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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1997, France, English"

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VI ■ 




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Politics Over All at the Clinton White House 

A Push for Brand-New Democrats? Vice President Goes on the Defensive 




By William Branigin 

Washington Piisi Sen ire 

J!f^ S ^ GT P N . 9® c ^ s °f a program to streamline the process of 
* «L25 acn ^ b,p 10 “"^granis came under heavy White House 
ES^r^'EST-" 1 P its woric and wound up naturalizing 180.000 people 
^nunal background checks, according to Send 
documents and people familiar with the program. 

p3 £; a £ usi ? by tbe w hite House to produce at least 1 million new 
citizens n time for last year's elections, the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service also naturalized thousands of other immigrants who received 
criminal background checks but whose eligibility for citizenship is now 
bemg questioned because of felony arrests on their records. 

The immigration service's program is coming under renewed con- 
gressional scrutiny, including two House hearings this week, following the 
disclosure Feb. 24. that a government audit had found severe problems with 
the citizenship process. 

The failings of the program, called Citizenship USA, have triggered one 
of the most damning indictments ever leveled at the immigration service: 
that it has cheapened U.S. citizenship. 

Internal reports on Citizenship USA and interviews with officials on both 
sides of the dispute indicate that the White House — prodded by Democratic 
activists and Hispanic groups — became deeply involved in trying to accelerate 
the program- Spearheading the effort was the office of National Performance 
Review, directed by Vice President AI Gore, which is charged with “re- 

See RUSH, Page 3 


By Dan Balz 

Washington PflM Service 

WASHINGTON — Vice President Al Gore has discovered that it is easier 
to play the part of loyal understudy to President Bill Clinton than to face an 
unpleasant spotlight, now that his role in raising millions of dollars in political 
contributions is being called into question. 

At a White House news conference Monday, Mr. Gore was on the defensive 
over a report in The Washington Post that described him as the “solicitor in 
chief’ for the Democratic National Committee in 1996. Admitting he made 
telephone calls to campaign contributors from his office in the West Wing of 
— i the White House, the vice president offered 

NEWS ANALYSIS a shaky defense at best. He ducked direct 

questions about the propriety of using a 

federal building for such purposes, and his overall message may have sounded 
contradictory to the average person watching on television: I'm proud of what 
I did and I won’t do it anymore. 

Mr. Gore Jong has been called the Boy Scout of the Clinton administration, 
a politician of such integrity and personal probity that even Mr. Clinton has 
jokingly complained about the vice president's glowing press. 

So it was unexpected that Mr. Gore would find himself on the griddle over 
the controversy about how the Democrats raised their money. 

Given his reputation, this was hardly the subject a man with his eye on 
winning the White House in 2000 would have chosen for his first nationally 
televised news conference of his and Mr. Clinton's second term. 



Guy CmcnM/Xctiien 


See GORE, Page 3 


Al Gore pausing as he pondered a question 
about his fund-raising for the 1996 campaign. 


Anti-Nuclear Protesters Confront Riot Police in Germany 



South Begins to Weigh 
The Cost of One Korea 

Some Say High Times Will Dissolve in 6 Chaos 5 


Udotani Knuu/Rcmcn 


Policemen surrounding protesters in Dannenberg, Germany, on Tuesday after demonstrators threw i 
stones and gasoline bombs in an attempt to block a road that could be used for the last leg of a convoy i 
carrying reprocessed waste from nuclear reactors. Germany deployed 30,000 police to guard the route. 

- — _ — - - — — — — ______ — — — - - - ■ ■ ■ - - — - i 

China Export Boom Also Benefits U.S. 

30-Fold Growth in 20 Years Adds to Sales for American Companies 


By Seth Faison 

New York Times Sen-ice 

SUZHOU. China — On whai was a 
cow patch not long ago, young women 
in white gloves and jackets snap to- 
gether pieces of plastic with a pop that 
announces the completion of a computer 
“mouse." a tiny symbol of China s 
growing strength as an exporter. 

About 40 percent of these devices are 
exported to the United States, including 
four of every five computer mice sold 
with Apple computers. 

The women at this factory, run by a 
Taiwan subsidiary of Swiss-based Lo- 
gitech International, cam an average of 
only $75 a month, but that is still more 
than they made on the farm. Logitech s 
business, by combining local labor with 
imported parts and management, is 
growing fast: Exports zoomed to 51w 
million in 1996 from $500,000 in 1 994, 

the year the factory opened. 

All along China' s coast, and inland as 
well, thousands of companies are churn- 
ing out simple electronics such as the 
computer parts produced for Logitech, 
attracted bv this kind of cheap, reliable 
labor. These goods, along with the foot- 
wear and toys in which China dominates 
global production, are fueling a surge in 
exports that has brought untold eco- 
nomic benefits and personal freedoms 
to ordinary Chinese citizens, even « 
many are still poor and the government 

remains authoritarian. 

China’s total exports inched 5151 
billion in 1996. represent s 3(MoId 
increase in 20 year*- 
months last year. U.S. trade 
show, China surpassed Japan as the 
nation with the greatest trade urp 
with the United States. 

To anxious Americans, it may ^seem 

ominously /ami) if- 

where China is again a front-burner con 

| Newsstand Prices --- 

j Andorra .1 — 10.00 FF Monjeco.--^^ 

! Antilles....;.... .12.50 FF Qatar tO-OOP®* 

j Cameroon ..1.600 CFA Morion " 

! Egypt EE 5.50 gaud Arabe..-10.00R. 

, Fianra..,. ‘ 3.00 FF ggpggal 1. 100 CFA 


cera after the death Feb. 19 of Deng 
Xiaoping, 92, the country’s senior leader, 
the question is being heard over and over. 
Is China becoming the next Japan, threat- 
ening American manufacturing jobs? 

The tempting answer, often heard in 
Congress, is that America's trade prob- 

Beijing describes United States as 
‘democracy for the rich." Page 4. 

letns with Beijing in 1997 look much 
like its problems with Tokyo in 1976. 

U.S. trade officials have contributed 
to such thinking by contending that 
China's economy operates with a host 
of protectionist trade barriers and by 
calculating that the U.S. trade deficit 
with China has more than tripled in five 
years — from $12.7 billion in 1991 to 


$39.5 billion last year. Only Japan’s 
surplus with the United States — $47.6 
billion — was larger last year. 

Yet the differences with Japan are 
profound. Even the true sue of China’s 
trade imbalance with the United States 
is debatable. 

Chinese officials count it at $10 bil- 
lion. and independent economists place 
the truth somewhere between the Amer- 
ican and Chinese figures because each 
side fiddles with the way it counts goods 
that pass through Hong Kong. 

Whatever trade statistics are used, 
they offer an incomplete picture of 
China’s overall economy and its com- 
merce with the rest of the world. China 's 
emergence as an export powerhouse is 
as much a measure of broad economic 

See CHINA, Page 6 


By Mary Jordan 

Washington Post Sen-ice 

SEOUL — With Beethoven’s Fourth 
Symphony playing in the background. 
Chon Jin Sook sat with her friends in the 
Terazzo Cafe in Seoul’s ritziest shop- 
ping district and admitted that one of the 
last things she ever wants to see is a 
unified Korea. 

The 50-year-old flutist, who wore red 
Ferragamo shoes and a rock-sized dia- 
mond on her middle finger, fretted about 
the chaos and cost of uniting her pros- 
perous nation with North Korea, one of 
die world’s most impoverished, 

“Things are very good here." she 
said. “I don’t want chaos. I like the way 
things are now." 

Reunification of the Korean Penin- 
sula. cleaved by ideology and barbed 
wire since the end of World War H, is 
the official goal of the South Korean 
government But for many South 
Koreans who have grown accustomed 
to a First World standard of living, the 
idea of reuniting with their Third World 
siblings is far more attractive as a wish 
than a reality. 

The prospect of a united Korea is 
growing here, along with increasingly 
urgent reports of the North's economic 
and political meltdown. And as the pros- 
pect does grow, more South Koreans are 
worried that their own lives may soon 
change for the worse, that the high times 
that have accompanied their “economic 


Renault Job Cuts Signal a Shakeout 


Renault said Tuesday it would cut 
an additional 2,764 jobs in France on 
top of the 3,100 jobs it plans to shed 
by closing its plant in Belgium. 

Union leaders promised a long 
labor conflict as a result of the cuts, 
which are the company's biggest 
since it laid oft 6,000 workers five - 
years ago at its headquarters in 
Boulognc-Billan court, near Paris. 
The company has long had a program 
of attrition, and jobs have declined by 
about 60,000 in the past decade, to 
138,000. Page 11. 


Separately, General Motors, the 
world’s biggest car producer, said job 
cuts at Renault and Ford signaled the 
start of a long-awaited shakeout of 
Europe’s auto industry but said it 
hoped it would be healthy enough to 
avoid similar action. 

“Some say there is excess capacity 
in Europe of 3 million to 4 million 
units," said the president of General 
Motors Europe, Richard Donnelly. 

“It is not our goal to close plants. If 
we have to, we might, but this is not on 
the immediate honzon.’’ Page 13. 



miracle" could dissolve into hard times. 

Acutely aware of the pains, and the 
price, of German unification — from the 
unpopular 7.5 percent income tax sur- 
charge West Germans had to pay. to that 
unified country's unemployment and 
social problems — many people here 
echo the complaint of Mrs. Chon at the 
Terazzo Cafd: Who needs it? 

“Only recently have we learned how 
bad things are inside North Korea," said 
Chung Moon Sook. 49, as she shared 
afternoon tea with Mrs. Chon. “When 
we were in the dark. I was all for die idea 
of unification. But now I am worried not 
just about the financial problems, but 
the pollution up there, the nuclear waste, 
the uncertainty of what other problems 
are involved." 

The most daunting task facing the 
government is the anticipated eventual 
nision of two completely different na- 
tions. and reluctance on its citizens* part 
will only add to the burden. Protests, 
strikes and turmoil over unification 
would be a government nightmare. 

“Building a consensus for the sac- 
rifice that unity will bring will be a hard 
job," a government official said. “A 
very hand job." 

Ho Yang Kang, spokesman for the 
National Unification Ministry, said that 
while most South Koreans share the 
* ‘firm basic philosophy that we must be 
united, there are many different ideas 

See KOREA, Page 6 


AGENDA 

U.S. Gives Ground 
On NATO Issue 


BONN (Reuters) — Responding to 
a German initiative, the United States 
on Tuesday opened die door to the 
possibility of eventually giving up or 
sharing the command of southern 
NATO forces with a European officer 
after several years. 

" ‘We have a completely open mind. 
U.S, Defense Secretary William Cohen 
said after his German counterpart, 
Volker Ruehe, announced a tentative 
proposal to delay a fight between the 
United States and France over the issue 
for five or six years. 

Mr. Cohen said that the United 
States was willing to review the matter 
in five, six or seven years, but stressed 
that the command might still remain in 
U.S. hands. 


rri» m • 

lirana Ines 
To Impose 
Control on 
The South 

Security Forces Move 
On Rebellious Cities; 
US. Assails Policy 

CjmpJofbr Qtr Skiff firm Dujwchn 

TIRANA. Albania — The govern- 
ment moved to regain control of towns 
in southern Albania on Tuesday as Pres- 
ident Sali Berisha met with political 
opponents on the nation’s crisis. 

Security forces with orders to shoot 
armed protesters on sight have been 
moving south from Tirana to quash vi- 
olence since a state of emergency was 
declared by Parliament on Sunday. 

The disorder erupted after a wave of 
protests, mainly in the southern part of 
Europe's poorest country, was sparked 
by the collapse in January of high-risk 
pyramid investment schemes. 

The authorities said that the Adriatic 
port of VI ore and the coastal town of 
Sarande remained out of their control, 
despite a government ultimatum that 
forces would shoot without warning if 
weapons were not surrendered. At least 
19 people have been reported killed in 
VI ore since Friday. 

The United States said it strongly 
regretted Albania's imposition of a state 
or emergency as well as a vote by Par- 
liament to re-elect Mr. Berisha. 

“We strongly regret the measures taken 
by fee Parliament and government today 
to, in effect, introduce a state of emer- 
gency and to introduce censorship of fee 
Albanian press," fee State Department's 
spokesman, Nicholas Bums, said. 

“We’re very concerned that the state 
of emergency declared by the Parlia- 
ment today is being used to stifle le- 
gitimate free expression." 

In Rome, Italian news agencies re- 
ported that two Albanian pilots flew a 
military aircraft to an Italian military 
base Tuesday and asked for political 
asylum. 

The plane was a two-seater MiG of 
the son made in China and used by the 
Soviet air force in the 1950s. It is gen- 
erally armed with 23mm cannon. 

The news agency ANSA said the 
plane landed without permission at the 
southern Italian base of Galatina at 
12:30 P.M. 

The two pilots were escorted by fee 
police to administrative offices where they 
were to request asylum, the agency said. 

There was no immediate confirmation 
from fee Italian Defense Ministry. 

In London, the NATO secretary-gen- 
eral, Javier Solana Madariaga, ruled out 
any military operation in Albania but 
left open fee possibility that the alliance 

See ALBANIA, Page 6 


1 The Dollar £ 

New York 

Tuoottay e 4 P ML 

previous daw 

DM 

1.7141 

1.697 

Pound 

Yen 

1.6135 

122.175 

1.8175 

121.255 

FF 

5.7845 

5.731 

musp 

The Dow 



Tuesday dose 

previous doss 

-66.2 

6852.72 

6918.92 

1 S&P 500 I 

change 

-4.36 

Tuesday O 4 P.M. 

790.95 

previous cfow 

795.31 


Lynne Slaft-j/Thc Awnraned Pnao 

UPBEAT — Former Liverpool 
star Bruce Grobbelaar arriving 
Tuesday at the Winchester court, 
where the jury in a soccer match- 
fixing trial was dismissed. Page 18. 





Pape 10. 


Pages 8-9. 

Sports 

Pages 18-19. 

International GfeanMocf 

Pagw 4 « 7 . 

| The IHT online 

http://vAVW.iht.com | 


Rebels Reject Asylum 

The rebels holding hostages in Lima 
since Dec. 1 7 rejected an asylum offer 
and are sticking to the demand that 
their jailed comrades be released. “If 
there is no liberation, there is no solu- 
tion." fee rebels said in a shortwave 
radio interview with reporters. 

President Alberto Fujimori arrived 
in Lima from Havana early Tuesday 
wife an offer of asylum from Fidel 
Castro, the Cuban leader. But the head 
of the rebels. Nestor Cerpa, said, “We 
have no intention of looking for exile 
or political asylum. We want freedom 
for our jailed comrades." Page 3. 


ElTs ‘Club Med’ States Get Serious About Financial Rectitude 


Gabon ......... 1100 CFA 


.225 PTAS 


\ Italy 2,800 Ure Tunjsia 250 Din 

! Ivory Coast. 1-250 CFA . - ;....lO.OOD»f 

iJonfen 1 - i 50 J£ us Mrt "(BffJ---* 1 -® 

; Lebanon LL 3.000 U.S. Mil. (cur, 




By Alan Friedman 

fawnmi/HMf Herald Tribune 

PARIS — There was a time when the guardians 
of financial rectitude in Bonn and Paris could look 
down upon fee laggands of Southern Europe, those 
countries, with a reputation for being financially 
undisciplined and for running up debts, the so-called 
Club Med members of fee European Union. 

But lately Italy, Spain and Portugal have dis- 
played a degree of fiscal discipline and even political 
consensus on the need for sacrifice that would have 
startled most observers as recently as a year ago. 

By contrast Germany, normally the powerhouse 
of Europe, has looked wobbly of late, beset by 
record unemployment, political clashes over tax 
and pension reform, a slip m Helmut Kohl’s ap- 
proval ratings, and opinion polls that continue to 


show a majority of Germans opposed to giving up 
the Deutsche merit. 

AH of this has produced a bout of angst in 
Germany and jitters in financial markets, not- 
withstanding fee faith of most observers in Mr. 
Kohl’s ability to ultimately battle through and meet 
the conditions (aid out in the Maastricht treaty. 

NEWS-ANALYSIS 

In recent days these travails in Germany have 
even sparked talk of a delay of the launch of 
monetary union in January 1999. an idea that is 
anathema to Mr. Kohl and feat was dismissed 
scornfully this week by fee Bundesbank president. 
HamTielmeyer, by Finance Minister Theo Waigel 
and by a host of other senior European officials. 

Even so. on Tuesday a Bundesbank council 


member — Klaus-Dieter Kuehbacher — warned in 
a newspaper interview that Germany will fail to 
meet the critical Maastricht target of having a 
budget deficit of no more than 3 percent of gross 
domestic product unless it takes extraordinary 
steps such as raising taxes or cutting social security 
payments “brutally." 

Many economists still doubt that Italy and Spain 
can catch up with Germany and France in time to 
meet all single currency conditions in 1997. But a 
growing number of political insiders in Europe 
now believe that Italy and Spain stand a good 
chance of succeeding in 1 998. and that could allow 
them to join in 1 999. 

This, in fact, was the essence of a proposal 
floated recently by Valery Giscard d'Esraing. 
former president of France. H is an Idea described 
by several European officials as plausible, es- 


pecially because it would allow Mr. Kohl logo into 
the October 1998 German elections without having 
to debate the issue of Italy or Spain. 

"The genuine efforts by Italy and Spain to meet 
fee convergence criteria make Kohl’s job more 
difficult." said David Marsh, director of European 
strategy at fee London investment bankers Robert 
Fleming. “He desperately wants to start monetary 
union with a core group of unambiguously stable- 
currency. low-deficit countries that would nor in- 
clude Italy and Spain." 

Mark Cliffe. the chief international economist ai 
HSBC Markets in London, said: “The Gentians 
are beginning to realize that they have b«*n out- 
maneuvered by France and the Club Med nations, 
meaning that Bonn will find it very difficult to keep 

See EMU, Page 6 









■ iiit ' * t x'ii 


.a, 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARGE 5, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Aftermath of Agony /A Quake's Devastation 


For Iran Villagers , a World Gone in Seconds 


New York Times Service 

V HJLADARAGH. Iran — It look just 15 
seconds for Farzaneh Akh wan’s life to 
change forever. The earthquake that 
struck here last Friday swept away not 
just bet home and her livelihood, but also took the 
lives of almost her entire family. 

“Your child is alone now," she wailed to her 
dead mother, beating her hands on ho* head in grief. 
“No husband, no daughter, no uncle, no cousin, no 
mother.” 

Sitting atop a pile of rubble, Mrs. Akh wan gazed 
down at a scene of devastation. More than 100 
inhabitants of Villadaragh. an isolated village of 
1 ,500 people in northwestern Iran, died when die 
quake toppled the village’s mud houses, bringing 
wooden rafters and tons of debris down on those 
inside. 

Government relief officials raised the official 
death toll from the quake to 965. with about 2,600 
injured. The earthquake measured magnitude 6. 1 on 
the open-ended Richter scale. 

But another quake hit the region Sunday, meas- 
uring 5.2 (Hi the Richter scale, and it sent rescue 
teams fanning out across tile countryside in search 
of new casualties and damage. 

The Iranian Red Crescent Society has mobilized 
the rescue effort for survivors, and the government 
has sent troops and Revolutionary Guards to die 


region to help provide food and shelter for the 
estimated 40,000 people who have been left without 


estimated 40,000 people who have been left without 
homes by the quake. 

Villadaragh, one of more than 80 villages af- 
fected by the quake, lies in a mountainous region 
near Iran’s border with Azerbaijan. The area is 
home to many of the 20 million or so Iranians of 
Azeri stock — about a third of the country's pop- 
ulation. 

Winter here is harsh. Falling snow, freezing 
temperatures and thick mists since the quake have 
hampered rescue efforts by road and air. The mono- 
tony of the area's white and gray was broken 
Monday only by scattered piles of bright yellow and 
red rags, the traditional Azeri women’s clothing that 
contrasts starkly with the black chador found in 
most other parts of Iran. 

Three days after the quake, an eerie calm seemed 
to have settled over this area, where tough fanning 
men held their heads in shock, or huddled for shelter 
in one of the thousands of tents provided by the 
emergency services. 

Only the sound of children crying drifted across 
the remains of the village, along with an acrid smoke 
as survivors burned tires and timber to keep warm. 

“Those who have survived are dying inside 
because they have lost everything,” said Gafiir 
Lutfi, a farmer and beekeeper in Villadaragh whose 
mother and two nieces died in the earthquake. “All 
we had in the village was our animals, and they are 
all dead now.” 

“These are simple people." said Namdar 
Abrand, an architecture student from Tehran, who 
had come to the region to study the effects of 
earthquakes on historical buildings. “They simply 
don’t understand what has happened to them. 
Grown men have kissed my hand today because 
they thought I could help them.” 

Grieving relatives followed ambulances contain- 
ing the bodies of the victims slowly through Vil- 
ladaragh’s narrow streets, heading for a cemetery at 
the end of the village, the names of the dead 
scratched hastily on slips of card and fixed roughly 
to the graves. 



Women of Kalkhoutan, 
about 20 kilometers from 
Ardabil, comforting each 
other amid the ruins of 
their home. At least 80 
villages in northern Iran 
were destroyed in the 
earthquake that struck 
Friday , , leaving tens of 
thousands of people 
homeless. 


NAKHICHEVAN 

(AZERBAIJAN) 


Caspian See 


AZERBAIJAN 


../’ink#] 


Mud flowed down the steep streeis, churned up 
by mechanical diggers sent by the Iranian gov- 


ernment to shift the mounds of debris in the search 
for corpses. 


I N THE nearby village of Saraein, a hot spring 
had been converted into a morgue where bod- 
ies were washed according to Islamic ritual 
before burial. 

Police officials in Ardabil, the provincial capital, 
said rescue workers were still finding bodies in 
some of the region's more inaccessible areas. 

“Getting an accurate number of casualties is 
always difficult in situations like this,” Michael 
von der Schulenburg, the United Nations’ resident 
coordinator in Iran, said by telephone in Tehran. 
“But the final count is not likely to-be in the 
thousands because Ardabil is such a rural area." 

The Ardabil earthquake was certainly less dam- 
aging than the one that hit neighboring Gilan 
Province in Jane 1991, killing more than 30,000 
people. 


~ ; In Ardabil, some buildings 

mjan ^ sustained structural damage, 

\ / turkmenbian £ and several aftershocks sent 
> y > residents running for cover. 

Caspian See j The municipal authorities 

U I were using the city’s soccer 

— . stadium to house some of the 

■ homeless, and local hospitals 

were overflowing. 

•Tehran “We don’t have enough 
| beds.’ ' said Kamer Kaboudi, 

j a nurse ai a hospital there. 

7 iran “We only have four beds in 

\ C faytM -. the intensive care unit, and 

■J sea" 1 they are already full. I don’t 

know what we’ll do when 
' * Q ^50| more patients come in.” 

ntt Medical staff members from 

the Red Crescent also said their resources were 
stretched to the limit 

In a street nearby, villagers clutching chits for 
medical supplies clustered around health officials. 
Trucks piled high with food, clothing and plastic 
sheeting trundled through the city streets, beading 
for the worst-hit areas. 

■ Tehran Appeals for International Aid 

Iran asked Tuesday for aid to help survivors of the 
quakes. Reuters reported from Tehran. 

The head of the UN Information Center there. 
Iftikhar Ali, said, “Today we received Iran's re- 
quest, and the UN coordinator briefed ambassadors 
of donor countries, mostly European states, about 
the situation in the field.” 

The appeal came -as Iran announced that four- 
people on a relief flight to the stricken region were 
killed when their light plane crashed in bad weather 
Monday night In addition to knee-deep snow and 
freezing temperatures, rescue teams were battling 
marauding wolves in the search for more victims. 


Egypt Is Slowly Razing Village of Tomb Robbers 


By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Service 


QURNA. Egypt — In the late 18th 
centuiy, residents of the dun-colored 
hills on the west bank of the Nile pelted 
Western visitors with boulders, sicced 
their dogs on them and set the strangers’ 
boats afire, from their mud- brick 
homes built atop pharaonic tombs, the 
local people found little reason to wel- 
come the age of exploration. 

Over rime, the people of Quma have 
found a way to coexist with the ad- 
venturers and gawkers who have 
swarmed their way, often by peddling 
the artifacts and trinkets so treasured by 
those eager to uncover the mysteries of 
ancient Egypt. 

But if the Egyptian government has 
its way, Quma, population 8.000 and 
still without running water, is about to 
yield ar last to the pursuit of science and 
tourist dollars. 

Since the year began, bulldozers have 
reduced more than 100 of the village’s 
1,500 homes to rubble. The govern- 
ment. which has tried and failed to trans- 
plant the villagers since shortly after 
World War II, calls the plan a long- 


overdue effort to open new sites to ar- 
chaeologists. Some of the local people 
call it an invasion. 

“They have no conscience.” said 
Ahmed Abdelrahim Mohammed. 80. 
who asserted that he was tricked into 
signing away his rights to the old house 
he shared with four sons and their fam- 
ilies and returned to find the bulldozer’s 
blade already at work. "They just 
loaded up our furniture and everything 
else and put it on the back of trucks.” 

Egyptian officials say they are bent 
only on providing archaeologists and 
tourists with fill! access at last to hun- 
dreds of tombs built into the rock, part of 
a vast beehive that includes fine ex- 


ovens with dried cow dung and rely on 
donkeys to haul water up the steep 


slopes to their dirt-floored homes. 
But many of the residents say the 


arnples of Egyptian relief, painting and 
sculpture. 


sculpture. 

Dating to 2200 B.C.. these are the 
tombs of noblemen, simpler but in some 
ways more revealing than the royal nec- 
ropolises of Tutankhamen and his 
brethren in the Valley of the Kings. 

As incentives to relocate to a New 
Quma being built about three kilome- 
ters away, the government has pointed 
to the faucets, concrete walls and li- 
noleum tile they will find there, all 
luxuries for people who still fire clay 


But many of the residents say they are 
in no huny to surrender their homes, 
some of which are more than a century 
old and whose access to ancient pas- 
sageways dug into the rock provide 
them and their animals shelter from the 
searing heat. 

The people complain that the two- 
bedroom apartments built by the gov- 
ernment so far are not big enough to 
house their children, let alone the water 
buffalo, cows, chickens and goats that 
are part of nearly every household. 

A petition signed late last year by the 
heads of 70 local families warned of 
“revolution with heavy and certain 
damage” unless the government adopt- 
ed a more generous course. 

“They will move,” declared Mo- 
hammed Soghir, general director of an- 
tiquities for Upper Egypt, and an ar- 
chitect of the $15 million relocation 
plan. 

Tension has run through Quma since 
the days of the early explorers. Having 
only recently emigrated to the arid hills 
from the sands of Arabia, the founders 


Correction 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


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An article Friday incor- 
rectly placed China's Anhui 
Province. It does not border 
Vietnam. 


Uganda Helps Rebels 

In Zaire, Diplomats Say 


(joflinf 


By Stephen Buckley 

Washmuum Post Service 


KAMPALA, Uganda — The gov- 
ernment of Uganda has aided rebels m 
eastern Zaire with money, weapons, 
equipment and tactical and communi- 
cations support, political analysts and 


diplomats here say. 

President Yoweri Museveni and his 
government have denied playing any 
role in the war between the Zairian 
milit ary and a rebel group that controls a 
1,440'kflometer-long (900-mile) zone 
on Zaire’s eastern border and is pressing 
deeper inm the interior. The sources 
said, however, (hat government officials 
privately had acknowledged Uganda’s 
involvement. 

In the past week, the rebels — known 
as foe Alliance of Democratic Forces for 
foe Liberation of Con go-Zaire — have 
captured foe key towns of Kindu and 
T jihnm, overrun a camp that boused 
170,000 Rwandan refugees and moved 
closer to Kinsangani. Zaire’s third- 
largest city. 

The extent of Uganda's entanglement 
in the conflict is unclear, but aerial 
photographs have shown convoys of 
Ugandan mili tary trucks crossing into 
Zaire. The Ugandans also are believed 
to have provided ammunition, artillery 
and heavy mortars to the rebels. 

In addition, government sources said, 
rebel commanders frequently visit 
Uganda, and the insurgency’s leader, 
Laurent Kabila, often seeks tactical and 
political advice from Mr. Museveni. 

Uganda is not foe only country ac- 
cused of bolstering the rebels. Political 
analysts said that Rwanda, a neighbor of 
both Zaire and Uganda, has helped the 
rebels with training, logistical support, 
weapons, equipment and soldiers. 

Like Uganda, Rwanda has denied it is 
involved in the war. But diplomats said 
foe Rwandans felt compelled to act be- 
cause Zaire had threatened to expel eth- 
nic Tutsi who have lived in what is now 
Zaire for two centuries. 

In 1994, members of Rwanda’s Hutu 
majority slaughtered at least 500.000 
Tutsi and moderate Hutu before a Tutsi- 
led rebel force threw out the govern- 
ment and halted foe killings. Those 


Diplomats and political analysts here 
said Mr. Museveni — who became 
Uganda’s first directly elected president 
in May, 10 years after becoming head of 
state by winning a guerrilla war— longs 
for a stable and prosperous Zaire. Since 
Marshall Mobutu took power in a mil- 
itary coup in 1965. he and his lieu- 
tenants have skimmed much of foe rev- ,, 
enue from the country’s mineral nches j : 
while allowing the nation to crumble. 

“We think that Africa should really 
move away from propped-up, little-edu- 
cated soldiers put in place by colo- 
nialists in places like Zaire,” said Re- 
becca Kadaga, minister of stare in 
Uganda for foreign affairs. “We would 
behappy to see legitimate lead e r sh ip in 
those places." . 

That said. Miss Kadaga denied that 
the government was aiding foe Zairian 
rebels. “To foe best of my knowledge, 
we are not helping the rebels in eastern 
Zaire in any way." she said- She later 
added, “No one has brought forth any 
evidence.” 

Mr. Museveni and Mr. Kabila, the 
rebel leader, have known each other 
since the 1960s, when they met at foe 
University of Dar es Salaam in Tan- ^ 
zania. Since then, they have been only V - 
distan t acquaintances, diplomats and 
government officials said, with little 
contact until the rebellion in eastern 
Zaire erupted in October. 

Mr. Museveni does not necessarily 
see Mr. Kabila as Zaire’s future leader, 
foe sources said, but he apparently be- 
lieves that Mr. Kabila can usher in a 
regime capable of bringing stability to 
the long-troubled nation. 

A stable Zaire would be especially 


helpful to Uganda’s economy, which 
boasts one of foe fastest growth rates in 
sub-Saharan Africa. “Right now we 

can’t get to West Africa directly because 
there are no roads in Zaire.” a Ugandan 

said. “That hurts us economically. If 
Zaire had some stability, it would be 
good for both of our economies." 


Guerrillas Capture 


Another Key Town 


rebels now govern Rwanda, and “they 
weren’t going to stand by and watch 


weren’t going to stand by and watch 
something like that happen all over 
again,” a diplomat said. 

The Rwandans also see the regime of 
President Mobutu Sese Seko, who has 
ruled Zaire for 31 years, as a nasty relic 
of an African past dominated by corrupt 
autocrats who have fleeced their pop- 
ulations and fomented political chaos 
throughout the continent 

Mr. Museveni of Uganda, widely 
seen as one of Africa's more enlightened 
leaders, is said to share that vie w. 

Diplomats also point out that Mr. 
Museveni was a major supporter of the 
Rwandan Patriotic Front, the Tutsi-led 
rebels who took power there in 1994. 






of the village proved suspicious of foe 
newcomers, who ventured up theNile as 
part of foe Napoleonic expeditions at foe 
end of the 18th century. 

And as the explorers grew eager to 
discover what lay buried in the rock, 
their aspirations often clashed with foe 
residents' adoptioa of tomb robbing, a 
profession that proved extraordinarily 
lucrative in foe late 19fo century. 

Sometimes foe two quests worked in 
common cause, as in foe case of Abdel 
Rasul, the sheikh of Quma, who in 1 875 
discovered a cache of mummies stacked ■ 
30 deep in a rocky cleft. They had been 
removed from their tombs in foe Valley 
of foe Kings thousands of years before 
by priests who hoped to protect them 
from the tomb robbers of that day. 

Rasul, now remembered as Quraa's 
most famous resident, sold off bits and 
pieces of his discovery for foe next six 
years as his need for money arose, but 
eventually archaeologists traced the 
items to their source in a find still dis- 
played in the Egyptian Museum. 

By now, archaeologists agree that 
most objects of value have almost cer- 
tainly been removed from Quma’s 
tombs, including what was plundered 




VuxorfPi 

. Asiwn 

EGYPT & Dam Wf, 

Nasser^ 


0 Km aoo 


during World War H in a robbery so 
brazen that foe government commis- 
sioned a noted architect, Hassan Fathi, 
to build an alternative village site. 

That effort to establish a new Quma 
ended in failure when residents refused 
to be uprooted. Over foe nearly half 
century that has followed, isolated scav- 
enging has continued. 

Kent Weeks, a professor of Egypto- 
logy at foe American University in 
Cairo, said, “Ultimately, foe removal of 
the people will help us to protect and 
preserve the tombs that are there.” 


The Associated Press 

MUKJNGm. Zaire — Rebels 
pressed their westward offensive Tues- 
day. scattering thousands of Rwandan 
refugees and announcing foe capture of 
another important Zairian town. 

UN aid workers said pilots flying 
over foe empty refugee camp ar Tingi- 
Tingi reported seeing a 50-kilometer- 
long column of people moving toward 
Kisangani, about 230 kilometers to the 
north. ' 

A rebel commander, Jonathan Ndir- 
osonga, said Tuesday that the Alliance 
of Democratic Forces for the Liberation 
of Congo (Zaire) controlled foe camp. 
The rebel group would not allow re- 
porters to enter. 

A rebel spokesman in Goma, on the 
Rwandan border, said Tuesday that 
rebel forces had also taken Manono, a 
tin- and coal- mining town in Shaba 
Province. The town is also important 
because it is on a rail line. * 

On Monday, rebels said foeir forces r 
were within 23 kilometers of Kisangani, 
foe government’s last stronghold in 
eastern Zaire. 

A rebel spokesman, Mwenze Bon- 
golo. said that there had been no fight 
for Manono and that local residents had 
forced government troops to flee. 

On Tuesday , the rebel leader, Laurent 
Kabila, used a DC-3 plane to fly re- 
porters from Goma to Kindu, a strategic 
mining town 360 kilometers south of 
Kisangani that foe rebels had captured 
over the weekend. 

Some of the Rwandan Hutu refugees 
who have fled Tingj-Tingi say they are 
heading home. They originally fled 
Rwanda in 1994 in fear of reprisals for 
the slaughter by the Hutu of half a 
million or more of the minority Tutsi. 

“We fled and we fled, but we didn’t U 
find refuge. Now we’re going home,” « 
said Marie Louise Mushimiyimana, 
who was guiding her five children on 
the 370-kilometer walk to Rwanda. 

Many of the 170,000 refugees at 
Tingi-Tingi were former Hutu members 
of foe Rwandan Army and Hutu mi- 
litiamen suspected of leading the mas- 
sacres against the Tutsi. 


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Spanish Matadors Put Off Strike Europe" 


Forecast for Thursday Ihrough Saturday, as provided by Accu Weather. 


Pacific Western University 

1210 AuaN Street Dept 23 
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every Tuesday 


VALENCIA. Spain (AP) — Striking matadors agreed 
Tuesday to call off their strike for two months while they hold 
talks with foe government in hopes of hammering out a long- 
term accord over shaving down bulls’ horns. 

The bullfighters’ strike was called off after the regional 
Valencia government reached an agreement with the Fed- 
eration of Bullfighting Professionals. 

The strike was called on Sunday to force the Interior Ministry 
to alter a law requiring veterinary examinations of bulls after 
each fight to detect hom shaving and other irregularities. Many 
fans and experts say breeders commonly shave down bulls' 
horns to make them less dangerous in the ring. 


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China will ban smoking on public transportation start- 
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allowed to smoke in railroad cars, planes, ship cabins, buses, 
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North America 

Near- to milder- than-nor- 
mal weather will prevail 
tram me Plains to me East 
inio (his weekend. The 
East will stay mainly dry. 
while a storm system 


Europe 

Broad high pressure areas 
wiH promote dry and rather 
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northwestern Russia. 


day. then Tokyo Friday. 
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able in Hong Kong. Singa- 
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with a thunderstorm each 
afternoon. 



China is offering tours of the former top-secret base in 
Qinghai Province where its nuclear weapons were developed 
in the 1 960s, the Xinhua news agency has reported.' ’Nuclear 
City." situated on the Tibetan plateau, was decommissioned 
in 1987, cleaned up and tamed over to foe provincial gov- 
ernment. the report said. (AP) 


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JOVTERJVATJQINA JL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MARCH 5, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


PAGE 3 


Clinton Suspends 
Cloning Research 

Human Tests Await Report 


V 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — Pr es , 

idem Bill Ciinion on T uesday 
banned federally funded re- 
search on human cloning and 
asked pnvate scientists vol- 
enforce a similar 
moratonwn until government 
advisers have reported on the 
issue. 

The ban is broader than the 
prohibition on U.S .-funded 
human em bry 0 research in ef- 
fect since 1 994, and Mr. Clin- 
ton said his intent was to close 
any loopholes pending the re- 
view of cloning he has re- 
quested from his National 
Bioethics Advisory Commis- 
sion. 

"Any discovery that 
touches upon human creation 
is not simpjy a matter of sci- 
entific inquiry,’ ’ the president 
said in brief remarks from the 
Oval Office. * * It is a matter of 
morality and spirituality as 
welL'" 

The possibility of making 
carbon copies of human be- 
ings crossed from the realm of 


voices heard across the world 
since the sheep named Dolly 
made her debut, he said be 
was deeply troubled by the 
idea of cloning human be- 
ings. 

"Like the splitting of the 
atom, this is a discovery that 
carries burdens as well as 
benefits," he said . 

"My own view is that hu- 
man cloning would have to 
raise deep concerns, given 
our most cherished concepts 
of faith and humanity," he 
said. 

"Each human life is 
unique, bom of a miracle that 
reaches beyond laboratory 
science. 

"I believe we must respect 
this profound gift and resist 
the temptation to replicate 
ourselves. 

"At the very least, 
however, we should all agree 
that we need a better under- 
standing of the scope and im- 
plications of this most recent 
breakthrough." 

Mr. Clinton has asked the 



Peru Rebels Reject Asylum 

They Stick to Demand for Prisoner Release 


SKKSS A man rescuing a d|g Tuesday from flooding in Lebanon Junction, Kentucky!" 

ist reported he had cloned an gal and ethical 


CtmpiM tif Osr Sn0 F ran Dapauba 

LIMA — The leader of leftist rebels hold- 
ing 72 hostages here rejected the idea of 
accepting asylum abroad, insisting Tuesday 
there would be no end to the crisis unless 
imprisoned rebel comrades were freed. 

"If there is no liberation, there is no solu- 
tion." the rebels said in a short-wave radio 
interview with reporters. 

Following President Alberto Fujimori’s ar- 
rival in Lima from Havana early T uesday after 
securing an offer of asyl urn from Cuba for the 
rebels, the top rebel leader. Nestor Cerpa, said 
by radio that “on that we are very firm." 

"We have no intention of looking for exile 
or political asylum," Mr. Cerpa said. "We 
want freedom for our jailed comrades." 

The Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Move- 
ment rebels who stormed the Japanese Em- 
bassy residence 77 days ago are using the 
hostages to get freedom for more than 400 of 
their jailed comrades. 

"The problem here which must be solved at 
the negotiating table is our main demand: the 
release of our prisoners," Mr. Cerpa said. 

"I want to tell you that the only peaceful 
solution revolves around one simple fact: The 
government is going to have to decide what 
comes first, the right to life, or the so-called 
state of law," he said. 

Cuba became the first country to make a 
public offer of asylum for the rebels, but made 
this conditional on Peru and Japan making 
formal requests. Havana deems the requests 


essential to avoid being criticized as a country 
that supports terrorism. 

The next round of talks between the rebels 
and government negotiators begins Wednes- 
day. 

Refuting claims by mediators made after 
previous talks, Mr. Cerpa said "there have 
teen no agreements" and “neither were there 
any substantive advances." 

The rebel chief warned that the dialogue 
could not drag on indefinitely because the 
system of contacts tends ‘ 'to get worn out and 
lose a certain degree of legitimacy." 

Fidel Castro said Monday that he would 
give the rebels asylum if asked, but there has 
been no indication that Mr. Fujimori asked. 

"This is a moral duty, not a position taken 
merely for advantages." Mr. Castro told re- 
porters in Cuba. 

Mr. Fujimori said the two leaders “dis- 
cussed some points that I can’t disclose." 
adding that attempts to end the hostage crisis 
"must be discreet-" 

"The discussion was fruitful." Mr. 
Fujimori said, adding that Mr. Castro showed 
"goodwill" during three hours of talks. 
"Cuba is willing to cooperate" but "not to 
participate as a mediator," he said. 

Cuba. Jamaica and the Dominican Repub- 
lic all have been mentioned as possible havens 
for the rebels if an accord can be reached to 
end the standoff. 

The 72 hostages include Japan’s ambas- 
sador to Lima, Morihisa Aoki. (AFP, AP) 


POLITICAL NOTES 


adult sheep. 

Although human cloning is 
not imminent, many scientists 
believe it will someday be 
technically possible — 
though morally repugnant 
Mr. Clinton noted that 
cloning technology, applied 
to animals or human cells and 
proteins, could reap tremen- 
dous benefits for science, ag- 
riculture and medicine. 

Bm echoing the ethical 


issues in- 
volved and to report its find- 
ings within 90 days. 

The president said he 
wanted to balance the pos- 
sible benefits of cloning with 
the dangers. 

“We have a responsibility 
to move with caution and care 
to harness the powerful forces 
of science and technology so 
that we can reap the benefit 
while minimizing the poten- 
tial danger," he added. 


Indiana Readies Sandbags 
As Storm Death Toll Hits 48 


Blackbeard’s Revenge 
Haunts Carolina Seas 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — He was an ogre, tall, bloodthirsty, 
strong, with a booming voice, a savage appetite and a 
busby black beard that hung down to ms belly. 

Edward Teach, known as Blackboard, was one of 
history’s most famous and cruel pirates, a man who 
apparently loved torturing his victims as much as he loved 
a drunken oigy. 

Sailing from a base in North Carolina, he sacked and 
pillaged the Carolines and -the Caribbean' during, the 
golden age of piracy, directing a large fleet as well as lus 
own flagship, a captured French merchantman that he 
packed with 40 guns. His bloody rampage was interrupted 
temporarily when his flagship, Queen Anne’s Revenge, 
sank in June 1718 off the coast of Beaufort, North 
Carolina, seemingly lost to history with whatever cannon, 
cutlasses and plunder it may have carried. Blackboard and 
his men escaped. - 

. Now, a team of marine archaeologists from a private 
company and the state ofNorth Carolina have found what 
they believe to be the shattered hulk of Blackbeard’s 
flagship lying off Beaufort in a watery graveyard strewn 
with hundreds of lost ships. On. Monday in Raleigh, they 
announced the discovery, which was made in November 
after a decade-long search. 

The archaeologists said die wreck had already yielded a 
bronze bell, the brass barrel of a blunderbuss, a cannonball 
anda lead sounding weight They said the big anchors and 
large number of cannon at the rite strongly suggested that 
the ship is in fact the Queen Anne’s Revenge. 


The Associated Press 

LOUISVILLE, Kentucky — Muddy rivers 
slowly retreated to their banks in parts of 
Kentucky, revealing acres of muck-covered 
destruction, while people along die rising 
Ohio River braced for k record crest 
Two more bodies were found Monday as 
water receded, raising the death toll to 12 in 
Kentucky. In all. 48 deaths were attributed to 


"It hasn't been this high in so long that the 
weather service isn ’t sure what the changes in 
river flow and flood control projects wilfdo," 
said A] den Taylor, an Indiana stale emergency 
official, “so we’re preparing for the worst.” 

Hie Ohio, headed for its highest levels in 
more than 30 years, also had already flooded 
some low-lying roads and property in Louis- 
ville and Cincinnati, but those cities are 


weekend storms, flooding and tornadoes in largely protected by flood walls, 
the region, including those of 25 people killed Not so many smaller towns. 

Much of Falmouth, Ohio, about 30 miles (50 
kilometers) southeast of Cincinnati, remained 
virtually covered Monday by die Licking 
River, which crested at 52 feet (nearly 16 
meters) Sunday nigfrt, nearly 24 feet above 
flood stage. 


by twisters in Arkansas. 

The flooding, which followed record 
downpours Friday night to Sunday morning, 
forced thousands of people from their homes 
in Tennessee, Kentucky. Indiana. Ohio and 
West Virginia. 

Residents of several southern Indiana 
towns were joining the evacuations Tuesday 
as tbe Ohio River started rising above its banks 
there. State officials sent National Guardsmen 
to the region and ordered a million sandbags in 
anticipation of higher water later this week. 


Dr. Paul Pack spent the day pushing brown- 
ish muck left by the flood out of his veterinary 
clinic along Stoner Creek in Paris, Kentucky, 
about 10 miles northeast of Lexington. 

“I think this caught everyone by surprise 
because of how fast it came,' ’ he said. 


The President Stands by His Man 

Gore Wis Only Aiding Effort to i Get Message Out , 9 Qinton Says 

Standing alongside Mr. Gore at an Oval 
Office ceremony, the president said, "I would 
remind yon, we bad a very stiff challenge. We 


GOREs Dodging and Weaving 


Continued from Page 1 .Mr- Gme’s discomfort 

with allegations about his role 
When he debated Jack in questionable fund-raising 
Kemp in the vice presidential practices has been apparent 
debate, and when he demol- since the first revelations 
ished Ross Perot in their free about his participation in an 
trade debate in 1993, Mr. 

Gore showed the effective- 
ness of his ability to stick to 
his message relentlessly. On 
Monday, he demon strate d the 
drawbacks of that approach. 

He began with a declar- 
ative sentence: "Evenrthing 
that I did, I understood to be 
lawful." He then asserted dial 
a legal memo by the White 
House counsel’s office de- 
scribing whar White House 
employees could and could 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton 
on Tuesday said he supported Vice President 
AI Gore in the controversy over Democratic 
Party fund-raising, saying die goal of the 
adntinistration's efforts had teen to “get our 
message out." 

Mr. Gore acknowledged at a news con- 
ference Monday that there were “a few oc- 
casions” when he called potential contrib- 
utors from his office. 

It is illegal for federal employees to solicit 
money in federal buildings, but Mr. Gore main- 
tained he was not subject to thar restriction. 

He said, "I do not feel like I did anything 
wrong, much less illegal ’ ’ While insisting he 
was exempt from restrictions that covered 
others at the White House, Mr. Gore nev- 
ertheless said he had decided not to make such 
calls “ever again.” 

Mr. Clinton said he agreed that Mr. Gore 
had done nothing wrong, and also supported 
his decision not to make such calls again. 


were fighting a battle not simply for our re- 
election but over the entire direction of the 
country for years to come. 

"We knew that we were going to be out- 
spent and outraised but we knew we had to do 
everything we could to at least get our mes- 
sage out* 

Unlike bis low-key appearances on behalf 
of administration initiatives, Mr. Gore's 24- 
mmute news conference was intended to 
dampen a controversy that might cloud his 
hopes for the presidential race in 2000. 

He declined!© say he had made a mistake in 
soliciting money, but added: “If I had realized in 
advance that this would cause such concern, 
then I wouldn’t have done it in the first place." 

Mr. Gore’s fund-raising network raised $40 
million of the $180 million collected by the 
Democratic National Committee for the 1996 
campaign. The Washington Post has reported 


A Budget To-and-Fro 


WASHINGTON — The chairman of the 
House Budget Committee, John Kasich, 

Republican of Ohio, said that Republicans 
were unlikely to begin serious budget ne- 
gotiations unless President Bill Clinton 
scrapped his five-year balanced budget pro- 
posal and sent Congress one that actually 
eliminates the deficit by 2002. 

"I think the president and his team ought 
to send us another budget," he said. Jnurnalivt Arro^toA 
* ‘They're getting the rhetoric right, but they /UTeSWa 

ought to come teck with the reality." 

Mr. Kasich made the challenge shortly 
after the release of a sew Congressional 


that day, many with preprinted signatures of 
President and Hillary Rodham Clinton. 

The Secret Service is not amused. “Our 
agents don't have the opportunity to say to 
the president. ‘I’ve got an egg, would you 
sign it?' That’s not professional. That's not 
how we work." said spokesman Amette 
Heintze, adding: “It’s an ad trying to pro- 
mote an authenticated egg. How betiertodo 
that than invoke the name of the Secret 
Service?" (WP) 


Budget Office analysis showing' that, left 
Clinton's budget plan 


WASHINGTON — A journalist was ar- 
rested when she tried to enter the White 
House to cover a meeting between Mr. 
Clinton and the Palestinian leader Yasser 
Arafat 

Secret Service officers arrested the re- 


unchanged, Mr. Clinton's budget plan 
would produce a $69 billion deficit by 2002 

~ n « to- 517 billion surplus predicted by porter at the White House's northwest gate 
to® administration. (WP ) Monday after discovering her name, date of 

birth and Social Security number matched a 
theft warrant out of Iowa City , said a Secret 
Service spokesman, Marty Ratchford. 


