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INTERNATIONAL 




(tribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


London, Tuesday, March 11, 1997 



No. 35, J 


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n • k M CTiaudahry/Tbe Auotuicd Ptcm 

Saima Waheed, right, celebrating with her lawyer, Asma Jehangir, in 
Lahore on Monday after the Pakistani High Court upheld her marriage. 

Court in Pakistan Rules 
That Love Conquers All 

It Upholds Right to Dodge Arranged Marriage 


CtWfalni by Our SlqffFnm D qw il ri 

LAHORE. Pakistan — Couples who 
marry for love do not violate the re ach- 
, ings of Islam even if the marriages were 
*not arranged by their parents, Pakistan's 
High Court ruled Monday in a landmark 
decision. 

For more than a year, Saima Waheed. 
a young bride who defied tradition and 
chose the man she wanted to many, 
lived in a shelter for women in Lahore 
while her parents tried to have her mar- 
riage declared invalid. 

They argued that Islam requires pa- 
rental permission before a woman ban 
many, and asked die court to annul the 
marriage in February 1996 to Arshad 


In Islamic Pakistan, civil courts rule 
on religious as well as secular issues. 

The case tested whether women have 
legal autonomy in Pakistan and touched 
on how strictly Islamic precepts should 
be interpreted in Pakistani law. 

Mr. Ahmed was jailed for four 
months before he was released on bail, 
pending the court's decision. 

In its ruling Monday, the court said 
Saima Waheed's decision to choose her 
own husband did not violate Islamic 
teachings, meaning that the couple are 
, now free to live together. 

“I feel as if I am reborn," she said 


after the ruling. * “This verdict proves that 
one can still get justice in Pakistan.” 

In Pakistan, arranged marriages are 
the norm and it is unusual for a woman 
to question her parent's choice of a 
husband. 

Extreme rightists supported the par- 
ents and threatened the bride's lawyer, 
Asma Jehangir, if she did not abandon 
the case. 

‘‘The apprehension expressed by re- 
ligious groups that this would lead to the 
lowering of moral and family values is 
absolutely wrong," Miss Jehangir 
said. 

Mr. Ahmed said he was elated by the 
ruling. "Eventually we got justice." he 
said. “It shows that the young also have 
rights." 

His bride's parents refused to com- 
ment, and it was not known whether 
they would appeal. 

"It’s a historic decision for the wo- 
men of Pakistan,” said Miss Jehangir, 
who also is bead of the Human Rights 
Commission of Pakistan. 

“The court is worried that young 
people should not defy their parents, but 
at the same time they cannot curb the 
rights of young people, so they have 
tried to take a very balanced approach 
toward that." she said of the ruling 
Monday. (AP. Reuters) 


Pearl Harbor 
Plays Host to 
China’s Navy 


By Susan Kreifels 

Washington Post Service 

PEARL HARBOR. Hawaii — 
Chinese military ships en route to their 
First visit to the U.S. mainland have 
made a port call here as part of a trip 
that officials say could help improve 
relations between the two nations. 

Only one other Chinese military 
ship has visited U.S. shores, the train- 
ing vessel Zheng He, which stopped 
here in April 19S9, two months before 
the violent crackdown on pro-demo- 
cracy demonstrators near Tiananmen 
Square in Beijing that c joled relations 
between the two countries. U.S. naval 
vessels made port calls in China in 
1995 and 1996. as well as a decade 
earlier. 

"Today marks a major milestone in 
the relationship between China and the 
United States,” Admiral Archie R. 
Clemins, the U.S. Pacific Fleet's com- 
mander. said at a welcoming cere- 
mony for the destroyers Harbin and 
Zhuhai and the oiler Nancang. "With 
today 's visit, our navies are entering a 
new era of peace and cooperation.” 

Vice Admiral Wang Yongguo, 
commander of China's South' Sea 
Fleet, said the ships would visit Mex- 
ico. Peru and Chile after a port call in 
San Diego. He said the ships were 
making the voyage to enable Chinese 
military officials to evaluate the qual- 
ity of the crews and to enhance re- 

See HARBOR, Page 6 



The destroyer Harbin arriving at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, as part of a 
visit by three Chinese warships. The vessels are en route to San Diego. 


Common Drug May Cut Alzheimer Risk 

Study Points to Benefits oflbuprofen but Warns of Other Hazards 


By Thomas H. Maugh H 

Los Angeles Tunes 

LOS ANGELES — The risk of de- 
veloping Alzheimer's disease can be 
reduced by as much as 60 percent by 
frequent consumption of the common 
anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen over 
two years or longer, a massive study has 
shown. 

Even shorter use could reduce the risk 
by as much as 35 percent, a team from 
Johns Hopkins University and the Na- 
tional Institute on Aging reported in the 
journal Neurology. 

Earlier studies had hinted that ibupro- 
fen, which is sold under the brand names 
Advil, Motrin and Nuprin, and other 


anti-inflammatory drugs might delay 
the onset of Alzheimer's, but this is the 
largest study to dale and perhaps the 
most convincing, specialists said. 

Surprisingly, the researchers noted 
no similar benefit for aspirin, which is 
an even more powerful anti-inflamma- 
tory agent than ibuprofen. But the re- 
searchers cautioned that the study par- 
ticipants may not have taken large 
enough doses of aspirin to be effective. 

Acetaminophen, another painkiller 
that has no anti-inflammatory proper- 
ties. also had no protective effect. It is 
sold under the brand name Tylenol. 

But the researchers cautioned against 
widespread use oflbuprofen in an effort 
to stave off the debilitating disease. 


which affects as many as 4 million 
Americans, most of them over the age of 
65. The drug can cause peptic ulcers and 
kidney damage. 

The study does riot recommend a 
minimum effective dosage of ibupro- 
fen, researchers said, because the effects 
of the drug were not part of the study’s 
original brief: They were noticed be- 
cause some participants, who were be- 
ing studied for the effects of aging, said 
they had used ibuprofen regularly for 
other reasons, such as pain relief. 

Usjng ibuprofen "seems to offer 
promise as a way to prevent or delay the 
onset of Alzheimer's." said Walter 

See DRUG, Page 6 


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Dutch Take a Pragmatic, Secular Approach to Unused Churches 


By Marlise Simons 

New York Times Service 


AMSTERDAM — Every Friday afternoon, a 
courtyard along a busy Amsterdam street fills with 
Muslim men parking their bicycles and removing 
their shoes as they prepare for prayers. They may 
not see it this way, but the worshipers at the Fatih 
Camii Mosque are pan of a fundamental change in 
the Netherlands. 

The site where Allah is now loudly praised used 
to be a Roman Catholic church. It has been stripped 
. of its crosses and paintings, and the spires on its 


two plump towers now carry a crescent moon. 

But it is not Islam, brought here mainly by 
Moroccan and Turkish immigrants, that is troub- 
ling the Dutch priests and pastors. Rather it is a 

The Vatican establishes full diplomatic 
relations with Libya. Page 6. 

more far-reaching shift, the continuing decline of 
Christianity. 

Dwindling church attendance by Catholics and 
mainstream Protestants here and in much of 


Europe has forced the clergy to confront an often 
painrnl question: What to do with the cavernous 
churches, the myriad chapels, and sprawling mon- 
asteries that have become redundant and require 
small fortunes to keep up. 

Lfaused churches can be found in Britain, 
France, Germany, and elsewhere in northern 
Europe, and many are simply closed. German 
churches, though, are supported by tax revenues, 
and French churches long ago became municipal 
property, all of which help pay for maintenance. 

But in the crowded Netherlands, where the 
churches own the buildings and space is precious. 


the response has been pragmatic and secular. 

Cash-strapped church elders have sold off more 
than 250 places of worship in the last two decades, 
buildings where Catholics, Calvinists, and Luther- 
ans had prayed for a century or longer. Many have 
already been convened into libraries, shops, cul- 
tural centers, and even apartments and dis- 
cotheques. 

Some chan geo vers signal another kind of tran- 
sition. A handful of churches were bought by 
young evangelical sects. New Age groups, and 

See FAITH, Page 7 


AGENDA 




Clinton Defends Veto at UN on Israel 


WASHINGTON (.Reuters) — Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton defended Monday 
the U.S. decision to veto a UN res- 
olution condemning Israel for decid- 
ing to build housing in East Jerusalem, 
but said it did not constitute U.S. ap- 
proval of Israel’s action. 


NawYwfc 

DM 


The Dollar 


Monday O * P -M- 
1.7015 


preutausdoae 

1.714 


Pound 


1.6037 


1.603 


Yen 


121.63 


121.90 


Speaking at a news conference with 
President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt, 
Mr. Clinton told a questioner that the 
United States felt the proposed United 
Nations criticism of Israel would have 
damaged efforts to promote Israeli- 
Palestinian peace negotiations. 

He added: “That should not be in- 
terpreted as an approval by die United 
States of the decision by the Israeli 
government." 

In Israel, Yasser Arafat warned of a 
“real crisis" in the peace talks over 
West Bank land policy. Page 6. 



5.741 


5.781 



+ 78.5 


7079.39 


S&P 500 


7000.89 


Change Monday • * P-M- r*e*»*<*** 


- + 8.1 


813.05 


804.95 





Page 18. 


Pages 8-9. 


Pases 18-19. 

* 

IntvruabonW CtmasHied 

Page*. 

| The 1HT on-line 

http://vA\r,y.iht.com | 


'NoiahT* 


NCAA Gets Ready 
For March Madness 

The NCAA has picked the 64 teams 
for its postseason college basketball 
tournament Kansas, North Carolina, 
Minnesota and Kentucky are the top 
seeds. Kentucky, the defending cham- 
pion, will meet Montana when play 
starts Thursday. The final four teams 
will play in Indianapolis on March 30 
and 31. Page 19. 


Blink, Blink, Blink, Book 

French Author Dies After Dictating Memoir by Eyelid 


By Anne Swardson 

Washington Post Service 


PARIS — In the rankings of human 
achievement, what Jean-Dominique 
Bauby accomplished in the year before 
his death probably won't go into any 
record books. 

He was a citizen of a country in love 
with exploits. French men and women 
long have been enthusiastic pioneers of 
danng feats: sailing around the world, 
rowing across the Pacific, trekking 
alone across Antarctica, walking above 
Niagara Falls on a tightrope. 

But Mr. Bauby ’s exploit required a 
different kind of courage. 

A well-known journalist who had 
been the editor-in-chief of Elle 
magazine, he was paralyzed in Decem- 
ber 1995 by a rare form of stroke that 
severed the connection between his 
brain and his body. He was unable to 


speak, breathe, ear or move anything 
except his left eyelid. 

With that eyelid, be wrote a book. 

By blinking his eyelid in code, Mr. 
Bauby dictated from his hospital bed a 
130-page book, "The Diving Suit and 
the Butterfly." which appeared in 
French bookstores last week. 

The title was chosen because Mr. 
Bauby's image was of his motionless 
body encased in a diving suit while his 
spirit could “fly around like a butter- 
fly.” The condition is known as 
“locked-in syndrome." 

He died of bean failure Sunday in a 
nursing home in Paris, at the age of 44, 
just before a series of celebrations of his 
achievement 

A film about him by the director Jean - 
Jacques Beineix is scheduled to be 
shown on French television Friday 

See WRITER, Page 6 


Coal Miners 
In Germany 
Blockade 
Party Offices 

Angry Demonstrators 
Assail Proposed Cuts 
In Industry Subsidies 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 

BONN — With a cavalcade of high- 
powered motorcycles and egg-throwing 
protests at political parly offices, angry 
German coal miners paralyzed Bonn’s 
government center for several hours 
Monday to register their opposition to 
proposed cuts in subsidies to the coal 
industry. 

The demonstrations, coinciding with 
sit-ins at two town halls and highway 
blockades in coal-mining regions, threw 
light not only on the heavy state padding 
in the German economy, but also on the 
deep opposition the authorities face in 
their attempts to reduce it. 

Like other European countries, Ger- 
many is trying to cut state spending to 
meet the criteria for the creation of a 
single European currency. But protests 
like Monday's showed the strains such 
savings impose on a society long used to 
the benefits of a munificent stare. 

Coal miners on expensive motor- 
cycles roared by the offices of the Free 
Democratic Party, the junior partner in 
Bonn’s coalition government, to show 
their anger at a proposal to reduce an- 
nual stale subsidies to toss-making coal 
mines to $2.2 billion, from around $5.5 
billion, over the next eight years. Rep- 
resentatives of the coal-mining union 
insist that the reduction in subsidies be 
smaller. 

Other protesters threw chains across 
the doors of both the Free Democrats’ 
offices and the offices of the Christian 
Democratic Union. Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl's party, hoping to exert pressure 
on the government before a meeting 
Tuesday between union representatives 
and Mr. Kohl. 

Protesters also set off firecrackers 
and hurled eggs at party offices as the 
police blocked off the main thorough- 
fare through the government district. 

City halls in two towns in the Ruhr — 
Luenen and Bergkamen — were oc- 
cupied, and protesters closed the main 
highway leading from Germany to Lux- 
embourg. 

Germany's 18 coal mines employ 
around 85,300 people at pits in the Ruhr 
area north of here and in the Saarland on 
the border with France. Union officials 
say the government's proposal would 
cost 50,000 mining jobs and threaten 
those of 70,000 people in related in- 
dustries. 

The protests have brought the mines 
to a halt for the past three days, and 
demonstrators said they would besiege 
government offices here until Thursday. 
The coal mines are a throw-back to the 
days when the Ruhrgebiet area was 
heavily dependent on coal for its power- 
house heavy industries. But, as in other 
pans of Europe, the advance of tech- 
nology, and alternative supplies of 
power, has left the mines facing ob- 
solescence. 

The dispute with the coal miners, 
however, has plunged Germany's slow- 
moving economic reforms into disarray 
at a time when problems are mounting 
with a record 4.7 million unemployed 
— 1 2 per cent of the work force — and 
with increasing skepticism about Mr. 
Kohl's frequent protestations that the 
planned single European currency will 
go ahead on track. 

Last weekend, the opposition Social 
Democratic Party — whose power base 
Lies partly in the Ruhr and Saarland — 
pulled out of talks on reforming the 
cumbersome lax system to protest the 
proposed cuts in subsidies to the coal 
mines. 

"We are not going to negotiate with 
people who want to cut back on coal 
and. at the same time, lower the top tax 
category for millionaires,” said Oskar 
Lafontaine, the Social Democrat leader 
who is himself from the Saar area. 

The prospect of joint negotiations be- 
tween the government coalition and the 
Social Democrats had inspired some 
commentators here to speculate that the 
nation's political parties, faced with ar- 
guably toe most uncertain economic 
conditions since World War H, would 
unite to face them. 

But leading Social Democrats said 
Monday that they would consider re- 

See GERMANY, Page 7 


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In Middle Age , Ex- Criminals Halt Their Successors’ Violence 


By Michael Janofsky 

New York Times Service 


WASHINGTON — Of all the homicides re- 
corded in tile nation's capital in recent years, this 
one in particular left the eight men shaken. Walk- 
ing home from school one day in January, Darryl 
Hall was viciously beaten by three teenage gang 
members, forced into a car and killed 
His body was found three days later in a ravine 


near his home with a bullet wound in the back of 
his bead He was 12. 

A few days later, the eight men gathered, as 
they have on Sunday nights for the last six years, 
and all they could talk about was Darryl's death 
and the insanity of four lives wasted — — his and 
those of the three teenagers who were arrested and 
charged with the killing. 

‘‘The next morning, Tyrone called me and said 
he couldn’t sleep,” said Arthur Rush, one of the 


eight, referring to his friend and colleague Tyrone 
Parker. “We all couldn’t sleep because of the 
viciousness of the crime. We had done some 
outreach before in that neighborhood; we once 
got a drugdealer off the street. We knew we had to 
do something. We all knew.” 

Meet the Alliance of Concerned Men of Wash- 
ington, a collection of middle-aged former felons, 
substance abusers and inmates who share an 
extraordinary histoiy. 


Friends as youths growing up in low-income 
neighborhoods of Washington, they went their 
separate ways into hellish worlds of crime, drugs, 
homelessness and incarceration, only to emerge 
as young adults who found salvation, jobs, fam- 
ilies and. eventually, each other again. Convinced 
it was God’s work (hat transformed and reunited 
them, they vowed to return to the streets as a group 

See FELONS, Page 6 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY', MARCH II, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


A Missions New Era / Search lor Successor 

In Mother Teresa’s Footsteps 


By John F. Bums 

Near font Times Service 

C ALCUTTA — Off an aUeyway in the 
teaming heart of this city of 15 million 
people, a plain wooden board with simple 
white Lettering hangs on the wall inside a 
discreet doorway. By means of a slide that can be 
adjusted by the nuns within, the board rells visitors 
what they mostly want to know. 

“Mother Teresa: In." it says. 

From the gray-washed building Calcuttans know 
simply as the * ‘Mother House.” Mother Teresa has 
presided for decades over the Order of the Mis- 
sionaries of Charity. The order has been judged by 
many to be the most successful Roman Catholic 
mission of the century, as well as one that has helped 
sus tain the church's reputation for compassion in an 
age when its critics have frequently accused it of 
doctrinal rigidity, 

from a start in 1948 when Mother Teresa, an 
ethnic Albanian, ventured alone into Calcutta's 
streets to tend to the “poorest of the poor,” the 
order has grown to a worldwide institution with 
more than 4.000 nuns and 400 Catholic brothers 
running nearly 600 homes, clinics and schools in 
more than 100 countries, including the United 
Stales. 

Mother Teresa, who was awarded the Nobel Peace 
Prize in 1979, may be better known than any living 
Catholic leader aside from Pope John Paul Q. 

But the signs from the Mother House these days 
suggest that the era of MotherTeresa, who is 86 and 
weakened by a chronic heart ailment and other 
health problems, is (hawing to a close. 

For weeks, an electoral college composed of 
more than 100 nuns and brothers from around the 
world, including at least half a dozen Americans, 
has been gathered in the house on Lower Circular 
Road, struggling with the problem of choosing a 
successor to Mother Teresa as the order's superior 
general. 

A month ago, a deadline for a decision passed 
with no announcement, other than a statement that 
the nuns and brothers would continue their retreat 
Now, fresh reports, purportedly originating from 
the Mother House, have suggested that a decision 
could come soon, possibly in days. Few church 
matters have aroused such, anticipation since the last 
time the College of Cardinals in Rome chose a pope, 
in 1978. i 

Once before, in 1990, the order met to find a 
successor to Mother Teresa, at her request, but a 
last-minute wave of sentiment led to a vote in which 
only a single vote. Mother Teresa's own, was cast 
for an alternate candidate. 

At the time. Mother Teresa was already in ill 


health, with a heart pacemaker that had been fitted 
in 1989, and had permission to step down from the 
Pope, who directly oversees the work of the order. 

This time, there seems little chance that Mother 
Teresa's wishes will be defied. 

Five feet ( 1 J> meters) tall when in good health but 
bent lower now by a spinal affliction and in a 
wheelchair for much of her days. Mother Teresa is 
said by those close to the Missionaries of Charity to 
have persuaded the order that it is time for her to step 
down. 

To do so. Mother Teresa has had to confront 
worries that the order, without her charisma and 
rigorous leadership, may have trouble making a 
transition to a new era. 

Loyalists within the order are said to have been 
convinced that Mother Teresa should be allowed to 
retire when she spent much of the last three months 
of 1996 in and out of Calcutta hospitals. More than 
once, she hovered at the brink of death with com- 
plications from what doctors described as a mild 
heart attack, followed in late November by a balloon 
angioplasty, a procedure designed to clear block- 
ages from the arteries that supply blood to the heart 
It was her her third such procedure in six years. 

“Every single sister I have spoken to has ac- 
knowledged that they must let her go this time, 
because she is so sick,” said Navin Chawla, a senior 
government official who has written two biograph- 
ies of Mother Teresa. Mr. Chawla, 51. who has 
spoken to Mother Teresa by telephone from New 
Delhi in recent days, said the mood in the Mother 
House appeared solemn, but resigned. 

•‘I can ’t imagine any last-minute change of heart 
this time,” he said. 


M R. CHAWLA said that Mother Teresa 
sounded stronger than she had in 
weeks, but that this appeared to be due 
more to willpower than returning 
health. With oxygen equipment and a heart monitor 
in her bedroom, and capable of standing unassisted 
for only brief periods, Mother Teresa has spoken 
often recently of her own death. In the spare sen- 
tences that have been her hallmark, she has said that 
dying holds no fear for her, that on the contrary it is 
something she awaits with anticipation. 

“It will come when my work is over, when the 
example has been given,’ ' she told an Italian friend, 
Gabriele Romagnoii. who visited her in a Calcutta 
hospital in December and wrote an account of their 
discussion that appeared in The Week, an Indian 
news magazine. 

The order's reluctance to allow Mother Teresa to 
retire appears to have been compounded by un- 
certainty over whom to appoint in her place. 
Unconfirmed reports in 1991 said that Mother 



[hcter Lod'ngrTbr j\cw York Tinm 

Mother Teresa has had to confront 
worries that the order, without her 
charisma and rigorous leadership, 
may have trouble making a transition. 

Teresa had signaled her preference for Sister Fre- 
derick. an 80-year-old nun of mixed British and 
Maltese descent who has acted as the principal 
administrator of the order in recent years and who 
has a reputation for being a strict disciplinarian. 

But Sister Frederick, who has overseen the med- 
ical care of Mother Teresa, is said to be ailing 
herself and reluctant to take on the job. 

Another nun considered to be a possible suc- 
cessor in the past. Sister Agnes Das, 66, is said to be 
suffering from cancer, and to have ruled herself out 
Many in the Missionaries of Charity are said to have 
considered Sister Agnes to be the natural successor, 
since she was the first nun to join Mother Teresa in 
her work among the poor in the late 1940s. 

Recent speculation in India had focused on sev- 
eral other senior nuns, all native-bora Indians. 
Among these three, the most widely discussed 
possibility has been Sister Priscilla Lewis, the or- 
der's official spokeswoman, who is in her early 60s, 
and who is favored by many in the order because of 
her experience running the order's missions outside 
India, including 16 years in New York City. 


Arbitration’s Growth Costs Americans Right to Sue 


By Barry Meier 

Ni rw font: Times Service 

NEW YORK — Americans are giving 
up their right to sue. To sue their banks 
over credit card and account disputes. To 
sue their agents over real estate pur- 
chases gone awry. To sue their mortgage 
companies over false advertising. Even 
to sue their doctors for malpractice or 
their health plans over coverage. 

Often they are giving up the -right 
without even knowing it, consenting to 
have disputes settled outside a 
courtroom through arbitration in which 
a private referee or panel renders a bind- 
ing, nonappealable decision. 

On many occasions, companies have 
unilaterally wiped out customers' rigbt 
to sue merely by sending out notices of 


new arbitration requirements. With re- 
cent court decisions upholding the use 
of arbitration over litigation, it is easier 
than ever for companies to demand that 
claims be handled out of court. 

Certain companies have long required 
customers to resolve disputes privately. 
Arbitration of grievances, for example, 
is common practice at brokerages and 
some health care plans. Many corpo- 
rations have required nonunion employ- 
ees to arbitrate discrimination claims. 

But the pace has picked up over the 
last five years, spreading to new areas of 
frequent conflict with customers. 

Statistics on the number of compa- 
nies, doctors and others that routinely bar 
customer lawsuits do not exist But Will 
Lund, director of Maine’s office of con- 
sumer credit regulation, is among those 


who have seen a sharp increase in recent 
years of arbitration provisions in such 
areas as credit cards and personal loans. 

‘They are coming in like tidal waves, 
and we are wrestling with their pres- 
ence,” he said. “Some of the clauses I 
have seen are so broad that they could 
prohibit a consumer from contacting a 
state regulator if they have a problem.” 

Consumer advocates like Mr. Lund 
and some legal scholars say the wider use 
of arbiiration sharply limits the kind of 
compensation that individuals can re- 
ceive for everything from improper med- 
ical care to deceptive sales practices. 
Worse, they contend, it fosters a system 
of private justice that conceals wrong- 
doing from the public. Patterns of im- 
proper corporate or professional beha- 
vior. they say, may never come to light 


“The public can not get the infor- 
mation to protect themselves, the way 
they can if there was a trial," said Mark 
Budnitz, a professor of law at Georgia 
State University College of Law. 

Along with undogging the courts, sup- 
porters of arbitration say it benefits busi- 
nesses and customers alike by cutting the 
time and expense of resolving disputes. 

Consumer advocates say customers 
must inspect contracts and purchase 
agreements to determine if they contain 
an arbitration clause, paying special at- 
tention to provisions that require travel to 
resolve a dispute, as those who fail to 
notice or read arbitration agreements are 
generally subject to their terms. But the 
advocates note that workers can be bound 
by arbitration terras under an employer’s 
health plan without even knowing it 



Kurdish Fighters Wage ^ 

War for Public Opinion ' ‘ 

But Ankara Wins Some Hearts and Minds 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Tuna Service 

BATMAN. Turkey — Whether Tur- 
key is winning its 12 -year war against 
Kurdish separatists depends on which 
village you believe. 

In Palisiran « nip ped outpost near the 

Iraqi border where 4,000 Kurds scratch 
out a living as shepherds and fanners, 
the war seems to be all but over. 

Three or four years ago, guerrillas 
from the Kurdish Workers rarty, known 
as the PKK, roamed freely in the area. 
But the Turkish Army has built a 500- 
so Idler base on the edge of town, and 
squads are on constant patrol in the 
surrounding mountains. Things are 
quiet again. 

On ooe recent afternoon, military of- 
ficers convened a meeting of local men, 
who thanked them effusively for their 
work. 

“Thanks to the soldiers, we’re going 
to open the coal mine again, and maybe 
even get a paved road.” said the village 
chief, Nadir Yaman, who has two wives 
and 18 children. “Maybe a few people 
from this area were tricked into joining 
the PKK, but no one supports them any 
more. The PKK is a terror and murder 
group.” 

But about 200 kilometers (about 120 
miles) northwest of Caliskan lies the 
village of Gumusorgu. 

Rumors have been circulating 
through the surrounding countryside 
that something awful may have 
happened there. Some say soldiers 
burned the village or forcibly evacuated 
it or committed some kind of atrocity 
there. 

A reporter who tried to reach Gu- 
musorgu this week was arrested, taken 
to a military prison in Batman, the pro- 
vincial capital, and interrogated for sev- 
en hours by anjpy government agents 
who accused turn of spying for the 
Kurdish rebels. 

Part of the proof they cited was a 
restaurant receipt they found in his 
pocket indicating that he had met with a 
representative of a group with the 
phrase “human rights” in its name. 

One agent described Gumusorgu and 
two other villages that the reporter had 
hoped to visit as “PKK villages.” An- 
other said Batman Province and neigh- 
boring Siin Province were infested by 
the rebels. 

“They’re all over the place!” he 
shouted. “We can’t go out at night. The 
PKK is everywhere around here.” 

Is the war proceeding as it looks from 
Caliskan, with die army in firm control 
and local Kurds grateful that life is 
returning to normal? Or is it the way it 
looks from around Gumusorgu, where 
soldiers seem far from victory and ru- 
mors of repression spread unchecked 
over the high hills? 

A six-day tour of southeastern Tur- 
key suggests that the army has dealt 
powerful blows to the rebel group, 
killing many guerrillas and forcing most 
of tiie rest across the border to sanc- 
tuaries in Iran, Iraq and Syria. Many 
villages once tom by conflict are now at 
peace. 

But throughout the region, many 
Kurds still resent the government's re- 
fusal to accept their ethnic identity. 


With Kurdish newspapers closed. 
Kurdish politicians in jail and hundreds 
of Kurdish civilians murdered by mys- 
terious death squads, the Kurdish Weak- 
ens Party is the only surviving orga- 
nization that upholds , the concept Of, 
Kurdish identity. • » • 

* ‘People are not for the PKK, because 
the PKK kills children and schoolteach- 
ers a nd commits all kinds of violence,’ ’ 
said a university student in Diyarbakir, 
the largest city in the region. “But t here 
is a pe rtain sympathy, because we share 
the same blood. 

“We want to be able to express 
ourselves as Kurds, with books and 
newspapers and radio and television sta- 
tions,^ ” the student said. 1 r What the gov- 
ernment has done makes us think they 
are against any peaceful Kurdish move- 
ment,” 

As many as one -fourth of the -60 
milli on people in Turkey are fully or 
partly Kurdish, tracing their lineage 
back to tribes that have lived in this 
region for more than 2^000 years'. 

Kurds have never had a state of their, 
own, and today not only the TuridsC). 
government bat also the governments of 
Iran. Iraq and Syria, all' of which have 
substantial Kurdish populations, strenu- 
ously oppose efforts to create one on 
their territory. > 

The group leading that effort is the 
Kurdish Workers Party, toping a deep 
strain of Kurdish nationalism that has 
persisted since the founding of the Turk- 
ish Republic 73 years ago. 

The first evidently organized Turkish 
response to the rebels was a campaign of 
murder and kidnapping that has killed 
hundreds or perhaps thousands of Kurd- 
ish nationaii&s since 1991. 

This wave of killings effectively de- 
capitated the Kurdish elite in south- 
eastern Turkey. It may also have 
crippled the rebels' efforts to build 'an 
organized base among civilians. 

The next blow agamst the rebels was 
struck by the army, which beginning in 
1993 flooded southeastern province^ 
with hundreds of thousands of soldiers/ 
They have overwhelmed the rebels, 
who probably never had more than 
10,000 guerrillas. .. 

Army intelligence officers say they 
believe that fewer than 3,000 guerrillas 
remain inside Turkey, with perhaps an 
additional 4,000 encamped In neigh- 
boring countries. 

Published estimates suggest that the ! 
war against the Kurdish rebels costs 
Turkey $7 billion to $8 billion a year.- : 

Despite that cost, despite the social ! 
upheaval caused by the hundreds of i 
thousands of Kurds who have aban- 
doned their villages voluntarily or tin 
orders from the army, and despite the 
political price that Turkey has had to 
pay for the accusations of human-rights 
violations that have been lodged against 
it in Europe and the rest of the world, 
most Turks seem to believe that their 
leaders have no alternative. 

“Turks have never forgotten how the 
West tried to dismantle the Ottoman 
Empire,” said liter Turan, a political 
scientist at Koc University in Istanbul. 
“They see the PKK as trying to cu|£t 
away a part of Turkey to create a sep- * 
arate state, and they don’t tolerate 
that.” 


b, 


Oscar Lewenstein Dies, Producer 
Of Royal Court Theater and Films 


New York Times Service 

Oscar Lewenstein, 80, a theater and film 
producer who was a central figure at the Royal 
Court Theater in London from the early 1950s 
until the mid-1970s, died Feb. 23 at his home 
in Brighton, England. 

Mr. Lewenstein worked with some of the 
most innovative figures in British theater and 
film, notably George Devine, Tony Richard- 
son, John Osborne, Joan Littlewood and Lind- 
say Anderson. Although his primary allegi- 
ance was to the theater, he also helped produce 
some of the most important British films of the 
1950s and 1960s, including “The Entertain- 
er,” "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning,” 
“A Taste of Honey" and "Tom Jones." 

Mr. Lewenstein was born in Hackney, the 
son of Jewish dmigrfis who fled Russia. A 
committed Marxist from an early age, be 
found work at the Workers' Bookshop after 
leaving school. He joined the army in 1940. In 
bis 1994 autobiography, “Kicking Against 
the Pricks," he wrote that his wartime ex- 
perience convinced him that he bad a talent for 
organizing and managing. 

After the war Mr. Lewenstein became gen- 
eral manager of the Unity Theater, a leftist 
theater club. In 1 952 he was hired as general 
manager of the Royal Court. In 1956, en- 
visioning a writers' theater nin on repertory 
lines, he formed the English Stage Company at 
the Royal Court with Ronald Duncan and Mr. 


Devine. Their production of Mr. Osborne’s 
"Look Back in Anger” heralded the rise of a 
new generation of British playwrights. 

Alfred Sheinwold, 85, Bridge Expert 

New York Times Service 

Alfred Sheinwold, 85, of Los Angeles, one 
of the leading personalities in the world of 
bridge, died Saturday after a series of strokes 
in a hospital in Sherman Oaks. California. 

Mr. Sheinwold gave service to bridge in 
seven decades, primarily as a writer. For the 
last 30 years tie wrote a daily syndicated 
column for The Los Angeles Times. He wrote 
13 books, of which the most important was 
“Five Weeks to Winning Bridge,” whicb 
sold millions of copies. 

Born in England, Mr. Sheinwold went to 
Brooklyn, New York, at age 9. After gradu- 
ating from City College in 1933, he worked as 
a writer for Ely Culbertson, then the leading 
authority on bridge. He was an alitor of The 
Bridge World magazine from 1934 to 1963. 
Jointly with Edgar Kaplan, he created a bridge 
system, Kaplan -Sheinwold, which had great 
influence on the theory of the game. Mr. Sbein- 
wold also was an authority on backgammon. 

Alice de Toledo Sommerlath, 90, the 
mother of Queen Silvia of Sweden, died 
Sunday at Drattningholm, the royal residence 
west of Stockholm. 


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86 on Plane 
Hurt in Skid 
In Abu Dhabi 

Agence FraiKe-Presse 

ABU DHABI — At 
least 86 passengers were 
injured Monday, most of 
them only slightly, when a 
Gulf Air plane slid off the 
runway at Abu Dhabi’s 
international airport dur- 
ing a takeoff, airport and 
hospital officials said. 

The Airbus A-3'20 slid 
on its belly and overshot 
the runway in strong 
winds before it came to a 
halt in sand, according to 
some passengers, who 
were bound for Cairo via 
Bahrain. Officials said a 
burst tire may have 
caused the mishap. 

'Hie Abu Dhabi Civil 
Aviation Department 
said the aircraft carrying 
109 passengers, had been 
damaged on its left side. 
The airport was closed 
for three hours, officials 
said. 

Gulf Air is owned by 
the governments of Abu 
Dhabi, Bahrain. Oman 
and Qatar. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


wrrrtT; 

LvILIili 


! A Member ef Per Be* /hpauarien 


HAvAmmotfanf **■ 

Fax: ((15) 732 3866 


Paris Comes Under Pollution Alert ^fiding apa* ** 

not be a copy of fivou but inspired by the Danish model. 

PARIS (AFP) — Paris authorities issued a pollution alert The site for the Berlin park, Tivoli Freizeitpark Berlin will 
Monday in the French capital, as warm sunshine and very little probably be near Fort Hahneberg in Spandau. 
wind combined to push levels of nitrogen dioxide up to level 

To encourage Parisians to use public transport until the TfllWflll Airline Allger S ChlllR 
pollution dissipates, authorities at city hall said in a statement TAIPEI (AFP) -— EVA Airways of Taiwan angered China 

that parking for residents would be free. with the announcement Monday that it will start direct flights 

Weather forecasters predict little change in atmospheric between Taipei and Phnom Penh, a close ally of Beijing 
conditions for the immediate future. The authorities urged EVA, Taiwan’s second biggest international carrier which 

Parisians “to limit as much as possible the use of motor is privately run, said it would launch three flights per week 
vehicles, ' ’ and people with respiratory problems are advised starting April 10 using Boeing 767-200 aircraft after aboom 
to avoid excessive physical effort outdoors. trips to Cambodia by Taiwanese. But China quickly reacted to' 

_ the plan, saying that Cambodia needed its permission before 

Berlin Plans Its Own Tivoli Park entering mto such an agreement 

COPENHAGEN (AFP) — Tivoli, Copenhagen 's celebrated Japan Airlines Co. Ltd. will set up a new airline next 
amusement park, is the inspiration for a park to open in Berlin in month to operate domestic regional routes startinfi bv 
the year 2000, officials of the 152-year-old park said Monday. September 199 8, with foreign crews in the" cockpit; the 

TTtey said Tivoli’s manager, Lais Liebst, signed an agree- company announced Monday. (AFP) 

’ ~ ~ ~ WEATHER ~ 


Europe 


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Ankara 

Aftans 


Caperhaoan 

Cows D»S* 

DuDBri 

Ednourgh 

Roranck 

Franfc/un 

Geneva 

HelstnM 

kaanbri 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrtd 


Forecast tor Wednesday through Friday, as provided by Accu Weather. 


Sl PeMrucxjnj 

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Strasbourg 

Tafcn 

Varies 

Vtenns 

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Today 

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17*2 306 pc 

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16/61 041 pc 

04S -3/27 pe 
17/62 V39 b 
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7,44 ■ 1/34 pc 
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15/61 7W4DC 
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North America 

The North so st will bo 
chilly, white The southern 
lior ol the nation slays 
mild. A storm exiting the 
Rookies wi» ailed the 
Great Lakes and Plains 
Thursday, then move into 
the East Friday. Cool and 
damp in the Northwest and 
southern British Columbia 
through Thursday. 


Europe 

Showers may dip London 
and Amsterdam Wednes- 
day, then affect eastern 
Europe Thursday. Stormy 
weather will continue to 
lash northern Scandnavta. 
The rest ol Europe ivfll stay 
dry with near- to above- 
normal temperatures. How- 
ever. a chMy shot wfl mow 
Into northeast Europe tale 
*i the week. 


Asia 

A series ol small storma 
oxWng eastern China wfli 
bring wet weather to both 
Kora a a end southern 
Japan Northern Japan w* 
be mainly dry but chilly. A 
shower could also affect 
Belling each day; other- 
wise. mild with some sun- 
shine. Warm In Hong Kong 
wUh sunshine. 


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nSdH . 23*4 12*3 pe 

Tunis 13/55 8/43 *h 

Latin America 

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-J 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


■Tribes’ Campaign Gift Yields Grief 

Democrats Ask Indians Who Gave $107,000 for More Donations 


By Susan Schmidt 

Washington Post Service 




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WASHINGTON - Ust year the 
^Cheyenne-Arapaho Indians of Ok- 
^fahoma kicked in $107,000 to the 
-•Jtemocranc National Committee and 

- Mid they hoped the money would beto 
,^ing favorable action by President Bill 

s administration on the return of 
..“tnbal land. 

■+c." It did not happen, 

•-..Since then, the two small tribes 
plagued by chronic unemployment’ 
■.have been asked for still more campaign 
.^'-contributions and are being pressured to 
■'hire high-profile consultants with close 
ties to the White House, tribal officials 
✓■say. 

j*' ' • A longtime fund-raj ser for Vice Pires- 
-ident A1 Gore, Nathan Landow. has 

- been seeking to represent the tribes, and 
be has brought in the lobbying firm of 

-■.the Clinton -Go re campaign manager 
Peter Knight, to try to win the return of 
C&eland. Mr. Landow routed his and Mr. 
■•■Knight’s access to administration of- 
.■ficials, the tribal officials added. 

-.I.* In a meeting last month, tribal leaders 
said, Mr. Landow explicitly warned dial 
yif the tribes did not agree to sign a 
. •/contract with him, he would make sure 
'■•they never got their land back. 

- J Mr. Knight's firm is seeking a 
-.5100.000 retainer plus $10,000 a 
■'month. Mr. Landow has proposed that 
his development company, based in 
fBethesda, Maryland, get 10 percent of 

■ ■all royalties from mineral rights on die 
Lland — rights that the tribes say, based 

- fm geological surveys, ultimately could 
be worth hundreds of millions of dol- 
lars. 

« ■ - "We’re trying to learn to work all the 
L-ahgles — we have to," Archie Hoff- 
man, the tribal business council sec- 
retary, said in explaining why the im- 

- poverished tribes would consider such a 
-.pan. 

■>■ The solicitation of the tribes for con- 
j.tributions and consulting fees by people 
with influence at the highest levels of 
, "government is a new twist on an old 
-.practice. In this instance, it is not the 
■wealthy and powerful who are being 
.•courted for cash, but people who are 
.powerless and vulnerable. 

The president’s aides have said that, 
notwithstanding benefits the White 

■ House doled out to big donors ~ such as 

- a. meal with Mr. Clinton — no one was 
.-led to believe their financial contribu- 
-iSon would affect government policies. 
Mr. Gore, who has been criticized for 
..using his office to solicit contributions. 
>bas said he never pressured anyone to 

give and finds the idea repugnant. 

Lr • “We got great hopes we’re going to 


get our land back this year," Mr. Hoff- 
man said. 

The hopes have been bought at a high 
price. 

The $107,000 that the tribes gave the 
Democratic committee Iasi year came 
from a welfare fund maintained for tribe 
members who need help with heating 
bills and other emergencies, such as big 
hospital bills. After they agreed to make 
a donation, tribal leaders were invited to 
a White House lunch, where they raised 
the issue of the land claim with Mr. 
Clinton. They also met with Mr. Gore at 
two receptions for big donors. 

The handling of the land claim, mean- 
while, has become a source of dispute 
between tribal leaders and the Wash- 
ington advocates they hoped would help 
them. 

Mr. Landow has denied touting bis 
access to the administration or threat- 
ening the tribes. He said tribe members 
were first brought to him in December 
by a Democratic campaign worker and 
that he listened to their concerns "to be 
polite." He acknowledged sending the 
tribes a consulting contract last week 
■ but said he was busy and * ’never had any 
intention" of actually following 
through on the proposal. 

Mr. Knight, for his part, said he had 
had little to do with the tribes and knew 


nothing about any claims Mr. Landow 
might have made as to influence with 
the administration. 

But his partner. Ken Levine, is ne- 
gotiating a lobbying arrangement with 
the tribes. Mr. Knight conceded. An 
associate at their firm, Joseph Trapasso, 
a former Clinton administration aide, 
also has met with tribal representatives 
several times over the past few months. 

Most of the tribes’ 1 1,000 members 
live in dusty hamlets spread across the 
prairie landscape of northwestern Ok- 
lahoma. The tribes have long struggled 
with an SO percent unemployment rate. 
For decades, leaders have pinned their 
economic hopes on winning the return 
of about 7,500 acres (3,000 hectares) 
within their reservation taken by the 
federal government in 1869 for a mil- 
itary fort. The tribes say they want to 
develop a truck stop or outlet stores 
there and to make 19th-century Fort 
Reno a tourist attraction. 

Fort Reno currently is closed, and the 
land is under the control of the Ag- 
riculture Department, which maintains 
a small research project there. The tribes 
say the department could declare the 
land to be surplus and return it to them 
through the Interior Department, or the 
president could issue an executive order 
returning the land. 


. —wr issrinaa; 



Manel LIumJRcvun 


ON ALERT — Police officers guarding the Japanese ambassador’s residence in Lima as negotiations to end the 
crisis between the government and Tupac Amaru rebels holding 72 hostages were scheduled to resume Monday. 


Senate Girds for a Showdown in Battle Over CIA Nominee 


By James Risen 

Los Angeles Timet 


WASHINGTON — One of Wash- 
ington’s nastiest political dramas will 
break into the open Tuesday when hear- 
ings begin before the Senate's Intel- 
ligence Committee on the nomination of 
Anthony Lake to be director of central 
intelligence. 

Mr. Lake, the former White House 
national security adviser, will face off 
against his chief tormentor. Senator 

NEWS ANALYSIS ~ 

Richard Shelby, the Alabama Repub- 
lican who heads the committee. The two 
have little in common. 

