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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POSTjg^ 


London, Tuesday, March 18, 1997 


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No. 35.472 




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Yeltsin Deputizes 
2 Reformers to 
Revive Economy 

Start ‘ From Scratch, 9 He Tells 
New Leaders of Young Team 


By David Hoffman 

W/thingioa Past Service 


^¥S COW T President Boris Yeltsin, reaching be- 
yond Moscow for one of Russia’s youngest and most 
popular reformers, named Boris Nemtsov, governor of 
the Nizhni Novgorod region, as a first deputy prime 
minister Monday, in the strongest signal yet that Mr. 
l eltsrn is determined to reanimate Russia's economic 
transformation. 

In addition, the Kremlin said Anatoli Chubais, who last 
week was named a first deputy prime minister, will serve 
simultaneously as finance minister, giving him broad 
powers to oversee the economy and focus on overhauling 
Russia's chaotic tax system. 

Mr. Nemtsov, 37, is known 
for his pioneering economic 
reforms, including issuing lo- 
cal bonds, nurturing reorgan- 
ization of the collective 
farms, privatizing small 
shops and retooling industrial 
dinosaurs. His innovative 
ideas included a clean-water 
program for schoolchildren, 
subsidies to women wbo have 
a second or third child and so- 
called free-enterprise zones 
to give tax breaks to faltering 
factories. 

Located about 400 kilome- 
ters (250 miles) east of Mos- 
cow, Nizhni Novgorod, 
known as Gorky dining the 
Soviet years, is Russia's third- 
largest city and one of its more prosperous regional hubs. 

Mr. Nemtsov is widely regarded as the leading ex- 
ample of the rise of regional leaders in Russia who are 
gaining power and achieving results independent of 
federal authorities in Moscow. 

With the appointments of Mr. Nemtsov and of Mr. 
Chubais. 41, Mr. Yeltsin appears to be setting the stage 
for an ambitious start to his long-delayed second term, 
with an agenda as far-reaching as tbat of his first gov- 
ernment in 1992, which freed prices and trade and began 
a huge privatization plan. 

See YELTSIN, Page 8 

TB Peril in Russian Prisons 

Russian prisons and labor camps are breeding drag- 



Agcocr Iraacr'IVmk 

Boris Nemtsov, 37. 


resistant tuberculosis that is spreading through the region 
as prisoners are set free, officials in Moscow and at the 
World Health Organization warned Monday. 

The Moscow Center for Prison Reform said 2,481 of 
every 100,000 prisoners contract TB, but at some labor 
camps the question is almost not whether prisoners will 
catch the disease but when. Russia has a prison pop- 
ulation of more than one million. Page 5. 



Vincenzo Kurus Rrun-re 

An Albanian passing his child Monday to an Italian sailor at the port of Brindisi, now swamped by refugees. 

Italy Strains to Welcome Albanians 

As Fort City Runs Out of Room, Prodi Message Is: Stay in Homeland 


By Celestine Bohlen 

New York Times Sen-ice 


BRINDISI, Italy — Three days into 
the latest exodus of Albanians onto 
Italy’s southeast coast, this ancient port 
city has run out of room. 

On Friday, the number of refugees 
here was about 300; Monday it reached 
3.000, not counting the latest arrivals, 
about 900 people aboard an aged mil- 
itary frigate tbat ran out of fuel about 12 
kilometers out of harbor. 

All but about 120 of the ship’s oc- 
cupants were taken abroad an Italian 
ship and ferried north to the larger city 
of Bari, under armed guard. 

"We are completely full,” said 


Pietro Antonacci. the deputy police 
chief in Brindisi, ticking off a list of 18 
temporary settlement centers com- 
mandeered since the weekend, includ- 
ing hotels, church centers, sports camps 
and nursery schools. The latest estim- 
ates of new Albanian refugees for Italy 
as a whole was close to 6.000. 

It was 7 P.M. on Friday when local 
officials in Tuturano, a fanning village 
of 3.200 thar lies among vineyards and 
olive groves about 15 kilometers out- 
side Brindisi, had word that a busload of 
about 40 Albanians was on its way. 
Working through the night, they cleaned 
up an old nursery school that had been 
vacant for three years. 

Now the school is the temporary 


borne of 40 Albanians, among them 
Nuredin Lejla and his family. The Lejlas 
— including Ada, 15. a student at Tir- 
ana's language school — were among 
the first families in the Albanian port 
city of Dunes to make a dash for the 
open sea. after hearing the first bursts of 
gunfire last Thursday, the day Albania 
descended into near-total chaos. 

"Until then Dunes was calm, and 
then little by tittle the war came there," 
said Mr. Lejla. a mechanic who looks 
older than his 44 years. “Everywhere 
people were running because they were 
afraid.” 

In normal times, a ferry takes about 

See REFUGEES, Page 8 


Financing Furor: Clinton’s Quagmire 


By Alison Mitchell 

New York Times Senior 


WASHINGTON — Like a conta- 
gion, Washington’s campaign finance 
controversy is hobbling an array of fed- 
eral agencies and starting to change the 
political calculus of President Bill Clin- 
ton’s second term. 

From die White House to the Com- 
merce Department to the State Depart- 
ment Bureau of East Asian and Pacific 
Affairs, U.S. government offices are 


tied up in document searches that Clin- 
ton administration officials say are 
likely to become even more time con- 
suming as congressional investigations 
move into high gear. 

NEWS ANALYSIS ^ 

The investigations are to focus on how 
the White House solicited and received 
campaign contributions for the 1996 
residential campaign — particularly 
m Asian donors. 


£ 


In a host of areas, the controversy is 
raising all kinds of new political con- 
siderations. 

For example. Vice President A1 
Gore’s coming trip to China was once 
viewed as high-profile diplomacy. 

But now administration officials are 
fretting that the vice president’s every 
action will be viewed through the prism 
of accusations that the Chinese gov- 
ernment and Asian business interests 

See CLINTON, Page 8 


Daewoo Executive Faults EU on Jobs 


By Alan Friedman 

International Herald Tribune 


PARIS — The chairman of South 
Korea’s Daewoo Electronics Co. on 
Monday sharply criticized the way 
European polftical leaders are trying to 
tackle the Continent’s jobs crisis, and 
blasted France over its cancellation of 
the company’s agreement to purchase 
Thomson Multimedia. 

"The main problem in Europe, 
whether it is France. Germany orotber 
' it countries, is how to create jobs," said 
Bae Soon Hoon. chairman and chief 
executive of Daewoo Electronics, a 
branch of the giant Daewoo conglom- 


g in g interview at Daewoo’s Paris 
headquarters, "here the Socialists and 
the unions thi nk they can create jobs by 
contracts, or by agreements, which is 
not a veiy practical idea. I am not here to 
create social security, but to create jobs 
and make profits.” 

He was especially critical of calls from 
tliticians such as Prime Minister Jean- 
: Dehaene of Belgium foe the French 
aatomaker Renault to be threatened with 
legal action for taking a commercial de- 
cision to close a car plant in Vilvoorde, a 
northern suburb of Brussels. 

"This is not a legal issue,” Mr. Bae 
said. “They should think about how to 
sell more cars. You cannot maintain 


polit 

Luc! 


state-subsidized, raake-woik jobs.” 

Mr. Bae's comments mark a rare in- 
stance of a senior Asian business leader 
publicly attacking the way Europe does 
business. Daewoo Electronics, a major 
Korean company that has seen revenues 
grow by 25 percent a year since 1993 and 
which is predicting 1997 sales of $5.3 
billion, was furious in -December, when 
France backed out of a deal to sell the 
state-owned Thomson Multimedia. 

On Monday, Mr. Bae dismissed as 
"very unreasonable” the fears by the 
French privatization commission that in 
buying Thomson Multimedia, Daewoo 

See DAEWOO, Page 8 


erate. , 

"But these days you cannot use laws — ^ 1 T1TI1TT 

MMKSMSS New German Doubts on EMU 

business- environment, and that means 
investing in infrastructure, providing 
tax incentives for companies and train- 
ing for wotkers, and offering hospitality 
to fareijpi managers.” _ 

•• said Mr.- Bae in a wide -ran- 


Spark Attacks on 2 Currencies 


The Dollar 


Now Yort 

DU 


Monday * P-M-_ 

1-691 


Pound 


15887 


Yen 


123.735 


5.704 


previous cfc» 
1.6953 
1.6014 
123.35 


5 . 7 TB 



S&P 500 


clanga 
+ 2.4 


Monday © 4 PM 

795.71 793£\ 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 


BRUSSELS — Speculation about a 
postponement of European monetary 
union swept through currency markets 
Monday sifter Finance Minister Tbeo 
Waigel said Germany attached more im- 
portance to the economic criteria for the 
single currency than the 1999 starting 

date. , , ... 

In addition to his suggestion of delay, 
which appeared in a German newspa- 
per, Mr. Waigel acknowledged at a 
meeting of European Union finance 
ministers in Brussels that Germany 
might fail to achieve the government s 


forecast of 2.5 percent growth this year. 
Thai target is vital to Bonn’s chances of 
meeting the low-deficit requirement for 
the single currency. 

He also made his first request for 
leniency in judging Germany’s debt, 
which stands slightly above the single- 
currency ceiling. 

The central banks of Italy and Spain 
intervened to prop up the lira and peseta 
after the markets read Mr. Wai gel's 
comments as further evidence that 
Europe's single currency project might 
be delayed and drove the two currencies 
down. Mr. Waigel insisted to the min- 

See EMU, Page 8 


AGENDA 


4 Killed as Car Bombs 
Again Rock Algiers 

ALGIERS (AFP) — Four people were killed in three 
separate car bomb explosions in the Algerian capital 
Monday evening, state radio reported. 

The radio said the bombs went off around the busy 
Kouba district, in Ben Omar and nearby Anassers. Wit- 
nesses said a third bomb exploded on a highway in the 
same area. A witness reported seeing a number of victims 
being removed from a flaming bus by emergency work- 
ers after one bomb went off at about 6 P.M. near a bus 
stop in Ben Omar. 

The explosions were the first in the capital since Jan. 
21. A total of 48 people were killed and more than 200 
were wounded when Algiers was hit by a series of attacks 
between Dec. 23 and Jan. 21. 


RAGE TWO 

Die Embryo Problem 

THE AMERICAS Pafl» &■ 

Clinton's Lack of Democratic Defenders 

ASIA/PACIFIC Page 4. 

Leading Books to Mao's Readers 

EUROPE Page 5. 

Hot c Much Nickel to a Euro? 

BUSINESS/FINANCE Page 13 . 

Japan's Trade Surplus Rises 

Books.... _ Page 6. 

Crossword - Paged. 

Opinion Pages 10-11- 

Sports Pages 20-21. 

International Classified 


The IHT on-line http:, Vvvwvv.iht.com 


rsh Elections 
Are Set for May 1; 
Major to Debate 
Labour Rival on TV 

Trailing in Polls, Tories Seek to Play 
On Prime Minister’s Folksiness 
To Combat Blair’s Flashier Image 

By WaiTen Hoge 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — John Major, the embattled Conservative 
prime minister, called a national election for May 1 on 
Monday and said he would face his opponent, Tony Blair, the 
■leader of the Labour Party, in televised debates — a first in 
British politics. 

Mr. Major, who trails Mr. Blair by 25 points in a poll 
published in The Sunday Times, had turned aside an in- 
vitation for such an encounter in the last general election five 
years ago, telling the House of Commons, “Every party 
politician that expects to lose tries that trick of debate, and 
every politician who expects to win says no.” 

But Monday he embraced the idea, put forward by Mr. 
Blair months ago, in what appeared to signal the Con- 
servatives’ "presidential" strategy of putting forward Mr. 
Major as the quarrelsome party's greatest asset. It is the 
party's hope that Mr. Major’s folksiness will compare fa- 
vorably with the flashier and more youthful image of his 
opponent, which has been polished to a high gleam by his 
political handlers. 

Dressed in a pink shirt and light patterned tie, Mr. Major 
made his announcement before a solitary microphone in front 
of his official residence at No. 10 Downing Street moments 
after returning from Buckingham Palace where, in keeping 
with tradition, he had asked the queen to dissolve Parliament 
on April 8 in preparation for the election. 

Mr. Major said that his party had overseen a “revolution in 
choice, opportunity and living standards" and deserved the 
chance to continue. 

"We have changed this country," he said. "We have 
changed it immeasurably for the better. We have not finished 
those changes." 

Under the British electoral system, there are no fixed 
election dates, and the prime minister must only call an 
election within five years of having taken office. Mr. Major 
had waited until the last possible moment in the hope that 
voters would credit the Tories for the significant economic 
recovery that Britain has experienced since 1992. While the 
economic indices have continued to rise, the popularity of the 
Conservatives has continued to decline. 

Mr. Blair eagerly took note of this phenomenon in wel- 
coming Mr. Major's announcement, saying, "Most people 
look at the Conservatives and think they are rather incompetent, 
rather tired, and offering rather poor leadership for the coun- 
try.” And. as he has been doing in recent weeks, he counseled 
against overconfidence. "I don't take anything for granted," 
he said. “I am the eternal warrior against complacency." 

Slipping into characteristically dramatic language, Mr. 
Blair said. "We are on the verge of a new millennium. There 
is so much this country can do. So much talent, resource and 
energy amongst its people. I want a new government to come 
in with different values and different priorities to lead a 
national renewal which will be at die heart of everything we 
want to achieve.” 

The Conservatives under Mr. Major and his predecessor, 
Margaret Thatcher, have run Britain for 1 8 years, but they are 
given little chance of emerging this time with what would be 
their fifth straight national election victory. Since becoming 
the party’s leader three years ago, Mr. Blair has transformed 
his party into a centrist movement that has abandoned its 

See ELECTION, Page 8 



Johmt, Ecein/AcaKe RjacoPme 

Prime Minister John Major on his way Monday to ask 
Queen Elizabeth n to dissolve Parliament on April 8. 


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il» T 



Daily Chore for Peru Hostages: Keeping Depression at Bay 


By Sebastian Rotella 

Los Anzdes Times Service 


I IMA Inside die besieged mansion with the 

columned facade rerointent of the Southern 
manor in "Gone Whh the Wind, , a Peruvian 
congressman. Luis Chang Chmg, 37, wards off 
despair with a disciplined routine. 

Awaking at dawn, Mr. Cbang reads the Bible. 
He does push-ups and sit-ups, and jogs in once- 
elesant hallways now smeared with die guerrilla 
graffiti of the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Move- 


mem. As his fellow hostages strum guitars and 
take Japanese lessons in the stuffy confines of the 
mansion. Mr. Chang writes letters to his family, 
{louring out the melancholy and tension of cap- 
tivity. 

In a despondent moment three weeks ago, 
when he apparently felt death close at hand, one of 
Mr. Chang s letters made a gloomy reference to 
his two dead brothers: "Being realistic, I think I 
will soon visit Manuel and Santiago. 1 hope my 
journey will be calm." 

But Mr. Chang’s mood has picked up: he joked 


in a recent letter tbat he needs a haircut. * ‘I have a 
mustache, a beard, long hair. I look like Jesus 
Christ.” 

Mr. Chang and 71 others began their fourth 
grinding month under the guns of their Tupac 
Amaru captors on Monday. The standoff at the 
Japanese ambassador's residence has debilitated 
the diplomats, legislators, cabinet ministers, busi- 
nessmen and police and military commanders, 
according to relatives and government officials. 

“Right now it’s pretty miserable,” said a for- 
eign diplomat monitoring the crisis. ‘ ‘There’s the 


heat, the illness, the psychological roller coast- 
er.” 

The captives are mostly middle-aged and el- 
derly men — Peruvians, Japanese ana the Bolivi- 
an ambassador. Jorge Gumucio. They suffer 
chronic stomach problems, rashes, gum disease 
and other ailments caused by stress and harsh 
conditions; the already precarious health of sev- 
eral men has worsened. And the mood of the 
leader of the Tupac Amaru guerrillas, Nestor 

See LIMA, Page 8 






PAGE TWO 


In Vitro Fertilization / Frozen Cells 

Spare Embryos Pose 
Dilemma for Clinics 


By Gina Kolata 

New York Tunes Service 


N EW YORK — Robert Prosser, an em- 
bryologist at Columbia- Presbyterian 
Medical Center in New York, guards the 
future children of hundreds of couples. He 
keeps them in a locked room, frozen in tiny straws 
and immersed in three barrel-like tanks of liquid 
nitrogen. 

The tanks are connected to an elaborate alarm 
System that telephones Mr. Prosser and others if it 
senses a slight rise in a tank's temperature. A tank of 
liquid nitrogen, otherwise empty, is always ready in 
case one of the other storage tanks fails. 

No precaution is too great for these embryos, be 
said. “We treat them as though they are viable 


developing babies." he said. 
Tens of t 



Jens of thousands of embryos are steadily ac- 
cumulating in tanks of liquid ni trogen across the 
coun 
vitro 

engineered, and they 

product of tbe union of one egg and one sperm. 
Infertile women now routinely have eggs harvested 
from their ovaries, fertilized in a laboratory and 
implanted in their wombs. Many of them deliver 
babies. Just as routinely, many have leftover em- 
bryos, which are frozen and stored. 

But tbe ranks of frozen embryos raise a host of 
legal, emotional and ethical questions. These ques- 
tions become even more complex when the people 
who provided tbe eggs and sperm divorce, die or 
simply Jose contact with the centers where their 
embryos are stored. 

At New York. Hospital -Cornell Medical Center, 
Dr. James Griffo, the director of reproductive en- 
docrinology, has thousands of frozen embryos. 
“It's a fuS-time job for someone to keep track of 
them." be said. 

In vitro fer tilizati on, an arduous regime of hor- 
mone injections and surgical procedures, was con- 
sidered a great success a decade ago if it produced 
even a few embryos that could be transferred into a 
womb. Now, with the success of freezing, “people 
are literally disappointed" if they do not have 
leftover embryos that can be stored, said Dr. Mark 
Sauer, director of Columbia's in vitro fertilization 
program. Unused embryos can be discarded, but 
virtually every couple with extras wants them 
frozen. 

The embryos are, in a sense, a sort of perpetual 
youth for the couples. As a woman's ovaries age, 
they cease to produce eggs capable of being fer- 
tilized. But a woman with frozen embryos can 
become pregnant in middle age, or even beyond. 

They also offer a kind of immortality, as a source 
of children even after a parent has died. Some women 
with cancer have stored embryos before undergoing 
chemotherapy and radiation, which damage the 
ovaries, causing sterility; unlike sperm, unfertilized 
eggs cannot be stored by freezing them. 

Some of the women with cancer have died, and 
| — their relatives are selecting surrogates to carry the 
embryos they left behind. 

The embryos are cells at the very dawn of human 
development. Some are just a single cell: a fertilized 
;. The largest are balls of eight cells. If fer- 
ion bad taken place naturally, an eight-cell 
embryo would barely have begin its journey down 
a woman's fallopian tube to her uterus. 

Couples have mixed feelings about these mi- 
croscopic balls of cells. 

“When you ask couples. ‘How do you feel about 
its status? ’ they’ll say, 'It’s not really a baby.’ * ’ Dr. 
Sauer said. “But when you talk about discarding, it 
becomes a fetus.” 

Dr. Robert Anderson, director of the Southern 
California Center for Reproductive Medicine in 
Newport Beach, said one of his patients had buried 
her embryos rather than have him flush them away. 

But no U.S. agency has responsibility for over- 
seeing decisions about these embryos. So legally. 


the status of such embryos is 
uncertain, said Lori An- 
drews, a professor at the 
Chicago-Kent College of 
Law who teaches a law 
course on reproductive tech- 
nology. 

One state, Louisiana, says 
a frozen embryo is a person 
and cannot be discarded; 
such embryos must be kept in 
perpetuity. In Illinois, the at- 
torney general said a woman 
who had a frozen embryo 
was considered pregnant 
But Ms. Andrews said, “In 
most states, tbe embryo is in 
legal limbo.” 

Meanwhile, the frozen 
embryos continue to accu- 
mulate nationwide at the rate 
of 10,000 a year overtire past 
five years, she said. 

“You can quickly figure 
out the magnitude of the 
problem,” Dr. Sauer said. 

“You are the trustee for these 
embryos. You are charged 
with keeping them forever." 

The centers try to protect 
the frozen embryos against 
emergencies, but they also 
try to limit their liability. 

‘ 'The only thing that could 
really give us a hard time is 
fire/' said Dr. Griffo, add- 
ing, “We have a clause in tbe 
consent form that says we 
can’t be responsible for every 
act of God" 

Even after couples have 
completed their families, al- 
most none want their embry- 
os discarded doctors say. 

And there is no way to force 
the issue. 

Many centers ask couples to pay a yearly fee, 
usually about $200 to $300. for storage. But few 
would allow embryos to thaw if a couple did not pay 
the fee. 

“If they don’t pay, I do nothing,” Dr. Anderson 
said “It's not like I can say, 'Ifyoa don’t pay, I will 
thaw them and throw them oul' ” 

His center has 10 tank* containing a total of about 
3,000 embryos, including 2,000 from a nearby in 
vitro fertilization center that went out of business. 

“Because of the larae number of embryos I ac- 
quired, I had to get people to make a disposition." be 
said Nearly everyone contacted wanted to keep the 
embryos frozen, he said and nearly all who did not 
want to keep their embryos wanted to donate them to 
other couples — which would mean that their bio- 
logical children would be bom to strangers. 



Juura Eatrio/Thr (U 


c 


ouples may feel better by offering to 
donate their embryos to others. Dr. An- 
derson said but that usually does not solve 
tine problem. At a time when couples with- 
out viable eggs or sperm can create a sort of custom 
embryo by carefully picking sperm or egg donors, 
who, after all, would want a donated embryo? 

Egg and sperm donors offer detailed medical 
histories and even provide photographs, heights and 
weights and descriptions of their education, hobbies 
and personality quirks, People who donate em- 
bryos, in contrast, provide almost none of this 
information, he said 

“At best, with donated embryos, you can find out 
what die parents look tike," Dr. Anderson said, 
adding, “5fo one has ever taken a donated embryo 
— at least not from me. ” 

Ms. Andrews noted another problem with donat- 
ing embryos: The donor couple may decide to seek 


Tens of thousands of embryos are steadily accumulating 
in tanks of liquid nitrogen across the country , each the 
product of the union of one egg and one sperm. 


custody or at least visitation rights. In most states, 
she said, they could get those rights. As more and 
more embryos are stored, doctors are increasingly 
coming across patients with heart-wrenching situ- 
ations. 

Dr. Griffo stored embryos for a married woman 
who subsequently died. Before she died he said she 
said she wanted her embryos destroyed, and her 
husband agreed. But now. Dr. Griffo said, "her 
husband has changed his mind and says he wants 
someooe to cany the embryos” so he can have his 
dead wife's babies. 

“It creates a legal nightmare.” Dr. Griffo said, 
because New York Hospital-Comell Medical Cen- 
ter does not know whether it is bound by the wife’s 
wishes or the husband's. 

Another case involves tbe embryos of Julie 
Garber, who, in \ 994, was 26, single and dying from, 
leukemia. She knew her only chance of surviving 
was to have a bone-manow transplant, a radical 
therapy involving such high doses of chemotherapy 
and radiation that it causes sterility. 

With one month to go before her transplant, said 
her mother. Jean Garber, Ms. Garber decided to 
store some embryos. She andher father. Dr. Howard 
Garber, a retired optometrist, selected a sperm 
donor from a sperm bank to fertilize her eggs. 

Ms. Garber ended up with 12 embryos, which are 
stored in Dr. Anderson’s tanks, but she died in 
December. Her parents are now choosing between 
two women who have agreed to carry the embryos 
— their grandchildren — to term. 

“This is a love situation." Mis. Garber said. 

Dr. Garber said he and his wife had not con- 
sidered what they would do if any embtyos were left 
after a surrogate birth. “Our main concern now is 
our baby-to-be," he said 


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Prostate Cancer Screening ‘Not for AH’ 


Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The American College of 
Physicians, in a break with what bas become a 
widespread practice, has concluded that there is no 
evidence that patients benefit from routine screen- 
ing for prostate cancer and recommends against 
regular testing for all men. 

“Screening for prostate cancer is not for every- 
one.” said Harold Sox Jr., the group’s president- 
elect designate. 

Because of uncertainties in the reliability of the 
tests, and the risks of aggressive early treatment, 
the organization decided screening should be un- 
dertaken as an “individualized decision” of each 



issue 
are at odds with 


King Hussein’s Gesture: 
It Won’t Defuse Crisis 

Israel Owes Him Nothing, ’ Sharon Says. 


By Serge Sdunemaim 

New York Times Service 


JERUSALEM —The noble image of 


recommendations of the American Cancer Society 
and other medical groups. 

The American Cancer Society, the American 
College of Radiology and the American Urological 
Association recommend that men begin under- 
going annual digital exams at age 40. Tbe cancer 
society recommends also getting annual prostate- 
specific antigen tests beginning at age 50. 

But the American College of Physicians, in its 
first set of recommendations on the issue, advises 
that "rather than screening all men for prostate 
cancer as a matter of routine, physicians should 
describe the potential benefits and known harms of 
screening, diagnosis and treatment, listen to the 
patient's concerns, and then individualize the de- 
cision to screen." The group comprises 100.000 
specialists in internal medicine. 


forgiveness from tbe bereaved Jew .... 
its place among tbe icons of Arab -Israeli 
relations Monday, alongside such clas- 
sics as Anwar Sadat speaking to the 
Israeli Parliament and Yitzhak Rabin 
shaking bands with Yasser Arafat. 

But if those earlier moments also 
marked momentous changes in the 
course of Middle Eastern history, the 
most concrete result of King Hussein’s 
extraordinary visit was something as 
prosaic as an Israeli agreement to let Mr. 
Arafat the Palestinian leader, land his 
plane in Gaza. 

Of course, there was also the rescue 
of Israeli -Jordanian relations from the 
back-to-back blows of the king's bit- 
terly critical letter to Prime Minister 

NEWS ANALYSIS ~ 

Benjamin Netanyahu and the murder- 
ous attack of a Jordanian soldier on a 
group of Israeli schoolgirls, tire act that 
prompted King Hussein to make his 
journey. 

But these incidents, however grave, 
were not the real source of problems 
between Jordan and Israel, bur a result 
of the serious disintegration of the Is- 
raeli- Palestinian peace track. It was this 
that had prompted the king to dispatch 
his stem warning to Mr. Netanyahu, that 
persisting with plans to build a new 
Jewish settlement in the East Jerusalem 
area known in Hebrew as Har Homa 
would “maneuver our Palestinian 
brethren into inevitable violent resis- 
tance.” 

Yet, even in the warm afterglow of 
the king's round of condolence calls, 
when Mr. Netanyahu was asked wheth- 
er construction on Har Homa would 
begin this week on schedule, tbe prime 
minister was unyielding: “I said they 
will begin this week. They will begin 
this week." 

That statement produced an almost 
tangible sigh of relief from the prime 
minister's rightist backers, who had 
been afraid that he would bend before 
the king's display of dignity and honor. 
“It was a nice gesture, but Israel owes 
him nothing,” Infrastructures Minister 
Ariel Sharon, the premier champion of 
Jewish expansion on occupied lands, 
told Likud party loyalists. “You don’t 
pay for visits, and for a gesture you 
don’t need to add concessions.’ ’ 

Mr. Netanyahu's stance ensured that ... 
was not seriously challenged in the Par- 
liament oh Monday when the opposition 
introduced its motion of no-confidence. 
The vote was 54 to 46. 

But whether he had gained any res- 
pite on the Palestinian front was less 
sure. There was still no telling what 
would happen when bulldozers actually 
began moving earth on Har Homa, and 
no certainty that another crisis was not 
around the comer. 

However grand the king's gesture, in 
this context it was only one of a series of 
crises and convulsions by which Israel 
and- tbe Palestinians have measured 
their relations in the nine months since 
Mr. Netanyahu look office. 

In the first four months, the process 
nearly ground to a halt from inaction. 
Then the eruption- of violence over the 
Western Wall tunnel jolted the Amer- 
icans into an intensive mediating effort, 
and even that took more t han three 
mouths to reaffirm an agreement on 
Hebron. And no sooner was that done 
than the next crisis loomed, this time 
over the Har Homa project and Pal- 
estinian dismay over tire amount of land 
that Israel decided to cede in a sched- 
uled withdrawal. 

King Hussein's face revealed nothing 
when Mr. Netanyahu affirmed that con- 
struction in Har Homa would begin this 
week. By ail accounts, he had come to 
Israel knowing this was a lost cause, and 
he focused ms mediating efforts on 
restoring communications between Mr. 
Netanyahu and Mr. Arafat in the hope of 
heading off a violent confrontation that 
could well doom whatever was left of 
the peace process. 

The king succeeded, inasmuch as the 
two of them spoke by telephone in his 


presence, and their lieutenants got 4b 
work to arrange landing rights for Mr. 
Arafat and a face-to-face meeting be- 
tween Mr. Netanyahu and Mr. Arafat 
Tbfi king also drew from Mr. Netanyahu 
a commitment to seek compensatory 



considered many other ways to get rite 
process moving. “I believe we can 
move forward, and will surprise you,- 1 
think,” be said at apress conference. B\Jt 
he had said that before, and whatever 
conciliatory note be hoped to sound wSs 
largely offcet by statements made the 
day before by one of Mr. Netanyahu.’ s 
closest allies in the government. Justice 
Minister Tzahi HanegbL __ 

Mr^egbi Joosed*a series of crude 
threats against Mr. Arafat should vi- . 
olence erupt over Har Homa. “Nobody 
who comes to wipe us out is immune, 
neither the engineer nor somebody in a 
villa,” he sa id , striking a link clear to 
everyone in the audience between Mr. 
Arafat (“somebody in. a villa”) and* 
Yehye Ayyash, a Hamas bom b-makfcr 
known as “the engineer,’* who was 
assassinated in January 1996. 

Mr. Hanegbi’s comments weife 
widely reported in the press and were 
viewed by many Palestinians as a fir 
more accurate reflection of the zeal 
thinking in the government than Mr. 
Netanyahu’s vague promises. . '* 

It confirmed that the critical com- 
ponent of the process, trust, was gate. 
To Mr. Hanegoi, Mr. Arafat was still a 
terrorist, just as to Mr. Sharon, the 
king’s visit was just a ‘ ‘nice gesture. *}. 


Leftist Wins : 
San Salvador 
Mayoral Race 

The Associated Press 

SAN SALVADOR — The candidate . 
of the leftist coalition led by the Far- 
abundo Marti National Liberation 
Front which fought unsuccessfully for 
power here in 12 years of civil war, hds 
won the mayoral race in tills capital of - 
1.4 million people. 

“We are going to show that we can 
govern^” saidthe victor. Hector Silva.* 
Boston-boro gynecologist - '■ • 

About 2.000 cheering supporters 
gathered, at , tbe Front’s headqnqttets 
early Monday to celebrate. 

With 66 percent of the ballots coun- 
ted, Mr. Silva had 47 percent of the vote 
compared with 41 percent for Mario 
Vaiiente, his opponent in the govern- 
ment party, the rightist Nationalist Re- 
publican Alliance, known as ARENA 

ARENA conceded defeat in San Sal- 
vador. but insisted it would outstrip the 
Front in the National Assembly. Both 
parties' claims are based on reports ' 
from party volunteers at individual vot-A' 
jug booths around the country. 

Incomplete official returns Monday 
indicated tbe front was virtually even 
with ARENA in congressional and city 
elections Sunday. With 59 percent of 
votes counted, the government party 
had 35 percent of the vote in congres- 
sional races compared with 34 percent 
for the Front Eleven other parties di- 
vided die rest 

Channel 12, . an independent televi- 
sion station, calculated that ARENA 
would end up with 32 seats in the 84- 
member National Assembly to 29 for 
the Front. ARENA now has 41 seats 
won in 1994, while the Front has 14. • 

Either would have to rely on a co- 
alition with at least two other parties to 
form a majority. 

The Front became a political party * 
after signing a peace treaty in December f 
1992 that ended a 12-year war in which 
76,000 people died. 

Officials noted that despite the his- 
tory of hostility, there were no reports of 
violence Sunday. But the turnout was 
unexpectedly low at less than 40 percent 
at many of the 372 polling centers. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


WEATHER 


Snowfall Disrupts Travel in Austria Eur °p e 


VIENNA (AFP) — Air and road traffic was disrupted in 
Austria on Monday after surprise snowfalls of up to 20 
centimeters (8 inches) blanketed Vienna and the east of the 
country overnight. 

Airport authorities in Vienna said that some flights were 
delayed by up to 30 minutes and that others were being 
diverted, although they denied reports that the airport had been 
shut during the morning. 

A strike Monday by Italian postal workers protesting 
threatened layoffs closed post offices throughout die country 
and interrupted mail delivery. {API 

A strike by Air Zimbabwe pilots was in its fourth day 
Monday, disrupting regional and international flights, airline 
officials said. The 70 pilots and flight engineers are de- 
manding salary increases, but the struggling airline says it 
cannot afford to pay more. (AFP) 

Thai border regions recorded big increases in malarial 
infection rates in the last quarter of 1996, a public health 
official reported, with Sa Kaew Province, which borders 
Cambodia, reporting 2,646 cases, eight times higher than in 
the high season for malaria the year before. (AFP) 


Correction 

The name of the French designer Marie-Ange Lepercq was 
spelled incorrectly in tbe March 15-16 Special Report on 
Fashion. 




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| - 

1 Who Shields 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TU ESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


PAGE 3 


""’Vi 


By Adam Clymer ' 

New Times Service 

sacK 

im - 

beS^Jrh ^ three senior Democrats put it, or 
n0t Wanl to take chants, Mr. 
cowSJtoaM?^ ur 0t P rov * < ® I, 8 *e sort of verba] 
S^S™ publ '*9^* S® ve Richard Nixon dur- 

d *“*" durins 1110 
I^mocraric leaders like Senator Tom Daschle 

“S-? 


Clinton From Fund-Raising Arrows? Not Democrats 


sibility only to ensure a fair investigation. 

Only a few Democrats have been openly crit- 
ical, and they have different reasons. Senator 
Daniel Patrick Moynihan of New York, who 
called for an independent counsel, has never had 
any love for the Clinton administration. 

Representative David Bonior of Michigan did 
not know that a reporter was on hand when he 
told high school students that Mr. Clinton's fund- 
raising “demeans the White House.' ’ 

For most Democrats, party loyalty demands no 
more than not joining Republicans in the attack, 
and perhaps attacking Republicans for trying to 
load the investigative dice. 

Their silence about Mr. Clinton is not a phe- 
nomenon they like to discuss for die record. 
Asked why Democratic senators did not defend 
Mr. Clinton, Senator Daschle said: “We have 
read all the allegations. We’re not in a position to 
say whether those allegations are right or wrong. 
But we are certainly in a position to say, to 
demand, that he get a fair hearing. ” 


Mr. Gephardt, the House minority leader, re- 
sponded similarly, saying. “If there wens probl ems 
m what anyone did, it ought to be investigated.'’ 

But he said what was important was to "fix the 
system" of campaign finance, and that Mr. Clin- 
ton was trying to do so. 

But when two dozen Democratic senators and 
House members of various regions, ideologies 
and seniority were offered the opportunity to 
discuss the question without being quoted by 
name, they were much more forthcoming. 

“There is no personal desire of any of the 
members to help Clinton because he has never 
helped us," said a veteran representative from 
the Middle Atlantic regioa. “He didn't lift a 
finger for us, didn't want us to win. I think he is a 
man without a party.'' 

' * We were all saying we wanted a Democratic 
president," a veteran senator from the Midwest 
said. "Did he ever say, T want a Democratic 
Congress' or I want a Democratic Senate* ? No, 
because the polls said it would hurt him.” 


And a New England senator said: “There is a 
feeling that the president can take care of himself, 
just the way he did last year," when he raised 
millions for his own campaign but neglected his 
patty’s congressional candidates. 

Some Democrats sound less focused on what 
may amount to a tactic of revenge by inaction. 
They find the president's fund-raiamg procedures, 
and some of his fund-raisers, indefensible. 

“I am not going to stick up for anyone who does 
what I would not do,” a junior senator said. 

"It is obscene," a veteran Southern repre- 
sentative said. “It is embarrassing." 

A veteran New England senator said the prac- 
tice of allowing donors to the president’s re- 
election campaign to sleep in the White House's 
Lincoln Bedroom was “lousy." 

A handful of Democrats in Congress have seen 
fit to publicly complain of this ancf other missteps 
in Democratic Party fund-raising reported re- 
cently. Besides Mr. Moynihan and Mr. Bonior, 
Senators Russell Feingold of Wisconsin and 


Robert Torricelli of New Jersey have spoken out. 

Mr. Feingold said he believed die time had 
come for an independent counsel. Mr. Torricelli 
disagreed, but pointedly observed: 

"I'm not going to be in the position of de- 
fending the indefensible. And what is more, I do 
not believe it is appropriate for the president or 
vice president of the United States to directly 
solicit contributions through telephone calls." 

But a more typical public silence was reflected 
by a junior Midwesterner who said, "You just 
don’t warn to pile on and bash, but you don't want 
to defend what you don't think is appropriate." 

Self-protection is another motive for silence. 

A- Midwestern House freshman said. ‘ ‘There is 
nobody here who knows enough about what 
happened over there to be comfortable staking out 
a front-line position supporting the president." 

A veteran Western representative said that this 
was the fean "Make a defense today, you get 
burned tomorrow. They never quite get it all out 
It’s pretty smelly." 


Mexico Gets EU to Drop Fund for Vote Monitors 


By Clifford Krauss 

Afcw fort Tunfci Service 

MEXICO CITY — The Mexican government 


leader of the Mexican Academy of Human Rights. 
"We want to send brigades of observers to poor 
regions to prevent the buying of votes, but now our 
activities will be reduced.” 


ing Spanish member of the European Parliament, 
had said that the retraction of the donation was ‘ 'not 
a signal in the right direction." 

Mr. Aguayo has appealed to European diplomats 


4 has Dereuaderi rfv acovines wui oe reaucea. Mr. Aguayo has appealed to European diplomats 

-$42flnonrfnn!itTrv, Umon to rescind a The rights group is affiliated with the Civic Ac- stationed in Mexico City for their governments to 

' see kins to nghtS F? ap “f anizal i? n * which obtained a similar rethink their positions on the donation, but be said 

31x1 h^ 0 ™ 1 dec- $150,000 grant from the European Union in 1 996 to he thought it was unlikely that his group would 
~ * Posable fraud. monitor local elections in Mexico that year. It found receive toe financing. 

effort ■“* drawn many instances of payoffs and coercion of voters. "It’s very important that credible nongovera- 
•whnM> of the European Parliament and will publish a study on its findings this year. mental organizations who are interested in mon- 

concerned that leaders of the governing Marco Provencio. an assistant undersecretary of itoring the elections get adequate funding," a West- 
-tpstmiuonal Revolutionary Party, or PRI, may seek foreign relations, said the government opposed em diplomat said. “It’s going to be a very hot 
u inwart expected advances by two opposition "the use of foreign governmental resources for toe campaign, and a lot is at stake." Polls show Alfredo 
' n>fJS , mdJca “ jnat PRI could lose control promotion of activities in Mexico that deal with del Mazo, toe PRI candidate for Mexico City may- 

formayor^f M^ico^'tjf 11258 ^ ^ e * eCtl0n or electoral processes. ’ ’ He added: “To or, is running 10 percentage points behind 

r m . The Mexican Academy of Human Rights, an 
independent group that receives financing from 
fo und a t ions in the United States, received the grant 
in October from the European Union to organize 


accept this project is the equivalent of Mexico 
accepting toe view of 15 European governments 
that we need foreign resources to allow our elections 
to be clean and trustworthy.’ ' 

He said that Mexico expected 5,000 foreign 


poll-watching and to study Mexican campaign fi- observers for the July elections, and rtiar the voting 
nances. But the money was rescinded in early would be “as transparent as possible.’’ 


Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, candidate of the leftist Party 
of toe Democratic Revolution. 

■ Opposition Shows Strength 

Voters in the central state of Morelos appeared to 
give opposition parties victories in several key 



Ni/Yi 

trnl j 


January after a lobbying campaign by the Mexican 
ambassador to Brussels, Manuel Armen dariz. The 
decision only became public earlier this month. 

- , “This is a major blow,’’ said Sergio Aguayo, 


The dispute between Mr. Aguayo and toe gov- 
ernment is receiving attention in the Mexican press. 
Reforma, a Mexico City newspaper, published a 
report Friday that Jose Ignacio Salafranca, a lead- 


cities Sunday in a test of the strength of President 
Ernesto Zedillo’s party, Reuters reported. Early 
results gave a slight lead to the rightist National 
Action Party in the race for mayor in toe state 
capital, Cuernavaca. 


Jim l'.nihma/nv Atmulrd Firm 


Sister Joan O’Reilly walking in Philadelphia’s St. Patrick's Day parade. 


Senatorial Hyperventilation? 

WASHINGTON — The FBI told the State Depart- 

■ ment, the CIA, toe Justice Department and some mem- 

- bers of Congress in 1995 that China was planning to make 
illegal campaign contributions to members of Congress, 
according to Senator Onin Hatch, Republican of Utah. 

The assertion on CBS by the chairman of toe Senate 
Judiciary Committee, which was immediately discounted 

- by administration officials, would indicate that -the FBI’s 
concerns about alleged attempts to direct illegal cam- 
paign funds to U.S. politicians were disseminated earlier 
and rriore widely within government circles than had 
previously been disclosed. 

The White House press secretary, Michael McCurry. 
• discounted Mr. Hatch’s remarks. “His information is 
• contrary to what has been communicated to me and 
" contrary to what I’ve briefed you,” be said. "I suspect 
that this is another case of a senator hyperventilating on a 
Sunday talk show.” 

Last week, the FBI said it had briefed two members of 

■ the National Security Council staff cm June 3, 1996, about 

■ the alleged Chinese attempts. (WP) 

Budget Battle: Ain’t Over Yet 

WASHINGTON — The Senate budget committee 
~ chairman. Pete Domenici, has retracted his declaration of 

■ last week that bipartisan budget talks were "finished” 
'• and stated his willingness to continue h ag gl i n g with 
; counterparts from the Clinton administration about how 

to eliminate the deficit by 2002. 

But Mr. Domenici, making plain his frustration with 

- Democrats and Republicans for the lack of progress in 
those discussions, said that without new c onces sions he 
would support a plague-on-both-houses approach that 

‘ "• achieved budget balance by junking both toe spending 
increases sought by the White House and the broad tax 

■ cuts championed by Republicans. (WP) 

Gearing Up for IRS Overhaul 

’ WASHINGTON — The Clinton administration plans 
to propose a major overhaul of toe management of the 

- InternalRevenue Service aimed at dealing with years of 

H 

Lawrence Sommers, would bnng IRS op- 
eratkmsunder closer control of the Treasury Depamnent, 

■ ^crease ^e agency's flexibility m personnel and pay 
! matters! and pan a management specialist, rather than a rax 

_L expert, in charge of the agency. 


First Amendment v. Internet 

Court to Hear Arguments Over Smut in Cyberspace 


By Joan Biskupic 35 c r mnor P rovide 

I IhshMtwr. Post strike WIth U5d , ecej1t . P ,C ?^ 

2 m bookstores, they should be 

WASHINGTON — Allis- barred from doing so on the 
on Evans was writing a sev- Internet, 
ento-grade book repon on Government lawyers con- 
"Unle Women" when she tend that if parents fear then- 
decided to get on the Internet, children will find sexually ex- 
But when she typed in “little plicit materials on the Inter- 
women" on the computer in net, they will not let them use 
the family room of her Vir- this unparalleled educational 
ginia home, she found much tool at all. 
more than information related But toe ACLU, toe Amer- 
to toe Louisa May Alcoa clas- icon Library Association and 
sic. On her screen appeared other challengers counter that 
an X-rated entry that prom- the law not only stops adults 
ised * ‘Women! Women! Wo- from getting information that 
men!" is constitutionally permitted. 

The incident last year re- toe act is ineffective for keep- 
inf orced toe commitment of ing out indecent pictures be- 
tter mother. Doris Evans, to cause as much as 40 percent 
keep sexually explicit mater- of the information on the In- 
ials off the Internet. Parents ternet is posted overseas. 


blockers would be more ef- 
fective than government in 
protecting children because 
they would screen out foreign 
pornography, too. 


\’f iv \ .» si'l 


' ■■ U. , 7-n, S4-:* 


Away From Politics 

• The Supreme Court upheld Califor- 
nia’s restrictions on toe sale of erotic pub- 
lications from coin-operated vending ma- 
chines on public streets. The court, without 
comment, turned down arguments by pub- 
lishers of adult newspapers that a state law 
violates their right of free speech. (AP) 

• Even though air bags have killed at least 
38 children, a majority of Americans be- 
lieve toe auto safety devices help more 
children than they hurt, according to a sur- 
vey by the Center for Risk Analysis at the 
Harvard School of Public Health in Cam- 


bridge. Massachusetts. Air bags, which de- 
ploy at up to 200 miles per hour (320 
kilometers per hour), are credited with sav- 
ing more than 1 ,600 adults, but there are no 
documented cases of a child being saved by 
an air bag. said the center's director. (AP) 

• Three people were killed and five injured 
when a fire track responding to an alarm 
collided with a car in Queens, New York. 

(AP) 

• The Ohio River crested over the week- 
end raising hopes of a respite for disaster 
workers and flooding victims, but the Na- 
tional Weather Service said the high water 
would remain for much of the week. (AP) 








keep sexually explicit mater- of the information on the In- 
ials off the Internet. Parents ternet is posted overseas, 
like Mrs. Evans, who was as- They also note that using toe 
sodated with the organiza- Internet requires several steps 
non Enough is Enough, to find various materials. 


pressed Congress to pass a 
law making it a crime to send 
"indecent” or "patently of- 
fensive" material to children 
under 18 through the Inter- 
net. 

But the legislation, cover- 
ing materi al that depicts or 
describes sexual or excretory 
activities or organs in a pat- 
ently offensive manner, and 
signed into law by President 
BUI Clinton in February 
1996, was immediately chal- 


sexuaUy explicit or not. 

“If toe government pre- 
vails in this case, it will de- 
stroy toe Internet as we know 
it," said Jerry Berman, ex- 
ecutive director of toe Center 
for Democracy and Techno- 
logy and a coordinator for 
dozens of civil liberties, in- 
formation and computer or- 
ganizations that have joined 
m the lawsuit. 

For the justices, this is one 
of toe toughest cases of toe 


see&iss sfasi 




- v«'r— ' 
















:C'.C ***"’•* 


wfcv. > ' \. *.• .... finS/VS!?*,-- 


lenged as violating the First term. Not only will it require 
Amendment rights of adults, them to deal with the difficult 


Now at the Supreme Court, 
where it will be argued Wed- 
nesday, die challenge to the 


balance of free speech rights 
and protecting children from 
“indecency,” it will force 


indecency provision is one of them to become familiar with 
the most important free an emerging technology. 


■i ^nJtririciOT of toe IRS has become so harah recently 
j rHat^ta^sttation officials and some members of Con- 
could undercut the nation's ax system 

for critics who want to junk the mcornc 
lax infevor of another system. W 

Quote/Unquote 

: £ House 

and chairman of *e ^Sreceived federal aid 

sn^ommirt^.onregrts ^ b]ack beaIS 

Predators don't pay a dime. 


speech cases in recent de- 
cades and could determine 
the future of toe never-ending 
global conversation that is toe 


Most of the justices are de- 
cidedly low-tech; some still 
write their opinions in 
longhand. The computers in 


Internet. Parents, members of their chambers do not have 
Congress, civil libertarians, access to the Internet There 


computer users, educators 
and every business involved 


will not be a demonstration of 
personal computers as there 







mm 










Pj«><90CSV f ^ 


r 




in toe on-tine world have a was when the case was heard 
huge stake in whether die by a lower court and each 


— ^ ^ 1 uic ovuviura ui wuu 

Afrirns Slaves Are Paid 

/if f MAj’IA' ° would retrieve posted infer- 

Tribute by Mrs. Clinton years in prison or a $250,000 

t*. our suff F*** The case of Reno v. Amer- 

c~r**tty ,, Clinton began a visit ican Civil Liberties Union 

DAKAR. Senegal -- HiUaty Rodham Lmi^ ^bolizes marks the first occasion for 
to Africaon Monday by STimbark- tte Mgh court toreview re- 

fim relationslup witn uua. smctirais on cyberspace tech- 

for Africans sent ^ u.S. first bidy noloaj. However toe justices 

- SSrcring fom Washingtonbefore ^wn^ . ilinderecore the ralyheirdecisiOT will set toe 
.aid^diose Senegal as hff .^.^mkour two nations." standard for future con- 

rtf hlStOTV flDfi ^ _ _ j« A »Airr4fl iSrh-cenmrv straints and censorship by 


Communications Decency side will have only half an 
Act survives. hour to present its case. 

A special three-judge panel Still, with a few clicks of a 

that first heard the case ruled mouse, even an Internet 
that toe standards of the law novice can realize toe vast 
were unconstitutionally wealth of information on toe 
vague. network, including toe avail- 

The court said Congress ability of sexually explicit 
had wrongly made crimin al images — from vulgar car- 
the activities of people who toons to hard-core pictures of 
would have no way of know- human bondage and torture, 
ing the age of anyone who Such pictures typically are 


“ strong boiids of to tour an lSth-oe^y 

. foSbservmceof^I^ ,e P l ^ e meD and women were 

slave house o* 1 ^H^icen to North aid South America, 
herded onto ships and token ra oftbe horror of the dave 


straints and censorship by 
federal or state governments 
— both of which have been 
concerned with the prolifer- 
ation of sexual materials on 
toe Internet. 


