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INTERNATIONAL 




The Worlds Daily Newspaper 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON JfogS;-.*, \ 



Paris, Wednesday, March 19, 1997 


China Spirits Defector 
To Temporary Haven 

Diplomatic Crisis Solved, Beijing Says 


No. 35.473 




By Patrick E. Tyler 

. New York Times Sen tire 

- BELI1NG — - China defused a dip- 
lomatic crisis Tuesday by spiriting a 
senior North Korean defector out of the 
country and sending him by special 
plane to the Philippines, where he is 
expected to rest for a decent diplomatic 
interval before traveling to freedom in 
South Korea. 

Hwang Jang Yap. a key ideological 
mentor to the North Korean leader. Kim 
Jong D, and the most senior member of 
Pyongyang’s hard-line elite to defect, 
arrived ar Clark Air Base in the Phil- 
ippines just after noon aboard a China 
Southern Airlines Boeing 737 that had 
carried him and three unidentified es- 
corts from the South China port city of 
Xiamen. 

“What I can tell you is that through 
consultations among all sides, the prob- 
lem has already been solved." China's 
Foreign Ministry spokesman, Cui 
Tiankai, said at a news conference. The 
official Chinese press agency, Xinhua, 
reported that Mr. Hwang “left China 
today for a third country." 

Mr. Hwang, 72, sought political 


asylum at South Korea’s consulate 
building in Beijing on Feb. 12. At the 
time, he was passing through the 
Chinese capital on the way home from a 
conference in Japan. North Korea ini- 
tially accused South Korean agents of 
“kidnapping" Mr. Hwang and 
threatened unspecified retaliation. Fears 
that North Korean intelligence agents 
would try u> seize or assassinate the 
defector set off a sizable security alarm 
here and triggered the deployment of 
Chinese troops backed by armored per- 
sonnel carriers to the tree-lined streets 
of Beijing’s diplomatic quarter. 

The high security ope ration Tuesday 
ended five weeks of drama around the 
South Korean consulate that served as 
Mr. Hwang's sanctuary as urgent dip- 
lomatic negotiations were carried out in 
several Asian capitals to pave the way 
for his departure. 

Mr. Hwang's successful departure 
was a significant diplomatic victory for 
China, whose leaders were aghast at 
suddenly finding Beijing a battleground 
in a high stakes struggle over a defector 
whose intimate knowledge of the North 

See KOREAN, Page 4 


New Anti- Clotting Drug 
Wards Off Heart Attack 





GeriMn Steelmaker 
Resists Rival’s Bid 

Thyssen Workers Besiege Krupp 


By Thomas H. Maugh n 

Las Angeles Tim es 

ANAHEIM, California — A new 
anti-clotting agent modeled on a 
snake venom could prevent as many 
as 40,000 heart attacks and 10,000 
deaths each year if it were used 
routinely, according to researchers. 

The drug, tirofiban, reduces heart 
attacks and deaths by half in patients 
with so-called unstable angina, the 
most common cause of hospital ad- 
missions in the United States, phy- 
sicians said Monday at a meeting of 
the American College of Cardiology 
in Anaheim. Such patients come to 
emergency rooms with symptoms of a 
heart attack, but their coronary vessels 
are not completely clogged, and they 
do not require clot-busting drugs. 

If left untreated, many of these 
people would have heart attacks. 
Even with the best available blood- 
thinning therapy — aspirin and hep- 
arin — nearly one in 10 has a heart 
attack during the hospital stay. 

The researchers say that giving the 
new drug along with aspirin and hep- 
arin prevents the clot from growing, 
which reduces the risk of heart attack 
and gives physicians time to decide 
whether surgery is necessary. 


“This is a breakthrough study." 
Dr. H. Vernon Anderson of the Uni- 
versity of Texas in Houston said. "To 
reduce deaths by 50 percent is very 
dramatic. This drug gives us a great 
opportunity to make meaningful re- 
ductions in the number of bean-attack 
deaths.” 

Representatives of Merck & Co., 
which manufactures the drug under 
the trade name Aggrastat, said the 
company planned to apply to the Food 
and Drug Administration this year for 
permission to market the drug. A re- 
lated drug. ReoPro. made by Cento- 
cor Inc., has already been approved 
by the agency to prevent clot form- 
ation during angioplasty, in which a 
balloon is inflated in a clogged artery 
to open it. 

In developing tirofiban, research- 
ers turned to snake venom because 
poisonous snakes, when drey bite, in- 
ject a very effective anti-clotting 
agent that allows their venom to 
spread throughout the victim’s body. 

Tirofiban, said Rick Sax of Merck, 
a molecular biologist who developed 
the drug, is a “designer molecule” 
that incorporates some of the best 
features of snake venom while elim- 
inating those that cause adverse ef- 
fects. 


Heinz DucUaBlThc Amend Prr» 

Gerhard Cromme, the Krupp chairman, being shielded Tuesday by 
company guards before speaking to demonstrators in Essen, Germany. 


By John Schmid 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The German steel- 
maker Thyssen said Tuesday that it 
would fight a hostile takeover attempt 
by a rival. Krupp, feat would create 
Europe’s biggest steel group, and thou- 
sands of Thyssen steelworkers stopped 
working to protest job lasses that could 
accompany an acquisition. 

Thyssen 's management and super- 
visory boards teamed up wife fee com- 
pany’s unions to seek out allies in busi- 
ness and politics to oppose the takeover, 
Thyssen s management and labor lead- 
ers wrote in a letter to workers. 

“It cannot lead to sensible results to 
destroy a strong, healthy company, well 
prepared for fee fiiture, to solve the 
possible problems of another company 
or to satisfy fee short-term profit in- 
terests of capital providers," the leaders 
wrote. 

Reflecting fee rarity of hostile 
takeovers in Germany. Thyssen assailed 
“Wild West" takeover methods. 

Should Krupp take over Thyssen, it 
would create a steel company wife 18 
million tons of output and combined 
sales of more than 63 billion Deutsche 
marks ($37.36 billion), larger than Brit- 
ish Steel or Usinor Sacilor of France, 
analysts said. It would dominate an es- 
timated 70 percent of Germany’s steel 
market and potentially force rivals into 
restructurings, analysts said, by tight- 
ening competition and trimming fee 
overcapacity that has hindered Europe's 
steel industry for two decades. 


Krupp offered 435 DM per share, or 7 
billion DM for a 50 percent stake. It 
enlisted Deutsche Bank. Dresdner Bank 
and Goldman Sachs to press its bid. 

Rolf Brener, the designated board 
chairman of Deutsche Bank, rejected 
the term “hostile," saying late Tuesday 
that the acquisition would be in ac- 
cordance with German takeover codes. 

A LOO percent takeover would cost 
1 3.6 billion DM, although it is not clear 
how large a stake Krupp eventually will 
acquire. Thyssen shares finished 
Monday at 344.50 DM, and trading in 
Thyssen and Krupp was suspended 
Tuesday. 

Assuming fee takeover goes ahead. 
Iran would end up wife a significant 
stake in Europe's new steel giant 
Tehran already ranks as Krupp’s largest 
shareholder, wife a 22 percent stake. 

At a time when German unemploy- 
ment already lies at a record high, the 
prospect of mass layoffs could ignite a 
new round of labor unrest in Germany's 
steelmaking heartland in fee Ruhr Val- 
ley. 

Hurling eggs and insults, more than 
1,000 Thyssen steelworkers thronged 
outside Krupp’s headquarters in Essen 
and vowed to defend fee independence 
of Thyssen. 

Protests over job losses have become 
almost commonplace throughout Ger- 
many and much of fee rest of Europe in 
recent weeks. Facing lower-cost com- 
petition from Eastern Europe and Asia, 
workers from such diverse heavy in- 

See KRUPP, Page 4 


Lake Nomination: Imperiled From the Beginning 

Clinton Angered by Senate Treatment Candidate a Symbol of Foreign Policy 


AGENDA 

WTO Panel Faults EU Policy on Bananas 


GENEVA (Reuters) — A World 
Trade Organization panel has issued a 
preliminary ruling thar the European 
Union ’s banana import policy violates 
trade rules, diplomats said Tuesday. 

The ruling, which fee EU can appeal, 
is a victory for I atin American nations 
and U.S. 'fruit companies. The diplo- 
mats said fee panel's initial report, is- 
sued after several months of deliber- 

Books. 

Opinion - Pages 8-9. 

Sports - Pag* 30 - 21 ; 

International Classified Pages 4 & 19. 


The IHT on-line http://www.ibt.com 


ations, recommended that fee WTO’s 
Dispute Settlement Body ask Brussels 
to bring the policy into line with its 
obligations under global trade accords. 


By Brian Knowlton 

Imerruiscna! Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — The White 
House vowed Tuesday io act quickly to 
nominate a new director of central" in- 
telligence. but it lashed out at Repub- 
lican senators for mounting what it 
called an " inexcusably flawed" con- 
firmation process that led a bitterly frus- 
trated Anthony Lake to withdraw his 
candidacy. 

Michael McCuny, the White House 
spokesman, described President Bill 
Clinton as being angry over fee “in- 
excusable" treatment of Mr. Lake by 
fee Senate intelligence committee. He 
said Mr. Clinton had been “willing to 
fight for an entire year if it took that to 
gain confirmation." 

Republican members of the commit- 
tee defended their hearings as tough but 
not political, fair and not personal. 

* ‘I don’t dunk the hearings were bru- 
tal.” the committee chairman, Richard 
Shelby of Alabama, said on CNN. ‘ ‘but 
they were rigorous, and they should be 
rigorous.” 

He insisted that he was 4 ‘never out to 
get Mr. Lake.” Another Republican 
senator, Onin Hatch of Utah, said be had 
expected Mr. Lake to be confirmed. 

But in a letter submitted Monday to 
Mr. Clinton, Mr. Lake said the process 
bad been “nasty and brutish." He ac- 
cused fee committee of “endless 


delay,” which he said threatened to 
harm both his former agency, fee Na- 
tional Security Council, and" the CIA. 
and said he was troubled that it was 
taking an unusually close look at his 
personal background, requesting his 
raw FBI background file, without any 
reason to do so. 

Mr. McCuny said serious questions 
had been raised about fee capacity of the 
traditionally evenhanded committee 
“for effective bipartisan oversight of 

See LAKE. Page 7 



P.ul H/vJnWTb, V. VniTnon 


Anthony Lake during his hearing. 


By John F. Harris 
and R. Jeffrey Smith 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — A week after 
President Bill Clinton nominated An- 
thony Lake to be CIA director, the ques- 
tions were already mounting. “Is Tony 
Lake in trouble?" a reporter asked. 
“And wall you go to the mat for 
him?" 

“No and yes." Mr. Clinton shot 
back. 

Three months later, fee real answers 
are dear. Yes and no. 

Yes. Mr. Lake's nomination was im- 
periled from the beginning. Key Re- 
publicans in the Senate saw fee nominee 
as a symbol of Mr. Clinton’s foreign 
policy, and a vulnerable one at feat, and 
went for his scalp. 

No, Mr. Clinton did not in the end go 
to the mat for Mr. Lake. A White House 
spokesman said Monday night that he 
wanted to, and told Mr. Lake he would 
let the nomination fight go on for a year 
if necessary, but Mr. Lake decided that 
would be too destructive to fee agency. 

As it happened, “the mat” was the 
wrong metaphor for the nomination; 
which proved to be not so much a fight as 
a morass. The questions raised by the 
Republicans — probably no single one of 
which would have killed fee nomination 
on its own — kept piling on until their 
cumulative weight was unbearable. 


Two large questions linger in the 
wake of Mr. Lake’s withdrawal. 

One is how Mr. Clinton will respond 
to what amounts to fee latest in a long 
series of stumbles as he attempts to put 
his personal imprint on the intelligence 
community'. Whoever he chooses io re- 
place Mr. Lake will be his fifth nominee 
to head the agency in five years. 

The other is what the bitter episode 
will mean for fee president’s hopes for a 
new season of bipartisanship in Wash- 
ington. 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

There is vast resentment at fee White 
House at what many senior aides be- 
lieve was Mr. Lake's unfair treatment at 
fee hands of Senator Richard Shelby of 
Alabama, chairman of the intelligence 
committee, and his Republican allies. 

The Republicans, for their part, have 
shown feat they do not think Mr. Clin- 
ton’s re-election was so impressive as to 
prevent them from humiliating a man 
who spent the first term as one of Mr. 
Clinton's most senior advisers. 

During the election campaign Mr. 
Clinton had no hesitation about attack- 
ing Republicans as extremists out to rob 
senior citizens of their Medicare, but 
since then be has toned down his rhet- 
oric and sermonized about fee biblical 

See NOMINEE, Page 7 


Under Guard, Israelis Break Ground for Disputed Housing 


The Dollar 


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1,673 L 89 ! 

d- 1-5905 V s §g 

1 22.425 123.735 

5.645 5,704 


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The DOW 


6896.56 


S&P 500 


6955.48 


. Andorra — 

tatfles 

Cameroon 

Egypt 

Fraree — 
Gallon — 

Italy 

ivory Coast 
Jvaan-.... 
Labanon._. 


Tuasdny pawnees* 

795.71 


Newsstan d Prices 

10.00 FF Morocco ijDh 

„..1Z50FF Qatar 10,00 ^5 

.1.600CFA Reunion.- 12.50 FF 

5.50 gaud Arabia ...10-00 R- 

._ 10.00 FF c-neqal 1.1D0CFA 

. 1100CFA _ .225 FT AS 

_^800Lire r'-T 1.250 Din 

UAE ...-..-10.00 Dirh 


By Barton Gellman 

Was hington Post Smice 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli government sent 
earthmovers to a disputed hillside in East Je- 
rusalem on Tuesday, breaking ground for a new 
Jewish neighborhood and setting a collision course 
wife its Palestinian partners. 

The arrival of bulldozers marked the commence- 
ment in earnest of a confrontation over East Je- 
rusalem that has isolated Israel diplomatically and 
raised fears of significant violence in coining days. 

prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, having 
rebuffed a direct appeal from President Bill Clinton 
to postpone the work, is without an international 
ally in his bid to demonstrate Israel’s right to build 
in historically Arab parts of fee city conquered 
from Jordan m the 1967 Middle East war. 

Israeli commanders, expecting bloodshed, can- 
celed all leaves and halted fee joint patrols at the 
heart of their security partnership wife the Pal- 
estinian Authority. Army troops sealed off feetwo 
nearest Palestinian cities, Bethlehem and Hebron, 
and made conspicuous preparations for combat 
throughout the West Bank. 


About 1,000 soldiers formed concentric rings 
around the building site, where bulldozers gouged 
deep brown furrows in fee rocky green grazing 
lands between Arab villages in southeastern Je- 
rusalem. Police and border guards bear back Pal- 
estinian protesters wife fists, boots and rifle butts. 

Soldiers from the Givati infantry brigade took 
up firing positions on the flanks of the demon- 
strators wife belt-fed machine guns and sniper 
rifles equipped wife telescopic sights. 

The Har Homa housing project, which would 
bring 30,000 new Jewish residents to a pine-topped 
ate feat Arabs call Jabel Abu Gheneim. is the first 
major effort to change the political geography of 
East Jerusalem since Israel i-Palestmian negoti- 
ations began in 1993. Israel expropriated fee land 
m 1991. three-fourths of it from Jews and one- 
fourth from Arabs, but successive Likud and Labor 
governments had deemed it too provocative to 
begin construction until now. 

Mr. Netanyahu and his officials said fee project 
is meant to demonstrate Israel’s commitment, as 
Dore Gold, a senior aide, put it Tuesday, to “pro- 

See ISRAEL, Page 7 


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A Palestinian official, Faisal Husseini, center, during a scuffle on Tuesday at the building site. 





Fundamentalists Step Up Attacks on Egypt’s Coptic Minority 


By John Lancaster 

Washington Post Service 



EZBETDAWOUD, Egypt— The most sinking 
memory of fee surviving villagers, when they 
describe fee horror of what happened here, is how 

pC f^was just^er dS Jadala Mansour, 46, was 

woricine behind the counter of his tiny tailor’sshop 
S a® assistant hunched over a sewing machine. 

A few Fadel Harafi with 


four friends in from of his small grocery shop. 

It didn't seem to matter then that Mr. Hanafi, a 
father of 1 1, was Muslim and the four other men 
were Coptic Christians. Now it seems to matter a 
great deal. 

In abloody spasm of violence and terror, gunmen 
believed to be Islamic militants, wielding assault 
rifles and wearing masks and military fatigues, 
walked into this predominantly Christian hamlet 300 
miles (4£0 kilometers) south of Cairo around 6:30 
P.M. on Thursday and shot everyone in sight. The 


four-minute assault killed 1 3 men — nine of than 
Qjpts — including Mr. Mansour and his assistant as 
well as Mr. Hanafi and his four Coptic friends. 

The attack was the second of its kind in a month 
and one of die bloodiest against Egypt's Christian 
minority since 1991, when Mamie militants 
launched a violent campaign against the secular, 
military-backed government of President Hosni 
Mubarak. On Feb. 12, gunmen killed nine Chris- 
tians while they attended a you* meeting at a Coptic 
church in Abu Qurqas, 160 miles to the north. 


Although Egyptian security forces have clearly 
gained the upper hand in their battle against Is- 
lamic extremists during the last several years, the 
spate of recent attacks has reminded Egyptians of 
the militants’ continued capacity for mayhem. In 
particular, they have reinforced a sense of vul- 
nerability am wig Christians — who make up 
roughly 10percentofEgypt’s60million people — 
in a predominantly Islamic country where some 

See EGYPT, Page 7 




• L. 














INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY MARCH 19, 1997 


PAGE TWO 


Death of an Icon / Sacrifice for Hie Bottom Line 


^rtdich 

S; W 


After 43 Years, Ford Takes T-Bird Away ^he (Secular) Faith 

t/ ^ . . _ _ V. . i ^ , /•« !•' D/U 


D ETROIT — Wife even the Beach Boys 
going bald and turning gray, perhaps it 
had to happen: Ford Motor Co. is ending 
production this year of its legendary 
Thunderbud after 43 years of building the car that 
found a beloved spot in America’s cultural history. 

Introduced in Detroit’s postwar glory period, die 
Thunderbird went on to win the affection of gen- 
erations of Americans for its supporting role during 
their years of young love and adventure. 

When the Beach Boys crooned about the good 
times, the Thunderbird was their chosen symbol. 

1 ‘ She’ll have fun, fun. fun ’til her daddy takes tfaeT- 
Bird awaaaaaay." they sang, and America's crush 
on the Thunderbird deepened as it seemed to cap- 
ture the melody of the times. 

Even as Ford announced Monday that it would 
stop making the Thunderbird, it held out hope to 
longtime fans that it might resurrect the model as a 
small two-seater a few years from now. But a T-Bird 
return was presented as an if, not a when. For now. 
Thunderbird devotees could only mount. 

Ford announced the move as pan of a broader 
plan to cut costs, and, in the process, up to 2L500 
jobs. The company also said Monday that it would 
discontinue this year three of the Thunderbird ’s 
slow-selling siblings — the Aerostar van, the Probe 
and the Mercury Cougar, itself a legend to many 
baby boomers. 

The Thunderbird dates to the early 1950s, when a 
group of Ford engineers drafted plans for a powerful 
roadster only to be discouraged from building it by 
Ford’s senior management, which was more in- 
terested in family cars. But that attitude among top 
executives changed completely when General Mo- 
tors displayed the first Chevrolet Corvette in January 
1953 at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York. 

Moving with a speed that would be unusual today 
and was extraordinary (hen. Ford was able to start 
selling two-seat Th underbirds in September 1954. 

The Thunderbird had one feature that the Cor- 
vette did not: It was the first mass-produced Amer- 
ican convertible offered with two roofs, said Eu- 
gene Nelson, a Ford engineer who is treasurer of the 
Detroit chapter of the American Road Thunderbird 
Club. A young couple out on a summer date under 
cloudless skies could leave (be removable hard top | 
behind in the garage. If a storm suddenly blew up, 
the couple could then pull up the collapsible soft 
top, which was stored behind the seats. 

For all its glamour, the two-seat Thunderbird 
moved slowly out of the showrooms at first, with 
j'ust 14.190 cars sold in the first year. Ford re- 
sponded in 1958 by installing a rear seal. Sales 
climbed to 9 1,000 in I960 and hit a peak of 322^517 
in 1977. By last year. Thunderbird sales had shrunk 
to just 80,000. 


By Robyn Meredith 

New fork Times Senior 


But the classic Th underbirds live on. Mr. Nelson 
said that just two years ago, he was out driving one of 


said mat just two years ago, he was out driving one oi 
his two 1^7Thunderlnrasona sunny Saturday when 
clouds appeared and it suddenly began to rain. 

*Td had the top off, but I bad the soft top,” be 
said. ‘ 'So no problem: I put up the soft top. and away 
we went.” 

While the news release issued by the company 
said. “The Thunderbird nameplate will return in a 
different form in the future,” a Ford executive said 
be was less sure it would be resurrected. 

“If we do bring it back,” said Jacques Nasser, 
president for automotive operations. * ' it would need 
to make good business sense." 


shutter part of the Ford factory in Lorain, Ohio, at 
the cost of about 1,800 jobs. Because 20 other 
factories nationwide build parts for the vehicles 
being discontinued, the moves could result in an 
additional 700 layoffs. 

Wall Street’s reaction was to cheer, not to mourn, 
the passing of the Thunderbird and other models. 

“It is an encouraging development,” said David 
Garrity; an auto analyst at the financial advisory 
firm Smith Barney Inc. * ‘The reason they are doing 
this is that these products didn't selL” 

Ford is likely to take a charge against earnings in 
the second quarter of up to $150 million to pay for the 
moves announced Monday, Mr. Nasser said. Work- 


A Blunt Opponent of Religious Power 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Tunes Service 







“We haven’t made a de- 11 

rision,” be added, but in several for all its gi 
years. Ford might sell a smaller, . „ . rrPo 

spotty car carrying the Thun- two~^at 1-M 
derbod name, one that recalls die 1955 model , 

T-Bird’s roots. “It would be 

very limited production levels." 

The Thunderbird came on the scene in what 
seemed tike a more expansive era, when down- 
sizing was foreign to the national vocabulary and to 
a mighty U.S. auto industry. 


For all its glamour, the 
two-seat T-Bird, like this 
1955 model, sold slowly. 


T HESE DAYS, all of Detroit’s grand old 
names — and roomy, soft-riding cars — are 
struggling. Buick, Mercury, OldsmobOe 
and even mighty Cadillac have watched 
their sales slow for years as younger buyers shied 
away from gas-hogging road barges. Even a grand 
name like Thunderbird no longer seems to be 
enough of a lifeline. 

“What we’re really seeing is die continuing trend 
to more trucklike products,” Mr. Nasser said. Dis- 
continuing the Thunderbird and the other models “is 
really responding to changing consumer tastes.” 
Discontinuing the Th undo-bird and Cougar will 


™ ere who are laid off trill receive 
nour the long-term pay and benefits under 

i ».».». their union contracts. 
t, luse this For the first 36 weeks of job- 

tld slowly. lessness, they will receive un- 

employment benefits and other 

payments amounting to about 95 
percent of tbetr pay. After that, they will get 100 
percent of pay and report for duty , where they will be 
assigned to community service work or job training. 
The workers will be high cm the list to get any 
openings at other Ford factories. 

Of the models being discontinued, only the Th un- 
derbird and the Cougar are built in Ohio and will 
result in layoffs. The Probe, a sports car, is built at a 
factory in Flat Rock. Michigan, dial Ford and 
Mazda Motor Coni, jointly operate, and workers 
who built the Probe will instead build additional 
Mazdas- Ibe Aerostar is built in the same Sl Louis 
factory that builds the popular Ford Explorer, and 
workers there will switch from building vans to 
assembling sport utility vehicles. 


Ford seeks to cut costs in Europe. Page 15. 


ANKARA — Upsetting stereotypes 
is not the normal way to advance in the 
Turkish Army, bid General Cevic Bir 
has risen to tire top ranks as much. by 
challengin g dogma as by accepting it 

With the army now playing an in- 
creasingly public role in Turkish politics, 
new attention is bong focused on Gen- 
eral Bir. He is already one of tire most 
influ ential figures in Turkey, and.de- 
fendere of secularism here fervently hope 
that his influence will continue to grow. 

During a trip to Washington last 
month, the general delivered a series of 
speeches whose frankness amazed 
many listeners. He not only condemned 
the rise of religious power in Turkey, 
but also defied diplomatic protocol by 
directly accusing Iran of sponsoring 
anti-Turkish terrorism and trying to de- 
stroy tire secular Turkish state. 

When an Iranian consul in Turkey 
differed with the general, be was im- 
mediately expelled from the country. 
The incident was a sign of General Bir’s 
power and his willingness to use it. 

Among his most startling innovations 
has been a drive to erode tire obsessive 
secrecy that has traditionally shrouded 

th e Turkish Army. 

For years, even officials of the For- 
eign Minis try and other government 
agencies were unwelcome inside the 
sprawling military headquarters in cen- 
tral Ankara. Now they drop in regularly, 
and officers have gone so far as to invite 
reporters in for lunch. 

General Bir would not have been able 
to take such steps without the support of 
his boss. General Ismail Hakki 
Karadayi, chief of the general staff. 

But many outsiders view General Bir. 
58. as a driving force within tire mil- 
itary, and he has gathered a remarkable 
group of highly loyal officers around 
him. In the years ahead, these officers 
are likely to take control of a military 
that, as a North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization ally and one of tire world's 
10 largest, is considered die only truly 
effective fighting force in the Middle 
East other than Israel's. 

Last week. General Bir agreed to 
answer a few questions during a brief 



General Cevic Bir defies protocol 


session in his office. His dose-cropped 
gray hair and chiseled face, do min a te d 
by a shar ply pointed nose, give him tire 
air of a man completely comfortable 
with command. When answering ques- 
tions. he is brief and blunt . 

“We are military.” he explained. 
“We have to be outspoken." 

Radical as he may be in army terms, 
be does not live up to the hopes of some 
civilian intellectuals, who dream of. the 
day when a top Turkish officer will, take 
a fresh look at tire conflict with Kurdish 
separatists, probably the country’s 
greatest single problem. 

He has, however, gone further thafi 


- 


any other senior officer in publicly de- 
manding that economic development 
accompany military action in the Kurd- 
ish region. “ 

“We have marginalized tire terror- 
ists," he said, referring to the Kurdish 
separatists, “but if the government 
doesn't make social and economic im- 
provements out there, we are always 
going to have more of them. Let's efim -7 
inate the conditions that push people to 
become terrorists. Let tbe government 
do its part." 

General Bir is undoubtedly Turkey’s 
best-known military leader. This is due 
partly to his command of English, partly 
to General Karadayi’ s practice of using 
him as a foreign emissary and partly to 
his service in 1993 and 1994 as com- 
mander of the UN force in Somalia. He 


Serbs Supplying Equipment and Mercenaries to Zaire’s Army 


By Jonathan C. Randal 

Washington Port Service 


BELGRADE — Brokers with con- 
nections to President Slobodan Milo- 
sevic’s government have made deals to 
supply the embattled Zairian military 
with men and equipment, from a hand- 
ful of jet fighters and multiple rocket 
launchers to uniforms and several hun- 
dred combat veterans who have signed 
up as mercenaries, according to dip- 
lomats and other analysts here. 

Serbia and other former Yugoslav 
republics have stepped in to become 
Zaire's suppliers because they are des- 
perately short of hard currency and have 
a highly developed arms industry. In 
addition, the Balkan wars have left a 
ready pool of experienced combatants, 
many now adrift in drained economies 
and eager to make money out of their 
military expertise. 

The first contingent of about 180 
Serbs, mostly from the Serb region of 
Bosnia, arrived in Zaire on three-month 
contracts at the turn of (he year and are 
due home by the end of this month, 
according to veterans in touch with 
former colleagues now in Africa. Scores 
more, including combat veterans from 
Yugoslav and Bosnian Serb commando 
units, were recruited here and have fol- 
lowed the first batch out on flights from 
Belgrade, the veterans said. 

Monthly pay, they added, varies from 
$3,000 for protecting airfields, artillery 
fire bases and economic assets such as 
diamond and other mines, to $ 6,000 to 
$ 10,000 a month for participating in 
front-line combat operations. Half the 
money due the mercenaries is paid on 
signing of the contract and the rest is 
paid in Zaire, they said. 


Even the base pay would represent a 
small fortune in postwar Serbia and 
Bosnia, where once-ballybooed combat 
heroes now are yesterday’s men, often 
earning less than $ 100 a month in meni- 
al jobs. Volunteers were also promised 
$50,000 life insurance policies. 

So far, no Serb mercenaries are known 
to have been killed in the fighting, but 
several have been wounded and sent 
home, according to Belgrade newspa- 
pers. 

The Yugoslav Foreign Ministry’s 
spokesman denied any government in- 
volvement in the deals with Zaire. But 
diplomats and Yugoslav sources, speak- 
ing anonymously and elaborating on 
press reports, said the government at 
least was tolerating the operations and 
probably was taking a share, partic- 
ularly of weapons exports. 

The Yugoslav arms industry, which 
was highly developed even before the 


Balkan wars, has a long history of 
selling abroad. “The mercenaries are 
just the icing on tbe cake," a Western 
diplomat remarked. “The equipment 
represents the real money for Belgrade 
and Pale.” seat of the Bosnian Serb 
Republic. 

Shipments were still under way as 
recently as last week, he and other dip- 
lomats indicated. 

Yugoslav analysts said the govern- 
ment has sought to distance itself from 
the weapons sales and mercenary con- 
tracts by enlisting shadow companies to 
handle payments and other details. 
Would-be mercenaries said in inter- 
views that businessmen who said they 
are close to the government are con- 
ducting the recruiting of veterans to 
bolster President Mobutu Sese Seko’s 
faltering army. 

The arms-and-mercenaries deals re- 
portedly were initiated by an army of- 


ficer who accompanied the Yugoslav 
president. Zoran Lilic. on visits to Af- 
rican countries last summer. Another 
key player in the recruiting operations, 
veterans said in interviews, is Milorad 
Palemic, former commander of an 80- 
man Bosnian Serb commando unit in- 
volved in the July 1995 massacres of 
Muslim prisoners after the fall of tbe 
United Nations- protected enclave of 
Srebrenica in eastern Bosnia. 

Traditionally, the Yugoslav Army’s 
Federal Directorate for Supply and Pro- 
curement has bandlai overseas 
weapons sales, known in army parlance 
as “special products goods.” Accord- 
ing to press reports here, its former 
commander. General Jovan Cekovic, 
helped set up a dummy Egyptian tour- 
ism company that arranged refueling 
and overflight rights for aircraft taking 
mercenaries and arms to Zaire. 

A Bosnian Serb combat veteran said 


Parliament Votes Out Zaire’s Prime Minister 


The Associated Press 

KINSHASA, Zaire — Zaire’s prime 
minister, widely blamed for sweeping 
military losses to rebels in eastern Zaire, 
was removed from office Tuesday by a 
nearly unanimous vote of Parliament 

Leon Kengo wa Dondo was toppled 
only hours after he left for Nairobi for an 
international meeting on the insurgency 
in Zaire. 

His dismissal came after his gov- 
ernment's worst setback in the war, the 
loss of Kisangani. Zaire's third-largest 
city, over the weekend. 

With President Mobutu Sese Seko 
hospitalized in Monaco with prostate 


cancer, his regime appears weaker than 
it has ever been in his nearly 32 years of 
autocratic role. Government soldiers 
looted the market Tuesday in Zaire's 
diamond center, Mbuji-Mayi, underlin- 
ing tbe nation's instability. 

Of 464 members of die 470-seat tran- 
sitional Parliament who voted, 9 voted 
against Mr. Kengo’s removal and 10 
abstained. No replacement was imme- 
diately named. 

Military leaders had been among Mr. 
Kengo’s harshest critics, blaming him 
for setbacks in the war against tbe 
rebels, who have captured most of east- 
ern Zaire in the last seven months. 


Marshal Mobutu’s top military aides 
have held several daylong, closed-door 
sessions since the fall of Kisangani. 
Diplomatic sources, speaking cm con- 
dition of anonymity, said the generals 
were discussing a coup. 

In Monaco, Marshal Mobutu's son, 
Nzanga Mobutu, said that the president 
was well enough to walk around his 
hospital room there and would soon 
return to Zaire. 

But a source in Monaco, speaking on 
condition of anonymity, had said the 66 - 
year-old Mobutu was in serious but 
stable condition, with internal bleed- 


in an interview that a businessman with 
links to the government conducted his 
recruitment interview in Belgrade. 

Although potential mercenaries were 
instructed not to talk about details of 
feeiriecraitxneiu. articles started appear- 
ing in the Bosnian Serb press in mid- 
January. 

Any semblance of secrecy disap- 
peared when television footage from 
Zaire showed Zairian recruits wearing 
distinctive Yugoslav camouflage uni- 
forms and Yugoslav-made Galeb tac- 
tical jets still bearing inscriptions in 
Serbo-Croatian on their fuselages. 

■ Wounded Foreigners 

Hospitals here are filling with 
Rwandans and other foreigners 
wounded while fighting alongside 
Zaire’s retreating army, medical work- 
ers and human rights activists said, 
providing new evidence that the war 
between the government and eastern 
rebels has become a regional conflict. 
The Washington Post reported from 
Kinshasa. 

The army's recent defeats at the 
hands of eastern rebels have filled the 
Zairian capital's hospitals with Large 
numbers of wounded troops. 

Of about 500 wounded combatants in 
two hospitals, 170 are from Rwanda, 
Angola and other countries, employees • 
said. 

They said hundreds of other troops 
had been taken to at least three other 
hospitals in the city, and it was unknown 
how many of (hose are foreigners. 

A spokesman for the Defense Min- 
istry said that while many wounded 
Zairian troops had been brought to Kin- 
shasa, “if there are foreigners. I don’t 
know anything about it." 


is the only Turkish officer ever to hold 
such a command. - 

“You should bave seen die look op 
tbe journalists in Somalia when 1 first 
arrived,” he said with a broad smile! 
“They were expecting a Turk with a big 
black mustache and a fat belly.” 

Asked about his vision of Tin-key’s 
future, he answered quickly and un- 
equivocally. "I want it to be a moderfi 
country with values like those of any 
European country or the United 
States,” he said. ■ 

“Everything I do is aimed at inte- 
grating wife the West” * 

The Turkish Army has a constitu- 
tional duty to defend tbe secular system 
In recent months this obligation has led 
it to issue several strict warnings to the 
Islam-based government, winch has 
been in power since June. - 

“Of course I worry,” General Bn 
said about the rise of fundamentalism, 
stressing feat he was expressing his pet; 
sonal views. “As a citizen of this coun- 
try, I worry about it It’s important far 
me feat as we enter fee 2 1 st century, we 
go forward and not backward.” 

His outspoken defense of secularis# 
and ill-disguised distaste for the gov- 
erning Welfare Party have led some 
Islamists to complain about him. They 
view his brand of secularism as an im- 
plicit attack on religion. 

■ Koranic Schools Closed .» 


P 1 


Following directives from the mil" 
itary, Turkey’s Islamic-led government 
has begun shutting down unauthorized 
Koranic schools. The Associated Press 
reported Tuesday. 

Three establishments providing Kor: 
anic study courses in the capital were 
closed Monday, the Ankara governor’s 
office said. 

“Others will be closed as soon as 
they are detected,” Governor Erdogan 
Sahinoglu was quoted in the daily Mi(- 
liyet as saying. 



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WASHINGTON ( AFP) — A special panel 
appointed by President Bill Clinton to me- 
diate a dispute between American Airlines 
and its pilots must submit its report to him on 
Wednesday. 

The parties will have 30 days to accept or 
reject the findings. If rejected by fee pilots, 
their union representatives could call for a 
strike. 

But a White House statement said fee 
parties had agreed not to take any unilateral 


action until one minute after midnight on 
April 28. 


Europe 


Forecast tor Thursday through Saturday, as provided by AccuWeather. 


A delay in relocating squatters will push 
back completion of a commuter train line in 
Manila to July 1999. About 3,500 families are 
squatting at fee proposed terminal of the 17.8- 
kilometer ( 1 1 -mile) railroad. (AP) 


Tirana airport, which was closed March 
1 3 during anti-government disturbances in the 
capita], will reopen on Thursday, Interior 
Minister Lush PerpaJi said Tuesday. (AFP) 


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needles, Israeli researchers have successfully tested a new 
influenza vaccine in the form of nose drops, it was reported 
Tuesday. 

Virologists at Jerusalem's Hebrew University school of 
medicine developed the new delivery system for the vaccine 
over fee past six years and recently applied for a U.S. patent 
following successful clinical trials, according to the report 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1997 

THE AMERICAS 


PAGE 3 


Gingrich Backs Delay for a Tax Cut 


By tnc Pianin and Clay Chandler 

WajJiutgic m Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The House 
^a^r. Newt Gingrich, has endorsed 
the idea of temporarily shelving the Re- 

KSJK *? ve for a “ajor to cut. 
Mding his voice to a cacophony of Re- 
BMblican views on how best to achieve a 

Hinton** budget ^ wilh President Bill 

Mr • Gingrich characterized his switch 

tax cuts as a tactical retreat that would 

4^ deprive liberals of their favorite objec- 
* Hf® P the balanced budget debate, while 
Slaving the Republicans free to rejoin the 
campaign for lower taxes later. 

-/‘We don’t want to get into a trap 
where every time we propose any kind of 
healthy change in the government, lib- 
erals have automatic screaming about 
tax cuts,” the Georgia Republican said. 
»So let’s take tax cuts away for a mo- 
ment- Let’s just talk about balancing the 


budget. Now whar’s the liberal excuse 
for not balancing ihe budget?” 

But the speaker's proposal put him. 
along with the majority whip, Tom 
DeLay. Republican of Texas, and other 
House leaders, at odds with the Senate 
majority leader, Trent Lott, Republican 
of Mississippi, and House and Senate 
Republican tax- writing leaders. 

Mr. Gingrich’s willingness to reverse 
course so abruptly on an issue that has 
dominated the Republican agenda since 
the party swept into control of Congress 
in 1994 was interpreted by some as 
evidence that congressional Republi- 
cans are badly divided and grasping fora 
coherent negotiating strategy. 

A senior Republican House aide ac- 
knowledged Monday that his party was 
“just drifting” on budget and tax issues 
because many Republican leaders were 
unwilling to stick their necks out. 

But Republicans say Mr. Clinton must 
share in the blame. “Neither side is 


making the effort to pull together the big 
picture,” the aide said. 

Mr. Lott, who emerged after the elec- 
tions last year as the most powerful 
Republican on Capitol Hill, has con- 
tinued to push hard for a tax cut of more 
than $200 billion. But many feel it is 
politically and mathematically im- 
possible to pay for a large tax cut without 
curtailing spending for Social Security's 
retirement benefits. Medicare's health 
insurance for the elderly and other en- 
titlement programs. 

Mr. Lott insisted Monday thai * ‘it’s not 
my intent to have a package that doesn't 
have some appropriate tax relief for 
working Americans.” But if the Repub- 
licans put off deliberations on a tax cut 
until after Congress completes work on a 
balanced budget, as Mr. Gingrich. Mr. 
DeLay and others are proposing in the 
House, the Republicans would be left 
with virtually no leverage in negoti ating a 
tax-cut package with the White House. 



Denver Heir’s Trail of Destruction 


Jury Hears a Tale of Fast Cars, Drugs and a Mysterious Woman I President Clinton, in his wheelchair, meeting with Mrs. Baker and Mr. Mondale on ram pa igp - ffnap ee reform. 


- By James Brooke 

New York Times Service 

DENVER — Growing up in a moun- 
taintop mansion, Spicer Breeden could 
survey a shining city stamped repeatedly 
with the name of his mother's family 
fortune: Boettcher. 

A Boettcher gave Denver the down- 
town estate where the governor resides. 
Boettcher Halls grace the city’s botan- 
ical gardens, theater complex and nat- 


driver. Denverites are spellbound by this 
case with its testimony about fast cars, 
old money and blizzards of cocaine and 
with a mysterious former model as a 
witness. 

It was 1 869 when 17-year-old Charles 
Boettcher fled Prussia’s military draft 
and joined his older brother selling nails 
in a hardware store in the Wyoming 
Territory. When Charles Boettcher died 
in 1948. he presided over a Rocky 
Mountain business empire: railroads, 


ural history museum. On the far side of ranches, mines, meatpacking plants, ce- 


rfie Rockies, a Boettcher, Mr. Breeden's 
uncle, helped transform an old mining 
town into a glittering ski resort: Aspen. 

So, nearly one year ago. Denver’s 
collective jaw dropped when the police 
broke into a barricaded home here and 


mem factories, sugar mills, a life in- 
surance company and the region's most 
powerful investment house. 

As be neared his 96th birthday, the 
iron -willed entrepreneur told Time 
magazine: “I like to work. I’ve worked 


lifeless body of Mr. Breeden. Before In contrast, his great-grandson. Spicer. 
* snooting his dog in the neck and himself never held a job. At age 13, Spicer 
" ip the head. Mr. Breeden, the 36-year- Breeden inherited $2 million of die 
old scion of the Boettcher clan, hastily Boettcher fortune from his mother, who 
scribbled a suicide note. The one-line, died of cancer. As an adult, he spent his 


ijusspelled postscript to the note read: 
vp.S. I was not driving the vehical." 

The note referred to Mr. Breeden's 
Eire, “cosmos black” BMW 540i, 
winch slammed into the rear end of a car 
at 1 10 miles perhour (180 kilometers per 
hour) March 17. 1996, instantly killing 
the other driver, Greg Lopez, one of 
Denver's most beloved newspaper 
columnists. 

On Wednesday, a jury will be asked to 
decide who was driving the vehicle — 
Mr. Breeden or has friend, Peter Jorg 
Schmitz, a German artist who was 
charged with vehicular homicide in Mr. 


time, court records show, using copious 
amounts of cocaine and racking up speed- 
ing tickets and tw o convictions for driving 
under the influence of alcohol or drugs. 

In the last decade, Mr. Breeden's life 
was increasingly controlled by cocaine, 
according to testimony at Mr. Schmitz's 
trial and at a probate trial last fall over 
Mr. Breeden's will. 

At the probate trial. Jennifer Chel- 
wick, a friend of Mr. Breeden’s, testified 
that Mr. Breeden would consume $800 
worth of cocaine tri a night. Ms. Chel- 
wick also said his main supplier had 
been Sydney Stone, a woman identified 


Lopez's death and leaving the scene of by Mr. Breeden as his “business man- 


an accident. Mr. Schmitz has admitted 
only to joy riding in the car with Mr. 
Breeden on the night of the crash. His 
lawyer. Walter Gerash. care of Denver’s 
most prominent lawyers, has argued that 
Mr. Breeden, high on cocaine, was die 


* Away From Politics 

• Florida has freed 200 more pris- 

oners before their sentences were up. 
provoking a new outcry among law- 
enforcement officials. Three hundred in- 
mates were released last week because 
the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled that 
yne stale could not revoke automatic 
early -release time it had granted to re- 
lieve prison overcrowding in the 
1980s. (*P) 

• The incoming president of the Cit- 
adel. John Grinalds, said he was con- 
fident that officials at the South Carolina 
military college punished everyone re- 
sponsible for the hazing of two female 
cadets. A male cadet was dismissed and 
three others resigned, the college an- 


ager.” On the witness stand, Ms. Stone 
denied dealing drugs. “I’m 50 years 
old," the svelte Ms. Stone said. “Would 
I look like this if I took drugs?" 

A model turned society seamstress, 
Ms. Stone is reported to have lived at a 


nounced last week, while 10 others were 
given lesser punishments for hazing and 
Harassing die two women. One cadet 
was cleared ( AP ) 

• A comatose woman who was raped 

and gave birth to a child during her 11 
years in a vegetative state has died, 
according to a Rochester, New York, 
newspaper report The cause of death of 
the 30-year-old, known only as Kathy, 
was not disclosed. (AP) 

• Prosecutors in California dropped 

marijuana possession charges against 
an AIDS patient. The case was a key 
challenge to die state’s new medical 
marijuana law. The patient had a doc- 
tor's written diagnosis that recognized 
the benefits of the drug in his treat- 
ment. (AP) 


CROSSWORD 


reduced rent in a house owned by Mr. 
Breeden in Denver’s chic Cherry Creek 
neighborhood. 

While Mr. Breeden grew up in a man- 
sion atop Lookout Mountain. Mr. Lopez 
grew up in the fiatlands below, in 
Golden, a brewery town. 

He fell in love with words, finding his 
voice writing for the hometown tabloid. 
The Rocky Mountain News. He was a 
listener, a man who would spend hours, 
days, weeks with the subjects of his 
column: a teen-age father, a brain-injured 
couple or a newly released convict. 

His wife, Kathleen Bohiand, remem- 
bers herhusbandas an unpretentious guy 
who “owned 96 Hawaiian shins and one 
suit-” She gave birth to their daughter. 
Calla, seven months after the accident 

By the rime of his suicide, Mr. 
Breeden had begun to exhibit increas- 
ingly paranoid behavior, apparently be- 
cause of cocaine use. He changed jocks 
and telephone numbers and occasionally 
scanned his backyard with a search- 
light 

To detect intruders, Mr. Breeden, who 
lived alone, placed string over windows 
and sprinkled cornflakes in halls. He told 
friends that FBI agents were trying to 
tunnel into his house and were watching 
him through his television. He hired an 
investigator to check on his friends. 

But by St Patrick's Day 1996, Mr. 
Breeden had made plans to check into a 
drug rehabilitation clinic. After an af- 
ternoon of shots of vodka, beer chasers 
and. some say. cocaine, he and Mr. 
Schmitz then piled into Mr. Breeden’s 
car and roared down Interstate 25, Den- 
ver’s heavily used north-south highway. 

Weaving in and out of traffic at high 
speed, the 560,000 BMW slammed into 
the back of Mr. Lopez's black Toyota 
4Runner, passed it on the right then rut it 
a second time with a fishtail so powerful 
that it snapped off the Toyota’s right 
front wheel. The Toyota, a sport-utility . 
vehicle, barrel-rolled four times, killing 
Mr. Lopez instantly. 

The BMW stopped briefly, then sped 
off. .After switching to an Audi sport 
wagon at Mr. Breeden’s house, the two 
returned to bar-hopping in Denver’s 
trendy Lower Downtown, according to 
testimony. 

Two days later, on March 19, the 
police were knocking on Mr. Breeden’s 
door, and the first television crew started 
broadcasting live from his front lawn. 
With furniture pushed against the doors 
and sleeping bags covering the win- 
dows, he drank rum, snorted cocaine and 
watched the television coverage. 

Before turning his .357 Magnum re- 
volver on his beloved chow, Gambo, 
wounding the dog, be scribbled a will 
thai cut his entire family — father, broth- 
er and sister — out of nis will. He left all 
his money, less than one-third of his 
mother's legacy, to Ms. Stone. 


Add Mondale to the Blitz 

WASHINGTON — The White House has broadened a 
publicity blitz on behalf of stalled legislation to regulate 
political fund-raising, enlisting two political dignitaries to 
whip up public support for political reform. 

The two, former Vice President Walter Mondale, a 
Democrat, and Nancy Kassebaum Baker, the recently re- 
tired Republican senator from Kansas, appeared at the 
White House on Monday with Vice President Ai Gore, who 
was filling in for President Bill Clinton. 