Mr. Lake is a rnagna cum laude grad- 
uate of Harvard University, earned a 
doctorate at Princeton, and has ties to 
the Stale Department and the Carnegie 
Endowment. He is of the Northeastern 
elite but has never been elected to any- 
thing but the planning board in Wor- 
thington, Massachusetts. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Mr. Shelby, of T uscaloosa, is a gradu- 
ate of the University of Alabama and its 
law school and has served in the Senate 
for more than 10 years. 

He was once a Democrat. But when he 
opposed President Bill Clinton’s 1993 
budget plan, he was punished by the 
White House and switched parties. Now 
he is in a position to return the tire. 

The two sides in this political drama 
have been preparing for the collision for 
months, fighting over FBI files, trading 
accusations, whispering innuendoes 
and dealing out leaks to the media. It is 
now a Washington set piece — a test of 
wills between two men backed by 
powerful partisan forces: Mr. Clinton's 
Democratic administration and the Re- 
publican-controlled Congress. 

The larest twist in the confrontation 
came Sunday, in response to a report 
that China may have tried to funnel 
illegal campaign contributions into U.S. 
politics last year. 

According to the report, staff members 
at the National Security Council which 
Mr. Lake headed, were informed by the 


Justice Department of an FBI investi- 
gation into the allegations concerning 
China, but Mr. Clinton and senior White 
House officials were not briefed. 

Mr. Shelby said he would raise the 
issue during Mr. Lake's confirmation 
bearings to try to find out whether a 
breakdown in the system had kept the 
president in the dark. 

Fire fights between Mr. Shelby and 
the White House have been breaking out 
almost daily: over Mr. Lake's FBI file, 
over National Security Council contacts 
with controversial Democratic fund- 
raisers, over White House claims of 
executive privilege on documents re- 
lated to U.S. policy in Haiti. 

The White House has resisted many of 
Mr. Shelby's requests, prompting him 
twice to ratchet up the pressure by delay- 
ing hearings on Mr. Lake's nomination. 

Exasperated White House officials 
have said that as soon as they meet Mr. 
Shelby's conditions on one issue, he 
piles on new demands or raises new 
questions. 

"This is torture by QFR.” admitted 


one Republican, using Congress-speak 
for "questions for the record." 

"The opposition has reached critical 
mass," said a gleeful Frank Gaffney, a 
conservative defense analyst who is 


Anthony Lake’s 
nomination has evolved 
into a foreign-policy 
surrogate for the clash of 
cultures between the 
White House and the 
Republican Congress. 


widely credited with — or blamed for — 
starting the drumbeat against Mr. Lake. 

Now. with virtually the entire con- 
servative wing of the Republican Party 
lined up behind Mr. Shelby, and with 
Mr. Clinton demanding that the Senate 
consider the matter, Mr. Lake's nom- 


ination has evolved into a foreign- 
policy surrogate for the clash of cultures 
between the White House and the Re- 
publican Congress. 

Stuck in the middle is the Central 
Intelligence Agency, an organization 
already numb from a bad case of the post- 
Cold War blues and scandal. Its highest- 
ranking officer ever to be charged with 
espionage pleaded guilty March 3 to 
providing secrets to Moscow. 

“The longer this goes on." said 
Richard Stolz. a former chief of the 
CIA’s clandestine operations who has 
been consulted by Mr. Lake, "the more 
damage it does to the agency." 

It is difficult to predict Mr. Lake's 
fate. Two moderate Republicans — 
John Chafee of Rhode Island and 
Richard Lugar of Indiana — have said 
that they will probably vote for him. 
which should give him at least a one- 
vote margin of victory in the committee. 
But Republicans warned that the real 
battle will be on the Senate floor, where 
it is still unclear whether Mr. Lake can 
win enough support. 




■A rv. 
1 


ittr 




■- t. 


. Security Aides Told 
Of China Donations 

WASHINGTON — The Justice De- 
■ Apartment told two National Security 
. “’Council aides in June that China was 
1 .^trying to influence congressional elec- 
rations. But the aides were instructed not 
' 1 jo pass the information to their White 
v. House bosses, a presidential spokes- 
man said Monday. 

The White House press secretary. 
4- Michael McCurry. said the Justice De- ■ 
partment conducted the briefing on the 
, condition that the information not be 
-J- circulated within the White House. 
"They were given a briefing on very 
specific ground rules and they respec- 
: .ted those ground rules,’ ’ Mr. McCurry 
said of the unidentified council aides, 
who work for President Bill Clinton. 

The rules, which Mr. McCurry 
called unusual, meant that senior 
...White House aides and Mr. Clinton 
. i first teamed about the accusations of 

‘China’s involvement when The Wash- 

* ■ .in gton Post reported them, Mr. Mc- 
I Curry said. The matter could become 
-an issue in the confirmation hearings 
: .of the former council chief, Anthony 
• Lake ,, who is Mr. Clinton's nominee 
for CIA director. 

I It also raised new questions: wny 
> would the Justice Department wanttbe 
■ information kept secret and w y 
‘ .would the staff members agree? 

- Mr. McCurry refused to disclose the 
, names of the aides, saying they wo* 

H""in intelligence matters. He said his 


answers were restricted because he did 
not want to appear to be hindering a 
Justice Department inquiry. 

Two California senators who were 
among lawmakers said to be targeted 
by the Chinese government plan to 
make illegal campaign donations say 
tiie FBI briefed them about China's 
attempt to influence U.S. policy. 

Senator Barbara Boxer said 
Monday that, like her Democratic col- 
league, Dianne Fein stein, she received 
a classified FBI briefing last year 
about the China’s efforts to gain in- 
fluence in Washington- (AP) 

A Nice, Quiet Time 
For Sworn Enemies 

WASHINGTON — By all accounts 
it was an extremely civil weekend. No 
tie-pulling or shoving. No hissing or 
booing. No calling each other liars or 
hypocrites. Nobody drinking too much 
and behaving badly. 

About 200 House members Sunday 
finished a weekend retreat in Hershey, 
Pennsylvania, intended to bring Re- 
publicans and Democrats together to 
find ways to stop being so unpleasant 
to one another in the workplace. 

‘It was an environment in which we 
could really level with one another,” 
said Representative David Skaggs, a 
Colorado Democrat who was one of 
the retreat’s organizers. “It was the 
beginning of friendships and relation- 
ships that will lasL” 

But members were coy about saying 
who made friends. The proceedings 


were closed to reporters, and members 
were reluctant to describe them in any- 
thing but general terms. (WP) 

The Cost of Winning 

WASHINGTON — Life rolls on for 
the winners, and few know more about 
the soaring price of winning than Sen- 
3ior Christopher Dodd, a Democratic 
principal in the presidential spending 
binge of 19% who is already working 
on the S5 million kitty he needs for his 
own re-election next year. 

"You could really get blown 
away." the senator explained of his 
need to dart from the Capitol to his 
private, ethically sanitized fund-raising 
office a few blocks away and get down 
to real political business. “I’ve never 
believed in unilateral disarmament” 

The Connecticut lawmaker, who 
was general chairman of the Demo- 
cratic National Committee at the 
height of the Clinton re-election drive, 
is downright Darwinian about the sur- 
vival of the financially fittest in Amer- 
ican politics. 

"There’s so many loopholes in the 
campaign laws you can drive a fleet of 
buses through them." he said, but, he 
added sourly, "reform will not be 
passed" (NYT) 

Quote /Unquote 

Roger Clinton, on being President 
Bill Clinton’s brother “It’s been a real 
stumbling block. I know so. ’ ’ (NIT) 


‘■i 


Z&Mr: 




■K 



1 1 ■llllliMIMt ll - i>^Kouni»A*w*«jr«* 

k J nnrch Sunday in Ohio. 

A flood victim hosing off a P° reB 


Away From Politics 

• More rain plagued the Ohio River valley, causing some 

streams to rise again and slowing the monumental cleanup 
from the worst deluge in more than three decades. Com- 
pared with the 12 inches (30 centimeters) of rain that fell in 
the region a week ago, however, the new rains were more a 
nuisance than a threat to life and property, residents said 
The floods have claimed 29 lives and left tecs of thousands 
of people homeless across West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, 
Tennessee and Kentucky. (Reuters} 

• A male cadet at The Citadel has been dismissed, aod 

nine others have been given various punishments in the 
hazing and harassment of two women cadets, school of- 
ficials said One cadet was cleared The FBI and the State 
Law Enforcement Division also are investigating the al- 
legations. The women did not return to the state military 
school for the spring semester. (AP) 

• Los Angeles’ police chief, Willie Williams, should not 

be given a second term because he has not been an 
effective leader, the police commission said Mr. Williams 
was brought in to restore confidence in die police after the 
Rodney King riots. The 15-member City Council can 
override die commission’s decision but needs lOvotes.Mr. 
Williams, the city’s first black police chief, has said he will 
sue if he is not retained (AP) 

• A police officer who took his father along for a day on 

bis beat was shot and killed after pulling over a driver for a 
traffic stop, said sheriff’s deputies in Winter Haven, Flor- 
ida. who tracked and arrested the suspect. The police 
officer, Johnnie Patterson Jr., would have turned 26 on 
Friday. (AP) 



If you want to wind your Rolex, 
turn the page. 

It was Rolex who invented and patented the Perpetual rotor 
for the very first successful self-winding wrist chronometer. 
Today, this clever little device still reacts to the slightest move- 
ment of the wearer’s wrist. Jgjgg OK, now you can turn over. 



ROLEX 

(f Geneva 


i 







PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH II, 1997 


ASIAIPACIFIC 


Jet Airliner in Taiwan 
Is Hijacked to China, 
And Quickly Returned 


CemfHnt bp Ov So# Fran Oapaabtt 

TAIPEI — An unemployed journalist 
on a Taiwan airliner doused himself 
with gasoline Monday and hijacked the 
plane to China, where he complained of 
political repression by Taiwan and re- 
quested asylum, officials said. 

Liu Shan-chung, 45, was arrested 
moments after the Boeing 757 touched 
down at China's southeastern port of 
Xiamen. The plane remained on the 
ground for only a few hours before 
being sent back to Taiwan. 

The Far East Air Transport plane had 
just left on a domestic flight from south- 
ern Kaohsiung bound for Taipei with 
150 passengers and eight crew members 
when Mr. Liu drenched himself in gas- 
oline threatened to immolate himself 
unless the pilot flew to China, officials 
and witnesses said. 

"lama victim of political repres- 
sion,” he said during the confrontation 
with the flight crew, according to the 
chief flight attendant, Kao Yung-chen. 

“I’ve faced discrimination because I 
am a mainlander on Taiwan,” said Mr. 
Liu, who was bora in China's Henan 
Province and bad a history of friction 
with co-workers as an adult in Taiwan. 

There was a spate of hijackings from 
China to Taiwan in 1993 and 1994. but 


Cambodia Appears 
To Ready for Battle 

The Associated Press 

PHNOM PENH — The Cambodian 
Army secretly transported heavy artil- 
lery and tons of ammunition Monday to 
the northern province ofPreah VOiear for 
an apparent offensive against the Khmer 
Rouge, witnesses and officials said. 

The deployments appeared aimed at 
pressuring Khmer Rouge leaders at their 
last major stronghold. Anlong Veng, 
into accepting a peace deal, four weeks 
after government negotiators flew there 
to secure their defections. 

The talks appear to have stalled, and 
government officials have made con- 
flicting statements on whether the ne- 
gotiators have been abducted by the 
rebels or are still working on a deal. 

Cambodia had refrained from offen- 
sives this year, hoping peaceful per- 
suasion would be enough to persuade 
more Khmer Rouge to defect to the 
government side. About 10,000 have 
done so, leaving 400 to 3.000 still op- 
erating around Anlong Veng. 


there has been only one reported hi- 
jacking in the opposite direction. 

Taiwan swiftly demanded Mr. Liu's 
extradition. “We have legal jurisdic- 
tion,*' Justice Minister Liao Cheng-hao 
said before the plane had returned. “The 
mainland authorities should return the 
hijacker immediately.” 

Passengers’ papers were checked try 
Chinese officials but the plane was al- 
lowed to return to Taipei after just two 
hours. 

“The mainland authorities’ handling 
of the affair was highly commendable, 
said Tsai Tui, Taiwan's civil aviation 
chief. 

Taiwanese defense officials said four 
fighters had scrambled into an escort 
formation and tailed the plane part of the 
way across the Taiwan Strait, but they 
pulled away to avoid a ' ‘misunderstand- 
ing” with the Chinese military. 

There was confusion over the plane's 
route back to Taiwan, a sensitive polit- 
ical issue in view of Taiwan’s decades- 
old ban on direct flights and other direct 
contacts with Communist China. 

The president of the airline, Lee 
Chung-ning, said the pilot, at China's 
request, had flown directly to Taipei 
rather than detouring through Hong 
Kong or Macau air space. 

Mr. Tsai disagreed, saying the plane 
had come under Hone Kong air traffic 
control even if it did not overfly the 
British territory. 

The pilot, Yeh Teh-yung, said that 
Beijing had ordered the jet to fly directly 
to Taipei, but that be had taken it briefly 
into Hong Kong's air traffic control 
zone. 

In the only other known incident of a 
Taiwan plane flying to China, a Taiwan 
captain was hailed as a hero by Beijing 
in 1986 after piloting a cargo plane to 
Guangzhou and defecting. 

Relieved passengers Far East Boeing, 
safely back in Taipei, praised airline and 
government authorities in both Taiwan 
and China for their handling of the in- 
cident. 

“The Xiamen authorities really 
treated us well when we were there.” 
Wang Kuo said in Taipei. “They were 
very reassuring.” 

A Taiwanese lawmaker, Kao Yu-jen, 
said Xiamen's mayor came aboard to 
console passengers and gave them food 
and gifts. He then provided mobile tele- 
phones with which to call family in 
Taiwan. 

Pdng Yi-hsin said the police came 
aboard and easily overpowered the hi- 
jacker. “He had no chance to fight 
back. " (Reuters, AP ) 





Liu Shan-chung, with glasses, being arrested Monday by Chinese police officers at the 
airport in Xiamen after he hijacked a Taiwan jetliner to the mainland and requested asylum. 


South Korean Unions 
Scorn Amended Law 

The Associated Press 

SEOUL South Korea’s National AssemMyadopted new 

measures Monday to replace a labor law -that ^ouebed off 
violent strikes in December, but a major union group said the 
changes still were not acceptable. 

The Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, the umbrella 
union group that had led die earlier three weeks of strikes; 
threatened to stage another round in May aimed at forcing 
further revisions. But with flagging support, it was uncertain 
whether it woulcTbe able to do so. . 

The four bills passed Monday were a compromise worked! 
out in weeks of negotiations between governing and op* i 
position party lawmakers after President Kim Young San 
ordered the law revised to end the strikes. 

The compromise package immediately lega lizes multiple 
union umbrella groups, thus making the confederation legal, 
but it puts offali owing multiple unions at the workplace level 
until 2002. 

■ China Will Allow Elderly Defector to Leave 

An elderly North Korean defector staying in South Korea's 
embassy in Beijing will be allowed to leave China, the Foreign 
Ministry said Monday, The Associated Press -reported from 
Seoul. 

Whether Hwang Jang Yop, 74, will be allowed to travel to 
Seoul directly or by way of another country is still under 
negotiation, said Ryu Kwang Sok, head of the Foreign Min- 
istry’s Asia-Pacific Affairs Bureau. Mr. Hwang was the former 
teacher of North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong II, and a member ef 
the Central Committee of the governing Workers’ Party. 





Libel Decision in Singapore 

SINGAPORE — Singapore’s High Court 
found Monday that an opposition politician had 
libeled Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong and other 
governing party members during an election 
campaign in December. 

Justice Goh Joon Seng said Tang Liang Hong, 
who fled Singapore shortly after the election, had 
presented no defense, and the judge therefore 
found in favor of the litigants of die governing 
People’s Action Party. 

Justice Goh. who is not related to the prime 
minister, said he would set a date later for a 
hearing to determine the damages and costs Mr. 
Tang would have to pay. 

The High Court earlier ordered Mr. Tang to 
declare assets worth 1 1_2 milli on Si ngap ore dol- 
lars ($7.9 million) to cover damages if be was 
found liable. (Reuters} 


AIDS in 1983 and 1984 and persistently opposed 
quick approval for safe heat-treated blood products 
being used in the United Scales and other nations. 
Prosecutors have suggested that Dr. Abe may have? 
refused to approve imported treated blood products •’ 
because of his close relations with Japanese phar- 
maceutical companies, which were working on 
their own versions of the products. (AP) 

Nepal Gets New Leader 

KATMANDU. Nepal — Nepal’s political . 
crisis ended Monday when King Birendra named - 
Lokendra Bahadur Chand as the Himalayan king- 
dom's fifth prime minister in seven years. 

Palace officials said Mr. Chand, leader of the 
centrist Rasbtriya Prajatantra Party, was expected 
to be sworn in Tuesday by the king, who aban- 
doned his absolute powers in 1 990 but remains a 
constitutional monarch. . . . (Reuters) 


Japanese Denies AIDS Role Kidnapping in Philippines 


Kami Kisboftfltaoen 


FIERY PROTEST — A Tibetan refugee holding a 
burning Chinese flag at a rally Monday in New Delhi. 
Thirty-eight Chinese flags were burned on the 38th 
anniversary of a Tibetan uprising against B eying. 


TOKYO — Testifying in the first of several 
trials in a widespread AIDS scandal, a doctor 
denied charges Monday that his negligence 
caused the death of a hemophiliac who contracted 
AIDS from untreated blood products. 

Takeshi Abe. a professor and former vice 
president of Teikyo University, told the Tokyo 
District Court that he did not know at the time that 
using untreated blood products was dangerous. 

Dr. Abe was head of a government panel on 


MANILA — Gangs have seized 42 people 
since January, bolstering the Philippines’ image, 
as the kidnapping center of Asia, an anti-crime 
watchdog group said Monday. 

The gangs collected more than 31 million 
pesos ($1 .2 million) in ransom from relatives of 
the 42 victims, the Movement for Restoration of 
Peace and Order said in a statement. It also said 
that 242 people were kidnapped around the coun- 
try in 1996 and that 23 of them died. ( Reuters ) 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MARCH 11, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Peace Talks in ‘Crisis , 5 
Says ‘Deceived 5 Arafat 

He Assails Israeli Stand on West Bank 


The Associated Press 


Tensions between Israel and the Pal- 


JERU SALEM — Yasser Arafat said estintans have risen since Israel's de- 


Monday that peace talks were in a “real 
crisis" and accused Israel of deception 


cision to build a 
borhood in East Jei 


Jewish neigh- 
i, the sector the 


for offering him only a third of the West Palestinians claim as a future capital. 


Bank land that he said be expected to 
receive at this tune. 

Mr. Arafat's main deputy threatened 
to resign over the dispute, and an Israeli 
official said U.S. intervention might be 


Israel announced last week that it 
would withdraw troops from 9 percent of 
the West Bank in die first redeploy- 
ment 

The Palestinians said they expected to 


needed to resolve the impasse over the receive 30 percent of the West Bank in 
pullout It is the first of three “further each of three redeployments, but Israeli 


redeployments" that Israel has prom- 
ised to cany out by mid- 1998. 

Mr. Ararat “is facing a serious crisis, 
from Palestinian public opinion, from 


leaders say dial accords brokered by die 
United States allow them to determine 
the extent of each pullback. 

It was not dear how much of the 


Ashrawi. 

She added that Mr. Arafat was con- 
tacting Arab countries and the United 
States for help. He sent a senior ne- 
gotiator, Saeb Erekat, to Jordan on 
Monday with a message for King Hus- 
sein, Palestinian sources said. 

The Palestinians have refused to co- 


ordinate with Israel on the transfer of signed." he said. 


having been betrayed by Israel. 

Mr. Arafat said that he felt deceived. 

“Brat of all there is a real crisis be- 
cause there is a real breaching of what 
has been agreed upon, a trick and die 
conspiracy against the peace process, 
against the agreement which has been 



Zairian Rebels 
Claim to Have? ; 

A, 

Strategic City 
Surrounded ; ; 


authority in the areas scheduled for a 
pullback, freezing the withdrawal. 


He would not comment when asked 
whether Mr. Abbas had handed him a 


8y>l W«ntoY*ym»e Anrcri tt rri PTtn 

As Yasser Arafat asserted that the peace talks were hi ‘crisis,' demonstrators, such as this one being beaten by 
Israeli soldiers, tried to stop bulldozers dealing a new road to a Jewish settlement in Hebron on Monday. 


Mr. Arafat's deputy, Mahmoud Ab- letter of resignation. 


bas, threatened Monday to resign as top 
negotiator over Israel’s limited with- 
drawal plan. Several other Palestinian 
cabinet ministers also said they might 


step down. 

Mr. Arafat was so pessimistic about the 
peace talks, Palestinian sources said, that 
he has explored the idea of leaving the 
autonomous Gaza Strip and moving to 
Cairo. Such a step that would throw peace 
efforts into further turmoil. 


Mr. Abbas met late Sunday with the 
Israeli foreign minister, David Levy, and 
was angered when told that Israel would 
not change its withdrawal proposal and 
would go ahead with its decisions to 
build in East Jerusalem. 

Mr. Levy said after die meeting that 
Mr. Abbas had told him he would resign, 
and Mr. Abbas asserted Monday that 
“what you have heard about me is 
true." 


Mr. Erekat, the negotiator sent to 
Jordan, said the peace talks were in 
trouble. 

“The negotiations are over,** he 
stated. “I think die Israeli government 


“die argument is over whether or not we They also control most of die Gaza 
have to negotiate" the three pullouts and Strip. 


has announced this by insisting on dic- 


that Israel would not set a precedent by 
improving its offer. 

* 'There’ll have to be a kind of Amer- 
ican intervention to resolve this thing," 


taring new terms of reference and that we Mr. Bar-Ban said. “There is a brink- 


are not partners. 

Mr. Levy suggested that the pullout, 
which was to have taken place at die start 
of the week, might be postponed. 

David Bar-Ban. an adviser to Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, said that 


manship game going on here which the joint control. 


bmp. 

Under Israel’s plan. 7 percent of the 
West Bank will be transferred from Is- 
raeli-Palesrinian control to full Pales- 
tinian control, while 2 percent now un- 
der Israeli occupation will come under 


Palestinians have chosen to play." 

The Palestinians have frill autonomy 
over 8 cities — 2.8 percent of the West 
Bank — and partial control over more 
than 500 villages — about 24 percent. 


The redeployment will reportedly 
give Mr. Arafat’s Palestinian Authority 
full control of 50 more West Bank vil- 
lages with a population of about 
200,000. 


Ignoring U.S. 
Vatican Sets 
Ties to Libya 


F KLONS: Middle-Aged Now, Ex- Criminals Halt Violence in Washington Neighborhood 


Continued from Page I 


to try to break the cycle of crime and 
hopelessness that produced them and 
teenagers like the killers of Darryl Hall. 

Within weeks of Darryl's death, the 
alliance intervened with the two factions 
of a gang that had been terrorizing his 


VATICAN CITY — In a move that neighborhood. They mediated a truce. 


put it at odds with the United States and 
other countries that have tried to isolate 
Colonel Moanunar Gadhafi, the Vat- 
ican established full diplomatic rela- 
tions with Libya on Monday. 

Ambassadorial-level ties were forged 
despite months of whar diplomatic 
sources called intense but private lob- 


bying by the United States to persuade 
the Vatican to hold back. 


Its spokesman, Joaquin Navarro- 
Vails, said the Vatican, which has dip- 


brought the warring sides together as 
friends, helped find them jobs and en- 
couraged them to dream beyond hoping 
to reach an 18th birthday. 

A banquet Monday night in Wash- 
ington honored the president of the six- 
year-old alliance, Pete Jackson. 51. and 
six people from similar groups around 
the country, for their efforts in saving the 
lives of young people in their commu- 
nities — as well as their own. 

It was the fifth such annual award 


gether because “they saw a need, and 
drey responded to the need." In addition 
to mediating gang disputes, the alliance 
has organized two other community pro- 
grams, including one that arranges for 
children to visit their fathers in prison. 

But Mr. Woodson readily admitted 
dial heart and dedication only reach so 
far. The other key components of the 
alliance's success, he said, are the mem- 
bers' past experience with crime, which 


the streets as a teenager and quickly fell 
into a life of crime. He robbed stores and 
banks, sold drugs and abused alcohol. 


In 1965, at age 18, he was convicted of they were young, conflicts were 


armed robbery. After a couple of years in 
a youth prison, he returned to school, got 
a degree in sociology and began working 
as a drug counselor for the same prison 
system that housed him as an inmate. He 
is now deputy warden. 

“I’ve had a great life, really." Mr. 


bers say their work is so urgent. Many 
said that no matter how contentious re- 
lations grew between rival groups when 
they were young, conflicts were gen- 
erally settled with fists, not guns. When 


the alliance got gang members together negotiate with the rebeLteader. Laurenri 
in a room, they noticed that all the teen- Desire Kabila. 


agers were wearing bulletproof vests. 
“If you were in a fight and were beat- 


ing the other guy bad enough, you would 
stop and ask him if he's all right,” said 


allowed them to communicate with the Jackson said as alliance members recoun- James Alsobrooks, now a car salesman. 


gang members, and the willingness of ted their experiences and agreed that they 


lotnaric relations with more than 130 ceremony, organized by the National 


countries, had decided to forge ties with 
Libya in part to recognize recent “pos- 
itive results" there in the area of re- 
ligious freedom. 


Center for Neighborhood Enterprise, a 
16-year-old organization founded on the 
premise that the most effective solutions 
to urban ills often come from the com- 


someone in toe community to create jobs 
as an alternative to criminal behavior. 

The combination, he said, has con- 
vinced center officials that they have a 
model intervention program to replicate 
in other cities. 

Mr. Jackson's life was typical among 
the alliance members. Growing up poor 
and without a father, be was lured into 


had much in common with gang members 
today. “We all went through toe same 
thing as these kids, rage against denial." 

' 'But all you had to do is relate to these 
kids through toe heart," he said, “tell 
them you love them, show them you care 
about them." - 

But not everything is the same as h was 
in toe old days, which is why toe raem- 


The men also said they could not 
recall any fights in their day that in- 
volved children so young as 12. 

By contrast, Mr. Parker, who was once 
toot in toe back by toe police after rob- 


* ‘Our position remains the same," he, 
said. “We will not negotiate with those 
who are making war.” He said that if 
Mr. Kabila really wanted talks, he - 
should stop fighting. ~ 

Tens of thousands of refugees flooded 
into Ubundu, 100 kilometers southeast of 
Kisangani, in advance of toe rebel 
forces. 

The UN World Food Program said the 


bing a bank, described a recent encounter sudden influx had overwhelmed the four 
with the younger brother of a gang mem- aid workers in Ubundu. 


He said he hoped international re- muni ties themselves, rather than gov- 


HARBOR: A Watershed Visit by China 


action to toe decision would be positive, eminent. The center coordinates efforts 


adding that the move was aimed primar- of groups like the alliance in 38 states 


Continued from Page 1 


iiy at looking after the needs of the 
50.000 Catholics in Libya. 

The United States and Britain have 
accused Libya of sponsoring terrorism. 


and assists them by raising money and 
helping find jobs for the young people 
they are turning away from crime. 

The center seeks no government sup- 


Both have also accused it of harboring port other than work opportunities 


two suspects in the bombing of Pan Am 
flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 
1988. 

The United Nations has imposed a ban 
on air travel to Libya because of toe 
Lockerbie case. 

The spokesman said that toe Vatican 
also hoped the decision would give a 
“particular impulse” to Internationa] 
dialogue and would underscore its view 
that toe Mediterranean should be “a 
region of peace, stability and securi- 
ty” 

Diplomatic sources said Washington 
had been talking to the Vatican for some 
time about its concern over the impend- 
ing relations. 

The Americans told the Vatican “that 
they thought that it was not a good idea, 
that the United States was very con- 
cerned about support for terrorism and 
the suspicion that Libya is seeking to 
acquire weapons of mass destruction," a 
diplomatic source said. 

The source added, however, that there 
was no attempt to pressure the Vatican 
and that Washington was hopeful that 
the Vatican could exercise “a moder- 
ating influence" on Tripoli. 

The new relations with Libya were the 
latest a series of Vatican moves in toe 


through local agencies, like toe $6-50-an- 
bour jobs of painting, landscaping and 


lations with the nations they were vis- 
iting. 

the trans-Parific deployment is be- 
lieved to be one of toe longest missions 
sailed by Chinese combat ships and is a 
step toward developing a blue-water 
fleet capable of plying open ocean be- 


“It gives toe appearance of a more 
equal partnership.” Mr. Morrison said. 
“U.S. ships will sdh be going to Hong 


Kong. To have Chinese ships going to 


U.S. naval ports is an effort by the U.S. to 
show it’s willing to accept China on the 


show it’s willing to accept 
same terms." 


ber who told him how be had watched his 
older brother die after a rival shot him. 
The little boy told Mr. Parker that his 
brother had remained still after taking 
several nonletoal shots, but toe shooter 
realized be was faking death and returned 
to finish the job. “putting four slugs into 
his head," as Mr. Parker said. 

City police officials have not entirely 
blessed the efforts of the alliance in Darryl 
Hall’s neighborhood. The department an- 
nounced last week that it was intensifying 
police presence in seven high-crime 
areas, one near where Darryl lived. 

Some alliance members wondered how 


The United Stales made 65 port calls a effective such police efforts would be. 


trash removal that David Gilmore, toe yond coastal defenses. 


court-appointed receiver of Washington’s “This journey is in some respects a 


public housing authority, has provided for coming-of-age mission," said Ralph A 


20 of the gang members in Darryl’s neigh- 
borhood. Since toe youths began working 
last month, peace has prevailed in the 
neighborhood, and residents say they feel 
safe for the first time in decades. 

Like other groups in Washington and 
beyond, said Robert Woodson, president 
of the center. Concerned Men came to- 


Coass, director of the Honolulu-based 
Pacific Forum for Strategic and Inter- 
national Studies. 

Charles Morrison, an international- 
relations specialist at toe East-West 
Center in Honolulu, said the United 
States was offering “a real olive 
branch" to China with the port calls. 


year in Hong Kong under British rule. 
China has said those visits can continue 
after it takes control July 1 . but details 
are being worked oul 
Retired Admiral Ronald Hays, com- 
mander of U.S. Pacific Forces in 1987- 
88, said toe visits could be a step toward 
rebuilding toe military relations that had 
been established by 1989: “This visit is 
a move in the right direction. We can get 
a better feel for the Chinese military's 
objectives and plans." 


“Tens of thousands of refugees 
poured into Ubundu over the weekend,' 
and there are possibly as many a$ 
100,000 there now." a UN spokeswom- 
an, Michele Quintaglie, said. 

“The refugees are in very bad shape,; 
they need food and medicine, so we are 
trying today to kick our operation into the 
highest gear possible." she said. Sixty- 
five tons of food arrived in Ubundu on 
Thursday. (AP, Reuter# 

■ Mobutu Is tFeeUng Great 1 __ 

Mr. Mobutu, suffering from cancer anti ^ 
convalescing in southern Ranee, is “feel- 
ing great" and plans to return to Zaire thk 
week, his son said Monday. The A s= 
sociated Press reported from Paris. 

“Everything is prepared for toe trip,’ 
but there’s still no date," toe son) 


“Ministers have tried reaching these week, his son said Moods 
kids, toe police, sociologists, psycho- sociated Press reported from 
logists. teachers, politicians — and they * ‘Everything is prepared 
still can’t figure it out," said Mr. Rush, a but there's still no date, 
former homeless heroin addict who is Nzanga Mobutu, said, 
now a substance abuse therapist- “But The younger Mobutu has announce*} 
we know these kids. They’re lost, caught his father's imminent return several times 
up in tiie wrong thing like we were. ’ ’ since die Zairian president arrived for his 

“Our experience and lifestyles have current stay in France on Feb. 21. 
taught us certain things.” Mr. Alsobrooks Asked about his father's health, 

said “In a way. we have been preparing Nzanga Mobutu declined to give details' 
for this job all our lives.” but said. “He's feeling great.” - 


N. Y. to Diplomats: 
No More Immunity 


DRUG: Ibuprofen May Reduce Risk of Alzheimer's 


Continued from Page 1 


last few years to strengthen ties with toe 
Arab world after the Vatican recognized 


Arab world after the Vatican recognized 
Israel in 1993. 

The Vatican said Pope John Paul II 
had appointed Archbishop Jose Sebasti- 
an Laboa as nuncio, or ambassador, to 
Libya. 

Archbishop Laboa is no stranger to 
controversy with toe United States. He 
was the Pope's ambassador in P anama 
City when General Manuel Antonio 
Noriega took refuge in the Vatican mis- 
sion in 1989 to elude a U.S. invasion 
force. 


Agence France-Prcsse 

UNITED NATIONS, New York 
— New York City and U.S. au- 
thorities announced Monday that as 
of April 1, diplomats would lose 
their immunity for committing 
traffic and parking violations in the 
city. 

The announcement, made at a 
City Hail news conference, was 
contained in an official U.S. state- 
ment released here. 

In toe statement, toe U.S. del- 
egate, Bill Richardson, said that “if 
any diplomats park illegally, they 
can expect a ticket and they will be 
held accountable for payment.” 

The parking ticket issue came to 
the fore after a Russian envoy and a 
Belarus diplomat were accused by 
the police in December of drunk- 
enly attacking notice officers who 
had ticketed their car parked next to 
a fire hydrant. 


Stewart, an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins 
School of Public Health, but clinical trials will be 
needed to “prove that the drug confers protection 
and ultimately to make public health recommen- 
dations to reduce risk/' 


“Ibuprofen can shut down your kidneys," Dr. 
Claudia Kawas of the Johns Hopkins School of 


Medicine said. “That would be a terrible thing to do 
while trying to prevent something you might not 


‘age 1 In fact, some studies have shown that very 

powerful anti-inflammatory agents, such as in- 
be Johns Hopkins domethacin, can slow the progression of diseases, 
nical trials will be Unfortunately, such drugs have side effects that 
confers protection may often be worse than Alzheimer's itself, 
health recommen- Researchers also are conducting promising clin- 

ical trials with a milder anti-inflammatory agent 
our kidneys.'’ Dr. called prednisone, as well as with aspirin, ibuprofen 
fopkins School of and other anti-inflammatories, such as naproxyn. to 
terrible thing to do see whether they will slow the progression of 
ng you might not symptoms once Alzheimer’s has been diagnosed, 
even get.” The current study, however, focused on routine 

But doctors said that people who were already use of anti-inflammatory drugs long before symp- 
taking the drug routinely for other purposes may get toms became apparent. 

protection against Alzheimer’s as a bonus. The research centered on a group of about 2300 

Alzheimer’s is characterized by memory loss, people who have been studied since 1958 as part of 
disorientation, depression and deterioration of bod- toe Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, con- 
ily functions. It is ultimately fatal, causing about ducted at Johns Hopkins and sponsored by the 
100,000 deaths in toe United States each year. National Institute on Aging. Since 1978. the re- 
Researchers have long been considering anti- search team has asked participants about their use 


Mexico Names Anti-Drug Chief V $ 


MEXICO CITY — The government Monday named a. . 
little-known lawyer to direct Mexico’s war on drugs, 
replacing a general who was dismissed and jailed last . 
month on charges he was in the pay of a cocaine king. 

Attorney General JorgeMadrazo announced that Mari- 
ano Herran SaJvatti would take over the National Institute 
for Drug Combat with a mandate to root out corruption 
and clean up the organization. 


Mr. Herran replaces General Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo. a -•} 
top military officer who was jailed after die government 


ed 


It 1 ” f 
1,1-1 


n< 


■ jf\ / 


CtmrdtdbfOv Si&Fnm ObpodKS 

WALIKALE, Zaire — Zairian rebels 
said Monday they had dosed in mi the . 
strategic city of Kisangani and pledged^ 
to continue their westward push until' 
President Mobutu Sese Seko agreed to 
face-to-face negotiations. 

No independent account of the situ- 
ation around Kisangani was available. 
The last fighting was reported Wed-; 
nesday about 40 kilometers (25 miles) to 
the north. . ‘ - 

Several sources in the city said the 
surrounding bush was heavily mined and 

the three main approach, roads manned - 
by government troops and mainly Serb, 
mercenaries hired by Mr. Mobutu. * 

The rebels, in a radio broadcast from 
the eastern border city of Goma, said 
government soldiers were fleeing Kisan- 
gani. 

“The city of Kisangani is now stuv 
rounded by five columns from the north,' 
the south ami toe east,” a rebel spokes'-; 
man, Nyembwe Kazadi, said from 
es Salaam, Tanzania. 

“We left toe corridor to toe west open 
for civilians and Zairian soldiers to 
flee.” 

The Defense Ministry spokesman: 
Leon Kalima, denied Monday that the 
rebels were closing in on Kisangani. 

“That's totally false," he sakt 
“They're not even close — they’re some 
80 to 100 kilometers away, it's just pro- 
paganda to scare the people and tft^r 
reftigees." 

Bur a regional military analyst and 
local army sources said rebels were 
massing on the southeastern flank after 
using Zaire’s vast river network to ap 5 -' 
proach Kisangani to the north. 

Independent sources report that using 
the Linai River, the rebels were able to 
take toe town of Beogamisa last week to 
teach within 40 kilometers of Kisangani. 

Another government spokesman* 
Jean-Claude Biebie, repeated the 
eminent 's insistence that it would nor** - 


said it found he had taken money from Amado Carrillo 
Puentes, the country's top drug lord. ( Reuters ) 


gtogTSn- Netanyahu Heads to Moscow 

ed by the 


inflammatory agents as a potential treatment for of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. 


Alzheimer’s because it is known that at least part of 
the damage to the brain in the disease is caused by 
the accumulation of white blood cells triggered by 
the immune system. If this inflammatory process 
could be blocked, they reasoned, the onset of the 
disease might be delayed. 


The researchers found that the average risk of 
developing Alzheimer’s among all the 1,686 par- 
ticipants who took toe drug regularly was about half 
as high as among those who did not The longer toe 
subjects took the drugs, they found, the lower toe 
risk of Alzheimer's. 


JERUSALEM — Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday 
embarked on his first trip to Russia since becoming prime ■ : 
minister nine months ago, planning to urge Moscow not ■ ! 
to arm two of Israel’s arch-foes, Iran and Syria. 

Mr. Netanyahu will emphasize “Israel’s growing con- \ 
cents about the transfer of advanced military technologies ' 
10 (P?! 16 Middle East, such as Iran, Syria as • 

well,” said his foreign policy adviser. Done Gaf&euters) 


WRITER: Dictating With an Eyelid, Stricken Frenchman Created a Book as His Last Testament 


Sudanese Rebels Report Gains 


Continued from Page 1 


evening, followed by a pane! discussion. 

The book is mostly anecdotal, written with 
a touch of humor and a dollop of sairaam 
Noting that some of his former friends in 
Paris were describing him as a “vegetable.” 
be wrote: “It was hinted that only a Philistine 
could ignore the fact that I was more part of 


on toe telephone, telling his son the news of me later he was afraid it was Dumas’s re- 
toe day while knowing that he would hear no venge," the editor said. 


answer. 

His father could not visit because he was 
too frail to leave his apamnenL 

“We are both in Mocked- in syndrome, each 
in his own way. me in my carcass, he on his 
third floor.’ Mr. Bauby wrote. 


write the letters. Mr. Bauby devised a 


voice that Mr. Bauby's disability “made him 
a better writer.” 

“What he teaches us is toe value of words. 


code of b linkin g his eyes a certain number of When you have nothing but words, every 
times for each letter of the alphabet, rearran- word counts.” 

tliA nlnknlut* n wifla * * nr Ian TTia !w\L 4 Sl/OC KlC WOCAn frtr 1 llflfin 


ging the alphabet into a “hit parade." as be 
put it, where the most common letters, such as 
“e" and “s." required the fewest blinks. 


The book “was his reason for living,” Mr. 
Audouard continued. “It made him very 


the produce market than of the company of wrote and had mass-mailed to dozens of his 


The idea for the book came from letters he .Periods were designated by closing his eye. 


man. 

“If I was going to prove my intellectual itor for toe bookMr. B; 
potential had remained superior to that of a when he bad his stroke. 


friends, including Antoine Audouard, the ed- 
itor for toe book Mr. Bauby was working on 


radish. I could only count on myself." 

Some passages are vivid and moving- He 
describes Father’s Day with his young chil- 
dren (he was estranged from his wife) and 
writes about hearing his elderly father’s voice 


□ton myself. They batched the idea of changing the English after the Beaties song, and Mr. Bauby's 

ivid and moving. He book’s subject — it was a modern reworking stenographer kept running woids together 
with his young chil- of “The Count of Monte Cristo,” the Dumas when he dictated lines from toe song in Eng- 
L from his wife) and novel in which a character is paralyzed and lish. 

elderly father’s voice communicates by blinking his eyes. “He told The editor said with clear emotion in his 


The rally difficulty came in one of the last 
chapters, toe one where Bauby described toe 
last day of life before his stroke. 

The chapter is titled “A Day in toe Life" in 
English alter the Beatles song, and Mr. Bauby's 
stenographer kept running words together 
when he dictated lines from toe song in Eng- 


happy to be judged as a writer. Like many of 
his mends, I would have liked him to enjoy 
more of his success, but I’m happy to see he 
lived to see the book and see that it was well 
received." 

Mr. Bauby’s doctor said the timing of his 
death seemed to be just bad luck. He had many 
projects he wanted to pursue, toe doctor said, 
including establishing an association for vic- 
tims of locked-in syndrome and their families, 
an effort that will continue. 


ASMARA, Eritrea — Rebels have seized key gov- ■' 
eminent gamsons along Sudan's southern border with-- - 
Uganda and Zaire during swift weekend attacks, a rebel ' 
spokesman said Monday. 

But Sudan accused Uganda of launching the attacks, •- 
and appeared to dispute that the towns had been taken! 
The government said its forces were con tinuing to fight 1 
“on all fronts." 

About 12,000 fighters of the Sudan People’s Liberation ' ' 
Army, backed by tanks and artillery, captured Kajo-Keji • 1 
their former headquarters about 25 kilometers (15 mil**) 
north of Uganda, the rebel spokesman said. (AP ) * 


Gunmen Kill 9 in Colombia 


BOGOTA — Gunmen sprayed a bar in Cunulao in’ 
nprtnwest Colombia with auto mati c wea po ns fire, killin g- 
mne people and wounding six, the police said Monday ' 
Tne motive for the killings was not clear, but toe police said ■ 1 ■ 
tney believed a guerrilla group was responsible. (AP) 


■ermam 


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"fce Skills 


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1 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. MARCH II, 1997 


PAGE 7 


" iau W 

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EUROPE 


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Armed Civilians Seize 
Most of Albanian South 

Anti- Government Forces Dismiss Deal 
Reached by Berisha and Opposition 


r r Reuters 

I; TIRANA, Albania — Anti-govem- 
jienl forces seized control of mosTnf 
■oouthem Albania on Monday, dismiss- 
al a deal by President SaU 
isha and the opposition for a political 
end to the conflict. 

