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The World’s Dally Newspaper 

Suharto Foe 
Is Jailed on 
esof 
Subversion 

Opposition Politician 
Had Urged Boycott 
Of Elections in May 

. By. Michael Richardson, 

truernarional Herald Tribune 



SINGAPORE — An outspoken In- 
■ ~il ■;;■-) Sife donesian opposition politician who 
•/ - 1 ' :!«* tailed for a boycott of forthcoming elec- 

r ^ dons' has been detained on subversion 

-■*- sfc charges. which carry the death oenaltv. 


, , !$ 

c last 


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, carry the death penalty, 

officials in Jakarta confirmed Thursday. 
•=-tl y Sri Bintang Pamungkas, leader of the 
>•! fledgling and officially unrecognized 
•-0 United Democratic Party of Indonesia, is 

a former member of Parliament who was 
convicted last year of defaming Pres- 
ident Suharto. He was free on bail while 
•r- ^ appealing a 34-month prison sentence in 

- ■■c-T die defamation case when he was de- 
rr. *T. tamed along with several colleagues. 

Last month, Mr. Bintang sent out 
~r greeting cards marking the Muslim fest- 
i vai of EidalFitr and printing his party's 
\ 'Jr. three-point agenda on the cards. The 

- agenda calls for a boycott of May 29 
legislative elections, rejection of Mr. 
Suharto’s re-election in March 1 998 and 
preparation for a new post-Suharto or- 
der after die presidential election. 

Among others, the cards were sent to 
•..Vice President Try Sutrisno, military 
'leaders and cabinet ministers. 

“He is not only being detained here 
because of the greeting cards but also 
because of his actions. Attorney Gen- 
eral Singgih said Thursday. “I don't 
want to explain; it’s currently under 
investigation.*’ 

The governing Golkar party is con- 
sidered certain to win another landslide 
victory in May. But there is rising dis- 
content in opposition ranks about tight 
restrictions imposed on campaigning, 
with some groups calling fra 1 a boycott of 
the voting and others threatening to ig- 
nore the restrictions unless they are 
eased. . _ 

Analysts in Jakarta, said Thursday 
that .die detentions of Mr. Bintang and 
his colleagues were intended to serve as 
a wanting to other critics not to boycott 
the voting or flout the rules. 

See INDONESIA, Page 6 


Bogota Halts 
Eradication 
Of Drug Crops 

■ - By Douglas Farah 

~ H as hingion Post Sendee 

BOGOTA — President Ernesto 
Samper has suspended programs aimed 
at eradicating crops used to produce 
cocaine and heroin, a swift rebuff to the 
United Stales that came less than a week 
after Colombia was stung by Wash- 
ington’s, refusal to certify the country as 
an ally in the global war on drugs. 
Joaquin Polo, coordinator of Colom- 
1 bia's. anti-drug efforts, announced the 
suspension on the radio Wednesday after 
informing the U.S. ambassador, Myles 
Frechette; of the government's action. 

Mr.Polo said a decision on whether 
to resume eradication efforts would be 
mad? after the government had re- 
viewed aspects of its anti-drug cam- 
paign that Involve cooperation with the 

United States. . . . 

Colombia’s action — - which promp- 
ted a small group of anti- American pro- 
testers lo block traffic outside the U.S. 
Embassy — was widely viewed as a 
swipe at the Clinton administration, 
which was in the process of providing 
five airplanes to the Colombian police 
for eradication efforts. . . _ 

U.S. officials have said the decision to 
decertify Colombia was largely a re- 
pudiation of President Sampe r, who has 
.been linked to drug traffickers. Mr. 
. -iSamper; in turn, has consistently said that 
' the U.S. rebuke was a national msulL 
American officials cooNdBrwI 
spraying of coca plants, from ‘ 
cauie is derived, and fields of poppies. 

Sec DRUGS, Page 6 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND 


Paris, Friday, March 7, 1997 




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SORRY END FOR THE HOME OF SOLIDARITY — Workers at the Gdansk shipyard in Poland 
listening Thursday as they learned that the yard, where Lech Walesa founded the Solidarity union in 
1980 that was to challenge Communist hegemony, would be closed shortly at the cost of 3,800 jobs. Page 5. 


Donor’s Check , via White House 

Adimmstratioii Defends H andling of $50,000 Contribution 


and Sharon LaFraniere 

Washington Post Senice 

WASHINGTON — Hillary Rod- 
ham Clinton’s top aide took a $50,000 
political donation from a California 
businessman while he was visiting the 
White House in March 1995, even 
though federal law bars government 
employees from accepting campaign 
contributions on government prop- 
erty. 

Margaret Williams, the first lady’s 
longtime chief of staff, agreed to take 


the check and pass it along to the 
Democratic National Committee, the 
White House acknowledged Wednes- 
day. The businessman. Johnny Chung, 
provided the money at a time when he 
was seeking access to Resident Bill 
Clinton's weekly radio address for him- 
self and several business associates. 

The White House offered a law- 
yerly defense, saying she did not vi- 
olate laws governing political activ- 
ities by government workers. 
.Although she took the money, she did 
not “accept” or “receive" it under 
the starutory definition; officials said. 


Moreover, they added. Ms. W illiams 
followed established White House 
policy that checks be forwarded to 
“the appropriate recipient.” 

“There was nothing noteworthy 
about this.” said Ann Lewis, the 
deputy White House communications 
director. 

Several attorneys familiar with the 
law disagreed with this interpretation, 
though, and word of Ms. Williams's 
role as a go-between became the latest 
in a series of revelations about the 

See CASH, Page 3 





Tbr AaaottaS Preal 

The California businessman Johnny Chung, left, appearing with President and Mrs. Clinton at a 1994 
Christmas party at the White House. Also in the photo are two business associates of Mr. Chung, Chen 
Shizeng, president of the Haomen Group, and He Yejun, right Mr. Chung gave $366,000 to the Democrats. 

Windfall for a Fallen Clinton Friend 

How Did Webster Hubbell Earn $400,000? 


By Jeff Gerth 
and Stephen Labaton 

New York Times Senice 

WASHINGTON — In the months 
after Webster Hubbell was forced to 
resign to face a criminal investigation 
in 1994, the former associate attorney 
general received more than $400,000 
from about a dozen enterprises, in- 
cluding the organizers of a huge de- 
velopment in China that received the 
endorsement of the Clinton adminis- 
tration. according to associates of Mr. 
Hubbell and to government records. 


Some payments to Mr. Hubbell 
came from businesses controlled by 
old friends and campaign donors of 
President Bill Clinton, according to 
the friends and witnesses interviewed 
by investigators. Many of those who 
paid Mr. Hubbell, a former law partner 
of Hillary Rodham Clinton ana one of 
the Clintons’ closest friends, were reg- 
ulars at the White House fund-raising 
coffees or overnight guests in the Lin- 
coln Bedroom. 

Bur the largest payments appear to 
have come from Hong Kong-based 
businesses controlled by the Riady 


family of Indonesia that have been 
dealing with the Chinese government. 
These businesses are central to a $2 
billion American-Chinese joint proj- 
ect in Fujian Province in China, which 
includes development of a $700 mil-, 
lion power plant, a resort complex, a 
port and an industrial park. 

The Fujian project received crucial 
backing from the administration at 
about the same time that Mr. Hubbell 
was being paid, according to govern- 
ment records and people who have 
been questioned by investigators. 

Ronald Brown, who was then , the 
commerce secretary, announced the 

See FEES, Page 3 


Yeltsinjrrepares 

To ‘Restore Order’ 

He Tells Parliament to Expect 

High-Level Cabinet Shake-Up 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Senice 


MOSCOW — President Boris 
Yeltsin formally returned to the political 
arena Thursday after an eight-month 
absence, with a stem vow to “restore 
order’ * out of economic chaos and polit- 
ical corruption, but he blamed others for 
the country's decay. 

In his annual address to Parliament. 
Mr. Yeltsin said he would make high- 
level government changes. He was ex- 
pected to announce on Friday the ap- 
pointment of Anatoli Chubais, his chief 
of staff, as deputy prime minister. 

The reshuffle would return Mr. 
Chubais to day-to-day management of 
the economy and government under 
Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin. 
Mr. Chubais held the same post before 
he was dismissed by Mr. Yeltsin in 
January 1996. 

Mr. Chubais. 41. is widely disliked as 
a symbol of the inequities of privat- 
ization in the early years of post-Soviet 
reforms — the immense transfer of stale 
property to private hands that enriched a 
few and embittered millions. But he is 
also regarded by the liberal elite as one 
of Russia's rare, skilled. Western -ori- 
ented civil servants. 

Grigori Yavlinsky, who heads the 
centrist Yabloko bloc in Parliament and 
has been outside the government in re- 
cent years, said in a imho interview that 
several members of his parly had been 
invited to join the reorganized govern- 
ment, 

Mr. Yeltsin also warned that the ex- 
pansion of die Atlantic alliance “may 
become a fateful decision which will 
cost dearly for the peoples of Europe.” 
Reiterating Russia's opposition, he said 
enlargement of the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization to the East could 
“cause direct damage to our securi- 
ty-'* 

Behind the expansion plans “is the 


desire to oust Russia from Europe,” he 
said. “Let me remind you that attempts 
to create a system of European security 
without Russia, let alone contrary to 
Russia, have always ended in failure. '* 

In a 24-minute address. Mr. Yeltsin, 
66, who underwent quintuple heart by- 
pass surgery four months ago. looked thin 
but spoke with a firm voice. He re- 
peatedly borrowed the law-and -order 
vocabulary of his chief political rival. 
Alexander Lebed, promising to crack 
down on slothful bureaucrats and swind- 
lers. 

“It's high time to restore order, 
primarily in power,” he said, striking a 
different tone from last year's address 
on the eve of his re-election campaign, 
when he celebrated Russia's evolution 
into a pluralistic democracy. 

His address Thursday was welcomed 

See RUSSIA, Page 6 


Tirana Declares 
2-Day Cease-Fire 

Albania's president and his 
political rivals agreed Thursday 
that the military would suspend op- 
erations against rebellious southern 
cities and towns for 48 hours. Pres- 
ident Sali Berisha and his oppo- 
nents also appealed to insurgents 
defending the southern enclaves lo 
hand in their weapons. The cease- 
fire is to begin at 6 A.M. Friday. 

An opposition leader. Neritan 
Ceka, said that the agreement was 
“a first step" toward a political 
compromise and that talks would 
continue Saturday. The rebellion 
began with protests over fraudulent 
investment plans, which hurt most 
Albanian families. Page 6. 


Zaire Rebels Are Hailed 
As Liberators of Towns 

Disgust With Mobutu After Decades of Larceny 


By James C. McKinley Jr. 

New York Tones Service 

KINDU, Zaire — Before Zairian 
rebels captured this steamy river town 
Sunday, young local men ferried them 
across the wide Congo River in dugout 
canoes and rowboats before dawn and 
told them where to attack. 

The battle lasted all of an hour. At the 
first rumor of an attack, the Zairian 
military fled. When the 600 rebels ar- 
rived, the city's defense consisted of 
about 125 former Rwandan soldiers, 
recruited from refugee camps and flown 
in the day before in a desperate attempt 
to halt the insurgents' advance. 

No rebels died in the battle, but at 
least 1 1 of the Rwandans were killed 
before the rest fled into the bush. Three 
schoolchildren were killed by a mortar 
shell. 

Now Kindu is in the grip of liberation 
fever. Schoolchildren parade through 
the city waving palm branches and 
singing: “Mobutu, your day has finally 
come.” 

All along Kindu's unpaved streets, 
people were calling the rebel leader. 
Lament Kabila, “the liberator.” Young 
men were coming out in droves, prom- 
ising to join the rebel army. Teachers 
and other educated people were 
gathered outside the railroad workers* 
meeting hall, talking about democracy 
while they waited for their delegates to 
elect a new governor and other pro- 
visional leaders. 

While some of the enthusiasm may 
stem from simple self-interest, os people 
played it safe by flocking to the winning 
side, it was nonetheless hard to find a 
defender of President Mobutu Sese Seko, 
the autocratic president who has driven 
this mineral-rich country into poverty 
over three decades of corrupt rule. 


“The people were so tired of the 
system in place here," said Etienne 
Beya. 39, a forestry expert. “It was a 
system that maltreated people. There 
was no freedom of expression. Kabila 
has never worked with any government 
that had anything to do with Mobutu. 
We are really behind him." 

Zaire's war began in October, when 
Zairian Tutsi began attacking govern- 
ment forces, with support from Rwanda, 
Uganda and Burundi. They have moved 
from town to town, driving out refugees 
and seizing territory from the govern- 
ment forces. 

Kindu. with a major railhead and 
airport on the wesl side of the Congo 
River, was an important prize. The fall 
of the city was typical of the civil war so 
far — the defenders fled without much 

See ZAIRE, Page 6 


Xiangyang, Half of It Anyway, Pauses to Honor Deng 


By Seth Faison 

New York Tunes Service 


XIANGYANG, China — As a chilly afternoon rain 
fell outside, the young women behind the counter in 
the Bright Bright Optical Shop chatted about the recent 
day when nearly half the town went to a courtyard to 
bow before a memorial photograph of Deng Xiaoping, 
whose agricultural reforms were pioneered in this area 
20 years ago. 

"It was so full of flowers, there was barely room for 
all the people." said Wu Jing. “I stood there, thinking 
about all thechanges here since 1 was a small child. But 
after a while, I thought: OX. O.K.. this is a waste of 

time. I have things to do." 

In an everyday village in Mr. Deng s native Sichuan 
Province, as in much of China's heartland, the calm 


reaction to his death at 92 on Feb. 19 — an event so 
long anticipated and feared — points to the way that 
Beijing's authority has receded from ordinary life all 
over this country. 

Mr. Deng’s agricultural reforms started in this fer- 
tile corner of China in the late 1970s with the simple 

China hints at unrest in the far west Page 4. 

formula of “family responsibility,” which meant 
abandoning state-run communes so that each family 
could till the land for its own profit, however mea* 
ger. 

Few imagined how far that simple idea — reducing 
government control of people's lives — would grow 
and spread its way from farms into towns and cities. 


where h eventually meant that millions of people had 
more freedom to choose where they worked. 

The relationship between China’s capital and its 
provinces has been precarious for centuries, with an 
invisible leash between them alternately tighter and 
looser, depending on the ruler in power. 

If Mao unified China, imposing his dogma on 
virtually every county, Mr. Deng allowed regions to 
flourish individually, offering less and less instruction 
from Beijing. 

Many Chinese have expressed the fear that large 
chunks of the country might break off after Mr. Deng’s 
death. But even in a region as populous and in- 
dependent-minded as Sichuan, with more than 100 
million people, such a possibility now seems incon* 

See CHINA, Page 6 


AGENDA 

Barshefsky Cains 
Senate Approval 

The Senate confirmed the nom- 
ination of Charlene Barshefsky as 
U.S. trade representative by a 99-1 
vote, but only after a bruising, four- 
hour debate underscoring mount- 
ing congressional restiveness with 
the administration’s free-trade 
agenda. The appointment still re- 
quires the House to grant Ms. 
Barshefsky a waiver of a 1995 law 
on lobbying. Page 3. 


1 The Dollar \ 

Now York 

Thursday O 4 P.M 

previous ctoee 

DU 

1.716 

1.7128 

Pound 

1.6143 

1.6155 

Yen 

121.155 

121.145 

FF 

5.7875 . 

5.7785 

Lt?. 

The Dow 

1 

mm 

THjrsdaydosa 

previous dose 


-1.15 


6944.70 


S&P 500 


694535 


change TTusday a < PJ4. previous dost) 


•3.4 


798.59 


801.99 


Books Page 9. 

Crossword Page 4. 

Opinion Pages 8-9. 

Sports Pages 22-23. 

International CUaeinod Pa^clO. 


The 1HT on-line http://wvvw.iht.com 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. MARCH 7, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


When Miehelin Strikes / A Guest With Terrible News 


And the Chef and His Family Wept Bitter Tears 


C HAMPAGNAC. France — The big 
news out of Paris this week was of new 
stars awarded to the finest French res- 
taurants by the famous Miehelin red 
guide in its 1997 edition. Most of the buzz 
surrounded the chef Alain Ducasse. who won a 
third star, the top honor, for his restaurant in 
Paris — and lost his third star at his original 
restaurant in Monte Carlo. 

Humbler and more humbling news landed 
here, in a mountain hamlet 485 kilometers (300 
miles) south of Paris, as it did in other places 
whose names you may never hear and whose bed 
and board you may never sample — casualties of 
the world’s most exacting and respected hotel 
and restaurant rating system. 

The Chateau de Lavendes. an unpretentious, 
unfamous hostelry with a good chef and amiable 
proprietor named Gerard Gimmig. was dropped 
altogether by Miehelin. With it went any men- 
tion in' France’s guidebook of reference of 
Diampagnac, population 1.339. 

"It’s a catastrophe.” Mr. Gimmig said over 
and over on learning the news Tuesday night. 
“We’ve worked for 10 years at this.” he said, 
standing numbly in his dining room and rubbing 
his hands on his white chefs tunic, “and now 
we’ve been chucked like a leper.” 

Mr. Gimmig, who runs the Chateau de Lav- 
endes with his wife, son and daughter-in-law. 
said Wednesday morning that family members 
had all cried themselves to fitful sleep. The loss of 
their status in the book Mr. Gimmig called “the 
bible” is something akin to excommunication. 

This inn's fail from grace was particularly i 
swift and harsh, and is for now without ex- 
planation. Bibendum. the smiling Miehelin mas- 
cot and unquestioned god of French cooking and 
innkeeping, had thrown a thunderbolt from the 
sky to show displeasure. 

The Chateau de Lavendes w on a place in the 
red guide, the Miehelin tire company's equally 
renowned sideline, in 1987. just a year after Mr. 
Gimmig and his wife. Louisette, a local 
Auvergnat. converted a little 14th century chat- 
eau into a country inn. 

Two years later, the place was upgraded to a 


By Charles True heart 

Washington Post Service 








all night remembering this guest or that 
who ha d been unhappy — the guy who 
kept calling the front desk with a com- 
plaint without gening an answer (the 
Gimmigs sleep'on the third floor); the 
man who had a few wasps in his room 
and a wife with an allergy to them; the 
man who arrived after dark with dogs, 
which the bote! — as noted in the 
Miehelin guide — does not welcome. 

Mr. Gimmig said he was sure 
someone complained- and that he was 
sure that someone was French, who he 
said were the most difficult custom- 
ers. Luckily, he said, more than half 
his clientele is foreign. But unluckily, 
he added ruefully, more than half his 
clientele is foreign — because for 
them Miehelin is “the standard.” 


* — UTLANDERS may use the 

u ■ Suide f° r reservations. Mr. 
m a Gimmig said, but French 
^ people ~ wield it like a 

-r weapon. "They come in and set the 
* •; ' : Miehelin down on the table — that's 

- their stick. If I don't measure up. they 

>.■ • ' want me to know they have ways to 

'*♦'*<** punish me." The punishmenr would 
uiM urMHT be turning him in to the people ar 
Miehelin — the anonymous, feared 
and discriminating inspectors who travel the 
countryside, dropping in on hotels and restaur- 
ants unannounced, and identifying themselves at 
its conclusion, if at all. 

Mr. Gimmig last remembers an inspector’s 
visit two years ago. and he and his family have 
made two pilgrimages to Miehelin headquarters 
in Paris to seek guidance on their “evolution" 
— that is. their progress through the ranks of the 
demanding Miehelin system. He wishes the high 
priests had given him “a signal” of their dis- 
pleasure — removing a red” rocking chair, or 
turning his red houses black again. 

“I would have thought you’d have to kill a 
customer to get this treatment,” he said. “Do 
they think I have one buried in the garden?" 

fie will find ouL Miehelin has granted him an 
audience in Paris in three weeks, opening a way. 
he hopes, for an appeal of his excommunication. 


weapon. 




SmoIm UrUHT 


higher level of Miehelin recommendation — two 
red houses, unlike the more common black 
houses. Then it got a coveted red “R.” for a good 
meal at a good value, and a red rocking chair, 
meaning unusually pleasant and quiet atmosphere. 
That put Champagnac on a map with some 300 
other special places that travelers use to plot their 
driving and dining trips across the country. 


M R. GIMMIG, a Parisian by birth, has 
won some cooking awards, was fea- 
tured in the Gault-Miilau and the 
Bottin Gourmand, two popular 
French guidebooks, and in 1995 opened a small 
restaurant in nearby Bort-les-Orgues. He has 
been looking forward to mm ins the business 
over to the next Gimmig generation. 

And now these bad tidings, borne by his only 
guest Tuesday night — me. Using the 1996 


edition, I had booked a room for an unrelated 
reporting trip to the Massif Central. Just before I 
left Paris on Tuesday. I got an early press copy of 
the 1 997 edition, which did not go on sale until 
Wednesday. Checking for the updated listing of 
the place I would stay, I found there wasn't one. 

Here at the inn. I had just finished a superb 
mountain trout and local St. Nectaire and Carnal 
cheeses, and was about to tuck into Mr. Gim- 
mig’s prune tart and creme brulee when I heard 
the family talking about the new' Miehelin. 

Making conversation. I asked Mr. Gimmig 
why he wasn’t in the new book- He looked 
disbelieving. "It’s nor possible.” he said. I got 
the 1997 book from my room. He checked and 
rechecked, shaking his head. The resi of the 
family fell silent. I was almost as distraught as I 
dutifully finished the sublime dessert. 

In the morning Mr. Gimmig said he had spent 


Christian Rebels Step Up Bloody Terror Campaign in Uganda 


By James C. McKinley Jr. 

New York Times Service 


KITGUM. Uganda — The Lord’s 
Resistance Army strolled into the vil- 
lage of Palabek one recent morning, a 


ragged bunch of teenage boys with ma- 
chine guns and machetes. They an- 


chine guns and machetes. They an- 
nounced that they were looking for three 
deserters whom they had abducted from 
the same village a few months earlier, 
witnesses said. 

They did not find them. So they 
rounded up nine women and a little girl 
and took them down to a nearby river 
bank to interrogate them about the miss- 
ing boys. That afternoon, growing tired 
of asking questions, they made the wo- 
men lie face down on the river bank. 
Then they went down the line, attacking 
each woman with stones and a bayonet, 
a survivor said. 

"They are just criminals who came 
from Sudan,” said Eveline Achan. a 30- 
year-old woman who said she had been 
wounded in the attack. “They made us 
lie down. Don’t look at them, they said. 
And then they killed us one ar a time. I 
was the only one who escaped. They 
thought 1 was dead.” 

A year after President Yoweri 
Museveni vowed to wipe out the in- 
surgency in the north of this central 
African country, the bloodthirsty gangs 
of self-styled revolutionaries and Chris- 
tian fundamentalist rebels known as the 
Lord's Resistance Army have not only 
survived, but also are stepping up their 
campaign of terror. 

Theirs is a familiar kind of warfare in 
this part of the world, repeated in dif- 
ferent forms in Rwanda. Bunradi and 
eastern Zaire. Though the rebels claim 
to be fighting to oust Mr. Museveni, 
their war consists mainly of killin g ci- 
vilians, sowing terror in the countryside 
and making it appear to Ugandans and 
the outside world that the government 
cannot control the nation. 

"It’s not what you would call a bona 
fide rebellion in the traditional sense.” a 
diplomat in Kampala said, speaking on 


the condition of anonymity. “I would 
call them terrorists.” 

Militarily, the rebels lack the re- 
sources to topple the president. Western 
diplomats say. They have little suppon 
among the people. They survive mostly 
on the charity of neighboring Sudan, 
which arms them to retaliate against 
Uganda for supporting rebel groups in 
southern Sudan. 

”1 don’t think their intention is to 
overthrow the government,” said John 
Bosco Oryem. chairman of the Kitgum 
council. “They are just being used as a 
whip by Sudan.” 

Since January, the rebels have 
stepped up their raids, burning farms 
and schools and killing at least 400 
people in the districts of Kitgum and 
Gulu, the local authorities said. They 
have also abducted hundreds of young 
men and women, marching them to 
training camps in the Sudan, where their 
leader. Joseph Kony. holds court. 

The rebel group began in 1986 as the 
Holy Spirit Movement, a Christian fun- 
damentalist revolt under the leadership 
of a cult leader. Alice Lakwena. who 
claimed to give her followers immunity 
from bullets by anointing them with 
holy water. 

The holy water didn't work, and the 
movement was crushed by the army. 
Miss Lakwena fled to Kenya, where she 
was imprisoned in 1987. But with Su- 
danese help. Mr. Kony revived the re- 
volt and has been plaguing Mr. Musev- 
eni since 1990. 

Mr. Kony is a former faith healer who 
wears white robes and claims to talk 
directly to God. His followers embrace 
an eclectic group of beliefs, including 
prohibitions against riding bicycles, 
killing pigs and eating white-feathered 
chickens. Punishment is severe; the 
rebels have chopped off the feet of 
young men caught riding bicycles. 

The recent attacks have devastated 
the northern provinces, forcing more 
than 220,000 people to flee their farms 
at a time when they would normally be 
harvesting. 




insurgency operation, placing his 
brother Salim Saleb in command. The 
president spends weeks at a time in 
Gulu. overseeing the forces. Heavy ar- 


tillery and helicopters have been 
brought into the north. 


brought into the north. 

But the attacks persist, despite the 




president’s refusal to negotiate with Mr. 
Kony and his boasts that he will trap and 


ony and his boasts that he will trap and 
execute the rebel leader. Some diplo- 


mats suspect the government’s effort is 
half-hearted. “More and more people 
are leaning to the view that Museveni’s 
people are not serious about it,” a dip- 
lomat said. 

Government officials point out that it 
is difficult to eradicate a determined 
terrorist group using hit-and-run tactics 
over an area of 1 8.200 square kilometers 
(7.000 square miles). 

Still, military officials say they are 
making progress. Recently’ Ugandan 
soldiers ambushed a column of rebels at 
Aswa Ranch, near Kitgum, killing two 
and rescuing more than 20 youths who 
bad been abducted earlier. 

One reason Konv’s group has con- 
tinued to find recruits is the strong un- 
dercurrent of anger -and discontent in the 
north. Dominated by the Acholi tribe, 
the north has always been a stronghold 
of opposition to Mr. Museveni, a south- 
erner. It was the northern provinces that 
produced Uganda’s last three dictators 
— Idi Amin. Milton Obote and Tito 
Okello. 

When Mr. Museveni’s rebel army- 
swept to power in January 1986, he 
defeated not only Mr. Obote. but also 
Mr. Okello’s mainly Acholi forces. 

Since then the northern Acholi tribes 
lost much of their influence in gov- 
ernment. and. as a result, the north has 
lagged behind the south in development. 
During the elections in May. the Acholi 
voted overwhelmingly for the opposi- 
tion candidate. Paul Ssemogerere. 

One of the ugly ironies of the conflict 
is that most of the victims of the vi- 
olence are the very people Mr, Kony 
could convert to his cause — impov- 
erished Acholi farmers and merchants. 











W&ri-: ' 

raw.* 




sal 


Eveline 

gunmen 


lama C. McK wiry, The Nc« Y«l Tiine> 

Achan says she survived an attack in her village by teenage 
who killed eight other women and a girl with rocks and a bayonet 


With agriculture grinding to a halt 
and crowds of displaced people jam- 
ming towns and refugee camps, the 
World Food Program, in a $6.7 million 
relief effort, has begun shipping tons of 
food into the region to avert famine. 

"The big question is, will the security 
situation allow them to go back to their 
farms before the March rains?” asked 
Herve Cheuzeville. an emergency co- 
ordinator for the World Food Program 
in Kitgum. * ‘We are really praying they 
can go back to the fields in March. If 
they can’t, it will be a disaster. In six 
months it will be much worse.” 

All along the main roads leading from 
Kitgum toward the Sudan one can see 
the rebels' handiwork. There are 
bumed-out farmhouses every couple of 
kilometers or so. Here and there the 


ruins of churches and schools can be 
seen. There are few people walking on 
the normally crowded route, but truck- 
loads of soldiers pass by in a dusty 
whoosh, on their way to search for the 
rebels. 

On some farms mangoes are rotting 
on trees and chickens run wild through 
the ashy ruins. Still, few of the people in 
makeshift camps in the towns and trad- 
ing centers are brave enough to venture 
back to their farms to get food. 

The success of the rebels’ tactics has 
undermined Mr. Museveni's standing 
among Ugandans, even if he won elec- 
tion last May in a landslide and is presid- 
ing over an economic boom. 

h is a measure of the war’s impor- 
tance to the president that he has per- 
sonally taken charge of the counter- 


jmW in beautiful 
"*** aristocratic 

MEGEVE 


TRAVEL UPDATE 
London Adopts Ferry Guidelines 


WEATHER 


U.S. Hedges 
On UN Call 
To Israelis 


♦ mM 


i. 


L 


Envoy Wont Declare 
Support for Resolution 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Post Senice 


UNITED NATIONS. New York — 
■ Faced with swelling international cri- 
ticism of Israel's plan to build housing 
in East Jerusalem, the United States has 
reiterated that it disapproves but refused 
to say if it will suppon a proposed 
Security Council resolution urging Is- 
rael to reverse its decision. 

U.S. officials acknowledged that die 
equivocal position taken by the new 
U.S. chief delegate. Bill Richardson, 
meant the Clinton administration bad 
not made up its mind about what po- 
sition to take on the resolution being 
pressed by the 15 countries of the Euro- 
pean Union. As a permanent member of 
the council, the United States has the 
power to veto’ any decision. 

Washington's reluctance to declare 
itsel f cast an aura of uncertainty over tfc® 
council debale on Jerusalem that begin? 
late Wednesday. Spurred by an appeal 
from the Palestinian leader, Yasser Ara- 
fat. a parade of UN members appeared 
before the 15-nation council to de- 
nounce Israel's plan to construct 6300 
homes on a hill in East Jerusalem known 
in Hebrew as Har Homa. calling it a 
dangerous threar to the peace process. 

"Die sole exception was Mr. Richard- 
son. who was confronting the first major 
issue to come before the council since 
he arrived here two weeks ago. He told 
the council: “As President Clinton said 
on Monday, the United States would 
prefer that the Har Homa decision had 
not been made. We believe that this 
decision undermines the trust and con- 
fidence that is so badly needed if a 
lasting peace is to be achieved." 

But Mr. Richardson then reiterated the 
long-standing U.S. view that the Se- 
curity Council was not the best forum for*: 
dealing with the Arab- Israeli conflict. 

In the past, (he United Stales has 
regularly vetoed resolutions that it re- 
garded as one-sided criticism of Israel. 
But there also have been occasions 
when Washington sought to send a mes- 
sage of rebuke to Israeli governments by 
abstaining and allowing a critical res- 
olution to pass. 

U.S. officials, who declined to be 
identified, said the situation had con- 
fronted the administration with a dif- 
ficult choice. They said that the ad- 
ministration clearly did not like the 
confrontational actions announced by 
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's 
government in recent days. 

On Monday, with Mr. Arafat at his 
side, Mr. Clinton said he believed the 
Har Homa decision "builds mistrust, 
and I wish it had not been made.” 
Thursday, toe administration had toe 
State Department spokesman. Nicholas 
Bums, criticize Israel's order io shut 
four Palestinian offices in East Jeru- 
salem as "very difficult to understand" 
at this time 4 ‘when there is a very dif- 
ficult environment in toe relationship 
with toe Palestinians.” 

Nevertheless, the officials said, toe 
administration is uncertain about wheth- 
er permitting passage of a Security Coun- 
cil resolution might make the situation 
worse. A resolution, they said, could 
cause Mr. Netanyahu’s government to 
retaliate by slowing down Israeli with- 
drawal from occupied Arab territory. It 
also could encourage Palestinians to ig- 
nite a new round of the violence that 
broke out last fall over Israel’s opening of 
a tunnel near Arab religious shrines in 
East Jerusalem, they added. 

For those reasoas. the officials said, 
toe administration wants to wait until 
debate ends. Then, they said, U.S. of- 
ficials will assess the situation arid begin 
negotiations here with the European 
sponsors of the proposed resolution. 


rqlfA 






Correction 


Because of an editing error, an article 
Thursday incorrectly stated the birth- 
place of Ignaiz Bub’is. He w as bom in 
Breslau, then part of Germany. |i j s now 
Wroclaw, Poland. 


Europe 


Forecast tor Saturday ffirough Monday, as provided by AccuWeathar. 


(Haute-Savoie, France), altitude 1,200 m 
60 km from Geneva by highway 


Extraordinary mountain CHALET overlooking 
the Megeve resort, 2.500 sq.m, pine forest. 
570 sq.m, accommodation, recent construction of 
the highest standard comprising 1 1 rooms - 
9 bathrooms, vast dining and living rooms, 
unique gaming room, separate apartment for 
housekeeper(s) garage for 3 cars, outside 
parking for 8 cars. 


LONDON (AFP) - — The British government on Thursday 
marked toe 1 0th anniversary of the Herald of Free Enterprise 
ferry disaster by adopting fresh international guidelines aimed 
at improving safety on passenger ferries. 

The lives of 193 passengers and crew were lost on an icy 
March night outside toe Belgian port of Zeebrugge. prompting 
toe British government to mount a crusade to improve toe 
stability of “roll-on. roll-off” ferries. In February 1996, 18 
countries, most of them from toe North Sea region, signed an 
agreement to reinforce safety guidelines. 


Bulgaria's cabinet agreed on Thursday to abolish visa 
requirements for nationals of the European Union and the 
European Free Trade .Area visiting for up to 30 days. 

/ Renters ) 

Some of the gondoliers who ply the canals of Venice went 
on strike Thursday in a dispute over fares. (AFP) 


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Fax ++41 21 312 05 27 
Apply to: Cipher W/1 21 847 
Publicitas International, P.O. Box 3600, 
CH- 1 002 Lausanne, Switzerland. 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S • MASTER'S « DOCTORATE 
For Work, Lite anti Academic Experience 
Dwough Convener!} Home Study 

® f808l 597-1909 EXT. 23 
Fax: (310) 471-6456 
httk / lwww.pwu.csn 
Fa* w send delated resume for 


DEATH NOTICE 


=■ , . — n -IPT-Iiyri 

Pacific Western University 

1210 Auah Street. DepL 23 
HoroUu. HJ 96814-4922 


The members of toe 
CANADE family announce 
with sadness toe death in Paris 
on 1? February- 1997 of 
Mrs Laura ZIGROSSER 
nee CANADE 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 


PAGE 3 


-ji 




THE AMERICAS 


I 


W . 

■ ’ m 


Barshefsky Approved 
F° r Top Trade Post 

: H ^° te I s 99 -1, but 4-Hour Debate is Rough 


POLITICALS 


By Paul Blustein 

Washington Post Service 


lo n ^T h GTON - The Senate has 
-confirmed the nomination of Charlene 
-Barshefsky as U.S. trade representative 
out only after a braising, four-hour de- 
bate underscoring mounting coneres- 
sional rwnveness with the adminfstra- 
uon s free-trade agenda. 

Her appointment still require House 
acuon on a waiver of a lobbying law. 

Ms. Barshefsky, who has served as 
acung trade representative for nearlv a 
year won raves Wednesday from a 
number of senators for her negotiating 
.frills- Noting that she has been labeled 
* Dragon Lady" in Asian capitals. Sen- 
ator Darnel Patrick Moynihan. Demo- 
crat of New York, declared: "The ca- 
pacity Ambassador Barshefsky brings 
Jo issk is formidable to the point of 
being dazzling.” 

~ But her nomination ran into a le- 
gislative roadblock and scorn from Sen- 
ator Ernest Hollings, Democrat of South 
.Carolina. “The dragon lady, the dragon 
•‘lady, oh man, tough, tough, tough,*’ he 
; scoffed. He asserted that Ms. Barshefsky 
had “given away the store" in a recent 
.global trade agreement to open tele- 
communications markets, which he said 
would effectively rewrite long-standing 
.U.S. laws restricting foreign ownership 
of communications companies. 

The debate revolved around an 
amendment proposed by Senator 
Hollings and Senator Jesse Helms. Re- 
publican of North Carolina, to the 
waiver bill needed to clear the way for 


Ms. Barshefsky *s confirmation. The 
amendment, winch would require con- 
gressional approval of all trade accords 
that involve changes in U.S. “law or 
practice,” was strongly opposed by the 
White House as an excessive burden on 
its ability to negotiate trade deals. 

The amendment was killed by an 84- 
to-16 vote, but even among the ma- 
jority, several senators said they were 
doing so to avoid delaying the nom- 
ination, and said Senator Hollings was 
raising some important issues about 
congressional prerogatives. 

_ Administration officials and congres- 
sional staff said this was symptomatic of 
a growing sentiment on Capitol Hill in 
recent years to reassert Congress's con- 
stitutional authority over trade. 

House and Senate critics of free trade 
are expected to fight against the ad- 
ministration’s effort to win new “fast- 
track" negotiating authority to expand 
the North American Free Trade Agree- 
ment. Richard Gephardt of Missouri, 
the House minority leader, also is seek- 
ing to require congressional approval of 
the admission of China to die World 
Trade Organization. 

Ms. Barshefsky's nomination has 
been complicated by a 1995 law barring 
the president from appointing a trade 
representative who has worked for a 
foreign government. She formerly rep- 
resented Canada and Quebec on some 
trade matters. 

The Senate approved, 98-2, a bill 
granting Ms. Barshefsky a waiver from 
the lobbying law. Her nomination was 
then approved by a vote of 99 to 1. 


Gingrich Donors Got Access 

ATLANTA — Newt Gingrich, the speaker of the 
House, once courted wealthy donors to his political 
action committee by promising special access to him 
and a chance to influence national policy, a news- 
paper reported Thursday. 

The Atlanta Journal -Constitution said some 
donors were also invited to a meeting with George 
Bush, who was president at the time, at the Old 
Executive Office Building next to the White House. 

The paper reviewed Mr. Gingrich’s fund-raising 
strategies from the early 1990s, when he was waging 
an accelerated campaign to win Republican control of 
the House. It found that top donors to GOPAC. his 
political action committee, were routinely invited to 
small group discussions on national issues, were en- 
couraged to stop by Mr. Gingrich's Washington office 
and were consulted during the writing of the Re- 
publicans’ Contract With America. 

Mr. Gingrich’s spokeswoman, Christina Martin, 
said be did not do anything wrong. 

“Newt Gingrich obeyed the law. Newt Gingrich did 
not make phone calls from his office. Newt Gingrich 
did nor take foreign contributions. Newt Gingrich did 
not auction off the Lincoln bedroom." she said (AP) 


whelmingly to support an Alabama judge who ig- 
nored a court order to remove a copy of the Ten 
Commandments from his courtroom. 

The nonbinding resolution, which was passed 
Wednesday by a vote of 295 to 1 25, stales that the Ten 
Commandments "promote respect for our system of 
laws and the good of society." 

The measure stems from a dispute involving Judge 
Roy Moore of the Etowah County Circuit Court In 
Gadsden, Alabama, who posted a hand-carved ren- 
dering of the Ten Commandments behind his bench. 

Last month, another circuit court judge agreed 
with the American Civil Liberties Union that the 
display was an unconstitutional mix of church and 
state and ordered Judge Moore to remove it. After 
Judge Moore refused and appealed the decision, the 
Alabama Supreme Court blocked enforcement of the 
lower court order until it had a chance to consider 
Judge Moore’s appeal. (WP) 

The $680 Million Rent Error 


fali" that the administration revealed last month. 

The shortfall, which was caused by a two-year 
string errors in forecasting and budgeting, means that 
the General Services Administration, the agency that 
oversees the management of many federal buildings, is 
$680 million short in the account that collects rent. 

That money, collected from other agencies that 
occupy space in buildings controlled by the admin- 
istration, goes into a fund that pays for federal con- 
struction. To make up for the shortfall, the agency will 
not begin any new construction projects in the 1998 
fiscal year, which begins in October. Most major 
building repairs also will be delayed a year. 

Three major factors caused the shortfall. Mr. Peck 
said. Slimmed -down federal agencies used less of- 
fice space than projected. Hie problem was com- 
pounded by rent reductions made in several cities to 
bring them closer to the private market — only 
someone forgot to use those lower rents as a base for 
preparing future budgets. Finally, construction 
delays at several projects meant that the buildings 
brought in less rent than projected. (WP) 


WASHINGTON — Robert Peck obviously was ^ 
not happy to be on Capitol Hill. After all, it’s no fun UuOtP / 1 JnfHintp 
to explain a $680 million mistake. X ^ 7 UlUfUUlc 

“You, as representatives of the stockholders, have 
every reason to be concerned and even upset," Mr. 

1 f\ i q Peck, who runs the real estate program at the General 

IV vommanaments KjQJI otay Services Administration, told members of a House 

** subcommittee Wednesday. He was the sole witness at a 
hearing called to examine a $680 million “rent sbort- 


WASHINGTON — The House has voted over- 


Michael McCurry, the presidential spokesman, on 
the problem, from the white House view, that the 
clamor of scandal is threatening to drown out what 
Mr. Clinton wants to talk about. “I don't think 
there's any question that when you're mid- water in a 
feeding frenzy, not much else filters out.” (WP) 


Clinton Sent Aides in Secret 
To Shore Up Mexico Ties 


By Molly Moore 
and John Ward Anderson 

Washington Post Service 

MEXICO CITY — A delegation of 
senior White House officials has met 
here with President Ernesto Zedillo in 
what was intended as a secret mission to 
smooth over contentious anti-drug ef- 
forts and other issues between the 
United States and Mexico less than six 
weeks before President Bill Clinton is 
'scheduled to visit. 

Amid revelations of corruption at all 
levels of the Mexican government’s anti- 
drug program, both presidents have been 
berated by domestic critics since the 
Clinton administration certified Mexico 
last week as a cooperative partner in 
combating drug trafficking. 

The brief, unannounced visit here 
Wednesday by such a high-level del- 
egation, arranged just a day earlier, 
demonstrated the two countries’ deep 

rility of 


House committee voted to revoke his 
certification that Mexico is cooperating 
fully in the war on drugs, The As- 
sociated Press reported from Washing- 
ton. But the measure, approved, 27 to 5, 
by the International Relations Commit- 
tee, would allow him to waive decer- 
tification on national security grounds. 



FLOOD TOLL IN KENTUCKY — Cars piled up by flooding of the Licking River in Falmouth, Kentucky, 
where four more bodies were recovered Tuesday and Wednesday, bringing the death toll in the state to 17. 


Away From 
Politics 

• A test of the Pentagon's anti-mis- 
sile missile, intended to demonstrate 
that it could intercept a rocket, ended 
Thursday in the fourth failure in a row 
for the weapon, known as Thaad. A 
Pentagon spokesman said it was too 
early to say what the consequences 
might be for the project. (AP) 

• Beset with scandals and rising 

concern over the FBI’s ability to po- 
lice itself. Director Louis Freeh has 
announced creation of an expanded 
and newly independent Office of Pro- 
fessional Responsibility, headed by a 
Justice Department prosecutor, Mi- 
chael DeFeo, to investigate and ad- 
judicate internal allegations of mis- 
conduct. (WP) 

• An au pair accused of killing a 9- 

month-old baby in her care has been 
indicted on a charge of first-degree 
murder. Prosecutors allege that 
Louise Woodward. 19, a British sub- 
ject, violently shook Matthew Eappen 
at his home in Newton, Massachu- 
setts, and caused his head to hit a hard 
object, fracturing his skull. (AP) 


Can a House Divided Agree to Civility? Members Will Try 


By Francis X. Clines 

New York Tunes Service 


■« 


WASHINGTON — Barely into a congressional 
session that has already seen the speaker rep- 
rimanded for his ethics and members bracing for a 
tooth -an d-claw inquiry into big-money politics, 
the House of Representatives is about to go off on 
a "bipartisan retreat" to try to repair its tattered 
decorum. 

The unusual outing, which grew out of a late- 
night oratorical slugfest on die House floor Last 
spring, has brought small smiles to some members, 
as if at passage of a resolution to don plus fours and 
bird watch at some quiet fen across that bridge to 
the 21st century. 

But about half the House has already signed up 
for the voluntary event in search of alternatives to 
the House's chronic incivility, which politicians 
trace to the aggressive anti-Washington culture 


that many of them exploited in getting here in the 
first place. 

The trumpeting of this weekend's retreat 
seemed more like a mere whistled timeout in this 
typically combative legislative week. Parry leaders 
continued to fence in corridor news conferences 
over plans to rake over President Bill Clinton's re- 
election fund-raising — ' 'bigger chan Watergate,” 
in the words of the House speaker. Newt Gingrich, 
who was fined by the House for some of his own 
fund-raising practices. 

“There’s been accelerating decay in behavior 
over die last six or eight years," said Repre- 
sentative David Skaggs, Democrat of Colorado, 
the retreat chairman. 

Mr. Skaggs noted that three-fifths of the mem- 
bers arrived in the 1990s from a political process 
that has become increasingly polarized and ab- 
rasive. The anti-Washington mood has encouraged 
three-day work weeks with longer hours and short- 


mutual concern over the viability 
their joint effort to stem the flow of 
icit drugs through Mexico into the 
nited States. 

. The arrival of the U.S. national se- 
curity adviser, Samuel (Sandy) Berger; 
the special presidential adviser, Thomas 
McLarty, and the bead of the govern- 
ment's anti-drug efforts, Barry McCaf- 
frey, was not publicly disclosed until 
after workers at the Mexico City airport 
tipped off a local radio station. 

American officials said the fact that 

such a high-level meeting could be ar- - 

strated the close cooperation between FEES: Whitewater Investigator Studies Who Paid Webster Hubbell $400,000 After His Resignation, and Why 

the two countries. But American and “ ” J 

Mexican officials conceded privately 
that the meeting included discussions of 
how to ease tensions that have de- 


er tempers as more members leave their families 
back home. * 'The place has become more and more 
dysfunctional," he said. 

In search of a remedy, more than 350 family 
members will accompany the lawmakers to the 
retreat at die Hershey Conference Center in 
Pennsylvania. The gathering is designed to deter- 
mine, in the words of the invitation, if "vigorous 
debate and mutual respect can coexist" if some 
bad habits are broken. 

"This is a real departure," said David Mc- 
Cullough, the historian, who will be addressing the 
lawmakers during their soul-searching. "I don't 
think anybody will be there to grandstand," 
adding, "Let’s hope they’re not." 

Mr. McCullough indicated he was mindful of 
opinion polls that show the public regularly dis- 
gusted with Congress, viewing it as an arena of 
partisan fractiousness. 

The working sessions are being designed by 


Mark Gerzon, an author and specialist in civil 
discourse who. according to the retreat plan, will 

Hnn mehimae tn mvtnu "civ Ualiaf rtfrtnmr rtau. 


television producer, a New Age enthusiast and 
star-spangled politician." 

If peace breaks out, it will be off the record, for 
the retreat is to be closed to the public and jour- 
nalists to encourage unscripted candor. 

Each member will pay a token fee of $60. 

In the historic pah, uncivil legislators were 
known to thrash each other with walking sticks in 
the chamber, spit in an opponent's face and even 
chase a debater about the floor with tongs from the 
congressional fireplace. There was a history of 
dueling off the floor, which climaxed in 1 839 after 
the honorable gentleman from Kentucky shot dead 
the honorable gentleman from Maine, prompting 
Congress to pass an anti-dueling law. 


Continued from Page 1 


veloped in recent weeks. 

Mr. Clinton's decision to certify 
Mexico, just after its top anti-drug of- 
ficial was charged with collaborating 
with a drug langpin. enraged some 
members of Congress, who said they 
would try to overturn certification. In an 
effort to bolster support for the decision, 
some officials of the Clinton admin- 
istration have said Mexico has pledged 
major changes in its drug policies. 

Newspapers in Mexico City seized on 
the reports and have run daily front-page 
stories criticizing any concessions as a 
sign that Washington is meddling in 
Mexico's internal affairs. The relentless 
headlines have created major headaches 
for Mr. Zedillo four months before ms 
party faces critical midterm elections. 

The Zedillo administration has 
denied that any concessions were made 
in exchange for certification. and Clin- 
ton administration offices sai “ 
nesday that none had been demanded. 

■ Co mmi ttee Rebukes Clinton 
% In a rebuke to President Clinton, a 


American endorsement of the project on 
a trade mission to Beijing in August 
1994, two months after Mr. Hubbell was 
put on the payroll of a Riady family 
company. Afterward, an Arkansas as- 
sociate of the Riadys left a message with 
a friend in the administration saying the 
Riady-con trolled Lippo group was "very 
happy" with the outcome of the trip. 

A reconstruction from public records 
and interviews with witnesses, associ- 
ates and former employers of Mr. Hub- 
bell show that be was paid significantly 
more money than was previously 
known, far more in fact that he had 
earned as a lawyer in Little Rock, Arkan- 
sas, and from a wider variety of sources, 
many with close ties to Mr. Qinton. 

It has been reported that Mr. Hubbell 
was paid about $100,000 from compa- 
nies controlled by the Riady family. But 
the new details show that his income 
was derived from the businesses in 
Hong Kong controlled by the Riadys 
that have worked closely with China on 
the Fujian project 

The Whitewater independent counsel 
is now examining Mr. Hubbell's 1994 
income to determine exactly who paid 


him, whai work he may have done in 
exchange and whether any of the money 
was intended to discourage him from 
helping investigators who were looking 
into the Clintons’ finances. Thar inquiry 
is increasingly overlapping with the 
newer investigations by Congress and 
the Justice Department into the fund- 
raising activities of the president and the 
Democratic Party. 

All of the investigations share an in- 
terest in the same small circle of Demor 
cratic donors and fund-raisers, as well as 
in the ties of the Riady family to the 
Chinese government and overseas 
Chinese business interests. Investiga- 
tors suspect these organizations may 
have tried to funnel money into the 
United Stares for political purposes. 

The reconstruction of Mr. Hubbell's 
income shows that he was paid by a 
company controlled by Bernard Rapo- 
port, a Texas businessman and longtime 
donor to Mr. Clinton's political cam- 
paigns. He hired Mr. Hubbell in the 
spring of 1994. shortly after being 
named to a White House advisory com- 
mittee for trade policy. 

Mr. Hubbell was also paid by a com- 
pany controlled by Truman Arnold, a 
petroleum distributor in Texarkana, 


Texas, who was the top fund-raiser for 
the Democratic National Committee in 
1995. It was Mr. Arnold who suggested 
to Mr. Rapoport that he consider hiring 
Mr. Hubbell. 

In addition, the reconstruction shows 
that Mr. Hubbell was on the payroll of 
Sun America Inc., a California financial 
services company controlled by Eli 
Broad, a close Clinton friend who, like 
Mr. Rapoport and Mr. Arnold, stayed 
overnight at the White House. 

The Riadys, Mr. Rapoport, Mr. 
Broad, Mr. Arnold and their families 
and companies have donated nearly $1 
million to the Democratic National 
Committee in the last five years. 

In two interviews, Mr. Hubbell said he 
did not think it was appropriate to discuss 
the work he did for his clients in 1994 
when he left the Justice Department. 

“I’m not going to talk about my 
clients," said Mr. Hubbell, who was 
released from prison last month after 
serving 18 months for overbilling his 
clients at the Rose Law Firm in Little 
Rock, where Mrs. Clinton also was a 
partner. 

He has told friends that although he is 
not bitter about his prison term, he feels 
frustrated that some have questioned his 


integrity, and that some former friends 
now shun him. He has also told friends 
that he has nothing incriminating to say 
about the Clintons, yet he has had a 
difficult time getting new clients because 
they fear they would get subpoenas. 

“I made a veiy difficult, but the right 
decision, to plead guilty," Mr. Hubbell 
said Wednesday. “As part of that de- 
cision I agreed to cooperate. Since that 
time, I have answered every question 
and provided every document that has 
been asked of me by four special pros- 
ecutors." 

“I have only declined to discuss my 
clients because I must honor their con- 
fidentiality," he added. “Bur who my 
clients were, how I got them, what I did 
for them and bow much I was paid, has 
played absolutely no role in either my 
decision to plead guilty or how I have 
cooperated." 

President Clinton has said that he did 
not know about Mr. Hubbell's work for 
the Riadys until it became known in 
news accounts. Earlier on Wednesday, 
responding to reports that prosecutors 
had subpoenaed the White House for 
records pertaining to die Lippo Group. 
Mr. Clinton said he did not believe there 
had been any improper influence by 


either China or the Riady family on Mr. 
Hubbell or the White House. 

In response to questions about reports 
that had raised the issue in a general way . 
Mr. Clinton said, "The charge is serious; 
we need to get to the bottom of it." 

Once described by Mr. Clinton as his 
closest friend, Mr. Hubbell was named 
associate attorney general in 1993, the 
No. 3 post at the Justice Department. 
Indeed, Mr. Hubbell, rather than At- 
torney General Janet Reno, was the de- 
ent’s main contact with the White 


FUNDS: Aide to Hdlary Clinton May Have Broken Federal Law by Taking $50,000 Donation From Businessman 


Continued from Page 1 

. White House in questionable 

™r° d f ^inactivities that have dogged 
gn fund ra>* * year's election. 

insisted again Thursday that 

White Bou. , ^ j aw against fund- 

Ihanisdid Reuters reported from 

« paidotfil trip. 

[.Michisan. dunn^ P an, Michael Mc- 
White Hou^ • P° ■ Ls white House 

aid , M foNow the pnKdures approved by 
fc!.un^ and Lfs what Maggte ap- 

' did C „| in net Reno, meanwhile, said 
mey fSon^o appoint an independent 
w investigate die matter despite' a mount- 

S e r!li&y^ i ' 1 P risonorilfineof 


up to $5,000. The White House, though, pointed to 
regulations that provide an exception for “min- 
isterial activities,- which precede or follow the 
official acceptance and receipt, such as handling, 
disbursing or accounting for contributions." 

But one election-law expert, a Democrat, said 
that exception was intended to protect rank-and-file 
federal workers who inadvertently receive political 
contributions, not to allow presidential aides to 
knowingly collect donations at the White House. 

In addition, a 1995 memo by a then- White 
House counsel, Abner Mikva. staled flatly that no 
contributions should be received at the White 
House. The only except ioas he envisioned were 
gifts via the mail; Mr. Mikva instructed that those 
be sent to the correspondence department and not 
acknowledged to the donor. 

Yet, Jan Baran, a Republican attorney special- 
izing in election law, said if no one at the White 
House requested the contribution and if Ms. Wil- 
liams promptly turned it over to the Democratic 


committee, the White House "may have an ar- 
gument that those circumstances do not constitute 
a violation.” 

The disclosure comes the same week that Vice 
President A1 Gore acknowledged that he solicited 
donations to the committee from his White House 
office. Mr. Gore contended thai there was no 
“controlling legal authority” that prohibited him 
from soliciting contributions at the White House. 

Mr. Gore's office issued a statement Wednesday 
saying that he used a telephone calling card issued 
by the Ointon-Gore campaign, not a Democratic 
National Committee credit card as he originally said 
Lyn Utrecht, the campaign's general counsel, said 
the committee may need to reimburse the Clinton- 
Gore campaign for the cost of the calls, but she 
characterized that as a "not uncommon" matter. 

Mr. Chung has been one of the central characters 
in the fund-raising controversy, a glib entrepreneur 
who talked his way into the White House 49 times 
despite the fact that a National Security Council 


official concluded that he was a “hustler” seeking 
to exploit his friendship with the Clintons to im- 
press Chinese business associates. 

In all, Mr. Chung gave $366,000 to the com- 
mittee, all of which is now being returned. 

“Mr. Chung was seeking some access, and there 
may well have been some implicit understanding 
or peitiaps some hopes on Mr. Chung's part that a 
donation might well facilitate his request." Mr. 
Chung’s lawyer. • Brian Sun. told NBC News, 
which reported his transaction with Ms. Williams 
on Wednesday night 

White House officials said that Mr. Chung first 
suggested to Ms. Williams that he wanted to give 
money directly to the Clintons. 

Ms. Williams' told him he could not do that, but 
informed him he could contribute to the Democratic 
committee or some other entity. According to thus 
account, Mr. Chung returned with the $50.000 check 
dated March 9, just two days before he attended a 
presidential radio address with his business clients. 


louse. 

Mr. Hubbell announced his resigna- 
tion on March 14, 1994, stepped down 
on April 8. and on Dec. 6, pleaded guilty 
to two felony counts of mail fraud and 
tax evasion. At the time, he had few 
assets and heavy debts that included 
legal bills and large back-taxes and pen- 
alties. in a sign that investigators did not 
believe he had provided much useful 
information, prosecutors declined to re- 
commend a reduction in his sentence. 

Mr. Hubbell has said little publicly 
about the work he did for the Riady 
family or other clients. Last summer he 
told congressional investigators on the 
Senate Whitewater committee that he 
was retained by one of the family’s 
businesses in June 1 994, but he declined 
repeatedly to say which one or what 
work he had done. 

