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Heralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


The World’s Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHEJDyUTH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


London, Thursday, March 13, 1997 



No. 35,468 






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Albanian Revolt 
Melts Into Chaos 

Peaceful Protests Give Way 
To Thugs With Kalashnikovs 


By Jane Perlez 

New York Tima Service 


VLORE. Albania — There is no enemy, there is no war, 
* ,s cit y reverberates with gunfire. 

Killes that were drnnped on town streets roann a popular 
rebellion axe now being used in menacing shows of bravado 
at roadblocks on the main boulevard. The armed revolt 
here, which began 1 1 days ago as the outgrowth of peaceful 
protests, is showing signs of going sour and giving way to 

here agrees pn one thing. They want to see die 
end of President Sail Berisha, whose government sat back 
— and, some Western economists believe, enriched itself 

us pyramid investment schemes siphoned off depositors * 
money, leaving thousands of Albanians penniless. People 
here are even talking of having Mr. Berisha hanged. 

Before the guns arrived, angry Albani ans had been 
protesting for weeks, demanding that the government see 
that their investments be refunded. When the protests 
erupted into violent ones in Vi ore, many here were proud 
that their uprising had set the stage for a string of rebel 
victories over government forces in 10 major towns across 
the southern region of Albania. 

But ordinary people are terrified by the gangsters and 
thugs ruling the streets. 

One young man said he was upset to see convicted felons, 
freed by the rebels from (he jail of a nearby town, cavorting 
with automatic machine guns in the center of town. 

It is too dangerous to venture out because the 


cnm- 


See ALBANIA, Page 6 


MdodLccUIRmn 

Two residents of Elbasan in southern Albania walking away from an army base alter 
- about 100 protesters denouncing President Sali Berisha looted it of weapons Wednesday. 


AGENDA 

Nigeria Laureate 
Faces Treason 

Agence F rance-Proxe 

LAGOS — Fifteen people, in- 
cluding Wole Soyinfct, the self-ex- 
iled Nobel Prize-winning writer, 
were charged with treason Wed- 
nesday on counts of causing ex- 
plosions and waging war on Ni- 
geria's military leader. General 
Sani Abacha. 

Eleven defendants were present 
when the two-count charge was 
read at the magistrate's court in 
Ikeja, near the capital. If convicted 
they face the death penalty, their 
lawyers said. 

AH 15 are accused of "conspir- 
'ing to levy war” against Nigeria 
, ana of “causing explosions.’ 1 Four 
of the defendants, including Mr. 
Soyinka, are out of the country. 


| The Dollar 1 

Now Yam 

Wednesday « 4 P.M. 

previous dose 

DM 

1.6928 

1.7038 

Pound 

1.5987 

1.6077 

Yen 

122-27 

121 .7B5 

FF 

5.713 

5.7435. 

| s The Dow 1 

mm 


previous does 

■45.TO 

7039.37 

7085.16 

i S&P 500 1 

Change 

Wednesday « 4 P.M. 

previous ckne 

-7.79 

803.44 

81123 


Cost of Bailout Rises 
At Credit Lyonnais 

The bailout of Credit Lyonnais, 
the embattled state-owned bank, is 
likely to end up costing the French 
government far more than had been 
expected — about 130 billion 
French francs ($23 billion), Patrick 
Devediian, a member of a parlia- 
mentary finance committee, said 
Wednesday. Page 15. 

PAOETWO 

A Battle in the Duty-Free Shop 

THE AMERICAS PW 3 - 

Lake's Bearings Begin Tensely 

EUROPE P *®* 7, 

A Leap Into the Void for NATO? 

Page 9. 

Page 9. 

Pages 8-9. 


Books.. 

Crossword 

Opinion 

Sports 


International Classified Page 12. 


French Plea: One ’ 98 Event at a Time 

Don’t Let Euro Decision Coincide With Our Elections , 9 Paris Urges EU 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — France urged its European 
partners Wednesday to carefully time 
the decision next year on which coun- 
tries will be allowed to take part in the 
launch of Europe's single currency so 
that it does not coincide with French 
national elections and “create some 
political turbulence.” 

Finance Minister Jean Arthms, 
speaking at a meeting in Lyon with his 
German counterpart, Tbeo Waigel . said; 
“We don’t want the two events — the 
French election and the procedure for 
selecting the countries that will launch 
the euro — to overlap.” 

An aide to Mr. Armttis explained that 
* 'it is obvious that the subject of the euro 
will be an issue in the election” and 
added that ‘ ‘it would be quite difficult to 
have the selection process during the 
two rounds of the French elation be- 
cause it could create some political tur- 
bulence.” He said this was the first time 
Mr. Arthurs had broached the timing 
issue in public. 

The aide said that Mr. Waigel “un- 
derstood the problem” and promised in 
light of Franco-German friendship to 
help keep separate the French legis- 
lative elections and the timing on the 
decision on which nations fulfill 
Maastricht single currency criteria. 
France is expected to hold its elections 
in March 1998, implying that the de- 
rision on who will launch the euro 
would probably be pot off until after the 
voters have gone to the polls. 

The German and French ministers, 
however, were adamant in denying ru- 
mors that the launch date for the euro — 
Jan. 1, 1999 — would in any way be 
delayed. “We shall keep to the 
timetable,*' Mr. Arthurs said. 

The choice of which nations will 



*j*j*^l 

Paitck CMO Asjocated Pre» 

The finance ministers of Germany, Theo Waigel, left, and of France, 
Jean Arthurs, sharing a laugh Wednesday at a meeting in Lyon. 


Chinese in Japan Find a Thieves’ Dreai 


By Sheryl WuDunn 

New York Tuna Service 


TOKYO — A year ago, five men 
swooped in on a club in the Ginza 
district here, cut the telephone lines and 
used short swords and fake guns to 
threaten guests and steal more than 
$100,000 in jewelry, watches and cash. 

Last month, four men burst into a 
cond ominium at about midnight, bran- 
dished large swords and held their cap- 
tives fora couple of days for a $280,000 
ransom until the police broke in. A few 
days later, aman was kidnapped, robbed 


of $43,000, and was then found by the 
police to have previously kidnapped 
someone else for ransom. 

Such flashy crimes are unusual in 
Japan, particularly because crime itself 
is rarer than in most industrialized coun- 
tries. But what both relieves and dis- 
turbs the police about these crimes is 
that they were committed not by Jap- 
anese but by Chinese. 

One aspect of internationalization in 
Asia is that a flood of Chinese are sneak- 
ing into Japan to find work. What alarms 
many people here is that these days they 
are sneaking in at a faster pace, aided by 


a formidable alliance between Chinese 
smugglers and the Japanese under- 
world, o ryakuza — and that these illegal 
migrants are often turning to crime. 

“Japanese society is completely un- 
prepared for these people, ’ ’ said Tateshi 
Higuchi, chief of the international unit 
of the criminal investigation bureau at 
the National Police Agency. “These 
people are not originally criminals. 
They are not members of an under- 
ground mafia. But they often borrow 
money to get here and find they can’t 

See CRIME, Page 6 


U.S. Move Steps Up 
Pressure on Israel 

Washington’s Decision to Join 
Arafat Meeting Irks Netanyahu 


launch the euro is politically sensitive increasing speculation that the single 
throughout Europe. In Germany, opinion currency launch will have to be delayed 
polls show that a majority is opposed to beyond January 1999. The debate is 
giving up the Deutsche mark. In France, being fueled by doubts about whether 
as elsewhere in Europe, critics have Germany will succeed in paring its de- 
linked austerity measures with the cam- firit enough to meet the Maastricht coo- 
paign to meet single currency criteria. 

The French request comes at a time of See EMU, Page 6 


By Serge Schraemann 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minister 
Benjamin Netanyahu declared Wednes- 
day that he was “fed up” with charges 
that everything be did violated the peace 
accords, but an American decision to 
join in an international meeting called 
by the Palestinians in Gaza this week- 
end indicated more such charges were to 
come. 

Mr. Netanyahu made his comments 
at a press conference concluding his 
visit to Moscow. His remarks came after 
unrelenting attacks on his decision to 
build a new Jewish neighborhood in 
East Jerusalem and on the size of the 
portions of the West Bank that Israel has 
decided to turn over to Palestinian rule; 
the Palestinians see that withdrawal as 
far too small. 

The criticism was capped by a bitter 
letter from King Hussein of Jordan, who 
accused Mr. Netanyahu of destroying 
the peace, saying his actions threatening 
to unleash a new wave of violence. 

“I'm getting frankly fed up with the 
idea that everything we do is a violation 
of the agreement, and everything the 
Palestinians say is in compliance with 
the agreement.*' Mr. Netanyahu said at 
the press conference. “If the Palestin- 
ians are serious about peace, let them sit 
down with us. If they are serious about 
airing their differences, let them sit 
down with us.” 

For now, however, the Palestinian 
leader, Yasser Arafat, was evidently not 
prepared to sit down, or even talk to Mr. 
Netanyahu. Israeli television said he 
refused to answer two telephone calls 
from Mr. Netanyahu on Monday, and 
was refusing to meet with represen- 
tatives of the prime minister. 

Instead, Mr. Arafat prepared to con- 
vene a meeting in Gaza to discuss the 
state of the Israel i - Pales tini an peace 
agreements to which be invited Egypt, 
the European Union, Japan, Jordan, 
Norway, Russia and the United Stales 
— but not Israel 

Mr. Netanyahu reacted angrily to the 
plan, telling reporters in Moscow, “The 
attempt to convene an international con- 
ference is a clear violation of die Oslo 
accords, because in the accords there is a 
system for working out conflicts — the 
supreme steering committee — and when 
Arafat refuses to talk to a prime minister 
and he convenes such a conference, that 
is a violation of die agreement.” 

Despite the Israeli position, the 
United States was among the first to 
announce it would attend. The State 
Department said it would be represented 
by the U.S. consul general in Jerusalem, 
Edward Abington. whose major respon- 
sibility is contact with the Palestinians. 

U.S. officials said they regarded the 
gathering as a normal meeting with Mr. 


Arafat, from which there would be no 
joint statement or resolution. 

“We regard this as a briefing by Ara- 
fat on developments in the peace pro J 
cess,” said the U.S. ambassador to Israel. 
Martin Indyk. “We do not see it as an 
alternative forum in any way whatsoever 
to the direct process of negotiations.’ ’ 

Last week! the United States vetoed a 
United Nations Security Council reso- 
lution condemning the plans for a new 
Jewish neighborhood in East Jerusalem, 
drawing an angry reaction from some 
Palestinians. 


King Hussein 
Admonishes 
Israeli Over 
His Policies 


By Serge Schmemann 

New York Tima Service 

JERUSALEM — In a personal and 
forceful rebuke, King Hussein of Jordan 
has written Prime Minister Benjamin 
Netanyahu that he cannot continue as a 
partner and friend “when I sense an 
intent to destroy all I worked to build 
between our peoples and states.” 

The king’s letter, which was de- 
livered Sunday, and a stiff reply from 
Mr. Netanyahu on Monday, added an 
unexpected dimension to the deepening 
confrontation between Israel and the 
Palestinians and threatened to com-: 
pound the political crisis in the Israeli 
government 

Both letters were made available 
Tuesday, after reports of the stem Jor- 
danian criticism, from a king known for 
his reserved public demeanor, were 
published in several Israeli newspa- 
pers. 

The king, alternating between ex- 
pressions of sorrow, anger and fear in 
the three-page, single-spaced letter, ac- 
cused Mr. Netanyahu of a long series of 
decisions and actions that amounted to 
“continued deliberate humiliation of 
your so-called Palestinian partners.” 

If Mr. Netanyahu proceeded with the 
construction of a Jewish settlement in 
East Jerusalem, warned the king, — 
Israel's closest partner in the Arab 
world — it would amount to pushing the 
Palestinians to “inevitable violent re- 
sistance." 

“I frankly cannot accept your re- 

See LETTERS, Page 12 


Life Sentence for Victims 
Of Rape in Peru: Marriage 


By Calvin Sims 

New York Tuna Senice 


LIMA — Late one night more than 
three months ago, three drunken men in 
their 20s raped a 17-year-old girl on her 
way home lrom work in the crime-ridden 
Villa El Salvador district of Lima. 

After the young woman told her fam- 
ily about the assault, her father and 
brother tracked down the rapists, who 
lived in their neighborhood. Her father 
wanted to kill them, said the young 
woman, who asked to be identified only 
by her first name. Maria Elena. Her 
brother wanted to beat them. She 
wanted to press charges. 

But when one of tlx; rapists offered to 
many her, her family put pressure on 
her to accept, and she finally yielded 
after being threatened by the men who 
had raped her. 

In Peru the penal code exonerates a 
rapist if be offers to many the victim and 
she accepts. The law, written in 1924, 
was modified in 1991 to absolve all co- 
defendants in a rape case if one of them 
marries the victim. 

Now the Peruvian Congress is en- 


gaged in a bitter debate over how best to 
reform the law. Feminists argue that the 
law should be removed from the crim- 
inal code because it is degrading to 
women and legally unsound. 

But so far they have faced strong 
opposition from President Alberto 
Fujimori ’s Change 90 party, which holds 
a majority in Congress. It maintains that 

The Lima hostages are showing 
signs of chronic stress. Page 2. 

only the provision that exonerates co- 
defendants should be eliminated. 

Fourteen other Latin American coun- 
tries exonerate a rapist if he offers to 
marry the victim and she accepts, said 
Gaby Ore-Aguilar. staff attorney with 
the international program of the Center 
for Reproductive Law and Policy. Tlie 
Law in Costa Rica, one of the 14, ex- 
onerates a rapist if he expresses an in- 
tention to many the victim, even if she 
does not accept. 

“The problem with this iaw is that it 

See RAPE, Page 12 


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Cyprus — C.B1-0Q 

Denmark -.14.00 D-Kr Oman — Rate 
Finland — 12.00 F.M. 

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Great Britain— £0.90 SaucBAabte i.IOOC m 
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Kenya. — K. SH 160 

KuviiJ . 600 Rs Zimb abwe — Zim£jQ-00 

1 1 


After Decades Apart, DMZ Is No Barrier for Some Koreans 

V ...... .. ..... n . o__.il. IT —.11 l , 


By Teresa Watanabe 

Las Anteles Times Sendee 



8050 



SEOUL— The letter appeared like a voice from 
the grave in 1992. along with a faded black-and- 
white photograph of the family .that Shun Young 
Soo thought bad died, possibly in a concentration 
camo. in his native North Korea, 

The letter, smeared with the tears of his brother 
and sister, informed Mr. Shim that they had j 
aged to graduate from college and that their mother 
had dieda natural death- 

“Just before our mother passed away, she ailed 

out your name,” his siblings wrote to Mr. Shim, a 
64-year-old South Korean businessman who fled 


foe North in 1947 to join his father. He asked that 
his first name be changed to protect his relatives 
from official harassment. 

A year after the letter arrived, Mr. Shim and his 
brother, an inventor of aluminum products, met at 
a Chinese town at foe North Korean border, thanks 
to a private underground network that is dedicated 
to helping families reunite. It took bribes, a forged 
letter and a complex chain of contacts in four 
countries for the Shim brothers to realize their 
dream. 

Despite official restrictions on contact between 
foe North and South, many families are taking 
extraordinary measures to meet in what many say 
is their only wish left in foe last days of their fives. 


Some South Koreans are spending small fortunes 
on frequent trips to China and elsewhere to meet 
siblings or supply them with a lifeline of medicine, 
clothes and money to help them survive the 
North’s widespread food shortages and worsening 
economy. 

Half a century of separation between capitalist 
South and communist North melted away as Mr. 
Shim’s brother, who looked thin and old beyond 
his 61 years, ran to him at the airport. 

They exchanged no words. They simply em- 
braced and cried. 

“Blood is much stronger titan ideology and 
belief, so we were able to overcome differences 
and become family again,” Mr. Shim said. “No 


matter how many years pass, that will not 
change." 

North Koreans risk their personal safety by 
bribing officials or using forged documents to 
cross the border to see relatives. 

More than 5 million Korean families were 
wrenphed apart during the tumultuous years after 
World War fl, when foe United Stares and the 
Soviet Union split foe Korean Peninsula at the 38fo 
Parallel in foe infancy of foe Cold War. Millions 
fled Soviet rule, walking over the mountains of 
taking to the seas in secret voyages south, until foe 
border was sealed in 1948, when the North Korean 

See KOREA, Page 12 


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ENTEBNATIONAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY; MARCH IS, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


S J 


Spoiled by Success? / A Shattered Partnership 


For Duty-Free Kingpins, 
BreakingUp Was Hurd to Do 


By Jon Nordheimer 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — The plea for harmony 
from Ira Millstein, a high-powered New 
York lawyer, to the four men who con- 
trolled DFS Group, die duty-free shop- 
ping colossus, started off on a scolding note. 

“Two people want to diversify: two do not,” 
Mr. Millstein wrote in August to the men who 
had hired him to arbitrate their dispute over 
breaking up their long partnership. “This has 
happened before in the history of the world, and 
people have worked it out. It doesn't require a 
rocket scientist, only a recognition of reality.” 

A legal fight, be warned, could expose the 
partnership's “dirty linen" and reveal the inner 
workings of the privately held and highly prof- 
itable chain of duty-free shops that the owners 
had labored so hard to shield from the public. 
Did his clients take Mr. Millsiein’s advice and 


make peace before the playing field got muddy? 
No. Too i 


much was at stake. And so the gilded 
tale of DFS — a textbook success story, an 
almost perfect business, a cash machine that 
practically ran itself — is ending in a sour and 
uncharacteristically public falling out 

By late summer, two of the partners, Robert 
Miller, who two years ago married off his daugh- 
ter to Greece's exiled crown prince, and Anthony 
Piiaro, an American tax lawyer, were exchanging 
smoking fax messages with the other two, 
Charles Feeney, a plain-living American who had 
secretly given away more than $500 million over 
IS years, and Alan Parker, a British accountant. 

Their long-distance battle centered on wheth- 
er Mr. Feeney and Mr. Parker had the right to sell 
their majority interest — 58.75 percent — to 
LVMH Moet Hennessy-Louis Vuitton SA. The 
French company, a major supplier of luxury 
goods sold m 180 DFS stores in airports and 
cities around the globe, and a competitor in many 


of the same places, had offered to buy out all the 
for $4.2 


partners tor $4.2 billion. 

Faxes soon changed to depositions and af- 
fidavits, lawyers and lawsuits, before the So- 
lomonic Mr. Millstein cut the baby in half in 
arbitration hearings last December, ruling that 


the sale could go through if the minority partners 
were protected from any move by L> 


,VMH to 

squeeze the lifeblood out of its new acquisition. 


Losing the legal battle forced Mr. Miller, who 
IJSpe 


controlled 38.75 percent of DFS, and Mr. Piiaro. 
who held 2^ percent, to concede the war, agreeing 
In recent weeks to sell their interests to LVMH. 

Mr. Miller's sale is pending; if a disagreement 
over whether the French company should pick 
up some of his American tax obligations is 
resolved and the deal closes, be and the foun- 1 
dations where most of his fortune is parked will 
pick up the same amount as Mr. Feeney and his 
foundations: $1.63 billion. Mr. Parker received 
$840 million, and Mr. Piiaro received' $105 
million. 

That, of course, is the sort of breakup that most 
people could easily shake off. Still, the question 
remains: How was it possible that the two 
founders, Mr. Feeney and Mr. Miller, and the 
two clever men they brought in early in the game 
to structure a worldwide web of luxury goods 
shops, Mr. Parker and Mr. Piiaro. could end their 
relationship on such an acrimonious note? 

The paradoxical answer lies in the very suc- 


cess of the three expatriate Americans and Mr. 
Parker, a native of Rhodesia. The unending 
cascade of money into their bank accounts en- 
abled the four to go their separate ways, socially 
and financially, undermining the bonds of 
friendship and solidarity that form the heart of 
most bountiful partnerships. 

All four former partners declined requests for 
interviews. The story of what happened was 
pieced together from affidavits and other doc- 
uments submitted to the arbitrator and from 
interviews with people familiar with their feud- 
ing, most of whom requested anonymity. 

Mr. Feeney, who lives in London, turned his 
attention to charity, secretly giving away more 
than $500 milli on in recent years. Mr. Miller, a 
more flamboyant New Englander, officially 
lives in Hong Kong but hobnobbed with Euro- 
pean royalty. Mr. Parker lives in London, and 
Mr. Piiaro. who was a 
former associate of the in- 
famous American financi- 
er Robert Vesco, lives in 
Geneva. 

The relationship frac- 
tured first in the late 1980s 
over a venture by Mr. 

Feeney that his partners 
said conflicted with DFS 
operations in Hawaii. It 



iotm Oneim/Tbc hw*' Voi* Tire* 


came apart when he began 
.VMHtn 


negotiating with L 
sell his entire holdings, 
eventually winning Mr. 

Parker and his 20 percent 
stake to his side. 

The $42 billion price 
tag would have been be- 
yond the imagining of the 
two young Americans who 
sat in a Barcelona bar 40 
years earlier, hatching 
plans to sell tax-free liqnor 
to fellow GIs ending their 
stints in Europe. But the 
business that Mr. Feeney 
and Mr. Miller founded 
was an immediate hit, growing over the years 
into a global merchandising empire. 


Dividends distributed to the owners 
of the DFS Group, from documents 
filed in arbitration proceedings. 

$400 million 



300 J 



200 

J 


100 I 

iiiJjiiL 

0 


’80 ’85 *80 

-Figures not available where records 
were unreadable. 

*95 


A shopper at the DFS Galleria in Hong Kong trying on.a 
watch . After a long-distance battle of smoking faxes 
and affidavits, the fate of a company that caters especially 
to free-spending Japanese travelers in the Pacific Rim 
was decided in the offices of a Manhattan law firm. 


N OW catering especially to free-spend- 
ing Japanese travelers in the Pacific 
Rim, DFS had 1996 sales of $2.7 bil- 
lion, according to Duty Free News 
International, a trade journal based in London. 

In less than two decades, from 1977 to 1995, 
the company generated dividends of nearly $3 
billion. 90 percent of which went directly in cash 
to the four partners or to their tax-driven trusts 
and foundations. 

“This was not just a nice cash cow they 
milked,” said a lawyer who was thrown into the 
legal fray. "The size is more on the magnitude of 
Godzilla and King Kong.” 

But while DFS was the main source of their 
wealth, it hardly represented the entirety of their 
assets. 

“All of these guys are professional investors 
and successful outside of DFS,” a financial 
adviser familiar with their portfolios said. 
"Miller has earned another fortune in invest- 
ments in Asia and Australia. Feeney in software 
and tour companies, and Parker and Piiaro in 


hedge funds and high tech. 
They all have invested 
wisely in the greatest bull 
market in history.” 

Congressional overhaul 
of the federal tax system in 
1986 increased their iso- 
lation by prompting them 
to restructure the company 
in a way that put more dis- 
tance among them. Instead 
of direct owners, they be- 
came “shareholder repre- 
sentatives” of tax shelters 
and charitable foundations 
they created. The three 
Americans gave up their 
citizenship, apparently for 
tax reasons, and all took up residence abroad. 

Serious trouble started brewing in the late 
1980s after Mr. Feeney started ms own retail 
stores in Hawaii that his partners complained 
competed with DFS. When he refused to sell the 
shops, they stripped him of representation on the 
boards of DFS and some subsidiaries. 

Seeking to avoid further dissension, the four 
agreed in 1991 to submit disputes to an ar- 
bitrator, or “ wise man. ” For dial role, they chose 
Mr. Millstein, a senior partner in the New York 
law finn of Wefl, Gotshal & Manges who had 
helped settle boardroom battles at General Mo- 
tors and IBM. 

Things were more or less patched up by 1994 
when anew storm broke out. Some years earlier, 
Mr. Feeney had transferred his entire DFS stake 
to his charitable foundation and given away 
hundreds of millions of dollars, with more com- 
mitments in the pipeline. He needed a steady 
flow of dollars that DFS, with its reliance on die 
unpredictable tourism trade, could not provide. 


For example, its dividend payments soared 
from $40 million in 1978 to $400 million ir 


| million in 1988, 
plunged to $12 million in 1991 because of travel 
disruptions linked to the Gulf War and then 


bounced back to $300 miflion in 1994, according 
to documents submitted to the arbitrator. 


S 


O Mr. Feeney decided to sell his DFS 
stock and pin the proceeds into more 
conservative investments. The most lo- 
gical buyer, he concluded, was LVMH. 
With annual sales of nearly $6 billion, it had the 
size to make the combination work. And as a 
longtime supplier to DFS of upscale brawl names, 
it would make a good fit, Mr. Feeney thought And 
so be initiated talks with the French concern. 

His partners were furious. They viewed 
LVMH as a direct competitor in prized Asian 
markets and feared it might divert earnings from 
dividends into its own operations. For two years, 
the other partners pressured Mr. Feeney to 
change his mind. Instead, Mr. Feeney won Mr. 
Parker to his side. Together, they owned 58.75 of 
die company — the majority stake that LVMH 
coveted. 

Mr. Miller and Mr. Piiaro then countered that 
any sale would violate their 1991 wise-man 
agreement and called on Mr. MiQstein to make a 
ruling. He called for reasonableness on all sides. 

But even with his coaching, negotiations went 
nowhere. An offer by Mr. Miller and Mr. Piiaro 
to buy out the others was rejected. 

The central issues quickly boiled down to 
whether the 1991 agreement required the selling 
partners to obtain the approval of the nonsellers, 
and if not, whether a sale would damage the 
holdings of Mr. Miller and Mr. Piiaro. 

Afcer much discussion, Mr. Millstein ruled in 


favor of Mr^ Feeney and Mr. Parker but per- 

ArnaulLto 


suaded LVMH’s chairman, Bernard 
sign a 21-page agreement designed to assuage 
the nonsellers’ concerns. 

Essentially, it requires LVMH to follow the 
established marketing and buying practices of 
DFS and to act in a way that would not divert DFS 
profits to the parent company’s operations. 

The sale of the controlling stake was closed 
the same day. 



^Jal 


Show Stress, J V 

B : ' i J , -E- 



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After 85 Days, Ailments 
Afflict Rebels as MS ; 


Reuters -- 

LIMA — Hostages in. the, Japanese 
ambassador’s home here are showing:. , 
signs of chronic stress, including gum;, 
disease and skin ailments, after l&.days Jt 
under the guns of Marxist rebels, 
doctor said. ’ ~ 

The 72 men, held by guerrillas 
m endi n g freedom for .around 400 jailed / - 
comrades,' are all in basically good. : 
health but are showing physical wear 
from nearly three mombs in captivity^ 
the doctor, a member of a Red Cross ;’ 
team treating diem, said Tuesday. -tv-tK. 

“They are- showing problems cora-.Jj 
mon to people in captivity, compUc-:,> 
ations related to chronic angst,* \ 
doctor said. : .rv- 

The plight of the hostages, who bave ( : 
been kept inside the mansion with the'*;' 
windows closed and no air c<mdiiiqnmgJ7. - 
during the Lima summer, has begun.^ 
drawing more attention in Peru as talks j 
to end the standoff collapsed last week! 
after the rebels accused the government j 
of planning to take the building by stomv , 
via a secret tunnel. . . - - 

Local television said one of the bos- “ 
tages, the Bolivian ambassador, Jorge.. 
Gumucio, bad had “an attack of Iws-.". 
teria” and bad calmed down only after ' 
being shouted at by one of the rebels"^ 
Several doctors have been seen walking. ■ 
into the residence in recent days. ■ - . ^ 

President Alberto Fujimori’s chief.; 
negotiator abruptly called off a meeting" ' 
Monday with die hostage-takers, whp 
are part of the Tupac Amaru Revoln-1,- 
tionary Movement 

The talks were to resume later Wed- .,, 
nesday. a member of the talks guar , 
amors’ commission said. . I 

Mr. Fujimori said he would exhaust^ 
all peaceful means to end the siege bat , » 
hinted again at his refusal to rule ouj: 'j 
force if the guerrillas harmed the bos-'.; 
tages in any way. *. ’ 

“1 repeat and I insist that we will ' 
always exhaust all the peaceful mea-.. 
sines at our disposal, and we hope drat 
the same contact is maintained — that is 7. 
to say, that there are no victims inside,’ w 
Mr. Fujimori said. 

For die hostages, the long ordeal is., 
starting to take its toll — as well as for, 
the rebels, some of whom also are show : 7 
ing symptoms of stress, the doctor said , 

He said he had seen about 14 cases of ‘ 
inflamed- gums. -and , other. .dental ail-"' 
merits caused or aggravated by. long- . 
term stress. .... ....... ... .. 

- A few hostages have (fevdoped a skin 7 
disease that causes flaking on the arms' 
and uncontrollable itching, the doctor , 
said. • ■ 

The captives seemed to be in gen 1 .* 
orally good spirits, and the doctor said ^ 
he had not seen cases of depression! "~ n 
“Hie hostages are all talented people 
with great human qualities," he said. ' . 


-•it 


2Dav> 


U.S. Makes Preemptive Strike at TWA 800 Missile Theory 


TRAVEL UPDATE 




By Matthew Purdy 

New York Timts Service 


NEW YORK — Preparing for an on- 
slaught of new claims that a U.S. Navy mis- 
sile shot down TWA Flight 800, government 
officials have responded with facts, furor and 
a subpoena in an attempt to kill a recurring 
theory of the unsolved crash. 

Government officials unleashed a pre- 
emptive strike Tuesday on a 57-page article, 
scheduled for publication this week in Paris 


Match and prepared by a group of people 
headed by Pierre Salinger, the former 


former ABC- 
TV correspondent who has become the lead- 


ing proponent of the claim that the Boeing 


747 was hit bjya navy missile on the evening 


of July 17, I! 

Although the possibility of a missile strike 
on the plane is one of three theories that 


investigators say might explain the crash, 
they have stead- 


which killed 230 people, 
fasti y denied that there was any evidence that 
a missile struck the plane or that any military 
missile was fired within range of iL 
“It is unfortunate that people who claim to 
be well Lmentioned continue to perpetuate 


rumors and innuendo that have no basis in 
fact or reality," said James KaUstrora, die 
FBI assistant director in charge of the New 
York office. 

“We have absolutely no evidence dial 
there was any incident Like this,” said Ken- 
neth Bacon, chief spokesman for the 
Pentagon. “All missiles owned by the navy, 
by any ships, submarines or planes in the area, 
have been inventoried, personnel have been 
interviewed, records have been checked.” 

[Speaking Wednesday on an NBC News 
program, Mr. Kallstrom said of the missile 
theory: “It's just not true,” The Associated 
Press reported. 4 ‘There is no missile flying up 
at this plane on any of the radar tapes.” 

[He also disputed Mr. Salinger’s claims 
that there was a cover-up of U.S. Navy in- 
volvement. “As far as Salinger is concerned, 
almost all of what he says is wrong,” he said. 
“All I can tell you is it's wrong.” 

[Mr. Salinger has scheduled a press con- 
ference for Thursday in Paris. Mr. Kallstrom 
said Mr. Salinger was expected to announce 
that he had an audiotape of navy personnel 
expressing regret that they had shot down the 
TWA plane. VI don't believe that it exists," 


Mr. Kallstrom said. “It’s a cruel hoax. All of 
these people should get a life."] 

Mr. Kallstrom rebutted specific claims 
made in the Paris Match article. For example, 
the article says that an Air France plane 
traveling near the site of the Flight 800 crash 


on the same night was directed to avoid the 
jf pa 


area because of possible missile traffic. But 
Mr. Kallstrom sard the crew was interviewed 
and ' ‘they reported nothing unusual and they 
have never sighted a missile.” 

He said that a government contractor who 
the article says has pictures of the missile told 
investigators that all he had were images 
downloaded from the Internet. 

Government officials, speaking on the 
condition of anonymity, said that although 
the area near the flight path off Long Island is 
sometimes used for military exercises, no 
missiles had been fired there, for at least two 
years. The officials said that on the night of 
the crash, a navy P-3 plane and a submarine 
were near the flight path on a practice mission 
but that neither was armed with missiles. 

The article also quotes Thomas Dougherty 
of East Quogue, as saying, “My eyes were 
glued to the TWA hitting the missile's 


flames.' ’ But Tuesday , Mr. Dougherty said in 
an interview that he was misquoted. He said 
that he saw what appeared to be a flame 
streaking in the sky ana an explosion, but that 
he never saw a plane. 

In the article, Mr. Salinger said he obtained 
pictures, radar tapes and accounts from wit- 
nesses that back up bis contention. 

On Monday, federal agents presented a 
grand jury subpoena to Richard Russell, a 
retired airline pilot who is working with Mr. 
Salinger, and took a radar tape that Mr. Rus- 
sell claims shows the image of a missile 
headed toward the plane. 

Mr. Salinger, who was President John F. 
Kennedy’s press secretary, said be believed 

“I dunk we axe very close totiie truth,” he 
said. “In fact I think we are at ft.” 

In a message on his answering machine in 
Daytona Beach, Florida. Mr. Russell pre- 
dicted that investigators would declare his 
tape a fraud. But he added, “I assure you, it's 
the real thing.” A federal investigator said 
that officials were interested in it to see if 
there was proof of a missile or if Mr. Russell 
had obtained unauthorized material. 


EgyptAir Monopoly Nears Its End : - 


CAIRO (AFP) — Egypt has granted licenses to private-.* 
airlines, effectively ending the 65-year monopoly of die; • 
national carrier EgyptAir, officials said Wednesday. , '* 
Transport Minister Soleiman Metwali has decided to grant'T, 
licenses to “several private airlines, including five passengefcT 

and cargo companies,” a spokesman at tiie ministry said ' \ 


French Beach Has High Radiation 

r a u a nr nc - . . . 




1 Hi. 


LA HAGUE, France (AFP) — The environmental or-* : 
ganization Greenpeace warned Wednesday that a beach near 
nuclear waste reprocessing plant here was dangerous because !" 
of high radiation levels. *• ’ 

The plant, owned by Cogema. said Wednesday it would post"' 
warning notices placing the rarely used beach out of bounds. ,. 


The special low price tickets offered by Air China from . 
Hong Kong to London on its inaugural flight April I, on- 7 
ginating in Beijing, sold out quickly, travel agents said The 
tickets cost 3,088 Hong Kong dollars each ($400), about half’ 
the usual fare. ( AFP) * 




A cyclone off Australia’s east coast weakened Wed- 
nesday, but weather Forecasters said they would monitor the . ■ 
storm in case it started to move inland. (Reuters) 


WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


WEATHER 


Mtn. Rk. Show Lost 


Resort 

L 

u 

Pistes Pistes State Snow Camnentt 

Andorra 








Pas dels Casa 

85 

145 

Far 

stash sptag 

15/2 

at 29 Bis open, bast nm 

Sotdeu 

30 

15D 

Fair 

stash 

**hg 

1 S/2 

of 21 Mb open, good a nMuds 

Austria 

techgl 

30 

140 

Fair 

skrti 

War 

0/3 

a 41 8ts open, good atom isoom 

KBzbuhet 

0 

70 

M 

diuh 


m 

mesonoUe sting high if) i> am 

Lech 

BO 

170 

Fair 

Stash 

spring 

6/3 

at 34 Rb qpen 

Mayrhofen 

GO 

70 

Fair Closed 


SIS 

af 35 «s open, dotty atm tetri 

Oborgurgl 

25 

135 

Good 

Oust 

Was 

fi/3 

al 22 0te open, ftawy Her down 

Saalbach 

20 

40 

«ws 

stash raring 

m 

aS m tipm. pmw etmtet 

Sl Anton 

40 

230 

FaP 

stash 

spring 

S3 

al X on open, good spring tUng 

Tiaiaila 

Lake Louisa 

130 

190 

Good 

Qx» 

Vfar 

11/3 

alls fite opart gmatsUng 

Whistler 

70 

250 

Good 

Opan 

War 

103 

el X As and al aafe open 

Franc* 

A/pe cWuez 

05 

250 

ftp 

slush 


BB 

7Y«3«sopea***sf* Sting 

Lea Arcs 

00 

230 

Wr 

rtnh 

aping 

Be 

TV77 Us opon. good spang aUng 

Avoriaz 

130 

150 

fair 

duah 


Be 

efaSsqpea Pan betoea mkttay 

Chamonix 

10 

270 

Good 

Cbsed 

Spmg 

Be 

^SM9 Su opn oganoaro bast 

Courchevel 

110 

WO 

Good 

fiteh sp/tag 

■an 

af 0S Ms open, afterg nan best 

Las Deux Alpes 

*0 

275 

Good 


flung 

aa 

sras «s epon. al but krmat good 

Megeve 

0 

140 

Ffcr 

son 

sp/ng 

27a 


MBrlbel 

*0 

1*5 

Far 

Ait 

spring 

275 

hly apn poor baba/ mama 

La Plagne 

Sene Chevalier 

12s 

50 

205 

190 

Fair 

Good 

Upm spring 
stab spring 

27 » 
27/2 

Items ate open 

7073 ttte apart, spring 

Tignes 

1*0 

200 

Good 

stash 

War 

5/3 


VafcThtere 

VaiThorens 

00 

00 

200 

200 

Good 

Good 

riwh spring 
Open spring 

BI2 

BIS 

2WB Kti^m^JmSoyOooO 

Garmwnjr 

Berahtesgaden 

Q 

20 

worn 

dosed 


S3 


Otraretdort 

0 

70 

Far 

Scree raring 

6b 

23/!6lte opan, bast In naming 


Resort 

Hratjr 


Depth 
L U 


Mtn. Res. Snow Lost 
PWes Ptatas State Sum 


Borniio 

to 

150 

Fm 

Art spite 

8/3 

UtlB Uu opan, XXaitt 3003m 

Cervpna 

BO 

340 

Good 

shah 

raring 

2772 

al2S ms open, oamosdy good 

Cortina 

0 

05 

Fair 

Owed 


6/3 

at SI Ms open, nearing lie tftnn 

Coumiayeur 

X 

1*5 

Fah 

nta 

soring 

2772 

wzwtstpen, 

Lhrigno 

70 

IBS 

Good 

flkah 

War 

60 

al 30 ms open, af tut kmstgood 

Madesuno 

45 

340 

Good 

Sfu* 

Vta 

60 

teiJ'fitsepw, Beet <1 morning 

Selva 

f5 

00 

ftir 

Art 

Vsr 

SO 

■161 Us and sola /orate opan 

Norway 

CSeJkj 

55 

GO 

Good 

Open 

Petal 

30 

alia HU open. meBpomed 


Sm iU wfaul 

Crans Montana 
Davos 
(Costers 
Mumen 


St. Moritz 
VOrbkrr 
Wengan 
Zermatt 


5 (50 
40 IBS 
0 160 
30 100 
50 330 
35 120 

3D 175 

5 BO 
20 220 


Pair jbsh 
Good Open 
Good earn 
Ffl» earn 
Goad shah 
Good slosh 
F* earn 
F# slush 
Good dush 


2772 non Sis opan.nl bat fawariGoad 
Bn if S Nts qwn. poor iwbw axttn 
6/3 if 55 fttpai sow pMf state 
sa at lams opan. good ammo 
6/3 2 SOB Ste qpe/i. greet sp/ng sktip 
63 tl Us open, goad abnm ZlOOn 
Bn mofinraapai 
S 3 00 20 Steepen ok betas mdtiay 
27 « al 73 Happen peal hfr up 


BrecheniWge 
Crested Butts 
Mammoth 
Park City 
van 

Whiter Parte 


170 ISO 
170 21D 


Good Opm Petal 03 Myopan. jnsf spmgtUng 
Good Open Pckd 9/3 WHS and 138 nto open 


170 ISO Good Open PcU 4/3 of USte. goorfcwvaf fenb 


320 44Q 
200 275 


Good Open Petal 3/9 2330 Ws opm. earn pea state 

Good Open Petal BS off U Us oni 8S trots trxn 

195 220 Goad Ooen Pckd 9/3 29 Us awl 4044 aam am 

175 216 Good Cpm V* 9/3 et2DMiandef WJ to* open 


Fire 


Knyl,U: Oopdi e> on on bwr end upper dspe& Mtn. Piste* I 
toadng id mon rttage. Art Artflcsl an*. 

Report} amtad by 0m SU Ok* a/ Qm Snhn 




find information on over 100 of the world's leading ski resorts online 

Planning your ska trip? 


Internet - HtCp / .' 3 kiln.c 0 m 


Europe 


T*»ev 

Toreanmr 


«Bh 

LowW 

HW 




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OF 

or 

taganw 

22/71 

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aw® ii*ea 


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3/37 r 

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11/52 


1283 

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AllKra 

13*56 

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1081 

0/46S 

Etafariona 

17*2 

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16*1 

BM6 a 

Wraad# 

19*1 

387a 

1380 

4/39 c 

EtarSn 

13*56 

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1080 

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(ternniilf 


a/43 pc 


7»44c 

Budapest 

12*3 


11*52 

387c 

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wipe 

7/44 

22/n 

387 on 
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14*7 

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Geneva 

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082 

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11/52 

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1080 4 

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19*4 

5/41 pc 

1BW6 

awape 


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11*2 

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1305 

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1BAB 

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16*4 1VS2nc 

a#o 

7/44 

pc 

OQ2 

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lass 

38* pc 


11/52 

c 

1263 


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*8/23 pC 

-181 

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1782 

4/30 B 

17*2 


SLPateraMt 

7*44 

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-aafl-iOrtSc 


0/46 

JtCKt nF 

1/34 

4/22 1 

SCKOCU-p 

14*7 

<W3pe 

16*1 

6M3c 

TsKnn 

5/41 

-anac 

S/Sff -1 1/|3 pc 

WKfiea 

17*2 


17*2 

7M4 pc 

Vienna 

14*7 

3*7 pc 

flMfl 

285 PC 

vsteraaw 

IMS 

3/37 C 

4J39 

-2/29 po 

Zurich 

12/53 

EMI C 

14S7 

4890 

Middle East 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as prowled by AccuWeatfw, 


Asia 



North America 

A strengthening atom 
could bring a wintry mix to 
the Gmat Lakes and North- 
east Friday, with matnty 
rain farther south. Drier 
and colder weather will 
press Into these area tar 
the weekend. Milder 
weather will affect the 
Roddes, whte wet weather 
prevefis In the Northwest 


Europe 

ChllBer air will press into 
eaatem Europe, while edd 
air envelops much of Scan- 
dinavia. A stem will bring 
unsettled weather to the 
northern her. Including 
Amoieidasn and Berlin Fri- 
day. Thta storm wtfl rapidly 
s trengthen over northeast 
Europe Saturday. Dry and 
mitt rt Madrid. 


Asia 

The lost in a aeries at arum 
storm 6 will bring wet 
weather to Seoul Friday 
Into Saturday, then into 
Tokyo Saturday. Belling 
win have a return to drier 
with a oDoBng trend acroes 
much of China, both Kora- 
ae and Japan. Sunshine 
and warm weather will con- 
tinue in Hong Kong. 


223/82 21/70 
28/78 IBM pc 
3289 23773 c 
23/73 1884 po 
23773 BM0 * 

2882 asm ah 
2780 1782 pc 
3188 asm r 
3289 20/77 c 
3188 2088 pc 
ZVM 13/55 PC 


3381 23/73 pc 
3381 23/70 pc 
1782 7/44 pc 

24/75 IHic 
3280 25/77 C 
38/78 IMS* 
1782 <¥43 pc 

28/77 IBM pc 


21/70 pc- 

3W76 IBM pC 

32/39 22 m pc 

33/73 1884 pc ->■ 
21/70 12/53/ 
2B8« 23/73 6 • ~ 
23/73 1881 S._*V 
3289 22/71 pe . 
3289 «/75cT 
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AfeiDtaH 27/80 T 7782 pC 

Bata* IBM 3« pc 

caw 23/ra wept 

Dwewson isffifi 3/37 pe 

Jannatam 14/97 337 pq 

ban 3188 V4> 

nyedh 20 ms i38Spc 


24/75 1353 W 
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14/57 2/35 PC 
14*7 3/37 PC 
3188 CMSC3B 
1068 1386 PC 


Tatar 

Mgh Low W 
CJF OF 
SOS -B/18 pc 
21/70 1388 ah 
307 -4/25 9 
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24/TS 13/55 C 
B>48 -2/20 pc 

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Houston 28/79 mi Mi 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 


PAGE 3 


a PS 

>octor C 


THE AMERICAS 


Senate Widens 
Fund-Raising 
Probe Against 
Lott’s Wishes 


By Eric Schmitt 

New York Times Semce 


WASHINGTON — In an abrupt 
«uwge of course, the Senate has unan- 
imously approved a much broader in- 
vestigation into White House and con- 
gressional campaign fund-raising 
practices than most Senate Republicans 
had originally wanted. 

Under pressure from Democrats and 
facing rebellious moderate Republi- 
cans, the Senate Republican leader, 
Trent Lott, bowed to demands to expand 
the inquiry to include “illegal and im- 
proper activities” in the 1996 elections. 
The Senate Rules Committee voted 
along party lines last week for a plan, 
brokered by Mr. Lott, that would have 
limited the inquiry’s scope to “illegal 
activities” only. 

The change may seem like a minor 
distinction. But the vote Tuesday will 
allow Senate investigators to examine 
serine of the most criticized legal fund- 
raising practices. like unregulated “soft 
money” contributions, the fund-raising 
coffees and sleepovers that President 
BHI Clinton held at the White House and 
unrestricted political spending by tax- 
exempt groups. 

.* * We didn’t want the scope so narrow 
as to look like we were protecting 
ourselves or trying not to embarrass 
ourselves,” said Senator Fred 
Thompson. Republican of Tennessee. 
He heads the Governmental Affairs 
Committee, which is leading the main 
Senate inquiry. 

The committee has already issued 52 
subpoenas, and it will set a schedule for 
hearings soon. 

The Senate vote restores the scope to 
the broader form that Mr. Thompson's 
committee approved last month, before 
a handful of Republicans on the Rules 
Committee vowed to water it down. Mr. 
Lott negotiated the scaled-back plan, 
£nd Mr. Thompson went along reluc- 
tantly, viewing it as the only one that 
could pass. 

But thar was also before some of the 
most jarring fund-raising allegations 
surfaced. Several senators said Tuesday 
that the seemingly daily revelations of 
questionable fund-raising practices, 
from Vice President AI Gore’s soliciting 
contributions from his White House of- 
fice to reports that China sought to buy 
influence in the 1 996 elections, exposed 
the limits of an inquiry that scrutinized 
only illegal activities. 



POLITICAL NOTES 


lanwl * livin' AfHirr Irani r- 

Anthony Lake, right, and Senator Edward Kennedy waiting for Mr. Lake’s confirmation hearing to start. 

Lake Hearing Gets Off to Tense Start 

Intelligence Panel Chief Presses CIA Nominee on Campaign Financing 


By Tim Weiner 

Net*' Yurt Times Semre 


WASHINGTON — As confirmation 
hearings began before the Senate intel- 
ligence committee. Anthony Lake. Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton's nominee as director 
of Central Intelligence, defended his in- 
tegrity against attacks by the committee 
chairman and promised a “renovation” 
of the nation's spy services. 

Minutes later. Senator Ricbard 
Shelby of Alabama, chairman of the 
committee, changed the subject to the 
campaign financing story of the day, 
trying to connect Mr. Lake to a White 
House morass of money and politics. 
Mr. Lake said mildly that he had nothing 
to do with it The chairman’s response 
was strongly skeptical. 

The tension Tuesday between Mr. 
Lake’s vision of a revitalized intelli- 


Chinese government to pour money into 
the American political system. 

“Did the National Security Council 
staff apprise you of this briefing and its 
substance?” the senator asked 

“No, sir,” Mr. Lake replied. 

“So you say tfaey didn’t,** Mr. 
Shelby said. “Well, why were you not 
informed of such a dynamite piece of 
news? Where was the failure?” 

Mr. Lake said the National Security 
Council staff members received all 
kinds of intelligence reports, and first 
had to assay their value. The senator cut 
him off. “Are they still working at the 
National Security Council?” he asked. 

"Yes. they are,” Mr. Lake said. 
“And very well. I believe.” 

“You call thar very well?” Mr. 
Shelby asked. “But you talked in your 
opening statement of total accountabil- 
ity. You know, if you’re die adviser to 



of past events, correct our mistakes and 
begin to build for a new era- 1 am very 
eager to help lead that renovation.” 

He said “ overzeal ous secrecy” in the 
intelligence agencies could harm die 
government. “Not sharing enough in- 
formation among ourselves, not sharing 
information with the Congress’* he said 
he found “simply unacceptable.” 

■ Lake Defends Iran Arms Deal 

The United States allowed Iranian 
arms to flow to Bosnia-Herzegovina to 
preserve a shaky, U.S. -sponsored al- 
liance between Muslims and Croats. 
The Associated Press quoted Mr. Lake 
as testifying Wednesday. 

Republicans have criticized Mr. Lake 
for not informing Congress about a 
policy he helped forge. They also say 
that the policy gave the radical Iranian 
government a foothold in Europe. 


Reno Rejects a Call 
For Special Counsel 

WASHINGTON — Attorney Gen- 
eral Janet Reno said Wednesday that a 
dispute between the White House and 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
over a briefing about possible Chinese 
influence in the 1996 election cam- 
paign was not enough to require ap- 
pointment of an independent counsel. 

“I think there was a misunder- 
standing.” Ms. Reno said at a hearing 
of the Senate Appropriations subcom- 
mittee. “Ji does not in any way trigger 
the independent counsel statute.” 

The Justice Department is inves- 
tigating possible wrongdoing in 
Democratic campaign fund-raising 
activities before the 1996 election. 
But Ms. Reno said she had not re- 
ceived any specific, credible evidence 
that laws had been violated, which is 
required before she can ask a court to 
appoint an independent counsel. 

The White House said Monday that 
FBI agents briefed members of the 
National Security Council on possible 
Chinese efforts to influence the elec- 
tion, but told staff members not to pass 
the information on to President Bill 
Clinton or other senior officials. The 
FBI said later thar it had not put any 
restrictions on what the security coun- 
cil aides could say. but the White 
House disputed that contention. 

“This doesn’t concern the cam- 
paign finance investigation,” Ms. 
Reno said. She said she thought the 
security council aides were told the 
information was sensitive but that 
there was a misunderstanding over 
who else could be told. (Reuters) 

Clinton Offers Plan 
To Revitalize Capital 

WASHINGTON — President 
Clinton has unveiled a $300 million 
“economic stimulus’’ plan for the 
District of Columbia that would offer 


federal giants and tax incentives to 
businesses and nonprofit organiza- 
tions that invest in neglected neigh- 
borhoods and hire low- and moderate- 
income residents. 

The centerpiece of the program 
would be a federally financed D.C. 
Economic Development Corporation, 
which would stride the city’s growth 
and promote, investment downtown 
and in poor neighborhoods. The new 
entity, run by a federally controlled 
board of directors and a paid staff, 
would have broad power to target de- 
velopment and attract investment by 
allocating $97 million in tax breaks. 

Mr. Clinton said the package would 
increase opportunity and hope for res- 
idents and demonstrate his adminis- 
tration’s expanding commitment to 
the national capital. He vowed to re- 
main involved in the city's revival and 
said he had directed his cabinet sec- 
retaries to find other ways to help the 
District, beginning with keeping fed- 
eral agencies in the city. 

“For too long. Americans had not 
thought enough about our capital city,” 
Mr. Clinton said. “But Washington is 
still worth fighting for. In fact, it’s more 
worth fighting for than ever.” 

Many D.C. politicians and business 
leaders praised the proposal, saying it 
would provide the economic lift the 
ailing city needs. The plan would in- 
clude tax relief for small businesses 
that increase their investment in the 
city, and would expand the use of tax- 
exempt bond financing. (WP) 

Quote /Unquote 

President Clinton, challenging the 
broadcasting industry to provide free 
television time for political candidates 
as a price for receiving lucrative new 
broadcast licenses: “We have to use 
the present intense interest in this, as 
well as the controversy over fund- 
raising in the last election and all the 
publicity on it, as a spur to action. We 
cannot let it become what it is in 
danger of becoming, which is an ex- 
cuse for inaction.” f WP) 


Away From 
Politics 

• A Minke whale that beached itself 

near Key West, Florida, and later died 
was found to have five bullets in it. 
The police said they believed that 
boaters in the Florida Keys had shot at 
the whale. (Reuters) 

• A man with a shotgun killed three 
people and wounded two others at a 
bank in Detroit. The police and wit- 
nesses said Allen Griffin forced two 


victims to recite the Lord's Prayer 
with him as he shot them inside a 
Comerica bank. When confronted 
outside, be killed a hostage before 
being killed by the police. (NYT) 

• The FBI office in Atlanta has 
warned minority communities and 
other “historic victims of violence 
and hate crimes” that die person re- 
sponsible for bombing an abortion 
clinic and a nightclub there would 
probably strike again. The groups are 
potential targets, the spokesman said, 
but declined to be more specific in 
identifying any other groups. (AP) 


oft*enns^lvaiiia. 