With the Albanian Army in disarray 
the latest areas to fall were the ancient 
town of Berar, abandoned without a fishi 
by the military, and the neaifry town“of 
Kucove. where residents pillaged an air 
force base. One person was killed by a 
stray bullet from celebratory fire 
• But rebels bad to fight to capture 
Fennel, a remote mountain region 
where political activity has been vir- 
uially unknown in the six years since the 
fall of communism. Five people were 
killed and six were wounded. 

_ Anti-government fighters patrolling 
the streets said they supported Mr. Ber- 
iya’s call for an Jill -party government. 
,but refused to lay down their weapons 
*until Mr. Berisha resigned. 

- They accused him of allowing fraud- 
ulent investment plans to flourish across 
the country before collapsing with the 
savings of hundreds of thousands of 
people. 

“We don't trust him anymore." said 
arebel in Be rat. "He deserves to be 
hanged by his tongue." 

.. In Rome, the Italian news agency 
ANSA reported that rebel leaders from 
die southern Albanian port of Vlore 
signed a declaration Monday with Italy 
undertaking to restore order in the town 
and encourage civilians to lay down 
their weapons. 

It reported from an Italian military 
vessel in the Adriatic Sea, where Italy’s 
Ambassador to .Albania, Paolo Foresti, 
was meeting rebel leaders. 

’ The Italian Foreign Ministry could not 
immediately confirm the ANSA report, 

. blit RAI television carried a similar re- 
_>port from the ship. It said Mr. Foresti had 
met eight representatives from Vlore. a 
center of the uprising in the south. 

. In Tirana, Mr. Berisha met leaders of 
his Democratic Party and the opposition 
to form an interim government and set 
new general elections by June. 


Perikli Teta. a leader of the oppo- 
sition Democratic Alliance, said the two 
sides had agreed to split ministries 
equally. 

More than 40 people have been killed 
in the last week. Before Mr. Berisha 
announced his deal with the opposition 
Sunday. Parliament had imposed a stare 
of emergency and then re-elected Mr. 
Berisha to a second five-year term, en- 
raging the opposition and dismaying 
foreign countries. 

An anti-government spokesman in 
Berat. meanwhile, said soldiers left their 
barracks Sunday after stale television 
showed parts of the meeting at which 
the deal was announced. 

Shots reverberated throughout the 
town and the surrounding hills, and 
most residents appeared to be staying 
inside to avoid the risk of being hit by 
stray bullets. 

The capture of Permei was consid- 
erably more bloody. 

A witness, Hekuran Bejollari, said 
Monday: "A group of soldiers left yes- 
terday. and as they were leaving they 
started shooting at people in the main 
square. There were many dead and in- 
jured. People look guns from the police 
station ana two barracks and we shot 
back/’ 

An army captain said 16 villages 
nearby had been captured by rebels. 
Journalists driving from the rebel-held 
town of Gjirokaster found no road- 
blocks on the way to PermeL 

Roadblocks were also absent on the 
main highway south of the Shkumbin 
River that divides the Balkan country 
into north and south. 

The only army t anks visible were 
clustered in a group just south of the 
river, apparently guarding the road 
north to Tirana and east to such gov- 
ernment-held towns as Elbasan. 

A police officer maiming the last 
blockade on the road south in Lushnje. 
20 kilometers (12 miles) south of the 
river, waved in derision when asked 
about die army: “What army? There is 
no army around here. We are the oniy 
ones left and we're thinking of pulling 
out. We have to protect ourselves." 


BRIEFLY 


EU Weighs Rules 
On Food Safety 

BRUSSELS — The European Uni- 
on might introduce tougher food-safety 
regulations following a report that 
many member countries were failing to 
detect cases of “mad cow" disease. 

Gerry Kiely, agriculture spokes- 
man for the European Commission, 
said Monday that the executive 
agency was already considering ways 
to improve Union -wide surveillance 
of the disease after an internal report 
highlighted several shortcomings. 

The report said existing EU food 
safety laws — including controls of 
meat plants — have not been uni- 
formly introduced or respected. 

Mr. Kiely declined to elaborate on 
what measures the Union might in- 
troduce. He left open the possibility of 
reviving a proposal to ban the sale of 
beef offal for consumption by humans 
or animals. Such a ban was rejected by 
farm ministers in December. (API 

Progress on NATO 
Is Seen by Moscow 

MOSCOW — The Rusisan Foreign 
Ministry said Monday thai its latest 
talks with the NATO secretary-gen- 
eral on the allian ce's eastward ex- 
pansion had been “positive," but that 
“differences remained on a range of 
problems/* 

The ministry saia in a statement that 
a meeting here Sunday between For- 
eign Minister Yevgeni Primakov and 
the alliance's secretary-general, Javi- 
er Solana Madariaga, had included the 
discussion of NATO's answers to 
suggestions put forward by Moscow. 

Mr. Solana left Moscow for Central 
Asia on Monday, but the assistant 
secretary-general, Gebhardt von 
Moltke. was holding a further day of 
talks with the deputy foreign minister, 
Nikolai Afanasievsky. (Reuters) 

Slovenia Banks On 
Support From Prodi 

LJUBLJANA, Slovenia — The 
Slovene government, preparing for a 
visit by Prime Minister Romano Prodi 
of Italy, said Monday that it hoped 
Italy would support its bid to join the 
European Union and NATO as soon 
as possible. 


W".. : 

t ' < .. 



DuQmjAnn 

Burned-out cars and trucks littering the M42 near Birmingham on 
Monday. A pileup in the southbound lanes involved about 60 vehicles, 
and a second involved about 30 vehicles in the northbound lanes. 


Mr. Prodi. who was expected to 
arrive late Monday, was scheduled to 
meet Prime Minister Janez Drnovsek, 
President Milan Kucan and the pres- 
ident of Parliament. Janez Podobnik. 

“Particular attention will be paid to 
Slovenia’s incorporation into NATO 
and the European Union, to the 
strengthening of economic, regional 
and cross-border cooperation,” die 
Foreign Ministiy said in a statement. 

Slovenia is considered the best- 
placed outsider to win NATO mem- 
bership in the alliance's first round of 
expansion, possibly before the end of 
the year. It also hopes to become an 
EU member quickly. (Reuters) 


4 Die inPileups 
On English Highway 

BIRMINGHAM, England — Four 
people were killed and more than 30 
were hurt Monday morning when 
about 90 cars and trucks slammed into 
one another in thick fog on a highway 
in central England, the police said. 

Seventy fire fighters put out blazes 
in more than a dozen vehicles in 
wreckage that was spread across a 
quarter of a mile of the M42 near 
Alvechurch on the southern outskirts 
of Birmingham. (AP) 


Poland Fires 
Military Chief 
Who Opposed 
Civilian Power 


Ccavtint by Oir toff Finn DupiMdiB 

WARSAW — Poland on Monday 
dismissed its armed forces chief of staff. 
General Tadeusz Wilecki, who was crit- 
icized by the West for opposing civilian 
control of the military at a time when 
Warsaw is seeking membership of an 
expanded NATO. 

He was succeeded by Genera! 
Henryk Szumski. appointed at a brief 
ceremony attended by President Alex- 
ander Kwasniewski, several ministers 
and journalists. General Szumski said at 
the ceremony that the army should be 
“apolitical, disciplined and efficient." 

Civilian control of the army is a basic 
requirement for candidates to the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

Just two hours before the ceremony, 
General Wilecki. in an interview on 
Polish radio, accused the government of 
former Communists of wanting to 
“politicize the army and bring it under a 
single political line." 

Critics have long accused General 
Wilecki of trying to entrench the general 
staffs authority at the Defense Min- 
istry’s expense, harming Poland ’s bid to 
meet the standards for civilian control of 
the army required by NATO. 

General Wilecki denies be under- 
mined civilian control while arguing 
that he has provided vital stability of 
leadership and battled for adequate 
Funds as the army prepared for NATO 
entry through five years of changing 
governments and ministers. 

Whh the Czech Republic and Hun- 
gary, Poland expects to be among die 
first countries invited at NATO’s July 
summit meeting in Madrid to start formal 
negotiations on joining the alliance. 

“I think one should not change the 
team at such a moment,” General 
Wilecki told the radio. 

General Wileclti’s dispute with Mr. 
Kwasniewski's allies, the ex -Commu- 
nist Democratic Left Alliance, erupted 
into the open last week when a party 
leader said it was time to remove him. 

General Wilecki had accused the 
party of reneging on promises made in 
1995 to spend 3 percent of gross do- 
mestic product on defense. 

(AFP. Reuters) 


GERMANY: 

Coal Miners Protest 


Continued from Page 1 


joining 
T bnlviff 


_ the discussions on tax reforms 
only if Mr. Kohl'settled the coal-mining 
dispute. 

'■ The tax-reform negotiations are sup- 
posed to cut about SI 8 billion in taxes as 
Germany seeks to make its economy 
more competitive in the global econ- 
omy. 

But as die government casts around 
for such cost-saving measures as re- 
duced pensions and sick-pay benefits, 
, the result has been a deepening sense 
among Germans — like the coal miners 
today — that they face unaccustomed, 
ljjng-tenn challenges to their well-be- 
ihg. . . 

“People believe they are livmg m a 
tipie of great upheaval, when everyone 
will have to make big changes/ ’ Renate 
Kbecber, an analyst with the AHensbach 
polling institute, said at a symposium 
here last week. 


War Crimes Trial Begins 
For Croat and 3 Muslims 


Reuters 

THE HAGUE — Scores of Bosnian 
Serbs were killed, tortured and raped at 
a prison camp in central Bosnia, a UN 
war crimes tribunal was told Monday 
when three Muslims and a Croat went 
on trial accused of atrocities. 

The Muslims — Zejnil Delalic, 
Hazim Dehc and Esad Landzo — and 
the Croat. Zdravko Mucic, are charged 
with war crimes against Serbs at the 
Celebici camp, near Konjic, in 1992. 

“From die time the prison was first 
opened, the prisoners were subjected to 
horrible mistreatment,*’ the prosecutor, 
Eric Ostberg, said at the opening of the 
trial, the third conducted by the tribunal 

Prisoners were murdered, tortured 
and raped by soldiers who brought them 
to the prison, by guards at the prison. 


and by outsiders permitted to come into 
the camp, he said. 

Mr. Mucic, the 41 -year-old former 
camp commander, and Mr. Delalic, a 
48-year-old former Bosnian Muslim re- 
gional military leader, are accused of 
command responsibility for atrocities at 
the camp, including at least 14 murders 
and torture, rape and sexual assault. 

The deputy camp commander, Mr. 
Delic, 32, is also charged with command 
responsibility and, along with Mr. 
Landzo, a 24-year-old camp guard, of 
taking part in torture, rapes and killings. 

They are accused of beating elderly 
men to death with wooden planks, base- 
ball bats, shovels and cable and of tor- 
turing people with pliers, acid, electric 
shocks and hot metal pincers. 

The trial is seen as a watershed for the 



ftur DeJoojm* Anocwwd PK» 

The defendants, from left, Zdravko Mucic, Esad Landzo, Zejnil Delalic and Hazim Delic, being guarded by a 
UN officer at the war crimes tribunal in The Hague as their trial on murder and other charges began Monday. 


Hague tribunal, set up in 1993 by the 
United Nations to punish war crimes 
committed during the bitter three-year 
Bosnian conflict. 

The first group trial, it is the first to 
focus on atrocities against Bosnian Serbs 
and the first in which command respon- 
sibility for war crimes will be con- 
sidered. The two earlier trials were of 


individuals, one Serb, one Croat; the 
Croat was sentenced to 10 years in pris- 
on, the Serb is awaiting a decision. 

In contrast to the four men on trial, 
most of the 74 men indicted by the 
tribunal are Serbian. The tribunal has 
had to defend itself against accusations of 
bias against Serbs, stating that its 
investigations are earned out irrespec- 


of politi 

Mr. Delic and Mr. Landzo were ar- 
rested in Bosnia last May and handed 
over to the tribunal, the first tune that the 
authorities in any former Yugoslav re- 
public had carried out a tribunal arrest 
warrant. Mr. Mucic was detained in Vi- 
enna and Mr. Delalic in Munich. All four 
deny the charges. 


France Wants to Turn Back the Clock on Summer Time Policy 


- international Herald Tribune 

fr BRUSSELS — France faces an uphill 
snuggle this week to exempr itself from 

European summer time, with all 14 of its 

European Union partners having indi- 
cated recently that they will support a 
continuation of the one- hour clock 
change. . _ . 

As government officials met in Pans 
to set their strategy for a meeting of EU 
transportation ministers here Tuesday, 
French officials conceded that then- 
campaign against summer tune, which 


France helped institute in the mid- 1 970s 
as an energy-saving measure, had won 
no converts. Nevertheless, they said 
Secretary of Stare Anne-Marie Idrac 
would demand either an exemption for 
Fiance, which would leave Pans with a 
one-hour time difference from other 
Continental capitals in the summer, or a 
shorter prolongation of summer time 
when EU ministers consider legislation 
to extend the current system from 1998 
to 2001. 

EU officials expressed some willing- 


ness to consider the latter option, but 
they dismissed the prospect of a French 


exemption as a practical nightmare. 

Both the Netherlands, the current EU 
president, and Germany, France 's biggest 
neighbor, argue that a time change at die 
French border would cause havoc with 
Europe's train and plane schedules. 

The negotiations will not affect the 
switch to summer time tins year. Euro- 
pean countries are to set their docks ahead 
one hour at 2 A.M. on March 30. a 
Sunday. 


FAITH: A Pragmatic, Secular Approach to Unused Churches 


* f ? -> 

Mi 


Continued from Page I 

growing Muslim communities. Jews 
have followed the trend, though on a 
smaller scale. One community sold a 
little-used 18th century synagogue m 
The Hague, and it was recently inaug- 
urated^ mosque. Another 
in Amsterdam, houses the Resistance 
Museum. A third is being turned into a 

: St °The Dutch government's ‘ 
heritage foundation ^ 

£Ip“ or nc£ 

tfiechurchesaie seen »«««**; 
neighborhood, asa vdri 

landscape, said Jaap h e * Hart, 

demolished 

ineyro “jj u t the coun- 

™ 8 ot’seS'ing, .here isles* and 
Ss^money^vailable to keep die budd- 

of Western Enn,pe.c^h 

jngto the national stans ^ 


various denominations. Catholics re- 
main the single largest group, m a kin g up 
33 percent. 

The dismantling of the churches has 
produced anxiety and soul-searching 
among parishioners, even in a country 
that tends to be more practical than emo- 
tional. Religion may seem irrelevant to 
many people, but the power of its images 
and symbolism endures. 

“People were offended ai first and 
said things like: How dare you violate 
the church?’' said Willem van Vliet, 
who in 1984 bought a large unused Prot- 
estant church in the heart of Hoorn, a 
town north of Amsterdam. The century- 
old, neo-Renaissance building had been 
closed for 20 years. Mr. Van Vliet and 
his partners paid $2.6 million for the 
hulking church and parsonage. The her- 
itage foundation ana die provincial gov- 
ernment put up a similar amount for 
repairs and conversion work. 

Today the church has five floors. 
Shops occupy the first two. In the soar- 
ing height of the nave, Mr. van Vliet 
built 18 apartments. “I’m proud as can 
be,'* he said. “We were so criticized, 
and now we have a waiting list of 80 
families wanting to live here," 

Amsterdam, the capital, has more 
than a dozen former churches with a new 
purpose. The Vondel Church, an elegant 
neo-Gothic structure named after a hal- 
lowed Dutch writer, houses several dis- 
creet offices with only tiny name planes 


on the door. But a few blocks away, the 
Holland Diving shop has painted the 
outside of an unused Protestant church 
black, bung up large signs, replaced the 
pews with racks of wetsuits and flippers, 
and built a swimming pool in the apse. 

As merchants have become brasher, 
opposition has mown. On the edge of 
Rotterdam, local residents were furious 
when a Protestant church was turned into 
a carpet salesroom and campaigned until 
the most objectionable billboards were 
taken down. A synagogue in Weesp that 
was recently sold was about to re-open 
as agiam outlet for discount jeans. Local 
citizens, considering this undignified, 
mobilized and stopped the project 

Of the country’s close to 40 Orthodox 
synagogues, only about a dozen are in 
use. Almost three out of four Jews who 
lived in the Netherlands before World 
War II died in the Holocaust Today 
many do not practice the faith. 

More than 125 Catholic churches 
have been closed since 1973, but as 
many smaller ones have been opened 
that allow, for more versatile use as com- 
munity centers. The old buildings have 
been much in de man d as mosques. 

But the Archdiocese of Utrecht hes- 
itates to sell them to Islamic groups, after 
a few “difficult” experiences, said Leo 
Klok, its head of finance: “Islam has 
many currents, and you end up dealing 
not with a religious group but with the 
government behind them." 


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TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1997 



EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Umlb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Eribune Play by the Common Rules and Pay Those UN Dues 

J J ... , noreement. not by unilateral decisioi 


* 


[<> 


reft 


nj BUSHED wrrH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The Price of Mobutu 


Zaire is paying an increasingly 
heavy price for the misrule of lingering 
autocrat Mobutu Sese Seko. As if the 
country's mal development and his 
corruption were not enough, Zaire is in 
the throes of a civil war that is inflicting 
a terrible human toll and could lead to 
national disintegration. The country 's 
immensity, strategic location, ethnic 
diversity and capacity to set an ex- 
ample add up to great potential trouble 
for ail of central Africa. 

The civil war is President Mobutu's 
creation. Last fell his forces undertook 
to expel a Tutsi minority that had lived 
peacefully for two centuries in eastern 
Zaire. That minority, helped by Uganda, 
Rwanda ami Burundi then geared up 
to unseat the Mobutu regime, whose 
army of looters hangs on now thanks 
to its longtime imperial-minded patron, 
France, some of France's African cli- 
ents (Morocco, Chad and Togo) and 
some Russian and Serbian mercenaries. 
There is the usual flow of refugees 
abused by the men with the guns. There 

is no peacekeeping force to speak of and 

no visible prospect of one. 

African states are alert to the re- 
gional perils of an unconstrained 
struggle in Zaire. Nelson Mandela, en- 
couraged by the United Nations and 
the Organization of African Unity, has 


launched talks meant to install a cease- 
fire and open a political negotiation. 
But the rebels have die military mo- 
mentum, the regime shrinks from ne- 
gotiating from weakness, and the talks 

- a cJ u Tn Kid finiirth 


Hi South Africa languish. In his fourth 
r. Mir. Mol 


decade of power, Mr. Mobutu bogs the 
leadership despite a degree of physical 
deterioration that has him aga i n in 
France, near his stolen billions. 

An accident of the calendar found Al 

Gore in South Africa as the Zaire talks 

were getting under way, and be and his 
team of experts helped. But the Amer- 
icans have chosen, wisely, not to get 
out in front of the man everyone wants 
to get behind Nelson Mandela. 

Washington supports the traditional 
and grill pervasive African attachment 
to the territorial integrity — that is. to 
the colonially drawn boundaries — of 
African states. This doctrine comforts 
the ins but, in this instance, legiti m ates 
President Mobutu’s power grab. Mul- 
tiethnic Zaire and its parts, as they 
loosen, need not only a democratic 
structure but an arrangement among all 
the neighbors to respect ethnic fron- 
tiers and flows as well as the old co- 
lonial lines. This takes a larger, almost 
a permanent negotiation, not simply a 
single piece of paper. 

— THE WASHINGTON POET. 


Jerusalem Mischief 


It should not be considered too late 
for Israel to somehow slide off its 
unilateral decision to plant 6,500 new 
Jewish apartments in Bast Jerusalem. 
The decision further preempts an issue 
— the status of Jerusalem — that Israel 
had promised to submit to negotiation 
with die Palestinians. It is calculated to 
inflame alm ost all Arabs. It has left 
Israel criticized and isolated by all of 
its friends, not least by the United 
States, which vetoed a United Nations 
rebuke of Israel but only in order to 
keep the Security Council out of an 
ongoing negotiation. 

Israelis of both major parties are de- 
voted to a single undivided Jerusalem as 

the capital of Israel. But the land des- 
ignated Jerusalem since Israel won the 
1967 war is larger by several multiples 
than it was before. The new apartments 
at what Israelis call Har Homa are to go 
in a part of the city added in that war and 
later annexed over universal interna- 
tional protest This is not holy land; it is 
strategic real estate. Israel's legitimate 
security and defense interests can be 
served by other means. 

To assert that every inch of greater 
Jerusalem is of equal emotional and 
religious value to the Jewish people is 
.simply wrong. To say that nowhere in 
this sprawling realm is there a place for 


a Palestinian capital is to pull the rug out 
from under the impending final-status 
negotiations. To equate die forward- 
looking prospect of sharing Jerusalem 
with the discredited notion of dividing 
the city is to take the issue off the table 
even before it has been put on. 

- It is said in his defense that Prime 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is taking 
his stand at Har Homa principally to 
keep together a governing coalition put 
under severe strain by his courageous 
decision to thin the Israeli presence in 
Hebron and to undertake further (lim- 
ited) West Bank withdrawals. Mr. Net- 
anyahu does deserve credit for accept- 
ing al least in theory die idea of 
territorial compromise in the West 
Bank But his rigidity on Jerusalem 
shoves onto the Palestinians' Yasser 
Arafat alone a burden of political ac- 
commodation dial both sides to the ne- 
gotiation ought to be carrying together. 

A frustrated Likud is said to be con- 
sidering breaking with its hard right 
and forming a ‘‘national unity" gov- 
ernment with the Labor opposition. 
That would complicate Israeli politics, 
which are in an extraordinarily venom- 
ous phase. But it could give the Israeli 
people a government with a better 
chance of making peace. • 

- THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Capital Gains Tax 


Since the beginning of the Bush 
administration. Democrats have man- 
aged to contain the Republican ob- 
session with cutting the tax on capital 
gains. But opposition to a cut among 
congressional Democrats, and even in 
the White House, appears to be weak- 
ening, now that stock prices are soaring 
and millions of investors are facing a 
stiff tax bill when they sell invest- 
ments. Small fanners and business 
owners are also begging the Democrats 
to go along. Both groups face tax bur- 
dens when they sell their family- 
owned enterprises at elevated prices. 

The Democrats should hold their 
ground. A major achievement of the 
1 986 tax reform bill, still mostly intact, 
.was to tax all types of income, in- 
eluding capital gains, at the same rate. 
It makes no sense to discard this hard- 
fought victory. It also makes no sense 
■to cut taxes at a time when Congress 
land the White House are faced wife fee 
;huge task of eliminating deficits total- 
ing hundreds of billions of dollars over 
[fee next five years. The wise course 
would be to keep capital-gains taxes tn 
■place. But if the Democrats want to 
Imollify small -business owners and 
farmers, they can easily do so without 
Icapitulating to the Republicans' at- 
tempt to grant what would be a large 
and discriminatory tax break. 

I The Republicans offer two argu- 
ments. One is that capital gains are taxed 
too heavily. The second is fear a much 
lower capital-gains rate would encour- 
age a wave of new investment and 
'growth. Neither argument is correct 
| Under current law, wages and in- 
terest income are taxed in fee year they 
lore earned. But capital gains on in- 
vestments escape taxes until they are 


sold. By postponing the tax, Wash- 
ington lets investors keep money they 
would otherwise turnover to theTreas- 
ury — giving them, in effect, an in- 
terest-free loan that weakens fee claim 
feat capital gains are overly taxed. 

More important, an across-the-board 
cut, as fee Republicans propose, will not 
deliver fee economic punch they prom- 
ise. If Congress cuts the tax in half, the 
after-tax profit on typical investments is 
likely to rise by no more than 7 percent 
That is too little benefit to generate a 
substantial increase in saving and in- 
vestment. As a fraction of national out- 
put, the additional investment would be 
minuscule, much less than 1 percent. 

Venture capitalists would be the ma- 
jor beneficiary of the tax cut because 
their reward largely takes fee form of 
capital gains. But even for them fee 
impact would be small, because ven- 
ture capitalists account for very little 
investment feem selves. 

Small farmers and business owners 
often have their wealth tied up in one 
place, their farm or business, and face 
large lax bills when they sell their 
operations. Exactly why fee tax burden 
is seen as unfair to these groups is 
unclear. After all, everyone else pays 
taxes on appreciated assets. Indeed, the 
code already provides tax relief on fee 
sale of family businesses. But if Con- 
gress wants to further ease their plight, 
it can do so wife a targeted measure 
that does not create a massive loophole 
elsewhere in fee tax code. The budget 
can afford a hit limited to family busi- 
nesses and small farms. It cannot af- 
ford a needless giveaway feat drives up 
fee deficit and creates a loophole feat 
Congress rightly closed 10 years ago. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Jtcral«KSribunc 


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W ASHINGTON — Unless fee 
United Nations cracked down on 
Moscow for refusing to pay for peace- 
keeping, Washington argued in 1964, na- 
tions would team to "pick and choose, 
wife impunity, from among their oblig- 
ations ... refusing to pay for items they 
dislike - How could any organization 
function on such a fiscal quicksand?’’ 

How, indeed? Ironically, it was fee 
United States, not Russia, feat later 
adopted delinquency diplomacy, setting 
an example feat threatens to overwhelm 
institutions that it has labored for de- 
cades to create, and erode fee rule of law 
on which UJS. interests and values in- 
escapably depend. A report from the 
United Nations Association of fee 
Uaited States charts fee result. 

When the United States began with- 
holding its UN dues in the 1980s, six 
countries were ineligible to vote in the 
General Assembly because they were 
two years behind in their payments. Last 
year, 27 were in arrears; this year fee 
number is 43. The Untied Stales ac- 
counts for three-quarters of what is owed 
on the rcgutor budget* and more thsn hslf 
of what is owed for peacekeeping. 

A tool feat could be appropriately 
used once or twice as a board to the side 
of the head of an indolent system has 
become routine practice — with dis- 
astrous results. The United States owes 
fee United Nations $1.2 billion. It owes 
$40 mill i nn to the World Health Or- 


By Jessica Mathews 


ganization. $95 million to the Food and 
Agriculture Organization and $200 mil- 
lion to the World Bank's International 
Development Association, President 
Dwight Eisenhower’s proud creation. 
All of these are assessed dues, meaning 
that they are Hard, legal obligations. 

Washington owes $200 million in 
pledges to each of the Asian and Latin 
regional development banks and $66 
minio n to the African bank. It is already 
$160 milli on behind to fee three-year-old 
Global Environmental Facility, the 
biggest initiati ve to come out of the Rio 
S ummi t It is even in arrears to the OECD 
and to fee World Trade Organization. 

Obviously, the threat that the United 
States might withhold funds is no longer 
a weapon in our arsenal. The question in 
others’ minds is not whether Washing- 
ton will meet its obligations but by bow 
much it will fall short. Even that has little 
to do wife how an institution performs. 
The size of the cut is usually an idio- 
syncratic result of congressional pol- 
itics, and institutions know it. 

At a quarter of fee world’s economy, 
the United States alone is large enough 
to wreak havoc with international in- 
stitutions’ budgets. When fee example 
spreads to others, planners have no way 
of knowing how much of their budget is 
real or whether the funds will arrive 


before the year’s last quarter. No one can 
manage intelligently, much less more 
efficiently, in such circumstances. 

And. so. the valid U.S. desire for better 
performance by these institutions is set 
back as resentment rises at fee miser- 
liness of the world's richest country. 

The loss of influence is not limited to 
the Uaited Nations. It becomes harder 
for America to enlist others in support ot 
its own initiatives. Since Uncle Samwith 
a tin cup is now a familiar sight (Desert 
Storm, fee North Korean deal. Middle 


East peace process, etc.), this bears more 
attention than it has received. 


A glo balizin g world is fee d iffe rence 
between a rooming house of strangers 
and a large family in a crowded home. 
Well-being requires constant attention 
to what others are doing. Economic 
growth, security, environmental quality, 
freedom from narcotics, corruption and 
so on all require a rising level of in- 
ternational cooperation. Success de- 
pends on healthy institutions and ob- 
served obligations. 

There could not be a worse time to 
encourage others to regard law as vol- 
untary. Does the United States want its 
intellectual property respected, help in 
arresting terrorist s , controls on techno- 
logies of mass destruction, an intact 
ozone layer over its head? Then it has no 
choice but to observe its obligations un- 
der the UN Charter, which means paying 
dues according to international 


agreement, not by unilateral decision; 

TTie United Nations Association re-? 
port suggests sensible chang es for raak-i 
inp payment formulas fairer and for im- 
proving fiscal operations. Dues should 
be owed quarterly, it recommends, to 
smooth cash flow and discourage gov- 
ernments from holding payments unti* 
the end of fee year. Interest should be 
charged on overdue bills. 1 

The first step, without which no im- 
provements can be made, i s for America 
to pay its $1 billion in UN arrears. " ; 

Cancer is an overused metaphor, bu* j, 
in the sense ofbehavior feaL escapes the T 
usual restraints and spreads wildly at 
great cost to the host, routine nonpay- 
ment of legal obligations fits precisely; 
The sums being saved are far less than 
the influence . lost, and the long-term 
interests ill-served thereby. ' 

Members of Congress who know that 
nothing can be accomplished domest-i 
ically for long without compromise and 
respect for differing views behave as 
though a take-ic-or-leave-it, not to men-: 
tion illegal, approach will work inter-’ 
nationally. They know better, or should; 

Balancing the budget ts important, but 
not at thic price. Whatever long-term 
plan is agreed to for eliminating the U.S. 
budget deficit must begin wife the re- 
cognition feat present practice is not 
serving U.S. interests. Full payment of 

assessed does has to be the rule. ? 

The Washington Fost. : ' ' ’ ' 


Wake Up, Business: You, Too, Need Rule of Law in China 


W ASHINGTON — At the 
recent Davos World 
Economic Forum, I found my- 
self seated at dinner next to the 
chairman of one of the world's 
largest energy companies, with 
major investments in Europe 
and China. He began by asking 
me. “What do you think about 
this Swiss-Jewish thing?" 

I told him the Swiss needed 
to be more forthcoming, and be 
mumbled something about 
how the Swiss were no better 
or worse than anyone else in 
Europe. It was one of those 
conversations where I knew if 
I had said "Those Jews, 
they’re just blackmailing the 
Swiss," this guy would have 
said “Man, you re so right ’’ 
Then be went on to China. 
What did I think of fee U.S. 
human rights activism there? 
Before 1 could answer, he un- 
leashed a broadside against 
promoting human rights in 
China, He added that one rea- 
son his oil business was doing 
so well there was because 
China didn’t have all those 
pesky environmental rules. 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


The encounter ruined my 
dinner but was typical of fee at- 
titude of big business toward 
China today, which is craven 
and amoraL The most cynical 
say that fee job of business is 
business, and that human rights 
in China is not their concern. 

Those slightly less cynical 
peddle fee view feat by doing 
business wife China we are 
promoting free markets there, 
which will inevitably change 
the Chinese system into 
something close to democratic 
capitalism. Therefore we 
Hadn’t press human rights or 
rule of law on China, since it 
will happen naturally. 

China's rapid economic 
growth definitely is prompting 
Beijing to introduce more rule 


of law in fields like copyright, 
and con- 


administrative law ant 
tracts. But there is nothing in- 
evitable about this march end- 
ing wife democracy and hu- 
man rights in China, and to 
pretend so is a cop-out 
We have learned from what 


happened in fee Soviet Union 
feat fee successor to commun- 
ism might not be democracy 
but “kleptocracy,” where an 
economic elite rips off all the 
state assets. One reason that 
happened in Russia was that 
there was no rule-of-law foun- 
dation in place when the 
U.S.S.R. collapsed. We can't 
afford that in China. 

Yes. the job of business is to 
make profits for shareholders, 
not to campaign for dissidents, 
like Wang Dam But if business 
can't be persuaded to sacrifice 
profit for principles, it should 
be persuaded not to sacrifice the 
long terra for the short term. 

In fee short term, businesses 
can operate in China, without 
adequate rule of law there, by 
simply buying risk insurance 
or paying bribes. But this is a 
very shortsighted strategy. 

As one diplomat in Hong 
Kong remarked to me: “How 
smart is it to be investing bil- 
lions of dollars in a country 
which at any moment could 


surprise you wife the worst 
thing you ’ve ever seen on CNN 

— all caking place in Tianan- 
men Square wife your brand 
name in fee background?” 

Both Congress and big pen- 
sion funds need to encourage 
business to think long-term. 
Congress should consider giv- 
ing tax breaks to U.S. compa- 
nies feat promote rule-of-law 
practices in China. And fund 
managers should question any 
company that is too heavily 
invested in a country wife in- 
adequate rule of law. 

U.S. business leaders better 
wake up. They do business 
wife China in fee context of a 
larger U.S.-China relationship 
— and anyone who has been to 
Congress lately knows feat this 
larger relationship is in trouble. 
There is a sour mood in Con- 
gress these days about China 

— a feeling feat in fee last few 
years the United States has so 
cravenly put profit ahead of 
principle with China feat 
people are a little bit ashamed. 

This mood could produce a 
violent reaction by Congress 


if, for instance, China mis- 
handles Hong Kong or is found 
to have meddled in fee U.S. 
elections. 

If U.S. business wants to 
prevent such a lurch backward, j 
it needs to start taking some 
responsibility for improving 
fee overall framework of U.S.- 
China relations. And that 
means taking some initiative to 
bridge the huge gap -between 
the U.S. business community 
and the U.S. human rights 
community when it comes to 
China — rather than always 
widening feat gap. 

Business could start by ■) 
looking for ways to promote 
rule of Law in China, which 
helps commerce, human rights 
and the Chinese people. 

I still believe in the mantra 
that human rights and business - 
rights are just flip sides of the ' 
same coin — fee rule of law. ; 
And in fee long run. when there 
is no rule of law for Wang Dan , 
there will be none for Mi- 
crosoft. Mickey Mouse or ' 
Ronald McDonald. 

The New York Times. • 


School as Assimilator: France Keeps Trying to Make It Work 


P ARIS — International com- 
ment on France’s troubles 
with extreme-right politics and 
immigration often neglects a 
significant point, of consider- 
able relevance to immigration 
licy in fee United States, 
t and various West Euro- 
pean countries. At a time when 
the multicultural model for so- 
ciety has made great progress in 
fee United States and Britain, 
and is firmly established in 
Canada, the French are deter- 
mined to stick with their policy 
of cultural assimilation. 

This is a crucial choice, since 
tension in France over immi- 
gration is fundamentally cultur- 


By William Pfaff 


al and social in origin, rather 
than racial. Even National Front 


voters object mainly that these 
people are “different” in the 
way they live. They say they 
have created an alien society of 
their own inside France. This, 
of course, is exactly what a 
policy of multiculturalism is 
meant to produce. 

Most immigrants in France 
would like nothing better than 
to become part of fee main- 
stream. That is what they are 
hying to accomplish. 

Those who do not are mainly 
Muslims. Even though Islam is 


The Old American Way 

By William Raspberry 


now. the second religion in 
Finance (its adherents are more 
numerous than either Protestants 
or Jews), religiously observant 
Muslims remain conspicuously 
exceptional in a country which 
today is firmly secular and ra- 
tionalist and historically is over- 
whelmingly Catholic. 

In principle, it is perfectly 
possible to assimilate socially, 
professionally and intellectu- 
ally in French society and re- 
main an observant Muslim, but 
in practice assimilation tends to 
produce secularization, and 
abandonment of the Koran. 

There was not fee same prob- 
lem wife earlier waves of im- 


W ASHINGTON — Al Shanker was one of those people 
columnists are grateful to know, whose institutional biases 
are obvious bat who can still be counted on for straight answers. 

Mr. Shanker. who died on Feb. 22 at age 68, seemed so matter- 
of-factly wilting to follow where his insight took him feat I often 
wondered how he was able to maintain fee loyalty of the 907,000- 
member American Federation of Teachers, whose president he 
was for nearly 23 years. His members seemed to adore him. 

You could pick up the phone and ask him about anything, and he 
would try his best to give it to you straighL If feat meant dumping 
on people in power, no matter. If it meant laying a good chunk of 
blame at the door of public school teachers, still no matter. 

Take the interview in which be was asked to explain fee appeal of 
“choice” and other aspects of fee education reform movement His 
answer Discipline. Parents want it, and too many public schools 
don’t have it “The amount of disruption in our schools is much 
larger than it needs to be because it is tolerated,” he told me. 

“A second-grade youngster has an outburst — maybe he curses 
al the taachfy or throws something at another kid — and nothing 
happens. At recess, he taunts his baddies, tells them how tough he 
is and how chicken they are. 

“One kid. and then another, reacts to the challenge, and pretty 
soon you've got a classroom feat's unmanageable.” 

Occasionally his mind would lead him to the very heart of the 
way schools operate, as when be said: “On the job, in the family 
and at play, we are expected to ask those close to us to show us, to 
explain, to help. The important thing is to get something done right 
and usually fear means doing it together with others. In school, 
asking others for help is called cheating. 

Al Shanker was no saint and he and I had our differences of 
opinion. I simply never believed that his opinions had any source 
beyond his unshakable faith in public education. His last column 
published in fee March 2 New York Times makes the point. 

“I believe,” he wrote, “that public education is the glue that has 
held this country together ... [Public schools] brought together 
children of different races, languages, religions and cultures and 
gave them a common language and a sense of common purpose. 
We have not outgrown our need for this; far from it. 

“Today, Americans come from more different countries and 
speak more different languages than ever before. Whenever the 
problems connected wife school refrain seem especially tough, 
I dunk about this. I think about what public education gave me — 


migrants. Poles, Jews, Span- 
iards, Portuguese, Indochinese 
and non-Muslim black Africans 
have more or less rapidly moved 
into the larger society. The new 
National front mayor of Vi- 
troUes, a town near Marseille, 
whose election drew internation- 
al attention to fee immigration 
controversy in France, is herself 
fee daughter of a feorougltly in- 
tegrated Jewish immigrant. 

In Germany and some East 
European countries [and in 
Asia), nationality is understood 
to derive from birth. There is 
held to be a “German people,” 
— “Croatian people,' and you 


ora 


cannot become a part of it by 
3 talk 


Chirac put it Last week, address- 
ing leaders of fee Jewish com- 
munity — is the public edu- 
cation system, which still is 
very powerful in France. 

The nation's schools are run 
from fee Ministry of Education 
in Paris, wife a national cur- 
riculum which by comparison 
wife most American public 
schools today makes very high 
demands on children. 

There is systematic inspec- 
tion of results, and much press 
attention each spring to the per- 
centage of children who suc- 
cessfully pass their “bac” (sec- 
ondaiy school graduation 
exam) as well as to which 
schools had the best results. It is 
a highly competitive system, 
since educational certification is 
crucial to finding a job. and also 
to social promotion in France. 

There is much fear can be 
criticized in fee system, which 
is very different in assumptions 
and practice from schools in 
North America and Britain. 
However, it has until now 
proved to be very good at turn- 
ing little foreigners into French 
men and women. 

Americans ought to under- 
stand this because this is how 
immigration worked in the 
United States until fairly re- 
cently. Multiculturalism is a 
post- 1960s idea. 


Before feat, American 
schools (parochial as well as 
public) instructed 


public) instructed immigrant , 
children in their Pilgrim an3 ™ 
pioneer ' ‘ancestors ’ ’ and taugfifc 
feem what they had to do to be 
“good Americans.” Z 

It worked. It worked at a cost 
since, as it was meant to do. it 
distanced children from their iren 
migrant parents, who may havp 
gone on speaking fee “oldt 
world” language and regretting 
fee lost standards of the societies 
left behind. But fee system math 
ufac Cured little Americans, in- 
tegrated into the culture of ti» 
mainstream. 

Today the major English 
speaking countries are under 
heavy pressure to gjve up feu? 
system and reject its assurapt-; 
uons about mainstream culturti 
and fee imperative of culturaF 
integration. The French havjs f 
not given it up and continue to 
apply it with determination. 

The fact that they are doing' 
so provides an important test fra: 
fee future of all of fee derm*; 
cracies, in an age when the pop^ 
illations of poor non- Western 
countries are on fee move. We 
will see in another decade of 
two who was right. We will see 
which of our societies is at 
greater peace wife itself. 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


mans, 

come 

Today 


: public education gave . 

a kid who couldn’t even speak English when I entered first grade. 

“I feink about what it has given me and can give to countless 
numbers of kids like me. And I know that keeping publje education 
together is worth whatever effort it takes.” 

The Washington Past. 


swearing an cafe of allegiance in 
an immigration office. 

There is no ‘ ‘French people 
in feat sense. The French have 
always understood feat they are 
a mixture of Gaulish and Ger- 
manic tribes, Celts, Latins, Nor- 
plus those who have 
in more recent times. 

. j 40 percent of all the 

French have at least one Foreign 
grandparent. 

Moreover, since fee Enlight- 
enment and the Revolution 
France has seen itself as fee 
home of human rights and fee 
source of modem civilization. 
Thus, just as in the United 
States, citizenship is a matter of 
commitment to certain political 
principles and values of uni- 
versal significance. 

The difference between 
France and America or Canada 
today is feat citizenship is also 
thought to mean acceptance of 
France’s language and civiliza- 
tion. The values of fee political 
society are held to he integral to 
the civilization. Multicultural- 
ism is explicitly rejected. 

The “machine for integra- 
tion” — as President Jacques 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1097: Crete Blockaded 


ATHENS — The Cretan ques- 
tion is considered in diplomatic 
circles to be settled, as the Greek 
fleet has been withdrawn, except 
two small warships. The island 
now being blockaded, fee army 
of occupation is considered of 
no consequence. The attention 
of Europe and Greece is turned 
now to the Thessalian frontier, 
where, in the general opinion, 
the fate of Macedonia and 
perhaps of fee whole Eastern 
question will soon be decided. 


followers, the extremes! of 
whom regard him as semi-di- 
vine, is taken here as indicating * 
a change of policy towards the & 
disorderly elements in India. 


