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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The World’s Daily Newspa ner 

CIA Agent 
In Germany 
Might Have 
Spied on Iran 

Intelligence Officials 
Deny US* Targeted 
German Technology 

By Walter Pincus 

w ashingiun Post Service ; 

' WASHINGTON -The CIA officer I 

who was ordered out of Germany re- 
cendy was working on gathering in- 
: formation there about a third country, 
probably Iran, according to American 
intelligence sources. 

Germany expelled the officer to em- 
phasize a new demand that it be kept 
informed of Central Intelligence 
Agency operations inside its borders, 
the sources said, and not because of 
anger that the United Slates was cov- 
ertly gathering economic intelligence 
about Germany, as initial German re- 
ports had suggested. 

‘ ‘This was a shot across the bow" by t 
the German government, an intelligence 
specialist said Monday. 

The initial report Saturday by the 
German magazine Der Spiegel said the 
CIA officer, who was working under 
diplomatic cover, was expelled for try- " 
mg to gather economic data relating to 
high-technology projects. 

But a U.S. government source said 
the target was not the German gov- c 
•* emment “but a third country.” The t 
source would not identify the target, but ( 
other intelligence sources said the CIA I 
has actively used Germany, and par- i 
ocularly now-closed facilities in Frank- 
furt and Hamburg, tocarry out activities t 
against Iran and Libya over the years. p 

The German government has been a 
asking in recent years to be kept in- 2 
formed of intelligence operations car- ii 
ried out within its borders, a desire for ii 
wbat the intelligence community terms h 
“greater transparency." 

“Germany has come of age/ 'asenior Z 
State Department official said, "and is b 
saying as far as intelligence is concerned, le 
‘This is our country and whatever was aj 
done in the past most change. N 

"This event is not going to spoil p 
relations between German Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl and the Clinton admin- g 

o 

See SPY, Page 8 a 


Paris, Wednesday, March 12, 1997 




No. 35.467 



SATO and Moscow 
Nearing Agreement 

Russia Would Get Membership 
In G-7 as Part of Eventual Deal 


SHEEP-LIKE LEGISLATORS — Green Party members of the European Parliament keeping identical 
straight faces Tuesday in Strasbourg as the commissioner for research, Edith Cresson, called for ethics 
panels in each member state to monitor doning-related issues following the duplication of an adult mammal. 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Senn c 

BERLIN — After three rounds of 
calks, Russia and NATO have achieved 
sufficient progress toward a new stra- 
tegic partnership so that an agreement 
could be ready for signing by President 
Boris Yeltsin and the alliance's 16 
heads of state at a special summit meet- 
ing in May or June, senior NATO dip- 
lomats said. 

In a key concession. Russia now 
seems ready to drop its insistence on a 
legally binding treaty that would need to 
be ratified by ail parliaments, and has 
signaled a willingness to accept 
NATO's preference for a political doc- 
ument endorsed by government leaders, 
the diplomats said. In return, the dip- 


Zaire Braces for Fall of Kisangani and Mobutu 

An Assault on the Political Class In Kinshasa, a Sense of Resignation 


By Howard W. French 

/VWt York Times Service 

KINSHASA. Zaire — Almost every 
day, a few score members of Zaire's 
transitional assembly show up at the 
Chinese-built House’ of the People, a 
Parliament building as monumental as 
its name is far-fetched. 

The discussions inside are animated, 
but are as likely to be about soccer, 
private business deals or girlfriends as 
about affairs of state. Never mind that 
Zaire’s government is being humiliated 
in a war against rebel forces in the ease 
it has been months since the assembly 
has produced any new laws. 

Things have not always been so. 
Zaire’s 784-member Parliament was 
bom of a political crisis in 1990. and the 
legislators responded -decisively, man- 
aging to strip Zaire’s dictator. Marshal 
Mobutu Sese Seko, of much of his 
power. 

What it did not do is get down to 
governing Zaire. Instead, a combination 
of corruption, back-room maneuvering 
and inexperience with democracy have 


made this country's bloated assembly, 
like most of its institutions, almost com- 
pletely irrelevant to the life of a nation in 
collapse. 

If most people see Zaire's five-month 
armed rebellion, led by Laurent Kabila, 
as an attack on the decrepit power of the 
cancer-stricken Marshal Mobutu, it is no 
less an assault on an entire political class. 
In seven years of sporadic effort, polit- 
ical insiders and die opposition alike 
have shown themselves incapable of 
fashioning a workable future for Zaire. 

With the failure of politics, many have 
wanned to the idea of a transformation by 
the gun. Although they can only guess 
what the rebels might offer Zaire, fresh 
recruits and hordes of jubilant citizens are 
rallying to their cause as the insurgency 
gallops rhrough the countryside. 


gallops inrougn the countryside. 

"For seven years this government 
has been unable to do anything for its 
people, and has been absolutely power- 
less to slow this rebellion,” a Western 
diplomat said. "You wonder if the way 
things are going isn’t for the bener. 

See REBELS, Page 8 


By James Rupert 

Washington Post Se nice 

KINSHASA. Zaire — As rebels pre- 
pare to assault the northeastern city of 
Kisangani. Zairians and foreign diplo- 
mats say military and political power is 
continuing to slip away from the gov- 
ernment of Marshal Mobutu Sese Seko. 

Among foreign and Zairian analysts 
here, the question of whether Kisangani 
will fall is no longer much discussed. The 
focus now is on what will happen to this 
massive, fractious country when it does. 

Several analysts said families of senior 
political and military figures were leav- 
ing Kinshasa, the capital, anticipating 
that the fall of Kisangani would suddenly 
end Marshal Mobutu’s 31-year reign. 
Newspapers speculare about whether the 
loss of Kisangani would trigger a military 
coup against Marshal Mobutu, who is at 
his villa in southern France recuperating 
from treatment for cancer. 

In addition, according to some in Kin- 
shasa, there are whispers that perhaps 
the era of Marshal Mobutu — who gave 
Zaire its name and whose corrupt, re- 


pressive government has robbed it of its 
riches and stability — is already over. 

"People are learning to ignore 
Mobutu," Bruno Lokuta. a leader of a 
prominent human-rights group here, 
said. "They don't even ask whether he 
is present or absent." 

With the government excluding jour- 
nalists from Kisangani, there is little 
information available on the situation 
there. The government has denied a 
claim by a rebel spokesman that the city 
is surrounded by forces of the coalition 
of anti-Mobutu groups that has seized 
much of eastern Zaire amid only token 
army resistance. Kisangani’s location 
on the Zaire River means the rebels 
would have to cross the river to seaJ the 
city off, and there is no clear evidence 
they have done so. 

[Zairian rebels said Tuesday they had 
seized a port in the southern mining re- 
gion of Shaba and would soon capture 
Kisangani. Reuters reported from Goma. 

[The French government, which 
backs Marshal Mobutu, denounced 

See ZAIRE, Page 8 


lomats said. Western leaders now' seem 
prepared to offer Russia full member- 
ship in the Group of Seven leading 
industrial nations. 

The new flexibility was evident in the 
latest discussions on a NATO-Russia 
pact that were held Sunday night in 
Moscow by Foreign Minister Yevgeni 
Primakov and the NATO secretary -gen- 
eral, Javier Solaria Madariaga. Mr. Pri- 
makov may elaborate further on Mos- 
cow's new thinking when he visits 
Washington later this week to plan the 
U.S.-Russia talks scheduled for Hel- 
sinki next week. 

Western officials close to the talks 
said Russia had not muted its hostility 
toward the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization’s planned embrace of new 
democracies in Central Europe, bur now 
seemed closer than ever to cutting a deal 
that would imply acquiescence in the 
granting of NAT6 membership to coun- 
tries such as Poland. Hungary and the 
Czech Republic. 

NATO leaders have declared their 
intention to issue invitations to new 
members at a summit conference in 
Madrid on July 8-9. Russia is now hint- 
ing it wants a separate ceremony mark- 
ing the conclusion of its own agreement 
with NATO ahead of the Madrid meet- 
ing, preferably when leaders of Western 
industrial democracies gather for their 
annual G-7 summit conference in Den- 
ver in late June. 

Mr. Yeltsin has expressed a strong 
desire for Russia to become the eighth 
member of the exclusive club, joining 
the United States, Japan, Germany, 
Italy, France, Britain and Canada. 
While its anemic economy does not 
qualify Russia as a leading industrial 
democracy. Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 
Germany and other European leaders 
say that acceptance of Russia as a full- 
fledged G-7 member is a small price to 
pay if Moscow abandons its opposition 
to NATO enlargement. 

The acceptance of Russia as a full 
member would formalize what already 
is a de facto G-8. Mr. Yeltsin has been 
attending the final day of G-7 meetings 
to participate in economic sessions but 
now will be included in political dis- 
cussions as well. 

Another possibility, NATO officials 
See NATO, Page 4 


For a Few Rich Russians , a Dark Side 


ATS.T 


By AJessandra Stanley 

h V*v York Times Service 

MOSCOW — In the elegant Estee 
Lauder Beauty Center on the sump- 
tuous grounds of the Moscow Country 
Cub, wealthy women fill empty lives 
with facials, massage and the kindness 
of beauticians. 

"To be honest, I am very lonely." 
Elvira Averyanova confided in a whis- 
per. "I am someone who needs human 
contact I try to go to places where I am 
known, and I am greeted warmly.” 

She cited the beauty center, her 
hairdressing salon and an upscale shop- 
ping mg if as her havens from solitude. 

Mrs. Averyanova, a trained pianist 
who gave up working and whose hus- 
band, a successful CD manufacturer, 
never stops, was describing a darker 
side of life among Russia's new rich. 
Like many wives of successful busi- 
nessmen, she is finding that money and 
privilege are shadowed by isolation, 
anxiety and boredom. 

A new phenomenon in post-Soviet 
society, such women represent less 


The Dollar 


NwYorti Tuesday O 4 P.M. previo us dosa 

DM 1,7036 1.7015 

Pound 1.6077 1J037 

Yen 121.785 J 2 ?- 63 - 

FF 5.7435 5 - 741 



7085.16 


dungs * Tuw dBV 8 4 P.M. P™*”* 

-1.B2 B1t23 813.05 


Newsstand Prices 

....10.00 FF Morocco 

_.12.50 FF Qatar 10.00 Riate 

.1.600 CFA R&jnkXi - 1250 ^ 

J3E 5.50 gaud! Arabta...l 0 . 00 R. 

.... 10.00 FF Senegal 1.100 CFA 

..1100 CFA - 225 PTAS 

...2,800 Lire 1.250 Din 

■12»CFA 10.00 Dirt 

ii as 


Andctra — 


j Cameroon. 

[Egypt 

| France — 

I Gabon. 

j Italy 

l\wy Coast 

! Jordan 

I Lebanon...,. 


Women Discover 
Depression Amid 
All Their Wealth 

than 1 percent of the population. The 
vast majority have little choice but to 
work; millions are locked in dead-end 
jobs and have not been paid in months. 
There is little sympathy for the laments 
of ladies of leisure. 

Russia remains a highly sexist so- 
ciety, where women, regardless of mar- 
ital or professional status, are rarely 
allowed a prominent public role. De- 
spite, or perhaps because of. 70 years of 
Soviet lip service to female equality, 
women distrust fe minis m. The few who 
can afford the luxury of not working 
often find that option irresistible — 
particularly when their husbands insist. 

But many who happily quit their jobs 
quickly discovered that it was not the 
liberation they expected. The stay-at- 
home wife has become an important 
status symbol for the new rich, but the 


prestige falls on the husbands far more 
than the wives. 

Psychologists, psychics and mas- 
sage therapists have built flourishing 
practices ministering to such women. 

Sergei Agrachev, a leading psycho- 
logist, charges $60 an hour to guide 
wealthy patients, most of them women, 
through depression and the anxiety that 
often follows sudden wealth. 

Russians have their own special 
psychoses to work through, be said, 
issues of disillusionment that are 
unique to post-Communist society. 

“For 70 years," he said, “we ideal- 
ized the WesL Now we discover that 
wealth really doesn’t buy happiness. 

"Intelligent women who used to 
work in institutes and universities find 
themselves alone at home, entirely de- 
pendent on their husbands. They find out 
that in this brave new world, their role 
has regressed to the 19th century.” 

He is not licensed to prescribe drugs, 
but he said many of his patients dis- 
regarded his advice, overindulging in 

See BORED, Page 4 



Jum Ilium* VhYorhlW* 

Elvira Averyanova at one of her sanctuaries: “I go to places where I am known, and I am greeted warmly.” 



White House and FBI 
Spar on China Briefing 

Clinton Says It Was Secret; Agency Differs 

~ ~ By Peter Baker 

Washingto n Post Service 

WASHINGTON — In a rare public confrontation, the 
White House and the FBI have offered sharply conflicting 
versions of their contacts with each other concerning evidence 
of an alleged Chinese plan to influence U.S. congressional 

^IpresidemBill Clinton said in a news conference Monday that 
he had only recently found out about the alleged involvement of 
a foreign power in the elections because FBI agents who briefed 
National Security Council staff members at the White House 
last summer "for whatever reasons, asked that they not share 
the briefing, and they honored the request’ 1 

Mr. Clinton complained that "the president should know” 
about such matters. 

Within hours, however, the FBI issued a statement saying 
that it had “placed no restriction whatsoever on the dis- 
semination up the chain of command at the NSC on any 
information provided to the NSC senior staff.’ ’ 

The White House refused to back down, countering with its 
own assertion that the FBI was wrong. The White House 
spokesman, Michael McCarty, told reporters that the bureau 
statement was “in error,” 

[Mr. McCixrry maintained that position Tuesday, saying again ' 

See BRIEFING, Page 8 


AGENDA 

Sweden to Probe 
Its Nazi Dealings 

NEW YORK (Reuters) — Sweden 
has agreed to launch a full-scale in- 
vestigation into its wartime dealings 
with the Nazis, the Wold Jewish Con- 
gress said Tuesday. 

The executive director of the or- 
ganization, Elan Steinberg, said 
Sweden had promised a comprehen- 
sive examination of its handling of 
bank accounts of victims of the Holo- 
caust and its trade with the Nazis. 

Sweden was neutral during the war. 
but its relationship with Hitler has 
come inuler scrutiny as part of a probe 
into Swiss dealings with the Nazis. 


Vi 

r l i J 

•• 



Books 


Crossword.... Page 3. 

Opinion 

.. Pages 10-11. 

Sports 

- Pages 24-25. 

Bmmrta, a Sponsored Section Pages 19-22. 

International Classified 

Page 9. 

| The IHT on-line http:. 

7wvvw.iht.com | 



Iidc DaJnghJanfPcnltri 

CHINESE CHIC — Galliano 
went Oriental in his first ready-to- 
wear collection for Dior. Page 12. 


Japan’s Biggest Bank: 
The Local Post Office 

Rural Residents Worit Want It to Change 

By Sandra Sugawara 

Washington Post Se rvice 

HORI, Japan — When S&toko Masuda, 82 and a widow, 
needs some cash, she does not go to the bank. She rings up 
KazuaJri Iemoto, the postmaster of this small farming village. 

Early the next morning, "before I am even out of bed, he 
stops by to pick up my passbook,” Mrs. Masuda says. ‘ ‘Later 
that day, he returns with the money.” 

The postmaster’s efforts do not go unrewarded Mrs. Mas- 
uda is so grateful that sheputs almost all of her savings, not in 
a bank, but in the post office’s own savings system. 

She is not alone. Tens of millions of Japanese maintain 
accounts at the post office, making it the largest financial 
institution in the country. At the end of 1996, money on 
deposit there totaled a stunning $1.8 trillion, more than four 
times as much as at the country’s biggest commercial bank. 

As Japan tries to fix a bankmgsystem that has been pummeled 
by recession and risky lending, it is grappling with a basic issue. 
Should a government agency be sucking up more than one-third 
of the country’s total personal savings and funneling it to 
government-backed loan and development programs? Or 
should market faces be determining where that money goes? 

In many other industries, officials are asking similar questions 
as they seek to retool a paternalistic economic system that 

See POSTMAN, Page 8 








ft 







page mo 



Emerging Albania / Alter Isolation, Chaos 


A Bitter Taste of Capitalism 


By Christine Spolar 

Washington Post Service 


V LORE. Albania — Wounded, sedated and 
stretched out on a hospital bed, Agim Hazizi 
roused himself to fever pitch when asked to de- 
scribe the financial crisis that has spun this country 
into anarchy. “I've worked 32 years," the bus driver shouted- 
“I don't have a house. I don’t have a cent to buy bread.” 

“I have only my head,” he added, pushing himself up 
from a sweat-soaked bed in a dingy room at the hospital 
here. "Let them take my head.” 

After 45 years in the shackles of a repressive Communist 
dictatorship, in isolation from the rest of the world, Al- 
banians had little notion of how capitalism worked when 
communism fell in 1991. 

At least one-quarter of die population sank their life 
savings into get-rich-quick investment funds that were 
essentially pyramid schemes, and seven weeks after they 
began collapsing one after another, thousands of investors 
like Mr. Hazizi are screaming, "Where’s my money!” 

Their ftiry over the government’s failure to warn or 
protect them has escalated from mass demonstrations into a 
deadly revolt. Now a fast-paced, all-out armed rebellion, 
fueled more by avarice and revenge than ideals, is burning 
through the southern half of Europe’s poorest country. 

Last week, protesters who were once ignored by the 
government took on the military and began raiding ware- 
houses and weapons depots. Bands of undisciplined thugs 
have taken over cities throughout southern Albania, where 
President Sali Berisha's support is weakest and the fi- 
nancial losses have been greatest. 

That the collapse of pyramid schemes could shake any 
place so deeply can be understood only by taking into 


account the desperate and corrupt nature of life in Albania 
— and by peeking into the pocketbooks of people like Mr. 
Hazizi, who was shot in a recent gun battle between rebels 
and government security forces. 

Six years after the Communist regime fell, people here 
survive on $40 to $60 a month. Those who have bad the 
most success in these helter-skelter years of change are the 
ones who have operated outside die law, smuggling drugs, 
people or guns through Adriatic ports such as VI ore. 

But the same chaotic conditions that enabled Albania’s 
emerging criminal element to flourish also ensured the 
downfall of honest working people. Strangers to capitalism, 
with no experience in investment or securities, they leaped 
at the impossibly high profits promised by the pyramid 


at the impossibly hign profits promise a py me pyramid 
schemes. Such ploys make big payouts as long as a pool of 
new investors pays up to keep them solvent; when the pool 


investors pays up 
dries up the mirage collapses. 

Mr. Hazizi. who has seven people to care for, tested the 
odds. He sold his home for $25,000 and promptly plowed all 
the money into three funds. Within weeks, the funds went 
belly up. Mr. Hazizi joined the street protests and ended up 
shot "All I want to do is feed my children,” he said. 


A 


ha’s govern 

tried to defuse the uprising — first by cracking 
f-en 


down with a state-of-emergency declaration last 
, week, then by offering to halt military operations 
and grant amnesty to rebels who turn in their weapons — the 
renegades say they will not give up. They blame Mr. Berisha 
for the scandal and have demanded his resignation. 

In an effort to form what he called a "government of 
reconciliation.*' Mr. Berisha offered Sunday to bold new 
elections. The parliamentary voting last May was riddled 
with fraud and gave his Democratic Party a virtual raono- 


Ymma BdntMbctar 


Rebels parading through Permet after seising it from the government Five civilians were hilled 
in the brief fighting for the town, one of several in the south that have fallen in the last week. . 


poly on power. But rebels here see his offer as a stalling 
tactic, and the revolts march on. __ 

The insurgents drove security forces from Vlore on Feb. 
28. Nearby Sarande and Delvine went to die rebels soon 
afterward. Then rebels overran Gjirokaster, near the border 
wiih Greece, on Saturday, and Sunday night the government 
lost control of the towns of Permet and Bern. On Monday, 
the city of Her, crammed with secret police last week, 
appeared to be breaking away from government control. 


Albania Gets New Prime Minister as Revolt Spreads to North 


hr Our Sarff Fran Duptitha 

TIRANA, Albania — President Sali Ber- 
istaa appointed a new prime minister on Tues- 
day as ann«J unrest continued in the south of 
die country and began spreading north. 

Bashkim Fino, an economist from the 
southern town of Gjirokaster and a member 
of the main opposition Socialist Party, re- 
placed Alexander Meksi, a member of the 


governing Democratic Party, who resigned 
last month 


as the unrest erupted. 

Mr. Berisha, his Democratic Party and 
nine opposition parties signed an accord 
over the weekend to establish a national 
unity government and hold elections by June 
in an attempt to find a political solution to the 
insurrection. 

Political parties in Tirana agreed Monday 
to split cabinet posts evenly between the 


Democratic Party and the opposition. But the 
two sides have been deadlocked on who is to 
get the key portfolios, political sources 
said. 

Meanwhile, the anti-govemment revolt 
spread from the south for the first time 
Tuesday, with residents of a major town 
north of Tirana saying insurgents there had 
raided a military base and carted away 
weapons and ammunition. 

Sources contacted by telephone from the 
capital said about 9.000 people were in- 
volved in the raid in Bajram Curri. but there 
was no independent confirmation of this. 

* 'We are ready to stand by the president if 
he needs us.” said one of the residents of 
Bajram Curri. which lies about 20 kilometers 
( 12 miles) from the Serbian border. 

This source said one person was slightly 


injured in a powerful blast of dynamite in 
another weapons depot in town. 

The incident was reported as the insur- 
rection in the south gained ground, with 
rebels capturing several additional towns 
and sticking to theirdemand that Mr. Berisha 
step down. 

With the north generally assumed to be 
loyal to Mr. Berisha. the reported raid there 
further burdened his attempts to defuse the 
armed revolt. 

Parliament was to pass an amnesty to try 
to quell the rebellion, which was set off by 
public rage over high-risk investment 
schemes in which nearly every Albanian 
family lost money. 

In the extreme south of the country, se- 
curity worsened. 

At Rakavia, on the Greek border, aimed 


insurgents shot and killed an Albanian after 
he crossed inro the country Tuesday. Wit- 
nesses said the victim was asked for money 
and was killed after an argument. 

The border station was looted after being 
abandoned by its guards. Shepherds in the 
area were carrying guns to protect their 
flocks from being stolen. 

Overnight, looters cleaned out a state- 
owned hotel in the city of Saranda. 280 
kilometers south of Tirana. The ports of 
Saranda and Vlore. both in the hands of 
insurgents, were declared closed Tuesday 
until further notice, state media reported. 

The police recovered a van Monday full of 
weapons stolen from army garrisons in fieri, 
1 13 kilometers south of the capital, but pro- 
testers made off with many more, a local 
reporter said. ( Reuters, AP, AFP ) 


The upheaval has revived some old. divisions -between - 
north and south. The regions are ethnically divided -*Gegr 
predominate in the north. Tosks and Greeks in the south — 
but their rivalry is now primarily politicaL . 


El 


NVER Hoxha, the isolationist dictator who ruled 
Albania from 1945 to 1985, was from the south, 
and the region remains a stronghold of the Socialist 

Party, successors to Mr. Hoxha 's Communists. Mr. 

Berisha, who grew up in the mountainous far north, came to 
power in 1992 and has surrounded himself wiih northerners 
— in particular, bodyguards and secret police. • 

But the north-south divide appears to lave little to dowitb 
why the south is in flames while the north remains relatively 
calm. Rather, capitalism — in its legal and illegal forms — 
had yielded relatively more in the south, giving southerners 
more money to invest, and lose, in the pyramid schemes. ” 
Mr. Berisha and the political opposition have held sev- 
eral rounds of talks aimed at ending the crisis, but the 
political debate in the capital has no echo here in Vlore. 

One has only to look around the homes of people like 
Katerina Dhimgjoka. a schoolteacher, to see why they warn 
a change in government. 

Miss Dhimgjoka played the pyramid scam for four years' 
and used the 25 percent return on her investments to retile 
her floor, fill her apartment with furniture, buy such West- 
ern luxuries as a coffee grinder and a Cuisinart and trade in 
her black-and-white television for a color model. But when 
the pyramids collapsed, she lost money. She will not accept 
any government, she said, that won’t pay. her back. 


“We still want the government to go, but we will keep 

“ " ud. "I 


the same demands for the new government,” she said, 
don't care about the elections. I don’t care who governs. I 
want peace and a better life and more money. 4 ' 


i, to St 

** Rt 'f 




ft 




For Netanyahu, Hard Step — For Arafat, Sense of Betrayal 


Confrontation Over Israeli Pullback Puts Peace Talks on Hold and Aggravates Prime Minister’s Woes 


By Serge Schmemann 

New York Timet Service 


prol 

Min 


JERUSALEM — The Palestinians’ 
unexpected refusal to accept Israel's de- 
cision to withdraw from an additional 9. 1 
percent of the West Bank has thrown the 
Middle East negotiating process into 
new crisis, in effect freezing contacts 
between the two sides only a week before 
scheduled talks on a final settlement 
The confrontation added yet another 
iblem to the political woes of Prime 
linister Benjamin Netanyahu, who 
went to Moscow on Monday for a two- 
day trip to Russia. 

The Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat 
ordered the Palestinian Authority to sus- 
pend all contacts with Israel, a Pales- 
tinian official said Tuesday, effectively 
putting the peace process on hold. Israel 
and the Palestinians are to begin talks on 
a final peace accord Monday, but it 
appears unlikely they will start on time. 

The planned withdrawal, which Is- 
raelis intended to complete this week, is 
stalled. Officials said it was not possible 
to withdraw without coordinating the 
action with the Palestinians because 
more than 50 villages and 200,000 
people were involved. 

Israeli television reported that Mr. 
Arafat refused two telephone calls 
Monday from Mr. Netanyahu. The Pal- 
estinian was apparently stung by what be 
considered the prime minister's failure to 
reward him for restraining protests over 
Israel’s decision to proceed with a new 
Jewish neighborhood in East Jerusalem. 

On the domestic front, Mr. Netan- 


yahu left with a rebellion by rightists in 
Parliament temporarily defused. Four of 
the eight legislators from his coalition 
who had threatened to vote against him 
on an opposition motion of no-confi- 
dence announced after meeting with 
him that they would not do so. 

But a new challenge loomed. Mem- 
bers of Mr. Netanyahu's Likud bloc and 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


the opposition Labor Party called for 
lowering to 61 from 80 the number of 
votes required in the 1 20-member Knes- 
set to dismiss the prime minister without 
dissolving the legislature. 

Mr. Netanyahu was said to view this 
as a serious threat because many of the 
rightists disillusioned with him might be 
willing to vote him out if they could 
keep their parliamentary seats. 

Speculation grew that Mr. Netanyahu 
might try to form acoalition government 
with former Prime Minister Shimon 
Peres. But the Labor Party leader in- 
sisted that until the police concluded an 
investigation into allegations of influ- 
ence-peddling in government, “there is 
absolutely nothing to talk about” 

On the Palestinian side, analysts said 
Mr. Arafat's public rage over the with- 
drawal decision reflected what he viewed 
as Mr. Netanyahu's violation of trust 

The analysts said Mr. Arafat had 
worked to prevent a Palestinian explo- 
sion after the Israeli announced plans to 
build the Jewish neighborhood in East 
Jerusalem, expecting in exchange to 
gain a decent piece of temtoiy in the 


ensuing withdrawal. The Palestinian 
then traveled to the United States, where 
he received a warm welcome. 

But immediately on his return home, 
basking in the sense that he was being 
treated as an equal partner, the blows 
felL The United States vetoed a UN 
Security Council resolution condemning 
the planned construction. The Palestin- 
ian Authority was served with an order 
to close four offices in East Jerusalem. 
Tien the Israeli cabinet announced the 
decision on the further withdrawal. 

For Mr. Netanyahu, the decision to 
withdraw from another 9. 1 percent of the 
West Bank represented a bitter victory 
over hard-liners in his cabinet, which 
approved it by only 10 to 7. But for Mr. 
Arafat, the hard fact was that most of that 
land, amounting to 7 percent of the West 
Bank, was already under Palestinian 
civil authority and was now being trans- 
ferred to full Palestinian control. 

The Palestinians had publicly in- 
sisted that the transfer should amount to 
30 percent of the West Bank areas under 
Israeli control and privately said they 
expected at least 10 percent 

After angrily delivering Mr. Arafat’s 
rejection Sunday to Foreign Minister 
David Levy, the chief Palestinian ne- 
gotiator, Mahmoud Abbas, tendered his 
own resignation in protest against Is- 
rael, but Mr. Arafat declined it 

Though Mr. Arafat’s authority 
among die Palestinians was not in ques- 
tion, he was not likely to back down 



Muba /ipjnJze/ 7 >r AmoQdoJ Pic 

Mr. Netanyahu in Moscow, where President Boris Yeltsin said Tuesday 
that be expected relations between their countries to expand significantly. 


quickly, at least not while President 
Hosni Mub 


Mubarak of Egypt was on an 
official visit to Washington and the UN 


Genera] Assembly was denouncing Is- 
rael for its East Jerusalem project. 

For the moment. Mr. Netanyahu put 
off the start of the construction, as well 
as any action to enforce the order to 
close the Palestinian offices in Jeru- 
salem. But the rebellious mood among 
his rightist supporters suggested that he 
would not be able to delay the actions 
too long. For the same reason, the con- 
sensus among Israeli commentators was 


that it would be politically impossible 
for him to increase the land to be turned 
over to the Palestinians. 

The travails of the two leaders created 
the impression of two figures steadily 
forced apart by separate politics and 
mutual distrust. Mr. Netanyahu's aides 
say his fundamental problem since com- 
ing to office has been in trying to caijy 
out a peace agreement he disagreed with 
but could not change. 


UsingLegos, 
Inventor, 17, 
Wins $40,000 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — A senior ai 
Hunter College High School in 
New York City who fashioned 
Lego, modeling clay and a pile of 
electronic circuits' into a sophis- 
ticated microscope suspended from 
his bedroom ceiling by bungee 
cords has won the top prize in the 
Westinghouse Science Talem 
Search, the nation's preeminent 
competition for budding research- 
ers and inventors. 

Adam Ezra Cohen, 17, of Man- 
hattan. won a $40,000 college 
scholarship for building his micro- 
scope and then turning it into an 
"electrochemical paintbrush "cap- 
able of printing exquisitely small 
characters — small enough, he 
says, to fit 50 words within the 
width of a human hair. Mr. Cohen 
said Monday that he believed the 
technique could someday be used 
to change tile way intricate patterns 


are imprinted on computer chips. 
The 56th annual Westi 


estinghouse 
competition is a monthlong nation- 
al science fair that has begun the 
careers of five Nobel laureates. 

Mr. Cohen had previously cre- 
ated a computer hard drive and a 
device that allows a computer op- 
erator to move a cursor across die 
screen with only his eyes. His mi- 
croscope is suspended from the 
ceiling to avoid vibrations. 


Pri 


sow 


•-’.-ir- 


9} 


! *«oss 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


Air France Pilots Call for Strike 


PARIS (AFP) — Three unions representing Air France 
pilots called Tuesday for strike action at the end of this month 
in a protest over salary policies. 

ACs 


because of car exhaust fumes and the lack of wind, die au- 
thorities lowered the limit from 80 kilometers per hoar (50 miles 

,„cr\ l-:i _^_i J. i • ■ I 1 


per hour) to 60 kilometers per hour on the capital's ring road, and 
from 70 kilometers per hour to 


Two unions, SPAC and Snomac. called for a strike from 
March 23-26, while a third, the SNPL, urged action from 
March 27-30, although it did not rule out starting its action 
earlier. The protest is over the implementation scheduled for 


50 kilometers per hour on 
express riverbank roads through the city. 

Mayor Jean Tiberi said parking for residents would be free 
Tuesday to encourage locals to use buses and underground 
transport until pollution levels returned to normal. 


April of a two-level salary structure for pilots that die airline is 
i fanning to hire over die next three years. 


Pollution Slows Down Paris Drivers 


PARIS (Reuters) — The police decreed stricter speed limits 
in the Paris area Tuesday in an effort to counter high pollution 
levels as drivers faced traffic jams because of a demonstration 
by Renault auto workers. 

After air pollution reached high levels Monday, chiefly 


Passengers on Sabena’s three weekly flights from Brussels 
to Johannesburg will be able to connect with flights to Cape 
Town, Durban and George after March 30 through an agree- 
ment with South .Africa’s Nationwide Air. Port Elizabeth will 
be added to the list on Aug. 1 . (AP) 


A Ear os tar passenger train traveling between Brussels 
and London hit a truck loaded with cows Tuesday morning, 
but there were no serious injuries either on the train or in the 
truck, according to the Belgian state railroad. (Reuters) 



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Weather forecasters lifted cyclone warnings along Aus- 
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Great Barrier Reef began to weaken. f Reuters) 


Europe 


Today 

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Forecast for Thursday enough Saturday, as provided by AccuWaather. Asia 



Today 

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North America Europe 

The southern tier of rbe Cooler air will push Into 
nation will remain mild, London. Paris and Amster- 
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rather efufly. A storm aver is expected. Madrid and 
the Plains Thursday will Home will slay mild. A 


strengthen as It moves powerful storm will lash 
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sweep Its 

bring a wintry mix to the associated cold tront 
Midwest Thursday Mo Fib- across northern Europe 


Asia 

A aeries ol small storms 
exiting eastern China uriff 
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China, both Koreas and 
southern Japan. A eoofing 


trend in Belong. Seoul and 
rti rough 


iropi 

day. than to the East Fn- Thursday and Friday. The 
will stall over south- 


day. Damp in the North- front 
west. east Eixope Saturday. 


Tokyo through Saturday, 

Hong Kong writ stay warm 
and sunny, while a stray — . — 

t hunde rstorm can affect Africa 
Singapore each afternoon. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MARCH 12, 1997 


PAGE 3 


THE AMERICAS 


.China Asks 

•U.S. to Stop 
■News Reports 
|0f Donations 


By Steven Mufson 

tWungHM Aw Service 


* 


m £S?1 G — ..^ ^nese Foreign 
Ministry has called in a top U.S Era- 

Sjffi ° ffici ^ “> Protest as ‘‘malicious 
^pcles that have ap- 
pearwl m The Washington Post about 
alleged plans by Beijing to donate 
money to the Democratic Party or mem- 
bers or Congress. 

A senior Foreign Ministry official 
asked the U.S. charge d'affaires, Wil- 
liam McCahil] Jr., on Monday to put an 
end to the reports so they do not damage 
nes between the countries, the official 
Xinhua press agency reported. 

. The “Chinese side has never been 
involved in U.S. polirical affairs in any 
form,” the agency quoted Mei Ping, 
dmector of the ministry’s division of 
affairs for the Americas and Oceania, as 
telling Mr. McCahil]. 

China has been upset with other U.S. 
press reports, although it has not lodged 
diplomatic protests. It recently com- 
plained that The New York Tunes 
treated China as ‘‘a potential enemy." 
The official China Daily said last 
Thursday that The Times was "waging 
a verbal war on China.” The Chinese 
newspaper said The Times’s "constant 
diatr ibe is both tiresome and dangerous: 
tiresome because it goes on relentlessly, 
day after day; dangerous because it mis- 
leads readers and damages Sino-U.S. 
relations.” 

In the last week, electronic mail users 
have complained that China has again 
cut off public access to World Wide 
Web sites of several U.S. news orga- 
nizations, including The Post and CNN, 
but not The Times or The Wail Street 
Journal. China for atime blocked access 
ro those sites last year. 

Mr. McCahiU said in an interview 
Tuesday that the meeting with the 
Chinese lasted half an hour. "They con- 
veyed their position on these allegations 
of campaign financing and denied that 
the Chinese government had in any way 
tried to influence electoral outcomes in 
the U.S.,” he said. 

The Post has printed articles saying 
that because of information obtained 
from intelligence eavesdropping, the 
Justice Department is investigating the 
possibility that the Chinese Embassy co- 
ordinated an effort to channel money to 
U.S. congressional candidates. 

China apparently does want to im- 
prove its standing in Washington. 
People close to the Chinese government 
say it has considered hiring American 
lobbying and public relations firms to 
burnish its image and improve relations 
with Congress. 

So far, however, China has been re- 
luctant to spend the money lobbying 
companies demand. And the Foreign 
Ministry has been reluctant to let non- 
Chinese make representations about 
Chinese foreign policy, said an Amer- 
ican who spoke to Chinese officials 
about such efforts. 



Public Dislikes Clinton Fund Drive 


By Richard Morin 
and Dan Balz 

Washington post Service 


Cuj Can-jnn/Rnaen 

President Clinton's approval rating dropped 5 points in the poll. 


WASHINGTON — An overwhelm- 
ing majority of Americans disapprove 
of President Bill Clinton's use of the 
White House to help raise funds for the 
1996 election, according to a Wash- 
ington Post-ABC News Poll. 

While the president’s overall stand- 
ing remains strong, the poll found signs 
that the disclosures about fund-raising 
have begun to affect public attitudes 
toward his presidency. 

Mr. Clinton’s job approval rating fell 
from 60 percent in late January to 55 
percent in the current polL Thai was the 
first drop of that size after roughly two 
years of improvement in the president's 
standing. 

Large majorities said it was wrong for 
Mr. Clin ion to reward big campaign 
contributors with coffees and overnight 
stays at the White House and for Vice 
President AJ Gore to make fund-raising 
calls from his White House office. 

A majority of those surveyed believe 
that neither Mr. Clinton nor Mr. Gore 
broke any laws. In addition, the over- 
whelming majority believe that Repub- 
licans are as guilty as Democrats of 
questionable fund-raising practices. 

Even though they did not believe the 
president or vice president violated the 
law. 6 in 10 surveyed said they favored 
the appointment of a independent coun- 
sel to investigate foreign campaign con- 
tributions to Mr. Clinton and the Demo- 
crats, rather than leaving it to the Justice 
Department. Attorney General Janet 
Reno has opposed appointing an in- 
dependent counsel. 

A total of 1.004 randomly selected 
adults were interviewed March 6-9 for 
the Post-ABC News survey. Margin of 
sampling error For the overall results is 
plus or minus 4 percentage points. 

The survey suggests that, on most 


measures, Mr. Clinton’s performance 
seems to have slumped in recent weeks. 

Still, 49 percent to 38 percent, Amer- 
icans say they trust Mr. Clinton more 
than the Republicans in Congress to 
deal with the country’s major problems. 
Despite softening reviews of his per- 
formance, 6 in 10 said they still liked 
Mr. Clinton. The survey found lhai 
nearly as many respondents have a fa- 
vorable impression of Mr. Gore, and 
almost 6 in 10 said they believed be has 
the honesty and integrity to serve as 
president some day. 

Slightly more than half — 53 percent 
— said Mr. Clinton has the honesty and 


integrity to be president. Whatever their 
views toward Mr. Clinton and Mr. Gore, 
those surveyed were less generous to- 
ward Congress. 

Six in 10 said they disapproved of the 
way Congress, which is controlled by 
Republicans, has been doing its job. 
And while a similar proportion think 
Mr. Clinton is trying to work with the 

Congress, little more than a third believe 

congressional Republicans are trying to 
work with die president 
The House speaker. Newt Gingrich, 
Republican of Georgia, remains highly 
unpopular, with only a third expressing 
approval for the job he is doing. 


A Democrat Fights Back 

Fund-Raising Inquiry Is Assailed as ‘ Hypocrisy 9 


By Dan Morgan 

Washingtitn Post Service 


WASHINGTON — The top Demo- 
crat on a House of Representatives panel 
investigating fund-raising by President 
Bill Clinton s campaign has accused Re- 
publican leaders of “hypocrisy” and 
released what he called "the most ex- 
plicit example” of Republicans using 
government property and facilities to sell 
access to high government officials. 

Representative Henry Waxman of 
California, the senior Democrat on the 
House Government Reform and Over- 
sight Committee, on Monday cited a 
1995 appeal that offered Republican 
fund-raisers who brought in $45,000 a 
special luncheon with Newt Gingrich, 
the speaker of the House, in the Great 
Hall of the Library of Congress. 

Mr. Waxman 's release of several Re- 
publican fund-raising documents 
showed how tensions were mounting in 


the committee, where Republicans say 
they plan to focus their investigation on 
allegations of illegal fund-raising activ- 
ities by Mr. Clinton’s administration. 

“This investigation is spending mil- 
lions on a partisan witch hunt,” Mr. 
Waxman said, adding that be wanted ‘ ‘a 
real investigation of Congress and the 
White House and let the chips fall where 


they may.' 
The' 


i Gingrich luncheon at the Library 
of Congress was one of the events held 
in connection with a $1 ,500-a-plare Re- 
publican House-Senate dinner in 1995. 
The gala brought in $5 1 7,400 for House 
and Senate candidates and $4,739,015 
in unregulated "soft money** for party- 
building activities. 

One Republican fund-raiser who 
knew of the event scoffed at die notion 
that it was comparable to the small 
coffees ax the White House. "Lunch 
with 250 people is not special access.” 
the Republican operative said. 


Kentucky Senator to Retire 

WASHINGTON — The assistant Senate minority 
leader, Wendell Ford of Kentucky, a crusty con- 
gressional insider whose causes have ranged from 
defending tobacco to promoting easier voter regis- 
tration rules, has announced that he will not seek a 
fifth term next year. 

Mr. Ford, 72. is the second veteran Democratic 
senator to decide against running again, raising Re- 
publicans' hopes of expanding on g ains they made in 
the last two elections. Senator John Glenn, an Ohio 
Democrat, announced last month that he will retire 
after four terms. Republicans, hold a 55-to-45 edge in 
the Senate. 

Noting that the average cost of a Senate race has 
risen from less than $450,000 to S4_5 million since he 
was elected to the Senate in 1974, Mr. Ford said 
Monday that "the job of being a U.S. senator today 
has unfortunately become a job of raising money to be 
re-elected instead of a job of doing die people’s 
business.” (WP) 

Gore’s Prospects Not So Sure 

WASHINGTON — Even if the fund-raising furor 
fades before the next campaign, it has already sig- 
nificantly complicated Vice President A1 Gore’s care- 
fully planned trajectory to the White House and given 


POLITIC A L NOTES 


new hope to other Democrats who would like to be 
president. 

From consultants to members of Congress to Mr. 
Gore's own advisers, several Democrats said in in- 
terviews that recent disclosures about the vice pres- 
ident’s deep involvement in soliciting donors during 
last year's campaign, and his occasionally clumsy 
public efforts to defend his conduct, had clouded the 
aura of inevitability around his prospects for w inning 
the presidential nomination in die year 2000. 

One of the vice president’s biggest practical ad- 
vantages was that because of his links to a vast grass- 
roots network of donors, he was in a position to scare 
off rivals by amassing large sums of money fast 

But now. Mr. Gore's advisers said, they would be 
reluctant to be too aggressive too early about fund- 
raising. Moreover, some donors themselves are said 
to be more skittish about the vice president 

Meanwhile, the dales of the Gore visit to China were 
confirmed — March 24 to 28. He will visit Japan on 
March 23 and 24 and Korea on March 28 and 29. 

(NYT) 

Mrs. Clinton and the Check 

WASHINGTON — Offering her first extensive 
comments on her office's role in the White House fund- 
raising case. Hillar y Rodham Clinton said Monday that 
her top aide, Margaret Williams, should not have 
accepted a $50,000 campaign check at the White 


House. Mrs. Clinton also said she had no explanation 
for the fact that die man who made the donation, Johnny 
Chung, a California businessman who is a central figure 
in federal investigations of campaign fund-raising, had 
been permitted to visit her office 21 times. 

Asked whether Ms. Williams should have suggested 
that Mr. Chong mail (he donation directly to the Demo- 
cratic National Committee, Mrs. Clinton said: “In 
retrospect. I’m sure die wishes that’s what she’d 
done.” But the first lady added: "She’s an honorable 
and courteous person and what she did is legal and 
proper under the prevailing rules. But given the concern 
that it’s raised. I'm sure she wishes she said, 'Go mail it 
or go walk it over yourself.'” 

As for the frequent visits Mr. Chung paid to her 
office — records show he made at least 50 visits to die 
White House in President Bill Clinton’s first term — 
Mrs. Clinton said members of her staff were probably 
too courteous to turn Mr. Chung away. (NYT) 


Quote/Unquote 


Jim Beem. 58. who is retiring after 20 years as a 
guard at the U.S. Capitol building, telling visitors 
what they are prohibited from carrying into the House 
viewing gallery: “No cameras, calculators, hair 
spray, aerosol cans, flash attachments, radios, bat- 
teries, whistles, extra shoes. No food, binoculars, 
umbrellas, backpacks, beepers, mace, tear gas or 
cellular phones." [API 


Away From 
Politics 

• Four female army recruits say 

they were coerced into accusing their 
instructors at the Aberdeen Proving 
Ground in Maryland of rape and wiU 
recant their allegations, an official of 
the NAACP said. The women admit 
that they had consensual sex with 
trainers at the military facility, said 
Janice Grant, president of the Harford 
County chapter of the National As- 
sociation for the Advancement of 
Colored People. (AP) 

• More than a thousand convicted 

criminals from Los Angeles have 
continued to take part in the federal 
food-stamp program after being sent 
to jail or prison, potentially costing 
taxpayers millions of dollars, accord- 
ing to a federal report (LATi 

• A man who had been dismissed 
from a nursing home in Ashtabula. 
Ohio, returned and shot two workers, 
killing one and seriously wounding 
another. The man, whose name was 
not released, turned himself in at the 
police station three blocks away. (AP) 


Prisons Trade In Chain Gangs’ Shackles for the Zap of Stun Belts 


By Peter T. Kilbom 

New York Times Service 


CENTREVILLE, Mary- 
land — Starting next month, 
authorities in Queen Anne’s 
County, on Maryland’s East- 
ern Shore, will become the 
latest to introduce chain 
gangs — and perhaps the first 
to make them chainless. 

Rather than shackling the 
ankles of inmates cm outdoor 


work crews, the county may 
buy devices called stun belts 
that would send convicts 
writhing into the dirt if they 
tried to flee or figbL 

The stun belts, the latest 
device in die booming cor- 
rections industry, are starting 
to generate as much debate as 
the chain gangs. 

Some jailers and local of- 
ficials like the idea of the belts 
because they would save 


money: fewer guards would 
be needed to keep an eye on 
prisoners wearing them. And, 
these officials contend, there 
is no long-term physical dam- 
age to a prisoner who is 
stunned. 

But human rights advo- 
cates and even some correc- 
tions officials around the 
country oppose the belts, por- 
traying them as the most de- 
grading new measure in a 


field that they regard as in- 
creasingly barbaric. 

The belt comes with a bat- 
tery and a receiver with elec- 
tric prongs. From up to 300 
feet (90 meters) away, an of- 
ficer can press a button to 
detonate an eight-second 
burst of 50,000 volts of elec- 
tricity and stun a fleeing in- 
mate for up to 10 minutes. 

“Ir overrides the body’s 
neuromuscular system,” said 


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Dermis Kaufman, president 
of Stun Tech Inc. in Clev- 
eland, which makes the belts. 
‘ * Normally, you can open and 
close your band twice in one 
second. This device makes it 
contract 20 times in a second. 
It wears the muscles down.” 

Mr. Kaufman said he has 
sold 1,100 belts to law-en- 
forcement agencies, includ- 
ing 200 to the U.S. Marshals 
Service and 100 to the Federal 
Bureau of Prisons. Currently, 
he said, they are used in trans- 
porting dangerous prisoners 
or in court, replacing 
shackles. 

Amnesty International has 
appealed to Washington to 
ban the belts, in pan because 
it says they can be used to 
torture. It calls them “cruel, 
inhuman and degrading.” 

But Mr. Kaufman said they 
strike such terror in prisoners 
that a belt has been fired to 
subdue a prisoner only 14 
times in the 30,000 occasions 
one has been worn. He said 


the belts cost $600 to $700 
apiece and readily pay for 
themselves in reducing the 
number of officers needed to 
guard work crews. 

Wisconsin plans to start us- 
ing them soon. At Governor 
Tommy Thompson’s behest, 
the stare legislature last year 
ordered the adoption of chain 
gangs, joining Alabama, Ari- 
zona. Florida, Iowa and some 
county sheriffs* departments. 

Bill Clausius, spokesman 
for the Department of Cor- 
rections, said that when the 
first Wisconsin gangs go out 
this spring, jailers will have 
the option of the belts or in- 
dividual leg restraints. 

It would be the first use of 
the belts for work-crew con- 
trol. unless Queen Anne’s 
County acts faster. 

People in Centreville, a 
two-century-old town an 
hour’s drive across the Ches- 
apeake Bay Bridge from 
Washington and Baltimore, 
say their interest in the stun 


belts and in chains reflects 
their growing anger about 
rising crime in their town. 

Rehabilitation does not 
work, say people in Centre- 
ville. 

And prisoners have it too 
easy, they add. A convict gets 
free room, board, medical 
care and television, while 
they have to earn both their 
own keep and his. They want 
convicts, like welfare recip- 
ients, to wort. 

But they also want to stig- 
matize and shame die people 
who violate them. 

“Give them public humi- 
liation,” said Deborah S teen- 
ken, a crew leader for a fast- 
food chain who was resting 
on a bench in the courthouse 
square. "They never think 
twice about committing a 
crime.” 

These attitudes trouble ad- 
vocates of prisoner rights. 

" We claim to be a civilized 
society, and we return to these 
primitive methods of punish- 


ing people,” said Mark 
Kappelhoff, legislative coun- 
sel for the American Civil 
Liberties Union in Washing- 
ton. "We executed 54 people 
last year, and now we’re de- 
humanizing them. It causes 
you to wonder what will sat- 
isfy this thirst for ven- 
geance." 

