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INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World's Daily Newspaper 


London, Thursday, March 6, 1997 



No. 35,462 


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Swiss Offer 
$4.7 Billion 
To Assist 
Nazi Victims 

Government’s Plan 
Faces Potential 
Rightist Opposition 

By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Ser vice 

• BERN — in their boldest financial 
maneuver to gain the moral high ground 
in the dispute over wartime dealings 
with Nazi Germany, the Swiss author- 
ities proposed Wednesday to revalue 
their gold reserves to create a $4.7 bil- 
lion fund to help victims of the Holo- 
caust and other calamities. 

At the same time, the Swiss National 
Bank" offered to donate about $70 mil- 
lion to a separate fund set up last week 
for short-term help to Holocaust sur- 
vivors, doubling the value of that fund. 

Both ideas need Parliament's approv- 
al and could face major difficulties if 
rightist Swiss politicians opposed them. 

The government’s proposal, an- 
no meed at an unusual breakfast - time 
session of Parliament by President 
Arnold KoUer, represented not only a far 
greater financial commitment than pre- 
viously discussed but also a studied at- 
tempt to walk the thin line between in- 
ternational pressure and domestic 
reluctance to use taxpayers' money for 
what many Swiss regard as an unjustified 
acknowledgment of wartime guilt. 

For about 1 8 months, Switzerland has 
been under increasing pressure from the 
World Jewish Congress and its political 
allies in New York and Washington to 
atone for its wartime dealings with Nazi 
Germany and the subsequent reluctance 
of its private banks to help relatives gain 
access to bonk accounts and other assets 
deposited in Switzerland by Holocaust 
victims. 

Last month, the .Swiss government 
finally agreed. io share with Jewish or- 
gamzatjons-the administration of a sep- 
arate fund, financed principally by 
Swiss private banks — and beginning 
Wednesday, by the Swiss National 
Bank : — to compensate Holocaust sur- 
vivors living in hardship in Eastern 
Europe, Israel, the United States and 
elsewhere. 

But Wednesday's proposal went fur- 
ther, offering, as Mr. KoUer told a joint 
sitting of the upper and lower houses of 
Parliament, to create a “Swiss Foun- 
■ dation for Sobdarity” drawn from funds 

■'^accruing from the revaluation of gold 
" ' deposits currently on Swiss books at 

" around one- third of their market value. 

, The.- proceeds from investing the 

. W* 0 funds, he said, would “be destined for 

victims of poverty mid catastrophes, of 
, — genocide and other severe breaches of 

human rights, such as, of course, victims 

of the Holocaust'’ He said the foun- 
dation could be created by next year and 
wotfld be used “half in Switzerland, 
half abroad.’* Mr. KoUer put the overall 
value of the proposed fund at “about 7 
billion Swiss francs" ($4.7 billion), 
meaning it could yield several hundred 
- million dollars a year. 

• “This shows us that the Swiss people 
have finally got it," Israel Singer, sec- 
rctary-generai of the World Jewish Con- 
gress, said in New York, reflecting a 
broadly- positive response by Jewish 
... - groups in the United States, Israel and 
: Switzertand. 

But die proposal could deepen a split 
in Swiss • society between younger 
people who believe their country played 
. ap ambiguous, if not collaborationist, 
role toward Nazi Germany and older 
Swisson the right of die political spec- 
> truth , who -see the outside pressure for 

See SWISS, Page 6 




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Rebels atop a captured army tank cheering outside Sarande in southern Albania on Wednesday. 

Albania Moves to Stifle Revolt 

Vlore Mans the Barricades Government Rejects Mediation 


By Jane Periez 

New York Times Service 


By Jane Periez 

New York Timet Service 


HER. Albania — Palm-studded Vlore, a Wild West port 
on the Adriatic Sea where expensive new cars compete with 
donkey carts on dusty streets, has been organizing itself for 
one of Europe's most bizarre revolts. 

In Fier. on a hill 1 1 kilometers (seven miles) north of 
Vlore, a ragtag group of rifle-bearing men haphazardly 
dressed in army uniforms manned a government front line. 
They were backed by more than a dozen tanks strung along 
the road behind them. 

But inside Vlore, where secessionists were considering 
declaring an independent city-state, the people's army was 
cocky and confident. “We are waiting," said a local 
businessman reached by telephone. “If the army comes 
there will be a war." 

The citizens in Vlore have their own tanks and armored 
personnel carriers captured from deserted army barracks, 
added the businessman, who insisted on anonymity be- 
cause of fear of retribution from the government. 

See REVOLT, Page 6 


TIRANA, Albania — President Sail Berisha pushed the 
military Wednesday to regain control of two important 
coastal towns, and his government rebuffed a European 
diplomatic mission that offered to help mediate the stand- 
off between armed civilians and the army in the south. 

Foreign Minister Tritan Shehu declared that the Adriatic 
port of Vlore was “totally out of control.” Two men in their 
30s were killed by gunfire Wednesday, and many others 
were wounded. “Tbe government is going to re-establish 
calm with the fewest casualties and the least destruction." 
Mr. Shehu said. 

Residents in Vlore, the coastal town at the heart of the 
rebellion, said they believed that army tanks and armored 
personnel carriers had moved closer to the town. 

More than 20 people have been reported killed in south- 
ern Albania since Friday. 

Vlore has defied a state Isf emergency imposed by the 
government Sunday and ap accompanying shoot-on-sight 


See ALBANIA, Page 6 


Parallel Universes at White House 

1996 Campaign Strained Laws Separating Government From Politics 


By Alison Mitchell 

New fort Times Service 


WASHINGTON — A visitor last 
year to the cramped White House office 
of Harold Ickes might have noticed one 
computer in his office and several just 
outside — one of which was set aside 
solely for campaign politics. Mr. Ickes, 
then a White House deputy chief of staff, 
also had two telephones, one for gov- 
ernment and one for politics; two pagers, 
and a cellular phone for politics. 

In Douglas Sosnik's office the same 
duality existed. The White House polit- 
ical director had four phones, two fax 
machines, two pagers and two cellular 
phones. As with Mr. Ickes, half of them 
were paid for by the government for 
official business, half were pad for by 
the Ctinton-Gore campaign. 

These are toe parallel universes that 
White House aides lived in last year as 
they ran Bill Clinton's presidential cam- 
paign largely from within toe White 
House while trying to obey — their crit- 
ics would say skirt — toe laws separating 
government from politics. Vice Presi- 
dent Al Gore admitted this week that he 
had made calls from his White House 
office to solicit campaign donations, but 


said he had used a credit card issued by 
toe Democratic National Committee. 

Dick Morris, the president’s former 
political strategist who advocated the 
television advertising campaign that 
forced the Democrats to raise so much 
money, described it this way: “It always 
struck me like using toe special dishes in 
Passover — you couldn't mix the tiayf 
[noakosher] and the kosher." 

Michael McCrary, toe White House 
press secretary, said the two sets of 


Clinton Asks Probe 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — 
President Bill Clinton said Wed- 
nesday that he had no reason to 
believe that any foreign govern- 
ment sought to influence the 1996 
U.S. presidential election but that 
be wanted a full investigation. 

M can while, toe Whitewater in- 
dependent counsel is seeking infor- 
mation on a payment to a key figure, 
and the Democratic Party fund- 
raiser John Huang sought help from 
a member of Congress. Page 3. 


AGENDA 


The Dollar 


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Chirac ‘Shocked’ by Renault Plant Closing 


DU. 


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122.175 


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President Jacques Chirac of France 
said Wednesday he was “shocked” by. 
the abrupt announcement of a Belgian 
plant dosing by the French automaker 
Renault SA, and toe European Com- 
mission urged labor unions to sue tbe 
company for violating EU labor laws. 


European economic and political unity. 
But die leaders brushed on Belgian pro- 
posals for new EU legislation. 

Prime Minister Alan Juppe of France 
met with toe chief executive of Renault 
and said he favored “alternative solu- 
tions” in conformity with EU and na- 


PAGE TWO 

A Jeu> Campaigns in Germany 

BUSINESS/FINANCE PageH. 

New Rise in German Jobless Seen 


Books. 


Cfany Wgdnwdny Q 4 P.U 
+Tl.W ' 801.99 


prev iyctoae 

790.95 


The expressions of indignation un- tional roles in Belgium and France. The 
derscored growing fear among European French government earlier character- 
leaders that- Aroerican-style corporate ized toe closure as the rightful decision 
downsizing at a time of high unera- of a private company. Renault is 46 
ployment could undermine support for percent-owned by the state. Page 1 1. 


Crossword 

Opinion ....... 

Sports 


Page 9. 

Page 10. 

.... Pages 8-9. 
Pages 18-19. 


IntenutfomS OmtOhd 


Page IS- 


The JHT on-line http://mviv.ihl.coni 


Thailand Wrestles 
With Financial Crisis 

Depositors Withdraw $1.2 Billion 
As Stocks and Currency Slump 


By Philip Segal 

Special to the Herald Tribune 


HONG KONG — Thailand fought a 
deepening financial crisis Wednesday 
as its central bank attempted to stop a 
run on thecounny's weakened financial 
institutions while government officials 
negotiated to avert a critical downgrad- 
ing of the country's debt rating. 

Prime Minister Chaovaiii Yong- 
chaiyut, meanwhile, suspended three 
central bank officials in connection with 
a failure to bring former executives of a 
failed bank to court. 

Varatoep Raton akom. a government 
spokesman, said that Jarong Nookh- 
wun, a deputy governor who has been 
suspended, and two central bank of- 
ficers would also face disciplinary re- 
views. 

Thailand appears to be in the grip of 
one of its deepest financial crises ever. 
What is perhaps more worrisome is that 
no one seems to know just how severe 
the problems are. although it is dear that 
many of the country's banks and fi- 
nancial companies are in trouble, ana- 
lysts said. 

Depositors are not waiting to find out. 
They have rushed to withdraw an es- 
timated $1.2 billion from finance 
companies in toe past week, centra] 
bank officials reported Wednesday, and 
tbe nation's currency, the baht, has 
fallen for five days in a row. 

A sign of how deep problems run may 
come this week from Moody’s Investors 


Service Inc., which downgraded toe 
country's sovereign debt in September. 
Moody's was to continue talks with 
government officials Thursday as it 
considers whether to lower the credit 
rating once again, a move that would 
make borrowing more expensive. 

At the tooi of Thailand’s financial 
quagmire are the country’s finance 
companies, which have become 
burdened with billions of baht in bad 
property loans after a spate of over- 
building of both condominiums and 
commercial property. Analysis have 
been given little information and remain 
unconvinced that toe government has 
admitted toe extent of toe bad loans on 
the books of the country’s financial in- 
stitutions. 

On Monday, fresh concern over the 
health of the finance companies was 
raised when the government suspended 
trading of all banking and finance shares 
and announced that Finance One PCX. 
— toe single largest finance company, 
previously believed to be healthy — 
would be merged with Thai Danu Bank 
PCL, Thailand’s 12th-largest bank. Ten 
other finance companies have been 
ordered to raise their capital levels to 
offset bad loans. 

“We are very worried about the ex- 
posure financial institutions have to the 
property sector," said the governor of 
the Bank of Thailand, Remgchai 
Marakanond. 

See THAILAND, Page 4 


North and South Korea 
Discuss Talks to End War 


By R. Jeffrey Smith 

Washington Post Sen. tee 


equipment kept political expenses 
walled off from government expenses. 
“Common sense applies," he said. 
“The taxpayers shouldn’t pay for us to 
run a campaign.” 

The Clinton White House is not toe 
first to use dual systems. C. Boyden 
Gray, President George Bush’s White 
House counsel, recalls that James 
Baker, the chief of staff who ran toe 
1992 campaign, had a separate fax ma- 
chine for politics. Mr. Gray sent a 
memorandum of rules to toe White 
House staff in late 1991 instructing them 
to use political credit cards for political 
calls or “telephones installed and main- 
tained by a political committee.” 

But Mr. Gray said fund-raising so- 
licitations were prohibited from any- 
where inside toe White House. 

On Capitol Hill, members of Congress 
and the Senate can sometimes be seen 
outside government buildings on cellular 
phones — a quick way to obey tbe ban on 
soliciting contributions from their of- 
fices. They also have cubicles and 
phones reserved for their fund-raising 
calls in various political headquarters just 
a few blocks from toe While House. 

See CAMPAIGN, Page 6 


WASHINGTON — When four 
North Korean bombs were detonated by 
remote control at the Martyr’s Museum 
in Rangoon in 1983, killing 17 visiting 
members of toe South Korean Iea«f 
ership. one of those lucky enough to 
survive was a political counselor at toe 
South Korean Embassy named Song 
Young Shik. 

On Wednesday. Mr. Song, as head of a 
South Korean delegation, was among 
those exchanging smiles and small talk at 
toe start of the first direct talks his country 
has held with senior North Korean dip- 
lomats in nearly three years. 

The goal of the daylong meeting at a 
New York hotel was to lay toe ground- 
work for eventual full-fledged nego- 
tiations that would produce a formal 
cease-fire to the 1950-53 Korean War. 

The New York Foreign Press Center 
spokesman. Kenneth Bailes, who was 
present at toe beginning of toe meeting, 
said, “The meeting started with toe 
members of toe delegations exchanging 
small talk and pleasantries.' ’ 

Representatives of the two govern- 
ments agreed to attend Wednesday’s 
meeting, in which the United States also 
took part, only after months of U.S. 
diplomatic labor and some intense bick- 
ering over everything from where toe 
talks would be held to the shape of the 
tables. 

In recent months, their icy relation- 
ship has thawed a bit. North Korea’s 


Communist regime issued an unpreced- 
ented statement of regret about toe in- 
cursion of one of its spy submarines into 
South Korean waters last year, and 
Seou l agreed to join the United States in 
providing a small amount of emergency 
food aid to the North’s increasingly 
hungry people. 

Tbe meeting Wednesday fell short of 
a real peace negotiation. “Talks about 
talks,” a senior U.S. diplomat said, 
adding toar nonetheless be thought toe 
North Korean leadership had already 
jumped “the highest hurdle” merely by 

Hefty U.S. troop cuts could follow a 
Korean peace. • The South Korean 
leader fires eight ministers. Page 4. 

agreeing to send its diplomats to tbe 
hotel conference room. 

The three delegations sat at a round 
table. Although the agenda was modest, 
the meeting marked toe first time in 25 
years that the two Koreas have sat in toe 
same room to talk peace. 

“We need to hear what they say 
before we respond,” North Korea’s 
chief delegate. Deputy Foreign Minister 
Kim Gye Gw an, said. 

The isolated North Korean regime 
has been induced to participate partly by 
its growing recognition that it will need 
substantial foreign help to solve its se- 
rious economic problems and deal with 
what some experts say is an imminent 

See KOREA, Page 4 



»«ny UalEbudtentE Amcatcd Pwa 

Mr. Kim, left, greeting Mr. Song, right, before the Korea talks Wednesday 
in New York. Charles Kartman, center, represented the United States. 



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Untouched for 40 Years, Bikini Atoll Is Now Ready for Tourists 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New York rimes Service 




BIKINI. Marshall Islands — ; After the 23 nu- 
clear explosions that toe United States conducted 
on this remote coral atoll m toe 1940s and 50s, one 
almost expects to visit today and find just a few 
charred islets surrounded by brackish water enrn- 

^lo'^maiingtoing about Bikini is how alive it 
f white sand island full of coconut palms 

Swaying a P** 01 Iun i uoise 


turtles swimming languorously by the beach. 
There are also a few tourists, and many more are 
expected, because Bikini is now once more open to 
tbepoblic. 

The paradox is that toe same atomic bombs and 
hydrogen bombs that once caused immense 
tragedy to the Bikinians, even vaporizing some of 
their islets, have now made the island an unusually 
valuable tourist property. 

Aside from Its worldwide fame and relics like a 
bunker that once had a hot line to toe White House, 
Bikini has the appeal of an untouched island and 


coral reef, as well as a lagoon offering some of toe 
best scuba diving in toe world. 

Divers often like to explore shipwrecks, and 
there is no place with wrecks like toe lagoon here in 
Bikini, one of toe specks of islands scattered in toe 
Pacific between Hawaii and Japan. Some 1 9 ships, 
including toe only divable aircraft carrier in the 
world, fie al the bottom of the lagoon, where they 
sank after tbe United States tested what would 
happen to big ships when an atomic bomb ex- 
ploded nearby. (TJiey sink.) 

Most atolls in toe Pacific are barely viable in a 


modem economy. But Bikini, because of its fame 
and toe bombed -our shipwrecks, might emerge as 
one of toe few that can thrive on tourism. The 
heartbreak of toe Bikinians would become their 
sustenance. 

Six scientific surveys have declared that tbe 
island is now basically habitable, so long as res- 
idents do not eat too many local coconuts. So toe 
people of Bikini who have been wandering 
about the Marshall Islands as “nuclear nomads” 

See BIKINI, Page 4 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


One Jew in Germany / A 'Moral Institution*? 


IgnatzBubis Tastes His Slice of Popularity 


By John Vinocur 

International Herald Tribune 


B ERLIN — If 5.6 percent of the vote in a 
city council election can be called a polit- 
ical embrace, then German democracy has 
reached out and hugged Ignatz Bubis. 

So what if it hugged the candidates of the not-so- 
cuddly extreme-right Republican party a little tight- 
er, as drey won a 6.2 percent share in the same 
Frankfurt election. No matter. All the pictures in the 
papers these last days have been of Mr. Bubis 
smiling, voting, shaking the hands of the good and 
the great, while the articles alongside are smattered 
with words like respect, admiration and affection. 

' Deep readers might be forgiven for finding a trace 
of self-satisfied partisanship in the accounts because 
in some places in the world 5.6 percent of the vote is 
not enough to get a candidate's deposit back. 

But Mr. Bubis, who is 70 and chairman of the 
Central Council of Jews in Germany, the country's 
principal Jewish organization, received over- 
whelming credit for turning his good reputation into 
the vehicle for returning the liberal Free Democratic 
Party to the Frankfurt city legislature this week after 
an absence of 16 years. 

Even before the votes were counted, the weekly 
Die Zeit had pushed things a bit last week by saying 


that Mr. Bubis's place at the top of the Free Demo- 
crats’ candidate List was part of 


‘a struggle for the 
normality of Jewish life in Germany." 

Mr. Bubis mulled over whether the commentators 
weren't getting ahead of themselves on the afternoon 
after his victory. He had come to Ber jin for a meeting 
and now, late in the day with his tie loosened and 
collar open, he folded and unfolded his hands. He 
wanted to say something diplomatic, something that 
would keep him admired, respected and, in Helmut 
Kohl's words, beloved. But he clearly did not want 
to run away horn his idea of the truth. 

“Yes, the German papers are happy to show the 
world and themselves that Jews can go into politics 
here. They like that. But I foresee only very few 
Jews becoming part of the political process. Perhaps 
I shouldn't say this, but I'm sure the right-wing 


extremists got an extra point because of me. So I 
mobilized the 


democrats — and I think the right. 


too. 


Normalization? “Everybody says it, but because 
they do, it shows it isn't true. As long as you have to 
talk about it, it hasn't happened. Germany is the 
only country that I know of that knows how many of 
their Nobel Prize winners are Jewish, and this is the 
problem. The language here still divides us into 
Jews and Germans. 

‘ ‘It will take another two generations for things to 
change." he continued. “Nothing that has to do 
with Jewish things is normal here. When the victims 
and those who victimized them are gone, then 
maybe we can start to talk about normalization." 

This comes without particular heat, and almost 
smilingly. Mr. Bubis thinks it may be this approach, 
particularly suited to television, and a willingness to 
speak positively about life in Germany, that has 
brought him his slice of popularity among Germans. 
He is openly pleased that German politicians have 
heaped praise on him,- though occasionally it has 
been of the some-of-my-best-friends-are variety. 
When the embrace is tightest, Mr. Bubis has been 
called “a kind of moral institution." 

In contrast, some younger German Jews have 
made the point that they have no ambitions to be a 
“moral institution," and that normalcy for them in 
Germany would come when they could run for city 
council without any saintly virtues — ambition, 
intelligence and hard work should suffice. 



community, be joined the Free 
Democrats, who have been the ju- 
nior partner with die Christian 
Democratic Union in the governing 
coalition in Bonn since 1982. 

This year, with citizens of other 
European Union countries voting in 
the Frankfurt municipal elections for 
the first time, the party asked Mr. 
Bubis if be would consider bringing 
his image as a particularly reasonable 
man, framed at the head of the Jewish 
community, mm the campaign. 


A! 


Axel Srdcnnui/Thc .Wd-ted Pnm 


Ignatz Bubis tapping his ballot into the box as 
he voted in Frankfurt * When the victims and 
those who victimised them are gone, then maybe 
we can start to talk about normalisation 


In line with this, the best known Jewish political 
figure in the country besides Mr. Bubis is Michel 
Friedman, a lawyer in his 40s. whose quick lip and 
occasionally confrontational style has only the very 
limited admiration of Mr. Bubis. 


H E WAS bom in Poland and survived 
during World War II in a Polish ghetto 
and labor camps while most of his family 
was being murdered by the Nazis. He 
came to Frankfurt in 1956, getting into the jewelry 
business and later real estate. He says he always 
wanted to emigrate, but somehow didn't: "I never 
decided to stay in Germany, but I stayed in Ger- 
many.” 

hi the 1970s, Mr. Bubis was designated “an 
enemy of the people" by radical leftists who ac- 
cused -him- of ru ining - Frankfurt's- West End by 
buying up old brownstones to clear the way for 
high-rise apartment construction. 

A decade later, he and other demonstrators suc- 
ceeded in closing down a production of a play by 
Rainer Werner Fassbinder, revolving around the 
Frankfurt real estate scene, that they contended was 
anti-Semitic. 

Mr. Bubis's national reputation grew out of these 
events. While rising to the leadership of the Jewish 


S CHAIRMAN of the Cen- 
tral Council of Jews in Ger- 
many — a name that trans- 
lated from the German 
embodies all the awkwardness of the 
relationship — Mr. Bubis says he has 
been determined to take another ap- 
proach Than that of Heinz Galinski, 
his best-known predecessor. 

' ‘Galinski never said anything 
was right here. When there are un- 
justified attacks on Germany, I de- 
fend it- 1 shout, too, but not 24 hours 
a day. If there is something positive, 
I say it" 

Mr. Bubis reacts with ease raiher 
than irritation when asked how he 
feels about critics within the Jewish 
community who say he is more a 
“house Jew" than a statesman — a 
mostly tame, establishment appar- 
atchik who too often says what the 
Germans want to hear. For example: 
his view that Germany will not dom- 
inate a united Europe; Mr. Bubis sees 
the country instead as much more of 
a worry to its neighbors outside the 
European Community rhan in 
“fm not expecting that every- 
body will like my way of thinking," 
he says. “Many Jewish people out- 
side Germany only want to hear 
shouting from someone in my job. 

They loved G alinski because he 

never had a good word for anyone 
here. If the French Jews come and complain. I'd tell 
them to look ai the 15 percent Le Pen gets." 

He was referring to Jean-Marie Le Iren, leader of 
the extreme right in France, who is credited with 
commanding about 15 percent of the voter pooL 

The Bubis approach had an illustration the week 
before the election when Mr. Bubis described him- 
self as choosing to respond softly to an article in the 
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeirung, his local news- 
paper, in which Malcolm Rifitind, the British foreign 
secretary, was referred to as * ‘the Jew Rifitind.” 

“The young woman who wrote the article is 28 
years old," be said. "She doesn’t know the dif- 
ference between ‘the Jew Rifitind' and ‘ Riflrin ri, 
who is Jewish*. She didn't understand the dif- 
ference." 

But Mr. Bubis said the German press had not 
quoted his entire response. The papers grabbed the 
smooth part and trimmed the nettle. Referring to the 
reporter’s attempt to link Mr. Rifitind ’s quotation of 
Martm Luther in a speech and the foreign secretary's 
religion, Mr. Bubis insisted, "If a Catholic had said 
what Rifitind did, the reporter would not have called 
him a Catholic. That’s the real problem." 

“Someone asked me during the campaign if I 
was campaigning as this or as that. I told them I was 


running as a Frankfurter." 


Robert Dicke Dies at 80; Theorist 
Predicted the ‘Big Bang Echo 9 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Lower Fares and More Passengers in U.S. 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Robert Dicke, 80, who 
predicted the discovery of the “Big Bang 
echo,' ’ conducted classic experiments m grav- 
ity and for a time was a chief challenger to 
Einstein’s general theory of relativity, died 
Tuesday at his home in Princeton, New Jer- 
sey. 

The cause was complications from Par- 
kinson's disease, said Princeton University, 
where he was the Albert Einstein University 
Professor of Science. 

Mr. Dicke was widely respected both as a 
theorist and as a meticulous experimenter. Nu- 
merous experiments in space and the laboratory 
were devised by him and others to test his 
propositions, including the Brans-Dicke theory 
of gravity. 

He was an early believer in the “Big Bang” 
theory of the creation of the universe, and be 
theorized that a microwave echo of that initial 
explosion might persist to the present day. He 
was building a radio antenna to test that idea 
when two other investigators, Robert Wilson 
and Amo Penzias, discovered the echo by 


accident. They were later awarded a Nobel 
Prize, in which Mr. Dicke did not share, and 
some physicists thought he had been unfairly 
excluded. 

A leading astrophysicist, John Bahcail of the 
Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, said 
Mr. Dicke had "made an incredible range of 
contributions" to many aspects of physics, 
astrophysics and cosmology. 

“The most difficult problem for the Nobel 
committee would have been deciding which 
of his many achievements most wamuited a 
prize," Mr. Bahcail said. 

Lars Bergstrom, 62. an aeronautical wiz- 
ard whose affinity for boats led to numerous 
design innovations in yachts as well as air- 
planes, died Sunday when an experimental 
glider he was testing crashed near Wauchula, 
Florida. 

Huynh Cuong, 72, an ethnic Khmei and 
longtime Communist revolutionary cadre 
who had represented all ethnic groups in the 
Vietnamese National Assembly since 1993, 
died Tuesday in his hometown of Can Tho, 
Vietnam. 


French civil servants planned to go on strike over wage demands 
Thursday, and marches were expected to jam traffic in cities. But public 
transport workers were not part of the 24-hour walkout. (Reuters) 


A ferry carrying 135 people ran aground in the Stockholm ar- 
chipelago at dawn Wednesday while coming from Finland. No injuries 


were reported among the 107 passengers aboard the ferry, the SUja 

Sea T_ " J 


Line's Seawind. 


(AP) 


Nigeria Airways has been barred by British aviation authorities 
from flying to London because the airline's fleet is not insured, Nigerian 
press reports said Wednesday. {AFP) 


A record 26.2 million tourists visited Britain last year, the gov- 
ernment announced Wednesday. (Reuters) 


Netanyahu, in Cairo, 
Gets Chilly Reception 


fflfl 


(l-h 


u 


By John Lancaster 

Washington Pom Service 


CAIRO — Amid a deepening chill in 
Arab- Israeli relations. Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel and Pres- 
ident Hosni Mubarak of Egypt held a 
tense, two-hour meeting here Wednes- 
day that only underscored their sharp 
differences over Israeli plans to build 
housing for Jews in East Jerusalem. 

In a press conference after the meet- 
ing, the two men avoided confronta- 
tional language, emphasizing the his- 
tory of Egypt and Israel as partners in 
the peace process. But Mr. Mubarak, in 
particular, appeared uncomfortable in 
Mr. Netanyahu's presence, at one point 
whipping out a prepared text to con- 
tradict him on a point relating to Israel's 
peace accords with the Palestinians. 

“My fear is it will lead to com- 
plications in the future when they start" 
negotiations over the final status of Je- 
rusalem, he said. Jerusalem, whose east- 
ern half was captured by Israel in the 
1967 war, is claimed by both Pales- 
tinians and Israelis as their natural cap- 
itaL 

The Israeli prime minister was even 
less welcome on the Egyptian street One 


sociazed Press reported from Jerusa- 

icm 

A senior aide to Mr. Netanyahu 
countered that the Palestinians them- 
selves promised to shut down Pales- 
tinian government offices in the city in 
line with the peace accords. “If n*- 
ciprocity is to have any meaning, those 
offices must be closed immediately/ 
said the aide, David Bar-Dan, ' 

The increasingly angry exchanges 
came just ahead of two important dates 
in the peace process — an Israeli troop 
pullback in the West Bank, to be com- 
pleted Friday, and the start of talks orwt 
permanent peace accord by March 152 
On Tuesday, Mr. Netanyahu an- 
nounced that he had ordered four offices 
of the Palestinian Authority operating m 
East Jerusalem to be shut. The Pal- 
estinians want to establish a capital in 
the eastern sector, captured by Israel 
from Jordan in the 1967 war. 

Under the Israeli-Palestinian 
autonomy accords, Yasser Arafat’s 
government may operate only in self- 
rule areas in the west Bank and Gaza 
Strip, but not in East Jerusalem. 

The s tarns of the city is to be de- 
termined in the March 15 talks. 


tirr* 11 ' 1 

jtk- 1*' 1 ' 

fliitf it"' 

utd Lip|»« 


with the headline, ‘The Air is Polluted 
Today. Netanyahu Is in Cairo." 

Mr. Netanyahu’s invitation to meet 
with intellectualsandnewspapereditors 
here chew a tepid response, even from 
those who favor formal contacts with 
their Israeli counterparts. 

"I think that Netanyahu's behavior is 
anti-peace," said Abdel Moneim Said, 
director of the Al Ahram Center for 
Strategic Studies, who turned down an 
invitation to the conclave. ‘ ‘I am willing 
to sit with anyone who wants peace but 
his actions are very destructive, espe- 
cially concerning the latest derision for 
settlements in Al Quds." 

Mr. Said’s comments were striking 
because be has advocated a formal al- 
liance of Arab and Israeli intellectuals, a 
move that many of his Arab counter- 
parts have denounced as treason. 

Given the depth of hostility to Mr. 
Netanyahu in Cairo, some analysts had 
speculated that Mr. Mubarak would find 
a way to postpone his visit, which was 
arranged when the two men met on the 
sidelines of the world economic summit 
meeting in Davos, Switzerland, this 
year. But Mr. Mubarak went ahead with 
the meeting apparently out of concern 
that to do otherwise would add to strains 
in Egypt's relations with the United 
States. Western diplomats said. 

Mr. Mubarak goes to Washington next 
week to meet with President Bill Clinton, 
and an open breach with Israel could 
imperil relations with the U.S. Congress, 
winch approves EgyptYannual package 
of militaiy and economic aid. : J - 

■ Office-Closing Ruling Attacked 

An Israeli decision to close Pales- 
tinian offices in Jerusalem is part of a 
plan to raise tensions and sabotage the 
peace process, senior Palestinian offi- 
cials contended Wednesday, The As- 


UN Is to Name 
James Baker 
To Sahara Post 


f- 


By John Goshko 

Washington Post Service 


WASHINGTON — In a new bid to 
resolve a long dispute over control of the 
Western Sahara, the United Nations 
p lans to name a former U.S. secretary of 
state, James Baker 3d, as a special envoy 
to explore possible compromise settle- 
ments, sources say. 

The appointment by Secretary-Gen- 
eral Kofi Annan, expected to be an- 
nounced soon, would mark Mr. Baker's 
first foray into international diplomacy A 
since he left the State Department to ran * 
President George Bush's unsuccessful 
1992 re-election campaign. 

Mr. Baker developed a reputation as 
an high-profile secretary of state under 
Mr. Bush. He played an important role 
in forging tiie alliance that fought Iraq in 
the Gulf War and in prodding Israel and 
the Palestinians into peace talks. 

By contrast, the Western Sahara dis- 
pute is an obscure issue involving rival 
claims by Morocco, which annexed the 
former Spanish colony in the mid- 
1970s, and guerrillas of the Polisario 
Front, which seeks independence for the 
desert region. To underscore the im- 
portance be attaches to the issue, Mr. 
Annan wanted to name a well-known 
diplomat, people dose to the matter 
said. He also considered Cyras Vance, 
another former U.S. secretary of state, 
and the former U.S. mediator in Bosnia. 
Richard Holbrooke, they said. 


WASHINGTON (NYT) — U.S. air fares declined last year and will 
continue to fall, as airlines cut salaries and travel agency commissions, 
and buy more efficient planes, the Federal Aviation Administration 
predicted Tuesday. 

In its annual assessment of the industry, the agency predicted that air 
travel would continue rapid growth, partly as a result of the lower fares, 
while airplane makers are also expanding, and one is designing a “super- 
jumbo" that would carry more than 700 people. 

The agency said airlines saw a record 69 percent of their seats filled in 
1996, and had profits of $2.7 billion. 


2 Ex-Guards Guilty in Slaying 
Of Youth at Berlin Wall in 1962 


The Associated Press 

BERLIN — Two former East Ger- 
man border guards were convicted 
and given suspended sentences Wed- 
nesday for the notorious 1962 shoot- 
ing of an 18-year-old who bled to 
death at the Berlin Wall. 

Peter Fechrer was shot as be tried to 
flee to the West a year after the East 
German Communists started to build 
the wall to keep their citizens from 
fleeing to the West He lay screaming in 
tiie no-man Viand between as allied 
soldiers and others watched for 50 
minutes before East German soldiers 
hauled his body away. His death 
shocked the world and became a symbol 
of the East German regime's cruelty. 

Rolf Friedrich. 62, and Erich 
Schreiber, 55. were convicted of man- 
slaughter. Mr. Friedrich got 21 months, 
while Mr. Schreiber, a minor at the 
time of (he shooting, got 20 months. 


When the trial opened Monday, both 
mot testified that they did not aim to 
kill Mr. Fech ter on Aug. 17, 1 962, as be ■ 
tried to flee to the West 

Mr. Friedrich and Mr. Schreiber, on- 
patrol at the wail, fired 24 shots from" 
automatic weapons. An East German, 
report read in court said the victim" 
died of massive internal injuries. 

The wall fell Nov. 9. 1989. and 
Germany was united less than a year 
later. Former East German leaders and 
border guards had been tried for 
deaths at the inter-German border, but . 
Mr. Fechter’s case is the most fa- ■ 
mous. 

During the wall’s existence, more £ 
than 500 people were killed trying to 7 
escape across the internal border. 

A German television reponer dis- 
covered the names of Mr. Fechter’s 
alleged killers while sifting through 
files of the Stasi, East Germany's 


§?ERIC 
Jo pi 


AN 


r i 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


WEATHER 




Resort 


Orvtk 
L U 


Mfn. R*l Snow Lost 
Pistes Piste State Snow 


Cn c uwH h 


Resort 


Depth 

L U 


Mtrt. Res. Snow List 
Pistes Pistes State Same 


Comments 


Europe 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by AccuWsather. 


Asia 


Pas de la Casa 
SokJeu 

100 

30 

IK 

m 

Fair 

Fflfr 

Own spring 
stall *ssg 

15/2 
15 12 

at 29 tbs open, nasty goad 

121 tfu opan spang stung 

Austria 

lectigl 

40 

160 

Good 

Opan 

ter 

73/2. 

HI Is open, post about ISOOm 

KjtztnFiel 

0 

BO 

W1 

atah 

heavy 

27)2 

damp condOms dbwfcr 

Lodi 

as 

195 

Good 

duah 

heavy 

2312 

-134 Ms opan. goal qvng stag 

Mayihofen 

60 

70 

Fair 

Oraod 

ter 

4/3 

1 28 ms open gooa atuw laaom 

Obergurgl 

40 

160 

Good 

Open 

ter 

«5 

ai 22 Bts aoen. petes most!/ good 

Sanl&Bch 

30 

55 

Fair 

stall 

heavy 

27/2 

rffeqwivnrigeentfHis 

St. Anton 

40 

270 

Fas 

deh 

homy 

27/2 

132 as open, nm fad 

Canada 

Lake Louise 

IX 

1B0 

Goad 

Opan 

ter 

4/3 

1 12 Gfb open, some gntt skmg 

WWBder 

70 

255 

Good 

Open 

ter 

3/3 


Franc* 

Alpe cTHuez 

no 

250 

Far 

Open 

ter 

270 

74*3 ms apon.OdmtUt Odng 

Lbs Axes 

65 

260 

Good 

start 

ter 

2712 

71/77 mapmimtmttvy 

Avoriaz 

145 

165 

Fas 

stah 

heavy 

27/2 

1 Us opan. Homy ty sferruon 

Chamonix 

20 

310 

Good 

Some 

ter 

27)2 

4699 fts open. iFooing runs Das) 

Courchevel 

110 

I BO 

Good 

slush 

ter 

270 

168 ms open, best abonZmn 

Laa Dewe AJpos 

X 

280 

Good 

stah 

to 

26 a 

163 Us open, good ail tens 

Megeve 

5 

160 

Fw 

stah 

ter 

27C 

mass flte pern* Mw 

M&rlbel 

40 

ISO 

Fuk 

Urti 

ter 

27/2 


La Plagne 

135 

220 

Good 

Opan 

ter 

27/2 

107/113 ms o. test abort 2500m 

SarraChevafior 

60 

210 

Good 

Opan 

ter 

27/2 

70,73 Bis open, pdas mostyGoaa 

■nyiea 

ISO 

ZOO 

Good 

Open 

ter 

Z7Q 

most fto a, some /naafent dang 

vadlaftfe 

in 

225 

F*r 

Opai 

ter 

270 

mam Ms qMn gnm Am Tarkn 

VaJThorene 

in 

220 

Good 

Open 

te* 

2772 

2405 as open. Itut krutapaed 


Italy 

Bonrao 

Cervinla 

Cortina 

Courmayeur 

Uvigna 

Madesimo 

Setva 


10 IBS 
90 350 
15 B0 
30 145 
85 165 
50 345 
15 60 


Good Art Vaf 
Good Open ter 

Far CtoSOd spring 

Good n/a heavy 
Good Open ter 
Good Open ter 
Far Open ter 


2B/2 Bts nn. atm v ZXKtv 
232 4)25 Mb open, gw sprng Otar 
2612 151 fib open AgA ip> 

2312 2K2«sa. Mumgdbim 
2712 eC 30 ms open. 1 but lowest good 
012 IBtl7Uts open good BBtMeh 


Algarve 

AnWBidam 

Arvma 

Athens 


Pei ninny 

Berchtaagaden o 30 
Oberetdorf D 60 


Fan Closed heavy 4/3 S3f (its even : 
Fob Some heavy 4/3 2S3S 


Norway 

Geric 

50 

65 

Good 

Open 

ft*d 

313 

1 1S Bh open. 230km el xcoowy 

Switzerland 

Crane Montana 

15 

250 

Ftf 

stah 

heavy 

27/2 

nmima.yajjjir-— mr 

Davos 

50 

190 

Gold 

Open 

ter 

7712 


Ktoslers 

5 

190 

Good 

Soma 

ter 

20/2 

1 55 0a opan. some great stung 

Mu man 

X 

IX 

Fas 

dudi 

ter 

25/2 

at 12 m open, ween* km down 

Saas Fee 

55 

335 

Good 

Open 

ter 

27/2 

21-76 hte opnrr. gmat spang skSng 

SI. Moritz 

X 

140 

Good 

Open 

ter 

27/2 

IBis opan. pBmmooty good 

Verbier 

35 

200 

Fas 

stah 

heavy 

27/2 

nMst nms opto. nFaaig runs beer 

W*3ngen 

5 

X 

Fas 

stah 

tei 

27/2 

120 Bit open, wanmsta 

Zermatt 

25 

230 

Good 

tUi 

ter 

7712 

63/73 Bte open. stBmastyGood 

UJS. 