Mr. Gore said the two would "help educate the public, 
rally public opinion and expand the circle of reform.” 

It was not obvious how the two would do that, much less 
persuade the Congress to pass an enormously controversial 
election-spending bill by July 4, the goal that Mr. Clinton 
has set for getting the legislation to his desk. 

Congress has tried for years to enact an overhaul of 
campaign-finance laws, and the latest bill, sponsored by 
Senators John McCain, Republican of Arizona, and Russell 
Fein gold. Democrat of Wisconsin, is opposed by most 
Republicans and more than a few Democrats. (AftTl 

Foes to the Left, Foes to the Right 

WASHINGTON — One reason proposals for campaign- 
finance reform aren't exactly taking wing may be that a 
significant number of important national orga niz ations 
really, truly hate them. 

These include groups on the left, such as the American 
Civil Liberties Union and the National Education As- 
sociation, and groups on the right, such as the Christian 
Coalition, National Right to Life Committee and National 
Rifle Association. 

“The fact is we don't represent the same people, don’t 
contribute to the same candidates and don't believe in the 
same things,” Don Morabito of the education association 
said — except, he added, for the First Amendment to the 
Constitution, which guarantees freedom of speech and of 


the press. That is why Senator Mitch McConnell. Re- 
publican of Kentucky and finance reform ’s sworn enemy in 
the Senate, invited these strange bedfellows to the Capitol 
last week to trash the proposed constitutional amendment 
on political spending and the campaign -reform measure 
sponsored by Mr. McCain and Mr. Feingold. 

All these organizations, except the ACLU, were big 
players in last year's elections, when the rifle association's 
political action committee spent $6.6 million and the edu- 
cation association spent $5 million. Among them these 
groups boast 8.5 million members. 

And all of them say the so-called reform proposals would 
sharply constrict both their spending and the content and 
tuning of their political advertising. (WP) 

A Monumental Conflict 

WASHINGTON — In a city where no war monument 
seems to get built without a second war over how it should 
be done, it appears that the $100 million World War II 
memorial planned for the National Mall in Washington will 
be no exception. 

In recent weeks. Senator Bob Kerrey, Democrat of Neb- 
raska; Deborah Dietsch. editor of Architecture magazine, 
and Roger Lewis, an architecture professor who writes a 
column for The Washington Post, have all stepped up their 
criticism of the site chosen for the memorial, between the 
Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial. 

Mr. Kerrey has asked the American Battle Monuments 
Commission to find another site. (NYT) 


Quote/ Unquote. 


Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama and Senate 
Intelligence Committee chairman, on Anthony Lake's de- 
cision to end his fight to head the CIA: "It was never 
personal with me. I hope with no one. It was a question 
whether or not Mr. Lake was a fit and proper person for this 
very important job in America. ' ’ (Reuters) 


China Firm Shifts on White House Visit 

Company Denies Lehman Brothers Set Up Chairman’s Meeting 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Post Service 

BEIJING — China International 
Trust and Investment Corp. says that 
although the Lehman Brothers invest- 
ment firm invited its chairman to visit 
the United States in February 1996, the 
principal intermediary for the chair- 
man’s attendance at a White House cof- 
fee for Democratic fund-raisers was a 
restaurateur from Little Rock, Arkan- 
sas. 

The statement Monday by CITTC con- 
flicts with one given Friday by the cor- 
poration’s chairman, Wang Jun. 

In an interview with The Washington 
Post on Friday. Mr. Wang said Lehman 
Brothers had set up the White House 
meeting. He referred at the tune to the 
Arkansas restaurateur, Charles Yah Lin 
Trie, as "probably one of the ar- 


rangers.’ * and said be had never met him 
before the February trip. 

On Monday, however, in a brief 
statement to The Post that was also sent 
to Lehman Brothers, CITIC’s general 
office said, “We would like to clarity 
that Lehman Brothers had nothing to do 
with arranging the meeting with Mr. 
Clinton, President of the United States, 
although it was Lehman Brothers that 
invited Mr. Wang to visit the United 
Stares.” 

Later, an assistant to Mr. Wang told 
The Post that Mr. Trie was primarily 
responsible for arranging the White 
House stop. 

Mr. Wang said last week that the 
purpose of his U.S. visit was to explore 
the American market’s interest in pos- 
sible new Chinese bond issues. 

His explanation raised the possibility 
that the visit might have been linked to 


efforts o f Am erican financiers seeking 
to court OTIC and Mr. Wang for their 
business, rather than Mr. Wang seeking 
to sway U.S. government policy. 

Mr. Wang said he never proposed 
going to the White House to meet Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton and added that he 
"had little to talk to him, Clinton, 
about." 

But die issue of what Mr. Wang was 
doing in the United Stales and at the 
White House has been controversial be- 
cause the executive, who runs China's 
most influential financial and industrial 
conglomerate, is also chairman of a 
Chinese arras-trading company under 
investigation for alleged involvement in 
a weapons smuggling case in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Mr. Clinton has called Mr. Wang's 
attendance at the White House coffee 
“clearly inappropriate." 


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PAGE 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


U.S. Rights Official 
Going to East Timor 

ShattuckMeets First With Jakarta Aides 


Camp taf to Oar Staff From Ditpodta 

JAKARTA — A senior U.S. gov- 
ernment official met Tuesday with In- 
donesian officials to discuss human 
rights before he visits die annexed ter- 
ritory of East Timor. 

John Shattnck, undersecretary of 
stale for democracy, human rights and 
labor, is expected to leave for Dili on 
Wednesday or Thursday on what will be 
a sensitive trip for both Jakarta and 
Washington. 

Foreign Minister Ali Almas said (hat 
during his meeting with Mr. Shattnck, 
“We have bad an exchange of views in 
his field of human rights, we discussed 
the latest developments on East 
Timor.” 

Talks between Indonesia and Por- 
tugal, East Timor's former colonial 
over the island’s future have 
on for nearly IS years without 
ig a solution acceptable to both 

rides. 

Indonesia invaded the territory in 
December 1975 after Portugal withdrew 
and annexed it as the 27th Indonesian 
province the following July in a move 
that the United Nations has not rec- 
ognized. 

A U.S. embassy spokesman, Craig 
Stromme, gave only details about the trip 
to East Timor, but said that Mr. Shattuck, 
who flew in Sunday from Washington, 
would be “meeting with government 
and nongovernment officials to discuss a 
wide range of issues.” 

Mr. Shattuck has already met mem- 
bers of Indonesia's National Commis- 
sion on Human Rights to discuss East 
Timor and the situation in Indonesia 
following riots last July in Jakarta. 

Indonesian authorities have many 
times publicly dismissed criticism of 
human rights violations in the country, 
calling the subject an internal matter. 



The new UN special representative 
for East Timor, Jamsheed Marker of 
Pakistan, is due in Jakarta on Thursday 
and will visit East Timor shortly. 

Mr. Alatas said he welcomed die ap- 
pointment of Mr. Marker, whom he 
described as very experienced. 

The foreign minister said that Mr. 
Marker, a former Pakistani ambassador 
to the United Nations, would report 
back to its secretary-general, Kofi An- 
nan, to belp decide his next move on the 
East Timor issue. 

The visits follow renewed unrest in 
East Timor. 

Last month, hundreds fled ethnic un- 
rest in the enclave of Ambeno after 
being left homeless. 

While the majority of East Timor’s 
800,000 residents are Roman Catholic, 
around 90 percent of Indonesia's 200 
million people are Muslim. 

The strong Indonesian military pres- 
ence in East Timor has long been 
charged with frequent abuses of human 
rights. 

The new Catholic bishop in East 
Timor said Tuesday that human rights 
had improved in the area but remained a 
problem. 

Bishop Basilio Do Nascimento, who 
will be installed Wednesday to head the 
new diocese of Bancau, said the situ- 
ation in East Timor was ‘ ‘catastrophic 1 ’ 
in the mid 1970s. 

“It is not so bard now,” the bishop 
asserted. 

Bishop Do Nascimento left East 
Timor in 1959 and spent 25 years in 
Europe before he returned in 1994. 
Bishop Do Nascimento. 46. will head a 
diocese numbering 300,000 out of East 
Timor's 800,000 people. 

Pope John Pam n split the church 
ad minis tration late last year, establish- 
ing the new diocese. (AFP, Reuters] 


Nuclear Waste Ship Docks in Japan 



Xxatato Nogi/A^mcc ftaflct-Presjc 

Pacific Teal, a British ship with a cargo of high-level radioactive 
waste reprocessed in France, arriving Tuesday at Mutsu-Ogawara 
port in Rokkasbo, Japan. About 400 anti-nuclear protesters gathered 
along a road. The ship left the French port of Cherbourg on Jan. 13. 


KOREAN: Defectorls Sent to Philippines 

Continued from Page 1 


Korean leadership makes his desertion 
as deeply embarrassing to Pyongyang as 
it is valued by Seoul and by those Asian 
and Western go ver n ments who will 
profit from die treasure of intelligence 
Mr. Hwang brings with him. 

As a leading theorist, Mr. Hwang 
expounded North Korea's doctrine of 
absolute self-reliance, but at the tune of 
his defection, a letter attributed to. his 
Hand by South Korean officials sug- 
gested he Had suffered a complete dis- 
illusionment arising from North 
Korea "s agricultural failures, mass hun- 
ger and unresponsive leaders. 

In managing the defection crisis, the 
goal of China's Communist Party lead- 
ers was to prevent violence from break- 
ing out in Beijing as intelligence op- 
eratives from both ends of the Korean 
Peninsula circled each other warily be- 
hind the police cordons that were thrown 
up around the South Korean consulate. 
Beijing showed that it has balanced its 
relations between its long standing 
C ommunis t allies in the North and its 
newfound capitalist allies in the South. 

China said Tuesday that it had raxed 
“according to Hwang's own wifi” in 
facilitating his departure, but had also 
taken into account “the positions taken 
by the parties concerned” and a desire 
to safeguard “peace and stability on the 
Korean Peninsula.’* After North 
Korea's initial strong protests, its pro- 
da organs- fell silent as the stand- 



AgcaCDFtaoftax 

The defector, Hwang Jang Yopl 


paganc 
off in ! 


in Beijing wore on, indicating that 
Pyongyang's leaders had become 
resigned to the fact that China was not 
going to hand over the defector. 

After Mr. Hwang arrived in (he Phil- 
ippines, be was reported to have flown 
by helicopter to the mountain resort of 
Baguio, about 200 kilometers (125 
miles) north of Manila. 

On Monday, a senior South Korean 
official said Mr. Hwang would remain 
in a “third country” for “a consid- 
erable period of time” before traveling 
to Seoul. This condition was presum- 
ably intended as a gesture to spare China 
the image of having its territory used as 
an escape route from North Korea. 


China to Retain Tight Curbs 
On Migration to Hong Kong 


BRIEFLY 


Reuters 

BEIJING — Beijing will main fain 
tight restrictions on Chinese visiting or 
migrating to Hong Kong after British 
rule of tire territory ends on June 30, the 
official China Dally said Tuesday. 

Rules governing travel between the 
mainland and Hong Kong will not 
change after sovereignty returns to 
China, the newspaper quoted Zhu Ji- 
anmin, chief of the Hong Kong division 
of the Exit Entry Administration Bu- 
reau, as saying. 

Chinese who believed that traveling 
to Hong Kong after tire midnight han- 
dover would be as easy as visiting Shen- 
zhen in China's nearby Guangdong 
Province were wrong, Mr. Zhu said. 

Many Hong Kong residents say they 
fear foe return to Chinese rule could 
provoke an economic migration, with 
workers from the mainland rushing co 
join tiie territory’s booming economy. 

But China Daily quoted Mr. Zhu as 
saying that after the handover only 150 
people a day would be granted permits 
allowing them to live in Hong Kong, the 
same as the current quota. 

The border between Guangdong 
Province and Hong Kong wall become 


an administrative line, with customs in- 
spections continuing, be said, and il- 
legal immigrants apprehended in Hong 
Kong will continue to be returned to 
China. Beijing has said that it, rather 
than the future government of the Hong 
Kong Special Administrative Region, 
will have the final say on migration to 
Hong Kong. 

■ A Line for Stamps of Queen 

Thousands of people lined up Tues- 
day outside tiie General Post Office in 
Hong Kong to buy the last stamps of the 
territory bearing a portrait of Queen 
Elizabeth U, which will be invalid after 
China regains sovereignty, The Asso- 
ciated Press reported from Hong Kong. 

An elderly man died, apparently of a 
heart attack, while waiting to buy the 
stamps, die post office said. 

In a special one-day sale, about 
1 1,000 people were expected to buy the 
last stocks ofthe stamps, issued in 1992, 
it said. 

Stamps with royal insignia were 
withdrawn from sale in January and 
replaced by new ones that show the 
Hong Kong; skyline and make no ref- 
erence to either China or Britain. 


Mercenaries Freed in Papua 

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea — Confident 
that he has quashed a potential military revolt. Prime 
Minister Julius Chan on Tuesday ordered the release of 
about 40 South African and British mercenaries detained by 
the anny on the orders of its now fired commander. 

“The government is in absolute complete control ofthe 
situation," Mr. Chan said at a news conference. 

He said the former commander of the Papua New Guinea 
Defense Force, Brigadier General Jerry Singxrok. was 
“guilty of gross insubordination bordering on treason” and 
face anef 


could face arrest. 

A tense 24-hour standoff between the government and 
die military ended Tuesday afternoon when General 
Singirok said be would leave the job without a fight. In his 
last official duty, he told a parade of 300 troops at Port 

Moresby’s main army base to stay calm and obey tbe r in » 

nation’s constitution. (AP) POT the HeCOT(i 


is 179,000 tons out of a total one million tons needed to feed 
its population of four million. ( Reuters ) 

North Korean Famine Seen Near 

BEIJING — The head of tbe World Food Program said 
Tuesday that North Korea's people were just weeks away 
from possible starvation. 

“The immediate future is not good,” Catherine Bertini, 
the program’s executive director, said here after a four-day 
visit to the country, adding that people were just weeks 
away from “running out of enough food to feed them- 
selves.” 

She said the average individual was receiving 100 grams 
(3.5 ounces), or about 350 calories, of rice per day. The 
UN’s minimum daily level for refugee maintenance is .five 
times that amount. { AFP ) 


UN Appeals for Food for Laos 

GENEVA — The World Food Program appealed Tues- 
day for nearly $15 million to feed 420.000 people 
threatened by famine in Laos, some of whom have been 
eating lizards and rats to survive. 

The funds will be used to import 43,000 tons of rice to 
help rural families survive in Laos's traditional “rice 
bowl” region until tiie harvest in six months, a spokes- 
woman said. 

Typhoons last September caused heavy flooding in cen- 
tral and southern Laos, which had been suffering drought, 
according to tbe United Nations agency. Laos’s food deficit 


Gunmen killed six policemen and a civilian in Laikana, 
Pakistan, the police said. A police spokesman in Karachi 
said be did not know the shooting motive. (Reuters) 

The president of China’s National People's Congress, 
Qiao Shi, is to leave March 25 for a tour of France, Italy, 
Norway and Mongolia, the Chinese Foreign Ministry said 
Tuesday. (AFP) 

A nighttime curfew has been imposed and roadblocks 
have been erected in Mandalay, Burma's second-largest 
city, following a weekend protest by Buddhist monks, 
residents reported Tuesday. (AP) 


KRUPP: 

Thyssen Resists Bid ] . 

Continued from Page In - 
dustries as coal mining, construction 
and automating have taken to tbe street? 
to d ef e n d their jobs, which-econamists 
say are threatened by steep labor costs at 
borne that price the workers out ofthe 
global market. . ' 

Unemployment in Germany already 
stands at 122 percent a postwar record: 
The consolidation of Germany’s two j 
largest steelmakers, analysts said, posed ’ 
a threat to 10,000 or more jobs. - — ; 

Global competition is the main ra- 
tionale behind Krupp’s - takeover 
strategy, tbe Krupp chairman, Geifaaa 
Cromme, tried to tell tbe clamorous 
protesters, who had to be contained by 
the police. ... - ! 

Earnings from steel activities at both 
Krupp and Thyssen fell sharply last 
year, reflecting tough competition in the 
industry, analysts said. ’ 

Thyssen said in January that it cosi 
160 DM to produce a ton of crude steel 
in Germany, compared with the equi^ 
valent of 155 DM in France and 120 DM . 
in Britain. 

The takeover bid, announced late 
Monday, touched off crisis meetings hj 
the statehouse in North Rhine- West- 
phalia, where the state's leaders only 
last week fought the federal govern, 
ment’s plans to cut state subsidies to tht; Ji 
region’s coal miners, also clustered in 
tiie Ruhr. J 

Premier Johannes Ran and Wolfgang 
Cement, the state’s economics min-J 
ister,. said they opposed a hostile 
takeover and vowed to work on a non- 1 
hostile consensus solution that wouhj 
save jobs, a government spokeswoman 
said. 

Despite their efforts, job losses would 
be inevitable in a takeover, according td 
industry analysts, who noted that further 
consolidation of Germany’s steel mills 
had been under discussion for years. 

Krupp led the first wave of consol- 
idation Ih l991 with an irtifriendly 
takeover of another rival, Hoesch. « 

Of the combined 195,000 staff in a 
Krupp-Thyssen operation, a cut of 
20,000 would eliminate more than % 
percent from wage costs, doubling 
pretax earnings, according to Terencij 
Sinclair, a London-based analyst for 
Salomon Brothers. 1-. 

Although such a takeover would re* 
quire approval from European compel 
tition authorities, there were several W 
signs Tuesday that the takeover mi ght ' 
succeed. • * 

In the state capital, Duesseldorf, Eori^ 
noinics Minister Clement said Ncof^ . 
Rhine-Wesfphalia state had only lim- 
ited influence on such a transact! Dis- 
according to spokeswoman. -.- . 


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"iH ' 



Despite Poll Lead, 

Blair Sees Tough 
Race for Labour 


* The Associated Press 

*• LONDON — The campaign for Britain's 
fanonal election May ! wilTSfa 
Jougfatrace," Tony Blair, the opporiticm K 
«r, said Tuesday, avoiding any him of com- 
i>lacepcy despite his Labour Party's huge lead 
iin opinion polls: 6 

. Lid^ COnsi ^ t, y? orethan20 P oU points 
% of governing Conservatives, is ndins 

* wave of public disaffection with the long- 
semngToruM and a strong desire for change 

' out Prune Minister John Major saidTuesdav 

4 t was Tory policies that had improved Britain 

**?* 1 8 X?®* 50 its could afford 
the desire for a change. 

Mr. Blair told GMTV he was “obviously 
pleased that the Sun, a traditional Tory sup- 
porter and the country’s largest-selling news- 
paper, had decided to back Labour. But “there 
« still a long way to go in the election," Mr 
Blair said. 1 1 think what is good is that people 
■who have been Conservative before have come 
over to the Labour Parry for the first time." 

' discounted his party’s opinion poll 

lead. ‘ I don’t think anyone really believes the 
figures are as they are," he said. “It will be a 
bard, tight-fought race. * ' 

- A Gallup poll published in Tuesday's Daily 
Telegraph put Labour 28 points ahead of the 
■> Conservatives. Gallup polled 1,045 voters on 
Saturday, Sunday ana Monday, completing the 
interviews only after the election dale was 


EUROPE 



RuueJI IbncWTWrh 

Tony Blair, right, and Gordon Brown, his shadow chancellor, In London on Monday. 


announced Monday afternoon. The margin of 
error was plus or min us 3 percentage points. 

Mr. Blair has warned supporters not to take 
victory for granted. 

In a BBC television interview on Monday, he 
indicated that he had not ruled out the pos- 
sibility of continuing one of the hallmarks of 
past Conservative governments — selling off 
government enterprises to the private sector. 

Mr. Major, speaking to the BBC on T uesday, 


attacked Mr. Blair, saying: “He's a chameleon, 
isn't he, as far as politics is concerned. 

“It really depends which part of the country 
he is in and which day of the week he is in.’’ 

The details of Labour's policies are “su- 
perficially friendly to what has been achieved," 
Mr. Major said, but the way Mr. Blair proposed 
to cany them forward could not be achieved 
“without making 1 changes that would damage 
what has been done in die last 18 years." 


50 Are Feared Dead 
In Russian Air Crash 

The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — A civilian airliner crashed in southern 
Russia on Tuesday morning, and all 50 people on board 
were feared dead. One Russian official said an explosion 
was suspected. 

The Stavropol Airlines AN-24 twin-turboprop plane 
crashed after taking off Cram Stavropol, said Vikior 
Beltsova, a spokesman for the Emergency Situations 
Ministry. 

All 41 passengers and nine crew members aboard were 
believed to have been killed when the plane crashed in a 
wooded area near Cherkessk, about 90 kilometers (55 
miles) south of Stavropol, be said. 

Rescue workers flew to the site and discovered at least 
1 7 bodies, Boris Erkenov, deputy interior minister for the 
Karachayevo-Cherkess region, said in an interview with 
the Interfax news agency. 

The airliner appeared to have exploded in the air, Mr. 
Erkenov said. He based this conclusion on die fact that 
fragments of the plane and human remains were scattered 
over an area six kilometers wide. 

The plane was flying at 6,000 meters (20,000 feet) 
when it disappeared from radar screens and crashed at 
10:50 A.M., officials said. 

It had been beaded to the northern Turkish city of 
Trabzon, on the Black Sea 400 kilometers south of 
Stavropol. 

Trabzon is a popular destination among the estimated 1 
million Russian 1 'shuttle traders' ’ who travel to Turkey to 
buy inexpensive clothing and consumer goods for resale 
at home. 

A Turkish television station, quoting Stavropol Airlines 
officials, reported that no Turks were aboard the plane. 


PAGES 


Soldiers Attack 


3 Foreigners 
In Germany 


The Associated Press 

BONN — Ten German soldiers, 
some wearing ski masks, used baseball 
bats to beat two Turks and threatened an 
Italian with a knife as they shoured anti - 
foreigner slogans, the police said Tues- 
day. 

The rampage occurred Monday night 
in the central German city of Detmold. 
Six soldiers were arrested, and the oth- 
ers were being sought. Injuries to the 
three foreigners were minor, said a po- 
lice spokesman. Dieter Held. 

The attack angered the leadership of 
the German military, which has earned a 
reputation for dignity and honor since 
World War II and has been actively try- 
ing to keep neo-Nazis out of its ranks. 

Last week a government report said 
there was no noticeable rightist extrem- 
ism in the Bundeswehr, the German 
armed forces. 

Defense Minister Volker Ruehe de- - 
nounced the attackers, telling reporters 
that rightist extremists “have no place 
in the Bundeswehr.” He added that all 
legal and disciplinary measures would 
be used against the culprits. 

Mr. Ruehe also apologized to the 
three foreigners who were beaten. 

The Defense Ministry said in a state- 
ment that the investigation “must be 
handled without delay" to protect the 
Bundeswehr’ s international reputation. 






BRIEFLY 


EU Urged to Ease Border Rules 

BRUSSELS — The European Union should take action 
to make it easier for citizens of member countries to cross 
borders to work, study or unite their families, an EU 
advisory group said Tuesday. 

Despite being promised freedom of movement by the EU 
treaty, many citizens still face obstacles in matters regarding 
residence cards, taxes, car registrations, pensions, training 
certificates and health care, the panel said in a report. 

The eight-member group, headed by Simone Veil, former 
French soda! affairs minister, proposed some new laws but 
put the emphasis on better information, cooperation among 
national authorities and enforcement of existing rules. 

The group made 80 recommendations, including in- 
troduction of a one-year European residence card that could 
be used by students, trainees, volunteers and artists who 
move temporarily to other countries. It said the EU should 
amend its rules to make it easier for workers who cross 
borders to be joined by family members and possibly also by 
unmarried partners. (Reuters) 

French Far-Rightist Faces Suit 

PARIS — A French anti-racism group said Tuesday it 
was taking legal action against a leader of the far-right 


National Front for saying that immigrants “pollute our 
national identity." 

The League against Racism and Anti-Semitism said it 
was filing suit for racial defamation against Bruno Megret, 
whose wife, Catherine, was elected mayor last month in 
Vitrolles. near Marseille. 

The league said The New York Times had quoted Mr. 
Megret, the deputy to the National Front leader. Jean-Marie 
Le Pen, as saying that the Front wanted to send Arabs, 
Africans and Asians home “because they pollute our na- 
tional identity and take our jobs. ' ' (Reuters) 

Holocaust Fund Search Pressed 

TORONTO — The head of the World Jewish Congress 
vowed to go after more European countries to win full 
restitution for Holocaust survivors. 

“This is not about money, this is about justice," Edgar 
Bronfman Sr., who is also chairman of distiller and en- 
tertainment giant Seagram Co. I4d. , said. “As long as I draw 
breath I will try to see to it that there are no profits from the 
ashes of the Holocaust." 

Mr. Bronfman helped pressure Switzerland last month 
into establishing a S5 billion fund to aid victims of the 
Holocaust and other acts of genocide or disasters. The fund, 
which is subject to parliamentary approval and a national 
referendum, would be financed by selling tons of gold over 


the next decade. Mr. Bronfman said the governments of 
France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, Portugal and other 
countries would come under scrutiny so assets of slain Jews 
could be restored to their rightful owners or aimed over to 
Jewish charities. (AP) 

Ukraine Leader Will Visit U.S. 

KIEV — President Leonid Kuchma of Ukraine is due to 
visit the United States in the middle of May to discuss 
relations between Kiev and NATO and boost political and 
business ties, a presidential spokesman said Tuesday. 

He will meet with President Bill Clinton and will chair, 
with Vice President A1 Gore, a meeting of the Ukrainian- 
American committee on economic cooperation. Ukraine 
does Dot oppose enlargement of the North Atlantic alliance, 
but it has not formally applied for membership. ( Reuters ) 

For the Record 

Prime Minister Romano Prodi’s government won a 
vote of confidence T uesday in Italy's Chamber of Deputies, 
assuring passage of a decree concerning European Union 
fines on Italian milk production. The decree regards fi- 
nancing for fines Italian fanners have to pay for having 
exceeded EU milk production quotas. (AP) 



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Bucharesl. October 28 fr 30. 1997 

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PAGE 6 


INTE RATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19 , 1997 


INTERNATIONAL 


U.S. and Russia Fail 
To Settle Key Issues 

Both Sides Hold Firm Going to Summit 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Post Sen-ice 

WASHINGTON — The Russian for- 
eign minister. Yevgeni Primakov, has 
returned to Moscow after a meeting 
with President Bill Clinton at the White 
House and three days of high-level talks 
that apparently left all major issues un- 
resolved as Mr. Clinion heads for a 
summit meeting Thursday with Pres- 
ident Boris Yeltsin. 

While neither side revealed much de- 
tail of the meetings, their public rhetoric 
indicated that both were going into the 
summit meeting bolding to their po- 
sitions on the key question of expanding 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
into former Warsaw Pact countries of 
Central Europe. 

“Russia will not change its position 
of opposition on NATO enlargement,” 
Mr. Primakov said after spending more 
than an hour with Mr. Clinton on 
Monday. “But Russia understands that 
NATO is a real force, and Russia would 
like to have normal relations with 
NATO, which would serve the cause of 
normalizing stability in Europe.” 

The White House press secretary, 
Michael McCurry, said, “We beard a 
lot of good commitment to addressing 
those issues that clearly are outstanding 
and clearly where there are some dis- 
agreements.” 

“There will likely continue to be 
disagreements after the summit in Hel- 
sinki,'' be said. 

Mr. Clinton told Mr. Primakov that 
“the United States and Russia are in this 
for the long haul, that they have the 
capacity together to do extraordinary 
things.” Mr. McCuny said. But he ad- 
ded, “There is a substantial amount of 
work that needs to be done to clear away 
foe residue of the Cold War period.'* 

With NATO preparing for a July 
summit meeting in Madrid, at which 
some former Warsaw Pact countries 
will be invited to join, the outlines of the 
U.S. and Russian positions on European 
security issues have become clear. 

Russia opposes NATO expansion but 
has recognized its inevitability, so it is 
seeking the best possible terms, includ- 
ing a treaty guaranteeing that nuclear 
weapons and major NATO troop con- 
centrations will not be moved close to 
its borders. 

NATO and die Russians are nego- 
tiating an agreement that would give 
Russia some voice in NATO affairs, but 
the Clinton administration is unw illing 
to enter into a treaty that would legally 


restrict NATO's options. 

The gap between the Russian and 
U.S. positions on whether such an 
agreement would be legally binding is 
so great that Mr. Clinton and Mr. Pri- 
makov hardly bothered to discuss it, Mr. 
McCurry said. 

“That’s an issue that has been pretty 
well rehearsed now by the discussions 
that have occurred prior to the meeting 
hoe today, and our view is pretty well 
known on that,” he said. 

According to American officials and 
independent analysts, the Russians may 
be demanding a legally binding com- 
mitment restricting NATO deploy- 
ments in such countries as Poland be- 
cause they believed they had pledges 
from the United States and Germany in 
the early 1990s that NATO would not 
expand eastward. Now that expansion is 
immin ent, the Russians are apparently 
unwilling to take the West at its word. 

In Moscow on Monday, Mr. Yeltsin 
again criticized NATO expansion. The 
United States “will make a rude and 
serious mistake if it implements the plan 
for NATO's eastward enlargement.” he 
told journalists from Russia, the United 
States and Finland. 4 ‘Our diplomacy has 
made enough concessions to the United 
States.” he said. “To concede further is 
no longerpossible.” 

Mr. Yeltsin's tough talk may have 
been designed to set the stage for hard 
bargaining at the summit meeting. 

He said that Russia felt threatened by 
a NATO exercise to be held in August, 
with Ukraine as the host under the aus- 
pices of the NATO Partnership for 
Peace program. 

“Why, against Russia's wishes, are 
they preparing to have exercises in the 
Crimea, in the Black Sea?” Mr. Yeltsin 
asked. He also asserted that NATO ex- 
pansion would lead to an economic 
‘‘blockade’ ' of Russia, and insisted that 
Russia should be admitted to world eco- 
nomic organizations. 

American officials have said that 
these public utterances from Mr. Yeltsin 
and other senior Russians are largely 
obligatory rhetoric and that behind the 
scenes the Russians are negotiating se- 
riously. But there was also some starchy 
rhetoric on the U.S. side Monday. 

Asked about reports that the Russian 
ambassador to Prague bad threatened to 
curtail economic ties with the Czech 
Republic if that country joined NATO, 
die State Department spokesman, Nich- 
olas Bums, replied, “There’s no place 
in the new Europe for those kinds of 
public threats of retaliation.” 



Defense Minister Igor Rodionov of Russia and his British counterpart, 
Michael Portillo, after signing several accords in Moscow on Tuesday. 
They agreed to expand military ties but disagreed on NATO expansion. 

President Approves Dismissal 
Of Several Russian Generals 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Russia’s defense min- 
ister has received President Boris 
Yeltsin's approval to dismiss several 
top army commanders after barely 
hanging onto his own job, the Interfax 
press agency reported Tuesday. 

Only one of me targeted officials has 
been named publicly so far, the agency 
reported: General Vladimir Semyonov, 
die ground forces commander, who was 
suspended from his post in December. 

General Semyonov said this month 
that be had been asked to resign for 
building a second country home outside 
Moscow, although he denied any im- 
proprieties. The circumstances sur- 
rounding his suspension remain un- 
clear. 

Defense Minister Igor Rodionov said 
the decision on dismissal “applies to 
several generals who are not on top of 
their duties” or who were involved in 
“activities incompatible with their du- 
ties." 

Mr. Rodionov, appointed to his post 


last summer, inherited a military 
plagued by poor morale, deteriorating 
equipment and severe funding cuts. 
Long-proposed reform has remained 
stalled during his tenure, and Mr. 
Yeltsin chastized him last month for 
“whining” too much about the state of 
the military. But be survived the 
Yeltsin-ordered government shake-up 
that was mfldf; public Monday. 

“The president told me yesterday: 
Act more resolutely but within the 
frame of law,” Mr. Rodionov said. 

Mr. Rodionov also said the airborne 
force would be made subordinate to the 
ground forces, but he stressed that it 
would continue to have its own separate 
identity. 

While the shake-up was being dis- 
cussed in Moscow, Russia's Pacific 
Fleet began a large-scale three-day ex- 
ercise in the Sea of Japan on Tuesday. 
The exercise involves nuclear submar- 
ines, surface ships, naval aviation and 
coastal troops, the Itar-Tass press 
agency said 



BackFrom ‘ 1 
Yeltsin Awaits Clinton 


> $ 


By Lee Hockstader 
and David Hoffman 

• Washington Post Sendee — 


MOSCOW — President Boris 
Yeltsin, discounted for months as ter- 1 
minally sick and a political corpse, has 
stormed back into control of the Russian 
government with all the fire and fury of 
a man determined to have at least one 
more hurrah. _ /- 

For the umpteenth time in his stormy 
career, the Russian president has con- 
founded nearly universal forecasts of 
his political demise. And for the first 
time in at least a year, he has given the 
impression that the Russian government 
might be gearing up for something be- 
yond drift and paralysis. 

Rebounding from heart disease, by- 
pass surgery, double pneumonia and 
withering public attacks, Mr. Yeltsin 
has reasserted his authority by ordering 
a purge of his cabinet and has laid the 
groundwork for a new security rela- 
tionship with the West despite wide- 
spread objections from political elites in 
Moscow. 

As evidence of their leader's surging 
fortunes, Russians will be treated 
Thursday to the televised spectacle of a 
relatively robust and ambulatory Mr. 
Yeltsin greeting a hobbling Bill Clinton 
when they meet in Helsinki. Mr. Clinton, 
16 years younger than Mr. Yeltsin, had 
knee surgery Friday following a falL 

As for Mr. Yeltsin's health, sources 
say he still spends no more than two or 
three hours a day in bis Kremlin office. 
Although be has seemed animated and 
cogent, his loss of more than 23 kilo- 
grams <50 pounds) gives him a gaunt 
appearance and makes him look a de- 
cade older than his 66 years. 

But in the Russian media, Mr. 
Yeltsin's health is no longer an issue, 
even among the grumpier voices. 

Kremlin watchers have been follow- 
ing Russia's new flexibility in dealing 
with the West's plans to expand NATO 
into the former soviet satellite states of 
Poland, Hungary and the Czech Re- 
public. 

Until a few weeks ago, there were 
scam signs that Moscow was ready to 
bargain seriously with the West 

Moscow's newly flexible attitude co- 
incided roughly with Mr. Yeltsin’s re- 
turn to action and apparently was 
ordered by him. 

Now there are indications that a deal 
between Russia and NATO may be pos- 
sible before the scheduled expansion 
gets rolling in July. 

“Sick leave is finally over," the 
newspaper Kommersant Daily said. 

Time and again Mr. Yeltsin has been 


. -s,- 


written off as a spent force, only to come 

roaring back. . 

In the Mikhail Gorbachev era, 
Yeltsin .was purged from the Soviet 


«y? 


of the Construction Ministry, only to 
return triumphantly to thclimelignt.in 
barely ayear. ' 

In the abortive Communist coup of 
1991, be was cmtgujtried and surrounded 
by hostile traces, but be managed a 
victory, creating an indelible image by 
clambering atop a tank to face down the 
hard-line plotters. 

Just a year ago,. Mr. .Yeltsin’s -ap-. 
proval ratings were in the angle digits 
and his health was in doubt, his chances 
for re-election to a second term widely 
dismissed- - 

But he rallied, plunging into crowds, 
fixing a choice holdon tbe-Russiazr nK!- 
dia, gflnrmg on stage.-promisiog voters 
die world and outwitting his opponents. 
Ultimately he coasted to electoral vic- 
tory by a comfortable m argin . “■ ' 

Mr. Yeltsin's- knack for dramatic 
comebacks has been more impressive 
than his administrative acumen, which 
observers here believe has aggravated 
the enormous problems facing tfae Rns- 
sian government. - - 

To many observers, his stent denun- 
ciations of the malfunctioning Russian 
government have all the sincerity of the 
police chief in the movie “Casab- 
lanca,” who declares he is “shocked, 
shocked” by gambling as he palms his 
winnings. 

Sources close to the government say 
they expect Mr. Yeltsin’s current cab- 
inet reshuffle to wipe out some of the big 
ministries — railroads, perhaps, or coni: 
muni cations — and to reassign their 
functions to deputy prime ministers. 

The idea is driven by the fact that 
many governmental ministries have be- 
come nothing more than corrupt lob- 
byists for their industrial clients — , a 
situation that Mr. Yeltsin and Prime 
Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin - have 
tolerated for years. But the new gov- 
ernment, whatever its structure, may 
find it difficult to effect real change in a 
deeply entrenched bureaucracy. 

Moreover, it has become clear that 
the Kremlin is calling fewer and fewer 
shots as power has devolved to the re- 
gions. 

Recently, two Russian regions an- 
nounced feat they were no longer going 
to send tax receipts to Moscow, since 
they receive so little in return. The 
Kremlin responded with threats and 
bluster. 

The debate is unresolved, but it il- 
lustrated the fragile ties bolding the 
Russian Federation together. 




0 
tf 






if 

l 

b”; 

b 


BRIEFLY 


BOOKS 


Moroccan Dam to Start Service V.S. Proposes Colombia Aid 


RABAT — King Hass an of Morocco and President 
Oscar Luigi Scalfaro of Italy will inaugurate a nine billion 
dirham ($968 million) dam and power plant on Thursday, 
bringing to 1 million hectares (2.4 million acres) Morocco's 
irrigated farming area. 

“This is die biggest dam Morocco has ever had,’ ’ Public 
Works Minister Abdelaziz Meziane said Tuesday. Italy 
paid for 34 percent of the cost of the dam, which will 
generate 400 million kilowatts annually. (Reuters) 

Yemeni Argues for Tourism 

SAN ‘A, Yemen — Yemen’s vice president said Tuesday 
that tribesmen who had kidnapped dozens of foreigners 
would not damage the country’s fledgling tourism industry. 

“These mercenary attempts,” Vice President Abdul 
Rabbu Mansour Hadi said, “that have tried and will try 
again to hurt Yemen’s reputation and sabotage its image 
worldwide will fail in achieving their goals. ’ * ( Reuters ) 


WASHINGTON — Three weeks after penalizing 
Colombia for not fully cooperating in die drug war, the 
Clinton administration is proposing benefits for the South 
American nation that include $30 million in military and 
police aid, U.S. officials said. 

The officials, asking not to be identified, said the funds 
would be used for training of the Colombian military and 
for spare parts for equipment used to combat narcotics 
traffickers. Hie administration is consulting Congress on 
the aid package. (AP) 

Cuba Frees Drug Trafficker 

HAVANA — Cuban authorities have freed Patricio de la 
Guardia, a general condemned to 30 years in jail in 1989 in 
a drug trafficking case, family sources said Tuesday. 

Mr. de la Guardia was freed after his father, 96, died 
Monday, the sources said. They said they did not know if any 
conditions were attached to the early release. (Reuters) 


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THE CONVERSATIONS 
AT CURLOW CREEK 

By David Malouf. 233 pages. 
$23. Pantheon. 

Reviewed by 
Jennifer Howard 

N ew south wales. 

1827: a land of hard earth 
and desolation, punctured by 
moments of strange beauty. 
There, on a cold night when 
moonlight “stretched in every 
direction to the limitless ho- 
rizon," begins David Ma- 
loofs pristine, lovely novel 
about the wilderness within 
and without 

Two men, huddled in a 
shack against the cold, wait 
for dawn. 

Both are Irish by birth, but 
there the similarity ends. One. 
Michael Adair, is an educated 
man and an officer, sworn to 
enforce the law in a land still 
mostly lawless. The other, 
Daniel Carney, has led an un- 
tutored and renegade life; for 
his meager crimes as a 
bushranger (outlaw), he will 
hang in the morning. Adair has 
been sent by the authorities to 
cany out the execution. 


Outside the hut, a rough 
party of troopers — the men 
who captured Carney — sit 
around a fire, swapping jibes 
and stories. 

But Adair feels compelled 
to keep his prisoner company, 
and Carney, deprived in this 
back-of-beyond place of 
priestly comfort, makes his 
jailer a sort of impromptu con- 
fessor. It’s not his sins be 
wants to talk about: he wants 
to know before die life is 
choked out of him why things 
are as they axe. "There’s a lot 
that happens in the world that a 
feller tike me doesn’t never get 
the bearings of.” he tells 
Adair. “There must be a rea- 
son ... if I don't ask now then 
I’ll never know.” 

Adair doesn't have the an- 
swers. but as they talk he dis- 
covers a possible point of con- 
nection between them: Car- 
ney is the last surviving mem- 
ber of a band of bushrangers 
led by an outlaw named 
Dolan, who may have been 
Fergus Connellan, the adopt- 
ed brother Adair came to Aus- 
tralia to search for. As he and 
Camey talk through the night, 
Adair retraces the path that 


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11 VENDETTA: 
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13 THE CELEST1NE PRO- 
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14 3001 : The Final Odyncy. 

by Arthur C. Clarke l 

15 DESIGNATION GOLD, 
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NONFICTION 

1 MURDER IN BRENT- 
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2 PERSONAL HISTORY. 

by Katharine Graham I 5 

3 ANGELA S ASHES, by 

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4 THE GIFT OF PEACE, by 

Joseph Cardinal Bernar- 
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5 CONVERSATIONS 

WITH GOD. by Neale 
Donald WaJscti.._... 3 13 

6 HIS NAME IS RON. by 

die family of Ron Gold- 
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7 JOURNEY INTO DARK- 
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8 THE MILLIONAIRE 
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Danko — — ! 9 8 

9 A REPORTER’S LIFE, by 

Walter Craokile 6 1.1 

19 EVIDENCE DISMISS- 
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Phillip Vanatter as told to 
Don £ MoJdea. 8 5 

11 WHAT FALLS AWAY. 

by Mta Farrow II 3 

12 MIDNIGHT IN THE 

GARDEN OF GOOD 
AND EVIL by John 
Bcrctxil 12 

13 THE MORAL INTELLI- 
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S Robert Cok* IS 2 

Y SERGEI, by Ekate- 
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Swift 10 18 

15 L'NDAUNTED COU- 
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2 THE ARTHRrTIS CURE, 
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4 MEN ARE FROM 
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brought him halfway round 
the world: “a rigmarole of 
incomprehensible motives, 
misguided folly, hopeless 
readings after what from the 
beginning was already lost, 
all the confused and indirect 
ways by which he had come to 
a place ten thousand miles 
from where he began.” 

The orphaned child of two 
opera singers, he grew up as 
careful and disciplined as his 
parents had been footloose and 
bohemian: “He wondered 
which of his parents' qualities 
he had inherited, and if none, 
where his own came from: his 
doggedness, the sternness of 
manner that had given him . . . 
a reputation for being iron- 
bard and indefatigable but 
none for good-fellowship or 
gaiety.” 

T&en in by his mother's 
dipsomaniac old school friend 
Aimee Connellan, Adair be- 
came surrogate brother and 
parent to Aimee’s son Fergus, 
who was as singular and re- 
bellious as Adair was “sober 
and practical. " The boys were 
schooled with a wealthy 
neighbor’s daughter, Virgilia 
Fitzgibbon, a red-haired, in- 
dependent-minded girl who 
dreamed of wild places; “her 
imagination moved to a vision 
of desert wastes under the 
moon, of equatorial heal and a 
sky continuously alive with 
lightning.” Adair inevitably 
fell in love with her, as she did 
with Fergus. 

Neither Virgilia nor Ire- 
land could hold Fergus. Ru- 
mor traced him to New South 
Wales, and at Virgilia’s re- 
quest Adair took a post there. 
For Adair, "by nature a man 
who would have liked noth- 
ing better than to see the sun 
rise and set each day on the 
same bit of turf,” it’s a double 
purgaioTy : He has exiled him- 
self to an alien place to search 
for his rival in love. 


Adair, like Camey, has 
been wandering both literally 
and figuratively in the wil- 
derness. “I think sometimes 
that this place ... is a pun- 
ishment on a man just in it- 
self,” Carney says. Australia 
seems to Adair filled with “a 
high, wide emptiness that 
drew you on into an opening 
distance in yourself in which 
the questions that posed them- 
selves had no easy sociable 
answer, concerned only your- 
self and what there was at last, 
or might be, between you and 
the harsh, unchanged and un- 
changing earth, and above 
the unchanged, unchangeable 
stars.” 

“The Conversations at 
Curlow Creek” has at times 
the ecstatic lyricism of Ro- 
mantic poetry, with the ability 
to see the beautiful and the 
divine in the everyday — ants 
swarming up the trunks of 
young oak trees before a thun- 
derstorm, the smell of the sea 
in Irish mist Even Camey, 
whose name suggests the 
gross creature of flesh that he 
is, takes on an unexpected no- 
bility; his last request is that he 
be allowed to bathe in the 
creek that runs by the place of 
execution, a kind of corporeal 
farewell. 

"The Conversations at 
Curlow Creek” is never love- 
lier than at the end, when 
Adair, waiting to sail home, 
finds himself surprised by the 
possibility of joy. What be- 
comes of Carney — in folk- 
tale at least — is even more 
surprising. He and Adair 
have both looked into the 
abyss, but in doing so achieve 
an unlikely immortality, 
“unconfoundable ghosts” 
from “a freer and dmerent 
life." 


Jennifer Howard, who 
writes fiction, wrote this for 
The Washington Post. 


Living in the U.S.? 

Now printed in New York 
for same day 
delivery in key cities. 

1° subscribe, call 
1-800-889. 9JMM. 




the fc 


1 


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/ - 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1997 

INTERNATIONAL 


PAGE 7 


CIA Inquiring Into Controversial OilMan 9 s Contacts With White House 




By Walter Pincus and R. Jeffrey Smith 

Washingt on Post Srnice 

in.^? i ? INGTO N ~ The OA has begun an 
□uemal investigation into whether the Demo- 
Nati°nal eornmitia made “impropefcon- 
^cis and inquiries with agency Dersonnel rh*- 
acting director. George ' ** 

i^mvesdgaiion focuses on whether improper 

**** behalf of 

i™*L a . Lebanes c American businessman Ind 
|J«nocranc campaign donor who attended several 
White House functions at which President Bill 
Clinton was present m 1995 and 1996. 

Mr. Tamraz. a controversial figure whose 
Background ranges from high international fi- 
nance to an outstanding warrant by Lebanese 
auftontitt on suspicion of embezzlement, was 
seeking White House endorsement of a grandiose 
plan to build an oil pipeline across Armenia and 


Turkey to transport Caspian Sea oil to Western 
markets. 

According to an article in the Wall Street Jour- 
nal, Don Fowler, then Democratic National Com- 
mittee chairman, called an official of the National 
Security Council in December 1995 to intervene 
after the official had recommended that Mr. Tam- 
raz be barred from White House events. The 
Journal said “administration officials" believed 
that Mr. FowJer also arranged fora CIA report on 
Mr. Tamraz to be sent to & security council. 

Mr. Tamraz first met with Sheila Heslin. a 
Central Asia specialist and an aide to the then- 
national security adviser. Anthony Lake, on June 
2, 1 995. At the meeting, arranged with help from 
Harry Gilmore, ambassador to Armenia, Mr. 
Tamraz proposed that the administration back his 
plan for a pipeline to Turkey, passing through the 
mutually antagonistic territories of Armenia and 
Azerbaijan. Ms. Heslin told him U.S. policy was 


in favor of pipeline development in the region, 
but not to support any particular proposal. 