The administration's endorsement of 
the long-pending Fujian project was an- 
nounced along with a group of other 
deals in August 1994, when Mr. Brown 
took the trade delegation to Beijing. 

Lippo executives seemed delighted 
by the outcome. A few weeks after the 
trade mission, a Little Rock associate of 
the Riadys, Joseph O'Brien, left a mes- 
sage with Maria Haley, a director of the 
U.S. Export-Import Bank, who had 
been a member of the trade delegation. 

“Congratulations on your successful 
trip to China." said the message, made 
public last week with other government 
documents. “Lippo Group very happy." 

The project is being organized by 
Hong Kong China Ltd., which is con- 
trolled by Lippo Ltd., part of the Riady 
conglomerate. Participants in the power 
planr project include an Arkansas en- 
ergy company and Mr. Giroir. 


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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


U.S. Cancels Exercises 
In Korea After Meeting 

Briefing With North Could Lead to Talks 




In Hong Kong, 
Human Cost 
Of Handover 


Reuters 

SEOUL — South Korea and the 
United States on Thursday canceled 
joint war games in a goodwill gesture to 
nudge North Korea toward peace talks 
after a landmark gathering in New 
York. 

The announcement that this year's 
Team Spirit exercises would be called 
off came hiours after representatives of 
the rival Koreas and the United States 
met in a New York hotel for a briefing 
designed to lead to formal peace talks 
for the divided Korean Peninsula. 

Pyongyang has bitterly denounced 
past Team Spirit maneuvers, involving 
tens of thousands of troops from all 
branches of the militaiy. as preparation 
for an invasion. 

A South Korean Defense Ministry 
statement said the move was designed to 
build confidence and ease tensions. 

North Korean diplomats left the New 
York briefing without making any 
promises to take part in four-party talks, 
including China, on securing a peace 
treaty to replace the armistice that ended 
the 1950-53 Korean War. 

But U.S. officials said Pyongyang's 
very presence at the briefing was a 
promising sign and there was hope 
North Korea would join the formal 
talks. 

The talks were proposed in April by 
President Bill Clinton and his South 
Korean counterpart, Kim Young Sam. 

“Although North Korea gave no in- 
dication on whether it would attend the 
peace talks, judging from its sincere 
attitude, the briefing was meaningful." 
a South Korean Foreign Ministry state- 
ment said. 

It said South Korean representatives 
had dangled the prospect of food aid and 
investment in North Korea, which is on 
the brink of famine and suffering eco- 
nomic collapse. 


"We explained to North Korea the 
food shortage problem and business be- 
tween South and North Korea could also 
be discussed at the four-way peace 
talks," the statement said. 

But Pyongyang had repeated its de- 
mand for a peace pact with the United 
States, bypassing the South. 

The once -annual Team Spirit exer- 
cises are a major source of inter-Korean 
friction. Although they have not been 
held since 1993, a decision on whether 
to resume them is matte each year. 

“The decision to cancel Team Spirit 
is part of efforts by our two govern- 
ments to build confidence and to create 
an atmosphere conducive to the reduc- 
tion of tensions on the peninsula," the 
Seoul Defense Ministry said. 

It added that the decision would have 
no impact on the defense readiness of 
U.S. and South Korean forces. The 
United States maintains 37,000 troops 
in the South. 

The U.S. State Department spokes- 
man, Nicholas Bums, told reporters 
after the briefing that "there were no 
breakthroughs, but the United States is 
hopeful that today's talks will lead to 
North Korea's joining the formal four- 
party talks." 

A senior State Department official 
said North Korea's attendance at the 
briefing was a good sign. "I believe the 
joint briefing itself is modest progress," 
the official said. 

"North Korean diplomats have sat 
down with South Korean and American 
diplomats to talk about the possibility of 
getting to peace talks and that beats all 
of the alternatives." 

The official said the United States had 
proposed that die four parties meet to 
discuss an agenda for "a peace mech- 
anism and then a peace agreement, no 
strings attached, everything's on the 
table.” 


tm 


m 






WC- 



; 

/ ' L J 






f* » 

t -i ■» \ . 




Royston Griffey, one 
of 53 civil servants in 
Hong Kong leaving 
the colony before the 
June 30 handover to 
Beijing, as his son 
Allan, 8, wiped away 
a tear Thursday as 
they boarded a ship to 
take them to London. 
Mr. Griffey, who 
served in Hong Kong 
for 1 8 years, 
successfully sued to 
block die colonial 
government from 
favoring Chinese over 
expatriates in civil- 
service hiring. 


Am Gtoa^TlK Amrant Pm» 


China Hints at Ethnic Unrest in Western Area 


Reuters 

BEIJING — China hinted Thursday 
that ethnic unrest in the far west region of 
Xinjiang was a concern to the govern- 
ment, as a senior official called for unity 
in the Muslim region in which sepa- 
ratists carried out bombings last week. 

“Xinjiang must further improve eth- 
nic unity, protect social stability and do 
a better job of building up Xinjiang," 
the People’s Daily quoted Deputy Prune 
Minister Li Lauqing as saying. 

Mr. Li made no direct reference to 
bombings in Urumqi, the region's cap- 
ital, on Feb. 25, the day Beijing held 
funeral rites for Deng Xiaoping. Three 
bombs killed nine people and wounded 
74 others. 

The report of Mr. Li’s remarks to 
Xinjiang delegates at the National 


People’s Congress was one of the few 
mentions in the national media of unrest 
in the region. 

Official media outside Xinjiang have 
not reported the bombings. 


Exiled Uighur natio nalis ts in Almaty, 
e capital of Kazakstan, said the police 


the capital of Kazakstan, said the police 
had arrested at least 20 ethnic Uighnrs in 
Urumqi and Yining, near Xinjiang’s 
border with Kazakstan. 

"But the real number may be even 
higher because we have no information 


whether new arrests took place last 
night,” said Kakharman Khozhamberdi, 
bead of a Uighur association in Almat y. 

Officials and residents in Urumqi and 
Yining, contacted by telephone from 
Beijing, did not know how many people 
had been arrested. 

In the apparently coordinated attack 


Feb. 25, three bombs hidden on buses in 
Urumqi blew up within minutes of each 
other. A fourth failed to explode. 

The Xinjiang Daily said Wednesday 
that the authorities had arrested several 
people suspected of planting bombs and 
of selling detonators used in the attacks. 

The police were interrogating the sus- 
pects and were searching for others, the 
regional newspaper said. 

Muslim separatists say they want to 
set up an independent "East Turkest- 
an' ' in Xinjiang, a region that is home to 


many Tutikic-speaking people, such as 
die Uighur minoriiy. Exiled Uighur na- 
tionalists claimed responsibility for die 
bombings. 

In early February, anti-Chinese ri- 
oting erupted in Yining, and Chinese 
officials said nine people were killed. 



SOUNDS 


| The Ja2zman who took 
| on Bach 
| Woody Allen 
I The Fugees 


Lights Back On in Marcos Crypt 

Town Finds an Aged Generator to Restore Air Conditioning 


MikeZwejun If you missed it in the IHT, look for it 
Music Editor on our site on the Wbrld Wide Web: 


http://www.iht.com 


Reuters 

LAO AG. Philippines — The crypt holding 
the preserved corpse of former President 
Ferdinand Marcos glowed again Thursday 
after three days of darkness because of un- 
paid electricity bills. 

Using a second-hand generator. Mayor 
Jesus Nalupta restored power in the air-con- 
ditioned tomb in Mr. Marcos's home town of 
Batac, but he said be was not sure how long 
the generator would last 

"We bought it in 1990 from a store selling 


second-hand equipment from Japan," he 
said. “Maybe it is 10 or 20 years old." 

A local electric cooperative on Monday 
shut down power in the Marcos family com- 
pound where the mausoleum stands after the 
family failed to settle bills totaling 5.6 mil- 
lion pesos ($212,800). 


In Manila. Mr. Marcos's widow, Imelda, 
raged at President Fidel Ramos’s refusal to 
allow the former ruler to be buried at the 
Heroes Cemetery in the capital. 

"President Ramos cannot change history, 
that Marcos was a soldier." Mrs. Marcos 
said, referring to her late husband's exploits 
in World WarIL 

Mr. Ramos, now visiting South Asia, said 
Tuesday that the Marcoses were free to bury 
the former president anywhere in Manila 
except at the Heroes Cemetery, which re- 
quired presidential approval 

"If he will not allow that, it is as if we are 


back to the law of the jungles, where might is 
right,” she said. "We will just wait until we 
can give him an honorable burial.” 

“1 will have the patience of Job,’* she 
added. 



IbHc Fkbroo/Rcatam 

Imelda Marcos sobbing Thursday as she 
demanded a hero’s burial for her husband. 


214 Killed in Rebel Attack on 2 Bases in Sri Lanka 


The Associated Press 

COLOMBO — Hundreds of rebels attacked 
an army base and an air force headquarters 
simultaneously on Thursday, the military said. 

[ The offensive, the heaviest fighting in Sri 
Lanka in two months, left at least 214 people 
dead. 

The rebels overran a small army camp in 
eastern Batticaloa district and attacked an air 
force base in Trincomalee district, destroying a 
transport plane, the officials said. 

“Ground troops confirmed that more than 
160 Tigers were killed in the attack on Vavun- 
ativu army base,” the military said in a state- 
ment, referring to Tamil rebels. 

At least 49 soldiers also died in the attack by 
about 800 rebels on the base, 215 kilometers 
( 135 miles) east of Colombo, it said. More than 


80 soldiers were wounded, military officials 
said. 

Four guerrillas and one airman were killed at 
the air force's eastern headquarters, the military 
said. 

The guerrillas blew up a bridge to prevent 
reinforcements reaching the Vavunativu base 
for about seven hours, the military said. 

There was no immediate comment from the 
rebels, who are fighting for a homeland for 
minority Tamils, who account for 1 8 percent of 
Sri Lanka's 1 8 million people. They accuse the 
Sinhalese majority of discrimination. More 
than 48,000 people have been killed in tire 13- 
year-old war. 

The simultaneous strikes just after midnight 
were the first major attack since early January, 
when the rebels targeted the northern Paranthan 


army base. The military said 223 soldiers and 
350 guerrillas were killed in that tattle. 
Military officials said rebels burned several 


Military officials said rebels burned several 
huts at tire Vavunativu army base and carried 
away rifles and ammunition. 

The attack on the China Bay air base, 80 
kilometers to the north, was apparently de- 


signed to prevent reinforcements from being 
sent by helicopter. 


sent by helicopter. 

The Defense Ministry said four rebel suicide 
bombers were killed before they could detonate 
explosives strapped to their bodies at the air 
base. 

Dozens of rebel fighters fired rockets and 
mortars at planes and buildings on the base, 
military officials said. They withdrew at dawn 
after nearly six hours of heavy fighting, the 
officials said. 


Trfeune with a tov east, 2-mor 
home or office every morning. 


CROSSWORD 


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In this Saturday’s 






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40 Loudly moum 

40 Khan 

hi Precedent 
setter 

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7 Creep 
B Military 
command 
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10 Counsel 

11 Niceties 

12 Yearned 
is Bring up 

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29 Rowan, a.g. 

20 Interstate sign: 
Abbr. 

27 interstate sign 
20 Device used in 
an A.T.M. 



BRIEFLY 


Pakistan and India 
Set March 28 Talks 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — 
Pakistan announced Thursday that, 
it would resume stalled peace talks 
with India on March 28 in New 
Delhi, where Prime Minister H. D. 
Deve Gowda said he expected a 
positive outcome from the four-day 
meeting. 

The last round of talks between, 
the South Asian neighbors was in *? 
January 1994. but they bogged 
down because of differences over 
the disputed Himalayan region of 
Jammu and Kashmir, the cause of 
two of their three wars since they 
gained independence from Britain 
m 1947. {Reuters) 


Lawyers for Leader 
Of Japan Sect Quit 


TOKYO — The trial of the lead- 
er of a sect accused in the Tokyo 


subway gassing ran aground 
Thursday when court-appointed 
lawyers defending him tendered 
their resignations. 

“Our biggest concern is that the 
court is trying to railroad through 
the trial on the basis of society’s 
presupposition that Asahara is 
guilty, ’ said Osamu Watanabe, 
chief of the 12 lawyers appointed to 
defend Shoko Asahara by the 
Tokyo District Court 

“We can no longer fulfill our 
responsible roles as attorneys be- 
cause the court has degraded the 
trial to a ceremony,’ ’ Mr. Watanabe 
said. "We have no intention of 
sitting in court just as mere dec- 
oration." 

It was unclear whether the Tokyo 
District Court would accept the 


signations. 
Mr. Wata 


Watanabe’ s team was ap- 


K ted last year to defend Mr. Asa- 
, leader of the Aum Shinrikyo, 
is accused of the March 1995 


who is accused of the March 1995 
subway nerve gas attack, which 
killed 12 people and harmed 6,000 
others. 

Mr. Asahara also faces 16 other 
charges ranging from murder to 
drugs and weapons production. 

( Reuters J 


V.S. Asks Bangkok 
To Let In Refugees 


BANGKOK — Thailand came 
under new pressure from the United 
States on Thursday to open its bor- 
ders to ethnic Karen refugees flee- 
ing a Burmese Army offensive. 

Thailand sent hundreds of Karen 
men, women and children back to 
Burma last week, prompting cri- 
ticism from the international com- 
munity and human rights groups. 

Three Republican U.S. con- 
gressmen sent Prime Minister 
Chaovalit Yongchaiyut a letter de- 
manding respect for the refugees' 
"basic human rights" and saying 
that the repatriations were contrary 
to "international law and interna- 
tionally accepted humanitarian 
standards." (AP) 


China Sees Abuse 
Of Rights in U.S. 


BEIJING — China said 
Thursday dm it hoped Vice Pres- 
ident A1 Gore’s visit later this 
month would strengthen ties, but it 
also took a swipe at what it called 
human rights abuses in the United 
States. 

"It is an objective faenhat human 
rights violations exist on a wide- 
scale in the United States," said a 
Foreign Ministry spokesman, Tang 
Guoqiang. He said the West's fail- 
ings included racial discrimination, 
xenophobia, ethnic strife and social 
injustice. (Reuters) 


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OR CALL +33 14103 93 01 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 


PAGE 5 


EUROPE 



New Beef Imb] 
Embarrasses Tories 

Government Is Accused of Suppressing 
Report of Slaughterhouse Contamination 


By Warren Hoge 

M 1 w Yvrl Timex Ser\i7v 


S' LONDON — The Conservaiive eov- 
emmenr was accused Thursday of hav- 
ing suppressed a year-old re’pon that 

found its slaughterhouses guiityof prac- 
tices that can contribute to the spread of 
mad cow disease and e-coli bacteria 
poisoning. 

. i Twenty people have died and 400 
people have been affected from e-coli 
fpod poisoning in the past year in what 
has been the worst outbreak in Britain’s 
history. The crisis over mad cow disease 
±ai erupted last March resulted in a 
European Union ban on British beef 
exports and an overall collapse of public 
confidence in the quality of a product 
for which Britain was long famous. 

“I was told that it was not a good 
thing to release this type of document 
giving the industry a battering, with 
• BSL around,” said Bill Swann, the as- 
sistant chief veterinary officer of the 
Royal Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals, who was the editor 
of the report. Bovine spongiform en- 
cephalopathy (BSE) is the clinical name 
of mad cow disease, and last March 20 
the British, government caused a furor 
by disclosing scientists’ conclusions 
that a link ex : sted between it and a fatal 
brain disease in humans known as 
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. 

! The $1.6 million report, conducted by 
the Meat Hygiene Service, a national 
inspection service created in 1995 and 
commissioned by the Ministry of Ag- 
riculture, Fisheries and Food, dis- 
covered evidence of “major fecal con- 
tamination,” the principal source of e- 
coli 0157. salmonella and other organ- 
isms, on carcasses being prepared for 
human consumption. It also found that 
spinal cords were not always being dis- 
. carded, a practice that has been blamed 
. f or letting mad cow disease-infected 
matter into animal feed. 

It called for the creation of a national 
policy to define unacceptable contam- 
ination and urged that dirty animals be 
refused entry at all abbattoirs. The EU, 
alarmed at reports of shoddy practices at 
British slaughterhouses, said last June 
that better controls would be a condition 
of any easing of the beef export ban. 

The British conduct of the beef crisis 
has been continually criticized in Brus- 
sels. and the European Commission on 
Thursday expressed surprise and con- 
cern at news of the withheld report. 

“We were not told about these prob- 
lems or the existence of this reporrand, 
given the situation with mad cow dis- 
ease, it is not just the Commission but 
the other European Union member 
stares which would have been very in- 
terested to have been kept informed.” 


said Gerry Kiely. spokesman for the 
agriculture commissioner, Franz Fisc ti- 
ler. 

In a raucous session in the House of 
Commons. Prime Minister John Major 
acknowledged that the report had not 
been made public or shared with key 
officials but said that it was “a routine 
report of which there are very many and 
which are not normally shown to min- 
ister." Raising his voice to overcome 
the jeers of opposition lawmakers. Mr. 
Major said: “Ministers did not receive 
it. that is true. It was a working doc- 
ument That’s exactly the point” 

Tony Blair, the leader of the Labour 
Party', said he found that explanation 
“extraordinary" and added in the kind 
of comment that is becoming more and 
more commonplace as the May general 
election draws closer, "When will 
someone in this government take re- 
sponsibility for the proper and com- 
petent administration of our affairs?” 

Douglas Hogg, the agriculture min- 
ister. who last month overcame a par- 
liamentary motion to censure him for 
his conduct of the mad cow crisis, was at 
pains again Thursday to hold off his foes 
in the Commons. Hobbling to the speak- 
er’s lectern on a plaster-casted and 
bandaged foot that he broke in a week- 
end fall down the stairs of his home, he 
explained that the report was “an in- 
terna] working document” that had 
been simply a “first draft” of an “in- 
ternal working document" and that Mr. 
Swann had been asked to “recast his 
contribution” but had been “unwilling 
to do so." 

A spokeswoman for the Agriculture 
Ministry said the report “was not toned 
down, it was just made more concise, 
and was certainly not suppressed.' ' She 
said it was available to anyone who 
asked for it. 

But Sir Hugh Pennington of Aber- 
deen University', the head of the expert 
group set up to investigate the e-coli 
outbreaks, said he had never been told of 
the findings. “I’m very annoyed that I 
have not seen this report or even been 
made aware of its existence." he said. 
"It is very difficult to ask to see 
something if you don’t know it ex- 
ists.” 

Mr. Swann said he was asked to put a 
“more positive emphasis” on the report 
in the interest of protecting the meat 
industry, which has seen itsprofits de- 
cline nearly S6 million since the find- 
ings of mad cow disease were dis- 
closed. .. .. . . . 

Ghe o* ftr steps Britain has taken to 
persuade thejEU to lift its ban has been 
the culling of all beef cattle aged over 30 
months, and that has been a boon to the 
slaughterhouse industry’, was had been 
sufferings from overcapacity. 


BRIEFLY 



T«tu PjuIi 'Th, ui'd 

Children paying homage Thursday at the Brussels service station where the body was found. 


Body Is Found in Brussels 

BRUSSELS — The police investigating Bel- 
gium's series of kidnappings and child murders 
said Thursday they had found the body of an- 
other young girl, hidden in the basement of a 
Brussels gasoline station. 

Investigators said rhe body was probably that 
of Loubna Benaissa, who disappeared in ] 992. 
when she was 9. She lived just 300 meters from 
the place where the body was discovered. 

ITie police said they had arrested a convicted 
pedophile. Patrick Derochette. 33. who worked 
as a mechanic at the service station. Three mem- 
bers of his family were also detained. 

But the police said they had found no apparent 
link between Mr. Derochette and Marc Dutroux. 
the convicted child-rapist who is being held in 
connection with a series of other killings of 
children. (APt 

Urban Vote Set in Bosnia 

COPENHAGEN — Municipal elections in 
Bosnia-Herzegovina will be held Sept. 13-14. 
Foreign Minister Niels Helveg Petersen of Den- 
mark said Thursday. 

Denmark currently holds the rotating chair- 
manship of the Organization for Security and 
Cooperation in Europe, under whose auspices 
the elections are to be held. 

The municipal vote was to have taken place 
alongside elections ro the three-person pres- 
idency last September. It was put off mostly 
because of international concern that the vote 
might not be free and fair. (APi 

Major Denies Allega tion 

LONDON — Prime Minister John Major has 
denied a claim that he told a former treasurer of 
the governing Conservative Party to seek a big 
cash donation from a Greek tycoon in 1991. 

With Britain’s next election due by Mav. the 


opposition Labour Party this week seized on the 
claim to question Mr. Major's judgment, al- 
though it conceded that he had done nothing 
legally wrong even if the claim were true. 

Lord McAJpine said in his new book “Once a 
Jolly Bagman." serialized in The Times this 
week, that, as a result of Mr. Major’s instruc- 
tions. he had met with the businessman and 
received £500.000 ($808,000) from him. Lord 
McAlpine did not name the businessman, but 
The Times identified him as the Greek shipping 
tycoon John Latsis. 

Mr. Major, in a BBC television interview, 
flatly denied the book's claim. “I did not ask 
Alastair McAlpine to approach anyone on behalf 
of the Conservative Party,” he said. (AP) 

TapieAjfair Revisited 

VALENCIENNES, France — A French court 
gave a former Socialist cabinet minister. Jacques 
Mellick, a one-year suspended prison sentence 
Thursday for lying in court to try to shield the 
former tycoon Bernard Tapie in a soccer scandaL 

The court, in the northern town of Valen- 
ciennes. barred Mr. Mellick from running for 
public office for five years and fined him 30,000 
francs ($5,200). The prosecutor had requested a 
15-month suspended sentence. 

The ruling ended a case that captivated France 
and has already landed Mr. Tapie in prison for 
rigging a game between his soccer club, Olym- 
pique de Marseille, and Valenciennes. 

Mr. Mellick had testified that he was in Mr. 
Tapie's Paris office June 17, 1993. and did not 
see a soccer coach who testified earlier that he 
was there at the time and said he was being 
bribed by Mr. Tapie to take responsibility for the 
match-rigging. 

Mr. Mellick was exposed by a photograph 
taken at a ceremony he attended mat day in 
Valenciennes, where he was mayor, and by re- 
cords of highway toll payments showing that he 
could not have arrived in Paris in time for the 
purported meeting with Mr. Tapie. (Reuters) 


Basque Reporters 
At Heart of Trial 
In ETA Bombing 


The As»M'iiiieJ Press 

HERNAN1, Spain — 
When the trial of two men 
accused of bombing a factory 
on behalf of the Basque sep- 
aratist group ETA begins, a 
pair of reporters from the rad- 
ical Basque newspaper Egin 
will have front-row seats. 

They will be the defen- 
dants. 

The reporters, Fernando 
Alonso and Andoni Murga. 
are accused of bombing the 
clothing factory in retaliation 
for its owners' refusal to pay 
the separatists a “revolution 
tax.” 

Operating from offices in 
an industrial park in the blue- 
collar city of Hemani in 
northern Spain's Basque re- 
gion. Egin — the name means 
"To Do’ ’ — has long been an 
irritant to tbe government. 

While mainstream news 
organizations criticize ETA 
and its supporters as “los vi- 
olences " — the violent ones 
— Egin depicts them as free- 
dom fighters. 

The group is accused by the 
authorities of being respon- 
sible for violent acts that have 
killed nearly 800 people since 
1968. 

In addition, the line be- 
tween Egin and ETA has be- 
come increasingly blurred. 

The tabloid's top investig- 
ative reporter. Pepe Rei, was 
charged in August 1994 with 
compiling a list of Basque 
businessmen to be targeted 
for extortion, kidnapping or 
murder by ETA. His trial is 
scheduled to begin Monday. 
If convicted, he faces up to 
eight years in prison. 

The governing Popular 
Party’s leader in the Basque 
region, Carlos Iturgaiz, wants 
the courts to punish Egin if its 
reporters are found to have 
been working for ETA, an 
outlawed group fighting for 
the creation of an independ- 
ent Basque nation. 

“If they’re pulling out a 
newspaper, that’s one thing," 
Mr. Iturgaiz said. “But if 
they’re collaborating with a 
terrorist group, the courts 
should shut them down.” 

Joseba Egibar. a leader of 
rhe conservative Basque Na- 
tionalist Panv. which opposes 
ETA, said closing the 60.000- 
circulation daily “would only 
heighten tension and serve as 
a rallying point for its sup- 
porters.’ ’ 


For Mr. Rei, it is a case of 
freedom of the press. Mr. Rei 
denies that he, Mr. Alonso or 
Mr. Murga work for the 
Basque group. 

"This is part of the gov- 
ernment's attempt to crack 
down on those who favor or 
have sympathy for the armed 
movement,” Mr. Rei said. 

Spam’s major journalism 
associations have not made 
statements on the arrests. 

Mr. Rei’s case, however, 
has gained international at- 
tention, with political com- 
mentators such as Noam 
Chomsky, a professor at the 
Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, taking up his 
cause. 

Mr. Rei was arrested after 
the police searched the offices 
of Egin in December 1994 
and found what they called a 
list of potential ETA targets. 
The same names were ai- 


The police says the 
two journalists 
were filmed 
entering the village 
of Salvatierra 
shortly before the 
bomb exploded. 

Legedly found on an ETA 
leader arrested in Fiance six 
months earlier. 

As for Mr. Alonso and Mr. 
Murga. the police said a 
videocamera recorded their 
cars entering the village of 
Salvatierra shortly before the 
bomb exploded at the factory 
there on Aug. 15, 1996, and 
recorded their cars leaving 
soon after. 

Their attorneys said they 
doubted the existence of the 
videotape. 

The police say a search of 
Mr. Alonso's apartment yiel- 
ded 60 pounds <27 kilograms ) 
of explosives, a submachine 
gun. a 9mra pistol — the type 
favored by ETA assassins — 
and about 200 rounds of am- 
munition. 

Mr. Alonso and Mr. Murga 
are charged with being mem- 
bers of an armed group, plant- 
ing the bomb and possession 
of explosives and weapons. 
They face up to 52 years in 
prison if convicted. No trial 
date has been set. 


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Mayor of Boris 
'Vows to Fight 
New Charges 

Reuters 

PARIS — Paris’s Gaullist mayor. 
Jean Tiberi. vowed on Thursday to stay 
in his job despite being investigated, 
together with his wife, on suspicion of 
misusing public funds. 

Mr. Tiberi. who succeeded Jacques 
Chirac as mayor of the French capital 
when his mentor was elected president 
m 1995. said he was being formally 
probed over a payment made to his wife 
out of public funds and paid into the 

couple’s joint bank account. 

"It is being wrongly alleged dial t I 
< -intervened to have my wife hired by the 
Essonne General Council, Mr. Tiberi 
said in a statement- referring to a Pans- 
area department. 

He said neither he nor his wife had 
anything to reproach themselves for. I 
Will cany on with my mission, ne 

The case came as a &e&h b!ow forMr. 
Tiberi. who has come under fire m a 
housing scandal and a probe mm sus- 
pected illicit funding of his Gaullist RPR 
party by Paris's housing authority- 
j’The Paris city hall said Mr. 

fcmginVestisatedon si^picion of Iteing 

an accomplice to misuse o p 
funds. His wife, Xaviere, 

(.laced under in'^nianon.nDe ter 

&ived 200 000 francs ($34,000) from 
ihe&mte council foratt-paS* report 
largely copied out of a book. 



L mvI QmnzMD.-Tbii frv 

Mayor Jean Tiberi refuses to quit 

Xavier Dugoin, Gaullist president of 
the council, is also being investigated for 
allegedly paying the sum to Mrs. Tiberi. 
He was reported to have told inves- 
tigators that Mr. Tiberi himself decided 
the amount to be paid to his wife. 

Mr. Tiberi said he has been harassed 
by magistrates, media and political op- 
ponents since he took over from Mr. 
Chirac. 

"Over the past six months, this cam- 
paign has become a real manhunt," he 
said. “Mv private life and that of my 
family have been searched, my bank 
accounts have been scrutinized.” He 
said that “ray name has been be- 
smirched, my wife insulted.” 

Mr. Tiberi has also come under attack 
after his son. Dominique, was found to 
have rented an apartment, lavishly ren- 
ovated at public expense, from the city 
hall while letting out his own home. 


End of an Anti-Communist Monument 

Gdansk Shipyard in Poland Succumbs to Pressures of Capitalism 


CunpieJ try Oar Strj F ’vm [tupaichn 

GDANSK, Poland — The last 3,800 
workers at the bankrupt Gdansk 
shipyard, where Lech Walesa founded 
the Solidarity union 17 years ago. 
learned Thursday they would lose their 
jobs. 

“I have to dismiss everyone.” the 
yard's receiver. Wieslaw Szaj, said. 
“From today we are beginning the pro- 
cess of laying off 3,800 shipyard work- 
ers.” Mr". Szaj gave the message to 
employees holding a rally at the yard’s 
management offices. 

He said he would invite bids next 
week to buy the yard. 

“This will, however, be an offer to 
sell a shipyard that is no longer func- 
tioning,” he said. 

The Gdansk shipyard suffered from 
Mr. Walesa’s protection when he be- 
came president from 1990 to 1995. The 
yard avoided restructuring, kept too 
many employees on die payroll and paid 
generous benefits, all subsidized by the 
government and unsupported by prof- 
itable construction contracts. 

Meanwhile. Poland’s two other big 
yards. Szczecin and Gdynia, stream- 
lined themselves and joined the ranks of 
Europe's leading shipyards. But they 
are reducing their work forces, leaving 
little opportunity for the Gdansk work- 
ers. 

The closure announcement followed 
a decision Wednesday by one of Po- 
land’s largest banks. Bank Pekao SA. to 
refuse a S100 million loan to The yard. 
Last month a consortium of six other 


banks had refused to advance credit to 
the shipyard, saying it was too risky 
because the government could not fully 
guarantee the loans. 

“Some men wept like children. We 
are all like in a state of shock now,” said 
Bogdan Oleszek, the yard’s spokesman 
for Solidarity, which in 1980 became 
the first independent trade union formed 
in the Communist bloc. 

The government, which owns 60 per- 
cent of the shipyard, had been seeking 
loans and contracts to keep it partially 
alive. 

Prime Minister Wlodzimierz Cimo- 
szewicz, in a last-minute initiative, ask- 
ed the successful Szczecin shipyard fur- 
ther west along the Baltic coast to 
consider cooperation with Gdansk to 
save some of the yard's jobs and plant 


The Szczecin yard had said it would 
consider subcontracting to Gdansk the 
manufacture of some pans for its ships, 
but said it would have to be “very 
cautious.” 

Hope dwindled for the Gdansk yard, 
which has operated under bankruptcy 
rules since August when its debts 
reached 415 million zlotys ($135 mil- 
lion) and banks refused further crediL 

“Let’s not enter any more talks about 
saving the shipyard because it's just a 
waste of time,” the yard’s Solidarity 
union chief Jerzy Borowczak told the 
crowd of about 1 ,200 stunned workers. 

“My whole world has collapsed.” 
said a weeping office worker. Ewa Ser- 
watka, 46. “I don't know if 1'U be able 
to get work because they only want 
young people now. ’’ ( Reuters , AP) 


Swiss Companies Add to Holocaust Fund 


The Associated Press 

GENEVA — Swiss companies are 
adding 65 million francs to a human- 
itarian fund to help victims of the Holo- 
caust. the Swiss Federation of Commerce 
and Industry said Thursday. 

The contribution, equivalent to $44 
million, brings to 265 million francs the 
amount in the fund begun by the three 
largest Swiss banks a month ago under 
pressure from Jewish groups. 

The fund was set up to help impov- 
erished victims of the Holocaust, includ- 
ing Jews, Gypsies and homosexuals, as a 


goodwill gesture while investigations 
continued on the banks’ handling of the 
assets of people murdered by the Nazis. 

Tbe humanitarian fund is in addition 
to other private fund-raising efforts for 
Holocaust victims and to government 
plans for a 7 billion franc ($4.7 billion) 
foundation to aid victims of the Holo- 
caust and others. Finance Minister Kas- 
par Villiger said the foundation was in- 
tended to assist a broad range of victims 
in Switzerland and abroad and to relieve 
suffering from past, present and future 
genocide and disasters. 


U.S.-French Dispute 
On NATO Command 
Is Calming Down 


The .\ssocnitcJ Press 

PARIS — France and the United 
States appeared headed Thursday for an 
agreement to put off changing NATO's 
Southern Command, the key sticking 
point in talks to restructure the alliance. 

With a North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization summit meeting due in July 
in Madrid, the French Defense Ministry 
played down France’s demand that 
Washington cede to a European the 
Southern Command, which watches 
over tbe potentially volatile Mediter- 
ranean. 

“There has been an excessive po- 
larization of issue on the Southern Com- 
mand,” a ministry spokesman, Pierre 
Servem, said Thunday. 

As the European Union tries to es- 
tablish a common defense and foreign 
policy, Paris has said NATO must be- 
come more European-run before 
France, with Europe’s largest army, 
ends its 31-year-old estrangement from 
the integrated command. Washington 
opposes the idea of a European-run 
Southern Command because the com- 
mand includes the U.S. Sixth Fleet 

Mr. Servent’s comments came two 
days after the U.S. defense secretary, 
William Cohen, said in Bonn that Wash- 
ington could agree to rotating the com- 
mand In a joint news conference with 
Defense Minister Volker Ruhe of Ger- 
many. Mr. Cohen also agreed that a 
decision on the command could be put 
off for five or six years. 









PAGE 6 


Pause Called 

In Albanian 


Hostilities 


Accord Is ‘a First Step' 
In Possible. G>mpromise 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, MARCH 7. 199: 


INTERNATIONAL 


SHi Zaire Rebels Rej ect Call 


m 




For International Force 






Insurgents Fear Monitors Would Shield Mobutu 


Ci^npdnih\ i Stotf Fmn Dupffi hes 

TIRANA. Albania — President Sali 
Berisha and political rivals agreed 
Thursday that the military would sus- 
pend offensive operations against armed 
protesters for 48 hours and appealed to 
the insurgents to hand in their 
weapons. 

The statement offered a possible way 
out of the rebellion gripping southern 
Albania, where the government has ac- 
knowledged it has lost control. 

One opposition leader, Neritan Ceka, 
said the agreement was “a first step" 
toward a political compromise and that 
talks would continue Saturday on the 
question of naming a new prime min- 
ister. 

The 48-hour period is to begin at 6 
A.M. Friday, the statement said. 

Weeks of unrest that erupted into vi- 
olence led Mr. Berisha to impose a state 
of emergency Sunday. He is under in- 
tense pressure from abroad to resolve the 
crisis, which started with protests over 
the failure of high-risk investment 
schemes, and he has lost his credibility 
with many Albanians. 

In the southern part of the country, 
militants dynamited one small stone 
bridge to prevent government tanks 
from reaching the city of Sarande and 
reportedly blew up a second nearby 
bridge as well. 

A Greek television station said pro- 
testers in Sarande had seized seven tor- 
pedo boats and taken to sea overnight, 
preparing to battle a rumored invasion. 
But there appeared to have been no effort 
by the army to make a landing. 

On Wednesday, military jets bombed 
targets near Sarande, and anti-govern- 
ment militants commandeered tanks and 
fired off anti-aircraft guns. 

The two sides fired at each other across 
a river east of VIore. the city at the center 
of the conflict. Albania's foreign minister. 
Tritan Shehu, has acknowledged that the 
situation in VIore. Sarande and Livina is 
“out of control." 

In Washington, the State Department 
said Thursday that the United States had 
no plans to evacuate Americans from 
Albania and had not ordered a draw- 
down of its diplomatic staff there. 

“The U.S. ambassador has not re- 
quested any kind of military assist- 
ance," the department spokesman. 
Nicholas Bums, said. 

Mr. Ceka. of the Democratic Alliance, 
indicated that the opposition wanted to 
talk about much more than a cease-fire. 
He said new elections were part of "the 
most important formula that could 
change the situation." 

The entire country, not only towns out 
of government control, faced the same 
problem. Mr. Ceka said, adding. "It is 
the risk of civil war.” 

There were skeptics among the op- 
position delegation, too. Paskal Milo of 
the Social Democratic Party accused Mr. 
Berisha and his ruling Democratic Party 
of trying to win time by offering the 
negotiations. 

"We discussed only for about 10 
minutes fresh elections." Mr. Milo said, 
"out of almost five hours of talks.” 

The government of Prime Minister 
AJeksander Meksr resigned last week in 
an effort to quell the protests, which 
were a response to fraudulent pyramid 
schemes in which nearly every Albanian 
family lost money. 

The agreement said a commission of 
experts including members of all polit- 
ical parties would be formed to inves- 
tigate the fraudulent schemes. 

It was not known how the armed 
protesters would respond to the pro- 
posal. Thomas Papagika. the prefect of 
Sarande, who has joined the protesters, 
said before the announcement that an 1 1 - 
member committee formed to run the 
town arj organize its defenses had set 
condit' .ins for returning control of 
Sarande to the government. 

They said they would only do so if Mr. 
Berisha resigned, a coalition govern- 
ment were formed, new elections were 
planned and reparations were made to 
Albanians who had lost money in the 
investment funds. 

"We will give up the guns only when 
Berisha's government falls." Mr. Papa- 
gika said. 

In previous round-table discussions, 
Mr. Berisha only met officials from 
small parties represented in Parliament, 
but this time the entire opposition was in 
attendance. (AP. Reuters) 



'TJfrP' 









Wb'Vjh Knijju TT*- IV>» 

Zairian rebels walking Thursday through the deserted Tiugi-Tingi refugee camp, captured over the weekend. 


ZAIRE: Rebels Are Hailed as Liberators 


Continued from Page I 

of a fight and the population cheered on 


the whole battle.” he said. "1 refuse to 
fight." 

Like most Zairian soldiers. Mr. 


c r 

CAVEROON ( 


ZAIRE 


the invaders. A delegation of city leaders Tshabigera said his reason for deserting 
met with the rebel commanders in Ka- was drat he had not been paid. 


Ana of r 
Detail 


Bukavu, 

\ ' 


Kinshasa 


lima a week before the attack to let them 
know they would be welcome, local 
authorities said. 

The rebel forces have taken place after 
place in eastern Zaire in the same way. 
There were few visible signs of fighting 
at the Kindu airport, and the city seemed 
to have been damaged more by looters 
than by fighting. 

The Zairian government's soldiers 
have little left to fight for. people here 
say. More than 81 turned in their 
weapons to rebel officers here Wed- 
nesday, put on their civilian clothes and 
made plans to return home. 

One of them was Nyangezi Tshabi- 
gera. a 35-year-old former corporal, who 
fought in Bukavu when it fell to the 
rebels last October and then retreated to 
Kindu. 

This time, when the word went out the 
Tebels were coming, his commanding 
officer came to his house and told him to 
join the defenders. He refused to come 
outside. 

"I stayed inside my house throughout 


As is the case in much of Zaire, the 
banks in Kindu have not been open since 
1991, teachers have not been paid in 
three years, and civil servants survive on 
bribes. Until the rebels arrived, women 
did not wear jewelry, and well-to-do 
people went barefoot because shoes 
would mark them as targets for extortion 
by the army. Until the rebels arrived, 
people huddled in their houses and did 
not walk in the street unless it was ab- 
solutely necessary for fear they would be 
beaten and robbed by soldiers. 

Mr. Kabila's rebels, the Alliance of 
Democratic Forces for the Liberation of 
the Congo (Zaire), seem to have cap- 
italized a deep dissatisfaction with the 
government bred during years of mis- 
rule. In places tike Kindu. they are being 
welcomed by many who say any gov- 
ernment would be better than Marshal 
Mobutu's regime of neglect. 

In Kindu. Wabula Wabingwa, a theo- 
logy teacher, said: “The hatred was 
there for a long time, because the system 


in 


.fiS* 

Tanganyika 


• Kisangani 


ZAIRE 


T 


RWANDA) 
■ taka Knv) 


Lake 

Tanganyika ■ 


cj- Lase n 
JBURUN 


to say anything. Once this movement got 
started people could speak up.” 

Mr. Wabula added: "Africa is a tribal 
continent and we are very tribe-con- 
scious. They are frightened that we may 


was so rigid. But no one had any courage just go to another kind of colonization/ " 


Reuters 

KINDU. Zaire — Rebels rejected 
Thurs day a call by Zaire s government, 
which is under heavy pressure from 
rebel advances, for international mon- 
itors to be sent to eastern Zaire. 

The UN World Food Program said 
two planes over the east spotted 
Rwandan refugees arriving in the town 
of Ubundu, apparently from the Tingi- 
Tingi refugee camp, which was overrun 
by rebels last Friday. 

“International monitors could be- 
come an interposition force and it would 
just result once again in the protection of 
Mobutu Sese Seko by his foreign 
friends." the rebels’ justice official. 
Mwenze Kongolo. said in Kindu. 

Marshal Mobutu, 66, who seized 
power in 1965. is now in Europe, where 
he bad surgery for prostate cancer last 
August. 

Kinshasa on Wednesday abruptly 
urged the United Nations to send in 
monitors to oversee a withdrawal of 
foreign troops and the implementation 
of a UN peace plan that it had previously 
dismissed as too timid. 

Kinshasa accuses Uganda, Rwanda 
and Burundi of sending troops to Zaire to 
fight alongside rebels of the Alliance of 
Democratic Forces for die Liberation of 
Congo (Zaire ). who are closing in on the 
principal northeastern town of Kisan- 
gani. 

The three neighboring countries and 
the rebels deny the accusations. 

Mr. Mwenze said that the "only for- 
eign troops fighting in this war" were 
the government's mercenaries and 
former Rwandan soldiers. "There is 
nothing to monitor on this side.” he said 
"We have no foreign assistance." 

Kenya said Thursday it would con- 
vene a summit meeting on the conflict on 
March 1 9. but the rebel leader. Laurent 
Kabila, was not invited. 

A Kenyan Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man. David Kikaya. said Kenya had 
asked Marshal Mobutu to attend the one- 
day talks to "advance the search for 
peace” with President Nelson Mandela 
of South Africa and five other African 
heads of state. 

Since starting their rebellion in Oc- 


tober. the rebels have captured a swain 
of the mineral-rich east more than 1 .000 
kilometers long and. in places, more than 
300 kilometers wide. 

In Nairobi, a spokeswoman for the 
World Food Program said planes ferrying 
food to the town of Punia confirmed that 
Rwandan Hutu refugees were arriving iirg 
Ubundu. 130 kilometers northwest ol w 
Tingi-Tingi. About 1 70,000 refugees fled 
Tingi -Tin gi last Friday. 

The spokeswoman said that aid agen- 
cies hoped to send in a mission by plane 
on Friday, but that that might prove 
difficult because the Ubundu airstrip 
was last used in 1963. although work 
was done on it eight months ago. 


Peruvian Guerrilla 
Suspends Talks 


LIMA — Rebels holding 72 hos- 
tages at the Japanese ambassador’s 
residence in Lima said Thursday 
that they would not attend the next 
round of negotiations with the gov- 
ernment. which had been scheduled 
for Friday. 

Nestor Cerpa Cartotini, leader of 
the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary 
Movement, said in a conversation 
over walkie-talkies from inside the 
residence that the rebels had de- 
cided not to attend what would have 
been the 1 0th round of talks because 
they feared the government was 
planning an attack on the diplomatic 
mansion in their absence. 


"AU of a sudden they are waiting 


for us to leave to start an attack, 
taking advantage of oor absence/ ' 
Mr. Cerpa said. (Reuters l 


Truce Is Broken , 
Sierra Leone Says 


CHINA: Xiangyang Pauses to Honor Deng 


Continued from Page 1 


ceivable. Sichuan is not flourishing as 
much as China's coastal areas, like 
Guangdong or Shanghai. Nor is it as poor 
as isolated inland areas like Guizhou. 
Yet in all of these areas, the key levers of 
power — appointing regional governors 
and military commanders — remain 
firmly in Beijing’s hand. 

What changed sharply under Mr. 
Deng’s rule was the role of local of- 
ficials, who stopped obstructing people 
from a chance to make money, either on 
a small scale like the Bright Bright Op- 
tical Shop here in the village of Xi- 
angyang or on a far larger one like the 
Hope Group. China's largest privately 
owned company, which is based in 
nearby Chengdu, the capital of 
Sichuan. 

Instead of wielding power by block- 
ing people’s actions, officials now try to 
profit from them. While stories of bribes 
and official extortion are common, in 
many cases officials find legal or in- 
formal ways to share the wealth of local 
businesses, through fees or favors or 
informal taxes. 

“Farmers and officials and business- 
men all gain from our business." said 
Yu Guangming, a senior executive at 
Hope, a conglomerate whose core busi- 
ness is producing animal feed. “It is 
deeply entrenched in the system, with 
clients and supporters at every level.” 

Without going into details of Hope’s 
official contacts, saying they were “very 
complex," Mr. Yu said the conglom- 
erate could operate smoothly only with 
help from officials at every level of 
government. 

It seems to be working. It is telling. 


the commune system that was already 
coming apart by itself. Mr. Yu and other 
Hope employees uniformly credit Mr. 
Deng, who was bom and reared in 
Sichuan. 

Chengdu saw what was probably the 
largest spontaneous expression of emo- 
tion for Mr. Deng. On Feb. 20. rhe day 
after he died, more than 10.000 people 
gathered in the square at the center of 
town, many of them bringing flowers 
and placing them on a tall row of steps in 
a central square. 

The police let the people gather peace- 
fully, participants said. But the flowers 
were removed overnight, to keep anyone 
from getting the idea that momentum 
could build to a point where other de- 
mands might be voiced, as happened at 
the beginning of the student movement 
in Beijing in 1989. Yet few. if any. 
mourners seemed to object. 

“We got to take them for a day. and that 
was enough," said Gu Fan, who works in 
a bookstall not far from the square, where 
3 towering statue of Mao is now over- 
shadowed by advertisements for Samsung 
Electronics and Boss ini Clothing. “We 
wanted to show respect. Nothing more." 

Not everyone is so solemn. 

The three young women outside the 
Fragrant Bamboo Garden Karaoke Bar 



FREETOWN. Sierra Leone — 
The government on Thursday ac- 
cused rebels of killing civilians and 
ambushing vehicles and ordered the 
army and Kamajor hunters to flush 
out those responsible. 

Deputy Defense Minister Samuel 
Hinga Norman said the rebel leader 
Foday Sankoh was trying to derail a 
peace pact signed in Ivory Coast on 
Nov. 30, and urged all rebels to 
report immediately to four demo- 
bilization camps. 

The rebels say the government 
broke the cease-fire by sending 
Kamajors against their positions. 
Independent sources said it was un- 
clear whether rebels, former rebels, 
dissident soldiers or bandit groups 
were responsible for the attacks. 

(Reuters J 


Iranian Plans Visit 
To Saudi Arabia 


WiFjimTVJIt* ViIIbih 


Wang Li, Liu Jie and Xiao Yun. from left, are of the generation that grew 
up with the Deng reforms in motion. They were unmoved by his death. 


here in the middle of die afternoon, 
smoking cigarettes and joking, for in- 
stance. 

"When I heard Deng was dead. I was 
speechless/’ Xiao Yun said, deadpan, 
tefore bursting out into peals of laughter, 
which was echoed by her two friends. 

One of them. Liu Ji, added: "I called 


my mother, bur I didn't know what to 
say. She hung up on me.” They all 
laughed some more. The three women 
said they had not joined the townspeople 
who crammed into the nearby courtyard 
for the ceremony to honor Mr. Deng. 

"What for?" Liu Ji asked bluntly. "It 
has nothing to do with me." 


DUBAI, United Arab Emirates 
— The Iranian foreign minister 
plaas to visit Saudi Arabia next 
week, the first trip to the kingdom 
by a senior Iranian official in more 
than three years, a Saudi-ou ned 
newspaper said Thursday. 

It quoted Gulf diplomatic sources 
as saying Ati Akbar Velavati 
wanted to discuss how to improve 
relations and restore trust between 
two of the world's biggest oil pro- 
ducers. " (Renters l 


RUSSIA: In Return to Political Arena, Yeltsin lows Before Parliament to Restore Order ’ 


Continued from Page 1 


by reformers and centrists but criticized 
by Communists. Some members of Par- 
liament joked aloud during the address. 
"Not one word of accounting for 


“almost everyone as culprits of the fail- 
ure of the policy and the loss of control, 
including the government, the Parlia- 


been ill almost continuously .since he was 
elected to a second term last summer. 
“The president today was just exactly 


ment. the prosecutor’s office and com- how we loved him back in *87/* said the 


perhaps, that with Hope in the process of what's been done since the last three 


a restructuring, its largest subsidiary is 
changing its name in Chinese from Xi- 
wang, meaning “hope.” to Qiangda, 
meaning “strong and big.” 

Asked what is the worst that could 
happen to the Hope Group. Mr. Yu 
replied: ‘ ‘The whole company could be 
confiscated. But I can’t imagine the cir- 
cumstances that would bring that on.” 

Though China scholars now’ debate 
whether Mr. Deng’s early agricultural 
reforms were really initialed by senior 
officials or simply formalized an end to 


speeches." the Communist Party leader, 
Gennadi Zyuganov, remarked. He added 
that Mr. Yeltsin had provided "loud 
words and no analysis about what, and 
how and who will do this.' ' 

“I want to hear about w hy the econ- 
omy doesn't work, why pensions aren't 
paid.” Mr. Zyuganov said. "Law and 
order in power begins with the pres- 
ident’s team.” • 

Mikhail Gorbachev, the former Soviet 
leader and long a bitter rival of Mr. 
Yeltsin’s, said that he had identified 


pany directors." 

"But it is his policy, his team, his 
decisions." Mr. Gorbachev said. 

Gennadi Seleznov. a Communist who 
is speaker of the lower house, the State 
Duma, said Mr. Yeltsin had been “far 
more self-critical" and “far more real- 
istic." in this year's address, reflecting the 


situation in Russia. Also, he said. Mr. 
Yeltsin was “far more understandable in 
general about how to climb out of this 
situation." 

Mr. Yeltsin’s speech was half as long 
as last year’s, but his confident delivery 
and steady diction may diminish cri- 
ticism that he is too sick to lead. He has 


mayor of Moscow. Yuri Luzhkov, who 
also serves in die upper house of Par- 
liament. “Now everybody can under- 
stand and believe that he has regained his 
health." 

Mr. Yeltsin’s address was aimed 
squarely at his political rivals. Although 
he will not again face the voters, polls 
show that his standing has plummeted in 
recent months. He now trails Mr. Lebed. 
Mr. Zyuganov and Mr. Luzhkov. 

At the outset of his address, he said a 
March 27 national work stoppage being 
organized by the Communists would be 
“quite legit imaie." 

“This is an alarm." he said. "This is a 


sign that people are running out of pa- 
tience. Lack of will and indifference, ir- 
responsibility and incompetence in deal- 
ing with state problems — that’s how 
people assess present authorities in Rus- 
sia. 1 have to admit this is the correct 
assessment." 

Mr. Yeltsin did not accept direct 
blame for Russia's lethargy, but eril- 
icized his government, led by Mr. 
Chernomyrdin. 

“The executive branch has turned out 
to be incapable of working without the 
president shouting at it."Tie said. De- 
spite his displeasure, he gave no in- 
dication that he would dismiss Mr. 
Chernomyrdin. He also assailed the Par- 
liament for adopting laws entailing gov- 
ernment expenditures without having 
ihe means to pay for them. 


INDONESIA: Opposition Leader Is Charged With Subversion DRUGS: Colombia ; in Swipe at UJS-, Interrupts Drug Eradication 


Continued from Page 1 


"President Suharto evidently thinks 
that it is very’ important for the appear- 
ance of legitimacy for Golkar to get a 
good turnout." a Western diplomat said. 
"He apparently feels that by acting 
tough now. he can nip this incipient 
protest movement in the bud." 

Mr. Suharto may also be seeking to 
reassert his authority at the start of a key 
period in Indonesia's political calendar, 
following a number of serious ethnic and 
religious riots in various parts of the 
country in recent months. 

Mr. Bintang's wife, Ema. asserted 
that Mr. Suharto — who has ruled In- 
donesia for 30 years and seems set to be 
chosen by his party for another five-year 
term in March — had ordered her hus- 
band’s arrest "because he rejected the 
general election." 

Last week, seven district branches of 
the United Development Party said they 
would boycott the election campaign, 
which begins next month. They contend 
that the restrictions on campaigning dis- 


advantage the opposition. The party, 
which draws much of its backing from 
Muslims who comprise the overwhelm- 
ing majority of Indonesia's 200 million 
population, is one of only three, in- 
cluding Golkar, permitted to contest the 
election. 

An independent election committee is 
preparing to monitor the voting in May in 
Jakarta and eighi other major cities, de- 
spite government objections that such sur- 
veillance is unnecessary and may be il- 
legal. Gunawan Mohammad, chairman of 
the panel, said he was concerned that in 
the absence of a fair electoral process 
people were resorting to other means to 
express their grievances and achieve their 
objectives. 

He said that those w ho did not want to 


He said that those w ho did not want to 
vote should not be harassed by the au- 
thorities. 


Mr. Suharto last week urged people to 
vote, saying that. Ihey had a major in- 
terest in doing so. 

While there is no law in Indonesia 
compelling anyone to vote, a high turnout 
has always been considered a success for 


the government, and Golkar goes all out 
to achieve it. According to the official 
results of the last elections in 1992. 
Golkar took 68 percent of the vote on a 90 
percent turnout of the electorate. 

The ethnic rioting, which presents a 
challenge to Mr. Suharto, is seen by 
many analysts as a reflection of increas- 
ing popular discontent with the gov- 
ernment over perceived corruption, ab- 
uses of power and the wide gap between 
rich and poor. The most recent flare-up. 
in the province of West Kalimantan on 
Borneo island in February, pined in- 
digenous Dyakx. most of whom are 
Christian, against Muslim migrants. 

Die Indonesian Muslim Student Or- 
ganization said Wednesday that a three- 
member team appointed by it and other 
youth groups visited West Kalimantan 
from Feb. 7 to Feb. 14 and concluded 
that 1 .200 people were missing. 

The government disputed the finding. 
Military officials last month said that 
about 300 people had died in the clashes, 
but later said that this figure was incorrect 
and that an inquiry was under way. 


Continued from Page I 


used in making heroin, to be vital in 
countering hemispheric drug trafficking. 

In addition to being the world ]s 
largest producer of cocaine. Colombia is 
the second-largest grower of coca, sur- 
passing Bolivia this year and trailing 
only Peru. Colombia also has seen a 
rapid increase in poppy cultivation. 

Efforts to destroy coca plants, grown 
largely in areas where Marxist guerrillas 
maintain a strong presence, are dan- 
gerous and politically costly. Heli- 
copters escorting the planes must some- 
times fire at the ground to deter attack 
from the growers. Lust year, coca fann- 
ers fought pitched battles with police 
trying to disrupt their efforts, saying 
coca is the only crop from which they 
can make enough money to survive. 

Suspension of the crop- killing flights 
comes on the heels of Fri Jay s announce- 
ment by rhe Clinton administration that, 
for the second year in a row. it would not 
certify Colombia — a pronouncement 
that triggers U.S. sanctions. Washington 


has denied such certification to only six 
nations — Colombia. Nigeria. Afghan- 
istan. Burma. Iran and Syria. 

Mr. Samper’s decision is the latest 
blow to once strong tics between the 
United States and Colombia, a relation- 
ship (hat has deteriorated since Mr. 
S:unper was accused of accepting S6 mil- 
lion from the Cali cocaine cartel for hi< 
1994 presidential campaign. Mr. Samper 
has denied the allegations, but U.S. of- 
ficials have called them "credible." 

In Washington, the State Depart mem 
spokesman. Nicholas Bums, noted that 
by U.S. calculations Colombian coca 
cultivation had increased by 32 percent 
from 1995 to I99b. He said the United 
States had received no explanation for 
Wednesday’s decision, "hut we hope 
that it has been taken lor technical and 
not for policy reasons." 

■ U.S. Rebuffs Cartel tin Evidence 


The jailed Cali cartel bosses Miguel 
and Gilhcno Rodrigue/, offered^ to 
provide the United Slates evidence im- 
plicating President Samper in drug cor- 


ruption. The Associated Press reported * 
Thursday from Bogota, quoting Am- v 
bassador Frechette. 

Mr. Frechette said Miguel Rodrig- 
uez’s son. William, made a similar offer 
in a meeting with the former count r\ 
chief of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Ad- 
ministration. Tony Sennecu. who left 
Colombia last year. He did not elaborate 
on the circumstances or dates. 

"We’re not trying to arrive at any 
agreement with them." Mr. Frechette 
said of the Rodriguez brothers in a Wed- 
nesday interview with QAP television. 
"We want them to he judged and to pay 
the penalty. This matter of persecuting 
President Samper is not the policy of the 
United Stales." 

Mr. Frechette said William Rodriguez 
offered to provide the United States with 
all the Cali cartel’s smuggling routes and 
details of its operations if U.S. law en- 
forcement agreed to stop pursuing his * 
lather and uncle. 