Indeed. Mr. Thompson had told Sen- 
ate colleagues in recent days that he 
feared Democrats would deliberately tie 
up_ bearings with time-consuming pro- 
cedural questions over what was legal 
and what was noL 

■*‘One of the most important tilings 
you get out of this is comity with the 
Democrats,” said Senator John Mc- 
. Cain. Republican of Arizona, who is a 
Sponsor of major legislation to revamp 
the campaign finance process. 

The turning point came Tuesday at a 
spirited two-hour lunch that Senate Re- 
publicans held in a private caucus room. 
At^ least eight senators,’ including Mr. 
Thompson. Mr. McCain and Olympia 
SnOwe of Maine, urged their colleagues 
to broaden investigators’ jurisdiction — 
enough to deny Mr. Lott the votes he 
needed to approve the narrower in- 
quiry. 

Only Senator Christopher Dodd, 
Democrat of Connecticut, declined to 
go along with the plan, citing his two 
years as general chairman of the Demo- 
cratic National Committee, which has 
figured prominently in the fund-raising 

furor. . . 

In the end, he voted “present, in 
effect abstaining. 

> Republicans said the broader defin- 
ition would empower investigators to 
delve into the hundreds of fund-raising 
coffees and sleepovers that Mr. Clinton 
and his top aides held for large donors at 
the White House. 

“We’re eetting what we can all live 
with to get the job done, ’ Mr. Lott said. 
“Some of these coffees and some of 
these White House sleepovers may be 

^S^Lott denied that moderate Re- 
publicans had broken ranks and dealt 
him a personal rebuke, and he said it was 
more important to get the my^ngation 
under way and “qmt fiddling while 
Washington burns.” . 

Under the compromise workedoutm 
the Rules Committee, *e inquuywn^ 
have a $435 million 
back from Mr. Thompson s original re- 

vestigationfeat Mr- Thompson had 

W ^tecommittee will have until Jan. 31 
to finish its report. 


Mr. Shelby and some of his fellow sen- 
ators. Democratic committee members 
pleaded with him not to turn the hear- 
ings into “a trial by ordeal.” 

But in the first set of questions he put 
to Mr. Lake, the national security ad- 
viser from 1993 through 1996, Mr. 
Shelby pressed hard on a subject Mr. 
Lake said he knew nothing about — a 
meeting last July at which two FBI 
agents briefed two staff members of the 
National Security Council about an in- 
vestigation of a possible attempt by the 


you — accountability?* 

*’Of course it does.” Mr. Lake 
replied, and the line of inquiry ended 
without enlightenment. 

He identified one cause of “a real 
problem with morale” at the CIA as 
public disclosure of agency secrets. 

“The intelligence community has 
suffered from turbulence and scandal.” 
Mr. Lake said. “No one knows this 
bener than its dedicated men and wo- 
men. It’s time to put the old problems 
behind us. We must complete our review 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

Old-Fashioned Logging 
With Horses Catches On 

Logging with horses is having a 
modest comeback in the Northwest. 

To see Joe Wamess at work with 
his misty team, thinning stands of 
Douglas fir in southwestern Wash- 
ington state, is to step back in time. As 
his two geldings, Tom and Jerry, step 
through the forest, there is none of the 
noise of diesel engines — just sylvan 
sounds and the horses breathing. 

In recent years, though it costs 
more, the old-fashioned approach to 
logging has become more popular be- 
cause it is kinder to the environment. 

“There’s not as much root damage, 
not as much soil compaction and not as 
much mud,” Mr. Warness, 45, said. 

A horse and mule loggers asso- 
ciation. founded in Oregon six years 
ago with 20 members, now has 108. 

Short Takes 

Sweat lodges are a little- known 
feature of many federal and stale pris- 
ons. Once a week. Native American 
inmates — and others, if they wish — 
can crawl into the 2-foot-high (about 
60 centimeters) canvas-covered 
mounds where heated rocks make the 
cramped space searingly hot For three 
hours, the inmates pray, sing and pass 
around a peace pipe. Though In chans 
consider the lodge a sacred place, pris- 
on officials originally feared the prac- 


tice, unsure what might go on among 
the unclothed inmates inside. Now 
they appear to understand the view of 
Earl Forester, a prisoner at an Omaha, 
Nebraska, facility: * ‘When you go into 
the lodge and you see a guard, he’s a 
dog. be ' s nothing. But when you come 
out, he’s a person you would want to 
shar e your hincb with, to talk with. 
You see things differently.” • 

Fact: Some 23 million corporate 
phone lines in the United States can 
provide access to the Internet. Fact: 
Four of the top news and entertain- 
ment sites visited by Internet 
browsers are “adult” sites with 
names such as Cyberotica and Smut- 
land. Supposition: Many employees 
visit these sites when they should be, 
say, writing up orders. Result: A new 
Big-Brotherish software program 
from a firm in Bellevue. Washington, 
tells companies when, where and how 
often employees go on line, and it can 
block unapproved sites. Predictably, 
privacy advocates are complaining. 

Jerimoth Hill in Rhode Island, at 
812 feet (247 meters) above sea level, 
has become a Mount Everest for 
members of the Highpointexs Club, a 
national group based m Arcadia. Mis- 
souri, whose goal is to climb to the 
highest point in every state. Henry 
Richardson, 74, who owns fee hill, 
banned climbers after too many left 
trash b ehin d. Fifty of the club’s 1.200 
members have strafed all 50 states’ 
high points. But at Jerimoth Hill, 
members are allowed only to pose for 
a photo beside a sign identifying the 
hill as fee state’s highest. Somehow, 
members say, it’s just not the same. 

International Herald Tribune 


Democrats Offer to Return $107,000 to Indians 


By Susan Schmidt 

Washing, on P^^- 

WASHINGTON - 

ttt’&SEsssi 

urasstass* 

> return native lands. ^ Ky news 

“In to *«* 

xounts regarding “jSflniaee from 


Oklahoma, we discussed the situation 
thoroughly with fee leader of fee tribe. 
Chairman Charles Surveyor,” fee 
Democratic National Committee said in 
a statement 

[Leaders of the Cheyenne-Arapaho 
Tribe of Oklahoma said it was unlikely 
dial they would take back fee $107,000 
donation. The Associated Ptess reported. 
“They want their land, not their money,” 
said a lawyer for the tribes, Rick Grell- 
ner. “They will never give up.”] 

The tribes are seeking 7300 acres fee 
government took in 1869 to build Fort 


Reno in Oklahoma, which they want to 
transform into a tourist attraction. 

The tribes had been repeatedly so- 
licited tty Democratic National Commit- 
tee fund-raisers for campaign contribu- 
tions. In addition, some of Vice President 
Al Gore's top fund-raisers solicited them 
for private consulting work. 

“They have been taken advantage of 
twice; it’s unconscionable, frankly,” 
said Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell, 
Republican of Colorado, an American 
Indian who has worked with fee tribes 
on their land claim. 








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in 26 different languages. 

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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


Fire and Explosion Shake 
japan’s Nuclear Program 

21 Workers Exposed to Low-Level Radiation 


•. By Kevin Sullivan 

Washin gton Past Service 

TOKYO — Japan’s troubled nuclear-en- 
ergy p rogram suffered another blow when a 
fire and explosion hit a nuclear-waste re- 
processing plant, exposing 2 1 workers to low- 
revel radiation. 

• Prime Minister Ryu taro Hashiraoto apo- 
logized Wednesday for the government's 
“inadequate” response to the fire Tuesday, 
which was not extinguished property and led 
to an explosion 10 hours later at die 
Xofcaim ura plant 160 kilometers (100 miles) 
northeast ofTokyo. 

- Officials said that although workers at the 
state-owned plant had been exposed to ra- 
diation, only a “tiny” amount had leaked 
from the plant, where plutonium is extracted 
from spent nuclear-fuel rods. 

• The accident, the cause of which has not 
yet been determined, followed one in Decem- 
ber 1 995 at Monju, Japan’s only fast-breeder 
reactor, and occurred at a time of increasing 
Citizen protest agains t the nuclear industry. 

“I’m shocked that the government did it 
again,” said Ji nzab uro Takagi. a physicist 
and spokesman for an anti-nuclear group. 
Citizens Nuclear Information Center. Citing a 
delay in notifying the public of the accident, 
Mr. Takagi said, * ‘They have learned nothing 
from the Monju accident.” 


The Monju accident was covered up by 
officials at Power Reactor & Nuclear Fuel 
Development Corp„ which runs Japan’s nu- 
clear-power industry. An official there com- 
mitted suicide after it was revealed that he had 
tried to suppress videotapes of die accident. 

The Monju plant remains closed, and die 
public mistrust it caused was made worse by 
Tuesday's accident at Tokaimura. Mr. Takagi 
said be doubted the government’s figures about 
the amount of radiation that had been released 
and said the accident would harden public 
sentiment against nuclear power. 

Japan is sensitive about radiation and nu- 
clear safety. Despite its aversion to nuclear 
weapons, the government has been determined 
to malm die country self-sufficient in energy 
and end its dependence on imported oiL 
In its drive to produce its own energy, it has 
embraced fast-breeder reactors, which pro- 
duce more plutonium than they use. Many 
other countries are moving away from such 
reactors because they fear that increased 
plutonium production could lead to nuclear- 
weapons proliferation. 

Nuclear power accounts for more than one- 
third of all Japan’s electricity. The govern- 
ment hopes to increase that share, but the 
public is increasingly opposed. In a refer- 
endum last year, residents of a small town in 
western Japan rejected a plan to build a nu- 
clear power plant in their community. 


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An investigator checking the Japanese nuclear- waste plant where a fire and explosion exposed 21 
workers to low levels of radiation and further undermined the country's nuclear-power program. 


Malaysia Protests 6 Callous 9 Singapore Remark 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — In an unusually 
strong protest, Malaysia on Wednes- 
day asked Singapore’s senior min- 
ister, Lee Kuan Yew, to apologize and 
retract a statement criticizing a 
Malaysian state as “notorious for 
shootings, muggings and carjack- 
ings." 

Malaysian officials said that the 
remark by Mr. Lee. who was prime 
minister from 1959 to 1990, showed 
lack of sensitivity. 

“If the senior minister really val- 
ues our goodwill, he should retract his 
statement and tender an apology,” 
said Abdullah Ahmad Badawi, 
Malaysia's foreign minister, adding 
that he was “extremely shocked” at 
the derogatory sentiments expressed. 

Johore, which is on the southern- 
most tip of the Malaysian Peninsula, 
is linked to the island-state of Singa- 




pore by a road and rail causeway. 

Mr. Lee's comment came m an 
affidavit filed in one of 13 libel law- 
suits brought against a Singapore op- 
position politician, Tang Liang Hong, 
after elections in January. 

In campaigning, Mr. Lee and other 
officials accused Mr. Tang, a lawyer 
and advocate of Chinese culture, of 
threatening to upset racial harmony in 
Singapore by seeking to make ma- 

S Chinese superior to minority 
ys and Indians. 

Mr. Tang, who has taken refuge in 
Johore and refused to return to Singa- 
pore to face trial, called the officials 
“liars,” prompting the lawsuits. In 
absence of any defense by Mr. Tang. 
Singapore’s high court Monday gave 
judgment in favor of the plaintiffs, 
with damages to be assessed later. 

In his affidavit, quoted in Singa- 
pore’s Straits Tunes on Wednesday. 
Mr. Lee said that Johore was “no- 
torious for shootings, mu gging s and 


carjackings,” The affidavit added. 
“It did not make any sense for a 
person who claims to be fearful for his 
life to go to a place like Johore. ” 

Mr. Abdullah issued his statement 
in Kuala Lumpur after summoning a 
senior Singapore diplomat to his of- 
fice to protest. 

He said be did not believe that Mr. 
Lee’s “callous statement could help 
inspire confidence in the efforts to 
maintain good and friendly relations” 
between the two countries, which 
went their separate ways in 1 965. 

Instead, it “could only convey hos- 
tility and an utter lack of concern and 
sensitivity for maintaining goodwill 
and friendship between Malaysia and 
Singapore,” Mr. Abdullah said. 

The two countries were involved in 
acrimonious exchanges last year after 
Mr. Lee raised the possibility of even- 
tual reunification with Malaysia. But 
he said that Kuala Lumpur must first 
end an affirmative action policy for 





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subscription. 


Malays and other indigenous races, 
and pursue meritocracy. 

Singapore left the Malaysian fed- 
eration in 1965. partly over disagree- 
ment about the pro-Malay policy. 

Since then, relations have steadily 
improved. But growing economic 
competition and occasional disagree- 
ments over other issues have con- 
tributed to an undercurrent of tension 
between the two neighbors. 

Other Malaysian politicians were 
also angered Wednesday by Mr. 
Lee’s comment about Johore. 

Ahmad Zahid Hamidi, chairman of 
the youth wing of the United Malays 
National Organization, said that the 
remarks were disrespectful to Malay- 
sia. 

Johore’s chief minister, Abdul Gh- 
ani Othman, was quoted in local 
newspapers as saying that Malaysia 
was “a democratic country where all 
races live in harmony and there is 
freedom of speech.” 


Don’t Revise 
History, Patten 
Urges Beijing 









ve up 


to 60 




Reuters 

HONG KONG — Gov- 
ernor Chris Patten said Wed- 
nesday that he hoped Hong 
Kong children would contin- 
ue to be taught about the mil- 
itary crackdown in Beijing in 
1989 after the return of the 
colony to China this year. 

“I would hope that today 
and tomorrow children in 
Hong Kong, like children in 
the United Kingdom, would 
leam about the opium wars, 
would leam about imperial- 
ism in Asia and in China in 
the 19th century.” Mr. Patten 
said in a BBC interview. 

“I equally hoped the chil- 
1 dren would leam about the 
Great Leap Forward, the Cul- 
tural Revolution and what 
happened in Tiananmen 
Square in 1989.” Mr. Patten 
said. 

His comments followed re- 
cent remarks by China’s for- 
eign minister, Qian Qichen, 
that Hong Kong textbooks 
should be revised after the 
change of sovereignty at mid- 
night on June 30. 


BRIEFLY 


China Says Gore Will Visit 

BEIJING — China moved ahead on Wed- 
nesday with plans for the visit of Vice Pres- 
ident A! Gore, the most senior American to 
come here in eight years, ignoring a con- 
troversy over allegations that Beijing tried to 
contribute money to the Democratic Party in 
the last election. 

A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman 
denied the allegations and said they would not 
’ affect this month’s visit, which both sides have 
{ portrayed as part of their efforts to mend 
damaged ties. 

“The Chinese and American sides are ac- 
tively preparing for the visit,” a ministry 
spokesman said Wednesday. 

The allegations of Chinese assistance to the 
Democrats were made by “people with ul- 
terior motives,’ ’ die spokesman added, 
j China and the United States have been hop- 
j ing to use Mr. Gore’s visit, scheduled for 
{ March 24-28. to help restore ties strained in 
■ recent years by a host of issues, ranging from 
i Taiwan and trade to weapons and h uman 
rights. Mr. Gore would be the most senior U.S. 
official to visit China since President George 
Bush in I9S9. ( Reuters ) 

Taiwan Awaits Ihlai Lama 

TAIPEI — President Lee Teng-hui of 
Taiwan said Wednesday that he would like to 
meet Tibet’s exiled spiritual leader, the Dalai 
Lama, despite probable protests from China. 

Mr- Lee’s spokesman. Stephen Chen, said the 
presidential office would try to arrange an en- 
counter during the Dalai Lama's scheduled six- 
day visit to Taiwan beginning on March 22. 

Such a meeting almost certainly would an- 
ger China, which has warned Taiwan fre- 
quently in recent weeks not to fan separatist 
sentiment in Tibet during the Dalai Lama’s 
visit- ( Reuters ) i 

Indian to Meet Pakistani 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister H. D. Deve 
Gowda will meet his Pakistani counterpart, 
Nawaz Sharif, on the sidelines of a regional 
summit meeting in May, the Foreign Ministry 
said Wednesday. Foreign Minister Inder Ku- 
mar Gujral said the prime ministers would 
meet during a gathering in the Maldives of the 
South Asian .Association for Regional Co- 
operation. ( Reuters ) 

VOICES From Asia 

Arthur Holcombe. Beijing resident rep- 
resentative for the UN Development Program, 
saying North Korea was bracing for its most 
difficult summer in years: “After June of 1997 
and up until the next harvest in September 
there will be essentially no grain crop available 
for the population. It looks at the moment to be 
a period of particular hardship. ’ ’ (Reuters ) 


Party Affirms; 
Top Role in 
China, Despite 
‘Rule of Law’ 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Post Service • 

BEIJING — For nearly two weeks, . 
members of China’s National People's! 
Congress have pored over draft legist 
lation and met with a parade of top 
leaders. On Friday, the legislat ors w ffl- 
cast votes on weighty laws regarding 
criminal procedure, defense and gov- 
ernment spending. - 

But,, while. China’s top . Communist- 
leaders pledge devotion to the “rule of 
1 law,” the two-week session of the con- 
gress this year has stressed the need to 
guard the Communist Party’s uncou- 
tested role as supreme authority and 
affirm the leadership of the president 
and party chief, Jiang Zemin. 

Caught up by rails for stability and 
unity after the death of Deng Xiaoping, 
the National People's Congress meeting 
that was expected to showcase its chair- 
man. Qiao Shi, and shake off its rubber- 
stamp reputation, has focused on dec? 
taxations of loyalty to die Communist 
Party and to Mr. Jiang. j ’ 

' A parade of leaders dutifully reit- 
erated the description of Mr. Jiang as the 
core of die next generation of lead- * 
ership. and Mr. Jiang continues to dom- 
inate television and newspaper reports. 

The draft legislation standing before 
the National People's Congress also ' 
serves to buttress the authority of th£ 
Communist Party and suggests that 
China's march toward the * 'rule of law” . 
will be a long one. - 

For example, in adopting a clause in . 
this year’s national defense law. the 
congress would formally abdicate- its 
role in overseeing the Chinese military, 

— a role that had been ambiguous at 
best. ■ l - r 

“The armed forces of foe People's 
Republic of China shall be subject to the 
leadership of tbe Communist Party of 
China,” the new law says.' 

The timing of die law is. especially *4 
well suited to reaffirm the leaderships * . 
Mr. Jiang, the C ommunis * Party general . .. 
secretary, who many analysts feel has 
only shallow support among the mil- 
itary he nominally runs. 

Mr. Jiang is the only Chinese leader 
since the Cbing dynasty to rule without 
military experience. 

Many analysts say they also believe 
that the law is written in part to avoid a 
repeat of May 1989. 

At dial time, just days before Chinese 
Army troops fired on demonstrators 
who had occiroied -Tiananmen Square, 
some Chinese legislators cited the 1982 
constitution to demandthatthe standing 
committee of the National People's 
Congress be convened to debate the 
merits of martial law. : * - 

Defense Minister Chi Haotiao, in a 
speech to congress delegates as hestood 
below the giant red ^tar that decorates 
the ceiling of the Great Hall of the 
People, said that by contrast, after this 
law is adopted: 

“Adherence to the Chinese Commu- 
nist Party’s position as leader of the 
People’s Liberation Army and all other £ 
armed forces of the people is guaranteed 
by national law. And, at the same time, 
the legal standing of every party or- 
ganization in the armed fences is set, 
thus legalizing the principle, *the party 
before the troops.’ -• 

The principle of party conttol over 
the army is not new; Mao Zedong af- • 
firmed die jx> wer of the “party over the 
gun” back in 1932 during war against 
the Japanese and the Nationalists. 

But the fact that the party would draft 
legislation to bless such i principle 
points to the current trend in -Chinese 
politics: China may be becoming more 
legalistic in style, but-it -romains es- 
sentially Leninist in its political sub- ' 
stance. 

The National People's Congress and 
its chairman, Mr. Qiao, have been seen , 
by many relatively liberal Chinese as It 
the best hope for a greaterseparation eff 
powers between branches of govern- 
ment, a division of the party from tbe 
government, and the development of the 
“rule of law.” - 
But the curreni sesrioa provides little 
on which to pin those hopes;. 


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Meet the New Government 
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WITH THE LAST ELECTIONS, ROMANIA 
ACHIEVED ITS DEMOCRATIC PROCESS - THANKS 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


Zairians Call for Ouster 
OfU.S. Ambassador 

Washington Accused of Backing Rebels 


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TAf Associated Press 

a J^^SHASA. Zaire — Zairian pro- 
testers bunted the American flag Wed- 
nesday and demanded the expulsion of 
Ambassador Daniel Simpson and his 
•> staJ '- while the prime minister assailed 
■ ev .® r y°V e but France as ignoring what he 
eali«l the tragedy in eastern Zaire. 
"uT" 8 ? 1 * 11 * "Americans, get out!" 
about 200 people demonstrated at the 
U.S. Embassy. Zairian soldiers broke up 
the demonstration when the flag was 
burned. 

" Th e United States has been accused 
by some of supporting the rebel Al- 
liance of Democratic Forces for the Lib- 
eration of the Congo ( Zair e'), which 
seized two towns on Zaire's eastern 
border with Rwanda in October and has 
been pushing westward ever since. The 
rebel leader. Laurent Kabila, says one of 
his goals is to topple President Mobutu 
Sese Seko, whose 3 1 -year authoritarian 
0i/e has reduced the economy and in- 
frastructure to a shambles. 

■ For many years during the Cold War. 
die United States supported Marshal 
•f Mobutu when he was faced with re- 
bellions believed to be backed by the 


Soviet Union. Mr. Kabila took part in 
one of those rebellions. 

Also Wednesday. Prime Minister Le- 
on Kengo wa Dondo complained at a 
news conference that the world was 
indifferent to Zaire’s plight. 

* ‘The international community — the 
UN. the United States. Great Britain — 
gives the impression that they're not 
interested in the tragedy that is playing 
out ui Zaire.” Mr. Kengo said. 

“Could it be because Africans are 
involved?’* he asked. "Why can’t they 
use the same means as they did in Bos- 
nia and the former Yugoslavia to save 
human lives in the Great I jIcws re- 
gion?” 

Washington has made it clear that it 
does not support an international force 
for Zaire. Some see this as a tacit aban- 
donment of Marshal Mobutu and back- 
ing for the rebels. 

Several European governments have 
told the United Nations that they would 
consider taking part in such a force only 
if the United States supported the idea. 

That means France stands basically 
alone in pressing for more aggressive 
intervention in Zaire. 






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Zairians in Kinshasa reading the daily newspapers at a site known as the “Standing Parliament” Young 
people gather at the site in the center of the capital to debate the course of the Zair ian civO war and other events. 


■ France Seeks Help for Zaire 

France said Wednesday it would ask 
its European Union partners to- help it to 
organize a humanitarian airlift to the 
northeastern city of Kisangani, which 
the rebels say they are closing in on, 
Reuters repotted from Paris. 


‘‘We are going to propose today and 
tomorrow to our European partners at 
meetings in Brussels on Africa that the 
European Union get involved in cre- 
ating a sort of airlift to Kisangani and 
eastern Zaire,' ’ said a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, Yves Doutriaux. 

Kisangani is the government's last 


stronghold in eastern Zaire. 

A French cargo aircraft was already 
on its way to Zaire with supplies, he 
said. 

Mr. Doutriaux also said that the pos- 
sibility of sending a military force to the 
area would have to be considered again 
if there was no cease-fire soon. 


PAGE ^ 


Grenade Attack; 

i_ 

Damages Office 
Of Le Pen Party 

The Associated Press j 

MARSEILLE — An office of the far* 
right National Front was slightly dam- 
aged early Wednesday by a grenade 
hours after a- street protest against the 
party degenerated into violence. 

The police said ihere were no in- 
juries- s 

A previously unknown group, Pbr% 
tisans of Marcel Ponin, claimed resporH 
sibility for the attack on the National 
Front office in central Marseille, the : 
police said. Marcel Ponin was a member 
of the Marseille Resistance who was 1 
shot and killed death by the occupying- 
Nazis in 1944. 

On Tuesday night, the police u se$ 
tear gas to disperse 3.000 people who 
had surrounded a meeting ball where the 
National Front leader, Jean-Marie Lq 
Pen, held a meeting. 

Four police, a news photographer and 
several demonstrators were hurt in tb< 
melee. At least 10 people were arrested.' 
the police said. . 

Mr. Le Pen, who has been accused o| 
racism and anti-Semitism, held th^ 
meeting with Bruno Megret, a top party 
lieutenant and husband of Catherine 
Megret, the newly elected mayor of 
nearby Vitrolles, the fourth French towif 
controlled by the National front. -! 


Hugo Weisgall Dies; 
Composer Was Known 
Mainly for His Operas 


New York Times Service 

• NEW YORK — Hugo 
Weisgall, 84. a composer 
known primarily for his op- 
eras, died Tuesday in Man- 
hasset. New York, after a fall 
Friday. 

. Mr. Weisgall’s adherence 
\o a vigorous dissonant style 
caused him to be regarded as 
too modem in the 1950s and 
not modem enough — or 
rather, not postmodern 
enough — in the 1980s and 
'90s. He did not seem to 
mind. He kept to his own 
path, proving the powers of 
an atonal language to deal 
.with a wide variety of dra- 
matic situations. ' 

His range is demonstrated 
by his operatic adaptation of 
Pirandellp.’s,*‘Six Characters 
in Searcfaiof an Author. ” First 
presented hy_ fee. New. York 
City Opera in 1959, it is one 
of the works by which be will 
be chiefly remembered. 

He produced a number of 
one-act operas, including 
“The Tenor” (1948-50) and 
“The Stronger” (1952), a 25- 
minute monodrama for col- 
oratura soprano, drawing on 
plays by Wedekind and 
Strindberg respectively. Then 
»; tame a setting of Yeats’s play 
‘ '‘Purgatory,” for which he 
developed a cons i sten t ly 12- 
noie style. In the 1960s he 
produced two more full-scale 
operas, “Athaliah” (after Ra- 
cine) and “Nine Rivers from 
Jordan.” the latter introduced 
8y City Opera in 1968. 

His third work for the com- 
pany was “Esther,” which 
had its first performance dur- 
ing City Opera’s jubilee sea- 
son in ’1993 and will be re- 
vived on Oct. 12. one day 
before what would have been 
his 85th birthday. He also 
.wrote several other one-act 
pieces and numerous song 
cycles, bur little purely in- 
, strumental music. 

5 ., In the 1950s he taught at 
• Johns Hopkins University, 
wherein 1940 he had earned la 
doctorate for a study of nth- 
century Gentian poetry. From 
1957 onward he was based in 
New York City, teaching at 
the Juilliard School, at 
Queens College and at the 
■Cantors’ Institute of the Jew- 
ish Theological Seminary. He 
'was president of the Amer- 
ican Academy of Arts and 
Letters at his dearh. 

■ Mr. Weisgall was bom in 
Tvancice, in Bohemia, and 
tame to the United States 
-with his parents in 1920; the 
Ifamfly settled in Baltimore. 
His father was a cantor who 
-had sung in opera. Formal m- 
isEruction came at the Peabody 


Conservatory in Baltimore, 
intermittently with Roger 
Sessions in fee 1930s, and at 
fee Curtis Institute in Phil- 
adelphia. 

In 1943 he became the first 
American serviceman (per- 
haps also fee last) to conduct 
in uniform at fee London 
Proms; the work Sergeant 
Weisgall Jed was his own 
Overture in F. He later con- 
ducted concerts of American 
music in European cities 
while working for his country 
in diplomatic capacities. In 
1946-47 he was cultural at- 
tach^ in Prague. 

LaVern Baker, a Star 
Of Rhythm- V-Blues 

NEW YORK (NYT) — 
LaVem Baker, 67, one of fee 
most important rhythm- 'n'- 
blues singers of the 1950s. 
died here of heart complic- 
ations Monday. 

Miss Baker was a mainstay 
of the Atlantic Records roster 
of the mid-1950s, applying 
the fervor of gospel and fee 
bluesy power of Bessie Smith 
to songs about love and lust 
like “Tweedlee Dee.” Her 
string of hits ended by the 
mid-1960s, but in the late 
1980s she made a comeback, 
appearing on Broadway in 
“Black and Blue” and re- 
cording new albums. 

Miss Baker was bom in 
Chicago; an aunt was fee 
blues singer Memphis Min- 
nie. She sang gospel in 
church, and in the mid- 1940s 
worked as a blues singer. 

Through the 1950s. she was 
a consistent hit maker. She 
performed in “Rock, Rock, 
Rock!,” a 1956 movie with 
the disk jockey Alan Feed. 
“Jim Dandy,” released in 
1957, sold a million copies. 

Leon Danielian, 75. an 
American ballet dancer 
known during the 1 940s and 
’50s for his bravura and flair, 
died of heart failure Saturday 
in Canaan. Connecticut He 
was best known as a principal 
dancer wife the Ballet Russe 
de Monte Carlo, and later was 
director of the American Bal- 
let Theater School and pro- 
fessor of dance at the Uni- 
versity of Texas. 

Marie Marchowsky, 90, a 
modem-dance choreographer 
and teacher who was a lead- 
ing member of Martha Gra- 
ham's company in the 1930s, 
died Saturday in New York. 
A noted teacher of the Gra- 
ham dance technique, Ms. 
Marchowsky was also direc- 
tor of dance at the California 
Institute of Technology. 


He 


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PAGE 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MARCH 13 , 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


New Albanian Leader Calls for Talks With Rebels 


CcnfiM by Ov SirfFiw" QoJ**** 

TIRANA, Albania — Prime Minister 
Bashkim Fino. facing a growing wave of 
unrest, said Wednesday that he wanted 
talks with armed rebels holding towns 
throughout southern Albania. 

■ As rebellion moved closer to the capital. 

Mr. Fino met political parties to discuss 
forming an interim government to oversee 

elections. , - 

• His comments followed appeals from 
Italy and Greece to meet the rebels and an 
announcement that a European mediation 
mission led by Franz Vranitzky . the former 
Austrian chancellor, was to return to I ir- 

ana on Thursday. , 

“I think this is not a time to issue orders 
on either side,” Mr. Fino. who was ap- 


pointed Tuesday, told stale television. “It 
is a time for talks and dialogue.” 

Because of the instability, the United 
States ordered 160 U.S. government em- 
ployees and their dependents to leave Al- 
bania. 

The State Department also said Wed- 
nesday that it had urged the estimated 
2,000 Americans living in Albania to 
leave. 

The department’s spokesman, Nicholas 
Bums, said U.S. fears had grown because 
insurgents had not accepted a peace pro- 
posal put forward by President Sali Berisha 
and because large numbers of armed ci- 
vilians had broken into depots and stolen 
weapons, creating a highly volatile situ- 
ation. 


With more than a third of the country in 
.the bands of armed insurgents and the first 
signs of unrest in the north, there has been 
rising concern that violence will break out 
in the capital. On Tuesday, the Italian, 
French and British embassies said they 
would send personnel out of the country. 

In some parts of the south the rebellion 
appeared to have deteriorated into law- 
lessness, with armed gangs roaming 
through towns, robbing motorists, terror- 
izing women and shooting at travelers 
from Greece. 

A rebel council running the port of 
Sarande said anyone caught stealing or 
looting would be shot, but such warnings 
had little affect on gangs. 

A spokesman for a newly formed rebel 


National Committee for Public Salvation 
renewed demands for the resignation of 
Resident Berisha. and said the insurgents 
wanted a place at the Tirana talks. 

Anti -government rebels pillaged an arms 
depot near the town of Elbasan. a mere SS 
kilometers (34 miles) from Tirana. 

In the capital itself, witnesses reported 
that groups of men had entered the military 
academy and removed small arms. 

Tirana's mayor and leaders of major 
political parties appeared on television to 
urge residents to remain calm. 

Albania's exiled King Leka said he was 
assessing the situation hour by hour and 
was prepared to return if he judged the right 
moment had come. “I could be in Tirana 
within 24 hours,” he said. (Reuters. AP) 



ALBANIA: 

Hijacked Rebellion 

Continued from Page 1 
inals” control the weapons, said Bora 


Irferti rWVJRcuKn 

Prime Minister Fino. 


U.S. and Germany Hold 
Talks on Agent’s Ouster 


By Steven Erlanger 

New York Times Sen-ice 


. WASHINGTON— U.S. and German 
officials are negotiating over the fate of 
an American intelligence officer whom 
Germany has scheduled for expulsion, 
according to officials of both countries. 

• The officer has not yet been expelled. 

as originally reported by the German 
newsmagazine Der Spiegel, and if the 
discussions go well, he may be allowed 
to return from vacation to finish his 
regular tour of duty, the officials said. 
They said his tour was ro end soon in any 
case. 

- U.S. officials said the CIA officer was 
not engaged in industrial or economic 
espionage or espionage aimed at Ger- 
many, as Der Spiegel reported, but was 
gathering infor mati on about third coun- 
tries, which they did not identify. 

Germany has numerous business and 
diplomatic contacts with countries about 
which Washington seeks information 
and wants to ostracize diplomatically, 
like Iran, Iraq and Libya. 


U.S. officials said that the German 
government had made no formal com- 
plaint to Washington about the intelli- 
gence officer or his activities, but, was 
using him to send “a blunt post-Co Id-War 
message” about keeping Bonn informed 
of intelligence operations within its bor- 
ders and reducing the numbers of Amer- 
ican intelligence officers in Germany. 

A German official reached by tele- 
phone Tuesday said thar “this does nor 
seem to be the first such case” of Ger- 
man complaints about American intel- 
ligence officers and that “the number of 
people doing such work for the United 
States in Germany remains very high," 
especially now that the Soviet Union bas 
collapsed and Germany is reunited. 

German officials said the role of Ger- 
many as an American outpost and ideo- 
logical frontier, where East and West 
spied on each other and no one felt 
compelled to inform the German au- 
thorities, was now outdated. The United 
States has reduced the number of in- 
telligence officers in the last few years, 
but not as much as Bonn would like. 





lw SAva/Vhe Auutruud Prcu 


ZULU FLIGHT — Protesters scattering as gunfire broke out at a march of Zulus in Johannesburg to 
protest killings in 1994. Three people were killed and four were wounded in several incidents Wednesday. 


EMU: Eyeing Elections , France Makes Plea 


BRIEFLY 


Continued ftom Page 1 

dition of a budget deficit equal to no 
more than 3 percent of annual gross 
domestic product 

, Mr. Arthuis's request came just one 
.day after Jacques Delors, the former 
European Commission president, had 
accused German leaders of mishandling 
the single currency issue and worrying 
-voters needlessly about its stability. 

The two countries meanwhile reached 
p compromise on creating a “stability 
round!" — which they described as an 
informal discussion forum of single cur- 
rency member countries on the lines of 
the Group of Seven. Paris has been de- 
manding such a council since last year, 
but until now Bonn has resisted the 
'proposal on the grounds that it could 
-threaten the independence of the 
planned European central bank. 

On Wednesday, Mr. Waigel said. 
-"The independence of the European 
(central bank will be in no way affected 
by the activities of this council. France 
was very clear on this point." 
t At home in Germany, where he is faced 
with a skeptical German public. Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl would probably be 
happy to put off a decision on the single 
currency until after the German elections 
-in October 1998, observers say. But Ger- 
man officials say that cannot be done. 

The reasons why die French and Ger- 
man governments are worried about their 
.voters and would like to delay the final 
decision on who launches the euro are 
twofold: 

l •High unemployment — 12.7 per- 
cent in France and 12.2 percent in Ger- 
many — is often linked in the minds of 
.voters with the Maastricht process, even 
if the reality is that Europe's real prob- 
lem is seen by many economists as its 
•overly rigid and costly labor markets. 

• Governments, especially Ger- 
many's. worry, dial if Italy, Spain and 
■Portugal are allowed in the first wave of 


single-currency participants, then. Ger- 
man voters will fear that the euro could 
become a weaker currency. 

Until now, Europe-watchers have 
dwelled upon the risks posed by spec- 
ulators in financial markets, the extent to 
which high unemployment could pre- 
vent Bonn from fijlfiuing crucial mon- 
etary union criteria and whether to allow 
a flexible interpretation of the conditions 
contained in the Maastricht treaty. 

The political and social dimension of 
the Maastricht process, meanwhile, was 
evident Wednesday, when thousands of 
angry German miners paralyzed Bonn for 
the third day running. Europe's leading 
economy has found itself mired in mount- 
ing controversy over tax reform, spend- 
ing cuts, and the issue of how to proceed 
with Maastricht-mandated sacrifices at a 
time of record unemployment 

Even as top German and French of- 
ficials continue to dismiss the idea of a 
delay in the launch of the euro, financial 
markets are rife with speculation that a 
delay could he proposed during the up- 
coming European Union summit meeting 
in June in Amsterdam. EU officials say 
that would mean rewriting the Maastricht 
treaty and seeking new ratification from 
15 member parliaments, but some polit- 
ical insiders respond instead that there 
may be a way to “stop the clock” or 
justify a " technical” delay on the grounds 
that a new European central bank cannot 
be up and running by January 1999 — just 
six or seven months after the decision on 
who will launch the euro. 

In Germany, rumors of an overall 
delay have multiplied this week. Herbert 
Hax, a top government adviser, said that 
Germany would probably miss the 
Maastricht targets this year. As a result, 
Mr. Hax said, Bonn should put off join- 
ing the single cunency until it had 
cleaned up its public sector Finances. 
'The truth is quite simple: Stability 
comes before the timetable," Mr. Hax 
told the newspaper Bild am Sonmag. 


$5 Million in Cosh 
Found in Cali Raid 

BOGOTA — A cache of nearly 55 
million was discovered by the police 
Tuesday in a raid on a house in Cali. 
The national police chief. Rosso Jose 
Serrano, charged on a radio program 
Wednesday thatthd money belonged 
to Helmer Herrera, the fourth-rank- 
ing man in -fee Cali drug mob. who 
surrendered to the police in Septem- 
ber 1996. The find may provide the 
hardest evidence yet for U.S. charges 
that drug bosses continue running 
their empires from prison. (Reuters) 

Bribery in Mexico 
Alleged by Witness 

HOUSTON — Mexico’s federal 
police take a share of drug sale pro- 
ceeds and pass along bribes to high- 
ranking government officials, Cesar 
Dominguez Becerra, a former fed- 
eral police officer in Ciudad Juarez, 
testified Tuesday in the civil trial of 
Mario Ruiz Massieu. a former Mex- 
ican attorney general who is fighting 
the U.S. government's efforts to 
seize more than $9 million from his 
Houston bank account, (AP) 

Russia Coast Guard 
Fires on Turk Ships 

MOSCOW — Russian coast 


Georgia's Black Sea coast, killing 
one fisherman. One Turkish ship 
was held for further investigation, a 
spokesman said. (AP) 


Continued from Page 1 

earn it easily in Japan. And Japan is 
unprepared for crime.” 

Japan is a thieFs dream. People are 
relatively trusting since the crime rate is 
so low. Moreover, checks and credit cards 
are not much used, and people carry large 
amounts of cash without paying’ much 
attention to their wallets and purses. 

Chinese, in particular, have been struck 
by the opportunities. Although Chinese 
make up only 1 6 percent of the foreigners 
living here, they committed 4 1 percent of 
all crimes by foreigners in 1996. 

To be sure, only about 1 percent of all 
crimes in Japan are committed by 
Chinese, with nearly all crimes com’- 
mitted by Japanese themselves. 

Moreover, many Chinese simply as- 
pire to a better life, and for them this is a 
land of economic opportunity. They may 
come here illegally, but many find le- 
gitimate jobs and work 12-hour days 
under harsh conditions so they can save 
enough money to return to China and a 
new life. 

Many illegal Chinese immigrants 
meet a need in Japan, working at con- 
struction sites or cleaning toilets or tak- 
ing other menial jobs that Japanese 
themselves do not want. 

“Labor goes where it is needed." said 
Mo Bang Fu. a Chinese living in Japan 
who has studied the issue. “And the 
government often turns a blind eye." 

Still, the number of illegal Chinese 
immigrants is surging, so some worry' 
that this is the beginning of a major long- 
term trend. In January and February of 
this year, 579 Chinese would-be ’im- 
migrants have been caught sneaking into 
the country. That is more than the num- 
ber discovered during all of last year, 
and more than 30 times the number 
caught in all oF 1990. 

Accord ing to some estimates . the go v- 
em merit catches only 1 0 percent of those 
who slip in. 


Trapped in her apartment, she ^say* 


CRIME: Illegal Migrants in a Thieves' Dream 


"They come to Japan through the 
black market, ignoring the system of 
immigration control, so this problem 
shakes the very foundation of the Jap- 
anese government." said Masanori 
Yamanaka. an immigration-enforce- 
ment official at the Justice Ministry. 
“Dlegal entry is increasing and is a very 
worrisome situation now." 

For the first time. too. boats from 
China are boldly making their way to the 
eastern shores near Tokyo and are un- 
dertaking the week long joumev in winter, 
when the seas are particularly rough. 

Gangs in China, presumably with the 
protection of the local police and mil- 
itary. organize the expeditions and en- 
force payment, and have agents in Japan 
to ease the passage into society. But 
much of the reception work seems to be 
done by Japanese gangs, possibly with 
Chinese accomplices. 

The recent growth in criminal activity 
seems to have affected attitudes toward 
Chinese, according to a poll released last 
month. For the first time since 1978. 
when the government began conducting 
the poll, a majority — in this case. 51 
percent — of Japanese surveyed said they 
did not feel "friendly” toward China. 

There were many other reasons, 
however, including China's nuclear test- 
ing jast year and a dispute over own- 
ership of a group of islands claimed by 
both countries. But government officials 
have recently voiced growing concern 
over the illegal immigrants, raising the 
issue wrjth Chinese officials. 

If the economy continues to flounder, 
the problem could get worse. Chinese 
migrants, who have often borrowed 
$20,000 to $25,000 to be smuggled in, 
often find they cannot repay their loans. 

“They feel disappointed,” said Mr. 
Mo. "This was their dream. They come 
here, they can't find a job and can’t pay 
back the loan or don't want to pay back 
the loan. So they just start to steal and 
kidnap.” 


Vamgjeli. 

E & £ ££ . v£«if £2$ 

the $700 smugglers charge _ g 

blS “°Wedon'? 1 Sve any ^ 

we nut all our money in Gjalhca. are w 
STitoSw » one of the collapsed 

investment schemes. , ^ either 

The stores here remain closed, eitner 

locSd or empty of foodie cUn* 
stuffed into crates, are being sold a 
dusty street by a vendor brave enough to 
withstand the armed roughs 
Nearby, fish that had been blasted 
from the harbor with dynamite were 
being offered from the trunk ofaw.A 
worried father, fidgeting with i ■ i chpof 
cartridges, said he was looking form Ik 
for his 6-year-old daughter but couldn t 

^While others were searching for food* 
the leader of the so-called Committee to 
Protect VI ore, Albert Shyti, a laborer 
who drives a new Mercedes with a 
Kalashnikov in the front passenger seal, 
enjoyed vermouth on the terrace of a 
hotel at 10 AM. Tuesday morning. . W 
He was talking with a group of as^ 
sociates about how to divide the spoils of 
the revolt. . 

He was back at the hotel in the af- 
ternoon, sampling more vermouth while 
his bodyguards shot their rifles across 
the concrete yard for fun. 

The barman, Eliden Dura, said that 
rebel leaders were positioning them-i 
selves to “take everything — that’s why 
they’re leaders.’ * The anarchy, he said/ 
was a good opportunity for “mafia busi-f 
nesses to get organized.” • J 

Mr: Shyti was no more qualified than 
anyone else to lead a revolt, the bar-' 
tender said. “I have a gun, too." he said; 
“so I’m going to take 20 guys and go ana 
negotiate with the American ambassa-i 
dor.” ; 

In the last two days, more towns have 
tumbled in southern Albania to and-: 
government rebels. In Kucove. about 95 , 
kilometers (60 miles) south of Tirana^ £ 
the capital, armed local people claimed 
an air base, capturing more than a dozen 
MiG fighter jets. The government's hold 
on Elbasan, a strategic center on the road 
to Macedonia and Greece, only about 48 
kilometers from the capital, appeared 
shaky. i 

As part of an effort pushed on him by 
western governments to pacify the 
rebels, Mr. Berisha announced the api 
pointment Tuesday night of a new prim^ 
minister, Bashkin Fino, of the Socialist 
Party. But diplomats acknowledged that 
the formation of a new, broad-based 
government would dp lime to contain 
the anarchy. i 

As the turmoil seemed to be Speeding 
closer to the capital, the Italian Embassy 
— the biggest and best friend of Mri 
Berisha among the Western nations rept 
resented here — evacuated its dependent 
and nonessential staff Tuesday night. The 
French. British and U.S. embassies were 
in a similar process, diplomats said. i 
While Mr. Berisha remains as reviled 
as ever, Mr. Shyti ’s rallies have attracted 
only 1 ,000 or so people in the last few 
days, virtually all of them men. Before 
the gun-toting thugs took to the streets: 
tens of thousands attended rallies 
protesting the failed pyramid schemes. I) 
was too dangerous, the women said, to 
attend them now. 

Bitterness here is deep because after 
40 years of deprivation under Europe's 
harshest Communist regime, but with 
frequent contact with Italy since the col- 
lapse of communism in 1991, people 
dreamed of becoming instantly rich. I 
With few real jobs in such a backward 
economy, pyramid schemes pledging 
big interest rates promised easy wealth; 

The Albanian novelist Ismail Kadare 
said in an interview in Paris this week 
that instead of fulfilling their dream$ 
through the schemes, Albanians were 
living a nightmare. ’ 

“The people wanted to catch up with * 
lost time, to forget their poverty,” he P 
said. But now? “They are a people whi 
have lost their serenity and who are in 
the process of devouring themselves.” 


■v y 

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BALLY 

SWITZERLANO 


SINCE 1851 



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V(»"‘ 

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PAGE 71 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THJJRSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 


EUROPE 




The Price of an Enlarged NATO ‘on thp Cheap’ Is High in Problems 


By William Drozdiak 

J Washington Aw Se/virr 

BRUSSELS — When toe Clinton 
f ln V m f ran on made public a long- 
awaited report to Confess last montfi 
<fn the costs of NATO enlargement, i! 
appeared to offer the best of all worlds: 
a low-budget extension into Eastern 

S3°C woul ? ^ght-fisted 

legislators, ease defense burdens for 

prospective new members and defuse an 
, onunons showdown with Russia. 

.But after further scrutinizing the re- 
port, defense analysts in Europe and the 
united Slates say the “enlargement on 
me cheap strategy may be too op- 
nnusoc even in the absence of any vis- 
rble threat to the alliance. They also 


contend that the study raises a host of 
vexing issues that could portend serious 
new disputes in Europe. 

Interviews with NATO leaders, in- 
dependent military experts and senior 
US. and European officials have re- 
vealed fresh doubts about the assump- 
tions behind the administration plan — 
which foresees a total cost between $27 
billion and $35 billion over 13 years — 
that could magnify the alliance's burden 
as it incorporates new democracies from 
the ease 

“Like any major strategic innovation, 
it is a leap into an intellectual and political 
void,’ ’ said Richard Kugler, a senior ana- 
lyst at Rand Carp, who is the co-author of 
a major study on NATO expansion. "En- 
largement is beset with multiple objec- 


Kohl Hints at Easing 
Stand on Coal Subsidies 


t<y Our Slqff Fnm Dtspue-fca 

. BONN — Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
said Wednesday that he was optimistic 
that he and the leader of Germany's coal 
miners, Hans Berger, could reach an 
agreement Thursday over planned cuts 
in coal subsidies. 

. _ Mr. Kohl said in an interview in Mu- 
nich that he now favored phasing out 
{subsidies “step-by-step/' and so ease 


Paris Gets Serious 
With Measures to 
Curb Air Pollution 


Cuipied by (hr Suff From DuptKha 

PARIS — Trying to prevent the 
City of Light from turning into the 
City of Smog, the government has 
taken measures to crack down on 
air pollution in Paris. 

Environment Minister Corinne 
Lepage unveiled the new restric- 
tions to the National Assembly on 
Tuesday, the same day speed limits 
were lowered on the beltway circ- 
ling the city because of worsening 
air quality. 

Earlier this week, pollution in 
Paris reached a “level two” rating. 

The new measures mean that 
when pollution reaches “level 
three,” automobile traffic will be 
restricted, public L transportation 
:, wfrbd'frbejipd daytfipe tetrebtjtfirk- “ 
-Trig will be’ ‘free so residents cari 
tojne,-.;, ' 

The air quality levels are de- 
termined by the amounts of sulfur 
dioxide, ozone, and nitrogen di- 
oxide in the air. 

On the first day of a level-three 
alert, cars whose license plates be- 
gin with even numbers will be al- 
lowed on the roads. If the pollution 
persists the next day, only cars with 
odd-numbered plates will be au- 
thorized. 

Vehicles carrying three or more 
passengers are exempt. So are taxis, 
buses, electric cars or commercial 
vehicles. 

The ban will cover the capital 
and suburbs served by tire Paris 
subway system. 

Mrs. Lepage, who had originally 
said toe curbs would take effect 
when top levels of pollution were 
reached, told reporters that toe ban 
would be imposed on the basis of 
forecasts for toe following day, 
making it more frequent 

Tourists in foreign-registered 
vehicles would be covered by the 
ban, she said. 

Mrs. Lepage said disobedient 
drivers would be fined- The amount 
has not yet been determined. 

French ecologists were skeptical 
about toe new measures. 

“Level-three pollution is rare, 
because the thresholds are set un- 
usually high.” the Greens Party 
said in a statement (AP. Reuters) 


the effects of the deep cuts he wants to 
'make by 2005. 

Coal miners walked out of the pits 
and started daily demonstrations Friday 
after the government said it would cut 
federal cool subsidies from about 9 bil- 
lion Deutsche marks ($4.1 billion.) a 
year to 3.S billion marks by 2005. 

Thousands of miners paralyzed toe 
federal government district for three 
days, as others marched in Saarland 
state and the Ruhr Valley, Germany's 
two main coal producing areas. 

As Mr. Kohl asserted that the protests 
would not make the government alter its 
goal of slashing subsidies, an aide said 
the timetable for the cuts was open to 
discussion. 

Up to 8,000 miners blockaded a main 
thoroughfare Wednesday for a third 
day. but the crowd was smaller and 
more peaceful titan toe 15.000 who des- 
cended on Bonn the day before. 

The unions contend the govern- 
ment's plan would lead to toe closing of 
five to seven pits in the next three years, 
at a cost of 60.000 jobs, and have de- 
manded cuts to only 6.5 billion marks. 

The opposition Social Democratic 
Party also appeared more conciliatory 
Wednesday, saying it would end its 
boycott of the government's tax reform 
talks even if Mr. Kohl failed to make a 
satisfactory offer to the mine workers. 

Mr. Kohl said Wednesday, "I want 
toe coal industry to survive, and experts 
say that is possible at a lower level.” He 
added that the government should cut 
“step-by-step between now and 
2005.” 

He said the two sides could reach an 
agreement “with a bit of goodwill.” 

Sources close to toe government said 
it was considering improving welfare 
benefits for miners in the next three 
years to ease the pain of the cuts, but that 
it would not drop its goal of cutting 
subsidies to 3.8 billion marks by 2005. 

The Free Democratic Party, Mr. 
Kohl's junior coalition partner and toe 
driving force behind the cuts, said it was 
prepared to hold iis ground against the 
protests, but hinted it could be more 
flexible on the timetable for phasing out 
the subsidies. 

The party's leader in Parliament, 
Hermann Otto Solras, who has been 
locked out of his own headquarters in 
Bonn by toe miners' protests, said the 
party did not want shock measures and 
sudden mine closures. 

But toe opposition Social Democrats, 
who rule the two main mining states, 
strongly back the miners and say tem- 
pers will flare if the government does 
not come up with concessions on Thurs- 
day. “Then the situation will become 
critical,” Oskar Lafontaine, chairman 
of the Social Democrats and premier of 
Saarland, said ar a rally in Bonn. 

The government contends that it can 
no longer afford to pay 9 billion marks a 
year to compensate utilities for a do- 
mestic coal price that is more than three 
times the world market price. 

The protesting miners began dispers- 
ing Wednesday so that Mr. Kohl, who 
called off a meeting with Mr. Berger on 
Tuesday because of the threat of vi- 
olence, would come to the negotiating 
table on Thursday. (Reuters, AP) 


rives, complex trade-offs, uncertain con- 
sequences and agonizing dilemmas. ” 

NATO leaders plan to invite several 
countries from the former Warsaw Pact 
to join their alliance at a summit con- 
ference in Madrid this July. Poland, 
Hungary and toe Czech Republic are toe 
most likely candidates, but Slovenia and 
Romania are making strong bids to enter 
with the first wave. The number of 
entrants will have a major effect on toe 

enlargement bill. 