1947: Scrip Is Recalled 


1922: Gandhi Arrested 


LONDON — A Bombay mes- 
sage states that Mr. Gandhi, fee 
Indian agitator and apostle of 
“civil disobedience.” was ar- 
rested today [March 10J in fee 
city of Ajmene in Rajputana. 
Following fee resignation of Mr. 
Edwin Montagu as Secretary of 
State, fee arrest of fee Mahatma, 
as he is usually termed by his 


FRANKFURT — In a surprise 1 
dawn-to-mtdday conversion, the- 
Army of Occupation today 
[March 10) recalled millions of 
dollars of military scrip now re- 
ported to be widely counterfeited: 
throughout Europe. [United 
States Army currency was 
voided throughout the world at' 
the same time in a simultaneous' 
move from Berlin to Tokyo.) 
New scrip dollars will be sub-: 
mined for fee outlawed currency: 
within fee next few days. Op- 
erators in the illegal money mar- 
ket in western European cities! 
suffered a body blow in this swift: 
conversion. Only militaiy and! 
civilian personnel on authorized: 
Army rosters can exchange their; 
old currency for new funds. ; 




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• Connect Clinton 9 s Dots 
From Friends to Policy 

% William Safi re 

■ Wl^S^abT Z7 A Z'; f ™ s 'y th * 


■* TY ca scaoitalkoK.., T ,,u miUier now furiously uw 
“the fete ^ P° IilicaJ winds howl - 

■ even the woSrosv makeS ... Al ? d . 1 conf ^’ s that last fail, 1 
Say Bill SSSHSL dldnl know the half of it. Back 

on a comiDtinn rni^V then - y° u read here that Webster 

’ Gore is enmeshed in fn - A Hubbell > the felonious friend of 

. ffieation ^nlH f " d ; ra,S,ng ** Clinlons at the heart of the 
SSSSta cmtsrm?, , U / al lhe Whitewater case, had been paid 
A^Howe^S ‘“i.- *250.000 by the Lippo Group- 
erich cn' Gin- perhaps to discourage him from 

- presidency would UCCeed to spilling to the independent coun- 

i c ?““ su J h a K». Jeff Genh Vid Stephen 

woSdLw to ™ “ thal Newt ^haton of The New X ork Times 

- N x.wo,,te S L l Up - <IHT - M 7) have just re- 

President vealed that the total take from 


pro tempore of the Senate, but 
Strom Thurmond, 94, can’t raise 
his hand to take the oath. All eves 
would then swing to the sec- 
retary of state to become our fust 
woman president, right? 

Nope. The constitution also 
demands that the Chief Exec be 

natural bom" (denial of a right 
to 8 million naturalized Amer- 
icans that cries out for amend- 
ment) and Madeleine Albright 
was bom overseas, she thinks. 
That passes the buck to Treasury 
Secretary Robert Rubin, who for 
two years has been quietly run- 
ning the government while the 
Clintons were entertaining up- 
stairs. 

None of this wild conjecture, 
of course, will happen. Bill Clin- 
ton will stagger through his term. 
Why report "the Rubin scen- 
ario”? To show that although 
America may not have a lot of 
immediate bench strength, this 
superpower will remain stable — 


$250,000 by the Lippo Group — 
perhaps to discourage him from 
spilling to the independent coun- 
sel. Jeff Genh and Stephen 
Labaton of The New X ork Times 
(IHT. March 7) have just re- 
vealed that the total take from 
Clinton friends by the disgraced 
Mr. Hubbell. on the brink of his 
guilty plea, was more than 
$400,000, with the Lippo Group 
in for about one-fourth. 

Now we can guess why 
Richard Ben-Veniste, counsel to 
Democrats undermining the Sen- 
ate's Whitewater investigation, 
objected so vociferously last 
summer ro questions about Mr. 
Hubbell's providential clients 
and record rush of income. 

That colloquy — unpublicized 
before the election — would have 
exposed the Asian Connection. 
Clinton aide Bruce Lindsey, on 
JuneS. 1996, admitted learning of 
Mr. Hubbell's hiring by "the 
Riadys": mentioned “a guy 
named John Huang" as if un- 
aware of his huge fund-raising, 
and testified he discussed Mr. 
Hubbell's financial difficulties 
with Marsha Scott, Mrs. Clinton's 
database keeper, "who is a per- 
sonal friend of his and mine." 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PACE 9 


WPf 3 * 



Nosy Parkers suspect Ms. 
Scott, who observed Mr. Hub- 
bell's testimony from a sky box 
overlooking the hearing room, 
was a Clinton go-between in 
the alleviation of the Hubbell 
worries. 

Clinton crony Truman 
Arnold, then about to become 
DNC finance chairman and now 
a Ben-Veniste client, joined die 
Riadys in funding the plea-bar- 
gainer, oilman Arnold persuaded 
contributor Bernard Rapoport 
right after his Lincoln Bedroom 
overnight that "we need to help 
Web." Even Los Angeles tax- 
payers chipped in. 

Web, lavishly helped, kept his 
lip zipped. The sleepyheads in 
Ken Starr’s shop and the leth- 
argic crew at Justice did not t hink 


to subpoena Lippo and other doc- 
uments until months after “hush 
money" was discussed in the 
press. Only lately have prose- 
cutors and investigators come to 
see the Asian and other Clinton 
mon^-y steered to Mr. Hubbell as 
the bridge linking the White- 
water scandal to the foreign pen- 
etration of the White House. 

With justice delayed, truth 
may come from Congress. The 
Senate will bloom in May; 
though Fred Thompson is now 
the cynosure, Maine's freshman 
senator. Susan Collins, will steal 
the show. House Intelligence — 
"Hipsi" to the trade — should 
bestir CIA counterintelligence. 

Follow the policy that fol- 
lowed Clinton friendships and 
donations. 


Monetary Union 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


^ r Amid all the talk of delaying 
European Monetary Union, it is 
important to appreciate that Ger- 
many's economic data problem is a 
relative, not absolute, one. The dip- 
lomatic commdmm is bow to find a 
formula that allows Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl to reassure his elec- 
torate that Italy will not be “in’ ' at 
die start of EMU but also permits 
Prime Minister Romano Prodi to 
iclaira the opposite. Does such a 
■formula exist? The answer is yes. 
t At the spring 1998 assessment, 
ian announcement could be made 


that in 1999 there will be two for- 
mal start dates. January and July. 
The hard core could be invited to 
start on Jan. 1. 1999. Those coun- 
tries that had missed qualification 
on the basis of the 1997 data could 
be given an understanding thar 
their 1 998 data would be examined 
early in 1999. Provided the 1998 
data demonstrated further conver- 
gence, those remaining states 
could join EMU in July 1999. 

STEPHEN YORKE. 

Loudon. 

The writer is director of eco- 
nomic research at SBC Warburg. 


Regarding “A Grim Fairy Tale 
About Monetary Union and Dis- 
solution" ( Opinion , March 1) by 
Giles Merritt: 

The article reinforces the prim- 
itive idea that the European Com- 
mission is some kind of irrespon- 
sible behemoth pushing us into 
the abyss of monetary crisis, from 
which only Wall Street and the 
City know how to save us. 

As a matter of fact, monetary 
union was decided upon in 
Maastricht by die heads of state 
and governments of all member 
slates, and ratified by all national 
parliaments, in some cases after a 


Family Values 


Silicon Graphics' Ed Mc- 
Cracken talked to friend Clinton 
about loosening strategic export 
restraints, and now the Russians 
at the Chelyabinsk-70 nuclear 
plant have a dangerous super- 
computer. 

Right-wing ovemighter Carl 
Lindner of United Fruit antes up 
$415,000 and soon we'll hear 
about Bananagate. 

Mr. Clinton and Mr. Gore 
— each with hand over heart as 
if to say “ nioi, ?" — claim 
they did nothing wrong and 
promise never to do it again. 
At FBI headquarters, agents 
read the newspapers and watch 
NBC for clues. Small wonder a 
wild Rubin scenario is bruited 
about 

The New York Times. 


referendum. This was done with 
full knowledge of the drawbacks 
of monetary union, as sketched in 
the scenario related in the story, but 
the advantages were considered to 
outweigh the disadvantages. 

P.J.KUYPER. 

Hoeiiaart. Belgium. 


Regarding “Banning Mercy for 
the Foreigner" i Opinion . March 
/ ) by Anthony Lewis: 

The article about the new U.S. 
immigration law sheds light on the 
hypocrisy demonstrated at times 


The Theme Is Celebrity, 
Not Great Musicianship 


N EW YORK — A little more 
than three decades ago. I sat 
in a nearly empty Carnegie Hall 
one afternoon as Vladimir 
Horowitz prepared to end a 12- 
year absence from the concert 
stage caused by fragile nerves. As 
a teenager cutting classes and an 
indifferent student of the violin, I 
was lucky to attend the rehearsal. 
These many years later I can still 

MEANWHILE 

picture Mr. Horowitz leaning over 
the keyboard, his fingers nimbly 
flying through Chopin's surging 
Ballade in G Minor. The elec- 
trifying music nearly lifted me 
out of my seat. 

The moment comes to mind 
during the American concert rour 
of David Helfgott, the troubled 
Australian pianist wbose story is 
told so powerfully in the movie 
“Shine." Mr. Helfgott's return to 
the concert hall after a crippling 
mental disorder seems both in- 
spiring and saddening. It inspires 
because Mr. Helfgott bas finally 
made it to the world stage after 
years of anguish and recovery. It 
saddens because unlike Mr. 
Horowitz, whose brilliance was 
undiminished by his long absence 
and psychological tribulations, 
Mr. Helfgott turns out not to be an 
especially accomplished pianist, 
at least not now. If anything, his 
tour is more about the powers of 
celebrity and empathy titan about 
great musicianship. 

Mr. Helfgott, from all accounts, 
seems delighted and touched by 
the warm reception he has re- 
ceived. All his American concerts 
are sold out, inducting two sched- 
uled at Avery Fisher Hall in New 
York. The public attention de- 
voted to his American debut re- 
calls the interest generated by 
Van Ctibum after he won the 
Tchaikovsky Competition in 
Moscow in 1958. momentarily 
breaking the bleakness of the 
Cold War. 

Only the most parsimonious 
heart would begrudge Mr. 
Helfgott the acclaim of his en- 
thusiastic American audience. 

But there is a manufactured 
quality to the Helfgott phenom- 
enon that demeans the man and his 
accomplishments, not to mention 
the music he performs. Mr. 
Helfgott. at times, seems to be the 
captive of an entrepreneurial en- 


by political leaders in die United 
States. With all the references 
made in the past few years to 
"family values." it is extremely 
disheartening to see that laws 
passed by President Bill Clinton 
and congressional leaders bave die 
ability to break down the family in 
just the way those legislators 
claim to want to stop. 

The president and members of 
Congress should more thoroughly 
review the bills they make law so 
as to not contradict their own eth- 
ical platforms. 

KEVIN FORD. 

Rome. 


By Philip Tanbroan 

A little more teiprise being manipulated for 


maximum profit by his managers 
and the makers of “Shine.” He 
seems reduced to serving as part of 

a merchandising campaign, a spin- 
off marketed with "Shine” the 
way plastic velociraptors were 
sold alongside ‘’Jurassic Park.” 

The dynamic can be cruel. 
There is a premium on erratic be- 
havior in his performances, as 
though audiences expect Mr. 
Helfgott to live up to the madness' 
depicted in "Shine” by Geoffrey 
Rush, whose affecting perfor- 
mance as Mr. Helfgott deserves, 
an Academy Award. The real Mr. 
Helfgott talks to himself, grunts- 
and gestures wildly as he plays." 
If he stepped on stage sad. 
played flawlessly without quix- 
otic behavior, it might be a ; 
disappointment 

No doubt much of Mr. 
Helfgott’s behavior is genuine,, 
but it is hard to know where the 
real man ends and the man living, 
up to the movie begins. Audiences! 
seem drawn to him more for the 
madness than the music. There' 
is little argument among profes-. 
sional musicians that his perfor- 
mances are ragged, at best j 

Perhaps music, in the broadest 
sense, is served by “Shine" and 
by Mr. Helfgott. They have cer- 
tainly exposed millions of movie- 
goers to stirring pieces like Rach- 
maninoff s Third Piano Concerto, 
the centerpiece of “Shine” and a 
composition so technically and 
emotionally demanding it helped 
unhinge Mr. Helfgott years ago. 

But his concert tour, in other 
ways, diminishes music. As Mr. 
Helfgott neared the end of Chop-- 
in’s Ballade in F Minor in Boston 
last week, he turned to the audi- 
ence during a brief pause that 
comes before the final thunderous 
passage. When some listeners ap- 
plauded prematurely, be happily 
took a bow, then completed die 
piece. Chopin is not well served 
by such showmanship. 

Few pianists were more eccen- 
tric than Vladimir Horowitz, and 
none attracted a greater public fol- 
lowing. But the first order of 
business for Mr. Horowitz and 
his audiences was music. On 
the occasions I saw Mr. Horo- 
witz. including his emotional 
Moscow homecoming in 1986. 
he never let eccentricity over- 
shadow a performance. 

The New York Times. 




Make It Worl 


Patricia Wells 
At Home in Provence 

Recipes Inspired by Her Farmhouse in France 









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For the pasl thirteen years. 
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in a cookbook that captures the soul of 
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i’i 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
TUESDAY, MARCH II, 1997 
PAGE 10 



Gender-Bending: Milan Shows Reopen 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


M ILAN — M annis h suits 
with high-heeled shoes, felt 
coals with flimsy dresses, 
strict vs. soft, his and hers 
— exploring the boundaries between 
masculine and feminine was the story of 
the I talian fashi on season. 

By the time the weeklong shows 
closed on Sunday, Gianni Versace bad 
toyed with tuxedos; Prada's show had 
mixed sturdy gray flannel with em- 
broidered chiffon; and Armani, who 
made his name by bringing man’s at- 
titude to women's dressing, chased pin- 
striped tailoring off the runway with 
fringed shawls and beaded gowns. 

Gender-bending fashion? But wo- 
men have been there, done that. Richard 
Avedon’s photograph of a woman's 
bare, muscled back and slicked hair, for 
a Pirelli calendar exhibition in Milan, 
shows where sexual ambivalence stands 
in 1997. The Italian designers rethink- 
ing 1980s androgyny made for a dis- 
appointing season creatively, in spite of 
fine tailoring and knitwear. 

- That is why Versace’s show was a 
standout It seemed so arresting and 
energetic, with its modernist approach 
to linear silhouettes and geometric 
blocks of color. The designer was back 
in top form with short, sharp dressing 
-and sassy leather. Dresses were trans- 
formed with Cubist geometry on soft 
fabrics, and leather was given a fresh 
spin with hip-line cut-outs. Boots were 
spike-heeled and knee-high. 

“I thought to myself, ‘OJC., Versace, 
you’ve been around 20 years, let's start 
again,’ *’ said the designer. 

In the celebrity lineup were Paula 
Yates and the rock star Michael 
Hutcbence with their baby Heavenly 
Hirana Tiger Lily. Boy George, who 
bad done the soundtrack, was in ecstasy 
over a sparkling ted dress that matched 



-were adorable. They were part of a 
1 920s fed that came in the heavy, wider- ; 

collared, round-shouldered and - 

Wangling beads. Yet the standontjaece*. 
were die more traditionally glamorousr 
a white mink bathrobe coatand a black 
tulle evening stole tufted whh fur. - - '* - -- 
Romeo Gigli's prodigal return toMi*£ 
lan after seven years showing in Pam 
was a bonus for the Italirei season. The 
designer’s meld of poetic falsies with' 
sensuous tailoring, which had scented 


[Offkil'r 

small F 


if ort> 


'.sit- J 


a strong collection. Gigli’s take on the; 
man/woman thing was three-pVcOepam-. 
suits, shown with neckties, contrasting . 
with hankerchief-point skirts fluttering 
at the hems of knitted dresses. ;■ - y 

But the joy of the show was in it% 
opening coats in fabrics that seethed to, 
draw their rich colors and lattice or 
tapeshy textures from, the artistic soul ojE 
Italy. Other coats flirted with the high* 
waist theme that Gigli used last seaso^ 
but has now made subtle. j ’ . ^ 

There is also' something quintessen--, 
dally I talian in the delicate woik og 
sheer fabrics shown by -Alberta Fencttu- 

ron-dressesfyet made lingerie light ^ 
rics work for modern life by po tting 
them with cloud-soft cardigans, or 
tailored gray coats with raised sea min g. 

Other, dressmaker details included 
quilted velvet, beras decorated -wifov 
scallops and slippers in felted fabric. 






■ -w 


^ : V- 


-■ “J, - "... 

V-_ U- 

• V. . • 


From left, Versace's crystal minidress; Armani's fluffy feathers; Prada's coat and embroidered skirt; and , top , Ferre’s slim coat, and FendTs savage fur. 


his lipstick. 

“I love glitter,” he said, referring to 
die fabulous finale of short dresses 
flashing chrome yellow, electric blue 
and green, bisected with a contrasting 
stripe. By re-creating metal-mesh ma- 
terial of the 1980s with embedded crys- 
tals Versace had again moved fast for- 
ward in his signature style. 

Prada was into cross-dressing from 
foe square, mannish pantsuits worn with 
hefty high heels through the felted 
tailored coats flashed over bare bosoms. 
Other masculine-feminine images 
were strictly tailored skirts split ro foe 
thigfas; pelmets of skirts under maxi 
coats; and hooded and zippered 


sports tops with beaded chiffon. 

“After so much sweetness — a little 
strength,” said Miuccia Prada. But foe 
cross-dressing theme seemed heavy- 
handed, compared to foe dexterous 
clothes. They included perfectly pro- 
portioned coats curving gendy to the 
body and long, low-slung pants. 

Sequined edges and embroidery con- 
trasted with the felted fabrics. Decor- 
ating modernist clothes is a current cult, 
but Prada has its own strong take. 

If only Armani had sent out a man- 
nish pantsuit to lay claim to foe territory 
he conquered a decade ago. Instead, he 
went off at a tangent, throwing fringed 
shawls over pinstriped pants, sprinkling 


hair and body with silver dust and show- 
ing almost entirely evening clothes. 
Loose jackets in green and purple satin, 
skinny-fit velvet pantsuits, pajama pip- 
ing and dresses with liquorice-black jet 
or silver beading were classy. But what 
about work clothes? 

“There’s plenty of that in foe show- 
room,” said Armani backstage, his es- 
capist mood summed up by a model duo 
in fluffy black and white feathers. 

There were tailored coats and pant- 
suits, foe jackets thrown a feminine 
curve and foe trousers loose and fluid, 
before velvet took over. Fringe sug- 
gested a mild Shanghai-in-the- 1920s 
theme, that included a feathered cloche 


cap. foe lacquer-red final e dress and a 
Chinese decor for foe after-show party. 
But however beautiful foe evening 
wear, the show left the impression that 
Armani is out of sync with foe sharpen- 
ing-up on other runways. 

The long-short hemline debate 
rumbles on. Gianfranco Ferre drew a 
long, slim silhouette, clean-cut in 


camel, splitting open coats and dresses 
with zippers and buttons to show a 


with zippers and buttons to show a 
leg. That streamlined tailoring was 
well done and so were Ferre’s signa- 
ture white blouses. But foe designer’s 


problem is that foe luxury sportswear 
he delivers so well — like an irides- 


he delivers so well — like an irides- 
cent parka with a brocade lining — 


is fading out of fashion. 

Ferre must have a following for his 
fancy evening wear — the short skirts 
rattlmg with fringed beading and ribbon 
apptiquds on organza. 

Fendi played up the animal side of 
fur. with jagged coat collars, ragged 
cavewoman skirts and fur boas trailing. 
It seemed an unsophisticated way to 
celebrate FendTs extraordinary crafts- 
manship that made foe long coats seem 
feafoerlight, especially the feathery fox 
or skins aereated with faggoting. 

Thin and light was foe designer Karl 
Lagerfeld’s message, but the thrift-shop 
look of foe show seemed retro, even if 
the models' Art Deco-inspired purses 


T HE significant Milan trendy 
were for longtine silhouettes 
with some short skirts; for gray -- 
flannel, leather, ribbed knit-, 
wear, fur trims (especially fox), spark-, 
ting Lurex and for soft fabrics from 
velvet through mohair and jersey. " v 
But too many shows are about textile 
makers putting their wares on foe run^ 
way. That meant that Antonio Fusco's 
luxurious fabrics that beg to be caressed 
were shown from a distance by striding 
supermodels. Tmssardi tried to rein- 
force its reputation for fine leather by 
adding a leather corset to adroopy fleshy t * 
colored dress. Etroput its energy info ‘st a 
madcap presentation of neo-ethnic 
clothes moving at high speed against a 
backdrop of grassy raids. 

The country? The casual sportswear 
and refined tweeds which were once aq 
integral part of Italian style are in re-! 
treat. It was a sign of bow far off track 
Moschino has wandered that its show 
was devoted to ankle- length tweed 
suits, Norfolk jackets in glitter fabrics, 
flower bouquet pattemis and leaf ap- 
pliques — everything, .in ^fashion’s 
garden that no longer seems so lovely,". 


>'■< - - ■* .. 


- ••• K 1 


uri'iv ^ 


YSL : Paris Couture Bites Back 


BOOKS 


International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — How Yves 
Saint Laurent has foe 
last laugh! While foe 
Milanese designers 
were redrawing shoulder 
pads and plundering foe 
archives for YSL fur chub- 
bies and tuxedos, foe design- 
er quietly, discreetly and se- 
renely reinvented himself. 

Sami Laurent's show, 
which kicked off the fall- 
winter season, was an at- 
home affair — just 31 outfits 
shown in his gilded couture 
salon. But it contained fash- 
ion's key elements and 
worked them in a distin- 
guished way. 

Plumed coats wafted out to 
start foe show — fur recast as 
feathers that came in rich 
mixes of purple and brown or 
spinach green with mar- 
malade. Feathered hats ad- 
ded another touch of fantasy. 
Bm underneath went dresses 
in jersey that ran through the 
collection, whether it was for 
the new flat-front pants or for 
a jump suit. 

The most dramatic of 
those ah -in -ones came as a 
black lace and sequined 
jumpsuit with rhinestone zip- 
per. But Saint Laurent was 
also faithful to bis view that a 
pair of pants and a sweater is 
modem fashion — making 
them in black and fitted 


ESCAIM 

in Paris 


NEW COLLECTION 
SPRING-SUMMER 

1997 


Marie-Martine 


8, rue de Sevres, 

Parts 6th 

TdaOl 42 22 18 44 


much closer to the body. 

Seeing what Saint Laurent 
had chosen to show was in- 
structive. for foe rest of the 
collections was on hanging 
rails. A faint tinge of Africa 
was reduced to a fringed belt 
ringing foe hips. Formal tai- 
loring meant a prince of 
Wales check coat and pants. 
Suits with knickerbockers 
were eccentric, but part of the 
designer's heritage. 

The real point about Saint 
Laurent’s work is that his 
mastery of cutting makes 
everything look effortless, 
especially silky jersey 
dresses with interlacing 
draped straps and fluid fabric 
flowing over the body. 

“I am probably foe most 
copied designer in the 
world,” said Saint Laurent, 
when asked about Milan's 
YSL takes. This season he 
was a jump ahead. 

Couture bites back is the 
mood of foe Paris shows. Es- 
tablished couture houses, for 
a long time upstaged by foe 
avant-garde, are now setting 
foe agenda. 

The most eagerly awaited 
shows are Dior, where John 
Galliano presents his first 
ready-to-wear line Tuesday; 
and Givenchy on Wednes- 
day, when Alexander Mc- 
Queen has to slip into another 
skjn after the wild-animal in- 
spired show he presented un- 
der his own label in London 
last month. 

To match their clout, Karl 
Lagerfeld has moved his 
Chanel show to Wednesday 
and other designers have po- 
sitioned themselves in rela- 
tion to the big force. 

Guy Laroche is launching 
Thursday its first collection by 
the designer Alber Elbaz, 
formerly with Geoffrey 
Beene. 

Above all, the spirit of 
couture has invaded the 
ready-to-wear shows, with 





CRAZY RHYTHM in his column, accusing Hentoff of Sea- 

By Leonard Garment. Illustrated. 418 my Sma " pbce ” 

pages. $2750. Times BookslRandom But, as “Crazy Rhythm” reveals, al- 

House. most but not quite succeeding as a jazz 

Reviewed by musician was one of foe more conven- 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt SSSStt 

I F playing saxophone in a jazz band demanding father owned a dress-making 
strikes you as an unlikely way to have factory, as a child he would entertain foe 


£*§■ - -*ri«v . 


’a -•**' 


prepared for service in foe Nixon pres- 
idency, you are not alone. In his spark- 
ling and highly articulate memoir, 
“Crazy Rhythm,” Leonard Garment, 


hands by mounting a work table and 
singing “Tiptoe Through the Tulips." 


would eventually drive her to suicide. » 
Meeting Richard Nixon when the 
former vice, president moved east finoiri 
California and joined bis law firm in 
1963 didn’t greatly change Garment Hej 
had risen high in what was now callecj 
Nixon Mudge Rose Guthrie & Alex* 
ander, and he felt trapped. Although “sj . 
reflexive Nixon denigrator,” be saw* l c 
N ixon’s political rebirth as his ticket oul 7 
and devoted himself to building the new 
campaign team that would help to get 


flunking A! 


Europe 


Once psychoanalysis helped him to Nixon elected president in 196; 


tm 


understand his unhappy family, he gave 


who served on the White House staff up jazz and studied law. Yet despite a 


. k ~ v ' 

£ ■ 

« . 

7 -f. •••>' . . ” 

”* v ' t 

- * ' “0' 


from 1969 to 1974, writes, “many years 
later, in the 1970s, when foe political 
commentator and jazz writer Nat Hen- 
toff doubted in print that a Nixon stal- 
wart tike me could have played in 
Woody Herman's tend, William S afire 
was able to launch a successful defense 


breakthrough job with foe high-WASP 
Wall Street firm of Mudge, Stem, Wil- 
liams & Tucker, be lived in Greenwich 
Village, hung out with the Jewish com- 
ics who wrote Sid Caesar’s “Your Show 
of Shows” and married a writer of tele- 
vision soap operas whose depressions 


CHESS 




By Robert Byrne 


that bis own attack was the stronger, IS 
h5 be 16 Qh6 would have been crush- 


< ■ 


T AL Shaked, an lS-year-old inter- 
national master from Tucson, Ari- 


ingly beaten off by I6...Ng4! 
Finally, with 23 Na4, Yusui 



e * 



Andrew Tbocaa 


Yves Saint Laurent’s feather coat and matching hat. 
strong designers all talking reacted for comment 


up craftsmanship and atten- 
tion to details ana showing in 


bon to details and showing in 
intimate venues at floor level 
rather than on big runways. 

Meanwhile, foe search for 
new designers continues. 
Chloe is expected to an- 
nounce its new designer after 
Lagerfeld’s final collection 
on Friday. The Milanese de- 
signer Luisa Beccaria says 
she is in tine for foe job, but 
Mounir Moufarrige, presi- 
dent of Chloe, could not be 


reacted for comment 
After the appointment of 
Marc Jacobs at Louis Vuitton, 
Bernard Arnault is now look- 
ing for another designer to rev 
up Loewe, foe Spanish leath- 
er-goods company that is now 
integrated into foe LVMH 
group. And at Hermes, 
changes are expected after foe 
imminent departure of the 
design team leader Claude 
Brouet 


J. national master from Tucson, Ari- 
zona, made his first grandmaster norm 
in foe IV Anibal Open in Linares, Spain. 
In the last round he beat Artur Yusupov 
of Germany. 

Yusupov’s 5 Nge2, introduced the 
flexible Kramer System. White may play 
a later Ng3 with two ideas: either a long- 
side attack with Be2 and h4 or prevention 
of a black counterattack with ... f5 , while 
White advances on foe queenside. 

Yusupov’s strategy with 6 Bg5 h6 7 
Bf4?! was precisely met by Shaked’s 
7...Nc6! Probably wisest would then 
have been 8 d5. although either 8...Ne5 
or 8...eS gives Black a good game. But 
Yusupov stubbornly pressed on with 8 
Qd2 e5! 9 Bh6 Bh6 10 Qh6 Nd4, which 
yielded Shaked play in foe center, while 
White had no real kingside attack, as 
Yusupov 's retreat, 1 1 Qd2, admitted. 


Finally, with 23 Na4, Yusupov had to 
take the pawn that Shaked had been 
offering, but after 23...Qc6 24 hS gS 25 
Ng3, Shaked broke open the queenside 
with 25...c3! Yusupov could not play 26 
Rc37 because of 26.JBb3! 27 Bb3 Rb3! 
28 Rc4 Qb5!, winning heavy material. 

After 46 Kf3, Shaked struck with 
46...f5L aiming an avalanche of pawns 
at the hapless white king. Since 47 ef? 
allows 4/...Qf4 mate, Yusupov tried to 
block the position with 47 g4. 


But he never really found a place fb$ 
himself on that team. He writes tbai 
Nixon considered him a poor campaign 
manager, a political naif and no good a( 
lying. John Ehiiicbman, Nixon’s first 
White House counsel, described him as tj 
“nuclear ovexreactor.” j 

After the election, Nixon offered him 
□o job in particular but said that if h^ 
moved to Washington and learned foe 
ropes, he would soon be foe “Clark 
Clifford of foe Republican Party.’. ’ Gari 
mem writes that he didn’t understand 
what that meant, that he moped around 
enviously and finally asked to join fod 
White House staff. First he served as a 
special consultant, then in 1973 be be4 j 
came Nixon's counsel. Soon he wa$ ' 
close to foe action again, getting calls 
from the president even while [ymg 
an analyst’s couch. < 

Garment’s lack of a defined role id 
Nixon’s presidency somewhat weakenS 
his narrative of foe years from 1 968 om/3 
he puts it “I gradually became White 
House counsel to power-impoverished 
parts of the federal government, resident 
advocate for the great unwashed of the 
executive branch, omb udsman for the 






uirh 


on*,* u*; puaiuuu wiui •+/ executive orancti, ombudsman for the 

Shaked’s 47„.Qb2 48 Bbl Be2! was door-pounding outside world. Word pot 
devastating. On 49 Re2?, there would around. Business boomed.” •? 


have come 49...fg 50 Ke3 Qd4 mate. 

After 54...QG, Yusupov could not 
play 55 Rg5 bwause of 55 ...Qf2 56 Kh3 
Qg3 mate. After 55 Rgl Qf2 56 Rg2 
Qel, Yusupov gave up in foe face of 57 
Rgl Bfl 58 Bc2 QG 59 Khl Be2. 


Shaked quickly started a queenside 
attack with I3...b5l. the tactical point 
being that 14 cb ab 15 Bb5 loses material 
to 15.~Nb3. And Yusupov tried to revive 
a kingside attack with 14 b4, but Shaked 
coolly went ahead with 4...Be6l, betting 


KING'S INDIAN DEFENSE! 

i Black White Black 

iv Staked Yusupov Shaked 

N« 29 Kcl Nffi 
30 Nfl QaS 


SHAKECV8LACX 


Suzy Menkes 


MAURIZI0 GALANTE 


PARIS MARCH 1997 

PRESENTATION OF THE PRET-A-PORTER COLLECTION AUTUMN/WINTER 1997/1998 

PRESS OFFICE S SHOWROOM: MAURIZI0 GALANTE S.A. 22 RUE DE.PALESTRO 7SCG2 PARIS TEL. 01 55 34 34 55 FAX 01 55 34 55 50 



I 

ilPliP 

■ ■ 

■ □ @ 


YUSUPOWWHfTE 


Position after 48 Bbl 


White 

Mack 

White 

Yuqpov 

Shifted 

Yusnpov 

1 d4 

Nffi 

29 Kcl 

2 c4 

*L 

30 Nfl 

3 Nc3 

Bg7 

31 Kb2 

4 e4 

dB 

32 Kcl 

5 NgeZ 

M 

33 Kb2 


b6 

34 Nb5 

Nc6 

35 Kcl 

8 Qd2 

9 Bb6 

eS 

36 Bc2 

BUS 

37 Rf3 

10 (^4 

Nd4 

38 Nea 

11 Qd2 

ts 

39 Bbl 

12 Ng3 

aB 

40 Kd2 

13 Bd3 

b5 

41 KCl 

14 H4 

Bc6 

42 Kd2 

is o«o 

be 

43 BC2 

10 Bill 

NI>7 

44 Ke2 

17 Nfl. 

b5 

45 Rc3 

18 Bc2 

■4 

46 Kf3 

19 a3 

29 Rel 

Qb6 

Rfb8 

47 g4 

48 Bbl 

21 Bdl 

Ra7 

49 Kg2 

22 Re3 

Rab7 

SO Rch3 

23 Na4 

Qcfi 

51 bfi 

24 h S 

gs 

52 Rh5 

25 Ng3 

C3 

53 Kh3 

28 Nc3 

Rb2 

54 Kb2 

27 Qba 

28 Xl>2 

RbJ 

QM 

55 Rgl 

56 Rg2 



57 Resigns 


He’s a wonderful storyteller. But be* 
cause he did a little of this and a little of 
that, a flagging episodic quality mildly 
undermines his story. 

What sustains “Crazy Rhythm” and 
mates it belatedly by far foe liveliest of 
the Nixon administration memoirs is iffc 
portrait of foe enigmatic president. Gar- 
“.b}? own view, was “Nixon’s £ 
chief optimist and good-hick charm, foe ' 
nmi who had declared, way back in earit 
1 964 that he was destined to be prest 
,t *? L ’ So Nixon would call him late at 
mght and expose him to those nanbliqg 
start and stop” monologues (now so 




r ~>;t- * ,V 


Ctl 


were Nixon s * unprovisational method 
°* reeling his way through an uncertain 
con ver sation, probing, testing, targeting, 
gauging what the other fellow really had 
re mind” or what Nixon himself had is 
mind. 


? i 

XT' ^ 


In several passages, foe man nearly 
comes into focus. He liked foe telephone, 
trtmnent writes, because he could “con- 
centrate on his words wifooat having t» 
compose his eyes and coordinate hS 
hands to harmonize with foem.” Meeting 
people in person meant having to hear 
them out, and because be knew instantly 
the speaker was heading ariti 
where the speech would end," foe wair- 
reg made him acutely uncomfortable.? 


A >*• 


ifkmanrtrHaupt is on the 
staff cf The Akw York Times. 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


WEEKEND BREAKS 
FROM ONLY $60 

see our ad in this paper 


£ 


TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1997 


PAGE 11 


New Giant 

A 

Looking for 
Small Fish 


Italian Conglomerate 
Also Foresees Job Cuts 


Bloomberg News 

= MILAN — Gnippo Industriale Mar- 
. zottoSp A already is seeking rivals to buy 
Ui« three days after the creation of the $5 
bflljop-a-year conglomerate was pro- 
po^d, its future chairman said Monday. 

■ Pietro Marzotto said Gruppo Indus- 
™ e Marzotto, which would be formed 
through Holding di Parrecipazioni In- 
S P A ’ s Proposed 945 billion lire 
15556.3 million) acquisition of his fam- 
e's company, Marzotto & Figli SpA 
will use the 1 trillion lire in cash on 
•j Holding di Parteripazioiii Industriali's 
/ books to buy fashion and textile compa- 
nies. It also will finance international 
expansion by its RCS Editori unit. 

1 Holding di Partecipazioni Industrial 
publicized its offer for Maizotio & Figli 
after the stock market closed Friday. 
The merger would form a company with 
brands such as Fiia sportswear, the 
men's designer Hugo Boss and Italy’s 
largest newspaper, Corriere della Sera. 

Gnippo Industriale Marzotto includes 
Gruppo Fmanziario Tessile, a unit of 
Gemma SpA that makes clothes for de- 
signers such as Giorgio Ar mani anri Gi- 
anfranco Ferre, and Marzotto 's wool- 
weaving operations, the world’s largest 
" Mr. Marzotto said cuts in the work 
force of 21,000 would be inevitable. 

: He said the company would combine 
Holding di Partecipazioni 's clothing 
maker, Tessile. with Marzotto’s cloth- 
ing operations to create one company. 
Ffla and Hugo Boss will continue op- 
erating as independent companies. Mr. 
Marzotto declined to comment on po- 
tential acquisition targets. 

- Holding di Partecipazioni was spun 
off to Gemma SpA investors at a ratio of 
9 of its shares and one new Gemma 
share for every 10 pre-split Gemma 
shares. Hie transaction leaves Gemina 
as a holding company with financial and 
real-estate assets. 

*' Maurizio Romftj, 48, one of Me- 
diobanca SpA’s top bankers and son of 
the Hat chairman, Cesare Romiti, will 
be chief executive of the new company, 
which will controlled by Hat, the Mar- 
ietta fitmily and Mediobanca. , 



Plubf. Jncaha^/nw New V aril nmeulmi Su« nmynix Kc* York Timiiofi rtfdn nd above) 

Sunbeam’s chief, Albert Dunlap, left, wants to get rid of the Biddeford, Maine, mill, top righL The resulting 
worry has been hard on both the town and on mill workers like Norman and Sharolyn Gagnon, righL 


Mill Town Downsized, but Not Out 


By Jon Nordheirner 

New York Tunes Service 


Sunbeam Corp. Svmcc' SOC 


BIDDEFORD, MAINE — For 
more than a century, outsiders con- 
trolled the economic destiny of the 
men and women who toiled in the 
textile mills of this coastal town. 

Whether those who held this power 
were faceless Boston bankers. South- 
ern textile brokers or Wall Street port- 
folio managers didn't matter much to 
the mill workers. Owners came and 
went, and the only visible sign of each 
transition was a new company name 
printed on payroll checks. 

So when word spread last July that 
Albert Dunlap had been hired as the 
c hairman of the Sunbeam Corp.. own- 
er of the Biddeford Textile Co., the 
352 workers at the mill took the news 
calmly, expecting some manner of 
corporate shake-up but confident that 
their jobs were safe. 

After all, they reassured one an- 
other, they helped produce Sunbeam ’s 
profitable line of electric blankets. 


535 


Friday's close - 
$30,375 . 



1996 

Source: Stoamtwp Financial Markms 


True, the controls and wiring were 
manufactured in Mississippi and Mex- 
ico. but the fabric “shells” — some 4 
million of them last year — were 
woven for Sunbeam exclusively on 
Biddeford Textile looms. Once fin- 
ished, the electric blankets were 
shipped to department stores and sold 
for up to SI 79. 

But Mr. Dunlap didn't get his nick- 
name “Chainsaw Al" for nothing. In 
November, be announced that the Bid- 
deford plant would be either shut or 


sold as part of his plan to slash Sun- 
beam's work force in half. When 
Robert Reich, then the nation's labor 
secretary, described the move as 
“treating employees as if they are 
disposable pieces of equipment," Mr. 
Dunlap brushed off tire criticism and 
said his first obligation was to the 
shareholders who hired him to mak e 
the company profitable. 

The mill hands reacted to the thun- 
derbolt much as most people deal with 
death — with disbelief, anger and de- 
pression. They have resisted, so far. 
only the last stage: acceptance. 

Perhaps they should have seen it 
coming. It was no secret that Mr. Dun- 
lap hadjoined Sunbeam after lopping 
off 1 1,200 workers, one-third of the 
work force, at the Scott Paper Co., 
earning S100 million for his trouble. 
And the blankets are far from high 
technology. It would be cheaper to 
make them in the Third World. 

Moreover, plant closings are hardly 


See PLANT, Page 15 


Tokyo Speeds Debut 
Of Digital Broadcasts 

Japan Picks Own TV Technology 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Times Service 


TOKYO — Seeking to catch up to the 
United States and Europe, the Japanese 
government announced Monday that it 
would bring forward its introduction of 
digital-television broadcasting by as 
much as a few years. 

Japan is also planning to adopt a di- 
gital transmission system ir says is su- 
perior to the one that will be used in the 
United States. The plan to go with dif- 
ferent technology means that the Amer- 
ican system might be restricted to the 
United States, because Europe recently 
adopted a standard that is s imil ar, though 
not identical, to the Japanese one. 

Such divergence means that in tire 
digital television era, as it is now in the 
analog era, the world will be split among 
three systems, so a television set made for 
one region will not work in the other. 

Digital television, which transmits 
images in computer code, promises to 
provide clearer images than analog tele- 
vision and to hasten the convergence of 
computers and television sets. 

Digital technology could be used for 
high-definition television, in which pic- 
tures would be twice as sharp as on 
current sets, or to broadcast three or 
more programs on a single channel at 
normal resolution. 

Japan, which led the world in the 
development of analog high -definition 
television, fell behind as American 
companies developed digital techno- 
logy in the early 1990s. 


Tokyo had been planning to begin 
digital terrestrial broadcasting — as op- 
posed to digital broadcasting from satel- 
lites, which already exists — between 
2000 and 2005. 

But Shuji Kusuda, director general of 
the broadcasting bureau of tire Ministry 
of Posts and Telecommunications, said 
Monday that tire start of digital broad- 
casting would begin before 2000 . 

Digital service is scheduled to begin 
next year in United States, but many 
broadcasters say they cannot realistic- 
ally start until 1 999, if that soon. 

Digital broadcasting in Europe is ex- 
pected to start next year, at least in 
Britain. 

The three systems all use the same 


standard, known as MFEG-2, to com- 
press the images for transmission, so 
television sets for all three markets will 
have a lot in common. 

The difference has to do with how tire 
data are transmitted. Japanese officials 
say the American system, known as 8 
vestigial sideband, might be less ex- 
pensive and easier to implement but that 
picture quality might degrade in areas 
with many tall buildings or mountains. 

“The American system is not com- 
pletely digital." said Hiroshi Tanaka, 
deputy director of the digital broad- 
casting system development division at 
Posts and Telecommunications. “The 
U.S. system is simple, and sets can be 
made cheaply. But that doesn’t mean it 
will be a good system in the long nm.” 

While not being completely compat- 
ible. the European ana Japanese sys- 
tems will both use a technique known as 
orthogonal frequency division multi- 
plexing. This system would allow sta- 
tions in adjacent cities to use the same 
frequency without interference, allow- 
ing for more efficient use of spectrum. 
With the American system, adjacent 
stations must use different chann els to 
avoid interference. 

Last week a panel recommended that a 
Japanese broadcast satellite to be 
launched in 2000 be used fra 1 digital high- 
definition television broadcasts. Existing 
analog HDTV broadcasts would con- 
tinue until at least 2007. but the shift to 
digital is now certain. 

■ Quicker U.S. Sets Switch Urged 

President Bill Clinton's administra- 
tion is aiming to have every American 
home replace its television sets with 
expensive digital models within eight 
years, instead of die 15 years first 
planned, or risk losing tire ability to 
watch TV at all. The New York Times 
reported from Washington. 

The administration is eager to speed up 
the changeover because that would also 
speed up the auction of tire newly vacated 
chancels. The auction's proceeds, es- 
timated at SIS billion, would aid the 
effort to balance the federal budget. 

Under the original 15-year plan, it 
was assumed that most people would 
buy new televisions anyway, so the tran- 
sition would not present a hardship. 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


Europe Must Act to Create More Jobs 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


W ASHINGTON — The outcry that has greeted 
last month's decision by Renault, the giant 
French automaker, to close a plant in Belgium is 
symptomatic of much that is wrong with 
Europe. Now that tire French government is no longer a 
ma jority shareholder in the company, Renault is beginning a 
long-overdue reorganization to cope with increased global 
competition, lire move is another sign that European industry 
is finally starting the painful but necessary process of re- 
structuring that U.S. companies successfully launched in the 

1980s. The proper reaction is not to 

try to block the process, which 
should help to pm European industry 
back on its feet, but to step up efforts 
to create new jobs in other sectors. 

Instead, the longer-term implic- 
ations of Renault’s decision have 
been drowned out by lamentations 
from a chorus of eminent pawns including the tog and tire 
prime minis ter of Belgium and the presidents of France and 
tire European Commission. 

