X 

455 

IS 

Socramenro 

26 

32 

448 

15V. 

Phoenix 

22 

36 

J79 

19% 

Golden State 

21 

35 

775 

19% 

mnn'in 

not 

n 


LA. trtters 

22 

29 

24 19— 85 

latara 

26 

27 

25 23—181 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Standings 


enjutnc onnaoM 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Miami 

43 

IS 

.741 


New York 

43 

16 

.729 

% 

Orlando 

30 

26 

.536 

12 

Washington 

26 

31 

456 

16% 

New jersey 

17 

39 

JU 

25 

PhUadelpMa 

15 

42 

-263 

27% 

Boston 

11 

46 

.193 

31% 


CENTRAL taVTOOM 



CHcngo 

50 

7 

477 

_ 

Data* 

43 

14 

754 

7 

Alteita 

38 

19 

467 

12 

Owriotte 

37 

22 

427 

14 

aerotand 

32 

25 

461 

18 

Indkina 

28 

29 

421 

22 

Milwaukee 

25 

32 

439 

25 

Toronto 20 

37 

-357 

30 

■BIWEST DmSRM 

” 



W 

L 

Pd 

SB 

Utah 

41 

16 

J19 

_ 

Houston 

38 

20 

4S5 

3% 

MtonesoB 

29 

28 

J09 

12 

Dallas 

19 

37 

-3)9 

21% 

Denror 

18 

41 

JOS 

24 

Son Antonio 

13 

44 

.228 

28 

Vancouver 

n 

50 

.180 

32 


LA: Jones B-14 4-7 28, cmnpbefi 4-16 5-10 
17, h Milter 10-17 3427. Jocksofl 6-124-417. 
tto b o unds L A . 44 (Blown 10 ), Indiana 57 
(D.Doris 13 ). Asskts—Los Angeles 19 (Von 
Exemtndkmo 24 (Jackson 15). 

Utefc 25 W 30 73-n 

VoKOirver 21 13 29 23-46 

11: Russefl 0-151-2 2a Malone 7-16 4-61& 
V: Peeler 9-213-3 25. Abdur-Rahbn 7-16 6-9 
2& R c boon ds U tah 59 (Ostertog, Malone 
9), Vancouver 41 (Reeves 9). Assists—Utah 
31 (Stockton io. Vancouver27 (Anthony 91. 
Seattle 25 » 27 28—10* 

Ortaado 30 23 27 21—101 

S: Payton 12-205-532, Kemp 6-14 5-517; (k 
Anderson 6-13 24 2a Scott 4-16 0-0 17, 
Selkal* 6-14 54 17. Hardaway 5-13 6-4 17. 
RaOounris—SeaHto 36 (Kemp 91. OrioroSo 55 - 
(Seftaty 14). Asdsts—Seattle 26 (Payton 73. 
Ortondo 19 (Hardaway 6). 

Son Aateafe 22 14 17 17-72 

MM 15 27 24 13-79 

5A:W ma lM7692ftHraag7-1744 MMfc 
Brawn 7-1323 l&Mteftun 64302 lft AusBi 6- 
16 3415 Rebaanb—Sen Anorta «(Heron 1 3, 
MUriS (Auski 15L Asdris—5cn Aroonta 18 
umsona mart S (HndMy 10. 

Chorion* 29 26 23 30-188 

Mhnwsata 31 19 21 25- *6 

C ISce 12-1910-10 39, Mason 4-12 7-8 15.- 
M: Gamed 9-151-319, GuglMto 8-202-218. 
Martuiy 6-15 6-10 18. Itaborods Oiartane 
47 (Masai 14). MfmesalD 47 (GugBofta 15}. 
AssMs-amrlone 24 (Bogus 12 ). 
Minnesota 26 (MartHiry 9). 

Ahasfa 20 28 21 14-75 

DUroH 27 20 19 22-82 

A Loeffner 9-17 3-3 21, Smith 8-13 0-4 lfc 
Dr H» 9-19 5-7 23. Dumors 7-14 5-5 22. 
Rehmutr Mluiim 45 (Mutombo 12). 
DeW* 46 mmpe 12). Assists—AJfcmta 23 
(BJayfadcBl, Detroit 18 (HH itn. 
deleted 20 16 # 23-82 

Hew York 22 25 19 28-40 

C: PWBs 10-16 1-2 24 Peny 4-10 1-1 T* 


Brandon 3-14 8-1014N.Y^Houston 11-16 3-4 
2& Ewing 8-14 2 - 6 18. Rebounds—C. 43 (HD 
9). N.Y. 47 (Ewing 12). Asstsb-Oevetand 19 
(Sua 9). New York 31 (Oakley 4). 

Pfaaoate 22 33 22 30 12-40* 

Dados 29 33 23 12 11—188 

P: Kkfd 7-176-9 23, Johnson 5-1312-14 22 
D: Finley 9-19 4-5 24 SMctdand 7-15 0-0 16. 
Betehte Pimento 47 (WBBams to, Daflas 
48 (Groan 14). Assists—P. 22 (Johnson 1Q>, 
Dai (Rntey, Reeves, stridden* Harper 4). 
t-ACSpperc 35 28 17 19 12—107 

Denver 26 21 25 23 14—109 

L_A_- Vaught 11-16 3-4 25. Martin 4-13 5-4 
lfc D: McDyess 14-231-3 3X LOb 11-23 6- 
7 29. R eh eon rts — L o s Angeles 58 (VOvght 
15), Denver 56 (Johnson 13). Assists—l_A. 
19 (Dehero &. Denver 20 (Goltfwtre 6). 
PWadelptda 23 13 20 39- 95 

Portland 2* 14 35 34—112 

PModefcHo: Neman 11-19 30 25. 
Stockhouse 3-1110-12 lft Pmflamk Anderson 
9-14 1-1 2a Trent 9-13 2-3 2a 

tte eo n ds P ML45 tWBtans 8). Portland 54 
CSabarts 10). A gfate— P fiBodtiphta 19 
dromon 8), Portland 29 (Anderson 9). 


Bonaverture 83-59; beat Virginia Tech 81-72. 
15.Artaena (19-7) beat Washington Stole 100- 
8ft beat Washington 103-82 
tft Maytand 009) tost to No. 7 Duke 81- 
«i lost loVhglnta >1-74.17. iaetorine 02-7) 
beat North Carolina Chorion* 72-71; lost to 
Tutam 83-71. 18. VDaneva (21-8) tost to West 
Vlrgtola 83-76; beat Rutgers 84-74.19.04- 
orodo Ql-a beat WDflort 65-58; tostto No. 13 
Iowa State 65-54; beat Terns 83-60.2a Cal- 
tegen! Gbarfesten 08-2) heal Cvrienary 89- 
71; beat Southeastern Lnubtono 934% beat 
Ftorido Irtanattanol 83-73. 