Aspen 

IK 

IX 

Good 

Open 

vw 

4/3 

hlBr 

Bracken ridge 

175 

215 

Good 

Opan 

P»rt 

4* 


Crested BuUe 

175 

195 

Good 

Opan 

ter 

vs 

1 13 Ota. good comes ttwouspout 

Mammoth 

330 

450 

Good 

Opm 

ter 

3/3 

23/30 ms open, more ijraaf sUng 

Park City 

200 

295 

Good 

Open 

Uv 

4/3 

a«M Mb and as safe open 

VaU 

200 

230 

Good 

Open 

ter 

4/3 

29 Mi and J6*4 aim optn 

Whiter Park 

170 

205 

Good 

Open 

ter 

4/3 



I3S& 

Qrtan 

fSSET 


London 


Munich 


Hor-UJ: Deptn n an ai toner era i*pur dopes. Mtn. Pistes Uountatnaae pats. Rea. Plates Ruts 
i&dmg to resort vCaga. Art. ArtifcH Bins 


o*o 

Sb* 

Venice 


Wausau 

Zurich 


Today 

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9M6 307 » 

6/46 2/39 pc 

22/71 11/52 ■ 
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5M8 QM3 pc 
17*2 SMS pc 
10/50 1/34 sh 

0M6 205 r 

409 -3/27 an 
la/ss aaet 
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25/77 7/44s 

14*7 1050 c 
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6/43 4/39 r 
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6/43 -1*1 1 
14*7 B43s 
11*2 409*1 
1/34 -3/29 SO 
16*1 8M6 sh 
3/37 -1/31 an 
0U3 -203 DC 

tarea s*7c 

408 -007 «i 
12*3 6/43 r 

BMB 408 r 
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21/70 
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21/70 
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13*5 
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*V43 pc 
5/43 po 
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S/43 po 
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11*2 4 
6/41 f 
2*5 eh 
4/39 c 
4*9 s 
5MT pc 
1*4 pc 
7/44 pc 
16*1 pc 
12*3 pa 
409 S 
6/46 pc 
7M4 pc 

4*9 pc 

-4/25 an 
3/37 pc 
6/46 r 
-4/28 a 
409 a 
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-1*1 0 
307 PC 
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104 pc 
SMI pc 



Today 

Low* 
OF OF 
31*8 23173 r 
34*3 24ms 
TOGO 1/34 s 


North America 
MBd and dry In the South- 
ansi, white chBUsrttun nor- 
mal weather grips New 
England through the week- 


end. A storm movin^lnto 


the Plains Friday should 
affect the Great Lakes Oils 
wookend. Stormy in lha 
Northwest Friday, then 
gradually drying out over 
the weekend. 


Europe 

A front could bring shower* 
to the British Isles. Includ- 
ing London and Amster- 
dam Friday: otherwise, 
mainly dry weather and 
near- to well-above tern- 
pereiuree will prevail 
across much of Europe. 
However, unseated weath- 
er wffl remain Dm role over 
much ol Scandinavia. 


Asia 

Mainly dry and milder In 


Belflng through tha week- 
end. Seoul wto s 


stay mostly 

dry. txil cfiity through Sat- 
urday. Mild and unsettled 
in Tokyo Friday, then turn- 
ing dry. but coaler this 
weekend. Seasonably 
warm and humid In Hong 
Kong and Singapore. 




!•**» 

Tovyo 



:- ’■ hi". 


29*4 13*5 pc 
30*6 23 m or 
34*3 24/75 s 
3301 24/75 B 
1QS0 1*4 r 
22/71 iaWe 
31*8 24/75 oc 
23/73 17*2 pc 
17*2 6/46 ] 

24/75 17*2 pc 


Africa 



North America 


Algiers 

Cap* Town 


-2/29 1 
7/44 pc 


SlfeilN 


And information on over 100 of the world's leading ski resorts online 

Planning your ski trip? 


Internet - hTto y/stk 


615 connect 


Middle East 


AhuOnob 27*0 14*7 e S 8 /B 2 1 M 6 s 

Seme 14*7 4*9 pc 11*2 4 *es 

Case 17*2 6/43 pc 16*4 6 M 3 a 

Damascus 1060 - 1*1 e 7/44 -® 27 e 

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Luxor 24/79 6/43 B 24/76 GM 3 s 

npHtl 26/70 11/52 fl 26/79 11 * 2 * 



Today 

Tonxxrow 




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20*8 

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22/71 


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Memo City 23/73 8 m 6 c 
nortaJansim 82*8 24 / 7 S 1 
Santiago 26*2 11*2 b 


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Priiued by Newsfax International, London. Registered as a newspaper at the post office. 




PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 



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Fund-Raiser Used Access to Seek Lawmaker’s Aid on Banking Issues 


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By Dan Morgan 

„ Washington Post S, n !.-~ 

^«WlSU H^ali SSlSSSrtE 

partmeni to seek concrete help on serSbmk- 

fr ° m % member of Congress. 

.-Mr. Huang is a former banker who worked for 

«5wn*«S u fP° F™ U P “"E'“ 

rC 8, 1 When he was raising money 

for the Democratic National Committee, he 


Starr Studies 
links Between 
White House 
And Lippo 


By Susan Schmidt 
and Sharon LaFraniere 

Washin£ron Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Whitewater 
independent counsel, Kenneth Starr, 
Eas subpoenaed the White House for 
information on 20 individuals and en- 
tities connected to an Indonesian con-, 
glomerate that made a payment to Web- 
ster Hubbeli. a key figure in the White- 
water investigation. 

The White House counsel's office 
sent out a memo Tuesday instructing 
employees to search their files for vari- 
ous names, many of which appear to be 
'related to the Lippo Group, which once 
employed John Huang. Mr. Huang is the 
-principal figure in another investigation 
.that has embroiled President Bill Clin- 
ton's administration: the campaign 
r fund-raising controversy. 


asked Representative Joseph Kennedy 2d, 
Democrat of Massachusetts and a member of the 
House Banking and Financial Services Com- 
mittee. to look into delays In the Federal Re- 
serve's approval of an application by a Taiwan 
government-owned bunk to open a bank in 
Southern California. 

The previous May 18. when Mr. Huang was a 
deputy assistant secretary of commerce, he got a 
meeting with Mr. Kennedy for himself and some 
Asian- American businessmen and bankers con- 
cerned about the effect of fair-lending laws on 
community banks in the New York City area. 


Neither approach yielded results, according to 
Mr. Kennedy and his staff. He said he dropped 
the matter of the California bank application 
after having a staff worker make one perfunctory 
telephone call to the Federal Reserve System. 
The application, for First Commercial Bank, was 
approved almost a year later. 

Mr. Kennedy left early during the meeting on 
lending policy after telling Mr. Huang and the 
others that he could not support any exemptions 
to the Community Reinvestment Act. The act is 
designed to protect minority borrowers. Amend- 
ments sponsored by Mr. Kennedy in 1989 


toughened the act by requiring hanks to disclose 
their lending patterns by race and sex. 

Even though the approaches yielded no re- 
sults, they provide evidence of Mr. Huang's 
occasional pursuit of a commercial agenda. 

Since the late 1980s. Mr. Huang, relatives, 
friends in the Asian- American community and 
employees of Lippo have contributed tens of 
thousands of dollars to House and Senate cam- 
paigns. in addition to the funds that have gone to 
the Democratic Party. 

U.S. -based employees of the Lippo Group, 
including Mr, Huang and his wife, have con- 


tributed $10,100 to Mr. Kennedy since 1989. 
After the fund-raising dispute erupted, Mr. 
Kennedy directed that all the money be returned. 

It was unclear who asked Mr. Huang to in- 
tervene with Mr. Kennedy. The First Commer- 
cial Bank's Los Angeles attorney. Patrick Fields, 
said he had never met Mr. Huang and was 
unaware of any discussion with Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Fields said he knew of no connection 
between the bank and the Lippo financial or- 
ganization. Mr. Huang is not listed as a lobbyist 
or foreign agent for Fust Commercial, in which 
the Taiwan regime holds a 51 percent stake. 



POLITICAL 


U i ir o 



soup 

when he was considering whether to 
■plead guilty to fraud charges brought by 
.Mr. Starr and cooperate in the inves- 
tigation. Mr. Hubbeli resigned as as- 
-.seriate U.S. attorney general after ad- 
7 ; nutting he had overbilled clients at his 
daw practice in Arkansas, and prose- 
cutors were seeking his cooperation 
,-Wben he took a job with Lippo. 

•; He has acknowledged receiving pay- 
ments, including an undisclosed sum 
-from Lippo, during this period, but in 
f questioning before a congressional pan- 
el last year he refused to say what ser- 
. vices be had performed. 

I • Mr. Starr’s office has been trying to 
determine whether that payment and 
.others- to ,Mr. HqbbeU had; ,-beeq pr 7 
•phesfcated by the White House to try to 
rfcwy his silence on Whitewater matters 
.and obstruct the investigation. : 

. •• A parade of witnesses, including Mr. 
TJubbell. has been brought before a 
4 grand jury in Little Rock, Arkansas, over 
, the past five months to answer questions 
[about various payments to Mr. Hubbeli, 
.whom Mr. Clinton and his wife, (fillary 
Rodham Clintoa, have long counted 
among their closest friends. 

Mr. Hubbeli was once a colleague of 

■ Mrs. Clinton's at the Rose law firm in 
‘ Little Rock. 

A Among there named on the subpoena 
“*is Charles de Queljoe, a na tu ra l ized 

• American who is -president of Lippo 
; Securities, a Los Angeles affiliate of 

■ Lippo Group. 

‘ Also listed are David Yeh of Lippo 
; Realty Inc., a major donor to the Demo- 

■ cratic National Committee; Jose Hanna, 

I director of legal and corporate affairs 

• for Lippo, and Gordon Chen Ah-kum, a 

■ director of lippo Group. 

; Others on the subpoena include 

• Steven Riady, a merabCT of the family 

■ that controls Lippo Group, and two men 

• from Arkansas who have done business 

■ with the conglomerate and have long- 
standing ties to the Clintons — C. 

; Joseph Giroir Jr. and Mark Grobmyer. 


Hide Vtlkutg/Rraro* 

Mr. Lott, backed by the Senate’s Republicans, voicing his support for a balanced budget amendment. 

Doomed Amendment Meets Its Fate 


By Brie Plan in and Helen Dewar 

Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — The Senate’s re- 
jection of a proposed balanced budget 
amendment to the U.S. Constitution was 
the second time in three years that the 
measure had failed by a single vote, with 
President Bill Clinton and the Demo- 
crats prevailing in arguing that it would 
jeopardize Social Security and that it 
was not needed to eliminate deficits. 

Once a rallying cry for tbe Repub- 
licans, the amendment has lost much of 
fts : jwnrf}.as &e_ federal deficit, has de- 
clined sharply in reamt years and White 
House and Republican negotiators inch 
toward a possible balanced budget this 
year. 

Republican proponents insisted that 
passage of the amendment was essential 
to forcing Congress and the White 
House to balance tbe budget for tbe fust 
time in 28 years. The Senate majority 
leader, Trent Lott, cited a Congressional 
Budget Office study showing Mr. Clin- 
ton's own balanced budget plan would 
fall far short of its goal and declared, “If 
we’re not prepared to step up and pass 
this constitutional amendment now. 
we're admitting that it's not going to 
happen any time soon." 

Democratic opponents said that de- 
spite Republican rhetoric, a budget 
could be negotiated without tampering 
with the constitution. “If we don’t have 
tiie courage to do what’s right we don’t 
belong here.” said Senator Patrick 
Leahy, Democrat of Vermont. 

The Senate vote Tuesday was 66 to 
34 in favor of tbe amendment, one vote 
short of the two-thirds' majority re- 
quired for a constitutional amendment 
All 55 Republicans joined with 11 
Democrats to support tbe measure. 

Senates- Paul Sarbanes, Democrat of 
Maryland, said a Republican refusal to 


compromise led to the defeat of die 
amendment “Apparently, they decided 
early on that they were not going to 
accommodate legitimate concerns," he 
said. 

Once they made that decision, he 
said, it was impossible to round up 
enough Democratic votes to pass the 
amendment 

The amendment the cornerstone of 
the Republican congressional agenda, 
would require a balanced budget by 
2002 and every year after that and per- 
mit exemptions only if approved by a 
threerfifths’ majority, in both h_ 

Mr. 'Clinton pronounced ! 
pleased by the vote and used the op- 
portunity to ask, Congress again to work 
with him on a plan to balance tbe budget 
without rewriting the constitution. 

“The constitutional amendment 
could have caused or worsened reces- 
sions, permitted a minority of legis- 
lators to hold the nation's credit- wor- 
thiness hostage, involved unelected 
judges in spending and tax policy and 
threatened Social Security and other vi- 
tal benefits," he said. 

Though tempers grew frayed as the 
final vote approached, the outcome was 
foreordained last week when two fresh- 
men Democrats, Tim Johnson of South 
Dakota and Robert Torricelli of New 
Jersey, announced their opposition to 
the measure, despite their support for it 
while they served in the House. 

Mr. Johnson and Mr. Torricelli said 
they changed their minds after conclud- 
ing the amendment would provide in- 
adequate safeguards for the Social Se- 
curity retirement trust fund and because 
it would hobble tbe government in deal- 
ing with economic and national security 
crises and maintaining the nation's in- 
frastructure. 

Even without the turnabout, the Re- 
publicans' chances from the start were 


slim at best after Mr. Clinton and Demo- 
crats made it dear they would play the 
Social Security card. 

Democrats asserted that with a Re- 
publican-engineered balanced budget 
amendment in place. Congress would 
be forced to dip into the Social Security 
trust fund or reduce monthly benefits to 
meet the constitutionally mandated goal 
of balancing the budget. 

Republicans attacked this as “scare 
tactics" to frighten the elderly and baby 
boomers who will begin retiring early in 
the next century, but the tactics worked. 


Clinton Backs Bill 
To Limit Gun Sales 

WASHINGTON — President Bill 
Clinton appealed Wednesday for mea- 
sures to damp down on gun sales to 
foreigners, less than two weeks after a 
Palestinian went on a killing spree 
atop the Empire State Building. 

Flanked by state troopers and 
Democratic lawmakers in the Oval 
Office, he urged the passage of a 
Senate bill that would make it illegal 
for nonimmigrant foreigners to carry 
or buy firearms. He also announced 
new proof-of-residency requirements 
for legal aliens buying guns. 

The new rules would require a 
photo identification and some other 
proof, such as utility bills, that die 
applicant had been in the country for 
three months. (AP) 

Chairmen Vow Fotes 
On Lake and Pena 

WASHINGTON —Two embattled 
nominees to the Clinton cabinet 
moved closer to confirmation hear- 
ings. with Republican committee 
chairmen promising to schedule vores 
on both in the next few days] 

The chairman and vice chairman of 
the Senate intelligence committee an- 
nounced Tuesday that the March 1 1 
confirmation bearing for Anthony 
Lake, the CIA director-designate, 
would take place as scheduled Senator 
Frank Murkow&ki, Republican of 
Alaska and chairman of the Energy 
and Natural Resources Committee, 
said he would schedule a committee 
vote on Federico Pena, the energy sec- 
retary-designate, on Thursday. 

Mr. Lake's nomination had been 
stalled over a dispute with the in- 
telligence panel over access to his 
complete FBI background file; Mr. 


Pena's was delayed by a debate over 
nuclear- waste disposal. <WP) 

Reno Says 168 Felons 
ffbn Citizenship 

WASHINGTON — Attorney Gen- 
eral Janet Reno says the Clinton ad- 
ministration awarded citizenship to at 
least 168 immigrants last year who 
had been convicted of felonies that 
should have disqualified them. 

But that number could grow by 
several hundred or thousands in com- 
ing weeks once a Justice Department 
audit is completed, administration of- 
ficials said. 

The figures Ms. Reno gave a House 
panel Tuesday result from a review of 
10,800 people who were arrested for 
felonies but were granted citizenship 
anyway between August 1995 and 
September 1996. While the 168 
wrongly naturalized immigrants rep- 
resent fewer than 2 percent of the 
felony arrests, they are eight times the 
number of people whose citizenship is 
normally revoked in any given year. 

Auditors are also reviewing the re- 
cords of an additional 180,000 im- 
migrants who became citizens before 
the checks for criminal records were 
completed. (NYT) 

Quote / Unquote 

Oirin Hatch, Republican of Utah 
and tbe Senate Judiciary Committee 
chairman, attacking the president for 
opposing the balanced budget amend- 
ment while displaying a “lack of fis- 
cal integrity" in his own plan to bal- 
ance the budget by 2002; “What kind 
of a fool does be think we are?" 

Michael McCurry. the White 
House spokesman, in reply: “If they 
don’t like our budget, they ought to 
have the decency to produce one of 
their own.” (APi 


t 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


Accents Disappearing 
FOvahHeaah, OvaJh Theaah 

On the hill farms, in the small towns 
and ot the back roads of Vermont, the 
way people talk is changing. **K»ow 
is being replaced by “cow. the L 
is returning to Milton and Randolph, 
and “might” is turning into right. 

Ask Roy Ingalls. 81 1 . who hasspent 
his life in an 1820s farmhouse near 
Irasburg, to say. “The farm nght here 

is! Nacres.” It c 9 m f® n ou f ^ ~ £?! 
r fehm roighi heaah is 150 akus. But 

P the young girl at ^ store ^ own . 

C-sireet^lSthe relativel) 
fc English found across the Nonbeast. 

* Africans' mobility and t J^.^ e 
eneft of television play a rolemfte 
tread away front local accen , 

Away From Politics 

• The Ohio 

in Kentucky btgher than y i^isville, the state’s 

•At least 858 

to7*$ Fd®* ™ 

activity. 

accepting more recruits 
I as publicity about a rash 
combined with contzo- 


guage experts say. But regional ac- 
cents. they say, tend to stay and con- 
solidate. 

Rural accents are generally less pro- 
nounced in younger women, who 
work more often in service jobs, than 
in older men. But few young Ver- 
monters will have accents as thick as 
Mr. Ingalls, when he tells a story; “I 
went ovah to Maine deah huntin' for 
quite a few yeahs . . ." 

Short Takes 

In Las Vegas, a 9-year-old has 
been arrested, searched and charged 
with a felony for writing his name in 
wet concrete. A not-gufity plea was 
entered Tuesday for Jeremy Ander- 
son, who is charged with malicious 
destruction of property. In November, 
Jeremy and some friends were return- 
ing from school when a construction 
worker asked if they wanted to write 
their names in a freshly poured side- 
walk, says Jeremy. He ana his friends 
did so. A few weeks later, tbe con- 
tractor contacted his mother, Barbara 


Anderson, saying she owed 511,000 
because the company would have to 
redo the sidewalk. She refused to pay. 
Then on Jan. 28, when Jeremy didn't 
come home, his frantic mother learned 
that policemen had come to tbe school 
and taken him away. In Nevada, the 
police can arrest anyone 8 years and 
older for a crime, and property crimes 
above $5,000 are considered felonies. 
The other children are younger than 8. 
Jeremy may be 9, but he doesn’t quite 
understand why he is in trouble. Said 
his mother, “It’s a tragedy." 

Rosie Lee Hill thought she bad 
been ripped off, so site called tbe 
police. Her complaint, according to 
officers in Pensacola. Florida, was tbai 
someone had sold her fake crack co- 
caine. Tbe police say that when an 
officer arrived, she showed him two 
“rocks” tiiat sl« said lasted like bak- 
ing soda. The officer agreed with her 
taste-test, but found that the stuff was 
real crack. He arrested Ms. Hill, 35, for 
illegal possession. 

Iiuermtionai Herald Tribune 




versy over the so-called Gulf War illness, has hurt re- 
cruiting, The army says it is also having difficulties luring 
young people away from opportunities in business and 
higher education. CAP) 

•la the Democratic mayoral primary in St Louis, 
Missouri, a former police chief, Clarence Hannon, defeated 
the incumbent, Freeman Bosley Jr. Both candidates were 
black, but the contest had strong racial overtones in a city 
almost evenly divided between blacks and whites. (AP) 

• A shoot-out in Chicago’s Cabrini-Green housing pro- 
ject between residents and the police left four residents 
wounded. Tbepolice said the incide or began after a crowd 
a t tacked an officer who was chasing a suspect A woman 
was shot in the chest when someone in the crowd tried to 
seize the policeman’s gun, which went off. Gunfire be- 
tween the police and residents in high-rises ensued. (AFP) 



In a year's time it will be a Rolex. 

Every Rolex begins its life as a solid ingot of 18ct. gold, 
platinum, or stainless steel. Not until a full year later, with its 
self-winding movement beating safely within its Oyster t 

..i.i j c it • » * ROLEX 

case, will it be ready tor a figsmi nretimes service. afGtneva 




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ASIA/PACIFIC 


Chinese Leadership Moves to Pacify 2 Key Constituencies 

More Money for Army and Job Creation 


BRIEFLY 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Post Service 


BEIJING — China will increase of- 
ficial military spending by 12.7 percent 
this year and set aside $3.6 billion to help 
find jobs for people who are laid off in the 
restructuring of state-owned industries. 

The budget allocations, revealed dur- 
ing the annual two-week session of the 
National People’s Congress, are part of an 
effort by China 's leaders to pacify sol- 
diers ana state workers — two powerful 
and potentially disruptive constituencies 
that depend on government support. 

The sentiments of those groups will 
be crucial as the leadership in Beijing 
seeks to maintain political and social 
stability following die death last month 
of Deng Xiaoping, and in the period 
before an important Communist Party 
congress next fall. 

The workers in particular could be 
sorely tested by state-owned companies 
that are seeking to lay off up to a third of 
their employees. In the first nine months 
of last year, losses at state firms soared 
by 45 percent. 

The People's Daily on Tuesday 
quoted Jiang Zemin, the president and 
Communist Party chief, as telling the 
legislature: “China's state-owned en- 


Finance Chief 
Out in Seoul 
Shake- 


Up 


By Kevin Sullivan ‘ 

Washington Post Service 


TOKYO — President Kim Young 
Sam of South Korea replaced eight cab- 
inet ministers Wednesday, including his 
powerful finance minister, in a major 
reshuffle designed to distance hims elf 
from a sluggish economy and a massive 
financial scandal. 

The cabinet shake-up had been 
widely expected following Mr. Kim’s 
nationally televised apology last week 
for a scan dal that caused die bankruptcy 
of Hanbo Steel & General Construction 
Co., foe nation’s second-largest steel- 
maker. 

While Mr. Kim was not accused of 
any wrongdoing in the affair. 10 people, 
including several of his close associates, 
were indicted in a scandal laden with 
allegations of political corruption. 

Opposition politicians allege that of- 
ficials in Mr. Kim’s government took 
kickbacks to pressure banks to make 
loans to Hanbo that far exceeded foe 
company’s ability to repay. 

I * They allege that Hanbo, which faded 
[ 'under almost $6 billion in unpaid loans, 
ifoas been a major campaign contributor 
j ^to Mr. Kim. 

The president apologized for the 
I -scandal, and for any role his son, Kim 
■Tlyon Chid, 38. might have played in 

Opposition politicians have alleged 
;that the younger Kim was the mas- 
termind of the bribes-for-loans scheme, 
ibut he has been cleared by prosecutors 
lof wrongdoing in foe affair. 

• The scandal has badly damaged Mr. 
HCira only eight months before the next 
^presidential election. 

• Although presidents are limited to a 
Single five-year term, Mr. Kim hopes to 
jbave an important role in choosing his 
’party's nominee to succeed him. Ana- 
lysts say die scandal has left foe im- 
• popular president as little more than a 
3ame duck for the remainder of his 
term. 

* On Wednesday, Mr. Kim chose a 
^political veteran, Kang Kyong Shik, 60, 
to replace Finance Minister Han Seung 
Soo, who has taken much of the blame 
Tor the slumping economy. Mr. Kang 
-served as finance minister in 1982 and 
J1983 under President Chun Doo 
•Hwan. 

« Mr. Kim also replaced his ministers 
Jar trade, construction and transporta- 
tion, science and technology, home af- 
fairs, justice, culture and sports. 

* The new appointments follow Mr. 
“Kim ’s selection T uesday of a new prime 
'minister, chief of staff and three other 
•top aides. 


terprises control foe lifeline of the na- 
tional economy and play a dominant role 
in national economic development. 

But be added: “The traditional in- 
dustrial structure and foe traditional 
product mix are no longer suited for foe 
change from a sellers' to a buyers’ mar- 
ket. This has become an outstanding 
issue in our economic life." 

The increase in official military 
spending, to S9.7 billion, will easily 
outstrip the inflation rate, which 
dropped to 6 percent last year and which 
Prime Mini ster U Peng has vowed to 
drive down further. The allocation 
would put military spending at about 10 
percent of state spending and about l .5 
percent of gross national product 

“That is in line with past increases," 
said David Shambaugh, director of foe 
Sigur Center of East Asian Studies at 
George Washington University. “Since 
1988, Chinese military spending has 
been increasing at double-digit percent- 
ages. That’s significant because it 
comes at a time when other militaries are 
building down after the rad of the Cold 
War." But foe amount still pales beside 
foe size of foe U.S. military budget — 
$256.6 billion for this fiscal year. 

Mr. Shambaugh and other analysts said 
the change in actual military spending 
was difficult to measure because so much 
of it was kept outside the official budget. 
They estimated that China's spending on 
its mili tary ran four to five times as high as 
foe official budget figure. 

While the official budget mostly goes 
for salaries, food, housing and fuel, the 
hidden military budget covers weapons 
procurement and the bulk of research 
and development 

Mr. Shambaugh estimated that as 
much as 75 percent of the military’s 
research and development program was 
conducted through foe state Science and 
Technology Commission and govem- 
ment-run institutes. 

He also estimated that other money ' 
covered about 75 percent of the military 
budget for weapons purchases. That 
money comes from five companies that 
once were part of the Ministry of Ma- 
chine Building Industry, but now are 
incorporated as separate enterprises. 

Despite their corporate names, the 
entities still fall under the supervision of 
foe State Council, or cabinet The 
companies (krai with electronics, ord- 
nance, nuclear technology, shipbuilding 
and aeronautics and astronautics. 

‘ 'It’s a bureaucratic sleight of hand, 1 ’ 
Mr. Shambaugh said. He estimated that 
actual spending on the armed forces is 
about $36 billion. 

The International Institute of Stra- 
tegic Studies estimates the real military 
budget to be $32 billion. That would still 
leave China below Japan's military 
spending of about $50 billion a year. 

“Is foal threatening?’ ' Mr. Sham- 
baugh asked. “If you’re trying to im- 
prove housing, salaries, dietary intake 
and equipment, it isn’t much.” 


■J ; 'ir?w . 

*“1 *-c} 



PLEA IN BEIJING — A Muslim woman of the Hoi minority of Xinjiang calling for peace in the province 
with a poster in Chinese and Arabic. China said Wednesday that it had arrested several suspects and solved 
three bomb attacks that killed nine people and wounded 74 last week in the restive far western region. 


Peace in Korea Could Bring Troop Cuts 

If North Is Tamed, U.S. Might Alter Its Military Posture Across Asia 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 


SINGAPORE — A peaceful reso- 
lution to tensions on the Korean Pen- 
insula could result in cuts in foe 100,000 
U.S. troops in Asia and other changes in 
America's military posture there, par- 
ticularly in Japan, analysts say. 

One possibility, they say, would be to 
withdraw the U.S. Marine contingent 
from Japan, which consists of 20,000 of 
foe 47.000 U.S. milhaiy personnel sta- 
tioned in the country. At the same time, 
the powerful U.S. naval force there 
would be retained and the number of 
combat aircraft could be increased. 

A troop reduction would help temper 
opposition in Japan, especially on foe 
southern island of Okinawa, to the pres- 
ence of the U.S. military. 

President Bill Clinton has assured 
Asia that Washington will maintain 
about 100,000 troops in foe Pacific. But 
U.S. officials have caused unease in Asia 
by indicating that cuts in military spend- 
ing might farce them to trim manpower. 

Despite the opposition in Okinawa, 
Asian 


an editorial: “Any drawdown az this 
is bound to send foe wrong signals, 
it cannot bin suggest an inward- 
looking" America. 

Jusuf Wanandi, chairman of the su- 
pervisory board of foe Center for Stra- 
tegic and International Studies in Singa- 
pore, said Wednesday that improve- 
ments in technology and logistical sup- 
port could enable U.S. farces in Asia to 
maintain their effectiveness with smal- 
ler manpower and at lower cost. 

But he said the real crunch would 
probably only come in the next five or 
six years if there was a “relatively 
peaceful" reconciliation or reunifica- 
tion between North and South Korea. 

“It would then be a certainty that foe 
presence of 100,000 U.S. troops in East 
Asia would not continue,” be said. 

The Marines are based in Japan partly 
to provide rapid reinforcement for foe 
36,000 U.S. soldiers in South Korea to 
defend against an attack by the North. 

“If and as foe North Korean threat 
fades, foe importance of keeping U.S. 
Marines on Okinawa would seem likely 
to fade as weU,*’-Zafanay Khaliizad and 
David Ochmanek, analysts at Rand 


scape in East Asia, and one that could be 
sustained at less economic and political 
cost than today." 

In the latest issue of Survival, a 
published by the International 
of Strategic Studies in London, 


many Asian governments regard the 
U.S. presence as critical for peace and Corp.. wroteirL a magazine articled ‘The 
stability intbe region. net result would be a posture better 

The Straits Times in Singapore said in suited to foe emerging strategic land- 


foe two former senior Pentagon strategists 
wrote that of the three areas outside foe 
United States where large American 
forces were stationed — Asm, Europe and 
foe Gulf — “Asia is perhaps the most 

They said that the growfoofcfmiese 
economic and military power “and, 
with ii, uncertainty about how Beijing 
might seek to pursue its interests in Asia 
and beyond" made it essential for 
Washington to maintain a viable mil- 
itary presence in East Asia fen- many 
years to come. 

The two analysts argued that one re- 
latively inexpensive strategy for the 
United States would be to increase foe 
number of aircraft in Northeast Asia and 
send them more regularly to Southeast 
Asia for training and exercises with the 
air forces of countries in foe region. - 

“Such operations would unambigu- 
ously signal foe U.S. capability and in- 
tention to defend its interests in East 
Asia, along with those of its allies," they 
added 


North Koreans Try 
To ReachDefector 


BEUING — North Korean 
agents tried to enter the South 
Korean Consulate in Beijing where 
a top defector has taken refuge, 
diplomats said Wednesday. 

Shots were fired but the attempt 


failed, the diplomats 

Security has since been further 
strengthened around the consulate 
building where Mr. Hwang took 


refuge on Feb. 12, witnesses said. 

The diplomats said three or four 
men scaled foe wall of foe Burmese 
Embassy and crossed foe garden to 
get dose to the Congo .Embassy, 
next door to foe South Korean Con- 
sulate. The men were seen by police 
officers, who evened fire, probably 
in the air. to scare them off, the 
diplomats said.. . . , ... _fA FPJyj 


Cambodian Foes 
In Show of Amity 


PHNOM PENH — After months 
of fending that has led to factional 
violence, Cambodia’s two prime', 
ministers staged a sfaow of unity 
Wednesday by anwwting an in- 
formal luncheon together. •' 

“Both prime ministers have 

c ommi tted th ems elves fo. returning ^ 

to the past," said Hun Sen, second 
prime minister. He apparently was 
referring to 1993 to 1995, when' 
cooperation between his once com- - 


munist Cambodian People's Party 
arty Fun 


"uncmpec ‘ 


and the royalist party 
was at its height. 

“It is not enough to embrace' 
three times a day, but five times a- 
day,' ' be said after a cabinet lunch- 
eon. The first mime minister and" 
president of Funcinpec, Prince' 
Norodom Ranariddh, looked on’ 
smiling, and said that a continu- 
ation of tension between the two- 
’s con-' 
(AFP) 


les 


in the country. 


Burmese Dissident 
Accuses Military 


RANGOON — The Burmese 
dissident Daw Aung San Suu Kyi ‘ j 
says foe military has intensified ef-. j 
farts to crush her political party with 
threats, arrests and abductions. • 
She said that in addition to in-^ 
rimidating members of the National' 
League for Democracy wto refuse to 
resign, the army two weeks ago ab- 
ducted 12 party officials, including a ‘ 
deputy chairman whose body was 
later round by the side of a road. 

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, winner- 
of foe 1991 Nobel Peace Prize for 
her nonviolent campaign fordemo- 
cracy, called the military’s actions 
erode, inhuman conduct " (AP) 


V 

& KeU : 

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dear 'V 


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4 !: 


BIKINI: After 40 Years, Almost Unspoiled 


Continued from Page I 


ever since the United States evicted them 
in 1946 — are now considering whether 
to return. 

“It’s so beautiful here,' ’ said Edward 
Maddison, a Bikinian who is helping run 
a new scuba diving program for for- 
eigners on Bikini. 

“Sometimes I bring my family here, 
and my kids love to swim in the lagoon 
because it's so clean. 

“Every time I go back, people ask me 
what it’s like, if it's safe to come back to 
Bikini. If it's safe, we’ll be coming 
back.” 

The Marshall Islanders were in effect 
guinea pigs during the nuclear testing, 
and Western doctors still examine them 
to determine foe delayed effects of ra- 
diation. 

But this time, the Bikini islanders say 
with a smile, it is they who are con- 
ducting the experiment: Which means 
that they stand back and monitor foe 
results as wealthy Western tourists visit 
foe island. 

41 We’re very curious about the effects 
on those people," said Johnny Johnson, 
a Bikinian now living in Majuro, the 
capital of foe Marshall Islands. 

Bikini became a household name 
around the world in 1946 when the 


United States announced that it would 
test nuclear weapons on the atoll. The 
countdown for the first explosion was 
broadcast around the world, vast sum- 
plies of film were used to record foe 
mushroom cloud, and Godzilla was said 
to have risen from Bikini lagoon after 
being disturbed by foe explosions. 

A skimpy new bathing suit for women 
was just coming on foe market then in 
France, and its makers called it the 
bikini, advertising it as the world's smal- 
lest and hoping perhaps to suggest foe 
shocking effect of a nuclear blast. 

Over foe next 12 years, 22 more atom- 
ic bombs or hydrogen bombs were det- 
onated here. 

One hydrogen bomb dropped over 
Bikini in 1954 was the most powerful 
explosion ever detonated by the United 
States, equivalent to 750 Hiroshima- 
type bombs, it vaporized one islet and 
part of two others, and it showered ra- 
dioactive particles on Marshallese living 
on other atolls. 

So foe testing left Bikini deserted. 

“It was really bad for foe Bikinians, 
but anything trad can be turned into 
something good," said Fabio Amaral, a 
Brazilian who runs foe Bikini dive pro- 
gram along with Mr. Maddison and an 
American, Scott Homan. It is precisely 
the enforced desertion of Bikini, he 



THAILAND: Financial Crisis Deep ens 


Continued from Page 1 


TbcNew YoA Tana 



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Living in the U.S.? 


noted, that has made it such a gem 
today. 

“This is a wilderness,” he added. 
“This place hasn’t been touched in 40 
years." 

A large sea turtle made the point a 
moment later, lazily swimming in shal- 
low water a few feet off the beach. 
Schools of fish dart about foe coral, and 
Bikinians are also trying to set up a 
sports fishing program to attract Amer- 
icans interested in catching bonefish and 
other game fish. 

Despite nervous jokes about how the 
Bikini landing strip has no need for 
runway lights, the sea and wind have 
long since dispersed almost all of foe 
radioactivity, according to extensive 
testing. 

Indeed, Bikini now has less back- 
ground radiation than some American 
cities. The problem is that foe ground 
still contains cesium-137, a radioactive 
substance, and this is concentrated in the 
coconuts and other normally edible 
fruits grown on Bikini. 

A small group of Bikinians sent back 
to Bikini in the early 1970s had to be 
evacuated in 1978 because their diet of 


The release of a central bank state- 
ment late Tuesday clarifying the 
Monday measures and clearly backing 
deposits had helped stem the tide, said 
Swangchit Chaiyawat, department man- 
ager of foe centra] bank's Financial In- 
stitutions Development Fund 

“Confidence among depositors in fi- 
nance companies has been restored by 
foe Bank of Thailand's statement,” Mr. 
Swangchit said 

Investors, however, remain shaken by 
the suspension of trading in banking ana 
finance shares on Monday. 

The question, analysts said Wednes- 
day, is whether the measures are enough, 
or is Thailand in a situation similar to 
that in Japan where banks are widely 
thought to persist in underestimating the 
extent of bad loans on their books. 

With so little information available 
surrounding this week's measures to 
shore up shaky finance companies, no 
one is betting that there will be a Mex- 
i co-style financial meltdown, but neither 
is there any sign of an end to the tur- 
moil. 

Thai stocks fell Wednesday for the 
third day, as slumping company profits 
and increasing property-loan defaults 
drove foe benchmark index near its low- 
est level since December 1991. 
Bloomberg News reported. The leading 
index has lost nearly half its value the 
past year, as profits have been 
hammered by an economy growing at its 
slowest pace in a decade, mounting bad 
real-estate loans and interest rates near 
five-year peaks. 1 


"If Finance One is experiencing sig- 
nificant strain, then I think the problem 
can't be limited to the 10 finance compa- 
nies,” said Ray Jovanovich, manager of 
the Siam Fund at Indosuez Asset Maor j 
agement, which has been among the best* 
performing Thai equity funds in recent 
years. 

"The amount of nonreporting loans 
the finance companies tell us about is 
absurdly low compared to what tfte 
banks are telling us, and even the banks 
seem on the low side,” added a Euro- 
pean economist in Bangkok. 44 We have 
no idea how deep the problem goes.” • 

Some analysts worry that the problem 
may be veiy deep. In a worst-case seen* 
aria, a sluggish economy made more 
fragile by insolvent finance companies 
and ailing banks could result in bad 
balance of payments figures. Foreigners 
could pull out their money or refuse £ti 
renew short-tenu loans. At that point: 
speculators could pounce again cm the 
beleaguered baht and cause a full-blowil 
financial crisis similar to that experii 
enced by Mexico in December 1994. T 

In the meantime. Finance One’s prob* 
lems have a familiar, Japanese ring to 
them: the institution is burdened with 
bad property loans, and its capital base 
keeps shrinking as the value of its s&! 


\i 


itecim-’s I ik 


c unties — many of them property de-f 

velr—— , r— j 


ty was no different from 
other recent sessions on foe Bangkok 
exchange : The SET index, at a five year 
tow, fell 1 2. percent, but was dragged 
down by the finance subindex, which fell 



53 percent, and the property developers * 
index, which was down 4.5 percent.] : 


li 


KOREA: ‘Talks About Talks ’ on Pea>ce 


IT 


coconuts resulted in an alarming buildup 
of cesium in their bodies. 