AdmittSy, some of the fuss has been over tne way 
Renault announced its decision, especially the company s 
failure to consult its workers. That is a fair pomL Laid-off 
workers can more easily find new jobs ^employers give 
them some wanting and take other steps to help them. 

BuSher, more ominous reaction has attanpt 

to push Europe even further m the ^“^dir^on. Vu- 
tuahvcverv expert agrees that over-regulation of the labor 
nuuket is a big reason European unem ployme nt is so high. 
Belgian govenESKS Em^ Comnussion 


What Is lacking in most 
countries is the political courage 
to translate ideas into action. 


are now 


nmnnsina not less, but more regulation. 

The problem is not that Renault is shedding jote; it is that 
tb^aTno^rer jobs for those w^are M™-* 


ass— riS 


sized businesses. They have moved from manufacturing to 
the service sector. Many have become self-employed. 

Those alternatives are much less available in Europe. While 
the U.S. private sector has generated millions of jobs since 
1980, government has been the main source of new em- 
ployment in Continental Europe, creating far fewer jobs. 

Especially now, with governments cutting spending to 
meet the criteria for the European single currency, the 
public sector cannot provide work for all those being laid 
off by private industry, nor should fr. 

There is not much secret any more about how to create new 
jobs. It can be done by deregulating labor markets, reforming 
social welfare systems, encouraging tire growth of the service 
sector and self-employment, and 
fostering entrepreneurial initiative. 

Unfortunately, much of this flies 
in the face of Continental tradition. 
Many Europeans think services 
such as health care should be mainly 

_ supplied by the state, and there is a 

fear of risk-taking and failure. High 
taxes deter initiative, and burdensome social-security costs 
discourage hiring in the private sector. 

Governments can do something about most of these 
problems. Bui many of them say that Europeans do not want 
an American “hire-and-fire” labor market, with its ac- 
companying social ills. 

Europe does not have to copy the American model 
exactly. Different cultures may require different models. It 
is fashionable now in Europe, for instance, to look to the 
Netherlands, which has created jobs by restraining wages 
and making working time more flexible — without drastic 
U.S. -style labor reforms. 

The Dutch model may nor be suitable for, say, France or 
Spain. But there is no shortage of ideas for tackling 
Europe's unemployment problem. What is lacking in most 
countries is the political courage to translate the ideas into 
action. Blindly bewailing plant closures is not the best way 
to pluck up that courage. 


CURRENCY & interest rates 


T March 10 

Cross Rates „ w if. v. o 

$ * “V. _ ijb» i-ssr u* 

1*7 m i.im 1UJ _ mb oas h ws 

sa am asm uw **£ ^ ij» ias liw* 

UMS vn — "g 3012 54 OT ™ “ 

jtjuduao us* — wijj us- ±no ~ 

|4U8 OUH 8*W KM m *1125 UOT U3M0 TU2J 

xim usuB wua wus® )jna 1*0 33.12 i^tu mnj moi 
ft. 1 "® jjh UK5 uras — ;S5 M - Bfl IMS 


UbkHJbor Rates 


March 10 


French 


Bnra«S 


Suita 

Dollar D-Matfc Franc Stertng Fnnc Van ECU 

1-monttl Wl-STh 34U-3I4 5S1.-4 3M-3U V * - 4 vt, - 4** 

34nonttl 5U-5W m-3Vi IV-Tft 6 tt-Mt Fe-*6 

Mnonm 5 Ife-SVc 3Vk-XM IW-lft Wi-W* 4-4to 

1-year 5to-S&* 3V»-3H» Mft-m Mi-Ch 3U-3U W-*i 4-4VH 


ftAnato 


jjH UM 17, yu* ^ S3 Ofl — 
SSSS KS SS : ~ K : » 

2J54I (UM3 «KO iIga 1X01 ISU UMH 

\Sa w* £5 *M. mw I®* »» 

i S£5 nSfSXZ* TobV foimdaaae*UiSlstd'IOIbNA:o lll du^ediNAsnetaraMla 

To: Jbbuytoepcontiitr To W <**'****’ 

C: 


Sources: Heaters* Lloyds Bank. 

Rates oppflcaWff to mterbank deposits of SI mBBan minimum Cor equhahafl. 


Other Dollar Values 


r nmnnf fvt CBMCf hr* 

n , a-fi contact 7JM S-Afr.row! 

Owat y Per* GrteUdMt \XUS S.KDT.WM WSiJO 

SSxwg* «J**“L* w SwnUnM 7,8336 

< W m * “if ESEEt 17W3 S TtataS 27S3 

Austrian cdL 1101 ""ZL ZmLm 3SS4 W-P”, TS tu Daht 2 SM 

2 "tifrid 1J1B6 239AM 17 tS TertMHm 124140. 

Wjht" oMAS 5^,10 UAE#M» 3JOT5 

OK***"* 2 JSirtefc X75 VtoCLbae^ 477S0 

^.paond X39M 14774 1 

fLmUs 5J08S5 


3 Mur imw 

121JS 12075 12023 
1/676 1-4634 1^597 



Key Money Rates 


UolMd States 

a» 

Pre* 

Discount ral* 

5X0 

5X0 

Pilaw rate 

su 

BU 

Petted toads 

5Vfe 

5fe 

9Mar CDs dealers 

5 M 

5 M 

lM-day CP deafen 

537 

537 

3 neatfe Treasury bB 

5.19 

519 

i -year Trffl»Y OKI 

5X7 

567 

frytarTrMsafyM 

6X7 

6X8 

5-year Treasury note 

A39 

539 

7-yrnr Treason aato 

AM 

6X0 

lfryear Treasury oote 

655 

557 

38-year Treasury bond 

6JB2 


Alena Lyra* JMayRA 

4X7 

4X7 




Msceoatrato 

IJJfl 

0X0 

Caflneaey 

03? 

0.42 

1-OMcfli toleifamA 

05? 

0X9 

3-uoilb toterbaak 

0 59 

056 

fraaattfcfeilink 

039 

059 

1 8-year Carr bead 

243 

243 

Genunay 



Lombard rate 

450 

450 

Can money 

320 

312 

1-raoatb fetwbapb 

338 

338 

3-atoaHiiofetbnk 

335 

325 

6-nmtiialwtaHi: 

335 

3S 

Tfrywr Bddd 

566 

570 





Brttnfa 

Bank base rah 
CaHnoiwy 
IhubjuIIi Uahi6 


Wertant 

IO^wGBI 


6J00 600 

6VW 6 Vi, 
dJM AM 
6V» 6 A 

tutu 644 
7M 730 


Fra n ca 


Odmeaer 
1-OMOlh WmIxuS 

e-naan upiiMM 
10-fear dAT 


3.10 3LI0 
3ft 3ft 
3U 3ft 
3ft 3ft 
3% 316 

535 SjSO 


Sources: garters, Btacmten Menfil 
' .of Tokyc - Mlfsublsbl , 


Lrucb, Bank 


C/edB Lrooaats. 


Gold 


AM. PJKL Wgi 


Zurich 


35035 35050 +130 
34930 35035 -005 
NMrYM 35030 353.10 +330 
_ U£. UoDars per ounce. London officW 


(AtMJ 
Source Remo. 


PRIVATE BANKING 


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We’re all over it 


It’s not only our vast worldwide 
network that keeps us at your 
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It’s our total commitment to serving 
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The founder of Credit Lyonnais, 
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bank’s motto: 



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This has been the very essence 
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Switzerland: Geneva tel 41 22/705 66 66 - Headquarters for Credit Lyonnais International Private Banking 
Basle tel 41 61/284 22 22 -Zurich tel 41 1/217 8686- Lugano tel 41 91/923 51 65 
Paris tel 33 1/42 95 03 05- Luxembourg tel 352/476 831 442 -London tel 44 171/499 91 46 
Monaco tel 377/93 15 73 34 - Vienna tel 431/531 50 120 - Monievideo tel 598 2/95 08 67 • Miami tel I 305/375 78 14 
Hong Kong tel 852/28 02 28 88 • Singapore tel 65/535 94 77 


r;»”«.3Rv; . 






PAGE 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH U, 1997 


E Sf 


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R 


THE AMERICAS 


Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30 -Year T-Bond Yield 


6200 






73 


625 - - 


sS'S ~ 


5600 



Dollar in Deutsche matks H Dollar in Yen 



HYgg " T b&JDa#,:' * ■. . . :.3pa^*Vt&g 


1WSB. : 

s&pstid : '■ : 

- vS04.lt ■- 

was ... ' 



HYSE 

Opposite' 

' *%?u5s' 

is*. 

MasdaqCoinpo^ 

mtrf ;5sift96 ■ 

MB* 

Mah^lVaitfe ’ 

m&st l ;5i 

Torortto 

TSE Incite 


SSo Panto 

Bwsspa " ‘ 

..-JpHKfcS* ' 


Ssfea- x 


Buenos Aires fufervai 


SaaSago 

tf'isAGenejai 

S333.U 

Caracas 

Ca^jitetfQefieral v 



Source: Bloomberg, Reuters 


Santa Fe Opts for Newmont 


C^rrpikdbjOte-SaffFrmDapaBJta 

DENVER — Santa Fe Pacific 
Gold Carp, accepted a sweetened 
$2-5 billion takeover offer from 
Newmont Mining Corp. on 
Monday, ending a four-month bid- 
ding contest between Newmont 
and Homestafce Mining Co. 

The deal would create North 
America's largest gold producer, 
ahead of Barrick Gold Corp. of 
Canada, with 55 million ounces of 
proven or probable reserves and 
estimated gold production of 4 mil- 
lion “equity ounces" by 1998, ac- 
cording to Ronald C. Cambre, 
Newmont Mining’s chairman and 
chief executive officer. 

Santa Fe paid Homestake $65 
milli on for withdrawing from a 
previous agreement between the 
two companies and accepting 
Newmont 's bid, Santa Ffe’s chair- 


man, Patrick James, said. 

Under the accord, Santa Fe 
shareholders wQ] receive 0.43 of a 
Newmont share for each of their 
shares. The new offer is valued at 
$18.97 a share, based on New* 
mont's closing price Friday of 
$44,125. 

Newmont earlier offered 0.40 
share, valued at $17.65, for each 
Santa Fe share. Homestake bad 
offered $2 billion. 

Newmont and Santa Fe recently 
said they had found ways to save 
about $80 million annually beyond 
the $50 million in savings that 
Newmont identified in January. 

Santa Fe agreed to a $2 billion 
stock offer from Homestake in 
December. 

Homestake declined to increase 
its bid, calling on shareholders to 
look at the long-term gains in value 


that could be achieved by merging 
its operations with Santa Fe’s. 

Newmont Mining shares closed 
$1,125 lower at S43 in New York, 
while Santa Fe shares rose 62.5 
cents to $18. Homestake shares 
rose SI to $16. 

Five Santa Fe directors are to 
join the boards of Newmont Min- 
ing and its 91 percent-owned op- 
erating company, Newmont Gold 
Co. Newmont 's offer in January 
called for three board seats for 
Santa Fe, Mr. James said. 

Under the Homestake agree- 
ment, Mr. James would have be- 
come vice c hair man of the com- 
bined company. 

The S anta Fe executive said he 
was holding talks with Newmont 
about his future role in the com- 
pany . (Bloomberg , AP ) 


Potential Profits Take 
Wall Street to Record 




Ucert 


fitr- 


InaematioiuJ Herald Tr*une 


Microsoft Escalates Browser War 


Very briefly: 


By John Markoff 

New York Tones Service 


• The Federal Trade Commission voted to block the $4 
billion acquisition of Office Depot Inc. by Staples Inc. on 
antitrust grounds, claiming the combination of the two office- 
supply superstore chains would stifle price competition. 

• General Electric Co. agreed to buy Greenwich Air Ser- 
vices Inc. and UNC Inc., both jet-engine service companies, 
for $875 million in cash and stock plus an undisclosed amount 
of assumed debt. 

• Times Mirror Co. will sell its Harry N. Abrams Inc. book- 
publishing unit to closely held Groups Latingy of France for 
an undisclosed price. 

• The Energy Group PLC will pay up to $120 million for 
Citizens Lehman Power LLC, a Boston-based company that 
arranges power sales between utilities. Citizens Lehman is 
owned by Lehman Brothers Inc. and Citizens Energy 
Corp., the not-for-profit energy company co-founded by 
Joseph Kennedy 11 in 1979. 

• America Online Inc hired Brandon Tartikoff, a former 

head of the entertainment division at NBC, to bolster its 
development of on-line programs focusing on television and 
movies. AP. Bloomberg 


SAN FRANCISCO — Microsoft 
Corp. plans to announce Tuesday 
the release of a test copy of the 
newest version of its Internet Ex- 

? lorer program for browsing the 
/orld Wide Web. 

With this fourth version of Ex- 
plorer in a little more than a year, the 
company is blurring the boundary 
between the personal computer and 
the Internet so that the computer 
screen becomes a single porthole for 
viewing everything — from files on 
the user's hard disk to Web pages. 
But critics say Microsoft may have 


added so many ornaments to its win- 
dow on the world that users will get 
hopelessly lost 

With Internet Explorer 4.0, Mi- 
crosoft is not only pitching the soft- 
ware as a replacement for the current 
Windows 95 desktop — the basic 
screen from which most work on a 
PC begins. The company has also 
loaded the new Explorer desktop 
with launching points for a range of 
capabilities such as electronic mail, 
personalized information delivery 
and video conferencing. 

Alan Cooper, an interface-design 
specialist, said a torrent of new fea- 
tures was a result of the panic Mi- 
crosoft feels in its competition with 


Netscape Communications Corp. 

Microsoft technical designers 
deny that, saying they are searching 
for a common thread between the 
Explorer 4.0 and Windows 95 user 
interfaces. 

But Mr. Cooper says Microsoft 
was on the wrong track in trying to 
combine the PC desktop with the 
Internet dashboard. Web browsers 
should be used as needed for re- 
trieving information, he said, not 
controlling the basic operations of a 
computer. 

“Browsers are like elevators,'* 
he said. “Everybody takes elevators 
to get to their office but no one 
works in one." 


Cor^irJbyOur Staff From D is patches 

NEW YORK — Stocks rose to a - 
record Monday as investors bought . 
shares of companies that were ex- 
pected to have the best chance of 
f ulfillin g 1997 earnings forecasts. 

Investors were focusing on earn- 
ings growth after Alan Greenspan, 
the Federal Reserve Board’s chair- 
man, told Congress last week that 
stocks were not overvalued so long 
as profits lived up to expectations. 

“The economy is in great 
shape," said Anthony Conroy, di- 
rector of equity trading at BT Glob- 
al Asset Management. “I hope in- 
vestors start focusing on earnings, 
because if they do, they’ll see stocks 
are not overvalued.” 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- - 
age closed 78-50 points higher at . 
7,07939, a record high, after rising _ 
56.19 points Friday. The Dow last 
hit a record on Feb. 18, when it 
closed at 7,067.46. . - ‘ • 

For every 14 stocks that rose, . 
nine declined on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 

The Standard & Poor’s 5pQ- : 
stock index rose 8.68 pointe^to 
813.65, and the Nasdaq composite •- 
index climbed 10.92 to 1322.72- 

LLS- bonds were little changed 
amid concern that reports later in. 
the week on retail sales, prices and 
manufacturing may provide more 
signs of strength in the economy 
arid increase the likelihood of high- 
er interest razes. 

The benchmark 30-year Treas- 
ury bond closed unchanged at . 
97 19/32, taking the yield down 
0.02 percentage point, to 6.81 per-, 
cent. 

Stocks and bonds rallied Friday 
after a government jobs report 
showed a smaller- than -expected 


rise in hourly wages last month,- 
-giving the Federal Reserve less retf* 
son to raise interest cates when its. 
policy- making committee next' 
meets March 25- 
General Electric rose Vl to 105% 
after executives told investors they 
expected 1997 earnings to reach the. 
high end of expectations. . . Z 

Drug companies,, whose safes- 
tend to be immune to changes in the, 


\ei 


U.S. STOCKS 


general health of the economy,' 
were among the day’s biggest gain' 
ers. Shares of health-care - products, 
makers also gained after a new. 
study said some commonly used 
pain medications appeared to re- 
duce the . risk - of . developing- 
Alzheimer's disease. American, 
Home Products, the maker of Advil v 
rose to 6814, and Bristol-Myers, 
Squibb, which makes. Nuprin,', 
gained 1VS to 67% . . . j 

Texas Instruments gained HA. ip, 
8514, leading a rally incompater-, 
chip stocks after Goldman Sadis 
raised its estimate. far 1997 ean*b 
mgs. Microsoft rose -3%- to 99%^ 
HJ. Heinz rose 14 to 44 amid spec- ■ 
ulation the company would sell. 0. 
businesses, close plants, write off, 
assets and cut as many as 2,000jobs, 
as part of a restructuring. The tnea- , 
sores may result in a $400 million, 
charge, sources said. 

Ahmanson rose 14 to 42% after it; 
skipped a chance to raise its hostile, 
offer for Great Western, which has. 
agreed to a friendly deal with WaslK 
ington MutuaL Ahmanson sugges- 
ted a higher [vice , could hurt its' 
earnings, which the top savihgsr. 
and- loan company has said it wants, 
to avoid. . (Bloomberg, AP) 




" - ' > 


Dollar Slides Amid Fresh Doubt on EU Monetary Union 


Weekend Box Office 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — "Private Parts" dominated the U.S. box 
office ove~ the weekend, with a gross of $15.1 million. Fol- 
lowing are die Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday's ticket 
sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


1. Prhnte Parts 

(Pammountt 

Slil minion 

1 Jungle 2 Jungle 

(Walt Disney) 

512.7 rnBDon 

X Doiwle Bmsca 

(Trt-Star) 

S87 mfiSan 

4. The Empire Strikes Back 

mwrrtefftCMui+nid 

SB million 

S. Booty CoS 

iCoiumbkj Pidums) 

MJSmnBon 

6 . Star Worn 

CDmOeBi OsntAKfiH) 

S4mHHan 

7. Absolute Power 

(Columbia Pictures) 

SX7mllBon 

8 . Dante? Peak 

(Universal) 

SX3mB|lan 

9. Vegas Vacation 

(Warner herns.) 

52J1 aituton 

ID. Marvin's Room 

(Mkam<n) 

S2J6mBlaa 


Cempdfd tn Oar Stiff From Dupetchn 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
lower against most other major cur- 
rencies in late trading Monday amid 
speculation that Europe's planned 
single currency would not start on 
time. 

Comments from a Bundesbank 
council member added weight to the 
speculation. The council member, 
Klaus-Dieter Kuehbacher, said 
Monday it was doubtful that Ger- 
many would be able to slash its 
deficit to the level needed to join the 
currency union in 1999. 

Mr. Kuehbacher said the govern- 


ment’s goal of cutting its deficit to 
2.9 percent of gross domestic 
product this year from 3.8 percent in 
1996 was doubtful, given the ab- 
sence of a “self-sustaining'' recov- 
ery and the costs to government of 
rising unemployment. 

“The made is the best place to 
be" if monetary union does not hap- 
pen, said Roger Chapin, foreign ex- 
change manager at Banc One Corp. 
"That is die major factor weighing 
on the dollar right now.” 

Another Bundesbank council 
member. Gun tram Palm, said coun- 
tries with sound economies that 


failed to meet some of the 
Maastricht treaty's economic tar- 
gets for joining the single currency 
should be judged more favorably 
than those that met the targets 
through what he called "tricks." 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


h'cation Wednesday of U.S. data on 
retail sales, industrial production and 
current-account balances, as well- as 
the Federal Reserve Board's so-called 
tan book report mi the economy. 

The dollar was at 1.7015 DM at 4 
P At, down from 1.7140 DM on 


central bankers saw moderate in- 
flation in Europe despite a firm dol- £ 
lar, and recent signs of improved, 
growth in some countries. 

“In Europe we. see some effects" 
on the import-price side of dig, 
strength of the dollar in the last. 


jchann 


Mr. Palm said a delay in starting 
the euro would also harm the Ger- 
man economy by sparking a 
“massive” appreciation of the 
Deutsche mark. That would hurt 
German exports, he said. 

Traders also were awaiting the pub- 


Friday. It also fell to 121.630 yen months Mr . Tietmey er said after a 
from 121 .900 yen, to 1.4715 Swiss meeting at the Bank for Interna^ 


francs from 1.4800 francs and to 
5.7410 French francs, compared 
with 5.7810 francs. The pound was 
at SI .6037. up from S 1 .6030. 

Earlier on Monday. Hans Tiet- 
meyer. president of the Bundes- 
bank, said tiie so-called Group'of 10 


tiooal Settlements in Basel. Switzer- j 
land. The Group of 10 actually is 1 ij 
countries: the United States. Japan* 
Germany, Canada, Belgium, the 
Netherlands, Britain, France, Italy? 
Sweden and Switzerland. ?■> 
.. . (AFP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


AMEX 


u. s. stock; market diary 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Monday’s 4 P.M. Close 

tiie top 300 most adfve shores, 
up to the doting on Won Street. 
The Associated Press. 


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Marc-.^ 10 


Dow Jones 

om hw is, tost dro- 

Indus 7022.05 tVF)J9 499119 7079JV »78J0 

Traits 244108 2461.08 2437J7 1M\M *1402 

UlF 22473 226.73 2254S8 224 . 52 <14 

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19573 

Finance 




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♦244 
♦ 143 
+349 

Nasdaq 

MO" 

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tar 

dip. 

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1309.19 

131640 

+660 

Mistrials 

110637 

110675 

*1.13 

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hjautaBCB 

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+1X11 

+646 

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High Lew dose cmje Opmt 


H^h Lew cose Otge Doha 


Grains 


corn (exon 

U00 W nwibnum- oentt per busltel 
/Aar 97 314 
May 97 313 


ami 

312 

-6 

21.122 

382 

309V. 

-PU 145.136 

330 

3081. 

-5% 110435 

28713 

293% 

+3'A 

15,113 

mv. 

291% 

+3V> 

72452 


ORANGE JUICE (NC1NI 



1S4S0 Bts.- aerm per lb. 




Mss 77 34B 

8100 

sub 

-145 

413 

May 97 8t!C 

K3 

8540 

—145 

15,124 

JUI97 . 8940 

57.10 

3740 

—140 

4,875 

Sep 97 9140 

8940 

8903 

— L25 

\jp? 

Est. sttes flA 

Fri's. sates 2X55 


Fri'sccenint 26.(39 up 791 




Hlg)i Low dose Qige OpW 

10-YEAR FRENCH 60V. BONOS CMATIF) 
FFsmxfflto-ptsafioopet 

Mir 97 731.16 T30M 131.12 *0.101 QM52 
Jim 97 129.92 12974 129J8 +0.18 50796 
5ep 97 12874 12870 lJBJfi *070 1039 
Dec 97 N.T. N.T. 97X2 +0.18 0 


High La* Go se Oige OpW 


Industrials 


Est. volume: 104864 . Open W_- 15X889 up 
4627. 


Sea 77 295 
Dec 77 293 
Bt.stfes NA Fn’s. sales 123.130 
RTsapenint 394479 ua 1782 


Metals 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

100 ions- donors par ton 
Mar 97 282J0 27080 28280 -1150 MS 

May 97 Z7i70 27*70 -1080 «.011 

Jut 77 27180 26280 27180 -1080 28.179 

Aug 97 26520 25580 265J0 -1080 7.129 

Sep 97 2513! 24580 25380 +98D 48DS 

Od 77 23480 22SJ0 23280 -SJO 3819 

Est. Kies HA. Frfs. sales 
Fri'sooenirrt 


GOLDOOIX] 

1 3 troy as.- dwhwi per (no* a. 
Wm-57 mx 3S2-7B 3S280 
Apr 77 3S38C 3S08S 353.10 
May 97 35410 

junyr 33J0 2£Z«J 25SM 
AU397 35780 354J0 35780 
Oct 97 35950 357.50 3S9.90 


‘UO S 

♦ 380 66.971 
*388 I 

-380 26865 
*380 9,990 
380 5.951 


1TAUAN COVERKMENT BOND (UFFEJ 

FTL200 miBoo-pH of 100 pd 

Jon97 12782 12689 12780 —440 102.708 

S*p77 N.T. N.T. 127.12 —140 

Esf.snldK 33839. Prw.MJle* 68 758 

Pees, opm tittz 105L1U3 up 2841 


COTTON 2 CNCTfO 
sum Rro^cews perk. 
Mav 97 7885 7680 

MTJ 7980 77811 
Oct 97 7585 7780 

Dec 97 7585 8780 
Mar 98 7495 7883 

May 98 79.10 71.00 


7755 *183 32.12*- 
7881 *0.93 1388? 

78.10 +030 l-fi».- 

7033 *030 T786B- 
75.90 -080 1884; 

79.10 *0.11 4Mr 


V' '* 

■rJ*r. 


EURODOLLARS (OMER) 
SI at tea od. 


Dec 97 34281 35980 36251 -380 20.941 
Feb 95 36100 +380 J4BS 

Est. sote NA Frfs. sales 48831 
Fifsopeninf 1718*3 off 207 


SOYBEAN OB. (CBOT) 

60800 ns- cenbceru 

Mor 97 26.10 25J0 TUB -0.73 5,131 

May 97 2L55 2585 2683 - 084 55,755 

M17 24.90 2607 26J3 *085 27855 

Aug 97 26.93 2625 2655 -085 4816 

Sap 97 2707 2485 2636 

Oct 97 2780 2680 27.12 

Esl.sats, NA. FtTS-Wte 
FrrsqpenW 


*084 3.188 

*071 2474 


AMEX 


TWA 


Previous 


20 Bonds 
louwraes 
10 liKtusmate 


10385 

100.09 

10641 



vn. High Law Lad 

15176 64V 6*. 

9B43 5 4H 4M 

»4g 51% eoroueiWn 

65B1 OT* J7W 

5460 7Vb 7V» T*» 

*128 24b 2*a 2W 

2AM Iffa 18 IN 

3SD5 45W 4*1* 451* 

3455 17*v 169V 171* 

3354 BA B m 


^5 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

50DO bu rnMmurn- cerai per twshd 
Mor 97 862 B28 S55M +31 5.730 

B31 860 * 30 88.018 

8B 860 +30 56868 

523 851 +30 7412 

Sep 97 BOOVi 775 798 + 27W 3006 

Est sates NA FrTs-Sdes 87J16 
Fn'sQDfflinf 193007 up IM 


HI GRADE COPPER (NCMXJ 
25400 B». - eenn per dj. 

Mor 97 11550 11180 11486 -4185 MW 

APT 77 11150 11180 11110 —1-2 3869 

MOV 97 111.90 10905 109.95 —145 21417 

JU097 108.15 —105 991 

Jul97 108.10 10600 10669 —105 7430 

Aug 97 10585 —100 439 

SdP 97 10639 10100 10405 -005 2,932 

Od97 1020$ —095 603 

Nov 97 1(0.05 —0-95 583 

Est. sales NA Frf'v sales 11470 
Rfs open inf 60825 afl 490 


Mir 97 

9443 

94/1 

9441 


346451 

Apr 97 

9434 

9443 

9433 


12453 

May 97 

9448 

9446 

9446 



Jltn 97 

9442 

94.T7 

94.19 

-041 432,131 

Sep 9? 

94X0 

9197 

9X99 

-Ml 329449 

Dec 97 

9X83 

9177 

9349 

-Ml 246.112 

Altar «■ 

9X73 

9147 

9X69 


202.726 

Jun 98 

9162 

9157 

9158 


1554CB 

Sep 98 

9154 

910 

9150 


115419 

Dec 98 

9X44 

9140 

9141 


93X03 

Mar 99 

9142 

9348 

9140 


75474 

Jung 

9137 

9146 

9345 

+041 

71056 

to. sates NA 

Fri’s. sates Way 



7J81 

509? 

5468, 

09« 

7.994 1 


5001* 


FrYsopertM 2469419 UP 21489 


Mov 77 860 
■M97 880 

Aug 77 551 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


Nasdaq 


1651 Adwoncad 


WHEAT (CBOT) 

iPOO bu minimum- cam nar butfiel 
MOT 97 351 37116 376V, *IW 530 

Mov 97 381 V, 372 379 ’A +314 2S055 

Jul97 36M4 361 36615 +3 34032 

Sep 97 370 364 3W +3 3077 

Est. sales NA Frrs. senes 21,718 
WsopenW 70,931 up 975 


SILVER (NCMXJ 
54W *rov at- CORK par trey co. 
Mor 97 525.00 511.00 SZL40 
Apr 97 52500 

May 97 53000 51100 527 JD 
0897 53400 52000 53240 
Sep 97 5J70O 52700 53700 
Dec 77 54700 534J0 54490 
Jan 98 S4?J» 

Mar 95 55200 


BRITISH POUND (OMER) 

62400 pounds, i par poiaM 
War 97 um 15H0 10040 
Jutl 97 10030 12922 10015 
Sep 97 12962 1299 12962 
Dec 97 1-5940 

Est sales NA Frl's. safes 15008 
Pri'sapgnM 40047 UP 1424 


32015 

6496 

1028 


Est. sates NA Fri's-sofes 16041 
Erf's open trrt 89^69 up 52 


♦900 835 

+92» I 
+900 59425 
*900 12.21 
*9.10 3091 
♦ 900 5078 

+90D 1* 

+940 4059 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (OHBQ 
lOHOOBdattn. s per CWUPr 
Mor 77 7309 7293 J301 

Jun77 7347 7335 7345 
Sen 97 7359 7383 7389 

Dec 97 7425 7425 7425 

Est sales NA Ws. sales 23085 
Fid'S open W 70,944 up 4951 


36022 

29049 

3.W 

584 


May 77 Z10S 

Jun97 n.n 

JUI97 20.95 
AiSW 2BJ4 
Se»> 97 2070 
0397 2005 
NOV 97 2845 
Dec 97 2045 
jan98 20JB 
F8h98 7030 
Mar 98 2004 
Apr 98 


214 NewtfltfH 
I Lows 


- AMEX 


77 8»l 

Market Sates 


1B83 1994 

1415 ZD1D 

244 1734 

5742 5740 

110 144 

Si 98 


twJionpeit 


284 

»7 NYSE 
IS Amex 


New mote 
NewLWB 


IS Nasdaq 
9 Hinmons. 


Today Prae. 

4d» ants. 

46101 60404 

1606 2X73 

SIM! 63603 


Uveatocfc 

CATTLE ICMER) 

41000 HP.- cents nor B. 

APT 97 6900 6745 6770 

Ain 97 6445 6407 6445 

Aug 97 6345 6302 4305 

0097 67-15 6672 6607 

Dec 97 6905 6802 6805 

Feb 98 7505 7040 7000 

Est. safes 15.718 Ws. sales 
F=rfs open iflt 109031 UP 366 


PLATINUM (NMER) 

M tro» ox.- daaprt par irav ox. 

Mor 97 153040 153040 153040 
APT 97 38X50 37900 183 50 *540 18447 
Mov 97 38800 

Jul97 38640 38200 385.90 
CW 97 35800 

30198 39000 

ESt- soles NA Fri'S. safes 1309 
FfTsaoen irrf 24,933 Off 386 


+110 

+110 

+110 


3091 

ion 

1.123 


GERMAN MARK (CMER) 

121000 rtwta, i par mark 
Mar 97 J883 JB32 -558T 

Jun97 0916 0571 0914 

Sec 97 JM7 093S 0M7 

Dec 97 0939 

Est. sales NA Ws. safes 34076 
FWsoaenM 115443 ua 1156 


81043 

21471 

2018 

31 


-642 42,166 
-028 22.782 
—020 19798 
-000 14028 
-035 4740 
-015 2.909 
1X437 


Rtwtous 


Close 

LONDON METALS (LME) 

DoUare per metric ton 
AUmnani (HM Grade) 

Spat IfiS’A 1631 >6 164940 145040 
Forward 166240 166X00 167840 167940 


JAPANESE VBN(CMER) 

124 mKon van, 1 par 100 vwi 
Mo 97 423S JIM 4227 

Jim 97 4340 4297 4334 

Sep 97 4445 4445 J445 - 

EsL safes NA RfosafeS 24440' 
FrrsopflfiW 79,903 off 79 


63417 

15064 

729 


Dividends 

CWapcwr Per Amt Rec Pay company 

IRREGULAR 

Brazil AM 


Gfaw WoUaunr 
NewsCorpUd 
RTZCoap PLC 
Saidaer Now Asia 



J09 

3-17 

3-3 

b 

.7266 

3-21 

5-30 

m 

4387 

3-16 

3-31 

b 

1/8 

3-21 

4-22 

- 

-13 

3-17 

3-31 


SynovusRnn 


Per Amt Rec Pay 
INITIAL 

_ 49 3-21 

REGULAR 


4-1 


STOCK SPLIT 
Memos Pharm 3 for 2 mlTL 


Energy West 
Home Rnd Bncp 
Hudsons Bay Cog 
mdepend Squrav 


Synavus Rnd 3 far 2 ■ 


INCREASED 

gtBSfcOdMto a -58 3-21 

Ensign Resource g 
ICO Inc 


- 3-31 

S 02 3-18 Ml 
O ASS Ml 3-31 


TlMtai 

USFGP 

UTiEm 


Sift 

IMU I 


IMM, 

IBEsad 1 
VXMU3 


Vlocfi 

VteptE 

yaa 




WWET 

V8& 


Htt- 



John Aid 
Medtronic Inc 
Patrick |nd 
Peoples BkNC 

Ptoneer Inters! 
PrkaTHowe 
Schuller Cap 
Slate Auto 
2ottl Century Ind 


.105 3-14 
45 3-20 
.18 4-8 
-IIS 3-20 
49 3-tl 
.12 3-30 
495 4-4 

.04 3-14 
.13 3-17 
47 3-20 
.13 3-21 

43 3-25 

44 3-13 

45 3-17 


3- 28 
4-2 

4- 30 
Ml 

3- 14 

4- 20 
4-30 

4-3 

3-26 

3- 21 
4-7 

4- 11 
3-31 
3-28 


FSDB! CATTLE (CMER) 

50400 tro.- cam per b. 

Mor 97 6740 6775 a AS -075 

Apr 97 6605 66X0 66X5 -072 

WOV 97 6545 6700 6705 -045 

Aus97 7145 7X75 TOKJ -M0 

Sep 97 7205 71.90 7Z60 -045 

Oct 97 7170 7190 7X10 -070 

Est. sales 4015 FH-S. notes 7077 
RrsoaHlM 22456 afl 199 


Mtad»(Hgh&ade) 


2468 


5.117 

1170 

1415 

2.166 


245640 _ 

. _ aid 237240 237340 
Leal 

Spot 67440 
Forward 67540 

Nickel 


2493W 
241 2 W 


249615 

2413'/, 


67540 

67640 


69140 

68640 


69240 

68740 


SWES FRANC (CMER) 
ltuanromtpcrtaic 
Mar 97 d.mt 4782 4605 

JI4197 4870 4837 4164 

Sep 97 4923 0923 4923 

EsLsaes NA FrYs-WfeS 2X267 
Fri'S Open W 58,112 up 754 


61393 

1X798 

I0B 


Spot 799540 800540 
Forward 


Tie 

Si 


810040 810540 61, 


8060.00 

616040 


587040 568040 086540 567540 
591040 592040 592040 592540 


YEA REND 

Resource Mtg Cap - jis 3-31 4-30 


MUHMi+mreraatlMteaaiMiitner 
smnWADR: g-ppyqfale la Cnnodtai hinds; 
in wenthl w o ^m etwly , s-aem l-ewunl 


Stock Tables Explained 

Si des fi gures am unoffidiA Yfearty Kphs and tows reflect the paentous 52 wet6ts plug ihe 

am^weds^n«ditB West kmfing day. wherea spBtu's*^ *4,10^ omourfhg to25 

pacent or more Ins been paid. Hie yean Hgi+Jow range and (Bvldend are shown farthe new 
^a<s only. Urdem otheraitse noted rales of dMdends are annual dsfaursemerAs booed an 
tt» latest dedamlon. 

o - dMdend alsoexSro tet.b-onnuolralaol dMdend plus stock dividend, c-ltoutdanno 
dMdeod. ec - PE exceeds 99xM - caHod. d - new yearly low. dd - loss In the last 12 
months, e-dlvtdpnd declared or paid In preceding 12 months.! -cm rural rote. Increased 
I'Jtoidentl In Canadian funds, subject to 15% non-residence tax. 

■*mvtaerra declared alter splff-up or stock dividend. j*cHvldend paid this year, omitted. 
wiened.tr no acnoaraxan at West Artdenfi meeSno-k-dlvklend deck) red or paid this 
year, an occ unwlottye Issue with dividends In arrears, m - annual rale, reduced on last 

of trading, nd - ragtf day degvery.p.lnhtaJtfhrtdetid. annua! rate unknown. P/E-ortce- 
«wmgi g»rono.q-dtge<l-etidfriutugl tu nrLr- dividend declared or paid In wecetflna 12 

St StodCSpffl - DWWen,J date of spFL^s- 

saies.7- tfivfat end pa id In stack in preceding !2month4«a«mote(lcashvaJueonex- 
mwttend or BwfisWbtrtlon date.#- new yeariyWgh.v-lratSnflhallKLirt- in bankruptcy 

or racdwrahlp orbelng reorganized under the Bankruptcy Ad, or securities assumed 

^ arch companies, wd -when tCstrfcutwlwl- when hsuei/arw-wrtti warrants.*- ex- 

tfivWarvd or ta-rtgfts. Xrtis - ex-diilrlbuhon. xw - wimour warrants, v- «-dMdentf trod 

sales In fuL ytd- yield, z- safes In ML 


HOG5-L*on (CMER) 

40400 Ibs.- ants per b. 

Apr 97 ms 69.90 7X10 -ftl2 

Apt 97 77.1S 7600 7672 -0.17 

JUI97 7545 75.17 7545 -047 

Aug 97 7205 71® 72.17 -a.® 

0097 6640 6540 66X5 — 0.10 

Dec 97 6400 <195 6405 -04! 

EsL safes 7455 FrTs. sales 1Q094 
Fri'S open fet 31.183 aft 144 

PORK BELLIES ICMBU 
Hff - cents per b. 

Ma-97 7460 TIBS 74J2 

MOV 97 7447 7532 7S£ ... 

XI 97 7600 7500 7577 -047 

AUS 97 7400 7160 7340 -030 

Est. sales 2406 Fri's. sates 3487 
Frl's open inr 7073 off 362 


zme (SpecMre^h Grade) 


1X438 

9,964 

2418 

2047 

1466 


Soot 1243% 1244-A 1250% 1251% 

Forworn 1254X0 1255X0 1260X0 126140 


High low dose Chge Optnt 


Financial 


MftOKTM STERUHG tUFFE) 
C5oa4m-pfeonoqpct 
Mar97 9X76 9X74 

Jun97 9043 9009 

5«p97 9343 9339 

DTC97 9X29 9324 

Marffl 9X17 9X13 

JW08 9X05 9X01 

5ep96 9Z94 9X91 

Dock 9XS4 nsa 

Mot99 »76 9243 

Jun99 9X70 9X66 

S«99 9X6Z «240 

DOC99 9X56 9X54 

EAsofes: 6id3a Pm.pla 81028 

Piay.WJenWL: 54X033 UP 6231 


9173 UndL 69498 


9X60 *O0!13^M6 


9341 *003 ... 

9327 +004 M850 
9X16 +005 4&B20 
9X04 +005 30521 
9X93 +005 23435 
9203 +0XS 20263 

9X76 +006 11276 

' 

0019 


Estsfees NA Fri's. sales 3X225 
Fri's open ter 67037 up 3242 ~ 

HEATWOLUMER} - 

<0090 eoL omt» per eal 

Apr 97 5145 5330 5135 —073 34.904: 

MOV 97 5170 5X7T 53.95 -005 16.11^ 

JW197 5195 5115 5130 -033 1X486! 

-M?7 5535 5180 5150 -OM 12056 

AUB97 SiXS 5546 5155 -013 

Sep 97 5600 5630 5600 * 012 

Oct V7 5700 5745 57.15 4007 

NOV 97 5015 5745 5705 +022 

D#e 97 9060 5030 5050 *017 

JOn 98 5075 5040 5040 —028 

EsLsrfu NA Frfssrtes 2741a 
Fri's open irt 120069 up 21(6 '• 

LIGHT SKST CRUDE (NMER) 
IXOOCH-MtaniPvHA •‘I 

Apr 97 2147 2051 2007 -061 70957' 

2062 2070 -BL54 63, IT? 

2000 2073 -033 51.05* 

2000 2005 — (135 21485 

20-48 —031 15455 

2036 2043 -028 14X23 

2036 2007 -046 1X928 

2037 2042 —113 11,754 

2015 sua -028 27089 

2U0 2040 -0.24 15.0*6 

®JD 2040 —044 805L 

336 2034 —009 134J 

2042 i.vff 

Est sales NA Fri's. safes 1M424 
Fri's open mr 418488 up 10S2 
NATURAL GAS <NMBQ .1 

lam mrn Mrs, f Par nan Mu 

APT 97 2m 1490 1.935 

MOV 77 2X95 1070 2425 
jun97 i m 1.990 um 
Jid 97 X095 1.990 IMl 

AuB97 2X95 2X20 7.050 

SjpW 2.10 1035 2460 

Ocf 97 XUS TJtSS 1065 

Nov 97 2450 Xl» X195 

Dec 97 7060 1290 2J]5 

JOT 99 2390 202D 2320 

Feb 98 2320 24S0 2280 

Ed NA Fri's. sides 45.982 
Fri's open Pit 165449 off 1698 .5 

UNLEADED GASOUNEflMER) 

42400 gal cants par eal 

Apr 97 6630 6440 6500 —007 -wart 

May 97 66X0 6605 6645 -043 JW® 

AtnW 65X0 6190 6X90 -MB 14362 

f l9 L 6346 6XB0 6340 -033 tOT 

Aug*7 6230 6130 (130 -048 <L2U 

Sff”. 6MB ?-75 S945 -448 

Ed. safes NA Fri's. safes 33,988 ^ 

Fri's open Ini 8A6D7 off 1603 
GASOtLOPE) 

U 0 . dodara per metric tan ■ lots of 100 tons"’ 
J«0O 16545 167X0 -2X0 17X34 
Apl 97 17000 14735 169X0 -100 21X43 
Stay 97 171X0 169X0 16900 ~2SS Saw 
Jun97 17200 17X50 ITT 45 —1X5 SSab 

JUI97 17335 172X® 17X50 -1^ 


4 . 