21. I teals 0849 beat Penn State B74& 
beatNo.24MkMgat7D-51.22.UrtflteO(21- 
9) tad to Na 2 Minnesota 75-72. 23. SL 
Josephs (21-4) beat Massachusetts 7B4& 
beat Uj Sate 63-59.24. MfcMgmi 07-11) tost 
to Na2Mtonesota 55^54; tosltaNo.21 UUnofs 
70-51. 25. Startard 08-7) beat San Diego 
State 97 SBe beot Callfamta 73-63. 


Cotorodo 

39 

16 

8 

86 

211 

151 

Edmonton 

2V 

29 

7 

65 

203 

198 

CoKtary 

27 

31 

7 

61 

176 

189 

Anaheim 

26 

30 

8 

60 

184 

189 

VsKowrer 

28 

33 

2 

58 

201 

216 

Las Angeles 

24 

33 

8 

56 

175 

210 

Son Jom 

22 34 

SAY’S n 

7 

tm 

51 

IT* 

162 

209 


SKIING 


2-5 

1—2 


HOCKEY 


NHL Stan dings 


Top 25 CoLLsae Results 


How the lop 26 


ATLANTIC CHVBMM 


’ 1. Kansas (29-1) bear OUahama 70-68; 
beat Nebraska 85-65. 2. Mtanesoto (26-23 
beot No. 24 Mkrtgon 5554; boot No. 22 In- 
dtono 75-72. 3. Kentucky CZ7-4) beat Tet*- 
nessee 744ft ta» to No. 6 Scum Caroltoa 72- 
6ft 4. Utah (23-2) beot Rtoe 75-6ft beat 
Tesns-El Paso 68-55; beot No. 11 NewMeK- 
Iod 78-58.5. wake Forest CO-53 beat Georgia 
Tedi 71-6S lostto Florida State Si-65. 

6.SeetbCmadnaa3-4)beaiVk8iderti8t74- 
53; beat No. 3 Kentucky72-66.7. Dahe 03-73 
beat NA. 16 Maryland 81-6ft lostto Na 8 
North Caradno 91-85.8. North CaroOno 01-4) 
beat Na 12 aemson 76-69; beat Na a Duke 
91-85.9.Clnetaaa 04-6) beat Southern Mfe- 
dssfppt {&&. beat Marquette BO-74; lostto 
Memphis75-63. la UCLA (19-7) but Organ 
Hate 81-6% beat Oregon 74-47. 

11. Hew Medea 02-63 beaBrtghan young 
*>-4fc tost to Na 4 Utah 78-58.12. CM 
01-8) lost to No. 8 Norm CareOna 76-69; be* 

Ce«gtaTecti55-53.13. Iowa State (19-7) beat 

Na lACotaado65-54: tost to Oktohcma State 
47-61 14. Xavier, owe (22-6) beat St. 



w 

1. T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

PhUadeiphta 

37 

17 10 

84 

216 

164 

New Jersey 

32 

18 12 

76 

171 

146 

QiyU. 

Mom 

29 

X 15 

73 

175 

149 

N.Y. Rangere 

28 

27 9 

65 

204 

179 

Tampa Bay 

25 

X 7 

57 

172 

191 

Washington 

34 

32 7 

55 

158 

178 

N.Y. Islanders 

21 

32 10 

52 

168 

186 

NORTHEAST DIWSTON 




W 

L T 

Pts 

GP 

GA 

Buffalo 

33 

X 10 

76 

184 

156 

Pittsburgh 

31 

26 5 

67 

220 

205 

Montreal 

24 

30 11 

59 

202 

229 

■nnnwg 

24 

30 9 

57 

178 

200 

Ottawa 

21 

29 13 

55 

17B 

187 

Boston 

71 

33 9 

SI 

184 

224 

wmssNoownMNi 


CENTRAL MV»ON 




w 

L T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Dates 

38 

23 4 

80 

197 

159 

Deteoit 

31 

19 13 

75 

199 

145 

st Loots 

28 

29 8 

64 

192 

199 

CNcogo 

26 

30 9 

61 

171 

165 

Phoenfe 

28 

32 4 

60 

181 

XI 

Toronto 

24 

37 2 

50 

184 

221 

PAancavsxM 




W 

L T 

Pts 

CF 

GA 


Hartford 

1*1 Period; P-lindros 22 U-eOrtr, NM- 
moo) (pp>. 2 P-Otto 11 (Podein) 2d Period: P- 
NRnimao 4 (LeCkfc Snow) 4 H-Cossets IB 
(Sanderson. Feomers to ne) 3rd Perta* P-Le- 
Cte41,ftf*,Din«nl6(Cas5efc,Ha!ter)7.P- 
Podeln 14. (an).5tto!son geebPrt 3-10-11-34. 
H: 7-7-14—28. GedtaK P-Snow. H-Burke. 
N.Y. tsfanders 8 2 8-2 

Wastringten 8 0 0-0 

FM Period: None. Second period: New 
Yurie Mclnnh 19 (SmaHnskt Potffrt (pp). 2 
New York, Lapointe 8 (Andersson. 
Lachance) TMrt Period: Nona Shots an 
gold: New York 4-7-i— 19. W-11-11-17-39. 
Goodes: New York, Sara w-Kotztg. 

Anaheim 0 0 1 0—1 

Detroit toio-i 

Rrst Period: None. Second Period: None. 
Third Period: D-Winltby 2 (Fedorov. Brawn) 
Z A-Drury 6 (Todd Daflas) overtime None. 
Shots an goad A- 9-7-6-1-25. D- 7-18-9- 
1—35. Se ndee: A-Hebert. D-Vernon. 

Odcogo 2 1 1-4 

Phoesb 0 8 0—0 

Ptost Period: C-Zhomnov 14 (Amante) 
ISh). Z C-Sutter 6 (Wetnrich. Cummins) 
Second Period: C-A motile 34, <sh). Third 
Period: C-Sufkr 7, Shots an goal; C- 17-13- 
4—34. Phoenh 8-23-7—38. GdoOeK C- 
Hodtett. PHoenh, KhabbuBa 


tram woraetc ski awHoiww 

Rate medal tttnOiy Sunday In Die 

World Nardfe SM ChwnplonBhlpa H Trend- 

tehn. Norway: 

BOM 

sower 

brans* 

Russia 

6 

1 

3 

Norway 

4 

4 

3 

Finland 

3 

3 

2 

Japan 

2 

2 

0 

ttaty 

0 

4 

l 

Germany 

0 

1 

1 

Austria 

a 

0 

2 

France 

0 

0 

1 

Switzerland 

0 

0 

1 

Czech Republic 

0 

0 

1 



Cl 



t i 11 fw pi Real Madrid 59. Barcelona 53 
Rent Beds 5ft Deporifvo Coruna 50. AUettco 
Madrid 49, Retd Soc. 4& Athletic BAl <1 etc 


Federation Cup 


womnonoupi 
BELOntH 3, SPAM 0 

EtaCollens. Belgium, del. Mario Luisa Ser¬ 


na Spain. 6-1.6-3. Els CBOens, Nancy Febet, 
Betghim def. Gala Loon Garcia. Virginia Ru- 
ano-PasewiL Spafa 5-7,6-Z 6-Z 

ABWUmauuiPWNnvs 

SUNDAY. M PMLAOeLPHIA 
mi 

Pete Sampras (13, UJ-del. Patrick Rutter, 
Australia 5-7. 7-6 (7-4), 6-3. 