Matter of Gregg’s Egg 

WASHINGTON — How much will 
someone pay for a 1 994 White House East- 
er egg signed "ToGregg — Bill Clinton"? 

The document and autograph dealer R-M. 

Sxnythe & Co. of New York is guessing 
$350, which, experts say, is average for a 
presidential signature. 

Quote/Unquote 

Service agent and signed by the president” 

Smythe’s president, Diana Herzog, said the 
agent gave it to “Gregg," who gave it to 
someone else who put it up for auction. 

"We can’t divulge who it came from,” she 
said. 

The ad hailed the egg as “the first 
sale ever of an item from the Clinton 
House.” There were 7.000 hard-boiled 
eggs and 25,000 wooden eggs on the lawn 


* ’It was pretty strong, and that’s why we 
had probable cause to take her in," Mr. 
Ratchford said. 

The reporter’s identity was not released, 
but Mr. Ratchford said she was employed 
by the Reuters news agency, (AP) 


Tbe Senate minority 
Daschle, Democrat of South Dakota, after 
the majority leader, Trent Lott of Mis- 
sissippi, criticized two Democratic senators 
for reversing their backing of toe balanced 



narneip 

the olive branch but then you take out a 
machete and cut their heads off." (WP) 


Away From Politics 


• A woman who accused her psychiatrist 
of malpractice for diagnosing her with 120 
separate personalities settled her lawsuit in 
Appleton. Wisconsin, few $2.4 million. (AP) 

• New York City police will soon be armed 

with expanding hollow-point bullets, which 
are deadlier to their targets and kinder to 
bystanders. Civil-rights advocates are cri- 
ticizing toe move because of toe devastating 
wounds toe bullets cause. (AP) 


• After first calling Timothy McVeigh’s 

reported confession a hoax, tbe defense team 
for the Oklahoma City bombing suspect said 
it had faked the statement to persuade a 
witness suspected of being involved in the 
attack to talk. [AP) 

• Nancy Schultz, wife of the slain 

Olympic wrestler David Schultz, has filed 
a wrongful death suit against the chemical 
company heir John du Pont, who was found 
guilty of third-degree murder but was 
judged to be mentally ill. (API 


event at a Buddhist temple in 
Los Angeles last year: lie was 
slow to acknowledge it was a 
“mistake” and finally said in 
an interview in early January 
that he should have been more 
vigilant. 

In that interview, Mr. Gore 
was asked how he and Mr. 
Clinton could continue to de- 
fend themselves by claiming 
that all tbe allegations of 
wrongdoing were aimed at 
tbe Democratic National 
nnt An fn the 1996 campaign Committee, not the cam- 

did not cover toe president P 3 ^- 

appointed the chairman of the 

With ES* caveats estafr- national rommi^ directed 
lishecLMr Gore spent the rest it to spend mn* of ite funds 
of tte news conference duck- on a massive television ad- 
KS™ or repeating, verosmg campaign ^ bolster 

n ^V;kedwhemer hiwas say- bis re-etamon and helped to 

ins tewvSdM any fired- write tte teat of those ads. 

S tom a government Mr. Gore s answer, filled 


RUSH: Immigration Service Program Kept an Eye on Politics, Documents Indicate 


“i 


raising . — - - , 

building, he deflected, 
never asked for a campaign 
contribution from anyone 
who was in a government ot- 
fice," he replied. 

Asked again about long- 
standing prohibitions against 

raising money in a federal 

building, he ducked: 
never asked anyone in toe 
White House for a campaign 
contribution," he replied- 


Mr. Gore's answer, 
with pauses, was: “Well, toe 
DNCis a different entity from 
the campaign, and that, that’s 
a fact." 

When it was suggested that 
Mr. Gore bad attended more 
fund-raisers for toe national 
committee than for toe re- 
election committee, he said: 

“They are separate entit- 
ies. In saying that, I wouldn't 
want to imply that the DNC 
focused 


Continued from Page 1 

inventing government.” 

The effort’s stated aim was 
to increase efficiency, but the 
documents also point to 
hopes of creating a' potent 
new bloc of Democratic 
voters in what critics have 
called a political takeover of 
the citizenship drive. 

At toe same time, however, 
congressional Republicans 
also played politics with the 
program, exaggerating toe 
extent to whicn “crimljiaJs'' 
were receiving citizenship 
and widely disseminatin 
new citizens’ confident]' 
FBI records that were ob- 
tained under a subpoena last 
year for a House inquiry. 

It is not clear bow many of 
the 180,000 immigrants 
whose criminal backgrounds 
were not checked had crim- 
inal records that would have 
disqualified them from being 
sworn in as American cit- 
izens. but some felons have 
slipped through. Among them 
wens an Ecuadoran wanted 
for murder and a Vietnamese 
who faced deportation for 
two felony convictions and a 


other serious crimes such as 
robbery or assault could make 
someone ineligible if they 
were committed within five 
years of the application. 

The immigration service is 
re-examining its files to see if 
any new citizens should have 
been disqualified and says it 
will revoke toe citizenship of 
those found ineligible. 

White House and immigra- 
tion service officials involved 
with the program say the 
problems were attributable to 
bureaucratic snarls and not 
driven by politics. But 
memos, e-mail messages and 
Other documents amassed by 
tbe House Committee on 
Government Reform and 
Oversight suggest that, at 
least in the White House, toe 
elections became a factor in 
pushing tbe process. ' 

"There was tremendous 
pressure from tbe White 
House" w speed up the pro- 
gram, said Ro5emaiy Jenks, a 
policy analyst at the Center 


Chicago's naturalization bot- 
tleneck represent thousands 
of potential voters," wrote 
Daniel Solis, adding that 
“similar backlogs exist in po- 
huge surge in citizenship ap- litically important states" 
plications, which stemmed such as California and Texas, 
largely from an amnesty for Eager to deal with the prob- 
illegal aliens and, more re- lem, toe White House turned 


for Immigration Studies in 
Washington, which favors re- 
ducing immigration levels. 

The program began with the 
legitimate aim of addressing a 


Gently, welfare law changes 
that cut benefits to noncitizens. 
Citizenship USA was “essen- 
tially hijacked by people with 
very questionable goals." said 
Ms. Jenks, who has studied toe 
program and testified on it be- 
fore Congress. 

White House interest in toe 
program appears to have been 
aroused as early as September 
1995, when the head of a 
Democratic activist group in 
Chicago, toe United Neigh- 
borhood Organization, wrote 
to toe first lady, Hillary Rod- 
ham Clinton, to alert her to an 
“opportunity" presented by 
toe agency's new program to 
reduce the naturalization 
backlog. “The people stuck in 


ice pres 
where staff members began 
attacking what they saw as 
bureaucratic red tape and 
needless impediments to toe 
granting of citizenship. 

“Tbe president is sick of 
this and wants action," 
Elaine Kamaick. a senior ad- 
viser to Mr. Gore, wrote in a 
March 1996 e-mail message 
to Doug Faibrother, an aide to 


Mr. Gore who was assigned 
to help “reinvent” Citizen- 
ship USA. 

Mr. Farbrotber. in a sub- 
sequent e-mail memo to Mr. 
Gore and Ms. Kamarck. re- 
ported that toe immigration 
service had agreed to speed 
up hiring adjudicators, who 
interview applicants and de- 
cide who should be natural- 
ized But be complained that 
tbe agency had rebuffed his 
suggestion to use * ‘temporary 
service agencies" for these 
jobs. 

In a later message to Mr. 
Gore, Mr. Farbrother said the 
service was not doing enough 
to “produce a million new 
citizens before election day." 


re- 


one said 

This time Mr- Gore 
peated. “1 stated toe fecLs 
situation earlier, he saw. 
“And I described it in fj 1 

detail. I never have a>ked 


•i Ulb w»v.., -.j fiuie wasn’t focused" on among iwu iciuiy ww«i» 

Reportera tned 0 toer things toe success of the parole violation, 

to force him to 311 , campaign to re-elect the pres- Hie auditors also found that 
question. "You sal . ;j en tJBut it was also focused 
White House- yjj“ f a on a lot of activities that our 
people and asked them campaign was not, such as the 
contribution." one _ governors’ campaigns, state 

legislative campaigns, and so 

vour basic point is that 

these are toe same entities — 
and they’re not." 

The news conference may 


federal employee for a con ^ jo polon || a j rivals in 

rribution never * nm-up to 2000. 
never will." 


an additional 71,000 immi- 
grants were granted citizen- 
ship despite having criminal 
histories on file with the FBI. 

Of them, about 10,800 were 
charged with felonies. Thai 
alone would not keep an ap- 
plicant from being natural- 
ized. While murder has always 
disqualified an applicant no 
maner when it was committed. 



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Fashion Editor 


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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1997 


ASWPACme 


U.S. Business Seeks to Cool Ardor for Burma Sanctions 


briefly 


By Paul Blustein 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — As a place to do 
business, there are few countries worse 
than Burma. The military rulers keep a 
heavy bureaucratic band on an economy 
so poor its entire output is roughly equal 
to mat of Eastman Kodak. 

But despite Burma’s lack of appeal as 
a market, the U.S. corporate community 
is up in arms over a potent drive to sever 
U.S.-Burmese economic ties because of 
violations of human rights in Burma. 

The Asian country's military lead- 
ership is the latest of several govern- 
ments to be targeted lor U.S. economic 
sanctions — Cuba, Iran and Libya were 
hit last year — and corporate lobbyists 
argue that such policies are getting out of 


hand. Restricting trade and investment 
with Burma, they fear, will make it more 
difficult to stem similar measures from 
being imposed on other countries with 
human-rights problems that are much 
more important markets for U.S. goods. 

“It's not just Burma,” said Howard 
Lewis, vice president for trade and tech- 
nology of the National Association of 
Manufacturers. * ‘People are talking now 
about sanctions on Indonesia. They're 
talking about Nigeria. Pakistan. Turkey; 
so companies view this not just as a 
matter of Burma, but a continuation of a 
really unfortunate trend that has mush- 
roomed over die last couple of years. ” 
In a report issued by the association 
Tuesday, die business community is 
launching a campaign aimed at persuad- 
ing Congress, Resident Bill Clinton’s 


administration and die public .that the 
United States is wielding sanctions far 
too often and that die main victims are 
usually U.S. companies add workers. 

The report lists 35 countries that have 
been affected by U.S. sanctions over the 
past four years. It acknowledges that 
embargoes can work when many coun- 
tries join in isolating a rogue nation — 
die multilateral sanctions against South 
Africa's former apartheid regime being a 
prime example — but it aigues that 
Washington is increasingly resorting to 
futile gestures by acting unilaterally. 

Burma is a particularly troubling test 
case for the corporate community. Its 
ruling clique is widely reviled; it refused 
to accept its democratic opponents' vic- 
tory in elections in 1 990 and continues to 
crush dissent The Nobel Prize-winning 


opposition leader. Daw Aung San Suu 
Kyi, recently called on other countries to 


Kyi, recently called on other countries to 
refrain from investment in Burma. 

Senior U.S. officials discussed last 
month a possible ban on investment, and 
a number of states and cities, including 
Massachusetts and San Francisco, have 


enacted legislation that makes compa- 
nies doing business in Burma ineligible 


nies doing business in Burma ineligible 
for contracts with the city or state. 

All this is disturbing for business and 
awkward for the administration because 
it raises serious questions of double 
standards: Can Burma be sanctioned for 
human-rights violations without the 
same being done to richer countries? 

Especially ticklish is the issue of 
China, because Mr. Clinton bases much 
of his case for “engagement” there on 
the idea thar the best way to promote 


democracy is through economic growth 
and the development of a middle class. 

The administration, one U.S. official 
said, may have to resort to the argument 
rhnr applying sanctions to Burma makes 
sense because, unlike China, “it doesn 't 
have die world’s fastest-growing econ- 
omy, doesn't have a billion people and 
doesn't have a military chat can destabil- 
ize the whole Pacific Rim.” 

Bm Mike Jendrzejczyk, a director of 


Cambodia Arrests 
3 From Opposition 


Human Rights Waicb/Asia, argued that 
Burma could be singled out for punish- 
ment without affecting the argument about 
China. In contrast to Burma, he said, in 
China “at least there’s some possibility 
that over die long term, if economic en- 
gagement is accompanied by sustained 
political pressure, then economic reform 
could lead to political reform.” 


PHNOM PENH — The police 

second prime minister, Hun ben. 
Party officials called the charges a 

frame-up. , . . 

The arrests raised tensions be- 
tween Mr. Hun Sen’s Cambodian 
People's Pasty and its most vocal 
critic, die Khmer Nation Party, a 

c _ illianrA 


key member of a political alliance 
challenging Mr. Hun Sen in elec- 
tions next year. 

Mok Chito, a Phnom Penh police 
official, said the three were being 
held pending further investigation 
into charges of premeditated 
murder. (AP) 


Ex- Seoul Mayor Named 
As Kim’s Prime Minister 




Move Is Part of Shake-Up Over Hanbo Affair 


CaapUrJ b* Ot* Sljf From Dttpmha 

SEOUL — President Kim Young 
Sam appointed a former Seoul mayor, 
Kih Kun, as prime minister Tuesday, 
part of a government shake-up after a 
bribery scandal. 

Mr. Koh, 59, held cabinet posts during 
Chun Doo Hwan’s 1980-1988 presiden- 
cy and was mayor of Seoul from 1988 to 
1990, but resigned in a dispute with tie 
administration of President Roh Tae 
Woo over a corrupt land deal involving 
the Hanbo Group, the same company that 
is now embarrassing Mr. Kim. 

Mr. Koh, who has been head of My- 
ongji University since 1994, succeeds 
Lee Soo Sung, a legal scholar who was 
prime minister for 15 months. Mr. Lee 
quit to take responsibility for the scandal 
over the failed Hanbo Steel Co. 

Mr. Kim is purging top administra- 
tion officials to try to restore his image 
in an election year. Three of his closest 
associates have been arrested in due 
Hanbo affair, in which Hanbo exec- 
utives are charged with bribing politi- 
cians to put pressure on banks to extend 
loans to the company. The affair has 
damaged Mr. Kim’s reputation as an 
anti-graft crusader. 

- Mr. Kim apologized Feb. 25 for the 
scandal and has dismissed his chief sec- 
retary and other top aides. A cabinet 
reshuffle is widely expected Wednes- 
day. 

“President Kim believes Koh Kun is 
best suited for the job because be has a 
lot of administrative experience, integ- 
rity, a good personality and an ability to 
make friends.” said a Blue House 
spokesman. Yoon Yeo Joon. 

“He is the best choice Kim ever 
made,” said Moon Chung In, a political 
science professor at Yonsei University. 
“He is seen as a politically neutral per- 


son with managerial expertise who is 
respected by many.” 


Parliament voted overwhelmingly to 
prove Mr. Koh’s nomination. Mr. 


approve Mr. Koh’s nomination. Mr. 
Kun has discarded five prime ministers 
in four years. 

The president is constitutionally barred 
from seeking a second term, but is eager to 
bolster his prestige to give him greater 
leverage in choosing a successor. 

“We welcome the appointment” of 
Mr. Koh, said Park Hong Yeop, a 
spokesman for tbe main opposition Na- 
tional Congress for New Politics. The 
party demanded that Mr. Kim reveal the 
full truth behind the loan scandal that 
has led to 10 arrests, including Hanbo 
Group’s founder. Chung Tae Soo, and 
top bankers. 

“I believe nobody has been named 
prime minister with a heavier heart than 
mine,” Mr. Koh said. 

“But I have decided to accept the offer 
after much hesitation because I can’tevade 
the responsibility of pulling our country 
through hard times.” (AP. Reuters) 



I 


Rights War Heats Up 
As Beijing Assails 
‘Moneybag* U.S. 


Violence on Borneo 


life j ' ! ; I M 


■lpmer Fran..- I'nur 

Koh Kun, designated as prime minister, leaving his house Tuesday. 


U.S. and Both Koreas Set the Stage for 3- Way Talks in New York 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — After two false 
starts, all the derails have been worked 
out, including die venue, the identity of 
the delegates and the shape of the table 
for talks Wednesday in New York about 
the Korean Peninsula. 

The modest agenda calls only for tbe 
United Stares. South Korea and North 
Korea to talk about talks, but consid- 


ering the impasse between Pyongyang 
and Seoul less than 10 weeks ago, of- 
ficials see the meeting as something of a 
breakthrough. 

Appropriately, the three-way talks 


will be held around three tables joined 
together as a triangle. 

Officials said the North Koreans 
crossed a' high hurdle when they agreed 
to discuss peace in the presence of foe 
South Koreans. For years, Pyongyang 
has been trying unsuccessfully to cul- 
tivate the United States, dismissing South 
Korea as a stooge of Washington. 

When the North Korean delegation 
left for New York on Saturday, the one- 
sentence official announcement in 
Pyongyang said talks with the United 
States were planned. There was no ref- 
erence to South Korea. 


The main message the United States 
will be taking to the meeting is that it is 
attaching no North Korean conditions to 
Pyongyang's agreement to formal ne- 
gotiations, a senior official said. 

Leading their delegations will be 
Deputy Assistant Secretary of State 
Charles Karnnan. Deputy Foreign Min- 
ister Kim Kye Gwan of North Korea and 


Assistant Foreign Minister Song Young 
Shik of South Korea. 


Shik of South Korea. 

The senior U.S. official said the 
United States is ready to move quickly 
to formal negotiations but doubts that 
North Korea will be ready before July. 


The Associated Press 

BEIJING — China criticized the 
United States cm Tuesday as a * ‘money- 
bag democracy” that favors the rich, 
breeds violence and poorly protects its 
women, minorities and children. 

The attack, in a lengthy commentary 
released by the Xinhua press agency, 
catalogs the United States’ well-known 
social ills: crime, swelling prisons, ra- 
cial discrimination and increasingly im- 
poverished women and minorities. 

Xinhua's commentary represents an 
official reply to a U.S. State Department 
report in January that criticized China 
for using jai lings and harassment to 
silence dissent. 

The American report and the Xinhua 
rejoinder are part of an annual war of 
words as Washington decides whether 
to make China's rights record an issue at 
a meeting of the UN Commission on 
Human Rights in Geneva. 

Beijing has successfully lobbied oth- 
er developing countries to beat back 
such attempts for six years running. 
Citing recently improving ties, Beijing 
has asked Washington not to bring up 
the issue at this year’s meeting in late 
March. 

The commentary said: “The United 
Stares, which brags about being the 
model of democracy, has been peddling 
its democratic system throughout die 
world with wishful thinking, although 
everyone knows that this 200-year-old 
American democracy remains a demo- 
cracy for the rich.” 

It cited the exorbitant cost of political 
campaigns, the number of millionaire 
politicians and the scandal enveloping 
President Bill Clinton over the soli- 
citation of campaign contributions. 

“Political democracy has always 
been a game of the rich.” Xinhua said. 
“American democracy is. in the final 
analysis, a ‘moneybag democracy.' " 


SINGKAWANG, Indonesia — 
Tribespeople attacked Muslim mi- 
grants on Borneo, setting off a clash 
that killed seven people, an Indone- 
sian security official said Tuesday. 

Dayak tribal members armed 
with machetes and old guns at- 
tacked about 100 homes of 
Muslims, cutting off the heads of 
three victims and leaving them at 
tbe home of a local official, the 
security official said on condition 
he not be identified. He was speak- 
ing from Singkawang, about 80 ki- 
lometers (50 miles) from the scene 
of the fighting, in the jungles of 
■western Kalimantan. The govern- 
ment has said nothing publicly 
about the alleged attack. (AP) 


Karen Plan Attacks 


RANGOON — Ethnic Karen 
rebels threatened Tuesday to in- 
crease their guerrilla activity inside 
Burma after the military govern- 


ment vowed to keep troops at the 
Thai-Burmese border, where the 


Thai-Burmese border, where the 
rebels are based. 

“Burmese troops will face big- 
ger trouble inside the country.' ' said 
Mahn Sha, a top aide to Bo Mya, 
leader of the Karen National Union 
guerrillas. “We will step up attacks 
ui big towns,” he added, singling 
out Mandalay and Rangoon. 

A senior government intelli- 
gence official. Colonel Kyaw 
Them, said troops would stay at the 
border as long as necessary to fight 
die rebels. (Reuters) 


For the Record 


Australia evacuated its aid 
workers from Bougainville and 
closed medical aid projects after 
rebels on tbe Papua New Guinea 
island said foreigners could be in 
danger because of the government's 
use of mercenaries. (Reuters ) 


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0n!t oni> | Remains Loyal 

fo Pro-Islamic Leader 

S ^ i Turk Not Ready to Scuttle Coalition 


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fternen 

~ Prime Minister 

S?Stfirstff2r»! 

No,” Ciller said when asked by 
reporters if she would quit the coalition in 
a "5^ ^er Islamist activism. 
Thedmly MUliyet on Tuesday quoted 
OU «: a pro-Western cinserva- 
ove as telhng her True Path Party oa 

p£!? y she wouJd <tesen Mr. 
if he did not heed an army 

Times Correspondent 
Is Detained in Turkey 

The Associated Press 

ISTANBUL — The New York Times 
correspondent in Istanbul said Tuesday 
that security forces had detained and 
interrogated him for 19 hours, contend- 
In ? S? he was spying for rebel Kurds. 

‘They accused me for spying for the 
PKK,’ ’ said the correspondent, Stephen 
Krnzer, referring to the Kurdish Work- 
ers Party, a rebel group that is fighting 
for autonomy in the southeast. 

Mr. Kinzer said he was detained 
Sunday afternoon at a roadblock near 
the town of Kozluk in Batman Province, 
then taken to Batman city and inter- 
rogated for seven hours. 

* ‘They did not hit me but searched my 
body for hidden cameras,” Mr. Kinzer 
said. “They did not even allow me to 
contact the U.S. embassy, ray paper or 
family. * ’ He said be was released Mon- 
day morning. 

Ahmet Hrturk. the deputy regional 
governor, told the Anatolian News 
Agency that Mr. Kinzer was detained 
for security reasons. His translator was 
also detained. “Nobody was aware of 
his .visit to the area,” Mr. Extuxk said. 


The militaty-dominated National Se- 
curity Council ordered Mr. Erbakan at a 
meeting several days ago to reverse a 
recent wave of Islamist zeal that has 
been partly encouraged by his Welfare 
Party. 

Mr. Erbakan, the first Islamist to lead 
modem Turkey, has dug in his heels 
against the military challenge. 

He attended the security meeting, but 
the press says he refused to sign a final 
statement urging an anti-Islamist crack- 
down- 

parliament later dropped an oppo- 
sition censure motion against the 
troubled Islamist-led government. Last 
week the alliance survived a vote on a 
Censure motion brought by two leftist 
parties that said the country's secular 
system was under threat. 

The debate on Tuesday would have 
tested the government’s popularity in 
the 550-member legislation after the 


Council, which includes top generals 
and President Suleyman Demirel. 

Mr. Erbakan signed a council state- 
ment in support of secularism, but he 
has been resisting the implementation of 
the council’s directives. 

The directives include the closing of 
Koran study courses run by radical Is- 
lamic groups, keeping radical Islamic 
elements out of local governments and a 
ban on Islamic-style bead coverings for 
women at state offices and universit- 
ies. 

The security council also demanded 
curbs on radical Islamic publications 
and broadcasts. 

News reports said that Mrs. Ciller, the 
leader of the Western-oriented True 
Path Party, also warned the prime min- 
ister in an emergency meeting late 
Monday that their coalition partnership 
could collapse unless he implemented 
the council directives. 

Parliament will also debate Tuesday 




Major Sought Out Donor, 
Ex-Tory Aide Contends 

Greek Ship Owner Said to Give $800,000 


mus 

Deputy Prime Minister Taosu Ciller at her press conference Tuesday. 
Behind is a portrait of Kemal Ataturk, founder of the Turkish Republic. 

whether to open an investigation of accelerated a share sell-off. 

Justice Minister Sevket Kazan, a hard- The share slump followed a period of 
line Islamic politician. Mr. Kazan market optimism about die eight-momh- 


larist Turks by visiting a mayor arrested ging privatization program and push 
for holding a pro-Islamic rally. ahead with structural reforms. 

T urkish shares clawed back over half Shares had surged 65 percent in the 
of a 13 percent slump in active trading first two months of the year on hopes 
on Tuesday, driven by concern about the that political stability would provide a 
future of the coalition and higher-than- basis for stabilizing an economy be- 
expected inflation, brokers and analysts leaguered by annua) inflation of around 
said. 80 percent. 

The IMKB National- 100 index fell ■ o; cn 
5. 1 9 percent, or 79 points, to end the day U Gwm P Cn^ows EU 

at 1,443. The European Union is turning a 

Despite the late recovery, the market blind eye to the torture of children in 
was over 10 percent lower after two Turkey in order to maintain good re- 
days of concern about the country's lations with Ankara, according to an 
political situation that also pushed bond Amnesty International report prepared 
yields sharply higher and prompted cen- for release on Wednesday, Agence 
tral bank intervention to support a weak- France-Presse reported from Brussels, 
er lira. The independent rights watchdog is 

“A situation where the government urging the Union to respond to “hard 
could fall at any moment put the market evidence aboat systematic human rights 
under considerable pressure and pulled violations” by presenting a resolution 
it lower.” said Mustafa Karaahmetoglu, condemning Turkey at annual meeting 
a broker at Sayilgan Securities. of the UN Commission on Human 

The release of February inflation data Rights in Geneva from March 10. 


By Warren Hoge 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — John Major, the British 
prime minister, was personally involved 
in seeking an $800,000 donation for the 
Conservative Party from a foreign busi- 
nessman, a former party treasurer has 
disclosed. 

Lord Me Alpine, the Tories’ treasurer 
during the 15 years of Margaret Thatch- 
er’s administration, says in a new book 
that in 1 99 1 he was approached by Mr. 
Major and Chris Patten, who was then 
the party chairman, and asked lo solicit 
needed funds to help close a $29 million 
parry debt Mr. Patten is now the British 
governor of Hong Kong. 

Lord McAlpine does not name the 
donor, but The Times, which is seri- 
alizing the book. “Once a Jolly Bag- 
man.” identified him as John Latsis, a 
Greek shipping owner who was an al- 
leged supporter of the military junta that 


iuiw uo wuiiuy nvut iv 1 7 in. n 

was the biggest single donation collected 
by Lord McAlpine. known as the greatest 
fund-raiser in the party’s history. 

Unlike the fund-raising accusations 
against the Clinton administration in 
Washington, there is no suggestion that 
any favors were promised or performed 
in exchange for the money. 

In Britain, simply the direct involve- 
ment of a party leader or elected official 
is enough to raise questions. There are 
no limits on donations to parties, no 
restrictions on contributions from 
abroad and limited reporting require- 
ments. The governing rule is tradition, 
and traditionally party treasurers lave 
operated independently of office hold- 
ers and party chairmen to insulate fund 
raising from the office holders and 
avoiding intimations of quid pro quo. 

Lord McAlpine told the BBC: “I’m 
not suggesting it was wrong for John 
Major to do that. All I’m suggesting is 
that h was a mistake to get so closely 


involved with fund-raising, in retro- 
spect.” He said that Mr. Major changed 
the rules, malting the treasurer “sub- 
servient” to the party chairman and that 
that was “a mistake." 

The Labor Party, which is running 
more than 20 points ahead of die Con- 
servatives in polls of voters in die gen- 
eral election expected in May, seized 
upon the revelation to demand a par- 
liamentary investigation. The party’s 
deputy leader. John Prescott, sent an 
open letter to the prime minister saying, 
* ‘Lord McAlpine ’s allegations will only 
deepen public anxiety about the secrecy 
surrounding Conservative fund-raising 
and, in particular, the donations your 
party receives from foreign nationals.” 

Late last year, it was the Conservatives 
who were demanding a parliamentary 
investigation of a secret $3 3 million fund 
with which Tony Blair, the Labor leader, 
paid for his staff and expenses. The fund 
was said to be blind, with the names of 


uumiid tvwpi uuui wu. wn u. 

well known businessmen wrote checks to 
the fund shortly after having dined with 
Mr, Blair. 

Lord McAlpine reports that he was 
summoned to Mr. Major's office in the 
House of Commons by Mr. Patten. 
Once there Mr. Major told him there 
was a rich man who had been generous 
to the party in the past and that since 
“the funds of the party were in a des- 
perate state, a large donation would be 
most helpful.” 

Lord McAlpine says be saw “the 
gentleman concerned’ ' the next evening 
“and he generously gave me a large 
check.” 

Lord McAlpine is a passionate 
Thatcherite and a high-living art col- 
lector with homes in Venice and Monte 
Carlo who now backs the Referendum 
Party of his old friend Sir James Gold- 
smith. He believes that Mr. Major has 
been an ineffectual leader and has let 
down die Conservative cause. 



Italy Backs Romania NATO Bui 

BUCHAREST — A senior official from Italy’s For- 
eign Ministry said Tuesday that Italy would back Ro- 
mania’s efforts to gain quick admission to NATO. 

Italy's foreign affairs undersecretary, Piero Fassino. 
said that his country favored a “simultaneous beginning 
of talks between NATO and all candidates” for the 
alliance's eastward expansion, which is expected to be 
announced at a July summit meeting in Madrid. 

That approach “would avoid feelings of exclusion or 
frustration, which might endanger the development of 
^®5oe^hg democracies 'ifl'Easteni and Central Europe,”- . 
'hie' said after a meeting with Romania’s president, Emil 
Constantinescu. (Reuters) 

French Bicker Over Reactor 

PARIS — France’s environment minister clashed with 
a fellow cabinet member Ttiesday over whether to restart 
die Superpbenix fast-breeder nuclear reactor, which has 
been plagued by flaws since it was built 20 years ago. 

. . The dispute pitted Corinne Lepage, who wants the 60 
-- .billion franc ($11.5 billion) plant to remain shut until a 
new inquiry determines its fate, against Industry Minister 
Franck Borotra, who warns to restart it immediately. 

, The Council of State last week canceled a decree dating 

from July 1994 authorizing the restarting of the reactor. 

, . which is in Creys-Malville in die Alps and had been 
operating as a research reactor. (Reuters) 

Herzog Appeals Against Racism 

BERLIN — President Roman Herzog said Tuesday 
that Germany’s economic strength was due in part to 
foreign workers and that Germans were wrong to believe 
that foreigners were taking away thear jobs. 

Speaking at the opening of the European Year against 
Racism. Mr. Herzog urged Germans to build bridges to 
foreigners who live and work in Germany. 

‘ Tt is wrong to say that foreigners are taking jobs away 
from Germans. It is wrong to say foreigners are living 
from welfare or in need of support here, * ’ he said. 

“Rather it is more the case that they have made 
considerable contributions to the economic success of 
Germany as workers and independent business- 
men." (R'uiersl 

Cow’s Milk Is Safe, EU Finds 

BRUSSELS — EU scientists said in a report issued 
Tuesday that there was no risk of transmission of the 
disease bovine spongiform encephalopathy from cows’ 

“Their conclusion is that milk is safe, said the 
Commission's agriculture spokesman, Gerard 


tjarainals or humans through milk or milk products. 

The EU's scientific veterinary committee nonetheless 
^aid that current controls that prohibit the wmwpm&on of 
- S from suspect cattle should be maintained. (Reuters) 

Johen Firm on Bosnia Limits 

' BONN — The U-S- defense secretary Wiliam Cohen, 

■ tv rrin abroad as Pentagon chief, has warned 
European alliestha! America did not intend to keep troops 

. make a commitment in per- 

-oMBiw -V Mr. Cohen said to reporters wtnle en route to 
?SL Tuesday with Germany s rmmster of defense. 
tSfuehe. Mr Cohen said PiesidattBill Clinton wants 

WATO-S w-month peace mission to end by r£Xt summer, 
.* jLd lo egg that that directive is earned out. 
■• a ndIintendl0^mai s ^‘ ^ Monday at the 

T** i n ®J r irh Britain's defense secretary, Michael Por- 
- P n ltag hn ^rid the United Sates should remainm Bosnia 

should not expect Europe to 
S peeping themaione. (API 

Prodi Faces Confidence Vote 

called a confident rvote ^ seclorj 

-on a decree &C 8 o said Tuesday; 

Transport M'niste would be held Wednesday. , 

Mr. WO n a similar mouon in the 

. Prime MmJstei-Rom ^ ^ fiscaJ for ^ 

lower housejast * umberof highway tolls for freight 
sector and to tUl 11 (Reuters) 

companies- ■ ■ - 


Bankers Knew About Gold, Swiss Critic Says 


Jean Ziegler, a Socialist member 
of the Stviss Parliament and a pro- 
fessor of Sociology at the University 
of Geneva, has been a critic of the 
Swiss banking system and what he 
calls the country's " petrified " 
concept of neutrality. He favors ab- 
olishing bank secrecy laws and is 
the author of a forthcoming book. 
“Switzerland, the Gold and the 
Dead.” In Geneva, Mr. Ziegler 
spoke, with Robert Kroon for the 
International Herald Tribune. 

Q. In your forthcoming book you 
claim that World War II would have 
ended a year earlier if Switzerland 
had not sustained the Third Reich’s 
wartime economy. Isn’t that a bit of 
an overstatement? 

A. Absolutely not. I got access to 
some fascinating wartime archives 
from the Nazi Foreign Ministry at 
Wilhelmstrasse, which survived the 
destruction of Berlin. A 1943 doc- 
ument, signed by Foreign Munster 
Joachim von Ribbentrop and Walter 
F unk, Hitler’s economics chief, un- 
equivocally states thai without 
Switzerland's help, the economy 


Q&A/ Jean Ziegler, member off Parliament 


would collapse within two months. 
This refers to Switzerland as a laun- 
dering place for hundreds of tons of 
gold stolen from Poland, Czecho- 
slovakia and later Holland, Belgium 
and the concentration camp victims. 
The Nazis desperately needed Swiss 
francs to buy raw materials for then- 
war industry and in those days 
nobody wanted Reichsmarks. Hitler 
was very pleased with our so-called 
neutrality. 

e 

Q. The Swiss Central Bank has 
said the ingots were stamped with 
Reichsbank markings, so they were 
not aware of the origins. Does that 
make sense to you? 

A. This is utter nonsense. In 1939 
the Reichsbank president, Hjalmar 
Schacht, was fired for warning 
Hitler that Germany's gold reserves 
were depleted and the country was 
facing bankruptcy. This was no 
secret to central bankers anywhere, 
least of all in Bern. The first ship- 


ments of Polish gold carried false 
Reichsbank stamps, but the laun- 
dering operation went so smoothly 
that after 1940 the Nazis no longer 
bothered about such technicalities. 
Part of the 150 tons of ingots looted 
from the Netherlands arrived in Bern 
in its original state, or with French 
and American markings, because the 
Dutch Central Bank also held mon- 
etary gold from those countries. 

The Americans knew about all 
this through Allen Dulles, their spy- 
master in Bern. He had been a savvy 
Wall Street lawyer and cultivated 
excellent connections with Swiss 
bankers and politicians. The Allies 
warned us in 1943 that Switzerland 
would be held accountable after the 
war for its Nazi gold dealings, but 
they never stopped. 

Q. Wasn't this the price Switzer- 
land had to pay for keeping the 
Germans out? 

A. We might have been annexed 
if we hadn't played ball. But at 


least, our wartime rulers should 
have come clean after the war. They 
should have accounted for their col- 
laboration with Hitler and for de- 
livering tens of thousands of Jewish 
refugees to the SS. 

• 

Q. Quite a few Swiss politicians 
linnk a sudden confrontation with the 
past may shake the nation out of what 
some see as a state of complacency. 

A. I doubt ft. The banks have 
opened their books to the Volcker 
Commission and put up a fund for 
Holocaust victims. Calling that a 
humanitarian gesture is sheer hy- 
pocrisy. It was the result of inter- 
national pressure and not a long- 
overdue admission. 

Perhaps you cannot blame the 
Swiss for feeling like God’s chosen 
people, because we have had no 
foreign invaders since Napoleon. 
But in almost 200 years of peace our 
democracy has become petrified. 
We stand isolated, because neut- 



lk.Woindftni 

Come clean, Jean Ziegler says. 

rality is thoroughly irrelevant in 
today’s world. Switzerland should 
join the United Nations and toe 
European Union. We must become 
part of the European family and 
accept its common laws. History has 
caught up with us but, unfortunately, 
too many Swiss still believe this 
crisis will blow over and then we’ll 
again live happily forever after. 


Oversea 


er 


Managing people, making decisions, 
masterminding strategies - and all on 
an international level It's what our 
1996 Reader Survey tells us over 70% 
of you who work, spend your time 
doing. 

Understandable then, that you also 
spend an enjoyable half hour of your 
day following the ways of the world 
via your IHT. 

For summaries of the surveys from 
which these facts are taken, please call, 
in Europe, James McLeod on (33) 
1 41 43 93 8L in Asia, Andrew Thomas 
on (65) 223 6478; in the Americas, 
Richard Lynch on (212) 752 3890. 


Mi ■ 




THE WORLD’S 
DAILY NEWSPAPER 


It 

Bim 

, 19 97 
iGE 9 










PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Child Pilot’s Instructor Blamed in Air Crash 


By Matthew L. Wald 

Nr* York Times Servit e 


WASHINGTON. — A 7-year-oid girl’s attempt to 
set a record for the youngest person to pilot a plane 
across the United States ended with a crash last April 
because the flight instructor tried too hard to keep an 
overly ambitious schedule, partly because of “media 
commitments.” the National Transportation Safety 
Board concluded Tuesday. 

The instructor, Joe Reid. 52. made an improper 
decision to take off, into conditions “that were too 
challenging for the pilot trainee and, apparently, even 
for him to handle safely.” the board concluded. Mr. 
Reid died in the crash, along with the girl. Jessica 
Dubroff, and her father. Lloyd. 

Moments before the crash, the pilot of a twin- 
engine airliner had decided to delay his departure 
because of an approaching thunderstorm, but Mr. 
Reid pressed on. Board investigators said his judg- 


ment may have been clouded by fatigue, and said he 
had committed several errors. One, caught on a home 
video they showed Tuesday morning, was revving up 
the single engine of the Cessna 177 for taxiing, 
without Mr. Reid’s remembering to remove the chock 
from the nose wheel. 

But Jessica's mother, Lisa Blair Hathaway, said 
that no one knew the reason for the crash and that it 
might have been a problem with the plane — an 
argument for which the investigators said they could 
find no evidence. 

Mrs. Hathaway, who spoke to reporters outside the 
hearing room as her 4-year-old daughter. Jasmine, 
tugged restlessly at her collar, and 10-year-old son, 
Joshua, waited patiently nearby, said, “Joe would not 
knowingly go into weather that didn't work.” 

She dismissed the idea th3t he would stick to a 
schedule because television cameras would be wait- 
ing at subsequent stops in the planned joQmey of 
more than 7,000 miles ( 1 1 .000 kilometers). 


The crash, which occurred in a residential neigh- 
borhood near the airport, was at the beginning of the 
second day of what was supposed to be an eight-day 
trip from Half Moon Bay. near San Francisco, with 22 
intermediate stops. 

Mrs. Hathaway said that her other children bad 
flown on a helicopter soon after the crash that killed 
their sister, and that she would approve of them taking 
up piloting. 

“If it came from their soul, they should do it,” she 
said. 

After the crash. Congress passed a law requiring 
the Federal Aviation Administration to study die 
question of children at the controls, and seeking to 
forbid competitions to set records for yo ung pi- 
lots. 

But the agency said at the time of the crash that its 
regulations, which put all responsibility on the “pilot 
in command” — in this case, Mr. Reid — were 
sufficient 


CHINA: Export Boom Benefits US. as Welt 

* -.f A mmirtan in. 


Continued from Page 1 

trends throughout Asia as it is a con- 
sequence of Beijing's own trade 
policies. Unlike Japan, with years ot 
stubborn and huge trade surpluses. 
China has alternated in recent years be- 


Peace Process 
Must Go On, 
Arafat Insists 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Yasser Arafat 
said Tuesday that Palestinians and Is- 
raelis should continue the peace process 
despite Israel's decision to build a new 
Jewish neighborhood in Jerusalem. 

“We have to work hard now to carry 
on with this very difficult job." the 
Palestinian leader said. "We have no 
other alternative. ” 

At the same time. Mr. Arafat ques- 
tioned the commitment of Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel to the pro- 
cess. saying ‘ * protecting the peace is more 
important than building a settlement.” 

“Is it necessary to challenge the peace 
process and put it in a comer to build a 
new settlement? This is unfair," Mr. Ara- 
fat said at the National Press Club. “I 
can’t imagine that anyone who wants to 
protea the peace process will challenge 
it" 

Mr. Arafat spoke a day after discussing 
the Jerusalem dispute with President Bill 
Clinton and Secretary of State Madeleine 
Albright. Mr. Clinton criticized the Is- 
raeli on Monday, saying the decision to 
construct 6,500 apartments in the Har 
Homa neighborhood “builds mistrust” 

Palestinians oppose the project, an- 
nounced last week, as an Israeli attempt 
to break up the territorial continuity of 
Arab East Jerusalem and separate it from 
the Palestinian-controlled West Bank. 

Mr. Arafat said he had found Mr. 
Clinton "worried" about the Israeli de- 
cision. 

Asked about the Palestinian response 
to tiie settlement, Mr. Arafat said, * 'Def- 
initely we are against violence." 

■ UN Debate Is Delayed for a Day 

The UN Security Council on Tuesday 
postponed for a day a formal debate on 
Israel’s decision to build the new neigh- 
borhood in East Jerusalem, Agence 
France-Presse reported from the United 
Nations in New York. 

A U.S. official said that the United 
Stales and the Palestinians had requested 
the postponement, until Wednesday, to 
allow the Security Council members to 
meet informally beforehand with Mr. 
Arafat. 



W i960? when the United States threw 
to exports from Taiwan. 

S^aralHongKonstotelp^ter 
communism through economic growj- 

In 1975. the year before Mao Zedong 
. , _ . died. China’s combined imports and ex- 
tween surpluses and deficits. rnraled iust $4.75 billion, and its 

Many goods once made elsewhere in P°£ s e i oba i mule was smaller than it 
Asia - in Japan. Taiwan, Hong Kong earlier, 

and South Korea — are now produced in had b« y ^ ^ over hauling 

foreign-owned factories like Logitech s But ^ j 973 , foreign-trade 

that have been moved to China. First it China is y ^ to coor di na re 

was toys and footwear, and now it is compiuu outsideR r pro fit in- 
elec ironies. rhinese companies a rea- 

A1 though Chinese products may com- 1 garments and tovs that could 

pete on a broader scale with American f° n toD1 ~L, g At the same time, Beijing 
goods in tiie future, the gams by China so be «Po^tthfisame 
Far have generally not translated into job began 
losses in tiie United States. China’s lead- plan? s and consumer goods, 
ing exports are products that have not 
been produced in large quantity by 
American factories for more than a de- 
cade. Nor are the Chinese products com- 
peting with American goods to the de- 
gree that Japanese autos, steel and 
machine tools — all industries nurtured 
by Tokyo — have in the past. 


Washington took steps to assist 
China’s economic development. Con- 
gress granted it most-favored trade status 
£ 1980, a year after President Jimmy 
Carter established diplomatic relations, 
even though Beijing's restriction* on 
emigration violated the standardsset for 
the granting of lower import tariffs. 
“China is open to foreign direct in- By the early l 990s 
vestment and has low wages, so a lot of tractmg significant amo S° 

companies are moving production investment, which reac 
there," said Nicholas Lardy of Brook- 
ings Institution. “They’re not selling us 
high-technology goods that are produced 
in a hothouse set up by the government. 

This is pretty low-spectrum stuff. It’s 
mainly an assembly function." 

China is still full of obstacles to free 
trade. In addition to contending with a 
maddeningly disorganized bureaucracy, 
foreign manufacturers must bow to gov- 
ernment demands that they share tech- 
nological expertise. Foreign-owned 
companies are required to export a certain 
percentage of what they produce and must 
use Chinese trading companies to ship 
goods overseas. Beijing also provides 
huge subsidies to state-owned industries 
that are shielded from competition. 

Chinese officials have offered to re- 
duce trade barriers in exchange for World 


Agence Fho»Prbc 

Mr. Netanyahu aiming an assault rifle Tuesday at an officers’ training center in southern Israel. He ordered the 
closure of four Palestinian offices in Jerusalem, saying they were illegal facilities of the Palestinian Authority. 


BRIEFLY 


( 7 . 5 . Planned 2d Rescue in Iran 

LONDON — The United Stales planned a second at- 
tempt to rescue 53 hostages from its embassy in Iran in 1980 
by landing a modified cargo plane on a soccer field in 
centra] Tehran, it was reported Tuesday. 

But the top-secret plan was scrapped after the plane, fitted 
with 12 missiles designed to give it vertical takeoff and 
landing capability, tore apart in a trial run at a Florida air 
base, Jane's Defense Weekly said. It added that the crew 
escaped unharmed. 

An attempt in April 1980 to rescue the hostages failed 
when two helicopters collided and burned in the Iranian 
desert, killing eigjht U.S. servicemen. (AFP) 

Algeria Sets Elections for June 5 


and the country's bloody internal conflict will continue, if 
the Front is kept out of the election. (AP) 

Egyptians Get New ID Cards 

CAIRO — Egypt introduced magnetic identity cards 
Tuesday that it said could not be forged, as part of its 
campaign to combat militant Islamist militant unrest, as 
well as to update the state's civil register. 

The project, launched at the end of 1992 after the 
outbreak of a wave of unrest, cost 400 million pounds (SI 20 
million), an Interior Ministry official said. 

Police efforts to stamp out the unrest have been hampered 
by militants' use of false identification documents. About 
1 .150 people have been killed in anti-government violence 
since March 1992. 1 (AFP) 


ALGIERS — President Liaraine Zeroual on Tuesday set Diplomat Pleads Not Guilty 
June 5 as the date for legislative elections that would be the * J 

first such vote since the government canceled the 1992 
election that Muslim fundamentalists were expected to win. 

But this time, the Islamic Salvation Front, the party that 
was expected to win in 1992, is banned from participating. 

Some opposition parries say the vote will be meaningless. 


WASHINGTON — Lawyers for Gueorgui Makharadze, 
a Georgian diplomat, said Tuesday they had entered a plea 
of not guilty to charges involving a car crash that killed a 
teenage girl here two months ago. 

The judge scheduled a trial for July 21. (Reuters) 


Trade Organization membership, a step 
that would allow the country to benefit 
from low or no tariffs. But in China there 
is always a vast gulf between chan g in g a 
law and enforcing the change. 

Still, over the long run the United States 
has seen benefits from China’s export 
boom, even if they are not as plentiful as 
American policymakers would like. 

By granting so-called most-favored- 
nation trade status and the low tariffs that 
come with it, die United States has stead- 
ily encouraged China to develop its econ- 
omy, in part so that it would eventually 
open itself to American goods. It has: In 
recent years. Motorola Inc. has sold more 
beepers, Coca-Cola Co. more soft drinks 
and Boeing Co. more airplanes than have 
any of their competitors in China, foreign 
or domestic. Of those three products, 
however, only airplanes are reflected in 
trade figures, because the beepers and 
soft drinks are produced within China. 

Beijing, in toe process, has knit itself 
into the global economy to a greater 
extent than ever before in a trading his- 
tory that reaches back to silk routes and 
Marco Polo. 

“China-U.S. trade has become all 
wrapped up in politics, and you can debate 
it this way and that," said Qiu Xiangrong, 
a Chinese economist. “Yet trade is ba- 
sically about buying and selling, so it’s 
always good for both sides.” 

Oyer the past two decades, money- 
making has become the top priority of 
most government-run enterprises, repla- 
cing the traditional emphasis on feeding, 
clothing and housing workers. 

In a sense, die flowering of trade with 


.... which reached 

$170 billion by the end of 1996. Western 
and Japanese companies have often 
found doing business in China daunt- 
ingly bureaucratic and unpredictable 
and have been outpaced by Hong K on g 
investors and, later, investors from 
Taiwan, whose language and culture are 
as helpful as the modest size of therr 
goals, such as the assembly of toys and 
shoes in southern China. 

Outside investment has improved 
China’s ability to make export-quality 
products. As a result, the percwitage of 
its exports made by enterprises with 
foreign investment grew steadily, to 40 
percent in 1996 from 1 percent in 1985. 
Because foreign operations are more 
closely regulated by authorities, facto- 
ries run by outside investors almost al- 
ways have better working conditions 
than those of state-owned enterprises. 