But the crux of NATO's enlargement 
puzzle is how to pay for and provide 
enough defense “insurance'' for new 
members so they enjoy the same se- 
curity privileges as toe rest of the al- 
liance, without projecting so much mil- 
itary power to the east that it alarms and 


antagonize^ the Russians. During the 
Cold War, ft was relatively easy ro cal- 
culate whati forces were necessary and at 
what cost to strike that balance. The 
N ATO allies faced an easily defined and 
highly visible threat: hundreds of Soviet 
and Warsaw Pact divisions arrayed 
across central Europe and positioned for 
a potential blitzkrieg against toe West. 

Now, rtrith toe Warsaw Pact dis- 
solved am Russia’s army in disrepair 
behmd itSj/borders. NATO says that such 
an obvious and easily measured risk no 
longer e^jsts. In fact, experts say there is 
no current military threat to either toe 
present or would-be NATO members 
and that/ any future threat would take 
years tojdevelop. 

In this benign environment, calcu- 


lating what forces are needed for se- 
curity, or how much should be spent on 
them, is a far more speculative enter- 
prise. As a result. Pentagon and alliance 
officials concede that toe defense plans 
and cost estimates drawn up so far have 
more to do with toe politics of selling 
NATO expansion to both toe U.S. Con- 
gress and Russia than they do with mil- 
itary science. 

“There was a strong political im- 
perative to low-baJl toe figures,” a se- 
nior U.S. official said. “Everybody 
realized the main priority was to keep 
costS'tiown to reassure Congress as well 
as the Russians." 

The calculations start with a change 
of assumptions about how a NATO 
member can be defended. 



The Resolution is en route for England, where it will be put into service as a prison ship off Portland. 

A ‘Floating Alcatraz 9 for U.K. Prison Overflow 


Agence France-Prcsse 

LONDON — Britain's first prison 
ship since the days of the Victorian 
hulks known to Charles Dickens is on 
its way from toe United States, despite 
deep misgivings by jail governors, re- 
ports said Wednesday. 

The Guardian daily said the £4 mil- 
lion (S6.4 million) Resolution, de- 
scribed as a “floating Alcatraz," would 
house 500 prisoners off Portland, on 


Britain's south coast Bought from 
New York City, the ship has been ad- 
apted to include squash and badminton 
courts and a chapel, the report said. 

The chairman of toe raison gov- 
ernors' association. Chris Scott voiced 
concerns Tuesday over plans to use 
ships in the face of a prison population 
that has * ‘gone through the roof” under 
Conservative sentencing policies. 

“In normal circumstances no one in 


BRIEFLY 


their right mind would seriously con- 
rider toe introduction of prison ships 
and abandoned holiday camps as pris- 
on accommodation," he told an an- 
nual governors' conference. There are 
also plans to turn a former vacation 
camp in northwest England into a de- 
tention center. 

Last Friday, the prison population in 
England and Wales stood at 59,156, 
compared- with a capacity of 60.013. 


Irish President to Step Down 

DUBLIN — Mary Robinson, Ireland's first female pres- 
ident, announced Wednesday that she would not seek a 
second seven-year term. 

The announcement ended months of speculation about 
her future in the Irish government, but raised fresh spec- 
ulation about whether she plans to step onto the inter- 
national stage in a top job with the United Nations. 

Mrs. Robinson, 52, has been mentioned as a candidate to 
become UN Commissioner for Human Rights, a post that 
unexpectedly became vacant recently when Jose Ayalo 
Lasso decided to return home to become Ecuador's foreign 
minister. (AP) 

Spanish Labor Talks Bear Fruit 

MADRID — Spain's unions and employers reached a 
preliminary agreement on Wednesday that will lay toe 
ground for a final accord on labor reforms. 

After weeks of talks, unions and employers said they were 
ready to draft an agreement aimed at easing Spain's un- 
employment, the highest in Europe at almost 22 percent. 

“Today we have come close enough in our positions to 
give us sufficient basis to become more concrete and put 
tilings down on paper,” Antonio Gutierrez, head of the 
Workers’ Commissions told a news conference. (Reuters J 

Serbs Destroy Muslim Houses 

TUZLA, Bosnia-Heizegovina — A Muslim village in 
Serb-held territory was attacked by a mob and houses were 
destroyed for toe third time this year. United Nations 
officials said Wednesday. 


The attack Tuesday came the day after toe NATO-led 
Stabilization Force lifted a security cordon on toe village. 
GajevL, that had been instituted after a previous attack. 

A UN spokesman in the nearby town of Tuzla. Andrea 
Angeli, said there were no casualties in the attack at 6 PM. 
Gajevi was placed off-limits to a U but officiaJ visitors by 
SFOR last week after a Serb mob destroyed Muslim houses 
being built there. (AFP) 

Yeltsin Cabinet to Get Reformers 

MOSCOW — The new Russian government being 
formed under orders from President Boris Yeltsin will 
include market-oriented reformers. Prime Minister Viktor 
Chernomyrdin told Itar-Tass news agency on Wednesday. 

“Professional market economists, firm supporters of toe 
president's course of reforms, will come into the gov- 
ernment,” the agency quoted Mr. Chernomyrdin as saying. 

Mr. Chernomyrdin, who on Tuesday was ordered by Mr. 
Yeltsin to present a new government within a week, did not 
give any names of the future cabinet members. (Reuters) 

Euro Assembly Opposes Cloning 

STRASBOURG — The European Parliament, reacting 
to the successful cloning of an adult sheep, called on 
Wednesday for a worldwide ban on toe cloning of humans 
and strict controls on toe cloning of animals. 

‘ ‘The cloning of human beings, whether experimentally, 
in the context of fertility treatment, preimplantation dia- 
gnosis, tissue transplantation or for any other purpose 
whatsoever, cannot under any circumstances be justified or 
tolerated by any society,” the EU assembly said in a 
resolution. (Reuters) 


In current front-line NATO states, 
such as Germany, large numbers of U.S. 
and allied troops and weapons, includ-1 
ing nuclear warheads, are positioned an 
big bases. But in planning how to defendt 
Poland, Hungary and toe Czech Re-* 
public, alliance strategists foresee sta- 
tioning no U.S. or other Western troops! 
or nuclear weapons in those countries, f 
Instead, alliance army and air force 
units already based in Western Europe 
would be designated and trained as rap-1 
id-reaction forces thai would, in theory* 
be prepared to deploy quickly to the 
territory of toe new allies in the event o£ 
a crisis. * 

As a result, the costs of expansion 
would be limited to modifying toe mil' 1 
itary bases and other infrastructure of 
new members so they would be pre- 
pared to host rapid-reaction forces tem- 
porarily, upgrading current alliance 
forces so they are better prepared to 
deploy rapidly and _ buying. new 
weapons, communications equipment 
and other materiel for the new mem J 
hers. 

According to the latest U.S. proposal, 
new members would spend $10 billion 
to $13 billion to bring their ground 
forces and air defenses to alliance 
levels: NATO’s current members would 
pay $8 billion to $10 billion bolstering 
their rapid-reaction teams; and both cur- 1 
rent and new members would spend 59 
billion to $12 billion to link their com- 5 
muni cations and command systems. • 
Because U.S. forces in Europe 
already are relatively well prepared for 
rapid deployment, compared with those 
of Germany and other allies. Pentagon 
planners think toe U.S. share of the neW 
costs could be limited to $200 million a 
year — less than one- tenth of 1 percent 
of the current U.S. defense budget, t 
NATO’s secretary-general, Javier 
Solana Madariaga, said in an interview 
that, in addition to holding down costsl 
the NATO rear-guard strategy should 
convince Russia that the alliance har-i 
bors no desire to encroach on its ter* 
ritory. 

“We are making every effort to re* 
assure the Russians that NATO, by en- 
larging eastward, has no hostile intent 
dons and will never take offensive 
measures against them,” Mr. Solana 
said. 

The tug of domestic and East-West 
polidcs has shaped not only NATO's 
overall defense strategy but also the 
specific assumptions about how it will 
te implemented. 

This can be seen in the successive 
studies done in the last year on how 
much the rapid deployment forces 
would cost — a calculation that depends 
heavily on how many NATO troops and 
planes would be needed to counter any 
threat • 

At the high end, a Congressional 
Budget Office study postulated thatneW 
members 1 would require as- much mil- 
itary support as Germany did in the Cold 
War era. That means enlargement cost* 
could reach a whopping $125 billion. 

The study reckoned on a need to 
deploy 10 divisions and 10 fighter 
wings to the east from U.S. and allied 
forces based in Western Europe. Ah 
American NATO division consists of 
16,000 soldiers, and a NATO fightef 
wing usually comprises 90 jet fighters 
and 18 support aircraft. 

A subsequent Rand Corp. study, fol- 
lowing Pentagon guidelines, scaled 
down the cost to $42 billion by halving 
the troop deployment, earmarking 5 di- 
visions and 1 0 fighter wings to reinforce 
the defenses of new NATO members. 1 

But even that cost seems high at a 
time when both the United States and 
West European countries are struggling 
to cut government spending. So the 
Pentagon decided to shrink its military 
projections even further. 

It decreed that Poland and the other 
new members should have only four 
divisions and six fighter wings desig*- 
nated for their defense. • • 

That produced the estimate reported 
to Congress of $27 billion to $35 bill] on. 
Critics point out that all of the estimates 
appear to be arbitrary, given toe lack of 
an identifiable militaiy opponent * 
The other political imperative. U.S. 
officials say, was to place a hefty share 
of the planned enlargement expense on 
current and future allies in Europe — a 
move that is likely to provoke stormy 
disputes across the Atlantic in the 
months to come. 



Comprehensive yet concise, informed yet impartial, the affairs of the world unfold on the pages of the World’s Daily Newspaper. 








PAGE 8 


THURSDAY MARCH 13, 1997 




EDITORIALS /OPINION 


Rmli> 


INTERNATIONAL 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW TORE TIMES AMD THE WASHINGTON TOST 


Less Appetite for Military Involvement Abroad ^]|o 


Yeltsin Starts Again 


If Bill Clinton feels he's having 
trouble controlling the spin of news in 
Washington, these days, he might fate 
comfort in the reaction Boris Yeltsin is 
getting to his latest government re- 
shuffle. One opposition leader said Mr. 
Yeltsin was “spitting in the face of 
society, ” another said a new first deputy 
prime minister was about as popular in 
Russia as Hitler, and a third commented 
ihar the Russian president was reshuff- 
ling “a greasy okl pack of cards." 

With a Parliament controlled by 
PnmnniniBfs, ulrra nationalists and cor- 
rupt newly rich businessmen, Mr. 
Yeltsin is playing to a tough crowd. 
But the opposition's surly rhetoric re- 
flects a possibly encouraging under- 
lying fact: Mr. Yeltsin may have re- 
turned. By delivering a pointed state- 
of-the-union speech, naming reformer 
Anatoli Chubais as deputy prime min- 
ister and ordering all other cabinet 
members to tender resignations, the 
president essentially has begun, fi- 
nally, his second term. 

Mr. Yeltsin won re-election eight 
months ago but was sidelined by heart 
surgery followed by pneumonia. Signs 
of modest progress in Russia’s ne- 
gotiations with the United States on 
arms control and NATO expansion 


More Arms Reduction 


Bill din ton’s meeting with Boris 
Yeltsin in Helsinki later this month is a 
crucial opportunity to revive the lost 
momentum of nuclear weapons reduc- 
tion. A welcome oew bargaining de- 
cision recently announced by the ad- 
ministration should make it easier to do 
so. Washington, essentially, has agreed 
to look ahead to the terms of the next 
arms reduction treaty to ensure that the 
last one is belatedly approved by Russia 
and put into force. The proposal, if 
accepted by Moscow, can lead to sig- 
nificant cuts in tbe nuclear arsenals of 
both countries. 

The last treaty reducing the number 
of nuclear weapons was signed during 
the Bush administration but remains 
unratified by the Russian Parliament It 
would reduce die level of long-range 
nuclear warheads to between 3,000 
and 3.500 for each side, one-third the 
level of a decade ago. The accord 
would also outlaw land-based mul- 
tiple-warhead missiles, which are par- 
ticularly dangerous because they are 
considered the most tempting targets 
in a nuclear crisis. 

Since Russia has more of these 
mega-weapons than the United States, 
the destruction of them would leave 
Moscow well below the overall war- 
head ceiling. To maintain nuclear 
equality with the United States, Russia 
might feel compelled to initiate an ex- 
pensive program of building single- 
warhead missiles. By proposing to be- 
gin negotiations at once on a new arms 
reduction treaty, with ceilings of 2,000 
to 2.500 long-range warheads for each 
side, the administration offers a good 
way around tins problem. Levels that 
low would mean that no new Russian 
missiles would have to be built 


Washington should go even further 
by offering to sign anew agreement if 
doing so would assure Russian rat- 
ification of the last one. The Bush 


administration set an appropriate pre- 
cedent by signing the last treaty before 


cedent by signing the last treaty before 
theprevious one was ratified. 

Tbe missile-building issue is not tbe 
only problem holding up Russian rat- 
ification, The collapse of Moscow's 
conventional forces has made many 
Russian legislators more reluctant to 
reduce nuclear weapons. Western plans 
to expand NATO closer to Russia’s 
borders and America's programs to de- 
velop ballistic missile defense systems 
also increase Moscow's feelings of in- 
security. But in reality Russia’s security 
will be strengthened by continued nu- 
clear missile reductions, and its eco- 
nomy will be spared a taxing drain. 

American and European security 
will benefit as well. The future dangers 

Iistic^missile defense antF NATO ex- 
pansion are hypothetical. No rogue re- 
gime is near developing reliable long- 
range missiles. Russia’s weakened and 
demoralized land armies wfll not 
threaten Central and Eastern Europe 
anytime soon. But the thousands of 
nuclear warheads still sitting atop Rus- 
sia’s long-range missiles couldonce 
again become a danger to the American 
people if a less responsible Russian 
government comes to power. 

The faster Washington and Moscow 
can move ahead with actual reductions 
in nuclear arms, the safer both coun- 
tries will be. Working with the new 
American proposal. President Clinton 
and President Yeltsin have a chance to 
make real progress in Helsinki. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Ban Chemical Weapons 


The American debate over the 
chemical weapons treaty has become 
an argument among conservatives. The 
Democratic administration favors rat- 
ification. The real interest centers in 
the participants and terms of a recent 
exchange between Brent Scowcroft, 
national security adviser to Presidents 
Gerald Ford and George Bush (die 
latter signed the treaty}, and James 
Schlesinger, secretary of defense under 
Presidents Richard Nixon and Ford. 

The argument made by General 
Scowcroft in The Washington Post cm 
Feb. 11 is that toe treaty is an imperfect 
but still useful instrument to induce 
others to follow the example that Ron- 
ald Reagan set when be committed the 
United States to quit the chemical 
weapons business unilaterally in 1985. 
Mr. Schlesinger, with former Ford and 
Reagan defense chiefs Donald Rums- 
feld and Caspar Weinberger, replied on 
March 5 that tbe treaty’s flaws would 
leave the United States more, not less, 
vulnerable to chemical attack. 

Tbe specific textual anxiety of the 
three Republican former defense 
chiefs is that the treaty would obligate 
members to provide tire likes of Iran 
and Cuba with chemical offensive and 
defensive technology. Fortunately, 
this alarm is misplaced. The treaty 
permits technology transfers only for 


"purposes not prohibited under this 
Convention.” Rogues need not apply. 

The defense chiefs ’ general political 
anxiety is that the treaty will lull Amer- 
icans into neglect of a potentially 
growing threat They could be right; 
the treaty is not self-enforcing. But 
their and others' vigilance should help 
diminis h the peril. 

Tbe treaty has already been ratified 
by more than 65 countries — enough to 
put it beyond American amending and 
into effect in ApriL That is not an 
argument for ratifying a bad treaty, but 
this is a good treaty. Tbe years since 
Ronald Reagan laid its foundation 
have confirmed tbe wisdom of out- 
lawing these weapons. Morally, chem- 
ical arms generate a special dread. 
Strategically, they can embolden small 
countries. That the coverage falls short 
and that enforcement is uncertain are 
mostly arguments for going ahead in 
order to spread anti -chemical stan- 
dards and hone anti-chemical rules. 

Jesse Helms threatens to bottle up 
the bill to prevent ratification. But a 
procedure has been improvised (a ne- 
gotiation between the administration 
and nine Republican senators named 
by the majority leader) to address Re- 
publican concerns in a ratification res- 
olution. This is tbe way to proceed. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


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W ASHINGTON — Defense Sec- 

retary William Cohen returns 


suggest that he again is in charge. The 
domestic program he has outlined 
would, if enacted, initiate a second 
wave of economic reform, as needed 
— and as shocking to tbe system — as 
die first wave that he set in motion 
immediately after the Soviet Union 
collapsed in late 1991. 

But that’s a big ‘‘if.’ ' The first wave 
— smashing the Communist Party’s 


grip on the nation, freeing stale-con- 
trol! ed prices and selling off state- 


trolled prices and selling off state- 
owned property — played to Mr. 
Yeltsin’s strengths as bold destroyer of 
the old. The next wave will call for 
mare sustained and creative leader- 
ship, and it won’t be much fan. 

Tax, pension, energy and housing 
reform are uniformly dull and unpop- 
ular, a far cry from jumping atop tanks 
to rally toe oppressed citizenry. But 
whether Russia can pull them off will 
determine whether its economy be- 
comes open, transparent and growing 
or remains corrupt and for the benefit 
of a few. Which of those roads Russia 
follows in turn depends in no small 
measure on bow long its president can 
physically and mentally remain fo- 
cused on tbe long-delayed second 
phase of reform. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


W rotary William Cohen returns 
from his first trip abroad in office con- 
vinced of two things: American peace- 
keepers in Bosnia are doing a great job 
on an important mission that serves 
American interests, and they must stop 
doing it within 15 months. 

Mr. Cohen, a published novelistand 
poet as well as former a Republican 
senator from Maine, recognizes a para- 
dox when he sees one. Arm, as becomes 
clear in an interview at the Pentagon, 
the Bosnia paradox lies at the heart of a 
larger strategic dilemma that the Clin- 
ton administration faces in its second 
term: Is the world’s “indispensable 
nation” really too poorto lead? 

Money is toe reason that the United 
States will not continue its presence in 
Bosnia beyond June 1998, whatever 
happens on tbe ground or in American 
relations with Russia. 

June 1998 “is about as far as Con- 
gress is willing to go, notwithstanding 
the fact that we are making a very 
positive contribution.'* Mr. Cohen 
says. He flatly rules out “making a 
long-term commitment to a region 
which will take a great deal of your 


By Jim Hoagland 


resources and drain them away from 
your primary mission, and it will not 
have congressional support.’ ’ 

In Europe, geography is history. In 
America today, money is strategy. As 
we go on to discuss Russia, Zaire, the 
size and deployment of UJS. forces and 
other topics, Mr. Cohen returns re- 
peatedly to money and to Congress’s 
power over foreign policy. 

Absent from hU remarks is a clear 
commitment to fight to change con- 
gressional attitudes on Bosnia or other 
controversial questions. 

“The president can declare this will 
be our policy ,' * Mr. Cohen says, speak- 
ing hypothetically, “but if we don’t get 
tbe funding or we get opposition from 
toe HiD, resolutions in oppos iti on sent 
to the Senate or other types of le- 
gislative actions, that can only dimmish 
toe president’s powers and stature.” 

Any hii rnanfrariaTT mission to Zaire or 
elsewhere "would be very Limited and 
very well-defined” to avoid d raining 
resources. And while he does not ad- 
vocate toem. Mr. Cohen will notruie out 


new cuts in toe size of U-S. military 
manpower or in the number of troops 
permanently stationed in Europe and 
Asia if budgetary pressures intensify. 

His concents are not surprising, giv- 
en his 24 years in Congress and -the 
budget contortions be must perform to 
get an additional $2 billion to fund 
operations by the 8,000 U.S. troops in 
Bosnia this year. But his remarks also r 
reflect a shift in the center of gravity in 
the making of feringa and ' defense 
policy now that Mr. Cohen has re- 
placed William Peny at the Pentagon. 

Mr. Pteny leaned forward on toe- 
Bosnia mission, which he saw as an 
opportunity to remvigorale NATO and 
change U.S. relations with Russia after 
Moscow pot a brigade of its troops 
under American command there. Mr. 
Cohen leans back from Bosnia. 

“I dunk the president is fortunate 
that so far Congress has not undertaken 
initiatives to cm off funding, to toil to 
fund *e mission” in Bosnia, he ob- 
served in surprisingly downbeat fash- 
ion. This after I »»flnHnnwi toe 
soaring desenptfon of the Bosnia mis- 
sion mat Bill Clinton made in his last 
news conference, when be observed 


that U.S.-Russian mifitaiy cooperation 
in Bosnia had changed the. course of 

ge NATOMtions “tOgetoM- eqd^^ 
bloodiest war in Europe since Worid J 
War II, and we are doing it with Rus- 
sia." Mr. Clinton said. “And mere are ' 
lots of other things we can do vote ' 
Russia.” including petfcaps belonging * 
... ««, Minm/m emnitv alliance. he ■ 


to **a common security alliance, fie 
added, tossing out a strategic teaser- 
about Europe's future- -’I- 

Mr. Clinton, it seems to me, put U.5. - 
involvement in Bosnia in the right stra- •’ 
tegic perspective. That makes it harder 
to understand why Mr. Cohen js lash- ■ 
tug to the mast of an ironclad 

withdrawal date this far in advance. ■ ■ ■' 
Mr. Cohen’s evident suspicion of. , 
military involvement parallels Mr. 
Chilton’s reserve. Mr. Cohe n wffl not ' 
be pulling and tugging at toe president 
to take bold steps abroad that would 
cost money and cause him trouble with 
Congress, as Mr. Clinton felt some ■ 
ai des did in his first term. The two men 
meet on a common groundof ca ution . . 
of observing limits and of desiring . 
above all peace on toe home front. 1 

The Washington Post. ' 


New U,S . Guidelines for Providing Humanitarian Aid 


W ASHINGTON — At toe 
U.S. Agency for Inter- 


YY U.S. Agency for Inter- 
national Development, we are 
now guided by the following 
precepts: 

1. The United States win 
provide humanitarian assist- 
ance only if there is reasonable 
confidence that our aid can be 
delivered without threat to the 
lives of humanitarian workers. 

2. It will provide human- 
itarian assistance only if it has 
access, either directly or 
through reliable intermediar- 
ies, to toe site where assistance 
is to be provided and to po- 
tential recipients so that a de- 
pendable assessment of need 
can be p e rf ormed. 

3. It will provide human- 
itarian aid only if tbe delivery 
and utilization of such assist- 
ance. either directly or through 
reliable intermediaries, can be 
monitored effectively. 

4. It will not provide hu- 
manitarian aid if that assist- 
ance results in or supports the 
coercion or subjugation of 
either recipients or others. 

5. In providing humanitari- 
an aid, it will seek durable 
solutions to toe crisis which 


By J. Brian Atwood and Leonard Rogers 

This is the second of two articles. 


created toe need for U.S. aid. 

The last two of these prin- 
ciples are most likely to bring 
our h umani tarian assistance 
into the realm of foreign policy 
and pursuit of U.S. diplomatic 
interests. We should not shrink 
from that relationship. 

Tbe United States is now in 
a unique position to provide 
leadership, and the work! will 
not respond to crisis in peri- 
pheral states without our lead- 
ership. A vigorous U.S. for- 
eign policy provides the best 
hope for actually resolving 
current crises and preventing 
those of the future. 

Secretary of State Made- 
leine Albright has set forth a 
policy construct that is very use- 
ful to understanding tbe rela- 
tionship between humanitarian 
assistance and foreign policy. 

There are four categories of 
countries in her worldview: 
those that participate actively 
in international affairs and toe 
global economy and abide by 
mutually agreed rules: those 


emerging democracies that 
seek to participate positively in 
international affairs because 
they accept that course as in tbe 
best interests of their people; 
rogue states that reject toe ben- 
efits of positive participation 

in internatio nal affair s, . sup- 
press their own people and of- 
ten support terrorism; and 
states that have failed and are 
unable to provide toe basic re- 
quirements of life and physical 
security for their people. 

The critical point is that the 
secretary sees this construct as 
dynamic. The goal of U.S. 
policy is to assist countries to 
move from the latter three cat- 
egories so that they become 
fall and active participants in 
world affairs. 

Recognize that here the sec- 
retary is setting a new course 
for toe United States in our 
international relations, a course 
which for toe first time makes a 
real anempt to engage a world 
that changed forever with the 
collapse of the Soviet Union. 


For 50 years, we pursued 
successfully a policy of con- 
tainment of communism and 
preservation of the status quo 
to ensure our own freedom and 
market economy. Our diplo- 
macy focused on our adversar- 
ies and our allies. Now we will 
take a broader, dynamic view 
of the worid. 

Our diplomacy will devote 
more attention to rogue states 
and to failed states, recogniz- 
ing that our fimriatnen bii in- 
terests lie in moving those 
countries, as well as toe emerg- 
ing .democracies, into the in- 
ternational co mmunity as fully 
participating members. 

Recognize also that this is a 
profoundly humanitarian poli- 
cy. It is no accident that toe 
complex humanitarian disasters . 
we confront occur in toe rogue 
and failed states. We know from 
experience that development 
democracy and fall participa- 
tion in tbe international commu- 
nity are the best ways to ensure - 
against complex emergencies. 

Sane may be concerned that 
in pursuing this course toe 
voice ofhumanitariamsm with- 
in the U.S. government will be 


lost, that there jwiU be no op- 
portunity to inform our policy 
fro m ~ a purely humanitarian 
point of view. Rest assured, 
USAID will continue to assert 
that voice effectively, as we tod 
recently in the debate over 
evacuating staff of nongovern- 
mental organizations from . 
northern Iraq. 

If another situation such as 
Ethiopia in the ' mid-1980s 
should arise, then USAID 
would argue that we should - 
provide food aid. However, the 
secretary’s new course pro- 
vides new opportunities for the 
solution of the fundamental 
causes of the complex emer- 
gencies we now face, and we 
must take advantage of those 


ffetiUuj 

In (hind 

Roie-tiit 


Tins does not mean subor- 
dinating humanitarian aid to 
our political interests It means 
we will bring toe. full weight of 
our national policy to bear in' 
solving these crises. 


Mr. Atwood is administrator 
of the US. Agency for Inter- 
national Development and Mr. 
Rogers Heads Its Bureau for 
Humanitarian Response. 




Britain Has a Point When It Objects to Full European Uziioh ; SAP: <,<■ 


L ONDON — It has been a 
loss for Europe that Bri- 


J-zloss for Europe that Bri- 
tain’s debate on toe reform of 
European institutions has been 
so hysterical. The British have 
important points to make. 

The pace of the British de- 
bate has been set by what the 
pro-Europeans like to call toe 
“foreign-owned press” — the 
papers owned by Rupert Mur- 
doch, tbe Australian who de- 
fected to America on advice of 
accountants, and by Canada's 
Conrad Black. These include 
the biggest-selling London 
tabloids as well as The Times, 
of august hut faded reputation, 
and toe excellent Daily and 
Sunday Telegraphs. 

They produce one story after 
another of bureaucratic honor 
in Brussels, and of alleged in- 


By William Pfaff 


vasions of national sovereignty 
largely unremarked elsewhere 
in Europe — even in France, 
where chauvinism was inven- 
ted. The result has been that no 
one abroad pays attention to the 
serious things that some British 
have been trying to say. 

As the government of John 
Major, suffering its thousand 
wounds, staggers toward appar- 
ent obliteration in the forthcom- 
ing elections, officials in Brus- 
sels. Bonn and Paris have been 
waiting for a new and pro-Euro- 
pean Labour government in 
London. Just how pro-Euro- 
pean that government will be 
must be questioned. 

It will be rational in its re- 
sponses to reality, which toe 


Tory party has ceased 10 be on 
this issue, but it will ask many 
of tbe same questions that some 
Tories have asked, since they 
are good questions. 

Tbe foreign secretary, Mal- 
colm Riflrinil has made a useful 
contribution toward enlighten- 
ing the debate outside Britain 
with a recent tour of several 
capitals, telling the foreign pub- 
lic why many British have re- 
servations about the present 
course of European reform. 

He was in Sweden. Germany 
and France last month asking 
for a public debate across 
Europe on toe long-term sig- 
nificance of the Maastricht re- 
form proposals for an enlarged 
Union, which are currently on- 


Lake Stayed Out of the Loop 


W ASHINGTON — On 
Jan. 2, toe chief of in- 


YY Jan. 2, toe chief of in- 
telligence for tbe National Se- 
curity Council apparently read 
this column and became 
alarmed. After reviewing toe 
White House visits and money 
transactions of John Huang, 
Wang Jun and others, I had 
asked: “Is this a pattern of ag- 
gressive fund-raising, corrupt 
influence peddling — or part of 
an intellipftnre oneratinnV” 


By William Saftre 


an intelligence operation?” 

Rand Beers then remem- 
bered a visit the previous June 
by two FBI agents who told 
him and an NSC colleague of 
an investigation into penetra- 
tion of U.S. political cam- 
paigns by China. 

This was toe hottest piece 
of information in toe entire 
$28-biIIion-a-year intelligence 
community, one that the pres- 
ident bad a “need to know.” 

Did the FBI visitors im- 
properly direct Mr. Beers and 
a colleague to keep this from 
Anthony Lake or his deputy, 
Samuel Berger? The FBI 
fiercely disputes this incred- 
ible White House claim. Six 
months later, Mr. Beers con- 
fided in neither Mr. Lake nor 
Mr. Berger but in Alan 
Kreczko, the NSC lawyer-. 

In that first week in Janu- 
ary, a White House spokes- 
man informs me. Mr. Kreczko 
went to Jack Quinn, toe out- 
going White House counsel, 
and recommended checking 
out my suspicion with Justice. 
The spokesman does not 
know if Mr. Kreczko had 
spoken to Mr. Beets when he 


talked to Mr. Quinn. The in- 
telligence then sat in limbo. 

“I recall speaking to Alan 
Kreczko about your piece,” 
Mr. Quinn tells me, “and he 
may have said he wanted to 
have a conversation about it 
with the Department of Justice 
that I authorized. But had I 
known at any point that Justice 
was conducting such an inves- 
tigation into Chinese influence 
on our elections, there is no 
way — no way — I would 
have sat on that information.” 

All through January — with 
toe House Rules Committee 
publicly requesting the FBI to 
look into it, with tbe FBI di- 
rector responding that he had 


aftermath; he was not a sub- 
ject of investigation; he was 
cleared for America’s deepest 
national secrets. Why did 
aides who saw him every day 


keep him ignorant? 
The answer goes t 


25 agents already on the case 
— nobody in the NSC told 


— nobody in the NSC told 
their bosses or the president 
about a matter central to U.S. 
foreign policy. Nor did toe at- 
torney general. Why? 

We can disbelieve the story 
now being cooked tip between 
Justice and toe White House 
that it was all a “misunder- 
standing’ ’ among four spooks 
about security cautions. 

I can understand the NSC 
staffers' reluctance to tell 
Samuel Berger during tbe 
1996 fall campaign. He atten- 
ded the weekly political meet- 
ings that included * ‘Asian out- 
reach,” and might have been 
pan of tbe problem. 

But Tony Lake was not di- 
rectly involved in the cam- 
paign or toe revulsion in its 


Tbe answer goes to why toe 
Senate Intelligence chairman, 
Richard Shelby, is taking such 
a hard look at Mr. Lake's 
nomination to be CIA direc- 
tor. Mr. Lake’s four-year re- 
cord, at the NSC shows that his 
greatest weakness is toe han- 
dling of intelligence. He was 
uninformed about tbe China 
investigation because be cre- 
ated the atmosphere within his 
staff that there was much he 
did not want to know. 

While he was national se- 
curity adviser. White House 
clearance procedures were 
loosened in a way that made a 
mockery of security and cast a 
shadow over policy-making. 

Because Mr. Lake showed 
no interest in toe Asian Con- 
nection, his staff took an FBI 
security warning to mean he 
was out of the loop. Why 
trouble tbe boss's head with 
intelligence that would make 
him uncomfortable? 

Tony is an honorable, 
likable man. His abuse of con- 
gressional trust in winking at 
banian arms to Bosnia ana his 
sloppy stock dealings would 
not be enough to disquali fy him 
if he were good at mis line of 
work. The problem is that be 
has just proved himself to be a 
colossal flop in toe manage- 
ment of intelligence. ; 

The New York Times. , 


dergoing somewhat panicky in- 
tergovernmental revision in 
preparation for the Amsterdam 
European summit in June, 

The fundamental argument 
made by Mir. Rifkind is that tb& 
current reform momentum 
would shift power from broadly 
legitimate elected national insti- 
tutions toward narrowly legitim- 
ate and mostly unelected bodies. 
He has said that people today 
look to their national Parliaments 
and governments “to protect 
their liberties, to set their taxes, 
and to take the great decisions of 
national security.” 

People may not like the de- 
cisions actually made, but they 
acknowledge the legitimacy of 
tbe institutions making them. 
People know whom to blame 
and what to do about iL 

EU institutions are mostly 
appointive and do not enjoy this 
democratic legitimacy and pop- 
ular acceptance. Tbe European 
Parliament was created to rem- 
edy toe “democratic deficit” 
but has failed to do so. Mr. 
Rifkind says that “it has yet to 
win tbe affection and confi- 
dence of European voters,” as 
is demonstrated by the low 
turnout in European elections 
and toe lack of interest in what 
goes on in the Parliament 
Tbe legitimacy argument is a 
powerful one. The EU structure 
requires governments to set 
policy for the Commission. All 
important matters have to be 
sealed between governments, 
and the Parliaments that have a 


serious say about how Europe is* 
governed remain toe national* 
Parliaments. -a: 

The goal of ChanceUof* 
Helmut Kohl is to bind Gcr J i 
many into Europe at any cost 
The British fear that this tendjP 
toward creation of a “superb 
state.” London says that mats 
jority voting (eliminating tbfit 
national veto), together with the 
fiscal, budget and tax harmon- 
ization required by toe commoff 


currency, may create ar b i t rar y! 
and undemocratic bonds. 2 

Given toe robust sense of na£« 
tional interest which still exists! 
in the EU countries, it see mi' 
improbable that Europe would 
come to such a pass. But the 
unconsidered creation of ar- 
rangements now that may late* 
be repudiated would badly 
damage the European cause — 
as well as the German. \) . 

This risk, I think, is widely 
felt, and explains (he uneasinessi 
surrounding toe current EU re^ 
form program. There is a sense * 
that toe Maastricht agenda i 
not the right one. The prim- 
ordial political reality of Europe - 
remains toe nation-state, and- 
good intention s or high ambi- 
tion will not change that. 

The British arguetbat this 
reality can be - acknowledged 
only in an intimate partnership 
of nations, and that any attempt 
to create full union wfll faiL 
Europe’s elites have yet realty 
to answer this objection. — 

International Herald Tribune. 

© Los Angeles Tunes Syndicate. 




V 


-“I! . ' 


IN OliR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 5(V YF.ABS ACO 


1897: Taxing Wools 

WASHINGTON — Consterna- 
tion has been created among the 
dudes by a clause inserted in toe 
tariff on wools, restricting the 
value of clothes that can be 
brought home free of duty to 
$100, whether they have been 
worn abroad or not. All wool 
rates are restored to those pre- 
vailing under toe McKinley tar- 
iff. Under the present Wilson 
Tariff Bill, all kinds of raw wool 
are admitted to the United 
States free of duty. Under the 
McKinley Bill, first-class wools 
were taxed 1 1 cents per pound; 
second class 12 cents, and third 
class 50 per cent ad valorem. 


a part of the city.. The Govern-) 
ment has abandoned Ti rana and 
is moving to El Bassan. TbtJ , 
rebels are being led by Barairi j 
Zuri. Tbe uprising is political itJ 
origin, but is said to originate itia 
private feud between Barairi 
Zun and Mad Zogoli, MjnisteB 
of the interior. Aimed peasants 
invaded Durazzo and assumed 
control of the city. { 




1947: Helping the Free! 




S^eTf^TfiJiy.Und^S? WASHINGTON President 
McKinley Bill, first-class wools 00 Coo &?ssK 

were taxed 1 1 cents per pound- a 8S ression bj 

second class I2cents*andF toird “d meT 

class 50 per cent ad valorem ^ mal f ,als t . to 9**** 

^ ‘ Turkey. In a histone persona 

1099- m> address to a joint session of the 

±922. March on Tirana House and Senate, Presidem 
ROME — Truman said he was “fall* 


/a? 


Dna i Fora 


ROME — Insurgent troops, 
composed chiefly of northern 
clans rebelling against the Cen- 
tral Government of Albania, are 
matching on Tirana, and some of 
toe troops have already occupied 


aware of toe broad impIicaJ 
dons” of his foreign policy on 
helping free peoples to resist 
subjugation by outside pres-t 
sure. The president mentioned 
Communism bat not Russia. ■ J 


y c>jp Gr 

- av - 




,5 -jf ‘ 1 

s- .. 







4b 


road 


■' : '' 

V' - - : --r 






nan Aid 


>pt* 


an l nfc 


IN TERNATIONAL HERAL D TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 

OPINION /LETTERS 


rAOii 7 1 


' Scandalmongering 

Hurts Democracy 

By Robert J. Samuelson 

W^iSjdS™^ i-.~ jJ“J* dial die assorted Whiie- 
word to lose its meaXlv ^« v ^gadonsaimtod e - 
threshold for scandaf’ hS! stray President Clinton and the 
*oved so low li^wShhS Jj? r ! ^ y? t , Does ^yone doubt 
! f» is almost never without nfn against NewI 

one. The newest is the G gnch ’- ^ House speaker, 

paign finance” scSdal^ ^ mounted less by erfiical 


iPf^i 


Tvfedl&DlUnb 

and 

Tvfeedk Dumber 


In the Reaches of Cyberspace, 
You’ll Never Click Alone 


By Don Oldenburg 


paign finance” scandaL hnr wen '« l ?V va ^l«s by ethical 
* we are still dealing with thl sen sjf?viOte than the desire to 
’ Whitewater sSndS 2 an ? lhlJat ? *um politically? 

GingrichSaS.We^vfa a 

permanent aunaratu^ nfi^L pobocal weapon, is now more 
tioatn** 1 apparams oi inves- so than ever In a 1990 hook 

yagaag g c-saraES 

i. jamhi Ginsberg and Martin 

■ Outrage is Shefter correctly observed that 

; ® American politics have re- 

■ expressed at centiy undergone a funda- 

’ offen&P* that t T ansform abon. “Con- 

; u jjenses mat tending forces are increasingly 

* seem ever more relying on such institutional 
‘ * . , _ weapons of political struggle 

. ODSCUTe Or trivial 35 legislative investigations, 

: media revelations and judicial 

rvw*r o w,a - li* - proceedings to weaken their 

jEHZJF!* P ublj ctze alleged political rivals and gain power 
ever^Kin 1 " 8 .!, for themselves,” they wrote. 


WM 






take, he claims: a willful de- 
ception, say his foes). Mr. 
Clinton may be guilty of a 
crime in Whitewater, but three 
investigations — costing 


Hardly anyone wants to say: 
“Sony, nothing here' * or ‘ ‘It’s 
trivial." Every mistake, error 
or personal excess is elevated 
to a great evil. Sinister motives 


more than $24 million — have are alleged or implied If it's 


over campaign financing fits 
the pattern. It is driven by a 
coalition of Clinton haters, 
campaign -finance reformers 
and the press. The story surely 
seems compelling: the pres- 
ident (apparently) brokering 
the Lincoln Bedroom for con- 
tributions; a host of seedy 


everything they examine a 
scandal or potential scandal. 
\ Growing outrage is expressed 
.• over offenses that seem ever 
more obscure or trivial. 

! Of course, there are genu- 
ine scandals, and the behavior 
of our highest (or lowest) of- 
ficials must be open to scru- 
tiny. Government and the 
people who run it can be ac- 
countable only if their activ- 
ities can be inspected But the 
process has become twisted 
into a parody. At last week's 
press conference. President 
9 ill Clinton was asked 18 
questions; 15 concerned cam- 
paign fund-raising. Was that 
$e only important matte r? 

| Wbat we’re seeing is the 
attack culture. By attack cul- 
ture, I mean a mind-set and set 
of practices that go beyond 
ordinary partisanship, criti- 
\ cism, debate and investiga- 
bon. What defines the attack 
Culture is that its animating 


The attack culture origin- 
ated with Watergate, and 
Richard Nixon — destroyed 
and forced to resign — re- 
mains the standard of success. 
The mimicking of Watergate 
is increasingly undemocratic 
and breeds disrespect for the 
law, politics and (if anyone 
cares) the press. Most Amer- 
icans sense that the process is 
out of control, because do one 
— no one, that is, who doesn ’t 
study these scandals for 
countless hours — can un- 
derstand what they're about. 

What was Mr. Gingrich’s 


yet to disclose what it is. not a scandal, why bother? idem (apparently) brokering 
I am no fan of Mr. Clin- It’s also guilty until proven the Lincoln Bedroom for con- 
ton's or Mr. Gingrich's; nor innocent. Some investigations tributions; a host of seedy 
am I defending their behavior are self-fiiifilling. There are so characters schmoozing at the 
and certainly wouldn't offer it many laws and regulations White House; A1 Gore dialing 
as a model to my children. Bur that anyone who is invesugai- for dollars from his office, 
we have elections for voters ed exhaustively may be found What's missing is perspec- 
to decide whether, all things to have violated something, tive. The $2.96 million re- 
considered. they want to re- And some targets, flustered or fumed by the Democratic Na- 


W ASHINGTON — Maybe it was all the 
talk lately about cloning sheep, mon- 
keys, even human beings, that left me staring 
at the initial findings from my recent late- 
night Internet search. As I did, I could feel 
my DNA turning over in its chromosomes. 

On my computer screen were five names 
from across tiie United States, each listed 
with a different address and telephone num- 

MEANWHUJE 

ber. Each was Don Oldenburg. None was 
me. 

While cracking down one thing or an- 
other, clicking from one hyperlink to the 
next, I had stumbled upon InfoSpace (http:/ 
/www. infospace.com). Little did I know at 
the time I had chanced into the Web’s 
premier on-line directory. Fast and com- 
prehensive, InfoSpace is like an electronic 
detective service that anybody with access 
to the Internet can use to track down in- 
dividuals. businesses, ZIP codes, phone 


title is staff demographer, but he probably 
knows more about the incidence of names 
than anyone. 

“I'm surprised that they found that 
many,’ ’ Mr. Word said of the 27. He started 
keying something into a name-incidence 
computer program. 

He paused to consider the program's 
finding. “Don is big,” he said. 

“Donald was the 15th most common 
name in the distribution of 'first names 
male.' accounting for .931 percent, ages 
zero to 90. So. right off the bat, Donald is 
almost 1 percent." 

Mr. Word next keyed in Oldenburg. 
"You are ranked 10,441 — between Oliv- 
eri and Nutting," he said. “Thai’s on the 
orderof one Oldenburg per 1 00,000 people, 
or 10 per 1 million.” 

If you round off the adult male U.S. 
population to 90 million, that means 900 
Oldenburgs. “So if there are 900 male 
Oldenburgs.” he calculated, “and the name 
Don would occur only 1 percent of the time. 


as a model to my children. Bur 
we have elections for voters 
to decide whether, all things 
considered, they want to re- 
tain their elected leaders. Ex- 
cept in rare cases, that job 
shouldn't be hijacked by 
courts, prosecutors or the 
press with investigations that 
are increasingly inquisitional. 
They aim to prejudice people 
against their target, even if no 
serious charges are ultimately 
sustained. The process is ab- 
used because the investiga- 
tions are selective (often 


great offense? Well, he taught triggered by the target's 
a college course (a sin?), prominence) and aim (by ad- 


Then, some videotapes of the 
course were used for political 
promotion (gee. a politician 
acting political). But wait: 
The course was financed by 
tax-deductible charitable 
donations, which aren’t al- 
lowed for politics. Therefore, 
Mr. Gingrich committed a no- 


spirit — unexpressed, but ob- no and compounded it by 


vious — is to destroy and 
bring down. Does anyone 


ding false information to 
jess (an innocent mis- 


verse publicity) to convict 
and punish the target. 

The anack culture subsists 
on persona] ambition and vari- 
ous political agendas. Report- 
ers want a big story; prose- 
cutors seek convictions: 
partisans crave power. And 
the mere act of investigation 
creates pressures for results. 
Resources have been commit- 
ted; reputations are at stake. 


Real misdeeds are 
hard to find amid 
the spurious. 


embarrassed, blunder into 
criminal cover-ups. Nor are 
the targets only prominent of- 
ficials. The federal Office of 
Research Integrity recently 
cleared an experienced scien- 
tist of misconduct. But for 
three years, he was subject to 
congressional hearings and 
had his research branded 
fraudulent. Those years, he 
said, “have been holy hell. 
They look away my position, 
my reputation, my work.” 

People are smeared be- 
cause the attack culture is 
heavy-handed and single- 


for dollars from his office. 

What's missing is perspec- 
tive. The $2.96 million re- 
turned by the Democratic Na- 
tional Committee constitutes 
only 13 percent of all DNC 
contributions. Questionable 
gifts didn’t affect the elec- 
tion's outcome, and there's no 
evidence that donations 
changed any major policy. 
Much fund-raising is sleazy. 
But no one should forget that 
giving money to a candidate or 
party is a form of political 
speech. Donations can't easily 
be limited without comprom- 
ising free speech. The present 
hysteria, nurtured by self-pro- 
claimed reformers, intention- 
ally obscures this point 

All the crusading doesn't 
reassure the public. Just the 
opposite. Because most 
people grasp that the process 
has been conupted — being 
moved by ambition and pol- 
itics — they put the attackers 
and the accused increasingly 


dividuais. businesses, codes, phone Don would occur only 1 pence nt or me time, 
numbers, ail sons of data. In a matter of I would think there would only be nine Don 
seconds, this powerful cyber-Sherlock can Oldenburgs. Not 27.” 


scour 112 million U.S. and Canadian list- 
ings from white pages, yellow pages, gov- 
ernment directories and other sources. 

Looking over InfoSpace's cover page, I 
had noticed the people-finder icon and 
couldn't help myself. A click brought up the 
blank boxes awaiting a name, a state, 
whatever you know about someone you 
want to locate. Stumped over whom I might 
want to find, I typed in my own name. 

Seconds later, the first five Don Olden- 
burgs appeared — one from Oregon, one 
from Wisconsin, one from Arizona and two 
from Minnesota. My eyes focused on the 
Don and Ann Oldenburg at midlist. Must be 
me and my wife. It wasn’t. This Don and 
Ann lived in Arizona. I clicked on the 
“Next Results” icon and five more Don 
Oldenburgs appeared, some listed as Don- 
ald. The five after that included me. But, 
under the circumstances, I was just another 
Don Oldenburg, just a name in the crowd. 

Had you asked me beforehand how many 
Don Oldenburgs there were in America, I 
would have guessed three or four, tops. I 


Oldenburgs. Mot 2/. 

Mr. Word puzzled over the statistical 
discrepancy until I mentioned that of the 27 
InfoSpace Don Oldenburgs, 40 percent 
were from Minnesota and Wisconsin. And 
all of my relatives originated in Minnesota. 
“If a Swedish-type name like Oldenburg is 
prevalent in certain areas of the country and 
those areas were not picked up in the pop- 
ulation sample we used,” he said, “that's 
what you call a small sample, and that can 
cause some very funny things.” 

I decided to telephone one of the 27 
Oldenburgs. I was curious if the Don and 
Ann Oldenburg in Sun City WesL Arizona, 
were leading parallel lives of ours. 

“Hello? Don Oldenburg there?” I felt 
odd asking this. 

“No, he's not,” came the reply. I had 
reached Ann Oldenburg. 

She and Don had moved from Illinois to 
this retirement community 50 miles west of 
Phoenix. He’s 67 and she’s 65. so we’re not 
of the same generation. He worked for GM 
Chevrolet; she sold aluminum storm win- 
dows. They have three children, one named 


have never met or even heard of anyone else John, just as we do. They own a home in 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Crusades Mentality 

; Regarding “EU Group Rebuffs Tur- 
key" ( March 6): 


dition with unfair criticism. Remember 
the slogan “Don’t waste food, think of 
the starving Armenians”? President 
Woodrow Wilson understood the plight 


“ WBfiiea Martens, a former prime" of this people. 

minister of Belgium, apparently with the We in the Armenian diaspora who live 
endorsement of Germany’s Chancellor in democracies know very well that the 


Helmut Kohl, has labeled Turkey “not government' of Armenia should try 
acceptable” for membership in the bander to promote democracy. We for- 
European Union. At a one-day meeting give these leaders their shortcomings, 
of center-right parties in Brussels, it was however, because we know that if given 
unanimously agreed that Turkey’s size a chance they will learn, 
and its Muslim religion, as well as its Cutting aid will not improve demo- 
human rights record, disqualified it from cracy in Armenia; it will just add to the 
joining the Union. misery and suffering of the people. 

. Muslim but secular Turkey is shocked a. baghdiantz. 

by this Crusades mentality. This is a Nice, 

gross faux pas that serves only to ali- 
enate Turkey, a move raunterprodu^ve Dogmatic Economics 
to the interests of the EU and the North “ 

Atlantic Treaty Organization. Regarding " China Masks the Bigger 

- The Ottoman Empire, the precursor of Problem ’’ and " Growth Will Do More 
modern Turkey, was affirmed as a Euro- for Output Than for Consumption ” 
pean power at the 1878 Congress of (Opinion. March 6 and 7) by William 
Berlin. Whether Mr. Martens and his Greider: 

colleagues like it or not, Turkey's ad- Mr. Greider hits the nail on the head 
mission to the EU is a matter ofhistorical when he says that “it is China’s scale, 
determination. not its despotism that threatens the eco- 

- YUKSEL SOYLBMEZ. nomic system,” “China” being short- 

Taipei. hand for Third World exporters. 

Given the easy transfer of technology. 
tt i * allied with the eagerness of Western 

flCip Armenia capitalists to increase short-term profits 

Regarding "Aid to Democracies without regard ro the future of their own 
(Editorial, March 4): societies, one can only foresee a 

, America has compassion for suffering sharpening of the emerging conflict be- 
people in need of humanitarian aid. tween the ever-richev and the rest, who 
An nni sooil this beautiful tra- are ever more insecure at best 


minded. The current furor on the same moral plane. A 

plague on everyone. We be- 
come desensitized to genuine 
scandal because the artificial 
variety is so common. All 
democracies need to examine 
^-marketers will say tough their officials; an enduring di- 
lave to adjust The problem is lemma is how to prevent le- 
>t they themselves who have to gitimate inquiry from sliding 
the rest of the population. into sanctioned tyranny. When 

zation presents a problem of everything's a scandal, we’re 
irtions, only natural when half losing the proper balance, 
rorid's population suddenly Washington Post Writers Croup. 


colleagues tike it or not, Turkey’s ad- 
mission to the EU is a matter ofhistorical 
determination. 

- YUKSEL SOYLBMEZ. 

Taipei. 


Help Armenia 

Regarding "Aid to Democracies'' 
( Editorial . March 4): 

, America has compassion for suffering 
people in need of humanitarian aid. 
Please do not spoil this beautiful tra- 


The free-marketers will say tough 
luck, we have to adjust The problem is 
that it is not they themselves who have to 
adjust but the rest of the population. 

Globalization presents a problem of 
vast proportions, only natural when half 
of the world's population suddenly 
wakes up. But this is all the more reason 
to approach the problem in a compre- 
hensive rather than in a purely business 
way. 

China, because of its size, is the coun- 
try most difficult to accommodate. It has 
a quarter of the world’s population, and 
the work ethic, and the bomb and eager 
investors from the West ready to support 
its export-oriented growth. You cannot 
bully such a country. Nor can you con- 
tain it. So what are you going to do? 

One possibility is to leam from the 
Chinese and other such economic “ti- 
gers”: Look after your own interests, 
and not just in the narrow terms of 
private gain but in terms of general eco- 
nomic and social welfare. 

Why should we tolerate, even glorify, 
in our societies a Fifth Column of glob- 
ally oriented businesses dial casually 
destroy the social and economic fabric of 
the societies that nurtured them, all in the 
name of economic dogma? 

By the time the consequences really 
hit the West, we will all be gone. But I 
fear our children and grandchildren will 
damn their forefathers for their dog- 
matic ways. 

TEUVOLEHTL 
Gex, France. 


with my name. 

Altogether, InfoSpace located 27 Don or 
Donald Oldenburgs, all of them presumably 
living their sundry lives as if my name were 
theirs, as unaware of me as I was of them. 
And these 27 were only the ones with listed 
phone numbers. 

This troubled me. I mentioned it to a 
friend who scoffed and said that 27 matches 
was just a drop in the bucket when you 
consider that the adult male population in 
the United States is more than 94 million. 

But who are all these Don Oldenburgs? I 
telephoned the name guru of the U.S. 
Census Bureau. David Word's actual job 


Minnesota. 