Most leading jailers have 
scruples about using re- 
straints on work crews other 
than the customary officer 
armed with a shotgun. In a 
position statement, the 
20,000-member American 
Correctional Association, 
made up of wardens and cor- 
rections officers, has called 
on Congress to oppose chain 
gangs. 

The association says chain- 
ing and similar practices are 
“harsh and mean-spirited.” 
Such practices, it says, "re- 
sult in a hardening of criminal 
offenders,” raise costs of in- 
carceration and threaten in- 
mate health. 


©New York Times/Edited by FTiU Shorts. 


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Jesuits Arrested 
After Gun Battle 
In South Mexico 

Reuiers 

TUXTLA GUTIERREZ. 
Mexico — Mexican author- 
ities on Monday jailed two 
Jesuit priests on charges of 
leading a peasant attack in 
which two policemen were 
killed in the southern state of 
Chiapas. 

Geronimo Hernandez and 
Gonzalo Rosas were arrested 
on Saturday with two Mayan 
Indian leaders after a gunfighi 
near Palenque, the site of fa- 
mous Mayan ruins. Police said 
die priests led the attack on 
Friday. 

The Catholic Church said 
the charges were fabricated 
and pan of a campaign to dis- 
credit it Relations between 
the church and the govern- 
ment have been sour since a 
Zapatista peasant uprising in 
1994. 




1 — 




P; 







INTERNATIONAL 


BORED: Depression Amid the Wealth 


Continued from Page 1 

tranquilizers pre- 


Vaiium and other 
scribed elsewhere. 

Russian women do not usually ac- 
company their husbands to business din- 
ners or out-of-town conferences. Nor do 
they attend social events on their own. 


Mrs. Averyanova, who taught piano un- 
til her husband insisted that 


she stop, 

said that although she yearned to go to 
art gallery openings and receptions, her 
husband was too busy to take her and she 
would not dream of going alone. 

The social organizations that occupy 
affluent housewives in the West — 
garden clubs, book clubs, even the PTA 
— have not yet taken hold in Russia. 
Philanthropy, a relatively new thing here, 
is mostly handled by the tycoons who 
made the money and want credit for dis- 
bursing iL 

Volunteer work, too, common among 
the wives of foreign diplomats and busi- 
nessmen here, has not caught on. 

“The system isn't established here." 
said Olga Dubova, the wife of a top 
executive at Logovaz, the country's 
largest car dealership. 

"Y/e would love to do charity work.* ’ 
Mrs. Dubova said. “But you can't just 
drop by a prison or a hospital. There is a 
whole bureaucracy in the way." 

She added that higher-profile charity 
work — fund-raising or charity balls — 
was taboo. 

“Raisa Gorbachev annoyed the pub- 
lic by being too visible," Mrs. Dubova 
said. "Most husbands want to keep their 
wives in the shadows." 

The closest thing to public scrutiny of 


their problems was a recent episode of 

Famil y- * ’ 


the television talk show “My 
The topic was the new rich, and the 
program featured a masked man who 
said he was a gigolo for the wives of rich 
businessmen. 

“What you have to understand,'’ he 
told die snickering studio audience, “is 
that most of these women are really 
lonely. Their internal life is not as easy 
and comfortable as it appears on the out- 
side.” 

Feelings of isolation are compounded 
by the grim realities of financial success 
in Russia. Many have moved to high- 
security compounds in the suburbs. 
Bodyguards drive them to their appoint- 
ments. 

Bodyguards also take the children to 
their expensive private schools. Armed 
guards patrol school playgrounds. Kid- 
napping, common but rarely reported, is 


one of the rich Russian mother's greatest 
terrors. An academy in St. Petersburg 
recently began advertising courses to 
train nannies in die martial arts. 

Economic dependence breeds passiv- 
ity; all of the women interviewed 
seemed to be waiting for someone to 
rescue them. 

“I look in the newspapers every day 
to see if anyone has created a women’s 
club," Mrs. Averyanova said wistfully. 
“If only someone would organize us." 

There have been efforts to create a 
club for women of wealth in cities like 
Moscow and St. Petersburg, but none 
have come to fruition. 

The closest equivalent is a luxurious 
new private dub in Moscow called 
Monolith, founded by rich businessmen 
and government officials, which advert- 
ises itself as a “family club.” A pink 
marble emporium, it boasts a French 
restaurant, an English-style game room, 
a fitness center, a beauty salon and a 
children's playroom. 

Vladimir Popov, a manager of the 
club, dryly explained the modus op- 
erandi of the rich nuclear family at play. 

“Men are supposed to go somewhere 
with their families on weekends," he 
said. “Here the wife goes to the sauna, 
the kids go to the playroom and the 
husband goes to die bar to talk with his 
Mends — officially, it’s a family day.” 

Olga Zdravomyslova, a researcher at 
the Center for Gender Studies in Mos- 
cow, has conducted interviews with rich 
housewives for five years. 

‘ “They find themselves totally depend- 
ent on their husbands, cut off from old 
friends whose economic stations are now 
totally different, and alone," she said. 
“There is no role for diem in our so- 
ciety." 





Audi Maicet.Tfcc NuacuMd Pros 


REDCAP SERVICE — Part of a special force of 250 policemen in St. Petersburg preparing Tuesday to 
begin work, including assisting tourists. The officers, who wear red caps, all speak foreign languages. 


briefly 


B t 


i. (I: 


rampant 
as it is 


Male chauvinism is as 
among young businessmen 
among pensioners. 

“Sergei says that anything a woman 
can do, a man can do better," said Anya 
Lisovskaya, 29. paraphrasing her hus- 
band, one of Russia's most successful 
young businessmen. Mr. Lisovsky . 36. a 
music promoter turned advertising 
mogul, was a major fund-raiser for Pres- 


ident Boris Yeltsin’s re-election cam- 
paign last year. 

In an interview before the election, 
she explained, “He says it’s better for 
women to stay at home and look after the 
family." 

Married for five years, they have no 
children, but Mrs. Lisovskaya said her 
days were quite occupied. 

“I take English lessons three times a 


week. I go to the gym five times a week 
and work out with a trainer. I make 
dinner for Sergei when he can come 
home, so really I am quite busy." She 
added that he rarely made it home for 
dinner. 

“What can 1 do?" she asked with a 
shrug. “There is so much he wants to 
achieve. When we are old. we can sit 
down and enjoy our life." 


NATO: Alliance and Russia Appear Near Agreement on Plans for Eastward Expansion 


Continued from Page 1 


say, would be to bold a special NATO- 
Russia summit meeting arcund the end 
of May. when President Bill Clinton is 
scheduled to visit Europe for ceremonies 
marking the 50th anni vers ary of the Mar- 
shall Plan. 

“It would be difficult if not embar- 
rassing far Yeltsin to show up in Madrid 
when the meeting will be dominated by 
NATO enlargement to the east,’ ’ a senior 
NATO diplomat said. “The Russians are 
saying they want to come first in the 


sequence of events and would prefer to be 
at center stage, especially if it could be the 
G-7 session in Denver.’’ 

The jockeying over dates and venues is 
one of the surest indications that Russia 
wants to conclude negotiations by the 
early summer on a special “16 plus 1" 
relationship with the Western military 
alliance long viewed as its worst enemy. 

Mr. Solana and Mr. Primakov are now 
close to a full understanding on the prin- 
ciples and areas of cooperation under a 
permanent consultative forum linking 
NATO and Russia that would meet at 


various levels, from ambassadors up to 
heads of state, at least once a month. 

“There are still some tricky issues on 
the military consequences of enlarge- 
ment that may go down to the wire," 
said a senior NATO official. “But the 
Russians are leaving no doubt that they 
are very serious about reaching an agree- 
ment well before the Madrid summit." 

The new consultative forum would 
have its own secretariat, probably at 
NATO headquarters. Russia would have 
a voice but not a veto over subjects that 
would include joint peacekeeping mis- 


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sions. terrorism, nuclear proliferation, 
missile defense, environmental matters 
and how to transform military industries 
for civil purposes- 

Both sides have now exchanged draft 
texts and could wrap up final language 
on die political chapter of the document 
in the next few weeks, officials said. But 
achieving a mutually acceptable com- 
promise on die military aspects of 
NATO enlargement still looms as the 
toughest nut to crack. 

Russia is demanding stronger guar- 
antees that NATO will not deploy nu- 
clear weapons or permanently station 
foreign troops on die territory of new 
members. NATO has declared it has no 
plans nor does it foresee a need to deploy 
nuclear weapons, but cannot offer an 
absolute ban. 

On troops, NATO wants to keep open 
the possibility of dispatching NATO 
troops to new member states on a tem- 
porary basis for military exercises, 
peacekeeping missions, or security 
emergencies. 

Russia also worries about alliance 
military infrastructure moving east and 
greatly enhancing the war-fighting ca- 
pacity of neighbors that have long served 
as a territorial buffer zone. 

“The Russians say they do not want 
NATO membership to give any neigh- 
bor an attack capability that goes beyond 
present defense systems,” a NATO of- 
ficial said. “We are trying to design a 
package that would calm their fears yet 
not diminish NATO defense or create 
second-class citizens among new mem- 
bers.” 


Alseria Introduces 


ugt 

5-Day Worktceek 


PARIS — Algeria is cutting the 
standard workweek to five days 
from six, Algerian state radio re- 
ported Tuesday. 

The radio said that from new on 
the workweek would run from Sat- 
urday to Wednesday with the day 
beginning at S.A.M and ending at 
4.10 P-M- with a one-hour break for 
lunch at’ 1 P.M. 

Algerian employees worked six. 
days a week and eight hours a day 
until the change, introduced by a 
law aimed at creating new jobs to 
ease unemployment- t Reuters ) 


German Hostages 
Are Freed in Yemen 


SANAA, Yemen — Seven Ger- 
man motorcycle tourists kidna; 
by Yemeni tribesmen were 




Tuesday after beinjj held hostage 


for a week in an isolated mountain 
hideaway, the German Embassy 
here announced. 

An embassy spokesman said the 
seven were exhausted but in good 
spirits after their eight-day ordeal, 
and were being taken to die town of 
Sayun, about -500 kilometers (310 
miles) east of Sanaa, in Hadramut 
Province. The Germans, all men in 
their 30s and 40s, were taken hostage 
by about 50 armed tribesmen March 
3 while touring eastern Ye- 
men. (AFP) 


Assault Possible , 
Fujimori Says 


LIMA — President Alberto 
Fujimori said Tuesday that die gov- 
ernment would try to resume talks 
with rebels of the Tupac Amaru 
Revolutionary Movement soon, but 
also would continue planning for a 
possible use of force to free the 72 
hostages held in the Japanese am- 
bassador's residence here. 

The remarks came one day after 
the government canceled a round of 
talks with the Marxist rebels shortly 
before it was to begin. (AFP) 


Gunmen Kill 
Haitian Official 


PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — 
Gunmen shot and killed the head of 
the Justice Ministry security guard, 
the latest violence in a two-week 
crime wave in which at least 32 
people have died. 

Two. men on a motorcycle fired 
on Avrinel Qiarles as he was having 
a flat tire repaired Monday after- 
noon ai a Port-au-Prince service sta- 
tion. witnesses said. A motive for 
the killing wasn't known, and there 
were no immediate arrests. 

At least three police officers have 
been killed in the last two weeks 
during a rash of slayings and rob- 
beries. Radio Metropoie said 
Monday that a fourth officer had 
died of wounds suffered in a drive- 
by shooting last week. The report 
could not be confirmed. (AP) 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1997 


R4GE5 


INTERNATIONAL 


U.S.Qaiins Small Drug- War Victory 

Treasury s Moves Cripple Cartels’ Money-Laundering Scheme 

P.- T> . — . 


By Robert D.McFadden 

_Nguf )bft Timex Service 


NEW YORK — For years, drug car- 
wooey-launderers in New York have 
been sending as much as $1.3 billion a 
year back to Colombia through store- 
front shops that immigrants use to wire 
cash home. 

The major restraint on this electronic 
smuggling has been a federal require- 
jjventthai transactions of more than 
S 10,000 be reported-to the governmenL 
J>ut since last summer, as drug agents 
were due to testily in Congress on Tues- 
day. a Treasuiy Department order quietly 
orM^icif a of P®* 1 transaction 


remittance shops suspected of 
wiring most of that illicit money has 
resulted in a small victory in the war on 
dregs. The order has sharply cur the 
electronic transfers to Colombia and 
forced the cartels to return to older, cruder 
methods of smuggling money in balk. 

Faced with the alternative of wiring 
fortunes in penny-ante increments or 
submitting identification cards with 
their transactions, cartel operatives have 
gone back to stashing cash in coffins, 
bowling balls and ocher hiding places, 
investigators said Monday. 

\ But the drug sleuths have been wait- 


ing for them. At airports and see 
along the East Coast, agents seized $29 
million in smuggled money in the first 
three months the order was in effect, 
compared with $? million in the like 
period a year earlier, investigators said. 

Meanwhile, the cartels' wire trans- 
fers to Colombia have all but dried up. 

“The order has in effect shut down 
the money remitters as an avenue for 
narcotics proceeds, forcing launderers 
to resort to bulk currency shipments.’ ' 
Andre Flores, the chief agent of the U.S. 
Customs Service on Long Island. New 
York, said in an interview Monday. 
“The $750 limit is a major hurdle when 
you have to move $500,000." 

In an effort to persuade Congress to 
tighten currency restrictions ana make 
the Treasury limit on money transfers to 
Colombia and other sources of illegal 


senators Monday night to seek their 
support for his decision to certify Mex- 


ico's anti-drug campaign, and several of 
lawmakers said afterws 


drugs permanent, a group of federal 
1IOI 


law-enforcement officials were sched- 
uled to testify in Washington on Tues- 
day before the investigations subcom- 
mittee of the House of Representatives* 
Banking Committee. 

■ Clinton Makes Pitch for Mexico 


David Stem of The New York Times 
reported from Washington: 

President Bill Clinton met with nine 


the lawmakers said afterward that Mr. 
Clinton bad made a good case. 

The senators were briefed by the 
president and several cabinet-level 
aides, including Attorney General Janet 
Reno and General Barry McCaffrey, the 
drug-policy director. The officials ar- 
gued that refusing to recertify Mexico as 
an ally in the battle against drugs would 
be against U.S. interests, the senators 
said. 

“People listen to that," said Senator 
Patrick Leahy, Democrat of Vermont. 
“It’s easy to treat Mexico in simplistic 
terms." 

Senator Richard Lugar, Republican 
of Indiana, spoke of “the very serious 
situation" that would be created by de- 
certifying Mexico. But he stopped short 
of saying that Mr. Clinton had won him 
over completely. 

Mr. Lugar and Mr. Leahy said an 
alternate resolution was being worked 
on by Senators Kay Bailey Hutchison, 
Republican of Texas, Christopher 
Dodd, Democrat of Connecticut, and 
others. They declined to discuss its 
wording, but it seemed likely from their 
rone that the resolution would walk a 


U.S. Seises Video 
Said to Show Object 
Aimed at TWA Jet 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The FBI has 
seized a videotape that is said to 


show an object speeding toward 
‘ 800 seconds before the 


TWA Flight I 
plane exploded, killing all 230 
people aboard. 

The U.S. District Court in 
Brooklyn issued a subpoena for the 
seizure Monday night from the 
home of a retired United Airlines 
pilot, Richard Russell, as part of the 
criminal investigation into the July 
17 crash, a person close to the in- 
vestigation said Tuesday, speaking 
on condition of anonymity. 

The tape is to be reviewed by a 
federal grand jury, possibly as early 
as Wednesday, this person said. 

Mr. R us seU said the video was a 
copy of a Federal Aviation Ad- 
ministration radar tape. He refused 
to say how he had obtained it. 


Martin KippenJberger, 43, Dies; 
German Mixed-Media Artist 


diplomatic tightrope — expressing 
American resolve to continue the war on 
drugs while applauding efforts by Mex- 
ico to improve its performance. 

It is not clear that Mr. Clinton has 
majority support in the Senate or the 
House for recertifiving Mexico. 


New York Times Service 

Martin Kippenberger, 43, widely re- 
garded as one of the most talented Ger- 
man artists of his generation, died of 
cancer Friday at the University of Vi- 
enna Hospital. 

A dandyish, articulate, prodigiously 
prolific artist who loved controversy 
and confrontation and combined irrev- 
erence with a passion for art. Mr. Kip- 
penberger worked at various points in 
performance art. painting, drawing, 
sculpture, installation art and photo- 
graphy and made several musical re- 
cordings. 

He was a ringleader of a generation of 
“bad bov" German artists bom mostly 
after World War □ that emerged in the 
wake of the German neo-Expression- 
ists. His penchant for mixing media, 
styles and processes influenced younger 
artists on both sides of the Atlantic. 

He moved to Vienna last year. 

Dame C.V. Wedgwood, 86, 
British Writer-Historian 

LONDON (AP) — Dame C.V. 
Wedgwood, S6. one of Britain's most 
eminent and widely read historians, 
died Sunday in London after a long 
illness. 

Dame Wedgwood specialized in 
17th-century history, and her colorfully 


written works on the English Civil War. 
"Hie Thirty Years’ War," published in 
1938. is regarded as the standard work 
on the subject. 

Her 1944 biography of a Dutch mon- 
arch, “William the Silent, Prince of 
Orange,” won the prestigious James 
Tail Black prize in Britain. The Neth- 
erlands made her an Officer in the Order 
of Orange-Nassau in 1945. 


Dr. Pierre M. Galletti, 69. a leading 
researcher on artificial organs and tissue 
engineering who helped found the 
Brown University School of Medicine 
in Providence, Rhode Island, died Sat- 
urday of head trauma from a fall. 


Stan Drake, 75, illustrator of the 
comic strip “Bliondie” and creator of 
the classic romance strip "The Heart of 
Juliet Jones," died Monday in Norwalk. 
Connecticut, after a long il Loess. 


Kinnosuke Yorozuya, 64, one of 
Japan's most popular actors in period 
movies, died of pneumonia Monday 
□ear Tokyo. 


Lars Ahlin, 81. regarded as one of 
Sweden's top working-class writers, 
has died. No date or cause of death was 
reported. 


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ASIA/PACIFIC 


Trade Issues Drive Hanoi’s Pledge to Pay Debts to U.S. 



By David E. Sanger 

New York Times Service 


WASHINGTON — Vietnam's agreement 
to repay the United States millions of dollars 
in debts incurred by the former South Vietnam 
is a sign of how far the dialogue between 
Washington ami Hanoi has moved beyond 
questions over the remains of prisoners of war 
and toward broader, trade-related issues. 
American officials say. 

Vietnam agreed Monday to repay the 
United States millions of dollars in debts 
incurred by the Saigon government for roads, 
power stations and grain shipments before it 
fell to North Vietnamese forces in 1975. 

The agreement, struck Saturday in Hanoi, 
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worth about S140 million. Many of those 
debts were incurred to bolster the South's war 
effort, including the country’s main railroad 
and water systems and a major power plant for 
Saigon, now called Ho Chi Minh City. 


Vietnam did balk at repaying $12 million in 
outstanding loans for the “Food for Peace” 
program, arguing that through a series of com- 
plex transactions the United States used 
money that was ostensibly earmarked for grain 
purchases to help finance the Vietnam War. 

U.S. officials said the accord signaled move- 
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questions of how the Communist government 
will be integrated into die world economy. 

‘ ‘Tbe Vietnamese leaders have a clear eco- 
nomic agenda,” a senior U.S. official said. 
“And they knew dial resolving tins debt issue 
was one of tbe hurdles they had to get past 
before they get the trading rights they want.” 

Hanoi was also motivated by tbe visit of 
Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin, who is 
scheduled to arrive early next month. 

Under the accord, the Vietnamese have 20 
years to repay loans issued to the South. The 
first payment is due next month, shortly after 
Mr. Rubin's visit, which comes at a time when 


American companies are exploring large in- 
vestments in Vietnam, though they have been 


hesitant because of many of the country’s 
trading barriers. 

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Christopher was looking to celebrate the end 
of a raw chapter in American history; the 
Vietnamese were more interested in talking to 
members of his delegation about trade status, 
economic reform issues and getting the coun- 
try into the World Trade Organization. 

Talks since then have advanced painfully 
slowly. Vietnam maintains many of the same 
trade barriers that U.S. officials complain 
about in China: Foreigners are aot permitted 
to trade directly with customers in Vietnam 


(though many strike deals on the side), the 
country maintains strict import quotas and 
licensing requirements for companies that 
want to trade there and it prohibits many kinds 
of foreign investment 

li ke China, Vietnam has been hesitant to 
make tbe kinds of concessions that would 
open its state-dominated enterprises to foreign 
competition. But over the last several months, 
it bas been working with tbe United States to 
draft tbe specific language of a trade accord, 
one of the prerequisites for preferential, or 
“most-favored nation.” trading status. 


Haggling over the wording of that accord, 
le offick 


one official said Monday, “could take up 
much of the rest of the year.’ ’ 

Before most- favored-nation status could be 
granted, Mb'. Clinton would also have to waive 
a legal provision, known as the Jackson- 
V anik amendment, that concerns freedom of 
emigration. A similar waiver concerning 
China triggers an annual human rights debate 
in Congress, and the arguments would prob- 
ably be equally heated in Vietnam’s case. 


Farm Minister 


In North Korea 


Is Replaced 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Struggling to recover from 
two years of devastating floods. North 
Korea named a new farm minister Tues- 
day in the latest of several changes in the 
country’s power structure. 

A broadcast by the North's official 
Korean Central Radio, monitored in 
Tokyo, referred to Han Ik Hyon, a re- 
gional farm committee chairman, as 
chairman of the State Agricultural Com- 
mission, or farm minister. 

The radio did not say when Mr. Han 
took over from Kim Won Jin, who had 
been farm minister since 1990 and was 
last mentioned by North Korea’s official 
media 10 months ago. 

Mr. Han’s title was revealed in a list of 
dignitaries who attended an official func- 
tion. said Radiopress, which is based in 
Tokyo and which monitors North 
Korea’s state media. 

Mr. Han. whose age was not given, was 
nei ther a member nor alternate member of 
the severai-hundred-strong central com- 
mittee that rules the reclusive Stalinist 
nation. 

Radiopress analysts speculated that 
Mr. Kim may have been dismissed for his 
failure to get the country’s agricultural 
production back on course after Hoods in 
1995 and 1996 caused near-famine. 



China Discloses Blast 


In Mine; 89 Are Dead 


Kofcm Ne»t Smicr/Rcwerc 

North Korea’s leader, Klin Jong D, surrounded by officers and pointing in an 
official photograph as he inspected an army unit at an uniden tried location. 


Mr. Han’s elevation to a cabinet post 
follows a month of drastic changes in 
North Korea’s leadership. 

Pyongyang has requested food aid 
from the United States. China and other 
countries. 

The issue is linked to North Korea's 


participation in talks to sign a peace treaty 
laliy ending the 1950-1953 Korean 


form; 

War. 

In January, the Food and Agriculture 


Organization, an arm of the United Na- 
tions. said that food shortages in North 
Korea were likely to worsen considerably 
this year and require large-scale inter- 
national assistance to ensure that min- 
imum needs are met. 

“Two successive years of floods have 
undoubtedly set back agriculture and sig- 
nificantly compounded underlying food 
production problems in the country.” an 
FAO report said. 


in Our F rm Dvpxcka 

BEIJING — An explosion in a privately owned coal 
mine in central China has killed 89 people and injured nine, 
according to local officials. 

The blast, which occurred March 4 at a mine in Henan 
Province’s Lushan county, prompted the provincial gov- 
ernment to announce thai it would close all unlicensed or 
unsafe mines by mid-April. 

As an initial response, all 1 00 mines in Lushan have been 
closed temporarily pending the results of an investigation 
into the causes of the disaster. Yuan Zhoukan of the 
county’s emergency services said. 

The three owners of the mine were detained after the 
explosion. Mr. Yuan said by telephone. A report distributed 
in Hong Kong earlier said the owners had fled. 

' ‘There was a single explosion in one of the three small 
tunnels within the mine, but two other tunnels immediately 
collapsed as well.” Mr. Yuan said. 

The disaster was the latest in a long series of large-scale 
mining accidents across China, most of them at small, 
private mines — many of them unlicensed — that ignore 
state safety rules. A circular issued shortly after the ex- 
plosion by the provincial government in Zhengzhou 
ordered a survey of every min e in the province and said all 
unregistered operations had to close by the end of this week. 
Mines that have valid licenses but are found to violate 
safety regulations must be closed by April 15. it said. 

In January, 31 people were killed and four seriously 
injured in an explosion in a coal mine near Y ima, also in 
Henan, and in November. 1 14 people were killed in a coal 
mine explosion in the northern province of Shanxi. 

Explosions and other accidents kill as many as 10,000 
Chinese miners a year, with coal min es accounting for more 
than one-third of the toll, government statistics show. 

(.AFP. Reuters } 


Support for Rewriting History 


HONG KONG — Hong Kong s fuwre leader, Tung . 
Chee-hwa, on Tuesday threw his support behind China's 1 
proposal to rewrite parts of school textbooks after the » 
Britisbcolony is returned to Beijing later this year. 

“There are areas where textbooks need to be rewritten 
and other issues, which refer to Che colonial past, that need 

to be looked at.” Mr. Tung said. 

Possible changes include not only simple references to 
China, which in future will become a “sovereign” in- 
stead of the current “neighboring country’ but also those 

describing sensitive issues tike the 19th century opium 
wars, Mr. Tung said. _ 

Br itain prized Hong Kong from China a century and a 
half ago through the gunboat diplomacy and so-called 
opium wars that were sparked over opium that Western 
traders were shipping to China. (Reuters) 


Ihh 


Hong Kong Deports Vietnamese 


HONG KONG — The government deported 102 Vi- 
etnamese on Tuesday, while 50 others staged a roof-top 
protest at a camp, calling on the government to honor a 
court ruling that they should be screened to see if they 
deserve asvlum. 

Those deported — 71 men. 16 women and 15 children 
— were flown to Hanoi. Their departure brought to 9,802 
the number of Vietnamese sent home since November 
1991, the government said. 

Meanwhile, 50 Vietnamese protesters say that despite an 
order five months ago by Hong Kong’s highest court of 
appeal, the government still has not screened them. The 
Hong Kong government considers them illegal immigrants 
because they arrived from China. (API 


Blast at Japanese Nuclear Site 


TOKYO — Fire accompanied by what sounded like an 
explosion broke out Tuesday night at a nuclear waste 
handling facility northwest of Tokyo, shattering windows 
and sending out smoke, company executives said. 

No one was injured, and no one was in that part of the 
facility at the time, said Masato Sukegawa, a spokesman 
of the state-run Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel De- 
velopment Corp. (AP) 


Seoul Campaigning Starts 


SEOUL — Lee Hong Koo. the chairman of the rating 
New Korea Party, on Tuesday kicked off the presidential 
race by challenging other party elders to policy debates. 

Mr. Lee. who is to step down as party chairman on 
Thursday, said he would campaign to win the party’s 
nomination for presidential elections in December. Pres- 
ident Kim Young Sam’s five-year term expires in Feb- 
ruary 1998. 

“Selection of a new leader must be different from die 
method in the past,' * he said. We should break away from 
politics of money and factional forces. It should be 
through active policy debates.” (Reuters) 


Thailand Moves Refugees 


MAE SOT, Thailand — Officials began moving thou- 
sands of Karen refugees to a safer camp on Tuesday as 
Thailand attempted to tighten its grip on refugees Irving 
on its soil, officials and refugee sources said. (Reuters) 


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EUROPE 


Yeltsin Dumps Cabinet, 
Signaling New Reforms 

Only Chernomyrdin and Chubais Survive 


by Om Stiff H.wt, nitrun-he- 

MOSCOW - President Boris 

15’ fJXKnS. his authority after 
months ot illness, ordered Far-reaching 
cabinet changes Tuesday that could 
open the way for a new burst of radical 
economic reform. 

i J 11 3 P^ iden . tia5 deCT ee. Mr. Yeltsin 
' ord ered Prune Minister Viktor Chemo- 

. my 1- *" to come up with cabinet pro- 
posals within a week. But analysts said 
that Mr. Chernomyrdin’s new first 
deputy, Anazoli Chubais, could be the 
driving force behind the changes. 

Mr. Chubais, who spearheaded pri- 
vatization from 1991 to 1996. had been 
out of the government for more than a 
year because of the public’s intense 
hatred of his policies. He was a liability 
for Mr. Yeltsin as be fought off a strong 
Communist challenge in the presiden- 
tial election last summer. 

But Mr. Yeltsin brought him back 
tnto the government Friday, winning 
approval from foreign investors but 
raising protests from opposition politi- 
cians arid some commentators, who said 
he had let a minority loot Russia, 
v. But Mr. Chemomynlin said: “I think 
we will send the president proposals on 
forming the government at the end of 
the week.” It was not clear how many 

EU Blocks France 
On Time Changes 

Agtnce Fronce-Prtsse 

BRUSSELS — France's attempt to 
have the twice-yearly clock change in 
Europe abolished was blocked Tuesday 
by its European Union partners at talks 
' here. 

EU transport ministers voted to extend 
' the current rules governing time changes, 
which expire next year, until 2001 . 

Under the existing framework, all EU 
countries put their clocks forward one 
hour at the end of March and back one 
V hour at the end of October on the same 
* day. Most countries are one hour ahead of 
Greenwich Mean Time in winter, with 
Britain, Ireland and Portugal on GMT 
and Finland and Greece two hours 
ahead. 

France had insisted it would end die 
time changes, claiming that two-thirds of 
the French population support the move. 

It could have laced legal action by the 
EU's high court and caused disarray in 
transport companies’ timetables for the 
coming years. 


ministers would be reappointed in the 
new line-up. 

Before Mr. Chubais’s appointment 
Friday. Russia had three posts of first 
deputy prime minister — covering the 
economy, social issues and industry — 
and 1 1 deputy prime ministers. 

“First the government will need to 
concentrate on fiscal and military re- 
forms." Mr. Chernomyrdin said, 
adding that industry and housing also 
needed attention. 

The main policy guidelines laid down 
by Mr. Yeltsin in his state of the nation 
address last Thursday, in which he 
pledged radical changes and a crack- 
down on government "fat cats, ’ ‘ "must 
dominate the government's work.” Mr. 
Chernomyrdin added. 

Mr. Yeltsin lambasted the govern- 
ment in his speech for its failure to 
tackle chronic delays in wage and pen- 
sion payments, accusing bureaucrats of 
feathering their own nests. 

Millions of state workers and pen- 
sioners have gone unpaid for months, 
amid a general internal debt crisis, ag- 
gravated by the government's poor rec- 
ord on tax collection. 

The appointment of Mr. Chubais — a 
leading market reformer reviled by the 
Communists and nationalists wbo dom- 
inate the lower house of Parliament — 
signaled Mr. Yeltsin's determination to 
crack the whip to curb the influence of 
powerful lobby groups. 

"Chubais has become practically the 
most important contemporary Russian 
politician,” the daily newspaper Kom- 
somolskaya Pravda commented. 

By keeping Mr. Chernomyrdin as 
prime minister. Mr. Yeltsin avoided 
having to get the new government ap- 
proved by the lower house, the State 
Duma, said Irina Kobrenskaya, an ana- 
lysts at die Carnegie Endowment Mr. 
Chernomyrdin and Mr. Chubais effec- 
tively ran the country during Mr. 
Yeltsin’s absence for heart problems and 
pneumonia after his re-election in July. 

Mr, Chubais is expected to play the 
key role in pushing through fundament- 
al reforms on a scale unseen in Russia 
since mass privatization was started and 
price controls were lifted in 1 992. 

In his state of the nation speech. Mr. 
Yeltsin vowed to take personal control 
over the preparation of next year's 
budget, and promised reforms of the 
military, pension system and housing 
allowances, as well as a crackdown on 
powerful monopolies, which he accused 
of stifling the economy by imposing 
high tariffs. (Reuters, AFP i 







Mjchari l ft*r*'KctacT\ 

Chancellor Kohl taking his seat at the weekly meeting of his cabinet in 
Bonn on Tuesday as coal miners continued their protests outside. 


Coal Miners Again Tie Up 
Bonn, Then Start to Leave 


The Associated Press 

BOSS — Whistling and jeering, thou- 
sands of coal miners paralyzed the federal 
government district for a second suc- 
cessive day Tuesday to protest planned 
cuts in mining subsidies. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl's govern- 
ment put off a scheduled meeting with 

mining union leaders until Thursday, 
saying that it would nor talk under pres- 
sure. 

Hans Berger, head of the union, urged 
the miners to return home later Tuesday, 
and they began to disperse. 

About 5,000 demonstrators gathered 
by midday near Mr. Kohl’s fenced-off 
office building. 

About 150 demonstrators scuffled 
with the police after breaking through 
barricades and heading toward the Par- 
liament building on the edge of the 
Rhine. The demonstrators retreated 
after opposition politicians at the rally 
appealed for calm. 

Union officials say the subsidy cuts 
would wipe out 60.000 of the industry's 
90.000 jobs. 

Despite the protests and pledges of 
support from the opposition Social 
Democrats, some miners saw little hope 
of reversing the industry’s fate. 

"Future? There is no future.” a 
miner. Klaus-Dieter Schmidt, said 
wearily. 

Morning commuters sat in traffic 


jams Tuesday as police rerouted 
vehicles around Bom) ’s main thorough- 
fare. which was occupied by throngs of 
miners. 

Protesters chained themselves to the 
headquarters of the Free Democratic 
Patty, the junior partners in Mr. Kohl’s 
governing coalition and the most vocal 
free-market force in German politics. 

Miners also gathered at the headquar- 
ters of Mr. Kohl’s Christian Democratic 
Union a few hundred meters along the 
street 

Hundreds of protesters had spent the 
night in Bonn, some in tents and others 
sleeping in the- headquarters of the So- 
cial Democrats. 

Protests also continued Tuesday in 
Saarland state and the Ruhr Valley. Ger- 
many’s two main coal areas. 

German coal miners walked away 
from the pits and started daily demon- 
strations Friday after Mr. Kohl's gov- 
ernment said it would cut federal coal 
subsidies from about 9 billion Deutsche 
marks ($4.1 billion) a year to 3.8 billion 
marks by 2005. 

A ton of German coal costs 260 marks 
to produce, compared to a world market 
price of about 100 marks a ton. To 
preserve jobs, the government makes up 
the difference with subsidies. 

A 1994 law provided for cuts in sub- 
sidies, but the government long put off 
working out the unpopular details. 


BRIEFLY 


French Officials Cleared in Blood Scandal 

PARIS — France’s top prosecutor recommended Tuesday that charges be 
dropped against a former prime minister and two other former officials regarding 
their involvement in the contamination of about 1,300 French hemophiliacs by 
AJDS-tainted blood in 1985. 

The recommendation by the chief prosecutor, which was based on lack of 
evidence, means the three former officials are almost certain to avoid trial. 

Former Prime Minister Laurent Fabius, former Social Affairs Minis ter Georgina 
Dufoix and former Health Minister Edmond Herve. members of the 1984-1986 
Socialist government, had been charged with "complicity in poisoning,” which 
carries a maximum 30-year prison sentence. 

The scandal erupted in 1990 following disclosures that in 1995 health officials 
had knowingly used blood supplies contaminated with the AIDS virus. More than 
500 hemophiliacs have since died from the transfusions. Four high-ranking health 
officials have been convicted, and two have been jailed. (API 

Austria Paid $58 Million to Victims of Nazis 

VIENNA — Austria paid victims of Nazism 700 million schillings ($58 
million) in 1995 and 1996, the Parliament's president. Heinz Fischer, said 
Tuesday. 

According to Mr. Fischer, more than 1 1 ,000 people who were persecuted, or 
j escaped persecution, by the Nazis in Austria each received around 70.000 
[ schillings from a special fund set up in 1 995. Mr. Fischer said Austria would pay 
| 600 million schillings in 1 997 to victims of Nazism. ( AFP ) 

i 


Swedish Prime Minister Hits Low in Poll 

STOCKHOLM — Prime Minister Goran Persson of Sweden has scored the 
lowest popularity rating ever given to a prime minister by the IMU/Testologen 
polling agency, in a survey marking his first 12 months in office. 

Mr. Persson. who heads the minority Social Democratic government, got 2.4 
points out of a possible five in a poll published Tuesday in the daily Af- 
tonbladet (Reuters) 

Basque Prison Psychologist Killed by ETA 

SAN SEBASTIAN, Spain. — A Spanish prison psychologist died after being 
shot three times in the head by Basque separatist rebels Tuesday, officials said. 

Javier Garcia EloseguL. 37, died shortly after being taken to the hospitaL 
Basque police detained one of two attackers, a member of the Basque armed 
separatist movement ETA. according to the Interior Ministry. The other attacker, 
a woman, fled the score. (Reuters) 

Sweden Pleads for Chemical-Arms Treaty 

GENEVA — Sweden on Tuesday deplored the failure of the United States and 
Russia to ratify the global ban on chemical weapons. 

Sweden's foreign minister, Lena Hjelm- Wallen, told the 61 -nation Con- 
ference on Disarmament that it was "a deplorable fact that the United Stales and 
Russia — the two declared possessors of chemical weapons — have not yet 
ratified the convention.” which goes into effect April 29. (API 


The 

I 8th 
Oil & Money 
conference will be 
held on November 18-19 
in London. This major inter- 
national energy forum will be 
addressed by oil ministers from the 
world’s largest producing nations as well as 
senior oil industry executives. For further details, 
please contact Brenda Er dm a n n Hagerty in 
London on Tel. (44 171) 420 0307 
E-mail: bhagerty @iht.com 
Fax: (44 171) 836 0717 


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PAGE 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12. 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


Isolated and in 


, Bosnia’s Serb Republic Could Face War 




By Chris Hedges 

Note fork Times Service 

LUKAVICA, Bo sni a -Herzegovina — 
The collection of warehouses that makes 
up a sprawling factory less than a mile 
from the Bosnian capital stand as a bleak 
harbinger of the Bosnian Serbs’ future. 

The Fames factory, once owned by 
tbe Yugoslav government, employed 
3,500 people making track and bus en- 
gines and car parts before the Bosnian 
war began five years ago. 

At the end of the war in 1995, this 
factory was seen by the Bosnian Serbs as 


economy. It was to be the industrial 
centerpiece around which they would 
build a new Serb-controlled capital on 
tbe edges of the existing Bosnian capital. 
Sarajevo, which is under the control of 
the Muslim-led Bosnian government. 

The factory bad been in tbe Sarajevo 
suburb of Ilidza, but its 2,000 machines 
were dismantled and moved to Lukavica 
last year, to an area controlled by the 
Bo&iian Serbs. Tbe move took place 
before Ilidza was turned over to the gov- 
ernment as part of the peace agreement 
reached in late 1995 in Dayton. Ohio. 

Under the agreement, Bosnia was to 
include two distinct political entities — 


one controlled by a coalition of Muslims 
and Croats and tbe other by Serbs, their 
self-styled Republic of Srpska — with a 
national structure to coordinate the two. 

But the Bosnian Serb entity has re- 
fused to honor many of the Dayton 
terms. As a result, it has been cut off 
from inte rnati onal aid and remains iso- 


is faring no better. Its military is still 
largely run by General Ratko Mladic, 
who has been indicted by die UN com- 
mission at The Hague for war crimes, 
although be was publicly removed from 
his position last year. 

But the Bosnian Serb army, no longer 
financed by Yugoslavia, has dwindled 
from 40,000 to 12,000 soldiers. Thou- 


lated. The steady political and economic from 40.000 to 12,000 soldiers. Thou- 
decline of Srpska, along with the refusal sands of demobilized soldiers are unable 
to honor the Dayton agreement, has Left to support themselves, and much of tbe 
many Western diplomats 


warning that the enclave 

will pose an easy, and in- The de 

creasingly tempting target. f 

to- the Bosnian Muslim a tem P 
army once North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization peacekeepers de- 
part next year, although such an attack 
would trigger another war. 

Tbe faffuie of the Famos factory, 
owned by die Bosnian Serb leadership, is 
one of tbe most visible symbols of the 
looming breakdown of its political entity. 
In tbe last year, the factory has produced 
only 20 and 50 clutches, which 

were sold to the state-run bus company in 


The decaying Republic of Srpska could offer 
a tempting target for the Bosnian Muslims. 

epers de- military’s equipment is rusting from lack commac 
an «*rark of maintenance and spare parts. ing fora 

Although Radovan Karadzic, the hold the 
s factory, former leader who also has been indicted “At li 

dership.is for war crimes, was forced to resign swift,” : 
ols of the under international pressure, be still frankly t 
leal entity, wields enormous influence. And the cur- the Bose 
produced rent leadership is openly feuding. war, the 

les. which The areas of Bosnia controlled by the joint go 

jmpany in Serbs have frequent power outages, the refusal & 


neighboring Yugoslavia. Tbe Bosnian hospitals lack medicine and schools are 
Serbs have been unable to sign any con- often without books. 


fessionalsand skilled labor. Like Famos. 
most factories sit nearly idle. The un- 
employment rare is 90 percent. Of the 
800.000 Bosnian Serbs, 300,000 were 
displaced from their homes by the war. 

The implications of a collapse of (be 
Bosnian Serb entity are enormous- Under 
the Dayton agreement tens of thousands 
of Muslims displaced from their homes 
by the Serbs have a right to return home. 

So far, however, the Serbs have ai- 
. lowed none to go back. 

" NATO strategists say 

I offer dial the Bosnian govem- 

j. meat increasingly sees the 

Serb zone as an easv mil- 

iraiy objective. These 

commanders say that if the peacekeep- 
ing forces withdrew it will be difficult to 
hold tbe Muslim-led government back. 

“At least this war would probably be 
swift,” said a Western diplomat “And 
frankly there would be little sympathy for 
the Bosnian Serbs given their role in tbe 
war, their refusal to cooperate with the 
joint government institutions and their 
refusal to let displaced people go home. 
War. in fact, might be the best solution.” 


tracts with foreign firms or to lure outside 
investment. 

The rest of the Bosnian Serb structure 


ten without books. The despair and malaise rhat now in- 

There has also been a huge exodus, to feet the areas of Bosnia controlled by die 
Yugoslavia and neighboring European Serbs is palpable in nearly every village, 
nations, especially by the young, pro- On a recent day, Milena Jevric 


clutched a plastic container filled with 
her daily soup ration and walked in shoes 
several sizes too large up a muddy road 
in the village of Brezowice, about *.0 
miles northeast of Pale. 

“As a girl I lived like this, after tbe 
second world war — and as an old wo- 
man I live like this again, 7 ' she said- “We 
have no more savings. We are rfestituie. 
Most of the young people are leaving. Tbe 
country is dying. I just struggle to eat.” 

The Bosnian Serb leadership in Pale, 
in a move to establish a link with 
Yugoslavia, signed an agreement with 
tbe government in Belgrade that included 
a promise of military cooperation. 

The agreement, which Muslim leaders 
and Western diplomats said violated die 

Dayton peace agreement, also spelled oui 

cooperation in areas such as foreign trade, 
border traffic, citizenship and customs. 

But while the economic cooperation 
outlined in the agreement is mostly 
smoke and mirrors, it defiantly resurrects 
the apparent effort by President Slobodan 
Milosevic to integrate tbe Bosnian Serb 
enclave into Yugoslavia, which triggered 
the Bosnian war in the spring of 1992. 

The Bosnian Serb leadership, 
however, defends tbe agreement. . 

“We have bonded ourselves to Bel- 
grade with this agreement,” said Mo- 



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Banja Luka — 

IS 



BRIEFING: 

Sparring Over China 

Continued from Page 1 

that the FBI’s statement was erroneous. 
The Associated Press reported. But, be 
said, it was possible the national security 
aides misunderstood tbe ground rules 
when they were briefed on the matter.] 

Tbe clash came as relations between 
die White House and tbe Justice De- 
partment appear increasingly strained by 
an inquiry into the fund-raising oper- 
ations of die Clinton re-election effort. 

Tbe new squabbling on fund-raising 
also seemed certain to complicate Mr. 
Clinton's effort to win Senate confirm- 
ation of Anthony Lake as CIA director. 
Mr. Lake was the National Security 
Council chief at the time of the FBI 
briefing. 

As they prepared to open hearings into 
the nomination Tuesday, Senate Repub- 
licans planned to question Mr. Lake 
about his knowledge of tbe China in- 
vestigation. 

The White House has accused the FBI 
of withholding information vital to the 
conduct of foreign policy. The Wash- 
ington Post reported that tbe FBI last 
June also provided classified briefings to 
six members of Congress, warning them 
that they had been targeted by Beijing as 
possible recipients of illegal campaign 
contributions. 

Four of those legislators, ail Demo- 
crats, have identified themselves: Sen- 
ators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Box- 
er of California, Senator Daniel Patrick 
Moynihan of New York and Represen- 
tative Nancy Feiosi of California. 

In December, the Justice Department 
concluded that Chinese representatives 
had developed a plan to funnel nearly $2 
million not only into congressional cam- 
paigns but also into the presidential con- 
test. China has denied that its govern- 
ment tried to influence the U.S. 
elections, and on Monday it lodged a 
formal protest over the news reports with 
the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. 

During his news conference. Mr. 
Clinton said he had ordered his staff to 
find out why he had not been made 
aware of the FBI suspicions. 

Such information, he said, would 
have raised “a red flag,” which might 
have influenced his already delicate 
dealings with China or generated more 
wariness about questionable contribu- 
tions to the Democratic National Com- 
mittee and White House visits that since 
have caused him so much trouble. 

“It didn’t happen; it should have 
happened,” Mr. Clinton said of what he 
called the FBI's failure to allow warn- 
ings to be passed to him and to senior 
White House officials. 

The public focus oq China’s alleged 
campaign involvement comes at a sen- 
sitive moment diplomatically. Mr. Clin- 
ton has made an effort to reach out to 
China, and Vice President AI Gore 
leaves next week for a visit to Beijing. 
Mindful of that. Mr. Clinton cautioned 
several times Monday that tbe accu- 
sations are unproved and “it’s very im- 
portant not to accuse people of 
something that you don’t know they 
have done." 

Officials said that Raymond Beers, 
the head of the National Security Coun- 
cil's intelligence programs office, and 
Edward Appel, an FBI special agent 
detailed' to the council, were briefed at 
the White House on June 3 about tbe 
alleged Chinese efforts to target mem- 
bers of Congress. 

The briefing was conducted by two 
FBI counterintelligence specialists, 
Jerry Doyle and Ray Wickman. 

‘ ‘What they did was proper.” a senior 
intelligence official said of the FBI 
agents’ briefing. “They provided tile 
information and kept it in intelligence 
channels but didn’t restrict it from bigh- 
er-ups.” 

But Mr. McCurry said the two council 
officials were “adamant” and told the 
White House counsel. Charles Ruff, 
“ that they were urged by the FBI not to 
disseminate the information outside the 
briefing room.” 

“Therefore, the White House con- 
siders the FBI statement to be in error,” 
Mr. McCurry said. 

■ Qinton Calls for Free TV Time 

Mr. Clinton tried to regain the ini- 
tiative on the campaign-finance issue 
Tuesday, calling on broadcasters to give 
free TV rime to political candidates. The 
AP repotted. He urged the Federal Com- 
munications Commission to require 
broadcasters to provide free political air 
time as a condition of switching to di- 
gital broadcasting signals, which permit 
sharper pictures and more channels. 


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ZAIRE: Looking to the Post-Mobutu Era 





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COVERING UP — Voters at a polling station near Nairobi beating a man they said was part of a group 
in tending to disrupt a parliamentary by-election Tuesday. He and five other men were arrested for carrying 
gasoline bombs, whips and machetes. Tbe police reportedly detained 58 others for carrying weapons. 

REBELS : An Assault on Zaire's Discredited Political Class 


Continued from Page 1 

Then again, people are welcoming Kab- 
ila without knowing whether he is 
George Washington or a megalomaniac. 
Is this a new dark age coming for Zaire or 
an enlightenment?*’ 

For leaders of Zaire's political class, 
who oscillate between outspoken op- 
position to Marshal Mobutu and luc- 
rative collaboration with him. what 
seems increasingly certain is that a mil- 
itary victory by Mr. Kabila would mean 
a wiping of the slate. 

Zaire's leading politicians have tried 
to have it both ways with the rebel lead- 
er, much as they were used to in dealing 
with Marshal Mobutu. 

Rom denouncing Mr. Kabila as a pup- 
pet of neighboring Rwanda at die outset 
of his insurgency last October, with the 
collapse of Marshal Mobutu’s govern- 
ment apparently near, many have begun 
sending feelers to Mr. Kabila expressing 
their agreement on tbe need for change. 

Throughout, Mr. Kabila has kept die 
courtiers of Kinshasa at arm's length. 


showing little sign of being flattered. 

What many here say they expect is 
that Mr. Kabila will copy one of his 
principal sponsors. President Yoweri 
Museveni, whose own insurgency 
seized power in Uganda in 1979. 

Mr. Museveni has restored economic 
growth and a measure of order to a 
country ravaged by Idi Amin and other 
past dictators, but has been suspicious of 
democracy. 

"If Kabila takes power by force, we 
will go from rebellion to revolution, with 
all that that implies,” said Roger 
Nkema, a Zairian banker and former 
senior government official. “And if 
Museveni is his model, that means wip- 
ing out all pockets of resistance, creating 
a strong central power and giving him- 
self as much time as be feels be needs to 
impose his reforms. 

The tragedy, many here feel, is that 
Zaire’s political class has had ample 
opportunity to make things work. 

Under heavy pressure at home and 
from his traditional Western allies, in- 
cluding the United States. Mr. Mobutu 


decreed an end to his one-man rule in 
April 1990. 

Much of Marshal Mobutu’s power 
was formally stripped away from him 
the next year. Under a transitional pro- 
gram, Marshal Mobutu was to remain in 
office as a sort of ceremonial head of 
state until elections, which were sched- 
uled for 1994. 