Continued from Page 1 


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for same day 
delivery in key cities. 


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1 - 800-882 2884 

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There has been talk of scraping off the 
entire top layer of earth and sand of 
Bikini to get rid of the cesium, but foe 
scientific studies agree that the simplest 
and cheapest way of dealing with this 
problem would tie to spread potassium 
fertilizer. Plants prefer potassium to 


prefer potassium 
1 potassium were availa 
they apparently would take it and leave 
foe cesium alone. 

But the B ikinians are s till profoundly 
wary, and they say they want an as- 
surance from President Bill Clinton that 
it is safe to go back. 

“I see what's going on there on 
Bikini, and I’m very envious of the 
people there,” said Jason Aitap. the act- 
ing mayor on Ejit, a bleak little island 
accessible only by boat and inhabited by 
some of foe 2,200 B ikinians now living 
in exile. 

“I’d love to go back. But you’ve got 
to understand that we really want as- 
surances from foe U.S. that it’s safe.” 


famine that could rival Ethiopia's in the 
raid- 1980s. 

Mr. Song said earlier in a telephone 
interview that foe South would do its 
best to “tell our northern brethren about 
all the benefits that can accrue" if foe 
armistice signed in 1953 is replaced by a 
permanent treaty. 

Referring to foe bombs in Rangoon, 
he said: “The past is past. We should 
look forward to the future." 

A senior U.S. official who briefed 
reporters said he was guardedly optim- 
istic that North Korea would eventually 
agree to join peace talks. But he said that 
response — if it comes — would very 
likely be delayed until after the third 
anniversary in July of the death of the 
long-time North Korean ruler Kim H 
Sung. Thar’s when his son. Kim Jong I], 
is widely expected to assume the title of 
president and Communist Party chair- 
man. 

In the meantime, the United States 
and North Korea plan to hold more in- 


tensive bilateral discussions beginning 
Friday on such issues as North Korean 
missile exports, a possible lifting # 
some U.S. sanctions on trade and iB- 
yestment in North Korea, and foe open- 
ing of low-level diplomatic offices iff 
each capital. 

“We would consider further sanc- 
tions -easing measures as North Korea! 
made progress on issues of concern tw 
us,” such as curbing its missile sales. - 
said Charles Katin tan, the acting as- 
simnt secretary of state for East Asian 
and Pacific affairs, who represented the 
United States at die talks. 

. The U*S. delegation to the meeting 
included officials from the National Se- 
curity Council and the Pentagon. But the 



— . v. W6 u ivuuiaici rum. C/mClalS 

from the North Korean military, which 
some U.S. experts say remains an in- 
fluential bastion of hard-line views to-.* 
ward foe South, were not present 1 
providing yet another reason why no 
quick results are to be expected. 










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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. MARCH 6, 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 


Serman Police 
ctivists 

In Delivering 

Nuclear Waste 

Cj, * v Wh 0 sr StoffFr,m IXymKv 

: DANNENBERG, Gennany — Po- 1 

i ^ -l°^ e j P a by ami-nuclear 
H Ijcfty 1 *** < md battled protesters throwing 
•firebombs Wednesday while clearini 
.the way for the last leg of a nuclear 
waste transport 

! . ^gged by thousands of protesters 
lalong the route, the six flatbed trucks 
•reached their destination, a storage site 
-at Gorieben. by midafiemoon after a 20- 
Jtilometer ( 12 -mile) trip from the 
Dannenberg train station. 

Hundreds of police officers in riot gear 
secured the convoy along its route. Of- 
■ ficers charged into fields wielding batons 
and used water camion to keep away 
protesters, who threw stones and bottles 
jand set straw on fire along the route. 

After a three-and-a-half -hour trip, the 
convoy roiled through the gates of the 
.Gorieben complex lo a chorus of 
;whistles from protesters, backed into 
the trees, as helicopters whirred above. 

Earlier, the police used water cannon 
|to disperse some 6.000 demonstrators 
jwho had staged a sit-in at the station to 
fry to block the transport Activists said 
at least 46 demonstrators were injured, 
^including two taken to hospital. Police 
.confirmed some demonstrators were in- 
jured, but had no immediate details. 

It took Germany's biggest postwar 
;security operation, involving 30.000 
police nationwide to ensure that the 
radioactive shipment arrived safely at 
the dump. Each phase of the journey 
.was hindered by protesters pressing de- 
mands for a nuclear-free Gennany. 

; The operation was estimated to cost 
iat least 66 million Deutsche marks ($39 
Imillion). The waste from two German 
power stations and a French repro- 
cessing plant was transported by train 
from the southern town of Walheim 
early Monday and was unloaded onto 
trucks here on Tuesday. 

Explosives expens were called to a 
spot where an anonymous caller said a 
bomb had been planted. It was not yet 
clear whether the object was an ex- 
plosive device or a dummy. 

: Activists have already tried to make 
roads to Gorieben unusable by dam- 
aging die surface of some and tunneling 
underneath others. Local farmers set up 
barricades with tractors and haystacks. 

; On Tuesday hundreds of masked mil- 
itants lobbed petrol bombs and pelted 
police with stones to protest against the 
shipment Two police officers were in- 
jured in the clashes. (AP. Reuters ) 



Accord Eases Tensions in Turkey 


k^FadUTUfanaMalPiai 

Anti-nuclear protesters confronting police in Germany on Wednesday 
as authorities tried to clear the way for a convoy carrying nuclear waste- 


BRIEFLY 


Cirr^tlrd hr Otv Staff Frm DtlfKJhrt 

ANKARA — Nccmettin Erbakan, 
the Islamist prime minister of Turkey, 
has signed a military-sponsored plan for 
a crackdown against pro-Islamic rad- 
icals. ending a standoff with Turkey's 
powerful army, a senior military official 
said Wednesday. 

“The signing problem has been re- 
solved,’’ said the National Security 
Council's secretary general. General U- 
han KiJic. 

The end of the standoff had been 
disclosed moments earlier bv Foreign 
Minister Tansu Ciller. 

“The problem has been totally re- 
solved." Mrs. Ciller was quoted by the 
Anatolia News Agency as telling a 
meeting of her conservative True Path 
Party. 

A private Turkish television station, 
meanwhile, also reported that Mr. 
Erbakan had bowed to military pressure 
and signed the military-sponsored 
plan. 

“Erbakan today signed the resolu- 
tions of the National Security Council, 
which includes the military plan," the 
station. Show TV. reported. 

The council includes both political 
leaders and top officers from the armed 
forces, which regard themselves as the 
guardians of modem Turkey’s secular 
political system. 

Mr. Erbakan’s move to bow to pres- 
sure by the army followed several days 
of heightened tension after he rejected 
on Monday die 20-point-plan that had 
been proposed by commanders of the 


military during a weekend session. 

(AFP. Reuters) 

■ EL Group Rebuffs Turkey 

Europe’s latest rebuff of Turkey’s 
aspirations for European Union mem- 
bership risks undermining pro-Western 
elements battling against growing Is- 
lamist influence in the key NATO ally, 
analysts say, according to a Reuters 
dispatch from Brussels. 

Wilfried Martens, a former prime 
minister of Belgium, said it was “not 
acceptable” for Turkey to join. He was 
speaking after a one-day meeting of the 


pan-European grouping of center-right 
parties and diplomats said his remarks 
had been endorsed by Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl of Germany, die EU’s 
single most influential leader. 

“This could well have a negative 
impact and dishearten pro- Western ele- 
ments," said Shireen Hunter, an analyst 
with the Center for European Policy 
Studies. “It could backfire on attempts 
to further democratize Turkey.” 

The parties apparently agreed unan- 
imously that Turkey’s human rights re- 
cord, its size and its Muslim religion 
disqualified it from joining the Union. 


Spanish Law Post Stays Unfilled 


The Associated Press 

MADRID — Bowing to political op- 
ponents, a lawyer with strong connec- 
tions to Spain’s extreme right took his 
name out of the running for the National 
Court’s chief prosecutor. 

In amove likely to be seen as a setback 
for Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar, 
Luis Poyaios. who is said to have once 
headed a secretive rightist group called 
the Hospital and Military Order of Sl 
J ohn of Jerusalem, asked die government 
not to consider him for the post. 

Mr. Poyatos’s nomination had been 
slated for last Friday during Mr. Aznar’s 
weekly cabinet meeting. 

But heated charges from opposition 
parties that Mr. Aznar’s regime was 


embracing a man tied to the Franco 
dictatorship postponed a decision. 

The National Court’s chief prosecu- 
tor decides what cases are he aid. 

The court focuses on sensitive stale 
matters such as terrorism, extradition, 
serious drug trafficking and financial 
crimes. 

The United Left coalition said the 
group that Mr. Poyaios allegedly led 
included lawyers who represented the 
military officers who took part in the 
failed 1981 coup. 

Mr. Poyatos was a prosecutor of the 
Public Order Tribunal, the body that 
preceded the National Court during the 
Franco regime in dealing with cases of 
offenses against the stare. 


Sweden lines No Letup on Alcohol 

STOCKHOLM — Sweden will maintain a restrictive alcohol 
policy even if a European Union court forces the government to 
abolish its monopoly on the sale of most alcoholic beverages. Social 
Minister Margot Wallstroem said Wednesday. 

The EU advocate general. Michael Elmer, struck a blow Tuesday to 
the state package-store chain. Systembolaget. when he recommended 
to the EU court in Luxembourg that it find the monopoly contravenes 
European Union laws. A decision is expected in the summer. 

“Whatever happens in the EU court, it is ruled out that the Swedes 
would be able to buy alcohol freely in food stores," she said, adding 
that there would be “some form of license procedure." 

Sweden restricts sales of liquor, wine and most beer to the state 
stores, which are open from 9 A.M. to 6 PJM. Monday to Friday. The 
limited hours and high prices in the stores are seen as means of 
reducing alcohol consumption. (AFP) 

Chubais May Get Economic Post 

MOSCOW — The Kremlin chief of staff, Anatoli Chubais, an 
initiator of market reforms in Russia, is expected to return to the 
government to take charge of the economy, a liberal newspaper 
reported Wednesday. 

The daily Sevodnya said President Boris Yeltsin and Prime Minister 
Viktor Chernomyrdin had agreed Tuesday to make Mr. Chubais, 41, 


first deputy prime minister as pan of a cabinet reshuffle. The paper, 
which did not identify its sources, also said that Finance Minister 
Alexander Livshits would be dismissed. (Reuters) 

Prodi Gets Transport Bill Enacted 

ROME — The government of Prime Minister Romano Prodi won a 
vote of confidence Wednesday in the Senate on reorganization of the 
transportation sector, a parliamentary official said. 

The Chamber of Deputies approved the bill last week. It became law 
following the 155 -to- 84 vote Wednesday. (Reuters) 

Bonn Seeks Deal Over NATO Post 

STUTTGART, Germany — Chancellor Helmut Kohl is seeking a 
way to get France to rejoin NATO’s military structure despite a 
dispute over a key alliance command, the U.S. secretary of defense. 
William Cohen, said Wednesday. 

Mr. Cohen met with Mr. Kohl in Bonn before flying to Stuttgart to 
confer with U.S. military commanders on American forces in Bosnia. 

France has insisted that the NATO southern command be rotated 
among European officers. Mr. Cohen said he had told Mr. Kohl that 
the United States was prepared to review “all options" on the key 
Naples post in four to six years. But for now. he said, Washington 
intends to keep a U.S. admiral in the post. (AFP) 



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Patricia Wells 
At Home e\ Provence 

Recipes Inspired by Her Farmhouse in France 



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For the past thirteen years, 
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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 199 < 


INTERNATIONAL 


Abidjan Has One Goal for Heavily Immigrant Shantytown: Bulldoze 

. _ . .he r ulin g pa rty among immigrants, who form as 

' p as Africa’s population increases, and as civil a looming escarpment. There, fhe tfebris of larives and a&iefld m anoAef^n^own. ne ^^.thini of Ivory Coast's pogutojqg. 

By James Rupert nMnn t viii«<wrc enrh rviuhhnrhnodc hsvt* hniKfls desmived when seasonal rains brine mud- said. As be demolished his home. n _ Ffnunhouet-BoiEny s death Tb 

Washington Post Service 


I 


ABIDJAN. Ivory Coast — Last month, 
Moussa Konfe needed only a crowbar and a day 
to dismantle his family’s wood-plank home of 19 
.years. The shack, which had no running water or 
toilet, was one of thousands jammed onto a red- 
clay hillside in a shantytown here called Wasb- 


Jnlike the American city it was named for, the 
neighborhood of Washington harbors no wealth 
lor power. Rotting garbage and raw sewage sour 
the air. 

‘ Mr. Konfe was prying apart his home not 
^because his family had another place to live, but 
because the Ivorian government had sworn to 
'demolish the shantytown. 

; Africa, where most cities never developed 
much industry to attract rural job seekers, was 
slower than other Third World regions to build 
the vast shantytowns that long have surrounded 
ca pitals elsewhere in the developing world. But 


as Africa’s population increases, and as civil 
wars uproot villagers, such neighborhoods have 
grown large on the urban landscape. 

These days, a battle over Washington has 
demonstrated the vulnerability of Abidjan's 
shan tytowns — more than 30 squatter com- 
munities that house an estimated 20 percent to 30 
percent of the city’s 2.5 million people. More 
than any other West African capital, this is a city 
with pretensions to middle-class prosperity and 
an officially cultivated image that excludes the 
extreme poverty of neighborhoods like Wash- 
ington. 

Also. Abidjan is the seat of a government chat 
has shown some fondness for the bulldozer the- 
ory of development While Ivory Coast has won 
praise for many development efforts over the 
years, it also has been noted for spending lavishly 
on projects while paying scant attention to 
whether they will prosper — or even survive. 

Even without government plans for demoli- 
tion, the shacks of Washington are threatened. 
Doe side of the settlement runs along the base of 


a looming escarpment There, the debris of 
houses destroyed wben seasonal rains bring mud- 
slides is half-buried under clay mounds. 

But Washington persists because there are jobs 
nearby. Many" residents — immigrants from 
neighboring Burkina Faso, Mali. Ghana and else- 
where — work just over the hill as security 

K ds or servants in Abidjan’s wealthiest neigb- 
ood, Cocody. 

Typically, a family of four or more pays the 
equivalent of S8 a month to entrepreneurs who 
erect makeshift shelters. For their money, the 
renters get to jam into a tin-roofed shack enclosed 
by thin plank walls that may be lined with news- 
paper. A man who has strung illegal electric 
wires through the alleyways charges S5 a month 
to supply power to a flickering tight bulb. A few 
others have run pipes into the neighborhood and 
offer water for 5 cents a bucket. 

In late December, the government informed 
residents it would demolish Washington within 
weeks. Some, like Mr. Konfe, decided to flee. He 
had squeezed his family into the shacks of re- 


latives nnA a friend in another shantytown, he 
said As be demolished his home. Ire said he 
would store the planks with friends “until 1 can 
find another place to build the bouse again. 

But just before the demolition date, the gov- 
ernment relented under pressure from the World 
Bank, according to an official who spoke on 
condition of anonymity. A spokesman for Ivory 
Coast's Construction Ministry said only that the 
neighborhood's destruction has been postponed 
until the end of the school year, in June, and that 
the government would now try to find other land 
for Washington’s residents. 

Abidjan's shantytowns “are politically vul- 
nerable because they are composed of immi- 
grants.' ’ said Sylvia Schmidt, a German political 
scientist who is researching the case of Wash- 
ington. With residents from throughout West 
Africa, the shantytowns also “are more divided 
by ethnicity and are unable to unite" to oppose 
the government, she said. 

During his 33-year reign, former President 
Felix Houphouet-Boi gny built strong support for 


the ruling party among immigrants, who form as 
much as oste-tilirti of Ivory Coast's ponuto^ 
But since Mr. Houphouet-Boigny s dratfrlb 

1993 politicians here have begun to question the 
presence of so many foreigners. Security Mgs 
ister Marcel Dibonan Kone has. asserted ft* 
immigrants are responsible for most crane and 

that shantytowns are nests of bandits. • ; v - 

Meanwhile. Ivorian leaders have grand visions 
for Abidjan- ’ ‘Abidjan is well plaime^and pros - 
perous compared to other cities in West Africa, r. 
said Joseph Yao, director of the Ivctnan Center 
for Economic and Social Research- 

That means the shantytowns stand put more, 
and Washington in particular. ft site hard by a 
highway connecting Abidjan to middle-class and 
wealthy suburbs like Cocody and Deux Pla t ea u x, 
where villa walls enclose comfortable houses 
garages and gardens. A two-year-old economic 
recovery has helped expand ft ose neighborhoods 
and has given the government enough money $ 
think of clearing away what doesjtot fit the plan 
for Abidjan. Mr. Yao said. ^ 


Rebels Poised 
To Take Key 
City as Zaire 
War Intensifies 


By Howard W. French 

Ne* w York Times Service 

KINSHASA, Zaire — Advancing by 
foot, by jeep, and in their stunning final 
approach on the unofficial capital of 
eastern Zaire, by dugour canoe, rebels 
seeking to overthrow the dictatorship of 
Mobutu Sese Seko were poised Wed- 
nesday to capture Kisangani, the coun- 
try's thiid-largest city. 

Foreign diplomats and Zairian military 
analysts said that the fell of Kisangani 
could come at any moment, ami would be 
by far the largest victory in the rebels’ five 
month campaign, posing a grave threat to 
Mr. Mobutu’s political survival. 

“The collapse of the FAZ has caught 
the rebels by surprise, and they have 
been moving very fast," said one West- 
ern diplomat, referring to the Zairian 
army by its official acronym. “With the 
fell of Kisangani, the military campaign 
will be over. Beyond that point, what 
we’ll have is a victorious road trip." 

In the capital, few believe dial the 
government could long survive the fell 
of Kisangani. Many, in fact, say that 
upon hearing the news, depopulation of 
Kinshasa could either rally to the re- 
bellion, bringing the Mobutu era to a 
close, or ignite in a panic, as it has done 
twice this decade during bouts of wide- 
spread looting. 

Scrambling to forestall that outcome. 
Mr. Mobutu’s foreign minister, Gerard 
Kamanda wa Kamanda, speaking Wed- 
nesday in Paris, urged the application 
“without delay" of a five-point peace 
plan elaborated last week by the United 
Nations. The plan calls for an immediate 
cease-fire in die war and the withdrawal 
of foreign forces fighting on both sides 
of the conflict. 

When it was first released, Zairian 

i as “too 



Now It’s Behavior Implants! 

If It Bobs and Sings Like a Quad, Think Chicken 


The Associated Press 

SAN DIEGO — A scientist has 
found a way to implant the natural 
behavior of one animal into another 
ries, creating a chicken that acts 
a quail by transferring brain cells 
from one embryo to another. 

“It turns out there’s a part of the 
quail’s brain that i can transfer into a 
chicken that makes the chicken move 
its bead like a quail when it’s crowing 
tike a chicken." said Evan Balaban, 
experimental neurobiologist at San 
Diego’s Neurosciences Institute. 

A chicken also sang like a quail after 
Mr. Balaban transplanted cells from 
die part of a quail’s brain that de- 
termines its sound patterns. The crow- 
ing and bead-bobbing behaviors could 
be transferred “wholly independently 
of each other and still have behavior 
that's well organized," he said. 

Mr. Balaban 's work, the result of 1 2 
years of research, was published Tues- 
day in die Proceedings of the National 
Academy of Sciences. 

The fertilized eggs of a chicken and 
quail were incubated for 48 hours, tiny 
windows were cut in the shells and 


CnrinP' [bla^fUiCT 

Zairians cheering on rebel soldiers in Kindu on Wednesday. The rebels recently captured the Zaire port city. 

REVOLT: A Wild Wist Port Mans the Barricades and Vows to Fight the Albanian Army 


specific cells were cut out of the em- 3 
bryonic brain. Cells in the chicken were ,, 
replaced with corresponding quail 3 
c el l s , The chickens were hatched and. *j 
were observed for 14 days, then killed d 
so researchers could study die brains, i 

The finding comes afterreports of-,J 
the cloning of sheep and monkeys. *- 
President Bill Clinton on Tuesday 
barred spending federal money on hu- 
man cloning pending a report from a 
federal advisory commission. 

Mr. Balaban’ s research is supported j 
with corporate and private grams, and 
is not considered cloning. He added 
that cross-species experiments with 
humans are unlikely. 

“People had hoped that we sci- 1 
entists could put cells into a brain to 
restore a behavior," be said. “But 
that’s not true. We can put in cells that 
supply critical chemicals, but we can't 
actually put in a new nerve circuit to 
restore a behavior that doesn’t work 
anymore." 

The best hope is that someday sci- . 
entists can change remaining cells of 
people with brain injuries to improve 
their quality of life, he said. 


BRIEFLY 


Continued from Page 1 

VI ore bas been the scene of anti- 
government rioting for a month, in 
which several people have been killed 
and protesters have burned police sta- 
tions and other buildings. 

With government armor stationed 
here and more on the way down the road 
from Dunes, accompanied by trucks and 
buses carrying infantrymen, an armed 
confrontation between the people of 
Vlore and the government seemed in- 
creasingly possible. 

Albania. Europe’s poorest country, is 
now into the third day of a state of 
emergency imposed by the hard-tine 
president, Sali Berisha, who has lost 


control of the southern, and richest, part 
of his country. 

The law and order measures have 
failed so far to take hold, making gov- 
ernments in Western Europe nervous 
about yet another wave of Albanian 
refugees, the third in less than 10 years. 

Albania was where dramatic cracks in 
communist rule first began to show 
when tens of thousands of bedraggled 
refugees arrived on the Italian Adriatic 
coast in 1988, clinging to the hulls of 
ships to escape economic misery and 
political repression. After the Beilin 
Wall fell and the Albanian communists 
finally collapsed, a second flood of Al- 
banian refugees landed in Italy. 

The Italian government has stepped up 


its patrols around Brindisi on the Adriatic 
Coast. It stopped ferry service from near 
Brindisi to Vlore on Monday. 

It is unclear how effective a gov- 
ernment assault on Vlore would be if it 
came. The men on the tanks in Fier 
appeared to be irregular soldiers brought 
from northern Albania, tbe home of Mr. 
Berisha. This was one of many signs. 
Albanians and Western diplomats said, 
of the difficulty the highly unpopular 
president is having in mobilizing his 
30.000-strong army. 

Western diplomats reported wide- 
spread defections from the military even 
as Mr. Berisha tried to regain control 
with the appointment of a new army- 
chief of staff. 


officials scoffed at the peace plan as "too A T U A 1\TT A • A AM * Q±zrt D /> 
timid," insisting that the LJruted Nations AJ-JJWrKL 1 J_rV« AlTUVY JUOVCS to Stlf 10 ttOVOlt 

n^n/Wm I Dnr',.,sia M/I D.. V 


timid," insisting that the United Nations 
first condemn Uganda, Rwanda and Bu- 
rundi, which Kinshasa bas accused of 
supporting the rebellion. Wednesday, it 
was the rebels, highly confident after 
days of uninterrupted advances, who dis- 
missed the proposals, saying that Mr. 
Mobutu must step down. 

Along vrift Mr. Mobutu, who is in 
southern France, where he has spent 
most of tbe war undergoing treatment for 
prostate cancer, tbe fete of as many as 

200.000 Rwandan and Burundian Hutu 
refugees has been left hanging in the 
balance by the recent fighting. 

' In recent days, rebel attacks around 
the refugee camp at Tingi-Tingi have 
sent more than 100,000 Hutu, many of 
than women and children already sick 
and weakened by months of travel across 
the Zairian jungle, in search of a safe 
resting place. 

Rebels advancing on the camp from 
the direction of the town of Walikale are 
said to include substantial numbers of 
Rwandan Tutsi fighters who have en- 
listed to help the war effort of the Zairian 
rebel leader, Laurent Kabila. 

. Western diplomats say that as many as 

1.000 Hutu fighters from tbe former 
Rwandan army and Hutu militias have 
lived interspersed with the refugees, and 
fighting between the rival Rwandan ele- 
ments is believed to have been intense . 

- As the noose has tightened amend 
Kisangani, rebels have advanced on 
three fronts, overcoming Zaire’s fam- 
ously bad road network by carrying their 
own planks to span broken bridges. 


Continued from Page 1 

order for anyone in the streets with un- 
authorized weapons. 

The Italian foreign minister. Lam- 
berto Dim, who spoke earlier Wednes- 
day with Mr. Shehu, quoted him as say- 
ing that * ‘the police ana the armed forces 
have orders to isolate tbe places where 
rebels are concentrated, avoiding en- 
gaging in armed conflict" 

The first military attack appears to 
have been a government jet fighter that 
dropped a bomb Wednesday near 
Sarande, a town opposite the island of 
Korfu. according to a Greek photograph- 
er for The Associated Press. The pho- 
tographer, a former member of the 
Greek Army, said it was not clear if 
anyone was hurt The government made 
no statement about the reported attack. 

In the same area, tbe array appeared to 
have made an unsuccessful attempt to 
put down the revolt around Sarande. 
Witnesses said about 60 soldiers re- 
treated after battling civilians near the 
town. A hospital reported treating four 
people wounded by gunshot. 

The Organization for Security and 
Cooperation in Europe said Wednesday 
night that the Albanians had refused to 
accept a mission headed by Franz Vran- 
itzky, a' former chancellor of Austria. A 
spokeswoman for tbe organization said 
the delegation wanted to come to Tirana, 
the capital, to persuade the government 
to open talks with the opposition, respect 


human rights and stop the use of force 
against civilians. 

News agencies reported earlier: 

Government troops backed by tanks 
and fighter planes went into action Wed- 
nesday to put down the uprising in the 
south, but they faced stiff resistance and 
in one skirmish appeared to retreat 

Troops retreated after a clash with 
armed residents near Styari, a village 10 
kilometers (six miles) east of the port of 
Sarande. Four villagers and at least two 
soldiers were wounded, witnesses said. 

"Eyewitnesses just told us that the 
battle is over and the troops withdrew," 
Dimitris Stefos, a former prefect in the 
port, said by telephone. “The fighting 
lasted about 40 minutes, and ai least two 
soldiers were wounded." 

Rebels drove a tank captured from the 
army gleefully through the streets of 
Sarande, and hundreds of heavily armed 
men set up defenses in the hills at the 
entrance to the town, saying they were 
determined to fight to the finish. 

A fighter flew over the village of 
Livina near Sarande and smoke rose 
from the area, witnesses said. 

Meanwhile, a delegation from the 
Council of Europe arrived in Tirana on 
Wednesday even as the one from the 
European security organization was be- 
ing told to stay away. 

* ’The Albanians said they don ’t know 
whether this is the right time." a dip- 
lomatic source said. 

“Our main concern now is to get the 


2l’> S' 






SrdpD Ilk/TV •VrarcutoJ Prett 

A MOVE TO UNSEAT — Bel- 
grade University students tak- 
ing over the office of the pro- 
government rector Wednesday. 


government and the opposition talking 
and to make sure that the trouble does 
not spill over into other areas of tbe 
Balkans that are already unsettled." an- 
other Western envoy saidAFP. Reuters ) 


The revolt in Vlore and the unrest in 
other southern cities was set off by the 
collapse of fraudulent investment 
schemes that the government allowed to 
operate without regulation. Western 

f ovemments have said they warned Mr. 

erisha of an inevitable economic ca- 
tastrophe as long as 18 months ago. 

Almost every Albanian family put 
money into the schemes, which in fact 
were money-laundering and weapons- 
dealing businesses that were never cap- 
able of paying back the investors at the 
promised high rates of interest. Albanian 
and Western financial experts say. 

When some of tbe schemes failed to 
pay back dieir investors and many Al- 
banians lost their savings, widespread 
protest engulfed the major cities, in- 
cluding Tirana, the capital. 

But the anger at the loss of money has 
taken on a new dynamic in Vlore, a 
seafaring town with a long tradition of 
smuggling and relative wealth. When 
the Albanians won independence from 
the Turks in 1912, the Albanian flag was 
first raised in Vlore. 

And when the communists fell in Al- 
bania. Vlore quickly became the richest 
town in an impoverished country. Profits 
from the drug and weapons trade — as 
well as the smuggling of people to Italy 
— allowed tbe new entrepreneurs of 
Vlore to buy Mercedes Benzes, open 
restaurants and cafes and run banks. 

It was this relatively prosperous way 
of life that the citizens of Vlore wanted to 
defend, tbe businessman said. In the last 
week, leaders of anti-government rallies 
in Vlore have demanded the resignation 
of Mr. Berisha and new elections. 

In Her, residents said the govern- 
ment’s preparations to retake Vlore and 
to reinforce its positions here began 
Monday. A motorcade of army trucks 
rolled through the town then, loaded 
with armed civilians and nervous-look- 
ing young soldiers, one woman said. 

’ ‘It was psychological tenor,* ’ the 35- 
y ear-old mother said as she sat in her 
living room overlooking the street where 
the troops passed by. Tbe woman said she 
bad started to stockpile food; a large sack 
of flour rested against her front door. 

But in Vlore people were confident 
that they bad not only enough weapons, 
but also enough to eaL “We’ve opened 
up all the army warehouses that have 
food." the businessman said. 


7 German Tourists 
Abducted in Yemen 

SAN ’A. Yemen — Gunmen kid- 
napped seven German tourists in the 
southern province of 'Hadhramaut 
mi Wednesday, officials said. 

The police encircled the uniden- 
tified kidnappers, who are demand- 
ing a $7 million ransom, the of- 
ficials said. Yemeni tribes often 
resort to kidnappings to obtain com- 
pensation or concessions from the 
government (AFP) 

Lagos Bars Doctor 
From Regime Foe 

LAGOS — The personal phy- 
sician of a detained opposition lead- 
er, Chief Moshood K.O. Abiola, has 
been denied access to his patient and 
is concerned that his health is de- 
teriorating, The Punch paper report- 
ed Wednesday. 

Dr. Ore Falomo said he had not 
talked to Chief Abiola since Novem- 
ber 1995. Chief Abiola has been held ■ 
on treason charges after Iris self- . 
declaration as president on the basis 
of the June 12, 1993, electionf AFP) 

Gulf Illness’ Inquiry 

STUTTGART — The U.S. de- 
fense secretary, William Cohen, 
said Wednesday that an independ- 
ent investigation of the Pentagon’s 
handling of the so-called Gulf War 
illness was unnecessary because the 
military inquiry was “very thor- 
ough." The Defense Department 
says there is no evidence that U.S. 
troops were exposed to Iraqi chem- 
ical weapons during the 1991 
flict with Iraq. 

Iraqi Food in April 

BAGHDAD — International ob- 
servers to supervise an oii-for-food 
deal with Iraq are due in place by 
mid-March, but food distribution is 
unlikely to start until April, UN 
sources said Wednesday. (Reuters) 


Y 


con- 
( Reuters) 


CAMPAIGN: White House Strained Laws Separating Government From Politics SWISS: $4.7 Billion Fund to Aid Holocaust Victims 


Continued from Page I 

Just where the lines fall between politics and 
government have been set in two separate laws, 
tiie Hatch Act — which does not apply to the 
president and the vice president — and a late- 
1800s statute that bars “any person" from so- 
liciting contributions on federal property “oc- 
cupied in tbe discharge of official duties." 

The Hatch Act limits pofitical activities of 
federal employees even when- off duty. But it 
makes an exception for White House employees to 
cany out political activity short of fund raising. As 
previous administrations did, the Clinton White 
House instructed staff to put in a 40-hour gov- 
ernment workweek and to conduct campaign work 
on top of that. That is not required by the law. 

; “If they are on the payroll of the executive 
office of the president, they can do politics from 
their duty station 24 hours a day," said Michael 
JLawtence, spokesman for tbe Office of Special 
Counsel, which enforces the Hatch Act. “What 
they can’t do is solicitation." 

The Hatch Act carries civil penalties. A sep- 
arate law dating to 1883 makes it a crime for 


“any person" to solicit a campaign contribution 
on federal property used for official duties. 

"The White House does turn out to be the 
president’s house," said Stanley Brand, a former 
counsel to the House of Representatives. “He 
lives there." 

Because of such legal distinctions, successive 
administrations have held receptions for political 
and financial supporters of their party in the 
White House residence, not the West Wing. 

Mr. Clinton held his coffees in the Map Room, 
which is part of the residence. His weekly polit- 
ical meetings were held in the residence. 

But what about Mr. Gore, who admits that he 
made fund-raising calls from bis White House 
office — albeit with a Democratic Party credit 
card? He argued Monday that “no controlling 
legal authority" barred the practice — in es- 
sence, that such a situation had never been tested 
in the courts. 

Experts in election law are divided over 
whether Mr. Gore’s action was covered by the 
criminal law barring fund-raising solicitations. 

Mr. Gray, the counsel in the Bush White 
House, said: “It says no fund-raising. No fund- 


raising. How would you interpret it?” 

Fred Fielding. White House counsel for more 
than five years under President Ronald Reagan 
said, “We operated on the assumption that no 
fund raising was to be conducted in federal 
buildings." 

But Mr. Brand, a Democrat, noted that the 
legislative history of die statute in question 
showed that it was written to stop “shakedowns" 
of lower-level government employees by tbeir 
employers. 

■ Subpoena for tbe White House 

A congressional committee investigating pos- 
sible campaign fund-raising abuses has issued 
subpoenas to the White House and Justice De- 
partment to find out whether the Chinese gov- 
ernment attempted to contribute money to the 
1996 election, news agencies reported. 

The Washington Post reported in February that 
a Justice Department inquiry into improper polit- 
ical fund-raising activities had found evidence 
that represented ves of China had sought to direct 
contributions from foreign sources to the Demo- 
cratic National Committee. (Reuters. API 


Continued from Page I 

atonement as a Jewish conspiracy. 

“The Federal Council has lost its head,” said 
Christoph Blocher, a leading rightist. “These are 
public assets, not just any money.” 

Swiss government officials fear that Mr. 
Blocher could use Switzerland's system of direct 
democracy (o organize a referendum to block the 
entire proposal. 

Until Wednesday, the Swiss government and 
the Swiss National Bank had held back from 
committing themselves financially. But Mr. 
Koller’s largely conciliatory speech, which 
sought to defend Switzerland against its critics 
and acknowledge that Switzerland’s wartime 
survival had “its bright sides and its dark sides" 
was the first time the Swiss government seemed 
to seek the initiative after months of criticism. 

In December, Jean-Pascal Delmuraz, Mr. 
Koller’s predecessor in the rotating Swiss pres- 
idency. called Jewish demands for a Holocaust 
compensation fund “extortion and blackmail," 

“Today, we do not have to feel ashamed that 
we escaped the war." Mr. Koller said Wed- 


nesday. * Every country defended primarily ics* 
°'*T l interests, and we too were entitled to this! 
ngjiL We had the right to survive. ■* i 

But nevertheless, the question arises as flC 
whether and to what extent all Swiss citizen^! 
managed to satisfy the high moral demands dut* 
. e war period. That means that we have toj 
publicly admit self-criticism and admit the dark? 
sides of that difficult period. ’ ’ ; J 

„ . e announcement coincided with the opening' 
session m Bern of a commission of foreign a ad" 
iwiss historians appointed by the government tf* 
look into Switzerland’s dealings with the Naziiu 

Vr!£u d !£ OI V a se P arate commission led by Paul 1 
olcker, foe former chairman of the ILS. j4dera£ 
reserve Board, is investigating die question o£ 

Sap® 

**retary for international trade, which is to pub-' 
one ^ m0nth - ,n sp*™g speculation thar 
to of announcement wafr 

Sw^TS- funher cn 4 cism from Washington of 
Switzerland s wartime behavior 








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PAGE? 


PAGE 17 


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PAGE 8 


THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 1997 


EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Jteralb 


INTERN 4TI0NAL 



NJSUSHED WITH THE HEW WMW TIMES AMD THE WASHINGTON POST 


Srxbutte Give the World a Clear Voice for Human Rights 

THE WASHINGTON POST V , . „ 

. . * .... Ui^ti ivunmicciraiPr fn 


Tim 

" ![ ? 1 


Investigate This Mess 


Wc salute Vice President AI Gore’s 
decision to come forward and answer 
questions about his role in the Demo- 
crats’ unrestrained fund-raising in 
1996. But surely Mr, Gore and Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton know that the situ- 
ation is too messy for the American 
public to accept Mr. Gore's relaxed 
reading of the federal law against so- 
liciting money on federal property. 

He argued that the law does not 
apply to his calls from the Whitt: House 
since he used a credit card supplied by 
the Democratic National Committee 
and was not soliciting federal employ- 
ees.' The Republicans and some legal 
scholars seem to think that the law 
actually means what it says, and that 
Mr. Gore broke it. Whatever the final 
resolution, Mr. Gore’s forthright state- 
ment about his actions leaves no doubt 
that Attorney General Janet Reno has 
file ‘'credible evidence” of possible 
lawbreaking that she needs to appoint 
an independent counsel. 

Of course, plenty more important 
evidence already exists, and the need 
for a thorough airing will only grow in 
the days ahead. Mr. Gore's undignified 
phone -athon, however demeaning to 
him and his office, is not the weightiest 
matter to be explored. What has to be 
determined is whether illegal foreign 
contributions were funneled into the 
president's re-election effort and 
whether staff members at the White 
House and the Democratic National 
Committee had knowledge or com- 
plicity in such an effort The political 
and legislative energies of this admin- 
istration will continue to drain away 
until those questions are answered. 

The extent to which Mr. Gore’s ad- 
mission dented bis own presidential 
hopes cannot be known immediately. 
What is clear is the utter tackiness and 


Untruthful as Usual 


On subject after subject, this turns 
out to be a White House that you be- 
lieve at your peril. Six months ago 


Republicans were accusing it of trying 
to make political use of the Immi- 


to make political use of the Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Service. 
The charge was that the White House 
had put the aim mi the INS to speed up 
and cut comers in the naturalization 
process, the theory being that new cit- 
izens would more likely vote Demo- 
cratic than Republican, and therefore 
the more of them die merrier. Die 
administration responded that there 
was no way it would do a thing tike 
that, manipulate the citizenship process 
for political gain, and folks believed it. 
We ourselves wrote sympathetically 
that, while '‘some congressional Re- 
publicans suspect a Democratic plan to 
load up the voter rolls the admin- 
istration replies that there are good and 
innocent reasons for the increase.” 

So now, guess what? It turns out that 
the White House was in fact leaning on 
the INS to hasten the process, in part in 
hopes of creating new Democratic 
voters. There are documents that 
amply show as much. 

The attempt was described in a 
lengthy account by Washington Post 
reporter William Branigin the other 
day. It was centered in the office of 
Vice President AI Gore, where they do 
reinventing government projects. But 
it wasn’t just another remveation. 
“The president is sick of this and wants 
action.” Elaine Kamarck, a domestic 
policy adviser to Mr. Gore wrote in an 
e-mail last March, the “this” being 
that the INS was not moving people 
along at the proper speed. 