[TO! 




NORTH AMD CENTRAL AHTOCA 
AND CARIBBEAN ZOIC 
SUNDAY. AT KINGSTON. JAMAICA 
Jamaica a United Slates a 

SUNDAY. AT MEXICO CITY 

Mesla ft Canada Q 

iwi ainen Mexfco 3 points. Jamaica 1, 
Unttetf States 1. Costa RkO 0 . El Salvador a 
Canada 0. 

ASA ZONE 
GROUPS 

Sf.nAnB .1 South Korea 6 points. Thai¬ 
land a Hong Kang a 

OMUneronw 


CRICKET 


1ST TEST. 4TH DAY 
SOUTH AftflCA V& AUSTnMJA 
MONDAY, IN JOHAIMESHUBG 
South AM CD.- X2 and 99-4 
Australia: 628-8 dedored. 


4-OAY MATCH, SO DAY 

JAIUUCAVS.HOIA 
MONDAY. H KINGSTON 

Jo mo fan 453-9 
India: 271-5 


Hamburg SV 1. Hansa Restock 1 
dreiiitoipii Bayern Munich 43 points, 
Barussfa Dartnund 40, Bayer Lerorkusen 3& 
VTB StoSgon 35 PC Gotogne 3Z Kmfaniher SC 
3ft Santa 04 3a Wader Bremen 29, VfL 
Bochum 29. ArmHa Bietetetd 2ft Hamburg SV 
24, I860 Munich 2ft MSV Dubburg 23. fa¬ 
una Ouessefcfcpf a M o enehengtodboch 2a 
St. PouS 19, Hmtsa Rostock 17. FraBwrg 13. 

RAUAN FIRST DfYWOH 
Udinese Z Napoo 2 

Vfiitoim Jurertus 4ft inter 37. Pormo 
37. Sampdorta 3ft Botogne 3ft Roma 3Z Alo- 
lanto 32, Vtacnza 31. Lazio 3a NspoU 3a 
Mflan 29, Ftorenflm za UdteseSa Ptocema 
Tft Perugia 23. Cagaorl 19. Verona 17, Reg- 
gteala 

amiBCM fust division 

RealSodedodOAItilattc BltooeO 


MAJOfl LEAGUE BASmAU. 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

ANAHEIM—Agreed to terms wdti C Oirts 
Tumor an t-ycor contract. 

eosroN-Added C Tim speiir ta me 40-man 
raster. Designated OF Jose Mafave Ur ns- 
Wgnmert. Signed C Walt McKee! and OF Trol 
Nixon ta l-yeor contracts. Purchased contract 
of C Tim Spehrfram Pawtucket, |(_ 
MiUflAUKEMgroed to terms ram 3B Jett 
Orllla P Bryce Hale. P Scott Kort. P Jose 
MercedevP Al Reyes, C Jesse Levis and C 
Kelly Sltnrrett on 1-year contracts. 

Minnesota Agreed to terms with RHP 
Brad Rodkeana 

three-year contract. Signed IB Scott Sftj- 
havtok too rwa-year contract. Agreed ta terms 
want LHP Rich Robertson. RHP Frank Ro- 

xH- 00 "® SteyEn3 ' 0F J J- John- 

Walker - T ™ris MHIer. 

nV,r ??"**• RHP T “ M PJ,chle "nd INF 

Denny Hocktog on 1 -ynr contracts. 

P Chib 

P R ° h ** ***** P Donny 

tor Sus r iMmvau **‘CiMike 

jreATTtJ-^flrea 1 ta terms wtfli INF Dow 
RHP PW «enhwrnnd 

RHP Solomon Tara tor 1 rom-m fl iU Lb . 

tampa BAY—Agreed to Terms with OF 


Dwight Smith. RHP Jock Armstrong and 
LHP Kevin Morton. 

Texas A greed to terms wffli SS BenSGJf' 
on 1-year contract. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

ATLANTA -Agroed to tern s with RHP Peon 
Huitgraveson 1-year contract. Renewed axv 
trod of OF Andraw Jones. 

aNaNNATi-Agteed to tetma wttti rhp 
K evtn Jarvis on 1-year contract. 
trowTtHi—Agreed to terms wflh RHP Chits 

Hoft RHP Jose Uma LHP Ahrtn Monrom. lhp 
BO y Wagnec RHP Doane Woo, of Bob Abnu 
and OF Ray Montgomery on 1-year amfegrK 

NSW Yon k—S igned OF Con Everett, IB. 
Robert Petogbie, C Alberto CastBia INF, 
Edgardo AJfonnv INF Rey Ordonez lML .- 
Butc h Husk ey and RHP Paul WHsan on 1^ 
l«or contracts. Agreed to terms with RHP 
Josan Isrtnghausen, P Juan Acevedo on 1- 

roorcontrads. Renewed the contracts of OF 

Ala Ochoa and LHP B8I Pulsipher. 

PHiLAOELPHiA-Agreed to irons wm 
RHP Rkky Bottoftto on 1 w conhwi " 





\V 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 

Dallas— Put G Sadia Daniovtc on Mured 

ItsL 

HOUSTON-Slgned G Sedate TTireatt ter re¬ 
mainder of season. 

SEATTLE—Put F Detlef Schrempf on ht- 
luredDsL 

Vancouver—S igned C Eric Leckner far r»- 

molnderof r - - 


t- 


\ 


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
amzoma—S igned C MBce Devlin to 2-year 
contract. Slgnea TE CMs Getbwy. 

An«TA-Slgned CB Ray Buchanan to an 
offer sheet and agreed to terms with G Gene 
WBoms. Released CB Tm McKyer. 

Baltimore—T ennlncitedeofltind of S Eric 

Turner. 

OMOUNA-RMlgned CB Rod SmW, and 
WR Rngtitt) IsmoS. 

DENVEB-SlgnM S Dedridi Dodge and RB 
Anthony Lynn. Waived WR Ttodd Khichen. 

■iacicson vt LLB—Re-signed TE Derek 
Brawn to 1 -year contract. 

Minnesota—S igned LB Jeff Brady to 3- 
yew centred extension. 

n ew England—S igned QT J.R. Conrad. 

^ Torn jCTs-.TMmirwiert the contracts 

Of DT Erik Howard ond LB Rick HamBfon. 

san MEco-Agroed to terms with RB Gary 
Brown. 




















3 




INTEWVATI0IV.4L HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 


PAGE 23 


SPORTS 


SuperSonics End Streak 
Of Magic’s New Coach 


ON -_. a .. 

^ehome'toSaS; 1 ^ 1 

ornise that cL audl -W ■■ 
*: For 

tesrS?# 

uranc«thaS°ih^Un- for 

nunue to keen v* o ILe<3 
IS say thev think u 

id someiS^Sj* 

reved that the 
attempt that gr Lt 
Eton's son u4 V l S 

1 * e ^ re ?une wej f 

there u a S noS '' 

“h «*»«»■ They de. 