Marshal Mobutu reneged on these ar- 
rangements. using the army to impose 
his own choice of prime minister. Since 
then, a cutoff of Western aid to Zaire and 
strong opposition to the president have 
limited his ability to govern. 

At the same time, however, the Par- 
liament, which from the start seemed 
more interested in debating its own salary 
raises and perquisites, has proved an easy 
mark for the president’s allies, who have 
been able to buy off political opponents. 

For months, legislators have sought to 
unseat the deeply unpopular Prime Min- 
ister Kengo wa Dondo, but every time a 
censure motion comes to the floor, one 
deputy said, the distribution of cash and 
favors is enough to persuade even some 


Continued from Page 1 

what it called a ‘ ‘conspiracy of silence' ' 
over Zaire and called for urgent hu- 
manitarian intervention in the country. 

[Rebel radio said fighters of die Al- 
liance of Democratic Forces for the Lib- 
eration of Congo-Zaire were within 10 
kilometers (6 miles) of Kisangani. Bat a 
regional military source said the closest 
rebel unit was still 40 kilometers from 
Kisangani and said he expected fighting 
for the city to begin in about 48 hours.] 
Tbe anti-Mobutu forces, who re- 
portedly have been aided by Ugandan 
and Rwandan troops, hold territory with- 
in about 50 kilometers of Kisangani , a 
Western diplomat said 

“Kisangani will go, whether in a few 
days or a few weeks,” he said. 

As foreign envoys here exchange 
guesses on when the city will fall, he 
said, “the latest estimafp- I’ve heard is 
the end of March.” 

The diplomat said the rebels were 
reported to have soil unarmed troops 
into Kisangani and that they had been 
seen walking around and chatting with 
government soldiers. 

These rebels are said to be telling 
troops that an assault is coming within 
days and encouraging them to abandon 
their posts. In the five-month -old war, 
Zaire's underequipped, unpaid troops 


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hardened opponents of the government 
to stay home. 

“If we have arrived at this situation, it 
is the result of the total failure of politi- 
cians who have only pretended to oppose 
Mobutu," said Albert Booto-Bo-Lon- 
gonba. a leader of the National Con- 
golese Movement of Lumumba, an op- 
position party. “If Kabila is on the verge 
of taking over, it is because tbe political 
class has virtually invited him. ” 


POSTMAN: For Many Japanese, He Is Banker, Financial Adviser and Letter Carrier 


Continued from Page 1 

created boom growth for years but now 
appears to be holding Japan in stagnation. 
On many fronts, there is resistance to 
change. But changing the postal savings 
system, which Japan's leading finan cial 
newspaper has called “financial social- 
ism,” is sure to be treacherous. As one of 
Japan's best-known political consultants, 
Takayoshi Miyagawa, points out, tam- 
pering with it has long been taboo. 

Leading the charge to preserve the 
status quo are close to 20,000 "special 
postmasters” such as Mr. Iemoto. They 
bold hereditary jobs dating back, more 
than a century. 

They have combined extraordinary 
service, tradition and giri — a word con- 
noting a strong sense of obligation to 
those who have helped you or your famil y 
— to create a powerful populist network 
that stretches across Japan. 

Why would any of tbe people in Mr. 
Iemoto *s town want a change? They get 
better rates of interest at the post office 
than at banks. His service includes not 
only home delivery of money but regular 
visits by postmen to elderly people living 
alone ana assistance to local companies. 

This service translates into strong polit- 
ical power, informal though it may be. As 
government employees, the postmasters 
are prohibited by law from campaignin g. 

But special postmasters know every- 
one in their area, so they can just talk 
about the elections in their daily con- 
versations. as part of their greetings,” 
Mr. Miyagawa, the consultant, said. 

Special postmasters have been strong 
supporters of the Liberal Democratic 
Party of Prime Minister Ryuiaro Ha- 
shimoto. That means something: Each 
postmaster can usually deliver 20 to 30 
votes, meaning that a politician whose 
district has 50 or 60 of them can count on 
more than 1,000 votes, said Kiyoshi 
Mizuno, a veteran Liberal Democratic 


politician and former cabinet member, 
now Mr. Hashimoto’s top aide in charge 
of administrative reform. 

Such a voting bloc helped keep the 
postal-savings system out of the final 
draft of Mr. Hashiraoto’s plan for privat- 
izing Japanese institutions, released in 
June 1996. although it originally was 
included, Mr. Mizuno said. 

Whether it will continue to protect the 
postal savings system is the question. 
Mr. Miyagawa said he believed it would, 
at least for the short term. 

Bankers, who view the system as un- 
fair competition, are making another run 
at it. In recent weeks, criticism has come 
from some top economists, politicians 
and the Nihon Keizai Shim bun, Japan’s 
leading economic newspaper. The paper 
recently advocated splitting the postal 
service — which requires no taxpayer 
money for its operations — into regional 
groups, which would then be privatized. 

Many postmasters, like Takao 
Harada, 49, are fourth-generation em- 


ployees. His post office, in the industrial 
town of Tonaa, near the Inland Sea, is on 
his father’s property and next to the 
house where his father and mother still 
live. His father, Asao Harada, 80, paid 
for the construction of the post office and 
in fact owns the building and rents it to 
the government. 

The postmasters are part of a system 
that dates to 1 87 1 , when reformers trying 
to pull Japan out of feudalism and into 
the modem age decided the country had 
to have a postal system. Short on money, 
they asked wealthy merchants and farm- 
ers to pay tbe costs in retnrn for status and 
rights to pass positions on to their son s. 

The postal savings system was set up 
four years later, in 1875, borrowing a 
practice common in Europe. The goal 
was to promote a culture of savings 
when Japan 's tradition was ‘ ‘don ‘t carry 
money overnight.” The money on de- 
posit helped pay tbe cost of building a 
national army as the feudal samurai class 
was phased out 


Later, tbe government used the postal 
savings system and a postal life-insur- 
ance program, established in 1916, to 
raise money for the country’s war ef- 
forts. After World War IL the funds were 
directed toward rebuilding Japan. 

Though the system was set up to end 
feudalism, in the 20th century it has 
helped a type of feudalism survive. Like 
ancient loros, special postmasters pass 
their jobs on to their children. The local 
community becomes in effect a fief, 
granted to the family in perpetuity to live 
off of and to serve. 

Today, special postmasters head 
18,654 of Japan’s 24,587 local post of- 
fices. Their salaries averaged about 
$ 90,000 last year, but they vary ac- 
cording to age and commissions. 

Such pay scales are coming under fire 
these days. But special postmasters say 
they don’t make much, considering ail 
tbe hours they put in. They also sit on 
community boards, organize weekend 
festivals and field calls at home. 


Tn Many European Nations, Rural Residents Bank at Post Offices 


Barry James 

Inlemmionql Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Most of the world’s post 
offices operate financial services to 
some extent, but usually this is limited to 
sending or receiving money orders — a 
service coordinated internationally 
through the 189-nation Universal Postal 
Union in Bern. 

But about 30 post offices, most of them 
in Europe, operate virtually as full-ser- 
vice banks, with investment services and 
checking accounts. The U.S. Post Office, 
however, provides no financial services, 
other than offering money orders. 

The postal banks are popular for three 
reasons. Usually their services are 
slightly cheaper than those of commer- 


cial banks. Customers do not need to 
open an account to use the services, and 
post offices are usually more numerous 
and convenient than banks. 

A spokesman for La Poste in France 
said the only thing that the postal service 
cannot offer is consumer loans, but it 
offers a frill range of financial services 
from checking accounts to life insurance 
policies at its 17,000 offices — one for 
every two communes in the country. In 
6,000 towns and villages, the post office 
is the only place offering financial ser- 
vices, the spokesman said. 

One of the most widely used services 
offered by European post offices are so- 
called giro accounts, which enable direct 
transfer of funds and conventional trans- 
fers by checks. The postal banks also 


issue, cash or deposit pension checks. 

In Central and Eastern Europe, where 
commercial banks are not well repre- 
sented outside the main cities, postal 
banks provide an unparalleled and easily 
accessible network that is well suited to 
customers who depend largely on cash 
rather than checking accounts. 

An increasing number of post offices 
are introducing banking services, be- 
cause. according to specialists, there is a 
cost advantage in combining postal and 
banking operations under one roof. As 
government-owned entities, the post of- 
fices provide confidence and a reas- 
suring image for ordinary people, ac- 
cording to Thomas Leavey. director 
general of tbe International Bureau of 
ttie Universal Postal Union. 


routinely have abandoned towns as the 
rebels approached, pausing only to loot 
’ as they fled. 

But Kisangani, the key transport and 
economic hub of northern Zaire, is 

- where the military has concentrated its 

- greatest resources, including foreign 
) mercenaries who are thought less likely 
a to surrender without a fight. Zairian 
t newspapers say the military has sown 
l minefields along the city’s perimeter. 

; Stiff, an exodus from Kisangani has 
begun. Zaire Air Lines’ twice-weekly 

- flights from Kisangani to Kinshasa have 
i been arriving packed, according to po- 

- iicemen at Kinshasa’s airport. Travel to 
i Kisangani has been virtually halted, 

tourist agencies in Kinshasa reported 
t Monday, because the government 
ordered last week that no more tickets be 
: issued for trips to the city. 
i “We hear that the upper class and 
i military officers ' families are getting out” 
of Kisangani and the southern mining city 
; of Lubumbashi, die diplomat said. 

> Kinshasa’s citizens and newspapers 
i openly discuss the possibility of amil- 
i itary coup or popular uprising if Kisan- 
gani fells. “Anything is possible: public 

; disorder, a general military mutiny or a 
l coup d’etat,’ ’ Mr. Lokuta said, 
i “Zaire’s top military officers are in 
, Kisangani,” a diplomat said. ‘ ‘They feel 

> abandoned by the government. No gov- 
ernment ministers have been up there to 
see them, and officers are resentful that 
government corruption has siphoned off 

. money that should have bought am- 
munition.’’ 

Public support for Marshal Mobutu 
• appears to have vanished since mid- 
December, when he returned from 
France to a jubilant reception by Zairians 
who apparently believed he would 
swiftly welcome opposition politicians 
into his government and permit a ne- 
gotiated settlement with the rebels. 

Marshal Mobutu's rejection of all 
compromise since then has embittered 
those who cheered him three months ago. 
Laurent Kabila, the rebel leader, “will 
not have to fight for Kinshasa,” an un- 
employed local woman. Juliet Muarnba. 
said “We will welcome him here.” 

As the position of the government has 
become marginal, its depiction of reality 
here has become ludicrous. State-run 
broadcasts ignore the conflict rending the 
country. Official television led its week- 
end newscasts with sports reports. Radio 
Zaire devoted one sentence this morning 
to a government condemnation of the 
rebels, then moved swiftly to a long 
report on the observance later this month 
of International Tuberculosis Day. 

SPY: 

Was Iran the Target? 

Continued from Page 1 

istratioo,” die official said, but added, 
“It is not settled yeL ’ 1 
In U.S.-German relations, matters in- 
volving Iran have been particularly sen- 
sitive because Bonn has been expanding 
its contacts and relationships with 
Tehran, while Washington has been try- 
ing to isolate and disrupt the Islamic 
government there. The clash in approach 
was illustrated when CIA officials were 
sharply critical of the heal of German 
intelligence when he met with his coun- 
terpart from Iran, according to a White 
House official. 

CIA officials in Washington said they 
did not understand why the CIA officer 
who was told to leave was selected, 
because his activities were not clandes- 
tine but carried out openly, sources said. 
The American sources suggested that 
domestic politics in Germany were in- 
volved in the apparent disclosure to Der 
Spiegel, which carried hints of U.S. eco- 
nomic spying on Germany. 

At one point, the CIA's largest station 
overseas was Germany, with installa- 
tions in Frankfurt, Munich, Hamburg. 
Beriin and Bonn, according to former 
CIA officials. In those days, U.S. in- 
telligence operations against the Soviet 

®°d Eastern Europe were under- 
taken with and without Bonn's approval. 
With die end of the Cold War, the CIA 
has reduced its presence in Germany, but 
not as much as Bonn would like. 

Although U.S. and German intelli- 
gence agencies continue to cany out 
some intelligence activities together, the 
United States has its own uituaieral in- 
terests and targets that it wants to pursue, 
sources said. Negotiations to come to 
some new understandings between the 
J-tA and G ermany’s intelligence services 
nave been under way for souk timn 




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CArareffip & 2nd Passport via Economic 
Imrastmertf, 100% legal Govermant 
Proyams. starting at $28,000. wwi n 

90 to 1 B0 days. Funds held in Escrow 
und you raceme your docunenta. 

B4TEHNAT10NAL ATTOWtfYS SA 
CARB8EAN: Fax: +®0) 290 587 
a Fat +(590)290 684 

E-MAIL WTATTfcAOLCOU 

LADIES & GENTLEMEN WANTED 
mriMda as traelance agenta to fnafze 
contracts tor recommendations to bob 
dass/deftue estabistments We exn 
since 1962 and pay high commssons. 
Operate with sub-ageras in your home 
area or travel Wrae tcc CD-C, P.OB. 

224, CH-8056 ZunchSwtzsdand or tax 
(+41) 1-371 71 08. 

GERMANY. RUSSIA UK & IRELAND 
MgtaqualBBdsalesandrartehngprot- 
tfs wih cfices it 3 courtfres w8 dewtop 
turnover aid care for ygra producs and 
customers on a cost saving and highly 
efteffw basis. 

EUVMILPHA 

Fax +49 231 7 281573 or* 353 66 62110 

FOR UCS6E USA AW EUROPEAN 
PATENT (Germany. France, Italy) Otto 
cycle internal combustion engne, con- 
structed prototype, increased perfor- 
mance with two ecological effects: tow 
consumption and much lower wxssion. 

Fra hfermabon please write to Pat B 

No. 70107B Feono PoGta Roma Monte- 
sacra, Mato Arfoaflcc. 136, 07147 ftora 

Italy. 

MOMBASA 30 Of FROM TOWN, 

1 KM bom upon. SH0PPWG CENTER 

FOR SALE: 7 shops. 2 restaurants, offic- 
es, telephone Ones Inked, water and 
efectaty connected. 150 m from a won- 
derful ante beach. Avaatable 14 piota of 
2JIOO sqja Wrie to: DATA STUD© 2c. 

Via liracori a 6. 34133 Trieste, Italy. 
Attention: Pauline. Photos and vtoeo 
avafeabto 

HAWAI, OAHU. Move to paratfse. ice 
mamrtadisiog 8 {fetrixoon conqiairy. 

SI 75,00a 3 bedroom cedar tone on 1 
acre termtend with pool. S450.000. 
808-2394258, work B0823S8345. 

MRSOCCTYOFfiNANCfERS 

Netwafong tor toHne pratesurols wCi 
projects tor taxfing or tuc&ig br 
projects. FREE Ainnailed ReoDtl 
704-2525907 Fat 704-251-5061 USA 

OFFStOTE C0UPAMES. For tree bro- 
ctwe or ata» M London 44 1B1 741 

1224 Fax: 44 181 748 5558-6338 
mmappMOLcaiA 

SELL YOUR STOCKLOfTS m Eurwe 
ttm0i a sold 8 quaKed coropar^. Of- 
fers ID Peacock Trading Ccirpapy. Tet 
+3140)299.874921. Far 674823 

LOOKING FOR PARDER tar invest- 
ment in sererat sectors in Tutey. Fax 
+90232368.1694 Tat +902322605340 

NEWLY PATENTS) RECSVWG Aerial 
suits aR types of ratio sets, Details? Pa- 
pyrus PO Box 13367 London SVI9 OZR 


OFFSHORE COUP AXES At the 

i paces. Fax enquiries to Ollstore 
i FAX + 44 115 942 7B46 


SEEK PARTNEMKVESTOfl to start-up 

5t d 4Tw?Te*ft^S-t-4S«a 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 


READY MADE COS., FULL AW* 
TRADE POCUMBITS AND UC 
BAMflNG&'ACCOWTWG 
CHWA BUSINESS SERVICES 


Gonad Stotta Ho tor tmmedsre 
senses 1 com»y wxtue 
NACS LTD. Reran IMS. AUon Plaza 
2-6 Grannie Real, TST, Kowtow. 
Hong Kong. Met nacsetitaw»«i 
Tel; 852-27241223 Fax 27224373 


WANTED FOR PURCHASE 
USA COMPANY WITH NASDAQ 
OR NYSE APPROVAL 
We are operaSng in ffe domesac mas 
recycling seoot. Unbig tooeard for n» 

present and future gensraoons. Please 
send us yon offer with die crarespaid- 
ing documeraatwv 

EURO- RECYCLING LIMITED 
Worts Trade Career 
CH-69K? Lugano l Agno 
Fax *41 91 519 3 T3 


SINGAPORE. From USS170D 
(7 n^te) persons! Sness Saner and pn- 
w» »u guide rciuded. Serge Meyers 
Trawl Constants. Tel / Fa* +252 51 76 
03 Lwartnug 


STUDEBAKEfl'S FRANCHISES cflered 
Tta large USA, Airtrafea. Asia chan at 
ertertarmert outlets otters franchise op- 
portjnitBS tar PRC, KL Surabaya Cebu. 
Bangkok. Fa* (65) 738 6009 


wv»jieic«zaxK.coM 
On-tine mcotpraabon service m one ot 
toe «rtfc' best a* teven venues 


Telecommunications 


Glob eNet 


GJcbeNet. privately owned partnership 


Italy I 

reth one ol tne US's larges! cable TV 


provide®, seeks to expand is tail 
CalBck wtateate program Ortv exper- 
ienced cattucfc operator! vnin nmmum 
morffoy traffic need apply Tta b lot the 
sertus caNKCk rasefcr or master agent 
IcoJong to inprwe the*- market position 
and margre. To (serve ar. overmew a 
our program, please coma* Karen Yavl 
via fax ar 510-525-6610 or E-mail: 
gna$mintfcpmg. com. 


fallback 


The Ort^naf & Largest Discount 
Tebcoirenmicattone Company 


Tel: 1i06.599.1991 


Fax: 1.3)8.599.1981 

Eras! into^kaUbactcom 
wwwJailbaeltcon 


Cars see .s Z CeBIT 9 7 
Hall «. Send CO. Baft £55 
Harmcrsr. Getrasm: Martr 15-19 


Business Services 


Lowest Inti 


Telephone Rates! 

Ci: T>J US* =7- 


Sams* 

Franca 
SWikE&ti 
SxfStei 
SauJ Arata 


— .M 

JwS 


JS3S 


CsLPr.K fees 
29? d Commisston 
Agents Welcome! 


-335 


KallMart 

Tab 1-107-777-4222 Fax 1-4CVT7-5411 
hap J iypLcor-.tftman 


MSA - Ptennteg to crcoog taaness 

r. India? > whI make 5 eas«; tor yu 
Trouble shtetmg. taswunx. locking 
potners or pre-raves; men: atvea. 26 
years experience, Retewces prowled. 
Fax Gauiam Berry in Mumbai 
91-322-2370507 


ANONYMOUS 3AMC ACCOUNT Avad- 
abte. Prompt deliver; and reasonable 
fee. Fax to +44 (0nS24 2005B1. 


INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITIES 



MARK FISCHER (L)and OUVER THRELFAU. 
Steamatic of Australia 

'Steamatic has provided us with many profit 
centres to enable us to grow at a rate that ranked 
us 84lh in the fastest growing private companies 
in Australia in 1993. Steama tic's continued 
research and development is the key to our ability 
ro stay ahead of our competition.'’ 

"Our ten years has seen us grow to multi- 
locations throughout Australia and we look 
forward to more locations." 

Saccos itetdyaeaBaway - me er»ri ..ito ifc * 

1-81 7-332-15 

FAX: 817-332-5349 % 


JUST PUBLISHED 

International Herald Tribune’s 
international Fra nchise Guide 
FVTER^TIONAL MASTER F^KANCIiD^E 
& UUEA DEVELOPMENT OPPORTOUBTIES 

TV. . ili-rmiiivr niide devoted solely to inleruauonal franchiong. 

S ^-Sa5“.s snsss* — 

«■ ^ gj? 5 SS 2 S or tSaU: Srcebook@caithlmk.nei 

Hfralb3ffi^ ri ^ unc 

umBaassss 


On April 25. 1997, 

The IHT will publish a sponsored section on 

ftTERTATlOVH FRiMlIISWG 


TeU 0171 «0 0325- Fax: 0, 71 «0 0338 

T " rJ-Retrancourt - IHT France 

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CONTROL 

AN ENTIRE COUNTRY WITH 


i Opportunity 


Master Ri> 

dSSSSa tssatirt&sk 

Stephanie Abrams. Exec V. P. 
tS: (201) 567-®00 «t. 23 
Fajr. (2£n) 5C7-4405 USA 
Moat our Execs in: 

UbQ Mar. 20-21 Paris Mar. 22-23 
Wash.tLC.Aff.2M7 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


YWffl OFFICE W DtBLM. Serviced Of- 
fices. Mail Phone 8 Fax. Offshore Co. 
Formations. Prestigious Address Tet. 

-253 <ff a?5 i©1 Fat ( I / 475 18® 

BUSINESS SERVICES m SOUTHERN 
SWITZERLAND. Eltodfi! S stpeneresd 
lufian ■ Gamo ■ Engfish ■ French Tet 
+41.91.60545 26 Fax +41.6055436. 

COSPDEffTlAL ma/Sna address 
regswed rtfee a UK /fusaias sravees 

Fax +44 10)1924 200581 

CONFIDENTIAL SWISS ADDRESS 
€100 per year Free information Fax 
your address- 33 Jtyl 53 01 51 19. 

YOUR QFflCE H LOWMN 

Bond Street - Mail, Phone, Fax. Tate 

Tel 44 171 499 9192 Fax 171 499 7517 

Business Travel 

Ist/Buslness Class Frequent Travefeeis 
Worldwide. Up ro 50% off. No coupons, 
no restncuons. imperial Canada Tel: 
1-514-341-7227 Fax: 1-514-341-7399. 
e mail address JmpenaiStogm.nef 
htipdfwwwJoyijnetffniperiat 

Security and Surveillance 

ALPHA BRAVO ASSOCIATES 

Alpha Bravo offer a complete dsoea S 
professional service to crapraate 
& ntiflrtiti efeertfs. To dsacs you 
reqiiremaras coread Jereny rtgson on 

-t44 171 352 9309 

Banking 

CREDIT ENHANCSNENT tefflrs d cred- 
it Pre-advice issued by bank m nanJco- 
py. SB4JC sen] ktL bank-o-bar*. Cell 
London 0171 4932S34 tax 0471-4956938 

Capital Wanted 

INVESTMENT OPPORTUMTY 

N RED SEA SWAJ RES3RT 

Partner (USSS mo) sough Ira 
tourisl viage dmity rat saa. 

Hcfi ecciftar cy rsS. ruerssjng proto 

10 yr. tax exemptions. Contact Stoss 

Star te Toraum OndapmeriL Cairo 

Tel 202-4010722 - Fax 202-1015545 

BANKER SEEKS US5800.000 tor high 
yield trading program. 5 t money back 
after 5 nets. Fax -*+49-42) -46221 7 

Capital Available 

"IMMEDIATE & UNLMTED ** 

Capitri ava ifebte kx 

ALL buaness prdedsl 

MN U S. SI iTflJno max 

Infl Buaness Consulting 
(717) 397-7490 (US. FAX) 
IrajLVrwtLnlbuscoiicom (irtemet) 

BLDCXH5 FlRffiS 
(BANK COttfiRUED) 

PROJECT LOANS 

TRADE FROfflAUS 

DEBT PURCHASE/RECOVERY 

FAX: 44 171 251 2477 (UK) 

COMMERCIAL/BUSINESS FINANCE 
available tor arty vable protects world- 
tvde. Fa bn^ synapse in Engbsh <0 
Craparaia Advances. (+)44-127J62130a 


ITIKISiTON * CO. 


bteniiona] Finding Eqcrts 
New York - Frankfurt • London 


- CotatesliGuarantes Proyams 
• Rea coae Protects 

- LfeiftB^^ ProgCIS 

- AacrWBifiplng 


BROKERS C0UFENSATED 
No fees Kit! contiact signing 
CALLusmsn. 

Tel: 516-873-7200 
Fax: 516-873-7201 


Anglo America 
. pll: 


n Croup 


PH0JECT FINANCE 
V9ITURE CAPTAL 
GLOBAL COVERAGE 
NO MAXB&B4 
BROKERS WELCOME 
For Cupcfate Saxhure ad 

irto matron pack 

Tel 4^4 1924 201 385 
Fac *44 1924 2ffT 377 
You are edttw to mm is. 


GLOBAL PROJECT FUNOMG 


Vemn Capita! - Jont Ventures 
Pitted Financing • Prrwne Eguiy Fmds 
BnxEfs PraROBd 
FAX: +44 113 2727 5B0 
For •CorporaJe awhure" 


*B 


I 1 T f I X ITIOM 


PROJECT FINANCING 


Veriup Capua) - Joint Venues 
No kfawrarn - Brokers Protected. 


RJJ. (NltflNATTONAL 
Tel: 001-809-363-1649 
Fax: 001-716-7794200 


TRADMG PROGRAMS 
Cash Av^abte 
For Finlj Fes Transactior 
Versus IDS or E^nabnt 
Unmun Tan MMon 
(212) 758-4242 Far (212) 758-1221 
Attorney s k Brokers touted 
375 Part Avt, NY. NY 10152 USA 


UNUMTTH) CAPITAL FOR PROJECTS 
M HF-APPROVED DESTINATIONS 
Mr. SlOklt USD, no rax. 
tata matiooal Furxflng Services 
1-904-280-4646 Fax 1-904-2BCM647 
Web: wnxd&org 
E-Mat funbngSisirg 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



SOUTHWEST RfVNCE 

250 acres constructabfe 
Restaurart + Hotel 

GOLF 27h 

Fbr sate USS million 
!. Fax: +33 (0)555 02 3252 , 

“The SWEDOC Group” 

“Solutions for Business” 
Offer? Extraordinary 

FAcnjmES 

to Entrepreneurs and 
Investors Worldwide 

Serioos enquiries to: 

Fax:+46-708-100343 

Efnaftdnfogswedocse 
bitpJ/wwvrsmdocM 
Brokers Welcome 


International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 



We are looking tor a succosor far or seduded resdence/confcrenee^uBi ho«e. On an 
ara of 700 squa^ meters acbce yai w® find 

* n«o brge rooms far corierence and reninara 
- a «7nd szion Wi open fire place far prwaee meora 
•recreational room m Tinny gyfavmh outdoor srwnmiqg poo l and km nge 
• mjral Teppar./alo-rocm Qjpanee jil -i three ffiestaparone us 

• separate employees room ■badwor'sthtorapxnmem 
aD this b offered n an estate, whidi by its location, age. charme and interior, almost 
resembles of an Ttoeran monastere and. thus s perfeedy stmed far busbies meafap and 


fepko IHT. 3 d 24i fheiiJisTrfe IE 04mZ3 frontjiiritftot GtwrBy. MX *ri4|0l >9-97 1250-20. 


INCORPORATE IN USA 
BY FAX OR PHONE 


• Corporations and LLCs 

• Free name resenration 

• Full reBistered agent services 

• Personal assets shielded 

• Confidential and cost effective 

• Attorney managed 

FAX: 302-421-5753 

Registered Agents, Ltd. 



Delaware 

$199.™ 

Wyoming 

$285.™ 

Nevada 

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Utah 

$270.™ 


TEL: 302-421-5750 
E Mail: corp@dca.net 
www.incusa.com 


1220 N. Market Street. Suite 606 
r? v 1 n •. «ur*i ; l j* 


Wilmington, Delaware 19B01 &. 

■ w.v.. 1 ■ - r r J|7^. » ^ iw i rc- 


SUPPLIER OF WELL 
KNOWN BRANDS 


of Glassware, Porcelain and China 
is looking tor strong buyers 
(wholesalers, discounl-sfores) 

PfrtOfjartKUT. 

World Wide StmpBes Inc. 

Fax; +31 72 Sr 6199 
Tbc Ndhtjfaxufa 


• LIECHTENSTEIN & WORLDWIDE 

• OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

• •CQURWY FORMATION - fi£4DY MADE 
*»M4AMG£MBV7 AM) ACCOUNTANCY 

• •WTERWTClfBL W, LEGAL AM) IRUST 

• SETWGES RBAMC W7TODUC7JOWS 
*• ASSET W07EC7EW « TTWX SUPPOfTT 

• •TELEPHONE AtO MU. FOFTNARDHG 


Free Brochure avstocte in Engwn, 
German, itafean and Rumen 



P^X Box 4431 
6304 ZUG - Switzerland 
Fe»++«1 - 41 - 7105064 
e-mafl ic^Maewtaxh 


BUSINESS iUfVVSTH INDIA -5, NEPAL 


Fox roim Ventures, In vestments, 
Business Tie-ups, Trading, Liaison | 
S. iooking ater your interest 
in India & Nepal 
Camncf in India Ot. Dinah Gad 
Phoae/Fax: 91 U 224 0465 


INTERNATIONAL 

PROJECT 

FINANCING 


Capital Investment Agency, 
London borough of Bromley, 
BRl IR\' 


TdLr +44 181 464 4442 
+44 181 467 7282 
Fax: +44 181 460 1364 
+44 181 467 6744 


EMPIRE STATE BUtDMG 
ADORES 

Gafci Instant credMUty. 
Establish a NY presence kn 
the Mfltfto besi-toXRvn 
buWMng. MWl icoelvacl. ptune 
nnawering. corfsranpe 
room, furnished mi nt-offices . 

n w nc state o ro c cgw ca 

TBj 2H-73MW • RUE2tt«Ma 




Since established in 1826 ‘Burkes 
Peerage* has published and dealt 
with the Aristocracy of Gl Britain. 
To acquire an authentic ancient 
Scottish title with confidence 
contact usai 

Strike 202, ABmxy Boose, 
Renew Su London W1B 5AA 
L Pfaone^DB (44) 1903 700476 _J 


FRENCH RIVIERA 

Assure the Seorty of yotr possesaons 

"LA SKURITE GENERALE* 
-LE CERTALE" 


Security and 

Video Surveillance Companies 


fee + 33 (0)4 93.732658 


SUPPLIER OF WELL 
KNOWN BRANDS 


of Designer Betting, Jeans Mot? 
andShoes is lootog lor s&WTgjJS®* 5 
(whotasaiers, ttecount-Bfores) 
Bamutt 
Wortd Wide SupptolK. 
ax: »?rrojg^7^i99 




We are tootang br ntkkada 

GOVERNMENT CONTACTS 


far the reafeawt d ther 


STATE PROJECTS 

PnxfBk eemaa t» Gemai 
FAX: {*49) 7425 74C4 


UNLIMiTEO tolwnational PROJECT 
FINANCE LOANS - COMUEHCtAL 
LOANS tnraugh pnme ftiancal instbu- 
tvns. tor isaamg fimsrgnamraan txxf- 
No 14 front tees. We reply to pnre- 
only. Crow list. Inc. via Fax 
2-972-9637 (USA). 


pals 

212 -! 


Financial Services 


FUNDfiG PROBLEMS? 


VENTURE CAPITAL 
EQUITY LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 


Long enn coSaera! 

Sitoponaa Gtarartees 
(Commission eamao ofiy upon Furefing) 
Banktele gimmees to saamtuxSng 
tor vtante projects anangad toy: 


BANCOR 

OP ASIA 


Fax 1 
Tab 1 


IB1M2B4 

894-5358 


Brokers Oorreresson Assured 


WE ARE PRIVATE LENDERS 
Project / Trade Fraaxe 
Emenpg Made; Puds 
Praatoton finance 
Currency Enchwge 
21st Century Enterprises Lto. USA 
Tat (9131 857-7762 Fax (913) 897-7753 
E-mat 2lsicenniyC2iswrftjryertcom 


FWANCIAL GUARANTEES 

hsurancs I Ffensurance backed 
grarartees tor quaBied 
buEross pnijeds. 

Tat 561-998-3222 
Fax: 561-998-3226 USA 


UJS. DOLLARS AVAILABLE 
' Treteg ProgranWVertae Capital 
' Equity Loensfiridge Loam 
' knponiExoon Ffaarcsn 
1 S2H-S0U Furxfe Guaranteed 
Frnicai tastijbors 


WE CRtHQUE MVESTMENT pn 
tar fraucVtcams. $375 kx up to 
evakatian Tel/Fax: 305-59 
Fax: 305-412-0925 toscxeaol.com 
Lawyer afWated. 


DOCUHBfTAHY A STANDBY fetters at 
creek, bank & Insurance repayment guar- 
antees. Funding commune rtfs tor ap- 
proved projects. Fax USA 
1-854-965-4257. 


PROFESSIONAL BAW0NG A 
fiduciary Servkas. Tel/Fax (44) 1245 
348668 or (47) 22 421 322 


W0RUHHDE RNANONG 


•Commercial Hortnagas 
•Vantire Capital 
•Stock Loero 
•Prejact Rmfln 
InasnolCrm 
‘Accounts Recehrafafa Fnancmg 
■Private Pfaceoanl 
*PubBc ShSs 


Tel: (212) 75M242 
Fac (212) 758-1221 


Broker's Welcome 

375 Part Ant, NY. NY 10152 USA 


Re&ndBbta Ratarai 
Sometimes Racial 


WORLD CAPITAL 
MARKETS CONSULTANT 
IOB0THA 

Project Financa Services 
Bank Finteg Ledee 
Bank Cobteal Semces 
No Ifa From Fees 
Af Busrtsss Uanagett by 
Reptfabia Law ftms 
GOLD COAST 
AUSTRALIA 
FAX 617 55943604 


Financial Investments 


MANAGED FUTURES ACCOUNTS 
arable tor quaffed mestois. 

Fax: ft Lau 31255&72S7 USA. 


Diamonds 


RAW DIAMONDS. We ml pay mstam 
eaeh tor gem quAy. African ongn. 
volume ertfy- Far 954 474-3866 USA 


Serviced Offices 


World-Wide 
Business Centres 
Network.® 



START YOUR 
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Bisnass aetttsses, furrashaJ ifices. 
neefeig taedbas to: AottM, BNgfaa, 
France, Garmaiy, Grant | “ ‘ 

«i-^ » ■- Hnrinnal I 

rwmenanos, ronugai, , 


Pteese contort Sdes Office in Zuridi 


Te). -41-1 214 62 62 
Fax 441-1 214 65 19 


E-Mat 101527 J01 1 9nwtousravxwn 


attention executives 


Puh Ui yam- hd 

tha kWri w l ii Hitf 


vain 


I Tribunai p 


wharm mra than a third af a 
mSw nrarian waMaddp, md 
of whom ore la JmmmooM aad 
intkMtry, wB nod & Jknr fax m 
(tab 33-1-41*39370) bm form 
10 am. an a a r b g t ha «• can h* 
you bod c fmb eatm wVdi major 
awfi awd you wish to chmpa # 
ro, the nomhor aud axpiratloo 
date, and your maatoga can 
empoa' wWo *8 haw*. P b oio 
also htdodrn war ocMrmss and 
lokphano tNODOar farowr fifaa 


Businesses For Sale 


MASSAGE THERAPY SCHOOUCSnic. 
soccesslul, excelteni mvestrreni! 

Beautitul New Mexico. 
ffim. Cash off. 1-619667-7747. 


COMMERCIAL 
& INVESTMENT 
PROPERTIES 


Offices for Rent 


A MAYFAIR OFFICE LONDON. Qually 
finished & Serwad bran US $115 per 
nek. Also presage business address 
orovshd. UK Tak *44 17 J 629 619? 
Fax: +44 171 491 7679 


MONIFELLER - SOUTH FRANCE (Ml 
aiqxxf) 340 sqm. offices far rertf in the 
heart ot tom historical bidUm near 
PALAIS DES CONCHIES. For ntramaOon 
Fax: +33 (0) 4 67 61 10 96 


OFFICES M CENTBT OF ROME 
furnished, short S tanWerm basis, office 
Bqu'gHnent, optonal services. Tel: 
394478681 Fax 39M786S24 


PARIS 3rd - 18th century buikfing, 
25 sam. to 60 sqm redone offices, on 
Tel +33(0)142064141 


Sales 


RESTAURANT TOR SALE 

SupariVy coc sfru ctari in 1990. 

10 irntes (ram Arc de Triumphe. 
Bradertng the Stme. private axaSon, 
security. 100 paikrg ptacas. 

750 shjb imG SPACE. 

3 (Snng moms, ak cratfSortnq 
PoKitfe 330 sqm enclosed 
terrace tor extra restaurant. 

17 10 MMon turemr. 

Qcsed 2 dqs a week. 

FAX PARS: +33 (bp 40 86 31 60. 


LEGAL NOTICE 


UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK 


MERRILL, LYNCH, PIERCE, FENNER 
& SMITH INCORPORATED, 


- against - 


Plaintiff, 


No. 96 Cht 95B9(RWS) 


BANCO KTERNATIONAL SA; SWISS UNION SERVICES LTH; ABEL COSTO; GRACE ’ 
AVIGDOR; D. SALMON; WHOLESALERS' INTERNATIONAL; ASA KO YOK OMUBA. ate I 
ASAKO ALUBOWICZ; VORTEX B4TBU1A710NAL TTtUST, MKL; JEFFREY YOKOUURA; | 
HS4FfY ALUBOWICZ; ROMEO SflLES; MB TRUST; SOLER PROMOTION SJL4 ANTWNE 
SOLER; MCH B. HAM WajN; SARL TTB.lt; SYIYA W GALLEA; MCKAB. LUCAS; ■ 
SAM. DA. TUFFEHYt REU TUFFERY; PERflETTT TUFFERY; BERNARD WIRTTi; | 
JACQUES DERREB; LOUIS DSAUHEY; SA JCM WDUSTOlE; JEANOLAUDE MOREL; . 
SERGE SAVJDAN; CLAUDE DUDEFAND; SARL AGRRJX; RACHEL DESCAMPS; SCI " 
BELLE ALLEE; It BACQUET; RENE LABORDE; EUETTE VIOLLE; ALAM VKJLLE; I 
UL1ANE SPENNATO; DANIEL BtfNE; KEt. ENCOHTHE, a/Wa KM; JEAN-RAUL KBL; 1 

0000 ET CJE; PHOEMX KAPTCALDENST^ ECOUARCHE SA JEPLAR; MAN UEL DE ' 

1 CARVALHO; JEANOLAUt£VEmDE;MARE^RANCOiSE ANTOINETTE MOURICETTE I 


ORDER PURSUANT 
T028U8AS1655 
DIRECTING ALL 
DEFBffiANTSTO 
APPEAR OP PLEAD 


I BON; BERNARD BROUSTWE; CHERF HADJEB; SERGE ai^Yi RIAWMCBCUUDE 
RtBES; JEANCLAUOE HAKE 7EKSSRE; PATRICK BOUE: CHfflSTtAN HERVE 


RJCARD; EUROPEAN TRADERS INVESTMENT GUARANTY, REOS LS40Y;_EURL 
POGA; ANDREQERRIER, tiJbfe ANDRE OEM * 


! OERRIER CONSULTANT) PRO VANTAGE ONE I 




unknown); JOCELYNE JOUFFROY; GUY TAVET) ALAW BASSE; SBK5E DU 
JOmDOESl-3, 

P ete n d ant s . 


Upon the annexed afQdevtt of Mrahael C. 
defendants In tin 


this action can be served vrilNn (he Stale 
due (Spence, to unable to 

Sttoeitrarg Affidavit, end far gcrad caise shown. It Is hereby j ^ 

ORDERED the! each defendant listed in Exhtoit A to the Sttoerbevg Affidavit ehaS be served with Bio frtar and the 
comptakd n Ms action in accordance vritii the reqiaremertfs of RiJe 4(e) or (0 ff the Federal Hides of CM Procedus, as 
anpicabto: and 6 is farther 

ORDERED that puaureitto 28 USO. § 1655. eacto defendant Bsted to EMM A to toe Sflaerborg ASdavtf ahal appear 
or plead in tttfe action no later than sufly (00) days after this order has been served upon nch defendant and It to hatoar 

ORDERED that the defendants Bated In Exhibit B to the SBbertrag Affidavit shall be served by pUHcatton of tob 
order, exdudfaa ExhM A to toe SUwtrerg Affidavit, to toe European waton of the MBmattana/ HamW 7rtbtfie, nof less than 
once a week for a period of six consecutive weeks (the "Pifoicatlon Period^' *td It is halher 

ORDERED that toe dafendarts fisted tn ExhUt B to the Sllxrtetq Affidavit shad appear or plead In the action no 

sixty (BO) days Bfiattt^exiiiiatkMic^lhaPubSc^ionPsfkxi. 


Datect 1-1547 


UNITED STATES DtSTRtCT COURT 
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK 


fHknatuTB of Hon. Robert W. Sweell 
Urtted States District Judge 


MERRILL. LYNCH, PERCE, FENNER 
& SWTH INCORPORATED, 


BANCO WTERNAriONAL SA et eL 
Defendants. 


- against - 


Plaintiff, 


MTCHAEL C. S&BERBBK^ being (My 
1 adCBney cadv aefenittod to practice before 
& SrrkBto Incorporated (tlerm! 


1.1 are an 1 


and says: ^ 


N0.96CN. 9589(RWS) 
AFFDAVir 
IN SUPPORT OF 
EX RARTE MOTION FOR 
ORDER DRECTMG 
AU DEFENDANTS TO 
APPEAR OR PLEAD 


poses and says: 

reprerserUtogplBintffl Men*. Lynch. Pferea, 
a this afBdmoto support of Men* Lynchto < 


Fdnner 


efidy admitted to practice Before this Court, 

Lynch") In tho aboro^aottoned action. I rm*a this aSdavfl tn sia^ort 

motion for an order, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1655, draatog toe defendants to appear or plead In this artion no later than 
(60) days alter service of the order upon them, and to etfhortze service by pubacctfion on six European defendants, todudtog 
four French nslfanato. whoee addresses. despSe tore (figwice. cannot be ascertained. 

2. As more particularly deserted in the Comptatot far Interpleader and Declaratory Ffofef rComplairt^, Merrtl 


along w* 

Lynch’s attention, caused concerns by MsrrH Lynch of possBrle frato andtor money 
courts. Men* Lynch has accorttirigfy bnx^tf ttis intBfpteader action under 28 U5.C. §§ 
cting chime ana remove the doud upon the 181a af the funds in ‘ 


Lynch to In possession of three Interest-bearing accounts in this dtotocL containing an agree^m of appraximatety 
&Z77. 143. tariiaStiviSes h (he tores aceouits / inducing tastrependes betfewn the idBntiflesff parsons anderrMes who 
tad deposited finds and those to whom toe account takers directed Man* Lynch to transfer the funds, along with other 
docunerts vrtxch came to Men* Lynch'S attention 
taundertoo in connection with the accounts. Men* Ly 
1655, to resahre toe conOcting datora and 1 

3. As alleged in toe Compton, as of the 

peraonaty or through an agent. Such that personal kntedxaion over them is a ppropriate- Sera Comptatot T a However, none of 
toe defendants can be served wfihfntta State of New York. Accordfcrty, Menffl Lynch re 
§ 1655. dbwting the defendants to appear or plead no War toan stay days 
ordeO. Such si order may be served on (he defendants wherever fauna. 

4. Men* Lynch nas located d of toe domestic defendants and 1 


. upon me rate at toe tints in the accounts. 

defendants have transacted business In the stale of New 'fork, either 


Lynch requests an order, pur$J*anTto28U.S-C. 
after service of the order is effected (toe “warning 


whom Men* Lynch hee located are Bsted In Exhflrtt A hereto. MerrS 
warning order, accompanied by as ‘ 

lynch attends to serve toe foreign ( 
taw. as reaubed by FecLR.OtP.4ffl. 

Upon infomraSon end betef. each of tto deteidarts fisted In ExHWf B hereto resides In Slope: most reside irr 
Exhibit B. Men* lynch has attempted to locate the Bddressee of these defendants through n 


most of toe 

„ intends to serve foe domestic dafendante with the 
£tf.taaccontance wtth Fed. fi.Ov.P4 (a) and (h). Mend 
aixatdBntavritoappkabtefntenafionMtraatitatflocte 


Franca. See Exhibit B. Men* lynch has attempted to locate the addressee of toeee defendants through n 
dBgant Er v esh oafl oa I am Manned that this Investigation todudad the efforts of Man* Lynch’s French 
exhaustively searched European national and local drefloifes A corporations and IndMduste. I am hutoer Ml 


nvesbgabon^^^^^H 
Jrectortaa. After tots (ffgant 


counsel who 

fuiftw informed that this 


inducted toe efforts of Men* Lynch’s in-house attorneys, who exhaustively searched European c or porate 
Investigation, Men* Lynch has been unable to foctffe the defendants Bsted in Etofort B. 


6. Because personal service on toe defendants listed in ExhH Bis hi 
permission, pmuant to 28 Wi 


the waning order once a water 

European version of the fofomatibraf 


plead or 


US.C. 5 1655, to sen® these defendants by 

consecutive weeks (the ■PuMcafion Period"), in the Nor Yak Law Journal and 
HsBtfTriiwie. 

7. With reaped to tta defendants Bsted In ExttfM B, Meal Lynch requests foal the warning order (Srea them to 
arear no later than sxly (60) days alter the expiration of the Ptabcation Period. 

B. No previous request tor this or similar rateThas been made. 

MonBture.QliMBrt C, Satartrarg. Esa.i 

Sworn to before ma this 23rd day of December, 1396 MtfffldC. Srerberg 

fstanatura ot notaiv oubfct 
Ncsary PutAc 
(stamp of notaty pubic) 

ExhU B to Affidavit of tBdael C. Sifoerterg 

1 . John Doe 1. John Doe 2 and John Doe 3; fflndpN Resfdsncn in France. 

2. Michel Hammeto; PrfedpaJ Reskfence In Francs, 
a Phoeftfx KspttalcBerrat; Prtocqal Piece of Buskiesa in Eraope. 

4. Econarche SA Jeplar; Principal Place of Business in Europe. 

5. Joan Ow rfa Vedrine: Principal Rasktence in Franca 

6. Cherff Karfeb; Principal Residence fa Franco. 

7. Serge Dumont; Prinripai ResWence n Franca 


Detembrts wfshlngto obtaki a copy of toe Comptatot in tote action dncfcl contact one of foe WkMkxcm Mttra Jean- 
Marie Bergoubetou. Ode Lcwette Nouet, 26 Ooua Abed Iff, 75008 Paris, Fifantt; (2) Uchad C. SBnberg, Esq, Mcnflo. 
Abramowtz, Grand, bson A Sa»ttiero, PjCl, Sffi FHr Avenue, NewVrak. New Ybik l0O17;orffl)7Tia Urtited SHk Dtarict Coul 
for tta Soutoem DtaMct of New %rit. &6ce of toe Clerk of tta Cent. 500 Peert Street. New Ybifo New 'ttrt 10007-1311 
TWs nobca was fe« ptfoBshed March 5, 1957. 


1 


-rfL-V.Vrs+fv'! 









_»v 

•--T5f 


PAGE10 


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1997 




ft 



EDITORIALS/OPINION 


lieralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribuite U.S. Policy Toward China Is on the Right Track 


Pt'BLJSHKD WITH THt WW VOKK TIMES AND TOE WASHINGTON POST 


A Swiss Airing 


Uncomfortable as they are with the 
pressure and publicity, the Swiss are 
wo rking their way through grave moral 
dilemmas that they avoided during and 
long after World War II. The question 
is at whose cost and at what cost did 
Switzerland purchase, from Nazi Ger- 
many, its successful and profitable 
wartime neutrality. The most painful 
part of the answer is: at the consid- 
erable cost of imprisoned and even- 
tually annihilated Jews. The electorate 
as a whole has yet to registeHts full 
reaction. However, the country 's polit- 
ical and banking leade r ship is, with 
some backsliding, moving ahead. 

Private banks and the national bank 
have created a $140 million fund for 
aging Holocaust victims or heirs 
whose deposits in Swiss banks had 
disappeared. An Internationa] panel led 
by Paul Volcker is searching for assets 
deposited by Holocaust survivors. 

A commission of Swiss and foreign 
historians is examining central bank 
purchases of Nazi gold, plus the fate of 
30.000 Jewish refugees turned back at 
the Swiss border. The other day a 
“Swiss Foundation for Solidarity” 
was set up to make hundreds of mil- 
lions of dollars available every year for 
victims “of poverty and catastrophes, 
of genocide and other severe breaches 
of human rights, such as of course 


victims of the Holocaust.” as Swiss 
President Arnold KoUer described this 
immensely promising project 

It is late but not too late for the 
Swiss to be asking, in tire words of Mr. 
Roller, “whether and to what extent 
all Swiss citizens managed to satisfy 
the high moral demands during the 
war period." Wartime choices — 
choices made under great pressure — 
cann ot be remade, but they can be 
reviewed squarely. The purpose is not 
simply to respond to critics, although 
there is merit in an honest response 
to critics. The purpose is to allow the 
Swiss people a thorough knowledge 
of what they did. 

Not everyone in Switzerland agrees. 
A n atio nalis t — and what Americans 
would call an isolationist — right ob- 
jects to any suggestion that Switzer- 
land played an ambiguous or dubious 
role toward Nazi Germany and depicts 
international interest now as a Jewish 
conspiracy. Such objections may yet 
push the country into a referendum — 
a familiar Swiss device — that con- 
ceivably could blunt the government's 
efforts to come retrospectively to terms 
with the Holocaust It would a great 
setback for the belated and altogether 
worthy if difficult effort of the Swiss to 
come to terms with their own history. 

~ THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Chinese Puzzle 


So now we know that people inside 
the White House knew about tbe pos- 
sibility of Chinese government polit- 
ical contributions for congressional 
races in June 1 996. President Bill Clin- 
ton was told last month, which means 
that he has had several weeks to ponder 
the possibility that some of his aides 
knew months ago that China might be 
trying to funnel tainted contributions 
into American political campaigns. 

It would not have taken much of a 
leap to wonder if China was doing so 
through such personal friends of Mr. 
Clinton as John Huang. Johnny Chung 
and Charles Yah Lin Trie. These rev- 
elations from the White House press 
secretary make Mr. Clinton's no-prob- 
lems attitude last Friday seem all the 
more detached from reality. 

But these latest disclosures send 
ripples far beyond the central question 
of Mr. Clinton's disinterest in where 
and bow he got the money to finance his 
re-election. What emerges is yet another 
picture of managerial chaos among the 
FBI, the National Security Council and 
the president and his close advisers. 

Mr. Clinton expressed irritation on 
Monday that the FBI had told NSC 
staffers to withhold sensitive informa- 
tion from their superiors, a charge that 
the FBI later denied in an extraordinary 
challenge to White House credibility. 
Whichever side is telling the truth, it is 
a serious lapse when reports that a 
foreign power might be trying to in- 
terfere with the American electoral 
process failed to reach the president. 

In any event, the strains, miscora- 
m unication and immediate blame- 
throwing that broke out between Mr. 
Clinton and the FBI mean that only an 
independent counsel can conduct the 
investigation. Attorney General Janet 
Reno and her subordinates in the FBI. 
including the director, Louis Freeh, 
clearly cannot direct an inquiry that 
now includes the issue of whether the 
bureau misserved the president or the 
NSC dropped the ball. 

There are, of course, reasons why the 
FBI agents in mid- 1996 might have 
wanted to withhold information about 
the Chinese connection from Mr. Clin- 


ton. They would have taken such a 
precaution if tbe FBI felt that it had to 
shield intelligence sources from polit- 
ical operatives in the White House, or if 
agents were already investigating the 
Clinton campaign and its efforts to open 
a pipeline or Asian political money. 

Senator Dianne Feinstein of Cali- 
fornia says she is asking Mr. Freeh for 
a frill explanation of circumstances be- 
hind the puzzling 10-minute briefing 
she got from FBI agents last June. Mr. 
Clinton says he has asked his lawyer 
and his national security adviser, 
Samuel Berger, to find out from Mr. 
Freeh why be was kept in the dark. 
That seems logical, but clearly 
someone is needed to referee the com- 
pelling questions of national interest 
anH campaign law. 

Mr. Berger, for example, was an 
active participant in some White 
House political discussions. If be 
learned of the potential Chinese con- 
tributors earlier than the stated date, 
that would have serious implications. 
Similarly, the Senate cannot vote on 
the confirmation of the former national 
security adviser. Anthony Lake, as di- 
rector of central intelligence without 
assurances that be, too, was out of tbe 
loop on the warnings about Chinese 
involvement. 

Disclosures about a Chinese plan to 
influence die election, first reported by 
The Washington Post, have taken the 
fund-raising scandal to a new level of 
seriousness and clarity. Last Friday 
Mr. Clinton suggested that only those 
people who questioned all political 
contributions were curious about the 
financing of the 1996 campaign. Now 
it is clear that any citizen with a rea- 
sonable interest in the efficiency of the 
federal investigative agencies and tbe 
integrity of the electoral process will 
want a full account of what went on. 

Even Ms. Reno’s flyspeck reading 
of the independent counsel law must 
see that under its conflict-of-interest 
provision an outside authority is 
needed to sort this mix of funny 
money, mismanagement, secrecy and 
possible malfeasance. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


A Europe of Old Roots 

Too much has happened to Euro- 
peans during the last 500 years to make 
it possible, even if it were desirable, 
to restore a Carolingian cultural and 
political unity on the model of Western 
Christendom. Few people today need 
reminding that societies are held to- 
gether not by abstract rational prin- 
ciples or convenient administrative ar- 
rangements but by deeply held habits 
of consensus and belief. 

There is an irrational dimension to 
all human relationships. Past regimes 
all recognized and exploited this truth, 
but in exploiting it they also tamed it 
and made it socially productive. At- 
tempts to ignore it. and lay out society 
on new, just and rational principles, 
have produced only wilder and more 
terrible outbursts of irrationalism. 


So we Europeans must understand 
our past if we tee not to repeal it; 
understand why we have been aland of 
war if we are successfully to remain a 
land a! peace. That is why 1 am always 
uneasy when I hear our American 
friends talk about "a new European 
architecture.” Peoples are not building 
blocks; neither are we building on an 
open-field site. If there has to be an 
analogy, let it be that of a garden. 

The peoples of Europe and their 
institutions should be regarded as dis- 
tinct and living organisms, rooted in 
the particular soil of their regions. 
Weeds must be watched for and erad- 
icated. And as with all gardens, the 
work of cultivation is never-ending. 

— From “Land of War. Land of 
Peace" by the British historian 
Michael Howard, in the winter issue 
of the Wilson Quarterly. 



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N EW YORK — Tbe media 
have been full of innuendo 
that the Clinton administration’s 
policies toward China have been 
influenced by Asian business 
contributions to tbe president's 
1996 campaign. As one of the 
architects of those policies, I 
know firsthand that there is no 
basis for such allegations. 

Our approach to China has 
been crafted by economic, na- 
tional security and foreign 
policy experts from many fed- 
eral agencies who have debated 
options, sometimes heatedly, 
but always on their merits and 
always with the goal of serving 
American interests. 

Reasonable people can dis- 
agree about the effectiveness of 
the administration's approach, 
but they should understand its 
overriding motivation and its 
underlying logic. 

Hiis approach starts with the 
simple notion that America is 
best served over the long run by 
China's stable evolution toward 
a more open, more democratic, 
more market-oriented system 
based on the rule of law. 

The logic of our policy also 


The writer, 
chairman 


By Laura D’ Andrea Tyson 

aiter. a professor of economics at the University of California ® 
t of the White House Council of Economic Advisers and of the National Econo 
Council in the first Clinton administration. 


depends, however, on a realistic 
assessment of the means at our 
disposal. Critics too frequently 
overlook this distinction be- 
tween means and ends. 

Consider the administra- 
tion's often criticized support 
for renewal of China’s most- 
favored-nation trading status in 
each of the last four years. 

Some critics allege that the 
White House has sacrificed hu- 
man rights goals for crass com- 
mercial ones. Others have gone 
even further and argued that the 
administration's trade deci- 
sions have been bought by the 
lobbying efforts of American 
multinationals or of Asian busi- 
ness interests. 

Both accusations are wrong. 

Improving human rights con- 
ditions is an essential part of our 
long-term goaL But the admin- 
istration's policymakers, sup- 
ported by China experts at 
home and abroad, believe that 


withholding most-favored -na- 
tion status for China would not 
promote, and would even im- 
pede. achieving this objective. 

Nothing in China's history or 
in the history of economic sanc- 
tions suggests that revoking the 
countrv’s most-favored-nation 
trade status — which would 
prnnnnf to imposing unilateral 
economic sanctions on Chinese 
goods — would impel Beijing 
to ease its human rights stance. 
Nor have China’s other trading 
partners been willing to join the 
United States in multilateral 
sanctions against the Chinese. 

Certainly America could hurt 
C hina ’s economy by withhold- 
ing its most-favored -nation sta- 
tus, but to do so would under- 
mine our long-run goal for at 
least two reasons. 

First, it would cause a dra- 
matic deterioration in our over- 
all diplomatic relations with 
China and in our ability to ne- 


gotiate on other important as- 
pects of our relationship, such 
as nuclear nonproliferation. 

Second, the bulk of American 
imports from China come not 
from its state-owned enterprises 
but from its private or quasj" 
private sectors, on whose health 
de pends a developing Chinese 
middle class and China's con- 
tinued evolution toward a more 
democratic system. 

This is why many China ex- 
perts believe that the best way 
to encourage reform and demo- 
cratization is to strengthen 
China’s trade and investment 
ties with the rest of the world, 
even though this approach may 
yield few if any short-run im- 
provements in human rights. 

Critics often point to the ap- 
parent anomaly between the ad- 
ministration's willingness to 
threaten economic sanctions to 
encourage China’s adherence to 
made agreements and its unwill- 


Let’s Get Tough on International Corruption 


P ARIS — Public resentment of inter- 
national corruption has never been 
stronger. Governments and business 
should work together to halt its progress 
and at least make bribery a marginal and 
hazardous practice, even if they cannot 
stamp it out altogether. 

Corruption is wasteful and both ob- 
structs and distorts trade. In country after 
country it has iV- stahiliTed governments 
and discredited political establishments. It 
deprives tbe deserving of their rightful 
reward and nourishes political extremism. 

There is real momentum behind the 
drive against bribeary in international trade 
and it must be maintained. Business is 
determined to play its pan. 

We need laws that allow enterprises to 
be reasonably confident that incorrupt- 
ibility will not hamstring them when they 
compete in die International marketplace. 
The consequences of being a lone knight 
in shining armor can be failure to win 
foreign contracts, tbe shutting down of 
production lines and massive job losses. 

For business, therefore, the internation- 
al coherence of legislation as well as 
vigorous enforcement are keys to success 
in suppressing corruption. Regrettably, 
despite recent international initiatives, 
business is still confronted with a maze of 


By Maria Uvanos Cattani 

differing national regimes ranging from 
the official blind eye. and even conniv- 
ance at tbe highest level, to strict en- 
forcement of tough anti-corruption laws. 

Particularly in this digital age of instant 
communication, we reject the argument 
that what would be morally unthinkable in 
one county must be accepted as part of the 
way of doing things in another. We are 
troubled by the tilted playing field on which 
international business now has to operate. 

Yet much that is positive has happened 
in the past couple of years. On the gov- 
ernment side, leading industrial countries 
belonging to the OECD agreed in 1994 
that they should suppress bribery - in in- 
ternational business transactions. Last 
year they called for a ban on what amounts 
to officially sanctioned corruption — the 
tax deductibility of bribes. 

The International Monetary' Fond and 
the Work! Bank are committed to the anti- 
corruption drive. They have tbe muscle that 
comes from funds that can be withheld. 

How to keep free of corruption and 
remain competitive is high on the agenda 
in corporate boardrooms. The Interna- 
tional Chamber of Commerce introduced 


the first business code to combat extortion 
and bribery in international transactions 
in 1977: It is now urging its thousands of 
members ail over the world to apply an 
updated and strengthened set of rules. 

Tbe idea is that the ICC's rules — 
which have been expressly endorsed by 
our Council representing business in 130 
countries — should be written into in- 
ternal corporate codes of practice that 
employees are required to observe. 

For business and governments alike the 
important thing is the will to enforce. We 
call upon governments to follow through 
on the recommendations laid down by the 
OECD. Specifically, that means crimin- 
alizing the bribery of foreign public of- 
ficials and e liminatin g tax deductibility 
for all bribes, foreign and domestic. Tax 
deductibility is little more than a gov- 
ernment subsidy of improper activities. It 
must be stopped. 

The tide is starting to tum in the fight 
against corruption, but decisive steps are 
needed. If business and government act in 
concert, we can win this battle. 

The writer is secretary-general of the 
International Chamber of Commerce. She 
contributed this comment to the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


Rethinking Humanitarian Aid in the New Era 


W ASHINGTON —Food 

from the United States 
will socxi reach hungry children 
and farm families in North 
Korea. In eastern Zaire, our food 
will be available to feed the 
hungry children of refugees 
from Rwanda and Burundi But 
underlying political and eco- 
nomic forces that have brought 
these people to the edge of star- 
vation have npt been addressed. 

The debate over the critical 
yet changing role of human- 
itarian aid intensifies. 

The foreign policy interests of 
the United States, the traditional 
humanitarianism of the Amer- 
ican people — must the two be 
sepamt'l Should they be? 

Recent events are forcing a 
review of how we manage hu- 
manitarian aid overseas. The 
future course seems clean Hu- 
manitarian aid must be linked 
more closely to our foreign 
policy. If we can come to view 
our humanitarian interests and 
our diplomacy as complements, 
then we strengthen the chances 
that we will achieve the ob- 
jectives of both. 

“A hungry child knows no 
politics.” That slogan has ral- 
lied U.S. support for human- 
itarian aid since the early 1 980s. 
when it was coined to help ex- 
plain a change in policy by the 
Reagan administration. 

Then die debate turned on 
whether the United States 
should supply food aid to a 
Marxist Ethiopia in tbe grip of 
drought and resulting famine. 
Tbe president made the right de- 
cision, and many innocent lives 
were saved by American food. 

Since then the United States 
has provided aid to the people 
of other countries whose gov- 
ernments we considered objec- 
tionable — Sudan and Iraq are 
prominent examples. 

But the world has changed. 
Now we are the only super- 
power, the largest economy and 
the only nation with truly global 
reach. As a result, we have new 
opportunities to advance our in- 
terests well into the next cen- 
tury. Those interests should in- 
clude traditional American hu- 
manitarianism. 

But taking advantage of the 
times will not be simple. We are 
in a period of political and eth- 
nic conflict with a number of 
nation-states disintegrating. 

Why this is happening is not 
clear. Bosnia, Afghanistan. Su- 
dan. Rwanda. North Korea and 
Liberia don't have much in 
common. 

Some feel that there is grow- 
ing ethnic and political conflict 
as a result of competition for 
scarce resources. 


By J. Brian Atwood and Leonard Rogers 

Mr Atwood is administrator of the US. Agency for International 
Development. Mr. Rogers is the acting administrator of irs Bureau 
for Humanitarian Response. This is the first of two articles. 


Some feel that the dead hand 
of colonialism still touches 
many countries as they struggle 
within artificial borders and as 
contrived governmental struc- 
tures collapse. 

Some feel that the breakup of 
the Soviet Union inspired na- 
tionalist passions around the 
world. Some see the emergence 
of a new era of conflict arising 
from Islamic fundamentalism. 

Whatever the answer — and 
there is merit in ail of tbe above 


Aid helped those 
who committed 
genocide to control 
these people for 
two years . 


— it is significant that super- 
power competition no longer 
modulates events in smaller 
countries. So conflict becomes 
crisis, and tbe world must deal 
with intractable complex emer- 
gencies as best it can. 

The human costs in terras of 
lives lost and innocent suffering 
have been extremely high. So 
have the financial costs — as 
much as $6.5 billion per year by 
some estimates. 

As the Dumber of complex 
emergencies has risen, sharp 
differences have begun to 
emerge among tbe government 
agencies, international organi- 
zations and private voluntary 
groups which manage aid. 

Tbe crises currently dividing 
the international humanitarian 
community are in North Korea 
and eastern Zaire. There are 
desperately needy people in 
both places, there are complex 
political issues in both, and the 
mix presents difficult choices 
for American policymakers. 

In North Korea. Andrew Nat- 
sios, who ably beaded U.S. dis- 
aster relief operations in the 
Bush administration, and Rep- 
resentative Tony Hall, who in 
many ways is the conscience of 
U.S. humanitarian assistance, 
have both called for immediate 
food aid. They believe that we 
should be guided by the ex- 
perience of Ethiopia and pro- 
ceed without regard to other 
U.S. national interests. 

But North Korea is no 
Ethiopia. There are good rea 
sons to 


the formidable military capa- 
city of the North Koreans; the 
need to assure ourselves that 
food is not diverted to support 
that military force; and the need 
to assure ourselves that we can 
monitor the distribution of our 
food to assure thai it reaches the 
intended beneficiaries. 

Most important, the crisis in 
North Korea is not the result of 
some natural disaster such as 
floods or drought, nor even of 
ethnic or political conflict. Tbe 


refugees voted with their feet 
and returned home. 

Shocking but true, die pro- 
vision of humanitarian assist- 
ance by the United States, the 
European Union and others 
helped those who committed 
genocide to control these people 
for more than two years. That 
never happened in Ethiopia. 

We will provide assistance to 
the needy women and children 
currently in eastern Zaire, but 
only if we can ensure that our 
food reaches those in need. 

Ar the same time we recog- 
nize that the humanitarian in- 
terests of all the people of the 
Great Lakes region are best 
saved by political stability and 
ethnic reconciliation. Aid can 


World Food Program estimates — — 

that only 15 percent of the cur- help, but diplomacy and political 
rent shortfall of 2 million tons negotiation are essential, 
of food results from floods. 


The remainder results from 
long-term economic problems. 
North Korea faces perennial 
hunger until there is systemic 
change in its economy . 

After careful consideration 
. and consultation, the United 
States has decided to join with 
others and provide North Korea 
with $10 million of food aid. 
But we are under no illusions 
that this modest contribution 
will solve North Korea's food 
security problems. The human- 
itarian needs of the North 
Korean people will be met only 
if their government takes sig- 
nificant steps toward reform. 

America, Japan and most of 
ail South Korea stand ready to 
help in this extremely difficult 
environment: resources are not 
the problem. U.S diplomacy 
will be more important to a suc- 
cessful outcome than our hu- 
manitarian or development aid. 

In eastern Zaire, Emma Bo- 
nino, the ardent European Uni- 
on commissioner responsible 
-rgency 
United! 


negotiation 

Are North Korea and eastern 
Zaire isolated cases? No, in 
today's changing world there 
are many ethically difficult hu- 
manitarian crises. 

For example, in Afghanistan 
the United States is asked to 
provide assistance in areas con- 
trolled by Islamic fundamen- 
talists who insist upon the sub- 
jugation of women. 

In Liberia, starving people 
ask the international commu- 
nity not to deliver relief food 
because they are being held by 
factional fighters as bait to at- 
tract just such assistance. 

New approaches to human- 
itarian aid are needed. 

tniemalioful Herald Tribune. 


ingness to withhold favorable 
trading status over human rights 
violations. But a dispassionate 
assessment of means explains 
away this anomaly- . 

The threat of specific trade 
sanctions has proved effective 
in getting China an dmaay of 
our other trading partners to 
stop violating trade agreemenfcs. 
Sueh sanctions can be fash- 
ioned to be commensurate with 
the economic costs that such 
violations have imposed, on 
American businesses. 

Consider the dispute ov er the 
protection of intellectual prop- 
erty. Precisely crafted sanctions 
encouraged the Chinese to re- 
spect the rule of law established 
in last year’s bilateral agree- 
ment on intellectual property 
and in multilateral standards of 
copyright protection, without 
jeopardizing our ability to ne- 
gotiate with China on other is- 
sues at the same time. 

By contrast, revoking most- 
favored-nation status would be 
a blunt instrument that would 
bring disproportionate harm to 
China's private ventures. 

The most recent criticism of 
President Bill Clinton’s policy 
relates to the ongoing negoti- 
ations over C hina 's admission 
to the World Trade Organiza- 
tion. Tbe latest round of these 
negotiations concluded in 
Geneva last week amid 
ising signs from the 
that they are willing to meet the 
major conditions that the ad- 
ministration laid out in a blue- 
print several months ago. 

This blueprint reflects a firm 
administration resolve, shared 
by China's other trading part- 
ners, that it not be admitted un- 
less it meets sound commercial 
conditions comparable to those 
met by other member countries. 

These conditions include 
commitments on improved ac- 
cess to China's market, greater 
openness in its trade and in- 
vestment rules, including infor- 
mation on the extent of subsidies . 
to China's state enterprises, and 
an end to requirements that for- 
eign investors export the pro- p 
ducts they make in China. 

As a member of the WTO, 
China would have the same re- 
sponsibilities to honor the rules 
of international trade as its trad- 
ing partners. This would curtail 
the power of its state decision- 
makers who resist opening mar- 
kets, and it would strengthen the 
hand of economic reformers. 

At the same time, we would 
have a powerful multilateral 
forum in which to resolve trade 
disputes with China, thereby re- 
ducing the pressure for high- 
stakes, bilateral trade confron- 
tations that threaten to destabil- 
ize the entire United States- 
China relationship. - - 

In short, China's admission 
to the World Trade Organiza- 
tion — on commercially ac- 
ceptable conditions — is prob- 
ably our single most effective 
means of shaping a more open, 
market-oriented China. 

Unfortunately, the recent ac- - 
cusations of an unholy connec- • , 
tion between the Ctinton ad- 
ministration's China policy and 
Asian campaign contributions 
threaten to obscure this reality. 
Some members of Congress are 
now proposing further, unspe- 
cified conditions on China's ad- 
mission to die WTO, as well as 
requirements that Congress be 
given the right to “review" 
China's application before the 
administration can approve iL 

Both of these proposals are 
misguided. They could delay or 
even scuttle China's application . 
to die WTO, contaminate other 
aspects of our relations with 
China and call into question 
America's broader commit- 
ment to tbe trade organization, y 

The administration’s ap- * 
preach to China is based on a 
clear understanding of our na- 
tional interests and of the tools at 
our disposal. Our progress with 
China has been disappointingly 
slow in the short run, but we are 
on the right track for the long 
run. Irresponsible speculation 
about the role of campaign 
donations cannot be allowed to 
undermine responsible policy. 

The New York Times. 


for emergency aid. has pushed- 


for the United Stales to provide 
immediate and massive assist- 
ance to hundreds of thousands 
of refugees from Rwanda and 
Burundi. There are no doubt 
many hungry people in the 
forests of eastern Zaire. 

There is also real need to 
consider the safety of human- 
itarian aid workers. 

Most important, however, we 
must heed tbe lesson from an 
earlier phase of this disaster. 
We must not let our human- 
itarian aid be manipulated as it 
was in the refugee camps along 
the Rwandan border. 

It now seems clear that in 
these camps more than a million 
people were controlled against 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
1897: Corrupt Police 

NEW YORK — City Magistrate 
Herman Kudlich has contributed 
an open letter to Mr. Theodore 
W. Roosevelt, President of the 
Police Board. The magistrate had 
made a complaint to the Board of 
the misconduct of a member of 
the force. The complaint was re- 
turned as not justified by the 
facts. The Magistrate now replies 
that hereafter he will do his own 
investigating and adds tbat ‘ ‘dis- 
honesty and corruption are 
rampant in the Police Depart- 
ment” and there are “men in the 
force given over to dishonest 
practices, such as blackmail.” 

These men, he said, “might be 
disciplined by their superiors if 
the latter were bent on branding 
dishonesty as it deserves.” 


their will by the perpetrators of _ _ — „ f 

a. There are good tea- genocide in Rwanda. When that old scores have been wiped 

proceed with caution — they got the chance, most of the out. e 


1922: Rebel Is Invited 

NEW YORK — Just to prove 
* I "‘ '’Id scores have been wiped 
Emilio Aguinaido, once 


Filipino dictator and insurgent 
general-in-chief, upon whose 
head rewards have been offered 
by Spain and the United States, 
has been invited by the United 
Spanish War Veterans’ Associ- 
ation to be the guest of honor at 
(he veterans’ annual meeting in 
Los Angeles next summer. The 
noted rebel chief, who lives as a 
simple farmer near Manila, has 
accepted the invitation. 

1947: Tel Aviv Protest 

JERUSALEM — Labor ele- 
ments in Tel Aviv are accusing 
Mayor Israel Rokacb of open 
co-operation with the British 
and of affronting the dignity of 
the Jewish community by 
“begging on his knees” for 
small concessions from the Mil- 
itary Governor, Major General 
Gale. Labor circles supported 
by communal settlements were 
demanding that Rokach “cease 
flirtation with the British and 
show more backbone.” 






-lili! 


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BVTERJVATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1997 

OPINION/LETTERS 


PAGE 11 


How to Kick the Money Habit 

1 7 ASHrwnTAM _ a/ 


ysissuiA 

r !ls au ^ ors seem io 


By David S. Broder 

capitulate ro those wicked Re- 
publicans. they say. 

When I remark that this ra- 
tionale is more revealing than 
they realize, what 1 mean is that 
this is the very sort of mind-set 
that has made it impossible to get 
real change in the campaign fi- 


nave 

been saying is this: We Democrats 

^ot our clocks cleaned by the Re- Both Parties 
publicans in 1994 and they were / » ° . , 

f u ? lo outs P end us again in lambaste sleazy 


publicans in 1994 and they were 
gearing up to outspend us again in 
“fact they did. So we 
cranked up the money machine in 
eamesL Some folks decided for 
reasons of their own to help us out 
Some of them were shady, and we 
should have put a finer moral 
screen on their contributions. 

. But —and this, Clinton & Co 
insists is the key point — nobody 
has proved yet we did anything 
improper in return. And, remem- 
ber, please, that we weren't do- 
ing this for ourselves. We were 
doing it to save those millions of 
people whose lives would have 
been ruined if the Republicans 
were running everything in 
Washington. 

Therefore despite the embar- 
rassment of having to return $3 
million so far to some partic- 
ularly sleazy characters, despite 
the knocks they’re getting for the 
hospitality they lavished on these 
suspect donors, despite the rule- 
bending i: voived in solicitation 
calls from the White House by 
the vice president and a $50,000 
check being received at the 
White House by the first lady's 
top aide, despite all this press 
furor, they are proud — proud — 
of what they did. 

Better to stand and fight than 


campaign practices , 
but neither makes 
any real move to 
change. The answer 
is a bipartisan 
commission. 


nance system for the last 20 
years. 

In all that time, there has never 
been a moment when one party or 
the other — and often both — 
could not discover a better reason 
ro exploit the opportunities the 
present system allows than to 
change it in any basic way. 

Rarely a day goes by that Pres- 
ident Clinton and Vice President 
AJ Gore do not urge Congress to 
pass a sweeping campaign fi- 
nance reform bill. But when the 
Democrats controlled the White 
House, the Senate and the House 
of Representatives in 1993-94. 
no campaign finance bill ever 
reached the president's desk. The 
many House Democrats who de- 
pend on union political -action 
committees for their biggest con- 
tributions did not want to accept a 


ban or severe limitations on 
PACs that senators, who are less 
dependent on PACs, were ready 
to write. Feminist Democrats and 
their supporters insisted that 
Emily’s List — a wildly suc- 
cessful machine for bundling 
contributions for female Demo- 
cratic candidates — be given 
special protection. 

Republicans, for their part, 
have wanted union spending 
curbed — but not much else. 
George Bush vetoed a “reform” 
bill he rightly said was tilted to 
the Democrats, and the last Re- 
publican Congress never passed 
any legislation in this area. 

The reality is that most in- 
cumbents of both parties — for 
all that they may whine about the 
burden of fund-raising — prefer 
the system under which they 
were elected to any untested 
scheme that might replace it. 

Another reality is that it is dam- 
nably difficult to devise a system 
lhar will effectively reduce the 
role of money in politics and still 
not trample on constitutional 
rights to express political views. 
The difficulty of striking a balance 
— and rising above the parochial 
interests of incumbents — makes 
it sensible to consider creating a 
blue-ribbon bipartisan commis- 
sion to frame a proposal Congress 
could vote up or down, but not 
amend. Former Senator Bob Dole 
offered that idea several times and 
it is embodied now in a bipartisan 
proposal originated by Represen- 
tative Rick White. Republican of 
Washington. 

It is likely the focus on sleazy 
campaign practices will force the 
passage of something called the 
Clean Elections Act of 1998. 

But without such a commis- 
sion, it may well be cosmetic le- 



DEMOCRATIC 
f>, MATIO/JAL 
iS COMMITTEE 







m 


‘Whit a minute - we may be sending back 
more than we took itu' 


gislation. You could probably get 
a unanimous vore in the House 
and Senate today for a provision 
that would impose a federal death 
penalty on any foreigner giving 
even a $5 contribution to an 
American candidate. 

They would love to congrat- 
ulate themselves on their virtue 


and be able to tell their constitu- 
ents that they had slammed the 
door shut on those despicable ali- 
ens' tampering with the integrity 
of our American elections. 

And then they cou Id go back to 
business as usual. Republicans 
and Democrats alike. 

The Washington Post. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


•i Expatriate Schooling 

Regarding “Harsh Math of 
Overseas Transfers: Employers 
Subtract School AUT (Money Re- 
port. Dec. 14): 

It has been documented that the 
number one reason for failed for- 
eign postings is pom- family ad- 
justment. To assume that most 
young children can easily adapt to 
"local" foreign schools — and 
thus assume that international 
schools are a luxury — is mis- 


leading. Contrary to popular be- 
lief, all children are not flexible. 
As a veteran expatriate (Norway. 
Japan, France and Belgium) and a 
therapist who has counseled many 
other expats. I am all too aware of 
children who have daily stom- 
achaches and tears for three 
months or more while adjusting to 
local schools. 

One of the determining factors 
of a positive adjustment to ex- 
patriate life is the type of welcome 
the family receives. The interna- 


tional school community can 
provide a warm welcome and also 
can serve as the community 
around which the family’s social 
life revolves. This expat social life 
is not another luxury but a nec- 
essary support system that most 
families need. 

Not all international schools of- 
fer a positive experience, and not 
all local schools will produce 
stomachaches. But corporate hu- 
man resource managers and ex- 
patriate parents should be aware 


of all facets of the issue . Parents 
should be able to choose which 
school environment is best for 
their children. 

Finally, saying that there is a 
belief among human resource 
managers that expats are happier 
and more productive if integrated 
fully into die host-country culture 
may apply in some cases, but for 
the' typical expat family this can 
present overwhelming stress. 

PAULA KUGELMAN. 

Randolph, New Jersey. 


Medicine as Commodity: 
A Dangerous Rx 


Bv Richard G. Williams 


Chin a's Population 

Regarding “Albright, in China. 
Upholds Rights” f Feb. 25): 

The article says that Deng 
Xiaoping, at the pinnacle of power, 
ruled over a quarter of the world's 
humanity. 

This is not accurate. China's 
population today makes up 
roughly one-fifth of the world’s 
population. 

OTTO H. NOWOTNY. 

Basel. Switzerland. 


W ASHINGTON — I was a 
physician for more than 20 
years. Now I am a provider. “Pro- 
vider" is the term used by health 
maintenance organizations to 
refer ro physicians and other 
health care professionals. They at- 
tempt to suppress the very word 
“physician,” and for good rea- 
son: It has connotations of ex- 

MEANWHBLE 

pertise, authority and respect, 
which are incompatible with the 
man aged -care agenda. 

Being a provider is a limited 
and discouraging job. There is, for 
example, the problem of prescrib- 
ing medications. I treat many pa- 
tients for hypertension, high cho- 
lesterol, heart disease and 
diabetes. Some of these patients 
are on complicated regimens of 
multiple drugs that have been 
carefully adjusted over months or 
years. J am now expected to dis- 
continue many of these medicines 
and substitute others that happen 
to be on the HMO drug formu- 
laries. These formularies are se- 
lected largely on the basis of 
which drug of a particular class the 
HMO can obtain most cheaply. 

This means, for example, that a 
patient whose high blood pressure 
is well controlled on a medication 
that is well tolerated is to be ar- 
bitrarily switched to a formulary 
drug. He or she will therefore be 
exposed to the small but real risk 
of an adverse reaction to the new 
medicine. He will be exposed to 
this risk for no possible benefit, in 
violation of the most basic prin- 
ciples of therapeutics. If it is tol- 
erated, the new medication may or 
may not be effective. If it does 
work, the patient will need one or 
several extra office visits, wasting 
his time and my own, to adjust the 
dose and re-establish blood pres- 
sure control. He will then be back 
where he started. 

However. HMOs negotiate 
with pharmaceutical companies 
continuously; if his health plan 
obtains a better deal on yet an- 
other drug next year, the whole 
process will need to be repeated 
— all for no purpose other than 
to minimize the expenses of the 
insurance company. 

The provider faces many other 
frustrations. There is relentless 
pressure to discharge patients 
from the hospital whether or not 


they are ready. Il is sometimes 
difficult or impossible to refer pa- 
tients to the appropriate specialist 
A good deal of time is wasted 
debating medical care with rep- 
resentatives of managed-care 
companies. These individuals 
generally have no medical train- 
ing. and their primary concern is 

not the patient but (he financial 
well-being of their company. 

I have noticed something about 
these “managers”: They all want 
a piece of my authority, but they 
want no part of my responsibility. 
If I cut comers in an attempt to 
satisfy (hem and the patient suf- 
fers as a result, it is the patient’s 
problem and my own. 

Good medical care is 
threatened not only by the above 
constraints but by the capitated 
system of reimbursement. Under 
this system, the physician is paid a 
small monthly stipend for each 
patient assigned to him, regard- 
less of what, if any, services he 
provides to that individual. 

Capitation not only fails to re- 
ward high-qualify care but effec- 
tively penalizes it. Quality takes 
time, and the doctor who devotes 
time to his managed-care patients 
will assuredly suffer for it finan- 
cially. The physician whose repu- 
tation is such that sicker patients 
are attracted or referred to him is 
in particular trouble. There is a 
problem with a system that makes 
the sick patient a personal finan- 
cial threat to his own doctor. 

The provider’s final problem, 
then, is simply malting a living. I 
have a busy and previously suc- 
cessful internal medicine practice. 
An hour of my time is now worth 
approximately 60 percent of its 
value several years ago. 

It is the apparent intent of those 
who drive managed care that 
medicine be reduced to a com- 
modity, and a cheap commodity at 
that, to be bought, sold and ma- 
nipulated solely for the financial 
benefit of their industry. In the 
San Francisco Bay area, these 
goals have already largely been 
achieved. I believe this portends 
very serious problems ahead, not 
only for the profession but for the 
future of patient care and the well- 
being of the population at large. 

The writer, who practices in- 
ternal medicine in the San Fran- 
cisco Bay area, contributed this 
comment to The Washington Post. 


BOOKS 


THE KISS: A Memoir 

By Kathryn Harrison. 2 07 
pages. S20. Random House. 
Reviewed by 
Jonathan Yardley 

I T IS a measure of the times 
that this book — slimy, re- 
, pellent, meretricious, cynical 
— is enjoying the rapt at- 
tention of the gods of pub- 
licity. The chattering classes 
of Manhattan and the Hamp- 
tons have homed in on if with 
the unerring instinct of swine 
slopping in swill. It is the Fla- 
vor of the Month, so those of 
us in the boondocks are ex- 
pected to belly up and smile. 

No way. “The Kiss” is 
trash from first word to last, 
self-promotion masquerading 
as literature. It is the “mem- 
oir’ ’ of Kathryn Hamson, wbo 
claims to have bad a sexual 
relationship with her father 
and who has made that the 
central clement of this book. 
You may wonder, since 
•. Harrison has already pub- 
lished three novels of trans- 
parently autobiographical im- 
port, why she chose this time 
around to tell her story as non- 


fiction. The answer, given in a 
Q&A supplied to reviewers 
by her publisher, is revealing: 
“There was an internal im- 
perative to deal with the sub- 
ject now, and that need was 
confirmed by my husband 
Colin's and my desire that it 
be pablisbed as soon as pos- 
sible — before our children 
were any older and more 
aware of die media around 
them.” 

From this one must deduce 
that Harrison fancies books to 
be mere e-mail, gossamer 
things that, once read, vanish 
into cyberepace, never to be 
heard from again. Just, get this 
out now, cash in on it today, 
and the poor innocent chil- 
dren will never know any- 
thing of iL So we apparently 
are to believe. 

That this is self-serving 
hogwash needs no elabora- 
tion. The publication of * ‘The 
Kiss" has nothing to do with 
shielding the young and 
everything to do with exploit- 
ing the current infatuation 
with confessional memoirs. 
The juicier the confession the 
hotter the sales, so the or- 
thodoxy of the hour has it, and 


BEST SELLERS 


New York Times _ 

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Kathryn Harrison means to 
out-juice everyone. 

Harrison and her apolo- 
gists want us to believe that 
from dark personal experi- 
ence she has produced a work 
of art notable for its 
“hraveiy,” a book that is 
“ironic and compassionate." 
“thoughtful, disciplined," 
“uncanny, heartbreaking." 
Those are some of the words 
used by Tobias Wolfe, Mary 
Karr, Robert Coles and Mary 
Gordon, all of whom have 
supplied smarmy blurbs for 
this book and all of whom as a 
consequence should be sen- 
tenced to perdition eternal If 
“The Kiss’* were indeed art, 
perhaps we could find a way 
to forgive its offenses against 
familial privacy and ordinary 
decency, but there is not an 
artful word in it. Instead it is 
cfaockablock with romance- 
novel cliches and mannered, 
heavy-breathing minimal- 
ism. 

The story, such as it is, be- 
gins with the divorce of Har- 
rison’s parents when she was 
a baby, continues through a 
childhood spent largely in the 
custody of her maternal 
grandparents along with ir- 
regular connections with her 
indifferent mother, then cli- 
maxes — sorry, no other 
word will do — with the re- 
appearance of her father and 
his seduction of the not -un- 
willing her. Its essential ele- 
ments are not graphic sex — 
in that department Hamson is 
coy rather than revealing — 
but a revolting mixture of 
self-pity and narcissism. 

Poor little her. “I grow 
afraid of the dark." “I wake 
screaming.** “I am, as J have 
been from my birth, the in- 
evitable compromise of my 
parents' privacy." “My days 
are as long as despair can 
make them," "Her mother’s, 


eyes, when they turn at last 
toward me, are like two 
empty minora. I can’t find 
myself in them." 

It’s not for lack of looking. 
She may be a well of self-pity, 
but Harrison is a world champ 
when ii comes ro self-ador- 
ation. As Daddy begins his 
come-on, "His hot eyes con- 
sume me.’ * Those words were 
written, mind you. not by 
Danielle Steel or Judith 
Krantz but by the reigning 
darling of the New York liter- 
ati. So were these: 

* ‘Whatever I do . . . enthralls 
my father. “He looks at me 
with his hungry eyes.” | 
“ ‘How can a daughter of , 
mine be this beautiful?’ he ' 
murmurs." And — here 
comes the line that retired the 
World Narcissism Cup — 
“in me he found a creature 
more worthy of worship than 
the Creator." 

As for Harrison, her own 
hungry eyes seem focused on 
the bestseller lists. This con- 
fession isn’t from the heart, 
it’s from the pocketbook. She 
talks to her publicist about 
“the implicit dishonesty of 
keeping a secret such as 
this.” but that is 100 percent 
humbug. The real act of dis- 
honesty is this shameful 
book, which exploits the 
private life of the author’s 
family — if, by the way, any- 
thing herein actually 
happened as she claims it did 
— for personal gain and talk 
show notoriety. 

The temptation to go on 
and on about this book, piling 
one abusive paragraph upon 
another, is extreme, but must 
be resisted. Space is short. 
Let’s save it for something 
worth my words and your 
time. 

Jonathan Yardley is on the 
staff of The Washington Post. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 
WEDNESDAY; MARCH 12, 1997 
PAGE 12 


Fi 



STAGE/ENTER TAINMENT 



Women’s Work: Comedy and Morality 


Irrrf IVn-rrH-iilrTi 

Notorious B.I.G., who was shot to death in Los Angeles as he left a party. 

For Another Rapper ■ 

A Violent Demise 


By Jon Pareles 

.Vi m }'..W Tmwf Sen ter 


N EW YORK — On the West 
Coast, there was Tupac Shak- 
ur. On the East Coast, there 
was Christopher Wallace. 
a.k-a. the Notorious B.I.G. and Biggie 
Smalls. Now both are dead after drive-by 
shootings. 

The two rappers were bitter rivals, as 
Shakur accused Wallace of copying his 
style. Both were associated with hip- 
hop moguls who hud their own coastal 
feud: Shakur with Marion (Suge) 
Knight of Death Row Records and Wal- 
lace with Sean (Puffy) Combs of Bad 
Boy Entertainment. 

Despite their differences, both pur- 
veyed a similar message. They rapped 
about a life of gun toting, drug' dealing, 
easy women and endless battles for 
dominance. That life, spawned by inner- 
city poverty, was til i Hating and dra- 
matic, but it was inevitably suicidal, 
with violence begetting violence. 

The Notorious B.I.G". who was killed 
early Sunday in Los Angeles, said death 
was always bn his mind."His first album, 
released in 1994. was "Ready to Die" 
(Bad Boy/Arista): his second, a double 
album due out on March 25. is called 
* ‘Life After Death. "On" Ready to Die.’ ’ 
he described himself as a former drug 
dealer and stickup man who had turned to 


rapping. "Used to sell crack so I could 
stack my riches." he rapped. Actually, he 
did not have the riches yet. In the March S 
issue of Billboard, he recalled. "When I 
made ‘Ready to Die.* I was broke and 
depressed." 

But he fantasized a mixture of success 
and anxiety — part exploitation, pan 
warning. He recalled the mundane de- 
tails of bagging, transporting and selling 
drugs: he" boasted about sexual con- 
quests and mourned a murdered girl- 
friend. The album mafter-of-factly re- 
counted the shootings and joltings of 
friends, and it was laced with paranoia, 
as the narrator's newfound riches made 
him a target. As the album ends, the 
narrator commits suicide. 

Song dries for his second album in- 
clude “Notorious Thug," "Ten Crack 
Commandments" and "Niggas Bleed 
Just Like Us.” 

On stage. Wallace performed with a 
show of" opulence, settling his 280- 
pound frame into a thronelike chair, a 
pasha of rap who asserted that he would 
defend himself against all comers. 

Like Shakur, the Notorious B.I.G. 
clearly perceived the hazards of living 
by die gun. On "Ready to Die.” both his 
lyrics and his ominous production re- 
vealed his misgivings. Many gangsta 
rappers prophesy them own deaths with 
bravado or fatalism. Sometimes that 
prophecy comes true. 


By Michael BiUington 

L ONDON — Women dominate 
the agenda this week: two new 
plays, from April de Angeiis 
and Marie Jones, plus a major 
Stratford production from one of the 
best directors in Britain. Katie 
MitcheiL 

April de Angeiis ‘s “The Positive 
Hour’* (at the Hampstead) is a witty, 
intelligent comedy about a group of wo- 
men who, in the wake of the feminist 
revolution, are all straggling to give 
meaning and definition to their lives. The 
play implies that we are all, in an age shorn 
of idealism, floundering in the dark. 

De Angelis’s heroine. Miranda, is a 
social worker and former ’60s radical. 
But her marriage to a wan academic 
who can't finish bis book on Hegel is in 
as much of a mess as the counseling 
group she runs for a trio of disturbed 
women: Emma is a failed painter dab- 
bling in sadomasochism. Paula is a 
battered single mother trying to retrieve 
her fostered child, and fticola is a 
nervous student struggling to escape a 
lunatic ally possessive father. 

It sounds grim and gritty but, in fact, 
de Angeiis depicts the moral muddle of 
modem life with engaging lightness. 
She is clearly saying that the Hegelian 
belief in the progress of reason and the 


political idealism of the '60s are dead in 
the water. Her most positive character, 
in fact, is the world-class mum who 
takes the law into her own hands. 

But de Angeiis dissects our current 
malaise with a mixture of compassion 
and wit; Emma's private encounters 
with a man in a leather mask are hil- 
arious, with both parties behaving with 
studied middle-class decorum. Max 

THE BRITISH STAGE 

Stafford Clark 's production for the tour- 
ing Out of Joint company is fluent and 
excellently acted by Margot Leicester as 
the unconsciously manipulative Mir- 
anda. Patti Love as the sexually ex- 
perimenting Emma and Julia Lane as 
the gutsy Paula, whose sheer survival 
instinct offers hope in a world where 
bourgeois radicals blindly stumble. 

If this is middle-class comedy at its 
best, Marie Jones’s “Women on the 
Verge of HRT" (presented at the 
Vaudeville by Ireland’s Dubbeljoint 
company) is a more old-fashioned piece 
of consciousness-raising propaganda. It 
deals with two Belfast women who have 
made the pilgrimage to Donegal to hear 
a singer called Daniel O'Donnell; Ire- 
land’s real-life answer to Barry Ma- 
rniow or Cliff Richard in that his biggest 
fans are adoring middle-aged mums. 

Vera, played by the author, is a badly 



£ 


1 1 


bruised figure still reeling from her has- a Soridng from * 

band's defection with a younger womaa Now Mirc ^ Kemp> 

Rvall, is a recognizably human figure 

J _ . > I i - l ■ If., ni f i inmmif ■ m» 


encounters with a whimsical waiter, who 

takes on the identity of tbe various men in 

their lives, the two women resolve over a 
weekend to fight for their right to get all 
the sex and love they can. 

What Jones has to say is fine. But her 
play, a huge hit on tour in Ireland and 
Scotland, looks a bit out of place in the 
West End, where its endorsement of 
middle-aged sex seems to be preaching 
to the visibly converted. The writing 
also has tbe thinness of sitcom rather 
than the substance of real drama. But the 
play gets by. just about, on its single- 
minded pugnaciousness and on Pam. 
Brighton’s ebullient production in 
which all three characters — pjayed by 
Jones. Eileen Pollock and Dessie Galla- 
gher — burst into song at the drop of a 
band-mike. 


T! 


| HE most ambitious venture of 
the week, however, is Katie 
Mitchell's two-part production 
of “The Mysteries' 1 * at The 
Other Place in Stratford-upon-Avon. In 
the 1980s these i4th-cenruiy guild 
plays, taking us from the Creation to 
Christ’s resurrection, were given a fa- 
mous promenade production by Bill 


who chuckles delightedly al his creation 
of the manifold riches of the earthand 
who. after the fall of man. is constancy 
tom between mercy and vengeance. 
And, after the stimng Old Testament 
first part, we get the New Testament 
second part where Jesus is played by f 
Paul Hilton as an impulsive, impas- 
sioned figure who. since he ccmsiantly 
greets his disciples while balancing up- _ 
side down, might best be descriBwTas 
headstrong. ' . , f-. • ‘ - 

Mitchell directs with miraculous sim- 
plicity: She is particularly strong in tbe 

first part, where she brings out the com- - 

edy of God’s injunction to the clueless 
Noah to build a vast ark and of the aged 
Joseph's surprise on returning home, 
from a business trip to find Mary hugely 
pregnant Played on a bare stage, these 
plays still grip even in an increasingly 
secular society, not least because 
Mitchell does everything possible- to 
bring out their humanity. 

Michael BiUington , drama critic of 
The Guardian, is filling in for Sheridan . 

M or ley. % 


In a French Opera, Murder at the Airport 


By David Stevens 

lnientaiie>nal Heroic/ Tribute 


P ARIS — The dramatic premise 
of "60th Parallel." an opera by 
the French composer Philippe 
Manouiy that has just had its 
world premiere ai the Chatelet. is that a 
disparate group of airline passengers is 
stranded in a desolate far northern air- 
port awaiting the end of a blizzard. 

At the end of the opera's 90 minutes, 
they are still waiting, except for two 
who have been murdered — one off- 
stage and the other with such profes- 
sional discreetness no one really no- 
tices. The killer is a war criminal 
reluctant to be taken back to face the 
music. Another minidrama involves a 
distraught woman who has been left by 
her husband, and her companion, who is 
taking her to Miami with a lesbian dal- 
liance in mind. A loony scientist is 
preparing a paper on Einstein's brain, 
which he may have in his luggage. 
There are other small events as waiting 
gradually gets on everyone’s nerves. 


Musically, (he work begins with a 
densely written prelude that develops 
into a kind of perpetual storm music, 
swelling and ebbing, yet also giving a 
feeling of immobility. A gain st this 
background are other musical events. A 
scruffy man with a ghetto blaster 
provides a loud rock interlude. There is 
also a waltz and a group of children 
singing a nursery rhyme. All this is 
subtly manipulated from time to time by 
electronic devices. 

Officially, tbe work is presented as a 
three- way collaboration among com- 
poser. die writer-librettist. "Michel 
Deutsch. and the stage director. Pierre 
Strosser. But that is a formality. Ail 
opera is collaboration, but in the end the 
composer carries the ball. 

The composer says he took Richard 
Strauss <among others i as a model for 
making the text comprehensible despite 


a basically heavy orchestral background. 
He was only partly successful, ana much 
of the texr was lost in the theater's space 
— a good case for sunides. 

At the end, the weary travelers are 
just where they were at the beginning, 
the airport's loudspeaker announce- 
ments are getting more detached from 
realire. and a vague feeling sets in that 
this is someplace like Sartre’s "Huis 
Clos," if not Hell itself then at least the 
anteroom to Purgatory. 

David Robertson and tire Orchestra 
de Paris offered an excellent cast solid 
support from the pit. 

At the Theatre des Champs-Elysees 
another kind of collaboration Is at work in 
"Ombra Felice," with Mozart as the 
posthumous collaborator. The staging 
and designing duo of Karl -Em si and 
Ursel Herrmann have taken about 25 of 
die composer's concert arias and a couple 


of his comic Viennese-dialect sc enes . 

Since Mozart's almost always set his 
concert arias to operatic texts, the- theat- 
er is never far away. What the Her- 
rmanns have done is to seize on the 
theatrical implications of the arias and 
try to link them in some coherent pro- 
gression. This is done with the help of 
poetry by Ingeborg Bachmann. Hans 
Arp. Marivaux. Heine and Holderiin, 
delivered by Mireille Mosse, a very { 
small and droll actress. 

Because Mozart's arias include some 
of the finest things he wrote for the voice, , 

and because they are sung handsomely by f " 
Cyndia Sieden, Eizbieta Szmytka, 
Veronica Cangemi, Nathalie Stutzmann, 

Yann Bettron and Wovtek Drabowicz. 
the evening is a delight, albeit a long one. 

Louis Langree and the Orchestra de Pi- 
cardie, who shared the stage with the 
singers, gave solid support. 



Chinese Dior Makes a Splash 


By Suzy Menkes 

Intematinrjd Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — With lacquer-red nails 
clutching a bamboo-handled 
purse. Shanghai LiJ sets off for 
Paris. What's an Asian babe to 
wear? Why. Dior, of course. For John 
Galliano's first ready-to-wear collection 
for the French couture house was a 
homage to China in the '30s. 