Some Chinese trading companies 
have tried to sell goods made with prison 
labor, but the scale of such trade has 
always been hard to determine. Amer- 
ican investigators have been unable to 
prove that prison-made products have 
actually been exported to the United 
States, in part because they have been 
routinely denied access to prisons. 

Huge portions of China's imports, 
meanwhile, apparently go uncounted. 
Tens of billions of dollars’ worth of 
consumer goods, notably cars and ci- 
garettes, are believed to be smuggled in 
each year to avoid onerous import du- 
ties. Chinese officials admit that high 
tariffs led to such rampant cigarette 
smuggling that in 1994. out of 80 billion 
American and other foreign-brand ci- 
garettes sold in China, not a single one 
had been imported legally. - 

With the exception of the scant in- 
crease posted for last year. China’s im- 
ports from the United States have shown 
a strong and steady rise, especially in 
such costly items as aircraft and power- 
generation equipment. But because ex- 
ports to the United States increased even 
faster — Beijing puts them at $27 billion 
for 1996; Washington says $50 billion 
— the trade gap has grown steadily. 

“Americans may feel like their stores 
are full of things made in China, but 
they're all small items like shoes and 
toys.” said Ma Xuejie, a trade official in 
Shanghai. “We’re buying airplanes and 
machinery from America, and think how 
many shoes we have to sell to pay for one 
airplane." 


KOREA: Fear at the Cost of Reunification 


Continued from Page 1 

about how and when." Along Seoul's 
conspicuously wealthy Rodeo" Drive, it 
is difficult to imagine comrades from the 
North strolling past the shops of Armani. 
Gucci and Dior. Here, hip South 
Koreans drive sports cars to expensive 
nightclubs, and fine restaurants serve 
heaping portions of filet mignon and 
barbecue. 

Thirty miles away in North Korea, 
international aid workers say, people are 
on the verge of starvation, hospitals and 
homes have no heat and factories are 
shut for lack of fuel. Few people have 
telephones, a black-and-white one- 
channel television is a luxury and the 
leaving of one's village. let alone the 
country, is forbidden by law. North 
Koreans all wear the same style shirt or 
scarf because that is all the lone state-nin 
factory produces. 

The phenomenal differences between 
the two societies are what scare most 
South Koreans. "They think their leader 
is God; we throw ours in jail," said Park 
Kum Soo, an office clerk in Seoul, re- 
ferring to two former presidents who 
have been convicted of corruption and 
treason here. 

Nicholas Ebersiadt, a Korea specialist 
at the American Enterprise Institute in 
Washington, said that while there are 
many differences between the German 
and Korean experiences, Germany 
provides a useful benchmark. 

North Korea is far more impoverished 
than East Germany was, he sard, but he is 
not convinced the costs of unity would 
be higher here. Much of the S70G billion 
Bonn has spent on reunification went to 
bestowing on East Germany the unem- 
ployment insurance and other social 
welfare benefits of the west, but South 
Korea has no such welfare system. 

In other ways, unity could be tougher. 
As Mr. Eberstadt said, forgiveness and 
reconciliation will be hard because the 
North and South “fought a blood war 
with each other and almost every family 
lost somebody to the other side." 

Mrs. Chon said over her tea: "Their 
thinking is so different, it won’t be easy 
to even start a conversation. 1 don't want 
to have to adjust myself to North 
Korea" 

Koreans from both sides of the pen- 
insula speak the same language and 
share a history and customs. An es- 
timated one-quarter of South Koreans 


have relatives in the North. Although the 
half-cenrury divide is just a heartbeat in 
the peninsula's long history, significant 
differences have evolved in how the two 
societies function. 

For example, most women in North 
Korea work — in factories, cultivating 
fields and holding jobs more or less 
equal to those of men. Few women in the 
South work after marriage, and mothers 
who do take jobs raise eyebrows. Many 
here wonder how women would fare in a 
new. united Korea, and such questions 
represent only a few of the social issues 
to be worked out. 

The South Korean government is be- 
ing accused of failing to plan adequately 
for the problems that are sure to ac- 
company a sudden collapse of the North. 
Critics argue that it is not devoting 
enough funds for such plans and is un- 
wisely pinning its hopes on a gradual 
drawing together of the two countries. 

Many South Korean officials say the 
government would prefer that some kind 
of division remain between North and 
South even after reunification, until the 
economic level of the North is raised. In 
an ideal world, they say. North and 
South would remain separate, with the 
North opening itself to the outside world 
and restructuring its economy until it is 
closer to parity with the South. 

“The notion of a sudden collapse, of a 
flood of North Korean peasants in the 
streets of Seoul, is so frightening that we 
don’t even want to think about it," one 
official said. 



;2ftMtaiB2Ea 
xtm 


:■ ’ /• - ' 

Panmunlom / 1 ■**’* . Seam 

■Jafm 


>Seoui 


Mrtbw* \ 


SOUTH 

KOREA 




JHfcA I 

J 


Little in Common Disparities in wealth complicate Seoul' s goal of reunification 


South Korea 

435m88oo 
97,310 sq. km (38,375 sq miles) 
•’ 74% 
$508 billion 
. ‘$11,270 
$78.9 billion 
$81 totfifem 

1 per 4.3 persons 
.\1 per ^parsons 
Men 70, Women 77 
aperLOOOSveWrflw 


Population 


Area 


Urban population 


GDP. 1994 


GDP per capita. 1994 


Imports, 1993 


Exports, 1993 


Televisions 


Telephones 


Life expectancy at birth, 1996 
Infant mortality rate 


North Korea 

2&9mHHon 

124,381 sq. km (47,399 sq miles) 
81% • 

$21.3 billion 
$820 -V . 

SI .6 billion 
$L0bH8b» 

1 per 11.5 persons 
.1 per 21 persons 
Men 67, Women, 74 
2$ per 1,000 five births 

Sources: Europe roar Book: WF 


EU Court May Force Sweden to Give Up Its Monopoly Liquor 


The Associated Press 

STOCKHOLM — A small -town grocer who defied 
Sweden's state-run alcohol monopoly by selling wine may 
end up forcing the government to ease one of the West’s 
tightest alcohol policies. 

While plenty of money is at stake, the issue also touches 
one of this country's biggest social problems. An estimated 
300,000 of Sweden's 8.5 million people drink so much that 
their health is in danger, according to the Swedish Institute. 

The government tries to keep consumption in check by 
requiring that anything other than beer with less than 3.6 
percent alcohol content be sold in System bolaget, the state 
liquor stores. Harry Franzen, who defied the bah in front of 
journalists and television crews in 1994. won strong support 
from a senior European Union legal official Tuesday. 

The EU’s advocate-general. Michael Elmer, recommended 
that the EU court in Luxembourg find against the state 
monopoly. The court, which is not expected to rule for about 


three months, is not obliged to follow his recommendation, 
but in most cases it does. If it does in this case. Swedes may get 
to do what most other Europeans can do: buy a bottle of wine 
at a neighborhood store, after 5 P.M. or on a Saturday. 

A decision in Mr. Franzen ’s favor would also put the 
restrictions on sales of beer and liquor in jeopardy. 

Outside major cities, the state stores are widely scattered. 
There are only about 350 in the whole country, and they are 
open from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Monday through Friday, with 
occasional extensions of their hours near public holidays. 

In addition to the curbs chi sales. Swedes find the prices 
steep. A 700-miHiliter bottle of bottom-shelf bourbon costs 
about 220 kronor, equivalent to about $32 for a -standard -sized 
bottle. 

It is a 20 billion-kronor-a-year business, but how effective 
the state system is in curbing drinking is open to question, as 
strollers in Stockholm's squares on Saturday mornings dodge 
ample evidence of the previous night’s carousing crowds. " 


ALBANIA: Security Forces , Told to Shoot to Kill, Are Moving on Rebellious Towns 


Continued from Page 1 

could conduct unspecified “new mis- 
sions of peacekeeping." 

“Diplomacy is being done: now is not 
ihe time For a military operation by 
NATO or anybody else." he said, re- 
pealing that the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization was “not the world’s po- 
liceman." 

Diplomats in Brussels acknowledged 
that the European Union hud few options 
availahle to it as it sought to contain yet 
another destabilizing crisis in its Balkan 
backyard. 

In Macedonia. Defense Ministry 
sources said the army had raised its level 
of readiness along its border with Al- 


bania. fearing an influx of refugees. The 
border has not been closed, but traffic 
has been reduced. 

Government officials said Albanian 
soldiers and police forces controlled the 
main north-south road as fur as the hill- 
top town of Koshovice. beyond the 
(rouble spot of Fier and within 30 ki- 
lometers of Vlore. 

The Interior Ministry said residents in 
Fier had surrendered 1 .500 weapons and 
a quantity of ammunition in accordance 
with a government ultimatum. 

Farther south, the chaos showed little 
sign of ebbing, and television reported 
that “terrorists" in Vlore killed Tour 
people Monday as (hey tried to give up 
their guns. While security forces at- 


tempted to regain control. Albania’s 
main opposition Socialist Parry said it 
had appealed to Mr. Berisha at a meeting 
to agree to a new broad-based govern- 
ment to help end the violence. 

Parliament, which is controlled by the 
Democrats, declared the state of emer- 
gency after an announcement by Mr. 
Berisha that his unpopular prime min- 
ister. Aleksandcr Meksi. would resign 
failed 10 calm the southern disturb- 
ances. 

Other starc-of-emergency measures 
included u dusk-to-daw_n curfew and 
light controls- on the media. 

Western television broadcasts re- 
sumed from Albania after Tirana bowed 
to criticism over curbs on press I reedotn. 


a European Broadcasting Union official 
in Geneva said. 

It was the first suspension of the 
broadcasting union's links since 1989. 
when China interrupted Western repons 
of the military crackdown at Tiananmen 
Square, according 10 Tony Naets. head 
of Eurovision News Services. 

A Justice Ministry spokesman said 
journalists of foreign media organiza- 
tions were free to report but advised 
against any travel to the south. Road- 
blocks have been set up around Tirana to 
prevent the rioting south from reaching 
the Capital. A curfew was enforced, but 
gunfire could be heard in the deserted 
streets Monday night and early Tues- 
day • ( Reuters, /l FP ) 


EMU: 

Spotlight on South 

Continued from Page 1 

Italy. Spain and Portugal oul" 
Meanwhile, southern European p 
ical leaders are talking tough, and s 
ing every opportunity to restate t 
own desire to join the first wave. It 
in this context thar Prime Minister 
manoProdi of Italy, during a bamstc 
ing visit to Munich and Frankfurt 
month, said that Italy was committe 
the European dream, and he hoped 
Germans were as well. 

On Friday, when Mr. Prodi was as 
during a television interview about 
possibility of Bonn seeking a delay in 
launch of the euro, he demurred, saj 
in effect that while anything was f 
sible. this was Germany’s business. 
Italy meanwhile would press ahead, 
jittery are financial markets, or mor 
??' n J.; S0 ea £ er m speculators. 
Mr. Prodi s anodyne remark caused 
lira to slump. 

With talk of a delay in monetary ur 
refusing to die down, and the main ca 
being concern about the danger of C 

IT an ,^ n ] P i- 0 ^ rnenl in flat 

the 1997 deficit. France, where um 

ployment remains 12.7 percent, apnt 
relieved to be out of the spotliTht 
once. r 0 

In Spain. Prime Minister Jose Mi 
Aznar is meanwhile forging ahead v 
Maastricht-linked reforms, as is the g 
emment of Portugal. And in Italy. 
Prodi government is trying to sides 
opposition to spending cuts from 
Ketounded Communist Party by w 

f™ n #i Sisn *D °t su PP° n tor such at 
from Silvio Berlusconi, the center-ri 
opposition leader. 

. Mr - Prodi told Parliam 

he had had a long and friendly telephi 
about monetary union w 
President Jacques Chirac of France 
Tuesday, a French official who spoke 
condition ot anonymity noted that it 

in,h^ p3in / e ?. makin g serious effc 
on the road to Maastricht 

Will the Club Med states continue 

a,i \ ThM dc P ends mostly 

?h • rot r P0h ‘ 1 !^ in country, a 
Ihc relative ability to introduce 7 m, 

uuMenty measures. Bur in the mean™ 
the travails ot nonhem Europe i 
serving as .something of an euu-iliwr 
Ihe souih. Nobody. ifmSaSfiS 

easy time this year. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBIHVE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1997 


PAGE 



BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 



wKStS! ^ hBi 01 

Syg; mw «. wh £ S5 S 

SfM-s&fla 


T^S« C Ll. SeU, i 20 ' 0M SILK 

ijis. 100% A JacsjuarJ - mate in to»u 
Tttt33 42 77 63 22 Fax 4277 743? 


|***0US BRAND FOODS heeim & 

S£s.us y^vSL 8 

purchases omy Far 954474-3866 USA 


LEVI MVS. Used and New. Quality 
tensdirect trom the USA. Honestard 
JWfetfeFar 5U1B28-0749 USA 


^rtJaEO BILK, Holland onflow 

WSSSf”* ™ m 


TOUGH WAMOMDS: We buy uMied 


J^D^Vl SOI JEMS- AU colore 4 


« EXPORT -Vegetable al, tateet. 
awMn legs. mA whey powder, butter. 
w®B- Fee Canada 1902} 6654070. 


DELAWARE ffffis, UCs 

Deal ifired wifi Delaware aosrt, save 
money on USA company formation. 
Delaware ft*, or LLG. 5350 USS- Fast 
fttete, carqtttte semes m & US 
states. Free rfa Cslorbc 
CorpAmnca, b& 

30 OdRuinck lane. Dept H 
Dover, DE 19901 
Tet 302-7364300 
Far 302-736-5820 
/manat K^Amunpaoisiacon 


OFFSHORE COMMERCIAL BMC 
FOR SALE 

VWh Ctess A leenee and conespmdert 
berth retetashi). kektdBs totfng 
empany w#i Gama office; and a U & 
ytsdary w*i New fort City {flee, end 
a UX. sutsifiery win London office. 
tnrwSate vgustion. 100% conCoi 
US S60.(X»7nMMCE MERCHANTS 
GROUP. Nassau at 242-394- 7080 
Fax: 2C-394-7Q82. London (sMax: 

44 1B1 539 8246 


mHGRATXW OPPONTUMTES 
ObCm Perrsnert Residency. 2nd 
CtoraNp 4 2nd Passport va Eoononfc 
investmert, 100% legal Gnemmoi 
Progais, flanrg at 228000, issued n 
90 to 180 days. Funds tefct h Escrow 
vd m mm ygur dogma*. 
ftfERNATONAL A7TCWNEYS SA 
CARBBEAN: Far ^590)290 587 
or Fee M50O) 290 684 
E-MAIL 8irATr6AOL.COM 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPAMES & TRUSTS 
ASSET PROTECTION 
WMGRATION/PASSPORTS 
TRAOE-FWANCE 

ASTON CORPORATE 
TRUSTEES LTD 

19 M Road. Doughs, We of Man 
Brtiai ijJij 

Tel: 01624 626591 
Fax: 01624 625126 

E IM No, astnn®«rtwaWrwt 


MOMBASA 30 KM FROM TOWN, 

1 Of from airport. SHOPPWG CENTS? 
FOR SALE 7 shops. 2 resouarts, offic- 
es, telephone fires tinted, water and 
atectnofy comaaad. 150 m horn a won- 
dertJ unto beach. AvaAaUe 14 ptois of 
2.000 sqm Writ Br DATA STUDIO 2c. 
Via Marcort a. 6. 34133 Irate. I 
Anereun: PfluSne. Photos and 
avaieMe 


LADIES 4 GENTLEMEN WANTED 
wxti-nOe as trepans agents to fnafae 
contracts for recontmendattom to f»gh 
ctass^detuxe eoaBtstmerts. We exret 
since 1962 and pay Mgh cannssions. 
Operate with sub-agents in yow home 
araa or travel Write to CD-C, p.O.B 
224, CH-6056 Zundi/Switzertand or tax 
f*41) U 371 71 08 


LEGAL NOTICE 


Plaintiff, 


No.96Ctv.9589(RWS) 


UNTTED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
SOLTTHERN _DISTRICT OF NEW YORK 

LYNCH, piERCEi * FENNER** 

& SMITH INCORPORATED, 

- against- 

MMSS^SSSS ! 

SOLER; MICH EL HAH MELW; S ARL T. TJJL; SYLVAJN GALLEA; MICKAEL LUCAS: > TO 28 U.S.C. § 1GS5 
™^RV; REIN TOFFHW; PERRETTE TtIFFERY; BERNARD WRTH; I DIRECTING ALL 
iACGUraOtRRCR; LOWS DELAUMEY; SA JCM WDUSTTffi; JEAN-CLAUDE MOREL; ! DEFaVDANTS TO 
SER(E SAMOAN; CLAUDE DUDEFAND; SARL AGRIUX; MICHEL DESCAMPS; SCI 1 APPEAR DR PLEAD 
BELLE ALtEE; U. BACOUET; RENE LABOfmE; ELETTTE VK3LLE; AUUN VJOLLE; | BPPc^PnP^AP 
UUANESPBWATD; DAMEL ENNE; KBL ENCOWTRE. Ma KW; JEAN-PA UL iSl| , 

ODDO FT CE; PHOBflX KAPT1ALDENST; ECOUARCHE SA JEPLAH; MANUEL PE 1 
CARVALHO; JEAN43-AUDE VEDRBfE; MAfUEPRANCOtSE ANTOINEnE MOURfCETTE I 
BON; BERNARD BROUSTWE; CHERIF HADJffi; SERGE EMERY; HAURKE-CLAUDE | 

RISES; JEAN-CLAUDE MARIE TEBSSRE; PATRICK BOUE; CHRISTIAN HERVE 
FHCARD; EUROPEAN TRADERS INVESTMENT GUARANTY; REGIS LB90Y; EURL > 

POGA; ANDRE DERRER, cMVa ANDfffi DSUtER CONSULTANT; PRO VANTAGE ONE I 
INTBVMT10NAL; TDM KISER; ANNE RICARD; KARME POfTRAT; MS. GB.Y (first name - 

unkrwwn);JOCELniEJOUFFROY; GUY TAVETiALAM BASSE; SBIGE DUMONT and 1 

JOHN DOES 1-3, | 

— „ Ddandtnls. ^ ^ 


that none cA the 
. . . Fenner & Smith 

those defendants fisted r Exhtit B to the 


Ltoon the annexed affidavit of Michael C- SOrertreig (the -Sttjerberg AffidaviH. and tt appearing 
defendants n this action can be served wthtn Ire State of New York and that ptafnKfl MerrflL lynch. Pierce, 
incorporated, dasplta due rflSgenca, Is unable to ascertain toe addresses 
SfiberbergAflUate, and tor good cause shown, iris hereby 

ORDERED that each defendant feted m Eihflst A to the SSberterg Affidavit shai be served with this orter and the 
complamT to tore aetton in a ccorda n ce wfth the requbaments of Rrie 4(e) or (I) of toe Fedetai Rides of Ctvfl Procedure, as 
appwabia,- and i k further 

ptrtuarl to 28 § 1055, each defendant fisted in ExhfeB Ato the Sfeertn 

tar toan stxlv 160) days after tois order has bean served iron such defendant 

_ . J by publication i 

order. exchsfingExhfattAto the SBrerberq Affidavit. In the European vereionol the tot a malion a f Herafd Trtotm not less than 
onoa a week (br a period of sbe consecutive weekB (toe TiMcation Period 1 ): and fe is further 

t that toe defendants fisted in Exhfcft 0 to the SBrerberg Affidavit shall appear or plead in Ms action no 
later toan sixty (60) days after the expkafion of the PUbBceSon Period. 

Dated: 1-15-67 

UNITED STATES DfSTRKT COURT 
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK 


United States District Judge 


ICRRfLL, LYNCH PIERCE, FENNER 
& SMITH INCORPORATED, 


BANCO NTERNATIONAL SA at aL 


na_r_.m 

rtasnon. 


" x Md. 96 Ctv. %88(RWS} 
i AFRDAVIT 
» WSW»PORTOF 
< EX PARTE MOTION FOR I 
! ORDER WRECTWG 
l ALL DEFENDANTS TO 

£ APPEAR OR PLEAD 

... _ . sworn, deposes and says: 

cMy atWtted to pnac&e cefore iris Court. rarxEsertng planWl Men®. Lynch. Pterca, Farmer 
& Smith Incorporated (^tenre Lynctn to the above-capDoned action. I make thto attUevii in support cf Menu Lyrch's BtUBdfl 
morion tor an order, pureuantto 28 U.&C.S 1655. efceeMng toe defendants to ameer or plead in this acBon no later than stay 

>d to authorize service by proven on six European defendants. Inducing 


(red deposited funds and toose to whom the accourri holders dractod MerrC Lynch to transfer Ore funds, along with other 
documerts which came to Merit Lynch's attentat, caused concerns by Merit lynch at po a fiM e fraud endtor mot 
laundering In connection wlto toe accounts. Mend lynch (res acoordtogty brought tore ntevpteader action ireder 28 U.S.C. 

1 335 and 1 655. to rosotve the conUttlnfl debts ancf remove the ctoud upon toe title of the finds In the accounts. 

3. As aAeged to (he OontotasO, ad of tte defendants have transacted buskress to tha stale of New Ybrlc, eitoar 

personalty or thror# 1 an agent, such thefpeiareal juriedetion over them is appropriate. SSS ComplainL S 3. Howbvw, none of 
tire defendants can be served vtfhto toe state ol New Ybrk. AccorcMft MwSlynch requests an onter, pureuant to 28 U5.C. 
A 1655, dheettog the defendants to appear or plead no fater than sixty days after series ot the order is rinded (the 'warning 
oiden. Such an order may he served on toe detandarts whorever found . . . 

4. Mania Lynch has located aB of the domestic defendants and most of the foreign defendants: those defendants 
whom Merit Lynch has located are fisted in Exhibit A hereto. Merit Lynch intends to serve me domestic defendants with the 


wamtoq order, accompanied by a summons and a copy ol toe Complart. in sccotdance vrito Fed. R.ChrP.4 (e) and (h). Merit 
lynch rtends to serve toe foragn defendants atoms ires toeatedmaccordance w#i appbcabte totemattonaJ treaties or local 

^ M re^iSOT irVbrTTWflon "«TObeltel, each cf toe defsndents Bsiad it Exhtok B hereto reekfBS re 
France. Sea Embtt B. Merit Lynch has ettompted to locale the addresses of tone defendants 6 _ 

rflkMnt ijSSejiaaHtrL | am totormed that (hte xTvesdgaUon Induded the efforts of Men* Lynch's French counsel, who 
nvSusttv3v^»xiwd European natonri and toad ttoaewfes d corporatore md MNMb. \ am further Wormed ttat this 
toduefed the afforte of Men* Lynch's in-house attorneys, who axhausthriy searched 
dl^^sAftor this dSgerl tovesttoetton. Men* Lyrxto has been uiwbre to loeala toe defendarfe Bated In 

the defetiferts Saad r isbrosBcSrabte, Menil Lyrch re . 
nnmJasion pureuenl to 29 U.S.G. § 1655, to serve those defen dan ts by pubfchtog toe waring older once a week hr six 
P erTms) S n i "ptAOcatfon partorT), to the New York Lew Journal and the Etr 


most reside In 
reasonable and 


corporate 
B. 


consecuflve 
HsrakfTWjriA 


i Eticpean version of toe MemaOon af 


to the defendfli t s fe»d in ExhtoB B. Menff Lynch requests that toe warning order dead them to 
’ the Pu W ca t ton Period, 
made. 

(MooBt ua flt 1 


MMreslGLSBartMg 


7. with respect to the detendares bubo in arxpn.a, wems, 

^^^SffS^SSSRSlSSS^ 


Sworn to before me this 23rd (toy of December. 1996 
idnnature Of notary alricl 
NotetyPitoBc 
(stamp cri notary prtolcl 

i John Doe i. John Doe 2 and John Doe 3; Princfpaf Residercas in Frarare. 

9 Mchel HarronaRn; Prindpaf Residence in Franca 
| Ptoerix KaptwWer^&pel Piece of Biotoeu to Euopa 
4 EbomarchaSA^Mpfar; Prindpal_K ace of B uetoess to Etaope. 

5! JeaivCSaude Vedrine; Prinowl ReaMance in Firanoa 

6 Cherif Hedjab; Principal Restdence to France. 

7 DunES:^ PrirS^T Fteridenoe h Frenoa 

ruJivxtoTts wisWKJ to cfctain a ccpy cf toe Ccmpietol to W» acticn staid Gated cne d toe fclcwlng: (1) Metre Jearv 
Lcwefta NoueL 26 Coua Atari la*; 75008 Parifc Rraoosg (2) Mchael C. SBrertreig, Esq, Moryfc, 

P.C, 565 FiltoAwnue, New \WL^\txkt00f7; or (3 The ItolBd^sDWnctGato 
was ftretpubishad March 5. 1997 


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REQUEST for proposal 
FLORIDA 
DEPT OF CITRUS 

Seated prcposds w» be recaved by *» 
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PRIVATE MEDICAL CLINIC, PRAGUE 
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land d 1.800 sqm., mduding private 
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Thd brge USA. AusraEi asq 
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raws m Gemaw (tear Rome ■ wrtft 
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AGES 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


INTERNATIONAL 


Trouble in Albania 

irely seven years after it shed a regular police, Mr. Berisii 
ical Communist regime, Albania a state of emergency and 


It’s Not Too Late for Action Against War Crime 


Barely seven years after it shed a 
anatical Communist regime, Albania 
eers between anarchy and a brutal 
tew dictatorship. Either would be dis- 
stroiis for Europe’s poorest nation and 
he volatile Balkan region surrounding 
L Washington and other Western gov- 
mments must do their best to broker a 
»olitical compromise as a precondition 
or emergency financial relief. 

That will not be easy. The most 
roraising way out of Albania's deep- 
ning crisis would be for President Sali 
ierisha to form a broad -based gov- 
mment including opposition leaders 
nd prepare for new presidential elec- 
ions to be held by early next year. But 
Ar. Berisha on Monday ignored the 
vamings of foreign diplomats and pro- 
eeded with his own re-election by a 
’arjiament of political loyalists. That 
nazen action is unlikely to placate the 
housands of enraged Albanians who 
lave taken' to the streets to protest the 
;ovemment'$ failure to protect their 
avings from pyramid schemes. 

Deserted by much of his army and 


regular police, Mr. Berisha has imposed 
a of emergency and instructed the 
country's notorious secret police force 
to enforce it. On Sunday a gang of pro- 
regime arsonists burned the offices of 
the country's most important opposi- 
tion newspaper, Koha Zone. 

The attempt to suppress a broad pop- 
ular revolt by force may not succeed. It 
will surely make it impossible for con- 
cerned neighbors, like Greece, to 
provide the kind of emergency finan- 
cial relief that they might otherwise 
offer in their own self-interest. 

Continued instability in Albania 
would likely send refugees streaming 
into Greece and other neighboring 
countries. It could also fuel unrest 
among the large ethnic Albanian pop- 
ulations in Macedonia and the Kosovo 
region of Serbia. 

With Albania nearing a flash point, 
U.S. and Western assistance should be 
suspended until the Berisha govern- 
ment starts moving from repression 
toward political conciliation. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES . 


Gore Went Too Far 


A1 Gore turns out to have been not 
ust an accidental tourist at the oc- 
casional Buddhist temple but a mighty 
und-raiser for his parly over the past 
wo years who went so far as to work 
he phones and solicit individual 
lonors for funds himself, directly. He 
uid his supporters say that is no big 
leaL They rightly observe that it is not 
■gainst the law for the vice president to 
olicit funds and that other officehold- 
rrs — members of Congress, for ex- 
unple — do it all die time. 

The White House adds to this its all- 
mrpose gloss for just about everything 
hat happened in the period, which is 
hat the Clin ton -Gore operation badly 
leeded the money to get its message 
nit If you want to know why they 
;erved up the president afloat in all that 
;offee by day, or converted the place 
nto a kind of hotel at night, or didn't 
xxher to dig too deeply into the back- 
grounds of all the people who happened 

0 give them large amounts of money, 
he answer is always the same. 

RueftiJ aides recall what a wipeout 
he 1994 election was for the president 
ind party, how it took them all of 1995 
uid early 1996 just to fight their way 
jack into contention, and that the Re- 
publicans still out-raised them by many 
trillions. They add that vice presidents 
dways have had a major role in fiind- 
-aising, touring the country to help 
ihake the money tree. The difference 
jetween making a speech and making 
tome telephone calls is said to be only 

1 matter of degree. 

But parties have been behind and in 


need of funds before and not gone this 
far. And there is a difference between 
the speech and the calls. In the ag- 
gregate, the behavior with regard to the 
raising of mooey in this last campaign 
was different not just in degree but in 
kind. Somewhere in the course of all 
they did, they crossed a line. 

We remember writing several years 
ago about the efforts of Bob Packwood, 
then the ranking Republican on the Sen- 
ate Finance Committee and second- 
ranking on Senate Commerce, to raise 
money for his legal defense, ami yes, of 
course, he needed to defend himself and 
had to raise it somewtere. But from the 
lobbyists for interest groups with busi- 
ness before his committees? The 

money-raising seemed to us to fail a test, 
if not of law then of seemliness and 
egregiousness. It smelled. 

So here as well. We have no illusions 
about what the office of vice president 
demands of its holders; it has tended 
over die years to a less than majestic 
calling. But the vice president of the 
United Slates ought not be hustling 
donors over the phones. Someone else 
can do that. Mr. Gore said at a news 
conference that he did nothing either 
wrong or new in politics and was proud 
of what be had done. But not so proud 
that he didn’t also announce “a policy 
of not making such calls from gov- 
ernment buildings, ever again.” Why? 
someone asked. ‘‘If I had realized in 
advance that this would cause such con- 
cern. then I wouldn't have done it,” he 
replied It was not a reassuring answer, 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Unsavory CIA Agents 


The CIA’s purge of foreign agents 
with criminal histories is an important 
milestone in the organization’s effort 
io discard the bad habits of the Cold 
War. After decades of cavalierly re- 
cruiting foreign agents, including 
killers, torturers, terrorists and other 
assorted miscreants, the agency has 
belatedly stopped to see if the caliber of 
their work for America outweighs their 
sordid records. In many cases the an- 
swer appears to be “no,” and the 
agents have been dismissed. 

Without a detailed public account- 
ing, which the CIA wifi not provide, it 
is bard to know how exacting this ex- 
ercise has been. Congressional intel- 
ligence committees ought to review the 
record closely and give the public an 
independent assessment But the lim- 
ited information that has been dis- 
closed in recent days suggests that the 
CIA has made a serious effort in the last 
two years to examine the conduct of 
foreign agents and has dropped many 
of the worst offenders. 

The business of espionage does not 
easily accommodate an absolure pro- 
hibition on the recruitment of foreign 
agents with criminal backgrounds. 
There may be cases where the defense 
of essentia] American security interests 
requires the use of tainted informants. 
It may take a terrorist, for instance, to 
acquire information about terrorist 
plots against the United States or to 
prevent the development of nuclear 
weapons by terrorist groups. But these 
cases should be die rarest of excep- 
tions, approved by the director of cen- 
tral intelligence and the White House. 

Until now the CIA has applied no 
such test. Agency officers overseas 


were rated not by die quality of the 
foreign agents they recruited but by the 
number, and the value of intelligence 
received from criminal recruits was 
often marginal at best That was par- 
ticularly true in Latin America, where 
the CIA seemed to specialize in hiring 
murderous thugs and military officers 
responsible for vicious human rights 
abuses. Roughly half of the 1 00 foreign 
agents dismissal for criminal behavior 
were based in Latin America. 

Altogether, the CLA has fired some 
1,000 foreign informants, about a third 
of its total roster, in most cases because 
of incompetence rather than criminal 
activity. The review of foreign agents 
and establishment of recruiting stan- 
dards was pressed by John Deutch dur- 
ing his 20 -month tenure as the country's 
spy chief. While the standards are not as 
tight as they could be, they represent a 
significant improvement over the eth- 
ical vacuum that existed. Mr. Deutch 
deserves the thanks of his countrymen 
for insisting on their adoption. 

There is no more ingen t business 
pending now at the CIA than to put a 
new director in place to continue the 
reform effort. Mr. Deutch left three 
months ago. The changes needed at the 
agency, including a redirection of re- 
sources in die wake of the Cold War, 
cannot be made by interim leadership. 
The Senate needs to come to judgment 
on the nomination of Anthony Lake as 
directin' of central intelligence. Ex- 
amining the raw FBI files on Mr. Lake, 
as proposed by Richard Shelby, the 
chairman of the Senate Intelligence 
Committee, is a diversion. The hour has 
come for public hearings and a vote. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


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N EW YORK — A criminal justice 
system lacking in credibility and 
enforcement cannot provide justice to 
victims or deter future criminals. The 
same holds true for international hu- 
manitarian law — a system chat, among 
other things, aims to protect innocent 
civilians from war crimes. 

But that denial of justice is what is 
happening now. 

Under the auspices of the Interna- 
tional C riminal Tribunal for Yugo- 
slavia, the trials of Dusan Tadic and 
Drazan Erdemovic. former soldiers in 
the Bosnian Serb arm y charged with 
crimes against humanity, have been 
completed. Tadic's verdict will be an- 
nounced shortly. Erdemovic was found 
guilty and sentenced to 10 years’ im- 
prisonment last November. 

In the months ahead, trials will get 
under way for the remaining five Bos- 
nians and Croats in custody. 

But then what? Of the 75 indicted as 
war criminals in the former Yugo- 
slavia, seven have been arrested. The 
most important are still at laige — the 
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karad- 
zic, the Bosnian Serb army leader 


By Richard J. Goldstone 

Ratko Mladic and Dario Kordic. the 
Bosnian Croat leader. 

If there are no further meaningful 
arrests, the Yugoslav tribunal, which 
was setup by the UN Security Council 
in 1993, a year before it established a 
s imilar tribunal on Rwanda, will have 
been prevented from carrying out its 
mandate, and war crime victims will 
have been dealt another blow. 

Also dealt a blow will be die cred- 
ibility of the Security Council, whose 
binding resolutions about enforcing 
tribunal orders are being disobeyed 
equally by Serbia, Croatia, the Bosnian 
Serbs and the Bosnian Croats — all 
legally bound by these orders. 

The Security Council has the power, 
through diplomatic and economic 
sanctions, to enforce the tribunal's or- 
ders. But it has not put the governments 
in the former Yugoslavia under real 
pressure to arrest those indicted. 

At the same time, the Western 
powers who control NATO — Britain, 
France and the United States — have 


conspired to avoid encouraging their 
troops to arrest those indicted by the 
tribunal, despite clear jurisdiction and 
an implicit if not explicit obligation 
under the Dayton accord to do so. 

All this bodes ill for the future of 
human rights, and particularly for the 
establishment of a permanent interna- 
tional criminal court, which is the best 
way to tell future war criminals that 
their evil deeds will no longer be tol- 
erated The international community 
has put this project on the agenda, but 
has yet to hold a diplomatic conference 
to approve a treaty setting up such a 
court There must be do further delay. 

Meanwhile, the temporary tribunals 
for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda 
continue their work. The Yugoslav 
tribunal has already made a significant 
contribution to the advancement of hu- 
manitarian law. The prohibition 
against applying international human- 
itarian laws to civil wars has been al- 
most obliterated And systematic, mass 
rape has, for the first time, been rec- 
ognized as a war crime. 

It would be nothing short of a 
tragedy if the Security Council, having 


established the temporary tribunals, 
were to fail to enforce their findings. 

The message this would send out 
would be unmistakable — that alleged 
war criminals may be censured by the 
international community, but no more 
than thaL The cost of that message will 
be enormous — lost lives, suffering 
and extended postwar relief and peace- 
keeping missions. 

It is not too late for Western nations, 
particularly the United States, to 
muster the political will to ensure the 
arrest of those indicted so that the 
Yugoslav tribunal can complete its 
mission. Hundreds of millions of lives 
might be saved in the new millennium, 
and the prospect of establishing a per- 
manent International criminal tribunal 
— our best hope for justice — would be 
significantly improved 

The writer, a justice of South Africa's 
Constitutional Court, was chief pro- 
secutor of the International Criminal 
Tribunals on the former Yugoslavia 
and Rwanda until last October. He 
contributed this comment to The New 
York Times. 



Mexico Is Really in Bad Shape, So Stop Seeing Silver Linings 


M exico city — There 

they go again. By certi- 
fying that Mexico is hilly co- 
operating with the United States 
on drug enforcement, the Clinton 
administration has shown that it 
intends to pursue long-standing 
U.S. policy toward Mexico, no 
matter bow obsolete. 

Given the choice of prop- 
ping up the regime of the In- 
stitutional Revolutionary Party 
IPRI), whatever the cost or con- 
sequences. or risking a transi- 
tion that would end 75 years of 
one-party rule. Washington al- 
ways chooses the first option. 

No matter how much evi- 
dence is unearthed on corrup- 
tion or the absence of the rule of 
law, qo matter that the current 
system guarantees political in- 
stability, U.S. policymakers 
look the other way. 

And it is not just policy- 
makers. For reasons that some- 
times defy the imagination, the 
U.S. media and establishment 
continue to find silver linings 
behind every Mexican cloud 
Yet poll after poll in Mexico 
shows that Mexicans have ex- 
actly the opposite sentiment 
They believe that few things are 
improving in the country. 


By Jorge G. Castaneda 


The Mexicans are right 

We can start with the case of 
the celebrated loan repayment. 
The government of President 
Ernesto Zedillo won Bill Clin- 
ton and the U.S. media's ap- 
plause for paying back early the 
1995 U.S. loan that helped get 
both countries out of a mon- 
etary crisis. Yet all that Mexico 
did was to borrow the money on 
the European bond market and 
send it to the U.S. Treasury. 

Granted the refinancing 
saves Mexico some interest, 
and Mr. Clinton some political 
beat, but it should not be viewed 
as a reflection of Mexico’s eco- 
nomic recovery. 

The U.S. loan represented 
2.5 percent of an astronomical 
total foreign debt. At slightly 
more than $180 billion, that 
debt is a higher percentage of 
the national economy than in 
1982, when Mexico’s inability 
to meet payments inaugurated 
the Latin American debt crisis. 
If the country was overindebted 
then, it is so in spades now. 

The good news in the Mex- 
ican economy is the export sec- 
tor, which is showing impress- 


ive growth of 20 percent per 
year. Bin this, too, masks a 
much deeper problem. The do- 
mestic economy, completely 


ever before. They are. The rea- 
sons go beyond the economy. 

Mexico is suffering a break- 
down of law and order on the 
street and at the highest levels of 
government. Many midsize 


decoupled from this thriving ex- .communities in the provinces 
port enclave, remains stagnant, are spared this plague; life in 


Domestic demand last year 
grew by only 2 percent in re- 
lation to 1995. which was the 
worst economic year in the last 
half-century. Beer sales, for ex- 
ample, a traditionally faithful 
indicator of consumption, grew 
by 2 percent in 1996; that is less 
than the expansion of the beer- 
drinking population. 

The domestic economy em- 


cities from Aguascalientes to 
Merida is as safe and placid as 
ever. But in Mexico City, in the 
states of Morelos and Chihua- 
hua, in Guadalajara and Tor- 
reon, crime and impunity have 
simply overwhelmed local in- 
habitants and authorities. 

hi Mexico City (the world’s 
largest city), kidnappings, hanlr 
holdups, automatic teller ma- 


ploys more than 80 percent of chine robberies and taxicab as- 
the job-holding population. ' saults are now commonplace. 


Thus the export performance, 
which strongly influences ag- 
gregate statistics, has Unle im- 
pact on most Mexicans' lives. 

Those 80 milli on other Mex- 
icans continue to see their in- 
comes. standard of living and 
quality of life stagnate at best 
mid in many cases seriously de- 
teriorate. Mexico's per capita 
income today, in constant dol- 
lars. is less than it was in 1980. 

No wonder so many Mexic- 
ans say they are worse off than 


Mexicans Won’t Play by U.S, Rules 


tnance, This is true not only in the an administration that has few 
*s ag- shantytowns but in middle- successes to show for itself. Ini- 
tlc im- class neighborhoods and in the dally,- hopes were high an two 
lives. wealthier areas — where tour- fronts: reform of the judiciary 
r Mex- ists visit and magnates wine and and of the electoral system, 
teir in- dine. Kidnappings have be- Both have foundered, 
ag and come a business, and body- The nation's three largest 
it best, guards are a status symbol political parties negotiated on 
sly de- The explanation for this new electoral legislation for al- 
capita striking state of affairs — Mex- most two years. Finally, last 
nt dol- ico City was a safe place to live summer, they reached agree- 
1 1980. in and travel to just a decade ago ment on a broad series of 
Vdexic- — lies in two factors: die eco- changes that still left intact the 
ff than nomic crisis, and the disinteg- current party system and made 
ration of the Mexican police it likely that the PRI would re- 

.. ... and justice system. „ Ui . v taina majority in Congress. But 

. Joblessness, falling incomes' ~ when 'the time came to" vote oiT 


Guerrero military zone, have 
been shot down. 

No matter how strongly the 
press and the government seek 
to limi t news of the EPR’s ex- 
istence and activities, it is quite 
likely that during the approach- 
ing election campaign the group 
wfll seek to disrupt the process, 
or in any case to hold it hostage 
to its demands. It will make 
itself noticed. 

None of these problems stems 
directly from the exhaustion of 
the one-party political system. 
But the absence of a functioning 
political system makes it much 
harder to put in place the many 
necessary reforms. _ 

This is perhaps President Ze- 
dillo's greatest failure so far, in * 
an administration that has few 
successes to show for itself. Ini- 
tially,- hopes were high an two 
fronts: reform of the judiciary 
and of the electoral system. 
Both have foundered. 

The notion's three largest 
political parties negotiated on 
new electoral legislation for al- 
most two years. Finally, last 
summer, they reached agree- 
ment on a broad series of 
changes that still left intact the 
current party system and made 
it likely that the PRI would re- 


W ASHINGTON — In ret- 
rospect. that one mari- 
juana cigarette that Bill Clinton 
famously did not inhale has cost 
America plenty. It left the pres- 
ident with the unfortunate im- 
age of being some son of 
1960s-era liberal, and it left the 
country with a drug policy that 
Mr. Clinton can scarcely afford 
to question. If only he hadn't 
had that one nondrag, America 
might now have a (frug policy 
that made some sense. 

It doesn ’ t at the moment The 
government continues to con- 
centrate mostly on law enforce- 
ment both at home and abroad, 
going after the bad guys in a 
wonderfully telegenic but ul- 
timately futile effort to put all 
the drug biggies in jail. 

At home we have stacked the 
jails with petty pushers and the 
occasional kingpin. Abroad we 
have inadvertently managed to 
corrupt the police and the mil- 
itary — Mexico and Colombia 
being the prime examples. 

Mexico, it now seems, is one 
vast Chicago, circa 1 929. Police 
corruption is rampant. Last 
month the director of the Na- 
tional Institute to Combat 
Drugs, General Jesus Gutierrez 
Re bo Ho, was arrested for cor- 
ruption — which is like Eliot 
Ness being on the take. What is 
more, the good general had re- 
cently been briefed by U.S. 
anti-drug officials. 


By Richard Cohen 


The war on drugs is a good 
fight, but it is a stupid one as 
well. It would be good to rid the 
world of drugs, lock up all the 
narco-bandits and rehabilitate 
all the addicts. But the folly of 
that effort is in the math. 

A Mexican police command- 
er earns around $900 a month, a 
cop around $300 and a soldier a 
titue more than half that In con- 
trast, U.S. News & World Re- 
port says that a narcotics body- 
guard makes $2,000 to $3,000 a 
week and probably gets to wear 
those swell Ray Bans as well. 

The logic of the war on drugs 
must be hard for your average 
Mexican policeman to under- 
stand. For tiie sake of Newark or 
Detroit Washington or Los 
Angeles, he is supposed to turn 
down the sort of money that 
could keep his family in gro- 
ceries for a very long "time. 

When, for instance, the Mex- 
ican police arrested the cocaine 
drug lord Oscar Malherbe de 
Leon last week, he was said to 
have offered the arresting of- 
ficers a mere $2 million to be let 
go. The cops declined, leading 
me, cynic that I am, to conclude 
that Mr. de Leon did not have 
the cash on him. 

Bin who can believe that in 
due course, Mr. de Leon’s place 
in die Gulf cartel will not be 


Hardly a Certifiable Anti -Drug Ally 

M OST cocaine and man- drug dealers, die military hi| 
juana coming into the command threw the general 


IVXjuana coming into the 
United States crosses the border 
with Mexico. The White House 
continues to overestimate Mex- 
ico's ability to stem that flow. 

The White House has praised 
President Ernesto Zedillo for 
the arrest this month of Mex- 
ico's top anti-narcotics official. 
Genera] Jesus Gutierrez Re- 
bollo, charged with collaborat- 
ing with a leading drug traf- 
ficker. Never mind that Mr. 
Zedillo, who appointed General 
Gutierrez two months ago. hid 
the news of his drug czar's arrest 
for 12 days, until after Mexican 
newspapers broke the story. 

_ While vigorously denoun- 
cing corruption, Mr. Zedillo has 
allowed the militar y and his 
anti-narcotics agency to perse- 
cute people who blow the 
whistle on officials who col- 
laborate in die dreg trade. 

In 1993, after Brigadier Gen- 
eral Jose Francisco Gallardo 


an ombudsman to root out of- 
ficials guilty of human rights 
abuses and collaboration with 


drug dealers, die military high 
command threw the general in 
the brig on a hodgepodge of 
charges, including corruption. 

Mexican courts have since 
found the charges groundless, 
and the Inter-American Com- 
mission on Human Rights of the 
Organization of American 
States has called on Mr. Zedillo 
to release General Gallardo. 
Yet he remains behind bars. 

Last summer, Ricardo Cor- 
dero Ontiveros said he had 
resigned as head of the anti- 
drug agency's Tijuana office 
the previous November because 
his own agents were lazing 
around their base guzzling beer 
while agents of the Mexican 
attorney general’s office escor- 
ted drug shipments to the Amer- 
ican border and acted as body- 
guards for the dealers. 

A few weeks later, the Mex- 
ican police arrested Mr. Cor- 
dero, charging him with the 
very crimes he had denounced. 
Mr. Zedillo has done nothing to 
investigate the arrest 

— Andrew Reding, writing 
in The New York Times. 


and lack of opportunities are not 
new in Mexico, but they have 
got worse, and they have lasted 
taken by someone else — or that • too long. The incentive to sur- 
another cartel will not step into rive through illicit means has 
the void. Hie profit in cocaine is soared. The corruption and in- 
so huge that the Mexican barons competence of the police — lo- 
are estimated to spend $500 cal. state and federal — hascre- 
million a year on bribes. Should ated a situation where the risks 
you like to compare numbers, of crime are increasingly low, 
that is about 50 percent of the and the rewards ever greater. 
U.S. Drug Enforcement Ad- The sense of chaos is ex- 
ministration's annual budget acerbated by political violence. 

It is utterly naive to believe There is virtually no likelihood 
that non- Americans will turn that the various guerrilla groups 
down great riches, or even mod- in the country will ever pose a 
crate bribes, so dial American serious military threat to the 
drug users have to pay a bit mote, government or to overall sta- 
maybe even go without drugs. bility. But that does not mean 
After all these years of the that they are unable to infli ct 
soolled war on drugs, you severe damage to the army or to 
would think we had learned a the country's image abroad, 
thing or two about corruption. A The Zapatista threat in 
better policy has to be de- Chiapas has been largely neut- 
veioped But it is clear by now ralized, even though the political 
that the Clinton administration and cultural ramifications of the 
will not develop it. conflict in the indigenous com- 

Back before the last presi- munities continue to reverberate 
dential election, the administra- through Mexican society. But 
tion moved to immunize itself the Ejercito Popular Revolu- 
againsi charges that it was soft cionario (EPR) that burst forth in 
on drugs. In fact, it had been — the states of Oaxaca, Guerrero, 
nix in Taw enforcement, whose Hidalgo and Mexico last sum- 
efficacy is in doubt, but in its mer is a much more serious af- 
education effort, which is a dif- fair. The group has money 
ferent matter entirely. (probably from the widely pub- 

Tbe world’s most famous licized kidnappings of 1994) 
non-inhaler clearly had an un- and guns (purchased from the 
derstandable problem with the drug cartels), and people able 
entire subject and did not, until and willing to use them, 
he was pressed, tape a single Fn the last few months more 
public service anti-drug mes- than 50 members of the armed 
sage. Bob Dole and the Repub- forces have been executed by 
lican campaign opened fire any- the EPR, some in gruesome 
way. Once again we saw that circumstances. Several heli- 
grainy video of a younger Clin- copters, including one carrying 
ton laughing off his onetime the commanding general of the 
marijuana experience. The result 
has been sadly predictable. 

a&SiXSSSi IN OUR PAGES: 100. ' 

Arizona passed referendums 

permitting the medicinal use of I 897 . McKinley Pledge 
man man a. the administration / ^ 


the details, the consensus col- 
lapsed. Consequently, the de- 
gree of acrimony and mistrust 
between the opposition and the 
PRI is probably greater today 
than at any time since 1988. 