- ‘*vWtile it evokes bitter ®^??^^^gtoand resilience of the ation of sexual materials on 

■ rrade it also bears witness t° , •‘America has been en- toeJtateineL 

“ Mrs- Clinton said. naced djeir The Justice Department, 

tateSs.of so many peop ^ Reuters) defending toe act, argues feat 
origins to tills region* 


preceded by warnings that 
what follows should be 
viewed by persons over 18. 
To many younger teenagers, 
such a warning only increases 
their curiosity. 

The groups challenging the 
law argue that the best way 
fra- parents to deal with toe 
ranndiiest materials on toe 
Internet is to monitor a child ’s 
computer use or to buy read- 
ily available software that 
blocks sexually explicit post- 
ings. 

Brace Ennis, a lawyer for 
the American Library Asso- 
ciation who will represent all 
tiie challengers to the law in 
oral arguments, said such 


Before you buy an expensive watch, 
make sure you read the small print. 

Every single Rolex Oyster whose dial is inscribed with the words 
above is a genuine Swiss chronometer. Its movement has undergone 
15 days and nights of merciless testing at the hands of the Controle 
Officiel Suisse des Chronomfetres. jSSl And passed with flying colours. 



ROLEX 

of Geneva 



EYTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Guns and the Japanese — A People’s Fear and Fascination 


By Mary Jordan 

Wasfdggion Post Service 

TOKYO — Seventeen people were 
killed by guns in Japan last year, about 
the same number as on a slow afternoon 
in the United States. 

Japan has some of the toughest gun 
laws in the world: Handguns are illegal; 
the police inspect homes to make sure 
that hunting rifles are under lock and 
key, and possessing a single bullet can 
result in a $ 10,000 fine and five years in 
prison. 

The laws are so strict that the Jap- 
anese team in the biathlon, an Olympic 
sport that combines cross-country ski- 
ing and shooting, had to practice in 
Russia. Authorities worried that the ath- 
letes might accidentally pick off a bird 
or & skier if they practiced on the course 
near Nagano, the cite of the Winter 
Olympics next year. 

As strict as the laws are, the public is 
clamoring for the government to make 
them tougher. Although this is still one 
of the least violent societies in the world, 


and the vast majority of violence is com- 
mitted by yetkjca gangsters against one 
another, many people feel the “Amer- 
ican disease" of guns is spreading here. 

Chinese and Russian mobsters have 


Readers 9 Oasis in China: 
The One Heart Bookstore 


By Seth Faison 

New York Times Service 

CHENGDU, China — On a muddy 
lane where small homes made from slats 
of dark wood are squeezed together in a 
row, only one doorway was still open 
and well lighted by midevening. Within 
it sat an elfin old woman and her 
books. 

Perched on a bamboo stool beside a 
set of fixed shelves that sagged under the 
burden of hundreds of old volumes, 
Chen Yunzhea, SO, smiled cheerfully at 
each of the neighborhood readers who 
drifted in and out of her tiny place. She 
calls it the One Heart Bookstore. 

Miss Chen’s shop lends bodes in- 
stead of selling them, just like the read- 
ing societies that matured a cultural 
awakening in the 1920s in Chengdu, a 
city of 4 million in Sichuan Province. 
Browsing is free. Borrowing a book 
costs four cents a day. 

In a small way, Miss Chen and her 
bookshop reflect die thriving atmo- 
sphere for small business in a city that is 
home to many passionate readers. But 
unlike the majority of China’s intel- 
lectuals, Miss Choi is more a bene- 
ficiary of the Co mmunis t revolution, 
and its reform period, than of China’s 
literary traditions. 

“Mao taught me to read; Deng put 
money in my pocket,’ 'she said as tf she 
had known the two leaders personally. 

She was an illiterate street sweeper at 
41, Miss Chen explained, when a na- 
tionwide campaign in 19S8 taught mil- 
lions of ordinary peasants and workers 
to read Chinese characters for die first 
time. 

“Mao called it ‘sweep away illit- 
eracy,' ’’ Miss Chen said laughing. “I 
got swept away." 

Attending classes organized by her 
neighborhood committee. Miss Chen 
kept going long after most of her class- 
mates dropped out, satisfied that they 


bad learned enough to decipher street 
signs and simple announcements. 

“I didn't have much to do, except 
take care of my son." she said, since she 
was widowed when her husband died of 
a brain hemorrhage in 1956. "So I 
stayed home nights and read" 

She liked romance novels, though 
during the surge of fanatical leftism m 
five late 1960s they were denounced as 
remnants of capitalist pollution and she 
had to hide the few that she owned and 
read them at night by candlelight 
Only in the late 198%, after the au- 
thorities deemed it acceptable to run a 
private business, did she torn her living 
room into a bookstore, taking used 
books from neighbors and using her 
savings to buy new ones. 

“I love being surrounded by books," 
Miss Chen said pointing out that each 
was shielded with a blue or red plastic 
cover to protect it from the battering of 
daily life. “Too bad I haven't had the 
same protection," she said 
A woman in a black wool miniskirt 
with checked stockings and knee-high 
black leather boots perused the romance 
section of the shelves for about five 
minutes before settling on “A Month of 
Long Nights." 

“Have you read this one. old lady?" 
she asked Miss Cbm. 

“I know whattfiey all sayj" tfie pro- 
prietor chuckled as she passed die book 
to her assistant, Xiao Wang, who 
marked down its name in a ledger. 

The shop is barely six feet wide, and 
not much deeper. A pink paper drawing 
of a Buddha is tacked to the wall, and 
behind one shelf is a tiny kitchen with a 
single gas Same. Miss Chen sleeps in a 
small room upstairs. 

“Before Deng we weren't even al- 
lowed to run a shop like this," she said. 
“Life is more normal now." 

Down the street, many of the private 
teahouses that once served as breeding 
grounds for town gossip are now silent 


Japanese have traveled to the United 
States or Guam — the closest U.S. ter- 
ritory to Japan — for “gun tours." They 


street price for many black-market 
handguns has dropped to $500 from 
about $3,000 a couple of years ago. 
Prices are so low that guns have spread 
for the first time from organized mob- 
sters into the hands of extortionists, 
political extremists, petty criminals, 
even law-abiding people who have 
taken a fancy to guns. 

Perhaps even more upsetting to the 
collective psyche is that young Japanese 
are showing more interest in guns. A 
recent police survey showed that one in 
three Japanese men in their 20s would 
like to own a gun, or at least fire oire. 

“It's become a fad, a cool thing, to 
like guns," said Michiko Nagashima. 
49, a security company employee. 
“This is a bad import from the West.'’ 

In the past few years, more and more 


“If you go to the U.S„ you can shoot 
a gun for $50 or $100," said Keizo 
Kimura, an office clerk in Tokyo who 
went to Guam with his friends to blast 
away with semi-automatic weapons. 
“Japanese people want to do it for tbe 
experience. * 

One tour brochure advertised $1 ,000 
tours to San Francisco and Los Angeles 
during which the traveler could “ ex- 
perience 200 types of firearms.” 


The Japan Travel Bureau canceled a 
series of gua-shooting tours to the 
Unised States because, a company 
spokesman said, ‘ ‘we decided there was 
a moral problem with these tours, that 
they were against tbe good of society." 

Although people may fear that Japan 
is becoming more like America in terms 
of gun crime, tbe comparison is far- 
fetched. 

There are about 16,000 gun-related 


slayings in the United States each year. 
Counting killings, suicides and acci- 
dents, an average of 100 people die by 
gunfire every day in the United States. 

While owning a handgun is a legal 
right in the United States, where an 
estimated 75 million handgun s are in 
private hands, in Japan only 65 civilians 
— all sportsmen — legally own hand- 
guns. The government is so strict on this 
point that die location of the nation’s 
only factory producing handguns for 
use in law enforcement is secret 

But it is getting harder to keep 
smuggled guns out of Japan. More than 
800 nom South Africa have been 
seized, for example, including many 
packed in a ship alongside tuna. Other 
smugglers have simply mailed weapons 
to Japan. 

“The traditional . smuggling route 
used to be from the U.S. and Phil- 
ippines, but it has now. diversified to 
Russia, China, South Africa and Peru,” 
the National Police Agency's new an- 
nual crime report said. ' 

Japanese gangsters are doing almost 



Seth fcboG/’n&c No* WiTuotA 


in the evenings, with an of tbe chairs 
turned and pointed at a television screen 
where a videocassette of a Hong Kong 
action movie plays most evenings. 

“I don’t like those movies," said Liu 
Ying, 32, an office worker, as he 
checked out two books — "Diary of a 
Dragonslayer ’ * and ‘ ‘Dragon in a Sea of 
Blood." He added. “I'd always rather 
read." 

Mr. Liu said be thought of Miss Chen 
as a small neighborhood treasure. He 
regularly pesters her about what will 
become other store when she becomes 


top old to run, it “Are you ever going to 
get your Son come do this?" Mr. Liu 
asked. She frowned at tbe thought. 
“He’s not dependable," she said. “You 
know him." 

Miss Chen tucked a lock of wispy 
gray hair back into a navy-blue knit cap 
and confided to a visitor a sad fact that 
has been creeping up on her in recent 
years. 

“I can’t read anymore." she said, 
gesturing at her watery eyes. * ‘My eyes 
are too tired. AD 1 can do is look at the 
covers and remember what is inside." 


all of the smuggling, tbe police said, and 
the great majority of tbe trigger-pulling . 
Of fee 17 gun-related deaths last year, 
11 involved one mobster killing an- 
other. And two-foiitis of the 1,549 fire- 
arms seized last year were taken from 
mobsters. 

Parliament further toughened guns 
laws in response to record shootings and 
seizures of guns in 1995, and imme- 
diately noticed a drop in gun crime. For 
instance, new sentencing guidelines call 
for at least three years in prison for firing 
a gun in a public place — even if no one 
else is around. 

Gun crime involving ordinary cit- 
izens is. so rare here feat when a shooting 
does occur, many people instinctively 

say it could not have been committed by 

a Japanese. 

For instance, when three female em- 
ployees of a Tokyo supermarket — in- 
cluding two high school students — 
were Jailed in a holdup in 1995, even the 
police publicly speculated that the killer 
most have been a foreigner. The crime 
remains unsolved. 


Papua General 
Is Fired. Over 
Mercenaries 


The Associated press 

PORT MORESBY, Papua New 
Guinea — The government dismissed 
the commander of the army Monday 
after he encouraged soldiers and police 
to refuse to wont wife foreign mer- 
cenaries hired to crush tbe rebellion on 
Bougainville. 

The commander of the Papua New 
Guinea Defense Force, Brigadier Gen- 

with ^^ce 1 ^^missioner B6b*Nenta! 
according to radio reports from the cap- 
ital, Port Moresby. 

General Singirok said earlier Monday 
fiiar about 40 mercenaries in Port 
Moresby and Wewak had been detained 
and would be deported It was not clear 
what their status was late Monday night 

Prime Minister Julius Chan said the 
cabinet dismissed General Singirak 
after examining the text of an interview 
broadcast on Papua New Guinea radio. 

In the interview, fee general called for 
Mr. Chan's resignation for hiring the 
military consultants Sandline Interna- 
tional to help solve fee nine-year Bou- 
gainville secessionist crisis. 

“We are a democratically elected 
government, and as the representatives of 
file people, we will not be stood over by a 
member of tire disciplinary forces who is 
supposed to be acting on the expressed 
wishes of the people, through tbeofectad 
representatives;". Mir. Qian said 

Sandline International, based in Bri- 
tain, has been hired to help train Papua 
New Guinea’s 3,200 troops to fight fee 
Bougainville rebels, and has subcon- 
tracted some of the work to Executive 
Outcomes, a mercenary outfit based in 
South Africa. 

Colonel Alfred Aikung will take over 
as acting commander, Mr. Chan said 

Residents of Port Moresby said fee 
streets were quiet. Most troops stayed in 
feeir barracks. 


BRIEFLY 


Separatists Active 
In Northwest China 

BEIJING — Sepanaists seeking 
indepen den t in a restive repioiLOf ■? 
northwest China are agitating for * 
strikes in schools and factories,, an - 
official newspaper said- 

Tbe separatists m Xinjiang nave ? 
organized themselves into pohtical 
parries wife manifestos, aad are-- 
colluding with dozens of PTO-m-* 
dependence groups abroad, the - 
Xinjiang Daily said * 

Newspapers rarely gives? much v 
detail about separatists m JGnjrang, 
where Turkic-speaking Uighurs 1 
and other Muslim ethnic groups an^ 
resentful of Chinese rule. (AP) 

Beijing Rejects 
Hanoi Complaint , 

BEUING — China on Monday ’ 
defended oil exploration in waters, 
disputed by Vietnam, citing legal ; 
claims to the area under tbe United 
Nations Law of the Sea. 

Vietnam .demanded Saturday -• 
that China withdraw an explorat- 
ory oil rig it said it has been op- 
erating since early March in fee 
northwest comer of the South. . 
China Sea between Vietnam and * 
China’s Hainan Island 

The Chinese Foreign Ministry ' 
said its boats were conducting ; 
“normal exploration" along * 
China’s continental shelf. The area , 
falls under the economic exclusion 
zone China is entitled to under the ' 
UN law, fee ministry said in a - 
statement. (API 

Jakarta Rocked 
By Earthquake 

JAKARTA — A strong earth- .. 
quake rocked fire Indonesian cap- . . __ 
iral on Monday afternoon, sending ‘ 
people scurrying out of high-rise - 
buildings. 

There were no immediate re- . 
ports of damage or casualties. 

Officials at fee meteorological , 
department said the earthquake . j 
was centered below the seabed in . 
fire Indian Ocean, some 300 ki- 
lometers (200 miles) southwest of # 
Jakarta. It measured 6.0. on fee . ■ 
Richter scale. (Reuters) . 

For the Record 

JPhQippme police said Argie - 
FuHcttL, a bank guard, shot five fel- - 
low guards to death and wounded - , 
rwo others Monday before fatally 
[ shooting fumself. The shootings 
occurred before a suburban Quezon 
I'CSty branch of Rizal Comnrercial .' r 
•• Banking Coip. opened its doors to - ; - 
depositors. . (AP) - 1 

Buddhist monks demonstrated ; - 
on Saturday in Burma’s second - Z 
. city, Mandalay, but the protests i - 
were quelled without incident, gov- z* 
eminent sources said Monday. The - * 
sources said fee demonstrations ' - 
were sparked by rumors that a < 
young Buddhist girl had been raped - £ 
by Muslims. (Reuters) Z 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 


EUROPE 


PACE 5 


Russian Prisons Breeding Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Officials Warn 


By Barry James 

fnternaiicnal Herald Tribune 

IRussian prisons and labor camps have 
pecome incubators of virulent, droe-res- 
n'hmutom .hat .s s-prii" 
th« region as prisoners are re- 


ministers a treatment program in Baku, 
Azerbaijan, reported recently that there 
were 4,667 cases of TB for every 
100,000 prisoners — 50 times higher 
than in the general population — with a 
25 percent mortality rate. 

m Kazakstan, the government last 


leased official* in j 111 Jvazaksian, the government 

World ILdth “ ?! year released about 56,600 prisoners 


Monday I * eallh Organization said do- an amnesty, many of them suffering 

The ~ „ “ OID drug-resistant tuberculosis, ac- 

forrn JKSI R ?~ cordin E to die Global TB Education 

ioto said 2,481 of every 100,000 pris- Fund in Washineton 

licaraps Question i* ** sorae , la ^ or The fact that prisoners are spreading 
^prisoners wiU SSwJ“ t J? >twhe ?, er ^ disease among the general popu- 
w jj en _ eaten . the disease but lation after their release is one reason — 

p n ‘ ■ - , . along with the collapse of medical ser- 

JT*® ^ £JK“ population of vices and general poverty — - why “TB 
rw^SS^S^ ms* ^ climbing tack to levels of 20 

worse m , som e years ago, spawning the highest mor- 
Sf Commonwealth of tality rates in Europe and taking the lives 
International of those in their most productive years,” 


more than one millio n. 

The situation is even worse in some 
other regions of the Commonwealth of 
independent States. The International 
Committee of the Red Cross, which ad- 


which will be made public in Berlin on 
Wednesday. 

“The recent dramatic increase in TB 
cases is a clear reflection of the eco- 
nomic turmoil and social upheaval in the 
Russian Federation since 1990.” the re- 
port says. 

Figures given by Alexander Khoraen- 
ko, director of Russia's central research 
institute of tuberculosis, indicate that the 
rate of TB in the general population may 
almost have tripled between 1991 and 
1996 to 70 cases for every 100,000 
people in the Russian Federation. 

This is between four and seven times 
higher than the figures reported in most 
Western countries, where the disease is 
largely controlled by multiple drug ther- 
apies but is nevertheless becoming an 
increasing public health hazard. In 1995, 


of TB per 100.000, a total of 22,860 
cases, of which 4.1 percent were in cor- 
rectional institutions. 

Dr. Hans Kluge, Moscow coordinator 
for Doctors Without Borders, said that in 
some regions, 60 percent of TB patients 
were former prisoners. 


fore they are sentenced because of over- 
crowding, poor hygiene and lack of de- 
cent nutrition in holding prisons. 

Dr. Kluge said that from a public 
health point of view it was better not to 
treat the infected prisoners and allow 
them to die, rather than give them partial 


“If we want to break the chain of drug treatment that built up resistance to 


transmission, we have to tackle the prob- 
lem at the root, in the prisons, he 
said. 

Nick Banatvala of Medical Emer- 
gency Relief in London, which operates 
a TB treatment program among the gen- 
eral population, said there was a “tre- 
mendous need” for good work in the 
prisons, where the disease was mostly 
affecting young male adults. 

Valeri Sergeyev of the Moscow Col- 
ter for Prison Reform said many pris- 


of those in their most productive years,” the last year for which figures are avail- oners can expect to contract TB, which is 
according to the WHO’s 1997 TB report, able, the United States reported 8.7 cases spread by an airborne bacillus, even be- 


tbe- disease and spread it among the 
population. 

Doctors Without Borders runs a treat- 
ment program at the Mareensk special 
TB camp in central Siberia based on 
multiple drug therapy, but Dr. Kluge 
said sputum samples sent to Belgium for 
analysis indicated that some prisoners 
had acquired resistance to the entire 
panoply of drugs. 

The Mareensk program reaches only 
400 of the 2,000 prisoners at Mareensk, 
but Dr. Kluge said he was trying to 
persuade authorities to expand it to pre- 


vent continual reinfection. The camp, 
built for 700, is so overcrowded that 
prisoners sleep in shifts, and some rent 
out their beds by the hour. Nevertheless, 
prisoners consider they are better off 
there than in the labor camps and de- 
liberately avoid taking medication or 
fake their sputum tests in order to avoid 
being sent back. 

"It is a disaster.’ * Dr. Kluge said. “In 
January and February this year. 1 15 pa- 
tients died. It's a real cemetery.” 

He said that hundreds of TB victims 
were awaiting admission to Mareensk, 
and in the meantime spreading the dis- 
ease in other camps. The problem was 
compounded by homosexuality and 
promiscuity in the camps, he added. 

A principal means of spreading the 
disease. Dr. Kluge said, were prison 
trains where detainees were crammed 30 
into a compartment. 


Europe’s Coins: 
A Spat on Form 
And Content 

The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — ■ Swedish fears of 
" nickel allergies and Ger man concern 
that nine-sided coins will jam vending 
machines prevented the European Uni- 
on from agreeing on the design of 
Europe's future small change Monday. 

“It was not possible for us to come up 
with full agreement,” said the Dutch 
finance minister, Gerrit Zalm, who led a ‘ 
meeting of EU finance ministers. 

EU leaders are hoping to unveil the 
final designs of the euro coins at a June 
summit meeting in Amsterdam. 

The introduction of European money 
is scheduled for 2002, but several tech- 
nical issues must be resolved fust 

The biggest problem is Sweden's in- 
sistence that nickel not be used in the ' 
coins. Studies published in Sweden 
show that up to 20 percent of women 
and 1 percent of men may suffer from 
nickel allergies. Unions representing 
cashiers, bank tellers and other people 
, who frequently handle money are press- 
ing the Swedish government not to ac- 
cept nickel as a component of the Euro- 
pean coins. 

Sweden wants the EU to use an alloy 
called Nordic Gold, which could make 
the coins more costly to mint, especially 
since some countries want to recycle their 
existing coins into euros. 

Germany, meanwhile, objected to 
plans to help the blind by making the 20 
cent coin nine-sided, rather than round. 
Bonn is concerned the polygonal coins 
would jam vending machines. 


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at of women Fire fighters inspecting the damage after a firebomb devastated a Brussels cafe, killing four people, 
f suffer from _ _ 

otoCT^^Ie Firebomb Attack at Brussels Cafe Kills 4 

ley are press- ■/ 


The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — A firebomb attack 
on a cafg Monday killed four people 
sleeping in an upstairs apartment and 
injured five others, police said Five 
suspects were detained 

“It was a deliberate attack with an 
explosive device,” most probably a 
Molotov cocktail, said the assistant 
police commissioner, Johan Berck- 
mans . 

The victims’ bodies were re- 
covered from the ruins of the five- 


story building which partly collapsed 
in toe flames. The reason for toe 
attack is unknown. 

A mother and her four children 
were rescued from the roof of toe 
burning house and were taken to toe 
hospital suffering from shock and 
minor injuries. 

The bar was popular with North 
African immi grants in Molenbeek, a 
working-class' neighborhood north 
of downtown Brussels. 

The Molenbeek mayor. Philippe 


Moureaux, said there had been a dis- 
pute between toe bar owner and the 
residents of the house but stressed it 
seemed insufficient cause for such a 
brutal attack. 

Mr. Berckmans played down ra- 
dio reports that the caf£ was fre- 
quented by gamblers and drug deal- 
ers. He added that at first sight, there 
were no indications of political 
motives for the attack. 

Police questioned eight people 
and later detained five as suspects. 


BRIEFLY 


Italy Government Calls 
For Vote on Dairy Bill 

ROME — The Italian government on 
Monday called a confidence vote in toe 
Chamber of Deputies on a decree bill to 
re fo rm toe milk sector. 

Giorgio Bogi, minister for relations with 
Parliament, announced toe do-or-die mea- 
sure in Parliament. It relates to a package of 
r e form s for the dairy sector, which has been 
hit by a bitter dispute with farmers over 
strict European Union quotas. 

Parliamentary sources said the vote 
would start on Tuesday. The center-left 
government, which relies mi support from 
toe hard-left Communist Refoundation 
party, must resign if it loses but was not 
expected to face serious danger. 

Prime Minister Romano Prodi’s govern- 
ment unveiled toe decree, containing emer- 
gency aid measures for the dairy sector, in 
January after fanners blockaded roads and 
airports for two weeks to protest against 
hefty EU overproduction fines. ( Reuters ) 

Trial for Ex - Vichy Aide 
Will Start in October 

BORDEAUX — The trial of Maurice 
Papon, toe former Vichy official charged 
with committing crimes against humanity 
during World War IL will begin Oct. 6 in 
Bordeaux, officials said Monday. 

Mr. Papon, 86, a former budget minister, 
would be toe highest-ranking Vichy official 
and probably toe last living Frenchman to 
face such charges. 

Mr. Papon is charged with toe arrest and 
deportation of 1,690 Jews, including 223 


children, from toe Bordeaux region. Doc- 
uments show he signed arrest orders as late 
as 1944, even after the D-Day Allied land- 
ing in Normandy. 

He has denied any wrongdoing, saying 
he was following orders. He has claimed he 
was a member of the Resistance and has 
admitted to “sacrificing a few Jews to save 
others.” (AP) 

French Neo-Nazis Admit 
Desecrating Cemetery 

MARSEILLE — Four former French 
neo-Nazis admitted on Monday their part in 
toe desecration of a Jewish cemetery at 
Carpentras, in southern France, seven years 
ago. The event caused national outrage in 
France. 

Yannick Gamier, 27. one of the four, said 
that be had been a racist and had carried out 
the attack but added, “I am toe absolute 
opposite of what I was seven years ago. My 
hatred of others was hatred of myself. I was 
racist and anti-Semitic because I needed a 
scapegoat.” 

The four young skinheads, whose three- 
day trial started Monday, face a maximum 
two years in jail for profaning graves and 
destruction of property. 

They are accused of smashing 39 tombs 
in toe cemetery, and removing a man's 
body from one grave. They left the body on 
a tombstone after abusing it. (AFP) 

For the Record 

A bomb rocked a mosque in Paris on 
Monday, shattering windows and slightly 
injuring toe guardian. There was no im- 
mediate claim of responsibility. (AP) 



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PAGES 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 18,1997 



INTERNATIONAL 


Zaire Pleads for Calm After the Fall of Kisangani 


briefly 


C/mpMbyOir StffFimtXspsckes 

KINSHASA, Zaire — The government 
urged Zairians on Monday not to yield to 
panic following the fall of die country’s third 
city, Kisangani, to rebel forces. 

“The government calls on the population 
not to allow panic to lake over," said a 
government spokesman. Jean-Claude Biebie 
Ekalabo. 

The statement after an emergency cabinet 
meeting was issued apparently to halt a flurry 
of wild rumors in the capital, where travel 
agencies have been besieged for the past two 
days by anxious dozens trying to book flights 
to Europe. 

“The safety of the people of Kinshasa and 
of their possessions are a central concern of 
the civil and military authorities," the gov- 
ernment said. 

The statement made no mention of the 
situation in the east of the country, where rebel 
forces said Monday drat they were continuing 


their offensive. But it said the government 
“sought to reassure the people about the stale 
of health” of President Mobutu Sese Seko, 
who has been hospitalized in Monaco for 
treatment of his prostate cancer. 

Marshal Mobutu, die statement said, “will 
return to Zaire next week.” 

Marshal Mobutu’s son insisted that die 
president’s health was “nothingto be alarmed 
about*’ and that his father would retumsoon 
to Zaire. “He will return and continue the 
process of containment — of protecting the 
country,” Nzanga Mobutu said by telephone 
from Monaco. 

A spokeswoman at Princess Grace Hos- 
pital, Nathalie Neli, confirmed to The As- 
sociated Press on Monday that Marshal 
Mobutu was there. But she refused to give any 
details. 

A source in this Riviera principality, speak- 
ing on condition of anonymity, said Marshal 
Mobutu was suffering from bleeding due to 


complications from his Aug. 22 prostate op- 
eration in Lausanne, Switzerland. He was 
admitted to die hospital early Friday, die 
source said, calling Marshal Mobutu's con- 
dition “serious.” 

There is great fear in Kinshasa that, if 
Marshal Mobutu were to die, riots and looting 
would break out Riots in 1991 and 1993 left 
hundreds of people dead, including the French 
ambassador in 1993. and destroyed many 
businesses. 

The rebels, meanwhile, were sending 
forces toward Lubumbashi, Zaire's second- 
largest city, after capturing Kisangani, the 
country’s third-Iaigest town, over the week- 
end. 

“AH tbe towns of the republic are on our 
agenda,” said a rebel spokesman. Raphael 
Ghenda. “but Lubumbashi is our next tar- 
get” 

Rebel forces seized Kisangani with little 
resistance from the government's poorly paid 


army. Soldiers looted toedty, which has a 
population of 300,000. and fled with panicked 
residents across the Zaire River, aid workers 
said. 

Mr. Ghenda said tbe fighters who seized 
Kisangani would push west toward Gbadolite, 
Marshal Mobutu’s hometown. Forces also 
would head toward Kasai in : southern Zaire, 
he said. 

The rebels intend to continue their drive to 
tbe capital, Kinshasa, if tbe president fails to 
meet their terms for a cease-fire, Mr. Ghenda 
said. Marshal Mobutu has rejected demands 
by tbe rebel leader, Laurent Kabila, for face- 
to-face talks. 

Tbe rebels, who accuse Mir. Mobutu of 
robbing has country to enrich himself, have 
swept across eastern Zaire since October. 

Foreign relief workers fled Kisangani 
ahead of tbe rebel advance, leaving behind 
100,000 Rwandan Hutu refugees at llbundu, 
100 kilometers south of the dry. ' (AFP. AP) 


Apartheid Foe 
Denies Fraud 


By Suzanne Daley 

New York Tima Service 


JOHANNESBURG — Allan Boesak, a 
former clergyman who was once a prominent 
anti-apartheid activist, appeared in a Cape 
Town court Monday to face charges of fraud 
and theft 

Mr. Boesak faces nine counts of fraud and 21 
charges of theft involving the disappearance of 
more than $800,000, most of it donated to his 
Foundation for Peace and Justice by Danish and 
Swedish aid organizations. 

Mr. Boesak has been liviag in Berkeley, 
California, for the last year as a fellow at the 
American Baptist Seminary of toe West. His 
accountant. Freddie Steenkarap. who 3 Iso faces 
charges in the case, appeared in court last 
December. 

The magistrate postponed the case until Au- 
gust and released Mr. Boesak without bail but 
ordered that be report to police regularly, hand 
in his passport and make no attempt to contact 
witnesses in toe case. 

On Mr. Boesak’s return to South Africa on 
Sunday, tbe justice minister, Dullah Omar, said 
he bad been instructed by President Nelson 
Mandela to welcome toe former clergyman on 
behalf of the African National Congress. 



Nigeria Vote 
Is Pro-Regime 


Jwb ^gfeoifa/Kaiti-n 

Allan Boesak, facing fraud and theft charges, leaving a Cape Town courthouse Monday. 


The investigation of Mr. Boesak took nearly 
two years and is often cited as an example of toe 
new government's failure to deal swiftly with 
charges of corruption and misconduct leveled 
against its own. 

Lawyers for one of the organizations. Dan- 
Church Aid, say that the money, intended to 
help victims of apartheid, was diverted to buy 
Mr. Boesak’s luxurious home in CapeTo wn and 
to settle his wife’s debts. 

Mr. Boesak denied again Sunday that he was 
guilty of tbe charges. 

“I have come back. to this country, my coun- 
try, my home, because I am not afraid to face 


those who have charged me; because I am. as 
they know, totally innocent of the charges they 
have leveled against me,’ * he said at tbe airport. 

Mr. Boesak was carried shoulder-high by 
supporters to a giant teDt where he was cheered 
and many reached out to touch him. 

Mr. Omar first expressed his public support 
for Mr. Boesak Iasi week, drawing sharp cri- 
ticism from some quarters. But Mr. Omar said 
he saw no conflict in his position, saying he had 
not interfered with toe judicial process. 

• Mr. Boesak was a mi raster in Cape Town who 
won international fame for fighting to have the 
Dutch Reformed Church condemn apartheid. 


A gene r Frtmce-Presse 

LAGOS — The pro- government 
United Nigeria Congress Party has won 
outright majorities in at least 15 of the 
country's 36 states in multiparty local 
elections, results showed Monday. 

.The United Nigeria Congress Party, 
widely believed to have tbe support of 
toe Nigerian military ruler. General 
Sani Abacha, appeared set for an overall 
majority of seats in toe local govern- 
ments following the polls Saturday, tire 
first local ballot to be held on a mul- 
tiparty basis since General Abacha’ & 
junta took power in November 1993. • 

The results of the polls, published in 
local newspapers Monday, show that 
the mostly conservative United Nigeria 
Congress Party has outright leads in 15 
states and in toe federal capital, Abuja. 

The Congress Party recorded a total 
of 193 seats, followed by toe Demo- 
cratic Party of Nigeria, which led in six 
states, winning a total of 1 1 1 seats. 

None of the five parties approved by 
the military authorities in September 
have opposed the prospect of General 
Abacha’ s running for the presidency 
next year. 


Der Spiegel Prints CIA Names 

•„ mAMizine. Der Spiegel, oi 


BONN— A German news magazine, 

Monday identified a man *ho tt sajd « ^ OA sUtton 

chief in Bonn and of one fi of jj S i u ^l meo t S when asked. 


Colombian Quits in Drug Link 


BOGOTA— Colombia’s defense minister. Gmltermo: 
Alberto Gonzalez, resigned after atfraowiedgmg ttatta; 
wealthy drag trafficker may have given money to hw, 

1.989 legislative election campaign- ^ now Wived 
Mr. Gonzalez, who resigned Sunday, 

Friday that a $9,000 check paid to his campaign apjxssred. 
to have been signed by Justo Pastor Perafan. a fugitive who- 
allegedly matte a fortune trafficking in 
Gonzalez said he did not know at the tune that Mr. Perafwi. 
was trafficking in drugs. * ■ 


CNN Opens Havana Bureau 


NEW YORK — CNN opened a bureau Monday up 
H avana, becoming toe first U.S. news organization to . 
station a correspondent permanently in Cuba in 2.7 years.. 
The Clinton administration approved last month a h-: 
cense request from Cable Network News to operate m 
Havana after Cuba gave its permission in August. (Ar J; 


UN to Send Baker as Envoy 


UNITED NATIONS. New York — James Baker, tbe 
U.S. secretary of state from 1989 to 1992, was named 
Monday as the personal envoy of the UN secretary- 
general, Kofi Annan, to Western Sahara. 

His appointment is likely to bring international at- 
tention to the decades-old dispute over control of toe 
former Spanish colony. The United Nations has proposed 
a referendum on whether toe territory, which is rich in 
phosphate, should become pail of Morocco or an in- 
dependent ’state, but rival groups have failed to agree on 
bow tbe balloting would be conducted, (AFP) 


West Africa Defeats a Scourge 


OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso — “River blind- 
ness,” which a decade ago afflicted 100.000 people in ■ 
western Africa, has nearly been eradicated thanks to an. 
effort by 11 countries whose delegates were to meet here 
Monday. A drug called Ivennectine has reduced toe 
presence of the disease, known as onchocerciasis, by 90.". 
percent in Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Benin, Ghana, Mali, 
Niger and Togo, where it originated. (AFP) : 


BOOKS 


CHESS 


SLANDER 

By Undo Le. Translated From the French 
by Esther Allen. 156 pages. $30; 
paperback $J 4. University af Nebraska 
Press. 

Reviewed by Thomas McGonigle 

T HE Vietnam War, no matter what 
we might think about it. is now just 
another historical fact. Vietnam is once 
again an obscure country that rarely 
appears in the news and is present now 
mostly in the form of Vietnamese res- 
taurants in larger American cities. . 

Americans’ ignorance of this country 
and its people is nearly perfect in spite 
of, or because of, ouremanglement with 
iL 

So it. is startling, revealing, humi- 
liating and pleasant to read the first of 
Linda Le's six novels to be translated 
into English. 

Le, who was bom in Vietnam and 
immigrated to France at toe age of 14 
and writes in French, produced these six 
novels before the age of 30 and now 
dismisses her first three as just the sort 
of books anyone could produce at that 
age. 

“Slander,” her fifth novel, entwines 
and merges two distinct and contrasting 
voices: that of an old man, just released 
after a long incarceration in a mental 
hospital and now working in a library; 
and that of a young woman, his niece, 
who is trying to make sense of their 
world. It is a world of exile, an exile that 
is both physical — they have each been 


living in France for toe last 15 years — 
linguistic: Each now thinks in 


and 


French, and she writes in French, further 
distancing themselves from that country 
called Vietnam. 

It must be happily said that nothing 
“happens” in “Slander.” 

The niece does discover that the fa- 
ther she grew up with is not her bio- 
logical father. But there is none of that 
muck of dreary realistic incident and 
story that clogs so much recent Amer- 
ican fiction- Instead we are given tbe 
pleasure and texture of voice. 

Here the uncle hints at the complex- 
ities of Vietnamese history and of the 
recent past as personified tty the niece's 
real father, a Westerner who came to 
Vietnam with the war and had an affair 
with her mother “Her mother says, a 
man full of pride and courage.” 

(The man of courage braved am- 
bushes, defied snipers, visited the from 
lines but he beat a hasty retreat as soon 
as he was threatened with fatherhood.) 
The book is a wonderfully designed 
object And of course no conventional 
publisher would have the courage to do 
such a harsh, lucid book, which contains 
this voice: “You forget that love is 
nothing but sweat secretions, rancor. A 
simple matter of perspiration that begins 
in a nervous moment called coup de 
foudre, continues between sour- 
smelling sheets, and in the long run can 
only conclude in the proximity of two 
bad moods by day and two bad smells at 
(tight until the final bankruptcy, tbe last 
lather, which is worked up by toe fear of 
no longer having anyone to sweat 
with.” 

However, “Slander” is no novel of 
mere exotic heartbreak like Marguerite 


Dinas ’s “Die Lover.” Rather it is a 
novel about how to search fora father. It 
asks the unanswerable real question: 
Why was I bora? Le knows that “she 
will have to choose between these two 
specimens of father. Between a best- 
selling novelist’s book, a book that puts 
on a showy display of eradition and 
seduction, a book written with facility, a 
book that enchants the reader, a book 
padded out with frivolous phrases and 
ending with a pirouette — she has to 
choose between that charming book and 
toe other specimen, an austere book that 
encloses nothing but a little dried 
blood.” 

“Slander” takes up residence in the 
emotions of toe reader and creates a 
literary country one wants to visit and 
revisit. 

As Le’s protagonist says, “I look in 
books for a sign of recognition. I leaf 
through a lot of them. Most of the time, 
I see nothing other than a book, some 
paragraphs, some words. I get tired of 
turning the pages. I'm ready to stop. 
Then the miracle happens. I pick up a 
book, I open it, and something there 
makes a sign to me. In those moments. I 
feel like a shipwrecked man who sees a 
band on the horizon, a hand waving on 
the surface of the water, a living hand. 

“A hand that can do nothing for me. 
But still a hand that signals to tell me 
that at least there are two of us ship- 
wrecked here on this sea of solitude.” 


By Robert Byrne 


T HERE is nor supposed to be any 
luck in chess, but there is. Where 
would the winner of toe 59th Hoogoven 
International Tournament in Wijk-aan- 
Zee, toe Netherlands, Valeri Salov, 
have finished without his opponents' 
blunders? “I simply made some rea- 
sonable moves.” he said, “and kept an 
eye on ray opponent's mistakes.” 

In the fifth round, the usually re- 
doubtable Alexei Yermolinsky. United 
States champion, contributed a point to 
Salov’s prize fund. 

The contra-English Opening defense 
that Black sets up after U._d6 re- 


SALOVfiLACK 


Thomas McGonigle. the author of 
"The Corpse Dream of N. Petkov" and 
“Going to Patchogue.” wrote this for 
The Washington Post. 



ft c d « f g 
vEwioiJMSKriWHrre 


Position after 28 Nff 


sembles a Maroczy bind in that White 
controls a preponderance of space in the 
center with his c and e pawns. But Blade 
has an e6 pawn that denies White the use 
of d5 for a knight outpost. The setup 
may appear passive, but is so in the way 
that barbed wire is. 

After l2...Ne5. giving Black doubled 
pawns with 1 3 Ne5 de would allow him 
to seize the center with — Bc5 and 
~Bd4. ; 

It is not obvious why Yermolinsky 
. played 16 Bd2 rather than toe standard 
16Bb2. 

With 18...Qb8. Salov readied an at- 
tack on the ©4 pawn with 19... Qa8 and 
2Q...Nc5. Yermolinsky ’s 19 f3 was 
played to anticipate that, but instead it 
let Salov counterattack at once with 

19.. .d51 

After 20 cd ed, Yermolinsky should 
have played 21 Nf5. For example. 
2I.J3c5 22 Bc5 be 23 Qd2 d4 24 Qg5 
g6 25 Na4 creates a complex situation in 
which the outcome in unclear. Instead, 
he opened toe e line with 21 ed?, where 
his queen and queen bishop were placed 
uncomfortably. 

Salov sprang into action at once with 

21.. .Ba31 22 Rc2 Rc3! 23 Rc3 Nd5 24 
Rd3 Nc5!, first sacrificing rook for 
knight and then forcing its return with 
heightened powers for toe black 
pieces. 

Yermolinsky could not get out of a 
pin by 25 Qf2 because 25..,Nd3 26 Rd3 
Ne3 27 Re3 Bc5 creates a new diagonal 
pin that will win material. 

After 27...Bd5, he was still constric- 
ted; 28 Nf3 Re3 29 Re3 QeS 30 K£2 
(or 30 Ne5 ftS) Qe4!? would have cre- 


ated a situation that was excruciatingly 
difficult for White to defend and Yer- 
molinsky wanted no part of it. 

His 28 Nf5, however, gave Salov 
rook for knight after 28...Be4 29 Bc5 
Bd3 30 Qd3 be and a technical ending 
emerged. 

Although Yermolinsky straggled 
bard to keep the black queen and rook at 
bay, after 41...Rd8!, Salov *s rook pre- 
pared for a decisive entrance into tbe 
battle. 

After 47.„Qb7[, there was no way to 
stop ...f5 permanently. Thus, 48 Qd4 
Kh7! decisively unpins the f6 pawn. 
Yermolinsky gave up. 


ENGLISH OPENING 


White 

Hack 

White 

Hack 

Yenn’ky 

Salov 

Verna ’ky 

Salov J 

1 NO 

NfS 

25 M 

Nd3 ; 7 

2 c4- 

c5 

28 Rd3 

bc5;/: . 

3 Nc3 

efi 

27 Bd5 

Bd5 . 

4g3 

b6 

28 NfS 

Be4 - - 

5 Bg2 

BJ37 

29 Bc5 

Bd3 

6 (HI 

Be7 

30 Qd3 

be . 

7 d4 

cd 

31 Qc3 

« • 

8 Q64 

0-0 

32 Qc4 

Kb8; 

9 Rdl 

NC6 

33 QH 

R*8“ 

10 QM 

n«t" 

T 

34 M 

35 Qd5 

’ Qe® . 
Qel, 

12 b3 

Ne5 

36 Kg2 

Qe2 

13 Qe3 

Ned7 

37 Kh3 

b5. • 

14 Qe2 

a8 

38 Ndfi 

Qg4 . 

15 Nd4 

Qp? • 

39 Kg2 

RI8 • 

16 Bd2 

RfeS 

40 Kf2 

Kh7r- 

17 Raci 

RacS 

41 Oc5 

Rt» * 


19 13 

20 cd 

21 ed 

22 Rc2 

23 Rc3 

24 Red3 


d5 

ed 

Ba3 

Rc 3 

Nd5 

NcS 


43 Qc4 

44 Ne4 

45 Qc3 

46 Kf3 

47 Qd3 

48 Resigns 


Qd7 • 
Qe7 
K«7. 
Re8 =■ 
QW 


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successwise 




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A Space for Thought. 


29 Com serving 

24 Mornings, tor 
short 

25 Like some 
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29 'Beau ' 

31 Not guzzle 

» frrma 

33 Sounds from 
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M Approximately 

38 Tnal Judge 
Lance 

37 Dad's mate 
ae Bit ol hope 
as Turndowns 
40 Words before 

Wring the 
plunge 

43 Certain 
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44 Channels 
as Married 

4s Newspapers 
4?Atbara. e.g. 

43 Eternal queen, 
of book and film 
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is Eggs 
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2 1 kwon do 

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29 Operates, as a 
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MHighBgraing 

31 in an 
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32 Attempt 

34 Back-ro-work 
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33 Paddle 

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41 Director 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 


PAGE? 




l -Him- mj 


‘THE VALUE OF 
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man, then machine. 












PAGES 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


President Is Meddling, 


Albania Rival Asserts 

Let Government Work, Socialist Urges 


Ream 

TIRANA — The main challenger to 


ami d investment funds. The collapse of 
several of the funds, in which thousands 


President Sali Berisha, the Socialist of Albanians had placed their savings, 


Fatos Nano, urged him on set off anti-government protests that 


Monday to stop interfering in the work evolved into an armed revolt, with wide- 


of the government and try to restore 
order after weeks of unrest. 

Mr. Berisha, under increasing pres- 
sure from abroad to step down, was 


n and try to restore 


looting of weapons from army 


The government has appealed to cit- 
izens to turn in weapons, and on Monday 


awaiting the arrival of a high-level Euro- state -con trolled television showed 

Union mission. Its goal was to help Kalashnikov rifles, a shoulder-launched 


consolidate the calm of recent days, pos- anti-missile and dozens of cases of am- 
oiMir ht/ a«/firio thi> AlKomark rmlim mUQltiofl t?Gifl£ hflfltlcd III 31 ft TlTAHA 


™ 11 -member mission was being police station. , ^ 

flown to the capital, Tirana, by bell- “We shouldn t be bearing shots at 
copter. Rinas airport, which serves Tir- all,” Mr. Pino said “If people hang on 
afta was closed for the fifth day in a to these arms it will be the ruin of the 


country. „ , 

About 6.000 Albanians have fled 


Rebels bolding southern towns say Aboat 6.000 ai Damans nave pea 
they will not surrender their weapons across the Adriatic Sea to Italy, includ- 

i . . . M r d — Don Uno^au Ku 



EMU: 

New German Doubts 


Continued from Page 1 . 

isuas that Germany iSfe.'-. 




minister once again rejw^dtode-., 
termination to keep to\ toe i , 

But bis comments did btne to dispel 
the growing perception thattemany^ 
struggling economy, its record-high no- . 
emptoySnt rate andfee Mg .. . 
domestic political debate a*x»* 55 £-- 
etaiy union were making a delay of the 
project more likely. 

' man apparent bid to calm Gama 

concerns that *e euro may mrtbeas^^ 

as the mark, Mr. Waigel told the new^- : L 
paper BOd. “There won’t be any soft euro, 
wife me. The important thing xatiap.: 
have imecedence over time table. 


That report sparked a sharp nse ffl-fee. 
. value of the Deutsche mark a ga i n st othfcr 
European currencies and die dollar ,sh> 


European currencies auu w ; 

Monday; the mark closed at 16862 


Santiago Lfoo/nte iWraainl fro* 


until Mr. Berisha leaves office. 


Mr' Nano, who was released from Italian coastguards from a decrepit navy 
prison last week in one erf several con- ship. ... . , 

cessions by Mr. Berisha, has said that the EU foreign ministers approved the 


ing more than 800 rescued Monday by An Albanian firing over people rushing Monday to the beach in Dnrres, Albania, in a bid to flee by boat. 


Berisha ’s departure from office is not his 
first priority. 

Mr. Nano said at a news conference at 
Socialist Party headquarters that his 
message for Mr. Berisha was that he 
should “cooperate, not interfere.” 

“Since the majority of protesters con- 
tinue to demand his resignation, it means 
he hasn't got the message,” Mr. Nano 
said. “I would prefer to shake hands 
with him as an Albanian citizen and not 


EU foreign ministers approved the 
mission after rejecting military inter- 
vention, which the Albanian govern- 
ment bad requested. They pledged to 

A IluHii. M»fnr» nuilion flniptlirM 


REFUGEES: South Italy Is Running Out of Room for Albanians 


‘help Albania restore civilian structures 
nd law and order," 


Continued from Page 1 
five hours to go from Durres to Brindisi. 


with him as an Albanian citizen and not 


Mr. Nano served briefly as prime min- 
ister in 1991. He was jailed in 1993 on 
corruption charges, which be asserts 
were politically inspired. Now he is be* 
ing mentioned as a possible successor to 
Mr. Berisha. 


and law and order," 

“The primary task will be to help the 
Albanian authorities recover the levels 
of administrative control," a diplomatic 
source in Rome said. 

Mr. Berisha said in an interview with 
Europe 1 radio of France that he would 
ask. the EU delegation for police and 
economic aid to help to rebuild Al- 
bania's institutions and stabilize the 
economy. 

The situation remains critical, and Al- 
bania needs food aid quickly, he said, 
adding: 

"We will request major assistance to 


ButtheLejla 


with about passengers (the other half were taken by 


70 other people, piled onto what they * e Red Cross) had settled into the vfl- 


described as a tugboaL The journey took l*ge nursery school, where hot meals are 
three days. No one among them was brought to them three times a day. 

. — »*- “We want to stay, but we don t know 


much of a sailor, let alone a captain; Mr. 
Lejla had the most experience with 
boats, and he is a mechanic. 

At one point in the middle of the night, 
the engine broke down, and they had to 
wait for another ship to come along to 
repair it The nights were cold, and the 


harbor at dawn Friday. By the following bused to other parts of Italy to relieve the 
day, the fiunily and half of their fellow pressure on the south, which has high 
passengers (the other half were taken by unemployment, particularly among the 
the Red Cross) had settled into the vil- young. * 

lage nursery school, where hot meals are Italian authorities are offering human- 
brought to them three times a day. harian relief to the new arrivals, but not 
“We want to stay, but we don't know so much as to encourage more to come, 
if the Italians want us to stay,” Ada said. On a quick visit to Brindisi, Prime Min- 


against the dollar, from 1.7052, a nd a* 
0.2963 against the French franc, from 

0.2964. ^ 

“These are all signs that the foreign 
exchange market, at least, I* getting^ 
quite skeptical and is taking- Waigel s . 
comments as the first acknowledgment 
that Germany ponders not being inEMU 
lQQQ ” «auf Thomas Mover, anecon- 


\\AL 


th«r Germany ponders not being rnEMy 
in 1999.” said Thomas Mayer, aoecou- 
omist at Goldman, Sachs in Frankfurt.; . 

In Borin, meanwhile, the bucket 
spokes man for the opposition Social 
Democrats, Karl Diller, said Germany 


and February was already two-drirds 


ding was rougn. 