It made an arresting spectacle, with 
the painted-cheek models acting like 
Oriental pinups, stroking themselves as 
they prowled the extraordinary decor. 
Shinto arches, rice-paper screens huog 
with Oriental flowers, blue and white 
porcelain and even a Willow- Pattern 
bridge were pan of the fantastic set 
created inside an Asian art museum for 
Tuesday's fall/wimer show. 

Dior had spent a ton of money to 
showcase the house's craft and Gal- 
liano’s an. His familiar siren evening 
dresses were beauteous creations, with 
orchids veiled under black chiffon or 
open sides buckled together over bare 
flesh. The cheongsam was given a whir- 
ligig spin, as a mandarin -collared top 
appeared above short, full skirts, as well 
as on slinky dresses. Those high collars, 
edged with pearls, were one of many 
couture touches, which included silk 
fringes, cute purses. Madame Butterfly 
hair ornaments and Chinese embroid- 
eries on a side-split trouser suit. 

In fact, give or take the fluffy sweater 
dresses in fondant colors, this might have 
been a polished version of tbe raw Janu- 
ary couture show. Yet it was ready-to- 
wear. And apart from throwing a bone to 
the fashion industry, which will run up 
Suzy Wong brocade dresses, where were 
the customer clothes? 

The Lolita daywear could be trans- 
formed by conventional skirts and by 
removing the platform -soled flowered 
sandals and bobby socks. Some of the 
body-conscious jackets even looked like 
Chanel, seen through Galliano’s ro- 
mantic color prism of mauve, boudoir 
pink and powder blue. 

Galliano is doing for Dior whai he has 
always done: romantic clothes, referen- 
cing the past and on the costume-party 
side, but given a modem sensuality. What 
Dioralready gets out of this deal is a sense 
of occasion and excitement, an edgy, even 
decadent sexiness. Over to the commer- 
cial boys to turn Galliano's image-mak- 
ing Chinese frolics into a buck. 



Dior s fringed dress by Galliano. 


The Orient is already a theme of the 
season and tbe Belgian designer Dries 
Van Noten had a magical way of making 
ethnic seem actual, with brocade kimono 
coats lapping the body and Oriental- 
print pants peeping under a coaL 
The modem romantic show the de- 
signer sent out on a gilded runway was a 
beautiful rendition of everything he 

PARISFASHION 

loves: layered clothing, creating a long- 
line fluid silhouette, with a subtle play of 
light and shade. That meant mat, mas- 
culine fabrics and neutral colors illu- 
minated with Oriental brocade, used as a 
coat lining, an obi sash or the vest front 
of ribbecT kniL Even the sboes were 
decorated with gilt studs. 

How does Van Noten manage to get so 
much into each outfit and yet never walk 
that yellow-brick road into fashion's 
fantasy land? Because broken down into 
individual pieces, the collection has a 
signature style and makes sense. 


Long coats and tailored jackets, some 
tightly padded, go over tunics and pants. 
The designer then integrates a ribbed 
knit coat, a velvet dress, a glitter sweater 
or a wrap skirt This ali-in-the-mix fash- 
ion is typical of Van Noten, but it was 
exceptional to use the solid fabrics of a 
winter season with such finesse. 

Playing with texture, as cm piano keys, 
is another theme of the early Paris 
shows. The wood-grain backdrop was in 
the spotlight at the end of Junya 
Watanabe's show — to reinforce his 
message that the subtle mixes of pattern, 
tone and texture were like the finest 
woodwork. First came flow! tunics and 
pants in marquetry-style patterns of 
seaming that made chevrons, diagonals 
and horizontals out of pinstripes. 

Those pantsuits were the base to 
which apron dresses were added, 
fastened with pins or ties and sometimes 
in floral -patterned fabrics. Colors were 
soft and sweet: teal blue, dusty pink, 
apneot and lovat green. They were used 
for plaids, with different patterns cut into 
the tailoring. It sounds complicated, but 
the clothes were mostly subtle and 
simple, showing a strong stride forward 
for Watanabe. 

"Classic is definitely in,” said Gene 
Pressman, president of Barneys, New 
York to explain the transformation of 
Dirk Bikkembergs from heavy metal, 
hard leather and clubwear to a couture 
style. The show, presented in a gilded 
hotel salon, was an about-turn for the 
designer and brought a new elegance to 
tailored pantsuits. They still had his sig- 
nature metallic effects, as a silver neck- 
tie knot or metal fox-head on a fur boa. 
The show was calm, dean, classy, com- 
mercial — and couture. But in a season 
when leather is such a strong story, the 
show missed Bikkenbergs's band- edged 

Which designer is so powerful that 
American clients would fly in for his 
first show? They crossed the pond' for 
Lucien Peliat-Finet — the designer 
whose cashmere sweaters, hand-stitched 
in French mountain villages, are col- 
lectors' items. Under the gilded cherubs 
of his showroom ceiling. PeUat-Finet 
sent — •— - - - - 

His 

--*■»*;» — w*ui me »uiu 

ot the line is in the knits, some as delicate 
and lacy as old-fashioned underwear. 
Iney correspond to that current aesthetic 
of luxuiy as a private pleasure. 


< * 


# 1 



! * 


MAURIZIO GALANTE 

PARIS MARCH 1997 

PRESENTATION OF THE PRET-A-PORTER COLLECTION AUTUMN/WINTER 1997/1998 

PRESS OFFICE & SHOWROOM: MAURIZIO GALANTE S,A. 22 RUE DE PALESTRA 75002 PARIS TF! me- 

•; ' u ‘ 5a 34 3A 55 FAX 0t S5 34 55 50 
















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Delors Accuses Bonn 
Qf Bungling the EMU 

Ex-Official Depicts Its Stance as Too Rigid 

C «Wp^ hr Ow- SktfA,*, Osp^hr. ^ 

* _ BONN -. Jacoue, rw~. ...- f!£«! debt_ that it itself insist on. Mr. 

European Commission nn-ciH«lf f R? 1 ? 15 criticized Finance Minister Theo 

German leaders Tuesda^M^ Waigel of Germany’s repealed insistence 

had mishand led the i«Kai» ® ,r on *he strictest possible interpretation of 
DTODOSed sinoio oi Europe's the treaty’s criteria for Dartirioarine 


TOd single cunS? 
v °tere needtessly about itLtabililT 
tuey have gotten people upset with 
some of the j argument m£ 2 id on 
G^raan Radio. “They have not used 
good arguments.” iK1 

About three^uarte^ of Germans res- 

SSlno“ r ‘ Eur0pean currenc * 

Senior members of the Bundesbank's 
central council, meanwhile, have sug- 
gested that criteria for joining the cur- 
rency need not be interpreted as rigidly 
^renf™ 180 officials have said. 

A The European Union must launch its 
t plaoned single currency on time, the 
bank officials said, or risk serious set- 
backs. 

The central bank officials hold this 
position even though Germany — the 
driving force behind integration — 
may miss key entry targets. 

“In my opinion European currency 
union can start in January 1999 while 
conforming to those EMU convergence 
criteria that are most often discussed,” 
Ernst Welteke. president of the stale 
central bank in Hesse and a member of 
the German central bank's policy-mak- 
ing council, said Monday. 

Mr. Welteke said he wondered how a 
budget deficit of just under 3 percent of 
gross domestic product would be good 
for stability while a deficit of slightly over 
3 percent would be negative. 

The Maastricht treaty outlining the 
accord says countries joining a single 
currency should have budget deficits at 
f or under 3 percent of gross domestic 
product and overall debt levels at or 
under 60 percent of GDP. 

These comments followed renewed 
speculation in recent days that Germany 
would fail to meet the Maastricht stan- 
dard for deficit spending because of its 
ballooning unemployment. 

One of Germany's leading econo- 
mists, Herbert Hax, called over the week- 
end for a delay in monetary union., ar- 
guing that Bonn would probably fall 
short of die standards on budget deficits 

MEDIA 


on the strictest possible interpretation of 
the treaty’s criteria for participating 
countries. 

“There is no magical number precise 
down to the second digit after the 
decimal point” for determining the best 
candidates for a single currency, Mr. 
Delors said. 

The German government increased 
its deficit forecast for this year from 2.5 
percent of GDP to 2.9 percent to allow 
for the cost of rising unemployment, 
even before a surge of 515,000 in the 
unemployed total in January and Feb- 
ruary. Thai drove the overall number to 
a record of 4,67 1,000, or 12.2 percent of 
the work force. 

Last week, a senior member of the 
Bundesbank. Klaus-Dieter Kuehbach- 
er, expressed doubt that Germany 
would be able to meet the strictest in- 
terpretation of the single -currency con- 
ditions even if taxes were increased or 
welfare were reduced. (Reuters. AFP) 

■ Britain's Euroskeptics Warned 

Twenty-three leading British indus- 
trialists bave attacked “the spread of 
extreme Euroskepticism” and wanted 
about the dangers of hostility toward the 
European Union. Agence France-Presse 
reported from London. 

The group warned, in a letter to the 
Financial Times, that unless Britain 
demonstrated its continued commitment 
to Europe, its negotiating position will be 
“gravely weakened" If it rules out 
memberriiip in European monetary uni- 
on. the group added, it will risk iso- 
lation. 

The signatories included the chairmen 
of British Airways. Unilever. Guinness, 
ICI, British Steel, Vauxhall. British Pet- 
roleum, Coopers & Ly brand. EMI Group 
and Goldman Sachs International and 
the chief executives of National West- 
minster Bank, British Telecom. BAT 
Industries and SmithKline Beecham. 

“As business people operating not 
only in Europe but across the world, we 
have watched with dismay the spread of 
extreme Euroskepticism and of the mis- 
taken belief that an arm's-length and 
hostile attitude on Europe is now in the 
UK's best interests.” the letter said 




BUSINESS/FINANCE 



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1997 


Personal Stock Portfolios 

Up nr down? Design your personal stock 
portfolio and track its daily performance 
using the IHT site on the World Wide Web. 

http:/^Www.tfrt.com 

PAGE 13 




■ . . V" 




Deutsche Telekom Sees 
1997 Profit Doubling 
After 24% Rise in 1996 


A#enoe Frmce-Prewe 

SEEKING FORGIVENESS — Shunsuke Inamori, president of 
Ajinomoto Co, apologizing after two executives were arrested. Page 17. 


1710- Staff From Piyvbhn 

HANNOVER, Germany — 
Deutsche Telekom AG said Tuesday it 
expected profit to double this year and 
that it would expand cooperation be- 
tween its T-Online service and Mi- 
crosoft Corp. 

The company's chairman, Ron Som- 
mer. said net profit at die parent-com- 
pany level rose 24 percent in 1 996, to 1 .6 
billion Deutsche marks (S936 million), 
assuring payment of a dividend of 0.60 
DM a share. “Group net profit will, of 
course, be higher than this,” he said. 

In the company's first detailed report 
on revenue since it sold shares to the 
public in November, Telekom said sales 
rose to 63.1 billion DM from 59.6 billion 
DM. The figures were adjusted to ac- 
count for value-added tax, which the 
company paid for the fust time in 1996. 
Its German business accounts for more 
than 90 percent of Telekom's sales. 

Mr. Sommer said the company's first 
reports on 1997 results showed it was on 
track to meet its forecasts and to double 
its dividend to 1 .20 DM a share. 

“We expect the positive sales trend 
to continue in the current year,” he said. 


7,000 Autoworkers Protest at Renault 


CawptMhji Ow Staff Firm Dapatdn 

PARIS — Thousands of European 
autoworkers demonstrated Tuesday at 
the headquarters of Renault to protest its 
decision to close an assembly plant in 
Belgium and cut nearly 3,000 jobs in 
France this year. 

At least 7,000 people, mostly from 
France and Belgium with a handful 
from Spain, took part in the demon- 
stration against the troubled French auto 
manufacturer, which is set to announce 
huge losses next week. 

"This pan-European demonstration 
is a first at Renault,’ ’ said Philippe Mar- 
tinez, a spokesman for the Communist- 
led CGT union, the biggest at Renault. 

Hundreds of police in riot gear were 
stationed outside the automaker's 
headquarters in the Paris suburbs, but no 
confrontations were reported. 

The protest was a sign of the mount- 


ing unease with which many of 
Europe's workers view the increased 
competition — and lack of government 
protection — brought on by a united 
European market Many fear they will 
lose their jobs and benefits as a result. 

“The unions are taking the initiative 
to create a Europe of social stand ards. " 
said Emmanuel Couvreur of the CFDT 
union, the second-largest at the com- 
pany. “Europe's politicians cannot be 
relied upon to move things forward so- 
cially. Only the European unions can 
provide a counterweight to free-mar- 
keteering excesses.” 

Prime Minister Jean-Luc Dehaene of 
Belgium has condemned the decision, 
and President Jacques Chirac of France 
has criticized Renault for the way it 
handled the closure. 

“I do not approve," Mr. Chirac said 
in a television interview Monday. "I 


believe basic procedures have to be re- 
spected.” Hie French state is Renault's 
largest shareholder, with 46 percent 

Renault, the smallest and weakest of 
Europe's six automakers, is expected to 
report an operating loss of more than 2 
billion francs ($350 million) for 1996 
and a total loss of close to 6 billion 
francs including restructuring 
charges. (Reuters, AP) 

■ Nissan Increases Stake in Spain 

Nissan Motor Co. will invest about 
100 billion pesetas ($690 million) in 
Spain during the next five years to in- 
troduce three new models, Nissan Mo- 
tor Iberica SA said, Bloomberg reported 
from Barcelona. 

The automaker will build two small 
vans and a sport-utility vehicle at its 
Barcelona plant, with production to start 
in 2000. 


"By indicating that the dividend is go- 
ing to double, we can already be assured 
that net profit will more than double.” 

The company's shares surged on Mr. 
Sommer’s statements, closing at a re- 
cord 34.85 DM, up 0.93. 

Analysts said that although the com- 
pany's report contained no surprises, 
the positive outlook confirmed in- 
vestors' view that Deutsche Telekom 

Wall Street gives a lift to European 
stock markets. Page 15 

would be able to withstand competition 
when the German telecommunications 
market is fully opened Jan. 1. 1998. 

“They're simply very strong in many 
important areas and will stay strong,” 
Petra Heist, a telecommunications ana- 
lyst at Bayerische Vereinsbank. said. 

Telekom's share launch, the largest 
ever in Europe, attracted 2 million private 
shareholders and gave a needed boost to 
Germany's weak * ‘shareholder culture.” 
So far. those shareholders have stuck 
with Telekom in its short history as a 
listed company, but their next test is just 
two months ahead. 

In Germany, investors who hold 
shares for less than six months must pay 
taxes on capital gains from share-price 
appreciation. But if they bold them more 
than six months, the gain is tax-free. In 
May, it will have been six months since 
the Deutsche Telekom offering. 

Mr. Sommer also announced that the 
1.4 million subscribers to its on-line 
service T-Online would have access to 
Microsoft Network, die on-line service 
of Microsoft Corp. In an extension of a 
cooperation agreement between 
Telekom and Microsoft, the on-line 
magazines and so-called chat forums 
from MSN will be integrated into T- 
Online. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 

■ Komnklijke's Earnings Rise 

Koninklijke PTT Nederland NV said 
its 19% net profit rose 9 percent, lifted 
by record sales and high income from its 
telephone and postal businesses, 
Bloomberg News reported from Gronin- 
gen, Netherlands. 

Koninklijke PTT, which is 48 percent 
state-owned, posted net income of 2.46 
billion guilders ($1.28 billion). 



TV and the Web: Happy Together? 


Global Private Banking 


By Steve Lohr 

New York Times Service 

N ot long ago. traditional media 
companies were said to be 
dinosaurs in the new-media 
world of the Internet — out 
of step, useless, probably endangered 
But today, the old-media reptiles are 
looking increasingly attractive as part- 
ners to some of the more popular sites 
on die World Wide Web. 

Last week. Sports line USA Inc. sold 
a 22 percent stake to the CBS television 
network in a deal valued at $100 mil- 
lion. The network, a unit of Westing- 
house Electric Corp., acquired its stake 
in the on-line sports service in ex- 
change for advertising, promotion and 
programming over five years. CBS has 
an option to raise its stake to 33 percent 
through an additional cash investment 
The CBS-Sports line deal comes as 
Starwave Corp., a leading Internet pro- 
grammer of sports, entertainment and 
family sites, is negotiating to sell 
roughly a one-third stake to Walt Dis- 
ney Co. for $80 million to $1 00 million. 
Starwave already has a partnership with 
Disney's ESPN cable sports channel to 
run ESPNnet Sportszone. a popular In- 
ternet sports site. In recent months, 
Starwave has also begun working wtn 
Disney's ABC News to build up the 
network's on-line presence. 

Both moves are viewed as an en- 
dorsement of the Internet by old-hne 
media companies — and they ace. But 
the moves also show bow even the most 


successful Internet media companies 
need the backing of older, established 
ones to enlarge their audiences and 
build profitable on-line businesses. 

The on-air promotion from ESPN 
has helped make Starwave's 
Sporrszone the leading Internet sports 
site in traffic and advertising. After the 
computer sites and Internet search 
sites, Sportszone is perhaps one of the 
most popular sites on the Web. 

Sports line, the No. 2 sports site, rec- 
ognized that it needed a television net- 
work partner to compete. 

One lesson, it seems, is that the 
attractions of Internet technology — its 
cheap distribution and low cost of entry 
for newcomers — have not rewritten 
the rules of competition for consumer 
media. Perhaps the most valuable com- 
modity on the sprawling Internet is 
attention, or “mindshare,” and estab- 
lished brands and mainstream promo- 
tion are invaluable in delivering iL 

‘ ‘A lot of the old principles really do 
apply in this medium," said Rich Le- 
Fhrgy, Starwave’s vice president of 
advertising and marketing. “Brands 
still matter, and promotion still mat- 
ters. That's why the cross-promotion 
on television is so important. Y ou need 
to be where the people are, not just on 
the Net.” 

Another reason partnerships with tra- 
ditional media companies appear at- 
tractive is that in the new-media field, 
building a profitable business is proving 
more time-consuming and costly titan 
many start-up companies had planned, 


Some trends are encouraging. There 
are signs that on-line advertising is at 
last picking up. Analysts, for example, 
were surprised by the strong ad rev- 
enue that helped Yahoo! Inc., an In- 
ternet directory, become profitable in 
the fourth quarter of last year. 

“We almost teared up around our 
shop when we reported that profit," 
Jeffrey Mallet, a senior vice president 
of Yahoo!, told his audience at the 
Jupiter Communications on-line con- 
ference in New York last week. 

By 2000, on-line advertising is pro- 
jected to reach $2.7 billion, compared 
with $220 million last year, according 
to Yankee Group, a research firm in 
Boston. Yet most of the advertising 
revenue is expected to flow into the 
coffers of just a few companies. 

Some of the larger ones say they 
welcome the evolution. 

America Online Inc. estimates that 
sites backed by AOL Studios, which 
creates and invests in on-line program- 
ming, will generate $200 million in 
revenue over the next 12 months from 
advertising and transaction fees — up 
from $5 million two years ago. 

Microsoft Corp. is spending more 
than $300 milli on a year on its media 
efforts, from its Microsoft Network 
Internet service to its MSNBC cable 
television and on-line partnership with 
the NBC unit of General Electric Co. 

Pete Higgins, Microsoft’s group vice 
president for interactive media, said he 
was optimistic about the new-media 
business, bur only over the long haul. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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AND PROUD OF IT. 



At Republic National Bank we run our 
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World UauJofumrierg of 

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Strength. Security. Service. 

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fact ~ — 

* Asset-Sale Vet 

'.ȴ{ To Run Thomi 


eran 


•la 


Before Privatization 


Cwprinl by Oar Staff Fmn Duyuahn 

PARIS — The government Tues- 
day appointed as chairman of Thom- 
son bA an executive with a track 
record of preparing stale -owned 
companies for sale. 

Thieny Breton, a state-appointed 

at com P uter maker 
^Croupe Bull, wilt succeed Marcel 
Roulet as chairman of the govem- 
mMt-owned producer of consumer 
and defense electronics goods. 

-M 1 "" ^ ou i e l will remain chairman 
of Thomson-CSF , the defense-elec- 
tronics unit of Thomson. But Mr 
Breton will take direct control of 
Thomson Multimedia, the com- 

American's Katz 
To Lead Swissair 

The Associated Press 

ZURICH — Jeffrey Katz, a 
former executive with American 
Airlines, will take charge of Swissair 
: in January as the airline bids to be- 
# come more competitive internation- 
ally, SAirGroup AG said Tuesday. 

Mr. Katz, 41. will take over* as 
chief executive officer from Philippe 
Bmggisser, who will remain pres- 
ident and chief executive of SAir- 
Group. 

Two British Airways managers, 
Ray Lyons, 44, and Lee Shave, 39, 
will join Swissair. Switzerland's 
shareholder-owned flag carrier, as 
vice presidents. 

“We must have international in- 
dustry knowledge and experience 
aboard if we are to rise to the dual 
challenges of liberalization and an 
ever-toughening airline market,” 
Mr. Bruggjsser said. 

Mr. Katz, who spent 17 years 
with American, has most recently 
been managing director of passen- 
ger sales for the western United 
Slates and was president of the 
Sabre Travel Information Network. 

SAirGroup AG reported that it 
went into the red in 1 995 with a net 
loss of 147 million Swiss francs 
($100 million) for the year. It also 
had a loss of 5 1 million francs in the 
first half of last year. 

Final results for 1996 have yet to 
be announced. 


pany*s consumer-electronics unit. 

“The government has just taken 
the decisions necessary for the pri- 
vatization of Thomson-CSF to enter 
the operational phase.” the Industry 
and Finance ministries said. 

Mr. Breton will be responsible for 
privatizing Thomson Multimedia 
and will make proposals for the sale 
shorrly. the ministries said. 

As executive president of Bull, 
Mr. Breton oversaw cost cuts and 
the sale of its Zenith Data Systems 
Inc. personal -computer unit, restor- 
ing it to profitability. The govern- 
ment allowed core shareholders, in- 
cluding Motorola Inc. and NEC 
Corp.. to buy bigger stakes in Bull a 
year ago and take control. 

The government said it had 
chosen Mr. Breton to oversee the 
sale of Thomson's units to private 
investors “because of his contri- 
bution to the turnaround" of Bull 
and to its privatization. 

“This tips the scales toward a 
gradual privatization of Thomson 
Multimedia, like what was done with 
Bull." said Luis Man jon, a Thomson 
SA board member who represents 
the General Confederation of Labor. 

Thomson Multimedia, the largest 
producer of televisions in North 
America, reported a loss of 3.1 billion 
francs ($538.9 million) for 1996 as 
competition among makers of con- 
sumer electronics and lagging Euro- 
pean demand hurt profit margins. 

Thomson Multimedia has said it 
will close several factories and cut as 
many as 10.000 jobs worldwide to 
try to return to profitability in 1999. 

Mr. Breton's appointment comes 
four months after Paris blocked a 
sale of Thomson SA to Lagardere 
Group, which planned to transfer 
Thomson Multimedia to Daewoo 
Electronics Co. of South Korea, 
amid public protest over potential 
job losses, i Bloomberg , Reuters) 

■ Aerospatiale Is Excluded 

Aerospatiale will not be allowed 
to bid for Thomson-CSF. the French 
Defense Ministry said, according to 
a Bloomberg News report. Defense 
Minister Charles Millon said earlier 
that the aerospace company's state- 
owned status raised questions about 
whether it could seek to buy parr of 
another state-controlled company. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1997 

EUROPE 


It’s No Big Deal, Boeing Says 

U.S. Giant Tries to Calm EU Over McDonnell Purchase 


RAGE 15 


By Tom Buerkle 

fntemarionai Herat J Tribune 

BRUSSELS — Philip Condit, 
the chief executive of Boeing Co., 
has a novel way of trying to per- 
suade European antitrust regulat- 
ors to approve his company's 

planned takeover of McDonnell 
Douglas Corp.: He is talking down 
the company that Boeing wants to 
pay $13.3 billion to acquire. 

McDonnell won just 3 percent 
of worldwide orders for commer- 
cial aircraft last year, Mr. Condit 
said Tuesday to a group of 
aerospace executives here. That 
puts it behind Seattle-based Boe- 
ing, the global leader, and its Euro- 
pean rival. Airbus Industrie. 

“The marketplace has already 
made a determination on the eco- 
nomic viability of McDonnell 
Douglas.” Mr. Condit said. 

Airbus has said that it has about 
35 percent of the world market for 
aircraft with more than 100 seats, 
compared with more than 50 per- 
cent for Boeing and less than 10 
percent for McDonnell Douglas. 


Between McDonnell's dwind- 
ling civilian order book and the 
prospect that die deal could per- 
suade some airlines to buy Airbus 
as a counter to Boeing's domi- 
nance. “I don'r think they bring 
market share either way.” he said. 

While many airline executives 
and analysts share that view. Mr. 
Condir faces a harder sell in Karel 
van Mien, the European Union 
competition commissioner. 

Even before the two men met for 
an hour at the European Commis- 
sion headquarters Tuesday in Brus- 
sels. aides to Mr. van Mien said he 
was certain to order a more detailed 
investigation after an initial one- 
month review ended next week. 

To date, Mr. van Miert has ex- 
pressed concerns that Boeing's 
sheer size after combining with 
McDonnell Douglas could enable 
it to abuse its dominance of the 
civilian-aircraft market to the det- 
riment of Europe's industry. 

His position has been buttressed 
by a turnaround of sorts at Airbus, 
which initially dismissed McDon- 
nell as a negligible competitor but 


lately has warned that a bigger 
Boeing could pressure subcon- 
tractors into dropping cooperation 
with Airbus. But antitrust special- 
ists have doubts about what Mr. 
van Miert can do. In contrast to 
previous merger cases, in which 
the commission has demanded di- 
vestitures to prevent market dom- 
inance, Boeing has no significant 
European operations to sell. 

U.S. officials, meanwhile, warn 
that Mr. van Mien will jeopardize 
the budding trans-Atlantic cooper- 
ation on international mergers if he 
tries to seize the initiative from the 
Federal Trade Commission, the 
agency that is leading the U.S. 
antitrust review of the deal. 

Washington suspects European 
officials want to use tbe review of 
the deal to force a renegotiation of a 
1993 U.S.-EU agreement on air- 
craft subsidies, an idea thai U.S. 
officials reject. Airbus needs an es- 
timated $8 billion to develop a 600- 
seat superjumbo jet to eclipse Boe- 
ing's profitable 747. and the accord 
limits government launch aid to 25 
percent of development costs. 


Wall Street Pushes Europe Higher 


Bloomberg News 

LONDON — Stocks rose across 
much of Europe on Tuesday, taking 
their cue from Wall Street's record 
close Monday and a stronger dollar, 
although a lackluster opening for 
U.S. stocks prevented even stronger 
gains. 

Benchmark indexes in Britain, 
Germany, the Netherlands. Finland 
and Norway all closed ar record 
highs. Stocks also rose in Austria, 
Belgium. Denmark. Ireland and Rus- 
sia. The strong dollar — the currency 
rose after President Boris Yeltsin of 
Russia dismissed most of his cabinet 
— lifted shares in exporters, includ- 
ing British Aerospace PLC. Volks- 
wagen AG and Nestle SA. 

“At the moment, everything 
looks good for the market," said 
Christoph Arzt. chief trader ai BHF- 
Bank AG. 

“The dollar movement is pos- 
itive, and we should continue to see 
record highs." 

Most major European stock in- 


dexes have done beuer than the main 
U.S. indexes so far this year. 

While the Dow Jones industrial 
average has risen less than 10 percent, 
Germany’s DAX index and the Neth- 
erlands' AEX measure have risen 19 
percent Sweden's OMX index has 
risen 17 percent the CAC 40 index in 
France has risen 16 percent and 
Italy's main index is up 13 percenL 

Strong earnings reports from 
Europe's biggest companies helped 
stocks Tuesday. 

Deutsche Telekom AG and the 
British drugmaker Zeneca PLC 
were among the companies report- 
ing solid profits. 

Optimism that corporate borrow- 
ing costs will remain steady added 
fuel to the rally. 

In Italy, top gainers in recent 
weeks have included tire big banks, 
which have been working to increase 
their assets under management 

Russian stocks rase as investors 
took Mr. Yeltsin's decision to fire 
most of the cabinet as a sign that 


economic reform efforts would con- 
tinue. Only Prime Minister Viktor 
Chernomyrdin and Anatoly Chubais, 
a first deputy prime minister, kept 
their jobs. 

Although the responsibility of 
naming a new cabinet in the next 
week will fall to Mr. Chernomyrdin, 
traders and analysts said they as- 
sumed that Mr. Chubais, a pioneer 
of Russia's market reform moves, 
would bring in some of his proteges 
and speed the overhaul of die Rus- 
sian economy. 

“If Chubais is allowed to bring in 
the people we assume he is, then it 
should be a big positive for the mar- 
kets. * * Roland Nash, chief economist 
at Renaissance Capital Group, said. 
“If he brings in the team, you're 
looking at one of the most reform- 
minded governments tins country 
has had from the be ginnin g.” 

The benchmark Russian Trading 
System index rose about 3 percent, to 
327 37. erasing most of last week's 
loss. 



FTSE 100 Index.. CAC 40.. 
•4650 - 2850 - - 

I 4500 - • 2700 

*—.4350 • A 2550- - 

- - 4200 / 2400 

- 4050jA-h/*- --'2250 M 


■ 2®D-0 Kb J' 


3300 ON 6' J F M 


'6 N D J F M 


Exchange 

Amstsdam 
Brussels . 
Frankfurt 
Copen ha gen 
Helsinki 

Opto . 

London 
Madrid 
Milan . 

Paris 

Stockholm ■ 
Vienna , 
Zurich • 

Source; Telekurs 


AEX 

BEL-20 

DAX 

Stock Market 
HEX General 
QBX 

FTSE 100 
Stock Exchange 
MtBTEL > 

CAC 40 • 

SX 16 ~ 

ATX 

SP1 


Tuesday Prev '■ 

: Close Close ; '£frange 

774.20 769.38 + 0,55 

2 , 220.77 2 , 205-20 +C- 7 ) 
3 . 460.59 3 , 436.07 * 0-71 
555.45 ' ■ 545.7 0 - 1 - 1.79 

3 .O 0&36 . 2 , 978.19 * 0-95 
612.95 609.75 ■ * 0.52 

4,44430 4 . 437.50 - 10.15 
43&05 488.40 * 0.34 

. 12 , 080.00 . 12 . 126.00 -038 
~ 2 . 686.15 2 , 709.21 - 0 . 85 ' 

2391.29 3 , 005.67 - 0.48 

1,255.43 jjjgj 40 M 
2,36032 2 J 959 Q 3 + 0.04 

Internal ion al Herald Tnhune 


Very briefBys 

• Hoechsl AG, a German chemical and drug maker, said 1996 
net profit rose 24 percent, to 2.77 billion Deutsche marks 
(S 1 .62 billion) as sales fell 2.4 percent, to 50.9 billion DM. The 
results were worse than analysis expected, but Hoechst said it 
performed well amid “sluggish activity in the chemicals 
markets.” Bayer AG, meanwhile, said its 1996 net profit rose 
a greater-than’-ex pected 13 percent, to 2.74 billion DM. 

• Adidas AG, the German maker of sports shoes and clothing, 
said it would more thun quadruple its 19% dividend, to 1.10 
DM a share from 0.25 DM a share in 1 995. as it announced a 
28 percent rise in annual profit, to 314 million DM; 1996 sales 
rose 34 percent, to 4.7 billion DM. 

• The International Petroleum Exchange in London and the 
New York Mercantile Exchange, which have traditionally 
been fierce rivals in the oil markets, expect to announce a deal 
soon that will make it easier to trade on both exchanges. 

•The Securities and Futures Authority, a British financial 
regulator, banned the former Barings treasury head Ian Hop- 
kins from being a director in London's financial district for at 
least three years for his part in the 1995 collapse of the 
investment bank. The agency also ordered Mr. Hopkins to pay 
£10,000 ($16,000) toward investigation costs. 

• Zeneca Group PLC. a British pharmaceutical company, 
said 1996 pretax profit rose 15 percent, to a record £1.01 
billion, amid healthy sales of new drugs. Sales rose 9 percent, 
to £5.36 billion from £4.9 billion. 

•Orange PLC, a British mobile-phone network company, 
said its 1996 pretax loss widened to £229.) million from 
£140.5 million for 1995 ax it continued to build infrastructure 
and subsidize mobile handsets. Revenue jumped to £619 
million from £228.7 million. 

• Generate de Banque SA, Belgium's biggest bank, said its 

1996 consolidated net profit rose 10 percent, to 15.10 billion 
Belgian francs ($427.5 million ). afp. BfcWviy. Reuters 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Hlgti Low Close Pm. 


High Low Close Prev. 


High Low Close Prev. 


ffigh Low Close Prev. 


Tuesday, March 1 1 

Prices hi local currencies. 

Tetekurs 

High Low Close Prev. 


Amsterdam 

Pl evtous. 769.96 


ASN-AMRO 
Aegon 
Alted 
AknNobd 
Boon Co. 

Bob Wesson 
CSMCVO 
DorttadwP* 
DSM 
Ebevfer 
Forts Amo* 
Getanks 
, G-Broccvo 

BEST 

Koogovanscn 
Hori Douglas 
ING Group 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 

OeeGrinten 

PhBpsEfeC 


RandstwfHdg 
Kotao 
Rodamoo 
Rolnco 
Romm . 

Rami Dutch 
Uiwevercro 
Vertex 
VNU 

WofenHcva 

Bangkok 

AO* Into Svc 
BonsrtkBkF 
Kruno Thai Bk 
PTTExjior 
Slam Cement F 
Stan Con Bk F 
Tntocorens/c 
ThdAlranys 
V TWFaraBkF 

UtdConm 

Bombay 


13£7D 139.10 
13160 13120 

142.90 14040 
288 28ZJ5D 

87 JO 87 
37 JO 36J0 
113 114J0 
36&5S 36530 
19030 199.80 
3230 32 

7080 78 

6230 060 
SOB 6330 
163JO 162 

338 34530 
91.70 93 

160 16030 
BOLlO 79 
59 59.60 
44J0 4480 

40.40 7030 
58-70 5820 

31180 307 

248 247 

9130 8870 

97.40 96.90 

152.10 150 
166 1 65.10 

6180 6230 
17840 17850 

109.90 11030 
34330 343JO 
36120 35520 

91.90 8980 

41.10 40.90 
255 257.90 


tfesiust Lever 
HMmtPeHm 
irtDwBk 

rrc 

MohanogorTel 
Retrace Ind 
Stale Bk in its 
Steel AuitiartTy 

Tata Eng Lon 

Brussels 

Amu* 

Boren Ind 

BBL 

CBR 

Cafeuyr 

Denote Lion 

Elearabei 

Eteomflng 

Ports AG 

feVOHt 

GEL 

Gan Banque 
KmSoitXBtk 
PcfcuOna 
^•erfln 
ROfafc Baige 
. SocGenSetg 
* SoMjy 
f Traoebej 
UCB 


Copenhagen 

BG Bout 30012 

OnttMgB AS 

Codon Fors 930 

Doitisa ,4ll 

DenOanskeBk 615.42 
WSSwndbrgB 
CVS 1912 B 199000 

FLShWB 5™ 
KoftLiiflhwtt 7W 

tophus BerB 877J0 
TefcoonmkB 
TiygfiaBfea Ml 
Un&ramoik A 3 70 


Frankfurt 


MSS 8 U80 

Adfcas Iri 

■ ft** £2 

as* ss 

Sow Hypo Bk 5«S 

tor a 

r BAMT 1749 

OCAGCotowa 16280 
Conuentunk jMj 
DoinlefBeni 133^2 
Dsguua 7iS 


High Law C30M 

Deutsche Bank 9 £35 9435 95 

Dad Telekom 3490 3428 3485 

DresdrmrBank 5765 57.40 5785 

Fresenhis 363 360 360 

FietMkisMed 165 16150 16450 

Fried. Krupp 297 295 29580 

Gehe 120 117 120 

HekMbgZnit 147-50 147 JO 147.50 

Henkel pW 10020 9128 98J0 

HEW 480 000 

Hodiflef 76_50 75 7650 

HoechSt 8080 7R55 7E55 

Kofstart 616 607 612 

Unde 1185117580117580 

Lufthansa 2453 2440 2450 

MAN 48450 477 480 

Mawesmm 601 669 671 

Metatgeseaxhaft36.9S 36J2 .3672 
Menu 167 16470 16580 

MundlRUBCfcR 4300 4270 4290 

PmiHog 4S 446 .455 

RhetaeleMra 1252 1250 1252 

RWE 7825 77 JO 7B 

SAPpM 275 274 27470 

Sdierfna 16480 16350 1645ffl 

SGL Carbon 229 228 228 

Siemens Bajo 8780 8785 

Springer (Amg 1275 1275 000 

SMdBKter 875 865 874 

Thyssen 363 36050 36140 

Veto 10280 102.15 10288 

VEW 502 502 SS 

Vtag 76750 764 765 

VowsMogen 946 94050 944 


Helsinki HEXGrtrtjnrt^go^ 


HEW 

Hodrtef 

Hoechst 

Korstadi 

Linde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mamesmem 


Preuuoq 

Rhrfne&lra 

RWE 

SAPpM 

Schefiio 

SGL Carbon 

Siemens 


SET index: 71985 
Previous: 783J2 

240 236 238 ' 236 

24B 230 246 226 

3750 3550 37£ 3525 
340 330 338 32B 

672 650 668 656 

154 142 1 49 I® 

4435 4235 42.75 42 

41.75 45 42J5 

169 Tol 167 158 

163 158 160 161 

Sense* 30 tader 372587 
Preirtoas: 3768J4 

1052 1 0» 1027J5 1042.75 

1M4 989 J5 100050 993 

»4 376 38150 397JS 

ggjs 92J5 93J5 9750 
41750 42475 43175 
274J5 2635» 272 265 

W 272 27650 287.25 
HIM 299 30250 30858 
2075 1950 2850 2050 
398 381 38425 39425 

BEL jOtadeic 222077 
PrEvfaus: 220520 

14050 13875 14M0 137M 
5810 5830 5880 

0200 8290 8200 

S WO 34U VW 
!5M5 14900 liJM 
wg 7060 2070 2060 

$00 8230 SS 

Sign 1440 3490 3470 

S ® ss S 

Sw 7500 2510 2483 

2^0 niO 5150 5180 

14200 13825 14000 13750 
13400 13125 13350 13125 

’i?» '1™ 

WO 8488 8540 8460 

-S ^ 2?s .ns 

1 5«BD 15400 15J7S 
JfmO 94600 94600 94800 


Elisa A 

HuMrenakll 

Kfnnira 

Kesko 

MWttO A 

MetraB 

Metsa-SeriaB 

Neste 

Nokia A 

Orion- Vlrtymoe 

Outokumpu A 

UPMKvmmefle 

Votmel 


4550 4480 
247 244 

57.90 5680 
75M 74-40 
19 1BJB 
307 305 

43 42 

13550 13450 
33250 326 

189 186 

9550 95 

118 11450 
9150 90.90 


4550 45 

247 246 

5&SS1 56.90 
7540 75 

1850 19 

305 306 

42.90 <3 

135 13450 
327 31850 
187 187 

9580 95 

115 116 

91 91 JO 


Hong Kong 

Amoy Props 
Bk East asm - 

Cathay Pacific 12.10 

Cheung Kong ” 

CK Intmstrud 
China Ltaht 
ClttCFIxltiC 
DnoHeaaBk 39^ 
First PacSic llJB 
htong Unig Dev 1580 
Hcnn SengBk ® 

Henderson ny 88B 

Henderson Ld 68.75 

HKChlnaGas l5iS 
HK Electric JO 
HK Tetecomm 1405 
Mmwe* Hdgs 4^ 
HSBC Hdgs 192 
HuteWson Wh 5125 
Hyson Dev 25.90 
S&E'HdO 2050 
Kerry Praps 19^ 
New World Dev 4650 
Oriental Press 
Petal Oriental 
SHK Props 
Shun Tok Hdps 
Slna Land Co. art 
STti China Post 785 

SwIrePocA 

Wharf Hdgs 
wheetack 


Haag Seng: 1325250 
prevtoas: 13267 J2 

9.10 9.15 975 

2650 2655 2680 

11.95 11.95 1285 

73 7125 7425 
21 21.40 2150 

3550 3160 35J0 
3950 3950 3980 
38J0 39.10 3830 
1180 1120 11-35 
1555 1520 1555 
8425 8475 8425 
880 BJ0 855 
6725 6725 
1490 1495 
2680 2685 26.90 

13.95 14 1195 

428 433 450 

190 19150 19ff 

5750 58 5750 

2525 2520 25.75 
2055 2055 2050 
1955 1955 1985 
4450 45 46 

135 380 X43 

585 605 58S 

B725 8750 B75Q 
585 585 550 

055 880 675 

7.10 780 7.05 

64 6425 6550 
33 3330 3380 
19 1925 1985 


Slock Mb 555.49 
prevtoas; 545.70 

295 29« «4 

So 404 40224 
920 « 7 JJ 9$ 

403 405 407 

JtSmS 183000 246000 

'TS ,86 ^ 

too 690 700 

& & 1 
$"g ^ 


Jakarta 

Astra liril 
SL ion Intlon 
BK Negara 

GudangGarm 

Indocemert 

indolood 

fndttsal 

Sampoenw HM 
Semen GresA 

TetekomunikBsi 


6100 6050 6050 6150 

1900 1825 1S50 1900 

ISO 1500 1525 1500 

10650 10325 HB5Q 10325 

*25 3400 3425 3400 

S75 54® 54® 5400 

S725 6675 6700 6650 

15103 11950 12100 12000 

6350 6125 6125 6350 

4150 4050 4075 418S 


mo nro 'I 7 ? 

167 167.30 lit 

3385 3442 34ri 

1410 1630 13|£ 
jus 34 15 3CL50 
Tr|? 60.78 6615 

II S 
*S s 4 

■s '! S '| 

-I -I s 


Johannesburg 

SSSSp® 1 

AngtoAm ind | 7 l jJ 17.75 172a 

AVW" Jgjs ^95 4975 4&40 

2775 26.75 27.15 2660 

CO.SmM ]W 16QJ5 15750 

DeBeen ^ 48 4575 

28 27J5 27.75 27.90 

KT ,j“ "ft '’ft 

^“ndHdOS 57-” „j£ 

ingweCed 3 « 150 385 353 

l« fir . , M 5650 58 5A95 57 

jonmuesihj ^ 324 324 324 

LOKrtyHdO* .«5| , 247i 12575 12480 

LtoeHyUle ujs 1575 1S75 

UOLKe Strut ^ ,05 1BSJ5 

Minon i wjo 1980 1980 19^ 

Nampa* 0530 85 83 

Neffcor StlO 45J0 <585 435 

fiemWondlGP tijo olJO 

T6 75 76 75 

p.<Kl PWrtum '■ 



139 

137.25 

137 JO 

137 

Venflome L* uts 

£34 

528 

520 

522 




Electro lux B 

505 

496 

503 

503 


56 

5£25 

5525 

5550 

Vcmrftme 

2.98 

2.91 

192 

195 

Paris 


CAC-40:2U£15 
Prevtous: Z70921 

Ericsson B 

276 269 JO 270J0 27150 


S5J5 

51 JO 

52 

5125 

Whitbread 

8.12 

£05 

£09 

£07 


Henna B 

1065 

1052 

1054 

1060 

SBtC 

187 JD 

187 

187 

187 

WBficans Hags 

137 

322 

326 

321 



incentive A 

550 

540 

540 

5* 

Tiger Oats 

77 JD 

7625 


7525 

Woiselev 

5.15 

4.94 

5.12 

4.93 

Accor 

856 

B38 840 846 

investor B 

371 

357 

358 36450 





WPPGraos 

165 

2.60 

163 

7.AI 

AGP 

21 7 JO 21150 214 21520 

Mo Do B 

248 

239 JO 

740 

24150 






7twta 

1928 

1£55 

1£61 

19 

Air Uquide 

944 

931 935 924 

Nordbonken 

273 

268 

2/2 

269 


Kuala Lumpur wim 


AMMBHdss 2380 

Gerrrtg 16.90 

AAdBocUdno 29 

Mol Intt Ship F 675 

PetranosGos 970 

Proton 16.10 

Public Bk 585 

Renang 432 

Resorts World 1180 

RattmansPM 2175 

Shne Darby 9 JO 

Telekom Mol 1980 

Tenqgo 1270 

UW Engineers 2270 

YTL 14.10 

London 

Abbey Nan ail 

AMerfDomeoj 489 

AngSan Wort 685 

Angus &7B 

ASM Group 1-15 

AsncBrnads 583 

BAA 582 

Bodays 1183 

Bass 880 

BAT Ind 672 

BankScofiand 388 

Blue Clide 4.15 

BOC Group 1039 

Baals 688 

BPS Ind 3-50 

Brit Aaosp 1372 

BittAkvniys 688 

BG 189 

Brti Land 580 

BrtPelira 777 

BSkvB 675 

BrtSKei 183 

Bril Tetocum 4.41 

BTR 2.91 

BunnahCastioi 1085 

Burton Gp 186 

Cable Wireless 577 

CndbuTV Sdrw 583 

Cordon Comm £45 

Coamd Union 77S 

Compass Gp 7.19 

Courtau Ids 384 

□bans STB 

Etedrocnraponenls 472 
EMI Group 1270 

Energy Group £33 

Enterprise 08 681 

Font Colonial 185 

Gem Accident 859 

GEC .386 

GKN 1186 

Gtao WeBcrnne 1174 

Granada Gp 982 

Grand Met 4.99 

GRE 206 

GieenoSsGp 557 

Guinness 486 

GUS 655 

HS^C Hlrigs 1559 

la 772 

Impl Tobacco 478 

KtopMier 6.92 

Lofirake 2ja 

Land See 7.97 

Lasnw 288 

Legal Gcnl Grp 4.13 

LiaydS TSBGp 579 

Uiaisyarlty 210 

Marts Spencer 5 

ME PC 485 

Mercury Assd 1429 

National Grid 2lf 


'reg 9 JB 

olSSunAH 495 


Nafi Power 5.10 

Narwtst 771 

Mesd £79 

Oranpe 2g 

P&O 6-2 

Psatson 7rt 

PflUnoton 152 

PoeesGen 674 

Premier Fames 5.10 

Prudensm 593 

RafltraCkPP 495 

Rraik Group 454 

RecUOCofan 885 

RaBand 3rt 

Reedina 12W 

Rentokfl InHal 40 

RmitesHdgs 6S 

Rewra .183 

RMC Group 1027 

Roftr Royce 257 

RayaIBkSail 5tt 

RTZreg 982 

» SDnAB ss 

SB iS 

Seat Newcastle 683 

Scot Power 385 

Securiax 118 

Severn Trent 755 

SrtOTfonspR 1181 

State 10.10 

Smith Nephew 183 

SmflWCSrt 982 

Smdhslnd 8.12 

SthemEles 755 

Stagecoach 759 

Stand CMfler 951 

TaleS Lyte <87 

TesOJ 389 

Thames wener J 

31 Group 576 

TI Group 58J 

Tomkins 293 

Unflner W53 

Ukl Assurance 580 

UMNewS 752 

UM UiBtfcs 6.91 


Prevtoas: 123788 

30 2330 2370 
60 1670 1880 
25 29 2850 

20 675 670 

10 9.15 9.10 

60 1590 1580 
30 575 575 

46 450 450 

30 1180 1170 
B0 2S5D 2 550 
20 975 970 

20 1980 1970 
60 1270 11.90 
B0 2280 2180 
SB 1190 14 


FT-SE 100: 4444J0 
Previous: 443780 

7.7B 788 7.77 

483 446 458 

656 682 853 

683 689 670 

1.10 1.10 1.11 

471 582 493 

530 534 536 

11.10 1178 1171 

886 857 885 

535 5-56 533 

389 357 351 

407 408 412 

10.10 10.16 1070 

677 680 682 

385 385 382 

1352 1371 1353 
680 683 680 

184 185 1.70 

S89 556 588 

7.10 7.11 7.16 

419 673 417 

189 181 180 

435 477 438 

270 284 284 

1076 1052 1072 

174 1-55 184 

5.05 £07 5.11 

574 £4l 578 

572 5JS £32 

7jQ3 7J05 7.05 

7JS 7.16 7-07 

160 142 M 

£18 574 577 

476 427 430 

11.93 1275 11.93 

575 571 £77 

421 422 438 

183 184 184 

B5D 885 aH 
180 372 183 

1072 1078 1073 

11.13 1154 11.16 
986 9.79 983 

883 485 483 

£81- 783 282 

£45 588 £47 

473 475 486 

487 450 £48 

£29 £44 578 

1588 1556 1587 

778 752 777 

419 476 418 

47B 490 473 

237 279 239 

7 JO 7.93 7.90 

275 276 286 

403 407 409 

5 519 5.19 

206 287 208 

485 486 492 

474 480 485 

14 1404 1423 

213 217 113 

5 £02 555 

783 786 785 

479 434 678 

214 119 214 

455 460 688 

737 7.91 737 

186 187 l.fl 

417 419 420 

490 507 497 

579 572 £32 

434 486 490 

440 488 440 

7.95 758 832 

370 3J3 375 

1187 1174 1135 

447 458 450 

435 438 684 

376 138 377 

10.17 10.19 10.16 

254 255 253 

573 535 557 

98B 951 980 

483 494 436 

383 264 386 

3jD9 110 113 

1770 1778 1775 

673 482 473 

381 164 262 

210 214 576 

785 750 786 

1030 1071 HL9S 

9.96 1002 9.95 

130 130 153 

9J9 9.47 979 

832 &10 B 

730 7.92 7.92 

7J9 785 758 

471 473 491 

480 445 488 

3,14 387 386 

439 494 691 

572 574 571 

555 584 554 

285 291 184 

1556 15.91 1573 

571 635 577 

779 7 JO 778 

472 £77 4,71 


Madrid 


Bobatadex:4aaiB 


Previous: 4S9 JO 

Acerinox 

20990 


20220 

20800 

ACE5A 

1765 

1675 

1605 

1745 

Agnus Barceton 

390 

5440 

5440 

5500 

Argentmto 

6690 

6410 

6460 

5540 

BBV 

8970 

HW 

8770 

8830 


1165 

1125 

1125 

1)40 

BonkWer 

20100 

19620 

19650 

19650 

Bcd Centra Hbp 

3970 

38/5 

3890 

3V40 

Ben Exterior 

2775 

2765 

2/65 

2/65 

Bco Poptfor 

27200 

26910 

26920 

26960 


10030 

91150 

9860 

9930 

CEPSA 

4350 

4300 

4300 

4340 


2630 

2550 

2630 

2565 

CoraMoptre 

7900 

7660 

7680 

7760 

Endesa 

9620 

9410 

9410 

9410 

FECSA 

1360 

1305 

1310 

1335 

Gas Natural 

34050 

33150 

33430 

33300 

Ibefdrata 

1700 

1660 

1660 

1655 

Piyar 

2750 

26W 

2/10 

2685 

Repsol 

6040 

5/88 

5820 

5940 


1380 

1315 

1315 

1150 

Tobacaleni 

7240 

7170 

7220 

71/0 

Tetefortco 

3535 

3515 

3535 

3490 

Union Fenoso 

1240 

1200 

1210 

1215 

Vatenc Cement 

1600 

1560 

1600 

1585 

Manila 


PSEtadee32B£99 


Prevtous: 320934 

Ayala B 

30 

30 

30 

30 

Ayala Land 

Bk PhOto 111 

31 

30 

30J0 

30.50 

134 

182 

183 

181 

CAP Homes 

13J0 

13 

13.75 

1125 

MtmBoBBCA 

121 

119 

120 

120 

Mem Bar* 

685 

600 

685 

685 


11 

1IL75 

>1 

I0./5 

PO Bank 

382JD 377 JO 

380 382-50 

Pbfl Long Dia 

1615 

1605 

1610 

1610 


90 

88 

WL50 

89 JO 

SM Prime Hdg 

720 

7J0 

7 JO 

7.90 

Mexico 


Botso tadeK 3802J0 


Prevtow: 3844J0 

AftaA 

44.00 

43 JO 

43J0 

4175 







7925 

29.00 

29 JM 

29 JO 

atraC 

11.96 

11:00 

11J2 

17-40 


41.65 

41.00 

41.00 

41J5 


45.00 

44.00 

44.70 

44.90 


TJ9 

IJ6 

IJ8 

IM 


2£10 

27 JO 

27.90 

2/JO 


166J0 

16400 

16400 

1&5J0 

TetevfcoCPO 

105JOO 

10330 

103J0 

104JO 

TalMexL 

16.16 

16JM 

16JM 

16.10 

Milan 

MIB TetetaoKca: HOBOjOB 


Previous: 1212600 


12745 

17455 

>2515 

72575 


3490 

3415 

3430 

3435 


4620 

4455 

4490 



1280 

1230 

1231 

1260 


20900 

20100 

20400 

20600 

Credtto Itcfeno 

2345 

3950 

2315 

2265 


9650 

9500 

9500 

9550 

ENI 

8795 

8600 

8*40 

8540 

Rol 

5580 

5470 

5545 

5«50 

General Asdc 

30750 

30400 

30400 

30500 

(Ml 

15300 

14940 

14995 

15280 

INA 

2275 

2240 

22/0 

22/5 

noHras 

MeSuet 

6025 

7250 

5905 

7100 

5905 

7110 

5995 

7050 

Mediobaitcn 

I15D0 

11210 

114111 

11310 

Motfedrswt 

1257 

1243 

1243 

1247 

OGvenf 

634 

626 

630 

67/ 

Pamntot 

2305 

2270 

2300 

2280 

Plndl 

3730 

3610 

3610 

3670 

RAS 

15420 

15120 

151» 