The Republican charge is that, in 
speeding up the process, the INS made 
citizens of some applicants with crim- 
inal records who should have been 


barred. The Democratic defense — die 
current version — is dial some of this 
may indeed have occurred, but not be- 
cause of political interference. Rather it 
was die result of simple bungling. You 
are told now dial you should not take 
the political meddling in this process 
— essentially a law enforcement pro- 
cess — seriously not because it didn’t 
happen but because it was ineffectual. 
Now there’s a comfort. 

The INS has long been an agency in 
disrepair. It had and still has a huge 
naturalization backlog, partly the result 
of increased applications after the grant 
of amnesty to certain illegal aliens in 
the immigration act of 1986, partly 
now the result as well of last year’s 
welfare tell, which cuts off benefits to 
immigrants who foil to naturalize. The 
agency was already trying to cut the 
backlog, as well it should, and if ever 
there were a candidate for reinvention, 
it is the INS. So you had a legitimate 
project until die folks with the hot 
hands in the White House decided it 
should be a political project as well, at 
which point it was compromised. 

Some of the worst ideas ginned up in 
die White House never got anywhere, 
in part apparently because of stout INS 
resistance. Nor is it yet clear how many 
people with disqualifying records were 
made citizens, nor how much of that 
was due to political pressure and how 
much to juk plain everyday incom- 
petence. But in a way it doesn't matter. 
What matters is that once again the 
political people could not keep then- 
distance from a process that should 
have been respected and left alone on 
decency- in-government grounds, and 
then they were untruthful about it. 

Who believes them and goes bail for 
diem next time? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


The ‘Miracle 5 Isn’t Over 


After a year in which some East 
Asian superstars seemed to be stum- 
bling. it has become popular to pro- 
claim the "end of the Asian economic 
miracle.” The fortunes of millions of 
Asians will now depend on how their 
governments rise to the challenge to 
adjust and reform. Japan, which re- 
mains by far the richest country in 
Asia, nonetheless demonstrates the 
dangers of delaying structural reform. 
Economic success and a financial mar- 
ket boom allowed Japan to put change 
off, and it is now paying the price. 

The fact that countries such as South 
Korea are also running into difficulties, 
at levels of development far below Ja- 


pan's, suggests that they have structural 
problems that are potentially even more 
serious. Bui it also means that, with 
luck and judgment, adjustment will be 
carried out in time. The “miracle.'' and 
such it was, is far from over. 

— The Economist (London). 


Downhill in fliina 


It seems likely that [Deng Xiaop- 
ing’s] successors will continue his 
policy of economic liberalization com- 
bined with increased social repression, 
their highest priority being to maintain 
themselves in power. That policy is 
certain to lead to increased social ten- 
sion and eventually to total collapse. 

— Neue Zurcher Zeitung (Zurich). 


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N EW YORK — UN Secretary- 
General Kofi Annan faces one of 


Jl/N General Kofi Annan faces one of 
his first major tests as he moves to 
name a new high commissioner for 


By Heed Brody 


lack of restraint that prevailed within 
file re-election councils at (his White 
House. Mr. Gore now bids to be re- 
membered as the vice president who 
went a clear step beyond what previous 
vice presidems and presidents were 
willing to do. Typically, file party’s top 
officeholders appear at fund-raising 
events and thank contributors in a gen- 
eral way, but they do not do the arm- 
twisting themselves. It is demeaning 
and potentially corrupting for a vice 
president to ask directly for money, 
especially from people with business 
before the government 

Senior business executives called by 
the vice president felt that they were 
being shaken down, and they bad a 
right to think so. Such transgressions 
against propriety have become a re- 
current theme with this administration. 
Whatever the final adjudication of its 
conduct, this White House has time 
and again blurred lines that other ad- 
ministrations have drawn between pol- 
itics and government. 

After the disclosures that Democrat- 
ic National Committee officers and 
staff members were attending White 
House meetings and receptions, using 
White House phone logs and offering 
the Lincoln Bedroom and other per- 
quisites to potential donors, it should 
perhaps not be surprising that Mr . Gore 
felt it was ail right to sit in his office 
and call contributors. 

Just once we would like to hear of 
someone within this administration's 
inner financial circle who bad the 
strength, self-discipline and taste to say 
“no.” Failing that, most people would 
settle for an independent counsel to 
check the vice president’s reading of 
the Jaw and the legality of the entire 
Democratic fund-raising operation. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


human rights, after the resignation last 
month of Jos6 Ayala Lasso, whose 


month of Jos6 Ayala Lasso, whose 
lackluster performance disappointed 
human rights advocates. 

The United Nations created the high- 
profile post in 1993 after a worldwide 
drive by rights groups, led by Amnesty 
International, culminated in a UN World 
Conference on Human Rights in Vienna- 
The high commissioner was charged 
with taking “an active role” in “pre- 
venting the continuation of human rights 
violations throughout the world.' ' 

Proponents hoped that the high com- 
missioner would use his visibility and 
resources to become the “conscience 
of humanity,” delivering a swift public 
response to abuses and ensuring that 
human rights became part and parcel of 
all UN activities. 

Secretary -General Boutros Boutros 
Ghali, over whose opposition the post 
was created, imdenmoed these hopes in 
April 1994 by turning to Mr. Ayala 
Lasso, a cautious career diplomat who 
had served Ecuador’s former military 
government as foreign minister, the 


position to which he now returns. 

Publicity and the marshaling of 
shame, activists know, are among the 
few weapons in file human rights ar- 
senal. But cm issues ranging from Rus- 
sian atrocities in Chechnya to ethnic 
cleansing in Bosnia, the first high com- 
missioner relied exclusively on “quiet 
diplomacy,” squandering Ms unique 
potential to stigmatize illegal conduct. 

He visited scores of countries but 
almost never reported on what he saw 
or discussed. At the UN Women's Con- 
ference in Beijing in 1995, Chinese 


authorities hauled away Hong Kong 
jour nalis ts practically my fo r the high 
commissioner’s nose, while undercov- 
er agents harassed exiled Tibetan wo- 
men. Mr. Ayala Lasso looked the other 
way. Pressed by reporters for a re- 
action, be ducked the issue. 

When it did not require him to 
openly displease powerful states, he 
sometimes took important new initi- 
atives. He boldly son a team of mon- 
itors to Rwanda (four of whom were 
recently killed), and established field 
offices in Burundi, Zaire and the 


former Yugoslavia. A new outpost in 
Colombia means that for the first tune 
the army and die paramilitary death 
squads there will be subject to on-site 
international monitoring. 

He originally allowed governments 
to play off his own quiet diplomacy 
Agains t die public reporting of expert 
envoys named by the UN Commission 
on Human Rights, but more recently he 
would take up file envoys* findings with 
government officials, albeit privately. 
His recent restructuring of the UN Cen- 
ter for Human Rights in Geneva could 
unlock frustrated talent in what has 
often been a bureaucratic backwater. 
His web site allows immediate global 
access to UN reports of abuses. 

He proved unable, however, to inject 
human rights concerns where they 
really count — on the agenda of top UN 
officials and the Security Council at 
UN headquarters in New York, where 
officials set long-term strategy, re- 
spond to crises and deploy peacekeep- 
ing operations. This is partly because of 
his passive approach, partly because 
his office is isolated in Geneva, and 
partly because of his choice of a weak 
New York liaison officer. 

Secretary-General Annan, in pro- 


posing a new high commissioner to file .? 
General Assembly, should also up- < 
grade the rank of the commissioner «-; 
New York representative. 

The secretary -general has named, a. 
respected UN legal official as caretaker ~ 
while he considers his options. The post 
is too critical to be left vacant .for tong , 
or to be part of a business-as-usual re- 
shuffling of UN jobs among in-house v 
careerists or diplomatic w annab es. 

The high commissioner's job de- , 
scrip don calls for a person of “high * 
moral standing and personal integrity” 
with expertise in fields including human 
rights. As the United Nations prepares 
to celebrate in 1998 the 50th an- . 
niveesary of the Universal Declaration . n 
of Human Rights. Mr. Annan has the. -■ 


opportunity to appoint a true c h a mp ion ’ 
of Bberty, someone who is not afraid to \ 


snly challenge governments when 
: y violate the rights of their citizens. 


The writer, a former human rights 
director of the UN peacekeeping op-. ’ 
eration in El Salvador, coordinated ■ 
lobbying for human rights groups at the 
UN World Conference on Human J 
Rights. He contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


Next for Arabs and Israelis, a PeopIe-to-People Peace Alliance" 


P ARIS — The outcry among 
Egyptian and other Arab m- 


JT Egyptian and other Arab in- 
tellectuals over a meeting with 
Israelis in Copenhagen at the end 
of January is a measure of bow 
far there is yet to go before peace 
in file Middle East becomes 
more than a piece of paper. 

There have been such unof- 
ficial, smaller meetings in the 
past, but secretive. This time, 
prominent Egyptians, Jordani- 
ans, Palestinians and others 
joined openly with prominent 
Israelis and produced what they 
called “The Copenhagen Dec- 
laration: International Alliance 
for Arab-Israeli Peace.” 

David Kimche, a former di- 
rector-general of the Israeli For- 
eign Ministry who helped or- 
ganize the session, says it is the 
first time in nearly 20 years 
since the Israel-Egypt peace 
treaty that there has been “a 
breach in the wall of hostility” 
from the Egyptian intellectuals. 

Even then, those who went 
home to write about it were 
defensive, arguing that it is nec- 
essary to at least discuss dif- 
ferences with Israelis instead of 
maintaining personal boycotts. 


By Flora Lewis 


if peace is ever to be achieved. 
Among them were highly re- 
garded writers including Lutfi 
Kholi, Mohammed Sid-Ah- 
med, Salama A. SaLazna, Abdel 
Moneim Said. 

“It showed great courage,” 
said Mr. Kimche, aware of the 
climate on the Arab side. “It 
shows how necessary it is to 
launch a people-to-people dia- 
logue.” This hasn't happened 
yet, despite all the official hand- 
shakes and documents. 

The negotiations that are 
watched so carefully from 
abroad somehow have not pen- 
etrated into public acceptance, 
and the Arab leaders who take 
part have done little to persuade 
the home front This includes 
the king of Morocco, as well as 
Egypt's President Hosni Mu- 
barak, who refuses to visit Is- 
rael, saying that his public opin- 
ion “isn't prepared for it’’ 

The Copenhagen document 
says that “peace is too important 
to be left only to governments.” 
ft warns that the peace process 
“could yet be derailed with the 


shadow of war again eng ulfing 
the Middle East” 


Israeli participants included 
four members of the Knesset: 
Maxim Levy, Mother of For- 
eign Minister David Levy, Yael 
Dayan. Shiomo Ben Ami and 
Amos Eton. They went well be- 
yond the official Israeli pos- 
ition. accepting the prospect of 
Pales tinian statehood and that 
“to allay Palestinian fears, no 
new settlements should be built, 
and no Palestinian land, state or 
private, will be expropriated. * * 
Asked for comment. Prime 
Minister Benyamin Netanyahu 
brushed it off. saying “I wel- 
come a regional peace move- 
ment.” However, his Foreign 
Ministry said people-to-people 
contacts were fine but they 
shouldn’t get into politics, with- 
out trying to make sense of that 
The document called on ‘ ‘re- 
gional and international groups 
and individuals concerned with 
the fixture of the region to sup- 
port our declaration, join our 
movement and support actively 
its causes and goals.” 


Egyptian Foreign Minister 
Amr Moussa, who has been 
harshly outspoken about Mr. 
Netanyahu's government, pro- 
mised his support. He said the 
failure of peace would be "a 
catastrophe for Egypt — it 
would mean that Sadat’s de- 
cision was a mistake and Egyp- 
tian policy has been all wrong,” 
and “we can’t accept that” 

The underlying idea is that 
there are people on both sides 
who don’t want the only kind of 
peace that is possible, through 
compromise, and that people 
who do want it must join to 
promote it themselves, with or 
without governments. 

This is particularly bard for 
many Arab intellectuals. They 
tend to be liberals, more or less 
opposed to their own regimes. 
Under attack from hard-line 
peers, they find it hard to support 


example by announcing a huge 
new housing development on 
the outskirts of the city, is deeply 
rooted. They can be more adam- 
ant than the Palestinians, who do 
know the Israelis and their do- 
mestic quarrels better. 

Denmark has sponsored the 
new Alliance, a complement tp 
the Oslo accords that achieved 
the Israeli-PaJestxnian break- 
through, and is encouraging the 
founders to develop into an ac- 
tive movement. They want en- 
couragement from the United 


Stares, both public and private, 
but above all they want to reach 


peers, they find a hard to support 
government foreign policy while 
they are critical at home. 


They are aware that Israeli 
opinion is deeply split. But the 
habit of expressing their anger 
by denouncing “the Israelis” in 
general when file Jerusalem 
government offends them, for 


but above all they want to reach 
out to each other. 

The importance of this new s 
essentially civil initiative cannot 
be overstated, ft is just what has 
been missing all these years, the 
human underpinning for the stra- 
tegic calculations. 

The founders have under- 
stood at last that it won’t just 
arise spontaneously, by itself, 
and that it is the intellectuals, 
die voice of community, who 
must lead ft. It is their activity, 
not just treaties, that can make 
peace irreversible. 

© Flora Lewis. ~. 


As Europe Looks ‘South,’ America Watches a Wider Screen 


P ARIS — Two weeks after 
Madeleine Albright jetted in 


By Jim Hoagiand 


and out of their capitals on her 
inaugural global trip as secre- 
tary of state, European officials 
are still tiffing an unexpected 
Albright remark for clues to an 
impending shift, however slight, 
in U.S. policy toward Iran. 

In several meetings on the 


tour, Mrs. Albright brought up 
Europe’s continuing trade and 


Europe’s continuing trade and 
diplomatic relations with Iran. 
The Europeans portray these 
contacts as a “critical dia- 
logue” intended to moderate 
Tehran’s international behavi- 
or. Washington pursues a policy 
of isolation and economic boy- 
cott for the same purpose. 

“Your critical dialogue 
hasn’t worked,” Mrs. Albright 
fold European foreign ministers 
and their aides, some of whom 


braced for yet another Amer- 
ican lecture on Gulf policy. 
Then she smiled and added: 
“Of course, our critical silence 
doesn't seem to have accom- 
plished that much either.” 

She quickly moved on, re- 
citing familiar U.S. positions and 
leaving her hosts to wonder if 
they had heard more than a deft 
icebreaker. A French official 
noted later that Mrs. Albright's 
conversations in Paris had 
centered much more on Iran and 
Iraq than on Arab-Israeli peace 
negotiations, possibly giving 
some indication of her Middle 
East priorities as she takes 
charge of the State Department. 

There is a certain logic to the 
proposition. Her predecessor, 
Warren Christopher, made hos- 


tility to Iran a personal crusade, 
blasting Tehran for opposing 
his efforts in the Middle Hast 
peace process. In contrast, Mrs. 
Albright’s staff at the United 
Nations ran the U.S. govern- 
ment’s quiet liaison with Iran in 
a nonconfrontational way. 

Too much can be read into 
these initial meetings in Europe. 
U.S. officials say that Mrs. Al- 
bright did not intend to com- 
municate 3 lessening of U.S. 
opposition toward Tehran’s 
ayatollahs by her banter. Many 
Europeans, Led by the French, 
assume that Washington chafes 
to resume its privileged position 
in Iran. They tend to over-in- 
terpret U.S. words and deeds on 
the subject 

But this new focus on the 


Gulf helps make a broader 
point: For all the heavy lifting on 
Russia, NATO enlargement and 
China, the zones of greatest im- 


mediate political and diplomatic 
turbulence lie in the Gulf, the 
Mediterranean, Central Asia, 
the Balkans. Africa — “the 
South.” as the French say. 

“The conflicts are m the 
South today rather than in file 
East” French Foreign Minister 
Herv6 de Chare tie told me. 
"We must adapt our military 
and political strategies to that 
reality.” Added Defense Min- 
ister Charles Millon in a sep- 
arate interview: “The military 
threats have changed. The 
dangers come not from East- 
West rivalry, but local conflicts 
in the zones of instability.” 

This has been clear since the 
end erf the Cold War. But 
whereas America and Europe 
could quickly agree on ways to 
contain the threat from the East, 
joint strategies for dealing with 
the problems of the South are 
far more elusive, as the Euro- 
U.S. gap on Iran indicates. 

The struggle between Wash- 
ington and Paris over who 
should command NATO’s 
southern headquarters is symp- 
tomatic of an era of increased 
disaccord between Europe and 
the United States. 

Washington sees its interests 
in die Middle East as paramount 
and insists on maintaining the 
command in American hands. 
Paris wants a European attuned 
to file dangers of Algeria. Bosnia 


China Masks the Bigger Problem 


W ASHINGTON — Pre- 
vailing wisdom, pro- 


VV vailing wisdom, pro- 
moted by multinational con- 
glomerates and embraced by 
President Bill Clinton, holds 
that China’s middle-class con- 
sumers will lift all boats. The 
Cassandra school foresees a 
flood of low-wage exports that 
will swamp the global system. 

The problem with malting 
China file focus of the glob- 
alization debate is that glor- 
ifying or demonizing what 
Communist leaders call “mar- 
ket socialism with Chinese 
characteristics” misses the 
larger point The real issue 
should be the flawed nature of 


By William Grader 

First of two articles . 


file global system itself. 
If China succeeds in be 


If China succeeds in becom- 
ing a world economic leader, 
its scale may push the manic 
logic of global capitalism to 
predictably dangerous conclu- 
sions: increased loss of jobs 
from higher-paying deve loped 
countries to the Third World, 
and overproduction of goods 
relative to demand. 

China will do exactly what 
global capitalism permits and 
even encourages. Beijing is 
following the Japanese model 
of developing sophisticated 
manufacturing but “with Chi- 
nese characteristics.” It in- 
tends to build a world-class 
industrial base and become a 
major exporter of technolo- 
gical goods — cars, chemic- 
als, steel, electronics, even 
commercial aircraft. 

Multinationals from Boeing 
to Volvo, from Airbus to Mit- 


subishi. are trading elements 
of production in order to sell 
aircraft or cars to die Chinese. 
China, like many others before 
it. demands jobs and techno- 
logy as the price of entry. 

At the huge assembly hails 
of Xian Aircraft, I saw ma- 
chinists who earn $50 a month 
assembling Volvo buses and 
the tail sections of Boeing 
737s. The workers are super- 
vised by Communist Pbty 
cadres. “If you want some- 
thing done,” Boeing's plant 
manager told me. “you go to 
the party member and it’s 
done — like that ” 

Rigid control over the work 
force has always been part of 
what economists call the 
“comparative advantage” of 
manufacturing in very poor 
countries. In Indonesia, the 
ruling ideology is right-wing 
rather than Marxist, but the 
suppression of workers’ rights 
is nearly as harsh as in China. 

Malaysia's burgeoning elec- 
tronics industry is based on an 
explicit promise to American 
semiconductor companies that 
workers will be barred from 
unionizing. When it considered 
lifting this ban, American 
companies threatened to move 
to China or Vietnam. 

China’s industrial strategy is 
not secret It publishes blue- 
prints. industry by industry, 
elaborating how it intends to 


focus on certain export mar- 
kets. Party bureaucrats envis- 
age a car industry as large as 
North America's within 15 
years, with a capacity way be- 
yond the potential demand at 
home. The shoddier cars can be 
sold domestically, higher-qual- 
ity models will be exported. 

China’s vision is not as im- 


probable as many assume. 
Volvo now ships assembly 


Volvo now ships assembly 
kits made in Sweden to its 
Xian plant, but accepts that its 
buses will soon be made of at 
least 90 percent Chinese parts. 
A manager of the Xian Air- 
craft Co., which is run by the 
military, boasted that it 
“already has almost the man- 
ufacturing level to produce 
one whole aircraft at the level 
of the Boeing 737.” 

Boeing's strategists do not 
scoff at this claim. China 
hopes that with the help of 
international partners it can 
launch its own “Asian Air- 
bus," modeled after the gov- 
ernment-subsidized aircraft 
consortium in Europe. Why 
denounce Beijing for copying 
Bonn and Pans? 

Boeing wants a piece of the 
new venture — a smart stra- 
tegy for the company, if not 
for machinists and engineers 
in Seattle. 


or Turkey to command the al- 
liance’s southern ground forces. 

The divergence arises in part 
from geography. Europe’s 
South is not America's. Mex- 
ico, with its problems of cor- 
ruption, drug smuggling, emig- 
ration and social unrest, is not a 
high priority for Europe. 

Beyond the Cold War, stra- 
tegy becomes geography. Thai 


point was brought home in an 
interview with Micbel Bamier. 


interview with Micbel Bamier, 
France's minister for European 
affairs and a rising star in Pres- 
ident Jacxjues Chirac’s cabinet, 
Mr. Bamier predicts that, con- 
trary to most expectations, the 
15-member European Uniori 
w'fil before year’s end establish 
a coordinated approach to for- 
eign policy "on problems that 
exist on Europe's periphery.” i 
This “will not involve a 
unique approach on all sub 1 
jects,' ’ he acknowledged. “But 1 


expect that the European Uniori 
will fix a common line on our 
relations with Russia, file Bal* 
kans, Turkey and the Maghreb,’ t 
as the Arab countries of North 
Africa are known. “The peri 1 
pheiy is where we start.” j 
America’s global power and 
responsibilities make the world 
its periphery. Keeping Euro} 
pean-American cooperation in 
sync in an era when the prob- 
lems of the Third World, not 
Europe’s South, may well dom- 
inate the global agenda will be 
one of Secretary Albright’s 
most challenging tasks. 

The Washington Post. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS A 

1897: Greeks Mobilize the long periods spent waic 


ATHENS — The war fever con- 
tinues here unabated. King 
George and the Government, de- 
fying the ultimatum of the Great 
Powers, have now decided to 
undertake war against Turkey 
and to put the whole army on a 
war footing. The total strength of 
the Greek army mobilized is ex- 
pected to amount to 50,000 men. 
The third class of the marine 
reservists has been called out 


the long periods spent waiting in 
the open air in ail weathers. * 


1947: A Lesson of Wait- £ 


1922: Cold Queues 


The writer is author most 
recently of ” One World, 
Ready or Not: The Manic Lo- 
gic of Global Capitalism. ” He 
contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


PARIS — A forlorn hope, fa- 
miliar in many capitals, is being 
revived in Paris by M_ Renfi 
Fiquet, a Municipal Councillor, 
who proposes thar theatre 
queues be abolished. He has 
written to the Prefect of Police 
asking to institute instead of the 


queue a system of distributing 
numbered tickets at the theatre 


doors, thereby avoiding the risk 
to public health brought about by 


PARIS — [The Herald says in an 
Editorial:] America has beai 
taught a grim lesson in the feefc 
of international life. The lesson 
is thar there are limits to the readi 
of our own aims and desire*. 
Booted into the war as we were] 
we fought to defend our own 
democratic system. But we also 
entertained exaggerated ideas of 
the extent to which victory in our 
own defense would automatic* 
ally establish our democratic 
system throughout the rest of the 
world. We expected that the 
world would make itself over in 
our own image and that it would 
*us be simple to deal with the 
Soviet Union. All these were if-* 
lusions. The only aims which we 
pan make good are those aims 
behind which we are willing ro 
put our beliefs, our money and 
ow earnest effort 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


tAUJC- V* 




It s Time to Expose Watergate II to Public View 


UN has fc, : 

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fWTASHINGTON - The "high 

L V J , of Wa,CT gaie was 

Richard Nixon’s abuse of his While 
House power to affect his 1972 re- 
election- That same offense — the 

, n nn.-. Ult 


By William Safi re 


The president chose to place his 
administration in the occasion of 
political sin — namely, bribery. Two 


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wait of today s campaign scandal. 

In a democracy, no official may use 
jovemment power for the political 
snpose of staying in power. That 
p™ciple was subvened in 
the Oval Office on Sept. 13, 199S 
^ The Indonesian head of the Lippo 
Group, James Rjady, was present, as 
fas the employee he had placed in the 
key trade post in Commerce. John 
Huang. Joseph Girotr Jr. was there, 
Jthe lawyer who had hired then-Gov- 
pnw Bill Clinton’s wife. Hillary, at 
• |he Rose Law Firm, who is now doing 
Piady business in China. A Clinton 
confidant, Bruce Lindsey, sat in to 
cany out any decision made in that 
Jueeting by the president 
t Under Washington’s portrait, on 
federal property, one participant re- 
commended tbar President Clinton 
reassign Mr. Huang from his gov- 
ernment job to a political fund-raising 
§ob, where he could extract contri- 
butions for favors done and favors 
yet to come. 




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oy Congress. the White House deputy 
chief of staff was on the phone to 
“Johnnie Huang." 

In his crabbed writing, Mr. Ickes 
noted that Mr. Huang had told him 
that “55 million overseas Chinese 
live outside China." That included 
"Silicon Valley — ',4 of the compa- 
nies are [illegible] by Chinese and 
Indians ... 1 2% of population in Cali- 
fornia is Asian Pacific. ...” 

Having evoked this horde of po- 
tential contributors, Mr. Huang set 
out his job requirements to Mr. Ickes: 
“Willing to move out of DNC. but 

needs a wearable [?] title How to 

leave Commerce ... perhaps retain 
as an unpaid consultant. ... He met 
with [the DNC finance chairman] 
Marvin Rosen.” 


such access to U.S. intelligence, 
which was surely impressive to Lippo 
in Indonesia and the Chinese Em- 
bassy in Washington, with which he 
never lost contact, 

Mr. Huang then used Mr. Clinton's 
governmental power to extract more 
than S3 million in illegal political 
largesse from Asian sources — at Mr. 
Clinton’s direction, with Mr. Clin- 
ton's active White House cooperation 
and effusive praise. 

One year later, Mr. Ickes noted on 


followed by a reminder of the 
Criminal Code 607a about fund-rais- 
ing on federal property and its section 
44 le against soliciting from foreign 
nationals. 

Doing justice will now compete 
with exposing the truth. This week. A! 
Gore all but invited a legal test of his 
fund-raising calls from the White 
House, while Senator Fred Thompson 
pressed the Senate Rules Committee 
to let him hire the staff needed for 
public hearings. 

Obfuscating Democrats pretend 
that the crime is what is legal, as if that 


The Debate Over Dolly Marks 
A Philosophical Turning Point 

By Jessica Mathews 

W ASHINGTON — Thinking about the manipulate the gene in all kinds of ways, 
post-Dolly world, let it first be clear including transferring it from cell to cell or 


that there will never be a human clone in the 
sense tftar that word is generally understood, 
namely as an exact replica of another in- 


species to species. These were the dis- 
coveries that made bioengineering pos- 
sible, and they are the ones that have 


dividual. As applied to humans, a clone is a changed our lives — and perhaps the nature 
literary conceit, not a scientific possibility, of human nature — forever. 


his yellow pad: "Safire — 10/4/96 — excuses the commission er the most 
called J. Huang. Doesn't return call, egregiously illegal. Such sophistry 
Safire won't take a [unfinished both obstructs the truth and perverts 
thought]." Hmm. On that day, one justice. The Senate majority leader. 


month before the election, I did call 
the little-known John Huang at the 
DNC and would not accept as a sub- 
stitute a call from Marvin Rosen, the 
finance chairman, who wanted only to 
blame the DNC's then-chairman. Don 
Fowler, for Mr. Huang's doings. 
Evidently the DNC immediately 


The deed was done. The Riadys's called its de facto boss. Mr. Ickes at 


man was made vice chairman of DNC 
finance. The prospect of remaining 
a government consultant was the 
device by which Mr. Huang retained 
his top-secret security clearance. He 
was the only DNC "operative with 


the White House, to warn of interest at 
The New York Times about the Com- 
merce official whom Mr. Clinton put 
at Lhe DNC to milk Asia. 

On Oct. 7. “The Asian Connec- 
tion" appeared in this space, soon 


T rent Lott, should force a floor vote to 
fund Senator Thompson’s committee 
without further delay. Let’s see how 
many senators want to go on record 
favoring a cover-up. 

Although independent counsel is 
in the wings, that does not absolve 
Congress from its duty to expose 
Watergate II to public view. Then, 
as before. Congress will dutifully 
pass and the president will solemnly 
sign laws for officials with a lust 
for re-election in the next generation 
to ignore. 

The New York Tunes. 


A cloned sheep proves that it will prob- 
ably soon be possible to make a genetically 
identical copy of a person, but that is not 

MEANWHILE 

remotely the same thing as making another 
you or another me. 

This is so because a human's genetic 
inheritance is not, as xbe usual metaphor 


Within the next 10 years, the 60.000 to 
1 00,000 genes in the human genome will 
have been fully deciphered. Long before 
then, this flood of genetic information, 
combined with what biotechnology can do. 
will change the way we think about 
ourselves and our children-to-be and chal- 
lenge ethics, religion, social values, per- 
sonal privacy and legal protections. 

When genetic screening becomes 


portrays it, a precise and fixed blueprint. It routine, will pregnancy become a matter of 


is. rather, a set of changeable potentialities 
that act on an individual's environment and 
are acted upon by it. Much more than any 
other species, we are the result of nature 
(genes) and nurture (environment) — not 


choosing among fetuses with hundreds of 
different dangerous or undesirable traits? 
What will it mean for religion when char- 
acteristics that have been innate through all 
of human history become a matter of 


merely the sum of the two but the product of choice? Do we share our genetic predis- 


a constant interplay between them. 


positions with a prospective spouse? Would 


A physical or emotional characteristic of we want to know them ourselves — do we 
our environment interacts with a particular have a "right" not to know? 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


finish the Wall 

* Regarding “The Wall That 
Never Went Up" {March 1): 
° In correspondence from 
the group that was to build the 


but the result of efforts by 
a monied, influential group 
of Americans of Cuban 
descent. 

I am also appalled to 
see that the Lfmted States 


to march over the borders of who fled after the coup in 
its neighbors again, when it Indonesia? Why? Because 


Wall of Liberty, I and other justifies itself in this by citing 


U.S. "security interests.” 
Arguing that Cuba is a seri- 
ous threat to tbe United States 
is about as credible as jus- 
tifying NATO expansion 
by saying that Russia is about 


"ase w— 

Omstoktom 

wARAP 

mm m 


Veterans were assured that it 
■would be completed in time 
fbr the 50th anniversary ce- 
remonies in Normandy in 
?une 1994. 

I was particularly eager to 
make sure that the name of 
fene of my friends, James 
(pieary — who parachuted in- 
to France with me in 1944 — 
would be inscribed on the 
ifcafl. 7 filled out the form and 
Was told that his name would 
appear. He was killed in ac- 
tion during the terrible Battle 
‘of the Bulge, on Dec. 27. 
1944, tbe day after his 19th 
birthday. 

l l Whatever happened to the 
tooney raised for it, the wall 
Should be completed — with 
'government help if necessary 
Vf- in order to honor those 
courageous American sol- 
diers who gave their lives to 
free Europe from Nazi dom- 
ination. 

T. FORAN de SAffcfT-BAR. 

Nemfly-aur-Seine^ France . : • 

An American Affair 

Regarding "US. Rebuffs 
WTO Probe of Cuba Sanc- 
tions" (Feb. 21): 

As an American overseas, I 
jtim embarrassed by such a 
"ijamowJy focused, protection- 
ist law as the Helms-Burton 
“AcL 

Regularly asked to explain 
jSiis mystifying measure, I 
jnust explain that it is not a 
normal, sound U.S. policy 


Education 

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can't even afford to feed its 
army. 

Cuba is barely carrying on 
at the moment, and targeting 
it for sanctions is nothing 
more than a transparent at- 


it's in the economic interests 
of the United States ro invest 
in the rapidly expanding mar- 
ket there. 

Of course the European 
Union is miffed at the U.S. 
attempt to punish it for 
something that is strictly an 


tempt at vengeance for a attempt to punish it f 
handful of citizens. something that is strictly ; 

Why do we Americans not American affair, 
have a similar program for, SHARON RJGGLE. 

say, Indonesian-Araericans Brussels. 






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Sex Harassment 

Regarding “A Chorus of 
Discord Over Se.x Harass- 
ment'' f Opinion , Feb. 25) by 
Ellen Goodman: 

While I’m inclined to 
agree with Ms. Goodman that 
sexual harassment charges 
against President Bill Clinton 
are unwarranted, I certainly 
don’t subscribe to her reas- 
oning. 

That reasoning suggests 
that any man can drop his 
pants in front of any woman 
— once — and must desist 
only when given to under- 
stand that the behavior is un- 
welcome. Fortunately, laws 
against indecent exposure im- 
ply the reverse. First the wel- 
come signal, then tbe trouser 
drop. 

Paula Jones's charges 
are serious. Situations such 
as the one she describes 
should be of concern to us 
all. 

Also, Ms. Goodman ben- 
efits from hindsight when she 
asserts that Ms. Jones’s job 
was not threatened. 

BARBARA FLECK. 

Mannheim, Germany. 


genetic endowment to elicit a particular 
behavior that in turn puts the individual into 
a particular environment and so on and on in 
an endlessly complex pattern that makes a 
person unique. 

Identical twins reared separately provide 
a rough idea of how similar cloned people 
would be. While eerily alike in some re- 
spects, these genetically identical individu- 
als also can be quite different. Clones would 
be even less alike because they would not 
have shared the same uterine environment. 
So much for apocalyptic visions of multiple 
Hitlers or even of the fantasy of reproducing 
oneself. 

Dolly is an exciting scientific step be- 
cause until now it was thought that cell 
differentiation in a higher organism — the 
pattern of gene expression through which 


If, as is likely, it becomes possible to alter 
genes that give rise to inherited diseases 
wouldn't we say yes to human eugenics? 
What about improving intelligence? Where 
will we draw lines? 

What will happen if/when the genetically 
screened rich begin to diverge from the 
mass of humankind? How will the rest of 
the world feel about a global commerce 
based on genetic intellectual property — 
once considered God's work or nature’s — 
and all of it owned by companies in the 
developed world? 

In one sense, Dolly is best understood as 
one drop in a towering wave that is about to 
crash over us. The achievement will prove 
enormously valuable if it galvanizes us into 
readying ourselves for this inundation of 
helpful, treacherous, value-shattering and 


an embryonic cell becomes a liver cell or a life-saving information. Americans will 


taste bud — is a one-way process that could 
not run backward. Dolly’s genetic parent 
cell was in effect tricked into starting over. 
Animal cloning opens up enormous com- 
mercial opportunities with benefits for hu- 
man health, food and more. And it promises 
tremendous insights into the cellular basis 
of aging — is Dolly seven months old. or six 
years and seven months, the age of the cell 
from which she was replicated? 

For all that, however, this is more a 
philosophical than a scientific turning 
point The great breakthroughs came 25 
years ago with the discoveries that made it 
possible to done genes: that is, the ability to 
fish out one gene from among the tens of 
thousands in an organism and make any 
number of copies of that particular stretch 
of DNA. With that came the ability to 


have to divorce the discussion of what 
should be allowed and what should not from 
the debate about abortion. The link is 
through research on human embryos. Re- 
sponses to Dolly this past week have ranged 
from Just Say No (ban human cloning and 
related work) to Just Do It (allow what 
comes but keep government regulation out). 
Neither is realistic. Sdence and commerce 
will march on. What now seems incom- 
prehensible will be routine. The only good 
outcome is sensible, humane regulation, 
based not on courtroom decisions but on 
broad, informed public debate. Understand- 
ing the science is the first, essential step. 

The writer, a senior fellow at the Council 
on Foreign Relations, contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Post. 


BOOKS 


WHITTAKER CHAMBERS: 

A Biography 

By Sam Tanenhaus. Illustrated. 638 
pages. $35. Random House. 

Reviewed by Richard Bernstein 

F EW things are as satisfying as a life 
story that rekindles the spirit of an 
era and presents its subject in a way that 
Sophocles would have understood: as 
the confrontation of character with cir- 
cumstance. 

Sam Tanenhaus 's "Whittaker Cham- 
bers: A Biography " is that kind of story . 

If anything about Chambers’s life is not 
in dispute (though after this book, a lex 
of old arguments ought to wither away), 
it is that be was fijJly engaged in his time. 
He Lived only 60 years, but he seems to 
have crammed the entire 20th century 
into that brief and tormented span. 

Chambers was most famous, of 
course, as the accuser of Alger Hiss, tbe 
well-bred and imperiously cool former 
State Department official who was con- 
victed of peijury in 1950, the perjury 
charge being a legal technicality that 
stood in the Hiss case for espionage. 

Tbe Chambers-Hiss battle, as it 
played out in the courtroom and in the 
press, was as much a national obsession 
as, say, the trial of O J. Simpson nearly 
half a century later. It was one of those 
battles on which whole systems of belief 
depended, one that mirrored the most 
emotion -laden political divisions exist- 
ing in American society. 

Tanenhaus ’s meticulous account of 
the Chambers-Hiss case is the kind of 
writing that can keep you propped up 
against your pillow late at night. It is 
sober and careful and patient; Tanen- 
haus stays out of the way so that tbe facts 
rather than his explanations or inter- 
pretations give the story its weight mid 
force. His overall conclusion, that Hiss 
was a member of a Communist cell in 
the 1930s and passed secret documents 
to Chambers, is important though not 
surprising; other writers, especially Al- 


len Weinstein in his 1979 book “Per- 
jury," have made the same finding, 
despite Hiss’s denials. 

But the bean of Tanenhaus’s bio- 
graphy is Chambers himself, his in- 
tellectual and moral trajectory and the 
way in which his life intersected with 
those of so many figures, major and 
minor, in 20th-century American his- 
tory. There are Henry Luce, Richard 
Nixon, Dean Acheson, Walter Lipp- 
mann. Hairy Truman and various Com- 
munist operatives, FBI agents and 
members of tbs New York intellectual 
establishment, all with a role in Tan- 
enhaus’s large tapestry. 

Of the Hiss case, Tanenhaus writes 
that what set it apart "was not its mys- 
tery but the passionate belief of so many 
that Hiss must be innocent no matter 
what the evidence. ’ ' 

One of the reasons many people at the 
time believed in Hiss’s innocence — 
including such prominent journalists as 
James Reston, Lippmann and AJ. 
Liebling — was the character of Cham- 
bers himself. He was seen by many 
people at the time as an insidious figure, 
rumpled, lacking in charm, a confessed 
former Communist a liar and a spy who 
had become so militantly anti -Commu- 
nist. so stentorian and hard-line in his 
warnings of the threat posed by in- 
ternational communism that he ap- 
peared to be a right-wing fanatic. 

The impression gained credibility 
when Chambers was compared to Hiss, 
whose credentials as an establishment 
liberal seemed unimpeachable. Tanen- 
haus shows that image was not alto- 
gether wrong. 

"The awful fact, which Chambers 
could not admit — and never did — was 
that his own world view, stripped of its 
lyrical refinements and humanist vi- 
brato. had helped bring McCarthyism 
into existence," Tanenhaus writes. 
Still, his portrait of Chambers is a very 
sympathetic one. For all of his mistakes, 
Chambers emerges in this biography as 
a man with a powerful intellect, an 


enduring moral vision and, above all 
else, the courage of his convictions. 