I told her InfoSpace not only gave me 
their address and phone number, it also 
allowed me to view a street map of Sun City 
West for directions to their house. And it let 
me find the closest Mexican restaurant to 
them — Maria’s on Grand Avenue. 

“That does make you a little worried,” 
said that Ann Oldenburg of the kind of data 
accessible on the Internet. “I guess any- 
body can find out anything they want to 
know.” 

Or, for that matter, anything they don’t 
really want to know. 

The Washington Post. 


BOOKS 


CROSSWORD 


' ACROSS 
. 1 1979 exile 
a Double or triple. 
1 possibly 

a “Center de 
’ Rodrigo’ hero 
14 Actress Hatcher 
is Plod (through) 


IB Nero's 
Instrument 
17 Neighbor o« 

Albion 

IB Kazakh-Uzbek 
sea 

« -Ghosts'* writer 
20 1983 Eddie 
Murphy movie 


Est. 1911, Pans 
Sank Roo Doe Noo' 


A Space for Thought. 


23 Like some 
letters 

24 Opposite at 
Idles 

X» Run into 
M Kitchen needs 

« 'Would ?’ 

(sieazebalTs 

question) 

32 Procters 
Gamble brand 

33 Penultimate 
fairy-tale word 

ae Where 

61 -Across was 
“drawn" 

as Clock settings 
30 Thing, inlaw 
H F.D.R. program 

M* How dry " 

4 B 'Ah, But Your 
Landis 
Beautiful’ 
novelist 
43 Wax 

43 Flamenco Cheer 

44 Foreign 
Secretary under 
ChurchiB 

41 Transport to 
Sugar HIM 
47 Mary's -Ink* 
co-star 
4 » Brave 
49 Funnyman 
David 

st Stock market 
activity 
sB“Chflr 
M Not very bnghf 
59 Hirt hit 
M Sultan Qabus 
pin Said. e.g. 

oiTtw— 77 
NeteseUne 
«z Holy genus 
as Vegas casino, 
with -The" 

*4 June hortorees 
•s Kudzu. lor one 
DOWN 
I Lein stand 


2 Title for Mozart 
a Home solo 

4 Caste member 

5 Graceful 
descent 

b Chess and Risk 
7 Electrical 
device 
4 Manhattan 
Project 
physicist 
B 'Beowulf.' "lor 
one 

IB Oldest republic 
in Africa 
it Big Mama 
12 Bruckner's 
Symphony 

NO. 7 

is Mane boss 

21 Detain during 
wartime 
at Clio winners 
2S Sports 
commentator 
Dick 

24 Uke old nylons 
27 Cut the 
mustard? 
a Loser of 1588 
SB OveraH guide 
34 What a bore! 

37 Had a dispute 
3B Expert advioe 
41 Kind of road 

43 Island discovered 

by Columbus 

48 Disney 
* acquisition ol 
1995 

48 This will help you 
shoot straight 
so Indira's son 

S2W.W. II side 
tsBuVuel 

- collaborator 
54 Neck and neck 
»OW German _ 
duchy name 



FORD MADOX FORD: 

A Dual Life 

By Max Saunders. Volume 1, 632 pages. 
Volume II, 696 pages. Each £35. Oxford 
University Press. 

Reviewed by Katherine Knorr 

F ORD Madox Ford was maligned by 
other writers during his lifetime, of- 
ten though not always unjustly, and un- 
accountably has been mostly ignored 
since his death. Although his tetralogy 
"Parade's End” is one of the mas- 
terpieces of the 20th century and al- 
though he has many enthusiastic read- 
ers, he is something of a connoisseur's 
secret. He is better known, if at alL for 
his complicated private life and his ed- 
itorship of The English Review. 

Max Saunders has tried ro do him 
right with a massive two-part biography 
looking both atthe life ana at the work of 
a man who ranks with Joyce, Proust and 
Musil. This biography is too long and 
too detailed, and tries to do too many 
things. This is partly due ro Ford’s enor- 
mous output, but it will turn off the more 
casual reader (although it is easy to dip 
in and out of various sections). 

Having said that, Saunders has pro- 
duced an extremely valuable work that 
contains all a reader needs to know (in 
addition to the novels, of course) about 
the man who was born Ford Hermann 
Hueffer in 1 873 of a German father and 
an English mother, and whose grand- 
father was the painter Ford Madox 
Brown. 

Ford's life can be broken into acts, 
according to his emotional and literary 
relationships. In the first act, he eloped 
with Elsie Martindale and developed 
perhaps the most important literary re- 
lationship of his life, with Joseph Con- 
rad. Although he was tiie younger man. 
Ford was in some ways a mentor to 
Conrad, and their collaborative working 
relationship was highly useful to both. 
Characteristically for Ford, Conrad later 
turned his back on him. 


In the second act. Ford lived with the 
literary hostess and novelist Violet 
Hunt. As editor of The English Review, 
he published unknowns like Lawrence 
and Pound as well as established writers 
like James and Hardy. These were dif- 
ficult times; though Ford was published, 
he had little success, and he spent much 
time trying to divorce Elsie, then trying 
to extricate himself from his relation- 
ship with Hunt In 1915 he published the 
first of his truly great books, "The Good 
Soldier.” 

That act ended in 1915. when Ford, at 
the age of 41 , enlisted and later was sent 
to the Somme with the Welch Regiment 
When in 1916 Ford was viciously at- 
tacked by New Witness magazine. H.G. 
Wells wrote to the brother of the editor, 
G.K. Chesterton: “Hueffer has many 
faults no doubt, but first he's poor, 
secondly he's notoriously unhappy and 
in a most miserable position, thirdly he's 
a better writer than any of your little 
crowd and fourthly, instead of pleading 
his age and his fat and taking refuge 
from service in a great obesity as your 
brother has done, he is serving his coun- 
try." 

After the war. Ford moved to France, 
where be lived with the painter Stella 
Bowen, edited The Transatlantic Review 
— publishing a stellar roster of Modernist 
writers — and wrote his masterpiece. 

The last act of Ford’s life was spent 
with the American painter Janice Biala. 
He traveled and taught in the United 
States, attracting and repulsing various 
aspiring writers. He never stopped writ- 
ing but his greatest works were behind 
him, and he died in 1939. 

The war changed Ford forever, and of 
course provided the material for 
“Parade’s End,”, which was published 
volume by volume during the 1 920s. 

The story of Christopher Tietjens, 
who sees himself as the last civilized 
man, or at least the last Tory gentleman, 
"Parade's End" is also a portrait of 
English decline in the face of barbarism 
within and without (not least of which. 


perhaps, in the shape of rich American? 
ladies intent on buying up the dusty' 
goods of English country houses). 

Ford was a big man with a walrus' 1 
moustache, large, down turned eyes, and*' 
a voice that became increasingly! 
hushed. He was mentally fragile, and the' 
Somme left him with shell shock. 

His womanizing had both a childish 
and a seriously self-destructive quality. 
It would cause him many problems, 
material and social , and it led him also to 
be portrayed unfl altering ly in fiction.-, 
notably by Jean Rhys. h 

Ford was also a compulsives 
storyteller, a myth omani ac. Saunders! 
argues successfully that you can’t sep-^ 
araxe Ford the great novelist from Ford* 
the raconteur. 

The stories were usually worth it} 
Saunders quotes one man's recollection-, 
of a Ford story, about Kipling helpings 
him with Sunday School work (he couldh 
have met Kipling, but there is no proof): 

“ ‘If you are good, Fondie,’ began Rud-; 
yard, ‘you will go to a place on the- 
clouds; and there will be harps. You wilL 
sit on a cloud and sing praises unto the: 
Lord, and that is wbat you will do for* 
ever and ever. You will wear a kind of; 
white dress. And there will be creatines’.- 
like mama but with great wings . . And/, 
Ford’s face grew longer and longer^ 
‘But,’ continued young Kipling the real- 5 *- 
ist, ‘if you are bad . . . you will go to a; 
much worse place ,» 

Why has Ford been so neglected, inv 
contrast to less talented contemporar- 
ies? He was extremely helpful to many! 4 
young writers, and be was an enor-^i 
mously influential literary theorist. Her 
could also be pretentious and portentous? 
and overwhelming in person. i> 

Nevertheless, hrs greatest sin vis-a-ir 
vis the big egos who turned away from? 
him is that this fine editor should have 
turned out not merely to be an instru- 
ment in their greater glory but, im* 
pudently, to be a far greater artist than 
most of them. 

International Herald Tribune 


PntitoDrlMCtftoty 


BRIDGE 


88 Bacillus shape 
87 Big bird 


©/Veto York Tunes J Edited, by Will Shorts. 


Solution to Puzzle of March 12 


□no E3[2O0[n anan 

□□ED QQSHn 000021 

□on sanaa asaas 
QQnnanasaaaaaaa 
□□□b ass ana 
□□bq maana ocias 
non □□□□ ana 
ansa nsooQiD [!□□□□ 
□sg aaaa ana 
□□□□ □□□as anas 
□□□ edeo anaa 

□□□□□aaasaaatQCjg 
□□□□□ □□□sa mao 
hocjbiu aauoo ana 
ooaa aaaaa gaa 


— — — "7 pre-empted in hearts and led 

By Alan Truscott the club jack. 

South planned to ruff two 

E DITH Kemp Freilich was hearts in his hand and even- 
inducted into the Bridge rjrlly surrender a club trick to 
Hall of Rone recently. East- He won the first trick in 

She is the first living woman his hand, led to the heart ace 


to be so honored. Winning na- 
tional titles since 1941, die is 


and raffed a heart Then he 
crossed to the spade king and 


die second woman in the his- ruffed the remaining heart 


toiy of the game to have won 
all three major team champi- 
onships. The first was Helen 
Sobel Smith who died in 
1969. 

On the diagramed deal in 

1966 shting East Kemp made 

a memorable play. She was 
defending six diamonds, 
reached after her partner had 


The declarer was headed for 
12 tricks. He could cash two 
diamond winners in his hand, 
cross to die club ace and draw 
trumps. Finally, he would give 
East his club trick. 

On the third^round ^o^heaitsi 
East, made a devastating dis- 


known what was happening, 
South coaid now have made 
an overtrick. Bui he could not 
imagine that East would sac- 
rifice a sure trick. 

After cashing the king- 
queen of diamonds, he there- 
fore finessed the club nine. 
East produced the club ten and 
led a spade, defeating the slam. 
South had no safe way to Teach 
dummy and draw the missing 
trumps. 

South was naive. If Kemp 
had begun with a doubleton 
club queen, her discard would 
have been friendly, allowing 
the slam to make. And she is 
only friendly to hex opponents 


card The club queen. If he had away from the table. 


NORTH 
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The bidding: «*»«**, 

South West North East '' 

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f {PAGE 10 


international herald tribune, Thursday march 13 , 1997 


rPARIS FASHION 


HEALTH/SCIENCE 


Chanel: Lagerfeld’s Fashion Slavs 







By So?/ Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — Just when you 
thoug ht that there was nothing 
left for Karl Lagerfeld to mine 
at Chanel, he took Wednes- 
day's show into undiscovered territory: 
his own. 

The German-bom designer went 
» back to his Teutonic roots, splattering 
} the clothes with the vivid kaleidoscope 
{ patterns of the artist Vassily Kandi n sky. 
| Then he explored Coco Chanel’s love 
} affair with Russia. The result was a 
| collection — felted fabrics and dresses 
• decked out with folkloric braid — to 
j turn fashion's slaves into Chanel 
* Slavs. 

1 ‘Tve never used that side of her 
.{ before,” said Lagerfeld. “And then I 
1 thought bow the Bavarian group were 
!• the be ginnin gs of modernity in art.” 
The show showed the weight of these 
complex themes and the bridge that 
served as a runway — meant as a link 
between past and future — seemed an 
all-too- visible metaphor for a collection 
that was here and there. 

It opened strongly with long, loose 
mats and. slouchy pantsuits, rustic in 
their thick fabrics and brown and green 
. colors. Then click! Lagerfeld switched 
from M unich to Paris, where little black 
suits came with sharp shoulders, short 
skirts and curvy jackets. They were 
closed with zippers, while the Slavic 
clothes tended to have fly -fronts. But 
either way, Lagerfeld had kissed off the 
logo buttons. The show was also almost 
jewelry free. But then click! again, and 
all the bijoux a Chanel boutique might 
need clocked out on multi-colored Tyr- 
olean tweeds — in fact knitted effects 
created by London’s Julien MacDon- 
ald. 

When you can see a designer’s brain 
working, it doesn’t make for a great 
collection, although it had many fme 
pieces, not least the new close-to-the- 
body jackets. Nor are we used to seeing 
I Chanel as an artist’s canvas. The Kand- 



ChaneVs tweed-knit cardigan. 


modem takes were slits at the hips of 
Lurex dresses and chino iserie tree pat- 
terns done in flocking on sheer fabrics. 
Although the color palette was almost 
entirely black and red and the silhou- 
ettes similar, the special fabric effects 
gave surface interest to a strong col- 
lection. 

It is so easy for designers with a 
cerebral take on fashion to seem pre- 
tentious. At Comme des Garcons came 
one of those perplexing Fashion mo- 
ments when a designer who is much 
admired and widely coined seemed to be 
having an interior dialogue that is baff- 
ling to the audience as conceptual art. 


| insky patterns were sophisticated as 


jewel -bright appliques on a long wool 
dress; or veiled in chiffon on velvet 
evening dresses; or as the colored 
braids, which seemed like a new take on 
.the Chanel tradition. But after so much 
pattern, four slender, strictly-Coco. 
evening dresses, split at the front, were 
welcome for their simplicity. 

Can decoration ever look really mod- 
! era? Martine Sitbon has found a way of 
| malting it both cool and hard, with her 
1 flimsy fabrics, patterned wth open- 
work, set off against tough tailored coats 
or gleaming peariized leather. The scis- 
sor effects on chiffon looked like Jap- 
anese shadow prints, the foliage burnt 


O UT, in dead silence except 
for the occasional squawk 
and honk of atonal music, 
walked models with Kabukd- 
white faces and black arched eyebrows, 
wearing clothes that explored the body 
by laying pieces of doth on a muslin 
base like a home dressmaker. A very bad 
one. For the pattern pieces were stitched 
askew, so dial curving bust seams dis- 
located the bosoms ana seams failed to 
join up. Through the gaps, could be seen 
heavy underpants. 

Occasionally the puzzle was solved, 
and the coarse-weave canvas, maybe 
gilded with embroidery, would settle 
into a graceful dress. And sometimes the 
pieces moved poetically like ice floes 
shifting, to explose a gap of flesh. 
"Raw” was the message according to 


out, then cut away and maybe edged 
with velvet ribbon or sequins. Other 


designer Rei Kawakubo. whose takes on 
body forms have recently produced 
striking collections. This one just 
seemed too much like a reploy of fash- 
ion deconstruction in the late 1980s. 

Issey Miyake’s vision is extraordi- 
narily consistent He makes art and he 
makes clothes, using inventive fabrics 
as his canvas. His collection was per- 
fectly orchestrated from its arresting 
opening of white coats in a white land- 
scape with frosty sparkles on the mod- 
els' faces, through the finale dresses 
with abstract splotches of vivid color 
tike the Northern Lights. It was a superb 
spectacle, but also intriguing, because 
Miyake, who has for so long [worked 
with a boxy, flat-plane silhouette, sent 
out coats and jackets curved to top body, 
giving a new dimension to his work. 

The technical design schoql that 
Ocimar Versolato chose for his -venue 
was symbolic of his work. For although 
his clothes are about glamour and se- 
duction, technique is his strength. For- 
getting multi-zippered daywear with 
sbow-a-Ieg skirts, Versato produced 
beautiful evening dresses, smocked, 
fringed and sliced geometrically so 
show the body in a sensual, but not a 
vulgar way. Their lightness, and a rich 
color palette from Yves Klein bine 
through pinks and purples, gave a mod- 
em spin. 

References to the past are receding 
from Paris runways, but Nina Ricci’s 
parade of cross-dressing pantsuits, daxk 
velvets and opium-den brocades reeked 
of 1 930s Berlin — not least the Marlene 
Dietrich-waved hair sprinkled with glit- 
ter. 

What was the point? Designer Myri- 
am Schaefer was just elaborating on her 
signature fitted tailoring and stirring in- 
to the fashion cocktail mink trims on 
chiffon evening cardigans and the in- 
evitable lingerie touches like lace and 
corsets. Thankfully, they too are mov- 
ing out of fashion. 

Wednesday’s showings started with 
Vzone. Valentino's secondary line, 
which is what is known as an “item” 
collection, meaning disparate pieces not 
intended to make a coherent whole. 
That's just what it looked like on the 
runway, as the eye blinked from a gold 
leather jacket here to a soft cowl-backed 










Rxk FufMua far The New YodcTtan 


Barry Clifford, who found the wreck of the Whydah, outside the Wkydah museum in Massachusetts 


Kinder, Gentler View of Pirates j firite 


By William J. Broad 

New York Tunes Service 


top, through a sassy, 
nel mini to the end 


nel mini to the ending of stiver gray 
gowns that looked very Valentino. 

Tire problem with the current Paris 
fall/ winter season is that not only are the 
shows back-to-back in various venues, 
but there is also no attempt group them 


into generic types of designer collec- 
tion. Whereas me season used to open 
with the Japanese designers and move 
through the avant garde to the ready-to- 
wear of the couture houses, now the 
shows are literally and figuratively all 
over the place. 


EW YORK — Pira tes a re 
often pictured as inhuman 
devils, quick to maim and 
kill in pursuit of treasure. 
They fired broadsides into hapless mer- 
chant ships, sent captives down tire 
plank and took grim pleasure in tor- 
turing victims and even one another. 

But scholars in recent years have 
assailed much of this mythology as 
misleading or wrong. They find the 
age of piracy in the late 17th and early 
18th centuries to be peopled by rogues 
at times less cruel and more egalitarian 
than previously imag-inert 
Now newly discovered pirate ar- 
tifacts are starting to confirm and 
deepen parts of that revisionist por- 
trait, shedding new light on a lost age. 
Spoils appear to have been carefully 
divided for distribution among crew- 
members, including rare jewelry from 
the African gold trade. And weapons 
like primitive hand grenades have 
been found that appear to have been 
meant more for intimidating victims 
and waging psychological warfare 
than for blasting apart ships. 

Many of the discoveries come from 
tiie wreck of the Whydah, a famous 
pirate ship sailed by Black Sam Bel- 
lamy that sank in 1717 and was found 


in 1984 off Cape Cod. “The finds are 
opening up a whole new world of real 
piracy that belies the stories,” Philip 
Masters, the head of the team that found 
the new wreck, said in an interview. 
“Pirates were nowhere near the mon- 
sters they were made out to be.” 

Until archaeologists began excav- 
ating the Whydah. ™ m*d after the 
African “widow bird,” or the African 
port of the same name, there was little 
evidence available to show how the 
pirates lived. “The problem is that 
pirates moved from ship to ship and 
often came to a sticky end.’ ’ Dr. David 
Cordingly, author of “Under the Black 
Flag: The Romance and the Reality of 
Life Among the Pirates” (Random 
House. 1995), said in an -interview. 


“We do not have Henry Morgan’s 
cutlass or his articles of clothing. 


cutlass or his articles of clothing. 
There's been nothing, really. It's like a 
whole race of people who disappeared 
off the face of the earth.” 


T HE 100,000 items recovered 
from the Whydah. Dr. Cord- 
ingly said, are “pretty amaz- 
ing — all the guns, the 
masses of African gold, the car- 
penter’s tools and ax. It's fantastic.” 
Such finds, he said, are having “a 
direct bearing on our understanding of 
the great age of piracy.” 

At first regarded as common crim- 


inals, the pirates of the golden age 
began to be viewed more sympath- 
etically in subsequent decades and 
centuries. They came to be seen as 
bold villains and romantic heroes, im- 
ages developed in literary classics like 
“Treasure Island” and “Peter Pan” 
and celebrated in movies full of swash- 
buckling action and deft swordplay. ? 

Of late, though, scholars, drawing" 
on old books and documents, have : 
thrown cold water on much of the 
mythology. Dr. Cordingly, a former 
staff member of the National Maritime 
Museum in Greenwich, England, is 
considered one of the best of die re- 
visionists. “Real pirates had no time 
for such ceremonies” as sending vic- 
tims w alkin g down a plank, he said in' 
“Under the Black Rag." Captives 
were killed at times, 1 ‘hacked to death 
and thrown over the side,” Dr. Cord- 
ingly said. But former prisoners were 
also known to testify to good treat- 
ment, apparently because some pirates 
wanted to cultivate a reputation for 
mercy that would encourage surrender 
rather than a resolution among their 
victims to resist unto death. 

The typical plunder was not chests 
of doubloons but he said. ‘ ‘a few bales 
of silk and cotton, some barrels of 
tobacco, an anchor cable, some spare 
sails, the carpenter’s tools and half a. 
dozen black slaves.” 


Intel P 


Minor Strokes and Alzheimer’s , — 


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By Rick Weiss 

Washington Past Service 


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W ASHINGTON — Small, 
silent strokes may cause 
much of the memory loss 
and dementia that affect 
people with Alzheimer’s disease, sug- 
gesting for the first time that many 
symptoms of Alzheimer’s can be 
avoided by preventing strokes, new re- 
search indicates. 

The findings suggest that many 
people at risk of Alzheimer’s can delay 
the syndrome’s onset, and those already 
affected may slow its progression, by 
quitting smoking, keeping blood pres- 
sure low and perhaps taking a baby 
aspirin every day. 

“There are a lot of changes in the 
very old that may not be an inevitable 
part of aging but may be due to small 
strokes,” said a researcher at the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, David A. Snow- 
don, who led the research appearing in 
the Journal of tire American Medical 
Association. “It’s dangerous to assume 
all the decline is due to Alzheimer's 
disease, because once you do that you 
give up on them.” 


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Other experts said they were excited 
by the findings, which suggest that even 
a modest reduction in the number of 
small strokes could have an enormous 
impact on geriatric health and the na- 
tion’s economv. 

At least 4 million Americans, most of 
them over 70, suffer from Alzheimer’s 
disease, and its incidence is rising 
sharply as the population ages. A five- 
year delay in the typical onset of 
Alzheimer’s symptoms could save the 
nation as much as S50 billion a year in 
health-care expenses, the experts said. 

The stroke findings are the latest to 
come out of a collaboration between 
Dr. Snowdon and the School Sisters of 
Notre Dame, a congregation of Cath- 
olic nuns who have agreed to be stud- 
ied as they grow old and to donate 
their brains for additional research 
after they die. 

Dr. Snowdon and his colleagues stud- 
ied 102 nuns until they died at ages 
ranging from 76 to 100. While they were 
alive, the sisters took a panel of cog- 
nitive tests to measure dementia. 

After the nuns died, their brains were 
autopsied. Researchers looked for the 
protein deposits, or plaques, that are the 


hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, and 
also looked for the tiny pockets of dead 
brain tissue that indicate a small stroke 
had occurred there. 

Strokes usually are caused by a blood 
clot that has blocked a vessel in the - 
brain, cutting off the supply of oxygen. 
Large strokes are catastrophic, causing 
severe dizziness, paralysis and in many 
cases death. But smaller strokes are 
much more common and, although of- 
ten unnoticed, may gradually take a toll 
on the brain’s ability to function. 

Of the 41 nuns who had too few 
plaques to qualify as having 
Alzheimer’s, the presence of a few 
small strokes did not increase the odds 
of their having been demented, sug- 
gesting that small strokes rarely cause 
dementia by themselves. 

In contrast, of the 61 nuns who had 
significant numbers of Alzheimer's 
plaques, those whose brains had signs of 
one or more strokes were 1 1 times more 
likely to have been demented than were 
those who suffered no strokes. 

People can reduce their risk of stroke 
by lowering blood pressure and cho- 
lesterol, quitting smoking and keeping 
their diabetes under tight control. 


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Caution Advised on Epidurals 


By Susan Gilbert 

New York Times Service 




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EW YORK — The epidurals 
commonly used to alleviate 
labor pains have come under 
attack. 

A study published in the current issue 
of Pediatrics reported that women who 
had epidurals during labor were more 
likely to have fevers and their babies 
were more likely to undergo painful 
tests, and sometimes treatment for pos- 
sible infection. 

The new study did not show that 


epidurals cause infections or even that 
the risk of actual infection in the babies 
was increased. But it found that women 
who had epidurals were more likely to 
develop fevers above 100.4 degrees 
Fahrenheit (38 degrees centigrade). And 
since such fevers are often signs of 
infections in the mothers, it is standard 








practice for pediatricians to test the ba- 
bies for infections and sometimes even 
treat them propbyJacticaJIy with intra- 
venous antibiotics. 

The study also found that women who 
had epidurals were more likely to have 
labor lasting more than 12 hours. 

An epidural, which numbs the body 
from the waist down, is one of the most 
common forms of pain relief used in 
labor, accounting for 32 percent of an- 
esthesia given to mothers-to-be. 

“I don’t want to cause stress in wo- 
men, but they should have this infor- 
mation when deciding whether to have 
an epidural.” said Dr. Ellice Liebennan, 
the study's lead author, who is director 
of obstetric epidemiology at Brigham 
and Women's Hospital in Boston. 

She said the testing process was 
painful for the baby because it in- 
volved taking the baby to the neonatal 
intensive care unit to draw vials of 


blood and sometimes to do a lumbar 
puncture, in which fluid is removed 
from the spine. 

The study found that about 14 percent 
of the women with epidurals developed 
a fever of at least 1 00.4 during labor, and 
38 percent were in labor for more than 
12 hours. Thirty-four percent of their 
babies were tested for sepsis, a grave 
blood infection, and about 15 percent 
were treated. 

By contrast, just I percent of the other 
women developed a fever and 8 percent 
had a long labor. Only about 10 percent 
of their babies were tested for sepsis and 






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about 4 percent were treated. 
In all, the researchers rei 


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In all- the researchers reported, 63 
percent of the' women received epidur- 
als, but they accounted for 96 percent of 
the women who had fevers daring labor. 
Their babies accounted for 86 pezeentof 
all newborns tested for sepsis and 87 
percent of those given antibiotics. 




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INTERNA 


AL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 












PAGE 12 


LETTERS: Rebuked by King Hussein 


Continued from Page 1 

peated excuse of having to act the way 
you do under great duress and pres- 
sure,” King Hussein declared. 

“1 cannot believe that the people of 
Israel seek bloodshed and disaster and 
oppose peace. 

”Nor can I believe that the most 
constitutionally powerful prime minis- 
ter in Israeli history would act on other 
than his total convictions.” 

In an equally long reply. Mr. Net- 
anyahu countered that he was not 
killing, but rather reviving, the peace. 

“Had there been a vibrant peace pro- 
cess in May 1 996, 1 would not have been 
elected by the Israeli public," he 
wrote. 

"I inherited a process that was fail- 
ing," he added. 

In his nine months in office, Mr. 
Netanyahu has led his government from 
crisis to crisis, maneuvering between 
the requirements of the peace plan — 
which stipulates territorial concessions 
to the Palestinians — and the conflicting 
demands of his right-wing constitu- 
ency. 

Many supporters had counted on him 
to halt or circumvent the peace effort. 

In his letter, he continued by listing 
various explanations he has offered for 
his actions. 

Then he turned to the tone of King 
Hussein's letter "I hold you in the 
highest esteem and I value your friend- 
ship and understanding.” wrote Mr. 
Netanyahu. "That is why I must confess 
that I am baffled by the personal level of 
the attacks against me. In ail my ex- 
changes with leaders in the Middle East 
— whether in private or in public — Ido 
not use this son of idiom/* 


Hie exchange, which became joiown 
while Mr. Netanyahu was on his first 
official visit to Russia, was certain to 
deepen seriously the political crisis sur- 
rounding the Israeli government. 

King Hussein is regarded by many 
Israelis as their best — perhaps only — 
friend in the Arab world, and his harsh 
and personal condemnation of Mr. Net- 
anyahu was bound to have a deep im- 
pact and to further damage the prime 
minister’s shaky position. 

Contacts with the Palestinians have 
effectively collapsed as a result of then- 
dismay over the size of Israel’s next 
scheduled pullback in the West Bank. 
The Labor Party opposition has called 
for a no-confidence vote this week, and 
many on the right have turned against 
Mir. Netanyahu as well. 

And tite police have announced that 
they would conclude an investigation 
into influence-peddling in Mr. Netan- 
yahu’s government in a week. 

Beyond Mr. Netanyahu’s cluster of 
troubles in Israel is a challenge by Yas- 
ser Arafat. 

The Palestinian leader has invited 
U.S., European and Arab envoys to a 
meeting in Ha ** on Saturday to discuss 
the state of the peace. Defying a warning 
by the Israeli foreign minister, David 
Levy, that the meeting could lead to a 
"freeze in the political process,” the 
United States signaled that it would 
attend. 

Last week the United States angered 
Mr. Arafat by vetoing a UN Security 
Council resolution criticizing Israel’s 
plans to build housing in East Jerusa- 
lem. 

That project and the Israeli decision 
to withdraw from 9.1 percent of the 
West Bank in the first of three pullbacks 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 



Juul Vm-aJJ+b.- \racr I l -l ir- I W r 


King Hussein gesturing as he spoke to reporters at his palace in Amman. 


required by existing agreements to be 
concluded by mid- 1998 were the major 
specific points raised by King Hussein 
in his letter, written when Mr. Arafat 
was visiting him in Amman. 

But the letter revealed a far greater 
sense of disappointment from a man 
who led his country both in fighting and 
in making peace with Israel and who 
profoundly touched Israeli hearts with 
his eloquent eulogy at the funeral of 
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who was 
assassinated in 1995. 

King Hussein was the Arab leader 
least opposed to Mr. Netanyahu's elec- 


tion, but already last October, after ri- 
oting over a tourist tunnel that the Israeli 
government opened in Jerusalem, be 
reportedly warned Mr. Netanyahu to his 
face against an "arrogance of power.” 

The letter said that Mr. Netanyahu 
had disappointed not only King Hussein 
but also the Americans who had tried to 
help him: "In pushing matters to the 
point of securing a U.S. veto at the 
Security Council, you have ill served the 
image and interest of your major ally 
and benefactor and our partner in peace- 
making as the honest balanced 
broker." 


Excerpts of Mideast Letters 


Sew York Times Service 

Following are excerpts from a letter 
from King Hussein of Jordan to Prune 
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, 
dated March 9, and from Mr. Netan- 
yahu's response, dated March 10. 

King Hussein's letter 

Prime Minister, 

My distress is genuine and deep oyer 
the accumulating tragic actions which 
you have initiated at the head of the 
government of Israel, making peace — 
the worthiest objective of my life — 
appear more and more like a distant 
elusive mirage. I could remain aloof if 
the very lives of all Arabs and Israelis 
and their future were not fast sliding 
towards an abyss of bloodshed and dis- 
aster. brought about by fear and despair, 
t frankly cannot accept your repeated 
excuse of having to act the way you do 
under great duress and pressure. I can- 
not believe that the people of Israel seek 
bloodshed and disaster and oppose 
peace. Nor can I believe that the most 
constitutionally powerful prime minis- 
ter in Israeli history would act on other 
than his total convictions. The saddest 
reality that has been dawning on me is 
that I do not find yon by my side in 
working to fulfill God's will for the final 
reconciliation of all the descendants of 
the children of Abraham. Your course of 
actions seems bent on destroying all I 
believe in or have striven to 
achieve 

On the question of your withdrawal 
from territories you have committed Is- 
rael. before the U.S-. Jordan and the 
world, to complete the process by raid- 
1998. what good did it serve to offer 
such an insignificant first-phrase with- 


drawal? Why the apparent continued 
deliberate humiliation of your so-called 
Palestinian partners? How can l work 
with you as a partner and true mend m 
this confused and confusing , atmosphere . 
when I sense an intent to destroy all I 
worked to build between our peoples 
and states. Stubborn ess over real issues 
is one thing but for its own sake, I 
wonder. In any event, I have discovered 
thaf you have your own mindset and 
appear in no need for any advice from a 
friend- 


x 


Mr. Netanyahu's letter _ ; 

Your Majesty, “ " . 

L read your letter with deep concern. 

The last thing I want is to cause yon 
anguish and disappointment- . • ! 

But your thorough knowledge of re-- 
cent events must surely make yon aware . 
that the difficulties we face in the peace, jp 
process did not begin with ray gov- ■gt 
eminent. ... By election time, the peace - 
process was in its death throes. But /-S 
rather than let the Oslo process die after. . 
the elections, I sought to revive it. I have' 
taken decisions that even my prede- ^ 
cessors were extremely reluctant to at- ^5 
tempL... 

Nor was the Further Re-Deployment ‘-jj 
(FRD) that we undertook at the end of v 
last week insignificant 

I know there are those around Chair-. ~ - 
man Arafat who built up his expec- Ljt 
tali o ns about its dimensions. But the fact 
is that the Oslo II Interim Agreement 
says nothing about the size of the FRD: 
it leaves this decision wholly to Israel’s ^ 
discretion. 

This may not be what Mr. Arafat _ 
wants, but it is the reality of the agree- 
ment that he signed. 


KOREA: After 46 Years, the Brothers Shim Manage a Reunion 


Continued from Page 1 

leader, the late Kim n Sung, established 
a Communist regime. War deepened the 
divide in 1950. 

Accounts of dramatic family ruptures 
and dogged quests to reunite underscore 
the tragic toll thai war. politics and fate 
have taken on the lives of so many 
Koreans. But they also offer a glimpse 
into North Korea's secretive society, 
now said to be worsening under a food 
shortage that experts believe will erupt 
into fall famine by spring. 

From their reunions. South Koreans 
are bringing back tales of people dying 
from starvation in rail stations as they 
wait for trains to take them to the border 
to forage for food. But the trains rarely 
come these days: severe fael shortages 
have slashed the number of runs, know- 
ledgeable sources say. 

Government food distribution, gen- 
erally amounting to two cups of rice a 
day. has been stopped for as long as five 
months in some areas, said a well-con- 
nected South Korean businessman who 


frequents the border area. He also said 
that the severity of shortages was 
prompting North Korean authorities to 
allow more people to travel to China for 
food and that they were expected to 
open the door even wider this year. 

Others say the Pyongyang govern- 
ment is increasingly cooperating with 
— or at least looking the other way at — 
efforts to find relatives abroad. Such 
family members are now viewed as one 
of the best channels of money and ma- 
terials needed to help the strapped popu- 
lace survive. 

In the past, few North Koreans dared 
admit that their relatives lived in the 
"capitalist South” for fear of punish- 
ment. sard Chon Am. a South Korean 
businessman who began corresponding 
with his sister in 1989. 

"North Korean authorities can no 
longer control this.'’ Mr. Chon said. 
“They turn a blind eye to this activity 
and say. ‘You can go out and solve your 
own poverty problems.’ ” 

The number of South Koreans who 
were bom in the North dwindled to 


400,000 as of 1990, and many are now- 
in their 60s and 70s. said a Unification 
Ministry official in Seoul. 

"When an old guy stops coming to 
our office, we presume he has died, ’ ’ the 
official said. “It's sad to see them go, 
one by one, and their children don't care 
much about this issue. In 10 or 20 years, 
this issue is going to disappear.” 

Interest in family reunification 
peaked in 1993 — when 743 South 
Koreans applied for official permission 
to contact their northern relatives — but 
declined to 23 1 last year. 

All told, 860 of 2,580 applicants have 
tracked down their families since 1989. 
when the law was liberalized to allow 
the contacts. 

Mr. Shim, the businessman who has 
just met his brother, fled south to follow 
his father, a journalist who escaped in 
1946 after being accused of leading an 
underground anti-Communist move- 
ment. 

The border was sealed before Mr. 
Shim's mother and his siblings could 
join them. 


RAPE: In Peru, the Victim’s Sentence May Be Life - in Marriage 


Continued from Page 1 

sends a message to society that con- 
dones sex offenses because they are 
easily absolved by an offer of "mar- 
riage* '' said Violeta Bermudez, director 
of Manuela Ramos, a leading women's 
rights group. 

The group estimates that at least 
25.000 women are raped in Peru every 
year and that a great number of the 
cases, particularly among young, poor 
women, are resolved by offers of mar- 
riage, which many victims feel obliged 
to accept 

Mrs. Bermudez said that in many 
poor and rural areas of Peru, relatives 
put pressure on rape victims to accept a 
rapist's offer, which the relatives be- 
lieve will restore honor ro the victim and 
her family. When the victim does not 
want to many, her family often tells her 
incorrectly that the law requires her to 
do so or drop the charges, she said. 

In some cases the rapist threatens the 
victim. Maria Elena said that when she 
initially declined to many one of her 


attackers, the two accomplices told her 
they would slash her face. 

"What choice did I have? ’ ’ she asked. 
‘ 'Everyone insisted that the way to solve 
die problem was for me to get married ’ ’ 
Three months after the wedding. Maria 
Elena's husband abandoned her. 

The congressional judicial committee 
recently rejected a bill introduced by 
Beamz Merino Lucero, president of the 
congressional committee on women, that 
w ould eliminate the marriage-rape pro- 
visions from the law. Instead, the judicial 
committee passed its own bill, which 
upholds the basic 1924 law but annuls 
the 1991 revision. Thus, participants in a 
gang rape could be prosecuted, except 
for the one who marries the victim. 

The legislation is now set to go before 
the full Congress, where the judicial 
committee has considerable muscle. 
But advocates of women’s rights say 
they will not give up without a fighL 

"To believe in 1997 that it is in- 
telligent and moral for a rapist to marry 
his victim as a mechanism for pardon 
shows me that some of my colleagues in 


Congress don’t fundamentally under- ■>:> 
stand what rape is,” said Ms. Merino, a 
Harvard-trained lawyer. ' 'Tin 

Oscar Medelius, chairman of the con- 
gressional judicial committee, said it 
wanted to change provisions regarding «.o 
co-defendants because they unfairly ab- _.n 
solve conspirators to a crime based solely :r? 
on tiie actions of an independent party — ■--! 
the rapist who marries the victim. -4 , A 

But be said that if a woman decides to of* 
many her rapist, "we cannot interfere in 
their private affair.' * 

Legal scholars here said that the pro- 
posed new rape legislation is legally M 
deficient because it sets the stage for a 
fight between rape conspirators over ' 
who will marry the victim. -.‘n 

"Can you imagine that a woman who 
has been gang raped will then be pres- 
sured to chose which of her attackers :i-. 
she wants to spend the rest of her life -l: 
with?” said Jose Ugaz, a criminal law- 
yer. “We have members of Congress ■ 
who are of such a low intelligence level 
that they actually believe this’law pro- ' 
tects ana supports women.**/" ..” : v 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 


PAGE 13 





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~j 2 Japan Phone Firms 
| Are Pl anning to Merge 

| ITJ and Japan Telecom Seek to Unite 
**j To Improve Their Competitive Strength 


‘■'fi ^Headquarters in WalldorT, Germany, of SAP, which has focused 


BJi'iwlwp. InirrnuLtmal ll'-roMItihuar 

on the fast-growing market of small businesses; Dietmar Hopp, chief executive. 


SAP of Germany Puts Silicon Valley on Guard 


By John Schmid . 

International Herald Tribune 

WALLDORF, Germany — In this 
rural hamlet near Heidelberg, nearly 
2,000 programmers from around the 
globe are at work adding refinements to 
what already ranks as one of the world’s 
best-selling software packages for run- 
ning businesses. 

Near their campus of glassy buildings 
lies a bustling construction site for an- 
other office complex, evidence of the 
rapid growth of SAP AG, a company 
that has transformed itself in less than 
four years into Europe’s leading soft- 
ware publisher and the only non-Amer- 
' Scan player among the world's top five 
software companies. 

Those refinements, according to the 
company’s chief executive, Dietmar 
Hopp. are at the heart of SAP's strategy 
to penetrate new markets and keep the 
company growing at a pace that has 
made it one of the darlings of Europe's 
information-technology investors. 

“This is still a wide-open market.” 
said Neil Herman, a Salomon Brothers 
analyst who calls SAP die ‘’King 
Kong” of business software. SAP has 
managed to join the league of global 


technology companies such as Mi- 
crosoft Corp. ano Oracle Corp., but its 
industrial and corporate clients position 
it in a less mature, faster-growing mar- 
ket than the others, Mr. Herman said. 

Among the upgrades to R/3. SAP’s 
flagship program that analysts say is 
infamously difficult to install, will be 
features meant to make it more user- 
friendly, Mr. Hopp said. 

It is little wonder dial R/3 is com- 
plicated. It was designed to centralize 
such diverse jobs as accounting, sales, 
purchasing, inventory, human resources 
and distribution, harmonizing just about 
eveiyrhing a conventional company can 
do. Corporate officers are said to ap- 
preciate the breadth and depth of R/3 
because they do not have to wait for 
monthly reports to get a snapshot of 
their operations. 

Henning Steinbrink. analyst at 
Schroeder Muenchmeyer Hengst & 
Co., said SAP’s software could handle 
about 85 percent of a company's pro- 
gramming needs. 

To fill in the gaps. SAP has scores of 
licenses with niche software bouses that 
offer compatible and complementary 
software. SAP’s rivals often integrate 
the basics and leave about two-thirds of 


a company’s operations absent from 
their programs, analysts said. 

R/3's complexity has not dented its 
popularity. Its sales are bigger than the 
combined revenues of SAP’s next six 
competitors, according to figures from 
International Data Corp., a market re- 
search firm. 

R/3 commands a 31 percent share of 
the world market for applications for 
client-server systems, which are net- 
works of workstations and servers that 
have grown in popularity as companies 
have moved away from less adaptable 
centralized mainframe systems. By con- 
trast, No. 2 -ranked Oracle has about 8 
percent of the market, IDC estimates. 

“I assume we can defend the 31 
percent share.” said Mr. Hopp. one of 
SAP’s co-founders 25 years ago. “ 'The 
serious competitors that we have lie 
well below that.’’ 

SAP also towers over its rivals in 
spending on research and development. 
Smaller companies thai cannot afford 
incessant upgrades to maintain state-of- 
the-art software may not survive, the 
executive said. 

The company plowed 16 percent of 
its sales of 3.7 billion Deutsche marks 
(S2.17 billion) in 1996 back into re- 


A Change of Lifeguard at Club Med 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Times Sen-ire 
ARIS — Philippe 


P ARIS — 
guignon, die 
Euro Disney 
given a first -1 


m. given a nrsi-nana ieei ior uuo 
Mediterranee SA since taking over as 
its new chief executive this month, 
visiting two Club Med villages and 
meeting in London with sales and mar- 
keting executives. 

In February, Club Med’s sharehold- 
ers, led by the Agnelli family of Italy, 
whose primary holding company con- 
trols roughly 13 percent of Club Med 


raoliahiip ones Gauguin painted. But the chal- 

mSsenice lenges facing Mr. Bourguignon, 49, are 

more those of wide economic slug- 

Phflippe Bout- gishness, high unemployment and lack 
le former head of of the disposable income that enabled 
sy SCA, has been generations of Europeans to make Club 
-hand feel for Club Med — “an antidote to civilization,” 
ince taking over as as it trumpeted itself — into a thriving 
mtive this month, vacation business. 

Med villages and With unemployment in France ex- 
with sales and mar- ceeding 12 percent. Club Med’s busi- 
ness is flagging in the country where it 
b Med’s sharehold- was founded almost a half-century ago 


and which generates roughly a third of company around. 


Even before the management shift, 
Mr. Trigano had begun making efforts 
to get a grip on the vacation group's 
problems. After commissioning a study 
by Bain & Co., die Boston-based con- 
sultants, Club Med late last year an- 
nounced a turnaround plan that involved 
closing or getting rid of seven of its 1 14 
properties and upgrading the others in a 
$144 million refurbishing program. 

The injection of new blood wife Mr. 
Bourguignon ’s arrival is expected to 
accelerate the process of turning the 


One reason analysis like Mr. Bour- 
guignon is that he is no stranger to the 


whose primary holding company con- its business. One reason analysis like Mr. Bour- 

trols roughly 13 percent of Club Med hi Germany, another key market, guignon is that he is no stranger to fee 
shares, hired Mr Bourguignon. They poor salesmanship and an onslaught of group he took over. In years past, he 
had lost patience wife Serge Trigano, clever imitators is hurting business; vacationed at Club Med villages in 
Chib Med’s chief executive since 1993 and in the United States, which in 1989 Morocco with his wife and two chil- 
and a son of Gilbert Trigano, who suppb’ed 220,000 club guests, business dren. While at Euro Disney, he kept 
heloed develop the concept of vacation is stagnant, hampered by ineffective abreast of Club Med domgs though the 
vilhmes in the I 9 ^ 0 s. marketing and club management that occasional recruitment of club exec- 

with Mr Bourguignon’s arrival, the some Club Med executives say became utives, including Michel Perehet, who 
vounger Mr TrigaSo was given a increasingly aloof. now dmeeB the cast members (such as 

i.rw^onmiDosiasctaimiari, [n AH of this has produced a wide gap the people in the Mickey Mouse cos- 


With Mr. Bourguignon’s arrival, the 
younger Mr. Trigano was given a 
largely ceremonial post as chairman. In 


occasional recruitment of club exec- 
utives, including Michel Perehet, who 
now directs the cast members (such as 
the people in the Mickey Mouse cos- 


OctoberMr^ Trig^o came under fire between high fixed investment and tumes) al Di^neyland Paris the theme 

cunem economic climate. ails spread last autumn. .Mr. Bour- 


^meSo^cdtaue. ails spread last antumn. Mr. Bour- 

ctob’^third loM in^br yeare “There is a failure to march supply guignon even suggested that Disney 

club sfe^lOMm six y - ^ demaD ^ ^ a ^st control and acquire the group, although the idea 

I 4 million, com- organization that are simply not ad- was rejected by executives of Walt 
S^^^l^Jinl989fee^Si STsaid hTige! Reedfi analyst Disney Co. in California, 
pared wfe JJJ, avenue P A11 wifeParibas Capital Markets in Lon- Many of fee problems he feces at 

fern! who lowe£d Club Med shares Club Med are similar tothose he re- 
ferough fee simmiCT Cl f304g Q f rom a buy rating to “fair value, no solved at Disneyland Pans. He cut 

^^^Vm NoveibeT action’ ’ after fee Sock price reacted to costs and prices drastically, recast fee 
Fraich francs ($53.07) ui NcwraiDer. management shake-up by climbing marketing concept and made subtle 
It may have seemed like a otsis ^ J cultural adjustments to the way the 

fewght about by Club Med shares closed Wednesday park was run to make it more palatable 

the at 430 francs, down 3. mEuropeaums.es. 


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search and development, about eight ward consolidation in the industry and 
times the amount spent by Baan NV, a Japan Telecom’s launch into fee in- 
company with a similar line of software temational market by buying an estab- 
based in fee Netherlands, company fig- lisbed company . * * Tod Wood, lelecom- 
ures show. In fee next five years. SAP’s muni cations analyst at ING Barings in 
R&D expenses will total 3 billion DM, Tokyo, said. 

Mr. Steinbrink said. One of Japan’s smaller international 

SAP is using fee money to develop carriers. International Telecom corn- 
new versions of R/3 tailored to specific petes with fee former monopoly, Kok- 
industry segments, such as aerospace, usai Denshin Denwa. or KDD, and 
automobile manufacturers and retailers, privately held IDC Corp. 
and to public-sector institutions, such as Japan Telecom, DDI Corp. and Tele- 

universities, nonprofit institutions and way Japan Corp. compete with the giant 
governments. Mr. Hopp said. NTT in fee domestic long-distance sec- 

Wife clients no longer tethered to tor. Japan Telecom also said it was 
unwieldy mainframes, R/3 can reach a attempting to establish links wife other 
market of medium-sized and smaller domestic rivals and with one of fee 
companies, fee classic German Mitt el- world's three international telecommu- 


By Velisarios Kartoulas 

InJemarumaJ Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — Two Japanese phone 
companies said Wednesday they were 
planning to merge to form Japan’s third- 
biggest telecommunications company, 
putting them in a stronger position to 
compete as Japan's telecommunica- 
tions market is deregulated. 

If International Telecom Japan, a 
privately held international carrier, and 
Japan Telecom Co., a domestic long- 
distance carrier, reach an agreement, 
they would merge by about October. 
Haruo Murakami, vice president of Ja- 
pan Telecom, said. The company would 
become the country's third -1 argest 
phone company in terms of sales, after 
Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp. 
and DDI Corp. 

“This represents fee first move to- 
ward consolidation in the industry and 
Japan Telecom’s launch into the in- 
ternational market by buying an estab- 
lished company." Tod Wood, telecom- 
munications analyst at ING Barings in 
Tokyo, said. 

One of Japan’s smaller international 
carriers. International Telecom com- 
petes with fee former monopoly, Kok- 
usai Denshin Denwa. or KDD, and 
privately held IDC Corp. 

Japan Telecom, DDI Corp. and Tele- 


stond, Mr. Hopp said. Of the more than 
9.000 R/3 installations in more than 50 
countries, half have sales of less than 
$200 million; by the time fee install- 
ations readi 20 , 000 . the number of 
companies could number 13.000 or 
14.000, he said. 

Although SAP was hardly the first to 
invest in the Internet, analysts say it has 
played a game of catch-up and now leads 
the evolution of the Internet to an every- 
day corporate tool for business trans- 
actions. 

In December. SAP became the first to 
offer so-called customer-to-business 
software that allows purchasers to look 
at goods, compare prices and place or- 
ders over fee Internet. 

Part of the fascination with SAP 
stems from the German company’s en- 
trepreneurial beginnings a quarter of a 

See SAP, Page 17 


tor. Japan Telecom also said it was 
attempting to establish links wife other 
domestic rivals and with one of the 
world's three international telecommu- 
nications consortiums. Mr. Murakami 
said. 

“We will not be able to maintain com- 
petitiveness just as a domestic long dis- 
tance carrier,” he said. 

“We believe it will be advantageous 
for us to enter fee international tele- 
communications sector.” 

He mentioned KDD as a possible do- 
mestic partner. The three international 
groups are WorldPartners. a group led by 
AT&T of the United States; Concert, 
which links British Telecommunications 
PL C and MCI Communications of the 
United Stales, and Global One, which 
links Deutsche Telekom. France Tele- 
com and Sprint Corp. of America. 

Telecommunications shares fell after 
Japan Telecom and International Tele- 
com Japan announced their possible 
linkup, amid concern feat it could fuel a 
price war among the nation’s phone 
companies, investors told Bloomberg 


News. Shares of NTT, the world’s 
largest phone company, fell 1 ,800 yen 
($14.78), or 2.25 percent, to 820,000 on 
concern that the new company would 
take some business away from the 
former state-run monopoly. KDD, Ja- 
pan’s largest international phone ser- 
vice provider, fell 160 to 6,940. 

Shares also were hurt after NTT and 
KDD reported feat U.S. authorities had 
delayed granting them licenses to 
provide international phone services in 
fee United States. 

Officials in Washington said the delay 
had been imposed because Japan had 
failed to meer demands to liberalize its 
telecommunications market. 

Tokyo has imposed a 20 percent ceil- 
ing on foreign investment in the two 
companies. 

Small Japanese telecommunications 
companies are in crea singly coming un- 
der attack from NTT, which is fighting 
for customers by streamli ning. Under a 
plan worked out last year. NTT is poised 
to split into three companies under the 
umbrella of a holding company. Jap- 
anese international carriers are facing 
stiff competition from foreign compa- 
nies offering cut-price calls in fee in- 
ternational market 

Junichiro Niyazu, president of NTT, 
said fee merger talks were not unex- 
pected. 

“I have said many times that the 
restructuring of NTT, including its entry 
into international business, would spark 
industry realignment” he said. 

For Japan Telecom, a merger with 
International Telecom Japan, or ITJ, 
would offer it experience in tire in- 
ternational market and an established 
customer base. Mr. Wood said. 

For ITJ, a merger wife Japan Telecom 
would amount to a preemptive bail-out 
he said. ITJ is expected to suffer a sharp 
drop in profit this year and to struggle as 
international call rates continue to fall. 
Its net profit in the year ending March 3 1 
should be around 300 million yen, Mr. 
Wood said. 95 percent lower than in fee 
previous year. Some analysts said it 
could incur a loss. 

The price of a three-minute call from 
Japan to fee United States has fallen from 
470 yen to 440 yen over the past year and 
is expected to fall as much as 25 percent 
further over fee next three years. 

Only a merger of all of its domestic 
rival s wo uld represent any sort of threat 
to N i l ’s dominance of the Japanese 
telecommunications market, and ana- 
lysts expressed doubt that could happen. 


Why This Economic Expansion Is Different 


By Louis Uchitelle 

New York Timer Service 

NEW YORK — The economic ex- 
pansion of fee 1990s, six years old this 
month, is displaying a resilience un- 
characteristic of earlier periods of siich 
sustained growth. 