Before the meeting, Ms. Heslin had requested 
a CIA report on Mr. Tamraz. The report provided 
an assessment of Mr. Tamraz's background, fi- 
nancial dealings and political connections, the 
official said. The report also said that Mr. Tamraz 
had voluntarily provided the agency with in- 
formation from time to time on matters he knew 
about, “like many U.S. businessmen." but that 
he was never employed by the CIA. 

Mr. Tamraz, whose company, Tamoil. donated 
$72,000 to the Democratic Party in 1 995 and 1 996, 
and who at the national committee 's direction also 
gave $100,000 to the Virginia Democratic Party, 
attended three White House gatherings at which 
Mr. Clinton was present in 1995, including a 
business forum reception and a dinner in Septem- 
ber, and a holiday reception in December. 

But at some point in the second half of 1995, 


Ms. Heslin told the Journal, she heard reports 
from within the oil industry that Mr. Tamraz was 
suggesting administration support for his project. 
She recommended he be given no more high- 
level access. Coit Blacker, her superior, said in an 
interview that the council staff was “‘very, very 
careful on this particular issue." 

"We didn't think that there was any policy 
reason for this person to be received at the White 
House," he said. 

In December 1995, the CIA prepared an up- 
date of its earlier report on Mr. Tamraz, although 
it is unclear who requested it- One intelligence 
official said that “there were some contacts 
between someone at the DNC and someone at the 
CIA." Another official said the CIA found some 
"preliminary indication" that the update was 
triggered by another council request, although 
this official did not know from whom the request 
came. The second official said the update did not 


repeat derogatory information about Mr. Tamraz 
contained in the initial report. 

According to the Journal, it was also in Decem- 
ber 1995 that Ms. Heslin received a phone call 
from Mr. Fowler in which administration officials 
said he asked her to drop her opposition to further 
meetings between Mr. Tamraz and Mr. Clinton. 
According to the Journal. Mr. Fowler said the 
CIA would send her a paper on him. A short time 
later, she received, unsolicited, an updated CIA 
report. Ms. Heslin reportedly told legal counsel 
about the contact, describing it as “highly ir- 
regular" and repeating her advice that Mr. Tam- 
raz not be allowed to meet with the president 

On April 1. 1996, Mr. Tamraz attended a 
White House coffee affair at which Mr. Clinton 
was present Last June, he also attended a White 
House reception and dinner. Ms. Heslin could not 
be reached. Mr. Fowler bung up after a reporter 
calling for comment identified himself. 


While Albanians Flee, 
EU Bloc Sees President 


Reuiers 

TIRANA, Albania — As Albanians 
continued to flee their country, a Euro- 
pean mission to Albania discussed with 
the government Tuesday how to restore 
order and ensure food supplies after 
weeks of anarchy. 

The European Union delegation heard 
from President Sali Berisha that his 
country needed food, medicine and help 
with its police force. 

Members of the delegation were due 
to travel to the port of Dimes, 30 ki- 
lometers 120 miles) west of Tirana, 
where chaotic scenes have reigned in the 
last few days as Alb anians desperate to 
leave the country fought to get on any- 
thing afloaL 

On Tuesday morning dozens of 
people rode a derelict and motorless 
freighter out of Durres, using makeshift 
paddles and sails fashioned out of rub- 
bish bags, witnesses said. 

About half the passengers on the over- 
loaded craft got off at the mouth of the 
harbor, fearing it might sink. The rest 
drifted out into the Adriatic, hoping to 
reach Italy or a seaworthy vessel to pick 
them up. 

Several smaller craft, also without 
power, were also seal drifting out of 
Durres on Tuesday. 

More than 1300 refugees reached the 
southern Italian port of Brindisi 
overnight, joining more than 6,000 of 
their compatriots who have fled to Italy 
recently. 

In Tirana, which was in turmoil for 
five days last week, life has returned to 
near-normal although a state of emer- 
gency, with an overnight curfew, is still 
in place two weeks after it was de- 
clared. 

Prime Minister Bashkina Fmo, who 
heads a national unity government that 
was sworn in last week, met newspaper 
editors Tuesday todiscuss their demands 
for the lifting of emergency restrictions 
that have closed all but one paper. 

Mr. Rno, a member of die party that 
has been die main opposition for five 
years, was also preparing to visit die 


south, which is under the control of rebels 
demanding Mr. Berisha 's resignation. 

The prime minister announced 
Monday that be would go to the south 
along with other members of his gov- 
ernment to negotiate with the rebels, 
who rose against the former government 
in anger over failed pyramid savings 
schemes that bankrupted tens of thou- 
sands of people. 

On Monday, Mr. Berisha told the EU 
team that Albania viewed rapid assist- 
ance as vital to restore order in what was 
already Europe's poorest country before 
the current troubles. 

* ‘We need humanitarian aid as soon as 
possible, mainly food and medicine to 
prevent further aggravation of the situ- 
ation.’' state television quoted him as 
having said. 

"European police units are necessary 
to distribute this aid and contribute to 
restoring order and rebuilding our po- 
lice. Reorganizing public and financial 
institutions in r uins would be another 
part of your assistance." 

■ Italy Blames Mobsters 

The Italian government said Tuesday 
that mobsters bad muscled in on the ex- 
odus, and refugees described how they 
paid hundreds of dollars to cross the 
Adriatic, Reuters reported from Brindisi 

“This is a business run by organized 
crime," said Giannicola Siztisi, under- 
secretary at the Italian Interior Minis try, 
who was in the southeastern region of 
Puglia to monitor the situation. 

The president of Puglia's regional 
council, Salvatore Distaso, called on the 
government to declare a state of emer- 
gency in the area, saying it could not 
cope with the influx. 

Exhausted passengers Teaching Italy 
said they paid the equivalent of S600 
each in the port of Durres for places on 
packed vessels. 

* ‘I paid and I would pay again if I had 
to," said Aljosha Sulaj, a 28-year-old 
businessman who said be had handed 
over the equivalent of about $3,000 
for himself, his wife, his mother-in-law 



LAKE: Clinton Angered by Treatment 


HnoL^omteacn 

A cargo ship from the port of Durres^riocklng Tuesday In Italy with 
about 500 Albanians aboard, fleeing the chaos sweeping their country. 
Some said they had paid hundreds of dollars to get aboard the vessel. . 


and their young son and baby daughter. 

The average momhly wage in Albania 
is about $65. 

“To get to the pon was not easy," Mr. 
Sulaj said. “At every checkpoint there 
were people with guns who asked for 
money, and I gave it to them. Then there 


was no problem getting near the boat’' 
An Italian prosecutor. Pier Luigi 
Vigna, said in Brindisi that he was wor- 
ried that the influx would increase crime 
because many of Albania's jails were 
emptied after rioters stormed prisons 
and opened the gates. 


Mexico Arrests 
General Tied 
To Drug Cartel 


ISRAEL: Work Starts on Disputed Housing 


By Julia Preston 

Nr*' York Taws Service 


MEXICO CITY — A brigadier gen- 
eral of the Mexican Army has been 
arrested on charges that he offered a 
multimiilion-doUar bribe to a top Mex- 
ican law enforcement official on behalf 
of a notorious cocaine cartel. 

Brigadier General Alfredo Navarro 
Lara is the second high-ranking military 
officer to be jailed on drug-related 
charges in a month. His arrest Monday is 
new proof that traffickers have suc- 
ceeded in corrupting the highest levels of 
the Mexican armed forces. 

Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo, a division 
general who was the head of the federal 
drug agency, was arrested Feb. 18 and 
accused of protecting and receiving ben- 
efits from Mexico’s most powerful drug 
lord, Amado Carrillo Fuentes. 

The arrest Monday mdicates that 
competing drug gangs have drvicted die 
officer corps in their campaign to buy 
protection. General Navarro Lara is ac- 
cused of trying to buy off the authorities 
in the border stale of Baja J" 

the service of the Arellano Felix bro th - 
STSminal cartel that has waged a 

bloody war across northern Mexico 

against Mr. Carrillo Fuentes sbaruJ. 

S Tbe only announcement of General 

Please Monday night by the office or 


Continued from Paige 1 

tect Jerusalem from being redivided.’' 
Palestinian leaders, backed by the Clin- 
ton administration and a virtually unan- 
imous world community, regard it as an 
effort to preempt negotiations that Israel 
is committed to conducting on the city’s 
"permanent status.” 

The Palestinian leader, Yasser Arafat, 
who has several times called the project 
illegal, adopted a mild public profile 
Tuesday in an effort to counter Israeli 
charges that he was fomenting violent 
acts behind the scenes. He met in Gaza 
City with Yuval Rabin, the son of the 
slain prime minister, Yitzhak Rabin, and 
said afterward. ‘ ‘We discussed ways and 
means of how we together can protect 
and save the peace process." 

He added, “I have asked my people 
not to use violence." 

Israeli officials, including Internal Se- 
curity Minister Avigdor Kahalani, 
charged Tuesday that the Palestinian lead- 
er consented to a resumption of suicide 
bombing attacks by the Islamic Resis- 
tance Movement, Hamas, which killed 
scores of Israelis in a campaign that 
stopped a year ago. 

"I rHink Chairman Arafat has made a 
mistake by giving permission to Hamas 
to act inside of Israel" Mr. Kahalani 
said. 

“Maybe what he is doing now is 


nying to quit the peace process between 
the Palestinian and Israeli people." 

American officials who routinely 
share intelligence with Israel said they 
knew of no direct evidence for that ac- 
cusation. 

But they noted with disapproval that 
Mr. Arafat last week ordered the release 
from a Gaza cell of Ibrahim Muqadmeh, 
the senior military commander of 
Hamas. 

“This is a very disturbing develop- 
ment," a senior U.S. official said, “l»- 
cause whatever its motivation, we're 
very concerned that it will send a signal 
to Hamas and others that they have a 
green light” 

Other signs of Mr. Arafat’s intentions 
remained mixed. 

Voice of Palestine radio, controlled 
by the Palestinian Authority, struck 
emotional notes of sadness more than 
anger Tuesday. 

Between interviews, it repeatedly 
broadcast a song; called “A1 Quds" by 
the Lebanese singer Fayrouz, which 
sings of Jerusalem with longing as a 
“city of peace." 

■ US. Criticizes Israeli Move 

The United States criticized Israel 
Tuesday for going ahead with the hous- 
ing project, voiced hopes there would be 
no violent Palestinian reaction, and 
urged both sides to resume negotiations. 


— Jerusalem city boundary. 

,«• Former cease-fire Bne (Green Line). 
Was IsraekJordan border from 1 949 
to 1967. 

: uJ Mostly Arab area. 

.LA Mostly Jewish area 
SB Jewish suburbs built since 1967 
beyond the former cease-fire One. 



Continued from Page 1 

the intelligence community." The pres- 
ident, Mr. McCurry said, “feels that the 
process that Tony went through was 
inexcusably flawed.” 

Mr. Lake became the first cabinet- 
level nominee this term to drop out of the 
process. The search for a new director 
reportedly was focusing on the agency's 
acting director, George Tenet. Mr. Lake 
reportedly has recommended Mr. Tenet, 
who worked for him at the National 
Security Council, to the president. 

Mr. Shelby on Tuesday described Mr. 
Tenet as a “very able" man, and said 
thar whoever is selected should be ‘ ‘non- 
controversial and a good manager." 

The committee had questioned Mr. 
Lake closely about the foreign policy 
architecture he helped put in place for 
Bosnia, Haiti and Russia. But Mr. Lake 
indicated that it was not disagreement 
over grand questions of geostrategy thar 
led him to withdraw, but the pointed and 
seemingly expanding inquiry about 
questions of daily management of the 
security council and how it dealt with 
White House fund-raising efforts. 

Samuel Berger. Mr. Lake's successor 
at the security council, acknowledged 
concerns about keeping staff above the 
fray of political fund-raising. 

“On the one hand, we want to isolate 
the NSC from political considerations," 
he said. “On the other hand, we don’t 
want to insulate the NSC from the 
world." 

■ Lake Gtes Postponements 

Walter Pincus ofThe Washington Post 
reported earlier: 

In an impassioned 216-pag e letter to 
the president, Mr. Lake said that “Wash- 
ington has gone haywire" in partisan- 
ship. He asserted he had sufficient votes 
for confirmation but said he could no 
longer tolerate postponements. 

Mr. Lake's letter cited three new de-r 
velopments thar he said would cause 
delay: Mr. Shelby’s demand for broader 
dissemination to senators of Mr. Lake’s 
FBI background investigation; the com- 
mittee Republicans' desire to question 
National Security Council staff members 
about meetings with Democratic cam- 
paign contributors; and a report alleging 
possible Democratic Party contacts with 
the CIA regarding a naturalized Amer- 
ican campaign donor who met an se- 
curity council aide and the president. 

In a 20- minute meeting with Mr. Clin- 
ton in the White House on Monday. Mr. 
Lake did not give the president a chance 
to talk him out of withdrawing, sources 
close to Mr. Lake said. They said he told 
the president that he was “not going to 
spend the next few months being a dan- 
cing bear in a political circus." 

Mr. McCuny, the White House press 
secretary, said that the president told Mr. 
Lake, “1 want you to stay and fight, but 
I'll respect your personal judgment. 
What's happened to you is outrageous.” 

White House staff had grown con- 
cerned that Mr. Lake was showing signs 
of the pressure. “We had become wor- 
ried that be might burst with anger," one 
said. "If Shelby wants to claim this as a 
victory, it shows how puny-minded this 
town has become,” be added. 


Senator Bob Kerrey of Nebraska, the 
ranking Democrat on the intelligence 
committee, laid blame for the withdraw- 
al on both the “unfair treatment" of Mr. 
Lake by the committee and Mr. Lake's 
own failure as head of the security coun- 
cil staff to establish an effective pro- 
cedure for subordinates reporting to him 
requests for help from political fund- 
raisers and donors. 

In recent weeks. Republican criticism 
of Mr. Lake had increasingly focused on 
his admitted lack of knowledge of an 
FBI briefing in June to two of his staff 
members about alleged Chinese efforts 
to influence congressional elections. 

Mr. Lake had considered dropping out 
10 days ago but was talked into ap- 
pearing at ms confirmation hearings, ac- 
cording to sources close to him. 

Republicans in December picked Mr. 
Lake as the one vulnerable nominee in the 
national security area. Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright and Defense Secretary 
William Cohen were easily approved. 

Mr. Lake's confirmation hearing, orig- 
inally set to begin Feb. 11, was first 
postponed far two weeks after a con- 
troversy over personal stock transactions 
and questions about the truthfulness of 
earlier testimony he had given related to 
Iranian arms shipments to Bosnia. 

A Justice Department investigation 
found no evidence of c rimin al wrong- 
doing in the stock matter, and Mr. Late 
agreed to pay a $5,000 penalty. It also 
determined that his testimony on the 
Bosnia matter had been truthful 

Mr. Shelby postponed the hearings a 
second time, until March 1 1, saying he 
still had questions about the stock trans- 
actions, as well as about Mr. Lake’s 
knowledge of security council staff con- 
tacts with Democratic campaign donors. 
At that point, Mr. Kerrey strongly ob- 
jected and warned against turning the 
CIA job into “apolitical football." 

The hearings began March 11. Mr. 

• Lake appeared to be doing well, han- 
dling repealed tough questioning. After 
three sessions, Mr. Lake believed be 
would finally have a vote in committee 
after a final appearance this Thursday. 
But obstacles continued to appear. 

Mr. Shelby said Friday after reviewing 
Mr. Lake’s FBI files that they had to be 
made available to members of the in- 
telligence panel — a request adamantly 
opposed by White House counsel. In ad- 
dition. Mr. Shelby and other Republicans 
continued to press for interviews under 
oath with security council members. 

Hie final, straw may have been the 
story about the businessman Roger 
Tamraz, who contributed $172,000 to 
the Democrats and had meetings with a 
security council staff member and Mr. 
Clinton. In his letter to Mr. Clinton, Mr. 
Lake acknowledged that the story in 
Monday’s Wall Street Journal about Mr. 
Tamraz was “likely to lead to further 
delay as an investigation proceeds." 

The Tamraz story promised to be a 
major embarrassment because Mr. Lake 
would have had to admit for a second 
time that he was not informed when one 
of his senior deputies had a direct con- 
frontation with the then -Democratic Na- 
tional Committee Chairman Don Fowler 
over granting a major party donor access 
to the White House. 


NOMINEE: Bid Imperiled From the Start 




Reuters reported from Washington. 

“I think that the Israelis understand 
the difficulties that we see with then- 
going forward." Secretary of State 
Madeleine Albright said. 


Continued from Page 1 

injunction to be "repairers of the 
breach." 

Yet while the president has extended 
“the hand of bipartisanship." his press 
secretary, Michael McCurry, said, 
“There are clearly some on Capitol Hill 
who have spit on that hand. Hopefolly, 
there are others who want to engage and 
make progress. 

Many White House officials — large 
numbers of whom have had their own 
tangles with congressional investigators 
— privately share the view Mr. Late 


EGYPT: Weakened Islamic Militants Strike at the Coptic Christian Community 


vi release Monday night r n 

^ Anonrey General J^MadraMCi^- 

^c!^S^v2fab£ y for comrrem^ 

Accordmg to ** “JTSp faEd 
Navano Lara inv, ^ a ‘gj&a to a 

justice officud iii J ^ous suite" in 

^rly^tis month. Hre 
a Tijuana hotel earty offered ^e 0 f- 

general is *“4 Garcia, who is 

ficial, Jose literal payments 

alsoanarmy a ££nih in 

amounting to 51 "J* i . dJow j ng co- 

return for cooperation jj^ugh 

caine and other *TuSiSstates. 
the stare en route M meU have 

> ^"a^dhistoilyifhere- 


Group denied the attack In Ezbet Da- "Why are they giving this priority to 
woud, accusing Egyptian security forces attacking Copts?" asked Hana Mustafa, 
of organizing the slaughter to discredit an expert on extremist violence at the 
the mili tants. Egyptian police have government-backed AJ Ahram Center 
named three Is lami c Group members as for Strategic Studies. “I think it was a 
suspects in the killings. long time since they had a high-profile 

Since 1991, more than 1,000 people attack and maybe the Copts represent an 
on all sides have died in political vi- easier target than assassinating a politi- 
olence in Egypt, a key U.S. ally and dan." 


Continued from Page 1 

Muslim militants regard them as heretics 
and even the government seems to con- 
sider them second-class citizens. 

“Clearly there have been enough in- 
cidents and they’ve been dramatic and 
bloody enough that it probably goes be- 
yond random acts of violence,” said — . . , ... 

Virginia Sherry, associate director of Hu- partner in the Middle East peace process. Egypt is the home of the Coptic raitn 

man Rights Watch/Middle East in New But the militants are now on the de- — known here as the Church of Si. Marx 
York. "The question is whether orders fensive. Government security forces 
are being given at some level within the have killed or driven abroad many of 
militant hierarchy to carry this out.’ ’ their top leaders and jailed thousands of 

Although Egyptian police say both at- sympathizers, 
tacks were the woric of the Islamic Group, As a result, militants who once staged 

Egypt’s main militant Islamic organ iza- high-profile attacks on government of- 
tion. they have yet to produce evit^icefar fidals and tourists in Cairo and other 
that claim. After the church massacre, an major cities are now laigeiy confined to 


sharply restricts their ability to build or 
repair a church. Religion is noted on 
government identity cards. In the past, 
human rights organizations have com- continuously around the agency was 
plained that official discrimination manifested in the broad range of ques- 
against Copts “fuels intolerance and — tions thrown at Mr. Late during his 


offered in his letter to Mr. Clinton that 
“Washington has gone haywire" and 
can be a “nasty and brutish" place. His 
letter even carries echoes of the suicide 
note left by the White House aide Vin- 
cent Foster, who complained that in 
Washington destroying people is sport. 

At least part of the controversy over 
Mr. Lake concerned what he knew about 
Democratic fund-raising among foreign 
donors, showing how the campaign fi- 
nance scandal is beginning to haunt the 
administration across a wide spectrum 
of issues. 

Some White House advisers expect 
that the Lake episode will be a discrete 
controversy. In this view, Mr. Clinton 
and Republicans will decide to cooper- 
ate or fight over the budget or other 
issues bared on what's in it for them, not 
on whether each side thinks the other is 
nice or honorable. 

The controversy that swirls almost 


Islamic Group spokesman denied respon- 
sibility for the attack, but was then con- 
tradicted by another spokesman. Some 
analysts said the contradiction suggested 
that the organization had splintered. 

In a statement sent to international 
news agencies Saturday, the Islamic 


— and has been since before the advent 
of Islam. While most of Egypt's Copts 
adhere to the Orthodox faith, some are 
affiliated with the Roman Catholic and 
Protestant churches. 

But despite their long history in 
Egypt, Coptic Christians, who often 
have a small blue crucifix tattooed on the 


intentionally or not — sets the stage for 
anti-Christian violence by Islamic mil- 
itants," according to a 1994 report by 
Human Rights Watch/Middle East 
Mr. Mubarak’s government recently 
has moved to redress some of these 
grievances by, among other things, or- 
dering Muslim preachers to refrain from 
describing Copts in their sermons as 
infidels.according to human rights mon- 
itors. Police guards have been posted 
outside Copti 
the Co 


confirmation hearings: What about the 
CIA’s role in Bosnia? What about mis- 
management of its operations? Why is 
its morale so poor? 

But some of the questions also had 
tittle to do with the CIA, and eveiything 
to do with the desire of Republicans to 
blacken the administration's foreign 
policy record — which Mr. Late had 
helped to create. 

Even as Republicans accused Mr. 


hit-and-run operations against toe police 
in the sugar-cane fields and mud-brick 
villages of Upper Egypt. Overall, the 
level of violence has dropped from a 
peak of 415 deaths in 1995 to 187 last 
year, according to the Ibn Khaldoun 
Center, a Cairo research organization. 


inside of one wrist, have long occupied 
an ambiguous place in a country where 
Islam has become the official religion. 

Copts are grossly underrepresented in 
the upper reaches of government and the 
army, for example, and are still subject 
to 19th-century Ottoman law that 


Lake of masterminding secret opera- 
opts remain especially vul- tions in Bosnia, they said the fact that he 
ilits 


jric churches. 

But the 

nerable to militant violence, in ptet be- was not informed by his own staff about 


cause they are often suspected of col- rumors of political influence-buying by 
laborating with police and also because China raised questions about his man- 
of their relative prosperity. Militants agement skills. He was at once too far in 
have been known to rob jewelry stores the loop and too far out of it. Either way, 
owned by Copts as u means of financing White House aides said, he simply 
their operations. couldn't win. 


t 

w 


/ 






• -- 'a^ .. — £^*3E3Sjgj' 


PAGE 8 


WEDNESDAY; MARCH 19, 1997 

EDITORIALS/OPINION 


Heralb 



PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Enough of Mobutu 


Russia Gets on Track to Be a Normal Country 






ri 1 1 
n h 


For more than 30 years, Zaire's pres- At this point, it is not even certain 

ident. Mobutu Sese Seko, made him- that the ethnically divided, politically 
self one of Africa’s richest and most demoralized country can remain 
powerful men by relying on a simple, united It was Marshal Mobutu who 
cynical formula. He crashed, corrupted created a unified country out of the 
or co-opted domestic dissent, made secession-riven ruins of Che former Bel- 
sure that his army was too weak to gian Congo in the mid- 1960s, renamed 
rtiTpatgn his rule, and cultivated the it Zaire and dominated it ever since. 
West with a militantiy anti-Conunu- In those early days, Washington sup- 
nist foreign policy, thereby ensuring ported him as a preferable alternative to 
outside military help to put down the leftist rivals who declared admiration 
occasional aimed revolt. for Russia or China, U*S. policymakers 

Now, however, Marshal Mobutu's also hoped, in vain it turned out, that be 
regime is in serious military trouble, would follow economic policies fa- 
and no foreign friends are rushing to vorable to Western business. _ 

I frfl fl |t out. That is for the best. Long after his domestic misrule be- 

Witb the Cold War over, former came evident, Marshal Mobutu cap- 
foreign allies like the United States and italized on his ann -Communist foreign 
France did nothing in recent days to policies to win renewed Western sup- 
rebel troops from marching vir- pest. Zaire became a key ally in Araer- 
y unopposed into Zaire’s third- ica’s prosy war against a pro-Soviet 

*st city, Kisangani. Serbian mer- regime in Angola, and a useful partner 


largest city, Kisangani. Serbian mer- 
cenaries whom Marshal Mobutu had 
recruited to defend the city fled after 
Zairian army units began defecting to 
the rebel side. Kisangani gives the 
rebel leader, Laurent Kabila, substan- 
tial control over Zaire's mineral 
wealth. He can now consolidate his 
rule over the gold-producing eastern 
third of the country while commanding 
river access to the rich copper and 
cobalt deposits of the south. 

The corruption, negligence and bru- 
tality of the Mobutu era have been an 
economic as well as a political disaster. 
There is a chance, however, that the 
untested Kabila, who has spent much of 
his life trying to mount an armed re- 
bellion, is better. He has reportedly 
reined in corruption and broughL a mea- 
sure of economic revival to the rebel- 
ruled east. But he has yet to commit 
himself firmly to democratic rule. 


to French foreign policy ventures in 
Africa. Most recently, he provided sanc- 
tuary and weapons to France's former 
Rwandan Hutu militia allies who fled 
their own country after organizing the 
mass murder of Rwandan Tutsis. 

That last adventure contributed to 
Marsha] Mobutu’s current plight. To 
push marauding Hutu militias farther 
from their border, Rwanda’s present 
Tutsi government lent crucial early 
support to Kabila's rebellion. 

America's interest in the present 
crisis is primarily humanitarian. Wash- 
ington should work diplomatically for 
an early cease-fire to spare innocent 
civilians and allow the repatriation of 
tens of thousands of unarmed Hutu 
refugees trapped by the fighting. It has 
no interest in prolonging for a single day 
Marshal Mobutu’s disastrous misrule. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Extraordinary Gesture 


That was an extraordinary gesture 
by Jordan's King Hussein in going 
literally on bended knee to beg for- 
giveness from the families of the seven 
Israeli schoolgirls killed by an appar- 
ently deranged Jordanian soldier. “To 
me it was a loss of my children as 
well.' ' the king said. With his example 
of personal grace, he was interrupting 
what is both an Arab-Israeli habit of 
coldness to the other's losses and a 
phase of surpassing difficulty and 
danger in Arab-Israeli talks. His mis- 
sion to the bereaved was earned live 
and with an emotionally shattering im- 
pact on Israeli television. Were its spir- 
it to prevail, the politics of the Middle 
East would be transformed. 

But don’t count on it Israel's ties 
with Jordan — the neighbor with 
which it has its most rewarding peace 
— fluctuate, but within a relatively 
small range. It is Israel's ties with tire 
Palestinians that are unpredictable and 
currently threaten to spin out of con- 
trol. King Hussein so warned Israeli 
leader Benjamin Netanyahu in a pas- 
sionate and even prophetic letter last 
week. He was concerned that Mr. Net- 
anyahu has apparently foreclosed ne- 
gotiation on the status of Jerusalem by 
undertaking to begin work this very 


week on a big new housing project for 
Jewish settlers in greater East Jeru- 
salem. The Jerusalem issue was meant 
to have been submitted to Israeh-Pal- 
estmian talks that were to start on 
Monday but that are nowhere near 
even being scheduled 

Prime Minister Netanyahu replied 
to the king that the two of them should 
not give “every Pales tinian-Israeli im- 
passe the power to hurt our own re- 
lationship/' But Jerusalem is not your 
routine abrasive “every impasse." A 
suitable presence in Jerusalem is fi- 
nally for both sides the most important 
thing. Without a Jerusalem agreement, 
there is no Israeli-Palestinian peace. 
The notion that the issue not be ne- 
gotiated but decided unilaterally by 
one side is a treaty killer. Already it is 
inspiring both sides to issue scarcely 
veiled threats of force and violence. 

In Israel on Sunday, King Hussein 
did more than deliver a heartfelt per- 
sonal message to a mourning nation. 
With his showing of empathy for Is- 
rael’s tragedy, he earned a respectful 
bearing for his belief in the mutuality 
of sacrifice and benefit. This is ne- 
cessarily the central belief of all those 
who labor for peace. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Start at the UN 


The plans announced on Monday by 
UN Secretary -General Kofi Annan are 
a strong sign that he wants to deliver on 
his commitment to reform. He pro- 
poses to combine overlapping depart- 
ments, cut the budget and bureaucracy 
and improve efficiency. His proposals 
for a larger restructuring of the United 
Nations will come later, but these mea- 
sures are a sound start and should be 
rewarded with full payment of Amer- 
ica’s back dues. 

Mr. Annan's power to reform the 
United Nations alone was always lim- 
ited. Changes to its mission and ad- 
ministrative practices that involve 
member nations require the approval 
of the General Assembly. He wants to 
consult with the members before com- 
pleting recommendations for broader 
changes in July. This is wise, as the 
talks will be necessary to build support 
for reform from a General Assembly 
that has blocked change in the past. 

Mr. Annan also needs General As- 
sembly approval for some of the pro- 
posals he announced on Monday, in- 
cluding cuts of 10 percent in the budget 
and staff to eliminate 1,000 positions. 
He can make other changes on his own. 
For instance, he promised to streamline 
the organization. Economic and social 
programs within the Secretariat, cur- 
rently spread over three departments. 


will be combined into tme. Various 
agencies working in a country will now 
be coordinated. Otter changes are 
aimed at sharply cutting administrative 
costs, now 38 percent of the budget. 

Mr. Annan’s recommendations 
show his political skills. He proposes 
using the administrative savings for 
development programs. This is not only 
right but will also help reassure poor 
nations which fear that reform is a code 
word for refocusing die United Nations 
on the needs of powerful countries. 

He also produced a new code of 
conduct for UN staff, which includes 
financial disclosure by senior officials 
and specific job performance stan- 
dards. This change is important in a 
body that has long served as a home for 
mediocre bureaucrats. 

The Clinton administration should 
seize on the reform proposals to per- 
suade Congress to end America’s 
status as the United Nations ’s biggest 
deadbeat. The plan now is to pay in 
stages as Mr. Annan meets a series of 
as yet unspecified benchmarks. But 
paying the dues is not voluntary. It is an 
obligation to fellow UN members. 
Holding the money hostage was not 
acceptable before, and is certainly not 
now that Mr. Annan has made a good 
start on reform. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


IV O.TEHMTU1NAL M , f 

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rtMjoD wmi m mrw mu nw m mu 

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W ASHINGTON — The appoint- 
ment of Anatoli Chubais as Rus- 
sia's firat deputy prime minister is & 
milestone for economic reform. 

The government structure has been 
fundamentally changed, and Mr. Chu- 
bais brings with him some of die best 
and the brightest of Russia’s economic 
reformers. They have gained valuable 
administrative experience. Russia now 
has the greatest chance since Yegor 
Gaidar's rale in 1992 to undertake far- 
reaching economic reform. 

After one year’s reform break, many 
issues are ripe for swift action. A fun- 
damental tax reform has been discussed 
for three yeare and is long overdue. The 
huge wage and pension arrears are in- 
tolerable and must swiftly be brought 
under control. The government wage 
arrears are less than half a percent of 
GDP. so payment is fully affordable. 

A liberal pension reform has been 
drafted, and a proper regulation of the 
natural monopolies is well advanced. 
Better bankruptcy legislation has long 
been demanded- Development of capital 
market legislation is under way. 

The new government can speed up 
all these reforms and turn Russia 
around to economic growth and rising 
economic welfare already this year. 
Still, land reform and most property 
reforms are blocked by the Commu- 
nists in the Parliament. 

The new government appointments 
tell us a great deal about how the new 
Russia actually functions. 

President Boris Yeltsin was the im- 
mediate cause, and he should be given 


By Anders Aslund 


foil credit. His strength comes from his 
democratic election last summer. He 
wants to do something good. Rising 
from his sickbed, be realized that his 
government had done a minimum since 
its appointment last August 
Prime Minister Viktor Cherno- 
myrdin lacks political vision or will. 
He packed his government with min- 
isters even weaker .than himself and 
made no significant decisions. His key 
strategy was to appease the old Com- 
munist elite. But the Communists must 


This team can 
undertake the reforms 
that Russia needs 
to get growth. 

be confronted if Russia is to become a 
normal market economy. 

Russia today is a highly pluralistic 
society. Moscow alone has more than 
20 daily newspapers of every shade of 
political opinion, and much of the jour- 
nalism is of amazingly good quality 
Restless Moscow journalists have ex- 
posed the passivity of the government 
and aroused popular dissatisfaction 
early enough so that the cost of a sub- 
stantard government can be contained. 

A broad desire for more for-reaching 
market reforms has prompted the elab- 


oration of a lot of concrete reform pro- 
posals and draft legislation by numer- 
ous smart young Russian economists. 

The media are owned by a multitude 
of new capitalists, who have gained 
strength and confidence as about 70 
percent of the economy has been 
privatized. Russia has many strong 
capitalists who push their interests in 
open competition and expose one an- 
other in the media. 

Many are bankers, but Gazprom, die 
big oil companies and major traders 
are also influential. The dwindling mil- 
itary-industrial complex and unre- 
formed Conununi5t-dominated agricul- 
ture have faded into the background. 

However discreetly, the IMF was a 
catalyst of the government changes. By 
withholding a monthly disbursement 
of its three-year loan for die fourth 
time, in February, it pointed out the 
government doppiness. The immedi- 
ate concern was that Russia had not 
collected as much taxes as agreed. 

Tax revenues have fallen for more in 
the former Soviet Union than in East- 
ern and Central Europe — to about 20 
percent of GDP last year, as private 
enterprises defended themselves 
against a totally arbitrary, ruthless and 
corrupt tax service. 

Moreover, the bloated regional bu- 
reaucracy invents all kinds of regu- 
lations to be able to extract more bribes 
from suffering entrepreneurs. The “so- 
cial” expenditures are still substantial, 
but they are not very social, as they tend 
to be regressive. 

The post-Soviet state is so corrupt 


that the only way back to economic 
growth seems to be by restricting and 
minimizing it Hie situation is Latin . 
American. Estonia, Ky^yzstan ®d 

Kazakstan have already done so. Kus- 

sia is now a laggard, and the Chubais 
team just have to catch up. ) 

The appointment of the Chubais ■ 
tyam indicates what a sophisticated 
pluralistic society Russia has become. - . 
His current rise is a reflection of the , 
new capitalists’ revolt against a corrupt 


interests based on private propeny mum - * 
market competition, and the society is a i? 
highly transparent democracy ■ 

Mr. Chernomyrdin’s trace with the * 
Communists to do nothing has for- 
tunately been broken, and we are likely 
to see more constructive confrontation, 
as Mr. Chubais is a man with a liberal 
reform agenda. 

Economically, this team can under- 
take the reforms that Russia needs to 
get growth. The social improvement 
can be considerable, when Mr. Chubais ' 
penalizes employers who do not pay 
wages on time and makes sure that the - 
state does pay pensions. 

The West should offer a hand by 
facilitating Russia's accession to the 
World Trade Organization. But Russia 
no longer needs Western aid. Instead, 
private investors can look at Russia 
with new interest .* 

i. * 

The writer, a senior associate ax the 

Carnegie Endowment for International 

Peace, contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


Southeast Asia: A Financial Reminder From the Thai Crisis 


H ONG KONG — The crisis 
in Thailand's financial sec- 
tor does not say much about 
whether or not East Asia is los- 
ing its edge. But it is a reminder 
of the periodic recurrence of 
credit excesses, usually linked 
to property markets. 

So do not assume, as most of 
Asia is doing, that Thailand's 
problems are isolated and will 
have no impact elsewhere. Giv- 
en the region's open financial 
markets, credit binges are linked 
to international liquidity. Back 
in the mid-1980s, Hong Kong 
and Malay sia suffered crises not 
too long after Thailand. 

Thailand's is not a Mexico- 
style crisis caused by an over- 
valued currency and flimsy for- 
eign debt structure. Thai prob- 
lems have been made worse by 
worries about its current ac- 
count deficit and the baht link to 
die dollar, but essentially this is 
a domestic crisis. The cunency 
is not overvalued, and exchange 
reserves remain high. 

However, foreign banks stand 
to be hurt Several were over- 
eager, latency cle lenders to Thai 
companies. The risk they face on 
their $25 billion exposure to 


By Philip Bowring 


Thai borrowers is ordinary cor- 
porate lending risk, not currency 
or national defonlt risk. 

The problems of Thai finance 
companies and banks are well 
publicized and reflected in 
share prices. But almost noth- 
ing is known about foreign 
banks’ likely losses and the im- 
pact they will have on future 
eagerness to build loan books 
elsewhere in the region. 

Two places with the potential 
to have (hopefully somewhat) 
mflrfgr versions of the Thai 
problem, perhaps two years 
from now, are Hong Kong and 
Malaysia. 

IMF Managing Director 
Michel Camdessus was in Hong 
Kong recently praising die 
managers of its monetary af- 
fairs. However. Hong Kong ex- 
hibits classic examples of 
dangers that Mr. Camdessus 
normally never tires of warning 
central bankers about the im- 
pact of large and uncontrolled 
capital flows on monetary 
policy, and the challenges to 
prudential supervision of banks 
posed by excessive credit 


growth to speculative and il- 
liquid sectors of the economy. 

Rather than being an exem- 
plar in die past, Hong Kong in 
die mid-1960s, mid-70s and 
mid-80s had spectacular booms 
followed by financial collapses. 

With a pegged exchange rate 
and complete freedom of move- 
ment of capital, Hong Kong can- 
not have a monetaty policy, and 
its interest policy is set by Alan 
Greenspan. One result; Partly 
because of foreign capital flow 
into die stock market, money 
supply has grown by nearly 25 
percent in die past year. 

Bankers have been all too 
keen to step up lending accord- 
ingly. fo Hong Kong this means 
mainly to the property sector, 
which now accounts for 46 per- 
cent of local loans. The author- 
ities' efforts to rein in property 
leading have lacked conviction. 
Despite previous disasters, asset 
values, not real incomes, are seen 
as (he gauge by which Hong 
Kong measures itself. 

Credit growth will probably 
slow, but given the level of ex- 
posure the vulnerability of the 


system to interest rate or political 
shocks should be clear enough. 

The subject is barely dis- 
cussed, least of all by the IMF, an 
agency all too good at lecturing 
on stable management after the 
horse has bolted. For Hong 
Kong. Thailand is another plan- 
et, and 1985 ancient history. 

Unlike Hong Kong and Thai- 
land, Malaysia enjoys the flex- 
ibility of sol unpegged exchange 
rate, which can cushion capital 
flows and enable an independ- 
ent interest rate policy. Its in- 
stitutional memory of the mid- 
1980s is also shaipa. A year ago 
it was bracketed with Thailand 
as facing severe current account 
deficit problems, and as a result 
dampened its growth rate. 

But with an improved trade 
balance, foreign money has 
flooded in and confidence is 
high. Credit growth is now 
headed for its fourth year of 20- 
percent-plus increase. 

There are early warning signs 
of stresses. An increasing pro- 
portion of veiy rapid credit 
growth is going to the real es- 
tate. construction and finance 
sectors. Physical signs of over- 
building are not as evident as in 


Bangkok, but they are hard tp 
miss. At foe very least, cor- 
porate Malaysia looks headed 
for lower rates of return on as- 
sets than it has been used to. Nor 
is this just an issue for the prope 
erty and finance sectors. j 

China is the most obvious 
case of unrestrained entbusiasnj 
for industrial investment, with 
scant regard for demand 
growth. But Southeast Asia has 
looming problems, too, partic- 
ularly in capital-intensive in- 
dustries. like steel, petrochem- 
icals and motors, which make-, 
heavy demands on management t 
and technical s kills and which 1 
face reduction in tariff protec- 
tion as a result of WTO and 
ASEAN pacts. 

Thailand need not be the pre- 
cursor of other crises. Bnt its 
lessons need to be taken se- 
riously in the region, not dis- 
missed as doe to Thai politics or 
the incompetence of a central 
bank that until recently was re- ' 
garded as one of the best in 
Asia, However strong GDP 
growth may be, it is never easy 
to dismount from a charging 
credit tiger. 

International Herald Tribune. 




Government Secrecy: Easy, Dangerous and Undemocratic 


W ASHINGTON — If you 
want to understand what 
out-of-control government se- 
crecy means, consider what 
happened to one of its heroes, 
Glenn Seaborg, Nobel laureate 
in chemistry, co-discoverer of 
plutonium and chairman of the 
U.S. Atomic Energy Commis- 
sion for 10 years. 

During that time Mr. Seaborg 
kept a journal — more than 
18,000 pages of a diary plus 
correspondence, minutes of 
meetings and other documents 
— intended as a historical re- 
cord. He rigorously excluded 
anything that could be con- 
sidered classified, but to be 
doubly sure he had the whole 
thing reviewed and cleared 
when be left the AEC. 

For 12 years all was well. 
Then, in 1983, the Department 
of Energy asked to make a copy 
for its own historical use. Mr. 
Seaborg mistakenly agreed. A 
year and a half later the de- 
partment informed him that the 


By Jessica Mathews 


journal contained classified in- 
formation. 

It ordered that his other copy 
be picked up, and threatened hnn 
with arrest if he resisted. He 
could be accused, be was told, of 
haidng removed classified ma- 
terial from foe Atomic Energy 
Commission, because there was 
no written record of declassi- 
fication. (Of course, since the 
material was not classified to be- 
gin with.) He could go to court, 
he was told, but the government 
had never lost such a case. 

Over the next years the jour- 
nal was “sanitized" three sep- 
arate times. Each time foe re- 
viewers made different de- 
letions, from words to entire 
documents — 1,000 in all. 

Some were “bits of family 
lore.” Another ‘ ‘particular spe- 
ciality.” Mr. Seaborg writes, 
were items already in the public 
record, such as the code names 
of nuclear tests, which foe De- 


More Openness and Fewer Mistakes 

T T NUKE the other government regulations, the secrecy system 
w operates, by definition, outside foe public view. Account- 
ability and secrecy are implacable foes. 

Secrecy's most damaging blow is to democracy and foe capacity 
for reasoned deliberation. Keeping too many secrets feeds para- 
noia and conspiracy mongering. (“Why isn’t the government 
putting out that information? What is it hiding?”) Facts that might 
explode conspiracy-spinning are withheld. 

More openness about just what Soviet spies were and were not 
doing in America might have led us to be somewhat more wary in 
the 1930s and early 1940s. but less paranoid in the McCarthy era. 
Soviet espionage success, according to Senator Moynihan, “was 
waning by the time we began to be aware of it” 

Disclosure of what the government knew, or thought it knew, 
could have avoided large policy errors by subjecting mistaken 
assumptions to public debate. 

Intelligence vasdy overestimated foe s t re n gt h of foe Soviet eco- 
nomy, so that almost no one expected the Soviet collapse in 1989. 

America went to war in Vietnam fearing dial the Soviet Union 
and foe People’s Republic of China were seeking to extend 
Communist control into South Asia and beyond. But that war 
escalated at foe very moment when the Russian-Chinese alliance, 
to the extent that it ever existed, foul thoroughly fractured. 

Secrecy within the government (agencies keeping secrets from 
each other) robs top officials of information they need. 

Senator Moynihan’s solution is straightforward: Keep fewer 
secrets, and safeguard foe ones that matter. Some declassification 
has already begun, but the Moynihan commission proposes le- 
gislation to push this further and make it harder for government 
officials to label things secret in the first place. 

We are talking a lot about deregulation in the part of the 
regulatory system that is most open. We need more deregulation in 


the pan that is most closed. 

— EJ. Dionne Jr., commenting in The Washington Post. 


partraent of Energy had itself 
published. 

Other deletions were entries 
that could be embarrassing but 
in no way threatened security. It 
was "an arbitrary, capricious 
and frivolous process, almost 
devoid of objective criteria.” 
(The whole awful story can be 
found in Science magazine, 
June 3, 1994.) Mr. Seaborg is 
still waiting for the original to 
be re-released. 

How explain this mindless, 
autopilot style of operation? In 
part, there are too many secrets. 
Everyone who has ever worked 
in government knows that 
stamping something "Top Se- 
cret” makes people pay atten- 
tion. If you work in the Defense 
Department, State, Justice, En- 
ergy or in the several intelli- 
gence agencies and you want to 
matter, you don't send unclas- 
sified memos. 

So foe system feeds on itself. 
It produced 3.6 million new 
classifications up to Top Secret 
in 1995. More than 1.5 billion 
pages of government docu- 
ments more than 25 years old 
remain classified. 

The report of a commission 
chaired by Senator Daniel 
Patrick Moynihan, Democrat 
of New York, identifies other 
huge costs. One is that when 
there are so many secrets, it is 
much harder to protect the re- 
lative few that count: leaking 
classified material becomes no 
big deal. Another is that when 
so much is classified, anything 
foal is not is presumed to be 
unimportant 

A survey of Cuban public 
opinion made at foe rime of foe 
Bay of Pigs invasion showed 
public support for Fidel Castro 
so strong that any hope of an 
uprising against him was 
fantasy. The findings could 
have spared the United States 
one of its most costly blunders. 
"It is difficult not to think,” 
Mr. Moynihan writes, that foe 
poll "might have had greater 
impact had it been classified.* * 

Or consider foe intelligence 
community’s colossal failure to 
detect the Soviet Union's im- 
minent collapse, for which 
there is still no satisfactory ex- 
planation. General Ervin Rokke 
served in that time as defense 


attache in Moscow. His highly 
classified reports on the usual 
national security subjects, be 
believes, provided less insight 
into the Soviet threat than the 
picture his wife could have 
drawn from foe signs of eco- 
nomic rein she encountered 
daily. But who at a high level 
would have paid attention to 
information so mundane and so 
freely available? 

The isolation that secrets im- 
pose on those who handle them 
impoverishes analysis. It per- 
verts judgment, silences dissent 
and protects poor performance. 
Particularly when documents 
are presumed to be classified 
forever, excessive secrecy can 
breed arrogance and extreme 
abuses of authority. 

In the nuclear establishment, 
where by law all information is 
bom classified, the government 
killed, lied to and then stone- 
walled Americans for decades 
behind secrecy’s unpenetrable 
shield. Radioactive fallout, foe 
Atomic Energy Commission 
asserted in 1955, “does not 
constitute a serious hazard to 
any living thing outside foe test 
site.” It knew this to be false 


then, and for years of successful 
lawsuits against radiation vic- 
tims thereafter. 

In his foreword to the new 
report, Mr. Moynihan high-" 
lights one more cost: foe at- 
mosphere of suspicion that too; 
much secrecy creates between 
Americans and their govern-' 
menL a fertile breeding ground 
for conspiracy theories and do- 
mestic tenorisra and a threat to 
healthy democracy. 

As the remedy, the commis-" 
sion urges that secrecy hence- 
forth be seen as a second system 
of government regulation and- 
be provided "the discipline of a' 
legal framework.” Statutory.’ 
standards should be set for what 
may be declared secret, and' 
secrets should have, from foe 
outset, a fixed lifetime, unless 
specific harm can be demon-, 
strated. Declassification should 
have equal status, made routine 
and efficient 

It might not work. A culture 
as deeply rooted as this one 
changes slowly and painfully at_ 
best. There can be no doubt 
however, that even partial suc- 
cess would be worth the effort. 