The oldest son of a troubled middle-' 
class family from the suburbs of New 
York, Chambers dropped out of 
Columbia University and escaped into a 
kind of working-class vagabondage in 
the South. His younger brother, Richard, 
committed suicide in 1926 and shortly 
after that, convinced of the moral bank-; 
ruptcy of capitalism. Chambers became 
a dues-paying, card-carrying member of 
the Communist Party, a revolutionary. 

Tanenhaus tells fascinating stories of 
Chambers's life in the party, especially 
when he went underground between 
1932 and 1937, delivering a regular haul 
of secret documents collected from the 
espionage cell he ran in Washington to a 
Soviet contact in New York. 

Chambers’s escape from his under-; 
ground existence makes for exciting 
reading. Eventually, after a couple of 
years in virtual hiding, he came out of 
the cold, getting a job at Time magazine 
and becoming one of Luce's closest and 
most admired writers. 

Then came the end of World War IE 
and the investigations by the House 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 
led by the young Richard Nixon, who, 
as one colleague correctly charged, had 
"one eye on today's evidence and the 
other on tomorrow’s headlines." 

Finally, there was the strange, even 
Byzantine tale of the Pumpkin Papers (so 
named because Chambers hid an incrim- 
inating 10-year-old cache of secret State 
Department documents in a hollo wed- 
out pumpkin on his Maryland farm be- 
fore turning them over to the FBI) and 
two Hiss trials, the first ending in a hung 
jury, the second in.cooviction. 

All of this remarkable story is told 
clearly, authoritatively and with won- 
derful richness of detail by Tanenhaus. 
who never loses sight of the complexity 
of his subject. 

Richard Bernstein is on the staff of 
The New York Times. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


W HEN annual world 
championships began 
after World War II, the first 
three were won by American 
teams with a nucleus of 
Howard Schenken, John 
Crawford, Sam S layman and 
George Rapee. The only sur- 
vivor is Rapee, who at age 81 
still plays in major events. 

In the 1953 world cham- 
pionship, Rapee held the 
South hand in the diagram. 
He found himself in game in 
hearts after bis opponent, who 
tended to overcail with shaky 
suits, had bid one heart over 
the one-diamond opening. 


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right. The club ace was 
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mff, and East perhaps 
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tricks. After South cashed the 
diamond ace he reached the 
position shown at right 
When another diamond 
winner was led. East ruffed 
with the heart king and South 
threw a club. Another chib 


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with the three, shortening his 
trumps, and led a spade to the 
ace. 

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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 1997 


HEALTH/SCIENCE 




Death and Dignity: The Things That Don’t Get Said 


By Esther B. Fein 

New York Times Service 



EW YORK — Joan Siff and 
her father. Martin Isaacs, 
were as close, she thought, as 

_ parent and child could be. 

She had always enjoyed die facility of 
his mind and the generosity of his bean. 
Though he never went to college, they 
would have lengthy talks about classical 
literature and class division in American 
society. His passion was poetry, and in 
1991. Mrs. SifTs sons. Andrew and 
Michael, published a volume of their 
grandfather’s verse as a family legacy. 

But for all the time they spent talking 
about his life, Mrs. Siff and her father 
never talked about his death. When he 
was healthy, working as a social worker 
for New York City, ft never occurred to 
Mis. Siff to raise the subject. 

As he aged. Mr. Isaacs had no real 
physical problems until be reached his 
late 80s, when he suffered a series of 
strokes that compromised his memory, 
his balance and eventually his thinking. 
Yet even then, as the situation grew 
more urgent, father and daughter never 
talked about death. 

Mrs. Siff and Mr. Isaacs are not un- 
usual. For all the vociferous political 
debates about how best to allow jreopte to 
die with dignity, few people discuss with 
their doctors or their families what kind 
of treatment they want when they are 
dying. 

For Mrs. Siff, the fact that Mr. Isaacs 
never spoke to her or to his own doctor 
about the care he wanted at the end of 
life meant that three times during her 
father's hospitalization, as he lay in a 
coma she was alone in making wrench- 
ing decisions about how aggressively 
doctors should treat him, decisions that 
she says still haunt her more than a year 
after his death. 

“If people don’t express whai they 
want, or someone doesn’t do it for them. 


it’s a matter of pure luck if they get what 
want.” said Dr. Robert G. 


they want.” said Dr. Robert G. New- 
man, president and chief executive at 
Beth Israel Medical Center in Man- 
hattan and an ardent supporter of pa- 
dents' rights. “There’s a spectrum of 
horror to blessing in the death process. 
To leave it to luck is foolhardy at best, 
dangerous at worst.” 


J OAN SIFF said she thought 
little about death until Oct. 23, 
1995, when an ambulance 
brought her 91-year-old father, 
Martin Isaacs, to the Beth Israel emer- 
gency room. He was disoriented, fever- 
ish and suffering from bedsores. Senility 
had robbed him of his ability to speak for 
himself, and his wife, Mrs. Siff’ s step- 
mother. was too emotionally fragile to 
make decisions for him. Mrs. Siff as- 
sumed the role of her father’s advocate. 

After several difficult days, Mr. 
Isaacs' bedsores began healing. A social 
worker was putting together a plan to 
send him home. But then, at 6:30 P.M. 


on Nov. 1, a nurse on routine rounds 
found (hat Mr. Isaacs had stopped 
breathing. His blood pressure had 
plummeted so low. she could not get a 
reading. He was deathly pale. 

Doctors raced to his room and per- 
formed cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 
They revived his heart, but Mr. Isaacs 
fell into a coma. Unable to breathe on 
his own. he bad a stiff tube inserted 
down his throat and into his lungs, and 
he was attached to a ventilator. 

Instead of going home, he was trans- 
ferred to the intensive care unit. 

The next day. Dr, Yoav Borsuk, a 
second-year resident in internal medi- 
cine. and Dr. Paul Mayo, co-director of 
the medical intensive care unit, sat down 
with Mrs. Siff and her stepmother to 
discuss Mr. Isaacs’ condition. 

His brain was functioning only min- 
imally. There was scant chance he 
would breathe again without the vent- 
ilator. Although he had stopped writing 
poetry years earlier, he would now no 
longer even appreciate hearing its 
rhythms. 

“Dr. Mayo was so kind.” said Mrs. 
Siff, a teacher of adult education. “The 
first thing he said was: ‘Tell rae about 
Mr. Isaacs. I only see him now, like this, 
but tell me what he was like when he 
was young and healthy.’ ” 

Nonetheless, Mrs. Siff said her meet- 
ing with Dr. Mayo and Dr. Borsuk was 
devastating. For the first time, she real- 
ized that her father was dying, and she 
was forced to make what she said was 
the most difficult decision of her life. 

Dr. Borsuk, the resident, noted in the 
chart that Mrs. Siff and her stepmother 
* ‘expressed their wishes that no aggres- 
sive medical treatment or intervention 
be taken because ‘he suffered so much 
so far.' ” Dr. Mayo's note in the chart, 
however, indicated that the family was 
still struggling with what such an ap- 
proach meant, considering that Mr. 
Isaacs was attached to a respirator that 
could keep his hopeless body techni- 
cally alive fora long time. “The family 
does not request active disconnect,” Dr. 
Mayo wrote, “but rather a peaceful 
completely noninterventional approach 
leading to peaceful death." 

To give the family time to absorb the 
reality of Mr. Isaacs' condition, Mayo 
said he waited a day before discussing 
with diem whether they wanted to place 
in his chart a “do not resuscitate," or 
DNR, order, instructing doctors not to 
revive him should he suffer the kind of 
attack he had four days earlier. 

Mrs. Siff 3gonized over the decision. 
“I am in general a believer in not keep- 
ing people alive if in general they are 
more dead, but I had a hard time signing 
something saying that they shouldn't 
save my father, she said. “If he had 
told me, if we had talked, it would be 
different Maybe he would want those 
few extra weeks or days no matter what 
It's possible. I don't think he would, but 
without ever having spoken directly 
about it I'm just guessing." 





Fnd R. OPBadfTbe Ne» YoritTlmo 

Joan Siff and her father, Martin Isaacs: They never talked about death. 


Chi Nov. 5, after getting the full sup- 
port of her family, Mrs. Siff signed the 
request asking doctors not to revive her 
father if his heart stopped. 

Days passed with no improvement in 
Mr. Isaacs* condition. He developed 
bacterial pneumonia. Dr. Patricia Vil- 
lameoa, an attending physician in pul- 
monary and critical care medicine, 
gently suggested to Mrs. Siff that she 
consider disconnecting her father from 
the machine that inflated his lungs 10 
times a minute, a hissing and whooshing 
sound accenting each artificial breath. 

Mrs. Siff was stunned Agreeing to 
the “do not resuscitate” order, not 


knowing her father's wishes, had been 
torturous. This decision seemed unbear- 
able. “The question of whether he lived 
or died was on my bead" she said 
Though it is often a brutal process, it 
is critical to be direct, even blunt, with 
families. Dr. ViHamena said Too often, 
she said, doctors resort to medical jar- 
gon or euphemisms, either because they 
want to preserve a kind of superiority 
over patients and families or out of sheer 
discomfort. But that only intimidates 
and confuses families. “When it's true, 
you need to use absolute terms, like 
'There's no hope,' ” Dr. ViHamena 
said * ‘That allows families and patients 


to tnaieei appropriate decisions with the 
least amount of guilt and grief.” 

As she visited her father and stared 
for hours at his withered body, tethered 
to a web of tubes, Mrs. Siff said she 
became lost trying to fathom what he 
would want and what she had a right to 
do. 

Although a few months earlier, on the 
advice of an estate lawyer, she had had 
her father sign a document na m i n g her 
as his health proxy, Mrs. Siff doubled 
his capacity to understand what he was 
signing and why. Even at that point, the 
two did not talk about “end of life” care 
and death. 

Riven by indecision, Mrs. Sin turned 
to Navah Harlow, who started as Beth 
Israel’s first patient advocate in 1979 
and is now director of its 14-person 
department of medical ethics. With Mrs. 
Harlow's help, Mrs. Siff scoured her 
memory for conversations with her fa- 
ther, searching for a hint of what he 
might have wanted. 

When Mrs. SifTs mother was dying 
of rheumatoid arthritis, her father fret- 
ted about the tormenting stream of test- 
ing and probing that would never 
change the fact that the woman he so 
adored, a woman just 48 years old, 
would soon die. She also remembered a 
discussion about the landmark case of 
Karen Ann Quinlan, whose parents suc- 
cessfully argued to the New Jersey Su- 
preme Court that they had the right to 
disconnect their brain -dead daughter 
from a respirator. 

“I remembered he had said. ‘It’s sad, 
but it’s not a life,' ' ’ Mrs. Siff recalled. 


On Nov. 8. Mrs. Siff finally 
asked that her father be discon- 
nected from the ventilator. Jn a letter . 
to Dr. Viilamena. she wrote that, al- 
though her father had left no written 
directions for his death, “he would 
clearly be opposed to. any extraordinary 
means of life support” and “would 
wish to carry on in a namral way without 

mechanical intervention." 




N Nov. 10. 18 days after M£ 
Isaacs was admitted to the 
hospital. Dr. Debora£ 

Ushkow withdrew the tube 

that ran from the ventilator down Mr/ 
Isaacs' throat to his lungs and shut th* 
machine off. 

The room went suddenly quiet Mr. 
Isaacs’ pulse was a steady 82 beats a 
minute. His blood pressure was a weak 
90/40. He was taking 1 6 labored breaihg 
a minute on his own. An hour and a half 
later, at 2:15 P.M., he was pronounced 
dead. 

A year later, Mrs. Siff still revisits he; 
decision. She asks herself whether m 
some way she betrayed her father: did 
she allow him to die in a way he might 
not have wanted? She is haunted by 
ambiguity. •> 

“It's a good thing for healthy people 
not to be obsessed by death, but you 
have to be prepared,” she said. h 
And yet, with all that she has exs 
peri raced, Joan Siff has not chosen a 
health proxy for herself; nor has she 
written out her wishes for when her own 
end nears. K 



^ stri ng 






3 Patients 9 3 Tough Decisions — and 3 Deaths 

.. .. . — _ ■ t A AA ■ T - ** i I — 1 MAn. fn ■mrlovotanrl 



New York Times Service 

EW YORK — Twenty 
people died at Beth Israel 
Medical Center from Nov. 1 
to Nov. 11,1 995. Each death 
was a personal loss, but together, the 
cases offer a glimpse of the complicated 
decisions that arise when death nears 
and the aversion people have to talking 
about such matters in advance. Some 
deaths were swift, others slow. Some 
families talked about how to manage 
pain but not how to manage dying. 

Here are three of the cases. 


A Joint Decision 

At 4:20 P.M., a 42-year-old man with 
AIDS died after suffering a severe case 
of pneumonia. He had been in the hos- 
pital for two and a half months, since 
Aug. 17, when his companion brought 
him in, weak and fatigued. 

Unable to eat on his own, he had a 
feeding tube inserted. His condition see- 
sawed. but social workers felt he would 
eventually be able to go home. Com- 
plications in arranging home care 


got the proper approvals Ocl 20, he 
developed an infection and a fever. He 
was no longer alert or able to speak for 
himself. 

His companion signed a “do not re- 
suscitate" order. 

Unlike removing someone from life 
support — which requires the consent of 
a health proxy or the advance instruc- 
tions of the patient, as in a living will — 
a relative or close friend can act as a 
surrogate for a mentally incompetent 
patient for the purpose of signing an 
advance order to withhold resuscitation, 
since it does not involve the removal of 
treatment but rather the decision not to 
initiate specific treatment. 

When the man’s parents arrived a day 
later, on Oct. 22, his mother signed the 
no-resuscitation form. His condition 
continued to worsen. He did not live 
long enough to go home. 


Five days later, her heart stopped. 
There was no “do not resuscitate” fonn 
in her chart, so doctors revived her and 
hooked her op to a ventilator. Despite 
aggressive medical intervention, vari- 
ous organs in her body began to fail. 

On Nov. 1. her sons signed a no- 
resuscitation order and requested that 
she be disconnected from the ventilator. 
The sons recalled that, after their father 
died, their mother had said she would 
not want to be kept alive on machines. 

That day, doctors examined the pa- 
tient and concluded that efforts to save 
her would be futile. The ethics com- 
mittee interviewed the sons and agreed 
with their decision. At 5 p jn_ the wo- 
man was taken off the ventilator. She 
died five minutes later. 


the man’s discharge. When he finally 


Recalling Mother’s Wish 
An 82-year-old woman, senile and 
suffering from leukemia, was trans- 
ferred to Beth Israel from a psychiatric 
hospital Ocl 26 after a weeklong caseof 
diarrhea left her dehydrated. 


Dealing With the Doctor 
While an 84-year-old retired doctor 
was clearly dying of chronic lymph- 
ocytic leukemia, his daughter said she 
was stunned at how blatantly her fa- 
ther’s doctor resisted following his 
slated wishes to try every treatment, 
every drag, every machine that could 
keep him alive. 


‘Doctors now seem to understand 
that when asituation is futile, a family or 
a patient has the right to end aggressive 
t reatmen t.” the daughter said. “But*I 
think the pendulum has swung too far, 
He wanted to keep pressing on, no mat- 
ter how infinitesimal the odds, and we 
were urged not to.” 

The physician said that because the 
patient was so weak during the 1 8 days 
he was hospitalized before his death, be 
spoke mostly to the daughter and that 
she refused to accept the hopelessness 
of her father's situation. 

“To me, to other doctors, death ap* 
peared imminent.” said the doctor, who 
reluctantly acceded to the patient's 
wishes. "She didn't want to hear it.” . 

In the end. both the daughter and 
doctor said, the patient agreed to stop 
aggressive treatments. He asked that he 
not be resuscitated should his heart stop 
and that he not be attached to a ventilator 
should he stop breathing. On Nov. 2, 
doctors began a steady drip of morphine 
into a vein to reduce his pain. 

He died later that day. 


Esther B. Fein 


MILAN FASHION 


The Celebrity Circus Folds, While Designers Play Musical Chairs 



By Suzy Menkes 

Imernarional Herald Tribune 



A spariding Lurex mini-dress from Byblos. 


ILAN — Apart 
from the un- 
seasonably warm 
spring weather, 
Italian fashion is mming down 
the heat Designers have aban- 
doned dramatics, the celebrity 
circus has folded and this in- 
dustrial city is reverting to 
type as a center of big bucks, 
commercial partnerships and 
designer musical chairs. 

The latest in that game is the 
arrival of American -based 
Richard Tyler at Byblos. But 
his eagerly awaited show on 
Wednesday turned out to be just 
another take on modernist 
trends, with spaikle reserved for 
the show’s glittering fabrics. 

So it is the backstage sto- 
ries that have made news in 
the opening days of Milan's 
fall/ win ter season; The 
launch of a joint fragrance 
venture between Ferragamo 
and the jeweler Bulgaru the 
potential appointment of the 
romantic Italian designer Lu- 
isa Beccaria to die French 
house of Chloe; expansion 
plans for a new line by the 
Genny group; and a deal be- 
tween GFT and Marzotto, 
two textile giants that under- 
pin Italian designer fashion. 

“Chic!” said Tyler, to sum 
up the message of his black 
tailoring, juiced with plum, 
gray ana glitter. He might just 
as well have said “cool,” for 
the boot-leg pants, tight in die 
thigh, the fly-front jackets, 
short coals over pants and 
layered dresses were all from 
the Gucci/Helmut Lang/Prada 


mold. The clothes were shown 
dead plain with a touch of pre- 
millennial decadence in the 
bruised colors — but we have 
seen all that before. Tyler's 
concession to Italian bravura 
(or maybe his Hollywood 
homej were brief dresses in 
Lurex jersey that looked sexy 
in a cheap way. The collection 
was modem and much more 
in sync with current fashion 
than recent Byblos shows, but 
Tyler needs to develop an 
identity for the line. 

Donatella Girombelli. pres- 
ident of the Genny group, 
which owns Byblos, said 
Tuesday that as well as taking 
on Tyler and making a new 
women’s line for the Amer- 
ican menswear designer John 
Bartlett she may add a new 
junior label and develop a 
design team on the Hermes 
model at Genny. 


with suede pants, ribbed knits 
that mixed navy with brown, 
and light scarf coats that ended 
in a wisp of fringe. Although 
the clothes sometimes seemed 
like accessories to dashing 
thigh-high boots, shoes with 
shapely heels and the new flat 
purses, Slowik should be cred- 
ited with developing Fer- 
ragamo’s clothing line from 
provincial sportswear to inter- 
national, modem style. 

Giovanna Ferragamo said 
at a post-show party that the 
house was sifting suitable 
candidates to lead the design 
team in Florence. 

Although the Milan show 


schedule is sniffed with sec- 
ondary designer lines. Gianni 
Versace withdrew his Istante 
toe from the runway and 
abandoned his familiar for- 
mula of sex. frocks and rock 
’n’ roll Instead, models 


posed in the showroom in 
crushed velvet outfits for 
what was described as a 
* ‘product presentation. 

Shapes were flat and linear, 
cut away from the body, using 
bicolor or graphic blocking to 
emphasize the straight, for- 
get-tbe-waist silhouette. 

That had a vaguely 1920s 
feel, with some stylized 
flower patterns and geometric 


inserts in vivid yellow, red 
and blue. 

The show Anna Molinari 
sent out was a riot of over- 
styling, from tiaras, rose -and - 
tulle hats through chandelier 
earrings and dangly neck- 
laces to bobby socks — with 
the models acting like Lolita 
let loose in mom’s closet. 
Molinari 's thing is knits; they 
were adorable as small sweat- 
ers with deep plunge, in lacy 
stitches, trimmed with fur or 
wafting marabou feathers and 
in sweet-and-sour mixes of 
colon spring green with pea- 
cock blue or sugar pink with 
flame red. 


Luisa Beccaria sent out a 


show for her disciples, an Itali- 
an clientele that applauded her 
feminine tailoring in pine 
green or plum and dresses rip- 
pling with romantic frills. Add 
matching hose, bar shoes and 
Botticelli curls and think of 
dressmaker details like smock- 
ing and waterfall ruffles. 

“I can’t talk about Chloe 
— it's very difficult because 
they want me to spend a lot of 
time in Paris and I have four 
children," said Beccaria, 
who made the point by taking 
a bow with her offspring 
dressed, like an Edwardian 
snapshot, in violet velveL 



3. 


r-j.iv r r 


CROSSWORD 


T HAT line is designed 
by another Americ- 
an, Rebecca Moses, 
who sent out a well- 
crafted collection from its open- 
ing scarlet coais curving over 
□arrow pants to its finale of a 
slinky red satin dress. It mixed 
very wide. soft, cuffed pants 
with strong tailoring, and gave a 
sense of tactile luxury with 
double-face wools, fur aims 
and velvet evening dresses with 
leaf patterns. 

At Ferragamo. the audience 
had “Georgia’ ’ cm its mind, as 
Ray Charles in a gilded bro- 
cade jacket upstaged the final 
collection of outgoing design- 
er Steven Slowik. His discreet 
show was all about the modem 
luxury of a fluid jersey jacket 


ACROSS 

i Pickle 
SKHngar 
portrayer. In 
WsW sTV 
• Tubby 
14 Chief 

Whitehorse, far 
one 


15 Cousin da 
clarinet 
i* Winning 
ir "Yeah, right!" 
i» First none in 
country 
is Explorer 
Amundsen 
» High points 


23 Places tor aces? 

24 Operculum 

25 Opposite ol 
post- 

2a Stone smoother 


5 Ontario city just 
west of BuflaJo 
5 Gives a yegg a 
hand 


I Mr. Jaggere's 
ward, tn Dickens 


7 BJbUcal atdre 
a Army's back 
section 


MAURIZIO GALANTE 


PARIS MARCH 1997 

PRESENTATION OF THE PRET-A^PORTER COLLECTION AUTUMN/WINTER 1997/1998 

PRESS OFFICE 4 SHOWROOM: MAURIZIO GALANTE S.A. ZZ RUE DE PAIESTRQ 75002 PARIS TEL. 01 55 3 + 3A 55 FAX 01 55 3A 55 50 



***** 


HOTEL METROPOLE 
GENEVE 

A PRIVILEGED PLACE l 
34,<wGenefblGuisan I21J Geneva 3 
Tel.: i41-22)318 32 00 
Fm: Ul-22} 318 33 00 

E-moilrvrww.mefropole.ch 


so Brat's Ghnstmss 
present 

31 Largest moon of 
Neptune 

33 Sounds of a teak 

34 Burdensome 


• Unit of 
capacitance 


37 Pandemonium 
w Hologram 
producers 
ae Gold war capital 

40 Price word 

41 Stand tora 
portrait 

44 Down 

45 Actress Tyler of 
90'sfflms 

4« Small quantity 
symbol. In matti 

48 Extremely 
exasperated 
si Flabbergast 
sa It's next to 
Mayfair, in 
London 

54 Signs 

•6 Director known 
tor spaghetti 
westerns 

se It's ai the same 
to mot 

57 CuL maybe 

55 Joined together 

se ‘It just tent ' 

ee Employees' 

ID's; Abbt. 


10 Sailor's 
salutation 

11 Hecrpe 
measure 

1 z Baseball's 

Bando 

13 Anomalous 

21 Turns Inside 
out 

22 Dance 
maneuver 

2e Enthralled 
27 City rattlers 

29 Like 19-Aeross's 
expeditions 

30 Ranks 

32 Broadcast 

33 Musical passage 
®4 Home’s hatter 
as Manual 

31 Door feature 




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€'/V«p York Times/Edited by Will Shorts} 


Solution to Puzzle of March 5 


37 Safer 

workpiece? 


40 Pizzeria 
order 


42 Twisty -homed 
animate 


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45 Drew m 
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Joblessness 
Stays Flat 
In Germany 

Economy Strengthened 


During the 4th Quarter 


^ 1 


t t ■- 





C(**p±<t hy Our Svff f n „ Dapochrs 

FRANKFURT — Germany will re- 
port Thursday that [be number of jobless 
workers rose by 14,000 in February, to a 
record 4,672.000. sources said Wed- 
nesday. 

Based on that figure, the country's 
seasonally adjusted unemployment rate 
frouid remain steady at 113 percent for 
the month, said Eckhard Schulte, an 
economist at IB J Bank in Frankfurt. 

'■ In January, the adjusted unemploy- 
ment level rose by' 160,000, to 
4,317,000 people. 

■ Separately. Bundesbank data re- 
leased Wednesday showed that the Ger- 
man economy was slightly stronger in 
the fourth quarter than previously be- 
lieved. 

.. But economists said die picture was 
still not one of a vigorous recovery — 
which would help allay some fears over 
meeting criteria for a single European 
currency — and that the outlook for the 
Current quarter remained slack because 
consumer demand remained subdued. 

Tbe German economy expanded by 
0.1 percent in the fourth quarter from the 
third, propelled by a 25 percent in- 
crease in investment in capital goods, 
the Bundesbank said. GDP growth was 
up 2.2 percent from die year-earlier 
quarter. 

- Bundesbank figures released two 
weeks ago had shown a 0.2 percent 
decline from die previous quarter. 

- * "These data show the economy was 
not as weak as we thought. At least now 
it's not a fall but a marginal rise.” said 
HolgerFahrinkrug an economist at UBS 
in Frankfurt. "Still, even these numbers 
are highly uncertain. Seasonal adjust- 
ments are putting a bias on die data. The 
2.2 percent in particular looks excess- 
ively strong." 

' Many economists believe the econ- 
omy remains sluggish in the current 
quarter, as witnessed by labor market 
Weakness and a decline in industrial 
ion in January. Industrial output 
1.7 percent from December, mainly 
because of a sharp fall in construction 
output, the Economics Ministry said. 

"The figures have, form, confirmed 
our belief That inflation won’t retreat 
and economic growth will pick op," 
said Dietmar Braun, a fund manager at 
DG Bank in Luxembourg. 

Record low borrowing costs and 
moderate wage increases are also ex- 
pected to spur investment 
"I think we'll see a clear upswing in 
the second quarter of this year, once 
we’re out of the winter gloom,” said 
Stephan Rieke, an economist at BHF- 
Bank AG. 

-> Economics Minister Guenter 
Rexrodt spoke optimistically about the 
economic outlook. "The investment 
climate in Germany has evidently im- 
proved,” he said .(Reuters. Bloomberg ) 


productic 
fell 1.7 p 



An Economy in a Stall 


Despite progress in curbing inflation and 
narrowing the current account deficit, the 
Uzbek economy remains stagnant and 
recent government decisions have hurt 
the country’s credibility with foreign 
investors. 

GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT. 

■ in billions of 1993 dollars 


$60 


50 


5 >< v ' - * » 


40 




30 


20 


1t*U 




10 


•si -aa 


.V*— c !S \:* 





CURRENT 

ACCOUNT 

BALANCE, 


in millions of dollars 


’91 ’92 ’93 ’94 ’95 ’96 


400% 


YEAR-TO-YEAR 
CHANGE 
IN CONSUMER PRICES 



Source: PlanBcon 




1.I 1 • i 


ShuulZhoinsim/TfK Nro York Tuva 

Uzbekistan once appeared very attractive to Western companies, but its march back to some of its Soviet-style habits has made investors wary. 


Promise of Sweet Profit Sours in Uzbekistan 


„ By Steve LeVine 

New York Tunes Service 


TASHKENT. Uzbekistan — Sieve 
Shaulis is selling the last of his seedless 
raisins, settling his debts and getting 
out of this central Asian country. 

It isn’t that he has soured on the whole 


rollicking fringe of the world’s emerg- 

ry, Mr. 


mg economies. On the contrary, 
Shaulis, 33, of Veto Beach, Florida, 
who works as a fruit trader, is headed to 
the wilds of Afghanistan and western 
China, where he expects easier profits. 

After a three-year effort to build 
U.S. or European markets for Uzbek- 
istan’s bountiful fruit, Mr. Shaulis said 
the problem was not mere chaos and 
efficiency: It was the government's 
gangland economic style, he said, in 
which Western investors were lined 
with sparkling promises, then in effect 
rolled in the back alley. 

"Until they free their economic 
policy,” Mr. Shaulis said, "this is go- 
ing to be a backwater.” 

Just a few months ago. this con- 
servative nation of 23 milhoo people 
was a darling of Western investors. 
After years of continued restrictions 
after tbe 1991 Soviet breakup. President 
I$lam Karimov at last opened up to a 

f s of Western products. Economic 
human-rights reforms repaired a 
cool relationship with Washington, and 
in June Mr. Karimov was rewarded 



ficials begin delaying, lengthening and 
altering procedures so much that turn- 


ing a profit is often impossible. 
U.S. of 


with a long-sought White House visit 

But today there is scant evidence of 
the short-lived boom that Mr. Karimov 
set in motion, one that had enlivened 
this sterile. Soviet-style capital of 
hulking concrete office buildings and 
apartment blocks. 

Large Western multinationals, such 
as BAT Industries PLC and Newmont 
Mining Coip., are still doing well here, 
diplomats say. 

But the International Monetary 
Fund, disappointed with Uzbekistan’s 
runaway monetary growth, has sus- 
pended the republic's $180 million 
loan program. 

Many executives from small and 
medium -sized Western businesses say 
they are freezing their investments or, 
like Mr. Shaulis, simply pulling out 
Once the required bribes are paid and 
an investment is sealed, they say, of- 


officials still strongly support 
Mr. Karimov, who has become a re- 
gional anchor for U.S. policy toward 
Iran and Russia. The officials predict an 
eventual improvement in the business 
environment and say the republic is 
simply slow to change. Many investors 
with deep pockets are staying puL 

But. analysts say. the fast reversal of 
Uzbekistan’s fortunes reflects what is 
wrong — and could easily be made 
right — in a region that some still call 
the best long-term investment in the 
former Soviet Union. It is also a 
into the realities of business in 
itral Asia, where Western investors 
confront among the most stubborn rem- 
nants of former Soviet bureaucracy. 

On paper, Uzbekistan has intrigued 
U.S. and European companies, which 
have regarded it and its neighbor, 
Kazakstan, as the natural core of a new 
emerging markeL 

Much interest lay in Central Asia’s 
large deposits of oil and natural gas, 
and its almost untouched consumer 
market of 55 million people. For 
broader thinkers, a regional toehold 
also meant a revival of Silk Road 
routes between East and West, includ- 
ing access to desert-bound Xinjiang, 
the oil-rich region of western China. 

Suspicious of Western intentions. 


however, Uzbekistan was reluctant to 
grant visas to any but the largest pro- 
spective investors. Even those compa- 
nies — such as Newmont. Daewoo 
Corp. of South Korea and BAT — 
were subject to long delays and other 
obstacles despite more than $1.5 bil- 
lion in promised investment 

Instead, tbe republic became known 
for the former Soviet Union's worst 
human-rights record — until last year. 

That is when Mr. Karimov abruptly 
shifted course. Without explanation, 
he adopted structural reforms and 
monetary targets, getting an Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund loan and the 
international recognition that goes 
with it. He won an ally in the U.S. State 
Department as well by assailing Iran, a 
friendship sealed when he welcomed 
home tbe Uzbek opponents be had 
chased into exile. 

Amid all this change, however, a 
silent crisis was brewing, diplomats 
say, one that no government ministers 


apparently wanted to risk relaying to 
the fear 


feared Mr. Karimov. The harvest of 
stale-grown cotton, Uzbekistan’s lead- 
ing export earner, was 20 percent be- 
low target. 

Worse, there was a glutted world 
market, and prices wens plummeting. 

On top of that, the wheat crop — 
central to the Uzbek diet — was small. 


See INVEST, Page 15 


EU Urges 
Workers to 
Sue Renault 
Over Layoffs 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 


(Color and Clout: Black Professionals Fight the ‘Iron Ceiling 9 


By Deborah Stead 

New York Junes Service 


•" NEW YORK — One of the most 
popular moments in the Broadway mu- 
sical “Bring In da Noise. Bring In da 
Tunk” comes in “Taxi!” — a scorch- 
ing tap number wherein four black men 
ijy, one by one, to hail a cab. 

In the audience, knowing smite turn 

into roars of recognition as even the guy 

wearing a suit and desperately waving ® 
gold card is passed by. In New York, all 
African-Americans know this dance. 


a few years ago in "The Rage of a 
Privileged Class." An article in a recent 
issue of Blade Enterprise magazine con- 
cluded that "many employers are going 
about tbe diversity challenge the wrong 
way.” 

Half of American companies have 
formal programs to manage cultural di- 


EVTERNATIONAL MANAGER 


For black American corporate em- 
. •- ■ taxi doors 


ployees. though, it is notjust taxi doors 

martendw stay closed Jtee is also the 

Slang of what some have called the 
“taS ceiling.”. Yeats of feeling .so- 
lated in this environment take a toll. 

r Shattered hopes and bosses with tow 
Expectations are feiriy conmotu ^^ 
mgtoEUis Cose, who chromcled the 
taxations of many black professionals 


versity, the article said, bat often these 
“place too much emphasis on changing 
the attitudes of people in a company — 
instead of changing the company culture 
itself." As the voices on those infamous 
audio tapes in last year’s Texaco dis- 
crimination case showed, “sensitivity” 
sessions can be pointless, especially if 
managers are not held accountable for 
racist behavior. 

How, exactly, can companies 
change? How can black women and men 
thrive in corporate America? Two new 


books take up these tough questions. 

Tbe usual corporate diversity pro- 
grams are ditched for something dif- 
ferent in "Proversity” (John Wiley & 
Sons, $19.95), by Lawrence Otis Gra- 
ham, a lawyer and management con- 
sultant who once wrote about the culture 
of a Connecticut country club where he 
had worked undercover as a busboy. 

In "How to Succeed in Business 
Without Being White” (Harper Busi- 
ness, $25), Earl Graves, the multimil- 
lionaire entrepreneur who publishes 
Black Enterprise, dispenses blunt ad- 
vice and sharp commentary. 

“Proversity,” a primer dressed up 
unconvincingly as a novel, lays out a 
corporate diversity plan that stresses tbe 
similarities under our surface differ- 
ences. Mr. Graham contends that the 
gap between whites and blacks is only 
widened by training sessions that ob- 
sessively categorize people. 

His program of “progressive di- 


versity" focuses on finding the qualities 
in all people that might be desired by a 
company: creativity and collegiality. for 
example. At the same time, white man- 

K are educated about racism, ki- 
ng their own. and all managers are 
expected to promote equality. 

Mr. Graves in his book estimates that 
clearing up preconceptions about the 
minority-group consumer market takes 
up "about 30 percent of my time' ’ when 
he makes presentations to* potential ad- 
vertisers. His son Earl Jr., a graduate of 
Yale and Harvard, is regularly inter- 
rupted during sales pitches to be com- 
plimented on being so "articulate." 

Mr. Graves says the key to racial 


equality is a strong black business class, 
and he devotes five detailed chapters to 
lenenant fi 


entrepreneurship. His own penchant for 
doing deals came, he says, from his 
father, “a natural salesman” who usu- 
ally held at least two jobs to support his 
family in Brooklyn. 

Mr. Graves's mother supported his 
social activism, helping him to integrate 
a neighborhood YMCA after he was 
booted out of the building "for SWB 
(swimming while black).” That activ- 
ism later found a home in tbe Democratic 
Party, where as a young man he worked 
for Robert Kennedy's Senate campaign. 
There, he says, he saw first-hand how 
money and clout add up to freedom. 


BRUSSELS — Renault SA came un- 
der heavy political fire Wednesday for 
its plan to close a Belgian auto plant, 
with President Jacques Chirac of France 
saying he had been “shocked” by the 
French company’s sudden announce- 
ment and the European Commission 
urging unions to sue the company for 
violating EU labor laws. 

The chorus of indignation under- 
scored a growing fear among Europe’s 
leaders that Ameri can-style corporate 
"downsizing” at a time of high un- 
employment could undermine support 
for a European economic and political 
union. But despite the strong expres- 
sions of support for workers at Renault, 
the European leaders showed tittle in- 
clination to meddle in industry’s re- 
structuring and gave short shrift to Bel- 
gian proposals for new legislation. 

In Paris, the government changed 
tack abruptly from Its original state- 
ments that characterized the closure as 
the rightful decision of a private com- 
pany — albeit one 46 percent owned by 
the stale. The turnaround followed 
heavy criticism from French politicians 
and media that the automaker’s de- 
cisions had sullied the country’s image 
and upset relations with Belgium. The 
criticism intensified after a report in the 
newspaper Le Monde that Prime Min- 
ister Alain Juppe had known of the 
closure plan since January. 

At a weekly cabinet meeting, Mr. 
Chirac said he had been "shocked by 
the method” the carmaker had used for 
the layoffs, according to Alain Lamas- 
soure, a government spokesman. 

Mr. Juppe summoned Renault's chief 
executive, Louis Schweitzer, late Wed- 
nesday to discuss the company’s sudden 
announcement last week of its decision 
to shut the plant at Vilvoorde, near 
Brussels, with a loss of 3, 100 jobs. 

"The method was not right," Mr. 
Juppe said. "I want to open a period of 
discussion, of consultations, to seek al- 
ternative solutions in respecting com- 
munity and national rules in Belgium 
and France.” 

Mr. Schweitzer struck a more con- 
ciliatory tone after his meeting with Mr. 
Juppe, saying Renault wanted “to start 
consultations immediately with repre- 
sentatives of the personnel at Vilvoorde 
about accompanying measures and toe 
possibilities of converting tbe factory.” 

In Brussels, toe president of the Euro- 
pean Commission, Jacques San ter, 
called Renault's decision "a serious 
blow to European confidence" and 
urged the automaker’s Belgian workers 
to sue the company for violating Euro- 
pean labor law by not consulting work- 
ers before announcing its decision. 

But at a meeting of the EU executive 
agency, Mr. Santer and his colleagues 
declined to discuss Belgian demands for 
legislation to curb tbe ability of mul- 
tinational companies to shift production 
and jobs across Europe. Those demands, 
made by Prime Minister Jean-Luc De- 
haene, run counter to the need for greater 
flexibility and reduced regulation that 
Ell governments have endorsed as an 
answer to Europe’s poor competitive- 
ness and employment record, commis- 
sion officials said. 

Renault's headquarters in the Paris 
suburb of Boulogne-Billancourt, Mr. 
Schweitzer was scheduled to meet with 
union representatives Thursday to dis- 
cuss toe company's plans to lay off 2,764 
workers in rrance. Mr. Schweitzer also 
has agreed to meet unions in Belgium, 
but a date has not been set, and union 
sources said be was refusing to come to 
Vilvoorde. where workers are blockad- 


ing 3 billion Belgian francs ($85 million) 
worth of new Meganes and Clios. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


Man* s Ubid-Libor Rates 


March 5 



y-ff um 
UT3 1HB 


nu it u HR IF. Ur, S PM 

* £ .12; UP* l.®3* !•** U»* 

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Dolor D-Mark Franc Sterttofl Franc Yen ECU 

i-flwfitti m-T* m-i* sfi-m vx-m u-Vi av»-&> 

3-month Skn-Sf 3W-314 6-iW 3U-3V* Tfe-V* 4M-4M 

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totes app/tathle to Interbank deposits af SI nriafcn mMnum (or equIvtienO. 