Economic growth, surging in some 
months, faltering a bit in others, has 
reached an annual rate of about 4 per- 
cent in recent months, well above av- 
erage. Unemployment has held below 
5.5 percent for months, an experience 
that in the J 970s and 1 980s helped cause 
wages and prices to escalate. 

Consumer spending remains strong, 
though much of it is on credit. Industrial 
production is on fee upswing, advan- 
cing at nearly a 5 percent annual rate, 
and home construction and auto sales, 
two pillars of the economy, were strong 
last year, although they have tapered on 
slightly in recent weeks. 

“The strength will last until the sum- 


mer,” predicted Edward Hyman, pres- 
ident and chief economist of ISI Grohp. a 
Wall Street firm, offering a view that is 
fairly common among economic fore- 
casters. Many expect chat the economy 
will strengthen again by fee autumn after 
a summer breather. But so far, none of 
this renewed strength has led to the short- 
ages and inflation feat prompted fee Fed- 
eral Reserve Board to bring down past 
expansions by raising interest rates nigh 
enough to starve the economy for credit. 

Wbat makes this expansion different 
is that even in its strongest moments, 
including fee surge this winter, inflation 
has remained quiescent, leaving fee Fed 
wife little provocation to act 

The Federal Reserve chairman, Alan 
Greenspan, has acknowledged that this 
is a less inflationary expansion, in part 
because fee Fed notched up interest rates 
in 1994, and be suggested m recent testi- 
mony that fee Fed's policymakers might 
raise interest rates soon anyway, as a 
“pre-emptive strike” against some fu- 


ture inflation and, perhaps, to cool down 
the stock market. But he said any rate 
increase would probably be modest. 

There are. several reasons fee expan- 
sion of the 1990s has unfolded in a 
different fashion from those of the past. 

Cheap and abundant imports have 
played a role, as have falling prices for 
computers, whose booming sales have 
helped to fuel growth. Health-care costs, 
meanwhile, are rising less rapidly. 

Wages have remained remarkably re- 
strained. That is, in part, a result of a 
sudden influx of people into the labor 
force — some of them older workers, 
some immigrants, some women — 
while fee growing use of temporary and 
contract workers has relieved pressure 
to grant raises. Millions of Americans 
also have helped fee process in their 
willingness io trade job security for 
modest improvements in their wages. 

The United States has had three long 

See GROWTH, Page 17 



itesisiyi 


% change 
1996/1995 



Retail network sales 
(trade volume) 


Net Sales 


Earnings before Interest, 
taxes and extraordinary items 


Income on ordinary activities 


Net income 


Net income 

excluding minority interests 


Earnings per share (FF) + 14 . 0 % 65.1 stTt 

In the last quarter of 1996, the Group's consolidated- net sales rose by 6.8%. 

On a comparable structure and constant exchange rate basis, excluding the Impact of the divestments 
of PROMOHYPERMARKT In Germany and DIA in both France and Italy, and the acquisition of a controllfna 
interest in GRUPPO G, sales would have risen by 7%. y 

Earnings before interest, taxes and extraordinary items were trimmed by FF 119 million refiectina 
the negative impact of the operations In Germany. Moreover, the disposal of PROMOHYPERMARKT led 
to a non-recurring expense of FF 109 million. 

Cash-flow stood at FF 3,019 million. 

At the Annual General Meeting of May 21, 1997, fhe Board will propose a net dividend of FF id nor 
an increase of 16.7% on last year. Following the conversion of bonds, the number of shares has tenten 
17,892,795 to 19.143,270. rBen tTom 


-1 a SBtsrajf 




























' PAGE 14 


INTEKNAXIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 




■ •; \ a.- aaftyr+iirf sj/ ‘Jj ~ 


THE AMERICAS 



Investor’s America 


The Dow 


30-Vesr T-Bond Yield 


j 

Marsh & McLennan to [Buy Ins 




Dollar in Deutsche marks H Dollar in Yen 


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Source : Bloomberg. Reuters 

lotenuuoPal Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


Cpnptarf by OwSuffFmm Dispctrhgs 

NEW YORK — Marsh & 
McLennan Cos. said Wednesday it 
would buy Johnson & Higgins for 
$I.Sbiilion in stock and cash, form- 
ing the world's largest insurance- 
brokerage company. 

Marsh & McLennan said it would 
pay about $600 million in cash and 
the rest in stock for the closely held 
insurance broker and consulting 
company, which had more than $ 1 -2 
billion in revenue last year and 
9,000 employees worldwide. 

A new company, called J.H. 
Marsh McLennan Inc., will be 
formed to run the combined insur- 
ance-services operations and will 
be a subsidiary of Marsh McLen- 
nan, the company said. 


Johnson and Higgins's chairman 
and chief executive, David Olsen, 
will become vice chairman of 
Marsh & McLennan after the deal is 
completed. Marsh & McLennan 's 
chairman, AJ.C. Smith, will be 
chairman and chief executive of the 
unit with four vice chairmen. 

The deal is subject to regulatory 
approval, but is expected to be com- 
pleted before the end of June. 

In late trading in New York, 
Marsh & McLennan ’s shares 
jumped S7.25, to $129.25. 

The companies are combining as 
a slump in the premium rates that 
form the basis of brokerage com- 
missions and a fall in demand for 
more diversified services have cre- 
ated pressure within the insurance 


\ 


brokerage industry for consolida- 
tion. t 

With fee takeover. Marsh & 
McLennan will reclaim its position 
as the world's largest insurance 
broker, a biace it lost this year to 
Aon Coro., which, in January 
bought Afexander and Alexander 
Services lac. for Si 22 billion. 

“Changes in the rapidly growing 
and increasingly competitive global 
marketplace have created new chal- 
lenges,'* Mr. Smith said. 

Buying Johnson & Higgins “will 
position ns to respond more effec- 
tively to fee increasing and more 
complex risks our clients en- 
counter,’’ he added 

The combination was not driven 
principally by a desire to reclaim 


the top ranking in the field in terms 
of size, Mr. Smith said He said the 
combined companies would realize 
cost savings by merging and stream- 
lining back-office and sales oper- 
ations. The cost savings could come 
as early as this year, he said He 
declined to specify how many em- 
ployees would lose their jobs. 

The transaction wall start adding 
to Marsh & McLennan ’s profits this 
year, he added- 

Marsh & McLennan ’s net profit 
last year climbed 14 percent, to 
$4593 million, from $402.9 million 
in 1995. 

Its revenue rose to $4.15 billion, 
from $3.77 billion the previous year. 
The company employs more than 
27,000 people worldwide and has 


clients in more than 80 cou ntrie s. 

The company’s insorance-broker- 
age service, which acts as a broker to 
companies baying or wiling insur- 
ance, accounted for 4o pe rcent of 
revenue, down from 52 percent m 

1995. :. 

Investment management in- 
creased to 26 percent of revenue last 
year from 20 percent in 1 995. ; 

“In bask terms, you’ve got a 
terrific company that s diversified 
into asset management and consult- 
ing and its core business is in # 
rwlining market," said Andrew 7 
Oliver, an analyst at Oliver Secu- 
rities in Boston. “Here’s an oppor- 
tunity for Marsh to get some growth 

back into their core business/ 

(Bloomberg. AP, AFP) 


Sylvan to Acquire Education Firm 


COLUMBIA. Maryland (Bloomberg) — Sylvan Learning 
Systems Inc. agreed Wednesday to acquire National Edu- 
. cation Corp. for $648.6 million in stock, creating the world's 
. largest education -services company. 

Sylvan will issue 038 of a Sylvan share for each National 
Education share. The transaction values each share of Na- 
tional at $18.27. hi late trading in New York. Sylvan’s shares 
were quoted at $3130, down $3,625. 


• Coca-Cola Co. is challenging a $530 million bill from 
Brazilian tax authorities, who charge that the company's 
Brazilian subsidiary, Recofarma Industrias do Amazonas 
Ltda.. did not pay excise taxes on two years of shipments from 
its Manaus plant to its warehouse in Rio de Janeiro. 

• US Airways Group Inc. extended its lawsuit against British 
Airways PLC, saying BA’s representatives on US Airways’ 
board had failed to act in the best interests of the U.S. airline. 

• General Mills Inc’s third-quarter earnings rose 5.6 percent, 
to $122.8 million, as cost-cutting offset lower cereal prices 
and weaker sales of packaged fowls. 

• Vornado Realty Trust agreed to buy Mendik Co., a New 
York office-property developer, for $654 million in cash, 
securities and debt 

• PacifiCorp. will buy TPC Corp. for $288 million, adding 
the Houston-based natural-gas company's operations in the 
Midwest and East to one of largest electric utilities in the 
western United States. 

• Microsoft Corp. and more than 30 other software-devel- 
opment and publishing companies said they would share tech- 
nology developed for Microsoft's Internet Explorer 4.0 browser, 
permitting broadcasts of “channels" of data over die Internet 

• Toys *R' Us Inc/s fourth-quarter earnings before charges rose 
6.6 percent, to $386 million, because of strong demand during 
the Christmas season. 


Philadelphia Exchange Rattled 


By Leslie Eaton 

New York Tunes Service 


NEW YORK — The Securities 
and Exchange Commission has 
come down hard on the Phil- 
adelphia Stock Exchange, which 
has been tarnished by two recent 
scandals involving board mem- 
bers. 

Arthur Levitt Jr., chairman of 
the commission, visited the ex- 
change on Friday to deliver a re- 
port that was sharply critical of the 
way the exchange does business. 
He accused board members of be- 
ing so preoccupied with political 
infighting that they neglected their 
regulatory responsibilities, accord- 
ing to several people who attended 
the meeting and spoke on the con- 
dition that they not be identified 

Mr. Levitt recommended that 


the exchange appoint people who 
represent the investing public to 
half of the slots on its board and 
strengthen its conflict-of-interest 
rules, according to people familiar 
with the report. Several of them 
described Mr. Levitt as “reading 
the riot act/’ 

Philadelphia has the fewest in- 
dependent directors of the five re- 
gional exchanges, “so we kind of 
stuck out,” said Nicholas Giord- 
ano, chief executive of the ex- 
change. 

The exchange is likely to shrink 
its board and add more independ- 
ent members after a special com- 
mittee makes a report later this 
spring, Mr. Giordano said 

The commission ’s investigation 
was prompted by a specific prob- 
lem: the failure to act promptly 
when officials discovered that the 


chairman of its board may have 
had a conflict of interest because of 
his ownership stake in a small 
company doing business with the 
exchange. 

The former chairman, Vincent 
Casella, has said be did nothing 
improper by investing in Ashton 
Technology Group, a start-up that 
had received a contract to develop 
a new trading system for the ex- 
change. 

The SEC is still looking into that 
matter. 

The exchange has also been em- 
barrassed by a complaint the com- 
mission filed last year against 
Richard Fein berg, a member of the 
board He was accused of cheating 
customers for whom he was ex- 
ecuting trades on the Nasdaq mar- 
ket; be is fighting those com- 
plaints. 


‘Beige Book 9 Shuffling 
Sends Stocks Lower 


Tietmeyer’s Comments Push Dollar Down 


Bloomberg. AFX. NYT 


GtunpVtd by Our Stag From Dapauha 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
against European currencies Wed- 
nesday after Hans Tiermeyer. the 
president of the Bundesbank, re- 
iterated that foreign-exchange cor- 
rections had been completed, in- 
dicating a possible end to the 
dollar's long rally. 

Mr. Tietmeyer, speaking in Lyon, 
said the correction of foreign-ex- 
change rates “has taken place" and 
that the leading industrial countries 
had “no interest” in a correction 
that went beyond the economic fun- 
damentals of the currencies. 

At 4 P.M. here, the dollar was at 


1 .6928 Deutsche marks, down from 
1.7038 DM Tuesday, at 5.7130 
French francs, down from 5.7435 
francs and at 1.4550 Swiss francs. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


down from 1 .47 1 0 francs. The pound 
fell to $13987 from Si. 6077. 

Mr. Tietmeyer also said financial 
markets had “understood” the most 
recent communique from the Group 
of Seven industrialized countries, 
which was widely seen as a warning 
against further dollar gains. In the 
month before the February G-7 
meeting, the dollar rose about 7 per- 


cent against the mark. It has risen 
less than 2 percent since. 

But die dollar gained against the 
yen, despite conflicting comments 
from Japan's finance minister. 
Hiroshi Miisuzuka. He said a 
stronger dollar could lead to a U.S.- 
Japan “trade war," and that 125 yen 
was the U.S. currency's upper limit. 
He later retracted the comments. 
The dollar rose to 122/270 yen from 
121.785 yen Tuesday. 

Separately, the U.S. Treasury sec- 
retary. Robert Rubin, said Japan 
needed stronger domestic demand to 
help narrow its trade surplus with the 
United States. (Market Xeivs. AFPi 


CompBrd bjO*r Sufi From Dapacha 

NEW YORK — Stocks fell Wed- 
nesday, led by Merck and Procter & 
Gamble, as investors abandoned 
some of this year’s best-performing 
stocks and focused on shares of 
companies dial would benefit most 
from an expanding economy. 

A report from the Federal Re- 
serve suggesting that the U.S. econ- 
omy barreled ahead in the opening 
months of 1997 spurred advances in 
Whirlpool, Sears and other so- 
called cyclical stocks. That rotation 
undermined shares of drug, health- 
care and software stocks that are 
highly valued when earnings pros- 
pects are weaker. 

“The economy continues to 
grow, so those groups that haven't 
done a great deal up to now — 
chemical, paper, heavy machinery 
shares — are doe for a pickup/ ’ said 
Garrett Nagle of Garrett Nagle & 
Co. Gains in those stocks may come 
at the expense of steady-earning 
consumer stocks, be said. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age closed down 45.79 points at 
7.03937, while the broader Stan- 
dard & Poor’s 500-share index, fell 
7.90 points, to 803.44. Declining 
issues outnumbered advancing ones 
by a 2-to-l ratio on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 

Merck fell 1% to 9214, and 
Procter & Gamble lost l Vz to 125. 

The Fed report, known as the 
Beige Book, suggested that the 
economy's surprising vigor had 
continued to stoke demand for more 
workers, biifihe resulting wage in- 


creases — a key force behind in- 
flation — have been fairly tame. 
But the report did little to ease 


Treasury bond investors’ expetfzjp 
2 interest 


tions for the Fed to raise — 
rates when its policy-making Open 


US. STOCKS 


Market Committee meets. March 
25. The price of the benchmark 30- 
year bond fell 12/32 point, to 9625/ 
32, taking the yield up to 6.88 per- 
cent from 6.85 percent Tuesday; 

Among the Dow’s losers, Philip 
Morris feH I'A to 1381*6 after the 
tobacco company said in an annual 
Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion filing that it might join talks to 
settle health-related lawsuits. 

Among losers in the technology 
sector, Oracle fell VA to 34 VS' as 
investors braced for the database 
software company's third-quarter 
earnings report. 

Access Health plunged 7Vfa hr 
15% after the health-care informa- 
tion service provider said it expec- 
ted 1997 earnings and revenue to be 
below analysts’ estimates. 

But expectations for buoyant 
economic growth helped spur gains 
in chemical, paper and retail shares 
— companies whose profits rise and 
fall with die economy's general 
health. 

“The economy is in happy land, 
and the cyclical don't look as ex- 
pensive as some other stocks these 
days,” said Ron Stribley. at Glen- 
mede Trust Co. (Bloomberg, API 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


■' Wednesday's 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 most actiw stares, 
up to the dosing on WaH Street. 

! The Associated Press. 


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54KI0 bu minimum- con per bmtiei 
Mar 97 309 XXTj 3J4'< — 4*.i 16JT7 

May 97 305% 29SV1 HF* -5 163,93 

JU197 304% 297V; 299Vi —5 109^94 

S*P 97 2B9Vt 7SS 235V, -Oi, 15,543 

Dec 97 28716 281 284 72.130 

ESI. sales HA TueV sales B3J0 
rue’s oowiint 388 .Mj off 1057 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 

100 tons- daflon. per inn 
M»97 291.10 N93> 271/0 -5L70 

MOV 97 27500 287 DO 26180 -500 

JUl 97 272J0 26UB0 2MJ0 -CO 

Aug 97 2MJ5D 25UO 260L30 -170 

Sep 97 25060 24100 24600 -340 

0097 230.40 224.50 22730 -130 

Esr.sales KA Tub's. sales 31550 
Toe's ooer W 110337 off 1952 


Hi^Pi Lew Case Otge Opmt 
□RANGE JUICE (NCTNJ 

1 S3X as.- cenfs per St. 

ASCV97 8123 8330 B230 -«A5 11031 

JlIV EL3 6123 MJO *050 5,284 

S«P 51 8235 9553 87.00 .080 1686 

te/97 KS1 12.90 B93B *1.10 

Est-soes NlA Tue's-saes 4477 
Tu^sapenW 2SJ95 1.3 55 


Hloo utw Ouse Oige OpW 

FF500000 - pis Of TOO Pd 

Mar 97 13136 131.18 131 JO *008 99,065 

HZ' S IMA? 129-96 +QX» Sw 

?2. S 1MM +0J » ws3 

Dec 97 N.7. N.T. 9730 +008 0 

Ert volume 201^16. Open W_- 154783 off 
AiOa. 


Wgh Low Close Chge OpM 


5.477 
49.1 J4 
293)49 
8.127 
5.265 
43119 


*1 

*IM 

-1 

*2 

-*» 

■Tl* 


SOYBEAN Oft. (CBOT) 
603100 Jbs- cents per St 


15 

in 


44 ** 

14 

1*V 


At 
14** 
in* 

10*1 low 
7** n 

34W 44* 

im 139k 

in* a 

4W 49* 
iw iw 


AMEX 


«m lam unt 
6KU6 40I-5B 602.04 


AMEX 


■U9 


TWA 

Homan 


4 ** 49 . at 

zw a* 23** 

2J* JTW Z** 

a* 2 as* 
UM 191* 19* 

l*t 3** 2* 


4* 

-ft 

■ft 


Dow Jones Bond 


SW- 


IM *M 
Mci in* 
W I* 
2M 


4 30* 

,09 » B* 1ft 

KM 98 8ft 9* 

«16 M 9* ** 

516 BN 8* 8* 

JR 1* 2M 3* 

576 3ft 3ft 3*1 

« 8M 7* I 

la 2ft 7ft »* 

«8 14* 14** Ml 

474 M 5ft 5*t 

J* ****** 
1589 18* 17W 17* 

124 9* 9* 9H 

in 8ft 9* Cft 

230 I 1 1 

an 12** 13 12 

15 eft 6 6* 

1» TV* 6ft 71* 

6 6 

«** 4*1 

in in 

Ift M 

21* 21* 

, r . in m n* 

2156 3* 3 N M 

*06 20* 20 2M 

« 18* 18* 18* 

M * ft W 

5* O* 46* 481* 

4W 9ft 9* 9* 

131 » 2*1 2* 

M 2* 2ft 3ft 

go 1ft 19* 19* 

jn » 3 3* 

M II* II |1 

<K »* 2ft 7* 

301 10 ft 10 

« ft 1 1 

108 1* I* I* 

« 4* 4 4V) 

1 Sfr fSS 

S IS S 

2» I* liv, ft 

“ 'ft 'ft 1* 

JW 4Ht 39* K* 

» K S 1SS 

iS "S “B 

726 3D 19* 1ft 

126 11* ||* 1* 

IIP as* Mft 


-ft 

•4* 

- 2 * 

+ft 

*ft 

♦ft 

tl** 

♦ft 

41 

♦* 


20 Bonds 

lOUtflRIes 
10 Industrials 


am qnl 

103.19 +0.11 

loan 4 -ojn 

106-26 +ai2 


SPL.. 

Amfflil 

VtacB 

Nabon 

PLC! 


32527 

10301 

7780 

25 

7021 

4603 

5316 

5128 

4403 


7* 

S 

7*6 

flfti 

HM 

36** 

*ZJ* 

20* 

13 

38 


6*» 

4* 


80ft. 


Oft Oft 
36* 36*6 
lift 1716 

in* in 

3S SS 


♦ft 

-**4 

ft 

♦* 


Mar 97 ZS.75 

25X8 

25X3 

-as 


May 97 a.17 

25 J8 

i&47 

-455 

57X29 

Ji4« 26OT 

25J5 

2400 

— a54 

30.243 

AUB 97 2440 

25X0 

26XB 

— 0L57 

5X89 

Sep 97 26X5 

26OT 

2428 

— (U7 

1300 

oan 2460 

76JQ 

26XD 

-065 

2.982 

ESI. sate NA 

Tue's. sales 

29X84 


Toe's open inf 

114.148 

Off 724 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 




MOO ou mmfrraum- emts nr buPul 


iwn 854 

B25 

831ft 


3.W 

Norn SUM 

831 

838 

— 17ft 

89,058 

Juf 97 80 

834 

841 

—17 

54558 


•2ta 

-ft 

♦4* 


S8P97 791ft 773ft 780 -8W 

EsLsates HA Hw's.sdes 87.802 
Tud's open iid 196X43 up 1614 


7J53 

4.721 


Trading Activity 
NYSE 


- New Lows 


946 

W 

3365 

135 

2B 


^ Nasdaq 


m ***** 


1906 


3368 . — — — . 
223 Jj®v Highs 
16 Hew Lows 


1491 
1995 

2251 -- 

5739 5744 

84 
60 


WHEAT (GB0T1 

S4W0 bu irtnimwT*- cenh per busnef 
Mar 77 383 379ft 311 

AW 77 390 382ft 3U *4 

JUI97 380 372ft 376 -r4 

5ep97 380ft 375 378 +4*6 

EH. sides NA Tim's, safes 15.155 
Toe's open W 73X0 up 1450 


295 

26X50 

37,908 

4J09 


Metals 

GOUMNCMXJ 

100 wav az.- CaRvs per trov oz. 

NaV 35470 S 

Aw 97 3S jO 352.40 352.W —120 6A330 

ffU/V 356.10 1 

■A" 1 ” 354JJ JS-30 —200 28X14 

Aug 97 359 JO 357.90 3J7J0 — 1.70 10J09 

aaw 36m 359.10 339 jo -zx mo 

Dec 97 36400 342J0 36170 -1.90 21,270 

Pet 98 366 JO 36630 366J0 -080 ajS/1 

fsr. sales ha Tue's. sales 39.798 
Tue'saneninl T7UJ32 a W 185 

HI GftAOE COPPER mCMXI 
25.000 it*. - oenrs Perth. 

A*tr97 115.10 lllJQ 11280 —130 
A Bf97 I1U0 T1Q.10 111.10 — 1J5 
M«»97 1113b 106.10 10930 -1A5 
Jim 97 107X1 10680 107X0 —US 
Ail 97 107 JO 105.00 106.10 — US 

Aug 97 IQ450 10400 1 0450 -455 
Sep 97 1043)0 103.10 10450 — 1J5 
0097 1010B IDIOT 10300 -055 
Nov 97 10100 102JB 10100 — OJ£ 

Es. sales HA Tim's, soles 9.97) 

Tim's open mt 58J34 off 791 

aLVERtHOAX} 

4000 mj> ot- ants oer mj» at 

Mar 97 526.00 SOOT 53400 — 0J0 751 

Apt 97 52tOO i 

Mav97 530-50 524OT 524.00 —450 58,931 

JU1W S5JB 5S8J0 S29JB -4 « 12.701 
Sep 97 53400 J34J0 536.00 — 2JD 1338 

Dec 57 54450 WI-5D 542J0 -150 1388 

JwiW 549.U0 14 

Mar 98 55400 <> jn 

B&Kdes HA Tim's. sales 11X35 
Tue's Open inf 89.019 ofl 1183 




m._20omaa»-rtsoniiopa — 

I2SJB -099 101899 


cZE" !|AW"T25J5 .**,«-*„ 
Ses97 12652 12450 I25J3 — 094 
Esl sates 64270. Pie*. sates 49,184 
Prey, open inL: 104274 up 545 
EURODOLLARS ICMEH) 

SI mflktn-ptsodQOiKd. 

MwOO 5119 9117 91T7 

JunOO 9114 9113 9112 

Sen 00 9110 9107 9108 
Dec 00 93JB 93.00 9301 

Mar 01 9103 9100 9100 

JwiOl 92.97 9194 92.95 

Sep 01 92.93 9191 93.91 


Industrials 

COTTON 2 fHCTH) 

50X00 lte.-t»ntl per Cb. 

May 97 7715 7465 

All »7 78.10 77 JS 
On 97 7775 I7M 
Dee 97 78.15 77J5 
Mor9B 7180 7BOT 
May 98 


70S -080 38.157 
7775 -0X6 11*91 
77X0 -0X0 1,557 
77X0 — HAS 20X86 
7480 -ea 1,557 
WJ7 - 4J8 


1375 


BL safes KA Tub's, sedes jfljBr 
Tue’s anon no 78X97 up 4900 


—COT 42X34 
—COT 34X51 
—DOT 32,978 
— 0.07 25X74 
-0OT 24X73 
-OOT T9X43 
— 003 KJ32 


HEATmeaa. (NMBU 

41X00 POL eer*» per utd 
AW 97 54J5 5255 5430 
MOV 97 54.90 5110 54J5 

Anjp 55.1J 5160 54J5 

JI897 55X0 SUP SUP 

A»» W 56.1* 55OT 56OT 
54J0 55J5 5650 

Del 97 57X5- 5490 57.15 

NOW 97 5835 57.00 3J5 


JVUI TtTJ 1 n.91 — OJB HX32 stMt anji 

S£S S 2 %% S£ dS ’kS B# SSI S 3 U 


7X70 

X719 

36.146 

9*0 

7X84 

648 

1970 

607 

583 


5X99 

5X53 

4X02 

5X86 


27X53 

42312 

1964 

740 


a 


Livestock 


■* AMEX 


Market Sales 


Unmanned 

TOM I 


222 

315 

202 

739 

22 

12 


Pw. 


Tetter 

«* 

Pftfc 

MS. 

iS 

NYSE 

47412 

598.76 

225 

Ame* 

19X1 

25.98 

724 

a 

4 

Nasdaq 

TnmBBons. 

SI 3X4 

57177 


CATTLE tCMERi 
4MX)0 Bs.- cents per Si 

APT 97 69 JO 6850 68.92 *0J2 34.348 

XnW 65L3S 64X0 64J5 — (US 24229 

Auh 97 are 6U5 6137 — 022 20JJ73 

£5 —0.17 16554 
Dec 97 69X7 68J7 68X5 —117 6X39 

Feb 98 70X0 7005 TfLB —0X2 2.0B4 

Esf sates 21372 Tue's. sales 16X26 
Tue's anen inf 108X39 up 757 


PLATVIUM (N64BR] 

50 lro» Ot- Mon per trey cot. 

APT97 389X0 383X0 38350 -110 18X38 
May 77 ymre 

-U97 38BJ0 385X0 3B4.00 -2X0 1470 

00 97 390X0 387X0 387.00 -420 2X93 

Am 98 39130 1.J23 

Est sates NA Tue's sales 3X43 
Tub's open ml 25,124 uu 70 

LONDON METALMLJME) Pk **°«* 
Doifais per metric fan 


Copper CnttodesfH j^ CfBriei 


1641X0 1642.00 
1677X0 167100 


Dividends 

c owp em y 


«* Liberty 7 
ft Sapa** 


Per Amt Rec Pay 
iBREeuLAR 

ABStarGrw - JO 3-21 


Company 


Pto 


. JO Ml 


5-7 

4-15 


-ft 

ft 

+* 


ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 


STOCK SPUT 
Interpool Inc 3 for 2 spur. 

INCREASED 

PsnneyXC Q 535 4-10 

pSuc5knm, Q -]7 5-12 

South SlHnd . .10 3-21 

SanCanmwn a X7 3-27 


5-1 

5-23 


Central Newsp A 
Commd Ntefals 
COavnun Systems 
Equity Inca AT&T, 
Fs Fed! Bncp OH, 
PaiflsSeair 
HRE Properties 
insured AAuri Inca 
Invert Grt Muni 
JqduMmne Bn^ 


Per Amt Rec Pay 
q .19 3-31 4-10 


4-14 

4-15 

430 


in m 


w n jire nit 

s ® ^ 


REGULAR 

AiAmerTesm M XBS 3-30 

AntBrfVfertPmp O .IS 3-26 

entep Q X2 Ml 

CVS Corp Q *1 

g Q .12 3-27 


CdnPa&lc 


3- 31 

4- 9 

4- TB 

5- 1 
4-28 


Liberty Tom TrS 

Mertdbn PI VIII. 
NaN InaiRdatty 
Piedmont Bnc 
ptaspeost Hi 
Quaker Oats 
SetosGorpAm 
2002 Target 
Trip A&Gv 1 
■ebb 


JtTim 

y!997 


.13 4-11 
-08 3-21 
-231 3-15 
X6 3-21 
X61 3-25 
XI 3-28 
X64 3-20 
X75 3-20 
- .125 Ml 
M X37 3-21 
Q X7 3-20 
Q .20 3-17 
Q .10 3-31 
M X3S 3-24 
Q -285 3-19 
O X65 3-24 

M X718 12® 

M JU17 3-20 3-31 
Ole mount pm 


4X5 

4-1 

4-1 

4-1 

4-15 

4-23 

3-31 

3- 31 

4- 11 
4-1 

3-31 

3- 21 

4- 15 
Ml 
4-15 
3-31 
3-31 


FSOER CATTLE (CMER) 

90X00 Kts.- cents oar Bx 
Mar 97 6830 OJ2 68X5 *0.15 

Apr97 6BJ5 66OT 67X0 *077 

May 97 6PJ5 6825 69X0 +05S 

Aub97 7192 7155 72X0 +0X7 

Sep 97 7160 72X5 7127 + 0X7 

Od 77 7425 73J0 74,15 +0X2 

Eta.sales 4XH Tue's-sdes 4X26 
Tic's open Int Z2X70 a It 59 


F^nnl 225!'® 2412X0 


2X82 

4,290 

U4S 

5234 

1X43 

2,106 


HOes-Leor (CM8?) 
40X00 Bis.- cents per *. 


— TUOM 2347.00 2344X0 2347X0 

Spot 687.00 689X0 667X0 668X0 
f yyq tte 487X0 669X0 671 X0 671 ft 

VVKtoH 

^ot 794100 7955X0 7875X0 7885X0 
™«nl 8050.00 8060X0 7980X0 7990X0 

in 

Spat 5985X0 5795X0 5960X0 5970X0 

MS “ 

sss a 


6470 

».10 

—0X7 

11.96* 

/54S 

7420 

—02 

HL892 

7445 

7495 

+0X7 

2X39 

71A5 

HOT 

+0X2 

2-362 


65L90 

♦ais 

1.437 

6180 

MOT 

♦020 

B9S 


Hltfi Lav* apse Chgn Oplnt 

Financial 


MorUt 92X6 92X3 92X4 —0X2 

Jun02 9181 9228 9229 —0X2 

Sec 02 9277 9174 9174 —0X3 

Dec 02 92X9 91X6 91X7 —002 

EsLsoles NA TlteVuSes 465X17 
Tue's open ini 2X54XM off 2D463 
BRITISH POUND (CMBtl 
O , W 0 pounds, t par pound 

1X084 Ijm 1JBU 27X12 

J-SS 1 - 5853 l- 5 ** 21171 

Sa>W 1J932 L5B60 1JW2 U56 

Dec 97 1X06 I 

Ete. sates HA Tue’s. sates 14J87 
Tue's wen nit 51,948 up 3566 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) 
loexoa dollws. S per Om. dr 
•fern 33« 7307 ZB2 

*mn 7388 7352 7378 
SOP 97 7432 7398 7425 

Dec 97 7463 746] 7463 

NA Tue's. sates 18,716 
Tire's open fed 74x20 up 161 

SWMAM MARK {CMBQ 
125X00 marks, l per mark 
Mar W JV02 JB40 JB9B 
JWI97 J934 JB75 J930 

SS -5M5 J9S0 J965 
Dec 97 jygtj 

Ert-sotes NA Toe's. ades 39X51 
Tue's open W no762 up 3379 

JAPANESE YS1 (CMBU 
ns nOSni ran, s per 10 > nm 
***% *?!*. JUS 8174 

JW197 X326 X248 X280 

SeP'L.'* 39 ? 8®” 8388 

Ert. safes NA Tue's. sates 29X70 
Tue's open H 88.163 OH 493 

5WB5 RRANC (CMER) 

121000 FrtncS. S Par franc 
Mar 97 X869 X767 X856 

JUR9T 6930 X827 X920 

SWW 7005 X930 X984 

Ert. safes NA Tub's. Sates 23X08 
rue's Open inf 59X95 oft ran 
jyȣTH IfTERLJNG (UPFE1 

JMW «64 9357 

§g %% sa 

S ss %% 

ssg§ %% SB 

a ss ss 

DOC99 92J3 9248 


66X46 

50,775 

1410 

J1 


48X74 

38.915 

581 


». sates NA Tub's, sales 28X24 
Tue's open W 128X41 IIP 1203 

UOfT SWEET CRUDE (NMER) 

1X00 ML- doUcn per UH. 

Apr 97 20X0 17 X 1 20X5 

MOV 97 30X5 20X5 20.62 

Xnn 2m 20X7 20.61 

Jmw are ais »i 5 o 

MTS 20.15 2050 

S »» 20X2 2115 2050 

Od97 3SBJS 2047 2047 

Mow 97 20X0 20X5 Mpi 

Dk97 2DOT 30.10 2040 

JWI 98 2048 2072 2077 

Fett 98 2B.45 2070 2U0 
Mar 98 30JB 7078 30J8 

Apr »8 20127 2027 2027 

Ett. sates HA Tue's. jute 
Tue^sopenint 419,153 Off 68 
■NATURAL GAS (NMER) 

10X00 mm Mu's, s Mr mm Mu 
fm-n 1X10 1.710 1.965 

Moy97 U68 1.990 
Am 97 U65 2L012 

M97 1X70 2X45 

AUB 57 2X80 2X50 

Sep 97 2X75 2X50 

OCJ97 2X90 2X65 

Mcvn 3.210 2_3£B3 

Dec 97 2720 12 J 0 

JcnJB Uio 2725 
Feb 98 1280 lm 
E^Srtes NA Tue's. soles 32X44 
Tub's open W 171,179 up 2(DI 


-LA7 33X51 
-1X3 17.927 
+ 1.03 13,739 
+0L63 11548 
♦1X8 7.571 
-088 5,135 

-0X3 5459 

- 178 4X58 

-178 8.W1 
♦DAB 5X«4 


♦D44 74713 

♦ DOT 64169 
+071 52.205 

♦ 075 24X31 
+ 0X9 tflLS33 
-072 1X571 
+072 1X994 

1L9B2 
♦D 29 v.ve. 
+ 0X0 153MS 
+X17 M3 
+ 0L14 1118 

♦ 0.11 3747 

12X449 


1025 

2X45 

7XS0 

2X50 

2X55 

2X65 

2X00 

1715 

1745 

1280 


3MCZ p 


74M 

11X83 

11,163 

9X49 

8X35 

9X60 

5X05 

9,261 

9775 

iva 


26755 

31788 

1.906 


Tue's open mt 30X44 off 231 


afWBfADRy o pa yu fcte te C—dfent fundsj 
HHnwoibiipOh t | ui »rtetps-S CT ii H< ^ ^ 


J- H* Mh 10 a* 

Ml W* IM if* 

510 15* lie u* 

Ite » P n 

ft 1* 1* 


PORK BELLIES (CMER) 

40X06 As. ■ eeram per to. 

Mw 97 75X0 7375 7375 -122 

May 97 7675 7475 7470 -2X0 

JUI 97 75X5 7470 74J0 —110 

Aua97 73X0 7270 7270 —175 

Feb 98 J0L55 7070 7TL55 +3X0 

Est. sees 2X58 Tue's ides 3X97 
Tue'saPtnM 7,735 up 37 


>S> 5* Jy« }m 4-s 

5* « 4(t *ft 

^ .a .”* 7* 


_ TradMdD 


Ztg7 ., . 

VS 15* U 
m m lit 
JJ » » 

1WI *71* 17* 

*7 im in* 
££ in 17* 

™ a 3«* 

in 4h n 
8 * 
i £ 

MW SMi 

•S 3M* 

* » 


442 


m 


15 * 
'E* 
% 

}% 
17* 

2ft 
47* 

*** 

a SS 

26*. 27 

S, X* 

\ "8- 
!*• ft 


Food 


COCOA (NCSE1 
10 DWrlc lortfr- S per ran 
Marti 1438 - “ 

July? 1461 


Dee 97 1503 
MorW 1522 


1410 

1414 

-37 

30.118 

1430 

1440 

—32 

19X59 

1450 

1450 

—32 

11X73 

1476 

1503 

—16 

7X58 

1585 

1512 

—36 

17JSB 


WEBJrn 


76 

2956 


is? 

ran 

19 

u* 

HM 

IM 

tt* 

H 


1ft 

13* 

life 

m 

in 

11 * 

17* 

*1 


♦V* 

ft 


Stock Tables Explained 

Sales figures txe unofficial. Yearty higtis and tows reflad the previous £2 vue^cs plus the 
ament week, but notihe (alert tracing day. Where a spH or stack tMctend amounting to 25 
paterd or mote has been pd&theyeonMghXowitngecndtMitendtnrtiownfcnlte new 
stocks orW- Untess dhemfee noted, rotes of cSyWends are annual (febureemetrfs based on 
ftehriestdedaRSkm. 

a - dividend also edra (s). fa-annual rats of dividend plus stock dividend, c- tlq uidatlnci 
dMdtnd. ee - PE exceeds 9VxJd - ended, d - new yearly low. <M - loss In the tost 12 
months. e-dMdertd declared or paid In preceding 12 months, f- annual rate. Increased 

on last dectaiotlon. g -dividend Hi Canadian funds, subject to 15% nan-resldence tab z~ — ■— -- — 

l-cflvkterid ttedared after spflt-up or sJocfedrvfdend-i-dlvtdetid paid this year, on ITted, 
dotened.ivnoodton taken at latest efivtdend meeting, k- dividend ciedo red or paid this 
yeor.nnoccumiTtaltve issue wtfh dMdends In arrears, m - annual rate, reduced an last 
deefamffo it.n- new issue in the past 52 weeks. The hlgh-tow range begins wrih Die start 
of^ tradna- wl^ doy del(wtv-D+ intflol dWWend, annual rate unknow n. P/E - price- 
eanrings rattaa -dased-end mutual fund. r-dMdend dedaied or paid In preceding 1 2 
months, plus start dividend, s - stock spot. Dividend begins wfm date of split. 
stt-sates.f-t9tfdendpafdlnslortln preceding 12 months, estimated cash value on 
ex-dtvfdaad or ex-distribuBon date. 0 + new yearty high, v ■ trading halted, vi - in 
bankruptcy or recefvershfp or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act or se- 
curffies assumed by such companies, ted- when distributed. wl+ when fssued/ww- 
»Wi wanadte-^ -■ «-<fiv*daid or ex-rtghts. nSs - ex-dlstTtbuttan.xw - without wsrants. 
y. «-dMdend and sales In ful ytd - y Wd. i . sate in (uO. 


341 

5X66 

1X84 

541 

2 


US T. BILLS (CMS) 
n mHtov. ns an 00 pa. 

Sf g SS SI 4 S Sf 

■« S3 -« S 

ZiSL&'Snn 938 


Ert. rates: 80482. Pray, series: 90406 
Peer, open Ini.: 537X49 OH 4JT2 


9373 Unt*. B5L851 
reJ7 -0X4 I34.1B9 
£U7 -0M B8LU09 
£132 -0-Q6 67^90 

93-2! — 1104 +4X94 
7L* W 

92X1 — 0X6 23X34 
9277 — ftS6 Site 
92» -006 ntaS 
9263 —005 1500 

9254 —0X7 
9249 ~OOr SX67 


UNLEADB36AS0LME (NMSQ 

■pxUBDt. cents P«r sol 

6575 63X0 64X0 + 074 31 3774 

Moy ?7 65.00 6370 64X5 -OOT uv\ 

Am 97 6470 M 437s +SS uj<n 

A4W «75 6210 4% 

Aug 97 6175 60X0 61 JO +IM 

«* Sot :{S g; 

SA solas Na Tue's rates 20x59 

SSfflff.fe*"" « ™ 
seaasaiag{gg^ 4 ® 

JW97 170K 16830 17125 

r£Pn? , J}-Jr 17425 +3X5 
pCfP7 17025 17425 17525 

m j* 4410 mM *3L50 

Dec 97 1 7075 174JQ 178X0 +35Q 


SYR. TREASURY {CBOT) 

S2§J^7ot5n»« Pe L W 31735 

S! MM K -"A® 

frt.sofes HA TueV sates 71X4 
Tie's Dpenint 714XM UP 4m 


10 VH. TREASURY (CBOT1 

rroaxoo rate- pts (k imii or loepd 

Mar 97 100-05 107-29 >07-29 — OT 62792 

Jl»lW 187-17 107-00 W7-M —07 250,955 

Spa 97 104-26 106-26 106-26 — 86 fcS 

f»satei NA Tue's. soles 108734 
Tie's open W JI9JB3 up 3147 


COFFEECtNCSE} 

374M *»- OMIMT h 

Alar 97 221 OT 2liX0 21SJ0 —350 
Mai 77 505JO 195OT 196X0 — 7.1S 
Jut 97 I BIOT 180X0 100X0 —675 
Sep 97 174X0 167.10 167.10 -4OT 
Es, sales NA Tue's. rales 13X4! 
Tue's open Inf dOOTo uc 253 


1X03 

22X20 

7X95 

4.773 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBOT] 

(8 pa-sraaxoo-uts & J2TOS or mo peri 
Mtr97t 10-14 TI<Wn 110-04 -12 120X07 

Jun»7 HB-31 109-17 1091-20 —12 3 m3» 

S«P 97 109-15 109-04 109-06 —13 14X13 

Dec 97 109— Ob JJ30 

ES-rafei NA Tin's, set* 408712 
Tuo’seoenint 525,103 an 3900 


LriHG GILT flJFFQ 
C9L0M - Bfe A 3ftdS al 100 pa 
M*97 112-08 117-28 Ill-SQ I 


JunV7 


SU6AR-MKMLD 11CNCSE) 
nsxoa na.- omijb ate t>. 

Mar 97 1088 1075 HL77 -X.IJ 

JufJ? 1067 I0J4 loss — 0.10 

oan H59 1M9 1050 —407 

Mar 98 1056 1(U0 10JD -0X5 

EsI. sates HA Tue's, SOteS <3X13 
Tue's open im i«9X79 up 1648 


"i5 ilYXzW'™" 


3-M pNTH E UROMARK OJFPG1 

DMimoHon - fis of loppa 

•fan 9474 9672 9673 + 0X1 164J1S 

wn 9674 96.74 9A74 * 0X1 Tjsl 

Vsff 2f-S 94^2 9674 »aor SS 

jm* Z JfcW 9671 9473 + 0.01 

Srig97 9443 9450 94.6V , pXl 174771 

SS! SS 83 M 

gg p its ttss 

SS S2 8S p :S %£ 

Sg SK SS SB W, 

Oo&* 9447 944 s 9444 - vTiSi 

JLT. HT. 9431 ?£?§ 

SS M- S-J- **14 t(UB 2J0? 

« L, ?19S * 010 St 

rafora I7&M3 

Pto*. open taL: I3XL361 off xsqb 

pS? 521 P|M S CMATfP) 

ssg gs 5^3 its jgjgsa 

sS « SJ-iJ S-I? IfcS 

nS M mS 95.93 +0J3 14m 

K54 KA 'mS 

estvaiun^aays 


9.979 
3X07 
7^49 
WIQ 
1-432 
730 

^ESt-Xfioaum. Open InL.-6a4S4 off 
BREjrro ,L ‘ ,p ® 

SS as 5 » « ii 

JulYW 1954 1841 )9M toio U1W 
6.390 
MIS 
4286 
<113 


*^)97 
S*p 97 
Od97 
Nov97 


T 2-3P lft?P «S| +059 


N.T. NX 1957 +028 
Jf-lf >9X7 +02a 
1935 19X5 19X6 +0X7 ^.ij 
^Ert. solas: 72500. Opealnr.-l70dl2off 


Stock Indexes 

su» COMP. INDEX (CMER) 
rao* mu, 

T ? XS SJS a0SJS 906 OT -~ 45 ft 139 ,, s 

g| sa S3 =3 SB 

FTSR IM IUFPE3 

r Mtai pan 


3432 

2504 


GfigiH'UM 


Jimw 44HX 4436X Jots -§S M 


N.T JR.T 4453X — 25X 
^L,*SS: ■15*^ p^v- 21,912 


zxs 


p&iegy 

RSTKlISSEiSa 


eaVll 



Intel P 


Il.lKI.H 'ifj 

^K^sa.ij. M.tTt 


?z* 


c Sw 


Hr 1 , 


StSBS 3 SKSf+» 


Mar 9 b 
Sep 98 


N-T. 

N.T. 


74 OT 0 

36451 

2MU 

11785 


6CIUUUI GOVERNMENT BUND (LtPFE) 

DM2noOT-pbof100Kt 

JuoW 101.92 10145 10178 -0X1 235,712 

Sep9? IDIOT 101X0 1005 1 —001 488 


sep?? 

Eat sates 123X14. Pm sate: ISS45S 
Prev. ripen inL 240400 up 2,994 


Mar»7 
Jun97 
»*p97 9127 

DWJ Win 


WWTiJL. 


«= E* 

Sn SIS “ S-T3 

maw 939+ SS ""S’)* 3**^ 

e^L,: l £8£ 


n’t’ 7,939 

e -4 ' ‘ N- r - «W 4 D— 20.00 1 X 10 

woiumlt: 30349. 0^ 


Moody's 
fieulers 
DJ. FuTurua 
CRB 


Commodity Indexes 
One 
„„ NA 
W18J0 
159X4 
24&S4 


PrMMiM 

1A1.70 

2X1240 

160X0 

247.19 


v >- ^ r* 


> ” *■ 

J . # 







PAGE 15 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 


EUROPE 


T 


Saving Credit Lyonnais: Gulp! 


-PARIS — The final cost to the 

• ^ h , g0vem ? n ® nt rf ' ^ rescue of 

- • is likely to be about 

•■' French francs ($23 bil- 

Devedjian, a member 
of a key parliamentary finance com- 
ri imtlM, said Wednesday. 

V comment marked the first of- 
ficial recognition that the cost of 

- rPauing out the state-run bank would 
. ..exwea^ Finance Minister Jean 
> Artnins most recent 



it: - -«■ 





Pin 


Ut Ly< . aii _ 

- ,r other bailout, which it wiffSreSSntto 

.European Union authorities for ao- 
provai by the end of March. Mr. 
-Arthuis said in February that the 
total cost of rescuing Credit Ly- 

- -onnais would be at least 50 billion 

francs, but he refused to put a price 
tag on the newest bailout plan. 

'£ Analysts have long predicted that 


S* total cost would top 100 billion 
francs, but Mr. Devedjian. a member 

a committee created to dispose of 
bad-property assets acquired by the 
bank during a fateful spending spree 
at the end of the 1 980s and beginning 
of the 1 990s, said the final cost would 
be “about 130 billion francs." 

Credit Lyonnais refused to com- 
ment on Mr. Devedjian 's . figures. 
Analysts noted that the figure would 
be equivalent to about half of the 
entire government deficit this year. 

Mr. Devedjian made his remarks 
after the committee met with 
Charles de Courson. a board mem- 
ber of the public body supervising 
die Credit Lyonnais restructuring. 
Mr. Devedjian said Mr. de Courson 
told the committee that “about 100 
investigations” were under way in 
connection with Credit Lyonnais.” 

The bailout plan that France will 
present to the EU later this month 
will be the fourth in three years for 


the bank. (AFF. AFX. Bridge News) 
1 Thomson-CSF Privatization 
The French government on Wed- 



foreign companies — — 

bid for die defense-electronics com- 
pany, AFX reported. The announce- 
ment marks the government's 
second attempt to sell the company. 

Hie successful bidder, who will 
be chosen by June 30. would be- 
come the majority owner by ac- 
quiring more than 50 percent of 
Thomson-CSF’s capital and voting 
rights, the Finance Ministry said. 

After examining the govern- 
ment’s specifications, Aicaiel-Al- 
sthom and Dassault Industries said 
late Wednesday they would make a 
joint bid for Thomson-CSF. 

Hie government said it would hold 
a “golden share,” which gives it a 
veto over any changes in ownership. 


ate$ 


Write-Downs Drag SBC Into Loss 

CcnwilaJ b? Our Staff a.. _ _ . _ 


CiwpiioJ by Our Staff Fn*n Duparhn 

•v- ■ BASEL — Swiss Bank Corp. on 
- £i . Wednesday became the third big 


■ p, 

\ L 


Swiss bank to post a loss for 1996, as 
. .. rising provisions against a write- 
down in the value of real-estate assets 
and for future credit risks eroded 
...earnings. 

: _ SBC said its net loss was 1.96 
; ; -billion Swiss francs ($1 33 billion). 
. . in line with analysts’ expectations. It 
"had profit of 1.05 billion francs in 
1995. As forecast in November, the 
. bank absorbed one-time charges 
‘ -totaling 3.31 billion francs. Oper- 
■' ‘ating income rose 21 percent, to 
- 10.75 billion francs. 

The bank's shares rose to close at 


310 francs, up 7. Loan losses in 
Switzerland soared in 1996 as the 
economy suffered through its sixth 
consecutive lean year, a streak 
triggered by a real-estate slump in 
the early 1990s. 

Swiss Bank’s chief executive. 
Marcel Ospel, said the bank was aim- 
ing for a net profit of 23 billion 
francs by 1999. 

He said its net profit for January 
and February was “well ahead” of 
that achieved in the whole first 
quarter last year, but he cautioned 
against presuming that this would be 
the trend for the whole year. 

All three big Swiss banks in- 
curred their first net losses in 1996, 


as one-time charges for loan losses 
and reorganizations overshadowed 
rising operating profit. Union Bank 
of Switzerland posted a 350 million 
franc loss, while Credit Suisse had a 
loss of 239 billion francs. 

Meanwhile. Britain's markets 


regulator said it was investigating 
JBCWari 


SBC Warburg PLC over a share sale 
of £300 million ($482 million) it 
handled last year for a British in- 
vestment trust. 

The company, which is the in- 
vestment-banking arm of Swiss 
Bank Cmp., is being investigated by 
the Securities and Futures Authority 
for allegedly mishandling a trade of 
a basket of shares. (Bloomberg. AP) 


IMF and WbrldBank 
To Ease Uganda Debt 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Times l emce 


WASHINGTON — The World 
Bank and the International Mon- 
etary Fund will act soon to forgive 
some of the loans they have made 
to Uganda, the firs: of about 20 
countries to be considered for a 
new program of debt relief. 

The bank's bovd approved 
Uganda's participation Monday, 
and the fund's board was expec- 
ted to take similar- action. Both 
institutions said they expected a 
final agreement to be negotiated 
with Uganda by next month to 
slash as much as $300 million 
from the country’s international 
debt of $3.4 billion. 

The program’s goal is to make 
economic growth more sustain- 
able while bringing under control 
the fiscal merry-go-round that 
sees international lenders pour 
more and more money into Third 
World economies and immedi- 
ately take much -of it back out 
again to pay for old loans. 

Other countries will be con- 
sidered on a case-by-case basis 
over the next few years after the 
bank and fund gain more expe- 
rience with the program. 

“The debt initiative is a corner- 
stone of our efforts on Africa,” 
David Lipton, the assistant U.S. 
Treasury secretary for interna- 
tional affairs, said. “If we are 


helping them to reform, we have 
to be sure they aren’t doomed by 


debt burdens.” 

The bank and the fund insisted 
previously that countries repay 
their debts to them as a condition 


of new aid. But with poverty prov- 
ing intractable in many nations, 
the institutions have softened 
their positions in the past few 
years and agreed that debt relief 
can be justified if it helps poor 
nations to sustain economic de- 
velopment and spend more on 
such pressing social needs as edu- 
cation and health care. 

Other African countries under 
study for participation in the pro- 
gram include Burkina Faso, Ivory 
Coast and Mozambique, officials 
said, and that South American na- 
tions including Bolivia and Guyana 
could also be included soon. 

Uganda was selected as the first 
beneficiary because it is a text- 
book case of a nation that has 
successfully pursued the kinds of 
stringent economic reforms pre- 
scribed by the bank and the frind 
but nonetheless faces long-term 
financial problems, officials said. 

Uganda's total debt payments 
last year were $154 million, of 
which more than half went to mul- 
tilateral institutions, primarily the 
bank and the monetary fund. 

■ Kampala to Open Market 

Uganda said Tuesday it would 
open its stock exchange within a 
month, although it still has to find 
a trading floor, Reuters reported 
from Kampala. 

The authority expects about 
five companies to be listed on the 
exchange in Its first year of op- 
eration, all of them newly privat- 


ized. They include Uganda Grain 
Co., Uganda Consolid- 


Milling 

ated Properties Ltd. and National 
Insurance Corp. 