The Washington Post. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1897: Japan Mourns monks in such matters as the 

PTOWino of hair nn U..J 


SAN FRANCISCO — The 
steamer Peru, from Japan, 
brings news of foe death of the 
Crown Prince of Japan several 
weeks ago. The death has been 
kept a State Secret because Ja- 
pan had just finished the period 
of mourning for the Dowager 
Empress. Pnnce Yoshihiro Har- 
unomiya was the only son of the 
Emperor of Japan. He was pro- 
claimed Heir Apparent in 1887 
and elected Crown Prince in 
1889. The heir to the throne 
must be the son of the Emperor 
and the Empress, or foe suc- 
cession passes to some collat- 
eral branch of foe family. 

1922; Nuns Revolt 

WASHINGTON — Buddhist 
nuns in Japan are engaged in a 
vigorous campaign to be re- 
leased from the more rigorous 
practices of their order by de- 
manding foe same privileges as 


monks in such matters as the 
growing of hair on the head, 
eating meat. etc. A significant 
phase is foe evident intention of 
Japanese women to secure 
equal rights with men. The nuns 
are revolting against foe cus- 
toms of centuries, which, they . 
declare, make them mere mes- 
sengers for Buddhist priests. 

1947s Indonesia DeaJ 

BATAVIA — The Netherlands 
government formally author- 
J?ed the Dutch Commission 
General to sign the Cheribon 
draft agreement ending foe* 
mnsteen-month-old Indonesian 
revolution. The Dutch recog- 
nize foe Republic’s de facto 

HJTO ov £ Java, Sumatra 
and Madura. The republic in 
tom agrees to join Borneo and 
eastern Indonesia in a federated 
US?®?? of Indonesia: 

whhNXSi ^ 311 equal P 3 * 1 * 
If"? m a Perpetual: 
Netherlands -Indonesian union— 1 


mm i 


■0 

SffJ <L*e^ 




1 




'c)yy\ 


l/sb 




OPINION/LETTERS 


Globalizing the Campaigns: 
A Billion Hands to Shake 


Tr . r , 

* nu! (.rjji. 


TXT - ASHDMGTON — Pres- 
yy Idem Bill Clinton has 
scolded the FBI for not telling 
•Urn sooner that it suspected 
Gnina of trying to funnel 
money into the U.S. political 
campaigns. He’s angry, 
everyone assumes, because if 
they’d only let him know 
what China was up to. he 
cpuld have put a slop to it 
1 from the start. 

; But thai might not be it at 
all. Mr. Clinton may be upset 
because of a golden oppor- 
tunity gone to waste. Just 
think of it, he may be saying to 
himself — a billion Chinese, 
and they wanted to give. 

; Okay, ax first maybe it 
doesn't sound so plausible. 
After all, per capita income in 
China is only $2,500 or so; 
you ’re not going to get a lot of 
$100,000 givers. But that 
hasn't stopped Coca-Cola or 
General Motors from seeing 
the great potential of the 
Chinese market, and it 
shouldn't stop the Democrat- 
ic National Committee either. 
If every Chinese just gave one 
lousy quarter, after all, you 
could collect $250 million — 
enough to pay for a year’s 
Wcrth of commercials and 
then some. 

; And once you 
roJing, you 
step at China. 

In fad. if the Chinese start- 
ed giving, the Indians would 
b<g to ante up just to protect 
tfrmselves. If the Indians 
gwe, the P akistanis would 


i you got the ball 
wouldn't have to 


By Fred Hiatt 

have to be at the table. The 
Iranians certainly wouldn't 
let the Pakistani donations go 
unanswered, the Saudis 
would have to match the Ira- 
nians — and pretty soon 
you’re in a neighborhood 
with real money. 

Some Americans might 
have qualms about foreigners 
gening involved in the cam- 
paigns. But President Clinton 
has explained, very patiently, 
that he never allows policy to 
be swayed by campai gn con- 
tributors. If American donors 
can’t influence him, certainly 
we wouldn't have to worry 
about Chinese givers, most of 
whom don't even speak Eng- 
lish or play golf. 

And there's a fairness issue 
here. Maybe, technically 
speaking, foreigners don’t 
nave the same constitutional 
right to give campaign dona- 
tions that Americans have. 
But — again quoting the pres- 
ident — - the United States is 
the indispensable nation in 
the world today. Nobody 
could deny that President 
Clinton, during his first term, 
did more than his fair share 
protecting Europe and Japan, 
sending troops hither and 
yon, running up huge trade 
deficits with Japan and, yes, 
China. If those people want to 
show some gratitude, who are 
we to say no? 

Globalization is the wave 


of the future, and the Clinton 
team has been quicker to un- 
derstand that than most. 
When reporters caught a 
bunch of Republican con- 
gressmen allowing fat-cat 
givens to treat them to a sunny 
weekend ax a fancy hotel in 
Florida in exchange for a few 
chummy conversations over 
drinks or links, the Senate 
majority leader, Trent Lott, 
explained that this was the 
American way. You wouldn’t 
catch Mr. Clinton using a ret- 
rograde excuse like that. Why 
only American? 

Of course, you can’t expect 
the internationalization of 
campaign finance to happen 
without a few hiccups and 
glitches along the way. It may 
take a while for the White 
House kitchen to get the 
morning rice gruel just right 
for Lincoln Bedroom guests. 
The time difference, too, will 
pose a challenge; Vice Pres- 
ident A1 Gore will have to 
tiptoe down to his study in his 
pajamas and bathrobe to 
make a few middle-of-the- 
night phone calls to potential 
donors in Wuhan. 

And if the Republicans de- 
cide to match the Democratic 
efforts, it could play havoc 
with Trent Lott's schedule. 
Just the other day, Mr. Lott 
explained that he’s happy to 
meet anyone. “People who 
don’t give one nickel can walk 
in and talk to me." Mr. Lott 
said “The door's wide 
open.*’ 





Columnist Tells All , 
For a Bargain Price 

By Maureen Dowd 

ASHINGTON — I told tell.” said Rafe Sagalyn, her 




That policy must already 
make it tough for him to man- 
age the Senate's business. 
Add a few million Chinese 
visitors, and you'll really foul 
up his schedule. On the other 
hand, just imagine if they all 
did give a nickel. 

Eventually, in the interest 
of fairness, we’d have to insist 
on a two-way street Trade 




Representative Charlene Clinton will do after the year 
Barshefsky would demand 2000*? Our campaigner-in- 
that Americans be allowed to chief will be only 54 then, in 
give to foreign candidates, the prime of life, but barred 


too. And it’s not just money 
that could flow back and 
forth, enhancing mutual un- 
derstanding, but talent. 

No doubt you see where 
we’re headed here — who 
hasn't worried about what Mr. 


from running again — in the 
United States. Imagine how a 
billion new hands to shake 
could reinvigorate him! After 
all. President Jiang Zemin isn't 
getting any younger. 

The Washington Post. 


A Donor Gave a Little to Clinton, and Got a Lot in Return 


VTEW YORK — I have been donating money to political 
- n candidates for 30 years. 

At first, I supported Massachusetts Republicans — in 1 970, 

was press secretary for an unsuccessful Republican can- 
idate for secretary of state. Later, I switched to Democrats. 

I'm a small contributor, giving $50 or less, but I always try 
j give something, just to participate in democracy. 

Of all the presidential candidates I’ve supported. Bill 
Clinton was die first to surprise me with favors and access — 
nd I respect him all the more for it. 

I have liked Mr. Clinton ever since the 1992 New Hamp- 
shire primary, where he impressed me with his ideas and with 
lis refusal to give up. 

When I saw a television report showing the Clintons 
stomping through snow handing out videos door to door, after 
the press had written him off because of Gennifer Flowers, I 
sent him a small check. 

. The surprise came after he won the nomination: I received 
a video in the mail, “The Man from Hope.” 

For some reason this gift made me extremely happy,, and I 
still have it. I haven't watched ii in a while, but in 1992 1 think 
I viewed it more times than the video of my first grandson's 
birth. 

I didn't fed that 1 bad bought the video with my donation, 
but that 1 had received it as a member of Bill Clinton’s support 
group. 

Later that year I sent the Clinton campaign a letter com- 


By Pal Caplan Andrews 

meriting on James Baker's role in the George Bush campaign. 
Soon after, I received a reply from the press secretary, Dee Dee 
Myers. She had read my letter and she answered it in detail. 

Before writing it. did she look me up on a computer to find 
out if I was a donor? The thought didn't cross my mind at the 
time. 

I was a supporter. Supporters give money and they write 
letters. I had done so with other candidates. They had accepted 
my support, but none had responded so personally and cre- 
atively. 

Nor did Mr. Clinton forget me after he won, I received an 
invitation to the inauguration. The elaborately printed parch- 
ment impressed me. even though I was perfectly aware that the 
mailing had gone out to many thousands of people and that an 
inauguration is a public event to which no invitation is 
needed. 

And that December I got a Christmas card showing Bill and 
Hillary standing in front of the White House tree; It stood on 
my mantel alongside the cards of all ray friends. I really liked 
it and the comments it drew. 

The favors continued. Last fall there arrived in my mail a 
“Certificate of Appreciation" from the Democratic National 
Committee, after a donation of S25. 

And during the 1996 race, the Clinton campaign sent me a 
picture of the president with this note: "Thank you for your 


dedicated support. ... 1 would not be here without you." For 
months, it hung on the bulletin board over my desk. 

Politicians have always raised money through dinners and 
coffee parties, and big donors have always had the ap- 
preciation of candidates and access to them. I wonder if Bui 
Clinton's high approval rating, so puzzling to commentators, 
might be related to his granting of favors to small supporters 
like myself as well as to the wealthy ones. 

Do I mind if some big donors get to talk to him about policy? 
It’s hard to, when my own letter received such careful 
attention. 

Does it bother me that wealthy supporters slept over at the 
White House? Not as much as pundits think it should, because 
I got a Christmas card. 


The writer, a pastoral counselor in Cambridge. Massachu- 
setts, contributed this comment to The New York Times. 


my mother I was writ- 
ing a memoir. 

"Of whom?" she asked. 

She doesn't get it. She's 
still in the dark ages, stuck in a 
time when people wrote 
about themselves only if they 

MEANWHILE 

had something interesting 
and valuable and exceptional 
and wise to say. A time when 
people kept their dirty laun- 
dry in die hamper. 

Now we are in an exhib- 
itionist era and publishers are 
frantically signing up the 
hampers. We have revenge 
memoirs. Good mommy 
memoirs. Bad mommy mem- 
oirs. Bad daddy memoirs. 
Very bad surrogate daddy 
memoirs. Celebrity memoirs. 
Nonentity memoirs. Pubes- 
cent memoirs. Senescent 
memoirs. Anyone remotely 
associated with a celebrity 
memoirs. I-could-have-run-I- 
did-Tun-I-might-stili-nin-for- 
president memoirs. 

The latest publishing sen- 
sation is an almost-centenari- 
an. A Wall Street Journal ar- 
ticle brought to light an 
autobiography, written in 
longhand, by a 97-year-old 
Kansas woman — "The Life 
of Jessie Lee Brown From 
Birth Up to 80 Years." 

A bidding frenzy erupted 
over her picaresque tele of sur- 
viving two wars, the Great De- 
pression, an alcoholic hus- 
band, eight children, a job as a 
cosmetics peddler and the first 
time she saw Lawrence Welk. 

"It feels like real people 
talking about real people," 
enthused an editor. 

Creepy people talking 
about creepy people works 
even better. Kathryn Harris- 
on, who wrote "The Kiss” 
about her four-year consen- 
sual adult love affair with her 
father, is also hot. 

But the kicker for me was 
when Little, Brown an- 
nounced that they were so im- 
pressed with Paula Barbieri’s 
"honesty and sensitivity" 
that they were paying O.J. 
Simpson's former girlfriend 
$3 million for a book. "She 
has a bittersweet story to 


Washington literary agent. 

Hey, Rafe. I have a bit- 
tersweet story to teU. And you 
can have it for $2.4. 

I never experienced incest, 
but I had a couple of very 
annoying boyfriends. I didn't 
break Warergate, but I’ve 
eaten there. A president never 
asked me for advice on for- 
eign policy, but I did give Dan 
Quayle the proper pronunci- 
ation of Pago Pago. 

George Stephanopoulos is 
getting $3 million from Little, 
Brown for his assessment of 
Clintonian governance: a tem- 
pestuous tale of mussable hair, 
a president who stressed him 
out by day and a Stairm aster 
that calmed him by night. 

I can do that. I have hair. 
The president stresses me out 
I use a Stainn aster. No, it 
doesn't calm me down. Like I 
said, only $2.4. 

In his $2.5 million stab at 
rehabilitation, the disgraced 
Clinton campaign adviser 
Dick Moms wrote about 
growing up: “I began life 
weighing only 2 pounds, 11 
ounces, and spent my first 
three months in incubators, 
untouched by anyone, even 
my mother. Only after years 
of therapy did I begin to un- 
derstand bow this early 
deprivation affected my per- 
sonality thereafter." 

Well, get this: When I was 
bom, a nurse, trying to clean 
out my throat, accidentally 
slit it on the inside. I couldn’t 
cry for months, only make 
little mewling sounds, like a 
kinen. I could spend pages 
exploring how this early 
deprivation affected my per- 
sonality thereafter. I'm a re- 
covering wader with a wound 
that will not heal. 

And as for my mother. I 
thought she was wonderful in 
every way. But, for $2.4 mil, 
the scales will suddenly fall 
from my eyes and I will see 
what I ready endured What 
about that night, when I was 
10, and I said I was in the 
mood for Italian, and she put 
an unopened can of Chef Bo- 
yardee ravioli on my plate? 

Harsh. Thar’s the kind of 
thing that can haunt a girl. 

The .VfH- York Times. 


f 3 I l ’ * <■•**• 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


f EU Competition 

May I ask why Boston Sci- 
entific’s decision to move a 
manufacturing operation 
from Belgium to Ireland, 
where corporate taxes are 
lower, constitutes a “blow to 
the European single market” 
as the article "Belgians Out- 
raged at Renault” (March 1) 
asserts? 

The point of the single mar- 
ket, even a protected and 
heavily regulated one like the 
European Union’s, is to allow 
producers to seek out the low- 
est possible cost regardless of 
political and administrative 
boundaries. Moving to ben- 

efit from lower taxes does ex- 

•* afcdy that Lower taxes mean 
lower prices for consumers. 
By moving, Boston Scientific 
has struck a blow for, not to, 
the single market. 

. If the article was referring 
to the political backlash firom 
the move, then surely the 
Mow to the single market will 


come from those politicians 
who are thereby deprived of 
tax revenues, and the power 
and patronage that go with 
them. That there will be losers 
is inevitable: other than 
politicians, the Belgian work- 
ers who have lost their jobs 
have to be helped. But let us 
avoid pandering to the culture 
of vienmhood. 

Moaning and isolation will 
not work. Those who lose 
must learn that the only cor- 
rect response is to beat the 
winners at their own game. 
That includes becoming more 
efficient and bringing about 
political change to lower the 
public sector’s appetite for 
taxes. If Boston Scientific 
helps Belgium do that, all 
Europeans, not just Belgians, 
owe it a debt of gratitude. 

FRANCESCO L. GALASSL 
Leicester, England. 

Normandy Memorial 

Regarding “ The Wall That 


Never Went Up" (March 1): 

This article on the Battle of 
Normandy Foundation and 
the Wall of Liberty project 
has unflattering statements 
about a former director of the 
foundation, Anthony StonL 
that need to be rebutted. 

I had the pleasure of work- 
ing closely with Mr. Stout and 
the Battle of Normandy 
Foundation for several years 
when I was the U.S. ambas- 
sador to France. 1 watched 
Mr. Stout’s unending efforts 
to build up the foundation, 
support the excellent new 
World War n museum in 
Normandy, and provide ser- 
vices to veterans and Amer- 
ican students. He impressed 
me as a hardworking and de- 
termined manager. 

The fund-raising program 
of the foundation tor which 
Mr. Stout was responsible 
was strong and paid the bills 
for projects that everyone 
now applauds. This program, 
run by a respected organiza- 



tion. was abruptly ended by 
Mr. Stout’s successors, which 
may account for the founda- 
tion's current difficulties. 

JOE M. RODGERS. 

Nashville, Tennessee. 

Hotel Telephones 

The article “New 
Weapons in the War Against 
Hotel Telephone Charges” 
(Feb. 28) reflects the opinions 
of frequent travelers dis- 
mayed by the "extortionate 
rates" charged by hotels for 
use of their telephones. 

Telecommunication sys- 
tems today are highly sophis- 
ticated pieces of electronics 
that do not require much 
maintenance since there are 
no mechanics to foil. Func- 
tions such as voice mail re- 
duce the need for costly op- 
erators. Investment and 
expenses should not be con- 
fused, and I wonder whether 
hotels are trying to pull the 
wool over their customers 1 
eyes when they claim tele- 
phone charge markups are 
needed to cover axnortiza- 
tian. 

From a business philo- 
sophy point of view, a hotel is 
a provider of paid board and 
lodging to travelers. It is in the 
hospitality industry, not the 
telecommunications in- 
dustry. Hotels should not de- 
rive profits from something 
that makes up an essential and 
integral part of their service ro 
their customers. Instead, 
overhead costs should be in- 
cluded in the room price as 
they are for all other overhead 
costs. 

M. von der DECKEN. 

Viiieneuve, Switzerland. 

Muslim Democracies 

Regarding “Turks See Pre- 
judice in EU's Closed Door ” 
(Feb. 24): 

I'm sure the governments 
of Pakistan. Malaysia and In- 
donesia would hotly dispute 
the assertion by the EU envoy 
Michael Lake that “Turkey is 
the only fully democratic 
Muslim country in the 
world.” In fact, probably 
everyone should. 

LEONARDO BREZ30, 
Hong Kong. 


PAnticiA Wells 
At Home in Provence 

Recipes Inspired by Her Farmhouse in France 



. Patricia 

‘ • • •.* " ' • y ‘ \\ >* 

at Home in Pro^tnge 




Recipes Inspired by ' Bef. fa rmh (ruse., Fr&yc*- ' 

, . t* 5 K-.T'. 0 ** 5 *MS »¥ Rone#* ;Fa*S OS,. -A; li—Ji 


•4 


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Hardback. 384 pages. 75 four-color photographs. 


For the past thirteen years, 
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Here are 175 recipes from 
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«f tali>3S8rib» ae 

THE WORLD'S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


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INTERNATIONAL herald tribune, 
WEDNESDAY MARCH 19, 1997 
PAGE 10 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 


Reviving the Ensemble and a Political Masterpiece 



By Michael Billington 


L ondon — no doubt about it 

The most important event in the 
London theater this year is the 
creation of The Peter Hail Com- 
pany at the Old Vic. The aim is to create 
a permanent company that will offer 12 
plays in repertory over the new 40 weeks. 
Ai a time when even the Naticxia] Theatre 
casts on aonwifaot basis, the return to the 
ensemble principle is crucial. Happily, 
die venture gets off to a strong start with 
Hall's own revival of Harley Granville- 
Barker’s “Waste," one of the best polit- 
ical plays of the century. 

The play has a complex history. It 
was written in 1907 and instantly 
banned by the Lord Chamberlain, os- 
tensibly because it touched on abortion, 
in reality because it exposed the daily 
chicanery of politics, eventually, the 


play was licensed in 1920 and six years 
later Barber took the opportunity to re- 
vise it, retaining the plot and characters 
but rewriting every lime of dialogue; it is 
this 1926 version that Hall presents, 
with great elan, at the Old Vic. 

Why is the play still so powerful? On 
one level, because it deals with sexual 
scandal; The plot concerns an independ- 
ent MP. Hemy Trebell. whose plan to 
introduce a bill, with Conservative back- 
ing, to privatize the Church of England is 
scuppered when his mistress dies in a 
backstreet abortion. But Barker’s real 
skill lies in putting the political process 
on stage. In showing precisely bow a 
visionary idea is comjtfranised less by the 
threat of scandal, which can always be 
covered up, than by realpolitik. 

Barker’s great scene — one that 
graphically illustrates the dynamics of 
power — is the incoming Tory prime 
minister's confrontation with his inner 


cabinet The dead woman's husband, an 
Irish political rebel, is introduced and 
smoothly silenced. The real battle is for 
the Chancellorship of the Exchequer, 
and it gradually becomes clear that, if 
Trebell and his bill are ditched, the way 
will be open for a rival candidate. Vis- 
ionary ideals are sacrificed on the altar 
of personal ambition and the parallels 
with today are instantly striking. 

But "Waste" is also a personal 
tragedy, and Michael Pennington gives a 
superb performance as Trebell, showing 
us an emotionally underdeveloped man 
to whom the death of a bill matters more 
than tire loss of a mistress and child. 
Felicity Kendal as Trebell's casually dis- 
carded lover, Anna Carteret as his loyal, 
sexually innocent sister and Denis Quii- 
ley as a Tray leader trying to reconcile a 
divided team also give first-rate sup- 
prat 

Meanwhile the National Theatre is 


Beyond Bach, to Human Drama 


By James R. Oestreich 

New York Time* Service 


N EW YORK — "Restora- 
tions'’ abound in the world of 
early music. But when the 
English director Jonathan 
Miller speaks of restoration in connec- 
tion with Bach's monumental "St Mat- 
thew Passion," he is not thinking, in 
typical early -music terms, of the work's 
first performance, in 1727. 

Indeed, there could have been little 
about that occasion, with chorus and 
orchestra crammed into two organ lofts 
at St. Thomas’s Church in Leipzig, to 
stimulate the imagination of a stage 
director. Nor does Miller suggest that 
Bach ever envisioned any overt dramat- 
ization of this expansive meditation on 
Christ’s waning hours and final agony. 

No, Miller is looking back mucb fur- 
ther in his production of the "St Mat- 
thew Passion,” which opens next 
Sunday at the Majestic Theatre of the 
Brooklyn Academy of Music in New 
York City. Specifically, he hopes to 
evoke the spirit of the early Christians 


in, say, the second century. 

"My idea when we first started to 


"My idea when we first started to 
stage the work was to present a sort of 
musical Last Supper, celebrated by the 
participants.’' Muler said from his home 
in London. "The whole thing would 
become an informal Eucharist, with die 
performance as the act of memory that 
Jesus had in mind when He said, ‘Do this 
in memory of Me.’ It may be very odd 
for a Jewish atheist to be saying this, but 
it is a son of musical sacrament, and it 
becomes a sacrament by partici p ation 

i,.. -I—,—!.. ' ' 


rather than by simply singing it’ 
Lest images of stuffy historii 


Lest images of stuffy historical pa- 
geants and tacky period costumes crowd 


the mind, it is worth recalling that Miller 
has in his recent opera productions ten- 
ded toward extreme subtlety and un- 
derstatement. Stuffiness is in fact the 
enemy here, as the director tries to break 
down the stiff reverential formality that 
usually surrounds performances of the 
"St. Matthew Passion" in concert set- 
tings. Whatever else the work may be, 
after all, it is also an intensely human 
drama. 

Miller’s staging of the Passion grew 
out of discussions with Paul Goodwin, 
an oboist and conductor at the center of 
the London early -music scene, and Ron 
Gonsalves, an artist manager. It was 
first presented in 1993 at Holy Trinity 
Church in London. 

The production dispenses with both 
costumes and formal garb. Singers and 
instrumentalists p erf orm in casual mod- 
em dress so that they become, in effect, 
an extension of the audience, huddled 
dose around, and vice versa. 

with tittTtwo choruses and orchestras 
divided but not widely separated. There 
is no scenery, and props are limited to a 
few symbolic items; a table with a loaf of 
bread, a cup of wine and an apple. 

The characters register the emotions 
that their words convey, and they ad- 
dress rate another diredly. Choristers 
reveal varied personalities, not only dra- 
matic but also musical, as they move 
and react independently and with seem- 
ing spontaneity. The pivotal event of the 
Passion, Christ’s crucifixion, takes 
place off stage and is merely reflected in 
the expressions of the singers. 

In the soprano aria “Ich will dir mein 
Herze schenken" ("I wish to offer Thee 
my heart"), for example, the words 
address Christ, and in tins charged con- 


A lthough the orchestra 

plays period instruments, 
Goodwin is flexible in his ap- 
proach to early-music ortho- 
doxy. He uses women singers where 
Bach used boys. And he neatly sidesteps 
a potential dramatic boondoggle: The 
presence of a boys' chorus, retained 
even in modem-style performances, to 
loft die chorale tune over the vast open- 
ing chorus. 

Fra die first time, tire production, 
which has traveled to Scotland, France 
and Spain, will shay from the German of 
Picander's libretto. The Academy 
wanted the work sung in English, so the 
text wiO be Robert Shaw's translation, 
altered in certain details by Goodwin. 


3 Queens and a Very Full House 


By David Stevens 

laicmational Herald Tribune 


M ONTE CARLO — Among 
this year's musical an- 
niversaries is the 200th of 
Gaetano Donizetti’s birth, 
which the Monte Carlo Opera is cel- 
ebrating with a tour de force — present- 
ing in mini-repertory the composer’s 
three major operas with queens of Eng- 
land as principal characters. 

On each of three weekends. "Anna 
Bolena,” "Maria Stuarda" and 
"Roberto Devereux" — billed as the 
"Tudor trilogy” — are being given in 
rotation, which is something of a phys- 
ical feat. Charles Gamier's ornate theat- 
er in the Casino building is a gem, but it 
has no storage space. Normally Monte 
Carlo goes through its season one opera 
at a time. To manage three in the same 
time frame, two large tents have been 
installed on the terrace overlooking the 
Mediterranean to house the two sets not 
in immediate use. 


As a long run-up to the anniversary 
year, John Mordler. the company’s di- 


rector, started five years ago with 
"Roberto Devereux” and added the 
other two in successive seasons, all 
staged by Jonathan Miller and with the 
same team of designers. 

But these operas were written for the 
likes of Pasta, Malibran and the tur- 
bulent Giuseppina Ronzd de Begnis, and 
in modem times have been revived for 
Callas, Sills and Caballe. Nothing on 
that order of flamboyance is on display 
here, but Mordler him assembled solid 
and balanced casts that delivered highly 
satisfying accounts of Donizetti's view 
of English history. 

The principal character In “Roberto 
Devereux" is really Elizabeth L and 
Mariana Nicolesco gave an exciting 
performance as the queen tom by jeal- 
ousy and rage at the vain and feckless 
Essex. Her singing was frill of risk- 
taking. but she always came through 
when it counted. Giuseppe Sabbatini 
rose to the occasion of Devereux 's pris- 
on scene, and Gloria Scalchi was an 
intense Sara, the queen's rival. 

In "Anna Bolena,” Giusy Devin u 
and Sonia Ganassi were a well-matched 


pair of the royal rivals, Anne Boleyn and 
Jane Seymour, with Giacomo Prestia as 
tiie irascible Henry VUI and Sara Min- 
gaxdo impressive in the trouser role of 
Smeton. 

In “Maria Stuarda,” the great con- 
frontation of Mary and Elizabeth, ima- 
gined by Schiller and given musical zest 
by Donizetti, was splendidly delivered 
by the soprano Maria Pia PisciteUi as 
Maria and Carolyn Sebron, the mezzo 
Elisabeth, both singers of dramatic tem- 
perament. Pietro Ballo sang strongly in 
the thankless role of Leicester, the tenor 
caught in the middle. 

Evelino Pido conducted all three 
works with feeling for the Donizetti an 
vocal line and dramatic drive, and 
Miller's revived stagings handled the 
principals well in their moments of con- 
flict, although the chorus did not always 
seem terribly involved in the events. 

RoniT area’s sets concentrated on the 
efficient use of space, with interiors that 
made little distinction between palace or 
prison. Color and sense of historical 
period was supplied by the rich cos- 
tumes of Clare Mitchell. 


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"Tschaikowsky” number became an 
immediate sensation. Today the show, 
while obviously intriguing to musical 
buffs, has the air of a dated curiosity. If 
anything, it has almost too much in- 
tegrity. We watch the editor of a fash- 
ionable magazine undergoing Freudian 
analysts to cure her emotional inde- 
cisiveness. Weill’s songs are deliber- 
ately confined to the heroine's dream 
sequences in an attempt to justify the 
music. In consequence you lose the 


spontaneity, which is the peculiar glory 
of the musical, in which characters sud- 
denly sing and dance out of emotional 
necessity. 

What the show most however, 
is the reverence for Freudian analysis. 
The heroine’s doctor, neatly played by 
Hugh Ross, is serai as an omniscient 
secular priest who clearly has all the 
answers. Even the final notion that the 
heroine has to share her editorial power 
to fulfill herself as a woman looks 
faintly patronizing. 

But even if the show is not a time- 
transcending classic like “Guys and 
Dolls” (playing in the adjacent Olivier 
Theatre), it still offers incidental pleas- 
ures. Weill's score, in particular, blends 
plangent echoes of his Berlin period 
with a '40s Broadway idiom most par- 
ticularly in the lyrically witty ‘ ‘Saga of 
Jenny' ’ and the quietly haunting "My 
Ship." 


^ jaria Friedman, last seen 
in Sondheim’s “Passion,’ ^ 

also confizms that she is Bntains ^ 

most authentic musical star- She ^ 
touchingly conveys -the heroine s 
buttoned-op emotional repression.; But 
she is at her best in an extended circus 
sequence that releases* clown-like qual- 
ity remin iscent of the late Italian actress 
Giulietta Masina. . 

Francesca Zambello s production is 
formally elegant and impressively de- 
signed by AdrianneLobel. Itis all harm- 
lessly pleasant and of obvious interest to 
theatrical historians. But whether H is 
the job of the National Theatre to revive 
a relatively minor musical that, in fwt, 
left little imprint on Broadway’s main- 
stream is a matter for serious debate. 


! S : JSU 
i iPi/CA 


IN 


Michael Billington, drama critic cf 
The Guardian, is filling m for Sheridan 
Morley. 



text, one might expect the singer to do 
the same, even though her role is med- 
itative and not that of a named character 
in the drama. Instead, she immerses 
herself visually in her musical dialogue 
with two oboes d’amore. 

"At those times, I wanted there to be a 
kind of joint attention, in which people 
were sort of praying together but not 
addressing Qmsi eye to eye, as h were,” 
Miller said. “The whole point about this 
was to try and make an intimate re- 
lationship between the obbligato instru- 
ments and the soloists, and also to gal- 
vanize the chorus into active partici- 
pation rather than simply providing a sort 
of Muzak." 

To some extent, the intimacy that 
Miller seeks dictates the musical style. 
Hie Brooklyn production calls for a 
tightly knit ensemble of seven principal 
vocal soloists; 24 choristers, many of 
them doubling in the smaller solos, and 
26 instr umentalis ts, all led by Good- 
win. 


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Epps, director of '‘Play On” and author West; inset, actors Cheryl Freeman and Tonya P inkins. 


Twelfth Night’: Take the A Train 


By Barry Singer 


Jem fantasy, with the Ellington songs 
centrally deployed to advance the plot 


N 


EW YORK — "I remember 
him being fee most stylish and 
elegant man I'd ever seen in 
my life. Not just the music.I'd 


never seen a man better dressed; who 
spoke so beautifully — his idiosyncratic 
use of language. And he was charming 
beyond measure. I wanted a show that 
be would be proud of.” 

The speaker, stage director Sheldon 
Epps, 44, remembers Duke Ellington 
vividly, though he saw the orchestra lead- 
er and composer perform only once be- 
fore Ellington’s death in 1974. As a re- 
sult, Thursday at the Brooks Atkinson 
Theatre. Duke Ellington will return to 
Broadway — a circumstance he longed 
for but never realized in his lifetime. 

“Play On!" is a homage to Elling- 
ton's memory, conceived and mountral 
by Epps. No mere song parade, “Play 
On!” re-relis Shakespeare’s “Twelfth 
Night” as a traditional book musical 
transported to 1940s Harlem using a 
score of 22 classic and obscure com- 
positions by Ellington and his alter ego 
and collaborator, Billy Strayhom. 

Epps, best known for conceiving and 
directing “Blues in the Night,” a blues 
musical revue on Broadway in 1983. 
first planned to stage the Shakespeare 


centrally deployed to advance the plot 
and develop character. “There is a nat- 
ural parallel,'’ he said recently, "be- 
tween the upstairs-downstairs nature of 
Shakespeare’s play and Ellington's mu- 
sic. Ellington wrote songs feat were 
both ‘high ’ and Tow,’ in the same sense 


lover to Olivia by default, were syn- 
thesized into Rev. Lady Liv’s adoring. 


uptight manager; 

“I wanted our Harlem to be a veiy 
nonrealistic, magical place, an Illyria, 
where music in tiie air would make 
things happen,” Epps said. * 

For all of its invention and rernven- 
tion« “Play On!” must answer one fun- 
damental question: How well served are 
the songs? The cast is strong on Broad- 
way veterans and includes Carl An- 
deraon (as Duke), who played Judas in 
the original "Jesus Christ Superstar”; 
Cheryl Freeman (Vy), the Acid Queen 
in the Broadway version of "Tommy"; 
Lawrence Hamilton (Rev), who was in 
"The WIz’ Tonya P inkin g (Lady Liv). 
who won a Tony for “Jelly’s Last 
Jam”; and Larry Marshall ("Hair") 
and Andre de Shields (“Ain't MBbe- 
havin ’ ”), who offer a take-no-prisoners 
rendition of the little-known blues 
“Rocks in My Bed” (credited to El- 
lington but actually the work of Stray- 
horn). The story-telling deployment of 
Ellington-Strayhorn standards allows 
listeners to re-examine familiar tunes in 
unexpected contexts: “Fm Beginning 
to See the Light,” delivered as a hip- 


tfaat Shakespeare defines his characters 
in Twelfth Night’ in terms of high and 


in Twelfth Night’ in terms of high and 
low language and antics. Putting the two 
together just seemed a fine thing to do." 


Epps brought in the playwright Cheryl 
L. West to write the script. “Hay On!" 


had its debut in San Diego in September, 
and the positive reviews were the kind 
that boot regional successes toward 
Broadway. Audiences were particularly 
taken by the clever crossbreeding of 
Shakespeare's characters wife Elling- 
ton’s uptown universe. 

Viola was now Vy, an aspiring song- 
writer from “down home” in the South, 
so desperate to crack Harlem's rigidly 


to pass herself off as one of the guys — 
a far better pretext for the play's central 
cross-dressing conceit than any actually 
supplied in "Twelfth Night.” 


O RSINQ, the Duke of Illyria, 
had become simply Duke, an 
Ellington-like bandleader 
whom Vy yearns to meet and 
soon learns to love, while the Countess 
Olivia, as the object of the Duke’s af- 
fection, had been transformed into Lady 
Liv, a Harlem nightclub diva. Malvolio, 
much abused steward to Olivia, and 
Viola’s brother, Sebastian, destined 


play straight, with an incidental score of 
Ellington songs, at the Old Globe 
Theatre in San Diego, where Epps was 
an associate artist in residence in 1993. 

Gradually it occurred to him, though, 
to refurbish “Twelfth Night” as a Har- 


shaking howl of liberation by Rev, 
dressed in a yellow zoot suit, earishlv 


dressed in a yellow zoot suit, garishly 
modeled on Malvolio's yellow crossed- 
garters: ‘ 'Prelude to a Kiss," offered up 
by Vy and Duke as they tenderly and at 
last acknowledge their love. 


Barry Singer, the author of "Black and 
Blue: The Life and Lyrics of Andy Razed . " 
wrote this for The New York Times 


It’s Chinese, but Is It Tradition? 


'-niiHrsi;,, 


N 


By Paul Griffiths 

New York Tunes Service 


EW YORK — Last month, on 
the very day Deng Xiaoping's 
death was announced, some 
of us were at Carnegie HaJi 


name for a kind of flute, and that a 
number of xiaos. together with erhus, 
pipas, shengs and other Instruments, can 
make a kind of orchestra. 

We were learning, because here was 
something new to us; This concert by 
the National Traditional Orchestra of 
China, based in Beijing, was the first 
given by such a group on the Carnegie 
stage, though a similar ensemble from 
Hong Kong played at Alice Tally Hall 
last season. 

Orchestras of this sort are also pretty 
new to the world. In this respect, fee 
“traditional” in the Beijing outfit’s title 
should be understood as advertising 
rather than fact. The Carnegie program 
book, a masterpiece of prevarication, 
deftly eluded the question of how deep 
into tiie past the group can trace its his- 
tory. but fee answer seems to be "not 
far." 

The 1949 revolution precipitated an 
energetic effort to adapt Chinese tra- 
ditional melodies and instruments to 
Western norms, as understood by Soviet 
advisers. Before that period, Chinese 
culture was blissfully ignorant of the 


notion of orchestral performance, and 
though the idea rapidly took off in 
Taiwan and Hong Kong, one must re- 
gard the National Traditional Orchestra 
as an expression of that strange hybrid 
of patriotic and international cultural 
strategy typical of Communist states. It 
has about as much authenticity as the 
Red Army Choir. 

Indeed, one doesn't have todelve into 
origins to sniff an aesthetic problem 
here: It is enough to listen, and to look. 
The National Traditional Orchestra of 
China is. on fee face of it. so pre- 
posterous a parody of the Western or- 
chestra as to be. a little sad, a little 
charming. 

The musicians adopt every ritual of 
the philharmonic but two: They wear 
long silk robes, and they don't tune up, 
for the elementary reason that they don 't 
intend to play in tune. 

Their instruments, though based on 
Chinese prototypes, shamelessly take 
over functions from fee West. As in 
Vienna or Cleveland, the orchestra’s 


are among the few instruments without 
a clear Western counterpart. 

Then there’s the music. Perhaps the 
only evidence, still surviving of the 
Chinese-Soviet friendship of the early 
1950s is in the Russian flavor of the 
Chinese traditional” repertory, which 
seems to consist entirely of folk tunes 
haimonized and colored wife all the 
skills Rimsky-Korsakov knew-, of pic- 
ture postcards in the manner of Glinka ? 
and Borodin, and of symphonic poems 
as graphic as those of Tchaikovsky 
. Bul where those 19th-century Rus- 
sian composers were concerned wife fee 
exonc, here are people who really are 
Chinese making a musical portrait of 
themselves as outlandish. Weird. 


>nr 


W HAT listeners heard was 
Chinese chinoiserie. The 
pentatonic tunes, lively oe 
soulful, were no doubt 
iiom^gromi. as were the nasal sonorities! 
and fee sudden changes of rhythm. BuJ 
fee arrangements estranged all these 
> n feat sense fee National. 
Traditional Orchestra is as far from arty- 

Wilhfn ' rad ^!? 1 . as '• ,s Possible to be*. 1 
Wimm a tradition, people speak of! 
what is theirs, which fee^Sn tlSnc^- *■ 
toothers, whereas herean afcn ! 
orchestra, was dividing 

&^Z aK i 0WB - Usle n«s weJi 

askedjo gaze but not touch, or be! 


foundation is a large complement of 
strings, but wife erhus in different sizes 
instead of violins, violas, cellos and 
basses. Similarly, xiaos replace flutes 
and suonas stand in for oboes. 


Lacking an indigenous alternative, 
fee orchesrra finds its timpani in tim- 


pani. Shengs — portable organs played 
by means of a mouthpiece, including 
one instrument the size of a small tree 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1997 


PAGE II 




DN WEEK 


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For the first time, more than 
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‘Today’s Europeans 
think pragmatically, asking 
themselves: ‘Which single 
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my career or business? 
Which language is worth 
my investment in time and 
money?’ The answer is 
English and, to a lesser 
extent, German.” says 
Wolfgang Heuss. the 
Munich-based language 
instruction expert and head 
of the English department 
of the city's Sprachen und 
Dolmetscher Institut 
(Institute of Languages and 
Interpreting;. 

Value for money 
This pragmatism has led to 
an unusual phenomenon: 
Central and East Europeans 
are flocking to Munich, 
Vienna and other attractive, 
nearby Western European 
cities to learn English. “It's 
actually quite logical,” says 
Mr. Heuss. “Many of our 
new arrivals from the east 
already have a good work- 
ing knowledge of German, 
and German-style language 
instruction enjoys a reputa- 
tion for giving vaiue-for- 
money.” 

This view is confirmed 
by Rosie Marie Weineck, 
spokesperson for the Oster- 
reichisch-Amerikanische 
Gesellschaft (OAG). Lhe 
Vienna-based language 
school: "In Vienna, we’re 
also seeing a continuing 
influx of Central and East 
European adult learners. 
They’re here for entirely 
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need German and, if possi- 
ble, English, for their 
careers, and they go about 
learning the languages in a 
very businesslike way." 


As Ms. Weineck points 
out, this practical approach 
has been changing the 
nature of the classes offered 
by many language schools. 
“One of our newest offer- 
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Over the past few years, the 
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duced a wide range of 
courses leading to various 
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ficiency in "business 
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Attendance in such 
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Residents of these countnes 
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"When we started out in the 
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Among the prime benefi- 
ciaries of the rush into 
English have been the inter- 
national schools in 
Germany and Austria Most 
of them have English as 
their main language of 
instruction. “About 80 per- 
cent of our families are 
□on-German,” says Adele 
Hodgson, spokesperson for 
the Frankfurt International 
School. “Because these 
expatriate families come to 
the country with a back- 
ground or interacting in 
English, and because their 
ultimate future often does 
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guage area the families are 
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A paradox of German 
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foreign students are 
shunning the state univer- 
sities - and flocking to pri- 
vate institutions. The 
Ministry of Education 
reports that non-Germans 
now account for 8 percent 
of all students attending the 
country's institutes of high- 
er learning. But according 
to Cologne’s authoritative 
1WD (Institute der 
deutschen Wirtschaft) eco- 
nomic think-tank, some 
one-third of these “non- 
Germans” are in fact long- 
time residents of Germany 
who still hold foreign pass- 
ports. The actual number of 
true foreigners has been 
slowly declining over the 
past decades, particularly in 
such key areas as Asia and 
in such important sectors as 
the sciences and business 
administration. 

Hie state university sys- 
tem is criticized on several 
points. Periods of study are 
too long: the degrees 
received do not correspond 
to lhe bachelor’s degree, 
master’s degree and doctor- 
ate progression prevailing 
elsewhere; and the courses 
are in German, which is not 
a world language. 

T think it’s the anonymi- 
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that are the main problem , 
with our universities,’' says i 
Hanna Kneser, spokesper- 
son for Schule Biridehof, a 
private school in the Black 
Forest “Conversely, that 
explains the popularity of 
our private schools. In such 
schools as BirkJehof, class- 
es are small, standards are 
traditionally high, and 


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there’s a tremendous com- 
mitment to developing the 
skills of each student This 
sense of caring attracts stu- 
dents from as far away as 
Taiwan and Korea.” Her 
words are backed by the 
latest statistics, which show 
thar enrollments of Asian 
students in high schools 
and private universities in 
Germany and Austria are at 
an all-time high. 

“This anonymity does 
not have to be a permanent 
feature of our university 


system,” says Viktor 
Augustin, the Berlin-based 
expert on multicultural and 
multilingual education. He 
suggests launching “part- 
nership programs,” in 
which foreign students are 
“twinned” with locals cog- 
nizant of the former’s lan- 
guage and culture. Through 
this interpersonal contact, 
the foreigners learn 
German, get acquainted 
with tiie country's mores 
and customs - and make 
their initial friends. • 


“International Education in Germany and Austria” 
was produced in its entirety by the Advertising Department of 
the International Herald Tribune. Tomorrow’s Education Week 
section will cover “ International Education in Switzerland. ” 
Illustrations: Karen A. Sheckler-Wilson. 

Writer: Terry Swartzberg in Munich. 

Program director: Bill Mahder. 


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PAGE 12 




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PAGE 13 


Alcatel Plans Alliances 
If It Acquires Thomson 

Firm Returns to Profit After Restructuring 


German 10 -year government 
bond yields, in percent t. 


CtmrOtdbyOMrSuffFnan Dupacha 

PARIS — Alcatel Alsthom SA's 
chairman. Serge Tchuruk, said Tuesday 
he aimed to conclude deals with both 
Dsumler -®« 1Z Aerospace AG of Ger- 
many and General Electric Co. PLC of 

won ** ■*“« *» 

Mr. Tchuruk also said Alcatel was in 
separate talks to merge GEC Alsthom, 
its joint venture with General Electric, 
with the state-controlled nuclear power 
plant builder Framatome SA, in which it 
also has a stake. 

Mr. Tchuruk said those discussions 
were slow but moving ahead and could 
repilt in “much broader cooperation” 
with GEC. 

"Discussions are under way with 
GEC about GEC Alsthom concerning a 
larger area of cooperation than Fram- 
atome," he said. 

Regarding the bid for Thomson -CSF, 
Alcatel has joined with Dassault In- 
dustries to compete with Lagardere 
Groupe to buy a 58 percent stake in the 
defense-electronics concern from the 
French state. Candidates must apply by 
March 29, and the state is expected to 
name the winning bidder by June 30. 

Mr. Tchuruk said his bid with 
Dassault would also involve the state- 
owned aircraft builder Aerospatiale. 

“If we succeed in obtaining the 
deal,” he stud, “we would be very keen 
in building European cooperation. We 
have of course had discussions with 
DASA and GEC. That being said, the 
game is entirely open.” 

Alcatel Alsthom also said it returned 
to profit in 1996, with the help of pro- 
ceeds from asset sales, and said earnings 
would improve in the next few years as 
cost-cutting measures took effect 

The company, Europe's biggest 
maker of telecommunications equip- 
ment posted a net profit of 2.7 billion 
French francs ($4743 million), higher 
than its January forecast of 2.5 billion 
francs. That followed a loss of 25.6 
billion francs in 1995, when reorgan- 
ization charges led to one of the biggest 
losses in French corporate history. 

In Paris, Alcatel's shares closed at 667 
francs, up 54, or 8.8 percent 

The net profit figure includes a second- 
half profit of 237 billion francs, the com- 
ly said, reversing a restated first-half 
of 374 million francs. 


New orders rose 8 percent in 1996, to 
168.2 billion francs, with orders for 
telecommunications equipment jump- 
ing 21 percent. Sales rose to 162.1 bil- 
lion francs from 160.4 billion francs. 

The company said its board would 
propose a dividend of 10 francs a share, 
up from 8 francs for 1995. 

( Reuters . Bloomberg, AFX) 

■ Paris to SdQ More of Bull Stake 

The government will cut its stake in 
Compagnie des Machines Bull SA, 
France’s biggest computer maker, by 
nearly half, to 17 percent in the next few 
months, a Bull executive said, according 
to a Bloomberg News report 

The changes in Bull's capital struc- 
ture will be unveiled at the company's 
shareholders meeting March 27, said 
the executive, who asked not to be iden- 
tified. The state currently bolds 303 
percent of Bull, making it the largest 
shareholder. 



Bonn May Plead Costs 
Of Unity to Join EMU 

Bundesbank Hints at Support for Move 


.India I Uc/Kmlrn 


Finance Minister Theo Waigel displaying a euro medal Tuesday in Bonn. 


Prague Starts to Look West for Energy 


By Peter S. Green 

Special to the Herald Tribune 


PRAGUE — Defying what it called 
“political harassment” by Russia, the 
Czech Republic said Tuesday that it 
would sign a long-term gas-supply con- 
tract with a Norwegian energy consor- 
tium, breaking Russia’s stranglehold on 
its gas supplies. 