32.768 

23,508 

11092 

11,106 

8035 

7466 

90B3 

9^M6 

Sfl 


’r. 






c~- ** T -4 


A>0 97 ]7fra 174X0 174.00 —1X0 


3003 

1044 

1.290 

1032 

730 


+ BJM 


— 0.10 


580 

5.166 

■\xa 

563 


2.916 

4482 

2X64 

W 


Fond 

COCOA (NCSEJ 

mmatricwrtt- SPBTipn 

Mtr97 

MOV 97 

Jut 97 
Sep 97 
Dec *7 

Est. sates rktk. m _!i 

Fri's OPW w 91,986 UP 1002 

COFFEE CMCSE) 

37«900llMv- acrPMPcr n __ _ 

2MS £!■£ 


1335 

1300 

333D 

1395 

1341 

1392 


1365 

>413 


1393 

Mfl 


1422 

1468 

NA 

Fri's. sates 


+0 

+67 
+65 
*65 
+ 62 


117 

30357 

19347 

10X45 

7.12S 


uStVimSl 18530 19930 +9A 

Sow ikS ina lna +*» 


Sep97 171J5 162X0 TTO-JO +535 
Est. safes NA l=Ws. safes 1*322 
Fri's open wt *iflM off 233 


1319 

22.988 

M17 

4476 


UST. BILLS (CMER) 

Si mMcn- on pi 10a pa. 

MOT 97 94.91 9600 9491 

Jon 97 9646 9444 9444 

Sap 97 9407 9406 9406 

Dec 91 9441 

Est sales NA Fri's. safes 1020 
Fri's open W 9,742 up 201 
5 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

1100X00 prtn- pro & MtnsallOO pet 

Mor 97 106-09 106-01 106-07 —02 40,162 

Jup 97 105- Hi 105-0 105-47 —01 169X64 

Sap 97 105-32 3 

EsLirtes NA Fri's. 5t»BS 7ZJSI 

Fri’s open fet 210X29 off 1552 

10 YR. TREASURY (CBOT) 

1100X00 Brin- PH &. Janus al 100 pc* 

Mir 97108-12 106-05 108-07 74381 

Jun 97 107-24 107-16 107-19 238014 

Sep 77 107-04 106-01 107-0 +01 6^99 

Est. safes NA FrTs. sates 171X08 
Fri's open ini 31903 up 4893 
US TREASURY BONOS (CflOT) 

(S ee>-liooxoo-m A Slnda nr loopct: 

Mor 97110-36 110-16 110-20 + 01 140.125 

Jun 97 110-13 109-31 110-06 +01 384.536 

Sep 97 109-79 109-22 HR-24 +03 13367 

Dec 97 169-15 109-10 109-10 +02 4.961 

ESI. safes NA Fri's. safes 579X55 
Fri's oaen M 546X67 up 12367 

LONG GILT OJFFE) 


3-MORTH EUR0MA8K (UFFE) 

DM1 mMoa-rtsofHMpcr 

Ma£7 96.7* 9672 9642 — 0X1 169,128 

ApW 9644 9643 96.73 -0X1 7XSA 

9604 9602 

JUR97 9604 9600 

Sep97 9644 9658 

DOS? 9647 96X1 

MarW 9627 9619 

Junta 9606 9508 

Septa 9544 9806 

Detta 9556 9501 

MOT99 9531 9539 

ftWW 95.11 95X6 

Sap 99 9406 94X3 

O0C99 9*66 9401 

EM. afeet; 219^22. Pnw. Safes; 309356 
Pm. open InL 1314725 op 33 


9673 - HUH 2,906 
9601 —0X1 199X10 
9640 — 0X0 1761a I 
9642 —0X2 190,762 
9633 -0X2 139X11 
96X1 —0X3 119JS1 
9J.78 — 0X4 9A148 
«03 —0X4 79,960 
95X1 — 0X2 52.116 
95X6 — 0X1 27XSB 
94X4 —OX1 7XSZ3 
9404 (Ml 34X24 


17605 17545 17545 —1X0 
0097 N.T. N.T. 17645 — 1XQ 
Nov 97 N.T. N.T. 178X0 —045 
Dec97 178.75 17875 17845 -1X0 

1046 S, ‘“ ,eS:17 ' 5 “‘ 0penWj71 '«8i^ 

BRENT OIL (lf>E) 

U3. doUora per barrel - tots of ixoa butreta , 
Apr?? 19.95 1943 1948 -006 40637 

May 97 19-60 19.14 19.15 -002 6^374 

June W 1908 19X7 19X7 nS 

JulyW 1909 19.13 19X2 -046 

“ 1947 19X6 18.97 to* 

1949 19X1 16.93 -039 

19X1 19X1 16.91 -OJ6 ta 

T9X2 1698 18X7 

EsLsaleK 42000. Open Inui 76038 ub 



t 


Aug 97 
Sep 97 
Od 97 
Nov97 


1030 


Slock Indexes 

56P COMP. MDEX (CMER) 


jEw 112X0 111-W lll-» + 


SUGAR -WORLD 11 INC50 
1 110M to*.- om« oer te- 
Mav97 11^ 10.M 

JulT7 1040 1670 

DO 97 16?* IBM 

Marta 1170 1004 „ 

E3t. safes NA Frt'isotes tU» 
Fri'soaenM lfi.M0 up 1225 


1143 *046 
1047 +am 
WP -AM 
1166 


73J2D 

33410 

36.166 

11052 


(M3 32454 

jS97 ire-op ni-re ill-re +-g-}?2SiSS 
Sq>97 N.T. N.T. 111-13 * 0-12 XEL9I9 
Est sales: 41083. Prcv.Mfe* 11S0I9 
Pnv.epepfeL: 201919 Off 13439 


3-MONTH PI BOR (MATIF) 

FF5 mBlon- ptsof lOOpct 
Mar 97 9603 9601 9601 - 0X2 *,912 
Jun 97 9609 9603 9604 —0X4 61X42 
Sep 97 9601 9643 9*44— 0X7 4X628 
Dec 97 9640 9603 9634 — 0X7 3Z22S 
Mar 98 96X8 9*41 9641 —0X9 18425 
Jun 9B 96.12 96X7 96X7 — 0X9 1 3,180 
Sep 98 95.92 95X9 95.90—0X8 lZlOO 
Dec 98 95.73 9SJ0 9540 — 0X9 llxS 
Mar 99 9505 9549 9S0O — OXB 1XM9 
Jun 99 9501 9547 9508 —OX7 7xS 
Sep 99 95.07 95X6 95X6 — 0X7 IIS 
Dec 99 9405 9483 9445-0X5 

Est. volume: 77^657. Open lnt_- 270844 up 


Mar 97 81100 KM. 10 80900 +3M 1 SB, 991 

Jun 97 811 X 0 21140 817.10 +240 S«3 

Sep 97 82540 820J0 80190 +245 Z7a 

Dec 97 B304S 20 S 

Est.stnes NA Fit's. srtes 9ZXM 
FiTsaaenint 205427 up 921 
FTSB 100 CUFFE) J 



£25 pet Index pi tin! 

Mariri 44314 *«H0 +4200 * 190 00^ 


.... 443... 

JtmOT 4449X 4421L0 44410 

Sep97 44734 44634 44664 +9 
to. sofese 15039. Piey.stees: 1243B 
Pm. open lot: 74.725 lip <70 
CACOOtMATlF) 


16044 

2485 


FF200 per Inden 'point 
97 2733X 37074 


1206a 


3J6QWTM EUBOLJRA (UFPE1 


ITL InflOon - poof lOOpd ' ” 

51? 545 9271 —004 *1075 


<S£BMAM GOVERNMENT BUND (UPFEI 


JunW 




101 JS + (L2S 237AM 
ta97 N.T. N-T. 10048+045 
Msrte* 0S419. PjBfcirtKjWW 
PriKODMlnL- 238481 


Mdr97 

Jim97 

sep97 

DPC97 


Junta 


93.16 

9X43 

7302 

9153 

9300 


9110 

P3JB 

93L47 

7106 

9X47 


Off 7.989 


fjstiSQlBo 17,765. Pm. sates: 
Pm. open bt 280836 


9271 

SI? “S-* 1«409 

541 47X29 

rare —0X3 34410 
9351 — tuo jeLtae 
rare -043 13025 


. Z4 S5-9 27D7-0 2713X— 9JM1 -wrtS. 

Apr 97 27310 27130 27I7X — rxo w 
Jun 97 269SX 2676X 2683X-XOO siK 
Sep 97 Z7«U 26MX 26960— 2X0 

Dec 97 NT. NT. 27160—XOQ 
« N-T. N.T- 27355 — 2X0 7<& 
Sep 98 NT. N.T. 27140 — 200 
Est voftime: 1X672. Open lot.- 63X16 up L0 





Commodity Indexes 


Moody's 
Reuters- 
DJ. Futures 
CRB 


Oose 

NA 

2X0X20 

160X2 

347X2 


Previous 

IriOXcO 

2X00X8 

158X0 

265X5 


'■'X 


- V 


+ L-, 





•7 ■■■»!.: 




• c )sy\^\z& 



> 

S-.T.- ' - -W^V- 


■->?:• 


u L-'-tr. - 
L*a»> 


•:’} - 


vs •— ... 


>. ; 


.>■ ■, . _ 
i *»■ 
1*1 !>-: . ■ 


* »i W.V. 


■■■tv 


m in Chm 


y. : i: 


‘*4 

X •• . 


vT’-'j. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1997 


PAGE 13 


EUROPE 


- *«4'S 
^ 

‘•yjU* 


. • ’" , 
' ■’■ Vfc" 

- " **?T.S 

• All. I " 


"i: 


Uncertain Prospects 
For New TV Raise 
Formula One Doubts 


c Reuters 

ari^?!2??F ~ The possible flot- 

aoon of a Fonnula One motor-ra- 
nng stock on the London and New 
York exchanges comes with the 

^S pente for Pay-for-view 
r sports still unproven. 

Salomon Brothers Inc. has con- 
firmed it is in discussions with the 
head of the Formula One Admin- 
istration, Bertrie Ecclestone of Bri- 
arn, about an initial public offering 
that could raise $4 bill ion 
. * That valuation is based largely on 

the potential income from media 
rights, in particular pay-per-view 
sejvjces that could be developed 
with the additional channel capacity 
offered by digital television. But 
pay-for-view soccer offerings in 
Italy have met a disappointing re- 
sponse, and the German digital tele- 
vision service DF1 . launched in July 
1996 to coincide with the German 
Grand Prix at Hockenheim, has only 
an estimated 20,000 subscribers. 

' “What is not clear is what the buy 
f rate for pay-per-view Formula One 
will be,” Chris Renaud of CSFB 
said, adding, “It could be that view- 
ers will think it is really good a few 
times but then not do it again. ” 

Investors might be interested in the 
flotation as means of buying into a 
content provider with the number of 
television channels multiplying, be 
said, but it would be difficult to estimate 
Fonnula One’s value on pay-per-view. 

“It is hard to put a valuation cm 
the business,” Mr, Renaud said. 
“The devil really is in the detail.” 

The 16 Grand Prix races each 


year draw a worldwide television 
audience of 330 million viewers in 
about 130 countries. 

“Ecclestone has invested a large 
amount of money on digital-tele- 
vision technology,” David Wilkin- 
son of the London brokerage con- 
cern Greig Middleton said, “and is 
looking at making the viewer much 
more pro-active. ” 

A vision of this future is offered 
by DF1. The German company, 
owned by the media executive Leo 
Kirch, allows viewers to switch be- 
tween images from the cockpits of 
top racers and shots from various 
cameras around the track. 

Optimism about potential pay- 
per-view sales fueled a big rise last 
year in share prices of British soccer 
clubs. But such stocks have fallen by 
about one-third ibis year as in- 
vestors have reconsidered the clubs’ 
prospects for such income. 

The’ one person almost sure to 
profit from a Fonnula One share 
offering would be Mr. Ecclestone. 
Besides heading the Fonnula One 
Administration, he is vice president 
for commercial affairs at the Inter- 
national Motoring Federation and 
the holder of the commercial rights 
for the federation's Formula One 
wold championship. 

Mr. Ecclestone made his first for- 
tune as a motorcycle dealer. After 
limited success as a car racer himselL 
in 1958 he bought his fizst Fonnula 
One team. Twelve years later, he 
bought another team and joined the 
struggle for power between the 
teams and the motoring federation. 


Paris Undercuts Its Own IPO 

State Interference Dims Appeal of France Telecom Sale 


Bloomberg News 

PARIS — Investors, once eager 
to buy stock in France Telecom 
when the government sells shares 
in the country’s biggest initial pub- 
lic offering, now are having 
second thoughts. 

Two months before the planned 
sale of about 20 percent of the 
telephone company for an estim- 
ated 25 billion francs c$4.32 bil- 
lion), investors say the govern- 
ment's treatment of other siaie- 
controtled companies risks making 
it a disappointment. 

‘ ‘The question is. are there more 
attractive, alternatives out there?” 
said Christoph Bruns of Union In- 
vestment in Frankfurt. “The 
French tend to have problems with 
government influence.” 

For example, Paris is taking 
rights to a New Caledonia mine 
away from Eramet SA, which the 
state controls with a 56 percent 
stake. The nickel mine is being 
turned over to separatists on the 
South Pacific island despite objec- 
tions from the U.S. fund managers 
Fidelity Investment Co. and Frank- 
lin Templeton Group, which each 
bold about 5 percent of ErameL 

“This is the worst possible ad- 
vertising campaign for France 
Telecom's IPO,” said Christian 
AJbuisson of Edinburgh Fund 
Managers. “My U.S. clients 
wouldn’t want to be open to the 
same kind of abuse Eramet share- 
holders have suffered.” 

That move compounded the 
damage done when Paris vetoed 
the sale of the television maker 
Thomson Multimedia to Daewoo 
Electronics Co. of South Korea 


amid public protests over job se- 
curity last year. 

A glut of similar sales will fur- 
ther complicate the initial public 
offering. Societa Fin an zi aria Tele- 
fonica of Italy, Telstra Corp. of 
Australia and the Philippine mo- 
bile-phone operator Smart Tele- 
communications Inc. are also plan- 
ning to list shares this year. 

To win investors' attention, the 
government will have to prove 
France Telecom can overcome 
challenges when its monopoly ends 
in 1998, especially with the battle 
for its $28 billion domestic market 
beating up. British Telecommuni- 
cations PLC and the water utility 
Generate des Eaux SA have 
bolstered their standing as possible 
competitors of France Telecom by 
linking up with the state-run rail- 
road. Societe N alienate des 
Che mins de Fer Francais, to use its 
national communications network. 
Electricire de France, the national 
electricity utility, is also expected to 
seek telecommunications partners. 

4 ‘There* s a heck of a lot of com- 
petition from well-financed, cap- 
able competitors such as BT,” said 
Bruce Behrens of Flag Investors 
Funds in Baltimore, “which 
makes it more difficult to have real 
visibility on earnings.” 

While fierce labor opposition to 
the France Telecom sale has eased, 
investors fear the concessions given 
— including promises that the state 
will maintain at least a 5 1 percent 
stake for now — could hinder the 
company's ability to compete. 

Unions also won the right for 95 
percent of France Telecom's 
150,000 employees to maintain 


their status as civil servants, which 
could make paring the work force 
difficult and costly. Civil-servant 
status gives employees nearly total 
job security and a fatter pension 
than their private-sector peers. 

“France Telecom will be able to 
alleviate a certain degree of labor 
rigidity by transferring people in- 
ternally.” said Emmanuel Dubois- 
Pelerin of Standard & Poor’s 
Corp., “but it won't benefit from 
the same flexibility that BT or its 
U.S. competitors enjoy.” 

But some fund managers main- 
tain that France Telecom’s record 
of profitability, strong cash flow 
and high profile in the world's 
fourth-largest telecommunica- 
tions market at the advent of broad 
competition in the $800 billion in- 
dustry make it a strong asset. Es- 
timates have valued the company 
at between 100 billion and 200 
billion francs. The initial price will 
be announced in early May. 

France Telecom had net profit of 
9.37 billion francs in 1995, die 
highest earnings in the country, and 
analysts have predicted 1 1 percent 
annual increases over the next de- 
cade. Results for 1996 are due 
March 19. In preparing for hill com- 
petition next year, France Telecom 
is working to shore up its dominant 
position by shaking up management, 
introducing Internet-based products 
and high-speed services for corpo- 
rate customers, and reducing some 
charges by 40 percent this year. 

“France Telecom is undeniably 
the best operator on the European 
continent in terms of quality, pro- 
ductivity and performance.” Elie 
Cohen, a French economist, said. 


Exchange Targeting Midsized Stocks Opens in Germany 


Comp&atbrOurSuffFnmDupachn 

‘ FRANKFURT — Germany’s 
smaller, growing companies gained 
a new avenue to investors Monday 
when a bourse targeting midsized 
stocks opened on die Frankfurt 
Stock Exchange. 

‘ The exchange, called the Neuer 
Markt, is controlled by Germany’s 
largest banks through Deutsche Bo- 
erse AG, the bolding company for 
Germany's stock exchanges. It is a 


domestic attempt to meet compe- 
tition from Easdaq, a pan-European 
over-the-counter exchange in Lon- 
don modeled on the Nasdaq stock 
market in the United States. 

“We will fill the gap for fast- 
growing companies,” Reto Fran- 
cioni, a member of the Deutsche 
Boerse, said. “In ayear’s time, I see 
about 1 5 fast-growing companies in 
die new market. 

So far, only two shares trade on 


die Neuer MarkL One of them, Mo- 
bil com AG, a mobile-phone ser- 
vices company, closed Monday at 
96 Deutsche marks ($56). up 53.50. 
The other. Bertrandt AG. an auto- 
parts maker, closed I higher at 93. 

“We believe this is the best mar- 
ket that goes with our plans,” Ger- 
hard Schmid, chairman of Mobil- 
com. said. “On the one hand, we are 
a growth-oriented enterprise, and on 
the other, this market offers trans- 


parency that foreign investors are 
looking for.” 

Promoters of the exchange hope 
its strict reporting requirements will 
attract foreign investors, who often 
are wary of markets outside their 
home country because of uncer- 
tainty about disclosure and account- 
ing standards. For instance, Neuer 
Markt will publish financial reports 
in English and adhere to interna- 
tional accounting standards. 


But some analysts were skeptical 
of how quickly the exchange would 
catch on. Juergen Lenders, a fund 
manager at Internationale Kapit- 

alanJagegesellschaft mbH in 

Duesseldorf. said there was “plenty 
of room” in Europe for exchanges 
that cater to smaller, high-growth 
companies “Such a market segment 
needs about 10 to 15 years to catch 
on. not six months,” he said. 

( Bloomberg , AFP) 


Investor’s Europe 



London:.-:.-: ■■ 

FTSE 

4650 " 




Exchange 


Amsterdam AEX 


3900 O^f D‘ J' F'M V ^O'N'D' J F m 3 

1996 1997 1996 1997 j 

:.a 


Sruseeis 

BEt*20 • • n ; 

•• 2 4 $®*- 

Frankfurt - 

oax. --.-v.; 

•• 3&t&m - 35 m%f 

Copenhagen 

Stock Market/ 


Hatemkr 

HEX General * .•** 

' - 2*7849 

OBfo • 

QBX 

tikn s ^mm^ssa 

London 

FTSE 100 

: "*#FFJSO ■ ■ ■!$& 

Madrid 

Stock Exchange 


Milan 

MIBTEL 


Paris • 

CAC 40 

■ Z, 

Stockholm 

SX 16 • * .. ; 


V terms - 

ATX 


Zurich 

SPl 

^msfmrnsm 

Source: Tetekurs 


ImenHUonil Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• Bertelsmann AG. the German media conglomerate, denied 
a magazine report that it was planning to offer telephone, 
mobile-phone and Internet services in a venture with a 
Daimler-Benz AG unit and the retailer Metro AG. 

• German construction investment is likely to tali 2.5 percent 
this year, forcing 10 percent of the country's contractors into 
bankruptcy, the builders' association ZDB said. Investment in- 
die building sector dropped 2.7 percent last year. 

• Wassail PLC shares rose 22 pence (35 cents) to 376 after the 
British maker of cables and adhesives announced plans to raise 
a! least $590 million by spinning off 70 percent of its U.S. unit. 
General Cable Corp., and pay a bonus dividend equivalent to 
about 76 pence for each share now held. 

• Psion PLC. a British maker of hand-held computers, said 
1996 pretax profit before exceptional charges rose 5 1 percent, 
to £ 1 7.6 million, as sales grew 37 percent, to £124. 1 8 million. 
But Psion shares fell 24 pence to 408.5 on concern that it had 
not named any licensees for its operating system, which 
competes with one offered by Microsoft Corp. 

• Bausch & Lomb Inc. of the United States agreed to buy the 
Killer Loop brand of sunglasses from Benetton Sportsystem 
of Italy. The Italian company will keep the marketing rights to 
Killer Loop clothing, accessories and snowboards, which 
account for 60 percent of the brand's more titan 100 trillion lire. 
($58.9 million) in sales. Terms were not disclosed. 

• Gambro AB, a Swedish pharmaceutical company controlled 
by the investment company Incentive AB, said operating 
profit slipped to 1 .49 billion kronor ($ 1 93.8 million) from 1 .50 
billion kronor as sales rose 8 percent, to 10.9 billion kronor. 

• Schindler Holding AG, a Swiss maker of elevators, es- 

calators and rail cars, said 1996 profit rose 13 percent, to 88.6 
million Swiss francs ($59.8 million), as orders increased; the 
company said it expected a profit of 1 60 million francs for the 
current year. Bloomberg. Reuters. AFP 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


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Prices to local currencies. 

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High Low Close Pro*. 


Amsterdam 


AEXtadOK769J6 
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4480 

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5850 

308.70 

348 

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11050 

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89.90 

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25850 


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298.10 

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139.10 13860 
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8980 88 

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3625 3525 3525 35 

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668 648 454 640 

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1350 

1350 

T abaci torn 

7250 

7070 

7170 

7170 

TeWoafcn 

3490 

3420 

3490 

34*0 

Union Ferosa 

1215 

1176 

1215 

1180 

Vatenc Cement 

1585 

1575 

1585 

1585 

Manila 


PSE tadac 3299 J4 


tTevtadc; 

QB645 

AjCtoB 

30 

2950 

30 

29 JO 

AyteiLand 

BkPtiaptal 

3050 

30 

3X50 

3050 

182 

181 

181 

182 

C84» Homes 

1350 

1X25 

1385 

1X50 

Manila EtocA 

122 

120 

120 

121 

Metro Book 

690 

680 

685 

685 


11 

1050 

1075 

1X50 

POBrt* 

38250 

380 

38X50 

38X50 

PMLxnoDSi 

1615 

1605 

1610 

1595 

SanMlguefB 

91 

89 

89 JO 

91JO 

SM Prime Hdg 

B 

7-80 

7.90 

7.90 

Mexico 


Batts 

itndwei 

B36J9 


prertow.-3n9.75 

'Alta A 

4XBS 

4X50 


4*50 


19 JO 

1B46 

18J0 

19.00 

Cenex CPO 

29.90 

29X5 

29*0 

29 90 

CBraC 

1248 

1232 

12*6 

1X36 


41 JO 

41.70 

4170 

41 JO 

CpoCarsoAl 

4550 

4*45 

45JJ0 

4465 


1-66 

1J4 

1J6 

150 

Gpa Fin Inb visa 
KraOaikMa 

27.10 

27 JO 

27.10 

7785 

16190 16450 

164.50 

166X0 

TfetavtsaCPO 

10050 10X30 

10X50 

10170 

TeiMexL 

1£04 

1178 

1604 

1686 

Milan 

MJBTttMatfCK 1212490 


Prevfsas: 12230M 

ABeanmAsaic 

12780 

12460 

12575 

12605 


3466 

3395 

3435 

3450 


4730 

4570 

4630 

4688 


1289 

1247 

1260 

1283 


31000 

20450 

20600 

20900 


2270 

2235 

2265 

2275 

Edtem 

9820 

9525 

9550 

9820 

ENI 

8655 

8585 

8540 

8680 

Brt 

5480 

5400 

5450 

5485 

General Assfc 

31100 

30400 

30500 

31000 

1MI 

15280 

15060 

15380 

15295 

INA 

2290 

27*5 

2275 

2295 

ttdgos 

Medtaut 

6005 

7100 

5940 

7015 

5995 

7050 

5990 

7140 


11*70 

11270 

11310 

11S30 


1258 

1232 

1247 

1264 

oewffl 

634 

673 

677 

628 

Porraalat 

2X8 


2280 

7326 

PWO 

3850 

3650 

3670 

3710 

RAS 

15410 

15170 

15170 

156B6 

Rato Bara 

1*500 

14015 

14295 

14*50 

5 Paata Torino 

12000 

11805 

11774 

11975 

Stef 

8050 

7B7E 

796.6 

8050 

Telecom Itotta 

4435 

4330 

4476 

4400 

TIM 

4465 

4370 

4465 

44W 

Montreal 

lodartriata tadec 2989 j08 


Prertm: 298475 

Be* Mob Com 

43 

42J0 

fi 


Cdn Tire A 

2585 

2115 

25.15 

76<* 

CdnlitflA 

33 

37*5 


32X6 

CT FBrtSvc 

32 

32 

32 

32 

Goz Metro 

17*0 

1785 

17*0 

1780 

Gt-WtatUfax 

2216 

71.90 

21J0 

7210 

llPOSCB 

38.15 

37.90 

38 

37 JS 

IrrvESJon Grp 

2570 

25W 

2SJD 

76 A0 

LobtawCoS 

1640 

l£60 

1660 

1685 

Nod BkConado 

1680 

1640 

1680 

16*0 

Power Carp 
Power Ftal 

2950 

29 JO 

29.70 

2965 

27b 

27 

VJA 

Jft.90 

OuetearB 

2135 

2115 

2520 

?5b 

Rogers ceamB 

9M 

9b 

9te 

Mt 

Royal BkCda 

6155 

60b 

61 JO 

6060 


Oslo 

AftVA 

BeraesanDyA 
QvfefariaBk 
Den make Bk 
Elton 
HoWundA 
KraenwAsa 
Nonk Hydro 
NonteSogA 
NyamedA 
Oitia Asc A 
PeUmGeoSec 
‘ " lA 


OBXodet 49975 

Provtaw66£9B 


181 17830 179 

149 147 1*730 

. 25 25 

3030 3030 

u« no 

46 46 

364 370 


2&20 

3070 

118 

430 

373 

34530 

21930 


176 

147 

2530 

3060 

116 

48 

366 


Paris 


ACCor 

AGF 

AlrUquide 
AknW Alsth 
AXD-UAP 
Boren Ire 
BiC 
BNP 

Canal Plus 

Cnrrefouf 

Casino 

CCF 

Cetetam 

CMstian Dior 

CLROexla Fran 

CredB Agriatt 

Danone 

Etf-Aquikrine 

Eridnnla BS 

Eurodtaner 

Eurtsunnrt 

Gen. Eaux 

Haras 

I mew 

La laioe 

Legrond 

LwboI 

LVMH 

Lyon Eaux 

MicteQnB 

PoiCxhA 

Pernod Rlaml 

PouaertCC 

PtaulFPrW 


CAC-40; 270921 



Prevtoota 270888 

851 

828 

846 

825 

219 

21*10 

21580 21610 

944 

922 

924 

923 

662 

640 

645 

651 

37770 375J0 

3/6*0 

37660 

792 

768 

7B9 

781 

915 

895 

910 

9|9 

268.90 

263 

264 

268.90 

1134 

1083 

1100 

1074 

3455 

3416 

342/ 

3*29 

27*90 

2/2 

27*50 27030 

289 

280 

287 JO 

27B 

748 

730 

736 

735 

857 

83/ 

■ 

BSD 

601 

592 

599 

600 

1300 

1270 

1300 

1307 

933 

922 

929 

931 

586 

573 

582 

576 

992 

940 

964 

1000 

1QJ0 

10*0 

10*0 

1086 

7.10 

7 

7.10 

7X5 

812 

792 

806 

805 

458 4*9.90 

453 4*9*0 

■ J 

841 

■JlJ 

860 

383 37X10 379 JD 

380 

1094 

1057 

1075 

1088 

2049 

2021 

2032 

7030 

1396 

1374 

1380 

1391 

610 

600 

605 

605 


EtactrohnB 
Ericsson B 
Hermes B 
IncenBve A 
Investor B 
Mo Do 6 
NDnlbantoi 
PnornVUp|onn 
sancMk B 
Scania B 
SCAB 

5-E BanketiA 
Skandlo Fan 
SkanskoB 
SKFB . 
Spartjaiiten A 
StadshypoteLA 
Store A 
SvHandlesA 
Volvo B 


High 

Low 

Close 

Prev. 

508 

493 

503 

493 

277 

26BJ0 27X50 270J0 

KJ75 

1053 

1068 

1056 

550 

- 536 

548 

535 

36SJD 

359 

36*50 

359 

252 24X50 24X5D 

25050 

27*50 

269 

269 27350 

305 

298 30050 

294 

197 19X50 

19650 

193 

195 

191 JO 

193 

194 

178 

174 

178 

175 

81 JO 

80 

80 

81 

249 

7*0 

248 

341 

353 

340 

353 

342 

197 19X50 

194 

19*50 

15X50 

ISO 

ISO 

153 

192 

190 

190 

190 

11050 

106 

108 

110 

217 

214 

216 

21*50 


194 19030 19230 19030 


36*50 39930 36140 36030 
39580 40050 39560 


Renault 

Reto 

RthPoulencA 

Sanofl 

Scrinelder 

SEB 

56S Thomson 
Sfc Generate 
SodaJio 
StGobaln 
Soez 

Synnwtobo 
Thomson CSF 
TOMB 
UshW 


32950 

324 

32750 

379 

649 

633 

636 

654 

2399 

2320 

2359 

2350 

1980 

1900 

1960 

1899 

13950 

13660 

13X90 139 JO 

1807 

1768 

1804 

1B10 

202 

I98JD 

20080 

201*0 

575 

555 

556 

566 

315 30950 31*50 309.20 


991 

992 

1006 

423 41X20 418J0 41 9 JO 

709 

895 

706 

695 

2990 

2940 

2958 

2935 

M ll 1 

B99 

905 

90S 

29*50 289 JO 

294 

29*50 

598 

586 

594 

590 

19870 

IM.10 

19730 

19X30 

*85X0 479 JO 

485 

483 

9050 

8520 

90 

9QJ0 

38*50 

375 38X90 37*10 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBking 

BHP 

Boral 

Brambles Ind. 
CBA 

CC Areas 
Coles Myer 

CRA 

CSR 

Ratals Brow 
Goodman Fid 
ra Austmno 
Lend 
MIM Hi 
MaiAust 
NolMutuolHdS 
News Cap 
Pocflle Dunlop 
Pioneer Inti 
Pub Broodatri 
5tGeapeBar£ 
WMC 

WestaocBUng 

WooifeiiiePel 


244190 


045 

784 

1785 

195 

22 

1X30 

1135 

£02 

£85 

1980 

*97 

273 

1.70 

1240 

2342 

179 

1£18 

195 

6J* 

145 

480 

£52 

760 

884 

7.19 

983 

173 


£35 

7.7B 

1789 

183 

2130 

13.15 

1145 

5JB 

670 

1981 

*82 

246 

163 

1225 

2X25 

176 

1481 

1.92 

669 

135 

*15 

£49 

745 

881 

7.10 

9.18 

361 


840 885 

730 772 

17.15 17 

338 331 

21.99 2177 
1X24 1336 
1148 1145 
6 539 

£85 666 

19.14 1892 

495 481 

269 266 

169 163 

1285 1285 
2X40 2X30 

177 175 

1£18 1595 
1.95 193 

£70 £67 

389 385 

480 *20 

£52 £48 

733 740 

886 881 

7.14 735 

982 9.16 

X71 161 


Sao Paulo Taipei 


8174.18 

816268 


BradescoPfd 
Brahma PW 
CemtaPfd 
CESP Ptd 
Copet 


tlmj bores Pfd 
UaMSerrictas 

pffisPfri 

rCuDOruS rTO 

PwTOrio Lnz 

Sid Nodonat 

SnaaCniz 

TofcbraPW 

Tetanrifl 

Tdtarl 

TetepPM 

UtAanco 

Usiminas Pfd 

CVROPfd 


930 

72999 

4030 

60.10 

1580 

49030 

57030 

46530 

32630 

22130 

15130 

3760 

990 

11280 

16*00 

15430 

30330 

4190 

182 

2740 


670 680 

72030 72530 
4630 4630 
5930 5998 
1530 15.10 
47330 48130 
54530 57030 
46030 46030 
31*00 32*00 
21660 21930 
14930 14930 
3630 3630 
983 990 

10990 11130 
16299 16430 
15490 15530 
29£0C 30130 
4600 4130 
1.18 180 
2630 2730 


890 

719.99 

4630 

5680 

1535 

47230 

54630 

45930 

31*41 

21930 

14790 

3790 

980 

10670 

16100 

15530 

29630 

4230 

1J3 

2670 


Cathay Ufo ire 
Chang HMBk 
CNooTungB* 
CWna Develpmt 
China Steel 
Firri Bank 


Hua Nan BX 
bdlCaremBk 
Han Ya Plashes 
Sirin Kang LKe 
Taiwan Semi 
Tatung 

utdMkraEtac 

UMWartdOita 


Seoul 

Docnn i 

Daewoo Heavy 
Hyundai Eng. 
Kki Motor 
KoroaBPwr 
Korea ExdiBk 
Korea Mob Tel 
LG Seaton 
Pahang Iren St 
Samsung Dfetoy 
SamsunaEtac 
Shtnhan Bank 


_SB 46785 
Previous: 68182 


109000 1 05000 
4210 4010 

20900 18300 
15400 14800 
25400 25100 
5430 5540 

478000 440000 
77000 24800 
*5300 38700 
43300 41400 
55800 52800 
10700 10300 


107000 105500 
4010 4200 

19400 20500 
15300 15100 
255CC 25200 
5600 5800 
470000 476000 
26000 27000 
41200 42000 
41600 42900 
52800 55200 
1II3M 10500 


340 34590 340JO 
«3 21650 214 


Singapore - 


Aria Poc Brew 
CerebasPK 
Oty Devils 
Cycle Cartage 
Dotty Fomi »■ 
DBS foreign 
DSSLotuT 
Kernel FMs 
FnaerANeove 
HK Land* 

Jard MattiOsn ' 

Jaid Strategic * 

Koppd 

KegpelBanK 

OCSC foreign 

05 Ulrica BkF 

PvkwayHdgs 

Sembenreng 

Stag Air foreign 

SbigLand 

SlngPressP 

Sing Tedi Ind 

SaigTetaaren 

KewelLond 

ToLeeBoflfc 

utd iMusau 

UtdOSes BkF 

WtogTolHdgi 

V* (/£<**& 


Stockholm » 


765 

765 

765 

7.70 

10*0 

1X10 

10*0 

10*0 

1*10 

1X60 

14 

1*20 

1450 

14*0 

1*40 

1*80 

QJ7 

077 

0J7 

077 

I860 

18*0 

I860 

1BJ0 

5JD 

5J5 

560 

570 

5J5 

5.70 

5.75 

5J5 

1X80 

12J0 

1100 

1X50 

229 

164 

IBB 

186 

£10 

5.90 

5J0 

£10 

126 

X26 

326 

X28 

1030 

1020 

10J0 

1X30 

*18 

*08 

*10 

£18 

IBM 

iaJo 

I860 

18.70 

11 

1X70 

11 

1IL90 

£20 

£10 

£10 

£M 

760 

7.55 

7J5 

765 

1X40 

1130 

1130 

12*0 

MO 

7.90 

X10 

X15 

28*0 

27 JO 

28 

27 JO 

i» 

180 

ISO 

194 

124 

320 

120 

374 

*78 

*74 

*78 

*76 

150 

148 

3*6 

3*4 

121 

1.19 

120 

121 

16 

15.70 

16 

15.90 

*68 

4*4 

*48 

*50 


Transnceon Off 
Storebrand Asa 


112 109JD 

110 

109 






548 542 

547 

545 

AGAB 

11360 

10750 

111 

106 

309 304 

386 

309 

ABBA 

995 

879 

879 

888 

117 115J0 1ISJ0 

116 


207.50 

202 

206 

703 

138 13&50 

137 

138 

Astra A - 

376 

367 

376 

370 

399 399 

399 

406 

Ada Cepes A 

187 JO 

186 18760 

186 

49 48 

4X60 

4770 

Aetofiv 

34760 

345 

346 346J0 


Tokyo 

Aitoamoto 
All Nippon Mr 
Armray 
AsntriBcr* 
ASOtriOrem 
Asolri Glass 
Bk Tokyo Mltau 
Bk Yokohama 
Bridgestone 
Canon 

OiubuEtae 

Qiugoku Elec 
DolNIpp PiVrt 
DoW 

DoHchl Kong 

DohraBar* 

DcftraHowe 

DaiwaSec 

DDI 

Denso 

East Japan Ry 

Eteri 

Fan ut 

Fu8 Bank 

Fu|Photo 

RjPtau 

HochgunlBk 

iffiodtf 

Honda Motor 

ISJ 

IHI 

ttodw 

lio-Yokado 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 

Jibed 

Kajlmo 

KaredElec 

Kao 

KoewaUHvy 

Kowo Steel 

KlnUNlppRr 

Kirin Brewery 

Kobe Steel 

Komatsu 

Kubota 

Kwcera 

KyushaElec 

LTCB 

Marubeni 

Morui 

Matsu Comm 
Matsu Elec Ind 
Matsu Elec Wt 

MBwbtaM 
MBsoNsNOi 
MBsubisHEl 
MDsubbKEri 
Mitsubishi Hvy 
Mitsubishi Met 
Mitsubishi Tr 
MITSUI 


183 

179 

179 

1B0 

109 

184 

IW. 

183 

9XSD 

91 

91 

93 

114 

111 

1IIJ0 

Ml JO 

37 

2630 

2650 

26.70 

191 

186 

186 

185 

77 JO 

75 

75 

76 

140 

)4i 

146 

US 

8450 

S3 

S3 

8X50 

69 

67 

67 

6SJ0 

113 

UQS0 

110J0 11X50 

66 


64 

65 

S8J0 

67 

67 

58 

47X0 

46 

46 

*7.10 

72 

6960 

70 JO 

71 JO 


NUeJ 225:1811389 


Pretests: 181 98J4 

1020 

1000 

1010 

1030 

809 

786 

791 

802 

3470 

3400 

3400 

3470 

810 

BQ3 

807 

800 

620 

609 

61V 

620 

1090 

1070 

low 

10/0 

1910 

1870 

1900 

1910 

53B 

519 

531 

540 

2220 

2160 

7190 

2200 

2530 

2500 

2530 

2520 

7130 

2110 

2130 

2130 

2150 

2130 

71.60 

2170 

1950 

1930 

1940 

1950 

770 

760 

770 

763 

1340 

1290 

1320 

1790 

473 

465 

465 

470 

1360 

1310 

1360 

1320 

970 

946 

962 

942 

7380o 

7240a 

7330a 

7330a 

2220 

2170 

2210 

7150 

5280a 

5700(1 

5280a 

5250a 

2230 

2190 

2210 

2220 

3700 

3600 

3610 

3750 

1300 

1340 

1370 

1360 

4070 

4010 

4030 

4040 

1180 

1168 

1160 

lino 

1050 

1030 

1040 

1040 

1060 

1040 

1060 

1050 

3810 

3/10 

3810 

3770 

1370 

1340 

1360 

1360 

428 

<23 

*27 

426 

568 

w. 

566 

56V 

5440 

5330 

5440 

5380 

« 

479 

480 

486 

790te 

7800a 

7W0b 

6000a 

3240 

3210 

3230 

fO) 

645 

637 

640 

630 

2160 

2120 

2150 

2140 

1310 

1790 

1310 

1290 


4711 

47V 

484 


325 

334 

336 


720 

723 

733 

1010 

966 

997 

1010 

221 

716 

219 

219 

853 

833 

833 

844 

532 

SB 

531 

SU, 

7040 

7000 

7MD 

6990 

2160 

2130 

2140 

2178 

425 

410 

4IH 

422 

443 

*34 

«7 

44 7 

1700 

1650 

1688 

1690 

2930 

2880 

2090 

2S\0 

1810 

1700 

1800 

1800 

1120 

1060 

1100 

1090 

1090 

1060 

low 

1070 

325 

T16 

322 


670 

657 

665 

680 

1440 

1400 

1420 

1430 

824 

815 

820 

818 

850 

MS 

850 

850 

1310 

1280 

1300 

1310 

872 

BS 

B59 

873 


The Trib Index 

Pncas as ot 3.00 PM. Nem York time 

Jan. 1. 1992 - 100 

Level 

Change 

%change 

year to data 





% change 

World Index 

154.18 

4-1.57 

+1.03 

+16.92 

Regional Indexes 

Asta/Paafic 

110.53 

+0.08 

+0.07 

-17.87 

Europe 

163.49 

+Z11 

+1.31 

+17.47 

N. America 

180.06 

+2.01 

+1.13 

+40.36 

S. America 

industrial Indexes 

143.20 

+2.20 

+1.56 

+60.83 

Capital goods 

178.96 

+1.41 

+0.79 

+34.68 

Consumer goods 

175.16 

+2.11 

+1.22 

+26.88 

Energy 

180.45 

+2.30 

+1.29 

+33.06 

Finance 

114.18 

+1.13 

+1.00 

-10JJ6 

Miscellaneous 

159.35 

+0.64 

+0.40 

+1733 

Raw Materials 

190.52 

+2.13 

+1.13 

+34.36 

Service 

143.38 

+1 26 

+0.89 

+19.48 

Utilities 

137.67 

+2-35 

+1.74 

+8.28 

The Intematlonet Herald Tribune World Sleek Index C backs the U.S. rMnatoiaf 
280 tntemBOtxiBky inmstnble stocks from 25 countries. For more Mormabon, a /roe 
booklet is available by wnong to The Tnfi Index. 181 Avenue Chartes de Gauds. 

S2S21 NouBy Cede*. France 


Compied by Bloomberg Norm. ( 

High 

Lm Close Prev. 


HJgt Low 

dm Piwl 


MIBrtFudasn 
AMtsul Trust 
MuratoMtg 
NEC 
NBuxr 
NMiaSec 
Nintendo 
Nlppl 


Nippon steel 
Nissan Motor 
NKK 

NocnuroSec 

NTT 

NTT Data 

OJPOper 

Osaka Gas 

fOcoh 

Rohm 

SoKuraB* 

Sankyo 

SanvaBtmfc 

Sanya Elec 

Seaxn 

Seflw Rwy 

SettsulOiem 

SeWsiri House 

Seven-Eteven 

Sharp 

ShlkoKuElPwr 

Shimizu 

ShhvrtwCh 

Sblseido 

SMnrokaBk 

SoflbarrK 

iumltomo 
Sumitomo B* 
SunritQtan 
Sumitomo Elec 
SumfiMJrttri 
Su mb Trust 
TtrishoPharm 
TahedoChem 
TDK 

Tohoku EIPwr 
Tokrt BanK 
ToUo Marine 
Tokyo El P»r 
Tokyo Electron 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo Corp. 
Tonen 

Toppan Print 
Toray Ind 
Taririba 
Tasiem 
TcryoTrusi 
Toyota Motor 
YamanoucN 
art laatLxUXX 


1300 

761 

4170 

1410 

1760 

725 

B970 

774 

500 

332 

712 

256 

1500 

8530a 

3150b 

624 

290 

1400 

8790 

735 

334) 

1330 

467 

6840 

5220 

1250 

1130 

7160 

1520 

2100 

701 

2310 

1460 

1000 

10400 

8900 

846 

1510 

460 

1660 

2B5 

1050 

2800 

2490 

8240 

2040 

900 

1260 

2210 

4310 

300 

557 

1230 

1360 

676 

671 

2640 

B46 

3090 

2450 


1280 1290 

743 754 

4170 4170 

1390 1410 

1730 1730 

715 724 

8710 8880 

763 772 

«6 495 

327 331 

699 710 

250 256 

1460 1470 

B2O0O 8340a 
3170b 3150b 
620 621 
286 286 
1370 1390 
8740 8740 

716 735 

3300 3320 

1300 1310 

461 463 

6740 6780 

5170 5220 

1230 1 250 

1100 1120 
7110 7140 

1480 1500 

2070 2090 

689 698 

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2 Quit at Nomura 
As Scandal Widens 

Brokerage Clients Pull Back 


TOKYO The damage to 
Nomura Securities Co. from its 
latest trading scandal widened 
Monday as two managing directors 
^resigned From Japan’s biggest 
brokerage and several major clients 
said they had suspended trading 
through the brokerage. 