Investor’s Europe 


Frdukftfrl: 

QAX . 

3600 } 4660 

■ 3400 f : 4500 

3200 -M -im- - 

3000 A 4200 




.. . 



0 N D J F M- 

1996 1997 

'Ifwjfesk 


jTm >; : 2100 O N’ 

1997 * 1996 1997- 


•■VSfedhaatey- 1 ke»: 
Ctoao — 


Amst^tiam 



Brussels, : . 

■m&> . 


Prenkfurt - ... 

■OAX-... • 


: Copenhagen 

Sfock Maitet ' • 

:ss4xr ss^49, 



- 'i^w / -a^bs.3&- 4i ^Sr ; 

'Clio.v-,-; 

■■psx: - ; 


.Tibinfeton. 

:ffSEicwf. 



■StSdi'dicriwigff 5 : 

, wag# ; ■■■:. 4(88.05 

man - 



. Paris 

S CAC.40' 

, 

Stockholm 

SXia. '.=‘.-\'.VV. 

2.991^9.: -a^B' 

Vfenm.y. 

fiXK- 

'■1^5637- ' OneSL 

i-ztofeit." • 

; spj- ~:\r. /, 

] : zjd6(k3z::jk&£. 

Source: Talekurs 


lmcnunooal Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• Daewoo Electronics Co. will invest 1.74 billion French francs 
($3023 million) to build a fourth factory in France, where it will 
make glass for televisions and computers. 

» Hoechst AG's shares fell 5.77 percent, to 70.45 Deutsche 
marks ($41.49), after the company said it would postpone 
selling shares in its Hoechst Marion Roussel unit. 


• Jacques deLarosiere was offered a second term as^pres- 


Intel Pressured Magazines Over Unfavorable Chip Review 


By John Markoff 

New York Tunes Service 


SAN FRANCISCO — In an in- 
cident shedding tight on the some- 
times too-close relationship between 
computer publications and the 
companies they cover, Intel Corp. 
recently threatened to punish two 
IGerman magazines for publishing 
unauthorized and unflattering re- 
views of an Intel chip that is not yet 


on the market. News of the dispute, 
which has circulated on the Internet 
in the past few days, has prompted 
hundreds of computer users to post 
angry messages on Intel's site on die 
World Wide Web. 

* Hie episode is an apparent em- 
barrassment to Intel, which has a 
policy of not linking its advertising to 
the editorial treatment it receives in 
publications that write about the 
computer industry. An Intel spokes- 


man said Tuesday that several of its 
executives had violated that policy by 
pressuring the German ma gazine s. 
The company is trying to resolve the 
matter with the publications and the 
Intel executives involved, the spokes- 
man, Tom Waldrop, said. 

The publications are two of Ger- 
many's leading computer 
magazines: C'T Magazin frier Com- 
luiertechnik and PC Professionelle. 
January, the magazines reviewed 


£ 


the Pentium II chip that Intel plans to 
introduce by midyear. They said die 
chip paled in comparison with clones 
of the Pentium and might be difficult 
to use. Intel officials complained that 
the magazines had reviewed a pre- 
liminary version of the chip and had 
obtained it not from them but from 
an unidentified computer maker. 

■ Intel in Satellite Venture 


Intel and Sodete Europeenne des 


Satellites said Wednesday they had 
set up a joint venture to specialize in 
delivering computer software in 
Europe via the Astra satellite system, 
Bloomberg News reported from 
Hannover, Germany. 

Hie venture, to be called Euro- 
Satellite Multimedia Services 
5 A, will start a communications 
platform to be called Astra-Net. As- 
tra is operated by Societe 
Europeenne des Satellites. 


pean 

SA, 


idem of the European Bank for Reconstruction anc 
vetopmenL The bank's net profit fell 35 percent in 1996, to 
4.9 million European currency units ($5.6 million). 

• Granada Group PLC, Pa the SA and Pearson PLC said their 
jointly held holding company, BSB Holdings LtcL, had sold a 
1.1 percent stake in British Sky Broadcasting Corp. 

• Sabena SA reported a greater -than -e x pected net loss of 8.86 
billion Belgian francs ($2523 million) for 1996, its fifth 
consecutive yearly loss. 

•Sweden’s gross domestic product rose 1.1 percent in 1996 
from 1995 and was up 1.1 percent in the fourth quarter from 
the third period, the Swedish Statistics Office said. 

■ Chargeurs International SA, the textile company created 
last year after Chargeurs SA was split up, posted 1996 profit 
of 1 36 million French francs, compared with a pro-forma loss 
of 65 million francs in 1995. 

• Ireland asked the state-owned airline, Aer Lingus Group, 
to submit a proposal on forming a strategic alliance with 
another carrier. 

• Cap Gemini SA's earnings more than quintupled in 1996. to 
282 milli on French francs, lifted by strong growth in new 
business and reduced interest payments. The French com- 
puter-services company will pay a dividend of 2 francs a share, 
its first since 1994. 

• Societe Generate SA, France's third-] argest bank, said its 

1996 earnings rose 1 9 percent, to 43 billion francs, as revenue 
rose and costs were reined in. afp. AFX, Bloomberg 


emit 


r - 

i 


* 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Wednesday^ March 12 

Prices In tocol currencies. 
7We*ws 

High Lb* One Pm. 


HI* Low 


Amsterdam 


AEXMK79M1 

PrWHOB7MJ» 


ABN-AMRO 
Aegon 
■ AhaU 

- AKmNoM 
- Boon Co. 

.• BoteWessew 

CSMcw 

- Dtttttsdte Pet 
DSM 
Ebevtar 

f Forth Amov 
■ Outranks 
G-Broco* 


Hi 


„ ICW 
_ Hun? Douglas 
. ING Group 
KLM 
KNP BT 
.. KPN 
i NidBnyifGp 
*■. Kutrtda 
OtxGitnen 
PliHpiEkc 
Polygram 
Rmwstod Hdg 
. Robaco 
- Rodamco 

\ ReSitGO 

' Rorarto 
• nwtU Dulch 
' _ Unsewrcw 
■ VemtaWI 

'■f.VMU 

• .Waters Klara 


mio 
13120 
14190 
287 JO 
88J0 
3840 
113 
305 
198 
31 JO 
7840 
6X50 
6130 
165 
329 
91.40 
161 
80.10 
59 


69J0 
60 
3I3J0 
249.10 
KLM 
97 
152 
146JO 
62.90 
17190 
1J0JO 
340l® 
36150 
9230 
41 JO 
255 


136JD 
13180 
13670 
275150 
86JO 
37 JO 
111 JO 
359 JO 
191 
3070 
77 
61 JO 
61 

161.10 
31470 
8420 
157 JO 
77.70 
57 JO 
44J0 
60 
5770 
307 JO 
246JD 
88J0 
91 JO 
147 JO 
166 
61.60 
16450 
71020 
337 
36060 
9030 

mm 

25060 


136J0 13870 
13320 13340 
137 14250 
27470 286 

8440 8720 
37 JO 37 JO 
110l60 113 

359 JO 34650 
191 19030 
3120 SUH 

77 78J0 
6250 62JD 
6250 6220 

16240 16370 
31720 330 

89.70 9170 
1606$ 1M 

78 8010 

58 59 

4400 447® 
69 6940 
60 5870 
308 31380 
347 24B 

89 JO 9120 
9150 9780 
14850 152.10 
164 144 

6170 6280 
169 170® 
11O30 109.90 
33750 34320 
36150 36320 
9060 9150 
4050 41.10 
W9 4Q 255 


DttriKtoBm 
Dent Telekom 
DresdnerBonk 
Pimentos 
Fresentos Mod 
Fried. Krupp 

Gefce 

HebtotogZiu 

Henkel pM 

HEW 

Hoctmn 

Hradtst 

Kaskdt 

Undo 

Luflhma 

MAN 

Maimwmnn 


95.10 94.10 
3555 3525 
57.95 5770 
376 363 

164 164 

297 293 

120 1UL30 
151 148 

9870 9520 


7 SSO 7450 
7058 *8 

61® 595 

1745 7125 
2453 2437 
47780 47250 
674 66150 


MetaflgeseBsdHfl3650 3680 
MellD 16358 159JE 

Munch RaeckR 4250 4210 
451 435 

7245 1243 

7BJ0 7780 
27BJ0 276 

167 JO 164 
229 JO 22850 
8655 8623 
1255 1255 

875 869 

35840 355JB 
10080 10085 
507 SOT 
760 748 

958 95050 


RWE 
SAPpfd 
Sdwrfng 
SGLCartwn 
Siemens 
Springer (A*e0 
Suednrtar 
Ttiwsan 
Venn 
VEW 

VaSmogen 


dose Pm 
9455 95 

3545 3485 
5755 5785 
373 360 

16520 16150 
29450 29SJ0 
11980 120 

15080 147 JO 
9520 9050 
ftOO 080 
75-50 7450 
7045 7055 
610 612 
113811715® 
2450 24J0 
477 JO 480 

661 JO 671 

3470 3472 
16380 165.31? 
4215 4290 
445 455 

1245 1252 
7025 78 

27020 27470 
16520 16*J» 
229 228 

8485 8785 
080 OKI 
875 874 

35680 36180 
10025 102J0 
507 502 

753 765 

951 JO 944 


SA BRVKffes 

5amcmcor 

Sasal 

sssc 

Tiger Oah 


High 

LOW 

Close 

Pm. 


High 

LOW 

dose 

13775 

13460 

137 

137 JO 

Vendome Units 

544 

571 

S79 

5SJD 

iS-tt 

55L25 

5575 

Vodofcne 

2.92 

272 

2J4 

52 

SI 

51 JO 

52 

Whfltjreoil 

615 

605 

606 

187 J5 

187 

■ 187 

187 

WtSomsHdos 

X37 

130 

133 

7675 

76.50 

7675 

77 

woiseiey 

5.13 

5 

SJJ3 





WPP Group 

2J7 

2J2 

243 


Hlgfe Law do to Pm. 


High Law Close Pm. 


5J0 


009 


Paris 


CAC40E 264170 
PlMtoOB 2684.75 


Zeneca 


163 

1877 1821 1884 1BJ1 


Kuala Lumpur 

1 Pimtaus 1250J3 


AMMBHdgs 
Genfing 


Mai loll Ship F 
PetronnaGos 
Proton 
PuWcB k 
Renoog 
Resorts World 
RoJImons PM 
StmeDortiy 

TetokomMol 


Utd 

YTL 


2150 

2130 

Z3JU 

2130 

1490 

1640 

1670 

1670 

2975 

2675 

2975 

29 

670 

ATS 

630 

675 

970 

9.10 

970 

9.15 

16 

1570 

1190 

1190 

540 

575 

575 

135 

448 

f® 

444 

430 

11J0 

1170 

1140 

1140 

2150 

24J0 

2480 

2530 

970 

975 

970 

975 

1940 

19.10 

1970 

1940 

1270 

1110 

1270 

1270 

2270 

2240 

•n u\ 

2260 

W 

1160 

1690 

1690 


London 


AM** Noll 
swim Domecq 
Anglian Water 
Aigos 
Asda Group 
Assoc Br Foods 
BAA 
Bmlays 


Helsinki HExserorttodg wAi o 


Bangkok 


SETtadHcrajg 
Pntftooc 71X95 


AdvtntoSK 
Bangkok BkF 
- ] That Bk 


KnSH Thai E 
PTT&plor 
.. -Shim Cement F 
. -Staro COro BkF 
■TetoamwsSn 


Thai AMOK 
Thai From Bki 



UW Contra 


244 

268 

40 

342 

696 

167 

4425 

45J0 

183 

161 


236 236 238 

248 264 246 

3780 3875 37£ 

332 332 338 

668 676 668 

^ i i 

159 160 160 


EnsoA 
Hutdamokl I 
Kendra 
Kesko 
MerttaA 
Metro B 
MeTso-SertaB 
Hesw 
Nokia A 
Orton- YMyinoe 
Outokumpu A 
UPMKymHwne 
vwmet 


4570 
248 
57 JO 
77 JO 
19 JO 
307 

4270 

135 
329 JO 
1B8 
96 
116 
91 


4480 4450 
244 24770 
56 56 

7450 7520 
18J0 19 

303 304 

40 4050 
134 134 

•wai mvi 
IBS 186 

109 JO 111 
B8JD 89 


45J0 

247 

56.90 

758a 

18.90 

aa 

4280 

135 

327 

187 

9SM 

115 

91 


BAT Old 
Bonk Scotland 
Blue ditto 
BOC Group 
Boon 
BPBtnd 
BitAerosp 
Brfl AJfwqrs 

BG 

Bill Land 
BrtfPsraa 


BSkvB 
Brfl Steel 


Bril! 
BritTeteoara 
BTR 


7J1 

449 

684 

672 

1.13 
586 
527 

1121 

B81 

570 

3J8 

409 

1077 

680 

386 

1178 

683 

170 

556 

7.13 
680 
180 
428 
284 


Bunnah Cnsbal 1073 


Hong Kong 


Hng Seas: 13119.13 
pmtouc 7325220 


.’Bombay 




Lever 

HtodutoPeOm 

liidDMBk 

ITC 

Tet 


-Slate Bk India 
■ Sleet AuBtofN* 
~ Big Loco 


1052 

1020 

39150 

96 

43575 

m 

39450 


[JOtodac^MJJ 

prntees: 3725X7 

1025103575102775 
Wfl 1007100080 
3B2 38875 3^» 
9X25 94 W25 

42475 431 JO 42475 
771 50 279 272 

m sag 

anjo 30450 302J0 

2175 saso 
■^4 387 38425 


Cathay Pocfltc 12^ 


a««J9 gno 73 
CK imtosmia 


gS* K 

OaoHawBR 39-l» 
IMlA 11^ 
Hong Lung Dev 1580 
Hang Seng Bk B 
HendeisNilRv &30 
Herotefsonui g 
HKOitoaGas 14« 
HKEtodrtC 26JS 
HKTetotranm 


14 


Brussels 


Aknon^ 




•<r- 


; -Paris AG 
. Gtvnert 
- -GBL 
GaaBanqiW 


% 



"“sassK 

’S ’SI ’3S 'S 
«£2 S8 IS S 
is 'S ’S 
i i ss s 
i ■ i I 

5348 5IC0 Si* 

14075 13675 1 3700 14W0 
J-Mf 13000 13200 13350 

l£oO '& 12675 

g45fl 8500 8540 B54D 
2135Q 21» 1USS 2T«0 


HopeweaHdgs 440 
HSBCHd 


HBtoH^Wh 
KmMnEIHdg 2070 


151! 


a 

fSchtooRBst 

SwtraPocA 6*^ 

Wharf Hdgs B7B 

Wiwetodk 1975 


9.15 

26.15 

1180 

7075 

2075 

35-10 

3880 

3880 

1085 

15JS 

83.75 

as 

6SJ0 

14J5 

2670 

1380 

425 

190 

57 

24J3S 

2080 

1985 

4! 

3.18 

6 

8675 

535 

B7S 

780 

6375 

3280 

1870 


9.15 9.15 

2680 2635 
12 1185 
7175 7325 
2&J5 2180 
3110 3580 
3B80 39 JO 
3880 39.10 
11.10 1U0 
1580 1570 
84 8475 
885 a» 
6675 6775 
1475 1495 

26.751 2485 
14 14 

4J3 433 

191 191 JO 
57 JO 58 

2450 2530 
20J0 2DJ5 
1985 1985 
4370 45 

373 3^3Q 

410 405 

87 87 JD 
5.40 585 

880 880 

6325 6425 

33 33J0 
1885 1975 


1J5 

£21 

5L56 

582 

789 

773 

386 

575 


Jakarta 


m 68281 

PlWtoOK 68783 


.Copenhagen 


SMdrtodeeSSCg 

WHO-K 55489 


293 »7 W 


-“BG Book „ 

tM&m* S v»li 930 92770 

'S2ST 5 S “ % So 

Dante0 - SU S??_6« » 


Astra trot 
Bkhdllarton 
Bk Negom 
GadanaGarm 

H Htocemtnt 

bidotood 

hvtosot 

SopipoemaHM 
Semen GraA 
Tetekomraiarad 


6100 

1825 

1B5 

10450 

3425 

sm 

6700 

12175 

6125 

4050 


6000 6100 6050 

1775 1775 1050 
1425 14S0 1525 
10300 10375 10350 
3350 3375 3425 

5650 5775 S600 
6650 6700 6700 

11925 12000 12100 
5900 6075 6125 
4000 4000 4075 


Den Dansjse Bk oil 384000 2 83000 

i tod B 



X2 870 on 

HCoO LeMyy* 479 680 6«W 

■Hwtkrtbk.B SI 838 377 


Johannesburg « 




ts\ 362 


Frankfurt 



BftWg 

BMW r . .. 

CKAGCotodn 
Coranantwnk 
.Ckdnfcr Benz 

Dcgussa. 


SS 

"s S' 1 ® 
111 


ffigxzr 

CJ&Sob 

De BoW. 

DrtotoS* 

FStNaUBk 

Grow 

{SliolHdBO 

IngaeCoai 

!Smto3lndl 

MWHtD 

Nomnak 

Hcheniont 

SStPMHhUlB 


7167J9 

PmtalB 714280 

Bks 28.10 2775' 2Bi& 27^ 
- 31050 M 31050 » 

m 27SJ0 274M 27M 
MO 32975 32975 329 

TX 173 177 180 

1775 1780 1770 T7J5 

St » SS 

16^,6^ nvus 

27.90 2775 2750 2775 
1935 1980 IftB I960 
122 121 121 121 
59 57 JO 59 57JD 
28 2785 2B 2780 
382 384 380 355 

5875 5BJS 5875 5875 
32450 324 W 324 

JM 1» 126 12SJ5 

15J0 15.10 1570 1575 
1W 10575 106 10575 

1970 1980 1980 1980 
UTS BS75 8675 85 

4450 4580. 4580 4575 
tfJS 55 ff J flJD 
7150 75 75 76 


Burton Gp 
Cable Wireless 
CWfcmy Sehw 
GnttoaComn 
Cominl Union 
CownssGa 
CourtouMs 
Dtons 
Eledroramponoiiti 430 
EMI Group 1Z^ 

is i 

Get! Aochterd 884 

GEC 386 

GKN 11M 

GfemWeBame 1187 

GnsnadaGp 984 

GnadMet 4» 

GRE 381 

GroenaBGp 5J0 

isr * 3 is 

HS&HWOS llS 

ia 7jj 

Impl TobOCSO 437 

HagMiof 684 

mfioke 280 

Inert Sec 7.95 

Lasmo 280 

Legal Genl Grp 487 

LtoydsTSBGp 574 

LuanVartty 28® 

Marks SpeMBT 4.90 

MEPC 482 

Hid Power 583 

NalWest 787 

Ned 637 

Qrango 119 

PBO 6JO 

Pennon 7.97 

eae - « 

583 

iPP 485 

ms, « 

373 

i mi 1189 

Rerflokl W1W 443 

ReutonHdgs 647 

Room 137 

RAAC Group 10.19 

Rafts Roycs 286 

Royal Bk Scot 586 

RTzreg 987 

lltSmAB 572 

389 

Sekafant. 370 

5dnders 1770 

Sad Newcastle 687 

. Scot Power 385 

5ecuriaiT 320 

Sawn Trent 780 

Shell TrcnspR 1088 

Sfcfee 1006 

Sroto) Nephew 182 

SratthKQne 980 

SaOhsInd 

Stttorn E»« 

Sto go cnodi 
Stood Charter 
ToteiLyte 
Tests 

Thames Motor 

31 Group 

Tt Group 
TaroUns 
Unilever 
UMA5PKanoB 
Uhl News 

IMUtnes 


873 

7.9S 

7J4 

BJO 

488 

151 

7J2 

625 

584 

2.94 

16K 

5L37 

788 

680 


FT-5E 106:442230 

PrwvkHt: 4444JP 

770 

780 

788 

443 

443 

446 

658 

660 

682 

662 

667 

669 

1.10 

1.11 

1.10 

5 

586 

102 

132 

572 

134 

11.13 

11.15 

1178 

650 

BJ5 

BJ7 

556 

586 

158 

351 

151 

3J7 

403 

486 

488 

1617 

1618 

1616 

670 

673 

680 

343 

344 

345 

13163 

1370 

1371 

653 

654 

683 

172 

189 

185 

139 

549 

156 

698 

782 

7.11 

674 

672 

673 

1J7 

1J8 

181 

473 

474 

477 

278 

276 

284 

1077 

1084 

1652 

1J4 

134 

1J5 

583 

585 

5.07 

542 

154 

141 

574 

576 

578 

7 

785 

785 

7.1 S 

7.19 

7.16 

3L61 

382 

162 

111 

115 

124 

476 

478 

477 

1270 

1275 

1225 

620 

571 

131 

616 

675 

622 

U4 

184 

184 

638 

042 

BJ5 

382 

384 

182 

16IB 

1618 

1078 

1175 

1179 

1134 

9J1 

971 

97? 

483 

487 

485 

280 

293 

283 

545 

547 

548 

450 

478 

475 

647 

649 


543 

530 

144 

1U5 

1541 

15JS6 

773 

742 

7 Si 

194 

474 


685 

690 

6_90 

277 

238 

279 

784 

784 

793 

272 

274 

276 

483 

484 

4 IB 

614 

119 

119 

284 

2.05 

287 

480 

480 

486 

473 

*32 

*30 

1386 

1395 

1404 

2.15 

216 

2.17 

693 

497 

US 

740 

742 

746 

632 

674 

674 

2.12 

213 

219 

65B 

659 

680 

785 

785 

791 

145 

185 

147 

618 

6Z7 

619 

H 

115 

589 

107 

592 

445 

470 

486 

441 

444 

448 

786 

790 

7.98 

346 

370 

373 

1674 

1130 

1174 

4.13 

4.15 

4JB 

673 

643 

678 

372 

375 

378 

987 

1085 

1619 

248 

252 

255 

54B 

579 

585 

9J6 

976 

981 

474 

in 

494 

389 

1H 

364 

216 

210 

1685 

1688 

1778 

678 

686 

682 

360 

162 

384 

3.12 

118 

314 

747 

7J3 

7J0 

1670 

1080 

1081 

M3 

1601 

1602 

180 

180 

180 

975 

Ml 

947 

6M 

612 

610 

780 

792 

7.92 

743 

7J4 

745 

844 

662 

873 

442 

444 

445 

146 

1* 

347 

688 

688 

694 

121 

124 

124 

160 

17B 

164 

ilS 

288 

1597 

191 

1191 

570 

135 

ITS 

740 

745 

7 JO 

145 

m 

677 


Madrid 


Bates tadee 48293 


PrevtaiiE 486K 

Acerinox 

20350 

20050 

20220 

20220 

ACESA 

1715 

1685 

1690 

1685 

Agi/as Baraekm 

5510 

5420 

5480 

5440 

Arqemuria 

BflV 

6440 

8838 

6260 

8690 

6260 

8740 

6460 

8770 

Banesto 

1145 

1125 

1125 

II2S 

acmHnter 

1M90 

19480 

19490 

19650 

Bat Centro Hbp 

3910 

3830 

3850 

3890 

Boo Exterior 


2765 

2765 

2/65 

Ben Puputor 

26970 

26430 

26580 

26920 

BooSankmder 

9880 

9610 

96® 

98fe» 

CEPSA 


4300 

4300 

4300 

Conttnenie 

2675 

2605 

2645 

2630 

CprpMaptra 

7730 

9420 

7510 

9150 

7510 

9100 

7680 

9410 

FECSA 

1315 

1250 

1355 

1310 


33570 

22920 

3M(W 

39430 


1675 

1625 

1640 

1660 

Piycn 

2775 

2/25 

2750 

2/10 

Rapssi 

5910 

5770 

5810 

5820 

ScvOanaElec 

1345 

1300 

1310 

1315 

Tabaariera 

7230 

7150 

7170 

rm 

Telefonica 

3545 

3485 

3485 

3535 

Union Ffenosa 

1220 

1195 

1205 

1210 

valeric Cement 

1615 

1590 

1615 

1600 

Manila 


P5E Indoc 327084 


Previsas; 32809? 


2980 

3830 

2850 

30 

AKdOLontf 

BkPhiaite 

31 

3030 

30-50 

7050 

184 

Iff/ 

184 

183 

C8J» Karnes 

1225 

13 

13 

1375 

Manila Elec A 

122 

120 

121 

120 

Mslro Bank 

685 

680 

685 

685 


1175 

1675 

11 

11 

PCI Bonk 

380 377 JO 

380 

38o 

PM Long Disl 

1610 

1600 

1605 

1610 

SanfcWguoiB 

90 

89 

90 

8850 

SM Prone Hdg 

780 

IM 

IM 

IM 

Mexico 


Balsa fadne 376449 


Prsvtovs: 3804.12 

AHaA 

4480 

<640 

44JJ0 

4375 

flcmastIB 

1642 

18.18 

1618 

1848 

Cemex CPO 

2980 

3645 


2890 

OfraC 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Ml. 

IIJ2 


4170 

4870 

40 JO 

41J0 

GpaCamAl 

4430 

4380 

Ad 95 

4460 

Gpn F Bcomer 

184 

180 

1-82 

IJ7 

GpoRnlnburaa 

2790 

2785 

VJb 

27.90 

16330 16290 1637D 16330 

Televisa CPO 

10070 

9970 

99 JO 1Q2J0 

TelMexL 

1590 

16/8 

15.78 

1600 

Milan 

MI8 TefaaaflCK 11B9990 


Previous: 12B0080 

MMwDAedr 

72460 

17100 

12300 

12515 

Sea Comm hoi 

3445 

3365 

3400 

3430 

Bat FKbutoh 

4530 

4350 

4520 

4490 

Bcatil Rnmo 

1245 

1210 

1218 

1231 

BesHtton 

20400 

19800 

70400 

20400 

CradBoIMfer® 

won 

WAS 

2285 

2315 


9510 

9370 

9410 

9500 

ENI 

8630 

8445 

B490 

BfrSi 

Hot 

5565 

5430 

5515 

5545 

G«wrafl Assk: 

30300 

27/00 

2W50 

30400 

IMI 

14865 

14500 

14565 

14995 

INA 

2245 

7195 

2235 

22/0 

& 

S92S 

7095 

5706 

7040 

5765 

7065 

5905 

7110 

NUfflaboncci 

UZ10 

10960 

11040 

11410 

Montedison 

1245 

1331 

173/ 

1243 


634 

AH 

£30 

631) 

Purmotet 

2280 

2201) 

7230 

2388 

PWS 

3605 

3530 

3560 

3610 

RAS 

16160 

14960 

151 SB 

15120 

Rato Banco 

14800 

14410 

14550 

14550 

SPcoS) Torino 

11860 

11350 

11415 

1186® 

SM 

7705 

/580 

7630 

7770 

TdeamMs 

4245 

4155 

4190 


TIM 

4380 

4145 

42/5 

43/5 

Montreal 

MBMriaBtadKlM7.16 


Previous: 2979 JO 

Bee Mob Com 


43 

43 

43V 

CdnTtoA 

9565 

254) 

K40 

25J5 

CdnUH A 

3285 

32U 

32J5 

32 JO 

CTB015VC 

®W 

37U 

32 tk 

329. 

Gaz Metro 

17Vi 

17.10 

17.10 

17.45 

Gt-WestLHeco 

22 

21.90 

21.90 

21V 


3ft.in 

37V 

37V 

38.10 

investors Gtp 

2H* 

25V 

25V 

25J0 

LflMowCBS 

17 


17 

17 

Nnti Bk Canada 

1620 

1610 

1615 

1615 

Power Cara 
Power FW 

29V5 

18.90 

79.15 

79*5 

2770 

77.10 

77.70 


QuefaewB 

wan 

75U 

rw 

7£70 

RogeroCmnB 

975 

970 

9J5 


RayrittCdo 

mi 

0 

59V5 



Accor 

AGF 

AkUquhto 

Alcatel Atom 

Axn-UAP 

Bancalro 

BIC 

BNP 

Canal PTue 

Qaretour 

Casino 

CCF 

CeWem 

Christian Dior 

CLF-Dedo Fran 

OnSAariasie 

Danone 

EH-Aqu Koine 

ErtdanlaBS 

EurodbneT 

Euiatutme 

Gen. Earn 

Haras 

U netoi 

Laftnge 

Learand 

Wrenl 


L\ 

LVMH 

E Eaux 
KtoB 
Pumas A 
Pernod Riasd 
Peugeot at 
Plnault-PArt 
Promodes 
Renault 
Reset 

WFPautoncA 

Sanaa 

Sdmehfcr 

SEB 

SG5 Thomson 

SteGawrale 

Sodmiia 

StGababi 

Sues 

SvrdhekdM 
Thomson CSF 
ToWB 
Usinor 
Valeo 


B4a 

215-30 

938 

632 

37830 

780 

908 
25370 
1155 
3520 
270 
27980 
738 
825 
622 
1315 
910 
577 
950 
1085 
7 
783 
443 
870 
380 
1065 
2028 
1358 
600 
349 JO 
40080 
321 
635 
2335 
1912 
13670 
1789 
20080 
556 
308JO 

m 
435 
695 
2987 
904 
296 
610 
194J0 
489 JO 
8980 
38480 


821 

210 

925 

613 

37430 

761 

900 

143 

1127 

3455 

26420 

270 

716 

799 

593 

1300 

894 

555 

930 

1075 

695 

761 

436.10 

858 

36650 

1035 

1988 

1322 

594 

- 342 
39610 
315 
615 
22B3 
1877 
134 
1700 
19650 
543 
30030 
986 
416 
673 
2964 
893 
283.70 
591 
19180 
48020 
87 JO 
38030 


824 840 

210J0 214 

927 935 

620 640 

37570 37670 
764 775 

904 909 

243 25780 
1144 1125 

3465 3445 
■m mso 
270 27980 
718 744 

a02 825 

597 614 

1315 1271 
903 905 

558 578 

947 944 

1075 10JO 
7 7 

771 783 

43610 444 

860 852 

372 367 JO 
1037 1048 

1982 2023 

1330 1351 

595 596 

34580 353 

39690 40030 
315 323.10 
625 629 

2290 2338 

1880 1917 
13570 133 

1740 1787 
19050 201 

546 551 

301 309 

9 W 998 

42159 432.10 
674 698 

2970 2909 

893 900 

28480 29680 
597 596 

WZB1 194.10 
48030 487.10 
89 B9.Q5 
38280 38190 


EtodrohnB 
Ericsson B 
Hermes B 
incentive A 
Investor B 
Mo Da B 
NoflBxmften 


PharniAJ^tohn 


San dull 
Scania B 
SCAB 
S-EBaikcn A 
Skandla Fors 
SkanstaB 
SKF B 

nkenA 


StoroA 
Sv Hnndfaa A 
Volvo 0 


504 
270 
4060 
545 
360 
245 
272 
304 
193 
191 JO 
174 
60JD 
254 
351 
192 
14650 
190 
10B 
226 
192 JO 


490 

263 

1028 

540 

3S5JD 

240 

263 

300 

189 

187 
170 

7650 

242 

343 

188 
14450 

190 
106 
217 

18650 


492JD 503 

265J0 270J0 
1035 1054 
545 540 

356 358 

24350 240 

265 272 

301 301 JO 
189 192 

1B7 191 

173 173 

8050 7650 
243 252 

343 349 JO 

189 19151 
14450 14150 

190 1905B 
107J0 U77 JO 
22550 21950 
189 JO 192J0 


Sydney 


AlOrttoratos 20480 
Piwtoora 246630 



The Trfb Index 


Pricaa as of 3.-00 AM New York tons. 


Jen. 1. 1992=100. 

Laval 

Changa 

%dwngn 

ymrtoitlte 
% change 

World Index 
Rngtonal tndaxau 

152.70 

-1.76 

-1.14 

+15.86 

Asia/Pacific 

110.76 

-0.80 

-0.62 

-17.50 

Europe 

161.25 

-1.85 

-1.13 

+15.86 

N. America 

178.53 

-2.47 

-1.36 

+39.17 

S. America 

feKtuterial hMJawa 

141.02 

-229 

-1.60 

+58J8 

Capital goods 

177.25 

-Z13 

-1.10 

+33.39 

Consumer goods 

173.76 

-1.80 

-1.08 

+25.85 

Energy 

176.98 

-2-49 

—1 .30 

+30.50 

Finance 

114^0 

-QJS7 

-0.76 

-10Z4 

Miscellaneous 

159.13 

-1.03 

-0.64 

+17.17 

Raw Materials 

185.81 

-3.02 

-Z07 

+31.04 

Service 

141.88 

-1.73 

-1Z0 

+1823 

Utmes 

136. TO 

-2.21 

-1.60 

+7.05 


The International H&aid Tribune Wood Stock In&xO tracks the U.S. Mar wtuee of 
280 internationally Invostabfa slocks horn !5 countries. For more information, a tree 
booklet b avaBablety writing to The Td> Avenue Charies do GmJle. 

92521 NeuSy Cudett, France. Compiled by Btoomhwg News. 


Hat 

Md Mutual Hdg 
News Carp 
PadSc Dunlop 
Ptaneerlnfl 
Puh Broadcast 
StGemgeBonk 
WMC 

Wedpoc BMng 

WooiaMeP« 

WooNMfttK 


Sao Paulo 


BradescoPM 
Brahma PM 

CESI^PM 
Copal 
Elefrobras 
Uaubanco Ptt 
Light semdos 
Ughtpcr 
Peirobias 


Seoul 


CaatpasRe tadera 663J0 
PmtMO;<55J5 


□acoai 

Daewoo Heavy 


Hyundai Eng. 
Ida Motor 


■ Motors 
KoroaEiPwr 
Korea ExdiBk 
Korea Atoh Tef 
L©Semfcon 
Pahang Iron SI 
Samsung DEsiar 
Samsung Else 
SidnhanBank 


105000 101000 101000 1(0000 
®30 3900 4030 JKFJ 

19200 18600 18600 18600 
16100 15200 16000 15500 
26000 24800 S45SSB 25200 
5650 5520 5610 5500 

447500 464008 457000 457500 
26500 24500 26500 25000 
4 sm 40100 40WO 40200 
40P® 39700 40300 39600 
54500 52100 S3700 52000 
10800 10000 10800 10000 



Singapore smm 


217779 

Pr rat— 1 :219475 


Ada Poe Brew 
CerelwsPac 
aiy DevBs 
CydeCOfriagt 
Da&y FrerolS* 


Oslo 


OBXMDC609J0 

PnitowiilK 


DBS Land 

KeppetFtis 

Fnsef&Neave 

HKLaad' 

JartMaltjem* 

Jred Strategic' 

Keppel 

KnodBank 

OCBCforetai 

05 Union Bk F 

PtBMnyHdgi 

Santaawaitg 

Sing Air foreign 

Sing Lund 

SlngPrassF 

Sing Teen Ind 

angTetecomm 


AJwA 

tonbA 
Ostoflanla Bk 
Den rente Bk 
Efelffl 

HatstundA 
KvaemerAsa 
NonkHvWg 
Non k£ Stag a 
N ycanedA 
Orida Asa A 
Pepm GeaSvc 


190 

147 

2SJ0 

3060 

120 


TroMooonOff 

StorabinndAsa 


369 

351 

222 

110 

551 

306 

U6JD 

138 

405 

47 


184SD IBS 
145 147 

2480 2570 
29 JO 3610 
11 BJO 119 
47 A 
365 365 

34650 348 

. 217 219 

10650 109 JO 

544 550 

300 302 

115 11650 
135 135 

3» 395 
45JD 4570 


14650 
24.90 
3660 
119J0 
47 
371 
349 
22130 
11650 
546J0 
306 
116 
136J8 
401 JO 
47 JO 


Kernel Land 
TmLeel 


i Bank 

UMtndustrifli 

LMOSeaBkF 

vmgTdHdgs 

■VSiUidWbnt 


745 

730 

745 

10.40 

IM) 

1040 

1180 

1140 

1140 

1450 

1460 

1470 

are 

0J7 

077 

1670 

18J0 

1650 

540 

575 

525 

620 

486 

488 

T3J0 

13 

13 

IBS 

2J0 

732 

610 

6 

6.18 

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PAGE 16 


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P% Budget SurpI US 
Allows Hong Kong 
To Raise Spending 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 

Koreans Bet Against Won 

Currency Slump Drags Down the Economy 


PAGE 17 


nan Aid 


■ ^ ! 
- • 


OwnpM bfOyrSbiFrm Oaparh» 

■ HONG KONG — Donald Tsang 
the territory’s financial secretary 
raised social spending and slashed 
^income-tax bills Wednesday as he 
unveiled a big budget surplus for the 
year of Hong Kong’s return to 
Chinese rule. 

_ Mr- .Tong's report depicted a sol- 
id, thriving economy in which gov- 
ernment departments have problems 
deciding bow to spend their funds. 

He predicted that gross domestic 
product would expand 5.5 percent in 
the year beginning April i, after a rise 
of 4.7 parent in the current year. 
Inflation, however, is expected to 
creep up to 7 percent from 6 percent, 
Hong Kong is to become a special 
admin istrative region of China on Ju- 
ly 1 after 156 years of British rule. 

' A strong property market and tax 
revenue cm stock-market transac- 
tions have caused Hong Kong’s gov- 
ernment coffers to overflow, Mr. 
VTsang said. “We tried to spend as 
much as we could,’ ’ he said at a press 


: Weak Inflation 
In China Raises 
: Rate- Cut Hopes 

Bloomberg News 

BEIJING — Retail prices 
"rose at their slowest rate in al- 
most six years in China in Feb- 
: ruary, paving the way for a cut 
' in interest rates within months, 

■ economists said Wednesday. 

Inflation was at 2.9 parent 

• annually last month, its lowest 

■ level since April 1991. compared 
^ " with a 3.3 percent rate in Janu- 
t : ary , the State Statistics Bureau 

-said. Inflation was 6.1 percent 

* last year, and prices are rising 
more slowly now than the gov- 

. ennneni and some private econ- 

■ omists expected. A cut in interest 
rates would help many debt- 

' strapped state-run companies. 

“I’d expect more easing of 
interest rates,” possibly in the 
. second quarter, said Jim Walk- 
- er, chief economist for Credit 
Lyonnais Securities (Asia). 


conference after disclosing that the 
government had underspent its cap- 
•ud -works budget by 5.5 billion 
Hong Kong dollars f$705 million). 

He said the government’s surpius 
from the current year to the year 
ending March 31, 2001, could total 
105.7 billion dollars. He also greatly 
mcreased his projection of the 
budget surplus for the currem fiscal 
year, to 1 5. 1 billion dollars from 1.6 
billion dollars. He predicted a sur- 
plus of 31.7 billion dollars for the 
year starting April 1 and surpluses 
totaling 58.9 billion dollars for the 
three subsequent years. 

Mr. Tsang described next year’s 
anticipated surplus as “exception- 
al and a “windfall” generated by 
“volatile sources." 

He said the big surpluses at the end 
of the century would be all but de- 
voured by an ambitious plan ro de- 
velop Hong Kong’s rail links to the 
mainland, but he insisted that Hong 
Kong would balance its books. 

The big beneficiaries in 1 997 will 
be public housing, which is to get a 
16 percent in spending after infla- 
tion. to 32.1 billion dollars; welfare, 
rising 9.1 percent to 21.2 billion 
dollars, and education, up 7.7 per- 
cent. to 45 billion dollars. 

He also said he would make no 
change in the corporate tax rate of 16.5 
percent in the coming year, said he 
would not introduce a value-added tax 
or a capital-gains tax and announced 
an 11 percent rise in die level at which 
personal income tax is levied. 

Hong Kong stocks fell, however, 
as brokers said investors sold prop- 
erty shares amid concern about the 
outlook for the territory’s property 
market. The Hang Seng Index 


Bloomberg News 

SEOUL — South Korean companies and individuals 
have now bet a total of $4.37 billion against their own 
currency, apparently out of conviction that the won will 
extend its 20-month slump against the dollar. 

The Bank of Korea said foreign-currency deposits 
at banks surged 280 percent to $4.37 billion in the 
four months ended in February. 

By comparison, the central bank itself has foreign- 
exchange reserves of just $30 billion. 

Any further currency depreciation — the won has 
lost one-eighth of its value against the dollar just in the 
past 12 months — would probably extend a stock- 
market slump as foreign investors unloaded Souih 
Korean assets to prevent currency losses. 

Renewed attempts by the central bank to stem the 
rout by buying won, on the other hand, would tend to 
drive up domestic interest rates and erode corporate 
profits. 

“The won’s fail is damaging the whole econ- 
omy,” Sohn Dong Woo. an economist at LG Eco- 
nomic Research Institute, said. ‘ ‘There are hardly any 
Korean companies which gain.” 

Corporate earnings released this month reflected 
the pain. Net profits in 1996 fell an average of 70 
percent from 1995 as the won’s demise inflated the 
value of dollar-denom mated debt. 

The currency slide compounded a 21 percent rise 
in crude-oil prices as crude-oil imports rose to $24.4 
billion from $18.7 billion in 1995. 

Korea Electric Power Corp., the state-run utility 
monopoly, and Yukong Ltd., the country’s biggest oil 
refiner, blamed their disappointing earnings on this 
double blow. 

“We had a large foreign-exchange loss last year. 


which eroded our operating profit,” said Lee Sang Soo. 
a manager at Yukong Ltd. Mr. Lee said Yukong had 
done little to hedge its currency risk except for paying 
its import bills early and changing its dollar earnings 
into v.'on as late as possible to profit from the dollar’s 
rise. 

The won fell 82 percent in 1 996 and about4percent 
this year against the dollar as a growing current- 
account deficit limited the supply of dollars. The won 
was uading at 87720 to the dollar Wednesday. 

The rush to buy dollars forces companies to sell 
domixtic bonds to meet their needs for working capital. 
That in turn pushes up interest rates as supply outpaces 
demand. 

The three-year corporate bond yield, Korea’s 
benchmark borrowing rate, is at 12.7 percent, com- 
pared with 1 2 percent a month ago. The rare increase 
was triggered by record sales of corporate bonds. 

The won’s fall is also pulling down stocks. The 
benchmark Korea Composite Stock Price Index, 
which has lost about 9 percent in the past month, 
ended Wednesday at 663.90, up 7.95 points. 

The central bank said tire amount of money that 
South Korea had to pay to service its foreign debt 
grew 1 .85 trillion won (52. 18 billion ) in 1 996 and has 
grown 890 billion won so far this year because of the 
won's fall. The total increase is equivalent to about 
62,000 won for each South Korean. 

The natural advantage of a weaker won for ex- 
porters. which makes their products cheaper over- 
seas. has been offset by an even weaker yen because 
Japan is South Korea’s chief export rival. 

The yen fell 1 1 2 percent against the dollar in the 
past six months, compared with the won’s 7.3 percent 
drop. 


Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

14000 

™- ftjOlJ 

13000 nj - 
12500 J* - 


12000 / -• 


%ND J F M‘ 
1996 1997 

Exchange fncte 


Singapore ' ■ -Tokyo::- 
Straits Times 

2250 — vtl-| — • 22000 

2200 — Af-Vy 21000 njfA — 

. 2150 V- +■ 20000 — 

2100 f-f 19000 — 

: 2050 -hr .18000 11 

2000 ^ ’ , 7 -^ — r 17000 «-TT7r-i 


N D J F M- 


NO J F M. 


1997 1996 

Wednesday Pwv. 
Close ' - Close ; 


Hong Kong Bang Seng • ' • 13,119.1 
Singapore Shats-Tmes 2,i77J39 
Sydney AS Ordinaries ]^4S4,4ti 
Tokyo f'tfkkai 225 ' 

Kuaia Lumpur Composite 1,249.72 

Bangkok SET L ; 72027 

Seoul Composite Index " ' S63&D 

Taipei ■■ ■ Stock Market Index 9&5J& 
fitenfia PS£ ' , 3^7064 

Jakarta Composite i ndeuT 68Z&I 
Wellington f£2S£-4Q ' .. ' 2265 


1^mi3 

2.177.39 -2,194.75 -QL79 

2.454.40 2,468-30 -0,58 

18,183427 18^87.72 ^0.4$ 
1,249.72 1,25033 

720.27 719.9$ . 

SSSo ■ . 65535 

8,255*87 8,245,64 A&tQ 
3^7064 'sjZBOM 
682.81 ' 687.93 -0.77 

23BSE0 2J8744S6. -030 


| Bombay. 

Source; Telekurs 


Sensitive Index' %782JXT ' 3,725.87 -..40.98] 


Imcrruuiotud Herald Tribune 


Tokyo Cautions Car Firms on Export Surge 


Bloomberg News 

TOKYO — The head of the Ministry of International 
Trade and Industry warned Japanese automakers Wed- 
nesday that rising exports to the United States could 
cause new trade friction. 

“Given the current situation overseas, care is needed 
in building trading relationships,’’ Shinji Sato said at a 
meeting of auto-industry executives. Mr. Sato did not 


Chrysler Corp. have complained thar the steady fall in the 
value of the yen against the dollar is helping the Japanese 
sell more in the United States and hurting U.S. sales in 
Japan. The popularity of its products and a weak yen 
helped the Japanese market share in the U.S. rise almost 
two percentage points in February. 

Toyota said Monday it would raise its U.S. prices on 
some 1997 cars by an average of 0.3 percent, or $57. 


slipped 1 33.07 points, or 1 percent, to ask the automakers to limit their exports, according to a Toyota, the world’ s third-largest automaker behind GM 


13.119.13. [AFP, Reuters) 

■ Cathay’s Profit Rises 

Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. said 
its 1996 net profit rose 28 percent 
from a year earlier, to 3.81 billion 
dollars. Agence France-Presse re- 
ported. The Hong Kong flag car- 
rier’s sales rose 6 J percent, to 32.38 
billion dollars. Swire Pacific Ltd.. 


ministry official who asked not to be identified. 

Mr. Sato said Tuesday that trade in autos could be on 
the agenda when Vice President A1 Gore visited Japan 
this month. Mr. Gore is to arrive March 23 for a two-day 
visit as part ofa trip that will also include South Korea and 

China. 

Japan’s auto exports to the United Stales jumped 75 
percent in January' from a year earlier, to 124.834 
vehicles. Exports also rose in all of the last seven 
months of 1996. making an average year-on-year in- 


the only British merchant house to crease of 8.3 percent, according to the Japan Auto- reported from Yoko- 01 - Tii . m T\ C* 9 

retain its base in Hong Kong, agreed mobile Manufacturers Association. They had fallen for hama. The Transport olOWdOWIl 111 JM6CIXOZ11CS UEUlpS SlllgdpOrC S vlUtpilt 


and Ford, had its best February ever in the United States, 
with sales of its redesigned Camry rising 27 percent 

■ Dock Workers Strike Over Dispute With U.S. 

Japanese harbor workers staged a 24-hour nationwide 
strike Wednesday to protest a U.S. plan to impose 
sanctions over what Washington says are restrictive port 
practices that inhibit competition. The strike halted most 

loading operations, 

Agence France-Presse 


Very brief lys 

• The European Union and Japan said they would press 
ahead with a complaint to the World Trade Organization 
against Indonesia's automobile program, which they said 
received preferential tax and tariff treatment. 

• Indonesia’s $2 billion Balongan oil refinery, which has 
encountered a siring of problems since it opened in 1994, was 
shut down after maintenance crews detected a problem with its 
long residue catalytic cracker. 

• Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp. said it needed to 
take measures regarding its business with Nomura Securities 
Co. in light of the brokerage concern’s suspected illegal 
transactions with a corporate client. Nomura is one of the 
leading underwriters of NTT's corporate bonds and stocks. 

• Ajinomoto Co., a Japanese food maker that is embroiled in 
a scandal over alleged payments to corporate racketeers last 
year, suspended its television and newspaper advertisements, 
a company spokesman said. 

• Shindongbang Co„ which has made a hostile bid to take 
over Midopa Department Store Co., asked a Seoul court to 
prohibit the retailer from issuing equity-linked bonds. 

• Daiei Inc’s executive vice president, Jun Nakauchi, said 
three to five of Daiei ’s subsidiaries, including Seifu Ka- 
bushiki Kaisha, a chain-store operator, and the department 
store Printemps Ginza would be taken public before 2001 . 

• Korea Mobile Telecom's 1996 sales doubled from 1995, to 
2.68 trillion won ($3.05 billion), spurred by explosive growth 
in subscribers, but competition held its profit rise down to 8 
percent, to a total of 195 J billion won. Bloomberg, Reuters. AFP 


in April 1996 to give China a major 
stake in Cathay Pacific, the jewel in 
its corporate crown. The accord ex- 
panded Beijing’s share of Hong 
Kong’s lucrative aviation market 


17 months before then. 

The increase reflects a Japanese push into the U.S. 
market for sport-utility vehicles, which Japanese car- 
makers do not build in North America, the ministry 
official said. General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and 


Ministry said it would 
hold talks Tuesday to 
discuss the practices be- 
ing criticized by the 
United States. 


| j \ I] JOB SAP: German Software Powerhouse Makes Gains GROWTH: Why It's Different 


Continued from Page 13 

century ago. In a tale reminiscent of the garage 
entrepreneurs of California’s Silicon Valley, 
five young programmers (average age:32) at 
International Business Machines Corp.’s Ger- 


down. Analysts call it “the law of big num- 
bers.” 

As Mr. Hopp pointed out, * ‘With 3.7 billion 
DM in sales, you need giant strides to du- 
plicate a 40 percent jump.” This year, he 
expects sales to rise 25 percent to 30 percent 


Continued from Page 13 

expansions in the past 35 
years. In the 1 960s, the econ- 
omy grew without a recession 


crisis that led to the Gulf War 
burst over the economy, bring- 
ing on the recession that start- 
edin the summer of 1990. 

Compress the American 


man division abandoned the security of their and pretax earnings to increase 28 percent or 
jpbs to survive on a single contract for a 29 percenL 
\ chemicals company. SAP’s goal is to expand at least as quickly 

i ‘ They had no capital and no offices, and it as the global market for business software, a 
was eight years before they could afford their pace that Mr. Hopp projected at 25 percent a 
own computer. year until 2000 but that many analysts have 

- Mr. Hopp, now 56 and one of the founding put at more than 30 percent 

five, said they shared nothing more than a Some individual markets, particularly Ja- 
singje idea — that software for companies pan. still have the potential for impressive 
could be standardized, not customized anew growth, according to Mr. Hopp. who once 
e ac h time — and had lots of luck. complained of the frustration of perpetually 

" After the heady expansion that followed R/ needing to revise projections upward. 

3’s introduction in 1992, which in turn began Analysts have applauded the speed with 
to loosen America’s grip on the world soft- which SAP cracked the Japanese market, be- 
ware market, some investors last year began coining the first to offer standardized ni- 
to grouse after annual revenue growth des- dustnal software there. Mr. Hopp said SAP s 
cendcd from a stratospheric 92 percent in Japan sales doubled last year, to 14 J bilhon 
1994 to 44 percent in 1995 and then to a yen ($119.1 million), 
merely exceptional 38 percent last year. The steady migration to client-server sys- 

- The high-flying shares plunged 30 percent terns continues to be one of the reasons Mr. 
in a two-week sell-off last October after Mr. Hopp remains optimistic. R/3 already ac- 
Hopp warned that SAP no longer expected to counts for two-thuds of the group s sales, 
rea?h ta?1996 goal of a 40 percent increase in making the company less dependent on its 

B previous senes, R/2, which was designed for 

> S spoken loo soon, it turned out. A mainframes and was the mainstay of SAP’s 
rerarf fourth* quarter helped lift SAP’s full- business for more tfaana decade. 

bv 43 percent. The shares It is ntfang a few other waves as well. Mr. 


for more than eight years. The economy into a line on a 
expansion of the 1980s lasted chart, and the last six years 


ComfUrd by OvShjfFntn Dispatches 

SINGAPORE — Output of 
manufactured goods fell 7.2 
percent in January from a year 
earlier, led by a slowdown in 
the electronics industry, the 
Singapore Economic Devel- 
opment Board said Wednes- 
day. 

It was the third consecutive 
month of year-on-year de- 
clines in Singapore’s output. 

Production in the key elec- 
tronics industry fell 10.9 per- 


cent, with most segments ex- 
cept for disk drives and 
telecommunications equip- 
ment affected by slower orders 
from overseas, the board said. 

Output of fabricated metal 
products fell 7.4 percent, and 
the output of the plastic 
products industry was down 
21.5 percent, hit by the slow- 
down in the electronics in- 
dustry. The petroleum in- 
dustry reduced output by 3.6 
percent in January as refiners 


nearly eight years. But six 
years into the 1980s expan- 
sion, when unemployment 
was as low as it is today, 
wages were already moving 
up steadily and prices were 
rising more than 4 percent a 
year to cover die higher 
wages. Even in the 1960s. the 
healthiest expansion on re- 


look like a gently undulating 
roller coaster, rising until late 
1994, falling in 1995, rising 
again late last year, perhaps to 
level off once more this year. 