The Russian natural-gas monolith 
Gazprom anil still deliver the 9 billion 
cubic meters (318 billion cubic feet) of 
natural gas that Czechs burn each year, 
but two West European gas companies 
linke d to Gazprom failed to win a 15- 
year contract for an additional 3 billion 
cubic meters annually. 

Czech gas consumption is expected 
to rise as coal-burning power stations 
are phased out 

Trade and Industry Minister Vladi- 
mir Dlouhy said the agreement with 
Norway would make his country * ’stra- 
tegically independent from eventual 
possible Russian economic pressure.” 

The Czech announcement followed a 
political uproar over indications this 


week by Moscow's ambassador to 
Prague, Nikolai Ryabov, and the chair- 
man of Gazprom, Rem Vyakhirev, that 
Russia might stop buying Czech goods 
if Gazprom lost the contract. 

As the Czechs and other former So- 
viet satellites in Eastern Europe bid for 
membership in the Noth Atlantic 
Treaty Organization, local officials and 
Western diplomats are increasingly 
nervous about potential Russian oppo- 
sition to NATO expansion. 

Mr. Ryabov told Russia's NTV tele- 
vision news Sunday that if the Czechs 
joined NATO, “agreements funda- 
mental to the Czech Republic, such as 
gas deliveries and nuclear energy, cre- 
ate a basis for future problems that our 
countries would face.” 

Czech officials characterized Mr. Ry- 
abov’s statements as a threat 

“We consider it irresponsible to con- 
nect the expansion of NATO with bi- 
lateral relations and to threaten economic 
sanctions,” Foreign Minister Josef Zkl- 
eniec said. 

To try to diversify its energy sources, 
tire Czech Republic has already begun 


MEDIA MARKETS 


Europe’s Studios Take On Hollywood 


By Erik Ip sen 

International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — After decades of 
eking out a third-rate exist- 
ence in the shadow of the Hol- 
lywood studios, Europe's film 
and television producers are breaking 
into die big time. 

Jan Koerbelin. president of the en- 
tertainment division at Pro Sieben 
Television AG in Germany, cited In- 
ternational Business Machines Carp, 
recently as an analogy for Europe’s 
new competitive spirit 

“For years everyone said that it was 
impossible to compete with IBM,’ ’ he 
said, “and then all of a sudden IBM’s 
day was over, and people noticed that 
lo and behold, there were a lot of other 
gcod computer makers around.” 

Mr. Koerbelin and other Europeans 
now insist thar Hollywood’s hold on 
the world’s television screens and, to a 
lesser extent over global movie screens 
is beginning to wane. Even in Southern 
PaHm mi a. studio bosses have felt the 
first stirrings of the new tide. 

“In my opinion, Hollywood is com- 
ing awfully close to missing the in- 
ternational boat” Jeff Sagansky, the 
president of Sony Pictures Entertain- 
ment Inc., said in a speech 

What is more, he said that a handful of 

French, German and British media 
concerns, such as Knch Group rnGer- 
many, TF1 SA in France and Carlton 

Communications PLC. ‘ now 
firmly in charge of Europe s enter- 


tainment future.” That process has ad- 
vanced furthest in television produc- 
tion. “The old phenomenon of 
American television series appearing 
in British prime time is almost a thing 
of the past now," said Nigel Walmsley, 
chairman of Carlton Television. 

“A successful domestic program will 
consistently outdraw American series 
and get 40 to 50 percent of the view- 
ers.” 

Familiar faces, places and story lines 
account for some of the new European 
edge. A steady increase in the quality 
of those programs has also helped. 
Inspired by Hollywood, Europeans 
have edged away from their dialogue- 
heavy stage-inspired productions and 
have moved in me direction of faster- 
paced and more visual fare. 

“We are also using better-looking 
actors now,” said Mr. Koerbelin. 

The sheer proliferation of new out- 
lets for programs has also helped. Fif- 
teen years ago, shows like “Starsky & 
Hutch” and “Dallas” dominated TV 
ratings across Europe. Back then, most 
Europeans <mly had access to one or 
two state-owned stations. National 
markets have since been thrown open 
to a profusion of independent com- 
mercial stations, all hungry for new 
programs. 

‘*hi the last decade, French tele- 
vision production has grown to three or 
four times what h was,’ ’ said Stephane 
Sperry, executive vice president for 
programming at Canal Plus SA. That 
growth is still accelerating. Two years 


ago, for instance, both Kirch and 
Carlton produced 400 hours of original 
programming. This year, they will each 
produce 500 hours. 

This year, Carlton will spend £170 
million ($269.8 million) making pro- 
grams ranging from “Inspector 
Morse” to "BramwelL” a Victorian- 
era medical drama. Many of those will 
find their way to prime time slots on 
Britain's largest television channel, 
ITV, which will spend £800 million on 
programs tins year, £750 million of it 
for British-produced programs. 

“People prefer local productions,” 
said Ludvig Zusalm, head of inter- 
national production at Columbia 
Tristar, a subsidiary of Sony Corp., in 
Munich. "They want to see their own 
stories and their own actors.” 

Alone among the Hollywood stu- 
dios, Columbia Tristar has made it a 
top priority to give Europeans what 
they want. It began in 1992 by re- 
writing scripts of the American com- 
edy series “Who’s the Boss?” and 
remaking it in Britain under the title of 
“The Upper Hand.” 

Next, the studio took its concept of 
what the industry calls “format ad- 
aptations” to Ge 
German versions of evt 
“Maude” to “Married With Chil- 
dren.” When audiences and critics 
alike panned those efforts, Columbia 
began producing original German fare. 
The first offspring of that effort, a half- 

See TV, Page 17 


iy, producing 
erytning from 


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importing crude oil through Germany 
and will operate a new nuclear reactor 
with American fuel rods. 

Officials said the Czech Republic 
would buy ar least 3 billion cubic meters 
of gas a year for IS years from three 
Norwegian energy companies: Saga 
Petroleum A/S. Norsk Hydro A/S and 
Statoil A/S. Mr. Dlouhy said he ex- 
pected a preliminary contract to be ini- 
tialed before a meeting Wednesday with 
King Harald V of Norway, who is in 
Prague on a state visit. The two West 
European companies that did not win 
contracts — Nederlandse Gasnnie NV 
of the Netherlands and a joint venture of 
Gazprom and Winters hall AG. a sub- 
sidiary of BASF AG of Germany — are 
both partly supplied by Gazprom. 

Mr. Dlouhy said he did not expect any 
immediate retribution from Russia for 
signing a deal with Norway, but be said 
Prague was worried about being de- 
pendent on Russia in the long term. 

“If we take Ambassador Ryabov's 
words seriously,” be said, “we see this 
pressure is not only esoteric but is 
something real.” 


CanfxUd by Omr Sujf Fran Oispaxka 

FRANKFURT — The Bundesbank 
on Tuesday lent credence to an escape 
clause that could allow Germany to 
squeeze into Europe's single currency 
despite its high debt, but doubt remained 
as to whether Bonn would be able to cut 
back its public deficit in time to qualify 
for the euro. 

In its report for March, the Bundes- 
bank appeared to support the argument 
that Germany deserved special treatment 
because its total public debt had swollen 
beyond the Maastricht Treaty's limit for 
joining in monetary union rally because 
of the str ains of German unification. 

Separately, a Bundesbank council 
member, Klaus-Dieter Kuehbacher, ad- 
ded to the uncertainty by saying he 
doubted Germany would meet the cri- 
teria for monetary union. 

If it does not, he said, the only feasible 
course of action would be to delay the 
launch of the euro, now scheduled for 
1999. 

In unusually strong words for a mem- 
ber of the central bank, he said a delay of 
monetary union would be the only option 
if Germany did not strictly fulfill the 
Maastricht conditions. 

In an interview with Boerse Online 
magazine, Mr. Kuehbacher said he saw 
little chance that Bonn would be able to 
cut its budget deficit to 3 percent of 
gross domestic product as required by 
tiie treaty. 

His comments followed those by Fi- 
nance Minister Theo Waigel on 
Monday that pointed to an increasing 
realization in the government that Ger- 
many may not succeed in cutting its debt 
to the qualification limit far the euro. 

He suggested that “special factors" 
that may prevent Germany from meet- 
ing the debt limit should not bar it from 
entry into the single currency. 

Ibe prospects of either a delay to the 
project or a weaker monetary union sent 
German bond and currency markets into 
disarray. The Deutsche mark rose to a 
three-week high against the U.S. dollar, 
which fell to 1.6730 DM from 1,6910 
DM the day before. It also rose to a 
seven-week high of 84.975 Spanish pe- 
setas and a four-month high of 1,005.10 
Italian lire. German bond prices, on the 
other hand, fell to their low far the year. 
The yield on the 10-year benchmark 


Bund rose nearly four basis points. 

Talk of less stringent entry require- 
ments gave rise to fears the euro could 
prove weaker than the mark, which 
would devalue Bunds when the time 
came to convert them into euros. 

On Wednesday, Bunds could fall fur- 
ther with an expected improvement in 
tiie Ifo Institute’s index of West German 
business confidence in February. Fore- 
casts are that confidence rose to about 
93.8 index points from 93.3 points in 
December. 

Regarding the cost of unification, the 
Bundesbank said that it had been re- 
spond ble for more than half of tiie surge 
in total debt to 2.135 trillion DM ($1.3 
trillion) at the end of 1996 from 929 
billion DM in 1989. 

“The unique event of the unification 
of Germany, including the takeover of 
the state and trade liabilities of the 
former DDR. lies behind the swelling of 
public debt,” it said, referring to the 
German name for the old Communist 
East Germany. 

The Bundesbank comment came just 
a day after Mr. Waigel gained the as- 
surance of European Union finance 
minis ters in Brussels that Ge rman uni- 
fication had to be taken into account 
when assessing the fitness of Germany's 
debt books for monetary union. 

Under the Maastricht Treaty, gov- 
ernments must meet set targets on in- 
terest and exchange rates, inflation, 
public debt and budget deficits this year 
to qualify for the start of monetary union 
Jan. 1, 1999. 

Germany is struggling on both fiscal 
criteria, with its debt above the 
Maastricht-recommended maximum of 
60 percent of gross domestic product 
and its deficit set to total 2.9 percent of 
GDP in 1 997, just a whisker below the 3 
percent target 

With unemployment currently at re- 
cord levels, many independent econ- 
omists say foe 2.9 percent forecast looks 
ic, raising foe specter of 
ipe’s largest economy not making 
the grade for monetary union. 

Doubts exist even within the Bundes- 
bank itself, pouring fuel on financial- 
market speculation that Germany's fail- 
ure to qualify could lead to a delay in the 

See EURO, Page 14 


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PAGE 14 



THE AMERICAS 


1 


nvestor’s America 




■> y : 


The Dow 


30-Year T-Bond Yield 



5700 - 


- ; 635 — 


Dollar in Deutsche marks* Dollar in Yen 



1996 


1997 / 1996 







v - y »• • 


Qaraeaf •; feapffi ^.jeznsfj. 

Source: Bloomberg. Reuters 


Imcmnrtnnal Herald Tiflmne 


When E-mail Turns Poison-Pen 

Companies Face Bias Lawsuits Over Offensive Messages 

Frank Connolly, a professor of 
id information 


By Michelle Singletary 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The mes- 
sages regularly travel between 
computer screens at workplaces 
across the United States: Why beer 
is better than women. Ebonics 101. 
Top 10 reasons computers must be 
male. 

For many employees, electronic 
mail has evolved into a casual elec- 
tronic conversation complete with 
jokes and gossip — some of which 
could be deemed, particularly in 
the eyes of someone of a different 
race or sex. than the sender, as 
offensive. 

Employees typically assume 
their messages are private and will 
be seen only by the recipient. But 
because messages are routinely 
saved by companies, if they end up 
in the hands of someone for whom 
they were not intended, they ul- 


timately could be used against the 
employee and the company in a 
lawsuit 

In the past four months, throe 
major UJS. corporations — R-R. 
Donnelley & Sons Co., Morgan 
Stanley & Co. and Citicorp's Cit- 
ibank unit — have been sued by 
black employees alleging discrim- 
ination as a result of messages sent 
via e-mail. 

Lawyers and technology experts 
say they believe the suits are the 
beginning of a wave of litigation in 
which employees produce e-mail 
as evidence of sex, race or age 
discrimination. Lawyers searching 
for ways to prove or disprove dis- 
crimination also routinely are ask- 
ing companies to retrieve e-mail 
from their computer systems. 

“Employees have this expec- 
tation that e-mail is private, but it's 
not, and they don ’t understand that 
they can leave a footprint,” said 


computer science ant 
systems at American University in 
Washington. 

Electronic mail, ore-mail as it is 
commonly known, is used by 
nearly 80 percent of VS. orga- 
nizations, according to a survey 
released last yearby the Society for 
Human Resource Management 
but only 36 percent of organiza- 
tions that use e-mail have written 
policies addressing its use. 

Companies can be liable for 
their employees' discriminatory 
actions, experts say, because le- 
gally, e-mail sent from work is 
treated the same as any official 
record, such as a memo written on 
a company’s letterhead. 

Ultimately, the heightened con- 
cern about the liability generated by 
e-mail -messages will cause more 
employers to begin monitoring 
electronic mail, specialists predict. 


Fed Rate Jitters Take 
Toll on Blue-Chips 


Omf*aib}0*rSta£FnmDisfnaixi 

NEW YORK — VS. stocks fell 


its 


Very briefly: 


Northwest Is Talking With Airbus 

NEW YORK (AFX) — Northwest Airlines confirmed 
Tuesday that it was holding talks with Airbus Industrie on a 
possible order for jetliners. 

A spokesman, Jim Faulkner, said, ‘ ‘The only thing we can 
say at this stage is we are in talks. *’ He declined to estimate the 
value of any possible order or say how planes Northwest may 
be seeking to buy. Published reports said that Northwest had 
put in a tentative order for as many as 40 Airbus A-330 
jetliners valued at as much as $4.2 billion. 

TWA Posts a 4 th- Quarter Loss 

ST. LOUIS, Missouri (AP) — Trans World Airlines Inc. 
said Tuesday that it lost $258.6 million in the fourth quarter, 
partly because of poor decisions it made trying to rebuild the 
struggling airline. 

For 1996, TWA said it lost $284.8 million, compared with 
a loss of $227.5 million a year earlier, partly because of the 
crash of Flight 800 in July near New York and partly because 
of higher maintenance, crew and fuel costs. 

• Prudential Insurance Co. has put up for sale a portfolio of 
10 hotel properties valued at about $450 million, a source 
familiar with the situation said. 

• Lilly Industries Inc. will consolidate two California in- 
dustrial coatings plants to try to aid efficiency and cut costs. 

• Host Marriott Corp. agreed to buy Forum Group Inc., a 
retirement-community owner, from a Marriott Internation- 
al Inc. unit for $433 million plus the assumption of debt. 

• LG Electronics Inc. of South Korea will invest $1 billion 
through 2005 to enter Brazil's consumer-electronics and 
household-appliances markets. 

• HFS Inc. said it expected to take a second-quarter pretax 

charge of about $265 million for its pending $1.73 billion 
acquisition of PHH Corp. Bloomberg 


Shell and Texaco to Join U.S. Units 


Bloomberg News 

HOUSTON — Shell Oil Co. and 
Texaco Inc. said Tuesday they bad 
agreed to combine most of their 
refining and fuel sales operations in 
the Midwestern and Western states, 
creating a company with eight re- 
fineries and 11,200 convenience 
stores and service stations. 

In October, the two oil companies 
said they would combine their re- 
fining and fuel-retailing assets with 
those of Star Enterprise, a 50-50 


U.S.-based joint venture of Texaco 
and Saudi Aramco. Saudi Arabia’s 
government-owned oil company. 

Shell and Texaco said that while 
they had reached agreement on a 
merger of their assets, negotiations 
with the Saudis were continuing. 
The companies said they expected 
those ialks to lead to an accord in the 
second quarter. 

Shell, the U.S. unit of Royal 
Dutch/Shell Group, and Texaco de- 
clined to give the value of the new 


company, but estimates in October 
valued the combined Shell. Texaco 
and Saudi assets at S14.8 billion. 

The two oil companies said they 
would continue to seD gasoline un- 
der the Texaco and Shell brands. 

In late trading in New York. 
Texaco shares were down 37.5 cents 
at $101375, while Royal Dutch/ 
Shell was down $230 at $176.25. 

Under the agreement. Shell will 
own 56 percent of the new company 
and Texaco will own 44 percent. 


EURO: Bonn May Evoke Costs of Unity to Qualify for EMU 


Continued from Page 13 

1999 launch. Countries’ strict qual- 
ification for EMU, according to the 
letter of the treaty, is a major issue in 
Germany, where the strict applica- 
tion of the criteria has been firmly 
linked to the stability of tire future 
currency. 

Thus. Germany had up to now 
riven no hint that it could use uni- 
fication as an excuse to exceed the 
deficit target, even though a high 
debt burden clearly means high in- 
terest payments. 

On the contrary, Mr. Waigdmade 
dear in Brussels that this explan- 
ation only applied to the debt goal. 


“Three is three, but I have never 
commented on 60,” he said, refer- 
ring to the figures in the debt and 
deficit criteria. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg . AFP) 

I Yen Firms Against Dollar 

The dollar fell against the yen after 
Japan 1 s government said it would help 
ailing banks reduce their debt, increas- 
ing hopes for the nation's economy. 
Bloomberg News reported. 

Finance Minister Hiroshi Mitsu- 
zuka said his government would un- 
veil plans this month to help banks 
dispose of land they hold as collateral 
against bad debts. Traders said the 
plan could improve die health of 


Japan's financial institutions. 

“People were happy to buy yen,” 
said Chris Iggo, currency strategist 
for Barclays Bank. “The program 
showed that the government has got 
some plans to deal with the coun- 
try’s economic problems.'' 

The dollar was quoted at 4 P.M. in 
New York at 122425 yen, down 
from 123.735 yen the day before. 

The U.S. currency also fell 
against other European currencies in 
lme with its drop against the mark. It 
was quoted at 1.4385 Swiss francs, 
down from 1.4590 francs, and at 
5.6450 French francs, down from 
5.7040 francs. The pound rose to 
$1.5905 from SI .5887. 


Federal' Reserve would raise in- 
terest rates as soon as next week. 

First Chicago NBD Corp; and 
other bank stocks led the decline. 

* 'Some people may see this as the 
start of a big move in rates,’-' said 
Douglas Eby ,a money manager -at 
Robert E. Torray & Co. “The per- 
ception is, near terra, a Fed move is 
not good for stocks.” 

The Dow Jones industrial ' aver- 
age fell 58.92 points to 6,896.56. 
hurt by declines in Boeing, J.P. 
Morgan and DuPont. 

The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index 
dropped 6.05 to 789.66, dragged 
down by First Chicago, Nations- 
Bank and Bank-qf Boston. 

Declining issues outnumbered 
advancers by a 5-3 margin on the 
New York Stock Exchange. . . 

The Nasdaq composite index fell 
10.05 points to 1,269 .38. The index 
has fallen in five of the past six 
sessions and is down 8 percent from 
its Jan. 22 peak. 

Novell bucked the decline in 
software shares, tiring % to 9 7/16 
after naming Eric Schmidt chair- 
man and chief, executive. - Mr. 
Schmidt was chief technology of- 
ficer at Sun Microsystems, which 
closed lower. 

The yield on the benchmark 30- 
year Treasury bond was little 
changed at 6.96 percent after rising 
to 7.00 percent early in the session 
when the government reported that 
housing starts unexpectedly surged 
in February. 

The last time the Fed began a 
series of rate increases, on Feb. 4, 
1994, the Dow Jones industrials fell 
2.4 percent, its worst daily drop in 
two years. Doting the following two 
months, the average lost 9 percent. 

Money-center bank shares, 
which lost as much as 14 percent 
that spring, led the decline. When 
short-term rates rise, the cost of 
borrowing for banks rises as well. 

Shares of Micron Technology ex- 
tended their Monday drop, tumbling 
4% to 39% as the semiconductor 
company reported second-quarter 
profit that disappointed analysts. 

Quaker Oats fell amid specula- 
tion that the food and beverage 
company may have to take a write- 
down for its Snapple beverage unit 
sometime this year. 

HFS rose after the franchiser of 
hotels and real-estate brokerages 
said its first-quarter earnings would 
exceed analysts' expectations. The. 
company also said it expected to 
take a second-quarter pretax charge 


of about S265 jniUion 1 For 

pending acquisition of PnH. 

"News Corp.’s American depos- 
itary receipts fell after a report, that 
the Australian media company was 
negotiating to buy Point Cast fo e., 
which broadcasts information 
through the Internet. ■■■ 

Advama shares continued to rail 
after the financial services com- 
pany, facing a first-quarter loss 

U.S. STOCKS 


from bad credit card loans, said 
Monday that it may pur itself np for 
sale. 

Gateway 2000 and Dell Com- 
puter slumped after it was down- 
graded by Prudential Securities. 

Johnson & Johnson shares rose 
as the medical products maker said 
one of its subsidiaries had pur- 
chased 94 percent of the shares oui- 
afandmg of InnOtech- 

U.S . bonds were little changed as 
investors looked past a report show- 
ing an increase in home building for 
more clues to. whether the Federal 
Reserve would raise interest rales 
next week. - 

' That evidence may come as-soon 
as Wednesday, when the govern- 
ment delivers its February con- 
sumer price repeat, or on Thursday, 
whan Ffed Chairman Alan Green- 
span speaks about the economy to a 
congressional committee. 

' “It's a close call” on whether foe 
central bank will raise rates next 
week, said John Burgess, a funds 
manager at Bankers Trust Global 
Investment Management in New 
York. “I'm not a buyer, period, 
because I think the Fed's going to 
go,” he said. ’ 

Mr. Burgess said that higher Fed 
rates would hurt shorter-term se- 
curities more than bonds. 

Bond -yields have climbed 29 
basispoints in three weeks billow- 
ing concern that the Fed will raise 
raies to cool the economy and head 
off inflation. 

While price increases are not 
evident yet — the government last 
week said producer prices declined 
last month — strong growth may 
trigger a rise in the coining months, 
investors and economists said. 

More evidence of a robust econ- 
omy came Tuesday when the Com- 
mence Department said starts of 
new U.S. housing construction 
climbed 12.2 percent to an annual 
rate of 133 million in February. 

(Bloomberg, AP 1 


AMEX 


U. S. STOCK MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 


Tuesday's 4 P.M. Close 

The top 300 most ocfiw shores, 
up to the dosing an Wall Street 
The Associated Press. 


so® hi* low lms an* Indexes 


Dow Jones 



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May 97 24-65 2426 2444 + 0.17 XL 470 

AH 97 2104 2463 2100 + 0.90 29 J 90 

AU 097 2 S 30 24 BT 25 . H + 0.17 5.789 

Sep 97 7 S» 2495 2530 + 0.17 3395 

Oct 97 2530 2 KB 2533 MLOB 3.175 

Est.Mles NA Mar's. sales 31.788 
Man's Open ii* 106.571 off # 5 M 

SOYBEANS «W>n 
SJXntiu minim iyn-osnn Mr busM 
Mar 97 m 810 828 +7 UJ 70 

May 97 834 814 833 +| Sim 

MV 035 117 835 + 7 K 59,014 

AU 097 024 ft 0 OBft 024 +4 SJO> 

SeP 97 74 i 755 ft 763 + 2 ft 4483 

Est. soles NA Man's, ides HU 07 
MonrsDpenM 1 WL 826 aft 1492 

WHEAT ItBQTl 

S 40 a Pu mwmimv- obks per bushel 
Mflr 97 378 ft 374 375 — 1 V 4 172 

May 77 385 379 383 +2 27,245 

MV 376 ft 370 375 ft +116 41,114 

SeP 97 377 368 ft 377 + 4 ft 4257 

EsL sales NA Man's, stees 15.916 
AWsopenirt 77490 Off 65 


HigO Low Latest Choe OpM 

ORANGE JUKE tNCTN) 
l&aaobfi.-oenrsi>erb. 

May 97 8400 8233 8400 +Z 3 S 14656 

Jul 97 87 j 3 84 J 70 B 7 i 0 +150 W 05 

Sep 97 8850 0480 BJJO -005 3439 

Nov 97 5000 893) 9000 +050 1 JT 5 

ES. sates NA Man's. soles \jua 
Mai's open int 25,785 up 00 


Metals 

wxomcMX) 

100 tray asL- donors DCrtrnyoz. 

Mar 77 35280 35280 35280 +498 5 

Aar 97 39 L 4 Q 34430 3 S 0 .W ‘180 SWSO 

MOV 97 34080 347.50 347 J 0 -280 3 

Jun 97 35280 34880 35250 +180 33,92 

Aua 77 35480 ElAfl 35450 + 0 X 1 10,279 

0077 35440 3 S 4 J 0 35440 +050 5869 

Dec 97 35980 35650 3 S 9 JB -080 71 J 31 

Feb 90 36090 359.00 3 MLOO -180 5 J 00 

ES.SDtes 70800 Mon’s. sates 42 J 74 
Man's open int 147,152 ua 538 

« GRADE OVPBt OKMX) 

24000 lbs.- cents Dsrb. 

MOT 97 11280 IttJD 11240 - 4 L 20 4111 

Afic 97 11090 109841 10980 -085 3.945 

Mov 97 110.10 10 BL 70 108-70 -095 34817 

Ain 97 107.90 10780 10780 -BJ 5 1817 

JulTt 10780 105 JU 10580 -085 7,957 

Aug 97 105115 474 

Sep 97 10450 UQJ 0 llttM -040 38 U 

Od 97 102 JB 0 613 

Nov 97 10223 601 


Hlgii Low Latest Chga OpM 

10 -YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS tMATlF) 
FF 500800 - pts Of 100 pet 
Mar 97 128.16 1278 B 12788—0801586727 
Jun 97 12430 126.10 12632—080 1853 
Sep 97 9580 9580 9402 — 080 0 

Eat. volume: 282842 . Open inti 174930 up 
10838 . 

ITALIAN OOVBMMENT BOND CLfFFE} 

m.2oo fflan - pts a ioo pd 
JIM 77 12474 12360 12417 - 0 . 1 81 DM 86 
Sep 97 12380 12380 17422 —MB 1606 
EmsoteK 81831 Pres. sates NU 99 
pTW.Bpenitec 11 U 92 up X3B4 

EURODOLLARS {CMBR) 

SI mHSm-Pts of HD PCL 
Mar DO 9386 9381 9185 +081 42,922 

JunOB 9382 9296 9380 *081 3&290 

Sep 00 9298 9282 92 M +081 34121 

DKOO 9290 9285 9208 +081 7?M 

Mar 01 9210 9285 928 B +081 25867 

JunOI 9204 9200 9283 +081 20812 

Sep® 9280 92 J 5 9 U 9 +081 12 J 57 

DK 01 9272 9280 9271 +081 HUM 

Mar 02 9222 9260 9271 + 08 « &M1 

JUR 02 91 ® 9261 9266 +201 5 JM 

Sep 07 9263 9259 9282 +081 5870 

Dec 02 92 S 9254 9254 +081 5,774 


Mgli Law Latest Owe Opfatf 


Industrials 


COTTON 2 INCTN) 
SIMM Bjs.- awns iwb 
May 97 7470 2385 

Art 97 7585 75.15 

0097 7630 7535 
Dec 97 7670 7680 
Mn-98 77.15 7780 
Mav 98 


7332 

7530 

7680 

7415 

7780 

78.10 


— 4 L 99 31,950 
—035 15379 
-080 1313 
-045 20,900 
—040 W, 
M7 


May 97 5458 
An 97 5460 
Art 97 5780 
AW 97 5485 
Sep 97 080 
Oct 97 5160 
Nw 97 5840 
DBC 97 4080 
JOT 98 5240 


EsL sales 8808 Man's, sates 0836 
Man's open int 9»830 is 94 

5B-VBZ (NCMX) 

5800 Pay at- cents per troy ol 
M ar?} S218B 51050 51480 
APT 97 52180 

May 92 52450 51180 5ia5Q 
All 97 52980 51780 SM80 

SeP 97 53180 52380 52780 
Dec 97 5480 52880 51780 
JOT 98 51430 

Mtr 98 549 JO 


—630 301 

3 

-430 < 1,240 
-481 13,130 
-470 3 JJ 1 
-430 5,190 

13 
4355 


11800 


1507 1530 

SI s 

57 « 5744 

30 66 

71 151 


Today Pres. 

** COBS. 

46780 59047 

1989 2490 

50189 88085 


Dividends 

Company Per Ami Rec Pay 

IRREGULAR 

Advest Grow - 83 MI 4 -t 5 

Akzo Nobel NV b 186 4-28 5-19 

ItUmmentarlum b 8325 *-1 *-11 

PlUdentl Uttl A - ZQ 2 3-21 3-26 

Prvdentl lllll 8 . C 182 3-21 3-26 

c- also payable an dass Ci 
PrudentUlSZ - 209 3-21 

Toyota Motor b .164 3-28 

STOCK SPLIT 
Gen Electric 2 tar 1 spat. 

Getty Pteiai 1 stupe of Getty Petroleum Mar- 
KeKna tar each ttnre held. 

Second Bncp 2 fbr 1 spltr. 

Textron Inc 2 for 1 sprit. 

Trinity IruttJdB at a share of Hatter Marine 
Group tor eodi share he«. 

STOCK 

ESELCOlnc - 3 % 5-1 5-15 

INCREASED 


Company 


Per Amt Rec Pay 

A 428 3-27 
a -4475 3-28 
Q 24 4-3® 

Q 87 3-31 
O .12 3-21 
Q 29 4-11 
INITIAL 
b .0801 
SPECIAL 

GranteCansnya - .12 3-31 


Revenue Prom 

SBCCommun 
5 econdBncp 
Uni- Select a 
Yort Inti 
Zwfdg Fund 


3.26 SmectAppolfd 


4- 1 

5 - 1 
5-1 

4-18 

3 - 28 

4 - 25 


4-1 5-16 


New Engknd Inv ^ 


REGUl 


Camden Prop Tr 
Chape Manhattan 
ESELCOlnc 
EutauJa Bncp 
GtAHansk&Pac 

LRtW Falls Bncp 
Magna inti Ad 
PABBtahrs 
PMC Coramd Tr 
Poc Tetesfc 


0 49 Ml 

O 8 D 

9 38 5-1 

0 8525 3-31 

O .10 4-11 

. 83 3-31 

O 30 3-31 

Q 88 3-31 

0 rtOUl 
0 3275 3-28 


4- 1 

4- 30 

5- 15 
4-15 

5- 1 
5-1 

4-15 

4-15 

4*14 

5-1 


AmGnHaspOaBty 
Bay Apartm en t 
BeaunContral 
CIGNA Ht income 
CPU Inc 
FNBFtad 
Global HimeoDUr 

MerDrost Fetfl 

New England Inv 
PaitraleHn 
Peridra Family 
Portland Gen 

PUnzerPttefisti 
SiT Bancorp 
STO Products 
Tronsamer income 


OATS 4-15 
0 A\ 3-31 
Q .105 3-31 
M 8675 3-27 
Q 34 3-31 
.16 3-17 
.106 3-24 
-175 3-31 
-S 3 3-31 
.13 331 
325 3-31 
32 3- 25 
.13 4-7 

.25 4-1 

.17 4-11 
.16 3-31 


4- 18 

5- 15 

4-30 

4-14 

4-14 

4-10 

4-18 

3-31 

3- 31 

4- 10 

5- 15 

4- 23 

5 - 15 

4- J5 

5- 1 
4-25 
4-25 
4-15 


Livestock 

CATTLE (CMS?) 

40860 etk- cents ffer b. 

Apr 97 6932 UJS 6635 -JL 72 3 L 747 

Am 97 6487 MS) 6480 -025 26870 

Aug 97 4365 6335 4235 -087 21348 

Od 97 6727 6780 67.10 15.196 

Dec 97 6962 68.97 6937 +022 7387 

Feb 90 7060 70.10 7050 +020 1208 

EsLsdes 1 X 4 M Man’s. scfcs 9820 
Man's open int 109,963 up 1022 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMER 1 
6 UI 0 Obi-CBr*sperb, 

Mir 97 68 - 9 ) 68.10 6827 +027 2816 

Apr 97 6865 6785 6820 + 055 3.951 

May 97 69.15 6065 *090 +030 5894 

AU 097 7260 7185 7220 + 062 5877 

Sea 97 7287 7267 7220 +062 1868 

OQ 97 73 JO 7335 7135 +025 1146 

Est. sales 2809 Man’s, sales 2386 
JUan^ open Inf 22809 aft 380 

HOGS-Lem ICMERI 

AM Ss.- cates per er. 

Aar 97 7035 69.10 09.10 —127 H 802 

Jun 97 77.55 76-50 76.57 -ILH 1225 ) 

Art 97 7632 7135 7 S 20 -092 2868 

Auo 97 72 J 0 71.40 7160 -022 llg 

Oct 97 66.15 6520 6585 -232 1655 

Dec 97 64.15 6180 6090 -065 910 

Est soles 7280 Man's, sates 7,171 
fton'sapenmt 1(801 off 480 

PORK BELLIES (CMER) 

40800 ce«s Per IL 

Mir 97 7780 75.00 7080 —122 120 

May 97 7740 7522 7032 -280 4 JM 

Art 97 7725 7480 7520 —180 1671 

Aug 91 M 20 7121 7233 -*» 5 fl 

Feb 98 7140 71 JO 7149 +020 37 

Mar 90 7130 1 

EsLstees 3 J 4 S Man’s. stees 2,140 
Man's open Enl rj? B up 259 


-460 15,912 


3871 

2-m 

1,137 


EsL scries NA Man's, sales 
Awn's open «n l off 93090 

PLATBRJM (NMER) 

50 irnv ae.- daBart oar tray oe. 

Apr 97 300.90 37380 37180 
Mffy 97 38M 

Art 97 39360 3754D 37L00 -560 
0(297 38100 37H49 37840 -76Q 
Jail 9B 382-5-.' 382JB 38240 -460 
EsL sales NA Alai's, series 1699 
Man's open Int 23363 ail 1510 

dose Previous 

LONDON METALS (LME) 

Doflats per metric ton 
jUMBtaun (High Grad#) 

Soot 1412JM 161380 1637ft 1638ft 

Forward 164780 1648.08 167280 167380 

Copper Canwdes WMtGrudro 
Spot 2385.00 238780 2«080 240280 

Fonronl 234280 234380 235380 235480 

liNPflt 

Spat 70880 70980 70880 70980 SoaflOO - pts ot 1 C.-:,k3 " 

Farinmi 70180 70280 70480 705.00 Ma97 9325 90-73 

Nfctort 

^want 
Tin 


EsL sates NA Man’s, sales 515877 
Mot'swotW 2434615 up 3*465 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) 

Utetemundte S pw mdid 
Am 97 14 B 90 14838 1 JB 74 37699 

Sea 97 14 B 56 14820 14855 1470 

Dec 97 14816 U 

Est. sales NA Man’s, sales 12430 
Mart's open int 628 » ite UfS 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMBU 
100800 doAn. s per COT. ter 
Am 97 .7347 7316 .7327 566*8 

Sep 97 J 375 JX& J 370 4,201 

Dec 97 2418 7395 2408 904 

Mte-ta 7457 566 

EsLsdes NA Man's. sates 71,140 
Mon'sopenint 71951 UP 2390 

GSSMAN MARX (CMER) 

1 13800 moms, s per mart 
Am 97 6016 4935 6006 

Sep 97 6051 4057 6050 

Doc 97 6070 6 D 70 6070 

Est. soles NA Mon's. Wfcs 37.902 

Mon’sopenint 111.137 off «49 


6*831 

2rC0 

125 


JAPAIC5EYEN (CMBU 
IIS mMon van, s per 14)0 yen 
Am 97 ATM 6170 6264 

Sen 97 JWC6 6365 6376 

Dec97 AM MS JM 
Est. soles NA Mon's, soles 19^5 
Mart’s open kit 89406 off 2S20 

SmSSFSANCfCMBU 
1TS8H turns. S o*r tronc 

Am 97 jm jm Jtm 

Sep 97 JD90 7036 JO 75 
Dec 97 7152 7115 7152 

Est soles NA Men's, soles 14825 
Mon's amen int 57778 oil 1310 

MWNTH STERUN* CUFFS 


61897 

783 

195 


39 JM 
1.939 
256 


782080 783080 771080 7 * 20.00 
773080 774080 803080 803580 


Jim 97 

S«p97 

D«y7 


spot 600080 601080 603580 
Forward 599080 600080 606080 
Ztac(5pectalHWi Grade) 

Spot 126380 127080 1275 ft 
Forward 


1276ft 

129280 129380 127680 129780 

High Law dose Chge OpM 


Junta 

Septa 

Decta 

Mata 

Junta 

Septa 

Dec» 


9 X 52 

9380 

9110 

92.94 

9263 

9271 

9261 

9244 


9249 


9269 

9277 

9266 

9247 

9250 

•HJO 


9374 UfKlL 78244 
9340 —OBI 131243 
9127 — OLCe 882174 
9306 —084 6 U 67 
9240 —006 4563 ] 
92.77 —006 36.922 
9266 -OD 7 22965 
9247 - 086 19720 
9250 — D 66 11622 


Est. stees NA Mar's, sates 5,990 
Man's open H 72206 off 000 
HbATWGQILQIMEB} 

42600 0O, oanra IV ate 
Apr 97 5L5S 5020 56.15 

5631 56.15 

5466 5670 
5561 5680 

5660 5665 
5780 58.00 

5770 5860 

5880 5860 
5860 6080 
50.95 5980 ... 

EsL sales NA Man's, sates 20.984 
Mon'sopenint 124603 off 713 
LIGHT SWEET CRUDE {NMER) 
lAOOUbL- OTOannw triri. 

Apr 77 2160 2064 2160 

May 97 2178 2079 2170 

Am 97 2160 a/2 2143 
Art 97 2185 MAS 2IJ8 
AUB97 2164 2043 2184 
SOT 97 2T.15 205f» 2184 

Od 97 20.95 ZL75 2065 
Now 97 2065 2087 M 
DBC 97 2068 2034 3tB5 

Am 98 2065 2080 2061 
Feb 98 2080 2080 2080 
Mar 98 5085 2035 20.45 

Apr 98 2035 2035 2085 
EsLh*s NA Mon's, sates 
Mon'sopenint 413615 of) 4629 
NATURAL GAS (HMB» 

MLOta mm Mu's, s per mm Mu 
Apr 97 I TIP 1670 1J>?0 

MOT 97 1.945 1610 ’ 

Am 97 1600 LM) 

JU1 97 1,985 I960 

AutV 1.99S 1.910 

S«P £7 1695 1665 

Od97 2610 1690 

Now 97 2140 11» 

Dec 97 2250 2730 

JOT 98 2290 1269 

F«b 78 2215 2200 

Est- sates NA Man's, sales 3&95* 

Man's open M 101.274 up 944 
UM-E40ED GASOLINE {NMERJ 
fWtawri, owns pgr ate 

Apr 97 6785 6110 6775 +169 mju 

MOV97 67.10 6471 66.90 +264 XJV0 

g|S + 169 I7J91 
-147 74*9 

® 3 - 4 ® jQ 4M7 

+M2 SS 

Man's open'w' 9330 “OT^aJ 9,0 ® 5 
GASOIL (1PE) 

U 6 . doflars per mOTk km - lots of Too fans 

Art 97 17240 16975 172iW +1.B ^79 
May 97 17340 17U.7S 17X2S +1 4s 
jwV 17400 17125 174M tljo iSS 
-Jut 97 17500 17300 17565 +200 iSo 

zwiB&vssi}* .iS 

1-50 713 


1.935 

1.960 

T.97S 

1.985 

1.995 

2010 

2.130 

ISO 

2290' 

2615 


AmW 6630 6410 

-All 97 65.10 6360 

AU 997 43.70 42.10 

Sep 97 tun 6080 . 


+165 3IL566 
+ 169 24.154 

♦ T84 12579 

+1JM 0745 
+ 164 7656 
+189 5,186 

♦ IJ9 5.720 
-174 4864 
+IJ9 1914 
+064 46M 


+068 4058 
+065 05404 
+<L74 SUM 
+ 0 L 7 D 26652 
+ 066 17,977 
+043 0898 
+060 15,933 
+046 12056 
+041 27,110 
+ 0 JB 14,997 
+ 0.12 0.172 
+020 3802 
+ 0.13 3636 
69813 


2JJU 

VMS 

13801 

11472 

9886 

9.120 

MUM 

5601 

MM 23 

MW 1 I 

4629 


> 


Nov 97 17650 17840 18025 


IBlS 17940 Jig 


sJte OT'APR? 9 -pgyrfric in OmocBan tondy 
n+rooalalftq+jeiteleflyji-seaUwtmJ 


Food 


Sto ck Tob ies Explained 

wwK, wAnwinebtestbDd&ig day. WheroospfllorstoAtflvidarKlinTiouniing 10 25 percent or more 

Men paid, the yean Hgf+faw ronge anddvidaid ore shown tar the new stocks (**. Unless 
wiWH 5 tiiic^ia»tffdMdewdstMa^^ 

a - dhrfdend oteo extra ft), ft . annual rate of tflvWwid plus stock fivideiKL c - Dquidaflno 
dMden^- PEeraeds WaM ■ colteid. new yaoriy l«», «- lessin H« tatt 12 lwmms. 
e -dwidan d declared or paid In precmflng 72 mantfis. f ■ annual rata. Increased on last 
dettaroflon. g - dividend in Canadian lunds, subject to 1 S% MR-msidence fax. I - dMdend 
dectaredafttasptt-up or stodc ffluYtand-l - OMdend peta mis year, omitted, deterred, or no 
octal taen at West dividend meellng. k - dividend declared or ptrtd mis rear, an 
occutnuwftve issue nrffli cUvhJends In arreats. n - annual iota reduced an lost dedantiaa 
n • new issue in the post 52 weeks. The high- low range begins wfffi the start of trod ma. 
wr-newday drilvery. p - fnrtku dhrtdend. annual rale unknown. P/E - priefreanrinqs ratio. 
q-CMSed+endiiwtuMtaRd-T-dtetaeMdettoredorpoM in precedtaQ'iZTnomhs, ptas stack 
dtektexl. s - stock spilt. Dividend begin with data of spBt. sis - sales, t • dividend paid In 
stack in preceding 12 months, estimated cash wrtue on ex-dMdend or ex-dlslribution dote, 
u-nenyc^raght-tnidtrig trailed, yl-inbankrophY or recelvetslilp or being redr^anired 
under the Bonknipicy Actor securities assumed by such companies, wd- when distributed, 
wi - when issued/ WW - wffll warrants. * - ex-dMdend ar es-riqhls, MRS • en-tfistribution. 

nr - without worrenta, y- «-dMdend ondsoles in ftiiLyM- yield, i- soles to fuH. 


COCOA mCSE) 


May 97 

las 

1446 

1460 

-22 

37855 

Art 97 

l »9 

1475 

1*7 

-17 

70,961 

SOT 97 

1575 

190 

1512 

-13 

11 , 47 / 

Dec 97 

IS* 

1520 

159 

-IB 

Ml* 

Mar 90 

1570 

1551 

155 < 

+22 

1 L 370 


ESt. soles 9J79 Mon's, sales 11809 
Mon's otwnirri 90L781 up 2318 

COPMECINCSE) 

37.5D0 IK -oenn. per Ri. 

Mar 97 32060 19340 20961 M155 K 

MOV 97 114.75 U400 M0J0 +015 20847 

JW 97 16160 15260 ISSiO -IJ5 7,920 

Sec 91 151.03 14135 1443S —145 WHS 

Est sales 15.142 Man's scria 1760 
Mart's open W »1«5 off 920 

SUGAR-WORLD II (NCSE) 

1 12600 Bte- amts oer Ri 
Mov 97 10.93 10 M I 860 45.993 

Art 97 1666 10 » 5 fi Stt 

OtSW 1051 1053 J 0 » —004 BM 2 

Mar 90 HLS 9 IOS HLS 7 -063 0655 

Est sales i.»Mii«W 
Mon’s open iirt M 3605 off 100 B 7 M 


Financial 

115 T.BAJL 5 
»i moaon- Disot lHBct. 

Mo -97 9464 9 CB 3 W 63 -061 2 . MS 

Am 97 94 J 1 HM 94 J 1 560 

SeoV M 86 9184 9466 -061 2 J 25 

■ Dec 97 9480 047 

ESLiates NA Morr^. sates 1671 
Man's open ii* 9800 off 112 

5 YIL TREASURY (CBOT) 

naiun res AMtitsoMBBoa 

Mar 97 105-31 705-22 105-50 11427 

AmV 7 105-14 104-40 TOS-tl —01 2 M.W 2 

Septa ' 04-00 3 

Est soles NA *WS. Seles « 47 I 
Mon's open W 221622 up 1223 

10 YH. TREASURY iCBOT) 

SI 00 JI 00 POT- PfS & 3 Mds at 100 Pet 
Mr 97 107-13 107-06 107-10 -Ot 39,937 

Junta 106-25 186-13 106-22 189,951 

Sep 97 106-05 106-40 10644 -02 88 » 

Ettsotes NA Mart's. sates 99651 
Mon's open Int 329 . 3*8 up 765 

US TREASURY BONDS (OWT) 
la pa- 5 iaunHOT a XMs oi reoptei 
Mar 97109-14 108-27 10 MB 64674 

Am 77 I 0 B-W 100-00 10 B -25 t 01 414654 

senta 106-14 106-06 100-1! 

DBC 97 107-28 107 - 
Est stees na 

Mon'nsrentn SIOJW oft 5561 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND CUFFS) 
OM 250000 -pbonOO|lCt 

9*29 W.lri -IL 3 B 706 
e* Men VHIgl £"*■*&* 
piM.apaakl: 22 U 37 eft ATM 

LONG GOT (UFK) 

JUR 97 110-16 110-01 11 MS -M 7 179867 
Septa N.T. N.T. ! 0 *- 22-047 0 

Ed sfaw 6T6M Prtv.iteeK 90 M 
Fre*. open InL 206855 up *703 


ES-SateK T 730 T. Pte.ntt^wns 


Prev.c 


>HJ 524808 


3-MONTK EUROMARK fUTTE) 

DM1 n>%m-ateBl 100 pel 
Ha 166868 

falta 96.71 9 iAS 96.72 Uod 8843 

Mfafta 9171 9 fc 71 9671 UlKtl 1039 

Junta 9689 9685 9687 UnteL 214867 

Septa 9 t 5 B 9430 9656 + 101 182,249 

DKta 9 AJ 8 WJ 3 9636 -Ml 187.313 

Marta 96.19 96.14 9616 - 0.01 14 Q 38 S 

Junta 9 S .98 9587 95.93 — 084 12031 * 

septa 9075 9589 95,70 -085 B &975 

Decta 9588 9582 9584 -084 78^58 

44 am 9 M 3 95.14 9520 -083 52091 

Junta 9499 94.95 94.96 - 004 27837 

VW 99 94 A 7 9*3* — 003 3*613 

.*481 9482 —083 27,367 

EA sates 248 * 8 . Pirn, sates 224 ros 
Prev.apeaku U 29816 up 29,178 

JJrtOttTH PIBOR [MATlFI 


«*»s: 7 J 09 . Open 64^1 ud 977 . 
BRENT OIL UPE 3 M,pW 

US. l»r borra - lots ot 1.000 borteh 

May 97 2080 1 PJ 8 2D2S 
■tone W 3031 WJ 31 20^1 +073 
Jl»ly 97 20.19 1927 XlDO to 87 

S?»! 3 SSi I 
U & 32 

sates: 42,29 5. Open (nf_- 154,9330ft 
Stock Indexes 

SBPOOMP. MDEX (CMER) 
fiWxliwteK 


to**! 2820 791.35 79280 -J.M n«u 

easugn 

_ — FTSerMOlFFE) 

Decw 9680 9426 9428 — oS 34005 S£? n, SlK w 

HsIsIslEEiS 

Dec 98 9 S 81 95 J 6 95 J 8 -SS 
Mar 99 95.37 «J2 w 3 -oS liili 
JU 0 99 95.12 95.10 95 . 10 -088 


FF5 mffllon ■ pts of 100 pd 

Jim 97 9452 9446 9450 — 
Septa 9441 4437 9438 — 


082 71839 
084 44130 


N.T N.T «406O 
gA sates 28,954 Prw. soles: 

ffrey.upwhiL- 7U74 Tw"® 

CAC 48 tMATlF] 

PFJOOi'" 


31101 

M04 


K! t* »P 99 9489 948? 9488 -Em £«? ^OOper index point 


2 & 602 . 