Official intolerance and gov- 
ernmental intimidation of critics 
and dissidents are also back to 
pre-Zedillo levels. Would-be 
PRI splinter group leaders are 
thrown in jail on corruption 
charges; publishers of critical 
newspapers are prosecuted for 
tax evasion; the president lashes 
out at critics, denouncing their 
"intellectual dishonesty” and 
publicly lambasting them for 
“entertaining foreign correspon- 
dents in then weekend homes 
and offering an inaccurate and 
negative image of Mexico. * ’ 

These are not the traits one 
would expect to see in a suc- 
cessful regime leading the 
country back to economic 
prosperity and democracy. 

Why the Clinton administra- 
tion continues to put the best 
light on all of this is a mystery. 
What is clear is that it makes 
little sense for Americans to 
keep pretending that nothing is 
wrong in Mexico, or that things ! 
are improving. 

They are not, no matter how 
often the American president 
claims that they are, nor how 
upset the Mexican president be- . 
comes when his critics speak 
their minds. 

The writer is a professor of 
political science at the National 
University of Mexico. He con- 
tributed this comment to The 
Washington Post. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS Am 


marijuana, the administration 
proved that it would not allow a 
little scientific knowledge to 
sully its new anti-drug image. 

Never mind that some sci- 
entists favor the medicinal use 
of marijuana, the Clinton ad-, 
ministration was opposed. For 
die sake of a failed drug policy, 
a certain number of people will 
not get a drug that possibly 


light help them. 

Given thaL it is too much to 
expect that the administration 
will re-examine U.S- policy to- 
ward the countries that we 
Americans used to call "our 
friends south of the border.” 

If it is true that only a cer- 
tified anti-Communist like 
Richard Nixon could have gone 
to China, then only an anti-drug 
zealot or a truly brave politician 
could change the drug policy of 
the United States. Wherever 
that man is, be is not in the 
White House. 

The Washington Post. 


WASHINGTON — To-day 
[March 4] die weather prophets 
turned the light of perfect day on 
the Inauguration of Mr. William 
McKinley as the 25th President 
of the United States. The simple 
ceremony of swearing in the 
President admits slight variation 
and the platform on the eastern 
front of the Capitol showed that 
all the essentials were as usual. 
Mr. McKinley rose, faced Chief 
Justice Fuller and solemnly 
swore to “faithfully execute the 
office of President of the United 
States to the best of my ability, 
and to preserve, protect and 
defend the Constitution.” 

1922: Mum’s the Babe 

NEW YORK - Babe Ruth is 
doing no talking. In fact, his 
silence is setting on edge not 
only the owners of the New 
York Yankees, but Gotham 
t^ns. The Home run King has not 


yet signed his name to a 1922 
contract There is no trouble be- 
tween Babe and the owners. 
Merely a matter of a few thou- 
sand dollars. In fact all the Babe 
wants is a little more than pres- 
ident Harding receives in salary 
each year, or payment in specie 
to the extent of $75,000 or so. 


,000 or so. 


1947: TJK-France Pact 

DUNKERQUE — France and 
Great Britain signed a 50-year 
alliance against Germany here 
today [March 4] and included in 
the pre-arranged formalities a 
prominently displayed invita- 
tion to the United States to join 
tiie contracting parties. British 
Foreign Minister Ernest Bevin 
and French Foreign Minister 
Georges Bidault issued a joint 
statement explaining that the 
agreement fitted within the 
framework of the United Na- 
tions Charter, and voiced tiie 
wish for both American and 
Soviet Russian assistance. 









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Iph 

we and Horn- v ‘ ! . ;r *‘> V> 
aiwn !hrc&i 2 ‘ ‘ r ' :fJ ■'-!“ •, *fe. 


INTERNAT IONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 9 


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Clinton’s Song: That’s 
What Friends Are For 


Qkag^yaiB- 


By Garry Wills 

P VAN ST ON. Illinois — De- Jimmy 
tiSPf J** scandal-a-day Robert 
WeCkS * PTC ^~ DOVels 31 
laSnlc, C1 ?? , ? ns popularity chine inti 
ra*wgs are as high as ever. Daley's t 

Washington reels with every ficial, a 
blow it delivers at its elusive tar- who gets 
get. a man who seems not to feel of his pr 
theim^aiaJL nostalgia 

ft is a van ant on Muhammad over the 
All s rope-a-dope tactic. This is voritism 
punch-a-dope, which leaves the opposed i 
assailant in a vacuum, ail cracyofc 
pinched out with no punches Even i 
landed, so far as popular revul- younger 1 

sl0 U°?- a Htl 

Why/ Are we Americans hem. If vc 


Jimmy is the fictional hero of 
Robert Campbell’s detective 
novels about the Chicago Ma- 
chine in the elder Mayor Richard 
Daley's time. He is a sewer of- 
ficial, a patronage appointee, 
who gets involved in die troubles 
of his precinct He reflects die 
nostalgia many people have felt 
over the years for the open fa- 
voritism of machine politics as 
opposed to the faceless bureau- 
cracy of civil-service reformers. 

Even as he’s aged into the 
younger Mayor Daley's regime, 
he finds the old rules sail work for 
him. If you don’t do favors, you 


sandal-numbed? Cynical? Con- don't get far in politics. 

twSL.D *f ey . aU ir ” ? In Timmy’s world, favors done 

tTooauly. But there is more. for die influential can get one an 
urte of my favorite philosoph- invitation to an exclusive club or 
ere, Jimmy Flannery, keeps a an audience with Duh Mayor or 
tavors bank,” in which he de- an appointment with a specialist 
posits all . the help others give for a sick person in your precinct 



When Real People Recoil 
From Fictional Portraits 


By Anne Bernays 


L- «, r ‘Ui oau.lb pt-IWil JJJ VUUi UlW-lllLL. 

him. Meanwhile, he makes They can also get you kickbacks 
“^posits in other people's and illegal contracts. Jimmy 


‘banks.” to be called on when 
he especially needs something. 
This, he believes, is what politics 
— or life — is all about 
Jimmy even calls it a favor 
when he is doing what he meant 
to do all along. He lets it be 
thought he was “bribed” into 


doesn’t take these favors. Some 
of his associates do, but he finds 
that no reason for giving up bis 
bank. It works. It makes his job 
possible, his life easier. 

Most people expect you will 
show favoritism to those who can 
help you. In fact, they depend on 


doing the right thing. He would it at every level of life. 

rarhpr tw» «r i u_« ■ 


rather be suspected of having a 
lower motive than stop the cir- 
culation of favors. 


In my own little sphere. I am 
constantly asked by friends to put 
in a good word for them with 


editors, agents or publishers. I do 
it when 1 can — what arc friends 
for? No one expects a politician, 
of all people, not to do that. 

In President Clinton's case, a 
monetary favor could get you a 
ride on .Air Force One. a dinner 
(or breakfast or coffee) at the 
White House, a stay in the Lin- 
coln Bedroom. This Iasi favor 
has caused special shock. 

The use of such sacred territory 
bonders on sacrilege — as if it 
would be all right to bunk down in 
the laundry room. But Lincoln 
never slept in. or set foot in. the 
Lincoln Bedroom, which is a cre- 
ation of the Truman presidency. 


No one complains when 
Chelsea's friends stay over. So 
can anyone spend the night except 
a political or financial ally? It is 
hard for the public to work up rage 
at perks given to such allies. 

If government policy is af- 
fected by the money, then com- 
plain about the policy. Bob Dole, 
angling for more tobacco money, 
opposed Food and Drug Admin- 
istration regulation of tobacco, 
claiming nicotine is not neces- 
sarily addictive. 

Does anyone think Mr. Dole 
was listening to scientific evi- 
dence and not the money ? This 
favor costs too much: Defending 


cigarettes kills people. If Mr. 
Clinton's supporters could be 
paid off with a night in the While 
House, that was cheap, in fact, it 
was a refreshing change from the 
Reagan era, when the president 
gave money to the rich in tax 
breaks. Having the rich give 
money to the president is a far 
better’ arrangement. 

The m riter. an adjunct profes- 
sor of history at Northwestern 
University, is the author, most 
recently, of "John Wayne's Amer- 
ica: The Politics of Celebrity." 
He contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Don’t Hector Asia 

Regarding "To Succeed in 
Asia, U.S. Should Recall Its Euro- 
pean Lessons" ( Opinion. Feb. 28) 
by Gerald Segal: 

Whatever die merits of Mr. 
Segal's general argument, it is not 
supported, by his extraordinary 
claim that ‘ ‘it is a cause of serious 
concern that in the 1993-94 crisis 
over North Korea’s nuclear pro- 
gram, it was Japan and Sooth 
Korea that held die Americans 
back from taking firm action.” 

And what might such firm ac- 
tion have been? Options canvassed 
at the time ranged from sanctions, 
which would have been useless 
without Chinese support, and so- 
called surgical suites against 


North Korea's nuclear facility, 
which would have unleashed anew 
Korean war. If South Korea and 
Japan, which are on the front line, 
hesitated to embrace such danger- 
ous advice being proffered from 
the safe distance of the United 
States, who could blame them? 

In fact, firm action was taken. 
Jessica Mathews’s article two days 
earlier ("At Last. There's Cause to 
Believe the Korean War Will End," 
Opinion, Feb. 26) rightly praises 
the success of the U.S.-North 
Korean nu clear accord of October 
1994. The KEDO consortium cre- 
ated to implement the accord also 
gives the lie to Mr. Segal’s claim 
that “South Korea and Japan need 
to bear greater burdens." In fact, as 
Ms. Mathews observes, Seoul and 


Tokyo are to pay for the North's 
new light-water reactors, costing 
more than $4 billion. 

I agree with Mr. Segal that 
America should develop some 
real friends in Asia. It will nor 
accomplish this, however, by hec- 
toring all and sundry in the region 
and accusing them of not pufiing 
their weight. 

AID AN FOSTER-CARTER. 

Shipley, England. 

The Character Issue 

No one understands White- 
water, but everyone can grasp the 
sleaziness of the latest revelations 
of White House sleep-overs and 
coffees and so on. Years ago. dur- 
ing Richard Nixon's first admin- 


istration, a British friend warned 
that Mr. Nixon 's character would 
be his undoing. I scoffed at this 
quaint British concept — after all, 
wasn't performance everything? 
How wrong I was. 

Those voters who held their 
noses while casting a ballot for 
BillOimon — on the basis that his 
first administration was, on bal- 
ance, successful — should rethink 
that quaint concept, character. 

GEORGE TAUCHER. 

London. 

Cowardly Fighters 

Regarding "Spanish Bullfight- 
ers Protest a Ban ” f Travel Up- 
date. Feb. 27 i: 

The bullfighters' effort to 


change a law forbidding the short- 
ening of bulls' horns is disgusting. 
Is not tormenting a bull to death 
bad enough? Only cowards would 
also seek to deprive their quarry of 
its natural defenses. 

YVONNE WALTER. 

Fully. Switzerland. 

Cloning Rare Creatures 

At last, there is a hope of saving 
endangered species. We might be 
able to witness the cloning of now 
nearly extinct condors, tigers, 
rhinoceroses and so many other 
living marvels. A big bravo for 
Dr. Ian Wilmut. A bigger one for 
Mother Nature! 

JOSE F. J ARAMELLO. 

Landsberg. Germany. 


C AMBRIDGE, Massachusetts 
— A librarian and literacy 
teacher who works in Harlem has 
filed a $100 million libel suit 
against Joe Klein, a.k.a. Anony- 
mous. the author of the novel 
“Primary Colors.” and his pub- 
lisher, Random House. 

Daria Carrer-CIark claims that 
she is the basis for the character 
Ms. Baum, a literacy teacher in 

MEAiWHJLE 

Harlem who has a fling with Jack 
Siamon. a Climonesque Southern 
governor sprinting through a pres- 
idential primary. 

Ms. Carter-Clark says she has 
been defamed because the novel 
suggests, falsely, that she had sex 
with Mr. Clinton. 

As a novelist who was once sued 
for libel. I feel Mr. Klein's pain. 
But l also understand Ms. Carter- 
Clark's pain, whether or not her 
lawsuit has merit. We fiction 
writers have to be careful when we 
appropriate other people's lives 
for use in our work. 

The collision of reality and fic- 
tion that provoked the suit against 
me concerned an odd surname I 
had given an unsavory character 
in my first novel. It was a name 
that swam up out of my uncon- 
scious: it belonged to a teenager 
I'd gone to dancing school with 
years earlier. 1 ended up settling 
out of court because my lawyer 
informed me that juries in such 
cases generally back the plaintiff. 

If names constitute a relatively 
easy shoal for a writer to avoid, 
“real life” events and people are 
somewhat trickier to navigate. 

W. Somerset Maugham, in his 
delicious novel “Cakes and Ale.” 
audaciously exploited two literary 
contemporaries. Thomas Hardy, 
who died shortly before the novel 
was written, and Hugh Walpole, 
an acquaintance. 

Saul Bellow used the tormented 
poet Delmore Schwartz, who had 
been a contemporary in New York 
literary circles, as his model for 
the main character in “Hum- 
boldt’s Gift.*' 

And Philip Roth, who seems to 
delight in taking great chunks of 
his and other people's lives and 
dropping them into his fiction, 
based his protagonist in “The 
Ghost Writer" on the novelist 
Bernard Malamud. 

None of these models sued. 


partly, I suspect, because they 
were all inhabitants of a rarefied 
literary world where such inva- 
sions are more or less expected. 

It’s understood that in addition 
to imagination, most fiction 
writers have always relied on what 
and who they know to provide the 
blood and bones of their stories 
and novels. And most of us who 
inhabit that world can live with it 

On the other hand, there is the 
case of die British poet Stephen 
Spender. He sued David Leavitt 
for plagiarism after Mr. Leavitt 
wrote a novel, “While England 
Sleeps,” that embroidered scenes 
from Mr. Spender's autobio- 
graphy in a way that the poet said 
he found “pornographic.” 

Mr. Leavitt’s publishers in 
America and Britain killed his 
book, although a reworked ver- 
sion was later published in the 
United States. 

In a recent interview (IHT, Feb. 
27), Mr. Leavitt acknowledged 
that he should have thought more 
about bow his novel would upset 
Mr. Spender. “But it was a fail- 
ure,” he said, “that resulted from 
the fact that I was so deeply into 
ihe novel as a novel that I forgot 
the real world." 

Mr. Klein cannot offer such an 
explanation. Though his novel 
tells a coming-of-age story about 
a young political aide, it’s really 
little more than a satire of the 1992 
presidential campaign. 

Despite bits of camouflage, it is 
obvious who all of the major and 
minor characters were modeled 
on. The protagonist, for example, 
is clearly based on George 
Stephanopoulos, evert though the 
fictional character is black. 

Indeed, the book, with all die 
hoopla about its anonymous au- 
thor, was marketed as disguised 
journalism: the inside story of the 
Clinton campaign. 

“Primary Colors,” and tbe 
Baum character, have the ring of 
authenticity because Mr. Klein 
hewed so closely to “real life.” 
But it is one thing to make fun of a 
public figure, especially in a book 
of political satire. It is another 
when a private person is involved. 

This is why I sympathize with 
Ms. Carter -Cl ark’s distress. 

The writer is co-author, with 
Justin Kaplan, of " The Language 
of Names." She contributed this 
comment to The New York Tunes. 


BOOKS 


TBE IDEA OF DECLINE 
IN WESTERN HISTORY 

By Arthur Herman. 521 pages. 
$30. Free Press. 

Reviewed by 
Gertrude Himmelfarb 

A dam smith said, 

“There is a great deal of 
ruin in a nation.” And so 
there is in a civilization. 

We have been living with 
predictions of decline and fail 
for so long that we have be- 
come inured to them. Yet na- 
tions have, finally, been 
ruined. It is sobering to think 
back, not only to the Roman 
Empire but to tbe Holy Ro- 
man and Ottoman empires, or 
to the Golden Ages of Spain 
and Holland. Western civi- 
lization has thus far survived, 
but it is getting harder and 
harder to be sanguine about 
its future. 

in the introduction to his 
book, Arthur Herman ex- 
plains that his subject is not 
the . decline of Western civ- 
ilization but the idea of its 
decline. But Western civili- 
zation as it has evolved in 
modem times is an idea, or at 
least a conglomerate of ideas 


— about liberty and demo- 
cracy, rights and law, church 
and state, science and tech- 
nology, private property and 
market economics. To the ex- 
tent that these ideas are dis- 
credited, Western civilization 
itself is imperiled. It is not the 
prophecy of decline that is 
self-fulfilling; it is the evi- 
dence of decline, tire loss of 
confidence in the ideas that 
have defined and sustained 
our civilization. 

Thai evidence, as presen- 
ted in this book, is powerful 
and persuasive. Theories of 
decline are as old as Western 
civilization itself, the self- 
critical spirit being an essen- 
tial part of this civilization. 
But it was in the Enlighten- 
ment that they became most 
interesting, as a foil to the 
dominant, triumphal theory 
of progress- It was then, when 
reason and nature seemed to 
conspire together to assure 
the continued progress of 
mankind, when men who 
were taken seriously by their 
peers — Condorcet in fiance, 
Godwin in England — could 
anticipate a time when per- 
fectibility would be achieved 
and mortality extinguished, 


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that others came along to re- 
fute those happy prospects; 
Rousseau insisted lhai civi- 
lization itself was corrupting, 
and Malthus that the inexor- 
able law of population would 
condemn most people to a life 
of “misery and vice." 

The crescendo of despair 
rose in the following centur- 
ies, even as the material con- 
ditions of life vastly im- 
proved. as die opportunities 
for social and economic ad- 
vance expanded, as science 
vanquished disease and tech- 
nology opened up vistas of 
new worlds to be conquered, 
and as more and more people 
came to enjoy tbe rights and 
privileges of citizenship. 
Moreover, it was not only 
particular aspects of civiliza- 
tion that came under attack; it 
was the whole of it. 

The subjects of this book 
— more than a dozen major 
figures and scores of minor 
ones — propounded grand 
theories about the decay and 
degeneration of Western civ- 
ilization. Herman categorizes 
them as “historical pessim- 
ists" (Jacob Burckhaidt. Os- 
wald Spengler, Henry 
Adams), “cultural pessim- 
ists” (Friedrich Nietzsche. 
Herbert Marcuse, Michel 
Foucault), and “racial pess- 
imists” (Arthur deGobineau, 
Houston Stewart Chamber- 
lain, Marcus Garvey). 

He distinguishes between 
those who deplore the decline 
(Burekhardt. Adams. Spen- 
gler) and those who welcome 
it (Nietzsche. Garvey, Fou- 
cault); between critics of the 
right (BurckhardL Nietzsche, 
Martin Heidegger) and of the 
left (Marcuse, Foucault, 
Frantz Fanon). 

Pans of the book read like 

potted history, a succession of 

names making cameo appear- 
ances on -stage before being 


rapidly ushered off. With the 
major characters, however, 
Herman displays great virtu- 
osity. managing to respect 
their differences and at the 
same time the common ideas 
that underlie them. 

Thus the theory of racial 
degeneracy is shown as an | 
argument for imperialism 
(the duty of superior races to | 
civilize primitive ones), and 
as an argument against it (the | 
pure, vital races of the Third 
World being contaminated by 
the interbred and effete 
West). Or religion appears in 
some cases as a cause of de- 
cline (Christianity making a 
virtue of weakness and meek- 
ness) and in others as a con- 
sequence of it (Christianity 
being subverted by the forces 
of materialism and secular- 
ism). 

Tbe most powerful parts of 
the book are the concluding 
chapters bringing the story up 
to the present. We are all too 
familiar with the apocalyptic 
thinkers of old; we dunk we 
have put all that behind us. It 
is unnerving, therefore, to be 
confronted with our own 
prophets of doom echoing 
those old ideas, and even 
more, to discover that they are 
predominantly of the left 
rather than the right. 

Whar we can now use is a 
companion volume that will 
put the idea of the decline and 
fall of Western civilization in 
proper perspective — the per- 
spective of two centuries of 
its rise and endurance, some- 
times. as this book suggests, 
in tbe face of great adversity 
and animosity. 

Gertrude Himmelfarb. 
whose most recent book is 
"The De-Moralization of So- 
ciety: From Victorian Virtues 
to Modern Values," wrote this 
for The Washington Post. 



Gaborone. November 18 8 19. 1997 


Following successful meetings in South Africa 
and Zimbabwe, the International Herald 
Tribune is convening I he third Sou (hem Africa 
Trade & Investment Summit in Botswana on 
November 18 & 19. The event will be lead by 
heads of state and ministers, wiih key 
industrialists and financiers among I he speakers. 


As part of the International Herald Tribunes 
world-wide summit program, emphasis will be 
given lt» high level debate and networking. 
Discussion will focus on a range of issues 
including investment opportunities, tbe outlook 
for business in the region and the prospects for 
increasing in Ira-regional trade. 



To ensure lhal you do nol miss this very special event 
please contact our conference office for further details. 

Finny Cuttuil 

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63 Lung Acre. IzJinUn W C2F. 9JH 

Telephone: l W 171 1 836 1802 Fax: (4-1 171) 83ij 0717 email: frowantS’iliLcom 





tr 

BUNE 

,1997 

VGE 9 


THE WORLD'S DAILY NEWSPAPER 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1997 
PAGE 10 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 



Cabaret Drama, Vampires and a Look at the Wilde Side 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — It’s a very offbeat 
kind of week, with an in- 
triguing cabaret drama and 
two remarkable solo plays. 
“The Stow Drag” by Carson Kreit- 
zer. at the seldom -used Freedom 
Theatre (a jazz club basement off War- 
dour Street), starts out from one of 
those riveting little stories, as tantal- 
izing as the sound of one shoe falling, 
that never seem to get fully explored. In 
a February 1989 issue of Time 
magazine, there was a very brief ob- 
ituary for a jazzman called Billy Tipton 
who had refused to take bis ulcer to a 
doctor or ever to undress in the presence 
of his adopted family. Four days after 
his death, the undertaker called to tell 
them that Tipton was in fact a woman 
who had lived her whole life as a man. 


From those slender beginnings, 

Kreitzer has crafted a haunting and 
mesmeric epitaph for Tipton and the 
whole world of postwar jazz on the 
road- Through the evening. Kim 
Criswell, our latter-day Ethel Merman, 
belts out the anthems and croons the 
classic torch songs of the era. while 
Nikki Slade and Christopher 
Colquhoun, talents new to me. play out 
this strange bandstand story. 

At only 90 minutes including a dozen 
songs, this is bound to be a fragmentary 
affair, and we end up knowing precious 
little more about Upton (Johnny Christ- 
mas in the play) than was originally 
recorded by Time. Yet the mood and the 
material are so right, so haunting and so 
evocative of a lost world that I suspect 
we shall be seeing “The Slow Drag ’ in 
a larger and better-funded venue. 

What it tell us in the end is that if a 
man has his music, he can even be a 


woman; what survives is the music, and 
a wonderfully bisexual performance 
from Slade. If love songs have ho spe- 
cial gender, why should their singers? 
Like all great short stories, this one 
leaves a number of unanswered ques- 
tions, but they are all the right ones. 

As for the solos, the one at the Bush 
has Brian Cox as a failed, alcoholic 


LONDON THEATER 


drama critic falling in love with an 
actress, pursuing Iter to London and 
ending up as the procurer for a house- 
hold of vampires. Daft as it sounds, “SL 
Nicholas” is a story of considerable 
fascination, and not necessarily because 
of the unspoken connection between 
vampires and critics. In Conor McPh- 
erson we have yet another young Irish 


dramatist of geains. which makes it, by 
my connt, half a dozen in less than half 


that many years. Cox gives us a shaggy, 
dogged man to go with his shaggy dog 
story, and soon enough it becomes clear 
that be is only a critic because, for the 
purposes of the tale, he needs to have 
some sort of. alibi for ending up in 
London theatrical pubs in search of lost 
love and his own lost soul. 

Soot he is among real vampires in- 
stead of theatrical ones; they are winy, 
elegant creatures who turn him into an 
equally elegant clone so that he may 
tempt young Londoners back to a series 
of garden parties at which the vampires 
merely remove a little of their blood, 
probably about as much as they ask you 
to donate to transfusion clinics, before 
returning them safely to mundane lives. 

Gradually we realize that “St Nich- 
olas’ ’ is a redemption story in reverse; 
the critic in midlife crisis eventually 
discovers himself in a morning-after 
hangover and decides to go home to 


Ireland and get on with some sort of 
writing, even if only the tale of the 
vampires. It is a strange, sometimes 
satirical and sometimes genuinely 
haunting monologue about the busi- 
ness of contemporary blood-sucking 

on all levels of creativity, and it is to the 
credit of Cox and his director-author 
that we feel we have just met a most 
extraor dinar y man in a pub, rather than 
paid good money to hear his tale. 


T HIS week’s other solo also 
eman ates from Dublin. From 
March 13 at the Savoy. Simon 
Callow brings back “The Im- 
portance of Being Oscar,” the Wilde 
solo that die late Michael MacLiam- 
moir took around the country and die 
world formost of the last 15 years of his 
life. MacLiammoir, origin ally from 
North London, had by then made him- 
self more Irish even than Wilde him- 


self, and Callow was his dresser on ^ 

some of those tours, so it is fitting that 
be should now be the first m reiave 
what it still a marvelous guide to life 
and death, on the Wilde side. 

In Patrick Garland’s staging. Callow 
brilliantly brings the show up to date. 
We set Oscar’s rise to fame, his decline 
to prison and early death. We also get 
the whole of “De Profundis and 
rather more of * “Salome' than we per- 
haps need; but by remaining outside the 
frame, as narrator and acror. Callow 
brings a kind of critical detachment to 
what used to be a celebrauon- 

The monologue was written long be- 
fore the definitive E 11m an biography. 
anrf there might perhaps have been a 
case for adding a few of its insights: but 
all in all this is a rich, rare and won- 
derfully entertaining account of the first 
great media star in all his self-created 
glory and self-inflicted despair. 


The New Voices in French Film 


P ARIS — A group of high- 
voltage women with singular 
voices, an original tone and a 
sense of humor have clearly 
emerged as a major force in French 
filmmaking. If any proof was needed, it 
was 29-year-old Sandrine Veysset. who 
came out of thin air late last year to win 
the prestigious Prix DeUuc and the 
Cesar for best first film for her “ Y aura- 
t-il de la neige a Noel?” 

The most visible and premising first 
films seem to be coming from women, 
and the phenomenon is picking up 
speed. This flourishing of first films is 
due in part to institutional support, such 
as the French commission that provides 
seed money for films . Jeanne Moreau, 
who acted as president of the com- 
mission — and who is also a film di- 
rector — sees a movement that has been 
growing for years: “Nothing happens 
overnight.” 

In 18%, Alice Guy directed and pro- 
duced for Gauraont studios. In the '20s, 
the avant-garde Germaine Dulac ma<fc 
films scripted by Antonin Artaud. In 
modem times, there was. memorably. 
Marguerite Duras, who handcrafted her 
films on the beaches of Trouville, and 
always went her own way. 

The political '70s exploded with a 
spate of movies about women going 
their own way: Nelly Kaplan's “La 


By Joan Dupont 

International Herald Tribune 


Fiancee du pirate,” Agnes Varda's 
“L’une chante, F autre pas.” Michele 
Rosier’ s take on George Sand, “George 
Qui?” Coline Serreau made a bisexual 


love story, “Pounquoi pas?.” two de- 
cades before Josiane Baiasko came out 


cades before Josiane Baiasko came out 
with “Gazon maudit,’ ’ her French twist 
on lesbian domesticity. “Seireau’s 
movie was more authentic,” comments 
director Pascale Ferrari, “but then, it 
was a more authentic age.' ’ 

Belgian-bom Chantal Akerman be- 
came the major independent of the ’70s 
with films that crossed borders — “Je, 
tu. il. elle,” showing women making 
love, “Golden Eighties,” a musical, 
and in the ’90s. “Un Divan a New 
York.” a comedy. 

Today’s women also explore private 
histories and uncharted ground; they 
film their actresses — Valeria Bruni 
Tedeschi. Sandrine Kiberiain, Charlotte 
Gainsbourg — like heroines, die way 
Duras filmed Delphine Seyrig, but in a 
world without glamour. 

Claire Denis’s “Nenette et Boni” is 
located on die fringes of Marseille so- 
ciety. Laurence Ferreira Barbosa's 
“Les Gens normaux n'ont rien d ’ ex- 
ceptions f (There’s Nothing Excep- 
tional About Normal People) takes 
place in a mental hospital, Ferran's 
“Petits arrangements avec la mort” 
(Coming to Terms with Death) on a 
beach with mourners of lost childhood, 
Laetitia Masson's “En avoir ou pas” 
among provincial have-nots, Yolande 


Zaubennan’s “Moi Ivan, Toi Abra- 
ham' ' in a Polish shtetl. “Today’s world 
is so hard,” muses Zauberman, “wo- 
men, who are out of the mainstream, 
turn inward, to their dreams.” 

Daniele Dubroux, an actress, is a di- 
rector first, who creates a character — 
elegant and wry — and writes herself 
into the film. Dubroux, whose modem 
fantasy, * ‘Le journal du seducteur” (Di- 
ary of a Lady's Man) opens soon in New 
York, came to direct by accident, when 
she was a critic at Cahiers du Cinema. 
“At the Cahiers in the '70s, we all 
wanted to make movies against the es- 
tablishment.” she says. “Tlien we went 
different ways. I started making 
shorts.” 

In “Journal du seducteur.” she plays 
a mother figure to Chiara Mastroianni. 
As a teacher of film, she welcomes 
younger directors. “Ferrari was a stu- 
dent of mine — brilliant — and I feel a 
kinship with Ferreira Barbosa. We have 
something in common, but we’re not 
really part of a family; we’re all out 
there.” 











Onor OrayoSipiu . 

Chiara Mastroianni and Hubert Saint Macary in Daniele Dubroux'sfilm "Le Journal du seducteur . " 


P ASCALE Ferrari, who gradu- 
ated from IDHEC, the state film 
school, sees women's cinema as 
“more in touch with reality.” 
Men, she says, “make movies that are 
connected to cinema culture; we don’t 
have a Wenders or a Lynch, not yet.” 

Ferran composed her crew for “ ‘Petits 
arrangements avec la mort” with care. 


Thursday, March 6, 1997 at 8:30 p.m. 

RICHARD LALU SARA LAIMON 


choosing a woman producer, “and a 
cameraman who wasn’t a cowboy, so I 
wouldn't feel isolated. 

Still,” she recalls, “when I finished, 
even after w innin g the Camera d'or at 
Cannes. I was at die end of my rope.” 
Ferran's second film, “L'age des pos- 
sibles,” will be screened in New York 
this spring. 

Laurence Ferreira Barbosa did not get 
into IDHEC; she went to work for Paulo 
Branco, a distributor, who became her 
producer. “Les gens normaux n’ont ri- 
en d’ exceptional el” appeared in 1993. 
starring Valeria Bruni Tedeschi as a 
woman over the edge. The film had the 


kind of ironic look at so-called normal 
society that became a hallmark of '90s 
cinema made by women. 

‘Tm from a generation that takes it 
for granted that women make movies,” 
she comments. Yet shooting love scenes 
makes her uncomfortable: “We don't 
have die same relationship with our 
actress as a man does, and we’ve been 
fed on films like Kazan’s ‘Splendor in 
the Grass.’ ” Ferreira Barbosa’s up- 
coming film is called “J’ai horreur de 
I’amour” (I hate love). 

Sandrine Veysset, searched for two 
years before finding a producer who let 
her make “Y aura-t-il de la neige a 


Noel?” (Will There Be Snow at Christ- 
mas’) her way, with a nonprofessional 
cast The movie opened in Paris the 
week before Christmas and won a wide 
audience, rare for a first movie. 

“I’m not part of the cinema milieu! 
and it scares producers,” she says. (She 
studied art and literature in Montpellier. ; 
in southern France.) But she found one. . 
Humbert Balsan, “who was tickled.” 

Balsan gave her a small budget, 
enough to bring the story of seven chil- 
dren — “a magic number" — to the 
screen. ' ‘I wouldn 't have known what to 
do with more money, ’ ’ she remarks. She . 
is now working on her second Film. 


FRANZ SCHUBERT 

DtesckSne MUM 
(The Beautiful maid of the mill) 


In Berlin, an Odd Space Odyssey 


H ’ J ‘Rkfurd LafS sang with enormous 
MjgM fedvtg and amtprrktnskm, 

W U&BBt doming the border between mask and poetry’ 

® (Alex Ross. New York Times ) 

Salle Cortot 

78. rue Card met 75017 Paris M“ Malesherbes. Monceau 
A ctwiBBinicw wu. be requested to benert La FosomoN des Honraux de Rubs. 


B ERLIN — Rank Lloyd 
Wright called U.S. television 
"chewing gum for the eyes.” 
Expanding on this idea, the 
Swiss rock musical “Space Dream” 
takes on as many senses as it can. 

“Space Dream” was bom in 1994 in 
the provincial town of Aargau, where 
three scheduled performances bur- 
geoned into nine sellouts. 

In 1995 it moved to the larger town of 
Baden, where 200,000 spectators, de- 
spite hefty ticket prices, turned “Space 
Dream” into a Swiss smasheroo. 

There, Brigitte Eichenberger caught 
what she calls the “Space Dream" virus 
(“Don’t dream your life, live your 
dream!”), and she has now moved her 
superspectacular production into the 
elaborately renovated Hangar H of Ber- 
lin’s Tempelhof Airport, at a cost of 
nearly $10 million. 


By Paul Moor 

International Herald Tribune 


BROADWAY 
A FUNNY THING HAPPENED 
ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM 

WHOOPI GOLDBERG 
Tue.-&at a 8 pm/Mafe Wad 8 
Sat 2 p.m., Suidays at 3 pJH. 


CBI (212) 23M2M4B00) 432-7250 
Si Jamas Theatre, 246 W 44 St 


BROADWAY 

BENT 

"Shimmera with hops ter the funjra 
of 8M American MuricaT The NY Timas 
Tuee-Sat 8p.m. Sun 7pjn. 

Mata Sal-Sun 2p.m. 
Ticfcetmaater 212-307-4100 
Nederiander Theatre, 206 W 41st St 


CATS 

Now and Forever 
Mon -Wad.. Fri. & Sat 8 pm. 
Mats Wed A Sat 2 pm, Sun. 3 pm. 
Tetechaige 21 2-239-6200 
Writer Garden Theatre 
Broadway 5 50th St, NYC 


SMOKET JOE’S CAFE 


The Songs at Leber & Staler 
Directed by Jerry Zaks 

GRAMMY WINNEFO Beet Musical 1996 
Tu»«al BjunJAa Vfed 4 Sri 2pm, Sui 3pm 
CaB Tatecharjje ( 2121 239-6200 
VYgWe Theatre 245 W 52nd St 


CHICAGO 

The Musical 

Tue-Sa a a Mate WM & Sal a 2, Sun at 3 
Catl Teie Charge TSxJay (600) 432-7250 
Groups (800) 223-7565 
StHdwt Theatre (♦} 225 Vf 44th Si 


Rodgars & Hammersfoin’s 
THE KING & I 

Tn a word. MAGNIFICENTT— 

The New Yorker 

Tue-Sat SpAtets Wed 8 Sat 2p Sun 3p 
Tlcfcetmasier 212*307-4100 
Ne« Simon Theatre. 25Q W 52nd Si 


What’s it all about? A female Earth- 
ling named Reachei dreams about the 
planet Hexxor, populated by two 
peoples who detest each other. As a 
substitute for war, they launch a space- 
travel competition. An emergency land- 
ing on Earth brings love at first sight to 
Reachei and the Hexxorian pilot, etc. 
The cast speaks German bur sings in 
English. Go figure. 

If you like Las Vegas, you’ll love 
“Space Dream.” It employs no sets 
worth mentioning, but it does feature 
dazzling lighting effects (Antonio 
delTEra). including a riveting laser- 
show interlude of awesome dimensions 
and impact. 

Costumes by Ursula BraendLi and 
Vittoria Michel range from Erector Set 
for the space-ship crew (“My mother 
was a Harley” boasts one, roller blades 
apparently grafted onto his ankles) to 
chieftains' robes reminiscent of the Ma- 
sonic passages in “The Magic Flute.” 

Generally speaking, however, there is 


considerably less to “Space Dream” 
than meets the eye. 

One could scarcely imagine more 
amateurish music than Harry Schaerer 
has cranked out Despite pitiless re- 
petition of certain passages, amplified 
only sporadically close to the threshold 
of pain, by the end everything bored into 
one ear has long since shot out the other, 
with no tune approaching hit potential. 

Most of the cast measures up to the 
quality of the material , although some of 
Mark Wuest’s choreography rises 
above the prevailing level, and the dan- ! 
cers perform with sometimes almost 
unnerving energy. 

Almost shockingly, for 1997, the 
negligible love interest never goes be- 
yond the early Beaties’ “I Want to Hold’ 
Your Hand.” 

Eichenberger reckons that, if “Space 
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BUSINESS/FINANCE 

IT 

R 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1997 

RUNE 

PAGE 11 , 1997 

— iGE9 


’ c« •" -'.IJI 






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Renault Announces 
Job Slashes in France 

Move Follows Belgian Plant Closure 


By Barry James 

— International Herald Tnhune 

PARIS Renauli S A told worker 
representatives Tuesday that it would 
cut an additional 2,764 jobs in France 
°l ^P. of the 3,100 jobs it plans to 
shed with us decision to close its plant 
in Belgium. 

i u^ on -If 31 * 6 ™ promised a long 
'"^conflict as a result of the cuts, 
wjuch are the company 's biggest since 
it laid off 6,000 workers five years ago 
at its headquarters in Boulogne-Bit- 
Jancourt, near Paris. But it has long 
had a program of attrition, and jobs 
have declined by about 60.000 in the 
past decade, to 138,000 

The decision to close the plant at 
Vilvoorde near Brussels came as a 
surprise to unions and politicians 
alike, since the factory had recently 
been extensively modernized and 
produces two of the company's best- 
selling automobiles, the Clio and 
Megane models. 

Production will shift to Douai in 
northern France and to PaJencia in 
Spain. 

The decision to close the Belgian 
plant touched off a labor blockade of 
the factory and the threat of legal action 
by the Belgian government, which al- 
leges that Renault failed to heed Euro- 
pean Union legislation requiring it to 
consult workers on the plant closure. 

Unions have called for a strike on 


Friday at all Renault plants. One labor 
leader, Daniel Richter, said it could be 
"the beginning of a long period of 
labor struggle at Renault all over 
Europe." But although some French 
union members marched with their 
Belgian colleagues during a demon- 
stration in Brussels, there has never 
been effective coordination among 
unions in Europe. 

While the Belgian decision hits a 
single region, the impact of job layoffs 
in France is likely to be more diffuse. 
Union officials said they expected the 
company to announce cuts in plants in 
Flirts, Cleon, Sandouville, Le Mans 
and at Boulogne- Bill ancourt. 

In France, there are likely to be 
fewer direct layoffs than in Belgium, 
with the company releasing workers 
on eariy-retirement programs, putting 
others on to part-time work and hiring 
some younger workers. 

Partly privatized in 1994 but still 
46-percent state-owned, Renault 
faces losses that analysts said may be 
much higher than expected because of 
restructuring costs. The financial 
newspaper Les Echos said Tuesday 
that the losses could amount to 5.5 
billion francs (almost SI billion). 

Not only does Renault face over- 
capacity in the European industry but 
like other automakers it will also have 
to contend with more competition 
from Japanese manufacturers when 
import quotas are abolished in 2000. 







Tin- 

The deputy Treasury secretary, Lawrence Summers, at a conference table, and senior officials of Japan’s Finance Ministry at a news conference Tuesday. 

U.S.- Japan Trade Upstages 6-Nation Talks 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Top financial and cen- 
tral-bank officials from six Asia-Pacific 
nations, meeting for the first time, 
agreed Tuesday to work closely togeth- 
er to avert Mexico-style currency crises 
in the region. 

The talks, however, were largely 
overshadowed by separate meetings be- 
tween Lawrence Summers, the U.S. 
deputy Treasury secretary, and Japa- 
nese officials during which Mr. Sum- 
mers strongly urged Japan to keep its 
trade surplus in check. 

He suggested that Japan lift its weak 


economic growth by stimulating de- 
mand at home rather than by pushing 
exports abroad. 

In the first what are planned to be- 
come annual meetings of what is known 
as the “Six Markets Group." the coun- 
tries agreed to “closely collaborate’ * on 
foreign -ex change and capital-flow 
policies, Japan's deputy finance min- 
ister, Takatoshi Kato, said. 

Collectively, the six — Japan, the 
United States, Chino. Hong Kong, 
Singapore and Australia — account for 
48 percent of the world's economic 
activity, a third of its foreign-exchange 
reserves and 31 percent of its trade, 
officials said. 


The agreement was viewed in Japan 
as another step toward tighter ties 
among the region's major nations: Ja- 
pan. China and the United States. The 
meeting was also considered significant 
because the organization is the first re- 
gional financial body to include China. 

Mr. Summers, in the separate dis- 
cussions. urged Japan to keep its trade 
surplus under control, echoing com- 
ments he made Sunday before leaving 
Washington. 

“We see it as very important that 
Japan acts to achieve domestic demand- 
lea expansion, of course, because that is 
necessary if there is not to be a re- 
surgence in Japan's global trade sur- 


plus," he said. Mr. Summers met sev- 
eral Japanese officials, including the 
finance minister, Hiroshi Mitsuzuka, 
and the governor of the Bank of Japan, 
Yasuo Matsushita. 

Mr. Summers said he told them Japan 
needed to implement macroeconomic 
policies to promote a strong recovery. 
To achieve a recovery led by domestic 
consumption, he said Japan also needed 
to deregulate its financial sector and its 
broader economy. Japan must also 
provide better corporate disclosure and 
access to local markets for foreign 
companies, he said. At a news con- 

See SURPLUS, Page 12 


Official Calls on China to Cut Trade Gap by Giving U.S. Firms Fair Share 9 


BEIJING — China needs to cut its 
mounting trade surplus with the United 
States, and a “fair share" of contracts 
for American firms would help to close 
the gap, a senior U.S. trade official said 
Tuesday, 

“■pie trade deficit with China is not 
politically sustainable and needs to be 
addressed," said Stuart Eizenstat, the 
U.S. undersecretary of commerce. 

Mr. Eizenstat said that in talks with 
Chinese officials he delivered this mes- 
sage along with a list of about 20 major 
projects on which U.S. companies hope 
to win contracts. 

The projects, worth “tens of billions 


of dollars," cover a whole range of 
sectors, including energy, telecommu- 
nications. information services and avi- 
ation, Mr. Eizenstat said. 

He said he handed the list, which 
includes “very precise designations of 
the projects involved." and which also 
names the U.S. firms competing for 
each deal to Sun Zhenyum, China’s vice 
foreign trade minister, during talks. 

During his talks with Mr. Sun and 
other senior Chinese trade officials, Mr. 
Eizenstat said he repeatedly mentioned 
the U.S. trade deficit with China, which 
swelled to nearly $40 billion last year, a 
17 percent rise over 1 995 and a fourfold 


increase since 1990. 

China accounted for almost 24 per- 
cent of the global U.S. trade deficit last 
year and is rapidly replacing Japan as 
the main trade concern in Congress, Mr. 
Eizenstat said. 

“The key to reducing this deficit is 
greater market access for our exports," 
he said. 

Responding to Chinese concerns 
over U.S. financing for certain projects. 
Mr. Eizenstat said the U.S. Export-Im- 
port Bank’s exposure in China was its 
second largest in die world. 

Mr. Eizenstat also called on both sides 
to stop arguing over the exact size of the 


U.S. trade deficit, which China says is 
far smaller because it does not count 
transshipments through Hong Kong. 

' 'The real debate should not be a duel 
over figures," Mr. Eizenstat said. "It 
should focus on real and sustained mar- 
ket access." 

He said the "best tool” for carving 
out that access would be China's joining 
the World Trade Organization. 

Mr. Eizenstat said that while the U.S. 
supports China’s accession to the WTO, 


it must be based on “sound, commer- 
cially viable terms." 

Besides excessive tariff barriers, Mr. 
Eizenstat listed a number of obstacles to 
increased trade with China, including a 
lack of transparency in rules and reg- 
ulations. the adoption of new regula- 
tions with no prior notice and an un- 
certain legal system. 

Mr. Eizenstat also said the United 
States would be willing to discuss grant- 
ing China a post -entry transition period, 


'‘where appropriate," to facilitate the 
adoption of certain WTO regulations. 

Beijing wants to join the WTO on the 
relatively easy tenns of a developing 
country, but Washington insists that the 
Chinese economy is too big for such 
treatment 

Mr. Eizenstat pointed out that about 
30 other states were looking to join the 
international body and were watching 
the negotiations with Beijing closely. 

(AFX. Reuters ) 






High-Definition TV Highlights Flaws 


Global Private Banking 


. . . By Joel Brinkley. 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Fake bookcases, 
graffiti on the anchorman's desk, stubble 
on the sportscaster’s chin — this is the 
future face of television, waits and all. 

At WHD-TV, where broadcasters are 
running an experimental high -defini- 
tion-television station, the engineers 
and on-air personalities are finding that 
the high-resolution digital images that 
will scan to be beamed into millions of 
homes next year can actually make 
some things look decidedly worse. 

For more than a decade, the action in 
high-definition television has involved 
debates over technical formats and other 
en gin eering arcana. But now that the 
U.sT Federal Communications Com- 
mission has adopted a single standard 
for the next generation of television, and 
high -definition sets are scheduled to 
reach the stores next year, television 
producers and directors are turning their 
attention to what will take place in front 
of the cameras. They do not always like 

what they see. . . . .. 

The problem starts with studio sets 
and backdrops. With conventional tele- 
vision. it matters little w hat tiwyare 
made of — mahogany or cardboard, 
chrome or duct tape — or whefterftey 
are filthy and battered. The resolution of 
regular televisions is so poor that view- 
er! cannot tell the difference. 


“With the old TV, you can get away 
with murder," said Jim Fenhagen, a set 
designer who works for the major net- 
works. When WHD began broadcasting 
last summer from the basement of WRC, 
the NBC-owned station in Washington, 
cameramen set up their high 'definition 
camera in some of WRC’s usual studios. 

"The sets just didn't bold up too 
well," said James McKinney, the ex- 
perimental station’s project director. 

Mr. Fenhagen was less understated. 

"In high definition,” he said, “it was 

3P Se tfie graffiti, for example. For 
years, members of WRC's evening 
news team have doodled on the studio 
desktop while wailing to go on the air. 
So the top of the three-seat desk is 
covered with drawings and short, writ- 
ten quips — all of it invisible to viewers 
so far. 

But when the WHD crew turned a 
high-definition camera on the set for test 
broadcasts, "you could read everything 
they had ever drawn — right thereon the 
TV,” Me.- M cKinney said. 

The problem does not stop with the 
sets. Some people do not particularly 
like the way they look in high defin- 
ition. 

For SO. years, television stars, both 
men and women, have applied heavy 
powder and thick pancake makeup to 
cover winkles. 5 o'clock shadows and 
other facial imperfections. Though the 


makeup is far from subtle, on TV it 
looks just fine. Even for problems that 
makeup cannot easily hide, television's 
low resolution usually smoothes the 
rough edges. Not so with high -defin- 
ition TV. 

"Where’d that mole come from?" 
one of NBC's longtime television per- 
sonalities asked rhetorically the first 
time he saw his face on a WHD mon- 
itor. 

With the transition to high-definition 
Television just around the comer, every 
station wilt have to install digital equip- 
ment in the next few years. Last year, 
260 stations in the United States con- 
tributed money to set up a model high- 
definition station to experiment with the 
new medium and figure out its problems 
and potential. 

The model-station project is coordin- 
ated by the Association for Maximum 
Service Television, a trade group. Man- 
ufacturers agreed to donate the equip- 
ment , 

Washington was selected as the site, 
and WRC was chosen largely because 
its offices had enough room for the 
equipment The Federal Communica- 
tions Commission agreed to lend WHD 
an unused UHF channel, 34, for the 
broadcasts. (They can be picked up on 
the few high-definition TVs that re- 
search engineers operate locally; reg- 

See DIGITAL, Page 15 


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PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 


The Dow 


30-Year T-Bond Yield 



635 




a 

- > 123 


Bonanza of Splits on Horizon 

Studies Find That Stocks Prosper Following Dilutions 


Data and Greenspan 
Shake Up Wall Street 


* 115 



By David Barboza 

NfH' York Times Service 


’'" O H O J F M'*"" O N D J F M 
1996 1997 ' 1996 1997 ’ 




NEW YORK — With the Dow 
Jones industrial average hovering 
around the 7,000-point level and 
stock prices at record levels, 
companies are once again indul- 
ging in that old bull market pas- 
time: stock splitting. 