“Everyone was sick the whole way. 


For the moment, they are caught in 
limbo — with temporary papers, a place 
to sleep and food to eat, but no money, 
and for the moment, no prospects. Those 
Albanians with relatives already in Italy 
who will come bens to collect them are 
free to go; others can slip away but not 


ister Romano Prodi sent a clear message of the way toward die government target 


across the Adriatic Sea wben be said that of 53 -3 billion. marks. 


so when we saw the tights of Brindisi, we many bave anywhere to slip away to, or 


The president says he will resign if his rebuild our institutions, also a very quick 
Democratic Party loses elections that humanitarian assistance.” 


were so happy," Ada Lejla said. 

The boat was pulled into the Brindisi 


the means to do it 

Already, 650 refugees have been 


Mr. Nano has thrown Us support to ransacked posts Monday along tte I UN Chief Calls for Staff and Budget Cuts 


Albanian border guards returned to 


Prime Minister Bashkun Fmo. a fellow 
Socialist who was appointed last week to 
head a government of national recon- 
ciliation. 

Shops in Tirana were open Monday, 
following five days of turmoil last week. 
Public transportation was operating and 


Greek frontier, and police patrolled the 
streets in nearby towns for tbe first time 
jn two weeks. The guards had fled in the 
face of the armed uprising. 

On Monday, patrols were sent out 
akmg the border with Greece. 

In Jergucati, south of the rebel strong- 


Reuters 

UNITED NATIONS, New York — 
The UN secretary-general, Kofi An- 
nan, called Monday for staff and 


He also announced $123 million in 
budget cuts for 1998-1999. The cur- 
rent budget is about Si billion an- 
nually. He said he would consolidate 


Albanians would not solve their prob- Mr. Diller said Chancellor Helmut 
lems by fleeing. He emphasized that Kohl “should come clean on how things 
about two dozen Albanians had already are to proceed with Europe.’ ^ ,_ ; T . 

asked to be repatriated, as the violence at “Under this government, 1 ” he said, . ■ 

home began to ebb. • • • “Germany stands no chance of meeting 

Here in Brindisi, everyone still has a the Maastricht goal." ... ' 

vivid memory of 1991, when two sue- Gerhard Schroeder. the Lowct Say-., 
cessive waves of emigrants from the ony governor and possible Social Demo- .= 
newly opened Albania, once the most cratic candidate for chancellor in next 
isolated of Eastern Europe's Communist year's elections, called for f delay ter 
countries, threw themselves onto ferries monetary union in an interview in the . 
bound for Italy. The city was unpre- Financial Times. 
pared, and Albanians were camped out The political pressures reflect fee 
in the streets. This time, the reception is newfound fragility of Mr. Kohl’s gby- 
more orderly, although a group of Al- eminent because of tbe recent surge ifl 


countries, threw themselves onto ferries monetary union m an interview m the .. 
bound for Italy. The city was unpre- Financial Times. 
pared, and Albanians were camped out The political pressures reflect- the 
in the streets. This time, the reception is newfound fragility of Mr. Kohl’s gby- 
more orderly, although a group of Al- eminent because of tbe recent s urge iri 
banians gathered outside the police sta- unemployment to 4.8 million, a postwar, a 
tion Monday were complaining about record, as well as the growing proximity “ 


budget cuts and tbe merging of some departments dealing with economic l poor conditions at their camp site and of parliame n ta r y elections scheduled for 

. rT 5 . . , - ° , __ . J - * _L J , J I L-. L... rf.. loot than eiv tnnnfhc after 


public employees obeyed a government hold of Gjirokaster, 30 kilometers (18 
order to return to work. But a stale of miles) from the border, and in nearby 


emergency remained in effect in Al- 
bania, wife schools closed and a curfew 
in effect from 7 P-M. to 7 AJM. 

At least 100 people have been killed in 


towns, the police resumed street patrols 
and collected weapons from people. 

In Gjirokaster. amain town and army 
base near fee border, rebels began 


UN departments under his control as 
fee first step in his promised plan to 
reform the United Nations. 

In a statement to a UN committee. 


and social issues and reduce docu- 
mentation. 

Mr. Annan said that 38 percent of 
tbe organization's resources were de- 


Mr. Annan announced a reduction of voted to administration and that he 


1 ,000 staff posts for fee Secretariat, or was committed to reducing this by a 


the country in more than a month of Sunday to turn over to the police tanks 
unrest sparked by fee collapse of pryr- that had been seized from the army. 


core UN staff, which has about 9,000 third and channeling the resources in- 


employees based 
York, Geneva and ! 


Nairobi. 


ly in New 


to economic and social programs for 
fee developing world. 


arbitrary treatment by fee authorities. 

In the playground next to tbeTuturano 
nursery school where the Lejla family is 
housed, a group of Italian boys were 
playing soccer with some uf the newly 
arrived Albanians. 

“They shouldn’t stay too long," said 
Massimiliano. 17, wife a brooding look. 
"We have enough problems here.” 


YELTSIN: Moscow Will Start From Scratch With a Young Team ELECTION: 


Continued from Page 1 


"I have a challenging offer for you,” 
Mr. Yeltsin told Mr. Nemtsov in a Krem- 
lin meeting. 

"Two young men, you and Anatoli 


Duma. Mr. Nemtsov is genuinely pop- 
ular, while Mr. Chubais, who has never 
held elective office, is widely blamed far 
fee inequities of fee privatization pro- 
gram which he oversaw. 

Mr. Nemtsov has been given respon- 


Chubaisinfee government, will set up a ability for the troublesome social issues. 


reporters he had taken the job because Britons to Vote May 1 
Mr. Yeltsin had implored him to. ** 

“I will explain to people what I am Continued from Page 1 

doing.” Mr. Nemtsov said, "including 

the most unpleasant things, if I have to socialist past, reduced its dependency 
do them.’ ’ trade union financing and broadened 

The appointment of Mr. Nemtsov, a membership to reduce the influence 




fresh young team from scratch. No ap- 
pointments have been made. All ap- 
pointments for ministerial positions will 
be cleared wife you.” 

Mr. Yeltsin vowed he would not be 
"shuffling the old Moscow pack,” and 


including Russia's deepening crisis of former 

wage ana pension arrears, and for so- while fighting the construction of a on- 
called natural monopolies such as util- clear power plant, drew applause from 
ities, which Mr. Yehsin said were still in reformers but warnings feat he faced 
need of reform. enormous obstacles. 

Mr. Nemtsov said only last month that Mr. Yeltsin announced further details 
he did not want to leave his region, of a government reshuffle later Monday 
where he said he could "do concrete in which most of Mr. Chernomyrdin's 
things." In Moscow, he told tbe com- former deputies were fired. The current 


his remarks seemed a clear signal that he did not want to leave his region, 
Mr. Chubais and Mr. Nemtsov would be where he said he could "do concrete 


calling fee shots although both nom- 
inally will report to Prime Minister Vikt- mercial NTV television, "it's im- finance minister, Alexander Livshits, is 
or Chernomyrdin. possible to do things.” being transferred to fee presidential ad- 

Mr. Nemtsov was first appointed gov- “I don't think I can save Russia,” Mr. ministration as deputy chief of staff. 
enxJrbyMr._Yeltsinin 1991 and elected Nemtsov said. "I have no messianic Vladimir Potanin, who joined tbe gov- 
govemor in December 1995 by 65 per- moods. I have no superiority mania.” He eminent after the election last year, has 
cent of fee vote at the same time that the added: “I am a provincial. I don’t feel been dropped from the cabinet, along wife 
Communists were scoring big gains in well in Moscow. ' two other former first deputy ministers, 

fee lower house of Parliament, the State But Mr. Nemtsov on Monday told Vifetorflyushin and Alexei Bolshakov. 


tnpleasant tilings, if I have to socialist past, reduced its dependency on 

trade union financing and broadened its 
>ointment of Mr. Nemtsov, a membership to reduce the influence of 
.ystrist who entered politics leftist factions feat have cost it past 
tine the construction of a nu- elections. 



finance minister, Alexander Uvshits, is 
being transferred to the presidential ad- 
ministration as deputy chief of staff. 
Vladimir Potanin, who joined tbe gov- 


Comnnuists were scoring big gains in 
the lower house of Parliament, the State 


two other former first deputy ministers, 
Viktor Ilyushin and Alexei Bolshakov. 


DAEWOO* Electronics Executive Assails Europe’s Business Ways 


Continued from Page 1 


would have been given government-fin- 
anced satellite television technology. 

"I don’t need the Thomson techno- 
logy and I don't need the brand,” Mr. 


Mr. Bae said that in France "many 
people claim that Thomson Multimedia 
is a crown jewel” but that in his view 
“it’s really more of a big headache.” 

He said that after the French privat- 
ization commission blocked the planned 


company being involved in the deal.” 

Mr. Bae said Daewoo was still pre- 
pared to examine a proposal to acquire 
Thomson Multimedia, but he rejected 
ideas he attributed to “fee French press" 
that his group should either buy an initial 


Keen on shedding its reputation for 
radicalism. Labour has limited its pro- 
posals for major change to reform of the 
House of Lords and proposals for con- 
sidering the establishment of legis- 
latures in Scotland and Wales. The party 
has gone to extraordinary lengths to head 
off the traditional "tax and spend” 
charges from fee Conservatives, prom- 
ising it will stick to projected Tory 
spending limits for tbe next two years 
and not raise personal income taxes for 
fee next five. 

On Monday. Mr. Blair aligned bis 
position on Britain's integration into 
Europe closely wife that of the Con- 
servatives. saying in a signed article in 
fee tabloid Sun that there were “for- 
midable obstacles' ’ in the way of joining 
the first wave of countries in the ad- 
option of a single currency in 1 999 but 
feat Britain should not “rule it out 


October 1 998, less than six months after . 
EU leaders are supposed to select; fee _ _ 
countries that will launch the euro.. . . . 

' In presenting the government's pro- 
gram for -meeting tbe Maastricht criteria 
to EU finance ministers in Brussels, Mr. 
Waigel predicted growth would accek 
erate throughout this year, helping' Bonn 
cut its deficit to 2.9 percent of gross, 
domestic product, just below the singly 
currency ceiling of 3 percent He sc - 1 
knowledged the risk that growth could 
be closer to 2 percent a view held by 
many private analysts, but said that 
would.still enable Germany to hit. meet- - 
the deficit tiugeiL .i 

Mr. Mayer agreed. Saying the govr 
eminent could freeze spending or cot 
investment later this year if growtir - 
comes in slightly below target. Tne reaL- 
risk, he said, is a repeat of the mid-year 
stall in growth that caused Germany to .j 
post a budget deficit of 3;9 percent last 
year. 

he said feat "you couldn't possibly 


fudge the deficit down” if growth lag i 
substantially. * 


Unfortunately for Mr. Waigel; doubcg 1 
about monetary union tend to drive fee . 
mark higher, curbing growfe by ; makii|^ 
German exports more expensive. £ 
And in another potential brake oti 
growth, German interest rates surged 


.Tt, * 

-im: 


RuncB Boyccfltaucn 

The Conservative Party chairman, 
Brian Mawhinny, leaving a meeting 
Monday at No. 10 Downing Street 


party attracts about 1 3 percent in polls 
compared with the Conservatives' 27 
percent and Labour’s 52, pronounced his 


Reserve will raise U.S. interest rates ne£_ . 
week to dampen American inflation • 
pressures. *f : 

Mr. Waigel also argued for leniency - 
on German debt, which his forecast puts 
at 61 3 percent of GDP this year, dr cafe 




people "buoyant, confident and ready 
for battle." He said. too. that he wanted 


and a half points above the Maastricht 
ceiling. German unification boosted ™^ 
debt by 17 percentage points, he eiF 
plained, as Bonn took over the Easgs: 
debts and crumbling industry. : ^ 3 
Gerrit Zalm, the Dutch finance m®- 
ister, who chaired fee meeting, said A&i 
Waigel had made a convincing case felt 
Germany would meet the criteria da-' 
time. --V 

But it was a sign of how much G»; 
many’s economic deterioration 
clouded prospects for monetary union tnj|t 
France’s program for meeting the singfer 


for battle." He said, too, that he wanted 
to be included in fee scheduled debates, 


forever." He said feat as prime minister and Mr. Major said Monday he had 
he would not tolerate any “fudging or “some sympathy" for that request. 

u.. — - r T— : " > i ni.i. 1 


Bae said, adding that much of Thom- Thomson deal, “I asked for a meeting minority stake in Thomson or join a 


son's digital satellite technology had wife the commission, but they declined to 
been invented in the United States any- see me.” He also said that in May 1996, 
way. "They think I’m hiding something, before Daewoo applied to buy Thomson 
but all I am proposing is to increase my Multimedia as past of a partnership with 


manufacturing capacity in Europe and France's Lagardere group, “we received 


consortium of several companies. 

“My message,” Mr. Bae said, “is 
that I am waiting, and depending on the 
procedure that is decided for the Thom- 
son privatization I will come up with a 


instead ofseting up a new plant I want to assurances m writing that there would proposal to create jobs.” In fee mean- 


use an existing plant. 


be no discrimination toward a foreign time, he added, Daewoo is going ahead 


tune, tie added, uaewoo is going ahead 
wife plans to invest 1.7 billion French 


fiddling" by other European Union na- 
tions on convergence criteria for qual- 
ifying for monetary union, a word-per- 
fect echo of the Conservative stance. 

Paddy Ashdown, tbe leader of Bri- 
tain’ s third party, the Liberal Democrats, 
has derided tins Labour pre -electoral 
tendency to ape the Conservatives as 
"synchronizetf swimming. ” 

On Monday, Mr. Ashdown, whose 


ustry. : 

;h finance - 
eeting, said A&i -h 


Mr. Major and Mr. Blair have en- Waigel had made a convincing case 
gaged in debate frequently in the twice- Germany would meet the criterii 
a-week question time in Parliament, and time. 

both have proven themselves adept at But it was a sign of how much 1 
verbal parry and thrust. The campaign many’s economic deterioration 
will get under way in earnest on April 2, clouded prospects formooetary union 
and it will be fee broadcasters who must France’ s program for meeting tbe siz 
decide by then on the format, timing and currency criteria, which also was 
location of the debates, all subject to dorsed by fee finance ministers Mon 
agreement by the parties. attracted relatively little attention. _:_ 


francs ($297 million) to build a new 

LIMA: Peru Hostages Battle Despondency gta&^for televisions and computers. CLINTON: Furor Over Campaign Financing Hobbles Him 


Continued from Page 1 


Cerpa Cartolini, and his youthful jungle 
fighters tuts darkened as their talks wife 


the government lurch from potential 
breakthrough to virtual breakdown, ac- 


cording to another diplomatic source. 

Reports compiled by Peruvian intel- 
ligence agents using long-range eaves- 
dropping equipment wife fee help of 
U.S. agents indicate feat the estimated 
18 rebels are increasingly jumpy and 
“paranoid,” the source said. 

But both sides seem convinced that 
violence would be disastrous, and hope 
for a peaceful resolution endures. 

Although no me expects President 
Alberto Fujimori to grant the guerrillas’ 
demand to free about 380 imprisoned 
rebels, diplomatic sources say fee gov- 
ernment may agree to compromise mea- 
sures, perhaps releasing relatively minor 
offenders, reviewing harsh sentences 
and improving prison conditions. . 

Tbe guerrillas and the government are 
groping for an accord feat allows both 
sides to save free, according to a so- 
ciologist, Raul Gonzalez, an expert on 
terrorism. 

As a mediating commission shuttles 
between fee two sides trying to bring 
them back to the negotiating table, the 
hostages and their families cling to fee 


solace of a routine. Since the crisis began 
Dec. 17, the International Committee of 
tbe Red Cross has been their bridge 
across limbo, providing the hostages 
medical care, counseling, clothes, mat- 
tresses, more than 6,500 gallons of wa- 
ter, and about 18,000 meals. It has 
passed along about 6.600 written mes- 


Asked to offer his view on the Euro- 


The Tupac Amaru stormed the gala 
reception at the Japanese ambassador’s 
mansion only two months after Mr. 
Chang’s brother Manuel died in a plane 
crash. The ordeal doubled the anguish of 
a family whose surviving son embodies 
fee new Asian- Peruvian political class 
feat has coalesced around Mr. Fujimori, 
a Peruvian of Japanese descent. 

Although the water also was cut off, 
the hostages are able to bathe. Tbe Red 
Cross has brought in water tanks and 
portable toilets. Three times a day, the 
Red Cross delivers meals prepared by 
Japanese and Peruvian restaurants in 
Lima and paid for by fee Japanese gov- 
ernment The rebels eat three hours after 
tbe hostages as a precaution because 
they fear the police might slip knockout 
dregs into fee food. 

In addition to weti-regimented chores, 
fee hostages find diversion playing 
chess, mah-jongg. Trivial Pursuit and 
card games. 


pean Union’s plans for a single currency, 
be said that tbe project was valid, but 
warned that it could strip governments of 
crucial economic policy tools that are 
needed to sustain growth. 

"Once you have a single currency it 
will be very difficult to make adjustments 
for the speed of growth,” he said. "Usu- 
ally that is achieved with different interest 
rates or different exchange rues, but after- 
fee single currency is launched they will 
lose the means fen- balancing periods of 
stronger and weaker growth.” 

Before Europeans launch a single cur- 
rency, Mr. Bae said, "they should think 
about how to ensure free competition and 
a free market, and how to help tbe less 
developed regions of Europe. ” 

Commenting on analysts' reports 


Continued from Page 1 


from Seoul on Monday predicting that 
publicly traded South Korean companies 


publicly traded South Korean companies 
would earn even less this year following 
an average 62.5 percent slump in 1996 
corporate earnings, Mr. Bae said much 
of fee problem was the depreciation of 
the Japanese yen against the dollar. 

‘ The >nen was 80 to fee dollar in 1995 
and now it is 122 or 123 to fee dollar," 
he said. "So fee Japanese can produce 
products very cheaply and Korea is suf- 
fering from fee yen. If the yen goes back 
coward 100 to fee dollar, then Korean 
profits will pick up." 


were trying to buy political influence 
through their campaign donations. 

For Mr. Clinton, naming three people 
to a new commission to study 
gambling ’s effects on fee country should 
have been a straightforward task. But fee 
appointments are months overdue as tbe 
white House considers bow to avoid any 
appearance that Mr. Clinton was influ- 
enced by donations from supporters of 
gambling. 

At the State Department, nominations 
of ambassadors and assistant secretaries 
are backed up at least in part, officials 
say, because tbe current climate has 
made fee administration extremely cau- 
tious in its background checks of can- 
didates. 

And fee fallout from the campaign 
finance controversy may also be starting 
to affect the negotiations over a balanced 
budget plan — for a continuing Re- 
publican assault on Donocratic fund- 
raising has left Mr. Clinton more de- 
pendent on congressional Democrats 
than he might have been otherwise, 
some administration officials and mem- 
bers of Congress say. 


Clinton's former senior adviser. Indeed, 
fee mood in Washington has changed 
sharply since Mr. Clinton was re-elected 
and promised to govern from the “vital 
center." 

For months, he tried to set the stage for 
a season of cooperation wife fee Re- 
publican-led Congress. He particularly 
had appeared poised to separate himself 
from fee liberal wing of his own party as 
he had done on such issues as welfare 

and trade. 

He named a Republican, William Co- 
hen. as defense secretary in an effort to 
reach out to fee Republicans. Later, fur- 
thering the impression that he was a con- 


budget plan. Many are calling for 
independent counsel. 

In such a climate, congressiai 
Democrats say. White House offid 
have been working to push more all 
out in public to defend the president a 
to stop members of his own party frt 


undercutting him by adding their rit ^ 
voices to the criticism of his nind-raisi® 
practices. ff 

But such tactics mak« it more difficw) 
for Mr. Clinton to oppose liberal Demo- 
crats and core Democratic constituency 
groups. « 


fe is much more dependent - 4 ^ 


"They are driving him into the arms 
: the Democrats who least want to 


of fee Democrats who least want to 
deal," said George Stephanopoulos, Mr. 


Bush and General Gatin Powell to say he 
would hold a three-day conference on 
community service this spring. 

Such gestures were supposed to pave 
the way for Mr. Clinton and congres- 
sional Republicans to reach an agree- 
ment early this year on a plan to balance 
fee budget by 2002 — a historic achieve- 
ment for both sides to embrace. 

But wife questions about White 
House and Democratic fund-raising 
dominating Washington, partisanship is 
on fee rise once more. 

Congressional Republicans have de- 
manded feat Mr. Clinton produce a new 


Democrats in C 

been otherw; 
strategist said. 

"He needs » 
fight He caivt 


le up there to fight] 
ford to turn them 


. Without progress on the^ ^ budget. feeflS 
is time on fee horizon despite forays info, 
foreign policy — like the president 's-fr^ 
to Helsinki this week — to dilute- fee 
focus on fund-raising and help Mr. Clife 
ton change fee subject 
He ran in 1996 on a scaled-back dgj- 
mestic program and his most major prp- 
' tex relief for higher education 
and additional money for work prtp 
grams for welfare recipients — are cot? 
ungent on the budget talks. 








■ • i 


"" K. % 

*t;r 


M'ONsoui n |» x ,., 


INTERNATIONAL HER ALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 


PAGE 9 



Wall St. Meets Ivory Tower 


Stateside vs. Euro MBAs 


B usiness schools do 
not exist in a vacu- 
um. Perhaps more 
Jhan any other academic 
■ discipline, business tends to 
draw inspiration for its cur- 
riculum from the real 
world. 

Today, in an effort to 
keep up with accelerating 
change, courses are being 
offered on an ad hoc basis, 
often for only one semester. 
Then, only if the course - 
;or the real-life situation on 
which the course is based - 
proves durable is it made a 
permanent part of the cur- 
riculum. 

. “Any course that is fine- 
tuned so that it more accu- 
rately reflects the market- 
place constitutes an advan- 
tage." says Dick Kwartler, 
.publisher of The MBA 
-Newsletter. The trend, 
’ according to Robert Dyer, 
associate" dean at George 
Washington University’s 
school of business, is 
toward integrating die real 
world into course work 
w henever possible. 
“Everybody is integrat- 


ing courses, moving away 
from ‘stovepipe' courses," 
says Professor Dyer. 
“Nearly everybody is 
addressing skills like pre- 
sentation skills and corpo- 
rate survival lore that man- 
agement regards as impor- 
tant." 

In the late 1980s, the 
increasingly global econo- 
my meant that schools had 
to react quickly to ^ave a 
more international mind 
set,” says Ronald Patten, 
dean of DePaul Univer- 
sity's Kellstadt Graduate 
School of Business. 

Coaching the team 
One enduring trend is the 
concept of the CEO as a 
team player. 

“Increasingly, our people 
are finding it necessary to 
work as members of a 
team," says Professor 
Patten. Responding to criti- 
cism from the business 
world that executives are 
poor communicators, 
DePaul now integrates 
communication skills into 
existing courses and 


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For other “soft skills.” 
such as leadership and 
motivation, DePaul has 
added courses with non-tra- 
ditional titles like 
“Managing People"; the 
intentionally jargon-less 
title is meant as a substitute 
for what used to be known 
as personnel management 
or human resources. 

Geared to entrepreneurs 
Mr. Kwartler cites entrepre- 
neur! alism as an example of 
how quickly schools have 
come to respond to stu- 
dents' needs. As more and 
more graduates opt to work 
for themselves or small 
start-up firms, schools have 
established entrepreneurial 
centers. 

“Here, they are certainly 
at a pace with the curve and 
maybe ahead of the curve," 
Mr. Kwartler says. 

Describing curriculum 
change as “not only a revo- 
lutionary' process but evolu- 
tionary," Professor Dyer 
notes that GWU assimilates 
suggestions and observa- 
tions from alumni and busi- 
ness leaders “and systemat- 


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viduals and brings them 
into the curriculum change 
process." 

GWU offers experimen- 
tal courses that the faculty 
can either drop (if the sub- 
ject becomes irrelevant) or 
propose for permanent 
inclusion in the curriculum. 

How much theory? 

Given that business is an 
academic discipline, the 
inclusion of the “real 
world" raises the question 
of whether there is a con- 
flict between the purely 
theoretical concerns that 
are a necessary part of any 
academic pursuit - even 
one as grounded in practice 
as business - and the needs 
of the marketplace. 

“There’s always a tension 
between what academia 
thinks the business world 
needs to know and what the 
business world thinks it 
needs to know." comments 


John Ebersole, assistant 
dean of continuing educa- 
tion at the University 
Extension of the University 
of California at Berkeley. 

“We try to convert theory 
into practice.’* As a totally 
self-supporting program. 
University Extension is “a 
little more market-driven 
than traditional institutions 
with much more applica- 
tion,” according to Mr. 
Ebersole, making it more 
flexible to the needs of the 
marketplace - that is, the 
students. 

Advisory councils 
In many cases, - business 
schools have established 
advisory councils to keep 
them in touch with trends in 
the real world. 

“Business schools really 
have tried to lead the mar- 
ket," says Mr. Kwartler. 
"They have tried to pick up 
the signs of what compa- 
nies want” • 


-Business Education in the United States” 
mw produced in iis entirety by the Adi'crtising Departmei 
of the international Herald Tribune . Tomorrows Educatii 
Week section will cover "International Education in 
Germany and Austria. ” 

Writer: Steve Weinstein, based in New York City. 
Program Director: Bill Mahder. 



PRESTON 

UNIVERSITY 

Wyoming, USA 


F or years, Europeans 
have flocked to 
American business 
schools. As the home of ihe 
MBA, the United States 
offered schools with a repu- 
tation for superior instruc- 
tion, as well as the opportu- 
nity to learn in an English- 
language setting. 

Today, the question is not 
whether European business 
schools can compete, but 
whether they have caught 
up with their U.S. counter- 
parts. With increased unifi- 
cation of European econo- 
mies. many schools in 
Europe do compete on an 
equal footing with their 
U.S. counterparts. Some, 
such as INSEAD and the 
London Business School, 
are now considered to be on 
a par with Harvard. 
Wharton, the University of 
Chicago and Stanford. 

In the past, the elite 
European schools looked 
down on business educa- 
tion. “Europeans were dis- 
dainful of the MBA for 
many years " notes John 
Ebersole of the University 
of California at Berkeley. 
“Now even Oxford 
University has a program.” 

Under the Erasmus 
Agreement, European stu- 
dents can take courses in 
other countries and have 
them count toward their 
degree. And with many 
classes in several European 
nations taught in English, 
the language barriers are 
less formidable. “When 
you had to learn Swedish to 
study at a Swedish school, 
you probably couldn’t do 
it,” says Robert Dyer, asso- 
ciate dean at George 
Washington University's 
school of business. 

GWU’s Mary Anne 
Waikart, executive director 
of Global Management and 
Research, formerly served: 
as associate dean at the 
London Business School 


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and has chaired the 
Graduate Admission 
Council, which administers 
Ihe GMAT lesL While in 
England, she helped form 
the European Foundation 
for Management and Deve- 
lopment (EFMD), based in 
Brussels. “I would say it is 
not a substantially different 
curriculum." she says. 

European edge 
European schools also 
require GMAT scores. But 
they have an advantage in 
requiring a second-lan- 
guage proficiency and 
“have managed to create a 
quite integrated curricu- 
lum." European schools 
also have made more effort 
to integrate alumni into the 
educational mix. (In Eu- 
rope, students often spend a 
week following an alum's 
daily routine.) Also, many 
programs in Europe are for 
one year only, as opposed 
to the two-year norm in the 
United States. The pro- 
grams are more intensive, 
according to Drew Hage- 
man, dean of the American 
College in London. 

The most significant dif- 
ference. however, is that 
Europeans are naturally 
more comfortable in for- 
eign cultures than are most 
Americans." 


“Schools abroad have a 
natural advantage because 
many have global enroll- 
ments already,” notes Dick 
Kwartler, publisher of The 
MBA Newsletter. 

“Students in the rest of 
the world are more willing 
to go outside of their coun- 
try." adds Ms. WaikarL 

At DePaul University, 
Dean Ronald Patten is 
beginning to see more stu- 
dents from Asia and fewer 
from Europe. He cites the 
“attractive alternatives” 
that keep students in 
Europe, which are not as 
widespread in Asia. At 
Berkeley, the school may 
be perceived as being “too 
focused on the Pacific 
Basin," says Professor 
Ebersole. 

Despite the gains in 
Europe, the United States 
still dominates business 
education, with nearly 800 
schools. 

But the Europeans are 
catching up fasL Britain 
alone has more than 100 
MBA programs. The 
American College in 
London, for example, has a 
four-year-old MBA pro- 
gram that draws its enroll- 
ment almost equally from 
Britain, the United States, 
Continental Europe and the 
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PAGE 10 


TUESDAY MARCH 18, 1997 


EDITORIALS /OPINION 


ReraUi 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribune 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Helsinki Business 


Bill Clin too and Boris Yeltsin 
should have plenty to tall about when 
they get together in Helsinki this week. 
They can exchange small talk about 
doctors, and about a rebuilt heart (Mr. 
Yeltsin) and knee (Mr. Clinton). Then 
they will warn to talk politics, no 
doubt, because tins will be tbeir fust 
meeting since both leaders woo re- 
election last year. Finally, if there is 
time, they will get down to the business 
of reshaping their two countries’ re- 
lationship for the 21st century. For if 
this summit meeting lacks the drama of 
Cold War sessions, the stakes are 
hardly any less high. 

President Clinton travels to Finland 
in the middle of a high-wire effort to 
accomplish two apparently contradic- 
tory things at once. He is determined 
that NATO, the military alliance of 
North American and West European 
democracies, will commit itself by Ju- 
ly to accept a first wave of new mem- 
bers from among former Warsaw Pact 
nations. But he also wants NATO and 
Russia to form a new, cooperative re- 
lationship. Because aspiring members 
want co join NATO in large part to win 
protection from Russia, and because 
most Russians still view NATO as a 
hostile alliance aimed at them, this is 
no easy task. Yet both goals are worthy 
and, as Mr. Clinton has stated, not 
contradictory. The administration has 
made far more progress on accom- 
plishing both than many skeptics were 
predicting even six months ago, but the 
thing is not in the bag yet. 

The principles that have guided the 
administration effort, and that should 
rule in Helsinki, are clear. Hie West 


should be as forthcoming as is 
prudently possible on questions re- 
garding Russia's integration Into the 
West That means, among ofeer things, 
giving Russia a voice in peacekeeping 
and security matters and forging a new 
agreement limiting the deployment of 
mnifg airp lane s and other weaponry in 
Central Europe. 

At the same time, the West should be 
as rigid as possible in declaring that no 
country, no matter what its history, can 
involuntarily fall into Russia's sphere 
of influence. That means, among other 
things, that NATO expansion proceeds 
on schedule, whether a NATO-Russia 
deal is done or not, and that no nation is 
excluded from eventual NATO mem- 
bership. It means working out a par- 
allel NATO agreement with Ukraine, 
insisting that Russia not use an un- 
democratic Belarus as a pawn, and 
committing firmly to the eternal sov- 
ereignty of the three Baltic republics of 
Estonia. Latvia and Lithuania. 

This is a time of ext 


pommity in Europe. Most formerly 
Communist nations are begging to join 
the club of free market democracies 
and are willing to resolve hoary border 
disputes and ethnic feuds to do so. The 
West would be both churlish and short- 
sighted to spurn them. Russia also has 
joined the democratic camp, if more 
tenuously than some of its neighbors, 
and remains fundamentally interested 
in finding ways to cooperate with the 
West Helsinki will not provide any 
breakthroughs, hut it could be an im- 
portant step toward creating an un- 
divided Europe. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


McCain-FeingoId 


In all the controversy over campaign 
financing, it is easy to lose sight of fee 
fact that promising legislation on fee 
table that would effectively address 
some of the core problems highlighted 
by die 1996 fund-raising excesses of 
both parties. That measure is known as 
the McCain-FeingoId bill for its leading 
senatorial sponsors. John McCain, Re- 


of Wisconsin. It is the most 
important campaign reform measure 
now before Congress. 

Soft money: Some of the most valu- 
able provisions in the bill would end the 
unlimited contributions known as ’“soft 
money." By restricting the source and 
size of contributions to political parties, 
tile measure would effectively close the 
loophole that allows corporations and 
labor unions barred from participating 
directly in- federal -campaigns; and 
wealthy individuals anxious to buy 
more influence titan current contribu- 
tion limits permit, to funnel outlandish 
sums to help candidates. 

Independent expenditures: Similar- 
ly, by proriding some commonsense 
definitions the McCain-FeingoId mea- 
sure tries hard to police the distinction 
between political activities that are truly 
independent of an individual candidacy 
and expenditures that are coordinated 
with a candidate, and thus properly 
subject to existing federal limits. 

The bill addresses another glaring 
loophole that was widely exploited in 
the last election. It creates tests to dif- 
ferentiate between genuine "issue ad- 
vocacy" designed to inform the public, 
and spending that is billed as issue 
advocacy but is in fact designed to 
affect the outcome of a particular race. 

Some of the proposed standards gov- 
erning advocacy spending need tight- 
ening. But the bill’s general approach 


would avoid easy evasion of restrictions 
on the use of corporate and labor union 
money in federal campaigns without at 
the same time unduly interfering with 
public discussion of issues. 

Clean resources: The Supreme 
Court's disastrous decision 21 years 
ago, in Buckley v. Valeo, wrongly 
equated money with free speech and 
knocked out mandatory spending lim- 
its for individual candidates on 
grounds that they violated the First 
Amendment. So, to entice candidates 
to agree voluntarily to reasonable re- 
straints era their spending, the measure 
provides reduced postage rates, and 
free and reduced-cost television time. 

These provisions fall short of tbe 
ideal — full public financing of con- 
gressional races. But that goal seems 
unreachable at this time. 

Even so, the bill’s framework of 
spending limits and new campaign re- 
sources not derived from tbe usual spe- 
cial interests would help slow the 
money chase and make it easier for 
challengers to wage competitive races. 

The measure fails short in other 
ways. It does not, for example, go far 
enough to create a tough, well-fin- 
anced enforcement agency to replace 
the notoriously weak Federal Election 
Commission. Nor does the bill ad- 
equately address the advantages of 
wealthy candidates who opt not to 
abide by the voluntary limits. Some 
fine-tuning is surely in order. 

But McCain-FeingoId is the best 
hope right now for transforming out- 
rage over 1996 abuses into concrete 
changes in Washington’s access and 
influence game. That, of course, is why 
so many of the professional fund- 
raisers moonlighting as the nation's top 
lawmakers would prefer to see it die. 

—THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


Not Another Yalta, Please 

For the third time this century. 
Europe is laboring over a peace set- 
tlement that will shape its destiny for a 
generation. It could be third time 
lucky, if [the] summit between Bill 
Clinton and Boris Yeltsin helps tbe 
West and Russia to clinch a new grand 
bargain before July, when NATO 
starts opening its doors to the first new 
members from Central Europe. 

Unlike Germany in 19 1 8, Russia is 
being offered a genuine security part- 
nership, not a peace imposed by victor 
on vanquished; unlike 1945, 1997 
provides no great ideological schism to 
undermine the peacebuilding. Six 
years after the Soviet Union collapsed, 
America, Western Europe and a demo- 
cratizing Russia have a chance to build 
lasting stability in this much fought- 
over continent. But unless the deal can 


be got right — with NATO offering 
Russia neither too little nor too much 
— the chance could be lost 

Russia would like NATO to aban- 
don any further enlargement after 
round one. But above all it wants 
NATO to rule out taking in any of the 
former Soviet republics as members. 

NATO is unlikely ft) want to. Ab- 
sorbing the first-comers, while continu- 
ing its own military reorganization and 
managing the partnership with Russia, 
will keep it busy enough. There are also 
limits to how big the alliance can grow 
if it is to operate effectively. But hand- 
ing Russia even an implied veto over 
fee future of independent stares from 
Estonia to Ukraine and beyond would 
be to consign a chunk of Europe to an 
old-fashioned Russian “sphere of in- 
fluence," rightly evoking fears of a 
new. Yalta-like division of Europe. 

— The Economist (London). 


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Confusion in a Year of Decisions 



N EW YORK — Reading the stories 
about how the White House 
hustled campaign donations from over- 
seas Chinese and Chinese- Americans 
certainly raises the question of whether 
the Clinton China policy was up for 
sale. If it was, I sure feel sorry for 
whoever bought it 
For the fijit three years the admin- 
istration’s China policy bounced around 
like a Ping-Pong ball, driven era dif- 
ferent days by fee Taiwan lobby, fee 
human rights lobby, silly campaign 
promises, a crisis in fee Taiwan Strait 
and demands of tbe U.S. business com- 
munity for unfettered trade wife Beijing. 
Tbe only consistent thing about fee 
Clinton China policy was that it re- 
sponded to the latest, greatest pressure. 

But after floundering about, tbe ad- 
ministration finally began a serious, 
high-level engagement with China last 
year that was developing some bipar- 
tisan support and setting tbe stage for 
what many hoped would be a more 
coherent China policy. Everyone knew 
feat it was urgent because by coincid- 
ence 1997 was going to require the 
biggest U.S. decisions on China since 
Richard Nixon’s opening in 1972. 

And that is why this Asian campaign 


By Thomas L. Friedman 


policy, 
be a 1 


finance scandal has potentially serious 
foreign policy consequences. Just 
when U.S. officials need to have a cool, 
clear head in thinking about China 
" j. just when it is critical that there 
a broad domestic consensus on 
China policy, the Clinton team has 
made China policy radioactive by en- 
gaging in fee most tawdry fund-raising 
from Chinese- Americans and overseas 
Chinese with dubious links to gov- 
ernments and business interests. 

Beyond shameful, this was breafe- 
takingly stupid. Every major decision 
fee administration now makes on China 
is going to be scrutinized for links, real 
or imagined, to campaign donations. 

Administration China experts will be 
reluctant to lake chances. Tbe prospects 
for bipartisanship on China will be di- 
minished, since fee China bashers in 
Congress are going to have a field day 
using China's ham-fisted efforts at in- 
fluence-peddling to discredit anyone 
who tries to engage it on the urgent, 
serious agenda feat needs addressing. 

And just consider for a moment how 
many issues are up for grabs this year. 


Should China be allowed to enter the 
World Trade Organization? How 
should fee United States respond u 
Hong Kong’s reversion to China on 
July 1 goes badly? Can fee Clinton 
rp^ m come up with a framework for 
relations with China that can bridge the 
gap between fee U.S. human rights and 
business communities, now that Deng 
Xiao p ing is dead and President Jiang 
fo-min is char ting his own course? 

That last question and the search for 
a common U^S. -Chinese security 
ag i-nria in Asia were set to be worked 
out this year during the first exchange 
of summits by the presidents of China 
and the United States since 1989. 

The only good thing about fee way 
the Clintomtes hustled for Asian 
money was that they clearly didn’t dis- . 
c riminate . They took from pro-Taiwan, 
pro-China, pro-Buddhist and pro-busi- 
ness overseas Chinese. 

They were tike the corrupt judge 
who calls the lawyers for both sides to 
his bench and says; "The defendants 
ha ve paid me $1 million and now if tbe 

f imn rif fs will just give me $1 million 
«>n decide rh»« case on tbe merits.’ ’ 
But fee merits now become much, 
hairier to focus on. For example, can 


gSTSSTteE* y-rff 

Newt Gingrich, Bill Clinton and AL , 
Gore all come for visits to China andtiy - 
to teU the Chinese leader he needs te -j 
have more respect for 

As for China entering fee 
will be tricky because 
down to a judgment by fee UfeteJ- 
States about whether it thinks Chnuu^. 
prepared to live up to mtemahqpaL 
trade norms. Optimise beEeve 
China's entry into the WTO could 
abig influence in promoting ndeoflaw - 
there; pessimists believe that 
admitted and doesn t abide by all WTQ ■ 
rules, it could undermine the whote, . 
WTO because of its size. . 

Said one senior U.S. official. Be- 
cause it’s going to be a judgments* 
was already going to be hotly debated, 
But now fee whole debate couM ba ' 
skewed by fee fear featif we dolet Utina 
into the WTO, people will say tij mri 
because China has moved forward but 
bp r ynsa we’ve gone soft. Tbere hi •& 
danger feat fee bar will be set so higJfcas 
to be ridiculous,. I worry that 
China does fee right thing, we WonH 
able to say ‘yes.’ " ' 

The New York Times. 


t 


$ 

* 

'j* 


The China Connection: Some Facts but Not Yet a Picture 


TB ■ 

I3H '■ 

aU 


N EW YORK — The soph- 
isticates of tbe political 
world never tired of saying last 
year feat tbe presidential race 
was dull, but its aftermath has 
been riveting. And even fee 
sophisticates have had a hard 
time figuring out how govern- 
ment, politics and foreign 
policy intersected in fee Clin- 
ton campaign ’s finances. 

The narrative thread of this 
scandal surely starts wife Bill 
Clinton's determination to turn 
his famines around after the 
electoral debacle in 1994, and 
the millions required to pro- 
duce television commercials to 
do it. A good chunk of fee 
money came from Asian- 
Americans with ties to busi- 
ness deals in China. 

Their contributions are no 
doubt no different from those 
of many other people wanting 
to participate in American pol- 
itics. But a lot of interconnec- 
tions need to be pursued if we 
are ever to understand what 
happened over the last year and 
a half, and it is necessary to try 
to knit the known facts together 
wife tbeir historic context and 
some informed speculation. 


By Steven R. Weisman 


A century ago, ‘‘open door" 
described Teddy Roosevelt's 
demand for a piece of the China 
commerce, which was domi- 
nated by European powers. 
Nowadays, "open door” could 
describe both fee desire of in- 
vestors to get into China and the 
desire of fee Chinese for a path- 
way into American politics. 

Most foreign investment in 
China is from tbe so-called di- 
aspora — fee millions of 
Chinese living in Indonesia. 
Thailand, Singapore. Malaysia 
and fee United States. Tradi- 
tionally. these ethnic Chinese 
have gained influence in tbeir 
adopted countries by using 
their economic power to help 
politicians and governments. 

Tbe simplest explanation of 
the fund-raising by Charlie 
Trie. Johnny Chung and John 
Huang is that the money they 
funneled into the Clinton cam- 
paign was in this tradition. In 
rum, they probably used their 
White House visits and pic- 
ture-taking sessions to impress 
future business partners. 

For investigators looking in- 


to Democratic fund-raising, 
these possibilities are less in- 
teresting than die Riady family 
of Indonesia — one of the most 
successful ethnic Chinese 
businesses in fee world. 

Its links to fee Chinese gov- 
ernment are more extensive 
than is generally appreciated. 
For example, die family’s 
Hong Kong holdings are co- 
developers wife China Re- 
sources, a government-owned 
entity, in six projects in China. 

Another Riady-owned en- 
tity has joined wife China Re- 
sources in two development 
projects in Indonesia, and a 
Riady bank has a financing re- 
lationship with the China In- 
ternational Trade and Invest- 
ment Corp., the largest of fee 
state-owned trading compa- 
nies. Wang Jun, atop official at 
that company, was brought to 
fee White House last year by 
Mr. Trie and Mr. Huang. 

If the Chinese were trying to 
influence the American elec- 
tion, it certainly would not be a 
surprise. Taiwan has doled out 
millions over the years for con- 


gressional junkets and public 
relations campaigns feat have 
won many friends in Wash- 
ington. It does seem implaus- 
ible, however, feat the Chinese 
would give money secretly to 
such acerbic critics of Chinese 
policies as Representative 
Nancy Pelosi of California, 
who once tried to unfurl an 
anti-government banner in 
Tiananmen Square. 

A more likely possibility, 
according to some experts on 
China, is that Beijing may have 
been using the Riadys’ con- 
nection to obtain something as 
precious as influence, which 
was informal! oo- 

Tbe Chinese were shocked, 
for instance, when Washington 
allowed President Lee Teng- 
hui of Taiwan into fee United 
States in 1995. His entry was a 
loss of face for fee Chinese 
Foreign Minis try. which had 
assured everyone fear it would 
never happen. What if the 
Riady family, which had re- 
ceived favorable business 
terms from the Chinese on a 
number of investments, had 
something to offer Beijing in 
return — its own former em- 


ployee, Mr. Huang, in feefraw.^ 
councils of tbe administration?!' 

People who attended meet- 
ings wife Mr. Huang at the ^ 
Commerce Department recalo 
that he rarely spoke up. Blit hcTj 
retained at least some of bis 
clearances when he moved 
over to tiie Democratic Nation-j 
aJ Committee. J 

No one is likely to claim feat ^ 
fee Chinese living out of Chmr^, 
turned Mr. Clinton into sontev 
sort of Manchurian candidate. ^ 
But we can reasonably assume 
that something was going oh, d 
given the huge amounts' of 
mysterious money flowing in- ^ 
to tiie election campaign of the 
president and the rich variety 
of well-connected players moa- 
ning through the story. v ' 

With die amount of legal ^ 
and journalistic energy now ari. 
rayed. It seems only a mailer of 
time before the sprinkled facts T 
are arranged into a pattern^ 
One guess is that the warnings,, 
delivered to Attorney General •' 
Janet Reno about Chinese ef- 
forts to influence tbe American r 
election will look like under- . 
statements. . Z 

The New York Times. 




The Aim Is Neither to Shut Russia Out Nor to Let It Dictate 


W ASHINGTON — As we 
and our partners proceed 
wife NATO enlargement, con- 
cerns have been raised about 
two dangers that stand on either 
side of me straits we must nav- 
igate — fee Scylla and Chary b- 
dis of NATO enlargement. 

On one side is the concern 
that NATO enlargement will 
shut Russia out from its rightful 
and essential place in Europe, 
thereby undercutting Russia’s 
nascent democracy and its se- 
curity cooperation with the 
West On fee other side is fee 
anxiety that a misguided attempt 
to mollify Russia will weaken 
fee alliance, giving Moscow a 
veto over NATO's decisions. 


By Samuel R. Berger 

The writer is assistant to President Clinton 
for national security affairs. 


We must chart a course that 
carefully avoids both hazards. 
Thus, while we move forward 
irreversibly to enlarge the al- 
liance, we have sought to build 
a strong partnership between 
the new NATO and Russia — 
but one feat sacrifices neither 
the interests of Central and East 
Europeans nor NATO’s ability 
to shape its own destiny. 

Now, after three years of 
planning and consultation wife 
our allies and Congress, fee pro- 
cess of enlargement is about to 


begin. At the Madrid summit, 
some nations will be invited to 
begin accession talks. 

These first new members, as 
President Bill Clinton has said, 
will not be the last. Because 
NATO aims to close rifts in 
Europe and not open new ones, 
all of Europe’s emerging demo- 
cracies are eligible to join 
NATO and will remain so. 

The alliance also will deepen 
its ties to those that are not in the 
first group of new members so 
feat no nation feels it is being 


The West Doesn’t Threaten Russia 


W ASHINGTON — Lead- 
ing Russian policy- 
makers and analysts see the 
West, led by tbe United States, 
as thwarting Russian policy at 
every turn and trying to stave 
off Russia's recovery. 

This belief in the West’s stra- 
tegic malevolence fuels the 
most self-destructive aspects of 
Russia’s opposition to NATO 
enlargement and Western en- 
gagement with tiie former So- 
viet republics. This consensus 
is an intellectual bog that mires 
serious Russian attempts to 
fashion a sustainable post -Cold 
War foreign policy. 

It puts the blame far current 
failures on outside adors. not 
on internal conditions. It en- 
courages Russia to see itself as a 
humiliated and injured party, 
not a power in transition. 

It hides from Russia tbe 
changing realities around it feat 
must be addressed, not wished 
away. And it puts Russian for- 
eign policy on a collision course 
with fee Western-oriented logic 
of its own economic and polit- 
ical reforms. 

While Russia claims a status 
that it cannot support, the rest of 
Eurasia is changing. New slates 
like Ukraine and Uzbekistan are 
consolidating. China is on the 
rise, and NATO and the Euro- 
pean Union are expanding. 

Russia's real security chal- 
lenges are in fee south and po- 
tentially in the east, not in 
Europe. 

The new geopolitical envir- 
onment virtually guarantees that 
Moscow will have to make 
choices at odds with its ambi- 
tions. It will have to accept a far 
less integrated former Soviet 
Union than it now demands. And 
if it wants to expand its rela- 


By Sherman Garnett 

The second of two articles. 

tionship with China, it will have 
to do so as a junior partner. 

Russia has also failed to ad- 
just to fee fact feat fee states on 
its western periphery — most 
significantly Ukraine, Belarus 
ami the Baltic states — are sig- 
nificant in their own right to 
Europe’s future and cannot be 
left our of tbe continent’s West- 
ern-based political, economic 
and security order. 

Russia is woefully unpre- 
pared for tbe expansion of 
Western interests in this region 
that NATO enlargement is 
likely to bring. Western leaders 
appear equally unaware that it 
will soon become harder to stay 
aloof from security problems 
along NATO's new frontier. 

Ukrainian President Leonid 
Kuchma recently lamented tbe 
"systematic deterioration" in 
Rossian-Ukrainian relations; a 
deeper rift would have contin- 
ental implications. This break- 
down could occur in Crimea, 
where economic decline, a dis- 
gruntled fleet and deep ethnic 
and social tensions have created 
one of Europe’s major potential 
flash points. 