^MO WTH E UBOLIM lUFFE] 

lTLI.MOten-plftelBppd 


Mwswra 
Junta 92A6 
5«*7 9087 

Decta 93.15 
Atota VI 1 4 
j Wjj 93.12 
aww W04 
oeae tin 

«MI99 92.96 


JJM 9 ZJ 2 -ato 11740 

S-? 3 taAO —0.10 31009 
9380 -0.10 S(§J 

—0.15 148(4 


9195 
7291 

J2.91 9289 -ffii 

ta.93 9287 — 007 
. ■ 9l|o 9281 —049 
I*”** y.-A^-.PniV. MUllg 76J70 
WWW; 306681 bp I44n 


Moodys 

Reuters 

pj.Futum 

CRB 


Commotln y Irmexes 
dose 

J. 545.90 
V*MJ0 

154.15 
244 J4 




PrevJqws 

1 -S 549 U 

1 , 997.10 

15432 

344.11 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1997 


PAGE 15 



European Carmakers Struggle in Flooded Market 

What Now fo r Volvo , After Chiefs Death? 


f 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Hera ld Tribune 

LONDON A turbulent chapter 
m the history of Volvo AB, Sweden’s 
iargesf carmaker, came to an end 
Tuesday with the death of Bert-Olof 
Svanholm, the so-called safe pair of 
hands chosen to succeed the com- 
^ny’s legendary chairman Pefar 
Oyllenhammar in January 1994. 

The handover followed the col- 
-lapse a month earlier of Volvo’s 
planned merger with Renault SA of 
France and the subsequent ouster of 
the Swedish company’s entire board. 

Since that time Volvo has not 
only held on to its independence but 
also sold off vast industrial interests 
-to concentrate on cars and trucks 

In January, the first possible 
•break m that strategy came with the 
! unexpected resignation of Volvo’s 
.chief executive, Soeren Gyll, the 
leading advocate of the company’s 
go-it-alone approach. 

Significantly, he was replaced by 
_a man from outside the auto in- 
dustry, Leif Johansson, the chief ex- 
‘eeutive of Electrolux AB, the 
world’s largest producer of large 


household appliances. 

Mr. Svanholm, who died of nat- 
ural causes, is expected to be re- 
placed at a Volvo board meeting 
Wednesday. Until early last year, he 
tod devoted most of his rime to Asea 
Brown Boveri Sweden, the Swedish 
arm of the Swjss-Swedish engineer- 
ing group, where he was chief ex- 
ecutive officer until that time. 

At Volvo he was a nonexecutive 
chairman, a reduced role that rep- 
resented an intentional break from 
the era of Mr. Gyllenhaminar. 

Still widely seen as too small to 
survive, producing just 350.000 cars 
last year, Volvo will shortly have 
two new leaders to sort out a pos- 
sible new direction for the company. 
With $2.1 billion in cash on its bal- 
ance sheet, pressure for a quick 
change in direction is absent 

But with West European auto- 
making capacity estimated to be far 
greater than the 12 million vehicles 
currently sold in the region annu- 
ally, the future looks threatening for 
a s m a lli sh independent with 60 per- 
cent of its production in hij 1 



mobile AB succumbed to similar 
pressures, selling half of its shares to 
General Motors Corp. 

■ Audi Expects Profit to Rise 

Audi AG. die luxury-car unit of 
Volkswagen AG, said it expected net 
profit to rise again this year after 
nearly tripling in 1996, amid strong 
demand for its A3 compact and A4 
sedan models. Bloomberg News re- 
ported from Munich. 

In the first two months of 1997, 
sales rose 15 percent, to 33 billion 
Deutsche marks ($1.95 billion). 
Continued robust sales of the A4 
and A3 models as well as strong 
demand for Audi’s new A6 luxury 
sedan and a weaker mark will boost 
sales and profit in 1997, Audi said. 

“All in all, we will do slightly 
better than the market,” with sales 
expected to exceed 20 billion DM 
this year, said Franz-Josef Paefgen, 
the management board member who 
will become chief executive in July. 

Audi said 1996 net profit rose 172 
percent, to 302 milli on DM from 1 1 1 
million a year earlier. Pretax profit 
rose 46 percent, to 862 million DM 
from 589 million DM. 


Ford Seeks More Cost Cuts 

: probl 
decisi 


koodoo fcaria 

hDAX ' • !^S£ tOp Index CAQfp 


Bloomberg News 

LONDON — It is easy to get a 
seal these days at the Orient, the pub 
across the street from Ford Motor 
Co.’s Halewood auto factory. 

The pub, which has served work- 
ers from the plant near Liverpool 
since it opened three decades ago. 
used to pack in a crowd of more than 
200 at a time. But then Ford focused 
its cost-cutting plans on the car and 
van factory, and the gloom set in. In 
February, unions agreed to cutabout 

1 .000 of the remaining 4,000 jobs. In 
its early days, the plant employed 

14.000 people. 

“If this goes through, a lot of 
people will move out,” said Mike 
Kelly, the pub's landlord. 

The gloom at the Orient may 
spread elsewhere in Europe, most 
likely to Ford’s Cologne plant. 
Labor leaders, industry analysts and 
Ford executives say the company 
must take drastic measures to re- 
bound from a $291 million loss last 
year in Europe. 

“There is a need to improve our 
cost base in Europe, and that need is 
pressing, ’ ’ Jacques Nasser, president 
of worldwide auto operations, said. 


* Novartis Sees Growth 
After Charge for Merger 


. OmpUedtn Our Staff FnwnDupasdtn 

, BASEL — Novartis AG reported 
Tuesday that net income rose 2 per- 
.cent before exceptional charges in 
• 1996 and said it was poised to 
achieve higher growth as it inte- 
. grated post-merger operations.. 

The pharmaceutical company, 
.which was formed in a stock-swap 
merger of the Swiss rivals Ciba- 
Geigy AG and Sandoz AG last 
December, said net income rose to 
4.17 billion Swiss francs ($2.86 bil- 
lion) in 1996. from 4.09 billion francs 
;in 1995. Including the expected one- 
‘time 1.9 billion francs charge fra* the 
costs of the merger, Novartis said, net 
'profit fell 453 percent last year, to 
<2.3 billion francs. 

‘ The company, which is the 
world’s second-biggest drugmaker, 
after Glaxo Wellcome PLC, said it 
would pay a 20 franc dividend, up 
from 16.80 francs last year. No- 
vartis’s chairman, Alex Krauer, said 
this was in line with the company’s 


new policy of paying 25 to 40 percent 
of group profit as dividends. 

Daniel Vasella, president of the 
company, said that all divisions of 
the company had expoienced “dy- 
namic growth trend’* in the first two 
months of the year as a result of 
currency movements and benefits 
stemming from the merger. No- 
vartis repeated that it expected to see 
savings of about 2 billion francs 
over the next three years. 

Mr. Vasella added that Novartis's 
bottom line would be lifted in 1997 
and beyond mainly by the intro- 
duction of new products. 

Pierre Douaze. head of Novartis' 
health care division, said that the 
industry average for research and 
development spending was about 15 
percent to 16 percent of sales and 
that Novartis would spend “maybe 2 
percentage points more than this." 

On the Zurich stock exchange, 
Novartis’s registered shares fell 1 
franc, to 1 .738. ( Bloomberg . AFX) 


Israeli Clothing Firm 
Returns to Profit 


Bloomberg News 

TEL AVIV — Polgat Ltd. said 
Tuesday it returned to profit in the 
fourth quarter as h cut production 
costs by using cheaper labor. 

PolgaL a clothing maker, re- 
ported earnings of 13 million 
shekels ($357,000) for the final 
quarter of 1996, in contrast to a 
loss of 1 9-8 million shekels a year 
earlier. The 1995 loss came after 
the company closed factories in 
Israel. Sales in the quarter rose 1.1 
percent, to 1542 million shekels 
from 1523 million shekels. 

Israel’s clothing industry has 
seen losses in recent years amid 
competition from countries with 
lower production costs. 

Polgat has started looking 
abroad to trim its costs, the com- 
pany said, using workers in Por- 
tugal, Egypt and the Palestinian 


Authority instead of Israelis. 

“We’re working in other na- 
tions,” said Dan Roth, the com- 
pany secretary. “We didn't have 
to close any factories this yean 
we’ll see what happens next 
year.” 

Polgat makes jeans, underwear, 
suits and other clothes. Polgat’s 
shares, listed on the Mish tanim 
Index of 100 issues, closed un- 
changed Tuesday at 7.49 shekels, 
while the index overall fell 138 
percent, to 243.89 points, and Is- 
rael’s Maof Index of 25 stocks fell 
1 .65 points, to 250.46. 

For all of 1996, Polgat’s earn- 
ings were 5.6 milli on shekels, re- 
versing a loss of 19.1 million 
shekels in 1995. Sales were little 
changed at 585.9 milli on shekels, 
compared with 585.2 million 
shekels in 1995. 


“We addressed 

we had with the Rale wood decision. 
We will see some more actions.” 

Mr. Nasser would not discuss spe- 
cific plans for Europe. But Fora's 
central problem plagues all the re- 
gion’s automakers: While the in- 
dustry has the capacity to make 15 
million cars a year in Europe, the 
public only buys 12 million. 

Competition from Japanese rivals 
is also cutting into marke r shares. 
Toyota Motor Corp., which seeks to 
increase European sales by 8.4 per- 
cent this year, is stoking production at 
its plant near Derby, E ngland Nissan 
Motor Co., the top seller of Japanese 
autos in toe region, is investing $350 
million m its Sunderland. England, 
plant to build a third model. Honda 
Motor Co.'s first Continental plant is 
to open in Turkey this autumn. 

“There will be winners and 
losers." said Walter Hasselkus, 
chief executive of Rover Group 
Ltd., a unit of Bayerische Motoren 
Werke AG. “If you added up all the 
predictions from toe world's car- 
makers of what they expected to 
produce, it would be enormous. It's 
not going to happen.” 


Norwegian Bank 
Bids $256 Million 
For Regional Rival 

CVwyttfrf by Our StrfFrm Di i ptmdta 

TRONDHEIM, Norway — Fok- 
us Bank A/S. a regional Norwegian 
bank, offered 1.75 billion kroner 
($255.6 million) in cash and stock to 
acquire a regional competitor, Bol- 
ig- og Naeringsbanken A/S. 

The bid pushes the value of bank 
takeovers in Scandinavia in toe past 
three months to more than $5 billion 
as banks pre p are for tougher com- 
petition ahead of the planned cre- 
ation of a single European currency. 

An executive of BNbank refused 
to comment on the offer, saying the 
board would need a few weeks be- 
fore it could advise shareholders. 

Fokus. which is the product a 
consolidation of seven banks from 
1987 to 1991, said the deal would 
save 80 million krona 1 over four 
years. Its stock rose 1 krone to 
5930. BNbank's shares gained 24 
to 1 9 1 . f Bloomberg . Reuters) 


Investor’s Europe 


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Source: Tetekurs 






iMenuunml Herald Titanic 


Very briefly: 


• Tele Danmark AS, Denmark's majority state-owned tele- 
phone company, said Det profit for 1 996 fell 1 1 percent, to 3. 1 
billion kroner ($482 million), amid higher marketing costs for 
its mobile operations and a drop in financial gains. Separately, 
toe company and its partners were granted one of three 
licenses to operate a Global System for Mobile telephone 
network in Ukraine. 

• BASF AG’s net profit rose 12.9 percent in 1996, to 2.79 
billion Deutsche maks ($1.65 billion) from 2.47 billion DM a 
year earlier. The chemical company’s results, helped by 
higher sales and lower taxes, were in line with expectations. 

• Compagnie Generale des Etablissements MicheUn SCA, 
Europe’s largest tiremaker, said earnings in 1996 rose 32 
percent, to 2.89 billion French francs ($508 million) from 2.80 
billion francs in 1995. Net income was lower than expected, 
largely because of the cost of a reorganization that has cut 
Michelin’s work force by 22,000 in four years. 

•Banco Santander SA, Spam’s largest bank, expects profit 
in 1997 to grow 20 percent and earnings per share to rise 15 
percent in toe next three years. 

• International Service System AS, a Danish cleaning-ser- 
vices company, reported a net loss for 1996 of 1.86 billion 
kroner ($288 million) after charges for accounting irreg- 
ularities. insurance charges and a write-down at its U.S. unit. 

• Skandinavisha Enskilda Banken AB. Sweden’s toird- 
largest bank, said its managing director. Bjorn Svedberg, 
would leave when his contract expired April 29. His deputy, 
Jacob Wallenberg, has been proposed as a replacement. 

• The European Commission, toe European Union’s ex- 
ecutive body, accused toe United States of trying to destroy toe 
economies of some Caribbean nations. It said American 
backing of U.S. companies such as Chiquita Brands In- 
ternational Inc. could ruin the economies of small countries 

Bloomberg. Reuters 


that relied on banana exports- 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


HlgJi L am Close Prey. 


SA Breweries 


Tuesday, March 18 

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Sens 
BMW 

-CRMCokuta 
. C uw-wg ra ank 
,9ncta8ew 
Setssae 


Am^n« «s ^ aS ^303 3M 

OT 268 26950 Z72 

315 31250 31*» 317 

AftaoAin Ind 17.10 

AVMIN 49^5 49 49.15 49-10 

27.10 2690 37 26» 

'Sol s 

SS 2750 27JB0 2775 

"its a a 

5775 57 5725 g 

jg x« 3^ 

5350 57.75 5750 

J 

15-10 

» J $ ^ 

21 4sJs. 

S ^ SS 


MiwtCooi 
AngtaAUvCmp 
ArepoAmGcjd 
AngioA mind 

AVMIN 
Borfow 
CG.Smltti 
De Be ers. 
EMtaentdn 

pst Nott Bk 

Geneor 

GFSA 

imperiMHdgs 

ingweCDOl 

tsajr 

ioJinrtesira* 

LieWHOp 

UberryLlfe 

(jHJfeSirol 

Minorca 

Nampa* 

Rknemont 

R u5l PtaHnum 


Land Sec 
Lasato 

Lead GetU Grp 
LkqdlTSBGp 
Lucas vartty 
Marks Soenoer 
MEPC 

S3 ar 

MaflPowcr 

Katwes 

Next 

Orange 

PfcO 

Peann 

Pffidnglon 

Pu*3G«ii 

Premier FameU 

PradedU 

RataackPP 

Rank Group 

RedtaC ota 

Remand 

Reedkrt 

RettoUimu 

Rearea Wgs 

Room 

RMC Group 

RoBsRayce 

RawIBkSat 

Ruyej^S anAH 
Safeway 
SataStowy 
Sdirodea 
5a8 Newcastle 
Sad Power 
Seatriar 
SeuemTiwd 
SheU Tramp R 

sue 

5BdBiNeptaw 

5™WU®2? 

SmMalnd 

SihertBec 

ISS3S- 

Taw & Lyle 

TescO 

Tlmnes Water 
31 Group 
Tl Group 
Tomsk's 
UnOeeer 
UMAsswanK 

Utdinotas 


654 

55} 

1497 

fi 

436 

667 

257 

752 

259 

420 

5-23 

2JM 

486 

479 

1377 

ZM 

690 

no 

151 

636 
615 
694 
479 
441 
8J3 
X82 

1157 

413 

644 

335 

10 

Z45 

661 

9.99 

472 

351 

125 

1630 

697 

X78 

xia 

755 

10.96 

10.15 

178 

940 

830 

7.95 

734 

851 

438 

X43 

637 
617 
557 
252 

1636 

627 

771 


743 

458 

644 

643 

1- 0S 
614 

5 

1058 

835 

5 

345 

415 

978 

671 
341 

1330 

650 

156 

538 

699 

620 

154 

411 

2 - 66 
1030 
158 

5 

528 

618 

690 

753 

353 

491 
417 
1145 

492 
643 
151 
830 
353 
950 

1053 

932 

482 

250 
638 
478 
640 
646 
1470 
735 
426 
673 

233 
775 

251 

412 
610 

2 

464 

471 

1X60 

2.10 

490 

7JM 

578 

234 
660 
743 
136 
683 
603 
669 
458 
423 
830 
171 

1158 

406 

635 

127 

936 

232 

547 

970 

460 

343 

X15 

1670 

686 

147 

X14 

735 

HUB 

1038 

175 

931 

Ul 

750 

650 

870 

470 

131 

672 
608 
675 
270 
!69fl 
622 
7.9 
648 


748 753 

463 464 

654 665 

645 649 

135 1-08 

616 616 
606 531 

1093 n 

639 847 

617 616 

X45 348 

415 418 

953 970 

A74 676 

341 346 

1133 1X51 

453 664 

156 159 
539 543 

755 7JJ3 
638 630 

158 154 

441 436 

159 2-72 

1030 1035 
IS 154 
535 612 

535 543 

623 626 

693 7X7 

7M 7.11 
359 356 

495 496 

419 423 

11.65 1130 
495 601 
650 651 

151 152 

824 840 

359 191 

955 954 

1151 11.10 
936 955 

458 489 

291 293 

638 550 

480 488 

641 650 

654 649 

1453 1459 
7.13 732 

436 431 

676 684 

235 237 

753 758 

256 252 
415 419 
613 619 

2 - 204 

454 470 
475 477 

1X40 1X74 
211 X12 

498 499 

7.12 737 

553 668 

257 259 

640 643 

73, 757 

136 139 

619 624 

603 612 

660 690 

454 451 

433 439 

828 626 
175 173 

1150 1131 
410 410 

629 640 

X29 334 

9.91 996 

232 243 

655 658 

973 97 3 

460 470 

146 150 

X22 121 

1685 1635 
687 696 

X49 154 

.117 X17 

735 756 

1089 ion 
Kuo 1009 
136 178 

936 933 

830 836 

792 7.97 
731 732 

852 834 

473 437 

1X3 135 

672 682 

610 614 

675 591 

275 280 

1618 1617 
622 625 

752 758 

652 653 


Madrid 


Bobo fades <7X15 


PrevfaaE 47699 

Acertra 

20000 

19800 

19900 

19920 

ACESA 

1680 

164S 

1650 

1690 

Agaos Bdrcekm 

5378 

5210 

5230 

5350 

Aiyoiluilil 

BBV 

6190 

HKO 

6080 

6160 

8800 

8640 

B680 

8790 


1175 

1134 

1145 

1150 

Bcnklntef 

19300 

19000 

19070 

19310 


3844 

3770 

371*5 

3850 


2780 

2775 

25750 

2//S 

2765 


263SQ 

25800 

260/0 


9750 

9660 

9700 

9720 

CEPSA 

4375 

4260 

4260 

4300 


2585 

2410 

2535 

24/5 

CorjMcpfre 

7440 

9150 

7160 

8950 

7160 

9080 

7400 

9010 

FECSA 

1240 

1180 

IIV0 

1270 

GosNotorot 

32800 

31500 

31 700 

32800 

Itartrota 

1560 

1520 

1530 

1535 


2795 

2650 

26/0 

7/05 


6080 

5920 

5940 

6000 


1300 

1278 

1300 

1290 


6890 

6M> 

6770 

6860 

Tetafanlca 

3375 

3325 

3340 

3340 


1170 

1156 

1164 

1 170 

VrtencCeraent 

1675 

1640 

16/5 

1660 


High Law 

CfaM 

Prat 

EtedraiusB 

Hlgb 

485 

Lew 

Ctee 

P«*. 

489 







Paris 


CAG4fc257U5 

Ericsson B 
Homes B 

26950 

1020 

« not 
1006 

261 

1012 

269 

1016 






UicenthvA 

535 

527 

528 

S3S 

Accor 

817 

801 

813 

815 

InrostorB 

350 

33750 

339 

34850 

AGF 

201 

19450 

200 20050 

MoDoB 

241 

22950 22950 

240 

AfrUsuide 

AicomMsOi 

B84 

857 

860 

875 

Nonfiiataen 

270 

26150 26450 

269 

682 

613 

667 

613 

PtamVUptam 

294 

287 

290 

292 

Aao-UAP 

371.90 

367J0 367 JO 37X70 

SavMkB 

18850 

186 

186 

18750 

Boncnlre 

749 

715 

720 

744 

Samlo B 

185 

182 

183 

185 

BK 

899 

tttt 

883 

H4 

SCAB 

174 

166 16750 

1/0 

BNP 

247 241 JO 24550 

244 

frEBantetA 

85 

8050 

8450 

B7 

Canal Plus 

1065 

1051 

1059 

1081 


23550 

22450 22450 

23/ 


3449 

3383 

3392 

3443 


337 

230 33150 

339 

fmfcir 

26650 

256 

260 

266 

SKFB 

187 

184 18450 

10650 

CCF 

266 

259 JO 

260 

265 

SpartxnkenA 

StattrypotekA 

136 

131 

132 

13650 

CMUlui 

695 

686 

689 

700 

190 

190 

190 

190 

Christian War 

825 

811 

815 

810 

StoraA 

10850 

104 

106 

108 


S87 

574 

577 

584 

SeHandtesA 

223 

218 

222 

224 

CretaAericole 

1240 

1246 

1246 

1268 

VWroB 

1» 

18350 

184 

18850 


Danone 

Bf-AqoMne 

ErtdtutoBS 

Eurodtsney 

Eurefonnel 

Gen. Eons 

Hows 


>92 

560 

926 

1015 

695 

737 


670 S75 B88 

546 555 553 

905 90S 916 

1005 10.10 1O10 

660 690 685 

724 733 734 


Lafarge 


LI 
LVMH 
Iron. Earn 
MICtefciB 
RtBOtaiA 
Pernod Rtand 
Pwigenror 
PI mull -Print 


Manila 


PSE 

fadee 321X64 


PrarfOUK 823156 

AyofaB 

2950 

2850 

29 

2950 

AyotoLota 

BkPttapW 

3050 

183 

29 

182 

30 

182 

30 

182 

CAP Homes 

13 

12-40 

11/5 

13 

MrodoEltcA 

120 

119 

119 

120 

Metro Bort 

675 

670 

675 

6/5 

PHTOo 

1050 

1025 

1050 

1050 

PCI Ben* 

40X50 

390 

395 39750 

Ptd Longest 

1595 

IMS 

1590 

1595 

Son Miguel B 

8750 

8650 

8X50 

85 

SM Prime Hdg 

750 

7J0 

750 

750 


Renault 

Rem 
Rh-PoulencA 
Scnafll 
Sdraekler 
SEB 

SGS Thomson 
SW Generate 
SaOedw 
SJGobafn 
Suez 

5wtoeta6o 
Thomson CSF 
TaWB 
Usurer 


41250 40230 40890 41410 
8B9 856 BBD 862 

383 37X30 277 379.10 

1022 995 1002 1002 

1956 1904 1914 1926 
1159 1329 1337 1334 

S71 562 565 575 

338 31640 31650 33950 
390 384 387 387 

31690 306 31 B 31250 

652 M2 649 647 

2240 2151 2164 2149 

1875 1880 1800 I860 

13730 132 13660 135 

1684 1645 1655 1684 

190 18640 11750 191 A0 
535 523 528 535 

293 284 285 29370 

990 975 980 985 

407 «1 40390 40550 

649 633 636 646 

2897 2816 5835 2891 

832 K» 851 


276* 

604 

18950 

463 

90JC 

379 


269 27248 279 JO 
577 580 60S 

185 1B550 18670 
451 45790 457 A0 
87.1 S 8990 8610 
367 377 J84J0 


Mexico 

AlfaA 

fl 

CereerCPO 

Citroen 

Erapriodemn 

GpoCoaoAl 

GpoFBcoraer 

Gao Rn inbursa 
Kata Clark Mes 
TdevbnCPO 
TelMeaL 


1850 

29.30 

1150 

40.15 

4450 

1-81 

27^0 

16X50 

10CJO 

1600 


: 379153 
Previous: 376055 

4X70 4190 4480 
1600 1660 16X0 
285S 29 JO 2980 
1088 11.12 1054 
7)50 4080 40.15 
4421 44J0 400 
Ui 180 1.79 

27-30 27 JO 27-35 
16180 16280 16350 
98LSO 10080 98J0 
1X82 15.98 1586 


Sao Paulo — 


BredescoPM 
Brahma PM 
CerataPM 
CESPPM 


Milan 

MIBTrirareticK 1155150 
PievfeassnrttLM 


12270 

11710 

117SD 

17115 


3285 

3114 

3125 

3250 


4315 

4115 

4190 

4370 

BmdRsraa 

1322 

1185 

1185 

1200 



19900 

20050 

20400 

CrefltoitaBaoo 

2330 

2275 

7300 

2315 

Edison 

9180 

8955 

8984 

9140 

EM 

8435 

8150 

8196 

8380 

Flat 

5450 

5320 

5380 

5390 

GeneraSASslc 

29550 

28350 

28800 

29450 

IMJ 

14430 

13840 

13840 

14400 

INA 

2220 

2145 

2165 

2210 

ttoigas 

5420 

5180 

4240 

4310 

Mertaset 

7045 

6900 

6974 

7000 

M«Gc banco 

10695 

10175 

10420 

10610 

MocSsfiscn 

1185 

im 

1156 

1160 

Olh*ta» 

630 

X9 

601 

613 

Ponnaiot 

7190 

7030 

2104 

2164 

Pkeffl 

3565 

3460 

3525 

3530 

RAS 

14830 

14400 

14620 

14740 


14500 

14774 

1«94 

14350 

SPoofa Torino 

11595 

11285 

11355 

11485 

SM 

7510 

7045 

7205 

7480 

Tefecom ttofla 

4220 

4010 

4080 

4165 

TIM 

4435 

4200 

405 

4115 


i PM 
LfafaSenridas 

pSS^pm 

PoatafaLuz 

SklNodorto 

Sauza Croz 

IMtarosPM 

THemtg 

Tetefj 

TefespPM 

Un&ancs 

UtlinlnmPtd 

CVRD PM 


890 860 

72280 71580 
4750 4160 
54J0 5X40 
1650 1630 
46880 46280 
58S8T 58080 
45Q8Q 4*4 nn 

T»nnn tkiki 

21X50 20950 
14480 14080 
38L2D 3780 
9500 9 JO 

112JU 11690 
17280 16780 
15580 15480 
29480 28880 
3950 3750 
1-22 1.19 

2610 2680 


080 695 

72280 71280 
45-60 47 JO 
S2.40 5480 
1640 1630 
46480 46780 
58180 58580 
- 45000 
33680 
21150 21050 
14480 13750 
3620 38J0 
950 950 

11135 1H50 
16780 169.99 
15451 15500 
28880 29580 
3789 4050 
UI 1J2 
2690 2600 


Sydney 


AI Ordkoles: 24MJ8 
Pievtaos: 2427^0 

Amcor 

840 

825 

828 

860 

ANZBOng 

7.90 

752 

765 

768 

BHP 

1X86 

1X73 

1X79 

1X82 

Band 

XB0 

368 

170 

i/a 


J1-4S 

21 J2 

2138 

2155 

CBA 

1X5/ 

1X44 

1X44 

1252 

GCAflwfl 

11-40 

1U3 

IIJ6 

1160 

COtes Myw 

XM 

552 

X99 

X93 

Coracto 

X84 

X75 

6J7 

668 

CRA 

1866 

1842 

1845 

1855 

CSft 

X92 

AJA 

484 

463 

Fosters Brew 

X» 

252 

252 

X58 

Goodman Fid 

167 

163 

165 

163 

lO Austrafla 

1X16 

1X08 

1X15 

1X12 

Land Lease 

aw 

2X80 

2769 

2120 

MUMHdM 

Not Aasf Bank 

1J6 

169 

132 

\J7 

1X07 

1X90 

1X90 

1538 

NarMutoaiHdg 

1J3 

1-86 

167 

162 

News Carp 

X43 

X34 

636 

658 

PocBt Dunlop 

X31 

336 

126 

131 

Pfeneerlnn 

All 

461 

467 

463 

Pub Brootaa* 

651 

666 

666 

647 

St George Bank 

754 

7-40 

7M 

750 

WMC 

830 

Lie 

812 

830 

WMoacBktag 

.... . -1— ■-!- n _| 

7.17 

9.17 

766 

962 

/6B 

96* 

7.15 

9.12 

woc*«inns 

362 

354 

364 

X60 

Taipei 

Stock Market fades ■ 
Praam:! 

18X20 

CM2 

OdhayLHelns 

179 

177 

177 

17B 


189 

187 

189 

187 

OUaoTUK Bk 

82 

7850 

82 

9050 

Chtoa Deedand 12X50 

120 

123 

122 

CMna Steel 

27.40 

2XB0 

27 

2X80 

FWBmk 

191 

1» 

191 

1W 


7B 

7X50 

7X50 

76 

Hua Nan Bk 

U6 

144 

146 14450 

tnaCoramBk 

8350 

8X50 

83 

83 

NrarYtt Ptasdcs 

71 

70 

n 

70 

SMn Kong LBe 
TtatratSend 

110 

68 

109 

67 

no 

67 

108 

6650 

Tatung 

UfdAtaoBec 

6150 

5650 

60 

5459 

6050 

M 

61 

54 

UtdWoridQibi 

709 

70 

7850 

70 


|The Trib Index 

Prices as of 3.00 PM New Yotkdme. 

Jen. i, 1902=100. 

Level 

Change 

%change 

year to date 
% change 
+14.41 

World Indax 

150.87 

4053 

+0.15 

taghml Intfarm 
Asia/Paabc 

109.81 

4-1^3 

+1.13 

—18.21 

Europe 

159.53 

Unch. 

Unch. 

+14.62 

N. America 

17559 

+0.12 

+0.07 

+36.86 

S. America 

tndostrfal tmfanaa 

139.90 

-0.03 

-0.02 

+57.12 

Capital goods 

175.07 

+0.19 

+0.11 

+31.75 

Consumer goods 

170.96 

+0.53 

+0.31 

+23.84 

Energy 

17727 • 

+0.87 

+0.38 

+30.71 

Finance 

112.38 

+0.62 

+0.55 

-11.67 

NBsceSaneous 

154.48 

-051 

-0.33 

+13.75 

Raw Materials 

183.05 

-1.47 

-0-80 

+29.09 

Service 

141.01 

-0.04 

-0.03 

+17.51 

Uffies 

134.10 

-O.IB 

-0.13 

+5.47 

Tho international Herald Tribune World Stock indax C tracks (he US. doBar values & 
2B0irtamuboaMyXmetnNa stocks from aSootgKrios. For more erformation. a ftuu 
boedder b avatmUn by wrUtno to The Trib Indue. 181 Avenue Chariaa do GatOa. 

92521 NeuMy Codex. Fiance. Comptod by Bbomberg Nows. 

High 

Low dose Prev. 


Hlgb Low 

Close Prat 


AUsuIFwfasn 
Mteul Trust 
MumtoMlg 
NEC 
Nfeon 
rektasec 
NWendo 
Mppl 


IS Wd 

iMofar 

NXX 

Nomura Sac 
NTT 

NTT Data 
3 Paper 


Seoul 

Dacem 


Korea EJ Put 
K orea EjdvBi 
KoroaMtaTd 
LG Semicar 
Pahang Iren St 
Samsung Dfciar 
Satasung EJec 
ShlntaiBtak 


19200 

15600 

26000 

5500 


26000 

43100 

40900 

56000 

10800 


K 65787 

P ieuta w: 658 . 9 0 
100000 100000 1 020M 
3900 3970 3970 

18000 18200 18000 
15300 15600 15600 
2200 25600 260M 
5200 5200 BSD 

466600 474000 46400 
25500 25800 M900 
42000 43100 43000 
39500 39TO0 4^0 
54700 56000 55000 

Iran 10500 108M 


Plu fa UT- 213623 


Montreal 

ItaesMofafadae 290148 


Prwrim 

90238 

Bee Mob CCni 

45 

45 

45 

44*4 

GfaTtaA 

2490 

2450 

2490 

25 

CdBUftA 

3155 

3U6 

31 JO 

3140 

CTFWSvC 

30H 

3015 

3014 

32 

Gaz Metre 

17 

1X95 

17 

17 

Gt-Wrat Uteco 

2395 

27*4 

23H 


franco 

386) 

3815 

3830 

3840 

kncstasGrp 

25** 

2X70 

2X70 

2X65 

LabknvCas 

1X70 

16*5 

1X70 

16** 

Natl Bk Caaada 

1565 

1X60 

1545 

1X80 

Power Carp 

2930 

W 

29 JO 

2940 

Power Ftol 

27 

2X96 

27 

2X60 

QuehecarB 

2530 

2X15 

2X10 

Bngmrnnn R 

850 

890 

890 

9 

RotrtBkCifa 

5830 

57 JO 

57 JO 

5815 


Oslo 


OSXIBC 

Pteyfaw MSB 


Dot ante Bk 


H nM ra dA 

KvanerAsD 
Nook Hydra 
WareteSj enA 
Nycoraed A 
Ortda AsoA 
PeflmGeeSyc 

PePmA 


TransacssnOff 

StaraiaandAso 


18X50 176 

14850 14750 
2680 25 

3BJ0 29J0 
12550 12250 
4750 4750 
363 356 

2S 338 

, 225 220 

10950 109 

548 543 

296 294 

US 116 
134 131 

405 390 

4450 4170 


177 
14750 
2610 
29 JO 
12250 
4750 
358 
340 
271 
10950 
544 
295 
116 
134 
400 
44 


19 

149 

2650 

30 

125 

45 

364 

342 

227 

10550 

550 

293 

118 

133 

403 

44 


Asia Pac Brew 
CeretwsPac 
CBy Devos 
Cycle Carriage 
DokyFannlnt* 
DBS foreign 
DBS Lata 

Hft_ 

HKLand* 

JardMathesn* 

Jart Strategic - 

tap pel 

KeopHBank 

OCBCfarotara 

OSUnianBkF 

PariawyHdgs 

Scmbariong 

Sing AS fotafpi 

Sing Land 

SlngPressF 

Sing Tech Ita 

SfaaTefacrena 

KnpMtad 

TaiLKBank 

ITtd Industrial 

UMOSeoBkF 

WingTafHdp 

ttiUSdo NR. 


735 

730 

730 

1030 

10 

10-10 

1120 

1X70 

1X70 

1440 

1410 

1430 

069 

047 

048 

1750 

1730 

1730 

535 

XI5 

XM 

480 

444 

470 

1230 

1150 

1150 

248 

X54 

237 

550 

880 

530 

334 

118 

330 

940 

930 

930 

466 

4 

4 

1820 

1760 

1750 

1040 

10 

1810 

X1D 

6 

X» 

735 

7.45 

730 

11.90 

1140 

1160 

7.90 

730 

7.90 

2X70 

2X30 

2X30 

174 

148 

168 

120 

114 

3,18 

440 

430 

450 

146 

144 

144 

1.19 

1.18 

1.18 

16 

1X50 

1X70 

434 

432 

422 


Tokyo 

Apnoraeta 

aT N ippon Air 

Amway 

AsaMBraik 

AsaMQwn 

AstaIGtaB 

Bk Tokyo Mlisa 

BkYotarrerao 

BrWsestone 

Oman 

OnibaElec 

Oiugoto Elec 

DalNlpp Print 

DoMcNKong 
DahroBata 
Dobra House 
Dobra SK 
DO I 
Oensa 

East JaproiRy 
Etsal 
Fanuc 
i Ban*. 

Photo 


Stockholm 

aga b 

ABBA 
AralDoown 
Astro A 


SCHtaWaSUK 

Pieyfao*: 294601 

no 10750 10 X» W 

573 B46 950 

204 195 19B 204 

363 354 355 340 


Attn Copco A 18150 18050 151 103 
- 326 315 319 327 


HochlluflfBk 

KBkM 

Hondo Wafer 

IBJ 

tttt 

Itochu 

to-YOtado 

JAL 

Japan Tobacco 

Jim 

Kajnre 

KansjPBoe 

Kao 

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japan Plans Steps 
To Spur Land Sales 

Stocks Rise , Analysts Are Whry 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1997 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


UJS. 9 s China Lobby Bulks Up 


PAGE 17 


Ca^ihd by Otr Staff Fra" Oufxas**, 

The government said 
Tuesday that it would announce de- 
jaiied plans this month to help spur 
-and sales, in a long-awaited attempt 
to help banks resolve their bad-loan 
Problems. 

Analysts said the move would 
breathe life info the stagnant prop- 
erty market, and banking and prop- 
erty shares led a stock-market rally 
after the announcement. But many 
analysts also expressed skepticism 
about the plan 's effects. 

Hisanori I to, an analyst ar Nikko 
Research Center, said: “It's a step 


Minister Hiroshi Mitsuzuka did not 
specily how the deficit-ridden gov- 
ernment would finance the land pur- 
chases, which they said could cost 
trillions of yen, and that it has given 
itself only two weeks to produce the 
plan. 

“There is good reason to be skep- 
tical that there is going to be a real 
bite to this plan,” Steven Wetier, 
senior analyst at Jardine Reining 
Securities Ltd., said. 

One reason for skepticism, ana- 
lysts said, was the fact that Mr. 
Mitsuzuka had made no mention of 
reducing the land-transaction and 


fnnKiry) „ . ~ , ‘wumig uie iauo- transaction ana 

stod ? re - capital-gains taxes that keep many 

actediuickly fhia ™ ornJn S- ^ tun ?- buyers from purchasing property. 

land mto good land is “Taxation changes are the key,” 

someth inp vnn rinhit ku k;» t* ...:n r ° , J . 


something you do bit by bit. It will 
take a very long time.” 

Others pointed out that Finance 


BT to Take Over 
Venture That Aims 
To Rival NTT 

CcmplaJ by Our Staff Front Chjpaarha 

LONDON — British Telecom- 
munications PLC said Tuesday it 
would take control of a Japanese 
joint venture with Marubeni Corp. 
that seeks to compete with Nippon 
Telegraph & Telephone Corp. 

NTT is BT" s partner in a bid for a 
phone-service license in Singapore. 

BT said it would consolidate BT 
Japan with its existing joint venture 
with Marubeni, called Network In- 
formation Services, to create BT 
NTS. The British concern will own 
51 percent of BT NIS, with 
Marubeni holding 31 percent. The 
company will sell domestic and 
global services developed by BT and 
by MCI Communications Corp. 

BT said it remained committed to 
tire Singapore license bid, an- 
nounced last week, and aimed to 
make Singapore an Asian communi- 
cations hub. (Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


Toshihiko Okino. an analyst at Sch- 
raders Japan, said, because if the 
country 's capital-gains tax is applied 
to the property- based securities that 
are (o be created under the plan, “no 
one will want to buy them.” 

Japan '$ capital -gains tax is 20 per- 
cent, and land -transaction taxes run 
as high as 40 percent. Those levies 
were designed to pop the speculative 
bubble of the late 1980s and early 
’90s that had resulted in Japan's real 
estate being valued at four times that 
of all the property in the United 
States, a country 25 times its size. 

The taxes ended most of the spec- 
ulation and helped drive commer- 
cial land prices down 71 percent 
from their 1991 peak. 

Mr. Mitsuzuka said the measures, 
to be drawn up before the current 
fiscal year ends March 31. would 
include creating securities based on 
land that is being held as collateral 
for loans, as well as outright gov- 
ernment purchases of some property 
being held by banks. 

Mr. Mitsuzuka said the govern- 
ment's plan would have a “positive 
impact” on stock prices and ac- 


By Paul Blusrein 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Worried 
that the controversy over alleged 
Chinese influence- buying in 
Washington is imperiling trade re- 
lations with Beijing, the U.S. busi- 
ness community is launching a ma- 
jor lobbying campaign to expand 
economic ties to China. 

The Business Coalition for 
U.S.-China Trade, which includes 
about 1,000 multinational corpo- 
rations and trade associations, 
plans to visit eveiy member of the 
House and Senate, according to 
Caiman Cohen, the group's co- 
chairman. 

The lobbyists will carry the 
message that expanding U.S. links 
to the Chinese economy would 
promote America's foreign-policy 
Interests and help create jobs for 
U.S. workers. 

Trade specialists say the group's 
lobbying campaign will play a sig- 
nificant role In this year's debate 
over Chinese- Am eri can trade. 

"On China over the past few 
years, the Business Coalition has 
probably been the most effective 
collective voice,” Greg Mastel. a 
former Senate aide who is now a 


trade specialist at the Economy ending UJS. sanctions that restrict 
Strategy Institute, said. "They are the export of certain high-techno- 
basically Fortune 500 companies logy products to C hina. The group 
with access to a lot of members, may provide a counterweight to 
and they do a good job of tailoring the anti-China sentiment in Con- 
their message." gress that has Increased in recent 

Die coalition intends to make a weeks because of reports that 
“far more comprehensive” pitch China attempted to gain political 
this year than in the past. Mr. Co- influence in America through ini- 
hen said. proper political donations. 

In previous years, the group has Many members of Congress also 
focused primarily on securing an- have long-standing complaints 
nual renewals from Congress of about Beijing on matters ranging 
China's most -favored-nation from human rights to Taiwan. 


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Close * ■ Cfoefe 


China's most-favored-nation 
status, which allows Chinese 
products to be sold in the United 


The furor over the alleged 
Chinese political contributions 


States on the same terms as other comes ar a time of growing criticism ] [ Bangfi&ic 


countries' products. Human-rights 
advocates have fought in vain to 
deprive Beijing of this status. 

This year, with President Bill 
Clinton having severed the link be- 
tween trade and China's human- 
rights record, the group's campaign 
mil be aimed at attaining “a stable 
U.S.-China commercial framework 
built on three pillars," according to 
the group's position paper 

Those pillars are to bring China 
into the World Trade Organization 
on terms that would require 
Beijing to expand access to its mar- 
ket, bestowing permanent most- 
favored-nation status on China and 


of Mr. Clinton's policy toward 
China. Mr. Cohen said be feared 
that U.S. companies would have 
difficulty remaining globally com- 
petitive if Washington, in the cur- 
rent mood of hostility to Beijing, 
restricted their access to. Chula's 
rapidly growing markeL 
“If there were illegal transac- 
tions. hopefully they will be un- 
covered and penalties imposed,” 
Mr. Cohen said 
"But thai is not relevant to what 
is in the U.S. national interest When 
the time comes, I don't believe 
members of Congress will walk 
away from that national interest” 


Kuate Lumpur Composite ; ' 

-'.T 


■yjt 




Iniemaiomk HtnldTrtaiM 


Very briefly: 


S&P Cuts Thai Banks 9 Debt Rating 


Reuters 

MELBOURNE — Standard & 
Poor's Corp. said Tuesday it had 
lowered the credit ratings of two 
Thai banks but affirmed the singJe-A 
long-term and A-l sb on -term ratings 
on the country's sovereign debt 
The American credit-rating con- 


rency credit rating on Thailand's 
debt denominated in baht 
"While the government has 
ample resources to cope with po- 
tential financial-sector losses,” S&P 
said, “the banking sector as a whole 
has deteriorated, affecting the ratings 
of all Standard & Poor’s-rated Thai 


cem said it was considering down- banks.” It said its affirmation of the 
grading debt of two other Thai banks, so verign-debt ratings reflected Thai - 


It said it had put the two on its 
CreditWatch with "negative implic- 
ations.” 

In announcing its rate moves, S&P 


celerare banks’ efforts to dispose of said Thailand's financial outlook re- 


their bad loans, which analysts es- 
timate total as much as 50 trillion 
yen ($400 billion J. The Nikkei 225 
stock index soared 391 .70 points, or 
2.17 percent, to 18.445.20. its 
biggest gain since Feb. 20. 

(Bloomberg, Reutersl 


mained stable but said conditions in 
the banking sector had “deterior- 
ated” and risks had risen. 

S&P said the sovereign ratings 
affected S2.5 billion of debt out- 
standing. The company also af- 
firmed its AA long-term local -cur- 


land’s "strong capacity to support 
the troubled financial sector without 
compromising macroeconomic sta- 
bility." 

The Thai finance minister, Am- 
nuay Viravan, said S&P's decision 
to affirm Thailand’s credit rating 
was a reflection that the government 
was adopting the right economic 
policies. 


ible policies to manage the econ- 
omy,” he said. "It also reflects the 
stability of the financial system and 
the economy." 

S&P lowered the credit ratings of 
Thai Fanners Bank PLC and Siam 
Commercial Bank PLC to BBB- 
plus/A2 from A-minus/A2. 

The two banks put on its Cred- 
itWaich list of securities whose rat- 
ings are subject to review were Bank 
of Ayudhya PLC and Industrial Fi- 
nance Corp. of Thailand. 

Mr. Amnuay said the downgrad- 
ing would not affect the stability of 
the banks but would make it more 
expensive for diem to raise money 
abroad. “Those banks will certainly 
have higher cost of foreign bor- 
rowings.” he said, "by about 10 to 


"This shows the government has _ 15 basis points,” or hundredths of a 
implemented appropriate and flex- percentage point. 


TV: Europe’s Top Studios Challenge Hollywood 


Continued from Page 13 

hour comedy series called 
“The Campers." made its de- 
but to good reviews last 
month. 

! Having made the leap into 
local production, however, 
Columbia must now confront 
the same problem long faced 
by the Europeans — the un- 
likelihood of finding big 
audiences for programs out- 
side their home markets. 
Shows like the German de- 
tective series “Derrik,” 
/ which has found a mass audi- 
k ence in France and in Italy, 
are rare. 

Working in English gives 
British producers a huge ad- 
vantage, especially in the rich 
.American market where 
dubbed programs are poorly 
received. For that reason, big- 
ser-budgei Continental pro- 
ductions, such as Kircb’s 
$120 million series on the 


INCORPORATE 


Bible, are almost always shot 
in English and frequently fea- 
ture big-name American or 
English stars.. 

Britain’s language edge 
helps explain why the country 
boasts die largest and most 
successful television-produc- 
tion industry outside Amer- 
ica. Still, with international 
sales last year of less than 
$400 million compared with 
Hollywood’s $4 billion, Bri- 
tain's television producers 
have a long way to go. 