151/0 

Roto Banco 

14790 

14210 

14550 

14295 

SPcsto Torino 

11990 

11750 

11BA0 

11925 

£fet 

8045 

//60 


/ 965 

Telecom ItaHa 

4475 

4260 

4260 

4425 

TIM 

4490 

43/5 

43/5 

4465 

Montreal 

MvsMtis todec 2991,43 


Preview 3004J9 

BeeMteCnm 

4135 

43 

4316 

4335 

CditTlreA 

25J5 

25.10 

25.55 

75 

Cdn ms a 

32.70 

32J0 

37 JU 

32.65 

CTHrriSvc 

37 Vt 

3216 

3214 

37 

Gaz Metro 

1714 

1/35 

1715 

17.40 

Gt-Wesliteca 

21.90 

2U0 

21 Jit 

2IJ5 

Iraasco 

3£40 

3£10 

3£15 

38 

Investors Grp 

2£80 

25J0 

2£80 

2SJ0 

LobbwCtis 

17 

1680 

1/ 

1665 

Nail Bk Canada 

1£70 

16M 

l£35 

1AB0 

Power top 

Potfccr rw 

29 (i 

2916 

29.70 

29.70 

27W 

2/.I0 

27 JO 

2/45 

QuetecnrB 

2130 

tun 

2538 

2JI4 

Rogers Comm B 

9U 

n 

9« 

9J0 

Royal BkCtta 

6190 

6016 

61ta 

62 


AkerA 

B»9K«DyA 
ChristadoBk 
DennoBktflk 
Eftere 
HotsiurtA 
KvoernerAsa 
Norsk Hvara 
NortkeSkoq A 

NyoomedA 

OririoAsoA 

PetteGeaSvc 

tosaPettsA 


TronsoctOnOH 

Storebrand Am 


OOXiida: 61195 
Prevtoas: 60975 

179 188 179 

14550 14650 14750 
3490 2490 25 

3050 3080 3050 
119 11950 118 

4650 47 46 

371 371 370 

345 349 34550 

220 22250 2143) 
110 11050 110 

545 54650 547 

306 386 306 

U5J0 116 11550 
136 13650 137 

40150 40150 399 

4680 4750 4450 


Akana Alsth 

Ajm-UAP 

Bnnmlre 

BIC 

BNP 

Cmri Plus 

Conofeiur 

Cosmo 

CCF 

Ceteiem 

ChrisltanDtor 

CLF-Detoo Fron 

Credit Agrioie 

Danone 

EH-Aquttalne 

Ertdanla BS 

Eurorflsnev 

Eurotunnel 

Gen. Eaux 

Haros 

Iroelnl 

Lotorge 

Legrand 

LtSeal 

LVMH 

L*on.Eau* 

MWreflnB 

Paribas A 

Pernod Beard 

Peugeot at 

Ptnautt-Prtm 

rranuoEi 

Renault 

Rexel 

Rh- Poulenc A 
SanoTI 
Schneider 
SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Ste Genera le 
Sodoxha 
SiGobain 
Suez 

Syirihetaho 
Thomson CSF 
Total B 
USIrw 
Vhleo 


651 636 m 645 

379-20 376 37 Art 37680 

793 775 775 789 

913 904 909 910 

26650 257 25750 264 

1135 1113 1125 1100 

3ST7 3435 3445 3427 

27680 27070 27050 27450 

28980 378 27980 28750 

750 732 744 736 


37980 365.10 36750 37980 

1093 1048 1048 1074 

2074 2008 2023 2025 

1397 1348 1351 1380 

611 596 S98 605 


Pharm/llPlohn 
SandvflcB 
Scania B 
SCAB 

S*E BankenA 
SkandtaFors 
Skanska B 
5KFB 

SpartwnkenA 
StadshypoiekA 
5KXUA 
Sv Handles A 
VotvoB 


Sydney 

Amcor 

ANZBklng 

BHP 

Borol 

Brambles ind. 
CBA 

CC Amort 


307 331 3B1J0 

197 JO 191 192 

194 190J0 191 

17750 172 173 

01 7850 7850 
252 247 252 


150 30050 
192 19650 
191 193 

173 178 

050 80 


404 399 JO 400-30 

40050 

Canteen 

7 

6-04 

7 

329.40 32110 321 ID 327.90 

CRA 

19JB 

IV.IU 

19-Tfl 

647 

625 

629 

636 

CSR 

5 

4./B 

4JII 

2392 

2336 

2338 

2359 

Fosters Brew 

2J4 

2J6 

14/ 

1965 

1913 

1917 

1960 

Goodman Fid 

1.73 

IJ0 

1.72 

140 

133 

133 

138.90 

IO Attend in 

12J0 

1141 

12-55 

1799 

1/85 

1787 

1804 

Lend Lease 

Z148 


2140 


202.90 20080 
566 549 

316 
1001 


L90 20080 201 20080 

551 556 

309 31450 
998 992 

437 42050 432.10 41&20 
711 698 698 706 

909 2976 2989 2958 

900 905 

140 295 29680 294 

587 596 594 

1.90 19410 19410 19770 
498 48650 487.10 485 

B9 8985 90 

380 38190 382.90 


MiMHdgs 

Nat Aunt Bank 
Nat Mutual Hdg 
News Corp 

Padflc Dunlap 
Pioneer Inti 
Pita Broadcast 
SI Grorpe Bonk 
WMC 

Westpac BMng 
WoodswePei 


Sao Paulo Bare^owawaTs Taipei 


34850 349 JO 
191 191 JO 
146 1485-5 
190 19050 
10550 1D7J0 
216JQ 21950 
191 JO 19250 


AlOnSnaries: 2(6870 
Prevtoas: 2(6150 

845 £48 £40 

750 752 780 

17.16 1772 17.15 
350 £85 358 

22.01 22J0 21.99 
13.13 1120 1374 
1173 1144 1148 
£93 654 6 

684 7 685 


1656 1618 
1.99 1.95 

654 670 

345 379 

414 420 

450 452 

753 753 

872 876 

771 7.14 

970 972 


stod: Martel iadec 824654 
Prevtoas: B1741S 


BradescoPtd 
Brwima Pfd 

CemtaPM 

CESPPfd 
copet 

Etotm 

HauoanooPfd 
Ugtn Senridos 
LJghtiiar 
PehnbnB 
PtruRsta Luz 
SMNodonol 
Sauza Cruz 
Tele bras Pfd 
Ttiendg 
Teteri 
Tefcsp Pfd 
Untoanco 
Usiminas PM 
CVRD Pfd 


980 8.70 

72180 715.10 
49 JO 4770 
6050 6070 
TS40 T£130 
48780 48180 
57580 57080 
457.90 45199 
34170 32980 
22080 21680 
14880 14650 
37.10 3640 
980 97S 

11410 111J0 
16780 16450 
ISaOD 15550 
30080 29680 
4189 4180 
173 1.19 

2780 2645 


£70 £95 

720.00 72080 
4980 4870 
6070 6080 
ISJO 1570 
4B680 
57380 57280 
457.90 46080 
33580 32699 
21750 220.00 
14780 14880 
26M 3670 
940 9.70 

113.60 11270 
16780 16580 
15880 15580 
299 JO 30280 
4179 4280 
172 171 

2655 2695 


Docah 

Daewoo Heavy 
Hyundai Eng. 
Kin Motors 
Korea EtPwr 
Korea Each Bk 
Korea Mob Tel 
LG Senrioun 
Pahang iron ST 
Sonsung DKioy 
Samsung Elec 
ShkihanBarft 


CowpasKe todec 65695 
P revio us 66775 

107000 103000 103000 107000 
4050 3960 4000 4010 

19100 1B600 ISM 19400 
1SS00 15000 15500 15300 
25500 25100 25200 25500 
StoO 5500 5500 5600 

469M0 455000 467500 470000 
25000 24700 25000 26000 
41100 39500 40200 61200 
41700 395W 39600 41600 
52600 51800 52C® 52800 
10300 10000 10000 10110 


Singapore 


AstaPocBtew 7J5 740 745 745 

CerteosPoc 10J0 10.30 10J0 1040 

□ry Devils 1420 13^8 1380 14 

cydecontaoe 15 144» 15 i«S 

Dairy Fann bd * 078 £77 077 077 

“■““foreign 1880 1660 *“*“ ’ 

Land 5.70 5J0 

KeppHFfeS £75 585 

Fraser* Neave 1370 13 1130 1280 

HKLrmd* 288 286 187 288 

JardMoUlbBi* £10 £95 

JardSMt^C* 370 374 

Keppel 1070 to 

KeppelBank 417 484 

OCeCbnrign 19 1870 

<7S Union BkF 1170 HUH I0>90 11 

PatanyHdgs 670 615 6-15 tlO 

Semtetaang 770 7J5 7^ 785 

Sing Air toreigil I2J0 1270 1270 1270 

sing Land 870 7.95 B £10 

Sing Press F 2880 2B.10 

SlngTecfllnd u» IB -5 

Sing Tetecomm 378 370 128 370 

Keppel Lond *JD 4.78 480 178 

Tot Lie Bonk 34B 346 348 346 

Utd todnsirU 172 1J0 172 170 

WdOSeoBkF 1630 >£90 >£90 16 

IMngTulHdgs 448 4J8 448 

*: in I/Jl dotan. 

Stockholm 

AGAB 11450 1I2J0 H3 1" 

ABBA B85 877 8M 8W 

AssiDomon an MS rt?J0 »6 

Astra A 3 79 JO 37380 Dig 376 

AilOS COPCO A 189 JO 107 187J0 187.50 

Adtoft 350 338 339 346 


Cathay Lite ins 
QwigHwaU 
Chtoo Tung Bk 
China Devdpmi 
China Steel 
First Bank 
FOrmasa Plastic 
Hua Nan Bk 
Inti Comm Bk 
NanYaPkndcs 
SWn Kang Lite 
Taiwan 
Tatung 
Utd Micro Elec 
UM World Cnin 


Tokyo 


Asotd Bank 
AsaNChem 
Asohl Gloss 
Bk Tokyo Mttsu 
Bk Yokohama 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
Qiutou Elec 
Owgobi Elec 
Dal Nlpp Print 
Dfflet 

DaHchl Kang 
Dorter Bank 
Dahlia House 
Dartn5ec 
DPI 
Demo 

End JapreiRy 

El vat 

Fanuc 

Rip Bank 

Fug Photo 

Fuptai 

HodrlhiniBk 

Hitachi 

Honda Mater 

IBJ 

IHI 

Itochu 

tn-Yokoda 

JAL 

japan Tobacco 

Jusco 

Kairtna 

KonulElec 

Koo 

KamSakiHvr 
Kowa steel 
KJnkINIpp Ny 
Ktrei Brewery 
Robe Steel 
Knnatsu 
Kubota 
KyocBT 
Kyushu Elec 
LTCB 
Marubeni 
Moral 

Matw Conn" 
MofwEteclnd 
Matsu Elec Wk 
Mitsubishi 
Mitsubishi Ch 
MHsubriMEI 
MinubtartEsi 
Mitsubishi Hvy 
Mitsubishi Mar 
Mlbubishi Tr 
Mitsui 


ISO 

179 

179 

179 





91 

90 

9OJ0 

91 

11150 

111 JO 

112 

1UJ0 

27.40 

2LB0 

2/JO 

rtJO 

187 

IRA 

186 

186 

76 

75 

75J0 

75 

1*550 

144 

144 

145 

84 

ra 

83 

83 

68 

67 

67 JO 

67 

112 

1IDJD 

11050 

IllUO 

65 

64 

64 

64 

58J0 

5/ 

57 JO 

5/ 

47 

46.70 

46 JO 

46 

7050 

70 

70 JO 

7OJ0 


Nfekei 225:1826778 


Prwtoas: 181 13J0 

1030 

934 

940 

1010 

805 

791 

79/ 

791 

3470 

3390 

3400 

3400 

834 

BID 

834 

007 

619 

m 

613 

619 

1110 

1090 

trio 

1080 

1950 

1900 

1940 

1900 

540 

572 

535 

53! 

2200 

21/0 

2190 

2190 

2570 

2540 

2570 

2530 

2160 

2130 

7140 

2130 

2170 

2140 

2160 

7150 

1970 

1940 

1960 

1940 

777 

/61 

771 

no 

1380 

1330 

1370 

1.171) 

478 

467 

470 

465 

1400 

1350 

1380 

1360 

965 

94? 

942 

Vt>7 

7410a 

7350a 

7400a 

7330a 

2400 

2260 

2360 

2210 

5341a 

5280a 

5330a 

5280a 

2210 

2160 

3180 

2210 

3700 

3620 

36« 

3610 

1440 

1370 

144(1 

im 

4M0 

4020 

4050 

4030 

1190 

1170 

1180 

1160 

1040 

1010 

1010 

1WS 

1070 

1030 

1050 

1060 

3790 

3740 

3/60 

3810 

1370 

1341) 

1370 

1360 

431 

420 

431 

427 

i/ll 

565 

A 10 

566 

wn 

5440 

540 

5440 

484 

4/5 

m 

480 

7860a 

lib Oo 

7760a 

7900a 

3320 

3250 

3310 

3230 

636 

625 

629 

640 

7190 

2160 

3170 

2150 

1370 

1300 

1310 

1311) 

485 

47i 

479 

4/9 

340 

334 

34U 

334 

738 

m 

730 

173 

1000 

991 

1(0) 

997 

Z18 

214 

216 

219 

854 

DM 

836 

IBS 

540 

526 

539 

531 

7060 

/ItWI 

7050 

AW 

2180 

2161) 

3180 

2UD 

418 

409 

418 

418 

453 

437 

450 

43? 

1690 

1640 

1670 

1680 

2940 

TWO 

7890 

2W0 

1810 

1790 

1810 

ISOO 

lt« 

1100 

1130 

1100 

MOD 

IBM 

urn 

IMA 

329 

319 

329 

372 

640 

661 

669 

665 

1440 

>400 

1410 

1470 

821 

805 

805 

870 

855 

849 

849 

850 

1330 

1290 

1320 

1300 

863 

85/ 

861 

859 


YIiq Trib Index PrKes! JS 3 ' w PM Nen Vc,rii ume 

Jan. 1 . 7992 = HX> Level Change % change year to date 

% change 

World Index 154 55 *0 37 *0.24 +17.20 

Regional Indexes. 

AswPacific 111.45 t4).92 -0.83 -16.9G 

Europe 163.10 -0.39 -0.24 +17.19 

N. America 1B1.00 +0.94 +0.52 +41.10 

S. America 143.31 +0.11 +0.06 +50.95 

Industrial Indexes 

Capital goods 179.38 +042 -0.23 +34.99 

Consumer poods 175.65 +0.49 -0.28 +27.22 

Energy 179.47 -0.96 -0.54 +32.33 

Finance 115.07 *0.89 *0.78 -9.56 

Miscellaneous 160.16 +0.81 +0.51 +17.93 

Raw Materials 189.73 -0.79 -041 +33.80 

Service 143.61 +0.23 *0.16 +19.67 

Utilities 138.31 +0.64 +0.46 +8.79 

The International Herald TnOune lYortd Stock Index D tracks toe U.S. dollar values at 
280 aVemabonnOy mvestabla shocks tram 25 countries Far mow mtarmaOen. a free 
booklet Is available by rrntmg to The Tnb inner, id t Avenue Clones de Gauffe. 

925? 1 Nataliy Cede*. France. Compiled by Bloomberg New a 


Mitsui Fudosn 
Mitsui Trust 
Murats Mfg 
NEC 
Nikon 
NikknSec 
Nintendo 
Nlpp Express 

Nippon GH 

Nippon Steel 
Nissan Motor 
NKK 

Nomura Sec 
NTT 

NTT Data 
op Paper 
Osaka Gas 
Ricoh 
Rohm 
Saturn Bk 
Sankyo 
Sanwa Bank 
■ Sanyo Elec 
S acorn 
Stsdj Rwy 
SeUsul Chem 
SeUsul Heine 
Seven-EJevefl 
Sharp 

ShAokuEIPwr 

Shtmcu 

SWn-ersu Oi 

SMseida 

Shtuoko Bk 

Soflbank 

Sony 

Sumitomo 
SutnimmoBk 
SumllChem 
SimRomo Elec 
SumHMeul 
Surah Trust 
Tabbo Phorm 
Tokeda Own 
TOK 

Tohoku El Purr 
Tokal Bank 
Tofcio Marine 
Tokyo El Pwr 
Tokyo E lemon 
Tokyo Gas 
Tokyo Corp. 
Tonen 

Tappan Print 
Toray Ind 


1270 IW> 
7M 750 
4200 4220 

139D 1410 

1740 1760 

705 720 

8850 8850 

772 778 

496 506 

337 328 

702 711 

258 26 7 

1360 1410 

8350a 8380a 
3160b 3180b 
608 

282 .+> 
1360 1390 

8740 B740 

737 

3340 3380 
1310 1360 

461 463 

6630 6650 
5230 5330 

1240 1240 

1110 1130 
7130 7140 

1490 1510 
2060 2090 

682 685 

2250 2260 

1450 1460 

995 1010 
10200 10900 
8740 8790 

S45 862 

1510 1570 

4S7 464 

I6» 1640 

279 282 

1040 1070 

2780 2820 

2470 2500 


Tostem 
Tayo Trad 
Toyota Motor 
YomonoucW 
ailtXkb.-rUXC 


Toronto 


AHiBK Price 
Alberta Energy 
Alcan Atom 
Anderson Expl 
Bk Montreal 
Bk Now Santa 
BarrtokGald 
BCE 

BC Tetecomm 
Btochem Ftioim 
Bern ban) lerB 
BnuunA 
Bre-x Minerals 
Cameco 

CiBC 

Cdn Nail Rail 
CdnNarRes 
COnOccld Pet 
Cdn Pacific 
Corn taco 
Dotosco 
Dam tor 
Donohue A 
DuPantCdoA 
Edper Group 
EureNevMfig 
FcrfrtuFinl 
Fukunbridge 
Fletcher- CJwH A 
Franco Nevada 
GuBCdo Res 
Imperial Oh 
Inca 

IPL Energy 
La Id law B 
Laewen Group 
MocmllBktl 
Mogno Inti A 


2090 2050 
914 890 
3241 1280 
2200 2180 
437B 4300 
““ 290 
... 557 
1250 1220 
1360 liSl 
674 665 
46« 6j9 
2630 2600 
850 835 
3110 3070 
2480 2440 


2090 2040 

913 893 

1210 1180 
2MP 2190 
4340 4300 

?91 2*9 

57B 554 

1250 1230 
1360 1360 

640 674 

466 664 

2630 
846 845 

3110 3090 

?«0 2450 


T5E Industrials: 6316.71 
Previous: 6332LB7 

SS 2235 22.45 22to 
10 2940 ?9h 29.00 

IVr 51’+ 51J0 52.10 
50 1635 1635 16.40 

90 54 54.95 £5^0 

« 55 56 57.10 

» 34'5 3685 34.20 

15 6£85 69.15 69.10 
>• 31 'j 31 JO 31.65 
B 77 77 77J5 

»5 36' 7 26*5 2rAi 
49 32 ' j 32 70 324. 

55 17J5 18 18 

55 56'+ 5640 56.20 

» 69 69.65 70.91) 

K 5115 5115 5135 
IS 34J0 35 35 

IS 22*4 2185 22.70 
10 35.70 36215 

l'4 40.10 40.15 40.10 
45 ?4li I4JJ 
12 11.95 T1.95 123B 
» 26J5 26'. 26'. 

U 34 U< 34' < 34'-: 

K 23.95 24 24 


3100 3285 
22 22.40 
MaS 6448 
10.90 1095 
62.35 6?'4 

51.15 51 JO 
39.95 40 

7(1.40 SH. 

44't 4485 
1£40 I860 
71 .» 72.45 


NewtiridgF Nel 

Noronoa Inc 
Norcen Enemy 
Nihem Tetecom 

Nova 

Cme* 

Pancdn PeBm 
PelraCda 
Placer Dome 
PocoPertn 
Potash Sask 
Renaissance 
RioAlgom 
Rogers CantelB 
Sean ram Co 
SneUCda A 
Slone Consola 
Suncor 
Talisman Eny 
TeckS 
Teleglobe 
Telus 
Thomson 
TorDom Hank 
Transoha 
TransCda Pipe 
TiinuriFirU 
Trizec Hahn 
TvxGotd 
Weslcoasi En« 
western 


1170 1155 
MG 29.95 
44J0 4X60 
3115 326, 

rt't 30.20 
98'; 9 T.v 
1170 1155 
1£10 24>* 

57 56.10 
20.05 

29.45 2£10 

i3js nos 

IBS 106 
4135 4065 
37 36'+ 

2780 7660 
54>V 5385 
S8U 5745 
22^0 72'* 

6110 62 
4430 4385 
33J, 3335 

40 391o 

21.15 21JJ5 

30.45 3020 

41 39.40 
17.10 16.90 
2685 26J5 
43.90 42.90 

33.15 3190 
1140 11.10 
2585 35.40 

74'; 73Vi 


Vienna 


ATX todn: 125143 



Prevtotrs: 124196 

BoetUer-Uddeh 

865 

845 

B61 

839.95 

Derfitonsr Pfd 

47195 

46/ 

47195 

467.35 

EA-C+neral 

3420 

3360 

3416 

3360 

EVN 

1757 1 742JO 

1752 

1750 

FlughntenWlen 

61155 

595 

601 

594.10 

OMV 

1424J51409JO 

1415 

1414 

Ora Eiekmz 

861 

855 

855 

as? 

VA5tobl 

491 

47030 482.65 

470J0 

VATedi 

1915188175 188£75 

1883 

Wlenerberg Bbu 

2785 

2343 

2271 

2244 


Wellington NzsE-40tada:2274L26 

Prevtoas: 228087 


Air N Zeald B 

3.94 

195 

3.95 


Brferty Invi 

1J7 

1J6 

>J6 

TJ7 

Carter Hon aid 

JJO 

128 

129 

37H 

Flotcfi Ch Bldg 

4.18 

115 

4.15 

4.1 5 

Ftoidi Cti Er»y 

3J8 

3A5 

3.B5 

3J5 

HeWiCh Foret 

?JI 

1.98 

IW 

?3M 

Fleieti Cn Paper 

3JK> 

101 

X0! 

3.09 


3J4 

IftO 



Telecom NZ 

6J0 

6J3 

6 l« 

6(7 

Wttsan Horton 

11.10 

11.10 

11.10 

11.10 


Zurich 

ABBB 
Adecco B 
AluMifseR 
Am-5eronoB 
AMR 
Boer Hdg B 
Baloise Hdg S 
SK Vblon 
OartantR 
Crd Suisse Go R 
Eiektrawati B 

EmtOwmle 
ESEC Hdg 
HokterbankB 

UethtmsiLBB 
NesHeR 
Novartis R 
OetOr Buen R 
Pargesa Hid B 
PharmVsn B 
Rjowmont A 
PtefllPC 
Roche Hdg PC 

SBC R 

Schindler PC 

SGSB 

5MHB 

SuterR 

Swiss Reins R 

SwtaairR 

UBS B 

Winterthur R 
Zurich Assur R 


SP1 wdac 296081 
Prevtous: 2959.D3 


1773 1750 
471 461J0 
1249 1225 
1680 1660 
860 860 
1770 1740 
3000 2970 
860 868 
744 730 

170.75 167J0 
531 529 

5975 5900 
4750 4625 
1138 1120 
483 480 

1670 1651 
'624 1775 

1 47 JO 144 

1700 IfcSO 
755 747 

3070 2035 
WB 205 

12850 12600 

310 JO JOQJO 
1750 1672 

3550 3490 
896 878 

W 960 
1559 1535 
1377 1312 
136J 1352 
973 960 

(63 45 £50 


1754 1757 
463 460 

1238 1223 
1670 1660 
860 860 
1760 17®J 
2«5 3000 
875 B66 

738 735 

170 ltd 

531 531 

5940 5900 
4650 4730 
1127 1122 
«3 476 

1662 1650 
1775 1800 
147 148J0 
1700 1660 
713 750 

7040 1901 

208 308 

12630 12695 
303 307 

1732 1610 
3540 JS05 
880 885 

963 949 

1537 1 542 
1316 1323 
1355 1348 
965 957 

457 458 








PAGE 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1997 


Dn yh PE ue>Mr>. um uflfr Crar 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. Close 

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PAGE 17 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Property Rescue Plan 
Bolsters Thai Stocks 

BANPk'n CUmr ** h s**'™ vw**” 

battered bourse Tnf^T 1611 in . ves,ors returned to ThaiJand’s 
cisiontolaunpha^?lM? S * e S ovemm tnt approved a de- 
real-estate market™ 1 * ^billion-dollar salvage operation for the 

100 bUHon^ha^u S?Q l 5 e J 1 ?. vernment wou,d raise 35 much as 
b,1 L ,on) !*** » issuc of seven-year, 

entity calWi FwJi.? 131 ' ll e saidl wiu ^ ow * l set up an 
euaranS 1 !^?^ t 0 , 3 ” Management Co., which will make 

properrv loaM^Lih t* 5 !? finance companies write off bad 
P 'nf ( Tc, r ^if 1 n ^ ^ e1 P dev elopers complete their projects. 

cloa at7^ X ?S 1 - 8 !, 0f ? ai M mdex rose 16 - 63 points, to 
‘w three session*?’*!?*- mdeX has Sum® 41 6.4 percent over the past 
'off Bur crrJi 5, erasu ?R "tost of its loss from lasr week’s sell- 
ing 2s U. C L are sui L l dowD abwi iS percent so far this year 
• ‘Hhffi S5? ** P M 1 2 months/ 

PrnnrWrltV • b!Ulon ^ ** mou &h money to help." Supon 
"W* dirccror of *»*e Agency for Red 

nrnKUf^*? ir ^ Bui 1 don r ,OJOW if it can solve the 

problems faced by buyers and developers.*' 

_ s . a su PP°n plan for poor projects could prolong 
problems m the propeny sector and said a far broader solution 
would be needed. 

While the mood of panic over the health of the finance 
“Of I?, 35 mssipated. many investors still have doubts because 
°t lnatland s slipping growth rate and faltering exports. 

t ne cabinet also approved a proposal Tuesday to trim the 
current budget by 106 billion baht as pan of am effort to trim 
the country ‘s current- account deficit, t Reuters. Bloomberg) 


u , VICTOIRE ARIANE 

- ™.ulc.awl hn.frunuil Scrra.,, I.-2P35 laucrmhuun: 
R.*_ 1 iiv. - mhnurn E5. i4 


AVIS AUX ACXIONNAIRES 


M wu:ur« If. acri- .nnairo. font convoque^ par le present avis j 
LI3SSEMBl£E GENERATE ORDINAIRE DES ACTIONNAIRES 
l m ■*“ s ' L P-‘ Mioal a Lu\cmboun: Ic Jcr avril 1997 a 

is n 00 jvcc !"• .fdff du |> -ur >un .mi ; 

ORDRE DU JOUR 

1. fnmpic Rendu d'Actii ite Uu Ctmscil d’Admintfirjnrwi pour IV \ trace 
st iL-rmir.anr Ic il dfCcmbru 1 W 0 ; 

2. Rapport uj Rcvkur d'Knrrt-pnw' pour IVwerace se irmnium Ic 
31 dtccmWc 

3. AJnpdon Jc> cimpics dc Icxitocl- sc icrmirum Ic 31 dccembrc 
i™ 6 : 

Allrtuiiun do rcMilrar dc IYmtcjcc sc icrminant k 31 decembrc 
19 °ii. 

3. pjchsiigc jus AiimniKtraicun et au Reviscur d’Emrcpnies pour 
I'tWKiiv sf tcrmiiunt Ic 3? decembre l‘ M 6; 
b. Ni immjm <n des wimi st'cuujj 

• Nomination dev Admini&traieuxv, 

• \nmirunon du Rcvisfur d'Enuvprist-s: 

™. Divers. 

I.w acu.'.nnairc.-. som in formes qu'aurun quorum n'est requis pour erne 
js'cmblcc ci que les dt-asions fim pn&vs a U majorite simple des actions 
preset) if - nu rcpri-scntccs. 

Chaquc action a un diuii de vote. 

T.iur acuonnj rc pew voter pur mandataire. A certe fin. des procurations 
v .nt dispmiMts au mc^c social ci screw cnvovccs aux action noircs sur 
demandc. 

\fin d'etre vjLihli-3. If? procu radons dument ?igne» par Lcs ac nonmires 
Jfvroni arc envoi ecs au *ic^e mcii! «fin d'etre tenues k jour precedant 
I'av^Riblce a IT hiuro? au plus urd. 

I.o pr.ipnci.urcs d'jctioiu au purteur. desirart pa rnci per a ccrtc 
j-vjnblec. divn-nt deposer leurs actions cinq jours ou viable* avanc 
I'jo-cmblt c au sieqc social dc ia soa'ctc. 

Lcs acnonnaires desireux d'obtcnir Ic Rapport Annuel Auditc au 
'■i dcccmbre 199b peuveni s'adresser au siege sociaJ dc la societe. 

Pour li sodctc. 

BANQUE DE GESTION EDMOND DE ROnTHSCHILD 
LUXEMBOURG 
- Sod etc Anonvmt - 
20. boulevard Emmanuel Scrvais 

L-2S3S Lt^FJvfBOLIRG 


Extortion Resurfaces in Japan 


Carjsfi’J h frrm Ditrou hr< 

TOKYO — A leading maker of food and seasonings, 
Ajinomoto Co., said Tuesday that two of its executives had 
been arrested on suspicion of paying several million yen in 
company funds to sokaiya racketeers. 

Shunsuke Inamori, the company's president, said the two 
senior executives belonged to the firm’s general affairs 
department He said that neither he nor other top managers 
had been involved in payoffs. 

The announcement closely followed last week's revel- 
ations of suspected illegal dealings and possible payoffs to a 
one-time racketeer by Japan’s biggest brokerage concern, 
Nomura Securities Co. 

Mr. Inamori said Yukio Noguchi. 60. who was head of its 
genera] affairs department, and Takao Lshigami. 48. a 
section chief in the department, were suspected of paying 
the money to six sokaiya racketeers to ensure that a share- 
holders' meeting held in June 1996 would go smoothly. 

“We take the case very seriously." Mr. Inamori said. 
“We apologize for upsetting the public. Everything is not 
yet dear, so we need an in-house investigation.” 

Sokaiya, often linked to yakuza crime syndicates, typ- 
ically try to extort money from companies by threatening to 
expose dubious business practices or io make a disturbance 
at shareholders’ meetings. 

4 ‘Sokaiya are in a way a reflection of the underdevelopment 
of Japan's capitalist economy," a Japanese executive said. 

“It’s an old practice, and legal changes were supposed to 
halt it. but it’s tough for companies to give up the old ways." 


Japanese law has prohibited these payoffs since 1982, but 
it is widely believed that dealings with sokaiya groups are 
still common at Japanese companies. There have been 26 
such investigations since 1 982. 

Ajinomoto also was one of several companies accused in 
the United States of fixing the price of lysine, a feed additive. 
Prosecutors there said in November 1996 that the company 
had pleaded guilty and agreed to pay a fine of SI 0 million. 

Asked whether the arrests in the sokaiya case would have 
an adverse effect on the company's sales. Mr. Inamori said, 
“I think so. but I’m not sure. 44 

Reports of the investigation weighed on Ajinomoto’s 
stock price, which ended at 940 yen f$7.71 ). down 70. 

(Bloomberg. AFP. Reuters i 

■ Scandal Is Expected to Hurt Nomura's Profit 

The scandal over suspected illegal deals and possible 
payoffs to a former racketeer is expected to hit Nomura 
Securities' profit, but analysts said the brokerage company 
was unlikely to lose its top ranking in Japan's securities 
industry, news agencies reported. 

4 ‘They're pretty well top across the board, and I find it hard 
to imagine that they could slip to No. 2 across a large number 
of product lines for an extended period of time/’ Walter 
AJtherr, an analyst at Jardine Fleming Securities, said. 

A loss of customers could cost Nomura 50 billion yen in 
revenue from trading commissions and underwriting new 
securities, David Threadgold of BZW Securities (Japan) 
Ltd. said . ( Bloomberg , Reuters ) 


Lippo Group Wins Plaudits for Its New Course 


Bloomberg News 

JAKARTA — Lippo Group Ltd., which was thought by 
some to be on the brink of collapse in 1995. appears to be back 
in favor with investors. 

Amid a series of recent acquisitions such as the food 
distributor Auric Pacific in Singapore, plans for rights issues at 
its property division and a bid for control of the Indonesian 
hotel operator PT Hotel Prapatan. investors have bid up eight of 
Lippo's nine publicly traded companies in the past three weeks. 
Its deputy chairman, James Riady, also is winning praise for 
aimin g the company at Indonesia’s growing consumer sector. 

“James is running the show now. and he’s playing a high- 
risk, high-return game," said Tjandra Kartika. an analyst for 
Kleinwort Benson Securities (Asia) Ltd. But despite the risks 
involved, “nobody's been disappointed so far." he said. 

Lippo Group, a conglomerate owned by the Riady family, 
has extensive interests in China and has figured prominently in 



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Seoul's Big Firms Reach Anti-Takeover Pact 


Ciwnptfedhi Our Staff From Dispauhes 

SEOUL — The country's largest conglom- 
erates agreed Tuesday to cooperate against 
hostile takeover bids, whether from domestic 
or foreign prospective buyers. 

The Federation of Korean Industries. South 
Korea's leading business organization, acted 
after three conglomerates last week under- 
mined the first such bid in South Korea. 

“Members shared the view that hostile bids 
aimed at snatching control of management 
without mutual agreement should be preven- 


Investor’s Asia 


Hons Kong 

Hang. Seng 

14000 — - — 2250 - 

13500 - -tr i-IUU" 2200 


Singapore ' 
Straits Times. 


Tokyo: 

mmm 

k— ; 22000 — 
' 21000 1 


13000- • 



1Z5QQ jy 1 



■12000* 

1,500 O If 

1996 

Exchange 

Hong Kong 



J F M'. "*"'0 N D 
1997 1996 

Index -Vi 

Hang Seng 

J F n/jvlTOW'o N D J F'M 1 
1997 ' 1996 1997 :: 

Tuesday ; 

iCtofia: ' * XJfew 
i3^t52J2» taiesL? 


• Straps Times- ...: v 


Sydney 

AHOn&iarias 


Tokyo 



~i — mm 


Bangkok 

SET .• 

, *19.35 ¥ 

Seoul 



Taipei 


Manila 

pse 


Jakarta 

Composite Index. 

:iiprs&". .m&r m 

Wellington 

N2SE*40 . •; 


Bombay 


, -$Z2&£7 ■ 

Source: Tetekurs 


liucnutmul Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


U.S. investigations of political contributions to the Democratic 
Party and President Bill Clinton's re-election campaign. 

In November 1995, shares in Lippo companies dropped on 
fears that an aggressive expansion strategy was about to get the 
group into trouble. The concern arose after one of its compa- 
nies, PT Lippo Land, reported a surge in its total debt to 1 trillion 
rupiah ($418 million), which was taken as a sign that Lippo had 
picked the wrong time to invest in the Jakarta area. But since 
then, Lippo Land has sold shares in a unit dial is developing one 
of its projects, trimming its net investment in property. 

“Lippo is taking steps to reduce its exposure to property, 
which is the right thing." Mr. Tjandra said. He cited the 
purchase in January of PT Matahari Putra Prima. Indonesia's 
largest department-store chain, by Lippo's PT Multipolar as 
proof of the company's desire to concentrate on this area. Auric 
is also a retail, owning convenience -store franchises and 
pharmacies in Singapore. 


ted," Sohn Byung Doo, deputy chairman of 
the federation, said. 

Mr. Sohn said companies feared that hostile 
bids by foreign concerns would become more 
common under a new law abolishing the 10 
percent limit on corporate stakes held by any- 
one other than a company’s principal share- 
holder. The federation also urged Seoul to scrap 
limits in the new law on cross-investment with- 
in conglomerates, arguing that the rules would 
leave companies at a disadvantage in fighting 
foreign takeover attempts. (AFP. Bloomberg ) 


• South Korean stocks appeared little affected by the passage of 
an amended labor law that delays two years provisions allowing 
for layoffs. The Composite Index fell 1 A points, to 667.35. 

• Acer Computer International Pte^ a unit of Acer Inc. of 
Taiwan, posted 1996 net profit of 51.6 million Singapore 
dollars ($36 million), up 63 percent, on strong computer sales 
and a sale of shares in its Latin American unit 

• Keppel Corp.'s 1 996 profit fell 5 percent, to 204.1 million 
Singapore dollars, amid intense competition in the ship-repair 
sector. Sales rose 17 percent, to 2.8 billion dollars. 

• Chinese legislators called for an inland special economic zone 
and suggested Xi’an as its location, an official newspaper said. 

• Cambodia has a fourth mobile-phone service, CamGSM. 
There are fewer than 25,000 customers in the country. 

• SmarTone Telecommunications Holdings Ltd. plans to 
spend 1 billion Hong Kong dollars ($129.2 million) to in- 
crease capacity enough to accommodate 400,000 more sub- 
scribers by July. 

• China Light & Power Co. plans ro buy Loy Yang Power 
Co. of Australia, a spokesman for the Hong Kong electricity 
supplier said. 

• The Philippines plans to issue its first 20-year Treasury 
bonds in an offering in April valued at 2 billion pesos ($76 

million). Bloomberg. AP, Reuters 


Japan to See 3-D TV This Summer 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Sanyo Electric Co. and Nippon Television 
Network Corp. said Tuesday they had developed a system for 
broadcasting three-dimensional images and would start test 
transmissions this summer. 

The system uses progressive-scan technology developed by 
Nippon, a nationwide broadcaster. Viewers will need to have 
decoders in their television sets as well as special glasses to see 
the 3-D images. 




Degussa on Nutrition 


Knowledge that sustains 
more than just hope. 


Year after year, parallel to the 
growth in world’s population, 
the demand for food increases 
and with it the need for valuable 
proteins. 

For over sixty years, Degussa's 
scientists have been investigating 
the promising potential of amino 
acids, the building blocks of 
protein. 

In the process, among other 
things, they developed Methionine. 


This is an essential amino acid 
which is becoming increasingly 
indispensable in animal nutrition 
because it makes a major contri- 
bution to the conservation of the 
world's narural food resources 
and optimizes the use of raw 
materials within our food chain. 

As one of the world’s leading 
producers of amino acids, the 
name Degussa stands for securing 
one of the key foundations of 


life. A task with a future, in 
other words, for a company with 
a tradition. 

For Degussa, it all beg^an 
with gold and silver. Today, we 
shine in many more fields. 






\0 


s° L ur/ 0 ^ 


Degussa & 

























































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1997 


PAGE 19 / 


SPONSOR! 1) SI ( MON 




BAVARIA 


Munich Airport is 
second-largest 
hub in Germany, 
it continues to 
expand its facili- 
ties- The state’s 

high-tech indus- 
tries, academic 
centers and tourist 
attractions are 
increasing travel 
to and from the 
region. 





‘Sunrise Sectors’ Breed Success 

77ie state enjoys high productivity, high-tech industries, low unemployment and low crime. 


C an Bavaria's success in creating 
a high-flying economy cen- 
tered on high-profile sectors be 
emulated by other areas fhar do not 
share Bavaria's geopolitical luck? 

The question is of more than casual 
interest for many regions in Europe 
that are striving to work major eco- 
. nomic transformations of their own. 
V “Every region experiences strokes 
of great fortune at one time or the 
other," says Otto Wiesheu, Bavaria’s 
minister for economic affairs, trans- 
port and technology. “But luck comes 
- and goes. And the successful regions 
are those, like Bavaria, which have 
been able to parlay short-term fortune 
into sustained, long-term growth.” 

Two strokes of luck 
Bavaria's luck came in two successive 
strokes, one that triggered the stale’s 
takeoff, the other that ignited its “sec- 
ond stage." 

In the postwar era, Bavaria - pat of 
the American zone - was geopolitical- 
ly safe. This induced corporations 
from Berlin and the nascent East 
Germany to relocate in tire state. Led 
by Siemens, these new corporate 
arrivals found a vast supply of highly 
qualified potential employees await- 
ing them. In addition to the native 
Bavarians, their ranks included mil- 
lions of refugees from East Germany 
hi and from other parts of Central and 
Eastern Europe. 

Then, in the mid-1960s, the great 
engines of Germany's Wirtschafts- 
wunder - steel-making, coal-mining, 
consumer goods and textiles - began 
to give way to new industries. Bavaria 
had been an industrial backwater for 


all of its previous history, with the 
great and notable exceptions of met- 
ropolitan Nuremberg, Augsburg, 
Schweinfurt and - to a lesser extent - 
Munich. 

Not seriously locked into any of the 
sunset industries, Bavaria's business 
community rushed into the sunrise 
sectors: telecommunications and 
office machines, electrical and auto- 
motive engineering and specialized 
capital goods. 

Make-or-break retoolings 
This community was comprised of lit- 
erally thousands of young companies, 
most founded by postwar refugees, 
and the state’s remaining manufactur- 
ers, virtually all of which had sur- 
vived only by undergoing make-or- 
break retoolings. 

In the late 1950s, BMW, a prewar 
producer of airplane engines, sports 
cars and Germany's version of the 
Model T, seemed to be facing two 
hard choices - bankruptcy or forced 
sale. While a cult object with 
Germany's teenagers, its motorcycle- 
engine-powered ultracompacts were 
not generating adequate revenues. 

Enter Herbert QuandL This outside 
investor had an ambitious and ulti- 
mately successful plan ~ to take 
BMW from the lowest end of the 
country’s automobile market to the 
veiy top. 

After fortune, fortitude 
Once catapulted to the forefront of 
this wave of industrial change, 
Bavaria and its companies worked 
hard to stay there and to overcome the 
setbacks caused by “oil shocks," 


worldwide recession and globaliza- 
tion. 

The slate’s success in doing so is 
amply detailed in a series of '‘high- 
low" set of figures. They reveal how 
Bavaria has succeeded - by continu- 
ing to invest heavily in its fiiture while 
keeping its books balanced. 

According to the statistics. Bavaria 
has long maintained Germany’s high- 
est rates of corporate and public-sec- 
tor investment and its lowest rates of 
corporate and public-sector indebted- 
ness. Bavaria allocates 3.6 percent of 
its gross domestic product to research 
and development. That’s not only the 
highest figure - by a wide margin - in 
Germany, but is also one of die high- 
est in the world. The figure also 
shows the positive impact pro-growth 
policies have had on the state's resi- 
dents and business community. 

Command performance 
Bavaria vies with Baden- 
Wurttemberg for the country's lowest 
rate of unemployment Over die last 
25 years, Hesse has beaten out 
Bavaria for Germany's best rate of 
long-term growth. Hamburg has 
remained Germany’s richest state in 
terms of per capita income. During 
this period, however, Bavaria has 
recorded the strongest rises in corpo- 
rate net worth as well as in personal 
income. 

The state’s economic performance 
has had direct substantial societal 
ramifications. Bavaria has Germany's 
lowest rates of crimes against people 
and property. Munich is Germany's 


Continued on page 21 


Minister Foresees Diverse Economy 

Based on High-Tech Development 


Otto Wiesheu, who holds a doctorate in jurisprudence, 
has been Bavaria’s minis ter for economic affairs, 

2- transport and technology sin ce 1993- He was bora m 

• 1944 and began his political career m 1969. Smce 1974, 
he has been a member of Bavaria’s state parliament 
From 1984 to 1990, Me Wiesheu headed the Harms 
Seidel foundation. In 1990, he was named state secre- 
tary of the Bavarian ministry for education, the sci- 
ences and cultural affairs. 

Has Bavaria's influx of high-tech companies from North 
America and Asia achieved a 

tum . or are further measures required to keep it goeng? 

As the influx is serving to farther 
strengthen the factors that dns 

process. Tin optimistic that it wiliset itself 
forth, and even gather strength in the 
future. Let me give you one example ot 
what I mean. . 

Many foreign companies come to 

Bavaria to profit from the unpaged 
depth and breadth of technologies lwre. 

T&se technologies have been developed 
bvHaiir Large° lumber of research mshtote* 
fraud technology-driven companies. Each 

'JSJSJaSd .or Europ^ «p-V 

that comes here brings ^vanc^techno^ 
gi* of its own with >t._ti;u 1= ng to 

Minister Otto Wiesheu 



^wever, should not 

be construed to meari that we _ re res aoes nave us snure uj pjuvmn arcus [ »•«« 

laurels. Quite the oppt^ Aputsche marks [$2.98 bil- unemployment and a falling industrial base), including 

mmAnt hac tfllCCn J DUJlOn , . . nmrrtar fjurvmhara nnd grtnvRinfiirt Thp XtfltP anwmmtmt 


companies have availed themselves of them, as have many 
of its newest and fastest -growing ones. 

Each successful start-up company creates a number of 
jobs, with estimates ranging from five to 12. Over the last 
few years. Bavaria has successively set one state record 
for start-ups after another. Unemployment is high through- 
out Europe, including, to a lesser extent than most areas. 
Bavaria. When will the start-ups start producing enough 
jobs to make a dent in the unemployment problem? 

They already have. Five-sixths of our new companies 
are in the service sector. It's no coincidence that the num- 
ber of people employed in providing services in Bavaria 
has been growing at a 2 percent annual rate. This increase 
in jobs has counteracted the effects of the lay- 
offs made by industrial companies. 