Already this year, live compa- 
nies whose stocks are Dow com- 






portents — Boeing Co., Du Pont 
Co., Exxon Co., International 
Business Machines Corp. and 
Philip Morris Cos. ■ — have an- 
nounced plans to split. Other large 
companies, such as Intel Coip., 
BankAmerica Corp. and Bristol- 
Myers Squibb Co., are also 
scheduling splits in whai analysts 
say could be one of the biggest 
years ever for stock splits. 

Although many dismiss stock 
splits as merely cosmetic, arguing 
that they fail to increase share- 
holder value, several studies have 
shown that shares that have split 
generally outperform the shares of 
comparably sized companies in 
die years after the split. 

In other words, while stock splits 
themselves, which simply lower the 
price of a stock by dividing those 
shares already held, are rather in- 




P ■ +082 j 








Source: Bioombera ! ' 


mm 


lacrmukMal Herald Tribune 


Very brief lys 

Tenneco to Fire 1,000 at Auto Unit 


DEERFIELD, Illinois (Bloomberg) — Tenneco Inc. said 
Tuesday that it would dismiss 1,000 employees at its auto- 
motive unit in the first phase of a reorganization aimed at 
saving $100 million over die next 18 months. 

Tenneco Automotive is combining the functions of its 
Walker' exhaust-products operations, based in Racine, Wis- 
consin, with its Monroe ride-control products division in 
Monroe, Michigan. It will also create six business units to 
operate in North America, Europe, Asia and South America. 

The moves will * ‘significantly improve our speed and agility 
as a company while increasing operational effectiveness,” the 
chief executive of Tenneco Inc., Dana Mead, said. 


ahead. That means a split could be a 
signal for investors to buy. 


“The evidence suggests that 
even though the event is meaning- 
less, the market tends to react pos- 
itively to it” said David Eken berry, 
a professor of finance at Rice Uni- 
versity in Houston, who co-wrote a 
study on stock splits. “Splits don't 
cause good news. Good news ap- 
pears to be motivating splits to oc- 
cur in the first place.” 

Of the 14 companies in the Stan- 
dard & Poor's 100 — an index of 
the largest U.S. corporations — 
that had. stock splits last year, nine 
of them have easily outperformed 
die index since they split, by about 
eight percentage points, and the 
average of all 14 has outpaced the 
index by more than two points. 

Shares of Hewlett-Packard Co., 
which split 2-for-l in July, rose 37 
percent, against 28 percent for the 
S&P 100, since then. 

Coca-Cola Co. shares, which 
split in May, were the index’s best 
post-split performer, nearly doub- 
ling the 21 percent gain in the S&P 
100 since then. 

There are always exceptions. The 
stock of PepsiCo Inc., which also 
split in May. was the S&P 100’s 
worst-performing splitter last year, 
gaining 0.8 percent since the split. 

Last year, it turns out. was a 
banner year for stock splits. On the 
New York Stock Exchange, 166 
companies had stock splits, up 26 
percent from the year before and 
the highest number since 1987. 


There were an additional 572 stock 
splits on the Nasdaq composite in- 
dex last year, among them shares of 
Microsoft Corp. and Oracle Coip. 

“We’re certainly seeing an in- 
creasing amount — we’re in an 
uptrend as far as splits go,” said 
Joseph Tigue of Standard & Poor’s 
Corp. “It the market keeps on its 
bull path, we should set a record." 

As for the Dow stocks sched- 
uled to split this year, two of them 
did very well the last time they 
split. 

Shares of Philip Morris have 


Cvyrfn/ M iVbffiaa Pur kUl 

NEW YORK — Stocks finished 
mixed Tuesday, as economic news 
carrying inflationary implications 
was offset by strength in technology 
issues. 

Comments from Alan Green- 
span. the Federal Reserve Board 
chairman, added to the volatility. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed down 66.20 points at 
6,852.72, and. the Standard & 
Poor’s 500-share index fell 4.36 
points to 790.95. 

But gaining issues outnumbered 


stable inflation." But he also said 
die Fed’s role was to "foster the 
conditions most likely io \ produce 
a healthy economy with low in- 
flation. Analysts took that comment 
as a him at higher interest rates to 

Expectations that central-bank 
policymakers will raise U.S. interest 
rates when they meet March 25 held 
back the stock and bond maikeis 
Tuesday. Those expectations were 


UJ3. STOCKS 


losing ones by a 5-to-4 ratio on the 
New York Stock Exchange, and the 


tripled since their 1989 split, com- 
pared with an increase of 150 per- 


pared with an increase of 150 per- 
cent for the Dow. Du Pom. which 
split in 1990, has gained 180 per- 
cent compared with the Dow’s 
166 percent 

But the history of this year’s 
other Dow splitters offer some 
caution. Boeing and Exxon trail 
the Dow badly since their shares 
last split Boeing is up 75 percent 
since it split in 1990. compared 
with a 140 percent rise in the Dow, 
while Exxon is up 112 percent 
since its 1 987 spliL compared with 
the Dow’s 170 percent gain. 

IBM, which said it would split its 
stock in May, has an even more 
tattered past The last three times 
IBM split its stock lost an average 
of 45 percent over the next few 
years. After its last split in 1979, 
shares of IBM lost 36 percent in 28 
months, falling from $75 to $48. 


New York Stock Exchange, and the 
technology-heavy Nasdaq compos- 
ire index closed up 6.19 points, at 
1,31737. 

Mr. Greenspan said Tuesday that 
he had no intention of driving down 
equity prices with his recent com- 
ments on the surge on Wall Street. 

Mr. Green span, appearing before 
the House Budget Committee, said 
he had merely been trying to ex- 
plain that Federal Reserve policy- 
makers had to take account of the 
behavior of tire stock and bond mar- 
kets in making decisions on mon- 
etary policy. 

“What I was trying to do in 
December — and what I did last 
week — was to try and lay out all of 
the various factors which we ex- 
amine for purposes of monetary 
policy,” he said 

Mr. Greenspan also forecast 
“continued sustainable economic 
growth accompanied by low and 


fanned by a government report that 
sales of new homes rose 8.6 percent 
in January from December and by a 
0 3 percent increase in the Con- 
ference Board’s index of leading 
economic indicators for January . 

The potential for inflation con- 
tained in the data also hit the Treas- 
ury-bond market where the price of 
the bellwether 30-year issue fell 14/ 
32 point to 96 31/32, taking the 
yield up to 6.86 percent from 6.83 
percent Monday. 


But there were bright spots on 
Wall Street Technology issues 
were led higher by Dell, which rose 
to 73, after the computer maker 
said sales from its Internet site were 
increasing 20 percent a month and 
generating revenue of more than $ 1 
million a day. 

Chipmakers also rallied on ex- 
pectations for chip prices to rebound. 
Intel rose l A to 1 47, and Texas 
Instruments rose 2, to 82, to lead the 
gainers. ( Bloomberg , AP. AFP) 


SURPLUS: Group Will Work to Prevent Asian Currency Instability, but Trade Issues Dog Talks 


• Ford Motor Co. plans to drop its Th underbird and Cougar 
car lines at die end of this model year, according to company 
and industry sources. The Thunde third, introduced in 1955, is 
Ford's oldest continuously produced car, and one source said 
the name would probably be revived in the 2000 model year. 

• Kruger Inc. has agreed to buy Scott Paper Ltd. for 351 
million Canadian dollars ($256.8 million) in cash and 10-year 
notes. Kimberly-Clark Corp. agreed to sell its 50.1 percent 
stake to the Montreal-based company, which will also assume 
100 million dollars of debt 

• Viacom Inc. posted a fourth-quarter loss of $227.4 million 
and attributed it to costs from its decision to leave the computer- 
game business. Sales rose 22 percent to $3.41 billion. 

• Microsoft Corp. said three students had found a security flaw 
in the latest version of its Internet Explorer browsing software 
that could affect control of documents stored on personal 
computers. 

• Boeing Co. predicts that airlines will buy more than 16.000 
new jetlmers valued at $ 1.1 trillion in the next 20 years. 

• United Airlines reached a tentative contract settlement with 

its pilots and mechanics that gives the owner-employees the 
Largest salary and benefit increases permitted under an ar- 
bitrator's ruling. NYT. WP. AP. Bloomberg 


Continued from Page 11 


faence, Mr. Summers said, “In our 
conversation. Minister ofFinance Mit- 
suzuka made it clear the Japanese gov- 
emment shared these objectives.’ 

Eisuke Sakakibara, a senior of- 
ficial at the Finance Ministry, said 
there would be no significant in- 
crease in Japan’s surplus because of 
changes in the structure of its trade. 

Japan's current-account surplus 
has fallen for 16 months in a row. But 
the dollar’s 16 percent rise against 
the yen since last August has helped 
lift exports. 

Japan's automobile exports to the 
United States rose 75 percent in 
January. This has enraged U.S. car- 
makers and fueled concern in Wash- 
ington that Japan’s trade surplus 
could rebound. 

While analysts are divided over 
what impact if any, the new body of 


Asian and Pacific nations might have, 
Japan is widely considered the driv- 
ing force behind the organization. 

Some analysts suggested that by 
preventing instability in Asian cur- 
rencies, toe group could help safe- 
guard corporate Japan’s weighty in- 
vestments in plants and machinery 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


across Asia. But other analysts said 
tiie organization seemed to offer few 
immediate benefits because it 
lacked cohesion. 

Japan, Australia, Hong Kong and 
Singapore have been meeting reg- 
ularly since 1992 to discuss financial 
issues. After the Mexican peso crisis 
in late 1 994. they agreed to cooperate 
on intervention to stabilize regional 
currencies and invited the United 
States and China to join the meet- 
ings. The dollar is the key currency 


in the region, but China has the 
world’s second-largest foreign-cur- 
rency reserves, after Japan. The 
Bank of Japan has already forged 
agreements establishing it as a lender 
of last resort for seven other Asian 
central banks. 

Signed a year ago, these accords 
allow neighboring central banks to 
stem any attacks cm their currencies 
by asking the Bank of Japan for a 
guaranteed flow of dollars. 

Analysts said the six-nation group 
could help Japan protect its invest- 
ments in mainland Asia from wild 
swings in other Asian currencies' 
exchange rates, many of which are 
pegged to the dollar. According to 
Bank of Japan figures. Japanese di- 
rect investment overseas grew by 
one-third, to $ 22.6 billion, between 
1992 and 1995. More than half of the 
total went to mainland Asia. 

But Mamoru Yamazaki. senior 


economist at Paribas Capital Mar- 
kets in Tokyo, said the group lacked 
the power of die Group of Seven 
leading industrial nations because of 
the sharp differences in economic 
development between its members. 
China’s restrictive foreign-ex- 
change markets would make it dif- 
ficult for the group to stage coordin- 
ated efforts to impose its will cm 
foreign-exchange markets, he said. 

But he added that in between 10 
and 20 years the group’s influence 
over exchange rates could rise as the 
rate of economic development of its 
members converged. 

■ Greenspan Lifts Dollar 

The dollar rose against other ma- 
jor currencies as economic reports 
and remarks by the Federal Reserve 
chairman stoked confidence that the 
U.S. economy would keep outper- 
forming its rivals. Bloomberg News - 


reported from New York. The dol- 
lar’s rise began after the U.S. gov- 
ernment said sales of new homes in 
January rose 8.6 percent from 
December. The currency rose further 
after Alan Greenspan said he ex- 
pected the economy to keep growing 
with little inflation. 

At 4 P.M. in New York, the dollar 
was at 1.7141 Deutsche marks, up 
from 1.6970 DM on Monday, at 
122.175 yen. up from 121 325 yen. at 
5.7845 French francs, cm from 
5.7310 francs, and at 1.4869 Swiss 
francs, up from 1.4775 francs. The 
pound feu to $1.6135 from $1.6175, 

The dollar's gains against the yen 
were limited by expectations for Jap- 
anese investors to sell the dollar as 
they bring assets back to Japan at the 
end of the financial year March 3 1 . 
The dollar gained strength against the 
mark from expectations that German 
interest rates will hold steady or fall. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 most rnflw shores, 
up In the dosing on Wol Sheet 
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Indexes 


Most Actives 


March 4, 1997 


Dow Jones 

Opai High Uw last Chj. 
tad US 683008 tfMJi 684141 48S2J2 -6S20 
Tmns ZmT\ 241638 237X10 240C24 +3TJ3 

as* mmmm H 


Standard & Poors 

Piwwa 

High Low One 
Industrials 92772 91 7 AS 92772 

Tronss. SMS4 55X78 569.00 

UfflBte 196.77 19SJA T9674 

Finance 9X8) 91.00 9279 

SP500 79571 785.66 79571 

SP IN 772.76 76279 77275 


VoL High 
156745 34* 
104990 40* 
83123 19W 
415*9 44* 
41279 33* 
58113 38 

42*94 44* 

«?B76 34* 
41493 58 * 


39817 33 * 
37971 <0* 
34313 2 S*+ 
36171 20* 


Low Lad 
35* 36 

39 * 40 

18* 19 

SB 3S 

44 44* 
45* 4714 
35* 36* 
56* 57* 

^ £ 


High Lav dose Chge OHM 


CORN (CB0T] 

54M0 bu mtnkmjnv can* per BuOmI 
M»97 an 301* 3 to* ft] 3M00 

Mov 97 308 300 301* -46 157.960 

Jul97 307 1 * 299* MP4 — * 107716 

Sep 97 293 287* ZBSW -th Uffll 

Dec 97 291 ’6 286* 28Mi -1* 43.916 

ES. rates NA Maris, rates 9W4* 

Man's open int 387794 up 6179 


WflS 

Lot 

aoao 

Qige 

Optat 

ORANGE JUK£ (NCTN) 



1S3X30 (SS.- cents Bv II 




MOr 97 BiOO 

8000 

3475 

+SJS 

l Ais 

Mav97 87 J5 

m a 

87 JO 

-5J0 

11082 

Jul97 89,70 

8190 

89J0 

+5fl0 

<ros 

S 6 P 97 9X10 

BX10 

9X10 

♦SflO 

X443 

Est.sates HA 

Maris, sales 


Moris open tat 

1 off 

2S727 




High Low Close Chge OpM 


High Law Qose Chge OpM 


Jun97 102J9 10146 10246 —009 190776 

Stp97 NX N.T. 10141 -OOV 
easotes 32S74& PfNLstfes: 365793 
PlCKapmHL 33X570 Off 74115 


Metals 


High Low tel Gbg. 

419.18 416 . 9 ? 41121 *007 


Nasdaq 


lifttushtaS 524 J 5 57173 5 ZL 35 -114 

Tmnsp. 374 JH 368.10 37197 »i 81 


37 UB 368.10 370.92 * 541 

Z 7 O 50 26843 2 ft 9 .ll 4175 

39127 3*845 MLS . 1 J» 


Nasdaq 


High Law te Chg. 

132322 131471 131947 *879 

10177 1098373 1102 J 1 -B.il 

143144 U 17 J 8 MIMA - 43 B 

, 487.53 1479.98 1485 J 3 *050 

1755.10 175060 1751 £3 *344 

*6558 SSO /5 86558 *1729 


VW. High 
134113 149* 

itSSIR 

73060 TOTOl 

652 H 2 57 * 
60670 24 
56561 5M 
53779 13 
44978 12 * 
46686 7 £l 
44414 72 * 
43976 53 * 
39277 18 


L0- 345 
146* 148 


98* 99H 
27V. ffl* 
38* 39* 

Jj 7 

11* 12 
ii is* 
71* 

21 * 22* 
SC* S2W 
9* 9* 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

100 Ians- doom per tan 
Mar 97 26X30 26020 262.30 -090 0021 

MOV 97 259.80 25430 258.10 -0J0 48,117 

Jld97 257 JO 2 SIM 25150 —030 28 JW 

Aug 97 251 JO 249.50 I504D *0.10 6,929 

Sep 97 241 JX) 239.00 2®.-*J *040 3,812 

Od 97 224J0 222JB 224J0 +1-00 2X12 

Est. sates ILA. 6ton'Lsates 2X497 
Man's open tnt 111,406 up 1837 


-I* SOYBEAN 00. (CBOT1 
IT* RUBO tot- cents per lb 


3ft 

Mar 97 

Mffi 

2C4S 

3*82 

-0-24 

1379 


May 97 

JX27 

2*35 

2S-23 

+031 

48,926 

-Ift 

Ail 77 

2S.70 


2SJ7 

+0J4 

7L3 04 

♦ft 

Asa »7 

3S.V 

TS-45 

2177 

-036 

44 68 

♦ft 

See 97 

2UI 

25JD 

2SJB 

+0JI 

1907 


Od97 

2S» 

25J3 

»9S 

+034 

1/492 


Est sates NA Man's, sides 27.298 
Man's open tat 94J12 up 1069 


High um te Chg 

597.24 594 J 0 597.19 *137 


1AL High Lon Last Qig. 


Dow Jones Bond 

Pnwfc w s Tocfor 

Qose Nora 

20 Bands 103.10 103.17 

lOUfllRteS 99.93 99.99 

10 IndusMab T0&29 T06JS 


19153 37 * 
l» 5 B 80 * 
■715 4 Aft 
M 60 16 * 

B 099 3 

«4D IS* 

6366 6 * 

2 * l ? 

S 366 7 * 
4488 89 ft 


36* 37 * -* 

79 *i 79 * -fm 
4 * 4 *ft -Vft 
15 * 1616 - 1 * 
2 * 3 -Vft 

ISYl 16 -* 

5* 69ft -* 
7 * 70 * -*» 

7* 7*ft -Vft 
8 * SVft -* 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

SJJ00 Ou mWmim. onws per buM 
Mar 97 809 799 806* *1M 

May 97 813 802 Vi BIO *2* 

Jut 97 112 802 80S* *2 

Aug 97 801 793 779V, tj* 

Sep 97 758 * 7S2 754 ♦!* 

Est. sales NA Mai'S, sates 67, Hi 
Mon ' S Open int 185456 up 5616 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


Nasdaq 


AUvcnanS 
DeeSned 
UreJwnaed 
Taral issues 
New Mans 
New Laws 


189 ft 1804 

1557 2214 

2284 1725 

5739 5743 

65 89 

39 118 


Advances 
Declined 
Unoawl 
Total issue; 
New Worts 
Now Lons 


1804 1695 

7214 2370 

1725 1678 

5743 BO 
89 100 

118 171 


89HEAT (CBOTJ 

5400 bu mMnftxn- omta per ousM 
Mar 97 380 361 371 -2 1485 

Mov 97 3W Wh 370 -7 25^0 

M7> 373 361 361* —5* &716 

See 97 374* 365 365* — 4* 1172 

ESI. sites NA Man’s, setes I9J66 
Man's open «d 70.109 ulf 612 


GOLD (NCMX1 

100 troy az.- dallvs per In* cn. 

Mar 97 36ai0 -IX 5 

Apr 97 364J0 360.10 360-50 -130 76J96 
MOV 97 361 JO -140 

JUH97 3663)0 362.10 36240 -340 24493 
AUB97 367 JO 364.90 36100 -140 I0A47 
00 97 36170 36740 367 JO -ISO 1266 

OC97 374J0 369 JO 37110 -150 3J.937 
Fe£)98 37340 372J0 37170 -340 4J04 

BJ.xftes NA Mai's, sates 37,909 

Man's open int 144444 off 28671 

HI GRADE COPPB1 (NCMX) 

25400 tn.- certs par*. 

Mar ?7 11171 1U2S 1J5J0 *0.15 1937 

Apr 97 114.75 I13JD 11475 *025 3,164 

May 77 1)125 117.50 1)100 -025 3643 

-km 97 11070 11 ISO 110.70 *040 992 

Jul97 >09.10 107.90 109.05 *ai0 7^14 

Aug 97 107.45 *0.10 631 

5ep97 10X95 10500 I05.*5 *aiO 2,721 

0(397 10470 *0.10 603 

Nail 97 10340 *aifl SC 

Esi. sates NA Mon's, seftes 8403 
Van’s open rn 59221 ate 510 

SILVER (NCMX) 

5L0Q8 Imv at- anil ocr buy ox. 

Mar 97 S28JD 521X10 52170 -7 JO 1,716 

Apr 97 527 JD S?dJJ0 574J0 —7 JO 1 

MOV97 53503 S2U» SliiO -7J0 60.M3 

All 97 SOLDO 5X50 531 JD -7.50 11.927 

5ep97 54040 S3640 53*40 —750 3J93 

Dec 97 5EJD 5*230 54440 -750 5220 

Jon 98 56650 —759 14 

Mar 98 551.90 -7.70 4466 

Est. sates NA Man’s, soes 71419 

Mon's open int B4J71 ad 5918 


J^VEAfl FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT1F) 

FF50O000- pis ofl 00 pd 

Mar 97 13228 13206 132.12 +0.14120455 

J«n 2 i£-£? +a I 4 

Sep 97 129^ 12928 12904 +0.18 1.782 

Dec 97 N.T. N.T. 9842 +014 0 

s Esl ftdtome: 120958 . Open hit; 15J909 up 


*22 95m 9539 9530 +001 4540 
Dec 99 95J» 95JW 9509 +002 4515 
2^51- «*liw 40006. Open ML- 250,768 off 


ITALIAN GOVERNMENT BOND QJFFE) 

ITL 200 BriBon - f*s of 100 pd 

Mai97 12040 12750 127.78 — 022 34429 

Jun97 17034 12728 127.40 -040 BZJ90 


Mwimi EiiRouRA turrej 
rr^imntoii - ms ot ion pa 

M^97 92^1 9246 9246 * flfl) 65,752 

SeS? SIS ♦ S- 01 ,09 '* 31 

SS &S 49JWS 

L>eCT7 247 9137 9137 + QJJ1 35032 

Mart? SS 9133 9334 * 040 21 UQ 0 

Junes 9139 9X30 9131 *083 

Eg- s*s: 3.750 Pip, rae* 91151 
PRv.epnlni* TVjxu off 1,749 


$0097 128.15 12880 177 . 1 Q -055 \A 00 

Ststae*: 85911. Piev.sahs: isasm 


Est tadg: ffl1.1j.Pny. sates 15X903 
Ptav.apen>nL 120619 off 6M3 

E IIR OOP4LABS [CMER1 
si n rtm u m 10 a oa. 

Mora 9323 9117 9117 

JunOB 9118 9111 9112 -OH 

SeoOO 9114 9108 9X08 -alt 

Dec 08 9186 9380 9X00 

NhrOI 9187 9101 9101 -0JX 

An 01 9X02 9X95 «X96 -OJE 

Sep 01 9X98 9X77 9292 -Ofl: 

Deem 9X90 9235 9285 -MI 

Mir 02 9234 9285 9285 -Off 

Jun02 9281 9280 9280 -fljE 

SeoO 92S 9277 9277 — (Uj; 

Deco? 9272 9269 9269 _oje 

Esl sates NA Mon's, saes 426 J7 
Mon*so«n»9 2J90JB9 up 10489 


-OJQ 42573 
—003 36421 
-003 32J97 
-0J3 25521 
-am 23494 
-tun 18492 
— 003 14JS0 
-Ofl? 10596 
-003 5486 
-003 5427 

— OTO 5,198 
-003 5.755 
426 JH 
10489 


Livestock 


Market Soles 


Advanced 

Ducfinrd 
IMdmiOBd 
Total issues 
Newrtohs 
New Ux+s 


218 266 

198 IB? 

194 194 

610 7*3 

II 18 

3 4 


NYSE 

Amen 

Nasdaq 

inmSSans. 


54137 52213 

2033 2246 

56053 531.98 


CATTLE (CMEB) 

*taM es- corns per e. 

Apr 97 6945 «fl 5 8U2 *017 43544 

Jun97 6542 65.12 6X35 —0.15 21,153 

Aug97 6440 6405 6407 —025 18525 

Odf7 £772 6755 67JO -OP 1X143 

Dec 77 69.92 49.67 49.70 -007 5470 

Feb 98 7105 70J0 70J0 -0.10 2J14 

EN. ides 14031 Aten's, sates 12374 
Man’s open W 105.199 up 982 


ILATMUM CNA4ER) 

SBIrwaz.- daftnrs wr vov ox. 

Apr 97 2WJ70 38100 389X0 -250 19.296 

Ju>77 37X00 389 JB 39120 -240 2<55 

OtJ97 3MOO 39120 39120 -2A 1.981 

Jon 98 39 Sl30 -240 1,128 

Ed. sates 1 Man's, sales 3 J& 

Man's open H 24,995 


Close 

LONDON METALS (LME) 
Pd tars per metric ton 


Ahratoum (High Grade) 

Spot 1665J30 166&00 166000 
F&nwrd 1691470 1672JB 5 1687'.' 1 


Colhadeft (High Grade) 
247000 247300 24 


247200 2473 GO IClBh 2478V, 
240200 240300 241000 241100 


Dividends 

CMBpanr Per Amt Rec Pay 

IRREGULAR 

Coition Com PLC b JO 3-1 4 3-17 

FlefUir Oid Enrg b 0845 3-14 4-9 


Company 


STOCK SPLIT 
Mercury Air 5 for 4 spGL 

Panomalcon Bev A 2 for 1 spRL 
STOCK 

Friedman Indus - 5% 4-25 5-23 


Bradley R) 

Cdn Occfdenllal g 


CataCorpA 
Cenfw CffltstiucJ 
CahenSJeers TRet 
Com outer Lang 
Denfaphr inti 
Devon Energy 
Eaton Vn Muni Bd 
CaoeUCvSeevr 
Gray Com mun 
GnrcnftrVti StMun 
GreenwlctiSIMui 
Nuveen AZPrem 
Old Republic Inti 
PcfmO»C Rn 
SI John KnAs 
Seaboard Carp 
TranrcnKCds 
United Fire 
ZentelneDFd 
Zenb incaFd 
Zenbc loco Fd 
ZftrefoTariRel 


MYR Group 
Mark rv. 

Nations Bal Torael 
Panamerican Bev 
StHsIde Bncshrs 
Welnoarten Rny 


INCREASED 

O 055 3-10 3-17 
0 .04 3-14 3-27 

igel Q .12 3-14 3-27 

lev O .105 3-14 3-31 

S O .16 34 3-15 

y a M 3-7 3-17 


REDUCED 

Petrol Heat Pw A. O 075 3-17 


Shamans 
Train RaH Hldng 


INITIAL 

- .13 3-17 4-1 

b 4111 3-6 3-74 


7 CATTLE (CMBU 

L-COAurb. 

p_ - 6X50 6787 66.12 -020 

pel Ant Rec pay Apr 97 6L62 66.10 6842 *a>o 

REGULAR Mov 97 70J3 »40 6»J7 -025 

n - ... . . AM 97 7135 7X85 73fl5 —0.15 

a "S tin -A 7X»S 7X40 7X50 -0.10 

a rri iin 705 70S -0.10 

O J A 4 317 « Est sates 7400 Ate's, sates JJSS 
Q X5 4 I 4 408 Wra'iwmlf* 81575 

BT M D& 3-14 3-31 HOGS-Leao tCMBt) 

9 - 1 0 J -78 40000 Ibft.- cerftft prrta. 

Q JJ72S 3-31 4-9 Apr 97 7455 7X05 7117 -0.90 

Q .05 3-14 331 jun?; 79 . 5 c 7547 7885 -075 

Id M US M 3-17 JJ97 1X12 P.25 77 JS -060 

S -12 J3? Aug 97 7475 7Xffi 7400 -0JS 

? -5? 5" 51 0097 67 JS LUC 66.95 -0J7 

m M M 324 3-27 0ec97 65.70 65.00 6500 -030 

Mi M M 4-22 4-25 EsLSOles 7400 Mon's. sates 5J92 

M JJ69 3-15 4-1 Mon's open hit 3X126 ail 549 

Q 317 327 FORK BBJJES (CMBU 




Spot 7174)0 71X00 72X00 72X00 

Forward 70300 70400 705“, 70X00 


Spot 013X00 814000 021500 itrrKaa 
Forward 822500 8235.00 831000 832000 

m 

spa 5800.00 5810 DO S79500 580500 
Fonmird 586000 586500 58S5A0 566000 
Ztec (Speda hm Grade) 

Spot 124500 124X00 1227-00 122500 
Forwont 125X00 I254JI0 1240JX) 1241.00 

High iw Close CTae OpM 


Q .10 >13 >28 
Q .0925 >31 4-9 


Q .05 >14 >31 
M 3)5 >3 >17 

Q -12 >20 >27 
Q SO. 3-21 >31 
M M >24 >27 

M JX, 4-22 4-25 
M -069 >15 4-1 

Q .11 >7 >17 

Q sa >17 >27 
O J125 >26 4-2S 
Q J5 >21 >31 

Q J37 >21 4-15 

O .15 >3 >17 

M 0561 >24 >27 
M 061 4-22 4-25 
M .061 5-27 5-30 
M J07 >13 3-25 


BHTWroUNO (CMBU 
6UOO pounds, t per pound 
Mar 97 1J18* 1.6116 14130 
Jun 97 14151 >4090 14100 
SeP 97 14090 

Dec 97 14086 

S^Lw’» N S?' 5,S<fc S 70-001 
Man's open** 39.191 up tx 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CM£R) 
1 te.oendateini-spwcan.dir 
Mar 97 7334 .7300 7303 

Ate 97 7359 .7341 7345 

Sep 97 jm .7387 J3B7 
Dec 97" J442 7430 7430 

ESI. tales NA Mars, sides 9J61 
Marriscpentai 63J3a off 97 a 

GB1MANMARK <CMER) 

1254)00 modes, s per mm 
Mar 97 J098 J834 5840 

Ate 97 JW T J866 Jan 
Sep 97 J929 J»ll J9|l 

Dec 97 5007 

EsLsdes HA. Man's. soles 24.900 
McrTsaPenM 103.627 up 2SD 

JAPANESE TEH (CAAER) 
lUuflluiron. s per laovwi 
Mar 77 JB74 51 97 531 J 1 

Ate 77 8390 Jam J30T 

Ss>» J*40 8416 sen 

&»•»** NA Man s. Sales 16418 
Atari's open te) 40454 off 38434 

SWISS FRANC (CMERI 

nsmvaetiipiiwc 

Mar 77 4783 4727 4737 

Ate 77 484S 4767 4798 

Sep 97 48H 4860 4660 

EsLsds 9LA Man's, sales 7411 
MonSnwtelrt 5X 538 W623 


Financial 


PORK BELLIES (CMBU 
4D400 tak- Oteta pm- B. 

Mar 97 8145 HA 7 BIJ 7 —077 
May 77 8125 3 X 40 8 X 55 — 1.17 

AH 97 81 X 5 81-55 81.80 —122 

Auh 97 BOLOO 7947 7942 —497 

EsLscftes 1213 Anon's. sates 34)64 
Man's open ini 8.111 up 545 


US T. BIAS (CMBU 

SI rrftlKjn- ns al 100 pet. 

Mir 97 *497 9187 MJ 7 3,785 

Jun 97 94 J* 94 J 4 9 E 74 4 . 71 ? 

SftP ?7 74 J 7 94 J 7 94 J 7 .042 1411 

Dec 77 9*48 847 

Est soles NA Man's, sales 

Mot's flnmH 


RESUMED 

- 4)25 3-4 >14 


(HBaraati b+ippnadMte aBMaat per 
sbart/AOK 9-payitete In Craadtoa tads 
rp m e rri M y i R-quartertif; s +w l qp apal 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sdes Agues are unoflUd. Yearly highs and toea ie8Bd Bid previous 52 weeia phis Vie current 
butnoiteiciiesrliudtafldBy. WtmaspffwsftrttMdendamounftig Id 25 percent ormore 
Ins bm paht ttra yena Mgiriow range and Mtend arc steMm for ttia new sfoda aiVy. Unless 
raiembe noted n*es of dMdends m annual dUnnseroerts based on Itie tees! dedaraffon 
a - WMend also extra (si. b • annual rote a* dividend plus stock dividend, c - Bout taring 
dletdend. ec- PE raneds Wxltf - railed, d - new yearly low. dd- loss fn the Iasi 12 months, 
e • dividend declared a paid In preceding 12 months, t - annual rates Increased on last 
dKkPOtfon. g- dWdond fnCaiwiOon funds, sub|ed toT5% non-ieAlenoe tax. I • dlvMsnd 
dedoratf afler spit-up or stock taridatid. i - dividend paid rids year, amHied. deferred, or no 
adlM token at latest dividend meeting, k - dMtand d odraed at paid thb year, on 
accumutarive issue wBft tSvMends In anears. n - annual rote reduced on last {federation, 
n - new Issue In Its past 52 weeks. The Mflh-low range begins wffh rile start of trading, 
ad - mat tay deCvety. p - biriU Aiidend. annum rote unknown. p/E - price-nmlngs infla, 
q - daed-end mutual fund r- dMdend deefored or paM In preceding 1 2 months, Mia sbxi 
®vWend. s - stock spflt. DMdend begins with dare of spin, sb - sales, t - dMdend paid In 

stack in preceding 12 manfla. estimated cosri value an a-dMdend or nc-dlsfitovridn dote 

o - new yearty high. *- trading halted. »f -In bankiupfcyor recehrerahipcr befog raorgieiizecl 
undetihe BankiwpteyAct arseaiiWJes assumed by such companies, wd - when distributed 
wi - when issued/ ww - with warrants, x - e* -dMdend or ex -rights, xdts - ra-dbhriiutton. 

wtttioul wananfe. r ex-dMdend and soles In hA yid - yield, Z - solos hi fuH, 


COCOA (NCSE) 

10 metric tans- sow ton 
MOT 77 1283 7271 

1283 

-23 

149 


1338 

1316 


•21 

34,738 

Art 97 

U 61 

1141 

135 * 

♦ IB 

K .773 

SOT 77 

1385 

1377 

1385 

*15 

10005 

DOC 77 

I 41 S 

1378 

1415 

♦ 17 

1380 


5 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

IIKAM Prir»- ptv a. 6 *tw gf 100 pa 
Ma- 97 106-07 105-56 105-56 —06 7 X 920 

Ate 91 105-52 106-7 105-39 —06 14 JS 1 

38077 105-29 3 

Est. totes NA Man's safes 103.962 

Man's ooenM 22 x 474 ait 3400 

10 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

SKXUXId tein- pts A JSndsol 100 per 
Mar 97 106-13 IflB-OO 10 B -00 —07 127336 

Ate 77 107-25 107-11 107-14 —05 179.152 

Sep 97 107-06 107-06 107-06 - 05 5425 

EsL staff NA Man'ssaws 178 .Z 76 
Mai's open nt 31 X 114 Off 313 B 


3-MONTH STB RUM (UFFE) 

tsoaooo-iraol ioo pa 

WJ7 nS nS “S- 01 94011 

sS «7 W 34 *■ 0.07 119.994 

It flsguis 

S nsl S* Tils? 

s P £% :gs ,&w 

B S 1 Btg B 
esatenSif- 4117 


Industrials 

COTTON 2 (NCTN) 

50.0X1 lbs.- OTrts per Ih. 

Mcr 77 74.10 7105 7105 -0.93 

May 97 75.75 74J0 74L75 -0J8 

Jj497 76JRJ 7X75 764)0 -0J0 

OdW 77.15 7X65 77415 -0J8 

Dec 97 7735 76J5 76.90 -4L« 

Mte9B 77.90 7736 7740 -045 

Est.50fes NA Mon's, sales 
Mon's open in! l off 61108 

HEATING CM. (NMB1) 

4X000 Ota, cerfts per OD) 

Aor 97 544)0 5X50 5185 *047 

May 97 5180 5X50 5X65 +0.91 

Jun 77 5175 5X70 5175 +0.96 

JU97 505 5115 54JJ0 +0.96 

Auo97 5U0 5375 500 *196 

Sep 97 5540 5475 5540 *046 

0097 56A) 55JS 5640 +1.16 

Nov ?7 57,10 5635 57.10 *131 

Oec97 57 JO 5675 57 JO +14J1 

Jon 98 584)0 57.10 SBflO +1.16 

Est.sates NA Stan's sates 31461 
Mai's open M 110456 

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

I4M0 MM.- dofton per PUL 
Apt 97 2074 20.08 2074 +049 

May 97 2052 19.95 MJ 2 +049 

Jun97 2033 1941 2037 +039 

A4 97 2030 1973 20.18 +042 

AU097 2008 1940 20X8 *040 

Sep 97 19.99 196« 19.99 .QJfe 

Oct 97 1970 1946 19.90 +031 

NOV 97 19.90 1944 19.90 +034 

Dec 97 1937 19 J5 1947 +033 

X»198 1940 1940 1940 +036 

Feb 98 1940 1940 19J0 +033 

Mt»98 j?jp 

AW« ml 

Est.safes NA Man's. safes 106433 
MctYsaPairt 408442 

NATURAL GAS (NMet) 

10400 min btu's. s per mm Mu 
Afr 97 1.950 1791 1325 

MOV97 1Q90 1345 1370 

« 1.990 1490 1.975 

Juin 1.985 1.900 1375 

AWW 1.995 1305 1380 

Sa^W 2000 1330 1.990 

0097 XQ20 1.960 2415 

NOV97 X1H ZWO Z1SS 

D«C97 2390 2340 23B5 

Jon 98 7320 7 aw ann 

Feb 78 29<a 1210 iw 

Ed.sotes NA Mon's. staas 22725 
Mon's open Int 169.180 up 9800 

UNLEADED GASOJME (NMER> 
42JM0 gat cents per pal 
AfrW 6X90 6130 6245 +148 

May 97 6245 61.10 6245 +141 

Ate 97 6X00 6075 £240 +141 

■MJ7 6140 6040 60.70 +140 

AuflW S M S,JK »■« +1.15 

^97 U 5640 5 B .40 +130 

K.sales na Mot’s. rates 22491 
Mdnsopenfot BU32 


ftft 7 & aarsa 


Est sales 11.952 Man's, sides 
Mon's open >nt 9X991 cfl 02 


COFFEE C (NCSE) 

37400 **■- cents nrb 
Mar 97 71100 19940 21145 +1120 WB3 

MOV 97 199 JO 164.00 19S3S +1048 24,202 

Jul97 18500 17440 18345 * 935 7434 

SftP 97 17235 16X00 17235 *979 4,711 

Est. rate 15332 Men's, staes 1X159 
Mon'S ooen int 42403 up 22 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

II pa-SlKUm-Pts LSnfcnl 100 pd' 

Mar 97110-9 110-08 110-12 —09 200442 

JOT 77 110-13 109-25 109-30 —IS 21 X 272 

Sep 97 109-31 109-12 109-12 -12 11759 

Dec 97 109-00 109-00 W -00 -11 4319 

Est. sates NA Man's sates 344.769 
Nftm'sapeaM OMft? ae 16443 


jSSp 9640 £•£ %% y7St«3g& 

SSr 82 SS Sa : J3iB£S 

S 18111 

i 1 1 1=11 

Srocc 908 “nS , S“ 

DrcOO 94.10 vJlS li" -OA4 .OCT 
Esl safes 119.966. Pm uBeKlrolf? ' 0, ° 
FIN. open M- 1.257,164 „ JS? 49 


GASOIL OPE) 

Per^ ton - tots of loo tons 
Mar 97 16435 161 JO 16375 + 33 Q 
AolW 16535 16X00 16475 S'? TS 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1997 

EUROPE 


PAGE 13 




Unions Ptess for End 
To Short-Term Jobs 

CumpMbfn* SttfFnnOapnte 

T s P anish employers 
said Tuesday they would not soften 

™r stance or succumb to political 

Si re ^ ch a P^ 1 on ,ab °r 

I™? 1 unions, after six weeks 
of talks between the two sides failed 
to produce an agreement. 

. assume ail the costs that 

might go along with a disagreement, 
but we are convinced the deal must 
be effecnve.” said Juan Maria 

■ Cuevas, the president of the CEOE 
employers federation. 

An informal deadline expired 
- Tuesday, though the two sides kept 
talkmg. jhe government is threat- 
ening to impose a settlement aimed 
at creating more permanent jobs in 
an economy with the highest un- 
employment in the European Union. 

risks embarking on a 
collision course with labor unions. 

Employers want to cut severance 
costs to encourage the use of per- 
manent staff, while unions balk at 
lower layoff costs and have focused 
on doing away with existing short- 
term job contracts. The government 
has always pushed for a negotiated 
settlement, though Prime Minister 
Jose Maria nznar has warned that it 

■ wanted the talks concluded by March 
or it would impose its own solution. 

Increasing the flexibility of Span- 
ish employment practices is critical 
to create a more competitive econ- 
omy. But Madrid is sure to anger 
workers if it imposes lower firing 
costs. A previous labor-market re- 
form led to a general strike in 1994. 

On average, Spanish workers 
fired by companies who can justify 
the need to cut staff receive 231 days 
pay as compensation. That can jump 
to a maximum of 1,260 days for 
companies that cannot justify lay- 
offs for economic reasons. 

Those high firing costs have led 
employers to eraloit temporary con- 
tracts, primarily created to help 
young people gain access to jobs. Of 
the more than 8.6 million new job 
contracts signed in 1996, less than 5 
percent were for permanent jobs. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


GM Says European Shakeout Is Here 


Caaf^J <•* « •*. f „„ Uipurrfar. 

GENEVA — General Motors 
Corp„ the world’s biggest car pro- 

^ ucer, . sal o * Ues ^ a y that job cuts at 
Renault SA and Ford Moior Co. 
signaled the stun of a long-awaited 
auto- industry shakeout in Europe 
but said it hoped it would be healthy 
enough to avoid similar action. 

Europe s carmakers are produ- 
cing more cars than they can sell at 
a profit. To keep plants running at 
close to capacity, car companies 
have slashed prices and offered ex- 
pensive buyer incentive programs. 

“Some say there is excess ca- 
pacity in Europe of 3 million to 4 
million units.” the president of 
General Motors Europe. Richard 
Donnelly, said. 

“We are seeing in the an- 
nounced plant closings and price 


cuts the start of some kind of 
shakeout." 

Renault con finned Tuesday that 
ir would cut nearly 2,800 jobs in 
France this year, a day after it said it 
would close its Belgian factory Ju- 
ly 31. idling 3,100 workers. Ford 
said in January that it would cut 
980 jobs at its plant in Haiewood, 
England. 

But not all is rosy for GM. which 
owns Adam Opel AG of Germany. 
Mr. Donnelly said GM Europe’s 
profit fed 23 percent last year, to 
$778 million from $796 million in 
1995. despite a 4 percent rise in 
sales, to $2533 billion from $2432 
billion. 

“It is not our goal to close 
plants.” Mr. Donnelly said. “If we 
have to. we might, but this is not on 
the immediate horizon.” 


Cor sales in Western Europe 
peaked at 133 million in 1992 but 
plummeted almost 15 percent the 
following year, their biggest drop 
in 50 years. Since then, sales have 
struggled to regain their record 
pace, creeping back up to around 
12.8 million last year. Forecasts 
generally call for sales of just over 
1 3 million this year. 

But to spur sales, car companies 
slashed prices and offered incent- 
ives to buyers. Governments were 
persuaded id offer rebates to buy- 
ers to swap 1 0-year-old vehicles 
for new, cleaner small cars. 

This skewed sales toward smaller, 
less profitable models and effectively 
stole sales from the future. 

PSA Peugeot-Citroen’s presi- 
dent, Jacques Calvet, said Tues- 
day that the European market for 


new cars was likely to grow just 
0.5 percent this year. 

The market for luxury cars, 
however, is perking up. BMW AG 
said it started the year on a strong 
note, with sales in January and Feb- 
ruary up 17 percent from a year 
earlier. The head of Audi, the lux- 
ury-car division of Volkswagen, 
said the carmaker expected to sell 
about 60.000 of its new* A6 model 
this year and 130.000 next year. 

Herbert Demel, Audi’s chief ex- 
ecutive, predicted Europe's luxury- 
car market would grow about 5 
percent this year, bolding up better 
than the market for small cars. 
Porsche AG, meanwhile, said 
profit in its current financial year 
would continue ar the strong rate it 
reported last week for its first half. 

(Reuters. AFP. Bloomberg ) 


Mercedes Spreads the Net With New Compact 


Reuters 

GENEVA — Mercedes-Benz 
AG, a giant among luxury-car man- 
ufacturers but an admitted * ‘dwarf * 
in the global industry, is counting 
on its new A -class vehicle, the 
smallest production car in Mer- 
cedes history, for future growth. 

The five-door hatchback, un- 
veiled late Monday at the Geneva 
car show, is the key to Mercedes’ 
aim of targeting younger buyers to 
help it reach a sales goal of about 1 
million vehicles a year by the turn 
of die century. 

Mercedes plans to build about 
200,000 of the A-series car annu- 
ally. The car, which was developed 
in 38 months for $1.65 billion, will 


face a fight from carmakers such as 
Volkswagen AG and General Mo- 
tors Corp.’s Adam Opel AG. 

But Mercedes executives say the 
German carmaker, which sold 
645.000 cars in 1996. will not sell 
its luxury- brand soul to become a 
high-volume company and will re- 
main a niche player and premium- 
car manufacturer. 

Instead, Mercedes wants the A- 
class to broaden its appeal to 
groups that often had been out of its 
reach. The A -class will have a base 
price of about 30,000 Deutsche 
marks ($1 7300), less than half the 
price of many of Mercedes' more 
upscale luxury models. 

“Far from posing a risk for the 


Mercedes-Benz brand, the A -cl ass 
is actually very necessary and im- 
portant in helping us achieve the 
kind of public perception that we 
want,” said Dieter Zetsche, Mer- 
cedes’ top marketing executive. 

Mercedes products compete in a 
luxury-market segment of only 
about 3 million annual vehicle 
sales out of a total worldwide mar- 
ket of around 39 million cars. 

“Although we had a share of 
oveT 20 percent in this competitive 
segment, in volume terms we are 
nevertheless a dwarf.” said Juer- 
gen Hubbert, the Mercedes man- 
agement-board member in charge 
of passenger car sales. 

Mr. Hubbert said the addition of 


the A-ciass, along with joint ven- 
tures in emerging markets such as 
India and Asia, would help triple 
the potential market for Mercedes 
cars, to about 9 million annual 
vehicle sales, by 2000. 

The carmaker said the A-class 
was a blend of the subcompact 
class, the compact class, the lower 
midrange class and the compact 
van. 

■ Daimler-Benz Profit Up 

Daimler-Benz said Tuesday it 
swung to a net profit of about 2 
billion DM last year from a record 
loss of 5.7 billion DM ($3.37 bil- 
lion) in 1995. Agence France- 
Presse reported from Stuttgart. 



Frankfurt London ; Paris "'v;- : ‘r % 

DAX . . • . . FTSE lOOhictex CAC 40 V"| 

3250 f) 4550 . 2700 ' ■ 

3100 J - m - - ~ ■ 2550 i* 

m ~ TlJ ' ■ 420 ' ‘ 24flD 

280 Q M 4100 - . ■■■ 2250 Af - : i 

ZHIr--* ■ 3850 — 2100 - 

““ONDJFM ™OND 
.1996 1997 1996 

Exchange Index = 

Amsterdsn t£X. 

J F M '**0 ND JFM' 
1997 1996 1997 » 

Tuesday Prev. •• ’ ' %: 
Ctoea . Ctooe 

753,40 - 736 ^ -:./+ 2 . 33 ; 

Brassed ; 8 S.- 2 & :• -** 

2 , 158,07 2 , 142 . 4 ^. 

FriwWuft DAX 


Copenbageo Sto.C^ Wa/^ : 


Hate**) ■ * • : VEXQemrat > • 

2^91 ^ 846,11 'Mjk 

•Orto' •_« ‘ :. ;1 . 

. 58 ^ 34 58 aiS;' ."; 4 l t /a 

Lowkn ■ ■ FTS^iao- 

'■ 4 jasr.T&: 4 , 307,10 ■- ++.??, 

itedrid *. Stock Exchange . 

'. 487.72 ■ ' 453 jB 7 .r* 0 M 

Miters . JiiBIEL * -,.V. 

tzjmM s 

Paris"-- -.CAC 40 

ZfiSlJB* ZjmZB. srPLSS, 

Stockholm . SX '16 ■ * ■ 

2 fim & 7 . tt, 827 J 54 

Vienna . ■ ATX'-' 

:L 24084 ?^ 37 jDtlVWj 

Zurich: /. ■ SPi. .■ . 

2^87044 a^ 37 .flS-;:.*V;i 4 

Source: Tetekurs 

tatonunanal Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


WTO Says Path Is Clear for Technology Pact 


Bloomberg News 

GENEVA — The World Trade 
Organization said Tuesday that 
countries representing more than 90 
percent of the information-techno- 
logy industry had agreed to scrap 
tariffs on items such as computer 
monitors and semiconductors, pav- 
ing the way for a formal accord this 
month. 

The United States, the European 
Union, Japan and more than a dozen 


other countries agreed in December 
in Singapore to remove import tar- 
iffs by 2000. 