"The response of my go\ eminent 
was a resounding. 'No. We re going, to 
bring you Injustice, period.' ” he said. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 


PAGE? 


FOREIGN INVESTMENT IN RUSSIA IN PERIL 

An Open Letter 

to U.S. Vice President Albert Gore 
and Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin 

Dear Vice President Gore and Prime Minister Chernomyrdin: 

A situation is erupting in Russia that now directly threatens the principles and progress of the Gore-Chemomyrdin Commission in 
opening Russia to international trade and investment. The very existence of foreign investors who have helped turn around 
Russian industry and brought hundreds of thousands of jobs, benefits and profits to the people of Russia is at stake. 

I should know. My name is David Reuben, I am an international businessman, and one of Russia’s largest foreign investors and 
employers. My story should serve as a warning to foreigners who wish to invest in Russia and to leaders who believe Russia is 
committed to true open market partnerships. 

My company, Trans- World Metals, was among the first to enter the Russian marketplace six years ago, when dozens of industries 
were being privatized. We went where no one else would go. We made long term investments of hundreds of 
millions of dollars in plant, equipment, and operations to revitalize Russia’s moribund aluminum and steel industries. 

Even though we accepted the huge investment risk, we did not seek out majority shareholder control, believing it to be more 
appropriately placed in the hands of Russian nationals. 

The record will show that with our Russian national team, we turned these industries profitably around into well-run, 
productive enterprises. In the process, the market infrastructure was enormously strengthened; reliable, well-paying 
jobs with medical, housing and day care benefits for tens of thousands of formerly unemployed Russian workers were 
created; and local community sponsorships in health care, education, culture, sports, and the arts were established. 

Every region we operated in has benefitted. The free market system succeeded. 

We took all the risks, encouraged by the Commission’s effort, and have been fortunate enough to reap some of the rewards. Yet 
today we stand on the verge of seeing all our investments and achievements destroyed. 

Why is this happening today to Trans- World Metals and other major foreign investors in Russia? 

The answer: a craven, political power play, Russian-style. This power play is aimed at confiscating certain foreign 
investments and facilities without due process. The tools being used are a well-organized political effort and a media 
disinformation campaign at high levels. Led by officials within the Ministry of the Interior who want to “reprivatize” these 
companies and by renegade Russian banks who see an opportunity to profit without taking risk or making real investments, the 
attempt to steal our company places all private enterprise at risk. 

Just last week, Mr. Kulikov, the Interior Minister, made a rare speech and demanded control of the aluminum industry 
for national security reasons, citing old and discredited allegations as his rationale. The Russian people are being told 
that curtailing foreign capitalists’ independence and retaking control of the aluminum industry is essential for their survival. 

The reality is that if established foreign investors are forced out of the Russian market, not only will the banks get a 
sizeable piece of the metals industry for free and the State will levy millions of new protectionist duties or taxes and impose 
non-tariff barriers but the international market for investment in Russia will also totally dry up. 

The takeover campaign is counterproductive to the long term interests of the Russian people, and completely foreign to the spirit of 
the Gore-Chemomyrdin Commission. If allowed to continue, this scheme will deliver a severe blow to U.S. - Russian trade 
relations and have immediate negative consequences on the world’s second largest aluminum market and Trans-World’s ability to 

stabilize it. 

If this Russian takeover agenda is allowed to succeed, it will close the book on what would have been substantial progress and a 
real East- West partnership envisioned during the past four years by the Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission. 

How American and Russian officials respond to this strong-arm threat will have long term consequences impacting both the 
political and economic stability of Russia, as well as that nation’s economic relationship with capable long term investors from 
around the world. The issue is now on the table; the choice is yours. 

Sincerely, 


T 

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1997 

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David Reuben 
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For furth er information, please call 312-553-0537 


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PAGE 8 


FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 

EDITORIALS /OPINION 


llcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


FUBLLSHfc'D wmi THE NEW TURK T1IHTS AND THE WASHINGTON TOST 


Yes. China in the WTO 


If China is prepared to honor in- 
ternational fair trade rules, it should be 
admitted into the World Trade Or- 
ganization. It makes no practical sense 
to complicate this issue with other con- 
siderations about China, including its 
poor record on human rights. Those 
important questions can be belter 
handled in other ways. 

China wants membership in the new 
trade organization to establish its place 
in the international community even 
though it will win few tangible eco- 
nomic benefits. Countries like the 
United States have already extended 
low tariffs and other trade privileges to 
China. But membership can' force the 
Chinese to take steps toward a fully 
functioning market economy. Trade 
organization rules require that foreign 
investment and trade be conducted on 
commercial terms, with no subsidies 
for exports or restrictions on imports- 

Washington demands, for instance, 
that China make explicit any subsidies 
the government provides to state- 
owned factories that allow them to sell 
goods below cost Membership would 
require China to drop restrictions that 
force foreign investors there to export 
products they make in China- China will 
have to honor patents and copyrights. 

Membership, then, can be useful to 
the West as a catalyst for reform in 
China. It would give leverage to 
Chinese officials who are pushing for 
political and market reforms. Policies 
that put more power in impersonal 
markets remove power from govern- 
ment bureaucrats. 


Membership will ease needless ten- 
sion between China and the United 
States. Rather than clas h i n g directly 
over trade disputes, the two countries 
could tum to an impartial international 
jury to resolve commercial tensions. 

Technically, the United States can- 
not block China’s entrance into the 
World Trade Organization. But some 
members of Congress want to force the 
administration to get its approval be- 
fore coming to agreement with die 
Chinese, fearing that China will win 
favorable terms. Such an intrusion is 
unnecessary. The administration has 
no reason to go easy on China, know- 
ing that Congress already has the au- 
thority to prevent the administration 
from extending trade privileges to 
China even if it gains membership in 
the World Trade Organization. 

Others in Congress recoil at inviting 
China into the trade organization be- 
cause of its human rights abuses and 
contempt for democracy. Those con- 
cerns are warranted, but Chinese mem- 
bership in the trade organization will 
not preclude America frompressuring 
China on these issues. The World 
Trade Organization, which Washing- 
ton worked hard to establish, should 
not be used for political and diplomatic 
ends, however worthy they may be. 

The important task for the admin- 
istration is to negotiate commercially 
fair terms, phased in quickly enough 
that China must initiate reform im- 
mediately. Congressional interference 
serves no good purpose. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES . 


Turn Tirana Around 


Last year, when SaJi Berisha won a 
tainted parliamentary election and then 
cracked down on peaceful opposition, 
neither the United States nor the Euro- 
pean Union complained much. Pres- 
ident Berisha, first elected in 1992, was 
an anti-Communist, after all, who had 
promised reform and support for U.S. 
efforts in the former Yugoslavia 
nearby. The West opted for stability 
over democracy. This week, with Al- 
bania spinning' closer and closer to 
civil wax, it is becoming clear once 
again that stability without democracy 
often is not worth much. 

The proximate cause of Albania’s 
unrest is the unraveling of a handful of 
financial pyramid schemes in which 
Albanians had invested more than SI 
billion of their savings. But because 
Mr. Berisha lacks democratic legit- 
imacy in the eyes of many of his 
people, he has been unable thus far to 
contain the protests. 

The fighting now taking place be- 
tween Albanian troops and armed in- 
surgents in the south could destabilize 
southern Europe. First in the line of fire 
is the Kosovo region of the former 
Yugoslavia, where ethnic Albanians 
could provoke unrest Italy fears that 
thousands of refugees could flee in its 
direction from the fighting. Greece, 
too, could be affected. 

The pyramid schemes that went bust 
have come and gone in every formerly 


Communist country: Russia still has 
political parties of cheated investors. 
The schemes took advantage of people 
too naive in the ways of capitalism to 
recognize a confidence man, or too 
impoverished and desperate to listen to 
their better judgment Many knew that 
the bubbles. would burst but believed 
that they could get out in time, and with 
a fat profit Corrupt and inexperienced 
governments offered no protection. 
Albania, which had been the poorest 
and most isolated of Communist na- 
tions, was particularly vulnerable. 

The unrest underlines an emerging 
divide in the formerly Communist 
world. As Poland, Hungary and the 
Czech Republic embrace democracy 
and become more prosperous, Albania, 
Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia fall be- 
hind in the south. “We all feel like we 
belong © die European losers’ club," 
says a Belgrade think lank director. Pre- 
drag Simic. It is a dangerous situation. 

Bulgaria and Romania now are 
working hard to right themselves, hav- 
ing finally elected pro-reform govern- 
ments. and they deserve Western sup- 
port Mr. Bensha is going the other 
way, imposing censorship and limiting 
democracy. The West is now pressing 
him to open a dialogue with the op- 
position. That should be a first step 
toward coalition government and a le- 
gitimate election. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Less Secrecy, Please 


It is a rare moment in Washington 
when someone does something sen- 
sible about the government’s obsession 
with secrecy. A congressional com- 
mission has done just that in a thought- 
fill new report that recommends a long 
overdue change in the way official 
secrets are made and maintained. The 
commission’s novel contention is that 
Congress, not the federal bureaucracy, 
should determine how and why in- 
formation is kept secret, by establish- 
ing a law on secrecy. 

Remarkably, no such law now ex- 
ists. The classification system is set 
forth in executive orders. With the 
exception of John Kennedy, every 
president in the past 50 years has is- 
sued his own secrecy rules, like an 
elected monarch. The result is an egre- 
gious mountain of musty classified 
documents, some daring back to World 
War L and a federal secrecy industry 
that cost taxpayers $5.6 billion in 1 995, 
so the commission reckons. 

Previous panels that have studied the 
secrecy system have expounded the 
benefit of sunshine laws and open gov- 
ernment and preached the people's right 
to know, but attempts at real change 
have always been blocked by a per- 
manent national security bureaucracy. 
The broad-based Commission on Pro- 
tecting and Reducing Government 


Secrecy, led by Senator Daniel Patrick 
Moynihan, could change all that. 

The commission urges Congress to 
enact a law that would limit classi- 
fication to 10 years unless an agency 
expressly requests continued secrecy. 
The law would require the declassi- 
fication of all information after 30 
yeans unless disclosure would demon- 
strably harm an individual or vital gov- 
ernmental activities. The commission 
further urges requiring the president to 
establish and publish secrecy proce- 
dures, and recommends creation of a 
National Declassification Center. As 
the report argues with considerable elo- 
quence, the system more often than not 
protects reputations and conceals blun- 
ders in the name of security. It makes a 
persuasive case that reform is the equi- 
valent of prudent deregulation. 

This panel's 12 members include 
Senator Jesse Helms, Republican of 
North Carolina, Representative Lee 
Hamilton. Democrat of Indiana, and 
John Deutch, the former CIA director. 
This gives its unanimous recommen- 
dations the bipartisan weight essential 
to command attention. Bnt enacting its 
reforms will take a serious commit- 
ment from both Congress and Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton. There is unlikely to 
be a better opportunity for years. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



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The Words Beijing Needs to Hear: Rule of Law 

, . i . A.nl latHS — — tO IM'QIUC 


W ASHINGTON — On Madeleine 
Albright's next trip to China, 
here is what she should say to President 
Jiang Zemin. Albright to Jiang ; 

We usually come to these meetings 
with a list of dissidents you have im- 
prisoned. If we are lucky you toss us a 
bone, let someone out of jail and we 
pretend that human rights in China 
have improved. We tell the U.S. press: 
“We bluntly raised our human rights 
concerns, but we have other interests 
and can’t hold the U.S .-China rela- 
tionship hostage to human rights alone. 
And blah, blah.” 

Let's stop this sham. You know that 
neither our allies nor our own business 
community will allow us to impose the 
sort of biting economic sanctions on 
you that would really get your attention. 
We could only muster such sanctions in 
times of war, and we are not in a war. 
But we have other tools. We have our 
own spotlight and we have the pres- 
sures building up inside your own coun- 
try to move toward a more law-based 
society, and we intend to use both. 

We are going to use our spotlight to 
highlight those areas where you have 
progressed in implementing rule of law 
instead of arbitrary Communist Party 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

rule, and to hi ghlig ht those areas 
whore you have not. 

That is going to be the thrust of our 
human rights policy from now on — 
rule of law. Get used to it Rule of law. 

We are no longer going to beat hu- 
man rig hts as simply winning the free- 
dom of some dissident, or as an isolated 
issue that my State Department human 
rights office deals with and no one else. 
No, no. The president has directed the 
State Department, Pentagon. Com- 
merce, trade representative and every 
other U.S. agency dealing with China 
to formulate all policies vis-a-vis China 
with the long-term objective of en- 
couraging you to replace arbitrary, un- 
accountable, opaque operations with 
rule-of-law procedures. 

Now, you deserve recognition for 
introducing more rule of law in the 
areas of administrative procedure, 
copyright, even criminal justice — al- 
though your officials soil have too 
much discretion in whether they im- 
plement these new laws. 

We know you are not making these 
changes for our sake. You are making 


them because you have concluded that 
without a more predictable, account- 
able role of law you will never be able 
to get to that next stage of economic 
development, and since you have no 
ideology anymore- — other than “to get 
rich is glorious’ ' —if you can’t deliver 
That next stage you’re toast 

But we are going to keep pushing 
you, because there are still too many 
areas you haven’t moved ul You roll 
restrict freedom of association. You 
still your laws to cri mina lize all 
sons of peaceful activities, from polit- 
ical dissent to environmental ad- 
vocacy. You still sentence people to 
“re-education through labor. 

We are going to draw attention to 
these practices in evety international 

forum, with as many allies as we can, so 

that it is clear to your people that this is 
not die United States versus China — 
which only brings out a nationalist 
backlash — but China versus inter- 
national norms. 

And we are going to look for every 
vehicle — whether it is funding legal 
ed ucati on programs, helping to train 
Oipiftsf* c riminal defense lawyers or 
intensifying our demands that you im- 
plement real co mm e rc ial and intellec 


vvwvtual property laws — to promote 
rule of law within China at large. _ 

Mr. Jiang, when our human rights 

policy toward China focused on freeing 
dissidents, we could be 100 percent for 
it and you could be 100 percent against 
iL But when our human rights .policy 
still cares about dissidents but makes its 
p rimar y focus promoting role of law in 
China, you can’t be 100 percent against 
it, because you are instituting role of 
law for your own reasons and betting 
that yon can do it in some sectors while 
never letting it apply to you at the top. 
That’s fine. We’ll take that bet 
Mao said “We will never accept for- 
eign capital.’’ Then Deng came along 
and said “We will accept foreign cap- 
ital, but never foreign norms. ’ No w 
you say “We will accept foreign capital 
and some foreign norms, but not oth- 
ers.’’ OJC, we’ll wait for the next guy. 

But in the meantime we’ll have a 
human rights policy toward China that 
helps make it a better place for the 
Chinese people and that lays down 
some rule-of-law foundations for 
whatever comes after you. 

Jiang to Albright: What does it mean 
to be toast? 

The Nett York Tutus. 


Growth Will Do More for Output Than for Consumption 


YX/ASHINGTON — The 
W United States is the glob- 
al system ’s buyer of last resort. 
It absorbs China's lopsided 
trade flows — an astonishing 
deficit of $40 billion last year. 
But the rise of low-wage high- 
er-tech industries there now 
threatens Japan’s domination 
of Asian markets as well. 

Thus Tokyo is more worried 
than Washington. 

“China is a horror story for 
the rest of the world if it simply 
grows as an exporting nation.' ’ 
Harou Shimada, a Japanese 
economist who advises the 
government, told me. “If you 
bring in 1-2 billion workers at 
those wages, that can destroy 
the global trading system.’’ 

In short, it is China's scale, 
not its despotism, that threa- 
tens tire economic system. 


By William Grader 

This is the second of two articles. 


e 


Even if China were to col 
tomorrow, the threat of lost 
obs would not disappear. 

iw-wage producers from In- 
dia to Eastern Europe are vying 
for the same ground. 

With this in mind , people 
should consider the funda- 
mental contradictions of glob- 
alization, particularly that the 
world is generating production 
much faster than it is creating 
consumers. 

Economists typically dis- 
miss this analysis, saying that 
supply and demand wm al- 
ways even out. 

But consider that the global 
auto industry will be able to 
produce 79 million vehicles in 


2000, while consumers won’t 
buy more than 58 million. 
Someone somewhere is going 
to have to close more car fac- 
tories — lots of them. 

The perverse paradox of 
globalization is that the very 
. steps companies think they 
must take to survive fierce new 
competition actually end up 
making the worldwide supply 
problem worse. Moving pro- 
duction to low-wage econo- 
mies exchanges high-wage 
workers for very cheap ones. 
The developing economy en- 
joys new jobs and rising in- 
comes. but overall consump- 
tion power is lost 

As Henry Ford observed in 


1 913, an industrial system can- 
not endure if workers cannot 
buy the things they make. This 
condition led to 1929, and it is 
before us again. To save the 
system, the United States must 
take real steps to emphasize the 
condition of workers and 
wages at home and abroad. 

It should, for example, in- 
corporate labor rights into 
trade negotiations by imposing 
tariffs on the goods of the most 
flagrant abusers of workers 
and giving preferential trade 
terms to poor -nations with 
more equitable governments. 

This would not end the pres- 
sures on jobs and wages in 
America, but it would boost 
global consumption. 

The United States should 
also use the threat of tariffs to 
keep countries from developing 


an export advantage through 
excess capacity. It has the 
leverage to do tins: If not Amer- 
icans, who will buy China’s 
$40 billion surplus of goods? 

None of tiiis promises to 
solve the problem of compe- 
tition from China. Bnt neither 
will China’s growth solve the 
problems of economic glob- 
alization, despite economists’ 
rosy views. 

TnsH-ari of coddling China or 
depicting it as uniquely evil, 
the United States should start 
questioning its own blind faith 
in the global economy. 

The writer is author most 
recently of “ One World, Ready 
or Not: The Marne Logic of 
Global Capitalism." He con- 
tributed this comment to The 
Nevr York Times. 


$ 








NATO and Russia: The Aim Ought to Be Healing in Europe 


H ELSINKI — When Mik- 
hail Gorbachev began to ap- 
ply his “new thinking * to for- 
eign policy in the late 1980s, 
Georgi Arbatov, the Kremlin’s 
spin doctor, issued his famous 
threat to NATO: We will do 
something terrible to you — de- 
prive you of your enemy. 

A military alliance without 
an enemy is doomed to wither 
away. But NATO has finally 
found a new enemy, and wife it 
anew role to play. The enemy is 
instability. 

NATO now aspires to be- 
come the guardian of order in a 
Europe united by common val- 
ues, with democracy and the 
market economy recognized as 
the only legitimate system. In 
such a Europe the function of 
the armed forces will be primar- 
ily crisis management, peace- 


By Max Jakobson 


making, peacekeeping and oth- 
er soft applications of military 
force. All the states of Europe 
will be able to join, either as 
members of NATO or through 
the Partnership for Peace. 

The new rhetoric tends to 
gloss over the difference be- 
tween allies and partners. 

No new line of division will 
be drawn on the map of Europe, 
Secretary of State Madeleine 
Albright has assured us. be- 
cause every democracy, wheth- 
er an ally or a partner, will have 
a say through the Atlantic Part- 
nership Council to be launched 
tiiis spring. 

But partnership is a some- 
what deceptive term. In every- 
day language, partners are ex- 
pected to share the costs and 


profits as well as the risks of the 
enterprise they are engaged in. 
This is not what is meant by 
Partnership for Peace. 

NATO is not prepared to 
share with its partners toe risk of 
war. The distinction between 
the countries covered by the se- 
curity guarantees contained in 
Article 5 of the NATO Treaty 
and the countries not covered 
remains toe line of division that 
partnership cannot erase. 

The Central and East Euro- 
pean countries are not seeking 
NATO membership because 
they are eager to join in peace- 
keeping operations. They want 
to move our of the shadow of 
Yalta. They worry about toe un- 
certainties of the Russian situ- 
ation, and they have little trust in 


Momentous Suspense 


J AKARTA — The wiser 
among Indonesia's rich and 
powerful avoid the word 
“succession,” lest the pres- 
ident hear of iL The story goes 
that one of President Suharto's 
favorites, a general named 
Benny Murdani, lost his po- 
sition a few years ago when he 
asked the president what he 
thought of Prime Minister Lee 
Kuan Yew stepping aside for 
younger men in Singapore. 

Mr. Suharto, the second 
postcolonial leader of this vast 
archipelago country, is 75. He 
took power in a military coup 
that removed toe unstable 
founding father. President 
Sukarno. In 30 years of power, 
he has created an autocracy 
made to look like a democracy 
from a distance. 

If he were to retire tomor- 
row, he would be remembered 
as the man who guided the 
country from chaos to order 
and from poverty to prosperity. 
If he does not quit and does not 
establish a rule of succession, 
things that few expect him to 
do, he could be remembered 
for taking Indonesians from 
bloody chaos to bloody an- 
archy. If there still is an In- 
donesia after Suharto. 

'Hus stale of 200 million 
people on more than 17,000 
islands was once called toe 
Dutch East Indies; it was ruled 
from Amsterdam by force and 
tenor for three and a half cen- 
turies. The idea of Indonesia is 
only 50 years old. 

h was Sukarno’s idea, but 
he was an incompetent tyrant 
Freedom and independence 
came only after the fear and 
terror launched from Tokyo in 
the 1940s led to toe flight of 
the Dutch before soldiers like 
Suharto, whose training and 
arms were provided and left 
by toe Japanese. 


By Richard Reeves 


The country’s rich re- 
sources and short national his- 
tory make it an exciting and 
dangerous place, quite like the 
United States in toe mid-19to 
century. Gold has been dis- 
covered, after oil and natural 
gas. The government is trying 
to tum a gigantic country into a 
nation by encouraging Muslim 
migration from toe crowded 
cities and overworked farms 
of Java, along a watery Oregon 
Trail leading into sometimes 
hostile tribal lands. 

There is rebellion out there 
against toe cold rule of Jakarta 
and Java. Civil war is pos- 
sible, and many of the for- 
eigners here seeking personal 
or corporate fortune cany 
their passports every day, 
along with undated first-class 
tickets home, just in case. 

There are differences, of 
course. The islands stretching 
across 4,800 kilometers are 
tropical. More important, per- 
haps. there is no rale of law. 
Indonesia, now a country 
ruled by a competent tyrant, 
may never become a nation. 

It seems to depend on this 
man Suharto — and perhaps 
on tolerance of the predatory 
greed of his family and friends, 
rapacious even by colonial and 
dictatorial standards. 

The country is booming, the 
economic growth rate is almost 
10 percent, and the Suhartos 
(the president’s children and a 
few trusted cronies j look to be 
getting about half that. For- 
eigners come to mine toe gold 
or assemble automobiles or 
build toll roads, but first they 
must form partnerships with 
companies that provide no cap- 
ital and usually tum out to be 
owned by toe Suhartos. 


in Jakarta 

World Bank types have 
conceded that 30 percent of 
money loaned to Indonesia 
disappears without trace. No- 
body much minded that for a 
time. Mr. Suharto was seen as 
a great man who brought an 
orderly semblance of modem 
economy. In Asia, a man’s 
first responsibility is to his 
family, and he had pulled him- 
self up from hungry poverty. 
Millions of others were get- 
ting a bit of toe action. 

Yes. there was and is 
trouble in East Timor. And 
there have been violent riots 
as ethnic Malays and Chinese 
take the law into their own 
hands, killing hundreds in 
never-ending mistrust of each 
other. And in tbe jungles there 
are small wars with natives, as 
there were on the plains of 
North America. 

But in prosperous Java, with 
a population of 110 million 
(larger than any - country in 
Europe), there is a rising if 
whispered demand for reform 
and stability. It is rime for laws 
to protect property and newly 
created wealth. 

The whispers do not seem 
to be reaching toe president 
through his vaunted network 
of loyal informers. There is 
no obvious or trained suc- 
cessor, and tbe president ap- 
pears to have every intention 
of re-electing himself next 
year after “parliamentary’’ 
elections this year. 

Perhaps President Suharto 
has a plan to install one of his 
sons or daughters, but he has 
not shown his hand yet, or 
perhaps has not figured out 
how to play it yeL But he will. 
The man, like his country, 
says an American resident, is 
Wee mercury — ‘‘smooth, 
opaque and elusive.” 

Universal Press Syndicate. 


the West That is why they seek 
toe protection of Article 5. 

The reason for their concern 
is that a Europe united by com- 
mon values is still a vision and a 
project, not yet reality. Mr. Ar- 
batov has failed to deprive his 
own country of an enemy. 

The Russian debate on se- 
curity is not about crisis man- 
agement but about toe bard- 
coze issues of military defense. 

At a recent conference in 
Sweden, former Ambassador 
Yuli Kvitsinsky, who now is 
security policy adviser to the 
speaker of the upper house of 
Parliament, shocked his audi- 
ence by stating that Russia’s 
geopolitical interests remain 
what they have always been. 
And Defense Minister Igor 
Rodyonov has talked about the 
need for buffer zones along 
Russia's border. 

The current Russian cam- 
paign against NATO has been 
explained away in tbe West as 
an attempt to extract maximum 
compensation for the enlarge- 
ment of toe alliance. By warn- 
ing the West, as for instance 
Prime Minister Viktor Cherno- 
myrdin did during his recent 
visit to toe United States, that 
enlargement would bring out 
the worst in Russia, Moscow 
has turned weakness into 
strength. Hie NATO govern- 
ments have been put on the de- 
fensive, trying to devise new 
inducements to placate Russia. 

The West hopes to unite 
Europe by integrating Russia 
into toe NATO-centered secu- 
rity order now being buiiL The 
proposed NATO-Russia Char- 
ter would establish mechanisms 
for consultation, cooperation 
and joint action in peacekeep- 
ing. defense, arms control, nu- 
clear safety, nonproliferation 
and emergency relief. It would 


set up apennanentNATO-Rua- 
sia Joint Council. 

Russian officers would be in- 
cluded at all the top levels of toe 
alliance command structure. 
Even a joint NATO-Russian 
brigade has been proposed. 
Russia would have a voice, al- 
though not a veto, in NATO’s 
deliberations. 

Russia’s future role, how- 
ever, will depend less on what 
will be written into tbe charter 
than on toe spirit in which it will 
be understood and applied by 
each of the parties. The danger 
is that Russia will look upon tbe 
charter in terms of traditional cl 
power politics — as an agree- 
ment on spheres of influence. 

Lacking the means to prevent 
what is ddled the first stage of 
NATO enlargement, Moscow is 
likely to use die voice it would 
have in NATO to make sure that 
there will be no second stage. 

The problem is not one that 
can be solved by diplomacy. It 
arises from the ambiguity of toe 
Russian internal situation. As 
former Foreign Minister Andrei 
Kozyrev has pointed out, the 
debate in Russia is only super- 
ficially about NATO; its real 
subject is the future of Russia 
itself. Without NATO as an en- 
emy, Mr. Kozyrev writes, op- 
ponents to democratic reform 
have no place to go. They need ■? 
an external threat to maintain 
their domestic power. 

Is Russia in its present state 
able to choose a life without an 
enemy by joining toe Europe of 
open societies represented by 
NATO? This question will be at 
toe heart of toe discussions at 
toe summit meeting of Pres- 
idents Bill Clinton and Boris 
Yeltsin on March 20 and 21 in 
Helsinki. Will they unite Eu- 
rope or divide it? 

international Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1897: Forming Habits 

PARIS — [The Herald says in 
an Editorial:] A bad habit is a 
remorseless despot. You think 
you are its master, but in truth 
you are its slave. A man will 
sometimes do even what be 
knows to be morally wrong. If 
you indulge in evil it is hard to 
get out of that rue but if you 
accustom yourself to high think- 
ing and noble doing, then tins 
will become a habit, and noth- 
ing else will satisfy. Persistent 
thinking toward good destroys 
toe desire to think on a low 
level. Break away from your 
captivity with a mighty effort, 
and you will soon like your new 
friends better than the old ones. 

1922: Ghostly House 

HALIFAX — Dr. Walter 
Prince, director of toe Amer- 
ican Institute for Psychical Re- 
search, has arrived here to in- 
vestigate toe now famous ghost 


of Antieenish. He will go to tbe 
haunted bouse, located near 
Caledonian Mills, which the r 
former tenant left several ** 
months ago stating that some 
occult power had started two 
fires and killed several head of 
live stock. Recently a detective 
and a newspaper reporter spent 
a night in tbe house and had 
strange experiences. Both 
averred that they had been 
slapped by an unseen hand for 
venturing to disturb the ghost 

1947: Free Enterprise 

WACO, Texas — In a speech 
today [March 7] at Baylor Uni- 
versity, President Truman poin- 
ted out toe advantages of free 
enterprise. “There is one thing 
Americans value more than 
peace,” toe President said. “It m 
is freedom. Freedom to worshqj. | 
freedom of speech, and freedom 
of enterprise. It must be true that 
toe fast two of these freedoms 
are related to toe third.” 













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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 


PAGE 9 


OPINION/LETTERS 


They Distrust the Press, 
And for Good Reason 


By Bernard Aronson 

W pS™h ttJfSd “ bener P“ b,ic “ f - 


recent! V >i. a V ,9V nlon “id vants. 

rewptly lhal politicians have But the pendulum has swung 


now become as cynical about the 

press as the press is about politi- 
cians, rus remarks were dismissed 
widely as self-serving sour 
grapes. The angry assault by the 
speaker of the House, Newt W 
S" ch - on the news media at about 
the same time was discounted im- 
mediately for the same reason. 

7 * U l n most People in pub- 

lic life feel almost as bitter as Mr. 
Clinton and Mr. Gingrich about 
the way they are portrayed in the 
■ P e 'y s , me dia. Though they admire 
individual journalists, they dis- 
trust the press as an institution. 

Representative Barney Frank 
spoke for this majority when he 
said of the news media: “You 
people celebrate failure and ig- 
nore success. Nothing about gov- 
ernment is'done as incompetently 
as the reporting of it’ ’ 

The press account of remarks 
by a former House speaker, 
Thomas Foley, at an orientation 
session for new members of Con- 
gress illustrates how the press 
covers government 

Among other things, Mr. Foley 
advised the freshmen not to repeal 
the mistake of former Represen- 
tative William Natcher, who, after 
pledging perfect attendance, 
drove himself to distraction for 
years trying to make every roll 
call and ceremonial vote. Since 
they would surely miss a proce- 
dural vote sometime, Mr. Foley 
advised, get it over with sooner 
than later. The speaker also 
counseled congressional foreign 
travel, although it an easy political 
target, because it was one of the 
few ways members could get to 
know their colleagues from the 
opposing party, llie next day’s 
headline in his district announced: 
‘‘Foley tells freshmen: Take a 
junket, miss a vote.” 

To criticize news media cov- 
erage of government when you 
are on the receiving end risks 
sounding like a humorless whine 
or a plea for a passive press. But 
most public officials who are 
angry with the news media are not 
seeking a less aggressive press but 
one that is more fair. 

In my experience, when the 
press confronts us with the moral 
dimensions of policy, even when 
reporters hype a story and we in 
government grind our teeth, it of- 


too far toward relentlessly neg- 
ative reporting. 

After all. it is easier to get on the 
front page with scandal than with 
substance. It takes less work to 
mock the pretensions of public 
officials than to penetrate their 
policies. Reporters who write fa- 
vorably about the people they 
cover sometimes are ridiculed for 
being “soft." And increasingly, 
news organizations are staffed by 
talented, articulate but young re- 
searchers, producers and editors 
who believe that almost 
everything government officials 
do or don’t do is by design. 

In fact, many things happen be- 
cause officials were focused on 
other things and weren't paying 
attention, didn't expect the con- 
sequences of something else they 
did, were tired, forgot or messed 
up. That doesn't mean when 
things go wrong government of- 
ficials deserve a pass; it does 
mean there should not be an auto- 
matic presumption of venal 
motives or a conspiracy. 

Journalists and public officials 
should talk honestly about these 
things. If they did, reporters 
would be surprised at the depth of 
bitterness even among public of- 
ficials who enjoy what is con- 
sidered a favorable press, and of- 
ficials would be surprised at how 
many journalists resent what the 
pressures of ‘ 'gotcha" journalism 
are doing to their profession. Ed- 
itors and reporters might adopt 
standards of journalistic due pro- 
cess, such as greater scrutiny of 
the evidence and agendas of crit- 
ics and accusers and reporting ex- 
onerations as prominently as the 
original charge. The press might 
begin to define itself not merely as 
government's "adversary” but, 
more substantively, as govern- 
ment’s "critic.” ■ 

A good critic knows his subject 
intimately. As a result, both his 
condemnation and his praise are 
more trenchant and informative, 
and both are considered a legit- 
imate and necessary part of his 
professional responsibility. 



The Criminal Prevailed , 
The Scholar Failed 


By William Raspberry 


W ASHINGTON — It wasn't 

supposed to end like this. 

It wasn't Terrence Johnson, the 
cop killer and criminal, who was 
supposed to emerge at the end. It 
was to be the Terrence Johnson 
who got it together: who finished 
high school and earned a college 
degree while serving 17 years in 


MEANWHILE 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Russia and NATO 


The writer, a former assistant 
secretary of slate for inter-Amer- 
ican affairs in the Bush admin- 
istration. contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Post. 


Fred Hiatt writes in “Russia 
Should Quit Carping and Focus 
on Its Future Role” f Opinion. 
Feb. 25) that Russian surprise at 
Eastern Europe's desire to join 
NATO is “either insincere or re- 
markably insensitive io history." 
Mr. Hiatt's attitude toward Rus- 
sian opposition to NATO expan- 
sion is equally so. 

Mr. Hiatt forgets that the world 
looks very different from the Rus- 
sian steppes than it does from 
Washington. Russia has been in- 
vaded nearly 300 times, and the 
last occasion is well within the 
living memory of many. Now 
Russia is on its knees — its army 
is literally going hungry', the sci- 
entific establishment that was its 
source of pride is rusting away, 
and the minds that created it are 
rushing abroad in search of a liv- 
ing wage. 

To the east, a ragged conscript 
army faces 1.2 billion Chinese 
who ate surging ahead econom- 
ically and military and seeking 
opportunities throughout Asia to 
flex their newfound muscle. To 
the south, the states of Central 
Asia are increasingly allying 
themselves with Islamic stales 
with whom Russia has fought 
dozens of wars. .And now on the 
western front, an organization 


founded for the express purpose 
of battling Russia proposes to ex- 
pand to Russia's doorstep. 

As Mr. Hiatt points out. Rus- 
sian leaders have on several oc- 
casions expressed willingness to 
accept an expanded NATO under 
certain conditions. The real prob- 
lem is that the West has handled 
the affair so hadly. 

Although NATO members are 
discussing new visions of its post- 
Cold War mission and identity 
they are hardly close to a con- 
sensus. No organization should be 
in the business of expanding itself 
until it can agree on why it exists. 
For now its real reason for ex- 
istence is unchanged — to pen 
Russia in. 

That would be understandable 
to most Russians if their govern- 
ment had threatened Eastern 
Europe militarily in any way since 
1991. Yet it has done nothing of 
the sort (nor could it while the 
Russian Army is on the brink of 
collapse). So. they ask. why are 
we being punished? 

To which the West responds 
that it's not a punishment at all; 
NATO has a completely new mis- 
sion now — it's just that no one 
agrees on what it is. The Russians 
do not take well to having their 
intelligence thus insulted. 

This is a country living with a 
lev el of everyday fear and inse- 


curity that few in the West can 
imagine. Its citizens don't hold 
demonstrations on NATO en- 
largement because they are too 
busy struggling to feed their fam- 
ilies. but dial doesn't mean they 
have accepted it, particularly 
when the West provides such spe- 
cious arguments to support it. 

LOREN GERLACH. 

St Petersburg. 


Mr. Hiatt is right in saying that 
‘ ‘there is no consensus in Moscow 
that die Soviet Union acted 
badly.” He should have added, 
however, that there is equally no 
consensus on this matter in the 
West. Despite well-documented 
reports of the genocide perpet- 
rated by the Soviet Union against 
its citizens, the West still remains 
quite ambivalent toward the Evil 
Empire. There has been no out- 
right condemnation of the inherent 
evil of the Communist system. 

Quite perversely the former So- 
viet Union seems to generate an 
indecent glamour. Toronto has a 
caf£ with paraphernalia from the 
Soviet Union as its decorations. 


Can you imagine the outcry if an 


analogous “Nazi cafe*' were cre- 
ated? Is the genocide perpetrated 
by the Soviet Union less odious. 
than the killings of the Nazis? 

D. H. STROK. 

Toronto. 


prison for killing two Prince 
Georges County. Maryland, po- 
lice officers and who, befriended 
by a lawyer, went on to become 
one. 

Right up until last week, when, 
on his 34th birthday, he appar- 
ently killed himself in the after- 
math of a bank robbery gone bad, 
Terrence Johnson seemed always 
on the brink of getting it togeth- 
er. 

The police say Mr. Johnson and 
his 35-year-old brother, Darryl, 
robbed a Maryland bank and fled 
on foot, only to be cornered by 
pursuing officers. When the of- 
ficers ordered the men to lie on the 
ground, they say. Darryl Johnson 
complied. But Terrence Johnson 
turned to face the officers, put a 
gun to his own head and fired. 

Terrence Johnson caught the 
public's attention in 1978, when 
he and a younger brother. Melvin, 
were arrested in Prince Georges 
County on charges of stealing 
$29-75 from a coin-operated laun- 
dry. While in detention, he 
grabbed a police service revolver 
and fatally shot two officers. 

The response to that incident in 
Prince Georges and here in Wash- 
ington was as polarized as any- 
thing involving O. J. Simpson. The 
police — and probably most of die 
white community — saw Terrence 
Johnson as a 15-year-old black 
punk who deserved execution. 
Blacks tended to believe Mr. John- 
son. whose explanation was that 
he was being so badly brutalized 
by the police' that he had feared for 
his life: why else would he have 
done what he did in circumstances 
that made escape impossible? 

Whites, afraid of black street 
crime, saw a cold-blooded killer. 
Blacks, many of whom had per- 
sonal experience with what was ai 
the time a particularly brutal, 
overwhelmingly white. Prince 
Georges police force, saw an in- 
nocent victim. And it went pretty 
much that way for nearly 20 years: 


at the indictment, at the trial and 
every time Mr. Johnson became 
eligible for parole. 

But it wasn't just black and 
white. Black people always 
seemed to see something special 
Ln Terrence Johnson. He was al- 
ways a good-looking kid, well- 
spoken and self-possessed. He 
seemed to be headed somewhere. 

In fact, one of my misgivings 
about my own reaction to Mr. 
Johnson is how much it had to do 
with his appearance. 1 never 
thought about it at the time, but I 
doubt now that a different-look- 
ing, rougher-featured 15-year-old 
would have been given the benefit 
of lhe doubts we gave Mr. John- 
son. But he seemed to carry him- 
self the way we would like our 
children to carry themselves, and 
that, as irrational as it sounds, may 
be what led us to cut him so much 
slack. 

It's hard to resist the conclusion 
that he owed us something for the 
faith we put in him, or that his 
dropping out of law school, not 
quite getting it together and, fi- 
nally, robbing a bank amounted to 
a betrayal of' us. Even now many 
of us will find it hard to confront 
the possibility that maybe he was 
just a good-looking, smooth-talk- 
ing thug all the while. 

What else bothers me is this: 
Imagine that Terrence Johnson 
had decided to rob that bank by 
himself. Imagine that he had run 
the same way he actually did run 
and was cornered by the same 
policemen. Without another wit- 
ness. how many of us. black or 
white, would have believed that 
this good-looking young man, on 
his birthday, had put a gun to his 
own head? How many of as, par- 
ticularly blacks familiar with the 
entire Terrence Johnson story, 
could have taken the word of 
Prince Georges officers that this 
cop killer, his brains blown out. 
had simply committed suicide? 

I don't say there would have 
been rioting in the streets. I only 
say that, had it happened that way, 
there would have been no pos- 
sibility of any judicial disposition 
that the community would agree 
was justice. 


No. we’d still be shouting at 
one another across racial lines 


years from now — each side won- 
dering why the other could be so 
blind to something so obvious. 
The Washington Post. 


BOOKS 


SUPERMEN: 

The Story of Seymour Cray and 
the Technical Wizards Behind 
the Supercomputer 

By Charles J. Murray. 232 pages. $24.95. 
Wiley. 

Reviewed by David Nicholson 

S OME years ago, in “The Soul of a 
New Machine,” Tracy Kidder took a 
complicated, potentially boring subject 
— the race to develop a new computer — 
and wrote an enthralling book. In “The 
Supermen.” Charles J. Murray takes an 
equally complicated and potentially bor- 
ing. subject — the development of ex- 
tremely powerful supercomputers, ma- 
chines for complex tasks like predicting 
die weather or modeling nuclear explo- 
sions — and makes it — boring. 

Murray begins his tale in the 1 940s at 
the U.S. Navy's Washington code- 
breaking facility, a onetime girls' school 
on Nebraska Avenue. There, the navy 
gathered a host of mathematicians, 
physicists and chess and bridge cham- 
pions whose task was to decipher Ger- 
man submarine radio transmissions dur- 
ing World War U. . 

Much of their work was done by hand 
at first, as analysts "labored oyer 
volumes of coded messages, searching 
for patterns that departed from pure ran- 
domness.” By 1944, however, scientists 
had developed machines with hundreds 
of vacuum tubes, primitive ancestors of 
today’s computers, that allowed them to 
perform in minutes calculations that had 
taken up to 600 hours- 
Some of the men who worked at the 
navy facility wondered if these new 
machines might not have commercial 
uses. After the war several formed en- 
gineering Research Associates, a com- 
pany that manufactured calcitiatingma- 
chines for the navy. Based in St. Pad* 
Minnesota, ERA was an enjnoer » 
paradise/ ’ a place where employees en- 


joyed tremendous freedom to be cre- 
ative. It could hardly have been oth- 
erwise. 

Computer science was in its infancy, 
and the men who worked at ERA — 
prototypical geeks who’d built radio 
equipment as children — were making it 
up as they went along. 

One of those engineers was Seymour 
Cray, who in 195 1 came to work at the 
convened glider factory that housed 
ERA, shortly after graduating from the 
University of Minnesota with degrees in 


The end of Cray Computer 
Corp. came m 1995, as 
new computer designs 
became the fashion. 


electrical engineering and applied math- 
ematics. He soon showed evidence of 
the genius that would make him a legend 
in the field of supercomputers. As Mur- 
ray tells it, a senior ERA engineer 
named Frank MuIJaney watched in puz- 
zlement as another engineer began to 
disassemble a computer that was 
already late in its development cycle. 

Wondering who had ordered die 
changes. Mull an ey asked what the en- 
gineer was doing. "Well,” he replied, 
“Seymour thought this ought to be 
changed.” 

At the time, Cray had worked at ERA 
for just two weeks. 


Though other computer engineers 
‘ of them 


people these pages — most of 
blurring into one another, remaining in- 
distinct because Murray fails to render 
them as living, breathing beings — the 
narrative focuses on Cray. From ERA, 
Cray moved on to Control Data Corp.. 
founded by several ERA pioneers after 
th ei r company was sold to Remington 
Rand Corp. 

Under Cray's leadership, CDC be- 
came the builder of the world's fastest 


computer. Created from "fallout” tran- 
sistors rejected by their manufacturer, 
many of the circuits of the CDC 1604 
were designed and built by Cray, who 
spent hours soldering them at a work- 
bench. 

That kind of can-do attitude and in- 
dependent spirit was characteristic of 
him. When he found his responsibilities 
as a CDC manager too onerous. Cray 
resigned as director of engineering. 

Needing “pure, blissful, b are-bones 
isolation” to concentrate on solving the 
technical problems that bedeviled the 
creation of supercomputers. Cray 
moved his team of engineers and de- 
signers to his home town of Chippewa 
Falls. Wisconsin. There, he built a new 
lab and an even faster computer. 

Ten years later. Cray left CDC to Stan 
his own company, Cray Research, 
where he built several more supercom- 
puters. each more powerful than the last, 
and enjoyed “a near monopoly in the 
highest of high-tech industries." 

Alas. Cray's success was not fated to 
endure. The end of the Cold War and 
dimini shed defense budgets meant less 
of a market for supercomputers. 

New computer designs based on 
those pioneered by Cray became the 
fashion, and 1995 saw the end of Cray 
Computer Coro., the company he foun- 
ded after leaving Cray Research. Cray 
died last year. 

There’s nothing intrinsically boring 
about this story. Anyone who cares 
about computers and the history of com- 
puting will find this story interesting and 
informative. The rest are likely to com- 
plain that Murray's prose too seldom 
rises above the ordinary, and that Sey- 
mour Cray, despite a few anecdotes 
about his eccentricities that are repeated 
with variations throughout the book, 
remains an elusive, shadowy figure. 


Meeting Africa's Growing Oil 
and Gas needs 


IS; 


A frica’s hydrocarbon potential 
attracting increasing attention. 
Exploration activity is increasing! 
[across the continent, especially in 
Western Africa and production is being 
established In new areas. Africa’s oill 
industry is entering a period of expan 
(sion. 


David Nicholson, a Washington 
writer, wrote this for The Washington 
Post. 


BRIDGE 


Both reams reached five 


B v Alan Truscott hearts doubled, and the Dutch 

J — declarer received a dub lead. 


He won with the ace, throw- 
ing a spade from his hand, and 


i'X:- 

1#'. 


T HE world's strongest an- 
nual ream contest is per- 
haps the Forbo-Kremmeme 
Tournament, played recently 
in Scheveningen. the Netb 
erlands. In the main event, an 
Italian foursome consisting^ 

Alfredo Versace. Norberto 

Bocchi, Massimo 

and Andrea Buramsna^Kl 

victory on the last 
gaining a slam swingwhen an 
opponent misguessed. 

The Italians also scored* 
victory over the n 
States, France and the Ne 
erlands in the Nations 
invitational event 
diagramed deal, the m 
matte, helped the Amc 
defeat the host country. 


NORTH 

♦ - 

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West led U* UuBe - 


misjudged by leading a heart 
to die king. When he then led 
the diamond ace. East was 
able to ruff, cash two trump 
winners and lead a spade. 
West captured the queen with 
the ace and led a diamond, 
eventually collecting 800. 

In the replay, after die bid- 
ding shown, the American 
declarer was Dick Freeman of 
Atlanta. After the same club 
lead, he won with the ace, 
discarding a spade, and led a 
heart to the jack. Then he led 
the spade king, ruffing out the 
ace, and played the remaining 
trump. East took the ace and 
led a club, ruffed by South. 
He cashed the heart king and 
exited with a heart, leaving 
the position shown at right: 


East led die club jack and 
South ruffed, squeezing 
West. A spade return would 
have been no better, for South 
would have won and led the 
last trump with similar effect. 
The contract was made for a 
score of 850, gaining 17 
imps. 


NORTH 
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For anyone interested in shaping the 
future, the Qi( and Gas Africa ‘97 confer-* 
ence/exhibition in Accra between 2nd 
and 4th April Is a vital fomm. 


fThe event will bring together key opin- 
ion leaders and top management and 
other participants from multi-national 
and African corporations, financial insti-| 
tut ions and governments. 


OIL 


AFRICA 



GAS 


INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 
CENTRE 


ACCRA GHANA 







2ND - 4TH APRIL *97 


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: 


Itanaoar, Pubic Affaire Dapartmant 

taivv rwweum nooss. 

Print* llafl Bag 
Tama. Ghana 
Tel: +233 21 232056 
Far +233 (0)22206068 


FSQC o— n unfc tfo na Ud 
Vhw Hoomftk fiwoBwch 
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UK 

Tat +44 1638 743633 
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Quincy Sin&n 
PO BOX 60827 AWr 
HomtonTX 772&0627 
USA 

litk 1281 448 8660 
Fax: +1261 449 8566 



SUNK 
,1997 
USE 9 


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PAGE 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 


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GO: 8453 

SCSI. 10241 SCSP: 10228 
a Usage ragterorti 


Business Opportunities 


GUARANTHD PROFIT SHARING 
Asset baited offer trough 
Swiss Trarfng Cotp. 

For furfter rfa please tec 
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LOOKING FOR P ARTIER tor tovesi- 
ment in several sectors In Turkey. Pax 
+90232368.1694 Tet +902323685340 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
ASSET PROTECTION 
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19 tad Boat Doughs, We of Man 
British Was 

Tel: 01624 626591 
Far 01624 625126 

E Hd No. astonttataprsud 


OFFSHORE COWEROAL BANK 
FOR SALE 

Wflh Class A tease and carre sp arx fe rt 
ter* reteiundte. Mules hotiSnq 
company w» Geneva ofica and a US. 
sUxuaiy wtfi New York Cay aft* and 
a UJL stettaiywBi London office. 
k nm ed Bta acqusteri uxftconML 
US S8MIXLFWANCE ffiTCHANTS 
GROUP. Nassau tat 242-39L7DS0. 
Far 242-394-70S2 London feUac 
44 101 539 8246 


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Obtain Permanent Residency. 2nd 
Qtanshp S 2nd Passport ra Eco no mc 
Invedmett, 100% legrt Gmemnent 
Programs, stating a S285D0. issued m 
90 to 180 days. Funds held in Escrow 
mS you recsve your dccumerte. 

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CARBBEAN: Far +{590) 290 5B7 
or Far +1590) 290 684 
E-MAIL INTATTGAOLCOM 


LBflXNG/LOANS FUNDMG BANK 
Tradng, dosm, disbursing, debt free, 
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OFFSHORE COUP AMES, Forte bro- 
chure or adrae Tet London 44 181 7<t 
1224 Far 44 181 748 6558/8338 
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Executive Positions Aifailable 


KOREAJAWAN. pacrbi 

imemationai heabfripersonai care 
uu i pa n y is axpafdng - 512 Bftm last 
year. Reerufters and fratos needed 
now! Mr Tartofc Teh 1-31W57-441fl; 
Far 1-310-589^71 USA 


TOPLACEMAD 
HV THE 

HcralbS^Eribunc 

Contact the Fbris office : 

IcLi (33-1) 41 43 93 8S - Fax; (33-1) 41 43 93 70 

E-mail: dawiiiede’ihLcom 


REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE 


Real Estate Services 


PALM BEACH FLORIDA USA 
Musky Realty Grate. Barbara Whrtfard 
Residennai-Cormnercial-tndusfnal 
Died 561-965-8239 Fax 561-964-3111 


Real Estate 
for Sale 


Real Estate for Sale 


JAMAICA: FOR SALE ! Jam Venture. 
210 Acres of land «i Sana Cruz mon- 
fans Si Efcafcaif). Corned C. Poncho 
Tat (34) E66 34863 (Spam 


Canada 


MONTREAL Charming pnd-s-terra lo- 
cated downtown in the famed Golden 
Square Mie Renovated. @ 1750 sq. ft. 
(163 sq m) coop apartment tn land- 
mark Art Nouveau bufeDrg Three bed- 
rooms. 1 1G baths, lying mom. dining 
room, kitchen. 24 hour security. 
CDNSI99.000. Tab 1-514-933-0343: 
Far 1-514-848-0767 


QUEBEC - Gracious home on 6 hectare 
estate, 900 mates S boafouse on tec 
das Steles, near hemic donreown Ste- 
Agade. 40 irin. Montreal Inti airport Joe 
Graham. Doncaster Realties Inc.. Tel: 
(019) 326-4963, Fax: (019) 3260829. 


French Alps 

VAL DISERE, PRIVATE CHALET - 
Unique tent on edge d slopes. South 
exposure. Excepfcral raw. 5 bedrooms, 
garage, terrace. FB.7 M negodaMe. Tet 
+33 (0) 1 4507 0009 / tec 4507 1262 


French Provinces 


NORTH CHAHENTE 
Oeep hi rural France, but only 2 112 
hcus from Pate on tie TGV. Substarhai 
Manor House tuly renovated by an 
Amarican to highest contort sfandanfc. 
Stanringonaliten n 10 ha. tomred 
park. Spectacular raws. Guest house 
also futy ranovaad. Total 7 bedrooms, 
3 receptions. FF3.500.000 Additional 
land avateWe Mcftidag mtfa orchard. 

Tel owner +33 (3)5 45 31 04 74 


YOUR REAL ESTATE CONTACT IN 
PROVENCE - Best selection at Wlage 
and oouidiy properties tor sale or rent 
Contact GWEN CLARK - LUBERON 
mVESTlSSEMENTS • GORDES - Tel 
+33(0)490720755. Fax +33(0)490720897. 

BURGUNDY, 210 sq.m. restored famv 
horaa. canal heating. 1112 hows Pans. 
Garden, beams, fireplace. 5 rooms, 
eqixpped kitchen. 2 baths + 210 sq m. 
attic. F550.00Q. Tel: +33 (0)140259057. 


French Rivier a 

COTE D'AZUR, Eze sur Mar. between 
Nca 8 Monaco. Charming villa, perfect 
confton. On Mtede rrtti fabulous sea 
view. Sui aH day. Large fivmg room, 2 
beds. 2 balhs, Independent stuho wih 
tecfteas. Swimming pod. pine trees, 
atist Plot of land: 500 span. FF17M. 
Owner Tel / Fax: +33 (0)4 93 01 S3 SO 


GREAT BRITAIN 



Or just five? 


CANNES 

Near sea. apanmera+ia. 

3 rooms, duplex, cupboards, terrace. 
Gardoi Superb saa view. 

Fax: +33 (OH 93 43 51 95 


CAP D’ANTIBES 

Owrsr sells 310 som via. 

3.000 sqja lend BeaxJJ saa view. 
Tel +33 (0)4 9293 0779L Fax 9293 0322 


CASTELLARAS - [NEAR CANNES). 
Suberb Hoop 3 bedroom villa, own pool 
+ panoramic views. In very secure 
domaxi + excall ere faoiaes. Brochure: 
Coast S Country. The Entfoti Esteta 
teems on the French Riviera. Tet +33 
(OH 93 75 31 07. wwwimughuoni 

NEAR CANNB - Architect safe superb 
«fe 600 sqm. Mh 14.000 agm past, 
swimwn pod. term Breaffrteirng view 
on sea & mountains. Eternal possible. To* 
+33 (0)148252450 Fax (0)14110939 


Great Britain 

HOHESEARCH LONDON LTD Let us 
search tor you. We find homes / Rais 
to buy end rexr_ For individuals and 
companies + Full Corporate Retain on 
Services. 7 dayw-week. Tel +44 171 
838 1066 Fax + 44 171 838 1077 
IBpi'imwhonvssearth aurWurn 

CLOSE TO PLYMOUTH, secluded 2- 
bedroom fbl character old fan. Healed 
outdoor swimming pool, tennis courts, 
private haibor A beach. Indoor Pahang & 
lift Lovely sea raws S coastal walks. 
£86030. TelfFw +33 (0) 2 5135 0309 


Holland 

AMSTERDAM CANAL HOUSE Early 
17th cera. excellent toeafon nett door 
Anne Frank Museum. Grouxf floor. 120 
sq.m, recent ly restored, renovated. For 
sate U5S278.000. Beams, 2 toiets. Vm 
on canal and A. FrarA chesnut tree. 
Preserty tench room and geiety. Conad 
owner Pans +33 (0)1 42 24 60 5f or 
+31 20 023 7882 


ON PORTOFWO MOUNTAIN, beairfhi. 
typicte smafl house. 50 sqjn. - pks gar- 
den. US5180.0D0 Tte 0360 6SM17 or 
010 3470343. 


Monaco 


MONACO 

1ES FLORAUES" Place du Casino 
Lunme studio. 42 sqm, 
lags, sunny terrace wth beautiful 
view on da sea and (he Caano wkh 
parting ndudel FF 2000X00 


PARK 


AGENCE 



MtiPSpHIlI 

- . " '•.. -V..V. ■ -i.' i 

*- - - , - . \ 



Le Parti Palace 
25 avenge de la Costa 
MC 90000 Monte Carter 
Tel: (377) 93 25 IS 00 
Fax:(377) 93 25 35 33 
wwwjnoniecariomcfleada te arii agence 


New Zealand 

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND. New 
higlwise. Bay/Cmr views. 2 apartments 
fufy fumishw. S275K1S190K U.S. dollars. 
Fax USA: 510-547-7837 


Paris and Suburbs 


NEU1LLY 

Omar's ageb 95 sqm flat to ^storey 
high class Siding. ChavgauMermann 
aria. Ready to move in 2nd floor, facing 
south. ian bafeony over large garden. 
Entry. Crag. 2 bedrooms, complete bath- 
room. shower room, 3 WCs, eqcxppte 
Mchen, pantry wtih service ML many 
eqAoarCs. ReTned ctecoration. Parting 
to 2 cars. ceSer Security. FF 3J80AXL 
Td Pvis +33 (0) 1 47 45 44 02. 


PAfBS - LLE SAW LOUS 
Vary bea&ti 220 sqm. apartment, 
nditoEx. View cxi Sene. Living room 
(firing room. 4 bedrooms. 3 bafts 
Beajttfd oto tenk&ig Parting. 
GARB! - 57 rue Chariot, 75003 Paris. 
Tab 01.44.5425-25. Iter 014454^529. 