I ECU UMM am ;.*> jg* 2MH IS* UBI WM 


Other Dollar Values 

basis —tar sb 

lustrum un. IM® JS rupee 354* 

S*e»YV0n X3253 [L*407 

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107 

171.90 

569640 

17498 

1.4278 


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4447 
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74699 
2752 
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Forward Rate® M 

£ is ■£ «■ 

3S '-w jf", 




3fr*r Ahhnr »*y 
120.98 12049 119.95 

14808 147*1 14710 





Key Money Rates 


UnlW Stoles 

Orae 

Prw 

Dtmvnt rate 

5JD0 

550 

Print rale 

N 

BVi 

MakknAi 

5V*. 

5W 

»-4oy CDs deaters 

544 

544 

lHMtoyCPdealm 

£35 

553 

Jnmitb TreaswY bW 

5.19 

5J1 

l-YOwTiwurytat 

549 

SM 

SuwTraannrbB 

409 

409 

S^nrTreasairaatt 

441 

442 

7-fcor Treourf note 

450 

450 

UHroarTroasurr naie 

458 

458 

30-year Troacwy hood 

484 

4X5 

M«fi Lyot* 3MayRA 

487 

488 

JnpQa 



Obmtndt 

ft» 

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CalanKy 

043 

043 

l-aoatti latertmk 

059 

054 

iHMMNtlatettHmk 

056. 

054 

e-uuutb biter bunk 

059 

059 

IPyear Govt band 

248 

247 

Oeinonr 



ImbanindB 

450 

4SD 

Calanaey 

3.12 

112 

1-monfli tetertmfe 

125 

125 

3-malti biterbaafc 

125 

125 

t awatb Mertaab 

125 

125 

10-yeorBuaiI 

SL63 

533 


Brttnte 

Book base rate 

400 

400 

Cakrecaey 

4Vk 



6 V* 

400 

Iraeatb intertask 

6Yi 

6Vn 

4-oMath bitertank 

M 

m 

lOwrGB 

7JS 

7.10 

France 

sntwantfM rats 

110 

110 

CaHnaaev 

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1-OMOb tetrrbaak 

34 

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twoatkteterbMk 

3»u 

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18-year OAT 

5.53 

SM 

Sources: RMM, Btoamberu. Merritt 
Lynch, Bank of Tokyo-Mlfsuhishl, 
aummulxu*. CictBt Lyonnafe. 


Gold 


AM. 


PAL QF pa 




35755 35Z35 -10,10 
355.75 354J0 —4.90 
NewYark 360J0 M -6.1 D 
_UL£ OoBm per ounce. UtnamoOkSal 
ikis-mi Zurich and New York cperfng 
dosing prices/ New Ytitk amen 
(ApriL) 

Skuas Roden. 


Lamborghini Races 
Down to Wall Street 


Bloomberg News 

GENEVA — Lamborghini SpA, the Italian sports 
carmaker, said Wednesday that it planned to sell shares 
on the New York Stock Exchange to pay for a move into 
less expensive spots cars. 

The shares of the Bologna-based company could be on 
toe New York Stock Exchange within 12 months, said 
Vittorio Di Capua, Lamborghini 's chairman. 

In Lamborghini's world, a less expensive car would 


still retail for more than $100,000. Still, that is quite a 

Diablo 


discount on the $260,000-plus that its current 
famil y of cars cost They can go 300 kilometers (180 
miles) an hour. The company also is planning to set up an 
engineering division to sell its expertise in designing 
hi^i-performance engines. J 

“It doesn’t make any sense for Lamborghini to remain 
a constructor of one family of cars,” Mr. Di C^pua said 
at the Geneva Motor Show. 

The changes are part of an overhaul taking place at toe 
unprofitable Lamborghini after its 1995 purchase by a 
group of Indonesian and Malaysian investors. 

Mr. Di Capua joined the company in September after 
a 40-year career at Fiat SpA and a brief stint as vice 
president of toe Italian motorbike maker Cagiva SpA, 
where he oversaw toe sole of a controlling stake in its 
Ducati SpA racing bike subsidiary to the Texas Pacific 
Group. Ducati is also planning an IPO. 

Lamborghini posted a loss of 10 billion lire ($5,9 
million) last year on sales of 65 billion lire. It sold 250 cars 
last year and will sell about toe same this year, though the 
company is planning to break even. 



CALDR. ROWENTA. SEB. TEFAL 


1996: SATISFACTORY DEVELOPMENT 


m 1595 1996(1995 

FRF auBuns FRF radons (%) 

•Sola 

9,857 

9JUM 

4- 8 

• Operating income 

1,135 

1,025 

+ U 

Financial expense 

192) 

(92) 


■ Current raceme 

1*043 

934 

+ 12 

Restructuring cos is 

(124) 

(15) 


Employee profit sharing 




& incentive plans 

(254) 

(208) 


Amortization of goodwill 




& miscellaneous iiems .. 

(31) 

(3) 


• Income before loses 

634 

708 

-10 

Income lax 

(154) 

(258) 


• Nr! income 

480 

450 

+ 7 

• Income + depreciation 




& amortization 

915 

858 

+ 7 


Globalization is accelerating: sales outside the countries 
of tbe European Union are up 40%. The operating 
income is improving: as a ratio of sales, it stands at 
11-5%. The Group is taking toe necessary measures in 
order to adjust Us production facilities. 


The Notice of Shareholders' Meeting / Preliminary Report 
will be available as of March 14. 

If you wish to receive it, please telephone or wrbe: 
Groups SEB - B.P. 172 - 69132 EcuUy Cedes . FRANCE 
Tel (33-4 i 72.18.16.40. 


nr 

UNE 
1997 
GE 9 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. MARCH 6, 1997 


PAGE 13 


EUROPE 


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GEC Links With Italian Fir 


CatftkdbyOwSafFem Pupojrv* 

- ROME — Finmeccanica SpA of 
Italy and General Electric Co. of 
.Bntajn said Wednesday they had 
signed an accord on technological, 
industrial and commercial cooper- 
ation in the defense industry. 

- Finmeccanica, . a state-owned 

^onglomerdte. said the agreement 
Would mvolve us Alenia Difesa sub- 
sidiary and GECs Marconi unit. 

>i The -agreement was signed Tues- 
day m London by GEC s chief ex- 
■ecuuve, George Simpson, and Fin- 
meccanica’s chairman. Fabiano 
fabiani, Finmeccanica said, 
r Defense sales account for about 
;*o percent of Finmeccanica's rev- 


enue. The company is active in the 
manufacture of missile systems, 
naval and terrestrial electronics, 
naval and air-based armaments, and 
other defense systems. 

Finmeccanica said it and GEC 
Marconi had the same views on the 
world market for defense systems 
and the need for "a European re- 
sponse to a strengthening of the 
already powerful U.S. industry” by 
means of joint ventures and struc- 
tural alliances. 

U.S. companies have steadily in- 
creased their share in the consol- 
idating worldwide defease industry 
through a series of mergers, buyouts 
and sales of subsidiaries. 


The GEC-Finmeccanica accord 
will involve radar, air traff c control 
and naval navigation activities. The 
alliance would result in an entity 
with combined annual sales of about 
$6 billion. GEC-Marconi plans to 
cooperate with Thomson-CSF, 
which the French government is try- 
ing to privatize, to develop missile- 

guidance systems. 

Bui General Electric has said it is 
not planning to bid for the French 
company. 

British Aerospace PLC. mean- 
while, has said it may team up with 
Lagardere of France to buy the mis- 
sile business of Daimler-Benz 
Aerospace AG. (AFP. Bloomberg) 



Thomson-CSF Swings Into Profit 


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Ccrr^Urd by Our Stuff Fnxn Otqjatcka 

*- PAR IS — Thomson-CSF. 
Europe's largest defense electronics 
concern, posted its first net profit in 
-four years' Wednesday, a develop- 
*nent that should make it more at- 
tractive to prospective bfdders as the 
government prepares to sell its ma- 
jority stake in the company. 

•* Net profit for 1996 was 745 mil- 
lion French francs ($128.8 million}, 
reversing a loss of 791 million francs 
in I995. Second-half profit was 349 
-million francs, against a year-earlier 
-loss of 427 million francs. 

-- Saks in 1996 were 36.3 billion 
francs, up slightly from 35.5 billion 
francs tbe previous year. The company 
^attributed the return to profit to cost- 


cutting measures taken in response to 
the shrinkage of military budgets. 

Thomson-CSF, a unit of the state- 
controlled electronics giant Thom- 
son SA, is scheduled for sale this 
spring. France last year backed 
away from a privatization deal for 
all of Thomson. The government 
suspended the sale in November 
amid concern about the proposed 
buyer's plans lo sell the Thomson 
Multimedia subsidiary to Daewoo 
Electronics Co. of South Korea. 

The government now intends to 
sell Thomson-CSF through direct 
negotiations with potential pur- 
chasers and has signaled that it wants 
the company to become a center of 
the French and European defense 


industries that can compete with 
leading U.S. electronics makers. 

The two bidders so far are 
Lagardere Groupe, which won the 
initial bidding in November, and 
Alcatel- Alsthom. the unsuccessful 
bidder Iasi year that now plans to 
link its offer with a combined one 
from Dassault and Aerospatiale. 

Some analysts say Thomson's al- 
liance with other companies could 
translate into a higher share price. 
Until a bidder is chosen and the 
winner’s plans for restructuring 
Thomson-CSF are made clear, they 
say, it will be difficult to put a value 
on the company. Thomson-CSF 
shares closed at 196 francs, up 3. 

(Bloomberg, AFP. AP ) 


Major Unveils Plan 
For Private Pensions 


emptied hr Uu- SiqJ tnm, Lh-puxlaa 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
John Major unveiled a plan Wed- 
nesday to change Britain's pension 
system by requiring young Britons 
to lake out private retirement plans 
costing about £9 ( $ 1 4.55 1 a week. 

The plan is a new uuempt to 
tackle the problem of spiraling 
state spending in the next century, 
much of which will come from the 
huge com of paying pensions to an 
aging population. 

But the plan is also purl of the 
Conservative Party government's 
search for issues with which to 
chip away at the Labour Party's 
lead of 15 to 20 percentage points 
in opinion polls ahead of the gen- 
eral election expected May l7 

Mr. Major said Britain had 
already pul aside more to provide 
for future pension liabilines than 
many other countries in the Euro- 
pean Union. 

"The United Kingdom is 
already better-placed than any 
other major European economy to 
fund its future pension liabili- 
ties,” he said. "This will put us 
another huge step ahead." 

Labour, which says the Con- 
servatives are whittling away the 
welfare stale, argued that it was 
wrong to "force everybody into 
personal pensions” and said the 
lowest-paid would suffer. 

“This is a chilling message for 
ordinary working families,” Har- 


riet Harman, Labour's social-se- 
curity spokeswoman, said. 

Salaried workers in Britain pay 
S percent to 10 percent of their 
earnings up to £23.600 a year in 
social security contributions, 
which include payments to a stale 
pension. 

About 70 percent of retirees 
also have pensions from jobs or 
investments. State pensions, cur- 
rently £6 1.50 a week, are paid 
irrespective of income and are 
funded by taxes. There is no gov- 
ernment pension fund. 

Under Mr. Major's plan, each 
British worker 23 years old or 
younger would have to take out a 
private pension plan. 

Government officials said the 
plan should enable an average 
wage-earner to have saved 
£130,000 by retirement, which 
would yield, at current prices, a 
pension of £175 a week If the 
investment lost its value, the gov- 
ernment would guarantee a basic 
stale pension. The plan would save 
the government an estimated £40 
billion a year by the middle of the 
next century, Mr. Major said. 

“This proposal is putting all 
the risks in one basket." said 
Frank Feld, a Labour legislator 
who specializes in pension fund- 
ing. "It may pay off, bur it if 
doesn't pay off, those of us who 
are debating it now will be dead 
and buried.” 


i* 

Credit Suisse Reports Huge Loss but Predicts Turnaround 


by Ota Sktf Fnm Disjxacha 

> ZURICH — Credit Suisse Group 
posted a loss for 1 996 on Wednesday 
■that was bigger than expected, but the 
hank forecast that profit would re- 
bound this year as cost cuts took 
■effect. 

. Credit Suisse posted a net loss — 
tbe first in its histmy — of 2-59 billion 
francs ($1.75 billion), mostly because 
of a charge of 5.4 billion francs for 
restructuring and provisioning fra- bad 
loans. The bank posted a profit of 1.4 
billion francs in 1995. 

■> But, based on what Credit Suisse 
described as “a gratifying start to 
-die current year.” the bank decided 
4o pay a dividend of 4 francs a share. 


unchanged from the 1995 payout. 

Shares in'Credit Suisse closed at 
158.25 francs, down 25 centimes. 

While Chief Executive Lukas 
Muehlemann predicted Credit Suisse 
would achieve a return on equity of 
15 percent by 1999. after a negative 
return last year, investors said the 
bank had to make good on its prom- 
ises before they would buy shares. 

"The strategy is certainly a good 
one, but I'll wait and see before I'll 
buy more shares.” said Daniel Hun- 
ziker. a fund manager at Union Bank 
of Switzerland. "There’s a lot of 
hope already in the share price.” 

Credit Suisse, along with UBS 
and Swiss Bank Corp., took multi- 


bill ion-franc charges against 1996 
earnings to stem loan losses and cut 
their domestic networks to raise 
profits that have lagged the profits 
of rivals who have focused mi asset 
management. 

Last month. UBS announced a 350 
million francs loss for 1996 and pre- 
dicted earnings would rise this year. 
Swiss Bank Corp. is expected to post 
a 2 billion francs loss March 12. 

Losses in Switzerland have 
widened as the economy suffered its 
sixth lean year in a row, triggered by 
a real estate crash in the early 1990s. 
Now, a growing number of compa- 
nies are failing, and unemployment 
is ai a record high. 


In July. Credit Suisse said it 
would streamline operations, cut 
3.500 jobs in its unprofitable op- 
erations at home and eliminate an 
additional 1.500 jobs abroad to 
boost profitability. 

Mr. Muehlemann joined Credit 
Suisse on Jan. 1 after reorganizing 
Swiss Reinsurance Co., the world's 
No. 2 reinsurer, within less than two 
years, causing its share price to 
double. 

Rainer Gut, chairman of Credit 
Suisse, said earnings would rise 
across the board this year. 

“With this new, more efficient 
structure, we have not only unproved 
our competitiveness, but have also 


Investor’s Europe 


London 
FTSE 100 Index 


Pails 

GAC4Q 



2100 — 


23X1 o NO 
1996 

Exchange 

Amsta-dan 

J F M' 3800 O N 'D 
1997 1996 

Index 

ABC 

J F M 1«’0 N D J r F”M‘: 
1997 1996 1997 

Wednesday Pray. % : 

Close Close Charge 

•755J23 753.40 *0J24 

Bnnaeas 

BEL-20 

2ft7t.1T- 2.1 55.07 +0^0 

Fraikfurt 

DAX 

45.364^9-3^20.66 +1. 33 

Copenhagen 

Stock Market 

540.44 -5^.73 *OJ32 

Helunki 

HEX General 

2,923.10 2.SS8.91 +0.83 

Oslo ■ 

OBX 

5M.1t- 592.M +0,30 

London 

FTSE 100 

4,305.10 4,357.70- +0.Q6; 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 

466.18 467.72 -054 

fifflan 

MBTEL 

11^05-00 12.0p0.00 -4>^S! 

Paris 

CAC40 

2,666.19 2.651.69 +QJ55 

Stockholm 

SX 16 

2^01^3 2,87057 +0.79 

Vienna 

ATX 

1^47^3 1,240.84 +0.55 

Zurich 

SPI 

2^9083 2,670-44 +0.71 

Source.- Teiekurs 


Irucrruutorul Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


laid the foundation for future growth 
and a significant increase in prof- 
itability," Mr. Gut said. 

Credit Suisse said it expected 
higher profits as rising earnings 
from asset management and invest- 
ment banking would no longer be 
erased by loan losses in Switzerland. 
Mr. Muehlemann sees ordinary pro- 
visions stabilizing around 600 mil- 
lion francs in 1997. after provisions 
of 2.1 billion francs in 1996. 

* ‘The year has started very well,” 
Mr. Muehlemann said. “We have 
under way a large number of struc- 
tural improvements which will help 
us achieve our earnings target.” 

( Bloomberg . Reuiers ) 


• BAT Industries PLC's deputy chairman and chief ex- 
ecutive, Martin Broughton, said the British tobacco company 
would be willing to pay $100 million a year as pan of any 
industrywide senlemeni of U.S. tobacco litigation. 

• Lonrho PLC said Dieter Bock, the German financier re- 
cruited to bolster the British conglomerate’s flagging stock price 
in 1993. would step down as deputy chairman March 26. 

• Philips Electronics NV*s president. Cor Boonstra, clearing 
the decks fora new management team, accepted the resignation 
of a third 30-year veteran senior manager, Jan Tollenaar. 

• Deutsche Telekom AG confirmed it was talking with 
Microsoft Corp. about on-line services in Germany but 
denied it had given up plans to work with America Online 
Inc. and Bertelsmann AG. 

• Cadbury Schweppes PLC, a British beverage and candy 
maker, said pretax profit rose 16 percent in 1996, to £592 
million ($957.4 million), at the top end of analysts' expec- 
tations. as sales of candy and of its Dr Pepper soft drink rose. 

• Skandia Insurance AB, Sweden’s largest insurer, said 
1996 operating profit rose I percent, to 239 billion kronor 
($312.5 million), as restructuring charges offset higher earn- 
ings in its insurance business. 

• Continental AG, a tire maker, said net profit last year rose 24 
percent, to 1923 million Deutsche marks ($1 12.7 million). 

• Arjo Wiggins Appleton PLC appointed Philippe Beylier, 
formerly group managing director, as chief executive; Daniel 
Melin resigned from that post last week. 

• Poland’s Treasury Ministry set aside a nearly completed 
deal to sell the nation’s largest press distributor. Ruch SA, to 
Hachette SA of France after receiving a more attractive from 
a Polish company. Polska Grupa Kapitalowa SA. The 
government would not disclose the amount of either bid. 

AFX. Bloomberg. AFP 


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UNE 

1997 

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171 

314 

17X5 

1680 

17X3 

1690 

672 

n<(9 

668 

673 

3X8 

360 

3X1 

3X2 

119 

Xti 

118 

XI4 

7X4 

71/ 

718 

7J4 

1077 

I JO 

1064 

I0J9 

978 

9X4 

969 

974 

1X4 

IJ9 

1X2 

1X6 

924 

9X6 

9J1 

931 

7JD 

7X7 

7X4 

7X1 

7« 

7X0 

7X2 

79? 

7 JO 

720 

737 

7.20 

593 

8X5 

BJfl 

683 

438 

4.10 

430 

4 31 

3X4 

138 

338 

3X1 

692 

685 

687 

6*6 

525 

516 

518 

5IH 

546 

532 

542 

53/ 

VS! 

2X2 

2X3 

2X6 

15*7 

1632 

1545 

15X8 

540 

5X5 

AM 

539 

7J0 

7X3 

7 J9 

734 

666 

658 

663 

661 


Madrid 


Bafca tadoc 46631 


Previous: 467 J2 


20140 

19750 

19930 

19900 

ACE&A 

1685 

1625 

1645 

1625 


5530 

5410 

5490 

6500 

Ar^entarfa 

6040 

8440 

4970 

8330 

6030 

8410 

6050 

8410 


1095 

1085 

1085 

1095 

Batata ter 

19360 

19010 

19040 

19400 

Bca Centro tfcp 

3830 

3765 

3820 

3840 

Boa Exterior 

H.T. 

K.T. 

N.T. 

2810 

Bca Paptriar 

26550 

26010 

26110 

26420 

Bar Santander 

9750 

9550 

9600 

9700 

CEPSA 

4200 

4125 

4185 

4200 


2495 

2435 

7444 

2490 


7190 

8820 

7340 

8660 

7560 

8660 

7500 

8830 

FECSA 

123) 

1175 

1190 

1200 


31600 

30310 

31100 

30590 

(bertruta 

1555 

1515 

1526 

1560 

Prycn 

2710 

2640 

2640 

26SS 

Repsol 

5650 

5660 

5580 

5570 

SevtoanoEJec 

1305 

12/5 

two 

1285 


6740 

6600 

6690 

6/60 

TetefotaCD 

3355 

3285 

3335 

3290 


1130 

1110 

1120 

1130 

Vdtenc Camera 

1550 

1525 

1540 

1550 

Manila 


PSE tadee 3292J8 


Previous:. 

082X2 

AytaaB 

3650 

30 

30 

30X0 

AwUo Land 
BkPMOplSl 

30X0 

30 

30X0 

3050 

192 

186 

188 

192 

C87» Homes 

1X75 

1X25 

1X50 

1X50 


122 

121 

122 

121 


715 

700 

7U5 

720 


1675 

1650 

10X0 

10.75 

POBonk 

382JD 

375 

380 382X0 

pnaLraigDB 

1670 

1600 

1605 

1565 

Son Miguel B 

91 

86X0 

07 

92 

SM Prime Hdg 

7X0 

7X0 

7.90 

7X0 

Mexico 


Btasaiedsc 376237 


PrnvtaOE 3755X9 


45X0 

44X0 

4460 

4470 


1690 

18X6 

18X2 

18X6 

CSnexCPO 

3650 

29X0 

3025 

30X0 

abac 

1238 

1X14 

1224 

1X14 


4640 

39 JO 

39.96 

4090 

Gpo Carso Al 

4X30 

4X50 

jinn 

43X0 


L93 

1X1 



Gpo Fto Inbuna 

27X0 

27X0 

27X0 

27X0 

16620 

16400 

164X0 

16X70 

TeMsaCPO 

102X0 

10030 101X0 

99X0 

TclM»L 

15X2 

1646 

15X0 

15X0 

Milan 

MIBTefcBtefrac 11905X0 


Provisos: 12000X0 


12350 

12030 

12220 

12215 


3475 

3390 

3380 

3495 


4450 

4285 

4420 

4365 


1250 

1201 

1225 

1219 


20050 

19400 

20000 

19845 

Qedta ItaSano 

2295 

2260 

2260 

225*5 


9630 

9350 

9394 

9600 

EN1 

8635 

8410 

8526 

8580 

Rot 

5475 

5365 

5375 

5430 


30700 

30150 

30300 

30550 

IMI 

15DI0 

14700 

14060 

14910 

IMA 

2235 

7700 

22U5 

2230 

IS&, 

6125 

7150 

S9» 

7010 

6000 

6100 

7080 


11200 

1)000 

11005 

11210 

Monredson 

1263 

1237 

1760 

1251 

OfretH 

<32 

671 

622 

640 


2GB 

2230 

2350 

2430 

PWB 

3530 

3460 

3530 

3500 

RAS 

15500 

1.000 

15385 

I55X 


18000 

1/600 

i/rnu 

1/BIO 

SPaaia Torino 

11900 

11690 

11810 

11985 

Stet 

7350 

7365 

7455 

7465 


005 

4195 

4?*0 

<295 

TIM 

4385 

4310 

4310 

4425 

Montreal 

tadHtUs 

tadae 2990X2 


Previous: 2997X1 

Bra Mta> Con 

43H 

GAD 

4X40 

4X40 

Cta The a 


2L45 

25X5 

25X5 

CdnUIDA 

32 

31.90 

31-90 

3IXU 

CTFkTISvc 

31 

31 

31 

30fo 

Bar Metro 

1714 

17 

1710 

17.10 

Gt-VteJ Ufeefl 

2146 

23 

23 

23 

imasra 

38 

37X5 

37.90 

37X5 

ImwteoGip 

2635 

2530 

25J5 

2X30 

LattawOs 

1670 

16X0 

16X0 

16X0 

Nal Bk Canada 

162S 

15.95 

16J0 

16 

PannrCOrp 

2930 

2890 

29 70 

7&X0 

26X0 

26X0 

26X0 

26X0 

QoeberarB 

2SJS 

2X35 

2535 

25JS 

RagnsCoranB 

9J5 

9J0 

9 JO 

94) 

Royal BkCdo 

57 J4 

5W4 

57 JO 

55X0 


Oslo 

AkarA 

BegeenDrA 
□bfioDtaBk 
Den Mrtte Bk 
Eton 
HdstundA 
KtoenorAso 
Monk Hydro 
NoRkeSkegA 
HytwnedA 
OridoAsnA 
PedmGeoSuc 
sA 


OBXtadBC594.il 
Prratoaci 592J4 


Transocean Ofl 
StarebrondAsa 


179X0 

T7H 

179 

179 

145 

140 

U2 

145 

24.90 

2460 

2470 

24X0 

3U8 

29.H 

29X0 

JO 

117 

112 

114 

11150 

050 

48X0 

49 

49X0 

344 

334 

341 

337X0 

346 

340 34ZX0 

34450 

214 

212 

312 

211X0 

no 

106 106X0 

108 

539 

532 

535 

536 

308 

225 

306 

291X0 

116 

112 

114 

112 

138 

US 

135 

136 

412 

398 

410 

385 

47X0 

45X0 

46 

45X0 


Paris 

Accor 

AGF 

AirLkruirie 

AJcntBl Ahtn 

AUO-UAP 

Bancoke 

BIC 

BNP 

C anal Pl us 

Carefour 

Casino 

CCF 

Cetefero 

Christian Dtar 

CLF-Dabo Fron 

Credit Agitate 

Danone 

Etf-Aqiritidue 

Eridania B5 

Eurodlaney 

Eumtunnd 

GereEnux 

HOKB 

I metal 

Laftuge 

Legrand 

LOreol 

LVMH 

Lyon. Etna 

MWiefln B 

Paribas A 

Pentad Rlcort 

Petj^orOI 

PteaulVPriia 


CA&44 266419 
PrataoB 2651X9 


810 771 

209 JO 205.10 


799 - 775 
208 20980 
908 883 897 911 

648 «J5 636 608 

378 374 375X0 37V JO 

760 70S 752 712 

929 905 925 927 

267 25L50 264X0 2*0 

1058 1042 1042 1050 

3495 3451 347B 3520 

267X0 259 267 262 

274 265 Z7Z40 36880 

725 699 720 698 

BS4 830 B49 837 

S95 573 509 579 

1289 12B9 1389 1290 

9S4 912 944 915 

540 550 558 558 

940 922 932 940 

10X5 10 l 40 10X0 10XS 
7.15 785 7.10 7.10 

808 795 B04 001 

450 443X0 448J0 451X0 


EtactteinB 
Ericsson B 
Hennes-B 
inardv e A 
InsestorB 
-MoDoB 
Nordbanten 
Phann/Uptohn 
SartdrtB 
Scania B 
SCAB 

&€BankenA 
Skandia Fors 
Sko astro B 
SKFB 

Saaritanken A 
Srod s n y potak A 
Store A 
Sv HantSen A 
VohraB 


487 

254X0 

1080 

536 

347 

249X0 

271 

285 

188X0 

192 
170 

82X0 

227X0 

343 

195X0 

144X0 

190 

108X0 

213X0 

193 


246X0 

1055 

530 

339X0 

242X0 

265 

282 

184 

187X0 

167X0 

80X0 

219 

338 

187X0 

141X0 

190 

105 

211 

188X0 


484 45 

252X0 247 

1QS5 1072 
533 534 

345 341X0 
249X0 243 

268 Z70 

285 282X0 
187X0 184X0 
191 189X0 
169X0 168 

81 82X0 
225 228 

341 341 

193 189 

144 143X0 
190 190 

106X0 106 

213 211X0 
190X0 192X0 


Sydney 


AH OrttamfeK 20X80 
Previous: 2432.10 

&50 840 849 M7 


826 

818 

824 

820 

ANZBktag 

7X0 

7X5 

7X0 

7.76 

371 JO 356X0 

369 360X0 

BHP 

17.10 

16X3 

17X7 

17.12 

1077 

1010 

1054 

1015 

Boro! 

1X5 

140 

150 

X44 

1983 

1929 

1965 

1948 

Brambles lr»d. 

2172 

21 JO 

71.72 

21J0 

I3B6 

1349 

1379 

1362 

CBA 

1273 

12X1 

1X73 

12X3 

627 

595 

<19 

*03 

CC Amaffl 

11X9 

11X2 

11X7 

IIX9 

362X0 

352 

357X0 

356 

Cates Myer 

5.90 

5X2 

5X8 

5X4 

389X0 3B2J0 

388 

388 

Coma Ico 

6.70 

M9 

6X0 

6X0 


| The Trib Index 

Prices as ol SOD P.M. New York time. 

Jan. 1, 1992= 100. 

Level 

Change 

% change 

yaarlodara 
% change 

World Index - 

151.79 

•»0.12 

+0.08 

+15.11 

Regional Indue* 

Asia/PadTfc 

111.80 

-0.54 

-0.48 

-16.73 

Europe 

159.92 

+0.90 

+0.57 

+14.90 

N. America 

176.21 

-0.34 

-0.19 

+37.36 

S. America 

Industrial Indexes 

139.80 

+0.25 

+0.18 

+57.01 

Capital goods 

176.15 

+0.83 

+0.47 

+32.56 

Consumer goods 

171.76 

-0.63 

-0.37 

+24.40 

Energy 

175.99 

+1.05 

+0.60 

+29.77 

Finance 

112.88 

+0.15 

+0.13 

-11.28 

Mscetianeous 

157.48 

-0.19 

-0.12 

+15.96 

Raw Materials 

185.92 

+0.43 

+0.23 

+31.11 

Service 

141.11 

+0.02 

+0.01 

+17.59 

Utmes 

134.19 

<0.33 

+0.25 

+5.55 

The lntomationaJH0rai(iTrt>tjneWorio Stock index O tracks the U.S.<toBar values a 
280 totemabonaUy intestable stodrs from 25 countries. For more formation, a free 
booklet te a vudabte by wnong to The Trib Index. IB 1 Avenue Charles do Go idle. 

92521 Nentsy Cede*. France. CompOod by Bloomberg News. 

High Low 

Close Ptbv. 


High Low 

CJase Pm. 


Renault 

Real 

Rft-PoutencA 

Sanofl 

Schnekler 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
Sodmritt 
SIGobaJn 
Suez 

SyrdtieJabo 
Thomson CSF 
Total B 
Usinor 
VGtea 


<70 

636 

<63 

64* 

CSR 

4X8 

4X4 

4X8 

4X4 

MH5vl Fudosn 

1300 

1960 

1270 

1300 


1» 

1X40 

1X60 

1X65 

2454 

2405 

2424 

2423 

Fosters Brew 

2X7 

2X0 

2X7 

2X6 

Mosul Trus 

733 

71/ 

719 

733 


,mrw 

29X0 

SMW 

30.15 

1763 

1726 

1737 

17A 

Goodman Rd 

1X8 

1X6 

1X8 

1X8 

MumtaMFg 

4230 

4160 

4170 

4230 

Newbridge Net 

4195 

42X0 

43X0 

42X0 



139 JO 

141X0 

K3 Austin la 

1X07 

11X5 

12X7 

12X6 

NEC 

1420 

1390 

1390 

1410 


32X0 

32X5 

32X0 

32X0 

1768 

1750 

1768 

1768 

Lend Lease 

23X7 

2X25 

23X7 

2150 

Nikon 

1820 

1/H0 

mo 

1790 

Noicen Energy 

29 JS 

29 JO 

29-20 

79 JS 

201.10 19X70 

200 201 JO 

MIM Hdg* 

1J6 

1J3 

1.76 

US 

NDdroSec 

743 

723 

726 

723 

Mhem Telecom 

raxo 

98.10 

9X40 

98 JO 

590 

567 

515 

573 

wctAust Bonk 

16J5 

16 

1623 

16.18 


8530 

8350 

8420 

8540 


12X5 

1X35 

12x0 

12ft 

31190 305.10 310X0 310X0 

mu Mutual 

1X3 

1X7 

1X3 

1.90 





760 


2X30 

75 

2530 

25J0 



1006 

1056 

Hdg 





Nippon on 




499 

Portof ': Pertm 

5635 

5610 

5635 

56ft 

383X0 

378 

37B 

38X30 

Neva Carp 

6J3 

6X7 

6.71 

6J3 

Nippon Steel 




328 

Petra Cda 

19X5 

19X5 

19 JO 

19 JO 

674 

663 

6 « 

678 

Padnc Dunlap 

119 

X13 

IIP 

115 





718 

PlocerDome 

27X5 

27.10 

774* 

27X5 

3055 

2975 

2975 

3060 

Pionetr Irrtl 

199 

X85 

197 

191 

NKK 




259 

Poco Peflm 

1X20 

12X5 

13 

12XS 

S84 

853 

879 

872 

Pub Broadcast 

135 

6t» 

635 

634 


1670 

1630 

1630 

1630 

Potash Sask 

106.95 104X5 

104X5 10615 

280.10 776.10 279X0 

279 

St George Bank 

7X5 

7X1 

IM 

7XS 

NTT 

8840a 

8720a 

8730a 

8820a 

Renaissance 

41X0 

40X5 

40X0 

40X5 

618 

590 

597 

618 

WMC 

BJO 

HM 

BIB 

831 

NTT Dan 

3060b 

■kWh 

3040b 

3060b 

RJc Algom 

36 

35X5 

35X0 

35ft 

196 191 JO 

196 

193 

Westpoc Bang 

7.10 

6.93 

7X7 

7.10 

08 Prater 

651 

641 

642 

651 

Rogers Camel B 

2480 

23IA 

24X0 

23X5 



Woodtide Pet 

8X8 

8X4 

8X8 

8X6 


294 

291 

291 

295 

Seagram Co 

5140 

52X0 

5X30 

52X5 




■»X70 

WooTworTta 

XS8 

3X0 

3X8 

154 

Rkzth 

1440 

1400 

1410 

14*0 

Shea Cda A 

56X5 

55W 

56 

56 


379 

3B4 387X0 






Rohm 

B790 

8710 

8770 

B70O 

Store ConsoW 

22 <6 

22 

22 

2X10 










Saturn Bk 

754 

729 

739 

756 

Suncor 

60X5 

60 ft 

6&40 

60X5 


SSo Paulo ftwjjWttmjj Taipei 


Stack MroM todetc 8*19X6 
PirarkMK 7956X7 


f*id 
BronmoPW 
Cerate pfo 
CESP Pfd 
Copel 
Elewbras 
ItmtoancoPM 
Ugfri Senridos 
Ltaritpar 
ranbresPfd 
Pauftsto Luz 
Ste Nadonol 
Souza Ciuz 
Terras PU 
Tetemtfl 
Trial 
TriapPM 
UnBwnca 
Usiminas Ptt 
CVRD PW 


9X0 
700-00 
4560 
58X0 
14X0 
47000 
52000 
450X1 
330.00 
22000 
14450 
38X5 
9.13 
107 JO 
154X0 
154X0 
295X0 
«J0 
T 24 
77 JO 


8X2 

685-00 

44X0 

54-90 

1470 

460X0 

517X0 

447X0 

312X2 

214X0 

144X0 

38X0 

9.10 

103X0 

153X0 

153X0 

290X0 

39X0 

IJO 

27X0 


US 895 
700X0 695X0 
4SJC 44X0 
57X0 57X1 
14J0 14.95 
47000 448X0 
520X0 518X0 
<50X0 447X0 
323.99 318X0 
219X8 215X0 
144X1 145X0 
38X0 38,99 
9.13 9.15 

104X0 104X0 
154X0 155X0 
156X0 155X0 
294X0 291X0 
40X0 4X20 
1X4 1X20 

27 JO 27.15 


Cathay Life las 
CM no HwoBk 
QrinoTimgBk 
CMna Devwprol 
CKna Steel 
Rrat Barit 
Fannoso Ptasdc 
HuaNan Bk 
HI Comm Bk 
Han Yo Plastics 
SAki Kong Lite 
Taiwan Send 
Tatung 

Utd Micro Elec 
UMWortdCNn 


182 

IBS 

93 

110X0 

26.10 

190 

75X0 

148X0 

85 

68 

112 

67X0 

S6XD 

47X0 

70X0 


179 

183 

92 

10B50 

25J0 

185 

74 

145 

8350 

67 

110X0 

46 

55X0 

46X0 

49X0 


179 179 

1B4 182 

92X0 91X0 
108X0 108X0 
25X0 25X0 
185 184 

7450 74X0 
145 145 

8150 84 

67X0 67 

110X0 11050 
66 67X0 
56X0 55 

44.90 47 JO 
70X0 69X0 


Seoul 

Doom 


K 67490 

PRVtaNE 679X7 


Hyundai 

KlaMaK 


I Eng. 
i Motors 
Korea BP** 
Karoo Exts Bk 
Korea Mob Tel 

LGSemtDn 
Poriaig Iran St 
Samsung Dbtay 
Samsung Elec 
stilnnonBaik 


108000 106000 
4290 4130 
20300 19000 
15500 15100 
25900 24000 
4110 5910 
495000 484000 
24900 251 DO 
42300 41900 
44000 4WW 
54500 54400 

10800 item 


106500 106000 
4150 4270 

19000 19000 
15400 15400 
24600 25600 
6040 6050 
487000 488000 
24100 26900 
■COW 41900 
43000 43600 
55000 56500 
10600 10600 


Singapore 

Asia Poe Brew 
CerebosPoc 
CTy Death 
Cyde Carriage. 