They then gave themselves until 
March 15 to get other nations on 
board for a formal accord that would 
encompass countries accounting for 
more than 90 percent of the $600 
billion industry. 

The WTO. the Geneva-based 
world trade body, said Malaysia, 
Thailand. India. New Zealand and 


Costa Rica had all come up with 
pledges to scrap tariffs in recent 
days. Malaysia's participation in the 
agreement was especially important 
because it accounted for about 5 
percent of the global industry. 

Countries such as India. Thailand 
and Malaysia refused to take part in 
the preliminary agreement in Singa- 
pore, saying they needed more time 
to develop their domestic industries 
before opening up to foil compe- 


tition. Negotiators will now review 
the latest offers to see whether they 
comply with foe agreement reached 
in Singapore and whether they cover 
a sufficient number of products. 

The first round of tariff cuts is 
scheduled for July 1. Tariffs will 
eventually be scrapped for more 
titan 100 technology products, in- 
cluding items such as digital pho- 
tocopiers. semiconductors and op- 
tical cables. 


• DG Bank, which acts as a clearinghouse for Germany’s 
cooperative bank network, said its headquarters had been 
raided by investigators looking for evidence that the in- 
stitution may have helped citizens evade income taxes. No 
charges have been lodged against the bank, whose full name is 
Deutsche Genossenschaftsbank. 

• Alcatel Alsthom's former chairman, Pierre Suaxd, and 
about 40 other managers of French companies went on trial on 
charges of plundering company funds for personal use. 

• Italy posted an annual inflation rate of 2.4 percent for 
February, down from 2.6 percent annually in January. 

• De Beers hopes to have final Russian government approval 
for a new diamond marketing agreement within one to three 
months, a company official said. Separately . the company said 
1996 earnings including retained income from associated 
companies rose to $134 billion, from $986 million in 1995. 

• Philips Electronics NV formed a joint venture with Thom- 
son-CSF and Siemens AG to make digital detectors tbat would 
eliminate the need for film in radiology, use a lower radiation 
dose and allow X-ray images to be seen immediately car a 
monitor or be stored on a disk. 

• Halifax Budding Society, Britain’s largest home-mortgage 
lender, posted a 7 percent rise in pretax profit, to £1.43 btilicn 
($2.32 billion), for 1996; Halifax, which is to float about £12 
billion of shares in June, also hinted at further acquisitions. 

• Acerinox SA, Spain’s biggest stainless-steel producer, said 
falling prices and a stronger peseta had caused its 1996 profit 
to drop 57percent, to 14.86 billion pesetas ($1033 million), as 
sales fell 5 percent, to 180.89 billion pesetas. 

• UPM-Kymmene Corp., the biggest European forestry and 
paper group, said 1996 profit fell 43 percent, to 336 billion 
Finnish markkas ($7 1 1 million), amid weak demand; sales fell 
5 percent, to 5 1 .76 billion marickaa. AFP. ap. Bloomberg. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Ibasday^ March 4 

Prices In local currencies. 
Tetekvrs 

High Law dose Pm. 

Amsterdam Afxgj taewwj 

niwwnm 


ABN-AMRO 

Aegon 

AhnU 

AtanHcW 

BoonCO- 

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CSMom 

DantecftePet 

OStA 

Etaevfer 

write Aim* 

Getrontc* . 

G-Broccvu 

Honoroeiw 

HemeWn 

Hoogwenscw 

Hurt Douglas 

(NG GfOtfp 

KLM 

KNPBT 

(CP# 

NUJnao 

OeeGrtrten 

PWOpsEhe 

Polygram 

Ran&todHdg 

RubecD 

Rodamco 
Roftnco 
Rortrto _ 
BwalDufch 
imleiercva 

Vendee Infl 

VKU 

VWBWS KIOTO 


MUD 

12EL60 

130 

200 

88X0 

34J0 

110X0 

3S6 

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31 JD 
74.90 

tuo 

65X1 
166 
349.50 
9Z50 
1SB 
7540 
S9JB0 
4420 
68X0 
57 SO 
29570 
239.90 
50.40 
9480 
150 
16160 
# I HI 
166X0 
11060 
33*50 

360 JO 
8820 
ta_3a 

2*3,90 


13580 

126X0 

126 

27540 

8520 

3350 

109 

3*7.70 

wqo 

3070 
7120 
62 
6*30 
164 
339 JO 
99 JO 

150 
7198 
5070 
*120 
67.40 
5650 
28850 
237 JO 
8U0 
9050 
147 
16SL30 
60 

16620 

11050 

327 

355 

87.10 

39XU 

24*00 


140 13550 
12M0 125JD 
12950 125 JO 
280 275 

87 JD 8*10 
3*60 3350 
11CU0 10650 

356 148 

192AQ 188 

31.10 3050 
7*90 72.90 
6170 6138 
65 8*20 
16520 16490 
3*720 338.80 
9U0 8840 
153 146 

7560 7330 
59 JD 59 

**10 *340 
6750 67 JO 
57 56J0 
29540 28650 
23B 23750 

89.90 B£70 
9X10 0950 

149 1*6.90 
16240 16020 
60 6030 
16620 16*80 
11050 11040 
33*20 327 JO 
359 JO 35140 
B740 84.90 

39.90 3950 

2*7.50 245 


Higb Lew 

DWlsdteBoifc 8945 89JB 
Dart Tele tom 3*05 3185 
DnsckMrBank 5625 56 

B ww n fl li 368 364 

FrasenhSMed 166 164 

FlM-XlUpp 281 779 

Get* 11750 11650 

HeMe&gZmf 1**-« 14120 
Henkel phi 9450 9120 
HEW 481 481 

Hodrtel 7650 7550 

HMcfoi 7380 7120 

KoRtotf 55B 553 

Unde 1150 1123 

Luttlonsa 23 2285 

WAN *50 - **Q 

MowiesBiann 687 67150 
M6ta0gsEetenatt37.18 36X0 
MTOro ‘ 15020 1»X0 
MundiRliecfcft *260 *220 
446 443 

1230 1215 

7630 75J5 
26550 26170 
15740 155.10 
22050 228 

8605 9520 
1270 1Z70 

765 • 764 
366 362 

9825 77 JO 
518 507 

763 741 

83520 83150 


dose Pm. 


RWE 
SAPprt 
Scnertng 
SGL Corson 
Siemens 
Springer (AnQ 
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IT" 

VEW 


89 JB 

3* 

5608 

364 

16400 

281 

117 

1*410 

9*20 

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7550 

7175 

557 

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23 

**630 

68550 

369S 

150 

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4*6 

1215 

7575 

26630 

156 

220 

85.40 

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744 

36*00 

98 

507 

763 

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Ti An 

5610 

358 

162JD 

275 

11600 

14200 

9*20 

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7650 

71-85 

551 

1095 

22JB 

434 

66650 

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4195 

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75.75 

257 

152.90 

227 

8*40 

600 

767 

3SSu40 

9695 

515 

7*1 

81*75 


High Low Ctose Pm. 

SA Breweries 13*75 13325 13* 13*25 

5amoiicor 5650 55 55 5675 

Sari 50J5 *900 5023 50 

58IC 18*25 183 18*25 183 

Tiger Outs 7650 76 76 7650 


Kuala Lumpur cmwteiswA 

PTW0O5: 1260.44 

AMMBHdgs 
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16X0 

1570 

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2950 

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2935 

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630 

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1650 

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1950 

19.70 

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1150 

1150 

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UK Comm 


230 

222 

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306 

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157 


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PimtoUE 787.24 

222 226 226 

206 214 228 

3*75 35 3150 

300 304 300 

WA 66* 672 

127 1*0 147 

4025 *025 4*50 

3960 JD 39.75 

13* 150 153 

150 157 757 


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Nokia A 

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236 232 

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9150 9040 


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Assoc Br Foods 

BAA 

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BAT I nd 

Bonk Scotland 

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BPBlnd 

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Bril Airways 

BG 

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665 

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11.11 

154 

553 

357 

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682 

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1125 

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Bombay 

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HMustLewr 
Hindus Petlm 
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Tata Eng Coco 


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313 
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101J5 104 10360 

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260 276 26675 

303,25 31160 30560 
321 33160 324 

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38460 3*3 389 


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Bk EOS Asia 
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cneungKong 
CKInfrasbua 
China Light 
CRtcPaafle 
Dao HenaBk 
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Brussels 


Almond 
Barca Ina 
BBL 
CBR 
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Eledroba 

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FartK AG 

Gmmit 

GBL 

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7970 7620 7^ 7« 

tM 5 3Z75 3285 32ffl 
15100 1*900 15100 leg 
2030 2010 2010 2005 

mS BOM 8090 8070 
33» 33*5 £*5 

6170 6120 6160 6110 

250D 2*30 2460 2*95 

*935 *«0 *«0 ^0 

13000 12925 12975 12*75 
12600 12700 12700 12725 
12750 12575 12700 12500 

5160 5110 5140 52W 

m ffig SS» SS 

21300 21B» 21125 211M 
15300 15150 15275 15100 
g*Q50 937® WW0 93600 


Stoe* Index: 53673 

PrevtoaK 53X91 


960 

2a*o 

TZ15 

78 

22.10 

3SJ0 

3960 

*660 

11-05 

16 

' 86 

895 

7135 

1*98 

2685 

1360 

*65 

188 

6060 

27.10 


Rot . .. 

Hang Lung Dw 
Hang Seng Bk 
Handeaonlnv 
Henderson Ld 
HK China Gar 
HKEtocWc 
HKTelecoaim. 
HiwMKVHdgs 
HSBC Htfgs 
Hutchison Wh 

ShSmBHdg 20.95 
Kerry Praps 2020 
Hew Wand Dev *9.10 
Otordal Pies* 368 
Peart Oriartri 635 
SHK Preps 9US 
snunTokHtfgs -5® 
sboundCa. tas 
Sth Chine Post 7.15 
SertePocA 67 

WhtnfHdgs 3530 
Wieetock . 2110 


Hoag Sang: 
pitvtoes: U5O7J0 

US 9A5 960 

27 JO 27.90 28J0 
1160 ll 65 12.15 
7560 7675 76J5 
2T60 22 22 

3150 3660 3670 
39-40 3960 3960 
39J0 40J0 *060 
10J0 n 10-70 
1SL75 15J5 1675 
KU5 8*75 » 

BJ5 860 600 

70JS 71 71 

1*75 1*00 1*75 
2*70 2685 2680 
1360 13J5 11® 
*40 460 *60 

■ U4 16650 109 

60J5 59J5 
■M m 27.10 27 

2085 20-90 21 

V?JQ 20 I960 
<860 *»« 

US 348 360 

6® 620 6« 
9075 91.75 90J5 

■u» 

ars a® 000 
SlS 635 
6625 66i0 

3*« S WQ 
2070 20.95 20-70 


168 

607 

612 

S67 

7J7 

7*5 

172 

638 


Burton Gp 
Coble Wireless 
DnfcwySdiw 
CoitTpn Comm 
Coovnl Union 
Compass Gp 
CDunaui* 

Mrans 
Etodraaimponerts *13 
EMI Group 12-05 

§ 

FamCatoolal 160 
GeniAcddenr 86* 
GSC 185 

GKN 9^ 

GtoaaWencame 1067 
GronadaGp 969 
GranriMW 
GRE „ 
GmenaMGo 
Guinness 
GUS 
Han 

HSBC HUBS 

ia 

big* Tobacco 


129 

662 

46* 

*67 

537 

1534 

8 

*28 
694 
129 
7.97 
.26 5 


Lodi ... 

land $tc 
Losmo 
Legal Genl Grp 199 
Ltoy&TSBGp 62* 
LwcosVQrity 
Moris Spencer 
ME PC 

Mercury Asset 
National Grid 
Nad Power 


Frankfurt 


11*0 

17MS 

330 

1*22 

3130 


AMS B 
Adidas 
MttjjuHdg 
Arte no 

BA Berlin -^,5 

tortHWlBk 

BwVaelnsMrt. 

92-90 
*75 

□ uyw 1l«* 

CKAGCriamo 
Cammercbanfc 
DatolerBeiiz •« 

oegus» 


Bewofl 

BMW 


285 286 2» 

399 *07 399 

9» W 9M 

39TJ8 S ™ 
02 590 579 

M70W24W«^J» 

S S «'-» 

BS6E5 068 85680 
34* 357 34* 

370 373 572 

3J6 336 339 

prewto ok 326366 

im 115 ’l* 

sa js 

MiO *265 

W SOJO 49.97 
61. *5 

7160 77-30 70.X 
92.10 92 M 91 
*73 *74 *K 

1155110260. 1135 

16160 16*» Jg 

*360 

« ^3 


Jakarta 

AflroWB 
BAlrrri Indon 
BS Negara 
GutangGaim 
mdoctmert 

(wfafood 

bidosot 

SaropoemoKM 

SrtiwiGres* 

Tdetomurtlma 


ffio Si so? ^ 

1700 1650 16® 1700 

11100 10BSD 10975 114M 
35D0 .3*25 3*® 3SM 
5175 SOTS 5175 
6825 67S) 6825 6825 

lWg nsoo m» IM 

7CB0 6950 6975 7000 

*150 *100 4150 4125 


731 


Johannesburg 

aasr IS. £ « 1 

AngtoAm-Oxp 28250 28060 200® S 

AnoteAmGold 360 - 3*0 3*0 ££ 

AngtoAmlnd 177^17*50 1» 

AVMIN 19^5 I960- 19JJ 

4725 *660 *670 4635 

36» 26 2610 7610 

159J5 157 157 1PJ0 

X 47M *760 5030 

2860 a 38J5 27.75 

WJ5 1965 19^0 19^| 

^1^,2650 mm 

il ^ si S al 

SMS 59J5 ® 

129 S tZB-25 12a» 

1»^ 107 107 J5 1|2 

WJS 19.10 19.10 19* 


AV. 

Bartow 
CG. Smith 
DeBeen, 
Driefonteei 
FSteMW 

Ge«w 
GFSA , 
imperial Hdg5 
IngwCari 
I SUP , „ 

jtdnvMslnel 

uwfiyHOgs 

LBWriyUrt 

LfljUfeSirat 

Mtoorea 

Nornpok 

RemoroiriGD 

RkHemont 

RuslPUtiBun 


NolWUI 
Ned 
omnge 
P&O 
Pearson 
POfcinglon 
PsweiGen 
PiemferFpriMfl 
Pai^rtU 

RolmnlPP 

Rank Groin} 
RertWCokn 

Retfond 

Reed ink 
ReirtoUlnHri 
ReutereHdgs 
Rexam 
RMC Group 
Rob Raya 
Royal Bk Sari 
RTzreg 
RmJASitoA* 

Safewny 

SaMwry 

Sduates 

SariNewcuJfte 

Sol fewer 

Sacuricor 

5emn Trent 

SMITrorspR 

Set* 

Sroto Nephew 
SmnniCffne 
5mJtt»lnd 
Stern Elac 


Stond Charier 
Tale & Lyle 
Tosco.- 
Thames Wrier 
31 &WP 
Tl Group 
Tomkins 
Unilever 
UK Assure nee 
UM Newt 
UTOUttOtos 


108 

601 

*71 

1177 

2.11 

*99 

762 

6 

2.12 

670 
7.95 
166 

671 
*8S 
5.99 
*73 

460 

8.17 

361 

WS. 

*54 

662 

3J0 

966 

268 

5.97 

9M 

569 

175 

117 

1695 

678 

365 

3.16 

?J* 

1058 

9.79 

1.92 

9J2 

768 

7.95 
765 

8.95 
4X1 
1*3 
692 
622 
US 
267 
15.47 
5X0 
764 
668 


FT-SE 1084357.71 

Prevtois: 4307.10 

7^B 

7X4 

750 

*31 

*35 

*33 

6XS 

450 

450 

433 

686 

693 

1.11 

1.12 

1.12 

*78 

*81 

*87 

£31 

£39 

5J» 

1892 

11.11 

1054 

8X3 

851 

8X5 

SX* 

551 

5X6 

141 

352 

141 

4 

*11 

*03 

937 

1032 

998 

676 

450 

£30 

135 

338 

337 

1195 

1113 

1895 

4.10 

653 

4X1 

170 

1.71 

1.71 

53* 

5X0 

534 

458 

657 

677 

507 

62S 

612 

151 

153 

152 

*36 

*33 

*28 

2X1 

221 

2X3 

1825 

TOJO 

I0J9 

156 

157 

158 

*92 

£02 

£03 

S03 

£09 

£07 

538 

5X6 

5X2 

6.96 

73* 

751 

730 

7X0 

7-33 

158 

27D 

163 

SJ0 

£32 

5J1 

199 

*10 

4 

1157 

11.98 

11X2 

£24 

£32 

£27 

604 

612 

614 

157 

159 

158 

831 

8X6 

8J7 

176 

XW 

3J1 

9X3 

957 

9X6 

18*0 

1856 

10X4 

9.18 

935 

9J7 

*53 

*60 

*54 

251 

184 

253 

£53 

SX2 

5J55 

*55 

*59 

*57 

458 

66* 

6X0 

5.15 

533 

£37 

1*88 

15.16 

1£06 

737 

7X6 

7J8 

*17 

*20 

*24 

676 

235 

El 

688 

259 

7.88 

735 

7.90 

237 

2X5 

2X0 

191 

3J7 

193 

5 

5.16 

£02 

2X2 

106 

253 

*87 

*89 

*98 

*64 

*67 

*06 

13X1 

1155 

13X* 

106 

110 

107 

*83 

*M 

*» 

7 JO 

737 

732 

vn 

5.98 

£99 

2-09 

111 

109 

657 

670 

659 

7.75 

7.75 

7J9 

1X0 

1X3 

1X2 

620 

624 

623 

*78 

*80 

*87 

5X7 

5J1 

£70 

*07 

4X9 

AM 

*30 

*30 

*22 

7.90 

8.13 

7.92 

152 

157 

355 

1133 

11X2 

1139 

432 

*52 

4X9 

652 

6ifi 

654 

126 

339 

128 

956 

951 

959 

233 

136 

234 

182 

558 

£79 

938 

9X2 

938 

*93 

£87 

*91 

165 

173 

1X4 

UB 

3.14 

358 

16X0 

1690 

1603 

4.70 

673 

675 

156 

1X2 

356 

110 

114 

113 

7.11 

73* 

7.14 

1034 

1039 

1U8 

9X8 

9.74 

9X8 

153 

155 

1.91 

9J3 

Ml 

M5 

7J3 

754 

7.75 

750 

752 

7.92 

703 

73Q 

70. 

8X5 

883 

8X6 

*35 

*37 

*37 

139 

3X1 

3X1 

4.82 

686 

685 

£07 

£18 

£12 

539 

537 

£31 

233 

256 

2X4 

15J8 

1558 

1550 

m 

£39 

736 

£33 

757 

657 

661 

657 



High 

Lew 

CJ«e 

Prev. 

Vemtome Lx ids 

£29 

£17 

£20 

£29 

Vodafone 

1<»8 

192 

2.98 

2X4 

Whitbread 

&07 

7.9* 

7.98 

7.94 

WBtatsKdgs 

122 

3.18 

330 

3.19 

Wakcty 

*91 

*71 

*91 

*73 

WPP Group 

2X8 

163 

2X5 

2X« 

Zeneca 

1959 

I6JA 

16/4 

1837 

Madrid 


Bate hrietc 467 J2 


Pmtoes 462X3 


20030 

19750 

19900 

19*70 

ACESA 

1435 

1400 

1624 

1590 

Afluas Bareeton 

5500 

4<J0 

4400 

5450 

Argentoria 

BBV 

6060 

8430 

5820 

B3» 

6040 

8410 

5800 

8360 

Scnesw 

1100 

1090 

1094 

1095 

Baradraer 

19440 

18960 

19400 

18840 

Bco Centro Hlsp 

3855 

3775 

38*0 

3775 

Bco Exterior 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2810 

BOPopufor 

26000 

24100 

2642C 

25B6C 

Bco Santander 

9800 

9650 

9700 

9700 

CEPSA 

4200 

4124 

*200 

*150 

Contherde 

2520 

2490 

2*90 

2465 

Coip Mapfre 

7510 

rtmi 

7500 

7260 

Endesa 

8850 

BA» 

8830 

8720 

FECSA 

1205 

1170 

1200 

1170 

Gas Normal 

30700 

30340 

30590 

30350 


1590 

1440 

1560 

1560 

Prvra 

2665 

2635 

2644 

2610 

Repsol 

5620 

4490 

4570 

5*50 


1305 

1285 

ITfti 

1290 

TobocaHha 

6820 

6490 

6/60 

6510 


3310 

3285 

3290 

3370 


1140 

1110 

1130 

1115 

VoiencCemert 

1440 

1440 

1450 

1550 

Manila 


PSEted« 338182 


Previous; 3328.41 

AyotaB 

3050 

30 

3650 

36X0 

AwtaLond 

BLPNtip« 

31 

30X0 

3640 

31 

192 

189 

192 

189 


1175 

1125 

13X0 

13X0 

MonfloEWCA 

122 

120 

171 

120 

Metro Bank 

724 

M4 

m 

725 


1075 

1034 

I0./4 

10.74 

PO Bent 

38230 377 JO 382X0 

380 

Phil Long Dtsi 

1570 

1560 

1565 

1565 

SonMIgueiB 

95 

9D 

91 

96 

SIA Prime Kdg 

7.90 

7J0 

750 

7.90 

Mexico 


Botatodec 377189 


Pi Brieas; 379192 


*£25 

45X0 

45X0 

45X5 


10X8 

18X8 

18 57 

1834 


3135 

3044 

30X4 

31 X 

OfraC 

1114 

11.90 

11.98 

12.12 


41X0 

40X4 

40X4 

*1X0 


***0 

4120 

4320 

4*30 


136 

13? 

1.95 

1.92 

Goo Bn infiurco 
OM) dark Me* 

27.10 

2694 

27.10 

26X0 

167X0 

I66J0 

166X0 

167.90 


10100 

97X0 

99 JO 

9620 

TetMexL 

15X4 

1438 

15X8 

15.34 

Milan 

MIB Tetemalte 1280680 


Previous: 11*09X0 


12415 

12170 

12215 

11790 


3600 

3490 

3495 

3545 


*<» 

*290 

4365 

4335 


1250 

1219 

1219 

1234 


20150 

19660 

19844 

19515 

Cradda ItaOuno 

2360 

72BU 

2285 

2375 


9710 

9*50 

9600 

9295 

ENI 

8715 

8560 

8480 

8615 

Hal 

S575 

5*14 

son 

5C5 


30900 

30550 

30440 

30650 

IMI 

15170 

1*5*0 

1*910 

1 4635 

INA 

2260 

2220 

2230 

2230 

ffojgas 

Mediuel 

6180 

Ties 

6075 

7055 

6100 

7080 

6145 

7140 

MedtoDanco 

11430 

III7S 

11210 

11065 

Montedison 

1277 

1252 

1258 

1247 


646 

632 

<*« 



2465 

7415 

7*» 

2*30 

FtaSl 

3S» 

3414 

M0 

3400 

RA5 

146/0 

14400 

15W0 

14*40 

Roto B0IK3 

18000 

17800 

17810 

17H34 


12050 

11850 

119H4 

11700 

SW 

1630 

7430 

/*64 

705 

Telscom tofts 

4MS 

4140 

4795 

*130 

TIM 

*450 

4330 

*424 

*350 

Montreal 

bjdosWafcdsdet 299671 


PrevtoiS: 301 4X7 

BCE Mob Com 

43U 

m 

43* 

4335 

CrinTkeA 

25% 

25X5 

25% 

2W* 

Cdnl/tOA 

31.90 

31X5 

JL90 

31X0 

CTFlniSre 

N.T. 

N.T. 

M.T. 

309» 

G02 Metro 

l/.lfl 

1695 

17 ID 

1695 

Gl-WeslUtes 

23 

23 

» 

23 

Sttwsod 

37X0 

37.10 

3710 

1735 

InKSoreGm 

2£35 

94* 

2£30 

KM 

LortowCUs 

1685 

1635 

1634 

1695 

NrfBkConmJo 

16 

15X5 

16 

15-80 

Powercsrp 
Power Fin • 

TUB 

7(170 

TftW 

3W0 

V 

»utn 

7*85 

2680 

OudteOTB 

2430 

25.15 

75 1 * 

25.10 

Rogers Comm 8 

9X0 

9X0 

9X0 

9X0 

Royal BkCdo 

5£» 

S&JO 

5180 

5SJ0 


High Low Oose Pm. 


Paris 


Accor 

AGP 

AlrUourte 

AkotKAirih 

AbHJAP 

Boncolm 

BIC 

BNP 

Canal Phis 

Canefaur 

Caarm 

CCF 

CtMem 

OxWlanDlor 

CLF-Deda Fren 

CredB Agricaie 

Danone 

Eif-AguOalne 

Erfdnrdo BS 

BarocfisDev 

Buntoimn 

Gen-Eaux 

Havas 

UneW 

Lntoge 

Learond 

LOreal 


CAC-46265169 
Prevlowe 260626 

7BB 771 775 767 

21060 208JO 20900 206.10 
912 90D 911 8*5 

609 591 608 S87 

38260 379^0 779 JO 381160 
718 705 712 690 

931 920 927 913 


Lv . 

LVMH 
Lyon. Eaim 
JWtteflnB 
Parlhcs A 
Pernod Rkjurd 
Peugeot CB 
PtnouWPlh* 
Promodes 
Renault 
Rew) 

»*- Poulenc A, 
Sanod 
Schnettfer 
SEB 

SGSTtwmsM 

SreGenerrte 

5odano 

Si Gobrin 
Suez 

Sw MMt 
Thomson CSF 
ToWB 
Usinci 
Volee 


260 256X0 

260 

258 

1064 

HUB 

1050 

1055 

3S45 

3500 

3520 

3492 

263X0 255X0 

262 258X0 

269X0 267X0 268X0 

265 

787 

m 

698 

699 

B*1 

832 

837 

830 

580 

566 

579 

568 

1290 

1290 

1290 

1285 

918 

886 

915 

800 

565 

5*9 

S58 

544 

944 

930 

9140 

932 

10X0 

10X5 

10X5 

10X0 

730 

7.10 

7.10 

7J0 

803 

794 

801 

793 

*51X0 

449 451-50 4*9 JO 

827 

814 

820 

812 

362JD 

354 360X0 353X0 

1021 

idle 

1015 

1000 

19S9 

1895 

1948 

1910 

1369 

1332 

1362 

1328 

605 

591 

603 

595 



High 

Low 

Ctese 

Prev. 

Electrolux B 

488 

*73 

485 

474 

Ericsson B 

247 146X0 

24/ 

2*1 

HennesB 

TOGO 

1068 

107? 

1060 

InceirtwA 

S36 

52/ 

534 

527 

Investor B 

342 

327 341X0 335X0 

mo do a 

244 

235 

243 23*50 

Nordharrtcen 

274 

269 

270 

272 

Phorw/Uplonn 

SamMkB 

283 

281 

282X0 279X0 

185X0 

183 

184X0 

183X0 

ScantaB 

189X0 185X0 189X0 18*50 

SCAB 

168X0 

167 

168 

166X0 

5-EBankenA 

82X0 

81X0 

82X0 

8) 


SJtorKfla Feis 

SKanskoB 

5XPB 

SpoTOanken A 
StatishTpotekA 
S/nroA 
S» Handles A 
Volvo B 


229 22650 228 22650 

341 331 3*1 327 

189 180 109 17150 

U! 1*1 1*150 1*3 

190 190 190 190 

106 103 106 102-50 

21250 21050 21150 210 

19550 192 19260 191 


357.90 35110 
390J0 38L30 
3^00 JI4J0 
6*8 629 

2*53 TX6 
1759 1700 
1*4 13110 
1769 1760 
20250 19750 

574 30% 


356 351 JO 


1011 


31150 
1070 
3B690 
685 656 

3089 3028 
872 846 

279 277 

09 617 

193 181 

468 *5650 
9175 89 

387.90 385.10 


319J0 71*00 
64* 623 

2*23 2394 

17*8 1683 

1*1.90 1*0 

1768 1768 
201.30 199 

573 5S8 

31050 305 

1056 100* 


678 655 

3060 3066 
872 838 

279 27*60 
618 629 

193 18150 
*65 *5150 
92.70 8690 
38750 38*70 


Sydney 


Amor 

AMZBklng 

BHP 

Bond 

Broomes (nd. 
CBA 

CCAmaJB 
Coles Myer 
Camalco 

CRA 

CSR 

Fasten Brew 
Goodman Fid 
IC1 Australia 
Lend Lease 
MIMHdos 
HrtAustSanfc 
Nat Mutual Hdfl 
News Carp 
Poctac Dunlap 
Pioneer Inn 
Pub Broadcast 
SI George Bonk 
WMC 


.. JPel 
Waotworms 


7.91 
17 JO 
350 
2150 
1250 
HAD 

5- 87 
673 

1850 

*51 

166 

150 

12.10 

2355 

1J6 

1625 

1.93 

6.75 

X16 

352 

6- 35 
750 
8J5 
750 
aTi 
359 


ABOnBnartes: MXL10 
Prevkns:342150 

8X7 8X0 

7J6 7JV 
17.12 16.78 
3M 1X7 
21 JO 2155 
1253 12-58 
1159 11J0 
55* 5J1 
660 653 

1655 18-00 

*54 *-S 

256 25* 

158 155 

12.06 1256 
2350 23X5 
1.75 1J6 

16-18 16JJ7 
1.90 1.9* 


7.72 
1687 
3X2 

2152 

1256 

1150 

SJ3 

660 

1850 

4X6 

250 

15* 

1253 

23JD 

1.73 
1605 

1.90 

669 

3-10 

181 

627 

752 

60S 

7.02 

855 

353 


iTheTrib Index 

Prices oe at 3.00 P.M. New Vorfc tone. 

Jan. 1, 1992 t 100. 

Lavot 

Change 

% change 

yevtodeie 





% change 

World Index 

151.67 

40-01 

+0.00 

+15.01 

Regional kidexM 





Aata/Partfic 

112.34 

+0.22 

+0.20 

-16-33 

Europe 

150.02 

+1.86 

+1.05 

+14.25 

N. America 

176.55 

+0.47 

+0.27 

+37.63 

S. America 

139.55 

+1.12 

+0^1 

+56.73 

Mutate! Indewee 





Capital goods 

175.32 

+O.70 

+0.40 

+31.94 

Consumer goods 

172.39 

+1.11 

+0.65 

+24.86 

Energy 

174.94 

+2.14 

+1-24 

+28.99 

Finance 

112.73 

+0-34 

+0.30 

-11.40 

Miscellaneous 

157.87 

+O.B2 

+0.39 

+16.10 

Raw Materials 

185.49 

+2-38 

+1.30 

+30^1 

Service 

141.09 

+0.19 

+0.13 

+17.57 

Utilities 

133.88 

+0.72 

+0.54 

+559 

The International HmaMTflxjne Worid Stock Index O tracks the U.S. Ootnrvaiuasot 

230 intomationaty tmosObfa stocks from 35 countries. For moro information, a frw» 

tiooMfrt is avsBobte by wrtfog SoTheTrB) Index, ral Awovtt c/wrtos Ha GouStt. 

92S21 NauayDatiex, Franca. 


Ccrrpltod by Bloomberg News. | 

High Lew 

Ouse Pm, 


High Lew 

dose Pm. 


3.15 

191 

63* 

755 

8J1 

7.10 

856 

35* 


6.70 

3.10 
181 
635 
755 
a56 

7.10 

8.70 
355 


Sao Paulo 


Index: 0906X1 
097622 


BrosestoPfd 
Bnriiraa Pld 

rhnrtoncoPfd 

ugmsrrricias 

UoWoor 

Pebvbras Pfd 

PtafishiLuz 

Sid Nadonal 

Sauza Cruz 

TeMutsPM 

Tetemlg 

Tetoit 

TeteraPfd 

Unttmvs 

UstorinosMd 

CVRD PM 


«.10 

70550 

4600 

6000 

1110 

*7650 

52750 

40».QQ 

329-90 

22150 

14160 

3950 

9-20 

107.70 

15600 

15699 

29850 

*0-75 

U6 

2850 


680 690 

70050 70050 
*3.99 44A0 
5350 S50 
1*00 1550 
46600 *6950 
51950 52250 
*4050 *<350 
31150 32550 
21350 21750 
1*550145510 
3670 3690 
950 9.U 

16550 105.10 
15*99 15550 
15*99 15550 
29600 29150 
4000 4000 
122 122 
2720 27 JO 


695 

699.99 

4399 

5669 

1*60 

*6950 

519.80 

*4600 

31650 

21250 

1*5.00 

3680 

690 

10520 

154.90 

15550 

29350 

4075 

u* 

27 JO 


Taipei 

CotnoyLitalns 
ChangHwa Bk 
CWoDTuugBk 
Cfitoa Devrtpmi 
anno Steel 
First Bank 
Formosa Plastic 
Hire Nan Bk 
tad Comm Bk 
Non Ya Plashes 
SNntongLXe 
Taiwan Seal 
Tatung 

UM Were Elec 
Urd World Oifri 


Stock MOrfM tadsc 795657 
Prevtoosc 788045 


181 

179 

179 

180 

186 

182 

182 

186 

92 

90X0 

91X0 

91 

108X0 106X0 108X0 106X0 

2£80 

25-60 

2£60 

25X0 

188 

184 

184 

187 

75X0 

7*50 

74X0 

74X0 

147 

144X0 

145 

14$ 

BS 

84 

84 

84X0 

68 

67 

67 

67 

mxo 

110 

110X0 110X0 

67X0 

64 

67X0 

63X0 

S£50 

5*50 

55 

55 

47X0 

45 

*7 M 

44X0 

69X0 

69 

69X0 

69 


Seoul 

Docom 

Daewoo Heavy 

Karoo El Pur 
Korea ErchSk 
Karoo Mob Tel 
LGSemleOO 

Pohong iron SI 
Scansung DfUay 
Samsung Elec 
SN nhen Bar* 


... ec 67997 
PrevtaestcniA 

108000 105500 106000 100080 
*090 *250 *270 *4M 

19700 10900 19000 19300 
15500 14800 15400 15400 
25800 itwi 25600 25200 
6200 5900 6050 6100 
*90000 48500C *88000 *90000 
27900 26500 26900 27*00 
42200 41200 *1900 42200 
44800 *3000 43600 44300 
57600 55600 56500 57600 
10700 10600 10600 10500 


Oslo 


AtorA 


0BXUec542JJ4 
Piwtoes 582.15 


OennarekeSk 

EMin 

HafcJundA 

KvaefnerAsa 

Norsk Hydre 

NciskeSugA 

ttycomedA 

OfMa Asa A 

Petto GeoSvc 

SogoPemnA 

scnBwec 

TremceonOH 

StorebrondAsa 


180 

147 

25 

30 

122 

SO 

338 

3*5 

213 

111 

5*2 

292 

n 

45JD 


172.50 

143 

2*60 

29.60 

109 

49 

329 

339 

211 

106 

535 

298 

113 

127 

370 

4*50 


179 171 

145 1*2 

2*80 2*50 
30 29M 
11350 107 jO 
*950 50 

337 JO 32950 
34*50 33690 
21 1 JO 208 

108 105-M 
53S 53650 
191 JO 287 
112 1T2J0 
136 ' 2650 
385 375 

45J0 45L10 


Singapore 


Ada Pk Blew 
CmrtwsPoc 
CBy DorHs 
CydeCflfrtwe 
Dulry Farm ml* 
DBS foreign 
DBS Land 
KeppdFel* 
Fraser iNemre 
HK Land* 
JOMMOTIWSrt* 
Joid Strategic' 
Kappel 
farad Book 

KBCtorejin 
OS Union BkF 
Pcrfa»qy_Hd gs 
SembffliTOng 
Sing AO foreign 
Sing Land „ 
StagPressF 
Sing Tech Ind 
SteoTWecorom 
Sirons Steam 
Tri Lee Bonk 
Utd Industrial 
UldOSeoBkF 
Wing Tri Htfcs 
•.■mUSOoBors. 


Sirota Time*: 2189X4 
Pr eiteas! 219634 


830 

830 

830 

830 

1630 

10 

10.10 

1030 

1440 

1*10 

1*10 

1*30 

IS 

1*90 

1*90 

1*90 

OJfl 

0-76 

OJS 

0J6 

18X0 

1830 

18X0 

18X0 

£65 

£55 

5X5 

£55 

5.95 

£55 

£70 

£95 

13 

1230 

12.90 

1290 

2.91 

287 

208 

287 

£15 

635 

£15 

£15 

336 

336 

326 

338 

10X0 

1030 

1030 

10X0 

*26 

430 

432 

*36 

13.90 

1850 

18X0 

IBX0 

10.70 

10X0 

TIL70 

10X0 

635 

6 

£05 

£95 

0 

7.95 

8 

8 

12X0 

12X8 

12X0 

1260 

8.15 

7X5 

7-85 

8.10 

2BX0 

27.90 

28X0 

27.80 

£96 

192 

330 

196 

330 

334 

338 

124 

434 

4X0 

*83 

*80 

352 

150 

152 

3X2 

135 

132 

133 

131 

16 

15-50 

15.90 

1530 

4J0 

*68 

*70 

*60 


Stockholm 


AGAB 

ABBA 

AsstDgman 

Astro A 

AitasCapcBA 

AutoUv 


108 10650 107 107-50 
866 853 8*6 849 
200 1« l«J0 192 
371 367 3W 364 
175 173 175 17150 
352 3*5 3*7-50 341 


Tokyo 


NMW225: 1B64J0 
Pmtoes: 18C9.13 

AUootnots 

AlNipponAlr 

1120 

851 

1090 

830 

noo 

840 

1080 

8*1 

Amtuoy 

AesHBcmk 

3480 

860 

3400 

845 

3420 

845 

3450 

850 

AsoWChera 

Itf? 

6*4 

657 

647 

AaohlGtots 

1060 

1060 

1060 

1060 

Bk Tokyo Mitsu 

2000 

I960 

I960 

1950 

BkYtotahama 

570 

561 

56.1 

564 

BrW^aone 

2230 

2W0 

2210 

2170 


2560 

'.'.MO 

2560 

2510 

ChubuEtoc 

2120 

71 TO 

7110 

2110 

OuraokuElec 
Do! few Print 

21X 

21DU 

2110 

3)80 

50 X 

2000 

7010 

7010 

Oriel 

797 

7fti 

790 

nt 

DaWert Kang 

1350 

1330 

1170 

1310 

DtrfwoBonk 

500 

*90 

*92 

*92 

Dohra House 

IM 

1320 

1140 

1340 

IWwoSac 

990 

940 

975 

923 

DD4 

7400a 

72808 

/340a 

L— 1 

Denso 

2320 

7250 

2770 

Kffl 

EosUoponRy 

5180a 

5)200 

5I60D 

51*0e 

Etoi 

7770 

2240 

2270 

2230 

Fonuc 

J8W 

37BO 

3800 

3850 

Fuji Book 

1*50 

(400 

1«0Q 

1380 

Fof Photo 
Futon 

4100 

1210 

400 

1190 

CH 

1200 

*030 

1190 

HotrtfonIBk 

1080 

1D60 

1070 

1050 

Hitachi 

1080 

1060 

1060 

1050 

Hotvia Motor 

300 

JIM 



IBJ 

i*30 

1380 

13* 

1390 

IHI 

442 

<35 

*?7 

05 

Itochu 

W3 

5/8 

58? 

590 

Ito-Yokoda 

55/0 

5470 

5530 

5*90 

JAL 

SOT 

*94 

*9/ 

*94 

Japan Tebocea 

00500 

8010a 

note 

KKOa 

Jusco 

3290 

3740 

3790 

3230 

Kofma 

6SB 

647 

647 

651 

KtnsalElec 

an 

2170 

2200 

7170 

too 

1340 

1320 

1330 

1330 

tovtasiUHyy 

*99 

•HR 

*88 

m 

town Steel 

■J 

322 

325 

324 

KWd«ppRy 

Hzzfl 

773 

777 

724 

Kirin Brewery 

1020 

1010 

1010 

1010 

Kobe Stout 

227 

224 

27* 

725 

Koraabu 

901 

098 

900 

900 

tottota 

SC 

531 

SC 

520 

Kyorcra 

71 (W 

7100 

7150 

7120 

Kwshu Elec 
LtCB 

7140 

2100 

2100 

7090 

*29 

4?1 

429 

4» 

Manibert 

*71 

466 

466 

47H 

Moral 

17C 

1680 

1WB 

1720 

Morse Comm 

3160 

3130 

3160 

3130 

MalsuEfMtad 

I860 

1830 

lfiC 

18* 

MrtsuEiecwk 

1130 

1080 

lift 

1100 

Mitsubishi 

1110 

1080 

urn 

1100 

MdstiibKOi 

3*7 

336 

344 

Ml 

Mitsubishi El 

688 

673 

680 

673 

MdftUrtsHErt 

1*30 

1400 

1400 

1400 

Mitsubishi Hvy 

86J 

854 

857 

864 

MBsehbMMai 

Bffl 

8/7 

Rfl? 

6ft* 

Mitsubishi Tr 

1350 

1290 

1300 

1300 

Mitsui 

89* 

879 

880 

895 


Mitsui Fudnsn 

MttsulTtus* 

MuratoMfg 

WEC 

Niton 

NBJuSec 

Ntraenda 

Nlpp&mness 

MppanOn 

tflppw Steel 

ffissan Motor 

NKJC 

Nomura Sec 

NTT 

NTT Daft 

Op Paper 

Osaka Gas 

tOcoh 

Rohm 

Salami Bk 

5anityB 

SanwaBonk 

Sanya Etoc 

seaun 

5eRiuRwy 

SettriOwn 

sektart House 

Seven-Eierefl 

Sharp 

sr&oku ElPwr 

Shbntzu 

SrifrvetsuOl 

Sltlseldo 

Shizuoka Bk 

Sofltxmk 

Sony 

Sumitomo 

Sumitomo Bk 

SuirttOtera 

Sutrtftrao Elec 

SumN Metal 

SuraH Trust 

TmshoPfnna 

TakedaOtem 

TDK 

Tofwku ElPwr 
Toknl Bank 
Tam Marine 
Tokyo ElPwr 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Gas 
TokyuCorp. 
Tonen 

TappanPrtm 
Turwlnd 
Tosiffia 
Totfon 
Ton Trust 
Toyota Motor 
Yomoroucri 
si UBt ze* 1.000 


1310 

739 

*230 

1*20 

1600 

7*3 

8570 

770 

509 

329 

724 

262 

1650 


1270 1300 

724 733 

*210 *230 
1390 1410 

1770 1790 

715 723 

6520 85*0 

7SS 760 
*W 499 
313 32B 

711 71 B 

256 259 

... 1610 16X 

08900 87500 8820a 

30906 30500 SldOh 

662 650 651 

297 295 295 

1450 lao 1440 

8710 8700 0700 

773 743 756 

3*10 3370 3390 

1*10 1360 1370 

503 *92 495 

68*0 6660 6660 

52*0 5020 5100 

1350 1140 12*0 

11*0 1120 1120 
7170 7120 7150 

15*0 1520 1530 

2100 3080 2100 

721 712 719 

2390 2350 2360 

1*20 1400 1*10 

1020 1000 1010 
11100 10200 10700 
8900 8760 0900 

895 886 890 

15*0 1*90 1500 

469 *57 463 

1600 1660 1670 

292 285 286 

1060 1020 1030 

2750 2700 2720 

2570 2460 240 

8330 8190 8250 

2090 2050 2060 

m 963 
11» 1210 
2220 22*0 
*270 *290 
905 306 

55$ 560 

1220 1 230 

1390 >400 

«S3 690 

684 685 

2780 7790 
849 871 

3160 3180 

2520 2530 


975 

1240 

2250 

43X 

310 

570 

1250 

1*10 

695 

693 

2810 

879 

3200 

2550 


1280 

724 

*230 

1300 

1770 

692 

0500 

755 

509 

322 

719 
260 
1590 

0730a 

30900 

665 

396 

1430 

8620 

743 

3350 

13*0 

490 

6740 

52*0 

12*0 

1130 

7160 

1530 

2070 

720 
2250 
1400 
1000 
10600 
8700 

897 

1*70 

*52 

1660 

286 

1000 

2710 

2*30 

8170 

2Q50 

962 

1220 

2210 

4260 

305 

560 

1230 

1*00 

683 

681 

2700 

875 

3120 

2520 


Memanro 

Moore 

Newbridge Net 
NorniKtouic 

Notcen Energy 

NttwnTriecom 

Nava 

Oner 

PancdnPeitm 

PetroCdo 

Placer Dome 

Poeofwim 

PamshSask 

RemAssance 

Rla Akjoai 

Rogen Confer 0 

Seooram Co 

SheflCdoA 

Stone CDnsaid 

Suncvr 

TaOsmonEny 

Tack B 

Tetegtobe 

Tetas 

Thomson 

TorDomBoi* 

Transaltn 

TrartsCda Pipe 

Trimark FVil 

Trine Kahn 

TVXGold 

WesKoostEny 

Weston 


13.95 13.65 
31X0 30.05 
43X0 *2.70 
32SO 321» 
39.15 2EB0 

99.10 97X0 
12X5 12X5 

25.10 54-55 
56-90 55.90 
19.85 19^5 
28J5 27J5 
1190 1270 


13.65 13J0 

30.10 am 

42J]0 42J5 
32J0 3195 
29.15 28-85 
98J0 98 hi 

12*5 12X5 
2110 3X70 
56X0 56W 

19.65 19 ifi 
37 JO 28.40 
1285 1270 


106'* 105.55 106.05 106.10 
40h 394. *tRy 3V* 

3SA5 3E2D 35A5 35JO 
2165 23X0 23 >6 23J0 

53X0 52J5 52.90 52J0 
55L* 55 55.05 5516 

22J0 22.10 22J0 22.15 
6180 60.05 60.40 51.90 
*5 **.10 45 400 

33”! 33V, 33J0 33X0 

39M ay-50 39.60 39X3 
20J5 20Si 201* 2070 
3010 29.15 30 29.10 

3814 3816 3840 3816 

17.15 1885 16.90 16JB5 
251* 25X0 ?5J0 25 Vi 

42>* *114 41U 41W 

33H 31.90 31% 31.90 

HjSO 11X0 litre 11.90 
25 14% 24.90 2485 

75 7314 7314 74W 


Vienna 


BaeMer-Udden 
Cretflwnsl Pfd 
EA-GenercA 
EVN 

FiugticrtenWlen 

OMV 

OestEleldrtZ 
VASWW 
VATech 
Wlenerberg Bau 


BUMteWim 
Pnrvtes: I237J11 

828 83805 824J0 83450 
*6885 *54.50 *6085 *5750 
3*50 3390 3*40 3400 
1?M 17*6 1760 1746 
59950 59* 595 595 

'SS '22f 1397 14,1 

BS9 860 
*87.70 473 *80X0 473 

158 eJffi S® 

23322199.90 2218 2189 


Wellington nzsexdubcszbiss 

l*rc»toas: 22*887 
fM U5 3JB6 

1*25 IS ,JB >■» 


Toronto 

Arittri Price 
Aibaite Energy 
Akron Alum 
AndenonEtol 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Nova Safa 
Baric* Gold 
BCE 

BCTeteawnm 

BloctwnPnnm 

BambanflerB 

BraseanA 

BiMMinenb 

Cornea) 

OK 

Cdn Nall RoD 
CdnNatRte 
Crii OcddPet 

am pacific 

Comlnm 

Masco 

Detnktr 

Donohue A 

Du Port CdoA 

EdocfGnuo 

EuroNevMng 

Fotrtonrl 

Fakertoidoc 

FtacherOnlA 

Fiance Nevada 

Criteria Res 

imperial M 

taco 

IPLEmray 
UMUmB 
Laewen Group 
MaairilBidl 
Magna InflA 


TSEUdarilMto 6161^6 
Preibas;6145LM 


AkNZMldB 
Brtertyhrvt 
Carter Hon «d 
FttchChBkfe 
PieldiCh Eny 
FWOi Ch Foret 
Field) Ch Paper 
Lion Nathan 
Telecom N1 
WUson Horton 


3J* 3J3 3J6 

•L33 430 4.3C 

W W W0 

J® 1.W 2XO 1J>9 

356 284 285 285 

156 3X3 

4J0 4J57 6J9 857 

11« 1180 11A5 Ilia 


22X0 an 

39.05 2SJ0 
49J95 49 JS 
1815 15.90 
50 49J20 
52X5 52JD 
3750 3717 
67.90 6655 
39>k 3810 
72 75 

2880 2830 
33J5 32JD 
1890 18W 
5155 5015 
6830 66 

SOKr 5D 
m 331-1 
23 2255 
3430 3350 
39 3880 
2555 24« 
1235 12-20 
2830 2815 
33J0 3190 
2340 2130 
44 4250 
395 390* 
33 3L70 
2250 77 59 
6165 62.95 
1016 

61.10 60 
*890 450 
39.95 39 « 

W JD »5S 
441V 43W 


19 

7250 


181* 

72 


2220 2235 
ms 29 
49X5 m 
15.90 1805 
4955 4895 
5235 52.15 
3755 3810 
67Vi 6870 
20% 3810 
73 72 

2630 2845 
3890 3185 
1880 1895 
5U5 5080 
6815 6805 
50X5 *9 JO 
3170 3115 
77 HC 33. K 
34J0 33*6 

39 3830 
2805 24.90 
1230 12U 
2815 2630 
3190 3115 
TW 23J0 
*280 4435 
295 JWft 
31.70 3130 
2160 2155 
a 6170 
1030 9ty 
61.05 60 

4&8S 4865 
393S to 
19.10 Wv 
44'a 44 

Wi 1935 
7214 72 '4 


Zurich 

ABBB 

Adecco B 

AkeufeseR 

Ares-SeronoB 

AW ft 

BaerHdgB 

BaiotseHdgR 

BKVbion 

OrttodR 

Qd Suisse GpR 

EfridrowtmB 

Ems-Owrte 

ESECHrig 

HrtdertonkB 

UedttenstLBS 

NesWR 

NarorilsR 

Oerfikn Bueii R 

PoigesoHWB 

PharmVlsfl B 

Richemont A 

PlrettPC 

Roche Hdg PC 

SBC R 

5chJndlerPC 

SGSB 

5M16B 

SulzarR 

Swiss ReWsR 

SwfeSoirR 

UB5B 

WWemuirR 

Zurich AssurR 


1729 

481J0 

1187 

1550 

14.T. 