Producing almost exclus- 
ively for their home markets, 
Europeans can still make 
good money in television pro- 
duction but not the vast 
profits posted by Hollywood. 
Andrea Kirk by, a media ana- 
lyst at Daiwa Europe in Lon- 
don. landed the Europeans for 
the improved quality of their 
programs but said the in- 
dustry was not yet equipped 
to compete on American 


terms. “They have produced 
some hits,” she said, "but 
they are still not set up to keep 
grinding ’em out Idee Hol- 
lywood does.” 

But that is changing. The 
proliferation of television 
channels, which soon will 
switch into high gear with the 
introduction of digital-televi- 
sion systems in major Euro- 
pean markets, appears to 
guarantee a sellers market in 
television programs for some 
time to come. 

To meet that demand the 
Europeans are planning ma- 
jor expansions. Pro Sieben, 
for instance, only started 
making its own productions 
three years ago. This summer, 
it plans to use a hefty slice of 
the proceeds from its expec- 
ted 1 billion Deutsche marks 
($593 million) stock-market 
flotation to delve deeper into 
television and possibly even 
movie production. 


Hashimoto Backs Cutting Budget 
Starting in 1998 to Reduce Deficit 


CofrBtd >> Our Staff Fran: DjpacJta 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Ryu taro Ha- 
shimoto proposed measures Tuesday to slash 
Tokyo’s budget deficit, which is one of the 
highest among major industrialized nations. 

Mr. Hashimoto called cutting general ex- 
penditures in the fiscal year that starts in April 
1 998 to below that of the year that begins next 
month, according to a proposal he made to a 
special task force he heads. 

The government has not cut general ex- 
penditures in 1 1 years. 

“Politicians should not delay reform for 
fear of pain,” Mr. Hashimoto was quoted as 
saying. 

The prime minister has made cutting Ja- 
pan’s 520 trillion yen (S4.20 trillion) debt a 
priority, saying it threatens economic growth. 
The government has forecast deficit spending 
in the coming fiscal year ax 33 trillion yen, or 
6.4percent of gross domestic product. 

Inis ratio of debt to GDP peaked at 7 
percent last year. By contrast, the U.S. ratio 
was 2.5 percent, according to the Organization 


for Economic Cooperation and Development 

Mr. Hashimoto proposed limits on public- 
works spending and cuts in government staff- 
ing levels and subsidies to public corporations. 
He also proposed reducing the 6 trillion yen to 
be paid to farmers affected by the partial 
liberalization of rice imports under global 
trade accords. 

Mr. Hashimoto called on the government to 
cut the deficit to 3 percent of GDP by 2003, 
two years ahead of the target date set by the 
cabinet in December. 

After the task force met. Finance Minister 
Hiroshi Mitsuzuka said the government 
would reduce deficit-financing bond sales by 
1 25 trillion yen a year. 

The government has estimated that the in- 
terest payments on such bonds will rise 2.6 
percent next year, to 16.8 trillion yen. 

Mr. Mitsuzuka said the government would 
submit legislation on the budges cuts during the 
current Diet session. The upper house of the 
legislature is still considering the budget for the 
coming fiscal year. (Bloomberg. AFP) 


r SINCE 

k 1899/ , Ts.A. 


Protact Your Personal Assets 
■ tneofpoiaw any sale, wdwing 
Delaware. Nevada & Wyomnfl 

• LLCs {Wanted Liaj*y Compares! 

• in2sattea&«ittuf5 

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; INGCBSOLL-RAND 
COMPANY 

(GDRa) 

AsMWialie N.V„ Spoistraat 17~ 

ssi ssassoga 

rt£*s share* be payabk 
Irflii Ofls- 1.54 net. (div. per rot 
184)2.97; gross 


FIDELITY GLOBAL SELECTION FUND 

Socidte d’lnvestisseraent k Capital Variable 
Kama! I is House. Place de I'Eioile, 

L-1021 Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B 27.223 

NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING 

Notice is hereby given that an Extraordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of Fidelity Global 
Selection Fund Sicav ("the Company"! will be held at the registered office of the Company in 
Luxembourg on March 28, 1997 at 11.00 ajn. to consider the following agenda: 

1 . To resolve to liquidate Fidelity Global Selection Fund 

2. To appoint Fidelity Investments Luxembourg S.A. as the Liquidator and to determine the 
~ powers to be granted to the Liquidator and the liquidation procedure. 

3. To fix the date of the second Shareholders' Meeting 10 hear the Report of liar Liquidator and 
to appoint Coopers & Lybrand as the Auditors of the Company. 

4. To fix the date of the third Meeting of Shareholders to hear the Report of the Auditor and to 
decide the close of the Liquidation of the Company. 

In order to deliberate validly on item I of die agenda, at least 50 & of the shares issued must be 
represented at the Meeting, and a decision in favour of the Resolution must be approved by 
Shareholders holding at least 2/3 of the shares represented at die Meeting. 

Subject to the limitations imposed by the Articles of Incorporation of the Company with regard 
to ownership of shares which constitute in the aggregate more than three percent <3 of the 
outstanding shares, each share is entitled to one vote. A shareholder may act at any Meeting by 
proxy. 

Dated: January 27. 1997 
By Order of the Board of Directors 


5^9) with Ms. L25 net 
VJISTERDAW DEPOSHA®' 
] COMPANY SO- 

gLmrferdam. March 14, 1997 


rr^ pfTfg readers in Luxembourg 

7.’ npveTbeen easier to subscribe and save. 

Just call toUfree at 0 800 2703. 

"toe WORLD'S NEWSWEB 


Now available at newsstands or bv subscription 
early morning on day of publication 
throughout the entire southwest region of trance. 
For more information on subscription rates, please cab 

toll-free 0800.437.437, 

THF. WORLD’S DAILY NEWSPAPER 


• BankAmerica Corp. plans ro expand its Asian bond staff 
by as much as 75 percent this year to by to increase its 
presence in Asia's $640 billion bond market. 

• Japan Telecom Co.'s merger with the privately held long- 
distance provider International Telecom Japan Inc-, which 
is to take effect Oct. 1. values International Telecom Japan's 
stock at 74 billion yen ($597.7 million). 

• Taiwan's benchmark stock index rose 97.89 points, or 1.16 
percent, to 8.524.31, a seven-year high, as investors ap- 
parently decided thar Taiwan's central bank was unlikely to 
raise interest rates soon. 

• Lloyd’s of London launched a Japanese unit. Lloyd’s 
Japan Inc., that will seek long-term business opportunities in 
Japan through the development of new products. 

• Microsoft Corp. and Legend Group of China signed an 
agreement allowing Legend to pre-install Microsoft’s Chinese- 
language Windows 95 software in its personal computers. The 
companies said the agreement could be worth 100 million yuan 
($12 million) to Microsoft over the next two years. 

• MobOeOne Asia Pte_ which will be the first mobile-phone 
operator to compete with Singapore Telecommunications 
Ltd-, said its monthly charges could be 20 percent lower than 
those of die state-controlled company. 

• International Business Machines Corp. and its subsidiary, 
Lotus Development Corp., will invest around 10 million 
ringgit ($4 million) over the next two years in Malaysia's 
planned “multimedia supercorridor.” Bloomberg. Reuters 


Taiwan Firm in Burma Talks 

Bloomberg News 

TAIPEI — The automaker Sanfu Motors Industrial Co. 
said Tuesday it was negotiating an $18.2 million agree- 
ment with a state-owned company in Burma that it hoped 
would return it to profitability. 

The company said it expected the project — supplying 
technology and equipment for producing Renault cars — 
to help reverse five years of losses by providing new 
markets for older models that are now out of favor in 
Taiwan. 

“Although these models aren’t new, incomes are re- 
latively low in Myanmar, and these are a good choice for 
them,” a spokesman. Huang Shu-shen, said. He refused 
to say when an agreement would be signed The gov- 
ernment of Burma calls the country Myanmar. 

Sanfu 's shares rose by their 7 percent daily limit, or 
1.20 Taiwan dollars (4.4 cents), to close at 19. 


Registered Office 
16, Boulevard Royal 
L-2449 LUXEMBOURG 

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS 

The Board od Directors of the Company has derided the 
following relevant amendments ana additions to the 
prospectus of the SICAV with effect on 1st April 1997: 

ISSUE OF SHARES 

(paragraph 2, 4, 5 and 10) 

The Board of Directors shall he authorised without limitation 
and at any time, to issue Class A or Class B shares of no par 
value in respect of oil Portfolios at the respective Net Asset 
Value per share, plus an issue commission of maximum 5 per 
cent of the Net Asset Value, without granting to existing 
shareholders a preferential right to subscribe for the shares to 
be issued. 

An issue commission of maximum 5 per cent of the Net Asset 
Value may be charged to investors upon subscribing for shares 
id the Company. Such commission will be paid to authorised 
and duly appointed financial instilu linns. 

Shares shall be allotted immediately upon subscription and 
payment for subscriptions must be made in U5 Dollars, Swedish 
Kronore, Norwegian Kronen or in any other major currency, to 
the Custodian not later than 2 (two) business days after the 
relevant Valuation Date- Otherwise, subscriptions may be 
cancelled without prejudice to the Company's right to recover 
any charges due or losses incurred- fn order to avoid the 
repayment to sbscribere of small surplus amounts, the Company 
may issue fractions to the nearest ltiOOtb of a share. 

The Portfolios of the SKAND1FOND INTERNATIONAL - 
NORGE and SKAND1FOND INTERNATIONAL - NORGE 
RENTEFOND will be launrhed from April 1st, 1997 until April 
4lh, 1997 at a price of 10 Norwegian JCronere per share. The 
money of the initial subscription is payable not later than April 

REDEMPTION OF SHARES 
(paragraph 2 and 4) 

A repurchase commission of maxi mu 0-50% may be levied in 
order to cover the costs or the financial intermediaries. 
Confirmation of the execution or a redemption will be made by 
tiie dispatch of an advice to the shareholder and redemption 
proceeds will be paid by bank transfer in US Dollars, Swedish 


within 2 (two) bank business days after the relevant Valuation 
Date and after receipt of the proper documentation. 

fNVESTM ENT ADVISER 
(paragraph 5) 

Under the terms of this Agreement, the Investment Adviser 
shall Bupply the Company with economic and financial 
information and recommendations regarding the Company's 
investments. In consideration of its services, the Investment 
Adviser shall be entitled to a fee at a yearly rate of 1.60 per 
cent, of the Net Asset Value of the 5KANDIF0ND 
rNTER NATIONAL- EM ERC INC MARKETS PORTFOLIO and 
the SKANDIFOND INTERNATIONAL-EASTERN EUROPE 
PORTFOLIO, a fee at a yearly rale or 1.50 per cent, of the Net 
Asset Value of the SKANDIFOND INTERNATIONAL - NORCE 
and a fee al a yearly rate of 0.80 per cenL of the Net Asset 
Value or the $KAM>lFOND INTERNATIONAL - NORGE 
RENTEFOND. A twelfth of these rates bring payable at the end 
of each month and based on the net assets of the last valuation 


of the respective month- 


THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 






PAGE 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19 1997 


Tuesday’s 4 P.M. 

The 1,00(J mosi-traded NcMoral Martetseatfilitt 
mtemsofdoflarwilue, updated twiceayear. 
wmAssodaai Press. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1997 


PAGE 19 


BUSINESS MESSAGE CENTER 




* 




READERS are advised 
JS®L * h * International 

Tnbun* cannot bo 
responsible for toss or 
aamqgBf incurred am a 
result of transactions stem 
, ™"P i "®»n arfw rti tni n l i 
w "«n appear In our 
paper. H is thorofone rec- 
ommended that readers 
appropriate inquir- 
es before mending any 
money or entering into 
any binding co mmitm ents. 


Import/Export 


BUYWG OUTLET FOR THE LARGEST 
TRADMG COHPANES 
Branded £ Luxury goods. Fimuanc ea! 
cosmetics. walenes. pens, dimaware 
pyatal. raraBags. optical frarres, ajtv 
tfaoes, Ira cigars, Gucci, Tan Heuer, 
Carter, WeAprad, Swaruvsto, Hwem, 
Fflnajaro, Prada. Hemes, etc. 

Ptaan (SUs TRADMG DESK 
Teh USA +1412407-0973 
Ftc USA *1-272407-9058 
M caSs mated Mh utmost confidsnce. 


BUYING ParrtU total 
AS branded goods/tuney goods 
Warns, pens, cttiaeare, oystsi. toys, 
leatoergoods, (ragrance/cosmeiics, 
opfical. cigars. Gucci, Tag Heuer, Cartier. 
Wedgwood, Herend, Coach, sic. A iexat- 
der TtatSrg M USA 71MB2-0530 Fax 
71B4W-2K9. Confidence guaranteed 


JEANS. International brands. Inquires 
firm principals only. Coronation Wems- 
ubbI Lid. Faratmte +3250.4291.19 
E-mai: on irwepophwteunabe 


INTERNATIONAL BRAND FOODS. In- 
quriss from prmjpak onV M Tafrjg 
& Modeling C&S Fax <£50.4291.19 
troai: on aneepoplmeunlbe 


BUHDHG MATERIALS 
w*Mj)lan6nccan 

Tel 4164314150 Fax 4164314243 Can 


BUYING BRAND NAMES and toxury 
prodoas fnr ttnd wold madetB. Guaran- 
teed. Stock lot pnees only. Cash pay- 
ments and (facrabon. Tet Paris +33 m 
46 59 68 85. Fax +33(0)1 48694380. 


GENERIC CIGARETTES, American 
biend tobacco, tows prices, prorate 
labeling a vattK*. FAX USA: 1 (954) 
474-3866. 


FAMOUS BRAND FOODS, healtfi & 
Oeaury ads. US wpi Vofcme 
puntases only. Fax 954-474-3666 USA 


Iff - 1 /French cheese it buScAJK origi- 
nal red telephone kiosks aB tor export. 
Fax -44 181 857 1221 


LEVI SOT'S. Used and New. Quafijy 
jeans direct from the USA. Honest and 
Ratable. Fax 5034284749 USA 


POWD0TED nut Holland origin tow 
pnees, vofcrne putdese only. FAX USA: 
+ 954 474386E 


OFFSHORE BANKS 
COMPANIES & TRUSTS 
ASSET PROTECTION 
IMMIGHATION/PASSPORTS 
TRADE-FINANCE 

ASTON CORPORATE 
TRUSTEES LTD 

19 Peel Road, Douglas, hie of Han 
British Wes 

Tel: 01624 626591 
Foe M 62 4 625126 

E Mail No. astoneenterprbsjtel 


n DELAWARE INCs, LLCs 

Deal direct with Delaware agent, save 
joney on USA company formation. 
Deteware he. or UC. SS50 USS. Fast 
reliable, complete service m all US 
Sates. Free info. Cai or lax 
CopAmerica, Inc 
30 OU Ruririck Lane. Dept H 
Dover. DE 19901 
Teh 302-7384300 
F« 302-7364820 
Internet rthU/wwwcoipairenc&Jsm 


OFFSHORE COMMERCIAL BANK 
FOR SALE 

Wbft Class A fcense and correspondent 
bank retetatshfL Indudes taking 
conanny wsti Geneva office. and a US. 
Srattary wfo Nw York Cty office. and 
a UX suDsKfary wto London office. 
fomedBte acqusttxi. 100% controL 
US SGQX0Q. FINANCE MERCHANTS 
GROUP. Nassau at 242494-7080. 
Fax 242-384-7082 London ti/tec 
44 18} 539 8248 


MOMBASA 30 KH FROM TOWN, 

1 KM from expat SHOPPING C8TTER 
FOR SALE T shops. 2 restaurants, offic- 
es, telephone Ines United, water and 
electricity connected. 150 m from a mn- 
tietU w*e beadi Avslatte 14 plots of 
2000 SJ.ni Wife to: DATA STUDIO 2c; 
Via Marconi n 6, 34133 Trieste, My. 
Attention: Pairiins. Photos and video 
avaUrie 


FOR SALE 

5,000 pieces Swba made 
(hertz Chronographs 
assorted models. 

For detaSs FAX (++41) 32 351 48 88 


INTERNATIONAL MARKETING: Pftfr 
pras. Poland, Brad. BBon dotar Com- 
pany expendng. Leaders to ate market 
share. Top 500 average S750.000ryr. Far 
USA Dr. Baisky 301-460-5557. 


BUSINESS CONSULTANT IN TURKEY 
Seeking new opportuvbes in Turkey? 
Our company can hefo in al ReWt 40 
years experience. Future A.S. Jet 90 
216 347 01 51 Fax 337 4| 53 


HAWAII, OAHU. Move lo paradise Ice 
manufacturing & distribution company, 
5175.000. 3 bedroom carter home on i 
acre farmland with pool 5450.000. 
60B-239425B, «nk 806-235-8345. 


QUALITY USH) JEANS al brands men, 
women. aU sues Also Levi 501's. 
Fffl 509 584 9483 USA 


US. OR EUROPEAN BUSMESS. We 
will bety you End connections to sell your 
products. Fax 503 584 9483 USA 


gtaoes.Tcr pnee Est FAX: 
USA RECYCLENEAR. 


- 4 ■ -f AMOL»i )f9egTHEQUES OFFERED^ 

2 newfarge successful franchise outlets 

in Singapore and Bal Available in Apti. 

Owner retimg. Fax (65) 834 U3£6H 


Business Opportunities 


2nd PASSPORTS / Driving Lcences / 
DegreesrCemouflage Rasspors/Secret 
Bank Accourts. GM. P.O. Box 70302, 
Athens 16610. Greece. Fax 6962152. 
ht^'-vrjM.globahnoneyxam 


BUSINESS APARTMENTS 


BUSINESS IN 
BRUSSELS ? 

For a week, a month 
or longer. 

business apartments 
with every facility. 

Contact Jacques at: 
Brussels Hilton 
Residence 
Square Ambiorix. 28 
B-IOOO Brussels 
Tel: <32 2>743 51 11 
Fax: 132 2) 743 51 12 

“...your home for 
business " 

Minute* fmm the European 
('nmrniviina ami Parliament 


MONTANA NATURAL GAEL Owner of 
gas ptart seeks partner for development 
of produena fekk. Hampton Maftrt Gas 
Company. Fax 916467-6624 USA 


HEWLETT PACKARD LASER Printers. 
In stock Mwrap. Special Prices. Cal 00 
34 528 25335 Fax 00 34 Sfl 60558 
Rondex Tracing Incorporated 


AFRICAN A EAST European bar*- 
eoA^fcmas/tund managers required kn 
francs deals. Fax +44 181 857 1221 


COfflDENTIAL SWISS ADDRESS 
£100 per year. Free Momabon. Fax 
yor address: 33 (0)1 S3 01 31 19 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 

READY MADE CO^. FULL ADUN 
TRADE DOCUMENTS AND UC 
BANKWG A ACCOUNTING 
CHINA BUSINESS SERVICES 

Colder Stahi Ho tor Immeias 
senves S company brothuB 
MACS LTD, Room tiOB. Abon Plaza 
2-6 Gtanvle Road. TST, Kowtoon, 
Horg Kong. e-n»t tecsGhluraier.nte 
Tet 8ffi27241223 Fax 27224373 


POLISH LID. CO DUTCH OWIBL Pot- 
toko d cftencal / phamaceutol imdb- 
natronals lor twikfing prepaiatTOns. con- 
struction and bukling management 
Expsnanced on Via Poferi matter, seeks 
Etraiepc pamr wtfh corporate capfia! to 
merge for mduORaL residential and real 
I in Poland. TeUFax: 


UX OPPORTUWTY 
Fantaac oppoduity to buy cton of 60 
retail dotting shops. 30 tedeswear. 30 
manswear. Annual sales 25 AJHfion 
Pounds Staring. Principal telefax USA 
1-757-253-7797 Or V8NMGH575 


LWqra Restaurant Opporhmttei 
‘World Famous*. High profle 8 Hgh 
Gross Sales. Beverly HNsfLos Angates. 
Caiomia. OuakSed Bums only. 

CJ Evrm, 23879 Catebasas Rd. POB 
150, Cabbasas, CA 91302-1502 


REMOVE YOUR PRODUCTIVE capac4y 
to Estonia 3 hangers of 500 sqm. Oder 
space 2000 sqjn., electricity 2300 kw, 
tebour COSl USS 300. Fax +372 6311533. 
E-maf mam&Qestpakee 


SINGAPORE. From US$1700 
(7 nghts) personal fitness trainer and pri- 
vate lour guide Included. Serge Meyers 
Travel Constetants. Tel / Fax +352 51 76 
03 Luxembourg 


SELL YOUR STOCKLOTS in Europe 
through a sold & quatfed company. Of- 
fers to Peacock Tradng Company. Tet 
*31 $299.674981. Fax 674923 


STUDEBAKER'S FRANCHISES offered. 
The luge USA Austrafea. Asia char of 
ereertanrent outlets diets franchise op- 
i for PRC, KL, Surabeye, Cebu, 
Fax (65) 738 0009 


NEWLY PATENTS RECEMNG Aerial 
suss aB types of ratio sets, Desas 1 * Pe- 
pyros PO Box 13367 Lnndor SW9 OZR 


OFFSHORE COW AMES. Fv tree bro- 
drore or advice TaL London 44 181 741 
1224 Fax 44 181 748 655&'6338 
wwwapdetnuxu* 


PORTLAND CEMENT + KL1NKER. 
We offer bulr-bagged any desliratm 
Fax 972 3 9243104 W 39 2 545W64 


SEEK PARTNERANVESTOR to stereup 
rtgn bass bingral magazine m Pans an 
Water i JiaveL TAtax -33-J Je340 GE 


Telecommunications 


kail back 


'4172ns A mw. • 
i.wa satis 


The Orighal A Largest Otscurart 
TetecoomurucaEkHis Company 

Tel: 1 .206^99.1991 
Fax: 1^06^99.1381 

Eat MoDkaUbacAcoro 


Come see uS a.' Cea-T ~ 
'Tiani^&jsiML"Br‘23 
Fbwwer. Ganany litodi 13-15 


Business Services 


BUSINESS SERVICES in SOUTHERN 
SWITZERLAND. Sbent & axperirced. 
ttafen - German - Engto • French. T tt 
+41 Jfl .005.45. a Fax +4180554^5. 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


ATTENTION CALLBACK AGENTS !! 


- Doable conmissions paid on first three months of 
actual usage. 

• Commissions paid promptly from monthly usage 

reports. 

• Worldwide low rates — Superior Quality & 

Service. 

• Ask about our now diroct dial service SI 
DYNAMIC TELCOM INTERNATIONAL, INC 


D T I 


Louis Dvorak / USA 
Tel: (954) 522-3300 Fax: (954) 522-8242 


SUPPLIER OF WELL 
KNOWN BRANDS 


of Leather Goods & Accessories 

is looking for strong buyers 

(wholesaler?, cfiscotsit-sfores) 


lnc. 
276199 


Worldwide 

Roc +31 (O, 

The" 


EMPRtE STATE M8UXNG 

ADDRESS 

Gain Mart cracariUty. 
EnkbMhaNr prnamce In 
the woritfs best-known 
building. MnS received, phone 
answering, contarence 
room, t u mtehwd minl-otlicen. 
M IL SI AIL O TTILL JO HC n 
TB: 21HJHB2 • MUMMW5 1 


INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITIES 


FREE 

ISSUE 


Leant a H you need to 
know about buying and 
owning a franchise ... 
with a subscription to 
Franchise Times. 

Call 1-800-678-9595 

_to receive a free issue for 
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no obligation whatsoever. 


Franchise Times 


CONTROL 

AN ENTtflE COUNTRY MOTH 



JUST PUBLISHED 

International Herald Tribune’s 
international Franchise Guide 
INTERNATIONAL MASTER FRANC HISE 
& AREA DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

Thi* ilclinilivR guidi- dx-volrd snMy 1u intrmalinnal franrhi>ing. 

I Mailed. uirin-dAr piuRIm on the vrorfifs h-aifing internet tonal 
fnmeiiMjri. i Th pag*~> l SSJ WS. 

Semi til IHT t.uiri*-. P.O. Hut 12188. Oakland (1A UlWt, t jsh. Monrj- Dnirr, \ iss 
or M/C (-J-nd ArrL #. Kxnir. Hair S .Auurnval Spiuluie). Trt^illO'WHiWl 
nr Fax: (SHI) .MT-SJ15 ur K*Uiiil: ram^niltifniithnDluirl 

jtmlb iS &ri bum: 


Tfo DdlJMlUO mwaw 


On April 25, 1997, 

Hie 1HT will publish a sponsored section on 

nvnatvATioivAi FMJvonsrvG 

This section will include advertising from franchisors 
marketing their products to the international 
investment community, as well as articles covering 
the trends in the industry. 

JI. g j^giBe in this j^gtUjLs a^UbjdsSBC iBBfiHfe 

Nina Nidi - IHT London 

TeU 0171 430 0325 - Fax: 0171 420 0338 

Kimberly Guerrand-Betrancourt - IHT France 
TeL 33 01 4-1 « 94 76 - Fax: 33 01 41 43 93 70 

Judith King - IHT New York 

Tel.: 212 752 3890 / 800-572-7212 - Fax:212-755-8785 


COMPANY SET UP SUPPORT 

You want la open a sAnfo n n Germa- 
ny. Warfl BAr France Wei set up me 
onpany tor you. ttoudina salt. Hasse- 
reer * Fanner FrenkhrUU Gemeny. 
TeMaVJ)69S34IW) F«448l(0|6Sffi27B4« 

MM - Planning to or dong business 
«i Indra? 1 wl make it eaaer lor you 
Troubleshooting, luma rounds, locating 
p aimers or pra-nwument advice 26 
years experience. Retererces provided. 

Fax Gautsm Berry m MumOar 
91-22-2870607 

YOUR OFFICE M DUBLIN Serviced Of- 
fices. Ual Phone & Fat. Offshore Co. 
Formations. Prestigious Address Tet 
♦353 (1) 475 1691 Fez <1) 475 1689 

PROBLEM SOLVER available globally. 

30 years varied business experience, 
credible, decisive, discreet Tel: 
*31-20-6701 B48 Fa* 31 20 6791371 

CONRDENTWLmafogakkpM 
rs^sterod office in UK /bustoess senicss 

Fax +44 (0)1924 200561 

YOUR FBENCH-ENGUSH OFFICE bi 
Florida Translatcns, Consulting. Ual 
Phone/Fax: BlMtB-1809 USA. 

YOUR OFFICE M LONDON 

Bond Street - Ual. Phone. Fax. Tetox 

Tet 44 171 499 9192 Fa* 171 489 7517 

Security and Surveillance 

ALPHA BRAVO ASSOCIATES 

Apia Bravo otter a compiae tSsoret 8 
prolessranai service to corporate 
& idvidual ctots. To dscuss your 
rBquirEfrms cortad Jareroy Upson wr 

444 171 352 9309 

Capital Wanted 

BANKS) SEEKS USS800JS0 for high 
yield trading program. 5 x money back 
alter 6 weeks. Fax ♦+49-42 1-46221 7 

SEEKMG SWISS FRANC LOAN 1S1M. 
well secure! Telefax: 1-757-253-7797 
or l-eOO-366-7575. 

Capita/ Available 

NEW SELF-UQUiDATING LOAN lor 
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LEGAL NOTICE 


Plaintiff, 


UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK 

MERRILL LYNCH," pi ERCe) * PENNER* * 

& SMITH INCORPORATED, 

- against - 

BANCO B7IERNAT10NAL SJL; SWISS UNK3N SERVICES DU; ABEL COSTA; GRACE J 
AVIGOOR; D. SALMON; WHOLESALBtS* NTERNATIONAL; ASAKO YOKOMURA, tJUa I 
ASAKO ALUBOWICZ; VORTEX NTBMATK)NAL TRUST, INC 4 JEFFREY YOKOMURA; | 
HENRY ALUBOWICZ; ROkEO MILES; Iffi TBUSTi SOLER PROMOTION SJt; ANTOME 
SOLER; MICH EL HAM MEUN; SARL XT.BJL; SYLVAM GALLE A; MCKAEL LUCAS; 1 
SARL DJL TUFFERY; REUI TUFFERYi PIERRETTE TUFFEHY; BERNARD WIRTH; | 
JACQUES DERRIER; LOUIS DELAUNEY; SA JCM DffiUSTRE; JEANCLMJDE MOREL; . 

SS1GE SAVDAN; CLAUDE DUDEFAND; SARL AGRSJX; MICHEL DESCAUPS: SCI 

BB1E ALLS; IL BACOUET; RENE LABORDE; EUETTE VKHJJE; ALAIN VIOLLE; I 

LUJANE SPQMIATO; DAMB. IEN7E; KBL ENCONTRE, afleta lQel; JEAN-PAUL KE1L; ■ 

OODO ET CK PHOENIX KAPITALDt&tST; ECOUA8CHE SA JEPtAR; MANUEL DE 

CARVALHO; JEAN-CLAUDEVEDRME;MARE-FRANCOISEANTOMEnEIIOURtCETTE ■ 

BON; BB1NARD BROUSTME; CHEW HADJEB; SERGE 3IH7Y; MAURIC&CUUDE | 

RIBES; JEANCLAUDE MARIE TEBSBBE; PATRICK BOUE: CHRISTIAN HERVE . 

RJCARD; EUROPEAN TRADERS INVESTMENT GUARANTY; R^GB LEROY; EURL ■ 

POGA; ANDRE OERRER, dtbAl ANKttDERRIER CONSULTANT; PRO VANTAGE ONE I 

NTERNATIONAL; TOM MSER; ANNE RICARD; KARME POITRAT, IIS. GtELYffiretnama ■ 

unknown); JOCELYNE JOUFFROY; GUY TAVET; ALAN BASSE; SERGE DUMONT) and ’ 

JOHN DOES 1-3, I 

Detwidante . 


Nol 96 Cfv. 9589(RWS) 


ORDER PURSUANT 
TO 28 U^.C. § 1655 
DIRECTMG ALL 
DEFENDANTS TO 


Upon the annexed effidavk ol Mchael C. SUbertrerg (the ■Sfcecbwa AffidavtT). and It appearing that none ot ttw 
defendetdB In this action can be served wtt*i the State of New writ and that ptakidB Marti, Lynch, Plaice. Fanner A Srm8i 

Incorporated, despite due dHganoe. is unrtde to ascertain the addresses ot those defendarte B&ted In Exhibit B to the 

Slboberg Affidavit, and tor good cause shown, it Is hereby , _ 

ORDERED that eech dslendant feted in ExhtoK A to lha Sibartwg Aflkfavfl shal be satved wftfi ttw order and the 

in Bits action in accordance with tt» leqrtrBmerts of Ride 4(e) or (f) ollhe Federal Rues ot C«a Procedure, as 

j; and lislurther 

ORDERED that pwsuan! to 28 U5.C. § 1655, each defendM fisted In Erf** A to the Sitoerberg Affidavit shaB appear 
or plesrt n tWs action no taterihan seay (80) days atteriNB enter has been served upon such detandart and it b further 

ORDERED that the defendants feted In ExhibB 8 to the SBwberg Afldattl shell be served by putfcalion of Me 

order, exchxfog ExhBsl A to the Sfoertoerg Affldevi. In Die European veislon of the tafemaaonal HwaW TAune. ned less then 

once a week for a period at six corsecuttve weeks (the ‘PiiiScatran Periotf): and 8 is further 

ORDERED that (he defenderte fisted In Exhfeit B 10 the SOberbei^ ASdawd shall appear or plead in this action no 
later than sbdy (60) dtoys after the expiration of Ihe PUbfcallon Pwtod. 

Dared 1-15-97 (att»bgB.ri ttHl. IlgfartLW. .SiBBaO 

Unried States District Judge 

UNTTED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

SOUTHE RN DISTR ICT OF NEW YO RK x „ 

MERRILL, LYNCH, PB1CE. FENNER , 

A SWTH INCORPORATED, i 

PtaMft, ' W SUPPORT OF 

— saainst- I B PA STE MOTION FOR 

BANCO KTEAHATTONAL SA. at tf. ^ \ 

D ofcnOanto . ^ APPEAR OR plead 

1. 1 am an II. Lynch. Pierce, Fenner 

S SmHh Incorporated 
mofion for an outer. 

io2 F^yfratiofBte. whose akfressas, 

2. As more partiadarty destxbad'in the Con^dairt tar Interpleader and Declaratory ReSef rConroWn T), Merrtt 
Lynch is In possBotion ol three nteresr-heartog accounts tn this district containing art agaagaia ol spprbxlrnaZary 
S2^77,14ai3. The adWtos in the toree aocounte, induefrg dtecrepanciee between me ktendbes a parsons ana entitles who 
had deposited funds and those to whom toe account holders directed Menfl Lynch to transfer the finds, along wtti otoar 

• ^ ■— - — 1 *"■ ■ — *- possible fraud andtor 

'ir action under 28 U.! 
h Ihe accounts. 

_ New YmK ekhar 

personady or through* egert. audfTtfra personal |uiiadteban over them is appropriate. SflaCompiaxn. 1 a However, none of 
toe deteratents can be Gened wllhin the Stele of New Ytefc. Accorrtngly. Menif Lynch n 




_ Lynch requests an onter, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. 

§ 1B55. rtreding the defendants to appear or plead no taler than sbdy dm after sendee ot thB order b effected (toe hKunmg 
ontet^. Such an order may be served on the defendants wherever foiaxL 

4. Merrd Lynch nee located an cd the domestic defendants and rnost of the foreign defendants; those defendants 
whom Merr* Lynch has located are feted to ExtfibU A hereto. Mani Lynch Mends lo serve the domestic defendants wto the 
werrtrei order, accoroperaed by a surnmons end a copy of toe Comptamt, m accordance Mto Fed. R.Ov.P.4 (el and (h). Merrte 
Lynch Hands to serve the tarrtan defendants whom a has located n accordance with appBcabie rtemalionai IraaBee or local 
law; as tequbad by Fed.aCtv.P.4(f). 

5. Upon Wormaflorr and toeOef. each of . . 

France See BSw B. Merrtl lynch has attempied 10 locate the addresses ol thrae defendants 


fiW B. Merrtl Lynch has 

. atari I am Mormed that — — „ . _ . . j ^ 

1 searched Europevi naaional and local (frectones ot corporatrons and todraiduaJs. 


Lynch's French counsel, who 

__ . Tam futoer Wormed that tote 

r w esSm fl or Included the ertons of Menfl Lyndi'b n-housa attorneys, who exheurftaly searched European corporate 
drectwraT After this rMgent towstlgailon. Menfl Lynch Ja» been uiabfa to locate the defendantelsted in ErfeltB. 


S. Because 


serves on the defendants Med to ExhfobB 1st 


A Bis Impracticable. Merrte Lynch respeettutyrequeeta 

permission, pursuant to 28 USD. $ 1655. to serve these defendants by pubishfng the warning order once a week for six 
consecutive weeks (the -Pubflcation PenocT). In the New York Law Journal and the European version ol the MamaUonat 
Hereto Tribune. 

7. With rasped to Die defendants listed In ExhM B. Merritt Lynch requests that the warning otter dtrea (hem to 
pieed or appear no later than sixty {SOI days after the expIreBon of the RtoP c Mfon Period. 

8. No prawns request for this or dmtar refid has been made. 


Swom to before me this 23rd day ot December. 1996 


Michael G. SUberbeq 


Notary Pubic 
(stamp of notary pubic) 

ExhfoR B to Affidavit of Michael C. Smoberg 

1. John Doe 1. John Doe 2 and John Doe 3: Principal ResUencas In France. 

2. Mktoel Hammeim Principal Residence In France. 

3. Phoenix KapiTakSenst; Principal Ptace cf Business in Europe. 

4. Ecomarehe SA Jepim; Princ^ai Place of Business in Europe. 

5 Jean-ctaude Vednne; Principal no sidnnee in Fiance. 

a Chert Hacjefc Principe) Residence In France. 

7. Serge Durant; Principal Residence in France. 

Ddendwris wtaffog to obian a copy d the CofttoteM fo this acbon should cotta one of the fofiowfog: (1 ) Mtetra Jean- 
Marie Bergouberw. Gkte Loyreca NoueL 26 Cous Albert ler. 75008 Paris. France: (2) Mktoart C. Sfoertwg. Esq., Uotvflo. 
Mxamowtz. GrareL taaon & Sfoerbere, P/Z. XS F»h A*enue. New Yafc. New^ Yc* 10017; or (3) The UnBad States Dtatrid Corel 
for the Sottfiem District d New Ybrit. Office of 9» C*arii al toe Can. 500 Peart SoeeL New Ybifc, New YbiK 10007-1312. 
This nonce was Brat pUAshad March 5. 1997. 











































































Sports 


PAGE 20 


WEDNESDAY. MARCH 19, 1997 , j 

— W 


World Roundup 


Pride and Fear a Spur as Porto Faces Manchester 


*1 fir* - 


Japanese Strikeout? 


By Rob Hughes 

International Herald Tribune 


BASEBALL Without ever throw- 
ing one of his vaunted 100- mite -per- 
hour fastbails, Hideki Irabu appar- 
ently will return to Japan and sit out 


O PORTO, Portugal — Fear 
ought never to enter the 
vocabulary of people in- 
volved in something as po- 
tentially glorious as reaching the UEFA 
Champions League se mifin als. 

Yet, traveling with Manchester 
United to this northern Portuguese 
stronghold of soccer, I heard and felt 
fear in two separate contexts. 

From Hilano, the young goalkeeper 
of FC Porro whose goal was breached 
four rimes in the first leg of the quarterfi- 
nal against Manchester, came the ad- 
mission that he had frozen with fear at 
the prospect of playing against Eric 
Cantona, the United cap Lam. At 21, 
maybe professional apprehension of a 
modem “god" of the sport is under- 
standable: it is just that few admit 
openly what Hilario did, and few em- 
bodied surrender in the field quite so 
obviously. 

I trust the young man gets a grip on his 
nerve, on the bail, and the situation for 
the second-leg game Wednesday night in 
the 50,000 capacity Estadio Das Antas. 

“We will not be as generous this 
time, I promise you." Hilario has said. 


this big-]eague baseball season. 
“We’re leaving Wednesda 


“We’re leaving Wednesday," 
his agent, Don Nomura, said From 
his Los Angeles office. Nomura 
said he and the Japanese pitcher 
were booked on a flight to Tokyo- 
Last week, Nomura faxed a tetter 
to all major-league general man- 
agers, saying lus client would not 
play this season unless he was al- 
lowed to sign with the New York 
Yankees by Tuesday. The San Diego 
Padres, who own Irabu’s rights, 
don't expect a deal by Tuesday with 
the Yankees or anyone else. {API 


Bye-Bye Bayern 


soccer Juergen Klinsmann an- 
nounced Tuesday that be would 
leave Bayern Munich at the end of 
the season because he is not happy at 

the club. The 32-year-old striker 
said be had had a talk with the team’s 
chairman, Fnuiz Beckenbauer, last 
week and said that he probably 
would play abroad next season. 

“I don't fit in here.' ' Klinsmann 
said. (Reuters) 


* 'No one can see us beating Manchester 
United 5-0, but who knows? If we gel a 
goal in the first 10 minutes. United may 
be frightened.” 

Histoiy, at least, is on the side of 
Hilario. The Porto colors he now wears 
were triumphant by 4-0 in this same 
seething cauldron a decade ago when 
United last visited, in the Cup Winners 
Cup. 

Yet fear is not in United's makeup. 
“We don’t want to do anything ally," 
says the Manchester coach, Alex Fer- 
guson. “It would take a tremendously 
inspired performance by Porto to win 
the tie. but we expect them to play for 
their pride in front of their own 
people." 

Pride before fear. That has a more 
noble ring to. sporting jargon. To 
achieve it, the second reason for ap- 
prehension has to be eliminated ar the 
same venue. 

Manchester United is the first English 
champion to reach this far in the com- 


petition since the horror of the Heysel 
Stadium in Brussels in May 1985. when 


Stadium in Brussels in May 1985. when 
39 fans were crushed to death and hun- 
dreds injured after rioting by English 
fans. England's penance is paid, so far 
as the unacceptable loss of life in a 
sporting arena can ever be forgiven. 


Now, not only has Euro 96 proved that 
the English can promote soccer safely, 
enjoy ably for millions of Europeans, 
but its champion, Manchester United, is 
on the cusp of restored preeminence on 
the field. 

That, however, brings 9,000 fans 
abroad in its wake. When United’s play- 
ers left behind the cold and die rain of 
Manchester on Monday, the advance 
guard of that mass army of fans were 
already there in the airport. Some of 
them were intoxicated in berth the literal 
and euphoric sense. They were bawdy 
rather man abusive. 

The landing in Oporto was a brighter 
world. Insraari of umbrellas, we needed* 
parasols to shield ourselves from shim- 
mering heat, 

The Anglo-Saxon and the Larin game 
shelter in Europe's diverse climes. Yet 
here, around a contest that should last no 
more than 90 minute, the cultural dif- 
ference is itself a volatile cocktail. 

Portugal is on red alert The B ritish 
Embassy in Lisbon, and police forces in 
both countries, are aware that 6,400 
United fans are coming with bona fide 
tickets for a segregated area of the Antas 
bowl. Estimates are that 2,600 others are 
heading for the stadium either without 
tickets, or with rickets for the Porto 


sector, supplied by rogue travel agents 
or scurrilous ticket touts. 

Europe has not seen such numbers in 

adozen years. There wilL apparently, be 

450 policemen inside Das Antas, ana 
many more, some of diem armed and 
some flown up from Lisbon, in the 
streets. 

From fall to winter and almost to 

spring, Porto had been unbeaten and had 

conceded just 12 goals in 27 games at 
home and abroad. It had ousted the 
migh ty — but faded — AC. Milan from 
the Champions Cup, it had stretched 
almost out of sight in the Portuguese 
league. 

Either complacency, or lost nerve, 
has reversed the picture. Before, during 
and after the thrashing in Manchester, 
Porto has suddenly shipped its second 
12 goals, only this tim e in five 
matches. 

Worse, its reputation is burning. 
There are millions of Portuguese, par- 
ticularly those in Lisbon and the south, 
only too ready to believe accusations 
that Porto systematically bought suc- 
cess by bribing referees, including, it is 
alleged, a R omanian whistler in 1984 
what Porto eliminated Aberdeen from 
the semifinal of the Cup Winners Cup. 
The Aberdeen manager that night. 


Alex Ferguson, is back wearing another, 
coat, the colors of Manchester united; 
He wisely keeps his own counsel da 
thoughts of bribery so many years ago. 

He thinks, rather, of the oppooerit-in 
Das Antas. though he cannot yet see. 
him. Antonio Oliveira, a Porto, hero 
until his team’s recent collapse, Jbs 
gone to ground. • - - : - - - 

Oliveim may merely be seeking pri- 
vacy to plot Porto’s comeback. But si- 
lence cost him $7,500- — a UEFA 'fine, 
for refusing to face die media — after, 
the first leg two weeks ago. Now, je-' . 
fusing to meet even Porto’s press, lad-; 
ing his team out of town at Santa Maria' ' 
da Feira, Oliveira works for self-respect 
and future employment. - - . . 

The meekness of his ceaia - in. 
Manchester may have been partly ex- 
plained by the fact that UEFA s warning " 

. system meant eight of the players were ; 
one yellow card from suspensionjt’sno; 
better for the game Tuesday: three are, 
suspended, another eight have one yel-> 
low card, and three more are abseothurt. 
Nevertheless, they have nothing to lose, 
but their reputation. They will fwget the 
cards and go for the ball. And fear 
should not come into it at all. ■ 

Rob Hughes is on the staff of, The 1 - 
Times in London. . 




mm 


Revelation in Senna Trial 


AUTO RACING Ayrton Senna's 
car bad been modified without per- 
mission before the fatal 1994 San 
Marino Grand Prix, a court in 
Imola, Italy, was told Tuesday as 
the trial continued into the Brazili- 
an auto racer's death. 

But Charles Whiting, race del- 
egate of tile ruling International 
Automobile Federation, said tbai 
changes made to the chassis would 
have been approved if (hey had been 
submitted by the Williams team. 

Whiting was testifying at the trial 
in which the team's owner. Frank 
Williams, his technical director and 
chief designer, along with three race 
officials, face manslaughter 
charges. (AFP) 




■ 



For Figure Skaters, It’s ‘Quad’ Time 

All-or-Nothing Leap Is the Big Weapon at World Championships 


L AUSANNE, Switzerland — 
Tuesday afternoon brought 
forth the kindest warmth of 
spring, and yet the crowds were 
filin g indoors to their seats around a 
pond of manufactured ice for the World 
Figure Skating Championships. 

It’s gymnastics, it's ballet, it’s Las 
Vegas. 

There is a 14-year-old girl who is the 
favorite to win the women's gold medal 
and the 550,000 first prize. 

Preceding her into the spotlight will 
be several older men, some of them 
dressed ridiculously, most of them seek- 
ing to impress by flinging themselves in 
the highest, fastest spin they can manage 
with the blind hope of landing squarely 
and surely upon a single blade. 

It’s a bit like jumping off a high-rise 
balcony with only a tightrope io break 
the falL 

As of Tuesday, the defending men's 
champion, Todd Eldredge of the United 
States, was mulling over whether or not 
to take the risk of attempting a "quad,” 
a four-revolution aH-or-nothmg leap 
that is being planned by his fellow' con- 
tenders, chiefly Alexei Unnanov of 
Russia, the defending Olympic cham- 
pion, and Elvis Stojiko of Canada, the 
world champion in 1994 and 1995. 

Eldredge sprained his right ankle less 
than two weeks ago, which might have 
persuaded him to err toward caution. 

But then in training Monday, there he 
was, hitting a quad. 

“It's something £ may still throw in 
there, but it's doubtful.” Eldredge said. 
“If I’m skating after the other guys and 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 




MU 


. . ■& . 
,^ v 




5 Charged in Hong Kong 


horse racing Five men were 
charged with illegal gambling Tues- 
day in a widening scandal in Hong 
Kong's multibilli on-dollar horse ra- 
cing industry. The five were among 
37 detained Sunday by Hong 
Kong’s Independent Commission 
Against Corruption in a swoop on a 
suspected gambling ring. Two of 
the men are Malaysians. All five 
pleaded not guilty to the charges 
and were released on bail. (AFP) 
• The owner-breeder Allen 
Paulson and his syndicate partner. 
Coo lm ore Stud, have filed an in- 
fertility insurance claim on Cigar, 
the 1 995-96 Horse of the Year. The 
action was disclosed in a statement 
by Richard Craigo, Paulson’s Los 
Angeles-based attorney. The policy 
is for $25 million. (AP) 







Dab BaliboauIRMen 

Sophie Moniotte and Pascal Lavancby of France performing their first 
compulsory dance on Tuesday at the figure skating championships. 


they’ve all skated well, then it definitely 
becomes more posable that 1'U try it.- ■ 

But would be be able to land it? 
That's the question. 

“I don’t know if I would,” he said. “I 
think I definitely could.** 

How can be be sure which decision is 
the right one? His sport is a conflict of 
traditional artistry, of newfound ath- 
leticism and a completely greedy urge to 
do whatever feeds the already enor- 
mously high TV ratings. 

If he wins, it might be because every- 
one else around him was demolished. 

Yet Eldredge agreed with his team- 
mate, Michael Weiss, who said, 
‘ ‘There's no reason to stop progress. Let 
everybody go and express what they 
want to do." 

Chen Lu, who in 1995 became the 
first Chinese skater to win a world 
championship, is caught in another kind 
of crossfire. 

She has been training in the United 
States for two years, only to return home 
to learn, apparently, that the Chinese 
federations had exercised its right to-take 
much of her prize money. 