’v commerce and tv» 
ek as largely informal, 

-sngnesoetu-eentheivS 
: >™ U.5 ^Sfi 

• os S«tu»; secuniv and 

S" wlw ** « 

according to a State 
C|uue clear 
‘-Oject of poy. 

..it t\e understand 

' c -\ V'- Clinton and 
"'if Albright, 

or.. the“ad- 
ifi.'rrr rd -.at the United 
•o:ec; S^i: Arabta and 
Oa;: >:;y.=- from Iraqi 
ur->^:-.r:.on underlying 

• as ih_: Mr Saddam is 
; tr. !>:•■.*. er :r,denn*ieh. 
i-"t 'c •>.■?) j Saudi Ara- 

:ner.ib. states 
•.:-n ha.-: been a 
since s 
drose Iraqi 
--.e :co; Gulf 


The Associated Press 

-Thanks to Gary Payton, the Orlando 
Magic are no longer undefeated under 
Richie Adubato. 

Payton scored a season-high 32 
points Sunday as Seattle snapped the 
Magic’s six-game winning streak 109- 
JO 1."‘I step up when I ha veto step up ” 
.saidPayton, who also had seven assists 
y - four rebounds. 

.pfShawn Kemp added 17 points, and 
Hexsey Hawkins scored 16 for the Su- 
perSonics, who have won 9 of their Iasi 
10 games. 

The Magic had won their first six 
games under Adubato, who replaced 
Brian Hill on Feb. 18. “We played 


NBA Rod 


MDUf> 


iciuj. 
on ;h: 

-i. 


Lid 


lackadaisical roost of the game until the 
last six minutes,’’ Anfemee Hardaway 
of Orlando said. "But it was too late.’’ 

The Magic pulled within three points 
before Payton made a 3-pointer for a 
104-98 lead with 1:08 left. Sam Perkins, 
Hersey Hawkins and Greg Graham hit 
five free throws down the stretch to keep 
the Sonics in front 

[.Nick Anderson led Orlando with 20 
taints. 

/ Pmemn lot , Lakers as In Indianapol¬ 
is, Mark Jackson had 17 points, 15 as¬ 
sists and 10 rebounds for bus third triple- 
cfouble of the season. Reggie Miller 
added 27 points for Indiana, which won 
its third consecutive game. 

..Jwa 83, CSrisdiee 86 Bryon Russell 
scored 20 points, including three 3- 
pointers, as Utah won in Vancouver. 
Karl Malone added 18 points for the 
J?zz, ending his streak of six straight 
games with at least 30. Anthony Peeler 
led the Grizzlies with 25 points and 
eight assists. 

Host79,Spurs ?2 In Miami, San Ant¬ 
onio produced its fewest points of the 
season for the second straight game, and 
the Heat came up with their best de¬ 
fensive effort since Alonzo Mourning’s 
injury. 


Hie injury-ravaged Spurs scored 
only 73 points Friday at Orlando, 

Hometx 108, TmburwotvM 98 In 

Minneapolis. Glen Rice continued his 
torrid scoring with 39 points as Char¬ 
lotte snapped the Timber-wolves’ four- 
game winning streak. Anthony Mason 
had 15 points, 14 rebounds and 8 assists 
for the Hornets. 

Wat on* 82, Hawks 75 Grant Hill had 
23 points, 10 assists and 7 rebounds as 
Detroit won for the ninth time in 10 
games. The Pistons held visiting Atlanta 
scoreless for more than seven minutes in 
the fourth quarter to snap its three-game 
winning streak. 

Knicfc* 90, Cavaliers 82 Allan Hous¬ 
ton scored 28 points as New York, play¬ 
ing its first home game since Feb. 18, 
beat Cleveland. The Knicks. coming off 
a nine-day road nip, led by 19 midway 
through the third period but needed con¬ 
secutive baskets from Larry Johnson 
and a jumper from Houston in the clos¬ 
ing minutes to hold off the Cavs. 

Son* 109, Mavericks loa Jason Kidd 
returned to Dallas and assisted on Way- 
man Tisdale's winning layup as the 
buzzer sounded in overtime, capping a 
huge comeback by Phoenix. 

The Suns trailed by 27 points in the 
third quarter before rallying to force 
overtime. Then, with time running out. 
Kidd drove and slipped a pass to Tis¬ 
dale. who scored to give the Suns’ their 
third victory in four games. Kidd, traded 
by the Mavericks to the Suns in a six- 
player deal on Dec. 26. finished with 23 
points and seven assists. 

Nugget* 108, Clippers 107 In Denver. 
Antonio McDyess scored the winning 
basket with less than a second left for the 
Nuggets, who tied an NBA record by 
playing their third straight overtime 
game. The Nuggets, who have been in¬ 
volved in nine overtime games this sea¬ 
son, snapped a six-game losing streak. 

Itafl Blazon 112 ,7Gers 95 Gaiy Tren t 
and Kenny Anderson scored 20 points 
apiece as Portland beat Philadelphia, 
which dropped to 7-22 on the road. 



Old Kentucky Home 
Isn’t Sweet This Time 

South Carolina Downs Wildcats 
On Senior Day, a First Since ’64 


Ti*ay bnxMiCKr Fnm-fYeue 

Nick Anderson of the Magic, left, fouling SuperSonics guard Gary Payton. 


.0. '••V: 
ri A 
-'.mere 
-« c.-u-.- 


Forget the Series: Braves Prefer the Positive Spin 


By Murray Chass 

New York Times Service 


- -J s .: ”t Cinwa ad- 

•• ' ‘o' jJ contain- 

r. '.:±c ^rid Ira 

u-jr •‘'vtr.::’. political 

>. f 

-l! -..jailed tha: 

?. b\ ±e 

^tinbu Ab- 
■ v- ... i - 'T'vrr:i!i cc- 

.• '.c'l r.- ■ £ *-.•* jn to 

: .j •i.r.e?- — 

r.- :r. _.e e’.ent 

'.’a.t < :n Bash- 

v,.."." ,. •> v ^heifc- 
- .:i> scic- 

r .«... .vc:T:.:-l*ai4 

L-..v. SaddLT. 

:c:-- Whatdo'** 1 

", «- _-.d p'i2nr.»ni 

i.i ... jr 

'.y ; 

' ^ _-j} 

wii: “co.1- 

J •_. 

"j- _ _ .'."n’.ri du* 

? ’j. "V ,-urb Lis 

r ’ -‘’■Vr-otL-i'i 

V77'7 v Jo bj 

. . .. friendl> 
; ~7'i V K. 1 ; 

’ ‘‘V 

■*- .-ttheihfi 

•;VW :ni: coe.‘ 

•.... --jnciTh 
r 'Vj suaf 

- ~ r.">; Hreoi ; 

«r;V‘-So-‘ 

Mi:- -, v ;ip3aCj 

ji.’.v- - - • • TfeJ 

.ii-.-d : ‘ ■■’iV-'Sabii’ 


W EST PALM BEACH. Florida 
—The Atlanta Braves did not 
like losing three of die last five 
World Series. But what they dislike even 
more are the comments they bear about 
themselves because of their failures. 