33 FOCH - SUNNY SIDE, on garden, 
living room, bedroom, balcony, bathroom, 

tossng. guest tote, equipped kfcftsn 
In perfect condition. Approximately 
S sqjn. - Pnce FF 2.000 000. TeL +33 
(011 47 55 01 28 1 (0)6 60 43 64 11. 

Sfcn WEST PARS by freeway & 25km 
from VersaSes 200 sqm house fufly 
renovated. 4 bedrooms, vzs and elegant 
1 ha part vrift sms caul Fftolos avaS- 
Ebte. FF3M. Tel/Fax +33 (0)1 3055 3644 

7ft, PRESTIGIOUS AREA • Unpobbte 
toSdes & BW Tower raw. 200 sqm 
apamero + 45 sqm stufio in M^r class 
bcdrtng. Tet owner +33 (0)1 45 51 49 66 

BOULOGNE. Marcel Semba. 62 sqm 
flat brite parquet Swing room on paSo 
aarten, 2 bedrooms, equipped kitchen. 
FF98aOOO. Tet +33 (0)1 48 a 90 57. 

PARIS PLACE ST-GERUAVfDE&PRES 
Top Ftoar Terrace, spedaatiar view. 

I beckuom pto-a^ene. ExcepbonaL Tel 
PSrs +33(011 45 49 16 03 

T8ft Nnr AVE FOCH Towrftousg 700 
sqm ♦ 700 sqm garden, high class. 
I*t CcxtcWon. FF32M. 014225 0300 

6ft GRANDS AUGUSTUS exceptional 
6-room apanment. 190 sqm- elevator, ‘ 
balcony. LAre (0) l 45 44 44 45 


South Pacific 

FUI ISLANDS, lakefront via, 30(7 saa- 
•alL deepwater dock, (fired access to 
ocean. Fully lumtshed, pool equipped 
Wchen. inera, tight A avy. quiet & pri- 
vate. tnsutti view. 1/2 aoe fru9 trees, 
landscaped mittens. Go4, tanrts, bash- 
es. S450K LB. Phonata (679) 450 119 


Switzerland 


LAKE SMEWS ALPS 

Stee a Inretaners authorized 
our spedafay rtwe 1975 


Ateacbve properties m MONTRSJX 
VEVET, WLLARS. DtABLEKTS, 
CRANS-MONTANA, eft 1 to 5 bed 
rooms, SFr. 200000 to 35 reto 
REVAC 

52. Mortbrtbnt CH-1211 Geneva 2 
Tel 4122-734 15 40 Fax 734 12 20 


NEAR LAISANNE, cfrarteer 151 sqm. 
flat, feed kitchen, big Swig with hre- 
pteca, 3 bertouns. tsg mazzarire. bto- 
corry. 1 battmc, 1 shower-wc. garage. 
Magniceni 3 entire view on L ake Lem an 
& Alps. Tel France +33 (0)296257371. 


USA Residential 

LANDMARK TOWNHOUSE, Eastsde, 
NY City. Japanese Garden, 5 Stories. 5 
bedrooms, 3 baths, maibto fireplaces, 
wine caber & mora Priced to ssl. 
51^545.000 R RoObhs f-9544460130 


COLORADO'S BEAUTIFUL ROCKIES 
SIQ AW) GOUT 

Desirable properties in Veil Keystone, 
Bredcemdgs, and Capper Marten. 
Sufis, condos, townhouses. stogie 
tonify homes, bidding lots. S50K-S3U. 
Dr. Kevin DmetenlWier & Ptryleaa 
Pteae Century 21 Mountain Spedabts 
Tel: 970-46B-2121; Far 97M6W515 


KEY WEST LUXURY a tworroed Euro- 
pean adtitecTs waled Key West master- 
work. filed with PNflp Starcka todures, 
Portugese Smestort floors, and a pool 
(ha’s a mrt of an. On over an acre ri 
open water land, complete with a foMjr tor 
entertatoing. electric gates tor privacy, 
boal slips tor tour, hri more. Much 
mote. S3.900.000. Contact Lynn Kauflet 
005)294-5155 The Prudential Knight 
tarty, be 

WATERFRONT MIAMI BEACH HfetoriT 
mtoi casfla. ExqusSely decorated to 
Art Deco, wftta rrartrie. 7 bedroom. 7 
mart*) bats. 51.790000. Shanee 
U astro. Mares lie Properties. Inc. 
305-480-7586 Fax: 30587*0704 USA 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, Brand 
new landmark estate resale nee. 20,000 
sq.fl.wrti every amenky. aicfasfve gat- 
ed equestnan area, praaWe 5 acres. 
S5.7H Canted Rory: Fax 818-7024291 

UWGBOAT KEY, FL: An Uend para- 
efise. Littury residences. S. Opw. Ron 
Baldwin 8 Assoc, Talfftex: 941-387-7199 
(USA), E-Mat LBK7Djunaxom 

Psfan Beach Hnbta Luucury Oceairtort 
Condo, pool doorman, 2 bedrooms 2 
bafts, balcony, My (unshed. $239,000 
Rune 1-201-3271111 Fax 1-20V3278222 

NYC/E6tTS STDDKVCOOP - NEAR UN 
charming, eet-totekhen. ideal pisd-a- 
tero, rjte S65K. Trt 212-5700016. 


USA Farms & Ranches 

SOU7HWEST MISSOURI approxtoatety 
3258 acre operating cattle ranch with 
3 tonaa. Broker protected. CaB or wfe 
tor totormation. Spring Grade Farm, Ltd. 
2001 S. Hanley Road. Si Louis, MO 
63144 USA TeKtex: 314*446010 

Real Estate 
for Rent 

French Riviera 

FRANCE: COTE D’AZUR for rentt*. 
Bate 5 bedrooms, 5 bafts, GOD sqm 
part 5,000 sq.m, solarium, jacuzzi, 
sam pod. caretaker's house Tet +33 
(0)493204341 Fare (0)493228979. 

Germany 

FRANKFURT • Furnished suite unique ' 
3-room (fee, 85 sqm Some antiques, ter- 
race ♦ garden, preferred area, 8 min 
carter, suite 2-3 years. DM1750 + 300 
charges ♦ deposl Tel- *»90iaS23644 

Great Britain 

LONDON BAYSWATER. near Part, 
natty furohed and decorated first door 
flat- 1 bedroom, recepwa kfchen and 
baib. Long let and good references re- 
quired. £280 pec week. Tet 44 (0)171 
580 3129 / 0956 291 572 


Holland 


RENTHOUSE MTSWATKMAL 
No 1 hHotand 

tor (semi) (unshed housesfflats. 
Tet 31-20-6443751 Fax: 31-206465909 
Nlioven 19-21. 10B3 Am Amsterdam 


FRANCE 


Ireland 

DUBUN ELEGANT VICTORIAN Flat to 
share April - September. Own double 
room erWft Oreriookng Bay, paring 
dosetocertre R£360 per month 
TeL- 353 1 230 22 47 


An 


FLORENCE STUDB. 25 squire metres 
to faxuiouE renferce: near I BatMtero. 
140:000 USS. Tet 44 171 258 0346 


Paris Area Funushed 



ideal accommodation: stutkoB bedrooms 
Quafty and service asarrad 
READY TO MOVE IN 
Tel +33(0)1 47538011 Fax (0)1 45517577 


CAPIfALE ' PARTNERS 
Handpidced qerffy apartments, al sees 
Pans mid sububs 

Tel +33 (0)1-46148211. Far (0)1 -46148215 
We hdp you best I 

PASSY, wal furnished smafl apartment 
newly redone, 50 sqm. fufly equipped, 
sunny, calm on courtyard. Minimum I 
war rent No agents. F9JXJ0 per month. 
TeL arret +33 ffll 42 30 71 40 

PARIS 7th - QUA! VOLTAIRE 
70 sq.m. duplex atelier. Livmg 
room, study, bedroom. FFn.000 
including charges. Entile GARCIN TeL 
+33 (0)1 42 01 73 38 

7TH, 1 Mock from Ettlel Tower. 
Large luxurious 4 bedrooms. Fufly 
equated. Tet 3KK52-2280 USA 

NEAR PANTHEON, 2-bedroom Hat~ 
baths, private garden, nice furmture. 
US$23X)fmonft Tet +33 (0)1 43316403 


Paris Area Unfurnished 


PARIS 7TH - RUE VANEAU 

5 rooms. 115 sqm FH 1,000 * charaes. 
Tet +33 (0)1 49 02 36 80. 


NEIBLLY S/SBHE. PRIVATE ALLEY, 
120 sq.m, duplex + 70 sqm garden, 3 
bedrooms, bathrooms, equpped Kitchen. 
FF15.000 mckxting charges. Chamwn. 
rite. AXIS- 33 fll)1 47 « 10 30. 


DAYTONA BEACH, FLOHIDA, 
Properiie5 lor rani. 
Can tifie (352)622^390 USA 

NYC FURMSHEO APARTMENT?, 
i week d i year. Graa! Locations. Cell 
Pal/Chtiqui: 212-440-9223, Fax: 
212-4484226 E-Mel aflnmeZfesnlHjm 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 


QUALITY TO APPRECIATE 


COTE D’AZUR 

Exceptional Estate 

Paradise. 40 minutes from the sea, unique and exceptional 
site between the coast and snow covered mountains, for 
those who appreciate nature and calm. 

A l_7jji century bosfide 

on 50 ha. of land, 10 ha. of which are 
a magnificent landscaped park, with rivers, lakes and 
waterfalls for the pleasure of trout and swans. 

The estate indudes 6 other houses and 15 old stone 
bridges, all in immaculate condition. 

Many extension possibilities. 
Documentation upon request 
Contact CH. JEANGILLES 

20, rue Latour Maubourg, 06400 CANNES, FRANCE 
Fax: + 33 (0) 4 93 43 51 95 


In an °W related wane bu»dl , >g In the hlstorteCBrtra Jpurfs , 1 ' " 

HW m from NottMtoirw ( 5 th Brrondlsawnent) 

afMrtmenl, vrdh (wo floors and an internal stalrcasa, large terracs 

and fireplace, dues rooms (onsof which psnafed with fli^taca), baftroom,2WG 

12 sq.ra nxif tonacs and 39 sq.m. celat 

800,000. US Dollar 

__RaptiM to Ortfrw X003-433B3B - Pifttidtes. PoMtetft OMOIO Basal - Switzertaryf 


u JSJL 


°* **• *w 

- ■jgff HaB & Associates, Inc. 


TO PLACE AN AD 
IN THIS SECTION 

Call 

FRED KONAN 

%k + 33(0)141439391 
Fax-* + 33 (0) 1 41 43 93 TO 




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Antelope, lion and elephant are among the animals you can photograph in the Masai Mara National Reserve. 

An Opulent Safari in East Africa 


By Michael Korda 

AIROBI — The first thing to know 
about making a safari in Kenya and 
Tanzania, as I did for two weeks last 
winter, is that everyone except travel 
agents will tell you not to. Those who have not 
been there will warn you that it's dangerous, 
pointing to a very few incidents in which tourists 
have been killed by bandits or poachers (and 
vety, very occasionally by the animals, mostly 
when the victim stepped out of the vehicle 
despite being told not to do so). 

Those who have been there will tell you that 
you're too late, that it’s all over, finished, down 
the drain. The right time logo on safari was when 
they went, five years ago. or 20 years ago. or way 
back in the 1920s when Kenya's Happy Valley 
was a white enclave, people dressed for Saturday 
night dinner at the Muthaiga Club and the char- 
acters from “Out of Africa” were alive and 
kicking. The game is gone, depleted by poaching 
and too many tourist buses, they will say. 

Then, too. you hardly ever see rhino or 
leopard, they will argue, and the wrong people 
are sitting on the terrace of the Norfolk Hotel 
where Bror Blixen and Denys Finch -Harton 
and Lord Delamere and Ernest Hemingway 
used to drink in the old days. 

No doubt East Africa was better in the old 
days, when Nairobi was still a small town with 
dirt roads, and no doubt it was even better in the 
19th century, before the famous man-eating 
lions of Tsavo were killed and the British pushed 
the railroad up from Mombasa to Nairobi. 

But vou can’t go backward in time, and 
probably wouldn’t like it if you could. 
Despite' the jumbo jets having opened the 
region up to tourists by the thousands, in 
many ways East Africa has improved for ' - 
travelers since my three visits in the ’80s. 

Havins done a gold-plated tour of Egypt g£j 
a year earlier, my wife, Margaret, and I 
were determined ro do an equally opulent gp 
safari. We wanted to go in maximum com- m~ 
fort — in luxury, in fact, where possible— 
and above all in privacy, with our own tag 
vehicle and driver and. for the longer legs of ||g 
the ioumev. our own chartered airplane. ||$ 

“Hakuna matata” (No problem), our mm 
safari -organizer friend Judy Houry said, gp 
Judy, an~ old Nairobi hand who arranges gg 
deluxe safaris from her home in Saudi m. 
Arabia, recommended ttutf westart m 
Kenya and go ro the Mara Brst, tben Sam- 
EunT then to the Wilderness Trails ar Lewa 
DowisTand from there to Amboseh, then onto 
Tanzania and the N^goioCriii^and ate 
eXdie Serengeri. This sounded good to us. 
SxSh we regretted sktemg Tsavo, amag- 

ESS^rveSsouthemkenya^ndhgrome 

dS about Tanzania, having . been Jere 10 
y^Tagain highly uncomfortable conditions^ 

RlAttOXURY 

On nnnious trips, we had almost always stayed 

Onpre hm JudY told us that if we wanted 

“ we should op for 

real luxury- gave us pause. Margaret 

JSl^^iSsports when it comes to living under 
MdI ^teSSs to be able to plug her hair 
S anva ?* tohave a hot shower, and I like to read 

dryer m and *0 nave ^ ^ ^ ^ tented 

were new^the only way to go, and had all 

ZEES** 


powered electricity in the morning and in the 
evenings (until If o'clock), big. comfortable 
beds, and an attached flush toilet and shower. 

The only problem was that we had ro keep 
fee tents firmly zipped up all the time, not only 
against the bugs (mosquito nets are provided 
and de rigueur). but also against marauding 
monkeys feat slip in through even fee narrowest 
opening in a fraction of a second. At night, we 
could hear the lion roar and the hyena howl just 
outside fee wire fence while’ bush babies 
bounced up and down on the roof of our tent. 

Mara Intrepids has a very pleasant restaurant 
serving a great British breakfast, a superb lunch 
buffet and a pretty good dinner menu, and an 
elegant open-air bar overlooking a tree in which 
bait is hung to attract the local leopard, who aims 
up every evening about on schedule, just as you’re 
having a drink, as well as a very nice shaded pool 
for fee afternoons between game drives. 

fat herb rvoftis There had been rain in the 
Mara, unusually late, wife the result that it was 
bright green, like Ireland, and covered in tiny 
white flowers. Rich grass means fat herb- 
ivores, and fat herbivores attract lion, so we 
saw enormous quantities of lion, some of them 
practically at the gate of the camp, and all of 
them as glossy and sleek as the ones in Dis- 
ney’s “Lion King.’’ Speaking of which, the 
Mara also provided us wife fee startling spec- 
tacle of a vast gathering of hyena, coming from 
all points of fee horizon, drawn from far away 
by fee scent of a kill. 

From fee Mara, we flew by charter plane ro 
fee Samburu Intrepids Club, its tents linked by 




■: 4 




Two of the 40 rhino at Lewa Downs Conservancy. 


spidery tree top catwalks feat bring guests to a 
kind of airy, palm -thatched tree house, where 
meals and thinks are served. Monkeys are 
ubiquitous here too (a man with a slingshot 
stands guard at meal time), but the tents are 
first-rate; there was a huge, old-fashioned Vic- 
torian double bed in ours, and a private tented 
flush toilet-shower space. Both camps served 
big breakfasts and good buffet lunches. Din- 
ners were a bit disappointing, and the best meal 
was usually fee vegetarian curry. 

The Mara is so big, and the trails so ill- 
defined that it was rare to see another vehicle; in 
Samburu that was less so, bm the scenery was 
as breathtaking as the game. Between the two 
reserves we saw the Big Five (elephant, rhino, 
buffalo, lion and leopard), including leopard in 
both places, whereas 10 years ago, when we 
were in Kenya and Tanzania for nearly three 
weeks, we saw not a single leopard. 

From Samburu we move — a long and 


the creature ’7L evenings — piped in From Samburu we drove — a Jong and 

least in the mornings ana me bumpy drive — to Wilderness Trails, at Lewa 

from a diesel fo stay in tented camps Downs, fee Craig family home since 1924. This 

We eventually A mboseli. At Lewa used to be a tented camp, but since our last visit 


cocktail parties in the hills, as well as night 
drives and bird-watching from a high tower. 

From Lewa Downs we flew on to Amboseli 
and fee Tortilis Camp, bordering Amboseli Na- 
tional Park, wife the most luxurious tents and the 
most dramatic views we had on our trip. Each 
tent faced out roward Mount Kilimanjaro, and 
was provided wife a big verandah and a very 
handsome bathroom. 

Unfortunately, the reserve itself seems to 
have become a treeless desert, in which the 
animals look depressed and are depressing to 
look aL This ecological catastrophe is usually 
blamed on the elephants, as they are hard on 
trees, but a more likely explanation is fee 
amount of dust and grit thrown irp by the tourist 
buses, which strangles and kills fee vegetation. 
We saw plenty' of elephants, a couple of rhino 
from a distance, a pair of unhappy-looking lions 
surrounded, literally, by mere than 20 buses and 
lots of birds, but it was, on the whole, a dis- 
appointing experience. 

We traveled by road from Amboseli to fee 
Tanzanian border — an endless, bumpy, dusty 
journey over rutted stone, with nothing in sight 
but dust, more dust and goats. The road im- 
proves as soon as you enter Tanzania, at 
Namanga, where you have to switch over to a 
Tanzanian safari operator and vehicle. The 
drive to Arusha is on a smooth, paved road, 
though there are still plenty of goats. 

After lunch in Arusha, we flew to the Ngoron- 
goro Crater, over fabulous landscape, and 
checked into the Ngorongoro Sopa Lodge. 

Nine years ago, Tanzania was so impossibly 
uncomfortable (and hard to get in and out of) that 
it was difficult to even notice fee game. 
— Today, this has changed dramatically. 
New lodges, tented camps and hotels 
have been built, fee chartered air services 
have been given fuel, and the tourist is 
welcomed — not so much at the border, 
where a certain surliness cm the part of the 
functionaries and a lot of red tape are still 
, the rule — but everywhere else. 

The Ngorongoro Sopa Lodge is re- 
cently built, ambitious and very conxfort- 
^ y able, the food excellent, by East African 
standards, the service stylish and crisp. It 
has a very pretty pool (no monkeys), and a 
™ lovely bar wife big fireplaces that we used 
HI in the evening, since we were high above 
III sea level here. 

sl&i The game is simply wonderful, though 
todil an otherwise peaceful picnic lunch in the 
icy. crater was briefly disrupted by the close 
approach of an angry young bull elephant 
who nearly stepped on two children whose 
parents should have known better than to let 
them wander. The crater is like that Because it 
is a relatively small area, you feel closer to the 
game than in most of the other reserves, and 
every so often you get closer than you (or they) 
might like. Many hippo, lots of lion, several 
rhino, a superb setting. 

On by car — another godawful road trip, but 
who cares? — across breathtaking landscape to 
fee Serengeri Sopa Lodge, also fairly new, and 
very comfortable, wife an exceptionally helpful 
staff, though the food was not up to the standard 
of Ngorongoro. From the handsome pool, we 
had a view across the Serengeri, and big herds of 
impala, wildebeest zebra and giraffe were al- 
most within reach as we basked in the son (since 
the lodge is near the equator and high up, it's 
possible to develop a major sunburn quickly). 

T HE Serengeri and fee Ngorongoro Crater 
were rich beyond belief, and unlike, say, 
Amboseli, not at all crowded wife mini- 
buses and Land Rovers. In fee Serengeri, fee 


zania we wouw rr fuj s out to two twin rooms, sumxmoea oy wnar iooks uix 

built since otf to' lighi-yetus a flowering. English gatta. 

he a happy choice. Tne loa^ ■ „ that The Craigs ‘ranch consists of 45,000 

^„ ov e?frorn ° or pnS remarkably acres- together with ‘5.000 acres of govern- 

miintrv and the tented cam up any ment reserve, surrounded by many miles of 
Sbrtable- withoujrcqu™^ fo electric fencing to form the Lew Wildlife 

, f ^mantle quality oi ^ Conservancy, and containing some of the most 

SKS . was tjfflSSShSS beautiful landscapein East Africa, rich in 
uSier fee furnishings wHeSUt ^ (there are 44 itano m fee Conservancy), 

where fee dozen or so guests and fee members 


After our rug*** " flight w fee Masai 
n own Air hip across 


National Rese™ 6 - a - 45 rin!Twas fee Mara of fee Craig family eat together. Ai Wilderness 
■ Galley • 0ur desnni !S?rimo that has its Trails, His possible not only to go an game rides, 

Hub, a newish tentedcampfejunas ^ 

Swn^afrstrip (sornenm^^r. generator- among fee wild game, and to enjoy sundowner 
affes). The tents have 


a sight that makes one realize what our own 
West must have looked like before the great 
herds of buffalo were killed off. In fee five days 
we were in Tanzania, we saw two lion kills close 
up and a hyena kill closer up than we really 
wanted to be, as well as cheetah, and the Big 
Five several times over, and returned dazed by 
fee wealth of wildlife and fee vastness of fee 
terrain. 

We took a fascinating drive across fee Ser- 
engeri, through miles of migrating zebra and 
wildebeest, past herds of elephants, to the 
Serengeri airstrip. There we were picked up 
and flown back to Nairobi. 

Michael Korda, editor in chief of Simon & 
Schuster, wrote this for The New York Times. 


Ginzans Hot Spring Inns 

Escape From Urban His in Japan ’s North 


By Joji Sakurai 

G INZAN. Japan — For city dwellers 
stifling in Japan’s prefab jungles, the 
onsen ryokan, or hot spring inn, can be. 
an obsession. It offers the opportunity 
to get out of your business clothes and into a 
lightweight yukata. lounge on cushions strewn on 
tatami mats, sip sake and drink beer in an en- 
vironment that sends you back to old Japan. The 
onsen ‘s steaming waters are said to cure a variety 
of ailments, but their most immediate salubrious 
effect is to ease away the cares of urban life. 

Ginzan, tucked away in a narrow valley in fee 
Yam a gala prefecture of northern Japan, is a 
village dedicated entirely to fee art of bathing. 
Few reminders of the modem day sully the 1 9th 
century feel of the town, making it an ideal 
weekend destination for those who long for an 
escape from the big cities. 

The town's buildings, most of them inns, are 
of tiered wooden construction, with lanterns 
hanging from curled up eaves and verandas 
opening out onto fee bracing country air. Gin- 
zan’ s two pedestrian walkways curve along the 
banks of a gentle stream that ends at the foot of a 
waterfall. Cars are left outside town limits. The 
clap of wooden clogs on wooden bridges, and fee 
sight of visitors strolling around in yukata loaned 
by fee inns, perfect the feeling of having stepped 
back in time. 

And fee town has an American import. The 
kimono-clad figure who slides open fee fusuma 
screen of your room at fee Fujiya ryokan and 
welcomes you with a graceful bow is Jeanie Fuji, 
nee Puth. of Portland, Oregon. She married the 
heir to fee Fujiya six years ago and threw herself 
head first into one of the most traditional of 
Japanese lifestyles; fee okamisan , or mistress, of 
a ryokan. 

“There was no job description," she laughs. 
“I really didn’t know what 1 was getting myself 
into." 

The Fujiya has been in fee same family for 
more than 200 years. When she first entered fee 
life of the ryokan, Fuji’s days began at six in the 
morning and ended at 1 1 P.M. The only other 
people working at fee inn were her husband, 
mother-in-law and the occasional part-time as- 
sistant . She embarked upon a crash course in fee 
sldlls involved in running a Japanese inn. 

"I had to learn flower arrangement, dressing 
up in kimono, moritsuke — fee art of arranging 
food on plates — “and the polite language we 
use to greet guests, which still gives me 
trouble," she said. 

T HESE days, her workload is lighter as fee 
ryokan has expanded its full-time staff. 
"The most satisfying part of ray work is 
talking to fee customers,” she said. 

The ryokan experience can often be bewil 
dering to fee uninitiated, and help is not always 
forthcoming in other traditional inns. Fuji ex- 
plains the lavish meals feat are brought up to 
rooms in the evenings and the etiquette of 
bathing in fee hot spring. 

“Foreign guests visit us to enjoy a traditional 
experience. I’m here to help when they feel 
unsure," she said. 




The waters of the Fujiya hot spring are in- 
vigorating. There are separate baihs for men and 
women. In the spacious and elegantly designed 
baths, you can chat wife fellow guests as you 
soak away your cares. There is also a delicately 
named “family bath’ ’ feat is barely large enough 
for two. 

Ginzan used to be a silver-mining town until 
fee veins dried up in the 18th century and the 
townsfolk found a more enduring source of 
revenue in the hot waters that sprang from the 
earth. 

The village is surrounded by tranquillity. The 
entire prefecture, with its waves of heavily for- 
ested mountains, is renowned for its beauty in the 
fall, when fee star-shaped leaves of the momiji — 
Japanese maple — flare into crimson. 

Ar fee far end of the v illag e, stone steps lead to 
the top of the tumbling waterfall feat feeds fee 
Yakushizawa river. From there, walking trails 
take you into a world straight out of a wood- 
block print. 

Moss grows on boulders set in limpid streams. 
Rows of momiji form a fiery canopy over the 
paths. Red bridges allow you to cross over 
brooks that suddenly burst into rapids. A strange 
cavern called fee natsushirazu (“ignorant of 
summer") remains cool even in the oppressive 
heat of August 

evening GLOW Evenings in Ginzan are a 
particular enchantment, when paper lanterns and 
old-fashioned gas lamps set on bridges cast a 
yellow glow around the town. Young couples 
stroll around clasping hands, and fee raucous 
noise of folk songs and melodramatic enka bal- 
lads emerges in intermittent bursts from the 
banquet halls of inns. On Saturday evenings a 
group of thick-set women in bright red costumes 
gathers on a bridge to perform a folk dance called 
the hanagasa, an energetic farming rite, in which 
fee dancers twirl around bamboo hats in a styl- 
ized imitatio n of field draining. 

Fujiya ryokan, tel (0237) 28 21 41. 1 8,000 yen 
($160). G inzan is a one-hour drive from 
Yamagata city, the prefectural capital. There are 
also frequent 45-minute flights from Tokyo's 
Haneda airport to Yamagata City; by bullet train 
fee trip takes four and a half hours. 

Joji Sakurai is a freelance journalist based in 
Tokyo. 


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The Moon in Barcelona 


By Al Goodman 

ARCELONA — One way to strike up a 
conversation at the new mega- 
nightclub, Luna Mora, is to ask about 
its name. Does it translate as “crescent 
moon," “waning moon" or fee more literal 
“blackberry moon?" 

Club employees are unsure. Some say it has 
no meaning except fee obvious connection to the 
moon decorations dominating the flashy locale, 
which can accommodate 1 ,200 party goers. Eva, 
who works at one of Luna Mora's eight bars, 
pours a hearty whisky but draws a blank 
on fee meaning of fee club's name. _ 

So one naturally seeks an opinion 
from fellow clients. On a recent night, W 
Joan Guitart Roy, a former ship's captain f AT* 

for Greenpeace and a caro-carrying 
member of the Ostrich Growers Asso- f safe 
ciation of Catalonia, pointed out that the 
crescent-shaped moons at the club could signify a 
new moon or a waning moon, depending on 
whether you were in fee northern or southern 
hemisphere. (Barcelona was north, last we 
heard). 

A perusal of fee “Moon Celebrities," in- 
cluding Jules Verne and President Kennedy, 
raised even more questions. Did anyone ask 
permission to use their names at fee club? Or fee 
important corollary: would they have come to 
this place? 

Well, maybe, at least out of curiosity. After 
ail, the club has convenient hours for nighfeawks 
and early risers alike. Inaugurated last October, 
Luna Mora promises to be open everyday of fee 
year from 10:30 PM. until 5 AM. 

It’s easy to find in fee thriving Olympic Port 
restaurant and bar district, hard by the Medi- 
terranean. Luna Mora’s entrance is only steps 
from the beach, and in the shadow of a giant 
metallic fish sculpture by the Basque artist 
Eduardo Chilli da. 


Inside Luna Mora, the large dance floor down- 
stairs has a counterpoint upstairs, where it's easier 
to converse because of dozens of moon-shaped 
tables and chairs, and fee softer pop and salsa 
music. The two levels have an intimate archi- 
tectural relationship, because fee ceiling-cum- 
floor separating them is transparent in places. That 
permits people upstairs to look down cm fee 
dancers below, and the gyrating types downstairs 
to look up to those engaged in thoughtful con- 
versation. 

The diverse crowd moves easily between the 
two levels on fee curvy mam staircase. Not all 
clients are young but most are dressed casually. 
___ Few seem to have crane from work in 
Iplf suits and ties or high beels and office 
dresses. 

The club owners, who also promote 
% A' pop concerts around town, have sched- 
uled live, 90-minute concerts at Luna 

' Mora on Tuesday through Thursday, 
ending about 1 JO Ail A frequently- 
booked band on fee small stage downstairs is a 
local group called “Jake & Elwiod, homage to fee 
Blues Brothers.” You can guess how they dress. 

Entry, which includes one drink, normally is 
1 300 pesetas ($1030) Sunday to Thursday, and 
1 ,800 pesetas on weekends. 

Dunng breaks, fee curious can read moon 
verse from Federico Garcia Lorca or Pablo 
Neruda on strategically-placed wall panels. 
There's also enough light to discern wall photos 
of U.S. astronaut Neil Armstrong’s fabled 1969 
moonwalk.The club’s overall lighting is low and 
the curvy bars are topped wife frosted white 
glass, and lit from below. That makes it easy to 
count out fee price of extra drinks, from 700 
pesetas for bottled water to 1300 pesetas for 
premium liquor. 

Luna Mora Music Club, 19-21 Carrer de la 
Marina, Barcelona. Tel: (34-3) 322-0326. 

Al Goodman contributes to The New York 
Times from Spain. 


IT 

RHINE 

,1997 

1GE9 








PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 


LEISURE 


Utah’s Snowbasin: Minimal Glitz, Serious Speed Skiing 

asrsesrass: sg&am <>i SEES 


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S ALT LAKE CITY— We were 
driving up Interstate 15 early 
one Saturday morning about a 
year ago. along the western 
edge of tie Wasatch Mountains in Utah, 
and the talk turned to speed skiing, that 
delight of athletes bent on the outer 
bounds of acceleration. 

Peter Webster, a friend who'd been 
living in Salt Lake for the better part of 
15 yeazs. described how records had 
been set upward of 140 miles (225 ki- 
lometers) an hour. I shuddered. 

Not that we had any intention of 
speed skiing that day; still the topic was 
inspired by our destination, Snowbasin, 
a small ski resort north of Salt Lake 
City. While the better-known Utah re- 
sorts have spent the 1990s stressing 
controlled sluing, to accommodate a 
range of tourists with an equally diverse 
range of skiing skills, Snowbasin has 
never compromised. 

Chosen as the site of the signature 
events of the 2002 Olympic Winter 
Games in 'Utah — the downhill and 
grand slalom runs — Snowbasin is all 
about speed. 

In part, Snowbasin won its leading 
Olympic role by default. Before envir- 
onmentalists agreed to support a 
statewide referendum favoring a bid for 
the Winter Games, they extracted a con- 


City. By doing so. they protected Snow- 
bird, Alta, Brighton and Solitude from 
the changes the Olympics would require, 
and opened the door for Snowbasin. 

In the pantheon of Utah's ski slopes, 
Snowbasin more than holds its own. Its 
2,400-foot (730-meter) vertical descent 
is greater than mighty Alta’s, and its 
average of 400 inches (10 meters) of 
snow a year surpasses Park City's re- 
sorts: Deer Valley, Park City and Wolf 
Mountain. 

U nlike Snowbird, the glamour resort 
for expert skiers, and Deer Valley, with 
its valets and fine dining at its mid- 
mountain restaurants,. Snowbasin is cut 
from the same quarry as Alta: siding the 
way it used to be. with minimal glitz and 
maxim um mountain. 


Fivi Chairlifts 


cession from local Olympic organizers 
to exclude resorts in either of the Cot- 


to exclude resorts in either of the Cot- 
tonwood Canyons south of Salt Lake 


Snowbasin consists of a range of five 
peaks, though its trails are centered un- 
der the middle three: DeMoisey, 
Needles and the tallest. Mount Ogden. 
Just five chairlifts take skiers up. none 
of them the gondolas you’d find at Park 
City or Snowbird or even especially 
high-speed. But they ride silently 
among firs, aspens and bowls of fine 
powder that build the anticipation about 
which run to tackle next Snowbasin has 
just 39 runs on the trail map, and the 
entire mountain can be tackled in a 
day. 

Peter and L along with another friend, 
Bryan Staffer, got to the ticket booth at 
9:20 AM., amid a knot of skiers that 


would be considered sparse at . ■*’ 
most other resorts, but which ,, * (. 
regulars called a crowd. We it i 
bought full -day tickets for $26, .£■ . , 
a bargain by Salt Lake Stan- g frj fefc, 
dards, a steal to Easterners — 
and were on the slopes 15 
minutes later. 

We first took the Wildcat 4l 
lift up to midmonntain, where £■’ - d 
the full expanse of Snowbas- ^ 
in’s range comes into view. 

Coming off that lift, taking in 
the blend of brilliant sun and 
wisps of snow scraping the 
craggy tops of Wasatch peaks, — : 

the iridescent orange rocks 
peppered with evergreens and 
conifers, it all came back: a 
mountain built for speed. 

The lanes are very wide, so 
wide that they’re not really . 
lanes at all, just the moun- 
tainside, and, because of the 
lack of traffic, [Hetty much 
mogul-free. Snowbasin rates 
70 percent of its terrain be- Sweet 
ginner or intermediate, and 
runs above the tree line are accessible to 
even low-intermediate skiers who want 
to imagine they’re Jean-Claude Killy 
for a day. Powder lined the edges of the 
upper bowls and meadows and was eas- 
ily attainable in some off-boundary 
areas that expert skiers could tackle. Yet 
the mountain was free of the excessive 
grooming that can rob slopes of their 
challenge. 

With so few people on the mountain. 


W A. 





AS Hccsann fa Its Nc» VsjkTaacs 


Sweet Revenge, an intermediate run at Snowbasin. 


there’s room enough for skiing as fastas 
you possibly can. Nobody, mcludingtbe 
ski patrollers, seems to mind. We found 
some snowboarders setting up a launch 
site just off a main run — by the af- 
ternoon, boarders and skiers alike made 
the most of the open invitation to hot- 
dog, and took shots at catching big air. 

Not me, though. I hugged the ground. 
As for the speed skiing, it was taken for 
granted I’d bring up the rear. At times, it 


' was all I could do to keep 
. Bryan and Peter in sight. The 

„ . first two runs were down 

Sweet Revenge off the 
Middlebow] lift, atagh-inter- 
mediate swoopfest to get the 
k/j la g ffi blood pumping. Breathless 
and exhilarated. I began ra- 
cing more quickly than I had 
' / fa BS in years, getting a little more 
ifjjg polished with each run. 

Even at the Porcupine lift 
reilltSfi — up the northern side of die 
mountain that is adjacent to 
f John Paul, the area on which 

m - Snowbasin will build the 
i Olympic runs — there were 

no lines. Triple chans whisked 
us up die mountain, with a 
view of the forest land yet to 
be cleared for the Olympics. 

Off tire lift, we hiked be- 
yond the groomed trails be- 
yond the boundary lines, in 
an attempt to reach the sum- 
. rait of Mount Ogden. But car- 

tas l n tying skis up a pitch of about 

35 degrees made us think 
twice, and insiead we headed over to the 
Sno-Car trails where the first Olympic 
surveying had been done. 

From there, we skied nonstop down 
Ml Ogden Bowl into Chicken Springs, 
to the bottom 2,400 feet below. There, an 
expanded base lodge served up standard 
burger-and-fries fare — and the only 
lines we ran into all day. Aftera late lunch 
we assembled, with several other friends, 
at the top of the Porc u p i ne lift The 


conditions were ideal: bril lia n t sun, near- 
spring temperatures and powder now 
rmrked iust firm enough for jet-fuel runs* 


Our band skied the runs off Porky lTkc a 
fi ghter squadron, swooping down in 
formation, matching the rise at the bottom 
of a curve in die mo untain , puHiiig up and 
exch anging grins or looking back to see 
the runs of other comrades. 


A FTER a full day of .thigh- and 
lung-burning runs, we headed 
down the mountain aid to the 
Shooting Star Saloon in Huntsville, the 
oldest continuously operating watering 
hole in the state. Given its. license- in 
1879, 17 years before Utah won stare- 
hood, tite Shooting Star is windowless 
and heavy with dark wood, .with in- 
teriors that haven't seen daylight in 100 
years. Dollar bills pepper the ceiling, 
mementoes of travelers over the years. 
A postage-stamp establishment froui- 
Ioaded with a bar and fined with bootis, 
the Star has a pool table and jukebox 
wedged into the cramped back quarters. 
The TV over the bar hawks the Hank 
Thompson catalogue of country hits. - 
The Shooting Star was famous in the 
area even before USA Today named its 
Star burger the best in the country . Now 
visitors clamor for the award-winner-: — 
two patties, melted cheese and a mess of 
grilled Polish sausage in a bun the size 
of a loofah mitt The regular clientele 
accepts die siding crowd as a burden to 
be Dome good-naturedly, if a bit 
grudgingly, since they make it tough to 
get a table on the weekends. . . 


MOVIE GUIDE 


ARTS AGENDA 


Fools Rush In 


Directed by Andy Tennant. 
US 


Trailing a cloud of television 
stardom, Matthew Perry of 
“Friends" plays a wisecrack- 
ing New York-based real-es- 
tate developer in “Fools Rush 
In," a lackluster comedy 
about a shotgun wedding. His 
leading lady is Salma Hayek, 
beaming ingenue and proud 
owner of the best midriff in 
movies. Though the two stars 
meet at the toilet in a Mexican 
restaurant and immediately go 
to bed (off camera), Hayek 
comes off as uncommonly de- 
mure. However, her naivete 
contrasts awkwardly with die 
glibness of Perry, whose clev- 
er way with a one-liner turns 
into ter minal facetiousness 
here. The movie is supposed to 
be about culture clash and 
winds up with more than it 
bargained for. One of die 
film's odder flashes of origin- 
ality is its assumption that the 
precise middle ground be- 
tween Perry’s Alex Whitman 
and Hayek’s Isabel Puentes is 
at the Hoover Dam. Several 
scenes are set atop die dam at 
the Arizona-Nevada state line. 
After learning dial his one- 
night stand is pregnant, Alex 
reluctantly decides to many 
her. "Fools Rush In" means 


to find humor in the essentially 
snobbish misunderstandings 
that threaten the Fuentes- 
Whitman union. But the film 
never gets past die unlikeli- 
hood that its characters have 
much chance of Irving happily 
ever after. Or of finding real 
beat or humor along die way. 

(Janet Maslin, NTT) 


Smilla’s Sense 
of Snow 

Directed by Bille August. 



boy. But there are so many 
plot complications that it 
seems the viewer has been to 
Greenland and back by the 
time Smilla unravels this my- 
stery. (Janet Maslin , NYT ) 


BRITAIN 


London 

Royal Academy of Arts, tel: (171) 
494-5B15, open daily. Continu- 
ing/ To April 6: "Braque: The Late 
Works." 


Mas alla del 
Jardin 

Directed by Pedro 
Spain. 


DENMARK 


“Smilla’ s Sense of Snow’’ 
has a heroine whose mother 
was killed by a walrus, one 
small sign of the chilly exoti- 
cism that made Peter Hoeg's 
mystery novel such a huge, 
unlikely popular success. 
Hoeg’s tale of Arctic intrigue 
moved from urbane Copen- 
hagen to remote regions of 
Greenland has now been 
gracefully adapted by Bille 
August into a sleek, good- 
looking film that captures the 
book's peculiar fascination. 
Readers of Hoeg’s best-seller 
will find this a faithful film 
that mirrors die novel's 
strengths — a tough, inter- 
esting main character and a 
strong sense of place — while 
also sharing its plot problems. 
“Smilla’s Sense of Snow" 
begins grippingly, then de- 


Ftu&Mjts 

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childhood in Greenland fol- 
lowed by an abrupt change to 
Danish city life, that makes 
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The film is timely with its de- 
piction of the heart-wrenching 
and violent scenes in the 
refugee camps of Rwanda, 
filmed, in this case, in die more 
peaceful Senegal. But it falls 
short during the story’s main 
action, centered in the south- 
ern Spanish city of Seville. 
There, an aristocratic lady 
leads a seemingly charmed life 
with a lively family and good 
friends, who all come together 
ai a lavish outdoor party. But 
die lady, Palmira, soon suffers 
a series of family tragedies that 
prompt her finally to go be- 
yond the security of her es- 
tate's manicured garden and 
pursue a dream in Africa, 
where she serves as an aid 
worker. The problem is not 
with the fine acting of Concha 
Velasco as the main character. 
She manages to keep the view- 
er engaged despite the film's 
crunching of the calamities in- 
to such a short period that there 
I is no time to digest them. Even 
some of the cutting from one 
scene to the next makes it look 
a bit jagged. The pacing does 
not make the film unbeliev- 
able. but simply less than what 
it might have been, given its 
inspiration in the 500-page 
novel of the same title by Ant- 
onio Gala, a masterful 
storyteller in contemporary 
Spain. (Al Goodman. IHT ) 


Copenhagen 

Arbejdermusaet, tel: 33-93-25- 
75. closed Mondays. To SepL 1: 
“Red and White: Posters from the 
Russian Civil War, 1917." Propa- 


ganda during the Civil War that 
followed the 1917 Revolution was 


followed the 1917 Revolution was 
carried out via posters. Jnacountry 
where a great part of the popu- 
lation could not read, the message 
had to be simple. Of the 50 heroic, 
satiric or edifying posters exhibited 
here, the 30 Red posters were 
open to the public during the Com- 
munist regime, white the 20 White 
posters were kept in secret 
archives in Moscow. 



dosed Mondays. To May 25: “Tal- 
Coat Dev ant ITmage." More than 
100 paintings and drawings trace 
the evolution of the French painter 
(1905-1985), from the early por- 
traits of Ns friends in Montparnas- 
se to self-portrate, a recurrent 
theme in his oeuvre. 


PL19E Nl ' p 


N IT! D STATE S 


Breton artist Tal-Coat’s works are shown in Geneva. 




GERMANY 


Marseille 

Opera de Marseille, tel: 04-91-55- 
10-50. Leo Delibes's “Lak/ne." Dir- 
ected by Gilbert Blin, conducted by 
Olivier Holt, with Nathalie Dessay. 
Michael Cousins and Alain Fon- 
■fla/y. March 14, 16. 18 and 20. 


Paris ; 

Grand Palais, tel: 01-44-13-17- 
17. closed Mondays. Continuing/ 
To May 26: “Angkor et Dix Siectes 
d'Art Khmer." Art from Cambodia 
dating back to the 6th century. 
Irrstitut du Monde Arabe, tel: 01- 
40-51-38-38, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/ To Aug. 31: “Soudan: 
Royaumes sur le Nil." An explor- 
ation of archaetogical finds from 
Sudan. 

Pavilion des Arts, tel: 01-42-33- 
82-50, dosed Mondays. To June 
18: “Le Surrealisms et L' Amour.” 
Features 150 paintings, scu fu- 
tures, objects, drawings, collages, 
photographs by Breton, Dali, 
Duchamp, Ernst, Giacometti, Ma- 
gritte. Miro, Picabia, Picasso and 
other members of the Surrealist 
movement. Also features books, 
pamphlets and magazines. 


Stuttgart 

Staategalerie, tel: (71 1) 212- 
4074, dosed Mondays. To May 5:„ 
“Magie der Zahl." Numbers and 
arithmetic In 20th-century art. Four 
hundred paintings, sketches and 
sculptures by artists such as Gi- 
acomo Balia. Andy Warhol and 
Jasper Johns. 


mills, trees, church steeples and 
dune landscapes. The selection 
documents the Dutch painter's 
artistic progression from realistic 
motives to abstract compositions. 


Baltimore 

Walters Art Gallery, tel: (410) 
547-9000, dosed Mondays: To 
May 18: The First Emperor 
Treasures From Ancient China.” 
The exhibition features 80 objects 
reflecting the history and culture of 
andent China during the reign of 
Ch'ln Shih Huang-ti, the First Em- 
peror (221-210 B.C.), including 
life-size terra-cotta tomb figures of 
solders and horses, created to ac- 
company and protect the First Em- 
peror in the afterfife. Other treas- 
ures indude architectural ele- 
ments from the imperial palaces, 
bronzes, ceramic vessels, coins, 
gold and jade jewelry as wefl as 
weaponry. ■ - . 


PORTUGAL 


TALT 


Lisbon 

Centro Cultural de Belem, tel: (1 ) 
301-9606. open datiy.- Continu- 
ing/ To April 21: “Ufa/Uve." Cur- 
rent artistic practices and initiat- 
ives in the United Kingdom. 


Boston 

Musoium of Sciancev. tel: (627) 
723- 2500, open daily. To Sepl. 1: 
“Leonardo Da Vina: Scientist, In- 
ventor; ArtisL" More than 200 
works tradng the fife of the 
Ftorenttoe painter, sculptor and 
draughtsman, including anatomic- 
al drawings and models of his In- 
ventions. 


_\iO( U 


Rome 

Teatro dell'Opera. tel: (06) 48-16- 
01. Massenet's “Don Qufchotte." 
Direded by Piero Faggioni, with 
Ruggero Raimondi. Anna Catarina 
Antonecri and Alain Vemhes. 
March 13. 16. 19, 22. 25 and 27. 


SPAIN 


NETHERLANDS 


Madrid 

Fundacio Juan March, tel: (93) 
435-42-40, open daily. Id June 8: 
“Max Beckmann: Retrospective.” 
More than 30 paintings by the Ger- 
man painter (1884-1950). Reflect- 
ing on the “grotesque banality of 
life," Beckmann created violent Im- 
ages that caused him to leave Ger- 
many and settle in Amsterdam and 


M VMU I IMJ II I Ul OUICU VI 

Rotterdam ages that caused him to te 

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dosed Mondays. To June 8: The ■ later in the United States. 

Early Mondrian." The exhibition, 

reviewing Mondrian's earfy work HTs'w' IDIN 
until 1920, features 150 paintings, ~ 

drawings and watercoiors. During Stockholm 
this period, Mondrian ( 1 872-1944) Modema Museet, tel: (8) 
experimented with flowers, wind- 50, dosed Mondays, To 


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Stockholm 

Modema Museet, tel; (8) 666-42- 
50, dosed Mondays. To May 19: 
"Picasso and the Mediterranean 
Myth." Documents the relationship 
between Picasso’s work, and the 
art of the ancient worid. His treat- 
ment of faces often reflects the 
same simplicity as small idols cre- 
ated in 3000 B.C. The exhibition 
includes examples of the mythical 
figures appearing in Picasso's 
works between 1904 and 1967: 
satyrs, centaurs and the Minotaur. 
The exhibition features more than 
100 paintings, sculptures, draw- 
ings, prints and ceramics as well as 
Cydadic, Mycenaean. Archaic, 
Iberian, Etruscan and Graeco-Ro- 
man objects. 


New York 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, tel: 
(212) 570-3791, dosed Mondays. 
Continuing/ To April 27: "Giam- 
battista Ttepoto." Paintings and 
etchings by the Venetian painter. 
Museum of Modem Art, tel: (212) 
708-9400, dosed Wednesdays. To 
May 18. “Manuel Alvarez Bravo." 
Comprehensive exhibition of the 
Mexican artist's career (bom 1902) 
from his early experiments with ab- 
straction to the realization of a per- 
sonal style concerned with Mex- 
ican customs and rituals. 
Continuing/ To April 29: "Wittem 
De Kooning: The Late Paintings: 
The 1980s." Forty paintings cre- 
ated between 1981 and 1987. 



CLOSING SOON 


S Wl TXE BLAND 


Geneva 

Musee Rath, tet: (22) 310-52-70. 


March 9: “Decouvrir la Geometrie: 
Ben Nicholson et la Bibnotheque 
Lauren tienrte." Canadian Center 
for Architecture, Montreal. 
March 9: "Celestial Treasures from 
China: Gifts for the Gods and the 
Dead," Kunsthal, Rotterdam. 
March 9: “Paul Strand: Le Monde a 
ma Porte. 1950-1976." Ma/son 
Europeenne de la Photographic, 
Paris. 

March 9: "Tony Cragg: Sculpture." 
Whitechapel Art Gallery, Lon- 
don. 

March 9: "Jesus Rafael Soto." Jeu 
de Paume, Pals. 

March 11: "Marie Laurendn.” Mu- 
seum ot Art, Osaka. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAS', MARCH 7, 1997 


PAGE 13 


ln g 


LEISURE 


71 :i: »?.?•** 


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Australian Food Goes Native 


l" 


By Kate Sing leton 

S fP^-WhenCapuinAr- 

*ur Phillip founded the Aus- 

SS® “^ny of New South 

200 veai^o^S^i 801 ^ raore *an 
T*1 ^ confided in his journal 

«h^iteSfc.rf. upon tfc ^“ na - 
S^5f^ ofagnci,,Iure: “To put into 

hdtrtSL 01 mCn J ead > r 10 perish for one 
?*** ^ huogeMfae means of 
procuring constant and abundant dto- 

■ss* t n be ^ v**** u p° n ^ 

bCTrfits of the highest value and or- 

Aborigines were not 
starving but the settlers soon were. Not 
only did Sydney’s infertile soil fail to 
produce the desired crops, but delays in 
tb&amval of the English supply ships 
forced the ravenous convicts and soldiers 
to forage for leaves and berries to sup- 
plement dwindling rations. History has 
its ironies, and this particular one proved 
so bitter that modern Australia took the 
bat part of two centuries to digest it 
Only in the last few years have Aus- 
tralians begun to realize that they have a 
unique indigenous food culture based on 
native products that are -clean, green and 
singularly different 

Bushfoods, as they are catW. are now 
proudly served in a growing number of 
restaurants throughout Australia. Bush 
flavors feature discreetly in the catering 
few airlines such as Qanias, Ansett and 
Cathay Pacific, while specialty food 
stores are stocking a range of cookies, 
preserves, p&t£s, sauces and teas made 
with exclusively indigenous Australian 
ingredients. Tastes are sharp, distinctive 
and wild, like, much of the continent they 
come from. 

culinary flagship The flagship for 
such cu linar y originality is surely Edna’s 
Table at the MLC Centre in Sydney, 
ingeniously designed and run by the 
Kersh siblings, Raymond and Jennice, 
whose experience of native foods began 
in the outback 30 years ago. With ex- 
traordinary flair, they devise dishes that 
combine traditional Aboriginal wild 
foods like bunya nuts (somewhat similar 
to chestnuts). Kakadu plums (which 
have die highest vitamin C content of any 
fruit in the world), wild rosella flowers 
and warn gal greens (the native equi- 
valent of spinach, used by Captain Cook 
to dispel scurvy among his crew), along 
with export -quality specialties like fresh 
kangaroo filet, gumleaf-smoked South 
Australian venison, Tasmanian ocean 


trout. Northern Territory buffalo and 
wild magpie geese. 

^Edna’s Table and the growing num- 
ber of restaurants pursuing similar goals 
are the fruit of concerted passions — of 
their owner-chefs, first and foremost, 
but also of a few pioneering spirits who 
have devoted years to studying and se- 
lecting the right species and to devel- 
oping methods Of Organic farming to 

supplement the limited quantities dial 
can be harvested from pristine envir- 
onments. For the chosen native produce 
embodies highly desirable * ‘wild” char- 
acteristics: ecological resilience and 
geographical suitability, for instance, as 
well as high nutritional density, low fat. 
high protein and high fiber. 

The remarkable spread of the bush- 
food trend throughout Australia and be- 



DandSiderAHT 


yond owes much to two men who have 
worked closely together over the years. 
Peter Hardwick is a subtropical spe- 
cialist who was first drawn to native 
Australian culture as an environmental 
activist when die north coast rain forests 
were being pillaged for timber back in 
the late 1970s. Since then he has been 
instrumental in setting up training pro- 
grams and grower cooperatives among 
Aboriginal peoples involved in provid- 
ing the basic bush ingredients that are 


largely being traded and distributed by 
Bush Tucker Supply Australia, a com- 
pany set up 10 years ago by Vic Cheri- 
koff.a versatile and dynamic scientist. 

‘‘We have over 1,700 collectors and 
growers out there gathering or growing 
foods for us from Cape Yoik to Tasmania 
and from the eastern seaboard to the 
Western Desert,” said Cherikoff, "but 
most of our products are now in cul- 
tivation in mixed species systems. We 
have selected the bat varieties, and tens 
of thousands of plants have been es- 
tablished to supply the growing markets 
we have built in Australia and around the 
worid.” 

Cherikoff, however, sees a threat to 
the fledgling bushfoods industry. 
"There has been significant poaching of 
many species already by foreign re- 
searchers,” he says, citing Israeli plant- 
ings of Australian wattles (Acacias), 
native cucumbers, quandong (a native 
peach) and desert limes, and emu farms 
in France, the United States and China. 

Cultural Pride 

The idea that growing and marketing 
native Australian products has become 
such big business that it involves some- 
thing akin to industrial espionage is just 
too much for some of the original ad- 
vocates of cultural pride. Aboriginal 
involvement and bushfoods as a pan- 
acea for tormented bodies and souls. 

"Make a living, not a killing," is the 
mono of Hugh Longstaff, erstwhile chef 
at the luxury Hayman Island resort and 
now purveyor of “bush" marmalades, 
mustards, pestos and barbecue sauces 
that are available in boutiques in and 
around Maleny. 

Maleny is an enchanting little town 
surrounded by some beautiful land- 
scape that includes various sites sacred 
to local Aboriginal peoples. In recent 
times it has attracted a number of white 
Australians in search of a slower pace of 
life in harmony with native culture. 
Bushfoods seemed to be die answer. 

In a country the size of Australia, 
there’s room for cottage industry as well 
as major operators. Both sorts of sup- 
pliers would probably agree that by tne 
year 2000. those who flock to the 
Olympic Games in Sydney will find a 
wide range of gourmet products and 
restaurants focusing on native Australi- 
an foods that speak for a new and con- 
vivial form of national pride. 

Kate Singleton is a writer based in 
Italy. 


MILAN FASHION 





; T. : 


wwmm® iifsi* 


The Vectra, a Boost for Diesel 


A Modern Twist on Italian Knits 


By Gavin Green 

T HE diesel engine may well be 
gasping for life right now, just 
like many people who breathe 
its fumes" It is likely to die — at 
least in its current guise — because of its 
probable inability to meet upcoming 
new emission legislation and because in 
two of the three major world car centers 
(Japan and North America) makers gave 
up on Dr. Diesel’s dirty device many 
years ago. Only the Europeans are fight- 
ing to save it and, while we’re not 
exactly at Custer’s last stand just yet, the 
scalping knives may soon be leaving 
their sh eaths . 

Unsurprising, it is likely to be the 
Japanese who wield the blades. Mit- 
subishi has just come up with a new 
direct-injection gasoline engine (Toyota 
is following soon) which gives all die 
economy benefits of diesel but none of 
the shake, rattle or (when it comes to 
performance) stroll. American and Euro- 
pean carmakers are bound to follow. 

European Stubbornness 

European makers have clung to the 
diesel motor because fuel prices there 
have traditionally been high and exhaust 
regulations lax. (Reverse circumstances 
explain diesel’s non-appeal in the United 
States.) The diesel engine's lower fuel 
consumption helps reduce oil imports in 
countries not rolling in the stuff. Thai's 
why France, in particular, began its long- 
term policy of taxing diesel much less 
severely than petrol. This has resulted in 
French makers gaining worldwide em- 
inence in diesel technology. 


Mind you, other European makers are 
also getting in on the acL Although it 
may be a brave last stand rather than the 
harbinger of a brave new world. Opel — 
General Motors’ German subsidiary — 
has recently launched a diesel motor 
that is right up there with the French in 
its technology. In some ways it’s 

THE CAR COLUMN 

better. It uses direct injection (the same 
technique that Mitsubishi has mastered 
with gasoline), a turbocharger (to boost 
performance, traditionally languid on a 
diesel) and 16 valves (both to boost 
performance and cleanliness). The up- 
shot, when fitted to the recently re- 
vamped Vectra, is fuel economy like 
that of a small gasoline hatchback. It 
sips as delicately as a hummingbird 
drinking nectar. 