“For two consecutive years my 
coach and I have been living in the U.S. 
and we were not familiar with the Na- 
tional Olympic Committee regulations 
concerning prize money," she said 
Tuesday. 

“Then we returned to China and 
found out about it " 

Chen was ' speaking at a press con- 
ference. Her answers were relayed by an 
interpreter who occasionally conferred 
with a Chinese official before answer- 
ing. 

Chen, 20, said she was competing this 
week only on behalf of the Chinese 


federation, which risks sacrificing its 
place in Olympic figure skating next- 
winter if Chen does not finish in the top 
24 at these championships. 

She recovered from a foot injury, less 1 
than a month ago and in qualifying this, 
week she left die ice in tears after am 
unconvincing performance in which rite 
fell once. i 

Such pressures might be beyond the) 
imaginati on of the 14-year-old Tara Li-! 
pinski. who, if she wins, will replace) 
Sonja Henie as the sport's youngest! 
world champion. Lipinski is a month' 
younger than Henie was in 1927 when) 
she won the first of her 10 world titles. < 
Lipinski 's main competition might) 
be her American teammates, the <te-. 
fending champion Michelle Rwan and 1 
Nicole Bobek. ! 

At 16, with a disappointing finish at 1 
the U.S. national championships last) 
month, Kwan seemed comparatively ■ 
old. ) 

Irina Slutskaya, 18. the two-tune. 
European champion from Russia, is* 
among the candidates to prevent an! 
American sweep. 

• -No Soviet or Russian woman has ever! 
won a world championship. 

■ Changes in Judging 

The president of the International' 
Skating Union, Ottavio C inquanta, said! 
Tuesday that changes in figure skating's' 
esoteric judging system could be made ) 
before the Olympics next year, Reuters* 
repented from Lausanne. ) 

C inquanta is known to be upset at the ! ' 
confusing result of the men's event at' 
the European championships in Paris in! 
January, which he felt was incompre- 1 
hensible to the public. 


■ c 


v / 






Tale of Two Players: Morose Cecil and Happy Ken 


N OT LONG after the Pittsburgh Pirates won 
(he 1979 World Series, their faiheriy first 
baseman and philosophical slugger, Willie 
Stargeil, was talking about the game he 
played so well. 

“When you watch kids playing sandlot baseball," 
he said, “you see kids having ftin. And that's basically 
what I think we should be doing as ballplayers. 
Whenever people talk about baseball, they don’t say, 
‘Work ball.’ They say, ‘Play ball.' " 

Stargdl’s credo should be tacked to the bulletin board 
in every major league clubhouse, except maybe that of 
the Seattle Mariners, where Ken Griffey Jr. resides. 

But even if StargeU's credo were tacked to the 
Yankees' bulletin board, another copy, enlarged and 
circled in red crayon, should be tacked to the wall of 
the locker where Cecil fielder resides. 

At the Yankees’ complex in Tampa, Florida, their 
designated hitter, Cecil Fielder, was grumbling about 
having to collect $7.2 million from die Yankees this 
season after enduring the embarrassment of rescinding 
his demand to be traded. 


By Dave Anderson 

Ne w York Times Senice 


fielder appeared unhappy enough for Joe Tone, the 
Yankee manager, to address his mood. 

“Being happy or unhappy isn't a qualification any 
more,” Torre said “He understands that.” 

But judging by his cheerless concern over his con- 
tract since spring training began, fielder seems to 
understand only that it’s time to shut up, hit home runs 
and drive in runs to enhance bis value as a free agent 
for the 1998 season. 

“I got a job to do now for the New York Yankees," 
he said “1 got to play baseball like I know I can this 
year, and then I’U take my chances.” 

He used the phrase “jilay baseball" like everybody 
does, but considering his somewhat bitter mood, he 
seemed to really mean “work basebaiL” 

Yes, to a major leaguer, baseball is a job. But to play 
it well, it should be thought of as a fun job. 

Of all the big-league players approaching the season 
that opens in two weeks, Ken Gnffey Jr. understands 
this concept the besL When asked at the Mariners’ 
camp in Peoria. Arizona, if he had to work at having 
fun playing baseball, he appeared dumbfounded. 

“Work at having fun?" he said "That could put a 
damper on things. Nah, I have fim. I grew up playing 
baseball. Why should l change because l make money?’ ’ 


Now in the second year of a four-year contract worth 
$85 million a season, the 27-year-old center fielder, 
who will probably still be known as Junior when he goes 
into the Hall of Fame, makes more money than fielder 
does. But he agreed to defer $1 .25 million a year to belp 
the Mariners pay his teammates. 

“I felt it was necessary for this team to be able to get 
guys they needed for us to win," Griffey said “If 
you’re going to get it, you’re going to get it. It doesn’t 
matter if you get it a year later or two years later or, in 
my case, four years later. The important thing is: What 
can I do to help this team that helps me?” 

Griffey suggested that if the Mariners asked him to 
take the minimum salary with his remaining money 
deferred in order to pay teammates, be would agree. 

“The big thing is getting to where the Yankees were 
last year,” he said “If that's going to help the team, 
let’s go. How much do you need to defer?" 

If only Cecil Fielder were more concerned with 
gening the Yankees again ‘ ‘to where the Yankees were 
last year,” instead of grumbling about his contract. 
But for him. like so many others, it’s "work ball." 

To Ken Griffey, it’s still ‘ ‘play ball.” And that's one 
reason many baseball people consider him the best ball 
player. 



' V* j n ■■ \ • i 





Boston second baseman John Valentin stopping a CTounThaVlir 1 ^ 

ovhlKiti'nn nnmi> .... .1 nil ^ . U “ U * U *>U 


exhibition game against Baltimore, as the Red Sox beat the Orioles 5-4. 


Scoreboard 


i * jn 

i 


BASEBALL 


Exhibition Baseball 


Atlanta 

Cluntotte 

Cleveland 

Indiana 

Mimaukee 

Toronto 


44 22 A7 12'4 

42 24 436 W* 

35 29 .547 201* 

30 34 MS 25% 

27 38 AI5 29 

23 42 154 33 


Florida 4, AitaniaT 
Pittsburgh 13.51. Louis 3 
Los Angtfes 7, Detroit * 

Boston 5, Bofflmort 4 

Now York Yankees fs»J & Kansas atv 2 

Tens 4. Minnesota 2 

Toronto 5 , Onto** 2 

Oncinnolt 4, New York Mete 1 

New Ydrt Yankees Is*} 9, GromMIng 0 

SanOfega&CatewfcS 

Chicago Cubs 8. Anaheim 1 

WBmukee 17, Seattle 5 

PNtaMpftla «, Outgo WMte Sox 5 , lOirm. 

San Fnmdsco & Oakland 5 


MIDWEST KUKION 

W L 


BASKETBALL 


NBA Stan dings 


*-utoh 

49 

17 

J42 

_ 

Houston 

43 

22 

M2 

5% 

Mtonesoto 

32 

32 

500 

14 

Oaflas 

22 

42 

Mi 

26 

Denver 

T9 

46 

an 

2916 

San Aid onto 

16 

49 

J48 

32 '4 

Vancouver 

11 

58 

.164 

W6 


PACarxcomSKMi 



x-Seattfe 

45 

19 

.703 

_ 

V_A. Lokm 

44 

21 

577 

VA 

Porltand 

38 

38 

i76 

8 

Sacramento 

2B 

37 

>131 

ir* 

LA. dippers 

27 

36 

.429 

1716 

PUUfun 

27 

X 

AI5 

I8'A 

Gawen Shite 
r-dlnotedpto 

25 

lyoff spot: 

40 

585 

M'A 


UmMCOMUOKI 

ATLANTIC DIVISION 

W L Pet CB 
Miami 48 17 .738 - 

Mew York 47 18 .733 1 

Orfondo » 29 i54 I] 

WbsWngtai 31 34 .477 17 

New Jersey » « Jl] iw 

pnnodaifihJo 17 47 M6 30-6 

Boston 13 54 .194 36 

CENTRAL OVTCHON 

x -Chicago 56 9 Ml - 

Detroit 47 18 .223 9 


MOMMY'S HSOLTS 

Mflwoukee 31 27 N 31—117 

Bosnia 31 27 34 34-128 

M: Robinson 1 1-18 4-8 28. Baker B-13 9-10 
25r B: Williams 8-10 13-14 2S. Walker 7-20 9. 
1224. Rebounds— Milwaukee 44 CGtlUom 7). 
Boston 44 (Water 7). Assists— Mltwautae 
24 (Douglas 9), Boston 2S (Wesley 6}. 

Utah 22 2V 33 30-114 

Chortott* 31 91 20 21- 93 

U: Malone 14-229-1 2 37. StatMqn 7-13 M3 
23r ft- Rl«e tl-18 4-« 29, Dim 7-11 3-4 17. 
Rebo un ds U tah S3 (MaioneU Charlotte 37 
(Dhoc 10J. Assists— Utah 30 (Homaeek 123, 
Owrkflto 25 (Mason, Dhoc. Bogues SI. 


Ortado 25 21 23 29 9—187 

AttoRto 21 27 19 31 14—112 

ft Hardaway 13-24 7-8 25, Show 5-0 3-4 14j 
A: Smith 14-23 7-7 28. Loettner 9-19 9-11 27. 
RoAowOs-Ortando 41 (Grant Stfkaty 93, 
Atlanta 50 (Loettner 15). Assists— Orlando 
21 (5taw. Hardaway 4). Atlanta 71 (Btarlock 
81. 

Detroit 17 9 34 22— 82 

awetad 23 18 IS 29— IS 

l>. Thorpe 3-7 1 4-1 7 2A G.HBJ 8-17 3-4 19J C- 
T.HH 11-13 4-10 26. CMiDs 8-14 2-2 19. 
nUMuoA-DeimB 45 tGJtm 11), deweiond 
42 (TJHIB 10>. Assists— Detroit 19 (G.H3I 7), 
Oveiamf 21 (Sura IQ). 

W B I hi mJ t au 33 23 33 71—1*9 

San Antonio 25 25 16 1W- 85 

W: Webber 9-U 4-5 24. Strickland 4-9 4-5 
1& LAj Alan rider 9-1 7 <H) 24, Maxwell 3-1 3 
5-8 11 Rebounds— Washington 44 (Webber 
9), San Antonio 39 (Perdue 7). 
Assists— Washington 30 (Slrfckfand 15 ), San 
Antonia 23 (Aieaonder ID). 

LA. Litters 37 29 21 28-113 

31 22 23 18- 94 
LAj Von Ert n-182-2% Campbel 10-18 
1-321; 0: McDyess 1 1-19 4-528, LEB9 8-20 
8-1324. Bebawmb— Los AngeM49 (Blount 
CamobeU 10). Denver 48 (MCOyeu 101. 
Asrtsfs-Las Angeles 15 (Von Exel 91, 
Denver 18 mwm&son 51- 

20 28 34 34-118 
Golden State 28 31 25 M— 95 

P: KMd 12-18 1-2 33. Ononw Ml A* 77; 
GAi MatthaH to-lBQ-4 21, Spewed 4-14 B-8 
20, Rebounds— Phoenh 48 (Johnson 10). 
Gotow Slate 51 (Martha* 11). 
Assbls— Phoenix 28 (Johnson 13), Golden 
State 20 (SprewtU uj. 


NCAA Women's 
Tournament 


SECOND ROUND 

MiMumnaioiiu 

Connedteul 72. Iowa 53 
Tennessee 74 Oregon 59 


Buffalo 

Pittsburgh 

Hartford 

Montreal 

Ottawa 

Boston 


NORTHEAST DMSIOH 

W L T PtS tf M 
37 21 11 8S 207 T73 
32 30 7 71 238 233 


27 33 10 64 193 319 

25 32 14 64 215 245 


23 33 14 M 193 206 

24 38 9 57 208 254 

WITUM COMTHTWr 

central revision 

W L T PtS GP 6A 
41 23 6 M 215 171 


Nolie Dame tut Texas 83 
George Washington 81, Tutor* «7 


Slanted 67, Texas Tech 45 
VtaderttlffSl. Kansas 44 

<MBUUT HnKNNW, 
LSU 71, Marquette 58 
FtarMa 92. Southern Cat 7B 


National Invitation 
Tournament 


41 23 6 88 215 171 

33 21 15 81 221 165 

33 33 5 71 204 213 

30 32 9 69 309 218 

20 31 12 86 166 160 

24 38 6 58 204 238 


SECOND ROUND 
Florida ST. 68. Michigan St 63 
WesrViroMd 74, North Caraflna State 73 
Altaians 74, Pittsburgh 71 
UNLV 89. HomS fiaOT 


x-Cbtemfo 

Edmonton 

Anahebn 

Cotgary 

Vancouver 

Los Angtfes 

Sqn Jose 


PACtnCDtMMN 

W L T fts GF SA 


43 18 9 95 240 171 

32 32 7 71 221 315 

29 X 11 4 ® 203 201 

X 34 8 <8 191 202 

29 37 4 82 218 2* 

25 37 9 59 188 233 


HOCKEY 


NHL Standi nos 


krPModtfpNa 
x-NawJaruy 
Boride 
NY. Rangers 

Washington 
Tampa Bay 
N.Y. 1 slanders 


IUTBB U OW BOW I 

ATLANTIC DtVBMN 

W L T Ms GF GA 
tfpWa 39 21 10 88 336 188 
nay 38 M 12 n m 1*1 


39 2M0 88 336 \B4 

38 X 12 88 198 161 

32 23 16 X 192 168 

33 » 9 75 729 TOO 

28 35 7 63 179 197 

27 35 7 61 187 217 

28 36 1 0 58 1 92 308 


Los Angtfes 25 37 9 59 188 233 

So" JdW 23 39 7 53 177 231 

x-cMnched playoff spat 

monbnt’s anui 

Boston a 1 0—1 

Buffalo 1 2 ?— S 

first Period: B-Audette » (Ptonto 

Smehfik) Second Period: B-HOttfnger 21 
(McKee. Shannon) A B-Souwie 17 (WRSari 
Payne) (ppl. 4, B-, Audotte 27 (ZMtoM 7VW 
Cartel: B-SmeMk 9 (Sanaa, Dam) & B- 
Ptante28 f&muk. Dowel fttoJ. Shots* ■«*: 
S- 5-15-6—28. B- 13-3-10-25. SooBeto B- 
Corey. B-Hcsefc. 

Ottawa 1 1 2-4 

N.Y. Rangers 8 2 1—3 

1st Period: a van Akn 10 tDoHUe) 2n) 


Period: O-Bdnk 5 CAifredMOa Redden] (sill, 
a New Tom, Bauer# (Langdon. Eastwood) A 
New Yart, Graves 29 CCourtncfl, Leeteh) 3rd 
Period: O-awrake 14 (AHredssaa PitfdO & 
N-Y. Gretzky X (Driven 7. D-Ganttier B 
(YasWn. PtttlcW Shots on goal: O- 1 34-M-33. 
New York 9-19-13-41. Gates OTugnutt. 
New York, RKtntr. 

Florida 8 1 3-4 

New Jersey 0 1 O—l 

1st Period: None. 2nd Period: F-Lowry 11 
ffLNIedermayer. Metkmby) % NU.-OdeWn 3 
(Ze-mO M Parted: F-Gustafsson & 4, F-Hufl 
B (Undsay, Rlzgerald} & F-wnshbum 2 
(Dvorak, Sheppard) tens on goat: F- ll-ll- 
1 — 29. NJ.- 11-11-10-32. Goalies: F- 
Vanbh a b rou dL NJ.-Puiham. 

St. Loots 0 1 1-2 

Pbowfc 2 8 1-3 

First Period: Phoenix, Tkacht* 4t 
(Mctfien-de) 1 Phoenix, Roenk* 22 
(Nurnitifaien, Curium) Second Period: 5I_> 
Hull 41 (Plunger, Tingeon) (ppl- TMnJ 
Period! S.L-Ptfuso 2 (Conray, YorVJ 5, 
PTiMnU, Finley 3 (Dim Shannon) Stab an 
goat SJ-- 10-14-13-37. Phoenix 104-7-36, 
Gooses S.L-Fuhr. Phoenix, KbaWbufln. 


Ill 525J»a 5. Mark Brooks 519.75a A. Phil 
Mfcketson 501 .790, 7. Tiger Woods oesuoa 8. 
scan Hoefi 48428a 9 . dovm Dum 390 . 00 a 
10. Kenny Perry 371 jsa 1 T. Paul Stonkawski 
38134a 12. Fled Couples 355.54a 11 Jim 
Furyti 34750ft 14. Steve Sirtcker 3425(Kl 15 
John Cook 341 uoa 

EUROPE 

1. Colin Moragomerta Scotland 331,364,16 
2- Miguel Anoei Malta Spain 266.23059 

3. Thomas Bfarn. Denmark 238457.40 

4. Darren Oaik* N. Ireland Ml J79.42 

5. Coternma Rosea Hob X0326-M 

6. tan Mfeavnm, mates 17186211 

7. Jean Van de Vetde. France 1&&07A.12 
& Per-UTrtt Johansson. Sweden 18163155 
9. Pool BraadhurA ertgtend 152,57190 
la Sam Torrance, 5cotkuid 150.90850 
IT.RooerChopirm England 118,99869 
12 Podralg Harrington, Ireland 112453.13 

13. Lee Westwood, EnBtamlKMjnax 

14. PetarMlROtaB. England 102898-57 

15. Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spidn 93^308 j22 


assKsaaSssS 

Be Tmjano Navka/N. Morozov, Belarus, 5 a 


la *' 

* 


CRICKET 


nmiouk 

TEST. STM [Mr 
*torimEiivs.iNoiA 

India: 438, 

liWIfs and India drew second tea. 




^ ' M 'TL * ^ 


SOCCER 




ICE SKATING 


Would championship 


jokhnu waixu ram cup 

SuwJtng* tar the Ryder Cup *0 b* played 
SepL 26-26 at VoMnroma In Sotupando. 
Spam. The Up lOffnblmqutfny for die 12- 
nwn tame end U.S. captain Tom Kftoond 
finpMR captain Sava B tf taf r a e aach 
Hive iwo wtkFcard ctaale a a: 

IMTED STATES 

1. Tom Lehman 74629ft 2 Mark ftMearo 
723.75ft 1 Slew ionn 5nm 4. Doris Law 


LAU8ANNE, BWTTZeRUND 

nuiia 


1. Oksana GrtlsdiuME. Piaiov, Russ. 0 4 

2. AffeUta WlttBWO. CMIonnlkov. Ruw< 0J 

15haa.Lynn Boumt/V. Knob, Cororaa. r O 
4 Sophie MankewP. Lannctiy, Franc*, 1 j 
he MMno Atestna/G. Peberat France. t R 
8. Elisabeth PunsakstfJ. SmUcut. U A, u 

7. Irina Lobacnma/i. Averfavkh. Russia. 28 

8. Wna RtmwwotL Yoroshenka Ukr, 


iwomoittiHi.finmi 
ASUH20N8 

Taiwan 3 Bangladesh I 

Barcelona 59. R^| ^ 
c " un “SftAfletkaMaiMd4v 

Tenerife 43 , Aitiienc Blll«n« , ? 0C ?* aW 

m 9 Gdon 32 CamSi ^?, 3Z ***- 
27- sevtiia 24. ^ 




i 











' 'c}^y\'c* 


;\ . , 


i? ^/a h 

1 'ni u > 

Ssss*^ 

• •■ -^V 


Van Exel Excels, 
Netting 30 Points 

Lakers Sink Nuggets , 113-94 


Nick V™?«u2.Th. , P 0 " 15 - Thorpe Jed De- 

A^uSfJi'Sis ^ , a ^r ts ' andGrant 
ISH&^'sSSs A&hTiKe ^is 

“? “h“. 8 *??*• ■ deficit 

t)ilr2 V^fp»l If 1 j 11031 48 seconds of regulation 
SfJUJJ; Va J.?* d . ®J*° sc ° red ^ won in overtime to end a 

3 0 tSSs WbUe SmkU,g eight season - hi 8 f i three-game tos- 
wuu , «ng streak. 

awhilP l .? B v“ V il T P Slcve Smi * scored 38 

“Thi ci,^ V ?* el s^d* points and Christian Laettner 
The Shots were just felling 27 for the Hawks- Buthwas 
^ me. I didn t do anything Mookie Blaylock who stole 

" J n . b ? u ? ds . p™. «« fouled 


enpH .1 ° —M.JFIUW*. WHO 5101 

i" ' ... ^ . an inbounds pass, was fouleu 

^ far S nt? ! II ^ S - th L Lakers 30(1 Wf both free throws to 
struggled with their shooting, even the score at 98 and send 

^ “ « the game into overtime. 

NBA Boohdup Blaylock, who finished 

. . ” ~ ‘ " with 18 points, put Atlanta 

^ to stay in the extra ses- 
Lakers wpe 14-of-23 on 3- sion with a 3-pointer 
pomters, including Van Ex- Anfemee Hardaway led 
C ^u~°r » « the Ma^c with 35 points. 

The Liters Byron Scott Jazz 114, Hornets 93 Karl 
.15p°m£s to reach Malone scored 37 points and 
^^mhis 13-year career. John Stockton reached the 
Elden Campbell had 21 12,000-assist mark as Utah 
points and 1 0 rebounds for the won at Charlotte 
Lakers, who swept the team’s The Jazz, who held Char- 
two games m Denver for the lotte without a field goal for a 
eighth time. 616-minute span bridging the 

Los Angeles has won sev- second and third quarters, 
en of the last 1 1 meetings in won its fourth straight and 
Denver. ninth in 10 games. 

With 26 points, Antonio Stockton, already the Na- 
McDyess passed the 2,000- tional Basketball Assori- 
point, while LaPhonso Ellis ation’s career leader in assists 
had 24 for the Nuggets, losers and steals, had 23 points to go 
of eight of 1 0 games. with five assists and two 

Cavaliers 85, pistons 82 In steals. That boosted his 13- 
Cleveland, Tyrone Hill's year career totals to 12,000 
short hook with 38 seconds assists and 2.499 steals, 
left gave the Cavs the lead for C©tticsi2&, Buck* 117 Eric 

good. Bob Sura added two Williams scored 25 points as 
free throws for the final mar- Boston snapped an eight- 
gin. and Hill finished with 26 game losing streak. It was 
Milwaukee’s 1 1th loss in 13 


Under 18? 
Free Entry to 
British Open 

The Associated Press 

TROON. Scotland — 
Attempting to capitalize 
on Tiger Woods's ability 
to draw youngsters to 
golf, British Open offi- 
cials said Tuesday that 
spectators under 18 
would be admitted free to 
the tournament July 17- 
20 at Royal Troon. 

“Hopefully, this will 
stimulate interest among 
young people and hope- 
fully it is something we 
will be able to continue in 
future years." said Peter 
Greenhough, chairman of 
the tournament conmrit- 
tee. 

Last year's tourna- 
ment at Royal Lytham at- 
tracted about 10,000 fens 
under 18 — wife tickets 
selling for $9.60. 

Woods, 21, has won 
three events on the Pro- 
fessional Golfers Associ- 
ation tour since turning 
professional last year. 


games, while the Celtics 
avoided a franchise-record 
eighth consecutive home loss 
wife their second victory in 
23 games. 

Glenn Robinson led Mil- 
waukee with 28 points, but 
fouled out with 4:49 left and 
the Bucks trailing by six. 

Bullets 109, Spurs 85 Chris 

Webber scored 24 points and 
Rod Strickland had 1 6 to lead 
Washington at San Antonio. 

The Bullets hit their first 
eight shots of the third quarter 
to break open a close game as 
Webber, Calbert Cheaney, 
J u wan Howard and Gheorghe 
Muresan scored .two baskets 
apiece in the 516-minute. 20-4 
run to open a 75-54 lead. Cory 
Alexander paced the Spurs 
wife a career-high 24 points, 
including six 3-pointers. 

Sims 1 1 6, Warriors 95 Jason 
Kidd had eight 3-pointers and 
capped a 17-0 Phoenix ran in 
the fourth quarter to finish 
wife a season-high 33 points 
as fee visiting Suns blitzed 
Golden State in San Jose. 

The eight 3-pointers tied a 
franchise record, while Kevin 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1997 

SPORTS 


PAGE 21 







TMBtOex ‘ 

kcilCrdrtHi^lV ftn* 

Colleen McCrea of George Washington heading downcourf with the ball, around Tu lane’s Grace Daley. 

Lady Ibis Reach NCAA Round of 16 


The Associated Press 

From fee beginning, the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association wo- 
men’s basketball tournament had a 
strong Southeastern Conference fla- 
vor. 

Two rounds later, it still does. 

Seven SEC teams reached the tour- 
nament. and six have made it to the 
round of 16, including fee defending 
national champion. Tennessee. 

The Lady Vols beat Oregon, 76-59. 
in fee Midwest Regional at Knoxville. 
Tennessee, on Monday night and will 
be joined in fee regional semifinals 
Saturday by league rivals Alabama. 
Georgia. FIoridaT Louisiana State and 
VanderbilL 

All won subregionals at home except 


Vanderbilt, which was not intimidated 
playing at Kansas on Monday nighL 
The Commodores won. 51-44. in the 
West Regional to snap the Jayhawks' 
21 -game winning streak at home. 

“We've played at Tennessee, at 
Alabama, at Georgia,'* said Vander- 
bilt's coach, Jim Foster. 

“When you play in those places, 
you develop a mentality and a mental 
toughness.” 

Florida and LSU both advanced in 
fee Mideast. Florida beating Southern 
Cal. 92-78, and LSU downing Mar- 
quette. 71-58. 

Alabama and Georgia won second- 
round games Sunday nighL The SEC’s 
other NCAA team. Auburn, lost to 
Louisiana Tech in the second round. 


Florida reached the final 16 for the 
first time, while LSU made it just two 
years after a disastrous 7-20 season. 

Vanderbilt, seeded sixth, is one of 
only three teams outside fee top 16 
seeds feat are still playing. The others 
are fifth-seeded George Washington 
and sixth-seeded Notre Dame, both in 
the East. 

George Washington beat Tulane, 
81-67, and Notre Dame defeated 
Texas. S6-83. 

The No. 1 seeds — North Carolina, 
Connecticut, Stanford and Old Domin- 
ion — all have advanced. 

Stanford and Connecticut played 
Monday, with UConn downing Iowa. 
72-53, and Stanford beating Texas 
Tech 67-45. 


Florida State Ousts 
Michigan State in 

2d Round, 68-63 


The Associated Press mance from fee foul line in 

Ran dell Jackson had 16 the final 1:33 to hold on. C.C. 
points and 1 1 rebounds to lead Harrison led the Wolfpack 
Florida State to a 68-63 vie- with 23 points, 
tray over Michigan State in the N.C. State had a chance to 
second round of fee National tie it at fee buzzer, but Ishua 
Invitational Tournament Benjamin's 3-point attempt 
Jackson, a 6-foot- 1 1 (2. 1 1- was short, 
meter) sophomore, grabbed North Carolina State, No. 2 
his final two rebounds and in fee nation in defense, had let 
sank two free throws in the rally four opponents all season 
-- score 70 or more points — and 

NIT Basketball none in its last 1 1 games. But 

fee Big East's highest-scoring 

final 1 1 seconds to seal the team set fee pace for much of 
victory for Florida State on fee second half. 

Monday night in Tallahassee. The Wolfpack closed to 
Florida. He had 20 points and 61-60 wife 2:58 left, but 
1 1 rebounds in Honda Stale’s Jeremy Hyatt lost fee ball to 
82-67 opening-round victory Jarrod West and an intention- 
al Syracuse. al foul against Justin Gainey 

Michigan State scored gave the Mountaineers a pair 
eight straight points to pull up of free throws and fee ball, 
to 60-59 with 1 :42 left on a 3- Damian Owens made a lay- 

pointer by Ray Weathers, but up and West added two more 
LaMarr Greer countered wife free throws to give West Vir- 
a 3-point shot as the 35- ginia a 67-60 lead with one 
second clock ran out to give minute left and set up fee final 
Florida State a 63-59 lead hectic moments, when the 


wife 1:04 left. 

Michigan Stare closed it to 
65-63 wife 33.4 seconds left 
on Maleen Cleaves's layup, 
but Jackson’s two free throws 
iced fee game. 

Greer and Kirk Luchin an 
added 1 1 points each for fee 
Seminoles {18-11), who will 
play West Virginia in the 
quarterfinals. 

Ray Weathers scored 15 
for fee Spartans, who led 39- 
38 at fee half but shot just 28 
percent in the second half. 

West Virginia 76, K-C. State 

73 In Raleigh, North Caro- 
lina, offensive-minded West 
Virginia turned to its defense 
in a second-round maich, 
confusing North Carolina 
State wife a variety of zones 
and then getting some key 
foul shooting down the 
stretch to pull out a victory. 

The Mountaineers (21-9) 
have now won their most 
games since fee 1986-87 
team won 26. Hie Wolfpack 
closed its season at 17-15. 

West Virginia was led by 
Seldon Jefferson's 19 points 
and a 13-for-15 team perfor- 


Wolfpack was forced to foal 
on defense and shoot from 3- 
point range on offense. 

unlv 89, Hawaii 80 Tyrone 
Nesby scored 26 points, in- 
cluding six in overtime, as 
UNLV avenged two regular- 
season losses to Hawaii. 

Keon Clark had 22 points 
and 14 rebounds for the 
Rebels (22-9), who will play 
Arkansas in the quarterfinals. 
Eric Ambrozicb led Hawaii 
(21-8) wife 22 points. 

UNLV had a chance to win 
at the end of regulation, but 
Jermaine Smith's 3-pointer 
hit fee back of the run and 
bounced long. 

Arkansas 76, Pittsburgh 71 

In Fayetteville. Kareem Reid 
had 15 points and 10 assists, 
and Pat Bradley's 3-pointer 
put Arkansas ahead for good. 

Reid stole the ball from 
Gerald Jordan and passed it to 
Bradley, whose long-range 
shot gave Arkansas a 64-62 
lead wife 4:53 left. 

The game was tied nine 
times. The biggest Arkansas 
lead was seven, and Pin never 
led by more than two. 


Aided by Fluke Goal, Panthers Display Best Playoff Form 


The Associated Press 

If their performance against the 
New Jersey Devils is any indication, 
fee Florida Panthers are primed for 
another long playoff ran. 

Florida played one of its most 
impressive games in recent months 

NHL Roundup 


The eight 3-pointers tied a Monday nighL After New Jersey's 
franchise record, while Kevin Bobby Holik put fee puck into his 
Johnson added his 13th career own goal in fee third period, the 
triple-double wife 19 points. Panthers added two more in the third 
13 assists and 10 rebounds. period for a 4-1 victory over fee 
Donyell Marshall led Devils. 

Golden State with 21 points The victory extended Florida’s 
and 1 1 rebounds. unbeaten streak to 3-0-1, and ended 


New Jersey’s home unbeaten streak 
at 15 games t9-0-6). 

The Panthers beat the Devils at 
their own game, trapping in center 
ice and then converting the breaks 
that came their way. 

The biggest break came early in 
the third period when Holik shot fee 
puck into his own net trying to clear 
a bouncing puck in front of goalie 


The loss broke New Jersey's 
four-game winning streak and pre- 
vented the Devils from taking sole 
possession of first place in the At- 
lantic Division from Philadelphia. 
The Devils and Flyers each have 88 
points wife 12 games left in fee 
regular season. 

Senators 4, Rengo r e 3 Bruce 

Gardiner scored wife 2:13 left as 


Mike Dunham. The Devils' Per Ottawa won at New York to move 
Gustafsson got credit for the goal to within four points of the final East- 


Roq Tugnuct made 38 saves and 
Tom Chorske. Shaun Van Allen and 
Radek Bonk added goals for 1 1th- 
place Ottawa, which reached the 60- 
point mark at 23-33-14. 

Pat FI alley and Adam Graves ad- 
ded goals for the Rangers. 

Sabres 5, Bruins 1 Dominik Hasek 
made 27 saves and Donald Audette 
scored his 26th and 27th goals as 
Buffalo beat visiting Boston to 


last 20 games. Ray Bourque scored 
for Boston. 

Coyotas 3, Mims 2 Jeff Finley 
scored with 13:29 left and Nikolai 
Khabibulin made 35 saves to help 
Phoenix reach the .500 mark for the 
first rime since Jan. 3. 

Khabibulin, making his 31 st con- 
secutive start, improved to 5-1-1 in 
his last seven games for fee Coyotes 
(33-33-5). Keith Tkacbuk scored his 


give New Jersey a 2-1 lead. 

Dunham stopped fee defense- 
man 's shot from fee point, bur failed 
to gain control. Holik then botched a 
clearing attempt after kicking fee 
puck to his stick. 


em Conference playoff spot. 

Just 2:39 after New York’s 
Wayne Gretzky tied it 3-3, Gardiner 
scored off a rebound as Shawn 
McEachera screened goalie Mike 
Richter. 


move within three points of the team-high 41st goal and Jeremy 


Eastern Conference leaders. Phil- 
adelphia and New Jersey. 

Brian Holzinger, Richard Srneh- 


Roenick added his 22d for 
Phoenix. 

Brett Hull scored his 41st goal 


lik. and Derek Plante also scored for and Mike Peluso added a goal for 
the Sabres, who have won three visiting Sl Louis, 2-6-3 in its last 1 1 
straight and lost just twice in their games. 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


THE MANAS£fcWANT5 10 KNOW) HE SAID HE DOESN'T WANT 
UWf YOU VOttT WEAR A CAP.. M TO MUSS UP HI5 HAIR.. 


TUEBJSVSGOU-fcTOBE. 

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ir id A 


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-sn NLimi 














Computer Ordeal 


A Boy’s Story No More: Who Buys Books? 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — If you 
don’t hear from me for 


1 N don’t hear from me for 
the next few months, folks, 
don't worry. I have to buy a 
new computer, that’s alL 

This means budding 
down, hitting the books, 
burning the midnight oil. Not 
since my two weeks in col- 
lege physics have 1 faced such 
an intellectual ordeal. 

This time I am determined 
to do better. As you will recall 
if you were around in 1942. 1 
was invited to quit the study 
of physics before the course 
was three weeks old. 

Couldn’t tell an erg from a 
dyne. 

Couldn't distinguish an 
adiabatic expansion from a 
morganatic marriage. 


Buying a computer is even 
tougher. Before walking into 
a computer store a man has to 
understand what a man has to 
understand. 

Those who don’t don’t last 
long. 

Knowing the difference 
between a Multimedia Mini- 
Tower and a 32 MB Sync- 
DRAM is what separates the 
men from the boys. 

And knowing whether it's 
good or bad to have a machine 
with 1024 x 768 non-inter- 
laced resolution. 

And knowing how they can 
get a Zip 100 MB drive into 
the same room with a huge 43 
GB HD. 

You’d better know how 
much MHz Pentium you want 
and how many gigabytes of 
RAM. Otherwise the sales- 
man will think you’re stupid 
when he asks. “How much 
MHz Pentium for you today, 
sir?" and you say. “Oh, 
about two gallons ought to do 
the trick." 

Suppose the salesman says. 


“Do you already have peri- 
pherals?” 

Unless you’ve studied 
carefully you’re probably go- 
ing to dunk he's asking if you 
have a venereal disease, feel 
insulted and walk out without 
a computer. 

Peripherals is neither a dis- 
ease nor a suburb of Phil- 
adelphia nor the ancient 
Greek general who defeated 
the Persians at Perse polis. If 
my studies disclose what 
peripherals is I'll let you 
know. 

This is the kind of stuff a 
cann y buyer ought to stock up 
on. Then he can drop it on the 
salesman to let die rascal 
know he’s not dealing with an 
ignoramus: 

“Don’t talk 13 GB HD to 
me, my good man. What I 
want to know is does it have 
VRAM, AV cards and 
enough PCI slots to accom- 
modate enhanced ROM Bow 
during a severe lightning 

ctnrm?” 


By Trip Gabriel 

New York Times Service 


EW YORK — Last fall Matt 
Bialer, a book agent at William 


Morris, salt publishers the latest 
manuscript by Ed Gorman, the author 
of 17 works of fiction, primarily sus- 
pense novels that have had steady, if 
not spectacular sales. But Gorman’s 
newest, “The Poker Club,*’ which is 
about four card-playing professional 
men who accidentally loll an intruder 
and see their lives unravel, was turned 
down flat by nearly a dozen bouses. 

* ’People said it was a good story but 
it was too male-oriented,’’ Bialer 
said. “They said it needed a stronger 
female protagonist' 1 


Bialer was forced to recognize 
what many writers, agents, publishers 


In computer shopping you 
always have to be alert for 
surprises the salesman may 
tty to pull on you. Suppose for 
instance you say, “Give me 
the Aptiva 2I61-C9E Mini- 
Tower 200 MHz Intel Pen- 
tium processor with MMX 
technology and 32 MB EDO 
RAM, 3.1 GB hard drive, 16x 
CD-ROM drive, Theatre- 
Sound CD quality audio. 3D 
Surround Sound. Total Image 
Video. 33.6/14.4 data/fax 
modem, full duplex speak- 
erphone and answering ma- 
chine and Windows 95,*' the 
salesman is bound to say, 
“You'll want a computer-to- 
TV adapter, of course, with 
outputs to NTSC/PAL and 
SECAM with SCART.” 

Tell him you’d rather have 
a dozen ergs and an adiabatic 
expansion. 

New York Times Service 


and booksellers have come to assume: 

The book market these days is in- 
creasingly a woman’s market 
While little publicized and hard to 
document, it is a widely held belief in 
die book business that more women 
buy books than men — perhaps as 
much as 70 or 80 percent of fiction. 

And when it cones to novels and sto- 
ries, what publishers believe women 
want are either works by female au- Kat 
thorsor — iftbeauthorisaman — then 
a story with a strong female central char- 
acter. 



on the other side,” said Carla Cota 
an owner of the independent bpc*- 


Katrina Ross checking out new fiction at a Washington bookstore. 


J \n T Toa»&>S’'7bo Ptew VnfcTnac* 


York Times hardcover fiction list in 1996 best sella “Disclosure” was a man pressing 
outnumbered their female counterparts by 52- a sexual harassment case against his female 
34; die margin differed little in 1994 and boss. 

1995. Bat there has been a crossing-over by such 

Currently, of the top 10 hardcover fiction aatfaors; in Crichton’s latest. “Airframe,” 
titles on the Times’ list, seven feature female the protagonist is a young woman inves- 
central characters: “Hornet’s Nest” by Pa- ti gating a near disaster on an airliner. 


* ‘Authors are very aware of it, because it’s 34; the margin differed little in 1994 and 
said all the time,' ' Bialer said. “Men have to 1995. 


write books fear will appeal to women and 
that usually involves having main characters 
that are women. Some can do it and some 
can't.” 

Laurence Kirshbaum, chairman of Time 
Warner Trade Publishing, whose Warner 
Books imprint was among those rejecting 
“Hie Poker Club,” speaks of the “fem- 
inization” of fiction publishing in the last 
five years. “I think of it as kind of a wave that 
has just risen and surged until it’s swallowed 
us all up.” he said. 

The current generations of prominent fe- 
male editors and authors helps reinforce the 
perception that fiction publishing is being 
feminized, as does the phenomenal ability of 
Oprah Winfrey to turn literary novels into 
best-sellers by commending them to ha 
largely female audience. 

But the male author is hardly an endangered 
species. The men who made it onto the New 


Currently, of the top 10 hardcover fiction 
titles on the Times’ list, seven feature female 


tricia Cornwell; “Total Control” by David 
Baldacci; “Evening Class” by Maeve 
Binchy; “Small Town Girl” by LaVyrle 
Spencer; “Airframe” by Michael Crichton; 
“The List” by Steve Martini, and ‘ ‘The Deep 
End of the Ocean” by Jacquelyn Mitchard. 
And while an eighth, “Sole Survivor’ ' by 


‘ ‘The techno-thriller has become a kind of The horse-player book t 

emoto- thriller, if you will,” said Kirshbaom. resented, “The Odds Mus 
“What we used to call the boy books don't Len Ragozm, is a handicap 
work nearly as well as they once did, except very male world of fee trad 
for a brief spurt at Father’s Day.” coming from little. Brown 

Exact statistics about the sex of book Whatever some male aut 
buyers are bard to come by in publishing, sumed feminization of pub! 


Dean Koontz. has a male crime reporter for a which is notorious for the paucity of its 


protagonist, the plot seems tailor-made to 
pluck at female heartstrings. The hero is 
trying to solve a plane crash that killed his 
wfe and daughters. 

Crichton and Koontz have usually spe- 
cialized in what the industry calls boy books, 
thrillers about serial killers or high tech- 
nology in which die hero saves civilization. 
In fact, Crichton raised gender hackles a few 
years back when the technoiogist-hao in his 


market research. A Gallup survey for fee 


store Politics and Prose ia Wash- 
Won. “It's like the brideand groom 
at fee wedding. People part when 
they come in fee door.” She estim- 
ated feat eight of 10 fiction sales were 

to women. , _ ... . 

Still, fee degree to wluch publish- 
ers consider female buyers when de- 
riding which books to publish re- , 
m ains an open debate- ■ i. 

“I can’t say I ever give a whole lot 

of thought to genda in the marketing 

of books,” said David Rosenthal, fee 
publisher of VillardBooks, a division- 
Ef Random House. “A publisher- 
looks for two things in a manuscript, * 
particularly a novel. Is i t a good boric, .. . 
ami is it going to sell? You doo t - 
tbiev ‘is feis book going to sell to" 
meai or women?’ ” . ■ / ~1 : . 

Thai doesn't step some agenisi 
from insisting that men are at a dis- ^ 
tinct disadvantage when writing^ 
about traditionally masculine sub- - 
jects. “It’s why ’The Horse Whisper- ?, 
er’ goes for $3.15 million and my 
book by a tioree player goes .for 
$35,000.” said Chris Calhoun, an 
nkTnM flgpn t with Staling Lord Lherisbc. = 
“The Horae Whisperer’ ’ by Nicb* y 
oias Evans, fee stray of a wrangle*^: 
and a lonely ranch woman, set a record price . 
for a firet novel in 1994 and was bought fer- 
tile movies by Robert Redford- Its appeak a^ 
plot guitar to “The Bridges of Madisons 
Counly” by Robert James Walla, whkhV 
became an unstoppable sella with a largely 
female readership. ' 

The horse-player book that Calhoun rep-p- 
resented, “The Odds Must Be Crazy” by _ 
Len Ragorin, is a handicapper's guide to-feb- 
very male world of fee track, which is forth- 
coming from little. Brown. 

Whatever some male authors feel die pre- 
sumed feminization of publishing has meant 
to them, there is no question that a generation 
of fr™* 1 ** authors has flowered in recent 


American Booksellers Association in 1994 years, including Ann Tyler, Margaret At- 
found that for fiction, women made op 59 wood and Jane Hamilton. 


percent of book buyers and men 41 percent 
For nonfiction, fee breakdown was 53 per- 
cent women and 47 percent men. 

Many industry people say fee gender gap 
may be widening. 

“We have fiction on one side of the store 
and then history and politics and biography 


“When I think of the novelists of our 
parents* generation, it was the Mailers and 
fee Roths and the Malamuds and fee Bel- 
lows,” said Jane Rosenmaim, the fortyish 
executive editor of Scribner. “In the last 20 
years there’s been an absolute burgeoning of 
first-rate women writers." 



PEOPLE 


A BRITISH entrepreneur on Tuesday 
won his leeal battle for the rizht to 


zVwon his legal battle for the right to 
sell Elvis Presley toiletries in Britain and 
declared. “Elvis belongs to the people.” 
Sid Shaw was jubilant after defeating 
the Elvis Presley Enterprises of Mem- 
phis. Tennessee, which had sought a 
monopoly on the sale of Elvis souvenirs 
in Britain. “We wooped them,” said 
Shaw, who has been selling Elvis mem- 
orabilia at his East London shop, Elvisly 
Yours, since 1979. “You cannot own 
famous names.” said Shaw, who sells 
Elvis soap, statues and underpants, 
among other things, in a range of 2,000 
items. “If you could own Elvis you 
could own Shakespeare." But the High 
Court ruling applies only to the sale of 
Elvis toiletries and could open the way 
for the U.S. company to try to prevent 
Shaw’s selling other kinds of souvenirs. 


of Durban, that it is blasphemous. The 
poster, which the director. Milos 
Forman, withdrew from France after it 
created a furor there, shows fee actor 
Woody Harrelson wife arms out- 
stretched superimposed on a woman's 
body. The new poster, which will be 
used only in areas where complaints 
have been made, shows Harrelson 
gagged wife a U.S. flag. 


There they will join those of another 
forma occupant of 10 Downing Street, 
Winston ChurchHL 


Chariton Heston, star of “Ben Hur” 
and a Hollywood legend for haif-a-cen- 
tury, was honored by Culture Minister 
Philippe Dooste-Blazy. who made him 
commander of France's Order of Aits 
and Letters. Heston joked feat, having 
played the roles of presidents, saints and 
knights so often, he thought it was normal 
dial he should be made a commander. 


The Eagles’ album “Their Greatest 
Hits 1971*1975” has received Record- 
ing Industry Association of America cer- 
tification for sales of 24 million copies, 
tying Michael Jackson's “Thriller’' on 
fee all-time U.S. sales lisL The Eagles' 
album was released in 1976; “Thriller” 
came out in 1982. “Tbrilla” remains 
fee top sella worldwide, wife estimated 
sales of 46 million copies. 


stem, half of the Washington Post duo 
that broke fee Watergate scandal, gone 
on to write “Loyalties: A Son's Mem- 
oir” in 1989. In that book, he credits 
“Crazy Joe Moltz” wife the idea for the . 
caper. Now, eight years later. Moltz has 
sued his old pal as well as Simon & 
Schuster for libel, defamation and in- 
vasion of privacy. “I was upset to say the 
least.” said Moltz, who did not deny the 
incident but claimed mental anguish and 
humiliation. “I don't like being called 
crazy. 1 don’t like fee idea feat tilings T 
did as a juvenile that are supposed to be 
sealed by the county were divulged. ” 


Job! Botanc/Ag-ncr iymacr-Pirmr: 

Commander Heston and his wife, Lydia Clarke Heston, at the ceremony. 


The South African film distributor 
Ster-Kinekor will tone down a poster 
advertising the film “The People vs. 
Larry Flint" after complaints from 
church groups, mainly in fee eastern city 


Forma Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher said Tuesday that she was 
donating her political and personal pa- 
pers to Cambridge University’s Chur- 
chill College on “permanent loan.” 


As a teenager, Carl Bernstein ran 
wife a crowd of guys that included Joe 
Moltz. They played poker together. 
They partied together. And one night 
more than 35 years ago in Silva Spring, 
Maryland, they and four pals broke 
nearly every fust-floor window of the 
home of an old neighbor woman. This 
act of vandalism — and the lads’ arrest 
and court hearing — might have been 
lost to the mists of time had not Bem- 


The courts have upheld Barbra 
Streisand's deal wife two companies 
ova an exclusive concert video. A 
Rhode Island video store owner. Robot 
Jaflfe. had sued Streisand, Blockbuster’ 
Entertainment and Sony Music in 1994, 
claiming that the deal discriminated 
against small, independent stores. But the 
stale Supreme Court said it needed proof 
of injury to competition, price-fixing or 
an attempt to destroy competition. • 



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Swedes 028-795-811 

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