Moreover, Russia has failed 
to normalize ties with the Baltic 
states, and a more assertive 
Russian government, driven by 
its frustrated ambitions, could 
create tensions over borders or 
ethnic Russian minorities. 

Clearly the Baltic states Mid 
Ukraine will never be satisfied 
with a strategic deal that places 
them permanently outside of 
Europe or in a de facto Russian 
sphere of influence. 

The Baltic states have made 


dear their wish to be pan of all of 
Europe’s institutions, including 
NATO. Ukraine seeks a “spe- 
cial partnership” wife the alli- 
ance and wants the doors to in- 
tegration with Europe left open. 

Over the next decade, Russia 
will need to recognize that its 
place in Europe will be deter- 
mined more by its relations with 
Ukraine. Estonia. Latvia and 
Lithuania than by those with 
Germany, France or Britain. 
For it is here feat Russia faces 
tbe greatest temptation to define 
itself against a European order 
that has reconciled old foes, de- 
emphasized military power as a 
means of resolving disputes, 
and allowed small and medium- 
sized states to flourish along- 
side the larger powers. 

It is also in this region that 
traditional Russian interests 
will encounter expanding West- 
ern ones. These latter need not 
be expressed solely through 
NATO. The European Union 
has an enormous political and 
economic role to play in this 
region. It is already under pres- 
sure to include one or more of 
fee Baltic states in fee first wave 
of its own enlargement.. 

The Organization for Secu- 
rity and Cooperation in Europe 
has been a useful vehicle for 
helping to bring about a peace- 
ful resolution of fee war in 
Chechnya. Direct U.S. involve- 
ment also will be critical, as it 
was in securing Ukrainian nu- 
clear disarmament and fee with- 
drawal of Russian military 
forces from fee Baltic states. 


consigned to a zone of inse- 
curity, cut off from fee com- 
munity of democracies. In fee 
years ahead, we will work to 
increase security throughout die 
region — not just among 
NATO’s new members — be- 
cause doing anything less would 
undermine our. overall goals. 

As NATO's adaptation pro- 
gresses, we will seek to 
strengthen our relationship wife 
Russia. We will strengthen our 
support for democratic reform 
ami fee economic transforma- 
tion of Russia. And we will seek 
to make Russia a partner of fee 
alliance in dealing wife fee new 
challenges to security in Europe 
that threaten us both. 

Deepening this partnership is 
clearly in the long-term U.S. se- 
curity interest, as we have al- 
ready seen in our cooperation 
wife Russia in peacekeeping in 
Bosnia. That makes sense for us 
and for the trans-Ailantic com- 
munity. This partnership is not 
something we do to compensate 
Russia for NATO enlargement. 

The success of Russia's de- 
mocracy, which is of the utmost 
importance to the United States, 
depends on how Russia, wife 
our help, advances its economic 
transition and strengthens its 
political institutions. 

There will be no bargain of 
alliance concessions for Rus- 
sia's assent to NATO enlarge- 
ment. The alliance will grow as 
scheduled, and no outside coun- 
try will have a veto over NATO 


decision-making. There will be 
no compromise of NATO’s 
prerogatives and no .second- 
class status for its new mem- 
bers. A member is a member. 

NATO’s enlargement will 
benefit Russia, above all by in- 
creasing stability in Central and . 
Eastern Europe, where Russia f 
twice has been pulled . into 
world war in this century. 

While many Russians may 
find it difficult to see beyond fee 
Cold War stereotypes of NATO, 
we hope that Russia will rec- 
ognize tbe profound transform- 
ation of the alliance over fee past 
six years — just as we recognize 
fee dramatic transformation of 
Russia- As NATO and Russia 
work together, we believe the 
advantages of cooperation for 
both sides will be apparent. 

Building a NATO-Russia re- 
lationship will not happen 
overnight We will move for- 
ward at a pace thai reflects our 
interests. In constructing this re- 
lationship, neither Helsinki nor. l 
Madrid is a deadline. Each is an f 
important meeting in its own 
right along the road to creating 
an inclusive security structure 
for fee decades to come. 

Like the broad range of our 
cooperation wife Russia — 
from our economic ties to our 
progress on arms control to our 
cooperation in science and cul- 
ture — the relationship between 
NATO and Moscow will move 
ahead one step at a time. 

The Washington Post. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100. 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


The writer is a senior as- 
sociate at the Carnegie Endow- 
ment for International Peace. 
He contributed this comment to 
The Washington Post. 


1897: Crete Autonomy 

LONDON — The Athens cor- 
respondent of fee Tunes says 
autonomy was proclaimed in 
Crete and a strict blockade of 
this island begun. “Notwith- 
standing the prevailing impres- 
sions that war will break out 
within a few days. I have reason 
to believe that in influential 
circles a peaceful solution is de- 
sired. Those who reflect on the 
consequences of a prolonged 
struggle wife Turkey and a rig- 
orous blockade by fee Powers 
cannot but regard the future 
with profoundest misgivings.” 

1922: Irish Revival 

DUBLIN Striking evidences 
of the revival of the traditional 
feeing of Irish nationality 
marked fee fust St Patrick’s cel- 
ebration since Ireland took con- 
trol of her own affairs. In ac- 
cordance wife a decree of DaiJ 
Eireann fee day was celebrated 


as a national holiday. Both the 
Catholic and the Protestant 
Churches held services in Gael- 
ic; Irish soldiers in Irish uniforms 
paraded to the various churches 
near the barracks headed by Irish 
pipers in saffron kilts; many chil- 
dren visited the parks wearing 
old Irish costumes. 

1947: Convents Raided 

PARIS — Six members of 
French religious orders, includ- 
ing Benedictines, Jesuits and 
Dominicans, appeared before a 
Pans police magistrate, charged 
wife harboring collaborationist 
fugitives from justice and aiding 
them to leave fee count™ wife 
forged papers. These were part 
of a group of twelve religious 
who were arrested in police raids 
on convents in Paris on infor- 
maboo that collaborationists 
who had been sentenced in ab- 
sentia were hiding there and 
wtoting for an opportunity to go 
to Spain or Portugal. 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY MARCH 18, 1997 


% 


OPINION/LETTERS 


The Common Cause 
Of Feminists and Foes 


By E.J. Dionne Jr. 

WASHINGTON — In our ar- Marriage 
v about sexuality ' S 

and gender, about men and wo- 
men and their roles, partisans of 
tradition and supporters of fem- 
uusra , are presumed to be blood 
enemies. But their discontents 
nave much in common. 

True, their list of complaints 
t aj? quite different. The tradition- 
aust catalog emphasizes the 
breakup of families, the lack of 
time parents spend with kids, the 
loss of parental authority, the fail- 
ure of one generation to pass on 
good values to the next 
; Feminists focus on sex discrim- 
ination, the failure to accommod- 
ate the needs of mothers in the 
work force, the refusal to give up a 
piisplaced nostalgia for some sup- 
posedly orderly time when men 
and women knew their respective 
roles spad accepted them. 

Because of these differences in 
emphasis, feminists and tradition- 
alists spend much of their time 
arguing the respective responsi- 
bilities of men and women. But 
that’s in theory. If you hear 
l\i enough of these arguments, you 
discover a deep, shared complaint 
that might be summarized in a 
question: Why are we makin g life 
so difficult for ourselves? 

Most women who think of them- 
selves as traditional nonetheless 
work outside the home, from eco- 
nomic necessity or because they 
believe work to be a good thin g or 
both. A “traditionalist” woman is 
not someone who slay $ home, peri- 
od. Statistics suggest she is usually 
someone who chooses to stay 
home or work part-time when her 
children are very young, and then 
goes back to work. 

. Nor do feminists match the par- 
odies about them. Few of them 
yearn for complete emancipation 
from family responsibilities. 

Betty Friedan’s 1963 classic, 

■The Feminine Mystique,” 
kicked off the modern feminist 
movement Today, Ms. Friedan 
argues that feminism ’s mission is 
to find ways of helping families in 
which both partners work outside 
the home to function effectively 
as families. That is, roughly, what 
traditionalists and just about any- 
body else wants, too. 

For sane dues to why argu- 
ments about these things don't 
seem to get us very far, you might 
turn to a little book called “Wo- 
men and the Common Life: Love, 




and Feminism,” a 
volume by the historian Chris- 
topher Lasch, recently published 
posthumously. 

Mr. Lasch combined brilliance 
with an ornery independence that 
could make biro seem quite rad- 
ical or rather conservative. This 
enabled him to see things that 
those stuck in the middle of public 
fights missed. 

One of Mr. Lasch 's central 
points is this: “The traditional 
family, so-called, where the hus- 
band goes out to work and the 
wife stays home with the children, 
was not traditional ar all. It was a 
mid -20th century innovation.” 

In agricultural times, men and 
women worked equally hard, but 
at different tasks. In the industrial 
era, poor women worked for 
wages. Middle-class and wealth- 
ier women also worked outside 
the home, though not always for 
money. 

Seen this way, the revolt 
against the American 1950s sub- 
urban family was a rebellion 
against something that was itself 
unnatural, the withdrawal of wo- 
men from the common life and 
from public work. 

Recreating the 1950s is not a 
reasonable goal because it would 
mean swapping one set of dis- 
contents for another. We’ve been 
there, and we left. 

At the same time, the dissat- 
isfaction many men and women 
feel with current circumstances 
reflects an equally sensible frus- 
tration with, as the introduction to 
Ae Lasch book says, "the larger 
degradation of work and the de- 
cline of civic culture.” 

Women, no less than men, can 
find themselves in jobs that are 
not satisfying. Mr. Lasch argues 
that while we were sending wo- 
men and men alike into the work 
force, we did not do enough to 
change the workplace or build the 
systems of support they needed. 

Anyone who comes to Mr. 
Lasch will have disagreements 
with him. as I did. But he's right to 
urge us against inventing a history 
that didn't exist He's also right that 
“gender” issues can’t be isolated 
from the matter of how we or- 
ganize our workplaces and our 
communities. On these problems, 
feminists, traditionalists and every- 
body else may find that they're 
speaking the same language. 

The Washington Post. 



1 TU take one of those 55-cent Big Macs - and hold the irrational 

exuberance 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Euros and Sense 

Regarding “ElTs * Club Med' 
Stales Get Serious About Finan- 
cial Rectitude ” (March 5): 

Though Italy certainly can 
qualify as a 'Club Med' state, it is 
unfair to label Spain and Portugal 
in this way. With a per capita 
income of $10,190 in 1994, the 
average Portuguese citizen can 
hardly be considered to be spoiled 
by an overgenerous welfare state. 
In fact, the country is in some 
ways still the “Third World” of 
the EU. Nor are the Spanish much 
better off with unemployment at 
nearly double the rate in Ger- 
many. 

More appropriate candidates for 
Club Med status might rather be 
France, Germany or Sweden, with 
their extensive welfare states. This 
is particularly true of Germany, 
which so generously extended its 
benefits to the residents of the 
former East Germany upon reuni- 
fication. Yet Germans still permit 
themselves to judge the “spend- 
thrift” southern Europeans. 

DAVID VL LEEGE. 

Montpellier, France. 

Regarding Thomas Friedman's 
assertion that “Europe’s Real 
Needs Aren’t the Euro and NATO 
Expansion" ( Opinion , Feb. 17 1 , 1 


think he is better answered with a 
question than polemic. Namely: 
what condition does he imagine 
that the economy of the United 
States would be in if every stale 
had its own currency? 

GEOFFREY BYRNE-SUTTON. 

Geneva. 

Britain’s Race Problems 

Regarding "Britain Re-exam- 
ines a Murder and Its Racial Di- 
vide ” (Feb. 19): 

However shocking the killing 
of a black youth by a group of 
white youths, perhaps the most 
startling aspect of this article was 
the remark by Trevor Phillips, 
chairman of a group that re- 
searches race issues, that reaction 
to the case gives him hope that 
"unlike America, where two 
completely different nations live 
inside one border, it is at least 
possible for Middle Britain to un- 
derstand Black Britain's pain and 
in some way identify it." 

Is there a country aside from 
India with a more entrenched race 
and caste system than England? 
Can Mr. Phillips truly believe that 
in London, “completely different 
nations” don't “live inside one 
border"? I know both cities well, 
and if I were a person of African, 
Jamaican, West Indian or 
Pakistani descent. I would rather 


live in New York City than Lon- 
don. all things considered. 

ELIZABETH LANCASTER. 

Brussels. 

Waiting for Annan 

Regarding "UN Leader's Cau- 
tion Cools Early Enthusiasm " 
(Feb. 10): 

I was disturbed to read that 
some member states, looking at 
the matter through the foggy 
glasses of their own selfish in- 
terests. are not happy with the 
present pace of reform of the 
United Nations under the new sec- 
retary-general, Kofi Annan. 

The secretary-general is the 
keeper and manager of the col- 
lective interests of the internation- 
al community, not of one state or 
group of states. The last election, 
which was the result of a solo 
navigational feat by one country, 
terribly damaged the credibility of 
the organization. 

Mr. Annan has said that he will 
reform the system, and he has 
proved that he means it by ap- 
pointing a strong task force with a 
clear mandate and deadline. Let 
him finish what he started. 

To attempt to pass judgment so 
soon is unfair and shows lack of 
respect for Mr. Annan. 

CLAUDE ECHARD. 

Commugny. Switzerland. 


PAGE 11 


It Sired a Free Market 
And It’s Paying the Price 

By Tina Rosenberg 


N EW YORK — In early Au- 
gust 1980. Communist au- 
thorities in Gdansk. Poland, 
caught Anna Walentynowicz, a 
forklift operator at the Lenin 
Shipyard, collecting the remains 
of candles from graves in a local 
cemetery. 

Ms. Walentynowicz wanted to 


MEANWHILE 


make new candles for a memorial 
to workers shot by government 
soldiers during food riots in 
Gdansk 1 0 years before. On Aug. 
9, the shipyard fired her for steal- 
ing. 

Five days later, the yard's 
17,000 workers were on strike for 
her reinstatement and a small pay 
increase. By Aug. 17. the strike 
had spread to nearly two dozen 
factories and a strike committee 
presented the government with 21 
demands, beginning with free uni- 
ons. Two weeks Tarer the gov- 
ernment and the leader of the Len- 
in Shipyard strike committee — a 
former electrician from section 
M-4 named Lech Walesa — 
signed an accord that included 
free unions. 

Ms. Walentynowicz gor her job 
back, and Solidarity was bom. 

The Lenin Shipyard's laborers 
always relished being the workers 
who upended the workers’ state. 
To drive the irony home, the 
strikers hung a banner outside the 
main gate reading “Workers of 
All Factories — Unite!" Now 
they face the ultimate irony: 
Solidarity was so successful thar 
the market is driving what is now 
known as the Gdansk Shipyard 
out of business. 

The yard was declared bank- 
rupt in August Earlier this month 
a government-appointed liquidat- 
or failed to get the $100 milli on 
loan needed to save the yard after 
the government which owns a 60 
percent share, announced it would 
not guarantee the loan. The li- 
quidator is now laying off the 
yard’s remaining 3,700 workers. 
Workers are protesting, but they 
know the yard is doomed. 

When I visited the yard, in May 
1992, the decrepitude inside — 
rusting cranes, empty berths — 
contrasted sharply with the proud 
political history commemorated 
just outside the gates. There was a 
memorial to the Poles killed in 
1970 and a plaque inlaid with gold 


carrying a picture of the Reverend 
Jerzy Popieluszko, the Solidarity 
advocate and priest murdered in 
1984. Other "plaques bore the 
names of different brandies of 
Solidarity and a list of Solidarity's 
demands ia the 1980 strike. 

One worker told me, grinning, 
“It’s not a shipyard; it’s a monu- 
ment.” 

That, in fact, is wby it is dying. 
While the yard's leaders accuse 
the government — which is led by 
former Communists — of closing 
it as revenge on Solidarity, the 
union itself blocked the changes 
necessary to modernize the yard. 
The union, which won part own- 
ership of the yard, refused nec- 
essary wage cuts, layoffs and 
changes in work rules. 

The yard was never profitable, 
but profitability was not important 
in the huge Communist factories. 
It was built to serve the Soviet 

It’s not a shipyard ; 
it’s a monument. 

And that’s why 
Solidarity’s 
birthplace is dying. 

Navy. Workers spent much of the 
day waiting around for materials 
they needed. In 1987, the yard 
required a Polish government sub- 
sidy of $7 million. Its problems 
increased after Communism fell, 
with the end of subsidies and the 
loss of the Soviet market 

About 240 kilometers (150 
miles) to the west of Gdansk lies 
the Szczecin Shipyard. Once as 
backward as Gdansk, the shipyard 
is now Poland's largest export 
earner. The government modern- 
ized it by stripping the work force, 
adding shifts, tying salaries to 
productivity and investing in new 
equipment such as stronger 
cranes. 

Building a ship takes one-third 
the time it takes in the Gdansk 
shipyard. Salaries have now crept 
up to double the national average, 
and some of those laid off from 
Gdansk are going to Szczecin to 
look for work. In die unsentiment- 
al new world that Solidarity 
helped to create, there is no longer 
a place for monuments, only 
shipyards. 

The New York Tunes. 


\ 


’l 

v 


7 


AN URGENT MESSAGE TO THE 

PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES, THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION, 
CHINA, FRANCE AND THE PRIME MINISTER OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, 
THE U.S. CONGRESS, THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION DUMA, 

THE UNITED NATIONS AND THE PEOPLE OF THE WORLD 



THE GREAT POWERS 


The United States and Russia, after decades of dangerous 
posturing and expensive distrust have come to realize that 
! they have much in common: vast natural resources, a free 
economy, and academic and intellectual leadership in the 
world's arts, sciences, engineering and medicine. China - a 
- - noble ally during World War H and a great nation also 
endowed with rich natural resources and renowned intellects - 
is on the road to incredible economic success and is now 
securing its rightful place in the new world order. 

WHY PROVOKE RUSSIA? 

Over 21.000 nuclear weapons - enough fire power to incinerate 
every living creature on the face of the earth - lie in silos spread 
over Russia and the adjacent republics of Belarus, Kazakhstan 
and Ukraine. Although no missiles are pointed at our nations, 
' the possibility that even one missile might find its way into a 
" despot’s hands is a frightening thought for all humanity. 


given time, can offer extraordinary opportunities for its people 
if properly stimulated and focused. As serious and pressing as the 
very real problems of national debt and budget deficits are for the 
United States, will those problems be solved any sooner if we 
must once again re-tool our defense arsenal to prepare for the 
possibility of nuclear global conflict - because we overlooked our 
obligation under the START Treaties I 3 , II 4 , and D3? 


" We must be shapers of events, not observers. For if we do not 
act, the moment wiU pass - and we will lose the best possibilities 
of our future, " 2 President Bill Clinton. 


ACT NOW!!! 


Leaders and people of the world, an irretrievable and historic 
window of opportunity is closing before us. It is closing steadily 
and silently. The Cold War is over, but we have not yet "won the 
peace" and cannot do so until we invest the time, energy, and 
hard assets to keep the peace safe, by destroying the world's vast 
stockpiles of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons , 

” We cannot, we must not, let this moment pass, for an 
incinerated earth and a cremated humanity have no 
further needs, ” A. J. Roach. 



The threat no longer comes from Soviet ideology and 
weaponry but from Russia’s economic decline as this great 
nation is trying to stage perhaps the most comprehensive 
economic and political, transition in human history. 

rvfi-Tice Minister Igor Rodionov "cautioned ... that Moscow's 
- ^ nucl“enJ, which helped establish the Soviet Union 
Ma superpower during the Cold War. could become 
. ^uncontrollable’. He said the state of the aimed forces was 

•horrifying'." 1 

t.est we Forget 


THE RISK FACTOR 


If we do not act now, our neglect can whipsaw us into parallel 
disasters. A nation with demanding internal priorities may be 
hard-pressed to safeguard super-weapons from the ravages of 
decay, a decay that could trigger a global environmental 
nightmare. Such a country could equally become easy prey to 
global nuclear pirates, intent on exporting mass destruction 
into the hands of rogue terrorists. Just because the ideological 
basis for the proliferation and threatened use of nuclear, 
chemical and biological weaponry seems to have declined, the 
risk has not vanished! 


THE BEGINNING IS NOT THE END 


Alfred J. Roach, 

Academician, Russian Academy of Sciences 
Fellow, World Academy of Arts and Sciences 
Fellow, Washington Academy of Sciences 
Member, New York Academy of Sciences 

Founder and Chairman of TU Industries, Inc. (Telecommunications) 
Founder, Chairman and CEO American Biogenetic Sciences, Inc. 

‘Russian Army Could Collapse in Chaos, ■Reuters" - February 14, 15197 

‘President Clinton’s State of the Union Address - 
http://www.whitehouse.gov/WH/SOU5l7/ 

3 START Treaty I - http://www.acda.gov/treaties/start/staritex-htTn 
J START Treaty II - http://www.acda.gov/treaties/start2.htm 

^ WHAT YOU CAN DO NOW! 

Please share your feelings about this message with a friend, 
other leaders of government and business, and especially with 
President Bill Clinton, the White House, Washington D.C., 
Secretary of State MadeLeine Albright, Washington D.C., 
Senator Trent Lott, Senate Majority Leader, Senate Office 
Building, Washington, D.C., House Speaker Newt Gingrich, 


to «;ee history in the long view and appreciate its 
We need . * the Cold War was, the era was still one of 
stages. As costly the ^ ^ stabiIi£y would never have 

relative world s War U if the United States had 

been created at ^ outward vision. Through the 

aot continued to en ii g htened foreign policies, we were 

Marshal 1 Plan M securely to, o the fold of 

able to bring Jtis m,w time to do the same for 

stable, democrat! . people perished in our fight 

Russia, 25 f JefreX/nr toe world. Tlte cost of 

against fascism to P f ^ Russja wou , d ^ minimal. Russia 

. a new MmWJ J £ J derstand ing, cooperation and help in 
“ ' S y elopm^ of new industries and free markets. Russta, 

/F YOU AGREE WITH THIS MESSAGE YOU ARE FREE TO PUBLISH OR SEND A COPY TO A FRIEND. GOVERNMENT OR BUSINESS LEADER. 


President Clinton, in his recent State of Ihe Union address, 
wisely points to the need to expand and ratify the Chemical 
Weapons Convention beyond the present 68 nation signatories. 

That convention and the START I, II, and HI Treaties, signed , . _ _ 

by the G7 Nations - Canada, France, Germany. Great Britain. V House of Representatives. Washington, D.C. 

Italy, Japan and the United States of America, are a worthy Publication of this message was paid for personally by Mr. Alfred J. Roach. 

beginning — which must be expanded and ratified without It may be reproduced without permission in its entirety. 

delay - but they are only a beginning. He pointedly set the tone ^ our ^ <t! www . peoplM f.fl 1 e. W orld.oT S 

for the outlook we must embrace. SOI Albany Street, Boston, MA 02118 



t W 




f 



.i - T «V* 


--- - 


BVTERNATI0M1L HERALD TRIBUNE, 
TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1997 
PAGE 12 



If 


i ' 


* IforC"”'! 


The Trend 
Is Contrasts 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


! ' ■’ 


P ARIS — A new. strong take 
on feminine beauty is the 
story that underpins the 
trends of the fall-winter 
fashion season. 

Ann DemeuJeraeester and 
Helmut Lang are the leaders in cre- 
ating a mascul ine/feminine image 
for women, which is expressed as 
much in plain, but pretty, faces as in 
clothes. 

Those two designers are also de- 
fining a modem dress code, using 
masculine fabrics for tailoring that 
is feminized with fine, supple or 
airy materials. 

Fashion's gender blending for 
the 1990s means fiat, dry wools, 
brushed mohair, alpaca and boucld; 
or silky jersey, chiffon and tulle. A 







R pgkpr . VlM ■ - -V- 

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* M ■■■ • * ••.tm •>«* mi. 


ChniMftin Moore and Anfec* tttmn' 

From left: Valentino's Mongolian lamb muffler, tweed jacket and sexy pants ; Lagerfeld and lus fairy dresses take a bow, and Ungaro's Chinese- inspired evening mix of pattern and texture.-- 


Paris, Where Old Guard and Avant-Garde Meet 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


Mocre/nmau 

Demeulemeester mannish coat. 



strong feeling for leather is 
matched by an enthusiasm for vel- 
vet-soft suede. 

The silhouette also plays hard and 
soft, with the vigorous return of 
structure, including shoulder pads. 
Yet there is a slouchy ease, espe- 
cially for low-slung, mannish pants. 
Their opposite is narrow trousers. 

Hemlines swing high, or low, 
with the long-line dress and car- 
digan pan of a focus on knits. Coats 
are short and straight, sometimes 
with a funnel collar, or they are 
long, with a half-belt 
The must-have accessory is a 
boa: in fox fur, or maybe in feath- 
ers. which is the fur-substitute, 
along with boucle and chenille. 
Shoes are high-rise with the knee- 
high spiked boot hot to trot. 

Ethnic themes from Asia and 
Africa bring silk embroideries and 
flat flower prints versus rugged 
textures. 

Like the rest of modem fashion, 
the story is nor about one look, but 
the yin and the yang. 


■ ARIS — It was a fairy-tale end- 
ring to the (all-winter season. 
Bad fairies. Karl Lagerfeld's 
models staggered out. appar- 
ently in the final stages of “mad cow” 
disease, but wearing cobwebs of silver- 
knit dresses lapped in moth wings of 
tulle. The wacky presentation, with a 
shower curtain of plastic strips dangling 
across the runway, did its best to conceal 
great clothes. And the question that has 
dogged the three-week European season 
was posed once Main: What are these 
fashion shows forf 
The Paris season, which officially 
continues until Wednesday, has been 
exciting and sometimes thrill mg — con- 
finning the French capital as the crux of 
global talent. Creative ideas about 
makeup, hairstyles, accessories and all 
the trimmings (let alone the clothes) will 
feed fashion’s voracious appetite 
through the new millennium. 

The monumental iceberg of estab- 
lished designer brands is also breaking 
up. with new. young talents 
either pushing through the 


swingy chiffon skirt and the evening 
dresses with their Venetian blinds of 
sheer and mat fabrics. Even if those 
have been around awhile. Lagerfeld 
does them deftly, as he does soft tail- 
oring in crepe. Bui reptile- and animal- 
patterned coats (shown with shocking- 
pink suede pants) seemed more like a 
reject from Lagerfeld's Fendi line. 

Fashion shows are about creating an 
aura and making an image. Valentino 
moved his line along nicely. In fact, be 
raced it forward, with a strong sexual 
charge in the sound track and clothes to 
match: tight-awhe-thigfi pants, short 
hemlines and spike-heeled, knee-high 
fancy boots. Down the shiny runway 
pranced models in their brief skirts ana 
lean jackets, often with a perky Mon- 
golian lamb bolero or fur and feather 
trims. Even when a racy little dress was 
black, gilded lines were traced on the 
hose and embroidered on the boots. A 
whisper-light Oriental theme brought 
dangling tasseled purses and a mini ki- 
mono. in sugar-sweet toiie de Jouy with 
matching boots. 

What might have seemed overdone. 


China was ever present at Leonard, 
where the lacquered red Imperial Palace 
doors at the end of die runway ushered in 
a theme that overwhelmed the show, 
what with the frogged and tasseled 
fastenings, textures inspired by the Great 
Wall and bamboo patterns. Yet Le- 
onard’s prints are magical and the way 
the border patterns are used very fine. 
Ambassador Cai Fangbo of China ap- 
plauded the finale of dragon embroidered 
skirt saying, “I welcome cultural co- 
operation.’ 

The conundrum of showbiz versus 


fashion straight up, highlighted by 
John Galliano's Pans spectacular, was 
shown by two opposing presentations 
on Sunday. Maurizio Galante hit his 
audience with ear-splitting music and 
aggressive models, while his clothes 
were composed of gentle silken threads 
on sweater fronts and even shoes. 

At Rochas, Peter O’Brien had pretty 
models ambulating around a restaur- 
ant. the better to show off the ribboned 
texture of a tweed jacket or the bias cut 
of a long jersey sku«~ The show glowed 
at night with its slender chiffon dresses 


and elongated cardigans or velvet host-' 
ess gowns. . ; 

Mounir Moufarrige, the president of 
Chloe. would not confirm or deny that! 
O’Brien is up for the job as Chloe’sj 
designer, although a Paris source 
claims that the contract is with the law- 
yers. 

The European season has ended on a 
high note for retailers, with Rose Marie 
Bravo, president of Saks Fifth Avenue; 
praising a “very strong season” and 
Joan Kaner of Neiman Marcus 
“Paris is sizzling.” 



saying: 


At Hermes, Quiet Sophistication 



intern 

Pi 


or even vulgar, was trans- 
MIV | A ■ J formed by Valentino's light 

cracks or taking over at the /J t Q iry~tCU€! touch and exquisite wcint- 

hip hnuvc Ypf mraHniir. J ■' 


International Herald Tribune 

ARIS — Couture is 
now fashion's hoi 
property, and a quiet 
sophistication is the 
new look of the avant-garde. 

Although European casual 
sportswear has never reached 
the big ease of American cas- 
ual clothing, houses that have 


big houses. Yet paradoxic- J j manship that brought lacy UiU VIVUIUI^, UVUOVO I11U& uu*b 

ally, the household names €tl(tltl£r tO tfl€ dresses shimmering with built a reputation on separate 

— call them the old guard - T? silver nr a hem cascading nieces melded together now 

— have never seemed faUrWlTltCT 

Slwmmr Rnfh Fmnniipl « 



stronger. Both Emanuel 
Ungaro and Valentino sent SCdSOTl. 
out powerful, clearly fo- 
cused collections, with fast- 


Lang's feminized tailoring. 


paced presentations but nothing tricky. 

With his own-label collection. Lager- 
feld is caught between the young dare- 
devils and the deep blue sea of boredom. 
How io show clothes that rely for their 
effect on precise and brilliant cutting in 
slinky fabrics? Send than walking dead- 
plain around a small white room — and it 
would suggest that Lagerfeld was march- 
ing behind the avanr-garde. Shown in a 
sophisticated, upscale -way. they might 
lack “edge." 

So in what looked like a desperate 
attempt to be “modem” at any cost, the 
designer had the models act weird, wear 
over-the-knee black socks, and fling bits 
of fur and feather around themselves. Not 
to mention tumescent shoulder-pads 
swelling under pin-striped jersey 
dresses. 

“Abstract and modem.” Lagerfeld 
said to describe the collection, although 
its down-among-the- fairies finale of sti- 
ver mesh was inspired by rum -of- the - 
century dolls. 

Sheared of its trappings, this was a 
fine, modem collection, with its hard- 
and-soft mix of black leather top with 


silver or a hem cascading 
with cut-out flowers. “I 
Wanted it to be fresh and 
quick and to get the models 
moving,” Valentino said of 
a peppy collection that had 
distilled the essence of his style. 

The smiling complicity between the 
models as (hey acted best buddies on the 
runway was a metaphor for Ungaro's 
collection. Like the women with their 
pretty makeup and easy attitude, Ungaro 
had Lightened up. And like them too, his 
signature pints, checks and plaids 
seemed to be getting on really well to- 
gether. Instead of violent clashes, there 
were subtle mixes of color and pattern 
used in a collection dominated by pants. 
They were worn with jackets or long 
cardigan coats, often flowered and some- 
times illuminated with Lure*. Long, 
slender jersey dresses, in graphic blocks 
of color, were another take on the long- 
line silhouette. For Ungaro had mostly 
abandoned short sassy skirts. The leo- 
pard-patterned backdrop suggested an 
animal-print theme that seems to have 
hung around too long in fashion, but 
Ungaro did his well, letting panther 
{Howl among flowers, all in the same rich 
bronze tones. Evening clothes, like panne 
velvet dresses had a rich elegance and a 
brief Chinese theme added just the right 


touch of exotica. 


pieces melded together now 
have to sharpen up. 

Hermes is in a command- 
ing position because of the 
quality of its products: the 
liquid, satin-son: leathers, the 
velvety suedes and the best of 
everything from cashmere 
through silk. This season’s 
African theme brought rich 
dark colors and a startling 
print of tribal necklaces. 

But this house is about re- 
finement, which meant a 
simple cashmere cape caught 
imo a belt at the back or a black 
pantsuit given chocolate 
brown lapels as a subtle take 
on the tuxedo. Linear tailoring 
was the strongest suit, and the 
retiring design director, 

■ Claude Burnet won deserved 
applause for her skill in putting 
Hermes on fashion’s radar 
screen. 

The abrupt departure of 
N arci so Rodriguez, after only 
a brief stay at Cerruti, shows 
the problem of a house with a 
strong sportswear tradition 
trying to turn hip. 

Nino Cerruti said Monday 
that Rodriguez, who shot to 
fame by creating the slip of a 


dress for Carolyn Bessette’s 
wedding to John Kennedy Jr.. 
was leaving after a “conflict 
in strategy” at the end of a 
two-year contract. 

In his show Saturday, 
maybe following his former 
employer Calvin Klein, Rod- 
riguez bad gone for edgy 
(well, it was last year! min- 
imalism. That meant skinny 
skirts and strapless dresses, 
bi-sec ted with seams. They 
came out on models with high 
heels and sultry scarlet lips. 

It looked tike a styling gim- 
mick by someone who wants 
to please magazine editors. 
But behind the cool, there was 
strong tailoring, including 
sailor-collar coats that were in 
the Cerruti tradition. Transpar- 
ent dresses (yawn! I were not. 

At Lanvin, designer Oci- 
mar Versoiaro, who produced 
sensuous evening wear under 
his own label, sent out a col- 
lection of what may be nice- 
for-customers clothes. 


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T opened wirfi a neat 
man/ woman take of 
pantsuits in masculine 
fabrics , worn with jaunty 
hats and high heels. But to get 
back a signature style, like the 
sporty freshness on which the 
house was founded, the de- 
signer needs to do more than 
send out belts emblazoned 
with initials, designer denim 
and polite evening wear. 

Jean -Charles de Castelba- 
jac did his thing, which Ls 
blanket coats, primary colors, 
naive prints and scarves made 
out of teddy bears. Their nurs- 
ery-school allure is beginning 
to pall and, although Caste i- 
bajac makes good coats, he 
proved how fast fashion is 
leaving behind square-cut 
duffels and bulky quilting. 

Herve Leger inhabits the 



Leather coat with strong shoulders from Hermes. 


M«K/njooas 


opposite side of fashion’s 
street. He has to prove that he 
can create clothes for daytime 
as strong as his sexy evening 
clothes. He struggled manfully 
to create everyday pantsuits 
and jazzed them up with hairv 
goatskin coats — but nobody 
woke up until he sent out his 
signature evening dresses, ibis 



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mat oners an excellent prod-- 
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Since this collection always 
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vrtien shown in a vast space’. 
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with newly fashionable fox* 
fur) were followed by taiG 
ormg in Prince of Wales- 
checks, and fluffy mohair: 

1 ne show moved predictably 
toward .sleek evening wear. . 

it was commercial and wo-.‘ 
man-friendly — but it made 
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TIFFS HAY MARfH 1« 1Q07 


PAGE 13 



Seeking Hackers 
With White Hats 

Internet Business Boosts Need 
For Computer Security Experts 


By Steve Lohr 

New York Times Service 


~ ' Ina ciuU y’ windowless room in a New 
. *ork suburb^four men are tapping furiously at their laptop 
computers. Their mission: to crack into the coraputCT 
system of a major U.S. corporation. 

Things seem to be going well, for them. 

‘ •Aiinghti we’re through the fire wall.” announced one 
bearded hacker. A few moments later, a second practitioner 
of high-tech mischief pronounced himself pleased by what 
he saw inside — a digital picture of vulnerability rendered 
by the lines of computer code dancing across his sc ree n. 

Looks like we can toast it," he said. 

Charles Palmer, a slender, bearded 40-year-old com- 
puter scientist, looked on with pride at the members of his 
team. Skilled hackers, Mr. Palmer noted, are scarce these 
days, at least ones that he will hire. 

“It’s hard to find good people in this field who do not 
have criminal records.” he explained. 

Mr. Palmer and his team work for International Business 
Machines Corp., and their brand of computer hacking is 
legal. Companies pay the IBM squad to attack their com- 
puter systems to test how well they can stand up to the 
increasing assaults by real hackers. 

The growing ranks of cyber-intruders are engaged in 
everything from snooping around to "parking” porno- 
graphy and pirated software on corporate machines to 

See HACKERS, Page 17 



•Slum i.rrrtrvoodm* Nn. \< y *. Tin 



Jjw: DopkseaThr Tori: Tow 

Nick Simirich, a security consultant, top photo, works from home in Boca Raton, Florida. Charles Palmer of 
IBM, at work below, says, “It’s hard to find good people in this field who don’t have criminal records.” 


Japan’s Trade Surplus Awakes 

February Increase Is First in More Than 2 Years 


By Velisarios Kattoulas 

International Herald Tribute 

TOKYO — The Japanese trade sur- 
plus rose in February for the first time in 
more than two years, the government 
reported Monday, because of a weaker 
yen that boosted exports and stifled im- 
ports. raising fears of fresh trade friction 
between Tokyo and Washington. 

The surplus in merchandise trade rose 
6.5 percent in February to 686.72 billion 
yen ($5.57 billion). It was the first in- 
crease since November 1994. 

The surplus with the United States 
grew for the fifth month in a row, rising 
12.3 percent to 407.35 billion yen. In 
recent weeks. Washington has warned 
Tokyo to keep its surplus in check and 
not attempt to export its way out of an 
economic slump. 

The Japanese government played 
down the increase and insisted that the 
surplus was still on a downward trend, 
but many private economists said the 
two-year decline in the surplus was 
over. Now the surplus will continue to 
rise, they said. 

The weak yen and the strong U.S. 
economy will lift exports, they added, 
and a mop in economic growth and 
consumer spending after tax increases 
of 9 trillion yen in April will hurt im- 
ports. The Japanese economy grew 3.6 
percent in 1996, but the government 
forecast growth of 1 .9 percent in 1997. 

The report Monday was the second 


time this month that Tokyo indicated its 
trade surplus was on the rise. On March 
6, it reported that die surplus in its 
current account — the broadest measure 
of trade, which includes merchandise, 
services, tourism and investments — 
unexpectedly soared in January. 

In a sign of what might lie ahead if die 
Japanese trade surplus balloons, fresh 
squabbling broke out Monday between 
Tokyo and Washington over telecom- 
munications. 

Tokyo said it would not discuss a new 
foreign procurement pact for Japan’s 
biggest telephone operator as long as 
Washington linked the issue to an op- 
erating license for the company in the 
United Stales. Earlier this month, Wash- 
ington said it would delay granting li- 
censes for international phone services to 
Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp.. 
Japan’s biggest telephone company, and 
to another Japanese telephone operator. 

Washington called on Japan to scrap 
the 20 perc ent c eiling on foreign own- 
ership in NTT and Kokusai Denshin 
Denwa Co., the second telephone com- 
pany. by the end of 1997. At the same 
time, Washingt on as ked for talks about 
guidelines for NTT’s purchases of im- 
ported equipment to start in May. An 
existing pact expires in September. 

Seiroku Kajiyama. the government’s 
top spokesman, was quick to dismiss 
warnings of a looming surge in the trade 
surplus following die release of Feb- 
ruary’s statistics. "1 do not hold the 


view that the huge surplus is necessarily 
rapidly increasing.” be said. 

But Mineko Sasaki -Smith, chief 
economist at Credit Suisse First Boston 
Securities in Tokyo, predicted that Ja- 
pan would record a trade surplus of 
about 7.4 trillion yen in 1997. compared 
with 6.7 trillion yen in 1996. “The 
underlying trend in the trade surplus is 
definitely higher,” she said 

In February, the trade surplus ex- 
panded with the European Union and 
Asia as well as with the United States. 
The surplus with Asia expanded 20.2 
percent from a year earlier to 494.2 
billion yen; with die European Union, it 
was 3.2 percent higher at 199.6 billion 
yen. 

The Finance Ministry said it was the 
first time since November 1 994 dial die 
trade surplus had expanded with all 
three major trading areas. 

It said exports rose 7.6 percent in 
February from a year earlier, while im- 
ports dropped 2.7 percent. The main 
reason, the ministry said, was die foil in 
the value of the yen. Economists said the 
strength of die U.S. economy, which is 
drawing in imports from around the 
world also contributed to the rise. 

The Finance Ministry said the dollar 
averaged 121 .1 8 yen in February, about 
14 percent lower than a year ago. The 
weaker yen’s impact on the surplus was 
most visible in statistics for car exports 
to the United States. They grew for die 
1 0th month in' a row. 


Pearson Chief lows Improved Profit 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 


LONDON — The new bead of the 
British media and entertainment group 
Pearson PLC set the stage Monday for 
big changes in the way the company is 
nm, repeatedly chastising it for its 
lackluster performance. 

”It is clear that there wasn't quite 
enough sweat and quite enough joy 
around here.” said Maijorie Scardino, 
an American who took over as chief 
executive in January. 

Ms. Scardino announced a five-year 
£100 million ($160.1 million) interna- 
tional expansion plan for the Financial 
Times, Pearson’s flagship newspaper. 


As part of the expansion plan, which 
will mostly be focused on the United 
States. Richard Lambert, the paper’s 
editor, will move to New York in July, 
and will edit the paper from there for one 
year. 

"Our aim is to achieve heroic cir- 
culation for tbe Financial Times and 
heroic profits,” she said. 

Although Ms. Scardino promised an 
“evolution, not a revolution,” her as- 
sessment of Pearson's performance left 
no doubt as to tbe strength of her desire 
for change. Her remarks came as Pearson 
unveiled a pretax profit of £357 million 
for 1996, down from £365 million in 
1995. Pearson’s profit was damped by a 
one-time charge of £100 million for im- 


proper accounting at its Penguin pub- 
lishing unit in the United States. 

Operating profit rose 7 percent, to 
£252 million, lifted by solid increases at 
the Financial Times and in its television 
division. Sales rose to £2.19 billion, 
from £1.83 billion in 1995. 

But Ms. Scardino appeared unmoved 
by the strong results. Standing directly 
in front of Pearson's chairman. Lord 
Blakenham, she lambasted the com- 
pany's profit record as inadequate and 
noted that Pearson would “have to start 
to perform like a managed group, not 
like an investment portfolio.” 

Ms. Scardino refused to answer ques- 
tions about which parts of the Pearson 
empire might be sold off. 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 


Globalization Needs a Moral Compass 


By Reginald Dale 

International Herald Tribune 


W ASHINGTON — Being right is no guarantee 
of winning an argument. As most people 
quickly learn in personal disputes, logic may 
not be the best weapon to deploy against 
emotion. In politics, economic facts and figures are usually 
no match for powerful public sentiment. During tbe bitter 
Fight over the U.S. budget 18 months ago, the Democrats’ 
skillful though often dishonest appeals ^ 
to compassion triumphed over the Re- 
publicans' dry fiscal rectitude. 

A similar confrontation now looms 
on a grander scale as the debate over 
economic globalization intensifies in 
the industrial countries. Generally 
speaking, economists who assert the _ 

benefits of globalization are right Globalization has on 
balance done more good than harm and lifted millionsof 
people out of poverty. The dismantling of economic bar- 
riers has stimulated world growth. 

But there is a risk that the pro-glotahzation frac^ will 
concede the moral and emotional high ground- While 
economists proclaim the merits of free trade and capitel 
movements —often in highly ant,_ 

elobalization forces are pressing emotional buttons. 

S Thefrmguments may be riddled with economic fallacies, 
but the global economy’s opponents appeal " public sym- 
paihy by claiming a monopoly of com passion for tbewc&ms 
SfpSvSty and exploitation. Agan^ecooonuc : theory, they 
deolov anecdotal evidence of real-life hardship. 

aSh^tes Piously distort their adversary’ positions. 
SurocMTenltf globalization are caricatured as beke v mgtha t 


Its proponents are right, 
but they need to make 
their case better, 


Economists 
globalization as 


clearly many of them are not. By denying there is any 
validity to the anti-globalization arguments, the economists 
are at risk of appearing ruthless — even of ultimately losing 
tbe debate and undermining support for their c a u se . 

Now, an economist who describes himself as a main- 
stream free trader is trying to bridge this chasm. In the book 
"Has Globalization Gone Too Far?” published by Wash- 
ington’s Institute for International Economics. Dani Rodrik 
accepts that in some ways the anti -globalization forces have 
a point Globalization, he writes, threatens to destroy social 
cohesion by widening the rift between 
people with the skills and mobility to 
flourish in global markets and those 
without them. The postwar social bar- 
gain, under which workers received 
steady increases in wages and benefits 
in exchange for labor peace, is in jeop- 
ardy, he says. 

With political support for trade eroding, a return to old- 
style protectionism becomes a serious possibility, Mr. 
Rodrik warns. But that would hurt the many groups that 
benefit from trade, creating the same kind of social conflicts 
that globalization itself generates. 

Tbe answer is not to try to stop globalization, much of 
which, like the Industrial Revolution before it, is irreversible. 
Tbe answer inora*! is tfaar those who support globalization 
must fight back more effectively. Of course, they should 
continue to rebut economic fallacies such as tbe belief that 
low wages are die driving force behind today’s global com- 
merce. If that were true, as Mr. Rodrik says, the world's top 
exporter would be Bangladesh and a few African countries. 

But advocates of tbe global economy should also admit 
that it can have undesirable side effects and propose ways to 
correct them, for instance through better educati o n and 
training. Above all. the pro-globalization forces need to show 
that they too have a moral compass. That should not be too 
difficult. Despite its problems, globalization is far more likely 
to alleviate poverty and its associated social evils than any of 
the alternatives proposed by its enemies. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


March 17 Lfbfd-Ubor Rates 


March 17 


tes an OF. IF. TW « 

S 1 nms- -- S*S' ,JMS «■’ 1M 

-«i im uisi aras ami 5 _ ejsrr ns 

i2t suss 21*325 am 

1JBB wra — “E IflK S32W 23141 1*319 U7« 22W133 

nSF, - i» w “f;". Tn* ms nans* mow — 

yqvB \XB> ^ *521 UM.1S H7» U3U5 \\M 

LfflWB JJSiSS 1J8US SOW y US? 121735 13® 

ijggjo uat ism tan* urn inis 

111 illicit 

ssebkT— “ — * 


Swiss FrencS 

D-Mark Franc Sterling Franc Yen ECU 

l-mantti 5W-S» 3W»-3 4 Sik-6V» 3V*-3W 4W-4W 

arnontt 59ta-5W 3Vto-31* l»fe-l>Vn 6Vta-69n 3^.-3* &*-*» 414-414 

6-mortti SW-SW 3*W-3* 3V»-3fte 4V6-41* 

1-yaar 5*V»-«V» 31*-3W 3U-3M 4>W»-6>V» 3U-3V* 

Sources Reuters, Uorris Bank. 

Rates appBcaOte to Interbank OepasBs of SI wSSon mtninwa (or apjtvatent). 


fcdrac. 

I KangS 
ttartat 
a rupee 
rep** 


.rt» 


Pert 

266J0 

7.7440 

177-45 

3538 

2401-75 

0.6416 

3J6» 

03012 

14772 


ContnCT 
MW- 1*” . 
M.ZW** 1 * 
Marw-fcreP* 

PnfcfciWT 

Port, ■so - " 

5*9.* 


part 

7.961 

1,4405 
68456 
26-33 
3419 
169-62 
571 0J 

375 

1.4339 


OuiW 

S.JUr.na4 

S.Kor.«BB 

SweAkre* 

TMwooS 

TbdDaM 

Tntttln 

UAEintan 

VeMZ-baBK. 


nrs 

*434 

87W0 

7733 

27.52 

2SM 

12502ft 
16705 
47 tOO 


X-Oaf 4MSf 9MW 

12299 . UZ4B 12151 

1,4486 1-4443 1.4397 


i-orvrara wares 

J apanc*!* 

FoBBdSMng iJ9U ,3554 swtwfre* 6 

iSS u» .ggeggl 

(TavJ^IMFiSDR!. Otbardata *«•> ** 


Key Money Rates 

(tatted Stales Cfase 

Pre* 

Dtacaotfiftfe 

5430 

SM 

Priam rate 

8V, 

8U 

Federal Raids 

5V» 

5W 

90-dcxr CDs decden 

569 

550 

180-dor CP dnoten 

SL42 

643 

3 mostti Tieusary bB 

SPA 

622 

1 -year Treasury bB 

5L73 

S./1 

2^ear TressOTjr bK 

6.T7 

614 

5-yets- Treasury note 

654 

651 

7-yew Treasarr eerte 

664 

A M 

10-TMf Trwswr Beta 

6J1 

669 

3M*VTTf«»iTftoad 

696 

6.94 

Juno lyscfe 30-day RA 

467 

467 

SEE 

Dtscnurtnde 

050 

050 

ad money 

039 

043 

l-a«1& Mertemk 

059 

059 

3-monta taterbunk 

059 

059 

tmeantetetak 

059 

059 

WiwMrtMirt 

Z2S 

Z32 

omany 

Leorturdrot 

450 

650 

Gd! money 

3.15 

113 

Mnonlfc ktertmnk 

3.2B 

12S 

3-emarti totatank 

125 

358 

frBWHnmrtgtek 

225 

22S 

10-fiar Bond 

5.77 

£70 


Britain 

Bank base rate 
CaR money 

T-t 


6 - m oath taterte 
Tfttvan 


6.00 64X1 

600 59. 