Of course, it sounds like a bag of bolts 
when first started, and when cold the 
motor spins as though it’s running in 
treacle rather than oil. But after a few 
miles, the new DI (for direct-injection) 
Vectra loses its grumble. It is never as 
quiet as a good gasoline engine — no 
diesel is, and direct-injection diesels are 
even noisier than indirect-injection 
ones. But the noise will rarely cause 
offense. Rather, it encourages early 
gear-changing to avoid high revs and 
high noise, and leisurely, unaggressive 
driving. It’s the son of car that you just 
pootle about in, smugly aware that 
you'll probably soon overtake all the 
flash folks in their GHs when they have 
to stop to refuel. In the Vectra DL you 
stop to fill up about as often as a camel in 
the desert. 

In most other ways, the Vectra is an 


ordinary if competent car. It is Europe *s 
best-se lling mid-sizer, even though it 
was once criticized for its stiff-kneed 
suspension. But recent models have in- 
troduced some suppleness, so that 
broken roads no longer result in bruised 
buttocks. The looks are ordinary, the 
interior space is average for the class, 
the dash is unexceptional, the seats O.K. 
You get the picture. Don’t buy a Vectra 
if you crave individuality and stand- 
alone specialness. All around, the Passat 
or the Peugeot 406 are better cars. 

But if competent, hassle-free, unex- 
ceptional transport is all you seek, then 
it's fine. 

typical buyer Who cares if diesel 
may be on -the way out? You’ll still be 
able to buy the stuff for years, and die 
French will probably veto any Europe- 
wide move to tax the noisome liquid 
more severely. 

Besides, if you're after cutting edge 
technology, you're not exactly going to 
be the typical Vectra buyer. This is a 
common car for the common person. 
Who. like everybody else, craves un- 
commonly low fuel bills. 

• Opel Vectra 2.0 DL About $25,000. 
Four-door sedan or five-door hatch- 
back. Four-cylinder, direct injection tur- 
bocharged diesel engine, 1994cc, 
82BHP. Five-speed manual gearbox. 
Top speed 176 kmh (110 mph). Ac- 
celeration 0-100 kmh in 14.8 seconds. 
Average fuel consumption: 5.8 liters/ 
100 km. 

Next: The Honda Prelude 

Covin Green is the editor-in-chief of 
Car magazine. 


nr 

bune 

,1997 
USE 9 


Pr- 


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minr*'"" 

.(rfr t - - ••• 

'*■ 

(*. J*m3 I .% " 

- 


cv*’-'.*- " 

d-i 


A. ’ Eri 




By Suzy Menkes 

Iniernjlipnal Herald Tribune 


te- 




• v Ik 






M ilan — - After 
years out in the 
fashion cold, 
knits are now 
hoL The forest-inspired col- 
lection of russet colors and 
leafy patterns that Missoni 
sent out Thursday was a flour- 
ishing example of what Itali- 
an designers do best: artistry 
rooted in technique. 

While the tailors, who used 
to be Milan fashion's heavy 
hitters, are in retreat, knitwear 
designers are on a roll for the 
fall/winter season. And their 
success comes down to two 
words '"soft" and ‘ Tig ht." 

The new jacket is a cardigan, 
the knitted dress traces the 
current long-line silhouette 
and what has been considered 
casual wear has been given a 
new urban sophistication, 
with gossamer fine or spark- 
ling Lurex dresses at night. 

“Nature is always our land- 
scape, but this time we wanted 
to make the clothes as light as a 
leaf falling,’' said Rosita Mis- 
soni backstage. after a power- 
ful collection, which con- 
tinued that the house’s revival 
was not just part of the 1970s 

"JEJ. the show opened Missoni's fringed-edge coat over a patterned 

with rainbow-colwed , Krizm had focused on the 

ers and long For instead magical knits on which its fashion em- 

gfa^uggesta tap ^e^ms^ ^fwas built. But Krizia’s designer, 
of bulky «H CT »»Jffiff3r , coais Mariuccia Mandeili, insists on sending 
som s length &S «with a out a foil collection of tailoring, lately 
as 8 a mix of and fancy evening clothes — which is no 

™ ^^SSstitehing. Other longer bow modem women dress or 
■ ngzag and horaonrai sn ■ 1 ^ houses show. 



— — uc»c7n» 

Missoni's fringed-edge coat over a patterned dress. 


rically in beige and ivory for a 
modernist take, or added a 
dollop of sugar with appliqufid 
roses. Velvet worked like for 
into a short cape had a vintage 
feel that added to a collection 
that goes its own sweet fash- 
ion way. 

What about sporty knits? 
They came out as marled 
jackets and tweedy sweaters 
at Sportmax, the junior line of 
big sister MaxMara. Yet the 
flea-market mix of wool with , 
chiffon gave the collection an 
urban feel, reinforced by 
ribbed tunics and pants in all- 
black and by the metallic 
bronze sweaters worn with 
pin-striped tailoring. 

The forty stoles and feather 
boas that were a motif of | 
Giorgio Armani’s Emporio , 
show suggested a new soft 
and romantic mood for this I 
once-sporty line. Although ' 
the show had trim, tailored 
pantsuits, that structure was 
chipped away by substituting 
liquid velvet pants with the 
tweed or pin-striped top half. 
Or a short coat would float 
away from the body, giving 
ease to the dressy collection. 
The velvets were patterned 
and textured with herring- 

bone and coin-dot effects as 

vkwnwsm Armani moved away from 
iress. mascnline fabrics. There was 
a strong focus on femininity 
— a young woman tiling — as models in 
long simple dresses, in bordeaux, ink 
blue, and pine green, came out holding 
hands and playing with matching or 
multicolored feather boas. It was a 
pleasing collection just because it 
seemed such a fresh take on a familiar 
style. 

Armani, who will close the Milan 
shows with his signature collection on 
Sunday, can justify showing twice. But 


new iaxe oh Other longer how modem women cress or seemea such a ireso rase on a iaminar 

’ , zigzag and horrzontai sme smar t houses show. style. 

: extraordinary effects in me p j. Krizia had a touchy-feely theme with Annani, who will close the Milan 
, feather colors were pane ma» . febrics mile and velvet and a light- shows with his signature collection cm 

like tree baik and appnques ol * ness ^ lts gossamer cardigans and Sunday, can justify showing twice. But 

cobwebs of long dresses. gauzy dresses cabled at the midriff. But the idea of showing secondary designer 

For the ultimate “ re _ j t sank with the evening parade of more lines on die runway is getting out of 

*. monkey fars of the hippie era merma id dresses than you would find in hand. It is a trend in all fashion capitals, 

x ‘ worked in black woolwith coioiTm ^ Qcean depths . with Donna Karan proposing to show 

. between the tufts; or mngfflg Cashmenfs self-styled queen was nat- three separate lines during the New 

*atwasas longand coiomu » » uraUy in her element this knitwear sea- York season next month. These design- 

poie Mixing knits and urban nyiw soa y g1ir a giagiotti took her favorite er doubles or trebles may have to be 

less successful- the evenmgwear c i 0Ce( j_ cre ani cashmere and knitted into rethought, for they are stretching the 

usuaflv a flop at Missoru — sjameu ^^wn dresses and coats with rope- already overcrowded show schedules to 

the Lurex dresses caught m tne run y cables. She blocked it geomet- the bursting point 

, spotlights like butterfly wings. 










PAGE 14 


CVTERNATIOIYAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 


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SHE WAS, HE SAID, 


AN ARISTOCRATIC EIGHTY YEAR OLD 

French lady and he loved her with a passion that bordered on the physical 
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that he would be coming to Singapore during the first week in March. And 
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excelled all expectations in the Singapore to Malaysia vintage car rally. 

A RAFFLES INTERNATIONAL HOTEL 
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4 L rffFJMTIUNALM , | 

itcralo^X%^g;ribunc 


ai r Canada 

ABrsatm of Fresh air 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


j 

R FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 PArv 

A Breath of Fresh Air 


WAUL S TREET WATCH 


Stock Markets and a Crystal Ball 


Growth Investors 
Put Their Money 
On Potential Profit 


By Floyd Norris 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — Growth 
stocks, the shares of compa- 
nies whose profits Wall 
Street expects to rise rapidly, 
have been the darlings of the stock 
market during the 1990s. But they 
lagged late in 1996 and have recently 
been downright poor performers. 

The best measure of the perfor- 
mance of the stocks dial analysts love 
is a pew index, the Montgomery Se- 
curities Growth Stock Index, which is 
based on the 500 stocks for which Wall 
Street expects the greatest profit 
growth in the coining five years or so. 

The index is new, but Montgomery, 
a San Francisco-based brokerage firm 
that specializes in growth stocks, traced 
it back to [he beginning of the 1990s 
and found phenomenal performance. 

Had you invested $100 in index 
stocks at the beginning of 1990, it 
would have risen to $310 at the end of 
January. In contrast, a similar invest- 
ment in the Standard & Poor’s index of 
500 stocks would have been worth 
$222, and one in the Russell 2000, the 
best-known index of small stocks, 
would have risen to just $220. The 
figures exclude dividends and trans- 
action costs. 

But since then, things have not been 
as friendly for many growth stocks. 
The index has fallen 1 1 .7 percent since 
the end of January, while the S&P 500 
has risen 2 percent and the Russell 
2000 has fallen 1 .5 percenL 
The search for growth has been a 
staple for many investors. Finding the 
next Xerox or Microsoft Corp. — 
companies that rose from tiny to su- 
preme in an important business — is a 
dream, and finding one can provide 
gains to offset a multitude of failures. 

But many companies that are ex- 
pected to grow instead run into prob- 
lems, whether from competition or 
changing technology. Such stocks can 
be vulnerable to concern that, the eco- 
nomic environment is turning less 
friendly. 

“Growth investors are looking to 
the future and paying for future earn- 
ings,” Michael Moe, Montgomery’s 
director of growth-stock research, 
said. Alan Greenspan, the Federal Re- 
serve Board chairman, has spoken 
again recently of the risks of “irra- 
tional exuberance” in the stock mar- 
ket and, some think, sent warning sig- 
nals that he may feel a need to push up 
interest rates. 

“When you are discounting future 
eamiags. people have a greater fear of 
interest rates going up,” Mr. Moe 
said. 

Perhaps, but it may also be that as 
stock prices have been bid up, so too 
have analysts' expectations. A review 
of where die Montgomery index stood 
at the end of each year shows just how 
much more expensive growth stocks 
have become. It also shows that the 
nature of whai Wall Street means by 
growth has changed. 

A few years ago, many investors 
looked for companies that would grow 
consistently whatever the state of the 
economy, such as Coca-Cola Co. Now 
they are often looking for the next 
Microsoft. .... 

The recent slip of stocks in the index 
parallels some recent performance 
problems by mutual funds thar had 
done well by picking growth stocks. 
The American Century 20th Vista 
Fund, once a star, has lost more than 8 

percent of its value so far in 1997. 

The Montgomery growth index is 
based on forecasts of analysts col- 
lected by EBES. the firm formerly 
known as Institutional Brokers Esti- 
mate Service. While it asks for earn- 
ings-per-share figures for coming 
quarters and years, it also asks for 

See PERFORM, Page 21 


Growing, Growing, Gone 


The Montgomery Securities Growth 
Stock Index compiles the perfor- 
mance of the 500 stocks for which 
Wall Street analysts foresee the 
fastest growth, with the components . 
of the index changed at the 
beginning of each year. It was a star , 
performer for much of the 1990's, 
but has faltered since the end of 
January. 

HISTORIC PERFORMANCE 

Plotted monthly except latest; 

Dec. 31. 1989 = 100. 


Prognosticators 
Warn Not to Be 
Seduced by Equities 


By Peter Passell 

New York Times Service 



| too i 

L S&P 500 index ; 
Russell 2000 index 50 ! 

1 *90 | *91 | 92 I *93 | *94 1 '95 | '96 j 97 j 

ENTRY THRESHOLD ! 

Minimum growth needed to qualify j 

for inclusion in the index. Figures are 
expected annual earnings growth for 
the next 3 to 5 years. 

25% 



m 

m 

1 

n 

1st 



B| 



”91 '92 '93 ’94 ’95 ’96 '97 


! DROPOUT RATE 


Percentage of companies from 
previous year's index roster that 
failed to qualify for inclusion again in 
the current year. 

60% 



'91 '92 *93 *94 '95 ’96 ’97 


• INDUSTRY SECTORS 

j Percentage of index companies in 
j ; each category. 


j Technology 
j Health care 



Consumer 
products 4 


Other 

industries — • | J j j- 16% 

’90 '93 ’95 1 — '97 — 1 

HIGHLY SPECULATIVE STOCKS 

Percentage of index companies 
expected to lose money in the 
current year, or trading at a high 
multiple of anticipated profits. 


■ 50% 



m 

; 40 

-tx Price-eamings 

n 

: 30 

. 60 or greater 



! 20 

m Loss 

1 



3i 

i 


90 '91 '92 '93 '94 *95 '96 '97 

■ Source: Montgomery Securities 


NYT 


N EW YORK — With the 
stock market outpacing the 
wildest expectations in the 
past few years, can the good 
times roll on much longer? Don't ask 
the dismal scientists. In what amounts 
to a rare instance of collective pro- 
fessional humility, economic fore- 
casters are loath to predict changes in 
equity prices. 

Bur that is not quite the end of the 
story. Dean Baker of the Economic 
policy Institute, a Washington-based 
liberal group, claims no special insight 
into the workings of the equities mar- 
ket. But he argues that the trend in 
stocks cannot be sustained. The 7 per- 
cent real return enjoyed by investors 
over the past 70 years, he suggests, is 
simply incompatible with mainstream 
forecasts of growth of less than 2 per- 
cent in the gross domestic product 
over the long haul. 

His analysis, in a report just issued 
by the Twentieth Century Fund, takes 
direct aim at pension specialists who 
have been promoting stocks as a pain- 
less fix to Social Security’s problems. 
But it is also relevant to individual 
investors, who have grown accus- 
tomed to thinking of the market as a 
perpetual-motion machine. 

Make no mistake: The equities-are- 
better argument is seductive. 

Since the mid- 1920s. the average 
annual return on stocks has exceeded 
the return on government bonds by 
more than five percentage points. 

Many stock analysts explain the 
high-flying Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage as belated recognition that re- 
cessions — and accompanying dips in 
corporate earnin gs — are a thing of the 
past. But number-crunching types do 
not bother with the “why. If the 
equity premium has endured for seven 
decades, the reasoning goes, the best 
guess is that it will endure for many 
more. Hence the enthusiasm for in- 
vesting retirement money — public 
and private — in stocks. 

Mr. Baker’s pessimism is not rooted 
in some theory of stock pricing. 
Rather, he argues that optimistic ex- 
trapolations of stock prices are in- 
consistent with modest projections of 
economic growth. 

The total value of traded stocks 
today, he notes, is about 20 times 
corporate profits. If profits remain a 
relatively stable share of national out- 
put and output per worker continues to 
grow at about 1 percent a year, the 
stock market’s price -earnings ratio 
would have to rise to 34 by 2015 to 
sustain a 7 percent average return. 

Is it conceivable? Perhaps. But this 
is a Ponzi game: For the assumption to 
hold, the market’s price-earnings ratio 
would have to reach 485 to 1 by 
2070. 

Of course, profits might grow more 
rapidly than gross domestic product, if 
the share of income going to capital 
grew at the expense of labor. But here, 
too. the unlikely soon becomes the 
implausible: to sustain a 7 percent 
return and a price-earnings ratio of 20, 
average wages — not labor's share of 
income — would have to fall by one- 
third over the next four decades. 

There is a way corporate income 
could rise more rapidly than GDP 
without exacting a pound of flesh from 
labor. “The stock-market bulls say 
corporations will earn an increasing 
share of profits in emerging markets, ’ ’ 
says Burt Malkiel, an economist at 
Princeton University. 

But the numbers would work only if 
corporate earnings outside the United 
States rose into die trillions of dollars 
by the middle of the next century — a 
far-fetched prospect 
“If I had to bet I’d guess we’ll see a 
major adjustment in stock prices in the 
next two years,” Mr. Baker said. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 


March 6 Libid-LJbor Rates 


Aiuihidtuu 
Breasts 
FiinUwt 

. __ Id 

Madrid 
Mikai 

Iteir York ft) 
Pari* 


£ Landes 


S * MS8- 1JM liStH' LTB LSI* 

1.935 ll'll Jf® JJHj. | OJ75 _ 0075 8JSIB 2582 M A* 

MS S7.WJ5 a* ^ 55*. uB uor 1.159 U1S- 1.2572 1-1®* 

1 ™ w" - 5n 1747* inn 57.14* woe vum vm nc sib 
16121 — gjm- 75.10 4.IW 97645 llWg'WUO — 

14523 231212 25J75 _ HUB 4tl31 1.144 14* IMS 1UJ 

I.WJS "L® Uflia 1*327 3WD UB. 121.155 13647 MS* 

_ 1*1410 1JK 5.7*75 alsJJ ua . ua 1>tf5 

5 _ 7 j, JJVC5 JJ735 .m nil — NBA BB391 


i_7!9 9J45 J3735 — juu ffi.,7 — BJ4 9392 

Tokyo i:iJ 5 UKT UW USB* U» 1 . 1 * 7 ' — 

Toraato 1JW 1XU 17953 U358 6*0 "“i AlHJ . — ij25r ujju iJjW 

S3 iSsSSiBSSSSSaiSSS 

Ttmnto rotes erepm- -units of lOtb N.O- net quote* HA- net wmBaote- 

a To buy one pound- tn Totiurone 

Other Dollar Values 
Cermcy Per* CMofiBf 

Argen.peso 0.9W8 
Ananrtml 1.2721 

Aottrtascfe. 12094 -EiS 

Breril red 1.0525 
CUKstym 1325 
Caen karate 29.36 
□oeHlkreoe 65524 
EgypLpend 3.79* 

FtafferUu 5 1253 


Marche 

Sy&S ri iMii 

Dado- D-ftUrt Fnac Storting Franc Yea ECU 

1 -month 5VS ■ 5*k 3VW-3Vu 1Rta-1«VW C-«Vk Wk-SVO ftt-to* 49»-*Vu 
3- month Sh»-SW 3VH-3W ldto-l*o»Si-6*« 3U-M 4Vo*4*k 

6- month 5*16-5% 3M-3U 1 % - 1 % 6Va - 6V* 314-3* fe-% *Vu-4*» 

1-yecr SW*-SW» -3K-3U ltt-l* &U.«* 3U-3U ¥,-&% 4V*-6V* 

Sotmxx Reuters. Uaytis Bmk. 

Rales appticable tobitertank deposits otSl mffficn minimum (orequMentl. 


Per* 

240.15 

7.7427 

177^3 

35J6 

2392.00 

0-4425 

3J42 

0.3038 

2.476 


Currency 

icZedandS 
Non*. kra»« 

PIA pew 
PoTtshzWy 

port, escudo 

Ross rate 

Saudi riyai 

stag.* 


Per* 

8JW5 

1.4269 

4.9515 

2632 

106 

17244 

569000 

ITS 

1.4303 


Omeocy 
S. Air. rad 
S.Kdr.wm 
Swed kroon 
TdwooS 
ThatbaM 

TetttsADn 

UAE tfirbotn 
Veoez. twHv. 


Per 5 
4.454 

869 JO 
7AT76 
27-52 
25.96 
123740. 
16705 
477JJ0 


Forward Rates w 

Cwtaocy 3®4»y ,*^03 japoaeceyen 

PooMStHfiag ^609 U580 Swiss'*®* 

ssr as as. .ora . — 


30-dey «W«y 9»W 

121.14 12063 

1^4849 1.4800 1-4756 


1J6W 

1 716O i- 7 ' 28 1-7092 „ Bam* Commentate ItoBana 

■ tndofuei Bank ffg^BmUiotCmaia 


WWKS. 

iMUgn): Barw* 4* Fmnc f 1 
'r*enfafc IMFiSDW 


Key Money Rates 


Iftftwf State* 

Case 

Pree 

DtaCMBtrota 

SJX 

5J» 

Prime rota 


8b 

Federal food* 


5W» 

WHtay CDs deters 

SM 

SM 

itoKJay CP dealers 

535 

555 

3 matt Treasury Ml 

521 

5.19 

l-year Treasury 

5J1 

5-69 

2-year Treasury bft 

6.12 

409 

5-year Trout note 

<U5 

6X\ 

7-rear Treasury rata 

654 

SSO 

10 -fnr Treasury note 

552 

658 

30-yw Tresny bead 

658 

654 

MerrS Lyacta 30-tfar RA 

457 

487 

Japan 



Dlsrmml rote 

050 

050 

CaB owner 

044 

043 

1 -canto kitertnak 

059 

059 

S^nobHi ioteitmk 

056 

056 

6-Rwotta joterbenk 

059 

059 

10-reor Gw! bond 

2M 

Z48 

Canaanr 



LMBbeud rots 

450 

450 

CbQ FTHfflfy 

3.10 

112 

1 -moitfi krtcrfamk 

328 

325 

3-awtti interbank 

125 

125 

6-moan bOcrtaaak 

3.25 

125 

10-year Bond 

556 

553 


BtHoki 

Boot base reft 

Cditmer 

1-Boett Interbank 
3-amrtt hrierbaeft 
6-aeatt krtertonk 
10 -yeerGflt 

Brace 

IntorvenUftC rate 
CeSmer 
1-mnaft tatertok 
iVm o nth tatertxat 
6 « 0 Btti tetsrtont 
liHfwrOAT 


6J0 

UX 

400 

6Vk 

M 

1SJ 


400 

5VU 

61V> 

6to 

m 

7.25 


3.10 

m 

Vhs 

3V* 

314 

558 


X10 

3 V» 

3\4 

3U 

553 

Merrill 


Sources: RetUen. Bloomberg. 

Lynch. Bank et Tokya-MItiublshl. 
CDemaztomb Cmdruaenafs. 

AM. PM. CTbb 


Zurich 


352.25 352.75 +t 

352.15 353.10 -1 

NnrYort 35450 35350 -t 

U5. dotian per ounce. London attic. 
fitkw tv** and New York opening 
anti dosing prices: New York Came* 

tAprfU 

Soane: Redea. 





Workers from Renault's Belgian plant demonstrating Thursday in front of the firm’s headquarters near Paris. 


EU Slaps Renault for Plant Closure 

Even Chirac Criticizes Carmaker’s Chief as Aid is Blocked 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The European Commis- 
sion on Thursday angrily blocked sub- 
sidies that would allow Renault to ex- 
pand a plant in Spain in response to the 
‘ French automaker's abrupt decision to 
close a factory in Belgium with the loss 
of3J00jobs. 

“It is absurd to close a profitable 
plant,” said Karel Van Miert, the EU 
competition commissioner, “and to 
make additional investments in Spain.” 

Renault's “present attitude'* made it 
“impossible at present” to give the aid, 
estimated at $17.5 million. Mr. Van 
Miert said. While he did not spell out 
what Renault must do to unblock the 
money, the action complicates 
Renault's plans to restructure in a mar- 
ket plagued by overcapacity. 

Renault had sought the aid to expand 
production at its plant near Valladolid to 
1 .200 vehicles a day from 865 and hire 
500 more workers. Some of the pro- 
duction from the Vilvoorde plant in 
Belgium is slared to move to Spain. 


Another EU commissioner, Padraig 
Flynn, told reporters that Renault had 
“behaved badly” by failing to respecr 
EU social directives. Earlier, the pres- 
ident of the European Commission. 
Jacques San ter. said the closure de- 
cision was “a serious blow to the spirit 
of European confidence." 

Louis Schweitzer, who took charge of 
Renault five years ago when it was one of 
Europe's industrial success stories and 
drove it into a financial ditch, faced 
mounting criticism from his own gov- 
ernment 

The Renault chairman, who is related 
both to the missionary doctor Albert Sch- 
weitzer and the philosopher Jean-Paul 
Sartre, was openly criticized by President 
Jacques Chirac, whom a spokesman said 
was “shocked” by the way in which 
Renault had acted in announcing its plans 
to close its plant in Belgium and lay off 
more than 2.700 workers in France. 

Past the spot where Sartre once har- 
angued capitalism outside Renault's 
headquarters in Boulogne-Billancourt. 
some 300 Belgian workers marched 
alongside French workers Thursday 


shouting “Same boss, same battle!*' 
Union delegates walked out of Renault's 
works council after management refused 
to allow a representative of the Belgian 
work force to address die meeting. 

But Belgian workers who invaded a 
Renault plant at Cleon, France, found 
little sympathy from engine-makers 
there, who are concerned about com- 
petition from a Renault plant in Brazil. 

At Vilvoorde. workers said they 
would hang on to their “war chest” of 
several thousand completed cars. 

Prime Minister Alain Juppe of France 
earlier told Mr. Schweitzer “to start, 
without delay, ail useful consultation 
within the framework of Belgian law 
and European legislation” about the 
Vilvoorde closure. 

When Mr. Schweitzer took over 
Renault, it had a record profit of more 
than 8 billion francs ($138 billion) in 
1992. Now, following partial privatiza- 
tion — the French state still retains 46 
percent — it is expected to announce 
record losses that union officials expect 
to be between 4 billion and 6 billion 
francs. 


Japan Trade Surplus Renews Debate 


By Sandra Sugawara 


washinjtron Post Serrice 

TOKYO — Japan's trade surplus un- 
expectedly soared 362 percent in Janu- 
ary — its first increase in 17 months — 
prompting warnings Thursday from 
American officials who fear that Japan 
will try to export its way out of its 
economic slump rather than increase its 
domestic spending and imports. 

Robert Rubin, the U.S. Treasury sec- 
retary, said a sustained increase in Ja- 
pan's trade surplus would not be "in 
anyone’s interest, including Japan.” He 
made the comment after testifying, before 
the House of Representatives' Appro- 
priations Committee in Washington. 

Mr. Rubin also rejected suggestions 
that the United States had launched a 
new round of "Japan trade-bashing” as 
"ridiculous.” 

Earlier. Lawrence Greenwood, a se- 
nior official ar the U.S. Embassy in 
Tokyo, said of the trade report. "If this 
indicates a trend upward, then it would 
be a matter of concern to us.” His 
statement echoed comments made this 
week by Lawrence Summers, the U.S. 
deputy Treasury secretary. 

The surplus in Japan's current ac- 
count — the broadest measure of trade, 
which includes merchandise, services, 
tourism and investments — widened to 
150.7 billion yen (SI .24 billion) m Janu- 
ary from 32.6 billion yen a year earlier. 

It was the first increase in the current- 
account surplus in 17 months, according 


to the Finance Ministry. Some analysts 
and economists had been expecting the 
report to show Japan's first current- 
account deficit in six years. 

[A ministry official, speaking on con- 
dition of anonymity, said an increase in 
income from rising Japanese invest- 
ments abroad also helped widen the 
January surplus. Reuters reported. But 
he said the declining trend in the cur- 
rent-account surplus remained intact, 
although the pace of the decline may 
slow as the fall in the country’s trade 
surplus also eases.] 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Germany’s econ- 
omy, which slowed to a standstill in 
recent months, appears set to resume a 
course of subdued growth, according to 
a raft of employment and economic data 
released Thursday. 

But the pace of any recovery will be 
plodding, economists warned, meaning 
that any gains in economic output this 
year will not significantly remedy Ger- 
many's record unemployment, which 
worsened again in February. 

High unemployment, which pollsters 
say has led Germans to lose confidence 
and see themselves living in a time of 
upheaval and uncertainty, will keep 


Japanese officials tried to play down 
the increase. A Finance Ministry of- 
ficial said it had been due in part to 
increased revenue from nonferrous 
metals and petroleum products. 

But some economists here sharply 
disagreed. “I think it's a real trend 
upward,” said Robert Alan Feldman, an 
economist with Salomon Brothers’ 
Tokyo office. He said the main reason 
was the depreciation of the yen, which 
has made Japanese exports cheaper 
while raising die price of imported 
goods in Japan. 


consumer demand muted and contribute 
to the sluggish economic pace, econ- 
omists said. 

• The Federal Labor Office reported 
that another 5,000 Germans lost their 
jobs in February, bringing the season- 
ally adjusted total to 432 million, a rise 
that was surprisingly less threatening 
than many had feared. The seasonally 
adjusted unemployment rate was un- 
changed from January at 1 1.3 percent. 

Unadjusted for seasonal factors, the 
jobless total increased 14,000 to 4.67 
million, with the unadjusted quota sim- 
ilarly unchanged at 12.2 percent 

The rise of 5,000 in February was 
slight compared with the shock increase 

See GERMANY, Page 21 


Signs of Patchy German Growth 


Canada, PJs and the Battle Over Cuba 


By David E. Sanger 

N ew Kwt Times Senior 

WASHINGTON — The battle to un- 
dermine the only Communist regime in 
the Western Hemisphere — Fidel 
Castro's Cuba — has spread to the pa- 
jama department at the Wal-Mart in 
Winnipeg, Manitoba. 

T xte last week, a Canadian customer 
rummaging through the store’s racks dis- 
covered that the Arkansas-based retailer 
was trafficking in Cuban-made PJs. A 
politically alert store manager pulled the 
pajamas off the shelves, fearful that the 
chain could find itself in violation of the 
Helms-Burton Act, the US. law that tries 
to force companies and governments 
elsewhere to join in or to aid U.S. eco- 
nomic sanctions against Cuba. 

But no sooner had Wal-Mart an- 
nounced that it was clearing the pajama 
shelves of its 135 other stores around 
Canada than the government opened an 
inquiry into whether the retailer had 
violated a Canadian law that bars 
companies operating in Canada from 
obeying rhe American statute or "ob- 


serving any directive, instruction, in- 
timation of policy or other communi- 
cation” from the United States thar 
furthers the Cuba embargo. 

"We expect Canadian companies 
and the Canadian subsidiaries of Amer- 
ican companies to obey Canadian law. 
full stop,” a spokesman for die Ministry 


NEWS ANALYSIS 

of Foreign Affairs and Internationa] 
Trade said. If prosecuted and found 
guilty, be added, Wal-Mart could be 
fined as much as 13 million Canadian 
dollars ($1.1 million). 

The case is considered unlikely to go 
that far. but i f Wal-Mart is the first to be 
caught in this maw of conflicting laws 
and contradictory national policies, it is 
almost certain not to be the last. Mexico 
and the European Union have recently 
adopted similar legislation making it 
illegal for companies doing business 
within their borders to obey die U.S. 
legislation, which they are challenging 
at the World Trade Organization. 

The United States vowed two weeks 


ago to block that challenge. In Wash- 
ington. Stuart Eizenstat, the deputy 
commerce secretary for international 
trade, said that rather than allow the 
trade organization to judge whether the 
Helms-Burton Act violated internation- 
al trade accords, the United Stales 
would invoke a “national security ex- 
emption.’ ’ a claim that Helms-Burton is 
not a trade action but a law to curb a 
Cuban threat to the United States. 

That declaration was sharply criti- 
cized in Europe and Canada and came 
up this week in a meeting in Washington 
between Canada's foreign affairs min- 
ister. Lloyd Axwonhy. and the U.S. 
secretary of stale, Madeleine Albright 

The Wal-Mart store where the con- 
troversy began, in Winnipeg, is in Mr. 
Axworthy’s political base. 

It is not clear whether the Wal-Mart 
manager overreacted. The Helms-Bur- 
ton measure is aimed at non-U.S. compa- 
nies that traffic in property that Mr. 
Castro seized from American nationals 
or companies when he took power nearly 

See CUBA, Page 21 


IT 

SUNE 
,1997 
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-t v 







THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30-Year T-Bohd Yield 


6800 - 



1996 

Exchange - Index 
NYSE • Wdw* • 


‘Thursday • Piw. . 

■ ! .«4pSH — - « 


.. S944+?©. -3945.85 : -0.02 


NYSE 

s&p soo 

: s 798JSO : '' . .7WJ45 . “ ‘ +1+12 

NYSE 

SSP4G& .•• 1 ; ; -.r 

■:77fiJW "..,775,12 .-Hlfikti 

NYSE 


.^taast-. 419.17 '+0.18. 

UA .• 

hlasda^ Composite. 1317.WM32fi.tD' - 0.66 

Amx 


..68&0J ;.. 508^»v;. +0,06 

Toronto -. 



S5oP«ito 

•Bdwwfte-t 


Mexico C% 

eobs , ;“- 

3762.68 ’ +0U8S' 

! 8ueoo«AirafeMBiva#';.'^ -'"-'V 

-OM. 

Santfe$o ' 

'l^tA'Csriteaf. a ! --'- 

5328.16 . .5314.75 ' +&£$ 

Caracas 

Capita} 

ytsossa ■ 

Source; Bbomberg, Reuters 

LmetBUietwJ Herald Tnbwie 

Very briefly: 


$6.6 Billion Bid for Thrift 


LiictptlctJ fry OurSiaff'Fran Dispatches 

SEATTLE — Washington Mu- 


tual Inc- agreed Thursday to buy 
Corp. for 


Great Western Financial 
S6.6 billion in stock, topping a 
hostile bid by a rival thnlt, H.F. 
Ahmanson & Co. 

The acquisition would create 
the largest U.S. savings and loan 
association, with S87.4 billion in 
assets and more than 1,500 offices 
in California, the Pacific North- 
west and Florida. 

The takeover would come at a 
heavy price to Great Western em- 
ployees, as Washington Mutual 
proposes to close 200 branches 
and slash annual costs by $340 
milli on by 1999. But Great West- 
ern has recommended that share- 
holders approve the deal. 

Washington Mutual's shares 
were unchanged in late trading, at 
$5325. while Great Western shares 
were up $1 .625, to $46,625. Wash- 
ington Mutual had been considered 
one of the leading contenders to 


take over Great Western, which has 
been seeking a better deal since 
Ahmanson. the largest U.S. thrift, 
made its bid last month. 

Ahmanson criticized the pro- 
posed Great Western- Washington 
Mutual deal, and analysts and 
takeover specialists said Ahmanson 
was likely to raise its bid. 

But a rival agreement could be 
costly, as Great Western agreed to 
pay Washington Mutual as much 
as $95 miUkm in fees and other 
expenses if it backed out 

“Ahmanson is fully committed 
to a proposed transaction with Great 
Western,” a spokesman for Ah- 
manson said, adding that the latest 
proposal did not fit with the ac- 
quisition strategy that Washington 
Mutual had discussed in the past; 
“We are amararf that Washington 
Mutual's bid is so totally incon- 
sistent with its prior public claims as 
to how it does acquisitions.” 

Washington Mutual said its pur- 
chase of Great Western would add 


to earnings within a year after the 


next 


million in pretax savii 
year and $340 million in IS 
Under the agreement. Great 
Western shareholders would re- 


ceive 0.9 of a share of Washington 

Great 


Mutual for each of their 
Western shares. 

If its bid succeeds, it will mark 
the second time in a year dial Wash- 
ington Mutual has doubled in size 
through an acquisition as West 
Coast banks and thrifts have 
merged to tiy to cut costs and ex- 
pand into new markets. Last year, 
Washington Mutual bought Amer- 
ican Savings Bank in Calif ornia for 
$1.2 billion. Six of California's 
largest hanks and t hri fts have made 
major acquisitions in the past few 
years. Washington Mutual will take 
a $278 milli on charge for costs as- 
sociated with the merger, including 
adding $100 million to its reserves 


( Bloomberg . Reuter si 


Interest-Rate Worries 

Keep Stocks in Check 


, &<** 


Xti 


dmpitaib i Oie- Staff Fnwn /Mfuccfies' 

NEW YORK — Stocks slumped 
Thursday, pulled down by a weak 
Treasury bond market, where in- 
terest rates rose amid more signs the 
U.S. economy may be too robust to 
keep inflation in check. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age slipped 1. 1 5 to close at 6,944.70 
points, while the Standard & Poor's 
500-share index lost 3.40 to 798.59. 
Declining issues outnumbered ad- 
vancers by a narrow margin on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

The price of the benchmark 30- 
vear Treasury bond fell 17/32 point, 
to 96 29/32, taking the yield up to 
6.87 percent from 6.84 percent 
Wednesday. 


Technology stocks : fell 
Odyssey Ventures, a S an : 
cisco-based research firm. 


slowing demand for personal com- 


after 
Ffan- 
ed 


ng den -- . 

puters from first-tune buyers. Com- 
paq Computer fell 3 to 78. and Dell 
Computer slipped ¥> 1 0-743%. 

* ‘It’s a first sign of slowing home 
PC sales,” Timothy Grazioso at 


U.S. STOCKS 


Bond prices fell as traders spec- 
ulated that a report Friday on Feb- 
ruary employment and wages may 
suggest that inflation and interest 


Waste-Management Giant Is Born 


Bribes: New Way of Making Deals? 


HAMILTON, Ontario (Bloomberg) — Philip Environ- 
mental Inc. agreed Thursday to purchase Allwaste Inc. of the 
United States for about $540 million in stock and debt, 
combining two of North America's biggest haulers and re- 
cyclers of industrial waste. 

’ The deal would create a company with annual revenue of 
about $1.6 billion, 8,000 employees and 215 sites in North 
America. Europe and South America. AlJwaste's focus on 
removing waste from refineries will complement Philip’s 
strength in the steel, auto and telecommunications industries, the 
companies said. Philip also said it would buy the Houston-based 
company Serv-Tech Inc. for $72 million in stock. 


TI Sees 10% Growth in Chip Market 


DALLAS (Bloomberg) — The world semiconductor mar- 
ket will grow 10 percent this year, an economist with Texas 
Instruments Inc. predicted Thursday. 

Vladi Carto. the economist, said his projection had been 
based on strong equipment sales, low levels of consumer 
inventories and reduced capital spending as a percentage of 
industry revenue. The market shrank 9 percent in 1 996. 


Bloomberg News 

WASHINGTON — Securities 
and Exchange Commission inves- 
tigations are finding that U-S. cor- 
porate bribery of officials abroad is 
emerging as a significant problem 
for the first time in 20 years, ac- 
cording to the commission's top en- 
forcement official. 

‘Tm worried about a level of 
behavior by some U.S. companies 
that may be benign indifference or 
tolerance of payoffs or bribes,” the 
commission s enforcement direc- 
tor, William McLucas, said. “Some 
apparently view them as a necessary 
way of doing business.” 

Mr. McLucas voiced his concerns 


about practices of U.S. multination- 
al companies after die commission's 
first enforcement action for bribery 
in 11 yean. Triton Energy Ltd. 
agreed last week to pay $300,000 to 
settle allegations that a subsidiary 
bribed Indonesian government of- 
ficials in 1989 and 1990. 

The commission is conducting 
several other civil investigations of 
possible corporate bribery under the 
Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, Mr. 
McLucas said. 

The Justice Department's last 
major case was in 1994, when Lock- 
heed Corp. agreed to pay a $24.8 
million penalty after pleading guilty 
to bribing an Egyptian legislator. 


Several lawyers who represent 
VS. multinationals say their clients 
are exposed id an increasing number 
of bribe solicitations, especially 
when bidding for contracts or li- 
censes in Eastern Europe and South- 
east Asia. Among the countries cited 
by these lawyers were Russia, South 
Korea and Indonesia. 

“In Eastern Europe, the sky's the 
limit; it's the Wild West,” said 
Judah Best of Debevoise & Plimp- 
ton in Washington, 

The United States is believed to 
be the only country in the world that 
outlaws bribery of foreign officials, 
although Japan is now considering 
such a measure. 


rales are poised to rise. 

A report Thursday of a 2.5 percent 
increase in orders to U.S. factories in 
January and a drop in weekly claims 
for jobless benefits added to concern 
that the Federal Reserve Board 
would raise interest rates to slow 
things down before inflation had a 
chance to accelerate. 

The markets were especially cau- 
tious because Alan Greenspan, the 
central bank chairman, reiterated 
Wednesday that the Fed's priority 
was to contain inflation. 


Cantor Fitzgerald said. The tech- 
nology-heavy Nasdaq composite in- 
dex fell 13.67 points, to 1315.42, 

But retailers rose after several 
reported an increase in sales in Feb- 
ruary. Wal-Mart Stores rose % to 
2TA after reporting a 6.8 percent 
sales increase. The company also 
raised its dividend and said it would 
be more aggressive in its stock buy- 
back program. 

Same-store sales “have been dy- 
namite,” Richard Ciardullo, head 
trader at Liberty Investment Man- 
agement, said 

Oil stocks also were strong, gain- 
ing oo optimism that growing worid- 
wide energy demandjwould spur the 
industry's profits through the end of 
the decade. Texaco rose 1-54 to 10314, 
and Che vrcm added 1V& to 66K. 

Drug stocks fell on concern that 
competition may eat into profit 
margins. Merck lost 1% to 92(4. 

IAP, Bloomberg l 


iteaW 


l 




German Jobless Report 
Gives a Lift to the Dollar 


Coffee Prices Get a Burst of Energy 


« Berkshire Hathaway Inc_ the holding company controlled 
by the investor Warren Buffett, said net income, including 
$1.61 billion in gains from investment sales, rose to $2.49 
billion last year from $795 million in 1995- The company’s 
1995 net profit included $125 million in investment gains , 

• Harte-Hanks Communications Inc. plans to sell its six 
newspapers and its television station to focus on direct mar- 
keting and shoppers’ guides. 

• Chicago Mercantile Exchange directors voted to specify 

that pork-belly futures contracts be settled by paying the cash 
value of the' price of fresh, pork bellies, instead of physically 
delivering frozen meat ap. Bloomberg 


By Kathleen Day 

Washington Post Serve 


Coffee drinkers should brace 
themselves for a jolt: The price of 
beans and brew is headed higher, 
possibly as much as 20 percent, ac- 
cording to analysts and retailers. 

Heavy rains that damaged crops 
in South and Central America last 
autumn and labor problems in 
Colombia and Brazil have sent cof- 
fee prices on commodities ex- 


changes to their highest levels since 
September 1994. The upward price 
pressure is likely to continue for 
months, analysts predicted. 


The price of a pound of raw coffee 
beans in New Yoi 


r ork was $2.1625 
Thursday, a 73 percent increase from 
$1.25 in January, said Judith Ganes, 
an analyst at Merrill Lynch & Co. 

“Consumers are going to see 
higher prices," she said. 

Food companies are already 
passing along die increased costs to 


retailers. Procter & Gamble Co., 
which mak es Folgers coffee, in the 
past two weeks raised fee average 
wholesale price of a 1 3-ounce can of 
coffee by 20 percent to $2.71. 

Grocery stores are expected to 
pass on fee price increase, analysts 
said. If shoppers respond by stock- 
piling coffee in an attempt to avoid 
the increases, feat will only intensi- 
fy price pressures as retailers re- 
place depleted stock wife more ex- 
pensive beans, she said. 


Cumpdattn Oar Staff Fran Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar rose 
against European currencies 
Thursday after Germany reported 
another increase in its already re- 
cord unemployment level. 

The number of unemployed in 
Germany rose by a seasonally ad- 
justed 5,000 last month. While the 
increase was smaller than some ana- 
lysts forecast, it indicated a still slug- 
gish economy, and came a day before 
a U.S. employment report that is ex- 
pected to show strong jobs growth. 

“It all points to fee underlying 
strength of fee dollar,” said Don 
Smith, international economist at 
HSBC Markets. 

At 4 P.M. here, the dollar was at 
1.7160 Deutsche marks, up from 
1.7128 DM on Wednesday, at 
5.7875 French francs, up from 
5.7785 francs, and at 1.4820 Swiss 
francs, up from I.4SI5. The pound 


slipped to $1.6143 from $1.6155. 

The dollar also got a boost from 
remarks by Yves Thibault de Silguy, 
the European Union finance com- 
missioner, who said feat the dollar's 


.1 lajor 

if 


U 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


recent strength had given a “lift" to 
fee European economy by increas- 
ing exports. But fee dollar was held 
back against the yen by comments 
from fee U.S. Treasury secretary, 
Robert Rubin, who said a widening 
in Japan’s trade surplus would ben- 
efit no one. 

Mr. Rubin's remarks reinforced 
fee impression that Washington did 
not want the dollar to extend its rally 
against fee yen, a development that 
would erode U-S. exporters’ com- 
petitiveness. The dollar was at 
121.155 yen, up from 121.145 yen 
Wednesday. ( Bloomberg , Renters I 


•-* 


’OKU) *IOi. 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


>urSG?V- ■'r'j'rr. t 


Thursday's 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 most ocflre shores, 
up to the closing on Wall Street. 

The AssoaatEd Press. 




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orr Indexes 


Most Actives 


Rflarch 6, 1997 


9M 
34 ft 
45ft 
in 
49. 

ft 

lift 

21ft 

ffft 

13V* 

W. 

7A 

15ft 

19M 

»l 

31 

i:h 

17“ i 
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11 

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4.W 


Dow Jones 

Open Hiflli Low Laa a®. 

India CT56J4 6987 JO 6937 JW 694670 -1.15 

Trans 2431 J6 7434.75 242^12 2432.14 +1 JO 

urn vj.n zkl» 225^3 Tost, -us 

Comp 21M.ua 218528 215X07 21545B -7 n 


NYSE 


-n. 


+w 

■n 


Standard & Poors 

Previous Today 
WgH tm Oose 4d» 
93AM 9ZIM 934 M 929.89 
581 JO 574.17 580.98 5&L24 
197 JO 198J8 197^45 19488 
93.90 92J9 93L89 94.14 

801.99 790.95 80199 798J9 
778J5 76496 77X87 77632 


indusmtils 

Trangp. 

unmies 

Ftnonce 

5PS0Q 

SP100 


NatwFS n 
AT&T] 

» 

HewIPkt 

C omas 

3 s 

& 

GIWFn 

Qinalrs 


VtL tflgh 
115891 27ft 


72690 37ft 
84744 27ft 
64382 42’i 
55544 « 
53083 32** 
32027 61ft 
51425 I0ft 
50911 17ft 
50547 131* 
44450 19ft 
43609 32ft 
40383 59ft 
39409 48ft 
38064 32ft 


Low Leg 
29* 26ft 
35ft 361* 
26ft 27ft 
40ft 40ft 

S3 2S 

60ft 60ft 

r« 


12ft jg 


184* 

31ft 32 
57ft 50ft 




i NYSE 


Compogra 

InAnktab 

Tiamn. 

UtUV 

Hnmce 


High Low Lag 
*01.95 419ja 42024 
S2M0 52134 528-1 B 
37848 37664 37831 
MB 266JJ7 28L59 
39538 39235 39406 


Nasdaq 


Chg. 

High 

Lre» 

OOM 

Chge 

Ootaf 



Grains 



+3 

CORN (CBOT) 






LOOObumMmiiin- cent* par bmrwl 


■^1 

4i 

Mar 97 306 V; 

299ft, 

3415% 

»3ft 

27034 

+M 

May 97 3Q5V. 

296'* 

303 Vj 

+4*6 162J80 

+2JJ 

Jul 97 304 

295 

30219 

*5V|i I09.M? 

•241 

5epW 291 

281 

29QW 

♦6V. 

140Q 

if 

Dec 97 289'A 

28016 

ZBSVb 

+6*4 

£7,102 

-*i 

J, 

Est sates NA 

Wetfs. soles 74JM 


*1 

Wetfs ooenM 

390.953 

UP 1778 


+’*» 

+te 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 




100 tans- (Man per tan 





Mar 97 76(30 

261.00 

26600 

+ 500 

1(1020 


May 97 26130 

25700 

262.10 

~5JB 

47,546 


High 

Lew 

apse 

Chge 

Opint 

ORANGE JUICE (NCTNJ 



15000 tea.- cents oer lb. 




MOT97 BSiO 

85.10 

S5J0 

+005 

541 

MOV 97 8700 

8605 

87 35 

+ UD 

0705 

JW97 8900 

8150 

89 JO 

-UD 

4042 

Sep 97 91.10 

90J0 

91 JB 

+XBD 

XS2B 

Ess. sates NA 

Wetfs. saes 

4.2P 


Ytetfs open irt 

25023 

off Z7 




HlgO Low One Chge OpM- 

10-YEAR FRENCH 60V. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF50CUB0 - pfs Of 1 DO pd 
Mar 97 131 At 131.14 13124 — 028109,742 
Jun 97 13020 179.92 I30JH— 028 44338 
Sep 97 128^8 12040 12038—028 1,820 
Dec 97 H.T. H.T. 9736—028 0 


High taw Close Chge Opint 


Eg. volume; 219.144 . Open Ms 154*900 up 
2440 


Metals 


Oft. 

-043 

*1S 


_ Nasdaq 


Conanslte 

indWrioh 

Banks 
Insurance 


Low Lad Chg. 


Insurant* 

Finance 

Tramp. 


Mgh 

13114a 131*49 131604 -1235 

111X54 1106.99 110709 -X74 

1431.91 1424.78 1427.17 

148904 140403 1«904 

1767.40 176307 1764.91 

87447 06739 86739 


♦2.95 

+5.19 

♦445 

-335 


ftodes 

CKCO 

Almd 

WMOCas 

CascCm 

3Com 

MkraSi 

sse*. 


TeteComA 


VtL Mgh 
18g35 39A* 

169906 1118 . 

142763 150ft 145ft I. 

109202 32 
102677 25 
97695 27*4 
■9837 36ft 
864B2 24ft 
70483 — 

49557 ... 

61722 75ft 
55575 39ft 
46697 16*1 
42786 12ft 


Low Ud dig. 
35ft 369* -3 ft) 

,10ft IV/* *fti 


JUI97 26000 -2S3JH 25640 +5.10 28^33 


’1 


♦410 4005 

+190 4174 


-4ft 

-2ft 

2V» 

■*» 


29ft 31ft 

23H 7M 

iSft OTh 97ft -Fc* 
73 73ft 

f a s 

I2U 17ft 


Aug 97 25450 2*9-20 25X00 
Sep 97 743L40 Z39.20 24X40 
Od97 123» mOO 25J» +1JB X3CB 
EsI. sales IMA. Wmfxselu 19J70 
Wed's open irt 11X146 off 440 


GOLD (HCMXJ 

100 IWR- OoMors oer mar as. 

Mom 35400 S 

AW 97 35530 35X00 35X40 -100 47^24 

MBV97 35530 1 

Jun 97 354.90 35500 3S3L50 -480 25+194 

Aug 97 339.10 357 JO 357 JO -490 9,971 

OcJ 97 344*0 34030 34041 -470 6J« 

Dec 97 34430 362-50 34200 -490 20,944 

Fe09B 365-70 34110 36110 -1.10 4.95 

Ed. soles NLA Wetfs. sates 63J« 
wed's open ini 170001 off 3229 


itauan government bond (uffe) 

ITL 2M mOtan - ptsof 100 pet 
JwW7 127*9 12465 127.10 +441 94053 
“ '"1084 




industrials 



COTTON UNCTO 
stum RK-- cents per Ii. 
Mot 97 7305 7270 

7305 

+ 0JS 

24S 

May 97 

76.13 

214.70 

7002 

+006 

32018 

Jul 97 

//3b 

7505 

77.00 

+000 

12065 

Oct 97 

7/M 

7605 

7700 

♦ (LOS 

1376 

Dec 97 

7/JB 

7677 

7702 

+026 

\4J3* 

Mar 98 

78.10 

77.W 

78.10 

+015 

1,136 


Sep97 XVM 12400 12702 + 002 
E5.sd« 47,025. Piw. sales: 90,233 


Wed's open im SUM off 301 


Pm.apeninL: 9&137 up its 


EURODOLLARS (CMBt) 

SI miwion-ols at ICO pa 
MqrflO 9ia H.15 9X14 


HEATING Ott. (NMER1 
ajjoa aaL cants, per JQI 


SOYBEAN 00. (CBOT) 

6 &fl00 On- cants pec o> 

Ntar97 2UD 2457 2600 


1ft 

♦Ift 

-1 


May 97 2171 
JUI97 2140 
AW 97 2174 
54097 2500 
0097 2195 


2100 

7SJB 

2158 

2505 

2575 


2571 

21» 

2148 

2175 

2195 


ESC soles ha. Wetfs. soles 33043 
Wetfs open ntf 96054 up 1547 


-0.15 5>SD 
+421 51061 
-0LZ1 33050 
+ 410 4026 
+415 3JJ32 

+422 1. 990 


Z AMEX 


AMEX 


ip* 

an 

J'S 

17V? 

8V. 

lv. 

-■ft 

an 

241* 

lift 

7*. 

8ft 

fft 

£l» 

aft 

w 

2ft 

lift 

n 

11* 

im 

8ft 

6 

17ft 


High Low ms 
Ml-tto 59975 60433 

Dow Jones Bond 

previous 

dose 

20 Bonds 103315 

lOUWffles 99.94 

lOIndustilats 106.16 


Chg. 

■005 


VOL 


Low Last 


Today 


P 


«gh 

14359 ffPftj 79ft Mft* 
11151 7ft 0Qt 6ft 


103.14 

100J17 

10421 


10761 IV 
BUT 5V» 
8353 7ft* 
8791 13ft 
7343 37** 
7039 7ft 
690* Jtnn 
6004 13ft 


15* 15* 

37ft J7ft 

' 7ft 


w 


Trading Activily 


in 




41} 

Hi 

19 

lift 

2*. 

3V 

18*. 

3*1 

lift 

11*1 

T4 


NYSE 




Ndob 

Prev. 

Advanced 

1252 

1604 

Declined 

1045 

945 

Unchanged 

081 

780 

Total issues 

Tttl 

3333 

NawUgte 

99 

128 

New Laws 

. 10 

18 

AMEX 




dose 

Prow. 

Advanced 

215a 

2014 

Decinea 

T74I 

1960 

Unctianred 

1740 

1736 

Tata issues 

5737 

5740 

Newtfiahs 

in 

114 

New Laws 

99 

im 


Nasdaq 



SOYBEANS (CBOT) 




Chg. 

5000 Du rrtiinjm- certs pur bmtirl 


-*fc 

Mar 97 016 

007 y. 

814 

+ 12ft 

7.774 

+M. 

May 97 121 

BW 

B18ft 

+Wft 

85063 

-a 

.M *7 820 

803U 

817ft 

tl4 

5M75 

a4 

AUB97 009 >i 

797 

807ft 

+ Wft 

6125 

SEP 97 764*4 

754 ft 

764ft 

+ I0ft 

1795 

-H 

Bisales NA 

wetfs. sates 

52040 


-M 

Wetfs wen ini 

188JW 

up 172 



WHEAT (CBOT) 





5J*» ou minimum- am nor bushel 



Mcr 97 373 

365 

370 

♦3ft 

903 


May 97 374% 

Iff 

371 

+2 

RL44S 


Jul 97 363% 

358 

360 ft 

♦ Ift 



Sep 97 365 

360ft 

362ft 

+lft 

17M 


» 6RADE COPPER (NCMX) 

25000 BU.- cents per ft. 

Mar 97 11400 11300 11500 
AtT 97 11430 112JW 11430 
MOV 97 11200 10900 11125 
Jun 97 liojo 11070 11030 
JU 97 109J0 10470 10470 
Aim 97 10X00 

Sop 97 105.90 10400 105.90 
OcJ 77 10145 

Nov 97 10270 

Esi. sales NA Wetfs. sales 4910 
Wetfs open ini 41.744 up 334 


105 4540 

2J0 1301 

105 27701 
100 994 

100 7.199 
438 

100 2703 
404 
583 


Jun 00 9114 
Sep 00 9111 
Dec DO 9303 
Mar 01 93J13 
JunC* 92.99 
Sep 01 9204 

Dec 01 9207 
Mar® 9205 
Jun® 9279 
Sep® 92.75 
Dec® 9X87 


93.10 

9304 

9295 

9297 

9292 

91M 

9281 

9204 

9279 

92.75 

9247 


9111 
9304 
9298 
9295 
9103 
9209 
9201 
9204 
9279 -001 
9275 -401 
9287 -001 


SR-VER (NCMX) 

5000 tro/ be.- cents per Irw az. 

Mir 97 52400 51500 51900 -000 
Apr 97 571.50 

May 97 53400 51450 52400 
0497 53500 SKC0 53900 
Sep 97 51950 53100 53500 
Dec 97 54800 53450 54300 
Jan 98 54440 

Mar 98 549 JO 549 50 549.50 
Est. sates HA wetfs. sales 22700 
Wetfs awn kit 91087 up 34 


1J82 

I 

41.713 
12017 
*100 134S 

•I JO SJtl 
14 

*410 4,703 


». sales ha wea s. sales 17057 
Wetfs open ./it 79084 up <348 


Advwiaed 
Decfined 
Undmaal 
Ttkal issues 
New Mohs 
New Laws 


173* 

1715 

281 

5734 

44 

45 


2156 

1741 

1740 

5737 

130 

99 


Livestock 


Market Sales 


NYSE 

Araex 

Nasdaq 


537.79 

2419 

60OQ5 


CATTLE (CMER) 

400001s.- cenixrA 

Apr 97 68.90 4805 6823 


63407 

29.76 

66410 


Jun 97 4492 
Aug 97 4192 
Od 97 £70? 