' “Fools in capital letters" is what 
General Manager John Schuerholz calls 
the.pnripswho pot the Braves down for 
vjMuaing d» World Series only once iiT 
four attempts. 

Manager Bobby Cox speaks with dis¬ 
dain for those misguided observers. 
Those people disgust him and Schuer- 
bolz. 

, “There have been teams that go to the 
World Series, and the next year finish 
Last," Cox said. “We’ve been there four 
out of the last five. This team has been 
great, and they should walk around like 
winners. But all you get is negative 
s'yE F. It’s.almost better to finish third. 
Tlien everyone thinks you're a genius. 
But you can’t take anything away from 
what this team- has done. Who else has 
done that?” 

! Division championships? The closest 
any team has recently come to the 
Braves’ five in five seasons is the 
Toronto Blue Jays, with five champi¬ 


onships in the last 11 nonstrike seasons. 
In the National League, die closest team 
is the Los Angeles Dodgers, with five 
championships in the last 15 seasons. 
Eight American League teams and nine 
National League teams have never even 
won five championships. 

World Series appearances? While the 
Braves have made four in the last five 
World Series, the Yankees and the 
Dodgers have made four in the last 19. 
Oakland four in, die last 22, Cincinnati 
four in the last 24, Baltimore four in the 
last 26 and St Louis four in the last 28. 

’ ‘I can’t deny the fact we’ve won only 
one of four World Series,” said Schuer- 
faolz, the architect of the Braves* cham¬ 
pionship teams. “It's disappointing for 
us. But m my view, it's inappropriate for 
people to use that as the only viable 
criteria for measuring an organization's 
success. 

“That's a veiy narrow, almost laser- 
like narrow, focus of measurement. 
Isn’t that sort of perverse? 'Geez, these 
people have lost all those World Series.' 
You had to get there to lose.” 

Now the Braves know bow the Buf¬ 
falo Bills felt in enduring the abuse that 
splattered them when they played in, 
and lost, four successive Super Bowls. 

Cox said he urges his players to ig¬ 
nore similar comments and to think no 


less of themselves just because they 
have been a .250 World Series team. 

"I preach that a lot." Cox said. “I 
said; ‘That's the natural question for the 
media to ask. Don't blame them because 
that’s their job. You’ve got to respect It. 
But they're going to magnify eveiything 
you’ve done. You’re going to feel like 
dirt. Don’t let that happen. You walk 
around with your heads high. We know 
what we’ve done.' “ 

T he Braves have a head start on 
everyone else because of their 
starting pitchers. The collection of 
Cy Young Awards epitomizes the team's 
riches. But that is an obvious advantage 
that’s out in the open for everyone to see. 
The managerial talent of Cox is not so 
readily apparent to many people, or ap¬ 
preciated. Yet, an executive of another 
club, who has scrutinized Cox's tenure 
with (he Braves, has proclaimed him the 
best manager in baseball. 

Cox played down his role, saying he 
is not sure what he does to keep the 
Braves coming back for more. “I talk 
about winning,” he said. “We talk 
about goals. In ’91,1 said we've got to 
set some goals we can meet. Some play¬ 
ers told me,‘Your goals are too high.’ I 
said we don't have these uniforms on to 
have a goal of finishing fifth or fourth or 


third, saying that’s a great year.” 

When the players arrived in camp 
earlier this month. Cox said, he de¬ 
livered much the same message that he 
gave them a year ago. 

“There's a word, complacency, that 
everybody’s going to use all spring,” 
the 55-year-old manager said he told the 
players. “You may as well get used to it. 
We’re not going to let it happen. 

“But it’s out of your mind the rest of 
tiie spring and the rest of the season 
because short-term happiness and vic- 
tory doesn't last. We did everything 
right last year. We had a great year. We 
lost a tough series and it's over. Get it 
out of your heads and let's go.” 

Schuerholz is another integral in¬ 
gredient in the Braves' perennial suc¬ 
cess. The team has reeled off its cham¬ 
pionships during his six-year tenure as 
genera] manager and also compiled a 
won-lost record (550-356. .607) that is 
63 victories better than the next best 
(Chicago White Sox 487-418, .538). 

His task this spring is to try to trade 
one of three high-priced players — tire 
outfielders David Justice or Marquis 
Grissom or the first baseman Fred Mc- 
Griff — to pare the puffed-up payroll 
and create a spot for one of the team's 
good young outfielders, Jermaine Dye 
and Andrew Jones. 


Compiled by Our SL&Fwm Dapaahrs 

Kenrucky uses its last home game of 
each season for Senior Day. This year, it 
was saluting players who had helped 
win the national championship last 
year. 

No. 3 Kentucky had not lost one of 
these games since 1964. It was the 
reigning Southeastern Conference 
champion. It had not lost to the same 

ColLBSC BASKITIALl 

team twice in the same season since 
Rick Pitino became coach eight seasons 
ago. It had won seven straight games 
and 27 straight home games. 

Kentucky’s last defeai had been in 
overtime at South Carolina. Victory on 
Sunday over South Carolina would give 
the Wildcats revenge and a share of this 
year’s conference title and a No. 1 seed¬ 
ing in the SEC tournament. A capacity 
crowd of 24.000 gathered at Rupp 
Arena to celebrate. 

Instead, the Gamecocks won, 72-66. 

No. 6 South Carolina improved to 23- 
6 over all and to 15-1 in the SEC. 
Kentucky slipped to 27-4 and 13-3. 

South Carolina's vaunted three- 
guard offense penetrated the Kentucky 
defense and then shot or dished the ball. 
On defense, South Carolina packed in¬ 
side and invited Kentucky’s nonshoot¬ 
ers to shoot from outside. 

It worked to perfection. Kentucky 
missed 27 shots in the fust half, four 
more than the total number of shots that 
South Carolina took. That pattern held 
through the end of the game: 48 missed 
shots for Kentucky, compared with 40 
total shots taken by South Carolina. 

“We knew who the shooters were 
and who they weren’t, so I guess you 
could say we were baiting them,” said 
William Gilliam, a Gamecock forward. 
“They got good looks. They weren’t 
going in. And if you’re a shooter, and 
somebody is challenging you to shoot, 
you keep shooting. And they did. And 
they still didn’t go in.” 

Only one Kentucky player, Ron Mer¬ 
cer. reached double figures (25 points). 
Kentucky took 29 three-point shots and 
made 10, while South Carolina fired 
only 10 and made five. 

The Gamecocks' three dynamic 
guards—B. J. McKie (22 points). Larry 
Davis (20) and Melvin Watson (9) — 
kept slashing toward the basket, slip¬ 
ping the ball to the big men for big 
finishes or driving toward a shot them- 
selves. That is why South Carolina had 
44 free throws — of which it hit 33 — 
while Kentucky reached the free-throw 
line only 15 times, malting 10 of those 
attempts. 

Pitino wasn't around for the end of 
the South Carolina game. He was ejec¬ 
ted with .04 seconds left for arguing a 
noncall on an inbounds play. 