You mentioned our record number of new 
companies. I’d like to add four other figures, 
which together show how the new compa- 
nies are alleviating unemployment - and cre- 
ating the basis for tomorrow’s economy in 
Bavaria. 

Our state has 14 percent of Germany’s 
population. Over the last few years, 30 per- 
cent of Germany’s net company foundings 
(the balance of start-ups and close-downs) 
have been in Bavaria, number one in 
Germany's states in this field. And, as a con- 
sequence, Bavaria has registered the lowest 
rate- of unemployment among Germany’s 
states over the last three years. 

While prospering on the whole, your state 
does have its share of problem areas (with 


have a demonstrable impact? 

I would take strong exception to categorizing either of 


I’d also like to business location services 

influx: the highly 0 f the world’s largest 

provided by our ministry. Many or 


Continued on page 21 


Advertising Department of the International Herald Tribune . It is sponsored by the Bavarian 
s entirety by the on/ j Technology; the Munich Airport Authority; and the display advertisers. 

Economic Affairs, r Writer; Teny Swartzberg, based in Munich. 

Program Director.- Bill Mahder, 


MAC 

Facts 


Construction 
begins: June 1996 
Completion: 

Spring 1999 
Architect: 

Helmut Jahn 
Size: 31.000 square 
meters (333,680 square 
feet), of which 21,000 
square meters will be 
allocated to office 
space and the balance 
to a conference center, 
restaurants, retail out- 
lets. banks and more. 


Business-Oriented Airport 

A new center at the Munich Airport will be an ideal venue for conferences. 


A lthough it is only five years old, the 
Munich Airport has already pio- 
neered a number of technical inno- 
vations. Most have been introduced to pro- 
tect the safety of passengers and the ambi- 
ent environment, or both. 

The icing up of airplane wings, for 
example, is one of the great dangers of 
wintertime flying. Munich Airport has one 
of the world's most advanced de-icing sys- 
tems. The 135 million Deutsche mark 
($80.58 million) system is comprised of 
spatial computerized roll-through facili- 
ties, each some 70 meters (230 feet) high 
and 25 meters wide. The fluids issuing 
from the facilities, which are located at the 
edge of the runways, flow into collection 
reservoirs for recycling. 

A current project at the airport will rede- 
fine how travelers use airports. The 
Miinchen Airport Center (MAC) will also 


provide die world's congress and conven- 
tion sector with a new kind of venue. 

Near thp main te rminal 
This major commercial innovation will be 
introduced within the next two years. 
Starting in 1999, a large number of the air- 
port's millions of passengers each year will 
fly into Munich airport and stay, at least for 
a while. These passengers will be attending 
conferences and meetings at the center, 
which has been under construction since 
June 1996. 

“The practice of holding the occasional 
meeting in an airport is, of course, not 
new,” points out Willi Hermsen, CEO of 
Flughafen Miinchen GmbH (FMG), the 
company that owns and operates the air- 
port “Virtually every major airport has 


Continued on page 20 


The MAN Group 



The MAN Group - one 
of the leading European 
manufacturers of capital 
goods. A systems sup- 
plier in the fields of com- 
mercial vehicle manu- 
facturing, machinery 
and plant construction. 
Trading worfd-wide. 

□ MAN trucks and 
buses - economical, 
reliable, low in pollutants. 
Pioneers in technical 
progress. 

□ Leader in many engi- 
neering world markets. 

□ Large-capacity high- 
power diesel engines 
for ships and stationary 
power-plants. 

□ High-tech printing 
machinery. Product sys- 
tems for sheet-fed and 
web-fed machines of all 
print-run capacities. 


□ Comprehensive 
systems for plant engi- 
neering. 

□ Project design, finan- 
cing, installation, and 
commissioning, even for 
the biggest projects. 

□ World-wide trading in 
the Group's own products 
and in boughi-in items. 

The MAN Group in the 
forefront of technical 
progress. 


MAN Aktiengesellschaft 
P.O. Box 401347 
80713 Munich, Germany 



■nwirodctuerterBol 

MAN AkteflpeseMschaa m Munich 







• ft 



:V 



PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1997 


SPONSORED SECTION 


BAVARIA 


PON SORED SECTION 


.ID 5 






A record number of travelers - 15.7 million - passed through the airport last year. At current growth rates, the year 2000 wBIsee 17mfflton to 20 mUHon passengers. The airport witi be ready tor thent 


Airport Facility 
Meets Its Targets 

Munich Airport's new terminal is meeting all its 
growth forecasts. 

D esigning a new airport is a tricky, high-stakes busi- 
ness. The airport has to be large enough to accom- 
modate decades of air travel growth, yet projections 
of exactly how large that growth will be are notoriously 
inaccurate. Since each underutilized terminal facility rep- 
resents an enormous financial loss, simply building big is 
not the answer. 

By taking a multi-stage approach, Munich’s airport 
company built in enough flexibility to adapt to trends in air 
travel. Made more than a decade and a half ago, the pro- 
jections of the first terminal's use are still right on the 
money. As foreseen in the airport's master plan, the com- 
pany has been proceeding with the planning and con- 
structing of a second terminal. 

In 1996. Munich Airport celebrated two record Fridays. 
On March 29, precisely 70,1 12 passengers passed through 
the airport. And on November 12, a total of 857 airplanes 
landed at and took off from the facility, forwarding 412 
tons of air freight in the process. These were single-day 
records in a record year. 

Also last year, 233,000 airplanes transported 15.7 mil- 
lion passengers to and from the airport. These represented 
increases of 9 percent and 5J5 percent respectively over 
1995, the largest gains recorded by any of Germany’s 
major airports. The 1996 figures were 41 percent and 46 
percent higher respectively than those of 1991. the last full 
year in operation of Munich’s old airport which was locat- 
ed in its eastern suburb of Riem. 

Second hub 

The increases have made Munich number two among 
Germany’s airports after Frankfurt and have kept it on 
course to meet the projections for its use originally drawn 
up in the early 1980s. when the final planning of Munich's 
airport was taking place. The planning forecast the build- 
ing of two terminal buildings, with the first terminal han- 
dling between 1 7 million and 20 million passengers by the 
year 2000, necessitating the completion of a second termi- 
nal shortly thereafter. 

At the current growth rates, Munich will process 1 9 mil- 
lion passengers in 2000 - just 500,000 more than the mean 
projection for the year. At the current pace of planning. 
Munich's second terminal, with a capacity for 15 million 
passengers a year, will be put into operation two years 
later. Die accuracy of the planning would seem a remark- 
able feat. 

“Nothing remarkable about it," says Willi Hermsen, 
CEO of Flughafen Miinchen GmbH (FMG), the airport 
company. “These projections were extrapolated from our 
old airport's rate of growth, and built upon the reasonable 
assumption that our new facility’s greater number of con- 
nections - especially in the international area and espe- 
cially those offeringdirect links - would greatly increase 
our aiiport's catchment area. 

“This assumption, in turn, was predicated upon 
Lufthansa's commitment to turn Munich into its second 


major hub and base of operations in Germany." Mr. 
Hermsen adds. 

Upgrades 

This major commitment was realized despite the turbu- 
lence caused by the recession prevailing in the world's air 
industries in the early 1990s. Like its counterparts. 
Lufthansa responded to the recession by launching a major 
re-engineering plan. 

The heart of it was Lufthansa’s upgrading of its Munich- 
based flight plan, stemming from the carrier's predomi- 
nance in Munich, and tn all of die country's other airports. 
Although Munich has recorded a 16 percent increase over 
the last five years in the number of scheduled carriers serv- 
ing it, Lufthansa still accounts for nearly half of all traffic 
in Munich. 

Since 1993, the number of destinations that Lufthansa 


serves from Munich has increased b> 36 percent, as has the 
number of Lufthansa flights per week to and from Munich. 
In line with Munich's grow ing role as a major Lufthansa 
intercontinental hub. the number of the carrier's non- 
German flights to and from Munich increased 58 percent 
in 1996 alone. 

Easy transit 

The accuracy of this step-by-step planning is reflected in 
FMG's balance books. For the last several years, its ordi- 
nary business operations nave been profitable, in itself 
quite an accomplishment tor ar.\ of the world's aitports. 
most of which are chronic consumers of state subsidies. In 
1996. powered by a further sharp rise in revenues and the 
effects of a one-off asset disposal, the authority reached the 
break-even point. 

Assuming that the current trends will be maintained. 


FMG as a whole will break into the black this year, far 
ahead of schedule. . . . 

In view of the large costs of long-term capital - arising 
from both terminals and from the Miinchen Airport Center 
(see related article) - that FMG is carrying in its current 
accounts, that would be a major feat. _ _ . 

The new terminal will reflect the changing . personality I ; 
of Munich Airport Rather than having its check-in opera- 
tions spread the entire length of the terminal, as is the case 
in the current terminal, the new structure will feature a cen- 
tral hub. at which passengers will check in - and transfer. 

“Some 20 percent of our passengers are in Munich m 
transfer between flights. That's three times higher than six 
years ago - and much less than what it will be in 2002 or 
2003. whenTenninal Two will be completed. Die new ter- 
minal will be designed to accommodate that change." say.- 
Mr. Hermsen. • " . . 







A High-Tech ‘Little North America’ 

In the Europe-based computer industry, Bavaria is where it's at. The momentum keeps building. 


fter reading the names of the 
lish-t 


A U.S. high-tech companies 
located in greater Munich, you 
might gel the mistaken impression 
that the best of Silicon Valley, 
Boston's Route 128, Seattle's north- 
ern suburbs and Austin's high-tech 
belt - 'plus the Finest from Canada's 
bubbling high-tech scene - had 
moved en masse to Bavaria's “capital 
area." 

In fact, such companies as 
Microsoft, Compaq, Intel, Netscape, 
Sun, Texas Instruments. AMD, Corel, 
Claris, Oracle, Apple and Packard 
Bell came one by one over the past 15 
years. Some 200 are now established 
in the area 

Digital and NCR were two of the 
first North American companies to set 
up shop in Bavaria Has this snow- 
balling mass of high-tech arrivals 
achieved a self-perpetuating momen- 
tum? 

“Very definitely,” says Stephen P. 
Garside, senior executive at Digital 
Germany. “It would be a brave com- 
pany that would risk being away from 
the action in Bavaria risk not finding 
the personnel or service providers it 
requires to grow in Europe." 

Says a spokesperson for Microsoft: 
“We located in Bavaria because 
Germany’s major 1CT companies are 


based in the Munich area, and 
because of the availability of person- 
nel. For young people, Munich is one 
of the most appealing places to work 
and live in Europe.” 


Enviable position 

North America's foray into Bavaria 
has made the state the envy of 
Western Europe. Typically, compa- 
nies upgrade, step-by-step, their initial 
one- or two-person offices into large- 
sized production, distribution, logis- 
tics and technical services centers, 
responsible for Germany, and. in 
many cases, all of Europe. 

In doing so, the new arrivals have 
pumped further revenues into the 
economy and created high-skilled 
jobs in the process. Microsoft 
Germany, founded in 1982, had sales 
of more than 1 billion Deutsche marks 
($596.87 million) in 1996. The com- 
pany now employs 653 people, nearly 
all of them at its headquarters in the 
northern Munich suburb of 
UnterschJeissheim. 

The inflow from North America 
and other areas has attained impres- 
sive dimensions. In 1995. Bavaria 
beat out all other German states when 
it secured 3.7 billion DM in inward 
investment from non-German compa- 
nies, an all-time best mark for 


Bavaria. During the first six months, 
foreigners allocated a further 1.7 bil- 
lion DM in long-term capital to 
Bavaria. 

This was, once more, the number- 
one performance in Germany. This 
track record is all the more impressive 
because most of the investment and 
jobs have been created without pub- 
lic-sector subsidies and other support. 

This is in sharp contrast to other 
parts of Germany and Europe, in 
which billions of public sector dollars 
have created thousands of low-skilled 
manufacturing jobs of often tempo- 
rary duration. The realization is 
spreading that this high-cost job strat- 
egy does not engender a lasting trans- 
formation of the local economy, 
reports HandelsblatL the German 
business daily, and Bavaria may pro- 
vide a role model for other European 
areas looking to create jobs. 

Says Otto Wiesheu. Bavaria's min- 
ister for economic affairs, transport 
and technology. “We definitely have a 
very good track record, one well wor- 
thy of emulation. The trick is now to 
sustain this growth, to use it to over- 
come the problem areas we also most 
definitely have. 

“A role model is only as good as its 
latest figures," he adds. "We know 
that.” • 




The state of Bavaria 

Area: 70,546 square kilometers (27,238 square miles) 

Population: 12 million 

Prime minister (governor): Edmund Stoiber 

Capital city: Munich (population: 1.27 million) 

Other migor cities: 

Nuremberg (pop.: 496,000) - Augsburg (pop.: 262.000) - Wuerzburg (pop.: 128,000) j 

Bavarian Ministry for Economic Affairs, 

Flughafen Munch en GmbH 

Transport and Technology 

Munich Airport Authority ! 

Business Location Advisory Service 

POB 23 17 55 

Mr. Manfred Pfeifer 

D85326 Munich 

Prinzregentenstr. 28 

Tel.: (49 89) 975 00 

D-80538 Munich 
Tel.: (49 89) 2162 2642 

Fax: (49 89) 975 579 06 

Fax: (49 89) 2162 2803 

GmiNDeeSTTZVERWAIJIMG 

Rbtohome 

Munchenerruck GmbH 

Aussere Sulzbacher Str. 

Kaulbachstr. 93 

E5-90491 Nuremberg 

080802 Munich 

Tel.: (49 911) 95 945 

Tel.: (49 89) 381 84 266 

Fax: (49 911) 95 94 999 

Fax: (49 89) 34 64 75 

B/OTERISCHE LANDESBAIW.-GlROZBnRAl£ 

MAN AG 

Briennerstr. 20 

Ungererstr. 69 

080333 Munich 

080805 Munich 

Tel.: (49 89) 21 71 01 

Tel.: (49 89) 360 9&0 j 

Fax: (49 89) 21 71 13 29 

Fax: (49 89) 360 98 250 

.... .... i 


Travel Industry Jobs Are on the Rise 

Munich Airport accounts for tens of thousands of jobs, and more opportunities are being created. 

F ■ ^ hp rrcnirc far Ft»hmnrv rhmuoh thf» nimnrf opnprafpc nnp rfpmanH is nnp nf thp fnprnre ram/. 


T he results for February have 
just been re’e^ei. and they 
show that the Freising area has 
once more recorded the lowest rate 
of unemployment among 
Germany’s 186 reporting districts. 
Not coincidentally. Munich airport 
forms part of die Freising district. 

The airport authority, Flughafen 
Miinchen Gmbh (FMG). and its res- 
ident airlines and service providers 
employ 16.000 people. FMG esti- 
mates that another 30.000 work in 
the belt of hotels, offices, industrial 
parks and shopping centers inter- 
spersed among the conservation 
areas surrounding the airport. 

The employment figures are set to 
rise sharply. FMG estimates that 
each increase of one million in the 
number of passengers passing 


through the airport generates one 
thousand jobs. Munich Airport 
expects its passenger totals to dou- 
ble over the next 1 S years. 

Based on the figures from the first 
two months of this year, which show 
double-digit increases in nearly all 
statistical categories, this prediction 
mav be a bit too conservative. 


Commercial space 
In addition to creating jobs, the 
ongoing increase of passengers and 
freight are having another desirable 
spillover effect on the surrounding 
area. After showing signs of weak- 
ness in the early 1990s. demand for 
commercial space in the airport area 
is now strong, reports Jones Lang 
Wootton in its January 1997 survey 
of Munich's real estate market This 


demand is one of the factors carry- 
ing the city's real estate market as a 
whole. 

“‘We’re experiencing that demand 
within the airport itself." says Willi 
Hermsen, managing director of 
FMG. “Since 1991 , there has been a 
tremendous influx of scheduled ser- 
vice and chartered carriers to 
Munich. More and more travel 
agencies are maintaining in-airport 
outlets. All of these service 
providers need office space with 
immediate access to counters. This 
demand has put in-airport office 
space at a premium." 

“We are all looking forward to the 
Miinchen Airport Center {see related 
article] - these service providers 
perhaps most of all,” Mr. Hermsen 
notes. • 


Business Is Made Easy at the Airport 


Continued from page 19 

rooms available for such 
purposes. 

“Nor are the advantages 
of such in-airport meetings 
hard to understand. Finding 
your way around a strange 
city is often difficult and 
always time-consuming. 
That is obviated by the 
holding of events directly at 
the ‘runway’s end,'” he 
adds. 


In-house providers 

Why. then, aren't there sim- 
ilar facilities at every air- 
port? 

“First of all. only the 
world \s hubs come i n to 
consideration, as only they 
provide a large number of 
direct links. If your partici- 
pants have to repeatedly 
transfer to get to the event, 
you're losing the time 
gained by holding it at the 
airport," Mr. Hermsen 
points out. 

“Second, as one of the 
youngest of ihe major hubs. 
Munich has something its 
‘elder colleagues' generally 
do not have - a tract of 
property right next to our 
main terminal building. 
Most major airports' central 
areas are comprised of a 
dense and interlocking 
thicket of structures.” he 
concludes. 

MAC will be located 
right next door to the air- 
port’s central service area. 


itself set for a 31 million 
DM expansion and spruc- 
ing up. Together, the two 
areas will form a single 
indoor “galleria" for 
.strolling, relaxing and 
shopping. 

Another contrast with 
existing airport meeting 
areas is that they tend to 
exist in isolation. They 
have rooms and refresh- 
ments on-site, but many of 
the requisite services have 
to be imported by their 
providers from outside. 
That costs time. 

MAC will have 31,000 
square meters (333,680 
square feet) of rentable 
space. Of that, one-third 
will be occupied by the 
conference center, restau- 
rants. shops, banks and 
other services. The other 
two-thirds will be occupied 
by service providers, most 
of which are active in the 
travel or event -organizing 
industries. 


dictated by the changing 
nature of air travel to and 
from Munich, and the 
changing nature of Munich 
airport itself,” says Mr. 
Hermsen. “We still place 
great emphasis on speeding 
passengers through our 
facility. Over the years, 
through the optimizing of 
our check-in procedures 
while maintaining our 
ultra-strict security checks, 
we’ ve managed to speed up 


f 


‘Today, we're an interna- • 
tional hub. Munich is the 
European port of entry and 
departure for a large and 
increasing number of oui 
passengers.” 

He notes that paj^engeu. 
starting or concluding their 
trips have a large and 
diverse number of pressing 
needs and interests - guide- 
books, clothes, souvenirs. 
MAC and the airport's cen- 
tral service area will answer 


Services, services 
Since MAC’S emporia are 
also targeted for use by in- 
tranet passengers, con- 
structing the facility would 
seem to represent a change 
in approach on the part of 
FMG. which structured the 
entire airport around get- 
ting passengers and their 
baggage to and from their 
airplanes in indusuy-best 
times. 

“If so, it’s one partially 



Business travelers - m large or small groups - will be able to 
assemble at the airport for meetings, wfth full services provided. 


the procedures still further," 
he adds. 

“In the old ‘Riem’ [site of 
the old airport] days, most 
of our passengers were 
intra-national. The interna- 
tional ones generally 
arrived or departed via a 
flight to Frankfurt. London 
or another international 
hub.” Mr. Hermsen says. 


U\R 




•■•prirfUi 


Tost 


‘ased 


HI 

O 


those needs. “This rethink 
ing has also been a 
response to the way our 
passengers view our air- 
port. Many of them sec 
‘their’ airport as a high!* 
enjoyable place, a place u < 
spend time in, a place not iu £ 
hurry through. The comple- 
tion of MAC will strength- 
en this trend.” • 




:! 



* 









9 


>. BAVARIA 


_ 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1997 

PAGE 21 






„." 4 W T 

IS. 

.r'% 

' ‘■T: t 

' 7 - .Jp 

• !-• . .:>i!U 


From Software Design 

The Statp tt A C T T7 A Tl\TT7T> 


A d technology products, of the corporeal and non-corporeal varieties , are taking international industries bx storm 

"T s soil ware a service or *> tl* 

I product? Accordinc to ivrvS ^? ftware created by real world ••entered'’ by the 

Xsonie statisticians it i« n Ten ' and Bavaria>s opening of a real-looking 
- f -- ’ “ othf»r nrvmnnntao “rlppi** hy an avntnr Thnr\ 

the 


v;- 


turn 



'-7 if C ‘ 


Y' 7 ** 

-'‘“JP :■ 
?~i~i p" 

r *ite 


service, since it doesn't 
T nave a corporeal existence 
This is somewhat illogical] 
since most software is 

mass-manufactured and 

sold, and since it has 
become as much a fact of 
production as lathes and 
assembly lines. 

It is also somewhat 
unfortunate for Bavaria. If 


iyffy *S ftwarc c«ated by 
usxjji, Spea and Bavana's 

750 other companies is 
often highly ingenious. 
Black Sun Interactive's 
products, which give life 
and dimension to the 
Internet, are a good exam- 
ple. 

Today, the Web is two- 
dimensional. The only 
movement in the individual 
sites comes from changing 
colors and varying images. 





• r c3 : 

mil, 

T ' — 




an* 



From this discreet srte, 330 mUHon horsepower have originated. 


software is included. 
Bavaria, with one of the 
highest manufacturing out- 
put per capita figures of 
, Germany’s states, would 
V take the overall lead in 
absolute figures. 


all basically flat. Links 
between the sites are 
accomplished by hyper- 
links. 

The Web will soon be 
composed of three-dimen- 
sional Web sites, each a vir- 


you, the end-user, in the 
three-dimensional form 
you’ve chosen for yourself. 

These three-dimensional 
images were created by 
Black Sun. whose story is 
typical of many of the 
1 80,000 companies and 
professional finns founded 
in Bavaria over the past two 
years. 

Black Sun is a rapidly 
growing second-generation 
company founded by pro- 
fessionals already em- 
ployed by the state's infor- 
mation and communication 
technology industry. About 
half of its employees work 
in its marketing and distrib- 
ution department, located 
in northern California. 

Multimedia chips 
The new generation of mul- 
timedia chips emerging 
from the world’s microelec- 
tronics industry enables the 
running of Black Sun’s pro- 
grams. These are indis- 
putably products, and many 
of them are manufactured 
in Bavaria. Wacker in 
Burghausen, for example, 
makes Lhe silicon wafers, 
and the final packaging is 
done at the sprawling plants 
maintained by Siemens, 
Texas Instruments and 
Hitachi. 

Another state microelec- 
tronics producers worthy of 
note is Micronas Semi- 
conductors GmbH. Located 
in the northern Munich sub- 


urb of Neufahm. the com- 
pany, a manufacturer of 
ASICs (application specific 
integrated circuits) reached 
the ranks of Germany's 
major high-tech producers 
(those with annual sales of 
100 million Deutsche 
marks [around $60 million] 
and above) in the record 
rime of four and a half 
years. 

Micronas. in turn, is 
interested in the products 
developed by Atomika 
instruments GmbH. This 
Bavarian company has 
come up with equipment 
capable of detecting even 
the smallest of impurities in 
silicon, thus avoiding the 
costly discarding of "inte- 
grated circuits. 

If microelectronics and. 
arguably, software, are the 
newest of Bavaria's indus- 
trial sectors, automotive 
engineering is incon- 
testably one of the oldest. It 
was in Bavaria, on the short 
stretch connecting the 
neighboring communities 
of Nuremberg and Fiirth, 
that Germany's first rail- 
road began operation in 
1 835. Sixty-two years later, 
the state made perhaps its 
most important contribu- 
tion to the industrial world: 
the diesel engine. 

Diesel dynasty 
In 1897. Rudolf Diesel, an 
engineer educated in 
Munich, saw 14 years of 
often frustrating work come 
to a happy end. Developed 
with the "technical staff of 




Biotechnology, a Leading Edge 


ih 




Jr fi 

4m- 


rr 



Five years ago, no one 
would have picked 
Bavaria to become 
Germany’s most impor- 
tant center of biotechno- 
logical research, develop- 
ment and .marketing. Noe 
would anyone have really 
cared to even discuss 
biotech in Germany at alL 
In those days, almost 
everything interesting in 
biotech was happening in 


the United States and, to a 
lesser extent, Britain and 
France. Clustered along 
the Rhine and in the 
Mannheim-Heidelberg 
area, Germany’s pharma- 
ceutical giants had set up 
a number of research cen- 
ters in their home areas. 
They were outnumbered, 
however, by those estab- 
lished by Bayer and oth- 
ers in the United States. 


Today, greater Munich 
has the largest biotech 
community in Germany . 
according to the technical 
publication Labor Report. 
The city is home to 70 
..institutes and 200 compa- 
nies engaged in biotech 
R&D. 

These companies have 
received half of 
Germany’s biotech-relat- 
ed venture capital, says 


the Siiddeutsche Zeitung 
newspaper. 

The products issuing 
from Munich’s laborato- 
ries are one important rea- 
son why Germany was 
described as one of the 
world's "rapidly develop- 
ing sources of advanced 
biotechnologies” in Ernst 
& Young's annual survey 
of Europe’s biotech 
industry'. 


f> ‘Sunrise Sectors’ Breed Success 



& 

if. 


it: rae*- ■ 


Continued from page 1'9 

safest large -sized city, safer than 
towns a fraction of its size. The num- 
ber of days lost to strikes, or other 
forms of job actions in Bavaria is sec- 
ond only to that of Austria in the 
entire world 

And the performance shows no 
signs of slackening. A 5.3 percent rise 
in exports, to 115 billion Deutsche 
marks ($68.64 billion), another all- 
■ lime record, led the state to a 5 percent 
rise in industrial production - also at a 
record level - and a good 2 percent 
rale (after allowing for inflation) of 
economic growth. 

Young products • 

These figures have been produced by 
the ongoing mutation of the state s 
business community. Long gone are 
the analog telecommunication sys- 
tems and office machines of yore. 
Today’s headlining products are in the 
information and communication tech- 
nology sectors: Web ware, multime- 
dia and CCC (computer-commumcar 
tionsconnectivity). . . 

According to the .Mmuch-ba»d 
think-tank, the EFO f&r 

Wmschaftsforschung), fully per- 
cent of Bavaria’s products ; are : five 
years old - or younger. This is the best 


percentage among Germany’s states - 
and one of the best in Europe. 

The youth of the state's products is 
not surprising. In 1996, a record 

101.000 companies were founded in 
Bavaria. After subtracting the compa- 
nies folding or being taken over, the 
net gain of 31.000 brought the total 
number of companies in the state to 

550.000 as of the end of 1996 - also 
an all-tinie record. 

Meanwhile, Bavaria’s major corpo- 
rations have also been busy launching 
new products and scaling down their 
operation costs. The results have been 
the recording of strong-to- record 
profits, sales and output by Siemens, 
MAN, Audi, BMW, V1AG and the 
state’s other large corporations. 

The price of prosperity 
.Prosperity has not proven an unal- 
loyed blessing for the state. Real 
estate costs in Munich and in the sur- 
rounding Upper Bavaria area are at 
countrywide highs, although low by 
the standards prevailing in London, 
Tokyo and other international busi- 
ness centers. . Wages, too, are above 
German averages in greater Munich . 

“Of course, as Germany's largest 
state in terms of area, there’s plenty to 
Bavaria outside the greater Munich 
region," points out Manfred Pfeifer, 


head of the business location advisory 
service of the state’s Ministry for 
Economic Affairs, Transport and 
Technology. 

“Fully developed property is avail- 
able at highly competitive prices in 
most parts of Bavaria. Highly quali- 
fied personnel are found throughout 
the state, as is high-access transport 
infrastructure. That’s why such major 
manufacturers as BMW, Hitachi and 
Toshiba have set up major production 
facilities in Dingolfing, Lands hut, 
Regensburg and other ‘upstate’ com- 
munities,” he adds. 

“This move upstate has greatly ben- 
efited the state's peripheral areas, 
which are also profiting from their 
proximity to the fast-growing Czech 
Republic, Saxony - the fastest-grow- 
ing of Germany's eastern states - and 
Austria, our long-time neighbor and 
among the newest members of the 
European Union.” Mr. Pfeifer contin- 
ues. 

“While having its disadvantages on 
the costs side, Munich’s attractiveness 
has given it even larger advantages on 
the personnel side, and these consti- 
tute one reason behind the great influx 
from North America,” he says. 

It would appear that Bavaria owes 
its success to more than just geopolit- 
ical luck. • 


,A . ' 

V .i_ 




p Minister Foresees D: 

T3 A ecn ON HIGH-TECH 





»T?5v.’ 


s. . 



Continued from 19 

. e oc “nroblem regions” The overall situation has 

these areas as Jts biggest employer, 

heen rescued from the brink of bank- 
Kugelfischer, ha - s iff n never fit the Nuremberg metropol- 

more than an economic 
itan area beCi ^ r Lp lir one’s problem areas are that way 
monoculture. ^^X^dues, with aU of die 

because S ecormroic monoodtnres 

attendant proWems ^ a vibrantly 

Nuremberg ?^i^^U*StcelIent transport looks and 
cosmopolitan metropous Vj business 

- and this is its » growing vocation in the 

community, one with of Forth and 

services. Along ^ is o ne of the world’s leading suppli- 
-Eriangen, Nurembe^*^ d ^cal technologies, 
e re ofstate-of-0 1 e-^^^^ m electronics, 
multimedia software ^ ^ ^ ^ complete 

Rather than any smgt p* & 


range of instrumentalities formulated and implemented by 
the state government that should be given part of the cred- 
it for keeping these regions on the pith of development. 

We’ve strived to work as a “change agent" and have 
done so by supporting projects that had the promise of 
transmuting local expertise and scientific advances into 
marketable, leading-edge technologies, ones capable of 
furthering the industrial transformation of these regions. 

■ The successes of these policies are perhaps best to be seen 
in such one-time agrarian regions as the Regensburg area. 
Today, this town has become one of Europe’s centers of 
business. 

•Regensburg has a strong business community comprised 
of Siemens, BMW, Toshiba and other major, advanced cor- 
porations. The city’s university is a source of highly 
advanced technologies and high-quality cultural offerings. 
And while all this has been happening"- and I think this is 
typical of all such metamorphoses in Bavaria - Regensburg 
has kept its traditionally high quality of life. • 


the Maschinenfabrik 
Augsburg - ihe forerunner 

of today ‘s MAN - in the 
company's facilities in 
Augsburg, his engine 
passed its official tests cer- 
tifying it for normal use. 

The diesel engine is one 
of the oldest of Bavaria's 
industrial products. It has, 
however, the sales figures 
of a hot new Internet 
browser or software utility. 
Registrations of diesel-dri- 
ven cars were up 21 percent 
in Germany last year - four 
limes the gain registered by 
the industry as a whole. 
Sales of diesel -powered 
oceangoing ships and 
power plants have been 
growing rapidly, especially 
in North America and the 
Far EasL 

Aside from the basic 
operating principle, today's 
diesel has little in common 
with the bellowing behe- 
moths of the early 20th cen- 
tury - or even with the 
high-polluting engines of 
the late 1 980s. A wide vari- 
ety of technological inno- 
vations has cut the amount 
of pollution emanating 
from the average truck- 
bome diesel engine by half. 
Fuel economy has also 
been increased substantial- 
ly. 

Many of these innova- 
tions have come out of 
MAN, now headquartered 
in Munich and still the lead- 
ing developer of diesel 
engines. 

The engines manufac- 
tured by MAN and Us 
licensees over the years 
have had a collective output 
of 330 million horsepower. 
Over the past century, 
MAN has also evolved. 
The company is today 
active in fields ranging 
from space transport 
launchers to steel mills. • 


OKV Farvcndl 


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Hotel bookings, transportation schedules and much more am available in German and English. 

Trawling the Web Sites 

Businesspeople and tourists can find a wealth of information on-line. 


Doing Business in 
Bavaria, the on-line infor- 
mation service maintained 
by the state’s ministry of 
economic affairs, trans- 
port and technology, in 
conjunction with the state 
chancellery, can provide 
any fact or figure that a 
potential investor would 
ever want to know, from 
the location of Bavaria's 
technology centers to the 
state's total manufacturing 
output 

To gain access to the 
service, type in 
http://www.bavaria.de, 
the address of Welcome to 
Bavaria, the state govern- 
ment's informative Web 
site. Then click on 
“English,” which brings 
you bo fee service. 

Also on-line are 
Bavaria's major trade fair 
authorities. The Web site 
maintained by MMG, 


Munich’s fair authority 
and one of the world’s 10 
largest, provides a 
detailed schedule of 
upcoming events. Its 
address is http://www. 
messe-muenchen.de. The 
Nuremberg trade fair 
authority’s address is 
http://www.nuemberg- 
messe.de. 

Municipal Web sites 
Given that Bavarian cities 
are among Germany’s 
favorite tourist attractions, 
it is not surprising that 
they maintain English- 
language Web sites pro- 
viding hotel booking ser- 
vices: listings of restau- 
rants; train, mass transit 
and airplane schedules; 
and other information 
required by tourists, often 
including useful street 
finder search engines. 

All of the municipal 


Web sites have business 
information services and 
hyperlinks, with the 
notable exception of 
Munich’s, and English 
versions. 

Here are some of their 
addresses: 

Augsburg: http‘7/www. 
augsburg.de. Click on 
English. Enjoy the flashy 
graphics. 

Munich: http://www. 
munich.de. In English. 
The site is maintained by 
the city's tourist board, so 
there is no business-relat- 
ed information. 

Nuremberg: 
http://www.nuem 
berg.de. Click on 
Nuremberg international 
home page. 

Wuerzburg: 
http://w w w. wuerz 
burg.de. Click on the 
Union Jack. Another visu- 
ally exciting Web site. 


Why are we 
present in all key 
financial markets 
worldwide? 


To provide you with a partner there as well 


/ 


Brienner Strasse 18 • D-8Q333 Munchen 
Phone +49 (89) 21 71-25 67 * Fax +49 (89) 21 71-16 61 
Internet http://www.bayernJb.de 
eMail: kontakt@blb.de 


Bayerische Landesbank 







* I 


PAGE 22 


'SPONSOR UP Six: HON 


BAVARIA 



5 



y 

The towering greatness of Munich is counted not in skyscrapers, but in spires. Instead of creating a standard business district, tte planners have focused on promotfng an aestfietic qualfty of Sfe, 


Munich’s Low-Key 
Style Belies 
High-Gear Pace 

The city has eschewed skyscrapers in favor of a 
relaxing atmosphere for business. 

A ppearances can be deceiving. In Munich's case, the 
deception is deliberate. The statistics show that 
Munich has a high-powered economy. For exam- 
ple, more books are printed by Munich's 1,000 publishing 
houses than in any other place in the world except New 
York. And only London and Tokyo administer more insur- 
ance-related assets than Munich. 

Leading the insurance business are Allianz AG, 
Europe’s largest insurer, and its associate, Miinchener 
Riickversichetungs-Gesellschaft, the world’s leading rein- 
surer. Add in a dozen other major insurers and reinsurers: 
Bayerische Vereinsbank and the Bayerisehe Hypotheken- 
und Wechselbank, two of. the country’s six largest banks; 
and another 168 finance houses, and you have one of the 
largest financial communities in Europe. 

Greater Munich also has Germany’s largest university 
and more university-affiliated and independent research 
institutes than any other city in the country. 

With six national television broadcasters, the city's 
6.700 electronic media companies employ more than 
100,000 people and had a total turnover of 25 billion 
Deutsche marks {$14.92 billion) last year. 

Such a city might be expected to have a high-rise central 
business district, but there are no skyscrapers in downtown 
Munich and few buildings worthy of the name in the entire 
metropolitan area. There is not even an identifiable central 
business district 

Even the university has no campus per se, just many 
square blocks of four- and five-story buildings from the 
Baroque to the postmodern eras. 

La dolce vita 

Guidebooks are not very helpful when it comes to Finding 
the city’s business district. They lead visitors to the best of 


Munich's many boutiques and cafes and are full of 
descriptions of the charms of Bogenhausen. Haidhausen. 
the Glockenbach-Viertcl, Lehel. Schwabing and Munich’s 
other desirable neighborhoods. 

After reading a guidebook, strolling through these 
neighborhoods and seeing people sitting in the cafes or 
playing in the English Garden, visitors sometimes set the 
impression that Munich is a city for dining, shopping and 
hanging out. but not for working. 

'That's the impression you're supposed to come away 


with," says Emilio Galli-Zusaro. head of press and public 
relations at Allianz AG. 

“Actually, of course. Munich is a very hard-working 
city. Among other things, it's Germany's second- largest 
manufacturing center, and the largest prouder of technical 
services. 

“This. low-profile approach is very well conceived. It is 
based on sound observation. People, especially business- 
people. flock to live and work in a city which is perceived 
as being enjoyable." 


Says Christoph Schwartz, information and commiinica- ■ 
non technology expert: *T think this ambiance of !a dolce , 
vita de Monaco di Baviera does constitute a great business » 
asset, and one that explains the ever-greater number of cor- * 
porate locations and relocations here. 

“All the rime, the businesspeople arc talking about the • 
advantages of the central location and highly stalled labor, • 
and what they really have in their heads are dancing | 
visions of silling in the sun at a bistro in the • 
Leopoldstrasse. or skiing down an Alpine slope.” • 




jl- * 7m 





Commerce 
Rubs Elbows 
With Culture 


Bavaria has some of the most celebrated 
museums in the world. 

The wish to see and be seen brought several million 
businesspeople to Bavaria in 1996. More than 2 mil- 
lion people attended Munich's trade fairs alone. This 
figure is set to make a major jump in 1998. The 
city's new 23 billion Deutsche mark i$ 1 .49 billion) 
trade fairgrounds will be inaugurated in the spring of 
next year. 

Many trade fair attendees come for business pur- 
poses and stay on for a few days of tourism, spend- 
ing an average of 200 DM a day in the process. Thus 
businesspeople-eum-tourists constitute a very 
important part of the tourist market. 

Important as these pastimes are, however, sports, 
beer and business-related tourism are not the major 
inducement to visit Bavaria. 

Nine hundred strong 

There are 900 museums in Bavaria. A number of 
them, including Munich’s Alte Pinakothek, Neue 
Pinakothek and Deutsches Museum (Germany's 
Smithsonian), and Nuremberg’s German Narional 
Museum, are among the most celebrated in the 
world. Some 19 million people visit the museums 
each year. 

Small museums with exquisite collections round 
out the picture. A late 19th-century Italianate villa, 
Munich’s Lenbachhaus, has an unparalleled array of 
paintings by the Blauer Reiter school of art. whose 
ranks included Vassily Kandinsky, Franz Marc. Paul 
Klee and Gabriele Muentber. Without major perma- 
nent collections of their own, a number of others, 
including Munich's Haus der Kuenste and Hypo- 
Halle, specialize in. blockbuster exhibitions. 



Snowboarding, hiking, dimbing and hang-gliding are some popular activities in the mountains. 



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Sports and Festivals Are 
Fueled by a Young Crowd 


The well-known activities are a small part of what Bavaria has to o ffer. 


W ith one-quarter of 
the country's 
arrivals and 
overnight stays. Bavaria is 
number one in Germany for 
tourism. The state also 
ranks among Europe's 
leading travel destinations. 
The reasons: beer festivals 
and gardens: romantic 
routes with romantic vil- 
lages; romantically lunatic 
kings; towering, snow-clad 
peaks: and snow-bedecked 
Christmas markets. At least 
dial's the popular view - 
which does not cell the 
whole story. 

Traditional attractions 
The 1996 Okcoberfest came 
very close to setting an all- 
time attendance record. 
One warm Saturday did set 
an aii-rime record for a sin- 
gle day. with 800.000 peo- 
ple jostling themselves into 
gridlock on the 
Theresienwiese fair- 
grounds. A brilliant if freez- 
ing-cold winter sent half of 
Europe (or so it seemed) to 
Nuremberg's Christmas 
market and" to the Zugspitze 
(Germany’s highest moun- 
tain). the Kranzberg and 
Bavaria's other ski slopes. 

The lines of cars with for- 
eign license plates making 
their way down the 
Romanitsche Strasse 
(Route of Romance) from 
Rothenburg ob der Tauber 
to Augsburg reached their 
usual, impressive lengths 
Iasi summer, as did "the 
queues of people waiting to 
marvel at die extravagance 
of King Ludwig's four mas- 
terpieces: Neuschwanstein, 
Linderhof. Herrenchiemsee 
and Schachenhaus. 

TuUwood 

The popular view ignores 
Bavaria's newer attractions 


Europe, the vast majority of 
its visitors come from 
Bavaria. With good reason. 
There are lots of young 
people in the stare. 

Population explosion 
An ongoing influx of youth 
from elsewhere in 
Germany and from the rest 
of the world- has given 
Bavaria the fastest-growing 
population among 

Germany's stales. It took 23 
years, from 1965 to 1988, 
for the state’s population to 
increase from 10 million to 
1 1 million, and only eight 
years to grow by a further 
million. 

The youthfiilness of the 
population, coupled with 
the state's strong and rising 
affluence, may explain the 
prolusion of sports activi- 
ties that involve a large 
amount of thrills and not 
inconsiderable costs of 
equipment. 

Newfangled snow sports 
Take snowboarding. Half 
of all people making their 
way down Bavaria's slopes 
now do so on snowboanfc, 
not on “old-fashioned” 
skis. Virtually all of the 
snowboarders are under 30 
years old. While their 
elders are hiking up the 
same mountains in the sum- 
mer. most of Bavaria's 
young are “cutting Lo the 
chase." 

'The only exciting part 
about mountains is the 
actual hand-over-hand 
climbing. The rest is work. 
TTiat's why I go to climbing 
gardens, where there’s no 
trudging, and there are 
thrills from the first 
moment on,” says Dominic 
Trujillo, a 16-year-old 
Munich resident. 


There are now hundreds ; 
of these gardens with guid- 
ed climbs in Bavaria, most 
of them in the Alps, the 
Franconian hills and 
Bavaria’s many other ; 
upland areas. 

Of course, older people ; 
are also avid patrons of the - 
climbing gardens. And the ; 
young often do hike - up 
mountains. Many of them , 
avoid the bane of any 
mountain climb - the 
descent, at least the descent • 
by foot-bygoing-afrborne. ' 

Lakeside lifestyle 
On any sunny day in south- • 
em Bavaria, squadrons of ; 
paragliders and hang-glid- 
ers hover above the wave- 
capped waters of the state’s * 
necklace of Alpine lakes. „ 
These “fliers" are riding Lhe • 
thermal drafts produced by 
the warm southern winds * 
being deflected upward by ! 
the lakes’ cold waters and 
the bell of cool air on top of . 
them. 

The same winds also ! 
make the Stamberger See. • 
Chiemsee, Tegemsee, - 
Schliersee and Bavaria's ■ 
other upland lakes favorites 
with sail-surfers, the ; 
younger counterparts of the . 
sailors whizzing around the ! 
dancing waters. 

To the shore j. 

For much of Germany, at f 
least its younger members, • 
the action on the shoreline ; 

is what really counts. “Kids ■ 
in convertibles: Bavaria’s ; 
lakeside lifestyle”, trumpet- » 
ed a recent article in Der ; 
Spiegel. 

A hit German pop song 1 
recently put it another way: ! 
‘That’s the life . . . days on : 
the Jakes [Bavaria’s], ’ 
evenings in Munich." • 




and the changing nature of 
tourism in the state. One 
major change has been the 
state's demographics. 

Bavaria is the center of 
youth-oriented tourism and 
is home to a late 1990s ver- 
sion of a youth-oriented 
lifestyle. 

Although the state does- 
n't have Berlin's Love 
Parade - Munich's Union 
Move is about half the tech- 
no-parade's size - it does 
have Toll wood. Held in 
early summer in Munich’s 
Olympic Park, it is 
Germany's largest youth 
and alternative festival. 
To 1 1 wood’s tents offer 
headline rock and ethnic 
music, wacky circus acts 
and tons of good ethnic 
foods and arts and crafts. In 
a good year - “good” 
meaning that the weather is 
cooperative - 600,000 to 
700,000 people attend 
Tollwood. 

While Tollwood attracts 
eniertainmem acts and 
groups from all over 



V 







PAGE S3 















































































































World Roundup 


Duncan Is Popular 


basketball Tim Duncan of 
Wake Forest was a unanimous pick 
for the All-America college team, 
becoming the first repeat choice 
since Shaquille O’Neal five years 
ago. The other picks were Keith Van 
Horn of Utah, Ron Mercer of Ken- 
tucky, Raef LaFremz of Kansas and 
Danny Fortson of Cincinnati. (AP) 


NFL Attendance Fails 


football NFL attendance 
dropped by a half- mil lion last sea- 
son, to 18,648,981 from the record 
19202,757 in 1995- Paul Taglia- 
bue, the commissioner, blamed 
falling crowds in Houston, whose 
team is leaving, and Seattle, where 
the team tried to leave. (AP) 


Array Finds Allies 

football After more than a 
century as an independent college 
football team. Army will join Con- 
ference USA in 1998. (API 


Role Models in All Sports 


• Darryl Henley, a former Los 
Angeles Rams defensive back, was 
sentenced to 41 years in prison for 
cocaine trafficking and trying to 
hire a hitman to kill a judge. 

• Lawrence Phillips, a Sl Louis 
Rams running back, was sentenced 
to 30 days in jail Tuesday for vi- 
olating his Nebraska probation 
when he was arrested for drunken 
driving in California last year. On 


Monday . Phillips pleaded not guilty 
to a disorderly conduct charge 


to a disorderly conduct charge 
stemming from a party last month at 
an Omaha, Nebraska, hotel. 

• Roscoe Tanner, a former tennis 
star, surrendered to authorities to 
face prosecution for willfully fail- 
ing to pay child support. 

• Bruce McNall. the former Los 
Angeles Kings owner, surrendered 
to police and began a 70-month term 
at the Federal Prison at Lompoc. 
California, for his rale in a scheme to 
bilk banks, a securities firm and his 
team of more than 5236 million. 

• Spanish soccer authorities on 
Tuesday ordered Athletic Bilbao to 
close its ground for two games after 
Zaragoza goalie Otto Konrad was 
hit by a firework Sunday. (Reuters) 


Wilfred WooUer, 85, Dies 


Wilfred WooUer. a Welsh star at 
both rugby union and cricket, has 
died at 85. WooUer set up the win- 
ning try when Wales beat the New 
Zealand All Blacks in 1935. In 1949. 
he captained Glamorgan to the Eng- 
lish county cricket championship. 
He was an England cricket selector 
and a journalist. f Reuters) 



M»L I. TrmCLflTie AiwoMd ft*M 

RETURN — Francisco Clavet 
of Spain defeating to Jim 
Courier at the Newsweek 
Champions Cup. 6-4, 4-6. 6-4. 









W *'<% 


f ; /• rf' 

: ’ *jW 



Past Glory May Not Save Eintracht 

Frankfurt Lost to Real Madrid, Now It Must Beat Debt 

T NArLT7“r^ m od- World Soccer /Ro.Huom, ' 

» fulfill statement For it is 


World Soccer / Rob Hwohbs 


em soccer, “match of a lifetime'' is 
a glib phrase. According to some 





VVfJ. 


.■ I* * . 

• *«* * •** 


10 




television networks such games come 
along as regularly as city buses. There is 
always another one right behind. 

When a performance really does 
stand apart, it separates whole gener- 
ations of fans — those who saw it. those 
who have seen the film or the video, and 
those so young they refuse to believe 
that 4 ‘old timers' ’ could ever have com- 
pared to today's idols. 

Eintracht Frankfurt versus Real Mad- 
rid in the 1960 European Cup Final 
stands die test of time. It brought 10 



goals, seven of them to the imperious 
Madrid team. It thrilled 127,621 spec- 


Clarence Seedorf of Real Madrid escaping Racing Santander's Merino 
Landaluce. left, and Francisco Sanchez Jara in a Spanish league game. 
Real, the league leaders, won, 2-1. Seedorf scored the winning goal. 


Liverpool Beats Newcastle , 4-3 , Again 


Reuters 

LIVERPOOL — Liverpool beat New- 
castle. 4-3. in the English Premier 
League, with Robbie Fowler scoring the 
winning goal in injury' time. Last year 
Liverpool also won, 4-3 at Airfield, after 


Stan Coliymore scored in injury- time. On 
Monday, Liverpool took a 3-0 halftime 
lead, but Newcastle tied at 3-3. scoring its 
last two goals in the 87th and 88th 
minutes. The victory put Liverpool a 
point behind Manchester United. 


Madrid team. It thrilled 127,621 spec- 
tators in the Scottish city of Glasgow. It 
set standards of movement, of skill and 
of sportsmanship that will be erased 
only when fathers stop telling sons how 
majestic it was. 

I recall it not simply to invoke nos- 
talgia but because one of the teams, 
Eintracht. is straggling to remain a pro- 
fessional club. The Frankfurt team, one 
of Germany’s elite just a couple of sea- 
sons ago, has slipped out of die Bundes- 
liga. into the lower reaches of the second 
division, and into financial dishonor in 
the eyes of the tax inspectors. 

History offers no protection, and per- 
haps it should noL Yet. when you ap- 
preciate what Eintracht Frankfort has 
been, what the name means to countless 
fans around die world, it would send a 
tremor through the game at large if the 
club was not to see its 100th an- 
niversary, in 1999. 

“We have always been first-class,’’ 
says Rolf Heller, Eintracbt’s president 
“Last season was the first time we were 
ever relegated, but we think we are at the 
bottom of the curve. We believe we’ve 
stopped falling; and that we will be back 
in die Bundesliga for our centenary." 

Heller will need every ounce of his 
acumen and a little help from the players 


to fulfill that statemenL For it is the 
modem professionals, rather than the 
ghosts of a great past, who threaten 
Eintracht’s status. 