1660 

2940 

B61 

725 

159 

531 

5BB0 

*61 

1626 

1701 

735 

2085 

20b 

123*5 

28*50 

1628 

3510 

872 

940 

151* 

1290 

1335 

908 

* 4*50 


SPItato c 287844 

«^Wta»2S2739 
1697 1729 1681 

!«S 1178 1W6 

«T W 1 S 0 
J?’!; I8T. 860 
160 1660 
»w 2WS 2915 
§46 855 845 

,715 725 m 

1S «n >S7J5 
K9 529 531 

S7BS »5 5770 
4760 *810 *nn 
WJ 

^60 *63 456 

lfw IK 1401 

IW 1671 
1*250 

’“8 1&2 1S10 
727 755 

8M0 2060 2075 

,S 

s ss g 

1*7 IsS 150? 

IS JW 1275 

T Sf 1338 1322 

90S M0 
«8 4*350 *3750 



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PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5. 199^ 


NYSE 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1997 


PAGE 15 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Sony Poised to Take 
Big Stake in JSkyB 


. . . _ <■ ii i 

CKOf S - * 


Attujhv-.... ; ’ ■*- - 

*wad&:\Ti- . V “ ■' j * 


flfopmfcwjj Nnrt 

gSSfe’SS&fK 

T?® Njjwn Kefeai newspaper re- 
ported Monday that Sony would 

q l ? 5 ? e , rcent stake »n JSkvB. 

Softbank s president, Masayoshi 
Son, said Monday that Sonv was 
close to signing an agreement to 
•become an equal partner, 

A Sony executive refused to com- 
m ® nt on what stake Sony might ac- 
*^®8 talks were continuing. 

As of today, we have no know- 
ledge that shareholding details in the 
JSkyB project have been finalized.” 
he said. Executives News Corp. also 
declined to comment 

Sony shares rose 200 yen ($1.66). 
to 8,900, in Tokyo. Softbank shares 
gained 100. dosing at 10,700. News 
Corp. shares rose 3 cents to 6.73 
Australian dollars ($5.28) in 
Sydney. 

News Corp. and Softbank each 
invested 10 billion yen to start 
JSkyB in December. 

A stake in JSkyB, which is to 
begin broadcasting in April, would 
'advance Sony’s drive to become a 
force in each stage in production and 
distribution of entertainment using 
the latest digital technology. 

JSkyB wc uld benefit from Sony ' s 
expertise in digital broadcasting 
technology, which moves pictures, 
music and other information faster 


than traditional analog systems. 

Sony, the largest maker of digital 
studio cameras and broadcast lard- 
ware. also produces programming 
through film and music businesses 
that could be broadcast over 
JSkyB 's network. 

In January. Sony’s president. 
Nobuyuki fdei, said strengthening di- 
gital satellite broadcasting was one of 
Sony’s top three goals for 1997. 

Sony owns 5 percent of the Jap- 
anese satellite broadcaster Ber- 
fecTV. a competitor of JSkyB con- 
trolled by the trading companies 
Itochu Corp., Mitsui & Co., Sum- 
itomo Corp. and Nissho Iwai. JSkyB 
also will compete with the Japanese 
version of GM Hughes Electronics 
Corp.’s DirecTV, a joint venture of 
Hughes and Matsushita Electric In- 
dustrial Co. (Bloomberg, AFX) 

■ Sony Console to Go on Sale 

Sony Computer Entertainment 
Inc. will launch its new PlayStation 
computer game console by mid- 
March in Singapore. Thailand. 
Hong Kong and Malaysia. Reuters 
reported Tuesday from Tokyo. 

The 32-bit machine, to be marketed 
only in Asia, is priced at 2^80 Hong 
Kong dollars (.$333) and wfll play 
video compact disks as well as games. 

Separately, Sony Corp. said it was 
negotiating to increase its stake in die 
advertising agency Tokyu Agency 
International. Bloomberg News re- 
ported. Sony has a 12.5 percent stake 
in the agency, which is controlled by 
the railroad company Tokyu Corp. 
and affiliated with Tokyu Agency, 
Japan’s ihird-largest ad agency. 


Taiwan Chip Executive Resigns 


Bloomberg News 

TAIPEI — Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing 
Co.. Taiwan’s largest chipraaker, said Tuesday that 
its president, Don Brooks, would leave the company 
May l. 

The announcement came as the company forecast a 
larger-than-expected 53 percent drop in its 1997 net 
profit amid declining prices. 

Mr. Brooks, 58, who has been president since 
1991 , will be succeeded by the company's chairman. 
Morris Chang, who will hold the two top posts in the 
company, Taiwan Semiconductor said. 

Taiwan Semiconductor is an affiliate of the Dutch 
electronics manufacturer Philips Electronics NV, 
which owns 35 percent of the company. Mr. Brooks 
said he was leaving so he could be closer to his family 
outside Taiwan. He said he had faced a choice be- 
tween leaving and making ’’another long-term com- 
mitment in Taiwan as the company comes out of this 
downturn, continues its aggressive expansion and 
embraces the rapid pace of technology change.” 

Mr. Chang. W. is widely viewed as the father of 
Taiwan's semiconductor industry, having used his 
business savvy and political acumen to propel 
Taiwan's chip business into the big leagues as the 


world’s founft-largest semiconductor maker. Mr. 
Chang, who was bom in China, was lured by the 
Taiwan government from the United States in the mid- 
1980s with the mission of building up the island's 
buddmg semiconductor industry. 

Mr. Chang came to Taiwan to serve as president of 
the Industrial Technology Research Institute, a gov- 
ernment-backed research body. At one point, he 
simultaneously served as chairman of the country's 
two biggest chip companies. Taiw'an Semiconductor 
and United Microelectronics Corp., both spin-offs 
from the technology research institute. 

Taiwan Semiconductor's forecast of a fall in net 
profit in 1997 to 9.14 billion Taiwan dollars (5332 
million) from 19.4 billion dollars in 1996 confounded 
analysts and cast doubt on the prospect for a surge in die 
semiconductor maker’s stock this year. The company 
said sales would fall 1 0.6 percent, to 35.2 billion dollars. 
The announcement came after Taiwan Semiconduct- 
or’s stock rose by its 7 percent daily limit, to 67.50 
dollars, bringing its gain to 21 percent since Jan. 6 . 
“Individual investors had been hoping for some 
jd news,” Nate Emerson, a broker at HG Asia 
curities, said. ”It’s likely we’ll have disappointed 
investors tomorrow morning." 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

15DC0 
14000 
13300 
13000 
11000 
10000 


Singapore ..Tokyo 
Straits Times ■ Nikkei 225 


• -• 

2250 , 

ift 22000 

r J^ svv 

2206 bf 
2100 y 

¥\ -21000 

20000 

19000 


2050 nr 

-16000 

O NO J F'M 
1996 1997 

2«»0 NO 

1996 

J F M. 17000 
1997 



o n o 
1996 


Proton Chief’s Death Casts Shadow on Malaysian Carmake r 


Cunqxiatty Our Sz& From Dup&cbes 

KUALA LUMPUR — Yahaya Ahmad, who con- 
trolled Proton, Malaysia’s largest automaker, through his 
huge holding company. Diversified Resources Bhd, has 
died in a helicopter crash, the company said Tuesday. 

His death appeared to be at least a temporary blow to 
Malaysia's efforts to build an automobile industry. 

"He was perceived to be taking the Malaysian car 
industry to the next decade,” said Yet* Keat Seng, vice 
president for research at Merrill Lynch & Co. in Kuala 
Lumpur. ‘ ‘The question is whether the company can find 
a successor as close to die prime minister as tie was.” 

But other analysts and government officials were 
confident about Proton’s long-term future. "For the 
six- to 1 2 - month period, nothing has changed fun- 


damentally; the policy and management teams are in 
place.” said Chung Yee Wah. automotive analyst at 
HSBC James Cape! in Kuala Lumpur. 

Mr. Yahaya. 50, was picked a year ago by Prime 
Minister Mahathir Mohamad to take charge of Malay- 
sia's national carmaker, Perusahaan Otomobii Nasional 
Bhd., or Proton. He died when a helicopter in which he 
and his wife were traveling crashed in the eastern state 
of Pahang on Monday, the company said. 

His holding company has operations spanning nearly 
every sector of Malaysia’s transportation industry, from 
car manufacturing to public-bus networks to aviation. It 
has a market capitalization of 29.6 billion ringgit ($1 1.94 
billion) and makes up 5 percent of the Kuala Lumpur's 
benchmark stock index. f Bloomberg . Reuters) 


Exchange 

Index 

Tuesday Prev- ■% 
Close arise Change 

Hong Kong 

HangSang 

. ia,45&a& 43307.28 4X42 

Singapore 

SlraSs Tim® 

• 2,m.44 2,198.34 -031 

Sydney 

AH Ordinaries .. 

2.432.10 2,421 2D 10.45 

Tokyo 

mm 22s. 

.18,429.13 .40.74 

Kuala Lumpur Composite 

■ 1,247.23 1,260.44 -105 

Bangkok 

SET 

688.74 707.24 .. ~2£SL 

Seoul 

Composite Index 

S79.97 . 679.64 +OjO$ 

Taipei 

Slock Market Index 7£5&57 7,880.45 +Q.97J 

ISanfla 

PSE 

&30&B2 &320.41 -0-53 

Jakarta 

Composite fntiex 

’ 89532 ’ 700.1 1 . -0.66 

Woffington 

NZS&4Q 

&28&5S 2^80.87 . 4034 

Bombay 

SenstSve Index 

• $944.61 .O87T.05 4l;?D 

Source: Tefekurs 


lirte national Herald Tntaoc 

Very briefly: 


DIGITAL: High-Definition TV Highlights Flaws 

Continued from Page II 


ular televisions tuned to chan- 
nel 34 show only snow.) 

WHD was not the first U.S. 
high-definition station to go 
on tbe air. Ten others have 
commission licenses to op- 
erate model stations. The first 
to go on the air, in July, was 
WRAL-HD, part of the CBS 
affiliate in Raleigh, North 
Carolina. 

But the technology is so 
new that very little digital 
high-definition-television 
equipment exists. WHD, die 
model station, had nearly all 
of it So WRAL-HD was only 
able to broadcast digital data, 
picked tip on an engineer’s 
spectrum analyzer. 

Patrick Scott, who operates 
an experimental bigh-defin- 
mon-television station in 
Seattle, said the project gave 
him a sense of breaking new 
ground. 

“It strikes me that we are 
inventing TV all over again,” 
be said. "This must have 


been how the pioneers of 
black-and-white television 
felt" 

Mr. Scott, president of 
Fisher Broadcarting, which 
operates the Seattle ABC af- 
filiate KOMO TV, is also en- 
countering all sorts of new 
possibilities — and prob- 
lems. 

“I’m really impressed with 
the clarity of the high-defin- 
ition picture and the sound 
quality.” he said. “But our 
cameramen are also having to 
learn bow to use videotape all 
over again." 


The problem is that the new 
pictures are wide, like a 
movie screen, rather than vir- 
tually square, as with ament 
picture tubes. That means 
cameramen have to consider 
how to fill vast new areas of 
real estate in the TV picture. 

"The temptation now is to 
use two-shots, ’ ’ said Mr. 
McKinney, such as leaving 
the meteorologist in the frame 
during the evening news even 
when the newsman next to 
him resumes talking. 
“They’ll have to get over 
that.” 


But the wide-screen im- 
ages can have benefits, too. In 
a baseball telecast, for ex- 
ample, a camera aimed at the 
pitcher can also show first and 
third base. 

There have been other 
pleasant findings as welL 

In Raleigh, digital signals 
are proving so robust and im- 
pervious to interference that 
the station has picked up a 
viewable signal 65 miles (105 
kilometers) from tbe tower — 
even though WRAL-HD is 
operating at <»Iy 5 percent of 
normal power. 

■ Pace of Shift Debated 

Leading U.S. networks fa- 


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TENDER NOTICE 

The General Directorate of State Hydraulic Works of Turkey (DSl) invites 
applicants for prequalification to bid for renting all the installations within the 
scope of ’’MANAVGAT WATER SUPPLY PROJECT” for the purpose of 
operating all these facilities and marketing the water to domestic and 
international clients upon completion of the construction works which will supply 
250 000 m 3 /day of treated water and 250 000 m 3 /day of raw water. 

The interested applicants should apply for prequalification to the below 
address latest at 17;3Q hours on March 31,1997. 

The complete text of the tender notice is sent to the commercial attaches of 
all the embassies in Ankara, Turkey. For further information please contact 
either the commercial attaches of the embassies in Ankara or call by phone or 
fax the below address : 

DSl Genel Muduriugu 

igmesuyu ve Kanalizasyon Dairesi Ba§kanftgi 
D Blok, Kat 4 
Yficetepe / Ankara 
TURKEY 

Tel :90 312 425 1257 
Fax : 90 312 425 8993 



CAPnALBIinNATlONALRmO 

Sori &6 crtrwasSoemert 6 Capital Variable 
Registered Office: 

H528 UKembourg, 5, Bcdeward de la Fbire 
R.C Luxembourg B 8833 

■ Shareholders are irwited to emend the 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 
- wWch wB be held at 5, Bcufewsd de la Fbire, luxembourg 
on Mnrrfi 25, 1997 at 11.00 c*n : 

AGENDA 

1. Approwi 
Author. 

2 _ Asorovd of the frwnad statenerts for the feed year 
ended December 31, 1996. 

3 , Demit* on cdoaafion rf net profts. 

L Discharge of the' Dinedora. . 

5 ^[ection of the Directors and rtmppemtownt of the 
Auditor. 

6. Miscellaneous. 

NOTES: 

i R^oMon, shall require no quorum “ 'M* 

7 BoWws of boar*- shares may vote at H» i Mooting 

WMUi will b. issued *» *■» ^ 

. &EZ* deposit ° f 

tbe Shore rmoi^ -* 

concluded. ^ ^ DIret>m 


CAPITAL ITALIA 

Soti£t6 Anonym® d'lnvestiwement 
Registered Office: 

L-I520 Luxembourg, 5, Boulevard de la Foire 
R.C. Luxembourg B 8458 


Shareholders are invited to attend the 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 

which will be held at 5. Boulevard de la Foire, Luxembourg 

an March 25, 1997 at 10.00 am: 

AGENDA 

1. Approval of the report of the Board of Directors and 
of the Auditor. 

2. Approval of the financial statements for the fiscal year 

aided December 31 , 1996 and dediion on the alloca- 
tion of net profits. 

3. Discharge of the Directors. 

4. Re-appointment of the Auditor. 

5. Miscellaneous. 

NOTES: 

T. Resolutions shall require no quorum but a simple majo- 
rity 0 f the shares present or represented at the Meeting. 

2. HoJdere of bearer shares may vote at the Meeting in per- 
son by producing at the Meeting a certificate of depo- 
sit which has be« issued to them against deposit of their 
share certificates with their bankers or all offices of Cre- 
difo ltdiano in Italy, five days prior to the Meeting. 

Holders of bearer shares may vote at the Meeting by 
proxy by completing the form of proxy which will be 
made available to them against deposit of their share 
certificates as aforesaid or presentation of their certifi- 
cates of deposit. In order to be valid all forms of proxy 
must reach the company at its registered office, 

' 5, boulevard de la Foire, L - 1528 Luxembourg or at 
Credito Italiano, five dear days prior to the Meeting. 

. , Shore certificates so deposited will be retained until the 
Meeting or any adjournment thereof has been con- 
chided. 

The Board of Directors 


var delaying tbe advent of 
high -definition television, 
but tbe chairman of die com- 
munications commission said 
they must offer programs in 
digital format relatively soon 
if tbe technology is to catch 
on with viewers. The Wash- 
ington Post repotted. 

“No one is going to buy a 
digital TV set unless tbe ma- 
jor networks are broadcasting 
their progra ms in digital 
formal in the major markets,' * 
Chairman Reed Hundt said 
Monday. * ‘It's a chicken-and- 
egg problem. We’re asking 
the networks to supply the 
chicken.” 

Broadcasters oppose Mr. 
Hundt’s proposal that stations 
owned by ABC, CBS, Fox and 
NBC in the 10 largest U.S. 


metropolitan areas begin of- 
fering digital broadcasts with- 
in a year of government au- 
thorization. Network represen- 
tatives say they prefer a phase- 
in that could last as long as six 
years. 

Tbe commission is widely 
expected to give station own- 
ers formal permission next 
month to use additional slices 
of the public airwaves free of 
charge for digital broadcasts. 

The commission already 
has agreed to give every U.S. 
station additional portions of 
tbe airwaves to broadcast di- 
gital signals. 

Tbe stations will also 
maintain their analog broad- 
casts for several years so that 
viewers won’t have to buy 
new sets immediately. 


• The Thailand Stock Exchange's SET Index fell to a five- 
year low. pulled down by a plunge in banking and finance shares 
after die market ended a one-day suspension of the stocks. 

• Asahi Breweries Ltd.’s consolidated pretax and net profits 
and its sales all set records in 1996. with the pretax figure 
rising 39 percent, to 40. 1 8 billion yen ($334.3 mutton), and net 
profit rising 25 percent, to 8.23 button yen. Sales, paced by its 
Super Dry beer, were up 1 1 percent, to 1 21 trillion yen. 

• South Korea blamed strikes for the 80 percent surge in 
January in its current-account deficit, to $3.09 billion. 

• Pohang Iron & Steel Co.'s 1996 net profit fell 26 percent, to 
624 billion won ($723.6 million), on falling steel prices and the 
weak dollar. Sales rose 3 percent, to 8.45 trillion won. 

• India will get help in building its communications infra- 
structure. die chairman of Microsoft Corp., Bill Gates, said. 

• FT Astra International has received 20,000 purchase or- 
ders for the revamped Toyota Kijang since its January debut 

• Taiwan's legislature gave final approval to a futures law, 
paving the way for the first futures exchange. 

• President Securities Corpus president, Raymond Tu, was 
acquitted of insider trading, the Taiwan company said; die 
verdict may enable the company’s affiliat es to proceed with 
initial public offerings that had been delayed Bloomberg. Reuters 


Japan’s TV Imports Reach Record 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan, which conquered world electronics mar- 
kets in the 1970s. is now falling victim to television imports. 

Industry data released Tuesday showed that Japan imported 
more TV sets last year than it produced domestically. Imports 
rose toa record 15 1 million sets while domestic production fell 
to 6.48 million, the Electronic Industries Association of Japan 
said. Many of the imports, however, came from Japanese 
companies that had moved their operations offshore to cut 
labor costs and offset the strong yen of recent years. 


Groupe Paribas 



1 996 results 


12.1 % 

return on equity 
The target of reaching 
return on equity of 10%- 
t>y 1998 was reached 
in 1996. 


FRF 10.7 

billion 

Increase *•» unrealised 
cnpit.il g.iins for the 
third successive year 
tollowmq asset 
iJisik>shIs in 1996. 


FRF 13 

per share 

An increased dividend " • 
will be recommended 

to the Annual General i 
Meeting of Shareholders 
on April 25. 1997. Vi 


•US$83015 million 

of exchaap rate Drermbpr 31. I«6) 


Net income FRF 4.35 billion* 

I q 1996. Groupe Paribas earned total net income of FRF 5,062 million and net income 
excluding minority interests of FRF 4.350 million. After a difficult year in 1995. owing to the 
appropriation of exceptional provisions. 1996 marks a return to growth for the Bank as a whole. 

All of the Group's core business activities saw 
their operating activities progress 

- Banque Paribas earned net income excluding minority interests of FRF 1,824 million and pre-tax 
return on operating activities reached 13%. .All of the Bank's activities- wholesale banking, 
capital market activities and specialised financial services- saw their revenues increase. 

- The contribution from Paribas Principal Investments rose substantially to FRF 3,197 million. 

For the past three years, this activity has made the largest contribution to the Group’s results. 
-All of the operating activities of Compagnie Bancaire have made progress. 

This business, however, contributed a loss of FRF 583 million to the Group's results owing 
to the exceptional provisions retained to eliminate real-estate risks. 

- Credit du Nord 3 I 50 reports enhanced profitability. At the beginning of 1997, Paribas 
signed a draft agreement for the sale of Credit du Nord to Sorifc* Generate which will take 
control of this subsidiary in 1997. 

The commitments made at the beginning of 1996 
have all been respected 

- The goals for asset disposals have been achieved ahead of schedule. They chiefly concern 
Poliet. Audiofina. Axitne and Banque Onpmane; they made it possible to realise capital gains 
worth more than FRF 3.1 billion. 

Unrealised capital gains on equity holdings have increased. They stood ai FRF 10.7 billion 
in December 1996 compared with FRF 8.8 billion in December 1995. 

- The asset disposals completed by Compagnie de Navigation Mixte enabled Paribas to recoup 
cash equal to the value of its takeover investment. 

- The financial resources of Banque Panbas have been reinforced by an increase in capital worth 
FRF 4 billion in order to consolidate its future development plans. 

A return to growth, a sharply-focused strategy 

The various items for which exceptional provisions were retained in 1995 (namely, the Bank’s 
real-estate holdings, Compagnie de Navigation Mixte and Credit du Nord) no longer have 
a negative impact of the Bank's accounts 

The results obtained in 1990 illustrate the validity o{ the specialisation and selectivity strategy 
adopted by’ Groupe Paribas, focused on two core business activities: international wholesale 
banking and specialised financial services. 



3, rue d'Antin, 75002 Paris 33 1 42 98 77 46 Internal :http^/www.paribas.com 



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d KfliFa Dirio Eerily 
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• C0 Hedge Fd s 

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0 SBC GiH-PTfl UED me A 
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a sacGWRin-DMGiatfm 
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a SBC G(bi PTB-DM lac A 
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0 SBC GtaLPtn DM Eg) A 
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a SBC Glbt-PM Eai Bal A 
a SBC G40LPKI Ecu Bal B 
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a 5BC £hra Flora USD 9S"V 
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SAFDIE GROUP/KEY ADVISORS LTD 
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SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 
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SKANOINAVISKA EN5KJLDA BANKER 

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0 Global InanrOA S 1106 

0 GMoal Income Cl B £ 1842 

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a EraergMkbFBIncQB 5 11.79 

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THE SAILORS FUND. SICAV 
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THORNTON INVESTMENT MGMT LTD 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MAKCH5, 1997 


sro\souM> sm ioN 


The Greek 


Telecommunications 


Organization (OTE) aims to 
become an important 


telecommunications center 


connecting the Balkans and 
the countries of the Black 
Sea with the rest of Europe 



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'ort* ■< 


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and the Americas. The 


company also wants to be a 
hub for the communications 
of Europe and the Americas 
with the Middle East, 


Southeast Asia and 







Internet hosts: 15,755 
Internet users; 35,000 
New internet hosts added: 
60%55% increase/year 
New mobile subscribers: 
273,000/year 
Cellular mobile subscribers: 
350,000 

PCs: 3.34 per 100 inhabi- 
tants (est.) 


***** 

-V!.Vv.V 

... •*FTf*4*v- 



Australia. At the same 


time, OTE is strengthening 
its position in the 


international telecoms 


market and is attracting an 


Audiotex, international 
networks, connections with 
the Internet, satellite 
connections with ships, 
card phones, electronic and 
digital equipment, and CD- 
ROM phone directories are 
just a few of the dozens 
of products and services 
that OTE offers. 



! presets ^ 

! 

^r-ets ex pan* 
^ more than* 
by tiie 

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Premier Pubuc Enterprise Has Broad Expansion Plans 


'TEnet 


T he Greek Telecommunica- 
tions Organization (OTE), 
Greece's most successful 
public enterprise, with $1 
billion net profit in 1996, could not 
remain u simple spectator as Greek 
businesspeople turned their acumen 
to profit by spreading their know-how 
throughout the Balkans and Eastern 
Europe. Indeed, expansion abroad - 
throughout the world - is OTE’s 
highest priority. 

Greece’s closer economic relations 
with the Balkans, Eastern Europe and 
the Commonwealth of Independent 
States was natural after the fall of 
communism in that region. Greece, 
being geographically isolated from 
other European Union- countries, 
gained marketing depth in its own 
neighborhood. Even the European 
Commission had predicted that the 
Greek economy would benefit more 
than any other of its members from 
the economic reforms in the former 
socialist countries. 

‘‘Greece had a vital interest in see- 
ing the procedure for these reforms 
along her northern borders and 
beyond continue successfully and 
gain momentum,” says Dimitrios 
Papoulias, president of the beard of 
OTE. 

While progress was being matte to 
the north of Greece. OTE moved 
toward the completion of its reorgani- 
zation program, which included 
reaching 5.3 million subscriber lines, 
46 percent of them digitalized, and 
improving 80 percent of its long dis- 
tance network. 


aggressive policy of investment 
abroad, without ignoring the possibil- 
ity of participation in existing or 
developing international “strategic 
alliances." 


Strategic location 

To further these objectives, OTE is 
taking advantage of Greece's geo- 
graphic position, which favors the 
passage of international submarine 
fiber optic cables and their connection 
to local networks. OTE hopes that 
major international axes of fiber optic 
cables between the Americas/Europe 
and Asia Australia and Africa via the 
Mediterranean will pass through 
Crete. 

The company also hopes to bring 
the main telecommunications axis 
from Central Europe through the 
Adriatic and Corfu to Crete for con- 
nection with other major international 
axes. 

Finally, the telecoms axis from the 
Black Sea through Bulgaria to 
Thessaloniki and from there through 
Corfu and Crete would join other 
main axes. 


works that are connected with the 
main international axes through 
Greece via the three main internation- 
al fiber optic cable gates now operat- 
ing in Crete. Corfu and Thessaloniki. 
This network is supported by two 
satellite stations, in Thermopylae and 
Nemea. 


Albania, Croatia, Yugoslavia, the 
Former Yugoslav Republic of 
Macedonia (FYROM), Bulgaria and 
Turkey have developed domestic net- 


Five networks 

Speaking at a seminar held on the 
occasion of the Tenth American High 
Technology Exhibition in Greece, Mr. 
Papoulias said that there are five fiber 
optic cables connecting countries of 
Centra] Europe and the Balkans to 
Greece and “through her to the rest of 
the world " The first network, named 
Adria 1. passes through Croatia and 
Albania. The second connects 
Thessaloniki through Fiorina with 
Bitolja (MonastirJ in FYROM. The 
third network also serves FYROM, 
connecting Thessaloniki through 
Kilkis with Gevgeli and Skopje. 
Bulgaria is connected with 
Thessaloniki through Kavala and 
Turkey through the network 
Thessaloniki-Alexandroupolis- 
Constantinople (Istanbul). “All these 
networks are at the last stage of com- 
pletion and will begin moctioning 
within 1997,” says Mr. Papoulias. 


He pointed out dial the most ambi- 
tious project under way in the Black 
Sea area is an underwater fiber optic 
cable connecting. Russia, Bulgaria. 
Ukraine and Geoigia through Vama 
and Kavala to the Mediterranean. This 
BSFOCS network, with the participa- 
tion of Greece and Cyprus, will be the 
most advanced technological project 
in the area and will serve the whole 
spectrum of modem telecommunica- 
tions - videophones, high-speed data, 
color television, videoconferencing, 
multimedia, etc. 

"It will be the most advanced and 
money-saving network in the area of 
the Black Sea and is scheduled to be 
completed within 1998." says Mr. 
Papoulias, who estimated that OTE's 
share will be $9 million of the total 
$72 million cost 


sea cables named SE-ME-WE3, 
which will connect more than 32 
countries from all the continents. 
OTE is contributing $28 million to 
this $ 1 2 billion project. 

OTE is also a member of the exist- 
ing international satellite organiza- 
tions Intelsat, Eutefsai and Inmarsat, 
and in 1998 will start supplying 
mobile phone services through its 
subsidiary OTE HeilasSat Mobile. 

Once its .infrastructure is complet- 
ed. OTE plans to enter the interna- 
tional communications market with a 
$400 million, five-year investment 
says Mr. Papoulias. The countries of 
the Balkans and the Black Sea will 
have priority in these investments. 
The Middle East and Africa will also 
be a focus of OTE’s attention. 


the “Ukrainian Wave” investment. r 

Meanwhile, in 1 996 OTE signed an 
agreement for the provision of 49,000 
digital connections and a 570 kilome- 
ter (354 mile) fiberoptic network of at 
a cost of 6 billion drachmas ($24 mil- 
lion) in Lithuania. 

Another agreement was signed with 
Hughes Network Systems and 
Communication Technologies of the 
United States; the local 
Telecommunication Organization of 
Lviv, Ukraine; and the Organization 
of Western Ukraine Railways for 
OTE’s participation in the internation- 
al consortium for the establishment of 
a wireless mobile telephone network 
»n the Lviv area, to the tune of $200 
million. 


SA OF 


OTP--- 


Undersea cabtes 

In May 1996, OTE completed the 
construction of a fiber optic cable 
connecting Corfu with Otranto. Italy, 
and the telecom operator is negotiat- 
ing for the establishment of a new 
cable connecting Corfu’ with 
Belgrade through Montenegro. OTE 
is also participating in the largest 
communications project under way, a 
universal system of fiber optic under- 


Entrepreneurial expansion 
In 1996, OTE laid the groundwork 
for its entrepreneurial expansion by 
developing closer relations with tele- 
coms and financial organizations- It 
prepared studies on strategic penetra- 
tion of markets, established a proce- 
dure for the evaluation of investment 
proposals with the assistance of inter- 
national and Greek advisory firms 
and set up a unit for the survey of 
international projects, starting with 


Cable Television Is on Its Way 


Entering the stock market 
OTE, which has been functioning 
since 1994 as an independent entity, 
entered the stock market last year by 
making public 8 percent of its stock. 
Knowing that it will lose its monop- 
oly on the domestic market in 2003, 
the company also turned to other ser- 
vices. OTE is now competitive in 
mobile telephony, private data net- 
works and call-back services. 

“In order to remain the dominant 
telecommunications company in the 
country, we had to develop both 
domestically and internationally.'* 
says Mr. Papoulias. 

With this in mind, OTE went ahead 
with a program of technological mod- 
ernization, quantitative and qualita- 
tive development of services and an 


T he T he Greek government has chosen 
OTE, the Greek Telecommunications Or- 
ganization,' to install cable television in 
Greece. By law, the exclusive right to pro- 
vide cable TV is vested in OTE and EHT, toe state- 
controlled radio and television co mpan y. 

After the year 2003, however, OTE’s telecommu- 
nications monopoly in Greece will end. At that time, 
whichever compary gets the right to establish cable 
TV win also be able to transmit both voice and data. 
In Britain, cable TV operators are already offering 
telephone connections to consumers at rates 40 
percent lower than those of British Telecom. 

The establishment of cable TV is included in 
OTE’s current five-year plan. The plan also provides 
for LANs (Local Area Networks), Electronic Data 
Interchange, teleconferencing with video and trans- 
mission of photos. 

The main advantages for toe public will bti high- 
quality pictures, high-fidelity sound, more TV pro- 
grams in areas where TV transmission is poor, the 


fiber optic network 
Hellascom International, one of 
OTE’s affiliates, undertook the con- 
struction of a 400 kilometer fiber 
optic network from Erevan to the 
Irani an-American border at a cost of 
15 billion drachmas. . ' 

OTE also plans to participate in the 
Balkan Pool, which brings, together 
the telecommunications agencies of 
Bulgaria, Romania, Albania and 
FYROM, to participate in a consor- 
tium that will establish a - phone card 
system in Jordan and a tele-paging 
system in Lebanon, as well as for pos- 
sible participation in. a consortium to 
establish and operate sc GSM (Global ■ 
System for Mobile Communications) 
network in Serbia. 






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establishment of advertising channels, local interest 
channels for movies or games, and programs trans- 
mitted on the basis of a pay4or-services system. 

OTE believes cable subscribers will be primarily 
homes and clients who are active in entertainment 
or ne ws, such as holds or TV stations. According to 
OTE President Dimitrios Papoulias, one out of two 
Greeks will be interested in installing cable TV. 

The Greek Telecommunications Organization can 
use MMDS (Multipoint Microwave Distribution 
System), the HFC (cable Hybrid Fiber and Coaxial) 
system or DBS (Direct Broadcasting Satellite)- AH 
three can transmit cable TV in Greece and the 
Balkans in a shorter time. 


Custo mer choice 

OTE’s foray into cable TV win result in an improved 
quality of TV programs transmitted by local and 
satellite channels such as Astra, Euteteat Pay TV, 
pay per view, video on demand, near video on 
demand, telemarketing and teleshopping. 


Pay-per-view TV will allow viewers to pay only for 
the programs they watch and not a full subscription. 
The same applies to video on demand. The cus- 
tomer will be able to contact a central service office 
and select news, sports or entertainment programs 
at will. 

With near video on demand, customers will be 
able to order from several packages of programs 
offered by the service, but they will have to wait an 
average of 2.5 minutes for the transmission. 

Telemarketing and teleshopping will allow cus- 
tomers to get information on products that interest 
them and to order by using a credit card or similar 
means that can be applied through the cable. 

According to European Union directives, toe reign 
of most telecommunications monopolies will end on 
Jan. 1, 1998. Greece will be allowed five more years, 
until 2003, to end OTE’s monopoly. By then! 
Greece's largest state-owned company should be 
ready to face the competition both locally and inter- 
nationally. • 


Powerhouse 

Mr. Papoulias disclosed that OTE will 
invest about $80 million, or 7 percent 
of its profits before taxes, annually 
through the year 2000 - for a total 
investment of $400 million. , 

“What we are doing to. protect our 
company from losses is-, to spread 
investments in the international mar- 
ket and to examine each investment 
proposal with specialized firms like 
Barclays (BZW), the HSBC Alpha 
Finance and Ionian Finance.” says 

Mr. Papoulias. "■ 

The president of OTE said that his 
organization hopes to become a 
regional “telecommunications power" 
in the Balkans, tbe Middle East, North 
Africa, the Black Sea and other 
emerging markets “as we pass from 
an environment of limited competi- 
tion to complete liberalization.”* . 








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I he leadership of the 
Creek Telecommunica- 
! l P ns Organization 
. — „ (OTE) has formulated a 
plan called the Organization for the 
-1st Century to prepare it for do- 
mesuc and international competi- :■ ?■■■.> '^■y- • *• ' 
“°l? ^*5* telecoms monopoly ^ ^ ‘ ** > 
ends m 2003. 

J*J*o and the 1997 budget set 
the following targets: 

thl 7*! slren S | hen OTE's position in 

tne telecommunications market 
■ To penetrate and gain new mar- 

Kets both at home and abroad. 

. * To introduce new technologies, 
increase digitalization and develop 

new high-quality services. 

• To strengthen the company’s 
economic vigor through the 
increase of profits and efficiency. 

• To continue streamlining 
efforts, with the aim of cutting 
operational costs. 

• To create and develop new 
financial units geared to OTE’s 
main activities. 

• To speed up organizational 
modernization. 


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Expenses will be kept low through 
increased productivity and a con- 
certed effort to reduce the cost of 
operations. 

Payments to third countries for 
international traffic and to mobile 
telephone companies will reach 
105 billion drachmas, from 92 bil- 
lion drachmas in 1996, a rise of 
14.1 percent that can be attributed 
to increased immigration from East 
European countries and a larger 
number of mobile telephone sub- 
scribers. 

Investments 

Investments will increase by 40 bil- 
lion drachmas in 1997, reaching 
242 billion, or a 1 9.8 increase over 
1996. They will include 8 billion 
drachmas in international participa- 
tions, 45 billion drachmas in 
investments in foreign markets and 
7 billion drachmas for partnerships 
m new companies. 

The construction program will 


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°TE predicts that the 
Internet's expansion will 
attract more than a billion 
users by the year 2000, 
toWng Into consideration 
that the rate of Increase of 
users Is expected to be 15 
Percent to 20 percent 
per month. 


Immediate results 
T|k application of the new budget 
will result in an immediate 
decrease in the expense ratio, 
which will be one of the best in 
Europe. It will also increase the 
number of telecommunications 
per employee from 
220 m 1996 to 232 in 1997. This 
wdl bnng the percentage of profit 
from 33.9 percent of 1996 income 
to 36.2 percent of 1997 income, 
wim profits after taxes surpassing 
-2.7 percent of the receipts. 

OTE’s 1997 budget provides for 
840 billion drachmas 
( W.I9 billion;, an increase of 13.82 
percent over last year, and expens- 
es of 535.6 billion drac hmae an 


. . j ^v^iwiii will 

— " wmite mssiM&gxwSB ■ inc ude me installation of 150,000 

trenches for urban and long dis- 
tance networks. 

Other investment projects 
include the digitalization of 48 per- 
cent of all lines; a 5 billion drachma 
investment in mobile telephones; 
continued modernization of exist- 


increase of 9.76 percent. Of this 
amount. 275.8 biilion drachmas 
will coyer operational costs and 
“4“ billion drachmas, investments. 
Profits are expected to rise by 
21.75 percent. 

Income sources 

Most of the organization’s income 
will come from the sale of services 
amounting to 840 billion drachmas’ 
an increase of 102 billion drach- 
mas, or 14.9 percent more than 
lWo. The nse is due to increased 
telephone connections and 
Telecommunications activity, 
income from new services and use 
of new digital centers. 

A iaige increase, 220 percent. 


also is expected in the sale of 
equipment, including telephones 
and secondary installations, a new 
field for OTE. Financing of OTE’s 
projects by the European Union 
shows a 32.6 percent increase in 
1997, for a total of nearly 6.1 bil- 
lion drachmas. 

The forecast for interest and 
other sources was kept to 19 billion 
drachmas, adding to the aforemen- 
tioned total of 840 billion drach- 
mas. 

Expenses 

Expenses for 1997 were estimated 
at 535 billion drachmas, showing a 
rise of 47 billion drachmas over 
1996, or a 9.8 percent increase. 


. VI UVJM- 

me networks; the introduction of 
cable television, voice mail and 
other value added services; and the 
modernization of the satellite relay 
station in Thermopylae. 

T he organization’s intensive 
investment policy aims at “expand- 
ing its operational horizons, 
strengthening its position in the 
international telecommunications 
market and making the company 
financially self-sufficient and reli- 
able.” according to a spokesman. • 


The company’s new plan Is 
geared to making it 
competitive at home and 
abroad in the next century, 
when it will no longer enjoy 
a monopoly. The 
application of Its new 
budget will result In an 
immediate decrease in the 
expense ratio, making it 
one of the healthiest in 
Europe. 


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The Greek Telecommunications Organization (OTE) can be reached at 
99 Kifissias Avenue, 15181 Maroussi, Greece 
Tel (30 1 ) 611 57 66. Fax (301 ) 611 57 65 


& 


vii'sg SASHES 




IN 

of Informatics 









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TEnet, the Greek Tele- 
communications Organi- 
zation (OTE) affiliate, is 
die company’s answer to 
the “international Web.” The new 
(ttfupany’s equipment, which includes 
servers from Sun Microsystems, 
routers from Cisco and moderns from 
Mfcronom, was purchased last year at 
a cost of 400 million drachmas ($1.5 
nnflion). The equipment has been in- 
^alled, and OTEnet will begin fill] op- 
feratioosthis year. 

fiitiy to OTEnet is gained through 
the ... existing telephone network 
(PSTN)' and operational informatic 
networits fHellaspac I, II), as well as 
, through ISDN (Intelligent System 
Digital j-' Network) and ATM 
-{Asynchronous Transfer Mode) net- 
wraks. Soon, however, OTE plans to 
jeaahBsh'-'a National Center for the 
Cqnhec^on of Internet Networks in 
Greece to serve members of the vari- 
ous networks. 

. OTEnet will have its main comiec- 
hoq centers in nine major Greek cities; 
Attens, Thessaloniki, Kavala, Larissa, 
Ibanmna^ Patras, Herakhon, Rhodes 
■aad'Mytiinii. The chamiels will all 
have a qpeed of 2 Mb/s, while their 
■pbanection overseas win be carried 
'Tiuriog the initial phase via an MCI 
4pe -to. the United States. New lines 
will -be installed and the network 
expanded according to demand, 
aeptading to an OTE spokesman. 

'Internet and more 
■Ya mris Paterianakis, general director 
trf:OIE’s affiliates, points out that 
GTEnk will offer both Internet ser- 
vices: and products as well as value 
padded services. . . 

■' K 0ur list of services is not static; it 

■W follow developments and will 
ecflaiT in its spectrum whatever new 


[services] appear on the market," he 
says. Dial-up users of OTEnet will be 
charged for a local call, and long dis- 
tance callers will be charged for the 
equivalent of 5.5 local calls, regardless 
of the distance from the centers. 

OTE will be the first sales represen- 
tative of OTEnet, with 90 pomts of 
sale in major towns and administrative 
district seats. Eventually, the company 
plans to expand its sales force in order 
to promote sales. 

Focus on quality 

OTE predicts that the Internet’s .expan- 
sion will attract more than a Union 
users by the year 2000, taking into 
consideration that the rate of increase 
of users is expected to be 15 percent to 
20 percent per month. 

“But what is more important is not 
tbe increasing number of users, but the 
increase in the number of services that 
are being offered through the 
Internet,” says Mr. Paterianakis. 
Although 21 companies are offering 
Internet network services in Greece, 
the Greek market for tbe Internet is 
currently low. Users today number no 
more than 40,000, according to Mr. 
Paterianakis. 

OTEnet will claim a large percent- 
age of Greek Internet clients. In addi- 
tion, OTE executives say that the com- 
pany win try to expand the Greek mar- 
fcet by introducing new services. At the 
same time, OTEnet will expand into 
Greece’s Balkan neighbors, starting 
with Yugoslavia and Albania. • 







To Meet Demand 


T he Greek Telecommu- 
nications Organization 
(OTE) offers more than 35 
products and services, in- 
cluding audiotex, international net- 
works, connections with the Internet, 


satellite connections with ships, card 
phones, electronic and digital equip- 
ment, and CD-ROM phone directo- 
ries. 

Tbe company has introduced 
VSATs (Very Small Aperture 
Terminals) to facilitate contact in 
distant areas. These will primarily 
serve customers who need direct 
satellite connections, advanced fax 
connections and voice transmis- 
sion. 

OTE now has a mobile television 
satellite station connected with 
Intelsat and EutelstaL Another ser- 
vice, introduced early in OTE’s oper- 
ations to serve mass media and busi- 
nesses that needed 24-hour connec- 
tions with offices in Greece and over- 
seas, is the leasing of long distance 
lines. 

Leased lines 

The introduction of Hellaspac in the 
1990s came as more and more cus- 
tomers started using their personal 
computers to gain access to dam 
banks and other sources of informa- 
tion in Greece and overseas. 
Hellescom was OTE's answer to sub- 
scribers’ needs for high-quality leased 
lines.- 

Hellescom offers lines with speeds 


& 


“Greek Telecoms Go Global” 

• was produced in entirety by 
■ the Advertising Department of 
. the International Herald Tribune. 

. V It was sponsored by 
the Greek Telecommunications 

- • Organization (OTE). 

W*n TBKJohnRigos. ba&d £ 'Mm* 
Program dkectok: BtU Mahder. 



The vast network of the 


Infrastructure provides a 
professional challenge for 
OTE’s engineers and a host 
of benefits for Its customers. 



from 2,400 bytes per second to 2 
Mb/s and, for short periods of four to 
eight hours, of 64 to 120 Kb/s. 

In 1995, OTE introduced ISDN 
(Intelligent System Digital Network) 
to the Greek market. ISDN is con- 
nected with the Euro-ISDN.This 
means that OTE provides high-speed 
fax service (G4), videotelephony, file 
transfer and high fidelity transmission 
for voice and music. 

OTE subscribers have had access to 
paging for several years, and the ser- 
vice is now being updated with the 
introduction of new receivers that 
show on a small screen combi nati ons 
of numbers and letters indicating 
short messages or phone numbers. 
Known as the European Radio 
Message System, ERMES is an effi- 
cienr and economic solution for peo- 
ple on the move who do not want to 
use a mobile phone. 

HelJastel is OTE’s videotex and 
mail box service. Using simple, inex- 
pensive terminal equipment, sub- 
scribers can receive news and other 
information, including stock market 
developments, electronic mail and 
spons and entertainment news. This is 
particularly useful for those who are 
rnifamiliar with computers because 
Hellastel’s terminals are so easy to 
operate. 

Transport facilities 
Through the satellites of the 
International Mobile Satellite 
Organization (Inmarsat), OTE is 
offering to tbe Greek Merchant 
Marine a perfect network for business 
connections, weather forecasts, pilot- 
ing and personal contacts. 

For trucking and land transporta- 
tion, OTE offers the Satellite 
Communications for Mobiles 
(Eutelsacs) system, which uses lap- 
top-type computers to connect trucks 
with its base. From there, a central 
computer may give instructions for 
deliveries, directions and other perti- 
nent information. 

Among the latest services offered 
by OTE are the Message Transfer 
Agent, M.H.S. for electronically 
transmitted mail, videoconferencimj. 
audiotex and direct entry to the 
Internet through OTEnet, which is 
beginning operations this year. • 





BUNe 
,1997 
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PAGE 18 


iiml a^6j teribttne 

Sports 


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1997 


World Roundup 


Aussies Win Test 


cricket Shane Warne and Michael 
Be van hurried Australia to victory 
over South Africa by an innings and 
196 runs with wrist spin bowling on 
the final day of the first test Tuesday in 
Johannesburg. South Africa, 302 be- 
hind on first innings, collapsed from 
their overnight 99 for four to 130 all 
out, losing the last five wickets for 
three runs in five overs. ( Reuters ) 

• A resurgent New Zealand team 
clashed England's hopes Tuesday of a 
one-day series victory, bowling the 
British out for 200 after setting them 
229 to win the fifth and decisive game 
in Wellington. With the victory, the 
Kiwis salvage a 2-2 draw in the five- 
match one-day series. {Reuters) 


Complaints in IOC Bidding 


Olympics The International Olym- 
pic Committee is expected to change 
the present bidding process for future 
Games after seven cities complained 
they were treated unfairly. 

Cape Town, Istanbul, Lille, Rome, 
San Juan, Stockholm and Sl Peters- 
burg were all given the right to written 
replies to criticism implied in an Eval- 
uation Commission report on their 
bids for the 2004 Games. 

"The report penalizes all the cities,'' 
said Turkey's international Olympic 
Committee member, Sinan Erdem. “It 
gives a ready-made excuse for dropping 
one or other of the candidates when the 
shortlist is drawn up." The shortlist of 
five cities will be announced Friday in 
Lausanne, Switzerland, and the final 
decision will be made Sept. 5 . Athens, 
Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro and 
Seville are the other candidates. (AFP) 
• The IOC's top anti-doping official 
expressed concern Tuesday over the 



^ nhrt DhlmlhU/ Vp-piT Ftani <— [Vw 

Australia's bowler Shane Warne winding up against South Africa. 


increasing practice of athletes’ using 
chambers to replicate high- 


hypobaric i 

altitude conditions. Prince Alexandre 
de Me rode, chairman of the IOC med- 
ical commission, said he was aware of 
Olympic athletes who travel to com- 
petitions in vans specially equipped 
with oxygen-deprivation rooms. (AP) 


Games in Albania Uncertain 


SOCCER FIFA, soccer's world gov- 
erning body, said Tuesday it was look- 


ing into the possibility of alternative 
venues for two World Cup qualifying 
matches involving Albania because of 
the worsening violence in die country. 