The annual growth rate in 
the best of these times has 
approached 4 percent, and in 
tire worst it has fallen to just 
above 1 percent. The average 


cord, inflation started to rise over the six years has been 2.6 



after five years of growth. percent, which is what many 
None of that is happening economists now say is the 
today, "mainly because tight most growth that can be sus- 
labor markets don’t lead so tained without generating in- 
quickly to higher wages.” flationary pressures. 

Stephen Roach, chief econo- 

mist at Morgan Stanley & Co., 
said. Still, there is bound to be 
a recession at the end of the 
rainbow. “The Fed controls 
the business cycle.” Mr. 

Roach said, “and in the end, it Escorts f Guldes 
will raise rales enough to bring 
on a recession.” 


Joe Fitchett 
Political 
Correspondent 


POLITICS 

Impeccable sources, 
intelligent, behind the scenes 
and at the heart of issues. 

If you missed his reporting in the 
IHT, look for it on our site on the 
World Wide Web: 


http://www.iht.com 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


UflHWATKWAL ESCORTS 

Wortfs Fvst i Mod Ex&gte Sum 


nercenL The shares It is riding a few other waves as well, Mr. Alternatively, the Fed will 
Hopp said. SAP offers an R/3 update that aims raise rales, trying to hold back 
have since rapproacneri , oK3 ^ per- to accommodate the phased introduction of a the economy, and then an out- 
■ But anyone who Iwks only ^ . European starting in 1999. side shock- an oil crisis or a 

centages, bv hist over 1 billion Because the new euro banknotes are not due to stock market crash — will 

saory. Revenue jumped uy just appear until 2002, European companies will cause the next recession. 

^ iaS^Knitude^Sning that S»dto keep parallel books in euros and in their That happened thelast time. 

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PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERAL® TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1W 



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A Special Report 


THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 
PAGE 19 


munications 


Race to Cable Britain 
Getting Nowhere Fast 

American Hopes of Swift Victory Fade 




By Erik Ip sen 

L SSP N x 7" ^ the of * e 

dfcade. North American tele- 
phone companies fell over 
themselves in the race to win 
“^nses to create cable television sys- 
tems in me world’s most deregulated 

J^one ri^"- Si "“ *“ ve ^ 

S“jS 

passed the half-way mark in the con- 
struction of its networks. Yet instead of 
wmnrng growing acceptance for its ser- 
vices. 78 percent of die Britons whose 
homes are passed by those expensive 
new cables still balk at signing up for 
the 50 channel service. 

Instead of getting easier for the cable 
companies many of which are con- 
trolled by North American companies 
such as Bell Canada, Nynex. SBC 
Communications, and US West, life 
just seems to get harder. The latest 
setback came last month when three of 
the most powerful forces in British 
television finked up to bid for the right 
to bring 30 channels worth of digital 
terrestrial television to Britain by 
1998. 

That bid brought together BSkyB. 


the satellite broadcaster 40 percent 
owned by Rupert Murdoch, plus two of 
Britain's leading television production 
companies — Granada Group and 
Carlton Communications. Many of 
those new channels will likely be 
offered free of charge. 

Hie arrival of another new com- 
petitor could not have come at a worse 
time for the cable companies whose 
hopes for a quick conquest of the Brit- 
ish market were long ago shredded by 
BSkyB ’s highly successful direct-ro- 
home satellite service. 

In the immediate aftermath of that 
announcement, the already depressed 
shares of the seven publicly quoted 
cable companies plummeted another 
15 percent. While those shares have 
recovered much lost ground since then, 
most observers still insist that the 
amival of another powerful competitor 
is bad news for the cable industry. 

“It is going to be a very crowded 
market with margins under great pres- 
sure,” said Steve Scructon. an analyst 
with toe brokers Credit Lyonnais Laing. 
“In the future, it looks like we will have 
free television, digital terrestrial tele- 
vision. cable television, satellite tele- 
vision and maybe even a video-on-de- 

Continued on Page 22 




Who Stands to Win 
Deregulation Payoff? 

Businesses Likely to Save Most 



DwidSiw/IHT 


Baby Bells Line Up for US. Battle 


INSIDE 


By Mitchell Martin 


N ew york — 

While the rest of toe 
planet is consider- 
ing how to imple- 
ment toe market-opening 
telephone accord signed last 
month, the United Stales has 
passed into the second year of 
its domestic version under the 
Telecommunications Act of 
1996. which theoretically 
aided the vestiges of .toe 
American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. monopoly by in- 
troducing competition into 
Ibcal service, 

' The World Trade Organi- 
zation pact “is a global ver- 
sion of the Telecommunica- 
tions Act of 1996," said 
, Jeffrey Kagan, an industry 
J analyst at Kagan Telecom 
' Associates in Atlanta. 

- If be is correct, do not ex- 
pect much change in toe glob- 
al market over toe next year. 
In the United States, toe re- 
gional Bell phone companies 
plus GTE Corp. are so far 
hanging cm to much of their 
virtual monopolies over 
roughly 80 percent of the U.S. 
local markets. (The rest of toe 
country is served by about a 
dozen companies that each 
Gave in the range of one mil- 
lion access lines and by hun- 
dreds of smaller concerns). 

The Baby Bells, spun off 
from what is now AT&T 
Corp.. are accused by the 
tong-distance companies of 
V taawng failed to open their 


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systems to competition. 

Unlike the global deal, 
American telephone deregu- 
lation came in two distinct 
parts. Iii 1984, a federal court 
brake up the AT&T mono- 
poly, forcing toe divestiture 
of the seven Baby Bell 
companies and opening toe 
long-distance market to com- 
petition. The Baby Bells were 
forbidden to offer long-dis- 
tance and other new services 
in toeir home markets, but 
.they did get .to keep control 
over almost all local tele- 
phone business. 

That- changed, with the 
signing into law of the Tele- 
communications Act of 1996 
in February 1996. The law 
requires a free-for-all among 
telephone, cable television 
and wireless communications 
companies for shares in each 
others' markets. So far, the 
key battle has been between 
the Baby Bells and tire long- 
distance providers, such as 
AT&T, MCI Communica- 
tions Coip„ Sprint Corp. and 
WorldCom Inc. 

- The long-distance concerns 
have been able to provide local 
service in only a handful of 
areas, largely because the play- 
ing field is not level. Getting 
into toe long-disttroce business 
is a relatively sinmle propos- 
ition, compared with running a 
wire to every customer that 
wants local service. To offer the 
Baby Bells an incentive to open 
their roaricets, toe Tdecommu- 
nicatioos Act bans diem from 
emetine toe lone-distance mar- 


kets in their service areas until 
they have allowed local-service 
competition. 

The act requires the Baby 
Bells and GTE, which already 
offers long-distance service, 
to allow potential competitors 
to connect ro their networks ax 
any feasible location. So 
AT&T, or a cable television 
company or an electric utility 
that wants to provide local 
telephone service, would be 
able to design a system that 
used the Baby Bell’s network 
to reach potential customers, 
rather than having to wire up 
its own infrastructure. 

The long-distance pro- 
victors complained last month 
that toe Baby Bells and GTE 
so far bad failed or refused to 
provide toe critical operations 
support systems. 


M ANY observers 
agree that the 
Baby Bells have 
been slow to 
comply with the legislation, 
but Arneritech recently said 
that since early January, it has 
lad “fully operational” sup- 
port-system interfaces avail- 
able. Ned Cox, president of 
Arneritech Information In- 
dustry Services, said; “Over- 
simplified statements con- 
taining hidden agendas only 
confuse the matter. That's toe 
game many who bash our sys- 
tem are playing.” 

But another Baby Bell, US 
West Inc., has more or less 
admitted dial it has been drag- 
ging its feet. President Sol 


Trujillo said his company has 
launched legal actions against 
some elements of federal and 
state regulatory actions asso- 
ciated with toe Telecommu- 
nications Act because it feels 
it is getting a bad deal from 
potential competitors that did 
not have to invest in building 
local-service systems. 

“We’re fighting for invest- 
ment-based competition," he 
said. “Right now*, new 
entrants are looking to come 
into the region and take 
money out without putting in- 
vestments back in." 

Mr. Kagan said: “Neither 
the local nor long-distance 
companies are going to lay 
down and let the other run 
roughshod over them. This is 
a very high-stakes poker 
game, a $200 billion market. 
One percent of market share 
is about $2 billion; with that 
magnitude, you’re not going 
to see even one chip left on 
toe table.” 

For all that, the Baby Bells 
still have advantages, accord- 
ing to Sim Hall, research vice 
president of Action Informa- 
tion Services of Falls Church. 
Virginia. “Our analysis in- 
dicates the local companies 
wil] be the big winners early 
on.” Besides their inherent 
advantage of already provid- 
ing the local service, con- 
sumers crust toe Baby Bells 
more than toe long-distance , 
companies or other potential : 
competitors, be said. 

Continued on Page 22 



Asian giants are slowly opening up their 
maikets. Page 20. 

Europe’s railroads are being courted by 
rival telecom operators. Page 21. 

East Europe braces for new wave of 
telephone privatizations. Page 22. 


By Sharon Reier 

P ARIS — The world telecom- 
munications agreement opening 
the $600 billion global telecom- 
munications industry to the free 
market will ring in a new era that will 
save consumers a trillion dollars, or so 
toe champions of this accord claim. 

But before anyone throws confetti or 
makes plans on bow to spend that tril- 
lion, it might be circumspect to inves- 
tigate just how that sum was reached. 

The figure originated from a study by 
the Institute for International Econom- 
ics. a Washington think tank. Firstly, it 
ascribes more than 40 percent of toe 
projected savings to the imputed value 
of better telephone services. These in- 
clude increases in cellular telephone 
density and pay phones, faster phone 
service and more digitalized services — 
toe technology that allows call wailing, 
call forwarding, speed dialing and caller 
identification. These services have be- 
come prevalent in the United States, 
where the long-distance monopoly was 
abolished in 1984. 

Secondly, toe majority of real mon- 
etary savings will go to business users, 
not households. Keith Mallinson, man- 
aging director of Yankee Group, a tele- 
communications consulting group, said: 
“The big corporations hitherto have 
been toe major beneficiaries. And they 
will continue to be.” 

Frank Walter, chief spokesman for 
MCI, the pioneer independent long-dis- 
tance company in the United States, 
whose lawsuit against AT&T helped to 
crack open the U.S. long-distance tele- 
phone market to competition, admitted: 
“It is reasonable to expect that larger 
users will save more faster because they 
have toe ability to negotiate volume 
discounts.” 

But whether the trillion-doll ar figure 
is an exaggeration or actually too low, 
and whether those benefits of the com- 
petitive market are likely to be unevenly 
distributed, toe World Trade Organi- 
zation has persuaded 69 countries to 


agree to open their telecommunications 
markets to international competition. 
And evidence from deregulated tele- 
coms markets like the United Stares, 
Britain, New Zealand, Australia and 
Sweden show that, where deregulation 
and competition have occurred, toe re- 
sults are significantly lower average 
prices and a substantial rise in the 
volume of calls. 

France Telecom, for instance, the 
former stare-owned monopoly which is 
readying itself for a partial privatization 
in May, last year decreased its average- 
price for international calls and long- 
distance national rates by 25 percent. 
This year France Telecom has stated it 
intends to decrease international and 
long-distance national rates by 40 percent 
in two increments. The moves are being 
made in advance of toe opening of Euro- 
pean voice and data communications 
markets in January 1998 in accordance 
with a European Union directive. 

Meanwhile, local rates have re- 
mained virtually constant since 1993. 
The national carrier raised its monthly 
access cost by 28 percent this year, on 
top of a 15 percent rise last year. That 
will be eased for certain disadvantaged 
groups like toe elderly who make few 
calls. But for ordinary French people 
with little use fora lower rate to Chicago 
or Mexico City, toe price reductions will 
not have much meaning. 

“We have a problem,” said Bruno 
Janet, toe France Telecom press officer, 
citing “the EU rule that telecommu- 
nications companies can't use their busi- 
nesses to cross-subsidize each other.” 

But EU regulation* aren’t all to 
blame. The fact is that toe technological 
advances that have made competition 
possible by bringing down the cost of 
sending billions of messages over fiber- 
optic cables and digital switches are 
more cost-effective over long-distance 
routes than over the so-called “last 
mile" to the consumer’s telephone. 

So in non-EU countries where the 
telecommunications markets have been 

Continued on Page 21 


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PAGE 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS / A SPECIAL REPORT 


Slowly, Asia Giants Open Door to Competition 


By Michael Richardson 


M 


AND-A — Things have im- 


proved for telephone sub- 
scribers in the Philippines 


I m# ■ scribers in the Philippines 
A ▼ A since Senior Minister Lee 
Kuan Yew of Singapore joked on a visit 
five years ago mat 98 percent of the 
country was waiting for a line — and the 
other two percent for a dial tone. 

Sweeping deregulation by the gov- 
ernment of President Fidel Ramos has 
injected some much needed competi- 
tion into the Philippine telecommuni- 
cations industry, reducing costs to con- 
sumers and forcing the former 
monopoly provider, PLOT, the Phil- 
ippine Long Distance Telephone Co., to 
improve its service. 

New entrants to the marketplace are 
obliged to install fixed-line phones as a 
condition for gaining access to other 
potentially lucrative services, such as 
wireless cellular phone networks. 

One of the new players, Bayan Tele- 
communications Holdings Corp.. a 60- 
20 joint venture between the Philip- 
pines’ Lopez family and Nynex Corp. of 
the United States, recently finished in- 
stalling the last of 300,000 conventional 
lines required by government policy, a 
full year ahead of schedule. 

Bayan offers near- instant fixed phone 
installation; PUTT, which used to keep 


customers waiting for years, now says it 
can get phones to them in some areas 
within a month. The Philippines has 
emerged as one of Asia’s most inno- 
vative providers of telecommunications 
services. 

But in many of the major markets, 
direct competition is still wing held at 
bay and the potential for growth may be 
less than some upbeat market assess- 
ments have suggested. 

The highest fixed-line penetration in 
any of the countries of the region, with 
the exception of Japan. Singapore and 
Hong Kong, is 15 for every 100 people. 
The average is in the range of five per 
100 . 

In the potential giants of the Asian 
telecommunications market, the ratio is 
even smaller: one per 100 in India, two 
per 100 in Indonesia and three per 1 00 in 
China — three nations with a combined 
population of about 2.3 billion. 

’‘Indonesia's telecommunications 
sector is still in the earliest stages of 
growth," said Fred Thomas, an analyst 
at P.T. Peregrine Sewu Securities in 
Jakarta. “Although long-term growth 
prospects are positive, the cost of basic 
services in most parts of the country is 
still beyond the financial means of most 
people.” 


people. 

This situation is expected to persist 

despit 


for the remainder of the decade, despite 
the Indonesian government’s aggres- 


sive plan to boost penetration rates 
among its population of 200 million. 

A recent Peregrine study estimates 
that the total average cost for an In- 
donesian residential subscriberto install 
and pay monthly subscription charges 
for one year on a fixed-line phone is 
around $250. 

Many people simply can’t afford this 
charge. In eastern Indonesia, for ex- 
ample. it would amount to more than 
one-third of average annual per capita 
income. 

Anxious to ensure that their econom- 
ic growth is sustained, governments in 
much of Asia are opening their tele- 
communications ’ systems — long dom- 
inated by state monopolies — to at least 
some degree of competition, increas- 
ingly in the shape of foreign service 
providers. 

Indonesia's privatized telecommuni- 
cation company, PT Telkom, has signed 
agreements assigning five joint ven- 
tures to run much of the country's phone 
service for 15 years from Jan.’l. 1997. 

The five are expected to install more 
than two million extra lines by 1 99 9 and 
to manage the phone systems in all 
regions, except greater Jakarta and East 
Java. 

India has adopted a similar region- 
alized auction for the right to operate 
basic telephone networks, but has 
angered and deterred potential investors 


by altering the rules for :- v 

private sector participation. •"» 

Frauds X. Colaco. a se- . j 
nior World Bank official. .'^f 
noted recently at an Asian ■) 
infrastructure conference in - ■ 

New Delhi, that there was . 

generally very limited sup- 
ply competition in Asia. Hb* 
“In telecommunications, 
private providers in fridose- 
sia and Thailand have been EO§^ 
given monopoly rights in the 
areas they serve,” he said. 

“This creates the potential jfeiS 
for ‘yardstick’ competition. HguE 
by comparing the pekfor- 
mance of private providers 
in two geographic areas/But 1 
the outcomes are likely to be j 
weaker compared to direct 1 
competition.’’ h j . 

In Indonesia, for example, 

the two local international ( 

carriers must charge the 
same rates. An em[ 

In China, where the World 
Bank estimates that more than S140 
billion must be spent on telecommu- 
nications development in the next de- 
cade. the government in Beijing re- 
mains reluctant to allow foreigners or 
private investors to take stakes in do- 
mestic communications businesses. In- 
stead. China expects foreigners to sup- 


flail' 

In ti 1 




i 

P 


nr. 


Rnweu tUrad/Agmer f-rJore-Piwae 

An employee of the Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co. checking the system. 


ply equipment and expertise on contract 
only, while encouraging a new state- 
linked group, Unicom, to challenge the 
dominance of the Posts and Telecom- 
munications Ministry. 

But many analysts feel this can only 
be a stopgap measure and that China 
will have to follow other Asian coun- 


tries in allowing entry to foreign and 
local service providers from the private- 
sector if supply is ever to make a major 
dint on demand. 


MICHAEL RICHARDSON is Asia ed- 
itor of the' International Herald 
Tribune. ii 


Investment in Developing Countries: Western Operators Are Treading Warily 


By Conrad de AenJle 


L ONDON — When an employ- 
ee working in a multinational 
company’s Lisbon office sends 
a fax to a colleague in Nairobi, 
there is a good chance mat the signal 
will be shepherded along by British 
Telecommunications. A caller flipping 
open his mobile phone on a street comer 
in Bangkok may count on Nynex, a U.S. 
Baby Bell, to complete the call. 

With prices shrinking at home as 
competition becomes more intense and 
line growth slows to a trickle, phone 
companies in developed markets are 
pouring several billion dollars a year 
into emerging economies, where mar- 
kets in phone services have only re- 
cently been opened and growth pros- 
pects are great 

As industry analysts are fond of 


pointing out half the world’s popu- 
lation has never made a phone call. 
Teledensity — the number of phone 
lines per hundred people — averages 1 0 
in emerging countries, just one-fifth the 
level in marine markets. The lower a 
country's teledensity, the higher its 


buildout potential — the number of 
lines that could be installed before de- 
mand is sated. 

A report by Salomon Brothers fore- 
cast line growth this year of nine percent 
for the two phone companies in Ar- 
gentina. which at 20 has the highest 
teledensity in Latin America. In Peru, 
with a teledensity of six, line growth of 
20 percent is expected. Such high buil- 
dout potentials, combined with low 
labor costs for installing and servicing 
lines, translate into higher profit mar- 
gins and growth rates than could be 
generated in mature markets. 

When Western companies enter a de- 
veloping market, there often is only a 
single large provider of phone service, 
usually an erstwhile state PTT. They can 
choose to work with it or against it. 

“ Com panies are either buying into 
the PTT. the fixed network, or more 
likely trying to get into the mobile mar- 
ket.’ ' said Robert Jowett, a researcher at 
CfT Research, a market research firm 
that specializes in telecommunications. 
“Buying into the local PTT is only an 
option if regulators allow it. If 10 per- 
cent is all that's on offer, do you want all 
the responsibility without the control? 


The chance to buy a monopoly operator 
doesn’t come along that often." 

It came along in 1994 when Tele- 
fonica de Espana paid S2 billion for 35 
percent of Peru's phone system. That 
was far more than analysts thought it 
was worth and four times what the Per- 
uvian government had expected to re- 
ceive, but it gave the Spanish phone 
company effective control. 

More often. Mr. Jowett said, compa- 
nies will wait until they have die chance 
to invest in a cellular system: “When 
you have licenses being issued in de- 
veloping countries, it will attract more 
interest because the cost of installing a 
mobile network is relatively cheap, 
compared to the cost of rolling out a 
modem fixed network, [and] the cus- 
tomer group you manage to address in 
mobile tends to be at the more affluent 
end of the market-" 

Even though rates of line growth are 
greatest in the most backward countries, 
phone companies prefer to concentrate 
on markets that are somewhat more 
developed and prosperous. 

“The return on investment is going to 
be much greater in middle-ranking 
countries, the boom economies of the 


Pacific rim. for instance.” he said. 

Some operators, such as Concert, a 
joint venture of British Telecommuni- 
cations and MCI. the second -largest 
American long-distance carrier, have 
chosen a middling path, working with 
the PTTs to attract business from mul- 
tinationals. 

‘ ‘In most countries, the distributor of 
Concert is tbe local telephone com- 
pany.” explained Paul Sharma. a 
spokesman for BTs international busi- 
ness. “In physical terms, we’ll put a 
node or a switch in country X and the 
people who want t o use the’service will 
call the local PTT.” 

Concert is active in 50 countries, 
building what it hopes will be a single 
global network. That is also the goal of 
two rival partnerships: Unisource, com- 
prising AT&T, Telefonica and the state 
phone operators of Sweden, the Neth- 
erlands and Switzerland, and Global 
One. an alliance of Sprint. Deutsche 
Telekom and France Telecom. 

Rates on international calls have been 
falling for many years, and the decline is 
accelerating. Between 1986 and 1991, 
charges on calls between the United 
States and points abroad fell by 3.6 


percent annually. Federal Communica- 
tions Commission figures show. In the 
five years through 1S&6, the annual de- 
cline was 1 1.6 percent Creating a glob- 
al network is the only way Western 
phone companies think they can main- 
tain profit margins. 

“If you build a pan -global network, 
there are economies of scale in pro- 
curement design of systems, research 
and development and software,” Mr. 
Sharma said. * ‘There is no one company 
that has the power to build a global 
network. Nobody is going it alone.” 

Evan Miller, a telecommunications 
analyst at Credit Suisse First Boston, 
argues that the overriding goal of build- 
ing worldwide links has shunted in- 
vestment in developing countries down 
the list of priorities. 

“Tbe idea of going into emerging 
markets. I’m not sure that’s the heart of 
the strategy for any of die three.” he 
said. 

‘ ‘They’re keen to win a share in some 
of the most developed markets, in many 


You have to link far-flung operations; 
but on behalf of a much larger entity 
headquartered in Europe or North 
America.” 

Investment in these far-flung phone; 
systems for its own sake is starting to 
lose appeal, he added. Even though gov-; 


ernments have only recently embraced 
liberalization; many have done it whft 


cases at each other’s expense. If you're 
targeting tbe 500 or 1.000 largest users 
of telephony worldwide . . . you serve 
them wherever their operations may be. 


such gusto that the advantages that 
Western phone operators once had are 
fading fast. : 

“Some of these markets are already 
very competitive, not just duopolies oc 
even triopolies, but with multiple li- 
censes: it suggests from die outset that 
this is necessarily , a higher risk envir-$> 
onment where returns on capital are not 
assured.” he observed. “European and 
North American operators have become 
much- more disciplined about investing 
in emerging markets. There is enough of 
a track record to say it’s not a case of 
throw $1 billion at Thailand and you’ll 
get $10 billion back. They're taking a 
more cautious approach.” 


CONR.4D DE AENLLE writes front 
London about financial and economic 
topics. - 


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INTERNATIONAL HER ALU TRIBUNE. THURSDAY. MARCH 13, 1997 


PAGE 21 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS / 4 SPECIAL REPORT 


Railroads Well Placed 
In Deregulation Race 

Networks Coveted by Telecom Operators 


Outsourcing Wins Over French Bank 


By Marsha Johnston 


.iki 


P ARIS — With the deregula- 
tion of the telecommunica- 
tions industry in Europe 
scheduled for Jan. 1, 1998, the 
continent’s dense railway network is 
^ en J2T gin ? as an important factor. 

The link between a 19th -century 
•raiKpoTt technology and the zipping 
electrons of cyberspace is not im- 
mediately apparent. In fact, the rail- 
roads in most European countries are 
the second largest telecomm unica- 
. dons operators after the main tele- 
. phone companies themselves. 

As such, they offer a ready-made 
u . solution for rival telecommunications 
;>1 operators to move into markets that 
- have until now been domi nant by 
monopoly state telephone companies. 
“The main thing they have is the 
. routes and infrastructure,'' said 
Richard Shenton, a railway commu- 
nications expert with Smith System 
Engineering in England. “Either they 
have their own facilities which they 
can sell, or they can provide access to 
their track for other operators to lay 
their own cable." 

The railroads provide direct links 
between major cities for both com- 
munications and travelers, but they also 
have complex regional networks that 
provide ready-made regional access. 

Most of the rail companies have 
plenty of spare communications ca- 
r parity as they convert their systems 
.. from copper to fiber-optic cables. For 
- , example, the French state rail com- 
. pany, the SNCF, uses only about 10 
percent of its capacity for traffic man- 
agement, reservations and adminis- 
tration. 


By Barry James 


of France’s largest media group, 
Havas, as part of a project to control 
not only communications but a sub- 
stantial pan of their content in coming 
years. Generale des Eaux aims to be- 
come the country's second largest 
telecommunications operator with 


projected annual sales of 40 billion 
francs ($7 billion! within five years. 


It recently concluded a partnership 
agreement with Cegetel. the telecom- 
... munications arm of Generale des 
,, Eaux. and British Telecom to exploit 
its 9,000-kilometer (5.500-mile! net- 
J work of fiber-optic cables. Telecom 
Developement, the new subsidiary of 
' Cegetel and SNCF, will invest over 
' the next couple ofyears to increase the 
~ fiber-optic network to 12,000 to 
‘ 1 3,000 kilometers. 

The deal has some interesting syn- 
ergies. because Generale des Eaux op- 
erates about 20 percent of the former 
nationalized rail service in Britain as 
well as France’s only private line. 

The company recently won control 


francs (57 billion! within five years. 

It is already the country's second 
largest cable television and mobile 
phone operator, using cables laid along 
its own water network and beside 1.700 
kilometers of toll highway. It is also 
negotiating to use the communications 
lines of the Paris Metro to reach con- 
sumers directly in the capital. 

Deutsche Bahn. the German rail 
service, is selling a 49.8 percent stake 
in its telecommunications subsidiary, 
DBKom, to a consortium led by the 
German industrial group Mannes- 
mann, which is Germany's leading 
mobile telephone operator. The Ger- 
man railway track operator offered its 
entire 40.000-kilometer network, in- 
cluding 4,000 kilometers of fiber-op- 
tic cables, which will be extended to 
14,000 kilometers in time for dereg- 
ulation. 

Mannesmann has the option of rai s- 
ing its stake in DBKom to 74.9 per- 
cent over a three-year period, and has 
signed a service contract with the rail- 
roads worth one billion Deutsche 
marks (.5625 million) a year. 

Meanwhile. British Telecom has 
entered a 50-50 joint venture with 
Netherlands Spoorwegen, the state- 
owned Dutch rail company, to offer 
domestic and international voice and 
data services to corporate customers. 
In Spain, British Telecom and the 
Santander Bank are challenging the 
monopoly of Telefonica de E span a. 
the Spanish telephone company. In 
Sweden. British Telecom has joined 
forces with Norwegian and Danish 
operators to set up a rival business to 
the Swedish phone monopoly. 

Until deregulation arrives, the new 
rail partnerships cannot offer direct 
services to homes and businesses, and 
have to rely on the phone companies 
to initiate and complete calls. Since it 
would be too costly to duplicate their 
nationwide networks, the phone 
companies are likely to remain in the 
dominant position after deregulation, 
despite the competition from the rail- 
roads and other partnerships. 

But Mr. Shenton said that the most 





P ARJS — While French corpo- 
rations have been slower than 
their European counterparts to 
contract out, or outsource, all of 
their computer and network systems op- 
erations to high-tech service companies, 
such reluctance may be evaporating 
among French bankers. 

Although outsourcing grew in France 
by about "12 percent to 14 percent per 
year between 1993-1996, it paled in 
comparison 10 rates of up to 22 percent 
in England and 20 percent in the Neth- 
erlands, according to Symec. France's 
association of software and information 
technology service professionals. 

Pierre Dellis. director of Synlec. says 
that the slower growth in France can be 
blamed on the near- impossibility of get- 
ting outsourcing contracts with the gov- 
ernment or with public enterprises, and 
the marked reluctance of many infor- 
mation technology directors, particu- 
larly in banking. 

But increasing economic pressure on 
French banks to reduce their general 
operating costs may be changing bank 
attitudes about getting rid of their com- 
puter or network operations. In January. 
Credit Lyonnais became the first French 
bank to hand over an entire network 


Railroads offer a quick solution. 


money in the business is to be made 
from long-distance carrying, while lo- 
cal access to homes and businesses is 
usually of low capacity and expensive 
to maintain. The railroads themselves 
face deregulation and are likely to 
move toward an increasingly integrat- 
ed pan-European infrastructure. 

To prepare for deregulation, the 
SNCF and other rail companies have 
split, or are in the process of splitting, 
into two separate organizations, one 
responsible for operating the trains 
and the other for maintaining and leas- 
ing out the track. 

For the moment, the benefits to 
railways, telecommunications 

companies and the public are mostly 
potential. The deals concluded so far 
are part of the jockeying for position 
in the deregulated market. 

The deal with Generale des Eaux 
provides the SNCF with capital and 
expertise that the heavily indebted 
railway track operator cannot afford 
on its own. Analysts estimate it will 
cost up to 12 billion francs to expand 
the fiber-optics network, while the 
SNCF could benefit from 5 billion 
francs in income over the next three 
years. The long-distance telephone 
market is estimated to be worth 57 
billion francs a year. 

Mr. Shenton said the idea of using 
rail lines for telecommunications 
traffic has caught on in Europe because 
the density' of the rail networks makes 
the operation potentially profitable. 


operation to an outside company. 

Its secretary-general, Jean-Francois 
Vemy, announced that the bank had 


signed over all of its telecommunica- 


tions to France Telecom and Global 
One. Global One is an international 
business telecoms consortium compris- 
ing France Telecom. Deutsche Telekom 
and Sprint of the United States. The 
five-year facilities management con- 
tract is worth about S550 million. 

Credit Lyonnais is outsourcing in an 
attempt to save money. After net losses 
of 20.8 billion francs (53.7 billion) be- 
tween 1992-94. the then newly appoin- 
ted CEO. Jean Peyrelevade, imposed an 
austerity plan on the state-owned bank 
in spring 1994. The program has cut 
Credit Lyonnais's general administrat- 
ive costs, including personnel, from 
40.4 billion francs in 1 993 to 34 billion 
francs 1 351 year. 

Under the contract, France Telecom 
and Global One acquire all of Credit 
Lyonnais's telecoms equipment and 
will take charge of managing and de- 
veloping the bank's telecoms install- 
ations in more than 2,500 sites in 
France, the Americas and the Asia-Pa- 
cific region. Global One will handle the 
international activity, which accounts 
for less than 20 percent of the total. 

The contract defines 38 services the 
two companies are charged to provide. 


including data, voice, video-conferen- 
cing and mobile. France Telecom and 
Global One will be responsible for set- 
ting up new services such as virtual 
private voice/dara networks, high -ca- 
pacity optical fiber loops and Internet 
networks. 

The contract is one of France Tele- 
com’s first, says Jean-Piene Temime, a 
France Telecom executive vice pres- 
ident. France Telecom has outsourced a 
data network for the French retailer 
Auchan and a PBX network for the 
electrical equipment maker Schneider. 
Global One also has only a handful of 
outsourcing clients, including IBM and 
Groupe Bull. 

Divesting its telecom activity, said Mr. 
Vemy. will allow the bank to focus on its 
core business, a statement closely echo-, 
ing Anglo-Saxon corporate mantras. 

It also marks a change in the bank’s 
business culture, says chief information 
officer Pierre Car Li. The deal, he said, 
‘ ‘would have been difficult to envision 
even a few years ago, because it just 
wasn't part of our culture, and it does 
mark a turning point for Credit Ly- 


MARSEL4 JOHNSTON is a freelance 
journalist based in Paris, specializing 
in telecommunications and information 
technology. 


Deregulation Payoff Likely to Go to Big Users 


Continued from Page 19 


R4RRY J.iMES is on the staff of the 
International Herald Tribune. 


deregulated, the prices of international 
calls also fell most sharply and inter- 
national traffic has become the fastest 
growing marker segment. 

According to Peter Roe, a telecom- 
munications analyst at Paribas Capital 
Markets in London, prices on inter- 
national traffic have fallen at an average 
rate of3.5 percent a year over the past 10 
years, while “volumes of international 
traffic have risen at a double-digit an- 
nual rate for many years, including 13 
percent in 1995." 

In other words, better technology 
paves the way for more competition, 
lower prices and higher volumes, a pro- 
cess that Mr. Mallinson calls a “vir- 
tuous circle.” 

This circle would be more virtuous 
still if there were low-cost technology 
available to enable competitors to 
cheaply gain access to the last mile to 
the residential customer. As the U.S. 
local access market opens to compe- 
tition, the American long-distance giant 
AT&T is experimenting with an elec- 
tronic box that could directly tie home 
phones to the AT&T wireless network. 


Numtetvf 




T ' Local 

"W j IS Longdistance' 
£fi International . 
1 ■ Cellular 


volume was between 4.5 percent and 5 
percenL” 

Tim Kelly, bead of operating analysis 
at the International Telecommunica- 
tions Union in Geneva, noted, “We are 
going from a paradigm based on co- 
operation to a paradigm based on com- 
petition. An international telephone call 
is a jointly provided service. Most 
traffic is carried on either submarine 


cables or satellite owned by the big 
telecommunications carriers. A sort of 




telecommunications carriers. A sort of 
cartel. There may be a tipping point at 
which we will see competition imple- 
mented. January 1998 may be that tip- 


Source: ITU Reaulatorv Database 


ping point 

But competition is not likely to work 
smoothly from the start The price 


But without new technologies, play- 
ers who plan to compete in the local 
phone market must either invest a for- 
tune for a redundant infrastructure, as is 
happening in Britain, or pay an inter- 
connect fee to the dominant local carrier 
to access their line to the customer. 

As competition threatens, prices fall 
and volume creeps up. Mr. Janet noted: 
“Over the last five years, traffic has 
increased in volume 2 percent or 3 per- 
cent per year. Last year, during the last 
trimester after we cut rates, the rise in 


smoothly from the start The price 
former monopolies are allowed to 
charge for interconnecting competitors 
to their switches and lines is determined 
by national regulators and courts. 
Former national monopolies will fight 
for the highest interconnect rates and 
contenders the lowest As Goliaths like 
BT become the challengers in countries 
like France and Germany, they will be 
fighting on both sides of the battlefield. 


SBARON REIER is a freelance jour- 
nalist based in Paris. 
















PAGE 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MARCH 13, 1997 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS / A SPECIAL REPORT 


Investment Game Heats Up as East Europe Prepares to Privatize Old Syste 


-t 


By Peter S. Green 


P iRAGUE — Across Eastern 
I Europe, governments are pre- 
paring a new wave of telephone 
privatizations, hoping to sell 
controlling stakes in their national tele- 
phone carriers. For the countries con- 
cerned, it mil be one of the biggest 
changes to hit their economies since the 
end of Soviet-style central planning. 

For strategic investors and the law- 
yers. consultants and stock pickers who 
follow them, it will be one of the last 
great opportunities in the region to get 
rich from the sale of the former Soviet 
bloc's state-owned companies. 

Tens of billion of dollars in invest- 
ment will be needed to modernize the 
aging and neglected systems, and many 
economies, like Poland and Slovakia 
which are already booming, promise 
rich returns for bom strategic and equity 


investors in their phone companies. 
Even today's laggards like Bulgaria, 
Romania and the rump Yugoslavia are 
expected to post high growth as they 
adopt long-delayed reform and privat- 
ization programs. 

“It's the hottest game in town. If you 
believe that in the 20th century we are 
moving beyond an industrial society to 
an information society, then this is the 
key privatization. Telecoms is the key 
investment that drives every other in- 
vestment in an economy,” said Joseph 
Tortorici, an attorney and a specialist on 
telecommunications privatization with 

WeiL, Gotshal & Manges. 

Mobile phone networks have sprung 
up in Central and Eastern Europe, some 
privately owned, some as joint ventures 
between state-owned companies and 
foreign mobile phone operators. But 
only the Czech Republic and Hungary 
have sold controlling stakes of their land 
line telephone companies to foreign 


strategic investors. In 1997, telecom- 
munications investors expect to see pri- 
vatizations in Bulgaria, Romania, Ser- 
bia. Hungary, Poland and perhaps 
Slovakia. Estonia and Macedonia. 

Mr. Tortorici is one of a number of 
telecommunications specialists who are 
predicting that the expected privatiza- 
tion of Poland’s Telekomunikacja Pol- 
ska wUl be this year's hot story. 

“All the big players you saw going 
after the Czech telecoms are going to go 
after Poland. It’s enormous.” Mr. 
Tortorici said. 

Poland is one of Europe's fastest 
growing economies. A massive indus- 
trial base, and a population fairly re- 
ceptive to capitalism mean Poland bas 
tremendous growth potential. Poland 
has yet to decide if it will find a strategic 
investor for TPS A or sell the utility on 
the stock market. 

In the rump Yugoslavia, FIT Traffic 
Serbia, the Serbian telephone company. 


is negotiating with STET. the Italian 
telephone operator. Bulgaria's new 
government, desperate for cash to stave 
off economic collapse, is looking to sell 
its phone company to the Greek state 
telecommunications company. OTE. 
which is itself still largely state-owned 
but slowly preparing for privatization. 

Last month. Romania announced a 
tender for Rom Telecom. The asking 
price is about SI billion. Hungary's 
Malav, 67 percent owned by Germany’s 
Deutsche Telekom and the American 
phone company Ameritech. will sell 
some of its shares on the stock market. 

The East is Europe's worst connected 
region, and pressure is mounting on 
governments to privatize their tele- 
phone companies quickly, as their 
monopolies expire on both domestic 
service and the more lucrative inter- 
national calls. 

The recent World Trade Organization 
agreement to open all the world's tele- 


communications markets to internation- 
al competition, and the European Uni- 
on's own plans to end national 
monopolies by 1998. mean national 
telephone companies must get their 
countries wired quickly. 

* ‘You’ve got to get as many people as 
possible hooked up so that when de- 
regulation comes you have the biggest 
franchise in your home marker, and 
many local telephone companies do not 
have’ the financial resources to put in 
place these programs.” says Anna Bos- 
song. an analyst with ING Barings Se- 
curities. 

But most of the telephone companies 
lack the necessary technical know-how, 
management expertise and cash, mak- 
ing them a good fit for U.S. and West 
European phone companies with deep 
pockets and armies of well-trained tech- 
nicians and managers running increas- 
ingly automated networks. 

In Bulgaria, which has one of the 


region s highest percentage ofconnec*-; 
ted households — 31 mam taw 
hundred inhabitants ~~ the technology, 
is nearly aJJ outdated analog switches* 
which are expensive to maintain and 
expand. Investors are expecting to have 
to rewire these countries with modern; 
digital and fiber-optic technology. . 

In fact, sav analysts, whether a couth 
try has 10 percent of its population 
connected or 20 percent, the phono 
companies will have to np everything 
up anyway, so what they are buying are. 


not fixed 'assets, but aa o^ortumry 
cash h 
growth 


on the country’s ex 


pecteitf 


In U.S., Baby Bells Get Ready for Key Battle 


Continued from Page 19 

Another consideration is that 
many people do not change their 
phone service providers very easily. 
Mr. Hall noted that 13 years after the 
long-distance market was opened, 
AT&T still has about 56 percent of it. 
If the pattern holds, the Baby Bells 
will have an advantage in offering 
long-distance services. 

New entrants into the local market 
cannot compere too much on price. 
Those agreements that have been 
reached between the Baby Bells and 
competitors provide wholesale dis- 
counts of 20 percent to 25 percent. 
Mr. Hall said. That does not leave the 
new entrants much room to cut 


prices, but there is plenty of capacity with slimmer profit margins than 
tn the long-distance market, so the they currently enjoy. 

Baby Bells can turn around and offer Similarly, J.D. Power 


those services with attractive terms. 

This situation, Mr. Hall said, is 
likely to persist until wireless tech- 
nology brings direct competition to 
the local market, but it will take 
about five years for that to occur on a 
large scale. The Salomon Brothers 
analysts injected a note of caution for 
investors. Although they predicted 
the Baby Bells would keep most of 
their load markets, their profit mar- 
gins will shrink as those competitors 
that do step in will concentrate on the 
most lucrative regions. 

Salomon Brothers predicted the 
Baby Bells would retain about 70 
percent of the local business, albeit 


& Asso- 
ciates said the long-distance carriers 
could acquire a third of the local 
business, and the Los Angeles-based 
market-research firm predicted they 
would retain control of their current 
business. The firm's analysis, based 
on a survey of more than 6,000 
American households, found that 65 
percent of U.S. consumers were 
likely to want to bundle their tele- 
communications services with one 
company. 

J.D. Power predicted that Amer- 
itech would retain the greatest pro- 
portion of its customers among the 
local phone companies, while Sprint 
would do the best among the long- 


distance concerns. Kirk Parsons, se- 
nior manager of telecommunication 
services at Power, said that for the 
long-distance companies, the key 
determinant for winning bundled 
businesses was current customer sat- 
isfaction. and Sprint's clients were 
the most satisfied among the three 
big long-distance concerns. 

For local-service companies, 
however, image was the issue. A lot 
of Ameritech 's advertising. Mr. Par- 
sons said, ‘‘has to do with techno- 
logy.” In addition, he said, the com- 
pany has been aggressive in trying to 
open its local market to competition. 

MITCHELL MARTIN is Money Re- 
port editor of the International Her- 
ald Tribune. 


NICHOLAS HADDAD, Operations Manager, Mobile Communications, Ericsson Australia Pry. Ltd. (with his father). 


Improvising takes two things. 
Creativity and experience. ” 



More than a century of telecommunication expertise leads force to the 
ingenuity that is instrumental in the way Ericsson serves its customers. 
Being a major player, we see our sophisticated repertoire in tele- 
communications not just as technological triumphs, but as ways to add 
value to peoples lives. What better inspiration for new solutions and 


services than to make things work for the individual as well as for 
companies and entire countries? 

Ericssons 90.000 employees are active in more chan 130 countries. 
Their combined expertise in switching, radio and networking makes 
Ericsson the world leading supplier in telecommunications. 


ft's about communication between people . The rest is technology. 


Tdefonakriebolagtt LM Ericsson. S-126 25 Stockholm. SWEDEN. 

http://www.ericsson.5e 


gi: 

l-=(-UL J -I 




Industry insiders are taking bets ot> 
who will emerge as the region s leaders. 
America’s Baby Bells, who were active 
in bidding for land lines and mobile 
franchises earlier this decade, are ex- 
pected to sit out now. as new rules m the 
United States have increased pressure m 
their home markets. _ . • 

Instead. G erman y 's Deutsche Tele- 
com. Italy’s STET and France Telecom, 
themselves in the throes of further pn-‘ 
vatization at home, are expected to step 
up their bids to become major regional 
players. The French and Germans ard 
already partners with Sprint of the 
United States in Global One. one of the 
top three international phone alliances! 
and Dutch Swiss, Swedish and Spanish 
national phone companies are allied 
with AT&T in Unisource, anotherof thf$ 
three big alliances. • 

Observers expect that many of the 
East European governments will evert'; 
tually opt for selling to one of the smal- 
ler West European countries directly. ; 

“You tend to find that the countries 
we are talking about are a little bit 
reluctant to get into bed with the AT&Tg 
and British Telecoms of this worid t 
They feel they’d be overwhelmed and 
completely modified.” said one in^ 
duslry expert. 

PETER S. GREEN covers Central 
Europe for the International Herald 
Tribune. ! 



Bv Julian Nundy 


Internet’s Next Global Task: ; j 
Hurdling Language Barrier f 

steep. By mid-February, Info me had jusi 
26,500 subscribers. Now its shares trade 
around the 165 franc mark. 

lnfonie started by offering Internet access 
and a French-language service of 123 items 
from games to educational services with 
graphics and sound for 149 francs a month! 
This was three rimes more expensive than 
America Online in France. - 

France, with its 15-year-old France Tele- 
com Minitel teletext service, is a . difficult 
market as the country has been slow to em- 
brace the Internet. There are 6.5 million M inf 
itel terminals, offering albeit erode if well- 
tried services, compared with little more than 
500,000 personal computers in French 
homes. 

Matching the lnfonie service, some French 
web sites also offer a highly luxurious and 
colorful service for their clients. One of these 
is Nirvanet (httpV/www.nirvaneLfr). intror 
duced at around the same time as lnfonie 
floated its shares. 

Hailed with no false modesty as a cy-/ 
berculture “temple.” with the insights of its* 
own gurus and specially composed techno 
sound and myriad original graphics. Nirvanet 
started with six “ underworlds " from Techno 
Ballroom on music and Kombat Zone oh 
issues such as computer security to CyberlaiJ 
with high-technology news and Cyberpunk 
Library with texts by Bruce Sterling and 
William Gibson. • 

However, Nirvanet is anything but an all- 
French service. It is offered in three lan- 
guages. French. English and Spanish, reflectr 
ing a view that no non-English-Ianguage 
communications service, even one promising 
“a cybercultural paradise." could afford the 
luxury of remaining monolingual. 


P ARIS — For those linguistic Anglo- 
phones who fear the increasing in- 
ternational dominance of the English 
language, the Internet must be a night- 
mare. Two-thirds of Internet host computers 
are based in the United States and another 12 
. percent are in other English-speaking coun- 
tries. Non-Engiish-speakine Western Europe 
‘ accounts for ! ~ percent. Asia for 4 percent' 
. and Latin .America for 0.6 percent. 

Therefore it is extremely difficult to op- 
erate in the Internet without a good grasp of 
; English. If the Internet is to become truly 
* global then the language barrier must be 
| tackled. 

Software companies are developing pro- 
■ grams that wiil automatically translate e-mail 
■ and Web pages into other languages. 

. Language Engineering, of Belmont. Mas- 
■ sachu setts, has a program that puts Internet 
1 services into Japanese while programs to 
1 translate sen ices into French. German. Span- 
| ish and other languages have been developed 
! by other manufacturers. 

In France, an on-line search program called 
Ecila scans the Net for ail sites created in 
France or about France. 

The experiences of lnfonie. a completely 
French sen er. however, show how difficult it 
is to break into the market and become a 
significant player. 

lnfonie was "the company chosen a year ago 
to launch the Nouveau Marche at the Bourse. 
Its early performance was spectacular, as 
over-optimistic investors foresaw a boom in 
the Internet in France. The share price rose 34 
percent in the first two days of trading to reach 
605 francs (5110). The fall, however, as In- 
fonie failed to attract the 65.000 subscribers it 
expected by the end of 1996. was fast and 


JULL4N NUNDY is a journalist based in 
Paris . 


The Hard Race to Cable Britain 


Continued from Page 19 


mand service from British Telecom as well.” 

Not to be left behind, the cable indusby is 
scrambling to ready its network to carry digital 
broadcasts, which it aims to begin by the final 
quarter of this year, the same time BSkyB will 
begin its digital transmissions. With the po- 
tential for as many as 200 channels, and for 
snazzy services like video-on-demand and in- 
teractive services, cable's digital network will 
be the most advanced on the market. The prob- 
lem is that it will be expensive to provide. 

Stephen Davidson, chief executive of 
Telewest Communications, the largest cable 
operator, terms those costs "modest com- 
pared to the investment we have been making 
in building our networks.” 

By most estimates, the total tab will run to 
hundreds of millions of pounds and embar- 
rassingly will require expensive upgradings 
of cable systems now barely five years old. 

Some observers have begun to wonder if 
cables' long-awaited profits will ever arrive. 

— This has generally been a ‘jam tomorrow’ 
industry.” said Rob OMerenshaw, director of 
analysis at CIT Research, who sees little signs 
of the promised feast arriving. 

A case in point is Telewest. whose largest 
shareholders are the American phone company 
US West and the cable television operator 
Tele-Communications Inc. Many analysts ex- 
pect it to post losses of around £220 million for 
1 996 and again for 1 997. Mr. Sc rue ion even 
predicts thafir a decade Telewest's shares will 
be lower than they are today and ihat the 
company will have paid no dividends. 

Ironically, the best business Britain's cable 
companies have is one that they saw orig- 
inally as linle more than a loss leader — 
telephones. Merrill Lynch predicts that this 
year the cable industry will make 70 percent 


of its revenues from telephone services, on 
which it typically undercuts British Tele- 
com's prices by 10 to 15 percent. As of 
October, the industry boasted 1.8 miltioh 
installed phone lines (vs. 1.6 million cable 
television homes). 

Analysts and industry officials agree that t b 
make money the cable industry must boost iti 
penetration rates for cable television from 
today's level of 22 percent to 30 to 35 percent 
“ Because of a well-established satellite com- 
petitor [BSkyB) which the U.S. market did 
not have, penetration of cable television has 
been slower than expected,” said A Gary 
Ames, president of US West International ”1 
doubt we W iii ever reach American penV 
etranon levels of 65 percent, but I think we . 
can get into the 30s.” 

The cable industry has had a huge dis- 
advantage its puny size. Thus far the welter 
of regional cable franchises have done little 
more than bay at the heels of BSkyB with itS 
nationwide coverage. BSkyB hi enioved 
huge advantages of scale, from its advertising 
budget to its ability to bid for the righUro 
cany top movies and sporting events - 

telephone business will create by far ££ m- 
dustry S largest company. me in 

"I see it as a crucial step forward for our 
industry, moving us in the direction of m 
atmg a national company ” said ff n °o ‘ 

"Tv Jt=" C ^lc ra ediK' hie ^“ v f “ m - 

By some accounts, there could he is 9C 
one or t wo cable companies by tire end of 


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I,YTEBNATON*L 


PAGE 24 


Sports 


• -4p - 

THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 199f\ 


World Roundup 


First for Wiberg 


skiing PemiSla Wiberg. the 
overall World Cup points leader, 
won a downhill for the first time 
Wednesday, and Ren ale Goeischl 
was second to clinch the downhill 
title in the first race of the World 
Cup Finals in Vail, Colorado, 
Wiberg, a slalom specialist from 
Sweden . has already clinched the 
overall title for points won over the 
season’s World Cup series. She fin- 
ished in l minute. 43 28 seconds to 
win the race that opened the five-day 
event that ends the alpine season. 

Goeischl, an Austrian, tied for 
second with Katja Seizinger of Ger- 
many in 1 :43 J 1 . That gave Goetschl 
enough points to pass Heidi Zur- 
briggen and Warwara Zelenskaja 
and claim the downhill title. fAP) 


Atletico Chairman 
Ends Brief Boycott 

He Agrees to Let His Team Play 




Wm 




AX 




England Recalls Andrew 


RUGBY union England recalled 
34-year-old fly-half Rob Andrew to 
its squad for the Five Nations' cham- 
pionship finale against Wales on 
Satur day Andrew is director of 
rugby at the Newcastle club. He 
retired from international rugby at 
the stan of last season. < Reuters ) 


NFL Changes Owner Rule 


FOOTBALL NFL owners voted to 
permit ownership of franchises in 
other sports, allowing Wayne Huiz- 
enga, who also owns Miami's base- 
ball and ice hockey franchises, to 
maintain control of the Miami Dol- 
phins. and Paul Allen, who owns 
tiie Portland Trailblazers of the 
NBA, to exercise his option to buy 
the Seattle Seahawks. The rules had 
forbidden NFL owners to own 
teams in any other professional 
sport except soccer. ( Reuters J 


Gwp M by l*ur Staff Fmm Dt^arbn 

Jesus Gil, the Atletico chairman, 
backed down Wednesday from his threat 
to withdraw his team from the Spanish 
Cup quarterfinal in Barcelona. 

Gil refused to allow his team to fly to 
Barcelona on Tuesday, saying he would 
withdraw his team from the Wednesday 
night game as a protest over bans im- 
posed on three of his players by the 
Spanish soccer authorities. 

But he told his players Wednesday at 
a lunchtime meeting to get ready to fly 
to Barcelona. 

Gil announced the boycott after the 
Spanish league’s disciplinary commit- 
tee issued two-game sanctions against 
the strikers Juan Esnaider and Diego 
Simeone, and a one-game sanction 
against the defender Delfi Geii. fol- 
lowing incidents Sunday at a league 
match against Betis. 

Gil called the combined sanctions 
“the greatest outrage in the history of 
Spanish soccer." 

“The people who cause the grave 
damage will pay for it.” Gil said." 

He is understood to be preparing legal 
action against the federation. 

Atletico beat Barcelona in the final of 
the cup last year. This season in the 
quarterfinal, the two teams tied 2-2 in 
die fust leg in Madrid. 