No. 1 Kansas 05, Nebraska 65 Raef 
LaFrentz scored 23 points to lead the 
Jay hawks (29-1,15-1 Big 12), whogave 
Roy Williams his 242d career victory, 
the most ever by a coach in his first nine 
years in Division I. Tyronn Lue had 18 
points for the visiting Cornhuskers (16- 
13.7-9). 

No. 9 North Carolina 91, No. 7 Duke 85 

Antawn Jamison had 33 points and 11 
rebounds to lead the visiting Tar Heels 
(21-6,11-5) to their eighth straight At¬ 


lantic Coast Conference victory after an 
0-3 league start. 

The Blue Devils (23-7. 12-4) had 
already clinched their 12th regular-sea¬ 
son ACC title. Steve Wojciechowski 
scored 18 points to lead Duke. 

No. 14 Xavier 01, Virginia TAch 72 

Lenny Brown scored 20 points to lead 
the Musketeers (22-4.13-3 Atlantic 10) 
as they won their sixth straight and 
ruined the final home game of Bill 
Foster’s 30-year coaching career. Troy 
Manns scored 30 points for the HOkies 
(14-15.7-9). 

No-15 Arizona 103, Washington 82 At 

Tucson, Michael Dickerson scored 27 
points and the Wildcats (19-7.11 -5 Pac- 
10) avoided losing three straight to the 
Huskies (16-9,9-7). 

Virginia 81, No. 16 Maryland 74 In 

Charlottesville. Virginia, Harold Deane 
scored 18 points and the Cavaliers (18- 
11,7-9) rallied from a 10-point deficit in 
tiie second half to get the victory they 
badly needed after losing six of seven. 
Laron Profit matched his career high 
with 24 points for the Terrapins (20-9, 

9- 7), who have lost 7 of 10. 

No. 21 Illinois 70, No. 24 Michigan 51 

At Champaign. Illinois. Kiwane Garris 
scored 29 points, and the mini (20-8, 

10- 6 Big Ten) overcame a 12-point 
second-half deficit. 

Brandun Hughes scored 17 points for 
the Wolverines (17-11,7-9). who have 
lost five straight and six of seven. 
ItaMiesoee-Chattaiiooga 71, Marshall 

70 In Greensboro, North Carolina. Chris 
Mims scored with three seconds left in 
overtime to give the Mocs (22-10) tfaeir 
fourth Southern Conference title in five 
years and their eighth NCAA tourna¬ 
ment bid. 

Mims, who seat the game into over¬ 
time with a layup with 14 seconds left in 
regulation, finished with 16 points and 
10 rebounds. 

Keith Veney scored 27 points for the 
Thundering Herd (20-9), who have not 
been to the NCAA tournament since 
1987. (AP.NYn 



Ed Rtiflfcemr Anoctaled Pto* 

Melvin Watson of South Carolina 
during Gamecocks’ 72-66 victory. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



PEANUTS 

/'this IS THE FIRST^nI 

! MATCH ..SNOOfVS 

PLAYJNfiWaW; 

dOOBlE.. 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


WHAT'S 

601N6 

ON? 



9 


. UJHOSe SERVE IS IT? I CAN T 
SERVE IN THE 5UN J I'LL RECEIVE! 
THE NET LOOKS TOO HIGH! MY 
JOIEE HURTS!MV EARS HURT! 

IX 


3-* 




1 THINK 
I’LL KICK 
HER..0065 
ARE ALLOWED 
TO KICK 
PEOPLE- 


& 


j 


ijl 

SpC 

• „ ° ° ° 

\ © / & * 

' V/ftr* •. • . 

WANNA CML THW A SWGrlE, 
v-yjSt SNETW& UP? J __ 

m 'xry , • • . 

o'. ' 1 ° 1 m 

a • • 1 n 0 

3-9 


wnnwciausiii itSBBPl 


GARFIELD 


WIZARD of ID 




TMTSCMIBBIWII* 


Uwaort* Santa smum. 

eu ka» b Men ifn is km 

hrMwfMfc 


•' .. i! * 


HILTE 

in 


- 

I^naigg 

L_, 


. : -:L ’HX 

an 


FROGLE 

mu 


ESM3 





fKOM KOPHEY 
AT THe PROMT. 



9VNWHPBP 
&Y THe etfetfr... 
fAcecefmin 

amnjwmtwn ,/ 


V 





BEETLE BAILEY 


NON SEQUITUR 


DOONESBURY 


WHW THE PLOT 
CALL® APUNE 
ftJLL OF TBN- 
AfiESttLS. 




* tthth * CLLLXD 

(MHMSMBHMJ 

- ■ 1 .^4- kitty doubt w«xe DW*» 

Uan- line DUST 


AStS&.AS(OQt!ES 


jDUKny wjoTauu — 

Td:+33 (0) 1414394% 
Faxr+33 (0)14143 93W 

or your nearest IHT office 

v an 






BLONDflE 



HgS CLEANING 
ms nSHINS 
0 00 AND 
P0USHJNS 
Ht& eCWUHS 
BALL 


Mj 








mo *0« ttfcr/ M Wrtnn Imp 


UH~VBAH.1HSRE£ AfMfrr 

AUJra=p&95uRB 

ONOSWBO.XHOPS 

MMtL0OA8LeTDEO 

SQMBTfms/Bourrr. 




x 


tr 

BU1YE 
? 1997 
UJE9 


y 

Is 


:r 

e 

e 

e 

e 

d 

d 

5 

1 


5 


i 


> 


i 


lull, 

in of 

Vran- 
y of 
?ung 
rmly 

es in 

n.A 

oud. 

>ody 

race 

•eric 


I his 
aint 
ap¬ 
ing 
his 


ape 

en- 

the 

3th 


ost 


o. 

>lo 

an 

or 

re 

-x- 


iy 

>- 

y 

y 

e 

e 

\ 











PAGE 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 4,1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Package Deals 


Buchwald 


W ashington — Let 

me make this dear — I 
am not concerned about the 
big givers having coffee with 
die president, or sleeping on a 
couch in the East Room, or 
jogging with 
him on the 
Mall, or play¬ 
ing golf with 
Mr. Clinton at 
a country club. 

That's what 
running a great 
country is all 
about. 

My big fear 
is that these people might also 
be running the government 
— or worse still, think they 
are. 


2 got the willies when I ran 
into Bubba Warbucks in front 
of the While House. 

"I can't talk to you now,” 
he said. “Air Force One is 
taking me to Colorado so that 
I can check out our air defense 
nuclear capability." 

"I didn't realize that you 
knew anything about nuclear 
capability.’* 

“I don't. It came with the 
package. For $250,000 1 
got two seats to a state din¬ 
ner with Yasser Arafat, cof¬ 
fee the next morning with 
the president, an opportun¬ 
ity to mark up his budgeL 
bill, and an appointment 
with the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff.” 

"That sounds like a bar¬ 
gain. You’re looking really 
good." 


“I slept in the Lincoln Bed¬ 
room. 1 thought 1 would be 
nervous but 1 was only woken 
up twice — once to send the 
Sixth Fleet to North Korea, 
and another call from A1 Gore 
asking me if I wanted him to 
attend Deng's funeral in 
Beijing." 