Dflity Form Ird 

DBS tauten 
DBS Law 
Report F«ls 

Fraser & Necve 1U0 
HKLond* 

Jard Mottiesn 

Jarasmtegic 

-^Bank 


OCBCfategn 
OS Uirion BkF 
PoriorayHdgs 
Sembmwrag 
Sing Alrlanign 
Sing i and 
Sine Press F 
Stag Tedi Ind 
Stag Telecomm 
KeoaHLmd 
Tm Lee Bank 
Utd Industrial 
UtdOSea Bk F 
WtagTalHdgs 
itrki ULrtaBqtc 


8 

7X0 

7X0 

M 

10 

1040 

1620 

Id 

1420 

15 

1480 

1490 

0J7 

0.76 

0J7 

1840 

17.90 

1X10 

5X5 

545 

5X5 

5J5 

5.70 

5J5 

1U0 

1150 

12X0 

2X8 

2X7 

1B8 

610 

60S 

6X5 

128 

126 

IS 

1040 

1020 

1X40 

6 26 

422 

426 

1U0 

1850 

1&70 

11.10 

10X0 

11.10 

610 

t 

6X5 

8 

7X0 

7X5 

1X50 

1Z30 

1230 

7X5 

7.90 

7X5 

28X0 

27X0 

2830 

2X9 

1X6 

3X0 

124 

122 

332 

4X0 

474 

476 

152 

3J2 

3X2 

1J3 

UD 

133 

16 

15X0 

15X0 

4X6 

460 

460 


Stockholm 

AGAB 107 

ABBA 880 

AsBloman 201X0 

Astro A 369 

Alias Copco A 184X0 

AlllD«r 347X0 


SXi6tndec290iJ3 
Prerteas: 2878X7 

10b 106X0 107 

863 080 866 

196 201X0 198X0 
364 368X0 369 

175 1S4XD 175 
344 346 347X0 


Tokyo 


NIM 225:1827X51 
Previous: 1B56478 

Alnomoto 

All Nippon Air 

1090 

lax 

low 

1100 

845 

876 

830 

B® 

Arow 

3460 

840 

3420 

625 

3450 

830 

3420 

845 


649 

611 

634 

657 

Asa W Glass 

I860 

10W 

I860 

low 

Bk Tokyo Mteu 

1990 

I92U 

1930 

196(1 

BkYakaborea 

565 

S3S 

538 

563 


2260 

22211 

ittJU 

2210 


2560 

2510 

2510 

2560 

ChubuBK 

2120 

7090 

2090 

2110 

Ouraofcu Etec 
Dal RS Print 

2150 

2020 

2110 

1988 

7130 

1990 

2110 

2010 

DaW 

781 

/U 

758 

/VO 

DoW eta Rons 

1340 

1310 

1310 

1320 

DoJwoBank 

499 

481 

485 

492 


1340 

1300 

1300 

1340 


995 

975 

97S 

975 

DDI 

740a 

/340c 

7428a 

7340a 


2290 

2200 

2720 

7270 


5190a 

91400 

5190a 

5I40O 

EM 

22/0 

»«0 

2250 

2270 

Fame 

3820 

3/20 

3 730 

3800 

Faf Bank 

1430 

1MJ 

1380 

<41X1 

rilwnlo 

4090 

1710 

4000 

1190 

4010 

1190 

4080 

1200 

HocniutaBk 

1090 

10/U 

ion 

18/0 

Hitachi 

1060 

1040 

1040 

1060 

Honda Mate 

VtfVl 

3/50 

3780 

3830 

IBJ 

1390 

13/0 

1370 

1380 


444 

4S4 

435 

437 


5B2 

570 

573 

503 

ta-Yakada 

5590 


5470 

5530 

JAL 

499 

#1 

494 

49/ 

Japan Tobacco 

fificnw 

79908 

8000a 

aosjo 


3290 

sm 

3240 

3290 


652 

646 

64/ 

64/ 


2190 

2140 

71/0 

2200 


1320 

1300 

1320 

1330 


490 

4/5 

47B 

« 


325 

316 

32! 

325 

Kbiki Nipp Ry 

727 

720 

m 

72/ 

KtrinBrewry 

1010 

982 

m 

1010 

Kobe Steel 

228 

77? 

722 

224 


OT 

899 

899 

no 

Kubota 

560 

538 

54 7 

540 

Kyocera 

7160 

7080 

7110 

7150 

KpfiftuBec 

2130 

7110 

2120 

7101) 

478 

413 

420 

429 


466 

4SA 

<5* 

46* 


1710 

1660 

1670 

1690 


3120 

3UW 

3060 

3160 

Matsu Etec ind 

1830 

1/M 

IHOO 

1640 

Mam Etec wk 

1120 

1090 

ion 

1120 

MRwbbhl 

1080 

1040 

1IM0 

1100 

MksuhtaMCh 

344 

328 

330 

344 

MBwttshlEI 

680 

6/0 

6/1 

600 

MksotristflEa 

1410 

1360 

13/0 

w» 

MimblsM Hvy 
Mnsubtshthtat 

855 

835 

83/ 

857 

881 

m 

m 

88? 

MftsubistaTf 

1310 

1X0 

1290 

1300 

Mitsui 

883 

871 

871 

880 


Sankyo 
Samm Bank 
Sanyo Elec 
5eajrn 
Setoti Rmt 
S eihari Chem 
SeUsui House 
Seven-Eiewn 
Sharp 

SUkofcu El Purr 

Shimizu 

SlttvetsuCh 

SMstada 

Shizuoka Bk 

Softbank 

Sony 

Sumflomo 
Sunritomo Bk 
Sumbcnem 
Sumitomo Elec 
SumB Metal 
Samh Trust 
Trrisho Pham 
TgkedaCheni 
TDK 

TohokuEIPwr 
Toko) Bank 
Tokio Marine 
Tanya El Par 
TaJcya Elearon 
TokyaGas 
Tokyu Corp. 
Tonen 

ToppanPriiri 

Toruvlnd 

Toshiba 

Tastarn 

Tayu Trust 

Toyota Motor 

YdmonoucN 


3390 3320 
1390 1330 

495 aa 
6740 6610 

5080 4910 

1240 1220 

1130 1090 

7160 7140 

1550 1530 

2100 2070 

712 695 

2380 2330 
1440 1400 

1010 1008 


3330 3390 
1340 1370 

48) 495 

6740 6660 

5000 5100 

12X 1240 

1110 1120 
7180 7150 

1530 1530 

2080 2100 
704 719 

2350 2360 

1430 1410 

1010 1010 


TaJhmanEny 
Tec* B 
Tetegtobe 
Telus 
Thomson 
Tor OotnB onk 
TrnnaritB 
TraruCdo Pipe 
Trimark FM 
Trtzec Htflm 
TVXGold 
westraast Eny 
Weston 


45-10 
33J8 
39 JO 
20.95 
30ta 
3935 
17 
26 
42Vi 
32.30 
11-35 
25 
74 


44 Kj 
32V4 
39X5 
20X0 
29 JO 
38X0 
16X5 
25X0 
41X0 
32 
11X5 
2465 
73 Ki 


46X0 44.95 
3195 33J0 
39X0 39 JO 
20.90 20U 

3040 30X5 
3885 38X5 
16.95 1690 
26 2» 
42 K 41X0 
3110 3120 
11J5 Ute 
25 2495 
74 73 Ht 


10900 10300 10300 10700 
9020 8900 8900 8900 

B82 851 860 990 

1520 1470 1480 1500 

464 4SS 460 463 

1670 1650 1660 1670 

785 280 282 786 

1050 1000 1000 1030 

2770 2710 2760 2720 

2530 2440 2450 2480 

8330 8250 8320 B25D 

7060 2020 2030 2060 

963 923 930 963 

1540 1190 1230 1710 

2240 2200 2230 2240 

437D 4310 4328 4290 

307 383 303 306 

560 5*6 549 560 

1240 1190 1200 1230 

1410 1370 1370 1408 

690 680 682 690 

69S 683 686 60S 

7770 2690 2700 2790 

8£9 858 859 871 

3190 3130 3140 3180 

2528 2430 2440 2530 


Vienna 


ATX bdec 124753 


Ptevteus: 124054 

BoeMer-Uddeh 

IDS B1X40 

820 82450 

CramronstPW 

460 4SS.15 

4W 46055 

EA-Generpfl 

34253400.10 

3W0 

3448 

EVN 

1766 

1747 

1764 

1/60 

FUwtmten Wien 
DMV 

604 

1418 

595 

1390 

604 

1414 

595 

1377 

Oest Elefctitz 

860 85750 

660 

859 

VA5WU 

48950 

477 

484 480*40 

V A Tech 

1877 

18X 

1877 

1853 

Wtenerbetg Bu 

2229 

2202 

2229 

221 B 


Wellington nzse-« moae 22*126 

Provhos: 2288X8 


az ■miKxtMO 


TOfOntO TSE Indmtrtata: 6188X0 

Piertaus: 415SJ5 


A bfflbl Price 
Alberti Energy 
Alcan Alum 
AMMflrtExpi 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Now Scuta 
Bank* Goto 
BCE 

BCTeteamin 
Bfachem Pham 
Bombardier 3 
B rescon A 
Bra-* Minerals 
Camera 
OBC 

CdnNoSRoa 
CdnNul Rts 
CdnOcCdPet 
CdnPocHc 
Comtara 
Dotesco 
Doratar 
Donohue A 
DuPorriCdoA 
Edper Group 
EuroNev Mng 
Rteta Art 
Fatcanbridoe 
Fletcher Chari A 
Franco Nevada 
Gud Coates 
Imperial 08 
Inca 

IPL Energy 
LairtawB 
Loeiuan Group 
Maanfi BUI 
MagnalrrilA 


2U5 22.10 
29X5 28.90 
49X5 48X0 
16 154 

50X0 494 

53X5 52.40 
37-35 37 

68X5 67.30 
31 JO 30X5 
7130 72 

2SJ5 9AM 

32.95 32M 

1BX5 1BJ0 
53J5 51% 

67 JO 66 
50X0 50 

34 3314 

22.50 2255 
351b 34J0 
39 JD 39 JO 
25X5 24.90 
12-30 12-20 
26H 26X5 
3315 33 

24 2360 
42X5 4U0 
293X5 293 

31X0 31X5 
22X0 22X0 

63.95 67.30 

10X0 10 

61X0 61.05 
«M 4830 
39X5 39X0 
19JS 19.10 

45.95 45.10 
1895 18X0 
72X0 71.70 


2220 22J0 

28.95 2BX0 

48.90 49 

15X5 15X5 
5DJ0 49X5 
vi /w «J0 
37.10 37X5 
6735 671» 

31J0 30X5 

73 72X0 

26J0 26J0 

32.90 32X0 
1830 18X5 
5330 51.90 

67 65.90 
50V1 50X0 
m 3155 
22ta 22X5 
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39 JO 3916 
2495 25 

1316 I2J0 
2Mk 24.15 
3105 3290 
34 23X0 
4195 4195 
293 29110 
3116 31X5 
23X0 22X5 

63.95 63X5 

10J0 10 

61X0 61 

4X70 481V 

39X0 394 

19H 19X5 
45J5 44.70 
1X90 1X90 
71.70 7110 


Air NZeaU B 

357 

X86 

357 

IBS 

Brierty invr 

IJ6 

1J6 

1J6 

1J8 

Cotter Holt ard 

125 

127 

377 

133 

FWcnaiBJdo 

4J0 

4.15 

4.15 

430 

FtetchCh Eny 

3JH 

174 

175 

173 

Flafth Ch Foist 

2X3 

•UU 

7XG 

3X3 

Retdi Qi Paper 

258 

256 

787 

385 

UenNrrihan 

350 

356 

358 

356 

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xsa 

658 

658 

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WDson Horton 

1105 

11X0 

I1XS 

11X5 


Zurich 


SHMm 2898X3 
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ABB B 

1748 

1715 

1737 

1779 

Adecco B 

48050 

477 

479 

479 

AlusuIseR 

1193 

1170 

1190 

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Ares-SersnB 

1640 

1551 

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1545 

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875 

155 

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1690 

1655 

1688 

1660 

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2990 

2915 

2975 

7935 

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StO 

BSD 

860 

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740 

720 

740 

725 

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Ml 

157 15X25 15850 

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530 

529 

530 

530 

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5880 

5795 

5800 

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4800 

4675 

4760 

4810 

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mi 

1093 

mi 

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465 

465 

465 

463 

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1639 

1618 

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1/18 

1694 

1710 

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14/ 

145 

14X75 

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is n 

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1545 

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747 

774 

747 

727 

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3060 

7006 

TV* 

2060 

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705.75 

204 

305 


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12345 

12180 

17320 

12260 

SBC R 

290 38150 

390 

284 

5cNndtarPC 

1637 

1616 

1634 

1635 

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1475 

347(1 

3445 

3420 

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BAD 

as? 

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860 

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WB 

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941 

940 

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1535 

1504 

IB? 

1508 

SartsstarR 

1309 

1280 

lam 

1380 

UBS 3 

1347 

IXffi 

1340 


wWertfturR 

923 

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452 <«50 44850 

44150 


,**?*»'*ii 



PAGE 14 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THl-RSDAT, MARCH 6, 1997 


PACE 15 


v 


ASIA/PACIFIC 



Japan Moves to Free 
Market for Pensions 


Bloomberg fines 

- TOKYO — In a move to de- 
regulate its financial-services in- 
dustry, Japan will allow investment 
advisers into its $1 70 billion market 
for a major form of corporate pen- 
sions, a U.S. Treasury official said 
Wednesday. 

The decision would allow both 
i k domestic and foreign investment-ad- 
* visoty companies to manage money 
ih SO-called tax-qualified pensions 
overseen by the Finance Ministry. 
This pension money is a major part 
pf Japan's corporate pension market 
that has been dominated by Japanese 

trust banks and life insurers. 

; Ja panese officials told tlieir U.S. 
counterparts about the change during 
a one-day round of trade talks on 
financial services, according to the 
P-S- official, who asked not to be 
identified. Officials from Japan’s Fi- 
nance Ministry were not available for 
comment 

. Among the U.S. companies that 
stand to benefit from greater access 
to Japanese pension funds are Gold- 
man Sachs Asset Management Japan 
Ltd. and Morgan Stanley Asset & 
A . Investment Trust Management Co. 

" The talks were held to review a 
1995 U.S .-Japanese accord and to 
discuss Japan's plans to deregulate 
its financial-services industry. 

• “In general, we’ve been very 
pleased with the steps Japan is taking 
to implement the agreement." the 
U.S. official said. 

.. Hie 1995 accord was designed to 


remove regulations hampering for- 
eign fund managers' growth in the 
Si trillion Japanese corporate and 
public pension market. 

Last year, foreign companies won 
a 14.8 percent share of the 5.58 tril- 
lion yen ($45.89 billion) in new 
funds distributed by Japan’s Pension 
Welfare Public Service Co., alw 
known as Nenpuku. In 1 995. foreign 
companies were not entrusted with 
any Nenpuku distributions. 

Still, the United States urged Ja- 
pan to open up another $170 billion 
market, this one for public pensions 
overseen by the Ministry of Posts 
and Telecommunications. It «lsn 
pressed for greater disclosure of 
privately managed funds’ perfor- 
mance dnia. 

■ Trade Deficit Is Forecast 

Japan will register its fust monthly 
current-account deficit in six years in 
its data for January, economists pre- 
dicted. But many said the current- 
account balance would return to a 
surplus in February because the 
yen’s weakness against the dollar 
was making Japan's exports cheaper. 
That could lead to renewed trade 
friction with the United States and 
other trading partners. 

The average forecasts of 1 6 econ- 
omists surveyed by Bloomberg 
News called for a trade deficit of 44 
billion yen in the January account. 
Thai would be Japan’s first deficit 
since January 1991, when there was 
a shortfall of 143 billion yen. 


Vietnam Imposes 
Fines on Peregrine 

f.i «pW H <,W Fi*m i Dcfudta 

HANOI — The government announced fines and punitive steps 
Wednesday against Peregrine Capital Vietnam Ltd. us one result of a 
lengthy investigation into alleged business irregularities by a major 
foreign investor in Vietnam. 

The Ho Chi Minh City People’s Committee proposed a fine of 
$50,000 for Peregrine Capital Vietnam and a range of penalties 
totaling $50,000 against associated firms. The company was notified 
of the decision Feb. 20. 

Alan Mercer, chief legal counsel for Peregrine Investment Hold- 
ings. said the fine was for operating from an unregistered office 
without a license in Vietnam. 

Peregrine Capital Vietnam is 60 percent owned by Peregrine 
Investment Holdings Ltd. of Hong Kong. 

The penalties also included the withdrawal of licenses firom eight 
firms connected with Peregrine’s chief executive in Vietnam. Nguyen 
Trung True, as part of an inquiry into alleged evasion of import taxes 
and duties. 

The companies hold distribution rights in Vietnam for products 
made by Hewlett-Packard Co. and Johnson & Johnson of the United 
Stales and Honda Motor Co. and Minolta Co. of Japan. 

A People's Committee official said a total of at least 13 companies 
associated with Peregrine were involved and that all were being 
punished for violations of Vietnamese law governing foreign busi- 
nesses. The measures included fines of between $900 and $9,000. 

"It's been a difficult time for us,’’ Mr. True said, but the Australian- 
Vietnamese executive said Peregrine Capital Vietnam would continue 
its business activities in the country. 

Mr. Mercer said, “Needless to say we are reviewing the situation in 
Vietnam with a view to discussing with the authorities the amount of 
the fine." 

Peregrine’s run-in with the authorities began in May when slate 
investigators turned up unannounced at the firm’s office in Ho Chi 
Minh City. Executives said it was a “routine" check, but within weeks 
a separate investigation was launched into the tax affairs of Mr. True 
and his wife, and they were barred from leaving Ho Chi Minh City. 

The source said authorities continued to hold their passports 
pending the outcome of the case and that Australian diplomats were 
frying to resolve the matter. (Reuters. Bloomberg. AFP i 


Samsung 
To Focus on 
Logic Chips 


Cr^fnlrJtn Otc' Staff Firm Ojpajxn 

SEOUL — Samsung Electronics 
Co. said Wednesday it would invest 
S8.1 billion to expand its nonmemory 
chip sector and reduce its heavy de- 
pendence on memory chips. 

The company hopes to lift sales in 
the nonmemory chip sector to S15 
billion by 2005. At that level. Sam- 
sung Electronics said, the sector 
would account for half of its total 
sales. The project is also aimed at 
raising the company’s share of the 
world's nonmemory chip market 
from to 5 percent from 2 percent by 
2005. 

“Samsung's future hinges on 
successful fostering of the non- 
memory chip sector," said Lee Kun 
Hee, chairman of Samsung Group. 
Semiconductors are divided into 
memory chips, used as the memory 
for products ranging from cellular 
phones to computers, and non- 
memory. or logic, chips, used as the 
“brain" for computers and appli- 
ances. 

Nonmemory chips are less vul- 
nerable to price fluctuations than 
memory chips, which have suffered 
an SO percent price drop during the 
past year amid fiat demand. 

As a result, profit at Samsung 
Electronics, the world's biggest 
memory-chip producer, slid 93.4 
percent in 1996 from a year earlier, 
to $189.9 million. 

(AFP. Bloomberg) 


INVEST: For Some Investors, Uzbekistan’s Runaway Economic Policies Stand in the Way of Profits 


■ Continued from Page 11 

and global supplies were expensive. 

when Mr. Karimov was finally 
informed, the state had lost $400 
million in cotton profit and $300 
million on grain imports. There was 
no emergency yet, though, diplo- 
mats say. Mr. Karimov could have 
■ r i calmly drawn on the state's almost 
$2 billion cash reserve. Instead, as 
one diplomat put it, “the govern- 
ment sort of freaked out.” 

Specifically, Mr. Karimov made 
three mistakes: He painted money, 
bought dollars at high black-market 
rates and, in effect, “borrowed'' 
from his new foreign admirers. 

More than 1,000 foreigners were 
barred from converting banked local 
earnings into dollars, which the gov- 
ernment itself felt it needed. That 


left them holding tens of millions of 
dollars of local money whose value 
had dropped by about half. There 
was a sudden shortage of dollars as 
the government bought them up on 
the black market. AH this was dev- 
astating to most foreign companies, 
which in effect had been robbed of 
their profit or operating capital. 

The government said that its in- 
tentions were honorable and that 
large multinationals were still wel- 
come. It was the unsavory small and 
medium-sized traders whom Mr. 
Karimov wanted out, the ones he 
said had flooded Uzbekistan with 
shoddy goods. Despite Western 
warnings that he was stalling the 
traditional engine of economic 
growth, be managed to drive out 
smaller businesses. 

Tire unsavoriness remains. 


though. Western diplomats, bankers 
and traders say. as endemic cor- 
ruption and nepotism have become 
even more flagrant A glance at die 
new short list of investors favored 
with the right to convert local earn- 
ings into dollars speaks volumes. 

Leading the list is a company 
called Aldus, which operates a 
Tashkent supermarket chain — and 
is owned by Mirabar Usmanov, the 
deputy prime minis ter in charge of 
die list itself. A second company 
near the cop of the list is Roz Trad- 
ing, run by Mansur Makhsudi, an 
Uzbek-American who is Mr. 
Karimov's son-in-law. 

“It took the government a long 
time to win investor confidence." a 
Western diplomat said, ‘ ‘and it's go- 
ing to take a lot longer to regain what 
they lost over just a couple of weeks 


in October." Mr. Shaulis. a fruit ex- 
porter, arrived in 1994. Flush with a 
stake of cash earned in grain ventures 
in Romania and Lithuania, he had 
been drawn by talk of Uzbekistan’s 
renowned fresh and dried fruit. 

He lost $50,000 almost imme- 
diately as he fried to export grapes 
and cherries to Europe. It was a 
lesson in the first reality of business 
here — that this region, landlocked 
and remote from Western markets, 
requires complex and costly trans- 
portation. In Mr. Shaulis ’s case, it 
took so long to organize a refri- 
gerated truck that he lost his entire 
shipment. 

In 1995, Mr. Shaulis, shifting 
from fresh fruit, won government 
permission to convert Uzbek cur- 
rency into dollars — the first ne- 
cessity of an import business. He 


began importing rice and tires into 
the hungry local market. 

In the autumn, Mr. Shaulis jumped 
at another opportunity — a raisin- 
processing factory bought by Soviet 
officials in 1989 and now idle. 

Mr. Sh aulis rented pan of the 
p lant, but when he arrived, he sensed 
a problem. The work had to be 
delayed, the factory director said. 

Why? Though he had been assured 
that the line was working, he was 
now told that the plant transformer 
was broken and the engineer who had 
it at home was visiting relatives in 
Russia. It was not known when he 
would return. “They weren't being 
upfront with me," Mr. Shaulis said. 
“Did they come after me later to get 
my business? No. they don’t do that 
here. I feel there must have been 
something wrong with the line." 


Investor’s Asia 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

15DD0 

14000- - 
13000 -- 
12000 
11000 - 

10000 o'Ttf D J F rtf 

1996 1997 


Singapore 
Straits Tones' 


Tokyo :: 
Nikkei 225 



O NO JFM 
1996 1997 


(TN' d j f m 

1996 1997 


Exchange 

Index 

Wtettaesday : ‘ ■ " 

Oose ‘ Close, -.Change 

Hong Kong 

MangSeng 

13,416.76 13y4SO.tS 

Singapore 

Straits. Times 

a^mss. 

Sydney 

ABOtfinartes - 

2,433.00 

Tokyo 

tmei23S . . ' 


( Kuala Lumpur Composite : 

■■ IJ53L28 1^247^2) 

Bangkok 

SET .. 


Seoui 

CorrpositB index 

674^0 0794& 

Teipei 

Stodc Market 5ntfex.3W^ ■ 7,956.57'- ;^79) 

VanUa 

PSE 

3&Z.3Q ifidZJBi'- 

Jakarta- 

Composite index 

688.16 88M7 : -^4i5® 

Wellington 

NZSE-40 


Bombay 

Senafive tndax 

3^64.10 

Source: Telekurs 


lucnuiional Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• Chrysler Corp. moved to prop up poor sales of its Neon in 
Japan with a one-year test-drive plan, offering 500 of the 
sedans for monthly fees ranging between 14,200 yen 
(SI 16.77) and 18.800 yen. 

• Sega Enterprises Ltd.'s shares fell 3.6 percent, to 3,180 
yen, after a report that the company would reduce shipments of 
its Sega Saturn game machine. 

• South Korea's floundering economy is forecast to show its 
lowest annual growth rate in 17 years in 1 997, at 5 percent, the 
Samsung Economic Research Institute said. 

• Japan's prime minister. Ryu taro Hashimoto. succeeded in 
pushing next year's budget through Parliament's lower house, 
paving the way for the government to keep its promise to cut 
its debt and tackle other reforms. 

• Orient-Express Hotels, a unit of Sea Containers Ltd, is 
looking at a site to build a hotel on Hollywood Road, in Hong 
Kong’s antiques district. The company, which also is con- 
sidering building a resort on Bali, operates the restored Orient 
Express trains in Europe and Southeast Asia. 

• India's car sales rose 20 percent in die past 1 0 months from 

a year earlier, to 325,41 9 units. IW. Bloomberg. AFP. Reuters 


Philippine Inflation Rate Falls 

Bloomberg News 

MANILA — The annual inflation rale fell to a nearly 10-year 
low of 4.4 percent in February as food prices stabilized after a 
shortage sent them soaring last year, according to data released 
Wednesday. The annual inflation rate was 5 percent in January. 

The lower- than -expected inflation should pave the way for 
lower interest rates, economists said. Tomas Africa of the 
National Statistics Office said, “The amount of deregulation, 
competition and the opening up of the economy at the moment 
seem to be having positive effects." 


IT 

VNE 
1997 
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World Roundup 



Juan Antonio Samaranch , an- 
nouncing he would run again. 

S amaran ch to Seek 
A Fourth IOC Term 

Olympics Juan Antonio Sa- 
maranch confirmed Wednesday 
what many Olympic officials had 
assumed all along: He said lie 
would seek another term as pres- 
ident of the International Olympic 
Committee that would extend his 
reign into the next century. 

After months of hedging about 
his plans, the 76-year-old Sa- 
maranch said he would seek re- 
election at the IOC session in 
Lausanne in September. 

If confirmed for a fourth term, as 
expected, Samaranch would head 
the Olympic movement until 2001, 
when he will be 81. (AP) 

Manning Is Stayin g Put 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL The Uni- 
versity of Tennessee’s quarterback, 
Peyton Manning, said Wednesday 
that he would return for his senior 
season, bypassing an early jump to 
die NFL in which he would likely 
have been the top draft choice. 

“I made up my mind and I don't 
expect to ever look back," Man- 
ning said at a news conference. “I 
am going to stay at die University 
of Tennessee." Cheers went up 
around the room. 

Peyton’s father, Archie Man- 
ning, a former quarterback for the 
University of Mississippi and the 
New Orleans Saints, has fielded 
most of the media calls for his son 
for the last two months. 

Peyton Manning said fee hiring 
of Bill Parcells as coach of the New 
York Jets — fee team with fee top 
draft pick — tempted him to jump to 
the NFL, but be decided against iL 
He said he researched his decision 
by talking to other athletes, includ- 
ing Michael Jordan. (AP) 

A Powwow Over Irabu 

baseball Executives of the 
Anaheim Angels and - San Diego 
Padres met Tuesday to discuss a 
potential trade involving a Japanese 
pitcher, Hideki Irabu. Major League 
Baseball's executive council last 
week upheld a recommendation that 
fee Padres retain Irabu's rights in- 
definitely. but the star right-hander 
of the Chiba Lotte Marines said he 
would not play in San Diego. (IAT) 


Not a Pretty Victory, 
But Schalke Savors It 

Monaco and Brondby Also Triumph 


By Peter Berlin 

International Herald Tribune 


DORTMUND, Germany — On a 
night of distress for borne fans in fee 
UEFA Cup, only Schalke 04 of Ger- 
many took advantage of playing on its 
own field in the first leg of the quarterfi- 
nals. 

Schalke beat Valencia of Spain, 2-0. 
on Tuesday in a game illuminated by 
moments of dazzling soccer but also 


Thi UK FA Cup 


disfigured by a long spell of disjointed 
and thuggish play. A 2-0 home victory is 
traditionally considered par in the first leg 
of European knock-out competitions. 

However, Schalke lost some of its 
advantage in the first 25 minutes of the 
second half when the players concen- 
trated more on kicking each other than 
on kicking the ball. Both Schalke goal 
scorers, Marc Wilmots and Thomas 
Linke, received yellow cards and will be 
suspended for the game in Valencia. 
Valencia will lose Vicente Engonga, 
who also received his second yellow 
card of this year’s UEFA Cup. 

Schalke enjoys a powerful old-fash- 
ioned advantage when it plays at its own 
Parks tndion in Gelsenkirchen. Every 
one of its UEFA Cup games this season 
has been a sellout It is the biggest draw 
in any European competition this sea- 
son. even though its ground capacity 
shrinks from 71,000 for games in tire 
German Bundesliga to 56,000 for 
UEFA Cup games. This is because 
UEFA, the governing body of European 
soccer, insists that fans at its games must 
be seated for security and safety. 
Schalke is one of the last big western 
European clubs where a large number of 
fans can stand. 

Research suggests that in a well- 
maintained stadium, standing fans are 


safe. What those fans might infli ct on 
the seated spectators is, of course, an- 
other matter. But on Tuesday night, the 
worst that could be said of Schalke 's 
young, male supporters — the sort that 
prefer to stand — was that many were 
drunk and most were horribly dressed. 

Schalke is one of the traditional 
powers of German soccer. It has won the 
German League seven times, although 
two of those titles came during World 
War II and none have come since 
1958. 

Indeed, Schalke has not won any- 
thing since it took tire German Cup In 
1 972. In the last 20 years it has struggled 
with debt and slipped into the German 
second division three times. Mean- 
while, many of its near neighbors — 
Dortmund, Cologne and Borassia 
Moenc ben gladbac h — have enjoyed 
success. Yet, Schalke still draws huge 
and passionate crowds. 

For European games, the club paints 
little numbers on the great curves of 
terracing ai the north aim south ends of 
the grounds, and provides thin plastic 
cushions for fans to sit on. The fiction 
does not even last until kickoff. On 
Tuesday, the fans dutifully sat for a few 
minutes, as if gathering their energies 
for what was to come, and then spent fee 
whole game on their feet -waving the 
stiff cushions like flags. 

The opening minutes brought a mood 
of foreboding, as Valencia sliced up the 
home defense wife precise passing. 
Leandro hit the crossbar wife a shot and 
then beaded on goal, only for a de- 
fender, Linke, to clear the ball off the 
goal line. 

Schalke adjusted its marking and 
soon discovered feat Valencia had a 
Count Dracula defease: crosses made it 
disappear. In the 44th minute, Olaf 
Then swung a hanging free kick into the 
Valencia penalty area and Linke 
powered a header into fee visitors’ goal 



Jarrgen SdWarz ‘Bruh » V| 

Otero of Valencia, right, and Youri Mulder of Schalke 04 wagin g an airborne battle for control of the bail. 


from 12 yards (1 1 meters) out to leave 
the crowd contented at halftime. 

The crowd’s mood changed in the 
second half to one of anger and in- 
dignation, matching fee mean-spirited 
approach of fee players. But a few 
seconds of inspired soccer in the S2d 
minute created instant collective joy. 

Again, Valencia's problems started 
wife a header. Martin Max sank to lu's 
knees to guide a deft header between 
Valencia defenders and into fee path of 
Jiri Nemec. who drove a low ball across 
the goalmouth. Wilmots, galloping in ax 
fee far post, scored. 


Even 20 minutes after the end, fee 
North Curve remained packed with 
singing fans. They should enjoy it while 
they can. Schalke has until 1998 to put 
in real seats. Schalke hopes to build a 
new stadium wife a capacity of 55,000 
for European games- But that will rise to 
60,000, wife a few still standing, in the 
Bundesliga. 

Andarieeht 1, Inter Milan 1 In An- 
twerp, Anderlecht took a first-half lead 
when Bruno Vensaval scored with a 
swerving volley from outside the pen- 
alty area. But Maurizio Ganz leveled in 
the second hal f after Anderlecht ’s goal- 


keeper, Geert De Vlieger. dropped the/ 
ball. 

AS Monaco 1, Mewcoatle 0 Host New- 
castle was without all three of its high;/ 
priced central strikers — Alan Shearer, Les> 
Ferdinand and Faustino Asprilla — leaving 
the stage to Sonny Anderson, Monaco’s, 
star goal scorer. He rose to the occasion, 
with a 59th-rainute winning goal. 

Brondby 1, Tenerife o Ebbe Sand gave ' 
the Danish visitors a surprise lead in the - 
29th minute. The Spanish team dom--* 
mated fee rest of the game, but could not 
score. Slavisa J ok an o vie wasted a- 
second-half penalty shot. 


China’s Latest Cultural Revolution: Fanaticism for Sports 


International Herald Tribune 

A FTER losing the Olympic 50-meter sprint 
by 0.03 of a second last summer in Atlanta, 
the tall Chinese swimmer Le Jingyi 
wandered behind a chain-link fence outside the 
pool, sat on a cement stump and sobbed un- 
wittingly in front of fee cameras. 

Le didn’t look up from her towel as she relived 
the loss to Amy Van Dylan of the United Stares, 
but the cameramen, working for Chinese news- 
papers and TV stations, moved in a scrunch around 
her. 

They sought out tire best views of Le’s misery. 
The crowd of Chinese reporters and TV crews 
behind the fence grew to two dozen before an 
Olympic official, an American woman, compas- 
sionately stood in front of Le as a shield. 

How things had changed, that an American 
would seek to prevent the Chinese media from 
behaving like Americans. 

Modem sport in China is basing itself on tire 
Western model, according to Timothy Fok, 52, a 
Hong Kong-based real-estate developer and sports 
fanatic. 

His father. Dr. Henry Fok, has served on the 
executive committee of fee international soccer 
federation, FIFA, and be was one of fee leaders of 
Beijing’s unsuccessful bid to host the 2000 Sum- 
mer Olympics. 

Timothy Fok is vice president of China’s 
Olympic Committee and its Football Association. 


Vantage Point/lAH Thomsen 


When China assumes control of Hong Kong; this 
summer, he will oversee sports development in the 
former British colony. 

He was in Los Angeles 13 years ago when China 
won its first Olympic medal, a gold for the shooter 
Xu Haifeng, a former chemical-fertilizer sales- 
man. 

“We were known as kind of the sick man of 
Asia,” Fok said by cellular phone this week from 
China. 

‘ ‘It used to be that fee only way anyone from fee 
West saw us was at a ping-pong tournament. But 
now China is becoming like America. Sports is 
becoming an important element." 

Last summer, China ranked fourth overall, be- 
hind fee United States, Russia and Germany, wife 
50 Olympic medals — despite a disappointing 
performance from its women swimmers, whose 
meteoric rise a few years ago has since been linked 
to illegal performance-enhancing drugs. 

The overall impression in the West, based on 
little first-hand observation in China, is that the 
Chinese government decided a decade ago to begin 
using sports in the same way as fee former Soviets 
and East Germans, as a tool to promote Communist 
ideology. 

The champion diver, Fu Mingxia, seemed to be 
the poster child of China’s newfound ambition. 


. .. -When she was 3 years old. she was training to be 
a gymnast, like her sister. At 7, she was identified 
as a potential diver. Two years later, die was taken 
600 miles (960 kilometers) from her home to a 
diving academy in Beijing, where she was said to 
be practicing seven days a week. Her parents saw 
her twice a year. 

As harrowing as her story sounds. Fu seemed, by 
Western standards, like a normal 17-year-old girl 
when she gave an international press conference 
last summer after winning her thud Olympic gold 
medal. 

She did not spout propaganda; she answered 
questions wife an insouciance, a relaxed sense of 
individuality, fear seemed completely at odds wife 
her background. 

I N ONE WAY, China seems to be applying the 
former- Soviet model. In another way, to judge 
from its hosting of international golf and tennis 
tournaments and its soccer and basketball leagues 
that feature foreign professional players, it would 
seem feat the Chinese were trying — wife some 
difficulty — to translate fee Western approach. 

Not that this is necessarily fee right approach. 

It does, however, provide sports wife an eco- 
nomic ‘ ‘right to life" as China undergoes a change 
in political leadership. 


‘ ‘The free -market economy has made a hell of a 
difference.” said Seamus O’Brien of Asia Sport 
Group, a sports -marketing company based in Hong 
Kong. 

“m China, sport itself has become a sort of free 
market From fee leisure side, sport is definitely a 
business opportunity when you look at fee golf 
clubs opening up, more tennis courts, more general 
sports dubs being opened.” ~ 

Fok said: “The kids, they’re wearing the big: 
pants and fee cap turned around wife fee bill in fee 
back of fee head. I don't know jf I like that hr' 
particular, but that’s what you see." 

Surely he doesn’t see a lot of it At fee moment 
as O’Brien points out, few Chinese children grow 
up wanting to make a career in sports. 

It might be refreshing to maintain fee point of 
view of sport as an avocation, a provider of bal- 
ance. But government and business are already 
seeing greater rewards. 

Fu’s success was just one of the first steps; 
alongside those of fee women distance runners’ 
who were coached to world records by Ma Junreh 
four years ago. 

“Of course, the conditions are different, buf 
really, every country is fee same," Fok said 
"Even the young people in different countries 
have similar aspirations." 1 

In feat case, someday Chinese media might find 

itself surrounding not a swimmer but — dare we 
say it — a Chinese version of Dennis Rodman. 


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Fat Years Over, Says Ump Who Lost a Friend 


The Associated Press 

CLEARWATER. Florida 
— In fee last year, Eric Gregg 
added one vice — Dominican 
cigars — and subtracted 
about 100 pounds. 

"The doctor said, ‘Eric, 
the way you were eating and 
drinking, if 400 pounds didn't 
kill you, one cigar isn’t go- 
ing to do it.' " the National 
League umpire said Tues- 
day. 

Gregg can joke again about 
his weight now, but it was a 
deadly serious topic last year 
after his good friend and fel- 
low umpire John McSherry 
died of a massive heart attack 
on opening day. 

McSherry, 51. was the one 
umpire who rivaled Gregg in 
size, and fee two of them fre- 
uently swapped stories 
about their attempts to lose 
weight and how fee weight 
ubbomiy resisted. 

Gregg, who said he'd lost 


ry’s funeral feat he would 
se it for good this time. 
"How many warnings do 
>u need?" Gregg said. 

“He had high blood pres- 
ire. He had an abnormal 


Gre 


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said he weighed 
pounds last year 


)8 pounds. 

“1 look in the mirror, and I 
ce fee way 1 fit in my 
clothes,” be said. 

"I’m tying my shoes. My 


original goal was to get down 
to 275 pounds, but if I never 
lose another pound. I've been 
a success." 

The process began April 
15, when Gregg announced 
feat he was taking a leave of 
absence from his umpiring 
chores to go into a profes- 
sional weight-loss program. 

He went to Duke Uni- 
versity, where doctors put 
him on a diet of 1 ,800 calories 
a day and instituted an ex- 
ercise program that had him 
walking eight miles every 
morning. 

By fee time he left on July 
6. Gregg was down to 340. By 
the end of the season, he was 
down to 319. 

The last 20 pounds came 
off during the winter, when 
Gregg continued his daily 
eight-mile walks, and added a 
regimen of water aerobics and 
swimming. 

There were changes in his 
diet. too. The cheese-steaks 
served all over his hometown 
of Philadelphia were out, as 
were the late-night food 
binges at fee umpires’ post- 
game buffet. 

And he stopped drinking, 
not because he felt he had a 
problem with alcohol, but be- 
cause he realized beer slowed 
his metabolism and 
weakened his resolve to eat 
sensibly. 

"I considered myself a 
junk-food drinker," he said. 
"I would just pour the beer 
down because it was here, 
then go back wife fee boys and 
have a few more at the bar," 
Gregg said his wife, Ra- 
mona. is happy he is losing 


weight, but she complains his 
new workout routine has cut 
into the time he spends wife 
her and their four children. 

‘‘But I’ve got to be self- 
centered.” he said. “I’ve got 
to get my workouts in." 

The way Gregg looks at it, 
he is taking time away from 


his family in fee short run sc 
he can give it back to them ii; 
fee long run. 

“I look at my kids, and 1 
want to see them graduate” 
he said. 