7 .i ke many clubs — Real Madnd 
among them — Frankfurt has tended to 
spend more than it earned to import big 
name players. In 1992-3 and 1993-4, 
Tony Yeboah, its Ghanaian star, was 
joint top goal scorer in the Bundesliga. 

Together with Maurizio Gaudino. he 
formed a formidable Frankfurt attack. 
But that soured when Jupp Heynckes. 
himself once a prolific marksman, made 
strict coaching demands that Yeboah 
and Gaudino rebelled against. 

Yeboah is a scorer of phenomenal 
goals, masterpieces of vision and power 
and intuition. He felt the coach asked 
too much of his time, his liberty, his 
habit of conjuring up great goals. The 
club backed Heynckes. and sold both 
Yeboah and Gaudino. 

Hans-Joachim Otto and Bemd Thate. 
the club president and treasurer, had to 
resign last year when tax investigators 
probed payments to Yeboah. Dragoslav 
Stepan ovie and Bemd Holzenbein, the 
next team coach and manager, have also 
been swept away. 

Heller picked up the poisoned 
chalice, aware that relegation had cost 
Frankfurt 8 million marks in revenue, 
and that millions more must be raised to 
prevent Germany’s soccer authorities 
calling rime on a debtor club. 

With a core support of 15,000 — half 
rive expectation in the Bundesliga — 
Heller must seek outside investment 
His biggest selling point is old times. 

That is a hard sell, as Real Madrid can 
testily. The Madrid giant the original 
European power, is itself gambling on 
spending its way out of $90 million 
debts. Right now, its team, despite find- 
ing life intolerably regimented under 
Italian coach Fabio Capelio, is nine 


points clear in the Spanish league. Re- 
entry to the European Cup will continue # 
its return to glory and ro serious i 


money. , _~ 

Eintracht watches enviously. Some- 
cruelly say it was ever thus, that on May 
18, i 960 , at Hampden Park, the Germans, 
were bystanders at the Madrid ball. 

I have to be honest. Youth made me a 
second hand witness to that event. In- 
deed. as a young apprentice soccerplay- 
er. I was told to study an 8mm fUm of the 
match: the flickering black and white. 


images of the supreme skills of Alfredo 
<jj Siefano and Ferenc Puskas. 


Rob Hughes is on the staff of The 
Times of London. *■' 


White Men (and Women) Can’t Sprint? 


Iniemuiional Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Here is a touchy subjecL 
For the first time in the professional era. 
the world champion sprinters were pre- 
dominantly white. 

Of the four sprints at last weekend’s 
indoor world championships in Paris, 
two were won by white men and one by 
a white woman. Two of the winners 
were Greek. 

When Kevin Little, a white Amer- 
ican, won rite 200-meter Final in 20.40 
seconds, a championship record, he was 
ready for questions about his race — not 
the race, but his race. “The way I see it, 
a man won the 200,” said Little, who is 
28. “It doesn’t matter what color. I 
knew what I was capable of, and hope- 
fully fans and the viewers around the 
world will see that and they won’t see it 
as a white sprinter winning the gold 
medal. I'm training to be the fastest, 
period.’’ 

Little's victoiy in itself was not 
shocking. Two years ago the world in- 
door 200 was won in Barcelona by the 
Geir Moen of Norway, albeit in a re- 
latively slow 20.58 seconds. Little 
already held bronze medals in the 200 
from these championships in 1989 and 
1993. His opponents in Paris included 
Ato Boldon of Trinidad, who had won 
two sprint bronze medals at last sum- 
mer’s Olympics, but suffered a ham- 
string strain while trailing in the final 
quarter last weekend. 

It would be an exaggeration to cast 
the weekend's results as an important 
racial story. The fact is that most of the 
world’s fastest men — Michael John- 
son, Donovan Bailey. Frankie Freder- 
icks and several others, all of them of 


Vantage Point / Ian Thomsen 


African descent — weren't in Paris, 
preferring to save their best performanc- 
es for the more lucrative outdoor Grand 
Prix meets and the outdoor World 
Championships in Athens in August. 

The results did. however, emphasize 
that white sprinters are among the most 
obvious underdogs in any sport. The last 
white man to win aglobal championship 
100-meter sprint was Allan Wells of 
Scotland at the 1980 Olympics in Mos- 
cow, which were boycotted by the 
Americans. Last weekend, when Har- 
alambos Papadias of Greece became, by 
one one-hundredth of a second, the first 
white man to be world champion at 60 
meters — which is the indoor equivalent 
of iOO meters — the photographers and 
cameramen at the finish line naturally 
aimed their lenses at the black runneis- 
up, leaving the 27-year-old Papadias to 
celebrate in relative privacy for a few 
moments until his vanning time of 6.50 
seconds was announced. 

The weekend's results also under- 
lined an apparent revival of Greek ath- 
letics, which is said to be receiving more 
government financing in the hopes of 
producing good results for the World 
Championships later this summer and, 
potentially, at the 2004 Summer 
Olympics, for which Athens is one of 
the five final bidders. 

“We have a lot of really good athletes 
in the high jump, the long jump, every- 
where," said Ekaterini Koffa of Greece 
after winning the women's 200 from the 
outside lane by. again, one one-hun- 
dredth of a second. 


Though statisticians have noticed 
Greek athletes improving in recent 
years, neither Koffa nor Papadias were 
expecting gold medals. Last year their 
compatriot, Ekaterini Thanou. became 
Greece's first European indoor cham- 
pion when she won the 60 meters. 

Unfortunately, an awkward drug- 
testing controversy may be developing 
around the Greeks. 

According to a report filed by a drug- 
testing official for die International Am- 
ateur Athletic Federation, a Greek 
coach refused to allow several Greek 
athletes to be tested for drugs last month 
in Dortmund, Germany. The Greeks 
have said that the official didn’t identify 
himself properly; the official reported 
that he was never given the chance 
before the athletes left the scene. 

According to a Greek coach. Christos 
Tsekos, the athletes were tested later. 
He declined to answer other questions 
about it. 

The case is to be evaluated by the 
IAAF next week in Turin. 



TALL ORDER — Courtney Walsh, the West Indies fast bowler, being 
congratulated by teammates after dismissing Nayjut Sidhu of India on 
the last day of the first test in Jamaica. The home team's hopes of 
bowling out India were dashed by rain, and the match was drawn. 


Scoreboard 


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Chicago WTrtte Sew 7. Pittsburgh 
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Tens 6. Toronto l 

Chicago Cubs (ss) 1 X Colorado Iss) 4 
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Crprui 08090605 Denmark 80016132 Finland 080011 10084 trance 080090 2246 Ureter 00800119273013 

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Japan 0031126609 Korea 0038110243 lurcmbvurg 08004552 Mexico 9580087841 78 Netherlands 080220657 

.v..f»i//fc-' 18009945757 ■>. Zealand 080044 1880 /Wr«x»/0501 12632 Singapore 800 1202501 £.!/>*-» 0B0O99B337 

Spain 900931007 i««/«r 020793158 .fn&rtW 080089 7233 001 M011SZ3066S Turtr > 00800139219013 

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ATLANTIC DIVISION 

W L T PB GF 6* 
PMhxSeiptria 38 19 10 86 724 170 

New Jersey 05 19 12 82 182 154 

Florida 29 23 15 73 177 158 

N.Y. Rangers 31 28 9 71 219 191 

Tampa Bay 27 32 7 61 184 204 

Washington 26 33 7 59 166 1B7 

N.Y. Islanders 23 33 10 56 181 19S 

NORTHEAST WTOON 

VI L T Pis Sf 6A 
Birftato 34 21 II 79 192 165 

Pittsburgh 32 28 6 70 228 216 


(P9l. Second Period: T-Wairtner 11 (5undW MOMMY'S USM 

A. T-Wdnlner 12 Center, Damn 5, D- CobtonSL 24 35 19 28—106 

NleinMfld)* 26 (Hogue. Vei&eekJ TMrri LA- □tapers 21 28 29 34—112 

g 8 *** G.S_- Sprewefl 9-1 7 22-25 41, Mulfln 5-16 7- 

O. u-iros. wrigtl| 5_-|0 u . Rebounds— Golden 

Vuncouwn 2 0 0 0—2 49 (Spencer IQ), Us Angeles 59 

ryi pwj, I 1 o 0-2 (VOugW 11 J. Assist*— Golden State 15 (Cates 

Rrsl Period: V-Bohanos 5 (Roberts, 5), Us Angeles 24 COehere 4). 

Nasfcmd) (ppl. 2, C-Craven 6 (MBer, Daze) 

(up), l V-Nastond 14 (Bohonas, Roberts) 

(Up). Second Period: C-Cummins 4 (Sykaro, 

Probert) Thtrri Period: None. Overibor MDUfOHS 

None. Stats on goat V- 14-14^0-37. C-l> isttest.cthoa 

9-WO— 32. GodBtS: V-HhSClL C-HocAClt^ NESTWDdivS.W 

Pbo«tfx 0 0 1— I MOHDAY. IN KINGSTON, J 

Ftral Period: (HJotgte 7« (Dwcfresne) LO- wanndtoKA^ond 241-4 ded 
. YasfUn 3? WcEodwn* ChorsAe) second Indio: 346 and 99-2. 

Period: O-Oudiesnel 2 (AitredssoaYasWnl Wesl Indtasand Indio drawn 

(pp). Turn Period: Phoetu Johnson 3 fifth and ttoal day. 

(Drotce. FWeyt S O-Atfredsson 23 (Van 
Alien) fen). Sbots e* wok O- 14^9—29. 

Phoant* 5-7- 10-22. Goofex: O-TufllWTI. j 

Phoenix, KhaMHffln. ; __ 

Defroff 2 10 0-3 JSMMWMWMUIIMMTI 

Los Aagetes 0 2 10-3 Standing* far the Ryder Cup 

Ftrrt Period: D-Kado* 21 (Sonridrom, Sept 28-28 at Vaktamma In 
Rouse) 2. CMftoper 7 (Piettsov, Spain. The tap 10 ftntaherstviaS 
KorotonSnwl (DP). Second Period: D- man teams and US. c aptain T 
Sonetrom 16 (Yzermon Rome) 4 LA.- E u rope on captain Sava Bella 
ODonnell 5 (Stevens) & LA, Olay*: 71 haw two wtemwd oh olc — : 

(5 towns J Tftlnf Puled: I— A. -Ferraro 23 UNTTSO STATES 

(Hurmtnesv Steteu) OmtUK Nona. Shots , Lehman 746^90. 2. M 

W*^**^*^* MtSSSSStme 

Gaa9es: DOsgaad. LA.- Defoe ... n. 


todofid 43. Tenerife 41 AJWeBcaObao 42, Vo- 
lendo 39, RobrffSonfond0r38. etc 

wiam no wu.inmiT 

TUESOAr.lNSOnA 
Bulgaria 0, StovaUa 1 


TRANSITIONS 


1ST TEST. CTH DAY 
VEST INDIES VS. MOU 
HOfOAV. m KINGSTON, JAMAICA 

west indies: 427 ond 241-4 deriorod 
Indio: 346 and 99-2. 

West Indtas and India draw on ttwrafn-hit 
fifth and ftoof day. 


ASKETBALL 


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34 21 II 79 192 165 
33 28 6 70 228 216 
36 30 10 63 183 201 

24 32 13 61 210 243 

22 32 13 57 184 197 

23 3S 9 55 197 238 


NBA Standinos 


COimAL (XVHTOM 

19 L T PIS GF CA 
40 23 5 85 205 165 

32 19 15 79 211 155 

31 33 4 46 192 20S 


31 33 4 46 192 20S 

26 31 fl 44 195 306 

24 31 11 63 174 170 

25 37 S 55 196 Z3t 


New York 

Miami 

Ortondo 

Washington 

New Jersey 

Phltadetphto 

Boston 


x-cotorodo 

Edmonton „ 

Anaheim 28 30 9 6S 195 194 £ 

catgory 28 34 7 63 181 196 Toronto 

Vancouver 38 35 4 eO 208 229 

Los Angeles 25 35 9 59 184 224 ‘ 

SonJose 23 36 7 S3 169 2!6 * 

*dino*ed ptoyotf berth Houston 42 

m o dD APi nswrs Mtonesoto » 

Mantrool 8 8 2 8-2 Danes 19 

PHtsbar g O 2 8 8 8-2 Denver 18 

Rrsl Period: P-Hamer 12 (Lemteux, San Antonio 15 

Johoroson) X R-Bames 16 (Htts Nodvod) Vancouver II 

Second Period: None. T»d Perto* M-Bure pacthcc 

13 (ReocfiL Rudnshy) (pp). A M-RWter IB Seattle 42 

(RKdd. Domphoussa) Ovwttaw: None. UA. Lnters 41 

SfMtsae goal: M- 12-10-13-4-39. P-5-10-18- Portland 35 

0-2S. Gaoles: M-TldbauR. P-WTOWet. Sacramento 28 

Do 80S 2 18 8-3 LA-CSpaere 26 

Toraata 0 2 I 8-2 pimento 24 

FM Period: O-Virtwhlfi (HtewwenayL Golden Stale 23 

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ATLANTIC 0WISJON 

W L Pd G8 

47 14 .746 — 

45 17 .726 1*4 

32 28 -533 13W 

28 33 .459 18 

18 43 -295 28 

I 16 44 .267 29 Vi 

12 50 .194 3414 

central onraoN 

S3 I - 

45 16 .738 S 

42 19 jS89 II 

40 22 445 I3H 

33 27 -550 1914 

29 32 ^75 24 

24 35 .426 27 

21 40 344 32 


Standings (or the Ryder Cup to tar played 
Sept 26-28 at lfoktarranta In Sotograntta. 
Spain. The top 10 W n tatw»qutoHy for thoia- 
man teams and US. captain Tom KMe and 
European certa in Seva Bafiaeleroa each 
have taro w8riord oboieae: 

UNTTSO STATES 

1 , Tara Lehman 746390. 2. Mark OMeara 
72&75a 3. Stove Janes 579J8a 4. Davis Low 
111 525UXXL 5. Wnrii Brooks 519J5a 6. Ph* 
Mldceisoti ail J9X 7. TTgar Woods 05000.8. 
Scort Hoctl 484380. 9. Dovto Duvot 390.00ft 
10. Kenny Perry 37135ft 11. Fred couples 
35534ft 12. Jim Funk 347300, 13. Steve 
Strieker 34230ft 74. John Cook 341.00ft !& 
Pouf StoidcowsU 340.000. 

eiinops 

1. Co8n Mont a omerie. Scotland 331,364.16 

2. AUgual Angel Mortfn. Spain 262,97539 

3. Tbomos BJont Denraari: 230057^0 

4. Costoifflno Races, Italy 20ft 32634 

5. Danen OorVa N. Ireland 187,609.42 

6. Ion Woosnom, lNolas 17X842.11 

7. Par-UbOc Johansson. Sweden 16260SS 

8. Jean Von da Veto*. France 1 60,77X39 

9. Sam Tenant*, Scortard 150.90830 

10. Paul Bniadhurs, England 130643.90 

1 1. Roger Chapman, England Uft99839 

12. Padndg Harrington, Ireland U2AS3.13 
IX Lee Westwood, England 104JH6J2 

14. Peter WflcheS, England 101,47837 

15. Mlgoei Angel Jimenez. Spain 9X527 38 


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL v 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

anaheiM— S igned 1B-OF Darin Ersted, 
RHP Dentils Springer and 3B George Arias to 
l -year con tracts. 

boston — Bought contract of OF Steve 
Hoeey from SVoux FaSx NL. 

CLEVELAND -Agreed to terms wilti RHP 
Chad Ogea on three-year controd, and P 
Bariolo Colon, P Maximo DeLoRosa. p Dan- 
ny Graves, P Stew (Otoe, P AtoJe Lopet INF 

Herbert Perry, INF Enrique Wfeorv OF 
Trenktad Hubbard, OP Alex Ramirez and C 
Elnar Diaz on I -year contracts. 

KANSAS CITY -Agreed to terms with inf 

Katth Loddiart, C Sal Fasano d nd OF Mictiaet 

Tucker on ) -year contracts. 

NEW YORK— Agreed to terms with SS Derate 
Jeter on I -year contract. 

Oakland — R eleased 28 Brent Gates. LHP 
Doug Johns ond OF Alien Battle. 

Toronto— S igned DH Carios DelgadOi 
NATIONAL LEABUB 

aNOMNATv— Released LHP Billy Brewer 
(Hid OF Scott Boded, 

sah diego -Signed RHP Joey HamBon, 
RHP Doug Boditter and SS Outhrio Vttas to 
l-yearcomracis. 

■ASKrmAu 

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 
NnA-Hned Milwaukee Bucks F Aimon 
Gnnam S730Q tor commlritog a Want tout 

against Cleveland G Bab Sura an March fi. C 

PORTLAND -Signed G Rumeat Rob^sor' 
for remainder of sesasan. Suspended F rjcvv 
tonlo Wlngndd tar 1 game far conitod detrt- 
mentollotheleom. 

san a ntonk)— S uspended G Maxwell tor 
one game ftran (Rchtant Involving tons dur- 
ing a game an Match 1. 

FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL TOOTBAU. (JEAOUE 
ATLANTA — Agreed to terms wim FB Bob 
OnMIan on three-ynor contnad and TE Ed 
wea to 2-year camrad 
DENVER -signed P Tom Rouen to X-yew 
contract. 

Detroit —Signed QB Frank Retch, wr 
M iles mock and TE Derek Price. 


NRWrESTMVISrON 

W L 

Utah 45 16 

Houston 42 2D 

Mfcwesoto 30 30 

Danes 18 6i 

Denver 18 43 

San Antonio IS ■ 46 

Vancouver 11 52 

PACmiC WWSKNV 
Seattle 42 18 

ULLaken 41 ' 20 

Portland 35 TB 

Sacramento 28 34 

LA-CHppen 26 33 

Phaento 24 37 

Golden State 23 38 


Pet GB 
.738 — 

A77 T* 
300 14 S 

317 gffn 
J9S 27 
J2A6 30 
.175 35 


SOCCER 


ntd LiW FMiuauAOM 

Liverpool l Newcastle 3 ECAc-Annwnced that Davidson College 

ta am dla ata Manchosier Unhaa 57 pofeiU ^ I QS b * CT In as a member at me cwv 
Llverpaoi 56, Ananal 54 Newcastle 48. Aston rSirrnrrtrr nm S nnn.mr. . n 

VWa 46, Sheffield Wednesday 45, Wimbledon wouW 

44. Oielsaa 41 Leeds 39. Leicester 37, Tat- iwa.^ tOTferen “ fcon »" starting in 

r^S*^* 6 ^^*** lows— stoned Havden Ft*. 


HATIOHAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 
VANCOUVER— Traded LW Eso TWianen 
md RW Russ CourtnoB to New York Rangers 
torC Sergd Nemchinav and PW Brian nop- 
nan. 


Joo — 
vi 

356 8Vi 
^52 15 
M\ 15Vi 
J93 18'A 

CT7 17W 


33, Smvterttma 32. Coventry 3ft Norttognom 
Fomst 27. Saumampton 25* Wort Ham 25L 

NUddtesbraugh 22. 

■"""'■wroifHioii 

Raat Madrid Z Racing Santander l 

Real Madrid 65 paints. 
Barcelona 5ft Rea] Befts 5ft Departtw Corona 
SI Afledco Madrid 49, Real Sadeuad *5, Val- 


iowa— S taled Hayden Fry. tootban a»ch. 
to a one-yoarcwimicreiaennon itmxigh June 
jQi 2001. 

mjssissippi state — S uspended WR 
James janes tram the tootban team otter 
bang arrested. 

Wisconsin— emended the contract of Bar- 
ty Atvarex tortbott coach, ttvough tv »nm 
season. 


tiial 


A Hf” 1 




“Play like that!” our coach said. 

Over the years, I met a generation of. 
influential trainers whose credo was the 
same, whose life’s work was to pass on 
the knowledge of the game at its best. 

Di Stefano. an Argentine who was 
arrogant and ultra-fit at 34. strutted [be 
midfield. He controlled the match with . 
his physique and his technique, and hef 
scored three times. Puskas, the portly 
Hungarian, scored four times. 

They were backed by Jose Santamina. 
an indomitable Uruguayan defender, by 
Canario. a direct Brazilian winger, and 
yes, by Francisco Gen to. a left winger of - 
breathtaking pace whose distinction was 
that he was Spanish by birth. 

Real in the !960s was, like so many 
dominant teams today, a United Nations 
of players. Frankfort ■ was German 
through and through. It had swept to the 
final, putting 12 goals past Glasgow 
Rangers, and. with Alfred Pfaff a fine 
schemer and Richard Kress a dynamic 
winger, had the effrontery to score the 
first goal of that epic final. 

Frankfurt played a spirited part in 
what many remember as soccer's finest 
hour. For that I hope it survives. 


Mi, . 

THI- V 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1997 


PAGE 25 




SPORTS 



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'Gophers Rise 
To die Heights 

Coach Haskins Coaxes 
Minmsota to NCAA Berth 


By Thomas George 

New York Tunes Sen-ice 


M 



’INNEAPOLIS— 
“I could score 50 
when I had to,*’ 
■the bold coach 
tells his doubtftil playere. 
“They couldn't check me." 

Uh-huh, uh-huh, nods a 
rapt, smiling audience of 
Minnesota Gol- 
den Gophers. 

"Sometimes. I 
would just fall out 
of bed and score 
50," the Gophers' 
coach. Gem Has- 
kins, tells his 
players. “I was 
sick once and 
scored 15 points and grabbed 
10 rebounds. Hey. wait a 
• k minute, that's not true. I’ve 
V never been sick a day in my 
life. Basketball was too im- 
portant to me." 

The Minnesota players re- 
quest one thing: Coach, 
please, show me the tape. 
Show us the video. 

Enough, says Haskins. 
Back to wont. 

That kind of playful ex- 
change between Haskins and 
his players has happened fre- 
quently during this Min- 
nesota season, a 27-3 season. 
16-2 in the Big Ten Confer- 
ence. Heady stuff. Minnesota, 
the Midwest region's No. 1 
seeded team, opens national 
'tournament play Friday 
against Montana (21-10) at 
Kemper Arena in Kansas 
City, Missouri. 

Well, here goes the Big Ten 
again, sending in another big- 
time team. Will it flop like 
recent Big Ten champions? 
Here goes Haskins again, an 
all-America guard called Clem 
the Gem at Western Kentucky 
before leaving in 1967, the 
third pick in the National Bas- 
ketball Association draft that 
year and a nine-year pro. He 
has coached for 17 seasons and 
is taking his seventh team for a 
tournament waltz. None has 
reached the Final Four. 

But this is a different 
Haskins team. This is a ham- 
mer team. . This team can 
score 50 on you when it has 
to. This team can fall out of 
bed and give you a game. 
Basketball is important to this 
team. 

This team is more like 
Haskins than any other he has 
coached, including six at 
Western Kentucky and his 
previous nine at Minnesota, 
where he won the 1993 Na- 
- tional Invitation Tournament. 
This team plays like he 
played: aggressive, confident, 
relentless. And with plenty of 
ability and flexibility. 

Finally, Gem Haskins has 
a team crafted and carved, 
inside and out, in his own 


Me a 




image. With his mind-set. 
Watch out. 

T want our players to 
laugh, to be able to laugh at 
themselves and to have ftm," 
said Haskins. 54, who last 
summer was an assistant 
coach for the U.S. Olympic 
team. “I exaggerate with 
them a lot about me as a play- 
er. But, you know, some of 
that stuff is true. 

As for Min- 
nesota? “This is 
home now. West- 
ern Kentucky will 
always be ‘home’ 
home, but this is 
where I have 
found there are no 
more mountains to 
climb, thai this is it for me, 
this job. this place. 

‘ ‘And this team, it has taken 
on my demeanor. My de- 
meanor is their demeanor." 

5°. that explains Min- 
nesota’s winning 22 of its last 
24; ripping through the sea- 
son with a 14-0 home record 
and claiming its best confer- 
ence record since the 1 9 1 8- 1 9 
season. So, that explains Min- 
nesota's winning so many 
close games — five by 1 or 2 
points — and suffering just 
three losses, all on the road. 

This is a hammer team. 

"This team plays had, has 
high-intensity defense, is 
physical and is mentally 
strong," said Minnesota for- 
ward Courtney James, who is 
from Indianapolis. 

Sam Jacobson of Cottage 
Grove, Minnesota, starts at 
the other forward, John 
Thomas of Minneapolis at 
center and Bobby Jackson of 
Salisbury, North Carolina, 
and Eric Harris, of New York, 
at guard. The 15 Gophers rep- 
resent nine states. 

“Minnesota, because of 
Coach Haskins's appeal, is 
getting players from every- 
where,'’ James said. “There is 
no way with what this team has 
accomplished that it is going to 
flop in the first round. 

"No way,” he added. 
‘.‘Coach won’t let it happen. 
We won’t let it happen^” 

Tom Izzo, the Michigan 
State coach, said: "Gem has 
molded this team into a unit 
And they have got the one 
special player, Bobby Jack- 
son. that makes it happen for 
them in tough moments. They 
have depth, they have guards, 
they have forwards, they have 
a perimeter game. 

Haskins is often told by 
parents, "Take my son and 
make a man out of him. " 

His players say be does just 
that Jackson said the coach 
concentrates on life after bas- 
ketball. Jacobson said that 
Haskins is a tremendous mo- 
tivator, his career tales in- 
cluded. 



.Nm-Unnu/Hiiariv 


Joe Dziedzic of Pittsburgh, right, trying to slow down Peter Popovic of Montreal during the first period of their eventual 2-2 tie. 

Trade Finally Starts to Pay Off for Maple Leafs 


The Associated Press 

So far. the Doug Gilmour 
trade is looking pretty good — 
for both the New Jersey Devils 
and the Toronto Maple Leafs. 

While Gilmour has played 
inspirational hockey in New 
Jersey since his trade from 
Toronto on Feb. 25. the 
Maple Leafs have come out of 
a season-long funk. 

The Leafs lost their first 
game after trading the star 
center and defenseman Dave 
Ellett for three young players 
on Feb. 25, but Monday 
night's 3-3 tie with the D allas 
Stars stretched their unbeaten 
streak since then to five. 

"I think there was kind of a 
prevailing altitude to let Doug 
ao it," said Mike Murphy, the 
Toronto coach. Other players 
now “realize they have to do 
it,” he said. "Doug isn’t 


coming off the bench any- 
more.' 

Steve Sullivan, one of 
those acquired in the trade for 
Gilmour, helped set up the 
Maple Leafs' tying goal by 
Dafby Hendrickson with 47 
seconds left in the third peri- 
od. 

The Stars led, 3-2, when 
Murphy pulled goalie Felix 
Potvin for a sixth attacker. 
Sullivan corralled the puck 
behind the net and whipped it 
to Mats Sundin. Sundin one- 
timed the pass to Hendrick- 
son, who fired it over Arturs 
Irbe to tie the game at 19:13. 

Pat Verbeek scored his 
16th goal and Benoit Hogue 
his 14th to give the Central 
Division-leading Stars a 2-0 
lead after the first period. But 
Todd Warriner scored his 
11th and 12th goals in the 


second to tie the game for 
Toronto before Joe Nieuwen- 
dyk scored his 26th at 18:41 
to give Dallas a 3-2 lead. 

“Sometimes you come in 
where a team isn *r playing all 

NHL Roundup 

that well and you think you’re 
going to have it easy," Dallas 
forward and former Maple 
Leaf Benoit Hogue said. “We 
got up 2-0 and thought we'd 
have it easy. But it’s not over 
'till the fat lady sings. Hope- 
fully we can learn from 
this." 

Canadians 2 , P e ng uin s 2 In 

Pittsburgh. Valeri Bure and 
Stephane Richer scored in the 
last 3:35 of the third period as 
Montreal tied the Penguins. 

Richer capped the rally 
with his 18th goal at 18:08 


after the Canadiens goalie, 
Jocelyn Thibault, was pulled 
for an extra attacker with 2:29 
left in the third period. 

Senators 4, Coyotes 1 Ot- 
tawa got goals from Alexan- 
dre Daigle, Alexei Yashin, 
Steve Duchesne and Daniel 
Alfredsson as the Senators 
ended Nikolai Khabibulin's 
consecutive shutout streak. 

Phoenix returned home 
after three consecutive road 
shutouts by Khabibulin, who 
was trying to become the first 
NHL goalie to notch four in a 
row since Bill Duman, a Hall 
of Famer, did it for Montreal 
in 1948-49. 

"I knew it was going to end 
someday. No goalie is going 
to stop ah the shots every 
game, ' ' said Khabibulin. who 
suffered his 30th loss of the 
season. 


Clippers Push Back Warriors, 112-106 


The Associated Press 

The Los Angeles Clippers ended a 
four-game losing streak and opened a 
three-game lead over the Phoenix Suns 
in the race for the final playoff spot in 
the Western Conference with a 112- 
106 victory over Golden State. 

The Warriors, who would have 
moved within two games of Los 
Angeles with a victory, instead fell 
four behind after their game, the sole 
contest Monday in the National Bas- 
ketball Association. 

Rodney Rogers scored eight of the 
dippers’ final 10 points to help them 
overcome a 16-point deficit and Latrell 
Sprewell’s 41 points for the Warriors. 

"We picked up our defense with a 
carload of guys," said Los Angeles's 
coach. Bill Fitch. “Our defense ac- 


tually got us into our offense. .1. told 
them at halftime that tight losses where 
the quality of play was good lets you 
think there might be areal stinker right 

NBA 

around the corner. You've got an ex- 
cuse to play a stinking game, but don't 
do iL Every game is important." 

The Clippers won the season series 
with Golden State, 3- 1 , as the Warriors 
fell to 0-8 on the road against op- 
ponents in the Pacific Division. 

Loy Vaught led the Clippers with 22 
points and 1 1 rebounds, arid a rookie. 
Lorenzen Wright, added a season-high 
17 points, as well as 10 rebounds. 

The Warriors had a 64-5 1 advantage 
with 10:46 left in the third quarter. But 


Brent Barry’s 3-pointer starred Los 
Angeles on a 15-2 run that tied the 
score 66-66 with 6:17 left in the peri- 
od. 

“Bottom line was they stopped us 
when they had to, and we weren’t able 
to stop them," Golden State’s Chris 
Mullin said. 

Mullin, whose string of 47 consec- 
utive free throws was snapped in the 
second quarter, was ejected with 1:38 
left in the game after arguing an of- 
fensive foul call with the referee. 
Tommy Nunez. Mullin walked off the 
court with the ball. 

“Most of the time you don’t have 
the ball in your hands when you’re 
ejected,’ ' he said. “I happened to have 
it in my hands and I just kept walk- 
ing." 


“I think we just play dif- 
ferently at home. We play 
simple on the road and ar 
home, we just don't do it for 
60 minutes." 

The Coyotes managed only 
21 shots on Ron Tugnutt, who 
lost a chance for his third ca- 
reer shutout when Jim Johnson 
scored 1:29 into the third peri- 
od. 

Blaefchawfcs 2, Canucks 2 

Chicago's Jeff Hackett made 
35 saves and Vancouver's 
Corey Hirsch 30 in Chicago. 

The decision left the 
Blackhawks with the worst 
home record in the league at 
1 1-18-4. At the same time, the 
Colorado Avalanche be- 
nefited, becoming the first 
team to clinch a playoff berth 
this season. Murray Craven 
and Jim Cummins scored for 
the Blackhawks, which have 
won one of their last seven 
games. Lonny Bohonos and 
Markus Naslund had goals 
for Vancouver, which has 
won one of its last nine. 

Kings 3, Rod Wings 3 Ray 

Ferraro scored on a break- 
away. with 7:38 left in the 
third period and Kevin 
Stevens had three assists as 
Los Angeles rallied from a 
three-goal deficit to tie vis- 
iting Detroit, 

Stevens, who missed the 
previous seven games be- 
cause of a bruised ankle, set 
up second-period goals by- 
Sean O'Donnell and Ed Ol- 
czyk. He also started the play 
that resulted in the tying goal, 
winding the puck around the 
boards from behind the 
Kings’ net to Kai Nurrainen, 

Vyacheslav Kozlov, Kris 
Draper and Tomas Sandstrom 
scored for the Red Wings, 
who extended their unbeaten 
streak to 1 1 games. 


Nike’sHead 
Faults Deal 
By Yankees 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Phil 
Knight, the Nike chairman, 
has accused Major League 
Baseball of making a mistake 
by allowing the New York 
Yankees to make their own 
deal with Adidas. Knight said 
his company would not rush 
out to sign teams. 

The Yankees and Adidas 
agreed last week to a spon- 
sorship contract worth about 
S95 million for 10 years. 

The Yankees’ owner, 
George Steinbreimer, has de- 
fied baseball's lawyers by re- 
fusing to provide a copy of the 
Adidas contract. The ruling 
executive council may vote on 
whether to fine the team un- 
less it reveals the agreement. 

The move came four 
months after baseball owners 
rejected a 10-year, league- 
wide agreement with Nike 
and Reebok. 

“Major league baseball 
screwed up, and it’s a real 
problem for them." Knight 
said Monday. “They have a 
ways to go to get their act 
together." 

Reebok is said to be talking 
about deals with the Boston 
Red Sox and possibly the 
Chicago White Sox. The 
Florida Marlins are said to be 
talking with Fruit of the 
Loom's Pro Player division. 

If large-market teams 
make their own deals, it will 
give them more cash when 
competing for free agents 
with the small-market clubs. 

■ Unhappy Infidder 

John Valentin, who had 
been absent from the Red Sox 
training camp, agreed to 
switch from shortstop to 
second base but he said be 
would prefer to move much 
further: away from Boston. 

Saying he would be back in 
camp Tuesday at Fort Myers, 
Florida. Valentin repeated his 
request to be traded 

“I am a professional," he 
said. “I am not a baby. It's 
time to come in here and turn 
die page, and I’m ready to 
play. 

“When I put on ray uni- 
form tomorrow. I will go out 
there just to play baseball, and 
every other thought will be 
out of my mind" 

Valentin, one of the best- 
hitting shortstops in the ma- 
jors, was asked to move to 
second base to make room for 
a top prospect, Nomar Gar- 
cia parra. 

The disgruntled infielder 
was given a 48-hour furlough 
Saturday after the new Red 
Sox manager, Jimy Williams, 
told him the plan. 

The Yankees, meanwhile, 
created their shortstop, Derek 
Jeter, to a pay raise. 

The Yankees could have re- 
newed his contract at 
$1 50.000, but instead they 
gave him $525,000 . 

Jeter, who was the Amer- 
ican League rookie of the year 
last season, had asked for 
$550,000. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


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ANP AN ERA5ER, ANP 
A RULER, ANP YOUR 
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PAGE 26 


POSTCARD 


Single Malt Stories 


By Janny Scott 

;Vw H'rt Times Ser\-ice 


N EW YORK — An in- 
vitation arrives, out of 
the blue. You are invited to 
supper with a couple of au- 
thors you admire, at a club in 
Manhattan where you will 
never be a member (but where 
you do not mind imagining 
you belong). 

You may notice the name 
of a literary magazine on the 
invitation. Maybe you notice 
the name of some liquor com- 
pany. too. Faintly flattered, 
you accept. 

On the appointed evening, 
you find yourself in a dark 
wood-paneled room abuzz 
with people dressed mostly in 
black, who can be overheard 
saying things like: “That was 
the weirdest book. I can't re- 
member a word of it now.” 


□ 


The only liquor being 
offered turns out to be single 
malt Scotch, made by the 
company whose name you 
half-noticed on the invitation. 
A marketing executive for the 
liquor company approaches 
the podium, clinks her glass 
and welcomes her guests: '*1 
want to thank everyone for 
coming to our evening of 
single mall and stories.” 

There is a new kind of cul- 
tural event on the calendar in 
New York City and in other 
cities across the United 
States. Over the last few 
years, several large distrib- 
utors of Scotch have organ- 
ized readings (accompanied, 
of course, by Scotch) and giv- 
en elaborate, bv-invitation- 
onJy literary dinner parties 
(accompanied, of course, by 
Scotch). 

The intention is to appro- 
priate some of the glamour 
that currently inheres in cer- 
tain attractive, youngish cre- 
ators of literary fiction for the 


purpose of peddling liquor. 

One evening in February, 
several hundred subscribers 
to Harper’s magazine sat 
down to a dinner of Scottish 
smoked salmon and roast 
beef in a banquet room at the 
Yale Club in midtown Man- 
hattan, at the invitation of the 
Macallan single highland 
malt Scotch whisky and Har- 
per's magazine. 

The evening's attraction 
was a reading by New York's 
much-discussed literary cou- 
ple of the moment: Kathryn 
Harrison, the novelist, who has 
just published a book about her 
incestuous relationship with 
her father, and her husband, 
Colin Harrison, also a novelist 
and deputy editor of Harp- 
er's. 

Ten days earlier, the Mac- 
allan and Granta magazine 
had held a similar dinner at 
the University Club featuring 
Paul Auster. Jeffrey Eugen- 
ides and three other writers. 

Johnnie Walker Black La- 
bel. too, has tried the literary 
tiling. In mid- 1 995. it re- 
cruited four young writers to 
read in six of the company's 
target-market cities. Working 


with promoters in each city, it 
ioed 


rounded up crowds of guests 
from the worlds of fashion, 
photography and advertising. 

In New York, Frank De- 
Caro read from “A Boy 
Named Phyllis: A Suburban 
Memoir” at Global 33 in the 


East Village. Jennifer Egan 
tisible 


read parts of “The Invisit 
Circus” in a rock *n' roil club 
in Washington. 

“There was this weirdly 
Noel Coward aura to the 
whole thing,” said Thomas 
Seller, who found himself 
reading from his book. “Se- 
duction Theory." in a Chica- 
go bookstore while tuxedoed 
waiters poured drinks. “It 
was as though l was a hedge 
fund manager having a cock- 
tail party.” 


Shockingly Mainstream: The New Howard Stern 


By Caryn James 

New York Tunes Service 


N EW YORK — All together 
now. the media mantra about 
Howard Stem: He is a compul- 
sively faithful husband; his rude- 
ness is just an act. and (pretend to 
be surprised here) he’s really a nice 
guy! 

Just a few years ago the spin was 
that Stem was vile, raunchy to the 
core. (Fans saw that as a compli- 
ment) The new spin, repealed re- 
lentlessly in interviews and reviews, 
is that Stem is a good boy mas- 
querading as a bad one. With this 
magical media transformation, he 
has made himself safe for main- 


stream America while spouting rude 
fantasies and 


questions, forbidden 
details of his sexual adventures on 
the Internet all the way to the bank. 

“Private Parts.” the autobio- 
graphical film that opened on Fri- 
day in the United States, is a cer- 
tified blockbuster, til was No. 1 ax 
the box office over the weekend, 
bringing in a strong $15.1 million.) 

On screen, his doss at WNBC 
radio, a man he nicknames Pig 
Vomit, yells at him. “You're the 
anti-Christ!" The scene is played for 
broad laughs and slapstick, because 
Stem, of course, is not the anti- 
Christ. He is the anti-Oprah, proof 
that a blunt, macho pop celebrity can 
go a long way in an age dominated 
by gushingly sincere sob sisters. 
That is the clever stance from which 
he has conquered America. Best 
known for making crass sexual re- 
marks. he has also insulted and de- 
flated die images of Oprah Winfrey. 
Kathie Lee Gifford, Roseanne and 
other weepy icons of public con- 
fession. 

He is now the kind of celebrity no 
one can escape. People know about 
him even if they don't listen to the 
radio, (about 18 million hear his 
show around the country) or watch 
late-night television (a half-hour 
version of the show appears 
weeknights on the E! channel, and 
he is a frequent guest on the Jay 
Leno and David Letterman shows). 

To hype “Private Parts” (based 


on his best-selling book), he has 
appeared on the covers of Enter- 
tainment Weekly. Rolling Stone. 
Time Out New York and even 
some editions of TV Guide (those 
sold on newsstands in about 35 big 
cities where his show is heard). 
You don’t get more mainstream 
than TV Guide. 

He has been profiled and ana- 
lyzed in magazines from Playboy to 
The New Yorker. And here's a 
thought more threatening than any- 
thing heard on the Stem show: A raft 
of scholarly work on ”1710 Semi- 
otics of Howard Stem” can't be far 
away. 

Back in the mainstream, critics 
have given the film glowing if 
dichd-ridden reviews, with phrases 
like "comic valentine" arid “ex- 
plosive laughs” featured in the ads. 
The reissued paperback of “Private 
Pans” will be No. 8 on the New 
York Times best-seller list on 
March 16; the movie's soundtrack 
entered the Billboard pop chart as 
No. 1, reportedly the fastest-selling 
soundtrack in history. 

His mainstream popularity may- 
say less about culture becoming 
edgier than about Stem becoming 
tamer. The movie is a sanitized! 
even polite version of his radio show 
and his two best-selling books. The 
film includes some nudity and un- 
printable words, but essentially it is 
an All-American success story, with 
a happy, monogamous marriage at 
its heart. People who expect to be 
outraged won t be. 

Today the bad boy has turned 
himself inside out and manages to 
have it both ways. He hangs onto an 
audience that prizes his blunt, ad- 
olescent attitude. This audience, 
mostly young and mostly male, is 
the one that embraces Stem’s 
routines, like nude massages and 
his lesbian obsession. But by in- 
sisting that he is a devoted husband 
and father, and by making that 
“private” fact an important part of 
his public persona, he has gradually 
cultivated a wider, mote upscale 
audience, too. Now he says vile 
things with a wink; he can't lose. 

His popularity gives him a place 



icaliy correct remark, and even 
Stem knows that child abase is no 
joke. But child abuse is not the point 
here; the absurdity of celebrity con- 
fessions is. Wouldn't there be a 
gleeful thrill in halting one of those 
teary moments in which Winfrey or 
Roseanne or a dozen other celebs 
share their pain? Didn't you ever 
want to yell, “Enough. Oprah”? 
He says it for us, but more crudely. 
In “Private Parts” he even writes a 
parody of a Christmas letter from 
the Winfrev family, a cheery note 
that fills friends in on all the uncles 
and cousins who did and didn't 
molest Optah that year. 

That complete lack of taste, the 
kind of thing that led bun to be 
labeled a “shock jock” in the first 
place, is missing from the flood of 
recent interviews and from the 
movie itself. The film’s commer- 
cial appeal is built on many smart, 
disarming choices. 

The producer is Ivan Reitman, 
who has also directed “Ghost- 
busters” and other hit comedies. 
The director is Betty Thomas, who 
was smart enough to make “The 
Brady Bunch Movie” a winning 
parody. And, when defusing po- 


tential problems, it doesn't hurt (o 
ifemal 


K.C fUiW. 


Stern in ‘'Private Parts”: Tbe nice side of the shock jock. 


in the cultural landscape. Maybe 
that place is the highway rest stop 
in New Jersey "that Governor 
Christine Todd’ Whitman named 
after him. Much of the Stem humor 
is on the level of a 3-year-old 
yelling “poop’ ’ out loud in church. 
People root for him the wav they 
once cheered tor the class clown 
who made fun of the teacher: he got 
detention, you laughed and went 
home on time. It's the classic 
strategy of the comic as scapegoat, 
carrying the weight of all the hon- 
esty- and bad behavior real grown- 


ups avoid. Stem is the illegitimate 
father of Beavis and Butt-head. 

But the deeper source of his pop- 
ularity. at least in his pre-Holly- 
wood phase, is his cutting down of 
shrewdly chosen targets. 

“Even,- celebrity book should 
have revelations,” he says in 
“Miss America,” a collection of 
observations that was his best- 
selling follow-up to “Private 
Parts.” He writes; “Oprah Win- 
frey has a great stoiy. She's been 
molested by half her family tree.” 

That is not, of course, a polit- 


have a female director tel] the stoiy 
of a man known for treating women: 
as sex objects. (In a similar way, 
racist and sexist problems on tbe 
radio show are defused by tbe pres- 
ence of his black, female sidekick, 
Robin Quivers.) 

But the film won't do much to 
explain his success or appeal to 
nonfans. Neither will the endless 
interviews, which echo the official 
press kit of information put out by 
Paramount Pictures. Rolling Stone 
says that in person Stern is “ten- - 
tative. honest, someone who wants 
to be liked.*' Last Friday on the 
"Tonight” show, Jay Leno intro- 
duced him by saying. “If you’re 
not a Howard Stem fan. you should 
see this movie. You'll see a dif- 
ferent side of Howard." ' As the real 
Stem says in the press kiu his fans 
will be “pretty surprised” by his 
softer side. Not after all those in- 
terviews they won't. 







iiThu^ 







PEOPLE 


PL 


I 


N A centuries-old ceremony. Paul McCartney, 
the Beatle who joked 30 years ago about smoking 


marijuana at Buckingham Palace, went back to see 
II to c 


Queen Elizabeth II to collect a knighthood for 
helping to revolutionize pop music. The lad from 
Liverpool, one of tbe most successful songwriters 
in history, became Sir Paul McCartney. Outside the 
palace, ft was just like tbe old days as London was 
treated to the screaming adulation that marked 
Beatlemania in the 1 960s. When the Beatles picked 
up their MBE aw ards in 1966. they joked that the 
band had smoked pot in the palace toilets before 
meeting tbe queen. Sir Paul said that the two other 
surviving members of the Beatles now call him 
“Your Holiness.” 


Sotheby's New York announced Tuesday that 
the Pamela Harriman estate, including the con- 
tents of her hous^is in Georgetown and Middleburg 
as well as the ambassador's personal possessions 
from the residence in Paris, will be sold on May 19 
and 20 in New York. The estate includes numerous 
paintings ana draw mgs u.s well as furniture, books 
and wine. There also will be a lair amount of 
Churchill memorabilia, the auction house said. 


irresponsible bit of filmmaking — if you can even 
call it that — that I’ve ever seen,” Pitt said. “I 
couldn't believe it.” 


□ 


The man who builds Mirage fighter-bombers. 
Serge Dassault, was accused of going oaaRambo- 
style hunting expedition firing off a hunting rifle 
from the roof of a speeding Jeep. A French court 
heard that Dassault, 71. broke all the rules of 


Nigeria Lai 
Face* I r.-a 


□ 


Ada* Budn/Th- Umud ft™. 

Sir Paul McCartney with his insignia after his investiture at Buckingham Palace. 


The Cuban-American singer Gloria Estefan, 
remembering her close brush with paralysis seven 
years ago. donated S250.000 and a public an- 
nouncement to research into spinal cord injuries. 
“When I wrote and produced ‘Get on Your Feel’ I 
never Imagined that the lyrics would become so 
profound and powerful and symbolize so much to 
me and millions the world over who have suffered 
catastrophic spinal cord injuries." said the former 
member of Sound Machine. Estefan suffered a 
serious back injury in a March 1990 bus accident. 


The 1 Sin movie aooul the superspy James Bond 
will be called "Tomorrow Never Dies” and the 
British star Jonathan Price will play its villain, the 
film's producers announced in London. Pryce. who 
starred alongside Madonna in the recent movie- 
musicai “Eura." plays a power-mad media mogul 
who controls new spapers and satellite systems. 


hunting on his estate adjoining the RambouHlet 
abi 


forest, west of Paris, inhabited by 20 0 deer. Game . 
wardens caught Dassault firing from his speeding 
chauffeur-driven vehicle with a hunting rifle with 
telescopic sights, the court heard. Dassault re- 
portedly told the game keepers he did not have the 
time to go hunting in the normal way by stalkinghis 
prey. The court reserved judgment until April 21. 


The actor Brad Pitt said only the threat of a 
lawsuit made him complete the filming of the just- 
released movie "Devil's Own.” in which he plays 
an IRA gunner who befriends an Irish-American 
cop. played by Harrison Ford. Pin said he wanted 
to call it quits when Columbia Pictures scrapped the 
original script, which he liked, for a revamped 
version he said was deplorable. “It was the most 


□ 


Fresh from two Grammy Awards, the country 
star Vince GiH has picked up another honor. The 
Tennessee PGA Junior Tour has been officially 

renamed the Vince Gill Tennessee PGA Junior* 

V 


Tour. At the Grammys. Gill ’s * ‘Worlds Apart” was 


named the top male country vocal performance. He 
won the collaboration award for ‘.‘High Lonesome 
Sound” with Alison Krauss and Union Station., 


iSL. 

I -■ — 



Even-' country has its own AT&T Access Number which 




makes calling from France and other countries 


really easy Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the 


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country you’re calling from and you'll get the fastest, 


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in the springtime. 


for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


EUROPE 


Sweden. 


0Z8-79Wm 



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Steps hi follow when 
calling imenjaUonafly from orerseas; 


1 Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the counUy you 
are calling from. 


2. Dial the phone number jmi’re calling. 

3. Dial ihe calling card number listed above your name. 



saw OOO Ttl 

I8QM . 0/ \ 


1VM? 309 


Austria «o 


022-933-011 

Switzerland* .... 

0880-89-8011 

Belgian! • .. 


0-800-100-10 

United KJnottam* 

0080-89-0811 

France 


. .0-800-99-0811 

MIDDLE EAST 


Germany 


0130-081 D 

E&yp1*(Ca(TS>)’ 

.. 510-0208 

Breeee* 


00-800-1311 

Israel 

. 177-100-Z727 

Ireland .. 


. 1-800-550-000 

Saudi Arabia^ ... . 

1 -089-10 

Haly« 


172-1011 

AFRICA 


Netturtaads*. . 


..06-922-B111 

Ghana 

0181 

Russia •*fMt»sow)» 


.750-6042 

Kenya* . .. 

0-800-10 

Spain-:- 


. ... 900-9M0-11 

South Africa 

0-800-99-9123 


AT&T 



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