Another major client, the largest 
pension fund in the United States, 
said over the weekend it would re- 
view its dealings with Nomura and 
. its affiliates. 

‘ ‘People are worried there will be 
more revelations," said Ken 
Okamura, a strategist with Dresdner 
Kleinwort Benson (Asia) Ltd. 

Nomura revealed last week that 
two managing directors improperly 
channeled trading profits to select 
clients. Those clients have been 
Jinked to sokaiya organized-crime 
groups by influential Japanese me- 
dia, including NHK public televi- 
sion and the Nihon Keizai business 
newspaper. 

pie two managing directors who 
resigned are Shimpei Matsuki, who 
was in charge of the equity division, 
and Nobutaka Fujikura. head of the 
general affairs and general services 
division. Both worked for Nomura 
for more than two decades. The 
brokerage said they were the only 
employees involved. 

Japan’s Securities and Exchange 
Surveillance Commission has been 
investigating the transactions since 
September and will conclude its in- 
quiry soon, Nomura said 

Executives ar Sakura Asset Man- 
agement Co..Tokyo-Mitsubishi As- 
• set Management Ltd and EBJ NW 
Asset Management Co. confirmed 
that their companies had stopped 


"We're worried that if Calpers 
does cancel our contract, other states 
may take similar actions.” an ex- 
ecutive at Nomura Investment Man- 
agement said 

To many observers the latest in- 
cident is similar to a major scandal 
thar enveloped Nomura and the in- 
dustry in 1991. That scandal also 
involved improper payments to cli- 
ents, some of which were linked 
with criminal groups, and brought 
down Nomura's president and 
chairman. 

Analysts said they expected 
Nomura’s current president, Hideo 
Sakamaki, to resign before the cur- 
rent scandal subsided. Neither Mr. 
Sakamaki nor the two Nomura ex- 
ecutives who resigned could be 
reached for comment. 

Nomura reportedly is planning to 
introduce measures to preventing 
further trading scandals, the Kyodo 
news agency reported. The mea- 
sures, which center on strengthened 
inspection functions and improved 
handling of buy and sell orders, will 
be announced after a meeting of 
Nomura top executives Tuesday, 
the news agency reported, quoting 
company sources. 

Nomura was the most active issue 
on the Tokyo Stock Exchange for the 
second trading day in a row, closing 
at 1,470 yen ($12), down 60. 

{Bloomberg, Reuers, Bridge News ) 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 199 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Thai Banks Worry Moody’s 



Cinpitrdby Our Sufi Fnm Dupjuha 

BANGKOK — Moody's Investors Service Inc. 
said Monday it would reyiew the credit ratings of 
three of Thailand's commercial banks, and some 
analysts said they consider a downgrade inevitable. 
The ratings agency said it planned to review its 


the more stringent provisioning requirements for sub- 
standard assets set by the Thai government last week. 

"I think it is fair to say Thai Military has made 
some fairly chunky settlements of old bad debts 
recently, bui the old ones need to be settled because of 
a risk of new ones appearing," said Alistair Mac- 


ratings on Bank of Ayudhya PLC. Siam City Bank donald. banking analyst at Asia Equity Ltd. "It’s 

di r D, n L- i u... c ■» 


PLC and Thai Military Bank Ltd. 

Bur Thai stocks rose as the government announced 
measures to help banks write off their bad loans. 

The review was prompted by Thailand's weakening 
financial fundamentals, and declining property and 
stock markets, Moody's said. A 
deepening crisis in the finance- 
company sector and Thailand's Stocks rose 
continuing economic slowdown *. 
also are worrying factors, the 2 IM 5 T me gK 
agency said. Moody’s said an an- announced 
dcipated drop in property values _ .... , 

would have "direct implications billion baiil 

reserve levels of Thai developers 

Moody's recently announced 
that it was placing its A2 rating on Thailand s long- 
term sovereign debt under review. It announced a 
review of the credit ratings and possible downgrade 
for the top four Thai banks at that time. 

"I think die reasoning for the review of these banks 
is based on the current country's review," an analyst at 
a Bangkok Bank PLC unit said. "If the country rating 
comes down, they all have to come down." 

Two Moody's executives were in Bangkok last 
week to meet senior officials and review national 
economic data for the review, which is expected to be 
concluded in two months. 

Bank of Ayudhya currently has a Baal deposit 
rating. Siam City Bank and Thai Military Bank have 
Baa2 deposit ratings. One step lower, Baa3, is 
Moody's lowest investment-grade rating. 

A lowering of the ratings could add as much as a 
percentage point to the banks' funding costs, analysts 
said. Several research houses have said Thai Military 
Bank's profit potential would be adversely affected by 


Stocks rose, however, 
after the government 
announced a $3.85 
billion bailout for 
developers and lenders. 


something of a race between these two factors.' ’ 

Meanwhile, Thai stocks rose for the second day in a 
row after the government announced a 100 billion baht 
($3.85 billion) bailout for property developers and 
lenders. Banking stocks led the gains, after plunging as 
much as 25 percent last week The 
“ government triggered the decline 

however, when it ordered them to increase 
m reserves against bad loans and 

'eminent named 10 that h said lacked ad- 
I $3.85 equate capital. 

. * The benchmark Stock Ex- 

Lit for change of Thailand index rose 

nd lenders 1 1 - 87 P° ints ' to dose « 703 32. 
uu tenners. Bangkok Bank PLC, the coun- 
try’s biggest bank, rose 5 baht to 
177. Thai Farmers Bank PLC rose 3 to 116. 

Over the weekend, the government announced the 
creation of a concern called Property Loan Man- 
agement Co., which is to make 100 billion baht in 
government-guaranteed loans. The funds would help 
banks and finance companies write off bad property 
loans and help developers complete projects. 

"Property companies will get cash injected into it 
through the measure," Kavi Chookitkasem, an ana- 
lyst at Prime Capital Nomura Securities PLC. said. 
"Thai means they can pay interest to their 
lenders." 

About half of the finance industry’s 1.5 trillion baht 
In loans is to the property industry, which has slumped 
in recent years amid a glut of new building. 

Concern that the bubble of real-estate debt could 
burst and cripple an economy already growing at its 
slowest pace in a decade has helped drive Thailand's 
benchmark stock index down 46 percent over tire past 
year. (Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


U.S. Executives Back ‘Engagement 9 Policy on Burma 


Ctwrdtd by Our Sufi From Dupatdies 

SINGAPORE — Top U.S. busi- 


giving Nomura new orders as of uessmen said Monday they would 


Monday. 

Nomura Investment Management 
& Co., which is 5 percent owned by 
' Nomura Securities, also stopped buy- 


oppose economic sanctions against 
Burma, adding that the Southeast 
Asian policy of “constructive en- 
gagement" was the right way to 


ing and selling securities through the push the military -ruled country to- 
brokerage, at least until the govern- want democracy. 


ment investigation was completed, an 
executive said. 


George David, the chief exec- 
utive of United Technologies Corp., 


The company had used Nomura said the Americans and their South- 


Securities for about one-fifth of its 
trades. 

The California Public Employ- 
ees' Retirement System, America’s 
largest public pension fund, said 
Sunday it would review its $724 
million fund management contract 
with Nomura Capital Management 
Inc., a U.S.-based investment com- 
pany owned by Nomura Investment 
Management Co. - ‘ 


“We feel that the policy of en- 
gagement is a better way to produce 
change." Mr. David, chairman of the 
U.S 7ASEAN Business Council, said. 
"We’re better off having engagement, 
participation and investments." 

President Bill Clinton signed le- 
gislation last year barring U.S. 
companies from doing business in 
Burma if the human-rights situation 
there should worsen. Legislators in 
the U.S. Congress also are consid- 


east Asian counterparts agreed after ering seeking unilateral trade sanc- 
a one-day meeting that unilateral dons against Indonesia in response 
sanctions on Burma would be to allegations of human-rights ab- 
wrong. Mr. David is chairman of the uses in East Timor. 

LT.S7ASEAN Business Council, Either measure could cripple U.S. 
which brought about 50 top Amer- business efforts in the region, ex- 
ican executives to Singapore. ecutives traveling on this week’s 


Most of the Americans said the . mission said. They said they planned 
idea of sanctions should be aban- to talk with government and business 
(toned in favor of pressing Burma leaders about averting sanctions, 
toward democracy from the inside. “There really isn’t sufficient un- 


derstanding on the administration’s 
pan of the impact these unilateral 
sanctions have on business,” said 
Michael Gadbaw, vice president and 
seniorcounsel at General Electric Co. 
But when asked whether profit was 
the only motive, Mr. David said: "I 
would certainly reject that. We be- 
lieve the way you induce changes is 
by participation and by engagement, 
nor by punishment or sanctions." 

Lloyd Bentsen, the former U.S. 
Treasury secretary, endorsed that 
view, saying: "1 think a construct- 
ive engagement is much more im- 
portant for the U.S. We shouldn’t 
lose what tittle influence we do have 
by pulling oul" 

Mr. David said he expected 
Burma, along with Laos and Cam- 
bodia. to join ASEAN, the Asso- 
ciation of South East Asian Nations; 
this year. ASEAN groups Brunei, 


BongKong 

■ Hang Seng 

'14000 

-13500 B-nrfl 


OnDJFM 
1996 1997 


Singapore 
Strafe. Times 


Tok^oY 
:ffl dcet'SES- 




NO JFM 


1997 

Index 


Exchange Index 

HongKong HaagSeng • 
Singapore . Straits Times 

Sydney : : MOrtfinarfes 

Tokyo-' :.Nfeke!225- 

Kuala Lumpur Composite ■ 
Bangkok ■ SET 


Jakarta 

Bombay 

Source: Tefekurs 


..Composite Index 667.36 

: sbck 

PSE Y ; 4. 

*' ^ComposH® iratex 68&G5~ 
WZSE-40 " ' ^ 2£80JU7 

Sensitive index = 3,768.74 


1997 1996 1997 

Friday Pmv. ■' '% ■'/ 

Close • . ... .Close -. 

13;2S&76 isAS5'.-a5f 
&,f72AB 

/2,te1.9G 2,438.68 

.18,113.89 48,188/74 
‘ 1,237.48 '' 

7TEU2 ■. 891.45 WB 

857.36 875,07. , ,-1.14 

: il 74.18 

3^$QJ34;: .3^8S;4S *049 

608.05 • 88&81 7 *062 

24280.07 - -2, 288. 96 -'4® 
376&74 3.97644. -2.77 

Internal tonal Herald Tribune 


Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philip- 
pines, Singapore, Thailand and Vi- 
etnam. The organization has agreed 
that Burma should join at the same 
time as Laos and Cambodia, re- 
sisting Western pressure to keep 
Rangoon at arm’s length. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg ) 


Very brief lys 

• Nissan Motor Co., Japan's second largest automaker, will 
buy a 50 percent stake in Automakers Ltd. of South Africa 
for 360.8 million rand (S81 million). Nissan will buy the stake 
from Sanlum Investment Corp.. a South African investment 
company that holds 87 percent of Automakers. 

• Sumitomo Corp. violated the spirit and possibly the letter 
of its own rules in its supervision of a rogue copper trader, a 
company official said at a sentencing hearing for Yasuo 
Hamanaka, who has admitted gambling away $2.6 billion 
over a decade on the London Metals Exchange. 

• Big C Supercenter PLC, Thailand's largest discount-store 
chain, said its 1996 net profit more than doubled, to 103.9 
million baht ($3.9 million) from 47 million baht in 1995; 
analysts, however, were expecting profit of around 151 mil- 
lion hahL 

• Koei Corp., a financial-services concern in which In- 
dustrial Bank of Japan Ltd. has a stake, sought liquidation 
under court protection in Tokyo. Koei said its debts as of the 
end of December totaled 264. 1 billion yen ($2. 1 8 billion). 

• David Jones Ltd.’s chief executive, David Tideman, 
resigned, two days before the Australian department-store 
company was expected to report lower first-half net profit. 

• IPC Corp., a Singapore-based maker of computers and 
electronic cash registers, said 1996 profit before a charge fell 
74 percent from the previous year. afp. ap. BLwmbrrg. Reuters 


Vietnam Makes Deal to Restructure Debt to U.S. 


Bloomberg News 

HANOI — Vietnam and the United States 
agreed Monday to restructure debt incurred by 
the former government of South Vietnam before 
unification in 1976, the two countries said. 

The two sides agreed on a total figure of about 
$145 million, which includes past due interest, 
said a person familiar with the situation. 

The agreement removes one obstacle to Viet- 
nam’s becoming eligible for a number of Amer- 


ican aid programs, although it does not pave the 
way for most-favorcd-nation trade status. The 
accord must be approved by both governments to 
go into effect, the countries said. 

Under the Paris Club agreement of 1993, Viet- 
nam agreed to assume responsibility for the 

f ovemraent-to-govemment debts of the former 
outh Vietnamese government, except for 
money used to buj> military equipment Vietnam 
restructured iis commercial debt last year. 


t.; 


PLANT: Mill Town Downsized, but Not Out 


Continued from Page 11 

unusual these days. About 10 
times a week, according to the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, a 
j*. big factory closes somewhere 
- in the United States, throwing 
an average of 190 people out 
of work with each closing. 
And those figures do not in- 
clude the even larger number 
of mining and construction 
sites and service-company 
workplaces that are 
shuttered 

Bui these are ordinary 
folks — on die flip side of the 
investing public’s obsession 
with performance (Sun- 

beam’s stock, for instance has 
risen $12.50. to $30. since 
Mr. Dunlap came on board). 
Many live from paycheck to 
paycheck, contribute to a 
modest union pension, but 
have no 401 (k) plans or stock 
V options. 

* The Biddeford mill work 
force now stands ar under 300 
hw-au y of winter layoffs. 
Few jobs in the local market 
come close to the $9 to $ 13 an 
hour rihat workers are paid to 
tend the thrumming weaving 
machines. , , 

On a November day after 
the announcement, disbelief 


mixed with anger reigned at 
the meeting hall of Local 
1856 of the Union of Need- 
letrades, Industrial and Tex- 
tile Employees. 

Members gathered there 
suspected that Sunbeam had a 
hidden agenda: It would 
either break the union con- 
tract and cut wages and health 
benefits, or it would sell the 
mill to a buyer who would 
crate up its modem machines 
and move production closer 
to Sunbeam's Mississippi 
plant, where the shells are 
shipped to be fitted with elec- 
trical-heating components. 

"Why else would they sell 
their only supplier?" asked 
Ray Tilton, president of the 
local. "It’s like making an 
engine without a car to put it 
in.’’ 

By mid-December some 
mill workers were being idled 
in seasonal layoffs and other 
cutbacks. The rest were pick- 
ing up their weekly 
paychecks not knowing 
whether each payment would 
be their last Then, the week 
before Christmas, the mill 
was idled for repairs to a 
smokestack. . There was no 
work and no pay. 

Suddenly, what anger re- 


mained had an air of desper- 
ation. "1 ain’t going to let A1 
Dunlap spoil Christmas,’’ 
Norm Gagnon sang out a little 
too brightly on a cold morn- 
ing as sunshine streamed into 
his new kitchen. 

Last spring, Mr. Gagnon, 
48, who had worked at the 
mill since 1974 as a carding- 
tnachine operator, and his 
wife, Sharolyn, also a mill 
weaker, took out a $75,000 
loan to remodel their home. 
That was a lot of money for a 
couple whose combined in- 
come at the time totaled $900 
a week. 

But, ibey figured, with 
overtime and with the extra 
money they made from their 
home photo- and-video side- 
line ana her work as an Avon 
saleswoman, they could af- 
ford to meet the repayments 
and pay the extra property 
taxes, totaling S300 a week. 

But two days before 
Christmas, Mr. Gagnon was 
laid off with 37 other mill 
workers. Now on S2l0-a- 
week unemployment, Mr. 
Gagnon has found little in the 
help-wanted ads that offers 
him much hope. 

* ‘The only jobs listed were 
picking shrimp or working in 


a warehouse for six or seven 
bucks an hour," he reported. 

But then the mood shifted 
to hope: maybe the mill won’t 
close, after all. 

An outside investor — Mi- 
chael Liberty, a real-estate 
developer — was willing to 
take a large stake in a new 
company that would buy die 
plant from Sunbeam for an 
unspecified sum. 

His two equity partners 
would be American Capital 
Strategies, an investment 
bank that specializes in em- 
ployee ownership of compa- 
nies. and the mill workers, 
who would make pay and 
benefits concessions m return 
for their stake. 

Mr. Dunlap, professing en- 
thusiasm for the proposed 
agreement, pledged to con- 
tinue buying the blankets for 
several years. He also said he 
would welcome efforts by the 
new company to sell blankets 
to other buyers; already, it 
sells one-tenth of its annual 
production to airlines and 
prisons. 

Late last month, the group 
signed a letter of intent with 
Sunbeam to buy the mill and 
was given exclusive rights to 
close the deal by later this 
month. Confidentiality agree- 
ments have kept all the prin- 
cipals and their agents from 


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commenting on all aspects of 
the pact 

However, a Sunbeam ex- 
ecutive said the company was 
“confident” the sale to the 
workers could be achieved. 

Sunbeam’s director of in- 
vestor relations, John DeSi- 
mone, also said that Sunbeam 
was prepared to offer the 
worker group a five-year 


guaranteed supply contract 
Sunbeam's agreement to buy 
all its electric-blanket shells 
from the Biddeford mill 
would give the factory a se- 
cure base for growth. And 
growth seems possible for 
this mill, especially now that 
Sunbeam is the only producer 
of electric blankets in the 
United States. 


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NYSE 


Monday's 4 P.M. Close 

(Continued) 


12 Monti 

Ngk L w Stoat Dh no PE 


imWaA La* Late! Orflol High LOT Uadi 


Dl* WO PE ion High Lot Urns C&gi I High "lot sodt 


Sis I I7EJXP 

tkr no P= ltMh riO\ lot Laer C^cj Higr- lot Boat 


Sis I " lutoah 

Dn no PE IDQlHMa LOT LOWI Orgo I tog* LOT Stoat 


Bn no PE IBS MBS 

































































































































































































• -p ■ i 


PAGE 18 


World Roundup 






New Zealand Crushes Sri Lanka 


cricket The Sri Lankan Romesh KaJuwitharana hit a 
blazing century Monday in Dunedin, New Zealand, but 
could not prevent New Zealand from winning the first 
test. 

The match finished late on the fourth day when Sri 
Lanka was dismissed for 328 in its second innings, giving 
the home side victory by an innings and 36 runs. 

Wicketkeeper Kaluwitharana came to the crease with 
Sri Lanka at 1 15-5. He reached 103 as he and Chaminda 
Vaas shared a seventh-wicket stand of 137 runs. 

• Brian Lara hrr a breathtaking 7S to give the West Indies 
a glimpse of victory a gains t India on the fourth day of the 
first test in Kingston. Jamaica. But rain on Monday morn- 
ing delayed play and increased the likelihood of a draw. 
Lara hit eight fours and a six to lead West Indies to 24 1 for 
four at the close on Sunday for a lead of 322. (AP) 


Philippoussis Hammers His Way To Tide 


tennis Mark Philippoussis powered his way to his 
second career tide on the ATP Tour, joining the mil- 
lionaire's club in the process. Philippoussis out-slugged 
eighth-seeded American Richey Reneberg, 6-4 7-6, to 
win the Arizona Classic in Scottsdale and pick up 
$43,000, which pushed his career winnings past $1 mil- 
lion in his third year as a professional. { Reuters ) 


Elkington Wins Doral-Ryder Open 


golf Steve Elkington hit an eagle from the fairway on 
the par four third hole to set the tone for his final round in 
the Doral-Ryder Open in Florida. The eagle brought 
Elkington to 1 3-under-par. He stayed on 13-under, fin- 
ishing the round in 69. for a four-round total of 275. two 
strokes ahead of Nick Price and Larry Nelson. { Reuters ) 


Commentator Weeps on Air After 7-0 Loss 


SOCCER A local BBC radio commentator was so upset 
at watching his beloved Swindon let in seven goals last 
week that be burst into tears on air. 

Stuart Mac was describing the goals in Swindon's 7-0 
humiliation by Bolton, the first division leaders, on BBC 
Wiltshire Sound when he started weeping uncontrollably. 
Fans jammed the switchboard in an effort to console him. 

Mac, 41, said: “I had already seen all the goals but I 

£ • .1 ■_ r *_ f. ... i* i . f • 


couldn't face reliving them again. I bit my lip but I just 
couldn't help it and started crying." Steve McMahon. 
Swindon's manager, said: "It's a pity some of the players 
didn’t show the same son of passion." (AFP) 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Exhibition Baseball 


SUMMIT'S UUI 

Brows 10, uk Angeles 1 
PWtafcJtohk! 4. Pittsburgh 3 
Bofflnwre & Montreal 3 
Boston (Ml 11 PhHmWphta (sal 2 
Cleveland 4. Houston 1 
Clndnnotl 11, Detroit 1 
St Louts la Kansas City & to Innings 
Ortega White Sax 1. Boston (ss) 0 
New Yoik Yonkers (ss) la Minnesota 5 
New YOtk Yankees (as) 4. Toronto tell 
Toronto (as) 5, Tens 1 11 innings 
New YOtfc Mets 8, Floifda 7, 10 Innbigs 
Colorado 4, CMcogo Cobs 1 
Oakland la San 01090 9, la innings 
Son Francisco 7, SetrttfeO 
Amtehi 7, Milwaukee l 


BASKETBALL 


Conference Tournaments 


AMERICA EAST. AT NEWARK. DELAWARE 
Boston University «ft Onscef «1 


ATLANTIC COAST. AT GREENSBORO. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

North Caradno 64 North Carolina State 54 
ATLANTIC MLATPHRAOELPHIA 
SI. Joseph's <1. Rhode Island 56 
BIG EAST, AT NEW YORK 
Boston College 7a VHtanovo SB 

BIG SKY. AT FLAGSTAFF. ARIZONA 
Montana 82, Col Stole Nortftridge 79 
BIG SOUTH. AT LTNOBURG. VIRGMU 
Charleston Southern 64 Liberty 54 

BtGIZ, AT KANSAS CTTY, MISSOURI 
Kansas 87. Missouri 60 

BIG WEST. AT RENO. NEVADA 
Padflc 6& Nevada 55 

COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

AT RICHMOND. VtRtUMA 
Old Dominfan 62. James MocBsan 58. OT 
CONFERENCE USA. AT ST. LOIRS 
Marquette 60. North Carofira Chortofta 52 
METRO ATLANTIC ATHLETIC, 

AT BUFFALO. NEW YORK 
RHrfleld 7a CortWus72 

MD-AMERICAN, AT TOLEDO, OHIO 

Miami. ONo 96 Eastern MWtfgon 76 

MOCONDWENT, AT MOLINE. toUNOIS 

Valparaiso 61 Western iWrtols 59 

MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC, 

AT NORFOLK, VIROMA 
Coppln State 81. Noon Carolina A&T 74. OT 






lleralb lJ^ Sribune 

Sports 


fetfg* 


TUESDAY. MARCH U, 1997 


Rominger Goes 
Into Downgear 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 


Jofen McCcnrocxVAP 


A cricket fan watching play between India and the 
West Indies at Sabina Park, Kingston, Jamaica. 


PARIS — The curtain-rais- 
ing races are over, the tune ups 
around the south of France, 
Valencia, Majorca, Sicily, 
even Malaysia finished. The 
real bicycle season tradition- 
ally begms wife fee weeklong 
Paris-Nice race, which is sup- 
posed to raise a rider's pulse a 
few beats: This me counts. 

So why was Tony 
Rominger so blasd just before 
! the start on Sunday? Tbe same 
Tony Rominger who won 
Paris-Nice in 1991 and 1994 
admitted that, this time, he had 
no idea of the course ahead. "I 
haven't seen fee profiles," he 
said. "Tell me, does the race 
look difficult?" 

Well, there is this climb up 
towering Mont Ventoux in a 
few days. "Really?" Romin- 
ger said, not feigning interesL 

forget Paris-Nice then. 
What are Rominger’ s overall 
goals for the season? "Oh. 
good question.'’ he answer- 
ed. "I haven't even thought 
about that.’ ' There’s really no 
rush, he implied; fee season 
still has eight months to go. 
Time moves slowly when 
you’re not having fun. 

But fun has never seemed 
to be high among the Swiss 
rider's priorities. A late 
bloomer and a man of fragile 
morale. Rominger has instead 
striven for success and col- 
lected it wife both bands. 

Courteous, articulate in six 
languages, baby-faced as 
ever, he unaccustomedly woe 
a two-day stubble just before 
the beginning of Paris-Nice. 
What next? Body piercing? A 
snake tattoo down an arm? 

No. it's simply age. 
Rominger will turn 36 later 
this month and insists he will 
retire at fee end of the season. 
He is fee leader of Cofidis. a 
new French team, by default, 
having been hired away from 
Mapei when Lance Arm- 
strong. fee Cofidis leader, re- 
potted that he had testicular 
cancer. Rominger said his role 
was limited: “I’ll try to do a 
good season, win some races 
and then stop. Having a good 
year is important” 

He no longer defines a good 
year the way he did. earlier in 
the decade, when be won the 


Vuelta a Espana from 1992 
through 1994, the Giro dTtalia 
in 1995 and finished second in 
the Tour de France in 1993. 
Although he ranked for a 
while as the No. 1 rider in the 
world and has fallen no further 
than eighth, Rominger doubts 
he can win such important 
races again, 

1 ‘Our time is over," he said, 
referring to tbe era when he 
and Miguel Lndurain annually 
came to the start of fee Tour de 
France as favorites and In- 
durate. annually won. The 
Spaniard is retired and 
Rominger is on the cusp. "I 
have to try to help tbe young 
guys on the team become good 
professionals. That’s it” 

Showing by example, be 
placed 15th of 136 nders in 
Sunday's 7-kilometer {4.5- 


miie) prologue from the sub- 
urb of N eutil y-sur-Seine into 


urfr of Neuilly-sur-Seine into 
Paris. He was second-fastest 
oo his eight-man team. 

Races against the dock are 
one of his specialties. For two 
years, from October 1994 un- 
til last September, he held fee 
world record for the hour's 
ride:55.29 kilometers. Then 
Chris Boardman, whose re- 
cord Rominger broke, took 
the title back by covering 
56.37 kilometers. 

"I'll try one more time." 
Rominger said. "In Novem- 
ber, I'll try to break the record, 
either in Bordeaux or 
Manchester." where Board- 
man set fee record. 

That, he said, would con- 
stitute his real season. He will 
stake nine months on a one- 
hour ride. "I will do it like my 
last race and then retire." he 
said. Win or lose? “No mat- 
ter whether I break the record 
or not. I will retire.” 



Aroimd World 
Soccer Players 
Have To Duck 


CampSaltn Our Ssafi From Dapcocha j 

Fans at an Argentine championshk) 
match threw so much paper onto fee pi ten 
in a traditional "ticker tape-'-’ reception 
that the players could not play on it. - 
The start of tbe Buenos Aires derby 
between RadngQubandliMiepeixiierm; 
on Sunday was delayed for a half-hoar 
while the field was cleared of paper. 


Would Soccik 


UaxLj J Tnrtek VnociaW Pros 

Venus Williams stretching for a forehand against Ai Sugiyama of Japan. 


Venus Williams Controls 
Her Boredom and Wins 


By Robin Finn 

Sew York Times Service 


INDIAN WELLS, California — 
Venus Williams made the latest in a 
haphazard series of cameo appearances 
on the women's tennis circuit and dis- 


posed of fee 29th-ranked player 
Sunday, then Questioned her own com- 


! Riders Fail Drug Test 


Three riders were barred 
from the Paris-Nice race 
Monday after blood tests, 
cycling officials said. Reuters 
reported from Paris. 

Erwan Mentheour of 
France and Mauro.Santaron- 
ita and Luca Colombo of Italy 
were not allowed to start 
Monday's second stage. Pre- 
race tests showed abnormally 
high numbers of red blood 
cells, which suggested pos- 
sible use of erythropoietin, 
which is banned. 


Sunday, then questioned her own com- 
mitment to the sport that has already 
made her famous. 

Only 20 marches into her career, fee 
towering 1 6-year-old. who over- 


at Key Biscayne. Florida, but beyond 
that she is not making any promises. 
Last year, she played six events and lost 
in the first round in four of them. Her 
trip to fee third round here represents 
her best and only showing. 

"There’s no hurry for me.’ ’ said Wil- 
liams. who is busily pursuing ber high 
school diploma while Martina Hingis, 
who is also 16, plays on the tour — “to 
get some more smarts" — and considers 
tennis a part-time job for now. 


powered Ai Sugiyama of Japan. 3-6. 6 - 
3. 6-2. at the State Farm Evert Cun. is 


3. 6-2. at the State Farm Evert Cup. is 
already cautious about overexposure. 
“I get bored with things easily, and I 


Williams wanted to play the french 
Open, partly to rehearse her few words of 
French, but die probably win not now 
make her Grand Slam debut there. 

Her father. Richard, is still pulling the 
strings, and according to him. it js still 
too soon for the 6 -foot-plus prodigy 
with the six-figure Reebok contract to 
take on the Grand Slam. 

"My dad doesn’t want me to play," 
said Williams, who takes most of her 
cues from him. 

She added that ‘ ‘probably it would be 
a good idea to wait" 


don't want to get tired of playing ten- 
nis,” said the 21 Itb-ranked Williams. 

' Her boredom can even extend to her 
elaborately beaded hairdo; she made her 
mother redo the jangling red. white and 
blue concoction before she flew here to 
the desert for her first event of the year. 

Williams's second event will be the 
Upton Championships later this month 


which had been thrown from the terraces 
as fee players entered, fee arena. Farts 
showed their displeasure at the delay by. 
throwing stones and’ other objects. 

Once play got underway, Independi- 
ente, coached by Cesar Luis Men ora. 
won. 2-1 — itsfirst victory of toe season 
— thanks to a last minute-strike by Jose 
Luis Calderon. . . 

Spain Fans threw, sometiiing more* 
dangerous in the match between Ath- 
letic Bilbao and Real Zaragoza -at&e 
San Mames stadium in . Bilbao oq 
S unday. Otto Konrad. Real’s Austrian 
goalkeeper, was hit by a firework. . 

Konrad was taken to' a hospital wife 
first degree burns near the eye but had 
frilly recovered by Monday and wasex- 
pected to resume training later in fee 
week. Konrad was hit by a bottle thrown 
from the crowd playing for Casino 
Salzburg in Milan in 1994. AC Milan, 
lost two European- Cup Champions’ 
League points, and Us San Siro stadium 
was closed for two games. 

Spanish soccer authorities are to in- 
vestigate the incident, which could cost 
Athletic a stadium closure. , 

Austria Another Austrian goal- 
keeper, Franz Gruber of Admira Wack- 
er of Vienna, underwent a five-hour 
operation on Sunday after sustaining . 
severe head injuries in an Austrian first ^ 
division soccer match on Saturday. 

Grube fractured his hose, forehead and 
several other bones in his head in 'a 
collision with GuenterZeOer of FC Linz, 
who was booked after the incident. 

ITALY Alen Boksic was sent off on his 
retum to Serie A after a two-month lay- 
off, but Juvemus held Inter Milan to a 0- 
0 draw at the San Siro. 

Boksic was dismissed in the 77th - 
minute for striking Inter defender 
Massimo Paganin just 10 minutes after 
coming on as a substitute. 

But the match had turned on another 
controversial incident jn fee seventh 
minute, when Maurizio Ganz beat An- 
gelo Fenizzi. Referee Pierluigi Collina 
first pointed to the halfway tine to signal 
a goal but then changed his mind, ruling 
out a goal for offside. As whistles rang 
out round the ground Collina walked to 
the sidelines to explain his mistake to 
Roy Hodgson, lfae Inter coach. 


MIDWESTERN COLLESMOE. 

AT DAYTON, OWO 
Butter 69, 1 lAnots-Ch 1019068 

WS30Un VALLEY, AT 5T. LOUIS 
innate Stole 75. Southwest Missouri stole 73 
NORTHEAST COTFERSTCE. 

Urns Istontl University 7X Monmouth, HJ. » 

OHIO VALLEY. AT NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
Manny State 88, Austin Petty 85* OT 
PATRIOT LEAGUE. 

AT BETHLEHEM, PENNSYLVANIA 
Kovy 76. Bucknefl 75 

SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE. 

AT MEMPHIS. TENNESSEE 

Kentucky 95, Georgia 66 

SOUTHERN CONFERENCE. 

AT GREENSBORO. NORTH CARO UNA 
Teiwessae-Cftattanooga 71, MctslwIT 7ft OT 
SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE. 

AT SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 
Southwest Terns Stow 74, Northeast 
Louisiana 64 

SOUTHWESTERN ATHLETIC, AT DALLAS 
Jodaan State 81. Mississippi Valley State 74 
SUN BELT, AT LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 
South Alabama 44, Louisiana Tech 43 
TRANS AMERICA ATHLETIC, 

AT CHARLESTON. SOUTH CAROLINA 
Goftotawriestoo 83, Rortda International 73 
west COAST, 


AT LOS ANGELES, 

St. Mona CoL 66, Son Francisco 59 
WESTERN ATHLETIC. ATLAS VEGAS 
Utah 89. Texas QirWtan 68 


The AP Top 25 


How the top as teams In Tbs Assort Mad 
Press' coOegr basketball poO fared teat 


I. Kansas Q2-1 > beat Oklahoma State 74- 
59; beat No. le Iowa State 72-48; beat Mis- 
souri 87-60. 2. Minnesota <27-31 beat Michi- 
gan State 61-74; last to Wisconsin 66-65. 3. 
UMt 125- J) beat Southern Methodist 59-58; 
beat No. 14 New Mexico 72-70: beat Texas 
Christian 89-68. 4. Sooth Cnrotna (24-7) beat 
Alabama 72-61; lost to No. 24 Georgia 78-63. 
5- North CaraBaa (24-65 bed Vhrjtata 78-6S 
beat No. 8 Wbke Forest 86-72 beat North 
Carolina Stote 64-54. 

6. Kentucky 09-0 beat Auburn 92-50; teal 
Mississippi 88-70; beat No. 24 Gea^e 95-68. 
7. Duke 03-8} last to North Carol na Stote 66- 
£C- 8- WaW Forest CQ-6) teal Roritto Stole 66- 
6& tostto Na S North Carolina 86-73. 9. UCLA 
(21-7) beat Washington 87-85.- beat Wash- 
ington State 8T-86. 1(1. OodtmaK (25-71 beat 
Saint Louts 71-4$ last to Marquette 97-79. 

II. Xarier.Obio (22-5) iosttoTempte 69-62, 
OT. 11 Arizona (194) tost to No. 23 Stanttri 


81-BO: tost to CnBfomto 79-77. 11 Oenstm 
(21-9) last to No. 22 Maryland 7661. 14. New 
Mexico (24-7) beal Son Jose Stote 103-70.- 
beat Homan 6S-S7;10snoi*o.3U»ah72-7a 15. 
I Knots (21-9) beat Ohio State 90-81 lost to 
Purdue 7769. 

16 town State (2D-8) beat Texas Tech 72 
7ft last to Na 1 Kansas 72-48. 17. College ot 
Charleston (28-2) did not play. 78. CMonxto 
(21-9) last toOktahoma 55-47. 19.51. Josephs 
<2361 beat SL Bonaventure 75-59: beat 
George Washington 78-7tt beat Rhode Island 
61-58. 20. Lodtevflk CU-8) beat South Ftarida 
69-54 tost to North Carolina Charlotte 6460. 

21. VlBanova 1236} beat Syracuse 80-7ft 
beat Providence 7363; tostto Boston College 
7K58. 22. Marytand (2l-in beat Na130etn- 
son 7661; tost to North Carolina State 65-58. 
23. Stanford (19-7) beat No. 72 ArtroraSIBft 
beat Arizona State 8663. 24. Gaorgta (24-7) 
beat LSU 75-54; beat Arkansas 6563; beat 
No. 4 South Caroano 7463; lostto No. 6 Ken- 
tudey 9564 25. Indiana (22-9) beat Wiscon- 
sin 7066: last to Michigan State 6360. 


PACIFIC DCVBION 


Secme 

42 

18 

.700 

— 

LA. Lasers 

41 

20 

■672 

IS 

Portland 

35 

28 

-556 

8 ’A 

Soanmertto 

28 

34 

•452 

15 

LA.CBppeis 

25 

33 

.431 

16 

Pnoenix 

24 

37 

-393 

18W 

Goiaen State 23 

x-dJ netted playoff spot 

37 

-383 

19 


HOCKEY 


NHL Standings 


Decdmcrsb 28 (SoUc Corbel) 4. A-. Setanne ‘ 
42 (Mironov, Kariyo) (ppj. Overtime: None. 
Penalties— Mane. Starts an goat A- 2-9-J4- 
2-32. C- 13-186-3— 4Z Coolies: A-Heben. 
C-Rov. 


The AP Top 25 


CROSSWORD 


TTie (op 23 team In The Associated Prose' 
collage heta w ihaH poK, with flrst-ptsco 
votes In panmttunea. records through 
March 8, total points baaed on 25 potato tor 
a Rret-placa vote through one point tor a 
2EUvploca vote, and laat weetem nridng: 


ACROSS 

1 Certain drapes 
• Atlantic food 
fish 

10 Gator's (an 
*4 Cop 


is White-tarted flier 


icDeN offering 
*7 Colt 45. e.g. 
19 List member 


(confess fora » -That's a Her 
lighter 


sentence) 


ai Household 




Est. 1911, Paris 

4 Sank Roo Doe Noo ~ 


2370S-80S 
robotic rock 
group 

29 The United 
Stales, 

metaphorically 

27 Uns hero 

28 Dance, in Dijon 
2» Member ot die 

500 HR chib 

30 Rock 
impresario 
Brian 

21 Surgical labnc 

38 Am. in dialect 
3s ‘Texaco Star 

Theater* host 

39 Cut down 
AOBrttfcance 

«3 High dudgeon 

49 Mai 

47 Go on to say 
48'Bravor 
90 It once settled 
near Pompeii 

93 Part of a whole 

94 Kangaroo 
movements 

99 Hayffeld activity 
97 Prefix with 
China 

99 Kind of cereal 
«2 Shade of red 
•9 Conception 
•* Bizarre 
B9 Bronte heroine 
•»PnH821 
Missouri, e.g.. 
Abbr. 

87 He had Scarlett 
fever 


7 Diabolical 
•Due halved 
• Words of 
assistance 

10 *1 ' (ancient 

Chinese text} 
it Record again 

12 Where to find 
Eugene 

13 Awaken 

ie Early Shirley 
Tola 

22 Signed up tor 
82 U.N.’S 

Hammarskjdld 
24 Former polit. 
cause 

ie of the 

Unknowns 
28 Like some 
greeting cants 
22 Nine-digit 
number, maybe 

33 Ultimate point 

34 R-N.'s ottering 
as Send 

27 Trompe f 

38 Stretch 

41 He KO'd Quarry. 

70(26/70 
«2 Asian holiday 
43 Tipple 
44'Chdjaever 
wonder . . .?* 
humorist 
Successful 
escapee 
47 Incarnation 
«8 Spanish 
Surrealist 
si Certain 
Investment, 
informafly 
92 More 
competent 




Record 

Pf» 

Pw 

1. Kansas (70) 

32-1 

1,750 

1 

2. Utah 

26-3 

1,578 

3 

3. Minnesota 

27-3 

1,571 

2 

4 North Carolina 

24-6 

1,566 

S 

S. Kentucky 

30-4 

1,559 

6 

6 Sautti CaroBna 

24-7 

1,365 

4 

7. UCLA 

21-7 

1J43 

9 

a. Duke 

m 

1-245 

7 

9. Woke Forest 

236 

1J23 

8 

10. Ondnnatt 

25-7 

14)14 

10 

11. Hew Mexico 

24-7 

949 

14 

12. St. Jaseptrs 

246 

B5A 

19 

11 Xarier. Ohio 

Z2-5 

765 

11 

14. Denison 

21-9 

713 

13 

15. AiUono 

19-9 

654 

12 

16 CoiLOf Charleston 

28-2 

599 

17 

17. Georgia 

24-8 

524 

24 

18. Iowa Si. 

20-3 

485 

16 

19. Illinois 

21-9 

437 

15 

20.vmonmg 

23-9 

387 

21 

21. Stanford 

20-7 

371 

23 

72. Morytend 

21-10 

344 

22 

23. Boston College 

21-8 

255 

— 

24. Cotorodo 

21-9 

244 

18 

25. LoubriBe 

23-8 

226 

20 

Others receiving 

votes: 

Tutsa 

128. 


CaWomta 99, Marquette 99. towa 89. 
Prtnaetori 79. Indiana 55. N.C Oiartatte 42. 
Wisconsin 35, Podflc 1& Mississippi 17, 
Purdue IX Rhode Island tl Georgetown & 
Terns Christian 7. N. Carolina St. 6, South 
Alabama & Boston u. 4, 51. Marys. Cal 4. 
Hanafl Z Illinois Sr. X Lang I stand U. T. 
Novyl. 


NBA Standings 


© New York Timea/ Edited by Will Short 3 . 


Solution to Puzzle of March 10 


A Space for Thought. 