Albania is scheduled to be host to 
Ukraine in a Group 9 qualifying game 
on March 29 and Germany four days 
later, but with the country teetering on 
the brink of civil war it may be forced 
to play both games at a neutral site. 

The FIFA World Cup organizing 
committee is to discuss the situation 
and make a decision before the end of 
the week, a spokesman said. (Reuters) 


Checkered Flag for Wallace 


AUTO racing Rusty Wallace be- 
came the official winner of the Pontiac 
Excitement 400 after further tests on 
the driver's engine showed it met Nas- 
car specifications. 

His victory was in doubt flour hours 
after die race Sunday in Daytona Beach, 
Florida, as officials said Wallace's Ford 
Thunderbird engine had failed tests 
measuring the compression ratio. Nas- 
car officials kept the engine overnight 
to complete their evaluation. (AP) 


2- Card Rule Tames Cup Matches 


Special to the Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — With great expec- 
tation. the European club com- 
petitions resume ai the quarter- 
final stage. But amid the trum- 
peting and triumphalism there is a cau- 
tionary tale. 

The Champions Cup matches Wed- 
nesday will probably be cagey rather 
than cavalier. It is the first leg and, apart 
from the inevitability of opponents reel- 
ing one another out and taking care not 
to blow their chances before the return 
leg, there is the fact that more than half 
the players taking part are one caution 
away from suspension. 

In the four games, the clubs can start 
only 88 players. Of those available for 
selection, no less than 54 have already 
received one yellow can! caution. 

The consequence is fear. Players 
reaching for the biggest rewards are 
obliged to mind their manners, to move 
as iftreading a carpet of yellow petals. 

We reach this impasse because, for 
television and sponsorship income, the 
tournament has expanded. The players 
take part in twice as many matches as 
before, but the tolerance level of of- 
ficialdom bas not been adjusted to com- 
pensate. 

Two cards, and you miss the next 
game. In the interests of fair play, tough 
refereeing has become the order of tile 
day. Fair enough. Sport, no matter the 
stakes, must always protect its finest 
performers and its integrity. 

The pendulum may nave swung too 
far. More players fear suspension now 
than injury. 

All of the matches Wednesday are 
compromised. 

In Manchester, 55 ,400 spectators will 
watch a first leg between Manchester 
United and FC Porto in which 16 of the 


European Soccer / R ob.Hi»chbs 


The tram does have in defense Jorge 
Costa, a none-shaU-pass hard man 
whose alleged racist remarks incited 
George Weah ro break his nose. It has 
Sergio Cooceicao, who was ejected 
twice in a month of Portuguese league 
matches. 

Closer examination of Porto’s yellow 
card mountain reveals two unsavory 
battles against AC Milan — but of 53 
fouls recorded during the second leg it 
was the Milanese, unable to accept their 
decline, who accounted for two thirds of 
the total. Porto retaliated. 

But with five Brazilians, including 
rampant strikers Artur and Jardei, and 
two crafty former Yugoslavs, Porto 
could beat England's champion with 
technical finesse. 

Juventus, the reigning European 
champion and still the best team around, 
has seven yellow cards. One of those, 
Aien Boksic, is injured anyway, but 
Didier Deschamps, Cino Ferrara and 
Vladimir Jugovic are important players 
who need to perform with care. 

Against Rosenborg, Juventus can do 
that Rosenborg is coming oat of deep 
winter that put on ice its r emarkab le 
progress. 

A depleted Rosenborg ought not to 
trouble Juventus, whose reserves for the 
injured Boksic and Alessandro Del Piero 
include the prolific Michele Padavano. 

Borussia Dortmund is another club 
with considerable yellow cards, and 


However, the redoubtable Juergen 
Kohler and the opportunist Karlheinz 
Riedle and Stefane Chapuisat are avail- 


able after injury. , 

Auxerre, though, must not be . 

as the country peasant from Burgundy/ 
Guy Roux, its wily coach, loves to give 
that impression, but he knows about 
tactics, about stealth and stubbornness. 
He shuffles his players, eight of whom 
have a yellow card, with such adapt- 
ability you are never sure where he is 
coming from, or going to. 

I suspect the greater experience and 
power of Dortmund will see off Aux- 
erre. Or am I falling for the Roux ruse? 

Last, and with the Dutch never least. 
Ajax versus Atietico Madnd. Both sides 
have given up on domestic league as- 
pirations. and give their all to Europe. 

Madrid, astutely coached by the Serb 
Raddy Antic, has done things the Spanish 
vray — with counterattacking flair but a 
measure of raised studs. , 

Two of its players are missing 
through suspension, Pablo Alfaro and 
the potential match-winning goaJ\r 
scorer Kiko Narvaez. Five mare are on a 
yellow card, including the dynamic 
midfielder Jose Luis Caminero and the 
cunning Milinko Pantic. Against that, 
Ajax is getting back to strength. 

Patrick KJ invert began the season. 
tikR so many at Ajax, under treatment. 
He will end it, like Winston Bogarde, by 
defecting to Milan. In between, the 


squad depth to cope. For its first leg young giant would quite like another 

lid- European Champions’ Cup medal. 


Auxerre, Dortmund loses mid 
(elder Michael Zorc to suspension, and 
has Matthias Sammer, Andy Moeller 
and Heiko Herriich on one caution. 


Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. 


Hernial 22 players will be holding 
of the two-card rule. 


Cack because of t 

United’s men in peril include Eric 
Cantona, the orchestrator and captain, 
and Roy Keane, the Irishman whose 
style fluctuates from rousing physical 
courage — he received 19 stitches in a 
leg wound in Vienna last December — 
to hot-headed idiocy. David Beckham, 
arguably England's most gifted young 
midfielder, and Ole Giinnar Solskjaer, a 
striker from Norway, are also one mis- 
demeanor away from suspension. 

Porto is in a worse piclue. It has TEN 
individuals under caution! One might 
assume that Porto must be kicking its 
way to European glory. 


Soccer Rigging Jury Dismissed 


Reuters 

WINCHESTER, England — The jury 
in the trial of English-based soccer play- 
ers Bruce Grobbelaar, Hans Segets and 
John Fashanu on charges of match-fixing 
was dismissed Tuesday when it failed to 
reach a verdict. Sky Television said. 

The three English Premier League 
players and Heng Suan Um, a Malay- 
sian businessman, had all pleaded not 
guilty to conspiring to influence the 
league's soccer games. The prosecuting 


counsel, David Calvert-Smith, said the 
government wanted a retrial but that the 
final decision would have to be mad/ 
"at the highest level." 

Earlier Tuesday. Judge Simon 
Tuckey told the jury he would accept a 
majority verdict at the end of the seven- 
week trial. But the foreman of the jun 
handed a note to Tuckey in mid-af- 
ternoon saying the jury was unable to 
reach either a unanimous or a majority 
verdict and was unlikely to do so. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Exhibition Babebau. 


MOMMT** OAJUS 

Florida 8, New YortcMcfsO 

St Louis U Houston 7 
Los Angeles 4, Montreal 3 
Kansas City 7 7. Pirtshirgh 1 J 
BattKHamli A!torto2 
Boston a PhUaodpWo 6 
Cleveland 7, andnnotl 4 
Toronto fas) X Chicago White Sax2 
Damn 4 New Yortt Yankees 5 
Minnesota fas) 9, Tews 5 
Minnesota fas; o, Toronto fas) 0 
Oricago Cubs 7, Cotamda 1 
Son Diego 7. Oakland 3 
Seattle 7, San Francisco 3 
Milwaukee UAnohofmS 


BASKETBALL 


Charlotte 

37 

22 

427 

14V. 

Oevnkmd 

32 

25 

361 

1W6 

Indtana 

28 

29 

491 

2216 

MDwaukea 

25 

33 

.431 

26 

Toronto 

20 

38 

■345 

31 

vmiMCMniHa 



■ODWEST DfirtBION 




W 

t 

Pet 

SB 

Utah 

42 

16 

724 

_ 

Houston 

38 

20 

455 

4 

hUiuiesato 

29 

28 

-509 

12VS 

Dallas 

19 

37 

339 

22 

Denver 

IB 

41 

JOS 

24V* 

San Antonio 

13 

44 

-228 

2BV* 

Vbncouver 

11 

50 

.180 

32V* 


mane divhuon 



Seattle 

41 

16 

-719 

_ 

LA. LntcsrS 

39 

19 

m 

2W 

Portland 

31 

28 

.525 

11 

Sacramento 

27 

32 

■458 

15 

LA. cuppers 

25 

30 

ASS 

IS 

Phoenix 

22 

36 

779 

19V* 

Golden State 

21 

36 

-366 

20 


U: Malone 14-25 9-11 41. Hamacek 7-13 7- 
B2S G.Sj Munin 10-12 B-8 28. SpreweS 7-15 
54 21. RaMram-UWl 31 (Matone 7). 
Golden State 33 (Spencer 11). Arafato— Utah 
30 (Homacefc, Stockton 8), Gordon State 23 
(Sprowex Price 71. 

Nsw Jersey 20 24 if 32-95 

Socnm w rt u 24 31 29 24—118 

N-Jj Cassell 9-16 5-6 24 Nfflee7-1B 3-4 2X 
GUI 9-21 2-2 2fa 5: Abdul- Rauf 9-12 1-2 22. 
Wc h n w n d 7-13 2-2 19. Rabaonds-New 
Jersey 44 (Jackson 11), 5aaamam>59 (Smith 
12). Assists— Non Jersey 17 (Cos** «j, 
S uu omni lu Zl (Owens 7). 


18. Colorado 

21-8 

490 

19 

19. St. Josephs ■ 

21-6, 

481 

23 

20. LoutsvUe 

22-7 

456 

17 

2). VUionova 

21-8 

437 

18 

2X Maryland 

20-9 

3S4 

16 

ZXStontar) 

IB-7 

207 

25 

24. Georgia 

21-7 

139 

— 

25.lmfiono 

21-9 

134 

22 


The AP Top 25 


The lop 28 teems In The Aeeactatsd Pnee' 
college bl re tt tal pod. with firm-place 
vatu In p ei e nt hee m , records through 
Bwoh 2, mat points bued on 2S points tor 
■ first-piece vots through one palm hire 


Others receiving votes: Tulsa 119. Prince- 
tan 79, Iowa 59. Tutane «S, Georgetown 30, 
Texas Then 21, Wisconsin 17, N.C Chortorte 
1& Mississippi 11 Massachusetts 11, New 
Orleans 11, Fresno St. 10, Podffc 10, Illinois 
St. A South Alabama 8, Boston Collage 7, 
Rhode (stand 7, CaBtomb % HawaB & 
Michigan 5, Syracuse 4 SW Missouri St. 3. 
Bawflng Green % Purdue X Soutnem 
CaSfomta Z SL Marys, c at. Z UNLV z 
Virginia Z Long I stand </. 1. Navy 1, 
Oklahoma 1, VandfafcRH. 


Hartford 24 30 9 57 1 78 200 

Ottawa • 21 29 '13 55 17* 187 

Boston 21 34 9 51 1 86 228 

wumtN coiirauNci 

CENTRAL DIVISION 

W L T PtS GF GA 
38 23 4 
31 19 13 
28 29 8 

26 30 9 

28 32 4 

25 37 2 

RAOHC PMSKM 

W L T PtS GF GA 
40 16 8 

29 V 7 

27 31 7 

26 30 B 

28 34 2 


Dallas 

Detroit 

St Louis 

Otago 

Pnoenfc 

Toronto 


80 197 159 
75 199 145 
6« 192 199 
61 171 165 
60 181 201 
52 188 223 


Deodmarsti) 2, C-ForsMng 14 (Lemteux, 
Janes) Z V-. Unden 7 (Hedtaui) Second 
Period: None. Third Period: C-Forsfaetg 15 
(Lemteux, Janes). & C- Young 18 (Corbet) 4 
o Janes 21 (Young, Ktamm) (pp). Shots on 
goat V- 10-14-9—33. C- 104-7—21 Gerdts: 
V-McLean. C-Roy. 


CRICKET 


Cotamda 

Edmonton 

Calgary 

Anaheim 

Vancouver 

Lffl Angeles 

San Jose 


ZT6 152 
65 203 198 

61 176 189 

00 184 189 

58 202 271 

24 33 8 56 175 210 

22 35 7 51 166 214 


NBA Standings 


ATLANTIC nVWON 



W 

L 

PCI 

GB 

Miami 

43 

15 

.741 

_ 

New York 

43 

16 

.729 

V* 

Ortanda 

30 

26 

-536 

12 

Washington 

26 

31 

.456 

16V* 

New Jersey 

17 

40 

.298 

25VS 

Philadelphia 

IS 

42 

-263 

27V* 

Boston 

12 

46 

X07 

31 

CENTRAL DmSriM 



Chicago 

51 

7 

879 

— 

Deirolt 

43 

14 

J54 

7V* 

Atlanta 

38 

19 

867 

12 V* 


MONDAY'S RUtllTS 
Boston 34 27 16 30-187 

Toronto 28 20 24 31-103 

B: Day 10-20 64 27,E.Wnitams 7-136-720? 
T: Rogers B*12 1-2 17, W.WHtams 6-110016. 
Rebounds— Boston 45 (Walker 10), Toronto 
46 (Staudamlre, Rogers 7). Assists— Boston 
33 (Foe 10), Toronto 31 (Staudamlre 17). 
MOwmlm 25 21 17 27- 90 

Otago 29 24 33 22-108 

M Robinson 9-184-5 21 Baker 5-10 6-8 16f 
C Jordon 1M9 6-6 3). Plppen 10-24 2-3 25. 
Rebounds— Milwaukee 46 (Wolf 11), 
Otago 53 (Rodman It). 
Assist*— Milwaukee 18 (Douglas 6), 
Chicago 30 (Rodman 7). 

IHC* 26 24 » 32-111 

Gotoen State is 26 10 «— ia« 


HOCKEY 


V. Kansas Wf) 

XMlnnesoto Q) 

Record 

2M 

PH 

1,773 

PW 

1 

NHL Stamoinqs 

_ ' 

26-2 

1,706 

2 






1 Utah 

23-3 

1J77 

4 

uumnw cmminKS 


4. South Carol bw 

23-6 

1.564 

6 

ATLANTIC DIVISION 



X North CaraDno 

21-6 

1,466 

8 


W L T 

PtS 

GF 

GA 

6. Kentucky 

27-4 

1^53 

3 

PhBartofphta 

37 17 10 

B4 

216 

164 

7. Duka 

23-7 

1,297 

7 

New Jersey 

32 IB 12 

76 

171 

146 

X Wake Forest 

22-5 

1J65 

5 

Florida 

29 20 15 

73 

175 

149 

9. UCLA 

19-7 

1,W3 

10 

N.Y. Ranger* 

29 27 9 

67 

209 

183 

10. Cincinnati 

24-6 

1JJ39 

9 

Tampa Bay 

25 30 7 

57 

172 

191 

ll. Xavier, Ohio 

22-4 

1.018 

14 

Washington 

24 32 7 

55 

158 

178 

IX Arizona 

19-7 

927 

15 

N.Y. Wanders 

21 32 10 

52 

168 

186 

VXOemsun 

2V-B 

B*8 

12 

NORTHEAST DIVl&KW 



KNewMadca 

22-6 

883 

11 


W L T 

PtS 

GF 

GA 

15. Illinois 

2 0-8 

607 

21 

Buffalo 

33 20 10 

76 

184 

156 

16. Iowa St. 

19-7 

606 

13 

Pittsburgh 

31 26 5 

67 

220 

205 

lT.CotLofCharieston 

38-2 

544 

30 

Montreal 

24 30 11 

59 

207 

329 


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N.Y. Rangers 2 2 0 1-5 

Fhst Period: S4.4loton 27 IFrtesea. 
Hawgood) (op). Z Now York, Driver 4, X S J.- 
Donavart 6 (Sutter) 4, New York, Messier 33 
(Oliver, Graves) Second Period: New York, 
SrnnueJssan 5 (Grahtof, Sundstrarol 6. New 
York. Samuel sran 6 (Fbtley) TWW Period; 
SJ.-HawgoodSlKozh».Noian) (pp).XSJ.- 
Frfesen 21 (KoUov, Kmipa) (pp). Overtime: 
9, New Yartu 5\mdstrom» TOnWWUel State 
on gaafc SJ.- T2^-12-0-3X New York 8-11- 
15-2—37. Goalies: SJ.-Bettour. New York, 
Richter. 

Boston 1 1 0-2 

Toronto 4 0 0-4 

first Period: T-Suflfvwi 9 (Muller, dark) 
(pp). Z B-Bourque 15 (Shim pet Beers) X T- 
OorV U (YusMtadv Sulltvon) A T-Mocoun 
t (Sundbt Berezin) & T-HendrKkson 9, 
Second Period: S- Bourque 16 TUrd Period: 
None. Shots on pool: B- B-ll-10-29. T- 9-7- 
3-19. Ouahes: B-Carey. ToOos. T-Potvb. 
Vancouver 1 0 0— 1 

Colorado 2 8 3-6 

first Period: C-SoWc 17 ILocrolx, 


AUSTRALIA TOUR 

1ST TEST 

SOUTH AFRICA VS. AWTT1AUA 
TUESDAY. IN 4aHANNE88UHQ 
South Africa 302 and 130 
Australia: 628^ declared 
Austnflia wan by an Innhtgs ond 186 tuns 
on the fifth and final day. 

ENGLAND YOU ■ 

ETH 1-DAY INTER N ATI ON Ai_ 

HEW ZEALAND VS. QJG LAND 
TUESDAY, IN WELLINGTON 
New Zealand: 228 
England: 200 

Now Zealand won by 28 runs. New Zealand 
and England drew the rive-match one-day 
series 2-2 after the third gome was tied. 
INDIA TOUR 
A-BAY HATCH 
JAMAICA VS. INDIA 
TUESDAY, W KINGSTON 

Jamaica: 453-9 declared and 190-4 
India: 323 

Jamahs and India drew. 


Ill 525JXA & Marie Brooks 519.7501 6. PM 
Mfcfcetsap 501 .79(1 7. Tiger Wood* 48SJXAB. 
Scott Hod) 484JM 9. Kenny Pony 371 .250, 
10. Fred Couples 355J40, 11. Jim Futyk 
347 joa IX Stove Strieker 34Z50X IX John 
Cor* 341. tea 14. Paul Stonkowsfd 34am 
15. Jeff Moggert 336625. 

EUROPE 

I. CBOn Montgomery Scotland 33U64.16 
X Miguel Angel Marfhv Spato 25W5109 

Thomas BJom, Denmark 23X057,40 
4. Cbstontlno Roccn, Italy 195,951.54 
Z Darren darks, N. Ireland 1 87,609.42 

6. tan Woasnam, Wales 17X86XH 

7. Jean Vpn de VMdS, France 16X77X39 
XPer-Ublk Johansson, Sweden 15X80X55 

9. Sam Tarronca, Scofinnd 147JP47J0 

10. Paul Broadhunt England 124876.76 

I I. Padralfl Harrington, Ireland 11020X13 
IX Lee Westwood, England 10A016J2 

1 X Peter Mitchell. England 10 W98J7 

14. Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spam 9&5Z7J8 

15. Roger Chapman, England 9X90X02 




Hu 


HAJOT LEAGUE BASEBALL 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

gncAflO - Agwedto terms with RHP Turk 
Wandefl and C Tyter Houston on 1-yeor con- 
IroCfa. Renewed fhe - oontroct of RHP Kent 
Boflenfield. 

BASKETBALL 

NATIONAL BASKHTBAU. ASSOCIATION 
Houston— S igned F Eddie Johnson tor re- 
mainder of season. Put G Brent Price an 
Infured list Activated G Clyde Dretoer from 
hi lured list. 


UPtlBH PR1MMB HA4MW 


jowmii WAuan bybcb cop 

Stomflngo far On Ryder Cup to be played 
SepL 26-M at VMdemune hi Sotogrenda, 
Spain. The lap lOfl ntehoriqiHlUy tor the 12- 
man teres end U.S. captain Tam KHe end 
European c apfaln Seva flrfl a ete ro i aaoh 

h -y- a — — Mrllrt riil ■ ■ 

Itoiu rau WlllrCtaV MMCm. 

iwiteo states 

l. Tom Lehmon 74dm X Merit O-Meoro 
72X750, X Steve Jones 579 .280, 4. Dovte Lave 


Cmentiy 1 , Wlmtatodon \ 

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erpool 51 Arsenal 51. Newcastle 4& Aston 
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Esponyal a Real Madrid 2 
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NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

Atlanta— R e-signed DE Lester A.-=hair).. 
beau to a 3-yatr contract, signed CB 
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India nap DUS— Signed DB Comon Gray. 

jacjcson VI LLE^-R e-sJgned G Ben Cole- 
man and CB Dove Thomas. 

NEW YORK JETS-Signed LB Pepper John- 
son to 2-year camroa. Signed DE Jeff Cum- 
mins and G Lonnie PaleieL Terminated the 
contract Of OB Frank Reich. 

SAN FHAMcisCO— Signed LB Mark Sander. 

st. Louis-Agreed to terms wim OB Marie 
Rypien on 1-year contract and with K Jeff 
WBktas on 4-year cantrocf. 

Washington — S igned OB Donald HaUas. 
WR Brannon Kennedy. WR Bobby Olive. TE 
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and DB Melvin Crawford. 

CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

edmontoii— S igned Rfl Frank Madu. 

HOCKIY 

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HHL-SuspefKtea San Jose Shorks c Beraie 

Nkholls lor two gomes without pay. an a fined 
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a game on Fob. 25. 

Hston— T raded C Adam Oates, RW Rkx 
Toaaiet and G BB Ranfora 10 Washington 

CdpRoH tar G Jim Corey, C Jason AUisarL C An- 
son Cotter otto 1997 IhJrd-iound draft chalcr^* 


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PAGE 19 


SPORTS 


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The Associated Press 

... What almost became another frus- 
j'tiating game for the New York Rangers 
aimed into one of their most inspiring 
victories. ® 

After giving up the tying goal with just 
52 seconds left in regulation time, the 
Rangers ended their eight-game winless 


NHL Roundup 


skid when Niklss Sundstrom scored 
1:24 into overtime Monday night to beat 
San Jose Sharks, 5-4. in New York. 

“It’s a big goal For us. and hopefully 
we're back on track now,” Sundstrom 
said “We took a penalty with two 
minutes left and they scored. We talked 
to each other and said we have to win 
this game, and we did.'* 

The Rangers. 0-6-2 in their previous 
eight games, blew a two-goal lead in the 
^ third period. 

But Sundstrom scored his 20th goal 
of the season, and Luc Robitaille got his 
500th career assist on the play. 

“We fought our hearts out.” the 
Sharks' captain, Todd Gill, said. “We 
made a mistake and they won Lhe 
game." 

With less than 20 games to go and 



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learns struggling for playoff position, 
these are no longer run-of-the-mill con- 
tests. 

Jeff Friesen scored on the power play 
with 52 seconds left in regulation, tying 
it, 4-4, with Bill Berg serving a penalty 
for hooking Tony Granaro. Friesen 
•scored his 2 1st goal of the season from 
right in front of the Rangers' goalie, 
Mike Richter. 

San Jose began its comeback with 
Greg Hawgood's goal on a power play 
.at 3:56 of the third, making it 4-3. 

Ulf Samuelsson scored a pair of 
. second -period goals to give the Rangers 
v "& 4-2 lead. Samuelsson's goals, his fifth 
and sixth of the season, both came on 
'slap shots that got past the Sharks' goal- 
tender. Ed Belfour. making his first start 
since a ligament injury on Feb. 1. 

Two San Jose players suffered in- 
juries that forced them to leave the game 
-in the first period. Left wing Bob Errey 
sprained his neck and defenseman Doug 
Bodger had facial lacerations. 

Maple Leafs 4, Bruton z Steve Sul- 
livan, a recent acquisition of Toronto, 
had a goal and an assist as the host 
Maple Leafs beat the new-look Bruins. 

Boston lost in its first game since 
{eradu^-AdamOaies, Rksk^Eoccfaet-and- 
goalie Bill Ranford to Washington. Jim 
Carey, obtained in the deal, gave tqp four 
goals an die Maple Leafs’ first nine shots. 
Sullivan, sent by New Jersey to Toronto 
'last Thursday, scored chi a power {day 
6:24 into the game. 

Ray Bourque scored twice for the 
■Bruins, whose season-high three-game 
unbeaten streak was stopped. 

Avalanche 5, Canucks 1 Peter Fors- 
berg scored two goals and Patrick Roy 
smarts 32 saves as Colorado unproved to 
+ £0 against Vancouver this season. 

Claude Lemieux had two assists for 
the Avalanche (28-2-3), which led after 
two periods. The Canucks lost for. the 
ninth time in 1 1 road games. 

Vancouver’s Donald Bras bear re- 
turned from a four-game suspension and 
needed only 3:42 to get in a fight with 
Colorado's Brent Severyn. 


UP AND AWA Y — Albert Belle of the White Sox losing his grip on the bat in a game against the Blue Jays. 

A Push for More Decorum in Baseball 

Fed Up, Umpires Say They Will Be Quicker to Punish Unruly Players 

officials, was held in Florida recently, 
a byproduct of the Alomar incident. 

The Baltimore Oriole second base- 
man received a five-game suspension 
for spitting at umpire John Hirschbeck 


CumpUfJ hr Our Sufi Fnvn Diqkaihri 

SCOTTSDALE. Arizona — Major 
league umpires, still seething over the 
Roberto Alomar spitting incident of 
last season and a general absence of 
stiffer penalties for abusive players, 
say they have had enough. 

They announced Monday that they 
would pm up with fewer arguments 
this season and would be quicker to 
ejeetplayers and managers. 

“Tolerance in baseball is leading to 
total anarchy." umpires Jerry Craw- 
ford and Don Denkinger said in a 
statement “The rules of the game will 
be rigidly enforced." 

Bug Selig, the acting commissioner, 
concerned that a short fuse is getting 
shorter, expressed dismay over the an- 
nouncement “'We expect they will not 
make a travesty of the game," Selig 
said in a statement “If they do. ap- 
propriate action will be taken. 

4t This is not a tune for divisive state- 
ments. Rather, it is a time for umpires 
and players to come together in the best 
interests of the game." 

Eugene Orza, associate counsel of 
the players* union, said: "How con- 
frontational and flamboyant state- 
ments serve the long-term interests of 
the umpires themselves is something, I 
-guess,- only -the umpires catr explain. 
As far as I’m concerned, it’s juk an- 
other press release." 

Perhaps, but the umpires seemed to 
be drawing a line. 

“Umpires will no longer bend over 
backwards to keep players in the 
game," said Richie Phillips, head of 
die umpires’ union. 

“The umpires, who have been oft- 
criticized for being too confrontational, 
will engage in less arguments on the 
field. Players who engage in aberrant 
behavior can expect an immediate ejec- 
tion and little conversation," he said. 

Phillips said the umpires believe 
they have been too tolerant and de- 
cided during a recent meeting that 
players would be ejected for even 
minor violations. 

As an example, be said, the rules on 


the speed of the game would be rigidly 
enforced. Pitchers are required to 
throw a pitch within 20 seconds when 
no runners are on base, but the rule has 
never been implemented. 

* ‘They will now tell players to get in 
die box." Phillips said. “If the player 
doesn’t get in the box, they’ll call for 
the pitch. If the player objects, he will 
be ejected.” 

Selig and other baseball officials 
were privately angered by the timing 
of the umpires' announcement, since it 
seemed to disrupt the possibility of 
progress in a series of meetings aimed 
at refining the rules of conduct and 
toughening penalties. The first of 
those meetings, embracing represen- 
tatives of the umpires* and players' 
unions, along with Selig and other 

With Yankees Deal, 
Adidas Takes Big Step 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Adidas, the maker 
of shoes, will spend $90 million to $95 
million through 2006 to plaster its 
name on signs at Yankee Stadium, 
advertise on New York Yankees* tele- 
casts, promote its connection to the 
team in local marketing, contribute to 
team charities and supply minor 
leaguers with footwear. 

That announcement overshadowed 
the unveiling of baseball’s new mar- 
keting campaign Monday with $150 
million pending in new sponsorships 
and an advertising push to portray 
players as cool human beings. 

The question now facing Greg 
Murphy, president of Major League 
Baseball Enterprises, is this: will 
baseball — which bad coveted a link 
with marketing-crazy shoe companies 
last year but then voted down a $325 
million joint deal with Nike and Ree- 
bok — challenge the Yankees? 

"I’ll need more details before I can 
make an intelligent response," 
Murphy said. 


last September and will serve it at the 
start or the season while still being paid 
The umpires wanted a longer suspen- 
sion without pay and wanted Alomar to 
serve it during the postseason, threat- 
ening a strike until a federal judge 
issued an injunction, forcing them to 
work the playoffs and World Series. 

Any change in the rules governing 
suspensions and overall conduct 
would have to receive the unlikely 
approval of the players’ union. 

• 

Ken Caminiti. the National 
League's most valuable player last 
season, who is still rehabilitating his 
left shoulder after major rotator cuff 
surgery Oct 9, had two singles for San 
Diego in his first two swings in a 
practice game against the Seattle Mar- 
iners. He then batted right-handed and 
struck oul 

‘He's fine. He’s ready to go,” the 
Padres’ manager, Bruce Bochy, said. 
“There’s no question in our mind as 
far as swinging the bat and throwing. 
He’ll be out there soon." 

“It feels good,” Caminiti said 
"The last swing I took right-handed 
hurt." 

• 

Ryan Klesko had the best season of 
his career in 1996. leading die Atlanta 
Braves with 34 homers and driving in 
93 runs, so he does not think he should 
be a platoon player this year. 

But he is afraid that that is what the 
Braves are thinking about because of 
their crowded outfield situation. 

“I feel like I’m beyond that," 
Klesko said dismissing the possibility 
of sharing time this season. "I’m out 
there to play every day. " 

The knock against the left-handed 
hitting Klesko is that he batted only 
.230 against left-handed pitchers dur- 
ing the regular season and hit only .176 
in the postseason. (LAT, AP) 


Celtics, in Toronto, End 
13 -Game Losing Streak 


The Associated Press 

The Boston Celtics, led by Todd 
Day’s 27 points, ended a club record- 
tying 13-game losing streak with a 107- 
1 03 victory over the Toronto Raptors. It 
was Boston’s first victory since Feb. 3, 
the last time the Celtics visited Toronto. 

"I made a conscious effort norm let a 
loss happen to our ballclub," said Day, 

NBA ROUNDUP 

who had 16 points in the fourth quarter 
Monday night. “We get so much neg- 
ative press, we warn to start some kind 
of other streak. Now it’s behind us. We 
can look forward" 

The victory gave Boston a 12-46 re- 
cord. one win better than the Vancouver 
Grizzlies, who have the NBA's worsr 
record at 1 1-50. 

Antoine Walker chipped in with 21 
points and 10 rebounds for the Celtics, 
while Rick Fox had 13 points and 10 
assists. Eric Williams added 20 points. 

Day helped put the Celtics ahead 92- 
82. when he followed up a missed shot 
and made a reverse lay-up with 5:10 
remaining. 

Carlos Rogers had 17 points. Walt 
Williams 16 and Damon Sioudamire 1 1 
points and 1 7 assists for Toronto. 

If the Celtics finish with more than 53 
losses, they would have the worst sea- 
son in franchise history. In 1978-79, the 
Celtics were 29-53. 

‘ ‘Looking at the rest of the season, you 
can obviously say one win does not cure 
all that's happened so far.' ' Fox said 

“Hopefully, it will put us on a win- 
ning streak. We’ve had our opportu- 
nities to win. We've just fallen short." 

Boston built a 14-point lead in the 
first half, but its advantage nearly got 
away in the fourth quarter. Toronto 
scored 10 straight points and closed to 
96-94 when Rogers made a pair of lay- 
ups inside. 

Day hit a 1 0-foot jumper and made a 
free throw with 39 seconds remaining to 
give Boston a 99-95 lead. Then Doug 
Christie's pass was intercepted by 
Walker, who hit two free throws with 32 
seconds left and gave Boston the vic- 
tory. 

Buds 108 , Bucks so Michael Jordan 
became the No, 7 scorer in National 
Basketball Association history, getting 
31 points to lead Chicago. Jordan has 
26211 points — 19 more than San 
Antonio's Dominique Wilkins. 

While Jordan dominated the first half 
with 24 points, Scottie Pippen scored 21 
of his 25 points in the third quarter. 

The Bulls improved to 51-7 overall 
and 28-1 at home in the United Center 


with their 21st consecutive vicroiy. 

Glenn Robinson had 23 points for the 
Bucks, whose season-high losing streak 
reached six games. Milwaukee fell IVi 
games behind Cleveland in the race for 
the final Eastern Conference playoff 
spot. 

Kings i os, Nats 9$ Mahmoud Abdul- 
Rauf scored 18 of his 22 points in the 
second half as Sacramento ran away 
from New Jersey. 

Ahead 55-44 at halftime, the 
quickly extended the lead early in 
third quarter. 

The visiting Nets, trailing by 21 
points entering the fourth quarter, 
closed to 93-79 on a 3 -pointer by Kerry 
Kitties midway through the period. But 
the Kings scored six straight points, the 
final two on a jumper by Abdul -Rauf, to 
take a 99-79 lead with 4:40 left 

Utah 111, Golden State 104 Karl 
Malone matched his season high with 
41 points, including 17 in the fourth 
quarter, as Utah won at Golden State. 

Malone shot 16-of-25 from the field 
and scored 2S points in the second half, 
when Utah stretched out a 50-44 half- 
time lead with a 13-2 run opening the 
.third quarter. 

Chris Mullin led the Warriors with 28 
points, going 10-of-12 from the field 
and 8-of-8 from the line. 


4 M 

._Z ' cte- 


Folk Gttja/Tbi AmociIbI Ppcbi 


Rick Fox of the Boston Celtics 
driving past the Toronto Raptors' 
Walt Williams for the lay-up. 


Fairfield Loses Its Why to NCAA Tourney 


The Associated Press 

Fairfield fl 1-18) became the fourth 
losing team in three seasons to barge 
into college basketball’s premier show 
by beating Canisius, 78-72, in the cham- 
pionship game of the Metro Atlantic 
Athletic Conference tournament. 

But Fairfield is quite likely going to 
face No. 1-ranked Kansas, in the first 
round. 

Greg Francis scored 26 points Monday 
night and Shannon Bowman had 22 as 
Fairfield held off Canisius (17-12). 

Three • other NCAA tournament 
berths were sealed Monday oighL 

Old Dominion needed overtime to 
beat James Madison, 62-58, in the final 
of the Colonial Athletic Association 
tournament; Illinois State beat South- 
west Missouri, 75-72, to complete a 
sweep of the Missouri Valley’s regular 


season and tournament titles, and Sl 
M ary’s beat San Francisco, 66-59, in the 
West Coast Conference final. 

In Sl Louis, Rico Hill scored 31 
points as Illinois State (24-5) became 
the first Missouri Valley Conference 
regular-season champion in six years to 
win the league's toumamenL 

Hill, a sophomore who was named 
the tournament MVP, had 81 points in 
three tournament games. He had a ca- 
reer-high 37 points in a regular-season 
victory over Southwest Missouri. 

Dan Muller clinched the victory 
when he made two free throws with 4 2 
seconds to go. 

In Los Angeles, 7-foot-3. 345-pound 
Brad Millard scored a career-high 22 
lints and grabbed nine rebounds as Sl 
' s qualified for its third trip to the 
toumamenL 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5 , 1997 


POSTCARD 


African Filmmakers 


Undercover: The Agent Who Became 


By Howard W. French 

NfW York Times Service 


O uagadougou, Bur- 
kina Faso — By mid- 


V_/Jdna Faso — By mid- 
morning the overnight cool 
that blows in from the desen 
gives way to an ovenlike heat, 
and the noisy motor scooters 
that dominate the traffic here 
have kicked up enough dust to 
make the air almost viscous. 

Last week, as Ouagadougou 
played host to die African film 
festival, the usually sleepy city 
was abusde, giving its ail to 
charm thousands of guests who 

flocked here even as trinket 
sellers and taxi drivers did their 
cheery best to fleece them. 

The festival, known as 
Fespaco, began 28 years ago 
and takes place every two 
years. Most past events have 


have ended on a self-congrat- 
ulatory note that one of the 


uiatory note that one of the 
world's poorest countries 
could have pulled it off again. 
But this year. Fespaco (the 
mime is the Preach acronym 
for Pan-African Film Festival 
of Ouagadougou) was riddled 
with self-examination. 

Die criticism began after 
confused organization left Af- 
rican filmmakers scrambling 
for scarce lodging while many 
foreign parvenus were treated 
as VIPs. Esoteric productions 
were screened in open-air 
theaters in poor neighbor- 
hoods while films with pop- 
ular appeal played in the city’s 
few true movie houses. 

Far more troublesome has 
been the realization among 
African filmmakers that 
nearly three decades after this 
festival was founded as a way 
to promote the continent's in- 
fant cinema, the organizers’ 
goals mostly remain a pan- 
African dream in search of an 
African audience. 

The festival and many of 
the African filmmakers who 
have become fixtures here 
have managed over the years 


to cultivate financial under- 
writing from backers in 
France and elsewhere in 
Europe. But along the way 
their work has often come to 
be the captive of rarefied for- 
eign tastes. This has locked 
much of African film, with its 
stark rural settings and glacial 

S lot progressions, in the ait- 
ouse ghetto of European and. 
American markets. 

“For African cinema to sur- 
vive,” said Idrissa Ouedraogo. 
a director from Burkina Faso, 
“we must find some way of 
exploiting our natural market, 
which is the rural world, where 
80 percent of Africans live. We 
need to make films in accord- 
ance with the realities of the 
African market To my think- 
ing that means drawing les- 
sons from India, and admiring 
their rhythm and cost of pro- 
duction. and keeping plots ac- 
cessible.” 


T, Weinranfc undercover work led to five years of trials in 

cities including New York. Milwaukee and 
Tampa, Honda, in winch more than 100 

L OS ANGELES — No one looked up people were sentenced to prison. “Some of 
when Joseph D. Pistone walked into the them have died in jail, some have gotten out. 


lounge of a Beverly Hills hotel the other most of them are still in jail,” he said. 

m «1 r ! — _ 1 — IV — • _ -1 k * - - - J —a fli— m f I PAlTM Irina 


afternoon. Wearing a baseball cap, jeans and Married with three grown children, he 


a sw eatshir t, he sat down and removed his declined to say where he lived. He generally 
sunglasses. He seemed perfectly unremark- refuses to have his photograph taken. Under 


able, which is the way he wants it 


federal protection during the years he test- 


“I'm cautious,” said Pistone, who as an ified. he has no guards around him now, but 
FBI agp-nf using die name Donnie Brasco be made it plain that he was cautious. “What 


infiltrated the Mafia in the 
1970s in one of the gov- 
ernment's most successful 
operations against the mob. 
“I'm always leery about 
bu mpin g into somebody. 
One tune I was with my wife 
in a restaurant, I saw some- 
body from my undercover 


Joe Pistone’s work 
led to more than 
100 hoodlums 
being put in jail. 


that he was cautious. “What 
3 do is take proper precau- 
tions. What you worry about 
is some cowboy who rec- 
ognizes you and wants to 
make a name for himself.” 

In the film, written by 
Paul Atmnasio, the Pistone- 
Brasco character leaves his 
family behind to take on the 


davs, and I got up and we just walked out. persona of a gangster who infiltrates the 

.... • C 1 _ • J 


You go crazy if you become a prisoner, and Bonanno mob family with the un wilting help 
' — •*--* •’ 0 f Ruggiero, a pathetic and violent thug. Die 


I'm not about to do that. 


Pistone 's six years of undercover work in older man enlists Brasco as his proteg6, and 
the Mafia, and his complicated friendship the two develop an unusually close bond that 


with an aging hit man. Lefty Ruggiero, are leaves the agent’s loyalties somewhat 
die basis for the new film, “Donnie blurred. 

Brasco.” which opened strongly last week- Soon after Pistone revealed himself to be a 


Many complained that Af- 
rican films shown at Fespaco, 
especially those made m the 
host country, come off as ro- 
manticized works of anthro- 
pology. often set in the hard- 
scrabble world of noble 
peasants. 

Many of the artists here 
said that such subject matter 
appealed far more to foreign 
audiences than it did to Af- 


Brasco.” which opened strongly last week- 
end. It grossed about SI 1 million. 


federal agent, several of the Mafia figures 


Directed by Mike Newell (“Four Wed- depicted m the film were killed by the mob 
dings and a Funeral”), the film stars Johnny because their trust in him led to prosecutions. 


Depp as Donnie Brasco and A1 Pacino as Ruggiero was released from prison because be 
Ruggiero, whom Brasco ultimately betrays, had cancer and died at die age of 67. 

Die film is based on the book “Donnie Pistone grew up in Paterson, New Jersey. 


Brasco: My Undercover Life in the Mafia,” the son of a bar manager, and yearned to be a 



Vl 


& on 

4.7 Bill* 

^Assist 

kti Victi 


. ;? rr inu-n? ’• I* 
grift 


by Pistone and Richard Woodley. 


policeman from the time he was a teenager. 


The film’s producer, Mark Johnson, said One reason was his angerar the stereotype that Johnny Depp and AI Pacino in “Donnie Brasco,” a tale of infiltration of the Mafia. 


the book’s appeal was that it seemed to Italians have mob connections. “I mean, even 


present a side of the Mafia not seen in today people say that, ‘Oh. you’re an Italian, 
movies. “We're so used to the grand scale, somebody in your family is probably in the 


ricans. “Why do the foreign 
critics favor the films of Burk- 


the ‘Godfather’ side, big mob killing s and mob.' 


guy.” Pistone said. ‘ ‘I mean. I grew up in an 
Italian neighborhood with mob guys around. 


critics favor the films of Burk- 
ina Faso so much? * ’ asked the 
Ivoirian actress Akissi Delta, 
a star who specializes in spicy 
roles. ‘ ‘Because everything is 
dry, and the peasants are poor 
and simple. For them, that is 
Africa. People in Togo or 
Benin, or wherever, might ap- 
preciate seeing characters 
who are sensual and compli- 
cated. When are they going to 
realize that our continent is 
immense, and not everybody 
is sad or stru g glin g with 
drought?” 


milli ons of dollars,” said Johnson, producer Pistone joined the FBI in the early 1970s 


of movies such as “Rain Man” and “A and almost immediately was assigned un- 
Perfect World.*' “We've never quite seen deicover work on a case thai involved car theft 


the worker bees, guys who were not par- and then truck hijacking. This led to his deep- 


ticulariy successful, not particularly bright, ening undercover Involvement with the mob 


who had to do the day-to-day dirty work.' ’ and his almost father-son friendship with Rug- 


Of his choice of a British director, Newell, giero. 


to make the movie, which cost $40 million, 
Johnson said he wanted a fresh perspective 
on the mob tale: “I used as the model film 


Why did the older man enlist him? “I was at 
an age where I could have been his son. 1 
mean, he had a son who was a couple of years 


‘Midnight Cowboy.’ which was John Schle- younger, a small-time petty thief and on-and- 
stnger’s first American movie. It's a quint- off junkie. So maybe be saw something in me 
essentially American film. And it can rake a that he wanted his son to have.” 
foreigner to render this in a new light.” At die same time, he said, the FBI pressed 

Pistone, who is 58, retired from the FBI him into undercover duty because it bad few 
last year after 27 years as an agent. His Italian-American agents. “I was a street 


you played cams, you went to the track. So 
the mob to me was not strange, it was not like 
I was an FBI agent from Salt Lake City.” 

What surprised Pistone about the mob, 
and disturbed him about many films that 
seem to glamorize the Mafia, was that die 
reality of Mafia life was grubby, petty and 
venaL “ ‘The Godfather* is a great movie, 
but it gives them too much credit,” be said. 
“What you don’t see is what really takes 
place: the in-fighting, the lying to each other, 
the scheming against each other to get 
power. I mean, I don’t know any of them that 
graduated high school, that wanted to push 
their kids to go to college. You know, Al 
Pacino as Sonny Corleone is eloquent well- 


spoken. coUege-edocateda war hero. That's 

not the way it is.” . r- 

Pistone said he managed to deceive the 

sonality remained unchanged Asked if^his 
time working in the mob had an effect on 
him, Pistone said he doubted it “1 didn't try 
to be atougb guy. “he said ‘ ‘I didn't fry to be 
a big mobster.! was who I was. I didn't stop 


doing what I normally did l worked out. I 
lifted weights. I ran. That's what Z usually 
did-. 

' ! loved to go to movies. I used to tellthe 
guys, ‘Hey, I’m going to the movies this 
afternoon.' They don't care. The time you 
draw suspicion is when you don’t do any- 
thing that normal people do. . 

“The only thing I changed was my name, 
Donnie Brasco.” 



PEOPLE 


F OUR London theater critics have 
agreed to cross the footlights in Amil 


A agreed to cross the footlights in April 
to direct a play and see how they like 


being reviewed by their usual victims. 
Michael BfUington of The Guardian. 


Michael BQlington of The Guardian, 
who will direct a play by Harold Pinter, 
said Tuesday that be was looking for- 
ward to learning more about the craft of 
theater from the other side of die cur- 
tains. “Perhaps I, or all of us, will turn 
out to be whipping boys and subject to 
excoriating reviews,” said Nicholas de 
Jongh of the Evening Standard, whose 
production of a play by Jean Anouilh 
will be reviewed by Stephen DaJdry, 
director of die Royal Court. “But per- 
haps the whole process may siphon off a 
tittle of the accumulated bile." The coup 
de theatre follows a series of virulent 
attacks on critics, like the incident last 
year in which die actor-director Steven 
Berkoff accused a reviewer of “spew- 
ing off his frustration and venom from a 
life of miserable flops.*’ 


The actor Gerard Depardieu is said to 
be planning to open a bar in Bucharest. 
Depardieu, in town for the country's 
annual theater awards, is on his thud 
visit to Romania this year. He also is a 
friend of the former Romanian tennis 
great Iile Nastase, who now lives in 
Paris. At the awards ceremony. De- 


lation on European tour begins April 
28 in Stockholm and ends July 6 in 
Monaco; it includes 15 dates in France. 
Dates for itsU-S. tour, planned for July 
and August, are to be announced. 


Bluestein said, adding- that she had re- 
mained at his bedside until the end. 


pardieu proved that he can diarm a 
Romanian public. Presenting the direc- 


manian public. Presenting the direc- 
Silviu Purcarete with the award for 


tor Silviu Purcarete with the award for 
best play of 1996 for his “Danaides,” 
he cracked jokes and won a round of 
applause. Depardieu’s latest film ven- 
ture is a cameo role in Kenneth 
Branagh’s “Hamlet.” 


The former White House adviser 
George Stephanopoulos will add 
Newsweek writer to his other new jobs. 
The magazine said that Stephano- 
poulos. 36. who is also working as a 
professor at Columbia University and a 
political pundit on ABC television, had 
signed a deal for seven yearly articles 
for an undisclosed sum. He also recently 
signed a book deal for $2.75 million. 


Yehudi Menuhin was awarded Ger- 
many’s highest, honor Tuesday. “We 
Ge rmans are happy to have you as our 
friend,”, said Foreign Minister Klaus 
Kiokel as he presented Menuhin with 
the Great Order of Merit. He called the 
80-year-oldviotinist “an ambassador of 
humanity and undeistanding between 
people and cultures.” Menuhin was the 
first Jewish artist to play with the Berlin 
Philharmonic after World War II. 


LaaBnu/Ihe AombbI pmt 

PLAY IT AGAIN, RAY — Ray Charles performing Tuesday in Milan 
as Salvatore Ferragamo presented its fall/winter fashion collection. 


Is a French version of Planet Hol- 
lywood about to be bom — in Romania? 


Ten years after their last studio al- 
bum, Supertramp launched a new al- 
bum in Paris on Tuesday and announced 
plans fora comeback tour. In its heyday, 
die British 70s megaband sold 50 mil- 
lion albums with hits like “Dreamer” 
and “Bloody Well Right” The new 
album, “Some Things Never Change,” 
produced by Jack Douglas, will be re- 
leased worldwide March 24. The band’s 


Brad Davis, the late star of “Mid- 
night Express" and the first Hollywood 
actor to reveal he had AIDS, did not die 
while in the hospital in 1991 but com- 
mitted suicide with sleeping pills, his 
widow. Susan Bluestein Davis, says in 
the biography ‘ ‘After Midnight ’ ' Davis 
decided to take his life after doctors 
diagnosed a fatal spinal cord infection. 


George Strait, gentleman cowboy, 
has received five Country Music Award 
nominations, as did LeAnn Rimes, the 
14-year-old Patsy Cfine sound-alike 
who won two Grammies last week. The 


performing duo of Kix Brooks and;, 
Ronnie Dunn not six nominations, in- . 


Ronnie Dunn got six nominations, in*, 
cluding one for entertainer of the year, a 
category whose nominees also included 
Strait, Tim McGraw, Garth Brooks 
and Alan Jackson. 


Not for 



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