SVb 600 
6V» 6V» 

6V, 

7.42 7 JS 


Mereenflaa rate 3.10 3.10 

Cnfl money jv* 3*» 

1-rwtffli M e r b unb 3>e 3** 

Hearts tatertsadc 3Vu 3Vu 

64MB& tater&isa 3 Sht 34* 

IfryecrOAT 675 560 

Sources- Reefers. Btoaatva, Merrill 
Lynch. BapkolTokre-Mlrsablshl. 
t OMv l)vs& 


Gold 


Zakh 


AJH. PJW. 0^6 


NA. 351J0 -1J5 
352435 35160 —160 

KewYertt 35260 34830 —460 

U.S. dofltos per amce. London cfHaal 
Sxiogs Zurich ana Nett York atealng 
and aosing prices New York Coma 
lAprfU 

Soucsgaan. 


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PAGE 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 


THE AMERICAS 




v-. ; 


30-Year T-Bond Yield 


6300 



Rockwell to Spin Off Auto Units 


Worries About Rates 
Leave Stocks Mixed 




ften 


Dollar in Deutsche marks a Dollar in Yen 


1.70 — — 


i» — 


1.60 


^ ON D J F hf' 110 ‘ O ~N ~D J ' F M 
1996 1997 1996 1997 






Nss^f Y. .s&p iqo-t- ^TTa^-'u.tsaa^v v.’^aso; 


ga«tfegp ZyteSftQ^tetrf";/,-:? ^-fe^5338-3S-- - v . 


Cmpikd hr OvrSstf Front Dtsparbes 

NEW YORK — Rockwell In- 
ternational Inc. said Monday it 
planned to spin off its $3.1 billion 
automotive-parts business to 
shareholders and would concen- 
trate on its. semiconductor, auto- 
mation and aviation businesses. 

The decision, along with the sale 
in December of Rockwell's 
aerospace and defense businesses 
to Boeing Co. for $3 2 billion, com- 
pletes a transformation of Rock- 
well into an electronics business. 

In late trading. Rockwell was up 
30 cents at $68 .375 a share on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

The automotive business, based 
in Troy, Michigan, has about 
16.000 employees worldwide and 
generated about $3. 1 billion in rev- 
enue last year. It includes com- 
ponents for trucks and buses, sun 
roofs, suspension systems, wheels 
and automotive electronics. 

The spin-off will “complete the 
transformation of our company 


from a broadly diversified concern 
into an enterprise focused largely 
on commeroa] electronics mar- 
kets,” Rockwell’s chief executive, 
Donald Beall, said. 

4 ‘We’re convinced that the full 
potential of these businesses can 
best be reached by operating sep- 
arately.” be said. “With this sep- 
aration. investors will be able to 
focus on tbe specific growth and 
value characteristics of each com- 


pany. 

Rockwell is splitting up because 
it is composed of “two distinct 
businesses, each with significant 
differences in their markets, 
products, technologies, invest- 
ment requirements and strategic 
growth opportunities,” he said. 

Rockwell said it hoped to com- 
plete the spin-off by the end of 


eptember, pending government 
pproval. Rockwell's sbarefaold- 


approval. Rockwell's sharehold- 
ers will get one share of the new 


company’s stock for every three 
Rockwell shares. That translates 


into about 727 million shares for 
the new company. Those new 
shares will trade on die New York 
Stock Exchange. 

After the spin-off. Rockwell 
will have about $8 billion in annnal 
sales and 44,000 employees in 
nearly 100 countries. 

Its units will supply automation 
products for manufacturing, make 
semiconductors and produce com- 
munications and control products 
for tbe aviation industry. 

Jeff Sprague, an analyst at 
Cowen & Co., said spinning off tbe 
auto businesses was a good move 
for Rockwell because those busi- 
nesses would not grow as fast as tbe 
chip and electronics businesses. 

After the spin-off, Rockwell will 
be one of the laigest makers of 
semicotsdnctors for computer mo- 
dems. Rockwell is in a race with 
US. Robotics COrp. to develop mo- 
dern chips capable of handling data 
transmissions as big as 56 kilobits a 
second. (AP. Bloomberg) 


By Mitchell Martin 

International Herald Tribune 


Imcmabonal Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• News Corp. agreed to acquire Heritage Media Corp., a 
broadcaster and provider of advertising and marketing ser- 
vices, for £1 .35 billion in stock and assumed debt 

• H.F. Ahrnanson & Co. raised its hostile bid for Great 
Western Financial Corp. to $6.66 billion, topping a friendly 
offer from Washington Mutual Inc. by $400 million. 

• Valero Energy Corp. agreed to purchase Salomon Inc-’s 
oil-iefining unit for $485 million in cash and stock. The sale 
will result in a loss of about $2 90 million for Salomon, 
requiring the New York-based company to restate its fourth- 
quarter earnings. 

• TCF Financial Corp. agreed to buy Standard Financial 
Inc. for about $424 million in cash and stock. 

• Ford Motor Co. suspended production for one week on its 
best-selling car, the Taurus, and its sister car. the Mercury 
Sable, at its Atlanta and Chicago plants. 


Tyco to Buy ADT for $5. 6 Billion 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Tyco Interna- 
tional Ltd. said Monday that it 
planned to buy ADT Ltd.. Amer- 
ica’s biggest burglar-alarm com- 
pany. for $5.6 billion in a deal that 
would block a hostile bid by West- 
ern Resources Inc. 

Tyco said the combination rep- 
resented a continuation of its effort 
to expand into service businesses. It 
will pay stock for ADT, which has 


rejected an offer from Western, tbe 
utility that is its largest shareholder. 

ADT shares rose sharply on tbe 
news and stood $3.75 higher ar 
$25.50 in late trading on tbe New 
York Stock Exchange. 

Tyco shares were $275 lower at 
$57.50. 

Michael Ashcroft. ADT" s chair- 
man and chief executive, said the 
combination would “enhance 
ADT’s ability to continue its 


growth, not only in North America 
and the United Kingdom, but in all 
parts of the world utilizing Tyco’s 
established infrastructure. ” 

Tyco makes a variety of products, 
including disposable medical 
goods, pa r-k agin g materials and 
electronic components. Once the 
deal is done, Tyco shareholders will 
own 64 p e rc e nt of the combined 
company, which will have more 
than $8.5 billion in annual revenue. 


• ITT Corp. is considering selling its majority stake in its 
educational-services business, valued at $5625 million, as 


Mark Profits From EMU Doubts 


part of a plan to fend off a $105 billion hostile offer from 
Hilton Hotels Corp. Bloomberg 


Bloomberg 


Weekend Box Office 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “Return of the Jedi” dominated tbeU-S. 
box office over tbe weekend, with a gross of $16J million. 
Following are die Top 10 moneymakers, based on Friday’s 
ticket sales and estimated sales for Saturday and Sunday. 


1. Return ofthejedl 

mtaOBbOaOrrHsO 

01*3 minion 

2. Jungle 2 Jungle 

(Walt Disney! 

SllJmn&on 

1 Private Ports 

CParmouat) 

*9mfl8on 

4. (tie) Dannie Brasco 

f Trf-Sfort 

S54mflDon 

The Empire Strives Bach 


S54 mtiBon 

6. taw tones 

(NevUneOemO 

MmSIBon 

7.SBng Blade 

(Miramax) 

S3 mBffon 

2 Absolute Power 

{Columbia Pictures) 

S24m&0aa 

9. Star Wars 

(Duadeet CMkiysFtsd 

SZ26mfllloa 

12 Booty Call 

(Columbia Pictures) 

524 motion 


CnnpOtdbfOvr Staff from Dupatbex 

NEW YORK — The Deutsche 
mark rose Monday against the dollar 
and other map: currencies because 
of a growing conviction that 
Europe's planned monetary union 
will be delayed. 

“One word,” said Tom Hoge, 
vice president at Bank of New York; 
“maiks.” 

Traders bought marks for Italian 
lire, Spanish pesetas and dollars 
after a press report that Germany’s 
budget deficit would exceed toe 
European Union’s prescribed limit 
for membership in tbe planned 
single currency. Comments from 
some German officials added to the 


concern. The dollar fell to 1.6910 
DM from 1.6953 DM on Friday. 

“After the reports about Ger- 
many. it looks like the timing for 
EMU will at least be pushed back,” 
said John Trammell, a funds man- 
ager at A. Gary Shilling & Co. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


“That’s bolstering the mark against 
all other currencies.” 

Europe’s monetary union, which 
includes plans for a single currency, 
is scheduled to begin Jan. 1, 1999. 
Signs of a delay buoy tbe mark 
because it is expected to remain 
Europe’s primary currency until the 


single currency begins. The dollar 
was little changed against the yen 
after Japan reported thai its trade 
surplus rose less than expected in 
February. The dollar was quoted at 
123.735 yea, compared with 
123.350 yen Friday. 

The pound tumbled after Prime 
Minister John Major called a general 
election for May 1. Investors are con- 
cerned that an opposition victory 
could harm tbe economy. Sterling fell 
to $15887 from $1.6014 Friday. 

Against other currencies, the dol- 
lar eased to 1.4590 Swiss francs 
from 1.4595 francs and to 5.704 
French francs from 5.7180 francs. 

( Bloomberg . AFP. AFX ) 


NEW YORK — Technology 
stocks slumped Monday although a 
late bout of program trading lifted 
many other shares to modest gains 
in volatile trading. 

Interest-rate concerns weighed 
on the stock market ahead of the 
scheduled meeting next week of the 
Federal Reserve Board’s policy- 
setting Open Market Committee. 

Reflecting a sell-off in the high- 
tech sector, the Nasdaq composite 
index fell 1354 points, to 
1,279.43. 

But the reconstituted Dow Jones 
industrial average, featuring four 
new blue-chip issues, was up 20.02 
points at 6.955.48, as the broad- 
based Standard & Poor’s 500-share 
gauge rose 254 points, to 795.71. 

Bond yields were rising, with the 
return on the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury issue at 6.95 percent, up 
from 6.94 percent Friday and ap- 
proaching tbe 7 percent level that 
many analysts consider high enough 
to encourage investors to switch 
from equities to the credit markets. 

Michael Flament of Wright In- 
vestors Service in Bridgeport, Con- 
necticut, said his company, which 
nms mntiial funds ana advises in- 
stitutional investors, bad bought 
bonds over tbe past year whenever 
the bellwether yield was near 7 per- 
cent. 

“We think at 7 percent there is 
real value in bonds and enough 
value that investors will come back 
into bonds,” he said. 

Foreign and domestic investors 
ought to be sufficiently interested in 
debt securities to put a ceiling of 
about 7 25 percent on yields, he 
said, while a low-inflation envir- 
onment holds out the hope that the 
return could drop to 6 percent later 
this year, providing significant 
gains for people who get into the 
market at die current level. 

Mr.- Flament said Wright was in 
the camp of investors expecting the 
Federal Reserve Board's Open 
Market Committee to raise interest 
rates, perhaps as early as the policy- 
setting panel’s meeting next week. 

At Salomon Brothers Inc., the 
investment strategist David Shul- 
man concurred. “We think the Fed 
is going to tighten,” he said “Our 
view is that the Fed will probably 
tighten on the 25th under the theory 
that credibility is in divisible." 

Mr. Shulman was referring to 
comments by Alan Greenspan, the 
Fed chairman, who questioned 
whether stock prices reflected '‘ir- 


rational exuberance" among in- 
vestor, who, feeling wealthy be- 
cause of their rising equity 
portfolios, might go on a spending 
hinge that would fuel inflation. 

The Fed, Mr. Shulman said « 
obliged to do something to rein in tbe. 

stock market's rise because unlvke- 

ordinary folks, when a centra l 
banker loses credibility in one area. iT - - 
may spread to other areas as welL to - 
the detriment of monetary policy. ^ 9 . 

Mr. Shulman said tbe shakeout m 
technology stocks reflected an evo- 
lution of some of the leading' 

U.S. STOCKS . 


Over 


companies- in tbe sector. Intel fell 
l%to 136%+and Cisco slumped 1 If 
16 to 49V*. 

“These companies have gotten 
to be so big,” he said, “that it is 
hard for them to invest at a sufr 
ficient rate to increase the value or 
their stocks.” 

As mainstream industrial con-* 
cents rather than fast- growing stait- 

r with new markets to conquer^ 
companies must invest in fee-- 
tones and the like to expand “One! 


tiling we know about capital spend-! 
ine.” Mr. Shulman said, “is that* 


mg, Mr. snuunan saia, uwuj 

it’s cyclical.” • 

Intel and Cisco were the two; 
most active Nasdaq issues laie» 
Monday, falling sharply. Oracle,', 
which in recent days nas been re-; 
covering as qualms about growth, 
prospects for the. maker of the data; 
bases subsided rose 3 to 42. Mi- 
crosoft rose to 100V4, even’ 
though it was revealed that its chair-; 
man, Bill Gates, had sold about. 
$200 million of shares. I 

On the New York Stock Ex-; 
change, Micron was the most active! 
issue, falling 1% to 43V£, and IBM ; 
fell 4 l A to 139&. Hewlett-Packard, 
one of the four new Dow stocks,: 
also was lower. 

Berkshire Hathaway; was lower 
after its influential chairman, War-! 
ren Buffet, said most U5. stocks 
were overvalued. He excluded his 
own company, though, and Mc- 
Donald's, in which Berkshire has' 
taken a 45 percent stake. McDon-. 
aid’s was sharply higher. ■ ” 

Tobacco issues such as Philip 
Morris and RJR Nabisco were 
lower after the industry suffered an - 
adverse court ruling in Florida, 
Advanta. a lender, led financial- ; 
services stocks lower, losing about a* 
fifth of its value after it said rising! 
credit-card delinquencies would re-, 
suit in a first-quarter loss. Credit 
problems have been a problem in an 
otherwise favorable environment. - 


[ O yom l' 
picliin- I 
[uropi I 


M i > ' i ' 




AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Monday’s 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 roost adta shores, 
up to ttie ctabig on Won Street 
ThB Associated Pnss. 


sen w i» iiw or* indexes 


Most Actives 


March 17, 1997 


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I OO ions- dot tori per Ian 

Mar 97 37730 27030 27030 -530 2354 

May 97 27680 28730 28770 -780 

Jul97 27230 26430 26C50 -770 23365 

Aug 97 26580 25680 2S30 -4.70 6,137 

Seo97 25180 24430 745.00 -6L30 1742 

0097 22130 22430 22430 —430 <252 

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Mar 97 2660 2436 2640 -0.9B 56880 

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HI GRADE C O TPER (NCMX) 
25890 Bs.- cents ppr Cl 


25890 B*. cents Bpr 8* iTS itdcS A W W 505 *-' s “JO -Q-T5 7.900 

Mar 97 11420 11280 11X40 -1.15 6255 «« m2 ZSmJJom 580,7 ®J0 5675 5675 -035 &1«2 - 

APf 97 nu> 11075 11180 -1AC 3844 ^ -J® 'OOOSB Od97 57 8S 5728 5736 -085 S - 

sar m * *■ s« -"vSMSSlgBHaHuB: 

Seog 10520 10370 1£7Q -085 1US gt-J* Mj 611236 Wi^W^2Ul?'S^im 1 


HJsn um Lnj, 09. 

60047 594.17 59624 -423 


Dow Jones Bond 


11% -ft 
2ft -ft 
74ft -ft 
18ft -ft 
18ft tft 
ttft tft 


20 Bonds 
10 untiles 
10 intfutfriob 


10280 +084 {fiK 

+M* rST 

105.91 +082 MKCp 


*» M* bn sad 

9498 8OT, 78ft, 79®*, tft 

15436 6ft 4ft B 5ft -1ft 

25? 37. M* 37 _** 

7713 23ft 22ft 27ft tft 

6411 vtfe I 4ft +n 

613 10ft 10 10V, -ft 

5628 tft 4ft 4*% -ft 

sn< W I7ft I8ft 

SOW 7V» TV. TV. tft 

«5» lift 12ft 12ft 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) 

S80D bu minimum- cants nv bu6M 
Mar 97 844ft 822 820 -26 1.967 

May 77 853 871ft 825 -24ft 1*726 

Jul97 855ft 825 EE -23ft H.747 

AU0 97 BO 816ft BIB -82 7839 

SOP 97 700 761 761ft -16 4209 

ea-sotes HA. Firvsotes 77AM 
RfsoMninr I922U up 13M 


0097 10225 

Nov 97 10145 

EsLutes HA FrYs. soles *475 
ftfaopenim 58,934 is> 337 


SOLVER (NCMX) 
ixtfmcL- omiwnytt 
MOT 97 52480 S2BJ# 5228# -3.10 
Apr 77 525J0 


613 Ftfsopenint 1500.150 up 1223 
s™ BRUSH POUND (CABU 

4LSD0 Pound*! per pound 
Mcr97 1J970 TJ898 1JR4 
Jun97 18998 \EB23 1EB71 
Sap 97 IJ930 1-5664 1-5866 
Cl S* 97 1-5M2 

Etf. soles NA. RTssaes 15866 


8V» 8ft 
73ft 3ft 
3ft 3ft 
3ft 3ft 
iw ni 
14 im 
5ft 5k 
17% 1 6% 

«ft 91* 
Sft 5% 
6ft 4 
7ft tft 
4 6 

17% 17ft 
1ft 31k 
17ft 16ft 
lit 1V» 
M 

m ah 
5ft s 
3ft JN 
WVi W* 
3 2ft 

,6ft 6ft 

17% in* 

91* 9ft 

2ft n 

IP* 19ft 
3ft 3ft* 
Ift 2ft 
ft Tft 
5ft 4ft 
90ft, 791% 

ljft Ift, 
1ft If* 

ift n% 

lit i« 
3lft 39ft 
<*k ft 
lift Ha* 
tft Mk 

11* in 
lift 17ft 
»» 


* * 
M tft 
M tft 
Ilk 4% 
lift -ft 
,94 -ft. 
lift -ft 

9ft tft 
Oft. tV, 
Pi 

7 4* 


Trading Activity 


Nasdaq 


WHEAT ICBOT} 

S8D0PU mfcftnom- cent* par Ousnai 
Mar 97 383 375 37H -5V, 168 

May 97 391 360ft 381V* -5% 36897 

JU197 380 371V, 377ft -5ft <1717 

Sec 97 379ft 373 373 -6 *108 

Est.stfes NA Fit's. soles 3L490 
FifsoptfiW 77^55 up 1391 


Mery 77 5900 trim 52*50 — , 190 ffl9«n WsOPenW 59.530 ip, 1252 

3rt97 B2-5D 52EJO 53CLDO — 3J0 12,911 CANA MA N ft** 1 1 « p [CMER1 

S«P 97 53680 S3480 53480 -420 3433 j^nodSarCtp^CPrrd^ 

^97 S4L00 5NLS0 5a» -2A0 5.177 jgf!? 1 55ft* 1 %A 

c-m •* Jn97 J370 .7324 J233 

M* W 430 S8P77 -7403 J37B 7378 

Dec 77 J430 J4T5 7418 

Frrsopenrt 93891 w 813 Etf.soiK NA M* «nNK 1/ 


Uft tft 
jv» 4% 
lot -ft 
iv. -ft 
6% -*% 
Bft *% 
i t«% 
31b •*% 


AsmcM 

SSSSed 

Total tssws 
NewHgns 
New Lows 


SI 77 NawHfB« 

55 39 New Lows 


1258 1967 
2S2 1954 
2714 1BZ2 
5744 5744 

69 in 


H8TMUM (NMBt> 

Mnwot- omots per fray oz. 

Apr 97 384J0 36 1 JO 382JO -IJ0 16886 

Moy 97 3BL50 

-M9 7 38*50 3B4J0 38460 — Ml 3847 


Dec 97 7430 JS\S J418 
Etf. safes NA Erl's, sate 1*906 
Frt’sopenW 71851 Off 5349 


usHT sweer crude (nmeri 

lAaotfat- dollars per UN. 

♦,744 Mr 91 7180 2085 2093 ~0Ji QMS 

"-"f Moy 97 21J3 2*85 2QJ86 -032 80JM 

YJc, Ajd 97 27 JO 2083 2084 -0L2S 53.226 ■ 

13 i* 77 *, S-2J S 76 7032 ~ A,S “.TO 

AmbW 2195 2087 2025 — *12 77.295 

SCP 97 2085 2080 2082 -*1B 13AW 

2? m 3DJ3 — 0.15 1*M9 ■ 

1909 97 2088 2*45 2085 — 0.13 12860 " 

Dec 97 XJO 2041 2041 -022 27J4S 

3*066 *»I9» 2-3 »A0 2081 -008 15.337 " 

51805 Feb 98 20.51 2*43 Z0JI —084 8J72 ’ 

*190 ft?" »» a« mo 1 

959 22f s ® tlLO XL*3 2X43 —008 1434 ' 

Etf. total NA Ws. sales 121^99 

RTsopenp* 41*244 or 3444 


GSZMANMARK (CMERJ 
tZSOOO route* 1 per men 
Mar 97 .5933 J919 8925 


Livestock 


Market Sales 


j «» 

6h tft 
17ft tW 

9ft 

2ft ft 
19ft ft 
3V. .ft 
2ft .ft 
M tft 


TaMtsaPK 


306 270 

^ ^ Nositot, 

'2 4 /n mmtns. 


489.46 57*11 

19J2 22.90 

52988 589.90 


Dividends 

Company 


799ft *ft» 
IV. tv* 
Ift* -ft 
Ift ft 
-ft 

Wft ♦% 
*»* 


Jft Ift 11% ft. 

18* lift 12ft ft 

ft, ft v, .y, 
» l«* 19ft ft 

lilt II II ft 

»• V m -3ft 

n, m 7% 4* 

4ft 4% 4ft .ft 

in 31 nt, -ift 

lift l» IM ft 

6ft 4% 6ft ,1* 

Tft Tft 7ft tft 


IM 

IE* 

U 

,1* 

58h 

a 

a 

-ft 

n 

HVi 

31 

•VI 

17 

14% 

left 

-u 

12ft 

lift 

Bft 

»N 

» 

» 

3V* 

-*» 

iV« 

1ft 

IN. 

-ft 

Uft 

IM 

IM 

At 

tft 

V* 

V» 

■v* 

lift 

25ft 

2M 

-ft 

yr. 

Ift 


■ft 

i*» 

IV, 

tv» 


4ft 

■«% 

« 

■ft 

3ft 

M 

Tft 

•ft 

KM 

«ft 

Hf* 

tft 

4% 

4ft 

Mb 

-tb 

17ft 

Mft 

17 

tft 

6ft 

6ft 

611 

•ft 

F% 

ft 

tft 

ft 

4ft 

4ft 

Jft. 

ft 


td in ion 

ns 14 im 

317 W* 35% 

12 Ift Ift 

s r & 

IS A 4ft 

50*4 TV. TV* 
354 3ff* 3b 
70S in 17ft 
an iv, m* 


Amcor Ltd A 
ArteTy Advertising 
Bonoorlnd 
CotamP 
Cfldbuty 
Schweppes 
Gt Ntnn Iron - 180 3-31 *30 

Hondo Victor b.1332 3-28 — 

MafcusN Etec b 812S 3-28 — 

NtoBMohwhad .8175 3-20 3-31 

TEL Offshore _ .1551 3-33 4-10 

Tempto Emre MH . 81 3-31 4-14 

VKtWttS - 8868 3-14 Ml 

VK Enterprise A - 2739 3-14 Ml 

VK Enterprise B C 8663 3-14 Ml 

VKEqlnooA -.1494 3-14 3-31 

yKEq incnB c .136* M4 >31 

37K Grw InajC „ 8311 >14 Ml 

VK Harbor A „ -2049 >14 Ml 

VKInsurTxFrA d 87 47 >14 >31 

d- obopermbto on doss 

Vlt RIESJ 5ec B C 47922 >14 >31 

Zeneca Group B 184 15 Ml 5-13 


Per Amt Rec Poy 
irregular 

b .1404 >25 4-25 
rjg _ J3 3-27 4-17 
b 879 >25 4-11 


Company 


Per Amt Rec Poy 


RodnrnH Irdt 1 tor srevene spilt 
Saratoga Brands 1 shore of Mobil caterers 
for eocfi 5 shares heW. 

Sun Sportswear 1 for Sreverse spot 


CATTLE (CMfiRl 
40000 *».- ewjfl per It. 

Apr 77 0.17 6BJD 69.10 t040 3*440 

Jui>77 65.30 6445 6475 tWff 25^460 

A«fl97 6170 6122 6347 21.170 

Oct 97 4745 6780 6785 -087 15437 

Dec 97 6945 69 JB 69.10 -045 7.239 

Ftp 98 7080 7020 7040 -412 L686 

Etf. soles 12444 Fri's. sates 9,93# 
FrTsopenitf 108,940 up 104 

FEEDER CATTLE (OAERl 

»4J00fc*.-cenr«perta. 

Mar 97 68. Kl 0-70 6800 tU22 2824 

Apr 97 6745 6*10 085 *087 *019 

May 97 6892 6820 6860 +045 587B 

Aug 97 7240 7180 7X2 +042 5885 

Sep 97 7220 7215 7225 +812 18BS 

Oct 77 7385 7110 7133 t(US %\* 

E tf.sdes UVL Ri's.'satas 2856 
FrfsopenW run up is 


-M97 38*50 38*50 38*40 -140 34*7 Vn*7 JM8 » h im 

0897 38UB »6» ML* -830 2.W Sw 8001 ^5 55S 

>390-50 Ii 137 pec 97 JOiA 

Ws S ^.W A MST‘'S ta t7* MSt ER-SOles NA. Frl-s. sales &J95 

Frrsopenint 7*801 off 176 Fri’sopenint 115.986 off 3808 


Oose 

LONDON METALS ILME} 
Dollars per metric ton 


JAPANESE YEN (CMBQ 
125 mWton yen. s par lap v«n 
Mo-97 4104 8076 8093 


Aforofrarramfob Grade) son 

Spot 1637V, 1638% 163200 163100 ^ 

Forwent 167200 167X00 1664,00 166540 

Comm Catt*o6e& (mob Grade m 

Sped 240000 240200 3411JI0 2413410 WSOpeneit 92,226 off 740 


NATURAL CAS (NMER) 

1 0400 mm s oer mn btu 

48465 Mr 91 2X00 1.900 1.92S 

654163 MOTH 2050 1J50 1.960 

24M 2460 1880 1.995 

» H 55 ’■« 2000 

Auo97 2JMQ ?ryi5 inie 

5«P 97 2060 2X00 2025 

OCl 97 2.075 2810 2XK 

Nw97 2190 2145 2)«5 

Dee 97 2J00 2240 2245 

38388 Jon 98 2330 jj*) a.MW 

40880 Fee 98 22® 22T0 2JT0 

777 &*■“*» .JfA FlVS-SOWS 17J£T 

Fri's open irt IB2330 uo 42m 


Forward 2353X0 2354X0 2355X0 2356X0 SWISS FRANC (OVER) 

SpaT 708X0 709X0 «94«A 695V* M^‘ T ’^ 4, 3£^.*a7? 

70*00 705X0 69000 690ft X9S ATO 

HKXm — 56P97 J01! 4981 4996 


UM-EADB76A50LME (NMETO 
■Q-O 0QM. CMSDQT nol 


Spot 791CLO0 7m. 00 8005-00 8015JI0 SLtmi Frts. n.l» 
Forward 0030X0 8035.00 3110X0 URN W 


^ *540 0.90 6*20 =?« •. 

1.9M AH 97 6*35 6100 6340 -an 7 « ■ 

Am 97 i,u Mn rif r.SW 


MOV 6245 «S Si ; 

Sep97_ 6140 6030 6080 , 


Spot 6035X0 6045X0 6045X0 605*00 34HONTH STERLING CLIFFBJ 
ftrword 6X60X0 6065X0 6055X0 6060X0 £S0WO6-pfe tflBOPO 
Opc CSpecUd H 10b erode) M«97 9175 rui 93J4 


b $44 Ml 6-2 


INCREASED 

Fsl Syqs Bncp Inc Q JO >31 4-18 

PMC Capital 0 JQ5 >31 4-14 

nranburgAlBo Q 4S >31 4-10 

UNUM Corp J85 -28 5-16 


Col Realty 
Rdei Puritan 
FWd US Eq Index 
Kenan Transport 
LTC Properties 
NfepMonwkadlpf 
Old Second Bng> 
Temple Emre Mk 
Vanttora Oaistfc 
VKEqlncoB 
VK Harbor B, 
WelltfordRes 
Vine Concho 
US Wst Comnun 
US west Inc 


TOO at a tjft 

he OT 3ft » 

UM ?v. Jft iv. 

149 7 6*% 6ft 

IN Ml Tft Tft 

573 17ft 17 17 

IM ,6ft Ok 6ft 

128 kl 13ft 13ft 

W fl> S*i 5XW 


III 9 A 5X% 

773 IB « W, 

444 Mrt 25b 2$ft 

M Wi 41* <n 

IN Uft lift II 

JU Jh S 5ft 

ID Ift Ift 1ft 


nt & 

£ f 

NM 24 
4ftl 4*b 
5ft SH 
6ft tft 
* ft 
4V* 4ft 
3 «* W* 
lift lift 
lift HI* 
*ft Wn 
I1« lift 
m 36w 
V 3CH 
> ft. 
3v* iq% 
1 w* 
m i» 
in* in 
in um 
n* m 

6ft 6ft 

nr* m 

61* 5% 

KM i«* 
i«* u« 
15ft TSH 


ft -ft 
TV, .ft 

Mft tl* 
(» -ft 


Beverly Bncp 


STOCK 

- 5°t 4-1 4-14 


REGULAR 

Q AS 4-3 4-18 
Q -16 >14 >17 
m Q .12 >14 >17 
Q.90675 >31 4-15 
Q X4 >31 >15 

pf _ 406 >2J >31 
O ^0 >21 4-1 

Q J1 >31 4-14 

Q.5168 >14 Ml 
C .1364 >14 >3t 
0 .1748 >14 Ml 
Q <485 3-25 4-11 
b .1209 >21 4-10 
0 -535 4-10 >1 

0 J6 4-tO >t 


mogs-lko ;cmer> 

40800 IbL- amt per er. 

Apr 97 78X5 7010 7042 t*32 

Jun97 TWO 77.1 D 77J7 t057 

JUI97 7*55 75X5 7*17 +05# 

Aua 97 72X2 7200 7205 -Old 

Oder 6680 46.05 6*15 -0X5 

Dec 97 6485 64X0 6*20 tO07 

Etf. safes iMX Ws.saes 7413 
Fri'sopenint 31881 off Itf 


Ztoc (Special H 10b erode) 4W97 

spa 1275V, 1276ft 1240ft 1261ft 
Forward 1296X0 1297X0 1281X0 1282X0 52 E 


PrPswenrt fUlS up 2M3 


1296X0 1297X0 1281X0 1282X0 

lull I n. rim rv« IU-. Mta9S 


High Um dose Chge Opint 5un» 
- -- - !7mt*0 

Financial Drew 


pork aaues (CMERl 

40X08 tek- camper lb. 

Me 97 7*25 7*50 7550 *0.10 

Mo? 97 7745 7*95 77X9 +1X2 

Jul 97 77X0 7570 77X0 +1X0 

97 74X5 73 30 714# *080 

Feb 96 72XB 7200 7200 *1X5 

Mar 98 71 JO 

Etf. stfes 2X77 Fri's. sots 1AC 
Fri's OOBiW 7X18 off 113 


US T.BttXS (CMER) 1MV9 ns* 

ft mUkn- pn at T80 pel. S*p99 9280 9IA2 9243 —OX 

Mar 97 WAS PUS M84 -0X1 2387 Dec 99 9240 92X7 9237 -at 

An 97 9*73 9*69 M89 —004 *874 Ext sates: 102870 Piev.iDtap XU99 

S6097 9*49 9*47 NA -XJH 2311 Pnn.apMM* 53*278 off 1,191 

Dec 97 9*48 847 

Etf. sales NA. FWs. rates 1J8S 3-WWNTH EUHOMARK (UW=E) 

FtTsepenini 9,592 off 26 DMimBon- entf toOocl 


9x73 9174 — (UJ7 8(1221 GASOlLffPPi 

^3 ^ W^WnteWctai-lahaioOtens - 

9109 93.10 — 0X9 70588 1T3-2S 170X0 17075 +1 *5 t^La ' 

AtaW 9293 US WZ 

w 25 ss ^=ss H iS Pi 

Etf - Bites: lOWO. Prev. softs: 0299 Dec97 181X5 18UJ0 1B0X0 —0X5 ' 

1^.000111^ 53*2711 Off 1.191 EM. rate 127Q 0. Open InL; *2304 uJT /, 

3-MPNTH EUROMARK UJFFE) * 5 ' . , ~ ' — 

DMimBan- eMtf loopd Stock Indexes 


DM1 mBon-eKotlOOpd OlOCkUldei 

Mor97 9*74 9*73 9*73 —0X1 157,135 S&PCOMP Uirrav min, 

torn 9*74 9*73 9*72 — 003 7M XQrJnsZ' {CMERJ 

96.7* 9*71 9*71-6X4 2M Ute f H *1 an ra. — ^ 


l£H M 

24* * h 
4ft, I 
5ft 

tf* -ft 
ft ,ti 
xft 

Sta - 
1»* * Ift 


REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 
Am Dental 1 for irevorae sdtl. 


o -o m b oL P-nppratfmnte amount per 
skanVADRr 9-payable ft* CaBBOOB fupds 
■H nu M i, rKiwflertg Htek—J 


tn it* 
ION 


MU M IA ft 

M Ift 15V. ft 

llh 1U% lift ,«< 

m im n 

Ift Ift lift -Hi 

'5ft lift Uft -ft 

% 4% V. 4% 


Stack Tables Explained 

Sdefigvses no uncfllddYeaiytfshswK} lows reOedffte previous 52 weeks plus the currant 
%ert.lArti»JffiekitetfliBrnngifoy.WhereaspaforBfod<tandortdomountfoBio25pcgcantorwwro 
VBsbets\FM.1tK won KgMaa range and tMdend ora tfwiMiforlhennitfodaorty.Untass 
BhBiiase noted, rates of Attends an annual (nsturmieas based n (tie best dedanflen. 

W- ««M0* raw ol UMOmO plus stock (JMdewl. c * fiquioottrw 
mvfcfend. ee- PE eweeds 99xU - cuffed, d - new nwrt/ low. dd * loss hi foe tasf i J months 
*- dectared w pan kt preceding 12 morths. I . onmnl rote. htawsMooksl 
OeaomKjn, g - dMtJmd Ia Conodfofl funda sublectlo 15% norwasldeoce fox i- dividend 
deaorad offer spfft-ai<irstockOIvidMd.|-dM(lena{nidthis year; omitted, deforce (Lor no 
odiiin taken at (atesr dlufdend fheetlng. k - dividend declared of paid this year, an 
aecumukrflve issue wffh dividends in arrears, a -annuai rate, reduced on last declaration. 
“ ‘ »«* toie m ine past 52 week* The WgfHow range begins wffli the stral of trading. 
M* next day deffmy. p- Wfial dMdend, annual rale unknown. P/E - pfte-eamlngs raflo. 
d-ctasettend muhral fond, r- dividend declared or paid in preceding 1 2 months, plus stock 
dividen d, s . stack split. Dividend begins wilt* date of spfit. sfs - sales, t- dividend paid in 

stock In premling 12 month* estimated cosh wlue on eR-dMdend or ex-distrf&uilan dale, 
u -newyeaity high, v- trading hatted, vf-bi banliiiipicy or receivership orbeing reaiganlzed 
undent* Bar*reptcyA*xasec«rtoe9BSMmiedb9MicSieDr»ipoi*es.*d-«tien distributed, 
wi - when lssuedr wtr - vrtiti warrants, x - ex-rtivldand or ex-rights, atis - ex-tRstribudon. 
«w - wtthowi watrart*. t- flifr^Atenfl and sales hi foH. yifl - ytebL i - soles In tuU. 


Food 

cocoa ewese 

« metric lom- S per ton 


>4E 

I«3 

t43 

3X69 

1444 

1505 

+41 

70X9} 

1468 

1525 

• A 

11,545 

149S 

1548 

+56 

*324 


1531 


1T.71J 


Mar 98 1533 

Etf. odes 11X68 PH's, softs 1IJ31 
FrKjooenlnr 9*411 up 1205 


SYR. TREASURY ICBOT) 9*7< 9*7T -0.tD 7^66 J00 * Inttu * 

,10*006 trtrv-pt* * AfthsGt KCDO Cj J*** 9^72 9*11 — *64 zt*« Marti 79,90 „ 

Ruvtir,- a M BS S S=96S w 

" B EMM ::il m ZZZZZT “ * 

SlQDXaOMn-BbS.XMsaiWpd jS» Sid KXO -0 1 

Mcr 97107-14 107-06 107-07 -07 4*973 5^99 9*93 9*ffl WJ?-n 3 

Jun77 184-28 106-13 106-18 -08 275,101 Dec* 9*70 94A3 «*M -* 3 77^ Xmn - 3«X 39X63 

»97I^« low 105X3^-07 *479 EAsalw 207J75. nnaatalU **97 «St iSSS ^25 *«« •' 

A75 TREASURY BOMMCCBOTl F^mUuSl^'lSaiSolS 0 CAC40 (MATlF) 

18 Pt*i®4»-ots*_3Sn« 01106 PCI) la .Am <k7«. PP200 Der irwfioT 


E$L sates 207*575. Pm. sate 12&333 4^5 

PtaV-ta*,^ uoftfl, rtf ilrr 3 

>MONTM PirOb (U4T,n 


BB k ill Ei! J £I B g ‘ 

BSsjwsw- i,n HI Wi 

»-«. »< SI || M KTBiiffi 5 SR KJSBfcJS ? 3 S : 
SS Tt! ”S^ i^ztS nuJ l II II mi 
sassatBartFAS" — 7 : 

BEBMAN BOVSRNMEITT BUND (UFPE| CommOCjtty IntieXQS 


FF5rnUUofi - ptSoflMpa CMATlF) 

ee as as as--K 2 Hss s%ss"^s 


COFFEE CCNC5E) 

Sdoa c.- arts ocr b. 

Mar 97 20SJC 196J0 197.65 —7^ 438 

MCV97 185.90 16765 18&65 -17J0 31^ 

JUl 97 171X0 15*25 1S*9S -4SJ0 6X9J 

Sep 97 18025 145.90 14190 -14A0 4.950 

Etf. sales 184S2 Fr?s. safes 12.13# 

Fri's open int 39X65 up 2X 


Dec 97 107-31 

Etf. sates NA Fri's. saes 362418 
Fri'sopenint 517X47 off 1066 
UMGULTCUFFE) 


SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NC5EI 

1 11.000*14.- wnBBpr e. __ 

Moy97 lfl.fi IOlO 1#93 *0X7 47.09 

Jut 97 1289 HUB 120 *0.84 35X46 

Oct 97 1260 1255 1248 *0X< 25,125 

NW 98 1241 1257 1280 +2JN 12J» 

Etf. safes 9.798 FVi'i-SdB 12567 
FfTsopetiW 1,144X39 up 1000028 


£S0«n - tts * Bn* tf 100 pet 

MB 97 111-27 11234 11228 — 


BEKMAN BOVBRNMEirTBURP OJFffiJ 

10241 -1X3 33X980 nfuSta- u ^rtitow n,B> 


Commodity Indexes 


Sep97 N.T. N.T. «J 4 - 1X2 
Etf. safes 217X92- PRv.nMtf 189,938 
PTKapaeW-- 23*636 off 1455 


iiLiram-phaiOODa MnMw. 

Many nta nsf 9134 — on* 

sSw Sw Sw SSrtll’iSg 






EUROPE 


Renault Chief Agrees 
To Meet With Union 
Over Belgian Closure 


k 


A 


t 


C^npMbyChrSuffhromDvjwen. 

■ PARIS — The chairman of 
Renault. Louis Schweitzer, has 
?£ re cd to meet with Belgian unions 
on Wednesday to discuss the French 
automaker's plan to close its factory 
in Vilvoorde, Belgium. 

Rare! Gacoms, a union spokes- 
man. said Mr. Schweitzer was will- 
ing to discuss ways to keep the plant 
Ppen. 

‘For us that was a condition to 
start talks,” Mr. Gacoms said. 

But a Renault spokeswoman said 
Monday that the company's de- 
cision to close the Belgian plant was 
final. 

The decision was “irrevocable,” 
she said, adding. “The closure will 
take place before the end of July.” 

She declined to comment on Mr. 
Gracoms’s comment about the 
meeting. But she reiterated that Mr. 


Toyota Denies 
Picking Site for 
Europe Plant 

Reuters 

BRUSSELS — Toyota 
Europe said Monday that it was 
considering feasibility studies 
for a third European plant but 
had yet to make any decision 
about such a facility. 

“We are still completely 
open to any idea for the third 
model plant in Europe.” Bri- 
gitte Delvenne. a spokeswoman 
for the unit of Toyota Motor 
Corp., said. But she said any 
decision would come only “in a 
few months' time.*’ 

She described as ‘'pure spec- 
ulation” a report that the auto- 
maker was considering build- 
ing a plant in Lens. France. 

Toyota is considering several 
sites, Ms. Delvenne said, but she 
refused to name them. 

Toyota’s two current Euro- 
pean production sites, one of 
which will not start operations 
until next year, are in Britain. 


Schweitzer has said for the past 15 
days that he was willing to meet 
representatives of the plant's 3,100 
workers to discuss measures accom- 
panying the closure. 

Renault announced Feb. 27 that it 
would close the Vilvoorde plant, in 
the suburbs of Brussels, as part of a 
reorganization of its European car 
assembly operations. 

The French automaker said at the 
same time that it expected a sig- 
nificant loss for 1996, including a 
2.4 billion franc ($415 million) 
charge for the plant closure. 

Prime Minister Jean-Luc De- 
haene of Belgium said Thursday 
that his government was consider- 
ing measures that involved reducing 
payroll taxes for companies that 
were undergoing restructuring and 
reducing weekly hours worked. 

Mr. Dehaene said be had asked 
Mr. Schweitzer to re -evaluate the 
decision in light of the proposals. 

A union spokesman said Monday 
that the meeting with Mr. 
Schweitzer would be in ‘'neutral 
territory, somewhere between Paris 
and Vilvoorde." 

The end of a government car- 
purchase incentive program in 
September has caused demand for 
French cars to plunge. 

Union representatives at PSA 
Peugeot-Citroen said that company 
was making plans to shed 2.700 jobs 
in France. {Reuters. AFP ) 

■ Business Picking; Up 

Most French companies report 
that business activity is picking up, a 
Bank of France survey showed 
Monday, further anecdotal evidence 
that a gradual economic recovery is 
under way. according to a 
Bloomberg News dispatch. 

The central bank's survey of 
6,000 companies showed all indus- 
tries reporting higher output in Feb- 
ruary’ and a “slight” increase in 
their usage of machinery or fac- 
tories. 

“Overall demand grew at a mod- 
erate pace,” the central bank said in 
a commentary accompanying the 
survey, with foreign demand 
bolstered by the franc's weakness 
against the dollar and the pound. 
Domestically, demand grew at a 
“much more moderate pace." 


Russia Shows Signs of Growth 

World Bank Sees More Gains if Reforms Are Approved 


Ctmpttni hy t >ur SuffFru n OufUfcftd 

MOSCOW — Russia's economy expanded for a 
second consecutive month in February, and the 
World Bank predicted Monday it would grow by as 
much as 6 percent a year starting in 1998 if reforms 
were enacted. 

The State Committee for Statistics said gross do- 
mestic product rose 0.9 percent last month, compared 
with a year earlier. 

In January. GDP rose 0.1 percent from a year 
earlier. That was the first month the economy had 
expanded si nee market -reform efforts began in 1991. 
according to Roland Nash, chief economist at Renais- 
sance Capita] Group. 

The state committee also said industrial production 
grew 2 percent in February from a year earlier. 
Industrial production in January rose 0.3 percent 
from a year earlier, its first gain since April 1996. 

The World Bank forecast that Russia’s gross do- 
mestic product would be unchanged this year because 
many Russian companies had yeL to begin their 
restructuring efforts. 

“Inflation has fallen in a big way, and that is a 
major success for the government as it lays the 
groundwork for economic recovery,” Michael Carter, 
director of the World Bank's Moscow office, said. 

“But at the same time.” he said, “you also have lo 
overhaul the taxation system and make far-reaching 
reforms to capital markets, pensions, housing, reg- 


ulation of natural monopolies and privatization, if Rus- 
sia is to see its potential for rapid growth come true.” 

For reform to continue, the government needs to 
tackle tax reform, reduce real, or inflation-adjusted, 
interest rates, increase property rights and protect the 
poor, the World Bank said. 

“It looks like a daunting list of things for the 
Russians to do,” Mr. Carter said. “But if Russia 
manages to sustain reforms, there is no reason why it 
could not be one of the world's booming economies 
at the beginning of the next century.” 

The World Bank has been helping the government 
meet its reform goals with a total of $6.4 billion in loans 
since August 1992, making Russia the World Bank’s 
biggest borrower after China and India. 

Meanwhile. Finance Minister Alexander Livshits 
said an agreement with the International Monetary 
Fund on a 1997 Russian economic plan would be 
ready to be signed in about two weeks. 

Mr. Livshits also said tax collection In March had 
improved slightly compared with last month and that 
tax revenue had risen sharply, thanks to the suc- 
cessful launch last week of Russia's 2 billion 
Deutsche mark ($1.2 billion) Eurobond. 

Separately, the Tass news agency, citing Finance 
Ministry sources, said Mr. Livshits would lose the 
finance minister's post to the first deputy prime min- 
ister, Anatoli Chubais, who would do both jobs in the 
cabinet now being formed. (Bloomberg. Reuters) 


BBC Reaches U.K. Pay-TV Accord 


Bloomberg News 

LONDON — British Broadcast- 
ing Corp.'s links with companies 
affiliated with the U.S. cable-TV 
empire built by John Malone grew 
Monday as the BBC agreed to a 30- 
year venture to develop pay -TV 
channels with Flextech PLC. 

FI extech, a British programmer 
that is 50.9-percent controlled by 
Tele-Communications International 
Inc., said it had signed a 30-year 


agreement that for the first time 
opened BBC's Television program li- 
brary for commercial use in Britain. 

Flextech shares closed down 2! 
pence at 751 ($12.02). The stock 
reached a peak of S02.5 just after its 
announcement this winter of plans 
for a joint venture with the BBC. 

The agreement calls for channels 
to draw on the BBC library for dis- 
tribution via cable, satellite and over- 
the-air pay-TV networks. 


The BBC agreed on a parallel plan 
in September with Discovery Com- 
munications Inc. to sell programs in 
the United States and international 
markets. Discovery is an affiliate of 
Tele-Communications Inc., which 
owns 83 percent of Tele-Commu- 
nications International. 

Mr. Malone, who is chairman of 
both Tele-Communications compa- 
nies, sold his stake in Tele-Com- 
munications International last year: 


Den Danske Buys 77% of Swedish Bank 


Bloomberg News 

COPENHAGEN — Den Danske Bank A/S, the 
largest bank in Denmark, said Monday that it had bought 
77.2 percent of Ostgota Enskilda Bank and had bid to 
acquire the remaining shares of the Swedish rival. 

Ostgota Enskilda shares nearly doubled, closing up 
23.60 kronor at 50 JO (S6.49), the price Den Danske 
paid for the stake and bid for the remaining shares. Den 
Danske shares fell 9 kroner to 601 (S92.38). 

The billion-krona purchase, if completed, would 


be the third banking takeover in Scandinavia in three 
months as the industry continues to consolidate. 

The Danish bank would become the third-Iargest 
bank in the region, in terms of assets. It is No. 4 now. 

“It's quite a fragmented industry despite the recent 
mergers.” said Sascha Serafiraovski, European bank- 
ing analyst at Deutsche Morgan Grenfell, “and there's 
room for more consolidation. Den Danske Bank was 
looking for a springboard, and it's not a surprise. But the 
price is pretty high at about 2.5 times book value.” 



Franklwt - 
DAX 

London '• ' l ■ :: 

. , .• frse ■; 




3400 — 

- -A- . 4500 • - - 

2700 A 

JH ? j™ 



j*i S50 ji ■ 

WWl a 


...V OtaW / 


r KT d^Tf in' 3930 o ' n'oTf'1; eT"J Tm- 

1396 1397 1996 1997 - 1996 1997 > 

Exchange 

Amsterdam 

•Index 

AEX .. 

• Moratfijk-.V ■ Ptev- %' 

n cans® .- cawe - enunge. 

Bruswi* 

BEL-20, • • 


Frmikfurt 

DAX ■ 

: -3^B9tj20- ' -^2S 

Copenhagen 

9rock>MwJqrt 

■ ; : ::.$*&&■, ..^4X32 

Helsinki 

. HBS =Seriwat 


■Oslo , 

”OSX V ■ • ; ; 


London . 

FTSEIOO < ! 


Madrid • : . 

Stock Exchange 


Mbn.. ■■/■ 

HfiBTEt, 

• s . )tt» 

Pi fte'. - 

CAD40'‘‘ 

.- ssseaas v 

Stockholm 

SX.16<- ■'* J - ' 


Vienna 

ATX 


Zurk* 

.spi • 


Source: Talekurs 


Inwnwiaoaal Herald Tribune 


Very briefly: 


• Deutz AG shares jumped 23 percent after the engine maker 
said it swung to a 1996 net profit of more than 800 million 
Deutsche marks ($471 million) amid cost-cutting and after a 
bank bailout of 1.06 billion DM. Shares closed at 16.60 DM, 
up 3.10. The stock has risen about 47 percent in 10 days amid 
expectations the company would post an operating profit 

• Tulip Computers NV, a Dutch computer maker, reported a 
net loss of 9.95 million guilders ($5.24 million) for 1996, 
blaming a fall in the price of chips and microprocessors. 