“And they have said to me! 
‘Dad. we don’t want you tc 
end up like John.’ ” 



Eric Gregg, who lost 100 pounds, 
preseason PhiHies-YankSs game in 



I 


PAGE 19 





t», 1997 



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EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 1997 


SPORTS 


5 Hardaway’s 
0X1 26 in 2d Half 
Help Orlando 


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The Associated Press 

-After being held scoreless in the firet 
half, Anfemee Hardaway had 26 points 
id the second half to lead the Orlando 

S c to a 101-89 victory over the 
le SuperSonics. 

:The visiting Magic, who lost to the 
Sonics in Orlando on Sunday, handed 


NBA Roundup 


■ T >-h 






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an# 


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Po 


51 


n-:. * 


* 2 


62 


tEe Pacific Division leaders only their 
second loss since the AU -Star break, 
r On Tuesday night, Rony Seikaly and 
Gerald Wilkins had 18 points each for 
the Magic, who are 7-1 under their new 
coach, Richie Adubato. The loss dropped 
tfle Somes to 22-8 at home, where they 
lest only three games last season. 
..'Paean $8, Celtics 95 Mark Jackson’s 
six free throws in the final minute 
helped host Indiana hold off Boston. 

Z Reggie Miller had 29 points. Dale 
Davis added 20 and had 16 rebounds 
and Jackson had 12 points and 13 as- 
sists. Indiana has won four straight, all 
ptt home, and is 4-2 since Jackson was 
re-acquired from Denver. 

~BuHata 107, 76wrs 106 Calbert 

Gheaney scored a season-high 24 points, 
including six of his team's final 10, as 
Washington defeated host Philadelphia. 

- Cheaney’s biggest basket came with 
fp seconds left when his base line jump- 
er gave the Bullets a 105-103 lead. 
Jtiwan Howard, who finished with 22 
points and 10 rebounds, intercepted the 
ensuing inbounds pass and Rod Strick- 
land made two free throws to give him 
19 points. 

Hrafca ua, Cavaliers 88 Christian 
Laettner and Tyrone Corbin scored 21 
points apiece and Atlanta held on to beat 
Cleveland. 

- The host Hawks built a 12-point lead 
in the second half and sealed the victory 
at the foul line after the Cavaliers made 
a late run from 3-point range. 

Kn»cks93, Bucks 86 The Knicks had a 



Lobos Stalk an NCAA Berth 


Jnhn C Hill'xv/ttnileni 


Isaac Austin of the Heat, right, fouling the Pistons' Grant Hill in the first 
half. Tim Hardaway led Miami to victory with 28 points and 16 assists.. 


'ingb 

but he returned and New York held off a 
late charge by visiting Milwaukee. 

The Knicks were leading. 85-69. with 
6:16 to play when Ewing headed to the 
locker room to be treated for a bruised 
right knee after a collision with Sher- 
man Douglas late in the third quarter. 
Milwaukee scored the next 15 points. 

But Ewing returned and hit one of 
two foul shots for a 89-86 lead with 51 
seconds left. 

Haat 108 , Platans 99 Tim Hardaway 
had 28 points and a season-high 16 as- 
sists to give Miami a victory in Detroit 

The Heat improved to 2-0 against the 
Pistons this season and handed Detroit 
just its second loss in 1 1 games. 

Hornets 105 , Spurs 98 Anthony Ma- 
son had his third career triple-double 
and surging Charlotte stepped up its 


defense in the third quarter for a victory 
over visiting San Antonio. 

Mason finished with 19 points. 13 
rebounds and a career-high 12 assists. 

Lakers 102, Mavericks 92 In Dallas, 

Nick Van Exel scored a season-high 37 
points and tied his club record with eight 
3 -pointers as Los Angeles avoided its 
first three-game losing streak of the 
season. 

TVail Blazers 1 23, Nets 118 Kenny An- 
derson and Clifford Robinson brought 
Portland back from a late 16-point de- 
ficit as the Trail Blazers beat visiting 
New Jersey. 

Rockets 113, clippers 109 Hakeem 
Olajuwon recorded his 14th career 
triple-double and first of the season with 
22 points. 16 rebounds and 10 assists as 
Houston snapped an eight-game road 
losing streak. 


The Associated Press 

New Mexico looked right at home in 
opening its defense of its Western Ath- 
letic Conference tournament title. 

That meant nothing but trouble for 
San Jose State, which had the dubious 
honor of playing the No. 14 Lobos in a 
first-round game Tuesday night at Las 
Vegas. 

New Mexico hardly seemed like tbe 
same team that has struggled on the road 
this season, blowing out the Spartans in 
the first half and cruising to a 103-70 
victory that served as little more than a 
tune-up. 

“We don’t have as much trouble 
playing away from home as we have 
passing the ball and playing offense 
away from home,' 1 said the Lobos* 
coach, Dave Bliss. “Our offense has 
gone into a deep freeze on the road.” 

Not against San Jose State ( 13-14 j, 
though, in a game that was settled early 
as New Mexico ran up a S2-26 halftime 
lead. Die Lobos set a tournament record 
by making 42 field goals and almost 
matched their own tournament record of 
104 points, set last year against Fresno 
Stale. Not bad for a team that won all 18 
of its borne games, but was 4-6 on the 
road this season. 

“The way we played, we deserve to 
be one of the 64 teams,*' Bliss said, 
making his case for a bid to the NCAA 
toumamenL 

In other Western Athletic Conference 
games, the University of Nevada Las 
Vegas got its 20th victory of the season by 
beating Rice, 71-61; Southern Methodist 
beat Colorado State, 93-89, and Texas 


Christian topped Wyoming, 72-61. 

After the triumph over Rice . UNLV’s 
coach. Bill Bayno, was more than ready 
to make his own case for a spot in the 
NCAA tournamenL “I think if we win 
Thursday, we deserve to be in there 
regardless of what happens with the 
other teams,” he said, referring to the 
R unitin' Rebels* showdown with Tulsa, 
a team that appears set for an NCAA 
tournament slot with a 22-8 record. 

Southern Methodist (16-11) won’t 
have long to savor its victory over Col- 
orado State, which was down 51-32 at 


CoLLkfti Basketball 


halftime, but rallied to make the game 
close. SMU will face No. 3 Utah, which 
had an opening round bye, in the 
quarterfinals Thursday. 

Texas Christian University (19-11) 
had trouble with Wyoming, trailing by 
15 points midway through the second 
half before rallying. The loss ended the 
Wyoming coaching career of Joby 
Wright, who had announced his resig- 
nation. The Cowboys finished 12-16 
and were 53-60 under Wright. 

Sim Balt Conference South Alabama 
made it into the NCAA tournament for 
the first time since the 1 990-91 season, 
holding off Louisiana Tech. 44-43. to 
win the Sun Belt Conference cham- 
pionship game at Little Rock. Arkansas. 
The Jaguars (23-6) won despite not 
scoring in the final 4; 14. 

Mid-Continent Confaranca Valparaiso 
clinched its second-consecutive NCAA 
tournament berth by defeating Western 


Illinois, 63-59, in the Mid-Continent 
Conference championship game in 
Moline. Illinois. Chris Aitis scored 15; 
points, and Jamie Sykes had 13 for the* 
Crusaders (24-6). The game was a re- - 
match of last year's championship; 
game, which Valparaiso won, 75-52. 

Midwestern Collegiate Conference 

Butler earned an NCAA tournament bid 
for the first time in 35 years, holding off 
niinois-Chicago, 69-68, to win the Mid- 
western Collegiate Conference tourna- 
ment in Dayton, Ohio. Jon Neuhouser, 
the conference’s player of the year, hit a 
bank shot with 35 seconds to play for 
Butler (23-9). 

JM5d4marfeanftenfan»»ea Ira Newbie 
scored a career-high 25 points as Miami 
of Ohio overcame a nine-point halftime 
deficit to beat Kent, 75-65, in a Mid- 
American Conference quarterfinal 
game in Oxford, Ohio. 

ivy Lnagin Jesse Rosenfeld had a ca- . 
reer-high 16 points as NCAA Tour- • 
namen [-bound Princeton capped a per- 
fect Ivy League season and tied a school 
record with Its 1 9th straight victory. 

The Tigers (24-3. 14-0) and first-year 
coach BUI Carmody now will have to t 
wait until Sunday to find out where they ’ 
will be going in the tournament. The . 
loss ended the first losing season at Penn 
(12-14, 8-6) since 1991. 

Brian Earl had 19 points to lead five ; 
Tigers in double figures, while Sydney ■ 
Johnson had 12. Mitch Henderson 11 ] 
and Steve Goodrich 10. Jed Ryan had 16 ; 
points and 10 rebounds to lead Penn, 
while Garett Kreitz and Michael Jordan . 
added 14 points apiece. 


Trade Pays Off as Capitals Edge Flames, 2-1 


The Associated Press 

In their debuts for Wash- 
ington, Adam Oates seemed a 
goal and Bill Ranford made 2 1 
saves as the Capitals beat the 
visiting Calgary Flames, 2-1. 

Oates and Ranford were 
part of the major trade be- 
tween the Capitals and Bos- 
ton last Saturday. Oates start- 
ed and centered a line 
between Joe Juneau and 


Jaroslav Svejkovsky and was 
put into the power-play unit. 

Devils 3, P en g u ins 1 In 

Pittsburgh, Doug Gilmour 


NHL RoliNbiiP 


scored a goal and set up an- 
other as New Jersey ruined 
Craig Patrick’s return to Pitts- 
burgh's bench as coach. 

The Devils couldn't score 


on five power-play chances in 
tbe second period, twice with 
S-on-3 advantages, but with- 
stood die toughened-up Pen- 
guin defense to improve to 10- 
1-7 in their last IS games. 

L i g ht n i ng B, Islanders 3 
Dino Ciccarelli and Chris 
Gratton each scored twice to 
lead visiting Tampa Bay to its 
seventh victory in nine 
games. John Cullen and Rob 


Zamuner also scored for the 
Lightning 

Oilers 4, Kings 1 Jason 
Amott had a goal and three 
assists and Mari usz Czerkaw- 
ski scored twice to lead host 
Edmonton to its first victory 
in six games. Doug Weight 
and Ryan Smyth had the other 
Edmonton goals. Vitali 
Yachmenev scored for Los 
Angeles. 


BASEBALL 


Exhibition Basebal 


raSMTIUMS 

Monts 3. Houston 2 

Onartnaff fa Toronto 2 

Barnmore 7. Los Angeles 1 

Phitodefttfan U New Ybric Yankees Css) 5 

Florida & Onrekmd (ss) 3 

Minnesota & Chicago White SmcS 

Kansas aty 5. DttoB 4 

New .York ytuDcrw tsO-i CJevrfontJ (ss) 3 

New York MetS 6, Monacal 0 

Chicago Cuds 9, San Francisco & la innings 

Saa Dtogo 16 Anaheim 5 

Cotarado LOaklond 3 

seante 1* Mlwaukee 13 

SI LnutS 9, Pittsburgh 7 

Boston & Trans 5 


BASKETBALL 


Indian 

29 

29 

.500 

22 

■Milwaukee 

25 

34 

•4Z4 

26V» 

Toronto 20 

38 

J45 

kftGI 

3t 

MIDWEST DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pa 

GB 

Utah 

42 

16 

.724 

— 

Houston 

39 

20 

Ml 

3'6 

Minnesota 

29 

28 

.509 

12% 

Dallas 

19 

38 

.333 

22% 

Denver 

18 

41 

JOS 

24% 

San Antonio 

13 

45 

224 

29 

Vancouver 

11 

50 

.tao 

32% 


PACIFIC DIVISION 



Seattle 

• 41 

. 17 

jar 

— 

LA. Lakes 

40 

19 

-67B 

1% 

Portland 

32 

28 

-533 

10 

Soatsnento 

27 

32 

.458 

14V* 

LAOtppera 

25 

31 

,446 

15 

Phoente 

22 

36 

J79 

19 

Golden State 

21 

36 

368 

19V. 

1BISMT-S 

KSSBU 

IS 


MAnekee 


Zl 21 

19 25-86 

Hew Yak 


26 22 

24 21—97 


NBA Stamkmmos 


N-Yj Johnson 6-3 3-5 17, Ewing 7-12 34 17. 


Beta* 


Atlantic omsfON 



W 

L 

pa 

GB 

Moral 

44 

15 

.746 

— 

NewYM - 

44 

16 

J33 

'A 

Orkffldo 

31 

26 

-5*4 

12 

muMngtoii 

27 

31 

•466 

ftf» 

MewJeoev 

17 

41 

-293 

2M 

Phtedelphb 

IS 

43 

259 

28W 

Boston • 

12 

47 

203 

32 

C8RBAL DIVISION 



Chicago 

51 

7 

279 

— 

Deb o»-..- - 

43 

15 

.741 

8 

AJtentn 

39 

19 

472 

12 

CharteBe . 

38 

22 

433 

14 

Oteetond - 

32 

26 

252 

19 


-Milwaukee 39 (Baker IS). New 

York 3$ (Oakley 9). Assists— MBmoukee 12 
(Douglas 5), New Yack 2S (Waul Brooks S). 
WOstatogtao 26 31 26 34-107 

PMadeipUa 29 26 24 25-106 

W: Oramey 11-19 2-2 24 Howorri 9-18 *4 
22s P: Stockhouse 9-14 7-9 K Cotemon 8-16 
5-8 Zl Rc taunrtl VKnhlngton 55 (HownrtL 
Webber 101. PWodeipWo SB (Weaitierepoon 
14). A ss ists- W as h in gton 24 (Strickland 10). 
Ptri to det p h to 26 (henon 13). 

San Antonio 22 30 15 31— 98 

Ctartott* 25 29 22 29— IBS 

LAj Herrera 9-15*421. Del Negro 8-16 00 
IT) C Woe 9-T9 3-4 2* Cary MMtt 
Reboeo d s- Son Antonio 43 tPentoe 7), 
Charlotte 35 (Mason 13). Assists— S. Aitoto 
23 (Johnson 81. Owrtatte 30 {Mason 121. 


27 17 14 30- 88 
Alfasta ZZ 23 17 SI — 93 

C HDI 7-10 *-5 18. PftBs 6-13 2-2 17) A: 
Corbin 5-8 7-7 21. Laettner 6-12 9-12 21. 
Rebeuads— Ctevdond 33 (HU 12), Manta 39 
(Laettner 12). Assists— Oevetand 17 (Sura 
6). Mama 17 (Btovkx*4>. 

Miami 24 30 21 33-108 

Detroit 22 28 21 28- 99 

Afc Hardaway 10-20 4-4 281 MeshSum 7-1 4 
1-2 18. Brawn 6-1358 1ft D: Hunter 9-1758 
75 Dumcrs 7-11 5421. Rebounds— Moral 36 
(Brown 11). Detroit 4l (Tharps 9). 
Assists— Miami 26 (Hardo&cy 161. Detroit 71 
(HB9J. 

Boston 24 24 23 24- 95 

tfM&toa 24 17 24 33- 98 

£L Wesley 8-12 55 22: Ocy 7-14 3-5 19: 1: 
Mflterft.20 10-11 29, tXDaviS 10-14 >3 S3. 
Rehtmuds Boston 49 (Day 7). Inricna 53 
[D.Dovfe IS). Assists— Boston 19 (Woiker. 
Wesley 5). Indiana 18 (Jackson 13). 

Oftawto 14 25 32 28-101 

Seattle 21 27 14 B- 89 

0: Hardaway 8-19 6-7 2& Seikaly 7-13 4-4 
IB, WtBdns 6-9 3-* 1&- S: Peyton 9-21 3-5 23. 
Hawkins 7-11 2-420. Retarmds— 0rion0o51 
(Grant 14). Seattle 40 (Kers p 18). 
Assists— Ottondo IS (Grant, Hsrdtnray 4). 
Seattle 23 (Payton 7). 

27 21 20 34—102 

26 21 2* 21— 92 

LA. Utes Van BttJ U-20 7-7 37. 

Campbell 7-20 8-9 2ft D: Rrfey 9-1B 4-5 23 
Green 68 5-6 17. IMioitodi Ln» Angeles 52 
(Canpfael I©. Dates 47 (Green 12). 
Assists— us Angelas 12 (Soinptaefl. Von 
Eat Bloom, Scolta. Dotes 20 (Reeves, Pack 
O. 

New Jersey 36 31 36 15—118 

Portland 39 30 27 33-123 

NJj: Writes 9-124-5 26. Cassell 9-20 2-4 25; 
P:CRoblnsaa9-137-122& Andeaon 9-166- 
9 28. Retaua rfs Ne w Jersey 46 (Momross 


13). Portkuid 52 (Dudley 9). Assists— New 
Jersey 23 (Jockson, CasseU 61. Portland 31 
(Anderson 14). 

Houston 32 19 36 26-113 

LA. Clippers 28 27 25 29-109 

H: BuQanJ 7-11 4-4 24. Otafuwon 8-13 6-6 
22 LA. CUPPERS. Vaught 10-15 34 21 
Martin 575 4-4 23. Rebounds— Houston 45 
(Oiaiuwon 161. Los Angeles 42 (Wright 11). 
Assists— Houston 26 (Otajuwon 10). Los 
Angeles 18 (Martin 4). 


PACTRC DtVttoON 

W L T PIS GP GA 


Colorado 

Edmonton 

Calgary 

Anohetm 

Vancouver 

Los Angeles 

San Jose 


88 216 IS 
67 207 199 
61 177 191 
60 1B4 189 
58 202 221 
56 176 214 
51 166 214 


HOCKEY 


NHL Standings 


KASTttH COtmuHQ 

ATLANTIC DtVTStON 



W 

L T 

PIS 

GF 

CA 

PhilnOeJphia 

37 

17 10 

84 

216 

164 

Nea Jersey 

33 

18 12 

78 

174 

147 

Ftoride 

29 

20 15 

T3 

175 

149 

N.Y. Ranges 

29 

27 9 

67 

209 

183 

Tampa Bay 

26 

30 7 

99 

178 

194 

Washington 

25 

32 7 

57 

160 

179 

N.Y. Istonden 

21 

33 10 

52 

171 

192 

NORTHEAST OMSUN 




W 

L T 

Pis 

GF 

GA 

Buffalo 

33 

20 10 

76 

184 

156 

Pittsburgh 

31 

27 5 

67 

221 

208 

Montreal 

24 

30 11 

59 

202 

229 

Hartford 

24 

30 9 

57 

17B 

200 

Ottawa 

21 

29 13 

55 

178 

187 

Boston 

21 

34 9 

51 

186 

228 

WVSTRRM CONPmMCS 


CENTRAL DiYTSKJN 




W 

L T 

PH 

GF 

GA 

Danas 

38 

23 4 

80 

197 

159 

Dabta 

31 

19 13 

75 

199 

145 

SL Louis 

28 

29 8 

64 

192 

199 

ariengo 

26 

30 9 

61 

171 

165 

Phoenix 

28 

32 * 

60 

181 

201 

Toronto 

25 

37 2 

52 

188 

223 


40 16 
30 29 
27 32 
26 30 
2B 34 
24 34 
22 35 
mwimuui 

New Jersey 0 1 2—3 

Ptttsbergb 0 8 1—1 

1st Period: None. 2nd Period: NJ.-G0maur 
19 (Ratstoa Ntectermayw) 3rd Period : NJ.- 
Gcwrin 23 (Gflmour. Ellett) a P-CMstlan 1 - 
(Hicks] 4. Nj.-MocLean 22 (Andrvytiniid 
(eti). Stotts aa goafe NJ.- 7-8-5-20. P- 5-12- 
5—22. Goofier NJ.-Dunhora Brodeur. P- 
wreggeL 

Tampa Bay 2 3 1—6 

N.Y. Iskraders 1 1 1—3 

1st Period: New York, Bertuzri 3 
(tLAndemon, Jansson) 2. T-OcaneU) 27 
(Langkow) l T-, Gratton 23 (PouRa 
PaescheiO 2nd Period: T-Cutiefil 5 (Hautder, 
HamrtHd (pp). 5. Zamuner 12 (Cullen) & New 
York. Berard 7 (N-Andersson] 7, T-dccorein 
2ft 3rd Period: New York. SreoSnskl 20 
(NAndersson) 9, T-Gmrton 24 (Poesdtek) 
(en). Sbels on goat T- 138-7— 28. New York 
10-9-12—31. Goalies T-Totaaracd. New 
York, Sato. HctowdL 

OAgary 0 1 8-1 

Vda stato gto u 1 1 8-4 

1st Period; W-Huraer 11 (Konowolciiuk. 
MBer) 2nd Portod: W-Ootes 19 (K«Ib, 
Juneau) 3. C-Hoglund T7 (Heury, Rodne) 3rd 
Period: None. Stalls oo goefcC- 4-10-7-21. W- 
12-7-5—24. Codes C-Rotoson. W- Ranford. 
Las Angeles 0 1 8—1 

WrPfffri— 2 8 2—4 

1st Period: E-Smyth 29 (Arnett. Weight) 
(pp). 2, E-CffifkawsU 21 (Arnett. Wright) 
[ppL 2nd Period: LA.-Vndimenev 6 


(Tsypkdm, Okzyfc) (pp). 3rt Parted: E- 
Oariowtt/ 2Z (Amott Norton) ft E-Amolf 1 7 
rtanitll riwta—liiminli ■■lyi I n 11 TIT 

5-29. E-1B-16-10— «4.QorilW LA.-Hsel 13- 
235, Dotoe-E. Joseph. 


aUARTERFWULS, FIRST LEO 
Anderlechb Belgium. 1, Inter MRon. Italy, 1 
Newcastle, England, ft Monaco, Franca 1 
Sdnfte. Germany; Z Valencia, Spain. 0 
Tenerife. Spain, oi BronAy IP. Denmark. 1 

■HOU1H Hum tlAGDI 

Sunderiand ft Tatonlwm 4 : 

atandlaac Manchester United 57, Liv- 
erpool 51 Arsenal 51. Newcastle 4ft Aston 
Villa 4ft Wimbledon 44, Chelsea 42, Sheffleld 
Mtektesday 42, Leeds 36, Tottenham 35, Ln- 
laester 31 Evertm 3Z Derby 2 Z Btaetbum 
31. Coventry 29. S u nderiand 29. Nottingham 
Forest 27. West Horn 25, Southampton 24. 
Middlesbrough 19. 

IPIH 



Style, Sounds, 
Dining, Arts. 


Hemlines, jazz, restaurants and art 
- the past year’s articles from die 
IHT can be found on our site 


on the World Wide Web. 


• • 


http://www.iht.com 


pnmnow Ai wo MRM 'iw mniT 

WEDNESDAY. IN CANSEMU. AUSTRALIA 
Aushote ft united Stoles 3 


TRANSITIONS 


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 
p« nirnn 1 c * n i tF 

KANSAS OTY— Wofvetf RHP Doug Unton 
tor the purpose of ghrtng trim Iris unoondl- 
ttorwl release. 

SOSTOM— Renewed the controds of SS No- 
mar Gcrdaponn and RHP Jeff SuppoL 
Agreed to terms wttti P John Wasdte P 
Vaughn Esheknorv P Mark Brandenburg, P- 
Rkb Gorcesb P Kerry Locy. C 5affl Hattebeig, 
and INF Antuimedez Pam on 1-year con- 
hods. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

FLORIDA — Agreed to terms with C Diaries 
Johnson. RHP Kurt MflCer, SB Josh Booty. 
RHP Jay Poweft SS Edger Renteria and 
RHP Rick Helling. 

Ftm mi boh— A greed to terms with IB 
Marie Johnson and 3B Joe Rondo an one-year 
Contracts. 

st. loub— A greed to terms uritti OF John 
Mabry. RHP Alon Bern RHPTj.Mdhews 
and OF Marti Sweeney on one-year con- 
tracts. 


NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
nba— S uspended Chicago Butte F Dennis 
Rodman tar one gome wfthour pay and lined 
trim 17.500 tor OeDberatoly striking Mlhnu- 
icee Buds F Joe Wolf to Mondays game. 
atianta— R eleased G Dannie Boyce. 


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
buffalo— R e-signed P Chris Mow. 
Carolina— A greed io terms with DE Ray 
Seals and WR Enrie Mins an 3yearconnacb. 

DiTRor r H e signed FB Eric Lynch. 
Slated FB Brad Baxter, OB Mike Cawley and 
WRMBceHoraak. 

Oakland— Signed WR-KR Desmond 
Howard to 4-year contract. 

st. Louts— Signed RB Craig Heywonl to 4- 
yurauttracL 

Washington— S igned Norv Turner, coach, 
to 3-year contract extension, to 2001 season. 
Edmonton— S igned RB Frank .......... 

Mocny 

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 

Pittsburgh— F ired Eddie Johnston, 
coodv Named Craig Patrick coach. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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• A 4 ... 


PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


The More the Merrier 


Vanessa Redgrave: Not About to Change 


W ASHINGTON — The 
biggest news to hit the 


YY biggest news to hit the 
world is that man can now 
clone sheep. 

Economically speaking, 
you will soon be able to go to 
your local Safeway and buy 
two legs of 
Iamb for the 
mice of one. 

But the next 
step is a little 
more fright- 
ening. If it is 
now possible 
to clone sheep, 
it won’t be long 
before they can Buchwa,d 
clone human beings — and 
not everyone is sure this is 
such a good idea. 

My friend. Jack Keyes, said. 
“There's not one person on 
earth that I would like to see 
two of.” 

“Not even Michael Jordan? 
Just think bow exciting it 
would, be if you had a dozen 
Michael Jordans running 
around a basketball court." 

Jack disagreed, “It 
wouldn’t be exciting at all. 
One Michael Jordan is a big 
deal — two is too much.” 

Jack saw great dangers in 
elating. “Suppose I was able 
to get some of Madonna's 
DNA andl produced hundreds 


of Evitas. all of them singing 
’Don’t Cry For Me Argen- 
tina. ’ It would drive the movie 


By Ben Brantley 

New York Timer Service 


business crazy.** 

I said, “I don’t think they 
will clone just anyone. Jack. 
They'll be discreet. Suppose 
the Democratic National 
Committee decided to clone 
contributors to their political 
fund drives. They could take 
one businessman from China 
and produce hundreds of 
donors just like him." 

Jack said, “I thought they 
were doing that already. My 
fear is that there will be a 
stampede to open up lobs and 
the nuts will start producing 
weirdos by the dozen.*' 

“There is something to 
that,” I admitted, “but think of 
all tbe top-flight reproductions 
we could get — Newt Gin- 
grich, Ken Starr, Alfonse 
D’Amato." 

“They're all Republi- 
cans." 


N EW YORK — Well after the era of 
Betty Grable and well before that of 


hoodlums.*' used in her Oscar ac- 
ceptance speech for “Julia” in 1978 
to describe those protesting her pres- 


France to Exhibit 


Art Taken by Nazis 

Reuters 

PARIS — About 900 
works of art the Nazis took to 
Germany during World War II 
will go on display next month 
in four Paris museums to al- 
low any owners or their re- 
latives to claim them, museum 
officials said on Wednesday. 

The exhibitions will open 
on April 8 atthe Musee d'Or- 
say and the following day at 
the Louvre, the Pompidou 
Center and the Musee Nation- 
al de la Ceramique. 


“Tbe more clones, the 
merrier,” I said, keeping my 
fingers crossed. “Jack, it’s 
too late to turn back. 

“What will be will be.” 

“Don't be funny. This is 
serious business. If God 
wanted more than one of a 
kind he would have created 
look-alike hockey teams.” 

“I'm sony I spoke in jest, but 
I'm just as scared as you. We 
now have to worry about bad 
guys being cloned because sane 
people consider them goodguys. 
For example, suppose Castro 
started producing thousands of 
bearded look-alikes, who all 
smoked cigars?” 

“The U.S. would have to 
respond by creating thousands 
of male Citadel graduates.” 

Jack and I agreed that tbe 
human race was in for it. 

We both began to sing, 
** We're poor little Iambs that 
have gone astray — if we 
don’t get enough DNA” 


J. v Betty Grable and well before that of 
Cindy Crawford, a most unlikely pinup girl 
reigned from the walls of men's dormitories 
in schools across America. She was rav- 
ishing. of course, and half-naked. But she 
had none of the invitational passivity com- 
mon to gorgeous women in posters. 

Her arms were crossed at defensive angles 
across her bare breasts and her gaze — 
electric, quizzical, haunted — seemed less to 
say “come hither” than “approach with 
caution.” If you got coo close, you were 
definitely in danger of being burned. 

That was in the mid-1960s. The image was 
from “Blow Up,” Michelangelo Anto- 
nioni’s elliptical, brooding fashion shoot of a 
film in which Vanessa Redgrave appeared 
for only 10 or IS minutes. That was more 
than long enough for the actress, playing a 
nameless woman of edgy sensuality aid 
unspeakable secrets, to emerge as a dis- 
ruptively vital presence in a movie that oth- 
erwise existed only on its surface. 

Redgrave, who opens on March 13 at tbe 
Joseph Pam? Public Theatre as the star and 
director of Shakespeare's “Antony and 
Cleopatra,” is 60 now. She is still beautiful 
and still possessed of a luminosity that is just 
short of radioactive. And she still troubles 
and baffles an audience that really wants 
only to worship her. 


ence.) This seemed perfectly fine in 
the 1960s, when she marcbed for 


the 1960s, when she mardbed for 
nuclear disarmament and against the 
war in Vietnam. That was what 
youth did in those days. 

But as tbe decades have gone by, 
with Redgrave championing the 
cause of Palestinian rights in lan- 
guage that was anything but circum- 
spect, even her liberal sympathizers 
lave become impatient. “Shut 


From the time of her triumphant portrayal 
as Rosalind in “As You Like It" at the 


Stratford Festival in England in 1961, she 
b as been garlanded with an embarrassment 
of superlatives: die was hailed as a “god- 
dess’ by tbe rigorous British critic Bernard 
Levin. 

Analyzing her stage work, writers have 
often been reduced to the language of love- 
struck sonneteers: “Force of nature” crops 
up frequently: so do phrases like * *a creature 
of fire and light.” 

But Redgrave is uncomfortable on altars 
(though not on a soapbox). Seldom has a star 
of her stature seemed so blatantly careless of 
image or less eager to be loved for herself. The 
Divine Vanessa, the performer who seems to 
fling herself over a precipice every time she 
creates a character, is also tbe Infernal 
Vanessa, the confirmed Trotskyite who brings 
the same intensity to pamphleteering and 
stump speeches, able to alienate millions with 
a single phrase. (The most notorious: “Zionist 


Vanessa!” or “Grow up, Vanessa! ’ 
implicitly runs the usual criticisms. 

The British director Peter Hall, 
who oversaw Redgrave’s harrowing 
performance in Tennessee Willi- 
ams’s “Oq^us Descending,” fam- 
ously described in bis diary what be 
perceived as die essential contradic- 
tion in tbe actress, after witnessing 
the “miracle” of her 1979 appear- 
ance in Ibsen’s “Indy From the 
Sea.” “You could see right through 
the skin to tbe emotions, tbe 
thoughts, the hopes, the fears un- 
derneath. But here’s the paradox. 

What Vanessa says politically is, to 
me. insane, and I believe that to her 
lies are troth if they support her 
ideology. So bow can she express 
such truth, such sincerity, such lack 
of hypocrisy in her art? m life, which 
is true, she is false. la art, witich is 
false, she is true.” 

Is it really such a paradox, 
though? Truth, as Hall suggests, is 
in the eye of the beholder, . and 
Truth, with a capital T. is whai 
Redgrave clearly believes she pur- Don < 
sues on all levels of her life. She Hare 1 
does so with a mixture of supreme 
arrogance and supreme humility. As an act- 
ress, she is fearless, endlessly empatfietic. 
willing to look ridiculous and at times per- 
versely foolhardy. 

She embodies the same traits offstage, 
even when it means suffering weighty pro- 
fessional consequences (such as being 
dropped from tbe American tour of tbe play 
“Lettice and Lovage” in 1991). 



Don Campbell (top), Vanessa Redgrave and David 
Hare-wood in “Antony and Cleopatra 1 ' in New York. 


cemible sense of irony, a trait she shares with 
tbe revolutionary dancer Isadora Duncan, 
whom she portrayed in Karel Reisz’s sprawl- 
ing 1968 film. “Isadora.'’ When the young 
Duncan says, “It's not my fortune I’m after, 
it’s my destiny." she summarizes Redgrave’s 
own epic ambitions. 

Tbe actress seems, in a way, a fantastic 


derful in an emergency, but life in 
between, with all the small hum- 
drum details, is just ^.important. If, 
you coaid only be reliable in small 
things -you would be amazing.” - 
She has admitted to a. definite - 
discomfort with Cleopatra, a role to 
which she would seem, by presence 
alone, ideally suited. She didn ’t turn 
on her full natural wattage until the- 
f fr-ath scene. When she did, you 
came close to forgiving all th e eari i- 
er disap pointments of the evening. 

That intensity of presence is, of 
course, something that can’t be' 
learned. Nearly 6 feet call and with 
classically sculptured features thaty 
glow even when snipped off. 
makeup, she is also possessed of a~ 
daunting physical energy. 

Tn movies, this can sometimes be 
overwhelming. Watching her go 
from radiant youth to desperate, 
paranoid middle ago in “Isadora” 
or losing the young prot£g6e she 
adores as the repressed suffragette 
in the 1984 movie of Henry James's 
“Bostonians," is emotionally ex- 
hausting and even painful. It makes 
sense tt»ar on fihn she has been bril- 
liantly used in parts with minimal 
screen time that must nonetheless 
fnaifft a maximum impact. Think of 
how her presence dominated “Ju- 
lia” (1977) and “Howards End” 
(1992), and yet how little she was 
actually seen in them. . 

In the current suspense movie , ,■ 
“Smilla’s Sense of Snow," she is J . 
on screen for all of five minutes. Y« 
KoSS? as a fanatically Christian, guilt- 
David plagued woman who holds the key 
York, to the movie’s central secret, she 
gives the film its depth of moral 
conscience. She is even able to say “the 
devil assumes many forms’ * without sound- 
ing hokey or melodramatic. 

Fanatics and people in extreme situations 
are naturally Redgrave’s specialty. She can 
render them with both concentrated stillness 
(as in her magnificent portrait of a member of 
a concentration camp orchestra in the 1980 


«b al 

jailed 


.><•!>« 




in 


Her father, the legendary classical actor unconditional heroics that all but vanished 
Michael Redgrave, once wrote of her, with after World War L Small wonder that her 
remarkable understatement, “Vanessa is great husband, die director Tony Richardson, told 
on gravity.” In a Western culture built on her when their marriage was breaking up. 
relativism, she stands out for having no dis- 


anachronism, evoking a world of romantic, television movie * ‘Playing for Time”) and 
unconditional heroics that all but vanished risky, extravagant showiness, as evidenced in 


after World War L Small wonder that her both die lows (a bizarrely imprecise Italian 
husband, the director Tony Richardson, told accent) and highs (a heartbreakingly undig- 


her when their marriage was breaking up. 
“Tbe thing is. Vanessa, you're simply w mi- 


nified pratfall of a death scene) in “Orpheus 
Descending.” 



>** v*V v ‘ v *• » - 

■ r • ... 


PEOPLE 




T HE Australian pianist David Heifgott, whose 
troubled life is depicted in the movie “Shine.” 



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AmmduU/nie A mriurt ft— 

David Heifgott acknowledging applause after his debut in Boston. 


A troubled life is depicted in the movie “Shine,” 
began his American concert tour at Symphony Hall in 
Boston to the first of a series of sold-out audiences. In 
keeping with an effort by his family and managers to 
protect Heifgott, who suffers from an undefined mental 
disorder, he was not present at what was advertised as 
the only press conference of his 18-performance, 10- 
city tour. Instead, his wife, Gillian, an astrologer, and 
Scott Hicks, the director of “Shine.*’ stood in for 
Heifgott, who they said was upstairs in the hotel 
“doing pushups” and “singing away to himself.” A 
child piano prodigy in Australia, Heifgott suffered a 
mental breakdown after his father forbade him to 
accept an invitation from Isaac Stern to study music in 
the United States. After more than a decade in and out 
of mental institutions. Heifgott gradually recovered, 
first playing piano in a wine bar in his native Perth, 
then, with his wife’s help, returning to concert halls 
around Australia. * ‘Critics have a right to express their 
views,” Mrs. Heifgott, 65, said of a wave of bad 
reviews of her husband’s concerts and recording of the 
Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3. Tbe reviewer for 
the Boston Globe, especially, was able to keep his 
enthusiasm for the pianist under tight rein. “The sad 
fact is that David Heifgott should not have been at 
Symphony Hall last night, and neither should the rest 
of us,” Richard Dyer wrote, adding that Heifgott had 
been byped by a Hollywood-created myth “that no 


individual, least of all this one, could possibly live up 
to.” Throughout his performance, be moaned and 
groaned, chanting to himself in a mantra and reminding 
himself: “Must concentrate.” 


longer be guardians of the child star’s property. Judge 
David Saxe of tbe Supreme Court replaced them with 


Princess Diana *s former maid almost got her day in 
court, but the princess agreed to an out-of-court set- 
tlement to avoid having to testify in an open session. 
Negotiations between lawyers for Diana and the maid, 
Sylvia McDermott, resulted in the settlement minutes 
before the hearing was scheduled to begin al an in- 
dustrial tribunal in London. Both parties agreed not to 
disclose terms of the agreement. ‘ ‘I am very satisfied,” 
McDermott, 44, said afterward. “It is like winning the 
lottery. It’s better than winning the lottery.” 


David Saxe of tbe Supreme Court replaced them with 
Macaulay's choice as guardian, his longtime account- 
ant Billy D. Breitner. Saxe also ruled that some of 
Macaulay's $17 million can be used to keep his family 
from homelessness. 


Former President Ronald Reagan and his wife. 
Nancy, spent their 45th wedding anniversary at their 
Bel Airborne in Los Angeles. “It doesn't seem like 45 
years. I can’t imagine life without him or before him,” 
Nancy Reagan said. “It’s been everything I’ve ever 
dreamed marriage would be. " 


The former film star Brigitte Bardot and her pub- 
lisher were ordered to pay 250,000 francs (about 
$44,000) in compensation to an ex-husband and son for 
invasion of privacy in her best-selling memoirs. A Paris 
court ordered the animal rights activist to pay 150,000 
francs to Jacques Charrier and 100,000 francs to her 
son by him, Nicolas Charrier, over passages in her book 
“Initiates B.B.” Bardot, 62, described her pregnancy 
with Nicolas as “a nine-month nightmare” with the 
fetus a mere “tumor.” As for the father, she described 
him as macho, violent and alcoholic. 


The founder of a spiritual movement that has 
reached nearly 100.000 villages in India with the 


message that God is greater than class or religious 
divisions has won the $1 million Templeton Prize Foe 

PrnrrtVHJC in Dafininn CK A a 


A judge in New York has taken the 4 ‘Home Alone” 
star Macaulay Culkin, 16. out from under the fi- 
nancial thumb of his warring parents, who will no 


Progress in Religion. Pandurang Shastri Athavale, 
76, was honored for his leadership of a self-knowledge 
movement based on the Bhagavad Gita, one of 
Hinduism ’s holiest texts. 


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Jim