"That's a pretty good deal 
for $250,000.” 

"The Lincoln Bedroom 
snooze cost me an additional 
$100,000 but it included four 
seals on the players' bench to 
the Army-Navy game." 

"Did you ever think that 
you, Bubba, a manufacturer 
of zippers for jeans, would be 
so close to the seat of 
power?” 


"The president desperately 
needs input from peo¬ 
ple like me who put their 
money where their mouth is. 
He was so impressed when 
I told him what to do about 
Medicare that he gave me a 
pair of cuff links and a tie 
pin.” 

"Did you have to donate 
any money to the DNC for 
those?” 

"What a suggestion! 
White House cuff links are 
not for sale.” 

"Are you planning on 
selling your zipper factory and 
moving to Washington?” 

“No, I'm going to stay in 
Freeport and only fly in on a 
B-29 when the president 
wants to have coffee with 


"When do you think that 
might happen?” 

"When he needs to know 
how to handle the crisis in 
Mexico. I rent a house in 
Acapulco.” 

I said, "The American 
people are blessed to have 
someone with your expertise 
running their country. You 
are so much better informed 
than anyone from Indone¬ 
sia." 

Warbucks started to sing, 
"This land is your land, this 
land is my land_" provid¬ 

ing the Democrats have 
enough soft money to win 
California. 


‘Skywalker’ Hamill: Fed Up With the Force 


By Sharon Waxraan 

Washington Past Service 

L OS ANGELES — 

Since making the 
“Star Wars” trilogy, 

Mark Hamill seems to 
have done everything 
possible to distance 
himself from the phe¬ 
nomenal notoriety that 
came with the role of 
Luke Skywalker. Is he 
stupid or just stubborn? 

The actor first left Hol¬ 
lywood for Broadway, 
then landed some small 
television appearances, 
made a number of un¬ 
successful films and fi¬ 
nally starred in CD- 
ROM action games and 
did voice-overs for an¬ 
imated cartoons. 

"To me it made 
sense,” says Hamill, 
who insists he is proud 
of his career. "I had a 
part that made such an 
impression on people 
that I felt I had to break 
that impression.'’ 

It worked. Within a 

few years of making Mark (Luke Ski 
"Return of the Jedi” in 
1983, Hamill was considered a second-tier 
actor and eventually disappeared from Hol¬ 
lywood. In the meantime, Harrison Ford 
used the wry appeal of his Han Solo character 
to become rate of the movie industry’s most 
bankable stars, and Carrie Fisher—featured 
as Princess Leia — built a successful career 
as an author and screenwriter. 



CttJi Omurv f** 


Mark (Luke Skywalker) Hamill, here with Carrie (Princess Leia) Fisher, is once again sought after for interviews. 


kids glow with happi¬ 
ness to the point where 
you don’t quite under¬ 
stand what it is they like 
so much.” 

Hamill takes care to 
mention his Broadway 
roles, perhaps because 
he resents being de¬ 
scribed as having done 
nothing since the tri¬ 
logy. He starred in ‘ ‘The 
Elephant Man” and 
* 1 Amadeus ’ ’ in between 
the "Star Wars” films. 
He was nominated for sj* 
Drama Desk Award for' 
his role in the musical 
"Harrigan *n Hart." 

"I come up on the 
short end of die stick be¬ 
cause I haven *t achieved 
what Harrison’s a- 
chieved. But not even 
getting credit for the 
stuff you did do, that 
surprised me. 1 take the 
theater scene serious¬ 
ly,” he says. A car ac¬ 
cident in 1977 required 
reconstructive surgery 
on his face, but Hamill 
does not characterize 
this as a crippling 
obstacle. 


week. "The crowds have continued 
throughout the week.... Our managers tell 
us that people are leaving smiling and com¬ 
ing back to see it again.” ' 

Because of the popularity of “Empire,” 


i train t himself 


man for the movie but to reacquaint himself Still, the truth was that HanuU tad a tard 
■with the public," says Stan Rosenfield, a time making it back m Hollywood after Har-j 
publicist rigan ’n Han’ closed m 1986. He had been our- 

But almost as if he were intent on sab- of die loop for too long. Eventually he tur^i 
otasine his own chances. H amill still to voice-over acting in cartoons and 


publicist 

But almost as if he were intent on sab¬ 
otaging Ids own chances. Hamill still 


20th Century Fox has derided to delay by a chooses to play down the "Star Wars' ’ roles. 


week the o\ 
the third ol 


Now the 44-year-old actor finds himself leased in the United States March 14. 


ening of “Return of the Jedi,” 
the trilogy. It will now be re¬ 
united States March 14. 


starring;, again, in the No. 1 movie at the box 
office in die United States, for more than a 
month. There be is, 12 feet tall, in theaters all 


For Hamill, the "Star Wars” reissue has 
been a rare chance to be seen by the public 
after nearly two decades of obscurity. He 


over the country. The second installment of will earn royalties from the theatrical siiow- 


the George Lucas series, * 'The Empire Strikes 
Back.” is proving nearly as successful as the 


mgs, which be did not get from the video or 
television releases. For the first time in years. 


rerelease of the first, setting a record for a he is besieged with requests for interviews. 


February opening when u took in $22.3 mil¬ 
lion in its fust weekend: it grossed $12.6 this 
weekend. 

"People are loving it as much and better 
than the first.'' Howard Lichtman, executive 


ting when it took in $22.3 mil- 
weekend: it grossed $12.6 this 


via his newly hired publicist (he has no 
agent). A carefully worded biography notes 
his "unique desire to experience the totality 
of the entertainment industry ... in film, 
television, theater, animation, CD-ROM and 


vice president for marketing at Cineplex graphics." 

Odeon theaters, a major exhibitor, said last "He wants to use this not to be a spokes - 


"It's not something I live with every day of 
my life, ft's not unusual for me to not think of 
it, speak of it — my house is not a shrine to 
any project I’ve done," be says in a rapid- 
fire riff. "I had not seen the movie since it 
was in the theater.” 

He adds, “I don't even think ‘Star Wars’ 
is the besr acting chops I've done. It's like 
'The Wizard of Qz.’ Who wants to play the 
innocent?” 

He goes on. “ ‘Star Wars’ comes along 
like one of those giant ice-walkers and dev¬ 
astates everything in its path. Not in a neg¬ 
ative way. The astonishing thing is how 
happy it makes so many people. I'm re¬ 
minded of those detractors who don't like 
anything the masses love.. .. But it makes 


to voice-over acting m cartoons jhu 

ROMs. Two of his “Wing Commander’ * CD- 
ROMs grossed more than $100 million, of¬ 
fering financial stability for his wife, MariJou, 
and their three preteen and Teenage children. 

Now Hamill is focused on his latest pro¬ 
ject, a five-issue comic book he wrote about 
a costumed vigilante named Black Pearl, 
which be is turning into a screenplay. He 
hopes to find an independent studio to fi¬ 
nance die film, a sort of dark comedy, which 
he would like to direct. 