• Lonrho PLC shares fell as the company said pretax profit 
could fall as much as one-third in its first half because of the 
strength of the pound and low precious metal prices. The stock 
closed 12.5 pence lower at 145. 

• Anglo American Industrial Corp.'s 1996 earnings fell, 
dragged down by decline in its steel and paper units. Net 
income excluding special items fell to 1.02 billion rand 
($230.5 million) from 1.04 billion rand in 1995. Earnings after 
special items fell to 1.03 billion rand. 

• Bulgaria and International Monetary Fund officials agreed 
on conditions for $700 million in loans. The deal includes a 
pledge by Bulgaria to establish a currency board by the end of 
June, a system that ties the domestic exchange rate to the level 
of foreign currency reserves held by the central bank. 

• Turkiye Tupras Petrol Rafinerileri AS, the state-con- 
trolled petroleum refinery, said its loss widened to 18.972 
trillion Turkish lira ($152 million) in 1996. In 1995. the loss 
was 4.997 trillion lira. 

• T-Online. the on-line service of Germany's Deutsche 
Telekom AG, said it would begin cooperating with Swiss 
Online to market its products ana software. 

• Nokia Oy of Finland signed a letter of intent with Siemens 

AG, the German electronics company, to develop a new chip 
for use in digital televisions. Bloomberg 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


High Low Close Pm. 


Monday, March 17 

- Prices bf (ocol currencies. 

Teletarts 

High Low Cto** Pro*. 


High Low Ouse Pm. 


High Low Oase Pm. 

50S 


609 


High Low Close Pm. 


H&t Low dose Pm. 


Amsterdam 


AEXMCC 75140 
Pmfws; 73606 


ABN- AMRO 
Aegon 
Afraid 
Ato Hotel 

SocnCa 
Beta Wess ora 
CSMcvc 
OonasdwPei 
OSAn 
tisewer 
FortlS Afiw* 
Gehcnks * 
G-6recc*o 

Heteteo 

Hcogcwnscro 

Horn Dougins 

I NG Group 

KLM 

KNPBT 

KPN 

NerfBcydGp 

NuJrido 

OceGrtnten 

PMBpsEfce 

Poiygimr 

^nuimVirf 1 t|4n * 

rnncsjuu nog 
Rabeco 
Rodomra 
goSrea 

SorpiJu 
Royal Curb 
UmJwercw 
vendee Mil 
VWJ 

Warns Klcra 


137J90 13140 
14130 138 

Ml 135 
27450 267 

57.90 B5l59 
3700 36.10 
110 107 

363 35620 
191.50 157X0 
32 3000 
TBjHJ 75-50 
62 6X60 
65.W 62.40 
16350 159 JO 
33750 32450 
8950 B6J0 
163 160 

7560 76 

59 56-50 
4420 4120 
72-80 7X70 
SLS0 5620 
309.70 300 

250-90 245-60 
85,70 5440 
92 S9.S) 
147 JO 1444)0 
162.10 161.10 
61X1 6CLB0 
16630 lt&BO 
109.40 106-60 
339 JO 33X30 
362.10 355-60 
89 JO 87-60 
*170 4160 
253.90 244.10 


133-20 136JBO 
13800 14030 

136.90 139.90 

26750 275 

8600 86.90 
36-50 37 

108 mao 

357 JO 359 JO 

188.50 IB87D 
3130 31 JO 
7570 77 JO 

62 61 

62.40 6140 
160.10 162-?.; 
326 JO 336 

87.10 8800 

161.50 162 

76.10 78-30 
56.96 53.90 
43-50 4420 

71 71 

57 JO 5X80 
303 210.10 
246 249 JO 
85 85.90 

91.90 9080 
145 JO 146 
161.10 162-40 

60.90 60.90 
166 JO 166-70 
10aJ0 109.90 
335.90 336-20 
357 JO 363-50 

Bfl-50 89 JO 

45.90 41.20 
247.60 251*0 


Bangkok 

Art icrfo Sxc 
Bangkok BhF 
KnmaTim Bk 
PTT Ersta 
StonCemenfF 
Saar Com Bk F 
Teteoxnasc 
Thai Airways 
Thai Fann BKF 
•JUConm 


236 

246 

3X25 

320 

668 

142 

39 

41 

170 

158 


326 

226 

242 

244 

345J 

3475 

312 

312 

c£i 

664 

139 

139 

37.75 

3625 

40 

40 

165 

167 

152 

152 


Bombay 

BOjOl AHtS 

HdunntLmr 

HtodustPetlm 

indDnBfc 

ITC 

'AotKHogor Tel 
ftefianeemd 
Stare Bh India 
Start Aottortty 
Tan Eng Loco 


Brussels 


dlmanlj 

Scjcotoa 

BBL 

CBR ■ 

Cohort 

Demos Lion 

Eiecnabel 

EJectmfmo 

Portia AG 

Gnroerr 

GBL 

Gen Basque 
Kiedtabank 
Peuufino 

aquatfff 

RayateMge 
SoeGenEWg 
Sower 
T octet*! 
UCB 


^ ’S§ ’SS '£1 

R*H) 8300 8310 8320 

Soo 3330 3345 3410 

14850 14525 14675 1482§ 
BBC 2010 2JgO 2055 
BOX! 7943 7970 POO 

3340 tWS 3270 325® 

6388 6230 6250 

2SJ* 2515 2540 2545 

cnOA 5OG0 5030 5100 

I3M0 134$ 13450 13450 
13300 12850 12950 13200 

lam lug mg 

€5 ™ & 

21700 2?373 2U25 21650 

S 


Copenhagen 


BE Bank 

CattfeeigB 

CodcnFore 

Danises 

Sen Danske BA 

D.^SwmtorgB 

□■5 1912 B 

FLSIodB 

<ob LaWavne 

MvaNordisk 3 

Secftus Be* 9 

TeteDanmiB 

Tiy gBdto 

‘Jmitjmtcrfc A 


301-37 

406 

925.93 

398 

615 

mubo 

710 

698 

026 

359 

366 

365 


Frankfurt 


5todll«iec 549-50 
iww; 547.76 

J96 297 297 

401.40 <03-50 

915 915 915 

393 395 394 

£01 601 610 

2&3000 285000 2B5OT0 

aao 840 Bfo 

iso 710 700 

en 6W 

812 IJ5 811 

335 156 359 

355 363 361 

359 359 362 


PiwtautaaW-M 

■ 120 1150 US 

JJ2 162.75 *87 

B50 3350 
1370 l 384 ifS 
33 3120 3110 
iis 6135 6170 
£j| SW S1J5 
xha 62.10 43 

US, HOT 72.20 
p.cg B9J5 
7.60 OT&S .£S 

V *8 j! 

£70 JSJS 

9 JO 12970 12975 
712 712 713 


Deutsche Bar* . 9270 
Dent Telekom 3675 
DtesdnerBanK- 5680 
Fiesenhia 361 Jo 

FrerwuhisMed 162 
FltaLKmpir 272 

Goto 

HefceftgZmt 
Henkel phi 
HEW 
HacMef 
Haechst 
KOTtaat 
Uncle 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

MamesmaR] 
MetaBgese*sctinft3675 
Mein 16220 

MundiRuedcR 4250 

Preussog 435 

Rheineleklra 1260 

RWE 7bM 

SAP pM 279 JO 

Schertnq 1*4.® 

SGL Carbon 228J0 

Stanens 86-50 

5pr!mjer (Altai 1235 

SoKteucker 840 

Thvssen 347 JO 

vena 97.10 

VEW 503 

7#9 
914 


120 

148 

9170 

481 

7350 

70 

600 

1143 

24.15 

479 

631 


VSU gon 


91 JO .9220 
3640 36J0 
5640 5640 
357 357 

161 161 
270 272 

118-50 120 

1457# 1457# 
9070 9080 
481 <U» 

72 73 

69J5 69 JO 
597 599 

1120 1127 
50J5 23-95 
475 475.50 
*21 JO 622 
36J5 36J0 

161.10 16150 

4180 4180 

•GO 430 
1246 1260 

76.10 76JD 
277 779 JO 

16370 16370 
227 227 

85J35 86.18 
1235 800 

B30 830 

345.7# 346J0 
96J0 9645 
501 m 

760 760 

900 901 JO 


91 JO 
3690 
56 
350 
16810 
275 
11650 
149 
9X50 
800 
71 JO 
6970 
608 
1146 
24J5 
477 
<33 
36J0 
161 
4199 
431 JO 
1255 
75J95 
775.50 
163 
228 
8675 
800 
830 
354 
9615 
502 
752 
907 JO 


SA Breweries 

139 JD 

136 136J5 13eL7S 

Yen±xieLx;.-ts 

SJ3 

575 

325 

Saihonccr 

56 

55L50 

55.75 

55.75 

vcdrSne 

191 

207 

2M 

Scsol 

53 

5075 

50. .'i 

£0.^ 

e.i: 

l 

B 

5 BIC 

16625 

IS5J5 

>06 

136 

M.0SR**1S» 

355 

128 

Ui 

Tiger Cats 

' J 80 

75 

■ » 

75 

V.'CcHSey 

WPP Srem 

509 

4.9s 

502 






276 

2J7 

270 






Zeoe=j 

1628 

13 

17.95 


Kuala Lumpur comwieiatM 

' Pmoaos: 124247 


AMMBHCgs 

Geahig 

Mat Banking 

MallnflShJpF 

PehonasGas 

Prawn 

PubficBk 

Renong 

Resar* world 
Rothmans PM 
Skne Darhy 
Telekom MaJ 
Tenon 
Utd Engineer 

m 


2180 
17J0 
29 JO 
640 
9.1 D 
1610 
540 
446 
1140 
24.90 
9J5 
1940 
1130 
22-50 
1170 


2140 
17.10 
2850 
615 
9 
16 
5-20 
430 
IT JO 
217# 
9.15 
19J0 
12 
2220 
1159 


2180 2343 
17 JD 17.10 
39 29 

615 633 

9.10 9-05 

16 16 
5-25 5.15 

430 442 

UJD 1140 
2440 2X60 
9.15 9J5 

19 JO 19 JO 
1210 1230 
2240 2240 
1160 1170 


London 


FT-SE 100: <37130 
Pmkms: 442630 


S£T index: 68492 
PmtoostMJi 


_ 39 

40 4850 


Helsinki 

Eli so A 

Huhmnuridl 

Kemlra 

Kesko 

MenmA 

Metro B 

Metso-SertaB 

Nesle 

Nokin A 

Orton- YMyraae 

OutokvmpoA 

UPMKvremene 

Volmd 


HEX Gooenrt lodeE 2942J3 
Pnetam: 295806 


415# 
255 
55 
74J0 
18J0 
300 
41 
140 
320 
184 
. 95-50 
11170 
90 


4420 

249 

5150 

73 

1610 

298 

39 

13250 

315-50 

183 

9340 

11140 

8850 


44J0 44 

249 255 

53.50 54J0 
73 74 

182# 1840 
298 296.50 
39 485# 
13250 134 

31640 31850 
18X50 18220 
9160 94 

H340 no 
0850 89 


Hong Kong 


““SSSSEK 

'"Kt'S'gSS'SiS 

392 38638 38875 388 

yijSD 9X25 9175 92 

436 -09.75 43275 43025 
287 JO 282 284.75 2B3J0 
■m 300-50 287 JO 279 
33L75 31050 338-25 305 

21J5 21 21-25 21^ 

39450 38850 39250 387 JO 


Bk I 
Cattray Pac»c 
Cheung Kong 
CKInfnshuo 
China Ugw 


Bk 


Otic Pacific 

Don HenoR 
HrstPaoBc 
Hang Lung Dev 
Hong Seng Bk 
HenoetsMi Imr 
Henderson Ld 
HK anno Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Tetawnai 

Honewefl Hdgs 

HSBCHdgs 
Hutchison Wh 
Hyson Dev 
Johnson El Hdg 

Oriental Press 
Peart Oriental 

StnnLandCa. 
Stti China PoH 

SwtaePac A 

Wharf Hrigs 
Wheetock 


9J5 

2640 

11.95 

7875 

20.90 

35-70 

3860 

3740 

1690 

15 

83 
850 
64.75 
1445 
27 JO 
1445 
440 
18450 
55-50 
24J5 
2850 
1865 
43 
340 
630 
8475 
540 
835 
7.10 

3140 

1805 


HaO(5eo>i12838L53 
pSvkWK 1273653 

880 9 865 

2620 363S 2610 
1L85 H-90 1170 
69 JO 7OJ0 69 
20.25 2040 20 

35J0 3570 35J0 
3820 3840 3X10 
3850 36.50 37 

10J5 1690 1075 
1490 14.95 1475 
B2J5 B2J5 B2J0 
825 825 840 

63J0 *450 6125 
147# 1480 1475 
27 JO 2745 27 JO 
14 164ffl 14 
UO 438 433 

183 184 IBS 

5475 55 54 

23 Jffl 2X80 2410 
2040 2845 2845 
1850 1850 1860 
4240 42J8 42.10 
X33 3J3 

620 630 615 

8X75 8425 8375 
£30 535 5X0 

820 835 8J0 

£90 7-05 680 

£650 *0-50 61 JO 
31J0 3U0 32 

i ? M 18 1775 


Jakarta 

Astro l tor 

Bk Inti tartan 
Bk Negora 
Gudanguorai 
inducement 

indofood 

imta sat .... 
5ampoema mm 
S emen Gregk 
TtWnnrnmlkosI 


IBS) HOT 

1425 1 375 MM 1375 

*58 'S ’S ’SS 

US S3 SB 

11S50 1T?50 H400 11450 
JlSO 6125 61OT 6100 

3925 3825 3825 3900 


Johannesburg “EgSS&SS 

-sraa- *» -* *» 


37 m 

UN 


ar 

Bortaw 
l^G. Smttn 
DeBeera 
Driefontem 
pst Natl Bk 
GSK or 

W^talH*S 

ingweCool 

KCOf 

LtbertyH^s 

(.BLtfcSWn 

Minorca 

Nantpok 

wch ahd"*_ 

JJjaJPIOtttWni 


2 M 275 27S 

316 32175 32175 
180 17425 17« 174 

IMS 17 I?-?! ’i-g 

<675 49 4975 4975 

2775 26M 27-« g-g| 
159.55 158 159-23 159J5 

’SSO «50 

27 27.90 27.90 

19 |97# 19-70 
1 M ’IB 118 
57 57.75 57^ 

20 20 28 

_ £59 Xg X39 

59 57J5 37 57 

325 32475 325-50 325JO 

i 2 wo nbs SS l»g 

”■£ MS *4 

.,5; jjn 4465 4465 

23 * 5975 5975 

77 JO 72 «4 7" 


2805 

1940 

117 

5875 

28 

174 


Abbey Nan 
AHedDatnecQ 

7.9S 

760 

765 

704 

487 

460 

460 

450 

Anglian Water 

6.75 

662 

&42 

67/ 

AMteGrenp 

*53 

628 

64/ 

640 

1.T1 

617 

10/ 

111 

108 

5.15 

1.10 

5.12 

BAA 

520 

520 

520 

526 


11.11 

lays 

11 

11.10 


662 

644 

645 

659 

BATInd 

L41 

420 

5.14 

541 


XS2 

34/ 

348 

X40 

Blue Clrtle 

420 

408 

416 

412 

BOC Group 

10JB 

VJB 

9.90 

9.99 


AT# 

66/ 

674 

67/ 

BPB ind 

3-48 

3-42 

344 

345 


1X60 

1X48 

1303 

1X60 

BrflAlrerovs 

678 

662 

662 

604 

BG 

173 

168 

170 

173 


SM 

.141 

.544 

545 

BrBPeHm 

70S 

6.95 

/0J 

6.9/ 

BSkyB 

Bril Steel 

625 

6.1V 

620 

62/ 

1J6 

103 

1-53 

106 


442 

42B 

4J7 

440 

BTR 

275 

240 

371 

279 


10-55 

1028 

1022 

1000 

Button Gp 

Cable Wireless 

1J6 

527 

103 

508 

104 

5.10 

105 

IDE 


943 

460 

542 

506 


£44 

S24 

524 

543 


723 

/05 

7.1 8 

709 


7.13 

708 

7.10 

708 


328 

354 

344 

X» 


650 

477 

5 

5.10 

EWrocornponents 425 

421 

424 

424 

EMI Group 

1225 

1175 

11.75 

12-05 


5.10 

5 

5 

5.14 

ErdMWtseOB 

6J4 

648 

648 

45/ 


1-63 

161 

162 

162 


652 

827 

637 

639 

GEC 

196 

184 

371 

375 


1613 

968 

903 

1029 


1127 

900 

1105 

1140 


922 

901 

903 

905 

Grand Met 

495 

4B5 

408 

493 

GRE 

X98 

285 

3.93 

278 


522 

548 

5.52 

502 


492 

483 

407 

409 

GUS 

6J3 

624 

6J0 

601 

Haw 

HSBCHldgs 

5L52 

S48 

549 

501 

1X4/ 

1485 

148/ 

1521 


7.56 

/JO 

/J? 

748 


439 

423 

433 

43/ 

Ktagfisber 

678 

2X3 

603 

2 

604 

228 

69B 

244 


773 

700 

706 

/ 09 


260 

200 

203 

207 

Legal Gord Grp 

421 

414 

418 

417 

Lloyds TSBGp 

528 

5.12 

XI9 

523 


207 

203 


706 

Marks Spencer 

480 

4*9 

4A) 

47V 

MEPC 

479 

475 

4/8 

476 

Mercury Asset 
National Grid 

1185 

X14 

1X70 

X10 

1370 

2.12 

1X69 

114 


5.10 

497 

478 

S08 

NdWest 

7JB 

725 

/J/ 

/JS 


607 

.506 

S07 

606 


2.12 

308 

3.W 

7.13 


469 

660 

660 

666 


770 

105 

/0B 

775 

PBUngtan 

1-43 

6J4 

128 

623 

129 

625 

142 

620 


5.15 

S.10 

5.10 

5.15 

Prodentlcl 

STB 

.508 

509 

X97 

Ha Strode PP 

470 

450 

463 

467 


415 

432 

440 

AJ9 

RedJflCotai 

632 

620 

623 

BJ0 


379 

369 

374 

371 

Reed tall 

1203 

117/ 

11.87 

1101 

Rcntclffi tnfflal 

418 

4 m 

412 

403 

Reuters Hdgs 

M4 

6 

629 

648 

326 

328 

3-32 

137 

RffiiC Group 

1Q05 

978 

9.95 

902 

Roto Royce 

ZJ9 

242 

243 

749 

Royal BkScnt 

RTZreg 

RwraSSnnAi 

568 

9.93 

4B1 

554 

9 

374 

507 

973 

471 

506 

977 

49V 


364 

347 

151 

365 

SabHbwy 

320 

X18 

320 

129 


1675 

1675 

1675 

17 

ScntHteiucnstle 

702 

672 

674 

701 

SadPRus- 

360 

303 

304 

16/ 

Seancor 

X18 

114 

X15 

X17 


706 

7-43 

743 

748 


1694 

10.12 

1003 

HL7B 

SMW 

18.15- 

1008 

1009 

10.13 

SrailbMepitssi 

120 

17/ 

1.7B 

179 


636 

920 

923 

927 


628 

&20 

628 

673 

Sttatn Elec 

7.95 

/.BO 

/TV 

1X1 

Stageonadi 

728 

?.» 

7.26 

720 

Stand Charter 

655 

626 

Ot 

845 

Tate 5 Lyle 

440 

435 

425 

429 


3L48 

324 

325 

346 


678 

678 

U9 

605 

31 Group 

&15 

XI 1 

5.1V 

&13 

Tl Group 

577 

478 

S71 

509 


70S 

3/8 

703 

701 


1626 

16.11 

1617 

1676 

Utd Assurance 

52/ 

523 

525 

523 

Utd News 

773 

i/a 

7.66 

770 

UWUtWtas 

620 

6J0 

620 

*67 


Madrid 


Batsatadeic 47603 


PreviavE 48570 


V03TO 

19920 

19720 

20490 

ACESA 

172S 

1675 

1 M0 

1/25 

Agus? Bnrcelon 

5560 

5330 

5350 

£450 

Anenluifj 

aav 

<290 

6150 

6160 

6290 

6733 

B740 

8/90 

8HV0 


1180 

115# 

1150 

1145 


19550 

19200 

19310 

19430 

3co Centro Hisp 

3935 

3805 

3850- 

' 3880 

BcoExterter 

2775 

7/65 

7/65 

2765 

Ben Papular 

7A600 

26000 

260/0 

26450 


9850 

9680 

9730 

93M 

CEPSA 

4400 

4285 

4300 

4260 


2630 

2S65 

24/5 

25/0 

COf^Aj^fte 

7610 

9220 

7380 

9000 

7400 

9010 

7550 

9250 

FECSA 

12S0 

1220 

1220 

1265 

Gas Natural 

33200 

32600 

32800 

33250 


1610 

1520 

1535 

1610 


2850 

2705 

2705 

2825 

Repsal 

6100 

59B0 

6030 

5970 

SeviHnnu Elec 

1300 

1280 

1290 

1380 

Tobacaleni 

7090 

i860 

6860 

mt 

Telefarucn 

3440 

3335 

ZMO 

3465 


1215 

1155 

1170 

1205 

Vatenc Cement 

1675 

1640 

1660 

1650 

Manila 


P5Etadec 333106 


Prevtoas: 323479 


3950 

29 

29 JO 

79 

Ayolc Lond 
BkPhHptsI 

3050 

X 

30 

30J0 

183 

182 

182 

184 

C&P Humes 

13 

1274 

13 

1274 


120 

MV 

170 

170 


675 

665' 

6/4 

6/4 


10.75 

IOlSO 

I0J0 

II 

PO Bank 

<10 

390 39700 

404 

PhBLnngDisi 

1595 

1585 

1595 

1585 

San/MlsuelB 

86 

S3 

85 

8600 

SM Prime Hdg 

700 

/JO 

700 

770 

Mexico 


Baba tadec 374269 


Previous; 377 5J1 

AHaA 

4X80 

4300 

4X55 

4400 


1600 

1/76 

1700 

18.10 


2800 

2&60 

2IL/4 

2H.V4 


1106 

1100 

1162 

1162 

EmpModero 

40.15 

40.15 

4L15 

4020 

GpaCfflsaAl 

4430 

475 

4400 

4500 


101 

100 

LH0 

103 

Gpa Ha tabursa 
Onb dark Ms 

2740 

2705 

2/35 

2760 

16360 

16200 16200 16360 

TelevtSoCPO 

9650 

9800 

9BJD 

loaoo 

TdAtoL 

1576 

1572 

1476 

1590 

Milan 

MIB TetareafioK 1169100 


Previxra 1195508 

ABeomaAssic 

12290 

11955 

17115 

12315 

Bar Camus rial 

3350 

asp 

3250 

3390 


095 

4315 

4370 

<430 

BcndlRatra 

1231 

1200 

1200 

1211 


20900 

20300 

20400 


Credlto Bcttsno 

2340 

raw 

2314 

7335 

Erflaon 

9470 

9055 

9140 

9455 

ENI 

8470 

8360 

8380 

8505 

Fill 

5410 

5335 

5390 

5440 

GeneraSAssIC 

29750 

79400 

29450 

2VB50 

IMI 

14840 

14345 

14400 

14935 

1NA 

2225 

2190 

2210 

2740 

ItoJgos 

MerJtaset 

2390 

7050 

5310 

6990 

5310 

7000 

5590 

7045 

MeCIcbaKa 

10900 

10610 

1Q6IU 

11030 

MornerB5an 

1223 

1176 

HOT 

1226 

Offrctff 

Pomsokzt 

644 

2250 

613 

2140 

613 

2165 

623 

7240 

PM 

3550 

3485 

3530 

3570 

RAS 

14925 

14/60 

14760 

15010 

Rato Banco 

14530 

14300 

14350 

14490 

5 Paolo Torino 

use® 

11400 

11485 

11660 

Star 

7680 

/44C1 

/m 

// 65 

Tetecom rtuEo 

4330 

4165 

4165 

<405 

TIM 

4255 

4100 

4115 

^230 

Montreal 

tarfostltaflklltac 289604 


Prevtoas: 291 308 


45 


44*6 

<4Vi 

CdrrTlreA 

25 

2400 

2400 

2570 

CdnlRUA 

32 

site 

3100 

32 

CT Fill Svc 

32 

32 

32 

32V> 

GozMem 

1770 

1611 

16.90 

1705 

Gt-»3tLBea> 

2265 

22-15 

72.15 

MV, 

itmxvro 

38 

3700 

.17.95 

3Z.95 

investors Grp 

2560 


2560 

25te 

LcbtawCas 

16J# 

Wfi 

161ft 

161* 

NaU Bk Coowi: 

1505 

1505 

1500 

14.95 

PamrCorp 

2900 

7916 

79.40 

2900 

Power Fori 

2&0S 

3640 

2605 

7*00 

QuebecorB 

2570 

25 

25 

2515 

RaareS Qmihsi E 

9.15 

9.NJ 

9.15 

9.15 

RayrrtBkCdO 

5816 

5/35 

58.15 

58)6 


Paris 

Accor 

AGF 

Air Liquids 

AkaW Alstn 

An-UAP 

Bancaire 

BIC 

3NP 

Coital Plus 

Ouretaur 

Ccsino 

CCP 

Cetaem 

Christian Dior 

CLF-Dexlo Fran 

Credit Agrtarie 

Danone 

Etf-Aaodame 

Eridanla BS 


CAC-48 258838 
Prevtoas; 264542 


Euretun 
GeaEaux 
Havas 
Imetat 
Lafarge 

Learn nd 

L’dreol 

LVMH 

Lvon.Eaux 

MldwBnB 

PortbosA 

Pernod Hiart 

Peugeot Cit 

Pinautt-Prim 

Promodes 

Renault 

RmbI 

Rh-PoutoncA 

Sanoli 

Schneider 

SEB 

SGS Thomson 
Ste Generate 
Sodexho 
SI Cobain 
Suez 

Svnthefcrbo 
Thomson CSF 
Total B 
UArar 
Voteo 


823 808 015 

208 20850 20850 
908 869 075 

620 608 613 

37X80 371 JO 3727# 
759 74T 744 

913 881 884 

254 24X10 2M 
1110 1073 I OBI 
3525 3443 3443 

2 73 JO 262 266 

279 265 365 

720 700 700 

826 BIO 010 
608 584 584 

1260 1256 1268 

NO HI at 
566 551 553 

945 915 916 

1825 1810 10.10 
i.95 6-80 6J5 

753 731 734 

423 41190 414.10 
B83 862 882 

392J0 379.10 379.10 
1030 993 1002 

19B5 192* 1926 

1150 1330 1334 

501 567 575 

343 33660 339 JO 
395 386 387 

322 312 312J0 

&Ht 642 647 

2280 2228 2249 

1920 1852 I860 

13650 134 JO 135 
1690 IASS 1684 
194 1 89 JO 191.40 
562 535 535 

30X70 29339 29X30 
995 982 985 

411.90 403.10 405.50 
670 646 A46 

2914 2883 2091 

B6S 851 851 

282.40 279 27970 

612 599 605 

192.10 186J0 186.7D 
46X50 45X80 457 JO 
8775 86.10 8610 
388 379 384J0 


825 

joe 

910 

620 

374X0 

762 

914 

255J0 

1108 

3529 

2*9.90 

274.90 

713 

M7 

596 

1270 

906 

568 

937 

10-25 

685 

746 

423 

868 

390 

1037 

1994 

1349 

580 

336 

39X90 

320 

659 

2284 

1900 

139.50 

1690 

195J0 

544 

303 

988 

411 

670 

2897 

871 

285 

604 

19X60 

465 

87.10 

387 


Electrolux B 
Ericsson B 
He nnes B 
incentive A 
Investor B 
McDoB 
Nordbanken 

PhrunvUrtoha 
SandvIkB 
Scania B 
SCAB 

S-E Bankeri A 
Skim Ha Fore 
Skare&aB 
5KFB 

SpartawtSten A 
StadsImHitElcA 
Stare A 
Sv Handles A 
Volvo B 


49050 

274 
1045 

540 

360 

251 

275 
299 

189 JO 
168JD 
17X50 
86 
2a 

350.50 

190 
144 

191 

no 

229 JO 
19450 


482 489 

267J0 269 

1008 1016 
534 535 

347 348-50 
240 240 

266 269 

290 JO 292 

1B7 187 JO 

185 185 

169 170 

81 JO 82 
23X50 237 

336 339 

186 18650 
135J0 13650 

190 190 

107 jo im 

222 224 

187 JO 18650 


491 
272 
1040 
535 
347 
24450 
266 
298 
187 
187 
174 
84JD 
241 
345J0 
187 JO 
141 

190 
110 
227 

191 


Sao Paulo 


BredescoPfd 
Brahma Pfd 
CemJgPtd 
CESPPW 
CoptH 
Peho tam 
rtanbanco Pld 
Light Senridos 


iPW 
PauOsta Lib 
S ldNadonol 
Souza Craz 
Tetemig 
Tefcrl 
TetespPM 

Urdbanco 
Usiminas Pfd 

CVRD Pfd 


9.10 
Ttd-OO 
47J0 
5650 
1620 
47X00 
58600 
46X70 
34600 
21600 
137.90 
37X1 
945 
163111 
15600 
299J0 
41 JM 
1J2 
OAVi 


694 
710X0 
47J0 
5150 
15J0 
464410 
58X00 
4574X1 
33600 
21900 
13650 
37J0 
9M 
167.00 
155 JO 
2904)0 
40 JO 
1-20 
2500 


927X49 
949900 

900 9.19 

71499 72000 
47 JO 4B430 
5450 5650 
1630 15-90 
4*9-00 48000 

585.00 590.00 

457.00 465.00 
33700 34600 
211J0 21650 
13770 13700 

37 JO 38J0 
905 9X0 

16X01 16300 
15600 156J50 
29400 299.50 
4665 4100 
1J1 I J3 

2610 26-50 


Sydney 


AO Ordknafefc 342700 
PlCVloasc 242X20 

Amcor 

86ff 

803 

860 

804 

ANZBUng 

7.90 

775 

/08 

770 

8KP 

1707 

1600 

1602 

16.92 

Boral 

302 

176 

378 

X7B 

Brumbies Ind. 

2170 

2100 

2165 

2100 

CBA 

1267 

12J0 

1202 

1200 

CC AiruriO 

11 JO 

1174 

1160 

11.15 

Cotes Myer 

598 

508 

5.V3 

506 


592 

605 


605 

CRA 

1578 

18.48 

1805 

18-92 

CSR 

407 

401 

403 

401 


261 

207 

70B 

258 


165 

163 

163 

161 

lOAushMo 

1X25 

1X10 

1X12 

1115 


2X30 

2X16 

rr-xi 

2X18 

MIM Hdgs 
NafAustBank 

100 

1.77 

1.// 

179 

16.16 

1595 

IV.VM 

1592 

Nat Mutual Hdg 

1.95 

1.91 

1.92 

1.92 

News Carp 

670 

6J8 

608 

667 

Podflc Dunlop 

X34 

379 

3JI 

378 

Pioneer Inti 

405 

4 

403 

401 


668 

607 

6.4/ 

605 

SI George Bank 

7J5 

765 

/0O 

760 

WMC 

800 

8.18 

8.20 

875 

Westoac Bktafl 

7.17 

7.10 

/.IS 

704 

wooasittePei 

9.18 

9.06 

9.12 

9.03 

WoohwrffB 

362 

309 

360 

361 

Taipei 

Slock Muter Bde» B4U02 
Prevtoas: 827557 

Cathay Life ire 

17V 

175 

178 

178 

Chang Hun Bk 
OiboTung Bk 

1B8 

184 

187 

186 

91 

8900 

9000 

90 

Chkta Dev£tami 

127JO 

117 

122 

11700 

CWna Steal 

27 

MV) 

2600 

27 

Fist Bonk 

190 

185 

188 

188 

Formosa PtasOc 

77 

7400 

/* 

7400 

Hue Nor. Bk 

146J0 

14200 

4400 

145 

Inti Comm Bk 

8X50 

82 

83 

83 

Kan Yb Ptettes 

71 

67 

n 

68 


MOJO 

107 

108 

I10J0 

67 

64 

6600 

64 


61 

54 

5900 

49.10 

61 

54 

59 

48.90 

liW Wortd Chta 

70 

6900 

70 

69 JO 


1 The Trib Index 

Pnc»s as at 3:00 PM New York time. 

Jan 1. 1992 = 100. 

Level 

Change 

% change 

year to date 
% change 

World Index 

150.64 

•1.19 

-0.7B 

+14.23 

Regional Indexes 

Asia/Pacific 

108.58 

*022 

+0.20 

-19.13 

Europe 

159.53 

■2.35 

-1.45 

+14.62 

N. America 

175.47 

-0.81 

-0.46 

+36.79 

S. America 

Industrial Indexes 

139.93 

-2.21 

-1.55 

+57.15 

Capital goods 

174.88 

-1.00 

-0-57 

+31.61 

Consumer goods 

170.45 

-1.46 

-0.85 

+23.45 

Energy 

176.60 

-1.01 

-0-57 

*3022 

Finance 

111.76 

-1.01 

-0.90 

—12.18 

MsceRaneous 

154.99 

+0.99 

+0.64 

+14.12 

Raw Materials 

184.52 

-1.93 

-1.04 

+30.13 

Service 

141.05 

-1.16 

-0.82 

+17.54 

Utilities 

134.28 

-£01 

-1.47 

+5.62 

Tim International Herald Tribune World Stock Index (f tracks the U.S doftowAwo/ 
280 intomotionaBy mvastsble stocks tram 25 countries. For mom nformatron, a free 

booklet is avaBMo by wnting to The Tri, Imtwc. IS j Avenue Charles da Gauds. 

92521 NouOy Codex, Franco. Compiled by Btoomtiorg Nav/s. 


Tokyo 


HIM 225: 1005X50 
Previous: 1792164 


Seoul 

Docom 

Daewoo Heavt 
Hyundai Eng. 
Ha Motors 
Korea EIPwr 
Korea ExchBk 
Korea Mob Tel 
LGSemfcxm 
PohanglrenSl 
Samsung Diday 

Samsung Elec 

SHahanBank 


CanposHe index: 65690 
Prevfoas: 64208 


162000 100000 162000 
4090 3770 3970 

18500 17800 18000 
15700 1 5500 15&00 
26000 25100 26000 
5390 5250 STsa 

465000 435000 464500 
26000 24300 25900 
43000 39700 43SS9 
40500 37000 46500 
55000 51700 55000 
10800 10000 10800 


100500 

3810 

18200 

15900 

25500 

5270 

452000 

24500 

39900 

37500 

51700 

10100 


Singapore 


Asia Poe Brew 
CerebasPac 
aty Devtts 


Stndts TUnes 21 3SJ3 
PrwtaUK 213S06 


Dairy Fmn Inf* 
DBS foretan 
DB5 Lena 
Kernel fefc 
Fnser&Neave 
HKLand* 
JanfMatbesn* 
Jwd Strategic* 

fflBanic 

OCBC fortagn 
OSUrdoaBkF 
Parioiray Hdgs 
Semhawai 


Oslo 


Aker A 


DennwsteBk 

Ekem 

KofstaadA 

KvoamerAsa 

Norsk Hydro 

MonkeaugA 

MicnmedA 

Orkla Aso A 

PetfaiGeoSK 

SagaPeitnA 

saasied 

Transocean Off 

StarebnaulAsa 


OBXtades 60651 
Previous; 61 0J6 

1B6 182 182 186 

149 JD 14650 149 149 JO 

25.90 2530 265# 25.70 

3050 31 3D 3040 

127 124 125 127 

48 47 JD 48 48 

367 361 364 364 

347 JO 341 342 3465# 

227 323 227 221-50 


Sing Land 
Stag Press F 
Sing Tech ind 
Stag Telecomm 
Kepbdifand 
Tat Lee Bank 
UtU Industrial 
UMOSeaBkF 
Wing To! Hdgs 
US. donors. 


N.T. 

ALT. 

N.T. 

7.40 

1000 

1070 

1040 

1040 

1X40 

12-50 

1X20 

1200 

1440 

1420 

1430 

1410 

0.71 

069 

070 

072 

18 

1700 

18 

1700 

5J0 

570 

575 

570 

406 

472 

472 

470 

1X50 

1X10 

1X20 

1260 

270 

266 

268 

269 

095 

500 

500 

505 

376 

X22 

372 

122 

970 

900 

960 

905 

4.12 

404 

404 

408 

1870 

18.1 D 

1870 

18.10 

1070 

1OL40 

1040 

1000 

605 

6 

605 

60S 

7 JO 

760 

700 

7.45 

1X10 

11.90 

110# 

1100 

70S 

775 

775 

7.90 

2770 

2660 

2670 

2660 

3-78 

368 

368 

178 

372 

X16 

X18 

X18 

444 

400 

460 

464 

X46 

X44 

144 

144 

1.19 

1.17 

1.18 

7.18 

1670 

1X90 

16 

15.90 

4 42 

432 

436 

432 


I Nippon Air 
Amway 
AsoWBa* 

AsahlChera 

AsaM Glass 
Bk Tokyo Mltsu 
Bk Yokohania 
Bridge s! one 
Canon 
ChuOu Elec 
ChogolcuElec 
OalNIpp Print 
Da tel 

Drri-ldil Kang 
Diriwa Bank 
Datmi House 
palwaSec 
DDI 
Denso 

East Japan Ry 
Eteai 
Panuc 
Full Bank 
FuPPhan 


Stockholm 

109 112 

871 880 

204 207 

360 36650 

IBS 184-50 

325 327 33650 


112 

55V 

108 10800 11000 
548 550 550 

AGAB 

11X50 

109 

797 

289 

293 

297 

ABBA 

Rftt 

H71 

120 

I17J0 

118 

118 

AsslDareon 

208 

202 

134 

133 

133 

i:« 

. Astra A 

375 35800 

405 

397 

403 

am 

Ados Copco A 

18500 18200 

4471) 

44 

44 

4430 

Autoliv 

335 

325 


1010 

976 

986 

984 

796 

790 

797 

798 

non 

3220 

jnn 

3290 

824 

■HI 

820 

834 

595 

KjI 

595 

586 

ton 

1080 

S6OT 

ion 

MOT 

1950 

1970 

I960 

535 

516 

530 

530 

2210 

2150 

2170 

2190 

257D 

MM 

2520 

2540 

2170 

2130 

2140 

2160 

2200 

2170 

2200 

2160 

1970 

1950 

1970 

1970 

706 

665 

6OT 

700 

1370 

1310 

1340 

1350 

475 

461 

466 

470 

1390 

1370 

1390 

1370 

899 

873 

877 

909 

7400a 

7180a 

7<00a 

7100a 

2390 

2330 

2380 

2360 

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1 Kim’s Son 
Apologizes 
To Nation 

Trial Over Collapse 
Of Hanbo Op ens 

SEOUL — President Kim Young 

* 53111 s . ? on ' facing charges by the 
opposition of influence-peddling 
and meddling in state affairs. apc£ 
jogized Monday to his father and the 
nation. 

lower my head hereby and 
deeply apologize to the people,” 
Kim Hyun Choi said. 

But Mr. Kim, 38. did not mention 
the two scandals to which his name 
has been linked and that are dogging 
his father's presidency. 

; The first involves $5.8 billion in 
improper loans to the failed Hanbo 
Steel & General Construction Co., 
the flagship of the nation's 14th- 
Jargest conglomerate, Hanbo 
Group. The second is connected to 
claims that the president's son 
played a key role in administration 
appointments and policy. 

** . Separately, a trial over the col- 

* lapse of Hanbo opened Monday. 
The founder of Hanbo Group, 
Chung Tae Soo. a former cabinet 
minister and eight businessmen face 
corruption charges. 

Mr. Chong is accused of bribing 
bankers for loans. In court Monday, 
the bankers denied the payments 
had been bribes; they said they had 
accepted the money as a "custom- 
arypractice” in return for favors. 

Tne president's son has been 
asked to testify before a congres- 
sional committee investigating 
Hanbo. Opposition lawmakers allege 
that he helped Hanbo obtain loans at 
easy rates. The younger Mr. Kim said 
he “wept profusely" when be saw 
his father apologize for the loan scan- 
dal on television bst month. 

Prosecutors exonerated the young- 
er Mr. Kim in an investigation of the 

, collapse of Hanbo, but the opposition 

* criticized the investigation. 

The president's son said he would 
agree toanew inquiry into bisrole in 
the Hanbo affair. He added, “I will 
willingly accept any punishment if I 
was in the wrong.’ 

(Reuters, Bloomberg. AFP) 


INTERNATIONAL HERAL D TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 

ASIA/PACIFIC 


PAGE 17 


Has Hong Kong’s Bull Market Peaked? 


By Philip Segal 

I Special to the Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Has Hong 
Kong's bullish stock market run 
out of steam? Like investors in the 
United States, to which Hong 
Kong's currency and monetary 
policy are tied, investors here are 
nervous about rising interest rates 
eating into corporate earnings. 

Last Friday, the chief economist 
for the Hong Kong Chamber of 
Commerce. Ian Perkin, warned that 
Hong Kong stocks looked "top- 
pish” at current levels and that any 
rise in U.S. interest rates would 
cause a ‘‘very quick reversal "in the 
territory's property and stock 
prices. 

The U.S. Federal Reserve 
Board’s rate-setting committee is 
scheduled to meet next Tuesday, 
and many analysts expect it to raise 
official U.S. rates. Hong Kong’s 
currency is pegged to the dollar, 
and rate rises in the United States 
are usually followed by compa- 
rable increases in Hong Kong. 

Property prices here drive the 
stock market because about 70 per- 
cent of the companies listed on the 
exchange derive some or all of 
their earnings from real estate. Not 
only are interest rates apparently 
headed higher, but many analysts 
say property prices may have 
reached a peak after going up last 
year by an average of 25 percent 


and by as much as 60 percent at the apa 
top end of the market. nor 

These factors, coupled with a pen 
renewed interest on the pan of fond idei 
managers In other Asian markets, ert> 
could give some Hong Kong in- rise 
vestors room for pause. 7 

After posting one of the world's pro 
best performances in 1996. when test 
the Hang Seng _ ^ _ 

SbSS iiSSlK 

ally down 4.6 


apartments on the market and eco- 
nomic growth in the range of 5 
percent, they argue. Hong Kong res- 
idents will continue to bid tip prop- 
erty prices even if mortgage rates 
rise one-half of a percentage point. 

That argument has sustained the 
property and stock rallies, but the 
issue of affordability becomes in- 

. creasingly im- 

Vi portant with 
»■'* apartment 


percent this 

year and has K- : ' 
been trading in 

its current, nar- 

row range 

since Novera- 

On Monday, 
the Hang Seng | aaAt 
I ndex closed at 
12,838.53, up 
0.8 percent. 

"In the 

short term we're facing fairly 




portant with 
.S: apartment 

M - prices among 

are using more 

cent of house- 
hold income to 
service their 

, . •• ■; x..w - “Vs Chet^analyst 
at Goldman 
Sachs & Co. 

The proportion of income used 


strong resistance.'* said Christina on mortgage payments, the "af- 
Cheung, a fund manager for Royal fondability index," hit 52 percent 
Bank of Canada Investment Man- before property prices fell by more 
agement. "Fundamentally, the than a third in the 18 months be- 


property market has run ahead and 
personally I think it’s well beyond 
fundamentals." 

Optimists counter that supply 
and demand for real estate are mis- 
matched. With a shortage of new 


ginning in March 1994. 

Apartment prices moved down- 
ward when the government inter- 
vened in the market to check spec- 
ulation. an option it has not ruled 
out using again if prices climb out 


of reach for even two-income pro- 
fessional couples. 

If the pessimists can point to 
property prices as the reason the 
market has put on the breaks, op- 
timists have their own counterar- 
gument: China. 

The honest stocks last year were 
“red chips,” or shares in Chinese 
state- controlled companies incor- 
porated and traded in Hong Kong. 
While the Hang Seng Index has 
soared since the beginning of last 
year, the Bloomberg Red Chip In- 
dex has outperformed it by 46.7 
percent 

As China gets inflation under 
control and gets ready to cut in- 
terest rates again, some managers 
say they are not concerned by the 
prospect of slightly higher interest 
rates in Hong Kong. 

"We are quite confident the 
Hong Kong market will be up at the 
end of the year from where it is 
now,” said Matthew Lee, analyst 
at National Mutual Funds Man- 
agement (.Asia). 

Hie red-chip earnings season be- 
gins this week, and analysts will be 
able to determine if the rapid growth 
these stocks promised through asset 
acquisition brought real profits. 
Yet, even if red-chip earnings rise, 
the companies are already trading at 
a premium. Shanghai Industrial, for 
instance, trades at 48 times expec- 
ted 1996 earnings and 27 times 
earnings expected for this year. 


South Korea’s Firms Face Another Year of Weak Earnings 


Bloomberg News 

SEOUL — South Korean compa- 
nies, reeling from the biggest slump 
in corporate earnings since 1980, 
will earn even less this year because 
of a slowing economy and the won's 
decline against the dollar, econo- 
mists and analysts said Monday. 

Net profit at 508 companies listed 
on the Seoul stock exchange fell an 
average of 62_5 percent last year, the 
Daewoo Economic Research Insti- 
tute said. The decline followed av- 
erage increases of 46.7 percent in 
1995 and 81 percent in 1994. 

“There is no reason why this year 
should be better,” said Lee Soo 
Bong, a spokesman at LG Electronics 


Co., the flagship of Korea's second- 
largest industrial group. LG Group. 

Economists predict the country's 
gross domestic product will expand 5 
percent this year, its slowest rise in 1 7 
years, buffeted by slumping exports 
and labor strikes in January. The 
economy grew 7 percent last year. 

An 8 1 percent drop in memory- 
chip prices caused by excess supply 
sapped profits at LG, Samsung Elec- 
tronics and other South Korean semi- 
conductor manufacturers last year. 

“Things are gloomier this year," 
Park Choon Ho, an economist at the 
Daewoo research institute, said. 

"The economy is heading down, 
exports are deteriorating, and the 


won continues to lose value.” 

Profits were also damped last year 
by the Korean currency’s 8.2 per- 
cent decline against the U.S. dollar. 
The combined foreign-exchange 
losses of listed companies amounted 
to $3.5 billion, according to Dong- 
won Economic Research Institute. 

The won has fallen 4 percent 
against the dollar this year. The 
combined foreign-currency debt of 
446 companies surveyed by Dong- 
won rose 48 percent in 1996, to 30.5 
trillion won ($34.69 billion). 

■ Stimulus Package Planned 

South Korea said it would unveil 
a package of measures this week to 


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stimulate the economy, Reuters re- 
ported. Anticipation of the mea- 
sures. which are to be announced 
Thursday, fueled buying on the 
stock market. The main index 
jumped 2.66 percent, or 17.07 
points, to close at 658.90. 

Analysts said the economic pack- 
age was expected to include mea- 
sures to stabilize high interest rates 
and the won and to revamp the fi- 
nancial system, but they said they 
expected no short-term remedy for 
the slowing economy. The govern- 
ment also is expected to raise the 
limit on foreign investors’ stakes in 
local companies to 25 percent or 26 
percent this year from 20 percent 


Jakarta^ . * ' .Composfci^ttxiB*' .' 1B70&4 h f 66fi.84r v 

Source: Telekurs Iwenuiioiul Herald Tribune 

Very brieflys 

• Singapore's competition to rum basic telecommunications 
services has heated up, with the maritime conglomerate 
SembCorp Ltd. and Singapore MRT Ltd., which operates 
the train system, saying they would bid together, in com- 
petition with two other consortiums. 

• Lufthansa AG is talking to several Asian airlines as part of 
an effort to expand its strategic alliances in Asia. 

• Japan's Ministry of Finance is considering increasing the 
staff at Japan’s securities watchdog agency and imposing 
harsher penalties for illegal securities deals after a recent 
scandal involving Nomura Securities Co. 

• Mosel Vitelic Inc^ one of Taiwan's largest semiconductor 
makers, said 1997 profit would be 40 percent higher than 
expected. It said net profit would be 4.05 billion Taiwan 
dollars ($1473 million), or 3.1 1 dollars a share. 

• Malaysia is "not likely” to introduce full competition in its 
telecommunications market earlier than 1999, the minister of 
energy, telecommunications and posts, Leo Moggie, said. 

• Singapore Technologies Aerospace Ltd. said a rebound in 
demand for commercial aircraft maintenance had enabled it to 
post 1996 profit of 27.8 milli on Singapore dollars ($19.4 
million), reversing a 1995 loss of 48.4 million dollars. 

• OPEC's oil production rose to 26.69 million barrels a day in 
February, the Middle East Economic Survey said, exceeding 
the quota of 25 .03 million barrels a day set by the Organization 
of Petroleum Exporting Countries. 

• Excel Machine Tools Ltd. of Singapore will offer 40 

million to 50 million new shares in an initial public offering 
this week, sources said. Reuters. Bloomberg 


Malaysia Aims to Go Global With New Appliance Town Singapore Shipyard Expands to Indonesia 

• A 4 r i a .t i ...u:. 