Dec 97 49J0 
Fe09S 7470 


4435 

6237 

47.10 

6935 

7442 


-437 43.11! 
MJ0 —445 22258 
4345 -442 19.2B9 
47.15 -447 11907 
4942 -032 4,175 
70JJ -432 2088 


PLATHUM (NMEKJ 
50 hoc at- datoers par np» 0*. 

Apr 97 389 JO 38200 3B150 + 240 19.001 

JUJ97 39450 38500 38900 +3J0 1211 

Oct 97 39100 39100 39100 *300 1,981 

Jan 98 39400 39400 39400 -0.10 1.116 

Est. sales HA Wetf&. sales 4,261 
WOtfs open M 25JM off 44 

Ouse Prevtaus 

LONDON METALS OJUE] 

Dalian per metric ion 
Alamlmn oiu Grade) 

Spot 1655 's 16STA 164900 165000 
Forward 168100 166200 5 1677ft 1678.00 


EsLsrtes 17.996 Wetfs. sales 1 4589 
Wetfs open im Iobjoi up 2380 


Cathodes UMi Grade! 

24390a 24M0O 2447.00 


243600 _ 

rd 237800 237900 238500 238600 


Dividends 

Company 


v* 


Per AjrT Rec Pay Company 
IRREGULAR 


Per Amt Rec Pay 




Bull Bear Gib into 
Bull Bear Muni 
Sabine Rowfly TT 
Sasal Ltd ADR 
Slrowbririge A 
Strnwbrtdge B 


- .05 

>24 

>31 

- .19 

>24 

3-31 

- .1625 

>17 

>31 

- .1458 

>14 

4-28 

- .128 

>17 

>24 

- .115 

>17 

>24 


STOCK SPUT 


Coianial ImrGrt 
EHet Bros 
Engetand Cafti 
Equity Irms 
FstBeroen Bn 
First Union RE. 
Koch Co 
Hefimge US Gov 
HwhwiTedi 


Cdn lmper10lBk2forl spot. 
PM LnqDfsf Tel 2 fbr Ispm 


Lannlew Fibre 
Mid Ocean I 


vv« 

% 

& 

ft 

2th 

I7I> 

TTm 

I5*« 


-ft 


INCREASED 

PnirienDal 58 g .125 3-T8 3-31 


INITIAL 

Cdn Imperial Bfcn g 05 3-27 4-30 


REGULAR 


II 


XSk 

|4®1 

14ft 


Vt 

left 

U 


Allegheny Power 
Asset Investors 
Berkshire Cos 
Bufl Bear U5 Gov 
Chrysler Corp 

Onrnm Ltd a 
Clnram Ud g 
CJnrom Lfdg 
Colonial Itdimkl 1 


O A3 3-17 3-31 

O 095 3-17 Ml 

Q -2B 3-31 4-15 

a .18 3-24 Ml 

O 40 3-15 4-15 

O 04 6-15 6-30 

O 04 ff-15 9-30 

04 12-15 12-30 


M 078 3-17 4-1 


• LM 

Newoorlnc 
Royal BkCda a 
SityderOfl 
sphere Drake 
sfairettLS. 

SuffaOtBngi 
Toubman Centers 
imr Industries 
Tri-COnrinental 
True North 
VdyugeurAZ. 

VotageurCa 
VUyageurFL. 

Vayageur MJtin 
VoffogeurMlM IL 
vayageur Minn IIL 
a-<SBPalr thappRadOMfe araoaat per 
sbarWADR; g-pajaMe la Qpnian ft.. 
BMMetMy; q^uarterty; s-searisenucri 


M 0535 3-17 4-1 

Q 02 >14 >28 

O 09 3-14 3-31 
Q -28 3-31 5-2 

- 03 3-17 3-31 
a .n >31 4-aa 

a 06 4-16 4-30 
M 087 3-14 >20 
Q 025 >17 3-31 
.16 >25 4-10 
J 5 Ml 4-10 
MS 4-10 5-2 

-37 4-24 5-23 
065 3-J4 3-31 
04 3-19 4-1 

.18 3-17 3-28 
03 3-14 4-1 

33 Ml 4-18 
03 Ml 4-4 
-16 >14 4-1 

.15 >18 4-1 

M 064 >17 >27 
M 0612 >17 >27 
M 063 >17 >27 
M 0775 >17 >27 
M 066 >17 >27 
M 063 >17 >27 


FESIER CATTLE ICMSU 

50.000 WV- cents wo. 

Mar 97 6X05 6740 67.70 

APT 97 68.15 67 JB 6700 

MOV 97 69J5 48.75 83.92 

Aup 97 7115 71.90 72.12 

Sep 97 7340 7275 72.95 


Spat 67800 67900 68600 68700 

Forward <7700 67B0O 68000 681.00 


Est. sales NA Wetfs. sales 409 AN 
WBfs open Inf 2411.931 up 23024 
BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

67.500 Pounds, I oer pourvj 
Mat 97 1.616b 14090 14141 
Jun 97 14136 14068 14IM 
Sep 97 14090 14060 1409Q 
Dec 97 1400 

Est. scries NA wed's, sales 7.158 
wetfsopenirv 38417 Off 179 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 

100400 aoilm. s per Cdn. dr 
Mir 97 JVS J310 7336 

Jun 97 7387 7358 7381 

Sep 97 7425 7810 7419 

Dec 97 7431 

Est. sales NA Wetfs. sales 8037 
Wetfs awn int 62407 off 55 
GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

12LD00 mat!, 1 per mart. 

Mar 97 4857 4813 482a 

Jun 97 4389 48*0 4860 

5ep97 4903 4888 4903 

Dec 97 4938 4934 4938 

Esi. soles NA wetfs. soles 24.534 
Wetfs even ini 115.160 up 2293 
JAPANESE YEN (CMER) 
l24mMionvei. Spur lOCivcn 
M<r 97 4290 0220 0264 

Jun 97 0387 4330 8369 

Sep 97 Mtt 4454 8454 

Est sales NA Wetfs sales 20,171 
Wetfs «W* int 80,190 ua 1371 
SWISS FRANC (CMER) 

72MJ0II frmes. S PPr tranc 
Mar 97 4789 4705 6744 

Jun 97 4ffl8 4767 4810 

Sec 77 4854 4840 4B40 

fet. sales NA wetfs sates iijij 
wea s open off 57075 off 79 


— 002 ^090 
—002 35763 
-003 32456 
—003 25027 
-am 23464 
-003 19088 
-003 14.110 
-003 10J16 
-aoi 5464 
5JB 
4038 
5088 


Apr 97 

MOO 

52.15 

5305 

+ 131 

36910 

May 91 

54.15 

53 5S 

5600 

‘i.n 

160)9 

Jun 97 

S4J0 

07J» 

5610 

-107 

13033 

JUl 97 

5420 

sun 

5400 

*0.97 

12031 

Aug 97 

S5J5 

54JW 

3535 

♦1.07 

7077 

Sep 97 

55.90 

54.93 

55.90 

+0.97 

6974 

Oct 97 

5660 

55 70 

5660 

+0.92 

5J87 

Nov 97 

57.25 

WM 

5135 

*0.*2 

IffiS 

Dec 97 

5705 

5695. 

5705 

+a*2 

6017 

Jan 98 

58.20 

5730 

5020 

+ 092 

5014 

Est. sates NA 

wetfs. sales 

35.785 



Wetfs open int 115058 up 2108 


LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NMBU 

1400 bee- dollars nef HP. 

Apr 97 21.15 2125 2048 


3X7» 

3056 

1J2B 


38055 

19037 

3025 

m 


May 97 20.95 
Jun 97 2075 
JUI97 2040 
Aug 97 3038 
Sep 97 20J2 
Od 97 3120 
Nov 97 30.13 
Dec 97 70.30 
Jon 98 mas 
Feb 98 RUM 
M»98 20.12 
Apt 98 2008 


20.16 

2006 

19.92 

1940 
1946 
1909 
19J7 
1905 
1909 

1941 

1942 
19.B 


2003 
2006 
2050 
2008 
2032 
2020 
30.13 
20.11 
3010 . 
2006 
20.12 
2B08 


Ed. safes NA Wetfs. sates 106.522 
Wetfs open ini 414006 off 49 


+ 049 84.978 
-006 S3SA 
-084 47,715 
-000 24.300 
+ 037 17073 
-006 11939 
+ 028 13490 
+ 0-75 >10)0 
-■027 27,744 
'026 15010 
+ 000 8JM 
+ 045 3J48 
■+0JD 3099 


•-•'ok 


NATURAL GA5 (NMER) 

I lUUD mrn eru+s. S per nan tvu 


91033 

21008 

2J97 

26 


70504 

8.769 

774 


Apr 97 1.940 
Mav97 2000 
Jun 97 1010 
JUI9J 2.00S 
Aug 97 2000 
Sec 97 2.010 

Del 97 JJ05 
Nov 97 2135 
Dec 97 2480 
Jen 98 2330 
Feb *8 2250 


101J 

1085 

1.910 

1.925 

1430 

1435 

1.965 

2095 

2230 

2260 

2410 


1.920 

1480 

1.985 

um 

1495 

2005 

2030 

213S 

2280 

2365 

2250 


Ea- safes NA Werfi. softs 44.128 

Wed's open M 166*768 up 5359 


36044 

19.979 

11057 

10029 

BJ74 

7,285 

>056 

5087 

9J91 

9,713 

1677 


47,747 

8013 

1,791 


UNLEADED OASOLME (NMER) 
42000 wl. cents oer oat 
Apt 97 64.90 6288 6405 

May 97 6405 6250 4425 

Jun 97 6150 61.90 6145 

Jut 97 6iU« 60L90 62ZS 

Aug 97 61.10 5900 61.10 



0097 7405 7345 7300 -005 

Esl. rates 4014 Wetfs. soles 2498 
Wetfs open Irt 22311 off 266 


—045 3062 
—0.92 3.923 

-047 5058 
-102 4033 
-005 1072 


NkW 


Sep W »0Q 58.50 59.06 »0Afl 

Bstsates NA WOtfS. sates 24048 
Wetfs open int 87049 up 75] 


-<0I 38,996 
*142 7Q 0W 
-US 14071 
* 1.10 A.1S3 
-1-35 XW 


llrr 


2,101 


Spal 804500 805500 7V950O 800500 
Fonrard " 


8145.00 815500 BO9O0O 8100.00 


GASOIL (IPE) 


2145 


Spat 584000 585000 577000 578000 

Fonurord 


5895.00 590000 583000 5835.00 


Tine {Special HMi Grade) 

5pot 122500 123600 122500 1226.00 

Forward 124100 1241 'A 1237V, 123800 


HOOS-Lean (CMERJ 
40008 Bn.- amts par lb. 

Apr W 7050 6905 70.15 —102 14,273 

Jun 97 76JO 7500 7640 — 0L25 9,737 

Jul 97 7500 7405 7143 +005 20*9 

AMD?) 7120 7125 7220 +02B U25 

Od 97 6500 4WH 4543 +017 1081 

Dec 97 6425 6175 6405 -020 

EsLsnies 1X856 Wed's. safes 15060 
WetfsaaanM 31064 off 977 


High Law dose Chge Oprt 


Rnandal 


S eiior 
Dec97 
Marti 
Junto 
Sep9B 
DeCft 
Mflrtt 
Junffl 
Sep99 
Oe&9 


Sifl «3 U0. daUars per meWcton- tots of 700 tons 

9107 + 004 12405T Mor97 16500 16000 1*4J4 +175 20095 


611 


FORK BSJL1ES (CMERI 
aajna ■».- cents per ft. 

Mar 97 7640 7037 7500 —197 

MOV 97 7705 7605 7600 -2.95 

Jul 77 7705 7500 76.15 -205 

Aug 97 7X00 7320 7X70 -2J2 

Est. sates 3037 Wetfs. sates 3056 
Wetfs aaen W 1.173 off 111 


UST.MLLS (CMER) 

SI mASan- ptsal 100 net. 

Mtr 97 9491 9409 9489 -001 

JUn 97 9477 9443 9473 ~4fll 

Sep 97 9454 9402 «453 -001 

Dec 97 9441 

Est. sates NA Wetfs. sates 1012 

Wetfs open In) 90OB ait 462 


WJP“JMSTERUN6 (UFFE) 

CSD04M0- ptsof too pa 

Marti 

- ==r ■57SJ'; iwfw taajw iau0U r«4/4 +Z75 20095 

ms ms nj 1 !a^ IWSf ww 16425 i6ioo 16 <sj» +205 19024 

9313 9305 Sob 1 SS *»W97 16700 14X75 16700 +200 4,940 

■33.CQ 9293 9200 + aw 3KW Jun 97 16925 16500 16900 +200 7JK4 

^.92 9205 9208 + 003 2X244 J°1 97 17100 16700 17075 +200 I403 

9276 9171 + 003 19089 Aug97 17200 1687517225 + 77S 

S-I5 *?-0Z 10,788 5ep| 197 170.75 17025 17300 +225 1.^) 

7093 Oct 97 14 T. N.T. 17500 +200 mm 

7073 Nov 97 17600 17600 17000 +200 704 

4027 Dec 97 17625 17575 17675 + 225 5027 

Esl sates 21 000. Open lnf^680OO up 



91*7 9202 9X63 - 003 

£62 nM 9266 uSS 

9204 9203 9203 + 001 

i’? 7 ^ Mtar 

Fin*, open mj 329.79] up 42I6 


1957 

4553 

1.996 

847 


M40NTH EUHMURK OIPFE) 

DMI mam ■ Ms ol 100 pet 
M»97 96.74 9ft 74 9475 UML 174456 

AC*97 96.77 9476 9678 - 001 


X170 


BRENT OIL (IPE) 

UAdaUars per barrel -lots of 1000 barrels 

£££n “MI 6-l« ft*r®7 19.78 19.16 1970 +020 ^ 016 

jW ^ St/s 33 M if-19 12-35 -si SS 


?E 


102 

5035 

1217 

51* 


I YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

IlffWWPrtn- Ms 6 64thsat 100 pet 
Mar 97106-05 105-58 105-55 —05 £1,434 

Jun 97 105-58 105-33 105-35 —08 181.549 

SSP97 105-25 3 

Est. sales HA Wetfs. sates 91.893 
Wetfs open int 214988 off 2801 


^ Jr? £3 juj?” }|^ )lf 7 JAW! 

SS £3 SS ipSffiS Ss 5S ® 


Dec97 
Marts 
JuirtS 
5ep98 
Dec98 
Morn 

JIW99 

5ep99 

Dew . _ 

Est sates: +24685. Prw sates: 184479 
Pre*. open Int- t.280.741 up 3<uS 


9421 9S.1J 96 15 — 003 119.983 

S- 9 l 25- n “ lUto 
S' 4 ' -°- M 38*1 » 

95^9 9$4j 91*3 — 006 50.137 

952 7 95.18 95.19 -006 2MS9 
9503 9500 9494 —DM n. V h 1 
?*«_ . 747S 9423 — 0.06 24712 


97 19.10 1803 1906 +040 Sin 

97 19.05 180) 19.03 +Q^0 4JM 

1902 1802 1900 +040 4270 


Nov97 

E«. sates 48000 . Openini.-l 77+444 up 


3 3e n 


Food 


Unfcb 


BUOT 

U58lncM 

USCr* 

VK5*C 

Wnar 


12ft 

17ft 

Wl 

9+ 

4*. 


1495 

use 

in 


VtecuC 

VWbC* 


VOrnc 

ssir 


73 a 

113 

ZW 


JItt 


IT* 

74** 

lllft 

TV. 

34ft 

37ll 


Ti 

17* 
261 ■ 
104 


Stock Tables Explained 

Salas figures cavutMSU Yeariy Hgls and laws reffetri the prevlouB 53 weeks plus Ore curtert 
wee*, but nature knesttmdng day. Wterea spa arstocK<lividendatnaananolD2Speicen>ar mare 
tns been paid trre yean tl^Haw range end dtektend are shewn »r the new stacks ardy. Unless 
affiefwlse noted, rales of dMdends are annual tfsbueements based an the tatoed dedaraflon. 
a - arvitiend ertso radra (sj. b - annual rale of dMdend plus stock cBvidend. c - Hqutdatlna 
dividend, cc - PE eueeds 990M - caned, d - new yearty low. dd - toss tn the fad 12 months, 
c - (Rvidend dedared or paid in preceding 12 months, t -annual rate, increased an last 
dedaratlon.g- HMdeivd hi Canadian binds, subtea K> IS 1 *, noiwttWm* tax. 1 >tMdeM 


COCOA (NC5E) 

10 metric Ions- s per Ion 
Mr 97 1277 1274 1274 — W 

MOV 97 130 1329 1331 -5 

Jul 97 1387 1355 1355 —6 

Sep 9? 1392 1382 1382 -4 

Dec97 1417 1410 1412 —6 

Est. sales NA Wetfs. sates HJ17 
Wetfs 0«a irt 91036 off 914 


135 

32083 

19001 

10016 

4539 


II YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

*100 0M Brin- pn 8. mute at 100 pd 
Mir 97 1 08-98 107-29 ID7-B -« 9700b 

Jun 97 IW-21 167-07 157-09 —05 20X000 >MONTH PI BOR MUTin 

8071 FF5mNI^^K! n 
Mar 97 9465 9464 


Stock Indexes 


SAP COMP. INDEX (CMER) 
Soo ■ 


Est. sates NA wetfs. srtes 107024 
Wetfs open Int Jaum off 3564 


+000 41085 


COFFEE C (NCSE) 
37000 bL- cents Mr ft. 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

18 PCf-llDO. 006-11*1 8 IMS Of IODbcII 
Mar 97 110-72 110-00 110-04 —10 172054 

Jun 97 110-08 109-16 109-71 -Of 348002 

SCO 97 109-26 109-08 109-08 —09 11130 

Dec 97 109-13 109-13 109-13 * 09 5012 

Ed. sates NA wad's. so6ss 383.922 
Wetfs open M 539, SS up 7695 


* 0 ' 20 SIH-JD -X75I63W1 
-300 3MI5 

Jim 97 9*A2 962o ^02 15.00 SxT« ^ 07^ TtU 

Sep w 96J7 9403 9606 —001 4K30B ED- sates NA Wetfs sates 86.83? 3J88 

«ft.47-ojll 29A70 WetfscmenM 208038 up mt 

mar +a +607 9434 9406 fl Ol 1 7 DXfl 

sS M J 9-=2— OJ>3 14200 LAC4B{MAnn 

r£ «w oS« ?605 — 003 12,250 f WOO.per Uxte point 


Mar 99 SIS SI'S £ g??-S “’'LO 27M0 +31 J» 3&413 

nST « 5-« ’5*S -004 13.7+1 fl> r 2 7717 0 27100 27050 +3l3n 904 


tw. 


or Stock dividend. | - dMdetid paid IWs year, tanltted> deterred, ar no JJgjf 


9Jw*Bf 

wirer 

mresTs 

OEBAsfci 

WEBGern 
WFB Jpni 

WEBSaqn 

WEBSn* 

WEBWKo 

<auu 


lift 

JW 

lit 


18ft 

MTV. 

IM 

lift 

1 1 -i 

)5li 

It*. 


13ft 

!». 
I Jft 
1 CH 


\fi 

l«» 


lift 

IPs 

12 %. 
15 l 


adran taken ai lateta dMdend meeflng. k - dividend declared or paid IWs year, art jifin jiTSi _6jo 

a ccumulcdtve Issue wltti dividends in arrears, re -annual rale, reduced an kTStdedannkm. SpSj injo JSS 14900 - 4 D 0 

n - new issue in the post 52 weeks, Tire hlgh-law range begins with the start of fma/ta. Ed. sates NA Werfi sales 11 WI 

Bd+ne» day deOuerv.p-it^toljSvkleod. annual rate unknown. P(E*pricMairilr«sratia Wetfs seenrt n ,«4 aH 380 

q - ckised-end tnutuoi fund, r - dMdend dedated or paid In praceding 12 manttis. phn stadk 
dividend. s> stock gpm. Dividend begins with date ofspfft sis -salesLt- dividend paid In 
stock in preceding 12 monm* estimate d gall value on ee-dlvldetid or es-dKIttbiitlon dote, 
u- new yetHly nigh, v- trading hailed. v(- In btHitaupfcy or recelvefaWp or being tBonjaniied 

under the BanRnjptof Ackor securittesossomed hY5UCj\CompanteS.wri. when dfttrfcuted. 


LDMG SILT (LIFFEJ 


7076 

4.167 


taaooo - pts & 32mtsaf ioa pa 

_ IfL 20 +M1 40612 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NCSE) 

IIUKte-CHiwre 

Mar 97 1004 1002 ».« 

Jut 97 1008 1003 1001 

OQ97 1005 11LS9 1005 


860197 112-07 111-77 l|. 

Jon97 111-25 Ill-Cff II 1-13 + 002 180.106 

SopW N.T. N.T. 110-30 +WB 220.718 
Est. sales: 94,051 . Pro. sates: 151,301 
Pro. son hit: 27IL71B Oft 39,938 




+007 7U15 
+001 31.605 
007 74.170 


wf - when Kiued/ m - with warrants. * ■ ex -dividend or ek-rtflMs. jafis - a-dlSMbutlon. ‘S£L.- iHS? uiS? lMB 


nr - irithout narronrs. y- w-ifiridendoml whts In hih. yld /yield. 7- sales IrTlun. ' " 8Jr!Sw^ 


KERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 
088250000- PH eMODpa 
Mar 28039 

Jim97 10207 10106 10107 -013 741205 
Sep97 100.90 10090 100*3 —0.13 

Eslsafcs: 1*7031 Pirr.sowv 337033 
PlW open HA: 271,771 off 1U45 


487 


ass Slf ^ ^ 

Maffl *“■« So?l 

Jurrta «4h 51 « 33 ii ^-J+4 


+3100 1,210 
Est. volume: 71,71 B. Open lnt_- «a 01 7 off 




iS ^ 


Commod^y Indexes 

Close 

1047.80 




2000.00 

16000 

7*508 


Previm 
104440 
. 1,98900 
160.07 
2*503 






£ 


4 


f 


r b 


{•on 

> I lif* 


$ 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 


PAGE 1. 


EUROPE 


Glaxo Profit Surges on Sales of Newer Drug 


PLC^S^ G1 ? xo WeU< »me 
«* *996 pretax 
profit more than doubled as declin- 
mg sales of its ulcer treatment Zantac 
W ere offset sales of newer drugs 

The world's biggest drugmaker 
P«?ed. profit of £236 billion ($4.77 


b 3j“> : «P from £1.29 billion a year 


earlier, when profit was denied by one- 
m elwi|« Saies rose to £8.3 billion 
^diion. But Glaxo warned 
that profit might not increase this year 
or next, sending the company’s shares 
town as much as 3 percent Glaxo's 
shares rebounded later in the day, clos- 


ing at £10.48, up 12 pence, after the 
company said new-produci sales in 
1999 would be stronger than many 
analysts had forecast 
Glaxo said earnings would be "at 
least maintained*' in 1997 and 1998, 
with “significant growth in 1999." 
It also said that while new products 
such as the migraine treatment 
Imigran and the AIDS drug Epivir 
had advanced, generic competition 
for its biggest products would slow 
its percentage sales increase to the 
"low single digits" this year. The 
company acknowledged for the first 
time that it expected U.S. generic- 


drug competition this year for the 
ulcer treatment Zantac, by far its 
biggest product. One of two U.S. 
patents for the drug expires in July, 
and analysts say Glaxo is likely to 
lose a U.S. court case that would 
have blocked generic competitors. 

“One way or another, someone 
will find their way through this and 
gel a generic product on the mar- 
ket." John Coombe. Glaxo's fi- 
nance director, said. 

Sales of Zantac, which once rep- 
resented more than 40 percent of 
Glaxo’s sales, fell 14 percent last 
year, to £1.93 billion, to just 23 per- 


cent of total sales. The drug faces 
competition from other drugs such as 
Astra AB 's Losec and Merck & Co.’s 
Pbpcid. 

But Richairi Sykes, Glaxo's chief 
executive, said the company’s sales 
forecast had been based on the 
"worst case” assumption of an al- 
most total collapse in sales of Zantac. 
He also said that data to be released at 
a medical meeting in May showing 
Glaxo's new ulcer treatment. Tritec, 
to be superior to Losec would ‘ ‘drive 
sales of Tritec forward.' ’ 

Glaxo said sales of drugs intro- 
duced since 1990 had risen 50 per- 


cent. Sales of products aimed at 
combating the Hu man immunode- 
ficiency virus that causes AIDS 
more than doubled, to nearly £500 
million, and sales of the migraine 
treatment Imigran grew 46 percent, 
to £500 million. 

The company said it had won 20 
significant product approvals in 
1996 and expected to bnng to mar- 
ket several new drugs in the next two 
years, including Romozine for dia- 
betes, the antibiotic Raxar, a hep- 
atitis B treatment called Lamivudine 
and Zanamivir for influenza. 

( Bloomberg , AFX, AFP) 


Steam Unit Saddles Rolls-Royce 


Compiled ht Ow SuffFwn, Dupadia 

LONDON — Rolls-Royce PLC 
posted a loss Thursday of £28 mil- 
lion ($45.2 million) for 1996 be- 
cause of a charge for its planned 
departure from the market for steam- 
power generation equipment. 

The maker of jet engines and tur- 
bines had profit of £175 million in 
1 995, but earnings last year were hit 
by a one-time charge of £263 mil- 
lion taken in July to close or sell the 
company’s Parsons steam genera- 
tion division. 

The company’s chief executive, 
John Rose, said he was optimistic 
the division could be sold soon. 

“We have continued to improve 
our underlying financial perfor- 
mance and to focus upon those busi- 
nesses where we have established or 
can establish leading market pos- 
itions," Mr. Rose said 

The company said operating 
profit, excluding operations that are 
to be discontinued, rose to £2 42 mil- 


lion in 1996 from £178 mill ion in 
1995 on die strength of its aerospace 
activities. 

Annual sales excluding busi- 
nesses due to be sold rose to £4.05 
billion from £3.34 billion. 

Rolls-Royce shares rose 1 7 pence 
to close at 255. 

Sir Ralph Robins, the chairman, 
said that the company delivered 
around 1,100 aircraft engines last 
year and expected that this figure 
would rise in 1997 because com- 
mercial-aircraft output was projec- 
ted to increase from the 360 de- 
livered in 1996. 

“We will clearly deliver more 
this year,” h_ said “There is fairly 
significant growth in the civil busi- 
ness at the moment. All the aircraft 
constructors are increasing their 
build rates, and that’s finally being 
reflected on us." 

The value of the company’s order 
book stood at £7 billion at the end of 
1996, compared with a backlog of 


£6.2 billion a year earlier. 

Rolls-Royce reduced its work 
force by 600 people during the year, 
to 43,200. and cur its development 
and research budget by £7 million to 
£199 million. 

Sir Ralph also said the market for 
replacement pans, which accounts 
for around one-third of total 
aerospace business, was on the in- 
crease. having recovered from a 20 
percent fall in the early 1 990s. when 
airlines had to tighten their belts and 
cut back on inventories of spare 
parts. (Reuters. AFP i 

■ BTR Banks on a Rebound 


BTR PLC said its 1996 pretax 
profit fell ro £1.3 billion from £1.5 
billion in 1995, but it said a re- 
structuring program should result in 
a better performance this year, Reu- 
ters reported. 

The results were better than ana- 
lysts expected, and BTR’s shares 
rose 10, to 261. 


Pechiney Posts Loss 
After Restructuring 


Major Admits Currency Grid Whs Error 


Reuters 

LONDON — John Major, sound- 
ing as if he were already prepared for 
a defeat in the coming election, ad- 
mitted for the first time that Britain 's 
entry into Europe’s currency grid in 
1 990 had been a “political mistake* * 
even though it also helped the coun- 
try bring inflati on under control. 

“Events made a monkey of us," 
the prime minister said of Britain’s 
humiliating ejection from the Euro- 


pean e: 
Septem 


exchange-rate mechanism in 
1992. In 


her 


an interview 


Wednesday with BBC television, 
Mr. Major implicitly endorsed the 
view held by many members of his 
Conservative Party that the currency 
debacle, by making ministers look 
incompetent, was at the root of the 
government's current unpopularity. 

Mr. Major said he was prepared ro 
apologize for the matter as long as 
be could also take credit for the fact 
that the discipline of joining the 
exchange-rate mechanism in Octo- 
ber 1990 had helped give Britain its 
lowest inflation rate in generations. 


He said if Britain ‘‘had not gone 
into the ERM, I very much doubt we 
would have killed inflation as com- 
prehensively as we had." 

The opposition Labour Party said 
Mr. Major should not be surprised 
that voters had refused to give his 
government credit for the economic 
recovery ushered in by die pound’s 
exit from the grid, which allowed 
interest rates to come down sharply. 

* ‘It is a bit late for reluctant death- 
bed apologies." Brian Wilson, La- 
bour's campaign spokesman, said. 


Bloomberg News 

PARIS — Pechiney SA, 
Europe's largest aluminum com- 
pany. posted a record net loss for 
1 996 of 2.98 billion French francs 
($515.6 million) Thursday as it 
took charges to pay for a three- 
year cost-cutting program. 

The loss wiped out a net profit 
of 1.47 billion francs in 1995 and 
included a charge of 1.73 billion 
francs for its cost-cutting program 
called Challenge, which sought to 
cut 20 percent from operating 
costs. 

The loss also included 1.31 bil- 
lion francs in other charges, such 
as $102 million in damages from a 
U.S. patent law suit 

Pechiney said it faced a "dif- 
ficult" environment last year be- 
cause of lower aluminum prices 
and a decline in demand. 

“The decline also reflects the 
lack of competitiveness and the 
delay in profitability compared to 
the main competitors," the com- 
pany said, adding that its Chal- 
lenge program aimed ro tackle 
those problems. 

Excluding the charges, operat- 
ing income fell to 2.19 billion 
francs from 3.52 billion francs a 
year earlier, the company said. In- 
cluding the charges, the company 
had an operating loss of 2.02 bil- 
lion francs, compared with an op- 
erating profit of 2.99 billion francs 
in 1995. Sales fell to 64.37 billion 
francs last year from 68.69 million 
francs a year earlier. 


Pechiney said it had decided to 
sell a stake of about 37 percent in 
Carbone-Lorraine, which makes 
industrial components. The stake 
is valued at about 995 million 
francs. 

Pechiney said it had detected 
“encouraging signs" in the past 
few months, especially in the 
areas of primary aluminum and 
semifinished aluminum products 
and because of the dollar's rise. 

Pechiney said its Challenge 
cost-cutting program should begin 
to bear fruit "significantly” next 
year and should have a “frill" 
impact on earnings in 1998. 

Pechiney shares rose 4.2 per- 
cent, to 270 francs. The results 
were released after the market 
dosed. The shares have risen 19 
percent since the company report- 
ed a decline of 35 pen*nt m first- 
half earnings last September to 
426 million francs and said it 
would cut 1 ,500 jobs. 

■ Thomson’s Loss Widens 


Thomson Multimedia. Europe’s 
No. 2 consumer-electronics com- 
pany. said its loss widened in 19% 
as it look provisions to close sev- 
eral factories, Bloomberg News 
reported. 

The state-owned company pos- 
ted a net loss of 3. 1 billion French 
francs, compared with a loss of 
1.09 billion francs in 1995. The 
loss included 1 .30 billion francs in 
provisions and 1.36 billion francs 
in financial charges. 


Investor’s Europe 


Fnimfcfeit 

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Brussels;'' 

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Source: Teiekurs 


Immuuoml Herakt Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• Airbus Industrie expects the global market for aircraft to be 
16,000 units over the next 20 years to satisfy traffic growth and 
replace old planes. The European jetmaker also predicted that 
the Asia-Pacific region would become the dominant market 
for plane sales. 

• Cap Gemini NV said 1996 net profit jumped 25 percent to 
90.2 million guilders ($46.8 million) because of strong sales 
growth in all its divisions. The Dutch computer services 
company is 58 percent owned by Cap Gemini SA of France. 

• Ukraine will impose tight spending controls on state agen- 
cies this month and step up tax collection to stem the flow of 
money from government coffers. Viktor Pynzenyk, the deputy 
prime minister for the economy, said the measures were 
needed to adhere to the as-yet unapproved budget and push 
through economic reforms. 

• Von Moos Holding AG of Switzerland plans to cut 300 jobs 
but keep its two Swiss production sites as the country's biggest 
steel company battles to return to profit by 1999, after what it 
called a “significant" loss in 19%. 

• Skoda Plzen AS of the Czech Republic and RAO Gazprom 
of Russia are planning a joint venture to produce gas turbines. 

• BTR PLC said 19% pretax profit fell 13 percent to £1.3 
billioo (52.1 billion). But the British industrial conglomerate's 
shares rose 10 pence to 261 pence on investors' optimism that 
the diversified group was making progress on its restructuring. 

• Arjo Wiggins Appleton PLC, an British-French paper and 
pulp company, said 1 996 pretax profit rose to £233.9 million 
from £72 million on increased orders in the second half. 


• Royal BolsWessanen N V, a Dutch food and drinks maker, 
said net profit fell 20 percent to 164.3 million guilders as 
earnings at its cereals and spirits and wine businesses fell. 

Reuters, Bloomberg, AFP 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low Otne Pm. 


High Low dose Pm. 


High Low dose Prtv. 


High Low Clou Pm. 


Thursday, March 6 

Prices in local currencies. 
Teiekurs 

High Low Close Piw. 


Amsterdam a exmk w^ 

Previous: 75533 


ABN- AMRO 

Aegon 

Ahold. 

Ato Nobel 
BqbiCO. 

Bolt Wesson 

CSMcvo 

DwdScftePM 

DSM 

Elsevier 

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KLM 
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Roboco 


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Rami Dutch 
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14050 
130 
139 
Z79.90 
9050 
37-20 
11450 
367 
20150 
3170 
77X0 
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65.10 
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347.50 
98 
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59 JO 
4430 
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5650 
303 
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94 
15230 
KABO 
6060 
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lit 
34550 
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B8J0 
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13X60 
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27760 
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34.90 
112 
363 
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34250 
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4030 
249 


14030 138.70 
12950 12750 
13760 13230 
27930 278 

B9.70 89 

3630 3430 
11460 112 

364^0 35950 
19950 19680 
32 32 

7730 75.40 
64 6330 
64J0 6450 
16650 165.10 
34090 345 

9260 91 

16150 15750 
77.60 7550 
5 B50 5850 
4350 43.90 
67 4600 
5650 5530 
29830 29670 
242 238 

9170 9250 
9170 9250 
15150 151 

16450 164 

6030 59.90 
16930 167 

11050 11050 
34150 33860 
357.10 356.70 
87.90 87.40 
41 39.90 

25360 24750 



Hlgb 

Low 

One 

Pre*. 

Deutsche Book 

9300 

9205 

9205 

90.10 

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3400 

3402 

3430 

3308 

Dresdner Balk 

57 JQ 

5600 

i/.lb 

56^0 

Fresenlus 

381 

364 

381 

35/ 

FresertusMed 

171 

166 

168 164.90 

Fried. Kropp 

291 

285 

290 

283 

Qehe 

11805 

115.10 

116 11700 

HektefljgZml 

14800 

146 

U4 

147J0 

Henkel pfd 

10030 

98J0 

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9630 

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481 

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76 

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1530 

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77.16 

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995 

58500 

4 SI 

571 

< biiU> 

1190 

1165 

1 1 15 

1185 

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2450 

2430 

2400 

2417 

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435 

474 47700 

470 

Manuftsmonn 

60700 

682 

607 68900 

MetnBoeseflschflft 37.10 

3602 

36.95 

3705 

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15700 15630 15730 

151 

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4440 

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295 

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504 

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159 

331 

335 

Tiger Oats 

76 

75-E) 

7=00 

76 


5 

*92 

499 






INPP Group 

241 

205 

205 


Paris 


CAC-40: 269852 
Previous: 264619 


Zhwc= 


260 

1180 1865 18.70 1850 


Kuala Lumpur 

r Prevtaas: 125238 


AMMB Kdgs 
Gertie; 

Mfll SdnUng 
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PejronasGas 
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Resorts World 
Rothmans P« 
SimeDareY 

TefefaOT Md 


RWE 
SAP uM 

Seriating 


SGL Outran 22950 


450 440 <41 445 

1260 1240 1260 1230 
7968 7760 7H5S 7660 
274 27270 27350 26950 
16450 161 161 160 


Tenogfl 

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8760 


Siemens 
Springer (Avefl 1295 
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228 228 22530 

8675 8755 8660 
1295 <L00 050 

800 768 B02 765 

36150 3S550 35550 36150 
10105 9970 10055 9960 


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008 

006 

506 

506 

794 

77250 77400 

778 

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874 

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871 


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1600 

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p redoes: 68372 


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Bumroh Castro! 1035 


Hong Kong 


Haag Seep 13*1436 
Previous: 1341076 


To Our Readers 


BkBHtAski 
Cathey Podflc 
Cheung Kora 
CK Irtfrnstnjd 


°*$x± 


Dae to a technical problem 
at die source Bombay Stock 
prices were not available. We 

regret the inconvenience. 


Otic I 


‘ Duo HOrtC Bk 
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Fhst 

Hong Lung Dev 


Hong Seng Bk 
Henderson I 


Brussels 


BSL 

CBR 

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Eledmbtf 

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Forts AG 

Gnuet 

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Pefiofino 


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9900 5870 9W0 5880 

8290 0160 

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HK China Gas 
HK Electric 
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Johnson I 


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8220 8190 

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Cot* Wireless 
Codbury Schw 
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Lucos Verity 
Maria Spencer 
ME PC 

Mercury Asset 
National Grid 
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P&O 
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Premier FaroeN 
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213 

491 
486 

1420 

215 

612 

758 

6.17 

236 

650 

758 

1^7 

637 

5 

690 

492 
437 
&30 
166 

1139 

458 

653 

335 

HUB 

156 

6.14 

9.65 


Satastwiv 
SctHoden 
Sait Hcwcn site 
Seal Power 
Seewfcw 

Seven Tsrtf 

5be8TnmspR 

SWe 

SreM) Nephew 
SadttiKGne 
SnritlBind 
StnemEiec 
Stageasd) 
Stand Charter 
Tata A Lyle 
Tess 

Thames Wrier 

31 Group 

T1 Group 

Tomkins 

UflSewr 

ytd Assunree 

LttfNOBS 

Uti UtflMes 


Sun All 5.15 
168 


lAO 

17.13 

675 

173 

132 

730 

1181 

977 

IBS 

9.4= 

7.95 

TSS 

73S 

197 

43B 

3L« 

633 

533 

LB 

187 

1572 

SjO 

tjSi 

678 


653 

677 

1.10 

480 

537 

10.93 

153 

530 

331 

411 

10.17 

447 

145 

1336 

656 

173 

536 

686 

630 

134 
431 
231 
HUB 

135 
499 
539 
533 
735 

7.13 
336 

536 
4T9 

1170 

530 

631 
139 
035 
304 
940 
901 
9.40 
462 
202 
S3B 
467 
653 
S3 5 

1516 

7J6 

413 

600 

234 

7.94 

M0 

19S 

533 

2J» 

407 

475 

1300 

ill 

409 

7-40 

606 

111 

670 

777 

104 

502 

490 

575 

454 

428 

a» 

357 

1175 

451 

630 

335 

904 
238 
5.97 
981 
404 
355 
3.16 
1695 

670 

302 

320 

730 

1008 

905 
102 

9.13 
707 
700 
730 
871 
420 
338 
687 
5.18 
543 
202 
153? 

537 
735 


636 653 

601 675 

1.11 1.10 
406 402 

539 641 

11.10 1105 

835 6SS 
647 530 

332 151 

416 41 a 

1038 10.17 

67? 660 
3^9 143 

13-45 13-JO 
664 633 

1.74 174 

638 630 

7.04 692 

632 625 

155 153 

432 432 

251 251 

1070 10.18 

156 157 

602 5 

638 637 

538 546 

7j40 735 

733 7.16 

173 374 

628 635 

420 410 

1171 1108 
627 625 

634 637 

102 159 

6S5 856 
306 305 

950 958 

1048 1036 

954 902 

473 406 

202 305 

658 659 

475 474 

654 653 

637 625 
1504 1631 

7 JO 757 
416 415 

683 600 

233 237 

7.98 7.92 

2-aO 2-46 
405 197 

624 534 

2.10 2.10 

480 487 

485 471 

1407 1305 
213 111 

606 498 

750 7-44 

615 606 

212 212 
678 472 
706 739 

146 244 

625 623 

491 494 

503 677 

408 476 

434 430 

033 610 

302 359 

1135 1138 
454 153 

641 643 

329 225 

10 908 

255 238 

604 6 

955 952 
495 602 
306 iiCT 
218 221 

17.10 1703 
673 608 

306 301 
130 11B 

7 JO 7.18 

1039 1004 

908 909 

104 102 
9J4 931 

702 70S 

702 7.92 

735 737 

a 93 870 

437 430 
240 338 

600 607 

621 618 
651 642 

204 203 

1503 15-6 
640 635 

73B 730 

&30 603 


Madrid 

Aeetirn 

ACES A 

Agwatocelpn 

Anmtaria 

BBv 

Banesta 

Sankinrer 

Bco Centro Hlsp 
Bea Exterior 

Bco Popular 
BcuSentander 
CEPSA 
Contlnerte 

Cera Mapfre 
Endesa 

FEC5A 

GasNohifol 

Ibertrota 

Pryca 

RepsoJ 

Sevflano Elec 

Tabacalcn: 

Teietantoo 

Union Fwwsa 
Vctenc Cement 

20500 

1695 

554) 

6150 

8170 

1100 

19440 

3873 

2755 

2M5C 

9710 

4370 

1520 

7850 

B810 

1270 

3184) 

1575 

2715 

0700 

1330 

6880 

3425 

1150 

1550 

Bate iodec 47337 
Prevtaas 46631 

30110 20500 1 9930 
1675 16S0 1645 

5430 5430 5490 
6050 6148 6030 
8350 5380 8410 

1090 1095 1085 

19180 19280 19040 
3835 386S 3820 

2755 2755 2810 

26200 26600 26110 
9630 9670 9600 
4200 430) 4185 

2470 2500 2445 

7620 7850 7560 

8720 8730 8660 

1200 1255 1190 

31 500 31600 31100 
1540 1540 1525 

2680 2690 2640 

5640 5740 5580 
1300 1305 1290 

6733 4850 6690 

1355 3420 3335 

1125 1145 1120 
1525 1540 1540 

Manila 


PSEtadee 327902 
Prevtaas 329239 

AyctaB 

30 

29.50 

2900 

30 

Ayolo Lond 
BkPWflpIst 

3000 

30 

30 

3000 

1B4 

182 

183 

188 


1375 

1335 

1100 

1100 

ManBo ElecA 

121 

120 

121 

122 

Urs tro Bank 

705 

695 

696 

705 


1075 

1000 

1000 

1000 

PCI Bank 

385 

380 

380 

380 

PM Long Dirt 

1605 

15/5 

1580 

1605 

San Miguel B 

9200 

8800 

9UJ>0 

B / 

5M Prime Hdg 

700 

/.» 

/.VI) 

/.90 

Mexico 


Bate tader 379438 
Prevtaas 376209 

Ada A 

4470 

4445 

4400 

4400 


18.96 

18.76 

1BJ6 

ItUB 


3005 

3035 

3005 

3035 

QtroC 

1204 

12.16 

13.44 

12.12 


4000 

40. 70 

40/0 

4005 

GpoCotSO At 

400 

4330 

4400 

4275 

GpoFBairw 

105 

1.91 

101 

1.92 

GpoFIn IntMirea 
tafto Oort Met 

2700 

2700 

2/00 

2/00 

16500 

16400 

16500 

16400 

Televlsn CPO 

TC47D 101.70 

KMX 

10100 

TelMexL 

1570 

1504 

1502 

1504 

Milan 

M1B TetanrottaK 12064M 
Prevtaas: 1190500 


12465 

12320 

12335 

12220 

Bca Comto Hot 

3480 

3430 

3460 

3390 

Bca FMeuram 

4600 

4450 

4600 

4420 


1269 

1230 

1369 

1225 

Benetton 

20345 

20QS0 

20215 

20000 


2295 

2260 

7265 

2260 

EtfSon 

9695 

WO 0 

9670 

9395 

ENI 

8660 

8540 

KVa 

8525 

Ftat 

5510 

5440 

5505 

5375 

Generali Assic 

30850 

30400 

30550 

30300 

1MI 

15200 

14950 

15140 

14860 

INA 

2250 

2220 

7215 

2205 


6125 

6050 

6080 

6000 


7205 

7070 

7150 

7025 

Medtabaneo 

11340 

11060 

11300 

11005 

fAontedlsoo 

1274 

1241 

1253 

1260 

OBveni 

634 

tM 

67/ 

622 

Parmdat 

2390 

7275 

2365 

2350 

Pttffi 

3605 

XS» 

XM 

3530 

RAS 

15560 

15380 

15380 

15385 

Rota Banaj 

18290 

17755 

18190 

1/800 

SPoato Torino 

11980 

11/20 

HBftO 

i mm 

Ster 

7740 

7990 

7710 

7*55 

Tefcconi Italia 

4340 

4250 

42V0 

4260 

TIM 

4475 

4350 

4390 

4310 

Montreal 

Indusniats tadesc 2987-18 
Prevtaas 299031 

dee Mob Cam 

42U 


4*14 

4138 

CtoiTIreA 

25$ 

2535 

2535 

25 Jb 

CdnUta A 

3235 

37 

3235 

31.95 

CTFtaiSve 

31 

31 

31 

31 

Gaz Metro 

17Vi 

17.LS 

I/.15 

I/.10 

Gt-Wesl LHeco 

23 

77ta 

77 tt 

23 


38 

37 70 

37.85 

3/J0 

IfwestareGtp 

2500 

75.60 

2560 

2035 


16/0 

16fc 

1600 

1600 

Nott Bk Conodo 

1645 

1620 

1630 

164 

Power Core 

29.15 

29 

79 

2930 

Power Fiiri 

2470 

26*a 

7670 

2605 

QuBbecorS 

2545 

?W 

7505 

2535 

Rogers CommB 

9-40 

920 

V* 

935 

Royal BkCdo 

59 JO 

5700 

59.15 

0/00 


ActD> 

AGF 

AirLiquide 

AianefAism 

Am-UAP 

BnncnsTE 

BIC 

BNP 

Canal Phis 
Cnrrefour 
Casino 
CCF 
Cet rte m 
Christian CXar 
CLF-Dtiin Fron 
Credit AgricoJe 
Do none 
Bf-AqutWne 
ErirJanfcj B5 
Eurortsney 
Eimmrnnei 
Gen. Eaux 
Hovns 
Imetal 

Leonmo 

LbreaJ 

LVMH 

LyorvEau* 

MltJttOnB 

ParbasA 

Pernod Rlcard 

Peugeot at 

PtaouH-Prtrt 

Pioaodes 

Retimih 

Rom 

Rfr-PotHenc A 
Sanofl 
Schneider 
SEB 

5GS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
SofletfB 
SiGobobi 
suae 

Symhetaba 
TnoraswiCSF 
Total B 
Uslnor 
Valeo 


810 

791 

795 

799 

21800 

Zll 

21200 

208 

935 

903 

934 

B97 

6d5 

637 

642 

636 

379.98 

376 37BJ0 37500 

815 

766 

793 

752 

940 

912 

924 

925 

275 

266 

27230 

26400 

1060 

1038 

1054 

1042 

3507 

3459 

3469 

3478 

276 

269 

276 

267 

277-40 

268 

273 27140 

762 

740 

745 

720 

862 

855 

858 

849 

609 

592 

604 

589 

1280125040 

1260 

1289 

955 

940 

942 

943 

569 

559 

567 

558 

969 

934 

969 

932 

1000 

1IM0 

HUS 

10-40 

7.10 

7 

705 

7.10 

BIS 

902 

B06 

804 

453 

44600 44900 

44630 

837 

B22 

832 

824 

387-40 37400 

381 

369 

1066 

1045 

1054 

1054 

2009 

1971 

2005 

1965 

1433 

1394 

1410 

1377 

627 

605 

607 

619 

37000 36130 

364 

357.90 

40300 38830 39400 

388 

33400 

324 

333 321.70 

676 

642 

660 

663 

2464 

2371 

2405 

2424 

1804 


1780 

1737 

140.10 

13900 

13930 

1800 

1760 

1792 

1768 


Electrolux B 

Ericsson B 

Henries B 

Incentive A 

InuestwB 

MoDoB 

Nordbanken 

PhannlUofa/m 

SandvBiB 

Sconla B 

SCAB 

5-E BankenA 
StanOlaFaa 
SkanskoB 

SKFB 

SpartxHikea A 
StadshypataKA 
StoraA 
Sv Handles A 
Volvo S 


<88 482 

262 256 

1067 1060 

530 03 

3S3 347 

255 25150 
270 265 

m 2S9 
194 189 

196 193 

17450 17150 
B2 9050 
24050 22650 
3<7 342 

199 190J0 
150 142 

190 190 

109 10750 
71550 214 

19150 109-50 


484 484 

260 25250 
1061 1055 

536 533 

34850 345 

25100 24950 
26750 268 

293 285 

191 10750 
19450 191 

172 16950 
8150 01 

239 225 

342 341 

19050 193 

150 144 

190 190 

10850 10650 
21450 213 

19000 19650 


Sydney 


Al 


i >44700 

Previees 243300 


20330 20230 20630 199.90 

586 566 572 575 

31450 307 307.40 31060 

1010 992 995 1006 


406 391.10 
687 673 

3000 2941 

896 B8t 
29100 282.70 
£12 597 

19900 193 

47100 46800 
9205 9100 


402 378 

687 666 

2945 2975 

069 878 

291 277.90 
597 597 

194 196 

470 46690 
92 9100 


Amcor 

801 

&3S 

80S 

8149 

ANZBktag 

7.94 

732 

700 

700 

BHP 

1735 

1705 

1705 

17.07 

Boral 

308 

305 

307 

300 

Brambles Ind. 

2105 

21.66 

2130 

21.72 

CBA 

730? 

1205 

1205 

1233 

CC Amaitl 

1100 

1100 

1)00 

1107 

Catos Myer 

5.92 

503 

505 

508. 

Coroafco 

6J0 

605 

670 

600 

CRA 

19.16 

19 

19 

1802 

CSR 

4.72 

457 

407 

408 

Fosters Brew 

208 

205 

207 

207 

Goodman Fid 

101 

109 

100 

108 

ta Australia 

1235 

12.13 

1230 

1207 

Lend Lease 

23.90 

2305 

2305 

2307 

MIMHcjps 

137 

134 

137 

136 

Nor Aug Bonk 

16.48 

1633 

1606 

1633 

Mot Mutual Hdg 

1.94 

1.91 

1.93 

1.93 

Hews Cwp 

601 

633 

635 

631 

Podflc Dunlop 

333 

330 

301 

3.19 

Pioneer Inti 

406 

198 

406 

197 

PuOBroadcasr 

605 

600 

600 

605 

St George Bank 

705 

70S 

706 

7-44 

WMC 

832 

8.16 

832 

8.18 

WertpacBUng 

731 

7.12 

7.13 

707 

Woodstae PW 

933 

8.99 

932 

8.98 

Fflohertts 

301 

305 

308 

308 


The Trib Index 


Prices as of 3.00 PM New York me. 


Jan 1, 1992 = 100. 

Level 

Change 

‘i. change 

year to date 
% change 

World Index 
Regional Indexes 

152.11 

♦0.32 

♦0.21 

+15.35 

Asia/Pacific 

110.67 

■1.13 

-1.01 

-17.57 

Europe 

160.73 

+0.81 

+0.51 

+15.48 

N. America 

177.25 

+1.04 

+0.59 

+38.17 

S. America 

bidustrial indexes 

130.92 

♦0.12 

♦0.09 

+57.14 

Capital goods 

177.33 

+1.18 

+0.67 

+33.45 

Consumer goods 

172.37 

+0.61 

+0.36 

+24.84 

Energy 

177.93 

+1.94 

+1.10 

+31.20 

Finance 

112.96 

♦0.08 

*0.07 

-11.22 

MtaceBaneous 

158.77 

+1.29 

+0.82 

+16.91 

Raw Materials 

186.81 

♦0.89 

+0.48 

+31.74 

Service 

141.59 

+0.48 

+0.34 

+17.99 

UUSties 

134.58 

+0.39 

+0.29 

+5.85 


The International Herald Triume World Stock Index O tracks the US. doBar vetoes of 
280 imemationallylmosiebto soda bom 25 countries. For more Wommon. a tree 
booklet wavaBaUeOy writing to The Tnbtodex.781 Avenue Charles tie GauBe. 

82521 NeuSy Cortex. France Ccmpted by Bloomberg News. 


389 383 3B4JQ 384 


Sao Paulo 


Mec9H633 
907447 


Taipei 


Stack MorteM 

PirtewLlMO 


BrodescoPfd 

BrohroaPfd 


CeaitaPfd 
CESPF 


CESPPfd 
coeel 
Betrobras 
itaubancoPM 
UgrtSentaH 
Ugmpar 
Prtro&nsPM 
PnuJlsta Luz 
Sid Nodartrt 
Scum Cruz 
TetetamPfd 
Tetamig 
Telerl 
TetesaPW 
Unibcnco 
llstmlncsPid 
CVRDPta 


906 

72500 

4640 

59-19 

1500 

47500 

54100 

45909 

32400 

moo 

14600 

3920 

930 

10800 

16301 

15800 

29900 

4200 

134 

Z70O 


8.90 

69900 

4500 

5700 

1405 

46*00 

S2S0O 

45500 

31400 

21500 

14400 

3700 

9.10 

10700 

16100 

1S50O 

293-49 

4000 

130 

2600 


900 80S 

72000 70200 
*4 70 4537 
57.70 5700 
1485 1470 
46500 47000 

539.00 52000 
459.99 45500 

315.00 31500 
221-00 2173X3 
14500 14400 

3700 3890 
930 9.15 

10730 10&90 
16100 16000 
15700 15600 
29149 29500 
41.98 4030 
131 133 

2600 27.10 


Cathay Ufe Ins 
Chong HwnBfc 
OUoc Tung Bk 
Ottno Devdpmt 
China Steel 
Href Bank 
Formosa Plastic 
Hun Mon Bk 
inttComm Bk 
/tonYcPteta 


Shin Kara Life 
Taiwan Semi 


Tatung 

UMMbof 


jElec 
lltd World Chin 


181 

179 

186 

18? 

94 

93 

112 

109 

2600 

26 

787 

183 

76 

7400 

147 74400 

8400 

8300 

6800 

6700 

112 

11000 

6700 

6500 

5/00 

56 

4830 

47 

7100 

71 


179 179 

183 184 

9300 9200 
110 10800 
2620 2500 
IBS 105 
7400 7450 
145 145 

8300 KL50 
6700 670C 
111 11000 
6500 66 

5600 5650 
47 4600 
7100 7000 


Mitsui Fudasn 

AUKulTrost 

MumtaMfg 

MEC 

Niton 

NlktoSec 

Nlnrendo 

NJpp Enress 
Nippon OH 
Nippon Steel 
Nissan Motor 
NICK 

NoniuroSec 

NTT 

NTT Data 
op Paper 
QsaknGas 
Rtcob' 

Rohm 
SotoTO Bit 
Sankyo 
SenwaBonk 
Sanyo Elec 
Socorn 


SetouRwy 
ui Orem 


Tokyo 


KBdtai 225:1804133 
Prevtaas 1827301 


Seoul 


AftaaDian 

AUNtafWii. 


... DC 678.11 
Prevtaas: 67400 


Daawi 

Daewoo Heavy 


Hyundai Eng. 


i Motors 
Korea El Pw 
Korea Extfi Bk 
Korea Mob Tei 
LGSemJasn 
Pobaag inn St 
5amsung Dbtoy 
Samsung Elec 
ShWwnBank 


107000 

4350 

20500 

15200 

25400 

6340 

486000 

27500 

42500 

43000 

55900 

10800 


104500 105000 106500 
4140 4200 4150 

19300 50500 19000 
14800 14800 15400 
24700 25000 24600 
5950 6020 6040 

400000 400000 487000 
26000 26000 26100 
41800 42000 42000 
42000 42200 43000 
54000 54500 55000 
10500 10700 10600 


Singapore 


Strutts Times: 217903 
Previsas; 21 9203 


Ada Pac Brew 
CereeasPoc 
aty Davits 
Cycle Carriage 
DakyFannurt* 
DBS foreign 
DBS Lana 
KeppeiFefc 
FiUer&Neoue 
HKLand* 
JaidMrthesn- 
JoniSftnlBcfc* 
tawd 
IBank 


C foretan 
ktfl&F 


Oslo 


OBXirtfeE 60682 
Previous: 594.11 


05 Union l 
ParicwayHdgs 
Sembawatg 
Sng Air foreign 

Stag Land 
Sing Press F 
Singled) Hid 
Stag Telecomm 


Aker A 


BeroesanDyA 

QuStoiiaBk 


Dennoreke Bk 

Ekem 

HafstundA 

KmenarAsa 

Norsk Hydro 

NaretoStogA 

NvcanedA 

OrtfeAsaA 

PettnGeaSK 

SagaPtdtaiA 

Sd&stad 

TabboSbi Off 

Starebraad Abi 


182 

140 

2500 

30-40 

118 

<9 

35900 

34500 

2165Q 

110 

550 

31B 

117 

139 

416 

47.40 


177 1»7 

145 146 

25 2530 
30.10 3030 
116 11600 
48 <B 
340 357 

342 343 

213 21400 
107 108 


542 

310 

115 

137 

40? 