1 Uncfeofnote 

2 New Deaf prog. 

3 Stream deposit 

4*1 can't “ 

(Stones refrain) 
b Morton prod uci 
a 'Rocky a, m e.g 


« Jesse who tost 
to Ronald 
Reagan m 1970 
ss Composer 

Stravinsky 
91 Ending with quiet 
90 N.Y.C. subway 


•i Modem 

iniormailon 
source, with 
‘the* 


B ona atnana aaaa 
ssa camasa nrgcis 
ana sauna aaao 

naan aaa 
□QHna Q0 : 3 aaana 

QQSQQEJ □□□ 33E3 

QnoGiiicaBmEinaaana 

□□□ 0 Q 0 Haanas 

DHHHS OE3E3 a£3£3t3Cl 

sqq aaaa 
caaaaaaanaaaaa 
aaaa □□□aa aaaa] 
anaQ snaas asam 
BHHQ □□qqq aaaa 



W 

L 

Per 

GB 

New York 

47 

16 

J* 6 

— 

Warm 

4S 

17 

.726 

1W 

Otfartdo 

32 

28 

533 

13W 

Washington 

28 

33 

.459 

18 

New Jerwy 

18 

43 

395 

28 

PhJlodefphta 

1 16 

44 

367 


Boston 

12 50 

CENTRAL DWISiaN 

.194 

34 W 

x-OUcago 

53 

8 

B69 

— 

Detroit 

45 

16 

.738 

8 

ATI onto 

42 

19 

689 

11 

Clwriotie 

40 

22 

MS 

m 

□owtond 

33 

27 

-550 

19‘6 

Indiana 

29 

32 

A75 

24 

Milwaukee 

26 

35 

A2 6 

27 

Toronto 

21 

40 

J44 

32 

WHnucoMnnia 

MOWEST DIVISION 



w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Utah 

45 

lo 

.738 

— 

Houston 

42 

20 

677 

Ti 

Minnesota 

3D 

30 

JOO 

14% 

Oaftas 

19 

41 

J17 

2 Th 

Denver 

18 

43 

J95 

27 

San Antonie 

>5 

46 

.246 

30 

Vancouver 

11 

52 

.175 

35 


SUNDAY’S B8SULTS 
Attaato 35 34 74 31—114 

Barton 19 17 R 34— So 

A: Smirti 7.J3 2-7 17, James 5-7 0-0 IS 6: 
Day 10-20 7-o 31 Canton 6-14 4 6 76. 
Reboowls— Atlanta 59 (Mutombo 14), 
Boston 54 (Contort ll). Assists— Attanto 32 
(Barry 7), Boston 22 (Hawkins 10). 

Miami 11 TB 21 26— 76 

Charlotte 31 23 19 16- 82 

M: Hardaway 1 1-24 6-7 37, Austin 7-20 36 
17; C Alee B-15 26 21, Dlvoc 8-13 -46 20. 
Redounds— Arttami 45 (Brown 12), Chartatte 
47 (Mason 14). Assirts— Mtoml 75 
(Hardaway. Ask Ins 4). Charlotte 25 (Bogues 
10 ). 

Vancouver 23 26 13 15— 77 

Tomato 21 29 20 II— B1 

V: Peeler 10-19 35 25. Reeves 9-19 6-824; 
T: W.WODarns 6-191-4 16, Stouda mire 5-184- 
6 14. Rebeuads—4Vonaxiver48 (Reeves 14). 
Toronto 66 (Got toy 72). Assists— < Vancouver 
23 (Anthony 71, Toronto 16 (Stoudamlra 10). 
PtiBodetobto 23 21 27 26- 99 

WasMngtoa 17 25 M 27—93 

P: Stackhouse 8-17 7-9 24 Weathers poon 
8-1766 72s W:MunnyB-164-4 2X Slrfctdoffd 
10-17 1-7 21. Rebounds— PttDoddptaa 47 
(Coteman 181. WnsWngton 38 (Muresan 13). 
Assists— PftJtadetohta 9 (Stockhouse 4L 
Washington 14 (SMddond 8). 

Houston 24 28 21 23— 88 

Dolto 73 13 30 27— 83 

H: WBRs 8-16 3-3 19. Johnson 5-12 46 17; 
0: Finley 7-20 66 24 Brodtey 9-14 1-2 19. 
Strtckkmd 6-76 66 79. Re bound s — Houston 
47 (Olafuwon 12), Dallas 50 (Green, Bradley 
71). Assists — Houston 24 (Maloney 7). 
Dados 14 (Reeves 5). 

Oltendo 31 22 21 11—85 

Pboeah 20 44 31 26—127 

O: Hardaway 7-19 5-5 19, Grant 8-10 2-2 IS 
P: Person 12-170-031. Ceboflos 10-183-4 23. 
Rebou n ds — Orlando 38 (Strono 8L Phoanbi 
52 (WBBams 10). Assbts-Ortauto 22 
(Hardaway 61, Phoenix 34 (Johnson 13). 
Seattle 26 » 19 24— 93 

Portland 29 26 24 34- IBS 

S: Hawttns 12-17 2-2 29, temp 5-10 6-10 
16. Payton 6-79 4-8 76: P: RWer 9-74 4-4 25, 
Trent 70-11 3-4 23. Rebounds— Seattle 43 
(Payton 10). Portland 57 (Trent 9). 

Assists— Seattle 27 (Payton 111. PorttondZf 
(Anderson 8). 

Utah 33 25 27 38-113 

Minnesota 21 2B 21 36—106 

U: Malone 16-26 4-5 36 Stockton 7-9 12-14 
26,- fJL Motbury S- 1 ? 9-1 1 21. Gorr5-7 9-12 2a 
mt wuma Ui o h 4& t Malone m, Minnesota 
45 (Garrett 8). Assists— Utah 29 (Stockton 9). 
Minnesota is (Gugttotta 5). 

Chicago 20 22 24 27— 93 

New York 20 32 20 25—97 

C- Jordan I4-3T 8-9 34 Ptopen 4-185-7 14- 
N.Y. Ecring 12-7B 8-13 32, Starks 5-12 7 -2 1 X 
Rebounds — Chicago 51 (Rodman 19), New 
York 51 rewing 74). Assista-CMcaga 15 
(Ptopetu Jordan 4), New York 19 (Chillis 6). 
New Jersey 37 18 21 29— 1« 

UL Lours 29 23 26 37—115 

NJ- CasseB 8-1 7 3-4 2& Kittles 7-1 7 0-01$ 
LA. LAKERS: Jones 13-24 5-7 34 Compbelt 
5-14 56 15. Ifbewn d s H ew Jersey 56 
iMontrass ll), Los Angeles 52 (Jones 13). 
Assi sts- N ew Jersey 22 (Cassatt ll). Las 
Angeles 28 (Van ExeL Fisher 5). 1 

sacnmrto 31 26 22 19— 9S 

GeMen State 15 33 30 25-102 ! 


Phltadetphfa 
New Jersey 
Borido 
N.Y. Rangers 
Tempo Bay 
WasMngtan 
N.Y. islanders 


ATLANTIC OIVISKM 

W L T Pfs GF CA 
i 38 19 10 86 224 170 


CRICKET 


Buffalo 

Pittsburgh 


f 35 19 12 82 182 154 

29 23 75 73 177 158 
ss 31 28 9 71 219 191 

t 27 32 7 61 184 206 

1 26 33 7 59 166 187 

ers 23 33 10 56 181 195 

NORTHEAST DIVISION 

W L T PS GF GA 
34 21 11 79 192 165 
32 28 5 69 226 214 


79 192 165 
69 226 214 


MUUUNUITOim 

1ST TEST 4TH DAY 
HEW ZEALAND VS. SRI LANKA ’ 

UOND4Y, H DUNEDIN. NEW ZEALAND 
New Zartand: 586 foe seven declared 
Sri Lanka: 222 and 220 for sfo 
New Zealand wen by -innings and 36 runs 
and leads 2-test series VO. Second test match 
Is starting to Hanrittonon Friday. 


26 30 10 62 183 201 

24 32 12 60 208 241 


21 32 13 55 180 196 
23 35 9 55 197 238 


CENTRAL DTVtSroH 

W L T Pfs GF GA 


1ST TEST, 4TH DAY 
WEST INDIES VS. MOM 
MONDAY. IN KAOSTON, JAMAICA 
West Indies: 427 anti 241 -4 . 
inc«a346 

West Indies have an overofl lead of 322. 


40 23 4 84 202 162 

32 19 14 78 208 152 

31 32 4 66 191 201 
28 31 8 64 195 206 
26 31 10 62 172 168 
25 37 4 54 193 228 


DoralOpen 


Cotorodo 

Edmonton 

Anohdnt 

Calgary 

Vancouver 

Los Angels 

San Jose 


PAdFtc nnnsroN 

W L T Pts GF GA 


41 17 9 
31 30 7 
28 30 9 
28 34 7 
28 35 3 
25 35 8 
23 36 7 


91 228 J63 
« 212 202 
65 195 1P4 
63 181 196 
59 206 227 
58 181 221 
53 169 216 


Flrtal ocores Sunday ItlttiO din land Son 
Dorsl Ryder Opart, ptayud on the Oorri 
Resorts 7,125-yvd (8.51 ^wter). par-72 
Btoo Course at Wanb 


WBsUngtan 

Pfdtadetptdo 


• 0 0-0 
1 2 2—5 


First Ported: P-BflntfAmour 22 (LeCtolr, 
Di*hms) Second Period: P-oesionSns 9 
IBrfmfAmour, Undras) 3, P-Forbes 1 
(Coffey, Undras) Third Period: P-LeCJalr43 
(Undras. Desjardlnsj (pp). & P-LeCUr 44 
(Umbusi Shots on goat W- 7-2-6-15. P- 5- 
13-7—25. Coattas W-RontonL P-Hadntt. 
Cofunry 8 0 l a — j 

Tampa Bay a 1 9 1—2 

First Period: None. Second Petted: T- 
H anink 12 (Cullen. Grattan) (pp). TNid 
Parted. c-Hogfund 18 (Reury, Gagnet) 
Owrilne X T-Zomune r 13 (Crass, Grattan) 
Shots aa goat c- 17-10-18-0—45. T- 8-11-13- 
2—34. GoaVas: C-Rnlosan. T-Schwab. 

H.Y. Rangers 1 1 p_2 

SosJtae 1 8 0-1 

ewt Parted: New York. RobiUBe 24 
(Gretzky. Kbrpovtsev) z SJ.-Fitesen 22 
(Bodger. Hawgood) (pp). Second period: New 
York. Sundstram 22 (Drtver, Gretzky) TIM 
Perio* None. Shots on gaol: New Ytork ) 1-12- 
2-25. SJ.- IM-ll- ». Gotflesz Hew Yolk. 
RkSiter. s J.-Beftour. 

E dm o ot oo 1 | 2—4 

SL Loots g l 0—1 

Pim Period: E-Grter 12 fW(H B M) Secoad 
Period: S.L-Turgeon 20 {Hub. CourmaUi 
(PP). a e-wwgtn 16 (Gitori ThW ported: E- 
WeigW 17 (Murray. DeVries) 5, E-Grter 13 
(MnrcftmenT) (on). Shots on goat E- 8-10- 
13—30- S.L- 11-13-3—27. GodltaS: E- 
JaseplL SJ_-Fuhr. 

Now Jersey 0 3 j i 

BefHde 8 8 1—1 

Fhrt Period: None. Second Ported: N_L- 
TtHtaias 12 (Nledenmyer, Andreychuk) 
taw- Z N-I.-Pederson 12 (MocLean. 
aaraberoj X Hj.-ztfepuHnll ItAoCLeon) 
TTM Period: B- Ward 12 (AudOte GoUeyl S. 
New Jersey. Andreychuk 23 (Odektirt) ten). 
Sbats aa gaa fc « j.- U10-9J1 . a- 34-7-18. 

Nj..Brodaur. B-Shletas. 

JS* O 1 3—3 


Sieve Elkington 
Lorry Nelson 
Nick Price 
□avid Duval 
Fulton AUent 
Robert Damron 
Ronnie Btodc 
Brad Bryant 
Craig Stodter 
Wayne Lori 
Greg Norman 
BobTway 


7IM6-70-69-275 

72-66-69-70—277 

68- 67-7D-72 — 277 
68^6-70-74—778 
' 7D-70-70- 70~-7BO 
72-66-71-71—280 

- 67-71-70- 17—280 

69- 70-74-68 — 281 
71-72-67-72—282 

72-68-72— 282 
r 66-68-74-74—282 
66-71-70-75—282 


SOCCER 


9UN0AT, SAN JOBE 

Costo Rica 5, Cdmeraon 0 

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Annette Bilbao Z Zorogora 2 

Real Madrid 62 paints. 
Barcelona 5L- Rsat Bette 56. Depwiteo 
Coruna 53, AflefkBMoififd «9, Real Sosfedod 
45. Volta dofid 43, Tenerife 42. Alhteflc Bilbao 
42. Vatoada 39. Rodng Santander 38, Cette 
iflgo 34, Sporting Gqan 32. Oviedo 32, Com- j 
pasteto 31, Raya VoBecano 30, Zaragoza 29, I , 
Extremadura 29, Lagnrws 28. Esponyoi 27, r 

Hercules 22, Sevlfia 21. 

nuutnmsTMVinon 

Inter 0, JuventusO 

ittoniteigoi 1. Juventus 45 potato 2. Par- 
ma 4a 3. Inter 3a < Somodorfo 36. 5. Roma 
3& & Bologna 35, 7. Atotamo 35. 8. Vicenza 
34. 9. Fkxenflna 31. ia Laztoai, ll . Napofl 3), 

12. Milan 3ft 13. UcSnese 28. 14 . Piacenza 25, 

IS. Penigla 21 16. CogBorl 70. 1». Regpiana 
17. 16 Verona 17. - 

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Monaco 0 Aussrre f) 

s twicngn Mermen 56 Parts 51 Germain 
52. Bartto 48, Strasbourg 47, Borctoaux 46 
Nantes 45. Alreene 41 Metz 41 Marseille 37, 
Gulngacnp 37, Utan 37. Montpefller 33. 
Rennes 31 Cannes 32. Le Havre 31. Lens 3a 
uwe 3ft Coen 21 Nancy 25. Nice 1 9. 


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TRANSITIONS 


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AssUte— Soemmento 25 (Patynlce 6), 
Golden State 18 (SpreweU 7). 


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c Oni and Outrage 

°* At NCAA Matchups 


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Pe«nC'”‘l 


By Malcolm Moran 

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The work was completed unusually 
quickly. But that does not mean that the 
judgments of the committee that shaped 
the National Collegiate Athletic Asso- 
ciation men’s basketball 
were simple. 


tournament 


career victories held by Adolph Rupp of 
Kentucky. The Tar Heels could then 
break the record Saturday, possibly 
gainst Bobby Knight's Indiana Hoo- 
siers, seeded eighth, who will meet Col- 
orado in the first round. 

Kansas, 31-1. die Big 12 tournament 
champion and the highest-rated team in 


the computer rankings used as a guide 
the tournament committee, was 


1-JT- - I- 1 - 
‘Ax- 

re- 


x-' j.- ■ 




Kentucky, die defending champion, by 

^. OTth Carolina and Min- placed in the Southeast and will face 
Jackson State on Thursday at Memphis, 
Tennessee. 






•*> K 


T .. 




: ■ ■ - r c 

J - '^v. 

•' : a 
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rv 


oesota as die highest-seeded teams in a 
64-team field announced Sunday in 
Kansas City, Missouri. 

In certain outraged precincts, the 
brackets that will lead to a national cham- 
• pi oc ship matchup on die night of March 
-31 were immediately characterized for 
which schools were omitted from the 
field rather than for the twimt that will 
begin play Thursday afternoon. 

_ Forty-three of the 64 teams come 
■from nine conferences, including the 
Atlantic Coast Conference and the Big 
Tot, which will each send six teams. 

‘ ‘We were fortunate there were not a 
lot of upsets,” said Terry Holland, the 
University of Virginia athletic director 
and chairman of the nine-member tour- 
nament committee. He was referring to 
•' lower-rated conference tournaments in 
which regular-season champions with 
strong records lose to weaker teams. 

The absence of many such upsets 
opened additional at-large positions to 
teams from power leagues. But the list 
; of high-profile teams not to make the 
-field includes Syracuse and West Vir- 
ginia from the Big East, which received 
just four bids, plus Fresno State of the 
Western Athletic Conference and 
Michigan of the Big Ten. 

*• North Carolina, which won the At- 
lantic Coast Conference tournament 
championship Sunday, is seeded first in 
the East. The Tar Heels will meet Fair- 
field on Thursday at Winston-Salem, 
'North Carolina. A top-seeded team has 
never lost a first-round game since the 
-current format began in 1985. 

* A normally routine game, will have 
-historic proportions. With a victory 
Thursday, Dean Smith, the North Car- 
Y-olioa coach, would tie die record of 876 


Minnesota, the Big Ten champion, 
maintained a No. 1 position in the Mid- 
west despite its loss at Wisconsin on 
Saturday. The Golden Gophers, 26-3, 
will open Friday at Kansas City against 
Southwest Texas State of the Southland 
Conference. 

Kentucky, 30-4, the defending cham- 
pion. was placed in the West, where the 
Wildcats will meet Montana on 
Thursday at Salt Lake City. 

The dominance of the power con- 
ferences in the 34 at-large positions 
came despite a willingness by the com- 
mittee to consider teams from smaller 
leagues. 

“The committee has focused very 
carefully on teams from leagues that 
have only one representative,” Holland 
said. “I think what you will find is that 
regular-season champions won their 
tournaments this year.” 

There were two significant excep- 
tions. Fairfield of the Metro Atlantic 
Athletic Conference and Jackson State 
of the Southwestern Athletic Confer- 
ence became the 12th and 13th teams in 
tournament histoiy to make the field 
despite having losing records. 

The Big East receded four bids, a tie 
for the league’s fewest representatives 
since 1981. The Big 12, Pacific-10, At- 
lantic Ten and Southeastern conferences 
each received five bids. 

Jim Boebeim. the coach of the Syra- 
cuse Orangemen, national fi nalis ts a year 
ago, and Gale Catlett of West Virginia 
each spoke strongly about the worthiness 
of their teams. Instead the league was 
loft with bids only for Villanova, Boston 
College, Providence and Georgetown. 




SPORTS 


PEClO'.AL 

FINAL 


MIDWEST 


1 Hfcin—oti (27-3 ) 

fttgy I 

Il6 5.W. Texas SL (1HJ) 

8 Mtofawippl (20-8 ) SuXBT 

Hdar \ 


9 Temple (19-10) 

[ 5 Tlri»a(23-9) 

Frktoy j- 

12 Boston U. (25-4) 

4 Ctetnson (21-9) 

Friday j — 

fl3 Werti, Ohio ( 21 - 8 ) 

I fl low StetB i 


Mareii 20 
Sen Mm 




FINAL FOUR 


1997 NCAA 
Men’s Basketball 
Tournament 




P 2 CIGNA 
PINAL 


I 


REG’CNAL ■ 22 

SENiiFINAL ■ RCJNC 


ThirtdBy 


Marti 22 
San Amor la 


11 NKnoto State (24-5) 
| 3 cmrinnrtl (2S-7) 
TNwrty f — 

It 4 Buttar (23-S) 

7 Xaarier(22-5) 

Thureday \ — 

ho VandMWft (18-11) 
2 UCLA (19-71 


Satuntsy 


Marti 20 
SeiAntono 


Sattrtay 


Thursday 



hS C hart eaton Southern (17-12) 


SEM FINAL 

March 29 
Wnapcfe 


WEST 


Kanrtcfcy (30-41 
ttx^y r 


116 


( 21 - 10 ) 


8 Iowa (21-9) 
Tluxaday 


Sanaday 


j 9 Vtaylnta (18-12) 

S Barton Cofl. (21 -8) 
Thndiy j — 


Marti 20 
Sen Jose. Cafl. 


|12 Valparaiso (24-6) 

4 St Joseph's (24 -6) 

Tto&it \ 

|l3 Pacific (24-5) 

i 6 Stanford 120-7) 
Finlay 


Satudsy 


Marti 22 
San Jose. CaSL 


|lt OMahoma (19-10) 

3 Wato Foraat (23 -6) Saxto|1 

J. FtWay 1 

Il4 SL Mary*. CaL (23-7) M»rti 20 
1 San Josa, CaSL 

; 7 HC.-Chartotte(21-8) 


Fnlay 


jlO Georgetown ( 20 - 0 ) 


2 Utah 126-3) 
Frtay 


Sinday 


FINAL 

March 31 

Lut u r - 

raanapoiB 


S L Carofina (24-6) 1 
— | Thinday 


SAoday 


FaWWd (11-18) 16 
bMflana ( 22 - 10 ) 8 


Thursday 


Marti 21 
Syracuse, K.Y. 


Colorado {21-9) 9| 

CaHtarato ( 21 - 8 ) 5| 
J Tlusday 


Sflintey 


Prtnooton (24-3) 12 

Viflanoim (23-6) 4 
-j_ Thursday 


Marti 23 
Syracuse. MY. 


Suiday 


Long (aland U. (21-8) 13 1 

LoutewlHa (23-8) 6 

} ^ 

UMau (18-13) 11 


Ma w Mrndco (2A-7) 
-[ 


Marti 21 
Syracuse, MY. 


Old Dominion (22-10) 14 
7 


SEMTRNAL 
Marti 29 
incfenapofe 


Wtoconatn (18-9) 
—I Fnday 


Stddsy 


Texas (16-11) 10 
S - _ Carolina (24-7) 2 

— I Fraky 


Coppln State (21-8) 15 | 


SOUTHEAST 


i^^jlaclcaon Sl (14-15) '6 

iww.nzjj)., 8 

" | Tlairsday 

Rhode Island (20-9) 9 


Marti 2i 
SrmnBtiaiB.Ata. 


ML 


Thursday 


ColL of Chorleaton (28-2) T2 
Satutday 

7 Arizona (19-9) 4 


Thunday 


Marti 23 
B a n w y a m, Ah. 


South Alabama (23-6) 13 | 
Ifflnota (21-8) 6 1 

T 


Southern Cal (17-10) IT 
Sunday 

Georgia (24-8) 3 


Fnday 


Terun. -Chattanooga (22-10) 14 
Marti 21 

Biminpan.AtL ( 22 - 8 ) 7 


Friday 


Suitay 


Providence (21-11) 10 


Putal (23-8) 2 


|*5 Navy (208) 


A Friday 


The Ncu- York Times 


Murray State (208) 15 




Kentucky 
Cruises to Win 
SEC Crown 


The Associated Press 

The Kentucky coach Rick Pitino 
called the Southeastern Conference's 
tournament a dress rehearsal for the 
NCAA's, and he gave his Wildcats a 
good review after they beat No. 24 
Georgia, 95-68. in the SEC final . 

“I don't know that we can play any 
better.” Pitino said. 

No. 6 Kentucky, the reigning NCAA 
champion, had a double-digit lead after 
10 minutes and was never less than 20 
points ahead for the final 15:57. 

But Georgia can take heart from the 
recent history of the SEC tournament. In 
each of the last three years, the touma- 

College Basketball 

ment runner-up has gone farther in the 
NCAA tourney than the SEC champ. 

Last year, Mississippi State beat Ken- 
tucky in the SEC championship game, 
but Kentucky won the NCAA tide. In 
1995. Kentucky beat Arkansas in the 
SEC championship, but Arkansas 
reached the NCAA championship while 
Kentucky lost in the regional finals. In 
1994, Kentucky beat Florida for the 
SEC title, but Florida reached the Final 
Four while Kentucky lost in the second 
round. 

Pacific 63, Nevada 55 In Reno, 
Nevada, Tim Bowman sewed 10 of his 
25 points in the final 2:07 as the Tigers 
(24-5) earned their first berth in the 
NCAA tournament in 18 years. 

In games reported in some editions 
Sunday: 

No.i Kansas 87, Missouri GO Top- 
ranked Kansas closed the inaugural Big 
12 tournament with impressive perfor- 
mances at both ends of the floor. 

The Jayhawks (32-1) beat the only 
team to beat them this season in the first- 
year league's title game Sunday. 

No. 4 North C aro l ina 64, N. Carolina St. 

54 In Greensboro. North Carolina, the 
Tar Heels (24-6) won their 14th Atlantic 
Coast Conference title and their 13th 
under coach Dean Smith, who got his 
875th career victory, one short of Ad- 
olph Rupp, the career leader. 


Ewing’s Heroics Power Knicks Over Bulls 


j' . 

J. ' : 

-ri i - 

ssr-S : 

i 

V • 


L...V. 


The Associated Press 

- Last year's Bulls are safe. It doesn't 
look like this year’s Bulls are going to 
"make it to 73 victories. 

Loss No. 8 came Sunday for Chicago, 
which finally made its first visit of the 
season to Madison Square Garden and 
•lost, 97-93, to die New York Knicks. 

The Bulis-need to finish the season 
*20-1 to break die record set last year 
-when they went 72-10, and Michael 
Jordan seemed to count out the pos- 
sibility when the subject was brought up 
-after the loss Sunday. 

' “This ream doesn’t have the mental 
pressure of trying to get to 72 or 70 wins 
because we did that last, year — the 
pressure is to defend what we have,” 
Jordan said. At 52-8, they still have the 
best record in the league. 

New York’s victory gave the Knicks 
! a 47-16 record. Patrick Ewing scored 32 
points and banked in the clinching shot 
from the corner with 7.7 seconds left 

Jordan t red 36 for die Bulls, who 
c3ttw» most of the way back from a 14- 
.point deficit in the final six minute s. 

Jordan made a bank shot with 1:05 
left and acoraer jumper with 29 seconds 
remaining to pull the Bulls to 95-93. The 


Knicks then dribbled the clock down 
and passed the ball to Ewing, who threw 
up a corner jumper over Robert Parish. 
The shot kissed off the top left comer of 
the backboard and wen tin — despite the 
almost impossible angle for a bank shot 
— and gave New York an insurmount- 
able four-point lead. 

«Isb 1 15, Tmbwwofves 1 06 Utah bad 
little trouble on the first stop of its 
seven-game, 1 1-day road trip, as Kari 


IMP 


Malone became just the fifth player in 
NBA history to amass 25.000 points and 
10,000 rebounds. 

1MI Blazers 103, SuperSonics 93 In 
Portland, the Trail Blazers won their 
sixth in a row as Rider scored 25 
points and Gary Trent came off the bench 
to scare 23 on 10-for-l 1 shooting. 

Rockets 88, Mavericks 83 Kevin Wil- 
lis had 19 points and 10 rebounds as 
Houston improved to 4-0 on its five- 
game road tap. 

Suns 121, Magic 85 In Phoenix, Wes- 
ley Person scored 31 points, hitting a 
career-high seven 3-pointers, and Kevin 
Johnson had 13 of his 19 points in a 


lopsided second quarter. 

Lakers 115, Nets lOO At Inglewood, 
California, Eddie Jones had career highs 
of 34 points and 13 rebounds, and be 
scored 12 points in a 29-5 ran as the 
Lakers held New Jersey without a field 
goal for 9:45. 

78ers 99, Bidets 93 Jerry Stackhouse 
played all 48 minutes and carried visiting 
Philadelphia down the stretch by scoring 
1 1 of his 24 points in the fourth quarter. 

Warriors 102, Kings 98 In San Jose, 
California, LarreU Sprewell scored 20 
points and Mark Price added 15. The 
Warriors, who never led until midway 
through the fourth quarter, made all 13 
of their free throws in the final period. 

In games reported in some Monday 
editions: 

Hcmete 82, Meat 76 Glen Rice had 21 
points as Charlotte built a 28-point lead 
and then held off Miami. 

Hawks 114, Cdties 90 In Boston, At- 
lanta scored the first 19 points of the 
game and won its fourth straight. 

Raptora81, GrtazDaa 77 Toronto over- 
came its 33.7 percent shooting by 
grabbing 53 rebounds, including a club- 
record 27 offensive boards, against vis- 
iting Vancouver. 



Devils Still Have Edge 
Over Streaking Sabres 


The Assoc i card Press 

The Buffalo Sabres have 
lost only twice in their last 1 7 
games. Both defeats have 
been to New Jersey. 

On Sunday, the Devils re- 
bounded from a 5-1 loss to the 


Nl 


IMP 


Bit! KoaBoas/nir AweaMed fYen 


Michael Jordan!, right, passing against the Knicks. 


New York Islanders on Sat- 
urday to beat Buffalo, 4- 1 . 

John MacLean set up two 
of New Jersey’s three goals in 
the second period. Dave An- 
dreychuk scored into an open 
net’ with 58 seconds left for 
his 499th career goal. 

Mighty Ducks 2, Avalanche 

2 In Denver, Paul Kariya 
scored after eight seconds for 
Anaheim which then fell 2-1 
behind before Teemu 
Selanne scored during a 5- 
on-3 power play with 3:18 
left 

Bruins 3, Pant h ers 1 Flor- 


ida dropped its fourth straight 
game as Boston's goalie, Jim 
Carey, made 26 saves and 
Tim Sweeney scored twice. 

Flyers 5, Capitals O John 
LeClair scored twice, Eric 
Lindros had four assists and 
Ron Hextall registered his 
fourth shutout this season as 
Philadelphia beai visiting 
Washington. 

Lightning 2 , Flames 1 In 

Tampa, Rob Zamuner scored 
with 2:40 left in overtime and 
the Lightning's goalie. Corey 
Schwab, made 44 saves in a 
rare start. 

Rangers 2, Sharks 1 1n San 

Jose, Wayne Gretzky, the 
NHL assists leader with 66, 
assisted on both New York 
goals. 

Oilers 4, Blues 1 Doug 
Weight had two goals and an 
assist and Curtis Joseph 
stopped 26 shots for Edmon- 
ton at Sl Louis. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


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.-ieitefisSU., .-ao- - ‘■•“w h 


PAGE 20 


ART BUCHWALD 


4 Gore’s on the Line 9 


W ASHINGTON — 
While defending his 
role in the Democratic fund- 
raising controversy. Vice 
President Gore said that he 
had done nothing illegal, but 
be won T t do it again. 

A pp ar e ntly, one of Gore's 
duties was to make telephone 
calls to pro- 
spective con- 
tributors and 
shake their 
money trees. 

What he said 
is anybody’s 
guess. 

’‘IB, this is 

SSWS B “ 

making a legal telephone call 
to you.” 

“This is an honor, Mr. 
Vice President. Why would 
you call me?” 

“Because the president 
told me what a great Amer- 
ican you are. He said, 
‘How I'd love to play a 
no-conflict-of-interest golf 
game with Philip Dellin 
ger.’ ‘Why?* I asked the 
president. He replied, ‘Be- 
ie lonees 


of anyone in Little Rock. 1 " 
“When did the president 



say that?” 

“Yesterday morning when 
he was having breakfast with 
eight Chinese businessmen 
and an aims dealer from 
Pakistan. It was all perfectly 
legal because we only served 
decaffeinated coffee.” 

“What do I have to do to 
play golf with the presi- 
dent?^ Phil wanted to know. 

“Don't cheat on your 
score.” 


□ 


cause he hits the longest bail 


Egypt Unveils Statue 
Of Ancient Family 

Ratters 

CAIRO — Egypt unveiled 
Monday a statue of a woman 
and four childrea probably 
carved in a royal workshop at 
least 3,000 years ago and 
found last week by a man 
digging foundations for a 
house m the Nile Delta. 

Ali Hassan, the govern- 
ment's chief Egyptologist, 
told a news conference the 
meter-high inlai d statue 
ranked in quality with some 
of the best pieces in the Egyp- 
tian Museum in Cairo. Has- 
san said be had ordered ar- 
chaeologists to comb the area 
in case there are others 
nearby. 


“Could I make a donation 
to the Democratic Party?” 

“We never mix golf with 
fund-raising. But if you 
would like to drop something 
in the 18th hole to help save 
this great country, we 
wouldn't turn you down be- 
cause our lawyers have as- 
sured us that it is legal.” 

* ‘If I gave $250,000. would 
that be legal?” 

“It would be more than 
legaL It would definitely be in 
the ballpark. However, the 
gift only entitles you to put- 
ting on the green with the 
president of the United States, 
and taking one shower in the 
Lincoln Bedroom when the 
game is finished.” 

Phil said, “That sounds 
like something I’d enjoy do- 
ing. When can we tee off?” 


□ 


“How about tomorrow 
morning before the president 
addresses a fund-raiser given 
by the Loyal Sons of Sultans 
of the Oval Office?” 

“Great Is there anything I 
should bring besides my golf 
clubs?” 

“That's it The Democrat- 
ic National Committee sup- 
plies the balls. Thar’s why it’s 
all legal.” 

“What does the party ex- 
pect from me after I donate 
$250,000?” 

“Just be yourself. Phil/’ 


A Director Long at the Edge Crosses a Border 


By Joel Simon 

iter York Times Service 


P ALENQUE. Mexico — It took four 
workers and two bulldozers to plow a 
road through the bush to the hill where John 
Sayles wanted to film a scene for his new 
movie. It took six more laborers with ma- 
chetes to clear the hillside of scrub, dodging 


tarantulas and scorpions as they went. 
Filming here in M« 


lexico’s jungle has not 
been easy. But Sayles knows that these 
obstacles pale in comparison with the one 
that lies ahead: persuading American audi- 
ences to see his Spanish -language film, 
* ‘Hombres Armados' ’ (the English-subtitled 
version will be called “Men With Guns”). 
The story is based on the Guatemalan civil 
war. which ended only last December after 
raging for 36 years. 

* 'Action!” Sayles shouted on a recent day 
of shooting. A Mayan Indian actor raised a 
gun to the head of another actor in a scene in 
which soldiers force villagers to execute 
their neighbors. 

“Cone,' ’ Sayles said when the scene was 
completed. "Bueno. Muy bueno .” 

Sayles. 46, has always been interested in 
Latin American culture. In addition to mak- 
ing “Lone Star.” about a Texas border town, 
he wrote a well-received book. “Los 
Gusanos,” in 1991 about Cubans in Miami. 
Now he has literally crossed the border, 
filming in Mexico with Spanish-speaking 
actors. 

As a child, when he visited his grand- 
parents in Florida, Sayles was fascinated 
with how the Cuban exodus was transform- 
ing the culture. In his 20s he lived in a 
Cficano neighborhood in Santa Barbara, 
California. 

Later he lived near a Puerto Rican neigh- 
borhood in Hoboken, New Jersey. His pro- 
ducer and companion. Maggie Renzi, com- 
plained that she was living with a man “who 
was obsessed with teaching himself Span- 
ish.” 

“Hombres Armados” may mark Sayles 
as a man in the thick of things; Latin-themed 
films like “Selena,” “Zapata” and 
’ ’Zorro ” are also expected to be released this 
year, although in English. Or “Hombres 
Armados” may be too difficult for even John 
Sayles to pull off. He already has a reputation 
as an uncompromising director driven to 
make movies without regard for their com- 
mercial potential. 

Since his debut in 1980 with “Return of 





STuof 1. 

John Sayles on the set in Mexico of his new movie;, “Hombres Armados.'’ 


the Secaucus Seven,” he has made 11 films 
and tackled sensitive subjects like lesbian- 
ism (“Lianna,” 1983). race relations (“The 
Brother From Another Planet,” 1984), and 
JaboT unions (“Matewan,” 1987). 

While Sayles has not been terribly dis- 
criminating about his work as a screenwriter 
for hire — the h or ro r movie “Pi ranha ” was 
one of his credits — be demands total artistic 
control over his own films. 

His tales are well constructed and full of 
complex characters and morally ambiguous 
resolutions. And whQe he has never had a 
blockbuster hit, be has made money on his 
movies consistently. His last two films have 
been critical and commercial successes. 
“The Secret of Roan Irtish.” a fanciful film 
set in Ireland and released in 1994, was well 
received as a family film, while ‘ ‘Lone Star' ' 
was nominated for an Oscar this year for best 
original screenplay. 

Sayles could have used the success of 
“Lone Star” as a springboard for a more 
commercial project, but instead decided to 
make a movie based on his passion for Latin 
American culture. In fact, in recent years. 
Sayles's themes have been moving steadily 
south. “It's the neighbors,” he said, ex- 
plaining his fascination with Latin America. 
“I’m interested in what separates people.” 


- “Hombres Armados” is set in a fictional 
1 atj n American country, but Sayles says it 
closely resembles Guatemala, whose civil 
war began in 1960. That conflict left more 
than lOOJJOO dead, a million people dis- 
placed and hundreds of Mayan villages 
razed, yet it largely escaped the world's 

ft fruition - .... 

Sayles began thinking about foe project 
five years ago, when a friend told him a story 
about doctors in a United Nations health 
program who were sent out into the coun- 
tryside by the Guatemalan military and 
murdered. • 

The script loosely follows that account, 
tellin g foe story of a well-to-do physician, 
Humberto Fuentes, who, like many people in 
Guatemala City, is unaware of the slaughter 
going on in the Indian villages. 

When Fuenies decades to drive into foe 
countryside to find the doctorshe trained, he 
gets a primer on Latin American exploi- 
tation, visiting a sugar plantation, a coffee 
plantation and a rubber camp, where Indians 
are practically enslaved. The doctor dis- 
covers a country in ashes: Towns have been 
annihilated, and his students have been 
murdered in cold blood. 

Sayles. who films in realistic locations 
with much historical research, was con-. 


cerned that his story would notbe believable 
if he cast &gUsh-speaking aptc^s as Latin 
. Ameri cans. So he hsed a bilingual casting 
director, Lizzie Martinez of Austin. Texas, to 
find talent He settled on Fbderico Luppi, a 
successful Argentine actor, as foe lead. 

The s uppor ti n g cast is. made up mostly of 
Mexican actors, several of whoixiareweU 
known here. Sayles also cast Mayan actors, 
who perform in their native tongues.— four 
different languages aroused in foe movie. 

Two Americans actors, including Mandy 
FatinJdii, have small roles in English. ' 

Sayles directs is a workaday Spanish that 
he taught hims elf while researching * ‘Los 
Gusanos. ” He originally wrote the script for 
“Hombres Armados” in simple Spanisnand 
wrote a~second draft in Englifo. He trans- 
lated the English version back into Spanish, 
then had a Mexican correct his grammar. 
Finally, he asked a Chfleanjo edit out foe. 
Mexican slang to make the Spanish more 
generic. .: ■ ■ . -. - 

Even though foe movie is set. in Latin 
America, Sayles sees its themes as raaversaL 
“This movie is about whether innocence is a 
sin,” he said, referring to Fuenies s willful 
ignorance about foe killings- in the coun- 
tryside- “ As far. as I'm concerned, it's your 
job to know.” 

By using Spanish to make the movie more 
authentic. Sayles knew he might sacrifice, 
part of his audieoce. He cerrairily made the 
project less appealing for investors, who 
might lured by toe success of “Lone Star.” . 

£ fact, when Sayles showed the.- script of 
* ‘Hombres Armados” to Renzi — his com- 
panion of 23 years and producer of nine of 
his 1 1 film*; - — she nearly bowed out. Renzi 
thought the movie would dost $5 million to. 
make; Sayles thought $1 million. 

“John had Bus fantasy that everyone 
would just i^Ie in a van and -drive around. 
Mexico,” Rena said.' 




Knowing that the movie will play to a 
all art-house 


small art-house audience in the United 
States,, he plans to recoup much of his in- 
vestment by . selling ‘ ‘Hombres Armados” 
overseas, particularly in Europe, where audi- 
ences are accustomed to watching subtitled 
movies. 

With an eye to international distribution, 
Sayles wrote the Spanish dialogue in short, 
simple phrases that could be easily translated 
into subtitles. “You can only fit 32 char- 
acters, including spaces, on the screen at one 
time,” he explained. “It’s kind of like writ- 
ing haiku.” •• 



nicrf-nrr 




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J-,r 


PEOPLE 


I N WHAT could be a bellwether for 
the Academy Awards, the Directors 
Guild of America has saluted Anthony 
MingheHa for directing foe critically 
acclaimed epic “The English Patient” 
The film stars Ralph Fiennes and 
Kristin Scott Thomas. It has been nom- 
inated for ] 2 Academy Awards, includ- 
ing best director. Since 1949, all but four 
winners of the feature film award have 
gone on to win the Oscar for best di- 
rector. Mingbella beat out Mike Leigh 
for “Secrets and Lies." Joel Coen for 
“Fargo,” Scott Hicks for “Shine” and 
Cameron Crowe for “Jerry Maguire.” 
Al Pacino, best known as the star, of 
such gangster movies as “The God- 
father,” won the best documentary di- 
rector award for “Looking For 
Richard,” an examination of William 
Shakespeare's “Richard HL” 


double-A side, “Mama/Who Do You 
Think You Are?” Profits from foe hit 
will be donated to charity. The Spice 
Girts — Geri, Victoria, Mel B, Mel C 
and Emma — have surpassed foe 
achievements of Gerry and foe Pace- 
makers, Frankie Goes to Hollywood, 
Jive Bunny and Robson and Jerome, 
who all hit No. 1 with their first three 
singles. The group began their run of 
hits with debut single “Wannabe” and 
followed it up with “Say You’ll Be 
There” and “2 Become 1.” "Wan- 
nabe” was No. 1 in the United States, a 
feat that evaded even the Beaties’ debut 
single. 


author said the French cultural author- 
ities should do something to stop the 
movie's “scandalous and obscene” ex- 
ploitation of the story. 

' D ‘ 

Elizabeth Taylor is out of the hospital ' 
fallowing a week of treatment and ob- 
servation for a seizure that followed sur- 
gery to remove a benign brain tumor. A 
hospital spokesman called the seizure a 
common after-effect of brain surgery. 

□ 


minivan full of godparents in atten- 
dance. In foe ceremony, William af- 
firmed his acceptance of the teachings 
of the Church of England, of which the 
prince is destined to be tire head: 


U " 


□ 


□ 


tied ProuKi/tiraira 


Al Pacino accepting the Directors Guild award for bis documentary. 


The Spice Girls have made pop mu- 
sic history after they became the first 
group to top the British charts with their 
first four singles. The all-girl band shot 
straight to the No. 1 spot with foeir new 


Descendants of Victor Hugo are wa- 
ging a war of words to protect foeir 
forefather’s reputation from foe ravages 
of Walt Disney. Charles, Adele, 
Jeanne, Sophie aid Leopoldine Hugo 
have accused foe American entertain- 
ment giant of “cultural pillage” over its 
blockbuster version of “The Hunch- 
back of Notre Dame.’ ' The great-great- 
great-grandchildren of the 19th-century 


With tickets going for as much as 
S2.500, you’d think the Three Tenors 
would at least start foeir Miami concert 
on time. But the 25-minute delay was 
only a small glitch as Ludano Pavarotti, 
Jose Carreras and PSaddo Domingo 
dazzled 42.000 people at Pro Player Sta- 
dium. 


□ 


Prince William, 14, elder son of 
Prince Charles and Princess Diana, 
was confirmed — with ins parents mak- 
ing a rare joint public appearance, and a 


.Christopher Buckley did not give 
his new book the title “Wry Martinis” 
just so he could serve martinis al his 
book signing appearances, but that is not 
a bad idea, he said. Asked what re- 
lationship foe title bears to the book, a 
collection of essays, he said, “None;” 
But creating it was no easy task. “It was 
very tough,” he said. “I went through 
about 10 tides, starting with ‘Oeuvre to 
You,' and going on to ‘Want to Buy a 
Dead Dictator' and ‘FedExLax and Oth- 
er Mergers.’ ” None of them passed 
muster with Jonathan Karp, Buckley's 
editor. “1 was very gloomy about it,” 
Buckley said, “and one day while I was 
in the midst of shaving or showering orj? 
some other bodily function, the title 
came to me. I was hoping that people' 
would mistake it for a book on mixology 
and make me accidentally rich.” 


'for a l 



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