"What I’d like to do is get a totally fresh 
start," he says. "In a way, you can get 
complacent and lazy. To tell the truth, i could 
go on being a voice actor for the rest of my 
career. But I want to follow through on 
‘Black Pearl.’ all the way. to the lights going 
down in the theater." 


PEOPLE 


j<M DeMana/Thr AnocuaH hw 

Mayor Giuliani, right singing with Julie Andrews at a black-tie dinner in New York. 


XTEW YORK Mayor Rudolph Gi- 
XN uliani, who enjoys his role as a 
tough politician, stunned friends and 
foes alike as he gamboled before 2,000 
people at a black-tie affair dressed as a 
woman. Giuliani swept onstage in a 
huge, blond, bouffant wig and a bos¬ 
omy gown for the finale of the “Inner 
Circle” dinner, a $40Q-a-plate event 
where New York journalists satirize 
city, state and national politics. He 
performed a startling reprise of Mar¬ 
ilyn Monroe’s breathless serenade to 
John F. Kennedy, "Happy birthday. 
Mr. President.” After a monologue 
zapping city hall reporters, he sang 
with Julie Andrews, star of the 
Broadway musical “Victor/Victor¬ 
ia,' ’ about a woman masquerading as 
a gay female impersonator. 


A day after suffering a seizure, 
Elizabeth Taylor was in good con¬ 
dition recovering from brain surgery 
she underwent last month to remove a 
tumor. "Everything is perfectly nor¬ 
mal." said a spokesman for Cedars- 


Sinai Medical Center. "She seems to 
be fine. She's very alert and her spirits 
are good, and she's not had a repeat of 
whatever it was.” Taylor had the 
seizure at her Bel-Air home nine days 
after surgeons removed a benign, 
golfbali-sized tumor from her brain. 


The slain singer Selena was 
honored with three Tejano Music 
Awards, including one for best song, 
"Siempre Hace Frio.'* for Tejano 
crossover "No Quiero Saber,” and 
for female vocalist of the year. Thir- 
teen-year-old Jennifer Pena was 
named as female entertainer of the 
year. Selena’s father manages Pena’s 
career. The awards ceremony was 
held in San Antonio, Texas. Selena 
was killed almost two years ago by the 
head of her fan club. * 


Visitors to an upcoming exhibition 
of the late Queen Victoria's dresses 
will see more than the black gowns 
that earned her the nickname "the 


Widow of Windsor.” The display 
opening in May ar the Museum of 
London will feature her wedding 
dress along with a pink and silver 
dress, baby shoes, coronation robes, 
caps, bonnets and dressing gowns. 


CBS has landed the television 
movie ri|bts to "The Celestine 
Prophecy’' after promising to include 
the spiritual message of the best¬ 
selling novel in its adventurous plot 
The author, James Redfield,had re¬ 
jected more than two dozen offers 
because he thought the film wouldn’t 
properly handle the spiritual aspect, 
his agen t said. CBS plans to air a four- 
hour miniseries over two nights in 
May 1998', with Redfield as executive 
producer. 


A Burkina Faso filmmaker has won 
the top award at the Pan-African Film 
Festival of Ouagadougou for his film 
about an orphan and his struggle for 
acceptance into his uncle’s family. 


The prize was awarded to G3Ston 
Kabore for his film "Budd Yam” 
during the festival's dosing ceremon¬ 
ies. Eighteen feature films were com¬ 
peting in the festival; which began 28 
years ago and takes place every two 
years. 


Placido Domingo, Luciano Pav¬ 
arotti and Jose Carreras found them¬ 
selves at the center of a storm over the 
quality of the sound they produced at a 
Melbourne conceit. Critics panned a' 
concert given by the three tenors at 
Melbourne Cricket Ground before an . 
audience of52,000, who paid between 
$100 and $1350 a seat. The trouble 
was not so much the volume but the 
sound and visual mix of the concert. 
Critics also disliked the pop reper¬ 
toire. The problem was blamed on- 
sound bouncing back, principaJJv 
from the southern stands far from tm 
massive neo-Greek stage, which 
caused many in the audience to see fee 
singers mouth the words on screens 
well before hearing them. 


I®** 

0 ’ v - 


.-rr.-W' 








fax:;. A 


' M 


•SSsSllI: 


nil mm 

►Vi-n s • ■ .v-V; 

.. ys&d&j" 1 **' '■■■■'■ 

r , , ; ^ 

% :*■. , ^ ££'• . trk' * 

^:.,vXS:J: >■ -- • • Wr.. 

* x :r;.;; 

wtf' O "• 


. V/, 


- ^ 






iB'Sfiasi 




•t 


'% • 




g 1 - ■ fi -iSs 

?-. s v . ■■■■■■■• 

%y ‘ 


f.; 

V SUfSf S 


■: & 


stays mainly in the plain. 


Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 


makes calling home and to other countries really easy: 
Just dial the AT&-T Access Number for the country 


you re calling from and we'll take it from there. And 


be sun? to charge your calls on your AT&T Calling 
Canl. It 11 help you avoid outrageous phone charges 
on your hotel bill and save you up to 60 %? low rales 


and the fastest, clearest connections home 24 houre 


a day Rain or shine. That's AT&T Direct 0 Service. 


Please check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


Steps to foflow for easy caTHng worldwide 
1. Jufl dial the AT&T Access Number lor the country you 
are calling from. 

L Dial the phone number you're railing, 

3- Dial the calling card number listed above- your name. 


836 800 6380 Tit* 
TWff* ' 




Austria* 1 ? .. 
BelBium*. . . 

Case!) Republic* 
France . . 

Germany . 

Greece*. 

Ireland 

Italy*... . 

Netherlands* . 

Rnssla*A(Mostaw)» 


-- - hot MM-nn tmwimi 020-795-611 

" ' SWitzariand* . 0800-S9-0011 

.. 0-800-1WI-10 United Kingdom« OStHI-OG-WII 

nbllCA . 08-42-000-101 _ _ BB00-99-0011 

... . 0-800-99-OOT1 _ __ _ MIDDLE EAST — 

.8130-0018 E«pt«lC*lnil* ••• 510-0280 

. 80-800-1311 Israel 177-100-2727 

. 1-880-550-008 Saudi Ar abia <• . 1-800-18 

TR-Ittl AFRICA 

la* . 0000-022-0111 Ghana 

(Moscow)* . . ..755-5042 Kenya* . O-SOG-IO 

. 9«MS4<»-11 SoidhAlrtca 0-MHMJ9-0123 

Coni find the AT&T Acass Ntunbcr fur the oruniiy you're callinc from? Jim jak any upt-nuor for 
AT&T Direct" Service, or visJi cur Weh site st hiip^irwwjMr.cam/inivcfcr 


AT&T 


> ^ . ^m ^na»tOTCM«nawy w|rig ^ i ^ i.rpii«Krl nttMrW Modern »t 

m£e0Cakar*w*M*CFkn>><fSrd^Bii4<w<-*{An> .SdWlWWsi WMmseUA li.4.UB|U*TOi 


>T lLYirll"I'MwIl' -.roiltJl.(.1 Jfqftm „ ... . _