545 

315 

116 

138 

474 


4500 4680 


179 

1« 

2670 

2900 

114 

49 

341 

34200 

212 

10600 

535 

306 

114 

135 

410 

<6 




Tai Lea Bank 
DM industrial 
UtdOSMBfcF 
WlngTalHdp 


730 

730 

730 

1000 

I0i40 

1000 

1430 

14.10 

1430 

1530 

15 

15 

078 

037 

0J7 

18-40 

18 

18 

505 

500 

500 

500 

505 

505 

1200 

1200 

1230 

2.91 

203 

230 

6.10 

605 

6.10 

338 

336 

338 

1840 

1810 

1810 

428 

420 

420 

1890 

1870 

1180 

1138 

1890 

?J 

6.15 

6.10 

415 

7.90 

70S 

700 

1200 

1200 

1200 

805 

7.95 

7.95 

2830 

28 

28 

192 

190 

190 

336 

332 

124 

400 

4J6 

476 

160 

300 

300 

133 

131 

131 

16.10 

15.90 

1590 

402 

454 

400 


7.90 


037 


505 

575 


20B 

605 

338 


436 


JJJ0 

635 

705 


705 


300 

332 

4J6 

302 

133 


400 


IHIppenMr 
Amway 
AsoMBank 
AsartChem 
AsaW Glass 
B* Tokyo Mirsu 
BkYotohomo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
Outtaj Qec 
aiuoakuElee 
Dal Kkip Print 
DaW 

Daf-tcMKang 
.Dahro Bar* 
Drtwa House 
Ddwa Sec 
DOI 
Denso 

East Japan Ry 

Eisal 

Fanuc 

FgHBank 

Fun Photo 

Fu^su 

HacMkmf Bk 

HfcK M 

Honda Motor 

IBJ 

■HI 

ItOCftJ 

ita-Yotodo 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 

JU5C0 

KOflfflO 

KansaiEiBC 

Kao 

Kateasau Hvy 
Karra Steel 
HrtdNippRy 
fGrtn Brewey 
Kobe Steel 
Kanofcu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
K^uEte 

Marubeni 
Moral 


Matsu Comm 
i Eteclr 


Stockholm 


SX 16 tarieE 2945.16 
Pre vtoo f . 29*133 


AGAB 

ABBA 

AssIDuRiin 

Asm a 

Altos COpea A 
AutaCu 


107 1IM 105 10600 

B96 885 890 880 

210 198 210 20100 

374 369 370 36808 

185 78600 18400 


Matsu Elec Ind 
Mate Elec Wk 

MltebbW 
MRsubtstnOi 
MftabhNB 
MbBtatsrt Ert 


MBsubbWHw 


350 348 349 346 


MBsJlfthi... 
MBtofeNTr 
Mosul 


1060 

1010 

1030 

1040 

830 

800 

BOA 

B30 

3430 

3290 

3400 

3450 

832 

803 

808 

830 

635 

600 

618 

634 

1080 

1000 

1070 

1060 

1950 

1880 

1890 

7930 

545 

038 

538 

038 

2250 

21 E0 

2210 

2230 

2040 

2470 

2470 

2510 

7720 

2090 

2100 

2090 

2100 

2130 

2130 

2130 

2000 

1960 

1960 

7990 

766 

700 

754 

758 

1330 

1360 

1280 

1310 

488 

<73 

<76 

485 

1340 

1310 

1330 

1300 

998 

940 

945 

9/4 

7 4200 

/760a 

7330a 

/420o 

2720 

7160 

2180 

2220 

07000 

0160a 

S170o 

0190a 

2250 

2220 

2240 

2760 

3760 

3640 

3670 

3730 

1420 

1330 

1340 

1380 

4060 

3960 

4000 

4010 

1190 

11/0 

1180 

1190 

1090 

1060 

7060 

10/0 

1078 

1030 

1040 

1IM0 

3840 

3680 

3680 

3780 

138(1 

1310 

1310 

13/0 

436 

<16 

421 

435 

583 

561 

570 

573 

5450 

5500 

4790 

04/8 

499 

<80 

486 

494 

arena 

8000a 

HO70O 

mu 

3330 

3160 

3190 

3M0 

658 

630 

635 

647 

3170 

2120 

21X 

7170 

1110 

1290 

mo 

1320 

485 

<75 

475 

478 

322 

312 

312 

322 

n 4 

718 

718 

722 

1010 

973 

973 

988 

224 

716 

219 

223 

902 

860 

863 

899 

547 

508 

514 

567 

7140 

7040 

7060 

7110 

2120 

2110 

2120 

2120 

<73 

<01 

400 

420 

457 

433 

436 

456 

1720 

lore 

I6B0 

1670 

3060 

2950 

2950 

3060 

1B» 

17» 

1790 

1600 

1090 

10/0 

1M0 

1090 

1060 

1010 

1030 

1060 

331 

321 

326 

330 

687 

666 

666 

671 

1400 

1360 

1360 

13/D 

M2 

822 

824 

83/ 

876 

Ufa 

862 

8/6 

1330 

1300 

1300 

1390 

874 

867 

863 

871 


Sekisrtl 
SeWsul House 
Seven-Elewn 
Sharp 

Slttato EIPwr 

SWmtzu 

SMivetsuCh 

SNsekia 

SUzuoto Bk 

Softbank 

Sony 

Sumitomo 
Sum homo Bk 
5utnltChem 
SunUtamo Elec 
Sum it Metal 
Sumlt Trust 
TalshoPtiarm 
TakedoChem 
TDK 

Torioku EIPwr 
TokrtBflM 
Totao Marine 
Tokyo EIPwr 
Tokyo Etetron 
TtfcyoGas 
TokyuCorp. 
Tanen 

Toppon Print 
Toniy Ind 
Tertina 
Tostom 
Tow Trust 
Toyon Motor 
Yamanouchl 


Mgh 

LOW 

Oast 

P rev. 

1280 

1230 

1250 

1270 

749 

77/ 

ru 

719 

4160 

4080 

4090 

4170 

1410 

1370 

1380 

1390 

1820 

1750 

1/60 

77B0 

748 

715 

729 

m 

8550 

B480 

8540 

8420 

769 

/4S 

14k 

/5) 

504 

485 

490 

487 

328 

370 

322 

.128 

710 

691) 

690 

m 

253 

745 

74/ 

74/ 

1630 

1570 

1080 

1630 

8810a 

8570c 

8580a 

B730n 

31000 

3tU0b 

3040b 

3040b 

644 

620 

630 

642 

293 

288 

292 

291 

1430 

1390 

1400 

14)1) 

8730 

8730 

8/30 

8170 

749 

/Oil 

772 

/39 

3350 

3260 

3280 

3330 

1360 

1300 

1300 

1340 

484 

460 

470 

<81 

6740 

6&50 

6/00 

5740 

5200 

0000 

0000 

£000 

1260 

1240 

1200 

1238 

1110 

1090 

non 

1110 

7240 

7120 

7140 

7180 

1550 

1520 

1520 

103(1 

2100 

2070 

2080 

2080 

713 

69/ 

69/ 

704 

2360 

2330 

2340 

2300 

7440 

1470 

1440 

1431) 

1010 

990 

990 

1010 

10500 

10000 

10200 

10300 

8960 


8800 

8900 

861 

816 

838 

B60 

1510 

1450 

1440 

1480 

467 

400 

401 

460 

1670 

1640 

1650 

1660 

286 

7/4 

ill 

287 

1050 

1010 

1030 

1000 

2840 

2770 

2/80 

7760 

2490 

2430 

2430 

Z450 

8350 

8230 

8270 

8320 

2060 

2070 

2040 

2030 

935 

896 

902 

930 

1260 

1730 

1240 

1230 

2230 

7700 

2210 

2230 

<340 

4760 

4270 

4320 

305 

300 

300 

303 

560 

539 

044 

049 

1230 

1190 

1220 

1200 

1390 

1360 

1360 

13/D 

687 

675 

676 

687 

689 

660 

666 

686 

2710 

2650 

2650 

2700 

865 

846 

m 

m 

3150 

3080 

3000 

3140 

2480 

2420 

2420 

2440 



High 

LOW 

dose 

Pre*. 

Methane* 

1345 

1310 

1360 

134 


3QTP 

29.95 

30 

30.10 

Newbridge Net 

44 

4JL60 

43M 

43 35 

Narontto Inc 

32.70 

‘SIM 

3740 

■xuo 


29 1* 

2930 

2930 

79b 


9SK 

97-40 

9760 

9/B0 


1155 

12-45 

12J5 

12(1 


2 SVi 

20b 

20-40 

20(0 

Poncdn Pettm 

56J0 

06* 

06(0 

0630 


1935 

1935 

19.90 

19b 

Placer Dome 

28-45 

2730 

2810 

2830 


13 

17-80 

12 BS 

>3 


11% J 

105 

105(0 

100.95 

Renolssance 

40(0 

3910 

3960 

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Rto Aigom 

35.95 

3&80 

30M 

364L1 

Rogers Cartel B 

2636 

24.90 

7030 

2W 

Seagram Co 

55 

53b 

0430 

03.40 

sfelCdD A 

6/ta 

0600 

5/ 

06010 

Stone Canwld 

69 IK 

33 

22 

2235 

Suncor 

61-45 

603 

61b 

61 

TrttewnEny 

4465 

44.10 

44.10 

44b 

TeckB 

32.95 

32 V, 

32V0 

33 

Tetogiobe 

39.90 

39b 

3960 

39.45 

Telus 

20.95 

2080 

20.90 

20.90 

Tfiomson 

30ta 

2910 

2960 

3030 

TorDomBank 

39.70 

383(1 

3890 

3880 

Tra r>satta 

17 

16.90 

T6JS 

1895 

TransCda Pipe 

26* 

26 

2616 

26.10 

Trfmcrt Rnl 

4330 

4711 

43.60 

4235 

Trtzec Honn 

33 

3230 

32J0 

32.10 

TVXGotd 

11-45 

1130 

1135 

1130 

Wertcoas! Eny 

2530 

7480 

2630 

24.90 

Wastm 

74 

7310 

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Vienna 


ATX tadera 125836 



Prevtaas 124733 

BeehleMJddeh 

■rrT| 

820 824J0 

870 

CrerficmstPtd 

465 460.10 46430 

440 

EA-GeneraO 

3420 

3380 

3380 

3430 

EVN 

17B0 

1756 

1756 

1764 

F tag hoten Wien 
DMV 

607.95 

605 609.95 

6U4 

14431410.10 

1430 

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OestEleHriz 

865 

856 

859 

860 

VA Start 

489B0 481.40 401.40 

484 

V A Tech 

1893 

1867187630 

18/7 

Wlenerterg Bou 

2253 

2230 

mn 

2279 


Wellington 


ark mkxtjtOO 


Toronto 


TSE Industrials: 621433 
Prevtaas: 629112 


AbBW Price 

239 

22 

22.10 

2230 

Albedo Energy 

29-40 

2VV. 

2930 

7930 

Atom Atom 

<930 

4835 

49 

4890 

Anderaan Expl 

15.95 

1080 

10,90 

1090 

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U70 

01 

02 

0060 


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5380 

04.10 

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37-0 

36-40 

36-00 

3730 

BCE 

4B4C 

67X5 

67400 

6810 

BCTetacsaim 

3I« 

317(1 

3IJD 

3154 


7530 

7435 

7035 

73.90 

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26ta 

76-40 

26M 

26-40 

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32.90 

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1830 

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1/ 

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Cocneco 

M30 

0310 

5430 

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CIBC 

6910 

d» 

69 

67.70 

CrtiNaBRaS 

51.10 

5865 

5030 

5855 

Cdn NrtRes 

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3840 

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3370 

CdnOcdd Pet 

72.90 

22 \S 

2254 

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Cdn Podflc 

3045 

35.10 

3040 

1530 

Comtaco 

3940 

T9ta 

39 JO 

39b 

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245S 

24.90 


1216 

12.15 

17.15 

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UVt 

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2610 

76b 

Du PoidCda A 

3310 

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33b 

3100 

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24 

2180 

rm 

2190 

EuroNwMi® 

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Fairfax Rnl 

297 

290 

797 

296 

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31V 

31.10 

31.70 

31-4) 

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2214 

22 

22 

22b 

Francs Nevada 

64 

6130 

63 AC 

XIJUI 

Guttata Res 

1865 

in in 

in is 

in <n 

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41.80 

6130 

61to 

61 AS 

Inca 

49 

4860 

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4BAS 

IPL Energy 

La total B 

<0.10 

m 

39* 

19.35 

40 

1965 

3960 

1935 

Loewett Group 

<6.10 

<170 

<190 

<5A5 

Mocmffl Eldl 

1895 

IBM 

1880 

19 

MognoInffA 

7230 

71 JO 

7120 

71X0 


Air NZealdB 

3.95 

387 

193 

187 

Briefly Invr 

131 

136 

131 

U6 

Carter Hoft r-ni 

337 

333 

337 

337 

FtaXSiCbBWg 

410 

400 

405 

415 

FterchCh Eny 

1B6 

374 

180 

1/5 

FkschCh Farst 

205 

J.0J 

762 

2.03 

Ftofch Qi Pupa 

7.93 

286 

193 

187 

Llan Nathan 

163 

160 

10 

158 

TetecoroNZ 

070 

M3 

A67 

668 

Mllten Horton 

1165 

11-05 

11.00 

11-05 


Zurich 


SPlIaiteto 292505 
Pmteus 289083 


ABB a 

1766 

1747 

AdeccoB 

490 

<81 

AliButeeR 

1215 

1200 

Ares-SeronoB 

1680 

1613 

AMR 

875 

855 

Boer Hdg B 

1740 

iiwn 

tatobeHdgR 

3030 

2950 

BKVbton 

871 

860 

OartontR 

746 

no 

Cnl Suisse GoR 16160 

159 

ElekRMattB 

530 

529 

Eit&OwfiUe 

5945 

5815 

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4780 

4730 

Halderunk B 

1129 

1116 

UeditenstLBB 

470 

468 

NesttoR 

1649 

1635 

NovorfisR 

1751 

1726 

Qerttai&uehR 

14950 

145 

Pargeaa Hkt B 

1715 

1551 

PtxumVlsr B 

751 

745 

RfcftefliartA 

M95 

Jim 

PWiPC 

207 

203 

Radio Hdg PC 

12565 

12450 

SBCR 

299 209.50 

Schindler PC 

1640 

1616 


3515 

3445 

SMHB 


851 

SuberR 

958 

946 

Swiss Reins R 

1540 

1S36 

SwiSSBlrR 

1325 

1310 

UBSB 

1348 

1322 

WimenhwR 

■71 

936 

Zurich AssurR 

<55 

450 


482 


1737 

479 

1190 


855 


7 S! 


870 

73B 

161 

530 


2975 

B60 

740 


<70 


148 


750 


205 


299 


938 


5800 

4760 

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466 

1639 

mo 

1*75 

1545 

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2050 

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1624 

3445 

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940 

1532 

1301 

1340 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 


PAGE 19 




f-r X 


*:■£ 



The new Ciba Specialty Chemicals 


launches with flying colours. 



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Value beyond chemistry 














































PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7. 1997 


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PREMIER INVESTMENT F UNDS L TD 
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m OLdior mn c und ILV. 5 &55P 

* CJOS Fcni N.V. i 35250 

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d Pcsc Ho! Fd Oulcti Bond FI 52544 

d RflMHUFdNLGCcsn FI 55.7310 

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c fcic Set Fd F*i Income F| 527710 


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m Abates Port FtooneW S 1773457 

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a Switzerland SF 27499 

a Europe DM 11449 

a North Amerlm 5 18255 

0 Far East s 105*2 

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tv ABgnoe USGr.SIrgtaB S 1244 

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ALPHA FUND MANAGEMENT. LTD 
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m Ab<ia Allas Fd-m C CVJonJl S 15148 

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m Canqrst Asia t 151651 

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CONZBTT HOLDINGS LTD 

■V Coomrma LlaBed SF 222352 

» Carcelt Eirepa teat LM SF imam 
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to EnWTangMUsauoMFdLtd DM 12255* 

- EquuSdum Fund Ud DM 128109 
• Srmtatof Trading Fund LM DM 1R7139 
COWEN ASSET AIANAGEAIE NT 


■v C3SU AShs S 

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CREDIS INVESTMENT FUNDS 
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d nprld Fund S 151 44 

d For Ecrs Fond S 5756 

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d Gtoooi Setocfcjn Find 5 22.15 

a SpedW GtOtoW Fund S 3 * 32 

FIN ANSA GROUP JFfflt 642 2404488) 

(Intornet E-MnftjtHBbacqlfitdiMi mm) 
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FLEMING FUND MANAGEMENT 

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FM GROWTH FUND (-31! 311 555 744 
m NAVal Jan 31 S 99.17 


a JF Hang Kong Trust 
d JF Japan Srn. Co Tr. 
a JF Jmcr Trosl 
a JF Malaysia Triad 
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JUUUS BAER GROUP 


a u 
S 1450 
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¥ 3370850 
Y 1025250 
3 3BJ2 
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d CSPartf Fh Inc BFRJ B 
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a 1-1,52 

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d CS Portf Inc SFS B SF 121164 

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a CS Port! Inc USS B S 1172.10 

d CSPwtftelDM DM 129*77 

d CS Portf BdISFR SF 124658 

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a CS Port! Faaa SFR A*B SF 108755 

a e Pont Growth DM DM 12&7JJ 

d CS Portf Grand! SFR SF 121X96 

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d CndbManerMMFdBEF BF 6315*. 00 

d Credit Mane, MB FdCS CS 150155 


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S 10.1625 

S 11.9* 

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S 1X33 

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t 1S51 

S 1092 

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a Data Band Fuad 
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5 25715] 

Ecu 19471 


d DM Band FHmd 
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a US Stock Fund 
d FtocSc Stock Fund 
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d Soedot Sirtjj Stock 
d Jap* Sloe* Fund 


S IS422 
AS 1044 
SF 14452 


SF 

DM 

Ecu 21416 


FRIED BERG MOLTFGECTOR FUNDS 

Tab M141 3(4-11 71/FBC (414)3644572 


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d Special German Stock 
0 K0TOOT SHeL Fuoa 


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VEN PORTFOLIO 

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a DmB V 1414 

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MERJ2UX LYNCH INCS PORTFOLIO 
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MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 
0 Mmiasi Irx S Ptfl □ A ■ S 103* 

a Mmdcan toes poiq B s lux* 

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d Meteor Inc Peso PM O B $ xcs 

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a OassB s 75* 

MILLENNIUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
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at SMI Ouan UMmreged S 11145* 

m Sttoss Franc Currency Fti SF 11312* 

m USS Gklfcal Currency Fa S 116656 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 


REGENT FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 


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a WP Siewort Aten Eouiiy s 

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WP STEWART GLOBAL GROWTH 
« WP Stonurt Glabd OWMi f 12298B 

WP STEWART HOLDINGS N.V. 
d WPSHIA-DAMSE' . S 7E143 

WPS INVESTISSEMENTS S5. 

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— REPUBLIC FUNDS I FAX 8309 


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if DEM LtaAd Reserv 
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m InrSa Pemrtnaitce Fd-Jon31 
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AMERICAN PHOENIX INVT PORTFOLIO 
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a US-GraantiCsiroianles Ptfl S 1SJ7 

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ARNHOLD a S. BLEKH BOEDER 
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» *“fts Coroaultor S KBTXHSE 

> AojOa liaWmhoral Fund 5 71457E 

w PEF AtoacWes N.V. 3167B3.15E 

>• Eagle SetoO Fund I 99S JBE 

■ Rtst Eagle Fund S999HL12E 

> Tlic Gtoaaf Beverage Fd S 1 222 IE 

ASIA PACIFIC PERFORMANCE. S1CAV 

I APP S 123* 

ATLAS CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

■ AflasCkbolFd I 10854. 

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to CflBvertbie ArtdVnge Fd s 106551- 

m Qidlengcr Fd t 11*570 

■ The Second Amro Among* a 103430* 

BAIi Tet 44-171-73* 3708 

r Irdettnarkdt Fd Latest NAV 8 4419S 

InleraalfaBo Fund 

I CanvemMr Fa (FFrt FF 308451 


m- 


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6 205730 

y 14760100 
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8 133996, 
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J 29254 
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Pb 4736000 
15 29263850 
15 J062J2.00 
SF 28X33 
V 1 9450.X 


to FrtedhargNewieattnB S IS 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID] 

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: i 

n FM G Europe 01 Jan) DM 

m FMG EMC MKT OUsO I 


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d ECU Cash Fuad 
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a Do«tor caw Fima 
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d Gertmds infl Asset 
d Gertonds mil BdS 
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in Momentum AI Weather 
m Alarrteafimi AssermtOBr 
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m MaaMtduro Mnaa i nawe r 




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FL 8475* 

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0 GWxf Oval Grondh Fa s 60.70 

m The Rutskm Federal OIDeO a l&l* 

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a Aaxic usa Georrtti Fund s 171J2E 

■V CraswaadCepintlLkt S14974J7E 

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iv SaugatucA MLM S 12M99E 

"* GMA CURRENCY FUNDS IFAX 82608 
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>* GdM HAdge II S 207.70 

to Gaia Hedge <11 8 \13J 

C GAIA Ft 8 19X01 

m Gala Gumvrteed □. I 5 9752 

m Gaia Guaranteed CL II I 9$4t 

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— GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT 


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c RS Fend F| 5*1 jbo 

d RG frjt=e FuraJ Ft 212.00 

d no PacS: Fund R 156.M 

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s PS- tedPtL i fi ic«J2 

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0 RC'.”25ner«uiFrL R 12431 

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GROUP FUNDS 

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8 1B8^8E 
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8 104L4TE 
i 1054275 
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KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 
CTO Furman Sab. DucSn Tel 1S3 1 679 7724 
m Key Ada HoKOnqs 8 11X21 

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m Key Longvrood UK 3 12MS 

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ifax _U jti nsea uyGya srwLeb e *250 
INTERNET SITE WpalMntatjmit 
OFFSHORE FUNDS . 


m Kl Ate Pacific Fd Ud 
LEHMAN BROTHERS 880897 
a Gi cM Adm in 11 nv A 
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<f Global ABHNR8 Port NV A 


FF 308451 
S 72097 

8 mn 

S 52989 


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£ 141*4 

119843 
8 478.75 

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0 BBLinvesiAaienrnCop 8 697*9 

0 BBL unrest Belgium Cap BF 21 n xoo 

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a BBL invesi Lain Amer COD S wi n 

0 BBL Invest HKLOWa Cte S 28BA4 

, BBL Invest Asian Grth Cap s 41107 

d BBL Imres! ur. Cao £ 3*621 

a BBL IL'Im Galdnilnes COP 8 134P2 

a BBL !L) Invest Europe Cot Lf thijboo 

a BBL (U Invest Wand Cb LF *77600 

a BBL lU irv Base Met COP S 43428 

0 BBLILi lnvTelea» AMeW t 5304 


0 BBL iF) invesi mice Cap FF 55XH 


a BBL Renta Fd mag 
lf BBL PtmnMM Bal 


d BBL R C Sb-Medum Cap BF 13260400 
0 BBL & MC Fund CaitliHWes DM civiti 
BA NODE BELGE ASSET MGMT FUND 
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to Inn Eouiry Fund S 1144 

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8 139.69, 

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to GAM ESonOai Raid 
to GAM Alt Krone 
» GAMAStAIT 
to GAM Allan Dev mures 
to GAM Austrnla 
GAMBKPMc 
to GAM Bond C 
to GAM Bard DM 


0 Lenmon Cur Adv. AfB S 

a Premier Futures Adv Afl 8 
LIBERAL BJLi FUNDS 
TW:9S21 212 4076 F8K : SS 21 242 7254 


m Mameraum Saraoi <moa 
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rr? Manerouei Teten Panels 
rn Mcroeaftss Ureven Hedge 
m M ura t ulwn Vah a. tr est e r 
MULTIMANAGER N.V. 
m Euranersa Euunies Ecu 17.17 

o Japanese Edmlles v 417 

n» Emerging Markets S 2081 

n Arbitrage s 1CJ7 

m Hedge s 14*7 

NAM FOREX MANAGEMENT 

■ NAM Mrftl Hedge Sr 1CC0 

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w NA FteteMGronttlFd 5 !77*7 

to NA Hedge Fund s 17420 

NOMURA INTL (HONG KO MG) LTD 
d Hatrari JaMnkj Fund S 118* 

NORTH STAR FUND MANAGEMENT 
TtL *45-33121122 Fax. -4X33324717 

■ NS iRuesOnm Find DM 49600- 

tv NS High Pertamana Fd DU *0600- 
* NS Miied mromahonel Fd DM 246X3- 
to NS Ccncord Fund DU 27980- 

« NS inteiaSortal Currency Fd S £080* 
- NS 3d 8 Marlgcge Fund DU 169X3- 
OLD M UTUAL INTL (GUERNSEY) LTD 


IE ENVIRONMENT 
Ordinary 
2DPs 


LSTRATEOYFUNDS^ 

3 S 1X18 

at S 21V7 

□ B s 1242 

S 17X2 

8 1X71 

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m Adaohie 
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ir Asia Vision 

m Asian selector Hdps 
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to CdtUmbretoSlctetaHY 

to Cot UtnweOo Sic Thai HV 
m CMarGtobaJ Investments 
■v Central 8 Eosbrn &*D 


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m Opoarrunity Raid LM rDed $ 110.93 

m TlSXwSrrarOftWLlJfDec) S 10,12 

* Wortd wen Mted Uon2ll 8 163.14 

THE SAILORS FOND. SICA V 
LUXEMBOURG. TEL D0253 4423M 284 

to (ltd Fixed mcofM Ecu 1579.1, 

■ lira EanPy Ecu 160073 

» rtnBan £□ wry to 1151,1.10 

» UraFtodlocarae LF UB20JXI 

to ■ BaKsiced Ponthua U 1172X00 

> Street Tern LU 1072X00 

* C&CBond S 1099.48 

THE WIMBLEDON FUNDS T: 809 393 8777 

r The MmMeCDn Fura Cuss B 8 1117.18 

« The Whutrtedon Fund 0«s C S 1*750 
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a Earn France ini Plus B 
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a Emir Katy Index Plus A 
a Emit itch index Plus 9 
a Emit Neb mm Plus 1 
d EaW Netti index Phis B 
a Erell jpatn tnd. PknA 
a EmN Spain lad. Purs. 9 
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a Emi Stood Irraca Plus B 
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0 Emn UK index Phis B 


Prices at 141EW 

a Thema Hedged US Equttes 8 1KL2B 
* Theoid HWiYTeM Fixed U>c SF 101.47 


MANAGED FUNDS 

• rt: 352 4 79 5*41 La. 352 *72566 

c Fare Cr* TrcdKcimel CHF SF KB49.11 
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3 Ptf r-Y Enter BtkK 8 1 4*551 


d AJJLSJ.Rmd 
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UPPO INVESTMENTS 
Tal do. 143 121 1521-267X73 
Fax no -(621(211 S21 -2477 
» Java Fund 5 913 

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« LG tmUn Fund Ltd 8 9 1« 

» LGJujot Fund S 4i2l 

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LLOYDS BANK INTL (BAHAMAS! U4 
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0 LOSvrtStS&M CODS CHF 5F 2X14* 


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S P*equity Furd Latin Am 8 10B.755 

> Pn-;scn Las f 3295000 

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S ESC7FE-J-. P=T-.lfi). Tst EC u 19.94 

« E.Tm«"S»S irr.rd Ecu 55.740 

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2 TcAer =i.n= Cirtd Send S 1016507 

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SANTANDER NEW WORLD INV. 

rt Ceroracraei Fane 8 139027a 

m Eccr =.-: S 19405X07 

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let 4*1 292-1018 Fax «7 295-2305 


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8 11843 

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8 1821 
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5 71150 


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LOMBARD OCHER OPPORTUNITY 


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> apnob Shu Sates 5 71150 

» Otvmpio Ste FF Hedge See FF 284707 
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» VThcfi GJoM HeraitKore Ecu 13S0XT 

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b Otymplo Naiural Resooices s 43560 

OPPENHE1MER A CD. INC Fds IFMml 

7 AltUrrage IWemaUcnd S 139J2 

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t OooenCntrVS lm LIO S 1-1X10 


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£ 93506 

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i £fA« Mate, MWs DM DM 1005, 

rf CSAM Money BBAltG 5F SF 1M.17 

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0 C-5AM Money MM» USA 8 100 90 

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5 


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a indmuez HmgKoroi Fu 

a indosuet Sing & Mns, 1 
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w indauiet Manned Tst 
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BANOUESCS ALLIANCE 
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* 71535* 

8 50.085* 

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5 ILMIfc 


8 39595* 

8 2011 

5 2003 


a Qewt Sum* Fds Bds SF iiij» 

a CSEurorora DM 10S74 

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» EtruesMatMube FF 1706658 

a Sam Aatcasn USDB s 124304 

CRE DIT LYD NNAB ROUSE CBetteMa) Ud 

aJ« ?E^rfl ^0?-97 ILUX REG) * ,ILtJ5 
m DhronWed USSOid 8 1008 

m DhrersHtad DM Ord DM Ttfli 

m DhenMedFFrM FF 5950 

ro DIvetStIM AS ora AS 1053 

a DtversWed US Gntd May 99 S 11*6 

m DMNSHhd AI Grid Jan 2000 AS 1303 

THE VOLATIUTY FUND 31 -01 V7 (LUX REG1 
«t TheVataWCrFifUSSSariesl s ,0» 

OEDIT SUISSE FUND MGMT (GUERNI 


REGtSTERED UCrTS 

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S ^»?S5SSS 


DM ID.14 
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DM 18X16 


» GAM Total BOM DM AOC DM 13454 

■ CAM UlttertM DM Ad DM 2RX71 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

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135 East S7Th Sire*. NY 1OC20 12 -88M2S0 

■ GAM Europe 8 1155 


d Jotwnriefen f 

a Pound SJertnq I 

a DeuRttvAtath DM 

d Dutch Rcvtn Fl 

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d Stops Plane SF 

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d SwbsMaMaHietKT SF 

a Eunwai Canency Em 

d BeigtonFraac BF 

d Convertae 8 

a Reach Franc FF 

0 SuAspMum-DMdend SF 

d MwFraK Shert-rerm SF 

d DmadlanDoter a 

0 Dutch Ffcrtn MdtN Fl 

a Stops Franc DTOd Pay SF 

0 Medtwmnirtjn Curr SF 

d Gonmflhies SF 

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a HLGHXhtairo.Otv R 

LOMBARD ODIER INVEST 
d SuroOer European Caps DM 

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f 5665® 
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1 Cropen Parogon tan Lki s USJs 

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OPTiGESTION PARS 
GRGUPE MARTIN MAUREL 
> Qonqec otal Fd-FUted lot DM 220.150 
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OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Front St. Ha mile oBetmudo 80979808% 


THORNTON INVESTMENT MGMT LTD 
33 Queen SLLandoa EC4R I AX 4* 1 71 2463000 
a Ptxuf frrui FdSA£ £ 1117 

a P*H lnvt Fd SA DM DM 36.*) 

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a Ttwno Orient me FdLId S 3009 

0 Thcndan Tter Fd Ltd \ S657 

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a AserraGraoth ■ 1808 

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e AMdft MtobI hivt T9 S 1084 

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% 11*543 

BF ItlJA-TD 
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a Ptmtepfnes S 91OT 

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a USS UcuKftf S 9.48 

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THORNTON TAIWAN FUND . 

■r Ffliily Incame 8 1407 

• Ea-Jtir Grown S 19.92 

UTAH CAPITAL MGT IFAX *2S0t 
FCC44I71 3 n 3U7/PhoneM 1 n 379 303) 

» Titan WtoMs S 12s 71 

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to TOCs Fx Detfa 5 1360* 

« Tima Fraex 8 I17JB 

Titan Currency Parti S 12903 

■v Titan GMfaol Hedga S 110160 

TRANS GLOBAL FUNDS GROUP 
to Trans GJooni liM Ptc S 341.92 

•> Trens Gtattfl Fbed Inc Pic s II 5.92 

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TWEEDY BROWNE VALUE FUNDS 

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to IntlVdkJt S 23.12 

» Intt Value SF If .80 


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m GCMbifi Eaulty FdLM 
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c Bcng DEV Au DM 15442 

a Bats DEM irr DM 09940 

c 3^-.; SClIet US Ac 8 15703 

1 tend Dilta US me S 10798 

a Smeder RexIMe Ba Acc Set 113016 

a Saeatr Ffecbie Bd lx Sex II02OB 

0 Shot Scad USD S 10591 

a Star; “end 5**isa Kronor Sc* 1X1088 

S043ETE FIN AN a ERE PR1VEE, GENEVA 
ADMINISTRATION TEL -41 228113131 


8 01 4*53 

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8 176U 

£ 20928 

8 14171 

S 1.199 
8 35049 

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ORBJ5 INVESTMENT Bwraada (441) 29i 
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tf Cterte. taper- Fa S A1511: 

d tttflex Long-Start Fd 8 8.171k 

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FACTUAL 

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d Etatnlly Fund Ltd ; 509 860 

d Irflnlt, Fund LM S 77M£K 

0 Novuiar Fund 5 17X0SS7 

d Star High YWd FdLM S 225 14W 

a Oren F-jnd DO _ 8 140B24B 

d Ttotnstw High YWd Fd 8 109JXUI 

PARIBAS MULTI-MANAGER GLBL FD PLC 
f Porbas Alternative lrtrDec3l S 1075, 
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0 ttanui A Man 

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a Panres Betglvni BF 728I3U 

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d Porves) Europe MW Cap Ecd 


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J Japan OTC Yen 115000 

d Eastern Eurowte DM 1SJ75 

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M0L BASS RE/EM TERPR1SE INTL LTD 
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MAGNUM FUNDS 


S 3.94*9* 
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8 46338* 

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ADMINISTRATION TEL -41 227183131 


FEB2S 

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k CurVtar End Asian Eq 


» GAM North America 

0 £AM Aston Cartel 
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d OteaiPPOiOSTOj S 11 


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d Hert tacn T reasury Fd SF 105980* 

d DHMtevMatartsFimd SF 1305803 

0 DH Mrodorin Pwttaito SF 1445X3) 

0 DH STOSS -Ev. SMI) SF 11237,* 

a DH Taroun pan SF 111336 

d Samurai Portfolio SF 25BAS7 

DELTEC PAN AMERICA TRUST CO. LTD 
ro Deter Late American Fd j sm 

rn Deflec Wortdnlde Inc Fd S 1469 

ro DetfccHlghYleWFd 8 119J759 

DISCOUNT BANK GROUP 

■v Scant Bd M81 Hgd Date 

w Scant BdNtajW Hgd CHF 
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GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 


* Magnum CdpAolGra*b 
w Magnun Edge 

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GLOBAL FUTURES A OPTIONS SICAV 

ro FFM l« Bd Progr-CHF a SF 81.93 

GOTTEX FUND MANAGEMENT 
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GRANITE GLPITAL INTL GROUP 
» Gronlta Capital EquflyFd fi 146140 

GROOTE INDOSUBZ FUNDS 88103197 
Tel : (3S23 46 54 2 * 470 


a Thakma flUHSi j 19348* 

a Asean Fund iOMHl s 9.18*; 

a South E«1 Ate 105*03) 8 38049* 

BARING ltm.ro MANORS (IRELAND) 

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LTD (NON5IB RECOGNIZED) IFAX 825« 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1997 






ASIA7PACIFIC 


& 


Seoul Sees 
Its First 
Hostile Bid 

Luxury- Goods Firm 
Is Named as Target 

Bloomberg Nws 

, — South Korea’s first 

ho«rie takeover bid began Thursday 
as Shindongbang Co. told the stock 
exchange it was considering buying 
Midopa Co., a luxury retailer. 

Shares in Midopa, where wealthy 
Koreans have bought their Rolexes 
and designer gowns for 30 years, 
have more than tripled this year on 
takeover speculation. But the stock 
plunged Thursday as Shindong- 
bang, a food producer, finally made 
pubhc its intentions. 

Foreign investors view the case as 
a litmus test for the government's 
market reform efforts, as it plans to 
relax takeover rules April 1 ro try to 
unprove the competitiveness of 
South Korean industries. 

Yoo Seung Gwan, a spokesman 
for Shindongbang, said the com- 
pany notified the Korean Stock Ex- 
change of its intentions Thursday. 
He said the company would make a 
decision on whether to proceed with 
the takeover bid within a month. 

South Korean companies cur- 
rently are required to report to the 
stock exchange every time they 
build up a 5 percent stake of a listed 
company. They are prohibited from 
owning more than 10 percent 

On April 1, the government will 
relax one regulation — known as 
Clause 200 — that makes it virtually 
impossible to complete a hostile 
takeover. Starting then, companies 
will have to report to the stock ex- 
change only after they purchase 25 
percent of a company. 

But some analysts speculated that 
Shindongbang was pushing for a hos- 
tile takeover even before April 1 . 

"Shindongbang probably wants 
to end the game as soon as possible 
because it has enough shares to push 
for a hostile takeover,’' said Yoon 
Kyung Hwa, an analyst at HG Asia 
Ltd. in Seoul. 

"Though the rules will be easier, 
it will be a more expensive task next 
month.” 

That is because, starting in April, 
companies will be required to buy 
more than 50 percent of a company 
to complete a takeover. At present, 
the prospective acquirer needs only 
to become the largest shareholder. 

Midopa shares plunged die daily 
limit of 8 percent Thursday, closing 
in Seoul at 41,500 won ($47.81), 
down 3,600. 


New Challenge for Taiwan Chip King 


Bloomberg News 

TAIPEI - — Morris Chang transformed 
Taiwan ’s electronics industry from a backwater 
into the world's fouith-Iargest maker of com- 
puter chips. 

Suddenly, at 64, Mr. Chang, who was bom in 
China and educated in the United States at Stan- 
ford and the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, must work his magic again. As chairman, 
he is being forced to retake full control of the 
company he built into Taiwan’s largest semi- 
conductor producer just as imitators are closing 
in and chip prices are in the doldrums. 

That is a tall order even for Mr. Chang, who 
turned Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing 
Co. into the world's first chip plant to produce 
only chips designed by customers. But die king 
of Taiwan’s $6.4 billion chip industry has little 
choice in the matter, as Don Brooks, the second- 

ranking executive at Taiwan Semi- 

conductor, resigned this week. 

“Morris Chang, as great as he 
is, won't be able to pull Taiwan 
Semiconductor out of this unless 
there’s a sustained industrywide 
rebound in chip prices,” said Ben 
Lee, an analyst at Nomura Se- 
curities. Many analysts say such a 
rebound is unlikely. But Mr. 

Chang is undaunted. He said 
Taiwan Semiconductor would in- 
crease both production and mar- 
ket share this year, although the 
company said this week that profit 
would rumble about 53 percent. 

Judging by the performance of 
the company's stock, some in- 
vestors are betting that Mr. Chang 
is in for a fight Shares in Taiwan 


Semiconductor, which is 35 percent owned by 
the Dutch electronics maker Philips Electronics 
NV, fell 2 percent Wednesday, to 66.00 Taiwan 
dollars (S2.40). as investors digested the news 
that Mr. Brooks, a Texan who once worked with 
Mr. Chang at Texas Instruments Inc., would 
leave the company to return to the United States. 
The company complicated their task by lowering 
its earnings estimate in the same week. The 
shares fell 50 cents Thursday, to 65.50. 

Mr. Chang, however, has surprised people 
before, in 1987, many industry executives 
scoffed when he turned Taiwan Semiconductor 
into a pure chip foundry. That was two years 
after he came to Taiwan, at the request of the 
government, to build the area known as Hsin- 
chu into Taiwan’s Silicon Valley. 

But small chip-design companies in the 
United States and Taiwan chose Taiwan Semi- 


Skepticism Greets S amsung ’s Plan 


Reuters 


SEOUL — Analysts said Thursday that Samsung Electronics Co.’s plan to 
invest $8 billion in expanding its nonmemory-chip sector would shield the 
company from the volatility in memory-chip prices but that its entry into the 
market would be difficult. 

Samsung Electronics said Wednesday it would make its investment over 
the next five years to try to achieve sales of $15 billion in nonmemoiy. or 
logic, chips by 2005. It said the sector then would account for 50 percent of 
Samsung's semiconductor sales, compared with from 20 percent now. 

“By developing a strong nonmemory portfolio, Samsung could ease the 
volatility of memory profits.’ ' Matt Geary, an analyst at HG Asia. But he 
warned that it would take time. “A lot of times, niche areas have already been 
dominated, and it's hard for the newcomer.” Mr. Geary said. Jon Chong Hwa 
of Hannuri- Salomon Securities said. “It will take five years for Samsung to build 
□onroemory-chip designing skills and establish good client relationships.” 


conductor over rival chipmakers in Japan be- 
cause the Japanese insisted on the right to mar- 
ket any designs they were hired to produce. 

Rivals soon copied Mr. Chang’s ideas. 

Those muscling in include United Microelec- 
tronics Corp., which in February cut its prices for 
foundry work by 50 percent to compete with 
Taiwan Semiconductor, according to Connor 
Liu. an analyst at Jardine Fleming Taiwan Ltd. 

Profit in the entire sector is being squeezed 
by a glut of semiconductors. Chip prices 
plunged as much as 80 percent last year. 

From 1991 through 1996, Taiwan Semicon- 
ductor's profit soared fourfold, to 19.4 billion 
dollars, while sales climbed sixfold, to 39.4 
billion dollars. 

Part of that reflected the fortunes of die world 
chip industry: From 1992 to 1994, global semi- 
conductor sales rose 60 percent. But now, that 
growth has stalled. Mr. Chang said 
he hoped to revive profit by ex- 
panding capacity and improving 
technology. The company is also 
seeking new business alliances. 
Taiwan Semiconductor plans to 
build plants in Taiwan and the 
United States next year and to 
spend about 50 percent more than 
it did last year on research. 

Those plans, and optimism that 
demand for chips will revive in 
the next few years, may help keep 
investors calm. 

"The worst is probably over, 
and foreign investors that are in- 
creasingly looking to invest in 
Taiwan will choose blue-chips” 
such as Taiwan Semiconductor, 
Peter Kurz of ING Baring said. 


investor’s Asia 


Hong Kang * '• 

Hang Seng ' 

15000 - - • 

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.HangSeng ' \ : 

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Singapore 



Sydney 

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Tokyo.. 

. Mkka'225 ' : 


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Bangkok 

SET 

' 676,65 .=683.72;“ 

Seoul 

Composite index-- 

-.67 &U .6T4S0 - ' 

Taipei 

Stock Market irafejc 8,081,00 3£ja46v^7?j 

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Source: Teiekurs 


International HetaU Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Flak Over Hong Kong 

Airlines Fear High Fees for New Airport 


By Philip Segal 

Special rc= the Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — The world's 
passenger airlines have fired anoth- 
er salvo in an increasingly biner 
fight with Hong Kong’s Airport Au- 
thority. charging that high landing 
and terminal fees at the territory's 
new airport will cost them hundreds 
of milli ons of dollars and deliver a 
mortal blow to Hong Kong's po- 
sition as a gateway to China. 

John Marshall, senior director of 
the International Air Transport As- 
sociation, a grouping of 254 of the 
world’s leading airlines, said this 
week: ‘ ‘If not corrected, die Airport 
Authority business plan will result 
in airlines being burdened with an 
unwarranted increase in charges. 
The effect will be higher fares, dam- 
age to tourism and a reduction in 
Hong Kong's role as a regional hub 


for business.” But the Airport Au- 
thority said the group's complaints 
were premature, because the author- 
ity bad not unveiled any business 
plan on which airlines could base 
their projected fees. 

The airline group and the Airport 
Authority will meet next week, when 
the government is expected to unveil 
the fees it will charge planes to land 
and park at the Chek Lap Kok airport 
that is due to open next year. 

The airline group said it had based 
its calculations on whai the authority 
said it would cost to run the airport. In 
November, the group's representa- 
tive in Hong Kong, Gilbert Chow, 
said research showed that landing 
fees for Boeing 747 airliners at the 
new r airport could amount to S 1 2,000. 
This would be four times the present 
level and 30 percent higher than Kan- 
sai Airport in Japan, the most ex- 
pensive one in the world today. 


Nomura Sees ‘Strong Possibility’ 

Of Executives’ Role in Illegal Trades 

Crifflpilrd by OwSsrfFnm Dispatches 

TOKYO — Nomura Securities Co. said Thursday there was a "strong 
possibility' ' that two of its managing directors were involved in allegedly 
illegal transactions using client accounts. 

Arsushi Saito, executive vice president, said the two had been involved 
in three transactions “deemed to be apparently illegal" and two other 
transactions whose legality the company was “not sure of” between March 
1993 and the summer of 19%. 

Nomura said the trades had been made using stocks in Nomura’s own 
account and that the resulting profits then were funneled to accounts of 
"corporate " clients. Mr. Saito said he could not say how much money had 
been involved in the trades until Japanese regulators completed their 
investigation. The Securities and Exchange Surveillance Commission has 
been investigating the irregularities since September and should complete 
the inquiry soon, he said. Nomura’s shares fell 3 percent Thursday, or 50 
yen. to" close at 1.580 (S12.98). (AFP, Bloomberg ) 

B Bring Reform Plan Forward 3 Years, Governing Party Urges 

Japan's governing Liberal Democratic Party proposed speeding up 
financial reforms by three years, increasing the chances that the country's 
banks, brokerage concerns and life insurers will face a deregulated market 
sooner than expected, Bloomberg News reported. 

The call to complete the reform effort by the end of 1998 instead of 2001 
battered shares of brokerage firms, which fell 2.2 percent as a group. The 
Nikkei Stock Average closed at 18,041 .36, down 232.1 8 points. 


• Diversified Resources Bhd„ the Malaysian conglomerate 
that controls the carmaker Proton, named its deputy chairman. 
Saleh Sulong, as its new chairman, succeeding Yahaya Ahmad, 
who was killed in a helicopter crash Monday. The company 
said it planned no change in its policies. 

• Nippon Steel Corp., Kawasaki Steel Corp. and Kobe Steel 
Ltd., three of Japan's largest steelmakers, raised parent-com- 
pany earnings forecasts for the year ending this month and 
predicted higher profits for the next financial year, based on 
higher product prices, a stronger dollar and low interest rates. 

• Mitsubishi Trust & Banking Corp. will form a joint 
venture with American International Group Inc. to enter 
the investment-trust sector in Japan, the Nihon Keizai Shim- 
bun reported. 

• China will expand its local-currency interbank market this 
year by allowing branches of major commercial banks and city 
cooperative banks to trade directly on the market, a senior 
exchange official said. 

• Hyundai Motor Co., South Korea’s largest carmaker, is 
negotiating a joint venture with AO Gaz, Russia's largest 
vehicle manufacturer, to secure a foothold in Russia. 

• Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. will spend 120 billion 
yen ($985.6 million) by 2001 to double its production of 
liquid-crystal displays for portable computers. 

• The Philippines' international reserves now stand at a record 
high of $12.05 billion, aided by strong foreign investment. 

• Pacific Century Group Japan, the Japanese arm of the 
Hong Kong property company Pacific Century Group Hold- 
ings Ltd„ mil pay a higher- than -expected 86.8 billion yen for 
a 4,854-square-meter (52,000 square feet) plot of land in 
Tokyo where it plans to build a 28-story office building. 

• The Central Bank of China, Taiwan's central bank, dis- 
missed repons that it was considering an increase in its key 
lending rate to slow a stock-market rally that has driven the 
benchmark index up 17 percent this year. 

• General Motor Corp.’s Saturn division unveiled its pricing 

policy for Japan, where it will introduce its first sedan, station 
wagon and coupe April 5. Reuters, Bloomberg. AP. AFP 


Thai Central Banker 
Tows Not to ‘Run Away’ 


CrwnpM by Our Surf From Dispacha 

BANGKOK — The head of the 
central Bank of Thailand pledged 
Thursday that he “will not run away’ ’ 
from the country's financial troubles 
amid a continuing run on deposits and 
a slump in shares. 

The run on Thailand’s ailing fi- 
nance companies sapped another 3.5 
billion baht ($134.9 million) from 
their coffers on Thursday, but central 
bank officials said pressure on 
troubled firms was easing. 

The officials said withdrawals for 
the day were 1.5 billion baht lower 
than the amount taken out Wednesday 
from 10 finance companies that had 
been ordered to raise their reserves 
andregistered capital at the beginning 
of the week. . . . 

■ The combination of the crisis in 
financial institutions and the suspen- 
sion Wednesday of two central bank 
nffiriaU over a bungled investigation 


into a banking scandal sparked rumors 
that tiie governor of the Bank of Thai- 
land, Rerngchai Marakanond, and Fi- 
nance Minister Amnuay Virawan 
would resign, which both later denied. 
“The situation improved today be- 
cause the amount of borrowing has 
been reduced, and a lot of big finance 
companies told me that they had a lot of 
money and were not going to have cash 
flow problems," said Suwit 
Nivartvong, a central bank director in 
charge of finance companies. 

Stocks were hammered for a fourth 
day. closing at their lowest level in 
nearly five years. The SET index fin- 
ished 7.07 points lower at 676.65. 

The baht was shaken by rumors of 
the central bank governor’s resigna- 
tion, as the dollar rose to 25.965 baht 
but denial of the rumor caused it to 
recede to 25.951 baht. It had closed at 
25.940 baht on Wednesday. 

(AFP, Reuters) 


CUBA: Canada, PJs and Helms-Burton PERFORM: Looking to Potential Profits 


Continued from Page IS 

four decades ago, such as the Mexican 
and Italian corporations that have stakes 
in tiie Cuban phone system that was built 
by U.S. companies. ’ 

In this case. Wal-Mart bought the 
pajamas from a Canadian distributor, 
who in rum had imported them from 
Cuba. Other U.S. retailers operating in 
Canada or Mexico could easily run into 
tiie same problem. But if Wal-Mart 
knows anything about the history or 
ownership of the factory that made the 
pajamas, ir was not saying. 

“We were concerned that the sale of 
these goods might violate the Helms- 
Burton Act,” Edward Gould, a spokes- 
man for the company, said Wednesday, 
explaining why stores from Nova Scotia 
to British Columbia had been told to 
remove the goods. “We 're still not sure. 
Counsel is looking into it." 

The diplomatic no-man’s land in 
which Wal-Mart now finds itself was 
created by two differences between the 
United States and Canada. One is an 
honest difference of strategy. The other 
is a dispute over America's effort to use 
its economic power to achieve foreign - 
policy goals. 


The question of strategy is this: Do 
you bring down Mr. Castro faster by 
preventing him from exporting paja- 
mas, and almost everything else, around 
the world, or by flooding Cuba with 
trade, investments and capitalism? 

The Canadian position is that a 30- 
year U.S. embargo has failed and that 
economic engagement — the phrase 
Washington uses to defend its policies 
toward China — is the only strategy that 
makes sense. Many in President Bill 
Clinton’s administration say privately 
that they agree. 

But at this point the White House is so 
committed to Helms-Burton, which was 
signed in the heat of last year’s pres- 
idential campaign, that dissidents in the 
administration dare not express their 
views in public. 

The second issue, which really riles 
Canada, Mexico and Europe, is more 
politically charged: Does the Congress 
have a right to extend the reach of 
American law beyond the borders of the 
United States? European officials have 
called the measure “arrogant” and 
“bullying." 


Continued from Page 15 


longer-term profit forecasts.. 

To compile the index, Montgomery 
each year takes the 500 stocks with the 
highest anticipated long-term growth 
rates, though it includes only companies 
with market capitalizations cf a! least 
$200 million. By focusing on long-term 
expectations, it can include stocks that 
are now losing money, or whose growth 
is not robust now but is expected to 


become so. 

How much more optimistic have ana- 
lysts become than they were? At the end 
of 1990, a company with expected long- 
term annual earnings growth of 1 1.6 
percent could get into the index. 

Now, after several years of economic 
recoveiy, joining the select 500 requires 
that analysts expect earnings to rise 24.2 
percent, more than double the rate re- 
quired six years ago. The figure has 
risen in every year since 1990. 


GERMANY; Signs of Life in Economy 


Continued from Page 15 

of 145,000 in January. Coupled with 
other figures announced on Thursday, 
the jobs report showed a hopeful break 
in the clouds, analysts commented. 

“The latest economic indicators sug- 
gest that the growth pause should be 
overcome in the months ahead,” said 
Holger Fahrinkrug, analyst ai UBS. 

Any economic revival follows a half- 
year of stagnation, according to the an- 


nual spring survey of business senti- 
menr by the German Chamber of In- 
dustry and Commerce. Based on a poll 
of 25,000 member companies, the fed- 
eration warned that the economy re- 
mained at a standstill during the first 
quarter after growth stopped in the last 
three months of 1996. 

The economy also will have to do 
without a rate stimulus. The Bundes- 
bank kept its interest rates unchanged at 
a meeting of its board Thursday. 



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PAGE 22 


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FRIDAY, MARCH T, 1997 t'j 


World Roundup 


Game-Fixmg Trial 
Will Be Replayed 


In a Dazzling Display, 
Dortmund Delivers 


soccer The former Liverpool 
goalkeeper Bruce Grobbelaar and 
three co-defendants will be tried 
again on charges that they fixed 
top-level soccer matches. Britain’s 
Crown Prosecution Service said 
Thursday. 

The announcement came two 
days after the jury in the first trial in 
Winchester failed to reach a verdict 
despite two days of deliberations 
after an eight-week trial. A Pros- 
ecution Service spokesman said no 
time or venue had been decided for 
the second trial. 

The four defendants will face the 
same charges at the second trial. 

A solicitor for the Dutch-bom 
goalkeeper Hans Segers, who with 
Grobbelaar faces charges of fixing 
matches on behalf of an Asian bet- 
ting syndicate, said he was unhappy 
with the decision. “Obviously, 
we're disappointed that we’re go- 
ing to have to do it all over again,” 
Mel Goldberg told BBC radio. 

A former Wimbledon striker, 
John Fashanu, and a Malaysian 
businessman, Heng Suan Lim, 
were charged with acting as 
middlemen in the alleged conspir- 
acy. Grobbelaar, who was bom in 
Zimbabwe, faced a separate charge 
of accepting £2,000 ($3,220) as an 
inducement to throw matches. 

All four defendants deny the 
charges. (Reuters) 


German Champion Downs Anxerre 


By Peter Berlin 

Inremarioiul Herald Tribune 


DORTMUND. Germany — Three 
spectacular pieces of midair gymnastics 


provided die turning points as Borns sia 
Dortmund, the German champion, beat 
Anxerre, die French champion. 3-1 . in die 
first leg of a European Cup quarterfinal. 

Kicking a ball that is moving through 
the air is one of soccer's most difficult 
feats- To do it well while leaping, twist- 
ing and falling is even harder. On Wed- 
nesday night. Stephane Chapuisat of 
Dortmund performed one spectacular 


overhead kick. Lilian Laslandes of Aux- 
erre responded with two dazzling vari- 
ations on the theme. One of the kicks 
succeeded: the other two were thwarted 
by inches. For all the tactics of the 
coaches, games at this high level often 
are decided by the success, or failure, of 
such moments of inspiration. 

In the 12th minute, Karl -Heinz Riedle 


ing chances came with regularity. 
Dortmund’s second goal, in thi 


laid the ball into the path of ChapuisaL 
His shot was blocked, and the ball bal- 
looned away. Chapuisat chased and, 
with his back to the goal and defenders 
closing in. leaped toward the ball, ped- 
aling like a cyclist climbing a steep hill. 
He kicked die ball back over his falling 
bead toward the goal, and Riedle 
swooped to head the ball into the net. 

A minute before halftime, Laslandes 
levitated to meet a floating ball. He 
swiveled his hips like a high-jumper and, 
sideways to the ground, violently 
scissored his legs to generate power and 
slashed the ball onto the top of the 
Dortmund goal. But, besides railing to 


Bowe Wants to Re-Up 


boxing Two weeks after his 
aborted stint as a Marine recruit, die 
former heavyweight champion 
Riddick Bowe says he wants an- 
other chance. 