Cimpded by Gbr Huff Fran Dbpacha 

- KUAAA 1 .1 JMPUR Prime Minister Mahathir 
bin Mohamad on Monday inaugurated a town 
being built to manufacture electrical appliances fear 
the global market and house the workers. 

Wien completed in 10 years, the township near 
the eastern coastal city of Kuantan will have cost 4 
billion ringgit ($1.6 billion). The town, which is to 
have dozens of Malaysian-owned factories, is 200 
kilometers (125 miles) east of Koala Lumpur. 

A brainchild of Mr. Mahathir, the ME C City 
project is aimed at stimulating Malaysia’s en- 
trepreneurial drive and marks the first step in its 


attempt to enter the global appliance market 

The main shareholders in the project are Malay- 
sia Electric Corp., which owns 60 percent and the 
government's investment arm, Khazanah Nasional 
Ltd, which has a 30 percent stake, Bemama said. 

Only a few factories are operating now in MEC 
City, including a refrigerator and air-conditioner 
plant 

The city will include housing for the estimated 
100,000 workers expected to be employed by the 
factories. About 70 percent of the production is 
expected to be exported. Among the Malaysian 
brand names to be seen in MEC City will be MEC’s 


own. The company makes refrigerators, rice and 
pressure cookers, air conditioners, television sets 
and stereo equipment 

Mr. Mahathir said the project would help Malay- 
sia's industrialization process and its trade balance. 

The prime minister said at the opening of die 
project “Products made by us have the same qual- 
ity as products imported from foreign countries. I 
believe Malaysian-branded products will one day be 
well-known Uke Japanese and European brands." 

Malaysia is already one of the world's biggest 
exporters of air conditioners through joint ventures 
with Japanese companies. (AP, AFP) 


Cotqdkd ty Ota Staff Fam Daputdia 

SINGAPORE — Sembawang Shipyard 
opened two facilities in Indonesia on 
Monday and predicted they would post 
revenue of between $20 million and $30 
million this year. 

Prime MinisterGoh Chok Tong of Singa- 
pore and President Suharto of Indonesia 
opened Karimun Marine & Industrial Com- 
plex and PT Karimun Sembawang Shipyard, 
both of which are on Karimun Island. 

The marine and industrial complex, which 
Sembawang Corp. owns along with Jurang 
Town Corp. of Singapore and Salim Group 


of Indonesia, and the shipyard, in which 
Jurong does not have a stake, seek to get 
around the rise in ship-repair costs in Singa- 
pore. Repair costs in Indonesia are expected 
to run 20 percent below those in Singapore. 

"Ship repair made a lot of sense in 
Singapore in the 1960s," said David Leow, 
an analyst at HSBC James Cape 1 Securities 
(Singapore) Pte. But as labor costs continue 
to nse in Singapore, he said. “we'U see 
more and more companies moving labor- 
intensive industries offshore’’ to compete 
with lower-cost facilities. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg ) 


HACKERS: Computer Pros in White Hats Test Security for Companies That Do Business by Internet 


Continued from Page 13 

computer-assisted fraud and 
theft. 

White-hat hackers, like 
those at IBM, are only one 
kind of computer-security 
professional whose skills are 
much in demand today. 

Once an arcane specialty, 
computer security has moved 
into the mains tream. As 
companies rush onto the In- 
ternet, they benefit from im- 
proved communication with 
customers, suppliers and far- 
flung employees, but they 
v also take on far greater risk 
* that their corporate computer 
systems will be breached by 
outsiders with malicious in- 
rem. 

The dangers of a net- 
worked world have created 
boom times for computer-se- 
curity consultants, auditors, 
cryptographers and others. 

Now they must contend 
with pushy headhunters as 
well as hadeers. Five years 
ago, six-figure salaries were 
rare in the security field. 
Today it is not uncommon for 
skilled computer-security 
veterans to be making 
$200,000 a year or more. 

Recognizing a seller s 
marker for computer-security 

expertise, Wietse Venema 
has come to die United Stales, 
t and he is selling. 

“ A computer scientist from 
the University of EindhovMi 
in the Netherlands. Mr. 
Venema is the co-author ot 
Satan, a sophisticated soft- 
ware program intended to 
find security fiaws m any 
computer system linked to the 

^The45 -year -old Dutch re- 
searcher is considering oti«^ 

from IBM and other leading 
American computer compa- 

"Many people are inter- 
ested in my capabilities 


See our 

Real Estate Marketplace 

everv Friday 


now,” he observed cheer- 
fully. 

Experts like Mr. Venema 
are suddenly stars because 
corporations are spending 
more on computer security. 
This year, companies world- 
wide will spend $6.3 billion 
on security for their computer 
networks, according to an es- 
timate by Dataquest, a mar- 
ket-research firm. 

Within three years the se- 
curity price tag is projected to 
more than double to nearly 
$12.9 billion. 

That estimate is only for 
services supplied by contract- 
ors. It excludes spending chi 
in-house staff, security soft- 
ware and hardware products. 

The industry in the United 
States, the world leader in 
computer security, is com- 
posed of hundreds of compa- 
nies. They run the gamut from 
large companies with world- 


wide computer consulting 
practices, like IBM, Science 
Applications International 
Corp. and Perot Systems, and 
Big Six accounting firms, like 
Coopers & Ly brand, Ernst & 
Young and Deloitte & Touche, 
to one-man independent con- 
sultants, like Mr. Seiden. 

Fueling the surge in com- 
puter-security spending is 
fear. 

The corporate concerns are 
heightened with eveiy report 
of hackers defacing well- 
known World Wide Web 
sites, Uke the recent attacks 
on the sites of the CIA and the 
Department of Justice. 

The FBI says few intru- 
sions into corporate computer 
systems — 15 percent at most 
— are reported to law-en- 
forcement agencies. 

But the handful that are re- 
ported, like the 1994 case of 
Russian hackers who tapped 


into Citibank and made $10 
million in illegal fund trans- 
fers (all but $400,000 was re- 
covered). tend to cause 
alarm. 

Just how great the threat is 
to corporate computer sys- 
tems is a matter of debate. The 
Internet, observes Peter Neu- 
mann, a computer scientist at 
SRI International, a research 
group in Menlo Park, Cali- 
fornia, was not designed to be 
secure. 

Once the bailiwick of a 
small community of research- 
ers, it is starting to be used as 
a freeway of commerce. 

“The infrastructure is vul- 
nerable,” Mr. Neumann said 
* ‘From that larger perspective 
the risks are enormous.” 

Dan Farmer, the co-author 
of Satan with Mr. Venema, 
did a survey of 1,700 cor- 
porate and government Web 
sites late last year and found 


that more than 60 percent of 
them had “serious potential 
security vulnerabilities." 

Mr. Fanner, a programmer 
at Sun Microsystems Inc., did 
not break into the computer 
systems, but be said they were 
open to attack and often could 
be severely damaged (His 
survey results are posted on 
the Web, at 

www.trouble.oig.) 

But there is a significant 
difference, some analysts say, 
between potential vulnerab- 
ility and the actual risk to cor- 
porate computer systems. 

"There is risk, but the 
threat tends to be vastly over- 
stated” said George Colony, 
president of Forrester Re- 
search Inc., a consulting firm 
in Cambridge. Massachu- 
setts. 

It estimates that losses 
from fraud in Internet com- 
merce are likely to be about 




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$1 for every $1,000 of busi- 
ness. To put the master into 
perspective, the fraud losses 
in cellular phone service are 
$20 for every $1 .000, accord- 
ing to Forrester, while the 
losses on credit-card transac- 
tions are nearly $2 for every 
$1 ,000 of goods charged 

Still, even skeptics, like 
Forrester’s Mr. Colony, agree 
that computer security re- 
quires continuous attention. 

“It is a manageable risk, 
and it should not deter compa- 
nies from jumping into In- 
ternet commerce,” be said 
" But I also tell our clients that 
they should think of computer 
security as a guerrilla war that 
will last forever.” 


INTERNATIONAL BOND TRUST 

2, boulevard Royal, 

L - 2953 LUXEMBOURG 


INTERNATIONAL BOND HHJ9T will pay out a dividend 
of USD 0.50 on March 2 1, 1 997. 

Shares will be traded ex-dividend on March IS, 1997. 

The dividend i& payable to holders of bearer ah&ro ugainat 
presentation of coupon no. 16 to the following bank: 

BANQUE INTERNATIONALE A LUXEMBOURG 
€ 3 , route tTEsck, L - 1470 JLaxemlioug 

GRAND-DUCHY OF LUXEMBOURG 

Ike Board of Directors of 
BVTERNATIONALItOND FUND MANAGEMENT COMPANY 
Soeh6t6 Anonyme 


FIDELITY SPECIAL GROWTH FUND 

Soci£td d’lnvestissemem a Capital Variable 
Kansallis House - Place de I’Eloile 
L- 1021 Luxembourg 
R.C. No B 20095 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

NOTICE is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the Shareholders of Fidelity Special 
Growth Fund, a soci&d d'invesusscmeni h capital variable organised under the laws of the Grand 
Duchy of Luxembourg ( the “Company"), will be held at the registered office of the Company. 
Kansallis House. Place de i'Eloile, Luxembourg, at 11.00 u.m. on March 27, 1997. specifically, 
but without limitation, for the following purposes: 

1 . Presentation of the Report of the Board of Directors. 

2. Presentation of the Report of the Auditor. 

3- Approval of the balance sheet and income statement for the fiscal year ended November 30, 
1996. 

4. Discharge of the Board of Directors and the Auditor. 

5- Election of six (6) Directors, specifically the re -election of Messrs. Edward C. Johnson 3d, 
Bany R. J. Bateman, Charles T. M. Coll is. Charles A. Fraser, Jean Hamilius and Helmert 
Frans van den Hoven, being all of the present Directors. 

6. Election of the Auditor, specifically the election of Coopers & Lybrand, Luxembourg. 

7. Declaration of a cash dividend in respect of the fiscal year ended November 30. 1996. 

8. Consideration of such other business as may properly come before the Meeting. 

Approval of items I through 8 of the agenda will require the affirmative vote of a majority of 
the shares present or represented at the Meeting with ao minimum number of shares present or 
represented in order for a quorum to be present. 

Subject to the limitations imposed by the Articles of Incorporation of the Company with regard 
to ownership of shares which constitute in the aggregate more than three percent (3%) of the 
outstanding shores, each share is entitled to one vote. A shareholder may act at any meeting by 
proxy. 

Dated: January 27, 1997 
By Order of die Board of Direciors 


70STOlUrSWtUNE*SWffl 


... T 


PAGE 18 


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PAGE 19a 


nTORj^TONALHERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. MARCH 18, 1997 


Office Equipment 





*\»MPS 





gKSS 


Equipping Knowledge Workers to Perform Effectively 


■' >JS • 


The keepers of a company’s electronic gateways play an increasingly important role. 


T\V-V 






suppliers 


Tills move to the “on-line” or “borderless” company has individual software : lnterlrakmg the 

elevated the keepers of these electronic gateways- the works into the lu ? fal1 - 8 of * e resultin S net- 

knowledge workers - to a new prominent. MiSy of fe S e?*™™***™*! grids. 

custom* . - , J . 


Hannover) have been developed to improve the efficiency S eSoS ^J 996 -’ 11,6 “S*"® of growth 
and effectiveness of the knoMedge wSker. y ' f d deepening of coiporate in-house net- 

com P a “ es ever-growing reliance on 

Hie importance of linkage . to carTy oul daia-processing and other ICT- 

Tho <> I IiV" . . oasea operations. 


The importance of linkage has eAanmti° C3ny oul d^'P 10 

The average amount allocated by companies to “work- Tn , 

place hardware” continued its dram^&op in 1996 t0 S TX f earch ^ *e 

According to one recent survey from Gennanv’s wnufaZSntSXT JJJ? 0 ^ ,*5 J 0631 area ne£w °ck CLAN) 


•dated 1 outsourcing" U 

£35 oLEH^. 1 ‘S£ 1^1 -e-dh. 


linkage products. For companies, the use of these out- \ 
sourcing services generally produces a highly welcome j 
reduction in costs. For a large n timber of the company's ■ 
employees, it dramatically changes the nature of iheir i 
work. Rather than processing parts of transactions them- \ 
selves, a large and growing number of people within each ? 
corporation are now responsible for maintaining the elec- j 
tronic data interfaces (EDIs) set up between their compa- ijf. 
ny and the providers of outsourced services. - ; 

These “knowledge workers” have an important respon- • 
sibility. They keep information flowing smoothly to and J 
from the service providers, and check on the quality and .' 
accuracy of work done by them. In a recent survey that * 
appeared in VDI Nachrichten, the German technical ‘ 
weekly, four-fifths of all outsourcing companies reported • 
that they either often or occasionally send back work done i 


p Cv 


cause of the drop is well-known to any home-user. As to the GaruSrGmnnTV ’ ,5 ™ on ’ according 

computer capabilities continue to rise, computer prices Gartner wh irfwS-' IMP 6 Sath^S force, says 
continue to plummet ^u«r paces vjrch forecasts that this market will amount to 

Although the news would have been welcomed by cor- * 1&/ mU ° by 2000 “ a near-doubling in only three years, 
porate budgeting dcnaitmenK a feu/ vow* »»» •» . 


by providers of outsourced services. 
Other knowledge workers, whru 


knowledge workers, whose numbers are also * 

Wrtirlltf mnMtniM iL. - - * d I _ * _ C . I . 1 


With the advent of Ok on-line 
workers" has taken off. 


company, the role of "knowledge 


growing r apidly, maintain the three other kinds of elec- \ 
tronic interfaces that are now becoming inereswinalv mm- ; 


^ ; w-u nuiA/UJCU DV COT- * — j — a. 

SKJiSSS tSSss^ _ 

ware has become somefting of a sideshow on the office rate 


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tronic interfaces that are now becoming increasingly com- 1 
mon to the world's, companies - those existing between J 
the company and its suppliers and subcontractors, those • 
between the company and its customers, and those among » 
the company's internal departments. : 

Thanks to such interlinked software as SAP’s R/3, in ■ 
today’s networked company a vast quantity of documents ■ 
and data are automatically “pushed” through today’s net- : 

| worked company. k 

I Here is an example of how it works: Originating in the * 

I personnel department, the data on a new employee is ? 
relayed by R/3 to the information technology department, : 
m which new equipment and passwords are readied for • 
him or her, to the accounting department, where cash flow ■ 
and overhead totals are automatically changed; and to the ! 
Truman affairs area, in which an additional seat is • 
reserved on the bus bringing employees to the company's ■ 
annual picnic. ^ J ■ 

As might be expected, it takes a great deal of expertise 1 
for the knowledge worker to properly handle these various ■ 
responsibilities. Training such workers has become a ■ 
major item of expenditure for the companies. The cost of r 
tra S“ l Jg knowledge workers to use such linkage software : 
as b AP s R/3 is pegged at anywhere between four to eight ! 
times more than the software’s purchase price. 


The advantages of IVPs 

Companies are also investing heavily in equipment that ' 
frets knowledge workers from the one activity that fore- ■ 
stalls their working quickly and effectively; the answering • 

^n^ b ^fJ^ UeneS ^ fi ? m fellow employees, outsourcing A> 
contact persons and the general public. e • 

_ **“ knowJedge workers from these chores is ; 

! expert ^ ystems> to* most common of which are ‘ 
the newest generation of interactive voice response (TVP) . 
devices, known to anyone who has ever called an airline ' 
car rental agency or telephone company. ' 

I S“ ^ ow ledge worker creates a “virtual 

answerer capable of responding to queries with pre- 
recorded information and handling follow-up queries and 
comments with further responses. 

According t° Frost & Sullivan, the European market for 

2ft S e h $1 f b !. ll,0n ^ in 1996 double by 
-UU l . One-fifth Of all companies in Germany have alreadv 
equipped their knowledge workers with [VPs in at /east a - 
rudmjentaty form, reports Thybr Nelson AGB. 

raaM or me ^ ly P ass . ively wait to be voice- 

mailed or called before swinging into action. Thev also : 

serve as the knowledge worker’s “electronic assistant." : 

mess ^cs and information to the desired recipe ' 
lent in the most effective form available - as either E-mail * 
or voice-mail (or a combination thereof) sent via the com: • 

rt ,s accora P Ilshed by coupling the IVPs with ' 

w "-' — « 


KOSE M 




Those pesky PCs - jb 

Answering routine queries was irksome, but the biasesf J 

° n know, fd8 e workere’ time used to come from': 
de^?mienL eXPeCted ^ com P any 's own ICf ’ 

Pr0ne to ^clowns, viruses and^ 
other problems, on-line networks, even more so The 
world s computer industry is constantly being roiled bv a : 
nerer-end," 8 spate of program upgracL ^I extensions ’ 
These often make previous programs obsolete or even 
incompanble with the newer models 6 e ?' 

^ yea^go, all rescue services, upgrades and ’ 
^tensions issued from the company's JCT deDartmenf * 

JwLh U S n ?- ng \ ii>ese departments were often overbur^ 
dene^ Making “house calls” is a time-^onsumJne iob 
is sending out a constant stream of diskettes. CD-ROM* 1 
d E-mail throughout the company. 

The resulting delays are now a tiling of the nast ihani-v ‘ 

their^jwn e ufxlar^ C vir^^cans ) ^5 s ^ : ® ular *^®'^^ " 
software providers’ Web sites. The tffects Efrf?i a,IK ,- fro - m % 
ed access have been dramatic For b^S^ S ® 

the companies themselves “* em P loy ees and ■ 


The open company 

- t: 

access to in -company and external infnr^?’ un,m P ede d ' 

siar ““ - r A"°sr'sss,: 

-£tk SsasSKS^r 11 ? *» 

allow companies to get a luuidle on To 7 

generation of “virtual superiors” iid®vHS a ? 0n ' a new ; 
has been launched on die world’t^ 

Equipment Cotporation. McAfa^ ^ NtocSrd y . Digita l 
Swumy Systems and other providers NetGuarcl Internet : 

These supervisors and scanners take all th* 

Internet servers and .search engines m s used b ^' 

anes within and without thf virtuaf >»«*;: 
Computerwoche put it. Each flow of dnL ^ fi^ nsc - “ J 
company and between com nan v h 01 * 1 ,nsid e the 

i 

ones. Firewalls are barriers protectinVA^ 1 ^ of ex 'sting ■ 
intrusion by unauthorized data 'mm ! 

this information has been consi'pn A^ P . ter ve macular i 
Mttets provide a first bn" o defe^l .o - n ° S° ; 
onslaught on a company's firewalk hv o?? a" 51 a '“ssive ' 
on creating havoc. ' 3 ou ^ide parties bent i 

Tl ' . v 111 


: ^0pp_ 


. ---o uem 

i heir ravonte tactic is spnri;„„ 
which bursts in front of the firewnjT rt 5* pl ?d ,n S cookie.” 
data sets. This tidal wave millions of 

firewall, rending « useless nformatlo n crests over the 
The ever-mventive computer world h. 

"SJ ^ c SW» i '« firewalk U P a 


* 1 *™. l ® mi encompassing firewaliT m? 8 001716 U P with a 
m»c. 

,00lS « ** hone « I- ^ 'he ^ 







INT ERNA TIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 


PAGE I9b 


SPONSORED SI rnuv 


Office Equipment 


Software Seeks Out R qad Warriors’ Ultimate Linkup TO the ‘Mother Office’ 


The Customer 

Securing software is no longer a headache. 

S oftware has long Wrirten in Sun’s Jav 
production in t h* 


GSM and GSM-Iniemet-based links will make life easier for out-of-office workers, who now represent 1.2 percent of the EU workforce. 


S oftware has long 
been a key factor of 
production in the 
world’s offices, and 
securing h was one of 
' the major tasks of any 
office worker. A year or 
; two ago, office workers 
; Spent a good deal of their 
-time scouting for new 
“products, upgrades and 
extensions, procuring 
- them on-line via an 
I Internet download or 
j - ordering them by fax. 
•Today, the software 
i - seeks out the customer - 
'supplying, upgrading 
and extending itself via 
■ Java-based programs. 

- Broadcasting systems 

The world's information 
- and communication 
technology market has 
moved on once more, 

• and it has brought some- 
thing useful with it: 

‘ Internet-based broad- 
- casting systems. These 
-systems also work on 
any Intranet or other 
• server-based network 
and are programmed to 
transmit news, weather, 

' electronic magazines 
- (including Hotwired, the 
best-known of the 
“Webzines”) and soft- 
ware programs to the 
end-user's computer. Via 
their “tuners,” the end- 
■ users decide which of 
- the broadcasts they want 
to receive. 

The most famous of 
the broadcasting systems 
-is Marimba’s Castanet 


A new generation of 
high-capacity 
mobile links is keep- 
ing the world's road war- 
riors on-line with their 
home offices - and well- 
informed about what lies 
ahead. 

The image of the “tele- 
worker” is very different 
from that of the “road war- 
rior,” yet statisticians lump 
both into the same catego- 
ry: “non-office staff mem- 
bers.” 

At the end of 1994, this 
category included 1.3 mil- 
lion people in the European 
Union. At prevailing rates 
of increase, that figure 
should be somewhere 
around 1 .6 million now - or 
about 1.2 percent of the 
Elf's total workforce, 
according to a study con- 
ducted by Cologne's 
authoritative Institut der 
deutschen Wirtschaft 
(Institute of the German 
Economy) market research 
group. Virtually all of these 
teleworkers transfer data 
and- documents to the 
“mother office” on-line. 

Part-time warriors 
Perhaps 10 limes Lhat many 
people could be classified 
as “part-time warriors” - 
people who spend from one 
day to one week a month 
away from the office, 
reports the study. Although 
they were equipped with 
mobile data- transfer links, 
until recently most of these 
nearly 18 million people 
generally waited until 
returning to the office to 
download their informa- 
tion. Their arrival was 
marked by a tangling of 
printer and computer cables 


Written in Sun’s Java 
programming language, 
Castanet works with the 
application distribution 
protocol developed by 
Castanet, using Java’s 
applets technology, 
which not only allows 
the ongoing supply of 
software to a network of 
users but also makes the 
entire network more sup- 
ple. 

Handy ‘"applets” 

Here is how it works: 
The server “broadcasts" 
a program containing 
one or more applets to 
the network’s PCs. Once 
they accept “delivery” 
the server “corresponds" 
with the applet, setting 
up an interface that 
allows the simplified 
transfer of programs. In 
most cases, this transfer 
occurs on an “as-needed 
basis” - when the end- 
user requires the particu- 
lar program or when a 
program previously 
installed on user PCs 
needs an update. 

“The advantages of 
this arrangement are 
many,” says Robert 
Hauk, the Vienna-based 
connectivity expert. 
"Hard disk space is 
freed, download times 
are shortened and, most 
importantly, it represents 
the end of ‘clutter’ - that 
vast mass of out-of-date 
programs clogging up 
individual PCs and 
entire networks." 



New and powerful mobile Finks are helping road warriors stay in touch with the home office - and prepare for what lies ahead. 


and a shoving of desktop 
machines. 

The problems with the 
mobile links were a lack of 
coverage by mobile tele- 
phones. differing standoffs 
of transmission and. cru- 
cially. a lack of easy-to-use 
interfaces and appealing 


Those Machines That Do It All 

Multifunctional machines are finally beginning to win the confidence of consumers. 


T he julvent. of CeBIT is 
heralded by a wave of 
launches of multi- 
functional. machines. All 
feature an impressive, often 
improbable array of func- 
tions hitherto carried out by 
individual machines. 

-This year’s launches at 
CeBIT include a modem 
with a built-in telephone 
link, manufactured by co co- 
mputer communication con- 
•*nectivity (CCC) specialist 
US Robotics. The micro- 
phone and loudspeaker 
built into many advanced 
computers serve as the tele- 
phone's speaker and receiv- 
er. Dialing occurs on- 
screen, via the mouse or 
keyboard. 

Tough scrutiny 
Like all of the multifunc- 
tional machines preceding 
it, the multifunctional tele- 
phone will be subject to 
tqugh scrutiny by the 
world's consumers, who 
have yet to show an innate 
enthusiasm for such 
machines. 

^ ■‘The fact that purchasing 
one machine will solve sev- 
eral of their equipment 
needs, and at a fraction of 
the total price of buying the 
individual ones separately, 
doesn’t necessarily carry 
die day with consumers.” 
says SUke Bohling, respon- 
sible for multifunctional 
machines at Minolta 
Germany. ‘‘Consumers 
look to see whether or not 
each of the new machine’s 
functions performs at the 
level of the separate, 
'stand-alone’ ones. If not, 
they generally don’t buy. 

“Multifunctional ma- 
chines are by their nature a g 
slow sell,” she adds. J 
^■‘Consumers need time to s 
‘‘accept the fact that many of 


their existing .machines can 
be replaced by a single, ver-’ 
satile one.” 

No cable spaghetti 
Sometimes, of course, die 
integrating of functions 
enhances the convenience 
of each of them, and these 
“all-rounders” have quickly 
established themselves on 
their markets. The entirely 
logical combination of tele- 
phone, fax and answering 
machine did away with a 
great deal of "cable 
spaghetti” and freed up 


desk space. Not surprising- 
ly, this combination has 
proven highly successful. 

Most of these machines 
are aimed at the fast-grow- 
ing small and home office 
(SoHo) segment of the 
office equipment market 
Virtually all SoHo con- 
sumers have a fax and a 
printer, but relatively few 
possess a scanner and a 
photocopying machine. To 
meet this emerging need. 
Hewlett Packard. Minolta 
and a wide range of other 
manufacturers have 


launched an office machine 
with all four functions. 

Is this newcomer finding 
a market? "Yes, because it’s 
passing a bit of benchmark- 
ing carried out by con- 
sumers.” says Ms. Bohling. 
"Consumers know printers 
very well and know what 
to expect of them. The first 
thing they do with one of 
our~MinoItafax 2500 or 
3500 models is to test its 
printer. And because our 
laser printer can put out six 
pages a minute, the con- 
sumers are accepting it" • 


applications. A new genera- 
tion of links is changing all 
thaL 

It is called a “lake-it-any- 
where service suitcase” by 
its manufacturer, Siemens- 
Nixdorf, and that is a fitting 
description of both its 
appearance and its func- 
tions. Inside its mgged 
exterior is a high-capacity 
laptop interlinked with 
mobile communication 
equipment. The service 
provided by the suitcase is 
the unlimited mobile trans- 
fer of data with the home 
office's computer net- 
works. To accomplish that, 
the suitcase uses high- 
capacity, long-range 
infrared beams. 

To decongest the elec- 
tronic gateway between the 
company's networks and 
the outside world, these 
beams can also be received 
by a new generation of end 
devices, including laptops 
and such printers as 
Minolta’s PagePro 6e. 

Talking to your laptop 
The sight of people speak- 


ing into their mobile tele- 
phones has become com- 
mon around the world, as 
has that of passengers busy 
typing into their laptops in 
trains or planes. To date, 
few people have been 
viewed conversing with 
their laptops. 

Sweden's PC Card Dis- 
tribution Scandinavia AB 
plans to change all that. It 
has developed the PCM- 
CIA card, which fits into a 
normal laptop and gives it 
all the functions of a mobile 
telephone, including voice 
and data transmission. An 
important advantage is that 
the mobile telephone works 
on the GSM standard. 

A mobile telephone 
equipped with an Internet 
interface sounds like the 
ultimate gimmick. After all, 
who has the time and inter- 
est to surf the World Wide 
Web while on the road? 

“Anyone needing easy 
access to information, 
while on the move. 
Information related to busi- 
ness matters found on cor- 
porate Intranets, E-mail and 


- why not? - general infor- 
mation such as weather 
reports, road traffic condi- 
tions. hotel room reserva- 
tions and airline sched- 
ules,” says Jacques 
Combet, marketing director 
of Alcatel’s GSM mobile 
phones unit 

“Thanks to the profusion 
of service-oriented Web 
sites, the Web is now full of 
useful information: a 
browser makes this infor- 
mation easy to find, and a 
handset gives the Web the 
one thing it was missing - 
universal wireless geo- 
graphic access.” 

Hie next generation 
Internet access is just one of 
the convenient features 
Alcatel will introduce into 
its next generation of GSM 
handsets. Another is the 
mobile phones’ One Touch 
PRO (tm) operator menu, 
which includes extra-large 
graphic display and a wide 
range of icons. They are 
easy to use - very impor- 
tant when dealing with the 
hubbub of the road. 


To provide this access, 
Alcatel teamed up with 
Unwired Planet, one of the 
United States' hottest new 
information and communi- 
cation technology compa- 
nies. 

Launched in 1994, 
Unwired Planet provided 
the software platform 
enabling mobile telephones 
to access Internet or 
Intranet-based information 
through the GSM network. 
Unwired Planet’s contribu- 
tions include a specialized 
browser and its “handheld 
device mark-up language” 
(HDML). 

In addition io "standard” 
World Wide Web access. 
GSM/Intemet handsel own- 
ers will be provided with a 
wide range of other interac- 
tive services. What exactly 
these are will depend on 
which provider and/or net- 
work the handset owner has 
chosen. Such services are 
already provided by a num- 
ber of U.S. cellular opera- 
tors, and GSM operators are 
now actively working on 
this, reports Alcatel. • 


The Growing Appeal of the Intranet 

In America, the number of Intranets is expected to rise by 369 percent over the next three years. 


T'7 .:> f # 









to market success. 


Europe on the Verge of a Web ware Boom 

market for connectivity programs has plenty of room to grow, at least in Europe. 

t medium-sized ones. Since the latter a fraction of the corresponding fig- 

“The Emerging European interne fof g8 percent of the ure in the United Stales, and one- 

Access Market" study has ront j ne m’s business community 17th of the number of faxes dis- 


O ften built on any existing cor- 
porate netware platform, an 
Intranet has a twofold appeal. 
By using the Internet’s powerful 
search tools, employees greatly raise 
their awareness of the corporate 
resources and information at their dis- 
posal. 

By turning the Internet from an 
open-ended into a closed-cycle sys- 
tem, corporate managers get one thing 
hitherto missing from the Web: guar- 
anteed message delivery. This guaran- 
tee turns an information broadcast 
into interactive communication, rais- 
ing management awareness of what 
Intranet participants know. 

Tremendous growth in Intranets 
The number of Intranets is growing 
nearly as fast as the expectations asso- 
ciated with them and the reposition- 
ing of the companies supplying 
groupware and netware. 

According to the U.S.-based Focus 
market research organization, the 
number of Intranets maintained by 
American companies will increase 
369 percent ova - the next three years. 
A pre-CeBIT study finds this forecast 
slightly conservative. By early 1998, 
the study says, half of the world's 
companies will have set up an 
Intranet; two years later, the Intranet 
segment of the world’s information 
and communication technology (ICT) 
market will have eclipsed the Internet 
market 

Showing a corresponding rise is the 
number of applications - the things 
you can do with and on an Intranet 
Focus estimates that this number will 
rise by 226 percent in 1997 alone. 

Many of the applications listed 
should have a familiar ring. Some 41 


percent of the companies surveyed 
report using their Intranets to send E- 
mail, 37 percent to provide open 
access to documents and data banks, 
25 percent to carry out enterprise- 
wide operations. 

These, of course, are functions 
already ably carried out by the net- 
ware and groupware provided by 
Novell, Lotus Development and other 
leading manufacturers for many 
years. To meet the market trend, these 
manufacturers are now repositioning 
themselves. “We are the Intranet com- 
pany!” trumpets Novell’s CeBIT 
advertising. 

New capabilities 

Is the Intranet only “netware equipped 
with a browser,” as many skeptics 
claim? 


Now broadcast systems 
autoamOcaSy supply and 
testatt so ft wa re 
In office PCs 


“No," says Andreas Zeitier, general 
manager of Novell Germany. Austria 
and Switzerland. “The melding of the 
Internet and netware produces a new 
entity imparting both with new capa- 
bilities. Employees in a pre-intranet 
environment did not have a single, 
on-line way to become aware of all of 
the information, expertise and other 
resources possessed within the com- 
pany. Bulletin boards generally cover 
current developments and issues, and 
E-mail is sent on a very narrow point- 
to-point basis. Today, the employees 


use their browsers' search engines to 
‘mine’ the entire company for usable 
information. Further, through search 
engines and hyperlinks, employees 
can track down useful information - 
and put together their own docu- 
ments." 

This may not sound very different 
from the Web, but Mr. Zeitier points 
out that “an Intranet, as a delimited 
world, has a set of advantages the 
Internet doesn't: Instead of searching 
the whole world for usable informa- 
tion -always a time-consuming, often 
a frustrating process - employees 
search within a highly finite ‘sphere,’ 
with a much better chance of success. 

"For management, the Intranet's 
advantages are enormous,” he contin- 
ues. ‘Instead of broadcasting a mes- 
sage to the entire world, with indefin- 
able results, you can transmit your 
message on a poim-to-point basis, 
meaning that you can make sore, via 
an Intranet supervisor, that all of the 
recipients have in fact received it." 

Nor are the similarities between 
groupware and Intranet a drawback 
for Novell or Lotus. In fact, for Lotus, 
these are a main selling point. As 
Stefan Kruger, product manager for 
communication systems at Lotus 
Germany, points out: "Because our 
groupware already had many of the 
Intranet's key features, the setting up 
of an Intranet requires only a minimal 
amount of readjustment and learning 
for groupware users. The primary 
impact of the new Intranet is. for 
them, entirely positive: They sudden- 
ly have access to additional applica- 
tions. One of them is the ability to cre- 
ate their own Web pages without 
learning a whole programming lan- 
guage.” • 


rowth in the internet maixei. compuien, are equippea wim a 

The study also found evidence modem. At the present rate of 
mritention reoeated- growth, it will take Germany an nth- 


more dramatic picture. | v made by Intel neao Anorew er ragw years ra caicn up wim tfle 

bv Bonn’s D3 Group, me sway e ^ Europe is lagging m the United Stares in this regard. By 
found that 98 percent ot we An average oflO mil- 2005, the study concludes. 

r- ~ .v lotw-scale companies rrwyssaees were sent Germans will be sending some 500 


with only 4 percent 


“Office Equipment” 
was produced in its entirety by the 
Advertising Department of the International Herald Tribune . 
Writer: Terry Swartzberg in Munich. 

Program director: Bill Mahder. 







PAGE 20 



„ K.v « . Vi*^ ?T ! '- 1 

TbeAnoo-Jfitn 

South African bowler Allan 
Donald suffering after a nar- 
row escape by Mark Waugh. 


Australia Wins Series 


cricket Mark Waugh hit a su- 
perb 1 16 Monday as Australia beat 
South Africa by two wickets on the 
fourth day of the second test in Port 
Elizabeth. Australia took a 2-0 lead 
in the three-test series. 

Needing 270 to win. Australia 
reached 258 for five before losing 
wickets in three successive overs. 
Jacques Kallis bowled Waugh in 
the 91st over. Hansie Cronje re- 
moved Michael Bevan (24 runs) 
and Kallis trapped Shane Warne 
(3). But in the next over Ian Healy 
flicked a ball from Cronje for six to 
give Australia, victory. 

• India, replying to West Indies* 
first innings of 296, was all out for 
436 on the fourth day of the second 
test in Trinidad on Monday. 

• A year after it won the World 
Cup, Sri Lanka sank to a 2-0 test 
series loss to New Zealand, ranked 
last among test nations. 

Set 326 to win Sri Lanka was 
bowled out for 205. Daniel Vettori, 
an 18-year-old spinner, took five 
wickets for 84 in the innings and was 
named man of the match. (Reuters) 


Scandal in Hong Kong 


HORSE RACING In Hong Kong. 
36 trainers, jockeys and other ra- 
cing figures were detained 
Monday. Hong Kong's Independ- 
ent Commission Against Corrup- 
tion said it arrested IS people 
Sunday in connection with allega- 
tions that jockeys and trainers were 
“corruptly involved with illegal 
bookmakers in syndicated horse 
race fixing.” (Reuters) 


Appleby Takes Title 


OOtF Stuart Appleby of Australia 
won the $1.5 million Honda Classic 
by a stroke from Payne Stewart, and 
Michael Bradley. (Reuters l 


Gr bac Joining Chiefs 


football The Kansas City 
Chiefs said Monday they had 
signed quarterback Elvis Gibac. 
who spent the last four seasons with 
San Francisco. (AP) 


Capobianco Banned 


athletics The Australian 
sprinter Dean Capobianco was 
banned Monday after an Interna- 
tional Amateur Athletic Federation 
arbitration panel upheld a drugs test 
for steroids. The ban ends May 27, 
2000. so Capobianco could com- 
pete in the 2000 Olympics in 
Sydney. (Reuters) 




WTEKNATTONAL 


Sports 


TUESDAY, MARCH 1&, 1997 


World Roundup 


All Top Seeds and Some Outsiders Gain in NCAA 


; P aU 

ft ai J 


A 14th Choice 
And 2 No. 10s 
Move Ahead 
To Sweet 16 


NCAA Roundup 


vived by one point at the East Regional 
when EteJuan Vazauez intercepted Con- 


when DeJuan Vazquez intercepted Cop- 
pin State’s inbound pass with four 
seconds left 

* ‘Athletes tike to win, but it is hard for 
me to bang my head right now,” said 
Reggie Welch of Coppin State, which 
shocked second-seeded South Carolina 
in the opening round. “We had a heck- 
uvaride." 

Reggie Freeman scored 22 points, and 
Texas blocked a shot with four seconds 
left and the Longhorns one point ahead. 

Vazquez then stole die inbound pass 
from Fred Warrick to preserve the vic- 
tory. Warrick bad just replaced Coppin 
State’s star. Terquin Mott, who fouled 
out 

Utah 77, North Carolina Charlotte 58 

All-American Keith Van Horn had 27 
points and 8 rebounds, and Michael 
Doleac scored 18 as Utah’s quick big 
men wore down North Carolina Char- 
lotte in the West regional. 

Ben Caton added 12 points for the 
Utes t28-3), who won their 13th straight 
and reached the final 16 for the second 
straight year. 

Tremaine Gardiner led the 49ers (22- 
9) with 14 points, Diraingus Bundy had 
1 1 and Shanderic Downs 10. 

Loubwflle 64, Now Mexico 63 DeJuan 
Wheat, playing with a shoulder injury 
that required a second cortisone shot in 
five days, led the Cardinals (25-8) with 
22 points in the East region. 

New Mexico (25-8) had a last chance 
to win but David Gibson badly missed a 
driving, over-the-head layup with 2.3 
seconds left. 

U will be the fourth trip to the round of 
16 in five seasons for Louisville. 


Avalanche Beat Wings 
To Take Division Title 


The Associated Press 

In a battle between two of 
the NHL's heavyweights, the 
Colorado Avalanche were in 
championship form against 
the Detroit Red Wings. 

“It was like playoff 
hockey out there,” Adam 


NHL Rovndhr 


Deadmarsh said after scoring 
two goals and assisting on 
another as die Avalanche 
beat the Red Wings 4-2 
Sunday night and clinched 
the regular-season Pacific 
Division title. “That's how 
we like to play, and that’s 
what fans like to see.” 

The sellout crowd at Mc- 
Nichols Arena saw the first 
meeting of Colorado’s 
Claude Lemieux and De- 
troit's Kris Draper since they 
collided last season In the 
Western Conference finals. 

Lemieux was suspended 
for two games after checking 
Draper head-first into the 
boards and sending him to 
the hospital. 

The teams combined for 
66 penalty minutes in the first 
period alone. Near the end of 
the period, Lemieux and 
Draper were involved in a 


scuffle among several play- 
ers, and each was sent off on 
10-minute misconducts. 

• Deadmarsh scored one 
goal on a power play and 
another with his team short- 
handed as die defending 
Stanley Cup champion Ava- 
lanche unproved the NHL's 
best record. 

All six goals came on odd- 
man situations — four on the 
power play and the others in 
shorthanded situations. Keith 
Jones and Jon Klemm scored 
the other goals for the Ava- 
lanche. Brendan Shanahan 
and Serge! Fedorov scored 
for Detroit, 

Blackhawtu 3, Islanders 4 

In Chicago, Tony Amonte 
scored three goals for his 
fourth career hat trick as the 
Blackhawks beat the Is- 
landers. 

Amonte ’s second and third 
goals, at 13:26 and 16:05 of 
die second period, keyed a 




~y "g*. ■ : 


• + 3t$' 



FINAL FOUR 


MIDWEST 


1 Wnnwets 79 


Bis S.W. Toon SL to 


1997 NCAA 
Men’s Basketball 
Tournament 


N.G*re*na82 1 


MrlWd74TS 


8 MadntppMO 


I TmntU>S7 

uadi 20 
San Antonio 

[ Tut*a SB 


Modi 21 
Syiacu**, N. Y. 


CoferactoM 0 


Stanford Ends 
Dream for 
Wake Forest’s 
6-10 Center 


CaJNomJa 55 S 


The Associated Press 

With two rounds complete in the 
NCAA tournament, all the selection 
committee's choices for the Final Four 
are still on course. But while all the top 
seeds are still standing, some other big 
names have fallen. 

The Sweet 16 includes 14th- seeded 
Tennessee-Chattanooga and a pair of 
No. 10 seeds. Providence and Texas. 

TwwmiMChirttamoga 75, Illinois 

63 The Moccasins, who beat No. 3 
Georgia in the first round, stopped No. 6 
Illinois on Sunday to reach the round of 
16 for the first time. 

Four Mocs scored in double figures 
and the team outscored Illinois. 21 -4, in 


Il2 Bon&nUt&Z 


PrtMMlanK iZ 


By Tom Friend 

New York Tunes Service 


■13 MhAOMdSB 


8 tanMO. 


March 22 
SwAnfcrio 


March 23 
Syracuse. fiY. 


Long Kiml U. 91 13 


11 MnoM State 57 


3 CtodnnatfaB 


Naw Mexico SB 


March 20 
SanArtaw 


WwHubial 

UtedlZI Old Dominion 88 

Syracuse, N.Y. „ . _ 


TUCSON, Arizona — Tim Duncan 
did not want to hear that college is the 
greatest tune of your life. 

He could have had mini ons of dollars 
in annuities by now, but instead be spent 
Sunday afternoon being pushed on bps 
empty wallet — by Stanford economics 


majors. 

Their names are Tim Young, Mark 


_ t UCLA9B 

15 CturiMBoa Southom 76 


SEMHNAL 

March 29 i 
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fWAL 
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Coppin Stetefl I 


Coppin State 7B is 


the final 7:25. Tennessee-Chattanooga 
was motivated by “disrespect’' from 
the Dlinois players, who according to 
senior Johnny Taylor, were singing and 
chanting “Final Four” before foe game 
after finding out that Duke, foe top seed 
in their bracket of the Southeast region, 
had lost to Providence. 

“We wanted to send them and the 
world a message,” Taylor said. “They 
were whooping it up in the locker room 
after Providence won. They thought 
they were going up against nobody.” 

Illinois guard fCiwane Garris, who 
scored 19 points, said the mini were 
only trying to pump themselves up be- 
fore the game. But they could do very 
tittle during it when forward Chris 
Gandy, troubled because of fouls, did 
not score in the second half and didn't 
have a rebound. The Moccasins con- 
trolled rebounding, 39-21, and shot 51 
percent from the mid. 

Texas 82 , Coppin State 81 Texas 
barely beat 1 5th-seeded Coppin State in 
foe East region. The Longhorns sur- 


SOUTHEAST 


Szkrtay [*«££* 


Jackson 8L 64 16 


Punfu»83 6 


9 Virginia 60 X**"™ Madia) 

SaiJosaCaB. 

5 Boston Con. 73 

1 Boston CoS 77 


March 21 
Bflringham. Nk, 

CofL of Ctiariast 


Rhod* Hand 7V 0 


P*12 Valparaiso 66 


Cofl. of QuriMrton 75 IS 


4 SL Joaapti'a 7G 


Arizona 65 4 


I lstJna T h-.in 
13 PaoMeSS March Z? 

5si Jose, CafiL 


Mach 23 
Bomr^han. Ala 


South AUtsana 57 13 


11 O k l ah om a 67 


THat-Chattanooga 


Southern Col 77 II 


3 WoftaFMaotSS 


ran 

U fit. Mary 1 *, CoL 46 NtodiZ) 

_ , „ San Jose, CaB. 


7 UC/Chariolte79 


■■■ - 

March 2 1 TomrChB&BnoogaTO 14 

B n raigft a n. Ate 


I nC/Charirttosa 


Pnnridance 98 1 


10 GcoffyaloOTi 67 


Proaldancv 61 IQ 


Murray State 68 15 


The Cardinals got a big break when 
New Mexico’s Kenny Thomas fouled 
out after elbowing Datnion Dantzler on 
the first of two Nate Johnson free throws 
with 3:53 left Johnson and Dantzler 
made all four free throws, opening the 
lead to six points. 

Clemsen 69, Tulsa 59 Clems on shot 


just 32 percent but held Shea Seals, 
Tulsa’s career scoring leader, to five 


Tulsa’s career scoring leader, to five 
points in advancing in the Midwest re- 
gion. 

Terrell McIntyre and Meri Code 
combined for 31 second-half points 
while Seals spent much of the game on 
the bench after drawing his fourth foul 
early in the second half. 

Seals, who became the school’s lead- 
ing scorer during Tulsa ’s first-round 8 1 - 
52 victory over Boston University, shot 
2 for 11. 

Clemson (23-9) shot just 18 for 57 
from foe field, but Tulsa (24-10) kept 
the Tigers in foe game by making only 
13 of 28 free throws. 

Mkmcmotm 76, Temple 37 In foe other 

Midwest game in Kansas City, Min- 
nesota completed the sweep by the top 
seeds, ripping past Temple and joining 
North Carolina, Kansas and Kentucky 
in the round of 16. 

Sam Jacobson hit four of Minnesota's 
10 zone-busting 3-poUiters and the top- 
seeded Gophers cruised past No. 9 seed 
Temple. 

The Gophers (29-3) did exactly what 


they promised against the feared matchup 
zone of Temple, which held Mississippi 
to a regional-record low of 40 points in 
the first round of the tournament 

Jackson was 4 for 8 from behind foe 
3-point arc and Charles Thomas was 3 
for 6. Altogether, the Gophers hit 10 of 
23 3-pointers while holding foe Owls 
(20-1 1 ) to 31 percent shooting. 

Providence 98, Duke 87 Derrick 
Brown scored a career-high 33 points to 
lead Providence over Duke in the South- 
east Regional. 

“He’s a warrior,” coach Pete Gillen 
said of Brown. “He gets that tunnel 
vision in his eyes and it doesn't matter if 
the Russian Army is in front ofhim. He's 
going to shooL He wouldn't be denied 
today.” 

Brown made 12 of 16 field-goal at- 
tempts and Austin Crosbere added 21 
points for foe lOfo-seeded Friars (23- 
II), who outrebounded No. 2 seed 
Duke, 43-24. 

Croshere played in foul trouble most of 
the day. But it was his 14-footer with just 
over five minutes to play that broke a 74- 
74 tie and triggered an 1 1-1 Providence 
run. Jeff Cape! closed his career with 26 
points, including 19 in the second half for 
Duke (24-9). 

The round of 1 6 begins Thursday with 
the Midwest in San Antonio and the 
West in San Jose. Play in the East and 
Southeast salts on Friday in Syracuse. 
New York, and Birmingham, Alabama. 



Pal SAikhTTV AuodxiaJ Pica 

Keith Van Horn of Utah, left, at- 
tempting to block a shot by Al- 
exander Kuehl of UNC Charlotte. 


Madson, Peter Sauer, Pete Van Elsw^k Jt 
and Mark Seaton and, while they could 
all use a student loan from Duncan next 
year, they were superior to him Sunday 
in aggregate. 

Duncan, college basketball’s player 
of foe year, did not have a field goal in 
foe game’s final 14 minutes, and he was 
not there when foe offensive rebound of 
Stanford's life fell into the lap of a 6- 
foot (1.8 -meter) guard. 

Arthur Lee's Iook-what-I-found re- 
bound basket with 29 seconds remain- 
ing was foe insurance that sixth-seeded 
Stanford needed, and Duncan's remark- 
able career at Wake Forest ended in tfie 
second round of foe West Regional inU 
72-66 upseL 

“I didn ’t know we could do this, to be 
honest with you.” said Stanford’s 
coach, Mike Montgomery. 

The Cardinal has not been to aregional 
semifinal since 1942, and Stanford's 
arch-rivals at Cal-Berfceley like to say jl 
that the Stanford men cannot even bear f 
their women’s team. But a point guard, 
Brevin Knight, controlled foe tempo 
Sunday, and Stanford's five big men 
pitched foe perfect makeshift tent around 
Duncan, the 6-foot- 1 0-inch center. 

Stanford (22-7) is foe fourth Pacific 10 
team to reach foe NCAA tournaments 
final 1 6. Stanford also gets to play just 20 
minutes away from the campus next 
Thursday at the San Jose Arena. 

“It will be very, very loud,” Knight 
said. The opponent will be Utah, which 
dismantled North Carolina-Cbariotte. 
.77-58, in an earlier- game Sunday,- but 
foe truth is, this West Regional in San 
Jose was supposed to be a pro scouting 
opportunity. 

Duncan was supposed to be there, 
along with Utah’s Keith Van Horn and 
Kentucky’s Ron Mercer — foe probable 
first three NBA lottery picks — but 
Stanford’s upset of the third-seeded De- 
mon Deacons (24-7) means foal Duncan 
can finally start talking to agents. 