ENGLAND Kasey Keller made a series 
of key saves as Leicester held on for a I - 
1 tie at Wimbledon to advance to the final 
of the League Cup. the less prestigious of 
England's two cup competitions. 


KeJJerflew out Wednesday to join the 
U.S. team for a World Cup qualifying 
game against Canada. 

Marcus Gayle of Wimbledon scored 
in the 23d minute, and Simon Grayson 
tied it in the 53d. The two teams had tied 
0-0 in the first leg in Leicester, which 
had advanced because it scored more 
goals away from home. 

Keller made two saves to stop Gayle 
midway through the second half. First, 
Gayle hit a sharply angled volley that 
Keller palmed over the bar. A minute 
later. Keller dived across the goalmouth 
to tip Gayle’s shoL 

GERMANY Fredi Bobic scored a hat- 
trick to revive VfB Stuttgart’s flagging 
Bundesliga title challenge. 

Stuttgart won 5-1 in Cologne to climb 
into third place, two points behind Bo- 
rnssia Dortmund and Bayern. 

Rico Sreinmann put Cologne ahead in 
the 20th minute, but Bobic equalized 






, m 


m m-r&i 




m: 






m 


within a minute and put Stuttgart ahead 
with a second after 33 minutes. 


with a second after 33 minutes. 

Bobic *s three goals made him the first 
division’s top marksman, with 16 goals. 
He passed Sean Dundee of Karlsruhe, 
who has hit 14. 

Italy Napoli's coach, Luigi Simoni. 
was reported Wednesday to have agreed 
to take over at Intemazionale when Roy 
Hodgson moves to Blackburn at the end 
of the season. 

The sports daily Gazzetta Dello Sport 
said Simoni had agreed to an $800,000 
annual contract with Inter’s owner, 
Massimo Moratti. 






y v ■ 






ffrMrr- -Axm 




Rip 


m&\ 


Mml ) TWn!lTLr S'-onjdrdPfrw - 

Mark Philippoussis celebrating his victory over Andre Agassi in the opening round of the Champions Cap. * 




Philippoussis Overpowers Agassi 


Musher Glides to 3d Iditarod Title 


Chanteur Takes Stage 


CYCLING Pascal Chanteur of the 
Casino team won the fourth stage of 
the Paris-Nice race Wednesday, 
while Laurent Jalabert of the Span- 
ish ONCE team kept the leader's 
white jersey. 

Chanteur led home a group of 
seven riders, which included 
Jalabert. at the end of the 165- 
kilometer stage from Montlucon to 
Clermont-Ferrand. The main pack 
finished 14 seconds behind. (AFP l 


The Associated Press 

NOME. Alaska — Martin Buser won 
his third Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race 
Tuesday night, completing the 1.1 00- 
mile 1 1 ,7604tilometer) course in nine 
days, eight hours, 3 1 minutes. 

Buser. who won in 1992 and 1994. 
earned $50,000 and a $38,000 truck. 

Shortly after Buser finished, race of- 
ficials announced the death of a fifth 
dog in this year’s race. About an hour 
before Buser reached Nome, another 
racer, Nicholas Pattaroni. reached a 
checkpoint with a dead dog. a three- 
year-old male named Al. 


Pattaroni, who works as a handler for 
Buser, was driving a team of B user’s 
younger dogs. Race veterinarians were 
unable to determine the cause of tiie 
dog's death, and Pattaroni was allowed 
to continue the race. 

The deaths in this year’s race have 
prompted animal protection organiza- 
tions to call for change. But Iditarod' s 
executive director. Sian Hooley. said 
Tuesday it was not clear what, if any. 
moves could be made that would elim- 
inate dog deaths, noting that two of the 
dead dogs had just ended a 24-hour 
rest. 


Ci*r^Cri in Out S^ffTFaxc Dap&jx} 

INDIAN WELLS. California — 
Mark Philippoussis. the biggest server 
in tennis, overpowered Andre Agassi, 
the biggest returner, in the first-round 
match of the Newsweek Champions 
Cup tournament, 7-6 (7-51. 7-6 (7-5). 

Philippoussis, a 20-year-old Australi- 
an, received almost as much attention last 
week for hitting the fastest serve on the 
tour at 142 miles per hour (225 kilo- 
meters per hour) as be did for winning the 
event in Scottsdale. Arizona. On Tuesdav 


he shot 23 aces at Agassi, many in the 
130-135 miles per hour range. 

Philippoussis gave the best measure of 
his approach on set point in the first set. 
He hit his first serve at 135 miles per hour 
but was inches long. Then he hit his 
second at 124 miles per hour, forcing 
Agassi into an error. It was the fourth 
tournament in a row in which Agassi has 
been knocked out in his first match. 

Defending champion Michael Chang 
needed just 75 minutes to beat unseeded 
Sjeng Schalken, 6-4. 6-3. 


In the Even Cup. also at Indian Wells, 
Conchita Martinez survived five match*' 
points and beat Chanda Rubin, 6-1; 1-6,- 
7-5, to reach the quarterfinals. .-* 

Rubin was ahead two sendee breaks*', 
in the final set and was serving for the.I$ 
match at 5-2 when Martinez broke back.^ 
Rubin served again for the match in the' 
10th game, ahead 5-4 and 40-love. 

But Martinez came back and then* 
won it in the 12th game when Martinez* 
hit a backhand long. 

(LAT. AP, AFP/ 


i!Dav$ 


Lindros Loses a Puck, and Flyers Lose a Game 




The first ATP Super 0 Champi*^ m ' 

Indian Wells v California; can strongest * 


opposition of the yeait : 


The Assocuted Press 

Eric Lindros lost the puck behind his 
own net, and the miscue led to Michael 
Peca’s goal 42 seconds into overtime to 
give the Sabres a 3-2 home victory over 
Philadelphia. 

The loose puck set up Jason Dawe's 
pass to Peca, who put a slap shot over 
the right shoulder of goalie Ron Hextall 
for the game-winning power-play goal. 

“It wasjusta horrible play." Lindros 
said. “I made a mistake and hopefully. 
I’ll learn from it.” 

Philadelphia leads the Eastern Con- 
ference but the loss allowed Buffalo and 
the New Jersey Devils to gain ground. 

The Sabres. 24th out of 26 teams in 
power-play goals, managed just three 
shots on six power-play chances against 
the Flyers. 

“The guys were saying ‘Let’s take a 
penalty instead, we ’ll have a better 


chance of scoring,’ ” the Sabres' coach. 
Ted Nolan, said. “We’ve had trouble 


with the power play all season long. 
We’ve learned to live with it and if we 
get a goal, great." 

Derek Plante and Donald Audette 
also scored for the Sabres, while the 


NHL Roundup 


Flyers got power-play goals from Petr 
Svoboda and Eric Desjardins, who 
scored with 1 1 seconds left in the 
second period to tie the score, 2-2. 

“.As far as the power play goes it 
seems we're wandering around not 
knowing whai we're doing, but we'll 
have it ready by playoff time," Peca 
said. 

Devils a. Otter* i Bobby Holik scored 
twice in a five-goal first period as New 
Jersey won its seventh in eight games. 


Scott Stevens, Bill Guerin, Bobby" 
-Carpenter and Brian RcrtstonaJ soseared 
as the Devils stretched their home un-. 
beaten streak to 13 games. 

Capitals 4, Canucks 1 Washington 
maintained its five-year unbeaten streak- 
against visiting Vancouver as Rick Toe- * 
chet had a goal and assist and Bill Ran-* 
ford stopped 16 of 17 shots. 

Martin Gelinas scored with 5:13 left' 
to spoil Ranford’s shutout bid after the- 
Canucks managed just 10 shots in the' 
first two periods. ~ 

P anth er s 3, Islanders 2 At Miami, 
Robert Svehla had a goal and an assist as: 
Florida snapped a four-game losing 
streak and won for just the second time-' 
in 12 games. 

Blues 4, Sharks 3 Pierre Turgeon 
sewed his 21 st and 2 2d goals in the third’ 
period to help St. Louis snap a five-game: 
losing streak with a victory at San Jose.- 



Scoreboard 


13 - 16 March, LIVE, 
Newsweek Champions 
Cup, Super 9 Series 

Sampras, Ivanisevic, Muster, 
Chang, Henman and Agassi wffl 
afl be in action m this £L3m 
event 



BASKETBALL 


NBA Standings 


ATLANTIC DIVISION 



W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

New York 

47 

17 

.734 



Miami 

46 

17 

J30 

•A 

Oriando 

33 

28 

SCI 

)2'k 

WasNngtan 

28 

33 

.459 

17* 

New Jersey 

18 

43 

-295 

m 

PhSadWphia 

16 

45 

362 

29*1 

Boston 

12 

51 

.190 

3416 

CEKTBAL (MVntOK 



x-Oricago 

54 

a 

.071 

— 

DetroO 

45 

17 

XU 

9 

Artanto 

43 

19 

JM 

n 

Chartotte 

41 

22 

*S\ 

WA 

□evetond 

34 

27 

SS7 

191a 

Indiana 

29 

32 

A75 

24 Vi 

MBwoutee 

26 

36 

jt!9 

28 

Toronto 

22 

40 

.355 

32 

W8STUN COURtBKS 


MTOWEST DtVTSXm 




W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

a-U»h 

4S 

17 

J26 

— 

Houston 

43 

20 

.683 

2W 

Minnesota 

3) 

30 

JOS 

13% 

Dallas 

20 

41 

J28 

24% 

Denver 

18 

44 

J90 

27 

San Antonia 

15 

47 

J42 

30 

Vancouver 

11 

S3 

.172 

35 


PACIFIC DIVISION 



Seattle 

43 

18 

.705 

— 

LA. Lakers 

41 

20 

.672 

2 

Porttond 

36 

28 

.563 

Sri 

Sacramento 

28 

35 

AM 

16 

LA. Cappers 

U 

34 

.433 

16W 

Phoenix 

24 

38 

JB7 

I9Vir 

Golden State 

23 

38 

477 

20 


ix-dlnehed playoff spat) 

WMMTt — U» 


NOT rut 30 T3 23 18-83 

Dates 27 TB 23 23-91 

N.Y.: OaUey 7-13 2-2 1ft Evrfng 4-1 1 4-4 12. 
Starts 4-13 2-2 1; D: Rntey 6-20 8-10 21 
SMdJond 4-12 12-12 22. RaOcu Wh NOT 
York 46 {Ewing 12), O olios 45 (Finley 9). 
Assists— New York 17 (OaUey 5). Data 15 
(Hntey 6). 

Taraata 32 22 22 23— IBS 

Pkoeott 24 33 21 23— 1U 

T: Cfltnby 10-15 3-8 21 StoudamtroS-20 4-5 
22: P: CebaSas 10-20 4-5 25. Ontarian 8-150- 
0 22. KHNUDtt— ' Toronto 63 (Rads 141, 
Phoenix 56 (CebaHas 16). Assists— Toronto 
25 (Stoudamhe 9), Phoenix 29 (Johnson. 
Kidd 7). 

LA. dippers 22 31 22 30— IB5 

Poritaed 28 34 ao 1 7—189 

LJL: Roger* 0-15 7-9 26. Saaly 5-8 4-4 16c P: 
WoDoee 11-15 3-6 26. Anderson 4-12 6-7 16. 
Wohoands— LA. cuppers 48 (Outlaw 8), 
Portland 55 < Schools 13). Assists — LA. 
Cappers 28 (Richardson 7), Portla nd 21 
(Anderson 7). 

Detroit 14 19 34 23- 88 

Seatie 21 16 34 22— 93 

Dr Hio 6-16 58 16. Hunter 6-15 1-2 16; S: 
Perkins 4-10 9-10 3ftKemp 7-16 2-4 It, 
Payton 5-1 o 66 16. Redcands— Oetrort 41 
CMCte 7), Seattle 59 (Kemp 10). 
Assists— OetroC 19 (HU 8). Seattle 21 
(Payton 61. 

OaHlo n d 24 22 a 14— 88 

S a c r am en to 22 17 19 27— 85 

C MB Is 7-12 54 21, Hill 8-8 1-1 17) S; 
Richmond 8-21 9-829, WWomegn S-83-S 11 
Rebounds— Cleveland 41 {Hin 13), 
Sacramento 50 (Smith 151. 


Assists— Oevetand 22 (Brandon 9). 
Sacramento 23 (Richmond 10). 

OWCOBO 29 30 27 31—117 

Bostoa 29 22 33 22-106 

& Jordan 1 3-235-6 32, Plppen 12-22 3-3 27; 
B: WBtams 810 11-14 27. Wesley 6-19 7-721. 
Wa&er 822 3-5 20. RUmUs— Chicago 56 
(Rodman 16), Boston 46 (Wlffiams 7). 
Assists— Chicnga 29 (Jordan 91, Boston 23 
(Pax 8). 

Vancouver 30 12 27 23— 92 

Charlotte 27 24 21 26- 98 

V; Abdw-RnWm 9-16 66 24 Reeves 1821 
3-723, Q Mason 8-148-11 24, Rice 6-23810 
24. Ratwiwto Vancouver 48 (Reeves, 
wuooms 13), Chartotrr 56 (Mason 13). 
Assists—' Vancouver 2> (Rogers, Anthony 5), 
Charicfte 21 (Mason 8). 

Utah 20 23 36 20- 99 

Aftoeto 24 28 27 27—106 

U: Malone 9-20 6-7 2* Horace* 7-11 3-4 
18; A: Smith 819 1810 27, Blaylock 814 6-6 
26J2efaow>ds — Utah 38 (Mafone 77, Atlanta 
45 (Mutombo 14). Assists— Utah 22 
(Stockton 10). Atlanta 14 (Blaylock 7). 
PfaBadefcNo 31 24 25 20-100 

Mhroesota 32 1* 23 30-104 

P: Stockhouse 12-23 89 34, Coleman 819 
3-620; M: MartHiry 5-16 )4-lP2AGugRcna *- 
11 5-6 13. West 87 3-4 13. 

B ebowd s PWta dUpMB 47 (Weattwspoon 
11). Minnesota 51 (Garnett 12). 

Assists— PMtadetphia 17 (Coleman 6). 
Minnesota 1 7 (Marbury 9). 

HoostoB 38 27 21 27—183 

Son Antonio 24 18 17 20—79 

H:Wffls 813 3-3 19, OJo|uwon 7-15 84 17; 
SJL-Wnr»oms813 1-2 19, wnwns 4-105-6 IX 
Rebo un d s H o uston 50 (wms 9). Son 
Antonio 51 (Feick 7). assists— H ouston 26 
(EBe 7), Son Antonio 16 (Del Negro 5). 

Miami 23 26 31 28-108 

Mtaraefcoe 25 22 28 26—93 

M: Hardaway 11-251-1 29. Austin 9-1 1810 
24.' MIL- Baker 12-17 2-4 27. Allen 820 7-7 
26Jteboands— AAtarnl 40 (Pj Brown 15), 
Milwaukee 46 (Baker tO). Assists— Miami 26 
(Hardaway 12). Aiutsroukee 19 (Alton 
Douglas 5). 

Orlando 30 20 19 27— 96 

Denver 31 19 22 19- 91 

O. Hardaway 1821 6-6 27. Strong 9-14 2-3 
20rD: LEWS 7-1 7 4-6 19. Johnson 81 00-0 18. 
Rebounds— Orlando 42 (Gram 12), Denver 42 
(Johnson 16). Assists— Orfanda 20 
(Hardaway 8). Dmver 23 (l_EWs 7). 



W L T 

Ph 

GF 

GA 

Buffalo 

35 21 11 

81 

195 

167 

Pittsburgh 

32 28 6 

70 

228 

216 

HorMont 

26 30 10 

62 

183 

201 

Montreal 

24 32 73 

61 

210 

243 

Ottawa 

22 32 13 

57 

1B4 

797 

Boston 

23 35 9 

55 

197 

238 

WUIUH COHRUHa 



central rovrarorr 




W L T 

Pt5 

GF 

GA 

Dallas 

40 23 5 

85 

205 

165 

DexroH 

32 19 15 

79 

211 

155 

Phoenix 

31 33 4 

66 

192 

205 

St. Louis 

29 31 8 

66 

199 

309 

Chicago 

26 31 11 

63 

174 

170 

Toronto 

25 37 S 

55 

196 

231 


Maine division 




W L T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

x-QXorodo 

41 17 9 

91 

228 

163 

Edmonton 

31 31 7 

69 

213 

308 

Anaheim 

28 30 9 

65 

195 

194 

Col gory 

28 34 7 

63 

181 

196 

Voicsuver 

28 36 4 

60 

209 

233 

Los Angeles 25 35 9 

59 

184 

224 

Son Jose 

23 37 7 

53 

172 

220 


(x-cBnched ptoyotn 



TUBSMT'SIUSMTS 




SKIING 


“V-A r'r; . .- 


WowlpCup Finals 


LOTd reoutta In the women’s downhtH 
WectateKtay. to VBfl Colorado; 1. Pernmti 
Wiberg, Sweden. 1 min. 4123 s_- Z Renata 
Gaetsct* Austria. 1:4231; Kat|a Sefetoger, 
Gerniniry, 1^331; A Isolde Kastner, ttaJy, 
1M3A1; 5 Heidi Zurtirlggea Swmertand, . 
1:43.7k & HHde Geng. Gertnony, V43J8; 7, S 
Kathorirw Gutensohn. Germany. 1:4299; a ^ 
Alesandro Mefasnlttw, Austria, 1^4.00; 9! 
HHarv Undh. IM4.15; 1ft Stetonte 
Schuster. Austria. 1W43B, 


i *- .. 



SOCCER 


¥ x ; ' : - 


Euro League 


ELDONATION ROUND. SECOND LEG 
SevtDa 75» Teamsystem Botognu , 79 
L|uM|ana 69. Ctoono Zagreb 66 
EsrucBantes 79. Vtoeurtname 77 
Lknoges 5ft PonolWnaftos 70 
Bacetono 72, A&» Bw8n 63 
Otymptakosaa Parttsan Belgrode 
Kinder Botogna 82 Slefanel WHma 76. 


HOCKEY 


NHL Stawmhos 


pt m aetph to 
New Jersey 
Ftorido 
N.Y. Rangers 
Tomgo Bov 
Wu st i to g ta n 
N.Y. Istanden 


ATLAIOTC IMVTStON 

W L T PI* CP GA 

I 38 30 10 84 224 173 

36 19 12 84 188 155 

30 23 15 75 180 160 

s 31 a 9 n 21? 191 

27 32 7 61 184 N6 

27 33 7 61 170 IBB 

n 23 34 10 56 183 198 


PkamWpbla 2 0 8 0-2 

Bctfots 2 0 0 1—3 

First Period: B-Ptante 25 (Boughner. 
HnseW Z P-SrobOdo Z (ppl. 1 8Aode11e 25 
(Wont Sooghnert * P-Destorttns lo 
(Lindros. Prospall (pp). Second Period: 
Nona. TMrd Parted: None. Overtime: 5, B- 
Peaalo (Dowel (pp)- Shots an goal: P- 811- 
12-0—31. B- 10-881 — 24. Bms» p. 
HedolL B-Hasek. 

E dmaatea q l 0— l 

New Jersey 5 D 

Rist Period: NJ. -Stevens 4 (ZetepukJn. 
Carpenter) ft NJ.-Guertn 25 (Pandolta 
Rolstan) ft NOT Jersey. HoNk 16 (MacLean, 
ZelepgWn) * NJ.-Holik 17 (Arukeychuk. 
nwmasj 5. NJ .-Carpenter 3 (MacLeaa 
ZdepuMn) Second Period: E-Smytti 30 
(Walght, A mom (pp), TWrf Period: NJ.- 
Roblon 18 (Simpson. McKay) Shots on gaaL- 
E- 816-12—36. N J.- 187-6—28. Goalies: E- 
Joseph, Essensa. N-l.-DunMm. 

Vonenuver „ Q 

WusMaylsn g j 2—4 

Rrst Protect None. Second Period W- 
Toochet 17 (Houstey. Cate) 1 W-Klee 2 
(Oates) Third Parted: w-Housley 8 
(Tocchetj 4. W- Bon Ora 41 rNIkaHswn) 5, v- 
Gellnas 24 (Bohonos, Noonan ) (pp). shots an 
goat V- 6-4-7 — 1 7. W- 813-11—31. GaaHns: 
V-Hlrach. W-Rantord. 

N.Y. Isteaders 1 g j — 2 

Pterida 1 , o_3 

Fist Period: F-SneWa 13 lUnd&oy, 
Nendrovshyi 2. New Vm*. Bertuai * 
(Anderssan, McCabe) Second Parted: F- 
Sheppeid 23 (Svehla) (pp). a F- Hough 7 
CUndsoy. FlftgeroW) TMrd Parted: Now 
York Kruse 6 l McCabe. Lapointe) Shots an 

P* "-V- 2-17-6—25. F- 18187-01 
P™*r-ptey Opportunities— N.Y. - 0 at a- F - 1 
ot 1 Goa Das: N.Y.-Sata. F-Vanbleshroudv. 

St. Louis n , 2 a 

Hrst Period: SJ.-GuaBo 9 (Errey. 

Mcsorley) Second Period: S.L-PronglTa 
(Turgeon. Htfy (p n ). 3 . s.^-CaurtnoH 15 
(Turgeon. Kravchuk) (pp)! TbM Period: 
SJ-Frtasen23 (Noton. Rognotsson).a 5.L- 
Turgeon 21 (Prangec. Krovaiuk) 4 . s.l-. 
Taraeon 22 (Mntwoul J. S J.-Notan 2& snots 
a a goafc 5X-- 1813-4-27. SJ.- 86-11-25. 
Gaafles: S.L-Funr. SJ.-Beltour. 


Blackbunt I, Nottingham Forest 1 
STAtHMNos, Manchester United 57; Li*- 
wpoot 5ft- Arsenal 54r Newcastle 4b Aston 
ynta torSh etfleld Wednesday 45,- Wtoitdedon 
4* Cheiseo 4ft- Leeds 39; Leicester 37; Tat- 
tonham 3ft- Btacuurn 3ft Eserton 33,- Derby 
ttSundertond 32; Couentry 3 ft Nottingham 
Ruesl 2& Southampton 25. Most Ham 25; 
Middtesorough 22. 

BWUSH IUNE COW 
SEMnNAL SECOND LEO _ 

Wlmbtedan 1, Leicester 1 
iLetcester won on awoy goals nde) 
MUUNBBNHflJM 

KaiHrvhe Z Bochum 3 

werder Bremen, 2 51 Poult 1 

Hamburg z Borussia Moenchen gtadb o ch 1 " 

SdtaJke 4 Duisburg 0 1 

Cologne I, VfB Stuttgart 5 

STAHDfMOS: Banrsski Dortmund 41 Bay- 

ora Munich 41 VfB Stuttgart 41. Bayer Lev- 

ericinen4l; Schalke 36t Kortsruhe 31 Cologne 

» w ^Bramen32,VfLBota«in,^tS!rr. A 

^rPwJ 860 Munfch 27; Atminia Bieiefotd ■& 

tasPnaS! ^ ® oruS5fa Mdeochengtod-- 

Bnch Z3; Fortuna OuesoeWorf 22; St PouB 19s 

Honsa Rostock lft Fietourg 13. 




IV 1 - “> 

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Oopofttwa Ca« 2. Penarot 0. 


TRANSITIONS 


V 


WAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 
"•OBCAN LEAGUE 

Ataifc e ^ HB n A9reBd 10 Wrm& LWP 
Alon Embree. RHP Paul Shuey and OF Brian 
Goes an ane-yeor contracts. 

Tampa BA v— Signed 1 8 Robert CoOna. 
tooohto -Optioned RHP Mark Stewart to 
Syracuse. IL and RHP Joe Young ana RHP 
KeMm Escobar to Knaorilte. Sl7 
FOOTBALL 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 

jss r*™ 0B Ertk 

*^"c^. l ^^ E ^ tesww, ° 
Wf> LaTW Th0ma * «l 

j£=25 , 35T'iT5SU 

^^BitedWR-KRTroyB^ggg 

it^lS^52? ed 10 4 ""“-wt entv 
tnra with DE Rayiee Johnson. 

SAN Francisco— S igned LB Mark Bvers 
«n«d RB Jeff Mekoviden. 9 


















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Players Leave, 
But Maljkovic 
Keeps Winning 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1997 

SPORTS 


PAGE 25, 


I. i i *i * vTK 

;p,h VlU'-foE? 


By Ian Thomsen 

International HeraJd Tribune 

^UMOCES, Fhmce— Basketball fans 
of nus small city m central France wel- 
■ .corned back Bozidar Maljkovic four 
<y6ars oner he brought them a European 
championship. Coach Maljkovic seerned 
touched by the golden plaque presented 
to nm before the game Tuesday night in 
the EuroLeague playoffs. 

r ^ K - n * 35 l 1 ® stood watching with his 
aims folded across his chest, his players 
strangled Limoges, his old club, 70-55. 
.The victory gave Planathinaikos of 
Athens, the defending European cham- 
pion, a 2-0 sweep of the senes and sem 
Maljkovic on to the quarterfinal round in 
two weeks. It was a surprisingly firm 
result considering that Panarhinaikos had 
been lucky to win die opening game at 
home last week by a point in typically 
controversial Greek style. The French 
had complained about the refereeing and 
a scoreboard malfunction. 

This time they had no excuses. They 
. ^fell behind early, wrestled their way into 
..^position and were finished off in a mar- 
velous display of outside shooting by 
Byron Dinkins, who created most of his 
own shots and was falling out of bounds 
dramatically as some of his 25 points 
splashed through. 

• Dinkins is the only American left at 
Planathinaikos. The club began the sea- 
son with Dominique Wilkins still on its 
books technically, as it was seeking legal 
action to avoid paying him the $3_5 
million remaining on his contract. John 
Salley, who owns three National Bas- 
ketball Association championship rings, 
was brought in to replace Wilkins and 
didn't last two months. Then Anthony 
A vent, another former NBA power for- 
ward, came and went before Christmas. 

All of them had trouble dealing with 
Maljkovic 's school of Yugoslav dis- 
cipline. Last week John Amaechi of 
England, yet another former NBA 
power forward, was suspended by 
£ Maljkovic at the most crucial time of the 



A Celebratory Basketball Finale 


By Kathy Orton 

Wrafcnffltw Post Sen-ire 

COLUMBUS. Ohio — The starting 
forward sang the national anthem. A fan 
was invited to sit on the home team's 
bench. Game 5 of the women’s pro- 
fessional basketball best-of-five cham- 
pionship series hardly resembled the 
men’s version, but it lacked none of its 
fever-pitched excitement. 

Basketball historians will note that 
the Columbus Quest defeated the Rich- 
mond Rage, 77-64. to win the inaugural 
American Basketball League champi- 
onship Tuesday night before a sellout 
crowd of 6.313. it was the first time the 
Quest, the league's lowest drawing 
team, had turned away fans all season. 

Valerie Still, a 35-year-old forward- 
center for Columbus who four years ago 
was leaching high school, was named the 
game’s most valuable player. She fin- 
ished with 14 points and 13 rebounds. 

While the ABL championship may 
not have had the trappings of the NBA 
Finals — no counside celebrities, no 
laser light show — the players could not 
tell the difference. 


"Now I know what Michael Jordan 
feels like." said Nikki McCray, a for- 
ward for the Quest and a 1 996 Olympian 
who was named most valuable player in 
the league’s inaugural season. 

The game's significance lay not in 
Columbus's victory or in the fact that 
McCray can hit a 1 0-foot jumper as well 
as the high note in the Star-Spangled 
Banner. Instead, what mattered most to 
supporters of women's professional 
basketball was that, unlike three of its 
four predecessors, the ABL survived its 
first season and sold out its final. 

Perhaps the game will end up having 
no more significance than the Pittsburgh 
Pipers' victory over the New Orleans 
Buccaneers in the 196S American Bas- 
ketball Association championship, 
which has been relegated to a footnote 
in professional basketball history. 

Bui maybe the eight-team ABL. 
which grew out of the increased interest 
in women's college basketball and the 
success of the U.S. national and Olympic 
gold medal teams last year, can withstand 
the upcoming challenge by the Women’s 
National Basketball .Association — the 
women’s version of the NBA. 


The ABA lasted nine years, from 
1967 to 1976, before it was absorbed by 
the NBA Perhaps the ABL is just a few 
short years away from being swallowed 
up by the WNBA. Or maybe, the ABU 
can build on its small, but encouraging 
success this season. 

On Tuesday night. Columbus was . 
focused on the present. The Quest dom- ; 
inated on their home court as they have ; 
all season. ; 

Led by Edwards's torrid shooting, the • 
Quest (36-11) attacked from the outside j 
early. They nailed three 3-pointers in the 1 
first four minutes for a 11-4 lead. That i 
seven-point advantage proved too much I 
for Richmond (25-22). Try as it might, ! 
the Rage could not close the gap. 

They were only able to exploit their ! 
height advantage defensively. They out- ; 
rebounded the Quest, 47-33, but missed > 
so many shots that they negated the • 
edge. I 

Dawn Staley, a former Virginia [ 
standout and Olympic gold medalist, j 
and the shortest player on the court at 5 1 
feet 6 inches, led Richmond with 19 ; 
points. It was her second- lowest scoring 1 
game ever. 


Some Will Cheer Fall of Rupp’s Record 


Umirl I j-mi AgHir* Hum lip* 

Yann Bonato of Limoges, left, trying to shoot over Ferran Martinez. 


season, or so you would have thought. 

Yet P&nathinaikos is one of the three 
teams to have advanced already to the 
EuroLeague quarterfinals. 

The others were Barcelona and 
Teamsystem Bologna, which beat Alba 
Berlin and Sevilla, respectively. None 
will know its next opponent until this 
round concludes Thursday. 

The most surprising result Tuesday 


was a 6 1 -60 upset at Olympiakos-Piraeus 
by visiting Panizan Belgrade, which 
forces the Greek champion to return to 
Yugoslavia for the decisive game. 

If Olympiakos wins, it will meet 
Panathinaikos in a best-of-three 
quarterfinal. Their Greek rivalry is 
probably the fiercest and craziest in 
world basketball today, the NBA and 
American colleges included. 


By Jim Litke 

The .Associated Press 

Adolph Rupp’s name is back on bas- 
ketball fans* lips, this time not so much 
because of whai he won, but because of 
what he is about to lose. Not everyone is 
unhappy about that, either. 

Come Saturday, 25 years after he 
coached his last game and almost 20 
years after his death. Rupp will very 
likely be bumped from the top of college 
basketball's career victory list by Dean 
Smith, the coach at North Carolina. 

Those who played for Rupp could not 
imagine him going quietly. 

“He would have had a few choice 
words.' ' said Frank Ramsey, a star at 
Kentucky in the early 1 950s. 

Larry Conley, a member of the un- 
dersized, overachieving 1966 squad 


known as “Rupp’s Runts,” said. “Any- 
body who had an ego as large as his. I 
guarantee would be upseL’’ 

Dan Issel. the last of 23 All-Amer- 
icans to play for Rupp, sees his old 
coach doing more. 

“He'd find a university or college 
that would employ somebody past the 
age of 70, and start building on. He was 
that competitive." Issel said. 

Desire obviously, wouldn't be a prob- 
lem for Rupp who gained 876 victories, 
four National Collegiate Athletic As- 
sociation championship titles, one Na- 
tional Invitational Tournament cham- 
pionship, one Olympic gold medal and 
27 Southeast Conference titles. 

But the game has changed, and Rupp 
was a prisoner of his time. Not in how he 
wanted the game played, but who he 
allowed to play it. Rupp was at Kentucky 


2 Days Later, Knicks Turn Into Pumpkins 




The Associated Press 

The New York Knicks, euphor- 
ic after beating Chicago two days 
earlier, choked on their encore. 

New York had its worst loss of 
the season Tuesday, dropping a 91 - 
83 decision on the road to the Dal- 
las- Mavericks in a performance 
that erased all the positive emotion 
the Knicks built two days ago. 

“On our best nights, we play as 
good as anyone,’ ’ their coach, Jeff 
Van Gundy, said. “On our worst 
nights, we play as bad as anyone." 

The loss ended the Knicks’ sev- 
en-game winning streak and cut 
their Atlantic Division lead over 
Miami to a half-game as the Heat 
beat Milwaukee. 

John Starks called the loss “a 
• big letdown.*’ 

• “Wehave to jump on teams like 
this and tear their throats out," he 
said. 

■ Michael Finley scored 23 points 
for the Mavs. and Erick Strickland 
arlrWl 22, including I2-for-12 
shooting from the free-throw line 
raid four foul shots in the final 36 
seconds. 


Haat ion, Bucks 93 In Milwau- 
kee, Tim Hardaway scored 17 of 
his 29 points, including five of his 
six three-pointers, after halftime to 
help Miami finish off a sweep of 
the four-game season series 
against the Bucks. 

• Hawks 106, Jazz 99- Atlanta 
made a season-high 40 free Arrows 
and shot 10 of 18 from beyond the 
3-point arc to stretch its winning 

streak to five games and improve 
its home record to 27-2. 

SoperSonics 93, P is to ns BO In 

Seattle, Sam Perkins scored 20 
points and Shawn Kemp bad 16 
points and 10 rebounds, but Gary 
Payton's defense against Detroit’s 
Grant Hill was the key for Seattle. 

Hill scored 18 points but was 
held to 6 for 16 shooting by 
Payton, last season’s defensive 
player of the year in the National 
Basketball Association. 

Bulla 117, Celtics 106 Michael 
Jordan scored 32 points and passed 
John Havlicek for sixth place on 


the NBA's career scoring list as 
Chicago won in Boston. Jordan 
took over the sixth spot on a free 
throw with 2:49 left that gave the 
Bulls a 108-97 lead after they 
struggled through much of the 
third quarter and early into the 
fourth before -pulling away. 

Rockets 103, Spurs 79 Houston 
completed an undefeated five- 
game road trip and won its sixth 
straight. The Rockets played with- 
out two injured all-stars. Clyde 
Drexler and Charles Barkley, and 
didn't miss them. 

Iriul Blazers 1 09, Clippers 1 0S In 
Portland, Rasheed Wallace scored 
26 points, and the Blazers won 
their seventh successive game. 

Portland led by 19 points, but Los 
Angeles closed to 106-103 on La- 
mond Murray's layup off a steal 
with 25 seconds left. Then two free 
throws by Isaiah Rider and one by 
Kenny Anderson made the game 
safe for Portland. 

Tcnberwoive* 104, 7 Sera lOO 

Stephen Marbury outdueled fellow 
rookie Allen Iverson, scoring 13 
points in the final 5:52 to rally 


Minnesota from a 14-point deficit 
and beat visiting Philadelphia. Mar- 
bury had 24 points and nine assists, 
and the Wolves outscored the Six- 
ers, 18-4, to close out the game. 

Raptors 105, Suns ioi Toronto 
completed a sweep of the season 
series as it hit 10 3-pointers to win 
in Phoenix. 

Hornets 98, Grizzlies 92 Glen 

Rice scored 20 of his 24 points in 
the second half as Charlotte 
struggled before extending its 
longest winning streak of the sea- 
son to six games. 

Magic 96, Nuggets 91 Derek 
Strong scored 10 of his 20 points in 
the fourth quarter, ana Penny 
Hardaway had 27 points as Or- 
lando won at Denver. 

With the loss, the Nuggets 
coach, Dick Mona, joined the Los 
Angeles Clippers coach. Bill 
Fitch, as the only coaches in NBA 
history to lose 1 ,000 games. Morta 
has a career record of 932- 1 ,000. 

Cavaliers 88, Kings 85 Chris 
Mills scored 21 points and Tyrone 
Hill had 17 points and 13 rebounds 
as Cleveland won in Sacramento. 



Jon irritVlIir VKeidiilaj Krrw 

The Knicks' John Starks passing against the Mavs. 


from 1 930 to 1972. In that time one black ; 
played basketball there, and that came at I 
the end. Yet Rupp was open-minded ; 
about every other aspect of the game. 

His Wildcat teams were fluid and ! 
predatory and for years stocked with the ; 
talent They were in many ways much ‘ 
like the polished North Carolina teams * 
that have produced National Basketball - 
Association stars by the handful. That 
was no coincidence. , 1 

Rupp and Smith played ball at Kansas ! 
30 years apart, but both had the good luck 
to apprentice under Phog Allen, one of ' 
the college game's great innovators. . 
Rupp's eye for talent was so good, in fact, 
thai when he went overseas in die mid- 
1950s to stage clinics for the U.S. Air 
Force, a kid he called out of line to help 
demonstrate was the young Smith. The , 
friendship they struck up then extended : 
over 20 years. 

Smith, whose record against Rupp ■ 
was 5-2. recalled his favorite meeting. It • 
look place in Charlotte. North Carolina, ! 
in 1969, a day before the two teams met : 
for the last time during Rupp’s tenure. 

“We were in the same hotel and he I 
called my room and said, ‘C’mon over.’ 
He had his red pajamas on. He was very 
entertaining." 

Unfortunately, Rupp's nimble mm of ; 
mind never extended to his roster. Hfe ■ 
knew that by ignoring black players, he 1 
was cutting himself off. To this day. 
rumors persist that he intended to in- : 
tegrate nis team in the mid-1960s, but: .* 
that the recruit backed out when Rupp., 
refused to enter his home and insisted 
that his parents come out and sign the”, 
scholarship letter in the car. Not long 1 
after, a team with five black starters ; 
from Texas Western. later renamed ’ 
Texas-EI Paso, beat Rupp’s Wildcats in ; 
the NCAA championship. I 

That 1966 final came to be viewed as a5 

watershed. Rupp was marked in the* 
minds of many as an enemy forever. He* 
achieved much, but, they argue rightly, "i 
be could have achieved so much more. 

“I never liked Mr. Rupp. I never f 
have,” said Nolan Richardson. Arkan- ‘ 
sas's coach, who is black. “I have rea- ! 
sons. Not because be didn't do a great job, ; 
because he did. Obviously, he won a lot ; 
of games. But 1 think the world of Dean. ; 
He’s a class individual. I’ll sleep much • 
better knowing Dean is the man." ; 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


j itti Kutiuri® : 






WHAT DO YOU THINK, MARGE? 
I BROUGHT A BANANA IN CASE 
THEY TEACH U5 H0U1TO MAKE 
BANANA CREAM PIE TODAY.. 


WE DON T/ 
HAVE ( 
C00KIN6 
CLASSES, 
^ SIR- y 


r WE 
DON’T? 




5U66E5TI0N TIME, 
MAAM. LET'S FORGET * 
THE MATH, AND I 
CONCENTRATE ON f 
BANANA CREAM PIE.. * 


YOUR E BECOMING 
INCREASINGLY 
WEIRD, SIR.. 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 

HON COME IT KESH'T TAKE MM8E IX 

'ey AS LONG fc£> MOM TO MORE 

OPONM TUE V»0SE? STVClENT. 


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DO AS GOOD 
-i A JOB. r- 




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CUR. UTH£ 
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xnmaruo 

HP IMS KM! 




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•Mr. Wilson must think Tto awful a^AiL. 

'fe&HSXto* HANDFUL- 




SELBS 


GARFIELD 






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WIZARD of ID 





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PAGE 26 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY MARCH 13. 1997 


ART BUCHWALD 


Par for Lobbying 


6 An American Symphony’: Mr. Kamen’s Opus 


W ASHINGTON — It is 
not onlv the Democrats 


but also the Republicans who 
give the impression to the 
public that they have a price 
tag on them- 
selves. A front- 


page scoop in 
The New York 
Tunes reported 
a story about 
Representative 
Dan Burton, 
chairman of the 



Buchwald 

mittee on Gov- 


ernment Reform and Over- 
sight 

This is the same commmit- 
tee in charge of awarding S5 
billion in long distance and 
local telecommunications 
contracts with the govern- 
ment. According to the Times 


story, the congressman was a 
euest of AT&T at its Pebble 


guest of AT&T at its Pebble 
Beach golf tournament 
which is a dream come true 
for every golfer in America. 


While denying that it 
would affect his judgment or 
his vote, there are some in 
Washington who believe that 
Burton was compromised. 

There is now evidence that 
golf is the best way for lob- 


Algonquin Hotel 
Being Sold to Group 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The Al- 
gonquin Hotel. where 
Dorothy Parker and her gang 
of literary friends gathered to 
muse, is being sold to an At- 
lanta-based group specializ- 
ing in historic hotels, the 
Daily News reported Wed- 
nesday. 

Camberiey Hotel Co. will 
buy the 165-room property 
for an undisclosed price from 
Aoki Corp.. which bought it 
for $29 million 10 years ago. 


by i sis to suck up to legislators 
and even presidents. 

Hugo DeRiviera, a lobbyist 
for Spit Communications, told 
me: “I never saw a golf-play- 
ing legislator who refused to 
tee off with an influence ped- 
dler, and by the end of 18 holes 
not be persuaded that the ped- 
dler's cause was just. 

“Our company will not 
hire a lobbyist in Washington 
unless he shoots a 65. But we 
don't want him to outscore 
the congressman he is playing 
with, so our man has to play in 
such a manner that the con- 
gressman always wins. 

“Everyone believes that 
our legislators are constantly 
trying to raise money for their 
campaigns by selling dinner 
tables. This is simply not true. 
You can get a lot more out of 
them through flattery during a 
golf game. For example, on 
one contract we had a con- 
gressman out on the course 
and whenever be hit the ball 
into the sand trap, the caddy, 
who was really one of our vice 
presidents, said. ‘Good shot! 
That was the best sand trap I 
ever saw. I don’t know where 
you learned golf, but you 
really have mastered the 
game!' Two weeks later we 
got a contract for $200 million 
dollars to string our phone 
lines across the Dakotas.” 

f said, “Once again golf 
plays its dirty role in this 
country's dirty politics. The 
long green fairway is more 
persuasive to selling out than 
a Vicuna coat.” 

“President Clinton sells 
golf games — why shouldn't 
we?” 

“I didn't say you should- 
n't. Your cause is as just as 
anyone else's. Does it cost a 
lot of money to subvert an 
elected official?” 

“Well, golf balls aren’t 
cheap, bur if we can persuade 
a congressman to smile on us, 
it's a blue chip investment. " 


By Mike Zwerin 

Ituernalioiral Herald Tribune 


N EW YORK — His enormous 
success with rock and film 


music notwithstanding. Michael 
Kamen has fancied himself a clas- 
sical composer ever since vener- 
ating those cute plaster busts of the 
Three Bs on his piano while prac- 
ticing as a child 

. So when a call came a few years 
ago asking “Do you want to write a 
symphony for this little movie? It 
doesn't pay very much, but ...” he 
held on for all of 20 seconds before 
replying: “Yes. Yes yes yes." 

On Feb. 26, he was awarded a 
Grammy for it, in the Instrumental 
Arrangement category. The name 
of the work was “An American 
Symphony” and it was featured in 
the film “Mr. Holland’s Opus’* in 
which Richard Dreyfuss plays a 
musician who wanted to write what 
Kamen describes as “this one piece 
of music that would embody every- 
thing he believed in about America 
and modem music. But be was so 
busy being a good teacher that writ- 
ing it stretched out over 30 years.” 

This was a persona Kamen could 
identify with. A Mr. Holland-type 
teacher had had a profound influ- 
ence on him in Music and An High 
School in New York. The type is a 
mentor or a guru more than a teach- 
er. And also, tike Mr. Holland with 
children, Kamen chose to dedicate 
his career to a supportive role. 

For whatever reasons, his suc- 
cess is largely due to his ability to 
tailor bis talent to elaborate other 
people's images. 

Kamen 's CV reads like an en- 
cyclopedia of media movers. 
Among many other rock stars, he 
has written for Aerosmith, David 
Bowie. Eric Clapton and Pink 
Floyd. His movie scores include 
three “Die Hards,” three “Lethal 
Weapons,” “Brazil,” ”101 Dalma- 
tians.” “Robin Hood, Prince of 
Thieves,” Don Juan De Marco” 
and Francis Ford Coppola's 
“Jack.” 

“Mr. Holland’s Opus. ’ * however, 
is autobiographical. Kamen draws 


cm themes from his own life and 
incorporates Mr. Holland's experi- 
ences through his o wn prism. This 
tittle move assumed far greater im- 
portance to him titan any number of 
“Lethal” blockbusters. 

Dreyfuss/Hotiand conducts the 
piece played by past and present 
grateful high school students. He 
has had a profound effect on all of 
them. Kamen discussed the story’s 
implications with Dreyfuss: “He 
and 1 hit it off. We ‘jammed’ for 
hours and hours about how this film 
could make a difference, how it 
could really say something.” 

They recognized that, despite a 
hokey side (Mr. Holland advises a 


‘Making music can 
iUmninate people’s 
lives, can make 
them better people.’ 


clarinet student to “play the sun- 
set”), this was one rare American 
film that is actually about 
something meaningful to the hu- 
man condition. There is also an 
important subplot: “The value of 
music education, even for those 
who do not become musicians. 
Making music can illuminate 
people’s lives, can make them bet- 
ter people.” 

This nice little piece of fiction, 
sort of Frank Capra for the '90s. is 
currently in the process of chan- 
ging reality. Earlier this year, Ka- 
men and Dreyfuss started a charity 
called “The Mr. Holland’s Opus 
Foundation." 

As part of the film's pre-release 
promotion, Kamen went back to his 
alma mater to speak. He re- 
membered that the High School of 
Music and Art had been “filled 
with Mr. Hollands, people who 
were dedicated to enriching the 
minds of children. They were 
people with emotional and intel- 
lectual wit, wisdom and warmth. In 
those days, even elementary 
schools were well stocked with free 
instruments for students.” 


When Kamen asked a current 
M&A reacber how things were go- 
ing, the answ er came back, “not so 
hoL” There’s a budget crisis. 
Funding for the arts is being cut. 
There is not enough curriculum 
time. When teachers retire they are 
often not replaced. Something sim- 
ilar is happening all over the United 
States. Tne movie 's drama revolves 
around this situation, and it is be- 
coming increasingly less fictional. 

The teacher took him to a room 
packed with hundreds of broken 
instruments — trombones wrapped 
around fiddles, cracked bassoons, 
headless drums. It was a graveyard. 
Every one of those instruments had 
once given pleasure to a young per- 
son. Kamen remembered the joy 
he'd felt being handed his first oboe. 
(He went on to study oboe at JuR- 
tiard and was co-founder of the suc- 
cessful Baroque-rock band die New 
York Rock and Roll Ensemble.) 

Wanting to give something back 
to Music and Art be offered to 
help. Bui everything he suggested 
seemed to be politically im- 


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possible. Kamen is a willing help- 
mg-hand extender. You do not 


mg-hand extender. You do not 
even have to ask, he’ll offer. For 
example, be hosts chamber music 
evenings for worthy causes in his 
London home. He had made him- 
self available when somebody sug- 
gested “somebody ought to do 
something about this,” and it oc- 
cured to him that there was an 
“achievable goal" here — to give 
new and repaired musical instru- 
ments to children, period. No pol- 
itics involved. 

Dreyfuss and Kamen talked 
about the idea during interviews. 
The response was immediate and 
enormous. One child wrote them 
thai music was the only thing keep- 
ing him sane. His parents were a 
mess, he hated staving home. He 
once had a clarinet but some kids 
beat him up and stole it. 

Sony Music, the Yamaha Cor- 
poration of America, the Avedis 
Zildjian Company. Rico Reeds 
and BML plus many smaller 
private sources have pledged sup- 
port. Apple computer designed 


Michael Kamen: Music “is a vibrant part of kids' lives. 11 


a web site for the foundation. 

“The irony of it,” Kamen re- 
marks, “is that I don’t think there 
has ever been a time in history 
when the making of music has been 
such a fundamentally vibrant pan 
of kids' lives. Inexpensive easy -to- 
learn electronic devices have made 
music more and more accessible. 

“We are only interested in put- 
ting a musical instrument in a 
child's hands. The curriculum of 


the school system is the prerogative 
of local boards of education. Real- 
istically, we can't change this. 
However, the sacrifice of our chil- 
dren's emotional expression is too 
high a price to pay for a slight 
reduction in school budgets.” 

The Mr. Holland's Opus Foun- 
dation. P.O. Box 262/, Toluca 
Lake, Calif orna 91610-0621. Fax. 
(SIS) 760-7321: web site, http ill 
wwwjnlwpus.org. 


, v .. 


PEOPLE 


1 ; 

s . 
I ■ 


T HE FUR is flying. Naomi Camp- 
bell, one of the five supermodels to 



pose nude for an anti-fur ad campaign 
(“We’d rather go naked than wear fur’ ’ 1 
has been spotted sporting a fur coat on a 
runway in Milan — and People for the 
Ethical Treatment of Animals is cross. 


. 


i' 


The activist group has “fired” Camp- 
bell, with the PETA spokesman, Mi- 
chael McGraw, saying that “It just 


Hunchback of Notre Dame.” He called 
the movie “admirable.” saying, that it 
“shows how the genius of my ancestor 
can extend to the mysteries of the strip 
cartoon.” Hugo added: “What the dev- 
il ! Did he not always write for the people 
and did not rag dolls of Quasimodo and 
Esmerelda sell out as soon as the novel 
was published?" 



goes to show that sometimes beauty 
really is only skin deep." Other well- 
known models in the ad campaign are 
Elle Maepherson and Claudia Schif- 
fer. “This is all about the power of 
fashion,” said Carole White, who runs 
Elite Premier, the London agency that 
handies Campbell. “Quite a lot of the 
girls are back wearing real fur again." 


A producer is suing Dick Cavett for 
S35 million because the talk show vet- 


Fftsd hueui/RiBtcn 


Kristin Scott Thomas with Anthony Minghella, who was nominated 
best director for “The English Patient,” at the nominees' luncheon. 


Pierre Hugo, the eldest great-great- 
grandchild of the 19th-century French 
romantic poet and novelist Victor 
Hugo, has broken ranks with other de- 
scendants who accused Disney of 
“plundering” their ancestor with the 
cartoon version of his classic, “The 


eran left a syndicated radio show. “We 
were First told thai Cavett had the flu,” 
Janies Moskovitz said. “Then we were 
told he had pneumonia, and then w e were 
told he had a manic-depressive episode. ” 
In the suit, Moskovitz says he spent a year 
and $650,000 to get "The Dick Cavett 
Show” on the air. Moskovitz said he 
believes the depression explanation. 
“We had a meeting on Feb. 21. and 
Cavett appeared caraionic.” 


Academy Awards ceremony on March 
24. several stars expressed how being 
nominated was honor enough and win- 
ning an Oscar was not important. But a 
few, like Kristin Scott Thomas, who is 
up for best actress for “The English 
Patient," were refreshingly honest. 
“I’d love to win,” she said. "I feel like 
a child of six and Tm over the moon." 
And Barbara Hershey, nominated for 
best supporting actress for * * Portrait of a 
Lady, said: “Honestly, Fd love to win. 
I am shocked at how much being nom- 
inated means.” And a bit of homespun 
humility from Billy Bob Thornton, 
nominated for best actor and best ad- 
apted screenplay for “Sling Blade”: "I 
feel like the ugly guy who got a date for 
the prom.” 


after the blockbuster Australian movie 
“Shine.” nominated for seven Oscars, 
told of his re-emergence as a pianist 
after a mental breakdown. “This man is 
full of joy.” Woodward said, “he has 
something to give. We're talking about 
something much bigger than music 
here.” 


Hollywood loves to play humble. At a 
luncheon for nominees before the 


The renowned pianist Roger Wood- 
ward is defending his fellow Australian 
David Helfgott as a pianist who has 
performed a colossal service to classical 
music despite being panned by Amer- 
ican critics during his 11 -city tour. 
Helfgott rocketed to stardom last year 


Levi Strauss & Co. has plunked down 
$25,000 for a pair of blue jeans that was 
found in an abandoned coal mine in 
Colorado-and passed through the hands - - 

of a Few savvy investors to a vintage - ;; ----- 

clothing store in New York, which sold 
the jeans to the San Francisco company. 

The jeans, made between 1886 and ' 

1902. would have cost about $1.25 new. - 

The company historian. Lynn Downey, 
said. “One reason this pair of jeans is so 
important is that we lost everything in 
the 1906 earthquake and fire, and the/;' 

frret sn UMrt nf nnr hietnnl UUM Aar-* , » , , 


First 50 years of our history were des- 
troyed.” A New York lawyer was to 
deliver the jeans. “I told him he has to 
put them in a briefcase,” she said, “and 
handcuff the briefcase to his wrist. ” 


; 


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for AT&T Access Numbers. 


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AT&T Access Numbers 


Sweden 

Switzerland* 


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Cacti RepatrikA . . . 
France .. 

Germany 

Green* 

WHand 

Italy* 

HettKrfandso . . . 

Russia oa(Mokow)» .. 


.. 0-880-100-10 United Kingdom* 
00-42-000-101 


820-795-011 

0800-89-8011 

0500-89-8011 

0880-89-0011 




0- 880-39-8011 

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