“Ail I think about is becoming a 
Marine,” Bowe told the New York 
Daily News. “I really would like to 
be a Marine and make the Marine 
Corps proud. If they gave me another 
opportunity, 1 know 1 can do it" 
Gunnery Sgti Hugh Hawthorne 
of the Marine Recruiting Com- 
mand told the Daily News that it 


taking his marker with him. Moussa Saib 
moved into the void. Saib skipped past 
Stefen Reuter’s wild lunge, watched 
while a mob of players jostled in the 


goalmouth and then slid a pass behind 
them to Sabri Lamouchi, who waited like 
a matador as Klos and three beefy de- 
fenders charged him, then struck a shot 
that Klos deflected — into the goal. 

Eight minutes later, and less than two 
minutes after replacing Chapuisat, 
Ibrahim Tanko stole the ball from a doz- 


ing Auxene player, turned, found the 
Bench still dozing and advanced. As 


Bench still dozin, 
Auxene scrambled 


and advanced. As 
ck, Tanko slipped a 


was "virtually Impossible" that 
die 29-year-old fighter would be 
given a second opportunity. (AP) 


Yankees Sign Pitchers 


BASEBALL The pitchers Andy 
Pettitte and Mariano Rivera, keys 
to tiie New York Yankees' cham- 
pionship run last season, signed 
one-year contracts with the team. 

The American League's Rookie 
of the Year, Derek Jeter, had his one- 
year contract renewed at a figure to 
be determined after the shortstop 
rejected an offer of $450,000. 

Pettitte, 21-8 with a 3.87 ERA in 
1996, signed for $600,000. The 24- 
year-old left-hander should be one 
of the mainstays of the Yankee 
staff. Rivera is expected to become 
the closer in the bullpen since John 
Wetteland left for Texas as a free 
agent. Rivera signed for $550,000. 

Jeter hit .314 with 1 0 homers, 78 
RBIs and scored 104 runs. The 22- 
year-old apparently was seeking at 
least as much as Rivera was 
offered. (AP) 



/• • -vi; \ 


Pacni Atiolu/Ageocc ftanee-Prmt 

Mats Hulth, Stockholm’s mayor, Agneta Andersson, an athlete, and Olaf 
Stenhammar, chief of Stockholm's Olympic bid, Thursday in Lausanne. 


Lured by Prize Money, 
Track Stars Run to Paris 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 


Prize money is the cleanest, safest 
propellant in track and field. An in- 
jection of pure performance-enhan- 
cing cash — paid out to medalists 
only — seems to bring out the best in 
everyone, as the sixth IAAF World 
Indoor Championships in Paris this 
weekend may prove. 

For the first time at a world cham- 
pionships. the winners will make 
money — up to $50,000 for each gold 
medal, plus $50,000 for each world 
record. Two years ago at the last 
indoor championships, at Barcelona, 
most of the favorites stayed home. 
Prize money has begun curing that 
problem already, even if multiple 
gold medalists from the Olympics last 
summer such as Michael Johnson, 
Marie-Jose Perec and Donovan 


Bailey couldn’t be tempted to come. 
Recently, Hicham Guerrouj, the 


22-year-old Moroccan star, changed 
his mind and decided to defend his 
world indoor 1.500 meters title after 
ail. In the last month Guerrouj has set 
world indoor records in the 1,500 (3 
minutes 31.18 seconds) and the mile 
(3 minutes 48.45 seconds), breaking 
the 1 4-year-old mile record of Ea- 
monn Coghlan of Ireland. 

“Breaking Coghlan ’s record wasa 
greater achievement as he is regarded 
as the man who brought indoor ath- 
letics to the world's attention,’ ’ Guer- 
rouj said. 

If Guerrouj can break the record 
once more in Paris, he will hit a 
$100,000 jackpot. 

It may sound a bit like a TV game 
show, but the athletes who will be in 
Paris are all professionals anyway, so 
why not make it honest? 

The contenders include relatively 
old athletes who might have retired 
years ago if track and field hadn’t 


changed with the rest of the sports 
world. Merlene Otiey, at 36, is sched- 
uled to defend her 60-meter title 
against Gail Devers, die American 
who has twice beaten Ottey in gold- 
medal photo finishes at the outdoor 
1993 world championships and the 
Olympics last summer. Mary Slaney, 
38, will not only be expected to win 
the 1.500 meters but will also be 
aiming for the world record of 4 
minutes 0.27 seconds held for seven 
years by Doina Melinte of Romania. 

In terms of endurance. Slaney is her 
sport’s Mick Jagger. At 14, she be- 
came the youngest athlete ever to 
represent the United States. Between 
1974 and 1985. she set 16 indoor 
world records. In 1986. she gave birth 
to a daughter during what turned out 
to be the halftime of her career. Al- 
together Slaney has undergone more 
leg surgeries than she can recount, 
only to be undone last summer at 
Atlanta by an apparent case of ex- 
ercise-induced asthma. She believes 
she has learned to control it 

“I feel like my old self again,” 
Slaney said. “Now that I have had 
treatment for the asthmatic condition, 
I can go out there and be aggressive 
and not run out of steam. I feel that I 
am capable of running under 4 
minutes, and Melinte 's record is in 
real danger." 

The most anticipated race will in- 
volve the amazing Hade Gebrselassie 
of Ethiopia, the Olympic 1 0,000 meter 
champion and the holder of numerous 
world records, most recently in the 
5,000 meter indoor race. He will be 
pushed hard in the Paris 3.000 meters 
by Moses Kiptanui. Kenya’s peren- 
nial champion in the steeplechase. 

These championships will also 
provide the first gold medal for the 
women’s pole vault. The favorite is 
Emma George, a former circus ac- 
robat from Australia. 


Tom Lasorda 
Bounds Into 
Hall of Fame 


By Bob Nightengale 

Los Angeles Times 


VERO BEACH, Florida — Tom Las- 
orda, whose passion for baseball grew 
into one of the great sport romances of 
tile last 50 years, has been voted into the 
Hall of Fame. 

Lasorda, who spent nearly 20 years as 
the Los Angeles Dodgers' manager and 
47 years in the organization, wept at 
being told of his election Wednesday. 
He is only the 14th manager in major 
league history to be so honored. 


“It’s the most precious day of my 
life,” he said, tears streaming down his 
face. "I’m overwhelmed. 1 can’t believe 
this has happened to me at this point of 
time. Everybody's goal is to get into the 
Hall of Fame, and I’m there.” 

Lasorda joined Nellie Fox, a long- 
time Chicago White Sox second base- 
man, and Willie Wells, who starred in 
the Negro leagues. They will be in- 
ducted Aug. 3 at Cooperstown. New 
York. 

“I am thrilled for him," said Vin 
Scully, the Dodgers’ Hall of Fame 
broadcaster. “Where some fellows 
make the Hall of Fame because of their 
remarkable God-given talent. Tommy 
has never been blessed with great phys- 
ical talent. He has fought and clawed his 
way throughout his professional career. 
It bas really been a rough ride.” 

The Dodgers immediately an- 
nounced that Lasordo’s jersey. No. 2. 
would be retired, as have those of Jim 
Gilliam and the Hall of Earners Pee Wee 
Reese. Duke Snider, Walter Alston. 
Sandy Koufax, Roy Campanella, Jackie 
Robinson and Don Drysdale. 

Lasorda, 69, who retired as the 
Dodgers' manager on July 29. after suf- 
fering a mild heart attack, nearly had to 
wait another year. The 1 5-member com- 
mittee was reluctant to vote him in be- 


score, Laslandes clipped a defender in the 
he ad, and the referee awarded a free kick 
for dangerous play. 

As die game drew to a dose with 
Dortmund down to 10 players but ahead, 
3-1, Laslandes tried again. This time he 
went overhead to meet an inviting cross. 
His strike was again sweet. But Stefan 
KJos, the Dortmund keeper, pawed it 
away. At once the referee whistled down 
the curtain on an exhilarating game. 

This was an encounter between two 
teams wbose talents lay in attack. Both 
defenses marked tightly, tackled ro- 
bustly, worked tirelessly and lived fre- 
quently beyond soccer's laws. Yet scor- 


Dortmund’s second goal, in the 54th 
minute, was simple but precise. Chap- 
uisat curled a free kick onto the forehead 
of Rene Schneider, who headed down- 
ward. goal ward and beyond Auxerre’s 
Lionel Charbonnier. 

Anxerre finally got a reward for its 
silky attacking play in the 75tb minute 
with a beautifully thought-out and ex- 
ecuted goal. Bernard Diomede darted 






m ■■■ ! !> ' ■» — - — — — ^ Don OBMy/Rrwcn 

Eric Cantona of Manchester United, left, kicking the ball past Paulinho Santos of FC Porto to score United’s 
second goal in a European Champions Cup match. United beat Porto, 4-0, to win a first-leg victory. at home. 


1 ' : ? 1 u>. ** 


ecuted goal. Bernard Diomede darted 
infield from his usual post on the wing, 
taking his marker with him. Moussa Saib 


pass to Moller. who lifted the ball care- 
folly over Charbonnier and into the goal 
Auxene was not done. Diomede out- 
ran the defense, but Reuter pulled the 
winger down. The German national de- 
fender had received a yellow card after 21 
minutes. Now he was shown red He will 
miss the return march in Auxeire. 
However, two other international defend- 
ers should be tack from injury: Jurgen 
Kohler raid the majestic Matthias Sam- 
mer. Sammer will add steel to the defense 
and fire to the attack. Even so, the ball is 
still in the air, if Auxeire can strike it 
Ma nch a rt w United 4, Porto O United 
took a tight grip on its quarterfinal 
against the Portuguese champion with 


an emphatic first-leg victory at home. 

In tiie 22d minute, Porto’s Hilario 
saved a header from one United center 
back, Gary Pallister, only for the other, 
David May. to scramble the ball into the 
goal. Twelve minutes later, Aloisio fell 
and scuffed the ball into the path of Eric 
Cantona, who finished ruthlessly. 

United struck twice cm the counter in 
the second half. Cantona sent a long, 
swerving pass to Andy Cole, who danced 
to the edge of the Prato penalty area, 
wailed as Ryan Giggs scampered behind 
him, then rolled the ball to the Welshman. 
Giggs finished with a low drive. United 
then repeated the move, as Ronny Johns en 
burst from defense. Cantona waited and 


passed, and Cole darted and scored. 

(Soseniwrg 1, Juvsntus i In Trond- 
heim, Rosenborg scored in the 51st 
minute. Trend Soltvedr beaded in after 
tiie ball had ping-ponged around the goal. 
The European champion leveled within 
60 seconds with a header by Christian 
Vieri. Trondheim reached the quarterfi- 
nals with a surprise 2-1 victory in Milan. 
Now it must repeat (he trick in Turin. 

Ajax Amsterdam 1, Attotaeo Madrid 1 

Juan Esnaider put Atietiix? ahead after 
eight minutes. Ajax pressed but scored 
only once when Patrick K1 divert lashed 
the ball into the goaL KJurvert’s yellow 
card for arguing means he will miss the 
game in Madrid. 


Cape Town Burnishes Olympics Bid 

City Says Crime Will Be ‘Totally’ Under Control Before 2004 


j(03£3 


The Msoaated Press 

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — Leaders of Cape Town's bid 
for the 2004 Olympics sought to assure the International 
Olympic Committee on Thursday that South Africa’s crime 
problems were improving and would be ’ ‘totally" under 
control within three years. 


Cape Town was one of the 11 bidding cities making 
imnaign pitches to the committee, which will trim the record 


campaign pitches to the committee, which will trim the record 
fiela to four or five finalists on Friday. 

The other bidders are Athens; Buenos Aires; Istanbul; 
Lille, France; Rio de Janeiro; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Seville, 
Spain; Stockholm and Sl Petersburg. 

Rome and Athens appear virtually certain to make tiie cut 
Stockholm, Cape Town, Rio and Buenos Aires are expected 
to battle for the other two or three spots. 

After a 14-member committee panel names the finalists 
Friday, the race will move into high gear for six months until 
the full committee selects the winner on Sept. 5. 

Stockholm, whose strength lies in Sweden's reputation for 
political stability, a low crime rare and efficiency, has sought 
to counter its biggest weakness: lack of public support for the 
bid. The committee's evaluation report cited a poll showing 
that 52 percent of the city population was opposed, with only 
32 percent in favor. But the Swedes presented the results of a 
new nationwide poll showing that 59 percent support the bid,, 
with 29 percent against. 

To underline the upswing in public support, the Stockholm 


delegation held up copies of the newspaper Aftonbladet with 
the headline, "Yes, we want it" 

Cape Town, seeking to bring tiie jgames to Africa for the 
first time, was once seen as the sentimental favorite. But its 
bid has been hindered by the committee's concerns over the 
country's high crime rate and political uncertainty surround- 
ing the succession to President Nelson Mandela. 

Both issues were raised Thursday by tiie committee panel 
after foe city’s presentation. 

"We explained that in 1994 we inherited an unacceptably 
high level of crime," said Frene Ginwala, the South African 
house speaker. * ‘But we have taken measures which have had 
a visible impact in results. We are confident that by the year 
2000, we will be in control of the situation totally. * ’ 

Chris Ball, chief executive of the bid committee, said the . 
latest national crime figures show a ‘ ‘marked improvement' ' 
since 1994. He said the real issue was security, not crime, and ’ 
that South Africa had "virtually no security threats" at any 
major events it has held. 

Mr. Mandela, who has publicly supported the bid, has . 
announced be will not be a candidate for re-election in 1 999. 
He also plans to step down later this year as leader of the 
African National Congress. 

Responding to concerns over future political stability. Mr. 
Ginwala said South Africa maintained a tradition of “col- 
lective leadership that will continue regardless of who is 
sitting in the presidential chair.” 







The Umps Strike Back? 


Quick Ejection ofPiniella May Be an Om en 


By Murray Chass 

New York Times Service 


Lasorda listening to the national 
anthem before a game in 1996. 


cause of his frequently stated washes to 
manage again. But he said last weekend 
that he had managed his last game and 
would stay retired. 

Buzzie Bavasi. a former Dodger gen- 
eral manager, relayed that to foe rest of 
the committee members, and the con- 
versation lasted less titan two minutes 
before the vote. 

Joe Brown, chairman of the com- 
mittee and once general manager of foe 
Pittsburgh Pirates, said: “We told him 
that if he managed again, we’d tear 
down the statue. Some of us talked to 
him afterward, and he assured us he 
wasn't going to manage again." 

Todd Worrell, a Dodger relief pitch- 
er. said: “Tommy, in a real bad way. 
needed something to bring closure to his 
career. Maybe this is it. We all know 
what he‘d want to do. The guy would 
mange until he dropped dead in the 
dugout if somebody would let him.” 

Lasorda. now a club vice president, 
finished his career with a 1^99-1,439 
record. His teams won two World 
Series, four National League pennants 
afld seven division titles. 


TEMPE, Arizona — The first ejec- 
tion of the spring training exhibition 
season may have escalated the dispute 
between umpires and everyone else in 
baseball, more than even Richie Phillips 
had planned. 

Phillips, tiie umpires’ lawyer, respond- 
ed "Wow” on Wednesday upon hearing 
a first-hand account of Ted Hendry’s 
ejection of Lou Piniella from an ex- 
hibition game Tuesday. 

Donald Fehr, head of the players' 
association, shook his head at the turn of 
events, in which umpires have 
threatened to eject players and man- 
agers at the least provocation. He pro- 
nounced it a sad day for baseball. 

Piniella. the Seattle Mariners’ man- 
ager, was given a quick exit by Hendry 
for a protest that was relatively tame. If 
the incident occurred as reported, Fehr 
said after a union meeting here, "that 
would tend to support the view that the 
umpires are looking for trouble, are 
looking for confrontations and are out to 
assert authority for its own sake." 

He added: “After all we've been 
through, for them to engage as sort of 
the cop on the beat in an overtly con- 
frontational way with players, managers 
and coaches is very sad. I almost wonder 
if they're starved for publicity.” 

Umpires, players and league officials 
were supposed to be working on an 
improvement in their relations and a 
code of conduct for ail sides, on initiative 
that arose from the umpires' dissatis- 
faction with the handling of the Roberto 
Alomar spitting incident last fall. 

Representatives of both groups met in 
Palm Beach. Florida, on Feb. 4 as the 
first conciliatory step. But Phillips and 
foe umpires apparently grew tired of 
waiting for the effort to go forward. 

A month later, a promised committee 
has yet to be announced, and no other 
meetings have been held. 

At their recent meeting in Palm 


Springs, California, the umpires en- 
dorsed a "get-tough" policy. Jerry 
Crawford and Don Denkinger, the um- 
pires' top union officers, said, “The 
tolerance in baseball is leading to total 
anarchy.” Phillips said the umpires had 
to "engage in self -protection.” 

Before Hendry worked Seattle’s 
game Wednesday, beandPiniella spoke. 
Piniella later said everything had been 
resolved. Phil Garner,” the Milwaukee 
Brewers’ manager, offered this account 
of the Tuesday incident: 

“Lou was sitting next to the dugouL 
The next thing I hear, Lou says. ‘Don’t 
talk to my shortstop.’ Ted says. Til talk 
to who I want.’ Lou says. ‘I’m just 
telling you not to talk to my shortstop.’ 
The next thing Lou's thrown out. He’s 
thrown out before he gets out oF his sear. 
It was as simple as that.” 

When Phillips was first asked about 
the ejection, he said Piniella “must have 
deserved it” But when he heard 
Gamer’s account, he said, * ‘Wow, ’ ■ then 
added, “I'll have to see foe tapes,’* 

A baseball official, speaking on con- 
dition of anonymity, said the apparent 
decision to eject players and managers 
at their first argumentative words re- 
portedly had been instigated by a minor- 
ity of the umpires. The official said the 
league presidents were investigating the 
Hendry-Piniella incident and would be 
prepared to discipline umpires if they 
engaged in any undue on-field action. 

“If they keep it up,” Fehr said at 
Tempe Diablo Stadium, “there will be 
some responses to it. I am confident that 
everybody will be able to take care of 
memselycs. Everybody's got to get foe 
Chips off their shoulders, relax, stop tak- 
ing things personally. Everybody’s got j 0 
stop trying to make a point, and we ought 
to go play baseball and have fun,” 

Ganier called the umpires* plan 
"overkill," adding, “t don't think 
people come ro the park to watch um- 
pires throw managers and players out at 
the slightest drop of a hat, or if you look 
at them cross-eyed.” 


:j • 1 p. 


C ,' 1 > 

'-■Kn, 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7. 1997 


SPORTS 


Panthers Send Huskies Home 


Tfie Associated Press 

A perennial power in the 1990$ 
Connecncut can forget about making 
any headlines ;n the NCAA tourna- 
ment this year. 

The Huskies, who won the Big East 

regular-season tide the last three sea- 
sons and were 89-13 in those years 
were edged. 63-62, by Pittsburgh in' 
the first round of the conference tour- 
nament on Wednesday night. That 
sank. Connecticut to 14-14 this season 
ana out of the chase for a national 
championship. 

Connecticut starred the season 1 2-2 
then lost its senior center, Kirk King! 
for the remainder of the season because 
of an NCAA rules violation The 
Huskies started three freshmen and two 
sophomores most of the season, and the 
inexperience cost them against Pitt. 

Vonteego Cummings, who scored 
1 7 points, made two shots in the final 43 
seconds, the second a jumper from the 
foul line that put the Panthers ahead. 

Bia East In other Big East openers it 
was Syracuse 84. Notre Dame 66; 
Providence 77, Rutgers 56; West Vir- 
ginia 77, Seton Hall 57: and Miami 76. 
St. John’s 68 in overtime. 

Todd Burgan. who missed Syra- 
cuse’s first two games with Notre 
Dame — both Josses — had 1 7 points 


and 1 1 rebounds for the Orangemen 
(19-11). who lost in the national title 
game a year ago. 

Providence (20-10) came in with 
five losses in seven games and three 
straight defeats. But Derrick Brown 

Comoe Busketbuu 

led the Friar? with 25 points, and Jamei 
Thomas added 1 S against Rutgers. 

Patriot League The only team to 
qualify for the NCAA tournament on 
Wed nes da y was Navy, which won the 
Patriot League with a 76-75 victory 
over Bucknell. Hassan Booker fin- 
ished with 25 points and 13 rebounds 
for Navy. (20-8), which earned its first 
NCAA bid since 1994 with its defeat 
of Bucknell. 

Atlantic 10 In the Atlantic I0's first 
round at Philadelphia, it was Virginia 
Tech 56. Fordham 53; St. Bonaventure 
81, Dayton 75; Massachusetts 64. La 
Salle 49: and Temple 64. Duquesne 47. 
Pepe Sanchez led Temple (18-9) with 
14 points and 10 assists, and the Owls’ 
zone held Duquesne to 20 points in the 
second half. UMass (19-12), seeking a 
sixth straight tournament title, saw Tyr- 
one Weeks score 21 points and pull 
down 11 rebounds. UMass held La 
Salle's Donnie Carr to 10 points. 


Conference usa Conference USA’s 
opening round at St. Louis saw No. 20 
Louisville defeat South Florida 69-58. 
In other games, it was Alabuma-Birm- 
in gham 55. Houston 54; Saint Louis 
69. Southern Mississippi 6 1 : and Mar- 
quette 79, DePaul 53. 

Five days after going 4-for-20 at the 

free-throw line. Louisville made all 

but one of 29 attempts against South 
Florida. Louisville (23-7) entered the 
game shooting 66.9 percent from the 
line. B. J. Flynn was 12-for-l 2. and 
DeJuan Wheat hit ail nine of his at- 
tempts. 

■ Knight Gets 700th Victory’ 

Bobby Knight became the eighth 
Division I coach with 700 victories as 
No. 25 Indiana improved to 22-9 with 
a 70-66 triumph over Wisconsin. The 
Associated Press reported. 

“All it means is. I've been coaching 
a long time." Knight said. "I look 
back and pinpoint ail the good teams 
we've had and the teams like this one 
that have struggled. One of the great 
things about something a coach ac- 
complishes is it represents ail the 
things the players have done over the 
years." Another ranked team. No. 15 
Illinois, came out on top against Ohio 
State, 90-83. 


Punchless Florida Dealt 2d Straight Shutout 


The Associated Press 

The Phoenix Coyotes got a short- 
handed goal from Jeremy Roenick and a 
power-play goal from Mike Gartner en 
roule to a 3-0 victory over the slumping 
Florida Panthers. 

Nikolai Khabibulin, making his 25th 
straight start in the net on Wednesday 
night, had an assist and stopped just 14 
shots — a season-low for Florida — to 
record his fourth shutout of the season. 

Despite a shuffling of lines, the Pan- 
thers were blanked for the second straight 
game for the first time in their history. 

Devito 3, Flyers 1 Dave Andreychuk 
had a shorthanded goal and an assist as 
surging New Jersey scored three goals 
in the second period to beat Philadelphia 
and stop a 16-game unbeaten streak by 


the Flyers’ goaltender. Garth Snow. 

The Devils climbed within four 
points of the division-leading Flyers. 

Sabres 4, Penguins 2 In Buffalo. 
Derek Plante had a goal and tw o assists 

NHL Roundup 

as the Sabres moved further ahead of 
slumping Pittsburgh. 

Whalers 2 , Flames o The Whaler cen- 
ters Keith Primeau and Andrew Cassels 
were credited with goals that Calgary 
players put into their own net. The 
Whalers' goalie, Sean Burke, made 28 
saves for his third shutout of season. 

Avalanche 7, Canadians 3 The goal- 
tender Patrick Roy made a triumphant 
return to the city he once ruled as Col- 


orado scored four second-period goals. 

Red Wings 4, Maple Leafs 4 In 
Toronto, the Leafs’ Mats Sundin scored 
twice, including the game-tying goal 
with 1:28 to play. 

Stars 3, Blues 2 Todd Harvey's goal 
with 7:53 to play snapped a 1-1 lie'and 
Dallas went on to beat St. Louis for the 
fust time this season. 

Mighty Ducks 4, Senators 1 Tee mu 

Selanne scored the first two goals of the 
game seven minutes apart in the second 
period as Anaheim extended its unbearen 
streak to 3 season-high six games. 

Blackhawks 1, Canucks 1 In Van- 
couver. the Canucks' Esa Tikkanen and 
the Blackhawks' Sergei Krivokrasov 
scored third-period goals as the teams 
battled to a tie. 


PAGE 23 


Spurs 5 Futility 
Hits New Low, 
As Bulls Romp 
By 42 Points 


The Associated Press 

Scottie Pippen scored 19 points: and 
the Chicago Bulls needed neither Den- 
nis Rodman nor a big game from Mi- 
chael Jordan to defeat the decimated 
San Antonio Spurs, 1 1 1 -69. 

The visiting Spurs set team records 
for futility with their 69 points and 30.6 

NBA Roundup 

shooting percentage on Wednesday 
night. They have a seven-game losing 
streak and are 13-46 this season after 
going 59-23 a year ago. 

The Bulls shot only 41 percent, but 
still had their most lopsided victory this 
season in improving to 52-7 overall and 
29-1 at the United Center. They have 
won 22 consecutive home games. 

Jordan had 16 points, about half his 
league-leading average. 

Knlcfcs loo, Raptors 94 In Toronto, 
Patrick Ewing scored a season-high 36 
points, including 1 1 straight for New 
York in the final quarter as the Knicks 
won their fifth straight game. 

Ewing, who added a game-high 13 
rebounds, started his siring of 1 1 straight 
points with a three-point play with 6:36 
remaining for an 84-79 lead. 

Marcus Camby. who had 24 points 
for the Raptors, losers of four straight, 
cut the lead to 96-94 before John Starks 
drained a pair of free throws for a 98-94 
Knicks lead with 14.3 seconds to play. 

Cavaliers 85, Pacers 78 Danny Ferry 
scored 19 points, including two late 3- 
pointers, and Cleveland ended Indiana's 
four-game winning streak. 

The host Cavs snapped a two-game 
losing streak and remained in the seventh 
Eastern Conference playoff spot Indiana 
is in ninth position, three games behind 
Orlando for the final postseason spot. 

Jazz 96, Mavericks 65 Karl Malone 
scored 20 points, and Jeff Homacek 
added 17, including 10 in the third 
quarter when the host Jazz increased a 
six -point halftime lead to 2 1 . 

The 65-point total was a franchise- 


V'yV-VT 

mufl ' ' • - 





LimK-rh Uartk/lgeocr Kr,mr-FV»« 

Bobby Phills of Cleveland trying to muscle through the Pacers' defense. 


low for Dallas and the lowest ever by a 
Jazz opponent. Dallas scored just six 
field goals in the second half — the 
fewest ever in a half by an NBA team. 

7Vail Blazers 121, Sims 99 In Phoenix, 

Kenny Anderson had 26 points, includ- 
ing six 3-pointers, and Portland made a 
team-record 16 3 -pointers to win its 
fourth straight. 

Jason Kidd sprained his right ankle 
early in the fourth period for Phoenix 
and did not return. The severity of the 
injury was not immediately clear. 

Kings 105, Nuggnts loo Mitch Rich- 
mond scored 1 3 of his 34 points in the 
fourth quarter to help Sacramento defeat 
visiting Denver. 


Ahead 89-88. the Kings went on an 8- 
2 run to build a seven-point lead with 
3:08 remaining. The run featured four 
straight free throws by Mitch Richmond 
and put-back shots by Michael Smith 
and Billy Owens. 

Rockets 90, Warriors 85 Hakeem 
Olajuwon scored 13 of his 31 points in 
the fourth period, and Houston, playing 
without Charles Barkley and Clyde 
Drexler, hung on to beat host Golden 
State. 

Kevin Willis added 17 points and 10 
rebounds, and Othella Harrington had 
nine points for the Rockets, who com- 
pleted a sweep of the four-game season 
series against the Warriors. 


IT 

BUNE 

,1997 

IGE9 




■ / t: 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Exhibition Baseball 

WEDNESDAY'S GAMES 
Florida 6. Atlanta S 
Los Angeles 1 1, Montreal 4 
Cincinnati a, Cleveland 1 
PiKsfciLTjt! 6. ttew York Yankees 5 
New >«k Mels A BaBimorei 10 Innings 
DetraJi5. Houston 4 

Texas 5. SI. Loots’. 

Taranto 11 PtiBodeiDhia 9 
Owxso White Son S. Kansas Oty 4 
Boston 8, Minnesota a 
Colorado (Ml 5. San Diego iss) 3 
San Francisco 6. Mawauhee (ss) 3 
Mil * xnMee (ss) 1 Colorado (ss) 6 
Son Diego (ss) 1 Oakland Issl 1 
Seattle & Chicago Cuds 3 
OsWoraKss) a Annhetm l: 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Stampings 
usiuii comwmici 

ATLANTIC DIVISION 




W 

L 

Pet 

GB 


■Miami 

44 

15 

.746 

— 


. - New York 

45 

16 

.737 

— 


Orlando 

31 

26 

-544 

12 


Washington 

27 

31 

AU 

1614 

- . . 

New Jersey 

17 

41 

293 

26'-. 


PhflcdetoWo 

IS 

43 

2S9 

28*6 


Boston 

12 

47 

203 

32 


CENTRAL DIVISION 



■ * * 

Chicago 

52 

7 

J81 

— 


DefroU 

44 

15 

.746 

8 


Alim Ju 

39 

19 

.672 

12’6 


Choriofto 

38 

22 

.633 

T4’.v 

Oewtond 

33 

26 

.55? 

19 

Indiana 

29 

30 

A92 

23 

MHumikee 

25 

34 

.424 

27 

Taranto 

20 

39 

JOT 

32 

WISTUM CONFima 



MDWe&T nmSION 



w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Utah 

43 

16 

.729 

— 

Houston 

40 

20 

-667 

36 

Minnesota 

29 

29 

J00 

13'-. 

Dallas 

19 

39 

-328 

23c 

Denver - • 

••••*8 — 42* 

JOG 

25k 

San Antonio 

13 

46 

-220 

30 

Vancouver 

11 

50 

.180 

33 


PACIFIC DMSIOM 



Seattle 

41 

17 

J07 

— 

LA- Latere 

40 

19 

-678 

lit 

Portland 

33 

28 

Sil 

?•-. 

Sacramento 

28 

32 

M7 

14 

LA. CBppers 

25 

31 

JU6 

15 

Phoenix 

22 

37 

373 

19t 

Golden 510* 

21 

37 

Jo2 

20 

WBMKSBdur's usmn 


New York 

28 

22 

28 3D— 100 

TlMltD 

22 

24 

27 21 

— 94 


N.Y: Ewing 13-23 ID- 15 36 OoMey 5-8 6-6 
1&- T: CMtette 9-172-2 24, Comby 7-17 10-13 
24. Reboonds-New York 55 (Ewing 13). 
Toronto 48 (Comby 9). Asslsts-New York 34 
(Oakley 6). Toronto 30 (Stoudaraire 8). 
Indkma 22 19 36 11-78 

Clevetaad 21 24 21 19-05 

k Milter 7-15 7-9 25 Smlts 5-11 3-3 !2fc C: 
Ferry 5-12 3-3 19, Brandon 5-13 5-6 17. 
Rebou nds — Indiana 45 (Fenetl 11), 
Oevetond 43 (HB 10). Assists— Indona 22 
(JaCkson 9>, Cleveland 21 (Brandon 9). 
Detroit 2 23 27 17-92 

M transom 30 T4 23 21-88 

D:Hun*er 7-13 5-5 21. Httl 7-19 5-5 19; M: 


Guglrotto 8-23 7-7 22, Garnet! '3-19 2-2 22. 
Rebeonds — Detroit -9 (Tfie^t?:./.':rnesctr 
51 (GuaSolta 1 51. Assists — Detroit 5 LV.cKse 
51, Minnesota 21 iMaib-.-ry 10). 

San Antonio 20 13 17 19-69 

Chicago 26 22 30 33-111 

S Jc : Tiltons 7-155-719. Feick 5-10 : -2 3 :• 
C Pippen 8-14 0-0 19, Jordan 7-” 1-1 
Rebounds— Son Antoric 55 .Fe.rt 151, 
Chicago 73 i Coffey. Langis* :r. 
Assists— San Antonio 15 ;Aie«r«* a], 
Chicago 53 (Brawn 

Dallas 21 20 10 14— tS 

Utah 27 20 2S 24— 96 

D: Finley 4-15 3-4 13. Bradley 4-:3 '.-2 72; 
U:Mni«ifiio-i3o-i 2a Horscek 17. 
B eb o w * Dalles cd 3rc<fley 12, Utah 44 
lOsiertog 13). Asserts— Dados 7 4 iStrikJsnd 
4). UUi 26 (Malone 71. 

Parfland 32 19 40 30-121 

PbaeaU 21 30 18 30— 99 

P; Anderson 10-14 0-025. CRchlrian 6-1 5 
3-424; P; Johnson 5-147-917. V=nrn5s-97- 
9 17. Reboands Portl and 4c (Dudley TV 
Phoenix 56 (Manning 12/. Assists— Portend 
28 (CJtobln-san. Anderson 6). Phaer.'a Ts 
UOdd7). 

Houston 17 19 25 29- 90 

Golden State 24 14 20 27— 85 

H: Otaiuwan 1 5-23 1 -3 31. Alffis 6-1 15-717; 
G.SzSpreweil 10-224-42*. f.'.ur.iti 5-1 1 0.9 ]o. 
Sroflti 8-18 3-4 19. Retemds— Kcuston <2 
(Otatuwon llj. Golden Stole 51 'Smith 13). 
Assists— Hovsion 27 CMctoney 71. Golden 
State 16 (Prices). 

Denver 22 14 34 30-108 

SaanmeatB 14 33 26 32-105 

D: LEJte 6-18 3-4 19. McDyns 7-17 5-10 
19; S: Richmond 10-22 1M3 34 Owens 6-13 
3-4 15. Polynlce 6-11 3-4 75. 

Rebounds— Denver 62 lEJohnsan 18). 


Sacramento tO 'Gwens 131. Assists— Denver 
21 ..V.cDvess. Goldvrlre 5). Sacramento 21 
! Richmond 6). 


HOCKEY 


NHL Stampings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 

ATLANTIC DIVISION 



w 

L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

phOadeiahla 

3T 

12 

:o 

£4 

217 

167 

S«a Jersey 

34 

18 

>2 

8C 

177 

143 

ftar.de 

29 

:i 

15 

73 

175 

152 

H.Y. Rangers 

25 

27 

« 

67 

20? 

133 

Tempo Bay 

26 

30 

T 

59 

'.73 

>94 

.'.asringter 

2£ 

32 

7 

57 

160 

179 

N.Y. Islanders 

21 

33 

10 

52 

171 

172 

NORTHEAST DMSION 




W 

L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Buffalo 

34 

23 1C 

73 

188 

158 

P.tlsturgt: 

31 

:s 

s 

67 

223 

212 

Harttora 

25 

30 

7 

59 

180 

200 

V.ontreo' 

•* ■ 

31 

11 

59 

205 

236 

Ctrano 

21 

30 

13 

55 

179 

111 

3a3cn 

21 

34 

9 

51 

186 

228 

WX5TEKN COfCTRENCX 


CENTRAL DIVISION 




W 

L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Defies 

39 

23 

4 

32 

200 

lei 

Derro'.i 

31 

19 14 

76 

203 

146 

SLLculs 

25 

30 

8 

64 

19i 

202 

Phcenix 

29 

32 

4 

62 

184 

201 

Chtoago 

26 

30 

10 

62 

172 

166 

Toronto 

25 

37 

3 

53 

192 

227 

P4C1RC DOrtStON 




W 

L 

T 

PIS 

IL 

(9 

GA 

Colorado 

41 

16 

8 

90 

223 

155 

Edmonton 

30 

79 

7 

67 

207 

199 

Ananeim 

27 

30 

8 

62 

198 

1«0 

Cfllgory 

27 

33 

7 

61 

177 

193 


Vancouver 26 34 3 59 203 222 

Los Angeles 24 34 B 56 176 214 

SanJose 22 35 7 51 Ida 214 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Calgary 0 0 0—0 

Hartford 0 2 0—2 

First Period: None. Second Period: H- 

Primeou 19. (sh). Z H-. Cassels »9. (pp). 

Third Period: None Shots 00 god: C- 7-11- 
10-26. H- 11-12-7—30. GoflBes: C-KJdd. H- 
Burke. 

Pittsburgh 1 1 0—2 

Buffalo -■ 2 1 7—4 

First Period: B-Auderte 24 (Galley. Pkintel 
topi.! P-Murray lOtr-rands, Nedved) ipp). 
1 B-. Ward 1 1. [sin. Second Period: B-Plante 
24 (Bortwby. Hcseki £ P-Dzleflric 7 
[Fronds. Murray) Third Period: B-Zhitrek4 
iPlontoi len). Shots on goal; P- 11-7-7-25. 
B- 12-6-9 — 77. Goalies: P-WreggeL B- 
HoseL. 

Colorado 2 4 1-7 

Montreal 0 2 1—3 

First Period: C-L«nieu» 8 rOzoilftsh, Rlcd) 
Ippi. 2, C-Lefetwrc 2 (Decdtnorsh, Young) 
(pp'. Second Period: M-Rudnsky 22 
ISavoge, Damphousse). a. C-Farsberg la 
[Kamensky) 5, M-. Rudnsky 23 (Richer, 
Donphoussel (pp). 6. C- Jones 22 (Pars berg. 
Sakld (pp). 7. C-Deodmarsh 26 (Young) A C- 
Yelle 7 (Lacroix. Keane) Third Period; C- 
Deodmorsh 27, 10. M-, Richer 17 (Popovfc, 
Domphousse) Shots on god: C- 9-10-18— 37. 
M- 9-15-9—33. GoaHes: C-Roy. M-ThIMulf. 
Theodore. 

New Jersey 0 3 0-3 

PWtadefphta 1 0 0-1 

First Period: P-LeOdr a (Fanoon) 
Second Period: N -(.-Andreychuk 22, (sh). X 
New Jersey, Nledetmayer 3 (Andreychuk, 
Thomas) 4, HJ.-, Guerin 24 (MocLean, 


Chambers) (ppj. Third Period: None. Shots 
00 goat: NJ.- 3-10-3-16. P- 8-1IF9-27. 
Goalies: NJ.-Brodeur. P-Snow. 

Phoenix 1 2 0-3 

Florida 0 0 0-0 

First Period: Phoenix, Roenick 20 
[Manson, Khabibulin) (sh). Second Period: 
Phoentu, Running 17 (Shannon, Gartner) X 
Phoenix, Gartner 29 (Janney. Tverdovsky) 
(pp). Third Period: None. Shots on goat 
Phoenix 6-10-12-28. F- 6-3-5-14. GocSes: 
Phoenh, Khabibutln. F-Vonblesbrouck. 
Detroit 0 2 2 0—4 

Toronto 2 0 2 0 — J 

1st Period— 1. T-Suntfin 34 (Worriner) 
(pp). 2. T-Domi 9 (Warmer) 2nd Period: D- 
Lapainn 11 (Konstantinov. Fetisov) 4, D- 
Lldstrom 12 (Fe-doiov, La pom tel 3rd Period: 
D-Droper 3 (Moltby, Udstrom) t, D- 
Sandst rom 15 (Kozlov, Yzemian) 7. T- Mutter 
20 (DomO 8, T-Sundn 35 (MuHer, Worriner) 
Overtime: None. Pe-nottles— None. Shots on 
goat: D- 6-11-21-1-39. T- B-12-5-2-27. 
Goalies: D- Osgood. T-Potvin. 

SLUMS 0 1 1—2 

Ddtas 0 1 2—3 

Fast Period: None. Second Period: SJL- 
Persson 4 (Conroy. Petrovtcky) Z D- Morin n a 
28 (Hatcher, Lehlinen) Third Period: D- 
Harvey 7 ( Carbon neau, Reid) 4. D-Lehtinen 
10 (Modano, Sydor) 5. S.U- Prong er 7 (Huh. 
Madnnis) (pp). Shots on goal; S.L- 6-1 1- 
6—23. D- 6-6-8 — 20. Goalies: S.L-Fuhr. D- 
Moog. 

Chicago 0 0 10-1 

Vancouver 0 0 10—1 

First Period: None. Second Period: None. 
Third Period: C-Krtvokrasov 9 (Sykora) 2. V- • 
TUckonen 11 i/Mogliny. Linden) (pp). 
Overttae: None. Shots on goal: C- 1 1-6-1 1- 
5-33. V- 6-14-94V— 29. Goalies: C-Hodiett. 


v-Hiradi. 

Ottawa 0 0 1—1 

Anahnai 0 3 1-4 

First Period: None. Second Period: A- 

Sekmne 38 (Kariya, Mironov) 2, A- Selanne 39 
(KurrQ 3. A-Beitows 9 (Todd, Van Imoe) 
Third Period: O-Chorske 12 (AHredssoa 
Bor*) & A-Kartya 32 (Rucctunl (en). Shots 
on goafc O- 8-12-20— AD. A- J-ll-4-19. 
GoaHes: O-Tugnun. A-Heberi. 


SOCCER 


EUROPEAN CUP 

OU AHTERFWALS. FIRST LEG 
Manchester U„ England 4, Porto. Portugal 
0 

Rosenborg. Norway I, Juventus, tiaty 1 
A|ax, Nethertanas. l AileHco Madrid, Spabil 
B. DornnwuL Germany 3, Auxerre. France I 
■NousH puma Luoa 
Chefcea 1, Blackburn 1. tie 
Leicester 1. Aston Villa 0 
Middesbrough A Derby 1 
Nottingham Forest a Sheffield Wed. 3 
Southampton 2. E verton 2 
ttfnittn B »i Manchester United 57. Liv- 
erpool S3, Arsenal 51, Newcastle 4& Aston 
vmo46. 5hefflew Wednesday 45, Wimbledon 
44, Chelsea 41 Leicester 36. Leeds 36. Tot- 
tenham 35. E verton 33. Blackburn 32. Derby 
32, Coventry 29, Sunderland 29, Nottingham 
Fores) 27. Southampton 25. West Ham 25, 
Mhkflesbrough 22- 


Royo VoDecano Z SevtUa 0 
w - n iwi y Real Madrid 6Z Boreelono 51 
Real Beds 50. DeportAro Coruna 5a Atteffco 
Madrid 49. Real Sodedod 45. AlMefic Bflbao 
41, VoJtadoOd 4a Tenerife 39. Racing Son- 


twider 3& Valencia 36. Cefn Vigo 33, Oriedo 
32. Compostela 31. Raya Valeama 3a Sport- 
ing GQon 29. Zaragoza 28. Logrones 2 a Es- 
ponyo! 26. EWremadura 26, Sevlfa 21. Her- 
cules 19. 


TRANSITIONS 


BASEBALL 

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

new York— S igned LHP Andy PetiRro and 
RHP Modano Rivera >0 1 -year contracts. 

Toronto blue— R enewed the contracts of 
IF-DH Cottas Delgadn IF Alex Gonzalez and 
OF Shawn Green. Signed RHP Tim Crabtree, 
LHP Huck Hener, RHP Robert Person. LHP 
Paul Spoforio C Sandy Martinez. IF TSsan 
Brrta IF Tomas Perez and OF Robert Perez 
to 1 -year contracts. 

FOOTBALL 

NATION AL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
ATLANTA— Signed LB PaschoD Davis to 1 ■ 
year comma. 

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PAGE 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 199 


POSTCARD 


Poof! Magic’s Gone 


A Pioneer in Exploring the Children’s World 


By Blaine Harden 

Washington pelt Service 

N EW YORK — Beyond 
the rubberized Severed 
Finger on a Slice of Pizza, past 
the glow- in-the-dark Space 
Mucous, three Manhattan ma- 
gicians convened a sad little 
news conference this week. 

It was about innocence 
lost. It was about little boys 
who do magic tricks to make 
friends. It was about immortal 
entertainers, stars like Steve 
Martin. Johnny Carson and 
Dick Cavett, who as timorous 
children got a start in show 
business after amazing 
friends and family with 
sleight of hand. 

Now ail that was shot to 
hell, complained the magi- 
cians. who were nervously 
shuffling cards and plucking 
silver dollars out of each oth- 
er's ears in the backroom of 
the Abracadabra magic shop 
in Greenwich Village. 

The television talk-show 
best Maury Povich had invited 
a guest on his show last week 
who gave away the tricks be- 
hind sawing a women in half, 

Christie’s lo Auction 
Loeb Art Collection 

jVith Ytvh, Times Senior 

NEW YORK — A private 
collection of 30 Impressionist 
and post-impressionist works, 
including two Cezannes and a 
Manet, are to be sold May 12 at 
Christie's in New York, the 
auction house announced 
Wednesday. 

The paintings and sculp- 
tures. from the collection of 
John Langeloth Loeb and his 
wife. Frances Lehman Loeb. 
are estimated to be worth 
about SSO million and are said 
to form one the most important 
private collections to come up 
for auction in a decade. 


operating a guillotine, linking 
metal rings and passing a 
sword through die neck. 

“ After the show I get a call. 
It was from one of my 8-year- 
old customers. He was cry- 
ing.” said I.V. Gonzalez, a 
magic instructor at the New 
School for Social Research 
and resident magician at Ab- 
racadabra. 

“I had sold him linking 
rings for $20. The kid saved 
up Tot it. you know, that was a 
lot of money for him, and now 
he’s crying because every- 
body knows bow it works. 1 
tried to tell him that it’s not 
the secret so much as the way 
it's performed. But, of course, 
to an 8-year-old those words 
ring hollow.” said Gonzalez. 

What particularly galled 
Gonzalez — who together 
with 10 or so other New York 
City magicians is trying to 
mourn some kind of boycott 
or petition-writing drive 
against the Povich show — 
was the manner in which ma- 
gic secrets were revealed. 

“It was much too casual. 
You should not be able to see 
these things while channel 
surfing. It is harmful to chil- 
dren, and what about people 
who are trying to make their 
living doing magic at parties? 
How would you like to be the 
magician whose main trick 
last Saturday night was sawing 
a woman in half? What’s he 
going to do now? He’s out at 
least $3,500 for the hardware 
that goes with the trick!" said 
Gonzalez , growing agitated. 

Povich was not available 
for comment, but a spokes- 
man for the show read this 
statement: “While we respect 
the magicians’ right to speak 
out, the program's content 
featured an author whose 
book and CD-ROM are read- 
ily available to the public. Ad- 
ditionally, several of the tricks 
had already been broadcast on 
prime-time television.” 


By Mary B.W. Tabor 

New York Times Service 

D URHAM. North Carolina — It 
was a quiet, gray winter af- 
ternoon. when only an occasional 
passing car or rustle of underbrush 
broke the silence of the surrounding 
pines, and Robert Coles was stand- 
ing at his front door, pleading gently 
with his black spaniel to stop bark- 
ing at the newly arrived guesas. 

“Come in, come in,” he said, an 
apologetic smile softening heavy 
brows. He knelt to calm his dog. bis 
worn corduroys, racy green sweat- 
er and disheveled hair suggesting 
more the rumpled graduate student 
than die noted psychiatrist. 
Pub' tzer-Prize- winning author and 
Harvard professor that he is. Then 
he led his visitors into a makeshift 
study overlooking trees outside his 
temporary home a few miles from 
Duke University, where he is 
teaching this semester. 

“Please, sit where you are most 
comfortable.” he said. “How are 
you? How was your trip? 1 was 
worried.” 

Such ease with strangers has no 
doubt been among Coles’s most 
valuable assets in the last 35 years as 
he has traveled the world, from 
South African townships to Alaskan 
fishing villages, with tape recorder 
and crayons in hand, asking thou- 
sands of children to talk and draw 
about religion and politics, about 
matters of the heart and soul. 

By weaving their stories into a 
flood of essays, articles and books. 
Coles has established himself as a 
pioneer in children's oral history. 

“His interviews have been not 
only essential but quintessential in 
the most classic definition of the 
word,” said Joyce L. Epstein, di- 
rector of the Center on School. 
Family and Community Partner- 
ships at Johns Hopkins University. 

At the same time Coles, who has 
made moral questioning and com- 
munity service a way of life, has 
become a Pied Piper of social con- 
sciousness for at least two gen- 
erations of college students. 

In his 55th and latest book, ‘ ‘The 


Moral Intelligence of Children” 
(Random House), Coles draws on 
his entire body of work as well as 
his classroom experiences. He de- 
scribes it as his last book about 
children. “There's no further as- 
pect I want to explore.” he said. 

At 67, this unconventional child 
psychiatrist still sees himself, like 
the children he profiles, as a work 
in progress. Replete with contra- 
dictions, he is a prolific author who 
never meant to write, a model for 
adults whose own inspiration is 
children and a straight arrow who 
embraces what he calls his “re- 
belliousness.’’ 

Coles has his critics — namely, 
those who complain that his work is 
disorganized, lacks scientific pre- 
cision. avoids tough questions and 
recycles material. But if writing 
about morality or child-rearing re- 
quires some measure of self-cri- 
ticism. he has mastered the form. 

He eagerly notes his own in- 
consistencies and lapses. 

As a parent, he says, he was some- 
times so distracted with work and 
volunteering that he did not spend as 
much time with his three sons and 
wife as he would have liked. And 
while Robert Coles writes about 
poor children and volunteers as a 
tutor in poor school districts, he ac- 
knowledges a privileged existence, 
which includes his Concord farm- 
house and an expensive car. He sent 
his own sons to private schools. All 
this has contributed to a sense of 
“moral anxiety** that surfaces in his 
teachings and writings. 

“I work with very vulnerable 
people, and yet I’m not very vul- 
nerable myself.” he said. “It makes 
me uncomfortable, seeing the dis- 
parities between the world I doc- 
ument and the world I inhabit.” 

Morality and service are themes 
rooted in Coles ’s childhood in Bos- 
ton and in his early relationship 
with his parents. 

In 1946. Coles began at Harvard 
with plans to become an English 
teacher. But by his senior year, 
after meeting William Carlos Wil- 
liams. the poet and doctor, and fol- 
lowing him on rounds to see pa- 



y r{i> 

, SvPjKv 


ju.sta^rnwrtnrfctkiai 

Robert Coles, the Pulitzer Prize- winning author and professor. 


dents, be had changed his mind and 
beaded to Columbia University for 
medical school. After beginning in 
pediatrics, he decided he was not 
“tough enough" to give shots. 

So at the urging of Williams, he 
turned to child psychiatry. But his 
passion for literature remained in- 
tact. For almost 20 years now. Coles 
has taught an undergraduate course 
at Harvard entitled “The Literature 
of Social Reflection." a perennial 
favorite in which he explores the 
work of great moralist writers, from 
Tolstoy to Tillie Olsen. 


Coles, who was recently named 
the James Agee Professor of Social 
Ethics at Harvard, has also taught 
courses at Harvard law, business, 
medical and education schools, 
where he has developed a devoted 
following. 

Eleanor Cunningham Cary, 37, a 
former student who is one of Gales’ s 
teaching assistants at Harvard, said, 
“Unlike any other course at Har- 
vard, Coles’s courses connect with 
the question of how to live a life." 

There have beat career kudos, 
too. In addition to a Pulitzer Prize 


in 1973 for two books in his series 
“Children of Crisis/ ’ he has won 
numerous awards. . including, in 
1981, a Mac Arthur Foundation fel- 
lowship, or so-called genius grant, 
of $248,000 over five year*, and his 
book ‘‘The Spiritual Life of Chil- 
. dren” became a best-seller. 

Many anthers would , revel in 
such success. But he remains rest- 
less. He rises each morning at 5 
A-M. to write, not on. a computer 
but on yellow legal pads, searching 
for new ways to convey what he 
sees as truths derived from his in- 
terviews. He teaches, at Harvard in 
the fall term and at Duke and the 
University of North Carolina at' 
Chapel Hill in the spring. And be 
volunteers . as a teacher in local 
schools several hours each week. 

“I’m so tired, so exhausted,” he 
admitted, rubbing his face. 

Yet constantly on his mind is the 
promise made to his wife, Jane 
Hallowell Coles, an English teach- 
er who died in 1993, to continue the 
work they began together in 1961. 

That year, while working as an . 
Air Force physician. Coles by - 
chance saw a 6-year-old blade girl 
being heckled as schools were in- 
tegrated in New Orleans. The girl. 
Ruby Bridges, stopped, not to yell 
backbuttopray — a sight Coles sill 
says was one of the most moving of i 
bis life. 

At his wife’s urging, the young 
psychiatrist put aside plans for a 
private practice and began inter- 
viewing other children involved in 
school integration. That led to 
years of involvement in the civil 
rights movement in the South and 
advising Robert F. Kennedy on ra- 
cial and education issues. 

“Everything I did had to do with 
my wife's initiative and her moral 
energy.” Coles said. “So all the 
things 1 am doing now I regard as an 
effort to complete suggestions, ini- 
tiatives and projects that she anti 1 
discussed over our 35 years of mar- 
riage." His high, raspy voice 
tightened. “When I lost her," he 
said, “I lost not only my wife and the 
mother of my children. I lost my co- 
worker.’ * 


t! k 


ijtf i ‘ < 



PEOPLE 


D&nna DovagaacaCTic Auocuard pres* 

CLASSIC — Charlton Heston holding the staff he used as Moses in the 1956 
film “The Ten Commandments" at the American Film Institute in Los 
Angeles. The prop will go on display at the Walt Disney Resort in Florida. 


E IGHTEEN top New York chefs — 
French and non-French — gathered 
around a piano at a Central Park res- 
taurant this week to pay homage to 
Pierre Franey, the best-known ambas- 
sador of French cuisine who died last 
year. Alain Ducasse. Paul Bocuse, 
Daniel BouJud and Gerard Boyer were 
among those who bade farewell to 
Franey, who for nearly four decades pro- 
moted French gastronomy on television, 
in books and in The New York Times. 


Ryan O'Neal, 55, and Farrah Faw- 
cett. 50, have put an end to their 17-year 
relationship by mutual agreement, they 
announced in a statement Bur the stars of 
“Love Story" and “Charlie's Angels" 
said they would both continue to be in- 
volved in their 8-year-old son’s educa- 
tion. 


Raquel Welch has been tapped to take 
over for Julie Andrews in the Broadway 
show “Victor/Victoria,” the New York 
Post reported. Welch. 56, was among 


several stars under consideration for the 
lead role in the musicaL Andrews, who 
returned to the show recently after a brief 
stint by Liza Minnelli, is due to leave 
June 1 . Welch's last Broadway show was 
1982’s “Woman of the Year.” 


Cabbage has replaced dead chickens 
as the thing to toss at Alice Cooper. The 
’70s rocker is starring in and helped 
write a variety show at his children's 
Phoenix school. It’s a vaudevillian 
theme that has Cooper playing some- 
body named Snavley Whipbum. a bad. 
bad man who is pelted with vegetables. 
“Dad, you are in trouble! We have 
cabbage!” said his 15-year-old daugh- 
ter. Calico, as she and his 1 1 -year-old 
son. Dash, prepared to let fly at a re- 
hearsal. Tbe produce was hardly a threar 
to the man who once toyed with snakes 
and chickens on stage. 


Frank Sinatra remains on the mend 
two months after a heart attack, his w ife 
said. Sinatra, 81, hasn't been seen in 


public since his release Jan. 17 from 
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he 
was hospitalized for eight days after a 
mild heart attack. 


Some not-so-rare Associated Press 
dispatches describing President John 
F. Kennedy's assassination are coming 
up for sale just months after similar wire 
copy on the shooting sold for more than 
S8.500 at auction. The 7-foot-long roll 
of AP wire copy detailing the news 
developments of Nov. 22, 1963, along 
with a collection of photos taken after 
the shooting, will be auctioned March 1 9 
by R.M- Smythe & Co. in Manhattan. 


Diahann Carroll can’t cash in on a 
nine-room apartment in Manhattan be- 
cause of a promise she made 32 years 
ago. She bought the place for $25,175 in 
1965. It's now valued at $1 million. 
When the actress fried to sell, she was 
reminded of a promise she made the 
former tenant, now 81. Lawrence Eno 
let Carroll and her daughter move into 


the apartment while she was a struggling 
actress. Later, he let her buy the apart- 
ment provided that if she should ever 
sell, she would sell it to him for what she 
paid, plus reimbursement for improve- 
ments. This week New York’s Sun re me 
Court’s Appellate Division said the deal 
was valid, forcing Carroll, 6 1 , who is in 
Toronto performing in "Sunset 
Boulevard," to stay put or sell to Eno. 


Princess Diana has picked an el- 
egant. flowing, dark blue capital D sur- 
mounted by her Spencer family coronet 
as her new logo on her letters and en- 
velopes. Although she retains her title as 
Princess of Wales, she’s dropped her 
former husband's Prince of Wales 
feathers emerging from a crown that 
until now formed the logo on her cor 7 
respondents. The Times of London said 
the official reason for the new logo is 
that Diana's has moved her office from 
St. James’ Palace to Kensington Palace, 
where she lives, and that the new let- 
terheads must show her new office ad- 
dress. 






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