“I couldn't sit here and tell you what 
I got out of staying, ’ ' said Duncan of his 
decision to finish college, even though, fe . 
he probably would have been foe first 
overall pick in foe last two National 
Basketball Association drafts. “I hadTa 
great time. I have no regrets.” 

His crime Sunday was not finishing 
what he started. 

Duncan's numbers Sunday were 
reputable — 18 points, 20 rebounds, 
three blocks — but be had six turnovers 
and not only did his erratic guards fail to 
get the ball to him, they waited 35 
minutes to warm up. • ■ 

Stanford’s center. Tun Young, 
played only five minutes of the first half 
because of foul trouble, but the Cardinal 
still led, 25-19, then scored the first 
seven points of foe second half. Knight 
finished with 19 points and five assist$, 
giving all the credit to foe bruisers who 
backed up Young. •” 

Sauer drilled two jump shots in tije i 
final two minutes to give Stanford a 66- Vj 
59 lead, and Lee’s lucky rebound made 

it 68-62. • 


jjtiBO A ■ 

figm ” 





' * 


Blazers ‘Flow On’ to Victory No. Sj 

Portland Downs Los Angeles, Extending League- Best Streak 


t \ 




Portland extended its league-best winning 
streak to nine games with a 106-94 victory 
over foe Los Angeles Clippers. 

“We have a lot of confidence right now.” 
said foe Blazers’ guard Kenny Anderson. 
“Our team trusts in each other. We’re just 
flowing.” 

Clifford Robinson scored 26 points for the 
visiting Blazers, including 3-for-6 on 


NBA Roundup 






3-pointers. Overall, Portland was S-for-14 




from long range. 

Lamond Murray had 20 points and 10 
rebounds for the Clippers, who trailed by 27 
points in the third quarter before staging a late 
rally. 

Nats 89, Knwka 74 In New York, 5am 
Cassell scored 23 points and grabbed a sea- 
son-high 10 rebounds as New Jersey won its 
second straight over an Eastern power. Kend- 
all GUI added 1 7 points for the Nets, who were 
coming off a stunning victory over foe Chica- 
go Bulls. Larry Johnson scored 21 points for 
foe Knicks. 

Host lot, dockets 80 In Miami. Tim 
Hardaway had 31 points and 9 assists as foe 
Heat moved back into first place in foe At- 
lantic Division. Isaac Austin had 18 points 
and 9 rebounds for Miami, which has won 
three straight to improve to 7-4 since the 
center Alonzo Mourning, was injured. Ha- 
keem Olajuwon led Houston with 20 poinLs. 

Bucks 102 , Racora 98 In Milwaukee, Glenn 
Robinson scored 1 1 of hi$ 30 points in the 
final period. Armon Gilliam and VSn Baker 


Robb Wil ha th/Hmrtro 


Brendan Shanahan of the Detroit Red Wings beating Colorado goalie Patrick Roy. 


three-goal spurt that snapped 
a 2-2 tie. The right wing had 
just one goal in his previous 
eight games. 

Stars B, Penguins 2 Mike 
Modano scored his 31st goal 
of the season, and Danyl 
Sydor ignited a four-goal 
second period as the Stars 


continued their run of home 
success with a victory over 
the shorthanded Penguins. 

Kghty Ducks 2, Flames 2 
In Anaheim, Dave Gagner 
and Robert Reichel scored 
power-play goals as Calgary 
ended an 0-for-29 drought 
with foe man advantage. 

Joe Sacco and rookie Sean 
Pronger each had a goal and 


an assist, and Guy Hebert 
made 41 saves for foe 
Ducks. 

■lopte Loafs 3, Lightning 1 

In Tampa, Felix Potvin 
stopped 39 shots and Wendel 
Clark had a goal and an assist 
as Toronto broke a five-game 
winless streak. 

After a scoreless first peri- 
od. Clark and Steve Sullivan 


put Toronto up 2-0 in die 
second. Mats Sundtn added 
bis team-leading 37fo goal in 
foe third period. 

Capitals 5, Whaler* 3 Peter 
Bondra had a goal and an 
assist in a three-goal first 


period as Washington beat 
Hartford, extending the 
Whalers’ road winless streak 
to seven games. 


added 18 apjece for foe Bucks, who won for 
only the second time in their last 12 games! 

10o< 83 10 Orlando, Gerald 

Wilkins scored 17 points as the Magic handed 
Vancouver its 13fo straight loss. The Magic 
won for foe I2fo time m 1 5 games under fodr 
new coach, Rjchie Adubato. 

Tfrnberwolvoa f-fg, Celtics 101 Boston lost 
m Minnesota and must finish the season wifo 
us worst winning percentage since 1 950 The 

£u 4 ' The besl «n finish is A 
*.8-54 for a .341 victory percentage. 

Kevin Garnett led Minnesota with 26 

■ **** rookie Antoine Walker 
paced the Celtics with 29. waixer 

, f Sonicsa3 Terry Mills scored 20 

Of his 25 points m foe first half as foTlWrit 
won ite 47th game, one more thanftetSSi 
won all last year. 016 ream 

. Dimais added 21 points for Dei™, 
including a patr of key 3-pointers itHhefourth 

Sis S* -4“ 

a 3-poim attempt with two secern*? f 1111 s f ed 
for Sacramento, whK^ fifc^ 

3-pointer with 2:58 left in «««,„• 311 txel 
Lakers ahead for ^ood van w P ut tiie 
his third field goaf hH i 5 ? ho L only 

3 92-89 lead Mdlhev wSfnn 8 ?^ 6 Lakers 
foe sixth time in 14 games 1 ° ** n for ^ 

Toronto with 25 . “““amine Jed visinng 


n 








SPORTS 


U.S. Beats Canada 


To Tie at Top of 
World Cup Group 


Cim^MlyOtrSkffFnimJDI^Ktcka 

The United States beat 
Canada 3-0 to draw level on 
points widt Mexico at die top 
of its World Cup qualifying 
group. Mexico meanwhile was 
> held 0-0 by Costa Rica. 

In the first round of games 
two weeks ago, Mexico beat 


WOKLD SOCCIB 


Can a da 4-0 while the United 
States tied 0-0 in Jamaica. 

Next weekend, the Amer- 
icans will play in Costa Rica, 
where, they lost dining the 
first round of qualifying in a 
game in which several U.S. 
players were hit with objects 
thrown from the stands. 

The United States toyed 
.with the Canadians Sunday at 
Palo Alto, California. The 
Americans outshot PanaHp 
Tl-3 in the first half while 
building a 2-0 lead on goals 
jby Eric Wynalda and Eddie 
Tfrpe. Ernie Stewart added the 
third goal in the 89th min ute, 
'and the Americans went 
home content. 

Wynalda hit the first goal 
.after eight minutes from a 
penally kick, awarded when 
Canada goalie Craig Forrest 
po Hided with Claudio Reyna. 


Less than six minutes later. 
Pope headed in a deflected 
comer kick. 

Stewart got the thiid goal 
but will be ineligible for the 
Costa Rica game because he 
picked up his second yellow 
card of the qualifying round. 

SMUN Substitute Em- 
manuel Armmike kept Bar- 
celona in the Spanish title 
race at Logrones on Sunday 
with an 8 2d minute goal. 

Barcelona won 1-0 to 
climb back into second place 
behind Real Madrid and 
above Real Beds. 

Am unike, who has 
struggled since signing from 
Sporting Lisbon, headed 
home his first goal for bis new 
club from a free-kick by mid- 
fielder Ivan de la Pena. 

Argentina Goalkeeper 
Jose Luis Chilaven missed 
two penalties in four minutes 
in a league match on Sunday. 

The Paraguayan interna- 
tional, who has already con- 
verted two penalties in the 
championship, missed one in 
the 79th minute and again in 
die 83d as Velez Sars field lost 
1-0 to modest Union. Union's 
goal had come in the 62d 
minute through Martin Perez- 
lindo. ( Reuters , NYT) 



U*S. champion Tara Lipins ki performing her routine in the qualifying round 
of the World Figure Skating Championships, Monday. Lipinskj was top in her 
group, outscoring reigning champion Michelle Kwan, who led the other group. 


Chang Thinks His Way 
To Champions Cup Title 


By Julie Cart 

Lot Angeles Times 

INDIAN WELLS, Califor- 
nia — Michael C hang needed 
only one set to gee his bear- 
ings; 10 games before the 
computer kicked in, before 
his analytic mind found the 
solution; 44 minutes in which 
Bohdan Ulihrach was al- 
lowed to lull himself into a 
sense of gladness, having so 
dominated the No. 3 player in 
the world. 

Once Chang processed 
Ulihrach's game and devised 
a plan for crushing it, the 
young Czech's own game 
plan abruptly vanished. He 
had been allowed his set, 
shown an opening and failed 
to take it. 

Chang retained his title at 
the Champions Cup on 
Sunday by thinking his way 
out of a shaky first set to a 4-6, 
6-3, 6-4, 6-3 victory and 
second title of the year. 

Chang’s usual meticulous 
pre-match preparation was 
useless against Ulihrach, an 
unseeded clay-court player 
against whom Chang had 
never played. 

Chang assumed that 
Ulihrach, ranked 43d, would 
play a slicing and spinning 
game similar to that of 


Thomas Muster of Austria. 
Chang beat Muster in the 
semifinal. 

Chang expected that the 
high -bouncing shots would 
allow him time to prepare his 
response. Instead, low. flat, 
hard shots came whizzing by 
him as he stood flat-footed 
and befuddled. - 

* ‘In the beginning, he was 
playing some incredible ten- 
nis,” Chang said. “We were 
trading ground strokes and all 
of a sudden be ripped a back- 
hand down-the-une winner 
from nowhere. 

“I just kind of stood there. 
I didn't know how to go about 
doing things. I think, as the 
match went on, I started to see 
a few cracks and exploit those 
a little bit.” 

Ulihrach began well, 
breaking Chang in the first 
game of the first set. Chang 
looked uncharacteristically 
clueless; Ulihrach appeared 
not to notice Chang's distress. 
The Czech player was so re- 
laxed and playing so fluidly 
that Chang's scurrying 
around the court seemed like 
the beginning of panic. 

But Ulihrach may nor have 
sensed the danger. 

“I started dunking I could 
win,” Ulihrach said. “But 
this is best of five. You have 


to concentrate all the game, 
every point. I lost a little bit of 
concentration at the begin- 
ning of the second set and he 
broke me.” 

Chang broke in the eighth 
game of the second set and 
that was enough to give 
Chang die set and get him 
back into the match. Chang 
began to crank up his serve — 
he had 12 aces for the maich. 

Ulihrach, who had returned 
so well all week, could not 
solve Chang's “change-up” 
serving style, in which be 
fires a 120-mile-per-hour 
(190 kilometers) first serve 
then pats one over at 87 miles 
per hour. 

The match remained de- 
ceptively close, but once 
Chang established his pattern 
of play, he was more com- 
fortable in going for shots. 

“I never like to be in a 
situation where it takes me a 
set to figure out what’s going 
on.” he said. “A set to figure 
out where his strengths are. 
what his weaknesses are. 
where he's hurting me. I don't 
like to do that.” 

The best -of- five -set match 
lasted 2 hours and 39 minutes, 
and even the 22-year -old 
Ulihrach admitted to exhaus- 
tion. 

Chang does that to people. 


Scoreboard 


BASEBALL 


Exhibition Baseball 


HMWfMIUi 

, Alton*] 17, New York Mete 3 
□ndnnofl 1 1. Florida 5 
Lm Angeles 5. Montreal 4 
[Houston ft Detroit] 

.Pittsburgh S Boston 0 
'St. Lou Is 4. Toronto 2 
Rhttode(pWo 1PJ.Y. Yankees 1 11 Innings 
BaMmare fss) ft CMcngo White Sax 1 
' Kansas City 4. Oevekmd 3 
BaJKsnore (ss) & Minnesota (so) 5 
Texas 1, Minnesota (ss) 0 
San Diego 10. San Francisco 7 
Mfimukee 15, CMcogoCubs ess) 6 
CMcngo Cubs (ss) 9, Seattle Css} 5 
Oakland 15, Anaheim 9 
Seattle lss)l 2, Colorado 8 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Stammnos 


■on— rnmiiiiiiri 


ATLANTIC DIVtSXlH 



w 

L 

Pet 

GB 

Mksni 

48 

17 

.738 

— 

New York 

■ 47 

18 

-723 

] 

.Oriando 

- . » 

~.JB . 

J63 

n# 

Washington 

30 

34 

.469 

1756 

New Jersey 

- 20 

‘44 

■3T3 

2756 

•ptifladeloiFO 

17 

47 

M6 

3056 

Boston 

12 

54 

.182 

36W 

. CENTRAL DIVISION 



a -C hicago 

56 

9 

862 

— 

T3etra# 

47 

17 

J34 

BMr 

Mtsnto 

43 

22 

-662 

13 

Cnriatta 

42 

23 

-646 

14 

-Oevelond 

34 

29 

J40 

21 

jndtana 

9 

34 

.469 

25*4 

MSwmiktt 

27 

37 

-422 

2BW 

-Toronto 

23 

42 

JS4 

33 

MnuNcomMa 


NBWESrDMSIOH 




W 

L 

Pet 

GB 

a-Utah 

48 

17 

738 

— 

i Houston 

43 

22 

.662 

5 

{ Aitanesota 

32 

32 

J00 

1556 

Oafios 

22 

42 

JU4 

25*4 

penuer 

19 

45 

JOT 

28*4 

son Antonia 

16 

48 

-250 

3156 

Vancouver 

11 

56 

.164 

38 


MCmCfHVWOH 



xoSeattte 

45 

19 

.703 

— 

UA. Laken 

43 

21 

.672 

2 

Portland 

38 

28 

-576 

8 

5acratseatD 

28 

37 

431 

1756 

LAOppers 

27 

36 

429 

17*4 


Phoenix 26 38 406 19 

Golden State 25 39 J91 20 

x-cBnched playoff spat: 

SUNDAY'S HStlLtl 
Houston 22 23 20 15- M 

Miami 25 24 24 28-101 

H: otaluwan 8-174-7 za WSfis 9-17 04MB 
M: Hardaway 12-25 1-1 31. AustblB-122-31B, 
Lenard 6-14 4-4 ia Rebooeds— Houston 40 
CWHBs 11), Miami 57 (Mastibwn 12). 
Assists— Houston 13 (WHKs 3), Miami 20 
(Hardaway 9). 

Now Jersey 26 23 23 17- 89 

Hew Yurt 19 14 24 17—74 

NJ^ Cassefl 8-24 5-6 23. GW 5-16 7-8 17, 
N.Y: Johnson 7-12 6-8 2). Houston 5-16 04) 
11 tleb— wfa New Jersey 71 (McDanM 
13), New York 46 (Oakley 1«. A»M>-Hew 
Jersey 18 (GH 7), New York IB (Childs 5). 
iodUaa 25 18 23 32— 9* 

MJhmutaie 28 28 15 31—102 

l-.SmBa 10-14 64 2A Miner 4-14 9-U20c NL 
Robinson 9-14 12-14 3a Baker 9-15 0-0 la 
GUflam 8-12 2-5 18. R etaB eds— Indtann 44 
CSmOs 10), Mfiwwkee 40 (RoMnson 8). 
Assists— indbma 22 (Jackson 11), 

Miwaukee 24 (Douglas ID). 

Vancouver 25 26 25 13-89 

Orfamdo 38 28 22 28-100 

V: Abdur-RaMm 9-184-422. Reeves 5-133- 
6U Anthony 5-72-2 11 Robinson 4-7 3-3 1® 
O: VWUns 6-12 4-4 17J^ant 7-11 2-3 14 
SeOcaly 7-14 2-4 14 Rebounds — Vancouver 

47 (Reeves 10), Orlando 54 (SeHtaty 8). 
Assist*— Vancouver 19 (Anthony 5), Ortnndo 
15(HanfcMay6). 

Bostoa 26 28 29 18-101 

M Inert nfn 31 26 XI 31-119 

B; Walker 13-24 3-3 29. Far 9-18 2-2 24 M; 
Garnett 11-17 4-5 24 Robinson 10-14 041 25. 
Ru b e—ts Duutn n 54 (Waiter 12), 
M in n u nta as (GuoDoita m. 

Assists— Boston 24 (Wesley 7). Minnesota 35 
(Martwty 10L 

Seattle 21 23 28 19—83 

Detroit 20 26 18 22- 86 

S: HawMas 6-133-4 14 Payton 6-16 7-2 14 
D: MIHs 10-17 1-1 25, Duinars 6-13 3-4 21. 
Rebounds— 5eoffle 54 (Karipm, Detroit 4? 
(H1 11). AssMS— Seattle 24 (McMBtan 7), 
Detroit 20 [Darrens 7). 

Portland 27 29 27 23— 1U 

LA-Otpon 17 25 16 36- 94 

P: CRoblnson 11-17 1-3 24 Augmon 3-6 7- 
8 1% LA. CUPPERS: Murray 6-15 B-9 
2aRogers 5-15 7-10 19. Rebeaads-Pnrifand 

48 (Dudley 7), Las Angeles 59 (Rogers, 
Money 10). AssMs— Portland 16 (Satanfe 
9, Ln» Angeles 15 (Murray 3). 

Dallas 23 27 16 25- 89 

Sacramento 22 17 26 23- 88 

O: Strickland 8-12 4-7 21, Harper 7-14 3-3 
17. Bradley 8-17 1-2 in S: RldwwdP-245-4 
24 Abdul-RdUf 9-18 3-4 22. 


Rebounds— Dallas 39 ( Bradley 11). 
Sacramento 52 (Poiynlce 13). 
Assists— Dallas 22 (Harper 10), Sacramento 
17 (Richmond 6). 

Toronto 24 24 19 20 3— 90 

LA. fatten 33 16 21 17 11— 98 

T.-StoUdamlre 10-21 2-4 25. Camby 8-18-46 
2ft LA. LAKERS; Jones 8-20 11-14 27. 
CompbeB 9-176-8 24. Rebounds— Toronto 69 
(Camby 11>, Los Angeles 52 (Kersey 11). 
AssMs— Toronto 17 (Stoudamlre 8), Las 
Angeles 19 (Vbn Enel 8). 


NCAA Women's 
Tournament 


SECOND ROUND 
MBMnST K4H08UU. ’ 
Colorado 64 Stephen F. Austin 57 
Illinois 85, Duke 67 

lAnttOtONAl 

North Catoflna 81, Michigan State 71, OT 
Alabama 61, St Joseph* 52 

WEST M090MAL 
Georpla 80, Arizona ?4 
Virginia 65, Utah 46 

MItMAST RKHONAL 
Old Dominion 69, Purdue 65, OT 
Ibuistarw Tech 74. Auburn 48 



NHL Stamomos 


IA8IDH COMUOKI 

ATLANTIC DTVtSON 



W 

L T 

Pb 

GF 

GA 

PhBaddptda 

39 

21 ID 

88 

236 

184 

New Jersey 

38 

19 12 

88 

197 

157 

Rortda 

31 

23 16 

78 

188 

167 

N.Y. Rongets 

33 

28 9 

75 

226 

196 

Washington 

28 

35 7 

63 

179 

197 

Tampa Bay 

27 

35 7 

61 

187 

217 

N-Y. Istamtars 

24 36 10 

58 

192 

2DB 

NORTHEAST DIVISION 




W 

L T 

Pb 

GF 

GA 

Buffalo 

36 

21 n 

83 

202 

172 

Pittsburgh 

32 

30 7 

71 

238 

233 

Hertford 

27 

33 10 

64 

193 

219 

Montrerf 

25 

32 14 

64 

215 

245 

Ottawa 

22 33 14 

58 

IBS 

203 

Boston 

24 

■H A 

37 9 

ST 205 

149 

CENTRAL DIVIBION 




W 

L T 

PO 

GF 

GA 

DoBos 

41 

23 6 

88 

215 

171 

Detroit 

33 

21 15 

81 

221 

165 

Phoenix 

32 

33 5 

69 201 

211 

SL Louis 

30 

31 9 

69 

207 

715 

CMaago 

28 

31 12 

68 

186 

180 

Toronto 

26 

38 6 

58 

204 

238 


x-COiorodo 

Edmonton 

Anaheim 

Calgary 

Vancouver 

Los Angeles 

San Jose 


PACIFIC DflRSON 

W L T Pis GF GA 
43 18 9 95 240 171 

32 32 7 71 221 215 

29 30 11 69 203 201 

30 34 8 68 191 202 

29 37 4 62 218 240 

25 37 9 59 188 233 

23 39 7 53 177 231 


x-dftdied playoff spot 


SUNDAY'S nSUITS 


Hartford 1 1 1—3 

Wcsbingtoa 3 1 1—5 

Krst Period: YJ-Haus ley 10 (Ban dm. Cole) 
2. w-Johonsson 4 (Juneau. Simon) l h- 
Emerson 8 (Cossets, CMasson) (pp). 4, W- 
Bondre 42 rroccheL Dales) Second Period: 
W -Piranha 6 (Berube) 6 H -Emerson 9. (pp). 
TUfd Period: H-Dbieen 17 (Emerson, 
Cossets) (pp].& I'^Kon owa lehuk 13 (Simon. 
Hunter) (en>. Shots oa geafc H- 7-7-12-14 
IV- 9-5-5—23. Goalies: H-. VV-Ronford. 

N.Y. Wanders 2 0 2-4 

CMCSgo 2 3 6-5 

First Period: C-Zharrmov 15 (Amonte, 
WeWrtchj z C-Amartte 35 (Dahton. 
ZnamnovJ 3 New York. Palffy 34 4, New 
York. Antfereson la Second Period: C- 
Amorne 36 (Zhora nov, Welnrf ch) (pp). 4 C- 
KVoreau 12 (Webute) 7, C -Amonte 37 
(Zhotr.nov, Dohien) Third Period: New York, 
McCafce 8 (SmeOnski Anderson) 9, New 
Yart, Palffy 37 (King, Green) Shots an goal: 
New Yeri. 6-5-13— 2b. C- B-15-5-2B. GcaBes: 
New YBk, Soto. C-Hocker. 

Toronto 0 2 1—3 

Tampa Bay 8 8 1—1 

FW Period: None. Seama Period: 
ToradD-Chn* 26 (Sullivan! 2, Toronto-, 
SuOvcn 11 (Qark. Johnson) nurd Period: 
Tcranto-SumJtn 37 (Serein, Murphy) 4 
Tampa Boy-Mytves 3 (Toms. HamrffiO Stats 
Ofl goat T- 8-7-16-25. T- 14-15-11-44 
Goalies: T -Potvfn. T-Taboracd. 

Pittsburgh 0 1 1—2 

Didos 1 4 1-6 

First Period: D-Modano 31, Second 
Period: D-Syttor 7 (Verbeek, Reid) 3, D- 
Hogue 16 (Zubov. Alodano) (pp). 4 D-Adoms 
17 (P-Hamer, Harvey) 5. P-Nedved 27 
(WooOey, Murray) (pp). 4 D-Lnngentminner 
13 (Weuwendyk. Zubov) Third Period: P- 
KDsparaUi32 (Fronds. NedwtU 40- Breton 7 
(Bassen, Verbeek) Stab oa goat P- 8-5- 
5-14 D- 7-254-38. GotAes: P-LnBme, 
Wregger. D-ube- 

Cmgary 0 116-2 

Anahtfn 1106-2 

Fbst Period: A-Saam 12 (Ptanger, DoRas) 
(pp). (delay of game); Simpson, Cal 
(Interference) Second Period: C-Reichel 16 
(Racine. Gagnert (PP). 3, A-Prwtger 6 
(Sacco. SeHowsi Tttirf Period: C-Gogner 25 
(Featheistone. Hogtond) (pp). Overran*: 


None. Shob oa goat: C- 5-19-14-5— 43. A- 9- 
11-7-4-31. GoaHes: C-Kldd. A-Hebert. 
Detroit 1 a 1—2 

Colorado 0 2 2-4 

FW Period: D-Shannhan 44 (Lldstram. 
Larionov) (pp). Second Period: C- 
Dearimanh 29 (Saklc Young) (pp). X C- 
Deadmarsh 3a (sh). Third Period: D- 
FettattN 28 (Shanahan, Udstram) (pp). X C- 
Jones 24 (QzoBnsh, Deadmarsh) (pp). 4 C- 
Klemm 8 (Forsfaarg) (sh-en). Stab oa goat 
D- 9-7-16-24 C- 12-11-9—32 GoaHes: D- 
OsgoocL C-Ray 34-12-7. 


ICE SKATING 


World Championship 


LAUSANNE. SWITZERLAND 
WOMEK3 OUALIFVtHG 
PUUHERS FROM CROUP A 
1. MklteBe Karon (U-SJ 1J) factored piace- 
menU 2 Vbnessa Gusmerofl (France) 2ft 1 
tiina Slutskaya (Russia) 3A 4. Krisrilna Czo- 
ko (Hungary) 4A4 Zuzonna Slwed (Poland) 
5.0. 4 YuDa Vorovieva (Azerbaijan) 4ft 7. 
Lenka KUtovana .Czech Republic) 7JX 8. 
Eve-Marie FPze IGenramy) BJL 9. LoeOfia 
Hubert (France) 9A 10. Joanne Coder (Aus- 
tralia) 70.0. 11. Marfa Andrade (Spain) DJ), 
lZSusan Humphreys (Canada) 12A 11 Mo- 
ks Kspac (Shwenlo) 13A 14. Zwana Row- 
rara (Skwokta) Kft 15. Tony Sabrina Boro- 
bartSert (Itoty) 15J) 

QUO UP 8 

1. Toro upbvskl (UJS4 IP. 1 Nicole Bobek 
nJ5J2AXAAaita Butyrskaya (Russia) 3J3 4. 
Yulia Lovronchuk (Ukraine) 4JV5. JuAa Lau- 
tora (Austria) 5ft 4 Ludnda Ruh (Switzer- 
land) 4ft 7. Olga Markova (Russia) 7JX 4 
Alhe Dre( (FWand) aa 9. h«k» Yakcya 
(Japan) 9XH0-FumieSugurt (Japan) lOJftll. 
Chen Lu (OilnoJ llJH 12 Tatyana MalWna 
(llzbeklston) 12ft IX Helena GfundMrg 
(Sweden) lift 14. Sofia Penkora (Bulgaita} 
14JI li non Jakupcevic (Craafia) 140. 

MEN^aUAUFYtNO 
GROUP A 

l.Todd Ekhedge (UAJ 1 A 2 Etrts Stnito 
(Canada) 2D, 3. Vtochestav ZOgarodnUk 
(Ukraine) Xft 4. Andrei Vkucenko (Germany) 
AA 5. Igor Pashkevtkh (AzerbaDan) 5A 4 
Motel Yogudtn (Russia) 6Jk 7. SzoboKZ 
VIdrai (Hungary) 7A 4 Camel Gheotgha (Ro- 
mania) 8A 9. Arthony Liu (Australia) 9JJ, 10. 
Patrick Schmktt (Luxembourg) lftft 11- 
Mkhaei Stanerkln (taraaO 11 Jk 12 Zhengidn 
Guo (Odno) 12ft IX hran Dinev (Buiguta) 
IXft 14. Maitus Lemlnen (Finland) T4A 14 
Vakhtang Munmnktze [Georgia) 15JL 14 
Patrick Meier (Switzerland) 140 
(Meier in 16th place qua Dried to fuffl an 


ISU requirement Hub the host Ration hove a 
skater In toe main event) 

GROUP B 

l.Aksef Urmanov (Russia) )A2 Ilya KuDk 
(Russia] 2ft X Eric MUtat (France) 3ft 4. 
Michael Weiss (U5J 4ft 4 Jeff Longiton 
(Canada) Sft 4 Laurent Tobei (France) 6ft 
7. Takeshi Honda (Japan) 7ft 4 Konstantin 
Kostin (Latvia) Sft 9. Steven Cousins 
(Britain) 9ft 1ft Michael Hopfes {Germany) 
t Oft 1 1. Lee Kyu-hyun (South Korea) lift 12 
Michael Tyitosen (Denmark) 12A IX Roman 
SkomMrav {Uzbekistan) 13ft 14. GUberio VI- 
adana (Italy) 14ft is. Robert Grzegarczyk 
(Poland) 15ft 


CRICKET 


MMU1MT6M 

2ND TEST. ATM DAY 
SOUTM AFRICA. VS. AUSTRALIA 
MONDAY M PORT ELIZABETH. SOUTH 
AFRICA 

South AiricK 209 and 168 
Austrate IDS and 2714 
Australia won by two wickets and leads toe 
3-raateh series 2-0. 

MUUMKATCMHt 
2ND TEST, ATH DAY 
NEW ZEALAND VS. SRI LANKA 
MONDAY, IN HAiOLTON. NEW ZEALAND 

New Zeotand; 222 and 273 

Sri Lanka: 170 and 205 
New Zealand wan toe test by 120 runs and 
the 2-match series 2-0 

INDIA TOUR 
2ND TEST, 3D DAV 
WEST POES WL nou 
SUNDAY. M PORT OF SPAOL TRHUD AD 
West Indies: 296 
India: 367-3 



Hmd ecoroa Sunday of the dta 1ft oWBon 
Honda Ctasalc on Hw por-72 (38-3Q, 7,268- 
yard (W1 4-meter) TPC to Haron Bay course 
In Coral Springs. Florida: 

4 Appleby, Australia 6648-67-71—274 


P. Stewart 
M. Bradley 
C NWntgomerte, Scot. 
R. Gamez 
M. Brtsky 
P.SMnbawsU 
R. Black 

C Parry, Australia 


66- 68-68-71 — 273 
69-65-73-68 — 275 

68- 68-76-71-277 
7666-70-72— 27B 
71-64-70-71— Z78 

67- 66-72-73 — 27B 

69- 71-68-70-278 
74-64-70-70— 27B 


J. Durant 
D. Martin 
A. Magee 

J. Pamevik, Sweden 


<8-71-68-70 — Z7B 

69- 66-72-71— 27B 

70- 68-68-73—278 

71- 69-68-70—278 



CONCACAF 

United States X Canada 0 
stwwfinaK Mexico 4 points, United States 
4. Jamaica 1, costa Rica 1, El Salradm 0, 
Canada ft 

snuasH nur division 

LogremsftBaraNonal 
W— Av u i Real Madrid 65 points. Botob- 
tona59. Real Beds 59. Departhro Conmo 54 
Altetlco Madrid 49, Real Sodedad a 4 Tenep 
He 4X Athletic Bltao 43, Valencia 42 Val- 
ladolid 41. Racing Santander 41, Oviedo 35 
Delta Vigo 34. Zaragoza 32 Sporting Glfon 32 
Compostela 32 Royo Vatteama 3a Ex- 
tremadura 29, Logranes 28, Espanyol 27, 
Sevflla24i Hercules 22 


SKIING 


WoiulwCup Final 


VAIL COLORADO 
WOMOI'f SLALOM 
Final ■Morw-ue an t Biivw 1- PernBla 
Wlberp (Sweden) 770 points. 2 Ooudki 
Rlegler (New Zealand} 418,2 Deborah Com- 
pagnonl (Italy) 407, 4. Lara Maganl (Italy) 

391. 4 Patricio anuvet (France) 347. 4 Eltt 
Eder (Austria) 306. 7. Ingrid Saivenmaser 
(Austria) 25ftB. Urska Hravat (Slovenia) 237, 
9, Sabine Egger (Austria) 234, 10. Martina 
Accota (Switzerland) 217 

fw mI i i w— i—fci i 1, Wlberg 1,96ft 
2 Sefctajer 1^24, X Gerg 1,150. 4. COnt- 
pagnonl 967, 4 Isolde Kastoer (Italy) B3X 4 
Heidi zurixlggen (Switzerland) 785, 7. 
Wochter 741, ft Renata GoetschJ (Austria) 
647, 9. Ertl 62ft 10. Warworn Zelenskaia 
(Russia) 604. 

HUDt* SLALOM 

Hail ■)■»■■, wvtUsM 1. Thomas, Sy- 
kora, Austria 694 2 Thomas Stangaialnger. 
Austria 67ft X Finn Christian Jagga Norway, 

374. 4 SebasHen Amlez, France. 37X 4 Al- 
berto Tombo (Italy) 352 4 KJettl Andre 
Aamodt Nonmy. 304, 7. Tam Srionsen iNar- 
vwiy) 2944 Kbnlnotw Klmura (Japan) 289, 9. 
Ota Christian Furaseth (Norway] 284 1ft 
Moeto Reiter (Austria) 272 

Fferol amroR BtaMdkiwai 1. Luc Alphand 
(France) 1,13ft 2 Aamodt 1,094 1 Josef 
Strabi (Austria) 1J»1, 4 Kristian Ghedlna 
(Italy) 99ft 4 Michael tan Groenlgen 


(Swftzmtand) 867, a Andreas SchWerer 
(Austria) 7B1, 7. Hans Knaus lAushta) 754 8. 
Sykora 697, 9. SlangasstagerATa 10. Werner 
Franz (Austria) 660 


TENNIS 


NnMWn (MAMMONS CM» 

SUNDAY, M INDIAN WELLS. CAUFORMA 
FINAL 

MkJioel Chang (3), United States, def. Bohdan 
Ultorach. Czech Republic 44 4ft 54,43. 


TRANSITIONS 


mw«n 

UAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

Cleveland— Purchased the contract of 
LHP Noe Najera tram the dndnnalf Reds far 
*24000. 

Kansas arr— Claimed LHP Doug Johns 
off waivers from the Oakland Athletics. 
Seattle— Signed I NF Brent Gates. Put LH P 
Greg Hibbard on the 60-day disabled isL 
Toronto— Moved RHP BR Risley from the 
15- to the 60-day disabled list. 

NATIONAL LEAOUE 

nl— Suspended SL Louis Cardinals RHP 
T J. Mathews six gomes ond fined bbn 32000 
tor admitting to throwing at Oodnnatl Reds 
2B Bret Roone- 

cinonnati — Acquired LHP Joey Elschen 
from the San Diego Podrastaroplayerto be 
named. 

Houston— A cquired INF Luis Lopez from 
the San Diego Padres tar LHP Seon Runyan. 
LOS ANGELES— Released INF John Wehner. 

FOOTIAU 

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAOUE 
ARtzoM* cardinals— Re-signed FB Larry 
Centers to 3-year cortroct 
Dall a s A nnounced they would not match 
toe 5245 miflfon aftar restricted free agent K 
Chris Bantol received from toe Phllodeiphia 
Eagles. 

Demon— Resigned S Ron Rice. 

Kansas errv— Agreed to terms with OB 
Efvb Grtac on 5-yeor confrad 
new rowt JETS-Slgned P Chris Modmis. 
PHILADELPHIA -Signed C Steve Everttt to 
5-year contract 

ian diego— S igned WR Anthony Rodgers. 
Seattle —Staled 5 Bennie Blades to 3- 
year contract. Waived WR Ricky PraehL 
Tampa bay— Signed LB Rufus Porter, DE 
Rich McKenzie. RB Dominique Ross and WR 
Shaston Cotemontoto 2-year contracts. 

CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE 
Hamilton— Signed OB Anthony CaMta. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 

W 7 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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PAGE 22 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 





ART BUCHWALD 


The Weather Terror 


W ASHINGTON — Be- 
ware of any column that 
starts, "When I was a boy 
Having given you fair warn- 
mg, I shall begin. 

When I was a boy I never 
knew what the weather would 
be like until I woke up in the 
morning. 

I'd go to the window and 
shout, “Oh, boy, snow!" or 
“Hotdiggety. 
ice, sleet and 
hail!’’ The ele- 
ments wens al- 
ways a surprise 
for my genera- 
tion ami no- 
body really 
paid much at- 
tention to what # . 

was coming Bnchwald 

next But this has all changed. 

Television and radio now 
play the biggest weather role 
in people's Lives and their pre- 
dictions strike fear into every- 
one's heart 


The other day Brent Minor 
called and said, "It's going to 
snow on Thursday." 

1 almost stopped breathing. 
"How do you know, Brent?" 

"I saw the weather map on 
WBTU. There’s a cold front 
coming in from the Texas 
Panhandle and it will pick up 
moisture from Nova Scotia 
and dump four inches of pre- 
cipitation on Long Island be- 
fore it blows out to sea toward 
Ireland." 

I panicked, tike anyone 
else who lives in 1997. 

My son was on his way out 
the door. "Where are you go- 
ing?" I asked him. 

He replied, ‘ T have to buy a 
cable for my computer." 

□ 

"Don’t go." I cried. 
"Brent Minor says that 
there's a blizzard coming in 
from Texas on Thursday. 
We've all been warned to stay 


in our homes to await further 
news." 

"Dad. it’s Monday." 

“Butthe snow and sleet are 
moving faster than anyone 
realizes. Help me spread sand 
on the driveway." 

I wasn't the only one who 
was stressed. Carlsbad called 
and his voice trembled, “I 
was just watching CNN and 
the weatherman warned us to 
keep our eye on Montana. 
That’s where the dense fog is 
going to stare I'm going to the 
Safeway and stock up on Rice 
Krispies before they run 
out." 


Now 1 had a real dilemma- 
should I try to make it to the 
office or not? I called 
Meisiersinger. who used to 
live in Minnesota. 

He said, "It’s hard to say 
how the high pressure system 
will be affected by the warm 
air from the Bahamas. My 
experience in Minnesota has 
been that when the snow fore- 
cast bell rings, it’s time to 
warm up your snowmobile 
and go for it." 

That made sense. From 
Monday until Thursday we 
were glued to our TV screens 
paying special attention to the 
weather maps, which showed 
cold drizzle coming down 
from Alaska. Brent checked 
in every morning to make 
sure that I had the latest 
weather information. 


It was a week filled with 
tension, but by Thursday af- 
ternoon a warm breeze from 
Okinawa broke up an icy blast 
from the Rockies and we had 
a balmy day. 

When 1 was a boy I couldn't 
have cared less about a weath- 
er forecast. As a child what I 
didn't know about counter- 
clockwise winds couldn't hurt 


In the Name of Art: ‘The Frankenstein Notion’ 


By Bruce Weber 

S'ew York Tunes Service 

N EW YORK — In the abstract 
sense, art can be said to animate 
life, but when an artist employs the => • 

reverse principle, he risks contro- 
versy — if not more serious con- 
sequences. So David Arnold is dis- * 
covering. 

Arnold. 26, a student in Columbia s 
University's graduate program in 
visual arts, has been working on a \ 
series of sculptures in which he kills 
frogs, removes some of their muscles 
and then electrically stimulates them " 
to lend movement to tiny animal-like 
skeletons he has constructed out of ^ 
stainless steel wire or plastic. 

The debate over the treatment of 
animals by artists is one that surfaces 
periodically, often with vehemence. 

Two years ago, British artist Damien 
Hirst, known for suspending the David 
corpses of animals in formaldehyde, 
had planned an installation at the Gagosian 
Gallery in New York City focusing on four 
dead cows, bui it was canceled because it ran 
afoul of the city's health code. In 1979, Tom 
Ottemess. now a well-known creator of public 
sculptures, brought down a rain of furor when 
he made a film of the shooting of a dog. 
Arnold, whom Robert Fitzpatrick, the 





Hit W YiiiL Tuan 

David Arnold’s fans frog with real muscles. 

gosian Still, that may not be the end of Arnold’s it was 
n four problems. A spokeswoman for the ASPCA, “I'c 
? it ran Victoria Campbell, said that the matter was tograpl 
K Tom under investigation by tbe group's legal de- "n 


It basically animates the creature." 

The work, which he said predated 
the recent revelation that a sheep 
. was cloned in Scotland, “involves 
notioos of failed human attempts to 
create a vision of life — tbe 
Frankenstein notion." He said that 
be did not enjoy killin g, and that his 
first notion, which proved too ex- 
... pensive, was to take a biopsy of his 
own muscle and then grow tbe cells 
to use in the sculpture. So far, he 
. said, he has killed only one frog. 
"I’m personally repulsed by having 
to do it," he said. "But I feel a 
compulsion to produce the piece. 
| The compulsion is stronger than my 
personal dislike for killing animals, 
' ",v which I hated as a researcher as 
. if'v well." 

* Several Columbia faculty mem- 

bers defended Arnold, calling his 
wirL Tuort work a sincere and serious attempt 
to examine motion and anatomy, 
though they stopped short of saying 
it was worth killing animals for. 

“I'm on the fence.” Tom Roma, a pho- 
tography professor, said. 

“I’ve always been against animal testing 


Arnold, whom Robert Fitzpatrick, the 
dean of Columbia's School of the Arts, 
called a serious talent with the potential to 
become an important artist, has not yet cre- 
ated a storm of that magnitude. But over the 
last six weeks, his work has generated an 
emotional debate within Columbia's three- 
year-old program, and has come to the at- 
tention of People for the Ethical Treatment 
of Animals ana the American Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 

In response to the reaction ar the school, 
Arnold decided to withdraw the planned piece 
using frog muscles from a show, featuring the 
work of 10 Columbia students, at the Leo 
Castelli gallery in SoHo from April 17 to May 
3. He said, however, that he intended to com- 
plete the piece and the rest of the series. "£ 
pulled it because it was causing friction and 
bad feeling among my fellow students," 


partmenL And Ingrid Newkirk, president of for things like heart valves, but then again if 
PET A, said her organization would, at the it’s your child who needs the valve. . . . And 
very least, ask Columbia to ban all student I would hate to think (hat making artjs less 
)m Robert Fitzpatrick, the artwork that harmed animals. important than making heart valves." 

abia's School of the Arts, There was also a possibility, she said, that Arnold’s work became a focus of con-. 

; talent with the potential to PETA would seek to have Arnold prosecuted trovers y at the school six weeks ago when the 
ortant artist, has not yet ere- under New York state animal cruelty laws, students in the visual arts program began 
that magnitude. But over the "This isn’t about animal rights," said discussing the Casxelli show. Tbe debate 
his work has generated an Newkirk, who learned about tbe case from an among the students, said Allan Hack! in, the 
te within Columbia's three- anonymous phone caller. "It’s about obeying department chairman, was largely over 
m, and has come to the at- laws that recognize gratuitous harm to living whether forbidding Arnold to exhibit his 
le for the Ethical Treatment beings. You can't frivolously kill animals for work would constitute censorship. Appar- 
the American Society for the art. It may be an amusement to this man ently, there was not much talk about whether 
!rueity to Animals. Arnold, but to the frog it's his little life.’’ killing a frog for art was unacceptable. 

o the reaction ar the school, "Artists are trying to send messages to All of Arnold's classmates, the faculty 

to withdraw the planned piece society, presumably," Newkirk said, "and members said, supported him, except one, 
les from a show, featuring the this is a bod message." Stavit Allweis. who raised the initial ob- 


In describing his work, Arnold, a former jecrion. 


medical researcher, said, “I'm creating new 
creatures." He explained the process. "I 
make an electronic board and mount it in the 
skeleton. I go to a food store in Chinatown, 
get a frog, anesthetize it with chloroform. 


Arnold said. “But I don't want people to get euthanize it, pith it" — a process that entails 


the impression I'm backing down. If pulling 
the piece meant I wasn ’t going to do the piece, 
then I'd be a bad artist, but that's not what it 
means. I'm just not going to show it at Cas- 
telli.’ ’ 


driving forceps into the brain — "which is 
basically destroying the brain in one swoop. 
Then I remove the muscles I’m using and I 
put the muscles onto the skeleton, then con- 
nect them with electrodes to the circuit board. 


‘ 'Whenever I see animals exploited as an. 
it bothers me," Allweis said. "I'm not a 
saint. I wear leather. But I grapple with these 
issues a lot." 

Allweis said it was she who contacted the 
ASPCA (but not PETA), though she added 
that she respected Arnold as an artist. "He's 
a good guy," she said. 

What she most regrets, she said, is her 
treatment, in the wake of her objection, by 
other students and some faculty members 



r; 


MariY)u K. VrT rb* IV* tok Tuw* 

"I feel a compulsion to do the piece." 

who felt that her complaint might jeopardize 
the show altogether. “I’m an but ostra- 
cized,” she said. 

Fitzpatrick, tbe dean of the arts school, 
who was formerly the president of the Cali- 
fornia School of the Arts, said the use of 
animals in makin g art was “a good ethical 
question." He said that the work itself was 
not about violence or cruelty, and that the 
killing and decapitating of the frog was not 
done as part of the work or in view of the 
spectator. Bui he acknowledged that that was 
not entirely the point. 

To the suggestion that killing art animal 
for art’s sake was simply wrong, he said 
Arnold was attempting to study motion, 
mechanics and anatomy, and be wondered 
how what Arnold did compared to a dis- 
section in a science lab . J ' I don't wish to 
minimize people's wish to protect animals," 
he said. "But this was not a cavalier or 
frivolous or masochistic kind of exploration. 
If David had done this in private, it would 
have been no different from what takes place 
in every biology class in the country.’’ 



PEOPLE 


Bcheto MtKhcwi/TlK Auocnicd Pisu 

JUST CLOWNING AROUND — Hopefuls for the Ringling Bros, and Barnum & 
Bailey Clown College giving it their best shot during auditions in New York. 


A DEBATE has broken out in London's literary 
circles over similarities between an award- 
winning novel by the British writer Graham Swift 
and a work by tbe American writer William 
Faulkner. Swift won the 1996 Booker prize for his 
book "Last Orders,'* about four fnenos on a jour- 
ney from London to the English seaside to scatter 
their friend's ashes. Faulkner’s 1930 novel “As I 
Lay Dying’’ tells the story of the transport of a body 
to Jefferson, Mississippi, to be buried. John Frow, 
an English professor at the University of Queens- 
land in Australia, points out that the similarities do 
not end there. In an article in The Australian’s 
Review of Books recently, Frow said Swift's use of 
first names as chapter headings, a one-sentence 
chapter and a chapter named after the dead person 
are some of the same techniques Faulkner used. But 
Swift says the similarities are minor and "simply 
not that important." The resemblance “never came 
up in discussion," the novelist Jonathan Coe, one 
of the Booker judges, said. "Having read the Swift 
in complete unawareness of the Faulkner," be said, 
* 'all I have to bring away from that is die power and 
presence of the Graham Swift noveL" 


Courtney Love is selling tbe Seattle mansion 
she bought with her husband, Kurt Cobain, just 


months before the Nirvana singer committed sui- 
cide. "I have a nice house, but I can’t live there,” 
Love told the Independent on Sunday newspaper. 
"Kids everywhere all the time." Fans have 
flocked to the mansion since Cobain shot himself 
in 1994. Love, lead singer of the band Hole and an 
actress in “The People vs. Larry Flynt,” said she 
and her daughter would move to Los Angeles and 
buy a horse farm in Olympia, Washington. 


The writer-actor Billy Bob Thornton received a 
top honor from the Writers Guild of America for 
“Sling Blade." his movie about a mentally retarded 
man with homicidal tendencies. "Sling Blade" won 
the award for best screenplay based on material 
previously published or produced. Ethan and Joel 
Coen received the award for best original screen- 
play, for "Fargo." . . . "Looking for Richard” was 
named the best documentary of 1996 and “The 
English Patient" won as bes ^edited feature film of 
the year by the American Cinema Editors. 


India's Supreme Court has imposed a strict code 
on a three-day extravaganza starting Thursday by the 
Greek-born musician Yanni at the Taj Mahal. The 
justices ordered that sound levels may not exceed 40 


decibels and that the audiences must be brought to 
the mock marble stage at die foot of the monument 
by battery-operated buses to prevent pollution. - 


Carrie Fisher agreed to work on this year's 
Academy Awards show even though she was upset 
that her mother, Debbie Reynolds, was overlooked 
in the irominations for her role in "Mother.’’ "I have 
some bitterness about that, especially after I saw 
some of the other nominated performances," Fisher 
says in TV Guide, “I’m a loyal child:" Fisher is on 
the writing team for the March 24 show. “They're 
not having couples present this year, so there won’t 
be any of that pretend repartee stuff — for which I’m 
sure America will be grateful," Fisher said. 


The 22-foot sailboat that the 19-year-old John F. 
Kennedy skippered to victory in a 1936 Atlantic 
Coast Championship race has been lovingly restored 
to near-mint condition. But don’t expect Rash II to 
race again anytime soon. “She’ll never be wet as 
long as I have her, but she'll be ready." said Ole 
Anderson, who restored the boat for a group of 
investors. “I’d like to see somebody sail her for a 
summer and then give her to the museum. Thai 
would be great I'd love to be the crew." 



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Every country has its own AT&T Access Number which 


makes calling home and to other countries really easy. 
Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country you're 


calling from and you’ll get the fastest, clearest connec- 


tions home. And be sure to charge your calls on your 
AT&T Calling Card. It'll help you avoid outrageous 
phone charges on your hotel bill and save you up to 
So when in Rome for anywhere else for that 


matter), do as many business travelers do. Use AT&T. 


do as the 172-1011's do. 


Please check the list below for AT&T Access Numbers. 


AT&T Access Numbers 


Steps to follow for easy cal ling worldwide 

1. Just dial the AT&T Access Number for the country you 
are calling from. 

% Dial the phone number you’ re calling. 

3- Dial the calling caul number Iftusi above tout name. 




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Can l find the AT&T Access Number for the country you're cafling from? Jusl ask any operatur fur 
AT&T Direct* Sentae, or visit our Web ate at bnpy/wwwjm.com/trj»vcler 




ai&T 1/irttT^ service, or visit our weo sue at aupwwwjiLtoBiraincicr 
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